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Full text of "WASP (July-Dec. 1905)"

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California State Library 



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Call JtoJ&QAl .„.\Sf.A 




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STA. 




Ttl E WASP 



Established 1876. 

Vol. LTV— No. 1. 

Price 10 Cents. 



Saturday, July 1, 1905. 
San Francisco, Oal. 




Published by the Wasp Publishing Company at 503-6 Mission St., and entered at the Postoffice at San Francisco as aecond-clasa matter, 





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Volume I.I V.— No. r. 



SAN FRANCISCO, JULY /, [905. 



Price 10 cents 



PUBLISHERS' NOTICE 

THE WASP Is published every Saturday by The Wasp Publishing 
Company, at 606 Mission Street. Subscriptions $5 per year, payable In 
advance, postage prepaid. Subscriptions to all foreign countries 
within the Postal Union $6 per year. 

The trade on the Pacific Coaat supplied by the San Francisco 
News Company. Eastern Agents supplied by the American News 
Company, New York. 

THE WASP will pay for contributions suitable to its columns, and 
will endeavor to return all rejected manuscripts, but does not guar- 
antee their return. 

Photographs will also be accepted and paid for. 

Address all communications to Wasp Publishing Company, 506 
Mission Street, San Francisco, Cal. 
Telephone Main 1643. 



TO ADVERTISERS.—As the Illustrated pages of THE WASP go to 
press early, all advertisements printed in the same forms should 
be received not later than Monday at noon. Changes of adver- 
tisements should also be sent in on Monday to insure publication. 



PLAIN ENGLISH 



•^■■■^fcARDLY anything that has occurred during the 
I TJ 1 Roosevell administration has excited more in- 
! I j !'| I terest in California than the utterances of 
^^^_^^J Secretary Taft on Chinese exclusion. The 
iBsJJTS^ Secretary is certainly a bold man. He talks 
IfBfjgaTCil like one who has the courage of his convic- 
^ttattamtf (ions, and it is easy to see why he is so much 
in accord with President Roosevelt. The latter 
is frank and blunt and outspoken. Secretary Taft goes 
him one better in every respect. Taft is even franker, 
blunter and more indifferent to public opinion. 

Of course, the local daily press has condemned Secre- 
tary Taft's utterances, and told him that California does 
not accept his views on Chinese exclusion. What particu- 
lar difference does that make just now? California is not 
on the map politically at present. It will have absolutely 
nothing to say in the selection of the next President of the 
United States. Our city is run by labor agitators, and we 
aTe thoroughly without political influence. 

On th" other hand, the great Eastern Stairs that live 
on marmfacturing, and want trade with China and Japan, 
are all politically powerful. They applaud the utterances 
of Secretary Taft, and are firmly convinced that the anti- 



Asiatic agitation in California is the work of demagogues 
and newspapers that stand in with them. And really such 
a conclusion is not so remarkable when one considers the 
class of men at the head of the present anti-Japanese agi- 
tation. The ruling spirit and ostensible head is George B. 
Benham, who has been mixed up in labor agitation all over 
the United States, and who is now the defendant in suits 
brought against him and his associates for boycotting. 
Some time ago the city was flooded with obscene cards and 
pictures when prominent clergymen called attention to the 
evil. It was then discovered that much of the filthy matter 
bore Benham 's initials and the number of his printing 
place on Seventh street. The Wasp asked Benham several 
times to come out and deny that he had any hand in the 
issuance of the obscene cards, but he kept carefully in the 
dark. Men of the Benham stripe prefer the shadow to 
the bright light, except it be the glare of public office. 
That always attracts them. 

Since the filthy card episode Mayor Schmitz has picked 
out Benham to be License Collector of the great city of 
San Francisco. In that position he can render much polit- 
ical assistance to the Ruef-Sehmitz administi'ation, al- 
though he has not had the confidence of the labor organiza- 
tions for some time, and was on the down-grade as a dem- 
agogue when Schmitz reached forth a helping hand. 

It is needless to say that unless the anti-Asiatic move- 
ment on this Coast be headed by better material than the 
George B. Benhams it will not impress the people of the 
Eastern States. In those sections of the country labor 
agitators have made themselves so obnoxious that the 
communities have turned against them. Whatever the 
labor agitators attempt is at once discredited in the eyes 
of the respectable and influential people. It should not 
surprise any one if the Eastern Congressmen advocate a 
practical nullification of the anti-Chinese exclusion laws, 
just because the labor agitators' are so ardent in their ad- 
vocacy. 

The argument that will be advanced in the Eastern 
States is that the Chinese and Japanese are less of a nui- 
sance to the institutions of our free country than the 
hordes of ignorant foreigners from Europe who are dumped 
weekly on the Atlantic shores. The Chinese and Japanese 
will go back to Asia. The white alien remains, and has to 
be assimilated. When to this argument is added the plea 
that unless we assume a friendly pose towards Asia we 
cannot hope to enjoy her trade, the manufacturing States 
of the East are sure' to declare for a favorable treaty with 
China. It must not be forgotten that the China of today 
is not what it was a few years ago. Japan has furnished 
an object lesson that the yellow race can hold its own 
with the white man in the most strenuous rivalry of war 
or commerce, and most assuredly the young generation of 
educated Chinese will insist on their rights and privileges. 
Statesmen like Mr. George B. Benham will have a fine field 
for their talents in devising means to treat China and 



I HE WASP 



[July i, 1905. 



Japan with defiance and contempt and at the same time 
preserve peace and amity with them and get the lion's 
share of their trade. The thing would be amusing were it 
not that California is likely to suffer, for when the bars are 
let down this State may receive the bulk of Asiatic immi- 
gration in consignments too large to be employed without 
disaster to white workmen. One thing which is morally 
certain is that the white and yellow races are just entering 
on a new era of competition which will have results that 
no man can foresee. 



DENTAL BOARD SCANDAL. 

Peter Pindar's question, "Should he who drives fat 
oxen be fat himself?" may well be appropriately applied 
to the scandal now brewing in the Dental Board of Cali- 
fornia. There are not a few bilious critics who maintain 
that the reason why Dr. Russell H. Cool and Dr. John 
Dunn are exposing the methods of the Board in general 
and the dealings of Dr. A. B. Mayhew in particular, is 
because they could not get in the ring. There is no doubt 
at all, it is maintained, that the Board is "rotten," but 
so are the two advocates of purity. It is, however, quite 
immaterial whether the men who have "belled the cat" 
are actuated by pure, disinterested motives or otherwise. 
The public is the gainer when cliques fall out and accuse 
each other publicly. That an unsatisfactory condition of 
obliqueness exists in the Dental Board is obvious. It is 
chars-ed, amongst other accusations, that some dentists 
are uermitted to practice without a State certificate. Who 
is responsible for such a flagrant violation of the law? 
Examinations are held twice a year by the Board, but 
if a dentist can satisfy the president that he is qualified, 
he can give him a certificate so that he can open an office 
and practice while waiting the Board's session. Such 
power should not be given to one person. What is the ob- 
ject of a Board, if the president has such plenary power? 
The greatest abuse, however, is the exacting of a $2 
"license fee" from each dentist in the State. By whose 
authority is such a fee collected? It is generally believed 
that it is illegal, and could not be enforced if the dentists 
chose to fight it out in the courts. Two eminent lawyers 
and a Superior Judge have already expressed their opin- 
ions as to the illegality of the obnoxious fee. The scandal 
in the Dental Board is clearly a case for the Governor to 
overhaul. The whole proceedings should be thoroughly 
exposed. 

SPONTANEOUS GENERATION. 

The Industrial Commission has discovered that the 
number of Japanese laborers in California now is larger 
than the number of Japanese arrivals shown by the rec- 
ords at all the United States ports during the past ten 
years. "How they came in is a mystery," declare the 
Commissioners in their report. It is not any mystery to 
Professor Burk, who has just discovered that spontaneous 
generation is very near a scientific fact. 

Spontaneous generation by means of raduim has almost 
been discovered by Professor Burk of Cambridge, England. 
Here is the recipe: Just take some bouillon as a culture 
medium, consisting of extract of meat, diluted in distilled 
water with some gelatine ; add a little salt and pepsin ; 
render it slightly alkaline by litmus; then put the radium 
into a tiny tube and use it according to Professor Burk's 
directions, and, presto ! the chances are good that a bounc- 
ing baby will emerge from the new process in the allotted 
number of days. By way of adjunct a baby incubator 
can be used after birth, and thus neither father nor mother 
will any longer be a necessity for the raising of babies. 
The young Irish savant is not at all a humorist. He really 
thinks quite seriously that he has created the primitive 
form of vitality. Our own Professor Loeb is satisfied with 
cultivating' ' ' urchins, "but Professor Burk aims at a high- 
er culture. Both savants will do well to look amongst 
the Japanese for the secret of spontaneous generation, a 
hint of which appears in the report of the Industrial Com- 
mission of California. 



PORTLAND EXPOSITION. 

The Portland Exposition is proving an unqualified 
financial success. Mr. Prank Spencer, one of the Com- 
missioners, who is a member of the important grocery firm 
of Allen and Lewis, is on a visit to San Francisco, and he 
informs us that the exhibits are now all placed and the 
show is in full swing. The attendance has exceeded all 
anticipations, and has already topped the gate money for 
a similar period at the Buffalo Exposition. The promoters 
are jubilant over the gratifying fact that all probable 
expenses are already covered by the revenue to date. There 
will not be any deficit, and a special medal ought to be 
struck for such distinction. As a rule Expositions have a 
lamentable knack of closing under the shadow of a big 
deficit. 

AN "INDISCREET" DIPLOMAT. 

President Roosevelt is a just man and hates a sneak, 
but in his eagerness to save the flag from being dragged 
through the international mire he has injudiciously dis- 
criminated in the Bowen-Loomis case. Bowen fully de- 
serves his degradation, resulting from dismissal, but 
Loomis who, it has been proved, had invested money in 
Venezuela whilst representing the United States, should 
fare the fate of his antagonist. President Roosevelt an- 
nounces that Loomis has been "indiscreet," and there 
ought not to be any room for "indiscreet" diplomatists 
in the United States service. An indiscreet Ambassador 
is a fool, and a fool can do mire harm than a rogue. 



DENS OF INFAMY. 



' ' Vive la Bagatelle ! ' ' Gambling flourishes more than 
ever in smellful Chinatown, notwithstanding Chief of Po- 
lice Dinan's declaration of a hatchet war on gamblers. 
The dead-walls of the picturesquely dirty and overcrowded 
Oriental quarter are just now decorated with yellow post- 
ers proclaiming in "scare-head" letters that the new 
Chief of Police "is determined to keep the lid on the gam- 
blers." On the other hand, the Dosses of Chinatown make 
light of Chief Dinan's threats and say that matters have 
been "arranged" with "other officials" who have prom- 
ised "protection." 

Bold type and recriminatory language have been called 
to aid in trying to cope with the lesser evil of gambling in 
Chinatown. Meanwhile, the notorious den at 620 Jackson 
street is running at high pressure night and day. The old 
Chinese theatre building, opposite, is being remodeled, to 
be used for similar purposes. Another building is going up 
on Fish Alley, which will extend back and connect with the 
theatre building, the rear wall being removed for that pur- 
pose. These three Lupaners will be under one manage- 
ment — alleged city officials! 




BCHAS. KLILUS & COM 

®*EXCLUSTVEM 

HIGH GRA DE CLOTHIERS 

This Ready Made Clothes Progression has had 
our close attention for years. We claim the distinction 
of being the "Parent" of this advanced Art. Our 
garments tower far above all others. Smart, correct 
dressers have appreciated our ideas of Modern Clothes 
Building, by their almost unanimous support. Are 
You a Smart Dresser? 




7r/?u*-/diP~&/&cM* 



[JOLY I, 1905. 



-THE WASP- 



CASSANDRA KITCHENER. 

[Written Specially for "The Wasp "] 

Smashing 1 lie Mahdi in the Soudan and destroying 
the South African Boer Republics were General Kitch- 
ener's greatest military achievements in the field which 
gained tor him a Government grant of £100,000 — half a 
million dollars — a peerage, and the most responsible 
military position in the British Empire, that of Com- 
mander-in-Chief of the British forces -in India. There 
was really not any gTeat glory in mowing down the Mad 
Mullah's rabble with gatling guns; neither was it a 
great military feat to conquer the 15,000 Boer peasants 
with an army of nearly :>00.000. Nevertheless any other 
British general, except Lord Kitchener, Would have be- 
come conceited over his "victories," and, placed in the 
position now occupied by the "hero of Khartoum," he 
would never have thought that he was sent to India for 
any other purpose than to guard the Khyber Pass against 
the Afghans, or keep the turbulent North Western tribes 
in subjection. Lord Kitchener, however, is an educated 
soldier, a student who prefers to read books and solve 
strategetical problems to feasting or idling away time in 
the society of fashionable women. He started early in 
life, as far back as 1S70, to take a more than ordinary 
interest in war between great nations, when he became 
attached to General Chanzy's army of the Loire. He has 
also watched diligently the current events in Manchuria. 
It is, therefore, not at all surprising to find Lord Kitch- 
ener figuring in the role of Cassandra, as nobody is more 
cognizant than himself of the inadequacy of the British 
Ai-my in India for fighting a great European military 
power. 

The general idea in India is that the English army is 
only intended for internal and frontier disciplinary pur- 
poses. Even Lord Curzon, who has been Viceroy of India 
during five years, when speaking in the House of Lords, 
only some fifteen months ago, on the matters relating to 
the employing of border police, declared that " India is 
like a fortress, with the sea as a moat on two sides and 
mountain on the third. Beyond the wall is a glacis of 
varying breadth and dimensions. We do not want to oc- 
cupy it, but cannot see it occupied by a foe. We are 
quite content that it should remain in the hands of allies 
and friends; but, if unfriendly influences creep up and 
lodge under our walls, we are compelled to intervene, be- 
cause danger would thereby grow up and menace our secur- 
ity. This is the secret of the whole position in Arabia, 
Persia, Afghanistan, Thibet and Siam." Lord Curzon 
thus explained the British Government's policy, which was 
protective against "unfriendly influences" on the glacis 
"beyond the walls." But Lord Kitchener apprehends a 
greater danger, and points out that "slowly but surely 
the deserts of Central Asia, once believed to be an impene- 
trable barrier, have been crossed by a great European 
power. They are now spanned by railways which have only 
one possible significance, and we have every indication that 
our Northern neighbor is pushing forward her preparations 
for a contest in which we shall have to fight for our exist- 
ence." The Northern neighbor, of course, is Russia, and 
anybody who has watched events in Manchuria will not 
only agree with Lord Kitchener that Russia is able to 
punish England in India, but that she has full intention 
to do so at no distant date. No matter what may happen 
at the peace conference Russia will remain a great land 
power, and her objective in Asia will now be India. 

The British Army in India consists of 75,000 European 
troops, 157,000 natives, and 127,000 feudatories, or a total 
of 359,000 men. Whatever may be the value of the native 
mercenary troops, it is quite certain that, with the excep- 
tion of 16,200 "Imperial Service troops," the feudatories 
are a worthless, undisciplined rabble, who would run for 
their lives at the first cannon shot fired by the Russians. 
Then there must also he taken into consideration the 
equation of probable treachery to the British, arising 
either from a sense of patriotism — native Indian patriot- 



ism — or through bribery with Russian gold. It must lie 
borne in mind that, should Russia invade India, she will 
pretend to come as "a deliverer from the Britisl 
Lord Kitchener scents the danger, and he has come to the 
conclusion that a thorough "reorganization" of 'he 
British Army is essential. "Reorganization," in Lord 
Kitchener's vocabulary, evidently stands for "increas- 
ing." The British Army in India will have to be in- 
creased to a million men if Russia is to be kept in check. 

MAURICE BRODZKY. 



SOCIALISM IN AUSTRALIA. 

An Australian correspondent of The Wasp writes: 
"The Commonwealth is being divided on the question of 
Socialism. Geoi-ge Reid, the Prime Minister, is a dis- 
credited man with the Labor Party, and Alfred Deakin, 
the late Prime Minister, now wants to be a Socialist, but 
does not please the Socialists, while Watson, the printer, 
has outlined a vigorous policy which is irresistible to the 
working people. Both Reid and Watson are speechifying 
all over Australia. The country is in a state of political 
turmoil, and a general election is prognosticated for Sep- 
tember. The labor party predicts that Watson will again 
become Prime Minister of Australia." 



CELEBRATION OF THE FOURTH. 

The cartoon in The Wasp this week shows the fourth 
man tried for complicity in the election frauds enjoying 
himself to his heart's content. The other three gentlemen 
who have been convicted are not quite so festive. Many 
eminently respectable people think that the community 
would not have been the loser had the fourth gentleman 
been sent to keep his pals company. His ability to remain 
on this side of the bay proves the truth of the adage that 
it is better to be born lucky than too scrupulous. The fact 
that the understrappers of our municipal administration go 
to jail, but the overstrappers are sent free, is also worthy 
of pointing a moral. 



^t-"T» « m ott/1 



CESS OF "SUNSET" MAGAZINE. 

With the July number of the "Sunset" magazine, of 
which 75,000 copies are issued, the high-water mark for 
a Western monthly is reached. The magazine is a credit 
to the editor, Charles Aiken. In addition to a leading 
article on the Lewis-Clark Centennial Exposition in Port- 
land, Oregon, by Dr. Reuben Gold Thwaites, of the Uni- 
versity of Wisconsin, are several short articles on the 
same subject by Governor George Chamberlain, of Oregon ; 
Governor Albert E. Mead, of Washington; Senator 
Mitchell; Director-General Goode and others; "Wood 
Call," a poem by Ina Coolbrith, illustrated by Anna 
Francis Briggs; an original poem, Joaquin Miller; "Ad- 
ventures in Mid-summer in the Snow Country of the High 
Sierras, ' ' Charles Wesley Reed ; "Details of the University 
of California Summer School," May L. Cheuey, Appoint- 
ment Secretary of the University ; "Money Makers of 
Goldfield"; "The Piute War," J. H. Cradlebaugh, 
illustrated by Todhunter. Dramatic reviews, Peter Robert- 
son; literary reviews, H. A. Lafler and Morgan Shephard. 
Ulustrated verse by E. S. Field (Childe Harold); "The 
Glow-worm," Elwyn Hoffman. 



SPECIAL RATES FOR THE HOLIDAYS. 

On the California Northwestern Railway tickets will be 
sold at greatly reduced rates on July 1, 2, 3, and 4, with 
return limit July 5. 

On July 4 special late trains will be run to San Fran- 
cisco, one leaving Camp Vacation at 7 p. m., one leaving 
Glen Ellen at 8 :15 p. m., and another leaving Napa at 10 :30 
p. m. These trains will stop at all points in transit. 

On occasions when it is expedient to prove the super- 
iority of Californian wines the Repsold vintages are 
served. 



-THE WASP- 



[July i, 1905. 



THE SCIENCE OF GOVERNMENT 

By an Administration Statesman. 

Wese found out dat it's a great knock to free govern- 
ment to have judges dat won't take orders. Dere r s Law- 
lor. Wese made up our min's dat he must come down off 
de bench nest year. Don' youse make no mistake about 
dat, Last year we got a hard knock when all our candy- 
dates fer de Superior bench wus turned down. Abe nearly 
cried over it. He says to me at dinner de nite after elek- 
shun: "I feels like Napoleon at St. Helena." I thought 
de guy was goin' out 0' his head. "Napoleon who?" I 
says; "an* what's de dago doin' up at St. Helena?" 
"Youse ignorant, Bill," he says. "I'm not talkin' 0' 
California, but de island o' St. Helena, where de bloody 
Britishers sent Napoleon de grate. " " Sent him a grate ! " 
I says. "What did dey send him a grate fer?" but°he med 
no reply an' jumped up an' went out. Abe ain't been just 
rite m his head since he lost all de judges last year. I seen 
him do several t'ings lately dat makes me t'ink he's a bit 
nutty. Marcus Blum told me he seen him pay fare on 
de street ear de oder day instead 0' showin' de conductor 
one 0' dem passes de United Railroads has give all us 
statesmen. Nest t'ing we know Abe will be givin' away 
favors in de Board o' Works an' Board o' Health widout 
chargin' attorney's fees. . 

# * # 

But dat feller Lawlor ! He 's de limit fer a judge. We 
can't do nuttin' wid him, an' de only t'ing is to wait till 
nest year an' put a good man in his place. Wese got sev- 
eral staked out. I don't want to mention no names jest 
now, bout youse wait. Wese had 'Grady in trainin' fer 
de job, an' dats why we t 'rowed him up agin Lawlor in de 
Rebstock ease to sass Wm. P. on de bench an' make him 
look "like thirty cents." Well, 'Grady's a dead one. 
I wouldn't back him now fer a nickel to run agin ont 0' 
dem Gyptian mummies in de Sutro Museum. He gets ici- 
cles on his heels too quick fer me. Jest so soon as Lawlor 
sez to him, "Youse committin' contempt 0' Court, Mr. 
'Grady," he begins to back water instead 0' gettin' up 
on a chair an' shakin' his fist at de judge an' sayin' de 
wiist he knew how. As Abe sez to him in me hearin', after 
'twas all over, "Why didn't yer sass him back good an' 
hard. When he sez to yer, 'Mr. 'Grady, youse in eon- 
tempt,' youse ought to say, 'Is it posserble, yer Honor, to 
commit contempt of dis honorable court?' " ' 'Grady ast 
Abe why fell he didn't take de job hisself. I had to larf 
at dat. Gee, if Abe got soaked fer $200 fer contempt 
same's poor 'Grady dere would be t'ings doin' round de 
City Hell fer a few weeks till de boss got his money back 
somehow. 

Now, it will be up to me, I guess, to find de money to 
pay de fine of two hun' fer 'Grady. No administrashun 
lawyer 'eept Abe ever has dat much loose change in his 
jeans. Abe went in de air when I give him de hunch dat 
he oughter put up de money hisself fer 'Grady. 
"Wot!" he sez, "put up $200 fer a man to lay down? 
Why, it would be eneouragin' treason in our ranks." Abe 
alius gets on his high horse when he's ast to come up wid 
de dough. 

* * # 

Dis week wese seen agin dat we must get control o' de 
courts or go out of biz. Did youse see how Judge Coffey 
turned down Abe in dat will ease where de boss was rep- 
resentin' de broken-hearted widder who never had no mar- 
riage license. De estate was worth fifty t'ousand bucks, 
too, an' Abe had de ease on a per cent basis — eighty an' 
twenty. Youse knows who was to get de small end. Be- 
tween you an' me an' de low down, Abe oughter cut out 
dis fake widder an' absent heir bizness or he'll get all de 
push lawyers down on him. Dey 're hollerin' murder al- 
ready at his takin' all de City Hall snaps an' buttin'.into 
Police Court eases, but if he shuts 'em out 0' de Probate 
racket as well dere's nothin' left fer 'em but to go fruit 



pickin' or drive a sand cart. But all de same, I don't 
stand fer no judge givin' de rekognized Boss of a party 
de wust of it. An' de langwidge dat ole Barna McKinley, 
de lawyer on de odder side uses ! 'Twor scandellous. He 
sed de perlice wuz but a feather in Abe's cap an' intimat- 
ed dat youse couldn't believe a mother's son of 'em on oath 
in a case where de Boss was concerned. An' Coffey sat 
dere an' didn't fine him fer contempt or say a word. 
Wuss'n dat, he decided agin Abe. We can't stand fer no 
sich raw work as dat. Wese got to elect our own judges or 
bust. 



Office of 
INSPECTOR OF SMOKE 
City Hall. 



BILL SYKES. 



TOILET POWDER. 



There is no toilet article in the selection of which great- 
er care should be used than a toilet powder. 

In these days of imitation and substitution there is so 
much of inferior goods on the market that it is necessary 
to be continually on one's guard. Highly scented powders 
are so frequent as to be a continual source of danger. Such 
inferior products will often do a permanent injury to a del- 
icate skin. It is far wiser never to take chances with an 
unknown article. Be sure, rather, to insist upon a trade- 
marked product of recognized merit. With toilet powder, 
as with other lines of goods, it is safer to trust an old- 
established house, with years of esperience and a reputa- 
tion for making only the best. Mennen's Toilet Powder 
is a trade-marked article, which has for years been recog- 
nized bv physicians as the best preparation made. The 
absolute purity of its ingredients and the exercise of the 
greatest care and skill in its manufacture have given the 
product of the Mennen Co. a quality of uniform excellence. 
That is why your physician recommends it. 

For your protection Mennen's face (the trade-mark of 
the Mennen Co.) is on the cover of every bos of the genuine. 

All first-class dealers carry Mennen's Toilet Powder, 
and will supply it if you insist. It is supplied by the Gov- 
ernment for both Army and Navy. 

The fact that over 11,000,000 boxes were sold during 
1904 is evidence of the continuing public approval of Men- 




That our garments nave maintained a char- 
acteristic individuality for graceful shapeliness (and 
the retention of their shapeliness through a long 
period of service) has been due, we take it, to the 
fact that, -while purchasing only from the very test 
of good clothes makers, we have taken the extra 
precaution to dictate the various materials that are 
used m their manufacture. 

An example worthy of emulation by our 

competitors. 

Heller & Frank, Inc. 

Clothiers 

Market Street and Grant Ave. 




NOTHEB will contest is imminent. The heirs 
of the late Captain Freese, one time Public 
Administrator, and for years a successful 
stevedore, are lined up in opposition to each 
other. The widow has engaged Dick Moga.-i 
as her attorney, and the grandchildren are 
trusting their case to Lynch and Drary. Mrs. Freese 
wants the court to allow her $500 a month for mainten- 
ance in the style to which she has been accustomed. Prob- 
ably the other heirs may oppose this petition on the 
ground that the estate has shrunk from the proportions 
it formerly had attained. The boys, sons of the Captain's 
first marriage, are managing the business, which includes 
dredging and lightering. It is understood that they are 
to be displaced and Ed. Clunie, the husband of Mrs. 
Freese 's sister, given the place. The captain loved good 
living and had a numerous family who cost him a fortune. 
Three servants helped to drain the exchequer. The house 
was run on a liberal scale. It is alleged, therefore, that 
the fortune of the deceased captain has dwindled materi- 
ally. There is none too warm a feeling between the widow 
and her children on the one side and the children of the 
first wife. Mrs. Freese was very much younger than her 
husband, and is still a handsome woman. 

Distinguished Excursionists. 

I hear from Portland that society in the Northern State 
excelled itself in entertaining the distinguished party that 
visited the Exposition in E. W. Hopkins' private ear. 
About twenty of San Francisco's haut ton accompanied 
Mr. Hopkins on the trip, the gay party including Mr. and 
Mrs. Henry T. Scott, Mrs. Walter Martin, Mrs. Mountford 
Wilson, Mrs. Willie Barnes, Mrs. Gaston Ashe, Mrs. 
Crockett, Mr. Mizner, Dr. Louis Lesser, Dr. Souther and 
Mr. Koster. The Hopkins yacht, "El Primero," had been 
sent ahead, and was used for excursions up and down the 
Willamette river, and in this way many of the invitations 
extended by the hospitable Oregonians were reciprocated. 
Mrs. Cyrus Dolph, sister-in-law of Senator Dolph, gave 
an elaborate reception in honor of Mr. Eleanor Martin and 
the other members of the party. It was one of the most 
notable affairs ever given in the Northern city. The Dolph 
residence and grounds are the most beautiful in Portland. 
The lawn was a veritable fairyland, with myriads of lights 
twinkling from the trees and shrubbery. Indoors was a 
mass of roses, the red library being entirely decorated with 
flaming jacqueminot. 

t5* s5* ^5* 

Mrs. Allen Lewis of Portland gave a pretty luncheon 
to a number of the ladies of the Californian party. The 
ladies were Mrs. Henry Scott, Mrs. Eleanor Martin, Mrs. 
Walter Martin, Mrs. Crockett, Mrs. Mountford Wilson and 
Mrs. Lewis, mother of Mrs. Kittle. 

c£* &5* c5* 

Hall McAllister and Edgar Peixotto were guests of 
honor at a dinner given at the Hotel Portland recently by 
Mr. and Mrs. I. N. Fleisehner. Both Mr. McAllister and 
Mr. Peixotto have been enjoying the sights of the Exposi- 
tion in the "Rose City." 

The exquisite wines of the Repsold vintages have be- 
come a necessity to discriminating people. Inspection in- 
vited. 



Fashonables at Wedding. 

Considering the lime — four minutes exactly — that was 
occupied in the wedding service of Miss Marie Louise 
Parrot t and Mr. Francis McComas, the noted artist, at 
Trinity Church, on Wednesday noon, a great deal of 
thought and money was spent on decorations. The flowers 
were superb and were used entirely in the church. So 
many society people are out of town that it was a very 
small wedding, only a few hundred being present, of which 
about ten were men. The wealthy Mr. John Parrott and 
his large family, and indeed all the Parrott connection 
were there, but Bohemians were conspicuously absent. 
The bride, who was gowned in white satin, with a long 
tulle veil, carried herself superbly, as alone she made the 
trying trip from the church door to the altar. She was 
preceded by her maid of honor, Miss Christine de Guigne. 
As Mr. Louis Parrott, the bride's father, is an invalid, 
her mother took his place and gave her daughter away. 
Even at a large wedding there are seldom more splendid 
equipages seen than were drawn up around Trinity 
Church on Wednesday. Really, no one seemed to walk or 
take a street car. But the women were so daintily gowned, 
nearly all in white or turquoise, that it was no wonder 
they preferred private coupes. As soon as the wedding 
breakfast at the Richelieu was over, Mr. and Mrs. 
McComas left for a honeymoon journey. 

Mrs. Fremont Older has returned from the East, 
whither she went to make arrangements for the publica- 
tion of her new novel, "The Giants." Appleton and Co. 
have accepted the story and will issue it in September. 

^w c£* t5* 

To Wed Business Man. 

The engagement is announced of Miss Mabel Handy, 
daughter of the late Dr. J. C. Handy, to Mr. Edward C. 
Mau, one of San Francisco's popular and prominent young 
business men. The wedding will take place in August. 

Rumored Engagement. 

I hear frequent rumors of the engagement of Mrs. 
Stevenson and the gifted young author of Alameda county. 
Whether a serious attachment exists has been the talk of 
the literary and Bohemian sets for some time. 

t£* t2& 1£& 

Entertains Handsomely. 

No one in Oakland society knows better how to do 
things in handsome style than Mrs. Thomas Mein, the 
widow of the South African mining millionaire. It is not 
often that Mrs. Mein "turns herself loose," but she cer- 
tainly entertained handsomely a few evenings ago in honor 
of two South African belles, who are visitors from "the 
land of sin, sand and sorrow." Miss Frances and Miss 
Gertrude Williams, who are spending the season in Cali- 
fornia, are daughters of a prominent mining magnate. 
They are accustomed to luxurious surroundings, but they 

Candy-loaded Cannon and Firecrackers for boys ; shield 
and flag boxes filled with sweets for the girls — these are 
some of the delightful novelties for the Fourth of July at 
Haas' Candy Stores, Phelan Building & James Flood Build- 
ing. 



THE WASP- 



[July i, 1905. 



probably never saw anything finer or more dainty than the 
orehid-enwreathed table at which Mrs. Mein's guests 
were seated. How Joe Chamberlain would gloat over those 
orchids ! 

c5* Ci?* t£* 

Kindred Enthusiasm. 

The engagement of Miss Maylita Pease, whose photo- 
graph appears in this issue of The Wasp, to Mr. Arthur 
Barry Watson is said to have been the outcome of the 
enthusisam of the two for automobiling. Miss Pease is 
a beautiful young woman with soft, chestnut-color hair 
and gray eyes that deepen to black or pale to blue as she 
talks. She is untiring in all kinds of outdoor exercise, 
and she and her fiance have been ehums since their school 
days. Mr. Watson is a delightful man, a son of the late 
Mr. and Mrs. Charles Watson, and a brother of Mr. Doug- 
las Sloane Waston. He has traveled extensively and is 
a great reader. The wedding is to take place in the Fall. 
With her parents, Miss Pease is to leave shortly for two 
months' trip to Portland, Oregon. After their return the 
preparation of the trousseau will be taken up seriously. 
Miss Maylita Pease is the daughter of Mr. H. K. Pease, 
one of the most influential business men of San Francisco, 
with the best interests of which he has long been promi- 
nently identified. 

ti5* c^* *£• 

Mrs. Robert Louis Stevenson is occupying her bunga- 
low in the mountains back of Gilroy this summer. She has 
as guests her daughter, Mrs. Isabel Strong, and Mrs. 
Frank Norris and her little child. 

t&* t&* &?* 



A Matrimonial Mix! 

Oakland draws a long breath after it has said in em- 
phatic tones: "I told you so." Of course, all Oakland did 
not know that Mrs. Carrie Brown Dexter, the "bird-like 
singer," has changed her name. She has united it with 
that of William A. Kling, the late secretary of the T. M. 
C. A. in Oakland, who left for the East on a business trip 
last year, just as a get-rich-quiek concern, of which he 
was manager, turned out to be a fake. The righteous, re- 
ligious financier and the beautiful church soprano had 
"many interests in common" whilst connected with mat- 
ters pertaining to the church work — at least, that is what 
Oaklanders thought, and no one could prove that the inter- 
esting pair talked of anything but their devotion to holi- 
ness. Shortly after Mr. Kling had resigned his position 
in the Y. M. C. A. and hied himself East, Mrs. Dexter sud- 
denly conceived an idea that she was not meeting with the 
appreciation that was her due as a singer of sacred music, 
and so gathered up her "traps and calamities," her gowns 
and fripperies, and went to Chicago. The hurried exodus 
set her husband, H. C. Dexter, Deputy County Assessor, 
thinking, and he considered that the time was ripe for fil- 
ing a divorce suit. Then followed Mrs. Cora Kling 's peti- 
tion for divorce. There had evidently been more than holy 
communion between William Kling and Carrie Brown 
Dexter. Sufficient legal grounds were shown why Carrie 
Brown should not continue as the wife of the Deputy 
County Assessor. It was also satisfactorily explained to 
the judge why Mrs. Cora Kling lost faith in her sancti- 
monious husband. But divorce is like wine — it requires 
maturing, as prescribed by law, and people who take ac- 
tion for separation must contain their burning souls in 
cool patience until the stern law declares a divorce "abso- 
lute." The errant Kling, however, did not bother with 
any such formalities as prescribed by Californian law. He 
wedded Mrs. Dexter in Utica, N. Y., two days after the 
decree nisi was granted. Meanwhile Mrs. Cora Kling dis- 
covered that she still loved the man who had been her hus- 
band for twenty-three years. Here is a nice "how do you 
do"! 

Nelson's Amycose, Infallible Remedy for Catarrh, Sore 
Throat and Inflammations of the Skin. 



Handsome Society Woman. 

Mr. and Mrs. Frank Griffin are spending the summer 
at Del Monte. Mrs. Griffin is one of our handsomest soci- 
ety women. Before her marriage to Mr. Griffin she was 
Miss Lilly Follis, who, with her brothers, Richard and 
Clarence, inherited a large fortune at the death of their 
father, Richard Follis. 

<&* t£* c£* 

Theatre Party. 

Miss Edith Simpson, who is quite the most beautiful 
girl in San Francisco society, and also has the additional 
charm of cleverness, was recently the hostess at a theatre 
party given in honor of Miss Cornelia Gordan and Mr. 
Isaac Upham. Among her guests were Mr. and Mrs. Silas 
Palmer, Mr. and Mrs. Dennis Searles, Miss Ethel Cooper, 
Mr. Will Sanborn and Mr. George Whipple. 



A Clever Architect. 

Mr. William Knowles, who married Miss Jean Mont- 
gomery Duncan on Friday, is a son of Mrs. W. T. Veitch of 
Walsworth avenue, Oakland. He is a graduate of Stanford 
University, and one of the cleverest architects in the State. 
The Veitchs belong to the exclusive Southern set across the 
bay and are of great social prominence, although they care 
little for general society, their friends being principally 
in army circles. One of the best houses Mr. Knowles has 
ever designed is the new one he has built for his bride. 
It is charmingly situated in the Piedmont hills. Mrs. 
Knowles is a daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Samuel M. Dun- 
can of San Francisco, and is of a very retiring nature. 
Oakland society is already planning to give the bride a 
warm welcome, and if she can lead ' ' the simple life ' ' when 
the strong-minded fashionables of that burg have decreed 
otherwise, she is clever, indeed ! 

The Visiting Prince. 

Prince de Windiseh Goaetz, who was visiting in San 
Francisco, has gone to the Yosemite. On his return he 
expects to spend some time here. The Prince is a scion 
of the reigning house of Austria, and an officer of high 
rank in the Austrian army. He was extensively enter- 
tained by the members of the Bohemian Club. The noble 
Austrian was so charmed by the form of entertainment 
offered by his Bohemian hosts that he has decided to cut 
short his sojourn in the Valley in order to taste again 
the joys and — well, other things, dispensed in the haunts 
of the jovial Owl. 



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THE NEWEST GOODS WILL AL- 
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OUR STORE WILL BE CLOSED MONDAY AND TUESDAY 

BOHM-BRISTOL CO. 

JEWELERS, SILVERSMITHS, 
DIAMOND MERCHANTS 

104-110 GEARY ST. 

above Grant avenue 



July i, 1905] 



-THE WASP 



Married an Heiress. 

When Miss Carlotta Steiner came from windy CI ii 

Id Hi-1 Mnnii' lor her nuptials she certainly expected the 
Californian sun to beam approval upon her union with 
one of the wealthy sons of the Golden West. Instead, sin- 
found a gray veil drawn across the face of the morning, 
and it was not once raised until the irrevocable step had 
been taken and she became united to Mr. Charles H. 
Crocker. Then the sun broke forth radiantly and all went 
merry as the proverbial "marriage bell." The wedding 
paily was a small one, but the bride and her attendant,' 
Miss Minnie Hennessey, were gowned as elegantly ' as 
though there had been a fashionable crowd in the chapel 
to admire the toilettes. Mr. Crocker was supposed to be 
beyond the power of woman to win, but in the way of 
those who boast their exemption from any condition he 
look the "fever called loving" in its most virulent form. 
Mrs. Crocker is, I hear, an heiress in her own right. She 
is a daughter of Mr. and Mrs. P. S. Steiner of Chicago. 
The guests at the wedding were: Mr. and Mrs. P. S. 
Steiner, Mrs. H. S. Crocker. Miss Minnie Hennessey, Mrs. 
L. B. Miller, Mrs. E. Criteher. Mr. and Mrs. Henry J. 
Crocker, Mr. William H. Crocker, Mr. Henry H. Hedger, 
Mr. and Mrs. J. P. Priceley, Mr. and Mrs. Charles Cox. 
After a brief honeymoon tour Mr. and Mrs. Crocker will 
come to San Francisco before going to Europe for the 
Summer. 

rjm it* iv* 

I hear the Uphams are spending their honeymoon tour- 
ing California. One of the pleasantest affairs given in 
their honor was a home-party at Mill Valley by Mr. and 
Mrs. Henry Payot. 

A Lady " Toastmaster. " 

A young lady in charge of toasts at a silver wedding 
is a novelty. Such an honorary public position was allot- 
ted to the intellectual Miss Anna Strunsky, on last Sunday 
evening, when Mr. and Mrs. M. A. Rapken celebrated their 
silver nuptials at 2545 Steiner street. Mr. Rapken was 
prominent in municipal life and charitable work during 
many years of residence in Australia, before making his 
home in San Francisco, some seven yeai's ago. He has 
in these few years made himself very popular, and is well 
known all over the Pacific Coast as one of the most ener- 
getic and successful of commercial travelers. Especially 
is he a favorite among his fellow "Knights of the Bag," 
who are proudly pointing him out as the highest salaried 
business manager in the West. He represents Bernheim 
Brothers, distillers, of Louisville, Kentucky, and his salary 
is larger than that of a Supreme Court Judge. The guests 
included many representatives of commerce and the pro- 
fessions. Miss Strunsky was chosen by acclamation as 
"toastmaster," and acquitted herself in such a brilliant 
manner as to warrant the laconic remark of an eminent 
legal luminary, that if he had entertained any doubts as 
to the justice of equal suffrage, after hearing Miss Strun- 
sky 's eloquence he was convinced that women are capable 
of occupying public positions, and at all events should have 
an equal suffrage with man. 

A Long Engagement. 

Now that Dr. Francis Munson is back from the Philip- 
pines, where he had been stationed for several years, 
there will be a wedding before long out at the home of 
Admiral Glass, United States Navy, in Berkeley, when 
Miss Katharine Glass will become the bride of her naval 
hero. It has been a long engagement, but there seems no 
excuse now for deferring the marriage. The trosseau, 
even to the wedding gown, is ready, and I hear that the 
happy event is to take place late in the Summer, prob- 
ably at the very end of August. Miss Glass is a very 
quiet girl who has mingled little in society. She is a great 

The unusual as usual. Tom Dillon's hats, opp. Palace 
Hotel, 636 Market St. 




Dodge stationery company 

PICTURES OBJECTS OF A HT 

STATIONERY ENGRAVING 

WEDDING INVITATIONS 

123 GRANT AVENUE, SAN FRANCISCO 

Norwood Browning Smith, Mer 



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every b ; em ish on beauty and defies de 
tection On its virtues it has stood the 
test of66 years; no other has, and is so 
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properly made. Accept no counterfeit 
of similar name Dr. L- A, Sayre said 
to a lady of the haut-ton (a patient) 
"As von ladies will use them, I recom- 
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harmful ^tall<>f the skin preparations. 
One bottle will last six months using it 
everyday Gouraud'a Poudre Sub- 
tile removes superfluous hair 
without injury to the skin 

FERD T HOPKINS, Prop'r., 87 
Great Jones •street. N . Y. 
For sale by all druggists and Fancy-eoods OealerB throughout the 

United States, Canwdas and Europe. 

Beware of base imitations. $1 ,000 reward for arrest and proof ol 

anyone selling the same 




THE WASP 



[July i, 1905. 



student, and fond of housewifely duties. Her father has 
just had completed a splendid residence in North Berke- 
ley, where the wedding reception will be held. 

Married at Last. 

At last Mr. E. Avery McCarthy is married and every- 
one is thankful. For many months his matrimonial com- 
plications and rumored betrothals gave society editors 
brain-fag. For some reason Mr. McCarthy's movements 
were of interest to society, and it was a fad with its mem- 
bers to keep "tab" on him. As soon as the searchlight 
was withdrawn he went off quietly and was married. The 
bride was Miss Howard of Los Angeles, the daughter of 
Mr. and Mrs. Albert J. Howard. 

A Striking Beauty. 

Miss Aileen Towle, daughter of the late Orrin Towle of 
Sacramento, who was married to Lieutenant Lowe McClure 
of the Fifteenth Infantry, stationed at Monterey, was 
formerly a resident of Oakland, where she was a noted 
belle. She is a striking beauty, dark, tall, and of splendid 
physique, and will -do credit to the position she occupies. 
Mrs. McClure 's brother married a daughter of Judge Prew- 
ett a short time ago. The wedding journey was direct to 
Monterey Barracks, the home of the couple. 

(,5* t5* c?* 

An Oakland Songstress. 

Oakland Society is preening itself on the success of 
Mrs. Beatrice Priest Fine. The fact of the matter is that 
Beatrice Priest spent her early days in Los Angeles and 
was married before she was well out of school, coming to 
the Northern part of the State with her husband. She 
has a splendid soprano voice and, unlike most songsters, 
is making an ideal wife. In New York the Fines have an 
enviable position in a leading church. I hear that she is 
to remain at her mother's home until Fall, and will then 
tour in concert, Will accompanying her on the trips. 
Henry Fine was not as fortunate as his brother Will in 
the choice of a wife. His marriage to Miss Campbell was 
» grand society function a few years ago, but the fire on 
the domestic altar soon burnt low and Henry went off en 
a long sea voyage, and the beautiful woman who had been 
so devoted to him secured a divorce. Society tea tables 
and club rooms rang with the stories, but no one could 
get at the bottom of it. The husband was out of reach of 
telegraph stations, and his people would not talk while 
Mrs. Fine could not be found. She "is in the country," 
was the message that was handed out to everyone who 
called at her mother's house in Twelfth Street. 

t5* t5* t^* 

A Popular Lady. 

I understand that Mrs. Phoebe Hearst, who has slipped 
quietly back to the hacienda at Pleasanton, after an ab- 
sence of nearly two years in Europe, is not at all strong. 
Indeed, she found the climate of New York so enervating 
that the three months she had planned to spend in the 
Eastern State with her son and daughter-in-law, and that 
wonderful grandson, George Hearst Jur., dwindled to as 
many days. Now that she is back in her beautiful Califor- 
nia country home the millionaire widow will doubtless 
grow strong again. Mrs. Hearst is one of the most popular 
great ladies in America, and she always receives a warm 
welcome when she comes to this State, where she has sev- 
eral handsome estates. 

t5* i5* *^* 

Among those who are going to the mountains for 
their summer outing are Dr. and Mrs. Harry G. Richards 
of Sutter Street, who leave for Skaggs Springs, July 1st. 

American Flag and Shield Bonbon Boxes, also candy- 
loaded cannon and firecrackers, are some of the Fourth of 
July novelties at Haas' Candy Stores, Phelan Building and 
James Flood Building. 



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by a guaranteed harmless remedy without exercise or 
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dress Mrs. E. F. Richards, 226 E. Ninth St., Riverside. Ca. 




Both Oriental and Domestic 
at 




261 Geary St., Union Square 



<X> 



PRESIDIO 
TERRACE 

IS NEARLY FINISHED 



In a short time it will be one of the prettiest 
residence parks in the world. 

It is the only one in San Francisco. No expense 
is being spared to make it an ideal place for a 
home. 

It is adjacent to the Presidio; close to Golden 
Gate Park ; within half a block of the ear line ; 
faces First avenue boulevard. 

Commands a grand view of Ocean and Golden 
Gate. All lots are wide and sunny and face a 72- 
foot avenue paved with bitumen. 

Sidewalks laid, sewers and side sewers are in; 
also water and gas mains ; telephone and electric 
light wires in underground conduits. 

Ornamental trees and plants in front of all lots ; 
price $100 per foot and up. 

Send for Illustrated Booklet 

Baldwin & Howell 



25 POST STREE 



^4 




July i, 1905.] 



-THE WASP 




opoff and Mrs. vou Siebert, both of the Russian Embassy; 
Mr. Wm. K. van ReypeD Jr., brother of the bride, and Mr. 
F. De Witt Wells of New York. The picturesque and 
elaborate ceremony of the orthodox Greek Church was 
performed, the Archbishop of the American Greek Church, 
A. Horovizky of New York, officiating. In the Russian 
marriage service the bride leads the procession. Accord- 
ingly, with her father, the Rear-Admiral, Miss van Rey- 
pen entered the drawing-room of the family residence, 
where the wedding took place, and advanced to the 
improvised altar, where the groom had already taken his 
station with the Archbishop. The six men followed, and 
then the bride's girl friends entered quietly and stood in 
the background. The Greek ceremony is divided into three 
parts: First, the nuptial canticle and the singing of the 
Songs of Solomon, followed by the exchange of the vows 
and rings. The second part consisted in the holding of 
silver crowns over the heads of the bride and bridegroom 
by the two first attendants, Baron Schilling and Mrs. Han- 
sen, who finally settled the crowns in place to the accom- 
paniment of prayers and chanting. These crowns were 
not removed during the remainder of the ceremony, and 
were worn for the rest of the afternoon. In the third part 
the bride and groom partook of the sacrament. Prayer and 
chanting followed, and then the priest congratulated the 
couple, after which he led the bridal procession, which 
marched three times ceremoniously around the improvised 
altar solemnly. The ceremony over, the rector of St. 
John's Episcopal Church, the Rev. Roland Cotton Smith, 
performed the service according to the Episcopalian ritual. 
After a honeymoon trip the groom will resume his work 
as Professor of Russian Law in Helsingfors University. 

A Gifted Mexican. 

Miss Mary Ayres expects to leave next month for Dres- 
den, where she will pursue her musical studies for two 
years. Miss Ayres is a daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Grove 
P. Ayres and a sister of the popular Dennis Searles. She 
has devoted very little time the last few years to sociely, 
as much of her time was devoted by her to vocal studies. 
Miss Ayres is decidedly gifted. Besides having a beauti 
ful voice, she has marked histrionic ability. 



MR. ANDREW CARNEGIE 

The wealthy American iion master, owner of Skibo Castle in his 
native Scotland 

A Double Knot. 

Washington society had an opportunity at the recent 
wedding of Miss Aletta van Reypen, daughter of Rear- 
Admiral and Mrs. van Reypen, to the Russian, Baron 
Sergekorff, to observe the grace with which the six men at- 
tendants on the groom carried themselves. The bride was 
wise enough to have a group of young girls in the wedding 
party, so there was an airiness of attire that would other- 
wise have been wanting. The six men who played an im- 
portant part in the half-hour ceremony were : Theodore 
Hansen, first secretary of the Russian Embassy; Baron 
Schilling, Russian Vice-Consul in New York ; Colonel Rasp- 

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-JTAN FRANCL5CO 



10 



-THE WASP- 



[July i, 1905. 




Clerk and g'ot a certificate to the effect that no bond was 
on file, and armed with that he returned triumphant to 
Judge Hebbard. Hebbard ordered Sanderson to file his 
bond immediately, and the young practitioner lost the re- 
ward that is supposed to attach to persistency and in- 
dustry. The incident goes to show that not all the ways 
of practicing law are demonstrated in the codes. 

^ js ^t 

Japanese at the Berlin Wedding. 

Especial significance is attributed to the fact that the 
Kaiser invited the Prince and Princess Takehito Arisu- 
gawa, cousins of the Emperor of Japan, to be present at 
the marriage of his son, the Crown Prince. The titled cou- 
ple were invited to Berlin in advance of other guests, 
which seems to indicate that the German monarch wished 



Photo by Webster 

MR. HOWARD HUNTINGTON 

Legal Ethics. 

Young lawyers are not the only ones who suffer at 
times for the indiscretions due to presumption. Still, I 
have noticed that the privilege of having "esquire" 
tacked on after their names (which every free-born citi- 
zen claims in common with them), and the possession of 
sheepskins showing their right to practice, give to youth- 
ful and inexperienced lawyers a degree of bumptiousness 
which renders them highly diverting to those that know 
their very bread and butter, perhaps, is paid for by their 
papas and mammas. 

In Judge Hebbard 's court recently an amusing incid- 
ent took place. In a certain case ex-Judge Sanderson se- 
cured an injunction without putting up a bond as the 
code requires. On the other side of the case was a "rising 
young lawyer" who looked into the matter and discover- 
ed that the bond was not up. He hiked over to Hebbard 's 
court and moved the dismissal of the case. "I am in- 
formed by Judge Sanderson," said Hebbard, "that a 
bond has been filed." The very young lawyer, with great 
energy, and persistency, declared that he was sure of his 
position, and the court directed his clerk to call up 
Sanderson on the telephone. Sanderson assured the clerk 
that the bond was up. 

c£» r^* t5* 

This might have satisfied an older and mors cautious 
man, but the "kid," as he is sometimes called, was not to 
be put off. He went again to the office of the County 

Go to Swain's dining-room, 209 Post street, near Grant 
avenue, for a fine lunch or dinner* 



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San Francisco 



July i, 1905.] 



THE WASP- 



n 




Photo by Taber 

MISS MAYLITA PEASE 

to do the Japanese special honor. Prince Arisugawa was in 
the United States during the World's Fair in Chicago, and, 
according to Secretary Hay, is one of the most enlightened 
and ablest men in Japan. Chamberlain von Mohl, who is 
versed in Japanese etiquette, was detailed by the Kaiser 
to see that the Japanese forms were rigidly observed, and 
everything went off splendidly. The Prince was the Mika- 
do's special envoy to Britain on the occasion of the late 
Queen Victoria's jubilee. He is forty-four years of age, 
and was trained in the naval college of Greenwich, after 
which he served for a number of years in the Japanese 
navy. To him are attributed many of the improvements 
in the equipment of the navy, and he is also responsible 
for the more thorough training that is given the men. 

Marrying Tonopah Men. 

There is quite a little colony of Oakland brides in 
Tonopah, Nevada, nowadays. The latest addition to the 
group is Mrs. Walter J. Thomas, who was Miss Harriet 
Helen Kinnear, of Hamilton Place, before her marriage 
last Thursday evening, June twenty-second. Mr. Thomas 
is the manager of the telephone company in the mining 
town, and has built a pretty bungalow for his bride. 

^w 10* t3* 

Honoring a New Yorker. 

One of the largest teas of the season was given by Mrs. 
Thomas V. 'Brien at the St. Francis Hotel on Fridav of 
last week in honor of Mrs. Walter Dean 'Brien of New 
York, a recent bride. The large rooms were filled with fash- 
ionable attired ladies of the exclusive set of San Francis- 
co about one hundred of whom were present during the 
afternoon. The hostess was assisted in her duties by Mrs. 
Lewis Lane Dunbar, Mrs. James W Edwards, Mrs. Har- 
wood Morgan. Mrs. Percy Howard O'Brien. Miss \ an 
Wvck, Miss Persis Coleman, Miss Perry, Miss Gertrude 



Palmer. Miss Gladys Deal. Miss Elsie Don-, Miss Lyman 
Farnsworth. 

Jt Jt jt 
Bachelor Seals. 

The Holluschickee — "Bachelor Seals" — Club, which is 
composed of about fifty well-known young men, left for 
their annual outing last week. The trip this year was 
to Ben Lomond, situated in the picturesque Santa Cruz 
mountains. The quiet atmosphere of Rowardennan as 
sumed a lively aspect during the visit of the jolly mem- 
bers. Professor Litchell was the original promoter of the 
Holluschickee Club, which is fast taking a foremost place 
in clubdom. Its members frequently entertain visiting 
celebrities. Assisted on several occasions by the Bohemian 
• lub Quartette, their musical affairs are of no mean order. 
Joe Redding occasionally lends his versatile talents, and 
Hoy Pike, with his attractive dancing and singing, always 
adds much to the success, as do also Jack Noyes and Harry 
Conniek by their cleverness at the piano. Other promi- 
nent members are Harry Scott, Jack Baird, Percy Will- 
Carpets cleaned. City Steam Carpet Beating nd Ren- 
ovating Works, Geo. H. Stevens, Manager, 38 Eighth St. 
New No. 70 Eighth St. Phone, South 250. 



GRAND PRIZE AT ST. LOUIS 



AWARDED TO 



Hommel's Champagne 

which delights the epicure who calls for 
White Star Brut or Extra Dry 

THE MOST DELICIOUS OF ALL WINES 

Served at Cliff House, New Poodle Dog, 
Tails', Bab's, Palace of Art, Lick Grill, 
S. P. Ferry Boats, Union League Club, 
Jefferson Square Club, Red Lion Grill, 
Cafe Richelieu, Transportation Club, 
and other first class resorts : : : : 

FRED. M. BOEHM, Sole Agent Pacific Coa.t 

Phone Polk 3093 915 Eddy St. San Francisco 



H. L. Davis J. W. Davis 

W. D. Fennimore 




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Visit the HOFFMAN CAFE 
LUNCH, - GRILL - AND - WINE-ROOMS 

Half a block below Palace and Grand Hotels, S. F. 
Fine Goods a Specialty. Merchants' hot lunch from 11 a. m. to 
2:30 p. m. Served also in Indies Cafe, Steaks, English Chops. 
Chicken, Oysters, Loaves, Salads and all delicacies a specialty. 

HANDSOMEST CAFE IN AMERICA 

Open all night. 49- Private Dining Rooms for Indies and Escort* 

HOFFMAN CAFE. PROPS. 

CHARLES HILDEBRECHT, Mgr. 



12 



-THE WASP 



[July i, 1905. 




■^aaii. 



Phot* by Geniht 

MISS GENEVIEVE PETERS 

iams, Wilberforce Williams, Isaac and Ben Upham, Bill 
Sanborn, H. L. Baggerly, Albion Wbitney, Roy and Leon 
Pike, Ellert Pierce, Norman Wrigbt, Fred Fennieh and 
Jim Bishop. Tad, the celebrated cartoonist, is one of the 
original Seals. 

London real estate agents allege that Lily, Duchess of 
Marlborough, is not entirely disinterested in her house- 
hunting fad, as she charges a commission for making inves- 
tigations on behalf of friends, just as she did recently for 
Mr. Whitelaw Reid, the new American Ambassador. Jf , 
the clever American woman charged a fee she would de- 
serve it, as nobody knows better the London County Coun- 
cils By-Laws than the Dowager Duchess, who has become 
known as the "Sanitary Inspector." 

Ideal Luncheons. 

Oakland society people ought to be able to manage 
with smaller houses now that they give the most of their 
entertainments out at the Claremont Country Club. The 
enormous piazzas form ideal luncheon rooms, and many 
a lively party is given under the shades of the vine- 
covered verandahs. A few days ago Miss Chrissie Taft 
gave a luncheon out at the Claremont Club in honor of 
Mrs. Eugene Hewlett, who was beautiful lone Fore. 
Covers were laid for twelve, and the table was splendid- 
ly decorated, great soft pink roses being garlanded 
around the board, and were also arranged in the form of 
an awning. Miss Natalie Fore, who was one of the 
guests, is quite as handsome a girl as her sister, Mrs. 



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GEO. J. CASANOVA, Manager. 



HOTEL R.AFAEL 

Fifty minutes from San Francisco. Twenty-five trains daily each way 
OPEN AI.I, THE YEAR 

CUISINE AND SERVICE THE BfcST 

Send for booklet. R. V. HalTon, Prop. 



Unsatisfactory results accrue from starting out wrong. 
How many men have you heard say, "I wish I had com- 
menced saving something twenty years ago while I had the 
earning power." How is it with you? Have a talk with the 
officers of the CONTINENTAL BUILDING AND LOAN 
ASSOCIATION of 301 California St. 



JOLY I, 1905.] 



-THE WASP 



13 




MRS. BEATRICE PRIEST FINE 

Hewlett. Miss Pauline Fore is a stunning beauty, and is 
also a clever writer. 

^* C£* t£* 

Eligibles from Michigan. 

Stephen Hortnell, who first came to act as usher at the 
marriage of Eleanor Wood and Dr. Welty, is still dallying 
in San Francisco, accompanied by his mother, renewing old 
acquaintances. Mr. Hortnell accompanied the groom 
from Detroit, and amongst the extensive wedding party 
were several Michiganders eligible for matrimony. 

t0& f£fi %£fc 

New Home for the Ebell Club. 

There are no busier persons these summer days than 
the Ebell Club women of Oakland, who are bending their 
enei'gies to the task of building a new home for themselves. 
Several architects have already offered suggestions, but 
the committee will be in no haste to decide upon a plan, as 
it is determined that the new club house is to be a model 
in every way. On the building committee are : Mrs. W. 
Childs. chairman; Mrs. Paul Lohse, Mrs. J. C. Lynch, sec- 
retaires - Mrs. John Beekwith, Mrs. B. S. Hubbard, Mrs. 
M. de L. Hadley, Miss Eva Powell. 

"Apropos des Bottes." 

"Forgiveness" is a word not included in the dictionary 
of society. A man may marry an unknown woman. If she 
is clever and has the means to maintain good style, society 
will not altogether neglect her, but when a woman is known 
to have overstepped the "cordon" and her unfashionable 

CALIFORNIA SOUVENIR. 

A handsome present for Eastern friends — Townsend's 
California Glace Fruits in fire-etched and hand-painted 
boxes. 767 Market street, San Francisco. 



address was known before marriage, even if only to the 
male friends of the bridegroom, it is a hopeless case of 
ostracism! Why? Should there not be forgiveness? Cer- 
tainly!! Society forgives, but it cannot forget, and pru- 
dence teaches that the percentage of reformed women is 
very small, indeed, so long as they can pollute respectable 
people by contact. 

The De Young family left New York for Europe by 
the Kron Prinz, which sailed on June 21st. They will in- 
clude Spain in their travels abroad. 



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or sent prepaid by mail for 50c by 

The Hawaiian Poi Flour Co. Honolulu, H. I. 




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Vegetables, Eggs and Butter direct from the interior 
Catering to Select Family Trade a Specialty 




THEO. GIER CO., Distributors 

San Francisco Oakland 



14 



-THE WASP 



[July i, 1905. 




Celebration of The Fourth 



The Sonntags. 

Among the passengers for England on the Cunard 
steamer Coronia last week, were Mr. and Mrs. Henry P. 
Sonntag, and their daughter Edythe. It is the intention 
of the Sonntags to spend the summer in travel through 
Europe, and in November they expect to be back in New 
York, where they will occupy their new apartments for the 
winter. Miss Edythe has just been set free from the fash- 
ionable Spence finishing school, and is, I hear, a very 
delightful young woman. 

The friends of Mr. George Whittell Sr. are expecting 
him and his family to arrive from San Francisco in New 
York, where it is hoped that he may spend a few weeks 
before setting his face towards Europe, where he is to 
spend the summer. 



A Surprise in Store. 

There is a surprise to be sprung at the Natianal Suf- 
frage Convention which will be held in Portland, Oregon, 
from June 28th to July 5th. Speculation is rife as to the 
nature of the surprise, but the clever women politicians 
know how to keep a secret. Among the most ardent advo- 
cates of "equal suffrage" is Mrs. William Keith, wife of 
the distinguished artist, who will attend the convention 
in Portland. Mrs. Austin Sperry, Mrs. Lloyd Baldwin and 
Miss Schlingheyde will be with Mrs. Keith on her trip 
from San Francisco to Oregon. 

Mrs. Flint. 

One of Oakland's brides is going seriously into house- 
keeping. Mrs. George Flint who, before her wedding a 
short time ago, was Miss Lucie Oliver, received among 



July i, 1905 ] 



-THE WASP 



15 



her presents s complete assortment of white enamelled 
kitchen ware, and bo seductive have t lie pans and kettles 
proved that the young woman has written her Friends of 

her intention to make use of them just as soon as she gets 
back from tlie honeymoon. Mrs. Flint's picture appears 
in this issue of the "Wasp." 

dt v* Jt 

A Titled American Woman. 

Although no time has been set for the wedding, it is 
announced that Mrs. Nannie Langholme Shaw is betrothed 
to John Baring, Lord Revelstoke, a member of the firm of 
Baring Brothers. Mrs. Shaw is a famous beauty, and is a 
sister of Mrs. Charles Dana Gibson and of Mrs. Reginald 
Brooks. She was married when very young to Mr. Robert 
G. Shaw of Boston, and several years later divorced him. 
Since then she has spent much of her time abroad and of 
late has occupied a house at Market Hardborough with 
Mrs. John Jacob Astor. Mrs. Shaw has been much in the 
society of Lord Revelstoke on the hunting field and riding 
through the English country lanes. 

Other Distinguished Americans. 

Mr. and Mrs. Hamilton MeCormick, cousins of the 
American Ambassador to France, are to add their quota to 
the gaiety of the American smart set in London. They will 
remain at Berkeley House for the season, as their residence 
in Hertford street is not completed. Mr. McCormiek is a 
Chieagoan and a member of the family who, through the 
invention of the steam plough and reaper and mower, made 
things move for the American farmer. His taste does not 
run to agricultural implements, however. He is a worship- 
er at the shrine of the old masters, and spends large 
amounts annually on the collection of their works. Indeed, 
his canvases of the old painters are said to be the finest of 
any individual in the United Kinudom. 

Joe Pulitzer's Heir. 

When Mr. Ralph Pulitzer of New York won the heart 
of Miss Fredericka Vanderbilt Webb he made a choice 
that will doubtless bring him not only Lappiness but com- 
fort. Miss Webb is a notable housekeeper, just like her 
own mother, who was the eldest daughter of the old Van- 
derbilt family, and was trained very rigorously. She was 
permitted none of the liberties given to the girls with whom 
she associated. The young woman was very rebellious, 
and during the months that she was trying to soften her 
father's heart toward Dr. Webb, who was regarded by the 
old man as "stuck up," she also carried on a rebellious 
objection to the sewing and household tasks. Mature de- 
liberation must, however, have satisfied her of the wisdom 
of the training, as Miss Fredericka has been brought up 
in exactly the same way as though Grandma Vanderbilt 
was at her elbow. The Vanderbilt-Webbs spent several 
days in San Francisco a short time ago, and with them 
in their private ear was a little aroup of friends, notable 
among whom was Mr. Ralph Pulitzer, the groom, who is 
associated with his father on the New York World. 

t5* &5* <j5* 

1 hear from Paris that the Bull girls are enjoying to the 
utmost the gaieties of the French capital. They have 
lately been joined by their brother, Charley Bull, who was 
famous at Harvard as an athlete. Few of Charley Bull's 
friends heard of his marriage in New Mexico, which took 
place about a year ago. He married a dashing young wid- 
ow, living with her only a few months. Lately he returned 

When your friends from the country visit you it is 
esteemed a pleasure as well as a duty to show them the 
sights of our beautiful city and take them to all the im- 
portant places. You have not done them justice, nor have 
you proved yourself a good guide unless you have taken 
them to the California Market and let them partake of a 
plate of Moraghan's celebratej oysters. 



to San Francisco, secured a divorce, and left im diati i 

I'm- Paris. The Bulls inherited a large fortune from their 
mother, which was equally divided among the four chil- 
dren. The three girls have been touring Europe for the 
last two years, and will probably visit India before re- 
turning to San Francisco by way of Japan. 

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Agents 



VACATION 1905 



IS NOW READY FOR DISTRIBUTION 



" Vacation " is issued annually by the 

California Northwestern 
Railway 

THE PICTURESQUE ROUTE OF CALIFORNIA 

and is the standard publication on the Pacific Coast for 

information regarding 

Mineral Spring; Resorts, Country Homes 
and Farms, where Summer Boarders are 
Taken, and Select Camping Spots 



This year's edition "Vacation 1905" contains 
two hundred pages, beautifully illustrated, and is 
complete in its detailed information as to loca- 
tion, accommodations, attractions, terms, etc. 

To be had at Ticket Offices, 650 Market Street (Chronicle Building) 
and Tiburon Ferry, foot of Market Street ; General Office 
Mutual t,ife Building, corner of Sansome and Cali- 
fornia Streets, San Francisco. 
In Oakland at 972 Broadway. 

Applications by mail will receive immediate response 



J AS. L. FRAZIER, 



Gen. Manager 



R. X. RYAN, 

Gen. Pass. Agt. 



16 



-THE WASP- 



[July i, 1905. 



Popular Army Surgeon. 

The return of Dr. Christopher Clark Collins from the 
Philippine Islands in September is being eagerly looked 
forward to by both the younger and older sets. Dr. Collins 
was quite the most popular army surgeon ever stationed at 
the Presidio. He eomes from an excellent Virginia fam- 
ily, and brought letters of introduction to several society 
women. Whilst in San Francisco he was much sought 
after as a dinner guest, and was frequently entertained by 
Mrs. Eleanor Martin and the Spreekels set. 

<^* t£* ^v 

When Mrs. Spence closed her New York school a few 
days ago for the summer vacation the Timothy Hopkins 
took their daughter, Lydia, to Europe for the summer. 
After tasting the delights of foreign travel the young girl 
will resume her studies at the Spence institution in the 
fall. 

An Interesting Complication. 

No better, excuse could be found for a series of gay 
doings than the engagement of a sister and brother of the 
same family, and when the two in question are prime favor- 
ites in the exclusive social set the fashionable world al- 
ways does its best to make life roseate for the four most 
interested people. Last week Major and Mrs. J. D. Peters 
of Stockton announced the engagement of their daughter, 
Miss Gertrude Peters, to Mr. Arthur Griffin Duncan of 
San Francisco, friend of President Roosevelt and former 
member of the Rough Riders in Cuba when the Pi-esident 
was their leader. Instantly the beautiful, dreamy-eyed 
brunette, was the center of attraction, and cups and saucers 
began to arrive by every train from San Francisco, while 
the Stockton offerings made a goodly showing. Just at 
this stage of the affair Miss Peters' brother, Mr. Joseph 
Foreman Peters, made public his betrothal to Miss Jessie 
Fillmore, daughter of Mrs. A. J. Fillmore of San Fran- 
cisco, and intimate friend of Miss Peters. It is being- 
planned, I hear, that one of the young women shall be 
bridesmaid for the other, and that the second wedding shall 
take place as soon as the honeymoon is over, so that the 
first bride may be matron of honor for her friend. It is 
furthermore whispered that the precedence will be given 
to the one whose dressmaker is most expeditious. Miss 
Genevieve Peters' picture is printed in this week's Wasp. 

t?* t[5" 1?* 

Miss Fillmore is a daughter of the late John A. Fill- 
more, who was for years one of the best-known and most 
popular officials who was ever connected with the Southern 
Pacific. Of late Miss Fillmore has not mingled much in 
society, but when she first made her debut she went about 
a great deal and gave numerous parties on her father's 
1 private car to girl friends, the bevy viewing all portions 
of California in this luxurious way. She is fond of the 
country, and after her marriage much of her time will 
doubtless be spent on Mr. Peters' plantation in the San 
Joaquin valley, where a picturesque bungalow has recently 
been built. 

jl JS j« 

A College Gala Day. 

The reception tendered at the Portland Hotel on 
Thursday evening, June 29, by the alumnae of Mills Col- 
lege to Mrs. C. T. Mills, founder and president of the 
California institution at Oakland for young women, re- 
calls some of the former anniversaries that have been 
held out at the big college in Seminary Park. Every an- 
niversary of the foundation of the college is to Mrs. Mills 
a gala day. Strawberries are served in profusion to all 
who attend the exercises and stay to luncheon and dinner, 
and there is no more hospitable mansion in California 
than Mills, and if the luscious fruit were fifty cents a 
box that would make no difference: "It is an old rule of 
Mills that we have strawberries on this anniversary," 



says the amiable little woman who has guided the des- 
tinies of the college since the passing away of Dr. Mills 
more than a decade ago. Mrs. Mills has a warm spot in 
her heart for "the old girls," as they are called. And 
it is reciprocated, as is proved by the belles, young mat- 
rons, and even grandmothers who flock to these anniver- 
saries. The preceptress is like a girl herself when sur- 
rounded by her former charges, and she is apt to correct 
them as quickly as though they were "little maids at 
school" instead of great dames in society. I heard Mrs. 
Mills speak to a group of Oakland matrons who stood by 
a door chatting. "Young ladies," said she, "how often 
have I asked you not to stand in the hall. Please move 
into the drawing room or else retire to the concert hall." 
The "girls" turned with a laugh and caught the old lady 
to their midst, and remained "in the hall" until they 
were pleased to carry her off with them. It is perfectly 
wonderful the way that Mrs. Mills manages affairs. Thei'e 
are fully 300 students at the college, and she knows each 
one by name and is familiar with the home life of each. 

An Old-time Serenade. 

A pretty compliment Miss Gertrude Hibberd's 
friends of the First Methodist Church Choir paid her on 
the occasion of her marriage to Mr. Edward Eliason, of 
Berkeley, at the Hibberd home on Vernon Heights, Oak- 
land. The Rev. E. R. Dille, pastor of the First Methodist 
Church, had just finished the wedding service when a 
stringed orchestra began to play the Wedding March and 
the entire choir to which the young bride belonged 
broke into song. It was a regular old-fashioned serenade 
and the serenaders were treated just as hospitably as the 
minstrels of old. Of course, the bride was the center of at- 
traction. Mrs. Eliason is a talented violinist and has 
played in the choir of her church for a number of years. 
She was gowned in white satin for her wedding, and wore 
a graceful veil of tulle. Her sister, Miss Edith Hibberd, 
was in delicate pink, and the floral decorations were 
carried out in the same shades. About 300 of the elite of 
the citv across the bay were present at the reception 
which followed the ceremony to which only the family 
was bid. 




TKis is tKe proper Pa>.nel Boot 
Victoria.. ? ? We have them. 

Fifty Pony Vehicles in Stock. 

RBOS.fPMPA]W 

Market a.nd Tenth Streets 



July i, 1905.] 



THE WASP 



17 




MRS. ROBBRT FRANKLIN MCMILLAN, «»« BLAKEMAN 

Vatican Treasures. 

Mr. Morgan seems to be the victim of story-writers in 
Europe. Just now a story is going the rounds which may 
not be true, but is, as the Italians say, "ben trovato." Mr. 
Morgan was strolling through the Papal palace recently 
with Pope Pius X when his attention was drawn to the doc- 
uments relating to Columbus. At once the idea took pos- 
session of the millionaire that these papers should be across 
the sea in the land that the navigator discovered. "I'll 
give you $10,000,000 for those documents," proffered the 
loyal New Yorker to the head of the Roman Church. 

The Pope took the offer as a jest. Turning to Cardinal 
Merry del Valle, he exclaimed: "Ah, these American 
princes! They are evidently not in the way of salvation, 
for they deny themselves nothing." 

The Paris Journal, whether in raillery or in earnest 
is not stated in the article, and no one could guess, says^that 
Mr. Morgan is about to write a book entitled: "Kings 
Who Have Shaken My Hand." 

Much Married Lady. 

Unlike those ladies who find one husband a trial too 
great to be borne, Mrs. Grace Snell Layman, daughter of 
the late Amos J. Snell, a millionaire of Chicago, who was 
murdered several years ago, is about to be married for the 
sixth time. Mrs." Layman's matrimonial experience ex- 
tends over twenty-one years, and not once has death dis- 
solved the bonds 'that were taken "for better, for worse." 
Three times she was wedded to Mr. Frank Nixon Coffin, 
and thrice the court set her free. It is reported that the 



oft-married lady will bei le the Initio of Mr. .Mack Love 

some time this month, and that their future home will 
be in Los Angeles. Following is a table showing the rap- 
idity with which marital bonds were assumed and discard- 
ed: 

iss4 — Married to Frank Nixon Coffin. 

L894 — Divorced from Frank Nixon Coffin. 

1898 — Remarried to Frank Nixon Coffin. 

lsiii) — Divorced from Frank Nixon Coffin. 

1899— Married to James C. Walker. 

1000 — Divorced from James C. Walker. 

1901— Married to Frank Nixon Coffin. 

1901 — Divorced from Frank Nixon Coffin. 

1903 — Married Perkins A. Layman. 

1903 — Divorced from Perkins A. Layman. 

1905 — Reported engaged to Mack Love. 

A Flutter in San Jose. 

There is white heat prevailing amongst the members of 
the Daughters of the Confederacy in San Jose. The foster 
mother of the organization is Mrs. MacLouth, a lady with 
undisguised aspirations to be a society leader. Recently, 
as president of the organization, she gave a concert and 
light banquet. She sent out the invitations, printed in edi- 
tion de luxe style, and ordered freely from florist shops 
for decorations, orchestras for music and requisitioned 
restaurants for ice cream and kindred delicacies. The next 
morning Mrs. MacLouth went on a trip East, leaving the 
dealers and her fellow-members of the D. O. C. to settle 
accounts. Now the women who elected Mrs. MacLouth say 
that she ought to recoup them, inasmuch as they were not 
responsible for the debts contracted and were not consult- 
ed. Whether Mrs. MacLouth will do so or not, they pledge 
themselves that she will never again hold an office in the 
society. Mrs. MacLouth was a candidate for the office of 
presidency of the woman's club recently, but was not 
nominated. She, however, captured a lesser office. 

i5* i5* iff* 

"Castle-Gould." 

It is a good thing for the building contractors of San 
Francisco that they do not have to please a patron as ca- 
pricious as Mrs. Howard Gould. Since the purchase of 
the large estate at Sands Point by her husband, Mrs. 
Gould, who has been given carte blanche in the management 
of the place, has spent five years trying to get a founda- 
tion upon which to build the expensive houses that are to 
constitute "Castle-Gould." So difficult is it to satisfy the 
chatelaine that five contractors have given up the job in 
despair. It is said that one firm, which makes a specialty 
of Italian brick arches, was commissioned to build the cel- 
lar for the stables. The arches were constructed according 
to given measurements, but upon removing the scaffolding, 
as always happens in that kind of work, the arches settled 
a little. Mrs. Gould had a trusted man to examine the cel- 
lar ceiling, when he discovered that the arches were half 




THE F. J. CAROLAN HOME, SAN MATEO, CALIF. 



18 



-THE WASP 



[July i, 1905. 




Photo by [mat 



MRS. KISABURO UYENO 
The Japanese Consul's Wife 

an inch lower than had been stipulated in the contract. 
Although the cellar was never to be used, Mrs. Gould in- 
sisted upon having the brickwork taken down and recon- 
structed, causing a great loss to the contracting firm. 

Married an Heiress. 

The Powers family are looking gleeful these days, and 
well they may, for their oldest hopeful has achieved a 
brilliant success in the matrimonial market. When Dr. 
George Herman Powers Jr. wedded Madeline Davis in 
Boston on Tuesday of this week the Powers family wel- 
comed an heiress. Miss Davis is the only daughter in a 
family possessing great wealth. They are foremost in 
Boston's social life and leaders in that city's most cul- 
tured set. Mr. Davis has amassed a fortune, and his daugh- 
ter has had every advantage. She is extremely talented, 
and is a great musician. Report has it that she attended 
no less than sixty concerts in two months, but report may 
have exaggerated a tiny bit. At any rate, the family own 
a handsome residence on Beacon street and a number of 
country homes as well, and it was in one of these, a beauti- 
ful baronial house at North Andover, Mass., that the wed- 
ding was celebrated. Young Dr. Powers is a clever sort 
of chap, who is rapidly coming to the front in his profes- 
sion. He has a fine voice, and sang for some years in 
church choirs here before he left for the East. The Pow- 
ers boys have both done well. Alan, the younger son, is* 
a forester and a graduate of the Cornell school of forestry. 

t£* £* cj* 

A Historical Bazar. 

The cynosure of all eyes at the historical bazar held re- 
cently at Dean's Yard, Westminster, England, was an 
American woman, the Countess of Yarmouth, who before 
her marriage was Miss Thaw of Pittsburg. Young Thaw's 
marriage to the chorus girl and artist's model, Miss Eve- 



lyn Florence Nesbit was opposed by Mamma Thaw out of 
deference to the feelings of her titled son-in-law. But 
"all's well that ends well," and the Countess blossomed 
out in a magnificent dress of the period of Charles I as 
though her brother had wedded the daughter of a belted 
Earl. The bazar was for charity, the noblest of all vir- 
tues, and those who attended were repaid by gazing upon 
great ladies gowned to represent twenty-one different 
reigns. The pageant lasted three days, and during that 
time $100,000 was taken. It will be used to relieve the 
bankruptcy of Westminster Hospital, which was establish- 
ed in 1719 in the district known as "Petty Prance." 

j* & & 
In Search of Health. 

I hear that Mr. and Mrs. Wni. Herrih and their daugh- 
ter, Kate, have taken a jaunt to some of the European 
watering places in search of health for Mr. Herrin, who 
continues far from strong. 

Introduced "English Kettledrum." 

When Mrs. William Lynham Shiels returns from Lake 
county, where she is rusticating with her husband, her 
mother and Mrs. Shiels' two little daughters, she will re- 
sume the small entertainments which have done so much 
to brighten society on the other side of the bay. Mrs. 
Shiels never gave a tea, a luncheon or a reception, to say 
nothing of a dinner, that was not. different from the func- 
tions given by her neighbors. She really introduced the 
English kettledrum to Oakland society folk, and the Oak- 
landers, with their wonted generosity, copied her teas and 
did not bother over the small formality of giving credit 
for introducing the style. It is said by those who have the 
doings of the smart set at their fingers' ends that upon the 
shoulders of this beautiful young matron will fall the man- 
tle of society leader when the serious task of entertaining 
is taken up in the fall. Entre Nous. 




Photo by [mat 

LITTLE DAUGHTERS OF THE JAPANESE CONSUL 



July i, 1905.] 



-THE WASP 



19 




SKIBO CASTLE. 

VIEW OP ANDREW CARNEGIE'S MAGNIFICENT SCOTCH RESIDENCE 



California Photo- Engraving Co 



20 



-THE WASP - 



[July i, 1905. 




AUTO ASCENDING THE STEPS OF THE CAPITOL AT LANSING, MICHIGAN 

Celebrities At Home 

INo. 14 



"She Mika.do's Capable Consular Representative a.t San Francisco 
Glimpses of His Public a.nd"Private Life 




have served as Consul in three foreign coun- 
tries, each post a little more important than 
the previous one, is a tolerably good begin- 
ning for a man not any older than Mr. Kisa- 
buro Uyeno, the talented and diplomatic rep- 
resentative of the Mikado at the highly im- 
portant port of San Francisco. The Consul- 
ate, which is situated on the second floor of a substantial 
block at 420 California street, presented a busy scene on 
the afternoon when the representative of The Wasp chat- 
ted with Mr. Uyeno over matters Oriental and Occidental. 
Not only was the large outer office filled with Japanese, 
who talked rapidly and with many gestures, with the suave 
secretaries, those masters of at least two languages and 
past masters of the gentle game of diplomacy, but sturdy 
Americans were there also, asking for favors of one kind 
and another. A well-known financier, who looked the bon 
vivant, was eager to see the Consul, he explained to one 
of the secretaries, for he was about to sail for Japan and 
would fain be instructed in the mining laws of the Mika- 
do's realm. He and his companion, a serious-looking young' 
man, whose experience of life must have been sad, indeed, 
to cast the gloom that shadowed his face and made itself 
seen in every line of his depressed body, were finally per- 
suaded that the Consul's private secretary was the one man 
who had the laws of Japan at his tongne's end. 



At the moment when I had entered the Consulate Mr. 
Uyeno sat at a great desk in his private office, his whole 
attention given to a telegram, but when he became aware 
that he was not alone he sprang to his feet, and with the 
politest of low bows motioned me to a seat. In a crowd 
of Japanese Mr. Uyeno would demand instant attention. 
He is much taller than the average of his countrymen, and 
has a striking personality and the ail of command. He 
looks as if he might have made a great "-eneral or admiral, 
and if I — who am not a seventh son, or anything in that 
line — may venture to predict, the day will come when this 
courtly Japanese gentleman will be veiy close to the head 
of the diplomatic corps of his country. But we did not 
speak of these things as we sat vis-a-vis in the Con- 
sulate. 

Mr. Uyeno has a dark, spare face, with somethin" of 
an eagle profile. He wears a drooping, though rather thin 
moustache, and his eyes are as black as ebony and slant 
very little. His dress is unobtrusive in the extreme. His 
suit was of so dark a mixture that it would be difficult to 
say positively what shade of color crossed the iron gray. 
His necktie was so unostentatious that it might be de- 
scribed as a narrow black string, and his shoes were patent- 
leather Oxfords. Altogether, it is a long time since I have 
seen a more scrupulously dressed man than the representa- 
tive of t':e Emperor of Japan in San Francisco. 



July i, 1905 J 



-THE WASP 



21 




is an institution where they teach these arts, and ladies 
send for one or two professors to attend at their houses. 
In the house there may be several ladies who will take 
lessons at the same time. It is a very fine art." 

"Is it not considered the finishing touch to a fashion- 
able belle's education?" I asked, fascinated by the 
glimpse into the home life of these gentlewomen. 

"No," corrected Mr, Uyeno, "the flowers are very re- 
fining and beautiful, but the art of tea making and serving 
is the great ceremony with my countrvwomen. It is to 
them what dancing is to Americans. They learn to bow, 
to be graceful. They learn all that is needed to make a 
great, fine lady, when they are taught to make tea and 
serve it." 

# * * 

From the solemn subject that savored of a rite, so 
reverently was it mentioned, we wandered to art as shown 
in the making of pictures, and of this the Consul pro- 
fessed himself supremely ignorant. "1 know my pro- 
fession," he said, with a slight shrug of his shoulders 
and a gesture of wide open palms, "but when it comes 
to learning other things, I do not make it a success." 

Our conversation next drifted to countries other than 
America and Japan, and the Consul confessed to a know- 
ledge of five languages, Japanese, French, English, Chin- 
ese and German, and admitted that he was familiar with 
a smattering of other tongues, but protested that he is 
"not much of a student and reads not deeply." 

"How long have you been in the service, Mr. Uyeno?" 
I asked. 

"For more than ten years," was the quick reply. "I 
came to San Francisco first as secretary to the Consul. 



Photo by Iwtai 
THE JAPANESE CONSUL AT SAN FRANCISCO 

The room in which he receives his visitors is of fine 
proportions, and is lighted by two immense square win- 
dows, while at one end is a pair of folding doors, orjenina- 
into another apartment whence drifted scraps of informa- 
tion concerning "minine law." The floors of the entire 
suite are bare, with an occasional straw rug in front of 
the desks, and the furniture is limited to what is neces- 
sary, and, really, it is interesting to find how much of 
what we have in our rooms is superfluous. The 
Consul was good enough to interpret the glance of admira- 
tion toward the rose he wore in his buttonhole Dad to re- 
ply to it by a compliment on the flora of California. 

"Your flowers are the most beautiful in the world," 
was what he said, and the accompanying smile showed 
that he meant every word of it. 

"But those of Japan?" I hesitated, endeavoring to 
be as courteous as my host; "we read so much of their 
beauty. ' ' 

"They are devoid of perfume, and it is difficult to ac- 
count for that fact," explained Mr. Uyeno, "but the fault 
must be in the soil or in the atmosphere, for rose trees 
that have been taken from here be'ar sweet-smelling 
blossoms for only one season after they are transplanted 
in the new soil." 

With a desire to learn something of what flowers are 
to the Japanese, I asked what education was given in the 
arrangement of them in Japan. 

"It is a part of the training of every Japanese lady," 
said the Consul. "It takes two or three months to be- 
come perfect in placing a branch of almonds in a jar, and 
if one is industrious one may become skilled in another 
six weeks in the arrangement of a cherry bough. There 

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agents. 



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Specially Built for the Storage of Household Furniture 
MAIN OFFICE, Eddy Street, Near Fillmore : : Phone West 828 



22 



THE WASP 



[July i, 1905. 



Here I stayed three years in that position, when I was pro- 
moted and sent to Berlin, Germany, as Consul, where I re- 
mained two years, and then went to Hongkong, China, as 
Consul, for two years, after which I came back here. I 
have been here four years." 

"You must know whether you like California or not," 
I ventured to remark, facetiously. 

The Consul was not inclined to jest upon so important 
a subject as his friendship for the Golden State, and re- 
plied, gravely : ' ' San Francisco is my second home, and 
next to my own land it is dear to me." 

"I suppose that you were educated in America or 
Europe, Mr. Uyeno?" 

"No," he said; "I was educated in Japan, and came 
here first as secretary." 

This seemed a good opportunity for gaining tin insight 
into what foreigners think of the universities of Califor- 
nia, and I therefore asked the question. 

' ' We regard them very highly, " said Mr. Uyeno. 

"To which do you give the preference?" I insisted, 
laconically. 

The diplomat smiled gently as he responded: "Some of 
our people attend the State University at Berkeley, and 
it is one of the best universities in America; others are 
students at Stanford, and there is not a better university 
in the United States. Take which you will." 

"I suppose you are looking forward to a speedy victory 
over Russia," said I, in congratulatory way. 

"It is not proper that I should discuss those matters," 
was the sweet-voiced retort that silenced my tongue on 
political events. But when I beean to seek information 
regarding entertainments given to foreign potentates, etc., 
the Consul calmly confessed himself completely at sea. 

"How can I know?" he cried, with as helpless an ex- 
pression as a bridegroom on the way to the church. He 
very kindly gave me permission to call at his residence, 
1730 Pine street, however, where I might gain a aiimpse 
into the home life of an Oriental household. 



Few San Francisco houses possess more nobly propor- 
tioned reception-rooms, or command such delightful views 
of far-spreading foliage as are obtained from the front 
of the Consular abode, where the great windows face a 
panorama of shrubbery which gives the place the appear- 
ance of being in the country, while the heart of the city is 
barelv a mile distant. From the rear windows is a splen- 
did view of San Francisco bay, with the Contra Cost" hills 
showing dimly on the far shore. The mansion, which is 
but recently built for a Japanese Consulate, is painted 
white; the broad entrance is on the corner of Gough and 
Pine streets, and is reached by shallow and very wide mar- 
ble steps. Its external appearance is well matched by the 
brightness and tastefulness of the interior decoration, in 
which white and red predominate. Three immense reception 
rooms on Hie first floor °re ^nr^e^ed with a red of a rich 
tone, and the fnrn.' fl ir" is of dirk wood, with elaborately- 
carved and pilded designs, nnd upholstered with the cost- 
liest of satin brocades, with gold and silver threads bright- 
ening the flornl p-i*Wn. On 'he walls hang paintings that 
are immensely valuable, and that are from the brushes of 
the world's masters. 

As I awaited Mrs. Uveno I was entertained bv a tiny 
maiden with night-black hrir and with almond-shaped dark 
eyes of wondrous depth and sweetness. She moved like a 
zephyr-swayed flower, so ?entle wpre her timid yet graceful 
gestures. A word of admiration for the doll in her arms, 
and we were on the friendliest of terms. 

"She is my doll," lisped the little one. "and her name 
is Eose. " 

Life is only froth and bubble until you have been in- 
vigorated by drinkine a cup of Armer Brothers' " Very- 
Best" Coffee, prepared under the firm's special supervi- 
sion. 



I admitted that the name exactly suited the flaxen beauty 
of American manufacture, whose dress was as gorgeous as 
anything that ever came from the Arabian Nights' tales, 
and was of rose-colored satin, with embroideries that would 
have made a Mandarin's guard look very cheap. 

"Is she called by your name?" I asked. 

"I am Yeiko," gravely responded the child, rising with 
quaint but pretty ceremony, as her mother entered the 
room. 

Mrs. Uyeno is a little woman with large, dark eyes that 
one moment twinkle with merriment and the next soften 
with emotion. She has an ivory complexion, and wears 
American-dress gracefully. The day I called upon her she 
was attired in a white embroidered shirt waist, and her 
trim skirt was of pale-gray cloth. I explained the object 
of the visit, and my hostess professed her willingness to 
supplement any information that her husband had been 
-unable to give me. 

# # # 

"Would you think me rude if I admired your hand- 
some rooms ? " I began. 

"No," replied Mrs. Uyerlo, as ingenuously as a child. 
"I like them very much. The house was just finished for 
us a short time ago. Before that it was hard to entertain, 
but now it is a pleasure." 

"And you give a dinner every night, I suppose," I re- 
marked, jestingly, as I should have addressed a woman 
of California. 

But the little foreign lady did not take my words other 
than in serious mood, and answered : 

"Not every night; that would be too often. About 
three or four times a week." 

"Do you not find the duties very onerous?" I asked, 

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Regal pens. Blank books and memorandums. Index cards 
and filing cabinets. Good printing and fine engraving. 
The best of everything at moderate prices. Sanborn, 
Vail & Co., 741 Market street. 

Brain and brawn benefited with a tonic that aids digestion — Ab- 
bott's Angostura Bitters are noted for their digestive properties. All 
druggists. 



Zl 



C. M. REHNSTROM 
bailor and Importer 



Mutual Bank Building 

Market, Kearnky and Geary Sts. 

formerly at chronicle bldg. 



SAN FRANCISCO, CAL,. 



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Sohmer Plaao Aeency The CBCILIAN-The Perfect Pteeo Player. 
Received Gold Medal— Hifheat Award World's Fair, SI. Louie, 1904. 



JOLY I, 1905. J 



TNE WASP 



23 



sympathetically, thinking of whal tliat would mean to the 
most strenuous of San Francisco matrons. 

"It is very pleasant,'' said Mrs. Uyeno. "I have Eons 
maids that I brought with me, two from Japan and two 
from Corea, and so I have none of the trouble that I hear 
so much about." 

"Good servants do make the wheels of domestic ma- 
chinery move smoothly," I began. 

"But they are not regarded as servants," she interpo- 
lated; "they are my maids, of the family, not servants, 
but very different. They do everything just as I wish." 

Evidently, the sweet-mannered lady of the Orient has 
had some insight into the service and servants of America. 

"And do you give Japanese or American dinners?" 
I continued, still on the qui vive for information. 

"When our friends first land from the steamers they 
are hungry for their native food, and I give a Japanese 
dinner. Later I entertain them at an American feast. 
We are equally fond of both." 

Then I asked how many courses were served at a formal 
Japanese dinner, and must confess that when I was in- 
formed that "about twenty-five" was considered the 
proper thing I almost gasped for breath. 

"And you have discarded the picturesque kimona?" I 
lamented. 

My hostess hastened to explain that it was because 
she was not able to procure the national garb in America 
that she wore American gowns. 

"It is strange that the merchants here have no idea 
apparently that kimonas grow old-fashioned. It is very 
awkward to be found by a Japanese lady or gentleman, 
just from home, with a kimona two or three years out of 
date. I prefer to wear American dress to that. But," 
with a gentle sigh, "the Japanese robe is so comfortable!" 
* * * 

Just then a soft-footed and deft-handed maid brought 
a tea service, and we sipped amber nectar from tiny, price- 
less bowls, supported in silver, cone-shaped saucers, and 
partook of wafers like frozen sea foam, so light and thin 
and white were they. 

My hostess told me that she gave a grand dinner, a cer- 
emonial affair, to the Prince Fushima, cousin of the Em- 
peror, when he was in San Francisco last winter. It was 
composed of Japanese dishes, and there were twenty-five 
courses. Mrs. Uyeno was unable through illness to appear 
at the table, and the Prince made her a gift of silver and 
gold brocade on white satin for a gown. 

"It is to be the wedding gown of my eldest daughter, 
Yeiko, " said the mother, proudly. 

"You have other children?" I questioned, as a tiny 
babe toddled into the room, and was caught by a maid and 
bome forth. 

"Four daughters," was the prompt response, "the 
eldest six years old. Yeiko had a birthday party last week 
when she was six. She invited a number of children, and 
they all came. She was a very happy little girl." 

From parties we turned to educational matters, and I 
was informed that the Consul's little ones attend Miss 
West's fashionable private school in Van Ness avenue. 
"They learn very well," said Mrs. Uyeno. "At first the 
American children seemed afraid of them, but now they 
are very friendly." 

With an apologetic word, I asked to what profession she 
would train her daughters, and the first shadow passed 
across the calm face, as the patriotic reply came: "I want- 
ed soldiers." 

"You have been a long time absent from your country, 
Mr. Uyeno tells me," I began. 

"But we were to have gone to Japan for a visit this 
year if the war had not stopped it." 

"KNOX" CELEBRATED HATS, 

Spring styles, now open. Eugene Korn, The Hatter, 
746 Market Street. Telephone Main 3185. 



In speaking of the euphonious sound of the children 
names, Yeiko. Fumiko, Voneko, and Michko, my hostess 
told me that in her country all girls' names end in "ko," 
and she apparently was greatly amused at the suggestion 
that those of her sex should prepare to take care of them- 
selves. Evidently, bachelor maids are not familiar to the 
haut ton of the Orient. 

By a little judicious questioning I gained the informa- 
tion that Mrs. Uyeno is an excellent housekeeper. She ad- 
mitted that she supervises every detail of the large estab- 
lishment, doing the marketing and ordering the state din- 
ners, to say nothing of the family meals. Incidentally, 
she is at the head of several large Japanese charitable or- 
ganizations, and does much for the relief of her country- 
people. To a request for a portrait, she replied that in 
Japan only those who have cause to be proud have their 
portraits published. 

"It would make me very much ashamed," she added, 
"to have my picture in a paper." 

"People are generally proud here in California to think 
the public prints want their photographs," I assured the 
little chatelaine, and a few moments later took leave of the 
charming group, bearing with me the portraits here repro- 
duced. 

If a good wife can do everything for a man by way of 
political advancement, then Mr. Kisaburo Uyeno ought in 
the course of time to be Japanese Ambassador to Washing- 
ton. 



Senator Chauncey Depew has refused a salary of $500,- 
000 a year from the Equitable. The man who made the 
offer is qualifying for Sing Sing. 

Hypnotism, Brahamanism and opium-smoking are a 
few of the occult tantrums indluged in by the 
fantastic youths and maidens who are members of the 
"Tantrik" Order of America, which has its grand lodge in 
San Francisco. 



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24 



-THE WASP 



[July i, 1905. 



WHO'S WHO ? 



HAVE WE A FOUR HUNDRED IN CALIFORNIA? 



By GRACE VAN TASSEL 

NO. VIII. 

The Buckingham family is well known. Money they 
have in plenty, and as their lineage may be traced back 
for centuries their position is naturally very high. George 
Buckingham married, some years ago, Miss Mary Eldredge, 
daughter of the late Captain Eldredge, a capitalist, who 
provided his daughter with a handsome dot. Their menage 
is very attractive. Everybody was looking forward to the 
time when they would occupy their magnificent new brick 
"mansion" on Scott street, which claims interest for many 
peculiar features, not the least being the possession of 
no fewer than nine baths. As a matter of fact, the house 
is really only moderate sized, so either the baths were 
too numerous or the house was a disappointment. Any- 
how, it is for sale, and the family live a block further 
down Scott street in a house recently purchased from Dr. 
Davis. 

Miss Edith Buckingham, a sister of George, is equally 
as well known and liked in society. 

Dr. Buckley and his numerous family are favorites in 
society, and the Buckley girls are bidden to all the ex- 
clusive functions. They are pretty girls, with graceful 
manners. Gertrude, the eldest, recently married an at- 
tractive young Englishman, James Augustus Thunder, and 
although Papa Buckley refused to attend the wedding 
the young couple seem to be happy. Mr. Thunder comes 
of a fine old English family, and his people figure in 
Burke's "Landed Gentry." The young couple are now 
visiting the elder Thunders. Grace and Violet Buckley, 
the younger daughters, are much in demand by society, 
especially since their father purchased the handsome Pa- 
cific avenue house from the William Thomas family, and 
their social prestige has increased. A son, Gerald, and twin 
boys complete this interesting family. Old Dr. Buckley is 
an interesting character, with a distinct personality. He 
has amassed a large fortune from the practice of his rjro- 
fession. 

# * # 

The Bull family has an interesting history. The late 
Alpheus Bull, founder of the family, was a brilliant mar., 
who had been associated with Sharon, Ralston arid the 
early-day millionaires, and in the race for riches was 
scarcely outdone, for he managed to amass a large for- 
tune. His tragic death is still fresh in the memories of 
those who knew him. One day, while driving in the family 
carriage with his wife and daughters, at Black Point, he 
left the equipage for a moment to admire the view, and, 
losing his footing, fell headlong over the cliff to his death. 
His wife, "en seconde noee," was a woman of strong 
character and brilliant mind, and she set herself to edu- 
cate her daughters to be as clever women as she was her- 
self. As she did not care to engage teachers at high sal- 
aries for her. girls alone, she purchased the beautiful 
Ralston place at Belmont and there established a school 
for sirls. She actually ran the school for years, although 
she was worth more than a million. Upon her death the 
daughters and one son inherited her estate, although Mr. 
Bull had two sons by his first marriage, who also inherited 
handsomely. Of these Alpheus, the younger, married Miss 
Daisy Crowell, a charming and popular girl. The mar- 
riage has proved very happy. The family is numbering 
already half a dozen little ones. Charlie Bull, the second 
wife's son, was a famous Harvard football player. He 
recently married in Mexico. The three girls, Edith, Marie 
and Kathleen, are now traveling in Europe. They are 
witty, pretty, and unusually attractive girls. 



Mr. and Mrs. Charles Bundsehu and their family are 
charming people of German descent, who always bring to- 
gether in their beautiful old home delightful people, who 
enjoy the quaint Old World manner in which this famil) 
lives. Their house is on Chestnut street, on the slopes of 
Telegraph Hill. 

One of the cleverest women in society and one of the 
most delightful hostesses is Mrs. Linda Bryan, whose home 
on Buchanan street is the trysting placa of many interest- 
ing people who cluster round the hostess, a mistress of the 
lost ait of conversation. Witty and handsome, she is mucn 
in demand. Her "eauseries" would meet with the ap- 
proval of even such a master of the art of conversation 
as Professor Manaffy of Dublin, who has written a very 
iuteresting book on the subject. 

George Bush is fast becoming one of society's sought- 
after beaux, albeit it is whispered that he is desperately 
smitten with a certain charming young heiress, the eldest 
of several sisters. Mr. Bush hails from Montana, and is 
doing exceedingly well as an attorney in San Francisco, 
handling the interests of wealthy Montanans, including 
those of the Clarks. 

* # * 

Equally as prominent in San Francisco society as in 
that of Southern California are Callaghan Byrne and his 
brother, W. J. Byrne. "Billy" Byrne is president of the 
Pacific-Union Club, and is one of the most eligible bach 
elors in society, although he seems to successfully avoid 
any trap to entangle him matrimonially. A rumor connect- 
ed his name with that of Charlotte Wilson before thai 
young lady made her debut, but no one believed in its 
truth, and it has since been proved a canard. Both the 
brothers Byrne have money, and will have much more on 
the death of their mother, Mrs. Margaret Irvine, who pos- 
sesses much wealth. "Cal" Byrne lives in Los Angeles 
these days, and has large interests in the Southern pare 
of the State. A few years ago he figured in a very roman- 
tic matrimonial deal which startled society most abruptly. 
Callaghan Byrne and Hope Ellis, the beautiful daughter 
of a wealthy Marysville banker, were lovers a dozen years 
ago, when the young lady was a debutante and the center 
of life and gaiety at Del Monte. Everybody thought it was 
a match, and the gossips had ceased speculating on the 
outcome of the affair when the engagement terminated 
abruptly. It was whispered that the pair had quarreled 
because the high-spirited young lady resented her fiance's 
criticism of the decolleteage of her gowns, which were the 
talk of the hotel. At any rate, "all was off," and not long 
after Hope Ellis became the bride of Bert Sherwood, the 
brilliant, attractive and fascinating but erratic son of Mrs. 
Robert Sherwood. Their marriage was most unhappy, 
and ended in a divorce, as did another marriage of the 
young man's, for he was also at one time the husband of 
beautiful Mamie Blethen. Mrs. Hope Ellis Sherwood, who 
had a little son, went to live with her father, and it was at 
his home that her marriage to Cal Byrne took jjlace in a 
most sensational manner. No one suspected that the old 
love affair was revived, and Marysville society went un- 
suspectingly one evening to a musicale at Banker Ellis' 
home. After all were assembled it wis announced that the 
guests were bidden, not to a musicale, but to a wedding. 
Too surprised to make any extempore comment, the party 
witnessed the ceremony which united Hope Ellis Sherwood 
to the love of her youth. All kinds of happiness was predict- 
ed for the pair, but scarcely more than a year after their 
union they were quietly divorced. Mrs. Hope Ellis Sher- 
wood Byrne still lives in Marysville, while Cal Byrne claims 
Los Angeles as his home. 

[to bb continued] 



"Elijah" Dowie has bought a million-acre ranch in 
Mexico for a Zionist colony. If Dowie become acclimatiz- 
ed in Mexico he will have to send back for his blankets 
when he reaches "the other place." 



July i, 1905.] 



-THE WASP 



25 




tiE^jpS 



Shortgras' colonial ancestors owned it. He was sitting in 
it on his front porch looking on while young George Wa 
ington was cutting down the famous cherry-tree. When 
the boy up and told his father the truth, old Shortgras 
was that surprised he tipped it over and broke the leg of 
the chair. Deacon Sleekton said that Mr. Shortgras told 
him the whole story, and anybody wishing to verity it could 
write to the Librarian at Washington, where the broken leg 
is kept in a glass case and guarded by a sentry. Oh, dear! 
I felt so bad to see the poor Deacon deceived that way J 
couldn't stop any longer and left. There was a string of 
furniture vans in front of the house taking the things 
away. When I turned the corner I saw another row of 
vans at the back of the house piling furniture into it. Mrs. 
Gabbs told me this evening that the auction is likely to last 
four days. That woman knows everything that's going on. 

Tabitha Twiggs. 



Monday — I was so shocked on a street car today ! Good- 
ness me! A real nice-looking girl took a powder puff out 
of her vanity box and powdered her face right in front 
of everybody. But that was not the worst. Another wo- 
man had to get her carfare out of her hosiery. Oh, dear' 
My cheeks are burning yet. "Fare, please!" said the con ■ 
ductor. She looked for it in her glove, but it wasn't there. 
"Wait a moment," said she, and got up and turned her 
back on a couple of men in the ear and made a quick grab 
under her skirt. Oh, gracious! I'd have died if it hap- 
pened to me. "Mere 'tis,'' said she, holding out a half- 
dollar to the conductor. Of course, the man grinned as he 
gave her the change. All the other men in the car languid, 
but she didn't seem to mind them a bit, and sat down as if 
nothing had occurred. She had a few packages in her hand 
and looked like a married woman. 

* # * 
Tuesday — Mrs. Lightley came back from the country 
today and told me how she acted as chaperone for a party 
of young girls that went out in automobiles. I asked her 
what her duties were, and she said she couldn't remember 
as she was too busy flirting with her second divorced hus- 
band, who happened to be one of the party. "I made up 
my mind to cut out the girl he was with," said she, "and 
I did it, too. Before he got back to the hotel he proposed 
to me." She accepted him conditionally, she said — that is, 
on condition that she does not see any man she likes bettei 
before the summer is over. Did you ever hear such a 
thing? Isn't it perfectly dreadful? Again I thank good- 
ness I've never had any matrimonial complications in my 
life. 

» # # 

Wednesday — Oh, dear! How I have wasted this day! 
This morning I read an auction advertisement that Mrs. 
Shortgras was selling off her furniture before going away 
to Europe. Lands sake! I was never so surprised in my 
life, for she was round to see me two weeks ago to borrow 
75 cents to pay her quarterly installment on her piano 
and her kitchen stove that she bought three years ago on 
credit. Although there was a special meeting of the Ethi- 
cal Effort Society this afternoon, I went to the auction 
out of curiosity. My, what a swindle! Oh, mercy me! 
How can people be taken in so! The place was crowded 
with women, and Deacon Sleekton of our church was auc- 
tioneer. It gives me the shivers to think how the poor man 
was imposed upon. Every room in the house was that 
crowded with furniture you couldn't turn round. Deacon 
Sleekton had to climb over tables and chairs to get in. 
Where in the world did it all come from? When I was at 
the house a week ago Mr. Shortgras had to sit on a 
cracker box because one of the three chairs in the, dining- 
room had a broken leg. The women were wild to buy 
things, and Deacon Sleekton couldn't auction them off fast 
enough. The old chair with the broken leg was sold for 
$18 because it was described as an heirloom. One of Mr. 



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At Hotel Del Monte 



26 



-THE WASP 



[July i, 1905. 






BOOKS and AUTHORS 



5 



"The Eternal City" is of perennial interest to Eng- 
lish and American writers of books. The latest addition 
to the great mass of books on Rome is "Alberto Pisa's 
Painting's," with test by M. A. R. Hope Malleson. The 
letterpress is in parts most interesting. It gives much 
curious information concerning the Romans of today, 
who, in the opinion of the author, are the same people as 
the Romans of the great epoch — but with a difference. 
They no longer have the power to impose themselves on 
the nations, or even on the rest of Italy, but they retain 
all the pride of the Roman Patricians of olden times. The 
Romans are, perhaps, the best-hearted people in the 
world, but they are very satirical. The spirit of Horace 
and Juvenal still permeates the people, and they do not 
spare anybody with their tongue, not even the Pope. 

The Romans live in flats which vary in size from three 
room suites to fifty rooms. The janitor is as much in 
evidence as the Paris concierge. A middle-class family 
is not very approachable in the morning. Although ex- 
tremely early risers, the house remains "en deshabile" 
till the afternoon. At first sight all the rooms appear to 
be bedrooms, which are used indifferently to sit in. Never- 
theless, one room, generally the smallest and least at- 
tractive, is set aside as the "reception room." The family 
never sit in it, and never enter it, except to receive their 
visitors. A jute-covered sofa of the most uncomfortable 
pattern, with a strip of carpet before it, is de rigeur, and 
a visitor would consider herself slighted if not ushered 
to this seat of honor. 

Romans, we are told, hate rain, and everybody carries 
an umbrella. Brigands only, according to popular belief, 
carry no umbrellas. That is how they become known to 
the police. The poor police ! Stupidity seems to be the 
badge of all their tribe ! 

The Romans have not any means for wanning their 
houses, though frosts are by no means unknown. Here 
is a chance for American coal oil stove heaters as a 
market. But the Romans are gourmets. All cooking and 
eating utensils are kept scrupulously clean, and the dirt- 
iest peasant will wipe out his glass carefully before using 
it, never trusting to the padrone as an arbiter of clean- 
liness. The Italians are also very fastidious about their 
beds, but there the standard of cleanliness stops. Floors 
are never washed. An Italian servant will never clean a 
floor on her own initiative, and is quite capable of giving 
notice should the omission be pointed out by the mistress 
of the house. 

* # # 

James E. Cutler's "An Investigation into the History 
of Lynching in the United States" is an interesting book. 
The word " lynching, "Mr. Cutler tells us, came from 
Colonel Charles Lynch, of Virginia, and that the verb 
"to lynch" had become a localism in Virginia between 
1780 and 1817. It then spread westward. The author 
shows how the practice of lynching, or of administering 
rough and ready justice, arose in the early conditions of 
the States and flourished especially, with more or less 
justification, in frontier communities where the legal 
machinery was insufficiently organized or entirely lack- 
ing. At present the custom is mostly pi'evalent in the 
South, and Mr. Cutler points out the causes of its exist- 
ence in the Black Zone. Slavery had acted in a way as 

The Vienna Model Bakery, 222 Sutter street, above 
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a school and a restraint of the negroes; emancipation re- 
moved all this restraint, and, its effect not having been 
fully foreseen, and no adequate legal provision made for 
the restraint of the freedmen, the worst instincts of the 
negroes came to the front. Racial prejudice is a fact, in 
some respect unreasoning, but with a basis of reality. 
In the opinion of Mr. Cutler, it is not likely to disappear 
for generations to come. So long as coroners' juries 
render verdicts of death "at the hands of persons un- 
known," sheriffs and jailers will not hazard their lives 
in rescuing prisoners; nor will prosecuting attorneys, 
judges and juries co-operate to secure convictions of 
lynchers. 

Dr. Moncure D. Conway, who witnessed the mowing 
down of men like grass by German cannon on the fields of 
France, when some years afterwards he spent a few days 
at Krupp's manufactory in Essen and noticed perfection 
in every department of gunnery, how happy the oenple 
were, and how every care was taken for the bringing up 
and schooling of the bright children whose fathers were 
making modern cannon to kill scientifically, he recalled 
the early Calif ornian epitaph: "Here lies Buck Fanshaw, 
who was killed by a ball from a revolver, one of the old 
kind, brass mounted, and of such is the kingdom of 
heaven." 

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STRICTLY BUSINESS 



Points of Interest on Trade and Finance. 




jjUROPEAN financial conditions do not present 
a very good aspect, but there were many sales 
of American securities by timid holders dur- 
ing the week. The steady succession of Rus- 
sian defeats, internal disorders and the un- 
certainty as to the outcome of the strained 
relations between France and Germany, with 
the possible mixing up of England in the trouble, have 
shaken the confidence of investors. Ultimately, this will 
be all for the benefit of American securities amongst in- 
vestors everywhere, but at present its effect is to impair 
confidence. Then the scandals attaching to those in charge 
of the management of some of our greatest financial insti- 
tutions have also had their bad effect. If the Government 
of the United States were to put a big loan on the market 
just now it would be eagerly snapped up by capitalists, 
even at low rates of interest. 

* * # 

The sensation in the market last week was cuts in the 
the prices of sugar. Several cuts have been made in the 
past few months, and during the week just passed there 
have been two, aggregating 40 cents per 100 lbs. The last 
was a big cut of 30 cents, which indicates that the forces 
that control the sugar market are at work to bring the out- 
siders into the fold. The contest will be short, sharp and 
decisive. Forty cents in one week means $8 a ton, or $3,- 
200,000 in the product of the Hawaiian Islands and the 
State of California. The Hawaiian sugar refinery and a 
couple of independent jobbers are in the way, and if they 
can be crushed the Western Sugar Refinery would be in 
possession of the field on this side of the continent. The 
friends of the Honolulu institution say, however, that it 
cannot be crushed; that it can continue to hold the fort, 
and that it will sell sugar at cost if need be. The cost is 
about $65 per ton. The struggle for the possession of the 
field, which has been going on quietly heretofore, promises 
to be a long one. Spreckels is a man of millions, and can 
afford to lets his profits go for awhile in order to get even 
with his antagonists. 

* * * 

The Struggle in the East. 

To be sure, it has been alleged that the general drop in 
the sugar market has been caused by the actions of the 
refineries in the attempt to break the jobbers' ring. The 
members of the latter, in the Eastern cities, concluded that 
they could hold up the refineries, and the latter made up 
their minds that they would not be held up. This accounts 
for the decline, some time since, in the markets of the East, 
but not for the local decline. If anything, sugar is Clans 
Spreckels' business, and he is determined to control the 
Coast market as long as he lives. 

* * * 
Statistical Position of Sugar. 

The statistical position of the sugar market is one of 
gTeat strength. About a year ago the stock and crop were 
estimated at 12,377,679 tons, while for 1904-5 it was esti- 
mated at 10,917,532 tons, or nearly a million and a half 
tons less. While this was the ease, the consumption was 
growing steadily — a matter of two million tons in five 
years— while in 1903-4 the increase was, in round numbers, 
a million tons. In fact, the estimate of consumption for 



1904-5 is a trifle larger than the supply. The market 

should go up again, and no doubt it will when the forces 
that have been antagonistic to the trust have been brought 
to terms. 

