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Full text of "WASP (July-Dec. 1912)"

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V LXVIII— No. 1. 



SAN FRANCISCO, JULY 6, 



Price, 10 Centa. 




ESTABLISHED 

The Pacific Coast Weekly 



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1 

31 



9 
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I 
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T/ze Cost of Your Summer's Outings Would Let 

Your Family Enjoy the Country the Year 

Round in the Beautiful 

"Burlingame Foothills" 



Mffli»»»l»«ffl«l«fflH«m 



™™»°™™™ m ««' M "" 



JEE 



WHERE 



— Allowing a moderate cost for 
your family's vacation, the ex- 
pense would cover a year's 
payment for a lot in the 

"Burlingame 
Foothills" 

where you would always have 
the clear country air, a gar- 
den, chickens, and fields where 
the children could roam. 




— Beautiful rolling country, 
rising from the Camino Real to 
the "Foothills" overlooking 
San Francisco Bay. Then, too. 



there are 



"No Fogs and 
No Ferries" 

Your family lives in the open 
country; you are but 25 min- 
utes from the Third and Town- 
send Depot — 25 trains a day. 



You Have the Joys of Country Life With M tst of the 
Citys Advantages by Living in "Burlingame Foothills" 

Beautiful near-by drives, wooded ravines, Spring Valley lakes only l'/ 2 miles away, Open fields, hills to roam, yet essential 
comforts and necessities such as electric lights, sewers, pure water, street lights, cement sidewalks, school, Fostoffice and 
Wells Fargo office on the tract, Large San Francisco stores make daily free deliveries. 



DEAL WITH 
THE OWNERS 



OFFICE OF EASTON ESTATE 



225 MILLS BLDG. 
SAN FRANCISCO 



a 

d 

d 

n 

O 

d 
o 

i 

i 

S 



LEADING HOTELS = RESORTS 



Hotel St. Francis 



Turkish Baths 
12th Floor 

Ladies Hair Dressing Parlors 
2d Floor 

Cafe 

White and Gold Restaurant 

Lobby Floor 

Electric Grill 

Barber Shop 

Basement, Geary St. entrance 



Under the Management of James Woods 



Casa del Rey 

New 300-room, fire-proof hotel located 
near the beach and Casino, open all jear 
round. SUPERIOR GOLFING. 

AMERICAN PLAN 

Tennis courts, good boating, bathing and 
fishing; numerous drives along the Coast 
and through the mountains. 

SANTA CRUZ BEACH HOTEL CO. 



<Sdnni# 



UTHO 

\co.y 



Schmidt Lithograph Co. 



PORTLAND 




ON'T nil oh yojuj goods a*; 
Label thai is'ifot woWiy:|| 
of-.^ur sears •»£ .toi}. 
: ,''•,'•'• '.•:/•• • '. 

Good Goods sell better" wMb 
labeled with Good Labels. We 
only print the good kind. We 
would be pleased to send samples. 



POSTERS -:- LABELS -:- CUT-OUTS 

HANGERS -:- CARTONS 

COMMERCIAL WORK 



SAN FKANOISCO 

SEATTLE LOS ANGELES 



PALACE HOTEL 

Situated on Market Street 

In the center of thg City, 

Take any Market Street Oar 
from the Ferry. 

FAIRMONT HOTEL 

The most beautifully 

situated of Any Oity 

Hotel in the World. 

Take Sacramento Street Cars 
from the Ferry. 

TWO GREAT HOTELS 
UNDER THE MANAGEMENT OF THE 

PALACE HOTEL COMPANY 



Hotel Argonaut 

Society of California Pioneers' Building 
Fourth St., near Market. 

|| California's Most Popular Hotel 

400 Rooms. 200 Baths. 

European Plan $1.00 per day and up. 

Dining Boom Seating 500 — Table d'hote 
or a la Carte Service, as desired. 



Special Sunday Dinner, 
Including Wine, $1.00. 



EDWARD R0LKIN 
Manager. 



GEO. A. DIXON 
Ass't M'g'r. 



HOTEL VON DORN 

242 Turk St., near Jones, San Francisco 




The Dining Room 



The hotel of many comforts and excellent 

service. Steel framed, Class "A" Fire 

Proof. Cafe of unusual merit. 

ATTRACTIVE TERMS TO PERMANENT GUESTS 




Vol. 1..W III— No. 1. 



SAX FBAJSCISQO, JULY 6, 1912. 



Price 10 Cents. 



Plaem English. 

By Americus. 

' w J 'I' IS t«i ho hoped t hut Mayor Kolph and the Board of Su- 
iVllv) pervisors realize that the engineering world is laughing 
_-MK-_ at San Francisco. 
Out municipality is 
the subject of intense 
mirth to real engineers. Jt 
isn 't that they snicker in 
their sleeves. Not at all. 
Their merriment is far more 
pronounced. They indulge 
in the Loudest guffaws. Why 
shouldn 't they? 

In the long history of 
municipal blunder! ug, has 
there ever been anything 
half as preposterous as the 
way the water problem has 
been muddled in San Fran- 
cisco by politicians calling 
themselves engineers? No- 
body else calls them that. 
What honest, capable, ex- 
perienced engineers say on 
l he subject wouldn 't fit 
well in the columns of a 
family newspaper. 

And the greatest joke of 
all is that this muddling 
and blundering of the wa- 
in- problem has already 
cost about two millions of 
dollars. 

Two million dollars' 
worth of Hetch Hetchy 
bonds have been sold, and 
the proceeds applied to 
financing the blunders and 
graft of the Engineer's De- 
partment. And the end is 
not yet — fay a long way! 

No wonder that competent and honest engineers indulge in 
guffaws every time Hetch Hetchy and the' Auxiliary Fire Pro- 
tection System of San Francisco are mentioned. 

But, let me tell you, the taxpayers of San Francisco are not 
laughing. And they will laugh less when they find their tax 




WHEN ONE GETS TIRED THE OTHER BEGINS. 



bills increasing instead of diminishing. 

The taxpayers know by bitter experience that in less than 
ten years the expenses of our city government have Increased 
from six millions of dollars to about thirteen millions. 

Over two millions of this waste of money can be charged 
directly to the Engineer's Department and many more millions 
to the Board of Works. 

The latest asinine suggestion for solving the muddled water 
problem is the appointment of a "commission." Hanson and 
Connick and Casey, and all the rest of them, having left the 

problem unfinished, if not 
in worse shape than when 
they begau at it, the mess 
is to be passed over to a 
"commission." That means 
a board of commissioners, 
with secretaries and mes- 
sengers and stenographers 
and experts to show them 
their business. These ex- 
peits will need the advice 
and assistance of other ex- 
perts, and between them an- 
other hole will be made in 
the public treasury bigger 
than one of the leaks in the 
Twin Peaks seive-reservoir 
that Connick built. 

Any person outside the 
Napa Asylum for the In- 
sane would naturally ask, 
"What are we paying the 
City Engineer and all his 
costly staff for 1 ?" 

Is a position under the 
municipal government mere- 
ly a soft snap, and is the in- 
cumbent expected to do 
nothing but draw his sal 
aryU 

it looks that way. Man- 
son makes no pretense of 
planning any important 
work himself. He turned 
over to Jiis assistant, Con- 
nick, the task of planning 
the Twin Peaks reservoir 
and laying the pipe for the 
Auxiliary Fire Protection System, Connick had no more ex- 
perience than Manson in that line of work, and the mechanical 
result is a sieve instead of a water-tight reservoir on Twin 
Peaks. The financial result is that the taxpayers willhave to 
pay many thousands of dollars to patch up the botched reser 



170038 



-THE WASP- 



[Saturday, July 6, 1912. 



voir, and in the end it would have been bet- 
ter, perhaps, to have pulled the whole badly 
constructed thing to pieces and started in 
over under the guidance of a thoroughly ex- 
perienced engineer. 

The Board of Works, and more particularly 
the engineering branch of it, seems to be con- 
ducted with a view to wasting as much as 
possible of the public money. The other day 
for instance, the Board of Supervisors decided 
to get plans for the extension of main water 
pipes to districts that need water badly. The 
moment the decision was reached by the Su- 
pervisors, in walks a deputy from the Engi- 
neer's Department to ask for $2,000 for mak- 
ing the- plans. Mind you, those plans are not 
to be used at once, but are only to be pre- 
pared and kept on file in the event of the 
city's concluding later on to pay the Spring 
Valley Water Company to extend its mains. 

Every conceivable excuse for tapping the 
treasury is used, and a person is compelled to 
conclude that the post of City Engineer is a 
sinecure. If any new work is to be done out- 
side experts must be hired and the cost piled 
up on the. already overburdened taxpayers. 

A few years ago we had the ' ' dollar limit. ' ' 
Now we have the "dollars unlimited," with 
the taxes going up by leaps and bounds. The 
bond habit has taken firm hold of municipal 
government, and money that comes so easily 
is apparently not worth taking any care of. 
Let everybody have a whack at it. 



MUCH NEEDED EXPOSE. 



FEOM many quarters The Wasp has receiv- 
ed commendations for its earnest and 
wholly disinterested efforts to bring 
about an investigation of the City Engineer 'a 
Department in San Francisco. 

When The Wasp began this task the work 
was most discouraging. A ring of political 
engineers had obtained full control and in the 
language of the street, had the Board of Su 
pervisors ' ' buffaloed. ' ' 

Any suggestion by an outside critic that 
the public money was being wasted in scan- 
dalous fashion was met by the answer, "You 
are an enemy of Heteh Hetchy. ■' 

An "enemy of Heteh Hetchy," of course, 
signified that the villain thus unmasked was 
a friend of poor old rotten Spring Valley. 

Boards of Supervisors are not usually noted 
for their erudition and are easily imposed up- 
on bj* pseudo-scientific gents- who follow the 
trade of political engineer or political doctor. 
A civil engineer 's calling appears to an un- 
educated Supervisor as a mysterious and semi- 
sacred calling, and he dreads to question any 



of its conclusions. As a matter of fact, good 
civil engineering is merely the application 
of good common sense and sound business 
judgment, guided by well-established princi- 
ples founded on experience. A successful civil 
engineer, like a successful business man of 
any kind, must possess a well-balanced mind 
to begin with. He must be thoroughly ground- 
ed in the technicalities of his profession. He 
must be honest. Such a man rarely makes 
politics his calling, and consequently you find 
but few honest and capable civil engineers 
connected with municipal governments. The 
majority of political engineers are tricksters, 




H. D. CONNICK 

Marsden Manson deputed Mm to build the Twin 
Peaks sieve reservoir. 

grafters or incompetents, who could not hold 
a first-class position under private employers. 
When any important engineering work has 
to be undertaken in a serious manner, and 
with a real purpose to accomplish something 
useful, municipalities are compelled to call 
in the aid of experts. That's why San Fran- 
cisco just now has the largest staff of special 
"experts" in any city in the world. 

Through the efforts of The Wasp alone, a 
public feeling has been created that the City 
Engineer 's Department in San Francisco 
needs investigation. It is under investigation 



now, and very soon the public may hear the 
conclusions of the. investigators. The latter 
are first-class engineers. They are men in 
whom the profession has full confidence. If 
these men tell frankly in their report, the 
whole truth about the City Engineer's De- 
partment in San Francisco, the public will 
be amazed. EveTy statement that The Wasp 
has made will be found more than verified. 
The mildest conclusion about the City Engin 
eer 's Department that can be reached is that 
it has been managed with gross incompetency. 
It would require pages to describe the things 
left undone that should have been done and 
the things done that never should have been 
attempted by the politicians masquerading 
as engineers for the municipality of San 
Francisco. 



MAYOR GAYNOR'S WISE WORDS. 

MAYOR GAYNOR -of New York, wheu 
asked what he thought of a President 
or a Governor, who leaves the pos- 
ition to which the people elected him and goes 
about making political speeches all over the 
country to get nominated, replied: "I would 
rather not tell you what I think about such 
a person. I have a notion, though, that he 
ought to attend to his official duties and let 
the rest take care of itself. What do I think 
of the initiative, the referendum and the re- 
call? It's quite a lingo, isn't it? Some 
people are in favor of it because they love 
the sound of it. As for referendum, we have 
more in this State than in any other State, 
more than in several States combined. Last 
fall we submitted nine to the vote of the 
people, and you remember what a mess was 
made of them. Only a very small minority 
took the trouble to vote on them either way. 
They were all beaten but one, wholly from 
lack of interest by the voters. They did not 
want to beat them. They just did not bother 
with them at all." 

Z + 

Where can you find a better advertising 
medium than THE WASP, reaching, as it 
does, over 5,000 society and club women? 
The women are the buyers. 



Neal liquor Cure 
Three wosSutterSt. 

DAY phone Franklin 1098 

ADOPTED BY AUSTRALIAN GOVERNMENT 



Thru Railroad Tickets 

Issued to All Parts of 

FOR PORTLAND 

1st class $10, $12, $15. 2d $6.00. Berth and Meals Included. 

The San Francisco and Portland S. S. Co. 

A. OTTINGER, General Agent. 



3 

BEAR 

BEAVER 

ROSE CITY 

Sailings Every 




United States, Canada and Mexico 

In Connection with These Magnificent Passenger Steamers 

FOR LOS ANGELES 

1st class $8.35. 2d class $5.35. Berth and Meals Included. 



Ticket Office, 722 Mkt., opp. Call. Ph. Sutter 2344 
8 East St., opp. Ferry Bldg. Phone Sutter 2482 
Berkeley Office 2105 Shattuck. Ph. Berkeley 331 



Saturday, July 6, 1912.J 



-THE WASP- 




BIRTH OF A NEW PARTY. 



W. A. D. 

THE Colonel, who, now unaided and alone, 
is governing the ^universe, was quoted 
as referring to Francis J. Heney as the 
"Wild Ass of the Desert." Hereafter Mr. 
Heney will be entitled to an alphabetical dis- 
play following his name, like a Fellow of the 
Royal College, etc. It can be written thus: 
"Francis J. Heney, W. A. D., which will pri- 
marily mean Roosevelt's classification, and 
will also suggest "wad" — meaning accumula- 
tion of money, invariably disdained by the 
Jleney school of reform. The last significance 
will bring to mind the Contra Costa Water 
Company's contribution of $32,000 for pure 
politics and civic righteousness, and other 
.sums produced by the elongation of the limb 
of Rudolph Spreckels. 



WE TOLD YOU SO. 



EFFICIENCY in the personnel of the Fire 
Department is compensating for some 
of the inefficiency in the personnel of 
the Engineering Department. It is the good 
fortune of the people that they have the ben- 
efit of any compensation. 

Samuel Bermingbam, Superintendent of En- 
gines in the fire Department, has completed 
changes in the two Auxiliary Fire Protection 
fire boats which have resulted in effecting a 
saving of half the fuel oil they have hereto- 
fore consumed. The saving in full expense 



made by the changes amounts to $500 month- 
ly, which is a good deal more than Mr. Ber- 
mingham's salary. The boats were made on 
original plans made by the City Engineer's 
Department, and cost more than twice as much 
as first-class fire-boats built for other cities. 
The saving which Mr. Bermingham's efficiency 
has made possible in their operations shows 
that the City Engineer's Department, besides 
wasting thousands of dollars of the public 
money in the construction of the fire-boats, 
designed them so that they would waste thou- 
sands more of the public money in smoke 
while tied up to the wharves waiting for 
water-front fires to call them into service. Let 
us hope the people will continue to have the 
services of Mr. Bermingham and of more like 
him. 

■ ♦ 

AN OVERSIGHT. 
The excellent picture of the Press Women's 
Breakfast given at the Cliff House on Tues- 
day last was the work of the well-known pho- 
tographers, Vaughn and Fraser. Owing to 
an oversight, credit was omitted in last week's 
issue, where it was justly due. 

♦ 

CANDY SENT TO THE COUNTRY.— A 
box of candy is always welcomed by friends 
in the country. Easily sent by express from 
any one of Geo. Haas & Sons' four candy 
stores. 

f 

All men are born equal, especially twins. 



DANGEROUS CONDITION. 

Crawford — "I hear he was operated upon. 
What did he have?" 
Crabshaw — ( ' Money. ' ' 



WHERE? 

A lady who gave herself great airs of im- 
portance, on being introduced to a gentleman, 
said, with a show of much indifference, ' ' 1 
think I have seen you somewhere." 

"Very likely," replied the gentleman, with 
equal sang froid, "I have been there fre- 
quently." 

♦ 

Many a man's idea of practicing economy 
is to preach it to his wife. 

The thick-skinned man is never impervious 
to the spur of the moment. 



WHAT TEDDY THINKS. 

I'm twice as great as Washington, 
I'm twice as great as Grant; 

Because third terms they didn't get, 
They needn't think I can't. 

I'm twice as great as Jefferson 

And Madison combined; 
I'm twice as great as all the lot 

Of Presidents, I find. 

I'm greater than my country 
And its customs and its laws; 

Its poor old Constitution, 
And its precedential flaws. 

I'm twice as great as any man 

Above or 'neath the sod; 
In fact, I'm half inclined to think 

I'm twice as great as God, 



THE WASP 



[Saturday, July 6, 1912. 




•WE SHOULD ONLY BE ASTONISHED AT STILL BEING ABLE TO BE ASTONISHED." — LA ROCHEFOUCAULD. 



LEADS TO ANARCHY. 

IT COST Los Angeles County upwards of 
$175,UUU to prosecute the cases against 
John J. and James B. McNaraara. This 
sum does not include the expenses of the trial 
of Clarence Darrow, now in pi ogress. It is 
said that only the Thaw trials in New York 
have exceeded the McNamara cases in their 
cost to a State. 

The Los Angeles Times building was de- 
stroyed, with a score of lives, on Oct. 1, 1910, 
and on Dec. 9, 1911, the McNamaras were 
sent to the penitentiary, after pleading guilty. 
Their apprehension and prosecution repres- 
ented an average daily outlay of $300 to the 
State. 

In addition to that outlay, a large sum was 
spent by the National Erectors' Association, 
for the detection of the murderers and the 
expusuie of the dynamite conspiracy to ter- 
rorize employers, and make them obedient to 
the structural iron workers wing of the Labor 
Trust. If the business men comprising the 
National Erectors' Association had not paid 
out of their own pockets for the employment 
of Detective Burns, the dynamiting of build- 
ings and the murdering of non-union men 
would probably have gone along as merrily 
as ever. 

These facts furnish material for a nice 
commentary on the existing conditions of 
Justice in the United States. Honest citizens 
can only count on protection of life and 
property by retaining private forces of guards 
and detectives. The State collects heavy 
taxes, ostensibly to protect life and property, 
but spends the money on everything but the 
enforcement of law and order. 

As the "Wasp has said hundreds of times, 
and intends to keep on saying it, things will 
go from bad to worse till honest people come 
to their senses and demand that judges shall 
be given their positions on the bench for life 
and be thus removed from the banal influ- 
ences of cheap polities. 

Under our present disgraceful judicial sys- 
tem we have a great number of poorly paid 
judges, who are compelled to be politicians' 
in order to hold their positions. 



We should have fewer judges, and they 
should get their positions for life, and be well 
paid and entitled to receive pensions on re- 
tiring from active service. 

Our present method of selecting judges it 
the surest road to eostly misgovernment and 
eventually must lead to eivil war. It cannot 
be changed too soon for the good of all honest 
citizens, who prefer law and order to anarchy. 



NO WEDDING BELLS FOR ±xilE. 

NOTWITHSTANDING the assaults made 
on it in Portland this week by Anarch 
ette Goldman, the government still lives. 
Miss Goldman is unalterably opposed to gov- 
ernment; she says "Christianity is the per- 
nicious system through which slavery is per- 
petuated," and she tells us that marriage is a 
degiadation from which women should at once 
free themselves. Miss Goldman is especially 
bitter against the marriage relation; she is on 
the sunset side of 40, and has not been mar- 
ried once. 

This entertaining anarchette would have 
men and women practice an unlegalized po- 
lygamy and polyandry. She would have a 
woman choose a mate, or as many mates as 
she pleased, and, generous soul that she is, 
she would give men the same privilege. Miss 
Goldman believes that nothing is so destruct- 
ive of freedom as monogamy; she views with 
alarm the continued servitude of the woman 




who has the execrable taste to marry but 
one man and remain enslaved to and by him 
as the mother of his children and the abject 
ruler of his home. It pains her exceedingly 
to note how the sacrificial bride willingly 
goes to the altar, -and there swears allegiance 
to one man, when she could, by following 
the Goldman creed, pick and choose as often 
as she liked among the sons of men. And 
Anarchienne Goldman has a very profound 
contempt for the smirking, pusillanimous 
bridegroom who takes one woman for better 
or worse, till death does them part, when lie 
might, like the brightly painted butterfly, 
flit from flower to flower in the garden of 
love. 

Miss Goldman would make of the world 
one great redlight district. But before judg- 
ing too harshly, remember that this poor 
middle aged woman flunks she must live. 
And the thought of work revolts her. So she 
talks anarchy, and tells us that "Christianity 
: s a pernicious system," and would destroy 
the very foundation of society — and takes up 
:i collection at meetings. — Portland Spectator. 



MISS ELEANORA SEABS OUTDONE 

Snapshot of a noted society woman on an 
Eastern polo field. 



WILLIAMS 


-AND- 


HUMBERT 


SHERRIES 


JEREZ, SPAIN 


For Quality, the Best. 


Nine Grades 


Charles Meinecke & Co. 


Agent* 


314 Sacramento St. San Francisco 






tiC -^M? * 







A.mi; BEN ('. TBUMAN, 
whose memory goes back 
with the utmost ease to 
tin- "days when the wa- 
ter came up to Montgoni- 
,eij Istroot," is writing 
for the Loe Angeles 
Graphic :i series of arti- 
ti famous pioneers. He lias no words 
to spare for the late Unit 
Senator .James (.;. Fair, or 
by which nickname the sue- 
man was known along the 
fhe Major 




eles 

of praise 

oil States 

' ' Slippery Jim. 

ri'sst'nl mining 

Yuba river sixty-eight years ag< 

describes Fair as an accomplished prevaricator, 

who could almost outdo Colonel Roosevelt 

with an even start. 

A Gifted Prevaricator. 

.litn Fair "lied systematically about the 
smallest matters," Major Ben asserts. "If 
he went to Virginia City from Keno in his 
private conveyance, he would assure the 
household that he had arrived by train. When 
he started for Carson he always gave out 
that he had business in Truckee, and if he 
attended a horse race he would go home and 
regale his family with the minute details of 
a cock fight. In the morning he would call 
up his servant for his black suit and after 
I he man was out of sight Fair would hide 
the black suit and put on a pepper and salt 
attire. Hitch up the team and take me down 
to the Union, we would say, and then slip off 
on foot to the Savage. He would often stop 
men on the street and tell them that Mackay 
wanted to see them in the Curry office, when 
he knew that Mackay was in San Francisco." 

v* t£* *£** 

Dreaded the Brigands. 

There might have been more than "lying 
for the mere lust of prevarication" in these 
perversions of truth by the old Senator. 
There were a number of enterprising gentle- 
men hanging around the Comstoek and Car- 
son in those days that wouldn't mind doing 
a bit of brigandage even on the person of a 
prospective Senator of the United States. It 
was well known in Virginia City that a plot 
to seize Fair and carry him off in the moun- 
tains and hold him for ransom was once 
formed by some desperate characters. The 
late Dan O'Connell, the poet, wrote in col- 
laboration with a rich San Francisco man of 
literary tastes a novel in which this scheme 
to make away with Fair was used as an inci- 
dent. 

Major Truman mentions that it cost Fair 
over $5,000,000 to get a divorce from his good 
wife, the mother of Mrs. Hermann Oelriehs 
and Mrs. Win. K. Vanderbilt Jr. The Major 's 
memory needs refreshing on this and other 



NOTICE. 

AH communications relative to social news 
should be addressed "Society Editor WaBp, 121 
Second Street, S. F.," and should reach this office 
not later than Wednesday to insure publication 
in the issue of that week. 



particulars in his narrative. Senator Fair 
and his wife separated while the Senator 
was still in the Senate. Mrs. Fair left him, 
and a settlement was agreed on. Neither Fair 




MES. EDWIN STADTMULLER 

President of Channing, and very prominent in 
literary circles. 

nor his wife married again, though it was 
thought likely that both would remarry. 

De Mortuis Nil Nisi Bonum. 

In these reminiscences of old pioneers, Ma- 



jor Truman injects more gall and wormwood 
in his ink-bottle than the subjects call for. 
Old Senator Fair, with all his shortcomings, 

had his good points, too. When he died he 
remembered some of his old cronies, and left 
them enough to keep the wolf from the door 
When the old Nevada Bank, owing to specu- 
lation in wheat, became suddenly short of 
ready money, Fair, to oblige his former part 
nets, turned in $4,000,000 of his coin and re 
lieved the dangerous strain on the bank's 
finances. The old Senator and his wife and 
most of their friends of pioneer days passed 
from the scenes of their worldly joys and 
sorrows. Bequiescat in pace! 

In the Royal Enclosure. 

The American Embassy at London is always 
seized with apprehension when Ascot Day 
approaches. It has become the rule that the 
English sovereign shall visit Ascot to see the 
races. Rich Americans are eager to obtain 
admission to the royal enclosure at Ascot, 
and the necessary vouchers of proper society 
status are only to be obtainer through the 
American Embassy. The Embassy make up 
the list and submits it to the Lord Chamber- 
lain, and usually thousands of applicants are 
remorselessly ' ' turned down. ' ' The W. H. 
Croekers and M. H. de Youngs and the Mrs. 
Bruguiere and Louis Bruguiere were amongst 
those admitted to the royal enclosure this 
year. As only a few people can be admitted 
at all, the unlucky American Ambassador is 
placed annually in a most unpleasant predica- 
ment by the anxiety of his countrymen and 
countrywomen to get in touch with royalty. 
It is such a wonderful thing for good repuh 
lieans to boast about when they reach home 
that they were allowed to get within hailing 
distance of a king. But it is one of the pe- 
puliarities of human nature that we always 
appreciate most highly what we don 't and 



HOTEL 

DEL 
MONTE 


oMte^ 


PACiric 

GROVE 
MOTEL 

Pacific Grove 


BOTH HOUSES UNDER 
SAME MANAGEMENT 

Address: 

H. E. WAENEE, 

Del Monte, - California 


A beautiful summer 

home at 
very moderate rates 


A tasty, comfortable 

family hotel. 
Low monthly rates 


^w 



-THE WASP- 



[Saturday, July 6, 1912. 




can 't possess. Multimillionaires may rub 
shoulders at home, but our only assets in 
the shape of crowned heads are those of carni- 
val kings and queens dressed up in their buf- 
foon attire for the greatness and glory of a 
rose festival at Potato Flat or a church bene- 
fit at Goon Greek. 

After the Ascot meeting the popularity of 
the American Ambassador and his secretaries 
is at such low ebb that he couldn 't be elected 
poundmaster by the votes of the American 
aristocracy in Europe for the summer. That 
is one of the disadvantages of holding high 
office in a republic. 

California Well Represented. 

At the recent Ascot meeting California had 



YOUR FAMILY 

SILVERSMITH 



Every family at some time or another 
needs something in the silverware line, or 
has articles to be repaired or matched, or 
jewelry to be fixed, and doubtless would 
be glad to know of an absolutely reliable 
house, where the charges are right. Such 
a house is the John O. Bellis Silverware 
Factory, 328 Post street, San Francisco, 
w T here all wants of this nature can be sup- 
plied at reasonable cost. The firm enjoys 
the confidence of some of the most promi- 
nent families of the State. A feature of 
their business is the altering, resetting or 
entirely reconstructing of old family jew- 
elry into modern styles. It is wonderful 
what transformation can be wrought on 
your old trinkets at trifling expense with- 
out impairing any of their sentimental 
value. 

For staple goods, such as toilet articles, 
tableware, etc., this .firm cannot be sur- 
passed on the Pacific Coast, while their 
trophy cups and presentation pieces made 
to order are without peers. A visit of in- 
spection at 328 Post St. (Union Square) is 
invited. 



CASTING FOE ACCURACY. 

more representation in the royal enclosure than 
any dozen other States except New York. 
Ambassador Reia's wife is a Calif ornian, and 
the Ambassador may be classed as one, though 
he was born in Ohio. Ambassador Reid'e so- 
cial position and influence have been much 
superior to those of most American Ministers 
in Europe. First of all, he is a man of edu- 
cation and ability, and besides that is very 
rich. His wife, a daughter of the late D. 0. 
Mills, is exceedingly wealthy. In Europe the 
old military prejudice against people whose 
money was acquired "in trade" still exists, 
though in a much less degree in England than 
in Germany and Austria. Ambassador Reid is 
not affected by that prejudice, and his wife is 
the daughter of a banker. It would be diffi- 
cult to find any citizen better qualified to fit 
easily and comfortably into the position of 
Ambassador at an European court. Ambassa- 
dor Reid, therefore, wields much influence in 
his official position. 

The average American diplomat in Europe 
is not an object of awe or admiration to the 
natives or his countrymen abroad. Experi- 
enced American travelers shake their heads 
dubiously when reference is made to our dip- 
lomatic service in Europe. 

Mrs. Leeds' Magnificence. 

Mrs. Leeds intends to supplement her social 
triumphs in Europe by lavish entertainment at 
Newport this summer. After the Ascot 

POWER OF MONET 

Cannot be overestimated. Money and the 
lack of it divides the world into two classes. 
To which class do you belong? Every mem- 
ber of the Continental Building & Loan Asso- 
ciation belongs to the Money Class. 

The CONTINENTAL BUILDING AND 
LOAN ASSOCIATION, Market street, at Gold- 
en Gate avenue, can be of assistance to you in 
getting the home. 

EDWABD SWEENEY, President. 

WM. CORBIN, Secty. and Gen. Mgr. 



meeting, she closed her London house and 
packed her jewels, which have dazzled Euro- 
pean society. When in full array at a great 
London function, this American widow has 
worn over a million dollars' worth of jewels. 
Her Chicago husband 's vast wealth, which 
she is spending so liberally, was made in rail- 
roads and the Diamond Match industry. Since 
his death there have been rumors that the 
widow would marry a title, but the man who 
seems to be most in*the lady's confidence is 
Moncure Robinson of New York. At the 
magnificent dance which she gave recently in 
Paris, Mr. Robinson never left her side for 
a moment, but the gossips were unable to de- 
cide whether sueh jealous guardianship was 
due to a romantic attachment or a prudent, 
regard for the personal safety of his fair 
friend, bedecked with a million dollars' worth 
of diamonds, pearls, rubies and emeralds. At 
this dance, where Mrs. Leeds outshone all 
her guests, the cotillion favors for the women 



HOTEL 

VENDOME 

San Jose, Cal. 



One of California's 
Show Places Where 
Homelikeness Reigns 



H. W. LAKE, Manager 



Saturday, July 6, 1912. J 



-THE WASP- 



were fine hats by celebrated Eue de la Pais 
milliners. The men received gold match box- 
The superb stomacher which Mrs. Leeds 
wore at this Paris affair, had been bought at 
(■artier's for $140, When the hostess en- 
tered the ball room, almost covered wild 
Magnificent gems, the gnosis held their breath. 
'I'lic elaborate and costly gowus and jewelry 
of other WMiiicn. which would otherwise have 
hem widely diBcnssed, passed almost unno- 

ii 1. Only one hundred and fifty invitations 

in the cotillion had been issued, for it was 
intended i" be a very exclusive affair. 

At Ascot. 

In enumerating the prominent society wo- 
men that attended the Asco1 race meeting, 
which brings out the wealth and fashion of 
London in their best clothes, and is attended 
by the English Sovereign and his royal part- 
ies, t lie London society reporters mentioned 
Mis. W. II. Crocker and Miss Crocker of San 
Francisco. The Crockers stopped in London 
In see the horse show at Olympia, which was 
n great affair, and the Ascot meeting, which 
is one of the greatest society events of the 
year in England. King George was cheered 
when he showed himself at Ascot, and the 
newspapers were somewhat surprised by the 
applause :is the King has not been treated 
llnis far by the British public with as much 



Jules Restaurant 

Special Lunches 50c. or a la Carte 

Ladies' Grill and Rooms for Parties 

REGULAR FRENCH DINNER WITH 

WINE, $1.00. 

Vocal and Instrumental Music. 

MONADNOCK BUILDING 

Next to Palace Hotel 

Phone Kearny 1S12. 

All Cars Pass the Door. Elevator Service. 



Contracts made with Hotels and Restaurants. 

Special attention given to Family Trade 

ESTABLISHED 1876. 

THOMAS MORTON & SON 

Importers and Dealers in 

COAL 

N. W. Cor. EDDY & HYDE, San Francisco. 

Phone Franklin 897. 



ASSESSMENT NOTICE. 



THE FRESNO AND EASTERN RAILROAD COM- 
PANY, a corporation organized under the laws of 
the Slate of California, principal place of business 
San Frnnrisco, California. 

Notice is hereby given that at a meeting of the 
Directors held on the 1st day of July, 1912, an as- 
sessment nf thirty (30) cents a share was levied on 
I tie capital stock of the corporation, payable on or 
before the fifth day of August, 1912, to the Treas- 
urer of this Company, at the office of said company, 
No. 771 Monadnock Building. San Francisco, Cali- 
fornia: and that all Assessments upon this stock 
that shall remain unpaid on the fifth day of August, 
1912, shall "he delinouent and advertised for sale 
at public auction, and unless payment is made be- 
fore, shall be sold on the twentieth day of August, 
1912, to pay the delinquent assessment together 
with the cost of advertising and expenses of sale. 
A. B. DODD, Secretary. 
No. 771 Monadnock Building, San Francisco, 
California. 



Cordiality as was generally shown to bis 
father, King I'M ward. 

Sportsman's Paradise, 

A San Francisco correspondent of the Oak- 
Inn. 1 Tribune, commenting on the Pelican Bay 
[pun-lia.se by Herbert and Mortimer Fleish- 
hacker, S. O. Johnson, George X. Wendling 
and W. P. Johnson, all of this city, says that 
they pai.l $152,000 for the Pelican Bay sum- 
mer home of the late Edward 11. Harriman, 
near Klamath Palls, Oregon. It is in the 
.•enter of one of the greatest fishing, duck 
hunting and game regions of the United 
States. Harriman spent about $28,000,000 on 
i he place, including the cost of buildings and 
grounds, and got only a three weeks' outing 
there for two summers in succession before 
he died. The new owners paid about the 
same price for the 1,000 acres in the place as 
did Harriman. The latter spent in addition 
a large sum creating an automobile road 
about thirty miles in length, reaching almost 
to Crater Lake. It also cost him $35,000 to 
run a telephone line to the resort from Weed, 
this State. Other extravagances, which he 
could afford, were also indulged in by him. 
The magnate was in love with the place. Had 
he lived, he would unquestionably have spent 
thousands more there and made journeys to 
it every summer. The new owners are finan- 
cially able to handle and improve the prop- 
erty, because jointly they are worth millions 
and have other large interests in Southern 
Oregon. Unlike Harriman, however, they do 
not have the strenuous life that caused him, 
whether in his loafing or in his fishing and 
hunting there, to receive between 9 a. m. and 
3 p. m., New York time, hourly messages, via 
San Francisco, from the East about the vary- 
ing movements in the stock and financial 
markets. Friends sought to persuade him to 
cut himself off. 

Special Luncheon Featured. 

When the question of "Where shall I 
dine?" arises, one's thoughts naturally turn 
to Tait's. Dining at this famous establish- 
ment is "quite the thing 1 ' nowadays. At no 
other cafe in town is enjoyment more thorough 
than it is here. On entering this establish- 
ment you immediately "sense" the charm of 
the place, and you are filled with the Bohe- 
mian spirit that pervades the atmosphere. 
Here even the blase, languid idler is roused 
to enthusiasm. And there's always a repre- 
sentative gathering of the smart folk at this 
cafe. One comes to Tait's to see and to be 
seen. The management is featuring a special 
luncheon every day, and it's well worth the 
half dollar asked for it. 

&?* <^* Cff* 

Victor Herbert will be one of the distin- 
guished guests at the Bohemian Grove when 
"The Atonement of Pan" is given. 

♦ 

AN IMPORTANT ITEM 
In every picnic basket should be a couple of 
split bottles of Italian-Swiss Colony TIPO 
(red or while). TIPO makes a cold lunch 
palatable. 



Art & Refinement are displayed In Tasteful Attire. 




-MAKERS OF- 



LADIES' GOWNS and FANCY 
COSTUMES 

420ISUTTER STREET. NEAR STOCKTON. 
Phone DOUGLAS 4964 

• AN FRANCISCO. CAL. 



DR. H. J. STEWART 

Begs to announce that he has removed his music 
studio to the Gaffney Building, 376 Sutter Street. 
between Grant Avenue and Stockton Street. 
Office hours, from ten to twelve, and from two to 
four, daily. 

Telephone Douglas 4211. 



LOUIS CREPAUX 

MEMBER PARIS GRAND OPERA 



iraPHOITKrlCHOOL 



FOR SINGING AND SPEECH 

French phonetics, configuration and placing_ of 
the phonetic sounds enabling the scholar to sing 
or Bpeak in French with the purest "Indre et 
Loire' ' accent. 

French repertoire in songs from Lully to 
Debussy. Italian tone placing, voweling and 
syllabation. Italian repertoire in songs from 
Oarissimi to Puccini. Studio recitals. 

251 Post St., 4th Floor Mercedes Building, 

Reception hours — 11:45 to 12, and 8 to 4, ex- 
cept Wednesday. Wednesday in Maple Hall, 
Oakland. 



"How to get rich quick" we know not; 
How to teach languages, we do know. 



To improve your mother tongue, 
study a sister tongue. 

THE LARCHER AND MOE 
School of Languages 

CALL OR SEND FOR OIROCLAR, 

162 Post Street at Grant Avenue. 

Office Phone, Douglas 2859 



TRANSLATION FROM AND INTO ANT 
LANGUAGE. 



HEALDS 

BUSINESS COLLEGES 

HOME OFFICE -425 M C AI.L1STER 5T..S.F. 



10 



-THE WASP- 



[Saturday, July 6, 1912. 




PAUL J. RAINEY'S AFRICAN HUNT. 
Scene from the wonderful sportsman's African expedition, to be shown in motion pictures at the 

Cort Sunday. 



Fair Lillian's Age. 

It was supposed that Lillian Russell's latest 
marriage license would settle the much-disput- 
ed question of her exact age. In getting the 



San Francisco 
Sanatorium 

specializes in the scientific care 
"of liquor oases. suitable and 
convenient home in one of san 
francisco's finest residential 
districts is afforded men and 
women while recuperating from 
overindulgence. private rooms, 
private nurses and meals served 
in rooms. no name on building, 
terms reasonable. 

San Francisco Sanatorium 

Phone Franklin 7470 1911 Van Ness Ave. 
H. L. BATCHELDER, Manager. 



license she gave her birthplace as Clinton, la., 
and the date of her birth as December 4th, 
1865. There are doubting Thomases who still 
assert that the question of "Miss" Russell's 
age is unsettled and that she is well over the 
50-year mark, instead of being three years on 
the right side of it. Seldom has an actress 
been so baited over her marriage as was Lil- 
lian after her recent wedding. "You've 
changed husbands several time's, haven't 
you?" said William Collier to her on the 
stage. "Who's the latest? What's your 
name now?., he asked a minute later, and 
Miss Russell retired to the wing while the au- 
dience shouted for more. They got it. When 
Fields and Weber appeared Collier inquired, 
"Where's Alec?" Lillian had to confess that 
she did not know, and when AVeber appeared 
introduced Field as "Alec's little brother." 
John Kelley took a hand later. "New mono- 
gram on your china?" lie inquired, as he 



handled some large stage crockery. "An M? 
You don't spell Moore with an M, do you?" 
"The M is for Me," replied Miss Russell. 
Just before the curtain descended on the last 
act Miss Russell was deluged with rice and 
old slippers. 

i5* tS* «,3* 

The Army Well Represented. 

Lieutenant Charles Sherman Hoyt, who 
married Miss Poorman, is one of the bost- 
liked men in the army. He is a member of 
the distinguished Sherman family. Among 
the army officers in attendance at the wedding 
was Philip Sheridan, Jr., son of "Phil" Sher- 
idan of the famous ride. Lieutenant Sher- 
idan and Lieutenant Hoyt were in West 
Point at the same time, and the hazing of 
Sheridan will long be remembered. It goes 
without saying that he was compelled to give 
a good imitation of the great ride. He rode 
many miles — on a broomstiek. He is quite 
a dignified member of society now, having 
gained through his own charming personality 
and his famous name, many enviable positions 
in the service, among which was an appoint 
ment on the President's staff during part of 
Roosevelt 's reign. 

Mrs. Jobn D. Spreckels, wife of the San 
Francisco and San Diego magnate, has just 
made the trip from San Diego to San Francis- 
co by automobile. A party of friends accom- 
panied her. 

Mr. and Mrs. Achille Roos of San Franciscu 
are spending the summer at the Hotel Potter. 
The wedding of Mr. and Mrs. Roos was one of 
the early events of the year. 



Any Victrola 

On Easy Terms 



Whether you get the new low price 
Victrola at $15 or the Victrola "de 
luxe" at $200, get a Victrola. At a 
very small expense you can enjoy a 
world of entertainment. Victrolas $15 
to $200. Any Victrola on easy terms. 



Sherman Ray & Co. 

Sheet Music and Musical Merchandise. 
Stelnway and Othtr Pianos. 
Apollo and Cecillan Player Pianos 

Victor Talking Machines. 

KEARNY AND SUTTER STREETS, 

SAN FRANCISCO. 

14TH & CLAY STS., OAKLAND. 



Saturday, July 0, 1912. | 



-TNEWASP- 



ii 



A Beautiful Wedding. 

Society !•• still discussiug the wedding <>i 
beautiful Mrs. Samuel Hopkins. Ii was an 
ideal wedding, and Elysse Sohultz was a pic- 
ture bride. Her dainty Juliet cap, adorned 
with ii> orange blossoms, was decidedly be- 
coming to her sweet face, and set off hei 
beauty '.'.Hi! ;i charm that was adorable. Her 
bridal robe >>i exquisite white satin with its 
rich lace garniture was increased in beauty 
h_v the court train, which gave dainty Elysse 
the grace of a duchess. Mrs. Harold Law, the 
bride's sister, was the personification of grace 
in her gown of pink, which set off her beauty. 
Miss Enid Gregg, always charming, always 
fascinatingly beautiful, was dressed in a light- 
er shade of pink, as were also the other hand 
some bridesmaids, Ethel Gregg, Sallie Fox, 
Alice Warner of Del Monte, Cora Kennedy of 
Sac. Jose, Their picture hats were beautiful. 

One of the unusual events of the reception 
was the marquee which had ben built on the 
lawn at the Schultz home. Here dancing was 
enjoyed amid a perfect bower of blossoms. 
A mass cf 'jptk blooms concealed the buffet, 
where tin- supper was served. 

Mr. and .Mrs. Samuel Hopkins have launch- 
ed upon their married life with the loving 
and generous gifts of many friends, who were 
lavish in their presents to this happy couple. 

One of the handsomest gowns at the wed- 
ding was worn by the bride's mother, Mrs. 
Schultz. It was of white satin, made with a 
court train of regal black velvet and trimmed 
in I'hiffon. 

Mr, John Gallois, the best man, and the 
ushers — Ferdinand Theiiot, Kenneth Moore, 
Stuart Lowry and Charles Freeborn Hopkins, 
cousin of the groom — were ideal in the parts 
1 hey represented in this picturesque wedding. 
Another touch of interest was in the giving 
away of the bride, the part essayed by Mr. 
William A. Schultz, grandfather of the bride. 

Mrs. Samuel Hopkins' going-away gown 
was a beautiful creation of Parisian design. 
It was an exquisite shade of old blue, with 
suggestions of cerise. A cerise hat adorned 
with French blue plumes completed the cos- 
tume. The going-away touring car in which 



PUCKETT'S 
COLLEGE of DANCING 

A More Beautiful Ballroom 
Could Hardly be Conceived 



Classes — Mondays. Assemblies — Fridays 
Advance Class and Social — Wednesdays 

PRIVATE LESSONS 



ASSEMBLY HALL 

1268 SUTTER STREET 

between Van Ness and Polk 
Hall for Rent Phone Franklin 118 




1 1 mployes i liat ii was "a typical Engli b 

hotel,' ' and asked i he name of t he Engli; b 
manager. The reply was thai the manager 
was a German, and furthermore that there 
isn't a first-class hotel in London that is run 
by an Englishman. The leading hotels are all 
managed by foreigners, with the Swiss and 
Germans in the lead. The reason of this su- 
premacy is that hotel-keeping is the main in- 
dustry in Switzerland, and the Germans un 
dertake to master the hotel business with the 
same patient, systematic industry which they 
apply to all their work. Eivery German waiter 
is trained for his calling according to an es 
tablished rule, and when he has mastered all 
the branches of the trade and acquired a 
working knowledge of English he heads for 
America if he doesn't go back from London 
or Paris to the Fatherland to manage a hotel 
or restaurant. English-speaking waiters who 
learn their business in a haphazard fashion 
have no chance at all in competition with the 
systematic and thoroughly trained Germans. 
Swiss hotel-keepers in Geneva and Lucerne 



Vaughn and Fraser Photo 
MRS. SAMUEL HOPKINS (nee Sohultz) ONE OF THE MOST BEAUTIFUL JUNE BRIDES. 



the bride and groom left on their bridal jour- 
ney was one of the gifts from Mr. E. W. Hop- 
kins, father of the groom. Mrs. E. W. Hop- 
kins' gift was a breakfast service of silver. 
The sisters of Mr. Hopkins presented an ele- 
gant silver dinner service. Mr. and Mrs. Au- 
gustus Taylor, Mr. and Mrs. William Taylor 
Jr., Mr. and Mrs. Frederick MeNear, and Mr. 
and Mrs. J. Cheever Cowden were the donors 
of this magnificent present. A complete ser- 
vice of flat silver for eighteen covers, suita- 
ble for any occasion, was an additional gift 
of Mr. Hopkins. The present from Samuel 
Hopkins to his bride was an exquisite pearl 
chain, from which was suspended a diamond 
plaque. This gem was the only bit of jewelry 
worn to the altar by the bride. 

All-Conquering Swiss and Germans. 

Otto Haeberli, who has taken the place of 
Victor Reiter as maitre d 'hotel of the' Palace 
and Fairmont, is a Swiss. Switzerland and 
Germany have conquered the hotel world. An 
American waiter in any fashionable New York 
hotel or restaurant is almost as rare as an 
Indian in war paint on Fifth avenue. A well- 
known Californian who was stopping at a 
Loudon hutel recently remarked to one of 



ANTIQUE EFFECTS 



Iffif 




1 


tgtf ;^| 





can be obtained 
with Garden Fur- 
niture in Pompeii an 
Stone. We pro- 
duce Fountains, 
Seats, Pots, Vases, 
Benches, Tables, 
Sun Dials, etc. 

Sarsi Studios 

123 OAK STREET 

Near Fianklyo 

San Francisco, CaL 



Ask your Dealer for 

GOODYEAR "HIPPO" HOSE 



Guaranteed to stand 
700 lbs. Pressure 



The Best and strongest 
Garden Hose 




TRY IT AND BE CONVINCED 



GOODYEAR RUBBER COMPANY 

R. H. PEASE. Pres. 589-591-S93 Market St., Sao Franci, 



12 



-THEWASP- 



[Saturday, July 6, 1912. 




SCENE FROM DAVID EELASCO'S PRODUCTION OF "MADAME BUTTERFLY" 
Which will be staged at the Orpheum nest week, beginning at the matinee Sunday, July 7th. 



conduct their business like a chamber of com- 
merce. They have regular meetings, and plan 




Established 1853. 
Monthly Contracts, 51.60 per Month. 

NEW WORKS JUST ERECTED AT 27 
TENTH ST, S. P. 

Largest and Most Uup-to -Date on Pacific 
Coast. 

Wagon* call twice daily. 

Cleaning Dainty Garments Our Specialty 

F. Thomas Parisian Dyeing & 
Cleaning Works 



their annual campaigns to catch the tourist 
dollars and pounds sterling, like the members 
<>f a gieat steel trust arranging all the nice- 
ties ot" a price-list calculated to gel every 
nickel in sight. 

A Charming Bride. 

Mrs. Frances Thornton Roe, who married 
Charles Thierot, ihe New York broker, spends 
several months of each year in California. 
She is the daughter of John Calhoun Thornton, 
a Southerner, of the well-known Thornton 
family, who amassed a large fortune in mines 
in Montana. The Thorntons are extremely 
popular in Butte, Montana, where they live 
part of the time, having a house in New York 
and a country place in Long Island. Mrs. 
Thierot appeared at a Oreenway dance dur- 
ing one of her periodical visits to San Fran 
Cisco, and she had all the men at her feet, 
for shf certainly looked most ■■hie and dazzling 



in a lovely, shining, shimmering, golden gown. 
Her sisiovs are Mrs. Oxnard, who lives in 
Southern California, and Mrs. Wales of San 
Mateo, who recently married Major Wales, 
an army officer, who has now retired, but a 
short time ago was stationed at the Presidio 
of Monteiey, 

& v *5 „< 

Mrs. Clrarles W. Clark of San Mateo, while 
awaiting t he arrival of her husband from Am- 
erica, has been stopping at the Ritz Hotel, 
London. 



5% per month 

SAVED on the investment by buying 

THE 

Alaska Refrigerator 

900,000 SOLD SINCE 1878 

We have a Test Refrigerator to prove what we 
claim for it Please call and see it. 

Paciric Coast Agents 

W. W. MONTAGUE & CO. 



557-563 Market Street 



San Francisco 



MORSE 

Detective and Patrol 

Service 



fcJV PERATIVES i» full dress furnished for 
[raJ ft weddings, receptions and other social 
I functions. Uniformed officers supplied 
as ticket takers for balls, dances and 
entertainments at reasonable rates. 
Patrolmen to protect property against fire and 
depredations of thieves during absence of owner. 
Engage in all branches of legitimate detective 
service and serve legal papers in difficult cases. 



602 California St., San Francisco 

Telephone Kearny 3153. Homephone C 2626 



Murphy Grant & Co. 

JOBBERS OF DRY GOODS 



NEW GOODS CONSTANTLY 
ARRIVING AND ON SALE 
AT OUR NEW BUILDING 

134-146 Bush St. N.E. Cor. Sansome, S.F. 



SPRING WOOLENS NOW IN 

H. S. BRIDGE & CO. 

TAILORS and IMPORTERS of WOOLENS 



108-110 SUTTER STREET 

French American E 
try Fourth Flo 

SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 



above 
Montgomery 



French American Bank Bld'g 
Fourth Floor 



Saturday, July G, 1912.] 



-THE WASP- 



13 



Can Genius Live in Peace? 



A New Light on the Ideal Life o( the Brownings. 



Till] unraveling oj the tangle in tin- do- 
mestic affairs of the Tullys has served 

it* a text f i:in\ lay preachers of 1 1 * * - 

press. Can ;i literary couple agree! Es il 
possible i"! ill.' bird of peace to roost perma- 
nently above tlieii bearthl In discussing tins 
difficult conundrnm numerous references bave 
been made to tin- "blissful married life of 
the Brownings." Whenever ;i literary couple 
.il' high repute appear upon the threshold "i 
ill*- divorce court the shades of the Brown- 
ings are called up from their dust and ashes 
to bear witness that domestic happiness and 
literaiy power are not incompatible beneath 
the same roof. Many are the boots that have 

I n written Mi, the Brownings, and many 

more, it is t<i be feared, will come from the 
press tn lumber the shelVes of the libraries. 
KviMi while this is being written another tome 
mi the famous couple is finding its way to 
readers on this Bide of the Atlantic. The au- 
thor is M iss Lillian Whiting, and Little, I IroTv u 
& in. are the publishers of the book, which 
attempts to amuse interest in the narrative 
df the Brownings' lives, despite the fact that 
everything worth telling about them has long 
since been put in print. 

Miss Whiting sees the Brownings only from 
tin' standpoint "t' an adorer, in the first few 
chapters the admirer takes up the separate lives 
of the twit subjects. We see the young Brown- 
ing among his father's 6,000 books, steeping 
himself in literature. He was a young man 
with ' ' a certain ivory delicacy of coloring." 
lie appeared taller than he really was, partly 
because of his rare grace of movement and 
partly from a characteristic high poise of the 
head when listening intently to music or con- 
vcrsation. His hair was so beautiful 

in its heavy, picturesque waves as to attract 
frequent attention. Another and more subtle 
personal charm was his voice, then with a rare, 
Butelike tone, clear, sweet, resonant. He had 
I he advantages of travel. 

Elizabeth Barrett, the fortunate girl who 
was fated to wed this superhuman, was one of 
eleven children. She grew up in a large coun- 
try house, and, .like her future husband, was 
immersed in much reading; but she came into 
little contact with the outside world, a fact 
she bemoans in one of her letters to Brown- 
ing: "How willingly would I exchange some 
of this ponderous, helpless knowledge of books 
for some experience of life." Nevertheless, 
she, too, was becoming :i light in the maga- 
zines and monthlies, though few people had 
met her or been admitted to her father's 
house. 

Presently we fiind Robert Browning, super- 
man, and Elizabeth Barrett, blue-stocking, 
launched on their full life together, and from 
there on Miss Whiting paints their existence 
from a full palette. She quotes discriminat- 
ingly from their poems and introduces all 
their friends, including Tennyson, Carlyle. Toe. 



and other start* ol the litei [i i \ firmament. Ten- 
nyson reads "Maud," and pauses now and 
then tn remark feelingly, "There's a wonder- 
ful touch, ' ' :i n;i ie\ eie i h.'it • • capt i\ ated ' ■ 
Mis. Browning, who wrote in Mrs. Tennyson 
thai he had left ;■ voice crying out "Maud" 
to them, "helping the ffect of the poem by 
the personality, (so) that it's an increase of 
joy and life to US forever." As lor Carlyle, 
Mrs. P.i. i uniiig found him ' ' highly pictures 
que" in conversation. To I'"". win. -en; her 

;> volume «if his i ms with mi inscription on 

the fly-leaf declaring her to be "the noblest 
of her sex, ' ' she replied, she laughingly 
stntes, ''Sir, you are the must d (scorning of 
yours. 

The plane mi which Miss Whiting depicts 
I he Brownings moving in serene dignity, like 







AN IMPRESSIONIST AT WORK. 

demigods, superior to (he pettiness ami ex 
aspei :i I ions of present -day life, is far too 
lofty to be reached by any literaiy people, 
married or unmarried, that 1 happen to know 
or have ever met. 

It. is astonishing how different two women 
can view another member of the sex. To 
Miss Whiting, with her gaze fixed reveren- 
tially on Mrs. Browning, that lady was the 
incarnation of all the virtues and excellences 
— a close approach, if not an actual realiza- 
tion, of human imperfection made perfect. 
On the other hand, the clever sister of the 
late Marion Crawford, the novelist, saw in 
Miss Browning "a preternatu rally, tense and 
febrile creature," whom one suspects she re- 
ferred to in private gossip with friends as 
"that old cut." 

But the Crawford woman herself was noted 
for ;i sharp tongue as well as a clever pen. 



MRS. ROLPH'S GOOD MEMORY. 

Mrs. James Rolph, wife of the Mayor, has 
recovered from a brief illness and is once 



■ graciously entering it 

of soei.-ii lite, i ler wholesomi 

any function ^h«- . ttends. I it i i lie charms 

ol \i re Ri Iph '- pei sonali! ■ i liei a m I 
ability to place names and faces, ffl ben w ■ 
introduced to a person, she is able to recall 

immediately the name of tin e whom she 

ments a second I ime, This quality is a gift. 



NORTH GERMAN LLOYD 

All Steamers Equipped with Wireless, Submarine 

Si i.- ii, Ms nnd Latest Safety Appliances. 

First Cabin Passengers Dine a la Cnrte without 

Extra Charge. 

NEW YORK, LONDON, PARIS, BREMEN 

Fast Express Steamers Sail Tuesdays 

Twin -Screw Passenger Steamers Sail Thursdays 

S. S. "GEORGE WASHINGTON" 

Newest and Largest German Steamer Afloat 

NEW YORK. GIBRALTER, ALGIERS. 

NAPLES, GENOA 

Express Steamers Sail Saturdays 

INDEPENDENT TOURS AROUND THE WORLD 

Travellers' Checks Good all over the World 

ROBERT CAPELLE, 250 Powell St. 

Gea'1 Pacific Coiit Agent Near S'. Francii Hotel 

and Geary St. 
Telephones : Kearny 4794 — Home 3725 



[wToyo Kisen 
j^SJ Kaisha 

(ORIENTAL STEAMSHIP 00.) 

S. S. Nippon Maru (Intermediate Service 
Saloon. Accommodations at reduced 
rates) Saturday, July 6, 1912 

S. S. Tenyo Maru, (Via Manila direct) 

Friday, July 12, 1912 

S. S. Shinyo Maru, (New). ..Saturday, Aug. 3,1912 
S. S. Chiyo Maru oaturday, Aug. 31, 1912 

Steamers Bail from Company's pier. No. 34, 
nenr foo! of Brnnnan Street, 1 P. M. for Ytko 
ha ma and Hongkong, calling at Honolulu, Kob* 
(Hiogo), Nagasaki and Shanghai, and connecting 
at Hongkong with Btenmers for Manila, India, etc 

No cargo received on board on day of sailing 
Round trip tickets at reduced rates. 

For freight and passage apply at office, 4th 
ilni.r. Western Metropolis National Bank Building. 
625 Market St. 

W. H AVERY. Assistant General Manager. 



CERTIFICATE OF MEMBERSHIP OF W. E. 
STANFORD & COMPANY. 



THIS IS TO CERTIFY that W. E. STANFORP & 
COMPANY is a partnership comprised of the follow 
ing persons: ALBERT GEORGE LUCHSIXGER, 
3221 Washington St., San Francisco, CaL; WIL- 
LIAM ESTELL STANFORD, 1445 Leavenworth St., 
San Francisco, CaL 

ALBERT GEORGE LUCHSINGER, 
WILLIAM E. STANFORD. 
STATE OF CALIFORNIA, 
City and County of San Francisco. 
ss. 

On (his 20th day of June, in the year One Thou- 
sand Nine Hundred and Twelve, before me, Gene 
vie-ve S. Donelin, a Notary Public in and for the 
City and County of San Francisco, personally ap 
Deared Albert George Luchsinger and William E. 
Stanford, known to me to be the persons whose 
names are subscribed to the within instrument, and 
they duly acknowledged to me that they executed 
the same. 

In witness whereof, I have hereunto set my hand 
:iml affixed my official seal, at my office in the City 
■ind County of San Francisco, the day and year in 
'his certificate first above written. 
.SEAL) GENEVIEVE S. DONELIN, 

Notnry Public in and for the City and County 
of San Francisco, State of California. 

809 Crocker Building. 




THE PERENNIAL 



**SST HAS seemed to many people rather 
Smi incongruous that Win. J. Bryan should 
^)MK? appear as a newspaper reporter in 
the Chicago convention, and later at 
Baltimore. Having been three times nominat- 
ed for President, and being this year again 
in line to accept another nomination if it 
came his way, Mr. Bryan's pose as a reporter 
appeared out of. keeping with his celebrity 
as a statesman and millionaire. 

People who took that view of the mattei 
forgot that Bryan stepped out of the report- 
er's gallery to make the famous speech which 
gave him his first nomination for President. 
Democracy of the Bryan brand means getting 
as close as possible to the "Common People." 
An ideal triumph of Democracy would be to 
have a street laboreT step in from the street, 
mount the convention platform, and be nom- 
inated in his shirt sleeves for the highest 
office in the gift of the people. 

The only work Bryan ever did was with his 
tongue and pen, and there is nothing incon- 
gruous in his appearance at the Baltimore 
convention, publicly a newspaper reporter, 
and privately a Presidential candidate on a 
still hunt. 

The public memory is very short. The cir- 
cumstances of Bryan 's first nomination are 
already forgotten by. the majority of old 
voters. Many of the younger ones never 
read or heard how the young Omaha news- 
paper man jumped from obscurity into the 
fierce glare of national political celebrity. 
The convention was noisier even than most 
Democratic gatherings of that kind. In the 
height of the turmoil there arose shouts of 
"Bryan, Bryan." But the veterans of the 
party noticed that the demonstration was 
rattier in the galleries, where there were no 
votes to count, than on the floor, where there 
were. The outcry increased. The wise men 
of the convention rubbed their eyes in aston- 
ishment. They could not understand 'the 
outburst. They did not believe it real, Bryan 
sat in the "newspaper gallery" taking notes 
for an Omaha journal with which he was 
connected. He seemed to know how and why 
the demand for him had come so suddenly. 
The moment he heard his name, he dropped 
his pencil on the bench of unpolished plank 
that had served him for a desk and made for 
the body of the. hall. 

"Well, boys," he said to the reporters 
whom he was leaving behind him. "I'm go- 
ing out to nominate the next President of 
the United States." 

The Nebraskan delegates rushed from their 
seats, carrying with them the guidon poles 
that had marked their location in the house. 
They caught Bryan in their arms, hoisted 
him to their shoulders, and swung, singing, 
toward the platform. There a score of ready 
hands outstretched to him over the footlights 
dragged him to the boards. The opportunity 
for which the Omaha scribe and politician 
had longed and planned was before him, and 
he grasped it with both hands. In a few 



Forgottein Tale 
®f His Premier 



minutes he was launching to the delighted 
galleries his famous and much overrated de- 
clamation about the "crown of thorns and 
cross of gold. ' ' it was the psychological 
moment, however, for such claptrap, and the 
poor newspaper reporter became, by the votes 
of the national convention of the Democracy, 
a candidate for the highest office in the land. 
"I knew I'd win!" he chuckled a little 



Bores of Iowa, Congressman ■" Dick ' ' Bland 
of Missouri. There was a quiet movement of 
Democratic Senators to nominate Senator. 
Henry M. Teller of Colorado, the real leader 
of the free silver Republicans. Their pur- 
pose was to defeat Bland first .and then bring 
in the Republican as the man of the hour 
for the new Democracy. This scheme failed. 
The "Crown of Thorns'' speech, which won 
the nomination for Bryan in 1896 was almost 
identical with a speech he had previously de- 
livered in Congress, where he had attracted 
attention by his talks with La Follette, who 
was then the Republican champion of high 
protection. The House of Representatives 




BRYAN'S CAMPAIGN AUTOMOBILE. 
Some of the despised coin of Belmont and Ryan helped to keep it going. 



later to the crowd that surged into his hotel 
room to congratulate him on his triumph of 
oratory and political wire-pulling. 

Bryan has become wealthy since he stepped 
out of the reporters' gallery to deliver his 
"cross of gold" speech. Perhaps he thought 
when he went to Baltimore to report for the 
San Francisco Chronicle, and other important 
newspapers, that he might do even better 
the second time he stepped out of a reporters' 
gallery to electrify a national convention of 
the Democracy. 

Mr. Bryan went to the Chicago Convention 
as the head of a contesting delegation which 
had crushed the Cleveland wing of the Neb- 
raskan Democracy. The gold delegation had 
been recognized by the National Committee, 
but it was certain that the Bryan delegation 
would be given seats. The seating of the 
Bryan delegation was spectacular. That 
helped its leader get the attention of the 
delegates, but Mr. Bryan was not yet very 
much in evidence as a candidate. 

The avowed and most prominent Democratic 
candidates in 1S96 were Governor Horace 



did not go into spasms of enthusiasm over the 
"Crown of Thorns" speech, for free silver 
did not then concern Congress as much as did 
the tariff. The Chicago Democratic Conven- 
tion of 1896, on the contrary, was intensely 
interested in free silver and very slightly in 
the tariff. 

Bryan was the youngest Presidential can- 
didate ever nominated, or at least as young 
as Stephen A. Douglas when the Little Giant 
was a candidate, but this was not enough for 
Mr. Bryan. He wanted to surpass all records. 
Few people knew how thorough his training 
for stump speaking had been. When the news- 
papers began to talk about him as the ".Boy 
Orator of the Platte" it was possible to trace 
his oratorical career back to the time when 
his companions could not remember him not 
talking. In his adopted State he was al- 
ways on the stump. During his first Con- 
gressional canvass he made a hundred speech- 
es. In the latter campaigns ne was equally 
active. He also got to varying his political 
speechmaking by lectures and addresses of 
all sorts. 



Saturday, July 6, 1912.] 



-THE WASP 



15 



Bryan must be a very thrifty individual, 

for with ;in unequaled t rd as a loser he 

has managed to grow sleek and fat on poll- 
I ics. Musi men find ceaseless [>o!it ical activ- 
ity the surest method of winding up their 
(•a reel in straitened circumstances. 

As to the statesmanlike qualities of Mr. 
Bryan, bia reputation on that score was greal 
er before the Baltimore Convention, where he 

showed liimsell to be a self-seeking politician 

of i most objectionable stripe. His antics at 
Baltimore have brought to my mind a discus- 
sion on his true character which 1 listened to 

inn' after] n at the Hotel St. Francis, where 

MM eral well-known politicians were chatting 
n\ri the lunch table. A leading Democral 
who served in Congress with Bryan, and had 
Voted for hi in at two national conventions, 
was asked what he thought of the "Peerless 
One.' 1 

"1 think," was the reply, "that Bryan is 
as small and narrow and as subservient to 
the clamor of the mob as the smallest little 
ward politician that ever came from south ot 
Market st reet." 

Nobody in the group challenged this esti- 
mate of the perennial candidate lor the White 
House, though the majority of them were 
Democrats. 



TAFT WAS RESOLUTE THEN. 

IN THE aftermath of national conventions 
is an interesting statement as to how 
President Taft secured the defeat of the 
third-term candidate and his own nomination 
by a sudden and unexpected display of firm 
ness. The President seldom acts suddenly 
mi impulse. This time he did act quickly. 
Rumors from Chicago reached him that a com- 
promise candidate was talked of. The Pres- 
ident knew that nobody could switch the 
Taft vote to a compromise candidate. If 
the Taft vote ever broke, the third-term can- 
didate would be nominated surely. 

The President rang for Rudolph Forster, 
the chief clerk to Mr. Hilles, the President's 
Secretary. 

"Forster, call Chicago on the long-distance 
phone and get for me." 

\n ten minutes Mr. Forster reported the 
man, a big leader in the convention, at the 
other end. 

"Senator," began the President, without 
preliminary, "I hear stories that many of the 
leaders would like to nominate a compromise 
candidate. Now, I went into this thing for 
principle, and propose to stick unless I find 
that there is any dickering or tinkering. In 
that event, or in the event that the first bal- 
lot shows that I have not polled the vote to 
which 1 am entitled, which means the nomina- 
lion, 1 will immediately direct the withdraw- 
al of my name. " 

The leader almost fell off the stool at the 
other end of the line. He could see visions 
Df the certain nomination of Roosevelt if Mr. 
Taft even gave an intimation- of withdrawing. 
Tt would be absolutely impossible to hold the 
line for any other man. The President got 
prompt assurance that the stories were with- 
out foundation and he would be nominated. 




MRS. WILLIAM HOWARD TAFT 
Long before her husband became President she hell a very high place in exclusive American society. 



ROOT'S ALMA MATER. 

SENATOR. ELIHU ROOT went straight 
from the Centennial Celebration at Ham- 
ilton College, New York, to the Chicago 
Convention, over which he presided. The 
story of Hamilton College is in no small part 
the story of Senator Root's own life and of 
the lives of his father, his brothers, and his 
sons. Elihu Root is President of the Board 
of Trustees of Hamilton College, his home 
is just across the broad road opposite the 
main entrance to the campus, and he, him- 
self, was born in a house that in its latter 
day reconstruction serves as the Mineralogical 
Cabinet. 

For the last seventy-five years the name of 
Root has been constantly recurrent in the 
annals of the college. Oren Root, Hamilton 
'33, and Oren Root, Hamilton '56, the father 
and brother of the Senator, occupied success- 



ively the chair of mathematics for nearly 
half a century. They were the "Cube Root" 
and "Square Root" of the college's tradi- 
tion. Another brother held for awhile the 
chair of chemistry. 



Now that the turbulent convention at Chi- 
cago is ancient history, it is known positive!) 
that President Taft wanted the nomination 
only as a vindication. He told his friends 
that he did not give a rap about making the 
race or being in the White House another 
four years. 



President Taft began bread-winning by re- 
porting law cases for the Cincinnati news- 
paper which is owned by his brother, Charles 
P. Taft, The future President was studying 
law r in his father's office at the time, and the 
$6 per came in very handy. 