* * * 
Sugar Stocks Quiet. 

Meanwhile, the market for sugar stocks has been affect- 
ed unfavorably through sympathy, and there seems to be 
little or no demand for them. They have been the stay of 
the San Francisco stock and bond market for months, 
but there have been very few transactions lately. How- 
ever, dividends are being paid regularly, and the com- 
panies are well supplied with funds. But confidence is a 
sensitive plant. Without confidence no market can be up- 
held. 

* * * 
Some Sales of Realty. 

Although June is generally a dull month in everything, 
it was active in real estate. Three of the week's sales ag- 
gregate over $800,000, and the total is a good average for 
the year. Two of the sales are south of Market stree*. 
One on New Montgomery — 160 feet front — brought $215,- 
000, or, not taking account of the improvements, $1,331 
per front foot. Another sale, on the south side of Mission 
street, near Fourth, brought $127,000, or $3,175 per front 
foot. There is no Teason for this seeming disparity in the 
values of property so close to each other, but the mystery 
is solved if we figure out the square feet in each lot. In 
the New Montgomery street lot there are 12,200 square 
feet, so that the price is about $18 per square foot; while 
the Mission street lot contains 6,400 square feet, and the 
price is nearly $20 per square foot. Mission street is next 
to Market, and will be the great business street of the 
city. 

* # # 

Another Big Week. 

Week after week, whether dull or active in other re- 
spects, owners of property are busy at the work of im- 
provement. Last week has been one of the most conspicu- 
ous in this line. One of the principal improvements is the 
fifteen-story steel building to be erected by Anua L. Whit- 
tell on Geary street, near Stockton, which will cost $100,- 
000. The total for the week w'as in excess of $600,000. 

* # * 
The Northern Pacific. 

A meeting of the stockholders of the Northern Pacific 
Company will be held August 23d to decide on increasing 
the capital from $50,000,000 to $75,000,000. Besides the 
big trunk road, it has been decided to build several branch- 
es in the Northern part of the State, which will develop 
the agricultural aud forest interests of that section. This 
road will be the salvation of Northern California. 

* * * 
Mr. Atherton Brownell, who writes in Public Opinion 
so glibly on matters and things on the Pacific, is not accur- 
ate in his statistics. Our exports to the Philippines have 
not increased to $35,000,000. The latest report, giving ten 
months of the fiscal year, sets that down at $4,689,643, 
and our imports thence at $9,924,893. In 1897 our exports 



28 



THE WASP- 



[July i, 1905. 



to the Hawaiian Islands were $9,000,000, or about double 
Mr. Brownell's figures. There is no doubt of the great 
value that the trade of the Pacific must prove to the United 
States, and San Francisco in particular, but writers on the 
subject should keep themselves posted. 

# # * 
Bank of California Shares. 

The New York Mutual Life Insurance Company proves 
to be the purchaser of the five thousand shares of the Bank 
of California, concerning which there has been so much 
mystery. It paid $1,875,000 for the stock, and could sell 
it today for more than two millions of dollars, so that the 
investment has been eminently good for the stock and 
policy holders of the big company. The company will de- 
rive an annual income of $S0,000 from the purchase, or 
somewhat over four per cent, which is a good return for 
money in New York. Should the New York Mutual hold 
the stock for twelve years, and even not reinvest the an- 
nual income, it will have made a million and a quarter dol- 
lars should the market value of the stock remain as it is 
today. Of course, it will make more than that, and it will 
reinvest the dividend, and will, besides be sharer on the 
portion of profits that the bank sets aside every year as 
addition to its reserve. The deal will draw the attention 
of other capitalists in the East and in Europe to the op- 
portunities that San Francisco affords for investment, and 
will still more add to its importance in the financial world. 

* * # 
Californian Cereal Crop. 

It was bruited abroad very recently that the fruit 
and grain crops would be failures, but enough is now known 
to prove the contrary. At a moderate estimate, the yield 
of wheat will be 650,000 tons, and that of barley about the 
same amount, leaving 350,000 tons of the former and 
200,000 tons of the latter for export, the value of both at 
present prices being about twelve millions of dollars. OE 
course, this does not take into account the quantity for 
home consumption, which is increasing every year. The 
real value of the wheat and barley crops this year will be 
twenty-five millions of dollars. 

* # * 
Worse than Pirates. 

There is a class of money sharks in this city worse than 
the highwayman or freebooter — the "money-lenders" 
who advertise to lend money to salaried people, and ac- 
tually succeed in some cases in getting unsophisticated 
fools to sign notes drawing 10 per cent, a month, com- 
pounded monthly. What a note of that sort can do is 
shown by the ease of one Arthur H. Clark, who, on 
March 12th, 1901, gave a note for $10 to Martin Aivn- 
sohn. The note drew 10 per cent, interest, compounding 
monthly. Aronsohn transferred his note to John Lapique 
who sued for $3821.21 and costs. Men of the Aronsohn 
stripe ought to be dealt with in some manner not as yet 
provided for by law. The North American Indians used 
to have a number of devices for inflicting punishment on 
prisoners, any of which would seem to be quite appropri- 
ate for the stamp of men who can be guilty of asking 
$3,S21 for the use of $10. 

* * * 
Borrowing Millions. 

Two leading San Francisco corporations are in the 
field borrowing money to help them to keep on operating 
These are the Wine Association and Alaska Packers. The 
latter company want two millions for twenty years, and 
will pay sis per cent. They will begin to put by a sinking 
fund in 1908. The outlook depends altogether on the run 
of salmon and the price that can be realized. A big run is 
predicted for this year — sis million cases, and the indica- 
tions, as now regarded, are warrantable. But it is impos- 
sible to guarantee the run of salmon for twenty years. 
The company must trust to luck for the rest. 



MONEY TO LOAN. 
To salaried people at low rates. The White Co., 420 
California St., Rooms 14 & 15. Take elevator on Leides- 
dorff street to third floor. 

The German Savings and Loan Society, 

526 California St., 5an Francisco 

Guaranteed capital and surplus $ 2,474,518.82 

Capital actually paid up in cash 1.000,000.00 

Deposits, Dec. 31, 1904 37,281,377.60 

OFFICERS — President, John Lloyd; First Vice-President, Danie 
Meyer; Second Vice-President, Emil Rohte; Cashier, A. H. R Schmidt; 
Assistant Cashier, William Herrmann; Secretary, George T ourny; Assist. 
Secretaiy, A. H. Muller; Attorney, W. S. Goodfellow. 

BOARD OF DIRECTORS— John Lloyd, Daniel Mevtr, Emil Rohte, 
Ign. Steinhart, N. Ohlandt, I. N. Walter, J. W. Van Bergen F. Tillmann, 
Jr., and E. T. Kruse. 

San Francisco Savings Union, "^C/W"' 

Deposits January 1, 1905. . $33,940,132 | Paid up capital $1,000,000.09 

Reserve and contingent funds, $976,109. 

E. B. POND, President; W. C. B. De FREMERY, ROBERT WATT, 

Vice-Presidents; LOVELL WHITE, Cashier; R. M. WELCH, 

Assistant Cashier. 

DIRECTORS— E. B. Pond, W. C. B. De Fremery, Robert Watt, 
Henry F. Allen, Wakefield Baker,, Jacob Barth, Fred H. Beaver, 
William A. Magee, C. O. G. Miller. 

Loans upon San Francisco and Oakland Real Estate, and Farmi 
and Farming Lands in the country. Receives deposits. Country re- 
mittances may be made In checks payable in San Francisco, Postofllco 
or Wells Fargo & Co.'s Money Orders, or Coin by Express, but the re- 
sponsibility of this bank commences only with the receipt of the 
money. No charge Is made for pass-book or entrance fee. OFFICE 
HOURS— 9 a. m. to 3 p. m., and Saturday evenings, for receipt of de- 
posits only, 6:30 to 8 o'clock. 

Security Savings Bank 31 ^S r c y o st - 

Authorized Capital, $1,000,000; Paid Up Capital, $500,000; Surplus and 
Undivided Profits, $265,000. Interest Paid on Deposits. Loans Made. 

Directors — Wm. Babcock, Parrott & Co.; S. L- Abbot. Security Sav- 
ings Bank ; O. D. Baldwin, O. D. Baldwin & Son; Joseph D. Grant, Mur- 
phy, Grant & Co.; E. J. McCutchen, Page, McCutchen & Knight; L. F- 
Monteagle, Capitalist ; R PI. Pease, Pres. Goodyear Rubber Co.; Warren 
D. Clark, Williams, D.mond & Co.; Jas. L- Flood, Capit-list; J. A. Dono- 
hoe Pres. Donohoe, Kelly Bankin< Co.; John Parrott, Capitalist; Jacob 
Stern, Vke-Pres:dent Levi Strauss & Co. 

William Babcock, President; S. L. Abbot, Vice-President and Man- 
ager; Fred. W. Ray, Secretary; Sidney V. Smith, Attorney. 

STARR (Si DULFER 



SAN FRANCISCO AND T0N0PAH 

Stock Commission Brokers 




Tonopah 

Goldfield 

Bullfrog 




OFFICES: 

Merchants' Exchange Building 
San Francisco 

Tonopah, Nevada 

H. W. Hellman Building 
Los Angeles, Cal. 

MEMBERS SAN FRANCISCO STOCK AND EXCHANGE BOARD 



JOLY 1, 1905.] 



THE WASP- 



29 



The Wine Bonds. 

As for the Wine Association bonds, there is no reason 
why they should not be a good investment. There is an 

annual wine yield of twenty to thirty million gallons in 
California, and a good market. 

* * # 
Pay Day. 

Semi-annual pay-day has come round for the industri- 
ous and saving people, and the savings banks will disburse 
about three millions of dollars. The dividend has been 
gradually increased, till now it averages 3y 2 per cent per 
annum. It may look small, but it is fully equal to the aver- 
age return of capital in the great money centers of the 
East, and higher than those of Europe. 

* * * 
Southern Pacific Dividend. 

There is some talk about a dividend to be made on the 
common stock of the Southern Pacific, but though such a 
change in the methods of Southern Pacific as this would 
involve would be welcome to the ordinary investor, it is 
less likely now than it was some time since. The coming 
construction of the Western Pacific which prompted the 
resolution of Harriman to spend $25,000,000 on tunneling 
the Sierras, would seem to be a bar to spending anything 
on the poor holder of the common stock, who has been so 
patient on the deprivation of dividends for so long. 

* * * 
Mining Stock Market. 

The attention of those who speculate in Pine Street 
seems to be centered these days altogether on Ophir, which 
is expected by the more sanguine to develop into another 
bonanza. But the market remains unresponsive, and the 
stock has been selling about $6.25. The news from the 
mine is very good. They are sinking from the 2,200-foot 
level. Here the mine looks very well, and some very fine 
ore is being taken out. It is the intention of the manage- 
ment to direct all their energies to the opening up of the 
mine, and they expect to be able to pay a dividend at no 
distant day. 

* # * 

Every one keeps looking for news from Tonopah and 
its neighboring gold fields today, but the lack of facilities 
for shipping or reducing ore keeps the progress of the dis- 
trict hack. Attention is now directed to Kawich, where a 
$1,000 per ton find is reported. The market still remains 
quiet, but all signs point to a renewal of the interest in 
the Tonopah and Goldfield securities and an upward move 
in the stocks. One of the best items of news is that during 
the week there will be a dividend of 10 cents declared on 
Montana. Tonopah, the shares of which have advanced a 
dollar during the week. Reports from Bullfrog are very 
bullish. Eastern capital is going into them. 

* * * 
Tonopah. 

The Tonopah Consolidated Mining Company has pur- 
chased the Alta group of mines, located about 28 miles 
west of Tonopah. Ore was shipped from the mines June 
10th, and continues from that time on. Besides having 
considerable ore on the dumps, ten additional shafts will 
be started at once, and about four carloads of ore will be 
shipped each month and the output increased as fast as 
new help can be put on. 



Oregonians have more enterprise than Californians. 
Eastern sociologists and bankers have been induced to 
vest fiftv millions in what is practically a colonization 
scheme. California with its superior climate is lagging be- 
hind in schemes to develop our natural resources. We 
neglect to attract organized capital and systematic settle- 
ment on the land by desirable workers. 



Citizens State Bank, 518 Montgomery, cor. Cora:- 
allows 4 per cent on time certificates. 



cial, 



N. T. MESSER 



ZADIG & CO. 

Member San Francisco Stock Exchange 
Member Calif. Stock and OU Exchange 
Member Merchants' Exchange 



COMSTOCKS TONOPAH 

GOLDFIELD OIL STOCKS 

BOUGHT AND SOLD 

LISTED and UNLISTED STOCKS BOUGHT and SOLD 



TELEPHONE BLACK 3471 

306 Montgomery St., San Francisco, Cal. 



Mutual Savings Bank of San Francisco 

710 Market St., ops. Third 

Guarantee Capital $1,000,000 

Paid-up Capital and Surplus „ 666 000 

Deposits, Jan. 1 1905 9,600,000 

JAMES D. PHELAN, President; S. G. MURPHY, Vice-Pres- 
ident; JOHN A. HOOPER, Vice-President; GEORGE A. 
STORY, Cashier; C. B. HOBSON, Assis ant Cashier. 

Directors— James D. Phelan, S. G. Murphy, John A. Hooper, 
James Moffitt, Frank J Sullivan, Robert McElroy, Rudolph 
Spreckels, James M. McDonald, Charles Holbrook. 

Interest paid on deposits. Loans on approved securities. 

Deposits may be sent by postal order, Wells, Fargo & Co., or 
c xchange on city banks. 




The Hibernia Savings and Loan Society. 

IneotporaUd 13th of April, U». 
Office: Cor. of McAllister and Jooee Streets, San Pranclseo. 

Deposits, January i, 1905, $58,648,182.32 
Reserve Fund, Actual Value $3,372,779.09 

OFFICERS— President, James R. Kelly; Secretary and Treasurer, 
Robert J. Tobln; Attorney, JoBeph S. Tobln. 

BOARD OF DIRECTORS— R. J. Tobln, James R. Kelly. P. Crow- 
ley, Richard M. Tobln, Charles Mayo, Joseph S. Tobln. 

The objects for which this association Is formed are. that by Its 
operations the depositors thereof may be able to find a secure and 
profitable Investment for small Bavlngs, and that borrowers may have 
an opportunity of obtaining from It the use of a moderate capital on 
giving good and sufficient security for the use of the Bame. 



French Savings Bank, 3 ' 5 SFSXZEL st ' 

CAPITAL PAID UP $600,000 

CHARLES CARPY, President ARTHUR LEGALLET, Vice-President 
LEON BOCQUERAZ, Secretary 



DIRECTORS- J. E. Artigucs. O. Bozio, Leon Bocqueraz, 
gerot, Chas. Carpy, J. B. Clot, J. S. Godeau, Leon Kauffman, A 
J. M. Dupas, A Ross, J. J. Mack. 



J. A. Ber- 
Legallet, 



SPECULATION 

AND INVESTMENT 

Railroad Stocks 

GRAIN, PROVISIONS AND COTTON 

■ ~f 1^> ■ / JCf Investors' Guide a.nd Memual 

*• M ^^ ft ••# ■ af An elegant cloth bound book containing infor- 
mation and advice to investors and speculators — complete statistics on all 
railroad and large industrial enterprises — will be furnished upon applica- 
tion, also Daily Market Letter sent free upon request. 

GEORGE SKALLER & CO. 

BANKERS AND BROKtRS 

413 California St., S. F. Tel. Main 579 

SEND OR CAIX FOR OUR SPECIAL MARKET LETTER 



30 



-THE WASP 



[July i, 1905. 



Dividend Notices. 



=*v 



DIVIDEND NOTICE. 

The Continental Building and Loan Association 

of 301 California Street 

Has declared for the six months ending June 30th, 1905, a dividend 
of 5 per cent, per annum on Ordinary Deposits; 6 per cent, on Term 
Deposits; and 6 per cent, on Monthly Payment Investments. Inter- 
est on Deposits payable on and after July 1st. Interest on Ordinary 
Deposits not called for will be added to the principal and thereafter 
bear interest at the same rate. • 

Dr. WASHINGTON DODGE, President. 
WM. CORBIN, Secretary 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 
HUMBOLDT SAVINGS BANK. 
626 Market Street 
Opposite Palace Hotel 
For the half-year ending June 30th, 1905, a dividend has been 
declared at the rate of three and one-half (3^) per cent, per annum 
on deposits, free of all taxes, payable on and after Saturday, July 1, 
1905. Dividends not called for will be added to the principal 
and thereafter bear the same rate of interest. 

W. E. PALMER, Cashier. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 
SECURITY SAVINGS BANK, 
316 Montgomery Street. 
For the half-year ending June 30, 1905, dividends upon all de- 
posits at the rate of three and one-quarter (3^4) per cent, per annum, 
free of taxes, will be payable on and after July 1, 1905. 

FRED "W. RAY, Secretary. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 
MUTUAL SAVINGS BANK OF SAN FRANCISCO, 
710 Market Street. 
For the half-year ending June 30th, 1905, a dividend has been de- 
clared at the rate of three and one-quarter (3%) per cent, on all de- 
posits, compounded semi-annually, and free of taxes, payable on 
and after Saturday, July 1, 1905. 

GEO. A. STORY, Cashier. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 
THE GERMAN SAVINGS AND LOAN SOCIETY, 
526 California Street. 
For the half-year ending June 30, 1905. a dividend has been de- 
clared at the rate of three and one-half (3H) per cent, per annum 
on all deposts, free of taxes, payable on and after Saturday, July 1, 
1906. 

GEORGE TOURNY, Secretary. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 
C^j-JFORNIA SAFE DEPOSIT AND TRUST COMPANY, 
Corner California and Montgomery Streets. 
For the six months ending June 30, 1905, dividends have been de- 
clared on the deposits in the savings department of this company as 
follows; On term deposits at the rate of 3 6-10 per cent, per annum, 
and on ordinary deposits at the rate of 3^4 per cent, per annum, 
free of taxes, and payable on and after Saturday, July 1, 1905. 
J. DALZELL BROWN, Manager. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 

SAN FRANCISCO SAVINGS UNION, 

632 California Street, corner Webb. 

For tne half-year ending with the 30th of June, 1905, a dividend 

has been declared at the rate per annum of three and six-tenths (3.60) 

per cent on term deposits, and three and fifteen one-hundredths 

(3.15) per cent, on ordinary deposits, free of taxes, payable on and 

after Saturday, July 1, 1905. 

LOVELL WHITE, Cashier. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 
SAVINGS AND LOAN SOCIETY, 
101 Montgomery Street, corner of Sutter, 
Has .declared a dividend for the term ending June 30, 1905, at the 
rate of three and one-half (3^) per cent, per annum on all deposits, 
free of taxes, payable on and after Saturday, July 1, 1905. 

EDWIN BONNELL, Assistant Cashier. 



Consistent. 
American procrastination in connection with the recog- 
nition of the Norwegian Republic is the Monroe Doctrine 
applied to European affairs. America practically says to 
Sweden and Norway: "A plague on both your crowns!" 



The PUREST and BEST country milk and cream is 
furnished by the BERKELEY FARM and NOVATO 
RANCH DAIRIES. N. J. Nelson & Co., props. Depot, 
1228 Polsom street, San Eraneiseo. Ring up South 676, 
or send postal. Families carefully supplied. 



Pure blood, bright eyes, bounding step, high spirits, good health — 
synonymous with Abbott's Angostura Bitters, intelligently used. Test 
it. 



Special Number 



Sunset Magazine 



For JULY 

Cover Design— "In Sight of Mt. Hood a Hun- 
dred Years Ago" W. H. Bull 

Frontispiece — Opening Day at the Lewis and 

Clark Exposition 

Overland a Century Ago Reuben Gold Thwaites 

The Oregon Expedition's Historian. .H. M. Stephens 

The Oregon Sierra (Verse) Joaquin Miller 

The Great Northwest's Centennial — A series of 
Articles on the Lewis and Clark Exposition, 
by 

Frank L. Merrick, Manager, General, Press Bureau. 
Henry W. Goode. President and Director-General. 
Hon. Geo. E. Chamberlain, Governor of Oregon. 
Hon. Albert E. Mead, Governor of Washington. 
Hon. John H. Mitchell, United States Senator from Oregon. 
Wm. W. Wheelwright, Pres. Portl'd Chamber of Commerce 
G. W. Allen, President Portland Board of Trade. 
Robertus Love, Assistant Manager, General Press Bureau. 
J. H. Cradlebaugh, Salem, Oregon. 

Oregon (Verse) Alice E. Tully 

Chautauqua by the Sea John Ivey 

Mining in Oregon Emma Seckle Marshall 

Wood-Call (Verse) Ina Coolbrith 

Summer in Sierra Snow Land. .Charles Wesley Reed 

California's Garden Calendar E. J. Wickson 

When the Prince Came (Serial Story — Chapter 

II) Flora Haines (Mrs. Loughead) 

The University Summer Session .... May L. Cheney 

Little Stories of the West 

Howlfsh Wampo's Warning (J. W. Redington)— Money 
Makers of Goldfield (K. R. Casper)— The Piute War (J. H. 
Cradlebaugh)— In Old Coloma (Heatherwick Kirk). 

The Course of Empire 

An Academy Hotel— Railroad Philanthropy— A Floating 
Flyer — International Conference on Agriculture — Sierra Club 
Outing— California Roads (F. J. Bramhall) — New Gaso- 
line Motor Coach— Portland, the Place for Investment— 
The Big Meadow Country— Hotel Lincoln, Seattle. 

Plays and the Players 

"Every Man in His Humor," Presented at Stanford Uni- 
versity (Katherine Chandler) — Julia Marlowe and Her Art 
(Peter Robertson)— Successful Grace Field (Isabel Fraser) 
— Portraits of Maud Williamson, Elmer Booth, Nellie 
Lynch, Theodore Gamble, Grace Hopkins, Frederick Wards. 

Books and Writers 

"The Flying Lesson," by Agnes Tobin (Henry Anderson 
Lafler)— A Story of the Middle Northwest, by Alice Winter 
(A. J. Waterhouse) — "Impressions of Ukiyo-ye," by 
Dora Amsden (Morgan Shepard) — "Hecla Sandwith," by 
Edward Ufflngton Valentine — "The Delta Lands of Cali- 
fornia," by A. A. Martin — "Gridley and Vicinity" — "The 
Retreat of a Poet Naturalist," by Clara Barrus— Portrait 
of Agnes Tobin— J. K. Gill's SUNSET Window. 

Sunset Rays -. 

In the Woods of Oregon (Mrs. L. R. Osborn)— Woeful Wil- 
lie (A. J. Waterhouse)— The Glow-worm (Elwyn Hoffman) 
—Good Time Comin' (A. J. W.)— Yes, He Knows (A. J. W.) 
—The Things We Earn (A. J. W.)— A Little Girl I Knew 
(Flora I. de Wolf)— My Ship That Never Comes (June Mc- 
Millen Ordway)— The Busybody (Drawing and Verse by 
Childe Harold)— The Bottle Man (Alberta Bancroft)— Re- 
sponsive Hearts (Martha Shepard Lippincott)— The Wild 
Wind and the Valley (Ethel L. Preble)— Under the Ever- 
greens (Augusta Kling)— Where the Sun Rests (George 
Birdseye). 

On sale at all Newsdealers 



^: 



^ 







By AUTOMAN 



The summer automobiling season has opened up, and 
is now in full blast on the Pacific Coast. Never have there 
been more motorists on the roads between San Francisco 
and Los Angeles than there are at present, and from the 
enthusiasm manifested by those who are louring the Coast 
in "chugwagons" there will be some record trips made 
during the next few months. The San Francisco-Los 
Angeles run is coming into popularity with the residents 
of both cities. The roads being fairly good at the present 
time over this journey, a number of automobilists who have 
never ventured over it before are now trying the run. 

The new regulations opening additional roads in Golden 
Gate Park to automobiles and rules by which their opera- 
tion will be governed go into effect today. The rules re- 
quire a strict compliance with the State automobile law, 
and machines not properly registered and numbered and 
operators properly licensed will not be permitted in the 
park. 

C. H. Wall, the wealthy young Oaklander, has been de- 
voted for some time to the sport of motoring, and is one 
of the most prominent of the automobile aggregation across 
the bay. Mr. Wall expects to tour extensively the next 
few months, and for this purpose has added to his posses- 
sion a forty horse-power Columbia touring car. 

There seems to be almost no end literally to the uses 
of the automobile. Some Detroit golfers last week engaged 
in a putting contest at their country club in the evening. 
A substitute for daylight was provided by ranging a num- 
ber of automobiles around the putting green and concen- 
trating the rays of their powerful lamps on it. The plan 
is said to have been entirely successful. Thus an even fur- 
ther extension of the popularity of the automobile is at 
hand. 

Governmental patronage is being bestowed on the Col- 
umbia car, so that it is in a fair way of becoming known 
as the car of officialdom. It was with this make of car 
that President Roosevelt first broke his rule of ignoring 
the motor vehicle, and now automobiles have been intro- 
duced by the United States Government in the Department 
of Submarine Mines. A Columbia electric truck chassis 
of five-ton hauling capacity has been bought and shipped 
to Fort Totten, New York. There it is to be equipped 
with a big gasoline generator. The new engine and dynamo 
will have nothing to do with the driving of the car, but 
will be a portable plant for furnishing light to the men 
laying mines in the harbor. 

An English car owner, who is almost deaf, has a set of 
mirrors fixed in the canopy of his ear in such a manner 
that all vehicles in his rear, within 60 or 70 yards, are re- 
fleeted in the glass. This increases his own and the public 
safety, and incidentally the panorama of scenery reflected 
in the mirror adds materially to the pleasures of motoring. 

Arthur Curtner, a rancher near Warm Springs, sees in 
the automobile the vehicle of the future, and in order to 
keep abreast with the times has purchased a four-cylinder 
Autocar. 

California wines are different — the Repsold vintages 
are not like others. The drawing of the cork reveals the 
difference. 



Sara Bernhardt bought her a coffin a number of years 
ago, and still has it on hand. Evidently, she does not ex- 
pect it to be put into commission very soon, for she has 
just cabled an order for a Columbia automobile. 

That New York bike cop who pedaled after and caught 
a motor car going forty miles an hour has been outdone by 
an English "bobby" of the foot force, who ran and caught 
a car, which he said was going thirty miles an hour. To 
top it, the "bobby" said he knew it was going that fast 
because he " 'ad to run so 'ard to catch it." 

Walter S. Martin of San Francisco is on an automobile 
trip through Eastern Oregon as far as Ontario. He has 
had many trying experiences, and says that although he 
has motored in many States nowhere has he encountered 
such terrible roads as there are in Eastern Oregon. 

In the early days of temperance reform, when the Brit- 
ish Parliament took up the question under the guise of a 
license act, a distinguished statesman remarked, "You can- 
not make a man sober by act of Parliament." The force 
of this truism is equally pertinent today, whether applied 
to the chauffeurs who persist in driving recklessly through 
the public streets, or to the motorphobes who regard every 
self-propelled machine as an invention of the Evil One. 
The moral defect in the make-up of both cannot be reme- 
died by act of the legislature. True it is that penalties 
may be provided for the first-named, which in time might 
teach them the error of their ways, but for the second leg- 
islation is powerless. The only way to bring them to 
reason is to "Give 'em a ride." 

"Automobile Topics "of New York stated in a recent 
issue: "Automobilists and peddlers are both affected by 
new California laws, which went into effect last month. 
Evidently the Pacific Coast Solons think there is some 
connection between the two classes." 

Harvey H. Dana and family advise the Pope-Toledo 
Touring Car Company that they arrived in Los Angeles 
after having made a perfect trip in their Pope-Toledo. 

F. C. Fenner's White touring car, which Captain Ryus 
of Los Angeles will drive in the Pike's Peak race in Sep- 
tember, arrived recently in the Southern California metrop- 
olis, and has been given several trial spins with most satis- 
factory results. 

M. Fisher and Fernando Nelson and their families made 
a 225-mile run through the Napa Valley last week in their 
new Winton touring car, Mr. Fisher in his model B and Mr. 
Nelson in his model A. Mr. Fisher has for the past four 
Sundays made trips in his ear ranging from 150 to 500 
miles. Both he and Mr. Nelson left yesterday for a run 
to Los Angeles. 



VWWW<i*^>/VWV\* 



ANDREWS, KEENAN & BLASAUF 

MACHINISTS AND ENGINEERS 

81 CITY HAI<L AVENUE Phone South 1089 



Automttblit Repairs. American and Foreign Cars. Agents 
for Oleo, French Spark Plugs. Tires, Batteries, etc., Furnished. 
Springs made. Forgings, Machine Work, etc. 



32 



-THE WASP- 



[July i, 1905. 



A. S. Kerry recently made a highly successful trip 
from Seattle to Portland in his White steamer. He made 
the journey in order to "blaze the trail - ' for a large num- 
ber of Seattle and Tacoma autoists, who expect to make the 
trip later in the season. 

Chas. C. Moore last week purchased from the Pioneer 
Automobile Company a model C Winton touring ear, 
which makes the second Winton purchased by Mr. Moore 
this season, his first machine being a model B. Mr. Moore 
left last Thursday with a party of friends for a tour into 
Santa Cruz county. 

Mr. and Mrs. John Harlein of Los Angeles, with Dr. 
and Mrs. White as guests, are on an automobile trip to 
the Yosemite Valley in Mr. Harlein 's new White steam 
touring car. 

An exchange says that the White Sewing Machine 
Company of Cleveland, Ohio, have 28 acres of land, upon 
which they they will build one of the largest and best- 
equipped automobile plants in the world. . 



Now's Your Chance 



TO VISIT THE 



YELLOWSTONE 
PARK 



The Southern Pacific will now sell round-trip 
excursion tickets to Yellowstone Park. The 
route is via Ogden, thence to Monida, through 
the Park by Concord Coach to Gardiner 
(spending several days among the geysers 
and other wonders), then over the Northern 
Pacific through Spokane and down the Col- 
umbia River to Portland, returning via the 
Shasta Route, or vice versa. 

$65 Round Trip 



Allowing stop-overs within 90-day limit. 
This is the greatest trip of the year. The 
route taken is through the grandest of scen- 
ery, and the best of service is given both by 
rail and stage. Make your plans now, and 
get full information from agents. 



SoutKern Pacific 



San Francisco Office : 
613 Market Street 



Oakland Office : 
12 San Pablo Ave. 




The Great 

WINTON 



«« A" 



40-50 Horsepower 
is here 



IT SIMPLY EATS UP THE HILLS — 
GREATEST MACHINE IN THE WORLD 
FOR THE MONEY— SEE IT. 



Nearly a half hundred Winton 4-cylinder 
machines now running in California — every 
one giving perfect satisfaction. We advise 
you to see any of the Winton owners. Then 
come to us and study the simple mechanics 
of the car— you will then be a Winton man, 
save money and truly enjoy automobiling. 
We have hesides the Winton line the whole 
1905 models of the Oldsmobiles on our stock 
room floor. 



Pioneer Automobile Co. 

905-925 Golden Gate Avenue, San Francisco 
Oakland Agency, Miller Motor Car Co., 134-40 12th St. 



FRANKLIN MOTOR CARS 

(air-cooled) 




Price $1800 
" 1550 
" 2650 
" 3650 

ALL FRANKLIN CARS ARE GUARANTIED FOR ONE YEAR 



12 h. p. 4-Cylinders, 
12 h. p. Runabouts, 
20-24 h. p. Touring Car, 
35-40 h. p. 



F.WORTHINGTON BUTTS 

Phone South 1142 

148 GOLDEN GATE AVE. 



July i, 1905 ] 



-THE WASP- 



33 



WEDDINGS OF THE WEEK. 

Miss Julia Kinsey of Oakland was married to Mr. Don 
Zumwalt of Klamath City, Oregon, al the residence of 
Mi-s Anna « )bermuller, Haywardsj on Wednesday evening, 
• him- 28th, the Rev. J. Kihsey, father ■•I' Hip bride, officiat- 
ing. 

Miss ( arolyn Belle Paine, daughter ot' Dr. and Mrs. D. 
A. l'ainr. til' Kugeno, Oregon, was wedded lo Dr. Frank P. 
Topping of San Francisco, on Wednesday, June 2Sih, at 
Eugene, Oregon. 

Miss Winifred L. Osborne, daughter of Mrs. Anna Mc- 
Laren Osborne, to Mr. Everett J. Brown, both of Oakland, 
at the Madison street residence of the bride's mother, on 
Wednesday evening, June 28th. 

Miss Florence Burpee of Oakland was married to Mr. 
William Morrish of Berkeley on Wednesday evening. June 
2Slh, at the home of the bride's parents, Mr. and Mrs. J. 
F. Burpee, in Oakland, the Rev. E. R. Dille, pastor of the 
First Methodist Church, officiating. 

Miss Jean Duncan, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Samuel 
M. Duncan, was married to Mr. William Knowles on Thurs- 
day, June 29th. 

Miss Mabel Hendy, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Samuel J. 
Hendy, married Mr. Albert Weber this Saturday evening, 
July 1st, at the family residence of the Eendys, 3652 
Clay street. 

Irish- Americans and others don't mind Whitelaw Reid 
hobnobbing with Edward Rex. but they decline to join in 
the "Anglo-Saxon Love Feast." 



Dr. Charles W. Decker, Dentist. 
Phelan Building, 806 Market street. Specialty : 
Gas" for the painless extracting of teeth. 



Engagements 

Miss Nina Munro, niece of Mrs. Harriet Brakenrid-e 
of Berkeley lo Mr. W. L. Reed of Santa Barbara. 

Miss Dorothy Barrel t Bowen, daughter of Mrs. Mar- 
garel Bowen of Alameda to Mr. Robert J. Holmes. 

Miss Georgie Carol] of Sacramento to Mr. Eugene 
Trefethen of Oakland. 

Miss Hilma Jones, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. W. W. 
Jones, to Mr. Harry H. Johnson, both of Berkeley. 

Miss Ella V. McCloskey to Mr. John Jacob Apple of 
the firm of Cunningham, Curtiss & Welch, both of San 
Francisco. 

Miss Helen Scoville, of New York, to Mr. Earle Talbot, 
of San Francisco. 



'Colton 



Weddings 

July 5th — Miss Clarice Lovely of San Francisco to Mr. 
Arthur Aiken of Oakland, at San Francisco. 

July 5th — Miss Jessie Blake to Mr. C. H. Detrick, at 
Swedenborgian Church, San Francisco. 

July 6th — Miss Vida McKean, sister of Mr. Winfred 
McKean, to Dr. Norman Henderson, both of Alameda, at 
Alameda. 

July 9th — Miss Annie Lerner, daughter of Mr. and 
Mrs. I. Lerner, of Alameda, to Mr. David M. Mosessohn, 
Portland, Oregon, in Alameda. 

July 19th — Miss Ella Sterrett, niece of Mrs. George H. 
Wheatou, to Mr. Edwin Barbour, both of Oakland, at" Mrs. 
Wheaton's residence in Oakland. 

August 9th — Miss May Belle Greencbaum, daughter of 
Mr. and Mrs. Sigmund Greenebaum, to Mr. Herbert Fleish- 
hacker, both of San Francisco. 



/5= 



EXCURSIONS TO PORTLAND EXPOSITION 



Every Day 
at 

8:00 a. m. 




$25.00 

Round 

Trip 



MT. SHASTA SEEN FOR ^N BOORS ON THR 



Tickets good for 10 days, returning on any regxilar train 
or return may be made by steamer 



21-day Tickets, $30.00 

Good for 21 days, allowing stop-overs any 
place on return trip by rail, within that limit. 
These tickets may also be exchanged for return 
by steamer. 



Special Tour Tickets, $50.00 

Going via Portland, with stop at Expositiou, 
thence up the Columbia River, through Idaho and 
Salt Lake City, and back to starting point. Stop- 
overs within 60-day limit. 



Ask for full information 



SOUTHERN PACIFIC 



H 



San Francisco Office: 613 Market St. 



Oakland Office: 12 San Pa.bIo Ave. 



34 



-THE WASP- 



[July i, 1905. 



FLORENCE ROBERTS' APPEAL. 

To My Friends and Patrons, the Public and Theatre-goers 

of San Francisco: 

Dear Friends: — In the last few years I have appeared 
before you in many characters and met with much success, 
for which I am indebted to your kindness and encourage- 
ment. Hitherto I have depended upon my own efforts to 
achieve the results, but now I am about to appear before 
you in a new role, in the great drama of life, as a suppliant 
and beggar in the mighty cause of Charity and Justice, 
and must ask you, dear friends, to become members of the 
cast and help the play along. I shall do my part to my 
utmost ability, and if you do yours, of which T have no 
doubt whatever in my heart, we are sure to achieve a suc- 
cess for which we will all be proud and happy. 

I desire to give a benefit performance at the California 
Theater on Friday afternoon, July 14, for Mr. Hobart 
Bosworth, the young gentleman who supported me during 
my engagement last August and September at the Cali- 
fornia Theater, and who has been stricken with the dread 
disease consumption, and incapacitated from performing 
his duties in the great labor of life. Daring all his career 
he lent honor and dignity to his profession and performed 
his duty to society and the world at laree with such integ- 
rity and conscientious effort that, all his fellowmen can 
say "He is a man." Now that relentless Fate has laid 
the cruel hand of sickness upon him, I have proposed this 
benefit, aided by his confreres and co-workers, all of whom 
respect and honor him as an actor and a man. During his 
career of ten years on the stage as a member of the Angus- 
tin Daly Company and as leading man with Henrietta 
Crosman, Julia Marlowe and Mrs. Fiske. Mr. Bosworth 
was ever ready with his own purse and labors to help his 
fellowman, and now that misfortunes have overtaken him 
no one is more entitled to a benefit thati he. 

The program in detail has not yet been completed, but 
I assure you it will be one of the most unique and interest- 
ing entertainments that has ever been given in San Fran- 
cisco, and as soon as it is ready will be announced. In 
the meantime I will be grateful to all friends who desire 
to subscribe in any such sums as they may feel justified 
for seats, which will not be less than $1.50 each, and shall 
be elad to receive checks or monev orders through the 
mail for same, addressed to me, care of the California 
Theater. 

With heartfelt gratitude and sincere regard, 
Respectfully subscribed, 

FLORENCE ROBERTS. 



Lighting Troubles 

Quickly remedied if you will phone 
Exchange S. You should have su- 
perb service, brilliant electric lights, 
23 candle power gas. We have a full 
corps of 

Expert Inspectors 



At your service day or night, 
know if anything is wrong. 



THE 



Let us 



CO. 



415 POST STREET 

Phone Exchange 8 



Moore's Poison Oak Remedy. 
Cures Poison Oak, all skin diseases. Sold by all druggists. 






$15.00 

for the ROUND TRIP to the 

Calaveras Big Trees 



A splendid opportunity to see the country 
made famous by Bret Harte's stories — 

Ta.ble Mo\jnta.in, *■ Jimtown," 
Stanislaus River, Angel's Camp 

the great mining country of Calaveras coun- 
ty, and one of the greatest Big Tree groves. 

Leave Today, 
Arrive 10:30 Next Forenoon 

The route is via Oakdale, Jamestown, An- 
gels and Murphy's. Only 22 miles stage ride. 
Interesting scenery all the way. The Mam- 
moth Grove contains trees nearly 100 feet in 
circumference, and is one of the finest of the 
groves. Fine hotel and many fishing streams. 

Southern Pacific 



San Francisco Office : 
613 Market Street 



Oakland Office : 
12 San Pablo Ave. 



RAMp||$ C 



Just What You Need 



to make your camping trip 
pleasant and enjoyable i« to 
be found in our Summer Camp on 
third floor of store. Twenty-five 
departments have made it the 
most complete camp outfitting 
headquarters in town. We guar- 
antee everything and save you 
money. Ask for 1905 Camping 
Suggestions. Free delivery to 
suburban towns. Freight paid 
to your nearest station. 

SMITHS' CASH STORE, Inc. 
25 Market St., San Francisco 

Phone Exchange 560 



July i, 1905.] 



THE WASP- 



35 



Family Exercise. 

The hotel has a weekly hop 
Where Ma and Sis abide, 

While Pa is weekly on the jump 
The money to provide. 

"C* "O- -c> 
FROM THE EDITOR. 



He Forgot That He Had a Stomach. 

Talking of food, there is probably 
no professional man subjected to a 
greater, more wearing mental strain 
than the responsible editor of a mod- 
ern newspaper. 

To keep his mental faculties con- 
stantly in good working order, the 
editor must keep his physical powers 
up to the highest rate of efficiency. 
Nothing will so quickly upset the 
whole system as badly selected food 
and a disordered stomach. It there- 
fore follows that he should have right 
food, which can be readily assimil- 
ated, and which furnishes true brain 
nourishment. 

"My personal experience in the 
use of Grape-Nuts and Postum Food 
Coffee," writes a Philadelphia editor, 
"so exactly agrees with your adver- 
tised claim as to their merits that 
any further exposition in that direc- 
tion would seem to be superfluous. 
They have benefited me so much, 
however, during the five years that I 
have used them, that I do not feel 
justified in withholding my testi- 
mony. 

"General 'high living' with all 
that the expression implies as to a 
generous table, brought about in- 
digestion, in my ease, with restless- 
ness at night and lassitude in the 
morning, accompanied by various 
pains and distressing sensations dur- 
ing working hours. The doctor diag- 
nosed the condition as 'catarrh of the 
stomach,' and prescribed various 
medicines, which did me no good. I 
finally 'threw Dhysie to the dogs,' 
gave up tea and coffee and heavy 
meat dishes, and adopted Grape-Nuts 
and Postum Food Coffee as the chief 
articles of my diet. 

"I can conscientiously say, and 1 
wish to say it with all the emphasis 
possible to the English language, that 
they have benefited me as medicines 
never did, and more than any other 
food that ever came on my table. My 
experience is that the Grape-Nuts 
food has steadied and strengthened 
both brains and nerves to a most pos- 
itive degree. How it does it, I can- 
not say, but I know that after break- 
fasting on Grape-Nuts food one 
actually forgets he has a stomach, let 
alone 'stomach trouble.' It is, in my 
opinion, the most beneficial as well 
as the most economical food on the 
mai-ket, and has absolutely no rival." 
Name given by Postum Co., Battle 
Creek, Mich. 

There's a reason. 



Rojestvensky the Pessimist. 
The defeated Russian commander,, 
Admiral Rojestvensky, was considered 
one of the most pessimistic men in the 
navy. He could never see the bright 
side of anything, and, judging by some 
of his remarks before setting sail for 
the East, he seemed to have fully an- 
ticipated the crushing defeat which 
overtook him and his fleet. A striking 
illustration of his morbid disposition 
was afforded by the verse he wrote in 
a young English lady's album a few 
years ago at her request. He select- 
ed the well-known little French poem, 
"La vie est breve," as the basis for 
his poetical efforts, the result of which 
was hardly likely to inspire the fair 
owner of the album with an overween- 
ing love of this world and its good 
things, for this is what she discovered 
when her treasured volume was re- 
turned to her: 

La vie est bete, 

Un peu de fete, 

Un peu d 'ennui, 

Et puis, bonne nuit. 

(Life is stupid, a little gaiety, a little 
weariness, and then good-night.) Ad- 
miral Rojestvensky has one daughter, 
a fair young girl of twenty, who looks 
far more English than Russian. She 
was married to a Russian naval engi- 
neer before the outbreak of the war, 
and followed him to the East in the 
capacity of a sister of charity. The 
work of nursing the sick and wounded 
proved too much for her, and she re- 
turned to St. Petersburg with the in- 
tention of accompanying her illustri- 
ous father to the East on board the 
hospital ship Orel. The Admiral, how- 
ever, regretted his temerity in consent- 
ing to allow her to sail with the Baltic 
Fleet, and when they put in at Vigo 
he sent her home overland. Mme. Ro- 
jestvensky is a stout, handsome lady, 
considerably older than her husband. 
She goes very little into society, and, 
indeed, is so rarely seen abroad that 
many Russians imagined that the Ad- 
miral was a bachelor, and the Novoie 
Vremya, commenting on his departure, 
stated that he was the only admiral 
that had taken over the command of 
the fleet that was not married. 

-O- *^- "\^- 

Nat Expresses Himself. 

The daily press for the last year 
has been springing stories on the mar- 
ital affairs of Nat Goodwin. After 
twelve months or more of sensational 
rumor that he and Maxine Elliott are 
about to separate, all of which has 
been not only positively denied, but 
disproven by both parties satisfactor- 
ily and consistently, the journals are 
now taking up the cry that Nat starts 
the thing himself. Ridiculously, he is 
made to appear in the light of being 
anxious not to have his matrimonial 
happiness overlooked. The reverse is 
the ease, for Nat has been pestered by 
the newspaper men. The Admirable 



Ashton is the last conspicuous one 'L 
these. He, too, appeal's to be putting 
it on Nat. 

Xow the right dope is given by Nat 
himself. "I do not know how this 
story could possibly have gotten start- 
ed," said the comedian, "but it ap- 
pears very silly. My wife and I are 
on the best possible terms; but thev 
try to make capital out of our being 
separated; but our business relations 
are also intimate, for I frequently se- 
lect the members of my wife's com- 
pany. What could be more convinc- 
ing than a private letter received in 
today's mail? Look at this, will you?'' 
Here Nat drew out a letter of the lat- 
est possible postmark. It was from 
Maxine, written in London. It was 
also long, and the very limit for terms 
of affection. There could be no sus- 
picion of the burnt-out fires of love 
there. It was "the real," as Willie 
Collier says. Sprinkled with dears and 
pets, it was fond solicitude and ardent 
interest personified. The most pictur- 
esque bit of expression was where she 
called Nat "dear little red head." 
Original Maxine! 

^ <^ ^S* 

Mrs. Jiggson: "The bull pup does 
not like mother; he growls at her." 

Jiggson: "Then I'll have the coach- 
man shoot him. I can't bear to see 
dumb animals suffer." 



Telephone Black 5713 

J. F. ROSSI 

Foreign and Domestic 

- Wines, Liquors and Cigars 

Depot of Italian Swiss Colony Wines 
and Celebrated Belmont Whiskey 



205 Washington Street 

Between Front and Davis San Francisco 

Valuable Franchise 

The right to publish the Associated 
Press despatches is the most valuable 
franchise a daily paper can acquire. 
The 

OAKLAND TRIBUNE 

holds the exclusive franchise for the 
publication of these despatches in 
Oakland and Alameda county. Send 
for a sample copy of the TRIBUNE. 



To Cure All Skin Disease!, Use 

DR. T. FELIX GOURAUD'S ORIENTAL 

CREAM, OR MAGICAL BEAUTIFIES? 

It Purine* and Beautifies the Skin. 
FOR SALE BY DRUGGISTS. 



WEAK MEN AND WOMEN 

Should use DAMIANA BITTERS, the Great 
Mexican Remedy; gtveB Health and Strength 
to the Sexual Organs. Naber, Alfa & Brune, 
Agents, 323 Market St. Send for circular. 



36 



-THE WASP^ 



[July 



1905 



Jack London as a Musician. 

Au Eastern newsaper says that Jaok 
London, on his last visit to New York, 
was introduced in a cafe to a musician. 

"I, too, am a musician in a small 
way." London said. "My musical tal- 
ent was once the means of saving my 
life." 

"How was that?" the musician 
asked. 

' ' There was a great flood in our town 
in our boyhood," replied London. 
"When the water struck our house 
my father got on a bed and floated with 
the stream until he was rescued." 

"And you?" said the musician. 

""Well," said London, "I accompan- 
ied him on the piano." 
*C> <a>- *C»- 
Threw Him Over. 

Gertrude: "What are you giving 
Hortense for a wedding present?" 

Babette: "Why, er — I'm giving her 
the groom." 

o o -o> 

IN COLONEL'S TOWN. 



Things Happen. 

From the home of the famous 
"Keyhnel Keeyartah of Carters- 
ville," away down South, comes an 
enthusiastic letter about Postum. 

"I was in very delicate health, 
suffering form indigeston and a ner- 
vous trouble so severe that I could 
hardly sleep. The doctor ordered me 
to discontinue the use of the old kind 
of coffee, which was like poison to 
me, producing such extreme disturb- 
ance that I could not control myself. 
But such was my love for it that I 
could not get my own consent to give 
it up for some time, and continued 
to suffer till my father one day 
brought home a package of Postum 
Food' Coffee. 

"I had the new food drink care- 
fullv prepared according to direc- 
tion's, and gave it a fair trial. It 
proved to have a rich flavor and made 
a healthy, wholesome and delightful 
drink. To my taste the addition of 
cream greatly improves it. 

"My health began to improve as 
soon as the drag effect of the old cof- 
fee was removed and the Postum 
Coffee had time to make its influence 
felt. My nervous troubles were 
speedily relieved and the sleep which 
the old coffee drove from my pillow 
always .came to soothe and strength- 
en me after I had drunk Postum— 
in a very short time I began to sleep 
better than I had for years before. 
I have now used Postum Coffee for 
several years and like it better and 
find it inore beneficial than when I 
first began. It is an unspeakable joy 
to be relieved of the old distress and 
sickness." Name given by Postum 
Company. Battle Creek, Mich. 

There's a reason. 

Read the little book. "The Road 
to Wellville," in each pkg. 



rLTLJiJTXLruTJTrirLrLJTXLruTXLJTruTri^^ 

I THE THEATRES | 

0V!J/TJiTiJiJiJxrirLrLruTJTXLrLrLruiJ^\JTJirLrrj 
The Chutes. 

Diversified and excellent entertain- 
ment is promised at the Chutes this 
coming week. Chiquita, the "living 
doll," will continue her pretty per- 
formance, and William Tomkins, the 
topical talker, will discuss the sense 
of nonsense. Charles and Edna Harris 
the refined character sketch artists, 
have an absolute novelty to offer, and 
Leon and Bertie Allen, vocalists of 
renown, will make their first appear- 
ance here. The MeConnell sisters will 
change their songs and dances, and 
Fields and Hanson, the black-face mu- 
sical comedians, will reappear. The 
Animatoseope will show the latest 
amusing and serious moving pictures, 
and the amateurs will appear on Thurs- 
day night. On Tuesday evening there 
will be a magnificent display of fire- 
works in honor of Independence Day. 
Babies in the life-saving incubators 
are again on exhibition at the Chutes, 
and Annie Redline, the plump lady, 
who touches the scale at nearly 600 
pounds, is a great atraction. 

"<C-K *S> *5> 

Impossible. 

Doctor: "Don't spend any more 
money on medicines! The Quickest 
way for you to get fat is to have a 
contented mind." 

The Patient: "That may all be, but 
medicines are cheaper. I couldn't get 
a contented mind for less than a mill- 
ion dollars, and I haven't got the 
price!" 

*^> -o <^ 

Bret Harte was so frequently com- 
plimented on being the author of 
"Little Breeches" that he was al- 
most sorry he ever wrote it, as is Secre- 
tary John Hay, who would prefer bis 
fame to rest on more ambitious work. 
A gushing lady who prided herself 
upon her literary tastes said to him 
once: 

"Mr. Harte, I am so delighted to 
meet you. I have read everything 
you ever wrote, but of all your dia- 
lect verse there is none that compares 
to your 'Little Breeches.' " 

"I quite agree with you, madam," 
said Mr. Harte, "but you have put 
the little breeches on the wrong 
man." 

^> <^ ^s. 

As Usual. 
He: "Yes, Dora trusts me. I am 
sure of it, because she admitted her 
aae to me." 
"She: "Wasn't that clever of her?" 
He: "How do you mean?" 
She: "Why, er — clever to make you 
believe it." 

<2^ 'O -C^ 

Ella: "Death is sad." 
Stella: "Yes; it is the divorce which 
pays no alimony." 



(RAMPS 

^^> ^^a» Colic, and 
^S»es»*^ troubles ii 



lieved with 



Colic, and all stomach 
troubles instantly re- 



"Painkitter 

[PERRY DAVIS'] 

This famous remedy never fails to 
cure pain, both external and in- 
ternal. 




DR. G. S. MOORE'S 

SCIENTIFIC HAIR RESTORER 

A positive cute for all 
scalp diseases. Will posi- 
tively make the haii grow. 
We chall-nge the world to 
equal this remedy. 

Send for- free catalogue. 

382 O'Farrell Street 

SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 




DR. H J. STEWART 

Teacher of . . 
* Vocal and Instrumental Music 

Studio. 1105 BUSH ST. 

<®®®®®®o®®®®®« 



All the Year 
Round Tours 
Travel by Sea 

Excellent Service, Low Rates Including 
Berth and Meal. 

Steamers leave Piers 9 and 11, San Francisco, for 

Los Angeles San Diego Santa Cruz 

Santa Barbara Monterey 

Eureka Seattle Tacoma 

Victoria, Vancouver, etc. 

And to those desiring longer trips to Alaska 
and Mexico. 

For Information regarding sailing dates, 
etc., obtain folder. 

San Francisco Ticket Offices: 

4 New Montgomery St. f Palace Hotel) 
10 Market St. and Broadway Wharves 

O. D. DUNANN. Qon. Passenger Agent. 
10 Market St. San Francisco. 

OCCIDENTAL & ORIENTAL 

STEAMSHIP COMPANY 

FOR 

JAPAN AND CHINA 

Steamers will leare wharf, corner of First 
and Bran nan streets, at 1 p. m., for Hono- 
lulu, YOKOHAMA, Kobe, Nagasaki, Shang- 
hai and HONGKONG, aa follows: 

DORIC Saturday, July 1 

COPTIC, calling at Manila, Wednesday August 2 
DORIC, " " Wednesday, Sept. 20 

No cargo received on board on day of tail- 
ing. 

Round Trip Tickets at Reduced Rates. 

For freight or passage apply at company's 
The Merchant's Exchange, 7th Floor. San 
Francisco. 

D. D. 8TUBBS. General Manager. 




1000 MARKIt 
«nd I tooy sr. 
Plient Svui/, ~ 



STOCKTON ST 
Ctai*,, 1608 

San Francisco 



Brushes 



FOR BARBERS. BAKERS, 
Billiard Tables. Brewers, 
- Boot-blacks, Bath-bouses 
fYouV rim""- g an " 1 J-°""'««. Canners, Dyers 
Flour-mills, Foundries, Laundries Pa D er- 

bIT L";„ H tt" er8 ' , Paln <? re ' iSoe e6 FactorTes. 
Sboe Men, Tin-roofers, Tanners, Tailors etc 

BUCHANAN BROTHERS, 

SaUSB MAHDTACTDRKSR, 

«09-«ll Sacramento St., ..- ..San Francisco 
Telephone, Main 6610. 



BAJA CALIFORNIA 

Dam i ana Bitters 

Is a Restorative. Invlgorator and Nervine. A 
powerful aphrodisiac and special tonic for the 
fcexual and Urinary Organs of both sexes nnd 
a great remedy for diseases of the Kidneys 
and Bladder, and has been used by the In- 
habitants of Lower California for the past 30 
years for the above complaints. It is ac- 
knowledged by leading physicians and chem- 
ists to be the greatest Invlgorator of the sys- 
tem In the world. NABER, ALFS 4 BRUNE 
Agts., 323 Market St. S. F. Send for circular. 

^J^ITCHELL'S;' 

R V .ulTd , i"r n ? n Wines and Liquors 

PAnlLY TRADE A SPECIALTY 

No. i Taylor St. and l Golden Gate Are. 

J. L. HER6ET, Proprietor 

GOLDEN WEST 

Clothing Renovatory 

121 MONTGOMERY STREET 
Phone, Main 1157. 

Suits Cleaned and Pressed 21 00 

Monthly Contracts 150 






ST. LAWRENCE 

Livery and Sales Stables 

423 Post St., bet. Powell 
and Mason 
San Francisco, Cal. 
Telephone Main IK!. 



«Er? 



W.E.BRIDGE.Prop'r 



Removed 

PATRICK & CO. »•»««««■• 

111-113 Sansome Street 

Or* block south of old location. 



LKOAI* 



• TICE 
SAW I ik MIIN 

Virgin: 1 t, Storey County, 

Nevada* 

Notlt - that at a inert | 

IB 
June. 1 to. al 

cents in 

■ayabfe tmmci 
In Uiin 

I Nevada 

Block, No. 309 Moutgotnci y direct, San Francisco, 
California. 

Any slock U] at shall 

remain unpaid on tli i ith dav of July, 1905, 
will be delinquent ami udvertised tor 

F auction, and unl< s.s payment is made be- 

ore, will be BSDAY, the 1 

of August, [90s, i" pay the delinquent 
assessment, together v.- ith costs of advertising 
and expei 1 

By order of the Board of Directors. 

John W. TWIGGS, Secretary. 
Office— Room 32 Nevada Block. No. 300 Mont- 
gomery Street, .. California 



ASSESSMENT NOT [CE —MEXICAN COLD 

and Silver Mining 1 |>any. location of 

principal place of business, Sap Francisco, Cal. 
or Works, Ston j County Nevada 

Notice la bi that at a meeting <>i 

the Board of 1 h day "I 

June, 1905, an Assessment (No. 82) "of fifteen 
cents per share was levied upon the capita I stork 
of the corporation, payable Immediately In 
United States gold coin, to the Secretary, at the 
office of the Company. Room No. 79, Nevada 
Block, No 309 Montgomery Street, San Fran- 
cisco, Cal. 

Any stock upon which this assessment shall 
remain unpaid on the roth day of July, 1905, 
will be delinquent and advertised for sale at 
public auction, and unless payment is made 
before, will be sold on MONDAY, the 31st day 
of July. 1905, to pav the delinquent assess- 
ment, together with costs of advertisiug and 
expenses of sale. 

By order of the Board of Directors. 

CHAS. D or,NEY, Secretary. 

Office — Room No. 79, Nevada Block, No. 309 
Montgomery Street, San Francisco, Cal. 

NOTICE TO CREDITORS. 

ESTATE OF SPYROS DONSSONNIS, DE- 
CEASED. 

Dept. 10. No. 32368. 

Notice is hereby given by the undersigned, 
M.J. Hynes, Public Administrator of the City 
and County of San Francisco, and Administra- 
tor of the Estate of Spy ros Donssonnis, deceased, 
to the creditors of, andall persons having claims 
against the said deceased, to exhibit them with 
the necessary vouchers, within four (4) months 
after the first publication of this notice, to the 
said Administrator, at room 568, Parrott Build- 
ing, Nos. 825 to 855 Market street, the same 
being his place for the transaction of the busi- 
ness of the said estate in the City and County 
of San Francisco, State of California. 

M. T. HYNES. 

Administrator of the estate of Spyros Dons- 
sonnis, deceased. 

Dated at San Francisco, June loth, 1905, 

CCIvUNAN & HICKEY, Attorneys fo- Ad- 
ministrator, rooms 567. s68 and 569, Parrott 
Building, San Francisco, Cal. 



BUY 



A Wasp Advertising Con- 
tract for six months or a 
year, and get your 

DIVIDENDS 



PACIFIC SAW 

Manufacturing Co. 

-JI-I23 BBALK STHEBT 

San Francisco 

aws and Machine 

'-. tilvea of every desenp- 
uii on hand or made to 
order. Saw repairing 
nnd Knife Grinding. 




HOTELS AND BBSTAUBAXTS. 

TJBROEZ'S RESTAURANT— ROOM': 
•* J ladies and families. Private onti 

Academy Building, 302-364 Pine St.. 

Montgomery. JOHN BERGEZ. 1 

pAULS OCCIDENTAL RESTAUKA 
£ Banquet and Private Rooms. Lunch 

dinner 75c., Including wine. 337 BuBb St.; 
telephone, 487. 

pOODLE DOO RESTAURANT, CORNER 
± Eddy and Mubod Sts., San Francisco. 
Private dining and banquet rooms. Telephone 
429. A. B. BLANCO & B. BRUN, Props. 

/-)LD POODLE DOQ RESTAURANT.— 445 
V-* Bush St., cor. Grant Av., San Francisco. 
Lunch 50c, dinner 75c. Also a la carte. Pri- 
vate rooms for parties and banquets. Pierre 
Carrere. J. B. Pon, C. Lalanne. Tel. Main 57H5 

T"\0 YOU LIKE FINE GAME OR FtSH, 
iJ cooked In the highest style of the cull- 
nary art? Try the FASHION RESTAURANT. 
504 Market St. Just renovated. Cosy family 
dining-room added. Prices reasonable. Ser- 
vice polite and prompt. Dinners a la carte, 
French or Italian style. 

LOUIS BESSOZI, Proprietor. 

LUNCH PARLORS. 

f> GALL, Successor to Volz & Gall. The 
VJr * leading Bakery, Coffee and Lunch House 
28 Fourth St.. Pioneer Building. 



8. F. BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 

BOILER-MAKERS. 

PF. DUNDON'S SAN FRANCISCO IRON 
• WORKS. 314. 316, & 318 Main St. Iron 
work of every description designed and con- 
structed on the most reasonable terms. 

BREWERIES. 

MILWAUKEE BREWERY OF SAN FRAN- 
1VA Cisco. F. Lurmann, Pres. ; W. Garms, 
V. P. Tel. Jessie 801. 440-446 Tenth St. 



FIRST SHIPMENT RECEIVED 

OF THE NEW 

L. C. SMITH &. BROS. 

TYPEWRITER 

(WR ITING-IN-SIG HTl 




L. & M. ALEXANDER & CO. 

Exclusive Dealers Entire' Coast 

110 Montgomery St., San Francisco 

TCL. MAIN 033 



JOHN J. DEANE 

NOTARY PUBLIC 

ROOM 102 CHRONICLE BUILDING 

SPECIAL CARE IN TAKING DEPOSITIONS 
Office Telephone, "Chronicle" 
Residence Telephone, Baker 951. 



Iff 



YOU WISH TO ADVERTISE 

IN NEWSPAPERS 

ANYWHERE AT ANYTIME 
Call on or Write 

! E.C. DIKE'S ADYMTISOG AGESCY' ! 

124 SaaBome Street 

SAM FBANC18CO, calif. 



-THE WASP- 



THE 

PALACE 

HOTEL 



The popular recitals of classical music given 
twice daily in the Palace Hotel Court are draw- 
ing forth much appreciative comment. If you 
have not heard them you have missed a treat. 



*** * ****** 



~ 



i TESLA BRIQUETTES 

The only good ones 
BETTER THAN EVER. 



H 0T 



ANDY 



TESLA COAL CO. 

I0th & Channel Sts. 
Phone South 95 



MURPHY, GRANT & CO. 

Importers of Staple and Fancy Dry 
goods. Manufacturers of Furnishing 
Goods, Patentees and Sole Manufac- 
turers of 

THE NEVER RIP OVERALL 

Best In the world. Gloves, Suspenders, 
Laces, Ribbons, Dress Goods, Velvets, 
Silks, Flannels, Oil Cloths, Cottons, 
Linens, etc; Blankets, Calicoes, Um- 
brellas. Cutlery, Siiawls, Notions, 
Smokers' Articles, Stationery, Under- 
wear, Hosiery, White Goods. 

CORNER SANSOME AND BUSH STREETS 
San Francisco, Cal. 



Edison Gold 

Moulded Records 

Reduced 35C B,ch 

PETER BACIGALUPI 

Edison Phonograph Agency 

786 Mission St. Sen Francisco 

Open Saturday Evenings. 



He Defined It for Choate. 

Kufus Choate was cross-examining 
a «iiuess about his idea of absent- 
mindedness, and had asked him to give 
bis best illustration of it. 

"Well," said the witness, who was 
.i typical New England Yankee, "I 
should say that a man who thought 
he'd lefl liis Hatch to hum, and took 
il mil 'n his pocket to see if he'd time 
to go bum and gel il was a little ab- 
senl minded." 

-^ <2- -c> 

"I waul l.i complain of the flour 

you sen! me ll ther day," said Mrs. 

Newliwed, severely. 

"What was the matter with it, 
ma'am.'" asked the grocer. 

"It was tough. My husband simply 
wouldn't eat the biscuits I made with 
it." 

-C> ^> <^> 

"Planning youi next summer trip?" 
"Gracious, noi I haven't recovered 
from (he last yet!" 



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I 



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SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 



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SAN FRANCISCO, JULY S, 1905. 



Price 10 cents 



PUBLISHERS' NOTICE 

THE WASP Is published every Saturday by The Wasp Publishing 
Company, at 606 Mission Street. Subscriptions $5 per year, payable In 
trance, postage prepaid. Subscriptions to all foreign countries 
within the Postal Union $6 per year. 

The trade on the Pacific Coaat supplied by the San Francisco 
News Company, Eastern Agents supplied by tbe American News 
Company, New YnrU. 

THE WASP will pay for contributions suitable to its columns, and 
will endeavor to return all rejected manuscripts, but does not guar- 
antee their return. 

Photographs will also be accepted and paid for. 

Address all communications to Wasp Publishing Company, 506 
Mission Street, San Francisco, Cal. 
Telephone Main 1643. 



TO ADVERTISERS.— As the Illustrated pages of THE WASP go to 
press early, ail advertisements printed in the Bame forms should 
be received not later than Monday at noon. Changes of adver- 
tisements should also be sent In on Monday to Insure publication. 



PLAIN ENGLISH 



STRAIGHT TALKS ON TIMELY TOPICS 




HE conviction of Senator John H. Mitchell of 
Oregon for complicity in land frauds is one of 
the most remarkable events in the history of 
the Pacific Coast. A few years ago it would 
not have been possible to convict such an in- 
fluential and wealthy man while wearing the 
toga of United States Senator. Our Federal 
Government is growing stronger and cleaner, and one rea- 
son is that the Federal judges are not politicians. They are 
not compelled to go before the people for election, and are 
therefore independent of political bosses. If we followed 
the same plan with regard to our State and county judges, 
we would soon find the government of our cities and States 
vastly improved. As it is, our State and county judges 
are elected, and the result is that our municipal govern- 
ments grow worse steadily. They will continue to do so 
until we reform our judicial system and appoint judges for 
life. 

Senator Mitchell's Crime. 
The specific offense charged against Mitchell was that 
he accepted fees for his services before a Federal depart- 
ment while holding a public office. Under the Federal 
statutes it is a crime. The Government has proceeded on 



the theory that Mili-hell is one of the powerful ring of land- 
grabbers who have been operating on the Pacific Coast. He 
has undoubtedly used his Senatorial influence to aid those 
pirates, but how far he has himself profited thereby can 
only be conjectured. Prosecuting him, therefore, on the 
charge on which he was convicted is like charging the de- 
faulting bank cashier with the specific crime of stealing 
$10, though it might have been morally certain that he 
stole $100,000. The law says, however, that in criminal 
procedure vague suspicions do not count. Actual facts 
must be charged, and known facts about Mitchell are that 
his law firm took money for furthering the schemes of no- 
torious land-grabbers. The jury found that he had cogni- 
zance of the receipt of the money and had misused his sen- 
atorial office and violated the Federal statutes for filthy 
lucre. That is the ease in a nutshell. 

Good for the Community. 
Mitchell's conviction sets a new mark in the uplifting 
and strengthening of our Federal Government. One of our 
greatest national dangers has been the immunity which 
powerful rascals, with a pull at Washington, have enjoyed. 
They were above the laws, and did almost as they pleased. 
Their vicious example affected all classes of office-holders 
and degraded public opinion. Rascality among those in 
low places could not be condemned or punished very vig- 
orously while those in the highest proceeded in open defi- 
ance of law and decency. 

A Boss Above the Law. 
Abe Ruef, the political boss, and de facto Mayor of 
San Francisco, does every day in the year what the Federal 
statutes declare to be aerainst public morals and punishable. 
He takes fees for using his influence on the city govern- 
ment. He does this as a lawyer, claiming that it is his 
professional privilege, and the Bar Association and the 
courts seem powerless to prevent the improper traffic. How 
long could such a state of affairs be continued under a 
proper judicial system? Either the subservient city offi- 
cials who aid the boss to collect fees would be brought 
to bar, or the lawyer-politician would be thrown over it. 

Mitchell's Checkered Career. 
Senator Mitchell 's record is not such as to cause great 
surprise that he has been convicted of improper conduct. 
The Wasp reviewed his history when he was protesting so 
loudly some time ago that it was an outrage to arraign 
him. To begin with, his family name is not Mitchell. It 
is always a suspicious sign when a man moving from the 
place of his birth assumes a new name. Senator Mitchell 
left a wife behind him in the Eastern State from which he 
emigrated. She publicly charged that he eloped with an- 
other woman. It is an established fact that he married a 
second wife in Oregon before he had obtained a divorce 
from the first. When Mitchell aspired tc high public office 






38 



-THE WASP 



I July 8, 1905. 



the calcium light was turned very thoroughly on his shady 
past by the Alta California, which at the time was the 
most influential Republican daily newspaper in San Fran- 
cisco. He was written up in much the same strain as 
bigamist Collins is at present. The files of the old newspa- 
per can be found in several San Francisco libraries. 

Mitchell Professed Repentance. 

When thus assailed, Mitchell fell back on the plea 
that youthful errors should be condoned when a man proves 
his repentance by living an upright life for years. Every 
fair-minded man concedes that fact without question, but 
there were several weak points in Mitchell's plea. He as- 
serted that he had changed his name and had come to the 
Far West to find complete obscurity and surcease from the 
pain of domestic infelicity. It was shown very clearly, 
however, that instead of hiding his light under a bushel he 
was diligent in advertising himself and zealous in gaining 
political prominence in Oregon. The deserted wife in the 
East had to resort to drastic legal measures to obtain 
money from him, though he was prospering. 

The Leopard Does Not Change His Spots. 

New frontier communities are not punctilious about 
such moral laches, however, and Mitchell, by the force of 
his talents, succeeded in forging ahead until he became 
United States Senator and one of the wealthiest citizens 
of Oregon. His daughter married a French nobleman, the 
Due de la Rochefoucauld. Now, in the closing years of his 
life this Senator with a checkered past and an assumed 
name is convicted in a Federal court of the crime of taking- 
tainted money as fees from Jsnd-grabbers who sought his 
influence in their felonious schemes. When we compare 
this chapter of Senator Mitchell's life story with those 
which deal with his flight from his Eastern home and his 
assumption of a new name and a new wife in Portland, the 
truth of the old proverb becomes more than ■ever apparent, 
that the Ethiopian cannot change his skin nor the leopard 
his spots. 

Roosevelt vs. Crooked Politicians. 

There have been more crooked politicians punished in 
President Roosevelt's term than in that of any of his 
magisterial predecessors. This is an encouraging sign. It 
indicates that the Republic has inherent strength. It 
needs strength and virtue to keep it together. When weak- 
ness and venality become the dominant characteristics of 
a government of the people it is doomed. Then follow 
revolution and civil war. 

The Privileges Accorded Employers. 

The exact truth about the printers' strike, which is now 
in progress, is that the employers did not find the eight- 
hour work-day profitable and resolved to return to the 
nine-hour system. No attempt was made to reduce the 
scale of wages, although San Francisco pays the highest 
in the country. The printers were merely asked to work 
fifty-four hours a week instead of forty-eight. This the 
men refused to do. They did not attempt to discuss the 
question of whether the employers were making or losing 
money. That phase of the matter did not seem to concern 
them in the least. Their whole argument was that the em- 
ployers, having once agreed to the eight-hour day, had no 
right to ever again ask for a longer work-day. In fact, to 
listen to their discussions on the subject, one would im- 
agine that the employers were committing a crime against 
humanity by suggesting a change. Union printers them- 
selves are constantly asking for changes in agreements 
they have made with employers. If they find that the 
agreements are not as satisfactory as they expected, they 
very quickly ask for a revision, but, according to their 
code of ethics what is sauce for the goose is not sauce for 
the gander. The employer has only the privilege of 
doing what is asked of him, and if he loses money thereby 
he must be satisfied to keep on losing it. Under the cir- 
cumstances, can his demand for new and more favorable 
conditions be conceded? The most that can be allowed 



him is the privilege of growling, and he should esteem 
himself lucky that he is not estopped even from that. 

What Happened in Australia. 

Such has been the experience of Australia, where the 
unions obtained complete control. They regulated the 
work-day by State legislation, and took the control of busi- 
ness almost entirely from the employers. All that was 
left to the latter was to pay the bills and stand the losses. 
Today Australia is ruined. Thousands of idle workmen 
roam the streets, homeless and hungry, and all who can are 
departing from the wretched country. The fact has been 
demonstrated that you can lead a horse to the water, but 
you cannot make him drink. Unions can pass laws compel- 
ling the employer to concede them everything they ask, but 
they cannot keep him in business one- second after he gets 
ready to quit. That is what great numbers of Australian 
employers have done. They have shut up their shops and 
closed their factories, and many of those who still remain 
in business have discharged their hands and are doing their 
own work. 

The Employers' Work-day. 

With regard to an eight-hour work-day, it may be re- 
marked that there is not one employer in ten who can get 
through his labors in that time. The employer who works 
twelve hours a day is far more common than the one who 
finds eight hours sufficient. Manv employers work over 
twelve hours a day, and at the end of the month find that 
their poorest paid employe has been better recompensed. 

Theory vs. Practice. 

Theoretically, it is a very beautiful thing to have every- 
body work only a few hours a day and devote the remain- 
der of the time to amusement and intellectual improve- 
ment. The plan does not work in practice, however. Ex- 
perience has shown that the nation which works short 
hours and dawdles over its daily toil goes to the wall indus- 
trially. The plan has failed in England, where the unions 
undertook to specify just how much work a man should 
do without hurrying. The result is that Germany has tak- 
en a large share of England's trade, and America has cut 
into her field. Just, as surely as men work short hours and 
fail in diligence their pay will be reduced. American work- 
men have in the past been paid much higher wages than 
Europeans, for, the American has produced more in a given 
time. Our country has gone ahead industrially by reason 
of the capacity of the American mechanic to distance his 
easy-going European competitor. If we drop to the Euro- 
pean level of production per capita the wages per capita 
will not be long in coming down also to the European level. 
The laborer is worthy of his hire ; but rest assured, he will 
not continue to get more than he earns, no matter to what 
country he may belong. He will not receive nine hours' 




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HIGH GRADE CLOTHIERS 

This Ready Made Clothes Progression has had 
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of being the "Parent" of this advanced Art. Our 
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You a Smart Dresser? 




_ _ JJErTT 

TZ7fus-/ofrrff/ocJk. 



[July s. 1905. 



THE WASP- 



39 



pay for six hours' work very long, for the simple reason 
that the employer could not afford to pay it if he tried. 
We may talk as we please about the great superiority of 
the American workman over '"the pauper labor of Eu- 
rope"; that sounds well in Fourth of July orations, when 
the eagle screams and the fireworks rattle, but the real 
superiority consists in his willingness to hustle. When he 
compresses two ordinary Europeans' work into one day he 
is undoubtedly very much superior, ninl is sure of high 
wages; but if his productive capacity shrinks to that of 
the European his superiority disappears and his wages will 
diminish. Wages are regulated by productive capacity. 
They may be kept up fur awhile by the operations of a 
labor trust, by high protective tariffs and other artificial 
methods of juggling, but in the end these laws will prove 
all-powerful. The wages of the American workman will 
drop to the European level when the American becomes as 
slow and lazy as his transatlantic brother. If the unions 
preached tireless industry instead of organized ease to 
their members, they would be doing them and the country 
at large a valuable service. 

Americus . 



A LETTER TO AN EDITOR 



Herbert George Speaks Frankly of the Citizens Alliance and Its 
Purposes 

The appended letter from Mr. Herbert George of the 
Citizens' Alliance to Mr. Fremont Older, the editor of the 
Bulletin, will be read with interest by everybody. When 
the Bulletin was subjected to a newsboys' boycott through 
the kind efforts of Mayor Schmitz and Abe Ruef the afflict- 
ed editor turned for aid and comfort to the Citizens' Alli- 
ance. The police looked on idly while ihe Bulletin's car- 
riers were being beaten and its patrons insulted and terror- 
ized. In such moments one realizes how close we are to 
a state of anarchy, and how necessary it is for the employ- 
ers of our city to have some defensive association to give 
them the protection which the laws of our land do not 
afford as long as the public offices are filled by corrupt 
politicians who look to demagogues for advice and appro- 
bation. In his letter to the much-aggrieved editor of the 
Bulletin Mr. George sets forth several facts about the ob- 
jects of the Citizens' Alliance and its relations to the polit- 
ical organizations of our community which, should be read 
carefully bv every business man. Nobodv should be more 
competent to say what are the objects and intentions of the 
Citizens' Alliance than Mr. George, and it is highly impor- 
tant that they should be clearly stated at this time, when 
we are in the midst of the troubles between labor and 
capital and one of the most important municipal elections 
ever held in San Francisco is before long to be decided. 



THE CITIZENS ALLIANCE OF SAN FRANCISCO 

San Francisco, June 29, 1905. 
Mr. Fremont Older, Editor "Bulletin," City: 

My dear Mr. Older: — My heart goes out to you in this 
your hour of distress, but you will pardon me if I indulge 
in a sarcastic smile on the side. You complain because 
you cannot get police protection, and bitterly deplore 
the attitude of a city administration that deliberately 
incites riot, with a view to taking advantage of a public 
sentiment that forbids visiting violence upon ignorant 
children and blindly zealous women. But, my dear Mr. 
CI ler, let me remind you of the fact that for the last 
si.. teen months, I have been contending against conditions 
of this sort continually, and I am sorry to say that I have 
not found a daily paper in the city of San Francisco will- 
ing to present my side of the question. Every day a column 
of so-called "labor news" is nublished in the daily 
papers, misrepresenting the industrial situation and go- 
ing continually undenied before the readers of those 




journals. You know how it is yourself now, and I believe 
you will appreciate the tremendous odds that the Citizens 
Alliance had to meet here upon the Coast; not as a "union 
busting proposition," but as an institution of defense 
against the lawlessness of misguided and indecent union- 
ism. I have no fault to find with a good share of the 
people who belong to unions, because they would do the 
right thing if they were given a chance to do so, just as 
thev would today get together and frown down the re- 
cognition of such an irresponsible thing as a Newsboys' 
Union. 

You have done everything in your power to court thj 
friendship of the unions, believing that our side of the 
house would overlook your eagerness to add a few names 
to your subscription list to please the advertising men of 
the big stores, but now, when the broad and conservative 
element of unionism should come to your rescue and pu: 
a stop to this lesson in lawlessness among the newsboys 
(who will have to be met later on in life in some other 
form of indecent unionism), they leave you to fight a. one- 
sided battle, without even offering the word that would 
stop it all. You would not be suffering today if those 
placed in charge of the city government would enforce 
law and order. This brings me to a circular I issued on 
April 15th, which has been commented upon quite exten- 
sively, but which has never yet been printed in full i.i 
any paper. In that circular I advised Democrats and Re- 
publicans to get registered, go to the primaries, and fight 
the battle for a decent administration of the laws. Perhaps 
I went further than I was warranted by advising those 
who spent their summers away to come home and to in- 
vestigate the registration laws, and, if lawful, vote where 
they do business. This last suggestion was well meant 
and made purely in the interest of decency, with the hope 
that the city might be rescued from a gang of pirates 
who use the police force principally to protect law-break- 
ing unionists, discredited by decent union men. I have 
been compelled to practically maintain a police force of 
my own in order to protect the 17,000 members of the 
Citizens' Alliance of San Francisco. 

This leads me to another topic, and I trust that you 
will forgive me for referring to it. I am charged with 
trying to drag the Citizens' Alliance into politics. I beg 
to inform you, sir, that this Association, which I have the 
honor to represent, is not in politics and cannot be 
dragged into politics, but will go on in the even tenor of 
its wav fighting the battles of its members regardless of 

The smooth, mellow flavor, sparkling brilliancy and de- 
licious dryness of the Repsold wines are a revelation and 
a treat to wine drinkers. Inspection invited. 420 Pine 
St. 



40 



-THE WASP- 



[July 8, 1905. 



the whines of interested politicians and would-be reform- 
ers, who yelp lustily about their not being members of 
the Citizens' Alliance, and who charge us with trying to 
precipitate "a class struggle" in this community because 
we ask the courts to stop lawlessness. If these people 
would urge the unions to abandon their lawless practices, 
they might be warranted in asking this Association to 
let up in its defense of its members "until after election" 
to the end that certain would-be reformers (who publicly 
uDbraid the Alliance) might succeed in defeating Mayor 
Schmitz. Personally, I would rather see Mayor Sehmitz, 
re-elected than some jelly-fish reformer anxious to forward 
his own political interests by pretending to be a peace- 
maker, with a view to ultimately putting the Citizens' 
Alliance out of business. 

The Citizens' Alliance has not failed in one of its pro- 
secutions in court, and it has had the entire city adminis- 
tration to fight. It has fought the conditions successfully 
and can continue to fight them successfully, no matter who 
is elected Mayor of the City of San Francisco. Speaking 
for myself (and not for the Citizens' Alliance)I had rather 
continue to fight along the lines I have established and 
know what I have got to contend with than see the opinion 
created through the election of a "reformer," that the 
unions had been whipped, and the time had arrived for the 
Citizen' Alliance to go out of business. With a i-eforcn 
Mavor bent on forwarding his own political interests 
through pandering to lawless leaders of unionism, the 
time would soon arrive when the generous people who now 
support the Citizens' Alliance would erroneously arrive 
at the conclusion that the end had been reached and all 
was over but the shouting, and the Association would go 
to pieces ; and, four years from now, the employer side 
of the question would be up against the strongest revival 
on the part of the unions they have ever yet been called 
upon to meet. 

I make this plain statement of facts so that people 
may know. I have no political ambitions. I am simply 
here to make a success of a movement that I have thought 
out and which I believe to be the only solution of the in- 
dustrial question: namely, the creation of an organization 
on our side of the question as complete and thorough in 
every detail as the organization of labor. Where there is 
perfect organization on both sides, then may we hope for 
the birth of the spirit of respect for both sides on the part 
of each, which will result in a sentiment that favors 
thinking out labor difficulties before trying to fight them 
out. The Citizens' Alliance has held to these methods, 
and its battles have been fought through the courts. If 
the unions have gotten the worst of it there, it should be 
plain to the average citizen that they got it because they 
deserved it. 

Yours very truly, 

HERBERT" GEORGE, 

President. 



says, be perfect little gents now, an' if yer has to break 
a mugs' head, why crack his nut perlitely. See? No rowdy 
business goes, or wese got to tell de perliee to speak to 
youse. See ? 

Well, everythin' is goin' on nice an' smooth, an' hardly 
a Bulletin is bein' sold, when along comes de Sheriff wid 
his deputies, an' backed up by the City Attorney's opin- 
ion, an ' by stoppin ' some nice, quiet little gatherin 's what 
is usin' moral suasion on some scabs, he puts up to Jerry 
Dinan, who can't choose but to do sometbin' to make a 
showin'. Den de Mayor prints an appeal to de boys to 
break de law like gents, an' de worst is over. But, say; 
I kin see dat wese got not only to elect de judges but de 
City Attorney an' de Sheriff, too. Den wese kin do about 
as we please. 

Dis yer nosey mug of de Grand Jury Andrews is goin Mo 
let go of his job in a mighty short time. Is we glad of it? 
Well now, officially an' fer publication, we wants a thor- 
ough investigation; but on de low down we is glad of it. 
Seemed as if he was not goin' to be able. 

I can hardly talk Ise so hoarse from cheerin' Gene 
when he red de declaration of independence at the Fourth 
0' July exercises. Me an' Abe fixed dat up. He wanted 
to be orator; but, say, wese could never stan' fer dat. De 
audience might holler "fire" an' de fire department was 
too busy elsewhere to respond. Dere might a-been a fatal 
stampede, an' den Crothers in his Bulletin would roast 
U3 again. Besides, we wanted to kill off Jim Gallagher, 
an' had him slated fer orator. If Jim can survive dat 
speech he's a dandy. Ise a-thinkin' he won't bother us no 
more as a lobster candidate fer Superior Judge. Me an' 
Doc Regan gave Gene a grand send-off when he spoke his 
piece, an' Maestretti had de push in de gallery to help 
out. He swelled up like a Central Theatre actor, an' has 
been so chesty ever since dat me an'_ Abe is a-feered he 
may resign aii' take an engagement wid Belasco._ If Fred 
encourages him in any such foolishness we'll spring a few 
ordinances on him dat will close up his fire trap theater 
mighty quick. 

Office of BILL STKES. 

INSPECTOR OF SMOKE 
City Hall. 




THE SCIENCE OF GOVERNMENT 

By an Administration Statesman. 

No matter how well youse may lay out a scheme in city 
politics some mug is likely to butt in an' spoil everything. 
Dere we had de evenin' newspaper fite fixed up to fine fer 
anything when dat fresh guy de City Attorney has to take 
a hand. What fer? It wur none 0' his bizness nohow. 
On de say-so of de City Attorney de Sheriff gits in an' 
stops de kids from havin ' a little fun wid ole man Crothers 
what has been abusin' Gene an' Abe an' de rest of us some- 
thin' scandalous. De ole reprobate even says dat Abe an' 
Gene an' me has been a-eggin' on de kids to make trouble 
fer him an' stop de scabs from a-sellin' his sheet. Dat's 
nonsense. Worse, it 's a d — d lie ! Yes, sir ; he lies, an ' 
he knows he lies. All wese did was to call a mass meetin' 
of de newsboys an' tell dem dat if dey's our frien's dey 
don't let no Bulletins be sold on de streets. See? But we 



That our garments Lave maintained a char- 
acteristic individuality for graceful shapeliness (and 
the retention of their shapeliness through a long 
period of service) has been due, we tale it, to the 
fact that, while purchasing only from the very best 
of good clothes makers, we have taken the extra 
precaution to dictate the various materials that are 
used in their manufacture. 

An example worthy of emulation by our 

competitors. 

Heller & Frank, Inc. 

Clothiers 

Market Street and Grant Ave. 




TRANGERS to George 1). Collins, the big- 
amous lawyer, ask with amazement how a 
sharp, tricky fellow of that kind could be 
such a fool as to commit bigamy and bring 
his second choice back to the city of his 
birth, where his record is well known and 
his lawful wife is living with her legiti- 
mate children. The fact is that Collins is 
the victim of circumstances over which he has no control, 
for they were all made for him by his pseudo-mother-in- 
law. Will, can trol a mot licr-in-law of the do or die 

order? When Collins concluded to risk bigamy and go 
through the form of marrying wife No. 2 he never figured 
that mother-in-law No. 2 was affected by the social mi- 
crobe. Xo sooner was the nuptial knot tied than mother- 
in-law McCurdy's soul began to yearn for the "social 
recognition" which she deemed her due as the proud ma- 
ternal parent of Mrs. Collins No. 2. She hurried Collins 
back to San Francisco to exhibit and exploit him. She 
insisted that he register the three of them at the Palace 
Hotel. Before the ink on the hotel register was dry she 
had sent a note to the society editors of the morning dailies 
apprising them of the important fact that Mr. and Mrs. 
George D. Collins and Mrs. McCurdy, the mother of the 
happy bride, had returned to San Francisco and were 
stopping at the Palace. Thus was the luckless lawyer 
irresistibly hurried to the brink of the precipice. He had 
mapped out an entirely different route for himself. He 
knew, of course, that his first wife would learn of his sec- 
ond marriage, and that he would have to face some un- 
pleasant scenes, but he had figured out to his satisfaction 
that he could easily dodge a prosecution for bigamy until 
the three-year statute of limitations would intervene and 
prevent any action against him. The notice to the society 
reporters, however, sent all the sleuths of the daily press 
in full cry on his trail, and, unluckily for him, the Grand 
Jury was in session and in an ugly mood, owing to the 
way it had been badgered and baffled by City Hall graft- 
ers. Instead of dodging justice for a couple of years, ns 
he fully expected, and getting the benefit of the statute 
of limitations, Collins was suddenly and vehemently drag- 
ged up to the bar and indicted and arraigned. All because 
a socially ambitious mother-in-law was dead set on adver- 
tising to the community that she had engrafted a real live 
limb of the law on her genealogical tree. Now that the 
Superior Court has decided that Collins must support 
wife No. 1 he is judicially proclaimed a bigamist, and also 
a perjurer, for when he drew his dead sister-in-law's 
money out of the Hibernia Bank, some time ago, he swor - e 
she had been his lawful wedded wife. The reputable law- 
firm of Tobin & Tobin presented that fact to the Bar As- 
sociation of San Francisco, but up to date no decision as to 
the disbarment of the crooked lawyer has been handed 
down. The Bar Assoeration was slow and not vigorous 
in the prosecution of the case, and the Supreme Court has 
gone to sleep over it, as it does on most matters that call 
for prompt action and could be disposed of in half an hour 
by a mentally live and morally resolute tribunal. Perhaps 
if Collins should be sent to State prison and decorated with 
a striped suit, the Bar Association of San Francisco and 
Supreme Court of the State of California might conclude 

The unusual quality and exquisite bouquet of the Repsold 
wines endear them to the palate of every wine drinker. 



that sufficient facts had been established to justify his 
expulsion from a profession which lie has done so much to 
disgrace. 

l£fr t£* t^* 

The Talbot Divorce Case. 

The divorce suit brought by Mrs. William H. Talbot 
against her husband has not. interested society very much. 
for both the Talbot boys were well outside it when they set 
up homes of their own. The great wealth of the Talbots 
was acquired in the lumber .business. The father of Wm. 
H. and Fred Talbot was a member of one of the original 
firm of Pope & Talbot, which has been in the lumber busi- 
ness for more than forty years. The foundation of their 
fortune was laid in supplying San Francisco and the West 
Coast of South America with lumber, and in the fifties, 
when Harry Meiggs was building railroads in Peru, the 
lumber used in their construction was all shipped by Pope 
& Talbot. It was estimated in the seventies that the 
Puget Sound lumber men made $4 per thousand feet on nil 
lumber cut on the Sound, and Pope & Talbot owned the 
Port Gamble mill, which cut 51,000,000 feet a year. At 
this rate they would make $204,000 every year, or over 
$8,000,000 in forty years. But the cut of the mill has been 
much greater than this, besides which they own forests, 
mills, docks, vessels, etc. At the time of the' elder Talbot's 
death it was estimated that he left his sons from $5,000,- 
000 to $10,000,000 each, besides bequests to other members, 
of the family. 

ftS* vs* (<?* 

An Auspicious Entry. 

The arrival on Tuesday of the Taft party, including 
Miss Alice Roosevelt, reminds me that the Palace Hotel 
has in its day sheltered many of the notable ones of the 
earth — princes, dukes, counts, ambassadors, great generals 
and heaven knows what not. The Taft party's entry to 
San Francisco on the glorious Fourth was auspicious, and 
their descent on the famed hostelry in automobiles and 
tally-hos was inspiring. Any relative of President Roose- * 
velt is sure of a hearty welcome in San Francisco. 

Mrs. Martin's Good Sense. 

Society was not a little surprised when cards to Mrs. 
Eleanor Martin's reception came out, to find no mention of 
Miss Alice Roosevelt made in the invitations. The guests 
are asked to meet Secretary of War Taft and party, but 
the first young lady in our land is not named specifically. 
Most people applaud Mrs. Martin for her good sense and 
taste in not placing the President's young daughter on a 
par with the distinguished statesman. And the guests 
will go to meet the young lady with a keener zest from the 
very fact that everything isn't coming her wav with such 
servile humility. I hear that the Martin reception will 
far outshine all of the Czarina Eleanor's previous enter- 
tainments as the Martin ball did the Assembly. Nothing is 
to be spared for the success of this great undertaking, 
which will bring our most eminent dowager's name befo"C 
the citizens of every hamlet in the land. Ah ! brave Lady 
Martin, we have, indeed, cause to be proud of you! 

Delicate cream enclosed in rich chocolate — a candy of 
quality, Old Fashioned Chocolate Creams, in 25c. and 50c. 
boxes. Only at Haas' Candy Stores, Phelan Building: and 
James Flood Building. 



42 



THE WASP* 



[July 8, 1905. 



A Mother's Forebodings. 

The engagement of Miss Mary Ursula Stone and Lieu- 
tenant Daniel Edward Shean, Sixteenth. Infantry, United 
States Army, is announced by Mr. and Mrs. Charles Ber- 
tody Stone, parents of the young woman. The secret can- 
not be said to be news, for it has been whispered in society 
for several months, but was always denied by Miss Stone. 
A funny little incident connected with the affair is that 
last winter Mrs. Stone objected to her daughter visiting 
an army post for fear that the way might be paved to her 
marriage into the roving army set. Her scruples were 
overcome, however, a short time later, when she permitted 
Miss Stone to become the guest of her brother, Lieuten- 
ant Charles B. Stone Jr., at Fort MePherson, Georgia, 
where she first met the officer to whom she is now be- 
trothed. So much for maternal forebodings. Miss Stone 
was one of last season's debutantes, and is a granddaughter 
of the late Rev. Dr. A. L. Stone and a niece of Mrs. L. L. 
Baker. Lieutenant Shean is stationed with the Sixteenth 
at the recently erected Fort MeKinley, just beyond the eon- 
fines of Manila. Mrs. Stone and her daughter are to sail 
for the Philippines in the fall, and the wedding will take 
place during the winter. 

Stanford Heir Takes Action. 

The Stanford poison scandal is revived through Wilton 
Stanford, of Schenectady, N. Y., who has published a card 
in an Eastern paper, offering one thousand dollars for the 
prosecution and conviction of the person or persons guilty 
of the poisoning. Mr. Stanford is the nephew of the late 
Senator, from whom he inherited $100,000. It is evident 
that the way is being paved for the contest of Mrs. Stan- 
ford's will, in which her late husband's nephew was not 
mentioned, and if the case comes to trial a strong point 
will be made of Mrs. Stanford's faith in clairvoyants. 




"THE POLO." 
The Leading Hat of the Day. 
The hat pictured above is the correct thing among the 
well-dressed and stylish women of the present. It has 
just been introduced into this market, and at once won 
the favor of swelldom. It is made of fine Milan straw. 
Unicme in design, and becoming to most faces, it is destin- 
ed to have an unprecedented run. 

Nelson's Amycose, Infallible Remedy for Catarrh, Sore 
Throat and Inflammations of the Skin. 



An Interesting Engagement. 

Announcement of Earle Talbot's engagement to Miss 
Helen Scoville of New York has caused no end of a flutter. 
Earle Talbot is one of the handsomest and most eligible 
young men in society, and comes of a most exclusive fam 
ily. His mother was Miss Amy Bowen, daughter of Charles 
R. Bowen, a wealthy merchant. She was and still is a 
woman of unusual and striking beauty, and her marriage 
to Mr. Talbot was a brilliant affair, and one of which 
much happiness was expected. Such proved not to be the 
case, however, and after a number of years of married life 
Mrs. Talbot went abroad to live. It was then that society 
discovered the rift within the lute and learned with sur- 
prise that it was the husband's infatuation for Miss Julia 
Bowen, his wife's young sister, who lived with them, that 
caused Mrs. Talbot to go abroad. She finally asked for 
and was granted a divorce, and Mr. Talbot married Julia. 
They now reside at their beautiful country place near the 
fashionable Woodside colony at Redwood City. Earle Tal- 
bot is the eldest son, and is a very handsome young man 
in his early twenties. Miss Scoville is an extremely hand- 
some young woman. She comes of a fine New York fam- 
ily, although not a wealthy one, and her mother now con- 
ducts an ultra-fashionable school for girls in New York 
City. Earle Talbot's family are cousins to W. H. Talbot, 
whose wife is now sueing him for a divorce. The two fam- 
ilies are not intimate, however, as none of W. H. Talbot 's 
relatives ever received his wife. 

t£& V?* &5* 

Munificent Mr. Clark. 

Everybody was astonished by the magnificence of the 
cup given by Charley Clark as a trophj in the golf handi • 
cap at Burlingame on Wednesday. The cup was costly 
enough for an annual championship trophy instead of one 
to be won only in a single handicap match, where the 
poorest player might capture it. Mrs. William H. Crocker, 
the banker's wife, also gave a very handsome cup as a 
prize for the lady golfers who played at Burlingame on 
Wednesday. This cup must be won twice to become the 
property of the successful player. 

^5* *^* c<5* 

She Could Keep Her Own Secret. 

The news of Miss Beatrice Spivalo's engagement to 
Lieutenant Rawle Shoemaker, of the United States Re- 
venue Service, comes as a complete surprise to her friends 
in San Francisco, for the simple reason that the wooing 
was done in Honolulu during the young woman's visit 
there last Winter with her mother. Miss Spivalo has been 
greatly amused over the remarks of her girl chums; "If 



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July 8. 1905 J 



THE WASP- 



43 



you were engaged, Beatrice, you couldn't keep the secret 
half an hour." To this Miss Beatrice invariably replied: 
"It is good to have a reputation for telling everything one 
knows, but those who have are the very persons who can 
keep things if they choose." The belles believe that she- 
is right, now that they know she had a bit o£ news all the 
time and never breathed a hint of it. Miss Spivalo is a 
daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Caesar R. Spivalo of Belmont, 
and. doubtless, her betrothal will be the excuse for enter- 
taininL' in the delightful way for which the family is 
famous. Miss Spivalo 's uncle. Augustus 1 1. S|>i\alo, the 
well-known attorney, who has always lived in San Fran- 
cisco, was wonl to entertain all the old-time Bohemians 
in lavish style. Indeed, tin- latch-string was always out, 
and all a "good fellow'" had to do was to make himself 
known and lit- was immediately among friends. The late 
Peter Bigelow, the brilliant journalist, and the late Dan 
O'Connell were intimate friends. Mr. Caesar R. Spivalo 
is engaged in the flour business in San Francisco on a very 
extensive scale. 

Oakland to Lose Mrs. Dargie. 

Mrs. William E. Dargie, whose picture appears in this 
week's "Wasp," is the wife of Mr. William E. Dargie, 
editor and proprietor of the "Oakland Tribune," and she 
is one of the most hospitable of the matrons in society 
across the bay. Several years ago the Dargies built a 
handsome house on Boulevard Terrace near Lake Merritt, 
hut they seem to have gown tired of life in Oakland, for 
they are erecting a still finer place on Pacific Avenue, 
San Francisco, and are to move to this city in the Fall. 
Before her marriage Mrs. Dargie was a Peralta, one of 
the proudest old families in California. She is tall and 
statelv. and dresses exceedingly well, always being the first 
woman in Oakland to wear a new style. She has a voice 
of great sweetness, although of late she has not suns 
much. Mrs. Dargie 's good heart has won her hosts of 
friends, and she is always striving to give someone 
pleasure. Before Leila McKillican was married she was 
calling upon Mrs. Dargie one day, and, girl-like, admired 
a long chain of gold and coral beads that her hostess wore : 
"Take it," said the lady of the house, "and think of me 
when you wear it." There was no getting out it, and 
then and there the ornament changed hands. At present 
Mrs. Dargie is in Santa Barbara, where her mother form- 
erly had their home in the old hidalgo days. Mrs. Dargie 
is receiving a good deal of attention from members of 
the smart set who are spending the Summer in the warmer 
resort. Her musical talents have made Mrs. Dargie a 
great acquisition to Santa Barbara society. 

t5* t£* t5* 

Gives Family Pictures to London Papers. 

Now that he is settled in London Whitelaw Reid, the 
new American Ambassador, is not at all averse to having 
his picture and those of his family reproduced in the news- 
papers. He was very much against such notoriety here 
in democratic America, however, where it is the thing to 
appear exclusive. Pictures of Mrs. Reid, Miss Templeton 
Reid and Mr. Ogden Mills Reid, the Ambassador's wife, 
daughter and son, are reproduced in this week's Wasp 
from photographs given to the London illustrated journals. 
Mr. Reid has just purchased in Paris a 40 H. P. automo- 
bile. 

t£fc t2fr <£& 

Bride-elect is Popular. 

Until the announcement of her engagement to Mr. 
Joseph Foreman Peters, of Stockton, Miss Jessie Fillmore 
did not realize just how popular she was in society circles. 
Since the death of her father, Mr. J. A. Fillmore, one of 
the best-known and most highly esteemed officials of the 
Southern Pacific Railroad Company, Miss Fillmore has 
withdrawn herself from the fashionable world, devoting 

The unusual as usual. Tom Dillon's hats, opp. Palace 
Hotel, 636 Market St. 



her time to foreign travel and to study. She is one of the 
linest equestrians in California, and after her marriage 
-he will probably take up this exercise enthusiastically, 
as she intends to spend much of her time at Mr. Peters' 
liuhach Plantation near Atwater. Merced County, where 
the roads are as level as a floor. The cups that this fiancee 
lias received, both from her San Francisco friends and 
from those at a distance, are fine enough to be placed in 
a cabinet. One of the rarest has a black pen and ink 
drawing — or at least that is what it looks like — of the 
Empress Josephine, and is said to be more than a century 




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get full information from agents. 

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Oakland Office : 
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44 



-THE WASP 



[July 8. 1905 



old. Miss Fillmore's picture appears in this week's 
"Wasp." 

c5* t5* ^* 

Another Alameda Belle Betrothed. 

The announcement of Miss Dorothy Barrett's Bowen'* 
engagement to Mr. Robert J. Holmes, both of Alameda, 
recalls a bon-mot of one of the beaux at a recent wedding. 
"If a girl will not become a bride she must move out of 
Alameda," said the gentleman, and he was from San 
Francisco, too. It is true that there is hardly a grown- 
up young woman left in the town, and the misses who go 
to and from the High School are accompanied by their 
several admirers, "men" in the same institution. Miss 
Bowen is very young, but is immensely popular in society. 
She is a daughter of Mr. Charles E. Bowen, the prominent 
business man, member of the Ann of Wetmore, Bowen and 
Company of San Francisco. The groom to be is a busi- 
ness man and is an old resident of the Encinal city, and 
had the honor several years ago of carrying Miss Dorothy's 
books to and from the Higl School, where the couple 
were in the same classes. Society folks are looking for 
something a little lively in the way of a wedding. It is 
a long time since there has been a really gay affair, and 
In the opinion of the maids who are left it devolves upon 
the bride to do things handsomelv at such a time. Sep- 
tember has been chosen for the happy event, and there 
is to be a long string of bridesmaids with maid of honor, 
flower girls, etc., and probably Christ Episcopal Church 
will be chosen as the setting. 

t£* t5* &?* 

Eugene Korn, one of our best-known business men, 
has gone to New York for six weeks on a trip of combined 
business and pleasure. 

&5* c5* <^* 

Had a Love for Teaching. 

That Oakland society people have the courage of their 
jonvictions is proved by the fact that Mrs. J. Everett 
Brown, who was before her marriage Miss Winifred Os- 
borne, taught in the public schools, and also moved in the 
exclusive set. The "Athens of the Pacific " has no hard 
and fast rules against "school-ma'ams." Mrs. Brown 
left the University in her junior year because she had a 
love for teaching and was offered a position in the Oakland 
High School. As the wife of the popiilar and wealthy- 
deputy district attorney, with a beautiful home in Pied- 
mont, the bride will find herself prominent in the smart 
set. Mr. Brown is the grandson of the late Frederick 
Delger, the eccentric millionaire, who left him a fortune. 
Mrs. Brown's picture appears in this number of The Wasp. 
■J* £ <*t 

Miss Anna Miller Wood, the singer, who is so great a 
favorite among society people in California, is expected 
here to spend the summer. Last season Miss Wood was 
the guest of friends in this city, and also visited Miss 
Elizabeth Westgate of Alameda, at her summer residence 
in the Santa Cruz mountains. 

Arrivals at Hotel Rafael. 

During the week ending July 2. 1905: San Francisco — 
Mr. R. Spreekels, Miss A. McNallv. Mr. M. E. Pinckard. 
Mr. C. G. Kuehn, Mr. P. S. Baker, Mr. A. Weihe, Mrs. W. 
H. Bremer, Miss H. Bremer, Mrs. J. F. Greig, Mrs. J. E. 
Miles and daughter, Mr. and Mrs. G. E. Davis, Mr. H. H. 
Rolfe, Mr. E. P. Finigan, Mrs. A. S. Wollberg and family, 
Mr. S. Wollberg, Mrs. H. Rolfe, Mr. J. H. Rosseter, Mr. 
j. A. MeNear, Mr. W. G. Knowlton, Mr. S. M. Henry. Mr. 
B. F. Nourse, Mrs. B. Long. Miss Yost, Mr. and Mrs. S. 
Dusenbere', Mr. H. S. Dusenberg, Mr. I. Strassburger, Mr. 

Old Fashioned Chocolate Creams — chocolate and cream 
of "old-fashioned" goodness — 25c. and 50e. boxes. Only 
at Haas' Candy Stores, Phelan Building and James Flood 
Building. 



E. M. Pomeroy, Mrs. E. L. Goldstein, Mr. and Mrs. J. 
Frowenfeld and family, Mr. P. Freygang, Dr. and Mrs. A. 
Garceau, Miss G. H. Smith, Mr. and Mrs. H. C. Breeden 
and child, Mr. and Mrs. F. Older, Mr. and Mrs. F. L. Ro- 
senthal, Mr. F. Rosenthal, Mr. P. B. Anspacher, Mr. and 
Mrs. M. Hyman and familv, Mrs. C. E. Schneely, Mr. C. 
Kenyon, Mrs. H. L. Dodge, Mrs. N. ?. Gale, Dr. V. G. 
Veeki, Dr. A. Weis, Mr. and Mrs. F. H. James, Mrs. R. 
Greenebaum, Mr. C. B. Russell. Alameda, Cal. — Miss Vil- 
leau, Mr. C. P. Murdock. Berkeley, Cal.— Mr. R. T. Craw- 
ford. Monterey, Cal. — Mr. and Mrs. H. S. Kiersted. 

FAT FOLKS. 
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^ 




July 8, 1905.] 



THE WASP 



45 




MADAME RKJANES LATEST PICTURE 
Mr. Hyde's friend Marguerite Gautier in "La Dame Aux Canielias " 

A Popular Girl. 

Maizie Langhorne is one of tlie most popular of the 
Bummer girls. I heard one matron declare that lliis piquant 
debutante had more invitations to country homes than any 
girl in society. Dainty little Miss Langhorne is an ex- 
ceedingly adaptable girl, and is popular in several sets, a 
feat that is impossible to most of the society girls. To be 
popular in one San Francisco society generally means only 
toleration in the other sets. Julia Langhorne, who is to 
make her debut next season, is a very attractive girl. She 
is taller than her sister, and there is something suggestive 
of Ethyl Barrymore in her manner and carriage. The 
Langhornes come of good old Southern stock. Th'eir cousin, 
Miss Langhorne, married Charles Dana Gibson, the artist. 
Mis. Langhorne comes of the old California family of 
Deane. She is related to Julia Deane, the actress, late of 
the Neill Company. 

"Borrowed Feathers." 

If "ye knight of ye olden dayes" who did his lady's 
bidding, riding to death if needs were that he might prove 
his devotion for her, were in San Francisco today, would 
he be haled to a police court for so simple a thing as 
plucking a feather from the tail of a bird which, prob- 
ably, flaunted more plumage than necessary to pi'otect it 
from the zero weather"? That, however, is what Mr. J. 
Walter Laymance, of Oakland, has experienced vicarious- 
ly. Waller did not, with his own white hands, despoil 
the hoarse-voiced fowl, with ill-omened, unearthly shriek, 
of its gaudy caudal appendix. He called: "What Ho, 
minion!" to the chauffeur, who propelled the auto from 

TRUNKS AND LEATHER GOODS. 

Don't forget our carload prices when looking for 
trunks, dress-suit cases, valises, traveling bags, purses and 
pocket-books. Lettering name in gold without cost to pur- 
chaser. Sanborn, Vail & Co., 741 Market street. 



ivhich the Oaklander ami Miss Lilian Winters, his fair 
companion, viewed the beauties of Golden Gati Park. 
Nfow a chauffeur 1- an obliging creature, ii we may 

believe the tale told by 3 g Floyd free to Judge 

Cabaniss; how he stopped the "devil-wagon" and hied 
inn forth at his master's bidding, quite in the style of a 
squire of ..1,1. Only, instead of slaying a dragon, the 

chauffeur simply gathered a pea sk's leather for which 

the lady bad expressed a desire. So faithful was the ma 
tc. his "lord" thai ii was only upon the mosl rigorous 
cross-examination by Park Commissioner Lloyd that he 
divulged the name of his employer. That feather lias al- 
ready cost .Mr. Laymance much trouble. Bui Mr. Lay- 
mance loves in figure in the limelight of courts. Not 
long ago he caused the arresl of Mrs. Gray on ■■< charge 
of forgery. He has also had experience as defendant in 
a divorce sail. By the way, I hear that Mrs. Laymance 
makes more in her millinery shop in Fourteenth Street, 
Oakland, than her erstwhile husband earns from his real 
estate business. Mis. Laymance has the e\ e of an artist, 
and, what is more to the point, she has the ear of the 
fashionable dames and belles across Ihe bay. Indeed, "so 
sorry" are they for the "poor little woman trying to 
earn her own bread and butler" that when they move to 

San Fn isco they return to the "Athens of the Pacific" 

for their hats and bonnets. 

Miss Landers as an Artist. 

I hear that Miss Pearl Landers has done some very 
clever sketching- this summer. She has been spending the 
last few months in Monterey, and has made several sketch- 
es of the scenery amid the quaint old town. Her artistic 
efforts are said to be highly creditable. Miss Landers has 
studied drawing for the last few years, and whenever she is 
in Monterey imbibes all the ideas afforded by an artistic 
atmosphere. She spends most of her time at the cottage 
of her cousin. Miss May, who was formerly a teacher at 
Hamlin's school. Miss May was left a small fortune sev- 
eral years ago, and then resigned her scholastic position. 
She cares absolutely nothing about society, but loves the 
company of artists and other clever people. 




Pkotoby Taber 



MRS WILLIAM E. DARGIE 
A prominent young matron of Oakland 



46 



-THE WASP- 



[July 8, 1905. 




the children of very rich people. He has five sous and 
daughters, and each of the five found at his or her plate 
a neat little envelope containing $20,000. Aside from 
the actual expense of the birthday dinner itself, the mem- 
orable meal, therefore, cost Mr. Wangenheim the snug sum 
of $100,000; but who shall say that he was not doubly re- 
paid in the pleasure of giving to those who are nearest 
and dearest. Too many very rich men defer their gifts 
to their family until the probate court becomes the real 
donor. These close-fisted capitalists hang on with bulldog 
tenacity to their bursting money-bags, and their anxious 
relatives watch, with eager anticipation, the hands of the 
clock as they mark the approach of the Grim Reaper. Mr. 
Wangenheim 's example is well worthy of frequent imita- 
tion in San Francisco. This open-handed father can part 
with $100,000 without serious inconvenience. He is one of 



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Japanese Conception of Hamlet's Unhappy Heroine 

Sol Wangenheim 's Birthday Gifts. 

When Mr. Sol Wangenheim celebrated the seventy-fifth 
anniversary of his birthday recently he gave his children a 
very pleasant surprise, and one which does not often thrill 




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Breakfast 



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July 8, 1905.] 



HUE WASP- 



47 




A JAPANESE STAGE SETTING 
The Mimic Stage where Hamlet depicts his father's murder 



jut- very rich men ; and, what is more, is one of our best 
litizens, a man of fine character, well-read and broad- 
ninded. Had he taken up law instead of commercial pur- 
■uils he would have made an equally great success therein. 
His children, to each of whom he gave the $20,000 birth- 
lay gift, are Mrs. Benjamin Arnbold, Mrs. Jake Stern, 
Mrs. Hermann Waldeck, and his sons Emile and Julius. 
The latter married Miss Klanker, who was noted for her 
emarkahle ability as an amateur painter. 

jt j* .* 

Mrs. Morrow, wife of the - popular Sausalito yachtsman, 
s at Santa Barbara for the summer. She has her 
•hildren with her, and has taken a furnished house for the 
varm months. Her sparkling wit has made her a decided 
icquisition, and she is said to have a "wonderful persou- 
tlity. ' ' During the summer Mr. Morrow will join his f am- 
ly, and hospitality will be generously dispensed from their 
mporary residence. 



Shakespeare in Japan. 

In this week's Wasp are re- 
productions of the principal 
characters in "Hamlet" and 
"Olhellu" as played from the 
Japanese idea of Shakespeare's 
great dramas. The Ghost, who 
wears modern Japanese full- 
dress uniform, and has a decor- 
ation on his breast and a sword 
in his right aand, is imperson- 
ated by Oto Kawakami, a noted 
actor. The roles of Desdemona 
and Ophelia are taken by fam- 
ous Japanese actresses, who ap- 
pear in the ordinary costume of 
scene in "Hamlet" where the 




OTO KAWAKAMI 
One of Japan's Greatest Actors in the role of Ghost in " Hamlet ' 



Japanese ladies. The 
Prince put on a mock play for the purpose of exposing his 
royal stepfather's crime is also given. The Japanese act- 
ors, including Hamlet and the King and Queen, are shown 
silling in front of the mimic stage. 

Carpets cleaned. City Steam Carpet Beating nd Ren- 
ovating Works, Geo. H. Stevens, Manager, 38 Eighth St. 
New No. 70 Eighth St. Phone, South 250. 



GRAND PRIZE AT ST. LOUIS 



AWARDED TO 



Hommers Champagne 

which delights the epicure who calls for 
White Star Brut or Extra Dry 

THE MOST DELICIOUS OF ALL WINES 

Served at Cliff House, New Poodle Dog, 
Taits', Bab's, Palace of Art, Lick Grill, 
S. P. Ferry Boats, Union League Club, 
Jefferson Square Club, Red Lion Grill, 
Cafe Richelieu, Transportation Club, 
and other first class resorts : : : : 

FRED. M. BOEHM, Sole Agent Pacific Co»t 

Ph. ne Polk 3003 915 Eddy St. San Francisco 



H. I,. Davis J. W. Davis 

W. D. Fennimore 

fifes' 




If we make your 
Glasses once we know 
you'll be a life-long 
customer. With our 
GLASSES you'll preserve 
your sight and have 
comfort and style com- 
bined. 



Visit the HOFFMAN CAFE 
LUNCH, - GRILL - AND - WINE-ROOMS 

Half a block below Palace and Grand Hotels. S. P, 
Fine Goods a Specialty. Merchants' hot lunch from 1 1 a. m. to 
230 p. m. Served also in Ladies Cafe, Steaks, English Chops. 
Chicken, Oysters, Loaves, Salads and all delicacies a specialty. 

"HANDSOMEST CAFE IN AMERICA 

Open all night. «" Private Dining Rooms for Ladies and Escort* 

HOFFMAN CAFE. PROPS. 

CHARLES HILDEBRECHT, Mgr. 



48 



THE WASP 



[July 8, 1905. 




AtPHONSO WITHOUT A UNIFORM 
The ordinary looking young man who is the Ruler of Spain 

A Pet Actor. 

Young- Jack Tarbeaux, who, to the surprise of his many 
society friends, left as a member of ihe Blanche Bates 
Company, is becoming quite a pet actor among the smart 
set of New York. Mr. Tarbeaux has always had a predi- 
lection for the stage. His mother, who is a rich widow, 
offered him all sorts of inducements in the way of travel, 
by way of a bribe, if he relinquished the idea of becoming 
an actor. However, during Blanche Bates' visit to San 
Francisco last winter, he joined her company and went 
East with the "Darling of the Gods." Young Tarbeaux 
recently joined the Players' Club of New York, and is con- 
templating a trip to England for his summer vacation. 
Among his intimate friends in San Francisco are Clarence 
Follis, Count Grimani and the Eastland boys. 

A Rose Wedding. 

I hear that the wedding of Miss Nina Otis Eldred and 
Mr. Philip Bancroft, a grandson of the greatest historian, 
which took place at Christ Church, San Diego, 'was a veri- 
table feast of roses. The aisles of the pretty Gothic 
church were of rose trees, with prim clusters of blossoms 
at their tops. The chancel was entirely of white roses and 
rose wreaths were hung in every available space. A recep- 
tion at the home of Mrs. Parker Syms, the bride's cousin, 



Leading Hotels 



For those who appreciate comfort and attention 

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SAN FRANCISCO 

A QUIET HOME CENTRALLY LOCATED 

GEORGE WARREN HOOPER, Manager 



Hotel Richelieu . . 

1012-16 Van Ness Ave. 

Hotel Granada.. 

N. E. Cor. Sutter and Hyde Sts. 

Special reduced rates during June 
July and August 

FINEST FANILY HOTELS ON THE COAST 



IP you want real 
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HOTEL BELLA VISTA 

Cor. Pine and Taylor Streets 
ifUfuff 

MRS. W. M. DENVER 

PROPRIETOR 



HOTEL BALTIMORE 

1015 Van Ness Avenue 

An American plan hotel conducted especially for families desiring ac- 
commodations for the season or by the year, situated in the most 
fashionable section of the city. Fully equipped with all modern 
conveniences. Comfortable sunny rooms with delightful outlook 
elegantly furnished and appointed. 

C. F. BUCKLEY, JR., 

Manager. 



SAN MARCO HOTEL- 
> 53G Taylor ST., Between Geary and Post 



A new modern fire-proof family and tourist hotel. 52 
sunny suites with private bath rooms. 44 single rooms 
with public bathroom on each floor. Electric lights, 
steam heat and telephone in every room. Only white 
help employed. In its furnishings and table the San 
Marco will compare favorably with any select family hotel. 

GEO. J. CASANOVA, Manager. 



HOTEL RAFAEL 

Fifty minutes from San Francisco. Twenty-five trains daily each way 
OPSN AIA THE YEAR 

CUISINE AMD SERVICE THE BfcST 

Send for booklet R. V. Hai/ton, Prop. 



In the vernacular sense a "good thing" is the man 
who blows his money on his "good times" friends. A bet- 
ter thing, however, is the man who saves a part of his 
money and invests it judiciously. The hardest thing is to 
make the beginning. See the CONTINENTAL BUILDING 
AND LOAN ASSOCIATION of 301 California street 
about it. 



July 8, 1905.] 



-THE WASP- 



49 




Photo by A mold Gtnthe 

MISS DOROTHY BARRETT BOWEN 
An Alameda belle who is betrothed to Mr. Robert J. Holmes 

olloweil. alter which the couple left for a honeymoon trip. 
"heir home is to be at the St. Dunstan, 111 San Francisco, 
here the Bancroft family live very quietly. Despite the 
terary fame of the great historian, the Hubert Bancroft 
amily have never mingled in San Franoisco society. 

J* J« & 
liss Boyle's Departure. 

Gertrude Boyle, the artist, lias gone to New York, where 
ic expects to get backing to exploit her new magazine, 
Ability." Miss Boyle has tiiven up modeling- for the 
resent, but expects to return to her art in a few years. 
hose who have read her literary expressions in "Ability" 
insider it a misfortune that she deserted art for litera- 
irc. She was very successful in selling her work during 
le past two years, and is spending all her profits in her 
L't literary production. 

t5* c5* %?* 

Genuine Surprise. 

Announcement of the engagement of Miss Ella V. Mc- 
loskev. the well-known contralto singer, and president of 
ic Papyrus Club, to John Jacob Apple was made last 

Ueek and created no little surprise ai.d interest in this 
ty, where both are so prominent and popular. And the 
;ws that they are already married is an even greater 
nsation! Indeed, no one, not even the bride's nearest 
latives, had the least idea that she was so close to the 
tar, anil the dispatch from Portland to a brother a day 
two ago, giving the date and details of the marriage, 
me like a thunder-elap to all. However, the two fami- 
s have had plenty of time to accustom themselves to 



CALIFORNIA SOUVENIR. 

A handsome present for Eastern friends — Townsend's 
ilifornia Glace Fruits in fire-etched and hand-painted 
xes. 767 Market street, San Francisco. 



oatch, lor 1 am told thai Mr. ami Mrs. Apple hai e been 
iged for 1 he past ten years! Think of it — a ten rears' 
engagement! Neither of them could have had the scon 
youth pleaded as an excuse for delay, for both are setting 
well on in years. Mis. McCloskey-Apple is a bright, jolly 
woman, and very popular in club circles, in which she 

- In eu prominent. She is the possessor of a magnifi- 
cent contralto voice and has lor manv years been a soloist 
of note. She is now solo contralto of Hie Posl Street S.vn- 
gogue and Si. Dominic's Church, where her sister-in-law, 




YOU CAIN EAT 

"por 

(The National Dish of the Hawaiians) 
WITH RELISH 



A NATURAL HEALTH FOOD 

A GREAT DELICACY 

A Godsend to People Who Suffer 
With Dyspepsia 

Ask GOLDBERG, BOWEN & CO., for Lutted's Hawaiian "Poi" 

or Sent Postpaid by Mail for 50c by 

The Hawaiian Poi Flour Co , Honolulu, H. I. 



Phone East 118 



Geo. Britner, Proprietor 



"THE FRUITERIE" 

1239 POLK STREET bet Bush and Sutter 

HIGH-CLASS FRUITS, Fresh, Canned and Dried 

Vegetables. Eggs and nutter direct from the interior 
Catering to >elect Family Trade a Specialty 




THEO. QIER CO., Distributors 
San Francisco Oakland 



50 



-THE WASP- 



[July 8, 1905. 




A REMARKABLE PHOTOGRAPHIC FEAT 
Snapshot of the Fatal Accident on the English Derby Day, when one of the horses fell in the Juvenile Plate 



Mrs. Apple, wife of Dr. ADole, is the soprano soloist. 
John Jacob Apple, the groom, is cashier of Cunningham, 
Curtis & Welch, and he has also an interest in the firm. 
The marriage took place in Portland, where both were vis- 
iting, last week. 

An Artist of Talent. 

Gordon Ross, who is one of our cleverest figure paint- 
ers, is doing splendid work in a memorial window for St. 




Peter's Chapel, at Vallejo. The design is illustrative oc 
the biblical story of the miraculous draught of fishes, and 
is handled by Ross in most masterly style. The figures 
of the Savior and the apostles depicted in the scene are 
over eight feet high, and Ross has drawn them with as 
much accuracy as if they were intended for a page illus- 
tration in a book. Every fold of the drapery and detail 
of figure drawing are worked out with almost laborious 
care, and show an immense amount of technical skill, as 
well as highly intelligent conception of the proper and 
dignified treatment of the subject. Ross is capable of 
great things in figure work, and improves steadily. For 
some years his health was not of the best, but he has over- 
come that, and is now well and strong. This physical im- 
provement has its good effects on his work. The memorial 
window, which will be commemorative of the talents of the 
designer as well as the heroism of Admiral Farragut, in 
whose honor it is to be placed in St. Peter's Church, is 1 
patriotic donation by the Native Sons of the Golden West. 
Ross, bv the way, while in SDirit a loyal citizen of Califor- 
nia, who loves her brown hills and her blue skies and pur- 
ple seas, is a native son of old Scotia. His father, who, I 
believe, is still living, is a Presbyterian clergyman — one 
of that scholarly and faithful body of men whose moral 
teachings have done so much to make Scottish people 
the sturdy sons and successful people they have shown 
themselves in all lands and under all conditions. 



Pkotoby Bnshnell 

MRS. J. EVERETT BROWN, nee OSBORNE 

An Oakland teacher who married wealthy County official 

CHOICE STATIONERY. 
Everything in the line of office and correspondence 
papers — papeteries, ream goods and pound papers. Kohi- 
noor and Regal pencils. Berkshire typewriter papers and 
Regal pens. Blank books and memorandums. Index cards 
and filing cabinets. Good printing and fine engraving. 
The best of everything at moderate prices. Sanborn, 
Vail & Co., 741 Market street. 




Pierce-Rodolph Storage Co., Inc. 

STORAGE, MOVING, PACKINC AND SHIPPING 



Warehouse: Eddy Street, Near Fillmore 

Specially Built for the Storage of Household Furniture 
MAIN OfFICE, Edd> Street, Near Fillmore : : Phone West 82S 



July 8, 1905.] 



-THE WASP 



51 




revolver in his hip-pocket. That would be an artistic 
touch that would make a touch party a veritable triumph, 
even it the police patrol wagon did not rumble up at the 

psychological moment and go through the mod cere i\ 

of transferring all the guests, yellow and white, to the 
municipal bastille. 

Jt Jt Jt 
The Retort Discourteous. 

Mr. Harry Lehr, the willyboy of E.istem society, has 
taken the Carter cottage at Newport. The Eastern gos- 
sips are quoting Lehr's pungent retort to Mrs. J. Coleman 
Drayton. Wishing to get rid of the effeminate beau, the 
great lady is said to have snapped out: "Now trot along, 
Mr. Lehr; yon arc entirely too ladylike for me." Mon- 
sieur Harry retorted: "I am sorry I cannot say the same 
for you, Mrs. Drayton." 



OBLITERATING THE COLOR LINK 

The Rage for Tough Parties. 

The immense success of the "tough party" in one of 
the great stone mansions of Presidio Heights has had its 
effect. Other hostesses, ambitious to shine as designers 
of social entertainments on uninue lines, are maturing 
their plans. Before long the society reporters will, no 
doubt, have the pleasure of recording some highly original 
efforts to keep the social whirl at fever heat. It will be 
no easy task to eclipse that famous evening in the woo! 
merchant's granite mansion when the climax was capped 
by the arrival of the police patrol wagon and the bundling 
of the guests into the ill-omened vehicle. That was a 
finale hard to beat, and not everyone has sufficient pull 
with Abe to cause the paraphernalia of the Police Depart- 
ment to be put at his disposal. One highly interesting- 
effect of these tough parties is to erase the color lines 
which have proved such a perplexing problem to the 
American people. In the last and most famous tough 
party the presence of some ehoiee specimens of Darkest 
Africa added eclat to the occasion, especially in the cake- 
walk, where all z'ace prejudice was eliminated and blacl 
and white tripped the light fantastic on an equal foolin" 
As it is not possible to outdo that famous party except 
on entirely new lines, one of our enterprising hostesses 
is arranging to substitute a corner of Chinatown for the 
section of darkeytown that gave such "local color" to the 
Presidio Heights gathering. It would certainly be unique 
to see one of our fashionable white belles in all the bravery 
of her imported costume whirling through a mazy waltz 
in the embrace of the Chinese cook, or, better still, a trucu- 
lent highbinder with a hatchet in his sleeve and a navy 

The poet Gray said, "The path of glory leads but to 
the grave." We in San Francisco have found it takes a 
different course — it leads us to the California Market, 
where we get fresh oysters daily, shipped from beds where 
they are raised from true Chesapeake seed ; such stock is 
nowhere else in this city to be obtained. Moraghan is the 
purveyor. 




IN THE EMBRACK OF THE COOK 



A trial of two generations or more has been the test that proves 
Abbott's Angostura Bitters to be the best tonic for family use. 



etr-TRy our 

Stanford Richmond Coal 

From the Richmondvale District, 

Newcastle, N. S. W., Australia 

Intense heat, little ash, and no 
clinker. Direct from the mine 
to the consumer 

SOLD TO TRADE ONLY 

ASK YOUR DEALER FOR IT AND 

SEE THAT YOU GET IT 

RICHMOND COAL CO. 

Agents 



52 



-THE WASP 



[July 8, 1905. 






Mrs. Whitelaw Reid 



Ogden Mills Reid 
THE HON. WHITHI.AW REID'S FAMILV 



Miss Jean Templeton Reid 



Fashionables at Southern Resorts. 

It is a long time since so many of our fashionables have 
turned their steps toward the Southern part of the State 
for their summer outings as this year. It may be because 
the season has been unusually cool, or it may be that there 
is more doing in the way of entertainment in the Southern 
resorts. 

Mrs. Clare Walker Brayton, the younger of the trio 
of beautiful sisters, of Oakland, is spending the summer in 
Santa Barbara, where she has taken rooms at Johnson's 
Farm with her children, and is enjoying the balmy air 
and the opportunity to rest after the strenuous life she 
led in society last winter. Mrs. Brayton and Mrs. William 
Lynham Shiels of Oakland are very intimate friends, and 
their entertainments are always worth attending. I hear 
that the Braytons intended to spend the Fourth in Santa 
Barbara city, so that, like all good patriots, they might 
listen to the music and see the fireworks. 

Mr. Tony Hellman, the popular member of the Bohemi- 
an Club, is also at Santa Barbara, where he is being lion- 
ized in a manner to turn a less strong head. But "Tony" 
has gathered about him a group of clever people — he never 
makes friends with stupid persons — and is quite at home 
at the watering-place. 

^ jt ^ 

Theodore Wores, the famous artist who just returned 
from abroad, is in Santa Barbara for an indefinite period 




and is finding much that is worthy of his brush. He is 
already at work on two Mission pictures, and declares that 
the possibilities for artists is greater in California than in 
any place or country that he knows. 



Kneel on Love Letters. 

Love letters encased in white satin covers, on which 
were embroidered hearts, darts and other emblems of love, 
were used as cushions at the wedding of Miss Bessie Wyatt 
and Mr. John Jenks in Virginia recently. All the letters 
written by the couple during the courtship were in those 
cushions, the size of which bore witness to great epistolary 
industry, and which nearly staggered the small boy and 
girl who bore them in front of bride and groom up the 
church aisle. The pillows are now preserved in the home 
of the couple, whence let us hope they may never be borne 
without the white satin covers, to play a prominent part 
in a divorce suit. For Cupid is such a fickle little chap ! 




DORCHESTER HOUSE 
The Residence of the New American Ambassador in London. 



This is the proper Panel Boot 
Victoria.. ? ? We have them. 

Fifty Pony Vehicles in Stock. 

SrUDEMEER 

RROS.fPMPANY 

Market and Tenth Streets 



July 8, 1905-] 



■THE WASP- 



53 




MISS EDNA RINN 
One of the Society belles of San Jose 

Beauty and the Beast. 

The story of Beauty and the Beast has had an exem- 
plification in Californian real life, although the denou- 
inent was very different from that of the romantic fairy 
tale of our childhood where the ogre grew, through the 
power of love, to a grand Prince and lived happily with 
the Princess ever after. But, perhaps, the poor Mongolian 
beast did not have an equal opportunity to develop along 
princely lines, for the fair one disdained him, and her 
father, in sensible, business-like twentieth-century way, 
sent for the police at San Mateo. The story began nine- 
teen years ago when Miss Mary Christina de Guigne 
toddled around the gardens of her father's handsome 
place in San Mateo, where Ah John or, as he prefers to 
be called, Jung Din, was gardener. The Oriental's adora- 
tion was all very well while the girl was of tender age, 
but as the devotions grew during a period of nineteen 
years, it increased in ardor to quite an embarrassing de- 
gree to the society debutante. When remonstrated with, 
the Americanized Chinese, who believed that "one man is 
as good as another, if not better," made known his desire 
to become the son-in-law of Mr. Christian de Guigne. 
There was no mistake about the infatuated Chinaman 's 
attachment, so much in earnest was he that the family 
considered it advisable to leave for Europe in order to 
escape a ridiculous situation. But the Chinese followed 
the de Guignes to New York. Fortunately he did not 
overtake them and returned to San Francisco, but on 
their return Jung Din returned to his suit with even 
greater ardor than ever, and was the first to bid the de 
Guignes welcome upon their home-coming. Offers of 
money, threats, cajolery, nil proved vain. A short til 1 
ago Mr. de Guigne and his daughter came by train from 
San Mateo to San Francisco, when the Oriental took the 
same car and renewed his obnoxious offers of marriage. 
That proved the last straw. Mr. de Guigne had Jung 



Din arrested, and Justice of the Peace Booth, ol 

I City, before whom il ase came up, sentenced the 

Mongolian to jail for fifteen days on a charge oi disturb- 
ing the peace. Now what is there at the back of this 
siiiry.' \Vli\ should the Chinaman have been so per 
1111. unless he was crazy .' Ii seems t" be a dangerous 
periment i" Christianise a Chinaman, and teach him thai 
all men are alike. If .lung liin had bi i a good Christ- 
ian, lie musl have had a great shock when his hand was 

-.' rudely refused on ii becoming a question of minglin 
Caucasian with Mongolian blond. II' Jung Din ever goes 

hack to China be is sure to b< ne an irreconcilable 

Boxer! 

i< ■.< Jt 

Honolulu Heiress Weds. 

The wedding gown of Miss Alice Campbell, who was 
married in Honolulu on June 21sl to Mr. Walter Macfar- 
lane, was purchased in San Francisco. With her mother, 
Miss Campbell came I" California six months ago, "ii 
route to New York, where she had planned to buy her 
trousseau. Buf the shops of San Francisco proved so al- 
luring that the ladies changed their minds regarding the 
Eastern trip. A number of brides have done the same 
thing. Miss Price, whose wedding in the Empire Room of 
the Palace Hotel was as fine a picture as I ever saw, told 
me that the modistes of San Francisco are greater artists 
than those of Europe, where until the last year she had 
purchased her clothes. Miss Campbell was entertained 
extensively while here last winter, and a number of our 
fashionables have received her wedding cards. Mr. Mac- 
farlane is also well known in San Francisco. He is a 
nephew of the late "Ned" Macfarlane, who many years 
ago was the publisher of The Wasp. The wedding took 
place in the Roman Catholic. Cathedral, and was attended 
by the smart set of the Islands. Mis< Muriel Campbell, 
the bride's young sister, acted as maid of honor, and Miss 
Clara Cummings, Miss Alice Macfarlane, Miss Ada Rhodes 
and Miss Irene Dickson, four prominent belles, were brides- 
maids. 

Entre Nous. 




Photoby Tabcr 



MISS JHSSIK I-ILIMORB 




SOCIETY WOMEN WHO PLAY GOLF. 



California Photo-Engraving Co. 



1 Mrs. Leroy Nickel of Menlo Golf Club and Mrs. George Roe of San Rafael. 2 Mrs. Minor Goodall and Miss 
Violet Whitney of Claremont Country Club. 3 Miss Wright of Claremont Country Club and Miss Doris Batchel- 
der of Menlo Golf Club. 4 Miss Sarah Dram of San Francisco Golf and Country Club and Frank Kales of Clare- 
mont Country Club. 5 Mrs. Ricard and Mrs. Harry Knowles. 6 Mrs. J. R. Clark of San Francisco Golf and 
Country Club. 7 Mrs. Florence Ives of the San Francisco Golf and Country Club. 8 Mrs. R. G. Brown and Mrs. 
H. H. Sherwood on Claremont Country Club course. 9 Mrs. Knowles of Claremont, Miss Dram and Mrs. R. 
G. Brown. 



July 8, 1905 ] 



-THE WASP- 



55 




Postd for TkllVasf 



"MAUD MULLER. 



California Photo-Engraving Co 



Celebrities At Home 

No. 15 



An Actress Who Likes to Portra^y the Daughters of Pa.ssion 




IT was whilst pondering over the slight line 
that separates the real from the ideal, and 
wondering if an emotional actress merges her 
personality with histrionic emotionalism oil 
the stage, that I was groping my way through 
the semi-dark region lying back of the stage of 
the Grand Opera House. A sobbing voice 
reached my ears and saddened my heart. The tones that 
thrilled me were 
those of Miss 
Maud Williamson. 
The first im- 
pression conveyed 
by Miss Maud 
Williamson o if 
the s.tage is thai 
of extreme weari- 
ness, but as a 
smile lights up 
the expressive 
Irish - blue eyes 
her mobile fea- 
tures grow radi- 
ant, effacing ev- 
ery trace of fa- 
tigue. She is tall- 
er than the aver- 
age woman; "ma- 
jestic " is perhaps 
the best word 
with which to ex- 
press the splendid 
figure and carri- 
age of the Eng- 
lish star. Her 
abundant black 
hair is as glossy 
as the oft-quoted 
raven 's win g. 
There is an undu- 
lating grace about 
her movements, 
and she seems to 
glide instead of 
walk. Her soft 
wool dress was of 
a brilliant blue, 
and of nun-like 
plainness, cling- 
ing in statuesque 
folds to her figure 
and trailing upon 
the ground. Her 
bodice was also 
severely cut, and 
the only brighten- 
ing touch was 
gained from a 
fichu and deep 
cuffs of white 
lawn. When I ap- 
peared in the doorway the actress was vigorously wiping 
tears from her eyes, but as she saw that she was not alone 
she caught up a large white and blue hat and pinned ii 
to her hair. 




MISS MAUD WILLIAMSON 



"These scenes always upset me," said Miss William- 
son, apologetically, motioning me to a seat on the couch 
and niacins herself beside me. "I wear a hat in this scene 
and must have it securely fastened so that I need not dis- 
tract my thoughts from the lines." 

"You really weep?" I gasped, with genuine surprise. 

Miss Williamson smiled, appreciatively, as she replied : 

"It is all very real to me. But I am not quite up to the 

mark, and as 1 
have been ill since 
landing from the 
steamer I find that 
'Kate Cregeen'is 
rather too har- 
rowing. ' ' 

Just then a call 
from the wings 
drew the actress 
to the stage, and 
again the low. 
sobbing tones vi- 
brated through 
the room. It was 
only for a mo- 
ment, as she re- 
entered almost 
immediately, ex- 
plaining that she 
should have to go 
back again for an 
instant, and later 
she should be on 
for a period of 
ten minutes. 

Before making 
her next entrance 
the actress arran- 
ged a long blue 
„-Joak over the 
plain dress, and 
made a stately ex- 
it. As she came 
back to the tiny, 
box -like room. 
Miss Williamson 's 
deep eyes glowed 
with a hint of the 
passionate feeling 
that had dictated 
the cry: "I will 
go to my child," 
with which she 
had left, the stage. 
Seating her- 
self for another 
jrief moment, I 
ventured to ask 
about the talis- 
man she wore. 

Actresses gen- 
erally have a pet 



lucky stone or some kind of a talisman which they carry 
about their person. 

"Mine is really odd and beautiful," declared Miss 
Williamson, fondling the figure that hung suspended fi'om 



July s, 1905 J 



'THE WASP- 



57 



aquain chain oi semi-transpareni green beads tnd b 
links. I| is a hk.. a sorl ..1 god from New Zet 
it was carved with a green-stone batchel bj Man,,- They 
regard the tiki very highly, and bury a Tiki win, its 
e ?\ s I-' for a period of forty years. The Tiki 

•''', ;" n '° ra With the Maoris. A Tiki 

sacred by a Nev Zealand nam,, as the crucifix it . 

TOU| ' "I 1 "'!"'- Bui lei me show yon soi thcr of «n 

-'"''" - 1 *""' jewelry," added Mi- Williamson. 

. OP enin 8 •' ' venienl trunk, she took from ii a col- 

lectl0D "' articles, all fashioned fr the same mala, 

green stone, thai is as bard a.- Hint. 

Marveling al the rather crude taste of the handsome 
woman, tasked whether tin- New Zealand ornaments were 
her favorites. 

"Sapphires are my pel jewels, with turquoise a close 
scia.ii. I. she replied, simply ami frankly. 

* * * 

Prom jewels we turned to gowns, and Miss Williamson 

ln|,i ■'"' tn al she bad le to America almosl vvithoul any 

theatrical wardrobe, as sin- ha. I been accustomed in Aus- 
tralia io baring the stage trappings furnished. ••! have 

■i lls i had der everything for my pari in 'The Besl to 

Win,' " she said. "As 'Meg Trevellian' I wear splendid 
Empire gowns, whicl si mo aboul five hundred dollars." 

"'Meg Trevellian' is evidently your favorite charac- 
ter," I suggested, whilst watching the lights ami shadows 
follow each other across Miss Williamson's mobile face. 

"No," she confessed, seriously; "I like 'Potiphar's 
Wife' in -Joseph of Canaan.' She is a ha. I woman, and 
there is where I do my host work. I„ a little Mink and 
white, wishy-washy .-real tire, full of pretty whims and 
windii." herself sweetly around her husband's moods, there 
is nothing Io inspire a woman. But a sinner, one who Eeels 
and loves and hales, suffers and is sorry that she has been 
guilty of emotions for which she is tortured— oh, that is 
Iniii"' in the heart of the world! T do not believe that the 
actress whose work amounts to anything can content her- 
self with weak, sweet parts." 

-V word about "Joseph of Canaan." The Biblical 
play was written in Australia by Walters, a Unitarian 
clergyman, who, to look at, one would think he could not 



'Bo 



to a goose. Pie. however, has pul a lot of 



"hell-fire" into "Madam Potiphar," and the Australian 
author has not a wife, like Mark Twain had. who used to 
take mil all the "bell-fire" from her husband's writings 
Mrs. Walters left all the "hell-fire" in "Madam Potiphar" 
and when the play was advertised in London the Lord 
Chamberlain — the censor of morals — who has not the 
slightest objection to Bernard Shaw's "Disagreeable 
Ciil" being allowed to talk veiled smut from the stage, 
told Walters that "Madam Potiphar" must bold her 
tongue in England. The production of "Madam Potiphar," 
if I remember rightly, is prohibited in England. 
# * * 

In the intensely passionate creature that lay back ii| 

the couch cushions and smiled at me from deep-set, glowing 
eyes, I here remained little trace of the wan woman who 
had confronted me half an hour before, as I entered h.r 
dressing-room. 

"I suppose that you have made your art a life-Ions 
study?" I said, as politely as my growing curiosity would 
permit. 

"I began my stage career fourteen years ago, when I 
was sixteen," said Miss Williamson. "I made ray firsl ap- 
pearance at the St. James Theatre, in London. England, 
with Mr. and Mrs. Kendall — Madge Robertson. I hardly 
remember what I played, but it was something \.r\ small. 
Then I took the part of 'Mrs. Lynx' in 'Married Life,' 
at the Haymarket, where I also played 'Countess Zicki' ir. 

To restore gray hair to its natural color use Egyptian 
Huna — a vegetable dye — perfectly harmless, and the effect of 
immediate. All druggists sell it. Langley & Michaels Co. 
agents. 



'Diplomacy.' That was with Mr. and Mrs. Bancroft. 1 

have been on the slau'c ever siln 

"Jusl a minute," added the actress, running toward if. 
door in answer 10 a call from the stage. 

" I have noi bad a vacal .on in seven years,' ' shi 
untying her cloak as she re-entered the room ami took up 
the thread of versation where it had I .1 dropped, 

"Bui v" 111.1-1 have diversions," I suggested. 

"I love pictures." whispered ihe aclress. turning a 

sparkling Eace upon me. "They lake mo out of myself; 1 
am exceedingly nervous, and when 1 can go to a picture 

nailery and steep myself in good paintings I forgel .-very 
thing that worries and distracts. I collect curios. I haw 
ihe garter— the real, true garter— thai Edmund Keene 
wore when he first played Richard III at Drury Lane. I 
fed thai I have something that was the property of a kind- 
ly actor in a kingly role I have a greal many curios; I 

cannol recall Ihrm at a moment, lint if you were to come 

io my home then you should have a feasl of antiques." 

"Most of the actresses I have interviewed were fond 

of Blowers besides having a talisman." 1 began, fearing that 
I was going to lose something of the personal tastes of this 
delightful woman and si long actress. 

"1 I ever without violets in my own land." she 

sighed, "and I love roses, loo. Violets are so wholes 

a blossom, though, that to the woman who loves the lowly 
flower it whispers wonderful secrets of purity and sa.ri 
lice. ' ' 

* # * 

Glancing at my companion, 1 noticed the new light thai 
grew in her eyes, and hoping Io lead her "thoughts to yet 
newer topics I touched upon literature, saying: "I snp- 
t'ose, like Ihe rest of your profession, you are an omnivor- 
ous reader. Miss Williamson ." ' 

She si k her head, slightly, as she replied: "I read. 

certainly, bill not miscellaneous hooks. It seems to me 
that there can be no benefit; from the perusal of light 
novels. The classics and the deep, emotional works, on the 
contrary, are of great educational worth to the profes- 
sion. One thing I notice in America is the great number 
of magazines that yon publish. In my room at the present 
moment I have a stack of magazines sent to me by un- 
known friends." 

Touching the subject of audiences. Miss Williamson is 
appreciative: 

"San Francisco audiences are immensely apreciative, " 
declares the actress. "They understand a player's mood 
and seem to enter right into it. It is satisfying, indeed, 
to be received in that way. T want to come back. When 
I know the tastes of the people and when they are familiar 
with my ways we shall grow fond of each other. My bearl 
goes out to meet their hearts." 

A call came and Miss Williamson apologetically dis- 
appeared. I made my way around the wonderland al the 
back of the stage, the voice of the wailing mother pursuing 
me in haunting sweetness as I stumbled over a piece of 
scenery and emerged into the every. lav light of Mission 
Street. 



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58 



•THE WASP- 



[July 8, 1905. 




Thursday — I alius did have a charitable disposition. 
Works of charity and neighborliness have always been in 
my line, but the way some people do charity stunts, as 
Flossie Gaygirl slangily says, has sort 0' soured me on 
that kind of thing. I have many and many's the time 
said I could not see how some people live. I have found 
out that some of them, at any rate, live by charity. Good- 
ness gracious me ! You would never think it. No, indeed ! 
They wear silks and Paris hats, and talk of their charities ! 
Why, I can hardly keep still when I bear them. There 
was Mrs. Grawfta that I called on the other day. She 
had a lovely sik matched quilt, and I said: "Lands sake, 
Mrs. Grawfta, how can you afford such a lovely quilt?" 
"Ob, I can't," she says, "and it isn't for me. I made it 
to raffle for a very deserving woman who has a husband 
and six children to support. The tickets are only one 
dollar each, and of course you will take one?" Now, I 
was wantin' to have my green bombazine, which I bought 
to wear to the Chicago Exposition (only I didn't go), dyed 
black, but she made such a touching appeal that I waver- 
ed. "She who hesitates is lost." That's my quotation. 
Well, I wasn't exactly lost, but my one dollar was. And 
the worst of it was that Mrs. Grawfta dame in the next 
week and said the tickets were almost gone and wouldn't 
I take another one? Will you believe it, 1 did. I don't 
know why. Then I asked Mrs. Grawfta about a month 
later about the quilt, and she told me she had the drawing 
and that she had won it. And that is not all, for I have 
learned something which makes me feel sure the worthy 
woman who got the money from the raffle was none other 
than Mr. Grawfta 's wife, and she came out in a new dress 
the week after. Gracious me, what hypocrisy ! 
* # * 

Friday — Goodness, what a scare I got today ! I called 
on old Mrs. Mugsby, who is taking face treatment to keep 
her from breaking mirrors when she looks into them. That's 
what Mrs. Lightley says. Really, she is the homeliest wo- 
man that I ever saw, and it appears she reads all the face 
and beauty doctors' advertisements, and spends oceans 
of money trying to have her face made over. Oh, dear! 
What a sight she was when I saw her today! I didn't 
know that she was undergoing treatment, and I thought 
that something terrible had happened her, or she had an 
attack of smallpox. The beauty doctor must have been 
desperate, for he all but skinned her alive. She resem- 
bled a boiled lobster. "Gracious me, Mrs. Mugsby!" I 
said, "you look as if you'd been lighting- the fire with the 
kerosene can and blew yourself up." The old fool was 
quite indignant, and told me that the treatment she was 
undergoing was mild compared with some other old women 

Good coffee is the best stimulant to brace up flagging 
spirits. The best beverage is obtained from Armer Broth- 
ers' "Very Best" beans grown on the firm's own planta- 
tions. 



who want to be Venuses in their second childhood. When 
I told her that her skin seemed to be coming off in large 
patches, she said that was just what the beauty doctor 
wanted. "The new skin,"- she said, "would come out 
soft and beautiful as a. baby's, and not a wrinkle would 
she have. Then she got down on the floor and began to 
walk around on all fours and kick her old heels up like 
a frisky donkey. Oh, dear ! Such a fright as I got ! I 
really thought the severe treatment for her face had in- 
jured her brain and she meant to attack me. I always had 
a great dread of insane people. But it was only an exercise 
to develop her hips and bust that she was going through, 
so I didn't have to climb on top of the piano or jump 
through the window to save myself. Goodness, what a 
headache I had when I came away. It will be a long time 
before I call on that old lunatic again. Mrs. Lightley tells 
me that the town is full of homely old women like Mrs. 
Mugsby who are boiling their faces and turning flipflaps 
on the floor to improve their faces and figures. I know I 
can never feel at home in this town. 

* -;:■ * 

Saturday — Mrs. Lightley called to see me this morning 
to say a'ood-by, as she was goino- away on one of her week- 
end trips this afternoon. She had a parcel in her hand 
that I thought was a pair of new gloves. Oh, goodness ! 
What do you think? It was her light-blue bathing suit. 
"Ethel Lightley," I said, in mv severest tone, "you 
wouldn't dare exhibit yourself in public in such an inde- 
cent garment as that!" She only laughed. Oh, dear! 
How do I tolerate that woman? She has no more sense 
of the proprieties than a South Sea Islander. She told 
me that all the young women of the %'ery smart set were 
cavorting up and down the beach at Santa Cruz in similar- 
garments. "That's one reason why there's such a rush 
of nice, eligible men," she said, "to the sleepy town this 
year." Nice, eligible men! Miserable, depraved brutes! 
That's what I would call them. "How could any nice man 
sit on the beach and see a woman make a shameless exhi- 
bition of herself?" I said. But Ethel ;s a hopeless ease. 
She is completely saturated with the perverted spirit of 
this awful community, and thinks of nothing only how 
to attract and please men. She wanted to go into my 
bedroom and put on her awful suit just to show me how 
well it became her, but I sternly objected to any such 

Put new life into the run-down system. Abbott's Angostura Bit- 
ters does it. Nothing like it to kill that "tired feeling." 



C. H. REHNSTROM 
<TniIor anft imp otter 



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Market, Kearney and Geary Sts. 

formerly at chronicle bldo. 



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asthma and all kindred ailments. We have five different 
Hot Sulphur Springs; tub and plunge baihs and the largest 
mineral water swimming tank in the State. Table and 
rooms are first-class. Rates $2 per day* $12 to $14 per week. 
Special rates to families and half rates to children. Inquire 
at Peck's, n Montgomery street, or address THEO. RICH- 
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Received Gold Medal— Highest Award World's Fair. St. Louis, 1904. 



July 8, 1905. J 



-THE WASP- 



59 



ballot dancer performance under my roof. "Ethel 1.1. al- 
ley," I said, "this is neither the dressing-room of a theatre 
nor a school of art for the exhibition of studies in the 
altogether. Please wear your disgraceful garment where it 
will be more in place." "Ail right, Tabby," 1 d she, 
without a blush. --If you want tu deprive yourself of ar. 
exhibition thai the crowd at Santa Cruz is hungering for, 
you're the loser." As she went downstairs she called out: 
" u " ! I get into mv thin gossamer suit tomorrow, Tabby, 

those fat society women thai have been posin 

admirers on the sands at Santa Cruz won't have a 1 rpoi 
al's guard to look at them. I'm mistaken if most of the 
opera-glasses will not be turned on yours truly. You watch 
the society columns of the newspapers and see." What a 
shameless woman, mapping out such a program for herself, 
and on Sunday, too. Hut it's the influence of this worldly 
town. I'm beginning to be afraid I may become contami- 
nated. I caught myself reading all t lie' disgusting details 
of a bigamy ease and a divorce suit this morning. I must 
read a couple of chapters of the Pilgrim's Progress before 
I go to bed. 

Tabitha Twiggs. 



Until recently lions, bears and coyotes in Utah were 
hydra-headed — for bounty purposes. Natural history is 
now being studied very diligently by the officials of* the 
Mormon State, whose treasury has been robbed to the ex- 
tent of $100,000 by bounty swindlers. In Arizona and 
Nevada, in addition to the prevalence of "wild eats," 
which usually haunt mining districts, there are still not a 
few wild animals with many heads. A "caput mortuum" 
of a ferocious animal is worth a lot of money in some of the 
Western States. 



BOOKS and AUTHORS 



1 

5 



Marie Robinson Wright's new book, "The Republic 
of Chile," describes in a thorough manner the growth, 
resources and industrial conditions of the chief country 
in South America. The most interesting chapter in Miss 
Robinson's book, however, is the account of Chilean 
art — painting and sculpture. It is barely fifty 
years since an Academy of Art was founded in Santiago. 
French influence is marked, but there is a strong and 
healthy art development in the great Republic of the 
South. 

Another unexpected industry of Chile is wine growing. 
Millions have been invested in Chilean vineyards; schools 
of viticulture have been established, and at all agricul- 
tural schools the pupils study the subject. Chilean 
brandy and wine won gold medals at the Buffalo Exposi- 
tion of 1900. The Chilean apologizes if he offers French 
wine to a guest. It may be considered conceit by a Bor- 
deaux wine merchant, but the Chilean conceit helps in 
developing the wine industry of the country. It would 
not do any harm to Californians if they had some con- 
ceit about our own excellent native wines! 

& # 3£ 
Mrs. Fremont Older's new novel, which the Appletons 
will publish in September, was written under high press- 
ure. The author scarcely took time to sleep or eat during 
the last four weeks of her task so wrought was she with 



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the desire to complete the book. This had habit of work- 
ing under excessive mental pressure has influenced u 
writers, and some of the most noted. Balzac was addicted 
to shutting himself up in a room and working night and 
day when once fully engrossed in the plot of a new novel. 
Zangwill is also noted for the same characteristic, and 
had some serious fits of sickness by indulging it. 

* * * 

It has come to light that "The Curfew Shall Not Ring 
Tonight," which has been wrung out these many yi 
by amateur spouters, was not written by Mrs. Rose Hart- 
wick Thorpe, who for many years lived at San Diego. It 
is an old English poem, and was reprinted in the Philadel- 
phia Penny Magazine in the early part of last century. It 
was from this, no doubt, that Mrs. Thorpe got her "in- 
spiration." 

* * # 

Mrs. Richard Walton Tully (May Eleanor Gates) is 
expected in Berkeley next month for a stay of six weeks 
or two months. Since she has lived in New Tork Mrs. 
Tully has returned to California whenever she could get 
away, for she is thoroughly in love with her adopted 
State. A funny little story is told of her first impressions 
of New York. Margaret Cameron Smith, now Mrs. Lewis, 
was in the East on a brief business trip, and before re- 
turning to Oakland she had paid a visit to Mrs. Tully, 
whom she knew well here in the West. She found the 
little authoress propped up in bed, and was told that she 
had been suffering form a cold. When Mrs. Lewis arose 
to say good-bye Mi's. Tully gave a sob; "You are going 
back to God's country," said she, "and I have to stay 
here in this hole." Since then the author of "The Bio- 
graphy of a Prairie Girl" has grown to like New York 
better than she did, and now that she is so pleasantly 
situated near Central Park, with her friends living near 
her, she is more contented. 



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60 



THE WASP- 



[July 8, 1905. 



WHO'S WHO? 



HAVE WE A FOUR HUNDRED IN CALIFORNIA? 



By GRACE VAN TASSEL. 

NO. IX. 

Mrs. Philip Caduc is a well-known society dowager, 
whose interest these days, however, is more in church work 
and charity than in society. The Caducs are a very old 
and fine family, and have always been prominent in tht 
social life of San Francisco. Florence Caduc, the elder 
daughter, married Harry Williams some years ago, and is 
the mother of several children. Cora, the young daughter, 
married Dr. De Marville, and died at the birth of her first 
child. 

The Cadwaladers are Red Bluff people, and are almost 
new-comers in our society, for it was only a few years ago 
that the family migrated to San Francisco. Linda Cadwal- 
ader, the only daughter, is a lovely girl and quite the most 
popular unmarried woman in society. She made her debuc 
about five years ago, and obtained immediate prestige. 
She is a niece of Mrs. Mayo Newhall and a protege of 
Mrs. Henry Scott, so her popularity was assured. She is 
greatly in demand as bridesmaid, and has officiated as such 
at many fashionable weddings. Her brothers — Bert and 
George — are both favorites in the smart set, and are al- 
ways included in the guest list of the Gaiety Club, that 
exclusive organization of which their sister is president. 
Bert Cadwalader, or "Baby," as his friends call him, was 
a famous Yale football player. 

Mr. and Mrs. George Toland Cameron took an active 
part in society's gay doings until Mrs. Cameron's failing 
health compelled her retirement and life across the bay 

George Cameron was one of society's favored beaux, 
and was at one time reputed engaged to Miss Frances 
Currey, now Mrs. W. E. Crist. Mrs. Cameron was a South- 
ern girl, a Tennesseean, Miss Sue Rose Crook of Memphis. 
She is exceedingly pretty, with exquisite coloring and del- 
icate features. She is a prime mover in the set in which 
are numbered Mrs. Henry Dutton, Mrs. Harry Gray, Mrs. 
John Rodgers and Mrs. Clark. 

* * * 

Mr. and Mrs. Fred Butters' family are decidedly clever, 
and their girls move in the set where brains and ability 
count. Alice Butters was one of the most talented pianists 
in San Francisco. She recently married Mr. Canfield of 
San Juan, and lives on his pretty ranch. Genevieve, the 
second daughter, is as talented as her sister, only along a 
different line. She is studying in Europe. 

Top of the heap are the Carolans. They are the leaders 
of our social regime. Mr. and Mrs. James Carolan, head of 
the clan, live in a handsome house on California street, 
and dominate the Four Hundred from that coign of van- 
tage. Mrs. James Carolan is a very pretty woman. The 
sons and daughters have inherited her good looks. The 
eldest daughter, Evelyn, was accounted the prettiest girl 
in society, and was a general favorite ; so her marriage, 
which took her East to live, was regretted by the numerous 
friends. Emily, the second daughter, is unmarried, and 
Genevieve, the youngest, is Mrs. Harry Williams Poelt. 
Then there are three sons — Francis, Dr. Herbert, and Ed- 
ward, who lives in the East. 

Mr. and Mrs. Francis J. Carolan live at Burlingame. 
They are the head and front of the exclusive set which 
makes that distinguished suburb its headquarters. To the 
Carolans, indeed, Burlingame owes its very existence, for 
it was the Carolans who first bought and built the mag- 
nificent home, "The Crossways," in the distant, secluded 
suburb. Mrs. Carolan was Harriet Pullman, daughter of 
the Chicago multimillionaire ear manufacturer, and has 



a large fortune in her own name. She is a very handsome 
woman, whose resemblance to Mrs. Pat Campbell is often 
a subject of comment. Frank Carolan is a nice, likable 
young man. He is Master of the Hounds of the Burlingame 
Hunt and leads the life of a country gentleman. 

* * # 

The Carrigans have always stood high up on the social 
ladder of the elect of San Francisco. Their position in 
society is unimpeachable, for they occupy it by virtue cf 
birth, wealth, and breeding. Miss Carrigan, the only 
daughter in the family, has never married, and her in- 
terest is greater in charitable affairs than it is in the do- 
ings of the smart set. She is now in the Philippines as 
the guest of her brother Jack. 

Andrew Carrigan the eldest brother, carries on the 
business of the firm of Dunham & Carrigan. 

Clarence, the second son, is an army officer. He was 
attending the University at the time of the outbreak of the 
war with Spain and secured a commission in the army at 
that time. He is attached to the Artillery, and is now on 
duty at Fort Baker. Little more than a year ago Lieuten- 
ant Carrigan married Miss Anna Sperry, quite the pret- 
tiest and most attractive girl in Sausalito. She is a rela- 
tive of the influential Sperry clan. 

Jack Carrigan, youngest of the flock, is a Berkeley 
graduate who now carries on business in our insular pos- 
sessions. He is quite a wit, and was a great favorite at 
college. 

The Carrolls were formerly leaders in the smart set, 
but nowadays very little is seen of them in society. The 
two Carroll girls — Lizzie and Gertie — had good looks, 
money and dash, but they were concerned in an unfortun- 
ate scandal, and rather than run the risk of being cut by 
friends, they have cut out of society. Mrs. Carroll is a 
most attractive woman of refinement, who has great 
wealth. She is a relative of the Murphys of San Jose, 
who are amongst the best-known families in California. 
Lizzie Carroll was a schoolmate and close friend of Mrs. 
W. K. Vanderbilt ("Birdie Fair"), but the intimacy 
seems to have lapsed. Miss Carroll married young Will 
Whittier several years ago. Her sister Gertrude is en- 
gaged to Georgie Hall, the handsome and debonnair ex- 
Minister to Turkey. 

* * * 

Mr. and Mrs. Maurice Casey's chief claims to social 
prominence come from the fact that they are stepfather 
and mother to Miss Katharine Dillon, now Mrs. Emory 
Winship, one of society's wealthiest young women. Mr. 
Casev has money too, but his step-daughter's fortune 
makes bis look small. Mrs. Casey, when she was Mrs. 
Dillon, had little in the line of this world's goods in the 
days her daughter, Katie May, was small. Existence for 
the widow and her little girl was a bit of a problem. 
About that time they met a Mrs. McLaughlin, a woman 
of vast wealth, and she became greatly attached to the 
pretty child. Mrs. McLaughlin educated the little girl, 
and at her death left her great fortune divided between 
the little Katie May and Miss Ives, now Mrs. Henry 
Crocker. It has been estimated that each of the girls in- 
herited about $3,000,000. Three millions! The Caseys 
live in a beautiful home which Miss Dillon built not long 
ago ou Broadway, commanding a superb marine view. P 
was in this house that Miss Dillon's marriage to Lieuten- 
ant Emory Winship was celebrated last winter. Mr. Win- 
ship comes of a fine old Southern family. It is said that 
he intends to resign from the navy, and that he and his 
wife will reside in Ross Valley, where Mrs. Winship re- 
cently bought a large estate, on which she will build a 
great country house. 

Mrs. Theresa Casserly occupies a position at the head 
of San Francisco dowagers, and the family's hold on 
society is very strong. Thev are closely allied with the 
Burlingame-San Mateo clan of society. They are very 
exclusive ! The only daughter of the family is unmarried. 
Miss Daisy Casserly is a woman of great refinement and 



July 8, 1905.] 



-THE WASP 



61 



much personal charm. She is a musician and a 1 0] 

music. Jacfc Casserly has two strong claims i" dis 
tion. First of all he is the husband "t fjreal liein -. 
his wife ix'iiiu- Miss Cudahy of Chicago, daughter 
lam. his Michael of that ilk. sin. i> a quiet, mousi 
woman, but very attractive. AJways simply gowned and 
hi . .-I unassuming, she would be the lasi person in the 
world suspected of great wealth. Her manners are charm- 
ing, and in contradistinction to many of our ultra-rich, 
wlnis.' snobbishness is so offensive. Mrs. Casserlj 1- a 

harpist of greal ability. Jack Casserly, ber busl I. is 

famous as the author .'I' a celebrated bon-mot. It \ il 
a San Francisco club dinner — the University or Pacini 
I'ni.ui chili — that .Mv. Casserly was .-all.'. I 1 « ■ respond in 
a toast to Will Crocker. It was at the time that Mr. 
Crocker's sister-in-law, Mis- Beth Sperrj of Stockton, 
hail just become tin- bride of Prince Poniatowski, ami Mr. 
(.'asserly. raising his ".lass to Mr. Crocker, proposed the 
health of "This prince Of hankers anil the hanker of 
princes." That toast has passed into club history. 

* # * 

The Castle family is of Hebrew extraction. Thej have 
always ha.l a prominent place in society, and the Castle 
"iris have ever moved in our exclusive set. Miss Hilda 
Castle married Charles Farquharson some years ago ami 
is one of the smart set's most prominent young matrons. 
Another sister, Miss Eva Castle, has never married, nor 
has the brother, Arthur. Related In the same family was 
Neville Castle, who married pretty Miss Mamie Scott, Mrs. 
Salisbury's niece, who later went on the stage. 

Another Miss Castle came into prominence in London 
in connection with a famous kleptomania ease. She was 
adjudged insane. Undoubtedly, kleptomania is a species 
of insanity. Mrs. Fred Castle, Miss Uva and Mrs. Far- 
quharson are now travelling abroad. Walter Castle is 
another connection of this family. 

Miss Norma Castle does not belong to "the" other 
Castles family. She is of the Stephen Castles whose home 
is on Jones Street. She is a handsome, Titian-haired 
girl, who is a close friend of Mollie Dutton, Mrs. Henry 
Bales and the Bull girls. 

Mr. and Mrs. Alexander Center are well-known in San 
Franciscan social life. Mrs. Center is a woman of great 
attractiveness, and her daughter. Miss Bessie, inherited 
not a little of her charm and brilliancy from her mother. 
There have been few more dashing, vivacious and beauti- 
ful girls to make their debut in San Franciscan society 
than Bessie Center. She was pretty as a peach with ex- 
quisite coloring, and had a wit that made her the best 
of company. Bessie Center left San Francisco for China 
with her mother about a year and a half ago, engaged to 
Tom Van Ness. On board the steamer Miss Center met 
a young Dane, Ture N. Stane, and he accompanied mother 
and daughter on their travels. In London Mr. Stane and 
Miss Center were married, and the news came as the 
greatest surprise to their Californian friends. Mr. and 
Mrs. Stane now live in Switzerland. 

Mrs. Stane 's brother, Alee Center, is a very popular 
young bachelor in our smart set. 

Two of our most eligible young bachelors are Joe and 
Selah Chamberlain, who are much sought after by society. 
Each has a goodly fortune of his own. They are bright 
and jolly young men. They live at St. Dunstan's when 
they are not attending to their mining interests in Ari- 
zona and Mexico. 

# # * 

One of the most popular women in society is Mrs. Horace 
Blanchard Chase. As Minnie Mizner, a sister of the 
famous Mizner bovs, Mrs. Chase was a famous belle and 
wit She still maintains her great popularity and ability 
to tell a good story or parry a keen thrust with the ablest 
wit Her good nature is proverbial, and her arrival at a 
dinner is the sure signal for fun to begin. Mr. Chase is 
an unconspicuous little man of excellent family, lhe 



family have a superb place in the Napa Vail, 
house parties at "Stag's Leap" an 

gathered congenial 1 pie, ami as a result more th to 

affair in the romantic place has culminated in an engag 
meiii. Mr. ami Mr-. Chase are now traveling abroad. 
(ireai favorites in the young married set an \i 

Mrs. Leonard Chenery. They are a delightful pi 

Mrs. Chenery was one of the attractive Patton girls 
whose mother is possessed of much wealth. The eldest 
daughter, Jessie, married " 1' the Boss Valley Berrys. 

William Pitzhugh Berry is his name. Then comes Edith, 
Mrs. Chenery, who married first a Mr. Wilde, from i> 
she was divorced. Ethel Patton is the remaining sistei 
Mi- Chenery is pretty and clever. Her busband is a well- 
to-do business man. lie is a close friend of the Ann's 

I'amily and lived with them before his marriage. 
[to be continued] 



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A great many San Francico people are planning to 
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Hotel Del Monte. No other resort in California offers 
such a combination of attractions— sea bathing, golf, 
automobiling, bowling, tennis, fishing, and all out-of- 
door sports. Instead of going from place to place 
seeking comforts, the wise ones of society spend their 
time at Del Monte by the sea. Address GEO. P. 
SNELL, Manager, Del Monte, California. 

At Hotel Del Monte 



62 



-THE WASP 



[July 8, 1905. 



Can England Be Invaded ? 



A SUBJECT OF INTEREST TO THE WORLD AT LARGE 

No less a military authority than Major-General Frank 
S. Russell asks quite seriously, in print: "Is not an inva- 
sion of England possible?" Of course, it would be possi- 
ble if the British navy were destroyed by a French or Ger- 
man Togo. There is, however, not any likelihood that the 
English would neglect to guard against any such national 
calamity. 

The nervous warrior deprecates the dogmatic eoeksured- 
ness of Mr. Arnold Foster, British Secretary for War, 
who is absolutely convinced of the entire immunity of Eng- 
land from the dangers of invasion. Mr. Foster supports 
the naval view that the crew of a dinghy could not land in 
Great Britain in the face of the navy. General Russell 
laughs the idea to scorn, and quotes Lord Wolseley's opin- 
ion that there is a possibility of England being invaded by 
a French force. We are also told that Nelson and Colling- 
wood believed in the absolute possibility of the invasion 
of England. The same opinion was entertained by Na- 
poleon and Wellington. Many European military authori- 
ties and students of strategy, including Moltke's favorite 
pupil, are on the side of Nelson and Collingwood, of Na- 
poleon and Wellington ; therefore, General Russell not only 
fears an invasion by France from across the channel, bu: 
he is also highly apprehensive of a German danger from 
across the North Sea. English history is pretty candid 
on the subject of invasion. It records four instances — by 
Romans, Saxons, Danes and Frenchmen, who were in 106G 
known as Normans. It is therefor somewhat puerile to ask 
the question, "Is not invasion possible?" 
# * * 

There is not the shadow of a doubt that it is "possi- 
ble" to invade England. The question is, Who will try the 
experiment and what will the British navy do in such an 
event? Of course, General Russell believes either France 
or Germany would, without any declaration of war, makr 
a dash across the channel or the North Sea, surprise and 
sink the British fleet, and effect a landing of troops. An 
occupation of London would disgrace the nation. He 
considers that the German navy is already most formida- 
ble, out of all proportion to the requirements demanded for 
the protection of its commerce ; it is daily growing strong- 
er; and if the present program is adhered to in eight years' 
time it will have a fighting force in the North Sea and the 
channel equal, if not superior to, any fleet which Great 
Britain could possibly bring against the German fleet. 

The fallacy of General Russell's argument lies in the 
assumption that Great Britain could not possibly, in 
eight years' time, create a fleet superior to that of Ger- 
many. Why not? Is Great Britain going to fall asleep 
during the next eight years? The English are the teachers 
of the Japanese in naval matters. Will the master lag 
behind his pupil? 

General Russell may be a good tactician on land, but he 
is very much at sea in connection with naval matters. The 
battle in the Straits of Korea is the greatest and as yet 
the only lesson taught in connection with modern naval 
warfare. Provided that a defending fleet has elbow room. 
Togo has taught us that the only way to destroy a hostile 
fleet intent on invasion is to await its arrival. The English 
did so with the Spanish Armada, and Togo has accomplish- 
ed the feat on a more terrible scale. "Would the British 
fleet be at the right spot at the critical moment?" asks 
General Russell. Of course, the fleet would be at the right 
spot. How could any naval movement be made on a large 
scale on the French or German coast, with sufficient troops 



The Vienna Model Bakery, 222 Sutter street, above 
Kearny, is the best and most convenient place for ladies 
to dine while down town shopping. 



on board to invade England, without the movement being 
known to tke Intelligence Department. From Sir Freder- 
ick Maurice's book, "Hostilities without Declaration of 
War from 1700 to 1870," it appears that no fewer than 
104 cases of this kind have occurred. But if war was not 
actually "declared," a state of war existed. There was 
invariably anticipation of war over some cause of fric- 
tion between the respective nations. If England should 
have a serious diplomatic difference of opinion with 
France or Germany, General Russell may rest assured that 
the Intelligence Department would be very wideawake and 
the British fleet would be at the right spot. 
* # # 

H there is any danger of invasion, it could only be a 
remote French danger. Germany would never venture 
on such a dare-devil expedition. A dash of 22 miles across 
the British Channel would be easier than to cross unobserv- 
ed 320 miles across the North Sea. Germany is geograph- 
ically so situated that she is really afraid of the British 
navy, whilst England need not trouble to take more than 
ordinary precaution. 

To invade England would be like going to a charity 
fair. One knows the price of admission, but cannot be sure 
about the cost of exit. Suppose that Germany succeeds 
in landing a few thousand soldiers somewhere on the coast 
of England. Great Britain has not only sufficient ships 
for attacking an invading fleet, but she would immediately 
block the Skagger Rack and the mouths of the Elbe and 
Weser, which would mean destruction of the entire German 
oversea commerce. Such blockades would also cut the Ger- 
man lines of communication. 

To invade England it would require a concert of mari- 
time nations. If Holland and France joined Germany, 
and Belgium were forced to give passage of troops to the 
alliance, it would become a possible matter for serious dis- 
cussion. Such an alliance, however, cannot take place 
before the Millennium. General Russell need not be afraid 
of an invasion. He might as well ask, "Can the United 
States be invaded?" Of course, they could be invaded, 
but what would happen to the invader? 

The Tactician. 



CHRISTIAN SCIENCE HUMBUG. 

Of all the suits brought in the local courts over dress- 
makers' bills, one of the most interesting was that of Miss 
Lucile Fernald against a ladies' tailor named Wiess. The 
lady undertook, as part payment for two gowns to cost 
$128, to give Christian Science treatment for deafness to 
the partner of Wiess, Jean Brooks, who afterward severed 
her business relation with the firm. The suit was tried 
by Justice of the Peace Daniels, who was given ocular 
evidence that one dress did not fit. The other had never 
been delivered. Miss Fernald had paid $93 in cash, and 
for this judgment was rendered. The lady was unable to 
satisfy the court that she had earned the $35 for "treat- 
ment." One reason was that Miss Brooks was still deaf. 
But skeptics will wonder why, if Miss Fernald was a real 
Christian Scientist, she was not able to convince herself 
that the gown tendered was a good fit. Surely, that would 
have been one of the most convincing triumphs of mind 
over matter — of truth over error! The Christian Scient- 
ist says that there is nothing but good, and, presto, evil 
vanishes. Why not say: "This dress is beautifully be- 
coming and fits perfectly," and, presto, it is accom- 
plished. 

»-i "I "I" I "I'»4 1 **4 , ^ ,, I"I" I " I " I " I"l " I " I "I"I"l" I " I'»*»4'4 l *' l"I "l "H" H'* 

* 

* 

* 

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4t C H. Philpott Co., Proprietor 

* 801 Market Street, 



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K. J. Kaplan, Manager 

San Francisco 

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1 W *i™3r *i* W I'VT V T TTTTT TTtTtTTTTTTT 



STRICTLY BUSINESS 



Points of Interest on Trade and Finance. 




VEN it' there were nothing else, the heavy 
exchanges of the Clearing House would clear- 
ly prove that the growth of our hanking sys- 
tem is great beyond precedent. The reports 
of the Banking Commission confirm the 
growth beyond the possibility of a doubt. 
The reports are not all consolidated, but sufficient has been 
shown to indicate that the increase for the half-year will 
amount to about six millions. 

«■ # * 
Our Savings Banks. 

The resources of the city savings banks on May 29th 
were $174,626,701.30, an increase of $2,445,720.72 since 
January 5th. This came from increased profits added to 
I he reserve fund, increased capital, etc. The deposits were 
nearly one hundred and sixty millions of dollars. This is 
a slight decrease of $142,93S.92, and indicates that quite 
a number of depositors have withdrawn their money to 
invest in real estate. This movement has been going on 
for some time. The loans on May 29th were nearly one 
hundred millions, while $66,821,626.S8 were invested in 
bonds, etc. The surplus fund exceeded the capital over a 
million dollars, being $0,378,458.01. There are now long 
lines of depositors drawing semi-annual interest, but most 
of this will be redeposited, and new deposits will be made 
in excess of those drawn out absolutely. 

■ * * * 
Costly Mining. 

Promoters who have tried in vain to secure a few 
thousands of dollars with which to open promising mines, 
will look with envy on the big expenditures made in the 
Transvaal before a mine begins to produce anything. The 
Johannesburg press states that a Rand deep-level mine, 
"1905 pattern," costs a million sterling before a single 
ounce of gold can be obtained from it. The Wit. Deep, 
one of the typical up-to-date companies referred to, ex- 
pended 299,504 pounds sterling for the properties, 285 
claims; 77,061 for shafts; 209,799 for development; 
346,211 for machinery and plant; and 101,544 for build- 
ings: making a total expenditure of 1,034,119 pounds be- 
fore crushing. It is remarked that there are other charges 
beside those enumerated, but that the example is a fair 
one. Such mining properties as those now being develop- 
ed in Nevada would probably be considered absolutely 
fabulous by the British investors. 

# * * 
City Commercial Banks (State). 

The resources of the Commercial banks of the city — 
that is, the State banks— were $109,635,851.80 against 
$127,374,241.04 on January 5th, an apparent loss of nearly 
eighteen millions of dollars. But this is merely a matter 
of classification. The Wells-Fargo Btnk in joining its 
forces to the Nevada National Bank did what the latter 
had done before— joined the ranks of the Nationals and 
deserted that of the State banks. Its resources exceeded 
twenty-four millions of dollars, which go to swell the re- 
sources of the Nationals. It and the Nevada National 
are San Francisco banks all the same, and their united 
resources so to swell that of the city banks. With the 



figures of the Wells-Fargo Bank added to those of the 
San Francisco commercial banks so called there would 
be in round numbers $134,000,000, a gain of nearly 
seven millions in less than five months. The resources of 
the Bank of California increased nearly seven and a half 
millions in the interim. 

* * it- 
One of the Big Sales. 

That business is in good condition in the East is 
plainly manifest by the big sale of a million tons of steel 
by the United States Steel Corporation at $25 per ton. 
The Steel Company will make at the least calculation ten 
dollars a ton, or ten million altogether, and the holders of 
common stock may have a hope to get something out of it 
as the goods go out and returns come in Good times in the 
iron and steel trade are always indicative of general pros- 
perity. 

* # # 
San Francisco Far Ahead. 

The statistics of the Treasury Department show San 
Francisco ahead of all its competitors on the Pacific 
Coast, especially in the matter of import trade. Out of 
a total of $49,906,602 for ten months ot the fiscal year, it 
can claim $43,077,637. The fact is that most of the im- 
port trade of the Coast with foreign countries is done 
through San Francisco, the goods being received here and 
distributed by sea and rail all over the other Pacific Coast 
States. As it is nearer as a shipping point to most foreign 
countries than any other of the leading cities, it will 
probablv, like New York on the Atlantic side, always re- 
tain its leading position. 

* # * 
Twenty-five Cent Gas. 

Twenty-five cent gas is a revelation to San Francisco 
people, but it will be a long time before many of them 
can become acquainted with the luxury; but that is what 
the San Francisco Gas and Electric Company offers to 
those who have signed an agreement with the San Fran- 
cisco Coke and Gas Company. All who can will, no doubt, 
avail themselves of the offer, and it now becomes a ques- 
tion with the new company how they can meet this un- 
expected turn of affairs. Of course, no one can manufac- 
ture and distribute gas at 25 cents per m. feet in San 
Francisco, but it will not seriously inconvenience the old 
company for a while. 

* * * 

Now it will be seen of what metal the new concern is 
formed. If it was designed from the beginning merely as 
a gigantic bluff, it will not last another year. Next month, 
as soon as it begins to distribute, it will have to confine 
its supply to those who have signed up, and most people 
will refuse to sign with the bait of twenty-five cent gas 
before them and a certainty almost that the price of all 
gas will be reduced to 75 cents in another year. 

* * * 

That this will have any effect on the present policy of 
the company in regard to dividends, I do not believe, as 
the new company will not be able to do enough for the 
next vear to affect the income of the old one seriously. 
The latter, under ordinary circumstances, would have an 



64 



-THE WASP- 



[July 8, 1905. 



increased revenue, and will not lose enough of it to afierc 
dividends. This will keep the stock steady. It weakened 
somewhat during the past few days, and $36.50 was about 
the best offered, and it may drop for awhile, but it will 
inevitably go back again. And in the future new and im- 
proved methods will not only enable all companies to pay 
a decent profit at 75 cents per m. feet, but it will also 
enable them to give an improved service and better gas. 
And I do not think that I am too optimistic to predict 
that in the vears to come even 75 cents will be considered 
high-water mark. 

# * * 

Our Possessions over the Sea. 

The attention of the world is being strongly attracted 
to the wealth and development of our possession over the 
sea — the Hawaiian Group and the Philippines. The form- 
er from their limited area are fast approaching the limit 
of production, which means the growth of sugar, and as 
sugar is the leading product of the islands, that is the 
only one that needs to be seriously sonsidered. Here 
400,000 tons have been raised in a single year, and with 
a thorough system of irrigation this can be increased to 
600,000 tons. ' At $70 per ton this will be worth $42,000,000 
a year, and allowing $8,000,000 for other products and 
manufactures, the total can possibly oe brought up + " 
$50,000,000 a year. When this point is reached the people 
of the United States will have to look to the Philippines 
as one of their great sources of supply of this indispens- 
able article. 

# * * 

Philippine Sugar. 

A large portion of our supply used to be obtained 
there, but the passage of the reciprocity treaty with 
Hawaii shut out for the most Dart these outside sources. 
But we will have to fall back on them again. We will 
allow Philippine sugars in duty free, and they will be 
one of the great sources of wealth to the islands of this 
group. Besides sugar there are many other articles, such, 
for instance, as Mauila hemp, so called, and rice for which 
a big market can always be found in *his country. But 
to encourage the cultivation of rice in the Philippines, it 
should be admitted duty free. A market could be found 
here also for cattle hides. The encouragement of the 
growth of these articles would result in a big trade' be- 
tween the United States and this part of our insular pos- 
sessions. 

* # # 

Big Dividends. 

July disbursements in New York and other Eastern 
cities, and by the big railroads of the country, show 1 
large increase over that for the same time last year, in 
all about $5,500,000. This is due to the improved business 
conditions of the country and to the immense amount of 
bonds issued and bearing interest. The total of dividends 
has been $140,311,563 as against $134,768,900 for this 
time a year ago. The Southern Pacific pays $1,500,000 for 
the half-year's interest on the $75,000,000 of 4 per cent, 
bonds. 

# * # 

Immense Bond Issue. 

There were issued during the half-year over $600,000. 
000 in railroad bonds alone, the interest on which will not 
be due till later on. Without being precise the interest 
on these would amount to about ten millions of dollars 
during the next half-year. Some of the bonds take the 
place of older issues,, so that some reduction must be 
made for this. 

# « # 

New York Banks. 

There was a great access of business this week in the 
banks connected with the New York clearing house. There 
was an increase of over nineteen and a quarter millions 
in deposits, and over eighteen millions iu loans for the 
w?ek. 



MONEY TO LOAN. 
To salaried people at low rates. The White Co., 420 
California St., Rooms 14 & 15. Take elevator on Leides- 
dorff street to third floor. 

The German Savings and Loan Society, 

526 California St., San Francisco 

Guaranteed capital and surplus $ 2,500,098.42 

Capital actually paid up in cash 1.000,000.00 

Deposits, Dec. 31, 1904 37.738,672.17 

OFFICERS — President, John Lloyd; First Vice-President, Daniel 
Meyer; Second Vice-President, Emil Rohte; Cashier, A. H. R Schmidt; 
Assistant Cashier, William Herrmann; Secretary, George lourny; Assist. 
Secretary, A. H. Muller; Attorney, W. S. Goodfellow. 

BOARD OF DIRECTORS— John Lloyd, Daniel Meyer, Emil Rohte, 
Ign. Steinhart, N. Ohlandt, I. N. Walter, J. W, Van Bergen F. Tillmann, 
Jr., and E. T. Kruse. 

San Francisco Savings Union, S32 SSS^S»1f ,M 

Deposits January 1, 1905.. $33,940, 132 | Paid up capital $1,000,000.00 

Reserve and contingent funds, $976,109. 

E. B. POND, President; W. C. B. De FREMERY, ROBERT WATT, 

Vice-Presidents; LOVELL WHITE, Cashier; R. M. WELCH, 

Assistant Cashier. 

DIRECTORS— E. B. Pond, W. C. B. De Fremery, Robert Watt, 
Henry F. Allen, Wakefield Baker,, Jacob Barth, Fred H. Beaver, 
William A. Magee, C. O. G. Miller. 

Loans upon San Francisco and Oakland Real Estate, and Farms 
and Farming Lands in the country. Receives depositB. Country re- 
mittances may be made in checks payable in San Francisco, Postofflee 
or Wells Fargo & Co.'s Money Orders, or Coin by Express, but the re- 
sponsibility of this bank commences only with the receipt of the 
money. No charge is made for pass-book or entrance fee. OFFICIO 
HOURS— 9 a. m. to 3 p. m., and Saturday evenings, for receipt of de- 
posits only, 6:30 to 8 o'clock. 

Security Savings Bank "•jstssss, 8 *- 

A uthorized Capital, $1,000,000; Paid Up Capital, $500,000; Surplus and 
Undivided Profits, $265,000. Interest Paid on Deposits. Loans Made. 

Directors — Wm. Babcock, Parrott & Co.; S. L. Abbot. Security Sav- 
ings Bank ; O. D. Baldwin, O. D. Baldwin & Son; Joseph D. Grant, Mur- 
phy, Gram & Co.; E. J. McCutchen, Page, McCutchen & Knight; L. F. 
Monteagle, Capitalist; R H. Pease, Pres. Goodyear Rubber Co.; Warren 
D Clark, Williams, Dimond & Co.; Jas. L. Flood, Capitalist; J. A. Dono- 
hoe Pres. Dotiohoe, Kelly Banking Co.; John Parrott, Capitalist; Jacob 
Stern, Vice-Pres dent Levi Strauss & Co. 

William Babcock, President; S. L. Abbot, Vice-President and Man- 
ager; Fred. W. Ray, Secretary; Sidney V. Smith, Attorney. 

STARR (Si DULFER 



SAN FRANCISCO AND TONOPAH 

Stock Commission Brokers 




Tonopah 

Goldfield 

Bullfrog 




OFFICES: 

Merchants' Exchange Building 
San Francisco 

Tonopah, Nevada 

H. W. Hellman Building 
Los Angeles, Cal. 

MEMBERS SAN FRANCISCO STOCK AND EXCHANGE BOARD 



July 8, 1905.] 



-THE WASP- 



65 



Geary Street Property Sale. 

The Humboldl Savings Bank on July 1st finally con- 
summated t Iil- sale of their Gearv streei property to the 
Magee Bros., and <ui the same date acquired from the Mar- 
ket Streei Co. a frontage of fifty Pee the sou 

Market streei I (red Eeel easl of fourth street, this 

property having a depth of one hundred and seventj feet, 
running through to Stevenson street. 

The Geary streei property which they have jusl sold 
has been the home of the bank since L870, and has a troi 
age of thirty-seven feet six inches on the north side of the 
street, just west of Keamj street, by a depth of sixty-two 
feet six inches. The price they sold tor was $220,000, be- 
ing slightly over $6,000 per front toot, or at the rate of 
$97.50 per square foot. We understand thai this is thi 
highest price per square foot thai has ever been paid for 
property in this city. The Market straet property which 
the bank lias just paid $400,000 lot- is at the rate of $8,000 
per front foot, or $4'i per square toot. 

Probably no better exhibit could be made for the pur- 
pose of showing how misleading is the present system of 
expressing real estate values at so much per front foot 
than this ease. The front fool valuation of the Market 
streei property at $8,000 per front tool is 33 I-:: per eenl 
in excess of the front foot valuation of the Geary street 
property, but on the square foot valuation it figures lesi 
than 50 per cent of the Geary street property. 

The progress of the Humboldt Savings Bank since the 
change of management at the beginning of 1903, when G. 
H. Luchsinger was made President ami W. E. Palmer was 
elected Secretary and Cashier, has been phenomenal, ;is 
will be seen by the statement of deposits on the following 
dates. 

June 30th, 1902— $2,553,043.29. 

June 30th, 1903— $2,911,817.14. 

June 30th, 1904— $3,348,775.59. 

June 30th, 1905— $4,219,159.47. 

The first statement after their election, issued on June 
30th, 1903, showed deposits of $2,911,817.14; the present 
statement, under date of June 30th, 1905, shows an increase 
of .$1,307,342.33, a trifle below 45 per cent increase in de- 
posits in two years, and this not in a new institution, but 
in one which was established in 1869. 

In view of this progress, and in line with the present 
progressive management of the bank, it was decided that 
a modern building was absolutely necessary. The Geary 
street property being too small for the erection of a build- 
ing which would provide satisfactory quarters for the 
bank, after an examination of the situation it was decided 
to sell the old property, which has been carried on the 
bank's books for $100,000, for $220,000, and purclase the 
prorjertv jusl bought on Market street. 

On this lot it is proposed to erect a modern bank and 
office building. Meyer & O'Brien, architects of the Cross- 
ley, Rialto, Monadnock and other prominent buildings, are 
preparing the plans for a fifteen-story structure, the lower 
floor of which will be devoted to the bai.king room, ladies' 
parlor, wailing rooms, and other conveniences to make it 
the most modern and complete banking room on the Coast. 
The question of adding safe deposit vaults is also under 
consideration. 

The location of the new buildin? is an ideal one for a 
savings bank, situated as it is in the center of the retail 
district. In addition to the regular saving's business which 
is carried on, this bank does a large and growing commer- 
cial business. When the first large commercial banks mov- 
ed to Market street and the Hibernia built its present 
home, they were considered out of the way ; but the history 
of their progress is remarkable, and when the Humboldt 
opens its new building the business community of that sec- 
tion will appreciate the benefit of! an institution having the 
reputation and financial standing of tnis bank, and its 
success of the past two years will prove to be only the be- 
ginning of greater prosperity. 



Twenty Per Cent. More. 

for the week ending with July Is! I he exchanges at 
the clearing house, which amounted i" $35,061,106.27, were 
aboul 13 per cent, more than fur the same time in 1904, 
showing a greal gain in financial ami sommercial opera- 
tions in thr space of a year. Those lor the month of 
May showed an even greater gain, one >>l 20 per cent. 
nearly, the total lor May being --fl 18,980,164.44, or nearly 
twenty-four millions in excess of May last year. All this 
-hows a wonderful increase over 191)4. which was in itself 
a good year. 




Citizens State Bank, 518 Montgomery, cor. Com^crdal, 
allows 4 per cent on time certificates. 



Mutual Savings Bank of San Francisco 

710 Market St., opp Third 

Guarantee Capital $1 000,000 

Paid-up Cap. tal 80 '.000 

Surplus _ 3011.0OO 

Deposits, Julv 1 I1K)5 9,9G9.2i!S 

JAMES D. PHEI.AN, President; S. G. MURPHY, Vice-Prei- 
ident; JOHN A. HOOPER, Vice-President; GEORGE A. 
STORY, Cashier; C. B. HOBSON, Assis ant Cashier. 

Directors— James D. Phelan. S. G. Murphy, John A. Hooper, 
James Moffitt, Frank J Sull *.i . Robert McElroy, Rudolph 
Spreckels. James M. McDonald, Charles Holbrook. 

Interest paid on deposits. Loans on approved securities. 

Deposits may be sent by postal order. Wells, Fargo & Co., or 
exchange on city banks. 



The Hibernia Savings and Loan Society. 

Incorporated 12th of April, 1S59. 
Office: Cor of McAHKtcr and Jontb Streets. San Prat] Cisco 

Deposits January 1, 1905, $58, 64S, 182.32. 
Reserve Fund, actual value, $3,372,779.09. 

OFFICERS— President, James R. Kelly; Secretary and Treasurer. 
Robert J. Tobin; Attorney, Joseph S. Tobin. 

BOARD OF DIRECTORS— R. J. Tobin, James R. Kelly, P. Crow- 
ley, Richard M. Tobin, Charles Mayo, Joseph S. Tobin. 

The objects for which this association is formed are. that by its 
operations the depositors thereof may be able to ftDd a secure and 
profitable investment for small savings, and that borrowers may have 
an opportunity of obtaining from it the use of a moderate capital on 
giving good and sufficient security for the use of the same. 

French Savings Bank, 3 ' 5 SrsZZXZ su 

CAPITAL PAID UP $600,000 

CHARLES CARPY, President ARTHUR LEGALIST, Vice-President 

LEON BOCQUERAZ, Secretary 

DIRECTOR* J E Artigues, O. Bozio, Leon Bo queraz, I. A. Be- ■ 
gerot, Chas. Carpy, J. B. Clot, J. S. Godeau, Leon Kauffman, A. Legallet. 
J. M. Dupas, A Ross, J. J. Mack. 



Lighting Troubles 

Quickly remedied if you will phone 
Exchange S. You should have su- 
perb service, brilliant electric lights, 
23 candle power gas. We have a full 
corps of 

Expert Inspectors 

At your service day or night. Let us 
know if anything is wrong. 



THE 



CO. 



41S POST STREET 
Phone Exchange 8 



66 



-THE WASP 



(July 8, 1905. 



Government Money in San Francisco. 

There is always a large amount of money in the San 
Francisco sub-treasury, as is fitting where the Government 
receipts are so large and where such a large amount of 
gold and silver finds its way. On the 1st of July the 
amount on hand was $34,043,034.71. Most of it though, 
roughly twenty-nine millions, was in silver dollars and a 
little less than four millions in gold coin. It is, however, 
not a little singular that in the U. S. sub-treasury in the 
Golden State there should be less than one dollar out of 
eight in U. S. gold coin. 



Dividend Notices. 



HIS TALENT. 
Old Mrs. Goodsoul: "Gracious alive, little boy! Where 
in the world did vou learn to swear in that terrible man- 
ner?" 

Bully Wragg: "Aw, it can't be learnt — it's a gift. 
If I didn't have it I su'pose I'd be sayin' 'Gracious alive!' 
just as you do." 



Engagements 

Miss Mary Ursula Stone, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. 
Charles Bertody Stone, to Lieutenant Daniel Edward 
Shean, Sixteenth Infantry, United States Army. 

Miss Beatrice Spivalo, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. 0. It. 
Spivalo, to Lieutenant Francis Rawle Shoemaker, of the 
Revenue Cutter Bear. 

Mrs. Madge E. Gray, daughter of the late Captain A. 
Webster of San Francisco, to Mr. Robert P. Warren of 
London, England. 

Miss Helen Seoville, daughter of Mrs. Scoville, of the 
fashionable New York finishing school, to Mr. Earle Tal- 
bot, son of Mrs. Amy Talbot. 



UPeddings 

July 9th — Miss Annie Lerner, daughter of Mr. and 
Mrs. 1. Lerner, of Alameda, to Mr. David M. Mosessohn, 
Portland, Oregon, in Alameda. 

July 19th — Miss Ella Sterrett, niece of Mrs. George H. 
Wheaton, to Mr. Edwin Barbour, both of Oakland, at Mrs. 
Wheaton's residence in Oakland. 

August 9th — Miss May Belle Greenebaum, daughter of 
Mr. and Mrs. Sigmund Greenebaum, to Mr. Herbert Fleish- 
hacker, both of San Francisco. 

August 19th — Miss Leslie Green, daughter of Mr. and 
Mrs. A. T. Green, Dwight Way, Berkeley, to Mr. Howard 
Huntington, at Berkeley. 



RAMp||$G 



CAMP OUTFITS 



It will pay you to visit 
our summer camp on third 
floor of store. Twenty-five de- 
partments are represented — 
everything for convenience and 
necessity in the camp is offer- 
ed in the greatest variety and 
at lowest prices. Ask for 1905 
Camping Suggestions. Free 
delivery to suburban towns 
and freight paid to your near- 
est station. 

SMITHS' CASH STORE, Inc. 
25 Market St., San Francisco 

Phone Exchange 560 



DIVIDEND NOTICE. 

The Continental Building and Loan Association 

of 301 California Street 

Has declared for the six months ending June 30th, 1905, a dividend 
of 5 per cent, per annum on Ordinary Deposits; 6 per cent, on Term 
Deposits; and 6 per cent, on Monthly Payment Investments. Inter- 
est on Deposits payable on and after July 1st. Interest on Ordinary 
Deposits not called for will be added, to the principal and thereafter 
bear interest at the same rate. 

Dr. WASHINGTON DODGE, President. 
WM, CORBIN, Secretary 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 
HUMBOLDT SAVINGS BANK. 
62G Market Street 
Opposite Palace Hotel 
For the half-year ending June 30th, 1905, a dividend haB been 
declared at the rate of three and one-half (3^) per cent, per annum 
on deposits, free of all taxes, payable on and after Saturday, July 1, 
1905. Dividends not called for will be added to the principal 
and thereafter bear the same rate of interest. 

W. E. PALMER, Cashier. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 

OFFICE OF THE HIBERNIA SAVINGS AND LOAN SOCIETY 

Corner Market, McAllister and Jones Sts., San Francisco. 

June 28, 1905. 
At a regular meeting of the Board of Directors of this Society, 
held this day, a dividend has been declared at the rate of three and 
one-half (3*£) per cent, per annum on all deposits for the six months 
ending June 30, 1905, free from all taxes, and payable on and after 
July 1, 1905. 

ROBERT J. TOBIN, Secretary. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 
MUTUAL SAVINGS BANK OF SAN FRANCISCO, 
710 Market Street. 
For the half-year ending June 30th, 1905, a dividend has been de- 
clared at the rate of three and one-quarter (3%) per cent, on all de- 
posits, compounded semi-annually, and free of taxes, payable on 
and after Saturday, July 1, 1905. 

GEO. A. STORY, Cashier. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 
THE GERMAN SAVINGS AND LOAN SOCIETY, 
626 California Street. 
For the half-year ending June 30, 1905, a dividend has been de- 
clared at the rate of three and one-half (3*£) per cent, per annum 
on all deposts, free of taxes, payable on and after Saturday, July 1, 
1905. 

GEORGE TOURNY, Secretary. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 
C-uIFORNIA SAFE DEPOSIT AND TRUST COMPANY. 
Corner California and Montgomery Streets. 
For the six months ending June 30, 1905, dividends have been de- 
clared on the deposits in the savings department of this company as 
follows: On term deposits at the rate of 3 6-10 per cent, per annum, 
and on ordinary deposits at the rate of 3Vi per cent, per annum, 
free of taxes, and payable on and after Saturday, July 1, 1905. 
J. DALZELL BROWN, Manager. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 

SAN FRANCISCO SAVINGS UNION, 

632 California Street, corner Webb. 

For the half-year ending with the 30th of June, 1905, a dividend 

has been declared at the rate per annum of three and six-tenths (3.60) 

per cent on term deposits, and three and fifteen one-hundredths 

(3.16) per cent, on ordinary deposits, free of taxes, payable on and 

after Saturday, July 1. 1905. 

LOVELL WHITE, Cashier. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 
SAVINGS AND LOAN SOCIETY, 
101 Montgomery Street, corner of Sutter, 
Has declared a dividend for the term ending June 30, 1905, at the 
rate of three and one-half (3%) per cent, per annum on all deposits, 
free of taxes, payable on and after Saturday, July 1, 1905. 

EDWIN BONNELL, Assistant Cashier. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 

THE GIANT POWDER COMPANY. CON., GIANT STATION, 

CALIFORNIA. 

A dividend. No. 79, of Fifty Cents (50 cts.) per share on the issued 

capital stock of the Company has been declared payable at the San 

Francisco office of the Company, Rooms 202, 204, and 206 Kohl 

Building, on July 10th, 1905. Transfer books close July 3rd, 1905, :.t 

noon. 

C. C. QUINN, Secretary. 



COUSINLY AID AT HAND. 

"The Emperor William seems to be hunting for 
trouble." 

''Then why doesn't he borrow some from the Czar?" 



&i-Si 



Inactive liver, depressed spirits — make both right with Abbott's An- 
gostura Bitters. The genuine Abbott's will revolutionize the system. 



By AUTOMAIN 



Automobile users will be interested in some control 

tests recently made in Toulon, France, in which aut o- 

biles and horses were handled by expeus, with a view to 
proving which was the safest. The tests showed that 
motor cars can be stopped quicker than horses, even when 
traveling considerably faster. At eleven miles an hour an 
auto was stopped in less than ten feet, while a horse need- 
ed twenty-six yards. At thirteen miles the horse took 
thirty yards and the auto three. At twenty miles the 
car stopped with four passengers in thirty feet. 

President Roosevelt has learned now that no matter 
how respectable a citizen may be, how strong an advocate 
of law and order, and how regardful of the rights of oth- 
ers, he is in conflict with the law as soon as he enters an 
automobile and rides at a pace that is entirely safe and 
reasonable. Being held up recently by a policeman while 
on his first voluntary motor car ride has taught him thai 
while the doctrine of the strenuous life may be a good one 
for Americans in all other sports and pastimes, il must adi 
be applied in a motor car. However noble and strong, yet 
considerate, a man may be, he is required by law to become 
very timid if he chooses the latest and most advanced 
mode of travel. Being held up by a cop as a law-breaker 
must have started the gentle Teddy a-thinking. I wonder 
if he has figured out which is behind tihe times and perni- 
cious — the automobile or the law? 

Alfonso Xin, King of Spain, is patronizing American 
industries, which may be construed as a token of his liber V 
spirit, or of his shrewd business judgment. After his trip 
to Paris, where he saw the French automobile products, 
he ordered a machine of American make, a Columbia, with 
the regular equipment as used here. In making his choic, 
King Alfonso sought the finest ear of American make, and 
picked out the same sort of vehicle that is used by Harry 
Payne Whitney, John A. Hoagland, and scores of other 
prominent Americans. 

W. W. Van Arsdale is enjoying automobiling to its 
fullest extent up on his ranch in Mendocino county. The 
wealthy lumberman of San Francisco takes daily trips in 
his Autocar runabout, and has already toured extensive!-- 
through not only Mendocino, but also Lake and Humboldt 
counties. 

W. P. Boland and party of three made a run from Los 
Angeles to San Francisco in a model C. Winton without 
even a punctured tire. In speaking of the trip Mr. Bo- 
land said: "My model C Winton is a wonder, and surprii 
ed the entire party. We found no difficulty whatever ' 
negotiating the steepest grades. A Winton for touring 
every time!" 

San Francisco will soon boast of another fine automobile 
garage, the home of the Rarig Automobile and Gar:rj 
Company, which they are having built on Folsom street, 
near Fourth, at a cost of $30,000 for the building alone. 
The premises will be occupied within another week, and the 
new concern will be prepared to enter the auto business 
on this Coast not only with one of the handsomest and 

Palatable and delicious wines for all occasions — Bepsold's 
select vintages. Inspection invited. 420 Pine St. 



most improved repositories for motor cars in the United 
States, but also with one of the most popular machines 
on the market, the Qneen. The line of Queens is the most 
complete ever manufactured in America, and being well 
adapted to the conditions prevailing in California, succes-, 
will without question be with the Rarig Company from the 
start. The site on Folsom street was selected by the new 
automobile concern for its headquarters on the Pacific 
Coast on account of its proximity to the business center and 
its convenience to the residents of Burlingame, San Mate • 
Menlo Park and the peninsula in general, and it will af- 
ford those people the convenience of having their automo- 
biles keDt within a few moments of the depot. 




The above is a reproduction of the engine in the chassis 
of the 40 H. P. Columbia automobile at present being ex- 
hibited at the salesrooms of the Middleton Motor Car 
Company. A section of one of the four cy'inders is taken 
away, which enables a person to see all parts of the engiiK 
in operation. 



ANDREWS. KEENAN & BLASAUF 

MACHINISTS AND ENGINEERS 
81 CITY HA 1,1, AVENUE Phone South 1089 

Automobile Repairs. American and Foreign Cars. Agents 
for Oleo, French Spark Plugs. Tires, Batteries, etc, Furnished. 
Springs made Forcings, Machine "Work, etc. 



•THE WASP 



[July 8, 1905. 



Miss Grace Spreckels was one of the party that accom- 
panied Dr. Harry Tevis in his Columbia automobile on a 
trip to Del Monte over the Fourth. The Wakefield Bakers 
and Harry Holbrooks were others at Del Monte this week 
who enjoyed the trip to Monterey in their motor ears. 

Mrs. Mary Armstrong- of Honolulu is still at San Jose, 
and is daily adding to her reputation as one of the most 
daring women motorists in the State. In the same White 
steam touring ear that she drove to San Diego this spring; 
Mrs. Armstrong left the Hotel Vendome the other day for 
San Francisco. She started at eleven o'clock, had lunch- 
eon, and shopped in this city, and withal was back cool and 
fresh at seven in the evening, which, when you come to 
think of it, is rather amazing. 

F. N. Isaac of Hanford and chauffeur left on Saturday 
last with two Oldsmobile light tonneau touring ears pur- 
chased from the Pioneer Automobile Company to run over- 
land to Hanford. 

Mark B. Lamb of this city is now the proud possessor 
of a new Oldsmobile, French type, touring' runabout, and 
left this week for a trip to San Diego in his machine. 

A typographical error occurred in a recent issue of The 
Wasp when it was stated in these columns that L. L. Whit- 
man said the transcontinental race of the two Oldsmobiles 
was not remarkable. On the contrary, Mr. Whitman re- 
marked that it was a most extraordinary task which the 
little machine performed, and he did not believe they could 
ever have successfully traversed those terrible roads. 

Dr. Chamberlain, one of the most enthusiastic motorists 
across the bay, left Oakland the other evening at 5 :05 for 
Ben Lomond in his White steamer. He stopped at San 
Jose for dinner, and reached his destination at 10 :30, 
despite the fact that the road was a "fright," to use the 
Doctor's own expression. 

Leavitt & Bill have secured the agency for the Reo 
automobile in Northern California, and have already made 
a number of sales. The car is a very durable one, and h .=- 
surprised all the local motorists in the remarkable manner 
in which it ascends the steep grades of San Francisco. 



DE DIETRICH AUTOMOBILES 




MR. PAUL KOECHLIN, California Representative, 
now at the Marie Antoinette, Van Ness Avenue, 
will be pleased to give demonstrations to prospective 
buyers, with his 30 h. p. Demonstration Car. 

Appointments by telephone or letter. 



H. W. Fletcher with 80 h. p. De Dietrich Racer 
beat World's Records for 100, 50 and 1 miles, at Ormond 
Beach, Fla.; also Road Records for 20, 10 and 5 miles, 
Cuba. 




The Great 

WINTON 



«« 



ft 



40-50 Horsepower 
is here 



IT SIMPLY EATS UP THE HILLS — 
GREATEST MACHINE IN THE WORLD 
FOR THE MONEY— SEE IT. 



Nearly a half hundred Winton 4-cylinder 
machines now running in California — every 
one giving perfect satisfaction. We advise 
you to see any of the Winton owners. Then 
come to us and study the simple mechanics 
of the car — you will then be a Winton man, 
save money and truly enjoy automobiling. 
We have hes des the Winton line the whole 
1905 m dels of the Oldsmobiles on our stock 
room floor. 



Pioneer Automobile Co. 

905-925 Golden Gate Avenue, San Francisco 
Oakland Agency, Miller Motor Car Co., 134-40 12th St. 



FRANKLIN MOTOR CARS 

(air-cooled) 




12 h. p. 4-Cylinders, 
12 h. p. Runabouts, 
20-24 h. p. Touring Car,: 
35-40 h. p. " " * 



Price $1800 

1550 

" 2650 

" 3650 



ALL FRANKLIN CARS ARE GUARANTEED FOR ONE YEAR 



F.WORTHINGTON BUTTS 

Phone South 1142 

148 GOLDEN GATE AVE. 



JOLY 8, 1905 ] 



-THE WASP- 



69 



STATEMENT 

OF THE CONDITION AND VALUE OF THE ASSETS 
AND LIABILITIES OF 

The Hibernia Savings and Loan Society 

(a corporation) 

AND WHERE SAID ASSETS ARE SITUATED 

DATED JUINE 30, IQOS 



ASSETS 

1— PROMISSORY NOTES AND THE DEBTS THEREBY 

SECURED, tbe actual vaule of which is $33,216,584. S7 

The condition of said Promissory Notes and debts 
Is as follows; They are all existing contracts, owned 
by said corporation, and are payable to it at its 
office, which Is situated at the corner of Market. 
McAllister and Jones Streets, in the City and 
County of San Francisco. State of California, and 
the payment thereof is secured by first mortgages 
on real estate within this State (532,843,584.87), and 
the States of Oregon ($98,000.00) and Washington 
($275,nno>. Said Promissory Notes are kept and held 
by said corporation at its said office, which is its 
principal place of business, and said Notes and 
debts are there situated. 
2— PROMISSORY NOTES AND THE DEBTS THEREBY 

SECURED, the actual value of which is 470.900.0i) 

The condition of said Promissory Notes and debts 
Is as follows: They are all existing contracts, owned 
by said corporation, and arc payable to It at its 
office, which Is situated as aforesaid, and tbe pay- 
ment thereof is secured by "•Northern Railway Com- 
pany of California first mortgage 5 per cent, bonds," 
"San Francisco and San Joaquin Valley Railway 
Company 5 per cent, bonds," "Southern Pacifio Rail- 
road Company of Arizona 6 per cent, bonds," South- 
ern Pacific Railroad Company of California Series 
'F and G' G per cent, bonds." "Oakland Transit 5 
per cent, bonds," "Los Angeles Pacific Railroad 
Company of California 5 per cent, bonds," "Park 
and Cliff House Railway Company 6 per cent, 
bonds," "United Railroads of San Francisco 
4 per cent, bonds," "United States 3 per cent, 
bonds," "Pacific Gas Improvement Com- 
pany first mortgage 4 per cent, bonds," "Spring Val- 
ley Water Works first mortgage 6 per cent, bonds." 
"Spring Valley Water Works second mortgage 4 per 
cent, bonds," "Forty-two shares of the capital stock 
of the Bank of California" and "One hundred and 
thirty shares of the capital stock of the California 
Street Cable Railroad Company," the market value 
of all said bonds and stocks being $564,467.25. Said 
Notes are kept and held by said corporation at 
Its said office, and said Notes, Bonds, and Stocks are 
there situated. 
3— BONDS OF THE UNITED STATES, the actual value 

of which is 16,073,978.02 

The condition of said bonds is as follows: They 
belong to said corporation, and are kept and held 
by it in its own vaults and are there situated. They 
are "Registered 4 per cent, of 1907 ($12,000,000.00) 
and 4 per cent, of 1925 ($3,020,000.00) United States 
bonds" and are payable only to the order of said 
corporation. 
4— MISCELLANEOUS BONDS, the actual value of 

■which is 10,293,4€9.82 

The condition of said bonds is as follows: They 
belong to said corporation, and are kept and held 
by it in its own vaults and are there situated. They 
are: 

"Market Street Cable Railway Com- 
pany 6 per cent, bonds" 51,121,000.00 

"Market Street Railway Company First 
Consolidated Mortgage 5 per cent. 

bonds" 340,000.00 

"Sutter Street Railway Company 5 per 

cent, bonds" 150,000.00 

"Powell Street Railway Company 6 per 

cent, bonds" 155,000.00 

"The Omnibus Cable Company 6 per 

cent, bonds' ' 82,000.00 

"Presidio and Ferries Railroad Company 

6 per cent, bonds" 25,000.00 

"Ferries and Cliff House Railway Com- 
pany 6 per cent, bonds" 6,000.00 

"Los Angeles Railway Company of Cali- 
fornia 5 per cent, bonds" 145,000.00 

"Los Angeles Pacific Railroad Company 



of California 5 per cent, bonds" loi'i.uoii.uo 

"Northern Railway Company of Califor- 
nia ii per cent, bonds" 584,000.00 

"San Francisco and North Pacific Railway 
Company 5 per cent, bonds" 3S4,uo0.00 

"Southern Pacific Railroad Company of 
California per cent, bonds" 866,000.00 

"San Francisco and San Joaquin Valley 
Railway Company 5 per cent, bonds" lll.iiiiD.Ou 

"West Shore Railroad Company of New 
York 4 per cent, bonds" 500,000.00 

"Spring Valley Water Works First Mort- 
gage 6 per cent, bonds" 123,000.00 

"Spring Valley Water Works Second 
Mortgage 4 per cent, bonds" 462.000.00 

"Spriug Valley Water Works Third Mort- 
gage 4 per cent, bonds" 1,020,000.00 

"The Merchants' Exchange 7 per cent, 
bonds" 1,500,000.00 

"San Francisco Gas and Electric Com- 
pany 4«> per cent, bonds" 495.000.00 

"City and County of San Francisco 3% 
ner cent bonds" 1,622.800.00 

"City of Valleio 5 per cent, bonds" 65,000.00 

And "City of San Luis Obispo 5 per cent. 

bonds" 13,500.18 

5— INTEREST ON MISCELLANEOUS BONDS, accrued 

to July 1, 1905 296,734.59 

6— (a) REAL ESTATE situated in the City and County 
of San Francisco ($148,857.32), and in the counties 
of Santa Clara ($137,315.45), Alameda ($145,871,701. 
and San Mateo($13.643.42), in this State, the actual 

value of which is 445,687.89 

(bi THE LAND AND BUILDING in which said cor- 
poration keeps its said office, the actual value of 

which is 471,452.76 

The condition of said Real Estate is that It belongs 
to said corporation, and part of it Is productive. 

7— CASH IN UNITED STATES GOLD AND SILVER 
COIN, belonging to said corporation, and In its pos- 
session, and situated at Its said office, actual value 1,644,840.18 

Total Assets $62,913,649.03 

LIABILITIES 

1— SAID CORPORATION OWES DEPOSITS amounting 

to and the actual value of which is $59,439,417.52 

The condition of said deposits is that they are 
payable only out of said assets and are fully secured 
thereby. 

2— RESERVE FUND, actual value 3,474,231.51 

Total Liabilities $62,913,649.05 

THE HIBERNIA SAVINGS AND LOAN SOCIETY. 

By JAMBS R. KELLY. President. 
THE HIBERNIA SAVINGS AND LOAN SOCIETY. 

By ROBERT J. TOBIN, Secretary. 



State of California, City and County of San Francisco, ss. 

JAMES R. KELLY' and ROBERT J. TOBIN, being each separate- 
ly duly sworn, each for himself, says: That said JAMES R. KELLY 
is President and that said ROBERT J. TOBIN is Secretary of 
THE HIBERNIA SAVINGS AND LOAN SOCIETY, the corporation 
ibove mentioned and that the foregoing statement is true. 

JAMES R. KELLY, President. 
ROBERT J. TOBIN, Secretary. 



Subscribed and sworn to before me this 1st day of July, 1905. 
GEO. T. KNOX. Notary Public 
In and for tbe City and County of San Francisco, State of Cali- 
fornia. 



70 



THE WASP 



[July 8, 1905. 



FLORENCE ROBERTS' APPEAL. 

To My Friends and Patrons, the Public and Theatre-goers 

of San Francisco: 

Dear Friends: — In the last few years I have appeared 
before you in many characters and met with much success, 
for which I am indebted to your kindness and encourage- 
ment. Hitherto I have depended upon my own efforts to 
achieve the results, but now I am about to appear before 
you in a new role, in the great drama of life, as a suppliant 
and beggar in the mighty cause of Charity and Justice, 
and must ask you, dear friends, to become members of the 
east and help the play along. I shall do my part to my 
utmost ability, and if you do yours, of which T have no 
doubt whatever in my heart, we are sure to achieve a suc- 
cess for which we will all be proud and happy. 

I desire to give a benefit performance at the California 
Theater on Friday afternoon, July 14, for Mr. Hobart 
Bosworth, the young gentleman who supported me during 
my engagement last August and September at the Cali- 
fornia Theater, and who has been stricken with the dread 
disease consumption, and incapacitated from performing 
his duties in the great labor of life. During all his career 
he lent honor and dignity to his profession and performed 
his duty to society and the world at larse with such integ- 
rity and conscientious effort that all his fellowmen can 
say "He is a man." Now that relentless Fate has laid 
the cruel hand of sickness upon him, I have proposed this 
benefit, aided by his confreres and co-workers, all of whom 
respect and honor him as an actor and a man. During his 
career of ten years on the stage as a member of the Augus- 
tin Daly Company and as leading man with Henrietta 
Crosman, Julia Marlowe and Mrs. Fiske, Mr. Bosworth 
was ever ready with his own purse and labors to help his 
fellowman, and now that misfortunes have overtaken him 
no one is more entitled to a benefit than he. 

The program in detail has not yet been completed, but 
I assure you it will be one of the most unique and interest- 
ing entertainments that has ever been given in San Fran- 
cisco, and as soon as it is ready will be announced. In 
the meantime I will be grateful to all friends who desire 
to subscribe in any such sums as they may feel justified 
for seats, which will not be less than $1.50 each, and shall 
be glad to receive checks or monev orders through the 
mail for same, addressed to me, care of the California 
Theater. 

With heartfelt gratitude and sincere regard, 
Respectfully subscribed, 

FLORENCE ROBERTS. 



Moore's Poison Oak Remedy. 
Cures Poison Oak, all skin diseases. Sold by all druggists. 



$15.00 

FOR THE ROUND TRIP TO THE 

Calaveras Big Trees 



A spleudid opportunity to see the country 
made famous by Bret Harte's stories — 

Ta.ble MoMnta-in, " Jimtown," 
Stanislaus River, Angel's Camp 

the great mining country of Calaveras coun- 
ty, and one of the greatest Big Tree groves. 

Leave Today, 
Arrive 10:30 Next Forenoon 

The route is via Oakdale, Jamestown, An- 
gels and Murphy's. Only 22 miles stage ride. 
Interesting scenery all the way. The Mam- 
moth Orove contains trees nearly 100 feet in 
circumference, and is one of the finest of the 
groves. Fine hotel and many fishing streams. 

Southern Pacific 



San Francisco Office : 
613 Market Street 



Oakland Office : 
12 San Pablo Ave. 



Dr. Charles W. Decker, Dentist. 

Phelan Building, 806 Market street. Specialty : 
Gas" for the painless extracting of teeth. 



' Colton 



Beryl : 
Sibyl: 



'Have the de Styles a family skeleton?' 
'Yes, their daughter Bonita." 



The PUREST and BEST country milk and cream ii 
furnished by the BERKELEY FARM and NOVATO 
RANCH DAIRIES. N. J. Nelson & Co., props. Depot, 
1228 Folsom street, San Francisco. Ring up South 676, 
or send postal. Families carefully supplied. 



Telephone Black 5713 



J. F. ROSSI 

Foreign and Domestic 

Wines, Liquors and Cigars 

Depot of Italian Swiss Colony Wines 
and Celebrated Belmont Whiskey 



205 Washington Street 

Between Front and Davis San Francisco 

To Cure All Skin Diseases. Use 

DR. T. FELIX GOURAUD'S ORIENTAL 
CREAM, OR MAGICAL BEAUTIFIER 

It Purifies and Beautifies the Skin. 
FOR SALF. BY DRUGGISTS. 



His Mistake. 

Mr. Slimsky — I don't believe the 
city water is safe. I notice it has a 
clouded appearance this morning and 
tastes sort of milky — and — 

Mrs. Starvem — That glass contains 
milk, Mr. Slimsky; the water is at 
your left. And, by the way, your 
bill was due yesterday. 
"^> "*^. ■^>. 

Miss Debutante: "I'm surprised 
that none of the papers say a word 
about my looks." 

Her friend Eunice: "I'm sure you 
ought to love the newspapers ; they've 
been awfully good to you." 



Valuable Franchise 

The right to publish the Associated 
Press despatches is the most valuable 
franchise a daily paper can acquire. 
The 

OAKLAND TRIBUNE 

holds the exclusive franchise for the 
publication of these despatches in 
Oakland and Alameda county. Send 
for a sample copy of the TRIBUNE. 



July 8, 1905. 



THE WASP 



71 



Already Economizing. 
Maud: "Do yon think yon ami -lack 
will ever bave enough 10 gel mar 

,,..,! .'" 

Maj : "Oh, yes. Dear Jack has al- 
ready given up smoking cigarettes be 

I'ure breakfast !" 

*c> <a, <s>. 

In the Lodge I\'»irn : Most Supreme- 
ly Otter Grand Khedive: '-The Eu 
tirely Supreme Grand Navigator will 
proceed, according to the ritual of 
our Intensely Obsolete Order, to in- 
form the Intensely Sublime Grand 
Usher that the Conclave is assembled 
for the purpose of initiating novices 
in the dread mysteries of our work." 

In the Anteroom. Entirely Sup- 
reme Grand Navigator to the Intense- 
ly Supreme Grand Usher: '"Coine on, 
Jim, with the kids. They're ready 
for you inside." 

*^> -^ -^- 

"Dimling always goes past the sior. 
'Fresh Paint' without feeling the 
paint to see if it is dry." 

"Has he no curiosity about him- 
theny" 

"I don't know about that, but he 
is nearly blind, noor fellow." 
-^ ^2>- -^> 
WANTED TO SLEEP. 



Curious That a Tired Preacher Should 
Have Such Desire. 

A minister speaks of the curious 
effect of Grape-Nuts food on him and 
how it has relieved him. 

"You will doubtless understand 
how the suffering with indigestion 
with which I used to be troubled 
made my work an almost unendurable 
burden, and why it was that after 
my Sabbath duties had been perform- 
ed, sleep was a stranger to my pillow 
till nearly daylight. 

"I had to be very careful as to 
what I ate, and even with all my care 
I experienced poignant physical dis- 
tress after meals, and my food never 
satisfied me. 

"Six months have elapsed since I 
began to use Grape-Nuts food, and 
the benefits I have derived from it 
are very definite. I no longer suffer 
from indigestion, and I began to im- 
prove from the time Grape-Nuts ap- 
peared on our table. I find that by- 
eating a dish of it after my Sabbath 
work is done (and I always do so 
now) my nerves are quieted and rest 
and refreshing sleep are ensured me. 
I feel that I could not possibly do 
without Grape-Nuts food, now that 
I know its value. It is invariably on 
our table — we feel that we need it to 
complete the meal — and our children 
will eat Grape-Nuts when they can- 
not be persuaded to touch anything 
else." Name given by Postum Co., 
Battle Creek, Mich. 

There's a reason. 

Read the famous little book. "The 
Tload to Wellville." in each pkg. 



An American Duchess. 

Pac tj will no doubt 

be interested i" learn 1 hal the 1 luchess 
ile la Rochefoucald has riven birth t" 
a sun in Paris. She is the daughter 
"i United States Senator John Hippie 

Mitchell, n ho been tvicted in 

Portland, Ore or complicity in 

land frauds. .Miss Mat tie Mitchell 
married the Duke thirteen years ago. 
and as this is their lirst born fhej are 
naturally ver» proud. They have bc- 
stowed upon the Itaby the title of the 
Duke of Liancourt. The full line of 
titles of the lady from the Webfool 
Sine 1- Duchess de la Rochefoucald. 
Duchess de Liancourt, and Princess 
de Marcilla. Ser father's correct name 
is plain John Mitchell Hippie. He 
was a school teacher and lawyer in 
Pennsylvania, where he married Sadie 
Hoon. a pupil. According to her 
statement, the marriage took place 
subsequent to the birth of their babe. 
Jessie. Soon afterward he left his 
wife ami went In Portland, where be 
changed his name to John H. Mitchell. 
What became of the babe Jessie is not 
knownr It was charged by some of 
bis old townsmen in Pennsylvania 
that in his flight he took about $4,000 
belonging to his clients. In 1R02 he 
was married in Portland to Mattie E. 
Price. In ISO", according to her pub- 
lished statement, his wife in Pennsyl- 
vania applied for a divorce, which 
was granted. She stated that her hus- 
band's former law partner. Colonel 
Thompson, paid her $500 to release 
her husband from this matrimonial 
tangle. 

-Q- *c^ ^> 

Theodore Wores' Adventure. 

Down in Santa Barbara, where The- 
odore Wores, the clever artist, is 
sketching, his fame and person is not 
familiar to the inhabitants of the 
sleepy city. A short time ago Mr. 
Wores prepared to stretch a bit of 
canvas for a sketch, but found that 
he had no hand-tacks. He hastened 
to the nearest shop and asked for the 
article. 

"What kind of tacks do you want ? 
What be thev for?" demanded the 
scrupulous shopkeeper. 
"For tacking canvas, etc.," respond- 
Wores, genially. 

For a moment the vendor of hard- 
ware looked him over from head to 
foot. Then: "Oh!" he exclaimed. 
"Be you the guy what's settin' up 
the 'merry-go-round' beyond the cor- 
ner there?" 

Wores was completely floored. He, 
in his turn, looked over the shop- 
keeper: then, with inimitable droll- 
ery, gasped, "No!" and went drearily 
from the shop. He did not buy a tack 

that day. 

O *z> -^> 

Hello, Brother Norway! Walk right 
in and take the seat alongside of 
Switzerland in the front bench of re- 
publics. 




The Preserver 
and Beautifier of 
the Complexion. 

A Positive Re- 
lief for Prickly 
Heat, Chafing and 
Sunburn, 



HKNNKVS ftce on every box; be sure that you get the ■ ri.'iml. 

Sold everywhere, 01 by mafias cents. Sample lr.-.-. 

i-> rli;i 1 ,1 Ucnnin Co.. Newark, \. J. 

TRY MENNEN'S VIOLET TALCUM. 




WHAT would become of the 
average American club if the 
buffet were removed — and what 
really makes the American buffet? 
The American drink— and that's a 
cocktail. CLUB is the only brand 
worthy of the American taste. 

CLUB COCKTAILS are 
scientifically blended from choicest 
liquors, and aged to tickle the most 
critical palate. 

Seven kinds — Manhattan, Martini, Ver- 
mouth, Whiskey, Holland Gin, Tom Gin 
and York. 

G. F. HEUBLEIN & BRO, Sole Proprietors 

HARTFORD NEW YORK LONDON 



PACIFIC COAST AGEN1 9 

SPOHN - PATRICK COMPANY 

San Francisco Seattle Denver 

Lot Angeles Salt Lake City 

WEAK MEN AND WOMEN 

Should UBe DAMIANA BITTERS, the Great 
Mexican Remedy; gives Health and Strength 
to the Sexual Organs. Naber, Alfs & Brune, 
Agents. 323 Market St. Send for circular. 



72 



-THE WASP 



[July 8, 1905. 



Satisfying. 

Nordy : ' ' Insure in your company ? 
With your highest officials fighting 
the way they are?" 

Butts': "Sure thing. You can see 
for yourself that we must have assets 
worth fighting over." 
^> -x> ^> 

' ' This certainly is muggy weather. ' ' 
said Jones, as he mopped his heated 
brow. 

"It certainly is," agreed Smith. 
And the two passed into a beer sa- 
loon. 

-^> "^ -^K 

"Wiggs:"I hear that they are ar- 
ranging for peace." 

Waggs: "In the East or the Equit- 
able?" 

-o* *^> *^> 

SIRE TO SON. 



Boy Can Sometimes Learn From His 
Father. 

When you catch them young en- 
ough you can usually make your sons 
profit by your own experience. 

Afterwards it is different. A lady 
tells how her son was made to profit 
by what his father had learned: 

"My husband was always fond of 
coffee, and after his business took 
him frequently into a German com- 
munity he drank it more, with the 
result" that his kidneys became affect- 
ed, and he suffered greatly with 
pains and despondency, till, as he 
says, ' coffee nearly killed me!' So 
he stopped using it, and began to 
drink Postum Coffee, It cured him; 
and in a very short time his kidneys 
resumed their normal functions, his 
pains were allayed, and the despond- 
ency which had nearly driven him 
crazy ceased to trouble him. 

"My little boy, a year old, had 
suffered ever since he was weaned, 
from stomach and bowel troubles. He 
could not properly digest the milk 
he drank. It passed out of his bowels 
in hard lumps, sometimes large and 
again like small pellets, frequently 
producing diarrhoea, and then we 
would have to call in the doctor. But 
the trouble returned again and again. 