Vacation 1912 

A Handbook of 

Summer Resorts 

Along the line of the 

NORTHWESTERN 
PACIFIC RAILROAD 

This book tells by picture and word 
of the many delightful places in Marin, 
Sonoma, Mendocino, Lake and Humboldt 
Counties in which to apend your Vaca- 
tion — Summer Besorts, Camping Sites, 
Farm and Town Homes. 



Copies of Vacation 1912 may be ob- 
tained at 874 Market St. (Flood Build- 
ing), Sausalito Ferry Ticket Office, or 
on application to J. J. Geary, G. P. & 
F. A., 808 Phelan Building, San Fran- 
cisco. 



NEW ENGLAND HOTEL 

Located in beautiful grove about 40 rods from 
station. Beautiful walks, grand scenery; hunt- 
ing and fishing, boating, bathing, bowling and 
croquet. Table supplied with fresh fruit and 
vegetables, milk and eggs from own ranch daily. 

Adults $7 to $9 per week; special rates for 
children. 

Address F. K. HARRISON, Camp Meeker, 
Sonoma County, Cal. 



OWN SUMMER HOME IN 

CAMP MEEKER 

Mountains of Sonoma Co. Lots $15 up. Meeker 
liilds cottages $85 up. Depot, stores, hotels, 
st an rant, phone, post, express office, theater, 
tiee library, pavilion, churches,, sawmill; 2,000 
lots sold, 700 cottages built. Sausalito Ferry. 
Address M. C. MEEKER, Camp Meeker. 



Redwood Grove 



% mile from Guerneville ; tents and cottages ; 
abundance of fruit, berries; bus meets all trains 
Rates $10-$11 per week; L. D. phone. Address 
THORPE BROS., Box 141, Guerneville, Sonoma 
Co., Cal. 



ROSE HILL 

HOTEL AND COTTAGES 
Camp Meeker 

Opposile depot; 20 minutes' ride from Russian 
River ; surrounded by orchards and vineyards ; 
excellent dining-room, with best cooking. Fish- 
ing, boating, swimming and . dancing. Many 
good trails for mountain climbing. Open all 
year. Can accommodate 75 guests. Adults, $6 
to $10 per week; children half rates. 

Building lots for sale from $50 and up. Ad- 
dress MRS. L. BARBIER, Camp Meeker, So- 
noma County, Cal. 



The Gables 



Sonoma county's ideal family resort, just opened 
to the public. Excellent table, supplied from 
our dairy and farm. Dancing, tennis, games. 
Bus to hot baths and trains daily at Verano sta- 
tion. Rates $2.50 per day, $12 and up per 
week. Open year round. Address H. P. MAT- 
TIIKWSON, Sonoma City P. O., Cal. 



Hotel Rowardennan 

OPEN ALL THE YEAR. 

New ownership, new management, new fea- 
tures. Golf, tennis, bowling, fishing, boating, 
swimming, clubhouse. Free garage. 

Rates $17.50 to $25 per week; $3 to $4 per 
day. 

Folders and information at Peck-Judah's, or 
address J. M. SHOULTS, Ben Lomond, Cal. 



:: RIVERSIDE RESORT :: 



Country home % mile from Guerneville; ideal 
spot; % mile of river frontage; $8 to $12 per 
week. For particulars, MRS. H. A. STAGG, 
Proprietor, Guerneville, Sonoma county. 



COSMO FARM 

On 1 lie Russian River; electric lighted through- 
out. Rates $10 to $12 per week. For particu- 
lars see Vacation Book or address H. P. Mc- 
PEAK, P. O. Hilton, Sonoma Co., Cal. 



RIONIDO HOTEL 

Lawn Tennis, Croquet, Shuffle Board, Swings, 
Shooting Gallery, Box Ball Alleys, also 4,000 
square feet Dancing Pavilion, unsurpassed Bathing 
and Boating, and large social hall for guests. 
Hotel ready for guests. Rates, $12 per week. 
American plan. For reservations address RIO- 
NIDO CO., Rionido, Sonoma Co., Cal. 



Summer Resorts 

AT HOME, AT THE CLUB, CAFE OR HOTEL 

CASWELL'S COFFEE 



Always -Satisfactory 

GEO. W. CASWELL COMPANY 

530-532-534 Folsom St. Phone Kearny 3610 

Write for samples and prices. 



CARR'S 



NEW MONTE 
RIO HOTEL 



NEAREST TO STATION AND RIVER. 

New modern hotel, first-class in every detail 
and equipped with every modern convenience. 
Swimming, boating, canoeing, fishing, launching, 
horseback riding and driving. Hotel rates $2 
day; $12 and $14 per week. Round trip, $2.80. 
good on either the broad or narrow gauge rail- 
roads. Sausalito Ferry. Address C. F. CARR, 
Monte Rio, Sonoma Co., Cal. 



HOTEL RUSTICANO 

The hotel is just a two-minute walk from the 
depot amongst the giant redwood trees. The 
amusements are numerous — boating, bathing, 
lawn tennis, bowling, dancing, nickelodeon, and 
beautiful walks. A more desirable place for a 
vacation could not be found. Rates, $9 to $12 
per week; rates to families. 

For folder, address L. B. SELENGER, Prop., 
Camp Meeker, Sonoma County, Cal. 



U. S. ARMY 



TENTS 

BLANKETS. COTS, HAMMOCKS 

SPIRO HARNESS CO. 

307 MARKET STREET, S. T. 
Write for Free Catalogue. 



Saturday, July G, 1912.) 



HUMOR, A VALUABLE ASSET 

Uj Josvuli Martin. 

ON E of t lie surprises "i I !"■ present con 
vent ion ot women now in our oiidsl is 
i he rare amounl of humor I hat lias been 
displayed. It baa been contended for so long, 
■■A woman has no bump of humor,'' that she 
was persuaded almost to think so, too. 

Along with other disclosures that have been 
made al this Biennial has been the undeniable 
Fact that humor lias played a very decisive 
part in the great scheme of things. Jt has 
been a potent factor in bringing to a quick, 
round i in n sunn- of the vital affairs of the 
moment. 

More than once humor has been the effect- 
ive weapon to gain a point. Ami how quickly 
ii has been recognized as a valuable asset! 
E'eihaps you may no]l have discovered any 
exuberance in the profound discussions. Per- 
haps ymi were prone to think that these wo 
men took themselves too seriously. Or per- 
haps at times the humor was of too subtle a 
nature to reach you — because you knew not 
what was beneath it all. But if you attended 
many of the morning, afternoon and evening 
conclaves you would find your mind stocked 
with enough felicitation and genuine humor 
in keep you cheerful for many a day,- 

All I his humor has been so replete with wis- 
dom and part and part-id of so much knowl- 
edge that we who listen are inclined, in sin 
cerity, to rise and call '''her" blessed. 

Not long ago a young attorney whom 1 
knew was taken seriously ill. An operation 
appealed inevitable. The attorney was placed 
in his bed to rest and to gain strength; and 
that is just what he did. He found so much 
enjoyment and rest away from business for 
the first, time in many years, he reveled so 
thoroughly in the relaxation, finding actual 
fun in the fact that he was obliged to remain 
inert, that in an astonishingly short time he 



A SKIN OF BEAUTY IS A JOY FOREVER 

DR. T. FELIX GOURAUD'S 

ORIENTAL CREAM 

Or Magical Beautifier 

Removes Tan, Pimples, 
Freckles, Moth-Patch- 
es, Rash and Skin Dis- 
eases, and every blem- 
ish on beauty, and de- 
fies detection. It has 
stood the test of 65 
years, no other has, 
and is so harmless we 
taste it to be sure it is 
properly made. Accept 
no counterfeit of simi- 
lar name. The dis- 
tinguished Dr. L. A. 
Snyre said to a ^ady of kie haut-ton (a patient) : 
"As you ladies will use them, I recommend 
'Gouraud's Cream' as the least harmful of all 
the Skin preparations." 




For Sale by All Druggists and Fancy Goods 

Dealers. 

Gouraud's Oriental Toilet Powder 

For infants and adults. Exquisitely perfumed. 
Relieves Skin Irritations, cures Sunburn and ren- 
ders an excellent complexion. Price 25 cents by 
Mail. 

Gouraud's Poudre Subtile 
I Removes Superfluous Hair. Price $1.00 by Mail. 

I FERD. T. HOPKINS, Prop'r, 37 Great Jones 
St., New York City. , 



-THE WASP - 



recovered, withoul an operation, and was able 
l> mum- Ilia profession stronger, better, and 
h greater philosopher than ever. LaugUter 
did it. For had ymi gone there to console 
him, as some of us did, you would have found 
instead such an abundance of cheerful phil- 
osophy that you. too, would have been as- 
sured that humor is a must valuable asset. 

In reference to our women here, let me 
observe that I have never known in real life 
nor read in tale or history of any woman dis- 
tingnishea for intellect of the highest type 
who was not also remarkable for her cheer- 
fulness of spirit, which is compatible 'with 
the habits of profound thought. Lady Mon- 
tague was one instance, Madame de Stael an-- 
other. The brignt, wholesome, ale.i women 
from :ill parts of these United States who are 
now with us are radiant examples of the 
combined forces of intellect and humor. 

1 think that J have discovered the secret 
of the happy humor of these women, and my 
discovery is something after the nature of 
the little girl who sat at the side of. her 
tat her, one of the world's greatest artists. 
After watching him for some time at his work 
she said: "I know how you paint. You 
think, and then you draw lines and put pret- 
ty colors around your think." That is what 
lias been going on in this great Biennial. The 
women think. Then there is revealed the 
wit of Portia, powerful and sweet like the 
ottar of roses; the gaiety of Rosalind, sweet 
and aromatic; the frivolity of Beatrice, play- 
ful yet profound; and the mirth of Isabella, 
like music hastening to "heaven. 

Blessed, then, are the humorous, especially 
be they women, for their 's shall be the habita- 
tions of the earth! 



17 



In a restaurant that strives to inculcate, 
good manners, a man who admitted that he 
was ratHer slow on etiquette, but was trying 
to learn besought the waiter to assist in the 
reformation. 

"My chief trouble," said he, "is splashing. 
I used to splash like anything. But by de- 
grees I am curing myself. Know how? Well, 
Sir, I have made it a rule to cover all the 
spots I make on the tablecloth, with silver 
money, nickels, dimes, quarters, halves, what- 
ever it takes to cover them, and then give 
the money away. As I am not a rich man, 
that nearly broke me and I began to reform, " 

The waiter nodded encouragingly and said 
he was glad to hear it. The man ate a sub- 
stantial meal. When he had finished, the cloth 
was disfigured with only one small coffee stain 
which a dime easily covered. He handed the 
dime to the waiter. 

"My fines," lie said, "constitute my tips." 
Mournfully the waiter watched him uepart. 

"How I wish," he sighed, "that I had 
known him in his sloppy days." 



A well-fitting shirt is one of the signs of 
the gentleman. Few things look so ungrace- 
ful as linen that hangs loosely or awkwardly 
upon the wearer. To secure well-fitting shirts, 
they should be made to order, and there is no 
place in San Francisco where they can be made 
better than at D. 0. Heger's, 243 Kearny St. 
and 118 Geary St. At these places skillful 
experts make excellent shirts and underwear, 
guaranteeing perfect fit and style, and using 
the best of materials. Every one patronizing 
ffeger 's expresses satisfaction with the re- 
sults. 



WALTERS SURGICAL CO. 

SUEQIOAL IN8TEUMENT8. 
893 Sutter St., S. F. Phon. Doug-Li 4011 



OPEN SHOP 



"The minimum scale * of 
the union represses all ambition 
for excellence," — Prof. Eliot. 
Harvard University. 



7 



The last word of the union 
is violence, its first word is a 
threat. 



Citizens' Alliance Office 
Rooms, Nos. 363-364-365 
Kuss Bldg., San Francisco. 




Sultan Turkish Baths 

624 POST STREET 
Special Department for Ladles 

Open Day and Night for Ladies and Gen 
tlemen. 
Al. Johnson, formerly of Sutter Street 
Hammam, has leased the Sultan Turkish 
Baths, where he will be glad to see his 
"Id and new customers. 



Blake, Mof fitt & Towne 

PAPER 



37-45 First Street 

PHONES: SUTTEE 2230; J 3221 (Homo) 
Private Exchange Connecting .11 Department.. 



LA GRANDE & WHITES 


LAUNDRY CO. 


Office and Works, 234 12th St. 


* Bet. Howard & Folsom Sta. 


SAN FRANCISCO, - CALIFORNIA 


Phones: Market 916, Home M 2044. 



Eames Tricycle Co. 

Manufacturers of INVALID 
ROLLING CHAIRS for all 
purposes. Self ■ Propelling 
Tricycle Chairs for the dis- 
abled. INVALID CHAIRS. 
Wholesale and retail and 
for rent. 1714 Market St., 
San Francisco. Phone Park 
2940. 1200 S. Main Street, 
Los Angeles. 










A_/:r 




•s:^ -^ 






V E R V remarkable state of affairs 
exists in San Francisco. Bank de- 
posits are increasing. The returns 
of the Clearing House show a stead- 
ily increasing volume of business, and yet 
every other business man you meet is full of 
gloom. "Business is awful" is the general 
ery. 

Two facts are made apparent by this howl 
about dull times while the bank statements 
show that the volume of business is increas- 
ing. One fact is that San Francisco, in pro- 
portion to its population, has the greatest 
aggregation of croakers that ever contracted 
the habit of "hollering before they are hurt. 1 ' 
The seeond fact is that San Francisco is be- 
coming more and more the financial center of 
the Paeifie Coast. The banks of San Francis- 
co reflect the general prosperity of California. 

If San Francisco is not as prosperous as 
other parts of California, our business men 
can blame themselves for a good deal of the 
trouble. They have not done their duty in 
suppressing dangerous agitators who are de- 
stroying the industries of our city. San 
Francisco years ago promised to become an 
important manufacturing place. Look at its 
reduced manufacturing plants now. It has 
lost many lines of business, and you can't 
get a capitalist to invest a dollar in any new 
enterprise which calls for the employment of 
skilled labor. The capitalist will buy public 
utility bonds or municipal bonds or good rail- 
road bonds, but try and sell him industrial 
bonds for a new factory of some kind — "Oh. 
no thank you! " The deal is off at once. 

No level-headed business man needs to be 
reminded that it isn't a good thing for a com- 
munity that its own capitalists, or outsiders, 
will not put their money into local indus- 
trial enterprises. The business men of San 
Francisco have it in their power to change 
this condition of affairs. The business men 



support the newspapers that support the agi- 
tators and help them gain political power and 
paralyze honest industry. 

Change the combination. Let the business 
men who support the newspapers by their 
advertisements say to sensational newspa- 
pers that encourage agitators and criminals 




E. F. DELGER 

A well-known capitalist who is regarded as a 
public -spirited citizen. 

of any kind, "Cut out this kind of improper 
stuff from your sheets or we will cut out our 
patronage." 

If business men are too indolent, short- 
sighted, or cowardly to take such measures 
for the protection of their properties and the 



THE ANGLO & LONDON 
PARIS NATIONAL BANK 




SAN FRANCISCO 



Capital $4,000,000 

Surplus and Profits $1,600,000 

Total Resources $40,000,000 

OFFICERS: 

HERBERT FLEISHHACKER President 

SIG. GREENEBAUM . . . .Chairman of the Board 

J. FRIEDLANDER Vice-President 

C. F. HUNT Vice-President 

R. ALTSCHUL Cashier 

C. R. PARKER Assistant Cashier 

WM. H. HIGH . Assistant Cashier 

H. CHOYNSKI Assistant Cashier 

G. R. BURDICK Assistant Cashier 

A. L. LANGERMAN Secretary 



progress of their city, they deserve to suffer 
the evil consequences. 

Need of Sane Co-operation. 

San Francisco faces what should be a most 
prosperous future, and, judging by the speech- 
es of our public men at many gatherings, it 
seems to be taken for granted that nothing 
can retard the development of this seaport. 
There is such a thing as being too confident. 
Overconfidence has turned many a likely vic- 
tory into defeat. 

Our San Francisco business men are very 
much mistaken if they imagine that no mat- 
ter what they do to scare away prosperity 
our seaport will continue to increase in great- 
ness and glory and wealth. It won't do any- 
thing of the kind. 

Unless our business men show more sense 
than they have exhibited in the past twenty 
years in the government of their city, San 
Francisco will lag behind other cities on the 
Pacific Coast. 

It is well to remember that if San Francis- 
co had grown as fast as Los Angeles in the 
last twenty-five years the population would 
be over three and a half millions, instead of 
less than half a million. 

We need not go all the way to Los Angeles 
for a comparison with San Francisco. Oak- 
land is growing faster than our city propor- 
tionately. It may be said that the fire of 
1906 helped Oakland. Unquestionably it did. 
But what have we done to outstrip Oakland 



Wells Fargo Nevada 
National Bank 

Of San Francisco 

Nevada Bank Building, 2 Montgomery Street. 
N. E. Corner of Market Street. 

Capital paid up $6,000,000.00 

Surplus and Undivided Profits. ... $5,055,471.11 



Total $11,055,471.11 

OFFICEES. 
Isaias W. Hellman, President 
I. W. Hellman, Jr., Vice Pres. 
F. L. Lipman, Vice Prei. 
James K. Wilson, Vice Prei. 
Frank B. King, Cashier 
W. McGavin, Assistant Cashier 
E. L. Jacobs, Assistant Cashier 
O. L. Davis, Assistant Cashier 
A. D. Oliver, Assistant Cashier 
A. B. Price, Assistant Cashier 

DIKE C TORS. 

Isaias W. Hellman Hartland Law 

Joseph Sloss Henry Rosenfeld 

Percy T. Morgan James L. Flood 

F. W. Van Sicklen J. Henry Meyer 

Wm. F. Herrin A. H. Payson 

John C. Kirkpatrick Chas. J. Deering 

I. W. Hellman, Jr. James K. Wilson 

A. Christeson F. L. Lipman 

Wm. Haas 

ACCOUNTS INVITED. 

Prompt Service, Courteons Attention, Unexcelled 

Facilities. 

SATE DEPOSIT VAULTS. 



Saturday, July 6, I'JIl'.J 



-THEW4SP- 



19 



in the laBt four years! Poi two yeare we 
had a political Board of Supervisors that \\:is 

n ■ interested in the I n Pi secution than 

the prosperity o£ San Francisco. Then wo 
It ad two years oi WcCarthyism, and now w* 
bave a new political outfit, # bu1 tbe boycott 

jackass can still be seen on many public 

Bfcreeta of om afflicted city, den strating to 

all thinkinjg American people i hal we have 
learned little by tbe bitter experience of the 

past. It may be remarked by some of the 
cynical critics of our Long Buffering seaporl 
thai "jackasses are amongst the principal 
products of San Francisco, " 

h is certain that our business men will not 
continue indefinitely to permil their city to 
be kepi bark by sensational newspapers and 
professional political agitators. The courage 
shown in tbe rebuilding of San Francisco is 
a guarantee that our business men have the 
energy to rectify the errors of misgoverament 
l hat have done so much to injure San Fran- 
cisco. The next year or two may work won- 
ders in the adoption nt' a new policy calculated 
in encourage capital and discourage mischief- 
makers. 

A Pull Week. 

Tlo- national holiday and the political con- 
vention have combined to make the local in- 
vest men 1 markets unusually dull. In real es- 



Smith-Tevis-Hanford 

Inc. 

MUNICIPAL AND 
CORPORATION 

BONDS 



57 Post St., 



San Francisco 



tate there lias been little of interest to be 
noted. 

The condition of the oil stock market can 
be understood when it is stated that on Mon- 
day at the early call there was not a share of 

oil stock sold, At the sei d session the total 

business was Miu .shares of Palmer. 

Everybody is looking forward to lively times 
after the Fourth. 

Municipal Bonds. 

X. W. llalsey & Co. submitted the highest 
bid on the $5,300,000 municipal u-per-ccut 
bonds. The city will pay a net rate of 4.60 
per cent. At the last sale municipal ."is were 
taken on a basis of -boa, being reoffered to in- 
vestors on a 4.3'y basis. It is probable that 
the present block will be offered to investors 
on a basis of about 4.40. This is the largest 
single block of bonds ever handled by the local 
house. 

Large Clearings. 

San Francisco bank clearings for the fiscal 
year L911-12 amounted to $2,553,155,093.(38, 
against $2 : 376,189,4(} u .95 for the fiscal yea. 
1910-11, or a gain of $176,965,623.73. Clear- 
ings for the last half of the calendar year 
1911 were $1,273,014,265.65, against $1,201,- 
372,763.10 for the last half of the calendar 
year 1910, or a gain for the six months' per- 
iod of $71,641,502.55. 

Our Lost Prestige. 

In 1850 the tonnage of our ocean-going 
craft was 1,440,000; in 1860 it was 2,380,000. 
The total tonnage in that year of Ameri- 
can vessels, both oceangoing and coasting was 
5,350,000, as against England's total of 4,660,- 
000 tons. 

Then came the civil war, and our merchant 
marine was swept from the seas. As early 
as 1S70 England was already far in the lead. 
Today the American merchant marine is neg 
ligible in the world's commerce.- In 1840 it 
was the carrier of 82 per cent, of the freight 
between the United States and other countries; 
in 1860 it carried 66 per cent.; in 1870, 35 
per cent.; in 1880, 17 per cent.? in 1890, 12 
per cent.; in 1900, 9 per cent. Low water 
mark was reached in 1901, when the total 
was 8.2 per eent., exactly one-tenth of the 
proud total carried in 1S40. Since then there 
has been a slight increase — not beyond 10 
per cent., however. 



ARMOR PLATE SAFE DEPOSIT VAULTS 

of Union Safe Deposit Company in building of 

UNION TRUST COMPANY OF SAN FRANCISCO 

Junction of Market and G'Farrell Streets and Grant Avenue 


LARGEST, STRONGEST and jPpl 


j ' f fj 


Im MOST CONVENIENTLY 


ARRANGED SAFE DEPOSIT Jflft jj 




Ijl WEST OF NEW YORK 


Boxes $4 per annum Ay2DL}fe^!ll|L 


Ij'iU and upwards. 


Telephone '^^Ssg^lijm^j' 


Kearny 11. 



The German Savings 
and Loan Society 



Savings 



(The German Bank) 



OommsrclaJ 



( Member of the Associated Saving! Banke of 
Sao Francisco.) 

626 California St., San Francisco. Oal 

Guaranteed Capital $ 1,200,000.00 

Capital actually paid up in caBh. . .$ 1,000,000.00 
Reserve and Contingent Funds . . .$ 1,681,282.84 

Employees' Pension Fund $ 181,748.47 

Deposits December 30th, 1911. . .$46,205,741.40 
Total Assets $48,837,024.24 

Remittances may be made by Draft, Post Office, 
or ExpresB Co. 'a Money Orders, or coin by Ex- 
press. 

Office Hours: 10 o'clock A. M. to 8 o'clock 
P. M„ except Saturdays to 12 o'clock M. and 
Saturday eveninga from 6:30 o'clock P. M. to 
8 o'clock P. M. for receipt of Deposits only. 
. OFFICERS — N. Ohlandt, President; George 
Tourny, Vice-PreBident and Manager; J. W. Van 
Bergen, Vice-President; A. H. R. Schmidt, Cash- 
ier; William Herrmann, Assistant CaBhier; A. H. 
Muller, Secretary; G. J. O. Folte and Wm. D. 
Newhouse, Assistant Secretaries; Goodfellow, 
Eells & Orrick, General Attorneys. 

BOARD OF DIRECTORS — N. Ohlandt, George 
Tourny, J. W. Van Bergen, Ign. Stoinhart, I. N. 
Walter, F. Tillmann Jr., E. T. Kruse, W. S. 
Goodfellow and A. H. R. Sehmidt. 

MISSION BRANCH. 2572 Mission Street, bet. 
21st and 22nd Streets. For receipt and payment 
of Deposits only. C. W. Heyer, Manager. 

RICHMOND DISTRICT BRANCH, 601 Clem- 
ent Street, corner 7th Avenue. For receipt and 
payment of Deposit! only. W. O. Heyer, Mana- 
ger. 

HAIGHT STREET BRANCH. 1456 Haigbt St., 
bet. Masonic Ave. and Ashbury St. For receipt 
and payment of Depoaita onjy. 6. F. Paulsen, Mgr. 



ON JULY 1st, 1912 

WE WILL MOVE OUR OFFICES 

TO 

410 MONTGOMERY ST. 



Our Facilities for Handling 

Investment Securities 

Will be Considerably Increased 



ESTABLISHED 1858 

SUTR0&C0. 



Telephone 
Sutter 3434 



Private Exchange 
Connecting- All Depts 



J. C. WILSON & CO. 



MEMBERS: 

NEW YORK STOCK EXCHANGE 
NEW YORK COTTON EXCHANGE 
CHICAGO BOARD OF TRADE 
STOCK AND BOND EXCHANGE, S. F. 

MAIN OFFICE — Mills Building, San Fran 
cisco. 

BRANCH OFFICES — Los Angeles, San Die- 
go, Coronado Beach, Portland, Ore.; Seattle, 
Wash.; Vancouver, B. C. 

PRIVATE WIRE NEW YORK AND CHICAGO. 



20 



-THE WASP- 



[Saturday, July 6, 1912. 



STATEMENT 

of the Condition and Value of the Assets and Liabilities 



OF 



THE HIBERNIA SAVINGS 
AND LOAN SOCIETY 

HIBERNIA BANK 

(A CORPORATION) 

(Member of the Associated Savings Banks of San Francisco) 

DATED JUNE 30, 1912 



ASSETS 

1 — Bonds of the Uliited States ($8,585,000.00), of the State of California and Municipalities Lhfireof ($4,091,- 

137.50), of the State of New York ($650,000.00), the actual value of which is $14,566,400.65 

2— Cash in United States Gold and Silver Coin and Checks $1,785,621.29 

3^ — Miscellaneous Bonds ($6,185,000.00), the actual value of which is $6,200,644.06 

$22,552,666.00 
They are: 
"San Francisco and North Pacific Railway Company 5 per cent Bonds" ($476,000.00), Southern Pacific 
Branch Railway Company of California 6 per cent Bonds" ($306,000.00), "Southern Pacific Company, San 
Francisco Terminal 4 per cent Bonds" ($150,000.00), "Western Pacific Railway Company 5 per cent 
Bonds" ($250,000.00), "San Francisco and San Joaquin Valley Railway Company 5 per cent Bonds" 
($120,000.00), "Northern California Railway Company 5 per cent Bonds" ($83,000.00), "Northern Rail- 
way Company of California 5 per cent Bonds" ($54,000.00), "Market Street Cable Company 6 per cent 
Bonds" ($758,000.00), "Market Street Railway Company First Consolidated 5 per cent Bonds" ($753,- 
000.00), "Los Angeles Pacific- Railroad Company of California Refunding 5 per cent Bonds" ($400,000.00), ^ 

"Los Angeles Railway Company of California 5 per cent Bonds" ($334,000.00), "The Omnibus Cable Com- 
pany 6 per cent Bonds" ($167,000.00), "Sutter Street Railway Company 5 per cent Bonds" ($150,- 
000.00 . "Gough' Street Railway Company 5 per cent Bonds" ($20,000.00), "Ferries and Cliff House Rail- 
way Company 6 per cent Bonds" ($6,000.00), "San Francisco, Oakland and San Jose Railway Company 
5 per cent Bonds" ($5,000.00), "The Merchants' Exchange 7 per cent Bonds" ($1,450,000.00), "San 
Francisco Gas & Electric Company 4% per cent Bonds" ($553,000.00), "Los Angeles Gas & Electric Com- 
pany 5 per cent Bonds" ($100,000.00), "Spring Valley Water Company 4 per cent Bonds" ($50,000.00). 

1 — Promissory Notes and the debts thereby secured, the actual value of which is $32, 260, 268. .20 

The condition of said Promissory Notes and debts is as follows: They are all existing Contracts, owned 
by said Corporation and are payable to it at its office, which is situated at the corner of Market, McAllister 
and Jones Streets, in the City and County of San Francisco, State of California, and the payment thereof 
is secured by First Mortgages on Real Estate within this State. Said Promissory Notes are kept and held 
by said Corporation at its said office, which is its principal place of business, and said Notes and debts arc 
there situated. 

5 — Promissory Notes and the debts thereby secured, the actual value of which is $297,879.00 

The condition of said Promissory Notes and debts is as follows: They are all existing Contracts, owned 
by said Corporation, and are payable to it at its office, which is situated as aforesaid, and the payment there- 
of is secured by pledge and hypothecation of Bonds of Railroad and Quasi-Public Corporations and other 
securities 

6 — (a) Real Estate situated in the Citv and Countv of San Francisco ($1,035,150.97). and in the Counties of Santa 
Clara ($13,891.54). Alameda ($2,997.80), and of Los Angeles ($5,396.62), in this State, the actual value 

of which is $1,057,436.93 

(b) The Land and Building on which said Corporation keeps its office, the actual value of which is $976,089.9." 

The condition of said RealEstate is that it belongs to said Corporation and part of it is productive. 

7 — Accrued Interest on Loans and Bonds $276,496.47 

TOTAL ASSETS $57,420,836.62 

LIABILITIES 

1 — Said Corporation Owes Deposits amounting to and the actual value of which is $54,099,871.46 

(Number of Depositors, 83,378; Average Amount of Deposits, $648.45.) 

2 — Contingent Fund — Accrued Interest on Loans and Bonds $276,496.47 

3 — Reserve Pund, Actual value $3,044,465.69 $3,320,962.16 

TOTAL LIABILITIES $57,420,836.62 

THE HIBERNIA SAVINGS & LOAN SOCIETY, 
By JAMES R. KELLY, President. 

THE HIBERNIA SAVINGS & LOAN SOCIETY, 
By R. M. TOBIN, Secretary. 



STATE OF CALIFORNIA, 
City and County of San Francisco — ss. 

JAMES R. KELLY and R. M. TOBIN, being each duly sworn, each for himself, says: That said JAMES R. KELLY is 
President and that said R. M. TOBIN is secretary of THE HIBERNIA SAVINGS AND LOAN SOCIETY, the Corporation above men- 



tioned, and that the foregoing statement is true. 

Subscribed and sworn to before me this 1st day of July, 1912 

Notar 



JAMES R. KELLY, President. 
R. M. TOBIN, Secretary. 

CHARLES T. STANLEY, 
and for the City and County of San Francisco, 
State of California. 



TliK reception given by tho officers and meni- 
i the Century Club in honor of Bar- 
onoBS Bertha von Suttner was decidedly an 
event of nolo. The Baroness is welcomed by the 
prominent women of our city with an enthusiasm 
attendant upon her accomplishments as a peace al- 
imi also for her charming personality. 

Beautiful women, elaborately gowned, received 
the hundreds of guests who came to this reception. 
rin- Baroness wore a handsome London-smoke taf- 
feta, embroidered in eyelet design, made over white 
silk. A rope of pearls was worn about her neck, 
and her beautiful gray hair was arranged in a sim- 
ple coil. 

Mrs. Horace Wilson, tho President, wore a gown 
of black velvet and chiffon made up with a lace 
corsage. 

Mrs. Phoebe Hearst wore a gray poplin silk trim- 
lnicl with r;ire old lace and chiffon. Mrs. Hearst 
was one of the founders of the Century Club. 

Mrs, George Bowman, a Past President, Mrs. Hor 
ncc Pillsbury, Mrs. E. E. Brownell, Mrs. Jonathan 
Swift, Mrs. P. B. Cornwall and other distinguished 
women assisted in receiving at this notable recep- 
tion. 



Weddings. 
Miss Maria 'Bustamente, the young and beautiful 
daughter of a wealthy Guatemalan coffee planter, was 
married last Saturday to Alfonso de la Cerda. Tho 
wedding ceremony was performed at St. Mary's 
Cathedral, and was followed by an elaborate ban- 
quet at the St. Francis. Both the Bustamente and 
the De la Cerda families are of great prominence 
in the Central America republic. Mr. de la Cerda, 
though only 26 years old, is the owner of half a 
dozen large plantations, and is very wealthy. Miss 
Uusiiimente has been hero for the past two years 
with her mother and sister, a vocal pupil of G. S. 
Wanrell. u^o has a beautiful soprano voice. She 
was educated in Paris, where she spent four years 
Her family is well known in San Francisco and 
throughout California. The wedding was an 
elaborate affair for which hundreds of invitations 
were issued. 

Miss Helen Gray and Mr. N. F. Wilson were qui- 
etly married on Saturday evening, June 29th, at 
the home of the bride's parents. The bride is a 
well-known musician of exceptional talent. Mr. 
Wilson is President of- the Lincoln Mortgage and 
Loan Company, his large interests being centered 
in Mexico. 

Miss Louise Marguerite Scott, daughter of W. R. 
Scott, Assistant General Manager of the Southern 
Pacific, became the bride of Mr. Joseph Hodged 
Beamer of Berkeley, on Wednesday, June 6th. Mrs. 
B earner is a graduate of Snell's Seminary of Berke- 
ley, and is popular among the younger set. Mr. 
Beamer is a graduate of the University of California. 

Miss Catherine Goodale was married to Lieuten- 
ant Rawson Warren at Honolulu. The wedding 
look place at the home of the bride's parents, Mr. 
and Mrs. W. W. Goodale. Mrs. Warren is a general 
favorite in society in Honolulu. Lieutenant Warren 
is a cavalry officer now stationed near Honolulu. 

An interesting event of the week was the mar- 
riage of Miss Genevieve O'Brien and Mr. Earl Har- 
riman Pier. Miss O'Brien is the daughter of James 
H. O'Brien, the well-known railroad contractor. She 
is a highly accomplished and charming girl, whose 
popularity in society has won for her a host of 
friends. Mr, Pier is a talented young lawyer, a 



graduate of Stanford University, who is connected 
with the United States District Attorney's office. 



Mrs. Shuman's Luncheon. 
A luncheon was given by Mrs. Percy Shuman, 
President of the San Francisco District of Women's 
Clubs at Hotel Normandie, on Monday, the mem- 
bers of the Executive Board and a few New York 
delegates being the guests. After the luncheon bus- 
iness matters wore considered. Mrs. Shuman has 
secured a strong board to serve with her in her 
year's work. The board is as follows: President, 
Mrs. Percy Shuman; Vice-President, Mrs. Percy S. 
King; Recording Secretary, Mrs. Nathan Frank; 
Corresponding Secretary, Mrs. Lewis Aubuy ; Treas- 
urer, Mrs. Henry A. Hansen; Auditor, Miss Bruner; 
Chairman Art Committee, Mrs. S. E. Peart; Civics, 
Mrs. Simeon Merrill; Civit Service Reform, Mrs. A. 
Parker; Club Extension, Mrs. Mary E. Tuttle, Mu- 
sic, Mrs. John G. Jury; Philanthropy, Mrs. Frank 
Bostwick; Press, Mrs. Norman Martin; State Uni- 
versity Fund, Mrs. Marian W. Leale. ; Conservation 




MRS. N. F. WILSON (nee Gray) 
Whose marriage took place at the close of June. 

and Forestry, Mrs. L. D. Jacks; Waterways, Mrs. 
H. W. Jackson; Education, Mrs. Edward Berwick; 
History and Landmarks, Mrs. Clara Burlingame ; 
Health Dr. Mariana Bertola ; Household Economics, 
Mrs. Mary B. Vail; Social and Industrial, Mrs. 
Louis Hertz. 



Mrs. Martin's Tea. 
Mrs. Eleanor Martin gave a delightful tea this 
past week in honor of the Baroness von Suttner. 
The affair was given at Mrs. Martin's mansion on 
Broadway. Among those who were asked to meet 
the noted visitor were Mesdames Garret McEnerney, 
Hancock Johnston of Los Angeles, Andrea Hofer- 
Proudfoot, Henry T. Ferguson, Erasmus Wilson, Ir- 
ving Hollingsworth and Nathan Spark Robertson. 



Breakfast Guests. 
Mrs. Edwin Stadtmuller, dramatic critic and Pres- 



ident of "Channing," was hostess at a table of in 
telleotual women at tne Press Club Breakfast at 
the Cliff House, and hnd at her table as guests of 
honor Mrs. Everett W. Patterson, chairman of the 
Art Department, G. F. W. C. At Mrs. Stadtmuller'B 
table were Mrs. John McGaw, Mrs. Frank Sumner, 
Mrs. 0. E. Grunsky, Mrs. S. G. Hindcs and Mrs, 
D. E. F. Easton. 



At the Hearst Hacienda. 

Mrs. Phoebe Hearst extended tho hospitality of 
her beautiful home to the officers of the Woman's 
Board of the Panama-Pacific Exposition, the Execu- 
tive Board of the General Federation of Women's 
Clubs, and to women prominent in the Local Bi- 
ennial Board, numbering 75 guests. Special trains 
conveyed the visitors to the Hacienda. The guest 
of honor on this occasion was Baroness von Suttner. 



Engagements. 

The engagement of Miss Dorothy Williams to 
Monroe Eyre Pinckard is announced by Mr. Gardner 
Williams. Mr. Monroe Pinckard is the son of Mr. 
and Mrs. George M. Pinckard of San Rafael, 

The ongagemen t has been announced of Mrs. 
Sarah Stetson Winslow and Colonel Hamilton S. 
Wallace, U. S. A. Mrs. Winslow is a sister of Mrs. 
Robert Oxnard and Mr. Harry N. Stetson. 



Mrs. Louis Hertz entertained the educators and 
officers of school patrons at luncheon on Monday. 
Among her guests of honor were Mrs. O. Shepard 
Barnum of Los Angeles, Mrs. E. L. Baldwin, Mrs. 
C. E. Grunsky, Mrs. Mary L. Cheney, Mrs. H. N. 
Rowell, and Miss Laura Drake Gill of New York. 



Miss Hazel Holm is spending a few weeks at 
Lake Leonard, Mendocino county, as the guest of 
Mrs. Henry Boyle of San Rafael. 



Ladies' Day was programmed at the Common 
wealth Club last Saturday at the Palace. Baroness 
Bertha von Suttner was the guest of honor and gave 
an address on "The Possibilities of Universal 
Peace." Miss Helen Varick Boswell, who was sent 
by President Taft to the Canal Zone to organize the 
women into clubs, addressed the members and their 
friends. 



The Missouri Society of California, of which 
General Tirey L. Ford is president, was host at a 
reception given in the "red room of the St. Francis 
on Monday night, in honor of the visiting delegates 
to the General Federation. Moving pictures of the 
Missouri representatives selecting the site at the 
Pannma-Pacific Exposition grounds were given. 



Mrs. Edward F. Coleman, the popular President 
of the Papyrus Club, will leave for the Yellowstone 
Park on July 6th, in company with Mr. Edward 
Coleman. After their return Mr. and Mrs. Cole- 
man will go to Lake Tahoe for the summer. 



Mrs. Eleanor Martin spent a few days at "Stag 
Leap," near Napa, where she was the guest of Mr. 
and Mrs. Walter S. Martin. 



Mrs. Marie Walton was hostess at a reception 
given in honor of the visiting press women. 



Colonel and Mrs. J. P. Wisser are planning a 
trip to Yosemite. They leave in a few days, and 
will be guests in the famous valley of Major and 
Mrs. William W. Forsyth. 



22 



■THE WASP- 



[Saturday, July 6, 1912. 



Mr_s. John- McGaw Receives. 
Mrs. John SIcGaw received the members of the 
Colonial Dames at her beautiful home on Russian 
Hill. The magnificent affair was in compliment to 
the Colonial Dames now in the city attending the 
Biennial- 
Mrs. McGaw was assisted in receiving by Mrs. 
0. D. Baldwin, Mrs. Frederick Jewell Laird, and 
Mrs. Selden S. Wright, and others whose position 
in this exclusive society is foremost. One of the 
honored guesas nt this beautiful reception was Mrs. 
W. C. Story. 

Mrs. McGaw was gowned in an elegant flowered 







EXCLUSIVE DESIGNS IN 

EMBROIDERED 

WAIST PATTERNS AND KIMONOS 



157-159 GEARY STREET 

Bet. Grant Avenue and Stockton St. 

Branch Store: 152 Kearny Street 
San Francisco 



f.OBEY'S GRILL 

^^ Formerly of SUTTER ST. 
Our Specialties 

OYSTERS, TERRAPIN, CRAB STEW 
STEAKS, CHOPS 

140 UNION SQUARE AVENUE 

L. J. D.GRUCHY, Manner Phone DOUGLAS 5683 



-Sutter 1572 
Home C-3970 
Homo C-4781 Hotel 



Cyril Arnanton 
Henry Rittman 
0. Lahederhe 



New Delmonico's 

(Formerly Maison Tortoni) 

Restaurant and Hotel 
NOW OPEN 

Best French Dinner in the City with Wine, 51.00 

Banquet Halls and Private Dining Booms 

Music Every Evening 

362 GEARY STREET, - SAN FRANCISCO 




eimai/v 



HOTEL AND RESTAURANT 

04-68 Ellis Street 

Our Cooking Will M«et Your Taste. 
Pricei Will Pleas* Yon. 



chiffon trimmed with lace and silver fringe. Mrs. 
Baldwin wore a black net embroidered in silver 
and draped over white satin. Sirs. Laird's dress was 
of exquisite white lace. Mrs. George W. Gribbs 
wore a most becoming lace gown. Mrs. William 
Tod Helmuth of New York wore a dress of white 
lace and satin and draped across the front of her 
dress was a broad band of ribbon on which was 
pinned the numerous club pins representing the 
clubs of which she is a member. 

Mesdames Cyrus Walker, Samuel Holladay, Sel- 
den S. Wright, Walter Mansfield, William A. Ash- 
burner, John Phillips, George W. Gibbs, George 
Thurston, Lee Richmond Smith, Miss Hurd and 
others assisted Mrs. McGaw in receiving. 



Prominent among those who are attending the 
golf tournament at Menlo were Mr. and Mrs. Arthur 
Chesebrough, who are the guests of Mr. and Mrs. 




MRS. EARL HARRIMAN PIER (nee O'Brien) 

A popular member of the younger set whose wed- 
ding was an event of the week. 

4 

William May» Newhall. Other enthusiasts in the 
golf contest arc Mrs. Tom Dri scull, Mrs. James 1" 
Pressley, Miss Upham, Mr. Jack Parrott, Prescott 
Scott, Everett Fuller, Ray SpHvalo, Oscar Bolde 
mann, Dr. Cummings, Charles Mellrose, Jack Mi- 
ghell, Roy Curran and Templeton Crocker, who 
started the tournament. 



The Percival W. Barnards are rejoicing over the 
advent of a little boy. The Barnards make their 
home in Santa Cruz. Mrs. Barnard was Miss Es- 
ther McCall of Oakland, and is a sister of Mrs. 
Charles Clarke of Dun^muir, Mrs. John R. Horn- 
berger of Mare Island, and Mr. Louis McCall of Ma- 
nila. Their mother. Mrs. J. G. McCall, resides in 
Oakland, at the old family home on Eighth street. 



VISIT THE 

Cafe Ju pi ter 

110 COLUMBUS AVENUE 

(Formerly Montgomery Avenue) 

SAN PRANCISCO, CAL. 

■•■ HOME OF MODERN BOHEMIA .-. 

WHERE YOU WILL FIND AN 

ARTISTIC ATMOSPHERE AND 

HIGH-CLASS ENTERTAINMENT 

THE MOST UP-TO-DATE TABLE D'HOTE 

DINNER 

In Town SI. 00, from 6 to 9 P. M. 

JACK McMAUUS. Manager 

Reserve your table in time — Phone Douglas 2910 



TECHAU TAVERN 

Cor. Eddy and Powell Streets. 

Phones, Douglaa 4700: 3417 



A High-Class 

Family Cafe 



A DAINTY LUNCH served gra- 
^ *■ luitously to ladies every day during 
shopping hours, between 3:30 and 5 p. m. 



Under the management of A. C. Morrison 



The New 

POODLE DOG 




HOTEL and RESTAURANT 

WILL REMAIN AT CORNER 

POLK and POST 

SAN FRANCISCO. 

PHONES: Franklin 2960; Horn. 6706. 



J. B. PON J. BERGEZ 0. MAILHEBUAU 
C. LALANNE L. CODTABD 




Bergez- Frank's 



OLD 



POODLE DOG 

CO. 



Hotel and 
Restaurant 

Music and Entertainment Every Evening. 
415-421 BUSH STBEET 

(Above Kearny) 
SAN FRANCISCO, OAL. 
Exchange, Douglas 2411. 




(BEGINNING Sunday, July 7th, Paul 
f J. Rainey will exhibit his African 
Hum! Pictures at ill-- Corl Theater 
with a run of two weeks. These pic- 
tures are reported to be the most 
marvelous motion pictures ever taken. They 
have been exhibited at the Smithsonian Insti- 
tute, and have attracted the attention «>i' the 
world's greatest scientists. Mr. Rainey is a 
millionaire sportsman of 
Cleveland, Ohio; and has 
the reputation -if being 
the most anted and fear- 
less hunter of wild game 
in the world. The films 
iu l„- shown at the Cort 
Theater were made while 
Mr. Rainey was on his last 
expedition to Africa. 
These pictures show the 
hunter and his associates 
hunting lions, tigers, leop- 
ards and other wild ani- 
mals in the jungles of Af- 
rica. Many hair-breadth 
escapes from death are de- 
picted on the screen. 

Among other views is 
given a picture of a herd 
of zebra led by a wilde 
beest which belongs to the 
gnu family. When driven 
out of his own tribe this 
wildebeest is more power- 
ful and seeks out a herd 
of zebra, appointing him- 
self their leader. 

In one picture Mr. Rai- 
ney is shown capturing a 
wild dog, a feat whieh 
stands unparalleled in the 
annals of natural history. 
It is said that Hagenback. 
the famous animal dealer 
of Hamburg, spent some- 
thing like $10,000 in an 
endeavor to secure one of 
these specimens alive, and 
finally gave up the task in 
despair, declaring that no 
one could capture one of 
these animals alive. 

Another picture shows a 
herd of several hundred 
Thompson gazelles. These 
animals are declared by 
scientists to be the most 
timid in the world. The 
photographs were taken 
only 75 yards distant from 
these gazelles. 

A baby rhinoceros is al- 
so shown. This baby rhi- 
no is now in the Zoologi- 
cal Gardens. 

These pictures prove 
that the Hon, which has 
always been termed the 
"king of beasts," turn- 
ed coward when brought 
.to bay by a pack of Mis- 
sissippi bear- hounds. In 



fact, some startling and wonderful incidents 
are revealed in tin- series of incidents in Paul 
Rainey 's expedition. 

Matinees will be given daily during the 
run of these wonderful pictures of Mr. Rai- 
ney 's hiinl ing expedition. 



"Pinafore." 
uld things become novelties 



by tin 




ALICK LAUDER— The famous Harry's brother, who makes his appearance at Pantages next week. 



changing whirligig of time is shown by the 
age for ' ' I 'in a fore ' ' in 1 lie Easl er States. 
The experiment of reviving Gilbert and Sulli- 
van's comic operas was watched with t he 
keenest interest by all theatrical people as 
well as play-goers. The results as translated 
into dollars and cents have been most satis 
factory to the Eastern theaters that have 
put on the old time favorites. It is a certain- 
ty that the revival of the 
Gilbert and Sullivan com- 
ic operas will be a grati 
lying success in San Fran- 
cisco, Many of the play 
goers who witnessed these 
delightful productions so 
many years ago in this 
city are now fathers and 
mothers, and grandfathers 
and grandmothers, but 
their children have heard 
them tell the furore which 
the amusing operas creat- 
ed. One of the most cele- 
brated amateur production 
that ever took place in San 
Francisco was the presen- 
tation of "Pinafore" hy 
a lot of young people in 
the exclusive society of 
those days. Frank linger 
of the Bohemian Club, 
who represented the "rul- 
er of the Queen 's Navee, ' ' 
and who is now grizzled 
veteran, was then a dark- 
haired, handsome young 
fellow. The opera had a 
long run, and San Fran- 
cisco seemed as if it never 
could have enough of the 
Gilbert and Sullivan op- 
eia music. 

"Pinafore" has been 
wisely selected as the 
opening bill for the great 
Gilbert and Sullivan com- 
ic opera festival which is 
scheduled to begin at the 
Cort on Sunday night, .1 il- 
ly 21st. "Patience," 
"The Mikado" and "The 
Pirates of Penzance "are 
the other operas that will 
be given during the four 
weeks' engagement. The 
Messrs. Shubert and Wil- 
liam A. Brady, producers, 
will send the original New 
York cast from the Casino 
direct to the Cort Theater 
for the notable season. 
Following is the correct 
cast that will interpret 
the operatic masterpieces: 
De Wolf Hopper, Blanche 
Duffield, Eugene Cowles, 
George J. MacFarlane, 
Kate Condon, Arthur Aid 
ridge, Viola Gillette, Ar- 
thur Cunningham, Alice 
Brady and Louis Bar- 
the!. 



24 



-THE WASP 



[Saturday, July 6, 1912. 



Orplieiun. 

.David Belasco 's magnificent production of 
his own play, ' ' Madame Butterfly, ' ' will be 
the Orpheum headline atraction next week. 
The impression that* it is a condensed version 
has become current and is erroneous. ''Mad- 
ame Butterfly " has always been a one-act 
play and Mr. Belasco ? s present presentation 
is exactly the same as when the piece was used 
origin aly in New York as a curtain raiser 
for ' ' Naughty Anthony. " In a fashion typ- 
ical of Martin Beck, the production will be 
of the finest and it comes from the genius of 
David Belasco. Mr. Belasco has given this 
piesentation, the first he has ever made for 
vaudeville, the best of his mastery of stage 
craft. Clara Blandick, a clever and popular 
young actress, has been selected for the part 
of (Jho-Cho-San, and Earl Ryder will enact 
the role of Sharpless, the Americal Consul. 
The others of the company are George Well- 
ington, Edgar Norton, .Frank L. Davis, Marie 
Hudspeth, Edith Higgins, Ynez Seabury, For- 
est Seabury and Arvid Paulson. Hugo Korach 
will be the musical director and a large corps 
of stage mechanics and electricians accompany 
the production. 

It would be difficult to classify Brown and 
Blyer, who come next week, except in their 
own terms, "Just Entertainers." These two 
young men have contrived an act which has 
the great merit of being entertaining through- 
out. There is some patter, a little song, a 
bit of music and a dance step or twcv The 
boys are genial and their work* effective. 

A trio of pretty, vivacious and symmetrical 
girls, bearing the name of 'the O'Meers Sis- 
ters and Company, will furnish a most attract- 
ive novelty in wire performances. The two 
O 'Mead girls are marvels. They skip and 
cavort on a thread of steel in a captivating 
manner. Their stunts are new and thrilling. 
They open with a pretty little song, then flit 
about on the wire and conclude with a Russian 
folk song, for which they wear a picturesque 
and correct costume. 

Honors and Le Prince, a team of French 
acrobats, and recent arrivals from Paris, will 
make their first appearance in this city. Like 
most Frenchmen, they are superior pantomim- 
ists, and they enliven their acrobatic feats 
with genuine comedy. 

Ray L. Royce, a splendid actor of excep- 
aional versatility, and an extraordinary gift 
of mimicry, well and favorably known here, 
will introduce his artistic sketches of eccen- 
tric characters. 

Next week will conclude th eengagements 
of Graham Moffat's Company of 'Scottish 
Players in Mr. Moffat's own sketch, "The 
Concealed Bed," the Five Piriscoffis, and also 
of George "Honey Boy" Evans, the peerless 
monologist, who is convulsing the audience 
with laughter at every performance and mak- 
ing the biggest kind of a hit. 



CQR£ 



LEADING THEATRE 

Ellis and Market. 
Phone Sutter 2460. 



This Afternoon and Tonight 

Last Times of the 

DURBAR IN KINEMACOLOr! 



Beginning Tomorrow, (Sunday) Matinee 



Mat. Daily at 2:30. 



Nights at 8:30. 



PAUL J. RAINEY'S 
AFRICAN HUNT 

The Most Marvelous Motion Pictures 
Ever Taken. 

Priees — 25c. and 50c. 



At Pantages. 
For the week commencing Sunday afternoon 
no less a personage than Alick Lauder, bro- 
ther of Harry Lauder, has been secured to 
head the program. Lauder comes direct from 
Australia, where he has been making a great 
hit and this, his first American appearance, is 
looked forward to with great interest. His 
original songs and characterizations are said 
to be wonderful studies. Sig. G-. Frizzo, the 
ramous quick change artist of Rome, will also 
be new here, presenting his transformation 
sketch, "Eldorado," in which he imperson- 
ates nine entirely different characters and 
gives a complete theatrical entertainment. 
Lordy's dog actors and acrobats, direct from 
London via Australia, will appear here for the 




GEORG KRTJGER 

The eminent pianist whose concerts have been 

so successful. 

first time, offering their novel skit, ' ( The 
Burglar s Fate," elaborately staged and acted 
with extraordinary canine vim ana intelligence 
and introducing an elaborate stage setting. 
The Marmeen Four, clever singers and instru- 
mentalists, including a couple of pretty girls, 
will offer a melange of musical oddities, and 
the Lessos, whose juggling feats have won 
them fame all over the world, will present 
their entirely original act. The musically in- 
clined will have a treat in the violin playing 
of Henri Kubelik, nephew of the famous Jan 
Kubelik, now making is first American tour. 
Jones and Mavo and Sunlight Pictures follow. 



Concert at the Fairmont. 

The Kruger Club will give a delightful musical 
evening on Saturday, July 6th, at the red room of 
the Fairmont Hotel. This is a new club, the aims 
of which are for the higher study and criticism of 
music. Miss Audrey Beer is President. 

The club is organized in the name of Georg Kru- 
ger, the eminent pianist and pedagogue. 

The program for this Saturday evening is a very 
brilliant one and is sure to prove highly enjoyable. 

NOTICE TO CREDITORS. 



No. 13499. Dept. 10. 
ESTATE OF PATRICK O'BRIEN, DECEASED. 

Notice is hereby given by the undersigned," M. J. 
Hynes, Administrator of the estate of Patrick 
O'Brien, deceased, to the creditors of and all persons 
having claims against the said deceased, to ex- 
hibit them with the necessary vouchers within four 
(4) months after the first publication of this notice 
to the said Administrator, at hie office, room 858 
Phelan Building, San Francisco, California, which 
said office the undersigned selects as the place of 
business in all matters connected with said estate of 
PATRICK O'BRIEN, Deceased 

M. J. HYNES, 
Administrator of the estate of Patrick O'Brien, 
deceased. 
Dated, San Francisco, May 28, 1912. 
CULLINAN & HICTCEY, Attorneys for Adminis 
trator, 858 Phelan Building, San Francisco, Cal. 



SAFEST AND MOST MAGNIFICENT THEATER 

IN AMERICA. 
WEEK BEGINNING THIS SUNDAY AFTERNOON 
Matinee Every Day 
MARVELOUS VAUDEVILLE 
DAVID BELASCO Presents "MADAME BUTTER- 
FLY," a one-act play by David Belaseo, .Based on 
John Luther Long's Japanese Story; BROWN and 
BLYER, "Just Entertainers"; O'MEERS SISTERS 
& CO., 3 Girls on the Wire; HONORS & LE 
PRINCE, French Pantomimic Gymnasts; RAY L. 
ROYCE, in Eccentric Character Sketches; GRAHAM 
MOFFAT'S SCOTTISH PLAYERS; FIVE PIROS- 
COFFIS; NEW DAYLIGHT MOTION PICTURES; 
Last Week — Great Laughing Hit, GEORGE EVANS, 
•'The Honey Boy.' ' 

Evening Prices, 10c, 25c, 50c, 75c. Box Seats, $1. 

Matinee Prices ( Except Sundays and Holidays ) , 
10c, 25c- 50c. 

PHONES DOUGLAS 70. HOME C 1670. 




Market Street, Opposite Mason. 
Week of Sunday, July 7. 
INTERNATIONAL ATTRACTIONS. 
ALICK LAUDER, Brother of HARRY LAUDER, in 
Character Songs and Studies; FRIZZO, World's 
Greatest Quick Change Artist; MARMEEN FOUR, 
in a Melange of Musical Oddities; LORDY'S DOC 
ACTORS and ACROBATS; HENRI KUBELIK, Dis- 
tinguished Hungarian Violinist; THE LESSOS, Fa- 
mous Jugglers; JONES AND MAYO, Comedy Con- 
versationalists; and SUNLIGHT PxCTURES. 



Mat. Daily at 2:30. Nights, 7:15 and 9:15. Sun. 
and Holidays, Mats, at 1 :30 and 3 :30. Nights, 
Continuous from 6:80. 



Prices — 10c, 20c and 30c 



SUMMONS. 

IN THE SUPERIOR COURT OF THE S.TATE OF 
California, in and for the City and County of San 
Francisco — Dept. No, 4. 

GIUSEPPE DIRESTA, Plaintiff, vs. All persons 
claiming any interest in or lien upon the real prop- 
erty herein described or any part thereof, Defend- 
ants. — Action No. 32,371. 

The People of the State of California, to all per- 
sons claiming any interest in, or lien upon, the real 
property herein described or any part thereof, De- 
fendants, greeting : 

You are hereby required to appear and answer the 
complaint of GIUSEPPE DIRESTA, plaintiff, filed 
with the Clerk of the above entitled Court and 
County, within three months after the first publica- 
tion of this summons, and to set forth what interest 
or lien, if any, you have in or upon that certain 
real property, or any part thereof, situated in the 
City and County of San Francisco, State of Califor- 
nia, and particularly described as follows: 

Beginning at a point on the easterly line of Octnvia 
Street, distant thereon thirty-one (31) feet, three (3) 
inches southerly from the corner formed by the in- 
tersection of the easterly line of Octavia Street with 
the southerly line of Lombard Street, and running 
thence southerly and along said line of Octavia 
Street twenty-five (25) feet; thence at a right angle 
easterly one hundred (100) feet; thence at a right 
angle northerly twenty-five (25) feet; and thence at 
a right angle westerly one hundred (100) feet to 
the point of beginning; being part of WESTERN 
ADDITION BLOCK Number 170. 

You are hereby notified that, unless you so appear 
and answer, the plaintiff will apply to the Court for 
the relief demanded in the complaint, to-wit, that 
it be adjudged that plaintiff is the owner of said 
property in fee simple absolute; that his title to 
said property be established and quieted; that the 
Court ascertain and determine all estates, rights, 
titles, interests and claims in and to said property, 
and every part thereof, whether the same be legal 
or equitable, present or future, vested or contingent, 
and whether the same consist of mortgages or liens 
of any description ; that plaintiff recover his costs 
herein and have such other and further relief as 
may be meet in the premises. 

Witness my hand and the seal of said Court this 
20th day of June, A. D. 1912. 

(SEAL) H. I. MULCREVY, Clerk. 

By S. I. HUGHES, Deputy Clerk. 

The first publication of this summons was made in 
"The Wasp" newspaper on the 6th day of July, 
A. D. 1912. 

PERRY & DAILEY, Attorneys for Plaintiff, 105 
Montgomery Street, San Francisco, Cal. 



Saturday, July 0, 1912.] 



-THE WASP - 



25 



Gray hair restored to its natural color by Al- 
fredum's Egyptian Henna — a perfectly harm- 
less dye, and the effect is immediate. The 
most certain and satisfactory preparation for 
the purpose. Try it. At all druggietB. 
♦ 

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE AND FOR PUBLICA- 
TION FOR CHANGE OF NAME. 



[N THE SUPERIOR COURT OF THE OTTY AND 
County of San Francisco, State of California. — Dept. 

N.. lit. 

IN THE HATTER OP TREWELLA-KENDALL 
• .it orporalion.— No. 42,989 

n appearing that TREWELLA-KENDALL CO. 
haa Bled uu application to tins Court praying tor a 
i-hunce of its corporate name to TREWELLA- 
rONKIN CO., 

h is therefore hereby ordered that Tuesday the l.'Mh 
day of August, 1912, in the courtroom of Dept. No. 
I .11 of said Court in the New City Hall, No. 1231 
Market Street, said City and County of San Fran- 
Btate "i California, at ten o'clock a. m. of 
said day, are hereby fixed as the time and place 
for hearing said application, and all persons inter- 
ested in said matter are hereby directed to appear 
before said Court, ;it said time and place, to pre- 
Miit any objections to the said application, and to 
ihow cause why it should not be granted; and that 
a copy of this order to show cause be published for 
a period of thirty days before the said 13th day of 
August, 1912. in "The Wasp," ' a newspaper of 
general circulation, printed and published in the said 
City and County. 

Dated, June 25th, 1912. 

THOS. F. GRAHAM, 

Judge of soid Superior Court. 

SUMMONS. 



IN THE SUPERIOR COURT OF THE STATE OF 
California, in and for the City and County of San 
Francisco. — Dept. No. 10. 

NORENA M. LIBBY, Plaintiff, vs. BURR A. 
L1BBY, Defendant. — Action No. 42,622. 

Action brought in the Superior Court of the State 
of California in and for the City and County of 
San Francisco, and the Complaint filed in the office 
of the County Clerk of said City and County. 

The People of the State of California send greet- 
ing to BURR A. LIBBY, Defendant. 

You are hereby required to appear in an action 
brought against you by the above-named Plaintiff 
in the Superior Court of the State of California, in 
and for the City and County of San Francisco, and 
to answer the Complaint filed therein within ten 
days (exclusive of the day of service) after the 
service on you of this summons, if served within 
this City and County; or if served elsewhere within 
thirty days. 

The said action is brought to obtain a judgment 
and decree of this Court dissolving the bonds of 
matrimony now existing between plaintiff and de- 
fendant, on the ground of defendant's willful neg- 
lect and desertion, also for general relief, as will 
more fully appear in the Complaint on file, to which 
special reference is hereby made. 

And you are hereby notified that, unless you ap- 
pear and answer as above required, the said Plaint- 
iff will take judgment for any moneys or damages 
demanded in the complaint as arising upon contract, 
or will apply to the Court for any other relief de- 
manded in the complaint. 

Given under my hand and the seal of the Superior 
Court of the State of California, in and for the City 
and County of San Francisco, this 1st day of June, 
A. D. 1912. 

(SEAL) H. I. MULCREVY, Clerk. 

By L. W. WELCH, Deputy Clerk. 

The first publication of this summons was made 
in "The WaBp" newspaper on the 8th day of June, 
A. D. 1912. 

GERALD C. HAI-SEY, Attorney for Plaintiff, 
501-502 503 California Pacific Building, San Fran- 
cisco, Cal. 

NOTICE TO CREDITORS. 



No. 13569. Dept. 10. 
ESTATE OF PATRIZIO MARSICANO, sometimes 

called P. MARSICANO, Deceased. 

Notice is hereby given by the undersigned Execu- 
trix of the Last Will and Testament of PATRIZIO 
MARSICANO, sometimes called P. MARSICANO, 
deceased, to the creditors of and all persons having 
claims against the said deceased, to exhibit them 
with the necessary vouchers within ten (10) months 
after the first publication of this notice to the 
said Executrix at the office of GERALD C. HAL- 
SEY, .ksq., Attorney for said Executrix, at No. 
501-502-503 California Pacific Bldg, corner Sutter 
and Montgomery Sts., San Francisco, California, 
which said office the undersigned selects as her place 
of business in all matters connected with said 
estate of PATRIZIO MARSICANO, sometimes called 
P. MARSICANO, deceased. 

MARY MARSICANO, 
sometimes called MARINA MARSICANO, 

Executrix of the Last Will and Testament of 
PATRIZIO MARSICANO, sometimes called P. 
MARSICANO, Deceased. 

Dated, San Francisco, June 12, 1912. 
GERALD C. HALSJEY, Attorney for Executrix, 
501-502-503 California Pacific Bldg., 105 Mont- 
gomery street, San Francisco, Cal. 



DIVIDEND NOTICES 

Associated Savings Banks of 

San Francisco. 



ITALIAN-AMERICAN BANK, S. K. corner of Mont- 
gomery and Sacramento sis. — For the half yvar 
ending June 30, 1912, a dividend has been declar- 
ed at the rate <>f fuur t-ii per cent per annum on 
all savings deposits, free of taxes, payable 00 and 
after Monday, July 1, 191J Dividends not called 
for will be added to the principal and bear the 
same rate of interest from July 1, 1912. Money 
deposited on or before July 10, 1912, will earn 
interest from July 1. 1912. 

A, SBARBORO, President. 

HUMBOLDT SAVINGS BANK, 783 Market Street, 
near 4th. — For the half year ending June 30, 
1912, a dividend has been declared at the rate of 
four (4) per cent per annum on all savings de- 
posits, free of taxes, payable on and after Monday, 
July 1, 1912, Dividends not called for are added 
to and bear the same rate of interest as the princi- 
pal from July 1, 1912. 

H. O. KLEVESAHL, Cashier. 



THE GERMAN SAVINGS AND LOAN SOCIETY 
(The German Bank), 526 California Street. Mis- 
sion Branch, 2572 Mission St., near 22nd. Rich- 
mond District Branch, 601 Clement St., corner 
7th Ave. Haight Street Branch, 1456 Haight St., 
bet. Masonic and Ashbury. — For the half year 
ending June 30, 1912, a dividend has ^een declared 
at the rate of four (4) per cent per annum on all 
deposits, free of taxes, payable on and after 
Monday, July 1, 1912. Dividends not called for 
are added to the deposit account and earn divi- 
dends from July 1, 1912. 

GEORGE TOURNY, Manager. 

THE HIBERNIA SAVINGS AND LOAN SOCIETY, 
corner Market, McAllister and Jones Sts. — For 
the six months ending June 30, 1912, a dividend 
has been declared at the rate of three and three- 
fouiths (3%) per cent per annum on all deposits, 
free of taxes, payable on and after Monday, July 
1, 1912. Dividends not drawn will be added, to 
depositors' accounts, become a part thereof, and 
will earn dividends from July 1, 1912. Deposits 
made on or before July 10, 1912, will draw inter- 
est from July 1, 1912. 

R. M. TOBIN, Secretary. 



SECURITY SAVINGS BANK, 316 Montgomery St. 
— For the half year ending July 30, 1912, a divi- 
dend upon all deposits at the rate of four (4) 
per cent per annum, free of taxes, will be payable 
on and after July 1, 1912. 

FRED W. RAY, Secretary. 
♦ 

The only pleasure a man gets out of doing his duty 
is the way he can bawl through the world that he 
did it. 



Market Street Stables 



\/\ 




New Class A concrete building, recreation 
yard, pure air and sunshine. HorseB 
boarded $25 per month, box stalls $30 
per month. LIVERY. Business and 
park rigs and saddle horses. 



C. B. DREW, Prop. 

1840 Market Street. San Francisco 

PHONE PARK 263. 



SUMMONS. 



IN THE SUPERIOR COURT OF THE STATE OP 
California, in and for the City and County of San 
Francisco.- — Dept. No. 5. 

EUGENE «J. CRELLER, Plaintiff, vs. All persona 
claiming any interest in or lien upon the real prop* 
erty herein described or any part theroof.Defend- 
ants. — Action No. 32,212. 

The People of the State of California, to all per- 
sons claiming any interest in, or lien upon, the real 
property herein described or any part thereof, Da 
fen dan ts, greeting: 

You are hereby required to appear and answer 
the complaint of EUGENE 0. ORELLER, plaintiff, 
filed with the Clerk of the above entitled Court ami 
County, within three montliB after the first publi- 
cation of this summons, and to set forth what in- 
terest or lien, if any, you have in or upon thai cer- 
tain real property, or any part thereof, situated in 
the City and County of San Francisco, State of 
California, and particularly described as follows: 

FIRST: Beginning at a point on the northerly 
line of Oak Street, distant thereon one hundred and 
ten (110) feet easterly from the corner formed by 
the intersection of the northerly line of Oak Street 
with the easterly line of Octavia Street, and running 
thence easterly and along, said line of Oak Street 
twenty-seven (27) feet, six (6) inches; thence at a 
right angle northerly one hundred and twenty (120) 
feet to the southerly line of Hickory Avenue^ thence 
westerly along said line of Hickory Avenue twenty- 
seven (27) feet, six (6) inches; and thence at a 
right angle southerly one hundred and twenty (120) 
feet to the point of beginning; being part of WEST- 
ERN ADDITION BLOCK Number 147. 