"We used to give him a taste of 
Postum Coffee occasionally, and as I 
saw that he relished it and realized 
how much good it had done his fath- 
er, I began to put a little in his bottle 
of milk. The effect was so salutary 
that I gradually increased the quan- 
tity till at last I used only enough 
milk to give it color. He thrived won- 
derfully on it. He is over two years 
old now, and his digestion is all right. 
Postum has made him uncommonly 
large and strong and healthy. I give 
him a bottle four times a day." Name 
given by Postum Co., Battle Creek. 
Mich. 

There's a reason. 

Read the, little book, "The Road to 
Wellville," in each pkg. 



OTTU. 



nxijijijiJiJLriJTJTJ^rLrLriJxruTnjTJTJTjTJTxiruT. 

THE THEATRES | 

TUTjUTXLTUTjirLruTJinjtruTjTjiijTJTJxro 

The Chutes. 

Commencing at the Sunday matinee, 
and thereafter every afternoon and 
evening for two weeks, Bothwell 
Browne's musical extravaganza, 
"Princess Fan Tan," with a cast of 
three hundred juveniles, will be the 
attraction at the Chutes. The piece 
will be gorgeously mounted and staged 
on the same scale of magnificence as 
when it was produced last Christmas 
at this ponular resort, when scenery 
and costumes of great splendor were 
especially prepared for the occasion. 
"Princess Fan Tan derives it name 
from an ancient Japanese legend, 
which tells of an evil spirit who made 
annual appearances and exacted as a 
price of his protection and favor the 
fairest maiden in the realms of a cer- 
tain Mogul. The action is bright and 
spirited from beginning to end, clever 
specialties without number are intro- 
duced throughout the action of the 
piece, and the ballets are many and 
varied in character. To enumerate the 
talented children who will unfold the 
thousand beauties of "Princess Fan 
Tan" would be well-nigh impossible. 
Sufficient it is to say that the bright- 
est and best-trained youngsters in 
San Francisco will take part. The am- 
ateurs will appear as usual on Thurs- 
day evening, incidental to the produc- 
tion of the extravaganza. Chiquita, 
"the living doll," the babies in the 
life-saving incubators and other fea- 
tures are great attractions at the 
Chutes. 

-r^_ <-v <ts- 

"It's a good thing for me," said 
Hercules, "that I was born thousands 
of years a°'0. " 

"Yes?" inquired Minerva, with a 
rising inflection. 

"Yes, indeed. Instead of being- 
asked to clean out the Augean stables 
I might have been asked to clean out 
San Francisco." 

Shuddering at the thought, he rang 
for Ganvmede and took a nectar and 
soda. 

-^> -^> -o 

Old Baggies (taking a suspicious- 
looking flat bottle from his son's va- 
lise) : "I thought there was nothing 
but surgical instruments in this 
bag. ' ' 

Young Baggies: "That's what. I 
said, clad." 

Old Baggies: "What instrument do 
you call this?" 

Young Baggies: "That? Oh, that's 
my eye-opener, dad ; very useful in- 
strument, very; couldn't get along 
without it any way." 
*i> -c* -^- 

Mrs. Hoyle : "I hear that your hus- 
band is dead." 

Mrs. Bovle: "Yes, but the loss was 
fully covered by insurance." 



when you have 

Cramps, Colic, Diarrhoea 

or similar troubles 

with 

"PlainkttW 

(perry davis') 

It never fails to give prompt relief. It's 
t_te Lest physician you could employ. 




DR. G. S. MOORE'S 
SCIENTIFIC HAIR RESTORER 

A positive cure for all 
scalp diseases. Will posi- 
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We challenge the world to 
equal this remedy. 

Send far free catalogue. 

382 O'Farrell Street 

SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 



«>®®<e>®<§ 

DR. H. J. STEWART | 

IS) 

® Teacher of 

* Vocal and Instrumental Music 

2 Studio, 110s BUSH ST. 

|®<e)®®®®®®®®<S 



S>®®®®®®®*<5Xi>fiV»<8 




All the Year 
Round Tours 
Travel by Sea 

Excellent Service, Low Rates Including 
Berth and Mcala 

Steamers leave Piers 9 and 11, San Francisco, for 

Los Angeles San Diego Santa Cruz 

Santa Barbara Monterey 

Eureka Seattle Tacoma 

Victoria, Vancouver, etc. 

And to those desiring longer trips Lo Alaska 
and Mexico. 

For Information regarding sailing dates, 
etc., obtain folder. 

San Francisco Ticket Offices: 

4 New Montgomery St. (Palace Hotel) 
10 Market St. and Broadway Wharves. 

C. D. DUNANN, 0«d. Passenger Agent. 
U Market St.. Ban Francisco 

OCCIDENTAL & ORIENTAL 

STEAMSHIP COMPANY 

FOR 

JAPAN AND CHINA 

Steamers will leave wharf, corner of First 
and Brannan streets, at 1 p. m., for Hone- 
lulu, YOKOHAMA, Kobe, Nagasaki, Shang- 
hai and RONOKONO, as follows: 

COPTIC, calling at Manila, Wednesday, August 2 
DORIC, " " Wednesday, Sept. 20 

COPTIC, '• " Saturday, Oct. 21 

No cargo received on board on day of sail- 
ing. 
Sound Trip Tickets at Reduced Rates 
For freight or passage apply at company's 
The Merchant's Exchange, 7th Floor. San 
Francisco. 

D. D. STUBBS. General Manager 




Volume LIV.—N0.3. 



SAN FRANCISCO, JULY 15, 1905. 



Price jo cents 



PUBLISHERS' NOTICE 

THE WASP Is published every Saturday by The Wasp PubllshlnR 
Company, at 606 MiBBlon Street Subscriptions $5 per year, payable In 
advance, postage prepaid. Subscriptions to all foreign countries 
within the Postal Union $6 per year. 

The trade on the Pacific Coast supplied by the San Francisco 
News Company. Eastern Agents supplied by the American News 
Company. New York. 

THE WASP will pay for contributions suitable to Its columns, and 
will endeavor to return all rejected manuscripts, but does not guar- 
antee their return. 

Photographs will also be accepted and paid for. 

Address all communications to Wasp Publishing Company. 506 
Mission Street, San Francisco, Cal. 
Telephone Main 1643. 



TO ADVERTISERS.— As the illustrated pages of THE WASP go to 
press early, all advertisements printed in the same forms should 
be received not later than Monday at noon. Changes cf adver- 
tisements should also be sent in on Monday to insure publication. 



DJTJTJTTlJTJTJTJTjnjT_nJTriJlJ^^ 

[ PLAIN ENGLISH 

STRAIGHT TALKS ON TIMELY TOPICS 




N a short time the present Grand Jury will ad- 
journ, and we shall no doubt have a full and 
detailed report of what they learned about the 
doings of the present city government. It is 
to be hoped that the Grand Jurors will not 
hesitate to take the public into their full con- 
fidence. The public is entitled to know just 
what has been discovered by Mayor Schmitz 
— sins of omission or commission. The Grand Jury should 
tell the whole story, nothing extenuating and naught set- 
ting down in malice. Let the public be ihe judge of the 
facts presented, and let nothing be presented but what can 
be substantiated by evidence that has been obtained iu the 
Jury investigations. There is not much doubt that if the 
Grand Jury tells all it learned about the city government 
during the past six months, there will nor, be found fifteen 
per cent of the voters who would east their votes again to 
place Rnef and Schmitz in control of the municipality. 

Ruef s Worst Blunder. 
Had the Ruef-Schmitz administration cudgled its alleg- 
ed brains, it could not have done a worse thing than incite 
the newsboys to a disorderly strike. It is a sorry day for 
any city when its chief executive conspires to incite vio- 



lence, to lead mobs, and inflame ignorant and youthful 
minds against the law. People who heretofore may have 
sympathized with Mayoi Schmitz have had their sympa- 
thies estranged when mobs insulted women who sold the 
Bulletin and assailed peaceable citizens who read it. From 
all over the State has come a storm of protest. How the 
public regards this infamous boycott has been shown by its 
refusal to support it. The administration found out very 
early that it had made a fatal blunder and tried to dis- 
claim all responsibility. But it was responsible, and the 
mistake cost it so dearly that it is not likely to seek ven- 
geance on an enemy again in that manner. 

A Good Riddance. 

At this writing the bigamous Collins has fled to parts 
unknown, and Chief Dinan and his sleuths are on his trail. 
No doubt Collins smiles at the pursuit, for the efforts of the 
Police Department to accelerate justice in San Francisco 
are enough to make the pot-metal angel on the dome of 
the City Hall shake with laughter. The best thing that 
could happen San Francisco would be to have Collins keep 
on running till he was lost forever and his uniformed pur- 
suers with him. San Francisco would be easily and cheap- 
ly rid of the lot. Then, too, we might all forget in time 
that the San Francisco Bar Association and the Supreme 
'.lOJTl, Court of the State of California have for ten long years 

_Jj tolerated Collins while the State prison yawned for him. 
and every man, woman and child in the state knew that 
there were much better men breaking rock and wearing 
convict stripes. 

Misstatements About a Strike. 

The statements about the printers' strike that have 
been published in several of the daily newspapers are 
grossly misleading. Daily newspapers are supported b-" 
the advertising they get from employers and business men. 
The unions give them comparatively little. They buy news- 
papers, but there is no profit in that for the publishers. 
The white papei costs about as much as the subscriber 
pays. Were it not for the advertising patronage the news- 
papers could not live at all, and the employers are the peo- 
ple who give it. Nevertheless, in every conflict between 
union strikers and their employers in San Francisco the 
daib' press is found arrayed against the employers. The 
facts are purposely distorted to mislead the public and 
cause the employers to suffer defeat. The duty of a prop- 
erly conducted newspaper, of course, is to give the public 
the exact truth about such affairs, regardless of whom it 
hurts. 

Why the Employers Organized. 

The San Francisco newspapers that have taken up the 
printers' side of the controversy so ardently make much 
of the assertion that the employers gladly conceded an 
eight-hour work-day. The truth is that they had little to 
say in the matter. ' The printers were strongly organized, 



74 



I TIE WASP * 



July 15, 1905. 



and demanded a shorter day, and the employers, being un- 
organized and defenseless, had to comply or face a strike. 
Lately they have organized for defence, and hence the 
present struggle with their employes. There has been no 
sacrifice of principle whatever by the employers. Their 
contract with the printers' union expired on July 1st, and 
they declined to renew it, just as any business man might 
refuse to renew the lease of a store which had proved un- 
profitable. The union said: "You must renew or suffer a 
strike," and the men walked out. The effect will be to 
convince employers more firmly than ever that the open 
shop is absolutely essential to industrial prosperity and 
the progress of the nation. The printers may win their 
present strike, or they may not, but that will not alter 
the conviction of all thinking business men that the closed 
shop is a constant menace to the industrial peace of the 
country, and must inevitably bring about stagnation and 
hard times if universally tolerated. 

A Local Application Necessary. 
As Senator Mitchell has discovered to his cost, it is a 
crime for a person occupying a public position to accept 
money for practising before the Federal departments. 
What a pity that some of our local politicians cannot be 
prosecuted under a State statute similar in its scope. Take 
the case of Lawyer 'Grady, for example. He is a Police 
Commissioner appointed by Ruef, yet he had the indecency 
to appear as counsel for Rebstoek, and no doubt would be 
only too glad to take anv ease where he would be required 
to examine police witnesses. Is it not most improper that 
a public official should be permitted to use his official 
position for his private profit in such manner? When 
Lawyer Hutton was in favor with Ruef and Sehmitz and 
held a Police Commissionership, he, too, appeared in cases 
where his official character was likely to intimidate police 
witnesses. This kind of graft can be stopped if the news- 
papers point out the indecency of it every time it occurs. 

Relentless Against Rascality. 
In advocating the relentless prosecution of all official 
wrong-doers President Roosevelt has rendered the country 
a service which should never be forgotten. Almost every 
other President has been swayed by party considerations. 
Greater Presidents we may have had, out none who so 
fully represented the whole American nation. Lincoln 
came into power as the leader of a minority faction, and 
was forced by a civil war to be but the representative of 
a part of the people. Garfield, another martyred Presi- 
dent, was more of a Republican partisan than an American 
statesman. Even MeKinley, who enjoyed a popularity that 
few Presidents have attained, was ever mindful of the in- 
terests of his political party. He held to the tradition that 
an American President is primarily a political leader and 
directly responsible to his partisan associates for bis polit- 
ical acts. Roosevelt ignores all traditions, and, doing what 
he thinks is his duty, leaves the politicians to take care of 
themselves. If any of them happen to be detected in 
crooked practices, so much the worse for them. A plea 
of party service will not cause the arm of the Federal law 
to be stayed by a word from the Chief Executive. The 
motto of his administration, so far, is, "Honesty before 
policy," and that is why statesmen with itching palms like 
Senator Mitchell of Oregon find themselves trembling in 
the dock like common criminals. Let us hope that we may 
never see this system of Federal Government reversed, but 
that the good example set by Roosevelt may be followed 
by all his successors. 

Evils of Hysterical Reform. 
Philadelphia, which, next to Peking and St. Petersburg, 
has had the crookedest government in the world for years, 
is in the throes of reformation. The late Senator Matt. 
Quay and his confreres had a bad influence on Pennsyl- 
vania politics. Quay was a type of Republican politician 
which is happily going out of fashion. With men of the 
Quay order the end justified the means. Conscience cuts 



no figure whatever in their political manipulations. To 
win was the thing of primary importance. It mattered not 
what reprehensible methods were adopted. Men who ac- 
quire power in such unscrupulous ways always use it dis- 
honestly. After forty years of subserviency to corrupt 
ringsters, Philadelphia is trying with feverish haste "to 
establish a good reputation. As usually happens in such 
eases, the work is overdone. The reformers fly from one 
extreme to the other. On a recent Saturday night some 
four hundred Philadelphia policemen made a clean sweep 
of the tenderloin, and captured wagonloads of the votaries 
of vice. Great stress is laid on the fact that the assig- 
nation houses were raided. Some of the women detected 
in wrong-doing tried to commit suicide, and altogether 
there was a sensation such as Philadelphia never had be- 
fore. These frantic efforts to purify a great city in a mo- 
ment do more harm than good, for they invariably cause 
reactions. We had an example of that in San Francisco. 
A few years ago the town was seized with a tremendous 
spasm of virtue. All side doors to saloons were closed. 
Partitions of rooms in restaurants were cut down so that 
any Peeping Tom might look over. In a short time the 
purifiers got tired and rested, and then the other side got 
to work. The saloon-keepers and the restaurateurs, and 
everybody who had been disturbed, made common cause 
against drastic reform and carried the next election. Now 
the anti-reformers run the town, and its last state is infi- 
nitely worse than the first. Moral reforms, like every- 
thing else, must be put into effect with moderation. Ex- 
cesses of all kinds are mere fanaticism, and do as much 
harm as good. Already in Philadelphia the police are 
being censured for the great raid, as several thoroughly 
respectable women were dragged from their houses as sus- 
pected wantons and thrown into jail with the scum of the 
city. How much better to have the police and the courts 
do their duty quietly and calmly every day in the year in- 
stead of neglecting it 364 days, and then trying to make 
up in one for all their delinquencies. 

Lord Roberts' Candor. 

Old Lord Roberts lost his temper in the House of 
Lords this week in discussing Premier Balfour's declara- 
tion that England was immune from invasion by reason of 
her navy. The old veteran blurted out the awful truth 
that England is a back number as a military nation and 
totally unfit to uphold her position on land as a first-class 
power. One of these fine days the world will get an object 
lesson verifying the old General's candid criticism. Eng- 
land has been dozing like a drowsy old woman for many 
years and the world is going past her. The best proof of 
this is that she lets invertebrate politicians like Bal- 
four run her national affairs. 




g-JCHAS. KC1LOS & CO 3g 

&EXCL usrvE& 

HIGH GRADE CLOTHIERS 

This Ready Made Clothes Progression has had 
our close attention for years. We claim the distinction 
of being the "Parent" of this advanced Art. Our 
garments tower far above all others. Smart, correct 
dressers have appreciated our ideas of Modern Clothes 
Building, by their almost unanimous support. Are 
You a Smart Dresser? 




Trrfus-Zoitrff/ocM, 



[JDLY 15, I905. 



-THE WASP 



75 



The Head of the Equitable. 
Like the majority of those who are at the head of the 
great financial concerns of America, Thomas F. Ryan, 
man who straightened out the tangle in the Equitable Life 
Assurance Company and assumed control of it, began life 
on a farm. He was born in Nelson County, Virginia, Oct- 
ober 17, 1851. At the end of the Civil War he found him- 
self dependent on two aunts whose home was the farm 
where he had been raised. In 1S0S he struck out for him- 
self, and was taken as clerk in the dry goods commission 
house of John S. Barry, of Baltimore. After two years he 
concluded that he had received sufficient training to enlcr 
upon something more ambitious, and accordingly moved 
on to New York, and in 1S70 associated himself with a 
stock brokerage concern. Through his strict attention to 
business and his shrewd methods he steadily advanced, 
and in 1874 became a member of the Stock Exchange. 
Shortly after he bought his seat he acquired the Richmond 
Terminal, and thus won the attention of William C. Whit- 
ney, with whom he afterwards was associated in the war 
upon Jacob Sharp and the boodle aldomien, who sought 
to bunko the city out of the Broadway Street Railway 
franchise. After he had routed the boodle ring and given 
New York a comprehensive system of transportation, he 
took up the surface railroads of the metropolis. Next he 
turned his attention to the immense profit to be cleared 
from tobacco, and from owning a portion of one small 
cigarette factory he gained control of the tobacco trade 
of the United States. While reorganizing the various 
railways of the South, his attention was turned to the 
money in coal lands, and he invested in vast tracts both 
in Virginia and in Ohio. Among the concerns of which 
he is at the head are: The Seaboard Air Line, with 
$60,900,000 capital; the Tobacco interests, with $293,620,- 
115 capital; the Metropoltan Street Railway Stocks and 
Bonds, with $175,000,000 ; the Equitable and the Washing- 
ton Life Insurance Companies; the National Bank of Com- 
merce; the Bethlehem Steel Company; and the Morton 
Trust Company, the combined millions of which render 
him one of the greatest and most powerful financiers in 
the world. Mr. Ryan was a delegate from Virginia to 
the Demorcratic National Convention of 1904, and was in- 
strumental in bringing about a cordial acceptance of the 
Parker gold telegram.' He is a member of the Southern 
Society of New York, and also of the Chamber of Com- 
merce, the Metropolitan Club, the Manhattan Club, the 
Union Club, the Lawyers' Club, the Catholic Club, and the 
New York Athletic Club. He was married m Baltimore 
on November 25, 1873, to Miss Ida Barry, and they are the 
parents of five sons. They live in a commodious house at 
Sixty-fifth avenue, New York, have a fine country place 
at Suffern, N. Y., and own Oak Ridge, a splendid stud 
farm in Virginia, where Mr. Ryan has the horses that are 
his chief pleasure. 

More Russians Running. 
The Russians are running in another direction now 
since the all-conquering Japs have taken the Russian penal 
settlement of Saghalien. This is the first conquest ot 
Russian territory by the Mikado's troops, but it will not 
he the last unless Nicholas may hurry his peace envoys 
and sign a humiliating treaty. Those Russian generals are 
the worst ever. 

Americus. 



Another pretty young girl who was willing to be an old 
man's darling has 'got a divorce and taken to the stage. 
Eleanor Dole, formerly wife of ex-Attorney-General Ji. Y. 
Dole of Honolulu, is said now to be a member ot the Kolb 
& Dill chorus, having joined the company in Po™?™- 
The lady was a San Francisco girl and wedded at the Fat- 
ace Hotel in 1900. The wedding was a much-talked-of 
affair. This aftermath of an Hawaiian scandal is bound 
to interest local society, but not because the lady was ot it. 
She was a school teacher and a Roman Catholic. While 



on a visit to Honolulu she attracted the attention of Mr. 
Dole, who finally persuaded her to marry him. He is of old 
missionary stock, and a difference of religious faiths was 
an early stumbling-block. Then Honolulu society was not 
ery kind to the bride. Naturally there were other causes 
for estrangement, and when the pretty young Mrs. Dol 
came back alone to San Francisco the newspapers had 
more or less thinly veiled hints about domestic infelicity 
and a separation. Both the Doles at first denied vigorous- 
ly any such imputations, but before long it was reluctantly 
admitted. One branch of the Dole family lives in River- 
side, and the boys, while in Stanford, distinguished them- 
selves as athletes. 



A striking story is going the rounds of our local socio! y 
women, which they tell keenly. The joke is a bit on San 
l-'rancisco, and on one woman in particular. The com- 
mentary on education is not flattering — the ignorance dis- 
played might even be termed benighted. Sad, sad, but 
true. But you may judge the matter for yourself. A 
wealthy and well-known woman of this city went to Eu- 
rope, to be gone on a two years' trip. She got as far as 
Paris, however, and she stayed there for eleven months. 
She did not count this out of proportion, for she was hav- 
ing a nice time. While there she met two girls from San 
Francisco, and as they were old society friends at home 
they all went around together. The two girls, who are now 
back, are the ones who tell the present tale. One day the 
three ladies went to view some new picture that had been 
hung in the salon. They were works, for the most part, 
of exceptional merit, and conspicuous among them was a 
sacred subject, "The Descent from the Cross." The head 
of the madonna in the painting was particularly fine, and 
they stood there wrapped in admiration. Suddenly the 
woman came out with this comment: "How sad! This 
woman's husband seems to have been murdered." 
The two girls, of course, were staggered, and, to make mat- 
ters worse, after they had quickly enlightened her, she said 
carelessly: "Oh, is that so?" 



Death levels all ranks and sects. Not so in Russia. The 
Christian Socialists murdered by Cossacks at Lodz were 
allowed burial by relatives. The Hebrew victims were 
treated like the carcases of dogs and refused burial ac- 
cording to Jewish rites. The blood of the murdered He- 
brews has once more cemented friendship between the Jews 
and Christians. Now the Czar may expect real warm 
business in Poland. 



President Roosevelt says that the surest way for a na- 
tion to invite disaster is to be opulent, aggressive and un- 
armed. "To be aggressive in speech and not be armed 
invites not merely disaster, but the contempt of mankind." 
Roosevelt's speech from which the above maxim is culled 
was made on the day that the news of the smash in the 
Straits of Corea was reported. 

Rather a curious prophecy in regard to King Alphonso 
of Spain has been dug up by a scribe on a Paris newspaper. 
The spooky prediction comes from the lips of Father 
Rodriguez Sanchez, a monk of the Carmelite order of 1530. 
In defining the course of King Alphonso XHI he said : 
"He will try in vain to ally himself with a princess of 
heretical blood. The house to which he belongs being very 
Christian, and having in the person of one of its daugh- 
ters endured great sufferings, inflicted by the kingdom to 
which he will attempt to ally himself, he will not commit 
the crime." Poor, weak King Alphonso ! It does seem as 
though he were handicapped sufficiently in the straggle for 
life without having a ghostly utterance thrust at him from 
the gloom of the sixteenth century. 



There's a subtle fascination in the exquisite bouquet of 
the Repsold wines that makes them the fixed choice of 
wine drinkers 



76 



-THE WASP- 



[July 15, 1905. 



SCHMITZ ATTENDS A SEANCE 

Scene — Mayor's office. 
(Sehmitz solus) : 

The time comes on apace 

For me to make the race 

Again for Mayor, and this 

Must give me pause. I miss 

Sweet William Randolph Hearst, 

Who taught me how to burst 

The party ties that bind 

One to his party kind. 

I'm much at sea; but I'll consult 

The powers of darkness — those occult 

Ones who hold communion deep 

With great departed souls who sleep 

Most while, till crack of doom 

I'll call them up from out the gloom 

Of graves, and ask advice, 

And, statesman grown, I'll break the ice 

With Jefferson, who's fully fit 

To counsel me, the Frisco "IT." 

Scene II. 
(Mayor to clairvoyant) : 

I would call up the lofty spirit 

Of Thomas Jefferson, and hear it 

Give me sage advice; 

For Tom, you know, was thrice 

First — first in war, in peace, 

And first in the hearts of his countrymen, 

And that has given him lease 

On immortality. Call Tom. 
(Jefferson) : 

What, ho! Who calls me from 

My quiet rest, where I am blest 

With Lethe's soothing mane 

That runs deep through the grave — 

Who calls me out, with human shout, 

And wrests me from my rest? 
(Sehmitz) : 

Great Tom! 'tis I, with one request 

Anent the coming hot campaign. 

And who are you, whom I must hear complain 

Of things remote, uncertain, 

And hid behind the mortal curtain? 

(Sehmitz) : 

'Tis I, dear Tom, the San Francisco "IT," 
'Twist two of a kind. I thought it fit 
That I should ask my elder brother 
The easiest way to 'scape the bother 
Of keen pursuit from irate men 
Who chase my chums into the "pen," 
And who'd jug me, had they the ken. 

(Jeff.) : 

So you are "IT"! I've heard of you before; 

I've heard till hearing has grown sore. 

You read my Declaration 

In the hearing of the nation 

With a crude enunciation 

That would vex the whole creation, 

And more. You leave the City Hall; 

Leave your business — duties — all, 

With dainty strap and jockey cap — 

Although you're growing bulky — 

To drive a horse and sulkey. 

And worse; you show your clown hoof, 

Gadding around with slick Abe Kuef. 

Why, in the olden, golden time, 

Clean Virtue sat in every public .way, 

And touched her servant with approof. 

Where is this "Frisco," anyway, 

Where things are run by nameless Ruef, 

Where restaurants and cigar-stands 

Guard sentry over gaudy bands 



Of drabbled angels, fallen doves, 
The profits of whose lustful loves 
Are gathered for the rich behoof 
Of vultures nesting 'neath your roof? 
Where is this "Frisco," anyway, 
That shames the very face of day? 
There was no "Frisco" in my time 
That sheltered thus atrocious crime, 
Where labor paid per cent in cash 
For leave to earn its daily hash; 
Where politicians collected dues 
That fell to strumpets in purlieus. 
"0 Shame! where is thy blush"? 
Let shameful "Frisco" rush 
Pellmell into her copious bay, 
And drown the sight and smell away ! 
Sehmitz, all considered, you won't do. 
Convictions prove your "chums" were rotted, 
And tou are mighty badly spotted — 
Couldn't possibly pull you through. 
But ere I flit, please solve this riddle : 
What have you done with your old fiddle ? 
(Sehmitz) : 

Alas! Alack! Jeff won't come back; 

He's lost the politician's knack. 

He raves, and seems to treat me light, 

As if I were not wholly bright, 

And twits me of my fiddle. 

Ah, well ! King David pranced and danced, 

And played the devil out of Saul, 

And Jeff himself, he played the fiddle; 

In fact, me Big Wigs all 

Have fads, from great to small. 

Jeff mocked at me, and stalked away in lofty state ; 

Jeff clearly was not up to date. 

To hear him talk, Abe would have laughed 

Of public place without a "graft." 

Good thing all Jeffersons are dead — 

Good, Frisco did not hear what old Tom said. 

Our "graft" will down their throats be crammed; 

The squirming public may be damned ! 

J. J. E. 




That our garments nave maintained a char- 
acteristic individuality for graceful shapeliness (and 
the retention of their shapeliness through a long 
period of service) has been due, we take it, to the 
fact that, -while purchasing only from the very best 
of good clothes makers, we have taken the extra 
precaution to dictate the various materials that are 
used in their manufacture. 

An example worthy of emulation by our 

competitors. 

Heller & Frank, Inc. 

Clothiers 

Market Street and Grant Ave. 




WOMEN 





01 I ETY will talk £or many a long day over 
Mrs. Eleanor Martin's reception to Secre- 
tary Tal't and party, including Miss Alice 
Roosevelt. Everybody admits that Mrs. 
Martin established beyond question her 
rank as the social empress of the Pacific 
Coast. "How did she do it?" is the oft- 
repeated query on the street and in the clubs. Many are 
the comments exchanged in the boudoirs and over the tea- 
cups by the ladies who went to the big reception, or those 
who were not given the opportunity. To all invidious re- 
marks Mrs. Martin can turn a deaf ear, for her triumph 
has been complete. 

Speculation is rife in society as to whether the pub- 
lished list of the guests invited to Mrs. Eleanor Martin's 
reception contained the names of all those bidden to the 
affair, or only those who were present. It is officially 
stated from the Martin menage that no list of invited 
guests was given out, and the reporters merely took the 
names of those whom they saw pass the hospitable portals. 
There is an easy way of letting down the notables who 
may have been purposely overlooked. It gives absentees 
a chance to explain that a previous engagement kept them 
away, or the weather was too hot to run up to town, or 
fifty other flimsy but all-sufficient lies suitable to the neces- 
sities of the delicate situation. 

Jt Jt Jt 

As history should be accurate in these matters, it may 
be stated that Mrs. Martin assumes no responsibility her- 
self for the selection of the list of guests. It is given out 
from the Martin household that the guilty one is Judge 
W. W. Morrow. Being a great friend of Secretary Taft, 
and also of Mrs. Martin, he suggested the brilliant social 
affair by which both could share the social honors essential 
to his official visit to San Francisco. He also, it is affirm- 
ed, made up the list of guests, and may heaven have mercy 
on his soul for that same deed, for San Francisco will be 
well along towards having a population of two millions 
before his crime will be forgiven by those whom he blue- 
penciled. 

J» J» J* 

Though Mrs. Martin's reception was, from the official 
character lent to it, the event of the season, it did not 
effectually determine "who's who" in San Francisco soci- 
ety. One can note many omissions, and at the same time 
see many names in the list of "those present" which 
cause mild surprise. But it is explained that those invited 
who were not really born to the purple were honored be- 
cause of official or semi-official connections. It needs a 
great deal of what Kolb & Dill would call "explanation- 
ings" to get the record straightened out in these matters. 
After all is said and done, society will probably not accept 
the list of guests as the "Burke's Peerage" of the Pacific 
Coast, but will still stick to Ned Greenway's tabulation of 
who's who. Dear old Ned ! As a friendly clubman said of 
him the other night: "He may be red in the face this hot 
weather, but he's no lobster when it comes to deciding 
society problems." 

The discriminating wine drinker asks for the Eepsold se- 
lect vintages because he knows what is most gratifying 
to health and palate. Inspection invited. 420 Pine St. 



A good deal has been said about the remarkable late- 
ness of Miss Roosevelt's arrival at the Martin reception. 
Those who got no invitations declare it was a slight, and 
sotto voce comments on the climbers present went unheard 
and unheeded for once. For the first time in the social 
history of San Francisco, too, Mrs. Martin had her fill of 
the military, for brass buttons glittered everywhere, a brass 
band blared on the balcony, and the flags of all waters in- 
tertwined on the walls to glorify the occasion. While the 
local devotees wandered in eestacy through this social par- 
adise, Miss Roosevelt, on whom the delights of the func- 
tion evidently palled, made what is commonly known as 
"a great sneak." The word was passed that a snug little 
poker party was being made up. Miss Roosevelt is what 
some men call "a good fellow," and likes to be so consid- 
ered. She cheerfully acquiesced in the program, and a 
quiet adjournment was made to the house of Mr. and Mrs. 
Robert Oxnard on Broadway, where the national game on 
reasonably stiff lines enthralled the company long after 
the glare of a thousand lights in the Martin mansion had 
given place to darkness. 

There have been so many contradictory descriptions of 
Miss Roosevelt's dress that the lady's gown calls for a 
special paragraph. She was dressed in white mousseline 
de soie, with a good deal of black chiffon about it. It was 
one of those peculiar Parisian creations which are impossi- 
ble to describe, much less to duplicate. Miss Roosevelt's 
wardrobe is very far from being inexpensive, and the cost 
of those seemingly simple frocks would surprise the trust- 
ing reporters who wrote of them as if they had been made 
for $4 apiece. In fact, the Eastern press has commented 
on the expensive and showy street dresses worn by Miss 
Roosevelt, and by Washington and New York society, 
which follows her lead. 

While stopping at the Palace Hotel Miss Roosevelt won 
ever}' one with her sweet, girlish ways. She was wholly 
unaffected, and was the life of her party. She was never 
dull for a moment. She took her dinners in the Palm Gar- 
den, where any one who cared could see her, and she was 
just as likely to jump up and run over to some group of 
people she knew as not to do so. It was amusing some- 
times to see some wiseacre point out the wrong girl as Miss 
Roosevelt, and to see every one stare at the wrong Miss 
Roosevelt. Perhaps this frequent occurrence may explain 
why one hears so many contradictory opinions of the Pres- 
ident's daughter. In reality, she is much like hundreds 
of well-bred, good-natured American girls — tall, slim, with 
good features, on which there is always a ready play of ex- 
pression and a never-failing vivacity. She is perfectly 
natural — which is one infallible sign of good breeding. 
Being full of life, Miss Roosevelt is as likely to whistle as 
she is to hum something, and she was wont to go about the 
hotel by herself with perfect unconcern. Always, though, 
she was gracious and thoughtful of others. 
J« J* J* 

Mrs. Helen Freese is spending a portion of the sum- 
mer in Portland at the Lewis and Clark Exposition. 

Old Fashioned Chocolate Creams — a delicious blend of 
chocolate and cream in three flavors. Only at Haas' Candy 
Stores, Phelan Building and Jas. Flood Building. 



78 



-THE WASP 



[July 15, 1905. 



"Hermann Oelrichs ' Wife Gains by $20,000,000 ' ' was the 
startling headline of a recent telegraphic dispatch from 
New York. The further information given under this re- 
markable heading was that the twenty millions had been 
made since Mrs. Oelrichs revoked her power of attorney 
to her husband. Incidentally it was remarked that she 
would soon be the richest woman on earth. The first im- 
pression of any intelligent reader perusing such a state- 
ment was that he must be dreaming. The next that the 
reporter who concocted such an article must have just laid 
aside his opium pipe and started to work before the fumes 
had got out of his befuddled brain. Only a little while 
ago Mrs. Hermann Oelrichs performed the brilliant fin- 
ancial feat of dropping about a million and a half in her 
foolish real estate transactions in San Francisco. That 
was one of the first clever performances after revoking 
her power of attorney to her husband. Hermann Oelrichs 
must be possessed of a very Christian-like disposition if 
he forgives the scurvy and outrageous treatment that he 
has received at the hands of Mrs. Oelrichs and her sister 
with regard to that power of attorney. It is well known 
that he asked the sisters to have it revoked long before 
they did so. They declined and insisted on his conduct- 
ing their tangled affairs and he consented to do so. No 
sooner was the business straightened oat, however, than 
they publicly revoked the power of attorney in such a way 
as to place Mr. Oelrichs in an utterly false light. San 
Francisco people know very well how to judge between 
Mrs. Oelrichs and Mrs. Vanderbilt and Hermann Oelrichs. 
The latter has lived here and enjoys the confidence and 
respect of the community. The two ladies referred fo 
prefer that their millions made in California shall be 
spent for the benefit of Newport, New York and Paris. 
That they have no deep regard for this State or its people 
is well known, and it would not be stretching the truth 
to say that the feeling is fully reciprocated. 

In the dispatch from New York a reference is made to 
Mrs. Charles Oelrichs which has all the earmarks of a 
gratuitous and undeserved slap at that lady. It is stated 
that she has adjusted her trouble with her sister-in-law 
and will no longer be prevented from living in the best of 
style. This, of course, is an intimation that Mrs. Hermann 
has been playing the Lady Bountiful to her husband's 
relatives. San Francisco people wonder why she did not 
show some of that generosity to her unfortunate brother 
Charlie and his wife when their naked and mangled re- 
mains were forwarded here from New York in the same 
cheap wooden box into which a Paris undertaker had 
thrown them. The truth about Mrs. Charlie Oelrichs is 
that her husband provides for her amply without any of the 
shekels of the Fair estate. Charlie Oelrichs is a prominent 
broker, who enjoys a large income and has always kept his 
familv in fine style. The manner in which his daughter, 
young Mrs. Peter Martin, was brought up is proof of that. 
It is also of record that Charles Oelrichs' elan was so inde- 
. pendent that it regarded with anything but enthusiasm 
the prospect of the alliance of the fair Miss Lily with the 
son of San Francisco's most affluent, ostentatious and dis- 
tinguished dowager. For a long time it looked as if Peter 
would have to look lower for a bride. 

n&fr c5* t^* 

The scandalous manner in which Captain Seymour was 
treated by Mrs. Oelrichs and Mrs. Vanderbilt is a matter 
of court record. He gave up his life position as captain 
of detectives to become manager of the Fair estate. When 
Mrs. Oelrichs sold her holdings here for a song she had 
no further use for the Captain, and notified him to quit 
at a moment's notice, though he had a contract for several 
vears' service. He has sued her for $30,000 and will win 
the case. Hermann Oelrichs admitted the justice of the 

Nelson's Amycose, Infallible Remedy for Catarrh, Sore 
Throat and Inflammations of the Skin. 



Captain's claim, but declined to testify against his wife, 
as such action might be misconstrued in view of the scurvy 
treatment Mrs. Vanderbilt and her sister had given him 
when they no longer needed his advice and assistance. The 
people who helped Oelrichs to baffle the rapacious New Jer- 
sey relatives of Mr. and Mrs. Charlie Fair received equal- 
ly disgraceful treatment. They were ignored when the 
ease was settled and Charlie Fair's large estate went to his 
ungrateful sisters. There was something of poetic justice, 
however, in the way in which the New York lawyers made 
those ladies disgorge large sums for services never ren- 
dered. 

It is a well-known fact that, the Fair will case was 
dragging along in our local courts. Mrs. Hermann Oel- 
richs notified her husband, authoritatively, to abandon the 
suit, as she wished to be rid of it. Oelrichs declined on 
account of his young son's interest in the estate, and final- 
ly won. In view of the lack of business acumen in her im- 
portant business affairs here, San Francisco people will 
require more than a dopy telegraphic dispatch to convince 
them that she has suddenly developed into a Morgan in 
petticoats, and in a few years piled up a colossal fortune 
of $20,000,000 on the ruins of her $5,000,000 patrimony. 

t£fr £& iff* 

The announcement of Miss Josephine de Guigne 's en- 
gagement to Vicomte Philippe de Tristan, an officer of the 
French army, is of interest to San Francisco society. Miss 
de Guigne is a daughter of Christian de Guigne, the prom- 
inent capitalist of this ctiy, and a granddaughter of Mrs. 
Abby M. Parrott, with whom she has spent much of her 
time since her childhood. The De Guigne family has a 
splendid house down at San Mateo, where the wedding is to 
take place at the end of August. It was during a recent 
visit to France with her father and sister, Miss Mary de 
Guigne, that the Vicomte de Tristan and the young Cali- 
fornia belle met and became engaged. The prospective 
groom will be a guest of the Vicomte Walter de Tristan, 
also a French army officer, who is a visitor to San Fran- 
cisco, and will remain until after the nuptials. The future 
residence of the young couple will be in France. 

Miss Susie Blanding has almost entirely recovered from 
her illness. She was one of the most popular girls in soci- 
ety, and was almost continually going to some kind of 
party, either luncheon, tea, or dinner. Although her 
friends meant well, they were really doing her a great deal 
of harm by their interminable dinners and other functions. 
Finally, the family physician called a halt, and insisted 



THE NAME 

BOHM-BRISTOL CO. 

ON ANY ARTICLE IS IN ITSELF 
A GUARANTEE OF SATISFACTION 
IN STYLE, QUALITY AND PRICE 

BOHM-BRISTOL CO. 

JEWELERS, SILVERSMITHS, 
DIAMOND MERCHANTS 

104-110 GEARY ST. 

ABOVE GRANT AVENUE 



July 15, 1905 ] 



-THE WASP- 



79 



that she should drop all Boeial functions and rest. Mil 
Blanding- obeyed, and went to Europe, and has rettirni 
splendid health. She was the most vivacious girl at Mi~. 
McBean's luncheon at Hotel Rafael the other day. 

Gordon Blanding is one of the best-dressed men in 
town. He is said to have as many different coats, 
and cravats as the famous Beau Bruinmel, though he nevei 
attracts attention by overdressing. Mrs. Blanding goes oui 
very little of late years. She was a great friend of the I 
j\lrs. .Monroe Salisbury and used to attend some of the 
Fortnightly dances as patroness just to oblige the indefati- 
gable leader. 

Jt Jit S 

I hear that the Harry Holbrooks are considering plans 
for their new home, which is to be built far out on Pacific- 
avenue. It is to be a very large and beautiful residence, 
and the furnishings, some of which are already purchased, 
are to be on an elaborate scale. 

Mr. and Mrs. Alfred S. Gump, who have made an ex- 
tended tour of Europe during their honeymoon, have re- 
turned to America on the steamer Deutschland. Mr. Gump 
is a member of the S. & G. Gump Company, and one of the 
best known young business men of San Francisco. 

t&** ^% (^% 

Lloyd M. Robbins, whose portrait appears in The Wasp 
this week, is a member of the well-known firm of Bobbins 
& Breeze, attorneys-at-law, with offices in the Kohl Build- 
ing. Mr. Robbins is a son of Colonel R. D. Robbins cf 
Suisun, Solano county's millionaire banker, one of Gov- 
ernor Pardee's staff. Mr. Robbins has been practising in 
San Francisco, has been intrusted with some heavy litiga- 
tion, and is well known in corporation cases. He is unmar- 
ried, and makes his home at the Pacific Union Club. 

It is said that Mrs. Hermann Oelrichs never has her 
little breakfast served at Newport without six servants 
in attendance. 




"THE POLO." 
The Leading Hat of the Day. 
The hat pictured above is the correct thing among the 
well-dressed and stylish women of the present. It has 
just been introduced into this market, and at once won 
the favor of swelldom. It is made of fine Milan straw. 
Uniaue in design, and becoming to most faces, it is destin- 
ed to have an unprecedented run. 



Another engagement now on the tapis, it is said, is 
of I '.ail Landers and Joseph Eastland, bul il 
ept very quiet np t" the day of the wedding, for Mi-s 
Landers has had rather more than her share of engage- 
ments, having been the fiancee of Ham' Scott and Geo) 
Wliit tell. Joe Eastland has been devoted to Pearl I 
ders for several mouths, and you never see one without 
the oilier. At present Miss Landers is staying with Mrs. 
Broil Bruguiere at Monterey, where sue went with the 
Fords in their automobile. Joe Eastland is down at Del 
Monte following the footsteps of the fascinating Miss 
Pearl Landers — her devoted slave. 



The surprise of the week was Miss Maylita Pease's 
marriage to Arthur Watson. The preparations for the 
wedding were carried on with the utmost secrecy, but two 
or three of the lady's closest friends having any suspicion 
that wedding bells were to swing so soon. The bride and her 
family intended to keep the affair secret till after the bri- 
dal couple were speeding away to the East and to Europe. 



The unusual as usual. 
Hotel, 636 Market St. 



Tom Dillon's hats, opp. Palace 




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WEDDING INVITATIONS 

123 GRANT AVENUE, SAN FRANCISCO 

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New Orientals just received 

Largest and best variety we ever had 




261 Geary St., Union Square 



HOT WEATHER SPECIAL! 



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Full size 16 inch; No. 214a, Reliable Gas Range — four top 
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80 



-THE WASP 



[July 15, 1905. 



but it leaked out a day or two ahead of time. Only the 
two families and the Howells, the Middletons and a few 
others were present at the wedding. Young Mrs. Arthur 
Watson and her husband have been engaged for some years. 
Indeed, Arthur had been Maylita's sweetheart since she 
wore short dresses. He is the son of the late Mr. and Mrs. 
Charles Watson, and inherited a goodly fortune. 

q^W tzfr t^V 

The invitations to the Midsummer Jinks of the Bohe- 
mian Club have been issued, and Winton Tharp is to be the 
sire. Mr. Tharp has issued a poetic proclamation to his 
fellow-Bohemians, which is somewhat suggestive of the 
pedantic days when gentlemen of the eighteenth century 
adorned their love letters with jingling metaphor, and no 
professional versifier could write five lines without di'ag- 
ging in half of the Grecian mythology Bohemian sires 
have been under a frightful strain for several years past, 
riding Pegasus, with stilts on that pat'ent roadster, right 
up the rock face of Parnassus. Cut it but, gentlemen. 
Come back to earth and be natural. The Bohemian Club is 
not the temple of Apollo, nor the redivood grove of the 
Summer Jinks the summit of Olympus, with Jove thunder- 
ing his edicts in blank verse. Many excellent Bohemians 
plod along in the prosaic walks of trads and finance, deal- 
ing in sugar and soap, and bonds and stocks, while others 
disdain not the profits gained honestly by transactions in 
flour and beans and kitchen stoves and tenpenny nails. 
Come down oft your high horse, nobie sires! and walk 
with the multitude. 

The divorce suit of Mrs. MeAneny is a great surprise to 
society in San Francisco. In a very few years' residence 
here she acquired the reputation of being the best-dressed 
woman in San Francisco. When one met a lady who looked 
as if she had just stepped from Paris into Kearny street, 
it was always Mrs. MeAneny. She had quite as distinctive 
a style as the first Mrs. Webster Jones, and had such a 
sweet disposition that she made a great many friends. 
She and Jennie Blair were great friends, and last winter 
she received at many very handsome functions. At Mrs. 
H. M. A. Miller's reception she appeared in a lovely frock 
and her sets of jewels always attracted much attention. 
Her mother, Mrs. Masten, was her shadow, and although 
her husband was not with her, she was always most care- 
fully chaperoned. She is rather studiously inclined, and 
when she was not going out spent her time studying and 
cultivating her voice. She is a blonde of medium height, 
blue-eyed and very pretty. 

Mr. and Mrs. Walter Dean O'Brien have gone south. 
Their longest stop will be at Catalina Island. About Au- 
gust 1st they will return to San Francisco, and for a few 
weeks will be the guests of Mr. and Mrs. Thomas V. 
O'Brien. 

(£* t,5* i5* 

The "Examiner" for the first time in three years is 
once more on the file at the Bohemian Club, and the "Ex- 
aminer" men who are members of the Family are, it is 
said, soon to be reinstated as members. All this has come 
about, it is said, through the election of '.'Bill" Barton 
to the office of President. In the hot election that char- 
acterized his campaign many pledges, it is alleged, were 
made in order to procure Mr. Barton's election, and he 
promised the "Examiner" crowd that if they would ap- 
pear and vote for him, he would see to it that Congress- 
man Hearst's saffron sheet should be restored to the Club 
files. Personally I disbelieve the yarn, though a con- 
scientious regard for my duty as a histrographer of soci- 
ety compels me to print it. Anyhow, the contemned news- 
Old Fashioned Chocolate Oreams — a new, delicate 
cream, enclosed in "old-fashioned" chocolate coating. 
Only at Haas' Candy Stores, Phelan Building and Jas. 
Flood Building. 



paper has been quietly replaced in the Club from which 
it was once taken out gingerly with a pair of tongs and 
deposited in the street gutter. A Club should have a 
stomach strong enough to stand for any publication, so 
there is really no cogent reason why a Bohemian anxious 
to ruin his moral fibre by reading the "Examiner" should 
be compelled to send out and have it bought for him. 
Now it is said that Ned Hamilton, or "dear old Ned" as 
he is called, who is President of the Family Club, is once 
more to become a member of the Bohemian, and even that 
he may take part in the midsummer jinks. As the Family 
Club was established more for Mr. Hamilton's benefit than 
that of any other member, it is not likely that he will 
slight it by resuming his old place in the Bohemian Club, 
where he had no time for any other social organization. 

t^fr 1£& (5* 

The news that Marian Harrison Sperry has sued for a 
divorce from her husband comes as no surprise to Sausalito 
society. The marriage of young Dick Sperry and his wife 
about a year and a half ago was a hurried affair, the cere- 
mony being performed under the management of the 
groom's mother at Sacramento during the twenty minutes' 
stop made there by the Eastern-bound train. Mrs. Sperry 
continued East with her new mother-in-law, while the 19- 
year-old husband returned to Sausalito. It was not until 
some months later that the Harrisons were informed of the 
event. Mrs. Harrison hurried East and brought her daugh- 
ter home, and she has continued to live with her parents 
in their pretty Sausalito residence ever since. The young- 
husband has never been welcome there, and his inability to 
support his wife has been an added source of estrangement 
between the two families. It is now whispered that the 
attractive Mrs. Sperry is only waiting for the bonds of 
matrimony to be severed to give her heart and hand into 
the keeping of another. 



d lUUttS! 



DELIGHTS THE PALATE OF A CONNOISSEUR 



A PERFECTLY PURE WHISKY DIRECT FROM KENTUCKY 



SHERWOOD & SHERWOOD, AGENTS 




July 15, 1905.] 



'THEWASP- 



31 




MR. AND MRS. W. H. TALBOT 
The principals in a divorce case which promises to be sensational 



After all the attention the fashionahles across the hay 
have showered on Miss Leslie Green since they found that 
she was to many Howard Huntington, son of the million- 
aire, they are to be excluded from the wedding party. It 
has been decided by the charming little bride-elect that 
only relatives shall be present at the important eveut, and 
there are about one hundred and fifty, counting those from 
both houses. The setting is to be as picturesque as though 
there were one thousand outsiders to view the decorations, 
gowns, etc. Wednesday evening, August 16th, has been 
chosen as the date of the marriage, and it will take place 
in the Dwight Way home of the Greens in Berkeley. A 
maid of honor, Miss Ruth Green, the bride's young sister, 
and four bridesmaids, Miss Marian and Miss Elizabeth 
Huntington, the groom's sisters, Miss Ruth Knowles and 
Miss Elizabeth Livermore, will complete Miss Green's at- 
tendants, and Mr. Huntington will have as best man his 
lifelong friend and intimate chum, Mr. Hugh Stewart, of 
Los Angeles. The honeymoon, which is to last five or six 

FAT FOLKS. 
I reduced my weight seventy pounds, bust six inches, 
waist six inches and hips fourteen inches in a short time 
by a guaranteed harmless remedy without exercise or 
starving. I will tell you all about it. Enclose stamp. Ad- 
dresB Mrs. E. F. Richards, 226 E. Ninth St., Riverside. Ca. 



months, is to be spent in Europe, and when the couple re- 
turn to California they will take possession of their own 
house in Los Angeles. Miss Green has the loveliest collec- 
tion of cups and saucers, numbering seventy in all, and 
three tables are set aside for their use in the Green resi- 
dence. 

Some socially prominent French people are trying to 
start a counter movement against the automobile craze 
with a view of sustaining the interest of the smart set 
in their old friend, the horse. The Touring Club of France 
will go to Trouville early in August on horseback and in 
horse-drawn carriages. Several important farms where 
horses are bred will be visited by the excursionists. The 
committee of arrangements includes Baron du Teine du 
Havelt, Due de Noailles, Comte Renee de Beaumont, and 
other leading horsemen of France. 



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* I * * fr *!* ' I * * fr * i * * r ' I * ' I ' V V TT ' W ' ' I"I * ' I ' " I * V ' I * WW V *V 'I' "I* '*■ V '»' TTtT tTTt 



82 



-THE WASP 



[July 15, 1905. 



.« * « « » » »**• 







nery would detract from the seriousness of the vows, and 
she ordered the skirt of the dress well off the floor, as she 
intended to wear it frequently. The wedding will take 
place on July 18th, at the residence of the groom's mother, 
Brick House, in Connecticut, where Miss Pastor has been 
a guest for a month. The groom's brother, the Rev. Anson 
Phelps -Stokes, will officiate, only the families being pres- 
ent. After a tour in Europe the couple are to live in the 
East End, where they will carry on their work for the 
benefit of the poor of that district. 

c£* t&V t&fc 

Will Sanborn, the popular Holluschickie president, is 
taking quite an extensive trip this summer. He left re- 
cently to spend a month in the Grand Canyon. 



MRS. GBOEGK F. GRAY XX 

JJ A San Franciscan who is cousin to I*ady Beatrice Marconi *♦ 

^♦♦♦♦♦♦&»I»Mt»M MM ««?i«**»»»^***^*««iMiiIil Si !!»*!•!!!»!»♦♦»»»«*♦♦*♦»♦*» 

I have heard that Mr. and Mrs. Robbins — Alice Ames — 
are to return to San Francisco next winter. Mr. Robbins 
lias been studying in Paris for the last few years, and has 
now completed his course. The Robbinses live in the Latin 
Quarter, and their home is the meeting place for nearly 
all of the notables. At a recent evening "at home" 
Mrs. Robbins entertained nearly a hundred San Francis- 
cans. She has taken lessons on the violin during her stay 
in the French capital, and is now one of the best amateur 
musicians in ' ' Gay Paree. ' ' Edgar Mills, who is living in 
apartments near the Robbinses, is studying voice culture, 
with the intention of going on the concert platform. 

After a honeymoon spent at Santo Barbara Captain 
and Mrs. McMillan are back in San Francisco. I hear that 
Mrs. McMillan, who was Miss Leontine Blakeman, was one 
of the most dashing brides of the season at the Southern 
resort. Her gowns were very beautiful, and she carried 
herself with grace and dignity. 

^* Ki7* t&* 

It is not only San Franciscans who appreciate the 
charm of the Mission city by the sea. Mr. Walter New- 
hall of Los Angeles is at Santa Barbara with a large party 
of friends. He made the trip in his yacht, and the vessel 
is found convenient for trips to the outlying islands in the 
Santa Barbara channel, where the fishing is excellent. 

Miss Rose Harriet Pastor, the young woman who is 
about to be married to Mr. J. G. Phelps Stokes, million- 
aire settlement worker of New York, evidently regards the 
wedding service as something very sacred, since she will 
not wear a handsome gown for fear it may take away from 
the solemnity of the occasion. Not very many girls, espe- 
cially among those who have never owned a dress of silk, 
satin, chiffon or lace, would limit the cost of her wedding 
robe to forty dollars when given carte blanche as to ex- 
pense. But Miss Rose Harriet Pastor declared that milli- 

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San Francisco 



July 15. 1905.] 



-THE WASP 



83 




It The President's Daughter, who has won the hearts of Californian 



A New York weekly society newspaper, which prides 
itself on its accuracy as well as its hostile attitude towards 
titled Americans, says that Baron von Horst, who has 
gone to Coburg to attend the coronation of the Duke of 
Saxj-Coburg-Gotha, asserted that his title dates back to 
1200, and is well-known and recognized throughout 
Europe. Furthermore, the genial California nobleman 
told the guileless editor that "titles may be purchased in 
some countries, but Germany is not in that kind of com- 
mercialism." It would afford great pleasure to all of us 
in California, who like the Baron so much, if we could 
only have the abiding faith in the authenticity and age 
pf his title that he professes himself. 

ij5* c5* %£fc 

In the distribution of the bride's garter, which was 
the closing ceremony of the wedding festivities of the 
Crown Prince and Crown Princess of Germany, at Berlin 
a short time ago, the young women of the smart set in 
California might find a suggestion for something a little 
out of the common. The rite began with the historical 
torchlight dance, during which the royal bride, preceded 
by twelve pages bearing gigantic candles, repeatedly made 
the tour of the apartment, each time attended by at least 
four cavaliers. During this procession the garter of the 
Princess, which had been cut in small strips for the occa- 
sion, was distributed to the wedding guests. At a dinner 
given the next evening these tiny bits of silk were worn as 
a decoration, by command of the Emperor. 

That dashing young San Francisco matron, Mrs. George 
F. Gray, is a cousin of Lady Beatrice 'Brian, who mar- 
ried Marconi, the wizard of wireless telegraphy. Before 
her marriage Mrs. Gray was Miss Minnie 'Laughlin. Her 
father's brother. Sir Michael 'Laughlin, was Master of 
the Rolls, a leading statesman of Ireland and England, 
and an able attorney, while an uncle, Sir Bryan 
'Laughlin, was at one time prominently identified with 
the government of Australia. A quaint old book, writ- 
ten by Mrs. Gray's cousin, Miss Attie O'Brian, contains 
a detailed account of her ancestry. From her mother she 
inherited the handsome silver that she uses when she en- 



tains in her charming apartments at the St. Pra 
lotel. The silver is s;ii.l 10 be over ;i hundred years old, 

<i the -1 1-. etc., are quaint in shape and marked with 

mat Hi' arms showing a hand and dagger, the m>>iio be- 
in;; "Strongest Hand Uppermost." Mis. Gray is one of 
most elaborately dressed women in San Francisco so- 
il. This season her fancy runs to white and nearly all 
of her gowns arc in that color, while »hoes, gloves and 
hats match. Mr. Gray boasts his descent from American 
Revolutionary stuck, and is quite as proud of his fore- 
fathers who fought against the powers of Great Britain 
as his wile is id Iff Celtic ancestors who bearded the lion 
on the other side of the Athtnlic. 

Titled Englishmen with an eye to the main chance are 
turning out of their London homes for the three months' 
season and renting them to rich Americans. Fortunes are 
spent by fashionables from the limed States lor the joy 
of going through the season in a style that astonishes the 
natives. The ones who are most in the public eye as lavish 

Carpets cleaned. City Steam Carpet Beating nd Ren- 
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New No. 70 Eighth St. Phone, South 250. 



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and other first class resorts : : : : 

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Half a block below Palace and Grand Hotels, S. P. 
Fine Goods a Specialty. Merchants' hot lunch from 1 1 a. m. to 
3-30 p. tn. Served also in Ladies Cafe, Steaks, English Chops 
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HANDSOMEST CAFE IN AMERICA 

Open all night. $&- Private Dining Rooms for Ladies and Escort* 

HOFFMAN CAFE. PROPS. 

CHARLES HILDEBRBCHT, MfcT. 



84 



THE WASP 



[July 15, 1905- 



>-»»♦♦»♦♦♦»♦ OH 




MRS. W. H. TALBOT 
The capitalist's wife who has begun a suit for divorce 



Leading Hotels 



spenders are Lady Bateman, the former Mrs. Knapp ; the 
Duchess of Roxburghe, formerly Miss May Goelet; Mrs. 
Leggatt, Mrs. John Jacob Astor, each of whom will spend 
$100,000 ; and Mrs. Prank Mackey, Eben Jordan of Boston : 
Mrs. John Law, Mrs. Potter Palmer, and Mrs. Glascow of 
Virginia, each of whom will spend $200,000 for the sea- 
son's expenses. 

Genevieve Harvey, who has just returned from a New 
York convent, is to make her debut this winter. She is the 
younger daughter of the Downey Harveys, and bears a 
great resemblance to her mother, as does the elder sister, 
Anita. Mrs. Harvey intends to entertain considerably 
next winter, and when she occupies her new home she will 
give a series of elaborate functions. It is said that all the 
Martin family rely upon her to settle all social matters, 
to give ideas on home decorations and to plan unique ideas 
for entertainments. Mrs. Eleanor Martin's mansion, which 
is a thing of beauty in its interior arrangements, owes much 
to Mrs. Harvey's discriminating taste. Mrs. Harvey is 
what one might call a self-made woman. As Miss Sophie 
Cutter she was a modest, unassuming young lady, whose 
name was very seldom seen in the social columns. Though 
her family was an excellent one, she was not born into 
great wealth and the social prominence it commands. Now 
she is considered one of the most cultured of our society 
women, and holds a most enviable and deserved distinction 
in her circle. There is nothing of the nouveau riche about 
her. 

San Francisco has no more loyal citizen than Colonel 
Kirkpatriek, manager of the Palace and Grand Hotels, 
and possible manager of the Pairmont. The Colonel has 
always held that San Pranciseo is a model city for national 
conventions. The railroads, always eager for the "long 
haul," warmly second his efforts. The benefit to be gained 
from conventions can scarcely be overestimated, and it is 
time that Californians realize that San Pranciseo is not 
too metropolitan to need such advertising. 

t5* c5* (£* 

Mr. William Waldorf Astor is himself again. King 
Edward has smiled upon him, and life is worth the living. 
The self-expatriated American millionaire was one of the 
guests invited to Kensington Palace to the coming-out ball 
of Princess Victoria Eugenie of Battenburg, one of the 



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July and August 

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HOTEL BELLA VISTA 

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MRS. W. M. DENVER 

PROPRIETOR 



HOTEL BALTIMORE 

1015 Van Ness Avenue 

An American plan hotel conducted especially for families desiring ac- 
commodations for the season or by the year, situated in the most 
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elegantly furnished and appointed. 

C. F. BUCKLEY, Jr., 

Manager. 



SAN MARCO HOTEL 

536 TAYLOR ST.. Between Geary and Post 



A new modern fire-proof family and tourist hotel. 52 
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Marco will compare favorably with any select family hotel . 

GEO. J. CASANOVA, Manager. 



HOTEL RAFAEL 

Fifty minutes from San Francisco. Twenty-five trains daily each way 
OPEN AM, THE YEAR 

CUISINE AND SERVICE THE BbST 

Send for booklet. R. V. Hai/ton, Prop. 



Some one has said that the man with but little money 
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reverse this rule by investing it to good purpose in the 
CONTINENTAL BUILDING AND LOAN ASSOCIATION 
of 301 California St., with a certainty of obtaining good 
interest on your small savings. 



July 15, 1905. 



-THE WASP 



85 




MR. LLOYD M. ROBBINS 
Member of the prominent law firm of Robbins & Breeze 

King's nieces. Only about six hundred persons were thus 
honored, ten of whom were commoners; so William Wal- 
dorf seems to be in high favor, particularly as the other 
nine got in through the influence of their titled wives. 
Since Mr. Astor publicly snubbed Sir Berkeley-Milne, one 
of the King's friends, a few years ago, and was himself 
snubbed by royalty and compelled to apologize in his own 
paper, the Pali-Mall Gazette, the American has not hob- 
nobbed much with the titled set. But things are looking 
up. King Edward is proverbial for good nature, and Astor 
is as rich as Midas. 

t5* ti?* t? 1 * 

The first public appearance of the brass band which 
Billy Hopkins is organizing in the Bohemian Club will be 
made at Bohemian Camp July 31st. This band seems des- 
tined to go down in history, and the club wits say that they 
hope it will not be in the criminal part of it. Besides the 
weight of their instruments, the bandsmen have to stagger 
along under the crushing title of Bully Bill Barton's Big 
Bohemian Brass Band. That is an attractive aggregation 
of big B's that has never been beaten outside of a circus. 
It holds the verbal record for the club world. The leader 
of the organization is W. J. McCoy, who has shown him- 
self a wizard at musical composition foi high jinks. Prom- 
inent amongst the able-bodied wind-jammers will be Ani- 
adee Joullin, Harry Carleton, Edgar Mathews, Bill Hop- 
kins, Harry Connick and Harry Lambertin. Henry Crock- 
er offered his services as cymbal-player, but was surprised 
to find that there was spirited rivalry for that ostenta- 
tious position. Whether he can have the coveted post re- 
mains to be seen. It is whispered around that rents have 

CALIFORNIA SOUVENIR. 
A handsome present for Eastern friends — Townsend's 
California Glace Fruits in fire-etched and hand-painted 
boxes. 767 Market street, San Francisco. 



□ and real estate prices have become depressed in the 
icinity of the bandsmen's homes since they began to prac- 
1 ice. Hopeful friends say, however, that the amateur mu- 
cians will cover themselves with glory when they make 
1 heir debut at the midsummer jinks in the redwoods. Less 
"[iliinistie clubmates say that it would be only ordinary 
I'i'udence for the bandsmen to do so, and point out signifi- 
cantly that the Russian river runs hard by the picnic 
-rounds deep and dark in its onward flow towards the 
Pacific. 



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Catering to Select Family Trade a Specialty 




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San Francisco Oakland 



86 



-THE WASP- 



[July 15, 1905. 




Mr. and Mrs. Frank 
MeComas have gone up to 
British Columbia on their 
wedding trip, and Mr. Me- 
Comas will do some 
sketching there. They ex- 
pect later to go to Mexico 
and England, and so their 
friends will not see them 
for some years to come. 
Mr. MeComas, I believe, 
would like to settle per- 
manently in London, and 
he expects to have an ex- 
hibition of his pictures on 
the other side. Mrs. Me- 
Comas' has always been 
surrounded with the great- 
est luxury, but she has lit- 
erary and artistic sympa- 
thies, and promises to settle down to the necessarily no- 
madic and Bohemian life of an artist. 

c£* tS* ^* 

Having sold his entire interest in the indemnity com- 
pany with which he was connected, Mr. Will PoWning 
has betaken himself to his large ranch at Novato and be- 
come an exemplar of the simple life. He is said to have 
caused a sensation amongst, the natives of Novato by his 
ultra-metropolitan attire and wonderful jewelry, including 
gorgeous rings for all his fingers and both of his thumbs, 
and a scarf pin for every hour of the day. 



Miss Helen Dean's friends are wondering if, when she 
returns to Paris in a few months, she will renew her 
friendship with Santos Dumont, and whether this friend- 
ship may ripen into something deeper. The famous aero- 
naut, it is said, was most devoted during Miss Dean's 
recent stay in Paris, and had her as his guest on several 
trips in his new airship. M. Dumont seems to have a pen- 
chant for rich California girls, his engagement to Lurline 
Spreckels being at one time rumored. However, he cannot 
be accused of being a fortune-hunter, and it is said has 
millions of his own — francs to be sure, but in highly serv- 
iceable quantities. 

Letters from Mrs. George D. Toy and Miss Mabel Toy 
to friends in San Francisco tell of the elaborate dinner 
that was given for them in Berlin by the Honorable Char- 
lemagne Towers, the American Ambassador to Germany, 
and his wife, during their recent visit to Berlin. Mrs. 
Towers was an Oakland girl, and no doubt was glad to 
welcome a familiar face. The ladies are quite in love 
with the hospitality of foreign parts, where they have 
received much attention. Mrs. Toy is a popular girl in 
San Francisco society. Unlike a great many of her asso- 
ciates, she was not finished in Europe or New York, but 
was graduated from the private sehooi of the late Mrs. 
Graydon, in Berkeley. By the way, the Josselyn girls were 
also educated by Mrs. Graydon, who was the widow of a 
naval officer, and an exceedingly delightful and cultured 
woman. Until her death, two years ago, the society girls 
from this side made frequent week-end trips to their for- 
mer teacher. 

There is material for a rattling good political novel, 
with plenty of strong society situations, in the story of 
Lord Cnrzon, who is said to be about io resign as Vice- 
roy of India, on account of his disagreement with the 
policy of Lord Kitchener. It is probable that Lord 



SNAPSHOT TAKEN TURING PROGRESS OF THE GORDON-BENNETT CUP RACE 



Curzon will be created an Earl or Marquis, and possibly 
a Duke upon his return to England, and, anyway, he will 
have the prestige of his distinguished career in India. If 
he gets a sufficiently imposing title it will not be possible 
for the Duke and Duchess of Marlborough to take such 
great precedence of Lord and Lady Curzon as they have 
done on previous occasions. When the Eight Honorable 
George Curzon married Miss Mary Leiter, it looked as if 
the Right Hon. George stood a fine show of being made 
Premier of England before many years, and everything 
was couleur de rose. Papa Leiter was stingy, but that was 
a trifling detail. Then Miss Consuelo Vanderbilt married 
the Duke of Marlborough, and the Prince of Wales, now 
King Edward, was so pleased with the match that he 
visited the new Duchess at Blenheim and the star of the 
Curzons began to wane. When the royal procession at the 
Coronation ceremonies was made up the Right Honorable 
George Curzon and his Chicago wife were appointed to a 
carriage behind a succession of dukes and duchesses, mar- 
quises and marchionesses, earls and countesses. That 
ended it. No American society woman with a scrap of 
pride about her would stand being described at the tail 
end of a long procession as occupying an equipage — "with 
certain others." A family consultation was. held, and it 
was decided that in view of the crisis, Papa Leiter must 
be reasoned with and compelled to "dig up." The post 
of Viceroy of India had previously been offered to Curzon 
and refused on account of the climate, but he reflected that 



If you must drink, why not have the best? 
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MAIN OFFICE, Eddy Street, Near Fillmore : : Phone West 828 



Jdly 15, 1905 ] 



-THE WASP ' 



87 




Phi, to by Arnold Cent he 

THE BARON VON HORST 
A popular native son of California who sports a title 

there are things before which the burning sands of the 
Sahara would seem frigid as the glaciers of the Alps. Mr. 
Leiter was approached by his daughter, and although to 
him the post of Viceroy of India looked a good deal like 
being made king of a South African tribe, he could not 
brook the thought that a New York Vanderbilt was crow- 
ing over his favorite daughter. True, he had just lost an 
immense amount of money in wheat, but he was promised 
that there should be no more snubs from his titled son-in- 
law, and, having once decided to make the Curzon cause 
his, he prepared to do things handsomely. He sold real 
estate to his hated rival, Marshall Field, and sent the Cur- 
zons to India in a style that made the heads of the Nabobs 
swim. When the Durbar was celebrated in India it was 
the turn of the Leiters and Curzons to pose in the limelight 
and the Marlboroughs were put in the shade. If the Cur- 
zons return to England, it will be interesting to see which 
comes out best in the tight for social pre-eminence. 

Dr. and Mrs. Hunter Voorhies, who have entertained 
Senator and Mrs. Scott of West Virginia during their 
visit here as members of Secretary Taf t 's party, are among 
the most hospitable people in San Francisco. Their houso 
is exquisitely furnished, most of the pieces being of histor- 
ic interest. 

When Mrs. Norma Henderson was Miss Vida MeKean 
and made her home with her brother and sister-in-law. 



When your friends from the country visit you it is 
esteemed a pleasure as well as a duty to show them the 
sights of our beautiful city and take them to all the im- 
portant places. You have not done them justice, nor have 
you proved yourself a good guide unless you have taken 
them to the California Market and let them partake of a 
plate of Moraghan's celebrate! oysters. 



Mr. ami Mrs. Winifred McKean, ah r?id nol think much 

of her brother's taste in having Dr. Henderson for a chum. 

Mr. MoKean i- cashier of the Hank of Alameda, and could 

• 1 very well take hi- friend to hi- private offlc iha 

11. 1 smoke, so his sister promised "to try ami stand the 
'"■linn." How well she succeeded was proved by the 

eddin" thai took place tl ther day, when ber brothi 

ol "iily gave her to the man of ber choice, bnl I occ 

-ion during I lie ceremony to whisper: "I told yon be 

.ill right." 

,< ,1 ,< 

The Rev. S. Parkes Cadman of Brooklyn. N. Y., tell? 
a story of how a cabman of that city once refused to accept 

Bitters that benefit the mind and body Abbott's Angostura build 
wasted tissue, brighten up the mental, and make new men and women 



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88 



-THE WASP- 



[July 15, 1905. 




ON THB ROAD TO SANTA CRTJZ 
A snapshot of E. P. Brinegar, of the Pioneer Automobile Company, and his friends at the summit of the Santa Cruz Mountains 



pay for his services. Dr. Cadman had beeii calling on his 
bishop. After arriving at the ferry on his way home he 
tendered the usual fare to the man who had driven him 
down. The man declined to take it, and a beautiful smile 
lit up his tanned features. 

"I'd like to know why you won't take this money," 
said the clergyman. 

"I'll tell you," came the answer. "I once heard you 
preach in the Metropolitan Temple, and at the close of the 
service you laid your hand on my shoulder and said to me, 
'For God's sake, be a man.' I had been a drunken sot for 
years, but that set me right about face. I now own my 
horse and carriage, live with mv wife and children in a 
snug little flat, and have $1,500 in bank. It's no strange 
thing that you should forget me, but I haven't forgotten 
you. ' ' 

cjr* *&& (,5* 

The one woman in New York and Newport society who 
can command invitations for yachting and house parties 
the twelve months of the year, .even though she has no 
money to speak of, is Mrs. Edmund L. Baylies, the stately 
New Yorker who, although she is not a beauty, has a pretty 
wit, an aristocratic manner, and an English accent that 
will not come off. She has some handsome clothes and an 
all-round diamond crown, which is much more swell than 
the ordinary tiara. Mrs. Cornelius Vanderbilt, Jr., asked 
her to be one of the party on the Vanderbilt yacht, "North 
Star," at Kiel this summer, and later on the popular lady 
will visit Mrs. Bradley Martin at her estate, Balmaeaan, 
in Scotland. After that she will stay with Mrs. John W. 
Mackay at her summer home. Last year Mrs. Baylies was 
at Floors Castle, the Duchess of Roxburghe 's place. It is 
a singular fact that Mrs. Baylies hardly ever entertains, 
and that the few dinners she has given have been served 
off Sheffield plate while her friends of the inner circle 
have gold. All of which proves that there are things be- 
sides mere money that make for social distinction and 
popularity. 



"It's like this," said the would-be actress; "I can't 
make up my mind to " 

"Oh, that'll be all right," interrupted the manager. 
"It doesn't matter about a little thing like that if you 
can make up the rest of yourself to the requirements of the 
part." 




This is the proper Panel Boot 
Victoria.. ? ? We have them. 

Fifty Pony Vehicles in Stock. 

STUDEBAKER 

RROS.fPMPANV 

Market and Tenth Streets 

& -c€ Jt 



July 15. 1905.] 



-THE WASP 



89 





I 




MISS MARY URSULA STONE 
A Society Debutante who will wed army man 



. \Ii<s Bmelie, Mi-- Abb] made her debut 
winters ago, and mingled with society at Ibe mosl exelus- 
unctions. The Parrotl girls have been very carefully 

reared, and quite in an old World (Banner, and they di ; 

to enjo] 1 1 ic ■ liberties accorded mosl fashionable 
young girls of their ages. They never sol tool outside of 
the Bcboolroom until they grew up. Thev made their debut 
.11 a most exclusive tea given by thair aunt, Mrs. Joe 

li shoe. Their gowns are alwavs of the simplest, and 

neither girl ever wears a jewel, save for the beautiful 
string of pearls which their Gi'andmothei Parrotl gave 
ilii'in as coming-out ui lis. The Parrotts are very rigil 
Catholics, so Miss AMiy's decision may meet with no op- 
position from the clan. 

>•* .< jC 

James V. Coleman's Good Fortune. 

Tin' many friends of James V. Coleman will be delight- 
c(l in learn that he is in a fair way to make a meal for- 
tune "Hi of bis mine in Calaveras county. A shorl time ago 
a couple of truculent Austrians, who had been discharged 
for good cause, blew up pari of the mine with dynamite, 
I for ihis outrage are now in custody. They unwitting- 
ly did more g I than harm, for in repairing II10 damage 

ii lias been found that the ledge in the mine is much wider 
and richer Ihau was supposed. The I'tica mine, which 



Rumors 

Every little while society goes a-buzzing over the rumor 
that this or that prominent Catholic girl is to become a nun 
and enter a convent for good and all. First of all, it was 
Frances MeKinstry who was said to be hesitating- at the 
door of a cloister, then Genevieve Harvey, and now the 
gossips have it that Abbv Parrott— iweet, gentle little 
Miss Abby— is to pledge her life to the Church. Abby 
Parrott is the eldest of the ten children of Mr. and Mrs. 
Jack Parrott, and is granddaughter of Mrs. Abby Pa 1 ™"- 
head of the wealthy and aristocratic Parrott clan. With 




Photo by Miss Grace Harvey 

MISS BEATRICE SPIVALO 
The daughter of a prominent pioneer family recently betrothed 



90 



-THE WASP- 



[July 15, 1905. 




" INDIAN GRATITUDE " 
Reproduced from one of Hansen's Famous Paintings of Frontier I,ife. 



California Photo-Engraving Co. 



adjoins Mr. Coleman's property, made the Hobart family 
rich. It has been one of the best-paying mines in Calif ot'- 
nia. It is thought likely that Mr. Coleman's property will 
prove even more valuable. If Mr. Coleman gets a fortune 
out of his mine it is certain that his friends will share in 
his good luck. He has spent more money on friends that, 
almost any living man on the Coast. The late John Mack- 
ay in his lifetime, I think, held the record for aiding peo- 
ple he liked. 

cp* c5* i2* 

A Weird Tale from London Town. 

The latest story floating through the London society 
journals anent the Prince and Princess Hatzfeldt is de- 
signed to illustrate the sublime self-confidence of the titled 
lady. The story is prefaced by the remark that the Prince 
is famous for his gambling proclivities — a piece of intel- 
ligence not new, by any means, to San Francisco, if indeed 
to any of the capitals of Europe. During Derby week the 
Princess kept her sportive spouse at home by inviting to 
Draycott, her English home, a bevy of bright American 
girls. The Prince was so interested in this bunch of 
beauty that all thoughts of the betting ring at the Epsom 
Downs went out of his noddle, and while he was skylark- 
ing at home the Princess went to the races herself in a new 
dress and an easy mind. So the weird story runs. The 
author of this gauzy tale overlooks the important fact that 
gentlemen who back the horses generally bet their money 
in advance of the day of the race, so if the Prince had 
any loose change in his pockets he would in all likelihood 
have tried to pick a winner in the usual style. The fact 
that he stayed at home — if he really did stay — would indi- 
cate rather that finances hi the house of Hatzfeldt are not 
at high-water mark, and that having no money to bet, the 
disconsolate Prince comforted himself with feminine chat- 
ter in default of equine excitement. But perhaps the real 
truth is that the Prince went to the races and lost his 



money, as he has done many times before, for he has been 
anything but a mascot on the turf. 

The Peasant and the Princess. 

Crown Princesses, like other people, have their troubles 
sometimes when they go motoring, as the following anec- 
dote will show: It has been related by several European 
society journals that the newly married German Crown 
Princess and her friend and relative, Mme. Dene of Peter- 
hoff, while motoring near Peterhoff, chanced upon an aged 
peasant driving home from town in a dilapidated cart, in 
which he had managed to stow away at least three genera- 
tions of his family. The instant the motor came in sight 
the horse bolted, scattering to right and ieft the occupants 
of the vehicle. The Princess, of course, at once stopped 
and ordered her chauffeur to assist the old farmer to catch 
the runaway animal, while she and Mme. Dene set to work 
in helping the women and children out of the ditches. The 
Princess has a marked aversion to fine feathers, and usu- 
ally walks abroad in a simple blouse and skirt and a sailor 
hat; consequently, when she appeared on the scene, an 
irate old woman of the party shook her fist in her face 
and bade her to get "to the devil." The Duchess, though 
naturally somewhat dismayed by this reception, would not 
be ousted and at last persuaded the old woman to allow 
her to drive her and her children home in her car. Up to 
the present day the farmer and his wife are ignorant as to 
whom that tall young lady might be, neither do they know 
the source of various mysterious gifts that find their way 
periodically to their humble home. 

Entre Nous. 

Trepoff, Governor-General of St. Petersburg, has been 
raised another step on the official ladder by the Czar. 
Both master and servant will very soon be up a tree. 




Posed for TkiiVasf 



'DON'T CRY, LITTLE GIRL, DON'T CRY!" 



California Photo-Etigrarino Co. 



92 



-THE WASP- 



[July 15, 1905. 




LONGFELLOW'S "WAYSIDE INN" California Photo-Engraving Co. 

The old building at Sudbury, Mass., which stirred the poet's imagination 

Celebrities At Home 

INo. 16 



Chat With a Vice-Consul of France Who Admires San Francisco Women 



A consular official of "La Grand Nation" in an impor- 
tant center like the port of San Francisco partakes more 
of the character of a diplomat than a mere commercial 
agent. Besides, San Francisco, being so far distant from 
the capital of the United States, its best people form a 
distinct social circle, brilliant and unique, and in keeping 
with the immense wealth and glorious climate of Calif oi'- 
nia. To represent adequately and with eclat the French 
nation amongst the warm-hearted, pleasure-loving, and 
not altogether money-worshiping San Franciscans, the best 
men are chosen. It is a matter of love with the French 
people to recognize the greatness of the sister Republic 
to the fullest appreciation. Without the aid of France at 
the end of the seventeenth century the people of the United 
States would very likely still be groaning under the 
oppression consequent upon being attached to the British 
Government. France was the first great European nation 
to extend the hand of friendship to our Republic, and 
France continues to be the friend of America. The feeling 
is reciprocated. All wealthy Americans go to amuse them- 
selves in Paris, and France, as if in recognition of the ma- 
terial benefit accruing to Parisians, sends the most refined 
and accomplished of her young men to fill consular and 
diplomatic positions in our Republic. The gain is double- 
barreled. Young men who fail to learn sufficient of polite- 
ness and "savoir faire" in Paris are afforded an opportu- 
nity to copy accomplishments from the refined Frenchmen 
who reside amongst us. 



When asked by the editor of The Wasp to interview 
Count J. de Peretti de la Rocca, the second in command of 
the French Consulate, I received strict instructions that 
whilst I was to be diplomatic myself, I should not 
approach the Vice-Consul in his capacity of diplomat, but 
as an ornament of San Francisco society. 

Since Count de la Rocca 's arrival, seven months ago, 
the unanimous verdict has been given by Californian soci- 
ety that he was the most charming man that ever was 
attached to the French Consulate of San Francisco. I 
therefore went full of pleasant anticipations, and I must 
say that not only has my imagined ' ' beau ideal ' ' not been 
shattered by the visit, but I discovered that society is very 
modest in its praise of the Count's charming personality. 

It is a long time since I have had the pleasure of being 
greeted with a bow that was quite as full of gallant defei'- 
ence as that of the handsome Frenchman. Indeed, I am 
inclined to think that only courtiers learn to bend from the 
waist ; but if some of our multimillionaires could know 
just the impression it makes on young women I fancy that 
to copy the bow of the Count de la Rocca would become the 
favorite aim of "la jeunesse doree. "Although rather tall 
and verv slender, the Count is well-proportioned and most, 
graceful in his carriage. His dark hair is rather closely 
cropped and his small moustache is also carefully trimmed, 
while his face is tanned a healthy brown that suggests 
much oper-air exercise. At the interview the Count wore 
a dark tweed suit, and his linen and necktie were just 



July 15. 1905 



'TMEWASP- 



93 




Pholoby Tabcr 

COUNT J. DE PERETTI DE LA ROCCA. 
The popular foreigner who is French Vice-consul at San Francisco 

what would have been chosen by any young man of ex- 
ceptional taste and with money to dress as a gentleman of 
leisure. In common with other persons who have the 
world at their feet, the Count has kindly brown eyes, with 
a lurking twinkle in their depths. 

# * * 

The Count loves San Francisco; he told me so almost 
before we had exchanged the amiable courtesies of society. 
"It is a warm land, a balmy air, perfumed, gentle," said 
he. 

"It is not a week since a great emotional actress told 
me the same thing," I said, in approval of his sentiment. 

The Count nodded his head, and his fuu-Ioving eyes 
shone with glee, in recognition that his sentiment had been 
approved. 

"She was a very clever woman, was she not?" he said, 
after a moment of deliberation. 

Seeking an opinion of San Francisco, Count de . la 
Rocea said: "San Francisco is to me nearly all of Califor- 
nia. I wish it were not quite so stormy. We Frenchmen 
are not quite accustomed yet to such a breeze." 

To a question as to how he regarded the San Francisco 
women, Count de la Rocea clasped his hands and said: 
"They are beautiful. The greatest beauties of the world 
are here. Why, it is a pleasure to go to Kearny street 
between 12 and 1 o'clock to see the handsome women. 
They are most graceful. Some of them are very stately, 
while others are piquant. They are wonderful, wonder- 
ful!" 

"But what about the Viennese, Count, and the women 
of other countries?" I exclaimed, surprised by the tone 
almost of adoration, for the women of the Pacific Coast. 

To restore gray hair to its natural color use Egyptian 
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••There are beautiful women elsewhere — yes," acqui- 
oed lilt- Vice-Cons ol; "but there is not such charm to be 
found anywhere." 

"Are you a devotee at the shrine of art?" I inquired. 

"Art in San Francisco? I find beauty in the bi - 
of woman, and that is nature's art," replied the Count. 

I suggested that golf was a game that found main ad- 
mirers in California. 

"Yes," agreed Count de la Rocea. "I play it. but J 
do not oare Eor it. It gives no time for chatting with a 
girl, and to play golf with a lot of men! No, no; golf is 
not for me ! ' ' 

"Tennis is better, you think."' 
"Much, for then one may stand and chat sometimes. 
But there are more amusing things." 

* # * 

As I desired to know what is regarded by a representa- 
tive French nobleman as an entertaining pastime I asked 
directly what he regarded as the best way of passing the 
time. 

"There is always dancing," returned the Count, his 
brows slightly elevated in surprise, and a shadow of a 
shrug hovering about his shoulders, which were not percep- 
tibly lifted. "I love to dance. The San Francisco girls 
are dreams. They can dance like angels. To glide over 
a well-waxed floor with a partner like thistle-down — why 
speak of golf?" 

Shame-facedly, I admitted that the strenuous game 
was a fool to the delights that drew such approving words 
from the lips of the young man who is popularly admitted 
to be the best dancer in San Francisco. 

"But you must have some other way of passing the 
time," I hesitated, wondering if even this ardent-eyed 
son of Gaul could spend all his life gliding with some 
daughter of the Golden State over a perfect floor to the 
ravishing strains of a waltz. 

After we had chatted of yachting, which the Count is 
not enthusiastic over, saying that the waves are not quite 
enough to suit his fancy, we turned to rowing, which is 
admitted by the Vice-Consul to be a sport after his own 
heart. 

"To glide over silver waters at Belvedere, or some spot 
like that, is delightful," he said. "It is an exceedingly 
healthful exercise, too, to pull an oar, and I thoroughly 
enjoy it." 

"And are you an enthusiastic automobilist?" I ques- 
tioned. 

"It is true that I run a motor ear," said the Count 
courteously, setting me right as to the name of his particu- 
lar equipage. "When I run it reasonably I like it, but there 
is no such word as reason in the vocabulary of the real 
motorist. If he can run ten miles an hour he wants to run 
twenty; if he runs twenty his desire is to increase his 
speed to thirty; if he could make two hundred, still would 
he strive for greater speed. Oh, motorists, are a fatiguing- 
]y enersretic lot." 

"Still it may be a pleasant sport," I insisted, recalling 



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94 



-THE WASP- 



[July 15, 1905. 



what the president of the automobile club once told me as 
to the greater enjoyment of moderate speed. 

"Why not horses?" suggested the Count, and I echoed 
the words. "A horse knows you; he is accustomed to your 
voice and learns to understand you. There is no animal 
that gets so near to a man as a good horse." 

"It is said that the automobile will get away with our 
equine friend," I remarked. 

"Not so; we are not utterly foolish, and when the 
motor ear is classed with other vehicles, the horse will 
still stand close to man." 

* # # 

Like President Roosevelt, the Count de la Rocea is an 
advocate of the strenuous life. He iays that he loves 
work, and in support of his sentiment told me that he is 
at the Consulate from nine o'clock in the morning until 
five in the afternoon. 

"Then, as I am a lonely bachelor, I dine with friends 
and make calls. Often I attend balls in the season." 

"Del Monte has a splendid ball-room," I interpolated. 
' "And I shall enjoy it," continued the Count, "for I 
go there in August when I take my vacation." 

During the years Count de la Rocca has been in the 
Consular service he has been in many lands — India, Africa, 
Germany, Australia. To an inquiring glance, the Count 
said: 

"I am older than I appear. When in Australia I went 
smooth-shaven, but it made me look too young. I am 
thirty." 

As he opened the door for me, after salutations, I cast 
a glance around the big, bare room, furnished with an eye 
to Spartan simplicity and frugality. The contrast between 
the elegant man and the rooms he occupied was remarka- 
ble. But such is the spirit of the French Republic which 
pervades all departments. Ornament must give way to 
utilitarianism. It may therefore be mentioned that, al- 
though Count de la Rocca is ornamental to San Francisco 
society, his services at the Consulate are onerous and use- 
ful to the country which he assists to represent under the 
chieftaincy of Consul-General Etienne L. Lanel. 



RELIGIOUSLY INDIGNANT. 

Bathing Master (tapping man on shoulder) : A lady 
has just complained that while she was diving through a 
wave you pinched her leg. 

Chesty Man (with bathing suit consisting of three loud 
stripes, a club insignia, and rims of trunks in middle dis- 
tance) : Well, what's that to you, when you have siens all 
over the place, "Not responsible for valuables unless 
checked at the office"? 

Tired brain and nervous tension relax under the potent action of 
Abbott's Angostura Bitters. Label on bottle tells Abbott's. 



Dr. De Vecchi Honored in Turin. 

Dr. Paolo de Vecchi of San Francisco, who is visiting- 
Italy, has been honored by having the title of "Commeda- 
tore" added to his name in recognition of the work he has 
done in California for the betterment of the Italian resi- 
dents of this State. He was tendered a banquet by Gen- 
eral Andrea Cerri of Turin on the everting of June 17th, 
at which a number of distinguished personages were pres- 
ent, among them being men prominent throughout the 
world as scientists, artists and merchant princes. General 
Cerri acted as toastmaster and spoke with deep emotion 
and gratitude of the cordial reception tendered him by Dr. 
de Vecchi and his family and by the citizens of San Fran- 
cisco during a visit he had paid to California. The Cave- 
liero Cantamessa, in the name of old university friends, 
recalled the high honors won by the guest of the evenint 
as a student, and told how Dr. de Vecchi had worked for 
the advancement of the Italian colony and for the honor of 
Italv. He drank to the happy return of the illustrious pa- 
triot, who, although he is absent at present from the coun- 
try of his adoption, is establishing a medal fund for the 
Italian students of the two universities of California, for 
the purpose of developing and encouraging the writing of 
themes whose subject-matter is of purely Italian nature 
and character. 

May: "Don't you think Jack is a very modest boy?" 
"I don't know. I never was immodest enough to find 
out." 




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what a cup of Armer Brothers' "Very Best' 
drooping spirits and relaxed energy. 



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July 15, 1905.] 



-THE WASP 



95 




A leading New STork magazine advertises for short love 
stones. Ii is not shorl on contributions, for it 
abont five hundred a month. They are not oi the "hni 
interest" character, however. The leading magazini 
Gotham each receive from eight hundred to one thousand 
manuscripts a month— according to the motive pov ere 
geniuses in front of the typewriters. More than half of 
this output is fiction. The magazine which is yearning for 
more love stories prints live or six of thai variety in each 
issue — about one per cent of the rubbish received'. This is 
a severe commentary on the frenzied fiction writers of the 
day. This desire for more love stories of "human interest" 
tells the story — the mass of fiction does not touch the heart. 
The stories are not true to nature. They are improbable, 
heavily worded with sentimental "gush," with a wide vein 
of nonsense running through them. The plot is either of 
the impossible kind or too weak to interest the reader. 
All love stories that are love stories are of "human inter- 
est," and when the magazine advertises for that class 
it intimates that the four hundred and ninety-nine "black 
smiths" whose work has been rejected have not touched the 
chord, and perhaps had better go to hammering horseshoes 
or driving sand-earts. 

I hear that Mr. W. R. Hearst now owns the stock in the 
Cosmopolitan, and already lots of Californians are work- 
ing on the magazine. Bailey Millard, however, is not the 
editor-in-chief, but a man named Russell holds that posi- 
tion, but Mr. Millard is close up. The Millards regretted 
so much to leave California ! Richard Walton Tully is on 
the Cosmopolitan. Mr. and Mrs. Hearst are abroad at 
present, and are anticipating another visit of the stork. 
Mr Hearst hopes by the time another Presideutial cam- 
paign comes on to have half as many children as Roose- 
velt. 



A Noted Japanese Financier. 

The man who, by negotiating loans in London and in 
this country to the amount of $60,000,000, made it possible 
for the Japanese to carry on the war against Russia is at 
present in New York. He is Korekiyo Takahashi, Vice- 
Governor of the Bank of Japan, and financial agent of his 
country. Indirectly, it was Takahashi 's ability to secure 
loans that enabled Admiral Togo to win his memorable 
victory. The difficulty of floating such a loan can be best 
appreciated by the fact that when the war opened the Jap- 
anese debt amounted to $250,000,000, ten millions less than 
has since been raised. Ignorance, both here and in Eng- 
land, of Japan's resources, physical and commercial, added 
to the difficulty of the task given Takahashi, who is now 
known among his compatriots as the Pierpont Morgan of 
Japan. Takahashi, who is amazed at the wealth of Amer- 
ica, where, he says, financiers talk only in millions, was 
reared in extreme poverty and in an atmosphere that re- 
fleeted one of the earliest feudal clans. When he was nine 
years old he started out to earn his own living and worked 
his way through school. Some of the Japanese officials, 
who admired the lad's pluck, were instrumental in aiding 
him to come to America to study the English language. 
He was in California for a year, and returned to Japan 

"KNOX" CELEBRATED HATS, 

Spring styles, now open. Eugene Korn, The Hatter, 
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at the tii f tin- inauguration ••!' the new Imperial re- 
gime, and was made instructor in tin- schi 

created Boon after the war .it: the 1 ation by the Im 

perial Government, His rank as a profi 501 .■» iron 

with the American Buccess mottoes, hut through tbeli 
I"'-- and I'ailh of old Japan, of which simple ulieilii-nee 
is the foundation. In addressing his pupils Takahashi 
"Urn said: "Be obedient to conditions and watch your 
chance Eo advance. Don't despise the work given to you 
to do, for if you neglect the slightest detail von may he 
laying a bar in your road to success." The Emperor 
so pleased with Mr. Takahashi 's work that he appoint I 
him a life member of the House of Peers, one of the highest 
honors in his gift. 



Passenger: "What became of the Bulger family?" 
Stage Driver: "Oh, Bill turned out fine. Got to be an 
actor. Tom's an artist. Mary's a music teacher. But 
John never amounted (o much. It took all he could earn 
to support the others." 



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Hotel Del Monte. No other resort in California offers 
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At Hotel Del Monte 



96 



-THE WASP- 



[July 15, 1905. 



WHO'S WHO? 



HAVE WE A FOUR HUNDRED IN CALIFORNIA? 



By GRACE VAN TASSEL 

NO. X. 

Among the most exclusive families in San Francisco 
are the Cheseboroughs, whose daughters, Miss Edith and 
Miss Helen, are both well-known belles. Mrs. Chese- 
borough is rather somewhat of an invalid and a relative 
of hers, Miss Dillon, has always managed for the family. 
Edith Cheseborough is a famous golf player and is devoted 
to out-of-door sports. She is a little distant in her man- 
ner, and her style of dress is always most severe. Helen 
Cheseborough, the younger girl, is pretty and vivacious. 
She was a debutante of the winter before last. There are 
two Cheseborough boys, one of whom lives in New York. 

Redwood City is the abiding place of the Curran- 
Clarks, who are prominent in suburban and San Fran- 
cisco society. Mrs. Clark was Miss Clara Taylor, daughter 
of the wealthy lumberman, John Taylor. The Clarks have 
a charming home near the little town, and usually spend 
a few months each winter at a fashionable hotel in town. 

Dr. and Mrs. John Rodgers Clark are prominently 
identified with the smart set, and go quite everywhere in 
San Francisco society, although they are affiliated with 
neither of the fashionable out-of-town sets. Mrs. Clark 
was before her marriage of some three years ago Miss Maud 
Mullins, daughter of a very prominent insurance man. 
She was a girl of spirit and vivacity, decidedly fine-looking 
and a favorite. Her marriage with the young medico was 
quite a romantic affair. He was then in the army as sur- 
geon and was attached to the general hospital at the Pre- 
sidio. Dr. Clark was a great beau in society, and Miss 
Mullins speedily became "epris. " The engagement was 
not long in coming to a point. Dr. Clark left the army, 
and on the advice of his father-in-law began a practice in 
San Francisco. Mrs. Clark is an expert golfer, and has 
won many tournaments. 

Mr. and Mrs. Warren D. Clark are members of the 
most exclusive of San Francisco's various sets. They are 
in the best of standing at Burlingame, and their summers 
are always spent near that fashionable gathering place. 
Their town house is a handsome one far out on Clay street, 
and at many entertainments does Mrs. Clark appear as the 
charming hostess during the winter season. Mrs. Clark 
was a Hopkins, a cousin of the famous Mesdames Taylor, 
Helen and Edna Hopkins, and is a sister to Mrs. Eugene 
Murphy, who was Frances Hopkins. She is a pretty, retir- 
ing little woman, and is very popular in the society in 
which she moves. 

Miss Elsie and Miss Kate Clark are daughters of Mrs. 
Z. P. Clark, and are no relatives to any of the other fami- 
lies of that name. They go out quite a bit in society, and 
know all of the smart folk. Both the Misses Clark were 
intimate with the late Mrs. Al Redding, and they spend 
much of their time at the Redding place at Menlo. They 
are bright, jolly girls. Elsie Clark was engaged for several 
years, but the engagement was finally broken on account of 
her poor health. 

* # * 

The Clement family claim Oakland as their abiding 
place, but as they have always been factors in San Fran- 
cisco's smartest society a few words about them would not 
be amiss. The most conspicuous member of the family 
is, or was, Miss Kate Clement. She is now Mrs. Dixwell 
Hewitt, and has retired a bit from the public eye, having 
become a model housewife, I hear. In her day, as a soci- 
ety sirl, however, Kate Clement was amongst the best- 
known and most written about. She was a remarkablv 
handsome girl. Her wit and brilliancy made her, without 



exaggeration, the most-sought-after woman in society. 
Dozens of society's most eligible bachelors were wild over 
the dashing Kate, and she was reported engaged as many 
times. She has always been exceedingly intimate with the 
Dimond sisters, Mrs. Jarbce and Mrs. Joe Tobin. Miss 
Clement married Dixwell Hewitt a couple of years ago, 
and happiness seems to perch on their roof-tree. 

Alf Clement is a brother of Mrs. Hewitt, and the tales 
told of that gay spirit would fill a volume. A handsome fel- 
low, extremely clever and awfully witty, he was a gay blade 
in society a few years ago. He was devoted to several 
noted belles who are now young matrons, and every one 
wondered if he wouldn't marry one of them. About this 
time, however, Mr. Clement figured one fine morning on 
Sutter street in an adventure with an irate lady who seem- 
ed bent on administering him a eastigation, and who it ap- 
peared had figured in his letters as "Peggy." Needless to 
say, the newspapers did not overlook the exciting but 
bloodless episode, and soon afterwards the gay bachelor 
went to Alaska, and it was there, two years ago, that he 
wedded Mabelle Hall, a pretty Oakland girl, who went 
north to become his bride. Mr. and Mrs. Clement have a 
baby, and are quite factors in Oakland society these days. 

Mr. and Mrs. Jabish Clement are heard of occasionally. 
Mrs. Clement was Miss Ada Dougherty, a daughter of Mrs. 
Chas. Dougherty, whose home is at the Pleasanton. 

Major and Mrs. Cluff have become social notables in 
the last few years, through their daughters, who are re- 
markably attractive girls. Major Cluff has heaps of money 
made in business, and the family live in much elegance at 
the Palace Hotel. The eldest daughter, Maud Cluff, is not 
as good-looking as her sisters. She married George 
Downey in the same year that Mabel, the second daughter, 
became the wife of Jack Wilson, the well-known club and 
society man. California, the pretty third daughter, became 
Mrs. John Breuner a few weeks ago. There is still an- 
other girl — Florence, a child of twelve, who promises to 
develop into a fine-loking woman. The Cluffs are very 
intimate with the De Youngs and the Hager girls, and go 
a great deal with that set. 

* # * 

Dr. and Mrs. W. R. Cluness and W. R. Cluness Jr. are 
all very smart society folk. The elder couple and their 
daughters live at Redwood, while the son and his wife 
have a pretty home on Steiner street. They go out a good 
deal during the winter, and are famed for their hospitality. 

Mrs. Cohen, whose beautiful home, "Ferndale," in 
Alameda, is one of the show places of the country, stands 
at the head of a family very well known in San Francisco's 
social history. The late Mr. Cohen was one of our most 
successful citizens, and left his widow a considerable for- 
tune. She is a sister of Dr. Henry Gibbons Jr., so is aunt 
to the pretty Gibbons girls — Ida, Florence, and Mrs. 
Shinkle. Mrs. Cohen has several sons and daughters, and 
all are entitled to a place in our most exclusive society. 
The girls were educated at Miss West's school and abroad. 
Edith, the eldest sister, is now Mrs. Daggett, and lives in 
the East. Mabel, the second daughter, is Mrs. Gerrit Liv- 
ingston Lansing, one of our foremost hostesses, and most 
charming young society matrons. Mr. Lansing was a 
wealthy man. He died five or six years ago, leaving his 
fair widow and one little daughter. Miss Lansing spends 
her summers in Alameda with her mother and her winters 
in the city at St. Dunstan's, where she entertains fre- 
quently. 

As Ethel Cohen, Mrs. Charles Lyman Bent was a dash- 
ing and popular girl, and since her marriage to the agree- 
able young army captain she has lost neither her dash nor 
her popularity. She is a very handsome woman, and fond 
of society. San Francisco has seen but little of her for 
several years, as she has been in the Philippines and at an 
Eastern army station. There was a rumor of a separation 
'twist pretty Mrs. Bent and her husband, but all seems 
serene now. 

[TO BB CONTfNUED] 



Jdly 15, 1905.] 



-THE WASP- 



97 



THE SCIENCE OF GOVERNMENT 

By an Administration Statesman. 

Young feller, if youse ever goes into politics, remember 
dat no matter how strong youse has de organizashun cinch- 
ed up, youse make at least a bluff of respectin' public 
opinion. Youse kin fool de public all the time if you-, 
de combination. 

Now, Ise been tellin' Abe dat, but sometimes Abe is 
hard to manage. He isn't bridle-wise on all de fine points 

of practical politics, but on most of 'em I has to hand 

him. Gene is de guy what makes trouble. What he don't 
know would make a book, an' he t'inks he knows it all. 
We let him take a wacation after he got shut out of de 
Taft bankwet. All we is sorry for is dat he didn't start 
fer de country de day before de bankwet. Den we would 
have fixed up a letter declining de inwitation what he 
didn't get. Gene has -a fresh Van Dyke cut on his whis- 
kers an' went to call on Taft de mornin' dat Taft was out 
lookin' down de necks of de cannons around de bay. Of 
course, he knows Taft isn't home, but to show how solid 
he is wid Teddy he sends up to Miss Alice a cord of Amer- 
ican Beauties, wid a card which says: "To the fairest 
American Beauty of dem all." He looks at it an' be 
says: "I t'ink dat will fetch her, Bill; nicht war?" Dat's 
where de Dutch crops out every little while. When we is 
wid de Irish he whistles "De Wearin' of de Greeu." It 
always make me t'ink of handlin' de long green. Any one 
could be a patriot if he could git enough long green fer it. 
Dat's why we has such a boss organizashun. We puts as 
many of de gang as we kin where dey kin git de long 
green. An' dose we doesn't git on de pay-roll we pollies 
along an' tells 'em dat dey will git on sure after de next 
election. Dat always gives 'em somet'ing to hope fer. 



To git back from patriotism to poliii,- ; 

paid as much as $30 fer dem roses — [ always told Abe dat 
wese ought to have somethin' solid about de Schmitz Cen- 
tral Club. "What's more solid dan dis/" he asks, a-pull- 
in' out a handful of twenties. "Yon're always thinkin' 
about de bolivars — de mazuma," I says. "Don't you twig 
dat folks will be want in' to know what de Schmitz Central 
does wid de dough?" "Oh, folks be dam," says ibe 
Well, he is on now. De Grand Jury has found out dat 
Abe is de club, especially de treasurer, and dat after he 
pays himself de rent of de club room an' de salary of de 
collector he make up any deficit dere is. De collections 
is about $4,000 a mont'— say $50,000 a year. Abe handles 
all de funds an' guarantees dere will be' no deficit. Fer de 
guarantee, we gives him all he kin make. I hope he den 't 
lose werry much. Did youse notice dat he is goin' into real 
estate pretty heavy lately? 

It has just come out dat Doc Ragan made all de trouble 
in de Emergency Hospital about a time book. You knows, 
Doc Stephen made believe he done it, but Ragan did it 
just to spite Steph. Now dey has one in de Board of 
Healt', and every one but Ragan has to sign it. Oh, mv! 
It's fierce ! An' Doc Bothe, what got de standard solutions 
in de chemistry shop all wrong, he has been given another 
job where he can't do no harm an' his assistant has had 
his salary doubled. Say, whisper! De docs has been all 
up in de air because de fellers what were published as hav- 
in' impure wines an' milk an' t'ings has been sayin' dev 
was going to sue fer damages, an' de docs has frown away 
deir samples an' couldn't prove nuttin'. Say, won't Louis 
Levy be mad if de Board of Works won't give him his job 
back when he comes home from de fair? Dey made Ches- 
ter Keongh aetin' secretary. Ach Louie! 

Wese in de fight game good an' hard agin. Did you no- 
tice dat Jimmy Coffroth wants to give $20,000 fer Britt 



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98 



-THE WASP 



[July 15. 1905. 



an' Nelson to fight at Colma on Admission Day? Is we 
in on it ? Sure ! I figgered it out rneself . 

You bet dey can't keep Jimmy down long. Jim Budd is 
wid us now, too. We kin take care of Jim all right. Say, 
did youse hear de mean trick dat was played on Jim by one 
of de newspaper fellers? He tells me how Jim has free 
offis room in de Ferry Building. Well, dat makes Mr. 
Crocker mad, an' almost before de ink on de paper is dry 
he has Jim a-movin' out his furniture an' books an' 
t'ings. Dey has gone up to Jim's house, an' dere is no 
more free law offises in de Ferry depot. Say, Jim is almost 
as big a lawyer as Abe is. Didn't he make 'em squirm 
in de Maestretti trial? Well, I wonder. Well, run eilong 
now. I has an engagement wid a medium who wants to 
give me de name of de nes' Mayor. 

Say, dat was a good one on MeDougald when Foreman 
Andrews sent him back his $15,000 cheek what Ed Smith 
passed on Louie Devoto. Dat honest Dutchman never hurt 
nobody but hisself, an' Smith had to do him up! Well, 
it was a low-down deal. But, say, John isn't none too 
proud of dat check if it is framed. I ain't so sorry fer 
him as I might be. He's no friend of miiie. 

We puts a flea in Tommy Graham's ear an' makes him 
go after Sheriff Curtis fer a suitable "court room." Say, 
we're goin' to worry Pete a little afore wese gits through 
wid him. May be he won't be so fly. An' we're not done 
wid de Superwisors yit — Brandcnstein, D'Ancona, Payot, 
an' all dat holy gang what always wants to interfere wid de 
graft. De Board of Works will worry dem a heap yit. 
You'll learn a lot about politics if youse only watches 
us. Did youse see us hand it to 'em on dat contract fer 
horses an' wagons? Well, wait; dat's jest beginnin'. 



Office of 
INSPECTOR OF SMOKE 
City Hall. 



BILL SYKES. 



A Mountain Out of a Molehill. 

The newspaper sensation over Captain Aleck McLean 
and his sealing schooner has as eomplerely subsided as 
if the Carmelita and her crew of alleged pirates of the 
main had gone down to the fathomless depths of ocean. 
Accordinglo narratives related b3 7 the yellow scribes, Mc- 
Lean is the prototype of Jack London's sea-wolf — the 
crazy Norwegian captain of a sealing schooner who spoke 
like a German Socialistic philosopher in one breath and 
in the next roared like a delirium tremens patient in the 
Emergency Hospital. I have been wondering if any news- 
paper would tell the truth about McLean, which is that he 
is a hard-headed, mild-mannered, ordinary-looking Nova 
Scotian mariner of medium height and strength. He is 
known to hundreds of people in San Francisco, every one 
of whom smiled broadly when thev saw him described in 
print as a mixture of Hercules and Captain Kidd. De 
Smett, who figured in the blood-curdling tale as sort of 
Count Monte Cristo, whose money fitted out McLean's 
piratical schooner, is also well known to nundreds of San 
Francisco people. He is a gentlemanly, straightforward 
and amiable Britisher, who put considerable money into 
a plantation in Tahiti, and finding it a losing venture came 
here and engaged in various peaceable pursuits. Amongst 
other things he Was connected with the business depart- 
ment of The Wasp for awhile. The whole story of the 
"pirate schooner" is that she was fitted out to go seal- 
huiitinp-. and no doubt if she could poach on the Russian 
preserves she did so. There was never a sealing schooner 
which left San Francisco that would not do the same thing, 
any more than there was never a yellow editor who would 
not make a mountain out of a molehill if he got the chance 
to do so. 



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"Has Maud learned to play bridge?" 
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STRICTLY BUSINESS 



Points of Interest on Trade and Finance. 




NE of the curious developments in business 
this summer has been the itumcn.-e bank 
clearances and the general complaint of 
dull trade amongst the retail dealers. The 

general increase in rents has no doubt had 
a depressing effect on the store-keepers, 
and landlords bad better ask themselves 
seriously whether they have not reached the limit of en- 
durance. The immense strength and ceaseless activity of 
the real estate market, has helped to swell the bank clear- 
ings. A good deal of the money that changes hands on an 
active real estate market does not stimulate business out- 
side the brokers' offices. If people buy property and make 
no improvements thereon, the general public gains nothing 
thereby. The Clearing House, however, records an in- 
creased volume of business. No one needs be told, how- 
ever, that the present real estate market is helping the 
community generally, for it has stimulated the building 
trades as never before. San Francisco never saw so many 
and such expensive buildings in course of construction as 
at the present time. When all things are taken into con- 
sideration, the prospects for San Francisco look most as- 
suring. The only cloud in the sky is the impending city 
election. It would be a great misfortune to San Francisco 
to have Scbmitz re-elected. The prospects are, however, 
that he will be defeated, as the community has grown dis- 
gusted as well as tired of his administration. The petty 
dishonesty as well as the utter incompetency of the present 
city government has exhausted the patience of the voters, 
and they will unite next November to elect another Mayor. 
With an honest city government, San Francisco should 
enjoy such prosperity in the next few years as it never 
before dreamed of. 

* # * 

Clearings Still Higher. 

The clearings for the first half of the new year keep up 
with record of the one preceding, and are nearly four mill- 
ions in excess of those of last year for the corresponding 
time. Were it not for the Fourth of July, the gains this 
year would have been greater. Increased business in 
everything has been the cause. And July will show as bis; 
an increase over last July as June did over last June, if not 

even e'reater. 

« # * 

Larger Wheat Crop. 

The crops will begin to move to market this month, and 
trade of all kinds to liven up. There will be 50 per cent 
more wheat than in 15)04, twice as much barley, and a great 
deal more fruit. And business of all descriptions will be 
proportionately more active, not to speak of the gams that 
will arise from the additions being made to our population, 
which may be estimated at about 75,000 a year. 

* * * 
In the Realty Market. 

The activity in building improvements keeps pace with 
that in sales, where the total of the half year has reached 
the fio-ure of $29,314,354, or four million dollars in excess 
of that of 1903, which was the largest half-year in the rec- 
ords of the realty market since the days of the wild spec- 
ulation of the olden times. So that those who have been 



interested in the purchase ami improvement of realty 
have set aside or borrowed $40,777,430 for both these pur- 
poses during the past six months alone. This is about 
eleven million dollars mure than for the same time last 
year. Here we have most potent proof of the exceptional 
increase in the Clearing Eouse exchanges of this city. No 
doubt in some cases the values of real estate have been 
pushed up rather taster than is consistent with prudence, 
those having desirable property for sale endeavoring to 
obtain, and in some cases obtaining, the price that should 
be looked for two or three years ahead; but, after all, in 
these days desirable realty is the safest mode of invest- 
ment where the investor acts with some judgment. If im- 
proved realty brings only about six per cent net that six 
per cent is certain, and in a growing city like San Fran- 
cisco the enhanced value in future years would be sufficient. 
of itself. 

* * * 
Overissues of Bonds. 

The fact that during the first half of the year there 
had been issues of bonds to the amount of six hundred mill- 
ions of dollars, and since that time another hundred million 
or so has been added to the total, and that the figure of a 
thousand millions will soon be reached, raises the questions, 
What is all this for"? Who has to pay for it? And is it 
for the geueral public good that such enormous issues 
should be floated and in such a short time? The answer 
must be made that, in as far as they are new indebtedness, 
these issues cannot be commended. They are a discount 
of the future that, if not stopped, is sure to lead to disas- 
ter. Most of them are made by the railroads of the coun- 
try, and it is intended they shall be paid by the people of 
the United States in the shape of increased freights and 
fares on the great roads of the country. 

* # * 

Of course, there is a limit to all this, and the day will 
come when it will not be possible any more to float these 
issues of fifty and one hundred millions against the prop- 
erty of the great railroads or the great industrial enter- 
prises of the country. The nation has been for some time 
borne along on the flood-tide of unusual prosperity, and 
those who direct the making of these vast loans have made 
sood use of their opportunity, for it must not be supposed 
that they have worked with a single aim and with the 
public good alone in view. Each loan has been worth mill- 
ions to those who floated it, and they have secured their 
share of the profits. And the readiness with which these 
loans have been floated have been a temptation to those 
who have placed them on the market. 

* * * 

There are tides in the affairs of a people — seasons of 
prosperity and seasons of adversity; years of plenty and of 
famine. The seven lean kine and the seven fat kine of 
Pharaoh's dream make their appearance with unfailing 
regularity — if not literally, at least distinctly similar — 
and so it becomes impossible to meet the interest on these 
inflated issues, and then thei-e is a crash. It would be so 
even if these issues were made in a conservative way, but 
the vice of overcapitalization has made itself felt every- 
where — the offspring of greed contains within itself the 



100 



-THE WASP- 



[July 15, 1905. 



seeds of dissolution. Let there be four bad years and a 
cessation of dividends on the preferred stock of the United 
States Steel Corporation, a defaulting of interest on its 
bonds, and then the collapse would come. This would 
bring down with it the other corporations capitalized in the 
same way, and stocks and bonds capitalized legitimately 
would suffer in the catastrophe. "Were it possible to avert 
the succession of bad years, of course this would not hap- 
pen, but the causes which bring them about are found 
deep down in the institutions of man and nature itself. 
Therefore, it is time to call a halt on the notation of these 
enormous loans. 