SECOND: Beginning at a point on the southerly 
line of Pine Street, distant thereon thirty (30) feet 
easterly from the corner formed by the intersection 
of the southerly line of Pine Street with the easter- 
ly line of Presidio Avenue, and running thence east- 
erly and along said line of Pine Street thirty-one 
(31) feet, five (5) inches; thence at a right angle 
southerly eighty-seven (87) feet, six (6i inches; 
thence at a right angle westerly thirty-one (31) 
feet, five (5) inches; and thence at a right angle 
northerly eighty-seven (87) feet, six (6) incheB to 
the point of beginning; being part of WESTERN 
ADDITION BLOCK Number 620. 

THIRD: Beginning at a point on the northwest- 
erly line of Howard Street, distant thereon two hun- 
dred and twenty-five (225) feet southwesterly from 
the corner formed by the intersection of the north- 
westerly line of Howard Street with the southwest- 
erly line of Sixth Street, and running thence south- 
westerly and along said line of Howard Street fifty 
(50) feet; thence at a right angle northwesterly 
ninety (90) feet; thence at a right angle northeast- 
erly fifty (50) feet; and thence at a right angle 
southeasterly ninety (90) feet to the point of be- 
ginning. 

FOURTH: Beginning at the corner formed by 
the intersection of the southerly line of Union 
Street with the westerly line of Polk Street, and 
running thence southerly aud along said line of Polk 
Street thirty (30) feet; thence at a right angle 
westerly seventy (70) feet; thence at a right angle 
northerly thirty (30) feet to the southerly line of 
Union Street; and thence easterly and along said 
line of Union Street seventy (70) feet to the point 
of beginning; being part of WESTERN ADDITION 
BLOCK Number 46. 

You are hereby notified that, unless you so ap- 
pear and answer, the plaintiff will apply to the 
Court for the relief demanded in the complaint, to- 
wit, that it be adjudged that plaintiff is the owner 
of said property in fee simple absolute; that his 
title to said property be established and quieted; 
that the Court ascertain and determine all estates, 
rights, titles, interests and claims in and to said 
property, and every part thereof, whether the same 
he legal or equitable, present or future, vested or 
contingent, and whether the same consist of mort- 
gages or liens of any description; that plaintiff 
recover his costs herein and have such other and 
further relief as may be meet in the premises. 

Witness my hand and the seal of said Court, this 
10th day of May, A. D. 1912. 
(SEAL) H. I. MULCREVY, Clerk. 

By J. F. DUNWORTH, Deputy Clerk. 

The first publication of this summons was made 
in "The Wasp" newspaper on the 18th day of May, 
A. D. 1912. 

The following persons are said to claim an inter- 
est in, or lien upon, said property adverse to plain- 
tiff: 

MOSES ELLIS', JR., Framingham, Massachusetts. 

KATE ELLIS, Framingham, Massachusetts. 

MARTHA E. BEAN, Framingham, Massachusetts. 

MARY F. ELLIS, Framingham, Massachusetts. 

GRACE E. HALL, Chicago, Illinois. 

PERRY & DAILEY, Attorneys for Plaintiff, 105 
Montgomery Street, San Francisco. GARRET W. 
McENERNEY and GEORGE H. MASTICK, of Coun- 
sel. 



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-THE WASP 



[Saturday, July G, 1912. 



WATER WEEK 

AT SANTA CRUZ 



A fairy Jake, viewed from the decks of a 
huge phantom ship, erected on a grass-grown 
island in San Lorenzo River — this is to be 
scene of the great water pageant and carni- 
val at Santa Cruz, starting on July 20th, and 
lasting an entire week. Hundreds of work- 
men, under the direct personal management 
of Mr. f'red Stanton, are gradually transform- 
ing the sandy flats just south of Hotel (Jasa 
del Rey into a veritable fairyland, soon to 
be peopled with strange and wonderful 
gnomes, genii and pixies and guarded by a 
fleet of mystic water craft, each vessel of 
which will remind you of Shakespeare 's ' 'Mid- 
summer Night s JJream. " 

It is a bold idea of Manager Swanton's, 
and one that will not soon be forgotten by 
those who are fortunate enough to witness 
the festival. It contemplates the damming 
of the San Lorenzo River a stone 's throw 
from where it joins the mighty Pacific, in or- 
der to create a charming lake; the decoration 
of the southern banks of that river Intil it 
shall resemble Arcady; the construction, on 
an island, of a huge amphitheater in the 
shape of a Spanish galleon, eapable of seating 
4,0U0 persons; and then a nightly parade of 
gorgeous floats and boats, filled with singing 
and dancing girls, robust steersmen and sol- 
diers and happy children. Rome, in its days 
of splendor, never conceived anything more 
entrancing. 

And then, to be sure, there will be the 
hundred daylight diversions for the visitor — 
the yacht, motor-boat, shell, swimming and 
hydroplane races; the airships encircling the 
lofty blue; the bathing, fishing, dancing, rid- 
ing and skylarking on the mile-long board 
walk. More than fifty great white birds, be- 
longing to the Corinthians and other yachts- 
men, will be in the harbor; an equal number 
of motor-boats; a pair of Uncle Sam's cruis- 
ers and two of his submarines; an even dozen 
of the world's famous swimmers, under the 
direction of Sidney Cavill; and, to erown ±i 
all, thousands of dollars worth of fireworks, 
which will illuminate the sky at the close of 
each evening's entertainment. 

in the preparation of the program Manager 
Swauton has been aided materially by Com 
modore Conney of the Corinthians, and ex- 
Commodore Hogg, each of "whom" has taken a 
keen interest in the carnival. The railroad 
company is offering exceptionally low fares 
for the week, and the hotels and cottage cities 
of Santa Cruz have pledged themselves to 
make no advances over their regular rates. 
Altogether, ' ' Water Week ' ' at Santa Cruz 
should be the biggest thing ever attempted on 
the Pacific Coast; and Manager Swanton is to 
be congratulated upon evolving such a meri- 
torious entertainment. 




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AT DEL MONTE. 

The Mayor brought Mrs. Eolph and their 
children down in their big louring car to 
spend their summer vacation in the most ideal 
way — in a cottage not far from Pebble Beach 
Lodge, in the midst of the piney woods, where 
the playground is without boundary and the 
comforts of the city home are afforded. 
"Ocean View Cottage" is on the famous 
Seventeen-Mile Drive, and situated in one of 
the most picturesuqe* places, where for every 
rural enjoj'ment nothing could be more invit- 
ing. 

Mrs. Lippmann Sachs, Mrs. E. M. Heller, 
Mr. and Mrs. Albert Baruch, their daughter 
Mary, and son, Albert Baruch Jr., are occu- 
pying the suite usually reserved for them, 
and expect to spend some time enjoying the 
balmy but exhilarating climate, beautiful 
scenery and the boulevards. Much of their 
time "will be devoted to golf, as well as other 
pleasures which the splendid, outdoor life of 
Del Monte affords. 

Mr. Walter Loewy came down to visit his 
parents, Mr. and Mrs. William Loewey, and 
sister, Miss Marguerite, who expect to extend 
their Del Monte visit for many weeks yet. 

Mr. and Mrs. Armand Cailleau are enjoying 
a month of Del Monte 's restfulness and quiet 
away from the din of traffic, but expect to 
return after the golf tournament of the Fourth 
is over. 

Mr. ana Mrs. J. K. Armsby, Miss Arnisby, 
Mr. and Mrs. Wayman of Ross, and a friend 
from Chicago, Miss Fisher, were down for a 
short visit. 

The United States army officers always en- 
joy Del Monte, and a party of young friends, 
including Mr. M. F. Smith, H. J. Breis and 
J. L. Dodge, spent the week in pleasant rec- 
reation and visiting comrades. 



BIRTH OF THE OPAL. 



The sunbeam loved the moonbeam, ' 

And followed her low and high; 
The moonbeam fled and hid her head, 

She was so shy, so shy. 
The sunbeam wooed with passion; 

Ah, he was a lover bold; 
And his heart was afire with mad desire 

For the moonbeam pale and cold. 
She fled like a dream before him, 

Her hair was a golden sheen; 
And oh, that fate would annihilate 

The space that lay between. 
Just as the day lay dying 

In the arms of the twilight dim, 
The sunbeam caught the one he sought 

And drew her close to him. 
But out of his warm arms, startled 

And stirred by love's first shock, 
She sprang afraid, like a trembling maid, 

And hid in the niche of a rock. 
But the sunbeam followed and found lifr 

And lead her to love's own feast, 
And they were wed on that rocky bed 

And the dying day was their priest. 



And lo, the beautiful opal, 

That rare and wondrous gem, 
Where the moon and the sun blend into on 

Is t lie child that was born to them. 

—Ella Wheeler Wilcox. 



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PATIENTS SPEAK POR THEMSELVES. 

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Saturday, July 6, 1912.J 



SUMMONS. 

THH SUPERIOR COURT OF Tilt; STATE OF 
California, in and fur the City and County of San 
Francisco.— D< 

■ iRAL IRON WORKS >,a corporation), Plain- 
tiff, vs. Alt persons cluiiuing any [uteres! 
lien upon tin- real property herein described or any 
part ih i .nts. — Action No. B2, 

The Peuple of the State of California, to all per 
■una claiming any Interest In, or Uen upon, 

frtj herein "described or any purt thereof. De- 
complaint ol CENTRAL IKON WORKS (a corpora- 
tion), plaintiff, tiled with the Clerk of the above 
entitled Court and Cuunty. within three months 
after the first publication of this summons, and to 
Bet forth what interest or lieu, if any, you nave In 
or upon that certain real property, or any part 
thereof, situated in the City and County of Sun Fran- 
cisco, State of California, and particularly described 
as roil i 

FIRST; Beginning at a point on the easterly line 
of Florida Street, distant thereon two hundred and 
thirty three (283) feet southerly, from tho corner 
formed by the intersection of the easterly line of 
Florida Street with the southerly line of Eighteenth 

Street, and running thence southerly and along 
eaid line of Florida Street twenty-five (25) feet; 
thence at a right angle easterly one hundred (100) 
feet; thence at a right angle northerly twenty-five 
(25) feet; and thence at a right angle westerly one 
hundred (lOOj feet to the point of beginning; being 
pari Of POTRERO NUEVO BLOCK Number 29. 

SEECOND: Beginning at a point on the westerly 
line of Bryant Street, distant thereon one hundred 
and Beventy-five (175) feet southerly from the cor- 
er formed by the intersection of the westerly line of 
Bryant Street with the southerly line of Eighteenth 
Street, and running thence southerly and along said 
line of Bryant Street twenty-five (25) feet; thence 
at a right angle westerly one hundred (100) feet; 
tbence at a right angle northerly twenty-five (25) 
feet; and thence at a right angle easterly one hun- 
dred (100) feet to the point of beginning; being 
part of POTRERO NUEVO BLOCK Number 29. 

You are hereby notified that, unless you so ap- 
pear and answer, the plaintiff will apply to the 
Court for the relief demanded in the complaint, to- 
wit, that it be adjudged that plaintiff is the owner 
of said property in fee simple absolute; that its 
title to said property be established and quieted; 
that the Court ascertain and determine all estates, 
rights, titles, Interests and claims in and to said 
property, and every part thereof, whether the same 
be legal or equitable, present or future, vested or 
contingent, and whether the same consist of mort- 
gages, or tiens of any description; that plaintiff 
recover its costs herein and have such other and 
further relief as may be meet in the premises. 

Witness my hand and the seal of said Court, 
this 28th day of March, A. D. 1912. 
(SEAL) rf. I. MULCREVY, Clerk. 

By S. I. HUGHES, Deputy Clerk. 

The first publication of this summons was made 
in "The Wasp" newspaper on the 4th day of May, 
A. D. 1912. 

PERRY & DAILEY, Attorneys for Plaintiff, 105 
Montgomery Street, San Francisco, Cal. GARRET 
W. McENERNEY and GEORGE H. MASTICK, of 
Counsel. 

SUMMONS. 



-TIOASP 



THE SUPERIOR COURT OP THE STATE OF 
California, in and for the City and County of San 
Francisco. — Dept. No. 3. 

SARAH A. BRYAN, Plaintiff, vs. All persons 
claiming any interest in or lien upon the real prop- 
erty herein described or any part thereof, Defend- 
ants. — Action No. 32,102. 

The People of the State of California, to all 
persons claiming any interest in, or lien upon, 
the real property herein described or any part there- 
pf Defendants, greeting; 

You are hereby required to appear and answer 
the complaint of SARAH A. BRYAN, plaintiff, fliled 
with the Clerk of the above entitled Court and 
County, within three months after the first publi- 
cation of this summons, and to set forth what in- 
terest or lieu, if any, you have in or upon that 
certain real property, or any part thereof, situated 
in the City and County of San Francisco, State of 
California, and particularly described as follows: 

FIRST: Beginning at the corner formed by the 
intersection of the southerly line of Geary Street 
with the easterly line of Hyde Street, and running 
thence easterly along said line of Geary Street sixty- 
eight (68) feet, six (6) inches; thence at a right 
angle southerly ninety-seven (97) feet, six (6) inch- 
es; thence at a right angle westerly sixty-eight (68) 
feet, six (6) inches to the easterly line of Hyde 
Street; and thence northerly along said line of 
Hyde Street ninety-seven (97) feet, six (6) inches 
to the point of beginning. 

SECOND: Beginning at a point on the easterly 
line of Laguna Street, distant thereon one hundred 
and thirty-seven (137) feet, six (6) inches noith- 
erly from the corner formed by the intirsecti'm of 
the easterly line of Laguna Street with the norther- 
ly line of Broadway, and running thence northerly 
along said line of Laguna Street thirty (30) feet; 
thence at a right angle easterly one hundred and 
ninety-one ( 191 ) feet, three ( 3 ) incheB ; thence at 
a right angle southerly thirty (30) feet; and thence 
at a right angle westerly one hundred and ninety- 



THE WASP 

Published weekly by the 

WASP PUBLISHING COMPANY 

Office of publication 

121 Second St., San Francisco, Cal. 

Phones — Suiter 789, J 2705. 

Entered at the San Francisco Postoffice as second 
class matter. 

SUBSCRIPTION RATES — In the United States, 
Canada and Mexico, 95 a year in advance; six 
months, $2.50; three months, $1.25; single 
copies, 10 cents. For sale by all newsdealers. 

FOREIGN SUBSCRIPTIONS— To countries with 
in the PuBtul Union, $6 per year. 



one (191) feet, three (3) inches to the point of 
beginning 

THIRD: Beginning at a point on tho northerly 
line oi Montana Street, distant thereon two hundred 
(200) feot easterly from the corner formed by the 
intersection of iho northerly line of Montana Street 
with the easterly Hue of Marengo Street, and ruuning 
thence westerly along said line of Montana Street 
two hundred (200) feet to the easterly line of 
Marengo Street; thence northerly along said line of 
Marengo Street one hundred and twenty-five (125) 
feet; thence at a right angle easterly two hundred 
(200) feet; and thence at a right angle southerly 
one hundred and twenty-five (125) feet to the 
point of beginning; being lot number three (3), in 
block "W," as per map of RAILROAD HOME- 
STEAD ASSOCIATION, surveyed by A. E. McGreg- 
or, March, 1867, and filed April 15, 1867. 

Yo uare hereby notified that, unless you so appear 
and answer, the plaintiff will apply to the Court 
for the relief demanded in the complaint, to-wit, 
that it be adjudged that plaintiff is the owner of 
said propery in fee simple absolute; that her title 
to said property be established and quieted; that 
the Court ascertain and determine all estates, rights, 
titles, interest and claims in and to said property, 
and every part thereof, whether the same he legal 
or equitable, present or future, vested or contin- 
gent, and whether the same consist of mortgages 
or liens of any description; that plaintiff recover 
her costs herein and have such other and further 
relief as may be meet in the premises. 

Witness my hand and the seal of said Court, 
this 11th day of April, A. D. 1912. 
(SEAL) H. I. MULCREVY, Clerk. 

By J. F. DUNWORTH, Deputy Clerk. 

The first publication of this summons was made 
in "The Wasp" newspaper on the 4th day of May, 
A. D. 1912. 

The following persons are said to claim an interest 
in, or lien upon, the said property adverse to Plain- 
tiff: 

MUTUAL SAVINGS BANK OP SAN FRAN- 
CISCO (a corporation), San Francisco, California. 

MERCANTILE TRUST COMPANY OF SAN 
FRANCISCO (a corporation), as Trustee for SAV- 
INGS UNION BANK AND TRUST COMPANY (a 
corporation), San Francisco, California. 

PERRY & DAILEY, Attorneys for Plaintiff, 105 
Montgomery Street, San Francisco, Cal. GARRET 
W. McENERNEY and GEORGE H. MASTICK, of 
Counsel. 

SUMMONS. 



IN THE SUPERIOR COURT OF THE STATE OF 
California, in and for the City and County of San 
Francisco. — Dept. No. 8. 

MARGARET O'MALLEY, Plaintiff, vs. All per- 
sons claiming any interest in or lien upon the real 
property herein described or any part thereof, De- 
fendants. — Action No. 32,228. 

The People of the State of California, to all per- 
sons claiming any interest in, or lien upon, the 
real property herein described or any part thereof, 
Defendants, greeting : 

You are hereby required to appear and answer 
the complaint of MARGARET O'MALLEY, plaintiff, 
filed with the Clerk of the above entitled Court and 
County, within thre months after the first publica- 
tion of this summons, and to set forth what interest 
or lien, if any, you have in or upon that certain real 
property, or any part thereof, situated in the City 
and County of San Francisco, State of California, 
and particularly described as follows. 

Beginning at a point on tne northerly line of 
Irving (formerly "I") Street, distant thereon ninety- 
five (95 feet easterly from the corner formed by 
the intersection of the northerly line of Irving 
Street with the easterly line of Second Avenue, and 
running thence easterly and along said line of 
Irving Street twenty-five (25) feet; thence at a 
right angle northerly one hundred and ten (110) 
feet; thence at a right angle westerly twenty-five 



27 



(25) feet; and thence at a right angle southerly 

one hundred and ten (110) feet to tb 

nejinnii .ufcl LAND BLOCK 

¥ou »r« hereby notified that, unlesB you io 
and answer, the plaintiff will apply to the 
for the relief demanded In the complnim, to 
hat it be adjudged that the plaintiff is the 
of said property in feo simple absolute; that 
I .tnd quieted; 
that the Court ascertain ana' determine all estates, 
titles, interests and claims in and to said 
rty, and every part thereof, whether the same 
be legal or equitable, present or future, vested or 
lit, nod whether (he lame consist of mort- 
gages or Hens of any description; that plaintiff re- 
c n er her costs b< rein and havi and fur- 

ther relief as may be meet in the premises. 

Witness my hand and the seal of said Court this 
Lflth day vi Me 1 1 1912. 

SEAL H. I. MULCREVY, Clerk. 

By J. F. DUNWORTH, Deputy Clerk. 
The first publication of this Summons was made in 
The WaBp newspaper on tho 1st day of June, A. D. 

I M J, 

The following persons are said to claim some in- 
terest in said renl property adversely to plaintiff: 

BANK OP DALY (a corporation), San Francisco, 
I alifornia. 

PERRY ft DAILEY, Attorneys for Plaintiff, 105 
Montgomery Street, San Francisco, Cal. GARRET 
W. McKNERNEY and GEORGE H. MASTICK, of 
Counsel. 



SUMMONS. 



IN THE SUPERIOR COURT OF THE STATE OF 
California, in and for the City and County of San 
Francisco. — Dept. No. 2. 

MYRTLE R. S.AYLOR, Plaintiff, vs. All persons 
claiming any interest in or lien upon the real prop- 
erty herein described or any part thereof, Defend- 
ants. — Action No. 32,239. 

The People of the State of California, to all per- 
sons claiming any interest in, or lien upon, the real 
property herein described or any part thereof, De- 
fendants, greeting : 

You are hereby required to appear and answer 
the complaint of MYRTLE R. SAYLOR, plaintiff, 
filed with the Clerk of the above entitled Court 
and County, within three months after the first pub- 
lication of this Summons, and to set forth what in- 
terest or lien, if any, you have in or upon that cer- 
tain real property or any part thereof, situated in 
the City and County of San Francisco, State of 
California, and particularly described as follows: 

Beginning at the corner formed by the intersec- 
tion of the northerly line of Lake Street with the 
westerly line of Seventh Avenue, and running thence 
northerly along said line of Seventh Avenue twenty- 
five (25) feet; thence at a right angle westerly one 
hundred and fourteen 1114) feet; thence at a right 
angle southerly twenty-five (25) feet to the north- 
erly line of Lake Street; and thence easterly and 
along said line of Lake Street one hundred and 
fourteen (114) feet to tne point of beginning; being 
part of OUTSIDE LAND BLOCK Number 65. 

You are hereby notified that, unless you so appear 
and answer, the plaintiff will apply to the Court 
for the relief demanded in the complaint, to-wit, that 
it be adjudged that plaintiff is the owner of the 
parcel of real property described in the complaint 
herein in fee simple absolute; that her title to 
said property be established and quieted; that the 
Court ascertain and determine all estates, rights, 
titles, interests and claims in and to said property, 
and every part thereof, whether the same be legal 
or equitable, present or future, vested o? contingent, 
and whether the same consist of mortgages or liens 
of any description; that plaintiff recover her costs 
herein and have such other and further relief as 
may be meet in the premises. 

Witness my hand and the seal of said Court this 
17th day of May, A. D. 1912. 

(SEAL) H. I. MULCREVY, Clerk. 

By J. F. DUNWORTH, Deputy Clerk. 

The first publication of this summons was made 
in The Wasp newspaper on the 1st day of June. 
A. D. 1912. 

PERRY & DAILEY, Attorneys for Plaintiff, 105 
Monte-ornery Street, San Francisco, Cal. GARRET 
W. McENERNEY and GEORGE H. MASTICK, of 
Counsel. 

NOTICE TO CREDITORS. 



No. 13497. Dept. 10. 
ESTATE OF JOHN COYLE, DECEASED. 

Notice is hereby eiven by the undersigned, M. J. 
Hynes, Administrator of the estate of John 
Coyle, deceased to the creditors of and all personB 
having claims against the said deceased, to ex- 
hibit them with the necessary vouchers within four 
(4) months after the first publication of this notice 
to the said Administrator, at his office, room 858 
Phclan Building, San Francisco, California, which 
said office the undersigned selects as the place of 
business in all matters oonnected with said estate of 
JOHN COYLE, Deceased. 

M. J. HYNES, 
Administrator of the estate of John Coyle, 
deceased. 
Dated, San Francisco, May 28, 1912. 
CULLINAN & HIOKEY, Attorneys for Adminis- 
trator, 858 Phelan Building, San Francisco, Cal. 



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TO CHICAGO 
AND RETURN 

on the Peerless 


OAKLAND. 








GOLDEN STATE 


YOSEMITE 




LIMITED 


NATIONAL PARK 

The Outing Place of California. 
SNOW-CAPPED MOUNTAINS :: THUNDERING WATER- 




A Transcontinental Delight. 


FALLS :: MIRROR LAKES AND HAPPY ISLES 

: : MASSIVE WALLS AND DOMES : 

A Galaxy Unsurpassed 

A SMOOTH, DUSTLESS. WELL-SPRINKLED 
ROAD INTO THE VALLEY 




THIS RATE GOOD ON MANY DATS IN JUNE, 


A Special Feature of This Season's Trip 




JULY, AUGUST AND SEPTEMBER. 


The waterfalls are booming full. Conditions in the Valley 
were never better than this season. Surrounding mountain 
peaks and watersheds are covered with late snows, which 




Similar Low Rates to Many Other Eastern Points 


insures a lasting flow of water. 

Why visit the commonplace resort, when the sublime and 
the beautiful beckon you. Cost of this trip is now reduced 




Return Limit October 31st, 1912 


to popular prices. Four excellent camps offer the visitor the 
most pleasing entertainment: 

CAMP CURRY — CAMP AHWAHNEE — CAMP LOST ARROW 
SENTINEL HOTEL 
Each is charmingly and picturesquely situated on the floor 
of the valley, surrounded by the masterpieces of Nature. 




Telephone or Write Our Agents. 


It is now a quick, comfortable trip into the Valley. For 
full information or descriptive folder, address your camp or 
hotel in Yosemite, any ticket office or information bureau in 




Rock Island 


California, or 

Yosemite Valley Railroad 




Southern Pacific 




COMPANY 

MERCED, CAL. 









$M3S&xtm&s®o^^ 



Vol. LXVIII— No. 2. 



S.\N FEANCISCO. JULY 13, 1912. 



Price, 10 Cents. 




§ 



i 
i 




T, 

ESTABLISHED 1876 

The Pacific Coast Weekly 



iMXomo^:-*wio'm<mm^ 




I 



1 
s 

f 
I 
gl 

i 
s 

s 

9 



§ 



i 



IIN VACATION SEASON 

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ATTRACTIVE TERMS TO PERMANENT GUESTS 




Vol. LXVm— No. 2. 



SAX FRANCISCO, JUNE 13, 1912. 



fnce lu Uem. 



P 



ii ! ) .^lVGUSH. 

BY AMERICUS 



ii.ii. 



atten 



, ECENTLY I have had occasion to direct 
tion to the frightful 
extravagance i n 
municipal affairs. 
Bond money has been flung 
away like waste paper. X 
called the attention of Su- 
pervisor McCarthy, Chair- 
man of the Finance Commit- 
tee, to the waste, and it be- 
gins to appear as if that 
Official realizes that the time 
"to fall a halt has arrived. Mr. 
McCarthy is a conscientious 
official. It is to be hoped he 
will also demonstrate that he 
is a resolute one. It takes a 
man with a nerve of iron to 
resist the raiders of the 
treasury. Like the daugh- 
ters of the horseleech of 
which the poet has written, 
they continually cry, "Give! 
give! " Their clamor is cease- 
less, and their greediness 
passeth that of a prize hog 
fattening himself with both 
feet in the trough. 

Mayor Rolph also begins to 
demonstrate that he realizes 
tue need of firmness in re- 
sisting raids on the treasury. 
..tie turned a deaf ear to the 
demand of Supervisor Nolan 
that a political engineer be 
given a position at $200 a 
month to plan out improve- 
ments for the city front. The 
money might as well be 
chucked into the bay. 

The representatives of 
union labor on the Board of 
Supervisors would be delight- 
ed to see Mayor* Rolph ac- 
quiesce in extravagance. The 

more wasteful the better for KIND 01jD GENTLEMAN: "And which of the Republi 
tneir plans. They are schem- "Oh, I'm the one they can't do uuffin wiv." 



ing already to pile up the cost of city government, disgust the 
taxpayers great and small, and thus pave 1 lie way tu the election 
of a Mayor backed by the labor vote and its usual allies. 

Supervisor McCarthy has noticed that the bottom of the city's 
barrel ui' mouey is not as far down as most people imagine, lb- 
evidently begins to see it through the disappeariug coin. His 
holding up of the bid of llalsey & Co. for municipal bonds 
showed what was passing through the mind of the Chairman ol 
the Finance Committee. 

llalsey & Co. 'a bid was $5,542,312 for $5,300,000 par value ot 
several 5 per cent issues. The premium of $242,312 offered by 
the bond bidders reduces the actual interest rate to 4. 78 per 
cent. That's the interest the city would pay for the money — 
4.78 per cent. But when the Geary Street Railway municipal 
bonds were sold, the city had to pay but 4.50. The plain English 
of this is that San Francisco is paying more interest for her 
loans than she did. The more bonds she sells the higher the 
interest she must pay. That is the usual rule with all borrow- 
ers, whether persons or municipalities. Their credit isn't :is 
good as when they began to borrow. 

Supervisor McCarthy didn't like the idea of the city's paying 
more interest than before, so he and his colleagues hesitated 

about accepting the bid of 




twins arc you 



Halsey & Co. They wanted 
to think the matter over. 
Thinking it over may result 
in the Supervisors realizing 
the causes of the rise. One 
of the causes is the general 
rise in the cost of money. 
Another cause is that mu- 
nicipal bonds are flooding the 
bond market of the United 
States. There are more of- 
ferings of them than buyers 
are normally digesting, so, as 
the bond dealers put it, new 
offers of municipals have to 
be sweetened to make bond 
buyers assimilate them. The 
sweetening of municipal 
bonds is. accomplished by 
making them pay a higher 
interest return. A nice, fat, 
juicy bond, paying 5Vj or 
per cent, with the credit of 
a big city back of it, will al- 
ways find buyers. 
tALy/Pga Other causes that are re- 
^sponsible for the rise iu the 
bond interest rate which San 
... Francisco pays are local. 
That is to say, they are 



THE WASP- 



[Saturday, July 13, 1912. 



wholly causes of our own creation. The city 
is paying out all ol its bond money, which is 
its municipal capital, in the acquisition of 
property or the accomplishment of objects 
which are not reproductive of new capital. 
The city is acquiring articles de lux — civic, 
parks, playgrounds, hospitals, libraries, audi- 
toriums, opera houses, bandstands, boulevards 
and the like, none of which are commercial 
enterprises reproducing capital through profit 
earned by selling something to ourselves. 

It is highly important, therefore, that this 
bond money should be handled most carefully, 
instead of being squandered. It represents 
our indebtedness, on which we must_ continue 
to pay interest. Already two millions of the 
Heteh Hetchy bond money have been wasted. 
One millions was given to Ham Hall for prop- 
erty to whieh he had no legal title; and, what 
is ' more, the Auditor knew he had no legal 
title, and yet approved the sale." Before elec- 
tion the Auditor declared he would never ap- 
prove such a claim. He really should have 
been recalled for allowing such a transaction. 

In order to meet the city's increasing debts 
our taxes have been raised to $2.10 on the 
new valuation. This new valuation is fifty 
millions higher than the valuation of last 
year. If the valuation of taxable property 
had remained the same as last year our tax 
rate would be $2.25 this year. 



WELL TO EXPLAIN. 

THE Examiner has been printing a good 
deal lately about the vast amount of 
money that is to be spent in San Fran- 
cisco in the next few years. Our sensational 
contemporary does not call attention to the 
important fact that a large part of this money 
is bond money. It represents indebtedness 
just as much as a mortgage on a building lot 
represents a debt. A prudent man does not 
mortgage his lot and throw away the money 
thus raised. He takes the best care of it and 
erects a building which brings him profit. 

San Francisco is not in a position to waste 
a dollar of public money, and yet the Board 
of Works has squandered millions of it. Mil- 
lions more will be wasted unless the Mayor 
makes a clean sweep of the incompetents that 
have had the handling of so much important 
work, which they have bungled most dis- 
gracefully. 

Every man of affairs in the State is asking, 
' ' Why doesn 't Mayor Eolph fire out the entire 
bunch?" 

♦ 

A reformer is usually a man who is very 
energetic in urging that somebody ought to 
do something. 



WATER SUPPLY FOR 

SAN FRANCISCO 

Here is the Truth of the Matter. 



'-i' T IS amazing' how the public remains in 
i\|jVi dense ignorance of the water question 
jjfl(5 in San Francisco — the most important 
question of all. The safety of the 
city depends on an improved water supply. 
The Panama-Pacific Exposition will make it 
imperative on the city to increase its water 
supply. 

A great fuss is made about forcing the 
Spring Valley Company to extend its main 
pipes. The Spring Valley doesn't wish to do 
it. "Why? For the excellent reason that the 
Spring Valley Company now hasn't enough 
water for the pipes in use. To extend the 
mains would only make matters worse. 

The truth is, as every sensible civil engineer 
who has given the subject attention knows, 
that Spring Valley is at the end of its water 
resources and wants to sell out at a fine fig- 
ure. 

There is much talk about developing the 
Spring Valley's water resources in Alameda 
county. This is only talk. 

The Alameda Creek watershed, on which 
the Spring Valley would have the city de- 
pend for its water supply, is a region of low 
rainfall. Spring Valley officials have fre- 
quently admitted this. The records of the 
annual rate-fixing hearings in San Francisco 
are full of statements by the company's offi- 
cials to the effect that the Alameda Creek 
lands were not worth as much per acre as the 
San Mateo reservoir watershed lands because 
they did not yield as much water, the rainfall 
on them being less. Now these same officials 
have changed face about. They claim Alame- 
da Creek lands to be most particularly valu- 
able because of the quantity of water they 
can be made to yield. 

To get as much as 18,000,000 gallons daily 
yield the company has robbed highly fertile 
lands in Livermore valley and in the district 
between INTiles and Irvington at the base of 
the hills and the bay shore of their natural 
underground water supply. This has made 
the lands infertile, and uninhabitable because 
infertile. Suits have been brought by the 
owners, and the company has been compelled 
to buy the lands and move their inhabitants 
away. 

The company, unable to get any increased 
quantity of water from the natural stream flow 
and the lowland ground water, claims that it 
would get its great yield of 130,000,000 gal- 



lons daily by reservoiring the waste stream 
water. But is there any such quantity of 
waste stream Water? Do storm waters run 
off enough to make it, assuming that the res- 
ervoirs to hold it can be built, a proposition, 
by the way, which the Spring Valley Water 
Company has by no means proved? 

The city of Oakland some years ago had a 
Citizens' Committee, of which Mr. Warren 
Olney, afterwards Mayor, was chairman. This 
committee made a most exhaustive investiga- 
tion of the chances of getting even the com- 
paratively small quantity of water wanted 
by that city, about 15,000,000 gallons daily, 
from Alameda Creek watershed, and in the 
end had to give it up. . The committee em- 
ployed Mr. Desmond Fitzgerald and Mr. Ku- 
dolph Hering to make their engineering ex- 
aminations. Their reports were that the sur- 
plus water in excess of the quantity then be- 
ing taken by Spring Valley and consumed lo- 
cally was inadequate to supply .Oakland be- 
cause of the successive years of low rainfall, 
during which there would be no surplus at all. 

The condition of short rainfall in the Ala- 
meda Creek watershed, of which this season's 
rainfall is typical, is too serious to be lightly 
passed over. It should be put up to the Spring 
Valley Company to make a better showing of 
possible reservoir capacity in this watershed 
than it has yet made. So far the water com- 
pany has never shown the courage of its offi- 
cials' conversation. It has built no reser- 
voirs at all. A single one built would have 
tested the storm water and the waste water 
proposition to a conclusive finish. The city 
canno-t afford to take chances in this matter. 
Spring Valley claims of water from Alameda 
Creek which it does not show or prove by res- 
ervoir construction should be taken with sev- 
eral grains of the saltiest kind of salt that is 
manufactured. 



SANTA CRUZ ON THE MAP. 

THE Glorious Fourth was celebrated with 
great enthusiasm at Santa Cruz. Visit- 
ors were impressed by the wonderful 
change which has taken place in the once 
sleepy little seaside town. It is no longer 
sleepy or little. It is alive and growing rap- 
idly. Its leading citizens intend to keep dem- 
onstrating that they are leaders, and they 
have put Santa Cruz on the' map much more 
prominent than ever before. Director-General 
Swanton, Chairman William T. Jeter, former 
Lieutenant-Governor of California, and their 
wide-awake business associates are planning 
to make the Santa Cruz Water Pageant from 
July 20th to 28th a spectacle to make old Nep- 
tune throw somersaults over his trident. San 
Francisco and the State of California will be 
well represented at the pageant. 
f 

Where can you find a better advertising 
medium than THE WASP, reaching, as it 
does, over 5,000 society and club women? 
The women are the buyers. 



Thru Railroad Tickets 

Issued to All Parts of 

FOR PORTLAND 

1st class $10, $12, $15. 2d $6.00. Berth and Meals Included. 

The San Francisco and Portland S. S. Co. 

A. OTTINGER, General Agent. 



3 

BEAR 

BEAVER 

ROSE CITY 

Sailings Every 




United States, Canada and Mexico 

Id Connection with These Magnificent Passenger Steamers 

FOR LOS ANGELES 

1st class $7.35 & $8.35. 2d class $5.35. Berth & meals included 



Ticket Office, 722 Mkt., opp. Call. Ph. Sutter 2344 
8 East St., opp. Ferry Bldg. Phone Sutter 2482 
Berkeley Office 2105 Shattuck. Ph. Berkeley 331 




YOUR 




§N OCTOBEB, L908, Judge Farrington, i 
iu the United States Circuit Court] 
madfl an order permitting the .Spring 

Valley Water Company to collect water 
ratee LS per cent higher than the rates fixed 

by the ordinance for the year limits ill). Regu- 
larly since then the Circuit Court has every 
year granted the Spring Valley Water Com- 
pany a restraining order against the enforce- 
ment of the city 'a water-rate ordinance, and 
a further order permitting the company to 
collect at rates 15 per cent higher. The ex- 
cesfl of LS per cent, however, was ordered im- 
pounded by the Court until a final determina- 
tion of the lit igation. 

Altogether four years have elapsed since 
the first order was made permitting 15 per 
cent higher rales to be collected. There is 
now impounded in the Circuit Court a total 
sum which approximates $1,500,000. It is the 
accumulation of seventy-two mouths' collec- 
tion of 15 per cent additional to the water 
ordinance water rates, "with interest com- 
pounded. To bring it down to such intelli- 
gible expression that water consumers will 
understand it, let us say that THE MONEY 
NOW IMPOUNDED IS EQUAL TO SEVEN 
AND A HALT MONTHS' WATEE BILL 
FOR EVERY CONSUMER. 

All of this money is impounded on the 
theory that the Circuit Court has original 
jurisdiction of the water-rate injunction cases. 
If it were found that the theory were wrong 
— if it were found that the Circuit Court did 
not have original jurisdiction — then the Cir- 
cuit Court would, on proper legal action be- 
ing taken, dismiss the case and order the 
money returned to the water consumers who 
had paid it. 

About two years ago the Circuit Court in 
the State of Washington ruled that it had no 
original jurisdiction in a street railroad case 
which was in many 
respects similar to the 
Spring Valley water- 
rate injunction cases. 
The newspapers' com- 
menting on this rul- 
ing resulted in an at- 
tempt being made to 
apply it in the Spring 
Valley -cases, but 
Judge Van Fleet of 
our Circuit Court rul- 
ed that his court had 
original jurisdiction. 
He refused to throw 
the water and gas 
rate cases out of 
court. No appeal was 
taken to the United 
States Supreme Court. 

On Monday of this 
week the Board of 
Supervisors directed 
City Attorney Long 
to move the dismissal 



Several Months' 
bate May Be 
Remitted 

from the Circuit Court of the .Spring Valley 
application for an injunction against the 
water rales adopted by the Board of Super- 
visors for this year. This is done on the 
ground that the Circuit Court had no jurisdic- 
tion, aud to appeal to the Supreme Court if 
the Circuit Court (Judge Van Fleet) refused 
to dismiss. There was no reason why the 
appeal should not have been made two years 
ago, t mi t that may turn out to be a Spring 
Valley misfortune aud only a water-rate pay- 
ers' inconvenience. 

If the Supreme Court rules against the 
Spring Valley Company and throws its pres- 
ent injunction case out of the Circuit Court, 
the four cases of the last four years will also 
be thrown out on the same ground. The effect 
will be to release the impounded 15 per cent 
and interest, now aggregating nearly $1,500,- 
000, and it will be paid back by order of the 
Court to the 'consumers who paid it into the 
impounded funds. Keep Spring Valley re- 
ceipts. They look like ready money. 

■♦ ' 

RECRUDESCENCE OF MARSDEN. 

IN what must have heen an unguarded mo- 
ment recently, Mayor Kolph remarked to 
a reporter that he was not aware that 
Marsden Manson was to get his walking pa- 
pers — or words to that effect. 

When this alleged iuterview took place the 
City Engineer was supposed to be strapped 
to his cot in a Livermore sanitarium, raving 
in the delirium caused by the discovery that 
Connick had built a sieve for him on Twin 







'MEASURE FOR MEASURE.' 



Peaks, where the citj needed a real reser- 
voir. That blunder, and others far wuise, 
had ruined the City tSngineer's nerves and 
almost overthrown hia reason. So 'twas whis- 
pered in accents of awe and pity. 

But behold the transformation! No sooner 
did our amiable -Mayor intimate that the ax 
wasn't just about to drop on Mr. Manson 's 
neck than he turned up at the City Engi- 
neer's office as fresh as a mountain trout and 
chipper as a skylark on a line -May morning. 

By the way, none of the daily papers have 
reported the true findings of the committee of 
really responsible engineers whom Mayor 
Rolph appointed to investigate the Twin 
Peaks sieve blunder, and others 

One of the candid admissions of Mr. Man- 
son was that he hadn't even signed the neces- 
sary papers in some of the contracts for iin- 
portant city work. He let irresponsible dep- 
uties use a rubber stamp and sign in that way 
for him. The committee of investigating en- 
gineers gasped with astonishment at this ad- 
mission, which Mr. Manson made as artlessly 
as if he were telling them that he left it to 
the janitor to sweep out the ofiice. 

All sorts of theories to account for Mr. 
Manson 's lack of proper attention to the du- 
ties of his important office have been advanc- 
ed. The latest is that his mind is engrossed 
with the construction of a wonderful globe 
which he wishes to exhibit to the admiration 
of the world at the Panama-Pacific Exposition. 
In fact, he has been doing some political 
log-rolling to get an appropriation for the 
exhibition to this globular wonder of the 
world, but the Exposition people have trou- 
bles enough of their own. 

It isn't to be supposed that a man whose 
mind is absorbed in scientific geography and 
progressive astronomy can come down from 
the stars at a minute's notice to build sewers 
"an 1 sich like." 



A girl's kisses are like pickles in a bottle — 
the first is hard to get, but the rest come easy. 



HOTEL 

VENDOME 

San Jose, Cal. 



One of California's 
Show Places Where 
Homelikeness Reigns 



H. W. LAKE, Manager 



THE WASP 



[Saturday, July 13, 1912. 



POOR OLD SAN FRANCISCO! 

POOR OLD SAN FRANCISCO is still get- 
ting hard swats on account of the de- 
funct Graft Prosecution. It is the style 
in Eastern cities to point out San Francisco 
as the fallen sister who was uplifted to eivie 
righteousness by Rudy, Jimmy Tabasco & Co. 
Buffalo is having a spasm of righteousness 
and demands a shake-up. The grafter must be 
exposed and jailed. Good! Who will do it? 

Who ean do it but our old friend Tabasco, 
alias William J. Burns, "the man who eleaneu 
up San Francisco." Sound the trumpets and 
beat the gongs! Start the subscription list 
amongst the higher-up that wants to indict 
the higher-ups. 

It's a great game, this newly invented sys- 
tem by which a coterie of American plutocrats 
can subscribe a purse to start private detect- 
ives to investigate public affairs and thus 
grab a city government which they never 
could get by going before the people and ask- 
ing to be elected in the legally constituted 
method. 

After all the illegality and police espionage 
and degradation of the judicial bench of the 
government in San Francisco, only one man 
landed in San Quentin. The others, equally 
culpable, got off with their plunder, and the 
net result to San Francisco is a bad reputa- 
tion which rival cities delight to sermonize on. 

The moral of it is that citizens should try 
to reform their city government through the 
courts in a regular open-and-above-board fash- 
ion, and not try fifteenth century methods on 
a twentieth century republic. 

Hiring regiments of private spies and sneak- 
ing around to secure indictments in grand jury 
rooms is retrogression, not progress. It was 
in much that style that Venice was governed 
by an oligarchy. 

Get decent courts and decent judges by ap- 
pointing them and giving them their places 
for life. Then when municipal grafters are 
brought before the courts the rascals will go 
to jail. 

Everybody will get something approximat 
ing to a square deal. At present the chances 
are nine in favor of a very raw deal. 

* 

IT WOULD BE A TRAGEDY. 

THE TIP has been passed out that Super- 
visor Giannini may be appointed a Com- 
missioner of the Board of Public Works 
and be made its President whenever Mayoi 
Rolph decides to behead the undesirables that 
have brought the Commission into disrepute. 

It would be impossible to conceive of a 
more unfortunate appointment than that of 
Supervisor Giannini. His educational train- 
ing as a medical man and business experience 
have had no relation whatever to tbe kind of 
matters that come before the Board of Pub- 
lic Works for action. 

Training and experience in the practice of 
medicine need not disqualify one from under- 
taking another line of work, but they are not 
the best preparation for service in the Board 
of Supervisors, and certainly nothing could be 
less suitable for the head of the Board of 
Works. 




NOT LONG FOE THIS LIFE. 

Mayor Rolph has appointed one member of 
that Board already, and nothing has been done 
by the appointee so far that would indicate 
that he was the best selection that could have 
been made. His voice has not been heard in 
protest against any of the many things that 
should have been condemned and denounced — 
the Twin Peaks sieve-reservoir, for instance. 
If the water had not run out of that costly 
sieve and disclosed the inefficiency of the en- 
gineering the gents who built it might still 
be enjoying the public confidence and milking 
the overtaxed treasury as diligently as ever. 

"Cobbler, stick to your last," is a very 
old but very good proverb. If the people of 
San Francisco had let Schmitz stick to his 
fiddle instead of putting him in the Mayor's 
chair our unlucky city would be in different 
condition today. 

Another false move where that same old 
proverb was disregarded occurred when Mayor 
Taylor was taken from pedagogy at the 
Hastings College of Law and made Chief Mag- 
istrate of an industrially and politically de- 
moralized city. We are still suffering from 
the effects of that awful blunder. 

Dr. Giannini is a worthy young citizen, well 
educated and socially prominent, and filled 
with civic pride and the spirit of progress; 
but with all that, it would be the acme of ab- 
surdity and the limit of bad judgment to make 
him a Commissioner of the Board of Works. 

Does anybody suppose that Dr. Giannini, 
as Commissioner of the Board of Works, would 
have stopped Deputy Engineer Connick from 
building that seive instead of a reservoir on 
Twin Peaks? Not a bit of it! The Doctor 
could have given Mr. Connick good advice on 
how to take care of his liver or kidneys, but 
not on the planning of an important water 
works for the municipality. 

Again we repeat the time-honored proverb, 
"Cobbler, stick to your wax," and keep your 
fingers out of things that you haven 't been 
trained for. 



It will be a melancholy day for the tax- 
payers of San Francisco if Mayor Rolph 
should begin to substitute for the present im- 
possible Board of Works a worse one as far 
as technical training for the position is re- 
quired. 

1 

HELLO, HANS. 

11:05 a. m. — "Hello, is dis der Drewery?" 

"No, this is the Y. W. C. A. " 

"Oh, oxcuse me, please, lady." 

11:06 a. m. — "Hello, Hans, is dis you?" 

"No, you've made a mistake, I guess." 

"Who iss dis, please $" 

"This is the Y. W. C. A." 

"Lady, I beg your pardon; I vas calling 
der brewery. ' } 

11:07.— Hello, Hans, haf I got you at last?" 

"Who is it you want, please?" 

"I vant der brewery. Isn't dis der brew- 
ery. ' ' 

"No, sir, this is the Y. W. C. A." 

"Veil, vat iss der matter mit dot central, 
anyway! I am sorry to disturb you, lady." 

11:08 — Hello, Hans, vy do you haf a number 
like the Vy. W. C. A. auyway? Effry time I 
call you I get a Christian lady, und ve are 
getting so vel acvainted like old friends al- 
ready. ' ' 

"You've got the wrong number, sir. This 
is the Young Women's Christian Association." 

"Ach! ain't it a shame! Lady, if you for- 
gif me this time I vill neffer try to get again 
my friend at der brewery on der phone. I 
vill write him a letter." 

f 

"A more deserving medical man than our 
friend Richard does not exist. He very fre- 
quently accepts no fees from his patients." 

Mr. B.: "You don't say so?" 

Mr. A.: "He generally settles with the 
heirs. ' ' 




BOORD'S 

LONDON, ENG. 

GINS 

DRY 

OLD TOM 
TWILIGHT 



CHARLES MEINECKE & CO. 

Agents Pacific Coast 
314 Sacramento St. ■ San Francisco 



p=4^$\ B^c 












HEBE have been two 
pieces of news this week 
i hal are of much interest 
tu society in the bay 
counties. A nuuuncement 
of the engagement of 
■Miss Abhy Parrott and 
Edward J. Tobin inter- 
ests everybodj in society in California, and 
more particularly the older members who can 
look back a generation. An unusually inter- 
esting bit of news also is the announcement 
that the former Miss Azalea Keyes of San 
Francisco is to marry Count Lewenhaupt of 
Palkcnstein, a grandson of Sir Andley Costing. 
The lady is very attractive and wealthy, and 
belongs to that famous California family of 
which the late Chief Justice Hastings was the 
head in his day, and his daughter. Mrs. John 
Darling, wife of Colonel Darling, U. S. A., is 
the present head. 

In May, 190S, The Wasp announced the en- 
gagement of Miss Keyes to Alfred Heilman, a 
wealthy Englishman residing in Paris and 
having extensive business interests in Man- 
chester. Miss Keyes, since the death of her 
father, Winfield Scott Keyes, a few years be- 
fore, had been residing in Paris with her 
chaperons. 

» * * 

The wedding of Miss Keyes and Mr. Heil- 
man took place in July, and the union seemed 
blissful; but. the young wife has not found 
matrimony with her Anglo-French husband 
all that she anticipated, and will essay a sec- 
mid venture as the Countess Lewenhaupt. The 
news has been a surprise to local society, if, 
indeed, old Californians could be surprised at 
unexpected things done by a member of a dis- 
tinguished family noted for its independence 
and determination to shape affairs to its own 
liking. 

* * * 

Winfield Scott Keyes, the father of Mrs. 
Ileilman, was a son of General Keyes, and a 
brother of Dr. Edward Keyes, a celebrated 
physician in New York. The newspapers here 
have referred to Alexander D. Keyes, a prom- 
inent lawyer, as the brother of Winfield Scott 
Keyes. He is the half-brother. He married 
Miss Salisbury, a member of a well-known 
pioneer family. The late Mrs. Monroe Salis- 
bury was the leader of local society before the 
accession of Czar Gre.enway to the throne. 
When Mrs. Salisbury passed away the seeptre 
fell to Mr. Greenway, there being nothing in 
the social laws of California to prevent the 
inferior sex from assuming the social leader- 
ship. Mrs. Monroe Salisbury paid special at- 
tention to Miss Azalea Keyes in her days of 
maidenhood, the young lady's mother being 
deadl Mrs. A. H. Loughborough of San Fran- 



NOTICE. 

All communications relative to social news 
should be addressed "Society Editor Wasp, 121 
Second Street, S. F.," and should reach this office 
not later than Wednesday to Insure publication 
in the issue of that week. 



cisco is an aunt of the future Countess Lewen- 
haupt. 

The Countess will bring to her titled hus- 




Jtoore & Clarke Photo. 
MRS. WALLACE R. POND 

Prominent in spcial and literary circles in 
Berkeley and San Francisco. 

band a very large dot, as she inherited a large 
fortune from the Hastings family, and her 



father, Winfield Scott Keyes, was .mm- of t he 
most prudent of men and one of the least ex- 
pensive in his habits, though by no means a 
parsimonious man. On the contrary, he was 
of a very liberal disposition. lie left an 
estate- valued at a million dollars, every cent 
of which he made himself. His daughter is. 
of course, a highly accomplished girl, for she 
has had all the advantages of wealth and po- 
sition. She suffered from nervous breakdown 
after the death of Mrs. Salisbury, to whom 
she was much attached, and with whom she 
remained during that talented woman's pro- 
longed and painful illness. The shock of 
Mrs. Salisbury's death was too much for the 
sensitive, high-strung girl, and it took her 
a long time to recover. 

Jt t *t ._* 
Unites Old Families. 

The marriage of Miss Abhy Parrotl and Ed 
ward J. Tobin will unite two of the oldest 
families in San Francisco that are noted for 
wealth as well as social distinction. Mr. Tobin 
is the brother of Richard M. Tobin, Secretary 
of the Hibernia Hank, Joseph S. Tobin and 
Clem Tobin. Richard is now the only unmar- 
ried one of the brothers. Edward Tobin, whose 
engagement to Miss Parrott has been announc- 
ed, is a very keen and energetic business man. 
He is a son of the late Richard Tobin, one of 
the founders of the famous bank with which 
his family has been so prominently and honor- 
ably identified. He is a nephew of the late 
Judge Robert Tobin, who for many years was 
Secretary of the Hibernia Bank. A good many 
people think that the Tobin boys are sons of 
Judge Tobin. The latter was their uncle, and 
had no children of his own. Richard Tobin, 
the father of the Tobin boys, was a lawyer, 
and devoted himself largely to the legal bus- 
iness of the bank. Judge Robert Tobin su- 
pervised the other branch of the extensive 
business, and between them and in co-opera- 
tion with some of the most influential Irish- 



HOTEL 

DEL 
MONTE 


aMMy 


PACIFIC 

GROVE 

MOTEL 

Pacific Grove 


BOTH HOUSES UNDER 
SAME MANAGEMENT 

Address: 

H. R. WARNER, 

Del Monte, - California 


A beautiful summer 

home at 
very moderate rates 


.A tasty, comfortable 

family hotel. 

Low monthly rates 


^w 



-THE WASP 



[Saturday, July 13, 1912. 



American citizens in California they estab- 
lished one of the greatest banking institutions 
in the United States. Kichard Tobin Sr. died 
many years ago. The Judge outlived him by 
many years, and died shortly before the great 
eatatsropbe of 1906, which reduced the busi- 
ness district of San Francisco to ashes. Mrs. 
Mary Tobin, the mother of Kichard, Joseph 
O., Clem and Edward Tobin, still lives. For 
many years before the fire of 1906 the family 
mansion was one of the imposing-looking res- 
idences on the summit of Nob Hill. 

jl Jl ji 
Another Banker's Family. 

The Parrotts, with whom the Tobin family 
is about to be united, are descended from the 
late John Parrott, a capitalist who came to 
San Francisco from South America in the 
days of the gold-seekers, and established an 
important private bank. The Parrotts have 
for several generations represented wealth 
and social distinction in San Francisco, and 
when Mrs. Abby Parrott, grandmother of Mr. 
Tobin 's fiancee, was active in social affairs 
an invitation to one of her elaborate affairs 
was equivalent to a rating in the first rank 
of California 's exclusives. 

^W t£pl t£T> 

The Parrotts, while amongst the richest and 
most eminent socially in California, have al- 
ways been the least ostentatious. They are 
like one of the old English country families 
one reads about in Jane Austen's novels. 

Many Connections. 

Mr. Tobin 's fiancee, Miss Abby Parrott, is 
the second daughter of Mr. and Mrs. John 
Parrott, and has lived abroad since her grad- 
uation from Sacred Heart Convent at Menlo. 
The Parrotts and the Tobins are in the list 
of leading Roman Catholic families of Amer- 
ica. Miss Abby Parrott is not only the most 
attractive of her family, but is the most pop- 
ular with the Burlingame set, though the 
whole family is highly respected. Her family 
connections are numerous. The Vicomtesse 
Helie de DampieTre and Vicomtesse Philippe 



Jules Restaurant 

Special Lunches 50c. or a la Carte 

Ladies' Grill and Rooms for Parties 

REGULAR FRENCH DINNER WITH 

WINE, $1.00. 

Vocal and Instrumental Music. 

MONADNOCK BUILDING 

Next to Palace Hotel 

Phone Kearny 1812. 

All Cars Pass the Door. Elevator Service. 



Neal Liquor Cure 
Three i 4 09SutterSt 

DAY phone Franklin 1098 

ADOPTED BY AUSTRALIAN GOVERNMENT 



de Tristan, daughters of Christian de Guigne 
of San Francisco, are her cousins. Mrs. J. A 
Donohoe, the banker's wife, is her aunt. Mme. 
de la Lande of Paris is also her aunt. Mrs. 
Parker Whitney and Mrs. Frank McComas, 
the daughters of the late Louis Parrott, are 
also her cousins. San Francisco relatives of 
Mr. Tobin and Miss Parrott have not yet 
heard whether the wedding will take place 
abroad or here. 

^* ^* ^* 

Anglers in Ecstasy. 

Never have larger catches of salmon been 
recorded in Monterey Bay, both on the Santa 
Cruz and the Del Monte side. Dick Eisert, 
the real estate magnate, caught about a ton 
of fish. The Society for the Prevention of 
Cruelty to Animals is said to be after him. 
Ordinary angling is a lawful pursuit, but they 
draw the line, so to speak at murder. Mr. 
Eisert 's defence will be that he and his part- 
ner, Louis Kerner, fished for three years along 
the coast, from Oregon to Mexico, and never 
got a bite before. His friends think this is 
a foolish plea, for if he escapes the charge 
of murder he may be prosecuted for misde- 
meanor in enticing fish under age, or naturally 
simple-minded. The case will be watched with 
great interest by the angling fraternity. Any- 
how, it is an undeniable fact that the boats 
at Santa Cruz and Monterey have been bring- 
ing in loads of fine salmon. 

A spirited picture of Mr. Eisert appears on 
page 5 of this issue. He is measuring his big 
fish with Mose Fischer, the famous Montgom- 
ery street real estate operator. Mr. Eisert 
can be identified by the slight fullness of his 
waist line, which hasn't lost anything in the 
picture by his having just lunched at the Casa 
del Rey before the artist sketched him. Mose 
looks much slimmer, as the tomcod he landed 
after a severe struggle made rather a light 
repast for his launch party of five. 

t£r* c9* t:'* 

A Golf Romance. 

Here is material for a golf novel: It comes 
in the shape of an explanation of why Miss 
Margaret Everet and Mr. Frederick Charles 
Von Schrader featured the conventionalities 
of so hasty a marriage. It seems that the 
bride and groom are devotees of the links. 
Both were possessed of a longing to witness 
the golf tournament at Del Monte. Both had 
an unconquerable antipathy for chaperons — 
and chaperoned they must be at Del Monte. 
The obstable seemed a big one, until the bril- 
liant idea siezed the young man — why not 
marry and be done with chaperons for good and 
for all, and incidentally make the honeymoon 
and the golf tournament one? The idea ap- 

LOAFING MEN 
And loafing money never did any community 
any good. The millions of dollars invested 
in the Continental Building and Loan Associ- 
ation have built thousands of homes. 

The CONTINENTAL BUILDING AND 
LOAN ASSOCIATION, Market street, at Gold- 
en Gate avenue, can be of assistance to you in 
getting the home. 

EDWARD SWEENEY, President. 

WM. CORBIN, Secty. and Gen. Mgr. 



pealed to the maid in the case, and the run- 
away marriage was the result. 

In the meantime, these victims of Cupid 
and golf completely forgot to send word of 
the program to the bride's mother, and when 
that estimable lady returned from Yosemite 
and heard the latest news she got something 
of a shock. So, also, did that debonair bach- 
elor, Joe Rosborough, who must have felt as 
if some small boy had slipped a lighted Fourth 
of July bomb in his pocket when he read of 
the elopement. For lo, these many moons 
the society editors had it all arranged in 
their files of "prospective happenings" that 
it was Joseph who would play the star part 
at the marriage of the fair golf enthusiast. 
The happy couple are now staying with Col. 
and Mrs. Von Schrader at their home on 
Presidio Ave., and are planning to go to 
housekeeping for themselves in the near 
future. 



YOUR FAMILY 

SILVERSMITH 

Every family at some time or another 
needs something in the silverware line, or 
has articles to be repaired or matched, or 
jewelry to be fixed, and doubtless would 
be glad to know of an absolutely reliable 
house, where the charges are right. Such 
a house is the John O. Bellis Silverware 
Factory, 328 Post street, San Francisco, 
where all wants of this nature can be sup- 
plied at reasonable cost. The firm enjoys 
the confidence of some of the most promi- 
nent families of the State. A feature of 
their business is the altering, resetting or 
entirely reconstructing of old family jew- 
elry into modern styles. It is wonderful 
what transformation can be wrought on 
your old trinkets at trifling expense with- 
out impairing any of their sentimental 
value. 

For staple goods, such as toilet articles, 
tableware, etc., this firm cannot be sur- 
passed on the Pacific Coast, while their 
trophy cups and presentation pieces made 
to order are without peers. A visit of in- 
spection at 328 Post St. (Union Square) is 
invited. 



NOTICE. 



NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN THAT JOHN C. 
LEMMER is transacting a general boiler, tank and 
iron business in this State under the name of CALI- 
FORNIA BOILER WORKS; that his principal place 
of business is the City and County of San Francisco, 
State of California; that he is the sole owner of 
said business, and his full name is JOHN C. LEM- 
MER, and he resides at 1730 Pierce Street, in the 
City and County of San Francisco, State of Califor- 
nia. JOHN C. LEMMER. 

STATE OF CALIFORNIA, 
City and County of San Francisco, 
ss. 

On this 8th day of July, in the year one thousand 
nine hundred and twelve, before me, Matthew Brady, 
a Notary Public in and for the City and. County of 
San Francisco, State of California, residing therein, 
duly commissioned and sworn, personally appeared 
JOHN C. LEMMER, known to me to be the person 
whose name is subscribed to the within instrument, 
and acknowledged to me that he executed the same. 

In witness whereof, I have hereunto set my hand 
and affixed my official seal at my office in the City 
and County of San Francisco, State of California, 
the day and year in this certificate first above writ- 
ten. 
(SEAL) MATTHEW BRADY, 

Notary Public. 
In and for the City and County of San Francis- 
co, State of California. 

VOGELSANG & BROWN, Attorneys at Law, 20 
Montgomery Street, San Francisco, Cal. 



Saturday, July 13, 1912.] 



THE WASP- 



Another Surprise. 

The surprise which was caused by t ho an- 
Douncement of Mrs. Heilman's (former Az 
alea Keyes) engagement has been added to 
by tin.* news that her marriage to Couol Lea 
wethaupl Falkenstein bae already taken 

place. The wedding ceremony was perfon 1 

at Holy Trinity Oburch, Sloant* struct. Lmnlun, 
.luly 8tb. The* bride was given away by the 
bridegroom's father, sir A-udJey (inslin^. ai 
ter t lie wedding, a reception was held at the 
Turzon Hotel, followed by a dinner party at 
the Carlton. 

<* ,** Jt 
An Exile Returning. 

Dr. and Mrs. William J. Younger are com- 
ing to San Francisco from Paris, and will re- 
main here during the early fall months.- Dr. 
Younger is a loyal Bohemian member, and will 
attend the "jinks'* at the Bohemian Grove, 
August 11th. Many years ago Dr. Younger 's 
fame as a dentist became too great for Cali- 
fornia, and he betook himself to Paris, with 
his accomplished wife, who had been the wid- 
ow of Henry Edgeton, a famous California 
lawyer and orator. The exiles found Paris so 
much to their liking that they have since 
made it their place of residence, though they 



EVERY LUNCH BASKET 
Should contain a couple of split bottles of 
[talian-Swiss Colony T1PO (red or white). 
They will make a cold lunch digestible. 



Art & Refinement are displayed In Tasteful Attire. 




-MAKERS OF- 



LADIES' GOWNS and FANCY 
COSTUMES 

420ISUTTER STREET. NEAR STOCKTON. 
Phone DOUGLAS 4964 

• AN FRANCISCO. CAL, 



ASSESSMENT NOTICE. 



THE FRESNO AND EASTERN RAILROAD COM-. 
PANT, a corporation organized under the laws of 
the State of California, principal place of business 
S;x\\ Francisco, Califr>rr.ia. 

Notice is hereby given that at a meeting of the 
Directors held on the 1st day of July, 1912, an as- 
sessment of thirty (30) cents a share was levied on 
the capital stock of the corporation, payable on or 
before the fifth day of August, 1912, to the Treas- 
urer of this Company, at the office of said company, 
No. 771 Monadnock Building, San Francisco, Cali- 
fornia ; and that all Assessments upon this stock 
that shall remain unpaid on the fifth day of August, 
1912, shall be delinquent and advertised for sale 
at public auction, and unless payment is made be- 
fore, shall be sold on the twentieth day of August, 
1912, to pay the delinquent assessment together 
with the cost of advertising and expenses of sale. 
A. B. DODD, Secretary. 
No. 771 Monadnock Building, San Francisco, 
California. 



came here periodically to see their friends 
and took after their property interests. Two 
daughters of Dr. Younger married Gorman 
barons, who had more pedigree than income. 
Another daughter, Miss Maude Sounger, is 
tireless :>- s settlemenl worker. She is a sin* 
cere enthusiast devoted to the uplift of the 
■ • submerged ' ' and as part of her plan of 
action joined the waitresses' union to be in 
closer touch with the objects" of her benevo- 
lence. The site of the old Colubmia theater 
on Powell street was part of the Younger 
property. 

In Classic Shades. 

The Summer School course seems to be more 
popular i hau ever this year, and many of 
our most popular maids and mat runs are ar- 
dently applying themselves to improving their 
minds at Berkeley. Miss Edith Treunor and 
Miss Alice Warner spend every week-day on 
the other side of the bay, and, together with 
Mrs. Leonard Lane and several others who 
are taking courses, meet at the noon hour and 
have jolly lunches together. 
& «£ <$ 
Gay Times at Newport. 

Newport has regained its social prestige 
this year. Never has the resort been so 
crowded at this period. Ochre Point has the 
record of having but one place closed — Wake- 
hurst, the residence of James J. Val Alen, 
who is salmon-fishing in Canada, and goes to 
Europe some time nest month. For the first 
time in three summers, Mrs. Vanderbilt is 
occupying "The Breakers." Her son-in-law, 
Count Szechenzi, and the Countess are to be 
her guests for the summer. Mrs. Stuyvesant 
Fish is, back at the "Crossings" for the 
first time in two years and Mrs.* Wm. B. 
Leeds for the first time in three seasons. The 
arrival of the Eussian Ambassador and Mad- 
ame Bakhmeteff (Miss Beale formerly) has 
been followed by the announcement that the 
German Embassy will be located at Newport 
for the summer, and that the German cruiser 
Bremen will be a frequeat visitor. Colonel 
and Mrs. Wm. Jay, the Arthur Iselins, Mrs. 
Oliver H. P. Belmont and her son, Harold 
Vanderbilt, are all at Newport this season 
again. The place will see a good deal of the 
New York Yacht Club during the season, 
and through the liberality of T. Suffern 
Tailer, there is to be no end to polo. The 
dog show in the theater building of the Ca- 
sino will be an interesting event. The name 
of Mrs. Hermann Oelrichs, formerly so promi- 
nent in accounts of Newport society, does not 
appear this season. 

+ 

A well-fitting shirt is one of the signs of 
the gentleman. Few things look so ungrace- 
ful as linen that hangs loosely or awkwardly 
upon _the wearer. To secure well-fitting shirts, 
they should be made to order, and there is no 
place in San Francisco where they can be made 
better than at D. 0. Heger's, 243 Kearny St. 
and 118 Geary St. At these places skillful 
experts make excellent shirts and underwear, 
guaranteeing perfect fit and style, and using 
the best of materials. Every one patronizing 
Heger's expresses satisfaction with the re- 
sults. 



DR. H. J. STEWART 

Begs to announce that he has removed hit mutio 
studio to the Gaffoey Building, 376 Sutter Street, 
between Grant Avenue and Stockton Street. 
Office hours, from ten to twelve, and from two to 
four, daily. 

Telephone Douglas 4211. 



LOUIS CREPAUX 

MEMBER PARIS GRAND OPERA 



FREfOPMETOMOOL 



FOR SINGING AND SPEECH 

French phoneticB, configuration and placing of 
the phonetic sounds enabling the scholar to sing 
or speak in French with the purest "Indre et 
Loire" accent. 

French repertoire in songs from Lully to 
Debussy. Italian tone placing. Toweling and 
syllabation. Italian repertoire in songs from 
Cnrisstmi to Puccini. Studio recitals. 

251 Post St., 4th Floor Mercedes Building, 

Reception hours — 11:45 to 12, and 8 to 4, ex- 
cept Wednesday. Wednesday in Maple Hall, 
Oakland. 



"How to get rich quick" we know not; 
How to teach languages, we do know. 



To improve your mother tongue, 
study a sister tongue. 

THE LARCHER AND MOE 

School of Languages 

CALL OR SEND FOR CIRCULAR, 

162 Post Street at Grant Avenue. 

Office Phone, DouglaB 2859 



TRANSLATION FROM AND INTO ANT 
LANGUAGE. 



HEALDS 

BUSINESS COLLEGES 

HOME OFFICE -425 M C ALI_ISTER ST..S.F. 



Contracts made with Hotels and Restaurants. 

Special attention given to Family Trade. 

ESTABLISHED 1876. 

THOMAS MORTON & SON 

Importers and Dealers in 



COAL 



N. W. Oor. EDDY & HYDE, San Francisco. 
Phone Franklin 897. 



Send for Our Select List of 
EIGHTY CALIFORNIA PAPERS 



You 
ads 



can insert display 
n the entire list for 



EIGHT DOLLARS AN INCH 



The Dake Advertising Agency, Inc, 



432 So. Main St. 
LOS ANGELES, OAL. 



12 Geary St. 
SAN FRANCISCO. 



-THE WASP- 



[Saturday, July 13, 1912. 