* * * 
Desirable Bonds. 

Of course, it depends altogether on circumstances 
whether the issuance of bonds in any particular case is a 
good proposition or not. The Western Pacific bonds to the 
extent of $75,000,000 are a good investment, and will de- 
velop the resources of a great extent of country in the 
State ; so also would bonds to extend the California North- 
western to Bel river, where it meets the road from Eureka, 
which would bring the riches of the forests of Humboldt 
and Mendocino within easy reach of the world. 

* * * 

The Schwab Shipbuilding Combine. 

This is interesting to San Franciscans principally be- 
cause of the fact that the Union Iron Works is a part of 
the property of the combination, and we have always taken 
a pride in the works that can turn out the best warships 
afloat. It has been for some time engaged in completing 
the government work which it had obtained prior to the 
sale. A gentleman well known in the industrial circles of 
San Francisco says that the object of the syndicate was to 
sell the works to some one at a big price, but, failing in 
this, they bought them in themselves. 

* # * 
New Flats versus Old. 

The supply of flats renting at over thirty dollars a 
month is in excess of the demand. As fast as new flats 
are built they find tenants, but it is at the expense of the 
old. A halt will therefore have to be called in the erec- 
tion of the large three-story fiats which have been so 
popular. A balance will have to be here established be- 
tween supply and demand. In the ease of flats renting 
for less than thirty dollars a month ihe supply is not 
equal to the demand. San Francisco is practically a 
wooden city and nine-tenths of the buildings will in the 
course of time have to be replaced by new ones. Only the 
big skyscrapers down town will last. The "building 
trade will, therefore, continue to be good right along and 
so will all the lines of business dependent on it. 

* * * 
A Two Million Month. 

The value of building contracts recorded in June was 
close on two million dollars, and there! seems to be no 
cessation in the work of improvement. Tenants, or oc- 
cupiers of all these houses and flats, must be found or they 
would not be built; at the rate here given it means an ad- 
dition of about fifty thousand a year to the population of 
the city, and one of a thousand dollars a year for each 
adult in its earning or productive force — including wages, 
interest on capital and profits. This also means that 
capital must find a market for the products of these people 
and a corresponding extension of our commerce both home 
and foreign. 

* * * 
Like Father Like Son. 

The developments in the ease of the Equitable Life 
show how easy it is for a capitalist to make use of the 
funds of one society to enable him to dominate another, 
and to make profits out of both, to the detriment of 
nil except himself. For instance, Henry B. Hyde, the 
founder and manager of the Equitable, is charged with 



MONEY TO LOAN. 
To salaried people at low rates. The White Co., 420 
California St., Rooms 14 & 15. Take elevator on Leides- 
dorff street to third floor. 

The German Savings and Loan Society, 

826 California St., San Francisco 

Guaranteed capital and surplus $ 2,500,098.42 

Capital actually paid up in cash x. 000,000.00 

Deposits, Dec. 31, 1904 37,738,672.17 

OFFICERS — President, John Lloyd; First Vice-President, Daniel 
Meyer; Second Vice-President, Emil Rohte; Cashier, A. H. R. Schmidt; 
Assistant Cashier, William Herrmann; Secretary, George lourny; Assist. 
Secretary, A. H. Muller; Attorney, W. S. Goodfellow. 

BOARD OF DIRECTORS— John Lloyd, Daniel Meyer, Emil Rohte, 
Ign. Steinbart, N. Ohlandt, I, N. Walter. J. W. Van Bergen F. Tillmann, 
Jr., and E. T. Kruse. 

San Francisco Savings Union, S32 SEW" 

Deposits January 1, 1905. .$33,940,132 | Paid up capital $1,000,000.00 

Reserve and contingent funds, $976,109. 

E. B. POND, President; W. C. B. De FREMERT, ROBERT "WATT, 

Vice-Presidents; LOVELL WHITE, Cashier; R. M. WELCH, 

Assistant Cashier. 

DIRECTORS— E. B. Pond, W. C. B. De Fremery, Robert Watt, 
Henry F. Allen, Wakefield Baker,, Jacob Barth, Fred H. Beaver, 
William A. Magee, C. O. G. Miller. 

Loans upon San Francisco and Oakland Real Estate, and Farms 
and Farming Lauds in the country. Receives deposits. Country re- 
mittances may be made in checks payable in San Francisco, Postofflea 
or Wells Fargo & Co.'s Money Orders, or Coin by Express, but the re- 
sponsibility of this bank commences only with the receipt of the 
money. No charge is made for pass-book or entrance fee. OFFICE 
HOURS— 9 a. m. to 3 p. m., and Saturday evenings, for receipt of do- 
posits only, 6:30 to 8 o'clock. 



Security Savings Bank 



316 Montgomery St. 

SAN FRANCISCO 



Authorized Capital, $1,000,000; Paid Up Capital, $500,000; Surplus and 
Undivided Profits, $265,000. Interest Paid on Deposits. Loans Made. 

Directors — Wm. Babcock, Parrott & Co.; S. L- Abbot. Security Sav- 
ings Bank ; O. D. Baldwiu, O. D. Baldwin & Son; Joseph D. Grant, Mur- 
phy, Grant & Co.; E. J. McCutchen, Page, McCutchen & Knight; X,. F. 
Monteagle, Capitalist; R H. Pease, Pres. Goodyear Rubber Co.; Warren 
D. Clark, Williams, D mond & Co.; Jas. L. Flood, Capitfllist; J. A. Dono- 
hoe Pres. Donohoe, Kelly Bankin< Co.; John Parrott, Capitalist; Jacob 
Stern, Vice-President Levi Strauss & Co. 

William Babcock, President; S. L- Abbot, Vice-President and Man- 
ager; Fred. W, Ray, Secretary; Sidney V. Smith, Attorney. 



STARR <aDULFER 

SAN FRANCISCO AND T0N0PAH 

Stock Commission Brokers 




Tonopah 
Goldfield 
Bullfrog 




OFFICES: 

Merchants' Exchange Building 
San Francisco 

Tonopah, Nevada 

H. W. Hellman Building 
Los Angeles, Cal. 

MEMBERS SAN FRANCISCO STOCK AND EXCHANGE BOARD 



JOLY 15, 1905.] 



-THE WASP- 



101 



doing many things thai ultimately inured to his owi 
in which In- was able to do bj the organization of other 
societies which co-operated with the Equitable 
after the fashion of the Pacific and People's 1 
ings Banks of this city. The People's Borne was thus 
a feeder to the Pacific, which borrowed the monej 1 
savings institution to bolster up itself. Henry B B 
his son confesses, worked up the system of alliliated or 
subsidiary companies to perfection. For instance, he cre- 
ated the Mercantile Safe Deposit Company by the aid of 
the Equitable. The object was that the insurance company 
should suffer the losses, if any, and the Mercantile Safe 
Company should get all the profits. Hyde dominated 
Equitable absolutely, as be had a majority of its stocl 
while he bad full control of its surplus earnings. He is 
charged with having the insurance company decline to 
buy the stock of one of these subsidiary companies, the 
Equitable Safe Deposit Company of Boston, because it 
was not a profitable proposition, while he took it himself 
because it was. He. in the name of the insurance company, 
rented another building to give the safe deposit company 
more space, and out of this rent he gave the insurance 
company only .+1011 a year, while he gave the Safe Deposit 
Company— that is, himself— $16,000 a year. All this and 
much more has been set forth in the "damning expose of 
the old rascal's doings and the dubious acts of his success- 
ors. 

* * * 

Paid Praise for the Elder Hyde. 

Some time ago young Hyde had a most expensive biog- 
raphy of his father published and scattered broadcast 
amongst the newspapers of the United States, with an ap- 
peal to the editors io notice it favorably. The biography 
was one of those written-up to order puffs of a rich man. 
and old Hyde was made to appear as one of the greatest 
benefactors of mankind because he had built up the Equi- 
table Life Company. Now it appears that he was a hard- 
fisted old boy, who took the lion's share for himself. It 
would be interesting to know how much of the cost of 
publishing that expensive eulogy of old Hyde was defrayed 
by his son and how much by the Equitable Life Companv. 
Or was the whole sum charged up to advertising and footed 
bv the company'? 

* * » 
Mint Drops. 

During the fiscal year ending June 30th, the gold coined 
at the San Francisco branch mint equaled $64,223,500. or 
five million dollars a month, so that the San Francisco 
branch of the United States mint is one of the greatest 
mints in the world. There were no silver dollars coined, 
but there was $1,488,038.90 in subsidiary coin besides some 
work done for the Philippines and for Salvador. The 
amount coined at this mint equals more than the greater 
part of the gold mined j'early in the United States. The 
San Francisco mint seems to be a center toward which is 
attracted much of the gold of the world. 

* * # 
The Twelfth of July. 

This is the date when the contract of the Pacific Mail 
with the Panama Railroad expires, and after that the 
business of transportation is to be thrown open to the 
competition of the world. There does not, however, seem 
to be any great rush that way on the part of the steam- 
ship owners, while the Pacific Mail is calmly pursuing the 
even tenor of its way. It now looks as if for the present 
at least it will hold the fort. 

* # * 
Cotton Conditions. 

The cotton market is again becoming excited, and 
again it threatens to make or mar the fortune of indivi 
duals in Wall Street. It is now given out that the acreage 
is 20 per cent, less than it was a year ago, and that the 

Citizens State Bank, 518 Monteomery, cor. Com.-- 
allows 4 per cent on time certificates. 



WONDERFUL ORE IN THE ALTA 
WEST OF TONOPAH 



Superintendent Says 170 Sacks Will 

Average $1,000 per Ton — Found in 

Forty-five Foot Shaft 



One hundred and twenty sacks of ore that are believed 
to be worth $1,000 or better per ton are awaiting ship- 
ment at tbe Alta group of claims, thirty-seven miles due 
west of Tonopah, and twelve miles north of Frenchy's 
station on the Tonopah railroad. W. E. Steineck, who is 
superintendent of the property, declares that for five to 
sixteen inches the ore will average $1,C00. 

The district has been named Monte Cristo. The Alta 
group was recently purchased by the Tonopah Home Con- 
solidated Mining Company, and the first payment made. 
Two leases have been let, and a fair amount of work is 
being done. Reece, Holberg & Bartlett have the rich lease. 
On a cropping it is said the assays average $7.40. The 
richer streak is at the bottom of a forty-five foot shaft. 

Bishop & Gavin have a lease upon another group, and 
it is reported that they have struck shipping ore. The 
exact value of their ore is not known. 

Eleven miners all told are working in the district, and 
a number of prospectors are working in the adjacent bills. 

Mr. Steineck says there is plenty of wood and water 
in the district, and shows a number of photographs of trees 
showing the mine workings near by. He states that the 
district is certainly one of the most meritorious in South- 
ern Nevada, but has been held back by reason of the tend- 
ency of stampeders to hurry on to Tonopah, Goldfield, 
Bullfrog and other boom centers. — From Tonopah Sun. 



Mutual Savings Bank of San Francisco 

710 Market St., opp. Third 

Guarantee Capital , $1,000,000 

Paid-up Cap. tal 800,000 

Surplus 300,000 

Depos'ts, Julyl 1905 9,969.228 

JAMES D. PHELAN, President; S. G. MURPHY, Vice-Prei- 
ident; JOHN A. HOOPER. Vice-President; GEORGE A. 
STORY, Cashier; C. B. HOBSON, Assis ant Cashier. 

Directors— James D. Pbelan. S. G. Murphy, John A. Hooper, 
James Moffitt, Frank J Sullivan, Robert McElroy, Rudolph 
Spreckels, James M. McDonald, Charles Holbrook. 

Interest paid on deposits. Loans on approved securities. 

Deposits may be sent by postal order, "Wells, Fargo & Co., or 
exchange on city banks. 



The Hibernia Savings and Loan Society. 

Incorporated 12th of April, 1859. 
Office: Cor- of McAllister and Jones streets. Ran Prandsen 

Deposits January 1, 1905, 558,648,182.32. 
Reserve Fund, actual value, $3,372,779.09. 

OFFICERS— President, James R. Kelly; Secretary and Treasurer. 
Robert J. Tobin; Attorney, Joseph S. Tobin. 

BOARD OF DIRECTORS— R. J. Tobin. James R. Kelly, P. Crow- 
ley, Richard M. Tobin, Charles Mayo, Joseph S. Tobin. 

The objects for which this association is formed are, that by Jts 
operations the depositors thereof may be able to find a secure and 
profitable investment for small savings, and that borrowers may havo 
an opportunity of obtaining from it the use of a moderate capital on 
giving good and sufficient security for the use of the same. 

French Savings Bank, 3 ' s .^VETuS st " 

CAPITAL PAID UP $600,000 

CHARI.ES CARPY, President ARTHUR LEGALLET, Vice-President 

LEON BOCQUERAZ, Secretary 

DIRECTORS-J. E Artigu«s, O. Bozio, Leon Bocqueraz, T. A. Ber- 
gerot, Cbas. Carpy, J. B. Clot, J. S. Godeau, Leon Kauffman, A. Legallet, 
J. M. Dupas, A Ross, J. J. Mack. 




102 



-THE WASP 



[July 15, 1905. 



condition is 4 to 5 per cent. less. Should this be borne 
out by the facts later on there must certainly be another 
advance, but there is a limit to the advance of such an 
article of world-wide necessity as even cotton. And when 
there is a slump in the market it is generally a big one, and 
it carries the biggest fortune down along with it. The only 
damage is that such a panic may spread, and that may 
involve the market as a whole as well as cotton. 

* * * 
Sales of Copper Property. 

The money of John Mackay is being again invested in 
the State where a great deal of it was made — that is, in 
California. The sale of the big Balaklava for $2,000,000 
has as the head of the syndicate Clarence W. Mackay. 
These Shasta properties are going at no distant day to lead 
the copper world, and to give rise to colossal fortunes. 



A Prominent Merchant 

For more than thirty years Mr. A. A. Watkins has been 
intimately connected with the commercial life of the city, 
and has taken part in every movement for the betterment 
of the city and State, notwithstanding that he is one of 
the very busiest men in all San Francisco. As the managing 
partner of the big hardware and manufacturing firm of 
W. W. Montague and Company, not a second of his time 
passes that does not necessitate attention to the duties of 
his vast business. Nevertheless somehow he finds time to 
take part in public commercial gathering's, the meetings of 
the Board of Trade, and the conferences of the Hai-dware 
and Metal Association. Hailing from the Sunny South, 
Mr. Watkins became connected with W. W. Montague 
nearly forty years ago, when the old iirm had its head- 
quarters on Battery Street, and he has stood close to the 
desk and the business ever since. He has been the regular 
president of the Board of Trade for a great many years, 
and takes an active part in the councils of the Hardware 
Association. Though he has positive opinions on all sub- 
jects of public interest, he seldom ventures into the lime- 
light of publicity, but prefers to labor unostentatiously 
for the good of any cause that he has at heart. 

* * # 
He is a firm believer in the destiny of San Francisco, 
and that it will become one of the greatest cities in the 
world. While he is a believer in legitimately fostering 
trade, he thinks that the growth of trade which is natural 
and not forced by special legislation is the best growth of 
all. 

* * # 

He has been in favor of continuing the agreement thai 
the Pacific Mail had with the Panama railroad. He does 
not believe in Government lines of steamers, but he con- 
siders that, as the Government has taken up the work of 
the Panama. Canal construction, and as it has to provide 
for the partial transportation of merchandise between the 
Atlantic Coast and San Francisco, it should safeguard 
the trade on this side, that it should be carried on under 
the American flag. Mr. Watkins believes that the trans- 
portation of merchandise over the isthmus between New 
York and San Francisco comes under that provision of 
the law which obliges such trade to be carried in American 
bottoms. v 

* * # 

Mr. Watkins considers that there is a good outlook for 
trade this year. Business in the hardware line is good at 
present, and crop prospects are generally favorable to the 
producer. The margin of profit in Eastern goods, such as 
hardware, has been light, owing to competition, but the 
volume of trade is large. The prospects for the manu- 
facturing industry are encouraging. 
* * # 

With regard to the improvement in prices of realty) 
Mr. Watkins recalled that the property on Market and 
Mason Streets, which sold lately for $568,000, changed 
hands in 1S67 at just $10,000. 



engagements 

Miss Helen Partridge, daughter of Bishop Sidney Cat- 
lin Partridge of Japan, to Mr. George E. Chapin of San 
Francisco. 

Miss Albertina Lohse, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Chas. 
Lohse of Contra Costa county, to Mr. George Westcott of 
Ygnacia. 

Miss Josephine de Guigne, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. 
Christian de Guigne, and granddaughter of Mrs. Abby 
M. Parrott, of San Francisco, to Vicente Philippe de 
Tristan of France. 

Miss Florine Juillerat of Oakland, daughter of Mr. A. 
Juillerat, secretary of the Swiss Mutual Bank of San 
Francisco, and granddaughter of the lata Andrew Paul- 
tanghi, to Mr. Harry M. Gesner of Oakland. 

Miss Clara Ruth Berringer, daughter of Mrs. C. G. 
Berringer of Fruitvale, to Mr. William Bell Dunsmore of 
Oakland. 



Weddings 

July 19th — Miss Ella Sterrett, niece of Mrs. George H. 
Wheaton, to Mr. Edwin Barbour, both of Oakland, at Mrs. 
Whea ton's residence in Oakland. 

July 30th — Miss Gladys Beringer, daughter of Profes- 
sor and Madam Joseph Beringer, to Mr. Harry Meyer, both 
of San Francisco, at the Beringer residence in Geary street. 

August 9th — Miss May Belle Greenebaum, daughter of 
Mr. and Mrs. Sigmund Greenebaum, to Mr. Herbert Fleish- 
haeker, both of San Francisco. 

August 9th — Miss Ethyl Gray, daughter of Mr. and 
Mrs. J. P. Gray of San Francisco, to Dr. David James 
Graham of Edinburgh, Scotland, in New York City. 

August 19th — Miss Leslie Green, daughter of Mr. and 
Mrs. A. T. Green, Dwight Way, Berkeley, to Mr. Howard 
Huntington, at Berkeley. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 

The Continental Building and Loan Association 

of 301 California Street 

Has declared for the six months ending June 30th, 1905, a dividend 
of 5 per cent, per annum on Ordinary Deposits; 6 per cent, on Term 
Deposits; and 6 per cent, on Monthly Payment Investments. Inter- 
est on Deposits payable on and after July 1st. Interest on Ordinary 
Deposits not called for will be added to the principal and thereafter 
bear interest at the same rate. 

Dr. WASHINGTON DODGE, President. 
WM. CORBIN, Secretary 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 
HUMBOLDT SAVINGS BANK. 
626 Market Street 
Opposite Palace Hotel 
For the half-year ending June 30th, 1905, a dividend has been 
declared at the rate of three and one-half (3^9 per cent, per annum 
on deposits, free of all taxes, payable on and after Saturday, July 1, 
1905. Dividends not called for will be added to the principal 
and thereafter bear the same rate of interest. 

W. E. PALMER, Cashier. 

~~ DIVIDEND NOTICE. 

OFFICE OF THE HIBERNIA SAVINGS AND LOAN SOCIETY 
Corner Market, McAllister and Jones Sts., San Francisco. 

June 28, 1905. 
At a regular meeting of the Board of Directors of this Society, 
held this day, a dividend has been declared at the rate of three and 
one-half (3%) per cent, per annum on all deposits for the six months 
ending June 30, 1905, free from all taxes, and payable on and after 
July 1, 1905. 

ROBERT J. TOBIN, Secretary. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 
C~±JFORNIA SAFE DEPOSIT AND TRUST COMPANY, 
Corner California and Montgomery Streets. 
For the six months ending June 30, 1905, dividends have been de- 
clared on the deposits in the Bavings department of this company as 
follows; On term deposits at the rate of 3 6-10 per cent, per annum, 
and on ordinary deposits at the rate of 3^4 per cent, per annum, 
free of taxes, and payable on and after Saturday, July 1, 1905. 
J. DALZELD BROWN, Manager. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 
SAVINGS AND LOAN SOCIETY, 
101 Montgomery Street, corner of Sutter, 
Has declared a dividend for the term ending June 30, 1905, at the 
rate of three and one-half (3%) per cent, per annum on all deposits, 
free of taxes, payable on and after Saturday, July 1, 1905. 

EDWIN BONNELL, Assistant Cashier. 



By AUTOMAN 



A project of great interest to automobilists throughout 
the State is the construction of a line modern highway 
from San Jose into the Big Basin, in the heart of the red- 
woods in the Santa Cruz mountains, where the State, at a 
cost of nearly $250,000, has acquired a park. The opening 
of this reservation and making it accessible to motorists 
will be like creating a new beauty spot for the visitation 
of those who find pleasure in exploring the scenic treasures 
of the State. 

At present the road from San Jose to the summit of 
the mountains near Saratoga is an ordinary earth road, 
muddy in winter, dusty in summer, and unworthy the 
Mecca of wonderful redwoods to which it leads. Bui the 
Supervisors of Santa Clara county have shown their inter- 
est in the plan by promising to convert this stretch of road 
into a fine macadamized highway. Upon the new stretch 
of road from the summit to the Big Basin, a distance of ten 
miles as the crow flies, the sum of $25,900 will be spent, 
and it will probably be the finest highway in the State. 
R. P. Schwerin, President of the Automobile Club of Cali- 
fornia, is assisting in the work and has promised to lay 
the matter before all the public bodies of the State. 

Mr. and Mrs. Will Taylor, Mrs. Gus Taylor and her 
husband, and Mr. and Mrs. F. W. McNear have of late 
taken a number of interesting motor car jaunts. They 
delight in spending their week-end days antomobiling to 
nearby resorts. The three Hopkins girls are all enthusi- 
astic motorists. When automobiling was first in its in- 
fancy on the Coast Mrs. Fred McNear took up the sport 
and soon learned to handle her Autocar with the utmost .if 
proficiency. The Mrs. Taylors also know the high signs 
and pass words of ehauffeurism. 

Mrs. William H. Middleton treated a party of friends 
to an enjoyable spin through the Park last Sunday in a 
double victoria Columbia. 

At last the true note of the Automobilists' battle-ery 
has been sounded by J. W. E. Douglass-Scott-Montague 
in the British Parliament. He wants to know why a 
road should not be set apart in Hyde Park for the use of 
automobilists and bicyclists, "where they will be free 
from the dangers and smells arising from horse traffic." 
That is it! The motor ear has been objected to because 
of being noisy and ill-smelling, but no one has heretofore 
inveighed against the uncertain tempered and malodorous 
equine. 

"I ean't say much for your San Francisco city 
streets," remarked an old hand at the touring game to me 
the other day. "They are about the worst I have seen 
in a city of the size and pretensions of yours. I think 
$200,000* honestly spent would work wonders toward mak- 
ing the city a more ideal one for automobilists as well :is 
for driving." 

E. L. Doherty, manager of the Mill Valley Lumber 
Company, realizes the development of the horseless veh- 
icle and its reliability and standing-up qualities for hard, 

Wine is the elixir of life. The Repsold vintages— the 
crowning achievement in wine making. Inspection .n- 
vited. 



every-day usage. He says traveling about Marin County 
is not near so tiresome now that an Autocar runabout 
has taken the place of his horse and buggy. 

Dr. A. K. Harshall, a prominent motorist of this city, 
is at present in New York accompanied by his family. 
After a little running about the East, Dr. Harshall will 
cross the ocean and tour Europe by automobile in the fall. 

1£ anybody thinks there is much of variety in divorce 
laws in the United States, he or she ought to look over 
the field of automobile regulations. The divorce laws 
would stand a pretty poor show in a contest with the 
automobile regulations. 

Germany uses a trio of automobile fire engines, two 
electrically propelled and one driven by steam. These 
have been in service for three years and seem to have 
given excellent practical performance, as well as satis- 
factory financial returns. Hanover is the city that oper- 
ates all three and it has saved nearly $10,000 in three 
years bv their introduction. 



Queen Automobiles 

The machine for all-around every-day usage 

A MODERATE PRICED CAR THAT YOU CAN DEPEND ON 




MODEL "E" QUEEN TOURING CAR, $1150 

The model E Queen touring oar has 18 actual horse power, with 
two opposed cylinders and a weight of 1600 lbs. All the working 
parts throughout the machine are well proportioned and have a sur- 
plus of strength Speed. 3 to 40 miles per hour: seats five people, 
double side door entrance, all speeds on one lever, finished in royal 
blue with cream colored gear and well upholstered in the finest of 
black leather. 

WHY PAY TWICE AS MUCH FOR A CAB. WHEN EVEN AT O 
THAT PRICE IT WILL NOT COMPARE WITH THE QUEEN ■ 



RARIG AUTOMOBILE AND GARAGE CO. 

(Occupying the finest repositories for motor cars on the Pacific Coast) 
827 TO 833 FoLSOM ST., SAN FRANCISCO 



104 



-THE WASP- 



[July is, 1905. 



Duluth has come to the fore in providing her fire chief 
with an automobile. A White steam car was shipped f o 
Duluth several days ago for use of Chief John Black of 
the Fire Department. 

R. R. Bray, of San Jose, has purchased a model B. 
Winton, four cylinder, side entrance, from the Pioneer 
Automobile Company to be used in the rent service in 
San Francisco. 

R. P. Schwerin and Miss Roosevelt with friends spent 
some time on Tuesday evening touring through the city 
in a Winton ear. 

Mr. and Mrs. Will Tubbs are back from their trip to 
Portland and are touring as much as ever in their four- 
cylinder Autocar. Mrs. Tubbs finds no greater pleasure 
than spinning over the roads of San Mateo county in her 
automobile. 

A White steam auto now holds the world's record 
for a mile on a circular track. Webb Jay at the National 
Championship Meet in New York on July 4th drove his 
15-20 h. p. White car a mile in the phenomenal time of 
48 4-5 seconds. 

The Rarig Automobile and Garage Company, Pacific 
Coast agents for the Queen line of motor cars, are 
now situated in their handsome and spacious quarters on 
Folsom Street, near Fourth, and extend an invitation to 
all motor car enthusiasts to visit one of the finest homes 
exclusively for automobiles on the Pacific Coast. 

White steamers are taking the initiative in runs to 
Portland, and four of these autos left Seattle during the 
past two weeks headed for the Exposition City. 

E. L. Stewart, of Denverton, Cal., bought a model C 
Winton three weeks ago, in which he toured 1500 miles, 
a punctured tire being the only trouble ie has met with. 

The Queen automobile is a very high-grade one, power- 
ful and a great hill climber. The ear has given universal 
satisfaction throughout the East, and principally to have 
the agency properly looked after did the Rarig Automobile 
and Garage Company decide to erect their costly building 
in this city. 

From Butte to Helena in virtually four hours, or prac- 
tically the same time as is called for in the schedule of 
Great Northern passenger trains, was accomplished recent- 
ly by a party of Butte autoists in a White steamer. 

Local motorists are taking much interest at present in 
record runs between this city and Los Angeles, and since 
Whitman's successful run several attempts have been 
made. These automobile races against time records should 
at least be helpful in furthering the project of a great 
highway between the cities, following the general coast, 
line. Consequently, the more such' races the better. 

In defense of any violation of speed laws motorists 
will probably now quote from the Bible. In chapter 2, 
verse 4, Nahum utters these words: "The chariots shall 
race in the streets; they shall jostle one against the other 
in the broad ways ; they shall seem like torches ; they shall 
run like the lightnings." 

District Attorney Campbell of Santa Cruz county has 
issued a warning to all persons operating motor vehicles 
against violating the county ordinance excluding them 
from the Santa Cruz and the Mt. Hamilton roads, holding 
as a basis for the warning that the ordinance is still oper- 
ative in spite of the act passed by the last Legislature. 

An automobilist of New York carries with him in his 
motor vehicle a gorgeous-hued parrott that has been train- 
ed to erv out : "Look out ! Look out ! ' ' whenever any one 
is endangered by his master's car. It was but recently re- 
marked in this column that fashionable London was in the 
throes of a most serious and earnest discussion as to what 
breed of dogs was best fitted to wear goggles and sit at the 
guest hand of the chauffeur, but perchance the news of this 



latest Yankee notion may give the British motorist fur- 
ther food for discussion. 

Queen Margherita of Italy is one of the most enthusi- 
astic motorists of the day. The Queen believes motormg 
to be the best and only positive cure for grief, and as she 
has never recovered from the horror of the death of the 
late King Humbert, she has become an ardent promoter of 
the pleasure of the automobile. She has but recently re- 
turned from an extensive tour of Southern France, and 
will leave in a short time for a trip through Germany. 

A story is told that an English firm of carriage build- 
ers addressed an inquiry to an automobile manufacturer 
in this wise: "Please send me immediately prices and par- 
ticulars of a motor and axles and exploding apparatus and 
gear wheels to make a motor car; our customer has the 
wheels. ' ' 

The Lady: "My poor man, is it really true that you 
have been arrested so often?" 

Gritty George: "Why, mum, I have been arrested as 
often as if I owned an automobile." 



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JOLY 15, 1905 ] 



-THEW4SP- 



105 




Old f^ • 



o'clock mi the day reading a aovel and chewii 1 mels, 
what do yon think she said to the servant when her 
irer was announced. "Tell him I'm in the kitchen 
with Maw putting np preserves," said she as ihe .lumped 
to the bureau and began to put powder on her face, as if 
she was dredging a veal cutlel with flour before Erying it. 
"Arthur," said she, "is one of those wise young guys thai 
want to marry a first-class cook and housekeeper, but he's 

ol stacks of money; so 1 mustn't lose him." Did yon 
ever? My I N\> wonder I'm nol married, Sooner than 
stoop to such base deceptions I'd go single all the days of 
m\ life, lint il 's the designing hussies that are most like- 
ly to get the best men. 



APPEARANCE COUNTS. 
"What have we mounted police for?" 
"I don't know; but whatever thev are for thev look 
Ihe part." 



Monday — My! What a place this is for divorces! I am 
shocked every morning when I read the newspapers. 
Gracious! Rich and poor find the bends of matrimony 
galling. I'm glad I never married. That Talbot divorce 
case does worry me, though I'd give the world to know 
the inside of it. Why don't the reporters get the real 
secrets and publish them instead of printing a lot of vague 
insinuations that only make one frantic to know more 
about the case"? I suppose all the testimony will be hushed 
up, too, when the case is tried behind closed doors. There 
should be a law compelling people to have their divorce 
cases tried in public. It would be a good thing all around. 
Everyone would know then just what kind of people they 
were and not be tortured by curiosity as now when you 
just get a peep at their domestic infelicity, and then the 
curtain is pulled down. It's perfectly horrid. I do hope 
the reporters will not keep me in suspense over that Talbot 
mystery much longer. Who are the objectionable people 
the husband forced her to associate with, and did he get 
her away from her first husband? I'm ashamed to confess 
I'm just dying to know all about it. 

* * * 

Tuesday — I met Mrs. Lightley down town today and 
we had lunch together in a restaurant and talked over the 
flood of divorce eases amongst prominent people. She 
told me some awful things about them that she heard at 
her dressmaker's. My! What gossips those dressmakers 
and hairdressers and milliners are! Goodness me! They 
seem to know everything that's going on. I'll have to go 
and see my milliner and ask her about Mrs. MeAneny, the 
young woman who is suing her rich old husband. Mrs. 
Lightley told me she saw her in the store one day buying 
a $50 hat, and the milliner said Mrs. MeAneny had thirty- 
six more of them all ready for Easter, and was undecided 
which one to wear. "What does an old millionaire ex- 
pect when he marries a gay young widow?" said Mrs. 
Lightley. "I wish I had the chance to make the old boy s 
money fly. Gee!" Such slang as that woman uses! She 
told me she met all of her three ex-husbands the day be- 
fore at lunch. Gracious! I'd have died on the spot. "\ou 
must have felt terrible," I said. "Yes," she replied; 
"I did, for the two men who are paying most devoted at- 
tention to me were there also and I didn't dare speak to 
either of them without tipping off my hand." Oh dear, 
such language— and such morals. I. suppose it's the influ- 
ence of this community. I wonder if I am proof against 

it. 

* * * 

Wednesday— Dear me ! It seems as if no age or s( 
this city is above practising deceptions of the worst kind. 
I was at Mrs. Mugsby's this afternoon when young Bonds 
called to see Clara Mugshy, who is only a little enit of a 
»irl barely out of school. She was propped up in bed at 



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106 



THE WASP 



[July 15, 1905. 



Mvisic and Drama 



Margaret Anglin is said to be coquetting with vaude- 
ville and has received "a tempting offer" for a thirty 
weeks' engagement. This means that Miss Anglin has 
been a failure as a star. How often have we read similar 
announcements anent the projects of decaying actors who 
have seen their best days, or thespians of the sky-rocket 
variety who have gone up with a flash and roar and come 
down with a dull thud. 

* # # 

Speaking candidly and without the least desire to be 
unkind to Miss Anglin, there is no strong reason why she 
should be accepted as a star; neither is there any reason 
why she should not, as long as certain other women in her 
profession are accepted as its brightest ornaments. She 
has her limitations, as they have. 

* # * 

To begin .with, Miss Anglin has not been long enough 
a player to have become a finished artiste. It is the fash- 
ion of our day, however, to take buxom chambermaids 
from their broom and bucket and turn the limelight on 
them in the roles of queens of the stage. Miss Anglin is 
not a chambermaid lately disassociated from the imple- 
ments of her useful though prosaic trade; nor is she any 
other kind of chambermaid. She is a clever, educated 
woman, who is a very capable actress, but her flight into 
the stellar regions is premature. She is a product of the 
bot-house system adopted in late years, and by which act- 
ors and actresses who do fairly well for three successive 
seasons in a mediocre stock company are placed at the 
head of a traveling combination and billed as people of 
■extraordinary genius. The public is quick to discern their 
true worth, regardless of what the critics may write or the 
paid press agents may print. If these made-to-order stars 
be of radium they continue to shine and be admired. If, 
on the contrary, they are only cobblestones, smeared with 
a coating of phosphorus to make them glimmer, they soon 
cease to attract public attention. Their evanescent glow 
■dies out, and they pass to the vaudeville stage, where any- 
thing that is well advertised will last for six months. Then 
to the junk heap or the ash barrel. 

* * # 

It is beyond question that the American stage was 
iiever in a worse condition than now, artistically consid- 
ered. The theatrical trust has degraded it to the lowest 
level of commercialism. Anybody who preaches the doc- 
trine of "art for art's sake" is laughed at as a dreamer 
and a fool. 

* # # 

The fact that such an actress as Mrs. Fiske receives 
so much praise is the best proof that the American stage 
bas sunk to depths that make it beneath criticism. Mrs. 
Fiske is ardently admired as one of the best actresses on 
the American stage, and she has had increased popularity 
"by reason of the brave battle she has waged against the 
rapacious theatrical trust. But, judged on her merits 
alone, and judged honestly and without prejudice, Mrs. 
Fiske falls far" short of the standard of ability requisite 
for an accepted artist of the first rank. She has no voice. 
Her articulation is a despair to her audience beyond the 
fifth row from the. stage. Artistic success is no more pos- 
sible for an actress without a voice than for a singer, even 
less so. A very bad singer can be helped by a good orches- 
tra, but what- is to save the actor or actress who has to 
stir the .emotions of an audience merely by the spoken 
words? Excellence in reading is the first and last requisite 
of a great- actor. A beautiful voice is a priceless gift to an 
(Continued on rage 107) 



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Mr. Denis O 'Sullivan, the noted baritone, with his wife 
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July 15, 1905 



'THE WASP- 



107 



'.Continued from page 106) 

actress, and should be treasured above 
all others. European actors under- 
stand this fully, and it is impossible 
to find in any good metropolitan com- 
pany in Europe a man or woman with 
a voice like a hired man or a dairy- 
man! occupying exalted rank. 
exhibitions are quite common on our 
stage. 

-o -<o *c>- 

A flagrant example of vocal impro- 
priety was furnished in every emo- 
tional play in which Clara Morris ap- 
peared in her day. Yet many cities 
praised her "emotional gifts," and a 
portion of the public accepted her in 
good faith as all that she was repre- 
sented. Eventually, however, she 

CHANGED HUSBAND, 



Wife Made Wise Change in Food. 

Change of diet is the only way to 
really cure stomach and bowel trouble. 

A woman says: 

"My husband had dyspepsia when 
we were married and had suffered 
from it for several years. It was al- 
most impossible to find anything he 
could eat without bad results. 

"I thought this was largely due to 
the use of coffee and persuaded him 
to discontinue it. He did so, and be- 
gan to drink Postum Food Coffee. The 
change did him good from the begin- 
ning; his digestion improved; he suf- 
fered much less from his nervousness, 
and when he added Grape-Nuts food 
to his diet he was soon entirely cured. 

'•My friend, Mrs. , of 

Vicksburg (my former home), had be- 
come a nervous wreck also from dys- 
pepsia. Medicines had no effect, nei- 
ther did travel help her. On my last 
visit home, some months ago, I per- 
suaded her to use Grape-Nuts food. 
She was in despair, and consented. 
She stuck to it until it restored her 
health so completely that she is now 
the most enthusiastic friend of Grape- 
Nuts that I ever knew. She eats it 
with cream or dry, just as it comes 
from the package — keeps it in her 
room, and eats it whenever she feels 
like it. 

"I began eating Grape-Nuts food 
myself when my baby was two months 
old, and I don't know what I should 
have done without it. My appetite 
was gone, I was weak and nervous, and 
afforded but little nourishment for the 
child. The Grape-Nuts food, of which 
I soon grew very fond, speedily set 
all this "right again, and the baby 
grew healthful, rosy and beautiful as 
a mother could wish. He is two 
years old now and eats Grape-Nuts 
food himself. I wish every tired 
young mother knew of the good thai 
Grape-Nuts would do her." 

Names given by Postum Co., Battle 
Creek, Mich. 

There's a reason. 



found her le e lacked in many 

ways the qualities a true ami finish 
.-•I artist, iich m> one can 

maintain a high place in the pub- 
lic estimation. The people of refined 
and correct laste will reject all im- 
postors, and 11 e opinion of '.he 
cultivated class thai establishes an 
artist's reputation firmly. 
-<^- -<a. <s>. 

Clara Morris bad a voice which 
suggested an early acquaintance with 

1 lie duties of a waitress in an Indiana 
boarding-house. Ii is superfluous to 
remark that she never achieved any 
success worth speaking about outside 
of American provincial theatres, ami 
European cities would have none of 
her. 

-^ "Cy <£>■ 

Verv different is the case of Ada 
Rehan, who has a beautiful voice and 
reads her lines with the musical flexi- 
bility and charm of Sarah Bernhardt. 
Europe accepts her as a fine artist. 
Her linguistic success is the result of 
cultivation on correct lines, for she is 
Irish-born, but the flavor of the old 
sod has utterly departed from her 
trained tones. 

-^i- -c> ^> 

Too many of our stage people make 
no attempt whatever at purity of dic- 
tion, and in the fulness of their self- 
satisfied egotism flavor their lines with 
accents of their birthplaces. They in- 
terpret the plays to us in Oregonian, 
Texanese, Bostonese, New English, 
and New Jerseyan, and the dialect of 
the Bowery. Some of them who faint- 
ly realize that the native tongues need 
trimming seem to imitate the worst 
school of cockney actors, and afflict 
their audiences with a bogus British 
accent which is a thousand times more 
offensive than anything heard in the 
most rural districts from Hoboken to 
the Golden Gate. English pure and 
undefiled is the language in which an 
American actor or actress should 
speak, just as the finished artists of 
the Comedie Francaise speak flawless 
French which defies criticism. 
'Jy "Q> "C* 

In her recent appearance in this 
city as "Leah Klesehna" Mrs. Fiske 
appeared to greater disadvantage than 
ever bv reason of her poor enuncia- 
tion. The piece called for little of 
what is known as "emotional acting," 
and which is often only another name 
for stage hysterics. In the most dra- 
matic scene of all, where she is dis- 
covered in the attempt to rob the safe, 
the whole situation depends on the 
voices of the man and the woman 
speaking in set : -darkness. To say 
that Mrs. Fiske spoiled the situation 
by the hurried indistinctness of her 
speech, is to state the facts mildly. 
No stronger proof could be furnished 
that an actress without a voice is no 
actress at all. To make matters worse, 
the male support was .unusually clever, 
thus serving', bv contrast, to exhibit 



in the strongest light tin- di ft< 

of the star. Thai .-mil a - 

-ai.le.l as one of the brightest 
of our dramatic system is certainly 
not encouraging. One is dispos 
ask how long it will take the theatri- 
cal profession in America to recover 
from the blight the theatrical b 
lias placed upon talent.' Will it ever 

r vcr, or. on the contrary, sink lower 

and resign itself In the BT 1 and all 

the consequences thereof that the pub- 
lic is a fool and likes to be swindled 
by mountebanks? 

<a- "a- -^ 

Miss Clara Alexander is represented 
as "creating a furore" in London 
with her negro recitations. She began 
her career in Alameda, where she was 
a teacher in Miss Charlotte Dea's 



NOTICE TO CREDITORS. 

ESTATE OH WILUAM DAVID HOWE DE 
CEASED. 

Dept. io. No. 32557. 

Notice is hereby given by the undersigned 
M. 1. Hynes, Public Administrator of the City 
and County of San Francisco, and Administra- 
tor of the Estateof William Dav.d Howe deeeas 
ed. to the creditors of, and at] persons' having 
claimsagainst the said deceased, to exhibit them 
with the necessary vouchers, within four months 
after the first publication of this notice to the 
said Administrator, at room 568, Parrott' Build 
lug, Nos. 825 to 855 Market street, the same 
being his place for the transaction of the busi- 
ness of the said estate in the Cily and Countv 
of San Francisco, State of California. 

. j . . M. j. HYNES. 

Administrator of the estate of William David 
Howe, deceased. 

Dated at San Francisco, July 15th iqos 

CUXMNAN & HICKEY, Attorneys fo- Ad- 
ministrator, rooms 567, 56S and 569, Parrott 
Building. San Francisco. Cat. 



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108 



-THE WASP- 



[July 15, 1905. 



school and first did "darkey stunts' 1 
for the delectation of the youngsters. 
Mrs. Philip Teller, then president of 
the Adelphian Club, took her up and 
a recital was given for her benefit, 
after which, in the usual good old way, 
she shook the dust of California from 
her feet. On June 29th Miss Alexan- 
der was given the use of Lady Lud- 
low's beautiful house, 27 Portland 
Place, for a recital. She is one of tin- 
favorite entertainers at private houses 
and seems to be making' considerable 
money. The young woman has no de- 
sire to return to California, which, I 
hear, she says is "crude." There 
was a good deal of criticism in the 
Southern set over the impersonations 
of negroes by a gentlewoman, and 
these aristocrats said things that were 
not as polite as the "nigger" artist 
thought they should be. Any way, 
"dear ole Lunnon" appreciates Miss 
Alexander. 

-x> ^> ^> 

John Drew, if he has the reputa- 
tion for having the best social position 
of any actor on the American stage, 
also has the name of being the biggest 
snob. He likes to give the impression 
that he is the Duke of Killicrankie in 
disguise, acting for fun. Charlie Eel- 
ton, the San Francisco clubman, who 
is a decent young man, rather took Mr. 
Drew's breath away one evening at 
dinner, where he met the actor, by 
blurting out: "Mr. Drew, are you as 
great a snob as people say you are?" 

^ <^>. ^>- 

COMES A TIME 



When Coffee Shows What It Has 
Been Doing. 

"Of late years coffee has disagreed 
with me," writes a matron from 
Rome, N. Y., "its lightest punish- 
ment was to make me 'logy' and diz- 
zy, and it seemed to thicken up my 
blood. 

"The heaviest was when it upsel 
my stomach, completely destroying my 
appetite and making me nervous and 
irritable, and sent me to my bed. Af- 
ter one of these attacks, in which I 
nearly lost my life, I concluded to 
quit and try Postum Food Coffee. 

' ' It went right to the spot ! I found 
it not only a most palatable and re- 
freshing beverage, but a food as well. 

"All my ailments, the 'loginess' 
and dizziness, the unsatisfactory con- 
dition of my blood, my nervousness 
and irritability disappeared in short 
order and my sorely afflicted stomach 
began quickly to recover. I began to 
rebuild and have steadily continued 
until now. Have a ^'ood appetite and 
am rejoicing in sound health, which 
I owe to the use of Postum Food Cof- 
fee." Name given by Postum Co., 
Battle Creek, Mich. 

There's a reason. 

Read the little book, "The Road to 
Wellville," found in each pkg. 



riiiiuuvvuvuuuuiriiuu\nririr\suuuu\ 

I THE THEATRES | 

mru/iriruinjiJ^nJiiTJiruTJTJUijTrLnxiinrn 

The Chutes. 

The Chutes has a delightful attrac- 
tion in Bothwell Browne's Japanese 
musical extravaganza, which will be 
repeated every afternoon and evening 
until Sunday, Judy 23d. The piece 
is magnificently staged, and the cos- 
tumes and scenery are gorgeous and 
picturesque. A countless number of 
children appear in the production and 
display a musical, dramatic and terp- 
sichorean ability that is simply mar- 
velous. The extravaganza is rich in 
beautiful ballets, and special mention 
should be made of one entitled "Early 
Days and Olden Days," danced with 
a grace and precision that has seldom 
been surpassed by the most experienc- 
ed adult performers. Eunice Gilman, 
who plays the title role, is a little 
wonder, while tiny Jasmine Sidlowski 
has created a perfect furore by her 
clever toe dancing. One of the great- 
est hits of the performance is the 
Champagne Dance, executed by a doz- 
en young misses. Experienced theat- 
rical men declare that San Francisco 
is the only city in America which 
could produce a program of such ex- 
traordinary merit, for it should be 
borne in mind that every child in the 
cast is the product of the Golden 
State. Chiquita, "the living doll," 
Annie Redline, the plump lady, and 
the babies in the life-saving incuba- 
tors, are great attractions at the 
Chutes and the amateurs will appear 
on Thursday night. 

'O "%> -Cs- 

Herschell Mayall's Wife. 

Mrs. Herschell Mayall, wife of the 
well-known actor, has left the stage, 
and, she says, forever. The unreal 
life behind the footlights has become 
impossible for her. Mrs. Mayall is 
an exceedingly attractive woman, with 
expressive dark eyes. She is very 
slender and of medium height ; her 
complexion is of an ivory tint, and 
with the exception of her lips there 
is not a touch of color about her face. 
She married some thirteen years ago, 
when just a school girl, in New York, 
and went on the stage to help her 
husband. She played with the Neill 
Company in the East, and with Froh- 
man, but was never very successful. 
Her enforced return to the stage re- 
cently caused a great stir in the pro- 
fession, as it was not known that any 
trouble had occurred between herself 
and her husband, whom the world 
regards as a single man. 
*c> -o* <a>- 

The experiment of using glass for 
street pavement has been found very 
successful in Philadelphia. There is 
now hope of immunitv even for people 
living in glass houses. 



(Keep it Handy 

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FOR 

JAPAN AND CHINA 

Steamers will leave wharf, corner of First 
and Brannan streets, at 1 p. m., for Hono- 
lulu. YOKOHAMA, Kobe, Nagasaki, Shang- 
hai and HONGKONG, as follows: 

COPTIC, calling at Manila, Wednesday, August 2 
DORIC, " " Wednesday, Sept. 20 

COPTIC, " '* Saturday, Oct. 21 

No cargo received on board on day of Bail- 
ing. 

Round Trip Tickets at Reduced Rates. 

For freight or passage apply at company's 
The Merchant's Exchange, 7th Floor. San 
Francisco. 

D. D. STUBBS. Qenrral Manager. 



Volume LI V.— No. 4. 



SAN FRANCISCO, JULY 22, 1905. 



Price 10 cents 



PUBLISHERS' NOTICE 

THE WASP Is published every Saturday by The Wasp Publishing 
Company, at 506 Mission Street. Subscriptions $5 per year, payable In 
advance, postage prepaid. Subscriptions to all foreign countries 
within the Postal Union $6 per year. 

The trade on the Pacific Coast supplied by the San Francisco 
News Company. Eastern Agents supplied by the American News 
Company, New York. 

THE WASP will pay for contributions Buitahle to Its columns, and 
will endeavor to return all rejected manuscripts, but does not guar- 
antee their return. 

Photographs will also be accepted and paid for. 

Address all communications to Wasp Publishing Company, 506 
Mission Street, San Francisco, Cal. 
Telephone Main 1643. 



TO ADVERTISERS.— As the Illustrated pages of THE WASP go to 
press early, all advertisements printed in the same forms should 
be received not later than Monday at noon. Changes of adver- 
tisements should also be sent In on Monday to Insure publication. 



QJTJTJTJOJTJTJTJTJTJTJTJTJTT^ 

PLAIN ENGLISH 

uTTUTJTJTJTTirUTJTJ UTJTJT^ 

STRAIGHT TALKS ON TIMELY TOPICS 




VERY school girl in Hayvvards has been im- 
pressed into service to pick fruit in the or- 
chards surrounding that thriving town, but 
still the supply of help is insufficient. "So- 
ciety women," the "Chronicle" tells us, bave 
volunteered to aid the school children who 
have generously assisted the fruit growers to save their 
crops, but with all this extraordinary commotion the fruit 
is in jeopardy. Where, oh where, are those myriads of 
Asiatics that the Anti-Jap League tells us have deluged our 
fair land and are crowding the luckless white man to the 
verge of starvation? Neither Japs nor white men seem 
to be available at Haywards, a brief hour and a half from 
the teeming city of San Francisco. The ripe fruit is drop- 
ping from the trees, and to save it from destruction thi- 
gh-Is of the High School have to leave their studies, and 
summer maids from the metropolis enjoy the frolic of 
picking apricots like hired hands. Verily labor is noi 
over-abundant in a land where all this is going on less 
than twenty-five miles from the largest and most crowded 
city. What must the actual conditions be throughout our 
State? Precise figures on this matter, showing the number 
of tons of fruit that rot every year, because hands cannot 
be hired to pick it, would be interesting. The daily news- 



papers are not likely to furnish such statistics, however, 
for those exponents of public opinion cannot even tell (lie 
truth about the labor troubles in the city of San Fran- 
cisco. The newspapers talk loudly about the immigration 
question, but they touch only one side of it. There are 
two sides to this question, and no American journal should 
be afraid to discuss them with equal candor. 

A Burning Question. 

The immigration question has been a burning one for 
many years, but at last it promises to be brought to a 
stage where it must be settled intelligently. The Anti- 
Japanese movement in California and the Chinese boycott 
of American goods are sure to give the immigration ques- 
tion an importance it never before attained. The Japan- 
ese will not tolerate any other treatment than such as 
would be accorded to a recognized world power. China 
is awakening and will insist on international courtesy to 
her people, and Japan will back her. It may be conceded 
at once that it is highly undesirable that a flood of Asiatic 
coolies should be allowed to sweep through Pacific Coast 
ports and spread all over the nation, or any part of it. 
But have we ever had such a deluge or does it now threat- 
en us? Agitators anxious to work up the labor vote and 
capture public office answer "Yes." Newspapers eager 
to swell their subscrintion lists by tickling the ears of the 
groundlings proclaim the agitators true prophets and pat 
them on the backs. Intelligent people, however, require 
more than vociferation to convince them. They want facts 
and what are the facts about coolie immigration to the 
Pacific Coast? We have now more Asiatics here than ever 
before at one time. Japanese have come in considerable 
numbers and there has always been a colony of Chinese. 
Yet 25 miles from San Francisco it is necessary for 
societv women and high school girls to .'o into the orch- 
ards to save the fruit from rotting. In the city of San 
Francisco itself competent Japanese house-servants com- 
mand wages of $6 or $7 a week, with board and lodgin-.;, 
and their wages have had a tendency to advance instead 
of decrease. If these Japanese had driven out white wom- 
en the number of unemployed girls would be large aul 
their wages low; but the contrary is the fact. Girls for 
house work arc hard to find and their waees are as high 
as those of the Japanese. The Chinese cooks command 
even better pay. So far then the yellow races have made 
no visible impression on the industrial condition here. 
What of the future? 

The European Deluge. 

The real problem of immigration is presented to Am- 
erica at our Atlantic ports, through which Europe is rush 
ing her surplus population. The Asiatics will go back to 
Asia. The European immigrants remain and become citi- 
zens. If honest and industrious, they are desirable. We 
get a large share of the other kind, however, and whether 



110 



THE WASP- 



July 22, 1905. 



good or bad, they should be made to realize that citizenship 
is a privilege worth striving for. The laws of naturaliza- 
tion should be changed and citizenship conferred only 
when proper educational proofs are presented, and after a 
probationary term of at least seven years — ten preferably. 
Congress will be compelled to address itself to this task 
of reform very soon, and the sooner the better. 

Japan's Projects. 

Japan as a nation does not wish to see her people 
nock to America. She has work for them at home or much 
nearer home. She desires to spread out in Asia. Korea 
is hers. She will take a hand in developing the industries 
and trade of China. Australia, which is a great continent, 
is much nearer than America, and some day Japan and 
China will have a good deal to say about its government. 
The Philippines are sure to attract the attention of Japan 
or China, and Asiatics will talk of the white men who con- 
trol them as we talked some years ago of the Spaniards 
who poverned Cuba. We objected to the domination of a 
European government in a land so near our shores. Asia 
for the Asiatics will soon be a cry in the Far East just as 
America for the Americans is the watchword of the West. 
So the prospective deluge of Japanese, which some of our 
agitators and the newspapers profess to fear, is not an 
immediate danger. The Jap will not need to come to this 
land where he is an inferior while he can colonize in Asia- 
tie territory, where he will be lord and master. 

And China Too. 

So also with the Chinese. If we opened all our ports 
to unrestricted Chinese immigration tomorrow there wouil 
be no deluge of pig-tail coolies. Who would pay their 
fares to this land, so far off, and of which three-fourths of 
China knows as little as of the planet Mars. They cannot 
swim across the ocean, and the steamships will not carry 
them for nothing. Contractors might bring batches of 
them, but that would be very limited, for their labor would 
be of no value unless work awaited them here. What work 
can armies of Chinese coolies do here outside of railroad 
building, canal digging, and reclamation of lands'? But 
such vast enterprises are not begun every day. It takes 
years to transform a coolie into a partially skilled laborer. 
Who is to take the trouble and stand the exDense of his 
training? In past ages the great migratory movements of 
mankind have been through Asia and Europe westward 
and across the Atlantic. The most observant travelers be- 
lieve that such will continue to be the ease for ages. Siber- 
ia alone contains thousands of miles of rich untenanted 
land over which Tartar hordes roamed for centuries like 
our American Indians. The Russians drove back the Tar- 
tars to Mongolia, but the great plains, corresponding in 
area and productiveness with our own vast prairies, have 
never been brought under cultivation. A deluge of Asiatic 
immia'ration is much more likely to pour landward through 
Siberia than across the Pacific Ocean. 

Americus. 



It is not often that one sees the extremes of fortune 
demonstrated as at present in San Francisco and New- 
York, where one sister, Mrs. Overacker, is selling papers 
in the streets, and another, Mrs. Howard Gould, is wonder- 
ing how she can spend her millions. Mrs. Gould is child- 
less and has great millions, and yet she does absolutely 
nothing for Mrs. Overacker, her sister. Mrs. Overacker 
and Mrs. Gould were born in Pleasanton, and were the 
daughters of well-to-do parents, the family name being 
Dynan. One married Charlie Overacker of Oakland, and 
separated from him. The other drifted on the stage, made 
her debut as a star under the protection of Buffalo Bill, 
and after much family opposition became the wife of How- 
ard Gould. Mrs. Overacker has been for years a religious 
enthusiast, and has supported herself in various ways. Of 
late she has been selling papers, as since the Bulletin strike 
it is a new wav for women to earn a living. 



A Public Duty. 
Frisco of the Golden State, 

Sitting by the Western sea, 
Here sweet breezes waft the freight 

Of old Ocean's melody. 

Frisco, of the nation's hope, 
You are fixed the Western star; 

Here must Virtue meet and cope 
With the reddest sins that are. 

Frisco, shake your radiant wings! 

Shake the vermin from your breast ! 
Rise ! Expose the crawling things, 

Creeping to your children's nest. 

Here let children laugh their glee, 

Growing in security; 
Golden eity bv the sea, 

Be thy name hence, Purity. 

Oust your boodlers, close red lights, 
Cleanse and save the rotting .own; 

From tarpeian rugged heights 

Cast your Ruef and Mayor down! 



T. J. M. 



MISS ROOSEVELT PHOTOGRAPHED. 

In this week's "Wasp" is reproduced a group showing 
the principal members of the Taft party with their hosts, 
during an afternoon in the Redwoods at the Sonoma Bo- 
hemian Grove. The photograph was taken by W. F. 
Street, official photographer of the North-Western Rail- 
way, and will be included in a souvenir volume that the 
Company is preparing for Miss Roosevelt and Secretary 
Taft. The persons in the group, reading from left to right, 
are: President Benjamin Ide Wheeler, of the University 
of California; Mrs. Eleanor Martin, Miss Alice Roosevell, 
Secretary Taft, Senator Clark, of West Virginia, Mr. Nich- 
olas Longworth, Mrs. Dubois, wife of Senator Dubois of 
Idaho, and official chaperone of the President's daughter. 



If some of our democratic millionaires could see the 
simple way in which the King of the Belgians lives they 
would be astonished. He rises at six o'clock and works 
two hours before breakfast, which consists of an apple, 
coarse, dry bread and a cup of tea. After a morning spent 
in transacting state business he has a plain luncheon. He 
devotes the afternoon to exercise in the open air, and 
after a dinner which would not satisfy a workingman of 
America — a plain joint, two vegetables, and a simple pud- 
ding, with which no wine is served, the King's beverage 
being filtered water — he retires to bed at an early hour. 

"Was there singing at old Gotrock's funeral?" 
"Oh, yes; a quartet sang 'Thy will oe done' while the 
relatives were laying plans to 'do' it." 




MCHAS. KLILUS & COJgJ 

&EXCLUSrVT& 

HIGH GRADE CLOTHIERS 

This Fall's Clothes we now present with new fashion 
plates (that bear the crest of originality) are so constructed 
as to give the wearer that herculean effect without the aid 
of a mattress of padding. This is Clothes Science, and will 
be appreciated by gentlemen who understand. 








ENERALLY I he memory of a ball or re- 
ception lasts Imi for a day. Societj is 
al) excitement and aniicipatiou the daj 
before the event. Next morning- the 
public, over its coffee and rolls, reads of 
the affair. Then the readers hurry to 
their daily work or go shopping, or <!<> 
a hundred different things that obliter- 
ate all thoughts of the great function. 
By dinner time no one is thinking of the affair but the 
florists and the dressmakers, who are figuring up their 
bills with the sinister purpose of mailing them bright and 
early next day to the customers who can least afford to 
pay them. The great reception given by Mrs. Eleanor Mar- 
tin to the Taft party is unique in this respect — that after 
the lapse of two weeks it is yet talked about. Stranger 
still, it is likely to be talked of for a yeai to come, for the 
memory of that much-mixed list of guests will not die. l! 
is easy enough to explain Mrs. Martin had to treat the 
affair as an official function and sink personal preferences; 
but that will not cool the heart-burnings nor salve the sore 
spots in society. As a matter of fact, there was nothing 
more official about the reception than if the enterprising 
hostess had entertained a Superior Judge of the city and 
county of San Francisco and got a brass band to play on 
the balcony while His Honor within ate a sandwich and 
drank a glass of wine. 

^5* t5* v* 

The fact that the band was from the Presidio might 
indicate that the Musicians' Union had been overlooked 
in the arrangements, but would certainly not of itself 
convert the reception into an impressive State function. 
Secretary Taft attended in the character of a plain Ameri- 
can citizen, so the plausible excuses offered for liberties 
taken with Mrs. Martin's invitation list will not suffice. 
Judge Morrow has been made the scapegoat and saddled 
with the responsibility of having excised the list. But why 
should the Judge have been selected for such a task when 
Mrs. Martin has never before had need for his services as 
a sort of judicial Greenway, to decide who's who and fit 
to shake the hands of the Secretary of War and the daugh- 
ter of a President of the United States. 

t5* ^* «5* 

The more the case is looked into the more evident it 
becomes that there was no absolute need for Mrs. Martin 
to have excluded many of her old friends while Hinging 
open the portals of her Broadway mansion to everybody 
who could reflect some of the glitter of political or financial 
notoriety. 

^5* <£• <5* 

Society is now fully agreed on that point, and also on 
the opinion that Mrs. Martin has by her latest coup estab- 
lished her position as the real leader of San Francisco 
society. A number of ambitious leaders have been coquet- 
ting with that title, but their pretensions are now brushed 
aside like cobwebs. Mrs. Martin's generalship has pui 
them all in seats away back, where they can sit down until 
she gets ready to abdicate the crown. 



Her victory is the result "l years of planning. While 
other hostesses have been wasting their energies on local 

somebodies, Mrs. Martin has made n specially of the eu- 
tertainineiii of roving diplomats and Warriors with a strong 
pull at Washington. When the real social lest came and 
the question was to lie deride, 1 who was lo entertain the 
most distinguished parly that ever visited San Francisco, 
the social prize tell into Mrs. Martin's lap like an over- 
ripe apple. It hardly needed a shake of the tree to bring 
it down, but if necessary Mrs. Martin could have bad a 
dozen brass-bound and bespurred generals, not In speak of 
colonels, majors and lieutenants, help her lo do the shak- 
ing. 

Jt .* ,< 

Mrs. Martin is one of the few prominent hostesses who 
seem to have fully realized that the most powerful influ- 
ence in social matters before many years will be the mili- 
tary element. Already it has leavened society, and ere 
long the military set is likely to thrust aside the ostenta- 
tious multimillionaire of trade and set the standard for the 
Upper Ten. In Europe that is the rule, and we are con- 
stantly adopting the social methods of the Old World. 

t5* <i5* t** 

The McAneny divorce case has all the earmarks, so to 
speak, of an affair that promises to develop into a lovely 
scandal. Seldom have I seen a ease of this sort open up 
in such a promising way for the yellow newspapers. Al- 
ready an added interest has been lent to the scandal by 
the linking of the fair plaintiff's name with that of her 
talented young attorney, Lloyd Robbins. The rumor 
comes on sturdy wings that, just as soon as Mrs. McAneny 
is free and can legally form another matrimonial alliance, 
she will become Mrs. Lloyd Robbins. Whether that be 
true or not it is a fact that Mr. Robbins has a sentimental 
interest in the case, for Mrs. McAneny 's father was the 
best friend of Mr. Robbins' father. The latter is now a 
rich man, but it is said that Mr. Mastell gave him his start 
in life, and I believe Mr. Robbins very willingly concedes 
that fact. This being so nothing is more natural than that 
Lloyd Robbins should figure as Mrs. McAneny 's champion 
in a legal battle which means so much to her. I have 
heard that the elder Robbins insisted that his son should 
take the case and thus help to pay the debt of gratitude 
which the father owes to his dead benefactor. The latter 
cannot profit by such payment, but his daughter may. All 
of which gives fresh interest to this old, old story of the 
rose of June withering in the frost of bleak Dscember. 
Mr. McAneny is 72 years old, and his wife who wants to 
shake him is'3G. That is a disparity which can hardly be 
bridged by saeks of gold or broad leagues of land. It is 
said that 'the published statements of Mr. McAneny 's 
wealth have all been ridiculously low. Shrewd business 
men declare that he is enormously wealthy, and scarcely 
knows himself how much his holdings in mines and lands 
are worth. Mrs. McAneny's attorneys will come very 
near finding out before they get through with the ease. 
An interesting statement in Mrs. McAneny's amendec" 
complaint is that her aged husband deposited ifloOO month. 
lv in a San Jose bank as her allowance for clothes. He 



The Repsold Select Vintages demonstrate the high excel- 
lence of California's wines. Inspection invited. 20 Pine 
St. 



Milk Chocolate Creams — cream center in coating of 
milk chocolate. New idea. Only at Haas' Candy Stores. 
Phelan Building and James Flood Building. 



112 



-THE WASP- 



[July 22, 1905. 



insisted, it is averred, that she should not save a cent of 
this pin-money, but spend it all on dresses and millinery. 
Oh joy! I can see the grave and learned judge listening 
to all this and the allegations of hoy, the aged hubby, 
with the essence of love in his heart changed to gail, 
choked his lovely young wife and broke her thumb, "and 
tried to get back the gifts with which he had showered her. 
It is not difficult to foresee what is gring to happen to 
multi-millionaire MeAneny's bank roll when the thought- 
ful and attentive jurist figures up with a long pencil and 
a large sheet of paper just how much alimony is necessary 
to a fair divorcee who has been voluntarily allowed $1500 
a month for clothes by her doting old hubby. The plain- 
tiff's attorneys threaten to call as witnesses a society wom- 
an to whom "for no consideration" Mr. McAneny is said 
to have given $3500, and another lady who benefited by 
his gallantry to the extent of $1500. If this threat be 
carried out the case will become almost as sensational as 
the famous Baron Von Schroeder versus John D. Spreek- 
els libel suit. 

<£* *5* t&b 

The wedding of J. Campbell Shorb and Miss O'Don- 
nell, which was celebrated Wednesday, was a very quiet 
affair. The Shorb men have not the predilection for soci- 
ety that their sisters possess, and are rarely seen at the 
gatherings of the Four Hundred. They both resemble 
their mother's side of the house, as do all the children, 
and are typically Spanish in appearance. Since the de- 
cline of the Shorb fortune — once so ample — the family 
have only entertained in a quiet way, Mrs. Shorb-Whito 
and Ethel Shorb doing the honors of the family at small 
affairs. Their sister, Mrs. Murtagh, se-dom mixes in the 
social whirl, and seems to be thoroughly domesticated. 
Miss O'Donnell is not very well known in society, though 
she was one of the members of Mrs. White's dancing 
club. 

t^» ^* t£* 

It is quite the thing these days for select little parties 
of young women to travel without chaperons, and whenever 
they come to this Coast they are pretty sure to put up at 
the Palace. Last week there were two or three of these 
coteries. Miss Eliza Prange, Mrs. Louise Roth and Miss 
Ella Myers, of Sheboygan, Wisconsin, composed the first 
group and the members of the second were Miss I. M. 
Ryan, Miss Ruth S. Lockwood, and Miss Isabel MeKenna, 
of Buffalo, New York. 

Society for the past few weeks has been all excitement 
over the rumor that an elopement was on the boards. 
That the girl who would figure as the heroine of the affair 
was no less an one than last winter's most feted and 
conspicuous debutante. The girl is beautiful and high- 
spirited, and desperately in love. The young fellow on 
whom her affection is bestowed is little more than a bo,r 
in years and an humble clerk by occupation. Hence father 
and mother M — 's objection to the match. Miss M — has 
been in love for several years. Rumor has it that during 
her recent trip abroad so love-sick was she that Italian 
palaces bored her to distraction, and even gay Paris failed 
to charm. Her heart was in far-away California. Her 
only pleasure was in buying dainty lingerie which she 
never wore, but laid aside for the happy ''some day." The 
girl's mother is a very ambitious woman, and is desirous 
that her handsome only daughter should make a brilliant 
match. Since their schooldays have the girl and the boy 
been friends, but Mrs. M. decided that a glimpse of life 
as it is lived on the Continent would effectually quench 
the young people's affection. To that end was the girl 
traveled, but to no avail, and upon her return to San 
Francisco the affair was on worse than ever. Every chance 
the young people got they were riding and driving, and 
from many a tea and luncheon did the young girl hurry 
away to enjoy a few minutes ' walk and talk with her lover. 
Society bored her even more than Europe, but to all the 
fetes and functions did her mother insist that she go. 



Occasionally did the bud rebel, and stirn mamma would 
buy her off. "If you go to Mrs. Martin's ball you may 
see A. tomorrow," for the young man is only permitted 
to enter his true love's home one evening of each week. 
Day by day the young woman has laid aside her handsome 
allowance until she has accumulated enough to purchase 
a trousseau, which she has been doing this summer. I hear 
that plans for the elopement have been taking active shape 
of late, but at last the parents have consented to give 
their blessing, and the wedding is to take place in Novem- 
ber. The family are spending the summer in the moun- 
tains, but as soon as they return to town the engagement 
is to be announced. In the meantime society breathes 
easier, as the prominence of the couple is equal to that 
of the other celebrated elopers — Daisy Parrott and Parker 
Whitney and Mai Moody and Douglas Watson. 

ti5* i5* ^* 

The exact date of the wedding of Miss Josephine de 
Guigne to the Vicomte de Tristan has not yet been de- 
cided upon by the Tristan, de Guigne and Parrott families, 
but it is supposed that it will take place some time in the 
winter. The marriage will unite two of the most aristo- 
cratic families of Southern France. Christian de Guigne 
was himself a count before he came to this country. He 
discarded his title when he became an American. I am 
told that he is more American than French now. All the 
Parrott family, I hear, prefer foreign men as suitors for 
their daughters' hands, and there is great rejoicing in the 
household over this last brilliant match. 

*5* 1£r* <£& 

Ambition was the bright and guiding star of Miss Flor- 
inne Juillerat until she met M. Gesner, when she forgot 
that the aim of her existence was to be a prima donna, 
and turned from the concert toward the altar of home. 
Her engagement to Mr. Gesner is just announced, and the 
wedding will take place in September. Miss Juillerat is 
a daughter of Mr. A. Juillerat, Secretary of the Swiss Mu- 
tual Bank of San Francisco, and a granddaughter of the 
late Andrew Pa.ultanghi. In addition to her rich contralto 
voice, the young woman is possessed of social qualities 
that make her a leader in her particular set. She has the 




That our garments nave maintained a char- 
acteristic individuality tor graceful shapeliness (and 
the retention of their shapeliness through a long 
period of service) has been due, we take it, to the 
fact that, 'while purchasing only from the very best 
of good clothes makers, we have taken the extra 
precaution to dictate the various materials that are 
used in their manufacture. 

An example -worthy of emulation by our 

competitors. 

Heller & Frank, Inc. 

Clothiers 

Market Street and Grant Ave. 






[JOLY 22. 1905 



-THE WASP 



113 



vivacity of her French ancestry, and is devoted to athl 
Bports, and is a dashing equestrienne. Mr. Gesner c 
from New York several months agvj to take the superin- 
lency of the Bay Counties Power Company. The wed- 
ding will be celebrated in the Tenth-avenue Baptist Church 
in East Oakland, and will be followed by a brilliant 1 
tion at the Berkeley home of the Juillerats. 
J* Jt J* 

Young Mrs. Elkins (nee Felton) and children an 1 visit- 
ing at the Felton home at Menlo. The beautiful residence 
was built in the days when Wm. C. Ralston was the finan- 
cial king of the Pacific Coast, and has recently been remod- 
eled and renovated, gorgeous hangings and tapestries hav- 
ing been purchased to make the house more attractive for 
the home-coming of Mrs. Elkins. It will be remembered 
that the will of Senator Elkins was the cause of much sur- 
prise when it was learned that Mrs. Elkins was left with- 
out a cent, and that the vast estate of several millions was 
equally divided among his children. 

Lieutenant Wetherill is one of the most popular army 
bachelors stationed here. He contemplates a trip to the 
beautiful country home of the Colliers at Clear Lake. 
There is not a more picturesque spot in California than 
this part of Lake county, and it would be difficult to find a 
more interesting and accomplished young lady than Mis^ 
Sarah Collier, who, with her clear-cut profile and graceful 
bearing, looks like one of Du Maimer's drawing's of the 
heroine in the most famous of his novels. Lieutenant 
Wetherill is now in command at Fort Mason during Cap- 
tain Faison's absence in the East. 

Quite a surprise was the home-coming of Mrs. Edwin 
Thayer (Miss Mabel Gunn) the other day. Few of her 
friends knew that she intended visiting her parents this 
summer, and even they did not know of her arrival till 
several days after she had arrived. The truth is that the 
long-legged bird flies even in distant Porto Rico, and Mrs. 
Thayer, like pretty Mrs. Stuart Rawlings, was warned of 
his coming and hastened to her parents' home. Mrs. 
Rawlings came away from the heart of Mexico, her hus- 
band's plantation being five days' travel by muleback from 
I he nearest railway. Mabel Gunn Thayer and her husband 
were manned quite romantically in Porto Rico last Christ- 
mas, and since then have traveled abroad. 

I&9 <4?t £* 

Miss Marian Westland of Oakland and Miss Hazel 
Hotchkiss of Berkeley, who are visiting in Scotland, had 
the good fortune to attend the reception at Holyrood Pal- 
ace, given by the Lord High Commissioner at the Geueral 
Assembly of the Church. The affair was in a measure a 
royal reception, as the King and Queen of England had 
representatives there. 

A party of physicians under the charge of Secretary 
F. H. Wigain of the American Medical Convention, which 
has just adjourned at Portland, arrived in San Francisco 
a few days ago by special Pullman and put up at the Pal- 
ace. The party left for their homes, via Los Angeles. 

(£* *5* i&* 

Mr. and Mrs. Francis Bruguiere must have slipped into 
town one dark night, for never have I chanced to see in 
any of the bavardes ' columns a single line of their arrival 
or a word of welcome at their home-coming. And yet they 
have been in San Francisco for several weeks, I hear. 
Francis is working hard in somebody's office, and pretty 
Mrs. Francis is living in the quietest manner. However 
have they escaped from the limelight that is perpetually 
streaming upon the Bruguiere family and its brilliant but 



eccentric sons! Francis Bruguiere is quite as handsome 
and as talented as his bothers, Dr. i'edar, Emile and 
Louis, and his wife has hosts of friends bete. In fact, 
•die made her home in San Francisco for sonic year.-, , lining 
which time she was a member of the Alcazar stock com- 
pany. Leila Convere was a girl of no little beauty and 
talent, and she is still a handsome and refined-looking 
young woman. The Convere family is a well-known one 
in the South, one of the Carolinas, I believe they hail 
from. So Francis did not make such a dreadful faux pas 
when he wedded the pretty young actress. The couple 
have lived in the East since their marriage, but intend to 
make their future home in San Francisco. 



It was a clever stroke on the part of Dr. and Mrs. 
Philip King Brown to name their little daughter, the first 
girl in the family, Phoebe Hearst, after the well-known 
millionaire benefactress. Mrs. Hearst has ever been the 
good angel in the Philip Brown family, for she is devoted 
to Mrs. Brown, who, as Miss Nellie Hillyer before her mar- 
riage to the clever young physician, was for some years 
Mrs. Hearst's secretarv. In that capacity she toured the 
globe with Mrs. Hearst and was quite like a daughter to 
her. Mrs. Brown is a remarkably interesting woman. She 
is very witty and has a ready gift of repartee. Dr. Brown 
has been very successful in his profession. The sanitarium 
he owns in Southern California was willed to him by a 
rich lady patient from the East who had used it as a resi- 
dence. 

^5* te* *3* 

Capitalists of this city would do well to notice the 
number of financiers from other States who are coming 
to San Francisco. Among the recent arrivals at the Pal- 
ace were J. W. Pero, a banker of Fremont, Ohio; F. 0. 
Wetmore, of the First National Bank, of Chicago; J. H. 
Black, a banker of Wichita, Kansas; F. M. Lee, a Winne- 
mucca banker; T. B. Rickey, a banker of Carson, Nevada. 
It may be that these gentlemen are traveling merely for 
the purpose of viewing the landscape and spending some 
of their surplus gold, or it may he that they are looking 
toward investing money. 

t£fr t5* ^* 

The Gordon Blandings are so wedded to Belvedere that 
they are putting up a handsome summer home there. They 
expect to be able to get into the house early in the Fall, 
when, probably, they will give a house warmine before 
closing it for the winter season. Miss Susanne Blanding 
is so fond of Belvedere that the family may, however, 
keep the place open all the year and onlv run up to town 
for entertainments of various kinds. 



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114 



-THE WASP 



[July 22, 1905. 




Moore's Poison Oak Remedy. 
Cures Poison Oak, all skin diseases. Sold by all druggists. 



Next MONDAY, July 24th 

We shall inaugurate a 

Building R^epair Sale 

Which should prove intensely interest- 
ing to every lady in San Francisco 
and vicinity. 

As a result of the fire which occur- 
red in the adjoining building on July 
5th, several of our departments were 
flooded and extensive repairs rendered 
necessary. To make room for these, 
for two weeks we will offer unprece- 
dented 

Bargains in Every Department 

Presenting an opportunity to replen- 
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at from 15 to 50 per cent less than 
regular prices. 

See Alanday papers for details 

NATHAN -DOHRMANN CO. 

122-132 Sutter Street. 



Photo by Vaughan &° Keith 

MRS. MARIAN PBNNINGTON 

The woman whose refusal to marry Beverly Letcher caused him to 
commit suicide 

As there were no society affairs of auy importance in 
Oakland this week the smart set was distinctly disappoint- 
ed not to be invited to the wedding of Miss Ella Steretl 
and Mr. Edwin Barbour, which took place at the beautiful 
home of Mr. and Mrs. George H. Wheaton, in Lake Street, 
on Wednesday evening. Mrs. Wheaton is the bride's aunt 
and really stood in place of a mother to her during the 
davs that she was a reigning belle of '.he city across the 
bay. No girl had prettier gowns than Miss Sterett, and 
no one entertained more often or in better style, but then 
the Wheatons always loved youn°- people. Mrs. Barbour 
was very pretty in her dainty white mousseline gown, with 
tulle veil and crown of orange blossoms, and her maid of 
honor, Miss Margaret Jackson, wore a white lace dress 
over pink. Two toddlers, Elizabeth and Elita Adams, act- 
ed as flower girls, and two tiny nephews of the groom 
were ribbon bearers. Mr. Barbour has erected a charming 
house in Moss Avenue where he and his bride will live 
after their return from the honeymoon tour. 

That President J. W. Byrne of the Pacific Union Club 
punched a Parisian footpad and captured the thief appears 
to be no fairy tale, although first told in the Paris edition 
of a New York newspaper. The footpad asked the time 
of day, and when Mr. Byrne took out his watch made a 
grab at it and got a good thump on the ear for his impro- 
priety. A few more well-directed jolts took all the fight. 
out of the marauder, and the gendarmes took him off to 
prison, a rather badly damaged knight of the road. To 
Mr. Byrne is largely due the credit for the present fine 
home of the Pacific Union Club. He is an enthusiastic 
golf-player, a good-looking', athletic man, whom a prudent 
footpad would rather avoid than encounter. 

The Repsold Select Vintages maintain the prestige of our 
Western wines. Inspection invited. 420 Pine St. 



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Vfe 



J 



July 22, 1905. J 



THE WASP 



115 



Soc ip is busy with the affairs of Dr. Peda 

Bruguiere and his wife, which have reached an ai 

Although there is do legal separation thi 

different households, he having a flat at Steiner and P 

Sin-cis and she with her ! old son, Pedar So 

Bruguiere Jr., living at the Hotel St. Francis. The trouble 

about a year ago the Fourth of July, when M 
Erml Bruguiere, who was summering at Santa Cruz, invit- 
ed her brother-in-law ilmvn. Soim'thini: prevented 

I '■■'l.i 1 lY.mi : 11 panying her husband and that pi 

i" be, as it turned out. very unfortunate, Staying 
Mrs. Emil was a venue girl, the step-daughter of a well 
known eandy man, and she and the susceptible doctoi 
is said, Immediately state* np an anient friendship. After 
ihe\ had returned to town the friendship continued and 
became so distasteful to Mrs. Bruguiere that she dema] 
an explanation, which the doctor was unwilling or unable 
to furnish satisfactorily, and so the separation took place. 
The doctor continues his visits to the home of the you us 
woman on Valencia Street and declares that he has a per- 
Cecl right to do so, as the physician of her lather, Mrs 
Bruguiere 's indignant female friends declare thai Ihej 
have seen him several limes sillin',' on the lawn conversing 
with the young lady, ami also observed her and a <*irl 
friend whirling round town in the doctor's automobile. It 
is also said that a sort of family excursion to Mexico is 
planned in which the doctor will play the triple idle of 
host, chauffeur, and chaperone. Things are evidently 
working up in line shape lo a divorce court denouement. 
Il would net lie a novel experience to the talented Dr. 
Pedar, as he was divorced from his first wife Madelene, 
1 hi' daughter of the late Judge McKissick. His present 
wife, whom he induced to marry him at Reno before the 
required year had expired, was a Miss Andrews, the 
daughter of a good old Southern family. She is refined. 
graeefnl and pretty, and, it is said, the doctor's mother 
has taken sides with her. 

t>* '.*?* '-^* 

I never saw Miss Leslie Green look better than she did 
last week at the luncheon given in her honor by her pro- 
peel ive mother-in-law, Mrs. H. E. Huntington, at the 
Palm Garden of the Palace. Tt is lovely the way the Hunt- 
ingtons have taken to their son's fiancee, and Miss Green 
is delighted, as anyone who looks at her happy face may 
see. There were forty guests at the luncheon, only a fen 
of whom were from Oakland and Berkeley. The decora- 
tions and service were as chic as the Valace could make 
it, and that is saying much. 

Mrs. Henry McLean Martin, whose marriage this week 
to Mr. John Dahlgren, an attorney of Washington, D. C, 
occasioned a good deal of surprise in society, is a daughter 
of the late Mrs. D. T). Colton, concerning whose property 
an item appears in another part of this paper. This is 
Mrs. Dalilgren's third marriage. Her first husband was 
Dan Cook, a wealthy mining man of San Francisco, who 
died a number of years ago. Shortly afterwards she was 
wedded to Mr. Martin, wdio lived but a short time. While 
in Washington last season Mrs. Martin met Mr. Dahlgren, 
a clever lawyer of that city, and many years her junior. 
She returned to San Francisco a month ago, and Mr. 
Dahlgren arrived a day or two before the wedding. 

t£* t5* t£» 

Miss Blanche Bates, accompanied by Ada Lewis, is 
spending her usual summer vacation here. She is at pres- 
ent visiting her old school friend, Mrs. Varney Gaskill, 
at Piedmont, and contemplates visiting several other coun- 
try homes ere the summer is o'er. After her strenuous 
winters she longs to lead the simple life and spends most 
of her time either reading or on horseback. She is a con- 
spicuous figure on the Mill Valley roads or Piedmont every 

The unusual as usual. Tom Dillon's hats, opp. Palace 
Hotel, 636 Market St. 



-ummer, riding astride. Bach year her engagement to Dick 
Mutating is rumored, and as she is again to visit his ranch 
there will doubtless he a fresh crop ..'' anticipations, and 

possibly the long-looked-for announcement. 

Miss A. la l,e«is. who is constantly seen with I 
Bates, and who appeared hen' as a member of her "Darling 

■ ■I the Gods" Co., will he remembered as lie ci 
"lough girl." Miss Lewis lias many friends here, where 
her wit and her talent as a raconteur have made her a i 

cided favorite. 

Nelson's Amycose, Infallible Remedy for Catarrh, Sore 
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116 



THE WASP- 



[July 22, 1905. 



The Italian warship, the Umbria, is back in port, and 
the officers are receiving considerable social attention 
The new commanding- officer is half American. His name 
is Di Lueea-Hennedy, for he is so proud of his American 
ancestry that he places his mother's name in the post of 
honor. His father was Consul in this country, and married 
an American woman. One of the officers of the Umbria 
is a Neapolitan prince without a son, and there are several 
counts and marquises on the Umbria. 

Edgar Saltus came, saw and was conquered by San 
Francisco. He left for the East a few days ago, but he 
vows he is coming back here to end his life and die a Cali- 
fornian. He was born in New York, has lived everywhere 
in the world, and thinks this is the most fascinating spot 
in existence. He did not go out very much while here, 
but he was given a few quiet dinners and luncheons. He 
is a very handsome, cultivated man, and is related to the 
best families in New York and Washington. 



Miss Dolph, daughter of Senator Dolph of Portland, 
Oregon, who has been the guest of Mrs. Eleanor Martin 
during the last two weeks, is visiting Mills College, where 
she was educated. It is only fair to Mrs. Mills to say 
that the girls that are her pupils never get away from her 
influence, and return to their alma mater even when they 
bring their grandchildren with them. This is simply a re- 
flection en passant and not apropos to Miss Dolph. 

i£* (5* J* 

Mr. and Mrs. Gilbert Perkins of New York are in Cali- 
fornia to attend the wedding of Mrs. Perkins' brother, 
Mr. Howard Huntington, and Miss Leslie Green. Mrs. 
Perkins is the eldest daughter of Mr. and Mrs. H. E. 
Huntington, and as Miss Clara Huntington was very popu- 
lar in San Francisco society. Her husband's health has 
been very poor of late, and there is talk of giving up their 
handsome house in Riverside Drive, New York, and moving 
to Southern California, although, as a Kentuckian, it might 
be supposed Mr. Perkins would prefer the Blue Grass 
State. 

Society across the bay was a good deal surprised at 
the announcement of Miss Edna Trethewav's engagement 
to Mr. J. Eisenbaeh, of the Wells-Fareo' Bank, of San 
Francisco. It is not that Miss Tretheway is not charming 
enough to be caught in Cupid's toils, but, although she is 
barely nineteen, she has always declared that she should 
devote her life to art, she being a musician of no mean 
ability. But the resolution of a girl's youth vanishes like 
mist before the sun, when the one man in the world comes 
along, and cards are now being prepared and will be is- 
sued ere long for the nuptials which are to take place in 
September. The bride to be is the daughter of Mr. and 
Mrs. John Tretheway of East Oakland. I understand that 
the groom is a singer of note and that their similar tastes 
and talents was what drew the couple together. 

t5* c£* t^* 

Miss Kate Condon, whose picture appears in Ibis week's 
Wasp, is receiving an ovation at the Tivoli as Flora Mac 
Donald Smith in De Koven's "Rob Roy." 

c£* c5* t5* 

Mrs. Marian Pennington, whose portrait appears in 
this number, is the woman for whom Beverly Letcher, the 
well-known clubman, killed lumself because she would not 
marry him. She is not exactly the raving beauty which 
the yellow newspapers have described her. 

Another new, dainty confection — Milk Chocolate Creams 
at Haas' Candy Stores, Phelan Building and James Flood 
Building. 



Miss Ethyl Gray, whose picture appears in this week's 
Wasp, is well known in San Francisco. She is a Pasa- 
dena belle, the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. J. P. Gray of that 
city, and will be married at the Waldorf-Astoria, New 
York, on August 9th, to Dr. David James Graham, a phy- 
sician of Edinburgh, Scotland, whom she met on her 
travels. 

Amongst the late arrivals at the Hotel Rafael are: 
From San Francisco — Mr. and Mrs. F. Serra, Mr. and Mrs. 
Hardy, Mr. and Mrs. D. Watson and children, Miss R. 
Abel, Miss R. V. Hyman t Mr. M. E. Piuekard, Mr. P. S. 
Baker, Mr. G. Sutro, Mr. M. S. Latham, Mrs. A. A. Taft, 
Miss F. Coffin, Mr. G. Hines, Mr. E. Emerson, Mr. C. Lin- 
painter, Mr. P. D. Kahn, Mr. C. E. Sehneely, Mr. M. Howe. 
Mr. J. H. Toler, Mr. B. J. Mitchell. Boston, Mass.— Mr. F. 
D. Cochrane, Mrs. J. S. Cochrane. Pasadena — Mr. LeRoy 
Leonard. Livermore — Mrs. A. L. Rosenthal. 

Arrivals at Hotel del Monte for the week ending July 
16th: Mr. and Mrs. Rudolph Spreckels and family, Dr. 
and Mrs. MacMonagle, Mrs. Joseph Donohoe and family, 
Mr. and Mrs. W. H. MeVittrick, Mr. and Mrs. Robert Ox- 
nard, J. S. Rathbone, Mr. and Mrs. Mark Gerstle, Mr. and 
Mrs. G. W. Scott, Maud C. Scott, Miss Bunker, Mr. ami 
Mrs. Adolph Roos, Lew L. Roos, Sherwood Hopkins, Miss 
Mabel L. Becker, Miss Florence Thomas, Mr. and Mrs. 
John Parrott and family, Mrs. R. H. Hayne, Robert Y. 
Hayne, Mrs. C. de Guigne, Ve. and Vtesse. de Tristan, 
Captain A. H. Payson, Mr. and Mrs. Richard Grey, Mr. 
and Mrs. E. T. Jones, San Francisco: Dr. and Mrs. H. L. 
Benepe, Mrs. Anne Gordon, Palo Alto ; Mr. and Mrs. H. S. 
Manning, H. S. Manning Jr., Russell A. Bliss, Arthur J. 
Ryan, New York. 



JL itfUttS! 



mmh-A 



DEUCHT5 THE PALATE OFA CONNOISSEUR 



A PERFECTLY PURE WHISKY DIRECT FROM KENTUCKY 



SHERWOOD &. SHERWOOD, AGENTS 




July 22, 1905.] 



'THE WASP- 



117 




MISS KATE CONDON 
Who appeared In " Rob Roy " at Tivoli this week 

A story comes to me of how Miss Patton of Washington 
met her Waterloo when she encountered General Young of 
the United States Army. General Young is well known 
here in society. The Patton girls were born here, educated 
abroad, and with their mother descended on Washington 
years ago, and proceeded to make themselves social quan- 
tities not to be ignored. They were good-looking, witty, 
sarcastic, rich, and the best "knockers" in society. The 
result was that when they were not wanted they were 
feared, and so they were not left out of any function. Their 
father originally made his money in the saloon business 
in this city. He was in touch with some prosperous mining 
men and increased his fortune by luckv speculations in 
stocks, so that the saloon no longer became a necessity to 
his existence. One of the Patton girls married Congress- 
man Glover of Missouri, and the other one became the wife 
of General Corbin. The Glover marriage was not happy, 
but now the Patton girls hold Washington society in the 
hollow of their hands, so to speak. Libel suits have been 
threatened against them by several indignant matrons, but 
without effect. Not long since one of the Patton girls met 
General Young at dinner and menaced him continually 
with, "I know something about you, and I'm going to tell 

FAT FOLKS. 
I reduced my weight seventy pounds, bust six inches, 
waist six inches and hips fourteen inches in a short time 
by a guaranteed harmless remedy without exercise or 
•tarving. I will tell you all about it. Enclose stamp. Ad- 
dress Mrs. E. F. Richards, 226 E. Ninth St., Riverside. Ca. 



it." General young bad an unhappj dinner hour, for, 
like most men, there were several things In- recalled that 

the young lady might explode, and so bef 

gentlemen for black coffee be took her aside and - 

•■Mi-s Patten, l.-i me iriv<- you a bit of warning. Ii .,■ 
ever explode anything about me, or I hear of you saying 
anything about me, at the nexl dinner when we meel 
tell the story of the water-front saloon vour father used 
to keep in San Francisco." Alt.,- that Miss Patton wi 
heard to remark that General Voting was a charming man. 
01 Jl Jt 
There has been some criticism of the small bequest of 
one thousand dollars left by Mrs. Col ton to her great- 
grandchild Saeher. It was not unexpected by those who 
knew the history of the Colton family. The child that has 
been given such a small legacy is the gandchild of Mrs. 
Colton's daughter who married Crittenden Thornton, the 
well-known lawyer. Mrs. Colton and Mr. Thornton did not 
get on very well together, and the mother-in-law showed 
much less regard for her Thornton grandchild than for 
the offspring of her favorite daughter, Mrs. McLean Mar- 
tin. Mrs. Thornton died and that severed all relations be- 
tween Crittenden Thornton and his mother-in-law. His 
daughter Helen married Siegfried Saeher, an opulent 
Jewish banker of Berlin, and it is his child who has re- 
ceived such a pittance that a contest of Mrs. Colton's will 
is expected. Aside from her feelings to Crittenden Thorn- 
lon, it is thought that the great wealth of Banker Saeher 
influenced Mrs. Colton to cut off the Saeher child and en- 
rich the descendants of Mrs. McLean Martin. 

&5* ^* t^* 

Crittenden Thornton, who married one of the Colton 
girls, was then a young and handsome lawyer with bright 
prospects. His family was a distinguished Southern one 
and his father was a Supreme Court Justice of California. 
Miss Colton was a handsome woman and the marriage 
seemed ideal, but it did not realize the expectations of the 
young couple's friends. The antagonism between his 
mother-in-law and Mr. Thornton was a matter of notoriety, 
and that it left its impression on the mind of Mrs. Colton 
appears to be shown by her bequest of only one thousand 

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118 



-THEWASP- 



[July 22, 1905. 




Mrs. Payne Whitney, who was Miss Helen Hay. 
daughter of the late John Hay, was, before her marriage 
three years ago, a writer of considerable merit. Her talent 
ran to poetry, and she contributed largely to leading mag- 
azines, besides having two books published. She is a 
plump woman of medium height, with a dark sparkling 
face, and merry, unaffected ways. She and her husband 
had just sailed for Europe before the Secretary's death. 
Payne Whitney is a son of the late William C. Whitney's 
first wife and a grandson of the late Senator Payne of 
Ohio and nephew of Col. Oliver Payne, with whom he 
made his home after his mother's death. It is probable 
that Mr. Whitney, who is Colonel Payne's favorite nephew, 
will inherit the bulk of his property, he being unmarried. 



. Photoby Bushnell 

MRS HERSCHEI. MAYAI.L 

Who left tne stage because it was unreal 

dollars out of her large estate to Crittenden Thornton's 
grandchild. 

To many of the present generation of society people the 
name Colton means nothing. To the past generation it 
meant a great deal, for the Coltons were amongst the most 
powerful of Californian society, and, financially speaking, 
Daniel C. Colton, the heir of the house, was the partner 
of Stanford, Crocker, Huntingdon and Hopkins in their 
great railroad and land enterprises. He was the showy 
man of social culture, who handled Congressional Com- 
mittees and wined and dined important stockholders and 
all other people who required skillful handling. He divided 
his time between Washington and San Francisco, where 
he lived in expensive style in the white house on Califor- 
nia St., opposite Hopkins Institute, which has been copied 
in so many modifications in San Francisco home architect- 
ure. His death was rather sudden and had some of the 
features of mystery. He was a tall, handsome, blonde man 
and reputed to be an admirer of the fair sex, and this led 
to the sensational rumor that he had been stabbed. The 
report given out officially was that he had been hurt by 
] lis horse while riding. The real cause of the secrecy 
thrown around his sick-bed was that the finances of the 
railroad company were in a critical condition at the time, 
and as he was an important member of the directory it 
was feared that reports of his fatal illness might cause a 
disastrous break in the Central Pacific stocks. Mr. Colton 
was undoubtedly a man of great ability, and in fact sel- 
dom have so many sagacious and successful men been as- 
sociated in a single enterprise as were united in the man- 
agement of the Central and Southern Pacific railroads in 
early days. 

Go to Swain's dining-room, aoo Post street, near Grant 
avenue, for a fine lunch or dinner - 



THE BUCKINGHAM 

Sutter St., near Mason 



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American or European plan, I to 8 room apartments, with 
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San Francisco 






July 22, 1905.] 



-TtlEWASP- 



119 




housewife — (hat is a different story. She 1 

deal more money now than heat husband the 

financial Btandpoini the man who made hei pi inallj 

can be ol no further use to her. Ii is an except ional ai 
who tails to take critical note of Bticb things. The Ki 
England h;i> been 1 >K-;isi-«1 to say complimentarj thin 
herself and her acting; and that being sn. England al 
enl is ai her feet. She enjoys the English mode 
and plays golf a great deal and goes in for outdoor amuse- 
ments generally. 

i5* 0* t % 

A woman lias no social standing al Newport, no matter 

how big her bank account may be, unless she can h lie 

an automobile as well as the most skillful chauffeur. So 
much time is devoted to this sport thai those who prefer 
other amusements complain thai they arc left oul in the 
cold. "Learn to run an autocar." answer the belles, secure 
in their use of the smartest name for the chug-chug wagon. 
The latest fad in Newport is a woman's automobile club, 
which the men are dead against, as they say things are bad 
enough now, when every woman in town hides her face 
behind an auto mask from morn to midnight. 

«^* i£fii t£* 

I wonder what the Puritans, from which the aristocracy 
of America sprang, would think of the modern bride's 
hosiery? Smiling Cupids, resembling dimpled, cooing babes, 
meander up and down the silken curves or peer 1 from gar- 
lands of roses, orange blossoms, or lilies of the valley 
which entwine the fair ones' ankles. Cupid hosiery is not 
new, however. Like manv a better and many a worse thing, 
it is borrowed from the coquettish Marie Antoinette, of 
whom the Puritans would have expected just "such do- 



Carpets cleaned. City Steam Carpet Beating ad Ren- 
ovating Works, Geo. H. Stevens, Manager, 38 Eighth St. 
New No. 70 Eighth St. Phone, South 250. 



Photo it Tabcr 

HKRSCFIH1. MAYAH 

An actor of National reputation, in "The Christian" 

There would be fewer robberies of wedding gifts if our 
belles could make up their minds to follow the new custom 
of Paris, and place the valuables in glass cases. It is 
asserted by the French that all objects, from diamond 
tiaras to cut-glass dishes look better from the vantage 
ground of a case. Then they are not so shopworn when 
the owner gets them home, and it is not necessary to resort 
to the unpleasant expedient of hiring detectives to guard 
the valuables. American society deems the glass ease too 
shoplike for the drawing-room, however, so they will prob- 
ably employ the old methods. Well, "you pays your money 
and you takes your choice." 

x£fc t£& £n 

Nat Goodwin announces that he is going to try to lure 
his wife back to San Francisco, and with that object in 
view he is buving real estate here. Mrs. Goodwin likes 
San Francisco, for it is one of the cities where she is 
received socially. Those who know the couple well say 
that the genial Nat will have to do something besides buy- 
ing real estate in this thriving burg to induce his beautiful 
wife to locate here. She has been soaring up to a great 
height in the theatrical world of late, and is a star of sueh 
exalted altitude that theatrical astronomers, like Ashton 
Stevens, have as hard a time finding flaws in her as in 
locating spots on the sun. She no doubt has a great regard 
for Nat, but to come home and settle down like a plain 



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S. P. Ferry Boats, Union League Club, 
Jefferson Square Club, Red Lion Grill, 
Cafe Richelieu, Transportation Club, 
and other first class resorts : : : : 

FRED. M. BOEHM, Sole Agent Pacific C.i.t 
Ph.no Polk 3093 915 Eddy St. San Francisco 



J, W Davis 
Fennitnore 



^^fe^ 




If we make your 
Glasses once we know 
you'll be a life -long 
customer. With our 
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your sight and have 
comfort and style com- 
bined. 



120 



-THE WASP 



[July 22, 1905. 




Leading Hotels 



COOL AND CALM IN A LION'S DEN 
How would you like her for your mother-in-law 



When royalty entertains the invitations are sent out by 
the Lord Chamberlain, and are really orders to be present. 
These bids are not to be lightly treated, and must not be 
refused, excepting for the gravest reasons. Invitations to 
the garden party given by King Edward and Queen Alex- 
andra of Great Britain in honor of their nieee and the 
Swedish Prince were sent out only ten days ahead of the 
affair. They were very plain, being in the form of large, 
oblong white cards, having on the top a golden crown and 
a monogram, also in gold, of "E" and "A" intertwined, 
with an "R" in the center. Underneath was printed in 
black: "The Lord Chamberlain is commanded by Their 
Majesties to invite (here the names of the guests were 
written) to an Afternoon Party, on Wednesday, the four- 
teenth of June, 1905, from 4 :30 to 7 'clock. ' ' In the left- 
hand corner of the card appeared the words "Windsor 
Castle," and in the right-hand corner was printed "morn- 
ing dress." On the back of the card were directions as 
to special trains, etc., and each guest was provided with a 
pass in the shape of a small card with his or her name 
written on it, and on the top the same gold crown as on 
the large cards. Beneath appeared in black lettering 
"Windsor Castle, June 14th, 1905," and at the foot of the 
card the sig-nature, also printed: "Pembroke and Mont- 
gomery, Lord Steward." The garden party was the day 
before the royal wedding, and although no crowned head 
was among the guests the company was exceedingly smart. 
Among the notables present were the Archbishop of York, 
conversing with the Duchess of Montrose; the Chinese Am- 
bassador and Mrs. Chang in the brilliant costume of he? 
native land : the Maharanee of Baroda, a piquant little 
Indian woman, gowned in embroidered and silver-powdered 
gauze, with a long veil draped over her smooth, dark hair ; 
Lady Howe, dressed in black lace, in her Bath chair; the 
Chief Rabbi, in a dark suit ; Sir Ernest Cassel ; the Poet 
Laureate and Lord Colchester; a group of Japanese offi- 
cers in their dark-green, gold-braided uniforms; a Labor 
member, wearing a billycock hat. Besides these pictur- 
esque personages there were a number of smart society 



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A QUIET HOME CENTRALLY LOCATED 

GEORGE WARREN HOOPER, Manager 



IF YOU want real 
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Cor. Pine and Taylor Streets 

MRS. W. M. DENVER 

PROPRIETOR 



HOTEL BALTIMORE 

1015 Van Ness Avenue 

An American plan hotel conducted especially for families desiring ac- 
commodations for the season or by the year, situated in the most 
fashionable section of the city. Fully equipped with all modern 
conveniences. Comfortable sunny rooms with delightful outlook 
elegantly furnished and appointed. 

C. F. BUCKLEY, Jr., 

Manager. 



SAN MARCO HOTEL- 

5S6 taylob ST., Between Geary and Post 



A new modern fire-proof family and tourist hotel. 52 
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Marco will compare favorably with any select family hotel. 

GEO. J. CASANOVA, Manager. 



HOTEL RAFAEL 

Fifty minutes from San Francisco. Twenty-five trains daily each way 
OPEN AI.I, THE YEAR 

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Fine Goods a Specialty. Merchants' hot lunch from 1 1 a. m. to 
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HANDSOMEST CAFE IN AMERICA 

Open all night. .09* Private Dining Rooms for Indies and Escorts 

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CHARLES HILDEBRBCHT, Mjr. 



Getting the drop on bad luek or adverse condition in 
life should be the common aim of everybody. An invest- 
ment in the CONTINENTAL BUILDING AND LOAN 
ASSOCIATION of 301 California St. is one of the best 
ways of annihilating old adversity. 






J0LY 22, I905.] 



THE WASP- 



121 




Photo by Bellt-Oudry 

MISS WINIFRED S. HUSTED 
A popular Piedmont girl who will be a July bride 

women in exquisite gowns, the cost of which were secrets 
between the dressmakers and their clients. Queen Alex- 
andra wore her favorite mauve gown, with a rope of 
pearls and a few amethysts. King Edward and the gentle- 
men of his suite were in light gray morning dress. The 
royal procession entered the garden after the guests were 
assembled. In the line were the King, Queen, members of 
the royal family and the house party. The Duchess of 
Portland, Mistress of the Robes, was greatly admired. She 
is a beautiful woman, tall, graceful and dignified, and was 
gowned in cream lace, with a pale-blue picture hat. Lady 
Ludlow, like the Queen, wore mauve, with hat and parasol 
to match. Lady Garioch was in brown, and Lady Algernon 
Gordon-Lenno looked very smart in black gauze, with a 
black hat on her pale, golden hair. Mrs. Faber, a sister 
of the Countess of Montrose, was charmingly gowned in 
cream lace over pale pink, with a hat to match and a pale 
pink feather boa. Altogether, the costumes were very 
much what fashionable Califoruians would wear to a gar- 
den party. The dwellers on the Pacific Coast, however, 
would have a "fete champetre" — nothing as common as a 
garden party for them, thank you. Refreshments were 
served in several large tents, and in the orangery, which 
proved the favorite place because the champagne (lowed 
freely, the fruit was fine, and there was plenty of room. 
The King and Queen mingled freely with t.btir guests, 
which, as they had invited them, was not, after all, so 
condescending. 

^* ^% cJ/* 

Congressman Longworth, who was so attentive to Miss 
Roosevelt during her" recent visit, occupies much the same 
position in Cincinnati that James D. Phelan does here, 
only that he is more powerful in politics, and even richer. 

CALIFORNIA SOUVENIR. 
A handsome present for Eastern friends — Townsend's 
California Glace Fruits in fire-etched and hand-painted 
boxes. 767 Market street, San Francisco. 



His aifltere married French noblemen. The Longworths 

ni'ver acknowledged On- Ziuinieniiaiis socially until Helen 
married (he Duke of Manchester. Tin >u|ile were 

invited to the wedding breakfaBl of Miss Longworth and 
her French husband, but as they were not placed at the 
table of honor, they left in a huff and Cincinnati had some- 
thing to talk abont for a tew days. It is thought Congi 
man Lonfrwortb will win Miss Roosevelt. 



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Geo. Britner, Proprietor 



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Vegetables, Eggs and Butter direct from the interior 
Catering to Select Family Trade a Specialty 




THEO. QIER CO., Distributors 

San Francisco Oakland 



122 



-THE WASP 



[July 22, 1905. 




MRS. COLLINS NO. 2 
Latest portrait of the young woman who has fled with bigamist Collins 

"Billy" Gorham, as every one eal's him, behind his 
back if not openly, is the president of the Alameda Town 
Council and also occupies the same official position toward 
the Gorham Rubber Company. Mr. Gorham is very pop- 
ular, as the conferring- of the nickname indicates. He has 
been in business for only a few years, but he is already 
very prosperous, and is likely to be a millionaire before- 
many years more. No one begrudges him his good fortune. 
As a motorist he is not quite so lucky. He came near bid- 
ding farewell, however, to this gay world on the occasion 
of the great water carnival and land parade that marked 
the celebration of the Fourth in Alameda. Mr. Gorham 
had planned to capture the prize for ihe best decorated 
automobile. He erected an immense structure supported 
by a gas pipe fifteen feet high screwed into the floor of his 
auto. From this depended a voluminous structure of wire, 
gauze and tissue paper in the form of a great hoop skirt, 
and the whole was decorated with numerous paper lanterns. 
The day parade was all right, but when the ambitious mot- 
orist tried to light up for the evening spectacle, one of the 
lanterns caught fire and soon the whole towering struct- 
ure was in a blaze. Mr. Gorham managed by some heroic 
work to unscrew the iron mast and throw the structure 



If you must drink, why not have the best? "Puck 
Rye" is second to none on the market. Try it. 



overboard, but not before he was severely burned. The 
thought of the gasoline reservoir beneath the machine 
doubtless accelerated his speed considerably. When he 
east over the blazing hoop skirt it ignited the draperies 
around the body of the machine, and they burned up, 
scorching off the paint and varnish. The consensus of 
opinion was that he should have had a special prize for 
the best display of fireworks. 

^V c5% t5* 

Too many cooks spoil everything they cook. 

Cd5* Iff* c£* 

Not to know "Freddie" Morton of the Horse Guards 
is to argue one's self unknown in London's fashionable 
set. The young officer is the especial pet of the numerous 
duchesses on the "tight little, right little island, "and the 
Duchess of Devonshire sent him an invitation recently at 
Devonshire House at which the King and Queen were 
guests. The invitation was sent through a mistake to the 
wrong club, and reached the hand of another Frederick 
Morton, who is an octogenarian, very short-sighted and 
equally short-tempered. As the old gentleman had not been 
out for twenty years in society he nearly dropped dead at 
such a mark of attention, but, recalling the fact that he \vas 
once a famous beau, he made up his mind to gratify the 
Duchess by appearing at her party. When he arrived he 
found himself in a land of strangers, for not a single per- 
son was known to him. After a time Queen Alexandra 
noticed the old man wandering about, gloomy and neglect- 
ed, and said to her hostess: "Who is that dejected old 
gentleman? He does not seem to speak to any one." The 
Duchess thereupon went up to her guest, not knowing in the 
least who he was, and said: "You do not seem to know 
many people here." "No," snorted the octogenarian, 
"and by the looks of them I do not miss much." Then turn- 
ing on his heel, and striding past the astonished Queeu and 
Duchess, he left the house. 

op* ,£* &5* 

Mr. and Mrs. Walter Dean and Miss Dean are living 
very quietly this summer at the Hotel Rafael, for they are 
in mourning for Mrs. Dean's mother. Thev will remain in 
this State for some time before going abroad again. Miss 
Dean has become very much interested in singing. Last 
winter she studied in New York with Miss Lillie Lawlor, 
who, by the way, has sailed for Europe. Miss Lawlor did 
pretty well last season in New York. Mr. Whitelaw Reid 
and Mrs. Lounsbery had her sing at their receptions. 




Pierce-Rodolph Storage Co., Inc. 

STORAGE, MOVING, PACKING AND SHIPPING 



Warehouse: Eddy Street, Near Fillmore 

Specially Built for the Storage of Household Furniture 
MAIN OFFICE, Eddy Street, Near Fillmore : : Phone West 828 



July 22, 1905 ] 



THE WASP 



123 



Mrs. Klilm Root, wife of 1 cretarj oi 

ol at all pleased, il is said, at the honor the 
has dune her husband. She fairly hi 
gather with its lav and traditions, its pomp and 
and Washington society in its turn shrugs 
shoulders and, u is -aid, shudders at the I ,| so 

straight-laced a lady leading the Cabinet circli 
course the presence of Mrs. Charles Warren Fairbanks 
wife of the Vice-President, will make Mrs. Hunt's position 
a much less important one than was held by Mrs. B 

when there was no Vice-President. It President R velt 

would do as his society friends in Washington wish he 
wuiild appoint only such men to the Cabinet as can and 
to the social lustre of the capital by possessing wive- 
are well instructed in the etiquette required in their posi 
tin,,. The working of this rule, however, would have elim- 
inated several of Mr. Roosevelt's Cabinet. 

*5* .3? Jt 
Miss Pearl Landers, to whom Joe Eastland has been 30 
attentive this summer, has had more than one woman's 
share of offers of marriage from wealthy young men with 
glittering prospects. Her first fiance was Harry Scott, 
the scion of a distinguished and influential family. The 
Whittell family would have been delighted to have seen 
the erratic heir to their large fortune lead Miss Landers 
to the altar, but she said nay to the program, and the man- 
ly but headstrong George sought consolation for his dis- 
cardment in a marriage with a fascinating young beauty 
of the stage. His name has been noticeably missing of 
late from the newspaper reports of court proceedings, so 
that the inference is reasonable that marriage has toned 
down the exuberance of his youthful spirits. The under- 
standing is that if young Mrs. Whittell can keep her hus- 
band within bounds for a year the doors of the paternal 
mansion will swing open to her for good and all. It is a 
prize, social and financial, that is well worth an earnest 
effort. Miss Landers' latest suitor has advantages over 
his predecessors, for his fortune is not prospective, but 
actual. His wife will not be subject to the whims of any 
parent-in-law, for he is in full possession of his estate. 
The late Mrs. Joe Eastland was a very handsome and at- 
tractive woman whose personality so impressed local so- 
ciety that she is still spoken of in teims of the highest 
praise. She left many handsome jewels to her sons. Tom 
Eastland bestowed his share on his handsome wife, who 
was Miss Helen Wagner. By the way the Tom Eastlands 
enjoyed very much their honeymoon visit to the Parke 
Whitnevs in Maine this summer. 

A bon mot of R. P. Hobson of kissing fame is beinn- told 
in the Eastern clubs. Some one complimented the naval 
hero on his bravery. Hobson replied that he was not en- 
titled to praise; "but," said he. "if you want an example 
of coolness and bravery under trying circumstances, you 
should hear of a friend of mine. He was in love with a very 
beautiful widow, and, sitting beside the fire one evening, 
he proposed to her. 'Don't make me answer immediate- 
ly,' said the fair one; 'give me a little time.' 'Very 
well,' said the suitor; 'how much time do you want." 
'Say half an hour,' said the widow. 'All right,' agreed 
the man; 'I'll just run around the corner and get a shave 
while you make up your mind.' He did not get the widow." 

Mrs. Lilian Ferguson of the Examiner staff is spending 
her vacation at Monterey, Pacific Grove and Santa Cruz, 
and is employing the time while she is resting in corre- 

Tbe poet Gray said, "The path of glory leads but to 
the grave." We in San Francisco have found it takes a 
different course — it leads us to the California Market, 
where we get fresh oysters daily, shipped from beds where 
they are raised from true Chesapeake seed ; such stock is 
nowhere else in this city to be obtained. Moraghan is the 
purveyor. 



Bponding with her paper. There are plenty of tales 
summer resorts that Mrs. Ferguson has not touched upon— 

perl, tips because she does not care 1., tell them over her 
signature. Mrs. Ferguson is a forceful and bright writer, 
and is doing splendid work along ber especial lines, eve.n 
,1 -in. win ,„, 1 i,it upon people's foibles. 

That a dug may he a pari of a link and yel not he a 
sausage, has been proved by Miss Van Alen of New 5 ork, 
who has dune awaj with her hoy caddie and replaced him 
with her favorite Scotch terrier which appears on the goll 
links dressed in a light leather harness, corresponding ill 
shade to his mistress's costume. To the strap across his 
hack is attached a bag big enough in hold six or eight 
clubs, and t'r.mi his neck is suspended a pouch for the 
halls. The collie follows at Miss Van Alen's heels, reads 
to provide putter, driver or lifter as ihe occasion demands, 
lie is also I rained to retrieve, and so quick of eye and So 
intelligent is he thai the fail has I ,, taken up by a num- 
ber of leaders. The collie waves his tail in satisfaction 
whenever he has followed the flight of a ball and laid it 
at his mistress's feet, and he is even said to show his ap- 
preciation when his side wins. It is not on record, how- 
ever, that he makes any remarks on the game. 