Garden Party at Paimdale. 

Tlie beautiful home of Henry Laeliman at 
Paimdale was the scene of an elaborate gar- 
den party last Saturday. The affair was un- 
to the management of Mrs. Louis Hertz and 
her committee: Mrs. C. E. Grunsky, Miss 
Kate Grunsky, Mrs. E. Mandel, Mrs. Lillian 
Wolff, Mrs. E. A. Abbott, Mrs. M. H. Herman, 
Mrs. Henry Hilp, Miss Eachel Abel, Mrs. 
Martin A. Meyer, Mrs. Norman Martin, Mrs. 
Joseph Artigues, Miss Laura Musto, Mrs. A. 
Koncovieri, Mrs. Thomas Morffew, Mrs. Thom- 
as Graham, Mrs. L. O'Brien, Mrs. L. M. 
Kaiser, Mrs. Louis Kahn. The members of 
the Woman's Country Club of the Washington 
Township, of which Mrs. Marion Mowry is 
President, received the guests at the station 
of Niles and escorted the guests Ly moicr 
cars to Paimdale. Mr. Laehman, owner of the 
beautiful estate, offered the freedom of the 
grounds, with all its alluring attractiveness, 
to the guests. Delicious refreshments, in- 
eluding an individual box of strawberries, 
formed a tempting repast at the garden party. 
Historic Mission San Jose, the industrial pur- 
suits of the prolific valley, and the bursting 
orchards were exploited before the Eastern 
visitor as a concluding feature of the delight- 
ful garden party. 

J* jt jl 

Mrs. Fisk's Niece. 

Miss Merle Maddern, a niece of Mrs. Min- 
nie Maddern Fiske, is home on a visit to her 
father, Mr. William A. Maddern. Her moth- 
er, the late Mrs. Maddern, was for many 
years the leader of dramatic art in this city, 
and a woman universally loved and auuiired. 
A number of interesting society events have 
been planned to greet the home-coming of 
Miss Maddern. 

s5* -J* t?* 
Caught in Time. 

Arabella — All the nicest men seem to be 
married. 

Amora — I don't suppose they were always 
nice. They've just been caught early and 
tamed. 

Prominent in Society and Literary Circles. 

Mrs. Wallace E. Pond, who is prominent in 
society and in literary cireles both in Berkeley 
and in San Francisco, was one of the most 



San Francisco 
Sanatorium 

specializes in the scientific care 
op liquor oases. suitable and 
convenient home in one of san 
francisco ' s finest residential 
districts is afforded men and 
women "while recuperating from 
overindulgence. private rooms, 
private nurses and meals served 
in rooms. no name on building, 
terms reasonable. 

San Francisco Sanatorium 

Phone Franklin 7470 1911 Van Ness Ave. 
H. L. BATCHELDER, Manager. 



beautifully gowned matrons "at the various 
functions given lately at the Palace and the 
Fairmont Hotels in honor of the Eastern vis- 
itors. Mrs. Pond carries her gown with such 
graceful poise that she is always a distinguish- 
ed figure at every social gathering. She was 
for two years President of the Laurel Hall 
Club, an exclusive literary organization. 

The Beason of It. 

"Tell me where you eat and I will tell you 
what you are" is paraphrasing an old saying, 
and it also expresses local public sentiment 
on the subject of dining out. "Where you dine 
in San Francisco is just as important as where 




MISS ELEDE PRINCE 

Whose engagement to Leon F. Morris has heen 
announced. 



you shop, where you live. Each expresses 
your taste, and your taste indicates where you 
"belong." Of eourse, there is always the 
quiet retreat to be considered, where one can 
dine in seclusion and take pleasure in being 
"different," but continued pilgrimages to 
such places soon turn the unique into the or- 
dinary. It 's human nature to want to be on 
the "firing line" — where things happen fast 
and furious; and it seems that the San Fran- 
cisco public has made Tait 's the "firing line" 
of its dining "engagements." This popular 
cafe is always crowded, and every face you 
see here is beaming, expectant. That "bored 
look" so peculiar to the habitual diner-out is 
never seen here. And the seasoned diner-out 
constitutes a large per cent of the establish- 
ment 's patronage. I overheard the following 
fragments of a conversation here last night: 
( ' Say, Bob, what makes you always come 
here; why do you like the place?" "Blamed 
if I know, Bess," the man answered; "ask 
me why I like one book, one painting, or one 
piece of music better than another. Guess 
the charm of the place, while hard to define, 



is on the same key with my temperament. 
Whenever I leave home to dine out, my feet 
naturally point this way, and by the crowd I 
see here every time I come I guess I'm not 
the only one who likes the place. ' ' And 
really there is a charm about Tait 's. You feel 
you're one of a number of babes in Toyland, 
and you therefore proceed to enjoy yourself 
according to your most impulsive whim and 
fancy. And you prove fo yourself that you 
did have a good time by coming again. 

^» ^* 1£& 

"Do you love me, Charles'?" inquired the 
beautiful girl. 

"Of course I do. " 

"Do you think only of me, by day and 
night?" 

".Well, I'll be frank with you. Now and 
then I think of "baseball." 

Americans in Paris, 

The month of June ends the social season 
in Paris, and thereafter people scatter to the 
mountains, the seaside or country houses. 
June was a very busy month for the new Am- 
erican Ambassador, Mr. Myron T. Herrick, 
and his wife. Among the entertainments 
given in their honor was a dinner party in 
the handsome apartment of Mrs. Barton 
French, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Arthur Ink- 
ersley. The dinner was followed by a music- 
ale, at which Signor Guardabassi, Miss Doug- 
las Wise and Mrs. Barton French sang. Among 
the guests at the dinner or who came in later 
for the music were the American Ambassador 
(Mr. Myron T. Herrick) and Mrs. Herrick, 
the Servian Minister and Mme. Vesnitch, the 
Greek Minister and Mme. Athos Eomanos, 



Any Victrola 

On Easy Terms 



Whether you get the new low price 
Victrola at $15 or the Victrola "de 
luxe" at $200, get a Victrola. At a 
very small expense you can enjoy a 
world of entertainment. Victrolas $15 
to $200. Any Victrola on easy terms. 



Sherman j§[iay & Co. 

Sheet Mualc and Musical Merchandise. 
Steinway and Othir Pianos. 
Apollo and Cecilian Player Pianos 

Victor Talking Machines. 

KEARNY AND SUTTER STREETS. 

SAN FRANCISCO. 

14TH & CLAY STS., OAKLAND. 



Saturday, July 13, 1912.] 



-TI1EW4SP- 



ii 




MAY 
Who will appear in "The Battle Cry 



PUCKETT'S 
COLLEGE of DANCING 

A More Beautiful Ballroom 
Could Hardly be Conceived 



Classes — Mondays. Assemblies — Fridays 

Advance Class and Social — Wednesdays 

PRIVATE LESSONS 



ASSEMBLY HALL 

1268 SUTTER STREET 

between Van Ness and Polk 
Ball for Bent Phone Franklin 118 



TULLY 

of Freedom" mxt week at the Orpheum. 

the Duke of Richelieu, H. S. H. Princess Hoh- 
enlohe, Mr. Herman Harjes (member of the 
Paris banking firm of Morgan, Harjes and 
Co.) and his handsome young wife, Mr. David 
Jayne Hill (formerly American Ambassador 
to Berlin) and Mrs. Hill, Mr. and Mme. Go- 
gorza (Emma Eames), C'omte and Comtesse 
Lionel de Montesquion, Mr. and Mrs. Arthur 
lnkersley, Mrs. Frederick Townsend Martin, 
Mrs. Bellamy Storer (to whom the famous 
series of "Dear Maria" letters was written), 
Comte Souza Eosa (the last Ambassador to 
Paris appointed by the King of Portugal), 
the Marquise de Schoenbrun and Mrs. Morris 
Cleios. A large entertainment was given on 
the same night by the Russian Ambassador 
and Ambassadress, and many of Mrs. French 's 
guests, including Mr. and Mrs. Herriek, "went 
on" to the Russian Embassy later. Nearly 
all the party being either of American birth 
or having associations with the United States, 



l,l « - coi i „|„ )T1 the 

National Republican Convention al Chicago, 
at which Mr. Merrick would prol 
been I 'haii man li; d n uiaiuod in An ■ 

ad of coming to Pi 
a Btaunch friend of bol li Mr. Tafl 
Roosevelt, be cong [f 0D being 

safe in the French capital instead 
painful position of being obliged to make :i 
choice between two men with both i whom 
he has been thrown into close association, 
and iui both of n horn tie entei tains a high 
regard. Mrs, Barton French is well known in 
California, M r. and M rs. Lnkersley lit ed here 
for set era! years. 



|wj°y° Kisen 

|pSj Kaisha 

(ORIENTAL STEAMSHIP 00.) 

S. S. Tenyo Maru, (Via Manila direct) 

Friday, July 12, 1912 

S. S. Shinyo Maru, (New). ..Saturday, Aug. 3,1912 
S. S. Chiyo Maru oaturday, Aug. 31, 1912 

S. S. Nippon Maru (Intermediate Service 
Saloon. Accommodations at reduced 
rates Saturday, September 21, 1912 

Steamers sail from Company's pier, No. 34. 
near foo L of Brannan Street, 1 P. M. for Yoko- 
hama and Hongkong, calling at Honolulu, Kobe 
(Hiogo), Nagasaki and Shanghai, and connecting 
at Hongkong with steamers for Manila, India, etc. 

No cargo received on board on day of sailing 
Round trip tickets at reduced rates. 

For freight and passage apply at office, 4tb 
floor. Western Metropolis National Bank Building. 
625 Market St. 

W. H. AVERY. Assistant General Manager. 



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12 



TME WASP- 



[Saturday, July 13, 1912. 



MADE RICH BY TIPS. 



Verification of the Proverb That All Things 
Come to Him Who Will but "Wait." 

MATRONS of restaurants in San Fran- 
cisco are good tippers. Many waiters 
in this city own snug bank accounts 
or valuable real estate. Our knights 
lit' the napkin are, however, not in the capi- 
talistic class of those of New York who were 
recently on strike. Some sleuths of the press 
looked up the financial status of the waiters' 
trade in Gotham, and discovered facts that 
astonished the investigators. 

A captain of waiters at Sherry 's Fifth ave- 
nue establishment is assessed on real estate 
valued at $110,U0U. A waiter at Savarin's is 
reputed to be worth $80,000. The Mayor of 
Montvale, New Jersey, where the waiter owns 
an extensive vineyard, appointed him Mayor 
protein, while the chief magistrate was away 
on a vacation recently. 

Another waiter at Savarin's is said to be 
worth $60,000. He made the money on tips 
from brokers. He cleaned up $18,000 in one 
turn. His son will graduate this year from 
the Massachusets Institute of Technology. 

Philippe, a waiter at Delmonico's, is the 
owner of a swell apartment house ou Twenty- 
sixth street. A lady and her husband, steady 
customers of Delmonico and well known to 
Philippe, were in search of a fashionable 
steam-heated apartment. The lady finally 
found one that almost suited her. But she 
required a parquetry flooring to be laid in 
the front room of the apartment, which she 
wished to convert into a library. She would 
be willing to take a two-year lease. The 
janitor referred her to the renting- agent, but 
the latter had no authority to make the im- 
provement, and referred' her to the owner. 
She was advised to call upon the owner be- 
tween certain hours. In due time she called 
upon the owner, and to her astonishment he 
proved to be none other than her favorite 
waiter from Delmonico 's. 

One of the oldest waiters at Hector's is a 
lover of the water. In the days before the 
old Rector establishment was torn down this 
man had one of the best "stations" in the 
restaurant. Too independent to work for 




«2 



Established 1853. 
Monthly Contracts, $1.50 per Month. 

NEW WORKS JUST ERECTED AT 27 
TENTH ST, S. F. 

Largest and Most Uup-to-Date on Pacific 
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Wagons call twice daily. 

Cleaning Dainty Garments Our Specialty 

F. Thomas Parisian Dyeing & 
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strangers while the new hotel was being built, 
he purchased a houseboat for $4,000, installed 
a pianola aboard it, fixed up a dynamo so that 
all six of the comfortable rooms were lighted 
electrically, paid $1,000 for a nobby little ten- 
der, and with the aid of the latter towed his 
property up the Shrewsbury Kiver. Together 
with his family he spent the summer of 1910 
anchored in comfort, and a part of this last 
summer when his duties at the new Rector's 
permitted him. 

Gossips among the waiters give this man 
the credit of taking in one of the largest bona 
fide tijjs ever pocketed in New York. It was 
upon the memorable occasion of the testimo- 
nial dinner to Prince Henry of Prussia, and 
is said to have been an even $200. 



CHECKING PRIVILEGES. 

Mere is a list of the annual sums said to be 
paid to certain New York hotels for the ex- 
clusive checking privilege: 

Hotel Albany $1,500 

"Hotel Plaza 2,000 

*Cafe Martin 2,000 

(Jafe Boulevard 3,000 

Cafe des Beaux Arts 3,000 

(Jafe Madrid 3,000 

Shanley's Restaurant 3000 

Sherry's Restaurant 3,000 

Murray 's Restaurant 4,000 

Maxim 's Restaurant 4,000 

*Hotel Astor 5,000 

Churchill's Restaurant 6,000 

Hotel Rector b',000 

Hotel Knickerbocker 6,500 

Luuis Martin's Restaurant ... 8,000 
^"Indicates that the privilege is a restricted 
one. 

The Waldorf-Astoria, among other hotels*, 
has uniformly refused to farm out its check- 
ing privilege. 



Mullins ' Decision. 

TU E friends of the late Patrolman O 'Brien 
wanted to give the widow an appro- 
priate memorial, and subscribed enough 
money to have a large oil portiait painted by 
;i rising Velasquez of the Carmel-by-the-Sea 
colony. When the portrait was finished it 
was taken to the house of the widow and 
placed on exhibition. All who subscribed to 
the fund were invited to come and see it, 
and they assembled duly. The portrait was 
unveiled by the artist. Half of those present 
said it was a good likeness and half said it 
was very poor. The dispute was warm. Fin- 
ally the painter, seeing his fee slipping away 
from him, as there seemed no basis of settle- 
ment as to the merits of the picture, suggested 
that Mullins, the plasterer, who was the most 
intimate friend of O'Brien, should be called" 
in and the merit or demerit of the picture 
left to him. 

Mullins came and was shown the picture. 

''Who is itf" asked the artist. 

' ' It 's O 'Brien, ' ' said Mullins. c l By my 
faith, it's O'Brien! It's my old friend, Pat 
O'Brien." 

Mullins walked up and put out his hand to 
touch the picture. 

"Don't do that!" exclaimed the artist. 
"It's not dry. " 

"Not dry!" shouted Mullins. "Not diy, is 
it? Then if it isn't dry it isn't O'Brien. " 



Profane Silence. 

THE other day upon the links a disting- 
uished clergyman was playing a closely 
contested game of golf. He carefully 
teed up his ball and addressed it with the 
[ most approved grace; he raised his driver 



and hit the ball a tremendous dip, but in- 
stead of soaring into the azure it 'perversely 
went about twelve feet to the right and then 
buzzed around in a circle. The clerical gen- 
tleman frowned, scowled, pursed up his mouth 
and bit his lips, but said nothing, and a 
friend who stood by him said: "Doctor, that 
is the most profane silence I ever witnessed," 
+ 

The Reason. 

"Oh, mother, why are the men in the front 
baldheaded?" 

"They bought their tickets from the scalp- 
ers, my dear." 



5% per month 

SAVED on the investment by buying 

THE 

Alaska Refrigerator 

900,000 SOLD SINCE 1878 

We have a Test Refrigerator to prove what we 
claim for it Please call and see it. 

Paciuc Coast Agents 

W. W. MONTAGUE & CO. 



557-563 Market Street 



San Francisco 



MORSE 

Detective and Patrol 

Service 



^ PERATIVES in full dress furnished for 
weddings, receptions and other social 
functions. Uniformed officers supplied 
■s;%ad y as ticket takers for balls, dances and 
' *=z£j entertainments at reasonable rates. 
Patrolmen to protect property against 6re and 
depredations of thieves during absence of owner. 
Engage in all branches of legitimate detective 
service and serve legal papers in difficult cases. 



602 California St., San Francisco 



Telephone Kearny 3153. 



Homophone O 2626 



Murphy Grant & Co. 

JOBBERS OF DRY GOODS 

NEW GOODS CONSTANTLY 
ARRIVING AND ON SALE 
AT OUR NEW BUILDING 

134-146 Bush St. N.E. Cor. Sansome, S.F. 



SPRING WOOLENS NOW IN 

H. S. BRIDGE & CO. 

TAILORS and IMPORTERS of WOOLENS 



108-110 SUTTER STREET 



above 
Montgomery 



French American Bank Bld'j 
Fourth Floor 



SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 



Saturday, Juiy la, 1U12.I 



-TNEWASP- 



Clmralbeirs Fnod 
Mewpoirtt: Cold 



o\Y long does n.e average newly rich 
last at Newport .' The history ol each 
of these interesting families is much 
t he Bame. They rent :i houBe for i he 
season, they sin' receptions, balls, musicales, 
they Btrivo to cultivate tl — celebr I lead- 
ers "ln.su tenure ol social position in thi 

ony has been sufticiently Ioixlc to give them 
their primature. The social Btruggle lasts 
aboul Beven years. Thai may be regarded as 
the average duration of the battle. Finally 
they give up and subside to the Btation for 

which nature had i 'e evidently fitted them, 

If their purses be unusually large, they may 
lasl somewhat longer, bul seven years ol 
effort usually uiaku ;iu end of their surplus 
cash and their stock of patience, or buth. 
Their average social career is the same length 
as the average life of a chorus girl or a 
yellow newspaper. 

The first year of the aspirant in Newport 

is very expensive. There are a s 'o or no. re 

prominent houses which may be leased for the 
season. The average rental for one of these 

"cottages" is $15, i for the season. The 

additional expenses i essary to keep up a 

fifteen-tbousand-dollar "cottage" are usually 
about $35,000. Therefore a Newport season 
even economically managed comes ordinarily 
to about $50,000. 

What can a man buy in Newport for tins 

$50, i that he cannot get elsewhere? Social 

opportunity. Reduced to concrete figures, his 
social opportunities will consist of these: One 
hour each pleasant week day at the Casino, 
one hour each pleasant week day at the golf 
links, and one hour each pleasant week day 
al Bailey's Beach. There and there alone 
will he and his brood find the chance to court, 
by hook or by crook, those casual introductions 
which alone are worth the price of admis- 
sion. Now the Newport season is very 
short, being about six weeks long, from the 
Ersl of July to the middle or August. 

Often it rains. In fact, on the average it 
rains a fifth of the time. Therefore, the 
assaulter of the inner shrine is reduced, to 
put the matter in vulgar minutes, to about 
ninety hours of social opportunity during the 
entiie season. Fifty thousand dollars for 
ninety hours! Pour hundred and forty-odd 
dollars an hour. Such a strain cannot be 
borne long on a moderate income. After a 
few seasons the average climbers pack their 
things and are seen no more, on the beach or 
at the Casino or on the golf links. 

•Take the case of the Jimson family, for 
instance. We call them Jimson because it 
isn't their honest family name. After a 
month at Newport in a $15,000 "cottage" 
I he Jimsons thought the time had come to 
spread out and entertain. Tn the sixty hours 
of social opportunity they had managed to 
be "introduced" to 280 of the Newport set. 
So the Jimsons announced a reception for a 



certain evening. They issued 280 invitations 
and received 280 acceptances. Great! The 

med -. easy that life was roseate 

in the y other mini 

until i ! _ of I hi m imentous e> ent. 

Simply l,, -how that money was no object, 
the Jimsons sent to New V'ork tor the 
musical talenl at the command of any agen 
and ascmbled a list of names for the musicale 
I tial would ha\ e gn en I iscar Hammeratein a 
fil of apoplexy, iii course, the Jimsons did 
'"« thai everyone in Newport accepts 
every invitation that is sent. Whether they 
go or nol is a dill". 'rent mailer. Nor did they 

know thai no in Newport relisl.es a sel 

entertainment. Of all things abhorred in 
Newport is the sort of entertainment one 

might get s ewhere else. No matter what 

the cosl, it you can get it anywhere else, it 
is no g I in Newport. 

The .liaisons didn't realize this. In the 

bottom ..I' their g I old simple bourgeois 

-..ills I hey were congratulating each other 
thai they were to leave a musicale thai would 
make a gala night at the Metropolitan Opera 
House look like seventeen cents. Besides, 
they prepared a magnificent supper and se- 
cured ninety extra waiters to serve it. 

This was I he history of the attendance at 
the -I tmson musicale: 

Al !l o'clock twelve persons were present. 

At In o'clock there were fourteen. 

At 11 o'clock there were fifteen. 

At 32 o'clock there were 235. 

At 12:15 there were eight. 

At 12:30 four guests went in. to supper and 
were waited on by ninety servants! 

Do you wonder that seven seasons of that 
is enough to wear down the stoutest heart 
and put a crimp in the fattest purse. 

The ordinary millionaire who goes to New- 
port lias a hard time, especially he who has 
made his money himself, for he usually thinks 
his money important. In Newport it is not 
important at all as a social prop. Money is 
very necessary to pay bills and very useful 
for loans, but being vulgarly rich is of itself 
not a complete qualification for social tri- 
umph at Newport. 

The owner of a pretty little yacht which 
bad cost him $75,000, dropped anchor in 
Newport last summer and called on an old 
friend who knew the town. 

"Look here," said the yachtsman bold, 
"my yacht's down in the bay, and she's 
yours for ten days. I want you to do with 
her as you please. Luncheon and dinner 
every day, if you like. Suppose we get right 
at it and make up a list of the guests you'd 
like to invite." 

"Have you a minute to spare now?" re- 
plied the Newport citizen. 

"Certainly." 

"Then hop into my motor car." 

They were driven to the pier. There the 
Newport man pointed across the water. About 
sixty yachts were riding at anchor — the finest 
fleet of private yachts in existence. 

' ' Most, of these boats are better than 
yours," said the Newport man mercilessly, 
"a»nd they're all better known. And there 



is not one among them that is not pining 
longing to give a dinner or a luncheon, both 

or either, to someone or any , M.. 

there is nol a hall dozen ..i them thai will 
be able • , ;uests, lei alo 

parly. \\ i.y .' Be. .. drug "ii 

the Newport market. Why ml hances on 

'■"lied al i .hi 1 1..- watei v, hen j ..u 

'■ In"' "i I I nlorlnblv as] .'' Sad 

au:.\ . sailor boj . to s o porl « here a yachl 

is a luxury and not a nuisance. ' ' 

" Whew ! ' ' exclaimed I he j achtsman, " I II 
pull anchor this afternoon. This frigid cli 
mule is not .114 able in my flannels." 

Tl iisi.le world believes that Newport 

is made up oiilir.dv of wild people, who spend 

their lime giving monkey and dog dinners, 

bul this is not quite correct. There is, ol 

course, the brass Land set, composed chief!} 

ol' people whose idea of elegance is based 141 
011 the proposition that you should be as in- 
sulting as possible to your neighbor, other 
wise you are not exclusive. Having a com- 
mercial origin, 1 hey are firm believers in the 
virtue of advertising. They feel that they 
must be talked alioiit. and to attain notori- 
ety, they are quite willing to do any and 
everything which will startle the community. 
Let. no one believe that they are happy; they 
have no confidence in themselves. They have 
brains enough to recognize their own de- 
ficiencies, considered from a mental and so- 
cial standpoint. Their greatest fear is that 
somebody will find them out, and the sad 
part of it is that they always are found out. 

If any one should ask what was the best 
rule to observe to be successful in Newport, 
let it be said: Determine from your experi- 
ence what convention teaches is the right 
thing to do, and then do the exact opposite. 
Society wdll forgive anything in a man if he 
is liberal, and everything in a woman if she 
is pretty. 

Socially, many people of very moderate 
means are prominent in Newport, and are in- 
vited to the frequent functions. Imagine, 
however, the heartaches in the homes where 
the annual income does not exceed $4, 000, 
when the women are obliged to come in re- 
peated social contact with other women whose 
incomes are from $100,000 a year up. Let 
us draw the curtain over the picture. It is 
.too distressing! 



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Telephones : Kearny 4794 — Home O 3725 



BLUFFING THE COLONEL, 



OW that Colonel Roosevelt has read 
himself out of the Republican party 
the public may expect, confidently, 
to find a good many anecdotes of 
the third-teim candidate cropping up in the 
newspapers. There was never a President 
who had more cause for gratitude to the 
^ress than Boosevelt. When be became the 
only "Former-President," the newspapers 
still kept in cold storage many stories about 
his political career that would have amused 
the public. There no longer exists the re- 
gard for the third-term candidate's feelings 
that held the reporters in check. Henceforth 
the newspapers will be very likely to print 
everything about Roosevelt as they would 
about the doings and sayings of any other 
politician. 

The story of how the late Boss Piatt and 
Benjamin B. Odell bluffed Roosevelt into tak- 
ing the vice-presidential nomination has just 
been made public. As every politician knows, 
United States Senator Piatt was distributor- 
in-chief ol the political pie in New York. 
Odell worked harmoniously with Piatt, and 
thus in time became Governor of the Empire 
State. 

Early in the Spring of the last year of 
Roosevelt's term as Governor of New York, 
politicians began to talk about the Governor's 
probable successor. Roosevelt, with his cus- 
tomary positiveness, said there was no ques- 
tion about bis successor. He would succeed - 

himself. 

* * * 

Notwithstanding Governor Roosevelt's con- 
fidence, the Spring caucuses in the counties 
didn 't indorse the Governor for re-election. 
They praised his administration but said no- 
thing about giving him another term in of- 
fice. The fact was that Boss Piatt and Odell, 
who was chairman of the State Committee, 
had fixed the matter up already. From his 
headquarters in the Fifth Avenue Hotel, 
Odell allowed it to be known that Col. Roose- 
velt would have the endorsement of his 
State for the Vice-Presidential nomination at 
the Philadelphia convention. The Colonel de- 
nied the statement. At first he laughed at 
it; then he grew angry and declared that no 
power on earth would induce him to accept 
such a nomination. Again and again he in- 
sisted that he would be renominated for Gov- 
ernor, and that all the bosses in the world 
■could not keep the nomination from him. 

These declarations came from Albany, and 
Senator Piatt was often urged to reply, but 
lie remained silent. He had many talks with 
Mr. Odell, and it was agreed between them 
that the Colonel would change his tune when 
he learned that he would have to run as the 
tail of the National Ticket or go home to 
Oyster Bay and stay quiet for a year or two. 

Meantime the Colonel kept up his efforts 
for renomination as Governor of New York 
and thought he had Piatt and Odell "beaten 
to a frazzle," when, in fact, he hadn't a ghost 
of a show for the renomination. 




June came ana the date of the National 
Convention drew near. The Colonel contin- 
ued to declare that he would not accept the 
nomination for Vice-President. He didn 't 
intend to let anybody shelve him, he said. 
He didn 't want anything but another term 
as Governor, and if he couldn't get that he 
would take nothing. This kind of talk didn't 
suit Piatt. He and Quay of Pennsylvania, 
and Mark Hanna of Ohio, had a political 




THE LATE THOMAS C. PLATT. 

program all arranged and didn't wish to see 

it broken just because one of the figures in 

the play was obstreperous. 
* * * 

Then one day Piatt and Odell had a talk. 
Just what was said by these two is not known 
but it was said that a plan was arranged to 
bring the Colonel to his senses, and keep 
him so busy chasing the bosses that he would 
have no chance to get at the head of the 
procession. By one of those underground 
passages which Piatt 'often found so useful, 
word became public to this effect: "Senator 
Piatt is very much annoyed and embarrased 
by the refusal of Gov. Roosevelt to accept 
the nomination for Vice-President, and he 
fears that unless this State immediately pro- 
duces an acceptable candidate that the prize 
will go elsewhere. He has asked State Chair- 
man Odell to be a candidate. He has learned 
.that Mr. Odell would be acceptable to Mr. 
Hanna and the other big leaders." 

When this "news ' ' was printed in the 



newspapers, Mr. Odell and Mr. Piatt met 
again and waited for developments. At 4 
o'clock the next afternoon the telephone bell 
rang in Mr. Odell 's private office, and "Cen- 
tral" said: 

"Governor Roosevelt would like to speak 
to you, Sir. ' ' 

Odell went to the telephone, and this con- 
versation took place: 

"That you, Ben?" 

"Yes, who are you?" 

"This is the Governor. How are you, Ben?" 

' ' Pretty well, thank you. How are you 
feeling?" 

"Bully. Say, could you run up here for a 
short time. I have something I want to talk 
to you about. It 's very important. Come 
up, will you? 

"Impossible for me to go up this week. 
Won't the thing wait?" 

"Not very well, and I want it disposed 
of." 

"Why can't you stop in here on your way 
to Oyster Bay on Saturday?" 

"That's fine.. I'll do that. Expect me 
along in the afternoon. ' ' 

Then Odell rang up Piatt, and the latter 
said he was much pleased at the quick and 
vigorous bite that had answered their fish- 
ing. Late Saturday afternoon Governor Roose- 
velt bustled into Odell 's room, and after an 
effusive greeting, said: 

"Must catch a train; great hurry to get 

home. Just jump into my cab with me and 

we can talk going over to the Thirty-fourth 

street ferry, and the cab ean bring you ba'-k. " 
* * * 

Odell professed great reluctance, but he 
finally climbed into the cab. On the way to 
the ferry Roosevelt chatted about many petty 
things, and it was not until the cab was with- 
in half a block of the ferry that the Gover- 
nor said to Odell: 

"By the way, Ben, what is this I hear 
about you being nominated for Vice-Presi- 
dent?" 

"It seems to be up to me," replied Odell, 
carelessly. "Yon won't take it and it ought 
to come to this State. The Senator has made 
some inquiries, and he says that I will do. 
I don't want it, but rather than have the 
State lose it, I will accept." 

Roosevelt asked with much anxiety: 

"Well, just promise me, Ben, that you'll 
do nothing until you hear from me. Promise 
me, won't you?" 

"All right." Odell replied, and then Roose- 
velt ran for his- boat, and Odell returned to 
his headquarters and telephoned the news to 
Piatt. 

The next scene of this political comedy 
opened at the Philadelphia convention, where 
Roosevelt was protesting strenuously that no 
power on earth could make him accept the 
Vice-Presidential nomination. These protest- 
ations caused no surprise nor uneasiness to 
Piatt and Quay and Hanna and Odell and the 
others who were engineering the affair. 



Saturday, July 13, 1912.] 



-THE WASP- 



15 




'HOWDAH, THEODORE! THINK YOU CAN GET MAHOUT?' 



ARTISTS WILL HAVE THEIR DAY. 

AS THE TIME approaches for the world's 
fair to appear upon the scenery, it be- 
hooves us to be very considerate of 
the men who paint pictures, for we shall have 
to show up some "culture" iu our midst. No 
doubt there will be many wonderful works of 
art brought here if the right people are sent 
to choose them, but we shall have to encourage 
our California painters more enthusiastically 
than we do at present, if we want them to 
make the impression which they are certainly 
capable of making. To be sure, Harry Stuart 
Fonda sold a picture a short while ago at the 
Del Monte art gallery for fifteen hundred dol- 
lars. But it was bought by an Eastern wo- 
man, and besides it was a great big picture, 
and must have required much time, many 
yards of canvas and about a thousand dollars 
worth of paint. McComas sells most of his 
pictures, but his personality is convincing, 
his pictures are strong, and most important of 
all he is an exceptionally lucky young person 
— witness his marriage with Miss Marie Louise 
Parrott. 



Charles Rollo Peters gave a stunning ex- 
hibition at the St. Francis this spring which 
would have been considered successful finan- 
cially for some men, but not for him, for he 
does everything on the same big scale in 
which he paints, and so he needs a lot of mon- 
ey to keep him, going. His son, Charles Rollo 
Peters, Jr., is now studying with Sargeant in 
London and is giving great promise as a por- 
trait painter. 

Charles Dickman has finished some very 
successful panels for P. M. Smith of Oakland; 
Joullin Las painted a portrait of William 
Greer Harrison; Martinez and Piazzoni, two 
of our most clever men, are painting and 
teaching. Burgdorf has struck it rich in 
Cleveland and has gone to Egypt. Arthur 
Mathews is doing some wonderful work in 
his quiet way at his studio, and some of the 
women, Evelyn McCormick, Maren Froelich 
and some others, are doing work which is 
good and strong. And this is all with but a 
7ninimum of encouragement from San Fran- 
cisco. But the painter-men will soon be hav- 
ing their day out here in the West if San 



Francisco intends to make the showing artist- 
ically which she will be expected to make as 
a metropolis big enough and important enough 
for a world's fair. 

+ 

EXPRESSING HIMSELF. 

THE erudite schoolmaster propounded a 
deep question to his students and peer- 
ed around the class-room for the an- 
swer. Silence followed from the blank faces 
before him. Presently his attention was at- 
tracted to a small freckel-face*d boy in a 
front seat, who, either from timidness or in- 
decision, seemed to be endeavoring to hold 
himself in check. 

"Out with it, Tommy!" urged the school- 
master ,getting up and advancing to a posi- 
tion near the student. "Don't be afraid to 
assert yourself; out with it!" 

Encouraged by the instructor's words, the 
youth threw back his head, opened wide his 
mouth and emitted a very loud sneeze. 

♦ 

TO THE POINT. 
At a teachers' conference one of the school 
principals rose to propose the toast: "Long 
live the teachers." 

And a meager, pallid assistant instructor 
in a hollow voice asked: "On what?" 




Vacation 1912 

A Handbook of 

Summer Resorts 

Along the line of the 

NORTHWESTERN 
PACIFIC RAILROAD 

This book tells by picture and word 
of the many delightful places in Marin, 
Sonoma, Mendocino, Lake and Humboldt 
Counties in which to spend your Vaca- 
tion — Summer Resorts, Camping Sites, 
Farm and Town Homes. 



Copies of Vacation 1912 may be ob- 
tained at 874 Market St. (Flood Build- 
ing), Sausalito Ferry Ticket Office, or 
on application to J. J. Geary, G. P. & 
F. A., 808 Phelan Building, San Fran- 
cisco. 



NEW ENGLAND HOTEL 

Located in beautiful grove about 40 rods from 
station. Beautiful walks, grand scenery; hunt- 
ing and fishing, boating, bathing, bowling and 
croquet. Table supplied with fresh fruit and 
vegetables, milk and eggs from own ranch daily. 

Adults $7 to $9 per week; special rates for 
children. 

Address P. K. HARRISON, Camp Meeker, 
Sonoma County, Cal. 



OWN SUMMER HOME IN 

CAMP MEEKER 

Mountains of Sonoma Co. Lots $15 up. Meeker 
'uilds cottages $85 up. Depot, stores, hotels, 
.staurant, phone, post, express office, theater, 
free library, pavilion, churches,, sawmill; 2,000 
lots sold, 700 cottages built. Sausalito Ferry. 
Address M. C. MEEKER, Camp Meeker. 



Redwood Grove 



% mile from Guerneville; tents and cottages ; 
abundance of fruit, berries; bus meets all trains. 
Rates $10-$11 per week; L. D. phone. Address 
THORPE BROS., Box 141, Guerneville, Sonoma 
Co., Cal. 



ROSE HILL 

HOTEL AND COTTAGES 
Camp Meeker 

Opposite depot; 20 minutes' ride from Russian 
River; surrounded by orchards and vineyards; 
excellent dining-room, with best cooking. Pish- 
ing, boating, swimming and dancing. Many 
good trails for mountain clinrbing. Open all 
year. Can accommodate 75 guests. Adults, $6 
to $10 per week; children half rates. 

Building lots for sale from $50 and up. Ad- 
dress MRS. L. BARBIER, Camp Meeker, So- 
noma County, Cal. 



The Gables 



Sonoma county's ideal family resort, just opened 
to the public. Excellent table, supplied from 
our dairy and farm. Dancing, tennis, games. 
Bus to hot baths and trains daily at Verano sta- 
tion. Rates $2.50 per day, $12 and up j>er 
week. Open year round. Address H. P. MAT- 
THEWSON, Sonoma City P. O., Cal. 



Hotel Rowardennan 

OPEN ALL THE YEAR. 

New ownership, new management, new fea- 
tures. Golf, tennis, bowling, fishing, boating, 
swimming, clubhouse. Free garage. 

Rates $17.50 to $25 per week; $3 to $4 per 
day. 

Folders and information at Peck-Judah's, or 
address J. M. SHOULTS, Ben Lomond, Cal. 



:: RIVERSIDE RESORT 



Country home % mile from Guerneville; ideal 
spot; % mile of river frontage; $8 to $12 per 
week. For particulars, MRS. H. A. STAGG, 
Proprietor, Guerneville, Sonoma county. 



COSMO FARM 

On the Russian River; electric lighted through- 
out. Rates $10 to $12 per week. For particu- 
lars see Vacation Book or address H. P. Mc- 
PEAK, P. O. Hilton, Sonoma Co., Cal. 



RIONIDO HOTEL 

Lawn Tennis, Croquet, Shuffle Board, Swings, 
Shooting Gallery, Box Ball Alleys, also 4,000 
square feet Dancing Pavilion, unsurpassed Bathing 
and Boating, and large social hall for guests. 
Hotel ready for guests. Rates, $12 per week. 
American plan. For reservations address RIO- 
NIDO CO., Rionido, Sonoma Co., Cal. 



Summer Resorts 

AT HOME, AT THE CLOB, CAPE OR HOTEL 

CASWELL'S COFFEE 

Always Satisfactory 

GEO. W. CASWELL COMPANY 

530-532-534 Polsora St. Phone Kearny 3610 

Write for samples and prices. 



CARR'S 



NEW MONTE 
RIO HOTEL 



NEAREST TO STATION AND RIVER. 

New modern hotel, first-class in every detail 
and equipped with every modern convenience. 
Swimming, boating, canoeing, fishing, launching, 
horseback riding and driving. Hotel rates $2 
day; $12 and $14 per week. Round trip, $2.80. 
good on either the broad or narrow gauge rail- 
roads. Sausalito Perry. Address C. P. CARR, 
Monte Rio, Sonoma Co., Cal. 



HOTEL RUSTICANO 

The hotel is just a two-minute walk from the 
depot amongst the giant redwood trees. The 
amusements are numerous — boating, bathing, 
lawn tennis, bowling, dancing, nickelodeon, and 
beautiful walks. A more desirable place for a 
vacation could not be found. Rates, $9 to $12 
per week ; rates to families. 

For folder, address L. B. SELENGER, Prop., 
Camp Meeker, Sonoma County, Cal. 



U. S. ARMY 



TENTS 

BLANKETS, COTS. HAMMOCKS 

SPIRO HARNESS CO. 

307 MARKET STREET, S. F. 
Write for Free Catalogue. 



Saturday, July 13, 1912.J 



-THE WASP- 



17 



SELECTING THE ALTAR. 
By Josephine Martin. 

A letter has come to the desk in which a ilcar 
bride-elect writes: "Do you think it displays 
bad t as! .- tn have ;< church wedding instead 

of ;i quirt borne affairl I going to be 

married soon, and 1 had clan I in be mar- 
ried in church— at a real altar, But my aunt 
tells me that church weddings are too public. 
She says that a quiet, refined, home wedding 
shows better taste — more culture, as she ex- 
pressed it. So, sin: is trying to persuade 
i and father t<> have it all "at home." 
My dearest mother and father just look at 
my aunt, and say that they leave ii i" me. 
•II./' says lie leaves it in me absolutely. So 
don't you see I have a dreadful responsibil- 
ity, and I just wish that you would help me 
in decide. Only let me tell you in secret: I 
have always dreamed that my wedding day 
would he the happiest in all the world, and 1 
have always pictured the wedding in a church. 
"Thanking you, > .'' 

" I'. s. — 1 forgot to tell you that my dear old 
mint is a maiden lady. ' 

Bless yull. deal', dainty l.ri.le elect ! V.pu 
waul my advice, do you J Vet, in the very 
cleverest possible way you reveal the hopes 

s ar to your heart. Then, too, it is very 

evident from the tone of your letter that you 
want a real altar tor your marriage, and with 
that divine spark within your happy soul 
which we mortals eall "love" you seek for 
it in a church. That there is no "had last,'" 
in anything you may do is evident from wdiat 
you have written. 1 am sure, also, that your 
iiiiinl is a beautiful garden-spot where white 
lilies grow. 

Why, a church is just the place, the most 
appropriate place in all the world for your 
wedding, because — you want it there. Every 
bride should have her way about such a very 
important matter, the most important in all 
the world — at the time. And, of course, your 
wedding day will be the happiest in all the 
wide world; every bride's is, unless — but let 
us not think of "unless." 

As far as culture is concerned, culture 
comes from within, not from without. It 
rests with what we are whether we are cultur- 
ed or not. 

There is an economic side to this question 
which is the most potent of all in making such 
a decision, but a church wedding does not 
necessarily mean that you must exceed your 

no s in carrying out your plans. A home 

wedding can be put to money extremes as far 
as that is concerned. Let parents decide that 
matter for you, and judging again from the 
tone of your letter, 1 am sure you are too sen- 
sible a daughter to want more than your 



GOURAUD'S 

Oriental Beauty Leaves 

A dainty little booklet of exquisitely perfumed 
powdered leaves to carry in the purse. A handy 
article for all occasions to quickly improve the 
complexion. Sent for 10 cents in stamps or 
coin. 

P. T. Hopkins, 87 Jones Street, N. T. 



"foil oasil; afford. Keep beneath, 

rather than within, your means. 

With all I his in mud. my little lady dainty, 
have your wedding in a church if you want 

i' ' he n drea t - as long 

it in i and father and " he" leave it to 
.von. \- l. H your dear aunt, she will be so 

I "I "l you in your beautiful bridal robl 

whether -mi are "at home" or at the church, 
that she will wish the whole world could see 
yon as you are. 

But, it' she needs persuasion before tin' 
wedding, tell her all about the beautiful 
Schultz-Hopkins wedding that just look place 
in Trinity I'liiireh, and which was a "dream." 
Tell her, also, about the pretty church wed 
ding that is going to take place over in 
Christ's Church, Sausalito, when beautiful 
Kililh Lowe will become the bride of Adolph 
Nans Wolbnan. Then, if she wants to hear 
of a magnificeni modern fairy story, tell her 
about the sumptuous wedding of Jennie Crock 
or and Malcolm Whitman which will be sol- 

'■ ized in the beautiful little church at San 

M .'i I en. 

Then send her your card and lots of love, 
bidding her to the wedding. She will come. 
So will all those who love you. 

P. SK— If your aunt were not a "maiden 
lady" she would understand. And if, per- 
chance, she should cease to be a "maiden- 
lady," and should want a home wedding, 1 
am sure that you would decorate every nook 
and corner of the nunc for her. 

♦ 

COULDN'T SEE IT. 

A FOOD faddist was lecturing to a large 
audience on the marvelous results to 
be obtained from chewing soup, or 
eating nut butter, or something of that kind. 
He was not an imposing person, physically; 
but swelling out his chest he slapped it thrice 
with his palm aud cried: 

"Friends, two years ago I was a walking 
skeleton, a haggard, miserable wreck-. Now 
what do you 'suppose brought about this 
great change in me?" 

He paused to let his words sink in, and a 
voice asked: "What change?" 



The June record of the six best-sellers was 
1. Fran, Ellis; 2. A Hoosier Chronicle, Nich- 
olson; 3. Through the Postern Gate, Barclay; 
-I. The Harvester, Stratton-Porter; 5. The 
Man in Lonely Land, Bosher; 6. Tante, Sedg- 
wick. 



"The Women of Tomorrow," by "William 
Hard, is a study of keen observation told with 
the author's capacity for humanising sta- 
tistics. The author has been in San Francisco 
addressing the women of the General Feder- 
ation. 

1 t 

"Is lie a night hawk?" 

"Yes, and she's a screech owl." 



Men of fashion always have their shirts 
made to order, for they find that the ready- 
made shirts are uncomfortable, ill-fitting and 
apt to give anything but a stylish effect. Such 
men patronize first-class establishments, such 
as I hat of D. C. Heger, 243 Kearny street, 
and 118 Geary street, where skilled workmen 
make shirts and underwear of perfect fit, the 
latest styles and the best of materials. A man 
is often judged by his linen, and good linen 
betokens the gentleman. 



WALTERS 


SURGICAL 


CO. 


SUROICAL IN8TEUMENTS. 




SOS Sutter St.. 8 


F. Phone Do*(Ui 4011 



Citizen'. Alliance of Sin Fr.nci.co 

OPEN SHOP 



"The minimum scale * of 
the union represses all ambition 
for excellence." — Prof. Eliot 
Harvard University. 



? 



Tin' Open Shop town is :i 

prospoi 9 town Thero is no 

excoption to tho rnlo. 



Citizens' Alliance Office 
Booms, Nos. 363-364-365 
Russ Bldg., San Francisco. 




Sultan Turkish Baths 

624 POST 3TEEET 
Special Department for Ladles 

Open Day and Night for Ladies and Geo 
tlemen. 
Al. Johnson, formerly of Sutter Street 
Hammam, has leased the Sultan Turkish 
baths, where he will be [-hut to see his 
old and new customers. 



Blake, Mof f itt & Towne 

PAPER 



37-45 First Street 

PHONES: SUTTER 2230; J 3221 (Home) 
Private Exchange Connecting all Department! 



LA GRANDE & WHITES 


LAUNDRY CO. 


Office and Works, 


234 12th St. 


Bet. Howard & 


Folsom Sts. 


SAN FRANCISCO, 


CALIFORNIA 


Phones: Market 916 


Home M 2044. 



Eames Tricycle Co. 




Manufacturers of INVAilD 
ROLLING CHAIRS for all 

purposes. Self - Propelling 
Tricycle Chairs for the dis- 
abled. INVALID CHAIRS. 
Wholesale and retail and 
for rent. 1714 Market St., 
San FranciBCO. Phone Park 
2940. 1200 3. Main Street, 
Los Angeles. 



<^?v?i' ;; 



a-Tna -lrHSTgri- & v«A ^ v* 










-y 






AST week "Jim" Hill retired from 
the eli airmanship of the Great North- 
ern Railway He is 74, but will re- 
main on the Executive Committee. 
Hill created the vast railroad system he 
has ruled, and in twenty years of service as 
President of the company never drew a cent 
of salary. For five years, more he held the 
position of chairman, also without .pay. He is 
accredited with having spent $2,000,000 of 
his own money in the upbuilding of the Great 
Northern, which was apparently hopeless at 
the start. 

Following the panic of 1873, the Dutch 
bondholders of the bankrupt companies made 
terms with Jim Hill and his associates, George 
Stephen (now Lord Mont Stephen), Donald 
Smith (now Lord Strathcona), and Norman 
W. Kithson. These men bought the default- 
ed bonds on March 13, 1878. For those days 
it seemed a formidable undertaking. The 
stock of these companies aggregated $6,500,- 
000, and their bonded indebtedness, with past 
due interest, nearly $33,000,000, aside from 
floating obligations. The total capitalization 
and indebtedness at the time of the companies 
taken over was approximately $44,000,000. It 
is now $600,000,000. 

The financing of the Great Northern was 
one of the most remarkable feats in the his- 
tory of railroad development. The Great 
Northern was built by the money furnished 
by its stock holders and what it earned. As 
part of the property of the St. Paul and 
Pacific, it obtained some fragments of a land 
grant in Minnesota. With the proceeds of 
the sales of these lands nearly $13,000,000 of 
bonds were retired and the annual interest 
charge has been correspondingly reduced. 

All the other transcontinental lines had 
received large subsidies in cash or land grants, 
or both. They suffered the stress of financial 
stresses and passed through receiverships and 



reorganizations. The Great Northern never 
failed, never passed a dividend, never was 
financially insecure in any time of panic. For 
thirty-three years its credit has been unim- 
paired, and its resources equal to any demands 
upon them, and in times of financial distress 
it has been able to assist materially in mov- 
ing the crops of the Northwest. There has 
never been a dollar's worth of stock or bonds 
issued that was not paid for iu cash, property, 
or services at its actual cash value at the time. 
The stock has paid a dividend ever since 1882, 
and since 1900 the rate has remained steadily 
at 7 per cent. 

Bargains in Real Estate. 

Although the daily newspapers Iteep on 
booming the real estate market, it is very 
dull in San Francisco. Few brokers are mak- 
ing any money. Some shrewd speculators are 
picking up good bargains, of which several 
have been offered lately. Owners who had 
inflated notions of the value of their proper- 
ties have been coming to their senses. They 
begin to realize that real estate values prior 
to 1906 are no indication of the true value of 
property now. In the readjustment of busi- 
ness some districts have suffered greatly and 
others have been benefited. It is during con- 
ditions of this kind that the keen investor 
with ready money is likely to find a very fine 
purchase. The timid buyers hold off in dull 
times and rush in when the market begins to 
rise. They are afraid unless they see the mar- 
ket booming that real estate will never again 
be as valuable as it was. The history of all 
large and growing American cities, however, 
«s that every dull period is followed by a sharo 
advance. Nothing is surer than the approach 
of a period of great progress and prosperity 
in San Francisco, and people who buy good 
property now at the ruling prices will surely 
make handsome, profits. 



THE ANGLO & LONDON 
PARIS NATIONAL BANK 




SAN FRANCISCO 



Capital $4,000,000 

Surplus and Profits $1,600,000 

Total Resources $40,000,000 

OFFICERS: 

HERBERT FLEISHH ACKER President 

SIG. GREENEBAUM Chairman of the Board 

J. FRIEDLANDER Vice-President 

C. F. HUNT Vice-President 

R. ALTSCHUL Cashier 

C. R. PARKER Assistant Cashier 

WM. H. HIGH Assistant Cashier 

H. CHOYNSKI Assistant Cashier 

G. R. BURDICK Assistant Cashier 

A. L. LANGERMAN Secretary 



Upper Market Street. 
Several times in these columns attention 
has been called to the opportunities for in- 
vestment on upper Market street. That prop- 
erty is now beginning to interest the right- 
class of buyers — people who have the money 
and the enterprise to improve their holdings. 
Unfortunately for upper Market street, it has 
been held chiefly by very rich men. They 
did not care to build because immediate prof- 
its could not be realized. They preferred to 
let the valuable property lie idle and gain 
the "unearned increment." "Let some other 
fellow build" has been the motto of these un- 
progressive owners. The result has been that 
scarcely anybody erected buildings, and con- 
sequently the finest street in San Francisco 
has been an e}'esore, with its acres of- empty 
lots and rows of billboards. A decided change 
has begun on upper Market street near the 
junction of A T alencia and Gough. Apartment 
houses of a permanent character are springing 
up and finding tenants readily. A very fine 
apartment building is almost completed at 
the corner of Franklin and Market, and has 
been leased to advantage. Further out, on 
the south side, at the corner of Brady and 
Market streets, Charles Crocker is erecting 
a five-story apartment house that will cost 
about $100,000. The Hotel Ascot, which cost 
about $40,000, adjoins Mr. Crocker's new 
building, and has proved a success. It is 
demonstrated that hotels and apartment houses 



Wells Fargo Nevada 
National Bank 

Of San Francisco 

Nevada Bank Building, 2 Montgomery Street. 
N. K. Corner of Market Street. 

Capital paid up $6,000,000.00 

Surplus and Undivided Profits .... $5,055,471.11 



11,055,471.11 



OFFICERS. 

Iaaias W. Hellman, President 
I. W. Hellman, Jr., Vice Prea. 
F. L. Lipman, Vice Prea. 
James K. Wilson, Vice Prea. 
Frank 6. King, Cashier 
W. McGavin, Assistant Cashier 
E. L. Jacobs, Assistant Cashier 
O. L. DaviB, Assistant Cashier 
A. D. Oliver, Assistant Cashier 
A. B. Price, Assistant Cashier 

DIEECTOES. 

Isaias W. Hellman Hartland Law 

Joseph Slosa . Henry Rosenfeld 

Percy T. Morgan James L. Flood 

F. W. Van Sicklen J. Henry Meyer 

Wm. F. Herrin A. H. Payson 

John C. Kirkpa trick Ohas. J. Deering 

I. W. Hellman, Jr. James K. Wilson 

A. Christeson F. L. Lipman 

Wm, Haaa 

ACCOUNTS INVITED. 

Prompt Service, Courteous Attention, Unexcelled 

Facilities. 

SATE DEPOSIT VATJLTB. 



Saturday, July 13, 1912.] 



-THE WASP 



19 



on upper Market street can be leased readily, 

and tlie reason is that many people have to 
live i-liise to their business and be independent 
of stn-et car service. Mr. Crocker is Bhowfhg 
more enterprise than most of the rion men of 
Ban Francisco, for he is patting up a fourteen.* 
Story structure as well as an apartment house, 
and has just taken over the stationery busi- 
ness of Cunningham, Curtiss & Welch. It is 
eitizene like Mr. Crocker, who have faith in 
the future of our city, that will hasten its 
proper development. 

Business Men Waking Up, 
The Wasp articles pointing nut to business 
men in S:in Fninciseo that they ran blame 
only themselves for the perpetual plague 

of industrial disturbers have had their eftVet. 
sii-ps are being taken to impress certain news- 
papers with the fact that the merchants have 
stood their nonsense long enough. If those 
newspapers prefer to encourage boycotters 
and other professional disturbers, the mer- 
chants will withdraw their advertisements. 
That would make an end of the pests in 
short order. It costs a few thousands a day 
to run a yellow newspaper, and most of the 
income is derived from advertisements. It 
needs no elaborate figuring to show that one 
month of retaliation by the afllicted business 



Smith-Tevis-Hanford 

Inc. 

MUNICIPAL AND 
CORPORATION 

BONDS 



57 Post St., 



San Francisco 



men of San Francisco would make havoc with 
? lie bank accounts of several publishers who 
are constantly endeavoring to create class 
strife and anarchy in our city. A1 present 
there are half a dozen boycotts going on in 
San Francisco. A donkey with a placard on 
its bach Stands in front of each boycotted 
establishment. Such sights are a disgrace to 
any American city, and much unpleasant com- 

no' i them was heard during the recent 

convention, which attracted large numbers of 
Eastern li-imrs to Sun Francisco. 
Oux Four Billions of Trade. 
While there is just reason for congratulat- 
ing ourselves that the foreign trade of the 
United States, as tho official estimates of a 
tew days ago indicated, passed $4,000,000,000 
in the fiscal year just closed, there is nothing 
in (his record to give the country any excuse 
for resting on its oars, so to speak, in the 
matter of its commerce with other nations. 
As long ago as 1900 the United Kingdom 
passed the four- billion -dollar mark in its trade 
with other countries. The figures for the 
first four months of this year show that the 
United States came third in the list of great 
trading nations, the United Kingdom and 
Germany being in the lead. 

(Continued on page 20.) 
♦ 



It Nearly Killed Him. 

"Medicine won't help you any," the doc- 
tor told his patient. "What you need is a 
complete change of living. Get away to some 
quiet country place for a month. Go to bed 
early, eat more roast beef, drink plenty of 
good rich milk, and smoke just one cigar a 
day. ' ' 

A month later the patient walked into the 
doctor's omce. He looked like a new man, 
and the doctor told him so. 

"Yes, Doctor, your advice certainly did the 
business. I went to bed early, and did all the 
other things you told me. But, say] Doctor, 
that one cigar a day almost killed me at first, 
It's no joke starting in to smoke at my time 
o ' life. ' ' 

4— 

Give It a Trial. 

"You have been fighting again, Tommy!" 

"I couldn't help it, mamma. That Staple- 
ford boy sassed me." 

"That was no reason for lighting. You 
should have remembered that 'A soft answer 
turneth away wrath' and given him a soft 
answer. ' ' 

"I did. I hit him with a chunk o' mud." 



ARMOR PLATE SAFE DEPOSIT VAULTS 


of Union Safe Deposit Company in building of 


UNION TRUST COMPANY OF SAN FRANCISCO 


Junction of Market and C'Farrell Streets and Grant Avenue 


LARGEST, STRONGEST and Jiii 


M 


Ilk MOST CONVENIENTLY 


ARRANGED SAFE DEPOSIT jfffll 


WEST OF NEW YORK 


Boxes $4 per annum JLlJJIJpjte: 


£i§j§g 


3 . Ill and upwards. 


Telephone -flSspSS 


illijgnr** -- Kearnj 11. 



The German Savings 
and Loan Society 

Saving! (The German Bank) Commercial 

Incorporated 1868. 

626 California St., San Francisco. Oal 

(Member of the Associated Savings Banks of 
San Franciaco.) 

The following Branches for Receipt and Pay- 
ment of Deposits only: 

MISSION BRANCH, 2572 Mission street, 
between 21st and 22nd. 

RICHMOND DISTRICT BRANCH, 601 

Clement street, cor. 7th Ave. 

HAIGHT STREET BRANCH, 1456 Haiglit 
street, near Masonic Ave. 



June 29th, 1912. 
Assets .... 551,140,101.75 

Capital actually paid up in Cash . 1,000,000.00 
Reserve and Contingent Funds . 1,656,403.80 
Employees' Pension Fund . . 140,109.60 
Number of Depositors . . . 56,609 

Office Hours: 10 o'clock A. M. to 3 o'clock 
P. M., except Saturdays to 12 o'clock M. and 
Saturday evenings from 6:30 o'clock P. M. to 
8 o'clock P. M. for receipt of Deposits only. 



ON JULY 1st, 1912 
WE WILL MOVE OUR OFFICES 



410 MONTGOMERY ST. 



Our Facilities for Handling 

Investment Securities 

Will be Considerably Increased 



ESTABLISHED 1858 

SUTR0&C0. 



Telephone 
Sutter 3434 



Private Exchange 
Connecting All Depts. 



I 



J. C. WILSON & CO. 



MEMBERS : 

NEW YORK STOCK EXCHANGE 
NEW YORK COTTON EXCHANGE 
CHICAGO BOARD OP TRADE 
STOCK AND BOND EXCHANGE, S. P. 

MAIN OFFICE — Mills Building, San Fran- 
cisco. 

BRANCH OFFICES — Los Angeles, San Die- 
go, Coronado Beach, Portland, Ore.; Seattle, 
Wash.; Vancouver, B. C 

PRIVATE WIRE NEW YORK AND CHICAGO. 



20 



-THE WASP- 



[Saturday, July 13, 1912. 



FINANCIAL. 

(Continued from page 19.) 
The Stock Market. 
A good many of the brokers are away in the 
mountains and at the seaside resorts enjoying 
their summer vacation. Many speculators are 
also out of town, so' the conditions for a 
booming stock market are the -reverse of 
favorable. Considering these things, the tone 
of the local market is remarkably firm. Sugar 
stocks were strong on small sales. 

Spring Valley showed unexpected strength, 
though the idea prevails that the city will not 
pay the price the company expects. Spring 
Valley 4s were in demand on advancing prices 
—from 93^ to 93%. 

The prospects for improved conditions in 
the stock market are excellent, as everybody 
seems to be satisfied with the political condi- 
tions, and convinced that either the Republic- 
an or Democratic candidate will give a safe 
and sane administration. 



eg^S^f at 




Amongst the great number of well-known 
people who motored to Casa del Rey last week 
were Mr. and Mrs. A. Schilling and Miss 
Schilling of Woodside, Mr. and Mrs. B. O. Mc- 
Gormick, Mr. and Mrs. Fay, Mr. and Mrs. W. 
S. Miller, Mr. and Mrs. W. H. Westphal (who 
have taken apartments at the Casa del Rey for 
the summer), Phil Prather, the San Francisco 
agent of the Cadillac, accompanied by Mrs. 
Prather, John O. Gantner and Mrs. Grant ner, 
W. B. Townsend, Traffic Passenger Agent of 
the Western Pacific, Mr. and Mrs. Lloyd S. 
Ackerman of San Francisco. 



"Show me a man," said Calvin B. Eib, 
Manager of the Pioneer Automobile Company, 
"who uses his brakes properly, and in nine 
cases out of ten I will show you a man who 
runs his car with the least expense. The act 
of stopping a car is as much of an art as any- 
thing else. But every day you see a man 
come tearing up the street at thirty miles an 
hour, shut off power, put on brakes, and slide 
five or ten feet before bringing his machine 
to a stop. This is not only doing the car a 
serious injury, but you can almost figure out 
the cost of rubber that he has used. Para- 
doxically speaking, the proper way to use 
brakes is to so judge your distance and speed 
that you practically coast up to the point 
where you wish to stop, and a mere touch 
will bring the car to a "standstill at the proper 
point. Any high-grade car will hold itself 
going downhill on compression, the driver 
using either, intermediate, second or low, ac- 
cording to the grade and character of the 
road, and then regulating the speed by gently 
touching the emergency brake from time to 
time. By doing this the brakes of a car are 
kept in perfect condition for an emergency, 
and they neither heat nor wear. Another place 
where bakes are frequently used and cause 
damage is on slippery streets ana grades, 
and if the brakes are applied at the time the 
car is being turned, the danger of skidding is 
increasing 100 per cent. One should always 
have the car under control before a turn is 
reached." 



Where can you find a better advertising 
medium than THE WASP, reaching, as it 
does, over 5,000 society and club women? 
The women are the buyers. 



msn< 



The musical world was represented in the 
affairs of the past week by very high stand- 
ards. The orchestral concert by Herman Per- 
let on Monday, June 24th, at the Pavilion, was 
of exceeding interest not only for the music 
which was presented, but because three of the 
leader's compositions were programmed. 

The tone poem, "Mt. Tamalpais, " based 
upon the melody of the Lake county Indians, 
was a rare, delicious symbolism; The delicate 
shadings were exquisite under the leadership 
of Perlet. A serenade and a tarantelle were 
the other two compositions of the leader. 

"Yosemite Legends in Song and Story" — 
the words by Allan Dunn, the solos by Mrs. 
J. E. Birmingham, the music by Dr. H. J. 
Stewart — were presented on Thursday even- 
ing, at the Pavilion. The stage settings were 
typical of the Indian legends. Allan Dunn 
was the early American, in face, voice and 
garb, true to the character. Mrs. Birmingham 
displayed another artistic interpretation in her 
work, her rich, full tones and sympathetic 
singing of the Indian lore revealing her dra 
matic ability. Dr. H. J. Stewart was at the 
piano. 

An event of interest in the musical 
world is noted in the marriage of Miss Vida 
Bispham, daughter of David Bispham, the not- 
ed singer, to Mr. Theodore Havenieyer. The 
wedding will take place before long. David 
Bispham will sing in ' ' The Atonement of 
Pan," by Joseph Redding, which will be giv- 
en at Bohemian Grove, August 11th. 

Mr. Paul Steindor.u, choragus of the Univer- 
sity of California, conducted the orchestral 
concert on Tuesday afternoon at the Greek 
Theater, Berkeley. Miss Fannie Bailey was 
the soloist, giving as her selection Liza Leh- 
man's "Endyniion. ' 

A chorus, made up of picked voices from 
the women's chorus of the California Club, 
the Wednesday Morning Club and the Treble 
Clef Club, gave the valse, "Blue Danube" 
(Strauss-Spicker). 

An evening devoted to the songs of Joseph 
B. Carey, the blind composer, was given last 
Tuesday. Miss Fernanda Pratt and Miss Ella 



Atkinson were the soloists. Mrs. Lawrence 
Strauss played several violin obligatos. W. 
E. Powell played a piano group. Hearty ap- 
preciation greeted all the numbers. 

REMARKABLE SALE OF MEZZOTINTS. 

Of much interest to collectors is the sale of 
a mezzotint engraving of Sir Joshua Reynolds' 
portrait of Lady Bampfylde, for $7,250. This 
mezzotint was by T. Watson and brought 
$6,000 in 1905, when sold at Christie's in 
London. The sale for $7,250 the other day 
occurred at the same place and is the highest 
record for a mezzotint. 

At the same sale, "The Ladies' Walde- 
grave, " a mezzotint after Reynolds, by Val- 
entine Green, sold for $4,100. Another print, 
"Henrietta, Countess of Warwick," after 
Romney, by J. R. Smith, brought $4,500. 
♦ 

SALE OF OLD MASTERS. 

An unrecorded portrait of Mrs. Thomas 
Mylne, painted by Gainsborough, and in poor 
condition was sold the other day in London 
for $19,000. An unrecorded portrait of Thom- 
as Mylne, by Raeburn, brought $2,400. An 
unrecorded portrait of Lady Frances Wynd- 
ham, painted by Hoppner, was sold for 
$10,000. 



-f- 



CANDY FOR HER VACATION. 

It will add to the pleasure of her stay in 
the country. Can be sent by express from 
any one of Geo. Haas & Sons' four candy 
stores. 

1 

"The White Ghost of Disaster" is the name 
of a fictitious narrative whose lurid descrip- 
tions of an iceberg disaster are appaling and 
yet they do not surpass the horrors of the 
Titanic. The book was published one year 
ago, and the thrilling incidents tally in .a 
weird way with the late horror of the sea. 
1 

Mrs. Owen Wister, wife of the American 
novelist, came to San Francisco as one of the 
delegates to the Biennial Convention. She 
was a member of the Pennsylvania delegation, 
her home being in Philadelphia. Mrs. Wister 
has been staying at the Peninsula Hotel. 



Since the decision rendered by the United States Su- 
preme Court, it has been decided by the Monks here- 
after to bottle 

CHARTREUSE 

(Liqueur Peres Chartreux) 

both being identically the. same article, under a combi- 
nation label representing the old and the new labels, 
and in the old style of bottle bearing the Monks' 
familiar insignia, as shown in this advertisement. 

According to the decision of the U. S. Supreme Court, 
handed down by Mr. Justice Hughes on May 29th, 1911, 
no one but the Carthusian Monks (Pferes Chartreux) is 
entitled to use the word CHARTREUSE as the name or 
designation of a liqueur, so their victory in the suit 
against the Cuserrier Company, representing M. Henri 
Lecouturier, the Liquidator appointed by the French 
Courts, and his successors, the Compagnie Fermiere de 
la Grande Chartreuse, is complete. 

The Carthusian Monks (Peres Chartreux), and they 
alone, have the formula or reeipe of the secret process 
employed in the manufacture of the genuine Char- 
treuse, and have never parted with it. There is no 
genuine Chartreuse save that made by them at Tarra- 
gona, Spain. 

At first-claBS Wine Merchants, Grocers, Hotels, Cafes 
Batjer & Co., 45 Broadway, New York, N. T. 
Sole Agents for United StateB. 




■ 



■ 



■■ 



GEORGE CAMERON' has gone to New York to 
meet Mrs. Cameron upon her return from 
Carlsbad, where she hns boon for some time 
with her mother, Mrs. M. II. do Young. Mr. and 
Mr*. Cameron will return to iliis city. But as Mrs. 
do Young's health is the cause of much concern to 
her family, she will remain abroad for some time. 
In all probability, mi operation may be necessary 
before Mrs. de Young regains her health, Miss 
Kathleen de Young, Miss Phyllis de Young and 
Mrs. J. O. Tohin will remain abroad until the fall. 
Thf latest news confirms the fact that Mrs. de 
Young's health is improving, thus permitting the 
n-tnrn of the Cameron family. 



Cupid's Triumph. 

One of the most youthful weddings which will 
have taken place in some time will be that of Miss 
Thelma Parker of Honolulu and Henry Guillard 
bmart — the bride being but 18 and the groom 22. 
Their extreme youth has been the cause of much 
opposition on the part of both families, and there 
was strong urging for the young people to wait a 
year. But evidently the hearts of the stem parents 
softened, for the wedding is to take place on July 
25th. 

Miss Parker is getting a very, beautiful trousseau, 
which is all being purchased in Honolulu, and it 
seems that an uncle of tho fair lady, Mr. Ernest 
Parker, the son of Colonel Parker, who is a great 
connoisseur on wearing apparel of the fair sex, is 
selecting it carefully and with much taste. 



Engagements. 
San Rafael society is bubbling with excitement 
over the announcement of the engagement of Miss 
Marian Hall and Mr. Frederick Nickerson. The 
attractive Miss Hall has a perfect host of admiring 
friends both in San Rafael and here in the social 
set. She is the daughter of the late Mr. and Mrs. 
George Hall, granddaughter of Mrs. Margaret Mee, 
of San Rafael, and niece of Mrs. Robert C. Hall. 
Her sisters are Mrs. Nathaniel Dodge and Mrs. 
Robert McBride. The engagement was to have had 
a formal announcement, but whispers of the inter- 
esting secret finally became audible enough to ex- 
act an acknowledgement of the troth. The wedding 
day has not been named as yet. 



Announcement is made of the engagement of Miss 
Katherine Force, the 19-year-old sister of Mrs. John 
Jacob Astor, and Mr. Henry C. Harnickell of Brook- 
lyn. The wedding will take place soon, as a short 
engagement- is the plan of the young people. 

Formal announcement of the engagement of Miss 
Zena Pearl Brown and Mr. Charles William Burek- 
halter was made on Tuesday by Mrs. A. S. Brown 
of Berkeley. Miss Brown is a popular Berkeley 
girl, with a host of admiring friends. Charles 
Burckhalter is the son of the well-known astronomer 
who has had charge of the Chabot Observatory for 
many years. The wedding will take place early in 
the fall. 



An Auspicious Event. 

A canopy of spreading foliage arranged in the 
red room of the Palace Hotel served as the setting 
for the assemblage of the Sons and Daughters of 
the Revolution. John Vining, president of the 
State Chapter of the Sons, Colonel A. B. Hubbard 
and O. D. Baldwin, an officer of the National Chap- 
ter, received the visiting Sons, and Mrs. I. N. 



Chapman, State Regent of iho Daughters, and Mrs. 
A 1'. Hubbard, founder of the order here, received 
the daughters. Tiny were assisted by Mrs. John 
McGraw, Mrs \\ . \\ . Wymore, Mrs. M. O. Austin, 
Mrs. J, D. Cerkol, Mrs. A. D. Bancroft, Mrs. J. F. 
Halloran, Mrs. Abbie E. Krebs, Mrs. Do Los Ma- 
gee, Mrs. Fernald, Mrs. Richmond Smith and Mrs, 
Frederick Laird, former state regent. Mrs. John 
F. Swift, tho national vice-regent of tho D. A. R,, 




MRS. LOUIS HERTZ 

Educational and Civic Leader, an Enthusiast in the 
City's Affairs. 

headed the receiving line. Beauty and fashion to- 
gether with the patriotic sentiment of the day lent 
a charm to this auspicious event. 



Lowe -W oilman Wedding. 
Another beautiful July wedding will take place 
on the 20th. Pretty Edith Lowe will become the 
wife of Adolph Hans Wollman on that day. Miss 
Lowe has been the honored guest at a rapid series 
of society affairs preceding her nuptials, as she is 
a great society favorite. The wedding will take 
place in Christ's Church, Sausalito, and will have 
all the beautiful accessories of the happy occasion. 
Mrs. Eldridge Green will be matron of honor, and 
the bridesmaids will be Misses Blanche Russell, 
Mildred Gilbert, Emma St. Goar. The wedding 
will take place at four o'clock in the afternoon, 
and will be witnessed by a limited number of rel- 
atives and friends. 



Claremont Country Club. 
Life and gaiety have been animating the Clare- 
mont Country Club .this past week. Many dinner 
parties added to the interest in the golf tourna- 
ment, which was usually followed by a dance. Of 



ill' many who motored to the club bouse, were: 
Messrs. and Mesdames Louis MoDermot, William 
Thornton White, Frank H. Proctor, Lorruinc Lang- 
stroth, E. A. Folger, Frank J. Symmes, Frank Ha- 
vens, Harry Weihe, John Van Sicklen, Rudolph 
Schilling, Edeon Adams, Houghton Sawyer; the 
Misses Marie Louise Tyson, Elsa Schilling, Juliet 
Borden, Winifred Braden, Dorothy Taylor, Elaine 
Hancock, Myra Hall, Emilio Harrold, Rose Kales, 
(.'r:iL'e Downey; and the Messrs. Jack Hartigan, 
Lyman King, Joseph Rosborough, Jack Neville, Har- 
old Barnard and Daniel Volkmann. 



State Reception. 
A rainbow of colors was reflected in the gowns 
worn by the hundreds of women who streamed into 
the ballroom of the Fairmont Hotel on Independence 
Day. Patriotism was the evident cause of the 
event, but, ostensibly, it was to greet both the new 
and the past officers of the California State Feder- 
ation that the interesting event was planned. Music 
and social chat augmented by many congratulations 
to the new officers proclaimed tho delight of the 
day. Mrs. J. W. Orr, president oi the California 
Federation, stood at the head of the receiving line 
and next to her was Mrs. Philip N. Moore. Mrs. J. 
E. Cowles, one of the past presidents of the Cali- 
fornia Federation and first vice-president of tho 
General Federation, and Mrs. E. G. Denniston, 
president of the local board, camo next. Other past 
presidents who were in the receiving line were 
Mrs. Kate A. Bulkeley, Mrs. Georgs Law Smith, 
Mrs. Robert Potter Hill, Mrs. Edwin D. Buss, Mrs. 
James B. Hume, Mrs. Russell Judson Waters. Also 
in the receiving line were Mrs. Frank Shiek, Mrs. 
John Threadgill, Mrs. A. A. Goddard, Mrs. E. D. 
Knight, Mrs. Calvin Hartwell, Mrs. George Fair- 
child, Mrs. George W. McCoy, Mrs. A. C. .Jones, 
Mrs. Johu C. Lynch, Mrs. S. L. Wiley, Mrs. Cora 
E. Jones, Mrs. Percy Shuman, Mrs. W. C. Mushet, 
Miss Jessica Briggs, Mrs. E. S. Karns and Mis6 
Dolliver. 



The Card Basket. 

An unusual marriage fete is claiming the atten- 
tion of many of San Franciscans. This event is 
the wedding of Miss Thelma Parker and Mr. Henry 
Gaillard Smart, which will take place at Waimea, 
Honolulu, on Friday, July 26th. Preceding the 
marriage event, a week of gaiety will take place, 
to which guests have been bidden. Elaborate pre- 
parations have been made for a' continued series 
of merrymaking at this pre-nuptial celebration. 

Mrs. Ernest A. Garlington and her daughter, 
Miss Sallie Garlington, are visiting at Governor's 
Island, the guests of Colonel and Mrs. Stephen C. 
Mills. Miss Garlington is a well-known horsewo- 
man, taking an active part in the driving tourna- 
ments of New York City. Miss Garlington and 
Lieutenant Harry D. Chamberlain will be married 
when the latter returns from the Philippine Is- 
lands, where he is stationed at Fort William Mc- 
Kinley. 

Miss Harriet Bradford sails soon for Honolulu, 
where she will be the maid of honor at Miss Thelma 
Parker's wedding. Captain Olney Bradford ac- 
companies his daughter. 

Mr. and Mrs. C. E. Mtiiid spent a few days at 
Del Monte during the goH tournament. 

Mr. and Mrs. Fleishhacker and family were among 
the motorists spending a week within the sound of 
the breakers. 



22 



-THE WASP 



[Saturday, July 13, 1912. 



Mrs. Carrol Bnck, wife of Major Buck, U. S. A., 
is being entertained at a number of delightful so- 
ciety affairs given in her honor before her departure 
for Fort Mackenzie, Wyo. Mrs. Buck will remain 
in San Francisco for a time at the home of her 
mother, Mrs. J. de Barth Shorb on Broadway. Major 
Buck has been ordered to the post at Fort 
Mackenzie. 

Mr. and Mrs. S. M. Worthington have gone to 
Honolulu to attend the wedding of their niece, 
Miss Thelma Parker. 

Mr. and Mrs. James Flood, their daughter, Miss 
Emma Flood, and Miss Barbara Donohoe motored 
to Yosemite Valley during the past week. 




3As i ^i*ziz..-;;Vi\..^ u;i 



EXCLUSIVE DESIGNS IN 

EMBROIDERED 

WAIST PATTERNS AND KIMONOS 



157-159 GEARY STREET 

Bet. Grant Avenue and Stockton St. 

Branch Store: 152 Kearny Street 
San Francisco 



f.OBEY'S GRILL 

^^ Formerly of SUTTER ST. 

Our Specialties 

OYSTERS, TERRAPIN, CRAB STEW 
STEAKS, CHOPS 

140 UNION SQUARE AVENUE 

L. J. DeGRUCHY, Maaaier Phona DOUGLAS 5683 



Phones: — Sutter 1572 Cyril Arnanton 

Home C-3970 Henry Rittman 

Home C-4781 Hotel 0. Lahederne 

New Delmonico's 

(Formerly Maison Tortoni) 

Restaurant and Hotel 
NOW OPEN 

Beat French Dinner in the City with Wine, $1.00 

Banquet Halls and Private Dining Booms 

Music Every Evening 

362 GEAB.Y STEEET. - SAN FRANCISCO 




] ei/nai/v 



HOTEL AND EESTATJBANT 

84-56 Ellis Street 

Our Cooking Will M«t Your Taste. 
Prices Will PI«at« You. 








"THE ACCEPTED THING. *' 

Among those who embarked for Honolulu last 
Friday was Fred Knight, who goes, to join Mrs. 
Knight. They will attend the wedding of Miss 
Thelma Parker and Henry Gaillard Smart. 

Miss Louise Bryant is spending the season abroad. 
She has been in Paris the greater part of her time, 
but many trips to other European cities have form- 
ed an interesting itinerary in the plans made by 
this charming member of the younger set. 

The Newhalls, Mrs. William Mayo and Miss 
Marian, expect to remain at Palo Alto until the 
fall. 

Miss Enid Gregg has been spending a few days 
at Santa Cruz. 

Mr. and Mrs. William Sesnon have been giving 
a series of house parlies at their delightful home 
at C'apitola during the summer months. 

Mrs. Prentiss Cobb Hale is sojourning at Shasta 
Springs for .a few weeks. Mrs. Hale had for her 
guest during the past week Miss Marcia Fee, who 
is prominent in local society. 

Miss Corona Ghirardelli left Monday for a six 
weeks' visit in Yellowstone Park. 

Isaac Upham expects to arrive in San Francisco 
August 12th, after his tour of Europe. 

Mrs. Allen Olsen has returned from Cononado and 
is ihe guest of her parents in Alameda. She will 
remain there during Ensign Olsen's absence in 
Alaska. 

Admiral and Mrs. W. H. Whiting and Miss Marie 
Whiting, who spent the past month at Castelta, 
are at their cottage in the Santa Cruz mountains. 

Mr. and Mrs. Earl Cummings and Mr. and Mrs. 
Hicks motored to Del Monte, where they spent the 
Fourth of July. 

Mr. and Mrs. Thomas Fermour-Hesketh have re- 
turned to their country estate in England. 

Mr. and Mrs. H. McDonald Spencer will remain 
for several weeks at Del Monte before going to 
Santa Barbara. 

Mme. Emilia Tojetti entertained a party of friends 
at a pretty tea at the Palace last week. 



VISIT THE 

Cafe Jupiter 

140 COLUMBUS AVENUE 

(Formerly Montgomery Avenue) 

SAN FRANCISCO. CAL. 

■•■ HOME OF MODERN BOHEMIA .-•■ 

WHERE YOU WILL FIND AN 

ARTISTIC ATMOSPHERE AND 

HIGH-CLASS ENTERTAINMENT 

THE MOST UP-TO-DATE TABLE D'HOTE 

DINNER 

In Town SI. 00, from 6 to 9 P. M. 

JACK McMANUS, Manager 

Reserve your table in time — Phone Douglas 2910 



TECHAU TAVERN 

Cor. Eddy and Powell Street*. 
Phones, Douglas 4700: O 3417 



A High-Class 

Family Cafe 



A DAINTY LUNCH served gra- 

* tuitously to ladies every day during 
shopping hours, between 3:30 and 5 p. m. 



Under the management of A. C. Morrison 



The New 

POODLE DOG 




HOTEL and RESTAURANT 

WILL REMAIN AT CORNER 

POLK and POST 

SAN FRANCISCO. 
PHONES: Franklin 2960; Eomi C 6706. 



J. B. PON J. BERGEZ C. MAILHEBUAU 
C. LALANNE L. COUTARD 

Bergez- Frank's 

OLD 

POODLE DOG 

CO. 

Hotel and 
Restaurant 

Music and Entertainment Every Evening. 
416-421 BUSH STBEET 

(Above Kearny) 
SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 
Exchange, Douglas 2411. 





4t r T™MlK Battle Crj ol freedom," a breezy 
comedietta which is □ satire od Reno, 
Nevada, divorces, will be presented 
next week at the Orpbeum by May Tally, who 
will be most pleasantly recalled for her sketch, 
"Stop, Look and Listen.' 1 The piece is writ- 
ten by Miss Tally and Bozeman Bulger, the 
well-known sporting writer and co-author of 
"Curves," Hie baseball skit. The complies 
t ions arise from the lodging of two Mrs. 
Smiths in the same room iu an overcrowded 
hotel. The playlet has bright lines and many 
a hearty laugh, and exhib- 
its Miss Tully, who is a 
c ■dieiine of striking clev- 
erness and individuality, at 
her very best. The support- 
ing company is capable, and 
assists in making the ac- 
tum in the little farce nat- 
ural, rapid and diverting. 

The Kaufman Brothers, 
Jack and Phil, will amuse 
with their tuneful origin- 
alities. These black-face, 
or, to be more accurate, 
brown-face, comedians are 
among the foremost in their 
class. They indulge in or- 
iginal, rapid-fire humor and 
their act is one of the most 
amusing in vaudeville. 

Harry Atkinson, the Aus- 
tralian Orpheus, will pie- 
sent bis monologue of nur- 
sery rhymes and his imita- 
tion of musical instru- 
ments. He imitates with 
accuracy the mandolin, mu- 
sette, cornet, banjo, harp, 
violin (playing both . pizzi- 
cato and with the bow,), 
bagpipes, penny trumpet, 
and other instruments too 
numerous to n.ention. His 
success in this respect is 
owing, according to Dr. Or- 
win, the eminent English 
throat specialist, to the fact 
that he has a phenomenal- 
ly large throat at the back, 
with most powerful vocal 
chords. The nostrils, too, 
are perforated and honey- 
combed, thus acting as a 
sounding-board and reed as 
well. 

The act to be presented 
by Mr. and Mrs. Elliott 
next week is decidedly out 
of the ordinary. These two 
gifted artists are virtuosi 
on that most difficult in- 
strument, the harp, on 
which they play everything 
from grand opera to rag- 
time. They are also vocal- 
ists of merit. 

Next week will conclude 
the engagements of Ray L. 



Boyce in his eccentric character impcrsona 
tions, the O'Meers Sisters and Co., and Hon- 
ors and Le Prince. It will also be the last of 
David Belasco's superb production of "Mad- 
ame Butterfly," which is creating the great- 
est theatrical sensation this city has known 
in quite a while. 



Excellent Music. 
To Mine. Emilie Tojetti, Mrs. David Hirseh- 
ler and Miss Henrietta Stadtmuller is due the 
appreciation of a music loving public for the 




high standard of music presented during the 
convention week. They did not hesitate to 
expend the sum of $500 for a single concert 
I'm- which no charge was exacted from I lie 
public This conceit was an evening devoted 
to orchestral selections, Herman l'erlet di- 
rector. Three of the " leaner 's compositions 
were presented on this occasion, the tone poem 
based upon a melody of Lake County Indians 
proving a great favorite. 

The orchestral conceit led by Paul Stein- 
dorff, Chora gus of the University of Califor- 
nia, at the Greek Theater, 
was another musical treat. 
-Miss Fannie Bailey was the 
soloist on this occasion. En- 
semble work was done by 
members of the Women s 
Chorus, California Club, 
\\ ednesday Morning Club, 
and the Treble Clef Club. 
" Vosemite Legends in JSung 
and Story/ ' interpreted by 
Mrs. J. lh. Birmnignam, Mi, 
Allen Dunn and Dr. 11. J. 
Stewart, constituted one 
program, Indian settings 
added to the work. 

Miss iviusio, sister ot 
Mine. Tojetti, sang at the 
.Fairmont reception, as did 
also the popular chairman 
ot the music commit tee, 
whose understanding of the 
"kind of music the people 
\\ ant ' brought her a lor- 
mal vote of praise from the 
uenerai Feueiation. Mme. 
j^ertna von Klenner, a prom- 
inent musician of New 
.oik City, President of the 
l\ew ^ ork Press Oiub, 
voiced the general senti 
meats of praise for Mme. 
jojeili at tne closing ses- 
sion of the Biennial. 



ONE OF THE PAUL J. RAINEY AFRICAN HUNT PICTURES AT THE CORT. 



African Hunt Pictures. 

The hunt pictures shown 
at the Cort Theater have 
been immensely successful, 
ami deserve it. Everybody 
was delighted with the 
• Kiuemacolor reproduction 
of the Durbar, and now 
the stage is given over 
to a reproduction of the 
thrilling scenes of Paul .). 
liaineys hunt for big 
game in Africa, tne para- 
uise of sportsmen. The ca- 
pacity ot the Cort Theater 
lias been tested by the 
crowds that have flocked to 
see the drama of the equa- 
torial wilderness transfer- 
red to the screen and re- 
produced in every detail 
just as the famous hunter 
and the motion picture man 



24 



-THE WASP- 



[Saturday, July 13, 1912. 



saw it when stalking lions and leopards 
the Dark Continent. 



At .the Cort. 

That the motion pictures of the Paul J. 
Rainey African Hunt have lived up to their 
advance heraldry is being evidenced by the 
capacity houses which have been the rule at 
the Cort Theater ever since last Sunday, when 
the films were first exhibited to a San Fran- 
cisco audience. They were acclaimed the 
"most marvelous motion pictures ever tak- 
en/' and that this seemingly extravagant 
statement is absolutely true has been conceded 
by the entire local press as well as the patrons 
of the Cort. The pictures start on the second 
and final week of their engagement tomorrow. 

These films really represent an expenditure 
of a quarter of a million dollars as well as 
years of effort and research. An expedition 
of 350 men, under the direction of Mr. Rainey, 
spent a year 'n the wilds of Africa and braved 
death and fever and wild beasts in order that 
science might be enriched. Mr. Rainey, who 
is a millionaire sportsman of Cleveland, Ohio, 
undertook the first ' African big game hunt 
purely from the point of sport, but he eventu- 
ally came to hunt for the camera and not for 
fun. The result is that he has done much for 
such institutions as the Smithsonian Institute 
and the American Geographic Society. Thb 
London Zoological Gardens and the Bronx Zoo 
of New York are also considerably in his debt 
for the number of rare wild animals captured 
in Africa and presented by him. 

Through the medium of the moving picture 
camera the last expedition of this noted hun- 
ter to the Black Continent is made to live 
again. The wilds are visualized. The lion, 
the rhinoceros, the giraffe, the tiger, the chee- 
tah ,are seen in their natural haunts. The eye 
of the camera has caught them as they natur- 
ally are. They were certainly not conscious 
of the fact that they were unconsciously pos- 
ing for a moving picture film. An illuminative 
lecture is given which adds much to the enter- 
tainment. Matinees are given in addition 
to the evening performances. 

On Sunday night, July 21st, comes the New 
York Casino Star Cast in a four weeks' sea- 
son of revivals of the Gilbert and Sullivan 
comic operas. 

At Pantages. 
The diversified bill at the Pantages Theater 
is serving to erowd the popular vaudeville 
house to the doors these afternoons and even- 
ings, the list of entertainments including such 
celebrities as Alick Lauder, who is as thor- 
oughly Scotch and as droll as his brother, 
Harry; Signor G. Frizzo, Italy's famous 
change artist, who gives an entire theatrical 
entertainment by himself; Henri Kubelik, an 
interesting Hungarian violinist; the Marmeen 



CQB£ 



LEADING THEATRE 

Ellis and Market. 
Phone Sutter 2460. 



YOU'LL HAVE TO HURRY 
2nd and Last Big Week' Starts Tomorrow 



Mat. Daily at 2:30. 



Every Night at 8:30 



PAUL J. RAINEY'S 
AFRICAN HUNT 

The Most Marvelous Motion Pictures 
Ever Taken. 
Interesting Lecture. 
Prices — 25c. and 50c. 



Four, in a cheering musical oddity; the Les- 
sos, very clever jugglers, and other interesting 
acts,* including some acrobatic and acting dogs. 
On Sunday there will be the usual complete 
change of program, and as a distinct novelty 
the moving pictures, in their entirety, of the 
Wolgast-Rivers struggle for " the light-weight 
supremacy on the Fourth of July will be 
shown for the first time in this city. Every 
incident in the thirteen exciting rounds, in- 
cluding the sensational knockout which has 
created so much talk and dispute in the pugi- 
listic world, will be faithfully portrayed and 
every one will have an opportunity of judging 
for himself as to the justice of Referee 
Welsh's decision. The vaudeville portion o± 
the entertainment will be up to the usual high- 
class Pantages standard, "A Night in the 
Edelweiss, ' ' a miniature musical comedy pre- 
sented by Howland, Lane and their company 
of ten musical comedians heading the attrac- 
tions. Carl Rosine, a renowned European ma- 
gician, assisted by Marguerite Kosine, will 
present a mysterious act in a special setting 
of scenery; and the Romano Brothers, hand- 
some exponents of physical culture and Gre- 
cian art, will offer a very artistic posing ex- 
hibition, the men made up to represent marble 
statues. Doesch and Zilbauer, Viennese street 
musicians, will offer a novel musical special- 
ty; and Bond Morse, known as "the man from 
nowhere," will appear in a tramp monologue 
and execute an eccentric dance that is said to 
be a revelation in its way. Clark and Verdi, 
the very original Italian comedians who made 
such a hit here the early part of the year, will 
return in their original act, which has, if pos- 
sible, been improved upon, and that .they will 
meet with a warm reception is a foregone con- 
clusion. 



Gilbert and Sullivan Revival. 
Sunday night, July 21st, will mark the open- 
ing of the great Gilbert and Sullivan comic 
opera revival at the Cort. The original New 
York Casino star cast, which has been inter- 
preting the masterpieces, will come to San 
Francisco direct from New York by special 
train. The original productions in all particu- 
lars will be put on here. It is particularly 
noteworthy that San Francisco is the only 
city in Northern California that will be play- 
ed by this organization. "The Mikado" will 
start the merry season on its way, and during 
the four weeks' season "Pinafore," "Pa- 
tience" and "The Pirates of Penzance" will 
be given. 

♦ 

SPEED-BURNER SWANTON. 



Sun., July 21. — N. T. Casino Star Cast in Re- 
vivals of Gilbert and Sullivan Comic Operas. 



Particulars of the Scheme for the Grand 
Pageant at Santa Cruz. 

Frederick Speed-Burner Swanton, ambassa- 
dor extraordinary from the joyous kingdom 
of Santa Cruz, announces the completion of 
all arrangements for the tremendous water 
pageant and summer festival planned for that 
resort during the week commencing July 20th 
and ending July 2Sth. According to official 
bulletins from the throne-room of King Pleas- 
ure — situated for the next four weeks in the 
big Casino, facing the beach — Santa Cruz has 
been transformed into a veritable "City o' 
Dreams, ' ' in anticipation of the great crowd 
of merry-makers who will assemble there dur- 
ing "Water Week." 

No expense has been spared to make the 
Sea Breeze City attractive and insure the hap- 
piness of a monstrous throng. The hotels, the 
Casino, the multiplicity of attractions lining 
the mile-long board-walk have all been pol- 
ished and put in order, while a hundred new 
sensations await the visitor who comes to 
Santa Ctuz, whether it be for rest, recreation 
or a rollicking romp beside the sea. Even 
the usually indifferent fishermen on the long 
wharf near Lighthouse Point can be seen 
scouring up their launches and preparing for 



the jolly parties which will want to troll for 
finny monsters of the deep. All are on tiptoe, 
awaiting the 20th of July. 

The mystic island, upon which is constructed 
an immense phantom ship seating 4,000 per- 
sons, commands a beautiful view of the rein- 
forced San Lorenzo Elver, down which will 
come nightly processions of flower-decked, 
electric-lighted floats, filled with pretty maids 
and stalwart yeomanry. The background of 
hillocks, reaching down to the water, has also 
been sprinkled generously with twinkling 
lamps, making a picture of exquisite beauty. 
A wonderful lake has been formed around the 
island, while the bridge leading to it will 
remind one of the Pont du Gar on carnival 
nights in Paris. 

The day's sports in Monterey Bay, offshore 
from the Casino, will be never-ending. Cou- 
pled with the bathing, fishing and boat-riding 
will be the great yacht and motor-boat races; 
the fleet of warships and submarines; the 
hydroplanes in their birdlike flights 'twixt 
wind and water; and a dozen other novelties. 
On shore will be found golf, tennis, dancing, 
driving and kindred diversions. 

The railroads are offering especial low fares 
from all California points to Santa Cruz dur- 
ing pageant week. The hotels — amongst them 
the beautiful new Casa del Rey and the St. 
George — have announced that no "extras" 
will be charged, the regular rates being main- 
tained throughout the festivities. Reserva- 
tions for the Casa del Rey and the Cottage 
City may be made now, to take effect on July 
20th or thereafter, as preferred. 



SAFEST AND MOST MAGNIFICENT THEATEK 
IN AMERICA. 

WEEK BEGINNING THIS SUNDAY AFTERNOON 
Matinee Every Day 
THE HIGHEST STANDARD OF VAUDEVILLE I 
"THE BATTLE CRY OP FREEDOM," a one-act 
Comedy of Divorce Life in Reno, Nev., Introducing 
MAY TULLY and Her Company; KAUFM'AN 
BROTHERS in Tuneful Originalities; HARRY AT- 
KINSON, the Australian Orpheus; MR. and MRS. 
ELLIOTT, Harpists and Singers; RAY L. ROYOE; 
O'MEERS SISTERS & CO.; HONORS & LE 
PRINCE; NEW DAYLIGHT MOTION PICTURES. 
Last "Week — Immense Success of DAVID BELAS- 
CO'S Superb Production of "MADAME BUTTER 
FLY." 

Evening PriceB, 10c, 25c, 50c, 75c Box SeatB, ?1. 
Matinee Prices (Except Sundays and Holidays), 
10c, 25c. 50e. 

PHONES DOUGLAS 70. HOME C 1670. 



Pantages Theater 



Market Street, Opposite Mason. 
Week of Sunday, July 14. 
MIRTH, DANCE AND MELODY I 
"A NIGHT AT THE EDELWEISS," with 10 Mu- 
sical Comedians; CARL ROSINE & CO., in Mystery 
and Magic; ROMANO BROTHERS, Physical Culture 
and Grecian Art; DOLESCH AND ZILLBAUER, 
Viennese Street Musicians; CLARK AND VERDI, 
Italian Comedians; BOND MORSE, "The Man From 
Nowhere' ' ; and 
WOLGAST-EIVERS MOVING PICTURES. 



Mat. Daily at 2:30. Nights, 7:15 and 9:15. Sun. 
and Holidays, Mats, at 1:30 and 8:30. Nights, 
Continuous from 6:30. 



Prices — 10c, 20c. and 80c. 



Saturday, July 13, 1912.] 



THE WASP 



25 




Rebuilt 
Standard 5100 
TYPEWRITER 

REMINGTON No. 6 or SMITH PREMIER No. 2 
We reit all makes of Typewriters 

L. & M. ALEXANDER & CO. 

Exclusive Dealers 

L. O. SMITH VISIBLE Ball-Bearing Typewriter 

612 Market Street, San Francisco, Oal. 

Phone Douglas 677 



Valuable Information 

OP A BUSINESS, PERSONAL or SOCIAL 

NATURE FROM THE PRESS OF 

THE PACIFIC COAST. 

ALLEN'S 

Press Clipping Bureau 

88 FIRST STREET 

Telephone Ky. 392. 
J 1538 



SAN FRANCISCO, 



CALIFORNIA 



For Health, Strength 

DAMIAINA BITTERS 

Naber, Alfs & Brune, Agents. 
635 Howard St., opp. new Montgomery St. 



ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE AND FOR PUBLICA- 
TION FOR CHANGE OF NAME. 



IN THE SUPERIOR COURT OF THE CITY AND 
County of San Francisco, State of California. — Dept. 
No. 10. 

IN THE MATTER OF TREWELLA-KENDALL 
CO.. a Corporation. — No. 42,989. 

It appearing that TREWELLA-KENDALL CO. 
has filed an application to this Court praying for a 
change of its corporate name to TREWELLA- 
TONKIN CO., 

It is therefore hereby ordered that Tuesday the 13th 
day of August, 1912, in the courtroom of Dept. No. 
Ten of said Court in the New City Hall, No. 1231 
Market Street, said City and County of San Fran- 
cisco, State of California, at ten o'clock a. m. of 
said day, are hereby fixed as the time and place 
for hearing said application, and all persons inter- 
ested in said matter are hereby directed to appear 
before said Court, at said time and place, to pre- 
sent any objections to the said application, and to 
show cause why it should not be granted; and that 
a copy of this order to show cause be published for 
a period of thirty days before the said 13th day of 
August, 1912, in "The Wasp," a newspaper of 
general circulation, printed and published in the said 
City and County. 

Dated, June 25th, 1912. 

THOS. F. GRAHAM, 

Judge of said Superior Court. 



Office Hours 
9 a. m. to 5:20 p. m. 
Phone Douglas 1501 



Residence 
573 Fifth Avenue 
Hours 6 to 7:30 p. m. 
Phone Pacific 275 
W. H. PYBURN 



NOTARY PUBLIC 



My Motto ' 
On parle Fra 



"ALWAYS IN" 

Sc habla EUpono 

Office: 229 Montgomery Street 
San Franciaco California 



STRANGEK TO FEAR. 

• " I came, Sir, in an swer to your ad ■ 
men. in las? nig] V.m said you 

wanted to employ a man who was a total 
Strange, to Pei 

1 * A re you 

"' ;"". sir. I have given proof of my 
courage in many pari- of the world." 
• reef" 

*"! have faced bullets in Mexico and inacb- 
el es in Cuba. " 

"G I! ' 

"I helped to defend t he missionaries ag- 
ainsl Utr Boxers, and I was present at the 
siege of Fort Arthur." 

"Fine.'' 

' ' I have fought the infuriated walrus of 
Baffin Baj and the maddened bull elephants 
of Central Africa, and I went through an 
V rmeniac mas sacre without losing my nerve." 

"Vini seem to be the man I want. Would 
you be willing to go out on a field in front 
iif 2n,inn.i fair-minded, sport-loving Americans 
and umpire a game honestly, deciding against 
the home team when necessary?" 

"So that's the job, is it?" replied the mao 
of courage, 'and broke into a cold perspiration 
and a run for the door simultaneously. 
r— 

The man who pays as he goes hates to see 
another fellow traveling on a pass. 
♦ 

Gray hair restored to its natural color by Al- 
fredum's Egyptian Henna — a perfectly harm- 
less dye, and the effect is immediate. The 
most certain and satisfactory preparation for 
the purpose. Try it. At all druggists. 

SUMMONS. 



IN THE SUPERIOR COURT OF THE STATE OP 
California, in and for the City and County of San 
Francisco — Dept. No. 4. 

GIUSEPPE DIRESTA, Plaintiff, vs. All persons 
claiming any interest in or lien upon the real prop- 
erty herein described or any part thereof, Defend- 
ants. — Action No. 32,371. 

The People of the State of California, to all per- 
sons claiming any interest in, or lien upon, the real 
property herein described or any part thereof, De- 
fendants, greeting: 

You are hereby required to appear and answer the 
complaint of GIUSEPPE DIRESTA, plaintiff, filed 
with the Clerk of the above entitled Court and 
County, within three months after the first publica- 
tion of this summons, and to set forth what interest 
or lien, if any, you have in or upon that certain 
real property, or any part thereof, situated in the 
City and County of San Francisco, State of Califor- 
nia, and particularly described as follows: 

Beginning at a point on the easterly line of Octavia 
Street, distant thereon thirty-one (31) feet, three (3) 
inches southerly from the corner formed by the in- 
tersection of the easterly line of Octavia Street with 
the southerly line of Lombard Street, and running 
thence southerly and along said line of Octavia 
Street twenty-five (25) feet; thence at a right angle 
easterly one hundred (100) feet; thence at a right 
angle northerly twenty-five (25) feet; and thence at 
a right angle westerly one hundred (100) feet to 
the point of beginning; being part of WESTERN 
ADDITION BLOCK Number 170. 

You are hereby notified that, unless you so appear 
and answer, the plaintiff will apply to the Court for 
the relief demanded in the complaint, to-wit, that 
it be adjudged that plaintiff is the owner of said 
property in fee simple absolute; that his title to 
said property be established and quieted; that the 
Court ascertain and determine all estates, rights, 
titles, interests and claims in and to said property, 
and every part thereof, whether the same be legal 
or equitable, present or future, vested or contingent, 
and whether the same consist of mortgages or liens 
of any description ; that plaintiff recover his coBts 
herein and have such other and further relief as 
may be meet in the premises. 

Witness my hand and the seal of said Court this 
20th day of June, A. D. 1912. 

(SEAL) H. I. MULCREVY, Clerk. 

By S. I. HUGHES, Deputy Clerk. 

The first publication of this summons was made in 
"The Wasp" newspaper on the 6th day of July, 
A. D. 1912. 

PERRY & DAILEY, Attorneys for Plaintiff, 105 
Montgomery Street, San Francisco, Cal. 



SUMMONS. 



IN" THE SUPERIOR COURT OF THE STATE OF 
California, in and for tho City and County of San 
»ept. No. 5. 

EUGENE ._'. ORSLLER, Plaintiff, vs. All persona 
claiming any interest in or lien upon the real prop* 
erty herein described or miv part thereof, Defend- 
ants. — Action No. 32,212. 

The People of the State of California, to all per- 
sons claiming any interest in, or lien upon, the real 
property herein described or any part thereof, De- 
Fondants, greeting: 

You are hereby required to appear and answer 
the complaint of EUGENE C. ORELLER, plaintiff, 
filed with tho Clerk of the above entitled Court and 
y, within three months after the first publi- 
cation >>f this summons, and to set forth what in- 
terest or lien, if any, you hove in or upon that cer- 
tain real property, or any part thereof, situated in 
the City and County of San Francisco, State of 
California, and particularly described as follows: 

FIRST: Beginning at a point on tho northerly 
line of Oak Street, distant thereon one hundred and 
ton (110) feet easterly from the corner formed by 
the intersection of tho northerly line of Oak Street 
with the easterly line of Octavia Street, and running 
thence easterly and along said line of Oak Street 
twenty-seven (27) feet, six (6> inches; thence at a 
right angle northerly one hundred and twenty (120) 
feet to the southerly line of Hickory Avenue; thence 
westerly along said line of Hickory Avenue twenty- 
seven (27) feet, six (6) inches; and thence at a 
right angle southerly one hundred and twenty (120) 
feet to the point of beginning; being part of WEST- 
ERN ADDITION BLOCK Number 147. 

SECOND: Beginning at a point on the southerly 
line of Pine Street, distant thereon thirty (30) feet 
easterly from the corner formed by the intersection 
of the southerly line of Pine Street with the easter- 
ly line of Presidio Avenue, and running thence east- 
erly and along said line of Pine Street thirty-one 
(31) feet, five (5) inches; thence at a right angle 
southerly eighty-seven (87) feet, six (6> inches; 
thence at a right angle westerly thirty-one (31) 
feet, five (5) inches; and thence at a right angle 
northerly eighty-seven (87) feet, six (6) inches to 
the point of beginning; being port of WESTERN 
ADDITION BLOCK Number 620. 

THIRD: Beginning at a point on the northwest- 
erly line of Howard Street, distant thereon two hun- 
dred and twenty-five (225) feet southwesterly from 
the corner formed by the intersection of the north- 
westerly line of Howard Street with the southwest- 
erly line of Sixth Street, and running thence south- 
westerly and along said line of Howard Street fifty 
(50) feet; thence at a right angle northwesterly 
ninety (90) feet; thence at a right angle northeast- 
erly fifty (50) feet; and thence at a right angle 
southeasterly ninety (90) feet to the point of be- 
ginning. 

FOURTH: Beginning at the corner formed by 
the intersection of the southerly line of Union 
Street with the westerly line of Polk Street, and 
running thence southerly and along said line of Polk 
Street thirty (30) feet; thence at a right angle 
westerly seventy (70) feet; thence at a right angle 
northerly thirty (30) feet to the southerly line of 
Union Street; and thence easterly and along said 
line of Union Street seventy (70) feet to the point 
of beginning; being part of WESTERN ADDITION 
BLOCK Number 46. 

You are hereby notified that, unless you so ap- 
pear and answer, the plaintiff will apply to the 
Court for the relief demanded in the complaint, to- 
wit, that it be adjudged that plaintiff is the owner 
of said property in fee simple absolute; that his 
title to said property be established and quieted; 
that the Court ascertain and determine all estates, 
rights, titles, interests and claims in and to said 
property, and every part thereof, whether the Bame 
be legal or equitable, present or future, vested or 
contingent, and whether the same consist of mort- 
gages or liens of any description; that plaintiff 
recover his costs herein and have such other and 
further relief as may be meet in the premises. 

Witness my hand and the seal of said Court, this 
10th day of May, A. D. 1912. 
(SEAL) H. I. MULCREVY, Clerk. 

By J. F. DUNWORTH, Deputy Clerk. 

The first publication of this summons was made 
in "The Wasp" newspaper on the 18th day of May 
A. D. 1912. 

The following persons are said to claim an inter- 
est in, or lien upon, said property adverse to plain- 
tiff: * 

MOSES ELLIS, JR., Framingham, Massachusetts. 

KATE ELLIS, Framingham, Massachusetts. 

MARTHA E. BEAN, Framingham, Massachusetts 

MARY F. ELLIS, Framingham, Massachusetts 

GRACE E. HALL, Chicago, Illinois. 

PERRY & BAILEY, Attorneys for Plaintiff, 105 
Montgomery Street, San Francisco. GARRET W 
McENERNEY and GEORGE H. MASTIOK, of Coun- 
sel. 



SUBSCRIBE FOR 

THE WASP 



$5.00 per Year 



26 



-THE WASP ~ 



[Saturday, July 13, 1912. 



THE LANGUAGE OF BUNK. 
The clerk at the counter inquires of my trip 
and squeezes my hand as 1 set down my 
grip; the boy with the buttons takes charge 
of me then and says he 's happy to see me 
again; they 'phone up and ask me if every- 
thing's nice and if I'm in need of ink, pa- 
per, or ice; the" waiter smiles on me and 
helps me with my chair and says he's de- 
lighted to see me back there; the boots and 
the barber are smiling and tell me how they 
are glad I am looking so well; they make 
me so welcome, the lift-boy and bell, they 
east o'er my coming a glamorous spell; you 
see, they have dreams of the forthcoming 
plunk, and I smile — and like it — and know 
it *s all bunk. 

My tailor, who garbs me, says I'm not too 
stout; my figure is better since it rounded 
out; he's proud of my shoulders, and says 
I am straight as many a youngster not half 
fifty-eight; he stuffs me and pads me and 
winds me with tape and gives me a style 
and presentable shape; he says it's a pleas- 
ure to do things for me because I have 
taste and know how things should be; he 
has a swell pattern of goods that he got 
with me In his mind — one exclusively 
bought; a little too good for the average 
trade, but, oh! suck a nobby and delicate 
shade; and so he easts bait for the forth- 
coming plunk — and I smile — and like it — 
and know it's all bunk. 

The candidate sees me and smiles with delight 
and anxiously asks if the folks are all right; 
he hears that I'm in every way all to the 
good and making a winning — he knew that 
I would; he locks arms with me in a broth- 
erly way and whispers important things he 
has to say; he sends his regards to my wife, 
whom he knew as the prettiest girl in a 
county or two; he'd like to do" something 
for Billy, my son, and wants me to say what 
I'd like to have done; he's known that rare 
youngster since he was knee-high and watch- 
ed him grow up with a fatherly eye; Bill 
ought to be Consul to Smyrna; he'll see, 
as he'd like to do something for me; he 
leaves me in oceans of heated air sunk, and 
I smile, ana like it, and know it 'sail bunk. 

And then I go home to my wife, and she 
smiles and says she was just looking over 
the styles; she knows I am proud of the 
whole family and she just strives to do 
credit to me; she says she has heard how 
the women all say there's no one like me 
in a generous way; they all seem to know 
there's one man in town whose wife must 
be happy, and his name is Brown; and her 
life with me, why, she says that it seems 
like one long succession of silver-lined 
dreams; and then comes the sample, the 
style and the price — she knows I will get 
it for her — I'm so nice; she get the goods 
ready and have it all shrunk — and I smile 
— and like it — and know it's all bunk! 



DEL MONTE NOTES. 

Mr. M. Meyerfeld came down last week to join 
Mrs. Meyerfeld and enjoy the enthusiasm of the 
golfing contests. 

Mr. and Mrs. J. W. "Wright and their two sons, 
W. Edgerton and A. Harvey, never forsake Del 
Monte for any length of time, and last week were 
among the San Franciscans who enjoy life on the 
peninsula. 

Mrs. Mountford "Wilson and her son Russell, with 
Mrs. J. B. Crockett of Berkeley, are spending a por- 
tion of their summer at Del Monte. 

After their honeymoon automobile trip Mr. and 
Mrs. Samuel Hopkins could not. resist the welcom- 
ing charms of the place where they have spent many 
a happy day. Mr. Hopkins likes the golfing game 
as well as other San Franciscans. Mrs. Hopkins 
round that Miss Alice Warner, her Del Monte 




"SPEAKING AS ONE MAN TO ANOTHER." 

bridesmaid, was visiting with Mrs. E. E. Ainsworth 
in Seattle, where a number of pleasing entertain- 
ments and dances have been given in her honor. 

Walter Loewy came down early last week to again 
spend a pleasant week-end with his mother and sis- 
ter. 

Mr. Arthur Vincent, Mrs. Charles H. Turner and 
Mr. W. M. Williams, good golf players of San Fran- 
cisco, were at Del Monte nearly the whole week, en- 
joying the holiday. 

Mr. and Mrs. R. N. Burgess, who reside on the 
Oakland side, but are equally well known in San 
Francisco, as Mr. Burgess has many interests in and 
out of San Francisco in banking circles, took a week 
of recreation amid the gardens of Del Monte during 
Fourth of July week. 

Dr. Fredericks, who plays golf all along the 
coast, remained after the tournament, being poined 
by Mrs. D. P. Fredericks, as some of the persistent 
enthusiasts needed him in a few games of syndicate 
golf. 

Macdonald and George Smith, who are coaching 
old-time golfers, and beginners too, at Del Monte, 
are busy every minute with those who wish to be- 
come better acquainted with the royal game. 



BOYES HOT SPRINGS. 

Arrivals at Boyes Hot Springs from San Fran- 
cisco are: Mrs. Sara Fowler, J. L. Lott, G, Kaskell, 
G. Goetz, D. McEwen, J. Gordon, Mrs. R. Coleman, 
D. Hymes, H. P. McCorriston, C. S. Bacon, G. H. 
Look, Mrs. F. Bigelow, Milton Dodge, Mrs. George 
Hinkel, C. M. Osborn, Henry Trevor, Mr. Moreno, 
Harry James, W. Rothlein, F. G. Huer, H. F. Find- 
lay, Mrs. W. P. Meyer, W. M. Klingan, A. T. Barr- 
ett, Henrietta Aronsou, Hilda Boris, O. Paulson, M. 
Gunsky, Martin Haines, Milton Weiss, E. L. Wyer, 

Frank Hart, B. Versoyle, M. Schroyer, Mrs. F. 
G. Sherwood, C. Brinkman, Mrs. J. W. Hudson, 
Miss Lillian Duncan, Mrs. Brices, W. H. Westereld, 
S. A. Folsoni, J. Broronk, S. Borax, F. Goetze, A, 
II. Connelly, Mrs. J. Gordon, Miss L. Gordon, Mrs. 
Judge Larabee, Geo. Nelson, W. S. Wetenhall, W. 
J. Olson, F. A. Burness, John Lavelle, Geo. Hinkel, 
Miss E. Hinkel, Grant Fee, L. Sanford, D. J. 
Oliver, E. Rochat, Angelo Byrne, E. Didrikson, W, 
P. Meyer, Mrs. E. H. Reed, M. Fox, John J. Doyle, 
Millie Corwin, Florence Corwin, J. Nossa, Harry 



I'm win, Leon Blum, A. D. Weiss, Harvey Hart, 
Jos. Chichi, K. .1. Carr, Mrs. 11. Nelson, J. W. Hud- 
son, Mrs. F. H. Browne, Miss Imogene Jones, J. J. 
Cunningham, T. Connally and wife, Mrs. Pasqual- 
elti. From other places are: Mrs. J. G. McCarthy, 
P. Olsen, Ennie Didricksen, Mrs. M. Scott, Geo. 
Thornton, Mrs. W. H. Harrison, Alicia Weaver, 
John Johnston, Father Jas. B. Demodf, Miss Anna 
Laurenzi, Mrs. I. H. Frank, Miss Evelyn Goldsmith, 
Geo. Monson, Mr. Rhodes, Miss Keber, H. A. 
Sellers, Mrs. Mary Wetenthall, Mrs. P. Olsen, B. F. 
Whittan, Jack Thornton, Miss Eleanor Thornton, 
W. H. Harrison, Mrs. Anna Dubois, Jack Ziel, S. 
F. Wenke, Richard Fischer, Robert Rouer, Mrs. F. 
F. Goldsmith, Miss Florence Clark, Mrs. Rhodes, 
Miss M, Mitehcll, Mr. J. G. McCarthy. 



DR. WONG HIM 

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betes and all organic diseases. 




PATIENTS SPEAK FOR THEMSELVES. 

Petaluma, Cal., November 11, 1911. — Dr. 
Wong Him — Dear Sir : This is to certify that 
1 was sick for about three years with a compli- 
cation of troubles resulting from tuberculosis of 
the bowels and liver combined with tumor of the 
stomach. I had been given up by all the doc- 
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ers may find help and healing. Gratefully, 
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419 Third Street. 
Formerly of Ukiah. 

DR. WONG HIM 

Leading Chinese Herb Doctor 

1268 O'FARRELL ST. 

(Between Gough and Octavia) 

SAN FRANCISCO. 



PATRICK & CO. 

RUBBER STAMPS 

STENCILS. SEALS, SIGNS AND ETC. 
660 MARKET ST.. - SAN FRANCISCO 




EYE TROUBLES VANISH 

WHEN USING MAYERLE'S GERMAN EYEWATER for weak, tired, in- 
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GERMAIN OPTICAL SPECIALIST 

960 Market Street, San Francisco 
&W Insist on getting Mayerle's "Tpg 



Saturday, July 13, 1912.] 



- THE WASP- 



n 



SUMMONS. 

IN THE SUPERIOR COURT OF Til. 

mis, in and («>r the City und County of Han 

i Kill' 

■ 

■ 

of die State of California 

■ laimiug any I 

j herein described or any pan thereof, De- 

■ .'ling : 

You urc hereby required t<i appear and anew* 

tiffs, Bled wit! 

. ■ 

: h M'het lu teres i of lieu, if any, you havi 

■ ■ 

line of 

■ rly from th 

■ 

■M I. | 

i rilman 

■ 

■' : 

. .i , J . I m. 

■ ■ ; , . lol m and i ■"> . 
in block 551, BA1 

''■■I iu tl dee "i the El 

i 

■ ire hereby notified that, unless you so appear 

■ iii ■. s .i i be < '"U rl (or 
the relief demanded in the complaint, to* wit, thai it 

plaintiffs nre the ov. 

ibsolule ; thai their i il ie to 
bed and quieted; thai the 
Hi .1 del ermine all estates, righi i, kitl< 
ists mid claims in and to said properi 
every part thereof, whether the same be legal or 
ible, present or future, vested or contingent, 
and whether the same consist of mortgages or liens 
description , n er their costs 

herein and have such other and further relief as may 
■i in the premises. 
Witness my hand and the seal of said Court, this 

■ i 13 ..[ june, A. 1». 1912. 

II. I. MULCREVY, Clerk. 
By s. [, HI GHES, Deputy Clerk, 
The first publication of this summons was made 
i in- Wasp" newspaper on the 13th day of 
i. i>. 1912. 
PERRY & DAILEY, Attorneys for Plaintiffs, 105 
Mom i 9b n i ra acieco, Cs li > ornia, 

CERTIFICATE OF MEMBERSHIP OF W. E. 
STANFORD & COMPANY. 

THIS IS TO CERTIFY that W. B. STANFORD & 
i H i.Ml'A N \ is s partnership comprised of the follow- 
ing persons: &LBERT GEORGE LUCHSINUER, 
Washington St., San Fruneiscii, Cal.; WIL- 
LIAM ESTELL STANFORD, 1445 Leavenworth Hi., 
San Franoisco, Cal. 

ALBERT GEORGE LUCHSINGER, 
WILLIAM K. STANFORD. 
LTE OF CALIFORNIA, 
City and County of San Francisco. 

on this 20th day of June, in the year One Thou- 
sand Nine Hundred and Twelve, before me, Gene- 

I alin, B Notary Public in and for t lie 

city and County of San Francisco, personally ap- 
peared Albert George Luchsinger and William E. 
Stanford, known to me to be the persons whose 
names nre subscribed to the within instrument, aud 
they duly acknowledged to me that they executed 
the same. 

In witness whereof, I have hereunto set my hand 
and affixed my official seal, at my office in the City 
and County of San Francisco, the day and year in 
i In- certificate first above written. 
(SEAL] GENEVIEVE S. DOXELIN, 

Notary Public in and for the City and County 
of Sun Francisco, State of California. 

809 Crocker Building. 

SUMMONS. 



IX THE SUPERIOR COURT OF THE STATE OF 
California, in and for the City and County of San 
Francisco. — Dept. Xo. 8. 

MARGARET 0*M ALLEY, Plaintiff, vs. All per- 
sons claiming any interest in or lien upon the real 
property herein described or any part thereof, De- 
fendants. — Action Xo. 32,228. 

The People of the State of California, to all per- 
sons claiming any interest in, or lien upon, the 
real property herein described or any part thereof, 
Defendants, greeting: 

You are hereby required to appear and answer 
the complaint of MARGARET O'MALLEY, plaintiff, 
filed with the Clerk of the above entitled Court and 
County, within thre months after the first publica- 
tion of this summons, and to set forth what interest 
or lien, if any, you have in or upon that certain real 
property, or any part thereof, situated in the City 
and County of San Francisco, State of California, 
and particularly described as follows. 



THE WASP 

Published weekly by the 
WASP PUBLISHING COMPANY 

Office of publication 

121 Second St., San Francisco, Cal. 

Phones — Sutler 74*9, J 8705, 

Entered at the San Francisco Postoffice as second 
class mutter. 

SUBSCRIPTION SATES — In the United States, 
Canada and Mexico, $5 a year in advance; Biz 
months. 92.60 ; three months, $1.25 ; single 
copies, 10 cents. Fur sale by all newsdealers. 

FOBEIGN SUBSCRIPTIONS— To countries with- 
in the Postal Union, $13 per year. 



ii- norihorly line of 

merly "I'') Street, distant thereon ninety- 

15 feet easterly from the corner formed by 

the northerly line of Irving 

Street with the easterly line of Second Avenue, and 

running thence easterly and along said line of 

■ \ ■ li v i_- (25) feet; thence at a 

hundred and ton (no) 

si ii right angle westerly twenty-live 

leei ; and thence at a right angle southerly 

one hundred and ten (IJ the point of 

beginni pari of OUTSIDE LAND BLO0K 

Number 672. 

i*ou are hereby notified that, unless you so 
appear aud answer, the plaintiff will apply to the 
Court for the relief demanded in the complaint, to- 
wit : That it be adjudged that the plaintiff is the 
owner of said property in fee simple absolute; that 
her title to said property be established and quieted; 
that the Court ascertain ana' determine all estates, 
rights, titles, interests and claims in and to said 
property, and every part thereof, whether the same 
be legal or equitable, present or future, vested or 
c ingent, and whether the same consist of mort- 
gages or liens of any description; that plaintiff re- 
cover hex costs herein and have such other and fur- 
ther relief as may be meet in the premises. 

Witness my hand and the seal of said Court this 
16th day of May, A. D. 1912. 

SEAL H. 1. MULCREVY, Clerk. 

By J. F. DUNWORTH, Deputy Clerk. 

The first publication of this Summons was made iu 
Tin Wasp newspaper on the 1st day of June, A. D. 
1912. 

The following persons are said to claim some in- 
terest in said real properly adversely to plaintiff: 

BANK OF ITALY (a corporation,, Sau Francisco, 
California. 

PEERY & DAILEY, Attorneys for Plaintiff, 105 
Montgomery Street, San Francisco, Cat. GARRET 
W. McENERNEY and GEORGE H. MASTICK, of 
Counsel. 

SUMMONS, 



IX THE SUPERIOR COURT OF THE STATE OF 
California, in and for the City and County of San 
Francisco. — Dept, No. 2. 

MYRTLE R. SAYLOR, Plaintiff, vs. All persons 
claiming any interest in or lien upon the real prop- 
erty herein described or any part thereof, Defend- 
ants. — Action Xo. 32,239. 

The People of the State of California, to all per- 
sons claiming any interest in, or lien upon, the real 
property herein described or any part thereof, De- 
fendants, greeting: 

You are hereby required to appear and answer 
the complaint of MYRTLE R. SAYLOR, plaintiff, 
tiled with the Clerk of the above entitled Court 
and County, within three months after the first pub- 
lication of this Summons, and to set forth what in- 
terest or lien, if any, you have in or upon that cer- 
tain real property or any part thereof, situated in 
the City and County of San Francisco, State of 
California, and particularly described as follows: 

Beginning at the corner formed by the intersec- 
tion of the northerly line of Lake Street with the 
westerly line of Seventh Avenue, and running thence 
northerly along said line of Seventh Avenue twenty- 
rive (25) feet; thence at a right angle westerly one 
hundred and fourteen (Hi) feet; thence at a right 
angle southerly twenty-five (25) feet to the north 
erly line of Lake Street: and thence easterly and 
along said line of Lake Street one hundred and 
fourteen (114) feet to tue point of beginning; being 
part of OUTSIDE LAXD BLOCK Number 65. 

You are hereby notified that, unless you so appear 
and answer, the plaintiff will apply to the Court 
for the relief demanded in the complaint, to-wit, that 
it be adjudged that plaintiff is the owner of the 
parcel of real property described in the complaint 
herein in fee simple absolute; that her title to 
said property be established and quieted; that the 
Court ascertain and determine all estates, rights, 



interests and claims in and 
ry part thereof, whether legal 

or equitable, pn 

and whether the samo consist ->f mortgagi i r Hens 

costs 
r and fur 1 : 
in the premises, 

hand and the leal of said Court thia 
17th de 

(REAL) I. MULCREVY, Clerk. 

By J. F. DUNWORTH, Di 
first publication of this I made 

in The Wasp w\\ spaper on the 1st day ol June. 

19] 2 . 

I for Plain;: 

co, Cal d A 

oENERNEY and GEORGE M m.' S'J ' 

Counsel. 

SUMMONS. 



01 PHI 
California, in and for the city and 0i 
co. — Dept. No. 10. 
tENA M LIBBY, Plaintiff, vb. BURR A. 
LIBBY, 1 lefend int.- 

i in brought in the Superior Court of the State 

i.iy of 

San Francisco, and the Complaint filed in the office 
of the County Clerk of said City and County. 

The People of the State of California send greet- 
31 RH A. LIBBY, De endanl 

You nre hereby required to appear I 
broughl against you by the above named Plaintiff 
in the Superior Court of the State of California, in 
nod for the City and County of San Francisco, mid 
to answer the Complaint filed therein within 
BXClusive of the day of service) aftej 
on you ol iiiis summons, if Barred wit Inn 
this City end County; or if served elsewhere within 
thirty days. 

The said action is brought to obtain a judgment 
cree of this Court dissolving ihe bonds of 
matrimony now existing between plaintiff and de- 
fendant, on the ground of defendant's willful neg- 
lecl and desertion, also fur general relief, as will 
more fully appear in the Complaint on file, to which 
special reference is hereby made. 

And you. are hereby notified that, unless you ap- 
od answer as above required, the said Plaint- 
iff will take judgment for any moneys or damages 
demanded in the complaint as arising upon contract, 
or will apply to the Court for any other relief de- 
manded in the complaint. 

Given under my hand and the seal of the Superior 
Conn of the State of California, in and for the City 
and county of San Francisco, this 1st day of June, 
A. D. 1912. 

(SEAL) II. I. MULCREVY, Clerk. 

By L. W. WELCH, Deputy Clerk. 

The first publication of this summons was made 
in "The Wasp" newspaper on the 8th day of June. 
A. D. 1912. 

GERALD C. HAIiEY, Attorney for Plaintiff, 
501-502 503 California Pacific Building, San Fran- 
cisco, Cal. 

NOTICE TO CREDITORS. 

No. 13569. Dept. 10. 
ESTATE OF PATRIZIO MARSICANO, sometimes 

called P. MARSICANO, Deceased. 

Notice is hereby given by the undersigned Execu- 
trix of the Last Will and Testament of PATRIZIO 
MARSICANO, sometimes called P. MARSICANO, 
deceased, to the creditors of and all persons having 
claims against the said deceased, to exhibit them 
With the necessary vouchers within ten (10) months 
after the first publication of this notice to the 
said Executrix at the office of GERALD C. HAL- 
SEY, i^sq., Attorney for said Executrix, at Xo. 
501-502-503 California Pacific Bldg, corner Sutter 
and Montgomery Sts., San Francisco, California, 
which said office the undersigned selects as her place 
of business in all matters connected with said 
estate of PATRIZIO MARSICANO, sometimes called 
P m IRSK 'and, deceased. 

MARY MARSICANO, 
sometimes called MARINA MARSICAXO, 

Executrix of the Last Will and Testament of 
PATRIZIO MARSICANO, sometimes called P. 
MARSICANO, Deceased. 

Dated, San Francisco, June 12, 1912. 
GERALD C. HALSJSY, Attorney for Executrix, 
501-502-503 California Pacific Bldg., 105 Mont- 
gomery street, San Francisco, Cal. 



DIVIDEND NOTICES 

Associated Savings Banks of 
San Francisco. 



THE IIIBERXIA SAVINGS AND LOAN SOCIETY, 
corner Market, McAllister and Jones Sts. — For 
the six niontliH ending June 30, 1912, a dividend 
has been declared at the rate of three and three- 
fouiths (3%) per cent per annum on all deposits, 
free of taxes, payable on and after Monday, July 
1, 1912. Dividends not drawn will be added to 
depositors' accounts, become a part thereof, and 
will earn dividends from July 1, 1912. Deposits 
made on or before July 10, 1912, will draw inter- 
est from July 1, 1912. 

R. M. TOBIN, Secretary. 






i 













Los Angeles 




Santa Cruz 






$25 round trip 


V \ \ \i 






"The Atlantic City of the Pacific Coast" 
Is planning a 

Wonderful Water Pageant 




Santa Fe 

% w 




San Diego $29 round trip 






Tickets on sale dailv. 










Good for return until October 31, 1912. 




For the following dates: 






Santa Fe : s new train. 




JULY 20TH to JULY 28TH, INCLUSIVE 






%Jj, e Leaves San Francisco 




Yacht Regattas — Motor Boat Races — Review of 






^ m daily at 4:00 p. m. 




American Battleships — Parade of Decorated 






£\ »^ Of*f^ 1 This is California 's 




Water Floats — Swimming and Rowing Con- 






i Wm.jC£*\^\. finest train. 




tests — Surf Bathing — Dancing — Golf — Ten- 
nis — Fireworks. 






On the return trip the Saint offers 










the same superior service. 




DON'T MISS THE FUN 






Phone or call on me for reservations. 










Jas. B. Duffy. Gen. Agt.. 673 Market St.. 
San Francisco. Phone: Kearny 315-J3371. 




Regular Rates at the New Hotel Casa del Rey. 






J J. Warner. Gen. Agt., 1218 Broadway, 










Oakland. Phone: Oakland 425 




Special Low Ticket Fares 






Santa Fe 




ASK OUR AGENTS 

SOUTHERN PACIFIC 

Flood Building 

Palace Hotel 

Third and Townsend Street Station 










$72.50 








\lr W warn • %^ V^ 




Market Street Ferry Station 

SAN FRANCISCO. 

Broadway & Thirteenth Street 






TO CHICAGO 
AND RETURN 

on the Peerless 




OAKLAND. 










GOLDEN STATE 




YOSEMITE 






LIMITED 




NATIONAL PARK ! 

The Outing Place of California. 
SNOW-CAPPED MOUNTAINS : : THUNDERING WATER- 






A Transcontinental Delight. 




FALLS :: MIRROR LAKES AND HAPPY ISLES 

:: MASSIVE WALLS AND DOMES :: 

A Galaxy Unsurpassed 

A SMOOTH, DUSTLESS. WELL- SPRINKLED 
ROAD INTO THE VALLEY 






THIS RATE GOOD ON MANY DAYS IN JUNE, 




A Special Feature of This Season's Trip 






JULY, AUGUST AND SEPTEMBEE. 




The waterfalls are booming full. Conditions in the Valley 
were never better than this season. Surrounding mountain 
peaks and watersheds are covered with late snows, which 






Similar Low Rates to Many Other Eastern Points 




insures a lasting flow of water. 

Why visit the commonplace resort, when the sublime and 
the beautiful beckon you. Cost of this trip is now reduced 






Return Limit October 31st, 1912 




to popular prices. Four excellent camps offer the visitor the 
most pleasing entertainment: 

CAMP CURRY — CAMP AHWAHNEE— CAMP LOST ARROW 
SENTUTEL HOTEL 
Each is charmingly and picturesquely situated on the floor 
of the valley, surrounded by the masterpieces of Nature. 






Telephone or Write Our Agents. 




It is now a quick, comfortable trip into the Valley. For 
full information or descriptive folder, address your camp or 
hotel in Yosemite, any ticket office or information bureau in 






Rock Island 




California, or 

Yosemite Valley Railroad 






Southern Pacific 




COMPANY 

MERCED, CAL. 









&^cmS33&m=m33&3&3f^^^ 



Vol. LX VIII— No. 3. 



SAN FRANCISCO, JULY 20, 1912. 



Price, 10 Ceuta. 




S.G.^ 



AS REFINED AS 
MAIN CAN MAKE IT 

All Closed S. G. V. Cars are built to 
order. No two alike. Constructed to suit 
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S. G. V. owners have advised us that the S. G. V. Car is the handiest, safest 
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428 VAN NESS AVE. 



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mmmmmmmmmmmmmMmmmmmmmmm 



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LEADING HOTELS •«! RESORTS 



Hotel St. Francis 



Turkish Bath* 
12th Floor 

Ladies Hair Dressing Parlors 
2d Floor 

Cafe 

White and Gold Restaurant 

Lobby Floor 

Electric Grill 

Barber Shop 

Basement, Geary St. entrance 



Under the Management of James Woods 



Casa del Rey 

New 300-room, fire-proof hotel loeated 
near the beach and Casino, open all year 
round. SUPERIOR GOLFING. 

AMERICAN PLAIN 

Tennis courts, good boating, bathing and 
fishing; numerous drives along the Coast 
and through the mountains. 

SANTA CRUZ BEACH HOTEL CO. 




PALACE HOTEL 

Situated on Market Street 

In the center of the Oity. 

Take an? Market Street Car 
from the Perry. 

FAIRMONT HOTEL 

The must beautifully 

situated of any Oity 

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Take Sacramento Street Cars 
from the Ferry. 

TWO GREAT HOTELS 
UNDER THE MANAGEMENT OF THE 

PALACE HOTEL COMPANY 



Hotel Argonaut 

Society of California Pioneers' Building 
Fourth St., near Market. 

California's Most Popular Hotel 

400 RoomB. 200 Baths. 

European Plan $1.00 per day and up. 

Dining Boom Seating 500 — Table d'hote 
or a la Carte Service, as desired. 



Special Sunday Dinner, 
Including Wine, $1.00. 



EDWARD R0LKIN 
Manager. 



GEO. A. DIXON 
Ass't M'g'r. 



HOTEL VON DORN 

242 Turk St., near Jones, San Francisco 



_1*.&$ 1 






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ATTRACTIVE TERMS TO PERMANENT GUESTS 




Vnl. [iXVIII— No. 3. 



SAX FRANCISCO, .ll'IA 20, IDlL'. 



Price, HI Cents. 



1 1 IcLiMGLISH. 

! < AMERICUS 



IT ll.\s been noticed, with some apprehension, by the citizens 
of San Francisco that the District Attorney and the Chief 
of Police :ire at loggerheads over the much-vexed question 
of allowing the Texas Tommy to be danced after midnight. 
Prior to that hour it is to be presumed that any kind of salta- 
tory antics inflicts no damage on the morals of the public. But 
the instant the hands of the clock pass the hour of 12 dancing 
of any kind in a beach or Barbary Coast resort of the bibulous 
and sporty becomes an evil of such magnitude that the District 
Attorney and the Chief of Police, in discussing it, are almost 
willing to tell right out what they think of each other. It would 
be preferable to have them whisper it down some dark alley 
when decent people are mostly abed. 
• • • 

WITHOUT intending any disrespect to any of our public 
officials, or at leas* not more than they generally wind 
up with at the end of their terms, it may be remarked 
that it is a bad sign to hear officers of 
the law shouting "It's your fault! ' ' and 
"You're another!" It would puzzle 
even as bad a lawyer as Julius Caesar 
Sauimaun to explain why the District 
Attorney and the Chief of Police should 
quarrel about the enforcement of the 
law against Texas Tommy dancing 01 
anything else. The laws specify just 
what a Chief of Police shall do, but 
doesn't, and what the District Attorney 
should do, but never comes within ten 
miles of accomplishing. If Chief of 
Police White arrests all the people in 
San Francisco that violate the laws 

habitually, and ought to be placed in jail, he will be kept so 
busy that he will have no time for a jawing match with any- 
body. So, too, with District Attorney Fickert. If he should 
undertake to prosecute all the people that the police should ar- 
rest, and that should be jailed, he would have lockjaw from ad- 
dressing juries. The cold fact is that when District Attorneys 
and Chiefs of Police get to mixing it up between them, the aver- 
age citizen, who isn 't a mutt, suspects that the public is being 
flimflammed. The real object is to distract public attention from 
the true state of affairs and keep somebody out of jail, instead 
of trying to put him between bars. The Rev. Dille might be 
able to take these remarks as a text for an eloquent sermon. It 
is understood in political circles that he furnished the authori- 
ties quite a comprehensive list of resorts that violate the laws 



by various high crimes and misdemeanors, from straight-out, 
old fashioned, downright gambling to the Texas Tommy at cock- 
crow. The good Doctor had his labor for his pains. His compre- 
hensive list of malefactors was pigeon-holed. Not a malefactor 
was jailed. But the District Attorney and the Chief of Police 
are making faces at each other. 



T 



M*,J'jr,+ '*-' ■ ■■■' jjj 



TEXAS TOMMY 



The cause of tlie clash of words between depart 
ments of the city government. 



UK decapitatory ax is about to fall on a member of the 
Board of Police Commissioners. Poor Spiro is the victim. 
Spiro deserves better than to have ever been a Police 
Commissioner under any administration in San Francisco, and 
above all under the regime of P. H. McCarthy. His instincts 
were thoroughly honest, and when it came to a question of sacri- 
licing principle or losing the sale of a box of soda water, he was 
never known to act precipitately. Taking him all in all, he was 
tar above the average statesman that has emerged from his 
shop or laid aside his overalls to grace a position on the Boaid 
of Police Commissioners in San Francisco. Can anybody explain 
why it is that, for political reasons, the men chosen for rln J 
Police Commission are generally those that should have been 
firmly overlooked. Of all undesirable aspirants, the worst is a 
man connected in any way witli the retail liquor trade, wheth"-' 
he sell soda water or whiskey. He arouses the envy of his 
rivals in the liquor business, and he sets 
the teeth of the prohibitionists on edge. 
He is praised by nobody, and retires 
from office amidst a show r er of fervent 
objurgations. Nevertheless, Commis- 
sioner Spiro did his duty better than 
men whose political connections were 
more favorable to the establishment of 
a brilliant record. He has agreed lo re- 
sign, and the ax that has not been dull- 
ed by hitting the necks of the long list 
of McCarthyite holdovers will imp on 
his Adam's apple with spectacuiai ef 
feet very soon. It will not si" prise 
Spiro nor create any fresh bubbles in 
the soda water trade, for the secret of his resignation is out, 
and the sensation of his decapitation has been discounted. His 
execution will be as tame as a last week's reel of films at a 

motion picture show. 