*3* ^* t?* 

Newport is looking forward to a visit in August from 
Consuelo. Duchess of Marlborough, and her two sons. It 
is reported every summer that the Duchess will honor New- 
port with her presence, and as inevitably the story proves 
to be untrue. This year there is authentic confirmation of 
the rumor, and it is stated that the daughter of the Vander- 
bilts desires to give her sons an idea of what the United 
States is like. Possibly it is just as well for them to have 
a speaking acquaintance with some of the millionaire 
youngsters, who may he of infinite interest to them in the 
future. The Duke will not be one of the party, and the 
visit will be a very brief one, probably not longer than a 
fortnight, certainly not more than a month. 

Knowing physicians prescribe Abbott's Angostura Bitters lo tone 
up the system— they know Abbott's will meet every requirement. All 
druggists. 



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124 



THE WASP- 



[JUI.Y 22, I905. 




Photo by Bellc-Oiidry 

MISS FI.ORINNE JOILLERAT 

A talented singer whose engagement is announced 

This summer, more than ever, the three-quarter-length 
coat is being worn, and Mrs. Clement Tobin and her 
mother, Mrs. de Sabla, are both wearing the three-quarter 
grey garment. Mrs. Joe Howell looks very smart in a 
three-quarter-length new blue coat. Mrs. Henry Kierstedt 
comes up occasionally from Monterey to the city, and she 
has been wearing a very smart dark blue grenadine frock. 
She still sticks to her favorite color, blue. Her mother, 
Mrs. McBreen, often runs down to Monterey to see her. 

t£7* c5* **5* 

Miss Lulu Pfizer, the beautiful Brooklyn girl who is the 
protege of the Princess von Hatzfeldt, adopted daughter of 
the late Collis P. Huntington, has stirred London society 



by the announcement of her engagement to Captain Spen- 
cer E. Holland, an aid-de-camp to his Royal Highness the 
Duke of Connaught, and who, although he has no title 
and no expectation of one, is one of the smartest men in 
London. Miss Pfizer is an heiress, being the granddaughter 
of Charles Pfizer, head of a chemical house in New York. 
Her parents, Mr. and Mrs. Charles Pfizer Jr., of Brooklyn, 
have never met their future son-in-law, but they will have 
that pleasure when they go across the Atlantic in October, 
however, to the wedding. Miss Pfizer has a flat in the heart 
of fashionable London, where, under the wing of the Prin- 
cess Hatzfeldt, she has given very smart parties. She is 
not the first one of the family to marry well up in the social 
scale, for her father's sister is the wife of the Austrian 
Baron Von Eeht. 

Miss Helen Gould is to construct a large addition to 
the navy branch of the Y. M. C. A., in Brooklyn, at a 
cost of half a million. When the noted philanthropist 
found that many tars are turned away nightly for want 
of room she decided to add to the sleeping accommodations. 

While the young Duchess of Roxeburghe, who was Miss 
May Goelet, is steadily growing in favor with King Ed- 
ward, her mother-in-law, the dowager Duchess, is non 
persona grata with the monarch. Like many another old 
woman, the dowager Duchess of Roxeburghe, it is said, 
has an unfortunate faculty of speaking her mind in and 
out of season. She was an intimate friend of the late 
Queen Victoria, and never liked the Prince of Wales. Of 
course, now that the Queen is dead and the Prince is King 
things are different. The sovereign pays marked attention 
to the American Duchess, even to the exclusion of the 
Duke's mother. For instance, to a, recent court function 
the dowager Duchess received no card of "command." 
She waited patiently for a day or two after the invitations 
were out, and then wrote to the Earl of Clarendon, whose 
unhappv fate it is to command the royal wishes. "I am 
sure there must have been some mistake," said the Duch- 
ess, "as I have not yet received the command to attend 
His Majesty's reception." The Earl replied: "I find that 
there is no mistake, dear Duchess, much as I regret it." 




TKis is tKe proper Panel Boot 
Victoria.. ? ? We ha.ve them. 

Fifty Pony Vehicles in Stock. 

* <gTTTT>ERATCBR 
BBOS.fPMPANV 

Market and Tenth Streets 



July 22, 1905.] 



•THE WASP 



125 




PRINCE AND PRINCESS GUSTAVUS ADOLPBDS 
King Edward's niece who wedded heir to the Swedish throne 

Of all her relatives the favorite of the Duchess of Marl- 
borough appears to be her young brother, Harold Vander- 
bilt, who is still an undergraduate at Harvard. Each sum- 
mer he runs across to England for his vacation, spending 
the time with his sister in London and Blenheim, and some- 
times accompanying her to the Continent. He made the 
trip across the Atlantic recently and joined the Duchess 
at Sunderland House, London. It is said that the Duchess 
sympathizes with her brother in his admiration for Miss 
Violet Cruger, with whom his engagement has been repeat- 
edly announced and as repeatedly denied. New York soci- 
ety construes these denials to mean that the couple are 
not vet of age to enter upon the serious matters of life, 
and it expects to hear a formal announcement after Harold 
has been graduated. He is the quietest of the Vanderbilts, 
and has stood by his mother, Mrs. Oliver Belmont, rather 
than his father, William K. Vanderbilt. Unlike his broth- 
er, Willie K. Jr., and his cousins, Cornelius, Alfred and 
Reginald, he has shown no sporting proclivities, rather 
taking after his uncles, George and Fred Vanderbilt. 

t£v t£fr t&* 

It will be strange if the fashionable marriages in the 
fall are not "picture weddings," which have such a vogue 
in London and New York. California brides and their 
comely attendants should have no trouble in presenting 
living* pictures copied from the Greuze paintings, which are 
generally taken as the models. Miss Park Lyle, a fashion- 
able English maid, whose marriage in London was attended 
by royalty, was attired in a white mousseline gown, almost 
exactly the same as that of the chief figure in a Greuze 
painting. Eight charming little girls, dressed in similar 
style and bearing garlands of crimson blossoms, clustered 



around the English bride in tin- -aim- waj a 1 the 

picture grouped about the central figure. 

1 mperor William is alive to the importance "t tl 
erican dollar. Nol only is he himself affable i" people 
from the United States, bul be is always impressing upon 
his statesmen and big merchants the advisability ol 
ing them every inducement to visit Germany. Man; 
this side id' tlir Atlantic received invitations in sviti 
the presentation of the Kaiser's cup for the transatlantic 
yachl lair, li was arranged thai Priace Henry should 
act as host to several American friends to whom he pro- 
i '■ i-i ■• I i" show the country from an automobile. Mrs. Rob- 
erl Goelet's program included the reception on the yacht 
Xahina of Emperor William. Prince von Buelow and Am- 
bassador and Mis. Tower. Mrs. Tower is. by the way, a 
Californian, her former home having been in Oakland. 

Miss Charlotte Wilson and her sisler Emily are, to- 
gether with their mother, visiting their many friends at 
their different country homes. Owing to their father's 
death the Wilsons will not go out at all next season. This 
will be a disappointment to their friends, for these young 
ladies have the reputation of being "the jolliest girls iu 
society." They are amiable to a degree; nothing ever 
ruffles them, and they do not appear to lie awake nights 
worrying themselves about "class distinctions." 




Photo by Taber 



MISS ETHYL GRAY 
A Pasadena belle who will soon become a bride 



126 



THE WASP 



[JUI.Y 22, 1905. 









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r.ORD CURZON'S STUDY AT SIMLA 



The society reporters of New York give William Wal- 
dorf Astor no rest or peace. Now they say that with all 
his experience in English ways Mr. Astor has not learned 
that one of the unpardonable social sins over there is to in- 
sist upon the members of a house party appearing at 
breakfast. Every one who goes to Cliveden, the reporters 
say, must be in the dining-room promptly for the first meal 
of the day, or else he or she has to reckon with an offended 
host. After luncheon, which is also a stiff meal, the guests 
are driven — or, perhaps, dragged would be a better word — 
to the river, where they board the steam launch, "Mar- 
guerite," and go for a six-mile trip on the water. This 
part of the excursion is as cheerful as a sail on the Stvx 
with old Charon at the helm and heading for Hades. There 
are those who would like to stroll back from the river to 
the house through the picturesque woods, but Mr. Astor 
frowns on all such doings, and the party is accordingly 
packed in brakes and whisked home to dinner. The host 
never permits a visitor to get away from being entertained, 
it is said, and very few persons, we are told, ever accept 
a second invitation. That is very remarkable. One would 
think the pleasure of being bullied and bandied around 
by one of the richest men in the world would more than 
console them for all their woes. Astor, if as bad as the re- 
porters say, is still some distance behind James Gordon 
Bennett of the New York Herald as an eccentric host. It 
is of record, and written by an ex-guest of that distinguish- 
ed publisher, that on a trip in the Mediterranean Mr. Ben- 
nett, pistol in hand, chased his guests round the yacht 
on several occasions to enliven the after-dinner tedium of 
the voyage. Well-meaning but over-effusive hosts, whose 
invitations are rarely accepted a second time, are more 
common than many people imagine. 



It must be that Miss Helen does not care for the airs 
and graces of her exquisite brother-in-law, the Count de 
Castellane, for she is one member of the family who 
does not spend a portion of the year abroad. By the way, 
the Count gave a soiree in Paris a short time ago that set 
even that extravagant capital talking. The gardens were 
lighted with Chinese lanterns, and sprays of electric light 
were thrown over the trees, while immense illuminated 
silken balloons, held by gold and silver cords, floated over- 
head. The interior of the house, it is said, was magnificent 
and the display of flowers simply wonderful. It must be 
so, for it made the Parisians fairly gasp. Gorgeous tap- 
estries lined the walls, and each piece of furniture was a 
work of art. Those who attended "were as brilliant as 
the setting." This is a matter of course. Diplomats, 
princes, the nobility of Prance, Americans of distinction — 
in short, everybody of any importance was there. The 
Countess de Castellane is very proud of her little sons, 
who were dressed that night in white satin as pages. Lit- 
tle Boni de Castellane, who is a manly chap, ten years old, 
won the 300-yards handicap at the annual children's day 
races at the Paris Polo Club recently, and bore off a calen- 
dar in a silver frame and a pair of silver candlesticks. 
He was lustily cheered, and the ladies present kissed and 
complimented him upon his victory. 

Entre Nous. 



"Do you sometimes have thoughts," asked the soul- 
ful young thing, "that are absolutely unutterable?" 

"I do, miss," answered the old poet. "And sometimes 
when I am discing for a rhyme that won't come I have 
thoughts that are absolutely unprintable." 






July 22, 1905 




Postd for ThiUasp 



OPHELIA. 



California Photo-Engraving Co. 



128 



-THE WASP 



[July 22, 1905. 




Pkvtoby W. F. Street 



A MEMORY OF THE TAFT PARTY 
The Secretary, Miss Roosevelt and Mis. Martin in the Redwoods on a hot day 



Celebrities At Home 

INo. 17 



An. Earnest Woman Who Hopes to See All Her Sex in Politics 



THE growing importance of women's clubs in 
the world and the avowed intention of the 
"gentle sex" to invade all fields of industry 
and politics, makes the expression of a rep- 
resentative club woman of more than ordin- 
ary interest. Such an one is Mrs. John F. 
Swift, President of the Daughters of the 
American Revolution and a leading member of the Cen- 
tury Club, perhaps the most exclusive organization of 
women in San Francisco. When a representative of the 
"Wasp" called on Mrs. Swift at her charming home, 
824 Valencia Street, the busy clubwoman was not re- 
covered from a severe cold contracted in Portland, where 
she was in attendance on the convention of the Suffragists. 
She was lying on a couch in the library on the second 
floor and chatted from her rest of pillows. Mrs. Swift is 
a beautiful woman, with silvery-white hair drawn from 
the face and piled high on the head in a style which re- 
minds one of the portraits of Marie Antoinette. The sug- 
gestion is strengthened by the ivory complexion, the deep 
brown eyes, and by the haughty carriage of the well- 
shaped head. One thing is certain, the French queen had 
no lovelier hands than this great dame of California. Mrs. 
Swift wore a becoming neglige, with a touch of flock, 
bringing out the rose and white of which it was made. 
With a brief word she explained the situation and, as I 
seated myself, began to speak of the Suffrage Convention 
in Portland, from which she has just retii'fheaT "The lib- 



rary in which we sat is also Mrs. Swift's "work-room," 
and with its big table and sold desks looks the part. The 
walls are lined with well-filled book-shelves and inviting 
chairs are placed conveniently beside tables and couch. 
The great room would delight a business man, and it 
would also satisfy the soul of an artist. Mrs. Swift's cor- 
respondence is so voluminous that she employs a young 
woman as secretary. 

"Women will have the ballot," she said, irrelevantly. 
"Just as soon as they want it sufficiently to demand it." 

"But I thought they had done that," I responded, 
rather puzzled as to what was implied in the word "de- 
mand." 

"No, not women. Just here and there a woman. The 
average sheltered woman — I call her sheltered for want 
of a better name — is not thinking much about the ballot, 
although I believe that in her heart of hearts she desires 
it. The trouble is that she is ashamed to take her stand 
under an unpopular banner." 

"And the working women?" I insinuated. 

"Thev are afraid to antagonize the men who employ 
them and so they will not express their sentiments. Men 
seem to fear that the ballot, when women get it, will in 
some mysterious way change the "eternal feminine." 
They need not worry over that. There will be always as 
many girls to run after and fall in love with them ; always 
as manv devoted wives and good mothers. The sickening 
part of the whole business" is that a woman of intel- 



July 22, 1905 




THE WASP 



129 



MRS. JOHN F. SWIFT 



lect and of sufficient intelligence— which after all is a 
widely different thing from intellect— has a son. She was 
clever enough to "born" him; she takes care of him dur- 
ing Ins years of infantile illnesses and works, if it is ne- 
cessary, to give him a good education and the best home 
that she can provide. When he has attained the age of 
twenty-one he is his own master, with a vote, and can tell 
his mother to retire to her place of obscurity, probably the 
kitchen, while he lays down the law. ' ' 

"Then you think that clever women — ", I began. 

"Know how to pretend that they do not 'know "quite as 
much as the most stupid of meu. If vou observe you will 
see women advance just in the ratio that they appeal to 
men for counsel and advice." 

# # * 

There was a "-ood deal of food for reflection in all this, 
and for a few moments we sat, silent, each occupied with 
her own thoughts. In the desire for light into this most 
complicated state of affairs I asked Mrs. Swift if she 
thought that women would be satisfied to vote on educa- 
tional matters and to take a leading hand in beautifying 
the cities of the land. 

"Nonsense," said the clubwoman, emphatically. "Wo- 
men have never beautified a single city, or if they have I 
have not seen nor heard of it. That is all talk. There is 
less said about it lately, however. There is a movement 
now under hand for establishing 'School City.' It is the 
hope of the National Daughters of the American Revolu- 
tion to introduce this into all the schools of the land. It 
will embrace the teaching of our form of Government to 
foreigners. It should be taught to both girls and boys. 
Why. here we are with the great torrent of foreigners that 
is being poured into the country, and not one of them is 
learning a thing about the Constitution of the United 
States. I doubt if, after years of residence here, many of 
them can speak the language. Yet these same foreigners 
will be our masters if we do not look out. Here is a work 



To restore gtay hair to its natural color use Egyptian 
Hnna — a vegetable dye — perfectly bunnies?, and the effect of 
immediate. All druggists sell it. Langley & Michaels Co. 
agents 



worth; ot the American woman and it should appeal to her 
ami be taken up with enthusiasm. She can make a 
splendid success of it, and 1 think that there are very few 

-'■' la where the principal cannot be induced lo make this 

a part of the regular course "i training. 1 shall see some 
"i the Drincipals of the High Schools and have the experi- 
iimhi tried here in San Francisco. It would be highly in- 
teresting, every department of the National and 
Government carried on under the roof of each school- 
house. 

* # * 

I wanted some expression in regard to clubs, and so I 
took the initiative and asked Mrs. Swift to how many 
chilis she belonged. 

"Just one, the Century Club," was the quick reply. 
"Some women are members of more," I said, casually. 
"I know a woman over in Oakland who is president of 
Ihree clubs and a member of nine." 

"That is nothing," retorted my hostess, easilv going 
me one better. "I know a woman in the East who is a 
member of nineteen clubs, and she has a family." 

"How does she keep house?" I asked, aroused to in- 
stanl interest in so energetic a specimen of her sex. 

"I don't know; I was never in her house to stay," 
coolly replied Mrs. Swift. 

"Then you do not believe that a woman should belong 
to nianv organizations?" 

"I have not much patience and no respect for the 
woman who is club crazy. I do not see what good it does 
her to 'just belong' and she must neglect her home to do 
so." 

"And vou think a woman has other more binding dut- 
ies?" I asked. 

"First of all there is the duty she owes to herself. 
Then there is her duty to her husband and children if she 
is fortunate enough to have them, and then there is her 
duty to her friends. Oh no, a club has no right to inter- 
fere with normal conditions." 

"Many women will not agree with you, Mrs. Swift, 
and your expressed opinion might offend them." 

"I do not believe in a number of clubs for one woman, 
and I am not at all averse to giving my opinion on that 
matter," was the reply. 

* * * 



Recalling something that I heard as to the exclusive- 
ness of (he Century Club, I ventured to ask if it were not 
rather aristocratic in its tendencies. 

Mrs. Swift laughed in an amused way as she shook 
her head slightly. "I do not think it can be called exactly 
exclusive," said she; "it has nearly three hundred mem- 
bers. ' ' 

"And you do nothing but enjoy yourselves? You are 
not interested in any of the work that the other women's 
clubs take un?" I said, rather hesitatingly, I must con- 
fess. But Mrs. Swift is not fond of roundabout ways and 
replied directly to the half-covered query: 

"We do no kind of work. The Century is solely for 
social and literary purposes, and I often wish that the 



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130 



-THE WASP- 



[July 22, 1905. 



members were not quite so quick and determined about 
voting down everything that comes their way." 

"Still you flourish?" 

"As shown by our magnificent new clubhouse that is to 
be ready for us the first of September and every cent of 
which came from the members. It will be occupied en- 
tire!^ bv the Century Club, too, and is something of which 
we are very proud." 

I acknowledged that the building was a credit to any 
body of women, and then I tried to get some expression 
of the clubwomen of the Eastern cities. 

"I did not enter a club while I was away," declared 
Mrs. Swift. "You know I am not a club fiend who can 
not go to a city without presenting a card and visiting a 
club. I care nothing whatever for the women's clubs out- 
side of San Francisco, and I never go to any but the Cen- 
tury here. I must tell you an amusing little incident con- 
nected with the 'Daughters of the American Revolution' 
who absolutely hate the sound of the word suffrage. Their 
motto is: 'Taxation without Representation is Tyranny.' 
They do not know they are suffragists. When we get the 
ballot the women who have fought against it will be the 
ones to get up before daylight so they may vote early. 
We won't; we've worked too long for it. I must admit," 
said Mrs. Swift as I arose to take my leave, "that I be- 
lieve Oregon will fall into line as a free suffrage State 
long before California." 

Recalling the dignified Chatelaine, who had arisen to 
accompany me to the head of the stairway, I wondered 
as I rode back to town, if the dav will indeed dawn when 
she and such as she will stand shoulder to shoulder at the 
polls. 



INSPIRED BY PAUPER GRAVES. 

A visit to the Potter's Field in the corner of a ceme- 
tery outside Athens was the turning point in the career 
of the late M. Delianny, the murdered Premier of Greece. 
He was a poor clerk who had evinced no desire to rise in 
the world. Sauntering through the "City of the Dead," 
the clerical dawdler noted how the rich were honored even 
in their graves, while the poor in the Potter's Field were 
huddled together in an obscure corner, without even a 
wooden headpiece to mark their last resting place. From 
that day he awoke to the fact that unless he amounted to 
something he too some day would become one of the army 
of "les miserables," "les ineonnus." Ambition took 
active form in his breast. He then and there swore a 
great oath to write his name on the tablet of his country's 
history. He never lost sight of that object and reached 
the top of the ladder long before his tragic death. In 
person the late Premier was tall and thin. He had an 
abundance of gray hair and penetrating although kindly 
dark eyes. He was an excellent host, genial and humorous 
and with a knack of putting everyone at his best. In his 
charming house in Kephissia, near Tatoi, Monsieur 
Delianny always had a party of friends staying and he 
was very fond of giving open-air entertainments to his 
social and political intimates, among whom were a host of 
English. A peculiar thing about the old man was that he 
could never make up his mind to converse in English, al- 
though he had studied the language for years and was 
really proficient in its use. In the Grecian vernacular, 
however, he was a great talker and nothing pleased him 
better than to recount his early struggles. Monsieur Deli- 
anny leaves two daughters, the elder of whom is the wife 
of an officer in the army, while the younger, Mile. Helena 
Delianny, was her illustrious father's secretary up to the 
day of his death. 

The myterious electric current generates light. Armer 
Brothers "Verv Best" Coffee is specially prepared to gen- 
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"Very Best" has a magical effect in cold weather. Take 
it hot. 



WHEN ROYALTY FALLS IN LOVE. 

If the old adage, "Uneasy lies the head that wears a 
crown," be true, it is equally certain that unhappy is the 
heart beneath a royal robe, especially when the wearer of 
the robe is young and beautiful and in love with a King's 
aid-de-camp, when another King comes a-wooing. Such is 
the sad fate of Princess Patricia, daughter of the Duke 
and Duchess of C'onnaught, and niece to King Edward of 
Great Britain. It was to meet Princess Patricia that the 
rather ungainly young King of Spain visited London re- 
cently. It was a matter of comment that the girl gave 
him a decided snubbing; but although nothing is being- 
said to her at present, it is altogether likely that she will 
be the future Queen of Spain — at least, that is the opinion 
of those near the throne of England. A girl's fancy has 
little weight with a monarch when the aggrandizement of 
the nation is weighed in the balance against a love affair. 
Princess Victoria of Wales, who has had several senti- 
mental attachments herself, is said to be deeply intereste I 
in the love affair of the gallant aid-de-camp and her 
cousin, the Princess Patricia ; but the Duke and Duchess of 
Connaught hinted very strongly to the Captain of the 
Guards that their daughter was not for him, and that he 
would dp well to marry within his own rank. Besides, he 
needs to secure a bride with a large dowry or he mav have 
to sell out his commission to pay his debts. While the 
Princess Patricia is being treated with the utmost consid- 
eration, she probably knows that when the next year opens 
she will be obliged to turn a favorable ear to the King of 
Spain. 

SAWS WITH NEW TEETH. 
Soubrettes are born, not made up. 
The chorus and true love never did run smooth 
, Half a loaf is better than no vacation. 
A soft man, sir, turneth away graft. 



Irate Purchaser: "See here; all my friends are laugh- 
ing at this cheap suit I bought of you. They say it's a 
mile too big." 

Dealer (gently) : "Mine frient, I know de cloding pee»- 
ness better dan your frients do. Shust you vait till it 



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I 



July 22, 1905. J 



-THE WASP 



131 



THE SCIENCE OF GOVERNMENT 

By an Administration Statesman. 

•■Will de reformers win out .lis EalM" Now dal 

lion shows dot yonse is nol on to de gai 1 politics. \\"y. 

out in Sammy Braunhart's district, where dey is all born 
pnder de shadow of an election booth, Jere isn'l b child 
in de kindergarten wol doesn't know de answer to dat. 

I k at de way dem relVirinei's clous liims mi' .to wj\ 

we does. De long hairs hires a hall an' rails out 1 
gents in Prince Alberts i" s|.i<-l about good government 
and overthrowin' de Boss. Dej has about nine pei 

present. Five of dem is our mugs a-pipin' oi ' 1. On 

de same nighl we has counter demonstrashun in de same 
districk. We has a bonfire in Erohl and a brass band. In- 
si.lr we has a barrel of beer, a wagon load of pretzels, and 
in: sandwiches, an' some hams from the Wanderwille 
Shows to sing a song an' do a dance. Here is a Hi lis 
speakin'. George Keane tells de gang we is join' to find 
work for everyone next year when we blows in de bond 
money, and dat we aims lo repeal most of de laws and give 
greater personal liberty to de indiwidual dat don't like 
bard work. You couldn't hear yerself 1 'ink fer de cheers 
lien de Wanderwille does a few slunls on de stage, an' 
all hands adjourn fer refreshments an' tackle de sand- 
wiches an' beer. Well, who do youse t'ink is coin' to win 
out when it's steam beer agin dry talks or savin' de tax- 
payers' money.' Pshaw! Dere's nothin' to it. Wese gol 
dem reformers done to a turn alreddy, an' we ain't started 
vet. 

* * « 

Well, I see George Collins has skipped over the line to 
Victoria, an' is fightin' agin bein' sent back fer trial. I 
hope dat dey '11 send him back, fer he's sure to get off an" 
we can 11111 him fer city attorney or districk attorney. He'd 
be a dandv in Byington's place, an' give dose guys in Lew- 
is' olfis cards an' spades on criminal law an' beat 'em 
hands down. We wants some smart feller like Collins on 
our staff. Abe can't go to de front on every crooked ease. 
As he said to me: "Bille, no matter how little reputashun 
a man may have, he can't afford to lose it when he's de 
head of a city government." Abe will have to write a 
book some day to put all lie knows in it an ' relieve the pres- 
sure on bis hatband. He's de wisest jehu I know. 

Take me tip fer it dat political doctors kin give yer 
more trouble dan all de odder guys put together. Dere's 
Doe Ra?'an! Nothin' can hold de Doc down. When he's 
not puttin' up any signs agin spittin' on de sidewalks an' 
causin' microbes he's doin' somethin' else dat would make 
a dorg larf . 

# # # 

I was flyin' down Folsom street de odder day wid Abe 
in a automobilly, an' we comes to a blockade. De showfer 
of de Healt' Board's disinfectin' engine was stuck in de 
ear tracks, an' every horse what comes along stops an' 
begins a Wild West performance. Say, Doc Ragan's ma- 
chine is a fake, but don't say I tole yer. De gay microbes 
could take possession of de whole town afore dat steam 
engine could travel its own length. 

Me an' Abe has kind 0' brought Gene to his senses on 
de trotten horse bizness. He don't go out to de Park 
now no more'n three times a week in his racin' sulkey 
wid his heels up on de nag's back. Fairfax Wheelan an' 
his reformers is dead ones or dey'd have photographed 
Gene on dat sulkey 0' his '11. What a fine elecshun card 
'twould be fer 'em to give liviu' picture. 1 ! of Gene on a big 
bulletin board on Market street. Den some guy wid a 
meggyphone could make a speech to de crowd an' say, 



"KNOX" CELEBRATED HATS, 

Spring styles, now open. Eugene Korn, The Hattir, 
746 Market Street. Telephone Main 3185. 



"Ladies an ' gentlemen, dis is do Mayor o' Sai Prai .is,-,,. 
i\ereisin' bis trotten horse in de Park when people is 

••"kin ' in vain !er him in de <"il.\ Hall You can sei 
and dai he's a better boss jockey dan a statesman, Cei 
monkej in a circus ''Mild sii perked up on dat sulkey 

wid greater ease. His trim's n' de tenderloin can pi II) 

i\ "' him dal nol only can he play fust-rate in an on 
tra, bui he don '1 play second fiddle to no one as a h.'ss 
rubber an' exeroisin' boy." I ain't no orator like Short 

ridge • George Knight, but 1 know enufi to see dat any 

hot air artist could make (hue look like a mug when he 
got through explainin' dem livin' pictures. 
* * * 
Wese been figgerin' how lo eel Hi'. Undue mil '11 de 
Assessor's offis. He way he soaks Abe an' Gene "11 do 
arbitrary assessment is scandalous. He even want 'em 
I" pay poll-tax, an' 1 has a hard time dodgin' it meself. 
See how many more jobs we could have if we had dal offis 
"1 Dodge's. Hut I'm a-feared Hoc has a copper-riveted 
'inch on it. lie won't budge. I see little Johnny Rogers 
has give up his idea of resignin' from de Civil Service 
Commission to be care-taker — is it curator? — of de De 
Young Memorial Museum. Guess dey didn't ast de Gen- 
eral about dat. Wese gittin' kind 0' tired o' Johnny. Abe 
ast him yesterday whedder his sins of emission was worse 
dan de sins of commission, an' Moran larl'ed so hard dal 
Johnny looked as if he could eat 'im up. an' Senator 
Maher didn't know whedder to larf or not. 



Office of 
INSPECTOR OF SMOKE 
City Hall. 



BILL SYKES. 



"Ah, if I could only share the tremendous sorrows of 
magazine editors!" exclaimed the disappointed author. 

"Sorrows? Do they have sorrows?" 

"Do they? Every letter I get from any one of them 
breathes regret." 



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132 



THE WASP 



[July 22, 1905. 



WHO'S WHO ? 



HAVE WE A FOUR HUNDRED IN CALIFORNIA? 



By GRACE VAN TASSEL 

NO. XI. 

Miss Maye Colburn, only daughter of Mr. and Mrs. 
George Lyman Colburn, is a most conspicuous figure in 
society. Her success in the world of society is all the 
more remarkable, for she has achieved her present emi- 
nence alone and unaided. She was scarcely born to the 
purple, and has quite made her own position. She is a 
tall, graceful girl, and has most agreeable manners and a 
kind word for all. She entertains frequently and very de- 
lightfully. Mrs. Martin is very fond of her, and her clos- 
est friend is Mrs. Henry Dutton, with whom she is always 
seen. Her engagement has been frequently reported, and 
it is said a very wealthy bachelor is now her devoted 
swain 

The Cole family comes of good old Southern stock, and 
the Cole girls come by their good looks and their aristo- 
cratic bearing naturally. Both Mrs. Florence Cole and her 
late husband hail from the sunny South — Virginia, I be- 
lieve. Mrs. Cole was a Custic and a direct descendant of 
the famous Martha of that name. Mr. Cole was a well- 
known and wealthy lawyer, who made a fine income, but, 
like many talented professional men, left his family a bit 
hard put for funds. They took boarders for a time in 
their handsome home, but it is pleasant to state that they 
are again in prosperous circumstances. Bessie, the eldest 
daughter, is a handsome girl, with the most beautiful head 
of hair in town. It is yellow in color, and makes her ap- 
pearance very striking. She is bright and sprightly, and 
very popular. Margaret, the second daughter, made a brill- 
iant marriage, and is now the wife of Lieutenant Martin 
L. Crimmins, son of John Crimmins of New York, whose 
wealth is said to mount up to fifty millions, to be divided 
amongst his eleven children. Margaret Cole Crimmins is 
a wit and a beauty. Florence, the youngest girl, made her 
debut a winter or two ago, and is a close friend of the 
Joliffe family. By many she is considered handsomer than 
either of her sisters. 

# # * 

Exclusive of the exelusives are Mr. and Mrs. Barry 
Coleman and their daughters, Miss Sophie and Miss Lucy 
Gwin Coleman. Of the Vere de Vere also, and a great 
beau in the Southern set, was the only son of the family 
once upon a time; but all is now sadly changed. For Du- 
pont Coleman, son and heir, married a charming lady, but 
one quite far removed from the circle in which his mother 
and sisters moved, and in which he formerly was a shining 
light. The Colemans come of fine old Southern stock, and 
the family is closely allied to the house of Gwin, head and 
front of our Far Western society. Sophie Coleman is a 
pretty girl, but quiet and studious in her tastes, and cares 
little for society. Lucy Gwin Coleman made her debut 
winter before last, and was a great belle, and shared with 
her estimable friend and chum, Christine Pomeroy, the 
honor of being the most feted bud of the winter. Miss 
Lucy is pretty and vivacious and a prominent member of 
that most exclusive of clubs, the Gaiety. 

Mr. and Mrs. John C. Coleman are not related to the 
Barry family of the same surname. The John Colemans 
have plenty of money, and live in a handsome house on 
California street. There are several decidedly interesting 
daughters in the family, and the girls have always taken 
quite an active part in society. Florence, the eldest, mar- 
ried a few years ago and lives in the East. Persis, the 
second daughter, is a sweet girl, talented and quite pretty. 
Janet, the youngest, is a beauty, and she it is who will 
make her debut next winter. She is sure of a good time 
and lots of fetes are promised her. 



Still another Coleman family is that of the Robert L. 
Colemans, whose handsome house on Fillmore street and 
Pacific avenue is more often vacant than it is occupied, for 
its owners are fore and front of the Burlingame clan and 
spend more time at their country home than they do in the 
city. Bob Coleman married, some ten years ago, Miss 
Alice Simpkins, who was quite the most popular and con- 
spicuous belle in the society of that day. Miss Simpkins 
is a cousin of Mrs. Ward McAllister — formerly Alice 
Decker — and the two girls were great cronies and exceed- 
ing favorites. The Robert Colemans have been rather busy 
with their growing family for the past few years, so soci- 
ety has not seen much of them. They are traveling in En- 
rope now. 

* * * 

Captain and Mrs. William B. Collier outran many in 
the social race, and although their once large fortune has 
somewhat dwindled of late years their prestige has not, 
and they are still foremost members of our Four Hundred. 
Mrs. Collier hails from St. Louis, and is a sister of Mrs. 
Edward S. Breyfogle. She is a very pretty woman, and 
although several times a grandmother, retains much of her 
good looks. There was a time, some years ago, when the 
lady was a great belle, and was eyed seriously by the tab- 
bies who gathered on the piazzas at Blythedale, where the 
Colliers summered. Captain Collier owns a beautiful place 
on Clear Lake, and Villa Ka-Bel, which was destroyed by 
fire half a dozen years ago, was the scene of many good 
times. A tragic event was connected with the fire, for 
sleeping in the house and burned up with it was the young- 
est son of the family, a beautiful boy. There are two 
other sons, Page and Will, both of whom are popular in 
soeietv. Dorothy, the eldest girl, known to her friends 
as "Dot," is piquant and attractive, and holds rather 
advanced ideas on life. She has been engaged to handsome 
Reginald Norris for some years. Sara, the next sister, is 
a great beauty, and is without doubt one of the most 
sought-after belles in society. Especially is she a favorite 
with the older ladies, and many delightful trips have been 
given her by these friends. In spite of a host of suitors, 
Miss Sara has never been engaged. She has always been 
said to greatly resemble in appearance "Trilby," Du 
Maurier's famous heroine. 

Next in this interesting family comes Mariquita, who 
married Atherton Macondray, and is thus related to all 
the famous members of that clan— Selbys, Eyres and 
Athertons. The "Attie" Macondray s have several chil- 
dren. Margaret Collier is the wife of Roy McDonald, a 
son of the well-known Santa Rosa business man, Mark Mc- 
Donald. The young Mark McDonalds have one infant, 
and live across the bay. Lutie, youngest daughter in this 
interesting family, is unwed. She is clever and witty, and 
possesses much skill in book-bindery, which she is making 
her life's work. 

# * * 

Frederick H. Coon, better known as "Fritz," is a very- 
popular bachelor. He is a brother of Mrs. Wm. F. MeNutt, 
and has the entree to the best society. He lives at the Uni- 
versity Club. 

Mrs. P. B. Cornwall is a charming woman, and is, in 
addition, a wealthy one. Her husband, who died recently, 
left her a very large estate, and as the family have bought 
within the past few months the handsome home on Pacific 
avenue where once the Downey Harveys lived, it is possible 
that when the period of mourning expires there will be 
some delightful entertainments in the big white house. 
Mrs. Cornwall 's daughter, Mrs. Moore, lives with her. The 
latter's son Pierre is of about the same age as his uncle, 
Bruce Cornwall, and both young men are exceedingly 
great favorites in society. The late T. B. Cornwall was one 
of our best-known and most public-spirited citizens, and 
for many years took an earnest and active interest in 
Republican politics. He was never an office-seeker, and 
sought only to improve the government of our State. 
[to bb continued] 



July 22, 1905.] 



■THE WASP 



133 



THE EXTRAVAGANT RICH. 
Some of the details .it dinners and suppers se/ 
the most fashionable of New York restaurants sound like 
tiili-s from 1 lie Arabian Nights Entertainments, s.> gorgeous 
are the tabic, ami so rich the \ iands served. It is estimat- 
ed by Mr. Louis Sherry, the great restaurateur, that be- 
tween three hundred and titty and four hundred thousand 
New Yorkers dine in public every evening, and the nut 
is last increasing. To cater for such a host calls for an 
army of chefs, waiters and luaitres d'hotel, estimated at 
sixty thousand in Manhattan alone. Sherry employs three 
hundred, the Waldorf-Astoria has an equal number, De!- 
monico's has two hundred and fifty, the new Astor two 
hundred and ten, the St. Regis one hundred and twenty, 
besides many other places with from one hundred au.l 
fifty to two hundred. In the leading restaurants excellent 
artists are maintained to design the menus and other spe- 
cialists receive extravagant salaries to devise startling nov- 
elties in the way of scenic effects and floral decorations. 

* # * 

The price paid a first-class chef is astonishing. Sherry's 
chef gets $10,000 a year, and he is no higher salaried than 
half a dozen of his fellows. M. Prosper Grevilot, Delnioui- 
co's chef, says that his despair lies in aevising dishes suf- 
ficiently expensive for the tastes and bottomless purses 
of his patrons. But if the chefs receive large stipends the 
service they are called on to render is by no means small. 
Boar, bear, and even rhinoceros, may be turned over to 
them for preparation, while game of all kinds and from 
every country is as common as email in California. It is 
when a greatbanquet is ordered, however, that the greatest 
lavishness is displayed. 

* « # 

At the memorable Eighteenth Century dinner given by 
James H. Hyde, the ex-vice-president of the Equitable 
Company, followed by a bal poudre and supper, note! 
sculptors spent months making beautiful figures in sugar 
for the dinner table, and eminent artists were retained at 
enormous fees to advise about the decorations. Each 
table was built around an immense rosebush loaded with 
blossoms. This dinner cost thirty thousand dollars, and 
the supper cost fifteen thousand. Two hundred and sev- 
enty persons were required on the catering staff for the 
evening. 

* * * 

The smart restaurants of New York represent an in- 
vestment of nearly $50,000,000. Any one of them can at 
short notice give special dinners to suit any client. For 
instance, at the new Astor there is a room for yachting- 
parties, which presents a tableau of hatches, companion- 
ways, bridges, and the decks of an up-to-date yacht. Forty 
thousand acres of glass near Boston are now devoted to 
forcing spring vegetables that the New York gourmet may 
enjoy "them before their natural time. The tips that ac- 
company the dinners are worthy of the Lucullian feasts, 
and of the pocket-books of the guests, seldom being less 
than five dollars. The man who receives and cheeks hats, 
coats, umbrellas and sticks at Delmonico's pays $1,250 a 
year for the privilege, and of course clears a good, big sum. 
New Y 7 ork couples frequently pay $20,000 a year rent for 
a suite of rooms in a fashionable apartment house, and dine 
out every night of their lives, thus reducing the cares and 
responsibilities of the housewife to the least possible frac- 
tion. 

Here is an opportunity for Americans who long to pos- 
sess something connected with past ages. The French 
Government is about to auction off 23,000 carbineers 
swords of the time of Louis XVIH and Charles X, and 
9,000 breastplates which belonged to the Emperor Napo- 
leon's cuirassiers. It would be a unique spectacle, that 01 
9,000 patriotic Americans clad in armor and waving 
sabre de mon pere." 



What the General Said. 

At the review in Berlin the Kaiser once reprimanded 
old General von Meerscheidt for losing his presence of 
mind at a critical moment. 

"it your Majesty thinks that I am getting too old I 
beg of you to allow me to resign." 

"No, no." replied the Kaiser: "you are too young to re- 
sign. Indeed, if your blood did not course through your 
veins quite so fast you would be a more useful army lead- 
er." 

On the evening of that day the Kaiser and the General 
met at a court ball. The General was talking to some 
young ladies. 

■ Ah. Meerscheidt," cried William, "that is right; get 
ready to marry. Take a young wife, then that excitable 
temperament of yours will soon vanish." 

The General bowed low as he retorted: "I beg to be 
excused, your Majesty. A young Emperor and a young 
wife would be more than I could possibly stand." 



Mrs. Grouch: "If I should die you would never get an- 
other wife who would look after you as 1 have done." 
Mr. Grouch: "No, not if I could help it." 



Tony: "Miss Muggles has had $25,000 left her by an 
uncle who had never even seen her." 
Ada: "Well, that explains it." 



Her Mother: "You will assume a grave responsibility 
when you marry my daughter. Remember, she was brought. 
up in the lap of luxury." 

Her Adorer: "Oh, she's pretty well used to my lap 
now." 

SANITARY REFRIGERATORS. 
It is a lamentable fact that so few people give any 
thought or consideration to the valuable sanitary points 
of a refrigerator. A poor refrigerator is as dangerous as 
a bad sewer. Unless the circulation sends a current of 
pure, dry air into every part of the refrigerator, and unless 
a non-absorbent material for the lining is used, the food 
must become tainted. Opal cases and opal-lined refriger- 
ators are constructed with the snow-white opal materia! 
on the exterior as well as the interior, which is held in 
place by nickel-plated, solid-brass trimmings. Refrigera- 
tors constructed of opal, in this manner, become great ice 
savers, and will in a short time offset the difference of the 
first cost in the saving of ice bills. To preserve the con- 
tents of a refrigerator the air within must be dry and pure, 
as well as cold. The air circulation is one of the most 
important features, and it has been demonstrated beyond 
the shadow of a doubt that Eureka Refrigerators have the 
best and most perfect system of air circulation known to 
science. They have no air flues to eaten dirt or food par- 
ticles. W. W. Montague & Co.. Pacific Coast Distributors, 
309-317 Market St., San Francisco. 



Take a Rest 

A great many San Francico people are planning to 
spend days and weeks during the Spring and Summer at 
Hotel Del Monte. No other resort in California offers 
such a combination of attractions— sea bathing, golf, 
automobiling, bowling, tennis, fishing, and all out-of- 
door sports. Instead of going from place to place 
seeking comforts, the wise ones of society spend their 
time at Del Monte by the sea. Address GEO. P. 
SNELL, Manager, Del Monte, California. 

At Hotel Del Monte 



134 



-THE WASP- 



[July 22, 1905. 



t 



BOOKS and AUTHORS 






>/V»iAA^iV»A^A^V^mV»AA^AA A A ^ V^^ 



Joaquin Miller, the white-headed "Poet of the Sierras," 
has been feted in Oregon until his hat is too small for him. 
The venerable poet was in his glory when he was seated 
as guest of honor at the Bohemian luncheon in Portland. 
There were spicy viands, no drought in the way of rare 
vintages, and the native wit flowed as freely as the spark- 
ling champagne. At the reception which followed Miller 
was again the lion of the day, and over three thousand 
people paid their respects to him. That is, he says, some- 
thing worth while. It is simply because he happened 
to linger in Oregon while on his way to California 
in ' ' the days of old, the days of gold, the days of forty- 
nine," that the web-footed citizens are making sueh a 
to-do over Joaquin. They seem to have an hallucination 
that during that brief visit the writer of verse discovered — 
well, whatever there is up there. Anyway, they are grate- 
ful to him for lending his name to their half-century blow- 
out. 

* # # 

Gelette Burgess has suddenly appeared in San Fran- 
cisco, after two years of travel abroad, in search of ma- 
terial for his new books. But lo ! a complete metamor- 
phosis has taken place in the gifted writer's appearance, 
quite as startling as his purple cow, his Titian locks, 
doubtless by the magic touch of a Parisian hair-dresser, 
having been changed to a raven hue. A tiny moustache 
and a goatee aid in giving the gifted author the air of a 
foreigner. 

* # * 

During his travels through Italy and Spain Mr. Burge-ss 
was accompanied on numerous trips by Anna Strunsky and 
her chaperon, both artists visiting together places of in- 
terest rarely seen by the average tourist. The author 
of the "Purple Cow" is now endeavoring to get local color 
for a new novel having San Francisco as a background. 

* * # 

Many writers who are writing the "best sellers" began 
as journalists. Among the successful novelists who were 
once on newspaper staffs are : J. M. Barrie, Richard White- 
ing, Robert Hichens, Frankfort Moore, Sir Gilbert Parker, 
Robert Barr, W. L. Alden. Right here in California we 
have Jack London, W. C. Morrow, the late Frank Norris, 
May Eleanor Gates (Mrs. Richard Tully), Mrs. Fremont 
Older, Miriam Miehelson, Bailey Millard, and others whom 
I cannot recall just at this moment. 

* * * 

Apropos of J. M. Barrie, the novelist, a story is told 
of how the late Duke of Cambridge read Barrie 's book, 
"The Little White Bird, "the scene of which lies in Ken- 
sington Gardens, and sent him a delightfully appreciative 
note, inclosing a key to the gate of Kensington Gardens 
opposite to Mr. Barrie 's house in Lancaster Gate. The 
nobleman said that he thought the key a fitting gift for 
the writer of such a volume. Mr. and Mrs. Barrie evinced 
their appreciation by going frequently to the Gardens on 
summer evenings. 

* # * 

Geraldine Bonner is turning very fecund as a novelist. 
I hear that another novel from her pen is to come out this 
winter. It is a story of modem San Francisco life, and, 
I hear, is quite melodramatic in theme. 



The Vienna Model Bakery, 222 Sutter street, above 
Kearny, is the best and most convenient place for ladies 
to dine while down town shopping. 




Why it Leads 

Competition is the life of trade, 

but success is only won by merit. 

That is why 

Hunter 
Whiskey 



is far in the lead with popular preference. 
Its quality, age, purity, flavor is the most 
perfect combination ever made. 



HILBERT MERCANTILE CO. 

136-144 Second Street. San Francisco, Cal. 

Telephone Private 313. 

O VV VVVVVTVVVVV^yV^v^VV^ vV VVVVVVVVVVv 




Dou't let anyone teil you you're beautiful. Go 
to At. Ella Harris, the greatest beauty special- 
ist of America. Her's is the only method that 
makes good, healthy flesh without a wrinkle, a 
complexion without a blemish. Her 16 yean' 
experience is a guarantee against failure. Spec* 
ial discount of 10 per cent off her usual reason- 
able prices for this month only. Investigate 
immediately. Consultation or Beauty booklet 
free.-M. ELLA HARRIS, 128 Geary St. 



THE RIGHT WAY 



OFFICES, 

ioib Broadway 

Oakland 
244 So. Broadway 

Los Angeles 
95 Washington St. 
Chicago 
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Sioux City, Iowa 



Correspondents in 
all principal 

cities 



When you wish to move 

And have everything go smooth 

Engage Bekins' Van, either large or small, 

Up to a seven-room house in one we take it all. 

What we load in one — others in three ; 

Just imagine what a comfort that will be. 

To the other house you go, goods are put in place, 

Over them all you look and find not a broken vase. 

When on vacation or abroad you go, 

Bekins' Warehouse is the safest place, you know. 

Furniture, pianos, china and brie a-brac, 

Bekins does it all if that's what there is to pack 

When shipping east, north or west, 

Bekins' cut rate service is the best. 

At 11 Montgomery either phone you call 

Further information will be given to all. 



The largest Van and Storage Company in the World 

Telephone Main 1840 Residence Telephone South 1185 



STRICTLY BUSINESS 



Points of Interest on Trade and Finance. 




AFTER tlic Fourth of July there is always a 
lull iii the real estate market, and this year 
has been no exception. The indications are 
strong, however, that after vacation, the 
market will be stronger and remain active 
through llir autumn and winter. The munici- 
pal election will have only a slight effect on it anyway. 
II Schmitz be elected people will be more than ever dis- 
inclined to put money in industrial enterprises. For that 
very reason real estate investments will attract them. San 
Francisco cannot be kept back very long by Schmitz or his 
maladministration. The city has a great future. Its trade 
is doubling, ami another transcontinental railroad is head 
ing lor the city. A great deal of public money is to be 
spent in improving' the city. These things tend to make real 
estate more valuable, so the shrewd ones will continue to 
invest regardless of the threatened calamity of a pro- 
tracted Schmitz administration. That the city is growing 
rapidly is best shown by the registration of voters this 
year. The figures have now climbed up (o something like 
80,000. It is but a few years since that San Francisco 
registered only 50.000. If the growth should be continued 
at this ratio we will reach the million mark sooner than our 
most sanguine citizens expect. 

# # # 
The Status of the Crops. 

Pessimistic reports continue to be made as regards the 
outcome of the harvest which is now being gathered in. 
and if they are in any degree reliable the outcome as to 
cereals will not be much better than that of 1904. A feu- 
weeks must elapse before anything definite can be really 
told about it beyond the fact that Southern California is 
coming to the front this year as a barley producer, and 
will add 50,000 to 100,000 tons to the output of the North. 
San Diego county especially figures prominently in the 
returns. Then the reports from the fruit section are better 
than they were, and more fruit, citrus and deciduous, will 
be marketed than was last year. Much more lumber will 
be marketed also, and there Will be a better yield of min- 
erals, including copper and gold. The oil situations are 
doubtful owing to the policy of the Standard and Associ- 
ated companies, and these will not show the increase in 
production that has distinguished other years. 

# # * 

The Withdrawal of Government Deposits. 

Owing principally to the deficit in the revenue the 
government has been obliged to call in more or less of its 
balances in the national banks of the country. This, 
however, has been done in such a manner as to make it as 
easv as 'possible for these institutions. Eleven millions 
were called in on Saturday last. but. this was only a baga- 
telle to the banks, and inconvenienced them little, if any. 
There had been previously $29,000,000 collected, making 
in all forty millions of dollars. 

# # * 
Foreign Trade on the Isthmus. 

The foreign trade over the Isthmus of Panama is large, 
consisting of coffee from the Pacific side and general mer- 
chandise from the European side. The loss of it to I he 



Pacific Mail Company would be serious. The lower 
freights are made across the isthmus the greater will he the 
volume of trade, as much that now goes around Cape Horn 
will be shipped across the isthmus. 

* # * 
Our Export Trade. 

The export trade of the port of San Francisco for the 
calendar year to date has nearly doubled that for the same 
time in 19114. Then it was about $15,51111,11110; now it ex- 
reeds $27,(1(111,110(1. The growth has been entirely will, the 
Orient and in the direction id' Japan, where some months 
the Mail Company's steamers have taken out over two 
million dollars' worth of merchandise. Whether peace or 
war prevails the heavy shipments will continue for the 
balance of the year, for the ravages of war have to be re- 
paired. 

* * # 
Four Millions Lost. 

Clans Spreckels is hard at work cutting away at the 
price of sugar, and in a month $10 per ton has 
been taken off. It is hard to tell where this wiil 
stop, but of course it must stop before long. This last cut 
will represent a loss of four million dollars on the whole 
product of the Islands should the fight be kept up. But the 
Honolulu Sugar Refinery people seem w*ll content to fight 
away. There is no doubt that once the present fight is 
over the Western Sugar Refinerv will put back prices to 
the point from which they started. It will perhaps have 
bought out the Honolulu Suear Refiner- and made the com- 
bine on this Coast practicallv complete. 

* * * 

Banking Boom in the West. 

The growth of the banking system of this city and State 
has been commensurate with the growth of the State and 
city. The large addition to our population by immigraliou 
and the growth of trade with the Orient, as well as the 
improvement in our industrial condition, has fully justified 
the great increase in the number and resources of our 
banks for the past three or four years. New banks have 
been established in new towns and in rapidly growing set- 
tlements, and this will continue to be the case right 
straight along. 

* * # 

Prosperous Times. 

In the Middle West States and the States lying between 
them and California there has been also a veritable boom, 
which has given rise to some alarm in the breasts of con- 
servative financiers. A treasury department official, how- 
ever, considers that there is no cause for alarm. He allows 
that there is bad banking, but that it does not arise from 
the rapid increase in banks and banking facilities. He 
says: "The condition of the country is prosperous, and 
people want to take advantage of the real opportunities 
that are opening up before them. ' ' What we are 

witnessing is a real and genuine expansion of industry and 
business. The same official thinks that ihere are too many 
institutions that are conducted too conservatively and thai 
keep too large a reserve. In this ease, however, those who 
know that in many instances only a few hundred or a few 



136 



-THE WASP- 



[July 22, 1905. 



thousand dollars are kept on hand against deposits of 
scores of thousands will not be likely to find fault. In 
the ease of national banks, however, an amount equal to 
25 per cent of the deposits must be kept on hand. 

* * * 

It would be well to have the State laws amended so as 
to render it imperative on banking' institutions to have at 
least 10 per cent of their resources either in cash or gov- 
ernment bonds. This will no doubt be done some day, 
but not until a lot of those small country banks with a few 
hundred dollars in the safe close their doors and bring 
about a general popular outcry for something of the kind. 

* * * 
The Gas War. 

The public by this time must be nauseated by the con- 
tradictory stories of the doings of the gas magnates as 
chronicled daily in the public press, when all that the 
same public is interested in is getting good gas at a reason- 
able figure. The public idea of good gas is unchanging, 
except, indeed, that it not unnaturally expects that the 
resources of science will be able to give a better service 
and that the companies will see that they get it. This the 
latter have been slow to do, except under the stress of 
competition such as now prevails. Competition, therefore, 
is to be welcomed when it insures both a good article and a 
fair price. 

* * * 

But What Is a Fair Price? 

On this point the opinion of the San Francisco public 
has been changing year by year, and its ideas have always 
pointed to steadily lower figures. It is not so long since it 
would have been contented with a dollar and a half; then 
a dollar seemed a reasonble figure when the article sup- 
plied was good and the meter was not out of order; now 
75 cents is the figure. Indeed, it ought to be when, under 
certain circumstances the old company offers to supply the 
article at 25 cents. This figure may be taken to be the 
cost of gas, without that of distribution or clerical work, 
or taking into account interest on bonds or dividends. Of 
course, the new company will be a long time before they 
manage to take away enough customers from the old to 
seriously inconvenience the latter, and as 25 cents cannot 
be met and will not be by the new aspirant for public 
favor, it will be either taken into camp or have to abandon 
the field. Five million dollars would not be long disap- 
pearing in these days of strenuous finance. 

* * * 
What Then? 

By that time — that is by next year — the city fathers 
will have been converted to the doctrine of 75-eent gas, 
and the old company will have to supply it. It will take 
a great deal more than five million dollars to conduct a 
fight to a finish with a company like the San Francisco 
Gas and Electric, especially with such a veteran warrior 
as Clans Spreekels in the fold. 

* * * 

With all the fight, however, there has been no essential 
difference in the price of gas stock for some time, and 
there will be nothing more than an occasional flurry till 
the new company has been supplying gas for six months 
or so, if it keep up an independent existence so long. It 
will, however, require pretty fine financiering on the part 
of the old company to pay dividends and compete. 

* # * 
The Last Japanese Loan. 

The last Japanese loan, consisting of $150,000,000, has 
been divided up between England, Germany and the United 
States, and of the amount allotted to the latter San Fran- 
cisco has been given her share. That will amount to any- 
thing less than $10,000,000 that our capitalists may pro- 
pose to take up. 



MONEY TO LOAN. 
To salaried people at low rates. The White Co., 420 
California St., Booms 14 & 15. Take elevator on Leides- 
dorff street to third floor. 

The German Savings and Loan Society, 

526 California St., Sao Francisco 

Guaranteed capital and surplus I 2,500,098.42 

Capital actually paid up in cash 1.000,000.00 

Deposits, Dec. 31, 1904 37j38.672.17 

OFFICERS — President, John Lloyd; First Vice-President, Daniel 
Meyer; Second Vice-President, Emil Rohte; Cashier, A. H. R. Schmidt; 
Assistant Cashier, William Herrmann; Secretary, George "Iourny; Assist. 
Secretary, A. H. Muller; Attorney, W. S. Goodfellow. 

BOARD OF DIRECTORS — John Lloyd, Daniel Meyer, Emil Rohte, 
Ign. Steinhart, N. Ohlandt, I. N. Walter. J. W. Van Bergen F. Tillmann, 
Jr., and E. T. Kruse. 

San Francisco Savings Union, s " SHEW* 

Deposits January 1, 1905. .$33,940,132 | Paid up capital $1,000,000.00 

Reserve and contingent funds, $976,109. 

B. B. POND, President; W. C. B. De FREMERY, ROBERT WATT, 

Vice-Presidents; LOVELL WHITE, Cashier; R. M. WELCH, 

Assistant Cashier. 

DIRECTORS— E. B. Pond, W. C. B. De Fremery, Robert Watt, 
Henry F. Allen, Wakefield Baker,, Jacob Barth, Fred H. Beaver, 
William A. Magee, C. O. G. Miller. 

Loans upon San Francisco and Oakland Real Estate, and Farms 
and Farming Lands in the country. Receives deposits. Country re- 
mittances may be made In checks payable In San Francisco, Postofflee 
or Wells Fargo & Co.'s Money Orders, or Coin by Express, but the re- 
sponsibility of this bank commences only with the receipt of the 
money. No charge Is made for pass-book or entrance fee. OFFICE 
HOURS— 9 a. m. to 3 p. m., and Saturday evenings, for receipt of de- 
posits only, 6:30 to 8 o'clock. 

Security Savings Bank '".isrssssK.* 1 - 

Authorized Capital, $1,000,000; Paid Up Capital, $500,000; Surplus and 
Undivided Profits, $265,000. Interest Paid on Deposits. Loans Made. 

Directors — Wm. Babcock, Parrott & Co.; S. L. Abbot. Security Sav- 
ings Bank ; O. D. Baldwin, O. D. Baldwin & Son; Joseph D. Grant, Mur- 
phy, Grant & Co.; E. J. McCutchen, Page, McCutchen & Knight; L. P. 
Monteagle, Capitalist; R. H. Pease, Pres. Goodyear Rubber Co.; Warren 
D. Clark, Williams, Dimond & Co.; Jas. L. Flood, Capitalist; J. A. Dono- 
hoe Pres. Donohoe, Kelly Banking Co.; John Parrott, Capitalist; Jacob 
Stern, Vice-President Levi Strauss & Co. 

William Babcock, President; S. L. Abbot, Vice-President and Man- 
ager; Fred. W. Ray, Secretary; Sidney V. Smith, Attorney. 



STARR ®l DULFER 

SAN FRANCISCO AND TONOPAH 

Stock Commission Brokers 




Tonopah 

Goldfield 

Bullfrog 




OFFICES: 

Merchants' Exchange Building 
San Francisco 

Tonopah, Nevada 

H. W. Hellman Building 
Los Angeles, Cal. 

MEMBERS SAN FRANCISCO STOCK AND EXCHANGE BOARD 



JDLY 22, I905.] 



-TI1EWASP- 



137 



The Panama Railroad and the Mail Company. 

Sweet are the uses oj adversitv, and the loss oJ the coi 

tract Willi the Panama Kailroad has spurred the I 
Mail to action. The program now is to build steamers 
like the Korea, the Manchuria and the Siberia to put them 
on in place of those now running, which, however s, 
able in the olden time, are now mainly so many back 
numbers. By doing this they will be able' to compete with 
foreign companies for the foreign trade of the is- 
and be making ready for the day when the canal will be 
an actual fact instead of a theory, as it is largely at pres- 
ent. And as the Mail Company is really backed up by 
the great railroad combination, it will be a comparatively 
easy matter, as money will be no object, and Harriraan is 
not going to allow the Hill combination or any foreign 
syndicate to seize the trade of the isthmus, if it can be 
helped. 

* * * 
The World's Gold. 

The product o'f gold for the present year is estimated 
at four hundred millions of dollars. Nearly one-half of 
this has been produced during the past sis" months, and 
about $40,000,000 in the United States, yet the actual 
amount on hand has remained practically the same. The 
great European banks hold about $115,000,000 more than 
they did six months ago. The greater part of the yield has 
gone to them, the rest to the uses of science and the arts, 
or to help on the war between Russia and Japan. 

* * # 
Bank Exchanges. 

The bank exchanges for the preceding week reached the 
figure of $37,428,256.25, an increase of more than five 
millions over the corresponding time last year. The effect 
of the activity in realty and general business continues 
to make itself felt here, and the business connected with the 
placing of the New Japanese loan has made itself felt, too. 

* * * 
Bay Counties Power. 

The agents of the Bay Counties Power Company are 
at work in the city to get their share of the patronage of 
the manufacturers of the city. This is a great company, 
taking in most of the Northern part of the State. It has 
been most successful, and its bonds command $100 1 , / 2 '■" 
$107 in this market. 

* # * 
Building. 

The value of contracts for new building's has not been 
as laro'e as in other weeks — just $257,674. However, this 
must be considered large for what may be termed a holiday 
week, and would have been looked upon as average in any 
other vear. 

* # # 

Buying Japanese Bonds. 

The Japanese bonds placed with the Wells Fargo Ne- 
vada National Bank of San Francisco and with the Anglo- 
Californian Bank were all subscribed, and over-subscribed, 
the first day. The total amount of subscriptions was 
£050,000 (pounds sterling), while the allotment here will 
be from £200,000 to £250,000. Many would-be subscribers 
will therefore be disappointed. 

* # # 
At Tonopah. 

Goldfield has had another bad fire, and is just goins 
through the experience of the old mining camps. But the 
eold is there, and these fires are but slight incidents in the 
history of the camp. Tonopah prospects continue good, 
and will be much better when the ore piled up has been 
disposed of. Not until then can the value of this field 
be realized. It will take rank with the foremost in the 

Citizens State Bank, 518 Montgomery, cor. Com.-:: Jai, 
allows 4 per cent on time certificates. 



world. May yueen ore has assayed $700 to the ton. Ne- 
vada Tonopah sold at $13.50, and market prospects are 
good. 

* * * 
The Mining Stock Market. 

_ There has been a turn for the better in Pine Btrei 
••?7..->0 has been asked for Ophir. Reports from the nun.- are 
good and the ore assays well. Pine St. is looking si, . 
ahead tVn- the promised dividend. The condition of the 
market is, on the whole, good. 



■» * 



Tonopah Home Consolidated stock will advance. Why? 
Because it is shipping ore from its Alia mine. Are there 
many mines shipping ore? We guess not. Just compare 
the prices the stocks are selling at. If you invest, buy 
stock in a shipper. 



A NEW CLUBHOUSE. 

The men who lived at the University Club are, for the 
most part, now installed in the Buckingham, where com- 
fortable apartments have been taken, and which are being 
run as an annex of the University Club. Milton Latham 
and several of the younger men of the club are at present 
domiciled at the Buckingham. Within a few weeks the 
repairs on the club building will be finished. The good res- 
olution has been formed to infuse a more cordial spirit 
into the organization when the members reoccupy the reno- 
vated club building. It is a matter of comment that one- 
half of the members are so ponderously conscious of their 
social position that they will not speak to the other half. 
An heroic effort will then be made to introduce more of the 
college spirit in the club and less of the Burlingame atmos- 
phere. The architectural and decorative improvements 
will cost $15,000. The ladies' dining-room is to be eliminat- 
ed as far as possible, if not entirely done away with. It 
was never a great financial success, and the directors are 
hoping that it will' die a natural death without having to 
be violently strangled. 



Mutual Savings Bank of San Francisco 

710 Market St., opp. Third 

Guarantee Capital $1,000,000 

Paid-up Capital 80 J. 000 

Surplus _ 300,000 

Deposits. Julyl IS05 9,969.2'28 

JAMES D. PHELAN, President; S. G. MURPHY. Vice-Prei- 
ident; JOHN A. HOOPER. Vice-President; GEORGE A. 
STORY, Cashier; C. E. HOBSON, Assisant Cashier. 

Directors— James D. Phelan. S. G. Murphy, John A. Hooper, 
James Moffitt, Frank J Sulli»'at, Robert McElroy, Rudolph 
Spreckels, James M. McDonald, Charles Holbrook. 

Interest paid on deposits. Loans on approved securities. 

Deposits may be sent by postal order. Wells, Fargo &. Co., or 
exchange on city banks. 



The Hibernia Savings and Loan Society. 

Incorporated 12th of April, 1859. 
Office: Cor. of McAllister and Jones Streets. Sao Francisco 

Deposits January 1, 1905, $58,648,1S2.32. 
Reserve Fund, actual value, 53,372,779.09. 

OFFICERS— President, James R. Kelly; Secretary and Treasurer. 
Robert J. Tobin; Attorney, Joseph S. Tobln. 

BOARD OF DIRECTORS— R. J, Tobin, James R. Kelly, P. Crow- 
ley, Richard M. Tobin, Charles Mayo, Joseph S. Tobln. 

The objects for which this association is formed are, that by Ita 
operations the depositors thereof may be able to find a secure and 
profitable investment for small savings, and that borrowers may have 
an opportunity of obtaining from it the use of a moderate capital on 
giving good and sufficient security for the use of the same. 

French Savings Bank, 3 ' 5 S ""&°.T.:2: st - 

CAPITAL PAID UP $600,000 

CHARGES CARPY, President ARTHUR LEGALIST, Vice-President 

LEON BOCQUERAZ, Secretary 

DIRECTORS-J. E Artiguas, O. Bozio, Leon Bocqueraz, J- A. Ber- 
gerot, Chas. Carpy, J. B. Clot, J, S. Godeau. Leon Kauffman, A. Legallet, 
J. M. Dupas, A Ross, J. J. Mack. 




138 



-THE WASP 



[July 22, 1905. 



engagements 



Miss Edna Tretheway, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. John 
Tretheway of East Oakland,, to Mr. J. Eisenbaeh of San 
Francisco. 

'Miss Phoebe T. Watkins, granddaughter of the late 
Mrs. P. T. Watkins of Piedmont, and niece of Colonel 
Little, to Mr. Frederick Ward of San Francisco. 



Sleddings 

July 26th — Miss Yvonne Finch, daughter of Mr. and 
Mrs. Alfred Finch of Cambridge, Mass!, to Dr. Thorns s 
Hartley Winslow of Oakland, at the residence of Dr. Wins- 
low's sister, in Arroyo Grande. 

July 30th — Miss Gladys Beringer, daughter of Profes- 
sor and Madam Joseph Beringer, to Mr. Harry Meyer, both 
of San Francisco, at the Beringer residence in Geary -treet. 

August 2d — Miss Florence Starr, sister of Mr." Walter 
Starr, East Oakland, to Mr. Joseph Notely Thomas, at Fast 
Oakland. 

August 9th — Miss May Belle Greencbaum, daughter of 
Mr. and Mrs. Sigmund Greenebaum, to Mr. Herbert Fleish- 
haeker, both of San Francisco. 

August 9th— Miss Ethyl Gray, daughter of Mr. and 
Mrs. J. P. Gray of San Francisco, to Dr. David James 
Graham of Edinburgh, Scotland, in New York City. 

August 19th — Miss Leslie Green, daughter of Mr. and 
Mrs. A. T. Green, Dwight Way, Berkeley, to Mr. Howard 
Huntington, at Berkeley. 



EVER YOUNG AND EVER FAIR. 
(From the Davenport Democrat.) 
The preservation of female beauty and its enchant- 
ments by the use of harmless cosmetics are duties the ladies 
owe to themselves and to those who value their personal 
charms as the}' appreciate their moral qualities. Unfortu- 
nately, unprincipled parties too frequently take advantage 
of the natural desire to be ever young and fair, and palm 
upon the market deleterious acid and mineral poisons which 
impart a momentary lustre at the risk of future sallowness 
and ruined health. In the Oriental Cream, prepared by 
Dr. T. Felix Gouraud, of New York City, the ladies have 
a harmless preparation for preserving the delicacv of the 
complexion, and obliterating blemishes, which has become 
the favorite toilet article of the leading professional art- 
ists, who owe so much of their popularity to their personal 
charms. Scarcely a star dressing room in opera or theatre 
throughout our land is without the Oriental Cream. It 
stands today the most harmless and perfect beautifier 
known. 

LAMENTATIONS. 
Gravel — dust — cattle — cussed — 
Wind and rain — hills that strain — 
Sand and mire — punctured tire — 
Stopped by train — jugged again ! 



SCIENCE JOTTINGS. 

In these latter days the doctors are becoming so per- 
fectly and wonderfully scientific that they are getting' to 
be dangerous to themselves. Last week at a local hospital 
a bunch of medicos were sterilizing their butcher knives 
preparatory to an operation, when the sterilizing machine- 
blew up. An unlucky nurse received a splinter of iron in 
her jaw, but none of the doctors was touened. Next time 
there may be better luck. 

Talking of medical science reminds me that when the 
late and niuch-lameuted Secretary Hay was on his death 
bed special trains were run to his bedside and expensive 
specialists called to consult with the family phvsieian. Up- 
on careful diagnosis it was determined and published thai 
"the Secretary is now out of danger and will be out in a 
few days." The consulting doctors had fixed the patient's 
ailing prostrate gland, and his natural vitality would in- 
sure an immediate rally, etc., etc. Next day Mr. Hay 
died, and the post-mortem showed that pulmonary trouble 
had been the cause. The Chinese system of paying a doc- 
tor for keepinq' you in health and stopping his fees when 
you become ill is not a bad one. The old Indian system 
of knocking the medicine man on the head when he lost 
too many eases was in some respects even better. If en- 
forced in a private hospital in the city where many "high- 
ly successful operations" give work to the undertakers, 
there would be a number of fine offices vacant on Sutter 
Street. 



It appears after all that no one really knows how much 
rent Whitelaw Reid, the new ambassador from the United 
States to England, pays to Captain Holford for Dorchester 
House, London. English journals declare that no one but 
the persons most concerned know anything of what the 
rental is. Dorchester is included in the groun of "palace-, 
of the metropolis," including Stafford House, Bridge- 
water House, and Apslev House, and is really the best of 
them all, being comfortable and well adapted to entertain- 
ing. Besides the noted collection of pictures by such art- 
ists as Velasquez, Rembrandt, Van Dyck, Titian, etc., there 
are some very fine statues and a library of rare books. The 
pictures are often seen in loan exhibitions, the rrroeeedi 
of which are, of course, for some favorite charitv. 



Dr. Charles W. Decker, Dentist. 

Phelan Building, 806 Market street. Specialty: 
Gas" for the painless extracting of teeth. 



"Colton 



"What did that man do to make himself so famous'?" 
asked the inquirer, gazing curiously at an individual who 
formed the center of a social group. 

"To the best of my knowledge," said the cynic, "he 
did the public." 



The PUREST and BEST country milk and cream is 
furnished by the BERKELEY FARM and NOVATO 
RANCH DAIRIES. N. J. Nelson & Co., props. Depot, 
1228 Folsom street, San Francisco. Ring up South 676, 
or send postal. Families carefully supplied. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 

The Continental Building and Loan Association 

of 301 California Street 

Has declared for the six months ending June 30th, 1905, a dividend 
of 5 per cent, per annum on Ordinary Deposits; 6 per cent, on Term 
Deposits; and 6 per cent, on Monthly Payment Investments. Inter- 
est on Deposits payable on and after July 1st. Interest on Ordinary 
Deposits not called for will be added to the principal and thereafter 
bear interest at the same rate. 

Dr. WASHINGTON DODGE, President. 
WM. CORBIN, Secretary 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 
HUMBOLDT SAVINGS BANK. 
626 Market Street 
Opposite Palace Hotel 
For the half-year ending June 30th, 1905, a dividend has been 
declared at the rate of three and one-half (3^) per cent, per annum 
on deposits, free of all taxes, payable on and after Saturday, July 1, 
1905. Dividends not called for will be added to the principal 
and thereafter bear the same rate of interest. 

W. E. PALMER. Cashier. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 

OFFICE OF THE HIBERNIA SAVINGS AND LOAN SOCIETY 

Corner Market, McAllister and Jones Sts., San Francisco. 

June 28, 1905. 
At a regular meeting of the Board of Directors of this Society, 
held this day, a dividend has been declared at the rate of three and 
one-half (3^) per cent, per annum on all deposits for the six months 
ending June 30, 1905, free from all taxes, and payable on and after 
July 1, 1905. 

ROBERT J. TOBIN, Secretary. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 
SAVINGS AND LOAN SOCIETY, 
101 Montgomery Street, corner of Sutter, 
Has ^declared a dividend for the term ending June 30, 1905, at the 
rate of three and one-half (3%) per cent, per annum on all deposits, 
free of taxes, payable on and after Saturday, July 1, 1905. 

EDWIN BONNELL, Assistant Cashier. 



By AUTOMAN 



The proposed boulevard leading oul of San Francisco 
is now taking definite shape, and the Automobile Club of 
California is asking for 350 subscriptions of $100 eacli 

with which to build the road. The i r road necessary to 

travel over as an exil from San Francisco, without cross- 
ing the bay, lias always been a great drawback to inotoriirj 
in this city. Many of the motorists have long appealed 
to the automobile club for a first-class roadway .mi ,,r 
San Francisco, and il is hoped thai they will assist in 
raising the money required for the venture. 

Three prominent motorists of San Jose, Dr. F. C. Gerlach 
Clarence Letcher and Waller .1. West, left recently on a 
400-mile journey to the North. The hip is in some re- 
spects unique, as the three automobilists will endeavor to 
penetrate wilds hitherto unknown (o augbt of locomotion 
save the conventional horse and wagon. In addition to 
iliis the party will prospect for bears, and will use the 
automobile as an aid in the hunt. The car is equipped with 
a small arsenal, sleeping- bags, a sto\e and other indis- 
pensable requirements for an extended camping trip. They 
headed for Redding-, and, arriving there, will push on into 
the mountains with the car, a feat that has heretofore 
daunted chauffeurs. 

An automobile stage is running- in Oregon between the 
towns of Salem and Independence. The service is pi - ov- 
ing successful and profitable, and in that country the auto 
is now recognized as the substitute for and forernnner 
of the railway. The trial of the horseless stage will be 
watched with interest, for perhaps it will show that inter- 
urban auto lines are practicable, and that interurban elec- 
tric railway lines cannot successfully compete therewith 

The J. K. Armsby Company recently equipped a num- 
ber of their "knights of the road" with automobiles. 
E. N. Richmond, manager in San Jose, is using an Autocai 
runabout in his country work, and is well satisfied, having 
ran the machine 2,700 miles without the least particle of 
trouble. Mr. Richmond tells me that this is the fourth 
season his concern has used automobiles for country work, 
and that they have been a far greater success than was 
ever anticipated. 

The Harry Holbrooks made the century run around the 
bay last Sunday in their handsome Columbia machine. 
Both are becoming wedded to the sport of motoring. They 
left this city on Sunday morning, proceeding to San Jose 
by way of San Mateo, stopping there, and also at Menlo 
Park to visit friends. The run home from the Garden City 
was made on the other side of the bay. 

Although foreign-made automobiles are still coming to 
this country, the American manufacturers are more than 
offsetting them by exportation of motor cars, which, ac- 
cording to figures compiled by the Department of Com- 
merce and Labor, amounted last year to almost $2,000,000, 
while for the year 1905 to date the total figure is $1,876.- 
063, indicating a record to about $2,500,000 for this com- 
plete year. 

The Repsold Select Vintages vindicate the reputation of 
California's wines. Inspection invited. 420 Pine St. 



Electric cars are to be introduced in Buenos Aviv-, 
Argentina, to replace the 3,000 horse-drawn cabs now in 
use. if the plans of the German Transatlantic Electric 
i ompany are successfully worked out, according to a re_pi n 
made by United Slates Minister Beaupre of Buenos Ayres. 
The electric company with the long- name controls the elec- 
tric lighting and street railway plants of Buenos Ayres 
and suburbs, and has enormous electrical power at its dis- 
posal. 

Lieutenant-Governor Ahhm Anderson has been con- 
verted into a full-fledged automobilist, and I am told he 

already handles the wheel of his Autocar with all the skill 
of an expert chauffeur. Automobiling is getting to be u 
popular sport in Sacramento, and Mr. Anderson could 
no longer resist an introduction to the horseless vehicle. 

Queen Amelie of Portugal is one of the latest of the 
royal personages to adopt the motor car. Two 
weeks ago the Queen, with the young- princes and members 
of the suite, went to the royal fetes at Lisbon in an auto- 
mobile, the Crown Prince acting as chauffeur. 



Queen Automobiles 

The machine for all-around every-day usage 

A MODERATE PRICED CAR THAT YOU CAN DEPEND ON 




MODEL "E" QOEEN TOURING CAR, $1150 

The model E Queen touring oar has 18 actual horse power, with 
two opposed cylinders and a weight of 1600 lbs. All the working 
parts throughout the machine are well proportioned and have a sur- 
plus of strength Speed, 3 to 40 miles per hour; seats five people, 
double side door entrance, all speeds on one lever, finished in royal 
blue with cream colored gear and well upholstered in the finest of 
black leather. 

WHY PAY TWICE AS MUCH FOR A CAR, WHEN EVEN AT O 
THAT PRICE IT WILL NOT COMPARE WITH THE QUEEN ■ 



RARIG AUTOMOBILE AND GARAGE CO. 

(Occupying the finest repository for motor cars on the Pacific Coast) 
827 TO 833 FOLSOM ST., SAN FRANCISCO 



140 



-THE WASP - 



[July 22, 1905. 



The Germans are stirred up simply because Prince Hen- 
ry has entered a reliability contest and will drive a car. 
Americans did not become over-excited when a Washing- 
ton cop stopped President Roosevelt while out driving with 
a scorching chauffeur. 

Emperor William of Germany recently ordered a fine 
automobile of an Italian manufacturer. He now owns 
eight cars, all big touring vehicles. 

John D. Rockefeller can travel seventy-five miles in 
his automobile over his estate in Westchester, without 
running twice on the same road. He has not yet, however, 
offered the use of his grounds for an international race. 

L. A. Stevenson, the well-known auto enthusiast of 
Oakland, purchased from the Pioneer Automobile Company 
a model B Winton touring car. The Pioneer Automobile 
Company made a recent shipment of two two-cylinder 
Oldsmobile touring cars to the Hawaiian Islands. 

S. P. Neal of Sacramento, in company with a party of 
friends, ran to this city in his model C Winton touring ear 
and will spend a few days touring the bay counties. 

Edward B. Hinds, a prominent San Franciscan, pur- 
chased a model E Queen touring ear last week from the 
Rarig Automobile and Garage Company. The machine is 
fully equipped with all the latest improvements. After 
one lesson in the operation of the car Mr. Hinds, accom- 
panied by his wife, made a fast run last Sunday down to 
his home in Belmont. The trip was made without the 
slightest trouble of any kind, and the auto is so simple 
that Mrs. Hinds ran the machine 15 miles of the way, al- 
though she had never before even been in an automobile. 

Webb Jay 's successes with the White car have been so 
pronounced and his reduction of the track record so em- 
phatic that it is not probable that he will do much more 
track-racing this season. It is probable, however, that ho 
will get his ear in shape for long-distance racing prepara- 
tory to the Vanderbilt cup race, in which he is entered. 

J. R. Whipple, proprietor of the Touraine, Young's 
Hotel and the Parker House, Boston, has purchased three 
White steam touring cars and placed them in the hands of 
competent chauffeurs, to be used at the call of the giiests 
of his Boston hostelries. 

To climb Mt. Tamalpais in an automobile has been the 
dream of a great many automobilists since the advent of 
the horseless carriage. There is not a more beautiful trip 
than this to be found in America, said R. D. Chapin of the 
Olds Motor Works, who, in company with Messrs Thomas, 
Brinegar and Kaufman, recently made the trip in an 
Oldsmobile railroad automobile. The time consumed from 
Mill Valley to the top of the mountain was thirty-five min- 
utes, and the car has proven a success in every way. 

The non-stop record for the automobile 11m between 
Los Angeles and San Francisco is now held by a Pope- 
Toledo machine. L. A. Nares' 30 H. P. car made the long 
trip this week in the phenomenal time of 24 hours and 
50 minutes. The journey was made without any mechani- 
cal trouble of any sort. 

Walter White of Cleveland, driving a White steam 
ear, was the first automobilist of the Chicago-St. Paul 
touring party to reach St. Paul, although he left Chicago 
24 hours behind the rest of the Chicago ears. 



Abbott's Angostura Bitters have the call wherever an effective 
tonic for run-down system is needed; builds up flesh and nerve 
tissue. Druggists. 



ANDREWS, KEENAN & BLASAUF 

MACHINISTS AND ENGINEERS 

81 CITY HAI.I, AVENUE Phone South 10S9 



Automobile Repairs. American and Foreign Cars. Agents 
for Oleo, French Spark Plugs. Tires, Batteries, etc., Furnished. 
Springs made. Forgings, Machine Work, etc. ^t^ 




The Great 

WINTON 



«« A»» 



40-50 Horsepower 
is here 



IT SIMPLY EATS UP THE HIUS- 
GREATEST MACHINE IN THE WORI.D 
FOR THE MONEY— SEE IT. 



Nearly a half hundred Winton 4-cylinder 
machines now running in California — every 
one giving perfect satisfaction. We advise 
you to see any of the Winton owners. Then 
come to us and study the simple mechanics 
of the car— you will then be a Winton man, 
save money and truly enjoy automobiling. 
We have besides the Winton line the whole 
1905 models of the Oldsmobiles on our stock 
room floor. 



Pioneer Automobile Co. 

905-925 Golden Gate Avenue, San Francisco 



DE DIETRICH AUTOMOBILES 




MR. PAUL KOECHLIN, California Representative, 
now at the Marie Antoinette, Van Ness Avenue, 
will be pleased to give demonstrations to prospective 
buyers, with his 30 h. p. Demonstration Car. 
Appointments by telephone or letter. 



H. W. Flbtchbr with 80 h. p. De Dietrich Racer 
beat World's Records for 100, 50 and 1 miles, at Ormond 
Beach, Fla.; also Road Records for 20, 10 and 5 miles, 
Cuba. 



JOLV 



■905] 



THE WASP 



141 




Oid r » 



Thursday — Dear me! What silly people there are in 
California! Mrs. Lightley came in to see me today and 
told me all about her week-end trip to Santa Cruz." The 
greatest attraction there this year, she says, is a stout 
society girl who goes in swimming every afternoon. The 
newspapers wrote up her silk bathing suit and told how 
it clung to the curves of her well-rounded form, and what 
do yon think? Every man in Santa Cruz goes down now 
to see her emerge from the waves. What brutes ! Oh, 
those men! Thank heavens, I'm neither a wife nor a 
mother! It's positively awful! Wouldn't you think 
people could find something better to do than sitting on 
a beach for an hour to see a fat young woman come jut 
of the water and wring out her bathing dress? Mrs. 
Lightley says that the last day she was down there were 
all of two thousand men, women and children in the 
beach with their eyes glued on the stout society woman 
while she flopped around in the waves like a walrus. There 
the idiots sat and stared as if they expected to see the fish 
rise up out of the water and walk ashore with straw hats 
and poke bonnets on their heads. When the fat woman 
got through with her evolutions in the breakers she came 
up the beach and stopped to wring out her skirt — or what 
passes for one — and, oh my! Isn't this fearful? Opera- 
glasses were focused on her from every direction and on all 
sides you could hear the comments from the men on the 
shapeliness of her le — her limbs. Oh, dear! The vulgar 
brutes! "The women paid no attention to her good 
points downstairs," said Mrs. Lightley, in telling me about 
it. "They said that she was much too top-heavy for her 
foundations, and that for the life of them they couldn't 
see what two thousand people came there to look at. It 
was ridiculous." That's what I say. Mrs. Lightley tells 
that just as soon as the fat woman went into her dressing- 
room the whole two thousand "rubbernecks," as she calls 
them, got up and went home. Rubbernecks! Did you 
ever hear such language? I must go down to Santa Cruz 
myself next week, if I can find some one to chaperone poor, 
dear Flossie while I am gone. I can't trust her with Mrs. 
Lightley, for she says that though she likes canaries and 
parrots, she can't abide cats. Oh, dear! 



Friday Gracious! How my bead aches. Those women 
al the Ethical Effort Club nearly talked me to d< 1 
ialk was informal while waiting for the Prea 
at the dressmaker's being Btted. Mrs. Gabbs brought 
that MaAnenj divorce case. My! She wenl on al a 
rate, and said what a too) Mrs. McAneny was to commi 
suit for divorce. "What would you have her dot" I 

ed, " Divorce is ha. I. 1 admit ; but ii \ bettei 
wretched marriage." "Why, wait till the "1,1 boj 
she answered, as coolly as if she was ordering dinner. And 
then the whole crowd began t<> figure up jusl about how 
naanj years she would have to wait. Oh! my! l-n'i ii 
dreadful! Mrs. Lightlej said that the worst of being a 
willow would he weariiiL' mourning, and black makes you 
look so old. Mrs. MiiLTshy I. .Id of a friend .if hers who. 

like Mrs. McAneny, married an old man. ex] ting him to 

"croak," as she expressed it. in a year or two; but he 
lived for eleven years, and then his relatives contested his 
will. "You can't tell." said she; "this Mr. McAneny 
may be one of them tough old pioneers that drank so 
much bad whisky in early days it's corned them clean 
through, and nothing will kill them. Thev would thrive 



in a smallpox hospital. 



Oh, 



rracious! I got the creeps 



when they talked of smallpox. Lands sake! I must buy 
some disinfectant tomorrow. Mrs. Shoddy related the sad 
story of her aunt's experience with an old man who had 
a bad cough and three millions in railroad bonds. He 
would not let anybody but himself cut off the coupons, 
and the exertion made him so weak that it was hoped 
he could not survive the next dividend day. Instead of 
that, he only got a slight hemorrhage that seemed to re- 
lieve him, and he gained weight and strength so rapidly 
his wife had to sue for divorce in self-protection. Lands 
sake ! Just think of it ! Before the case was decided the 
poor woman was run over by a street ear and her old hus- 
band got half her own estate, amounting to $3,600, and 
then turned round and married his trained nurse. Oh, 
gracious ! We would have talked more, but the President 
telephoned in to postpone the meeting, as the dressmaker 
bad spoiled the dress and she was going iiome to go to bed 
and send for the doctor. 

Tabitha Twiggs. 




Any Californian who knows The Theo. Gier Co. will be 
glad to learn that they received last week three carloads 
of the celebrated Puck Rve — the leader of fine whiskies. 



STOCKHOLDERS' MEETING. 
The regular annual meeting of the 
Jersey Farm Company will be held 
at the office of the company, S51 
Howard St., San Francisco, Cal., 
at the hour of 2 p. m., Tuesday, 
August 1st, 1905, for the election of 
a Board of Directors for the ensuing 
year and for the transaction of such 
other business as may properly come 
before said meeting. 

H. J. SNEATH, Secretary. 



He Got His. 

She: "I think a horse knows more 
than a dog." 

He; "I don't" 

She : "Very likely; but I was speak- 
ing of a horse." 



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142 



-THE WASP 



[July 22, 1905. 




John W. Thompson, a veteran actor and journalist, has 
been writing some very interesting' articles for New York 
dramatic newspapers lately. Some years ago Thompson 
was a member of the old and justly celebrated California 
Theatre Stock Company, when John MeCullough and Law- 
rence Barrett were connected with the famous organiza- 
tion. Thompson's articles are in the form of "Short 
Talks" with well-known actors — Frank Kildav amongst 
the number. Kildav was a very successful juvenile at 
the California in the olden days, and -went to New York 
when the MeCullough organization was disbanded. He 
"was well received in the metropolis, and has never since 
come West, except on a flying visit to some old San Fran- 
cisco friends. Thompson recently referred to the eulogi- 
nnis that San Francisco writers now keep up on the old 
California stock company. Kildav pointed out that the 
most noted critic of his day in San Francisco, the late 
Mrs. Joe Austin, sister of Jerome Hart, and well known 
in the journalistic world by her nom-de-plume of "Betsy 
B:, " found many flaws in the venerated and proverbially 
flawless company. It would arrnear from Mr. Kilday's 
statement that those stage idols we worship without reserve 
today were often made sport of bv Betsy B. and the lesser 
critics who followed her cue. Mr. Kilday is seriously in 
error, however, in his statement that John MeCullough 
became so intensely disgusted with the attacks of the 
critics that he "disbanded the company and shook the fleas 
and sand of San Francisco from his feet." The reason of 
the disbandment of the company and the dispersion of the 
sand and fleas from the pedal extremities of the great tra- 
gedian was a financial, and not a sentimental, one. Mr. 
Kildav 's memory, like that of many people, is faulty. 
-o ^^y <^ 

The old California Theatre stock company was backed 



by Win. C. Ralston, the man who built the Palace Hotel 
and founder of the Bank of California, and financed many 
other great enterprises. When Ralston 's fortunes suddenly 
changed the California Theatre ceased to be a subsidized 
concern, and MeCullough found it more profitable to 
launch out as a traveling star tragedian than to remain a 
fixture at the head of the local stock company. 
^> ^> <^ 
MeCullough certainly had gathered around him a won- 
derfully clever lot of people, and his success in that respect 
shows the influence of a subsidy on the art dramatic. The 
French stage is famous the world over for the subsidized 
theatre which the Government supports, and sets the 
standard. Art is there superior to money. With us in 
America at present the reverse is the ease. Art is nothing, 
and money is everything on the stage, and we go steadily 
from bad to worse. 

^> ^^ ^> 

The leading man of the old California Theatre stock 
company when Frank Kilday and John Thompson were 
connected with it in the seventies was Thomas W. Keene, 
who afterwards became so noted in tragic roles before his 
failing health compelled his retirement from the stage. 
In his talk with Thompson as published in the New York 
Dramatic News, Kilday rattles along in entertaining style 
about the composition of the famous old company. He 
says: "Bella Pateman was the leading lady, Ellie Wilton 
the ingenue, Mrs. Judah and Mrs. Sanders the old women. 
Harry Edwards and Walter Leman the first old men, Rob- 
ert Pateman the first comedian, Nelson Decker and Ralph 
Delmore lovers, Milliam A. Mestayer, a most versatile 
actor, played genteel heavies, character comedy, and, fur- 
ther, was equally at home in comic opera and burlesque. 
Barton Hill and Robert E. Eberle were stage managers, 
and when a particularly good part came along Mr. Hill 
would take it so as to relieve Tom Keene and give him a 
( Continued on rage 143) 

A Young, Ambitious Woman, with a small amount of capital, can 
secure an opportunity to be coached by an artist of great reputation, and 
featured in the leading fart for a Western tour of a play which has a 
ecord of 20 weeks in New York City; 16 weeks in Boston aud other 
large cities — with beautiful 1 thographs and special advertising ; an 
excellent route is now being booked. Address Bos 6, Wasp. 




JOHN RAPP & ^SON, Agents 

San Francisco, Ca . 

Distributors for Every Town on 
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I o the Superior Couri of the < ity and County 
of San Francisco, State of California, depart- 
ment No 7. Edward Jones, plaintiff, vs. 
Elaine Jones, defendant. Action brought 
in the Superior Couit, City and County of San 
Francisco. State of California, and the Com- 
plaint filed in said City and County of San 
Francisco, in the office of the Clerk of said 
Superior Court. 

The people of the State of California send 
greeting to Elaine Jones, defendant. 

You are hereby required to appear in an action 
brought against you by the above named plaintiff 
in the Superior Court, City_ and County of San 
Francisco, State of California, and to answer the 
complaint filed therein within ten days (ex- 
clusive of the day of service) after the service on 
you of this summons, if served within this 
Countv; or if served elsewhere, within thirty 
da vs. 

The said action is brought to obtain a judg- 
ment and decree of this Court dissolving the 
bonds of matrimony now existing between 
plaintiff and defendant, upon the ground of 
defendant's desertion, also for general relief, 
as will more fully appear in the Complaint on 
file to which special reference is hereby made. 

All of which will more fully appear in the 
Complaint on file herein to which you are here- 
by referred. 

And you are hereby notified that if you fail to 
appear and answer the said Complaint, as above 
required, the said plaintiff will apply to the 
Court for the relief therein demanded. 

Given under my hand and Seal of said Supe- 
rior Court at the City and County of San Fran- 
cisco, State of California, this 21st day of June, 
in the year of our I,ord, one thousand nine 
hundred and five. 

JOHN J. GREIF, Clerk. 

By W. J. HENEY, Deputy Clerk. 



Seal of the Superior 

Court of the City and ! 

County of San Francis- j 

■ co. State of California. . 



July 22, 1905. ] 



-THE WASP 



143 



'Continued from page 14s) 

ni'_'la off i" rest his \ oice. As the i 

pany embraced ab thirty 1 

lull actors and actresses) you will 

how strong ii was; in fact, 1 

and conld play everything from 
Shakespearean comedy and tragedy 
to burlesque and farce. No wi 

the S;in Francisc iwspapers ol to 

day love i" hark hack to those times, 
when Jennie Lee was our sonbrette 
and men iikr John Wilson and Ned 
Thayer wenl on for almost anything. 
N11 long rehearsals then; no coaching 
and telling you how to read this and 
thai speech. You were supposed to 
know your business, and if you didn'l 
you woiiMn'1 be there. 
«o -0 "^ 

BUSINESS WOMEN. 



A Lunch Fit for a King. 
An active and successful young 
lady tells her food experience. 

"Sume three years ago 1 suffered 
from nervous prostration, induced by 
continuous brain strain and improper 
f 1, added to a great grief. 

"I was ordered to give up my work, 
as there was great danger of my mind 
failing me altogether. My stomach 
was in had condition (nervous dys- 
pepsia, I think now) and when Grape- 
Nuts I' 1 was recommended to me. I 

had no faith in it. However, I tried 
it, and soon found a marked improve- 
ment in mv condition as the result. 
I had been troubled with deadly faint 
spells, and had been compelled to use 
a stimulant to revive me. I found, 
however, that by eating Grape-Nuts 
a I such times I was relieved as satis- 
t'aelorily as by the nse of stimulants, 
and suffered no bad effects, which was 
a great gain. As to my other troubles 
— nervous prostration, dyspepsia, etc. 
— the Grape-Nuts diet soon cured 
them. 

"I wish especially to call the at- 
tention of office girls to the great ben- 
efit I derived from the use of Grape- 
Nuts as a noon luncheon. I was thor- 
oughly tired of cheap restaurants and 
ordinary lunches, and so made the ex 
periment of taking a package of 
Grape-Nuts food with me, and then 
slipping' out at noon and getting a 
nickel 's worth of sweet cream to add 
to it. I found that this simple dish 
finished off with an arjple, peach, 
orange, or a bunch of grapes made a 
lunch fit for a king, and one that 
agreed with me perfectly. 

" I throve so on my Grape-Nuts diet 
that I did not have to give up my 
work at all, and in the two years have 
had only four lost days charged up 
against me. 

"Let me add that your suggestions 
in the little book, '''Road to Well- 
ville," are, in my opinion, invaluable, 
especially to women." Name given 
bv Postiim Co., Battle Creek, Mich. 

'"The Road to Wellville" in each 
pkg. 



Mas Freeman is receiving a greal 

,|, ' ;|1 '- 1 i" ; the imj 1 

that lias tak,-n place at the Tivoli un- 
der his inflm in a Far be it fron 
to say air. disparagemet 

Max. for hi 1 d always was one 
'he cli a i n ids business. 

I" ! 'it wouldn'l anything and any one 

be an improve 111 on the incubus 

under which the Tivoli has labo 
1 an you make a silk purse out of a 
""» 's ear? K it possible to run a 
temple of art on the same lines as an 
ipholsterer's shop? Doth any sane 
person expeel the atmosphere of an 
Augustine Daly Company in a house 

dominated and dei alized by a Sba\- 

ings 1 

"vi- -C- -Qy 

X. t'. Goodwin was narrating the 
adventures of a "Hamlet" company 
thai had toured the remotes! parts of 
the West. 

••Manager Smith, who also played 
first grave-digger." said Mr. Good- 
win; "was in despair iu a certain 
Arizona town, for his company was 
hooked for a two weeks' engagement, 
and the people treated the play with 
a most disheartening indifference. 
They yawned in the soliloquy, and in 
the mad scene many of Ihem went off 
to sleep. 

"Smith would have changed the 
bill, but no other play had been re- 
hearsed, and there was neither cos- 
I unies nor scenery Eor any other play. 
So •Hamlet' had to continue, though 
Smith would have given anything for 
the power to stir the audience up a 
bit. 

"One night he stirred them up un- 
intentionally. He put on. by accident, 
two vests. When he took off, in the 
grave-digging scene, first the one vest 
and then the other, the people were 
amused. A roar of laughter ran over 
the house, and there was a burst of 
applause — the first applause of the 
engagement. 

' ' Smith was pleased and proud. He 
saw now what the people liked, and he 
resolved to give it to them in full 
measure. So the next night, in this 
scene, he wore twelve vests, and. 
standing in front of the grave, he re- 
moved them one by one. Roars of 
mirth shook the house; it was the 
proudest moment of Smith's life; he 
felt that he had been the company's 
salvation. 

"As he removed the ninth vest he 
looked around, and at once his self- 
conceit fell 60 per cent. He had 
thought they were laughing at him 
alone, but there behind him was the 
second grave-digger, putting on the 
vests as fasl as he look them off." 

*o "o <a>- 

Tom: "He says he has so many bus- 
iness troubles they keep him awake 
al nights." 

Dick: "Yes; bid they don't keep 
him wide awake .luring business hours 
and that's his principal trouble." 




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Agents, 323 Market St. Send for circular 



144 



-THE WASP- 



[July 22, 1905. 



No Cause for Jealousy. 

Mrs. Wiekmire: "From the happy 
expression you had when Mrs. Potts 
was singing, one might imagine that 
you enjoyed that sort of thing. You 
don't break out into happy smiles over 
my singing." 

Mr. Wiekmire: "I wasn't smiling' 
over her singing. I was just thinking' 
how lucky I was that she belonged to 
Potts instead of myself." 
<3> ^> <i- 

"There was one reason why we did 
not give you any encores." 

Discouraged Entertainer (eagerly) : 
"And what was that reason?" 

"We were afraid you would re- 
spond." 

o ^> ^> 

MENTAL ACCURACY. 



Greatly Improved by Leaving Off 
Coffee. 

The manager of an extensive cream- 
ery in Wis. states that while a regular 
coffee drinker, he found it injurious 
to his health and a hindrance to the 
performance of his business duties. 

"I cannot say," he continues, 
' ' that I ever used coffee to excess, but 
I know that it did me harm, especial- 
ly during the past few years. 

"It impaired my digestion, gave 
me a distressing sense of fullness in 
the region of the stomach, causing- a 
most painful and disquieting palpita- 
tion of the heart, and what is worse, 
it muddled my mental faculties so as 
to seriously injure my business effici- 
ency. 

"I concluded, about 8 months ago, 
that something would have to be 
doue. I quit the nse of the old kind 
of coffee, short off, and began to drink 
Postum Food Coffee. The cook didn't 
make it right at first — she didn't boil 
it long enough, and I did not find it 
palatable and quit using it and wen* 
back to the old kind of coffee and to 
the stomach trouble again. Then my 
wife took the matter in hand, and by 
following the directions on the box 
faithfully, she had me drinking Post- 
um for several days before I knew 
it. When I happened to remark that 
I was feeling much better than I had 
for a long time, she told me that I had 
been drinking Postum, and that ac- 
counted for it. Now we have no other 
kind of coffee on our table. 

"My digestion has been perfectly 
restored, and with this improvement 
has come relief from the palpitation 
of the heart that used to bother me 
so, and I note such a gain in mental 
strength and acuteness that I can at- 
tend to my office work with ease and 
without making the mistakes that 
were so annoying to me while I was 
using the old kind of coffee. 

"Postum Food Coffee is the greatest 
table drink of the times, in my hum- 
ble estimation." Name given by Pos- 
tum Co., Battle Creek, Mich. 

There's a reason. 



AJiiTJirLruxruxruTxiJTJTnjijijxriJiJTjTrLrLrLn. 



"J 



I THE THEATRES 

QijTjriruTnrLajTjxnjinjiruiJinjirLrLrL' 
At the Chutes. 

So great has been the success of 
Bothwell Browne's Japanese musical 
extravaganza, "Princess Fan Tan," 
that it will be continued for one more 
week at the Chutes. Nearly three 
hundred clever children take part in 
the production, and it is safe to say 
that such a remarkable aggregation 
of youthful talent has never been seen 
upon a single stage before. The 
"Champagne Dance," participated in 
by twelve pretty misses, the ballet of 
"the early and olden days," and "the 
song of six cities" are but three of 
the twenty specialties with which the 
extravaganza is enlivened. The cos- 
tumes are new and brilliant, the scenic 
effects unusually atraetive, and all of 
the music is tuneful and catchy. The 
amateurs will appear on Thursday 
evening, incidental to the production 
of "Princess Fan Tan," and Chiquita 
"the living- doll," Annie Redline, the 
plump lady, and the babies in the life- 
saving incubators are always glad to 
receive visitors. 

-Q>- -^> <=>• 

The friends of Mrs. Hersehel May- 
all, whose picture appears in this 
week's Wasp, were very much sur- 
prised to read in last week's issue 
that she had returned to the stage and 
forsaken it again. Her reappearaner: 
and disappearance' was so rapid that 
it was suggestive of the famous tele- 
gram of the Irish railroader to head- 
quarters: "On agin, off agin, gone 
agin. Finnegan." Mrs. Mayall plaj'ed 
but very small parts, and it was 
through the friendship of George 
Lask, I believe, that she got the brief 
engagement at the Grand Opera 
House recently when she needed work, 
her talented husband having, it is 
said, left her to seek her own liveli- 
hood. While Hersehel Mayall is noi; 
exactly an Edwin Booth, he is a capa- 
ble actor, and actually shines in some 
parts. He has given very creditable 
impersonations as "Anthony" and 
"Mercutio." His "John Storm" in 
Hall Caine's "Christian" won him 
the most renown amongst actors. It 
is in that character he is depicted in 
this week's Wasp, but the saintly look 
on his countenance is not permanent. 
It comes off without washing, if one 
may believe the friends of Mrs. May- 
all, who sympathize with the little 
woman in her distress. 
^a- <^ ■ < o 

"What did that gentleman mean 
when he asked you if your environ- 
ment was pleasant?" asked the young- 
er sister. 

"Oh, he meant the things which 
were around me while I was in the 
country," replied the older one. 

"Well, Julia, I never heard men's 
arms called bv that name before." 



#" 



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1905 



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AH the Year 
Round Tours 
Travel by Sea 

excellent Service, Low Rate. Including 
Berth and Meal. 

Steamers leave Piers 9 and 11, San Francisco, lor 

Los Angeles San Diego Santa Cruz 

Santa Barbara Monterey 

Eureka Seattle Tacoma 

Victoria, Vancouver, etc. 

And to those desiring longer trips to Alaska 
and Mexico. 

For Information retarding ..lllng datea. 
ate, obtain folder. 

San Franclaco Ticket Office.: 

* New Montgomery St. (Palace Hotel) 
10 Market St. and Broadway Wharves. 

C. D. DUNANN, Qui. Passenger Agent, 
in Market St.. flan rranelsce. 

OCCIDENTAL & ORIENTAL 

STEAMSHIP COMPANY 

FOR 

JAPAN AND CHINA 

Steamers will leave wharf, corner of First 
and Brannan streets, at 1 p. m.. for Hono- 
lulu, YOKOHAMA, Kobe. Nagasaki, Shang- 
hai and HONOKONQ. as fallows: 

COPTIC, calling at Manila, Wedne-day, August 2 
DORIC, " " Wednesday, Sept. 20 

COPTIC, '• " Saturday, Oct. 21 

No cargo received on board on day of sail- 
ing. 

Round Trip Tickets at Reduced Rates 
For freight or passage apply at company 1 ! 

The Merchant's Exchange, 7th Floor. San 
Francisco. 

D. D. STUDB8. Oenrral Manager. 




Volume LIV.—N0.5. 



SAN FRANCISCO, JULY 29, 1905. 



Price 10 cents 



PUBLISHERS' NOTICE 

THE WASP is published every Saturday by The Wasp Publishing 
Company, at 506 Mission Street. Subscriptions $5 per year, payable In 
advance, postage prepaid. Subscriptions to all foreign countries 
within the PobUI Union 16 per year. 

The trade on the Pacific Coast supplied by the San Francisco 
News Company. Eastern Agents supplied by the American News 
Company, New York. 

THE WASP will pay for contributions suitable to Its columns, and 
will endeavor to return all rejected manuscripts, but does not guar- 
antee their return. 

Photographs will also be accepted and paid for. 

AddresB all communications to Wasp Publishing Company, 606 
MlBslon Street, San Francisco, Cal. 
Telephone Main 1643. 



TO ADVERTISERS.— Ab the Illustrated pageB of THE WASP go to 
press early, all advertisements printed in the same forms should 
be received not later than Monday at noon. Changes of adver- 
tisements should alBO be sent In on Monday to Insure publication. 



IJTJTJTJTJXTlJTJTJTJTJTriiTJT^^ 

PLAIN ENGLISH 



STRAIGHT TALKS ON TIMELY TOPICS 




HE remarks on immigration which were treated 
in these columns last week created some stir. 
People have such milk-and-water opinions on 
immigration handed out to them by the daily 
newspapers that when they read the truth 
in a weekly like The Wasp, which is not afraid 
of its shadow, they are astonished. The daily 
newspapers prate constantly on the "flood of Japanese," 
etc., etc. This pleases the labor politicians because it 
helps those gentlemen to get into office. But the truth is 
that with all" this "flood" of Asiatic labor our fruit groves 
within twenty-five miles of San Francisco cannot get 
hands to save their crops. This I showed last week by the 
dispatches published in the daily newspapers of this city. 
Since then a dispatch from Marysville has stated that 
I five hundred women and girls were needed to save the fruit 
Mcrop. The three canneries at that place are so short of 
Ihelp that they cannot handle the fruit, which is ripening 
fast under the stimulus of a summer sun. Large quanti- 
ties of fruit have been sent to this city, where there are 
I better facilities for handling it; but even here there is 
Icry for help, and the school authorities have been be- 
1 seiged by demands for certificates which will permit chil- 
dren under school age to work during vacation. The local 



canners are drawing on the youth of the Latin quarter 
1 ci the fullest extent to assist them. The Japanese and 
Chinese employment agencies cannot begin to meet the 
demand for help at reasonable prices. All this bears out 
the assertion many times made by The Wasp that the 
Asiatics on this Coast have so far not crowded out white 
workers. 

The Wasp has maintained that the industries of the 
Pacific Coast could easily accommodate a quarter of a 
million of Asiatics with advantage to the white popula- 
tion. These Asiatics might be utilized in occupations that 
white people avoid, and their employment would create 
wealth and make more work in various ways for Ameri- 
cans. 

The Asiatic question has never been a burning one 
here, save with labor politicians and the newspapers that 
stand in awe of them. It certainly is not a serious matter 
at present when white school children have to be drafted 
into the orchards and canneries to save the crop. 

No American citizen worthy the name desires to see 
California flooded with Asiatics and the white race crowd- 
ed out, and when there is any danger of such a calamity 
The Wasp will be found in the front rank of those'demand- 
ing action in behalf of our countrymen and country- 
women. The white demagogues and grafters who control 
our city government are, however, a far greater menace 
to American civilization than all the coolies that ever 
came through the Golden Gate. The coolies recross the 
Pacific and lay their bones amongst those of their long 
line of Asiatic forefathers, but the white peril which de- 
bauches politics and hopes to degrade public office by get- 
ting into it we have always with us. 

Coolies without votes, even if they came here in swarms, 
are a simple proposition for the American people to solve. 
Much more serious is the problem presented by the inva- 
sion of America by Europe's surplusage of poverty, crime 
and ignorance. That is really the burning question in our 
great cities, where every year the spirit of anarchy grows 
stronger, and the municipal governments controlled by the 
votes of the unthinking masses grow more venal, cowardly 
and incompetent. There is only one way of checking the 
political evils of unrestrained white immigration, and that 
is by restriction of the privileges of citizenship. 

In some of the Southern States — notably Alabama — 
the white people, fearful of the ever-increasing population 
of illiterate negroes, have placed a statutory bar on ignor- 
ance. They have imposed conditions on would-be voters 
that have disfranchised blacks and whites alike who are 
unfit to discharge intelligently the political duties of 
American citizens. The courts have upheld these laws to 
protect the ballot-box. What has been done in Alabama 
is possible in every State in the Union. The illiterate 
white man and the criminal without character or qualifica- 



146 



ME WASP ~ 



July 29, 1905. 



tions for true citizenship should be disfranchised. No 
alien, however intelligent, should be made a citizen until 
he has resided here at least seven years and proven his 
worthiness. As I said last week, citizenship should be 
made a prize worth striving for earnestly. Benefits that 
are too easily obtained are never fully appreciated. 

The Real Need. 

The other night, at a disorderly political meeting which 
Mayor Sehmitz attended and where he addressed the tur- 
bulent crowd, he was eulogized as "the irreproachable 
champion of labor." Laying aside the fact that Mayor 
Sehmitz is really the reproachable champion of graft in- 
stead of the irreproachable champion of labor, why should 
any candidate for American office be put forward as the 
representative of a mere class? Everybody in this nation 
of eighty millions does not earn his breaa with horny fist 
and bathed brow, nor go to his daily toil in overalls and 
jumper. Two or three people keep shops and offices, etc., 
and a few work on farms — something like ten millions I 
think. Labor, which means "organized labor," numbers 
about one million, four hundred thousand members. But 
if it numbered forty millions the principle would remain 
the same. We want no champions of any one set of people 
for public office. We do not want an irreproachable 
champion of the bankers, or of the church, or of the jew- 
elers, or the stockholders, or the piano movers, plasterers, 
stevedores or fiddlers. We want men who are champions 
of all classes ; men who represent the American people and 
American principles. 

Americus. 



CHEVALIERS d'INDUSTRIE 



Some Schemes That Call for Earnest Discouragement 

Another blackmailing scheme is reported from New 
York. The persons working the swindle have professed 
to represent the "Press Artists' League," but had no 
authority for doing so. 

Shrewd blackmailers not infrequently victimize people 
by falsely pretending to represent legitimate newspapers. 
It is rarely that newspapers which are thus misrepresented 
and injured learn the facts of the ease. The person who 
is blackmailed is unlikely to tell about the affair, and the 
rascals who get the money remain silent unless some quar- 
rel or other unforeseen circumstance induces them to 
confess. There is a nest of these blackmailers in San 
Francisco — birds of bedraggled plumage and evil omen 
who have been expelled from all decent newspapers because 
of their criminal tendencies. They perpetrate the most 
bare-faced swindles, and owing to the laxity of the admin- 
istration of justice in San Francisco manage to keep ou! 
of State prison. 

Two of these notorious rascals once patronized a ten- 
derloin resort and represented themselves as well-known 
and reputable newspaper men. The more brazen of the 
reprobates declared he was Ambrose Bierce, and in the 
name of that writer, who is notably abstemious and correct 
in his habits, ran up a large bill for wine and the etceteras 
of a protracted debauch. The presentation of the bill to 
the astonished journalist exposed the deception, but the 
offenders managed to dodge the county jail. 

Another brace of bunko men from whom the fraternity 
and publishers have suffered in reputation and money go 
around pretending to represent charities. All their phil- 
anthropic enterprises are managed on the plan that charity 
begins at home, for they themselves are the "widows and 
orphans" for whom they profess to be gathering funds. 

A particularly brazen swindle was perpetrated not long 
ago by two of these long-tolerated bunko men, who are well 
known to the newspaper fraternity and the police, and are 



long overdue in State prison. They pretended to publish 
a special edition of The Wave, a society paper which has 
been dead for years. Under the postal laws a newspaper 
has to be published regularly or it is refused admission to 
the mails as a newspaper. This means that it cannot be 
circulated at all unless the company sells it on the news- 
stands. There was not a copy of the so-called special edi- 
tion of The Wave sold through the News Company. The 
whole enterprise was the rankest of swindles. A number 
of reputable firms gave advertisements to the rascals, who 
might just as well have picked their patrons' pockets. 
Probably not more than a hundred copies of the fake edi- 
tion were printed, and these were got out just to be shown 
to the advertisers, and enable the thieves to collect their 
bills. I am informed that these bunko men contemplate 
another coup of the same kind next Christmas, but if so 
they are likely to get what has been owing to them by the 
law for a long time. Steps are being taken by reputable 
publishers to fully expose all such rascals and protect legit- 
imate newspapers that suffer indirectly by their miscon- 
duct. 

Of late years a graft has been perpetrated on the San 
Francisco public by schemers who get up what they call 
benefits for the newspaper artists. The daily newspapers 
pay their artists well and work them lightly, and they need 
no benefits. But if they did they would not receive much 
from the schemers referred to. At this moment canvassers 
are going around San Francisco representing that the 
daily newspaper artists are getting up an album of charac- 
ter sketches of prominent and successful citizens. The 
names of the leading artists are freely used to obtain or- 
ders for this work, and subscribers are given to understand 
that the money will go into the pockets of the artists. 
The fact is that these schemes are gotten up by men out- 
side of the profession, and who have no connection at all 
with the newspaper business. The artists get little or 
nothing from the enterprise, being merely used as eats- 
paws. Representative or independent newspaper artists 
have protested several times against this imposition. There 
are always a few artists, however, who are willing to stand 
in on such schemes, and so the gTaf t goes on and helps to 
injure the reputation of the artistic fraternity and the ad- 
vertising business of the daily newspapers themselves. 