* # * 

> BOTHER McCLATCHY of the Sacramento Bee has lost his 




B' 



high esteem for the labor unions, that in days past he 
glorified as the noblest work of a discriminating Provi- 
dence, aided by Sam Gompers and the McNamaras. It need not 
be said that Brother McClatchy's change of attitude towards 
the unions has been sudden and whimsical. Far from it. Only 
when the commercial and industrial life of his fair city of Sac- 
ramento was at stake did he even allow the thought to enter 
his loyal soul that a labor trust can be just as bad as any. 



-THE WASP- 



[Saturday, July 20, 1912. 



amsora's Faux Pai 



ENGINEER FREEMAN'S report on the Hetcli-Hetchy 
project for the city' water supply is a crushing indict- 
ment of the City Engineer's office for incompetency, if 
not worse. Every charge which The Wasp has brought 
against City Engineer Manson and his confederates is sus- 
tained by this report. 

Engineer Freeman makes an altogether new plan for the 
project. IF WHAT HE PLANS BE ACCEPTED AS THE 
LAST WORD, EVERY BIT OF SURVEYING AND PLAN- 
NING THAT THE CITY ENGINEER'S OFFICE HAS 
DONE IN THE PAST TWELVE YEARS MUST NOW GO 
INTO THE DISCARD. 

The $2,000,000 already expended must be written off as 
the city's loss. Nothing which the city has acquired, except 
its experience, is of any use in Engineer Freeman's new plan. 

Lake Eleanor and Cherry Creek, FOR WHICH THE CITY 
PAID HAM HALL $1,056,000, AND ON WHICH IT HAS 
EXPENDED IN SURVEYS AND ENGINEERING WORK 
AT LEAST $250,000, are set aside in favor of using Hetch- 
Hetchy. They are not to be developed until Hetch-Hetchy 
is first used to its limit. Not long ago Mr. Manson argued 
before the Army Board that Lake Eleanor and Cherry Creek 
would suffice- for many years; that in the far distance the 
Hetch-Hetchy source would be developed. Now it seems that 
when Mr. Manson made such statements he was merely 
raving. 

The power stations, for which most elaborate surveys and 
plans have been made by the City Engineer office, are not to 
be built now, but some time in the future they will be built, 
after new surveys and plans have been made. All the money 
has been wasted onihem. 

The water is not to be pumped over Livermore Pass, but 
is to come instead all the way to San Francisco by gravity 
along the south shore of Suisun Bay. 

THERE IS NOT IN ENGINEER FREEMAN'S PLAN A 
VESTIGE EVEN OF THE PLAN CITY ENGINEER MAN- 
SON AND EX-CITY ENGINEER GRUNSKY HAVE SPENT 
THE CITY'S MONEY ON DURING THE PAST TWELVE 
YEARS. ACCORDING TO ENGINEER FREEMAN'S RE- 
PORT, THE CITY MUST BEGIN AT THE BEGINNING 
AGAIN. 

Engineer Freeman undertakes in his report to sugar-coat 
the pill he is giving the taxpayers, who have been kept hop- 



ing and waiting for Hetch-Hetchy water for a dozen years 
now. The sugar-coating, however, is very thin, and does not 
sweeten the pill. 

THE CITY IS STUCK FOR $2,000,000 EXPENDED AND 
WASTED BY CITY ENGINEER MANSON AND HIS 
COTERIE OF POLITICAL ENGINEERS. 

The people are told that it will take seven years to bring 
in the water. It will not be brought here in twelve years, 
and the people want it now. They need it now. 

It is a sorry spectacle for the people of the city — this show- 
down by Engineer Freeman of this incompetency of the city 
officials who have had anything to do with the Hetch-Hetchy 
project. Nothing they have said is true. Nothing they have 
done has been done properly. And the city's $2,000,000 
might just as well have been flung into the bay. It is wasted, 
lost, gone forever, and with it the valuable time which can- 
not be replaced. 

If Mayor Rolph really understands Freeman's report, it is 
difficult to comprehend how he can justify himself in hesitat- 
ing five seconds to dismiss Manson and denounce every pub- 
lic official who has had anything to do with the Hetch- 
Hetchy project for the city. No private corporation with a 
similar report from its consulting engineer would listen to 
excuses. As quickly as a vengeful boot could reach their 
seat of intelligence, the whole lot of them would be out in 
the street and the office-door locked behind them. 
♦ ■ 

CONTRASTED PRISON DISCIPLINE. 

GOVERNOR JOHNSON is never so happy as when he is 
declaiming about his discovery that just government 
involves equal rights to all and special privileges to none. 
With the Governor, however, there are exceptions to the 
application of this maxim. He does not believe that newspa- 
pers have equal rights, and he does not apply his rule against 
special privileges when the special privileges are enjoyed by 
convicts. 

It is hardly possible that what is now going on at San 
Quentin is without knowledge or against the wish of the 
Governor. 

HE MUST KNOW FROM THE WARDEN OF THE PEN- 
ITENTIARY, AND FROM HIS FORMER PARTNER, MR. 
DUFFY, WHO IS CHAIRMAN OF THE PRISON COM 
MISSION, THAT RUEF HAS A STUDY SET APART TO 
HIM IN THE PRISON, WHERE HE IS PERMITTED TO 
SPEND THE DAY ENGAGED IN LITERARY WORK FOR 
THE BOUGHTEN BULLETIN. .RUEF IS THERE DAILY, 
ATTENDED BY A WOMAN REPORTER AND STENO- 
GRAPHER ON THE STAFF OF THAT PAPER. 



Thru Railroad Tickets 

Issued to All Parts of 

FOR PORTLAND 

1st class $10, $12, $15. 2d $6.00. Berth and Meals Included. 

The San Francisco and Portland S. S. Co. 

A. OTTINGER, General Agent. 



3 

BEAR 

BEAVER 

ROSE CITY 

Sailings Every 5 Days. 



United States, Canada and Mexico 

Id Connection with These Magnificent Passenger Steamers 

FOR LOS ANGELES 

1st class $7.35 & $8.35. 2d class $5.35. Berth & meals included 



Ticket Office, 722 Mkt., opp. Call. Ph. Sutter 2344 
8 East St., opp. Ferry Bldg. Phone Sutter 2482 
Berkeley Office 2105 Shattuck. Ph. Berkeley 331 



Saturday, July 20, 1912.] 



-THE WASP 



We are, of course, without information ;is to whether 
Buef, bimself, is on the start' of the Bulletin Eor pay. We do 
know, however, thai liis copy falls in with the lawlessness 
which the Bulletin daily glorifies. 

Apart from swelling himself and making it appear that 
he was merely a guiltless boy, too weak to stand temptation, 
Abe's particular purpose seems to be to give praise and 
glory to the Labor Union Party, by which this city was 30 
long cursed. That party typified industrial and govern- 
mental anarchy, because its chief characteristics were vio- 
lent opposition to both work and law. 

Ii may be thai Governor Johnson justifies this anomaly 
in prison discipline through sympathy with this double 
form of anarchy. We take consolation, however, from the 
belief that this degredation of law will hold the boards Eor 

a limited season and then pass away. In the years that are 

gone, during some administration which was not of the 

type of the "holier than thou" of these days, prison dis- 
cipline was very different. 



When the two noted bandits of the San Joaquin Valley, 
Evans and Sonntag, were captured, thej turned some honest 
pennies by selling copy to the newspapers. They, too. were 
glorified in their day, and pages and pages of yellow jour- 
nalism were devoted to their exploitation. In due course 
however, they were sentenced to (lie penitentiary and or- 
dered imprisoned at Polsom. Warden Aull was at that 
time in charge of Folsom. Yellow journalism pursued the 
bandits to the gale ,al Folsom, but as soon as the key was 
turned upon these convicts, Warden Aull notified them th.t 
their exploitation of the newspapers was over. They were 
convicts and would not he heard from again during his 
administration. 

Warden Aull kept his word and maintained the dignity 
of the law and discipline in penitentiaries as it existed 
through generations in all civilized countries. In these, our 
limes, it is different, lint these times and the practice of these 
times will hold the boards for a brief period and then pass 
away. 



AT DEL MONTE. 

The spirit of motion — sonic say restless- 
ness — seems to creep into every individual 
between the spring and autumn months, and 
the automobile comes the nearest to gratify- 
ing the universal whim. Del Monte lias had 
as many large parties from the South as from 
San Francisco — a halt-way meeting place for 
friends from eaeh direction. 

Mr. Clinton E. Worden motored down in his 
Pierre Arrow for a few days to ,ioin Mrs. 
Worden, wlio is motoring and visiting with 
friends. 

Mrs. Grant and Mrs. Colin M. Boyd of San 
Francisco drove down Saturday. Mrs. Grant 
is renewing memories of earlier visits when 
she used to see Del Monte often. 

These golf players like to keep in touch 
with Del Monte 's turfy fair ways. Mr. Ar- 
thur Vineont, Mr. C. II. Turner and Dr. D. P. 
Fredericks arrived Friday. One knows in- 
stinctively that their objective point ' is the 
17."> acre course that lies a few minutes' walk 
from the hotel. 

Mr. E. M. Folger of San Francisco comes 
down regularly to visit his family, who are 
enjoying the weeks in a variety of recreations 
and the young folks have acres in which to 
romp. 

M. Meyerfeld Jr. joined his parents for an 
over-Sunday visit. Mr. Albert Baruch came 
down Thursday also. 

A. R. Dabncy and Clara B. Dabney, Mr. 
and Mrs. J. Walter Crider came early in the 
week for a visit to the various points of old- 
time history and to enjoy the famous drive. 



FAMOUS HUMORISTS COMING. 
Press Woodruff and Cyrus E. Newton, the Apostles 
of Mirth and Banishers of Sadness, have completed 
arrangements for a transcontinental tour in har- 
monious combination. These gentlemen are favor- 
ites throughout America and clever entertainers. 
Their scintillating hursts of genuine humor entitle 
them to a front seat on the rostrum of American 
fun-makers. This combination is a team of men 
such as have not toured the country since the days 
of Twain and Cable, and yet it is distinctly different 
from all of its predecessors in the galaxy of the 
world of humor. The fun-makers of other times 
are mimicked and pictured by Newton, and Wood 
ruff lends no little as a foil to a well-chosen stage- 
mate. Woodruff and Newton are to give one of 
their popular entertainments here, and will un- 
questionably be greeted by a large crowd. Popular \ 
prices will prevail. I 




BLANCHE DUFFIELD 
The noted Prima Donna, who will he heard in "The Mikado" at the Cort Sunday night. 



THE WASP 



[Saturday, July 20, 1912. 



lam. Framcisc© 



WHICH SHALL IT BE? 

Oakland, Cal., July 15, 1912. 
GENTLEMEN:— 

1 learn from the Bulletin that a fund of 
$50,000 is being raised in San Francisco to 
finance the work of convincing Oaklanders 
that it would be far better for their interests 
to join a confederation of all the bay cities 
in a government that would eliminate waste 
and extravagance, promote efficiency, and 
banish any tendency to foolish rivalry and 
consequent bad feeling. 

Let me assure you, at the outset, that 1 
am now, and shall continue to be, an ardent 
advocate of consolidation. Any man who can- 
not see that we are one community, whose 
parts aie as interdependent as the various 
wards of a city, is either blind or will not see. 
1 am afraid that official Oaklanders will not 
see.; hence there is little hope of accomplish- 
ing, in the way the work is being outlined, 
the very laudable object a few San Francis- 
cans have in view. When one notices the self- 
satisfied air and boasting assumed by our offi- 
cials in the Knockeropolis, and the half- 
hearted manner in which the people and press 
are floundering in your city on the subject of 
consolidation, he must be convinced of the 
futility of any further agitation of the mat- 
ter. 

1 am told that 62,000 people cross the bay 
daily from these suburbs to earn a living in 
San Francisco. This means that something 
like 200,000 here are dependent upon San 
Francisco for their daily bread. Now, do 
you suppose that if these commuters had a 
tithe of the Los Angeles spirit they would 
have to be urged or coaxed into championing 
the cause? Do you suppose that if the Oak- 
land Chamber of Commerce were composed of 
broad-gauge men, who do not. mistrust their 
fellow-citizens, they would oppose the pro- 
posed legislative aid to enable San Francisco 
to enlarge its borders? Do you suppose that, 
if the merchants and manufacturers of San 
Francisco really meant business, they could 
not bring this matter to a head in mighty 
short order ? 

When all San Francisco rises in its might, 
as it did in its determination to elect Mr. 
Rolph, Mayor, it will accomplish federation, 
and not before. No tentative, pussy-cat, by- 
your-leave strokes of policy will bring about 
the desired end. Don 't deceive yourselves by 
the thought that the time is not ripe. On 
'the contrary, it is now or never. 

Thirty-seven years of residence in Oakland, 
of which fourteen have been tax-paying ones, 
has given me some knowledge of the psychol- 
ogy- °f Oaklanders. With my acquaintance 
with conditions here and in San Francisco, 1 
respectfully offer the following method as the 
best way to accomplish consolidation: 

Assuming that San Francisco and its news- 
papers are at last awake on the subject, let 



every San Francisco employer of transbay 
voters set aside a little time in which to meet 
his employes for a personal, heart-to-heart 
talk on the benefits of confederation. Let 
them ask these men and women, as a personal 
favor, to examine the subject in an unpreju- 
diced way, outside the ring of Oakland official- 
dom and its dusty atmosphere. The chances 
aie six to one that the average clerk, book- 
keeper or stenographer would be charmed by 
the boss 's businesslike talk and his interest, 
not only in them personally, but in the great 
subject of consolidation of the bay communi- 
ties. The chances are six to one that, after 
some such strong, quiet and effective work 
on the part of the business men, the question 
would be settled, once and forever, at the 
polls. 

Such a campaign might not be so attract- 
ive to some as a more excitable one of bon- 
fires and bands, but it would be the best 
vote-getter in the end. It has the added 
merit of being inexpensive, yet will enlist 
the persuasive arts ot the greatest of orators 
— the twenty-dollar gold piece, for to the av- 
erage employe the boss passes for one hundred 
cents on the dollar, and a gold dollar at that. 
Then, too, the potent contact of employe and 
employer could be just as effective when used 
in conjunction with noisier work. And, final- 
ly, it is a privilege that only San Francisco 
possesses, since Oakland does not employ any 
considerable amount ot labor beyond its bor- 
ders. 

Even in the event of your not being able 
to convince a majority of Oaklanders, you 
might win over the other towns that are not 
quite so self-centered and vain, and, with 
Oaklanders surrounded, they would be com- 
pelled to capitulate. 

I take it for granted that the citizens of 
San Francisco, aware that their city is being 
drained by non-resident wage-earners, would 
welcome consolidation if the subject were 
properly brought to their attention; but why 
there has not been concerted and effective 
work on that line passes my comprehension. 
Possibly, I am exceeding bounds of propriety 
in addressing you on this subject, but my ex- 
cuse is a Californian 's pride in San Francisco 
and a commuter 's love of fair play. 

If these suburban towns are to continue to 
shine by borrowed light, and snap at the hand 
that teeds them, then San Francisco had bet- 
ter speak without mincing matters. Call all 
your journalists and business men together 
and form a league of workers who will con- 
tinue to talk and buttonhole and boost until 
victory perches on your banners. 

I know that there is a sickly, cowardly sen 
timent abroad that expresses itself in this 
way: "Oh, it will come in time. By a natural 
evolution these bay cities will find that their 
interests lie in consolidation. Just wait 
awhile." Gentlemen, the piocrastinator never 
did anything worth while. In the course ot 
time Oakland, now leaning on San Francisco, 
as it has always leaned, may become the city 
of the Oakland booster's dream. . With con- 
solidation effected here, who knows but that, 
one by one, your wholesale houses may travel 



to this side, and the major part of the cus- 
toms and shipping business be done here* 
Stranger things have happened. Remember 
that Philadelphia was once the metropolis of 
this country, and remember that Oakland is 
on San Francisco Bay, with all the advan- 
tages and none of the drawbacks of San 
Francisco's position. 

And suppose that in eight or ten years Oak- 
land has equaled or exceeded San Francisco in 
population. Will it not welcome consolidation 
then? Aye, it will, and at what a price! 
Nothing short, I warn you, than the blotting 
out of the name "San Francisco." You 
know full well, in these consolidation agree- 
ments, that the fame goes with the name, and 
just imagine the name "SAN FRANCISCO," 
enshrined in the literature of Bret Harte, 
Mark Twain, Stevenson and Miller, the city 
know in ever port, "the city loved round the 
world" — imagine, I say, this name being sac- 
rificed to the flat, stale and meaningless one 
of ' ' Oakland. ' ' Why, the mere thought ought 
to be a trumpet call to every lover of San 
Francisco. 

Talk of boosting by printer's ink and by 
conventions and expositions! Why, there is 
no more effective work that the San Francisco 
Chamber of Commerce could do at this very 
moment, no better form of advertising it to 
the world, than to reach right out and take 
in what belongs to it. 

Within the city of greater San Francisco, 
population 700,000 — a city united and travel- 
ing onward to high ideals and purposes, its 
citizens could laugh at printer's ink. special 
trains, moving pictures and other forms of 
boosting, even as New York laughs. Men oi 
San Francisco, will you make San Francisco 
the New York of the West? 

Yours for Greater San Francisco, 

M. S. PARSONS. 



CHAMPAGNE 
Piper-Heidsieck | 

Anc n . e M - n HEIDSIECKfondee en 1 785 

KUNKELMANN & Co. Succ'i 
REIMS 



Charles Meinecke & Co. 

Agents Pacific Coast 
431 SACRAMENTO ST., S. F. 




il BJN Buxlingame undertook 
t<> snub Mose Gunst, it 
stubbed its aristocratic 
toe. 5Tea, verily. The 
lordly merchants and oth- 
er gentlemen of trade 
in all its varieties, who 
had bought the good ci- 
gars thai Mose baa sold for two generations, 
deemed it necessary to assume a social 
exclusiveness which barred tobacconists 
— even millionaire ones. So Burlingame 
tiptilted its exclusive nose and Lifted its 
lorgnettes superciliously, and let the pio- 
neer of his tribe know thai it preferred 
his room to his company. All that is 
very ancient history. It marks a phase 
nt' the evolution of an American republic 
into something mure akin to the social 
communities of the Old World, with 
which their own people, to the matter 
horn, art- so dissatisfied that it takes a 
large pari of the king's armies to keep 
I he taxpayers from making kindling- 
wood of the thrones. 

A New Jersualem. 

When it became evident that Burliu 
game was not quite comf Ortable, even for 
.Mose Const, with his money and savoir 
faire, and his intimate acquaintance with 
the business aristocracy of California, 
less wealthy and well-known Jewish resi- 
dents were deterred from carrying their 
lares and penates within sight of the 
Burlingame polo field, where the sons and 
grandsons of the prosperous bourgeoisie 
display themselves on their charges, like 
miraic knights of Charlemagne or Louis 
Me Grand making an afternoon of sport 
for the benefit of their "ladies fayre." 
Some bright-minded young men of the highest 
Jewish social set conceived the idea of start- 
ing a suburban colony of their own and doing 
things in a way to make Christian snobs eon- 
tract cirrhosis of the liver from disgust when 
they saw how they had been outdone in 
' 'stylishness. " 

& Jt j* 
A Bad Policy. 

The Jewish people are mentally the cleverest 
in the world, but they have a fatal facility 
for copying the weaknesses of overprosperous 
Christians. The new suburban colony of Ber- 
esford, founded by Jewish money and planned 
tfut by Jewish brains, had no sooner individ- 
ualized itself than somebody conceived the 
idea that a crest was essential. Why not the 
crest of the Beresford family— of Lord Charles 
Beresford, who is known in the English Navy 
as "Fighting Charlie." Happy thought! The 



genial ex-seadog was written to. it is said, 
and in- permission asked to use the Beresford 
crest in the coatof-arms of the municipality 
• if Beresford, situated in the county of San 
Mateo, in the sovereign State of California. 
By return mail came the complaisant reply 
thai I. ord Charles was only ton pleased to be 
of any service lo liis correspondents in Cali- 
fornia, and they were at perfect liberty to 



MRS. MALCOLM WHITMAK (nee Crocker). 

make such use as they desired of his family 
escuteheon, including the pious crest, "Chris- 




ins omnia primus est" (Chris! before every 

thing). 

< < ,< 

A Famous Marquis. 

The story about Lord Charles Beresford and 
the family crest recalls the amusing anecdote 
about the famous fox-hunting and steeple- 
chasing Marquis of Waterford, whose adven- 
tures were like those of the heroes of Charles 
Lever's novels. The Marquis was con- 
sidered a wild blade in the. wild age in 
which he lived, when an order for "pis- 
tols and coffee for two" would not have 
disturbed any well-trained waiter accus- 
tomed to dealing with the British nobil- 
ity and aristocracy. The Count de la 
Poer, a blood relative of the wild Mar- 
quis of Waterford, was his particular 
detestation for several reasons. The Mar 
quis disliked the Count on general prin- 
ciples, and the latter was anxious to 
sport the title he bore and which really 
was not his, as it had become merged 
in the Marquisate of Waterford. If any- 
body could legally bear the title, it would 
be the Marquis of Waterford himself. 
By courtesy, however, the Count de 
la Poer was so addressed, but he wished 
to make the title more than one of mere 
courtesy, and styled himself on his cards 
and everywhere as the real thing. As the 
first step, he wrote to his kinsman a po- 
lite letter in which he "presented his 
compliments" to the Marquis of Water- 
ford and begged to inquire if the latter 
had any objection to his using the name 
and style of the Count de la Poer. 

The answer of the wild Marquis was 
short and to the point. He wrote back: 

The Marquis of Waterford presents his com- 
pliments to the Count de la Poer, and begs to 
inform him that he does not care a damn 
what he calls himself. 

The correspondence was closed abruptly. 



HOTEL 

DEL 
MONTE 


zJMLz 


PAciric 

GROVE 
HOTEL 

Pacific Grove 


BOTH HOUSES UNDER 
SAME MANAGEMENT 

Address : 

H. E. WAENEE, 

Del Monte. - California 


A beautiful summer 

home at 
very moderate rates 


A tasty, comfortable 

family hotel. 
Low monthly rates 


"Wf* 



-THE WASP- 



[Saturday, July 20, 1912. 



Crocker-Whitman Wedding. 

It was regrettable that an unruly crowd of 
overcurious women, crazy to see at close 
range the wedding of the richest girl in the 
West, should have created a scene at the door 
of St. Matthew 's little church, . San Mateo, 
where on Tuesday Bishop William Ford Nich- 
ols performed the ceremony which made Miss 
Jennie Crocker the bride of Malcolm D. Whit- 
man of New York. The picture of the crowd 
around the church which is here presented 
shows that it was not immense, but it made 
up in energy what it lacked in numbers. In 
leaving the church the bride was again com- 
pelled to run the gauntlet of the excited 
women, eager even to snatch the orange bios 
soms from her veil as souvenirs had not the 
men of the wedding party interposed. This 
is, indeed, the day of the 'oi polloi — what 
Publisher HeaTst delights to call the "common 
people," cannot be kept nowadays at arm's 
length by awe of the exclusiveness of wealth 
or fears of a policeman. ' The behavior of the 
crowd around the chuTch and receipt of 
threatenning letters from cranks, or other 
brands of undesirable citizens, had impressed 
the bridegroom so unfavorably that au Exam- 




MR. MALCOLM DOUGLAS WHITMAN 

The fortunate New York' lawyer who won the 
richest heiress in all the West. 




WHERE WEDDING BREAKFAST WAS SERVED. 
Splendid pavilion erected by Miss Jennie Crocker in anticipation of her marriage last Tuesday. 



iner reporter professes to .have seen him with 
a long-barreled pistol in hand standing guard 
while the bride's trunks were transferred to 
her private ear at the railroad station at Bel- 
mont. Perhaps the reporter's imagination 
was even more than usually superheated. 

^* t&* t^* 

Conditions Are Changing. 

Theoretically any American citizen or citi- 
zeness has a right to get married in the pri-' 
vacy of the family circle, and extremely 
wealthy Americans are disposed to regard it 
as an insufferable nuisance that they cannot 
enjoy complete seclusion from the mob when 
they so desire. They would do well to remem- 
ber, however, that even in a country as wed- 
ded to caste as England the old order has 
changed, and the aristocracy and nobility no 
longer pretend to the aloofness of a generation 
ago. Even the King of England descends 
from his lofty pose nowadays to impress the 
"common people'' with the idea that he wish- 
es to be considered as democratic as them 
selves. 

At the wedding of the heir of the gieat 
Duke of Sutherland, the other day, to one of 
the highest-bred girls in the British Isles, the 
couple were photographed in many poses to 
gratify the multitude. Their picture appeared 
in every illustrated newspaper in London. Ex- 
cellent pictures they were, because taken care- 
fully with a view to obtaining the best effects. 
As a common sense proposition, it is better 



Gray hair restored to its natural color by Al- 
fredum's Egyptian Henna — a perfectly harm- 
less dye, and the effect is immediate. The 
most certain and satisfactory preparation for 
the purpose. Try it. At all druggists. 



for the titled aristocracy of England and the 
untitled, but even more exclusive, aristocracy 
of America to appease the vulgar curiosity 
of the mob decorously than to resist it with 
such undesirable results as have been observed 
at many fashionable weddings here as well 
as in New York. 

Few brides make attractive snapshot pic- 
tures when dodging in and out of a church to 
escape the unwelcome attentions of audacious 
photographers. But the law does not permit 
the murder of the miscreants, so why not put 
the best face on the misfortune, as do the 
British nobility, and have "your picters 
took" by a competent and respectful photog- 
rapher. It is only a question of time till our 
American nobility takes the same view of the 
matter as their British cousins. 



HOTEL 

VENDOME 

San Jose, Cal. 



One of California's 
Show Places Where 
Homelikeness Reigns 



H. W. LAKE, Manager 



Saturday, July 20, 1912.J 



THE WASP- 




ST. MATTHEW'S CHURCH 
The curious crowd waiting impatiently to catch a glimpse of Miss Crocker and Mr. Whitman. 



The Busy Bird. 

The much-renowned long-legged bird is flap- 
ping liis "wings over several homes just now, 
and is expected to alight next month at the 
domicile of the young Christian de Guignes 
(nee Marie Louise Elkins), and a couple of 
moii His later will visit the Talbot Walkers. 
Mrs. Walker was Miss Mary Keeney. It is 
whispered also that the Benjamin Fosses will 
receive a call. Mrs. Foss was the attractive 
Titian-haired daughter of the Wilfred B. Chap- 
mans, and is out here now making her parents 
a visit, but expects to return soon to her home 
in Boston. 

A luncheon will be given by the Thursday 
Club at the Hotel Peninsula, Thursday, July 




J J AfUVJ££3£AxTr ■ u L'ilj UUUUj 



EXCLUSIVE DESIGNS IN 

EMBROIDERED 

WAIST PATTERNS AND KIMONOS 



157-159 GEARY STREET 

Bet. Grant Avenue and Stockton St. 

Branch Store: 152 Kearny Street 
San Francisco 



25th, in honor of three of its prominent mem- 
bers — Mrs. Percy L. yhuman, President of 
the San Francisco District; Mrs. Frederick II. 
Oolburn, Past President of the Thursday Club 
and Chairman of the Program Committee foi 
the current year; and Mrs. Eugene de Vere, 
Assistant Curator of the Oakland Museum. 




By courtesy of The Call. 
RUNNING THE GAUNTLET 
The petite bride about to enter the church. 



Ask for Ctalian-Swise Colony wines. They 
i I tie be i . bei ausi they are bottled by the 
'".hirer ;nnl properly matured. 



DR. H. J. STEWART 

Begs to anuounce that he bas removed hia music 
studio to the Gaffney Building, 376 Sutter Street, 
between Grant Avenue and Stockton Street 
Office hours, from ten to twelve, and from two to 
four, daily. 

Telephone Douglas 4211. 



LOUIS CREPAIX 

MEMBER PARIS GRAND OPERA 



FREIKBPBOHETKiSCBBffl, 



FOR SINGING AND SPEECH 

French phonetics, configuration and placing of 
the phonetic sounds enabling the scholar to sing 
or speak in French with the purest "Indre et 
Loire" accent, 

French repertoire in songB from Lully to 
Debussy. Italian tone placing, voweling and 
syllabation. Italian repertoire in tonga from 
Carissimi to Puccini. Studio recitals. 

251 Post St., 4th Floor Mercedes Building, 

Reception hours — 11:45 to 12, and 3 to 4, ex- 
cept Wednesday. Wednesday in Maple Hall, 
Oakland. 



'How to get rich quick" we know not; 
How to teacn languages, we do know. 



To improve your mother tongue, 
Btudy a sister tongue. 

THE LARCHER AND MOE 
School of Languages 

CALL OR SEND FOR CIRCULAR, 

162 Post Street at Grant Avenue. 

Office Phone, Douglas 2859 



TRANSLATION FROM AND INTO ANY 
LANGUAGE. 



HEALDS 

BUSINESS COLLEGES 

HOME OFFICE -425 M C ALLISTER ST..S.F. 



Citizen's Alliance of San Francisco 

OPEN SHOP 



"The minimum Bcale * of 
the union represses all ambition 
for excellence. ' * — Prof. Eliot. 
Harvard University. 



7 



The Closed Shop town is 
doomed to industrial decay. 
Closed Shop and Calamity. 



Citizens' Alliance Office 
Rooms, Noa. 363-364-365 
Russ Bldg., San Francisco. 




10 



-THE WASP' 



[Saturday, July 20, 1912. 






AMERICAN HUSBANDS SOMETIMES BEAT THEIR WIVES. 



Mrs. Hanford's Wedding. 

The friends of Mrs. Marguerite Hanford 
are eagerly awaiting a cablegram from her 
from Shanghai( as on her arrival at that place 
she was to be married to Mr. Frederick Wil- 
liam Sehlueter, a very wealthy German, who 
is extremely prominent in the commercial 
affairs of the Orient. His headquarters are 
in Shanghai. Mrs. Hanford met him in Ger- 
many when she was traveling there with 
Mrs. Hedges, after her divorce from Mr. Han- 
ford, the well-known oil magnate, whose place 
on Pine street is known as the "Garden of 
Allah." Mrs. Hanford met Mr. Sehlueter 
again, by chance, on a voyage to the Orient, 
and their engagement followed. She came 
back here some months ago to purchase her 
trousseau. Mr. Sehlueter is building a very 
attractive bungalow for his bride at Tsing 
Tau, a very beautiful summer resort a day's 
journey from Shanghai, where all the elite 
of the Orient go at the hottest time of the 
year. 

J* & < 
Outdid the G-ods. 

Those 'fortunate enough to be invited to the 
barbecue given by Mr. and Mrs. C. C. Moore 
at their place in Watsonville, on the Fourth 
of Jul}', are still enthusing over the wonders 
of that feast. There were a hundred and ten 
guests, all of whom were the house-guests at 
the various country places in that vicinity. 
The Sesnons motored up from Santa Cruz 
with their guests, and Mrs. Florence Porter 
Pfingst, with her motor car full, came over. 
The gods of old, with their nectar and ambro- 
sia, would have been poor hosts in compari- 
son with what the guests of Mr. and Mrs. 
Moore found awaiting them. 



San Francisco 
Sanatorium 

specializes in the scientific care 
op liquor cases. suitable and 
convenient home in one pf san 
francisco's finest residential 
districts is afforded men and 
women while recuperating from 
overindulgence. private rooms, 
private nurses and meals served 
in rooms. no name on building, 
terms reasonable. 

San Francisco Sanatorium 

Phone Franklin 7470 1911 Van Ness Ave. 
H 1. RATCHELDER. Manager. 



Japanese umbrellas were arranged all over 
the lawns, and the guests clustered around, 
eating off wooden trays which were borne 
from the barbecue pit. It made one's mouth 
water to see and sniff the Monterey Ba}' sal- 
mon roasted whole, green corn frijoles, and 
steamed mussels. 

•Jt Jl J* 
Good Place to Stick By. 

One corner of the grounds was arranged 
as a refreshment place, and ever}' conceivable 
device to avert death by thirst was served at 
a moment 's notice. Mint julep, like they 
serve you in Baltimore, seemed to be the order 
of the day, and Henry Francis, Bush Finnell, 
and Jere Landfield seemed to identify them- 
selves with this sequestered spot, and the fun 
was fast and furious. It was unanimously 
decided that the C. C. Moore barbecue will 
stand its own against anything of the kind 
for the remainder of the summer. 

^* Iff* iff* 

Going Orchid Hunting. 

Jack Carrigan is planning a very interest- 
ing trip into some of the unexplored parts of 
South America in quest of a rare and very 
beautiful species of orchid. He is going in 
the interest of J. B. Coryell, the orchid king, 
who is always trying to add to his mar relous 
collection. He recently received twelve thou 
sand dollars' worth of bulbs from the Philip- 
pines, and has added seven new greenhouses 
to his already large conservatory. It is esti- 
mated that his collection has over fifty thou- 
sand plants, and is worth a fabulous amount 
of coin. A new orchid is like discovering a 
new gold mine. 

"Something Doing" at Tait's. 

When it comes to doing the "right thing," 
we must take off our hats to John Tait. His 
latest departure from the ordinary is giving 
away a beautiful, high-power $1,250 Oakland 
automobile — the Pri2ie Car. The machine is 
to be given to lady patrons of the cafe, and 
full particulars as to how the car will be 
awarded will be given every afternoon in the 
Tait Cafe ' ' 'tween the hours of 3 and 6 
o 'clock. ' ' 

' ' 'Tween the hours of 3 and 6 o 'clock ' ' is 
another innovation started by John Tait. Ev- 
ery afternoon between the hours mentioned he 
has arranged a special treat for patrons of 
the place. "When asked what the "treat" 
would be, he replied. "Come and see." And, 
judging by his past efforts, we can imagine 



the "treat" being well worth while. There's 
a particularly good entertainment bill at this 
popular cafe this week, and the cuisine and 
service is up to the usual high standard. 

J* Jt jt 
No Boom. 

' ' Bertie, ' ' said the hospitable hostess at a 
Sunday-school treat, "won't you eat some 
more cookies?" 

"I can't. I'm full!" sighed Bertie. 

"Well, then, put some in your pockets." 

"I can't. They're full, too," was the re- 
gretful answer. 

Ji J* ■„* 
Sublimity of Heroism. 

There is sadness and sorrow in many homes 
over the tragic death of Mrs. Edwin Pohl- 
mann. the beautiful daughter of Prank P. 
Sherman, vice-president and secretary of the 
Carlson-Currier Company. Mrs. Pohlmanu 
was killed in a railroad wreck at Chicago, 
July 14th. She was a bride of only a few 
months, in the height of her happiness, loved 
by many friends, cultured, refined and talent- 



Any Victrola 

On Easy Terms 



Whether you get the new low price 
Victrola at $15 or the Victrola "de 
luxe" at $200, get a Victrola. At a 
very small expense you can enjoy a 
world of entertainment. Victrolas $15 
to $200. Any Victrola on easy terms. 



Sherman Jpay& Co. 

Sheet Music and Musical Merchandise. 
Stelnway and Other Pianos. 
Apollo and Cecilian Player Pianos 

Victor Talking Machines. 

KEARNY AND SUTTER STREETS, 

SAN FRANCISCO. 

14TH & CLAY STS„ OAKLAND. 



Saturday, July 20, 1912.] 



-THE WASP- 



n 




SCENE FROM DAVID BELASCO'S REPRODUCTION OF "THE DRUMS OF OUDE' 
To be given next week at the Orpheum 



ed. Mrs. Pohlmann's wedding, which took 
place on the 11th of January, at San Rafael, 
was of social importance, as the bride and 



ANTIQUE EFFECTS 




can be obtained 
with Garden Fur- 
niture in Pompeiisn 
Stone. We pro- 
duce Fountains, 
Seat-, Pots, Vases, 
Benches, Tab es, 
Sun Dials, etc. 

Sarsi Studios 

123 OAK STREET 

Near Frankly d 
San Fraociico.Cal. 



groom were members of an exclusive set both 
here, and in Santa Rosa, where Edwin Pohl- 
mann lived. The sad close of this promising 
life is made more sorrowful by the fact that 
Mr. and Mrs. Pohlmann were on their way to 
New York to secure the body of Edwin Pohl- 
mann's father, who died in Porto Rico on 
his sugar plantation, three weeks ago. The 
train disaster, which caused the loss of thir- 
teen or, more lives, took place at Western 
Springs, sixteen miles west of Chicago. A 
mail train, dashing through the fog, plunged 
through the rear of the Overland Limited, on 
the Chicago, Burlington and Quincy Railroad, 
killing outright ten passengers asleep in the 
rear car. Three others died soon after from 
the crash. When the physician found Mr. and 
Mrs. Pohlmann lying aiming the debris, Mrs. 
Pohlmann tried to reassure them that she was 
not severely injured. ''Don't mind me, doc- 



tor," she said; " but look after mj husband," 
and she drew across her mangled limbe a Man 
tcel to conceal her dreadful injuries. Seldom 
has such hemic sell '-nlmrgnt inn I ■ . - . - ■ , ,-,..■,, „■!,■,! 

When the brave girl was lifted into the am 

bulance Consciousness gave way under tin- 
stress of her frightful sufferings, and she died 

Bef she reached the hospital. Imagination 

eould not depict an incident better calculated 
to stir the emotions by its pathos and its 
sublime heroism, 

Ethel Sherman Pohlmann was only just past 
23 years. She was bom and reared in San 
Francisco ,.'i graduate of the Girls' High 
School ami Irving Institute. She was a mem- 
ber of the Alpha Sigma Sorority, a great fa- 
vorite in her set, and admired by all who 
knew her. 



5% per month 

SAVED on the investment by buying 

THE 

Alaska Refrigerator 

900,000 SOLD SINCE 1878 

We have a Test Refrigerator to prove what we 
claim for it Please call and see it. 

Paciiic Coast Agents 

W. W. MONTAGUE & CO. 



557-563 Market Street 



San Francisco 



j^Toyo Kisen 
|p3^ Kaisha 

(ORIENTAL STEAMSHIP OO.) 

S. S. ShinyoMaru, (New) ...Saturday, Aug. 3,1912 
S. S. Chiyo Maru aaturday, Aug. 31, 1912 

S. S. Nippon Maru (Intermediate Service 
Saloon. Accommodations at reduced 
rates. ..... .Saturday, September 21, 1912 

S. S. Tenyo Maru, (Via Manila direct) 

Friday, September 27, 1912 

Steamers sail from Company's pier, No. 34, 
near fooL of Brannan Street, 1 P. M. for Yoko- 
hama and Hongkong, calling at Honolulu, Kobe 
(Hiogo), Nagasaki and Shanghai, and connecting 
at Hongkong with steamers for Manila, India, etc. 

No cargo received on board on day of sailing. 
Round trip tickets at reduced rates. 

For freight and passage apply at office, 4th 
floor, Western Metropolis National Bank Building, 
625 Market St. 

W. H. AVERT. Assistant General Manager. 



Ask your Dealer for 

GOODYEAR "HIPPO" HOSE 



Guaranteed to »t.and 
700 lb*. Pressure 



The Best and strongest 
Garden Hose 




TRY IT AND BE CONVINCED 



GOODYEAR RUBBER COMPANY 

R. H. PEASE, Pres. 589-591-593 Market St., Sai Fruciico 



12 



THE WASP - 



[Saturday, July 20, 1912. 



Knocked Out with Fixe Shovel. 

"The Knave," in the Oakland 
Tribune, tells how some Grand 
Army men were swapping stories 
when Dr. E. M. Green of Oro- 
ville, a member of the National 
Council of Administration of the 
Grand Army, set forth the tale of 
a boastful veteran he once heard 
told by Senator Depew. There 
was a chance meeting of a strang- 
er with the veteran and his wife 
on a street ear. Loquaciously in- 
clined, the warrior began telling 
of Civil War days and found the 
stranger a ready and attentive 
listener. Pointing to a mark on 
his cheek, the old fellow said that 
was the scar of a wound he had 
got at Antietam, while a thumb- 
nail had been shot away at Get- 
tysburg. A scar he said he had 
on the knee recalled a bad gun- 
shot wound he had sustained at 
the second Bull Eun ■ affair. He 
had also been shot just above the 
left ankle, which be got in a 
charge with his brigade at Spott- 
sylvania. The stranger, much in- 
terested, inquired where he had 
got. the long, deep dent so promi- 
nent on the side of his nose, 
thinking perhaps it came from 
some exciting hand-to-hand strug- 
gle amid the smoke and din of 
battle. With a noticeable frown, 
the veteran plainly avoided the 
question and showed .much un- 
easiness when his better half urg- 
ed him to tell about it. 

"Go on, Bill. Tell him how you got that 
gash," urged the wife; but he only growled 
for her to shut up. 

"I won't, nuther, " replied the old lady, 
with much spunk. "It just about riles the 
skin off me to hear you braggin ' and braggin' 
about the marks you got in the war, whilst 
you never open your head about the finest 
and most noticeable mark of all — the one I 
gave you when I knocked you out with the 
fire shovel." 

(,5* cJ?* ^?* 

The Old Order Changeth. 

How few of our present-day society people 
in California, in reading of the tragic death 




MORSE 

Detective and Patrol 

Service 



l PERATIVES in full dress furnished for 
weddings, receptions and other social 
functions. Uniformed officers supplied 
'^ojF/f. as ticket takers for balls, dances and 
\a~z<J entertainments at reasonable rates. 
Patrolmen to protect property against fire and 
depredations of thieves during absence of owner. 
Engage in all branches of legitimate detective 
service and serve legal papers in difficult cases. 



602 California St., San Francisco 

Telephone Kearny 3153. Homephone 2626 



MISS CAMILE DORN 

A beautiful debutante who is exceedingly popular 
in society. 

of the Baroness de Reinbach-Werth, formerly 
Miss Diana Morgan-Hill, knew that she was 
a grandniece of the late Barney Murphy of 
San Jose, head of the old pioneer family of 
Murphy, that once owned a large part of the 
great Santa Clara valley. The mother of the 
ill-fated Baroness, prior to her marriage, was 
Mrs. Diana Murphy of San Jose, a celebrated 
half-Spanish beauty. She had many suitors, 
some of whom were considerably crestfallen 
when it transpired that she had gone quietly 
and got married to Morgan Hill of San Fran- 
cisco months before her marriage was publicly 
announced. Mr. Hill was a good-looking bach- 
elor, noted for his polished manners and re- 
markably well-groomed appearance. For some 
time Mr. and Mrs. Morgan Hill lived in the 
Santa Clara valley, near the town of Morgan 
Hill, where so many motorists have fallen 
into the clutches of the constable for speed- 
ing. The Morgan Hills became residents of 
Washington, D. C, following the unpleasant 
publicity of the Sharon-Hill lawsuit in which 
Miss Sarah Althea Hill claimed to be the 
contract wife of United States Senator 
Sharon — a claim which the courts finally dis- 
allowed. It was through this case that Judge 
David Terry was shot at the Lathrop railroad 
station, where he met United States Justice 
Stephen J. Field, who was on his way from 
Los Angeles to San Francisco, guarded by 



Dave Nagle, a deputy marshal 
known to be quick on the trigger 
and very cool and resolute. 

. & ^ c$* 
Had Threatened to Kill. 

Terry, who had married Miss 
Sarah Althea Hill, threatened the 
thieatened the life of Justice 
Field because his wife lost her 
ease. Seeing the Justice enter the 
dining-room at the railroad sta- 
tion, Terry made a hostile dein 
onstration and was shot and killed 
by the deputy marshal guarding 
the Justice. The affair created a 
profound sensation owing to th*j 
great prominence of both Judge 
Terry and Justiee Field in the 
early history of California. Mrs. 
Terry was present when her hus- 
band was shot, and that tragedy 
and her other troubles culminated 
in her losing her reason. She 
never regained it, and died a few 
years ago. 

^* c£* &?* 

A Romantic Affair. 

The Morgan Hills went to 
Washington, D. C, and, being 
very refined and conventional peo- 
jle, have been a welcome addition 
to the society of the Capital. The 
future Baroness de Reinach-Werth 
inherited her handsome mother's 
beauty. She was educated abroad 
and became an accomplished lin- 
guist. Her first meeting with 
Baron Hardouin de Reinach-Werth 
a French cavalry officer, occurred 
when she was finishing her stud- 
ies in France. Mr. Morgan Hill looked with 
much disfavor on the suit of the scion of 
the old French nobility, and only after long 
persuasion did he consent to the marriage. 



Murphy Grant & Co. 

JOBBERS OF DRY GOODS 



NEW GOODS CONSTANTLY 
ARRIVING AND ON BALE 
AT OUR NEW BUILDINQ 

134-146 Bush St. N.E. Cor. Sansome, S.F. 



SPRING WOOLENS NOW IN 

H. S. BRIDGE & CO. 

TAILORS and IMPORTERS of WOOLENS 



108-110 SUTTER STREET 



above 

Montgomery 



French American Bank Bid's 
Fourth Floor 



SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 



Saturday, July 20, 1912.] 



THE WASP 



13 



Aa long as the parent aJ consent was withheld 
Mies Bill continued to pine. Foi two win- 
ters before her marriage she withdrew from 
the gaieties of Washington, a melancholia 
settled upon in.-i, and in the hopes of allevi- 
ating that condition her engagement was an- 
nounced last August. Prior to that her par- 
ents had brought her to California for change 
of M-.ne. Baroa de Reinach-Werth had given 
1 1 £ i his commission in the French army and 
acquired properly in Alberta, Canada, whence 
he corresponded with his liancee. The mar- 
riage of the Baron and Miss Hill took place 
last December in St. Matthew's Church, 
Washington. No invitations were issued anl 
only the parents of the bride and the neces- 
Bajry witnesses were present. The couple 
sailed for France the day after the wedding, 
and it was slated by the bride's parents that 
she would return in the Spring, after her 
visit to the Baron's relatives in France. Late 
in May last, Mr,, and Mrs. Morgan Hill 
closed their house on Connecticut avenue, 
Washington, and came to the Pacific coast 
fur the summer. On June 21st the Baroness 
de Keinach-Werth committed suicide by jump- 
ing from the window of a sanitarium near 
Regents' Park, where she had been treated 
for hysteria. While her nurse was at the 
other end of the room, the Baroness rushed 
to the window and jumped out, falling on the 
stone pavement, eighteen feet below, and 
fracturing her skull. The coroner's jury re- 
turned a verdict of suicide while temporarily 
insane. 

t&& t£fr t2fr 

Tom Powers* Treat. 

Thomas Powers is an attorney and politi- 
cian of Irvington who is a firm believer m 
hunches. At the Presidential primary elec- 
tion he cast his vote for "Woodrow Wilson, 
and when the ballots were counted it was. dis- 
covered that two other brave spirits had 
voted for the pedagogue. Powers was natur- 
ally elated, never thinking that more than 
one vote would be cast in the town for Wil- 
son, and expressed the wish that he would 
like to meet the other two Democrats and 
buy them a little dinner. Powers went out 
on a still hunt, and at last learned that the 
other Wilson admirers were two staid school 




jp 



Established 1863. 
Monthly Contracts, $1.50 per Month. 



NEW WOEKS JUST EEEOTED AT 27 
TENTH ST, S. F. 



Largest and Most Uup to Date on Pacific 
Coast. 



Wagons call twice daily. 

Cleaning Dainty Garments Our Specialty 



F. Thomas Parisian Dyeing & 
Cleaning Works 



inarms who had taken advantage of the suf- 
frage recently bestowed upon them. He did 

not buy the dinner. 

A Novelist's Wedding. 

In giving an outing to East Side moth- 
ers and children after his wedding to Bessii 
McCoy, the actress, Richard Harding Davis, 
the novelist, .reached his own story of "Van 
Bibber and the Swan Boats." Mr. I>;i\ i> 
went to the office of the Society for Improv- 
ing the Condition of the Poor and said to the 
Secretary: ''I'm going to marry Miss Bessie 
McCoy, and I want you to get up a wedding 
party for us," Then Mr. Davis explained 




MISS JANET VON SCHROEDER 

Who has been feted by many noted hostesses of 
the fashionable set. 



that he wanted the poor to benefit by his wed- 
ding and asked Mr, Capes to arrange a special 
outing for them. Mr. Capes engaged the Iron 
Steamboat Company to take the party of 51)0 
to Coney Island, where they improved their 
| minds and physical conditions by indlugence 
in the delights and the fresh air of that much- 
frequented resort. It looks so much like a 
free ad. for the author and his actress bride 
that most of the thrill is taken out of it, 
yet nevertheless a generous deed must be 
given the full meed of praise, even though 
the Golden Eule be not observed: "Let not 
thy left hand know what thy right giveth. " 

t5* (5* e5* 

Napoleon P. Vallejo Re-marries. 

Napoleon P. Vallejo and Mrs. Mattie Val- 
lejo were re-married last week at the home 
of the bride in Oakland. This marriage is 
the culmination of a loyal romance, which 
traces the years back to the middle seventies, 
Mrs. Vallejo was the favored daughter-in-law 
of old General Vallejo, and the daughter of 



the late Harvey S. Brown, for man} years 
chief attorney for the Southern Pacific The 
rooord of the re-marriage of the couple — ot 
187u and 1912, reveals as romantic a bit of 
loyalty on the part of the wife as could be 
found between the covers of a book. Mis. 
Vallejo is a handsome matron, whom tin* 
years have but marked with dignity aud grace, 

** <£ & 
The Woodrow Wilson Family. 

Mrs. Woodrow Wilson, wife of the candi 
date for the Presidency, is described by those 
who know her as wonderfully winsome. She 
has large brown eyes, an abundance of soft, 
wavy, brown hair, and a countenance so win- 
some and tender, reflecting the warmth of a 
generous heart. She has been likened unto 
one of "Angelica's cameos." The three Wil- 
son girls are all interesting in distinctively 
individual ways. One is studying music, one 
is interested in charitable work in the settle- 
ments, and the other one is just finishing her 
college course. It is whispered that one of 
the daughters is a suffragist. But the mother 
tactfully refrained from divulging the secret 
which one. However, Miss Elinor is under 
suspicion. 

^* <i*W ^% 

Turn About is Fair Play. 

A young married woman recently had a 
novel experience when she engaged her first 
Chinese cook. 

"What's your name?" she asked when the 
preliminaries had been settled. 

"My name Hong Long Loo," said the Cel- 
estial with much gravity. 

"And I am Mrs. Harrington Richard Buck- 
ingham, ' ' said his new employer. ' ' I am afraid 
I shall never be able to remember your name 
— it's so long. I shall call you John." 

"All light," returned the Chinese with a 
suspicion of a smile. "Your namee too longee 
too. I callee you Charley. ' ' 



DIVIDEND NOTICES 

Associated Savings Banks of 

San Francisco. 



THE HIBERNIA SAVINGS AND LOAN SOCIETY, 
corner Market, McAllister and Jones Sts. — For 
the six months ending June 30, 1912, a dividend 
has been declared at the rate of three and three- 
fouiths (3%) per cent per annum on all deposits, 
free of taxes, payable on and after Monday, July 
1, 1912. Dividends not drawn will be added, to 
depositors' accounts, become a part thereof, and 
will earn dividends from July 1, 1912. Deposits 
made on or before July 10, 1912, will draw inter- 
est from July 1, 1912. 

R. M. TOBIM. S.-crptary. 



NORTH GERMAN LLOYD 

All Steamers Equipped with "Wireless, Submarine 

Signals and Latest Safety Appliances. 

First Cabin Passengers Dine a la Carte without 

Extra Charge. 

NEW YORK, LONDON, PARIS, BREMEN 

Fast Express Steamers Sail Tuesdays 

Twin-Screw Passenger Steamers Sail Thursdays 

S. S. "GEORGE WASHINGTON" 

Newest and Largest German Steamer Afloat 

NEW YORK, GIBRALTER, ALGIERS, 

NAPLES, GENOA 

Express Steamers Sail Saturdays 

INDEPENDENT TOURS AROUND THE WORLD 

Travellers' Checks Good all over the World 

ROBERT CAPELLE, 250 Powell St. 

Gen'I Pacific Coast Agent Near St. Francis Hotel 

and Geary St. 

Telephones: Kearny 4794 — Home O 8725 



WHAT 




FIGURES TELL 




| HE LATEST FAD in City government fash- 
ions, which has attracted the interest of 
our municipal officials is an Efficiency 
Bureau. A budget appropriation of $10,- 
000 has been made for its acquisition dur- 
ing the present year. The Wasp has al- 
ways advocated efficiency in the spending 
of the tax-payers' money, but a $10,000 bureau seems merely 
an expensive investment in official furniture. For instance, 
why does it need a $10,000 a year Efficiency Bureau to tell 
Mayor Rolph how to obtain efficiency from his office? 

Efficiency m city government has only one meaning to the 
tax-payer. It means getting the full return of service from 
the office' with the expenditure of less of the taxpaj'ers' 
money. Surely Mayor Rolph can continue to give the service 
of his office and spend less of the tax-payers' money through 
it without having to be told by an Efficiency Bureau how to 
do it. 

UNDER MAYOR PHELAN'S ADMINISTRATION IN 
1900-01, THE FIRST FULL YEAR OF CITY GOVERN- 
MENT UNDER THE NEW CHARTER, THE EXPENSES 
OF THE MAYOR'S OFFICE, ACCORDING TO AUDITOR 
BRODERICK'S REPORT FOR THE YEAR, WERE $13,800 

UNDER MAYOR SCHMITZ' ADMINISTRATION IN 
1906-07, THE EXPENSES OF THE MAYOR'S OFFICE, 
ACCORDING TO AUDITOR HORTON'S REPORT, WERE 
$14,872, ONLY $972 MORE THAN UNDER THE PHELAN 
ADMINISTRATION SIX YEARS EARLIER. 

UNDER MAYOR ROLPH 'S ADMINISTRATION FOR 
1912-13, THE BUDGET APPROPRIATIONS FOR THE 
MAYOR'S OFFICE TOTAL $22,740, AN INCREASE OF 
$7,868 OVER THE EXPENSES UNDER THE UNSPEAK- 
ABLE ADMINISTRATION OF SCHMITZ AND RUEF SIX 
YEARS EARLIER. 

Is it not surprising that the "efficiency administration" of 
the office of Mayor Rolph should be fifty-three per cent, 
more costly than the extravagant administration of Mayor 
Schmitz, directed by Abraham Ruef ? 

This is how it worked. Mayor Schmitz expended $1,800 
for a stenographer and $172 for incidental expense. Mayor 
Rolph is allowed $3,600 for three stenographers and $1,740 
for incidentals. In addition to this 100 per cent, increase 
for stenographers and 1,000 per cent, increase for incidentals, 
Mayor Rolph has $2,100 allowed for an assistant secretary. 
$1,500 for a chauffeur and $900 for a telephone operator, 
$4,500 in all of expense for services which Mayor Schmitz 
did not expend anything for. 

NOW, REALLY, DOES MAYOR ROLPH NEED AN 
EFFICIENCY BUREAU TO TELL HIM HOW TO MAKE 
THE MAYOR'S OFFICE MORE EFFICIENT BY MAKING 
IT LESS COSTLY? 



ASSESSOR'S OFFICE. 

JHE ASSESSOR'S OFFICE in the year 1900-01, with 
Washington Dodge as Assessor, cost the tax-payers 
$87,435.84. In the year 1906-07, which, being the 
year following the terrible fire, which destroj'ed all 
the records of the Assessor's office, was unavoidably a 
costly year of administration, the expenses, with Washing- 
ton Dodge still Assessor, were $105,952.57. For the year 
1912-13, with Washington Dodge still Assessor, the budget 
allowance is $101,200, an increase of $13,764.16 over the 
expense twelve years earlier. In the year 1900-01 the total 
assessment valuation made by the Assessor's office was 
$410,155,304. For the year 1912 the total assessment valu- 
ation made by the Assessor's office is approximately $612,- 
000,000. The work of assessment accomplished by the As- 
sessor's office has thus increased something like fifty per 
cent in the same 12-year period, during which the expenses 
of conducting the office increased only fifteen per cent. 
Put it another way — Assessor Washington Dodge has re- 
'duced the cost of the service of his office to the tax-payers 
twenty-five per cent, during twelve years of his administra- 
tion. This is the kind of efficiency which keeps Assessor 
Washington Dodge in his. office, while we change Mayors 
with the changes in our political fashions. 
♦ 

CITY ATTORNEY'S OFFICE. 

MN THE YEAR 1900-01, City Attorney Franklin K. 
Lane conducted the office with the expenditure of 
$21,024.37. In the year 1906-07 City Attorney Wil- 
liam G. Burke conducted the office with the expenditure of 
$21,202.42. For the year 1912-13 the budget appropriation 
for the City Attorney's office is $39,700. Under the two 
earlier administrations, no expenditures for special counsel 
were made and charged to bond money accounts. The pres- 
ent costly practice is to employ special counsel and pay 
them from bond money funds. Also, appropriations out- 
side of the budget allowance are expended by the City At- 
torney's office and charged to bond money funds and to 
other budget funds. The budget figures for 1912-13 are 
thus- very much under the actual expenditure of the City 
Attorney's office. 



AUDITOR'S OFFICE. 

THE AUDITOR is the official who should stand between 
the wasters of the people's mone}' and the cormorants 
that are constantly reaching for it. There is little hope that 
Auditor Boyle will save a dollar for the city that can be spent 
on some pretext or other. The expenses of his office have 
increased enormously. 

Auditor Boyle is the man who said before election he would 
never pay Ham Hall a million dollars for Cherry Creek water 
rights, to which Hall could not give the city legal title, and on 
which the county taxes of Tuolumne were unpaid. Since 
election Boyle has authorized the payment of the million to 
Hall, and that 'gentleman has cashed his claim against the 



Saturday, July 20, 1912.] 



-THE WASP 



15 




•CAN'T THOU DRAW OUT LEVIATHAN WITH A HOOK7' 



treasury and pocketed a good uiilliou of Heteh Hetchy bond 
money. It is just a million wasted. 

The Auditor's office in the year 1900-01 cost the people 
of San Francisco $13,715.90. In the year 1906-07 the 
cost was $19,860.61, an increase from the William Broderick 
administration of $5,860.65. The budget for 1912-13 allows 
Auditor Boyle $40,700, an increase for his administration 
from that of Auditor Horton of $21,123.39. Auditor Boyle's 
administration thus increases the expenses of the Auditor's 
office 108 per cent over that of Auditor Horton, six years 
earlier, and 200 per cent over that of Auditor Broderick, 
twelve years earlier. 

♦ 

COUNTY CLERK'S OFFICE. 

EXPENSES of the County Clerk's office in 190-01 were 
$76,521.18, and in 1906-07 were $76,599.96, an increase of 
$78.78 in six years. The budget allowance for 1912-13 is 
$107,800, an increase of $21,200, or 29 per cent in the last six 
years. 

♦ 

TAX COLLECTOR'S OFFICE. 

THE expenses of the Tax Collector's office in 1900-01 were 
$65,748.15, and in 1906-07 were $61,010.07, a reduction 
of $4,738.08 in'six years. The budget allowance for the year 
1912-13 is $69,890, an increase of $8,880. or 14 per cent, in 
six years. The total sums of taxes collected were $6,119,- 
063,83, in 1900-01 ; $6,430,956.75 in 1906-07. and levied lor 
1912-13 approximately $10,620,000. On the basis of taxes 
collected, the cost of collection through the office has been 
lowered in the last six years. 

♦ 

SHERIFF'S OFFICE. 

THE expenses of the Sheriff's office in 1900-01 were $90,- 
389.83, and in 1906-07 were $71,391.08, a reduction of 
$18,998.75. The' budget allowance for 1912-13 is $104,400, an 



increase of $14,010 over the cost twelve years earlier. Tin 
expenses of 1906-07 were abnormally low, due to the fin' in 
the preceding April. 



RECORDER'S OFFICE. 

The expenses of the Recorder's office in 1900-01 were $33,- 
868.65, and the budget allowance for 191-2-13 is $7<i,(i00. 



SUPERVISORS' EXTRAVAGANCE. 

Under the present charter the Mayor and Supervisors are 
the masters of the financial situation to a large extent. If 
these officials set an example of economy, others are likely to 
imitate them. Per contra, extravagance by the heads of the 
city government is sure to cause general wastefulness. 

Let the figures of the budget for this year speak for them- 
selves : 

BOARD OF SUPERVISORS. 

1900-01 1906-07 1912-13 

$72,726.41 $78,717.55 $163,920.00 

Gain in 12 years, $92,193.59, or 110 per cent. 

COMMON SCHOOL FUND. 

1900-01 1906-07 1912-13 

$1,115,604.75 $1,218,411.61 $1,812,500.00 

Gain in 12 years, $696,895.25. 

DEPARTMENT OF ELECTIONS. 

1900-01 1906-07 1912-13 

$105,765.97 $45,197.97 $315,000.00 

Gain in 12 years, $209,234,03 or 200 per cent. 

PLAYGROUNDS COMMISSION. 
1900-01 1906-07 1912-13 

$80,000.00 




Vacation 1912 

A Handbook of 

Summer Resorts 

Along the line of the 

NORTHWESTERN 
PACIFIC RAILROAD 

This book tells by picture and word 
of the many delightful places in Marin, 
Sonoma, Mendocino; Lake and Humboldt 
Counties in which to spend your Vaca- 
tion — Summer Eesprts, Camping Sites, 
Farm and Town Homes. 



Copies of Vacation 1912 may be ob- 
tained at 874 Market St. (Flood Build- 
ing), Sausalito Ferry Ticket Office, or 
on application to J. J. Geary, G. P. & 
F. A., 808 Pbelan Building, San Fran- 



NEW ENGLAND HOTEL 

Located in beautiful grove about 40 rods from 
station. Beautiful walks, grand scenery ; hunt- 
ing and fishing, boating, bathing, bowling and 
croquet. Table supplied with fresh fruit and 
vegetables, milk and eggs from own ranch daily. 

Adults $7 to $9' per week; special rates for 
children. 

Address F. K. HARRISON,.' Camp Meeker, 
Sonoma County, Cal. 



OWN SUMMER HOME ItN 

CAMP MEEKER 

Mountains of Sonoma Co. Lots $15 up. Meeker 
"uilds cottages $85 up. Depot, stores, hotels, 
.staurant, phone, post, express office, theater, 
free library, pavilion, churches,, sawmill; 2,000 
lots sold, 700 cottages built. Sausalito Ferry. 
Address M. O. MEEKER, Camp Meeker. 



Redwood Grove 



% mile from Gueraeville; tents and cottages; 
abundance of fruit, berries; bus meets all trains. 
Rates $10-$11 per week; L. D. phone. Address 
THORPE BROS., Bos 141, Guerneville, Sonoma 
Co., Cal. 



ROSE HILL 

HOTEL AND COTTAGES 
Camp Meeker 

Opposite depot; 20 minutes' ride from Russian 
River; surrounded by orchards and vineyards; 
excellent dining-room, with best cooking. Fish- 
ing, boating, swimming and dancing. Many 
good trails for mountain climbing. Open all 
year. Can accommodate 75 guests. Adults, $6 
to $10 per week; children half rates. 

Building lots for sale from $50 and up. Ad- 
dress MRS. L. BARBIER, Camp Meeker, So- 
noma County, Cal. 



The Gables 



Sonoma county's ideal family resort, just opened 
to the public. Excellent table, supplied from 
our dairy and farm. Dancing, tennis, games. 
Bus to hot baths and trains daily at Verano sta- 
tion. Rates $2.50 per day, $12 and up per 
week. Open year round. Address H. P. MAT- 
THEWSON, Sonoma City P. O., Cal. 



Hotel Rowardcnnan 

OPEN ALL THE YEAR. 

New ownership, new management, new fea- 
tures. Golf, tennis, bowling, fishing, boating, 
swimming, clubhouse. Free garage. 

Rates $17.50 to $25 per week; $3 to $4 per 
day. 

Folders and information at Peck-Judah's, or 
address J. M. SHOULTS, Ben Lomond, Cal. 



:: RIVERSIDE RESORT :: 



Country home % mile from Guerneville; ideal 
spot; y z mile of river frontage; $8 to $12 per 
week. For particulars, MRS. H. A. STAGG, 
Proprietor, Guerneville, Sonoma county. 



COSMO FARM 

On the Russian River; electric lighted through- 
out. Rates $10 to $12 per week. For particu- 
lars see Vacation Book or address H. P. Mc- 
PEAK, P. O. Hilton, Sonoma Co., Cal. 



RIONIDO HOTEL 

Lawn Tennis, Croquet, Shuffle Board, Swings, 
Shooting Gallery, Box Ball Alleys, also 4,000 
square feet Dancing Pavilion, unsurpassed Bathing 
and Boating, and large social hall for guests. 
Hotel ready for guests. Rates, $12 per week. 
American plan. For reservations address RIO- 
NIDO CO., Rionido, Sonoma Co., Cal. 



Summer Resorts 

AT HOME, AT THE OLUB, OAFE OR HOTEL 

CASWELL'S COFFEE 

Always Satisfactory 
GEO. W. CASWELL COMPANY 

530-532-534 Folsom St. Phone Kearny 3610 

Write for samples and prices. 



CARR'S 



NEW MONTE 
RIO HOTEL 



NEAREST TO STATION AND RIVER. 

New modern hotel, first-class in every detail 
and equipped with every modern convenience. 
Swimming, boating, canoeing, fishing, launching, 
horseback riding and driving. Hotel rates $2 
day; $12 and $14 per week. Round trip, $2.80. 
good on either the broad or narrow gauge rail- 
roads. Sausalito Ferry. Address C. F. CARR, 
Monte Rio, Sonoma Co., Cal. 



HOTEL RUSTICANO 

The hotel is just a two-mintlte walk from the 
depot amongst the giant redwood trees. The 
amusements are numerous — boating, bathing, 
lawn tennis, bowling, daneing, nickelodeon, and 
beautiful walks. A more desirable place for a 
vacation could not be found. Rates, $9 to $12 
per week; rates to families. 

For folder, address L. B. SELENGER, Prop., 
Camp Meeker, Sonoma County, Cal. 



U. S. ARMY 



TENTS 

BLANKETS, COTS, HAMMOCKS 

SPIRO HARNESS CO. 

307 MARKET STREET, S. F. 
Write for Free Catalogue. 



Saturday, July 20, 1912.1 



THE WASP 



I? 



THE FIRST YEAR. 



By Josephine Martin, 

t fi Y/ll A 'I' would 

Y^/ rule in insure happiness the first 
year of married lit'*- * writes an 
earnest young bride, oul of the fulness of Uer 
heart. 

It would be impossible to give :i long sel 
of inics. And even if I were to write .'t 
propaganda for the young couples just start 
ing nit mi the road of life, oot one of you 
would read it. and, furthermore, not one oi 
you would obey. Besides, there should l" 1 oo 
sel of rules — rules don't make lives; princi- 
ples do, bul ii^i'1 rules, never. 

Yet. if I were able to help just one at all 
by advice during the first year's experience 
of marital happiness it. would be summed up 
in two words, which I should write in capi- 
tals: BE FRIENDS. Yes, be friends through 
thick and thin — friends, genuine, blessed 
friends, as long as you both do live. Do you 
think that it toe simple a creed, too meager 
an expression of devotion, too mild a form of 
your loyalty? Ah, that is where the mis- 
lake is often made! Friendship is the jet of 
affection which illumines the whole world. 
It is stronger than love, for it is less selfish, 
and it solves so many problems in a much 
shorter time — because it exacts less than love. 
Love is a powerful little god who extorts a 
tremendous rate of interest for all that he be- 
stows. Friendship is a more just encounter 
of the affections and indulges a more certain 
cordiality. 

During the first year of married life there 
are so many new pages to be read in the life- 
book. Often the paragraphs are confusing, 
and often, too, the words themselves are blur- 
red so that we cannot read them. Love whis- 
pers at times like these: "Ah, he does not act 
the lover, as he did!" or, "He never used to 
forget to bring me flowers, ' ' etc. In fact, 



A SKIN OF BEAUTY IS A JOY POREVEK 

DR. T. FELIX GOURAUD'S 

ORIENTAL CREAM 

Or Magical Beautlfier 

Removes Tan, Pimples, 
Freckles, Moth-Patch- 
es, Rash and &kin Dis- 
eases, and every blem- 
ish on beauty, and de- 
fies detection. It has 
stood the test of 65 
years, no other has, 
and is so harmless we 
taste it to be sure it is 
properly made. Accept 
no counterfeit of simi- 
lar name. The dis- 
tinguished Dr. L, A. 
Sayre said to a lady of iiie haut-ton (a patient) : 
"As you ladies will use them, I recommend 
'Gouraud's Cream' as the least harmful of all 
the Skin preparations." 