Why the newspapers tolerate it is a mystery. They 
could stop it in a moment, and they owe it to the public 
to do so. Merchants subscribe to such schemes under the 
apprehension that they are helping poor, hard-worked and 
underpaid artists, who need some assistance of that kind 
to eke out their miserable stipends and keep them from 
going hungry. It is a shame that the profession should 
be placed in such a false and humiliating position. The 
philanthropic merchant who gives what he regards as lit- 
tle more than alms has not the faintest idea that he is 
merely feathering the nest Of a glib-tongued grafter. 




SHCHAS. KEJLUS & COgg 

l&EXCL usrvE& 

HIGH GR ADE CLOTHIERS 

This Fall's Clothes we now present with new fashion 
plates (that bear the crest of originality) are so constructed 
as to give the wearer that herculean effect without the aid 
of a mattress of padding. This is Clothes Science, and will 
be appreciated by gentlemen who understand. 




7Z7it£*~/o 



[JOLY 29. 1905. 



-THE WASP- 



14i 



ABE'S SOLILOQUY 

" Uneasy lies the head that wears a crown." 

Scene — The Bowwow Cafe on Stockton street. 

Boss Ruef, having finished a $6.50 meal, not including 
the usual tip of five cents to the waiter, is immcrsi'il in 
deep thought, his head sunk upon his breast, and nolliin-j: 
but his noble brow and the curvature of his expressive 
nose showing above his shirt front. 
The Boss (solus) : 

The signs of late are not propitious; 
The registration looks suspicious. 
Whence comes this mighty host of voters? 
They're not my hoboes, thugs or floaters. 
They must be honest citizens. By thunder! 
It' that's the case they-11 snow me under. 
(The Boss shivers so that the silverware on the table 
rattles. Waiter enters hurriedly.) 
Waiter : 

Methought an earthquake did the dishes fling, 
Or did your noble excellency ring? 
The Boss (starting up): 

Varlet, begone ! Talk not to me of rings, 
And cause sharp pangs, as of a viper's stings. 
I would have peace and perfect solitude. 
Let Grady, Konkey, Ragan and that horde 
Have all the rings they please. 
Get out o' here, and leave me at my ease. 
(Waiter moves towards the door.) 
The Boss: 

But hold. Has any one left aught for me today? 
Go ask PieiTe downstairs, and let me know, I pray. 
(Exit waiter, who presently reappears with an armful of 
coin-sacks and business-looking envelopes.) 
Waiter: 

Your excellency, the graft today was light ; 
But the Chinatown squad will make it up tonight. 
The Boss (purpling with rage) : 

Darest talk to me of graft ! Varlet upon thy knees ! 
Learn, base scullion, that Abe Ruef takes but "fees." 
(Kicks the servitor downstairs, and opens the sack, 
spreading the contents on the table.) 

Aha ! 'tis pleasant to finger the mazuma 
When no one's looking. I may as well resume a 
Line of thought that fits the situation. 
And from Tom Hood extract an apt quotation. 
(Runs his fingers through the plunder while repeating 
the poet's lines.) 

" Gold, gold, gold, gold, 

Bright and yellow, hard and cold, 
Molten, graven, hammered, rolled 
Heavy to get and light to hold, 
Stolen, borrowed, squandered, doled, 
To the very verge of churchyard mold. 
Price of many a crime untold, 
Gold, Gold, Gold, G-o-l-d!" 
(Replaces coin in sacks and ties them up carefully.) 
Yet all this gold I'd give for slumber deep, 
For much I fear insomnia doth creep 
Upon me. Weighty, oh ! thrice weighty are my cares, 
And ruthless Crothers ne'er my feelings spares. 
(Drops wearily into chair and with half-closed eyes 
soliloquizes) : 

Like Macbeth, Ruef hath murdered sleep. 

The meekest of my sheep, 

The gentle cops, they sleep. 

And Schmitz! He was born asleep! 

Oh, sleep, that knits the raveled sleave of care! 

Yet I must wake up everywhere, 

And all times; mere somnolency 

Is all my rest. I wonder whence he 

Came, and of what stuff he's made, 



Thai in- can drive and fiddle in the shade 

While jurors dig up wrongs in blazing day, 

And with our plans the very devil play. 

He was not born to know a boss's woes, 

And that plain fact most evidently shows 

Upon that whiskered face he's 

Got. His methods are as raw as Case* 's, 

Oh, grievous are these troubles of my own ! 

O'er all the State it's widely known 

The Bar Association has keen scent of me 

And hopes to hound me up a tree. 

And there's that frightful registration 

That threats my utter desolation. 

It will not down, like Banquo's ghost. 

I've no defender but "The Evening Post." 

Sans sense, sans taste, sans worth of time, 

That prints but wretched slop aud slush and slime; 

Soon nothing in the world can give me joy; 

Life will be tedious as a twice-told tale, 

Vexing the dull ear of a drowsy man. 
(Commotion in the street.) 

What, ho! Say, waiter, what's all that rattle, 

So like the noise of coming battle? 
Waiter (entering) : 

It is, my liege, our Mayor Schmitz. 

A swarm of newsboys surround him now; 

He lifts his hat and shows his noble brow — 

That brow the orator so well befits. 

He mounts convenient an apple-peddler's wagon, 

And takes his place about the middle; 

He holds aloft his deadly fiddle. 

Alternate eloquence and melody 

Work ebb and flow upon that youthful sea 

Of sentiment. 
Ruef: 

I wonder if he has a jag on. 

Like "pied piper" of ancient days' renown, 

He charms all the vicious rats in town. 

In making of himself an ass 

No one in Frisco can Eugene surpass. 

At that diversion he's really great. 

Haranguing newsboys is his proper gait. 
(The noise abates. Enter Mayor Schmitz and Public 
Works Commissioner Maestretti. Ruef hides the bags of 
coin hastily, and sits on them.) 
The Boss: 

Oh, welcome on the hour; 

'Tis well you come, indeed, for now our power 

Is sorely tried, and we must think. 

The voters will not wink 

At governmental shame. 

The public is aflame, 

And we are all to blame. 

We play a desperate game. 

We played successful twice, 

But can we do it thrice? 

The facts are not the same. 

Now all the highways ring 

With stories of our violated trust, 

While scribes their charges fling 

Of tributes wrung from well-protected lust. 
Schmitz : 

You surely are not well today. 

I bring words of great good cheer. 

We opened up the fight with pipes and beer; 

We captured meetings, filled their halls with thugs, 

And made short work of Fairfax Wheelan's mugs. 

To win we 're in a Hooray way. 
Ruef: 

Oh, Schmitz, you are an ass immense, 

So awfully dense, 



Marriage Invitations, Announcements, at home, church, 
and reception cards engraved. Schussler Bros., 119 Geary 
Street. 



148 



■THE WASP- 



[July 29, 1905. 



That I almost despair 

Of making head against the blare 

Of wrath and red rebellion in the air. 

You talk of pugs and pipes 

As if we had not quite enough of stripes. 

Now, thugs and pugs are quite efficient in their way, 

But we have given them too much play, 

And now the voters flock away. 
Maestretti : 

Great Chief, you give me some fatigue. 

Are you, then, frightened by the League? 

The League may attitudinize. What then? 

We've downed 'em twice; 

Then why not thriee? 

'Tis true our foes have made some splutter 

Prom high Nob Hill to lowly gutter; 

But notwithstanding all their noise 

We hold our grip upon the working boys. 
Ruef : 

Maestretti, you have gone to school 

To me some time. You work by rule 

But fairly well. By nature you're a fool. 

The workingman, we stand him aft, 

Then load his union down with "graft." 

Our dangerous predicament you can't conceive. 

You've made mistakes. We must retrieve 

Our wavering lines or meet defeat. 

How can we handle conscience? There's the rub! 

The whale must have its tub. 

In former fights we had no one in prison; 

Another proposition now has risen. 

We had no graft or strumpets then to meat; 

You had not then been chased 

And mighty nearly placed 

On what they call Queer Street. 

This wakened public conscience is the whale, 

And to the latest hour of election day 

We are dangerously in the way 

Of the last swish of the mighty tail. 

So go your different ways. 

I'll think for several days 

What tub to cast that whale — 

The primaries may tell the tale. 
((Exit Sehmitz and Maestretti. More juvenile shouts 
heard outside, followed by fiddling.) 
The Boss: 

Gene has resumed his recreation; 

Presently, I guess, he'll read the Declaration 

Of Independence to those noisy kids. 

In every move the yahoo bids 

For sure defeat. He is the very worst. 

I wish his fiddle or himself may burst. 

For once Maestretti showed some thought, 

And yet he never caught 

The magnitude of our dilemma. 

I may have yet to show to them a 

Trick that's not put down in ink. 

Sehmitz might do for tub — could dump him with a 
wink. 

T. J. M. 



The True Account. 



The Morosini who states that an agent of the "Fads 
and Fancies" publication, in New York, attempted to 
blackmail him, and boasts that he kicked him out of his 
office, was "confidential agent" of Jay Gould, and aided 
him in some of the schemes by which Gould made his mill- 
ions. They quarreled over the division of the spoils, and a 
fight resulted. Morosini struck Gould, being the larger 
man, and perhaps armed and prepared for the attack. 
Before he attached himself to Gould he was a truck gar- 
dener in Jersey. His eldest daughter eloped with the fam- 
ily coachman shortly after he became a millionaire and 
created great excitement in the Gotham Four Hundred. 



Jay Gould's Sister. 

The story published in The Wasp about the impoverish- 
ed Mrs. Overaeker, sister of Mrs. Howard Gould selling 
newspapers on the streets of San Francisco, reminds me of 
a similar instance in the Gould family. A sister of Jay 
Gould's lived many years in Los Angeles, in poor circum- 
stances. She was the wife of an aged minister, whose ten- 
ure of a call was uncertain, and they were dependent upon 
his small salary for support. When Jay Gould yielded up 
the Ghost, years ago, his will showed that he had merely 
remembered his sister, the bequest being less than $50,000. 
A reporter called upon the sister, who was living in a 
cottage in a remote section of the city, and asked if she 
intended to contest the will, and why her brother had vir- 
tually disinherited her. The kind old lady replied that she 
was well satisfied and was grateful to "Jason" for remem- 
bering her. The cottage was plainly furnished, and every- 
thing showed a life of poverty and self-denial. Jay Gould 
left millions, and, according to reports, borne out by cir- 
cumstances, had previously extended no aid whatever to 
his sister. 

A traveler from the arid interior to where the cooling 
breezes fan the coast region, was refreshing himself with 
a long lemonade in the smoking compartment, where Jus- 
tice Van Dyke, snuggled into the corner of the settle, was 
puffing on a long, thick, black cigar, emitting clouds of 
thick white smoke with apparent enjoyment. Into this 
happy region, where the air was scarcely more than 100 
in the shade, came Dr. Henry Morse Stevens of University 
fame. Plunging his hands into the marble wash hand-basin 
Dr. Stevens sniffed the air, and pausing in his ablutions, 
exclaimed: "Where does that awful smell come from? 
We must have a hot box!" Thereupon the clouds from 
Judge Van Dyke's cigar became thicker and thicker and 
the jurist soon filled the compartment so full that not even 
one of his compatriots' opinions could be more obfuscated. 
Dr. Stevens, of course, soon discovered the source of the 
smell and retired to his seat in the car. Later in the day 
they were introduced by some common acquaintance, and 
the twinkle in the jurist's eyes indicated that he enjoyed 
the joke. 




That our garments nave maintained a char- 
acteristic individuality for graceful shapeliness (ana 
the retention of their shapeliness through a long 
period of service) has keen due, we take it, to tne 
fact that, while purchasing only from the very best 
of good clothes makers, we have taken the extra 
precaution to dictate the various materials that are 
used in their manufacture. 

An example worthy of emulation by our 

competitors. 

Heller (k? Frank, Inc. 

Clothiers 

Market Street and Grant Ave. 




T the present moment society is agog ovar the 
rumor that the Peter Martins, who are at 
present mixing in the gay whirl at Newport, 
are to visit San FTancisco ere the summer is 
o'er. Of course Mrs. Eleanor Martin will en- 
tertain extensively in honor of her daughter- 
in-law, who reinforced her wardrobe in great style while 
in Paris. Showing off her handsome and aristocratic 
daughter-in-law right on the heels of the Taft party would 
be another great triumph for our social empress. Society 
stood on its head, figuratively speaking, when Mrs. Peter 
was here before. It will throw flip-flaps to get through 
the crush when next she comes arrayed in the latest Paris- 
ian confections and with the crowned head of San Fran- 
cisco society holding the door open, so to speak. 

Beginning with the marriage of that fascinating little 
widow, Mrs. Anna Albrecht Irwin and Mr. Edward M. 
Bray at the residence of Mrs. Irwin in Fruitvale, on August 
2d, there will be a succession of weddings. Miss Leslie 
Green's marriage to Mr. Howard Huntington will be just 
as fashionable an affair as the pretty bride will permit. 
She will be attended to the altar by Miss Ruth Green, Miss 
Marian and Miss Elizabeth Huntington and Miss Rutb 
Knowles, and the groom will have as his best man his life- 
long chum, Mr. Hugh Stewart of Los Angeles. Only about 
forty relatives will be in attendance. By the way, the 
Huntingtons are paying a handsome compliment to the 
young fiancee in crossing the world to be at the nuptials, 
which is just what the Princess Hatzfeldt, who was Clara 
Huntington, is doing. Later in September Miss Bessie 
Haven is to marry Mr. Hiram Tubbs, but this will not be 
one of the quiet weddings. There will be a long string of 
bridesmaids, and the ceremony will probably take place 
in the Church of the Advent, after which there will be an 
elaborate reception at the Havens home, to which about 
four hundred guests will be invited. In Miss Havens' 
train will be Miss Laura Haven, maid of honor; Miss Eve- 
lyn Hussey, Miss Susie Hall, Miss Fannie Plaw, Miss Kath- 
arine Brown and Miss Charlotte Hall. Those who have 
seen it say that the little bride's gown, which is already 
made, is the loveliest thing ever seen in Oakland. It is of 
white mousseline satin and is trimmed with exquisite old 
lace, the lines of the skirt being straight and classic in their 
simplicity, and the bodice is as quaintly graceful a creation 
as was that of Martha Washington herself. A unique ar- 
rangement has been made for the bridesmaids' gowns, which 
shade from a faint tint of pink to a deep, warm rose, the 
difference being that instead of each dress having the 
shaded effect each dress is of the one tint, the group giving 
the color effect. 

Also, in September will be the weddings of Miss Edna 
Tretheway, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. John Tretheway of 
East Oakland, and Mr. J. Eisenbaeh of the Wells Fargo 
Nevada National Bank of San Francisco, which will take 
place at the Tretheway home, and will be an elaborate 
function, the bride being attended by seven girl friends. 

The more fastidious your taste the more it will be delighted Milk Chocolate Creams— another original candy crea- 

by the fine wines of the Repsold vintage. Call at 420 tion at Haas' Candy Stores, Phelan Building and James 
Pine St. Flood Building. 



Miss Ada Laymance has also chosen September for her 
wedding to Mr. Edward Dodge of Alameda, although the 
exact date and the minor arrangements have not yet been 
decided upon. 

V* *£& (Jy* 

The marriage of Miss Florinne Juillerat, daughter of 
Mr. and Mrs. A. Juillerat of Berkeley, to Mr. Harry M. 
Gessner of Oakland is to take place in the East Oakland 
Baptist Church, where Miss Juillerat has been leading 
contralto for several years, and September has again been 
named as the month of months. 

Either the end of August or the first of September is 
to witness the nuptials of Miss Edith Gaskill and Mr. Roy 
McCabe, both of Oakland. There have been no plans an- 
nounced for this wedding, although the prominence of the 
couple assures a fashionable event. 

Across the estuary wedding bells will ring in September 
for the wedding of Miss Dorothy Barrett Bowen and Mr. 
Robert J. Holmes of Alameda. This will doubtless be a 
very quiet affair in consideration of the recent death of 
Miss Bowen 's brother. The bride-elect as well as Mr. 
Holmes are prominent people in the Eneinal City. 

In the first week of October Miss Florence White, the 
daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Asa White of East Oakland, will 
wed Mr. M. W. Faitoute of New York at the Church of the 
Advent, East Oakland. This is to be one of the important 
social events of the opening season and will equal any affair 
ever given in Oakland. After the ceremony there will be 
a big reception at the White's splendid home in East Oak- 
land, at which there will be a large attendance from San 
Francisco and the other cities across the bay, as well as 
from Oakland itself. In the long line of bridesmaids will 
be the following young belles: Miss Claire Chabot, Miss 
Marian Goodfellow, Miss Lueretia Burnham, Miss Anita 
Oliver, Miss Florence Hush and Miss Flora McDermott. 
The young couple are to make their home in New York, 
where Mr. Faitoute is a prominent business and club man. 

(J* ^% ti5* 

An Eastern paper tells an amusing story of Miss Roose- 
velt's preference for the company of the Count de !a Per- 
retti de la Rocca, the fascinating French vice-consul at 
San Francisco. I give it for what it worth. It was dur- 
ing the trip to the Redwoods in Sonoma County, where 
the Count was among the guests invited by Mrs. Arthur 
W. Foster to meet the President's daughter, who was 
pleased with the French nobleman's fine manners, and en- 
couraged him to linger by her side. The Count is too pop- 
ular with the fair sex to be carried off without protest, 
however, even by Miss Roosevelt, and a San Francisco 
belle, who is said to be favorably impressed by the vice- 
consul, drew the guest of honor aside and told her that 
the young man is a flirt and an affirmed lady's man, be- 
sides being a count. "That's no disgrace," retorted Miss 
Alice promptly, and beckoning the popular Count to her 



150 



-THE WASP 



[July 29, 1905. 



side she resumed the interrupted conversation. On the 
way back to San Francisco that evening' she dropped a 
word of advice for the benefit of the girl who had coun- 
selled her earlier in the day: "You need not fear the 
Count," was what she said; "he does not mean to marry 
any Calif ornian. " 

While Brigadier-General Frederick Fuuston is at Mon- 
terey Mrs. Funston, whose picture appears in this issue 
of the "Wasp," is spending the time between the home 
of her parents in East Oakland and her pretty residence 
out beyond the Presidio. 

For the first time since the death of Mr. Isaac Regna 
last spring, Mrs. Eegna has opened "Highlands," the 
beautiful Piedmont residence, to guests. She is entertain- 
ing Bishop and Mrs. Whittaker of Philadelphia, old and 
dear friends of the Regnas, who are summering in Cali- 
fornia. 

Society is much interested to know how the Duke de la 
Rochefaucauld will take the conviction and sentence of 
papa-in-law, United States Senator John Mitchell, alias 
Hippie, of Oregon. The Duchess was Miss Mattie Mitch- 
ell, daughter of the venerable land-grabber. Now that 
the honorable gentleman from Oregon has been sentenced 
to six months in the cooler like a common thief, the ques- 
tion arises whether the Duke can stand it. Will he dis- 
own the senator, or will the latter when he gets out of 
jail and tries to lead a clean life disown the Duke? These 
nice points of etiquette amongst our American nobility 
are very hard to decide. 

t^v ^* ^?* 

The engagement of Edith Hemming and Fred Healey, 
which was announced some months ago, has been broken. 
No cause is given by the young couple for the severnient, 
but I believe the course of true love has not ran smoothly 
for some time. The affair has been on and off again sev- 
eral times, but is declared by both this time to be final. 
Society has taken more or less interest in Mr. Healey 's 
adventures ever since he failed to turn up as best man to 
the wedding of Walter Hobart. On his way to the cere- 
mony he met a friend and forgot all about the interesting 
engagement at the church. 

^* $5* ^* 

Ethel Hager ran up to town for a couple of days this 
week, returning Thursday. She was wearing a smart 
three-quarter-length coat of pale blue rajah silk, which 
was most becoming. By the way, the fair Ethel is very- 
much thinner. The strain of going into the surf every 
day in a silk bathing suit with two thousand Santa Cruz 
rubbernecks straining their eyes out of their sockets at 
her is enough to reduce anybody's avoirdupois. 

t5* t£* &5* 

They say that the meeting of the stately Mrs. Emma 
Shafter Howard and her guest, Susan B. Anthony at 
Cloyne Court, Berkeley, was an event that made the recent 
conference of Kaiser William and the Czar in the Baltic 
look very tame and commonplace. The inferior sex who 
sport whiskers and pantaloons got all that was coming to 
them, if not more. 

t5* t£* t£* 

This is John Vance Cheney's first visit to San Fran- 
cisco in many years, and he has returned with a young 
and healthy wife, to whom he has addressed some very 
ardent poetry. His friends say that his obtaining good 
positions came about largely through the brilliant politics 
of his former wife, who is an extremely handsome and 
clever woman. By skillful maneuvering she managed to 

Don't forget that for a light, refreshing luncheon no wine 
can be more acceptable than the Repsold vintage. 



land her husband in a splendid position in Chicago, to 
which he himself, unaided, could hardly have attained. 
Poets are not usually hustlers. It is said that the first 
Mrs. Cheney left the poet because, as she expressed it, 
"library work brought on central coldness," that did not 
suit her. 

Mrs. Aylett Cotton, the president of the California 
Club, and her daughter, Miss Claudine Cotton, are spend- 
ing a few weeks down in San Luis Obispo County prepar- 
ing for the Fall, when the new club-house is to be opened 
and all sorts of activities will take form in women's org- 
anizations. Next winter bids fair to bs a stirring one in 
female clubdom. 

£& t^t t&* 

Mr. and Mrs. Francis Carolan, who were presented to 
the King of Portugal and his royal consort during their re- 
cent European wanderings, have left the Continent and 
established themselves in Mayfair, where they will take 
part in the London season. What terms, I wonder, did the 
Master of Ceremonies use in presenting the Queen of Bui- 
lingame to the Queen of the Portuguese ? Did he give both 
their titles? 

Jt JS Jl 

The Bohemian Club camp is scheduled to open on the 
31st day of July, but Greer Harrison and a large party are 
to leave today. Bully Bill Barton's Big Bohemian Brass 
Band has made rapid strides, and the members are assured 
of being treated to some excellent music. 

Society is on the qui vive for the announcement 
of the engagement of Miss Alice Sprague and the popular 
young bachelor, Percy Williams. Miss Sprague is related 
to some of our best families, and is a great favorite in the 
smart set. Her mother comes of the influential Oxnard 
family. 

Mrs. Albert J. Le Breton, whose picture appears in this 
week's Wasp, is a charming American woman, who was 
presented at the last drawing room of King Edward and 
Queen Alexandra of Great Britain. Mrs. Le Breton is a 
daughter of Rear-Admiral McDougal of the United States 
Navy, whose home years ago was in San Francisco. She is 
a daughter-in-law of E. J. Le Breton, a prominent banker 
of Philadelphia. Mr. Le Breton, the husband, is best 
known to San Franciscans by the gift of the Home for the 
Aged Little Sisters of the Poor, which, with the land and 
furnishings of the institution, cost considerably over one 
million dollars. Besides the distinction of being at the 



LADIES' BELTS 

WITH BUCKLES OF STERLING SILVER 

OR FOURTEEN KARAT GOLD. 
SOME ARE PLAIN AND OF SIMPLE DE- 
SIGN; OTHERS RICHLY ENGRAVED OR 
ETCHED IN ELABORATE PATTERNS. 

THE PRICES OF ALL ARE MODERATE. 

BOHM-BRISTOL CO. 

JEWELERS, SILVERSMITHS, 
DIAMOND MERCHANTS 

104-110 GEARY ST. 



JCLY 20. 1905 J 



-THE WASP' 



151 



Court of the British sovereign, Mrs. Le Bretou has reci 
a great deal of social attention in London, and sue and her 
husband intend to make an indefinite stay in England. It 
is said that during the reign ut' King Edward there he 
been much more liberality in regard to presentations than 
during the time of the late Queen Victoria. In Russia, on 
the contrary, it is still almost impossible for other than 
wives of foreign diplomats I" gain entrance to tl»- exclu- 
sive circle that surrounds royalty. Other European coun- 
tries observe much the same stringent rules, the Emperor 
of Germany being, perhaps, a trifle more free with foreign- 
ers than his late father would have approved. 

Jewish society is much stirred up by the rumor that 
a wealthy and well-known clothier, with a very hands. 'in,, 
young wife, is to figure in a divorce case. No less than 
three co-respondents are mentioned. To avoid unnecessary 
notoriety it has been agreed, it is said, to have no contest 
of the suit further than to decide the question as to the 
custody of the children. 

A new leader now directs the energies and evolves 
sweet harmonies from the Palace Hotel orchestra. His 
name is William Hoffman, and he is an artist. The attrac- 
tion of the Palace Hotel orchestra has not waned at all, 
ami the music is heard to great advantage in the grand 
auditorium formed by the great court and Palm Garden. 

N. W. Halsey, one of the wealthiest private bankers in 
New York, was a guest at the Palace Hotel this week. He 
was accompanied by Mrs. Halsey, Miss Frances D. Halsey, 
and his son, R. W. Halsey. It is gratifying to see so many 
of the heavy weights, financially, of the East visiting Cali- 
fornia. They cannot but be impressed by the fact that 
here on the very edge of civilization, as they regard it, 
there is almost as much evidence of culture and comfort 
as can be found anywhere outside of New York. 

te& t&* 1£& 

Some prominent Philadelphia people were at the Palace 
Hotel this week. Thev were Mr. and Mrs. D. Newlin Fell, 
Mr. and Mrs. E. W. Fell, Misses A. E. Trezo and A. F. 
Levick, and Alfred Moore. The Palace register indicates 
that the stream of travel is much greater this year than 
for several years past. One cause for it, no doubt, is the 
Lewis and Clark Exposition. People who go to that gener- 
ally take in the more important points on the Coast before 
they go back East. 

Cff* tl5* %6& 

I hear that artist McComas did not fall on the neck of 
'artist Wores when the former on his honeymoon trip met 
the latter at Santa Barbara. Indeed, the spectators say 
that Mr. McComas exhibited more signs of disgust than .joy 
at the sight of an old Bohemian friend. While the traveling 
artist and his bride were having breakfast some practical 
joker, it is said, took a kangaroo out of the garden and 
locked the frisky beast in Mr. McComas' bedroom. When 
the Australian opened the door the long-tailed prisoner 
leaped over his head into the hall and landed within a few 
feet of an Irish chambermaid, who promptly went into 
hysterics, thinking that the devil was after her. Bohe- 
mians will have their fun. 

t2fr t£& T£& 

There was a good deal of bitterness shown at the first 
hearing of the McAneny divorce case in San Jose. The 
aged millionaire made rather a god witness. He was asked 
if he had not $6,000 in the Bank of California. He replied 
in the negative. "Do you mean to swear that you never 
had any money in this bank?" the lawyer persisted. "Of 
course I had," he calmly replied; "I put more money into 
that bank than you or all belonging to you ever saw." 
Mrs. McAneny had three lawyers engaged in fighting for 
alimony A claim of $1,500 counsel fees was made. One of 

The unusual as usual. Tom Dillon's hats, opp. Palace 
Hotel, 636 Market St. 



ei attorneys declared he could not see whj the millionaire 
objected to paying $1,500 tor three lawyers when on his 
own admission he was paying Jackson Hatch tin- same 
amount for fighting the east' for him. The old man's tv- 

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152 



■THE WASP- 



[July 29, 1905. 



tort was, "You would not expect me to pay the same price 
for a suit of clothes in Broadway and in the Bowery." 
The rejoinder was directed at ex-State Senator Louis 
Oneal. 

Mrs. Isaac Upham, since her return from the honey- 
moon trip, is wearing some of her handsome gowns which 
were made by Washington's smartest modiste, whose es- 
tablishment is frequented by the capital's haut ton and the 
diplomatic circle. Mrs. Upham will entertain extensively 
when they move to their attractive new home, which was 
presented them by Mr. Upham pere. The Uphams are at 
present occupying apartments at the Hotel Cecil. 

Mrs. Edith Madden, whose adventures caused so much 
commotion, is back in San Francisco after several months' 
residence in New York. Her desire to see her little son is 
given as the incentive to her return. The child has been 
living with the Jerome Maddens, and is a decidedly bright 
and handsome chap. 

Miss Florence Starr, whose picture appears in this num- 
ber of The Wasp, is to marry Mr. Joseph Notely Thomas 
on Wednesday evening, August 2d, at the residence of her 
brother, Mr. Walter Starr of East Oakland. The Starr 
family is one of the best known in Alameda county. 

c5* c£* t£* 

Miss Juanita Wells, whose portrait appears this week, 
is the attractive young sister of Mrs. Selby Hanna, lately 
Marie Wells. Several people say that Miss Wells is pret- 
tier than her married sister, but the admirers of that fa- 
mous belle are loyal to her and say "Nay, nay!" Miss 
Juanita has far more than the average share of good looks, 
however. Her engagement to Mr. Charles G. Huse, a rich 
young man and a great friend of Mr. Selby Hanna, lias 
been announced. It is on the cards for Mr. and Mrs. 
Huse to travel for two years. 

ti5* <&* <^* 

Oakland hostesses keep on striving madly for original- 
ity. They will have to think hard before they can surpass 
the San Rafael lady who gave a luncheon in honor of a 
well-known Oakland belle who is soon to be married. The 
girl's embarrassment can be imagined when she was pub- 
licly presented with a photograph representing an old doe- 
tor carrying a long-legged stork into the house in the dead 
nf night. 

t^V £m t5* 

From Oakland come persistent rumors that Mr. Geo. 
W. Reed, the prominent and popular attorney, politician 
and clubman of Oakland, will soon be called upon to part 
with his two fair daughters, who have yielded to the wiles 
of Cupid and entered the ranks of engaged girls. There 
will be entertainments and showers galore when the formal 
announcement is made. 

Arrivals at. Hotel Rafael during week ending July 9th, 
1905 ; From San Francisco — Mr. and Mrs. R. V. Whiting, 
Mr. and Mrs. G. A. Marriner, Miss K. Strickler, Mr. C. R. 
Gardner, Mr. M. Sondheimer, Mr. C. Burnham, Mr. L. 
Strassburger, Mr. W. L. Dreyfers, Mr. C. G. Kuehn, Mr. 
B. Wood, Mr. G. L. Edie, Mr. C. G. Follis, Mr. A. Betzel, 
Mr. J. E. Miles, Miss Jacobson, Mr. S. Rau, Mr. M. Mieh- 
elson, Mr. L. S. Williams. New York City — Mr. and Mrs. 
E. B. Britten. Honolulu— Mr. T. F. Ena. 

Arrivals at the Hotel del Monte for the week ending 
July 24th, 1905: Burlingame— Mrs. Whittell, Miss Whif- 
tell. San Francisco — Miss Gertrude Joliffe, Mr. and Mrs. 



Exquisite bits of milk chocolate and cream in orange, 
almond and vanilla. Milk Chocolate Creams at Haas' 
Candy Stores, Phelan Building and James Flood Building. 



Louis Lipman, Mr. and Mrs. J. CampbeD Short, J. A. Don- 
ohoe, Mrs. E. S. Rothschild, Alfred L. Murstein, Mr. and 
Mrs. T. Kirkpatriek, Mrs. E. H. Howe, Mrs. Hamilton 
Higgins, Mr. and Mrs. W. B. Tubbs, Mrs. A. N. Towne, 
Mr. and Mrs. Clinton E. Worden, Mi', and Mrs. J. B. 
Owens, Miss L. B. Owens, S. P. Josselyn, George Andrews, 
Mr. F. Meyerstein, Mr. and Mrs. Chas. P. Braslan, Mr. and 
Mrs. Henry Dernham, Miss Dernham. 



Building Repair Sale 

which began last Monday is still going on and 
will continue all next week. By reason of the 
flooding of several of our departments when 
the fire occurred above us on July 5th, our ceil- 
ings were badly damaged and on this account 

Unprecedented Bargains 

are offered to make room for repairs. The 
discounts vary all the way from 20 per cent to 
50 per cent, and apply to many of our most 
attractive designs in 

Decorated China, Cut Glass, Gold Decorated Glass 

Banquet Lamp Globes, Burnt Wood Novelties 

Art Goods, Kitchen Wares, etc. 

Watch tkc daily papers for interesting details 

Nathan = Dohrmann Co. 

122-132 Sutter Street 



j. wmm 



DELIGHTS THE PALATE OF A CONNOISSEUR 



A PERFECTLY PURE WHISKY DIRECT FROM KENTUCKY 



SHERWOOD & SHERWOOD, AGENTS 




July 29, 1905] 



-THE WASP 



153 




Photo by Ccnthe 

MISS J0ANITA WELLS 

Whose wedding will take the place of her debut in the Fall 

During the lifetime of the Hon. William E. Gladstone, 
late Premier of England, he and his wife were welcome 
guests at end of the week parties. On one of these occa- 
sions the entertainers lived at a vicarage some miles from 
Hawarden, and like many clerical families, had but a small 
establishment. Remembering this, Mrs. Gladstone decid- 
ed to dispense with the services of her maid, and instruct- 
ed the young woman to pack her belongings and to put 
everything carefully to hand. When Mrs. Gladstone, while 
dressing for dinner the night of her arrival, had reached 

FAT FOLKS. 
I reduced my weight seventy pounds, bust six inches, 
waist «ix inches and hips fourteen inches in a short time 
by a guaranteed harmless remedy without exercise or 
itarving. I will tell you all about it. Enclose stamp. Ad- 
dress Mrs. E. F. Richards, 226 E. Ninth St., Riverside. Ca. 



ihe point where sin- required t lie bodice of her gown, it 
was nowhere to be found. Finally the lady draped her 
shoulders with a black erepe-de-chine shawl, and made 
her way to the drawing room, remarking, as she reached 
her hostess' side: "The evenings are really very chilly." 
A moment later as, on the arm of her host, she headed 
the procession to the dining room, a titter was heard be- 
liind her, and the merriment grew so distinct that she 
turned to seek the cause. At the sight of her own bodice, 
neatly pinned to the train of her skirt, and trailing behind 
tier, she joined in the laugh and explained the shawl 
drapery. 

i5* v* t5* 

Mrs. C. P. Huntington's subscription of $10,000 to the 
society book which some New York schemers are getting 
out seems to have astonished several local newspapers. 

What about the subscriptions that A. A. Bancroft got 
from San Francisco capitalists for his "Chronicles of the 
Kings," in which he described them as self-made men 
who had done a wonderfully fine job on themselves. The 
late Senator Fair parted with something like $1,500, and 
to separate him from his good money was usually no 
task to be undertaken by a green hand in the bunko busi- 
ness. Others of "the kings" yielded up with almost equal 
prodigality. 

<^% t^* i£& 

Mrs. Huntington was an easy mark for a blackmailing 
solicitor getting up an official roll-call of the real Four 
Hundred. New York society turned its bare alabaster 
shoulder very coldly on her when the late multimillionaire, 
after bestowing on her his name and endowing her with 
his vast wealth, undertook to introduce her to the salons 
of the rich and refined great-great-grandchildren of the 
Knickerbocker market gardeners. The aristocracy of New 
York, with four generations between it and the ancestral 
tanneries, restaurants, corner groceries and cabbage gar- 
dens, declined to accept her social credentials as entirely 
satisfactory. It was then that Mr. Huntington bought 
the old Colton house on California street and came out here 



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CROCKER BUILDING 

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154 



-THE WASP- 



[July 29, 1905. 




ferred to the great metropolis, and San Francisco lost 
another treasure for the tradesmen who catered to the 
needs of the socially ambitious rich. 

(^* ^6 i&v 

The way things look now socially we are not sure of 
any 'subscription dances this winter: Greenway has not 
fully made up his mind whether he will continue the Fri- 
day night club this winter or not, and it is said tliat it is 

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SAN FRANCISCO 



THE KAISER IN SPANISH REGIMRNTALS 

with the Prince and Princess Hatzfeldt in his train, to 
establish a home in San Francisco, where lavish wealth 
would buy all the delights on earth, including undisputed 
social prestige. But a man may build transcontinental 
railroads and conquer worlds easier than to bridle women's 
tongues or force the white-winged bird of domestic peace 
to roost and coo on his roof-tree. The dream of an idyllic 
life on Nob Hill, with the Prince in a smoking-jacket play- 
ing pool with the railroad king after dinner, or sitting with 
slippered feet in an easy-chair reading "The Ladies' Home 
Journal," vanished. The Huntington menage .was trans- 
Go to Swain's dining-room, 209 Post street, near Grant 
avenue, for a fine lunch or dinner' 



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San Francisco 



July 29, 1905. 



: THEWASP- 



165 




The Josselynes keep the same apartments the year 
around in Paris, and the gay capital is as much their 
home now as San Francisco. They mingle with the Amer- 
ican colonial sel a great deal, though their at-homes are 
1 requently attended by the French noblesse. Florence 
Jossdlyn has had several offers from barons and counts, 
bul has refused them all — "a plain American is good en- 
ough for me" being her favorite song, I hear. It is said 
that the fair Florence is really engaged to a young man 
in San Francisco, one of the older set, and one whose fam- 
ily was prominent in society during the early days. 

Mrs. Phoebe Hearst has taken apartments at the St. 
Francis for a short time. I hear that she intends to re- 
sume her philanthropic work in a f,aw months or so. At 
the time of her son's campaign f or' the Presidency she gave 
up a great deal of her work, for her son's ambition cost a 
pretty penny, I am told. Mrs. Hearst brought back many 
Spanish works of art with her from her last trip to Eur- 
ope. Her home in Pleasanton is a veritable museum of 
Spanish art. She has agents in Spain, Mexico and Central 
America, who buy the old Spanish things for her. Her 
especial fad is old carved wood chests, and it is said that 

Carpets cleaned. City Steam Carpet Beating nd Ren- 
ovating Works, Geo. H. Stevens, Manager, 38 Eighth St. 
New No. 70 Eighth St. Phone, South 250. 



MRS. A. J. LB BRETON 

A former San Franciscan who was presented at King Edward's 
last Drawing Room 



an even chance whether Mrs. Ynez Shorb White will eng- 
ineer another season of dances. The patronesses of the 
Assembly are discouraged over last winter's dances, and 
probably will not give any balls next season. It is rumor- 
ed that several of the foremost patronesses will resign this 
year. When Mrs. McCalla and Mrs. MeClurg were in 
charge the tone was much higher according to some 
people's ideas, but as soon as they dropped out there was 
a distinct bourgeois flavor about all the Assembly dances, 
quite intolerable to the haughty few of the haut ton who 
only came, it is said, to criticize the nobodies. Several 
of our society people have been suggested as suitable lead- 
ers for a swagger dancing club, among them being Mrs. 
C. 0. Alexander, whose social position is assured in the 
very highest set. She knows who's who in society, and is 
more capable than anyone to separate the sheep from the 
goats. Mrs. Alexander is a sister of Mrs. Mountford Wil- 
son, and is a great friend of Mrs. Russel Wilson and Mrs. 
Will Tevis. She has long been considered the ideal chap- 
erone, and is greatly sought after in that capacity by the 
debutantes. 



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S. P. Ferry Boats, Union League Club, 
Jefferson Square Club, Red Lion Grill, 
Cafe Richelieu, Transportation Club, 
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FRED. M. BOEHM, Sole Agent P.elfleC.t 

Phana Polk 3093 915 Eddy St. San Francisco 



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156 



THE WASP 



[July 29, 1905. 




Leading Hotels 



PRODUCTS OF THE WILD WEST 
Cow girls ready for the season's 'ound-up 

she lias already collected at least a dozen of the rarest 
variety. 

t5* c5* (5* 

As the French nation judges a country by the style its 
representative lives in, the Honorable Robert S. McCorrn- 
ick, our new Ambassador to France, has taken and fitted 
up the Quai Debilly, perhaps the best private hotel in 
Paris. The rent alone is higher than the total salary the 
American Government allows the French Ambassador. It 
is fortunate that Mr. MeCormick's great wealth enables 
him to make so excellent a showing, while his handsome 
and brilliant wife will charm the foreigners across the 
English Channel with her vivacity and beauty. 

"For a life by your side, my darling, I would give up 
everything I possess — parents, position, wealth — all." 
"But in that case, what would there be left for me?" 

c^* tpV t£& 

An amusing little anecdote shows how far superior 
the Duchess of Montrose is to her titled husband, at least 
in the affections of the Scotch peasantry, than which no 
class is more sturdily loyal. It was at a charity fair that 
the Duchess of Montrose was selling photographs of herself 
and husband. An old Scotch woman was eager to possess 
a portrait of the Duchess, but the price, one dollar and a 
quarter, was beyond her means. "You may have a picture 
of my husband for one dollar," suggested the Duchess. 
The old woman looked at the proffered photograph and 
then at the Duke himself, who was standing near. "One 
dollar, " she grunted ; "I wouldna ' gie a silver saxpenee 
for him, but I'm willing and eager to gie a dollar for your 
bonnie Grace." The Duchess closed the bargain, and the 
despised Duke promptly made up the sum charged. 




For those who appreciate comfort and attention 

OCCIDENTAL HOTEL 

SAN FRANCISCO 

A QUIET HOME CENTRALLY LOCATED 

GEORGE WARREN HOOPER, Manager 



IP you want real 
home comfort, a 
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beautifully furnish- 
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times, you will find 
all these require- 
ments at the : : : 



HOTEL BELLA VISTA 



Cor. Pine and Taylor Streets 



MRS. W. M. DENVER 



PROPRIETOR 



HOTEL BALTIMORE 

1015 Van Ness Avenue 
An American plan hotel conducted especially for families desiring ac- 
commodations for the season or by the year, situated in the most 
fashionable section of the city. Fully equipped with all modern 
conveniences. Comfortable sunny rooms with delightful outlook 
elegantly furnished and appointed. 

C. F. BUCKLEY, Jr., 

Manager. 



SAN MARCO HOTEL- 

' 536 TAYLOR ST., Between Geary and Post 



A new modern fire-proof family and tourist hotel. 52 
sunny suites with private bath rooms. 44 single rooms 
with public bathroom on each floor. Electric lights, 
steam heat and telephone in every room. Only white 
help employed. In its furnishings and table the San 
Marco will compare favorably with any select family hotel. 

GEO. J. CASANOVA, Manager. 



HOTEL RAFAEL 

Fifty minutes from San Francisco. Twenty-five trains daily each way 
OPEN ALL THB YEAR 

CUISINE AND SERVICE THE BtST 

^^■Send for booklet. R. V. Halton, Prop. 



Visit the HOFFMAN CAFE 
LUNCH, - GRILL - AND - WINE-ROOMS 

Half a block below Palace and Gland Hotels, S. F. 
Fine Goods a Specialty. Merchants' hot lunch from 1 1 a. m. to 
3:30 p. m. Served also in Ladies Cafe, Steaks, English Chops. 
Chicken, Oysters, Loaves, Salads and all delicacies a specialty. 

HANDSOMEST CAFE IN AMERICA 

Open all night. **- Private Dining Rooms for Indies and Escoru 

HOFFMAN CAFE, PROPS. 

CHARLES HH.DEBRBCHT, Mgr. 



IHE BURLINGAME COUNTRY CLUB HOUSE 



If you're hunting for all the comforts of a home, you'll 
want the home, of course. If you can't afford to buy and 
pay for it in a lump sum, you can tackle the problem in de- 
tachments, with the aid of the CONTINENTAL BUILD- 
ING AND LOAN ASSOCIATION of 301 California St. 



July 29, 1905 J 



-THE WASP- 



157 




Phots by Btltt-Oudry 

MISS FLORENCE STARR 

An East Oakland girl whose engagement Is announced 

The separation of Lord and Lady Bagot of England 
interests San Francisco society for the reason that she 
has many acquaintances in this city, and her sister, Mrs. 
Willie Babeock, is the leader of San Kafael society, and 
one of the most prominent women in San Francisco. They 
are of the distinguished May family of Baltimore, and 
cousins to Charles and Hermann Oelrichs. Besides, I 
believe Lady Bagot is a distant cousin to Ned Greenway, 
for both boast of the De Courcey blood in their veins. I 
hear that Ned Greenway is prouder of the De Courcey 
strain in him than any of the others that mingle in his 
blue blood, for he believes that without the De Courcey 
corpuscles he would never have his aristocratic calves, 
which are the pride of his life. Lady Bagot is one of the 
most beautiful women Baltimore ever produced, and al- 
though she had no dot she married a peer of England and 
kept up the May reputation for making brilliant marriages. 

Mr. and Mrs. Timothy Hopkins, with their daughter, 
are drinking the water at Carlsbad Springs, and have not 
made any plans for returning to America, although their 
tour was to last only six months. 

The sons of W. H. Talbot are at present visiting their 
father at Redwoods. The daugher, Vera, remains with her 
mother, who contemplates a trip to Lake county, the notori- 
ety and nervous strain of her divorce suit having told on 
her health. 



CALIFORNIA SOUVENIR. 

A handsome present for Eastern friends — Townsend's 
California Glace Fruits in fire-etched and hand-painted 
boxes. 767 Market street, San Francisco. 



Friends of the Hon. WhUelaw Reid, the American Am- 
bassador in London, are reading with a good deal of amuse- 
ment the accounts from English papers of his popularity. 
From the glowing items it would seem that Reid is some- 
thing of a "hail-feliow-well-met" character, standing, 
glass in band, at a banquet-table, with his mistering 
friends around him as they sing, "For he's a jolly good 
follow." It is also chronicled how "Ambassador Reid 




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TrlBO. Q1ER CO., Distributor! 
San Francisco Oakland 



158 



THE WASP 



[July 29, 1905. 




THE DAUGHTER OF JUDGE ALTON B. PARKER PLAYING GOLF IN NEW YORK 



fairly beamed with good humor as he "shook hands with 
three hundred people whom he had never seen before." 
Truly, the English air must have done wonders for thl 
rather grave statesman whom we knew over here. There 
was a time, and not so many weeks ago either, when there 
was no diplomat in England fit to hold a candle to Choate. 
But the English have a wonderful way of their own of 
speeding the parting and welcoming the coming guest. A 
sort of "the king is dead; long live the king" spirit that 
simply makes a person who is not familiar with their 
ways dizzy. Anyway, Choate is as dead as a doornail, and 
the changeable British public is throwing up its hat for 
Reid, the new and powerful. 

t5* t£* ^* 

Mr. Leon Sloss and family and Mr. Louis Sloss are at 
Ais les Bains, where they are planning to spend their 
holiday time. It is not determined just when they will 
return to California. 

Mr. and Mrs. J. Selby Hanna are spending a short time 
in Paris preparing to tour Europe. Their trip is to take 
in the leading Continental countries, and will last for 
some time, probably until late in the Fall. 

c5* t^* c£* 

If the young widow of the late Marquis of Anglesey 
should marry the member of the princely house of Hatz- 
feldt with whom her name is so frequently coupled in 
London this season, it would be like a scene from an old 
romance. Before her marriage to the Marquis in 1S89, 
the Marchioness was Lily, daughter of Sir George Chet- 
wynd. The bridegroom was at that time twenty-two and 
the bride seventeen, and within a month of their marriage 
they had quarreled so bitterly that a decree of nullity was 

If you must drink, why not have the best? "Puck 
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sought and obtained. Before this was brought about, how- 
ever, it was charged by the late Marquis that the Princess 
Hohenlohe, a daughter of Count Hatzfeldt, who was ex- 
ceedingly intimate with the Marchioness, had sought by 
every means in her power to bring about a complete sep- 
aration, desiring the marriage of her brother and that fas- 
cinating little noblewoman. When the separation was 
finally made, it was agreed that the Marquis should allow 
his former wife a yearly income of fifty thousand dollars. 
This agreement was, I believe, not kept, but for some rea- 




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Specially Built for the Storage of Household Furniture 
MAIN OFFICE, Eddy Street, Near Fillmore : : Phone West 828 



Jdly 29. 1905 ] 



-THE WASP 



159 





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MRS. PBDAR BRUGUIERE 

sou the Marquis did not take kindly to the idea of another 
marriage. Subsequent developments led to the belief that 
she loved the erratic nobleman whose name she bore, for 
when, in 1900, he was at Monte Carlo, bis former wife, 
who was also at the resort, caught sight of him, she ran 
forward and greeted him effusively and ordered dinner 
served for them in a private apartment. They were recon- 
ciled, and the Marchioness then began proceedings to 
quash the annulment divorce. In June, 1901, the late Sir 
Francis Jeune, then President of the divorce court, granted 
the petition and the two were remarried. It was not for 
long, however, for they quarreled, and were again separat- 
ed, to meet once more at the deathbed of the worn-out 
young Marquis at Monte Carlo, where, strangely enough, 
a second reconciliation was effected, and Anglesey died in 
his wife's arms. 

t5% &5* fc?* 

Newport is greatly disappointed because Mr. and Mrs. 
John Jacob Astor are not to return to America in time 
for any of the gay doings at that resort. They are finding 
it more to their taste, apparently, to flock with the British 
Court circle, which is about to gather at Marienbad to 
drink the waters and enter into the whirl of a fashionable 

When your friends from the country visit you it is 
esteemed a pleasure as well as a duty to show them the 
sights of our beautiful city and take them to all the im- 
portant places. You have not done them justice, nor have 
you proved yourself a good guide unless you have taken 
them to the California Market and let them partake of a 
plate of Moraghan's celebrate! oysters. 



spa, Jt is nol probable, however, fefaat Mr. Astor will fore- 
»o the excitement of Newport during yachting week, so 

that the end of the season may be n little brighter because 
1 the presence of these leaders. 

^* c^* t^^ 

The Misses O'Connor, of Sau Fraiirisc... are in Paris, 
where they intend tn slay for some n, mil lis. They are 
having a rare treat, visiting picture galleries, hearing op- 
eras and concerts, and. of course, shopping. 
J« Jt jl 

The Josselyn girls are to arrive from their European 
trip early in October. They are lively young girls who 
think no more of crossing the Atlantic than other young 
Indies do of crossing the ferry trip to Oakland. They will 
return home in time for the winter gaieties, which will be- 
gin rather late this year. They are members of the Gaiety 
Club and Greenway's. For some reason, it is said, they 
were not included in Mrs. Inez Short-White's Cotillion 
Club last winter. They did not receive any invitations, 
but their friends say that they did not shed any bitter 
tears over it. Everyone is wondering why they were not 
invited. 

<*?* L?* ^* 

Many comments are made on the striking resemblanca 
borne by Mrs. Chauncey Depew to the pictures of Madame 
Pompadour. She has blue eyes and the same kind of 
a plump figure as the French woman, and while she is 
rather stiff in her carriage she is affability itself in her 
manner. Mrs, Depew was Miss May Palmer, a compara- 
tively unknown young woman, who had spent so many 
years abroad that hardly anyone on this side could recall 
who she was. Her elder sister is Madame von Andre, who 
was much better known to New Yorkers than Mrs. Depew 
at the time of the latte*s marriage. Now, however, the 
Senator's wife is a rather familiar figure both in New 
York and Washington, in both of which places she mingles 
freely in society. 

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grocer for a reliable tonic In tbe spring. Abbott's, the best for all 
seasons. 



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160 



-THE WASP- 



[July 29, 1905. 




Photo by BeUc-Ouiry 

MRS. FREDERICK FDNSTON 
A prominent figure in army social life 

Templeton Crocker is sojourning in Europe this sum- 
mer. I hear that young Mr. Crocker is engaged to a Sac- 
ramento girl; in fact, that he has been engaged for two 
years. He is a very generous young man and spends his 
money freely among his class-mates at college. His sister, 
Mrs. Francis Burton Harrison, is to make another visit 
to California early in the fall, and will probably bring her 
mother-in-law, Mrs. Burton Harrison, Sr., with her. The 
elder Mrs. Harrison is to write a novel of California life, 
it is said, and expects to find local color at Burliugame. 
As nearly all her stories treat of fashionable life Burliug- 
ame will probably be the most desirable place to learn 
of California society. "The Unwelcome Mrs. Hatch," which 
Florence Roberts played at the California Theater recent- 
ly, is from her pen. 

I wonder what the Chautauqua Society would think if 
its fair members could wander around San Francisco and 
see some of the unblushing works of art in the shape of 
statues that are scattered around the city by the "sun- 
down sea," as a local rhymester calls it. This thought 
grew from a published report of a pow-wow held in far- 
away Indiana, where it was only after prolonged and seri- 
ous discussion that a statue of the Venus de Milo was 
permitted on the Chautauqua grounds. The statue did 
not come out of the Chautauquans' pockets — oh, dear, no! 
A Pittsburg millionaire had a dream about raising the 
standard of art in that woozy place, and squandered his 
ducats for the marble lady. Some wag had heard the talk 
over the lack of drapery, and accordingly, when the learned 



ones arrived on the grounds the nest morning it was to 
find Madame Venus correctly attired in an evening gown, 
made decollete and worn over a pair of corsets, although, 
as aV lady present said, it did not ' ' draw in her waist one 
bit." 

t5* s5* ^* 

Mrs. Clement Tobin is to be one of the leaders next 
season I hear. She has the Tobin social prestige to back 
her as well as beauty, good health, money and enthusiasm. 
Not content with one of the handsomest trousseaux ever 
brought to the city, Mrs. Tobin has continued to add to 
her extensive wardrobe ever since her marriage. The Tob- 
ins are very fond of her, it is said. Mrs. Clement has al- 
ready entertained considerably at the de Sabla place, the 
former home of the Walter Martins at San Mateo. She 
often makes up a party with Agnes Tobin and the Charlie 
Clarks. Mrs. de Sabla cares more about home life than 
society and seems utterly devoted to her children. 

t5* c£* tt5* 

Mrs. Garret Livingston Lansing is spending the sum- 
mer in the quiet atmosphere of Rowardennan. Her sister, 
Mrs, Charles Lyman Bent (nee Cohen) is visiting at her 
mother's home, Fernside, Alameda. Mrs. Bent's arrival 
has been the cause of comment among the bavardes. 

^* t&* t5* 

Mrs. Clarence Maekay, who is one of the most devoted 
mothers in New York's smart set, snapped her fingers at 
the gay doings of Newport, and with her little ones has 
gone to the White Mountains for the remainder of July 
and August. It is the purpose of the fashionable leader 
to romp with the youngsters through the pine woods sur- 
rounding their lodge, sing them to sleep the nights that she 
has not a true, true story composed by herself during the 
day; to relate. 

t5* <5* (5* 

Mr. and Mrs. William K. Vanderbilt Jr. will spend the 
greater part of the summer visiting Mr. Vanderbilt 's 
mother, Mrs. Oliver P. Belmont, at Newport. They will 
also be the guests during a portion of the time of Mrs. Her- 
man Oelriehs, who, with her son, is still abroad, but who 
intends to return to the fashionable watering-place for 
August. 




TKis is tKe proper Panel Boot 
Victoria.. ^ 5 We ha.ve them. 

Fifty Pony Vehicles in Stock. 

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RROS.fPMPANY 

Market and Tenth Streets 

V c« 4 



July 29, 1905.] 



THE WASP 



161 




Photo by BelleOudry 

MISS WINIFRBD JUNB MORGAN 
A talented violinist of Oakland's smart set 

Across the Atlantic come floating more rumors of fie 
prolonged attachment of Santos Dumont for the beautiful 
daughter of the house of Spreckels. This aerial navigator 
has been mentioned as the admirer of so many beautiful 
and wealthy Americans that Californians read of him with 
something like awe and wonder what strange magnetism 
he has absorbed from the empyrean in the flights of his air- 
ship. He seems to be as attractive to Californian heiresses 
as a loadstone to iron shavings. As Mrs. Spreckels is suid 
to have set her heart on Count Von Hatzfeldt as a prospec- 
tive son-in-law, the road of love for the wealthy and accom- 
plished balloonist is likely to prove rocky. There are 
glorious possibilities for a romance of the first order in 
the straightening out of this sentimental complication 
What if "Monsieur Dumont should some fine day pounce 
from his descending airship on the roof of the Sprecke! 1 ; 



ansion, and, like another Lochinvar, oidy with his trans- 

ortation facilities brought fully up to date, 

lovely prize for which any man might risk his aeek! Mod- 
ern dramatists are behind the age it they fail to utilize 
me solution m|' thiil kind instead of - i \ in- us the same 
wearisome old Storj of a runaway couple ami a lame horse 
or broken-down postohaise. The Count Von Hatzfeldt, 
who is said to be in such active rivalry with Monsieur D11- 
mont, is a cousin of the Prince who married Clara Huut- 
ington. 

The Ascot races proved an attractive feature of Eng- 
lish society to Mr. and Mrs. Henry 1'. Sonntag and Miss 
Edythe Sonntag, who are spending the summer abroad. 
It was King's Day that particularly interested the party. 
There was the usual crowd and the most beautiful gowns 
were worn by the great ladies present, who all desired to 
do honor I" their sovereign and his family. The Sonntags 
left London for Aix les Bains on the fifth of July, taking 
I'aiis eu route. After leaving the watering place they iii- 
tend to visit Genoa and then return lo Paris, where they 
will meet a party of friends and with them tour France 
and Switzerland by automobile for three weeks. Early 
in November they expect to sail for New York, where they 
will occupy their new apartment for the winter. 

Mr. William H. Herrin is taking the waters at Nau- 
heim, the celebrated Springs, where the late Secretary Hay 
went in hopes of regaining health. The Nauheim Springs 
are much frequented by people suffering from heart 
trouble. 

Miss Jennie Crocker is at the Westminster Hotel in 
Paris and is apparently settled for some time. 




Plioto by Belle- Oudry 

MISS IDA MAY BRADLEY 

An Oakland Society girl who has joined Florence Roberts' 
Theatrical Company 



162 



THE WASP - 



[July 29, 1905. 




YORK HOUSE, THB RESIDENCE OF THE PRINCE OF WALKS 



While Mr. C. A. Griscom, the head of the ereat inter- 
national shipping trust, was en route to Japan recently, 
he stopped over at Honolulu, where he was a guest of 
Colonel George Maefarlane, who gave a delightful lunch- 
eon in his honor at the Royal Hawaiian Hotel, after which 
the whole party visited the aquarium. Mr. Griscom was 
deeply interested in the wonderful coloring of the fish, 
and said that to see the aquarium was of itself sufficient 
reward for a trip to Honolulu. Members of the same party 
were later on taken to Ewe Mills and Plantation, where 
they were the guests of Mr. B. F. Dillingham. A visit to 
the Pali, and an afternoon spent in bathing and riding on 
surf boards at Waikiki beach was another of the novel 
pleasures enjoyed by Mr. Griscom. 

^5* ti5* &5* 

All the American colony in Paris, my friends write me, 
are interested in the new Persian religion, and are becom- 
ing Babists. Mrs. Hearst was one of the first to accept 
the religion, and her Persian servant who guarded the 
entrance to her door when she occupied the Pennoyer 
house in Berkeley was one of the first converts to the new 
religion. Mrs. Cart, who is now her old gay self in Paris, 
is another Babist, and Sybil Sanderson's youngest sister, 
Edith, has been over to Persia, returned a Babist, and is 
endeavoring to convert all the members of her family. 

Mrs. Chandler Howard, the wife of the popular agent 
of the Pacific Mail Steamship Company, at Yokohama, 
Japan, with her two daughters, is at present in London, 
after several strenuous weeks of shopping in Paris. The 
trio will return to their home via San Francisco, so it may 
be that we will have a peep at some of the French con- 
fections. The young ladies have been in school in Switzer- 
land for the past year, and are as charming girls as one 
would wish to meet. 

Among those who are enjoying the season in London 
are Mr. and Mrs. Charles P. Eels and their daughter, Miss 
Dorothy Prentice Eels. After the gayety in the English 



metropolis subsides the party will visit Paris and some of 
the other European capitals. While in London they are 
domiciled at the Hotel St. Erminie. 

I hear that Dr. and Mrs. di Veechi are thinking of tak- 
ing up their residence in Italy, where they went intending 
to remain a year for the finishing of the education of their 
children, especially for the benefit of their beautiful eldest 
daughter, Margherita, who will be making her debut within 
a year or two. The Doctor is very well born, has a com- 
fortable fortune of his own, while his wife, who was Miss 
Follis, and a cousin to the Floods, is wealthy in her own 
right. 

*£fc i£& %2& 

Scotland is the Mecca which has attracted Mr. and 
Mrs. John F. Men-ill and their daughter, Miss Ruth Mer- 
rill, and they are touring the land 0' bannocks and heather 
in an automobile and having the gayest of times. They 
are to turn their steps homeward toward the end of this 
month. 

i3* t&* v5* 

Dr. and Mrs. Grant Self ridge, and Mrs. Self ridge's 
father, Mr. Monteverdi, have left Paris for Berlin and in- 
tend to tour Germany before they leave for home in 
August. The doctor has been making his stay profitable 
by visiting the celebrated hospitals of Europe. 

At the Hotel Regina, Paris, are Mr. and Mrs. Charles 
Josselyn and their three daughters. The Josselyns are ex- 
ceedingly fond of Paris and intend to remain until just 
before Christmas. 

Entre Nous. 



Mrs. A.: "There are times when I wish I were a man." 

Mr. A.: "For instance?" 

Mrs. A.: "When I pass a milliner's window and think 
how happy I could make mv wife by giving her a new bon- 
net." 



July 29, 1905. 



-THE WASP 



163 




Posed for ThtWasf 



HER FIRST. 



California Photo-Engraving Co. 



164 



THE WASP 



[July 29, 1905. 




A CHICAGO GOLF CLUB ON A FROLIC 



Celebrities At Home 



INo. 18 



A Musician. Who Believes Firmly in the Strenuous Life 



■poa^ T is generally recognized in art circles 
,| ▼ throughout California that while Dr. H. J. 
I'M Stewart is one of the leading spirits in 
j^^^V music he is also one of the hardest workers 
in the profession. Like most busy men, 
however, he is always able to find time to do 
something else, and it is to this very versatil- 
ity that he owes so much of his success, and 
to it also he is indebted for his great popularity. In the 
large studio at 1105 Bush street, where the musician and 
composer spends his working hours, Dr. Stewart sat at a 
great desk when a representative of the Wasp sought him 
a few days ago for a chat on matters musical. The splen- 
didly proportioned room into which I was ushered is one 
of a suite, connecting by folding-doors with another apart- 
ment. A glimpse into the reception-room gave a hint of 
rich furniture and of choice oil paintings on the walls. In 
the studio, however, everything was of the simplest. A 
grand piano occupies the place of honor, and at its elbow 
is a mahogany desk that would gladden the heart of a col- 
lector. Chairs and couches sufficient 10 seat a limited 
number of persons are scattered in comfortable disorder 
about the room, and they as well as the tables were filled 
with neat piles of sheet music. Dr. Stewart, who seated 
himself before the open desk, does not need any advertis- 
ing to proclaim him a student and scholar. It shows 
in the fine proportions of the slightly grayed head, in the 
earnest expression of the brilliantly blue eyes and in the 
whole poise of the stalwart and tall figure. In dress Dr. 
Stewart is very precise, wearing the conventional dark- 



gray tweeds of the professional and business man. He has 
none of the long hair and the languid look that so many 
eminent musicians affect. He would pass for a strenuous 
man of business or a successful lawyer, and is, in fact, a 
firm believer in the strenuous life. He believes that suc- 
cess comes from hard work. 

"The man who is always talking about lack of oppor- 
tunity and speaking of luck is the one who never attains 
success," said this earnest musician. "He has probably 
never done a good, hard day's work in his life. Why, 
opportunity is just taking the work that lies to your hand 
and doing it. There is lots of room at the top and the 
opportunities are as great today as they ever were." 

"You believe in a man doing what he is best adapted 
to?" I asked. 

"Yes and no," was the puzzling reply. "I believe in 
a man having more than one line of work, at least in my 
profession. If he is a singing teacher and nothing else, I 
hold that he has not half the opportunity that he would 
have if he played an organ and directed one or two church 
choirs, composed music, and — oh, half-a-dozen other 
things. ' ' 

"But it is the age of the specialist," I mentioned, recall- 
ing much that I had heard to that effect. 

"If musicians, like physicians, were forced to know 
the profession thoroughly before turning to specialities, 
very good. But that is not so and I greatly fear that the 
one who teaches only singing knows nothing further." 

Interesting as these reflections were, I was anxious to 
learn something of Dr. Stewart's own work, and so direct- 



July 29, 1905. J 



-THE WASP - 



165 




PfiotobyGenc/u- 



DR. H. J. STEWART 



ed the conversation toward his personal achievements, 
asking at what point he was working just at present. 

"But I do not like to exploit myself," he objected 
modestly. 

* * * 

_ However, after a little skillful questioning I gained the 
information that the musician is getting into shape the 
most ambitious piece of musical composition that he has 
ever attempted, and when once he was launched upon the 
subject it was easy to draw him out. 

"It is really an orchestral work and is something that 
has never been done before," he began. "There are to be 
four movements in the opera, but each one will be com- 
plete by itself . It is 'Scenes in California' in four move- 
ments. The first will be the principal one and is called 
'The Yosemite' ; the second will be a slow movement 
and will be entitled 'Under the Redwoods' ; the third is 
to be a baracole, 'Tahoe' ; and the fourth, 'Before the 
Gringo came,' has a sub-title of 'La Fiesta,' and is sub- 
divided into a 'Spanish Dance' and a 'Tarantella.' 
This last movement is the only one that is finished, and it 
is to be produced at the Bohemian Jinks on August the 
twelfth. Indeed, I finished it for that occasion." 

"How do you go about these compositions?" I asked, 
curiosity urging me on. 

Dr. Stewart was affability itself, and catching up two 
or three books proceeded to show how he jotted the notes 
down as the ideas came to him. "That is the rough 
sketch," he explained, "and this," opening a book where 
the notes looked difficult enough to give even a skilled 
player nightmare, "is the orchestral score. When that is 
done the copyist comes in and has to arrange each music- 

To restore gray hair to its natural color use Egyptian 
Hnna—i vegetable dye — perfectly hsnnlefs, and the effect of 
immediate. All druggists sell it. Langley & Michaels Co. 
agents 



ui's part. Hut the labor of getting all these parts into 

ine and harmony is very difficult." 

■ • \ <>ii have written a number of operas, have you not?" 
I ventured. 

"Three, I think. There is.'Bluil King Hal,' which was 
my first and was produced fifteen years ago. Then there 
is 'His Majesty' and 'The Conspirators.' I also wrote 
the .u-atorio, 'The Nativity,' besides over fifty songs and a 
great deal of church music. I had almost forgotten 'Mon- 

zuma,' which I composed for the Bohemian Jinks two 
.Mars ago and which forty men are going to play at the 
Portland Fair. Indeed, I have just been rehearsing them 
in it." 

"You are certainly very busy," I cried, admiring the 
energetic spirit of the man who mentioned his achieve- 
ments as calmly as if he were speaking of reading the lat- 
est light novel. 

"Yes," he replied. "I give eight lessons a day; I am 
organist and musical director of St. Dominic's Church, 
and hold the same position in the Jewish Synagogue; I am 
director of the University Glee Club, at Berkeley, and of 
he 'Choral,' a woman's club of the University; I am dir- ' 
ector of the San Francisco Musical Club, and besides 
lese things I lecture frequently before societies and wom- 
en's clubs. Yes, yes, I manage to keep from being idle." 

* * * 

Wishing to gain some information as to the training 
needed for such a career, I asked Dr. Stewart, when he 
commenced his work as a musician. 

"I was an organist at the age of eleven years," said 
he, with a twinkle brightening his blue eyes. "I was grad- 
uated from Oxford. I am an Englishman and the chair of 
music at Oxford is as fine as any in the world." 

"Then you do not think a Continental education neces- 
sary to the finished musician?" 

"No," emphatically replied the musician. "I have, 
always held that it is folly to send a girl or man to Europe. 
There are just as good instructors right here in California, 
and if it is a ease of genius there is no fear that it will 
escape. A voice may be built up and improved, but there 
must first be the voice. No man can create that. What 
we do need in San Francisco is a concert hall. A choral 
society may be organized and carried along all right, but 
when it comes to keeping it together permanently without 
a hall, it is simply an impossibility. If we were to have a 
place like the new hall being built in Los Angeles, which 
will seat several thousand persons and is to have a mag- 
nificent organ, it would be found that San Francisco sing- 
ers are not to be beaten by any in the world." 

"You have been in San Francisco a long time, I sup- 
pose," I remarked. 

"I came in 1886, but spent the year of 1891 as organist 
of Trinity Church in Boston. That is a splendid position, 
and is probably one of the most important in the United 
States ; but money and fame are not everything. My 
friends are here, and the climatic conditions are worth 
something. We have only this one life 10 live." 



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166 



THE WASP 



[July 29, 1905. 



Then seeking- information in regard to the advance 
made in musical methods, I asked him what was the dif- 
ference between the training of the past and that of to- 
day. 

"None at all," responded the master. "Tire study of 
music being an art must be along the same lines as it was 
one hundred years ago. We have not improved on Handel 
and Beethoven and the other old masters. We never shall. 
There is no want of opportunity in the musical profession, 
and there is no great crowd at the top." 

As I turned from the door for a last glance, after mak- 
ing my adieux, Dr. Stewart was absorbed in a written 
score, and he was deaf to all outward things. 



Frank W. Winch, who wrote the "Silver Cross" and 
the ' ' Criminal of the Century, " is at work on another 
play. He has already christened it, and perhaps the chief 
thing about it will be its name. Winch has chosen the 
weird title, ' ' The Scar of Satan. ' ' It might be a Salvation 
Army revival effort, but it isn't. Winch had the "Criminal 
of the-Gentury" produced at the Central, and it was voted 
a regular chamber of horrors, although I believe it managed 
to hold the boards for a full week. Some of the unregen- 
erate, however, say that the young man should stick to 
writing effulgent press notices of the Central's shows, and 
eschew the "penny 'orrors" which nightly shock the audi- 
ences of that home of the "drarcner. " 




Mrs. Ferguson's letters in the Examiner about summer 
resorts have improved very much. "Why?" may be asked. 
The explanation, I think, is that when she went out on her 
mission she was almost worked to death, and the compara- 
tive rest and relaxation has been most beneficial to her. 
The motto on the Hearst newspapers has always been 
"work a free horse to death," and when the patient road- 
ster is unable to go another yard get rid of him. 

# * * 

Mrs. Vance Cheney did not create any special furore 
here in her home city with her teaching of right thinking, 
or "sanctified common sense"; but she has succeeded in 
winning the golden tribute which mediocrity pays to 
genius in busy Gotham, and for that matter wherever rich- 
es are more conspicuous than brains. Mrs. Cheney's cult 
or belief is not particularly mysterious. It is merely a 
concentration of old wives' wisdom; sanctified common 
sense, indeed, very happily expresses it. We have been 
and are being humbugged to no end by the Swamis and 
other self-centered social highwaymen who come to us oui 
of the East. When their philosophy is stripped of its 
high-sounding and mystic phraseology, it amounts simply 
to the glorification of selfishness — the deification of the 
ego. It is the direct antithesis of meek and lowly self- 
abnegating Christianity. All the claptrap about vibrations, 
currents, auto-suggestion, and the other stock phrases, are 
merely to mystify and hypnotize the student. If every 
one had the good common sense to do his best and never 
worry about the unattainable, there would be no need of 
Mrs. Cheney and all the other people who expend their 
energy in teaching the art of "right thinking." 

It is very pleasant to hear that Charles Aiken, the 
very successful and highly talented editor of Sunset, will 
not leave San Francisco to take a position on the staff of 
the Cosmopolitan Magazine. I have not the slightest doubt 
that he would improve Cosmopolitan just as much as he has 
the Sunset. It is whispered in literary circles that a sen- 
timental reason, aside from a business one, chains the ed- 
itor of Sunset to his desk in San Francisco. His attention 
to a certain fascinating, tall, dark-eyed and talented young 
lady who aided largely in the founding of the Sequoia 
Club have given rise to rumors that Cupid has displayed 
fine marksmanship on him. 

The Arab enjoys great vitality and power of endurance, 
which he ascribes to drinking the best and purest of cof- 
fee. Armer Brothers have learned the secret how to grow 
and prepare the "Very Best" Coffee, which cannot be ex- 
celled in Arabia. 



A Comforting Assurance. 

A young Virginia woman who recently moved to New 
York with her husband brought with her a typical colored 
servant. The lady was quite ill, and one morning after the 
physician had left the servant appeared, much concerned 
for the welfare of her mistress. Approaching the bedside 
she said: "Miss May, mah mothah dun had a cousin what 
had de same ailments what you dun got." 

"Is that so, Cora?" replied the lady. 

"Yessum," responded Cora, encouraged, "but mah 
mothah 's. cousin she died, 'deed she did." 

"Well, Cora," replied her mistress, angry that she 
should tell her such a tale at such an inopportune time, 
"if that's all you have to say to me you can leave the 
room and don't come in again. I don't want to hear such 
stories. You haven't the sense you were born with, and 
that was mighty little." 

Cora was thoroughly frightened at what she had done 
and wished to ameliorate her ill-chosen story, so she thought 
for a moment, and, turning to go, said: "Well, Miss May, 
mah mothah ah tole me she_died mighty easy." 



Valet: "Telephone call, sir." 
Brummell: "What time is it?" 
Valet: "Just six o'clock." 

Brummell: "Tell them to call again later; I am not i.; 
evening dress." 



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July 29, 1905. J 



-THE WASP 



161 



THE SCIENCE OF GOVERNMENT 

By an Administration Statesman. 

Me boy, de real business part of a campaign is before 
an' at de primaries. You has to have your organisashun 

all right. Den it's easy to carry a primary. When de pri- 
maries is right, de delegates is right, an' de ticket will be 
right. Dat's nine-tenths of de battle. It isn't half so 
much trouble to elect a ticket as it is to nominate it. 

De t'ing what's bodderin' me a good deal now is de 
newsboys' fight. We made a big mistake in callin' up dat 
strike. I tole Abe an' Gene it wouldn't do no good, but 
Gene was stubborn. "It costs too much," he says. "De 
boys kin sells Posts, an' if dey can't, why we kin srit up a 
benefit, an' we won't have to put up nuttin'." Well, Abe's 
sick of de strike now, but bow to stop it is de question. 

* * * 

Say, kid, dere's war betwixt de clans of Gallagher. 
Walter is out a-knifiin' de Mayor, an' Jim is out fer 
Walt's scalplocks. De rest of de campaign sinks into 
insignificance jest at dis minute alongside dis family 
war. We captured one of Walt's meetin's a little while 
ago, an' mebbe he wasn't wild! We has Julius Kahn 
comin' our way, too, no matter what he says. Jest watch 
us fer awhile, an' you will se de bezziest campaign ever, 
an' de end of it will be dat we will have de long hairs 
on de ran agin. Ise worried about Gene's hoss-racin', but 
he's singin' low on de sport lately, an' mebbe if de papers 
don't say too much about it de good folks will fergit long 
enough not to wote. 

Wese managed to pull down John McDougald. We was 
afraid John might git de nominashun on de Republican 
ticket, an' if he did he would be a nasty competitor. Did 
youse notis how de unions shelled out to help John make 
up de overdraft of Ed Smith? Would dey wote fer him? 
Well, I don't want to take no chances. 

P. H. McCarthy is tryin' to ride two bosses agin, but 
he'd better be leary or he'll git spilled onto de sawdust. 
He might git Mae into de fight yit, but Ise hopeful fer de 
best. 

* * * 

It's enough to make a dorg larf to see how de pious 
long hairs is tryin' to git out 0' servin' on election boards. 
Doesn't yer tumble to why we puts 'em on de boards? 
Well, son, if dey is housed up in de election booths all day 
dey can't be outside ehallengin' wotes an' makin' trouble 
fer us; see? Fairfax Wheelan as judge of election can't 
do much harm. If he was a flyin' aroun' de 29th he 
might worry Frank Maestretti a whole lot. De elecshun 
board is a mighty handy thing sometimes, specially when 
we kin keep Georgie Adams out'n de way where he can't 
do no harm. George is a hippopotamus on our hands all 
right. Wese going to use de elecshun board to club de 
Supervisors over de head, too. Jest watch us do it. 

If ye has a piece of land ye wants to sell as a school 
site come an' see me. Yep; me an' Roneo is runnin' dat. 
Any thin' we recommends goes. We is doin' a land-oflis 
bizness in school lots, an' as long as de appropriashun 
holds out we kin keep it up. What does yer t'ink 0' de 
Fairmont as a site fer de Lowell High School? De ex- 
pense too heavy? Not on yer life! We kin call another 
bond elecshun an' wote de money. Wese dead stuck on 
elecshuns. What, must yer be goin'? Pshaw! I'm chuck 
full 0' news dis mornin'. Well, if yer must, yer must. 
Drop in termorrer an' I'll tell ye der whole ticket. 
* * # 

Dem guys what wants to run de City Hall like de 
Young Men's Christian Association ain't on to deir job. 



"KNOX" CELEBRATED HATS, 

Spring styles, now open. Eugene Korn, The Hatter, 
746 Market Street. Telephone Main 3185. 



ley gets' Andrews an' his Grand Jury to ast Gene a lot o' 
questions about why he 'lows de grafters to go on. Dey 
t 'inks dat is hurtin' him by showin' dat he is protectin' 
crooks. It makes me larf — it does, fer sure. Why, dat's 
what we wants. Wese got de laborin' wote. Nothin' can 
scare dem labor union mugs away from Gene. If youse 
proved to 'em dat he'd eat a dead man dey would wote 
for him jest de same. Dey has it all figgered out in dere 
minds dat he's deir friend, an' sometime dey may want to 
strike an' bust a few strike-breakers' heads without havin' 
de perlice or de sogers called out. If Gene is in offis, 
why dey t'inks dat den dey can commit murder as long as 
dey don't kill no one right in de Mayor's offis. We don't 
care nohow wot's thought about us by de reformers, for 
dey 're agin us anyhow, so wese lookin' out fer de criminal 
wote. If we can get all de burglars an ' de strong-ami men 
an' porch-climbers an' yeggmen an' hoboes wese on velvet. 
Since we an' Abe got to running de town dey has been 
flockin' to us as from all directions. Youse can see dat 
by the high registration dis year. It's de push wot's regis- 
terin', an' when we elect Gene next November we'll see 
dat de laws is changed about eompellin' people to put up 
bail when de cops pinch 'em fer highway robbery an' as- 
sault to murder, an' odder small offenses 0' dat kind. Me 
an' Abe intends to make dis de most popular an' de big- 
gest town in the Union. Our frien's will be breakin' out 
o' jail everywhere to come here. 

Office of BILL SYKES. 

INSPECTOR OP SMOKE 
City Hall. 



"I can't understand about this wireless telegraphy," 
said Mrs. Wunder. 

"Why, it's plain as day," said Mr. Wunder. "They 
just send the messages through the air instead of over the 
wires. ' ' 

"I know that," said she; "but how do they fasten the 
air to the poles?" 



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168 



THE WASP- 



[July 29, 1905. 



WHO'S WHO? 



HAVE WE A FOUR HUNDRED IN CALIFORNIA? 



By GRACE VAN TASSEL 

NO. XII. 

Augustus Costigan was for years a beau in San Fran- 
cisco society, but he was considered a hopeless bachelor, 
so the announcement of his engagement and later his 
marriage to the pretty little Washington girl, Miss Minnie 
Nash, came as no little surprise. Mr. Costigan had been 
surrounded by a romantic halo for years. Any one who 
cherishes a hopeless passion becomes at once an object of 
interest. It seems that once upon a time he was engaged 
to a beautiful girl who died on the eve of the wedding day. 
The bridegroom vowed to devote his life to the heart- 
broken parents, and for many years he was treated by 
them as their son. I hear that they gave full and hearty 
consent to his marriage with Miss Nash. She is a niece of 
Bobby Greer, who lived at the Hutch in Sausalito with Mr. 
Costigan, and it was through Mr. Greer that the pair met. 
Their marriage is a very happy one, and a beautiful infant 
has come to bless the home. 

Judge and Mrs. Aylett E. Cotton are very well known 
San Franciscans, although they cannot be termed society 
people. Mrs. Cotton is quite the most prominent club 
woman in San Francisco, and it is almost impossible to pick 
up a paper without seeing some reference to her as presi- 
dent of the Thus-and-so Club, or illustrating her views on 
some subject or other. She is undoubtedly a very clever 
woman. Her daughter, Miss Claudine, is a pretty girl who 
has not as yet been presented to her mother's friends. The 
two sons, Aylett and Steuart, have both been distinctly 
successful in their chosen profession, thi law. Both young 
men sailed to the Philippines, where Aylett received an 
appointment as District Judge and Steuart established 
himself in law practice. During a recent visit to the States 
Aylett laid siege to and won the heart of Alice Borel, one 
of the several daughters of Antone Borel, the well-known 
banker. Mr. Cotton has gone back to the Islands, and upon 
his return here, in a year and a half, will wed Miss Borel. 

Mr. and Mrs. Ernest Coxhead reside in San Mateo, 
where they have a charming home. They are very well 
connected, and have the entree to the best society both in 
the suburbs and in town. 

# # * 

Now have we come to the Crocker elan, perhaps the 
wealthiest and most influential family in the social hier- 
archy. The richest branch of the family are, of course, the 
descendants of Charles Crocker, who amassed his scores of 
millions whilst his brothers were content with just a few. 
Charles Crocker's only daughter, Hattie, married Charles 
Alexander of New York many years ago, and they are now 
leaders in the smartest set of Gotham society. W. F. 
Crocker, the banker, is one of the sons. He married Ethel 
Sperry of Stockton, whose sister Beth is the Princess 
Poniatowski. The Crockers have a Rooseveltian family, 
and lire either in their beautiful Nob Hill residence or on 
their extensive estates at Burlingame. 

George Crocker, brother of the banker, lives in New 
York, where his wife, the former Mrs. Emma Rutherford, 
recently died. It is said he is contemplating matrimony 
again. 

Colonel Fred Crocker, the third brother, who for years 
was the vice-president of the Southern Pacific Company, 
is dead. So is his wife, who was Jennie Easton. Their 
three children survive them. The eldest, Mary, is the wife 
of Francis Burton Harrison, the brilliant young New York 
Congressman. Templeton Crocker is the only son, and he 
is a lad attending Harvard. Jennie Crocker, the nineteen- 
year-old daughter, is one of the greatest heiresses in the 
country. She spends her time either on her beautiful 



estate at San Mateo with her grandmother, Mrs. Easton, 
or in New York with the Harrisons. The Crocker children 
own much valuable city property here, including the Hotel 
St. Francis, from which they derive only a portion of their 
vast income. 

Henry Crocker, brother of Charles, died a year or so 
ago. He was head of the great stationery house which bore 
his name. His family have never eared for society, and 
are not a part of the smart set. A son, Charles H., married 
Miss Steiner, an Eastern girl, a few weeks ago, and the 
bride may desire to take the place in society to which her 
husband's wealth entitles her. Henry Crocker and his 
sisters, Mrs. Van Vliet, Mrs. Fred Green, Mrs. MeCreery, 
and the late Mrs. Sam Buckbee, are all children of Mr. 
and Mrs. Clark Crocker, another brother of the famous 
Charles. The Clark Crockers possessed a comfortable 
fortune, but scarcely a vast inheritance. Henry Crocker 
married millions, however. His wife was Miss Ives, who 
received some $3,000,000 from Mrs. McLaughlin, a wealthy 
widow, whose ward she was. The Henry Crockers have a 
beautiful home on Washington street and a numerous 
family of children to fill it. They are shining examples 
of the anti-race suicide theory, and set more store on do- 
mestic joys than on the glitter of society. Mr. Crocker 
has a laudable desire to figure in public life, and ran for 
Mayor unsuccessfully, as the political conditions were 
such that no Republican candidate could have been elected 
that year. The city was the. greater sufferer, however, as 
Mr. Crocker would have made an excellent chief magistrate 
and the man who was chosen has proven the exact opposite. 
* * * 

During his lifetime Joseph B. Crockett was perhaps 
more strongly identified with San Francisco society than 
almost any other man of his time. Mr. Crockett was a 
good fellow, a charming host, and an entertaining com- 
panion. Mrs. Crockett was Miss Carrie Mills, the adopted 
daughter of "old man Mills," who for many years was 
proprietor of Saratoga Springs. She also is a favorite. 
Mr. Crockett died some two years ago, the last few years 
of his life having been quite unhappy ones. He lost the 
presidency of a large concern with which he had been iden- 
tified for years. His health failed and there were various 
ugly rumors afloat regarding his bad management, to say 
the least, in having speculated with and lost the fortunes 
of his wife and daughter, which they inherited through 
Mrs. Crockett's side of the family. Mr. Crockett was an 
intimate friend of E. W. Hopkins and Russel Wilson, and 
as their families were equally as good friends the three 
built handsome houses adjoining on California St. Caro, 
the only surviving daughter, is now the wife of Lawrance 
Scott. She and the Hopkins trio, Helen, Edna and Georg- 
ie, have been the greatest chums since early childhood, 
and when still in short skirts the girls and their following 
were the reigning sensation of Miss West's school and 
the despair of the poor teacher. Caro married Lawrance 
Scott not long after Helen Hopkins became Mrs. Gus 
Taylor, and about the same time that Georgie married 
Will Taylor. As young matrons the girls dominate their 
set no less now than they did when at school. All belong 
to the most exclusive Burlingame circle, the sanctum sanc- 
torum as it were of our provincial aristocracy. Mr. Crock- 
ett built a beautiful home at Burlingame, and there the 
Scotts and Mrs. Crockett reside the year round. Lawrence 
Scott is not very strong and the strenuous society winters 
do not appeal to him. He is a son of the late Irving Scott, 
one of our best-known and most distinguished public men. 
Mr. Scott inherited a large estate from his talented and 
successful father. 

[to bb continued] 



"Now," said Mr. Hazzard, who was instructing her in 
the mysteries of golf ; ' ' you know what a ' tee ' is. Let me 
explain now the duties of the 'caddy.' You see " 

"Of course," she interrupted, "the caddy's what you 
put tea in. I know what a tea-caddy is." 



July 29, 1905.] 



-THE WASP- 



169 



A SOUL ABOVE DISHES. 

The artistic soul of Hideo Kimura, a Japanese who was 
sent to this country from Nagasaki, Japan, as a laborer, 
has asserted itself, and, in the classic language of the 
Orient, he proclaims himself one who will "never give up 
the hope, although give me a terrible death." Some person 
with more sympathy for the Japanese than consideration 
for the "Poet of the Sierras," turned Hideo Kimnra over 
to Joaquin Miller. This is how Hideo wrote requesting 
an interview: 

"Mr. Joaquin Miller: 

I am very sorry 

I cannot express my thought 

In English freely, but if 

You admit that a soul exist 

In my gross body you shall 

Feel my spiritual aspiration 







Through all material being 
Between you and myself 

I believe the future 
Religion must be Music-Drama, 
Which these Architecture, 
Sculpture, Paintint'. Musi. . 
Poetry and Dancing, accorded 
By mysterious love and 
Scientific beam. 

This religion is 
The subject of universal 
Civilization. 

I must hold this 
Idea and become the actor 
As an incarnation of secret 
Power. 

Please trust my spirit, 
Who admire the highest and 
Deepest beauty. Please 
Introduce to me a noble actor or 
Actress. 



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HIDEO KIMURA 
The Japanese with a soul above dishes 



Take a Rest 

A great many San Francico people are planning to 
spend days and weeks during the Spring and Summer at 
Hotel Del Monte. No other resort in California offers 
such a combination of attractions— sea bathing, golf, 
automobiling, bowling, tennis, fishing, at d all out-of- 
door sports. Instead of going from place to place 
seeking comforts, the wise ones of society spend their 
time at Del Monte by the sea. Address GEO. P. 
SNELL, Manager, Del Monte, California. 

At Hotel Del Monte 



170 



-THE WASP- 



[July 29, 1905. 



I never give up ihis 
Hope, although give me terrible 
Death 

"Tour true 
"HIDEO KIMURA." 
"May last day, 1905." 

It is to be hoped that the hoary-headed poet did not 
receive the Oriental in a stuffy and heated room, as did 
Oakland callers a short time ago. I should like to have 
seen Kimura's expression if the venerable poet was, in- 
deed, in bed, with his red flannel robe de nuit fortified by 
a heavy fur coat brouaht from the Arctic. However that 
may have been, the wily Joaquin was not born yesterday, 
and he figuratively patted his brown fellow-poet on the 
back and passed him on to Jenne Morrow Long and her 
dramatic school. Like others whose feet have been turned 
toward the summit of Olympus, Kimura chafes under thj 
uncongenial daily tasks. Washing dishes is the cross 
from which his writhing soul seeks relief. In a cry to those 
congenial souls who have arrived, in a "rhymeless poem." 
as the writer very appropriately calls it, he thus asks the 
reason of existing conditions: 

' ' Violent eagle flies up all the day ; 

My spirit just like him also; 

Beautiful lily sips Diana's milk; 

But not I, for art through the night. 

' ' My friends genius whole on the history 

Steps and step onward to Supreme idea ; 

I know and aspirate for the Supreme, 

But not catch its brilliant beam. 

"Why must I be served by other? 

Why must I work as servant? 

Why must I be looked by other as Worker? 

It is nothing but money. 

"I celebrate high character and 

Sublime imagination of myself, 

For I am an Angel of heavenly art. 

"I came down into this world for 

Realization of the most beautiful 

Imagination from the Palace of 

The highest. 

"There are many kind of artist, but 

I am fond of actor especially; 

He is the incarnation of poetry and 

Music. 

"Poetry is the thought of God and 

Music is the ward. 

"Will be not here a noble and rich 

Man who has great interest for art, 

And help me to devote my lessons 

Of art specially. 

"If a man help me, will be a 

Splendid actor after three years, 

And then I will recompense bis 

Great kindness. 

' ' I wish to study duly Shakespeare 's drama . 

And actings specially. How I love and 

Worship my Shakespeare's drama! They are 

The best of all poetry in the world." 

Hideo's seat in the English saddle, with which he rides 
Pegasus, is a trifle insecure, but when he gains more con- 
fidence Lowell Otis Reese and Charlie Keeler will have to 
look to their laurels as jockeys fit to put the melodious 
steer through his best paces. Meanwhile some San Fran- 
cisco ladies are easting about for means to enable the dis 
dainful Oriental to devote to study the three years that he 
declares it will take him to dethrone Ward and James, and 
efface the fond memories of Booth and Forrest. 

The Vienna Model Bakery, 222 Sutter street, above 
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UNMADE HISTORY. 

The ending of the Protective Tariff was dramatic. 

One day a fleet of Japanese warships appeared in New 
York harbor. 

"We've come," shouted the Admiral in command, "to 
open your country to the civilized world ! ' ' 

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STRICTLY BUSINESS 



Points of Interest on Trade and Finance. 




F the great number of solid citizens who 

growl every year about their taxes only a 
limited number ever go before the Board 
of Equalization to record their protests. 
There were some amusing incidents this 
year in connection with the annual at- 
tempts to get reductions in the figures of 
the Assessor, and so reduce the tax bills. One citizen 
represented that he had been overassessed, but gave the 
cash value of his real estate as about 35 per cent more 
than the valuation placed upon it by Assessor Dodge. The 
law requires that real property be assessed at its actual 
cash value, so the Board of Equalization would have had 
a good excuse for raising that gentleman's assessment; and 
as he said his property was worth $180,000, the difference 
in his taxes would have amounted to a nice penny. It 
developed that Claus Spreekels pavs taxes on cash to the 
amount of $1,250,000, besides all the real estate he owns, 
and securities, and other personal property. A gentleman 
named Levy was being examined on his petition for a re- 
duction. "Would you take that for your property?" 
asked Supervisor Brandenstein. "Is this a real estate 
exchange?" quickly retorted the taxpayer. "I thought 
this was a hall of justice." The laugh was on Branden- 
stein. Another Hebrew petitioner was asked if she would 
be willing to sell her property for the sum she said it was 
worth, and she responded: "I live there. What shall I 
do — ii V e in the street?" Daniel Meyer, one of the wealth- 
iest men in the city, whose money is in coin and securities, 
was arbitrarily assessed for $1,050,000. He merely asked 
that he be not raised, suggesting that the Supervisors 
ought not to "kill the goose that laid the ~olden egg." 
Last year, when he was assessed for a round million, whi.rh 
was raised five per cent, he said to the Assessor: "If yon 
raise me again, Doctor, I shall need your professional ser- 
vices." It having been announced by the Assessor that 
he would not recommend the reduction of any real estate 
valuations, and it appearing that some assessments were 
nevertheless too high, the suggestion was made to some 
petitioners that thev apply for a reduction on their im- 
provements. "But I don't want any reduction on the im- 
provements," exclaimed one. "I am satisfied with the 
valuation on them. It's the land that is too high." 
"Well, I am sorry," replied the Assessor. "I made a sug- 
gestion, and you do not have to accept it." So his assess- 
ment stood. 

# * # 

Keeping Grafters in Check. 

The Board of Supervisors is keeping a tight rein on 
the Board of Public Works this year. Last year that 
famous aggregation of political curios succeeded in using 
up most of their appropriation before the end of the fiscal 
year, and this year the Supervisors have started out by 
making only that portion of their funds allowed for two 
months available for use in the division of repairs to 
buildings, streets and sewers. If it be found that this 
money is expended wisely, then the nurse-strings will be 
loosened a little more. It was very susro-estive the other 
day to see Cowden, the Superintendent of Street Sweep- 
ing, loosen up and sail into his employers, calling them 
liars, and declaring that he had been made a puppet of long 



enough. Cowden was being used as a witness with the 
purpose of showing that Contractor Clute could not furnish 
teams at the price offered, to keep the streets clear of 
sweepings. Egan said there were 000 or S00 wagonloads 
of sweepings on the streets waiting to be hauled away. 
Cowden had already stretched the truth as far as l.e 
dared by saying that there were about 250 loads accumulat- 
ed, and when he was asked to stand for Egan's figures he 
could not tolerate it any longer. The Supervisors found by 
personal inspection the next day that the streets were 
comparatively clean, and they became satisfied that the 
Board of Works had put every possible impediment in th? 
way of Clute to prevent him from doing his work prop- 
erly. The whole secret of the business is that the saving 
of about $20,000 from hiring the teams by contract will 
come out of the pockets of the political creatures of the 
administration and go into the pockets of the taxpayers; 
or, rather, it will be available to give the city better work 
on street sweeping. 

# * * 
Not a Glittering Success. 

The experiment of keeping safety deposit boxes open all 
night has not been a glittering success thus far. In New 
York conditions favor such an enterprise, but here the time 
is not yet ripe for it. It requires three people to man the 
place, and naturally enough the price for all-night boxes 
is increased to double the price of others. By the way, a 
banker tells me that bank deposits have increased materi- 
ally because of business men's distrust of general condi- 
tions that have been brought about by labor agitators and 
municipal grafters. Prudent capitalists desire to have 
their funds in a safe place. There is active competition 
in the safety deposit business, and two banks, one on the 
"Front" and one on Polk street, are about to enter that 
field. 

# # # 
Two Millions Loaned in One Day. 

Some of the savings banks have been doing a land 
office business in loans recently. On the 14th inst. there 
was a record day at the Hibernia Bank, when upwards of 
two million dollars were loaned out. And for the rest of 
this year the loans will be large and the releases few. The 
desire for improvements has seized hold on all who have 
good locations in the section previously noted, and where 
the purchases have not been speculative merely. When 
there is a lull for a week or so in building contracts they 
come in next week with a rush. 

* * * 
About Our Banks. 

The rush of depositors to collect their semi-annual in- 
terest at the Hibernia Bank every half-year is so great — 
there are over seventy thousand — that an addition costing 
up to date $75,000 has had to be made, and by January 1st 
there will be much better accommodation for the throng- 
ing thousands of industrious people whose money helps to 
put up many of the sky-scrapers that have now become a 
feature of San Francisco architecture. 

* * # 
A Great Institution. 

The Bank of California in its new statement reckons 



172 



-THE WASP- 



[July 29, 1905. 



in the result of the last sale of stock, making the total 
slightly in excess of forty millions of dollars. This brings 
the old bank, so dear to the hearts of all Californians, in- 
to the front rank of the financial institutions of the world. 
By and by the big sky-scraper will be erected and then it 
will have a home worthy of it and of the State. 

* # * 
A Big Bank. 

The establishment of big banks as well as the consolida- 
tion of others is beginning to be a notable feature of the 
world of finance. One of the latest organizations is that 
of the Soeiete Finaneiere JTranco-Amerieaine Societe An- 
onyme Franeaise with a capital of fifty million francs or 
$9,650,000. The president is Frederic Mallet, of Mallet 
Freres, and the vice-president, James Speyer, of Speyer 
and Co. It will handle American investments and be in- 
ternational in character. 

* * # 
Interest on Deposits. 

Many years ago our commercial banks abolished the 
practice of paying interest on mercantile deposits, and 
now only a couple of banks pay such interest. In New 
York, however, the competition has been so great amongst 
banks that the practice has been almost universal until 
lately. Now the practice has been generally discontinued 
save in the case of term deposits. The president of the 
State Banks Association favors the latter course. ,He 
says "Mushroom deposits give rise to mushroom loanSy'/ 
and he appears to favor a small interest on term deposits 1 , 
but not on those subject to call. It is better as in Cali- 
fornia to drop the practice altogether. 

* # # 
Foreign Finance. 

The unsettled state of affairs in Russia itself, coupled 
with the uncertainty as to whether there will be peace, 
has a depressing effect on foreign securities and causes 
American to be sought in preference. But the market as 
a whole is decidedly dull and lower. The foreign banks 
continue to accumulate gold and have now $140,000,000 
more than they had a year ago. On July 13th of this year 
they had $1,950,000,000 in gold, or almost two billions. 
The Bank of France added five million dollars to its pile 
the other day, while loans were decreased about half a mil- 
lion dollars. And that is the general tendency through- 
out Europe today. If the war should keep on every nerve 
will be strained to obtain money from this country, and 
rates for it, though rather easy now, will go up. The re- 
sources of both combatants are becoming rapidly exhaust- 
ed, and it will not be long before neither will be able to 
make foreign loans and will have to issue paper money as 
the United States had to do on a like occasion. Japan 
has not the same recuperative power as Russia, and wheth- 
er finally victorious or not will require a much longer time 
to recover than her huge rival. 

* * * 
United States Crops. 

It is seldom that the indicated crops of the United 
States come up to those of this year. The probable yield 
of wheat is given at slightly in excess of seven hundred 
million bushels, the largest but one in the history of the 
country, while that of corn is the same, being in excess of 
2,650,000 bushels. The total value of cereal crops and 
potatoes is given in excess of four billions of dollars. 
This is one of the best prospects the country has ever 
had, and if the vagaries of high finance could be kept in 
cheek the prosperity of the country would be assured for at 
least another year. But what between Lawson and Morgan 
and Depew and others, no one knows what to expect. 

* * * 

There will be a big margin for export in wheat and 
corn. The condition of the cotton crop is not reported in 
the last statement sent out, presumably on account of the 
scandals lately exposed in connection with that depart- 
ment, but the value of the crop cannot be less than $600,- 
000,000, the greater part of which will also be available 



MONEY TO LOAN. 
To salaried people at low rates. The White Co., 420 
California St., Rooms 14 & 15. Take elevator on Leides- 
dorff street to third floor. 

The German Savings and Loan Society, 

826 California St., San Prandico 

Guaranteed capital and surplus $ 2,500,098.42 

Capital actually paid up in cash 1.000,000.00 

Deposits, Dec. 31, 1904 37;73*.673.i7 

OFFICERS — President, John Lloyd; First Vice-President, Daniel 
Meyer; Second Vice-President, Emil Rohte; Cashier, A. H. R. Schmidt; 
Assistant Cashier, William Herrmann; Secretary, George "lourny; Assist. 
Secretary, A, H. Muller; Attorney, W. S. Goodfellow. 

BOARD OF DIRECTORS — John Lloyd, Daniel Meyer, Emil Rohte, 
Ign. Steinhart, N. Ohlandt, I. N. Walter, J. W. Van Bergen F. Tillmann, 
Jr., and E. T. Kruse. 

San Francisco Savings Union. 5 " SHaW" 1 

Deposits January 1, 1905. .$33,940,132 | Paid up capital $1,000,000.0* 

Reserve and contingent funds, $976,109. 

B. B. POND, President; W. C. B. De FREMERY, ROBERT WATT, 

Vice-Presidents; LOVELL WHITE, Cashier; R. M. WELCH, 

Assistant Cashier. 

DIRECTORS— E. B. Pond, W. C. B. De Fremery, Robert Watt, 
Henry F. Allen, Wakefield Baker,, Jacob Barth, Fred H. Beaver, 
William A. Magee, C. O. G. Miller. 

Loans upon San Francisco and Oakland Real Estate, and Farma 
and Farming Lands in the country. Receives deposits. Country re- 
mittances may be made in checks payable In San Francisco, Poatoiflco 
or Wells Fargo & Co.'s Money Orders, or Coin by Express, but the re- 
sponsibility of this bank commences only with the receipt of the 
money. No charge is made for pass-book or entrance fee. OFFICB 
HOURS— 9 a. m. to 3 p. m., and Saturday evenings, for receipt of de- 
posits only, 6:30 to 8 o'clock. 



Security Savings Bank 



316 Montgomery St. 

SAN FRANCISCO 



Authorized Capital, $1,000,000; Paid Up Capital, $500,000; Surplus and 
Undivided Profits, $265,000. Interest Paid on Deposits. Loans Made. 

Directors — Wm. Babcock, Parrott & Co.; S. L- Abbot, Security Sav- 
ings Bank ; O. D. Baldwin, O. D. Baldwin & Son; Joseph D. Grant, Mur- 
phy, Grant & Co.; E. J. McCutchen, Page, McCutchen & Knight; X,. F. 
Monteagle, Capitalist; R. H. Pease, Pres. Goodyear Rubber Co.; Warre* 
D. Clark, Williams, Dimond & Co.; Jas. L. Flood, Capitalist; J. A. Dono- 
hoe Pres. Donohoe, Kelly Banking Co.; John Parrott, Capitalist; Jacob 
Stern, Vice-President Levi Strauss & Co. 

William Babcock, President; S. L- Abbot, Vice-President and Man- 
ager; Fred. W. Ray, Secretary; Sidney V. Smith, Attorney. 



STARR ®l DULFER 

SAN FRANCISCO AND TONOPAH 

Stock Commission Brokers 




Tonopah 

Goldfield 

Bullfrog 




OFFICES: 

Merchants' Exchange Building 
San Francisco 

Tonopah, Nevada 

H. W. Hellman Building 
Los Angeles, Cal. 

MEMBERS SAN FRANCISCO STOCK AND EXCHANGE BOARi 



JDLY 29, 1905.] 



THE WASP- 



173 



for export. There will therefore be a big balance of traile 
against foreign countries which will go to olfsci the i 
est to be i>;ii'l i" foreign holders of American securities 
and the profits accruing to foreign capitalists on Am« 
industrial investments, and unless the unsettled state of 
matters in Europe should cause a big demand for Ameri- 
can gold, the condition of the New York money market 
should remain, on the whole, favorable to the borrower. 

This, of course, means rates a great deal lower than 
those that prevail in San Francisco, and while such is the 
case, the result will be to bring more and more capital to 
this citv and coast and to give rise to large investments 
in mines, forests and manufacturing industries. The ex- 
tension of the latter, long delayed, will be the outcome, 
and markets will be found for them all over the countries 
bordering on the Pacific. 

* * * 
United States Steel. 

The outlook for the last half of the year is exceptionally 
good, and the net earnings for that period are placed at 
$70,0110,000. Of course, this is all speculation, and is no 
doubt set forth partly to steady the market, but the out- 
look is good. Should the expectations of the public be 
realized, the net earnings of the corporation for the year 
should be $113,000,000, and the directors should remember 
the long-suffering holders of common stock, who hold it 
as an investment, and not for the purpose of controlling the 
company. The good outlook here and in other portions of 
the iron and steel industries is a favorable indication for 
general prosperitv. 

Are They Too Sanguine? 

On the other hand, comes the question, Are the di- 
rectors of the United States Steel Corporation too san- 
guine? A New York paper draws attention to the fact 
that prices of iron are declining, and that in the face of a 
decreased output stocks in first hands have increased. This 
would seem to say that the expectations of the directors 
are too sanguine. But then the salesmen say that the stocks 
in consumers' yards were never so low as they are now; 
that the foundries which have been waiting for lower 
prices will be obliged to buy, and that there will be a rush 
of purchasers which will send prices up again. Of course, 
it all depends on the dear public in the long run. If the 
people generally are prosperous they will buy, and the 
foundry men, machinists, etc., will be obliged to buy, and 
what the salesmen are looking for will happen. And the 
good condition of the crops promises well and leaves no 
doubt that these expectations will be realized. 

Railroad Dividends. 

The outlook for the railroads of the country is improv- 
ing, and the net earnings in general are increasing. This is 
encouraging the directors to put out money in the shape 
of dividends, and the Baltimore and Ohio has increased 
the dividend on common stock from 2 to 2y 2 per cent for 
the half-year, making it a five per cent stock. Now, as the 
common stockholder is generally looked upon as the Cin- 
derella of the market, this action of the Eastern roads is 
encouraging. Five per cent is just as high as anything 
outside of such corporations as the Bank of California 
can hope to climb to, and even here the premiums bring it 
down to a less than five per cent basis. There has been 
some talk lately of a dividend on the common stock of the 
Southern Pacific, and the common stockholders pray de- 
voutly that such may be the case, and that the era of 
dividend-paying may begin after all these weary years of 
waiting. 

* * * 
Government Deficit. 

The deficit for the fiscal year has been $23,987,752. 

Citizens State Bank, 518 Montgomery, cor. Com. ia!. 

allows 4 per cent on time certificates. 



This deficit has beeu caused altogether by increased ex- 
penditures, and unless these can be cut down this deficit 
is bound to increase. For the fiscal year 1003-1 there was 
a deficit of $42,002,144, but then there was paid out $55,- 
000,000 on account of the Panama Canal and the Louisi- 
ana Exposition. The year of the highest receipts lately 
was 1900-1, when they were $580,852,300, since when they 
have fallen off about $27,000,000. At the same time there 
has been an increase in expenditures year by year from, 
in round numbers $510,000,000 in that year, to $567,00,000 
during the past year. That is to say that the expenditures 
have increased enough to wipe out last year's deficiency 
and leave a balance on hand of about $34,000,000. Reck- 
oning the annual cost of the Panama Canal at $20,000,000, 
there would still remain a nice little balance if govern- 
mental affairs were managed with any decent regard for 
the most elementary principles of economy. 

# * # 
Who is He? 

He is a representative merchant and manufacturer, an 
old Californian, and prefers not to be tjuoted. He is a 
veteran who came here in pioneer days and roughed it in 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 
OFFICE OF THE HIBERNIA SAVINGS AND LOAN SOCIETY 
Corner Market, McAllister ami Jones Sts., San Francisco. 

June 28. 1905. 
At a regular meeting of the Board of Directors of this Society, 
held this day, a dividend has been declared at the rate of three and 
one-half (3%) per cent per annum on all depositB for the six months 
ending June 30, 1905. free from all taxes, and payable on and after 
July 1. 1906. 

ROBERT J. TOBIN, Secretary. 

MEMBER STOCK and BOND EXCHANGE. 

J. C. WILSON 

BANKER AND BROKER 

Local and Eastern Stocks and Bonds 

490 California Street, San Francisco 
telephone MAIN 3070 




Mutual Savings Bank of San Francisco 

71a Market St., opp. Third 

Guarantee Capital $1,000,000 

Paid-up Capital .100,000 

Surplus - 800,000 

Deposits. July 1 1905 9,969,228 

JAMES D. PHELAN, President: S. G. MURPHY, Vice-Prei- 
ident; JOHN A. HOOPER, Vice-President; GEORGE A. 
STORY, Cashier; C. B. HOBSON, Assis ant Cashier. 

Directors— James D. Phelan. S. G. Murphy, John A. Hooper, 
James Moffitt, Frank J Sullivan, Robert McElroy, Rudolph 
Spreckels, James M. McDonald, Charles Holbrook. 

Interest paid on deposits. Loans on approved securities. 

Deposits may be sent by postal order, Wells, Fargo & Co., or 
exchange on city banks. 



The Hibernia Savings and Loan Society. 

Incorporated 12th oC April, 1859. 

Office: Cor. of McAllister and Jones Streets. San Francisco 

Deposits January 1, 1905, $58,648,182.32. 

Reserve Fund, actual value, $3,372,779.09. 

OFFICERS— President, James R. Kelly; Secretary and Treasurer. 

Robert J. Tobin; Attorney, Joseph S. Tobin. 

BOARD OF DIRECTORS— R. J. Tobin, James R. Kelly, P. Crow- 
ley, Richard M. Tobin, Charles Mayo, Joseph S. Tobin. 

The objects for which this association is formed are, that by its 
operations the depositors thereof may be able to find a secure and 
profitable investment for small savings, and that borrowers may havo 
an opportunity of obtaining from it the use of a moderate capital on 
giving good and sufficient security for the use of the same. 

French Savings Bank, 3 ' 5 SZtSSSSL st ' 

CAPITAL PAID UP $600,000 

CHARGES CARPY, President ARTHUR LEGALLET, Vice-President 

LEON BOCQUERAZ, Secretary 

DIRECTORS-J E. Artigues, O. Bozio, Leon Borqueraz, J, A. Ber- 
gerot. Chas. Carpy, J. B. Clot, J. S. Godeau, Leon Kauffman, A. Legallet, 
J. M. Dupas, A Ross, J. J. Mack. 



174 



-THE WASP 



i 



[July 29, 1905. 



search of gold and found it, though not in the mines. He 
sits at the directorate of many a company and helps to 
steer many a business venture along the straight and nar- 
row path. He has done much to develop the industrial re- 
sources of the State and the industries of San Francisco, 
and is a firm believer in the protection of both American 
capital and American labor. He takes a keen interest in 
polities, but as a private citizen who does his duty on 
election day and is recognized as a staunch upholder of 
the party placed in power by the war. He is averse to 
publicity, because he believes that the newspapers of to- 
day interfere altogether too much with the private life 
and private affairs of the citizen, and that inquisitorial 
bodies by law established violate the secrecy which should 
veil their proceedings, and that their mouthpieces talk too 
much. 

# # # 
Nevertheless he has opinions, and he believes that the 
same policy which reared the mighty fabric of the indus- 
tries of the Republic is good enough for our time and 
should be persevered in by Congress. While the free-for-all 
policy in regard to Panama has an attraction for many 
he concludes that in the end it must hurt our business in- 
terests. Where the rates of freight are continually 
changing there is no security for the merchants. In comes 
a tramp steamer and cuts the rates. This induces the ship- 
ment of large quantities of goods by hei which are dispos- 
ed of at figures lower than the regular market rates, and 
the house which has served the public year in and year 
out sees its. profits come close to the vanishing point. By 
and by the tramp steamer and the tramp dealer disappear 
and freights go up, but it is next to impossible to advance 
prices in a corresponding degree. 

* * * 
Labor and Capital. 

As to prices he concludes that in any event they are 
too low; houses in the same business cut too close. And 
then with the dropping of prices comes the advance in the 
price of labor, and the merchant and manufacturer sees 
both approach each other till there is no margin left be- 
tween them and nothing left for the man who finds the 
money and puts in his time and his knowledge of business 
to make the latter a success. He would like to see wages 
go up to ten dollars a day in every line so that the inevit- 
able would come and matters get straightened out again. 

* * # 
A Banker's Views. 

A leading banker of the city thinks that the prices 
lately paid for first-class city realty are fully justified bv 
the location, and believes that they will hold their own. 
He does not concur in the opinion of some others that the 
future has been discounted, and does not deem $S000 a 
front foot, recently paid for Market Street property, ex- 
cessive. He says that the Blythe property is worth 
$10,000 a front foot and that the whole triangular section 
of the city bounded by Market, Van Nejs and California 
Streets, and south to Mission, is the section where the 
highest prices will always prevail. 

* # « 
Lower Interest. 

He allows though that these big prices involve the ac- 
ceptance of a lesser rate of interest on realty investments, 
not to exceed four or^four and a half per cent, per annum 
net. An Eastern banker here recently claimed that money 
was altogether too dear on the Pacific Coast, and that the 
capitalists here will have to be content with a rate of four 
to four and a half per cent. No doubt this will be the 
case in time. It does not seem so very long ago since ten 
to twelve per cent, was considered a fair rate to charge 
and it is still charged for third-class credit. But we have 
become accustomed to six and eight per cent, and even five 
is not considered bad by some of our banks or very large 
firms where the security is gilt-edged. 

The fact that Repsold wines are absolutely pure has much 
to do with the flavor, but more to do with the healthfulness. 



Engagements 

Miss Juanita Wells, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. George 
R. Wells of San Francisco, to Mr. Charles G. Huse of Chi- 
cago. 

Miss Hattie Coleman, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Joseph 
Coleman, to Mr. William Goldman, both of San Francisco. 

Miss Lucy Marguerite Cohen, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. 
John Cohen of Oakland, to Mr. Reuben Hugh White Ma- 
honey of Berkeley. 

Miss Ella Wight of Honolulu to Dr. Arthur Sinclair 
Knudson, formerly of San Francisco, but now of Hawaii. 

Miss Daisy Getz, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Louis Getz, 
to Mr. Benjamin Lewis, both of San Francisco. 



Weddings 

July 26th — Miss Yvonne Finch, daughter of Mr. and 
Mrs. Alfred Finch of Cambridge, Mass., to Dr. Thomas 
Hartley Winslow of Oakland, at the residence of Dr. Wins- 
low's sister, in Arroyo Grande. 