For Sale by All Druggists and Fancy Goods 

Dealers. 

Gouraud's Oriental Toilet Powder 

For infants and adults. Exquisitely perfumed. 
Relieves Skin Irritations, cures Sunburn and ren 
ders an excellent complexion. Price 25 cents by 
Mail. 

Gouraud's Poudre Subtile 
I Removes Superfluous Hair. Price $1.00 by Mail. 

IFERD. T. HOPKINS, Prop'r, 37 Great Jones 
St., New York City. 



lo> .- it ae a meddlesome rascal, who 

talks incessantly and makes mueb noise there- 
by. Love means well, and we declare that 
i is 1 he bighi si foi m ■<! i repression in all i lie 
; of human sentiment. So ii is. But aa 
i" oeping harmony in the home and bestow 
ing o Nobel peace prize— why, friendship can 
do more in the first year of married late to 
keep things fair and square than loye could 
<'\ er unravel in a I welvemonth. Friendship 
can make a home coBier. warmer and "more 
comfy" for the dear husband and wife than 
twenty-four Cupids flying about. Friendship 
is so secure and staple a joy! It is the secret 
ni' comradeship, which is the peari in married 
life. It is the best Louie in the market when 
things make as ill and Sick at heart. In fact, 
friendship is a panacea for every ailment 
uIi'm-Ii dares t<> creep into our happy homes. 

If a bride would remember to be the friend 
nf the man whom she weds, at all times, and 
under all conditions, not a ripple oi the thun- 
der-storm which the elements send would 
reach her world. If the other citizen would 
always bear in mind that the one best friend 
in all the world stands ready to extend the 
right kind of help right at his doorstep; if he, 
I say, could only lealize that his wife is and 
always will be his best friend in all the world, 
no difficulty would be too hazardous -to con- 
quer, no task loo tremendous for mastery. 

A wise philosopher gives us this: "The 
best way to have a friend is to be one." The 
higher the standard of friendship we demand 
in another, the higher the height: to which 
we must attain. 

What do we mean by this friendship be- 
tween man and woman, the husband and the 
wife'? Why, friendship in this relation is 
sublime selflessness which goes to add 
more and more happiness because of its un- 
selfishness. It tells the young wife that no 
matter what has happened, remember: He is 
my friend, and he means right. It tells the 
young husband: Here is a comrade whom I 
honor and respect because this friend under- 
stands me and knows that what I do is meant 
for the right. It takes two pairs of hands and 
clasps them so tightly together that nothing 
on this whole wide earth can part them. It 
cements every fact and fancy with a bond of 
fellowship and shouts defiance to anything 
that may come to annoy. Friendship does 
anything and everything to oil the machinery 
of the wheels of wedlock that they may run 
smoothly and without noise. Friendship is 
the bank stock which makes millionaires of 
the affections, adding principal and interest 
to its accumulating figures and dots. .Friend- 
ship is one of the greatest assets of the cor- 
poration known as the home. It will com- 
pound daily, for it is the Wall street- of the 
heart. 

So, dear little bride, if you are looking for 
the surest way to happiness in this blessed old 
world of ours, be the friend of the man whom 
you wed. Love him, adore him, if you must, 
but, to be happy forevermore, be his friend 
at all times and under all circumstances. 

And you, bread-winner, wise that you are, 
remember, the strongest, surest friend you 



can ''\ er hud in all this gray c inercial p d 

in which n ive and have our being is wait 

ing for you 'neat h i lie shade of \ o\i n 

library lamp. 



Might Is Right. 

When 1 differ from mother in si ■ little way 

And her reasons 1 manage to scatter, 

Why, then I ran always trust mothei to - 

•'Well, well, we won't argue the matter-. 1 ' 

4 ._ 

Men of fashion always have their shirts 
made to order, for they find that the ready-' 
made shirts are uncomfortable, ill-fitting and 
apt to give anything but a stylish effect. Such 
men patronize first-class establishments; such 
as that of I). C. Heger, 243 Kearny street, 
and US Geary street, where skilled workmen 
make shirts and underwear of perfect fit, the 
latest styles and the best of materials. A man 
is often judged by his linen, and good linen 
betokens the gentleman. 



WALTERS SURGICAL 


CO. 


SUEOIOAl INSTRUMENTS. 




808 Sutter St., S. P. Phon. Douglai 4011 



Sultan Turkish Baths 



624 POST STREET 
Special Department for Ladles 

Open Day and Night for Ladies and Gen 
tlemen. 
AI. Johnson, formerly of Sutter Street 
Hammam, has leased the Sultan Turkish 
Baths, where he will be glad to see his 
old and new customers. 



Blake, Mof f itt & Towne 

PAPER 



37-45 Tirst Street 

PHONES: STJTTEB 2230; J 3221 (Homo) 

Private Exchange Connecting all Depart men ta. 



LA GRANDE & WHITES 


LAUNDRY CO. 


Office and Works, 


234 12th St. 


Bet. Howard Sc 


Folaom Sta. 


SAN FRANCISCO, 


CALIFORNIA 


Phonea: Market 916 


Home M 2044. 



Eames Tricycle Co. 




Manufacturers of INVALID 
ROLLING CHAIRS for all 
purposes. Self - Propelling 
Tricycle Chairs for the dis- 
abled. INVALID CHAIRS. 
Wholesale and retail and 
for rent. 1714 Market St., 
San Francisco. Phone Park 
2940. 1200 S. Main Street, 
Los Angeles. 



\ c2£ a- 





^^^#^°^7 cc % j ^6 ^'^^s^^^M 



IN The Wasp's gallery of business men this 
week we present the picture of that well- 
known and public-spirited citizen. Cap- 
tain Dollar, who is striving earnestly to pro- 
mote trade between the Pacific Coast and 
China. Captain Dollar perceives clearly that 
there are vast opportunities in the line along 
which he advocates. The great drawback to 
all such movements in San Francisco is that 
our business men are disposed to treat com- 
merce and trade as if they were. matters of 
party polities. 

Just now the Chamber of Commerce is in a 
state of great excitement over the proposition 
to bar from use of the Panama Canal all 
ships owned by railroads. The first effect of 
this agitation will be to delay the opening of 
the canal. The Canadian Pacific Railroad, 
which is one of the most powerful and ag 
gressive railroad corporations in the world, 
and has done an immense amount of valuable 
work in the development of Canada, will 
fight strenuously against the measure. The 
Canadian Pacific owns steamers, and intends 
to make Vancouver a great seaport by the aid 
of the Panama Canal. Canada will claim 
equal rights with America under the Hay- 
Pauucefote treaty. 

The Wasp told its readers two years ago 
that England and Canada would insist that 
the Hay-Pauncefote treaty gave English ships 
equal rights with American in the use of the 
canal. No other American newspaper seemed 
to be aware that the treaty could be invoked 
for any such purpose. In Europe it was well 
known and discussed, and there isn 't the 
slightest doubt that England is now backed 
in her demands by the other great European 
maritime powers. England has probably 
sounded Prance, Germany, and Italy on the 
subject, and found them willing to back up 
her demand to have her shipping privileges 



protected as specified in the Hay-Pauncefote 
treaty. There will be some hot discussions 
before this matter is settled, for any treaty 
claim backed by France, Germany, and Italy 
cannot be pooh-poohed even by Uncle Sam. 
We do too much business with these countries. 




CAPTAIN DOLLAR 

A leading spirit in the revival of American 
shipping enterprise. 

Congress will, of course, dally with the mat- 
ter until after the Presidential election, and 
the opening of the canal may be delayed six 
months or a year. 




THE ANGLO & LONDON 
PARIS NATIONAL BANK 



SAN FRANCISCO 



Capital $4,000,000 

Surplus and Profits $1,600,000 

Total Resources $40,000,000 

OFFICERS: 

HERBERT FLEISHHACKER President 

SIG. GREENEBAUM Chairman of the Board 

J. FRIEDLANDER Vice-President 

C. F. HUNT Vice-President 

R. ALTSCHUL Cashier 

C. R. PARKER Assistant Cashier 

WM. H. HIGH Assistant Cashier 

H. CHOYNSKI Assistant Cashier 

G. R. BURDICK ABBietant Cashier 

A. L. LANGERMAN Secretary 



Schwerin Declined. 
It has been intimated that R. P. Schwerin, 
the efficient manager of the Pacific Mail 
Steamship Company, has been offered the 
presidency of the. Newport News shipyards. 
He declined it. Of course he did. Schwerin 
is a true Californian. Moreover, he is a man 
of education and possessed of talent. He 
knows that nature has made this the garden 
spot of the earth and is resolved to stick by 
it to the finish, despite all the curses that 
come upon us in the shape of Rudolph Spreck- 
elses, Meyer Lissners, Hiram Johnsons and 
Chet Rowels. Probaoly Schwerin realizes that 
a few years hence you would have to adver- 
tise in the "Lost and Found" column for a 
month to find any track of these unworthies 
that are now diligently engaged in running 
California. Thank heaven, the task is beyond 
their capacity! California withstood Dennis 
Kearney and his melodious entourage of the 
sandlot. It can withstand Hiram Johnson & 
Co., and still have a tuture, and a not distant 
one. 

■j* je <£ 
Seeing Too Far Ahead. 
The Newport News shipyards is the joint 
property of Henry E. Huntington of Los An- 
geles and Mrs. Arabella Huntington of New 
York, the widow of Collis P. Huntington. It 
was a part of the latter 's estate which was 
willed to them in equal shares. It is the 



Wells Fargo Nevada 
National Bank 

Of San Francisco 

Nevada Bank Building, 2 Montgomery Street. 
N. E. Corner of Market Street. 

Capital paid up $6,000,000.00 

Surplus and Undivided Profits ... .$5,055,471.11 



Total $11,055,471.11 

OFFICERS. 
Isaias W. Hellman, President 
I. W. Hellman, Jr., Vice Prea. 
F. L. Lipman, Viae Pret. 
James K. Wilson, Vice Prei. 
Frank B. King, Cashier 
W. McGavin, Assistant Cashier 
E. L. Jacobs, Assistant Cashier 
O. L. Davis, Assistant Cashier 
A. D. Oliver, Assistant Cashier 
A. B. Price, Assistant Cashier 

DIRECTORS. 
Isaias W. Hellman Hartland Law 

Joseph Sloss Henry Rosenfeld 

Percy T. Morgan James L. Flood 

F. W. Van Sicklen J. Henry Meyer 

Wm, F. Herrin A. H. Payson 

John C. Kirkpatrick Chas. J. Deering 

I. W. Hellman, Jr. James K. Wilson 

A. Chriateson F. L. Lipman 

! Wm. Haas 

ACCOUNTS INVITED. 
Prompt Service, Courteous Attention, Unexcelled 
Facilities. 
SAFE DEPOSIT VAULTS. 



Saturday, July 20, 1912. 



-THE WASP- 



19 



largest shipbuilding plan, in tin- United States 
and i* saiii to represent an investment of 

$20, t. Schwerin has always been high 

in tin' favor of the Buntingtons, and it was 
Collis P. who lirsf gave aim his position out 
here in 1893, on his resignation from Uncle 
Sam's Navy. Old Collis P. Huntington was 

i f tho farthest-seeing men of his day. 

He knew that Uncle Sam would not be con- 
tent tii remain the despised member of the 
shipping fraternity of i'"' world. :tud that 
some day a great shipbuilding yard like New- 
port News would In* a fine business asset. But 
the old man. like many a famous man of af- 
fairs, did not reckon accurately how Long i1 
would take the United States to become a 
power in the shipping business of the world. 
Mr died without getting anywhere near the 
realization of his hopes. In a local way that 
same thing happened to old Mayor Sutro, who 
took the money he made on the Comstock in 
Nevada and put it into land near the ocean 
beach and the Sutro Forest Heights. Less 
imaginative people thought that the old man 
was wild in his speculations, hut results show- 
ed that he merely saw much farther ahead 
than most people. The Sutro Forest today 
is the most desirable residence property in 
San Francisco, and the ocean beach property 
is worth ten times what it was rated when 



Smith-Tevis-Hanford 

Inc. 

MUNICIPAL AND 
CORPORATION 

BONDS 



57 Post St., 



San Francisco 



Mayor Si bought the laud in that vicinity 

by the hundreds "t acres. 

(Continued on pagi 



AN AMERICAN TRIUMPH. 
While th«' American athletes have been as- 

I suing the natives <>t Stockholm, American 

millionaires bave been amazing Londoners 

by their BOcial lavisbness. Anthony .1. I»iex- 

el's huge supper party at the Ritz was the 

talk of London. The invitation i-ards gave 
11 p. m. as the time for the commencement 
of the function. Betore supper the Russian 
dancers — KaKrsavina. Nijinsky and four oth- 
ers — entertained the guests. Some delightful 
songs were also given by MartiuelH, the Cov- 
ent Garden tenor. The surprise of the evening 
came after supper, when the American danc- 
ers, Vernon and Castle, appeared. They had 
been specially brought over from Paris. About 
twenty persons sat down to supper and quite 
300 witnessed the after-supper performance. 
It cost something handsome, let me tell you, 
to present such an after-supper program for 
millionaire Drexel 's guests, the list of whom 
included such impressive titles as the Duchess 
of Rutland, the Grand Duke of Mecklenberg, 
Prince Christopher of Greece, Lord and Lady 
Lonsdale, whom the German Kaiser himself 
once entertained in Berlin, the Due d 'Albe, 
and Princess Edmonde de Polignac, the Com- 
tesse Berckendorff, Lord Anglesey, Lord and 
Lady Derby, Lord ('olebrooke, the Duchess of 
Westminster, Lord and Lady Wolverton, the 
Duchess of Marlborough, Mrs. George Keppel, 
Lady Ripon, and foreign ambassadors and 
baronets in sucb profusion that tbey weren 't 
worth the trouble of counting. Of course, 
of fashionable Americans there was the pick 
at the Drexel affair — Mr. and Mrs. Bradley 
Martin, Lady Craven, Mrs. Ava Astor (in 
black), Mrs. Spendor Clay, Lady Paget, Mrs. 
George Cornwallis West, and others who shine 
by no reflected light. It will take" a great deal 
of hard cash and skillful manoeuvering for 
any other American millionaire to gather a 
congregation of titles and diamonds to his 
supper that will eclipse this supreme effort of 
Mr. Drexel to unite Fifth Avenue and May- 
fair. 



Many a reputation has been blasted without 
the aid of high explosives. 



ARMOR PLATE SAFE DEPOSIT VAULTS 

of Union Safe Deposit Company in building of 

UNION TRUST COMPANY OF SAN FRANCISCO 

Junction of Market and G'Farrell Streets and Grant Avenue 


LARGEST, STRONGEST and 


Jm 


pl|Sl|k MOST CONVENIENTLY 


ARRANGED SAFE DEPOSIT 






M[f WEST OF NEW YORK 


Boxes $4 per annum J 

Telephone 


ifi[_Vt- !3l 


JBlIU and upwards. 


^^ 


PP^*" Kearny 11. 



The German Savings 
and Loan Society 

SaviDgi <Th« German Bank) Commercial 

Incorporated 1868. 

626 California St., San Francisco. Oal 

( Member of the Associated Saving! Banki of 
San Francisco.) 

The following Branches for Receipt and Pay- 
ment of Deposits only: 

MISSION BRANCH, 2572 Mission street, 
between 21st and 22nd. 

RICHMOND DISTRICT BRANCH, 601 

Clement street, cor. 7th Ave. 

HAIGHT STREET BRANCH, 1456 Haight 
street, near Masonic Ave. 



June 29th, 1912. 
Assets .... $51,140,101.75 

Capital actually paid up in Cash . 1,000,000.00 
Reserve and Contingent Funds . 1,656,403.80 
Employees' Pension Fund . . 140,109.60 
Number of Depositors . . . 56,609 

Office Hours: 10 o'clock A. M. to 3 o'olock 
P. M., except Saturdays to 12 o'clock M. and 
Saturday evenings from 6:30 o'clock P. M. to 
8 o'clock P. M. for receipt of Deposits only. 



ON JULY 1st, 1912 
WE WILL MOVE OUR OFFICES 



410 MONTGOMERY ST. 



Telephone 
Sutter 3434 



Our Facilities for Handling 

Investment Securities 

Will be Considerably Increased 



ESTABLISHED 1858 

SUTRO & CO. 



Private Exchange 
Connecting All Depts. 



J. C. WILSON & CO. 



MEMBERS: 

NEW YORK STOCK EXCHANGE 
NEW YORK COTTON EXCHANGE 
CHICAGO BOARD OP TRADE 
STOCK AND BOND EXCHANGE, S. F. 

MAIN OFFICE — Mills Building, San Fran- 
cisco. 

BRANCH OFFICES — Los Angeles, San Die- 
go, Coronado Beach, Portland, Ore.; Seattle, 
Wash.; Vancouver, B. O. 

PRIVATE WIRE NEW YORK AND CHICAGO. 



20 



-THE WASP- 



[Saturday, July 20, 1912. 




OLD MAIDS 
DIARY • 



LANDS SAKE! I was so tired out after attending 
the Women's Biennial I had to take the rest 
cure at Monterey. Only its such a lovely place 
I woxildn't stay there a minute. No, not a second. 
Goodness me! Such a place for spooning bridal 
couples! They come in on every train. It's a sight to 
make any sensible woman sad. Is. there no hope for 
our sex? Must it always remain young women's ideal 
of life to pick out something that wears — garments 
distinctive of mental and Moral inferiority — I em- 
phasize moral — aud proceed to make the creature 
worse by catering to his vanity? Kisses and caresses. 
"Yes, darling" and "no, my honey dove, ' and ten 
chances to one they'll be throwing mutton stew at 
encli other within three months and spoiling the walls 
of their apartment house. 

Goodness me! I noticed a young couple there was 
so much about in the papers after their wedding. I 
was eating my dinner, when I thought some wicked 
boy fired off a Fourth of July bomb under my chair. 
It shook my nerves so I actually trembled for a 
week after. Heavens I 'Twas the youug bridegroom 
slamming the door after him to show he was one of 
the lords of creation. That's a trait of the sex. 1 
don't know what they did iu the stone age, when 
there were no doors to slam. I suppose huffy young 
husbands ran out of their eaves and kicked the bark 
off a tree, or threw rocks at one of them ancient 
monsters you see in museums and can't spell their 
names for the life of you. 

I peeked around to see if the bride was weeping 
when the young hubby nearly made kindling 'wood 
ef the door, sand's sake, she was going on eating 
her meal as if nothing had happened. Brides aint 
as weepy as when I was a girl. Thank goodness! 
That's a hopeful sign. When she couldn't e;it any 
more without spoiling her corsets, she went out and 



took Ethyl Gayleigh for an automobile ride in the 
bridegroom's fine touring- car, and left him to cool 
his heels on tue verandah. Goodness me, he was that 
mad I think he smoked thirty-three cigarettes in a 
minute and I was afraid he'd strangle himself or set 
the hotel on fire. I have a horror of fire. That's one 
reason I'll never be cremated if I can help it. Ethyl 
says I can't, and my relatives will burn me to a 
dead certainty to make sure of my money. The way 
that girl talks is just perfectly dreadful. 

When she came back with the bride, she said 
they had a lovely time, and fixed it up to serve 
papers on the bridegroom if he cuts up any more 
capers. Ethyl has been in the divorce court four 
times already, and isn't sure but she'll break the 
record before she's thirty. Oh, mercy! 

She says if she married a man for real, deep-down, 
true love — whatever that is^she might stand his 
bullying for three months or so, or eveu a few 
weeks longer. But under ordinary circumstances, 
she'd "chuck the lariat over his head right away, 
and yank him into the bull ring for Judge Graham 
to tag." Heavens! Such expressions! Where on 
earth does she get them? And she a graduate of 
old Miss Polishem's fashionable school, too. 

Land's sake, I had no idea the way women dress 
at all those fashionable resorts I've visited iu the 
last few weeks. My I Their husbands must own 
gold mines or be Uncle Sam's partners in the U. S. 
mint. I nearly fell off my chair one evening when 
young Mrs. Olive Branch came into the dining room 
in a cerise dress, slashed up and slashed down. 
Goodness me ! There was more slashes than silk. 
My eyes blinked like they do at one of them motion 
picture shows, when I actually saw her silk stock- 
ings most to her knee, through the slit in the skirt. 
' 'Doesn't she look perfectly stunning?' ' Ethly said 
to me, and if anybody was stunned worse than my- 
self they would have to be taken off in an ambu- 
lance. Ethyl said she'd get a dress just like it, only 
she'd have it a little lower on top. Mercy me 1 If 
she does, I'd like to be around and see how she ever 
gets into it. She might as well get into a pocket 
handkerchief. I told Ethyl if I had the making of the 
laws, I'd draw the line at dresses that expose your 
ankles. She called me a cruel old wretch, and said 
I'd be lynched and deserve it, for making the world 
hideous and throwing all the poor silk weavers out 
of work. It's people like me, she said, cause bloody 
revolutions. Goodness me, what an age we live in. 
It's perfectly dreadful. 

TABITHA TWIGGS. 



LEFT SHREVE & CO. 



Weil-Known Business Men Form an Important 
Jewelry Firm. 

George R. Shreve, who has been identified with 
the corporation of Shreve & Company for thirty 
years, has severed his connection with the well- 
known business house and identified himself with 
Treat & Eacret, jewelers and silversmiths, at 13G 
Geary street. 

Both George Shreve and Walter Treat were in 
the old firm of Shreve & Co, for many years, Mr. 
Shreve as President for fifteen years. Mr. Treat 
was with the firm for twenty-three years. 

The new corporation will no doubt be a strong 
one, following in the same line as the old firm, orig- 
inally established by George C. Shreve, the father of 
George. 



George R. Shreve 

Having severed his connection with 

Shreve and Co., announces that he 

is now associated with 

TREAT & EACRET 

Jewelers and Silversmiths 

* 136 GEARY STREET 



He asked a maiden for her hand. 

The maid, unruffled, calm, 
Merely replied to his demand: 

"You carry off the palm." 

♦ 

DON'T FORGET THIS when packing 
your suit-case for a week-end in the country. 
A box of Geo. Haas & Sons' delicious candies. 



Art & Refinement are displayed tn Tasteful Attire. 




-MAKERS OF- 



LADIES' GOWNS and FANCY 
COSTUMES 



420:SUTTER STREET. NEAR STOCKTON. 
Phone DOUGLAS 4964 



■ AN FRANCISCO. CAL. 



YOUR FAMILY 

SILVERSMITH 

Every family at some time or another 
needs something in the silverware line, or 
has articles to be repaired or matched, or 
jewelry to be fixed, and doubtless would 
be glad to know of an absolutely reliable 
house, where the charges are right. Such 
a house is the John O. Bellis [Silverware 
Factory, 328 Post street, San Francisco, 
where all wants of this nature can be sup 
plied at reasonable cost. The firm enjoys 
the confidence of some of the most promi 
nent families of the State. A feature of 
their business is the altering, resetting or 
entirely reconstructing of old family jew- 
elry into modern styles. It is wonderful 
what transformation can be wrought on 
your old trinkets at trifling expense with- 
out impairing any of their sentimental 
value. 

For staple goods, such as toilet articles, 
tableware, etc., this firm cannot be sur- 
passed on the Pacific Coast, while their 
trophy cups and presentation pieces made 
to order are without peers. A visit of iu 
spection at 328 Post St. (Union Square) is 
invited. 



PATRICK & CO. 

RUBBER STAMPS 

STENCILS. SEALS. SIGNS AND ETC. 
6S0 MARKET ST., - SAN FRANCISCO 



Neal Liquor Cure 
Three mosSutterSt 

DAY phone Franklin I098 

ADOPTED BY AUSTRALIAN GOVERNMENT 




o 






THE wedding of Miss Jenuie Crocker and Mal- 
colm Douglas Whitman on Tuesday, at St. 
Matthew b Church, San Mateo, transcended 
in Interest any inarriuge in California Bince tha 
late Hermann Oelrichs earns from New York i" 
claim Tesaie Pair as his bride, or since Sir Thumas 
Ih-sk.th sailed Into San EranoiBco liny in his yacht 
and espoused Flora Sharun, daughter of United 
States Senator William Sharun. 

Miss Crocker made u very attractive bride iu a 

w lorful creation of white oharmeuse and rose 

point. It is quite a coincidence that Miss Crocker 
should have been bridesmaid six years ago at Mr. 
Whitman's first wedding, when lie married Janettn 

McCook, 11 11 i i' the Charles li. Alexanders of 

New York. The first Mrs. Whitman died a couple 
Of years ago, and the widower's two little daughters 
came out hire fur the wedding with the Alexanders. 
With tin- two little Burton Hnrrison girls, the 
motherless nieces of Tuesday's bride, the little 
visitors were Die recipients of much attention. 

Mrs. Whitman (nee Crocker) is -devoted to chil- 
dren, and has practically reared her dead sister's 
little girls since their talented father, Congressman 
Francis Burton Harrison of New York, has married 
a second time. Mr. Whitman, who has won the 
hand and heart of our California ten-milliun-dollar 
heiress, is a Harvard graduate, and while not in the 
millionaire class by any means, is not at all poor. 
It has been commented on freely in the newspapers 
that he kept the tennis championship of America 
fur a number of years. He visited^ California seven 
Or eight years ago, and took part in a tennis tour- 
nament at Del Monte, defeating the Hardy boys 

Since his recent return to become the husband of 
Miss Croeker, he has played several sets at both 
l he Burlingame and California clubs. 

The matron of honor at Miss Crocker's wedding 
was Mrs. Walter S. Martin, the intimate friend of 
the bride's sister, and who was with her on the 
fateful day when Mrs. Burton Harrison was killed in 
an automobile accident in the East. 

The quartet of bridesmaids consisted of Miss Har 
riett Alexander and Miss Janetta Alexander, cousins 
of the bride, Miss Juliai Langhorne and Miss Mar- 
jorie Jusselyn. These girls were attired in gowns 
of white satin similar to the one worn by Mrs. Wal- 
ter Martin, but embellished with girdles of tur- 
quoise blue satin, instead of a touch of black at 
the shoulder. The bridesmaids' gowns were made 
witli the semi-flounce effect and trimmed with lace. 

In returning from the altar, the bridesmaids walk- 
ed two and two after the bride and bridegroom 
and the matron of honor, who was escorted by the 
best man, Harold Fitzgerald of New York. 

The ushers at this elaborate and now famous 
wedding were D. F. Webster of New York, C. F. 
Sheafe Jr. of New York, Frank Crocker, a cousin 
of the bride, and Oscar Cooper of San Francisco. 

The bride was given into the keeping of the 
bridegroom by her brother, Templeton Crocker, with 
whom she and her husband will sail on July 26th 
to the Hawaiian Islands, where they will stop at 
the great plantation of Mr. Templeton Crocker's 
father-in-law, Mr. William Irwin. 

Meantime Mr. and Mrs. Whitman will enjoy their 
honeymoon at the McCloud River Country Club, 
which they have rented, and which is an ideal spot 
for love and sport, both of which interest the happy 
couple. 

Following is the list of well-known people who 
were invited to Miss Crocker's wedding: 



Mr. and Mrs W. H. Crocker, Henry Orookor, 
Charles i !■■..! , . r, ,1,1,1,1,,,, Crocker. 

Mr. and Mi- Charles ". Alexander, Worthington 
Ames. Ettore Avemili, Lorenzo Avenuli, Horrj Bah- 
cock, Ward Barron, Hording Blanding, William B. 
Bourn, George Cndwalodi -. Horace Blanchard ChaBe, 
Arthur Chesebrougjh, Oscar' Cooper, Charles Temple 
ton Crocker, Morris Davis, Albert Dibhlee, Hasketh 
Derby, Joseph L. Donohue, Willard Drown, William 
Duncan, Henry Foster Dutton, S. W. Earle, Thomas 
Eastland, Ansel Boston, Charles 1'. Eel Is, Edward 
Byre, Perry Eyre, James L. Flood, James A. Folger, 
Alfred Ford, Richard Girvin, Charles Green, Bldridge 
Green, < 'hristian de Guighd, Lawrence Harris, Dow* 
nev .1. Harvey, Robin Uayne, l». Hewitt, William c,. 
Hitchcock, Louis Hobart, F. W. Hobbs, E. W. Hop- 
kins, Sniiiuel Hopkins, Timothy Hopkins, George H. 
Howard, Charles II. Josselyn, Henry Kiersted, Sam- 




MRS. EDWIN POHLMANN (nee Sherman) 

Whose honeymoon ended so tragically in the 
recent railroad disaster near Chicago. 

u el Knight, James P. Lgpgfiorne, Norman Livermoro, 
Alexander S. Lilley, Walter S. Martin, Athol Me 
Bean, Latham McMullin, Frederick McNear, S. F. B. 
Morse, William W. Morrow, Daniel Murphy, Eugene 
Murphy, William Ford Nichols, Robert Oxnard, Ira 
Pierce, Horace D. Pillsbury, Willis Polk, Hairy 
Poett, George A. Pope, Orville Pratt, Gerald Rath 
bone. Alexander B. Rutlierford, Laurance Irving 
Scott, Frederick W. Sharon, H. McD. Spencer, Augus- 
tus Taylor, W. Hinckley Taylor, Wm. H. Taylor Jr., 
Julian" ihorn, Joseph S. Tobin, William C. Von 
Fleet, Cyrus Walker, Edwin S. Webster, William 
Whitman, Benjamin Ide Wheeler, Mountford Wilson, 
L. L. Wormley, Baron and Baroness von Schroeder. 

Mr. and Mrs. George Shreve, B. B. Cutter, F. 
Beaver, Thomas Breeze, Frederick King, Homer 
King, E, J. McCutcheon, Talbot w a lker, Hayes 
Smith. 

Mesdames Phoebe Hearst, Charles O. Alexander, 
Edward Baron, M. E. BuIIard, James Cunningham, 
Joseph T. Crockett, Bislmrd Clover, Eleanor Martin, 
James Robinson, Henry William, Russell Wilson, 
Sarah Stetson WinslOW. 

Misses Jennie Blair, Jane Bullard, Helen Chese- 
brough, Edith Chesebroush, Ethel Crocker, Helen 
Crocker, Crosby, Eudora Clover, Ysonel Chase, Gen- 
evieve Cunningham, Evelyn Cunningham, Katherim- 



I' 'me, Jennie Eastun, Louise BaatOn, Cora .lane 

Flood, Augusta Foute, Alice Hager, Jennie Honker, 

Ethel llaveineyer, Vera HllvelneVer, Genevieve Kill-, 

Hazel King, Sara Moore, Ella Morgan, Sallie Maj 
nord, Marian Miller, Marian Newliali, Celio O'Con- 
nor, Cornelia O'Connor, Janel von Schroeder, Mabel 
Webster, Polly Webster, Frances Webster, Mabel 
Whitman, Marian Zcilo, Ruth Zeile, Enid Gregg, 
Ethel Gregg, Marian Croeker, Dorothy Baker, Edith 
Cutter, Alice Grimes, Alice Owens, Ruth Winslow. 

Rev. Edward Morgan, Bishup Furd Nichols. 

Messrs. Gordon Aruisby, Gordon Armsby, Judge 
J. V. Coffey, Charles Freeborn, Felton Elkins, Bar- 
nard Ford, Edward M. Greenway, Jerome Hart, 
Duane Hopkins, Dr. Morris llerlzstein, Stuart Low 
ery, Bertram Lord, Knox Maddox, William 11. New- 
hall, Richard Pease, J. M. Quay, Ralph Rainsford, 
Tracy Russell, Harry Scott, Prescott Scott, Henry 
T. Scott, Lieutenant Wilsun, Eric Wolsetey, Arthur 

Foster, Elliott McAllister, Hall McAllister. 



Reception in de Sabla Tea Garden. 

A reception was tendered Mrs. Philip Carpenter 
of New York and fifty other delegates on Saturday, 
ihe scene being the tea gurdeu of the Eugene de 
Sabla Estate. The President of the San Francisco 
district, Mrs. Percy Shumun, assisted by Mrs. Chas. 
E. Green, Mrs. Chas. F. McCarthy and Mrs. George 
C. Ross, welcomed the guests at the station and 
conveyed them by motor car to the Peninsula Hotel 
and through the beautiful estates of Miss Jennie 
Crocker, William H. Crocker, Charles W. Clark, 
Henry P. Bowie, Templeton Crocker, San Mateo 
Poto Cluo and the Burlingame Club. 

Mrs. Carpenter, the guest of honor, was formerly 
Miss Fannie Rouse, daughter of the first pastor of 
the Congregational church in San Mateo, over forty 
years ago. Among those present were: Mrs. Philip 
Carpenter, Mrs. Brown, Mrs, J. W. Orr, Mrs. B. F. 
Waters, Mrs. Lovell White, Mrs. Norman Martin, 
Mrs. Goddard, Mrs. E. S. Karns, Mrs. A. A. Fowler, 
Mrs. Grimes, Mrs. Wallace, Mrs. Stemple, Mrs. 
Mason, Mrs. Laura McBride Powers, Mrs. Francisco, 
Mrs. F. Sanborn, Mrs. King, Mrs. Osborne, Mrs. 
John Jury, Mrs. Charles M. Morse, Mrs. James P. 
Brown, Mrs. John H. Doane, Mrs. S. D. Merk, Mrs. 
Florence Richmond, Mrs. Robert Potter Hill, Mrs. 
Arthur Cornwall, Mrs. "Wallace Pond, Mrs. I. Low- 
enberg, Mrs. Robert Wallace, Mrs. Frona Wait Col- 
burn and Mrs. Kathleen Byrne. 



Friends of Mrs. Cecil Marrack will be glad to 
know of her return to the city. Her arrival was 
noted when the Sherman reached this port from 
Manila. Mrs. Marrack will live at the Presidio, 
with her father, Colonel Lee Febiger, of the United 
States Army, who has brought, his widowed daughter 
back to San Francisco. It is some time since the 
unfortunate automobile accident at Ross, which 
caused the death of the Rev. Cecil Marrack, yet the 
sad affair is still fresh in the memories of those 
who knew the Reverend gentleman and his wife. 
They both commanded the love and respect of a 
long list of friends, among whom the widow will 
find many warm hearts ready to greet her here 
"at home." 



Mrs. C. E. Maude, who has been spending the 
summer weeks at Del Monte, gave an attractive 
dinner-dance at Pebble iieach Lodge a short time 
ago. It was a novel affair, replete with interesting 
surprises. Among the guests who enjoyed Mrs. 
Maude's hospitality were: Mr. and Mrs. JacK Spreck- 
els, Mrs. John Breckenbridge, Mr. and Mrs. Vincent 
Whitney, Mrs. Parker Whitney, Mr. and Mrs. H. 
M. Spencer, Miss Katherine Redding, Miss Elise 
Clark, Prescott Scott, Vincent Bunker, Charlie Cor- 
bet,, Clinton la Montaigne, Wilberforce Williams. 



22 



-THE WASP- 



The many friends of Cnptain and Mrs. Augustine 
Mclntyre are extending them hearty greetings upon 
their return from the Philippines. ivlrs. Mclntyre 
was Miss Jane Sweigert of this city, before her 
marriage. 

Mrs. Eleanor Martin is entertaining Miss Janet 
von Schroeder, who will remain in the city until 
after the Crocker wedding. Last Saturday evening 
Mrs. Martin gave a dinner in compliment to Mr. 
and Mrs. Whitman of Brookline, the parents of 
Mr. Malcolm Whitman, fiance of Miss Crocker. 

Mrs. William H. Crocker, the Misses Ethel and 
Helen and William W. Crocker, Jr., have returned 
from abroad to attend the Crocker wedding. At the 
recent Derby meet in England, Mrs. Crocker was 
among the exclusive American set invited to sit 
within the King's, in closure. 

Mr. and Mrs. Robert Hayes Smith and son are 
at Del Monte. 

Mr. and Mrs. Clinton E. Worden are at Del 
Monte. Mrs. A. 'J. Towne has joined the Wordens ■ 
at this fashionable resort- 
Miss Ha Biver, who is well known in the dram- 
atic circles of Oakland, where her talent has been so 
efficient in the classical plays, has returned from 
Silver City, New Mexico. Miss Biven is exceeding- 



Jules Restaurant 

Special Lunches 50c. or a la Carte 

Ladies' Grill and Rooms for Parties 

REGULAR FRENCH DINNER WITH 

WINE, $1.00. 

Vocal and Instrumental Music. 

MONADNOCK BUILDING 

Next to Palace Hotel 

Phone Kearny 1812. 

All Cars Pass the Door. Elevator Service. 



ftOBEY'S GRILL 

^^ Formerly of SUTTER ST. 
Our Specialties 

OYSTERS, TERRAPIN, CRAB STEW 
STEAKS, CHOPS 

140 UNION SQUARE AVENUE 

1. J. DcGRUCHY, Msn.ier Phone DOUGLAS 5683 



Phones: — Sutter 1572 
Home 0-3970 
Home 0-4781 Hotel 



Cyril Arnanton 
Henry Rittman 
O. Lahederne 



New Delmonico's 

(Formerly Maison Tortoni) 

Restaurant and Hotel 
NOW OPEN 

Best French Dinner in the City with Wine, $1.00 

Banquet Halls and Private Dining Rooms 

Music Every Evening 

362 GEARY STREET, - SAN FRANCISCO 




eltfUU/l' 



HOTEL AND RESTAURANT 

54-56 Ellis Street 

Our Cooking Will M«et Your Taste. 
Prices Will Please Yon. 



WAIST OF EFFORT. 



ly popular among the talented set in the bay city. 
Miss Ila's health has improved wonderfully, as her 
rosy countenance assures. 

Mr. and Mrs. John P. Jackson sailed 
Tenyo Maru Friday, for Japan. 



the 



and her niece, Miss Ethel Shorh, 
Stockholm to enjoy the Olympic 



H. Kreulzman ana so 



n are touring 



Miss Wilson 
have gone to 
games. 

•Dr. and Mrs. 
Holland. 

Miss Rosina Nieto has been summering at Santa 
Cruz, 

Mrs. George E. Schaefer, a charming bride from 
Honolulu, sister of Mrs. J. Charles Green, has 
been visiting friends in San Francisco. 

Mr. and Mrs. Drummond McGavin are attending 
the Olympiad in Stockholm. The McGavins will 
remain at their home in Spitzenberg, where the 
large mining interests of Mr. McGavin are centered. 

Mr. and Mrs. Clement Tohin, Mrs. Charles W. 
Clark, Mr. and Mrs. Louis Monteagle and their 
two sons, Paige and Kenneth, are among the San 
Franciscans in Stockholm. 

Mrs. Kathryn Spinney and her daughter, Miss 
Helen Spinney, are in Pacific Grove. 

Judge and Mrs. N. P. Ohipman of Sacramento 
are visiting Mrs. William Hood at her home on 
Broadway. 

Mrs. Albert Niblack, wife of the American at 
tache to Berlin, left San Francisco Thursday to join 
her husband, Commander Niblack, TJ. S. N. Mrs. 
Niblack was formerly Miss Mary Harrington. 

Mrs. William Leahy, wife of Commander Leahy, 
V. S. N., is in San Francisco visiting her mother. 

Mrs California Newton and daughter, Miss 

Suzette, are at their summer home on the Russian 
river. Miss Newton is exceedingly popular among 
the younger set and the Newton home is always a 
chosen rendezvous for the merry young people. 



VISIT THE 



Cafe Jupiter 



140 COLUMBUS AVENUE 

(Formerly Montgomery Avenue) 

SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 

HOME OF MODERN BOHEMIA 



WHERE YOD WILL FIND AN 

ARTISTIC ATMOSPHERE AND 

HIGH-CLASS ENTERTAINMENT 

THE MOST UP-TO-DATE TABLE D'HOTE 

DINNER 

In Town SI. 00, from 6 to 9 P. M. 

JACK McMANUS, Manager 

Reserve your table in time — Phone Douglas 2910 



[Saturday, July 20, 1912. 




TECHAU TAVERN 

Cor. Eddy and Powell Streets. 

Phones, Douglas 4700: O 3417 



A High-Class 

Family Cafe 



A DAINTY LUNCH served gra- 
tuitously to ladies every day during 
shopping hours, between 3:30 and 5 p. m. 



Under the management of A. C. Morrison 



The New 

POODLE DOG 






\ iO 


. i 




HOTEL and RESTAURANT 

WILL REMAIN AT CORNER 

POLK and POST 

SAN FRANCISCO. 
PHONES: Franklin 2960; Homo O 6706. 



J. B. PON J. BERGEZ O. MAILHEBUAD 
C. LALANNE L. OOUTARD 



Bergez-Frank's 

OLD 

POODLE DOG 

CO. 

Hotel and 
Restaurant 

Music and Entertainment Every Evening. 

• 415-421 BUSH STREET 

(Above Kearny) 

SAN FRANCISCO, OAL. 

Exchange, Douglas 2411. 




24 



-THE WASP- 



[Saturday, July 20, 1912. 



"The Mikado" at the Cort. 

AT THE Cort Theater, beginning Sunday 
evening, the New York Casino Star 
Cast, which includes De Wolf Hopper, 
Blanche Duffield, Eugene Cowles, George Mac- 
Failane, Kate Condon, Arthur Aldridge, Viola 
Gillette, Arthur Cunningham, Aliee Brady and 
Louise Barthel, are to commence their long- 
heralded season, limited to four weeks, of 
revivals of Gilber & Sullivan's most popular 
works, with an elaborate production of "The 
Mikado' 1 the bill for the entire first week. 

It was two years ago that Messrs. Shubert 
and vVilliam A. Brady, with so many well- 
known musical stars at their disposal, came 
to the conclusion that time was ripe for a 
revival of those Gilbert & Sullivan operettas, 
which had come to be regarded as classics, 
was imminent, provided they were properly 
cast and presented, with that same religious 
adherence to the traditions laid down by the 
authorities themselves in their first produc- 
tion. That these managers reckoned well is 
a matter of record, as with every revival was 
established the fact that the wit and satire 
of Gilbert and the melodic charm and vivacity 
of Sullivan 's music still preserved their po- 
tency to the fullest degree, just the same as 
they did twenty-five years ago, when they 
were the joy and pride of two nations. 



Standing Room at Pantages. 

BREATHING room only is in demand at 
the Pantages Theater this week, so great 
is the interest taken in the thirteen 
spirited rounds of the Wolgast-Rivers contest 
of the Fourth of July, faithfully reproduced 
in motion pictures, and the uniformly excel 
lent vaudeville entertainment, including "A 
Night in the Edelweiss," a jolly singing and 
dancing interlude, with ten clever musical 
comedians; Clark and Verdi, the very original 
and amusing Italian comedians; Bond Morse, 
the droll "Man from Nowhere"; Carl Rosine, 
in his mystifying magical exhibition,' and 
other good features. 

On Sunday there will be the usual change 
yf bill, one of the many features being Jules 
B. Simon's Seven Aviator Girls, nifty singers 
and dainty dancers, headed by Miss Carlie 
Lowe, well known in musical comedy circles 
"Happy's Millions" is the title of a bright 
little sketch to be presented by William Mor 
row, Donna Harrie and their tiny company, 
and said to abound in cleverness from begin- 
ning to end. A feature of especial interest to 
San Francisco will be the first appearance up- 
onthe vaudeville stage of Estelle Allison 
well known in local society circles, and an 



CPJ£ 



LEADING THEATRE 

Ellis and Mart-l 
Phone Sutter 2460. 



Last Time Tonight 

Paul J. Rainey's 

AFRICAN HUNT PICTURES. 



Beginning Tomorrow (Sunday) Night 
THE NEW YORK CASINO STAR CAST: 
De Wolf Hopper 
Blanche Dufneld Geo. MpcFarlane 

Kate Condon Arthur Ald"idge 

Viola Gillette Arthur Cunningham 

Alice Brady Louise Barthel 

Eugene Cowles 
In a Revival Festival of 
GILBERT & SULLIVAN'S 
Greatest Comic Operas, 
Presenting for the First Week 

"THE MIKADO" 

2nd Week— "H. M. S. Pinafore," with Produc- 
tions of Patience and ' 'The Pirates of Pen- 
zance" to follow. 



Prices — 50c. to $2.00. 



actress of unusual ability. She will present 
her own musical problem playlet, "The Ques- 
tion," staged in splendid style with beauti- 
ful scenic accessories, and with most capable 
support. "The Question" is expected to 




PRESS WOODRUFF. 

An apostle of mirth and a banisher of sad- 
ness. 

c-eate something of a sensation, as it is very 
out of the ordinary. Another feature that 
the Pantages management points to with pride 
; s the first American appearance of Lucia 
Lottie Collins, the famous English singing 




CYRUS BROWNLEE NEWTON. 

Partner of Press Woodruff on a tour of the 
Pacific Coast. 

comedienne, and daughter of Lottie Collins, 
who brought the success "Ta-ra-ra-boom- 
de-ay JJ to America ana first made that song 
famous in this country. Miss Collins does 
not have to depend upon her mother's reputa- 



tion, however, as she is an artist of recogniz- 
ed ability and has made great hits in the prin- 
cipal English and Australian music halls. 
Many hearty laughs should be provided by 
Si Jenks, late of the "Get-Rich-Quick Wal- 
lingford" company, and a Yankee monologuist 
of hilarious reputation. Max Witt's "Four 
Harmonious Girls," dainty and pretty singers 
and instrumentalists, will present a charming 
act that is beautifully staged and costumed, 
and the Ausonia Trio, Olympic gladiators, will 
furnish the dumb portion of the program with 
a sensational Herculean performance. Sun- 
light Pictures, showing several surprises, will 
complete a varied and entertaining bill. 

At the Orpheum. 

THERE will be seven new acts in next 
week's bill, and chief anrong them will 
be "The Drums of Oude, " a one-act 
drama, produced and presented by David Be- 
lasco. Its author is Austin Strong, and it 
packed the Duke of York Theater, London, for 
two years. The Chicago press unanimously 
pronounced "The Drums of Oude" a positive 
dramatic success, and the Morning American 
in that city of May 10th of this year said: 
"Vaudeville these 'Says is more than merely 
interesting, it is important. 'When David 
Belasco trains his stage genius upon the little 
brother of the legitimate, calls to his aid play- 
ers rich in power and understanding, imports 
his properties from India, and gives us a 
drama like "The Drums of Oude," whicn 
leaves the aiiditor in a quiver and sends him 
forth awed and spellbound, then this 1912 
kind of vaudeville must be reckoned with 
seriously. Vaudeville has never known so per 
feet, so artistic, so faithful and so compelling 
an act. The daring of the expert makes it 
striking in its departure. The scene of the 
drama takes place in the tower of an ancient 
palace in India, where a few British soldiers, 
with their women folks, are preparing for the 



Cr-ARRtYA. bet.STOCWON &• POiNtVA. 

SAFEST AND MOST MAGNIFICENT THEATEK 
IN AMERICA. 

WEEK BEGINNING THIS SUNDAY AFTERNOON 
Matinee Every Day 
A GREAT NEW SHOW I 
"THE DRUMS OF OUDE," a one-act drama, pre- 
sented by Austin Strong and produced by DAVID 
HELAS.rO ; LEW SULLY, the Popular Minstrel; 
FOUR FLORIMONDS, Jugglers on Free Ladders; 
STEIN, HUME and THOMAS; SEALBY & DUC 
LOS: BERT TERRELL; EUGENE TRIO; NEW 
DAYLIGHT MOTION PICTURES. Last week of 
MAY' TULLY & CO., in "THE BATTLE CRY OF 
FREEDOM." 

Evening Prices, 10c, 25c, 50c, 75c Box Sents, $1 
Mnlinee Prices (Except Sundays and Holidsysf 
10c, 25c. 50e. 

PHONES DOUGLAS 70. HOME C 1670 




Market Street, Opposite Mason. 
Week of Sunday, July 21. 
7 AVIATOR GIRLS 
with CHARLIE LOWE: WILLIAM MORROW Ss 
CO., presenting "Happy's Millions;" AUSONIA 
TRIO, Olympic Gladiators; ESTELLE ALLISON 
& CO., in her musical playlet, "The Question:' 1 
LUCIA LOTTIE COLLINS, English Singing Com- 
edienne; SI JENKS, Y'ankee Comedian; Max Witt's 
4 HARMONIOUS GIRLS; SUNLIGHT PICTURES, 



Mat. Daily at 2:30. Nights, 7:15 and 9:15. Sun. 
and Holidays, Mats, at 1:30 and 3:30. Nights, 
Continuous from 6:30. 



Prices — 10c, 20c and 80c 



Saturday, July 20, 1912.] 



THE WASP 



25 



i ing of the Sepoye. Ae waa the case all 

over India daring this terrible period of Brit 
ish history, the Sepoys have taken advai 
at il"' absence of the regiment usually Bta 

tiniu'il ;il tin' garrison, ;iud imk-ss it ri'turns 

in time tiii'ir i- imt one thing left for the be- 
seiged soldiers to do, and thai is to blow up 
tin- powder magazine beneath their feet and 
thus save the women from the unspeakable 
fata which will bo theirs if they fall iuto the 
bands of the fanatical and barbarous Hindu 
stani. The story is weirdly thrilling, ami every 

t mi'ii! i> tense with dramatic suspense, and 

when tin' climax i tea with one of the most 

impressive battle scones ever created by the 
masterly combination of artistically usedstage 
effects an. I the power of suggestion, an 
appeal is made to the enthusiasm of the audi 
.■mo that ii finds it impossible to resist. Tito 
cast includes E. J. Bateliffe, one of the finest 
leading acinrs on the American stage, Jach 
Standing, Harry Hose, John Thomson, W. n. 
Phillips, II. II. McCoUum and Eleanor Scott 
I 'Estelle. 

Lew Sully, the popular minstrel, will appear 
in an original conceit entitled "Feminine 
Pads," in which he will introduce his famous 
burlesque of Alice Lloyd. 

The Four Florimonds, a family of foreign 
equilibrists and jugglers on the free ladders, 
will make their first appearance here. 

Stein. Hume and Thomas, who style them- 
selves "The Melodious Merry-makers," also 
come next week. They are a trio of splendid 
soloists, who sinji respectively tenor, baritoue 
and bass. They are also clever comedians, 
and their travesty on "II Trovatore" fur- 
nishes a laughable finale to their act. 

Mademoiselle Sealby and Monsieur Duclns, 
two fatuous French dancers and the creators 



Market Street Stables 




New Clasa A concrete building, recreation 
yard, pure air and sunshine. Horses 
boarded $25 per month, box stalls $30 
per month. LIVERY. Business and 
park rijrs and Baddle horses. 



C. B. DREW, Prop. 

1840 Market Street. San Francisco 

PHONE PAEK 263. 



CuntrariB made with Hotels and Restaurant* 

Special attention given to Family Trade 

ESTABLISHED 1876. 

THOMAS MORTON & SON 

Importers and Daalcm in 

COAL 

N. W. Cor. EDDY & HYDE, San Francisco. 
Phone Franklin 897. 



of the "No Clasp Waltz,' 1 will be seen for 
tin- first time in this city. Their dancing is 
described as the perfection of grace and > 
elty. 

Bert Terrell, the Dutch character vocalist, 
will also appear. lie has two voices, and is 
thus equipped for a little grand opera all by 
himself. 

The Eugene Trio, ih.ring and clever gym- 
nasts, will contribute a comedy bar acl which 
is remarkable for it s speed and originality. 

May Tully will have the distinction of being 
the only holdover, anu will repeal her Reno, 
Ne\ ada, divorce skit. "The Battle Cry >>t 
Freedom, which is scoring a tremendous hit. 



THE i elcbrated Mountain Ash Welsh I Shoir, 
recently iippranng at tlio Orpheum, are 
rehearsing Dr. 11. J. Stewart 's prize 
composition, "Tin- s.>ng of the Camp," and 
will shortly produce it. Mr. Glyndur Rich- 
ards, the conductor, is enthusiastic in praise 
of the work. The first local performance of 
"The Song of the Camp" will be by the 
Luring Club, in Oetober. 



Players' Club. 
At a recent meeting of the Players' Club the 
following members were elected as I lie powers to 
guide executive work: Reginald Trovers. Director; 
Arthur J, Owen, President; L. H. Daurauer, First 
Vice-President ; Mrs. 0. A. Meusdorffer, Second 
Vice-President ; K: S: Knudson, Secretary; Mrs. 
Jeannette Alferitz, Treasurer; Mrs. U. Grunt Burt- 
lett, Assistant. The Players.' Club is organized for 
the purpose of producing legitimate drama, and the 
splendid work of the past year bespeaks further 
triumphs. It has the encouragement and support 
<>i" many prominent society lenders, writers and lead- 
ing musicians. Among those interested in the Play- 
ers.' Club are Mrs. Phoebe Hearst, Mrs. Eleanor Mar- 
tin, A. W. Scott Jr., George H. Hooks, Mrs. James 
Rolph Jr., Mrs. Peter Cook, Mrs. James C. Jor- 
dan, E. P. Heald, Dr. P. A. Bill, Mrs. I. Magnin, 
Mrs. Ella Sexton, Daniel O'Connell, Mrs. A. V. 
Baker, Mrs. C. Paul Haag, and Mrs. R. H. Postle- 
thwaite. The first performance for associate mem 
bers will be given by the Players' Club in October. 
The play, by a well-known author, will be new to 
San Francisco, and in its production the full strength 
of the club will bo required. 



FINANCIAL. 

(Continued from page 19.) 

Better Feeling Prevails. 

Every day finds the feeling growing strong- 
er that we are on the eve of a period of great 
prosperity in San Francisco. Pacific Gas and 
Electric jumped to 65% from 61% this week 
on a ninety-day transaction. Giant Powder 
stock sold this week at 100, establishing a 
high record in price. Hawaiian Commercial 
was raised to 44 on Wednesday, but no offers 
to sell at that figure were received. 

The real estate market is feeling the effect 
of the hopeful spirit prevailing in all lines. 
Several important deals are under considera- 
tion. Building operations are .remarkably 
active. 

THOUGHTLESSNESS 

Means spendthrifts, dependence, disasters, dis- 
appointments. Better join the ranks of the 
careful saver in the Continental Building and 
Loan Association. 

The CONTINENTAL BUILDING AND 
LOAN ASSOCIATION, Market street, at Gold- 
en Gate avenue, can be of assistance to you in 
getting the home. 

EDWARD SWEENEY, President. 

WM. CORBIN, Secty. and Gen. Mgr. 



SUMMONS. 

IN THE SUPERIOR COURT OF THE STATE OF 
California, in and for the City and County of San 
Franciscu. — Dept. No. 5. 

EUGENE .J. CRELLER, Plaintiff, vs. All persona 
claiming any interest in or lien upon the real prop 
erty herein described or any part thereof.Defend- 
ants. — Action No. 32.212. 

The People of the State of California, to all per- 
suns claiming any interest in, or lien upon, the real 
property herein described or any part thereof, De- 
fendants, greeting: 

You are hereby required to appear and answer 
the complaint of EUGENE O. CRULLER, plaintiff, 
filed with the Clerk of the above entitled Court and 
County, within three monthB after the first publi- 
cation of this summons, and to set forth what in- 
terest or lien, if any, you have in or upon that cer- 
tain real property, or any part thereof, situated in 
the City and County of San Francisco, State ol 
California, and particularly described as follows: 

FIRST : Beginning at a point on the northerly 
line of Oak Street, distant thereon one hundred and 
ten (110) feet easterly from the corner formed by 
the intersection of the northerly line of Oak Street 
with the easterly line of Octavia Street, and running 
thence easterly and along said line of Oak Street 
twenty-seven (27) feet, six (6) inches; thence at a 
right angle northerly one huudred and twenty (120) 
feet to the southerly line of Hickory Avenue; thence 
westerly along said line of Hickory Avenue twenty 
seven (27) feet, six (6) inches; and thence at a 
right angle southerly one hundred and twenty (120) 
feet to the point of beginning; being part of WEST 
ERN ADDITION BLOCK Number 147. 

SECOND: Beginning at a point on the southerly 
line of Pine Street, distant thereon thirty (30) feet 
easterly from the corner formed by the intersection 
of the southerly line of Pine Street with the easier 
ly line of Presidio Avenue, and running thence east 
erty and along said line of Pine Street thirty-One 
(31) feet, five (5) inches; thence at a right angle 
southerly eighty- seven (87) feet, six (6 inches 
thence at a right angle westerly thirty-one (31 ) 
feet, five (5 ) inches ; and thence nt a right angle 
northerly eighty-seven (87) feet, six (6) inches I" 
the point of beginning; being part of WESTERN 
ADDITION BLOCK Number 620. 

THIRD: Beginning at a point on the northwest- 
erly line of Howard Street, distant thereon two hun- 
dred and twenty- five (225) feet southwesterly from 
the corner formed by the intersection of the north 
westerly line of Howard Street with the southwest- 
erly line of Sixth Street, and running thence south- 
westerly and along said line of Howard Street fifty 
(50) feet; thence at a right angle northwesterly 
ninety (90) feet; thence at a right angle northeast- 
erly fifty (50 1 feet; and thence at a right angle 
southeasterly ninety (90) feet to the point of be- 
ginning. 

FOURTH : Beginning at the corner formed by 
the intersection of the southerly line of Union 
Street with the westerly line of Polk Street, and 
running thence southerly and along said line of Polk 
Street thirty (30) feet; thence at a right angle 
westerly seventy (70) feet; thence at a right angle 
northerly thirty (30) feet to the southerly line of 
Union Street; and thence easterly and along said 
line of Union Street Beventy (70) feet to the point 
«f beginning; being part of WESTERN ADDITION 
BLOCK Number 46. 

You are hereby notified that, unless you so ap- 
pear and answer, the plaintiff will apply to the 
Court for the relief demanded in the complaint, to- 
wit, that it be adjudged that plaintiff is the owner 
of said property in fee simple absolute; that his 
title to said property be established and quieted; 
that the Court ascertain and determine all estates, 
rights, titles, interests and claims in and to said 
property, and every part thereof, whether the same 
be legal or equitable, present or future, vested or 
contingent, and whether the same consist of mort- 
gages or liens of any description; that plaintiff 
recover his costs herein and have such other and 
further relief as may be meet in the premises. 

Witness my hand and the seal of said Court, this 
10th day of May, A. D. 1912. 
(SEAL) H. I. MULCREVY, Clerk. 

By J. F. DUNWORTH, Deputy Clerk. 

The first publication of this summons was made 
in "The Wasp" newspaper on the 18th day of May, 
A. D. 1912. 

The following persons are said to claim an inter 
est in, or lien upon, said property adverse to plain- 
liff: 

MOSES ELLIS', JR., Framingham, Massachusetts. 

KATE ELLIS, Framingham, Massachusetts. 

MARTHA E. BEAN, Framingham, Massachusetts. 

MARY F. ELLIS, Framingham, Massachusetts. 

GRACE E. HALL, Chicago, Illinois. 

PERRY & DAILEY, Attorneys for Plaintiff, 105 
Montgomery Street, San Francisco. GARRET W. 
McENERNEY and GEORGE H. MASTICK, of Coun- 
sel. 



For Health, Strength 

DAMIAINA BITTERS 

Naber, Alfs & Brune, Agents. 
635 Howard St., opp. new Montgomery St. 



26 



-THE WASP 



[Saturday, July 20, 1912. 



NOTICE. 

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN THAT JOHN C. 
LEMMER is transacting a general boiler, tank and 
iron business in this State under the name of CALI- 
FORNIA BOILER WORKS; that his principal place 
of business is the City and County of San Francisco, 
State of California; that he is the sole owner of 
said business, and his full name is JOHN C. LEM- 
MER, and he resides at 1730 Pierce Street, in the 
Citv and County of San Francisco, State of Califor- 
nia JOHN C. LEMMER. 

STATE OF CALIFORNIA, , 
City and County of San Francisco, 
ss. 

On this 8th day of July, in the year one thousand 
nine hundred and twelve, before me, Matthew Brady, 
a Notary Public in and for the City and County of 
San Francisco, State of California, residing therein, 
duly commissioned and sworn, personally appeared 
JOHN C. LEMMER, known to me to be the person 
whose name is subscribed to the within instrument, 
and acknowledged to me that he executed the same. 

In witness whereof, I have hereunto set my hand 
and affixed my official seal at my office in the City 
and County of San Francisco, State of California, 
the day and year in this certificate first above writ- 
ten. 
(SEAL) MATTHEW BRADY, 

Notary Public. 
In and for the City and County of San Francis- 
co, State of California. 

VOGELSANG & BROWN, Attorneys at Law, 20 
Montgomery Street, San Francisco, Cal. 

SUMMONS. 

EN THE SUPERIOR COURT OF THE STATE OF 
California, in and for the City and County of San 
Francisco — Dept. No. 4. 

GIUSEPPE DIRESTA, Plaintiff, vs. All persons 
claiming any interest in or lien upon the real prop- 
erty herein described or any part thereof, Defend- 
ants. — Action No. 32,371. 

The People of the State of California, to all per- 
sons claiming any interest in, or lien upon, the real 
property herein described or any part thereof, De- 
fendants, greeting: 

You are hereby required to appear and answer the 
complaint of GIUSEPPE DIRESTA, plaintiff, filed 
with the Clerk of the above entitled Court and 
County, within three months after the first publica 
tion of this summons, and to set forth what interest 
or lien, if any, you have in or upon that certain 
real property, or any part thereof, situated in ihe 
City and County of San Francisco, State of Calif or 
nia, and pnrHcularly described as follows : 

Beginning at a point on the easterly line of Octavia 
Street, distant thereon thirty-one (31) feet, three (3.j 
inches southerly from the corner formed by the in- 
tersection of the easterly line of Octavia Street with 
the southerly line of Lombard Street, and running 
thence southerly and along said line of Octavia 
Street twenty-five (25) feet; thence at a right angle 
easterly one hundred (100) feet; thence at a right 
angle northerly twenty-five (25) feet; and thence at 
a right angle westerly one hundred (100) feet to 
the point of beginning; being part of WESTERN 
ADDITION BLOCK Number 170. 

You are hereby notified that, unless you so appear 
and answer, the plaintiff will apply to the Court for 
the relief demanded in the complaint, to- wit, thai 
it be adjudged that plaintiff is the owner of Baid 
property in fee simple absolute; that his title to 
said property be established and quieted ; that the 
Court ascertain and determine all estates, rights. 
titles, interests and claims in and to said property, 
and every part thereof, whether the same be legal 
or equitable, present or future, vested 6r contingent, 
and whether the same consist of mortgages or liene 
of any description ; that plaintiff recover his costs 
herein and have such other and further relief as 
may be meet in the premises. 

Witness ray hand and the seal of said Court this 
20th day of June, A. D. 1912. 

(SEAL) H. I. MULCREVY, Clerk. 

By S. I. HUGHES, Deputy Clerk. 

The first publication of this summons vas made ii 
"The Wasp" newspaper on the 6th day of July, 
A. D. 1912. 

PERRY & DAILEY, Attorneys for Plaintiff, 105 
Montgomery Street, San Francisco, Cal. 

ASSESSMENT NOTICE. 

THE FRESNO AND EASTERN RAILROAD COM- 
PANY, a corporation organized under the laws of 
the State of California, principal place of business 
San Fran ri sco, Calif "rL.ia. 

Notice is hereby given that at a meeting of the 
Directors held on the 1st day of July, 1912, an as- 
sessment of thirty (30 cents a share was levied on 
the capital stock of the corporation, payable on or 
before the fifth day of August, 1912, to" the Treas- 
urer of this Company, at the office of said company, 
No. 771 Monadnock Building, San Francisco, Cali- 
fornia; and that all Assessments upon this stock 
that shall remain unpaid on the fifth day of August, 
1912, shall be delinquent and advertised for sale 
at public auction, and unless payment is made be- 
fore, shall be sold on the twentieth day of August, 
1912, to pay the delinquent assessment together 
with the cost of advertising and expenses of sale 
A. B. DODD, Secretary. 
No. 771 Monadnock Building, San Francisco, 
California. 



Poor Recommendation. 

A YOUNG Scotchman living in Loudon 
married a beautiful and talented Eng- 
lishwoman, of whom he was justly 
proud. Not long after his marriage he went 
co Scotland on a flying trip to see an old 
bachelor uncle. 

"Weel, Tammas, ye have gotten a wife," 
said the old gentleman, i ' now what can she 
do, lad?'' 

' ' Do ! " echoed * ( Tammas. ' ' 

' ' Yes, do, ' ' echoed the old uncle firmly. 
' ' Can she sew on your buttons an ' make your 
porriteh an' your scones?' 5 

"Oh, no; she doesn't know how to do those 
things, ' ' said Tammas. ' ' But she has the 
loveliest voice that ever you heard. She's a 
grand singer." 

"Hout, mon!" cried his uncle, indignantly. 
"Could you nae get a. canary in Lunnoni" — 
Youths' Companion. 



SUMMONS. 



THE SUPERIOR COURT OF THE STATE OF 
California, in and for the City and County of San 
Francisco. — Dept. No. 7. 

JOSEPH G. McVERRY, Plaintiff, vs. All persons 
claiming any interest in or lien upon the real prop- 
erly herein described or any part thereof, Defend- 
ants. — Action No. 32,432. 

The People of the State of California, to all 
persons claiming any interest iu, or lieu upon, 
the real property herein described or any part there- 
of Defendants, greeting: 

You are hereby required to appear and answer 
the complaint of JOSEPH C. McVERRY, plaintiff, 
filed with the Clerk of the above entitled Court and 
County, within three months after the first publi- 
cation of this summons, and to set forth what in- 
cerest or lien, if any, you have in or upon that 
certain real property, or any part thereof, situated 
in the City and County of San Francisco, State of 
California, and particularly described as follows: 

Beginning at the corner formed by the intersec- 
tion of the northerly line of Lawton (formerly "L" ) 
Street with the westerly line of Eleventh Avenue, 
and running thence westerly and along said line of 
Lawton Street two hundred and forty (240) feel 
to the easterly line of Twelfth Avenue; thence north- 
erly along said line of Twelfth Avenue eighty-seven 
(87) feet, six (6' inches; thence at a right angle 
easterly one hundred and twenty "(120 feet; thence 
at a right angle northerly twelve (12) feet, six (6) 
inches; thence at a right angle easterly one hundred 
and twenty (120) feet to the westerly line of Elev- 
enth Avenue; and thence southerly and along said 
line of Eleventh Avenue one hundred (100) feet to 
the point of beginning; being part of OUTSIDE 
LAND BLOCK Number 779. 

You are hereby notified that, unless you so appear 
and answer, the plaintiff will apply to the Court 
for the relief demanded in the complaint, to-wit, 
that it be adjudged that plaintiff is the owner of 
said property in fee simple absolute ; that his title 
to said property be established and quieted; thai 
the Court ascertain and determine all estates, rights, 
titles, interest and claims in and to said property, 
and every part thereof, whether the same be legal 
or equitable, present or future, vested or contin- 
gent, and whether the same consist of mortgages 
or liens of any description; that plaintiff recover 
his costs herein and have such other and further 
relief as may be meet in the premises. 

Witness my hand and the seal of said Court, 
this 9th dav of July, A. D. 1912. 
(SEAL) H. I. MULCREVY, Clerk. 

By H. I. PORTER, Deputy Clerk. 

The first publication of this summons was made 
in "The Wtsp" newspaper ou the 20th day of July, 
A. D. 1912. 

PERRY & DAILEY, Attorneys for Plaintiff, 105 
Montgomery Street, San Francisco, California. 




DR. WONG HIM 

HERB CO. 

Established 1872 
Our wonderful 

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positively cure dis- 
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Heart, Liver, Lungs, 
Stomach, Kidneys, 

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pation, Dysentery, 
"Weakness, Nervous- 
ness, Tumor, Cancer, 
Dizziness, Neuralgia, 
Headache, Lumbago, Appendicitis, Rheumatism, 
Malarial Fever, Catarrh, Eczema, Blood Poison, 
Leucorrhoea, Urine and Bladder Troubles, Dia- 
betes and all organic diseases. 




PATIENTS SPEAK FOR THEMSELVES. 

Petaluma, Cal., November 11, 1911. — Dr. 
Wong Him — Dear Sir: This is to certify that 
1 was sick for about three years with a compli- 
cation of troubles resulting from tuberculosis of 
the bowels and liver combined with tumor of the 
stomach. I had been given up by all the doc- 
tors of Ukiah, Mendocino county, and three 
prominent physicians of San Francisco. They all 
told me that the only chance to prolong my life 
was an operation, and that I could not live long 
under any circumstances. When I began to take 
your treatment I weighed about 75 pounds. I 
am now entirely recovered and weigh 147 pounds, 
more than I ever weighed in my life. 