July 30th — Miss Gladys Beringer, daughter of Profes- 
sor and Madam Joseph Beringer, to Mr. Harry Meyer, both 
of San Francisco, at the Beringer residence in Geary street. 

August 2d — Miss Florence Starr, sister of Mr. Walter 
Starr, East Oakland, to Mr. Joseph Notely Thomas, at Fast 
Oakland. 

August 2d — Mrs. Anna Albrecht Irwin of Fruitvale 
to Mr. Edward M. Bray, at Fruitvale. 

August 3d — Miss Gertrude Shelton to Mr. Charles E. 
Bundschu, both of San Francisco, at the Swedenborgian 
Church. 

August 9th — Miss May Belle Greenebaum, daughter of 
Mr. and Mrs. Sigmund Greenebaum, to Mr. Herbert Fleish- 
hacker, both of San Francisco. 

August 9th — Miss Ethyl Gray, daughter of Mr. and 
Mrs. J. P. Gray of San Francisco, to Dr. David James 
Graham of Edinburgh, Scotland, in New York City. 

August 9th — Miss Mabel Handy, daughter of the late 
Dr. Handy, to Mr. Edward Man, of San Francisco, at 
Trinity Episcopal Church. 

August 12th — Miss Elsie B. Leale, daughter of Captain 
and Mrs. William C. Leale of San Francisco, to Mr. Fred- 
erick Bruce Johnstone of Chicago, at the Leale residence, 
2266 Vallejo street, San Francisco. 

August 19th — Miss Leslie Green, daughter of Mr. and 
Mrs. A. T. Green, Dwight Way, Berkeley, to Mr. Howard 
Huntington, at Berkeley. 

August 24th — Miss Marian C. Voorsanger, daughter of 
the Rev. Jacob and Mrs. Voorsanger, to Mr. E. A. Wazel- 
bauni of Macon, Georgia, at Temple Emanu-El, by the Rev. 
Jacob Voorsanger. 

August 28th — Miss Edith Gaskill, daughter of Mr. and 
Mrs. B. A. Gaskill, to Mr. Roy MeCabe, both of Oaklaud. 



Latest Collins Bulletin. 



The latest developments in the interesting affairs of 
Attorney George Collins, bigamist, is ihe expected visit 
of the stork to Clarice MeCurdy, alias Mrs. Collins No. 2. 
When Collins and his latest wife left here so hurriedly for 
Canada they expected to live there in quiet domesticity, 
awaiting the happy event, undisturbed by bigamy or other 
charges, but Fate willed it otherwise. The latest addition 
to the Collins progeny makes the much-advertised lawyer 
a father for the fifth time. Before he skipped off to Can- 
ada Collins borrowed money from as many friends as had 
any to give him or were willing to part with it. He pawn- 
ed his law library in his efforts to raise the wind. 

Tonopah Home Consolidated 

Shipped a carload of high-grade ore this week from Tono- 
pah to the smelter. A sharp advance in the price of stock 
from seven cents per share to ten cents a share has taken 
place. A dividend is being quietly talked of for Jan- 
uary. 



By AUTOMAN 



Whatever else she Joes, I lie Newport girl must drive au 
auto, for all the accomplishments in woman's list count 
for naught unless she can handle a ear with the assurance 
of a skilled hand. But there's another side to the picture. 
So much time do the enthusiastic devote to automobiling 
that many of their friends complain it is next to impos- 
sible to get them to engage in mildei social diversions. 
Miss Maude Wetmore and Miss Charlotte Warren are plau- 
ning a women's automobile club in Newport. The club, 
they sav, will have a parade every week or so and will 
take occasional runs out of town. The idea is meeting 
with general favor, but the Newport men say it's a shame 
so many pretty girls hide their faces behind auto masks 
from morn till midnight — a course to which, it is feared, 
the new club will tend. 

An unlighted cigar usually sticks oat from the lower 
part of Eddie Bald's countenance when he is driving in 
an automobile race. This is characteristic of Barney Old- 
field also. When they were bicycle riders and had to keep 
in training, neither of these men ever smoked. Now that 
they may indulge they seem to be as inseparable from a 
cigar as was General Grant. Bald was in the "Climb to 
the Clouds," up Mt. Washington, with his Columbia car 
last week, and had the best opportunity he has ever had to 
test out his theories on the scientific aspects of hill-climb- 
ing. "The opportunity for great head work is all there," 
says the now famous motor car piloter, "and the fine 
points involved in a good hill-climbing performance, 
though of an entirely different nature, are quite as exact- 
ing upon the driver's ability and judgment as is track 
work. ' ' 

M. A. Gunst and his family are spending a few weeks 
in Portland visiting friends and the Fair. They made the 
trip overland to the Exposition City in their big auto- 
mobile. 

There are hardly any of the society folk of this city 
more enthusiastic over automobiling than the J. J. Moores. 
Mrs. Moore is one of the cleverest of chauffeuses here- 
abouts, and they own several fine machines. "Jeff" Moore 
has imbibed much of his parents' enthusiasm in the sport 
and declares he knows of no greater enjoyment than hand- 
ling the wheel of a powerful chug-wagon on a tour into 
the country. Mr. Moore last week presented his young 
son with a four-cylinder Autocar, which he proposes guid- 
ing himself. 

A new racer will be built for Barney Oldfield. It will 
be enough larger and more powerful than the present 
Green Dragon to enable him to compete with foreign-made 
racing cars. 

White mice are regularly enrolled on the submarines 
of the British Navy to give warning of any leakage of gas- 
oline. The little animals are peculiarly sensitive to gaso- 
line fumes and make a great ado when there is any about. 
There is a fine suggestion for garages in this. 

Mr. and Mrs. Brown of Los Angeles left this city this 
week for Los Angeles in their White touring car. 



A. D. Bowcu, who is vice-president of the new Ocean 
Shore electric road, has of late made frequent inspection 
trips to Santa Cruz in his Autocar. Mr. Bowen enjoys 
his runs immensely, and bids fair to become very fond of 
automobiling. 

The White garage of Los Augeles reeenriy sold to the 
city of Los Angeles a White touring car, to be used by the 
Water Department of that city. Los Angeles ought now 
to be able to get some lessons in water economy, the White 
performance in that line being something remarkable. 
Wakefield Baker frequently makes the run up to his place 
in Lake County in his White touring car. 

In the recent automobile reliability trials of the Auto- 
mobile Club of Holland, a White steamer was among one 
of the ten cars to score the maximum of 900 points. An- 
other White was among the six ears which scored 899 
points and a third White scored 890 points. The showing 
of the White steamers was quite unexpected, as it was not 
generally known that a steam ear could make good in so 
long a contest, especially against gasoline ears of world- 
wide repute. 



Queen Automobiles 




Dr. Charles W. Decker, Dentist. 
Phelan Building, 806 Market street. Specialty : 
Gas" for the painless extracting of teeth. 



•Colton 



It will pay you to see the Queens before buying 

Model B. Runabout -12 h. p. - - - S925 

Model B. detachable tonneau-12 h. p. - - $1025 

Model C. detachable tonneau--l8 h. p. - - SIIOO 

Model E. touring car-18 h. p. - - $1150 

Model E. special-18 h. p. - - - $1500 

WHY PAY TWICE AS MUCH FOB A CAR, WHEN EVEN AT ^ 
THAT PRICE IT WILL NOT COMPARE WITH THE QUEEN ■ 



RARIG AUTOMOBILE AND GARAGE CO. 

(Occupying the finest repository for motor cars on the Pacific Coast) 
Phone Jessie 2091 827 to 833 Folsom St., San Francisco 



176 



-THE WASP 



[July 29, 1905. 



The Queen ear, for which the Rarig Automobile and 
Garage Company, occupying the extremely handsome 
building on Folsom Street, are agents, seems to be making 
friends rapidly. It is a neater-looking automobile and is 
not only unusually powerful, but very reasonable in price 
compared to other rigs on the market in competition. 

Mr. Rose, traveling representative of the Fairbank- 
Morse Co., has just returned from a 1,200-mile trip in his 
Oldsmobile French type touring runabout. In a trip which 
has heretofore taken him fourteen days to make, Mr. Rose 
cut the time down to nine days, saving about one-third. 
He left on Thursday last for another trip through the San 
Joaquin valley, and expects to cover another thousand 
miles before returning to San Francisco. 

The Chicago Commercial Manufacturing Company (of 
Harvey, 111.), manufacturers of gasoline and freight trucks 
of five-ton capacity, and passenger cars and buses with a 
seating capacity of from 16 to 40 people, have appointed 
the Pioneer Automobile Company as their Pacific Coast 
agents. It is expected that a large number of their ma- 
chines will be placed on the Coast during the next few 
months. 

Mr. Samuel C. Hammond's model A Winton touring 
car arrived in San Francisco Monday last and is attract- 
ing a great deal of attention. This machine is painted in 
colors selected by Mr. Hammond. Mr. Hammond's 
daughter will take the machine on a ten days ' tour at a very 
early date. 

Mr. Charles C. Moore, in company with a party of 
friends made a trip around the bay on Sunday last in his 
new model B Winton touring ear. 



THE RED FLAG. 



The opening of the convention in Chicago for the pur- 
pose of forming a new labor party to be known as the 
"Industrial Workers of the World" shows all the old-time 
anarchists and red-flag socialists in attendance, among 
them being Charles H. Moyer and W. D. Haywood, presi- 
dent and secretary of the Western Federation of Miners, 
respectively, D. C. Coates, a dyed-in-the-wool anarchist and 
president of the Typographical Union of Colorado, Mothe: 
Jones of unsavory reputation, and "Father" Thomas J. 
Hagerty, a red-flag priest, who made all the trouble in 
the Trinidad district of Colorado. 

Charles C. Sherman, a prominent anarchist, and presi- 
dent of the United Metal Workers, was elected president, 
while William B. Trautman was made secretary. These 
men are merely dummies in the hands of the Western Fed- 
eration of Miners, as is evidenced by the resolutions pass- 
ed, which provide that the Western Federation of Miners 
shall be prominently represented on the Executive Board, 
and Moyer and the rest of the gang were elected to serve, 
thus giving them absolute control of the whole organiza- 
tion. 

Their constitution and by-laws provide, among other 
remarkable things, that May 1st be set aside as an Interna- 
tional Labor Day, as the first Monday in September was 
used for that purpose by Mr. Gompers' labor unions, with 
which they would have nothing to do. 

Another item is that the working class and the capital- 
istic class have nothing in common; that the last thread 
which connected labor and capital has been cut, the gaunt- 
let thrown down and war against capital proclaimed. 

Control is further concentrated in the hands of a few 
men by the rule which allows only thirteen associations to 
be represented, thus the representative of the printing 
trades Would also be the delegate of the cooks, waiters, 
barbers, hostlers and other like interests, of which he 
would, of course, have no knowledge. 

Industrial troubles are to be handled by sympathetic 
strikes ; in other words, where there is any trouble in any 
line, the whole bunch of the Industrial Workers of Amer- 
ica will be called out in a body. 

Many red-hot resolutions were passed concerning em- 
ployers' organizations, and denying them the rights that 



the unions reserve exclusively to themselves — to organize 
for their protection. They also deny the right of any one 
running a business — for instance, like the packing business 
or any other mercantile business — to run a printing office 
or other outside business in connection therewith. 

They also state their ability to put 2,000 organizers in 
the field to drum up membership, and give out the idea 
that it is going to be a fight to the finish between the new 
association and Mr. Gompers' organization, stating that 
they are opposed to all the methods and trickery of the 
Gompers concern, and will seek to reform the industrial 
world. 

This is about as large and juicy a bunch of anarchists 
as ever came down the Pike, and the. decent and respecta- 
ble mechanic who belongs to an organization of this kind 
will find himself in a bad box. 

Another resolution was to the effect that no sick or 
death benefits were to be paid, but that assessments would 
be made to create a large fund for strike purposes only. 
If they follow the plan of the present-day labor unions, 
this will make it easy for the leaders to grab all the money 
that is put in without having to account to any one for its 
disposition. 

Brain and brawn benefited with a tonic that aids digestion — Ab- 
bott's Angostura Bitters are noted for their digestive properties. All 
druggists. 




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Nearly a half hundred Winton 4-cylinder 
machines now running in California— every 
one giving perfect satisfaction. We advise 
you to see any of the Winton owners. Then 
come to us and study the simple mechanics 
of the car— you will then be a Winton man, 
save money and truly enjoy automobiling. 
We have besides the Winton line the whole 
1905 models of the Oldsmobiles on our stock 
room floor. 



Pioneer Automobile Co. 

905-925 Golden Gate Avenue, San Francisco 



ANDREWS, KEENAN & BLASAUF 

MACHINISTS AND ENGINEERS 

81 CITY HAI^L AVENUE Phone South 1089 



Automobile Repairs. American and Foreign Cars. Agents 
for Oleo, French Spark Plugs. Tires, Batteries, etc., Furnished. 
Springs made. Forgings, Machine Work, etc. 



July 29, 1905 ] 



THE WASP- 



177 




Saturday — The street ear men in tbis town are simply 
too fresh for anything. Dear me ! How careless I am get- 
ting about my language. That Mrs. Lightley is spoiling 
me. Do you know, the men on my car line bow to every 
good-looking woman who gets on their cars, and smile and 
smirk — why, it 's simply too disgusting. I do not see how 
any decent woman can submit to being ogled by a car con- 
ductor. But, gracious ! some of them seem to like it. Mrs. 
Lightley forgot her purse yesterday, and she smiled so 
sweetly at the conductor that he said: "Oh, never mind!" 
She looked at me and said she thought that would fetch 
him. Did you ever ! I wish that the company would forbid 
the men to chew tobacco while on duty. It is such a filthy 
habit. My good leghorn hat that I bought only four years 
ago has a dash of tan on it, and I just know it is tobacco 
stain. I saw a gripman almost run over a poor old lady 
yesterday, he was so busy talking to a painted little thing 
on the front seat. Every day I see women hanging on to 
the straps in the street ears when they might have seats if 
the conductor only did his duty and told the people to 
move up. My ! Sixteen women can squeeze into one seat. 
When eight of them get out at some transfer point the 
other eight spread themselves out so that they take up just 
as much room. Then some respectable, modest-looking 
woman like myself comes and she has to stand up. The 
conductor seems to go into a trance. If some painted thing 
with high-heel shoes and dyed hair flounces in he may wake 
up and tell the selfish females to make room for her. Mrs. 
Lightley never has to stand, for if the women do not move 
up at once she acts as if she were going to sit on one of 
their laps and they scuttle away and give her a seat. Then 
they glare at her, but she seems to like that. Goodness! 
What composure that woman has! She can hypnotize any 
man, no matter how badly he wants to avoid her eye and 
keep his seat. It's useless for them to pretend to be en- 
grossed in their newspapers. Before she swings on a 
strap ten seconds some man in front of her gets up and 
gives her his seat as if she was doing him a favor to take 
it. I asked her the other day how she did it, and she said, 
"Oh, that's easy. If it's a young man he's sure to look at 
me and it's all up with him. If it's some crusty old boy 
that has his nose close down to the newspaper and won't 
look at anything else I accidentally step on his corns a 
couple of times and he gets away mighty quick." Oh, dear. 
I couldn't do such a thing for the world! 

* * * 
Sunday — Such a time as I've had today with Ivanhoe ! 
He stayed out all night and came home with his ear 
chewed up. I don't know whether a dog did it or some 
other Thomas Cat. What a trial he is to me! I've been 
applying arnica to his wounds all day. Poor, sweet Flos- 
sie! How different she is! She's such a comfort to me! 
Sweet pet! I've been so upset I missed the special meet- 
ing of the Dorcas Society that was to be held before prayer 



eeting in the church basement, where we were to hear 
Hr. Orlow lecture on the need of woden socks for the 
looted and benighted natives of India. 
* -X- * 
Monday— Oh, dear! How my head aches ! I'm afraid 
11 will split. Mrs. Topflatt and myself went to see our 
Christian Science healer today. She's been giving us ab- 
sent treatment, but neither of us improved, so we called 
on her. Oh, gracious ! I'm ashamed to even write it. She 
told us it must be our own fault that we didn't improve, 
for if we only put our minds on it we would get whatever 
we wanted. "Now, Mrs. Topflatt," said she, "you have 
only to think that your elbow is well and the rheumatism 
will disappear." "What are you talking about?" said 
Mrs. Topflatt. "I don't want to get rid of rheumatism. 
I haven't any." "What do you want, then?" asked the 
healer. "Why, I want to join the Roosevelt Brigade," 
said she. "Oh, great heavens!" cried the healer; "there's 
a horrible mistake here. I've been treating the other lady 
for that and you for the rheumatism." I shrieked so loud 
that a policeman came out of the saloon across the street 
and chased some boys round the block. How I kept from 
fainting I don't know. I wonder if your mind can affect 
you as these Christian Scientists say? Oh, gracious! And 
I've always had such a powerful imagination! H my head- 
ache don't get better soon I must send for the doctor. 

Tabitha Twiggs. 

HIS ADVICE. 

" He kissed me," she writes, "and I wonder 
If kisses are proper and right 
When candles are lit in the parlor 
Along toward the zenith of night." 

Now that is a poser, sweet Ida; 

In fact, I am greatly annoyed ; 
For why should I pass upon kisses 

That some other fellow enjoyed? 

Lf I were the kisser, sweet Ida, 

And you were the charming kissee, 
I think that the tender transaction 

Would seem less offensive to me. 

But being as how I was absent 

And some other fellow got in, 
I really believe, dearest Ida, 

The act was a palpable sin. 

Don't do it again, dear enchantress, 

Whatever my logic may be — 
If you would be modest and proper 

Save all your spare kisses for me. 

D. D. RICHARDSON. 



Mrs. Wickham Havens, who, by her good looks and chic 
gowns, has been dazzling society at Santa Barbara, is tak- 
ing the rest cure in her home at Piedmont, Oakland, before 
flitting North for a visit. Mrs. Havens is one of the pretti- 
est of the young society matrons across the bay, where her 
husband is the head of the great Realty Syndicate which is 
extending its little white placards, "This is the property 
of the Realty Sj'ndieate, " until nearly every lot in Ala- 
meda county is thus decorated. A funny story was once 
told along these lines by Mrs. Margaret Cameron Lewis, 
who was a member of the Spinners' Club when that famous 
body awarded a prize to the best anonymous story. Mar- 
garet's was a tale of mystery, and had to do with the "red 
planet, Mars." She wrote thrillingly of small spots 
brought nearer and nearer by powerful glasses, until one 
day a scientist proclaimed that he had made a lens so pow- 
erful that objects on Mars might be discerned. It was 
done, and various were the conjectures as to what were the 
words on the white spots. A still stronger lens was con- 
structed, when it was found that they each held this legend, 
"This is the property of the Realty Syndicate." 



178 



-THE WASP- 



[ July 29, 1905. 



An Ecclesiastical St. Helena. 
The manly and graceful form of Father Sesnon, the 
handsomest and smartest-looking priest in California, is 
now seldom seen on the streets of San Francisco. His rev- 
erence has been consigned to the wilds of Alameda county, 
which appears to be the St. Helena of the Roman hierarchy 
whom His Grace, the very level-headed Catholic Arch- 
bishop, thinks are in need of a change of air for the good 
of their souls. The Archbishop is a diplomatic as well as 
a wise and talented man, and he exiles his reverend sub- 
ordinates without any unnecessary fuss. The first thing 
they know they have a ticket for the social and political 
Sahara in their pockets and the fateful ferry-boat bears 
them away from the joys of the metropolis. The busy city 
soon forgets them, even if they do not forget the city, with 
all its pomps and vanities that dazzle the eye and bewilder 
the brain. We all remember how Father Yorke disappear- 
ed amongst the poison oak and cow pastures of Alameda, 
and has not been heard from since on this side of the bay. 
Had he been sent by archiepiseopal ukase to the wilds of 
the Arctic his eclipse could not have been more complete. 
Father Sesnon is not the blazing comet thai his politically 
inclined brother proved himself. With his fashionable silk 
hat, immaculate linen, admirably fitting coat, gold-buckled 
shoes and nobby walking-stick, he has, however, been a 
notable figure in our bustling burg and unmistakably well 
qualified to entertain Papal nobility at the Palace Hotel. 
Such a well-groomed priest might escape the critical eyes 
of the high dignitaries in several parts of Europe. The 
Roman priesthood in England affects an air of elegance 
and fine raiment, and in Ireland, the proverbial land of 
want, the Catholic clergy are arrayed, like bankers, in spot- 
less broadcloth and silk hats that shine like the dome of St. 
Peter's on a sunny afternoon. Here in this strenuous Re- 
public of ours the apostles of all faiths affect a carelessness 
of dress which is supposed to be in keeping with sacerdotal 
modesty. A figure like that of the well-groomed, well- 
dressed Father Sesnon is almost spectacular by contrast 
with the many that are crowned with dubious slouch hats 
and wrapped in frock coats of the vintage of '49. Father 
Sesnon, I believe, possessed such a splendid voice in his 
youth that it was intended to train him for an operatic 
career. 

A Pullman Car Incident. 

Not long ago Fairfax Wheelan of the Reform League 
and Tim McGrath, the ex-prizefighter and trainer, met in 
the dining-car of an East-bound overland train, neither 
knowing the other. Mr. Wheelan, desiring to feel the pub- 
lie pulse, and guessing that the ex-thumper came from San 
Francisco, asked whom McGrath thought would be elected 
Mayor. 

"Sehmitz in a walk-over," cheerfully responded the 
pride of Tar Flat. 

"No chance of defeating him, eh?" persisted Mr. 
Wheelan. 

"Not on your life," said McGrath. "Wese ain't a-goin' 

to have none o' your Holy Moses, lily-fingered 

Fairfax Wheelan reformers in ours. Wese satisfied wid a 
wide-open town." 

Later on in the smoker the two passengers met again, 
and some one said to McGrath, "Tim, shake hands with 
Mr. Wheelan." 

"Excuse me," said the knight of the sponge and buck- 
et; "but I don't ketch yer name." 

"Wheelan — Fairfax Wheelan," said the urbane and 
dignified leader of political reform. 

And the abashed Tim, in his own expressive dialect, 
"ducked as if Jeff had swung a right flipper at me cauli- 
flower an ' got out. " 

The PUREST and BEST country milk and cream is 
furnished by the BERKELEY FARM and NOVATO 
RANCH DAIRIES. N. J. Nelson & Co., props. Depot, 
1228 Folsom street, San Francisco. Ring up South 676, 
or send postal. Families carefully supplied. 



All's Well. 
It is a matter of gratulation that Secretary Shaw has 
ordered a drawback of duties on "benoylsulfonicimide an- 
hydrous sodium salt of benoylsulfonicimide manufactured 
wholly from ortholulosulfamide and potassium perman- 
ganate." This assures an autonomous illation of the itn- 
lin logomachy. ■ 




F your grocer can- 
not supply you 
with OLYMPIA 
BEER, phone 
Main 146. Imme- 
diate attention 
will be given to 
your order. 



Olympia Beer Co., S. F. 

NONE just as Good. "It's the Water." 



(? 



Go east 

via 

Portland 

Most picturesque ride on Continent 

by Shasta Route and Columbia 

River 

Low rates for the round trip. 

Inquire of 

S. F BOOTH, General Agent, 

Oregon Railroad and Navigation Co. 

and Union Pacific Railroad Co. 

No. I Montgomery Street, 

San Francisco, Cal. 



July 29, 1905.) 



-THE WASP- 



179 




The Wasp lias arranged with one oi the best-known 

newspaper a of New York to write his impressions of 

the San Francisco theaters while he is stopping in this 
t-it v. It will be interesting to note what this stranger has 
to say of the merits and demerits of the show-houses of our 
city. The Wasp has insisted for several years that the 
San Francisco stage has been more or less of a disgrace to 
dramatic art. Occasionally the public has been treated 
to a good performance, but worse than mediocrity has 
been the rule. The heavy hand of the Trust has degraded 
the business, and the motto might just as well have been 
nailed over the entrance to every Trust theater: "Our ob- 
ject is not to entertain you, but to skin you." The New 
York writer, whose first letter is printed below, has no 
instructions from The Wasp but to describe things 
honestly as he sees them. It cannot but be beneficial to 
see ourselves as others see us. 

o <^ < c> 
A NEW YORKER'S IMPRESSIONS 



I have been asked by the proprietor of The Wasp to 
write my impressions of the theatres of San Francisco — 
not that my impressions are better than others, but after 
mingling for fifty years with professional people I will 
write my honest judgment of what I think of the different 
syndicates sending entertainers to the Pacific Coast. If 
I offend any one in my criticism I do not do so with any 
feeling of malice, but I believe that all dramatic critics 
should tell the truth and what they actually believe. I 
never accept free passes to theatres or any favors whatso- 
ever from theatrical managers. I expect after the first 
week that I will be voted a back seat in each theatre he- 



cause I "ill try to praise those who are worthy, and will 
saj .jusi what I think of those who are unworthy. 

"O -o <2>- 

I hi ire is "lie thing I cannot understand — why the citi 
us of San Francisco allow the theatres to insult them 
nightly by the brazen advertising they have on their drop 
curtains between acts. It is only a catch-penny game, and 
not much of a one at that, and it is nauseating to see the 
badly painted portraits upon canvas and the immense signs 
nl the "water wagon." These signs are enough to give one 
the horrors or a slight attack of delirium tremens. 
-c* *Sk -^> 

If the theatre-goers would protest by letter to the dif- 
ferent managers to remove these eye-sores it would not be 
long before they would be taken down. San Francisco is 
a great city, filled with a lot of excellent people, both intel- 
lectual and of great financial worth, and it is a shame that 
such a city should be used like some barn-storming town in 
Texas. You have no idea what a feeling it brings over an 
Easterner who arrives late in the afternoon and goes to a 
theatre in San Francisco for the first time that night. 

^^ *C> -si- 
lt' the managers themselves have not sense enough to 
remove those hideous sights, which are eye-sores to the 
public, then the good citizens of this city should appeal 
to the law, and they can be forced into removing them. 

*c> -<s^ <:> 

Last week I visited the Central Theatre to see John L. 
Sullivan in "Fast Life in New York." Of course, the 
piny was an exaggeration from start to finish, and no such 
things as portrayed upon the stage that night ever happen 
in New York. In the two hours' work upon the stage of 
Sullivan 's play there were two murders, four or five deaths 
from natural causes, and one girl ruined. Of course, the 
story was written to play upon the minds of the lower 
classes, but it is too bad that the production of such plays 
is permitted, as it leaves an impression of horrible crimes 
committed around the Bowery in New York. People are 
just as safe on the Bowery as they are on Market street, 
(Conti nen 1 on page 1S0) 



RAINIEJL^BEER 





hM 



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July 25th and 26th 

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NO. 617 MARKET STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO 




180 



■THE WASP- 



[July 29, 1905. 



(Continued from page 179) 

and I think you will find but very 
little grafting among the police in 
connection with the saloons of that 
district. They generally go to the ten- 
derloin. I have been in the Bowery 
at midnight, and I never saw such hor- 
rible things as were portrayed by Sul- 
livan, so to me it was more a comedy 
than a melodrama. John L. was real- 
ly funny, although he was serious most 
of the time. His monologue was like 
that of a schoolboy who made his first 
speech, and when it came to sparring 
his avoirdupois was so great that 
even with the little work he did he 
puffed like a whale coming to the sur- 
face for air. 

"^2>- *o <c* 

There were about one hundred 
small boys on the stage who were sup- 
posed to make up and represent a 
prize-ring, and each boy had a smile 
on his face as though he were looking 
to see Humpty-Dumpty. Did you ever 
go to a prize-fight and see the faces 
that watched the gladiators battle? 
The expression of the faces of the au- 
dience is one of fear and anxiety com- 
bined. None of this in Sullivan's 
show — everybody with a broad smile, 
but nevertheless we were all there, 
and from the way the society people 
turned out in Frisco, I think they en- 
joyed themselves just as well as I did. 

•0 -Q> -c* 

I will undertake to write a criticism 
on the other theatres within the next 
two or three weeks. I think it was 
Willie Collier who penned these lines, 
which I think very apropos: — 

" They will gently toll a bell, 
Plant your carcass in a dell, 
There's no need to go to hell, 
You're in Frisco." 

GASPER. 



STOCKHOLDERS' MEETING. 
The regular annual meeting of the 
Jersey Farm Company will be held 
at the office of the company, 851 
Howard St., San Francisco, Cal., 
at the hour of 2 p. m., Tuesday, 
August 1st, 1905, for the election of 
a Board of Directors for the ensuing 
year and for the transaction of such 
other business as may properly come 
before said meeting. 

H. J. SNEATH, Secretary. 

Telephone Black 5713 

J. F. ROSSI 

Foreign and Domestic 

- Wines, Liquors and Cigars - 

Depot of Italian Swiss Colony Wines 
and Celebrated Belmont Whiskey 



205 Washington Street 

Between Front and Davis San Franclsoo 



JTJTJUTTUTJTriJTrUTJinJXruu 



THE THEATRES 



.inra 



DuiijTjTruTrurnjirLnjinjinjiiijTjixLrvi 
The Chutes. 

"Princess Fan Tan," the delight- 
ful Japanese musical extravaganza, 
participated in by nearly three hun- 
dred clever children, will receive its 
final presentations at the Chutes to- 
morrow afternoon and evening and at 
the Monday matinee the regular high- 
class specially performances for which 
this place of amusement is renowned 
will be resumed. Schepp's dogs and 
ponies, a veritable circus in vaude- 
ville, will repeat the hit that they 
made at the Orpheum recently, and 
Carlisle and Baker, "the colored aris- 
tocrats," and ragtime pianists, com- 
posers and vocalists, will make their 
first appearance here. Mr. and Mrs. 
James P. Lee and little Madeline Lee 
will present their beautiful playlet, 
"Thou Shalt Not Steal." Hallen and 
Hayes will offer an up-to-date black- 
face singing and dancing act, and Ed 
Cressy, the "rube" monologuist, Bris- 
eno, a celebrated wire-walker, and the 
Animatoscope, showing many modern 
and amusing moving pictures, will 
complete the program. The amateurs 
will appear on Thursday night, and 
Chiquita, "the living doll," Annie 
Redline, the plump lady, and the ba- 
bies in the life-saving incubators will 
continue to receive callers. 

"O "O -^ 
What Talent Can Do? 

When you see the old Tivoli crowd- 
ed, as it has been lately for the first 
time in an age, you realize what a 
touch of talent's wand ea:; do. Cun- 
ningham is a very capable artist, and 
so is Miss Condon. Barron Berthold 
does not altogether please Ashton 
Stevens, but that gentleman should 
remember that in twenty years the 
Tivoli did not have a tenor. So, for 
all that we now receive may the Lord 
make us thankful. If we never get 
worse than Berthold we should ac- 
count ourselves lucky. The comic tal- 
ent is good, and altogether the pres- 
ent company is one to do business 
with, if only the powers that be can 
get Manager Shavings to stick to the 
box-office and count the cash. He is 
as fatal to art when he gets behind the 
footlights as a hard frost to an orange 
crop. Max Freeman's staging of 
"Rob Roy" shows the hand and mind 
of an artist. It is a pitv that the Tiv- 
oli cannot be managed by some man 
of real talent, for the success that has 
attended the Condon and Cunningham 
engagement shows that the public here 
can support a comic opera house. 



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1 DR. H J. STEWART 

Teacher of . 
Vocal and Instrumental Music 




Studio. I10S BUSH ST. 




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steamers leave Piers 9 and 11, SanFrancisco. for 

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And to those desiring longer trips Lo Alaaka 
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For Information regarding sailing dates, 
•tc. ( obtain folder. 

San Franclaeo Ticket Offices: 

i New Montgomery St. (Palace Hotel) 
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C. D. DUNANN. den. Passenger Agent. 
10 Marke t SL. San Francisco. 

OCCIDENTAL & ORIENTAL 

STEAMSHIP COMPANY 

FOR 

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Steamers will leave wharf, corner of First 
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lulu. YOKOHAMA. Kobe, Nagasaki. Shang- 
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COPTIC, calling at Manila, Wednesday. August 2 
?■?£!£; ,'.' ^ Wednesday, Sept. 20 

LOPTIC, " Saturday, Oct. 21 

No cargo received on board en day of Mil- 
Round Trip Tickets at Reduced Rates 

t£? T J""?. ht ." "*"■" * vvlr " company's 

The Merchant's Exchange, 7 th FloorT San 
Francisco. 

D. D. 8TTJBB8. Oenrral Manager. 




Volume LIV.—No. 6. 



SAN FRANCISCO, AUGUST 5t 1905. 



Price 10 cents 



PUBLISHERS' NOTICE 

THE WASP Is published every Saturday by The Wasp Publishing 
Company, at 606 Mission Street. Subscriptions $5 per year, payable In 
advance, postage prepaid. Subscriptions to all foreign countries 
within the Postal Union IG per year. 

The trade on the Pacific Coa3t supplied by the San Francisco 
News Company. Eastern Agents supplied by the American News 
Company, New York. 

THE WASP will pay for contributions suitable to its columns, and 
will endeavor to return all rejected manuscripts, but does not guar- 
antee their return. 

Photographs will also be accepted and paid for. 

Address all communications to WaBp Publishing Company, 506 
Mission Street, San Francisco, Cal. 
Telephone Main 1643. 



TO ADVERTISERS.— As the Illustrated pages of THE WASP go to 
press early, all advertisements printed In the same forms should 
be received not later than Monday at noon. Changes of adver- 
tisements should also be sent in on Monday to insure publication. 



PLAIN ENGLISH 



STRAIGHT TALKS ON TIMELY TOPICS 




F the availability of City and County 
Treasurer John E. MeDougald as a Re- 
publican candidate for Mayor there has 
been considerable talk. Mr. MeDou- 
gald 's strength is supposed to lie in bis 
popularity with the labor unionists. Out- 
side of that he is not accredited with 
superior qualities. He is not a highly 
educated or naturally brilliant man, with fine executive 
qualities. He has performed no great public service, but 
he has managed while officiating as Treasurer to lose the 
tidy sum of $15,000 which a defaulting Tax Collector ex- 
tracted from the public treasury through the medium of a 
bogus check. Mr. MeDougald, be it said, has restored 
this money. Are we not in a dense mental fog in San 
Francisco as to the duties and responsibilities of our public 
officials? And are not our leading Republican politicians 
in that condition so graphically described in the Scrip- 
tures where the blind lead the blind, and both fall into the 
ditch? Some of them have been so long bound to the rail- 
road wheels of the Southern Pacific and chained to Spring 



Valley hydrants that their brains have become confused 
and their moral sensibilities benumbed. 

It would be discreditable in the highest degree to the 
Republican party in San Francisco if it could not nominate 
anv stronger candidate than a mere labor politician like 
Treasurer MeDougald. This is a year to put some good, 
stalwart, broad-gauge American citizen at the head of the 
Republican ticket and make a bold and earnest fight for 
decency in municipal government. There are a dozen such 
men to be had if the Republican leaders search with real 
determination to find them. The decent people of both the 
Democratic and Republican parties are eager to concen- 
trate on some respectable citizen who would be the Mayor 
of all San Francisco, and not merely of the districts south 
of Market street or those adjacent to Nob Hill. 

At least sixty per cent of the voters of San Francisco 
are honest men, who sincerely wish to see Schmitz and 
Ruef thrust from power. The man who at present con- 
trols the Democratic organization has avowed his desire 
to join forces in the reform movement. This being so, 
the Republican leaders must be regarded as utterly in- 
competent or dishonest if tbey fail to arrange matters for 
a proper consolidation of the reputable vote of San Fran- 
cisco. 

On all sides one hears predictions that Schmitz cannot 
be beaten. Much of this talk is inspired by Ruef 's active 
agents. Some of it comes from the weak and timid ones 
who always lose heart at the approach of a battle. All of 
it is untrue. Schmitz can be beaten, and that very badly, 
if the Republican leaders act wisely and in good faith. The 
public should realize that fact and pass the responsibility 
of defeat up to the leading Republican politicians, for it 
lies in their hands to send Schmitz into private life, a 
beaten and disgraced politician, or re-elect him and set 
back San Francisco a dozen years commercially and indus- 
trially. 

The winning of elections is not a matter of accident. 
Political battles are problems of generalship and figures. 
The ablest tactician must have sufficient men. Napoleon 
the greatest of all generals, declared he never could have 
enough. In political battles, however, all that is needed 
is a safe majority. The Republican leaders in San Fran- 
cisco this year have fully sixty per cent of the voters to 
draw upon regardless of party affiliations. Sixty out of 
every hundred voters are willing to vote for a yellow dog 
in preference to Schmitz and Ruef. But that is no reason 
why any kind of a mongrel should be nominated when it 
is possible to find some worthy candidate. Schmitz has 
never yet polled a majority vote. This year the registra- 
tion is close to 90,000. At the last election Schmitz got 
about 27,000. Less than one-third of the citizens of San 
Francisco voted for him. This year it is said "he cannot 
be beaten," even if the Republicans and Democrats com- 



182 



THE WASP- 



August 5, 1905. 



bine. Why? Because he has been shown to be a disgrace 
to the city. Because the proofs of his incompetency have 
been made plainer. Because the people have become con- 
vinced that the Mayor is but the tool of a grafting politic- 
al boss whose highest purpose is to put money in his own 
purse. This is a preposterous conclusion for it argues that 
the majority of our citizens are moral degenerates who es- 
teem crookedness and incompetency in public office as the 
best recommendations. 

Schmitz is no stronger this year than at the last election 
except with the criminal elements. This is more than off- 
set by what he has lost amongst the decent people. It is 
said that the labor unionists will support him to a man. 
They did that before. He has the saloons and the gamb- 
lers. He had them before. He has Ruef's following as 
he had before. Father Yorke can throw him a few votes. 
He did it before. The Fire and Police Department can 
do no more than they did for him at the former election. 

Giving Schmitz the benefit of 5,000 more votes than he 
polled two years ago when his administration was not 
nearly so besmirched, he would still be many thousands 
of votes short of a. majority. The more closely the matter 
is analyzed the clearer it becomes that the Republican 
leaders this year have only to consolidate with the Democ- 
racy and get rid of Schmitz. It is said that the Democrats 
will not vote for a combined ticket. What Democrats will 
refuse to do so? Why, the Democrats who really intend 
to support Schmitz in any event and are looking for an 
excuse to enter the camp of the grafters. There are al- 
ways some strict and conscientious partisans who refuse 
to vote at all except for a party candidate, but they are 
not numerous enough to affect the result of the election. 

While the decent citizens of San Francisco are un- 
doubtedly very anxious to get rid of Schmitz and all that 
he stands for, it is not by any means certain that the cor- 
porations are equally desirous of a change. The powerful 
corporations are always satisfied with an administration 
with which they can "do business," and if that be all 
they require the present city government should be emin- 
ently satisfactory to them, for Attorney Ruef is always 
read}' to take fees. It must soon be developed whether the 
corporations desire the re-election of Schmitz or his de- 
feat. If the former, their political agents will be found 
trying to keep the Democracy and the Republicans apart, 
so that there shall be three candidates for Mayor. Three 
candidates mean the certain election of Schmitz. Ruef 
realizes this fully, and will exert every influence to have 
three tickets in the field. It is a matter of indifference 
to him whom the Republicans may nominate as long as 
the Democrats also name a candidate for Mayor. He also 
realizes that if the Democrats and Republicans unite on 
one candidate for Mayor the battle for decency is as good 
as won. The public should not lose sight of this fact for 
a moment, but carefully watch the Republican leaders who 
have it in their power to consolidate and most certainly 
defeat Schmitz. II they vacillate and show an inclina- 
tion to act independently the public can rely upon it that 
sinister influence actuates them. The hand of some power- 
ful trickster may be pulling the wires, or self-interest may 
be strongest. The man who for selfish motives would this 
year obstruct any plans to defeat Schmitz is unworthy of 
citizenship. It is to be hoped that the next two months 
will not develop any such person in control in the Repub- 
lican organization. There are a number of sincere and 
honest Republicans engaged in the work of reform, and if 
not thwarted by treachery in their own camp will perfect 
the plans for the election of a decent Mayor of San Fran- 
cisco. 

The report of the now convened court of inquiry into 
the Bennington disaster will be awaited with deep interest. 
There is a suspicion, amounting' almost to a conviction in 
the public mind that somebody blundered and that the 
lives of so many men were sacrificed through carelessness 
or stupidity. Boilers may blow up on a hard-worked freight 



or passenger steamer, carrying barely enough hands to keep 
things running safely. But why should boilers be permit- 
ted to blow up on a war ship in time of peace, with more 
than sufficient men to keep every bolt and plate in the ship 
in perfect condition? We shall see how the court handles 
the ease. 

Health Officer Ragan has reported to the Board of 
Health that out of 215 samples of California wines anal- 
yzed during June, 41 proved to contain salicylic acid, ben- 
zoic acid or coal-tar dyes. Having learned wisdom by 
experience, the Doctor does not rush into print with the 
names of the makers of and dealers in the alleged adulter- 
ated wines. Admitting that the analyses are correct, the 
question arises, Why does the California vineyardist, with 
the best natural conditions in the world, need to use color- 
ing matters and adulterants? Possibly, it is with them as 
Dr. Ragan says it is with the milkmen. He says that ' ' the 
milkmen do not deliberatelv add formalin solution to their 
milk, but are inveigled into using so-called harmless pre- 
servatives alleged to be chemical compounds by the thrifty 
manufacturer of these products." H the simple dairyman 
uses an "orange aniline dye in solution" to make thin milk 
have a rich, creamy appearance, he is using it with intent 
to deceive, even though he does not know that it is aniline 
dye. The lax administration of the law is responsible for 
the looseness of morals discernible in milkmen who put 
formalin in their milk, as well as in the highwaymen who 
crack your skull in their mad race for your wealth. Fine 
the guileless milkmen who are putting something, they 
know not what, into their milk to make it look richer than 
it is. Fine them to the limit of the law, and if they do not 
mend their ways then put them in jail, if the law and the 
evidence are strong enough. Is it any less culpable to kill 
a man or an infant by slow poison than it is to club him 
to death? When the violators of the law are punished, 
and the "harmlessly" adulterated foods are labeled for 
just what they are, then perhaps we may have some chance 
to get from the innocent purveyors of foodstuffs that for 
which we yield up our good, hard coin. 



The action of the Board of Health in removing Warden 
Fleming from office, has been a puzzle to a great many per- 
sons. The Chronicle has it that Fleming was unfortunate 
not to be on band at a time when Dr. Ward, president of 
the Board, called at the City and County Hospital. The, 
Board is industriously circulating the rumor that Fleming 
was not fired for that reason at all, but because he had fol- 
lowed in the footsteps of his predecessor once or twice 
removed — Dr. Sussdorf. Apropos of the dismissal of 
Warden Fleming, the Health Officer, in his annual report, 
said that the City and County. Hospital had been conducted 
economically, wisely and efficiently, and that Warden 
Fleming was to be congratulated upon his successful man- 
agement. He adds : ' ' That the public have appreciated the 




E-gCHAS. KE.ILUS & CO JS 

&EXCLUSJVE& 
HIGH GRADE CLOTHIERS 

This Fall's Clothes we now present with new fashion 
plates (that bear the crest of originality) are so constructed 
as to give the wearer that herculean effect without the aid 
of a mattress of padding. This is Clothes Science, and will 
be appreciated by gentlemen who. understand. 




TZftur/oiv^BfocM* 



[ August 5, 1905. 



THE WASP 



183 



excellent administration * is shown by the attitude of the 
press, into whose columns nothing: has crept save in praise 
of the management. " Dr. Ragan's rhetoric may b 
□eed of professional treatment, but it is evident that he 
wished to give fulsome praise to the man who has since 
been expelled without any explanation to the public. As 
to the inference that only the innocent go unflaggellated 
by the press, the Doctor probably did not mean that; but 
he was closer to the truth than he knew. 



The Czar and Peace. 
The telegraphic dispatcher this week indicate that 
Russia is not as eager for peace as she was supposed to be 
prior to the recent meeting of the Czar and the German 
Emperor in the Baltic Sea. Statements by special corre- 
spondents anxious to furnish the ''latest news" about the 
coming peace conference must be taken with considerable 
allowance, but it is not improbable at all that the Kaiser 
has had an influence on the Russian ruler inimical to 
peace. It will be a dangerous proceeding for the Czar 
to concede anything to Japan that can possibly be with- 
held. The revolutionary party in Russia grows stronger 
steadily and a humiliating peace could precipitate troubles 
in which the reigning dynasty might lose its crown, if not 
several heads. The thoughts of self-preservation are 
doubtless stronger in the mind of the Czar at present than 
any plans for the general benefit of the Russian people. 



The War on the Motorists. 

Elsewhere in this issue of The Wasp reference is made 
In the arrest of a well-known society woman of San Fran- 
cisco who was charged by a country constable with speed- 
ing her automobile. A few days after the lady had been 
fined excessively a city capitalist and his companion 
were arrested in another county for using the highways 
in motoring. They were also prevented from entering a 
toll-road. The motorists are just now in that unpleasant 
transition stage where silurian officials in remote regions 
deem it their duty to stop the wheels of progress. It is a 
hopeless fight for the obstructors, however, as the motor 
car has come to stay. This is the age of machinery, and 
nothing is more rational than the use of machine-propelled 
vehicles on the smooth highways. Not all the Dogberrys 
from Mexico to Alaska can stop their triumphant progress. 

County officials are not, however, altogether affected 
by a silurian determination to suppress the new idea. They 
have a keen nose for fines, as fines help to pay the running 
expenses of the county government. In former years Oak- 
land got a good deal of money out of pot-hunters from San 
Francisco who thoughtlessly went to shoot ducks on the 
suburban marshes. The city limits of Oakland extend an 
enormous distance, and the unsuspecting duck-shooters 
never thought that in firing their guns on lonely marshes 
miles from the eity hall they were violating an ordinance. 
The police, however, were well aware of the fact and quiet- 
ly waited for victims to commit the crime. The moment 
a luckless pot-hunter discharged his fowling-piece he was 
pounced upon, dragged off to the municipal bastille and 
forced to contribute to the expenses of the city govern- 
ment. Motorists from San Francisco are shining marks 
for country officers, and the constable who can bag the 
greatest number of them is sure to be very popular in his 
village. The more motorists he captures and forces to pay 
tines the fewer natives need he arrest to keep up his record. 
The best way to baffle these legalized highwaymen is to go 
through a town as if following the funeral of a near and 
dear friend. If a motorist is creeping along at six miles 
an hour and the county ordinance permits uine, the chances 
are that the lurking bandit will pounce on the stranger 
and bear him off to pay ransom. 

Visiting street peddlers are another kind of game for 
wdiich the country constable always has his weather eye 
open. If the constable can by anything but downright 
lying induce the strange peddler to pry his trade he will 
do so. The last thing he dreams of is to warn the victim. 



w 



Sunset magazine 



CONTENTS FOR AUGUST 



Ik 



Cover Design— "In the Surf at Santa Cruz" 

Maynard Dixon 

Frontispiece — "The Modem Gold Mining Promoter 
— A Study at Bullfrog, Nevada" Maynard Dixon 

The Bullfrog Bonanza K. R. Casper 

How I Play Tennis May G. Sutton 

Intercollegiate Boating on the Pacific Ooast 

E. M. Garnett 

In the Redwoods (verse) Warren Cheney 

A Post-office That's a Palace Francis J. Dyer 

At Santa Cruz (verse) Clarence Urmy 

Oregon's Big Tree Building Frank L. Merrick 

Camping for Two Charles S. Greene 

Glory (versej Ednah Robinson 

From New York to Paris by Rail Marie Coe 

American Railway Building in China. .W. D. Evans 
Up Castle Crags Rosa V. Winterburn 

The Legend of Tahoe Nonette V. McGlashan 

Drawings by Xavier Martinez 

The Star (verse) Edith M. Thomas 

My Mother's Veranda— "A Chapter from a Califor- 
nia Ranch Calendar" Alberta Bancroft 

When the Prince Came (Serial Story) Chapter in. 
Flora Haines (Mrs. Loughead) 

California's Garden Calendar — August 

E. J. Wiekson 

Course of Empire 

The Biggest Crane in the World — A Novel May- 
day Fete — A Man: His Work — Sunshine on the 
Beach — Golf Week at Del Monte — A Kansas 
Hustler — The Line of Least Resistance — In the 
Heart of Romance — The Railway Congress — 
Portrait of the late Will S. Green. 

Plays and the Players 

The Women of the Tivoli (Blanche Partington) 
— Norval MaeGregor, Actor — Portraits of Grace 
Palotta, Kate Condon, and Norval MaeGrogor. 

Books and Writers 

"The Pioneer," bv Geraldine Bonner — The Au- 
thor of "The Girl from Home "—Portrait of 
Geraldine Bonner. 

Sunset Rays 

A Question Answered (Emily Hartley) — The 
Fall of Port Arthur (Jennie Boyle)— Wbv Dig 
Wells? (Elwyn Hoffman)— The Collie and the 
Dolly (Camilla J. Knight)— The Divine Engin- 
eer (Charles T. Greene). 

For Sale by all Newsdealers 



^e 



184 



-THE WASP- 



[August 5, 1905. 



The right arm of the county treasury hides away until the 
itinerant merchant begins to hawk his goods, when he 
swoops down and demands to be shown the peddler's 
license, which he knows full well the man has not. The 
arrest follows, and the captive is borne off in triumph to 
the courthouse, while all the natives chuckle with delight 
and the taxpayers nod approvingly as the brigand goes by 
with his prisoner. There is no glory, however, or great 
political advantage in squeezing a fine out of a peddler. 
It is a cold matter of business. There are both glory and 
political gain in capturing' a motorist from the metropolis. 
The exploit gratifies the rustic prejudice against "them 
city fellers," and shows that the "arrogant rich" are not 
allowed to run things their own way in the country. 



A well-known San Francisco business man who shipped 
more than twenty-five pounds of trout from Lake Tahoe 
in one parcel has been fined. It is right that the law should 
be thus enforced, although in this particular ease the an- 
gler was unaware that he was violating it. Why cannot 
the net fishermen be treated similarly? One net can do 
more injury to the finny tribes than all the city anglers 
that go out to whip the streams and troll the lakes during 
summer vacation. The preservation of the salmon, striped 
bass and other food fishes taken in vast quantities by nets 
demands the most rigid enforcement of the laws or the 
fish will be exterminated. It is charged that the laws are 
not enforced. Fishermen sweep the sloughs and inlets 
with nets almost a quarter of a mile long and of such fine 
mesh that bass not larger than a herring are taken in 
great numbers. The offenders, it is charged, bribe deputy 
fish commissioners to obtain immunity. The value of the 
food fishes of California is so vast and it is so important 
that the best varieties of fish should not be exterminated 
that their preservation is a matter of the greatest impor- 
tance. Were it not for the influence of the sportsmen's 
clubs the fish and game of this State would already be well- 
nigh extinct. The newspapers should aid in the good work, 
and when charges of official neglect or crookedness are 
presented should insist on a full and fair investigation. 



W. A. Gates, Secretary of the newly organized State 
Board of Charities and Corrections, has been lecturing on 
the "Increase of Crime; Some of Its Causes and Reme- 
dies." In this city the great increase of crime during 
the past few years is due to the flocking here of criminals 
who have heard that we have the worst city government 
in America. A similar state of affairs existed in Milwau- 
kee for several years when the police of that city were in 
league with the criminal elements. It needed a great pub- 
lic uprising to rid Milwaukee of the evil, and the same 
remedy is overdue here. It rests with the people whether 
it will be continued or stopped. 

Americus 

The Pauson Scandal. 

The Wasp stated last week that Jewish society was 
much interested in the impending divorce suit of a promi- 
nent clothier. Since then the clothier in question, Samuel 
B. Pauson, has filed a complaint against his wife Emma, 
who, as Emma Straus, the daughter of Ferdinand Straus, 
a merchant of Hew York, was one of the noted Jewish 
belles of that city. Mr. Pauson met her when in New York 
on business for his house here, and fell a victim at first 
sight. Other men have done the same, and hence the com- 
plications that have resulted in the secret filing of divorce 
papers in Judge Troutt's court. Those matters are not 
easily kept quiet, however, and indeed the unfortunate 
state of affairs in the Pauson home was common property 
long before the lawyers took a hand in it. The Wasp a 
month ago knew as much about Mr. Pauson 's grievance 
against his handsome wife as the dailies have printed this 
week. The possibility that the unfortunate affair might 
be settled out of court for the sake of the young children 
caused The Wasp to withhold the news until_ the legal 
steps had been taken to commence a suit for divorce. It 



is rarely, indeed, that a Jewish wife commits the indis- 
cretions that are charged against Mrs. Pauson in her hus- 
band's complaint and which bring reproach and shame 
upon her family. Jewish wives have an enviable reputa- 
tion for virtue, and the report that the beautiful Mrs. 
Pauson was an exception to the rule naturally caused a 
great commotion in Hebrew society, where the parties at 
interest are so well known. The scandal lost nothing by 
the statement that the injured husband had decided^ to 
have no less than three co-respondents in his complaint, 
and that one of them has a Celtic name that is hardly less 
Hibernian in flavor that the proverbial "Paddy's pig." 
The dailies state in their report of the case that Mr. Pau- 
son includes only two lotharios in his charges. There ap- 
pears to be a general agreement of opinion that no matter 
how many or how few the gallants that invaded his home 
during his absence, he had ample cause for taking the law 
into his own hands with a shotgun, much less seeking re- 
dress. 

It is said that Mr. Pauson made the acquaintance of his 
wife in a rather remarkable way. While visiting New 
York on business he was informed by some friends that a 
very handsome girl lived next door and they would like 
him to meet her. The handsome girl proved to be Miss 
Straus, his future wife, and who by the way is said to be 
only an adopted daughter of Mr. Straus. It is also said 
that her own mother had a stage experience of more or 
less celebrity. When the divorce case comes to trial one of 
the witnesses will be a domestic from whom Mrs. Pauson, 
it is said, did not take the trouble to conceal the fact 
that she was entertaining gentlemen callers during her 
husband's absence. A woman so indifferent to consequences 
could naturally be expected to leave some telltale letters 
around, and some tropical epistles from the gentleman 
with the Irish name fell into the hands of Mr. Pauson, it 
is said, and caused the merchant to seek an explanation 
from the lover. The latter very frankly stated that he 
didn't see why he should bear all the blame when he did 
not enjoy a monopoly of the fickle lady's affections, and 
so the whole unpleasant story was unfolded to the distress- 
ed husband. Mrs. Pauson has disappeared, and the sup- 
position is that she has gone back to New York, for which 
she always had an affection. 





Men of good 
taste buy clothes 
here 



Frank 
quality- 



combination 



Trousers that were $3.50, 'A off now $ 2.35 

Trousers that were 10.00, ft off now 6.65 

Suits that were 15.00, ft off now 10.00 

Suits that were 40.00, H off now 26.65 

Overcoats that were 15.00, ft off now 10.00 

Overcoats that were 50.00, ft off now 33.35 

and all prices between 

— now one-third off 



Heller & Frank 

Market Street and Grant Avenue 



THE leaders of local society are hailing with 
delight i lie news that at last San Francisco 
is to be visited by a white sovereign, for, al- 
though dusky kings and queens have been 
amongst us often, they count for lit lie. 
Queen Margherita of Italy, whose picture 
appears in this number of The Wasp, will 
certainly visit the metropolis of the Pacific, for here we 
have the largest Italian colony in America. Mrs. Martin 
is already making plans for the Queen's entertainment, 
and will probably give one of her famous receptions, for, 
although it is semi-officially decided that Her Majesty wili 
not be the guest of a private family, it is said that she 
will be pleased to be tendered a reception from the Amer- 
ican ladies. What could be more fitting than that the 
dowager queen of the oldest civilization on earth should 
be received by the Empress of the youngest here on the 
edge of the Ultimate West? So another peacock feather 
will soon be added to the badges of social superiority that 
mark the series of triumphs achieved in the Martin man- 
sion. If the war in the Far East is over when the Queen 
leaves Italy, she will arrive via the Golden Gate from 
Japan; otherwise she will come from New York to Cali- 
fornia. In any case the Baron Edmondo Mayor des 
Planches, Ambassador to America, will put aside his dut- 
ies in Washington to attend the royal lady during her so- 
journ in this country. She will travel with a large suite, 
and probably a whole floor will be reserved for the pro- 
minent party at the Palace Hotel. Altogether, there pro- 
mises to be very gay doings socially in San Francisco dur- 
ing the next season. Queen Margherita is the widow of 
the late King Humbert, who was stabbed two years ago 
while driving in a carriage through the streets of Monza, 
a summer resort just outside of Rome. The assassin was 
a Nihilist named Bresei, and, after a quick trial, he was 
executed. The Queen, who was a cousin of King Hum- 
bert, was Margherita "Teresa Giovanna, Princess of Savoy, 
daughter of the Duke of Genoa. She was born at Turin 
on the twentieth of November, 1851, and is therefore 54 
years of age. She holds an equal place with her son, King 
Victor Emanuel, and his wife, Queen Helene of Montene- 
gro, in the affections of their people, and she oceupie* l(er 
palace at Rome only for a short time each spring, travel- 
ing around Italy during the rest of the year. The visit to 
California will be the first of a series of journeys that the 
sovereign intends to take. She is slender and a little over 
medium height. Queen Margherita is very devoted to her 
two granddaughters, the Princess Jolanda and the Princess 
Mafalda. 

The engagement of Carmen Selby and Frank Johnson 
Jr. has been talked of for a year or more, and it was not 
intended that it should be announced until he comes into 
his fortune a year from now, when he will be twenty-one. 
Few youug men are born under such a lucky star. His 
grandfather was the late General Williams, father of T. H. 
Williams, and from him young Mr. Johnson inherits a rich 
estate. Mr. Johnson's own father is the well-known mer- 
chant, who for twenty-five years has been recognized as one 
of our most suecesful and enterprising citizens. In his 

The Repsold wines find their way into those homes where 
health is valued and taste selected. Inspection invited. 
420 Pine St., San Francisco. 



younger days Mr. Johnson Sr. was one of the handsomest 
men in California. The younger Mr. Johnson goes in a 
great deal for automobiling and yachting. This summer he 
is living on a yacht at Belvedere. Miss Selby is a piquant 
and pretty girl, with fair hair and brown, Spanish eyes. 
She is very sweet-tempered, and the engaged couple are 
madly in love with one another. She is related to the 
Macondrays, Eyres, Pinchards, Athertons, and all the 
Menlo Park set, so no girl in society has a better position 
than she. Mr. Johnson will take his bride on a tour of the 
world, I hear, and on their return he will build for her a 
beautiful home in this city. 

*5* ^* i^* 

The arrival of the Vicomtesse de Tristan, who has come 
from France to attend the wedding of the young Count de 
Tristan and Miss de Guigne, has been an event in local 
society, of which the Parrott family has been such a promi- 
nent part, for many years. The De Guignes and the De 
Tristans are already once related through the marriage 
of Miss de Lalande and another Vicomte de Tristan. This 
event took place last year in Paris. Years ago one of the 
Parrott girls married a De Lalande and has passed most 
of her time in Paris. Her granddaughter became the 
Vicomtesse de Tristan last year. It is a case of love at 
first sight between Miss de Guigne and the young Vicomte. 
The De Tristans have plenty of blue blood, but not by any 
means an excessive amount of the hard ducats that play 
such an important part in the fashionable life of America 
— and even in France. 

c5* ^* ^* 

Army circles are not much surprised at the engage- 
ment of Miss Margaret H. Hawes, daughter of Captain 
William H. Hawes of the Transport Service to Captain 
William G. Haan, Artillery Corps, United States Army. 
Captain Haan won his laurels during the Spanish war, 
and has added to them since. He met Miss Hawes, who is 
a diligent traveler, at Manila five years ago, and the ro- 
mance then begun has steadily grown, and will culminate 
in a wedding some time this fall. Captain Haan is one 
of the best authorities on the Eastern question in the army, 
*nd a few months ago, at the request of the Government 
at Washington, wrote a series of articles on the Russo- 
Japanese situation in Manchuria, which have been deliv- 
ered as lectures before the war college at Washington. 
Miss Hawes is a very popular young woman, although, as 
she has spent much of her time abroad, her friends here 
have seen little of her. 

It was a great disappointment to Miss Helen Partridge 
that her father, Bishop Sidney Partridge of Kioto, Japan, 
was unable to leave the Orient to attend her marriage to 
Mr. George E. Chapin. The ceremony was performed in 
St. Luke's Church, Thursday, August 3d, at noon. Mrs. 
John Simpson, the bride's aunt, gave her away, and the 
service over, there was a wedding breakfast at the Simp- 
son residence. The bride and groom have gone North on a 
trip, and when they return will go to housekeeping 
in a pretty cottage which is being built for them in Mill 
Valley. ' 

Milk Chocolate Creams are confections of flower-like 
daintiness in three flavors. Only at Haas' Candy Stores, 
Phelan Building & James Flood Building. 



1S6 



THE WASP 



[August 5, 1905. 




BLUEBEARD THE BLUNDERER 

Who has not heard of Bluebeard and his wives? 

Their fame will live forever, 
fie thought it requisite to take their lives; 

Divorce is far more clever. 

When wear}' couples quarrel nowadays, 

For murd'rous deeds they see no 
Need. They go their separate ways, 

And seek fresh joys at Reno. 

Interest congests in the latest developments of the 
Bruguiere case now that a divorce suit has been actually 
filed in Reno, Nevada, by Dr. Pedar Bruguiere against 
his pretty young wife for desertion. Just what he means 
by the action is uncertain ; no papers have yet been served 
on the defendant personally or through her attorney, 
Garrett McEnerney, and the fact of the Doctor's taking 
residence in Reno merely for the sake of obtaining a di- 
vorce is said to be an illegal proceeding which demands no 
answer. The friends of Mrs. Bruguiere say that the fickle 
Pedar will find it a hard matter to get a divorce on the plea 
of desertion or any other grounds, for his wife has been 
more careful of her reputation than he has been of his. 
That she did leave him in San Francisco in July of last 
year, they say, is true enough ; she went with her babe to 
Newport to live with the elder Mrs. Bruguiere because her 

Discriminating people prefer the wines of the Repsold vin- 
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purity. 420 Pine St., San Francisco. 



restless consort had some three months earlier tired so 
completely of domesticity in the cosy little Van Ness ave- 
nue home that he had voluntarily sought pastures new, 
where an ailing spouse and the cries of an infant could be 
forgotten. San Francisco is hardly the place for a frisky- 
husband, tired of connubial pleasures, to search vainly for 
consolation. By all accounts the Doctor has found a new 
affinity. Before his first marriage he was never satisfied 
with less than several. 

The Examiner, which has written up the Bruguiere 
case as if the eyes of the whole nation were centered on 
the gay Doctor, mentioned that he has been turning his 
chemical knowledge to account for » well-known eandy 
manufaeturer. I hear that the Doctor invested about 
$10,000 in the candy business. If he put all he got from his 
rich grandfather's estate into a good business, his present 
rating at the banks would be much higher than it is. 

(^* (^* i0& 

The year of separation has been spent by Mrs. Bru- 
guiere partly in Newport, partly here, but in both places, 
until lately, always under the shelter of her mother-in-law. 
Now the elder woman is again on the Eastern coast, whence 
she personally sends regular sums for the support of Mi's. 
Pedar and the child, the husband supplying nothing. Dr. 
Pedar 's praiseworthy offer in his suit for divorce to eon- 
tribute to the support, of his child is said by friends of the 
family to be his initial performance in this line. His action 
for a legal separation came as a surprise to his wife, ac- 
cording to the statements of her friends. She was in San 
Jose spending Sunday, and was perhaps the last there to 
learn of her newly acquired local prominence in the dailies. 
That she will fight the suit when papers are served, re- 
quiring Dr. Bruguiere to prove any charges he may choose 
to make, is said to be a certainty. Mr. McEnerney and 
herself are at present merely awaiting legal formalities on 
the part of Bruguiere. 

The engagement of Miss Helen Harrington, daughter 
of Mrs. H. Harrington of Adeline street, Oakland, to Mr. 
J, Alfred Fitzpatriek of New York is a surprise to the 
young lady's friends, who supposed that she was devoted 
to educational matters, she being a prominent teacher 
as well as a society woman. The wedding is to take place 
in September, after which the couple will make their home 
in the East. 

Will Sanborn and his sisters have just returned from 
a camping and hunting trip through the Yellowstone. 



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August 5, 1905.] 



-THE WASP- 



187 




"AND SKEK FRESH JOYS AT RENO" 

Oakland society people were not at all surprised, al- 
though rather disappointed, that they were not invited to 
attend the wedding of Mrs. Anna Albreeht Irwin and Mr. 
Edward M. Bray of Fruitvale, which took place at Mrs. 
Irwin's residence on Wednesday evening, August 2d. Mrs 
Irwin is a daughter of the late Mrs. Laura Albreeht of 
Fruitvale, from whom she inherited a considerable fortune 
in addition to what she had from her father and husband. 
Mr. Bray is a son of the late W-. A. Bray, and is also 
wealthy. The marriage seems an ideal one, for the .two 
cannot remember the time when they have not been 
friends and comrades, for if there is anv place where 
neighbors learn to know each- other well it is out in Fruit- - 
vale, where one has to feel one's way about by the trees 
after dark. Mr. and Mrs. Bray will continue to make their 
residence in Fruitvale, and why not, with three handsome 
places at their disposal. 

^v ^% ^5* 

The picture of Miss Alice Roosevelt, supported on one 
side by Mr. Longworth and on the other by Colonel Ed- 
wards, which is published in this week's Wasp, is from a 
snapshot taken on the wharf at Honolulu. It is evident 
that the photographers of Hawaii are as busy a crowd as 
those of California. Miss Roosevelt is plainly having a 
jolly time, and does not care a fig for camera fiends. Re- 
porters have, so far been unable to reach her. 

^* *&* '2fr 

Readers of The Wasp' will not be at all surprised at 
the formal announcement of Miss Mabel Linden Reed, 
daughter of George W. Reed, the well-known clubman of 
Oakland, to Mr. Harry Lane of Los Angeles, for in the 
last week's Wasp the happy event was hinted. Miss Reed, 
who is a fearless horsewoman and a prominent society 
belle, is at present in Portland. The home of the young 
couple will be in China, where Mr. Lane will engage in 
business. Miss Reed's picture appears in this issue of 
The Wasp. 

Among those awaiting the visit of the-stork are Mr. and 
Mrs. Sterling Postley and Mr. and Mrs. Webster Jones. 

Plenty of "so-called" California wines, but only one 
Repsold wine made in California. Inspection invited. 




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188 



-THE WASP- 



[August 5, 1905. 



Miss Winifred Yelland, the talented daughter of the 
late R. D. Yelland, the marine and landscape painter, who 
died about two years ago, is to marry Mr. Roger Sherman 
Phelps early in October. It was supposed by society that 
Miss Yelland was following her father's footsteps, as she 
has given her time recently to art studies and has develop- 
ed a decided forte with the brush. Mr. Phelps is a rising- 
young man, a graduate of the University of California and 
a post-graduate of Harvard. He has for several years 
been a member of the faculty of St. Matthews' Military 
Academy at San Mateo, and has just been appointed prin- 
cipal of the High School at Willits, where the couple will 
make their home after the marriage. 

It was a pretty sentiment that made Miss Florence 
Starr return to her brother's home in East Oakland for 
her marriage to Mr. Joseph Notely Thomas. The Stan- 
family is one of the oldest and most influential on the 
Oakland side of the bay, and although the bride had made 
her home with relatives in San Francisco for several years 
she chose to have her wedding at the home of Mr. and Mrs. 
Walter Starr. There were very few present ou Wednes- 
day evening when the ceremony took place and immedi- 
ately after a supper the couple left for a wedding tour. 

<£* c5* <5* 

The picture of King Edward which is published in The 
Wasp this week shows the royal family party picnicking 
like ordinary citizens on the banks of the Thames. 

%£& fc5* ^* 

Nowadays it seems quite the proper caper for a father 
who is a clergyman to perform his own daughter's wedding 
ceremony. The Rev. Robert Renison, rector of St. Mat- 
thew's Episcopal Church of West Berkeley, officiated at 
the marriage of his own daughter, Miss Julia Renison, and 
Mr. Arthur Pratt Musser, on Friday evening. It was a 
pretty little ceremony, and directly after the vows were 
• made the couple left for the North, where they will spend 
their honeymoon. Upon their return they will live in San 
Francisco. 

%£fc c&& t&* 

From Alameda comes the announcement of Miss Cecilia 
Green's engagement to Mr. Morris Z. Douglass of Oakland. 
Miss Green is one of the leading young women in Jewish 
society on the Coast, a daughter of Mr. and Mrs. S. S. 
Green, and sister of Dr. Green of Alameda and Oakland. 

t£* c5* t£fc 

Arrivals at the Hotel Rafael during the week ending 
Sunday, July 30th: San Francisco — F. D. Cochran, Mrs. 
Geo. W. Gibs, Mrs. Walter G. Holcombe, son and nurse, 
Mrs. Edgar J. Bowen, Mr. and Mrs. Wakefield Baker, Miss 
Meek, Mr. H. H. Harpham, Mr. M. A. Salisbury, Mr. and 
Mrs. W. H. Whitford, Lloyd S. Ackerman, Dr. J. Wilson 
Shiels, Mr. S. Latham, P. Delafield Kahn, Julian Hart, 
M. Miehelson. Ontario — T. F. Cunningham, F. R. Stamp. 
Boston — F. D. Cochran. Billings, Mont. — J. J. Del Mar. 
Washington, D. C. — J. P. Ault. Pleasanton, Alameda Co. — 
Mr. and Mrs. W. H. Donohue. Bolinas — John Parkin. 
Fruitvale — F. A. Berlin. New York City — Mr. and Mrs. 
N. W. Halsey, Miss Frances Halsey, Ralph Halsey, Helen 
Halsey, Douglas Hardy. 

t5* ?2*i c£* 

Arrivals at the Hotel del Monte for the week ending 
July 30th: Mr. and Mrs. S. J. Shaw, Mr. and Mrs. Clement 
Tobin, Jeremiah Lynch, Mr. and Mrs. Benno Hart, Mr. and 
Mrs. Albur Taub, Miss Grace Baldwin, H. M. Goldberg, 
Mr. Albert Pissig and Mrs. Pissig, Mr. and Mrs. Perry 
Eyre, Miss Anita Harvey, Mr. and Mrs. Clinton E. Wor- 
den, Mr. and Mrs. W. Havens, Mr. and Mrs. W. B. Bourn, 

Milk Chocolate Creams — the new candy with the creamy 
flavor. Only at Haas' Candy Stores, Phelan Building and 
James Flood Building; 



San Francisco; Mary Minnihan, Katherine Bellew, San 
Jose; Mr. and Mrs. J. D. Sherwood, Spokane; Mrs. D. M. 
Linnard, LeRoy Linnard, Dorothy Linnard, Pasadena. 

Nelson's Amycose, Infallible Remedy for Catarrh, Sore 
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Discount on Everything 

PICTURES, ART GOODS, CROCKERY 
AND GLASSWARE 




August 5, 1905.] 



-THE WASP 



189 




DR. PEDAR SATHER BRUGUIERE 

Mrs. Eleanor Martin's box party attracted a great deal 
of attention at the Tivoli last Wednesday night. She had 
with her Genevieve and Anita Harvey, her two grand- 
daughters, her daughter-in-law, Mrs. Walter Martin, the 
two Messrs. Burkes and the ever-popular Count de la 
Roeca. Mrs. Martin is one of the few society women in 
San Francisco who does not annoy the audience bv allow- 
ing her party to chatter through the performance. She is 
always most respectfully attentive to the play, and if she 
does go to sleep now and then she does not disturb any 
one by snoring. 

A great friendship has sprung up between Mrs. Fred 
Kohl and Anita Harvey. Miss Harvey has been visiting 
Mrs. Kohl at Tahoe, and the two ladies are as chummy 
as two school girls. Mrs. Kohl, I hear, is very young, and 
looks at least five years older than her age. From a friend 
who knew her as a school girl in Georgetown I am informed 
that this appearance of matured beauty was characteristic 
of Mrs. Kohl when she was just in her teens. When she 
was fourteen every stranger thought she was eighteen. 
It was a sore trial to the young lady, for so much is ex- 
pected of a person when they look older than their years. 
The Kohls, it is said, will paint the town a bright carmine 



FAT FOLKS. 
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this winter in social affaire. Mrs. Kohl intends to give 
another large ball, and will cut down the list of last year 
somewhat, for it is said that her inexperience in social 
matters here caused her to invite several people whom the 
older society people looked askance at. Mrs. Kohl would 
make a better social dictator than Mrs. Martin, for she 
has no shabby genteel friends and can invite whomsoever 
she pleases. 

Mrs. Alexander Garceau is chaperoning her niece, Miss 
Hyde-Smith, (his summer. Most of their time is spent 
at the Hotel Rafael, with occasional trips to San Mateo, 
where they visit Mrs. Garceau 's mother, Mrs. Hyde. Dr. 
Garceau has recovered from his recent operation for ap- 
pendicitis, and will soon be as well as ever. The Garceaus 
have become enraptured with the beauties of Marin county 
and it is said that they will build over there. 

%£?• t&* %&M 

Mrs. W. H. Irwin, Miss Helene Irwin, and Miss Mar- 
garet Hyde Smith were among those who greeted Alice 
Roosevelt in Honolulu recently. Both Miss Irwin and Miss 
Smith spend a great deal of time at Waikiki beach I hear. 
Miss Helene is quite an expert swimmer, for she has had 
a great deal of practice in the art, having spent near- 
ly every summer in the Hawaiian Islands since her birth. 

It is said that although the sale of furniture and curios 
from Walmer Castle, England, by order of Lord Curzon 
of Kedleston, lasted two days, it hardly paid for the money 
spent in advertising. A number of prominent persons 
were attracted to the sale through curiosity as to what the 
relics were, but most of the valuable historic pieces had 
already been purchased for the nation, so they were dis- 
appointed and would have none of the cheaper furniture. 
There was furniture from bedrooms which had been occu- 
pied at various times by the late Queen Victoria, the Duke 
of Wellington and William Pitt, but even the glamour of 
these names did not induce spirited bidding. The highest 
price paid was forty-five dollars for an antique mahogany 

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190 



THE WASP- 



[ August 5, 1905. 




and a flower girl, who will be Miss Helen Leale Johnstone, 
a sister of the groom. The bridesmaids will be: Miss 
Grace Runyon, Miss Marian Leale, Miss Edith Leale, Miss 
Ethel Banks, Miss Anita Sullivan and Miss Marguerite 
Vincent. The best man and one of the ushers who will 
accompany Mr. Johnstone from Chicago are respeetivelv 
Mr. Robert G. Gould and Mr. Thomas H. Blodgett. After 
touring California the bridal couple are to go to house- 
keeping in a handsome residence at Hyde Park, Chicago. 

Moore's Poison Oak Remedy. 
Cures Poison Oak, all skin diseases. Sold by all druggists. 



Pluto by Buskncll 

ROB ROY 

Arthur Cunningham's impersonation of the famous freebooter 

wardrobe, while a small copper warming-pan, said to have 
been used in Queen Victoria's bedroom, brought one dol- 
lar and a quarter. A fish kettle, which bore the initials of 
William Pitt, was sold for eight dollars, and a stew-pan 
bearing the crest and initials of the Duke of Wellington 
brought only twenty-five cents more. Eight dollars was 
paid for a Wellington bowl, which was used for serving 
baked potatoes in their skins, while a presentation picture 
to Lady Granville, the subject being the launching of a 
life-boat, went for four dollars. 

i5* v* ^* 

Miss Elsie Leale, whose picture appears in this week's 
Wasp, is a daughter of Captain and Mrs. Wm. C. Leale, 
and one of the most clever of the graduates of the Univer- 
sity of California. Indeed, she was the fortunate young 
woman who won the Phi Beta Cappa medal and with her 
mother made the tour of Europe, which her father gave 
her in appreciation of her efforts. Her marriage to Mr. 
Frederick Bruce Johnstone, a young attorney of Chicago, 
is the culmination of an old friendship between the two 
families. Miss Leale 's wedding is to take place on Satur- 
day evening, August the twelfth, at the family residence 
in Valltjo Street. She will be attended by six bridesmaids 

Go to Swain's dining-room, J09 Post street, near Grant 
avenue, for a fine lunch or dinner* 



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August 5, 1905. 



-THE WASP- 



191 




seems to know for what particular reason, although it may 
be that the good Boni's nether extremities look better 
when swathed in voluminous folds than when simply cov- 
ered with his trousers. Be that as it may, it is said that 
every evening he and his wife were seen on the Bois at 
Ariuunonville, and he sported a long, light overcoat, al- 
though the heat was intense and no one followed his ex- 
ample. 

t?* t&~ lt7* 

The English society papers have a story of how a super- 
sensitive housemaid was shocked by the Princess Henry of 
Pless, daughter of Mrs. Cornwallis West, the famous pro- 
fessional beauty, and sister of the Duchess of Westmins- 
ter, and herself one of the handsomest blondes in Great 
Britain. The Princess was in her bathroom, where she was 
immersed in a tub of perfumed water, when she received 
the wielder of the feather duster. From her comfortable 
station at the bottom of the marble and silver tank the 
titled lady plied the serving maid with questions, and 
finally declared that she was satisfied with her. The rose 
and snow of the perfect form in the bathtub had no charms 
for the prudish housemaid, however, and she fled the place. 
The respectable and offended young person assured the 
major-domo that she would not take service with Her Se- 
rene Highness nor with any Princess where such goings 
on might be expected. She said that she preferred the 



AT HONOLULU 

A snapshot of Miss Alice Roosevelt, Congressman I.ongworth and 
Colonel Edwards 



I hear that there is to be a change of policy at the Pre- 
sidio as regards the balls, making it more difficult for the 
outsiders to gain entrance to the hops than heretofore. 
Several years ago the Presidio hops wero considered quite 
recherche, for all the girls of the smart set attended and 
gave a deal of time to the affairs. During the last two 
years a great many young ladies from without the magic 
circle have been allowed to enter and the hop room has 
been filled with the merry chatter of feminine hoi polloi. 
Girls will be girls, for when the young ladies of the ton 
saw that the dances were becoming less exclusive, not all 
the charms of their favorite officers would tempt them to 
attend a dance at the Presidio. Since this has happened 
the young officers have not had as many favorable oppor- 
tunities to meet any of the rich girls, and many deem it 
an unwritten law that an army officer should marry for 
money. Perhaps it is because the officers themselves 
realize this that they intend to make their hops more ex- 
clusive. 

The club men who received little electric lighters as 
favors at Mrs. John W. Maekay's recent cotillion in Lon- 
don, are impressed by the good sense of the hostess in giv- 
ing them such a useful article. Nothing can be handier 
than a tiny torch tucked away in a vest pocket. For in- 
stance, when a fellow has lingered long at his club, how 
can he be expected to find his own house, to say nothing 
of the door or keyhole? The tiny affair, shaped like a 
cigar, can be lighted by simply pressing a button, and al- 
most anyone, even the weariest, is equal to that effort. 



Ever since the Count Boni de Castellane married the 
daughter of the late Jay Gould, no matter what reform 
the dandified young Frenchman tries to bring about, no one 
takes his efforts seriously. Count Boni has recently en- 
deavored to introduce the custom of wearing long, light 
overcoats when on the streets or in public places. No one 



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192 



■THE WASP 



[ August 5, 1905. 




COUNT TOtSTOI AT THE Plow 

middle classes, where the ladies did not mix their baths 
with the hiring of servants. 

ii5w %£fr Si5* 

The wedding of Miss Ada May Laymance, of East Oak- 
land, whose picture appears in this week's Wasp, and Mr. 
Edward Hall Dodge, of Alameda, will be one of the lead- 
ing social events across the bay. On account of the youth 
of the couple the marriage was delayed from last spring 
until the fall, and the bride will be still one. of the young- 
est of the season, which is to see so many debutante wed- 
dings. Mr. Dodge is in business with his father, Mr. E. J. 
Dodge, the lumber merchant of San Francisco. The young 
couple will probably make their home in Alameda, where 
the Dodges have a splendid residence. 

After seven years spent abroad, Mrs. George von L. 
Meyer, wife of the American Ambassador at St. Peters- 
burg, is, with her children, back in New York and Wash- 
ington, visiting friends. When Mr. Meyer went to Europe 
it was as United States Envoy at Rome, after which he was 
made Ambassador to Russia. During their stay in the 
Holy City Mrs. Meyer struck up a friendship with the 
young Queen Helen, and it is doubtful if any Americans 
e-ver enjoyed such a degree of intimacy with both King and 
Queen as the Von Meyers. At St. Petersburg, however, 
it was not quite so pleasant, for neither the Russian Court 
nor the Muscovite fashionable world can forget the pref- 
erence shown by America for Japan during the trouble in 
Manchuria. And the ruling house of Russia is not so 
democratic nor are the rulers as easy of access as are the 
King and Queen of Italy, so that the relations of both Mr. 
and Mrs. Meyers, formerly Miss Alice Appleton of Boston, 
in St. Petersburg have been of the coldest and most dis- 
tant order, with no signs of improving. 

Mrs. McLean Martin, who, though a grandmother, was 
married the other day, would make a good character for a 
play. Several of the suitors of her daughters are said to 
have fallen in love with her, to her great embarrassment. 
Ever since her debut as Carrie Colton she has been the 
most fascinating of women, and wherever she goes she has 
always a score of admirers. She is one of the most brill- 
iant and accomplished women in America. She tells a 
story well, and has a wit before which the cleverest men 
quail. She is a skilled musician, has a beautiful voice, and 
is widely read. She is an accomplished horsewoman and 
a fearless swimmer. Formerly, when at her summer home 
in Santa Cruz, she would often swim out a mile or two 
alone. Her second husband, Mr. Martin, became so alarm- 
ed for her safetv that he hired a professional swimmer to 
follow in her wake. Mr. Martin and the "professor" 
thought that by frightening the courageous lady she would 
cease her long swims seaward, so it was arranged that the 
"professor" should feign to get a cramp and act as if 



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PROPRIETOR 



HOTEL BALTIMORE 

1015 Van Ness Avenue 

An American plan hotel conducted especially for families desiring ac- 
commodations for the season or by the year, situated in the most 
fashionable section of the city. Fully equipped with all modern 
conveniences. Comfortable sunny rooms with delightful outlook 
elegantly furnished and appointed. 

C. F. BUCKLEY, Jr., 

Manager. 



SAN MARCO HOTEL- 

586 T A YLOK ST., BStWEBD 81817 Mi POIt 



A new modern fire-proof family and tourist hotel. 52 
sunny suites with private bath rooms. 44 single rooms 
with public bathroom on each floor. Electric lights, 
steam heat and telephone in every room. Only white 
help employed. In its furnishings and table the San 
Marco will compare favorably with any select family hotel. 

GEO. J. CASANOVA, Manager. 



HOTEL RAFAEL 

Fifty minutes from San Francisco. Twenty-6ve trains dally each way 
OPBN AIA THE YEAR 

CUISINE AND SERVICE THE BfcST 

gl^'Stnd for booklet. R. V. Halton, Prop. 



Visit the HOFFMAN CAFE 
LUNCH, - GRILL - AND - WINE-ROOMS 

Half a block below Palace and Grand Hotels, S. F. 
Fine Goods a Specialty. Merchants' hot lunch from 1 1 a. m. to 
2:30 p. m. Served also in Ladies Cafe, Steaks, English Chops. 
Chicken, Oysters, Loaves, Salads and all delicacies a specialty. 

HANDSOMEST CAFE IN AMERICA 

Open all night. 4V Private Dining Rooms for Indies and Escort* 

HOFFMAN CAFE, PROPS. 

CHARI.ES HUDEBRBCHT, Mgr. 



Every dollar added to your savings tightens your grip 
on success, you must make the start. No better medium 
is offered for small savings than by the CONTINENTAL 
BUILDING AND LOAN ASSOCIATION of 301 California 
street. 



August 5, 1905.] 



-THE WASP- 



193 




Photo by BclU-Oudry 

M SS ADA MAY I.AYMANCE 
One of the youthful Oakland September brides 

drowning. This he did when about a mile from shore. As 
soon as he commenced his antics Mrs. Martin swam back, 
and getting him by the head proceeded to tow him ashore. 
"If it's only a cramp that's bothering you," said she, 
"take hold of my shoulder and I'll take you in all right." 
The "professor" made no more attempts to frighten her. 

t&& t5* t4& 

Washington society has been considerably surprised 
by the news of Mr. Dahlgren's marriage to Mrs. McLean 
Martin, who is considerably his senior. He is tall, hand- 
some, clever, well born, rich, and was considered one of 
the catches of Washington. At one time he was supposed 
to be engaged to Alice Roosevelt, and he was thought to 
be an excellent match for her. No one from San Francisco 
would be astonished, however, if Mrs. Martin had married 
the heir apparent to a throne. 

Mrs. James Brown Potter is a godsend for the English 
society reporters. Her failures and her auction sales have 
kept the pens of the London scribes busy for two years. 
The most recent auction furnished a pathetic incident, 
which has been worked up in the highest style of the re- 
portorial art. The actress looked on with the cold, steelly 
eye of a tragedy queen while they sold her household 
effects for the benefit of her creditors, but when they put 
up her favorite steed for sale the tears of the busted act- 
ress-manager fell like a summer shower. It is needless to 
say that the deeply mourned quadruped was "a beautiful 
bay mare," though it is somewhat chilling to learn that she 

CALIFORNIA SOUVENIR. 

A handsome present for Eastern friends — Townsend's 
California Glace Fruits and Choice Candies in fire-etched 
and hand-painted boxes. 767 Market St., San Francisco. 



was saddled with the rather unromantic name of Nancy. 
Artemis, or Gwendolyn, or Aphrodite would have been so 
much better! Mrs. Potter twined her arms around Nancy's 
neck, and the mare whinnied as if she realized the immens- 
ity of the misfortune that had fallen upon the hyphenated 
house of Brown-Potter. The intelligent beast tugged at 
her halter as If she would have followed her weeping mis- 
tress and comforted her, but the cruel rope brought her up 
with a jerk, and had there been a stage curtain it would 



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194 



THE WASP* 



[August 5, 1905. 




PROMINENT GIRI. MOTORIST- 
MISS Irene G. Cahill, one of New York's dashing belles, taking her Columbia out for a morning spin 



have dropped to slow music. Notwithstanding all her in- 
telligence and the beauty of her bay hide, Nancy was sold 
for the modest sum of $200 to a country doctor, who will 
utilize her talents in his prosaic, if useful, occupation. 
From carrying a star actress in the fashionable throng of 
Hyde Park, London, to packing around pills and plasters 
for rustic patients is a fall in the world that would jar 
even the tough nerves of an army mule. 

Miss Alice Roosevelt's New York ehaperone is Mrs. 
Wm. K. Travers, who has recently secured a divorce. She 
managed very cleverly to keep the proceedings quiet, and 
once the divorce was granted she sailed immediately for 
Europe to join her sister, Mrs. Wm. K. Vanderbilt Sr. 
Mrs. Travers was a Miss Harriman, and inherited a large 
fortune from her father, the late Oliver Harriman. 

i£R tp& 10* 

Prom New York comes the news that Addison Mizner 
is rapidly recouping the shattered Mizner fortunes. A 
year ago, when the popular young bachelor betook himself 
to New York, his friends here predicted a speedy return, 
thinking that Addison would be a business failure. Through 
the friendship of Mrs. Herman Oelriehs he has secured the 
entree to the society of many rich people. He opened 
a studio near Washington Square, and collected in it rare 
curios of every description. These he sold for handsome 
profits. He has gone into business on a larger scale and 

If you must drink, why not have the best? "Puck 
Rye" is second to none on the market. Try it. 



opened a salesroom, which is prospering. Trips abroad are 
taken by him to secure works of art, and his patronage is 
proving exceedingly lucrative to him. 




Pierce-Rodolph Storage Co., Inc. 

STORAGE, MOVING, PACKING AND SHIPPING 



Warehouse: Eddy Street, Near Fillmore 
Specially Built for the Storage of Household Furniture 
MAIN OFFICE, Eddy Street, Near Fillmore : : Phone West S2S 



August 5, 1905.] 



-THE WASP- 



196 




It amused me the 
other day to read of 
Mrs. Rudolph Spreck- 
els' righteous indigna- 
tion at having to pay 
$25 for runniug her au- 
tomobile through Wat- 
sonville at a greater 
speed than eight miles 
an hour. The amusing 
thing about the affair 
was Mrs. Spreekels' 
simplicity in thinking 
that she had any re- 
dress lor such an official 
swindle — as swindle it 
is. Every country con- 
stable in California is 
on the alert to nab 
strangers and make 
them contribute to the 
county treasury, which 
is never ready to burst. 
This bunko game has 
been played by country 
constables from time 
immemorial, and in ev- 
ery State in the Union. 
California is amongst 
the bad ones, though not the very worst. The efficiency 
of a constable is rated largely by the amount of fines he 
can gather into the county treasury. Of course, he has 
to be very cautious about arresting and taxing the natives, 
for that would injure his popularity and cause him to lose 
his position. He is therefore full of zeal to seize and 
assess any unlucky stranger who can, by hook or crook, be 
made to appear as having violated an ordinance. Inas- 
much as the ordinances are drawn up by the Supervisors 
to aid the constable in his bunko game and assist in paying 
the salary of the county judge, it is easy to see where the 
unfortunate strangers get off. 

Reese Llewellyn, the wealthy iron founder of Los An- 
geles, came up the first of the week and registered at the 
Palace, where he usually stays. He has had so many ad- 
ventures that his friends have been trying to divine wheth- 
er on this trip he will be blown up in an automobile, wreck- 
ed on the bay, dropped from an airship, or just run over 
by a street car. They cheerfully predict that something- 
will happen to him, but the happy young man does not al- 
low the Cassandra-like forebodings to worry him. Any- 
way, he says he is here on business, and he has no time for 
forebodings. 

Mrs. Aurelia de Moro of 2834 Telegraph avenue, Berke- 
ley, described by the daily newspapers as a "society 
woman," has been receiving a very bad advertisement for 
one ambitious of social prestige. Mrs. Aurelia de Moro's 
name is not found in Ned Greenway's list of the elect, nor 
has Grace Van Tassel included it in her enumeration of the 
Four Hundred, as printed weekly in The Wasp. Pretty 
nearly everybody in Oakland who does not ostentatiously 
hang out the family lingerie on the hackneyed clothesline 
on washday is tolerated by the daily newspaper scribes 
as a "society woman." I suppose every woman in Cali- 
fornia has read how Mrs. de Moro's aged mother came 
from Mazatlan to die in her daughter's home, and was 

The poet Gray said, "The path of glory leads but to 
the grave." We in San Francisco have found it takes a 
different course — it leads us to the California Market, 
where we get fresh oysters daily, shipped from beds where 
they are raised from true Chesapeake seed; such stock is 
nowhere else in this city to be obtained. Moraghan is the 
purveyor. 



A KING AT A PICNIC 
The Bnglish royal family enjoying an informal outing 



stopped at the wharf by the immigration authorities be- 
cause she was penniless, too weak to work, and in her sec- 
ond childhood. After three weeks of torturing suspense 
on the old woman's account her loving relatives breathe 
easier, for she has been sent back to the land of cactus, 
bandits and poverty to die. Things looked gloomy for her 
socially ambitious people here when a good Samaritan 
named Mrs. Rafaela Schweisinger of 3045 Shattuck ave- 
nue, Berkeley, butted in, so to speak, and offered out of 

Pure blood, bright eyes, bounding step, high spirits, good health- 
synonymous with Abbott's Angostura Bitters, intelligently used. Test 
it. 



TRY OUR 

Stanford Richmond Coal 

From the Richmondvale District, 
Newcastle, N. S. W., Australia 

Intense heat, little ash, and no 
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ASK YOUR DEALER FOR IT AND 

SEE THAT YOD GET IT 

RICHMOND COAL CO. 

Agents 



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801 Market Street, San Francisco 

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196 



-THE WASP- 



[ August 5, 1905. 




MISS MABEL LINDEN REED 
An Oakland debutante who is betrothed to Los Angeles man 

sheer good nature to keep the unwelcome grandmother, 
though she had never seen her. Such presumption ! The 
impudence of people who do not belong to the pink- 
tea circles of suburban society is perfectly appalling. After 
the feeble old immigrant had been domiciled with her new- 
found friend a few days, Mrs. de Moro got her away, and 
by this time she is on the high seas again, a steerage pas- 
senger bound, for Mazatlan. Thus a most annoying situa- 
tion has been avoided. In the natural order of things 
old Mrs. Hernandez will be soon in far-off Mexico and the 
whole unfortunate affair will be speedily forgotten, for 
memory of the poor and friendless liveth not long. Every- 
body is in a hurry to have done with them. Tom Hood, 
who was never cut out for a pink-tea poet, tells us that 
the established procedure in disposing of a dead indigent 
is to — 

" Battle his bones over the stones, 

He's only a pauper whom nobody owns." 

t5* ^* w* 

Many Los Angeles people have been visiting the city 
lately. I have noticed on the Palace Hotel register the 
names of the F. H. Rindges, Colonel J. B. Lankerskim, Mr. 
and Mrs. Walter L. Vail, Mrs. Dr. E. L. Leonard, Mr. and 
Mrs. B. G. Adams, John D. Pope, A. P. Cross, Mrs. Homer 
Laughlin, the Misses Sabichi, W. B.' Cline, Gus B. Hill, and 
dozens of others. 

t5* t^* t£* 

There has been much curiosity to learn the name of the 
dentists alluded to by Ashton Stevens in his interview with 
Miss Fowler, the Orpheum monologuist, who made such a 
decided hit. Miss Fowler appears to be quite a candid 
young lady, and confided to the interviewer that she had 
sat up the night before and that morning till 6 a. m., so 



charmed was she and her chaperone with the conversation 
of two fascinating tooth-pullers. The most remarkable 
part of the story is that, to use her own expressive lan- 
guage, the monologuist was "on the water wagon," and 
had nothing to brace her up through the long vigils of the 
dai-ksome night but mineral water. What a fortune those 
two dentists would make if they could only keep their 
patients as contented as Miss Fowler while the victims 
writhed in the operating chair. I hear that a certain hand- 
some young dentist who bears a name highly suggestive 
of Irish oratory and English bayonets in apposition is very 
indignant at the suspicion that he was one of the enter- 
tainers who caused Miss Fowler to lose her beauty sleep. 
He says he would not have the slightest trouble in proving 
an alibi, as he was attending a lecture that evening at the 
Young Men's Christian Association Hall, and in proof of 
the assertion can point out the building at the corner of 
Mason and Ellis streets. There is no doubt whatever that 
it is there. 

t&N 10* t^* 

That Joe Bedding is to take up his residence here, as 
chronicled in one of my eontemporfjries, is doubted by his 
friends at the Bohemian Club, despite their wish to keep 
him always with them. Mr. Redding himself is non- 
committal on the subject. Joseph's fame as a wit is well 
known, and one of the best anecdotes about him includes 
his old friend Baphael Weill. It seems that during the 
genial Joe's last visit to San Francisco the White House 
had just undergone extensive alterations in every depart- 
ment. Mr. Weill was proud, indeed, of his establishment, 
and one day invited Bedding to inspect it. The friend 
made a tour of the entire place, and on arriving at the 
dressmaking department was shown into the workrooms. 
Mr. Weill, thinking to embarrass his companion before the 
many girls at work, announced suddenly: "Ladies, allow 
me to introduce Mr. Joseph D. Bedding, the famous law- 
yer. Mr. Bedding wishes to make you a short speech." 
This was too good a chance for the clever lawyer to miss. 
He spoke up quickly and without hesitation. "Yes, young 
ladies," he said, "I am delighted at this opportunity to 
speak to you, as Mr. Weill has asked me to say that from 
today your salaries will be raised 50 per cent." 




This is the proper Pa.nel Boot 
Victoria.. ? ? We have them. 

Fifty Pony Vehicles in Stock. 

SruraayLKER 

RrosTompany 

Market and Tenth Streets 

ft. fP A 



August 5, 1905.] 



■THE WASP- 



197 




QUEEN MARGHERITA OF ITAI.Y 
The Sovereign who is to visit San Francisco 

Mrs. C. P. Huntington, who, it is said, paid ten thou- 
sand dollars for a copy of "Fads and Fancies," is one of 
the most liberal of all the railroad king's women folk. She 
supported many charities in San Francisco, although she 
liked to have nothing said about it. Amongst other things 
she gave a bed to the Children's Hospital on condition that 
it should never be mentioned. Mr. and Mrs. Huntington 
were beset by people in quest of assistance. A good story 
is told of how the railroad king supported three generations 
of one family. Some friends inquired of him, "Why do 
you take care of those children? Why do you allow that 
family to be saddled on you?" "Let me see," he answer- 
ed. "Why did I begin taking care of them? It's forty 
years ago, and I've forgotten. Oh, it was because the 
grandfather of these children lived in the same town that 
my father did." 

Mr. and Mrs. I. W. Hellman are at the splendid mansion 
on the shores of Lake Tahoe, which is one of the show 
places of that part of the country. They went up there 
last week in a private car from San Leandro, and have as 
their guest Dr. Julius Rosenstirn of this city. Mr. Hell- 
man is the well-known banker of San Francisco. The way 
that Mr. Hellman has acquired millions and mansions in 
town and country is a fine object lesson on the glorious 
possibilities for a business man in California. 

There is a good deal of heart-burning these days in 
Oakland and the refined circles of Piedmont, over the 
news that Mrs. Henry A. Butters has captured the Count 
de la Roeca, the popular and titled French Viee-Consul, 
as her guest at her summer residence at St. Helena. Not 
the most attractive name in the world for a true French- 
man, by the way. Mrs. Butters has two bright young 
daughters, and so fortunate has that family been in all its 
undertakings that it would not surprise some of the know- 
ing ones if the recently graduated daughter were to marry 



- nobleman. Anyway, the brilliant Count, with whom 

the belles of San Francisco are well pleased, is out near the 
sanitarium in the hills, where they make yon go to bed with 
the chickens and insist on at leasl three baths a day. Miss 
Marie an.l Miss Marguerite Butters, whose firs! names are 
eerfainU as Parisian as the gallant nobleman himself, have 
him all to themselves, with the mamma as chaperon. It is 
simply maddening to think of, declare the lair ones who 
linger in tow a. 

jt ,1 j* 

Friends of Miss Ida May Bradley are wondering if she 
will find the stage as delightful as her Eancy lias painted it 
during the years she spent in preparation for a histrionic 
career. The young woman, when she shook the dust of 
Oakland off her feet last Pall, said that she should not 
return until she had reached her heart's desire — a sort of 
"With my shield or upon it" cry that thrilled the heart of 
every woman who heard her. Miss Bradley, whose picture 
appeared in last week's Wasp, is back in Oakland, and 
she is simply beaming, for she is enrolled as a member of 
Florence Roberts' company, and who shall tell an enthusi- 
astic girl, especially when Ihe footlights Dee is in her bon- 
net, that the stage is not better than attending receptions, 
purple luncheons and pink leas? She is receiving much 
attention in her home 'city, and, of course, when she returns 
in real actress stunts she may have the felicity of pungling 
up tickets so that those who have known her from her in- 
fancy may have the gratification of watching to see how 
much better they can do the part than she does, even 
though she has spent months in study. 

c^W £& t~* 

There were as many attendants, governesses, maids, 
nurses and men-servants in the train of little Miss Alice 
Astor, the small daughter of Colonel and Mrs. Astor, when 
she arrived at the residence of her grandfather, Mr. Ed- 
ward S. Willing, at Newport the other day, as if she were 
the heir to a throne. The four-year-old baby is to remain 
with her mother's father until her parents return from 
abroad. 




Photo by Genthc 



MISS ELSIE LEALE 



lya 



THE WASP 



[August 5, 1905. 




A MBMBNTO OF SECRETARY TAFT California Photo-Engraving Co. 

The Secretary in a Winton Automobile in Golden Gate Park with Park Commissioner Win. J. Dingee and Mr. R. P. Schwerin 



Washington is aghast at the cabled news that Mrs. 
Levi Z. Leiter, the mother of Lady Curzon, intends to take 
up her residence in the big mansion which she has not oc- 
cupied for several years, and that she will there lighten 
her mourning and revive the hospitable traditions of the 
home. Mrs. Leiter is the living impersonation of Mrs. 
Malaprop. The Chicago widow is still abroad and is tak- 
ing the waters at Kissenger Springs, while Lady Suffolk, 
another of her daughters, is in London enjoying the season 
as much as her half-mourning will permit. It was Mrs. 
Leiter who, when asked after a grand concert if she caught 
the airs, is said to have replied, "They never give me 
cold, but one of my girls is sick from them." Other bright 
sayings of a similar kind are attributed to her. When 
complimented on her suite of rooms in Paris she is said 
to have replied: "They are tres small so that I could not 
invite tout le monde." "It is sad," remarked the titled 
personage to whom she spoke. "Oh, no," responded Mrs. 
Leiter, cheerily and loudly, "it did not matter at all, for 
when I saw there was not room for tout le monde I in- 
vited the demi-monde." 

T£& £& t&* 

Mr. and Mrs. William Lynham Shiels are among those 
young people across the bay who believe in making one long 
holiday. Six weeks ago the Shiels family, with Mrs. C. A. 
Bennet, Mrs. Shiels ' mother, went to Lake county and took 
a cottage. Mr. and Mrs. Shiels returned to their home in 
Jackson street, Oakland, for a day or two, last week, 
however, and then went on to Haywards, where they are to 
spend two weeks, after which they will make an extended 
tour of the North, visiting the Portland Fair and then 
continuing their journey to Seattle, Taeoma, and British 
Columbia. Before her marriage Mrs. Shiels was Miss Elsie 
Bennet, and was considered the handsomest young woman 
in Alameda county. She is a sister-in-law of Dr. George 
Franklin Shiels and Dr. J. Wilson Shiels, both of whom 
have also married beautiful women. 



Miss Susanne Blanding, since her return from the gay 
French capital, is wearing some stunning clothes. Her 
hats are particularly smart, broad-brimmed affairs, with 
feathers or decorations arranged under the crown, quite 
different from the grotesque shapes worn at impossible 
angles that are affected by some of the local contingent. 
Miss Blanding 's friends are most emphatic in their denial 
of all rumors of an engagement, and say that after her 
European trip the young lady has returned heart whole 
and fancy free. I hear that Tevis Blanding is still a semi- 
invalid, and travels constantly, accompanied by a trained 
nurse. 

t&* c5* c5* 

Mr. and Mrs. Frank E. Baker and their son Ray of 
San Mateo have just returned from a two weeks' trip 
through the Santa Clara and San Joaquin valleys, and re- 
port having had a very enjoyable time. 

Entre Nous. 



Tearful Milk. 

A lady was complaining to her dairyman some time 
ago about the quality of his milk. "Short 0' grass feed, 
this time o' year," said the jocular milkman. "Bless you, 
them cows o' mine are just as sorry about it as I am. I 
often stands and watches 'em cryin' — regular cryin', 
mum — because they feel as how their milk don't do 'em 
credit. You don't believe it?" 

"Oh, yes, I believe it," said the lady; "but I wish in 
future you'd see that they don't drop their tears into our 
can." 

t£* <^» f£?t 

Old Gentleman: " How old are you, my little man?" 
Newsboy : ' ' Nearly ten, sir. ' ' 

Old Gentleman: "And how long have you been in the 
newspaper business ? ' ' 

Newsboy: "Oh, ever since I was a kid." 



August 5, 1905] 



-THE WASP 



199 




P 

H 



200 



THE WASP- 



[ August 5, 1905. 




^JuR&&Bts*. 



OUR DISAPPEARING FORESTS California Photo-Engraving Co. 

A photographic snapshot in the Redwood Region of California 

Celebrities At Home 

INo. 19 



A Ta.lk With One of the Most Successful Hotel Managers in America 




ECIDEDLY if a man would be a successful 
hotel manager he must first of all be endow- 
ed with the kind of brain that can take note 
of trifles and dispose of them without fuss 
or worry. He must have executive ability of 
the most marked description, and he must 
furthermore have a certain quality that is not exactly 
tact, yet comes so close to it that no other name seems to 
fit as well. Colonel John Kirkpatrick, the courteous and 
clever manager of the Palace, is one of the most promin- 
ent men in this particular line, and I accordingly sought 
him a few days ago for a chat on hotels and their man- 
agers. When I entered the door of Colonel Kirkpatrick 's 
private office, I found him seated at his desk, assuring an 
Eastern tourist who sat beside him that San Francisco 
has "the finest climate in the world, take it the year 
around, Sir." Colonel Kirkpatrick is a soldierly-looking 
man, although possessed of a goodly portion of what is 
delicately mentioned as "embonpoint." He is tall enough 
however, to carry it, and his well-fitting dark tweed 
clothes, with scrupulously neat linen and dark tie, 
are just what a man of his build should wear. His face, 
excepting the deep blue eyes, is of the type that Vandyke 
loved to paint, and his pointed beard adds to the resem- 



blance. Amiability is written all over the countenance 
and figure of the genial host, and added to it there is a 
latent power that would bode ill to the one who attempt- 
ed to overstep the bounds of propriety. In the office 
where he spends his business hours the Colonel has sur- 
rounded himself with comfort, while dispensing- with all 
useless things. Two immense desks occupy the greater 
part of the space and, with the exception of cabinets for 
bills, etc., and several easy chairs, constitute the entire 
furniture. On the floor is a luxuriously thick, deep crim- 
son rug, and good photographs of picturesque scenes in 
the Yosemite hang on the walls. As the door closed be- 
hind the Eastern man, Colonel Kirkpatrick turned to me, 
and I explained that I fain would learn something of what 
constitutes a successful hotel manager. 

The Colonel knitted his brows, pulled his beard 
thoughtfully, and replied not a word. 

"You, for instance," I prompted. 

"Really," he hesitated, laughingly, •'! think that I 
would rather my guests said that. Interview them." 

As I could not get an answer to my first query, I es- 
sayed another in a slightly different manner. "What has 
made the Palace the popular hostelry that it is?" I asked. 

It was easy to see that the topic was a gratifying one, 



August 5, 1905. J 



-THE WASP- 



201 




Photo by Taber 

COLONBI. JOHN KIRKPATRICK 

but my host thrust the Palace aside, saying: "Take any 
first-class hotel and there are four things that make it 
popular. They are: Good location, reasonably comfort- 
able rooms, polite, quick, attentive service, and a good 
cuisine. No, I think that perhaps the cuisine should stand 
first." 

"Men are so fond of eating?" 

"No, I would not say that. Those who can afford it 
like to eat well-cooked, well-chosen and properly seasoned 
food." 

"Is it not difficult to get a chef who can cater to such 
tastes?" I questioned, recalling tales that I had heard 
from the wealthiest private citizens. 

The Colonel fairly bubbled over with mirth. "I in- 
herited a chef with the hotel some twenty years ago," he 
said, "and also an assistant chef. After seven years the 
chef died and I simply put the assistant In his place. He 
had come from Paris and taken the position of assistant 
here, thinking that it would in time lead to something 
better. It did. Next to the chef the head waiter is of 
importance. He, as it were, stands between the people 
and the one who caters to them." 

"But the steward," I reminded him. 

"Um oh, yes, the steward," he echoed. "Well, you 
see, we do not have a steward here. I do not believe in 
putting too many between the first and second. All we ask 
is a little patience and anything that can be procured — 
and there is little that we cannot get here — will be served 
to our patrons." 

"European plan; but of those who dine after the 
American style?" I said. 

"None do these days. It is just like this. Food, to be 
good, must be served when cooked, and no one can do 
that when a meal stands for two hours, which is the usual 

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time of the American course dinner. Then a man does 
not like to buy a dinner a1 the Cliff, for instance, IJ he 
thinks that he is paying for one at the hotel where he is 
registered. It is not penuriousness, but a sense of not 
wishing to buy what he does not use. The ordinary man 
is perfectly willing to wait for his dinner to be cooked if 
he feels satisfied that he will get what he wants when it is 
served." 

"Now, Colonel," I interrupted, "is it not a fact that 
no one can get the service of which you speak unless he 
himself is something of a bon vivant and appreciates the 
lull value of the Epicurian feasts that are provided?" 

"Well," admitted the manager, "I am not averse to 
a good meal, and I suppose that I do appreciate its benefits 
on the system." 

# * * 

From gastronomies we turned to matters in general, 
and in reply to my question as to what constituted success 
in the management of a hotel the Colonel replied, epi- 
grammatically: 

"Small details well regulated make the house success- 
ful." 

"Did you go through a course of preparation for the 
work?" I asked, wondering how long a training were nec- 
essary for such a thorough knowledge of what was re- 
quired. 

Again the Colonel laughed, as he leaned back in his 
chair and turned contemplative eyes toward the ceiling. 
Then he shook his head in negation. 

"It was this way," he said finally. "I was manager 
of the Sharon estate, and one day I got a telegram saying 
that the Palace was not. paying and asking me to come and 
see if I could straighten it out. Dear me, that was twenty 
years ago, and I have been here ever since. I have that 
telegram somewhere, but do not know just where to put 
my hand upon it." 

"Then managers are not trained" 

"They just practice for years," said the Colonel, "and 
then they begin to find out how little they know about it. 
It is like banking, or any other business. There is a mul- 
titude of details to be dealt with, and they must be met 
and decided promptly. No one can tell how it is done, 
and that reminds me of the man who lived on the farm in 
West Virginia where I was brought up. Log-splitting was 
the chief industry, and there was this one man of whom 
I speak who could split more logs than any two others. 
He knew which end of the log to start at. If a man starts 
to split from one end the boards are smooth and fall right 
into shape, while from the other end the fibres intertwine 
and the board has to be fairly chopped free. Now that 
man could never tell any one how he knew, but he could 
walk around the log and choose the right end, and he never 
made a mistake." 

"And hotel managers?" 

"Know just what to do at critical moments, but cannot 
tell how they know." 



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202 



THE WASP- 



[ August 5, 1905. 



Turning to the guests, which an old saw declares to be 
the ornaments of the house which they frequent, I asked 
whether it were better to entertain them or to let them 
alone to amuse themselves. 

"Let them alone," said the manager, decidedly. "After 
you have given them fairly good rooms and excellent meals, 
don't harass them. People hate to think that some one is 
dogging them around." 

"Then you have no entertainers?" 

"No," said the Colonel, "and my guests would not be 
bothered with such people. One thing which makes the 
Palace a pleasant place to Eastern people is the Palm 
Garden and the Court. Then they like the homelike fea- 
tures of the place and the music, which happens just now 
to be particularly good. " 

# * #• 

"Is it true that you are to add the management of the 
Fairmont to that of the Palace?" I asked, thinking of the 
weight of responsibility. 

"It is under consideration," admitted my host, "but 
there are several points upon which no decision can be 
reached as yet. Mrs. Oelrichs does not wish to furnish the 
Fairmont, and it of such a character that the furniture 
must be made to order. No one who does not own the 
plaee would feel like going to the necessary expense. It 
would be a fine thing added to the Palace, but I should not 
think of leaving this house for any place." 

"Is this not much smaller than the hotel on the hill?" 
said I, still intent upon the comparative advantages of the 
two places. 

' ' There are one thousand rooms here, ' ' was the succinct 
replj. "We have our own laundry and workrooms of all 
kinds, which add greatly to the usefulness of the hotel as 
well as to its size." 

"You must have a great staff of people in attendance?" 

"Five hundred is our usual force. It is this way; there 
is always painting, carpet-cleaning and laying, carpenter- 
ing, furniture-repairing, etc., and we have our own work- 
men for all these things. Sometimes there will be 100 
guests going out on one of the great steamers, and we must 
have their laundry ready. Now, if it was out of the house 
we might be able to have it in time and we might not, but 
if we can get our hands on the laundress it is certain to be 
done, and just so all along the line." 

* * # 

Taking advantage of a pause in the conversation, I 
tried to ascertain the favorite guests of the Palace mana- 
ger. "Do you like Eastern people, foreigners, people of 
prominence or convention delegates?" I insinuated. 

The Colonel was too wise to show a preference, how- 
ever, even if he had one, and he replied, diplomatically: 

"I like the guest who is pleased with what we can do 
for him, no matter from what part of the globe he may 
hail, and that reminds me that the people who are the most 
widely traveled are the ones who are the easiest to get 
along with. They know what they want, and, while they 
are exacting, they are satisfied when they get what they 
require." 

From the hotel and its management I turned to private 
life, and requested the Colonel to give me some information 
regarding his own amusements. 

"Oh," said the Colonel, "horses are my chief pleas- 
ure. ' ' 

"And what kind?" 

"Any kind so that they are thoroughbred and fleet and 
perfect," was the enigmatical reply. "I have a little coun- 
try place where I go every week end. There is not much 
to it — an acre, perhaps, but there is a good track, and that 
is the principal inducement to me." 



Life is only froth and bubble until you have been in- 
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Best" Coffee, prepared under the firm's special supervi- 



"It is easy to see, Colonel, that you are prepaiing to 
retire to a ranch after a while," I said. 

"You are very much mistaken," he corrected, energet- 
ically. "I was brought up on a farm in West Virginia, 
and I do not care for any more farming in mine. No, thank 
you ; the city is g