I write this acknowledgment in gratitude for 
my miraculous recovery, and to proclaim to the 
public your wonderful Herb Treatment, that oth 
ers may find help and healing. Gratefully, 
R. E. ANGLE, 
419 Third Street. 
Formerly of Ukiah. 

DR. WONG HIM 

Leading Chinese Herb Doctor 

1268 O'FARRELL ST. 

(Between Gough and Octavia) 

SAN FRANCISCO. 



ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE AND FOR PUBLICA- 
TION FOR CHANGE OF NAME. 



IN THE SUPERIOR COURT OF THE CITY AND 
County of San Francisco, State of California. — Dept. 
No. 10. 

IN THE MATTER OF TREWELLA-KENDALL 
CO., a Corporation. — No. 42,989. 

It appearing that TREWELLA-KENDALL CO. 
has filed an application to this Court praying for a 
change of its corporate name to TREWELLA- 
TONKIN CO., 

It is therefore hereby ordered that Tuesday the 13th 
day of August, 1912, in the courtroom of Dept. No. 
Teu of said Court in the New City Hall, No. 1231 
Market Street, said City and County of San Fran- 
cisco, State of California, at ten o'clock a. m. of 
said day, are hereby fixed as the time and place 
for hearing said application, and all persons inter- 
ested in said matter are hereby directed to appear 
before said Court, at said time and place, to pre 
sent any objections to the said application, and to 
show cause why it should not be granted; and that 
a copy of this order to show cause be published for 
a period of thirty days before the said 13th day of 
August, 1912, in ' 'The Wasp,' ' a newspaper of 
general circulation, printed and published, in the said 
City and County. 

Dated, June 25th, 1912. 

THOS. F. GRAHAM, 

Judge of said Superior Court. 



EYE TROUBLES VANISH 

WHEN USING MAYERLE'S GERMAN EYEWATER for weak, tired, in-. 
flamed, dull, watery, Btrained or discharging eyes, floating spots, crusty 
eyelids, etc. It gives instant relief. For infants or adults. At all drug- 
gists', 50c; or by mail, 65c. 

GERMAN OPTICAL SPECIALIST 

960 Market Street, San Francisco 
|C Insist on getting Mayerlc's ~W 



Saturday, July 20, 1912.] 



-THE WASP 



27 



SUMMONS. 

IN THE SUPERIOR COURT OK Tilt; STATE OF 
California, in end for the City and Cuuuiy of San 

■ 

. Defendant - 

The People of the State of California, to all per- 
mits claiming any interest in, or lien upon, the real 
property herein described or any part thereof, De- 
-, greeting : 
You are hereby required to api" war the 

UDM ARD U HELE.N 

Bled with thi I 
■ 

■ 
lien, it any, you 
.1 property, or any pari I 
County of San Vn 

ribed as 
follows; 

■ 

hundred and 
corner 
■ 

! • '■■" 

'i\ "J" Street South), aud run- 
ning tu along Said li i 

right angle 
touihw hundred (10fl 

right M 
a l a ii 

sing; being lots 11 and 15, 
n. l-i. 

i' of the 

1 

ore hereby notified that, unless you so appear 

the plain title will applj to the Court for 

the relief demanded in the complaint, to-wit, that it 

i ■ ,i re i he on aera i ■ 
propel i their title to 

ted and quieted ; I hi 

nine all estates, rights, titles 
interests and claims in and to said property, and 
every part thereof,' whether the same be legal or 
equitable, present or future, vested or contingent, 
and whether the same consist of mortgages or liens 
description; thai plaintiffs recover their costs 
herein and have such other and further relief as may 
be meet in the premises. 

Witness my hand and the seal of said Court, this 

Id -I J 1, A, D. 1912. 

(SEAL) H. I. MULCREVY, Clerk. 

By S. E. HI GHES, Deputy Clerk. 
The first publication of this summons was made 
in 'The Wasp" newspaper on the 13th day of 
I D. L912 
PERRY & DAILEY, Attorneys for Plaintiffs, 105 
M ontgomery Street, San Francisco, California. 

CERTIFICATE OF MEMBERSHIP OF W. E. 
STANFORD & COMPANY. 



THIS IS TO CERTIFY that W. E, STANFORD & 
COMPANY is a partnership comprised of the follow- 
ing persons: ALBERT GEORGE LUCHSIMiER, 
3221 Washington St., San Francisco, Cal.; WIL- 
LIAM E6TELL STANFORD, 1445 Leavenworth St., 
San Francisco, Col. 

ALBERT GEORGE LUCHSINGER, 
WILLIAM E. STANFORD. 
STATE OF CALIFORNIA. 
City and County of San Francisco, 
as. 

On this 20th day of June, in the year One Thou- 
sand Nine Hundred and Twelve, before me, Gene- 
vieve S, Donelin, a Notary Public in and for the 
City and County of San Francisco, personally ap- 

t eared Albert George Luchsinger and William E. 
tanford, known to me to be the persons whose 
names are subscribed to the within instrument, and 
they duly acknowledged to me that they executed 
the same. 

In witness whereoi, I have hereunto set my hand 
and affixed my official seal, at my office in the City 
and County of Sjin Francisco, the day and year in 
this certificate first above written. 
(SEAL) GENEVIEVE S. DONELIN, 

Notary Public in and for the City and County 
of San Francisco, State of California. 
809 Crocker Building. 

SUMMONS. 



IN THE SUPERIOR COURT OF THE STATE OF 
California, in and for the City and County of San 
Francisco. — Dept. No. 8. 

MARGARET O'MALLEY, Plaintiff, vs. All per- 
sons claiming any interest in or lien upon the real 
property herein described or any part thereof, De- 
fendants. — Action No. 32,228. 

The People of the State of California, to all per 
sons claiming any interest in, or lien upon, the 
real property herein described or any part thereof, 
Defendants, greeting : 

You are hereby required to appear and answer 
the complaint of MARGARET O'MALLEY,. plaintiff, 
filed with the Clerk of the above entitled Court and 
County, within thre monthB after the first publica- 
tion of this summons, and to set forth what interest 
or lien, if any, you have in or upon that certain real 
property, or any part thereof, situated in the City 
and County of San Francisco, State of California, 
and particularly described as follows. 



THE WASP 

Published weekly by the 

WASP PUBLISHING COMPANY 

Office of publication 

121 Second St., San Francisco, Cal. 

Phones — Sutl 

Entered st the San Francisco PoBtoffice as second- 
class matter. 

SUBSCRIPTION RATES— In the United States. 
Canada ana Mexico, $5 a year in advance; six 
months, $2.50; :hree months, $1.25; single 
copies, 10 cents. For sale by all newsdealers. 

FOREIGN SUBSCRIPTIONS — To countries with 
in the Postal Union, $3 per year. 



ai northerly line of 

Irving (formerly "1") Street, distant thereon ninety- 
five (95 feet easterly from the corner formed by 
the intersection of the northerly line of Irving 
Street with the easterly line of Second Avenue, and 
running thence easterly and along said line of 
Irving Street twenty- five (25) feet; thence at a 
right angle northerly one hundred and ten (110) 
:>t a right angle westerly twenty-five 
i 25 i feet; and thence at a right angle southerly 
one hundred and ten tli'M feet to the pa 
bi ill) . oi 0! TSIDE LAND BLOCK 

Number 672. 

You are hereby notified that, unless you so 
appear and answer, the plaintiff will apply to the 
Court for the relief demanded in the complaint, to- 
wit: That it be adjudged that the plaintiff is the 
owner of said property in fee simple absolute; that 
her title to said property he established and quieted; 
that the Court ascertain ana.' determine all estates, 
rights, titles, interests and claims in and to said 
property, and every part thereof, whether the same 
be legal or equitable, present or future, vested or 
contingent, and whether the same consist of mort- 
gages or liens of any description; that plaintiff re- 
oover her costs herein and have such other and fur- 
ther relief as may be meet in the premises. 

Witness my hand and the seal of said Court this 
loth day of May, A. D, 1912. 

SEAL H. I. MULCREVY, Clerk. 

By J. F. DUNWORTH, Deputy Clerk. 

The first publication of this Summons was made in 
The Wasp newspaper on the 1st day of June, A. D. 
1912. 

The following persons are said to claim some in- 
terest in said real properly adversely to plaintiff: 

BANK OF ITALY (a corporation), Sau Francisco, 
California. 

PERRY & DAILEY, Attorneys for Plaintiff, 105 
Montgomery Street, San Francisco, Cal. GARRET 
W. McENERNEY and GEORGE H. MASTICK, of 
Counsel. 



SUMMONS. 

IN THE SUPERIOR COURT OP THE STATE OF 
California, in and for the City and County of San 
Francisco. — Dept. No. 2. 

MYRTLE R. SA.YLOR, Plaintiff, vs. All persons 
claiming any interest in or lien upon the real prop- 
erty herein described or any part thereof, Defend- 
ants. — Action No. 32,239. 

The People of the State of California, to all per- 
sons claiming any interest in, or lien upon, the real 
property herein described or any part thereof, De- 
fendants, greeting: 

You are hereby required to appear and answer 
the complaint of MYRTLE R. SAYLOR, plaintiff, 
filed with the Clerk of the above entitled Court 
and County, within three months after the first pub- 
lication of this Summons, and to set forth what in 
terest or lien, if any, you have in or upon that cer- 
tain real property or any part thereof, situated in 
the City and County of San Francisco, State of 
California, and particularly described as follows: 

Beginning at the corner formed by the intersec- 
tion of the northerly line of Lake Street with the 
westerly line of Seventh Avenue, and running thence 
northerly along said line of Seventh Avenue twenty- 
five (25) feet; thence at a right angle westerly one 
hundred and fourteen (114) feet; thence at a right 
angle southerly twenty-five (25) feet to the north 
erly line of Lake Street; and thence easterly and 
along said line of Lake Street one hundred and 
fourteen (114) feet to tne point of beginning; being 
part of OUTSIDE LAND BLOCK Number 65. 

You are hereby notified that, unless you bo appear 
and answer, the plaintiff will apply to the Court 
for the relief demanded in the complaint, to-wit, that 
it be adjudged that plaintiff is the owner of the 
parcel of real property described in the complaint 
herein in fee simple absolute; that her title to 
said property be established and quieted; that the 



Court ascertain and determine all estates, rights. 
titles, interests and claims in and to said property, 
tTf part thereof, whether (he same be legal 
or equitable, present or future, vested oi contingent, 
ether the same consist <-f mortgages or liens 
of any 

i r and further relief as 
may be meet in the premises. 

Witness my hand and the seal of said Court this 
day "f May, A. D. 1912. 
(ftEAL) H. I. MCLCREVY, Clerk. 

By J. F '. Deputy Clerk. 

The first publication of thin summons was made 
in The Wasp newM- day of June, 

■ 

' i for Plaintiff. 105 

Street, Sun Francisco, Cal. GARRET 
MASTICK, of 
Counsel. 



SUMMONS. 



IN THE SUPERIOR COURT OF THE STATE OF 
ai*, in and for the City ai 
CO. — Dept. No. 10. 

ntUY, Plaintiff, vs. BURR A. 

" No. 42,622. 

lUght in the Superior Court of the State 

in and for the City and County of 

.[ filed in the office 

of the County Clerk of said City and County. 

ii" People of the State of California send greet- 
ing to Bl RE a. LIBBY, Defend 

You are hereby required to appear in an action 

brought against you by the above-named Plaintiff 

OTl of the State of California, in 

and for the City aud County of San Francisco, and 

to answer the Complaint Bled therein within ten 

days (exelusivi h 'lay of service) after the 

on yon of this summons, if served within 
3 and County; or if served elsewhere within 
thirty days. 

The said action is brought to obtain n judgment 
and decree of this Court dissolving the bonds of 
matrimony now existing between plaintiff and de- 
fendant, on the ground of defendant's willful neg- 
lect and desertion, also for general relief, as (trill 
more fully appear in the Complaint on file, to which 
special reference is hereby made. 

And you are hereby notified that, unless you ap- 
pear and answer as above required, the said Plaint- 
iff will take judgment for any moneys or damages 
demanded in the complaint as arising upon contract, 
or will apply to the Court for any other relief de- 
manded in the complaint. 

Given under my hand and the seal of the Superior 
Court of the State of California, in and for the City 
and County of San Francisco, this 1st day of June, 
A. D. 1912. 

(SEAL) H. I. MULCREVY, Clerk. 

By L. W. WELCH, Deputy Clerk. 
The first publication of this summons was made 
in "The Wasp" newspaper on the 8th day of June, 
A. D. 1912. 

GERALD C. HAJ.dEY. Attorney for Plaintiff, 
501-502-503 California Pacific Building, San Fran- 
cisco, Cal. 



NOTICE TO CREDITORS. 



No. 13569. Dept. 10. 
ESTATE OF PATRIZIO MARSICANO, sometimes 

called P. MARSICANO, Deceased. 

Notice is hereby given by the undersigned Execu- 
trix of the Last Will and Testament of PATRIZIO 
MARSICANO, sometimes called P. MARSICANO-. 
deceased, to the creditors of and all persons having- 
claims against the said deceased, to exhibit them, 
with the necessary vouchers within ten (10) mouths, 
after the first publication of this notice to the 
said Executrix at the office of GERALD C. HAL- 
SEY, iiisq., Attorney for said Executrix, at No. 
501-502-503 C-Iifornia Pacific Bldg, corner Sutter- 
and Montgomery Sts., San Francisco, California, 
which said office the undersigned selects as her place 
of business in all matters connected with snid 
estate of PATRIZIO MARSICANO, sometimes called 
P. MARSICANO, deceased. 

MARY MARSICANO, 
sometimes called MARINA MARSICANO, 

Executrix of the Last Will and Testament of 
PATRIZIO MARSICANO. sometimes called P 
MARSICANO, Deceased. 

Dated, San Francisco, June 12, 1912 
GERALD O. HALSEY, Attorney for Executrix 
501-502-503 California Pacific Bldg., 105 Mont- 
gomery street, San Francisco, Cal. 



Office Hours 
9 a. m. to 5:20 p. m. 
Phone Douglas 1501 



Residence 
573 Fifth Avenue 
Hours 6 to 7:30 p. m. 
Phone Pacific 275 

W. H. PYBURN 
NOTARY PUBLIC 

My Motto "ALWAYS IN" 
On parte Francaii Se habla Espano 

Office: 229 Montgomery Street 

San Francuco California 



tsc&cm^c&Es^cm&cm&c^^ 











Los Angeles 




Santa Cruz 






"The Atlantic City of the Pacific Coast" 
Is planning a 




$2S round trip [fcsffils] 


mM^* 


San Diego $29 round trip 




Wonderful Water Pageant 




Tickets on sale daily. 








Good for return until October 31, 1912. 




For the following dates: 




Santa Fe's new train. 




JULY 20TH to JULY 28TH, INCLUSIVE 




"ff/, e Leaves San Francisco 




Yacht Regattas — Motor Boat Races — Review of 




jk ■* daily at 4:00 p. m. 




American Battleships — Parade of Deoorated 




J \ V% fV^^ 1 This is California's 




Water Floats — Swimming and Rowing Con- 




i ll *£> V^i finest train. 




tests — Surf Bathing — Dancing — Golf — Ten- 
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On the return trip the Saint offers 








the same superior service. 




DON'T MISS THE FUN 




Phone or call on me for reservations. 








Jas. B. Duffy. Gen. Agt., 673 Market St., 
San Francisco. Phone: Kearny 815-J3371. 




Regular Rates at the New Hotel Casa del Key. 




J J. Warner. Gen. Agt., 1218 Broadway, 








Oakland. Phone: Oakland 425 




Special Low Ticket Fares 




Santa Fc 




ASK OUR AGENTS 

SOUTHERN PACIFIC 

Flood Building 






d> to c n 






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Palace Hotel 




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SAN FRANCISCO. 

Broadway & Thirteenth Street 




TO CHICAGO 
AND RETURN 

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OAKLAND. 
















GOLDEN STATE 




YOSEMITE 




LIMITED 




NATIONAL PARK 

The Outing Place of California. 
SNOW-CAPPED MOUNTAINS :: THUNDERING WATER- 




A Transcontinental Delight. 




FALLS :: MIRROR LAKES AND HAPPY ISLES 

: MASSIVE WALLS AND DOMES : 

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A SMOOTH, DUSTLE8S. WELL-SPRINKLED 
ROAD INTO THE VALLEY 




THIS BATE GOOD ON MANY DAYS IN JUNE, 




1 A Special Feature of This Season's Trip 




JULY, AUGUST AND SEPTEMBER. 




The waterfalls are booming full. Conditions in the Valley 
were never better than this season. Surrounding mountain 
peaks and watersheds are covered with late snows, which 




Similar Low Rates to Many Other Eastern Points 




insures a lasting flow of water. 

Why visit the commonplace resort, when the sublime and 
the beautiful beckon you. Cost of this trip is now reduced 
to popular prices. Four excellent camps offer the visitor the 
most pleasing entertainment : 




Return Limit October 31st, 1912 










CAMP CURRY— CAMP AHWAHNEE— CAMP LOST ARROW 






SENTINEL HOTEL 






Each is charmingly and picturesquely situated on the floor 








of the valley, surrounded by the masterpieces of Nature. 




Telephone or Write Our Agents. 




It is now a quick, comfortable trip into the Valley. For 
full information or descriptive folder, address your camp or 
botel in Yosemite, any ticket office or information bureau in 




Rock Island 




California, or 

Yosemite Valley Railroad 




Southern Pacific 




COMPANY 

MEECED, SAL. 









§£f^&3f^fMH^f^&3^^ 



Vol. LXVin.— No. 1. 



SAN FRANCISCO. JULY 27, 1912. 



Price, 10 Cents. 







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BROUGHAMS NOW READY FOR DELIVERY. $2,800. San Francisco Delivery. 



Pacific Motor Car Company 




GOLDEN GATE AVE. 
at Polk Street 



LEADING HOTEL 



X 



Hotel St. Francis 



Turkish Baths 
12th Floor 

Ladies Hair Dressing Parlors 
2d Floor 

Cafe 

White and Gold Restaurant 

Lohby Floor 

Electric Grill 

Barber Shop 

Basement, Geary St. entrance 



Under the Management of James Woods 



Casa del Rey 

New 300-room, fire-proof hotel located 
near tbe beach and Casino, open all year 
round. SUPERIOR GOLFING. 

AMERICAN PLAIN 

Tennis courts, good boating, bathing and 
fishing; numerous drives along the CoaBt 
and through the mountains. 

SANTA CRUZ BEACH HOTEL CO. 



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Good Goods sell better when 
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would be pleased to send samples. 

POSTERS -:- LABELS -:- CUT-OUTS 

HANGER-i -:- CARTONS 

COMMERCIAL WORK 



Schmidt Lithograph Co. 



PORTLAND 



SAN FRANCISCO 

SEATTLE LOS ANGELES 



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Situated on Market Street 

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Take any Market Street Car 
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TWO GREAT HOTELS 
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PALACE HOTEL COMPANY 



Motel Argonaut 

Society of California Pioneers' Building 
Fourth St., near Market. 

California's Moet Popular Motel 

400 Rooms, 200 Bulhs. 

European PIhii $1.00 per day and up. 

Dining Room Sealing 500 — Table d'hni* 
or a la Carte Service, as desired 



Special Sunday Dinner, 
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EDWARD R0LK1N 
Manager. 



GEO. A. DIXON 
Ass't M'g'r. 



HOTEL VON DORN 

242 Turk St., near Jones, San Francisco 



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Proof. Cafe of unusual merit. 

ATTRACTIVE TERMS TO PERMANENT GUESTS 




Vol. Lxvrn.— No. 4. 



SAX PEANCISl 0, -ll'IA' 27, 1912. 



Price, 10 Cents. 



IGLISH 

BY AMERICUS 



NB of the daily newspapers has discovered that 
garbage smells, and that the people four years 
ago voted $1,000,000 bonds for a garbage- 
burning plant, which has not been erected yet, although 
most of the money has been expended and the people 
are paying interest regularly on the 
bonds. 

The Wasp published all the facts 
about the Good Government politi- 
cians' deal in garbage four years 
ago. When The Wasp published 
them in February, 1909, before the 
bonds were sold, the newspapers 
might have aided in stopping the 
deal. Now the nasty deal in gar- 
bage has become a civic institution 
and a permanently fixed daily graft 
on the people. There is still a little 
of the $1,000,000 left in the city 
treasury and hope of $600,000 more 
bonds being voted. The smell of the 
deal is fixed on us, to remain until 
this money is all wasted into the poli- 
ticians' pockets. 

As an example of tardiness and in- 
competency, the garbage deal is only 
second to the Auxiliary Fire Protec- 
tion bungle. From the start the pub- 
lie was misled by the public officials who had charge of 
the garbage problem. The Supervisors made no plans, 
though the charter says plans must be made before 
bonds are voted. The Supervisors told the people that 
they were voting $1,000,000 bonds to build a new plant 
and not to buy the Sanitary Reduction Works. After 
the bonds were voted, and the money from their sale 
obtained, the Supervisors bought out. the Sanitary Re- 
dution Works for $400,000. 

The Supervisors told the people one new plant would 



be built. After the bonds were voted and the money 
went under their unchecked control, the Supervisors 
voted to purchase first two, and finally three, sites for 
plants. 

With no plans for plants made in advance of voting 
the bonds, the City Engineer's office made plans, and 
the Board of Public Works let contracts cunningly de- 
vised to permit only the one favored bidder for the 
contracts. 

The Supervisors, having bought the Sanitary Reduc- 
tion Works at the preposterous price 
of $400,000, turned them back to the 
corporation seller, to be operated for 
its profit. It is still operating them, 
and the city keeps on paying interest 
on the bonds sold to pay for the erec- 
tion of works that haven't been yet 
erected. Heaven only knows when 
they will be in operation. 

It is a sure thing, though, that 
when they do begin to burn garbage 
the operation will cost the public 
more than ever, as the men employed 
will be paid not less than $3 a day 
for eight hours' work. The private 
concern that' was bought out by the 
city worked its Italian employes long 
hours and paid them low wages, and 
yet made no money. 

Our esteemed contemporary, the 
supervisor payot Call, quotes Supervisor Henry Payot, 

Guiding intellect in the slow furtherance of the as Saying that "criminal neglect' IS 

municipal garbage project. responsible for the delay in providing 

the city with the garbage destruction plant, and lets it 
go at that. Supervisor Payot should know better than 
anybody just what is the trouble with the garbage 
scheme. His has been the guiding intellect in the enter- 
prise from the outset. If not his conception, he cheer- 
fully became its guardian, and it can be truthfully 
said that the well-meaning old gentleman has had his 
hands full. The more the garbage scheme has been 
tinkered with the more muddled it has become and the 
more odoriferous its exhalations. 




THE WASP- 



[Saturday, July 27, 1912. 




EXPERT FREEMAN 

Autnor ot the Fifty Thousand Dollar Report on 
Hetch Hetchy. 



A $50,000 DOG-EAEED VOLUME. 

IN ONE of the rooms of the Custom House, where the Board 
of U. S. .Army Engineers holds its meetings, there lies on 
a table a book which at first sight looks like a dilapidated 

city directory of the 
vintage of some long 
years past. 

This dog-eared and 
loosely bound volume 
held together by a 
few brass staples, is 
the Fifty Thousand 
Dollar Report of En- 
gineer Freeman, that 
has been in prepara- 
tion so long that the 
memory of the aver- 
age man is not equal 
to the task of fixing 
the dates. In Novem- 
ber, 1911, the de- 
mand for Mr. Free- 
man's report became 
so insistent that he 
telegraphed from his Eastern home, where he was spending 
the holidays, that the document would be finished in ten 
days. Eight months elapsed (Mr. Freeman meantime draw- 
ing pay at the rate of $250 a day) before any report materi- 
alized. It isn't finished yet, for the dog-eared volume, filed 
hastily with the Board of U. S. Army Engineers, is composed 
in a considerable part of type-written pages, bound up with 
rough press-proofs, printed only on one side. Numerous 
illustrations have been clipped from magazine pages, presum- 
ably descriptive of reservoirs in other parts of the earth, but 
there are no titles to these illustrations which have been past- 
ed into the report in a hurried and sloppy fashion. 

It is little short of an insult to the Board of U. S. Army 
Engineers to file such a work as the brief of a great commer- 
cial city in a case involving at least $50,000,000 that will be 
spent before our muddled municipal water problem is settled. 
When it is remembered that this report of Engineer Free- 
man has cost the immense sum of $50,000, and that the Hetch 
Hetchy water question has been under investigation for a 
dozen years by the Engineering Department of the San Fran- 
cisco government, the presentation of a lot of type-written 
notes, untitled clippings from magazines, and rough press- 
proofs in a dog-eared volume to the Army Engineers is utter- 
ly unpardonable. It is little short of an insult to the Army 
Engineers, as well as a disgrace to our municipality. It 
would serve our Board of Works right if the Engineers from 



Washington threw the slovenly compiled work into the cor- 
ridor and demand a properly printed and bound volume 
that could be regarded as a permanent contribution to the 
case under consideration. 

When this $50,000 worth of printer's proofs and type- 
written sheets was filed with the Board of Army Engineers, 
the promise was made that a properly printed and bound vol- 
ume would make its appearance later. Otherwise it is doubt- 
ful if the Board would have accepted such an apology for a 
finished report. 

Any private concern or corporation could, in a quarter of 
the time that has been taken over the $50,000 report, and for 
much less than half the money, have prepared a carefully 
printed book with every detail of the plans worked out, and 
have filed it at the date required. 

No doubt the same promptness could be displayed by Engi- 
neer Freeman if he were employed as an expert by private 
citizens. In working for the city, however, the general rule 
is to regard the public service as of secondary importance, 
and give one's first thought to personal affairs. For instance, 
Mr. Freeman has spent in the Eastern States much of the 
time he has been investigating the municipal water problem 
of San Francisco and collecting data about the value of 
Spring Valley and the availability of Hetch Hetchy. And 
by the kind forethought of our Board of Works, he has been 
permitted, while investigating Spring Valley, to take employ- 
ment from that corporation — the consideration, it is said, be- 
ing a retainer of $10,000 a year. 

The municipal water problem of San Francisco should be 
staged as a side-splitting farce for the Orpheum Circuit. 
4 • 

SEVENTY MILES OF TUNNEL! WOW!! 

NOBODY called attention to the highly interesting fact 
that in his plan for bringing water from Hetch Hetchy 
Engineer John R. Freeman intends to run no less than 70 
miles of tunnel. The magnitude of the project doesn't appall 
Mr. Freeman and the Board of Works in the least, but it 
ought to give the taxpayers of San Francisco some food for 
thought. 

Engineer Connick and his colleagues, who didn't tunnel at 
all to lay the Auxiliary Fire Protection System, have been 
years at the job and don't seem to be any way near the end 
yet, judging by the howl that has gone up lately from Kearny 




21 MILES OF PROPOSED TUNNEL BEYOND LIVERMORE — HARD ROCK. 



Thru Railroad Tickets 

Issued to All Parts of 

FOR PORTLAND 

1st class $10, $12, $15. 2d $6.00. Berth and Meals Included. 

The San Francisco and Portland S. S. Co. 

A. OTTINGER, General Agent. 



3 

BEAR 

BEAVER 

ROSE CITY 

Sailings Every 




United States, Canada and Mexico 

In Connection with Tbese Magnificent Pasienger Steamers 

FOR LOS ANGELES 

1st class $7.35 & $8.35. 2d class $5.35. Berth & meals included 



Ticket Office. 722 Mkt., opp. Call. Ph. Sutter 2344 
8 East St., opp. Ferry Bldg. Phone Sutter 2482 
Berkeley Office 2105 Shattuck. Ph. Berkeley 831 



Saturday, July 27, 1912. | 



-THE WASP- 



street merchants, who complain of the street's condition 
with open trenches and piles of sand. Taking Mr. Connick's 

performam the Auxiliary Pire Protection System .-is a 

basis, and figuring that Mike Casey will remain President of 
the Board of Works as long .'is he can control a Fraction of 
the labor vote in the Mission, "the pure mountain water" 
Erom Betch Hetchy and the millennium will arrive about the 
same time. 

Professor J. C. Branner, geologist of Stanford University, 
estimates that of the 70 miles of tunnel, 8 miles will be in 
sandstone and shale, 12 miles through Calaveras quart/., 
which is as hard as Mint, 11 miles in porphyrite or altered 
lava, which is worse than quartz, anil IT'j miles in good old 

Sierra granite. In all, 69^ miles would have to be driven 

tin gh some kind of rock, and chiefly the toughest, the bore 

being 38 Eeet in circumference, in the Livermore hills, and 
•'ill feet in the Sierra granite. 

The accompanying diagrams are reproduced from Mr. 
Freeman's report, and show the contour of the mountains 
through which the 70 miles of tunnel would run. 




15 MILES OF TUNNEL IN SOLID GRANITE, nr. Hetch Hetchy. 

You and 1 and the rest of us, kind reader, who may own a 
little home and lot, or think of buying one, would take very 
little interest in civic enterprises before Marsden Manson and 
Mike Casey bored the last mile of granite and tapped the pel- 
lucid waters of Hetch Hetchy. 

Not only would Marsden and Mike have a job for life, but 
all the friends, relatives from Calaveras to 'Connemara, could 
figure on steady work till San Francisco went bankrupt and 
was auctioned off to awakened China at a knock-down price. 
Statistics on tunnels can be found in any library. Here 
are a few: 

COST OF SOME BIG TUNNELS. 

St. Gothard (9 miles) $45,000,000.00 

Mont Genis (7V. miles) 28,000,000.00 

Arlberg (li miles) 18,300,000.00 

Hoosae (4% miles) 12,000,000.00 

Liverpool-Birkenhead (4% miles) 10,000,000.00 

New York Subway (23 miles) 35,000,000.00 

London Metropolitan (13 miles) 29,450,000.00 

Paris Underground (8% miles) 9,400,000.00 

Gieat Simplon Tunnel (12 miles) 15,000,000.00 

S. P. Tunnel at Truckee (4% miles) 11,000,000.00 

+ 

RUEF 'S JOURNALISTIC LABORS. 

THE WASP'S STATEMENT that Abe Ruef, a convict in 
San Quentin, sits in his comfortable library, and with 
a woman reporter of the San Francisco Bulletin as aman- 
uensis, prepares articles calculated to boom the Bulletin's 
circulation is not denied. It cannot be denied because it is 
a fact. Being a fact, why is not the Warden of San Quentin 
dismissed for permitting the rules of his institution to be 
violated? Why are not the State Prison Directors not re- 
moved for neglecting to do their duty by firing the Warden? 



i.ast. but not least, why is not the Hon. Hiram Johnson re- 
siled from the office of Governor of the State of California 
ir allowing State institutions to become circulation depart- 
ments of yellow newspapers, and fur neglecting his sworn 
duties while practicing polities Eor self-glorification.' 



WE SHALL SEE. 

IN A FEW DAYS the people of San Francisco will have an 
opportunity to decide whether .Mayor Bolph's adminis- 
tration is to be a success or a failure. 

II may be a success if he kicks out the ringsters that are 
running the Board of Works and making our city ridiculous. 
The Wasp sincerely hopes .Mayoi- Kolph will be a brilliant 
success. 

The administration will be a lamentable failure if he per- 
mits Marsden Manson and Mike Casey to remain in control 
after the expose of the Auxiliary Fire Protection System and 
the Twin Peaks sieve reservoir that will be made in a few 
days. The report of the three engineers, M. M. O'Shaugh- 
nessy, W. R. Eckhart and H. C. Holmes, whom Mayor Rolph 
appointed to investigate the Auxiliary Fire Protection Sys- 
tem, is in print. Copies will be given to the press this week, 
and the public will see for itself that the Board of Works 
and the Engineer's Department, which are practically the 
same thing, are to blame for the delay, which has cost our 
city millions. 

It will be seen that the contractors who built the sieve 
reservoir and laid the pipes did their work as directed. There 
were inspectors galore from the Board of Works, supposed to 
be watching the construction, but those lazy and incompetent 
tax-eaters did nothing to rectify the mistakes being made. 

Seldom has there been an investigation which has placed 
the. blame more positively on the real culprits, and these are 
the Board of Works and Manson, whose deputy, Connick, 
prepared the defective plans. 

Why blame Connick? Why growl at the inspectors who 
neglected their duty? Why not punish the men at the head 
of the enterprise — the Commissioners of Works and the City 
Engineer? 

The eyes of the community will be focused on the Mayor 
next week to see what course he will pursue when the con- 
demnatory report of Engineers O'Shaughnessy, Eckart and 
Holmes will have been read and digested by His Honor. 
♦ ■ 

Two years ago Manson and Mike Casey were quoted in the 
San Francisco newspapers as declaring that no outside help 
at all would be needed by the Board of Works and the City 
Engineer's Department to build the Hetch Hetchy reservoir. 

"We'll jest dig down till we shtrike hard rock," said 
Mike, "and thin we'll bild the wall to keep in the wather." 

Mike and Manson were joshed for this interview by an 
engineering publication. A New York publication was par- 
ticularly merry over their plans. 

Mike and Manson were not as simple as they appeared, 
though, for they have been digging ever since into the public 
treasury, and the amount of good gold coin they have shovel- 
ed out for their hangers-on would make J. P. Morgan blink. 

Last month Engineer Grunsky, who is on the job while 
Manson takes a vacation for brain-fag, drew down $3,9917. 



THE WASP 



[Saturday, July 27, 1912. 



TemT 



EM Jl HOUSAMD 1VJLURDE 

Yearly Harvest of Crime and How to Check It. 



s-RIME is becoming so alarming in New 
York that ' ' experts ' ' have been 
called together to discuss it. Now- 
adays every important matter is 
passed up to " experts." In other words, 
the government is a failure. It should be 
the duty of the police and the courts to sup- 
press criminals and jail them. But the police 
and the courts between them manage to let 
the murderers and thieves escape. Therefore 
the "experts" must be called together to do 
what the expensive departments of the gov- 
ernment should do. The taxes are collected 
and paid in' the expectation that the money 
will be applied to the enforcement of law 
and order. Instead of that, the money is 
applied to the paying of salaries to a lot of 
incompetents or grafters, and the thugs and 
cutthroats continue on their merry way un- 
checked. More than that, they get bolder 
every day. 

Four "distinguished experts," as they are 
called, met in New York to discuss the why 
and wherefore of the constant increase of 
crime. One of the "experts was Police Com- 
missioner Waldo, and to his credit be it said 
he placed his finger on the cancerous spots. 
His words are worthy of reproduction, and 
they apply just as much to. San Francisco as 
in New York. Commissioner Waldo said: 
Many of our judges have theories about 
enforcement of the law and handling the 
criminal element in this community. But 
it seems to me that in the enforcement 
of law and maintenance of order we do 
not need to theorize. We have before 
us examples in the two other largest 
cities of the world, and the various meth- 
ods of handling the criminal element 
there adopted. 

London is a city where crime is almost 
at a minimum. Murders average from 18 
to 20 a year, and averages of other crimes 
are comparatively even lower. The police 
patrol their posts alone, unarmed; any 
one can go into any part of London with- 
out fear of molestation. 

In Paris, the next largest city, police- 
men go in pairs, armed with heavy-cal- 
ibre revolvers strapped on the outside of 
their coats. Crime is rampant; and the 
Chief of Police admits it to be unsafe for 
a foreigner to go alone outside the centre 
of the city. We find in Paris almost 
more murders in a week than we find in 
London in a year. 

In London, when a man commits an 
act against the law he is held responsible 
for it. In Paris he is not; his sins are 
likely enough to be condoned on the 
ground that he did wrong because he was 
hot-headed, or for some other equally 
frivolous reason. The English criminal 
. knows that if he is caught he will get a 
stiff sentence. The French criminal knows 
that if he is caught and put up a good 
plea before the court he will stand a good 
chance of escape. And that is the whole 
difference between the two systems. 

Eliminate from the criminal the fear 
of punishment, and you eliminate all re- 



straining influence. If you have a police- 
man upon every street corner and he ar- 
rests every man who commits any crime 
whatsoever against the law, and if the 
men arrested are not punished, and know 
that they will not be punished, then you 
will have a state of absolute disorder de- 
spite the number of your policemen; while 
on the contrary, if every man whose im- 
pulse is to commit a crime knows that 
he will probably be caught if he yields 
to this impulse, and that if he is caught 
he will surely suffer the consequences of 
his wrongdoing, he will probably restrain 
his criminal impulse. In the final analy- 
sis, it all comes down to this: whether 
or not the criminal knows he is going 
to be held responsible. 

Commissioner Waldo might have added that 
the best lawyers in England consider it an 
honor to accept judicial positions. In New 
York and San Francisco and other large Am- 
erican cities a good lawyer is a fool to take 
a judge's place. First of all, he must get 
elected and to do that must kow-tow to a 
lot of scrubby little ward politicians congre- 
gated as a "nominating convention'* and 
posing as statesmen (God save the mark). 
If the unlucky candidate for a judgeship isn't 
nominated by a convention of "reformers" 
or "progressives" he may be nominated by 
a convention of "performers" or "reaction- 
aries" or an acknowledged boss, who is not 
in politics for his health alone. 

In any event, no matter how nominated and 
elected, the unfortunate American jurist be- 
comes a sort of doormat for the sandlot and 
the slums, or the patent leathers of the "big 
interests. " If a really talented man, he is 
to be pitied sincerely, for he is wasting his 
time and talents serving the dear people, who 
are likely at the end of ten years of his faith- 
ful service, to kick him out and elect some 
howling demagogue in his place, or some al- 
leged lawyer who would grace a carpenter 's 
bench much more than the judicial one. 

In the years that the unlucky judge has 
been in office he has lost all his clients — if he 
ever had any — and his professional position 
is therefore deplorable. 

Is it strange that such a wretched system 
of selecting judges breeds incompetency, lax 
administration of justice, and increases 
criminality, until tlie United States has be- 
come known throughout the civilized world as 
the nation where 10,000 murders a year are 
committed. 

The way to change the condition for the bet- 
ter is to appoint judges, as under the English 
system. Pay them well, give them their posi- 
tions for life, and pension them. Those who 
don't behave themselves can be removed, but 
it will be found that the derelictions will be 
few. 

Unless this change in the judicial system be 
made in America things will go from bad to 



worse, lawlessness and disrespect of all lawful 
government will increase and anarchy super- 
vene. Then will follow the rule of the armed 
force and the reign of the dictator. It is not 
a bright prospect. Why not change it by es- 
tablishing a system which tends to promote 
justice for the rich and the poor? 



SINCE the foregoing was written a gam- 
bler in New York has been assassinated 
for giving information calculated to in- 
terfere with the tribute paid to the police by 
gambling-houses. The facts seem to indicate 
that the New York police protected the assas- 
sin, if they did not actually instigate the 
crime. 

In San Francisco, within the past week, 
there has been an expose of the payment of 
blackmail to the police by Chinese gamblers 
during the McCarthy administration. The 
District Attorney and the present Chief of 
Police are trying to explain why open viola- 
tions of local ordinances are permitted to go 
unpunished. 

Every day evidence accumulates that the 
great need of the nation is respect and fear 
of justice, and these can only be enforced by 
putting the courts of law on a firmer founda- 
tion. Unless we can do that America will 
become known as the land of blood and crime. 

f 

The Secret. 
HJ DON'T SEE how it is," Jenkins be- 
! gan, eying the tramp and his perform- 
ing dog with a frank envy. "Here is 
this mongrel of yours doing all these tricks, 
and there is my dog, with a pedigree a yard 
long, that can't be taught a single thing! I've 
hammered at him till I'm tired, and he can't 
even be trusted on to roll over when he's 
told to." 

"Well, sir, 'taint so much the dog," the 
tramp replied confidentially. "You have to 
know more'n he does, or you can't learn him 
anything." 




CHARLES MEINECKE &, CO. 

Mum P*oino Coujt, • t 4 Iuuhinti St., «. r 




!ANTA I'.AKl'.ARA scums to 
be the Mecca of wealthy 
girls with independent 
fortunes who prefer to 
live by themselves. There 
are Amy Browne and 
Sydney Davis, who are 
keeping bachelor girls ' 
quarters, separately, and are constantlly seen 
around town in their small Buick ^roadsters. 
Another girl of general prominence is Miss 
Marguerite Doe, who has adopted the appar- 
ently fashionable fad of dispensing with 
chaperons. She has been living in solitary 
grandeur, with a retinue of servants, at Mon- 
tecito, and not a sign of the hitherto indis 
pensable bulwark, of maidenhood. It is evi- 
dent that if the votes of the bachelor maids 
can send chaperons to limbo, they will get 
there in short order. Miss Belle Brittan, 
daughter of the late Nat Brittan of San Car- 
los, one of the oldest members of the Pacific 
Union Club of San Francisco, has been telling 
the Los Angeles reporters that chaperons are 
a nuisance. "The world would be better off 
if chaperons were made to walk the plank," 
Miss Brittan is quoted as having said. "Many 
a happy flirtation has become snow-capped 
because of the persistent presence of a lantern- 
. visaged chaperon," added the fair heiress of 
San Carlos. This is a new line of thought 
on the subject. Hitherto the most serious ob- 
jection urged against chaperons in general 
was that they had a tendency to develop un 
due friskiness themselvs and try to cut in on 
the limited supply of eligible bachelors by 
annexing the best-looking and liveliest young 
fellow themselves. 

i2M t2& *&* 

Miss Doe's Housewarming. 

The new home of Miss Marguerite Doe in 
Montecito, which cost over $20,000, formed a 
brilliant setting for one of the most elaborate- 
ly appointed dances of the season. Miss Doe 
resides with her mother, Mrs. Eleanor Doe, 
in Montecito Park, and the opening of her 
new home only extends the hospitality for 
which the Does are famed. Miss Doe and 
her mother have become permanent residents 
of Santa Barbara, and nobody can blame them 
for liking that place, with its delightful cli- 
mate, as well as its social attentions. Every- 
body is asking in San Francisco why the rich 
Doe estate does not improve its valuable hold- 
ings on Market street. On one of these 
large lots at Market and Larkin stood the 
St. Nicholas Hotel, which yielded a large 
revenue. Another valuable lot on the oppo- 
site corner was occupied by the furniture 
firm of Chas. M. Plum & Co., which failed 
recently. The money of the Doe family was 
made in the lumber and milling business. Mrs. 





NOTICE. 








All 


communications relative to 


toclal 


news 


should 


be addressed "Society 


Editor 


Wasp 


121 


Second Street, S. T.," and should reach this office 


not later than Wednesday to 


insure 


publication 


In the 


Issue of that week. 









Doe', the widow of one of the brothers Doe, 
remarried the late .T. B. Stetson, who was an 
important figure in public affairs and private 




MISS MARGTJERITE DOE • 

One of the bachelor maids of Santa Barbara, 
who need no chaperons. 

business a quarter of a century ago. Like 
many marriages of convenience, it was not 
propitious, and Mrs. Doe sought to get a di- 
virce — wisely, it is said. In the dolce far 



aiente of Santa Barbara one is likely to for- 
gel everything but that which is pleasant. 

Axdent Motorists. 

-Miss Marguerite Doe is, of course, an ar- 
denl motorist. This young 20-year-old million- 
airess and Miss Glaldlys Keeney, who also 
makes her home at Santa Barbara, drive little 
roadsters all along the cliffs and boulevards. 

& & ^ 
Lady Nicotine Nervous Here. 

Are we provincial for not following the ex- 
ample of the leading European and New York 
hotels by allowing women to smoke in our 
hotels? In London or Paris they can smoke 
till they get black in the face, if they wish to. 
At the Palace the Lady Nicotine is allowed 
to have her way, but those dainty souls who 
don't object to the public gaze rarely avail 
themselves of the opportunity. The St. Fran- 
cis put the ban on it, and the other day, when 
Mrs. Julius Kruttschnitt and her daughter, Mrs. 
Clifford Woodhouse, who has just returned 
from her wedding trip to the Orient, tried it, 
they were requested by the management to 
please refrain. Mr. and Mrs. Woodhouse are 
only to be here for a short time, as they expect 
to leave in a few days for their home in New 
Orleans. 

Latest from Paris. 

The Gregg girls, who recently returned from 
Paris, are causing many interested glanees by 
their eccentric head-dress, which I presume is 
the latest note from the Rue de la Paix. One 
has to make four visits a year, and then some, 
to dear Paree to know exactly what is la 
dernier cri. Miss Enid Gregg, whose beauty 
is extremely Oriental, wears her head-dress 
in a point over her forehead, and very low 
over her ears, an arrangement which accentu- 
ates the foreign caste of her features. Pretty 
little Miss Ethel, who has not yet made her 



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Low monthly rates 


^WIW 



-THE WASP- 



[Saturday, July 27, 1912. 



debut, wears hers severely parted in the mid- 
dle. Speaking of that young lady, I hear it 
rumored that Cupid has not waited for her 
formal bow to society, and one of those in- 
teresting announcements that follow carefully 
planned teas or luncheons would cause no sur- 
prise in society. 

J* Jt J* 
Elaborate Preparations. 

Miss Marion Miller, the beautiful fiancee 
of Bernard Ford, is making elaborate prepar- 
ations for. the wedding, which is to take place 
the 11th of September. Miss Miller is the 
stepdaughter of Mrs. C. 0. G. Miller, and has 
never really formally made her bow to soci- 
ety, contrary to the bavardes. A large debu- 
tante reception was being planned for her 
two winters ago. when she suddenly develop- 
ed appendicitis and had to be operated upon 
in London, and did not fully recover for many 
months afterwards. A few months ago she 
decided to enter the Children's Hospital for 
a nurse's training course, but she only re- 
mained there for a week or so — owing, it is 
believed, to Mr. Ford's urgent persuasion to 
the contrary. 

& <£ J* 
Evidently Not Superstitious. 

One member of the Smart Set, at least, is 
not at all. superstitious about the numeral 
concerning a bridesmaid's attendance; for, 
although thrice a bridesmaid, Miss Virginia 
Newhall ventured again, and performed the 
happy office for her dear friend, Miss Helene 
McVay, when she became the bride of Mr. 
Harold Paulin at Los Angeles. Miss Newhall 
has come to her home in San Francisco, 
bringing with her Mrs. Elizabeth Colt of 
New Jersey, whom she is entertaining at the 
Newhall home. 

J* J* J* 
Thoroughly Exclusive. 

The story in The Wasp last week about the 
Beresford Club 's desire to use the coat-of- 
arms of Lord Charles Beresford had many 
readers, I should judge by the number of ap- 
plicants for extra copies. The Beresford Club 
is a live wire, and the most captious critic 
could not truthfully charge it with lack of 
exclusiveness. Mr. Wiliam Fries, its popular 
president, I am told, is never out of arm's 
reach of his resignation. Make the Beresford 
Club first-class and thoroughly exclusive as 
I want it, or let some other fellow be czar," 
is his motto. It 's a winner, too. The more 
applicants shut out from membership, the 



5% per month 

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We have a Test Refrigerator to prove what we 
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more that strive to get in. The waiting list 
will soon be as long as one of Hiram Johnson's 
orations on the smashed railroad machine. 

At the fire down Hillsboro way there was 
great excitement, and when the chemical en- 
gine from San Mateo dashed up to aid the 
aristocratic fire-fighters a crowd of strangers 
burst into the grounds of the Beresford Club. 

"Get their names! Get all those people's 
names!" shouted clubman Louis Schwabacher. 
"Our rules exclude strangers from the club 
privileges more than once in six months. " 

"Is that supposed to be wit?" President 
Fries asked of the jocose Louis, who hits the 
bull's-eye ouce in a while; but Louis was too 
busy knocking the sparks out of the burning 
brushwood to indluge in prolonged persiflage. 

Rumors Revived. 

All eyes are once more centered on Clifford 
Cook, who has just come out here from Paris 
with his mother and sister, and many of the 
soothsayers are predicting that he is once 
again to try for the hand of that hard-hearted 
young lady who crushed his fond hopes when 
he was out here on his Coast visit. Just at 
present he is up at his mother's beautiful 
couutry place in the mountains, but is expect- 
ed in town soon, and Dame Rumor has it that 
he will again renew his siege. 

^* ^* ^* 
A Junoesciue Beauty. 

Miss Julia Langhorne, whose marriage to 
Lieutenant James Parker, U. S. A., August 
14th, will be a real "event" in society as 
society measures such things, is one of the 
tallest brides of the year — a good six feet. 
What a trial it would be if the Lieutenant 
were a "sawed-off! But, happily, he is a six- 
foot-four stalwart, and can look down on the 
top of his bride's coiffure, even though she be 
like that ancient classic beauty described of 
the poet as "divinely tall and most divinely 
fair." She is one of the best-liked girls in 
all the sets. Her sister, Mrs. Richard Ham- 
mond, being in mourning for her late -hus- 
band, will not participate in the wedding. 

t£fr x£fr t&& 

Has Host of Friencs. 

The friends of Mrs. Arthur Geisler are 
anxiously awainting her arrival this week 
from Chicago. She will be accompanied by 
her little daughter, leaving her two small sons 
with Mr. Geisler in Chicago. She is planning 
to visit her parents,_ the George A. Moores, 
in Boss; and the Du Val Moores are also 
anticipating a visit from her. Many jolly 
parties are being planned in her honor, as she 
has a host of friends who remember her very 
affectionately as Carol Moore. 

Jt «5t JJ 
Will Be a Quiet Wedding. 

Colonel Hamilton Wallace, the fiance of that 
socially distinguished matron, Mrs. Sarah 
Stetson Winslow, is a prominent member of 
both the Bohemian and Army and Navy Club. 
Mrs. Winslow is the daughter of the late J. 
B. Stetson, the capitalist, who married Mrs. 
Eleanor Doe, mother of Miss Marguerite Doe. 
Mrs. Winslow is to be very quietly married 



the first week in August, with only her im- 
mediate family present — her two daughters, 
Euth and Marie Louise, the Bobert Oxnards, 
Harry Stetsons, and a very few others. 

$5* c?* <&* 

Great Preparations. 

Great preparations are being made for the 
Bohemian Club high jinks, which begins the 
11th of August. It is expected to far surpass 
anything in former years, and members and 
guests are coming from all over the country 
for it, and accommodations are being made 
for a thousand or more men. David Warfield 
is eagerly awaiting it. Dr. Younger is hast- 
ening from Paris, as is also Frank Unger, and 
many from the East and from the southland. 
David Bispham is to sing some of Henry Had- 
ley 's wonderful music, and Joe Bedding of 
"Natoma" fame has the libretto. As is usual 
each year, there will be a large contingent 
from the army, and the debonair club men will 
fill their tents with guests. How the Bohemian 
can excel its efforts of previous years in spec- 
tacular effect or hospitality is a puzzle. 

J* Jt jt 
The Trouble With Him. 

Simpson was one day arrested and brought 
into the police court. 

Said the justice: "What is your name?" 

"S-s-s-s " 

"What is wour name?" demanded the 
justice. 

Why, S-s-s-s-s-s " 

"I don't understand. What did you say 
your name is?" 

"Why, my n-name is S-s-s-s-s " 

Turning to the policeman the justice said: 
"Here, officer, what is this man charged 
with?" 

"Faith, your honor, and I think it's sody- 
wather. " 

t(5* &5* &?* 

A Great Sale of Art Works. 

The disposal of the works of art that were 
owned by the late John Edward Taylor, who 
was the proprietor of that prosperous English 
provincial paper, the Manchester Guardian, 
has interested art. collectors all over the world. 
Mr. Taylor's collection was sold at Christie's 
in London, which is famous for such affairs. 
The receipts of the sale, which lasted several 
weeks, has been over $2,000,000. How many 



HOTEL 

VENDOME 

San Jose, Cal. 



One of California's 
Show Places Where 
Homelikeness Reigns 



H. W. LAKE, Manager 



Saturday, July 27, 1912. J 



'THE WASP- 



proprietors of American metropolitan newspa- 
pers possess two million dollars 1 worth of 
works of artl American buyers were very 
prominent at this sale of the Taylor collec- 
tion. The Dnveens of New fork paid the 
enormous price tit' $32,000 for a Chinese 
famille-verte vast-, oi the Kang-He period. 
The vase is only nineteen inches high, but is 
a splendid specimen of Chinese art. The im- 
mensely valuable vas ( - of porcelain is of square 
shape, tapering toward the base, with a beaker 
neck. Its principal beauty is its gorgeous 
enameled groups nf fluwers emblematic of the 
four seasons. They are in green and aubergine 

on a yellow ground, while the neck of the vase 

is a tender apple-green, decorated with 
branches of dowering prunus reserved in white 
and with stems of aubergine. . The shoul- 
ders of the vase are enameled w,ith spring 
flowers nil a green ground. 

Another high figure paid by the Ouveens 
was $15,00(1 for a set of three vases of Chi- 
nese porcelain with Louis XVI ormolu mounts. 
The vases are of celadon of the Kang-lle peri- 
od, painted with chrysanthemums, prunus and 
bamboo in blue, rouge-de-fer, and white. 

i£& ^* <J* 

A Real Connoisseur. 

Abe Gump of the well-known San Francisco 
art firm is a great connoisseur on old porce- 
lain, and has some beautiful specimens that 
he treats with more care than is given to the 
tenderest hothouse plant. To see Abe lift 
one of these $5,000 treasures, not much larger 
than a teacup, and fondle it while expatiating 
on its fine artistic points and the beauty of 
the coloring, would be a study for Dave War- 
field. That Abe knows the real goods when 
lie sees them is beyond question. 

i£* t5* c5* 

A Splendid Keith. 

By the way, I noticed in Gump's picture 
gallery the other day a particularly fine ex- 
ample of William Keith's work. It had be- 




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longed to the collecti t the late Fred Zeile, 

and was purchased I m the estate by Ihe 

Gumps al a high figui Fred Zeile and the 
old California master t landscape art were 

warm friends. The nerable painter out- 
lived the financier. l eith's works will be 
worth a greal deal 01 money one of these 
days if the pictures b; ppen to belong to the 
painter's best period 1890 to 1906. His 
work prior tu 1*91) an. I after 1906 is not val- 
ued equally high by connoisseurs. 

-.•« < ..* 
"Bagging" Still the Kage. 
One reads occasional statements in the 

newspapers that "racing" has died an un- 
natural death bul don 'I you believe a bit of 
it! Raj; parties are all the ra£C with a cer- 
tain set, and a very prosperous one, and the 
raggers of pronounced talent are deluged with 
invitations. The Texas Tommy "professors" 
are still reaping a golden harvest, but I don t 
mind predicting that their noble profession 
is on the toboggan and most of them will be 
peddling tamales or sweeping out saloons soon. 

Slightly Off the Mark. 

Some of the good ladies who glorify the 
society pages of our esteemed daily contem- 
poraries, persist in making Mr. "William B. 
Bourn go to visit his daughter, Mrs. Arthur 
Rose Vincent, at "Muckross Abbey." They 
mean Kenmare House, once the county seat 
in Ireland of the Karl of Kenmare. Every 
American tourist knows the place. Muckross 
Abbey is a "house from which" no resident 
returns, for it has been used for centuries as 
a cemetery. The idea of the Croesus of Cali- 
fornia residing in the wind-swept and aerie 
ruins of the old abbey, where toads and owls 
would hardly have a homelike feeling, is 
worthy of a front page in a comic annual, 

t5* t£& *2fr 

A Cafe with an "Atmosphere." 

The interior of Tait 's Cafe presents a gay 
and animated appearance these days " 'tween 
the hours of 3 and 6 o'clock." During these 
hours fashionable and Bohemian San Francis- 
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repast. The most casual observer must admit 
that the "atmosphere" of the place is very 
compelling, and the impression made is a 
pleasant one. 

There's a young Chinese petite girl who goes 
from table to table in native attire giving out 
neat little annoouncement cards which bear 
the interesting information that the cafe is 
going to give away a beautiful $1,250 Oakland 
automobile — the Prize Car. This young Chi- 
nese lady speaks very good English, and af- 
fords patrons of the cafe much amusement 
by her quaint replies to questions asked, as 
she moves among the merry-makers. The 
automobile that is to be given away is certain- 
ly a beauty, and one that any woman would 
be proud to own. 

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Booms, Nos. 363-364-365 
Russ Bldg., San Francisco. 




10 



-THE WASP* 



[Saturday, July 27, 1912. 



Criticism That Compels. 

It is said that tempting offers from Eastern 
journals have been made to the Chronicle's 
Berkeley representative who reported the per- 
formance of "The Toad" at the Greek Thea- 
ter, where the Carmel-by-tbe-Sea contingent 
exhibited such intellectual and dramatic re- 
splendency that there was little need of any 
artificial illumination. It was in the sentence 
devoted to the performance of Perry New : 
berry that the Chronicle's representative 
showed himself the peer of Dean Swift and the 
master of Ambrose Bieree in the use of Eng- 
glish at once graphic, incisive and thought- 
compelling. 

Perry Newberry made a good "Toad." He 
played the part exceptionally well. 

To add one word to this masterpiece of 
dramatic criticism would be a defacement of 
art in its highest manifestation — a painting 
of the lily and a gilding of the rose. Buskin, 
Hazlett, Walter Anthony, Tommy Nunan, 
Waldemar Young— all the tribe of critics roll- 
ed into one could not do the job better. 

Perry Newbarry made a good "Toad." He 
played the part exceptionally well. 

The true place of the veracious scribe of 
the Chronicle is not Berkeley, but Broadway, 
New York. If we mistake not, he will soon 
be heard of in the metropolis jostling Ashton 
Stevens and Alan Dale on their lofty pedes- 
tals. 

Fortunately for Mr. Newberry's fellow-act- 
ors, the Berkeley critic was not as critical in 
his remarks about them as the chief frog in 
the puddle. 

JS J* J* 
Two More Adrift. 

An unhappy sequel follows a brilliant wed- 
ding in the divorce of Lieutenant and Mrs. 
William H. Anderson. The notable wedding 
of the Andersons took place on the first of 
February. It was a fashionable church affair, 
the ceremony taking place at St. Luke's, 
when society attended en masse. A short hon- 
eymoon followed the wedding, and the newly 
married couple took a cottage in "Officers' 
Bow" at the Presidio. Almost two months 
ago Mrs. Anderson returned to her parents' 
home and refused to go back to the Lieu- 
ant. The suit for the annulment of the mar- 



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riage was kept secret. The bride and her 
counsel met the judge early one morning, and 
in ten minutes the decree of the annulment 
was recorded. Lieutenant Anderson made 
no attempt to contest the suit. Mrs. Ander- 
son is 18 years old, while Lieutenant Ander- 
son is 25. Nowadays any marriage between 
a girl of 18 and a young fellow of 25, with 
the facilities for divorce so numerous and 
inexpensive, is likely to be a sudden if not 
pathetic failure. When the couple are a San 
Francisco girl, accustomed to the gratifica- 
tion of her wishes, and without the slightest 
idea of the value of a dollar, and an unlucky 
young officer in Uncle Sam's army trying to 




ENGLISH NOBILITY ON VIEW 

A pose of the Duke of Sutherland's heir and 
bride for the benefit of the press. 

keep up appearances on the meager salary of 
a lieutenant, the impossibility of peace in the 
family becomes what the sporting gentlemen 
call a "mortal cinch." 

A Case in Point. 

There has been much discussion in society 
and journalistic circles over the question of 
permitting wedding parties to be photograph- 
ed and the pictures printed in the newspapers. 
The trouble over the photographers who tried 
to snap the Crocker-Whitman wedding has 
stirred up the discussion. Herewith is pre- 
sented a picture taken recently in London 
when the eldest son of the Duke of Sutherland 
was married to Lady Aileen Butler, also a 
member of the English nobility and one of the 
noted beauties of Great Britain. The Duke 
of Sutherland is one of the greatest landhold- 
ers in Europe, and his family is ah old one. 
It can hardly be said that when his eldest son 
and the titled beauty of the first rank have 
their pictures taken for publication in news- 
papers that they are seeking vulgar notoriety. 
But it was Thackeray who said that the most 



exclusive people in England were not the 
nobility, but the rich city people who had 
made their wealth in finance or trade. "A 
mere gentleman may hope to sit at almost 
anybody's table — to take his .place at my 
lord duke's in the country, to dance a quad- 
rille at Buckingham Palace itself," but unless 
you are a capitalist or a titled personage you 
may not hope to put your feet under the ma- 
hogany of the great commercial swell. This 
pose of great exclusiveness is not uncommon 
with our American rich people of the second 
generation of wealth, and they shudder at 
the mere tn ought of doing what the dukes and 
marchionesses they like to imitate do as a 
matter of course. 

W-* 1&* <£* 

She Guessed. 

Two ladies, previously unacquainted, were 
conversing at a reception. After a few con- 
ventional remarks the younger exclaimed: "I 
cannot think what has upset that tall blonde 
man over there. He was so attentive a little 
while ago, but he won't look at me now." 

"Perhaps," said the other, "he saw me 
come in. He's my husband." 

t?* t&* ^* 
A Bishop's Fee. 

Bishop William Ford Nichols is said to have 
received a check for $1,500 for officiating at 
the wedding of Malcolm D. Whitman and 
Jennie A. Crocker. The rector of the church 
got a check for $300, he assisting" the Bishop 
in the marriage ritual. The Crocker family 
has been very liberal in its donations to the 
Episcopal Church in California. The fine 
block on California street, between Taylor 
and Jones, on which the Crocker family man- 
sion stood until the great fire of 1906, was 



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Victor Talking Machines. 

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SAN FRANCISCO. 

14TH & CLAY STS. t OAKLAND. 



Saturday, July 27, 1912.] 



-THE I MP- 



II 




MRS. LOUIS JAMES, WHO WILL APPEAR NEXT WEEK AT THE OKPHEUM. 



given after that catastrophe to the Episcopal 
Church by Miss Jennie Crocker and other 
heirs. 

J* Jt JS 
Mr. Whitman's Train Acquaintance. 

A current story about young Whitman, who 
married Miss Jennie Crocker, depicts the Bos- 
ton man as a real American, devoid of any- 



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S. S. Nippon Maru (Intermediate Service 
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S. S. Tenyo Maru, (Via Manila direct) 

Friday, September 27, 1912 

Steamers sail from Company's pier, No. 34, 
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No cargo received on board on day of Bailing 
Round trip tickets at reduced rates. 

For freight and passage apply at office, 4th 
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625 Market St. 

W. H. AVERT, Assistant General Manager. 



thing in the line of what are usually desig- 
nated as "airs." Nobody on the overland 
train by which he came to California knew 
that he was coming to the Far West to marry 
one of its richest heiresses. He mingled free- 
ly with the other men on the train, and to one 
of them, the representative of a large Eastern 
furniture factory, he remarked casually in the 
course of numerous conversations in the smok- 
ing room, that he was a widower, but intended 
to marry again soon — not a word of the iden- 
tity of his prospective bride. The most sur- 
prised man in San Francisco was the furniture 
manufacturer's agent when he saw his fellow- 
passenger's picture in the newspapers as the 
husband of Miss Jennie Crocker. He blinked 
and rubbed his eyes and blurted out: "Why, 
that's the young fellow who came out on the 
train with me, and he never said a word about 
who was to be his bride. Well, I'm jiggered 
if that don't beat everything!" 

Mr. Whitman is sure of a hearty handshake 
if that manufacturer's agent should meet him 
anywhere on the highways. It took him three 
days to work off his surprise by telling every- 
body he knew what a fine fellow his chance 
acquaintance was, and what a lucky girl Jen- 

Where can you find a better advertising 
medium than THE WASP, reaching, as it 
does, over 5,000 society and club women? 
The women are the buyers. 



nie Crocker was to pick out such a genuine 
American instead of some nonentity with a 
title. 



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12 



-THE WASP- 



[Saturday, July 27, 1912. 



Alas, How True! 

The society editor of a San Francisco sen- 
sational daily — one of the yellowest — deplores 
the fact that so many fat fortunes made in 
this State have been annexed to other States 
by the effective and easy process of matri- 
mony. To recount: Hermann Oelrichs came 
here and carried away some of the millions 
of the Fair estate,, made by the late Senator 
Jim Fair in mining on the Comstoek and also 
on Pine street, San Francisco. Popular fancy 
has it that the thrifty Senator added more to 
his affluence by the smooth work of the Stock 
Exchange than by the strenuous shovels of 
the mineTS in Nevada. 

The carrying away of Flora Sharon, who 
became the wife of Sir Thomas Hesketh, and 
a member of the landed gentry of England, 
also gives the reminiscent editress aforesaid 
a bitter pang. Her tears drop as she counts 
the pearls of great price captured by Cupid 
and carried off to captivity in sister States, 
or far-away foreign lands — the Princess Andre 
Poniatowski of the nouse of Sperry, the Prin- 
cess Colonna of the house of Mackay, the 
Princess Hatzfeldt of the house of Hunting- 
ton. 

* * * 

Then, too, did not Mr. Searles, the art dec- 
orator, captivate the fancy and capture the 
millions of the widow Hopkins, who erected 
the great wooden palace which afterwards be- 
came an art school? Did not George Crocker, 
after he married Miss Rutherford of this, his 
native State, prefer New York} And did not 
his niece desert us and bestow a large slice 
of her great fortune on Francis Burton Har- 
rison? Alas, 'tis true! 

* * * 

But why weep for the bitter past and the 
the millions we cannot recall? Let us turn 
over a new leaf and resolve to keep our rich 
heiresses and our great family millions here, 
so that the "common people" for whom Mr. 
Hearst's tender heart and that of "The Col- 
onel" bleed incessantly, may have a hack at 
them? How shall we begin. One of the first 
moves should be to impress on these migratory 



Art & Refinement are displayed In Tasteful Attire. 




-MAKERS OF- 



LADIES' GOWNS and FANCY 
COSTUMES 

•420 SUTTER STREET. NEAR STOCKTON. 
Phone DOUGLAS 4964 

■ AN FRANCISCO. CAL, 



owners of millions that we prefer their pres- 
ence to their absence. The latter impression 
has hitherto been the, one most vigorously 
beaten into their intelligence. We have dili- 
gently cleared their minds of all doubt that 
we regard them as undesirable and aangerous 
citizens, who have to be watched constantly 
and denounced periodically. If they save their 
money we proclaim them misers, and if they 
they lavish their ducats on themselves and 
their neighbors we call for their extinction by 
the process of Socialism, which intends that 
everybody shall wear overalls and live on a 
dollar a day. 

On second thought, though, we may as well 
give up as hopeless any new schemes to keep 
the "idle rich" and their fortunes with us. 



' 




i ■■ ^^ h : 


^* 


p*#n 




t .*. 




i*5~~ ' 














\ 




i 
,,M, 




W§ - 




ifii 




rJMltidi '■' " 


' . 





Moore & Clarke Photo. 
MRS. IRWIN BROTJGHTON (nee Jungbluth) 
Her marriage to a Modesto banker was one of 
the interesting events of the week. 

Under any form of government it is a hard 
task. Even under empires and monarchies 
the millionaires are attracted to the great 
capitals and desert their ancestral abodes. In 
England the "landed gentry" has been striv- 
ing to keep up a pretense of mingling with 
the "common people" who knew their fathers 
and great-grandfathers from the time they 
were knee-high to a grasshopper. But even 
in old-fashioned, conventional England the 
habit is falling into disuse, and the aristoc- 
racy, when not in London, can usually be 
found in J^aris or some other Continental cen- 
ter of wealth and pleasure. 
• * * 

In a democracy like ours, where one man is 
"as good as another, and a blamed sight bet- 
ter," it is as hard to hold our aristocracy 
as a fistful of quicksilver. The tighter you 
grasp it the more of the stuff gets away from 
you. A radical change in human nature is 



first needed to rob us of envy of those who 
have dollars to our nickels, and keep us from 
calling them pet names instead of threaten- 
ing Hiram Johnson's legislature and the fe- 
male suffrage on them. Several earnest Apos- 
tles of Light and Sweetness are hard at work 
on this change. In the fulness of time it will 
be un fait accompli, so to speak. Brother 
Hearst is giving all the murders, divorces and 
suicides on his front page and the lay sermons 
by Brisbane on the back. In time people 
will only read the sermons. The politicians 
are calling one another liars and thieves while 
passing moral resolutions, promising that the 
millennium shall be installed by the election 
of themselves as cooks and bottle-washers. 
In the sweet by and by people will place some 
faith in those leaders, and the latter may 
actually begin to believe in themselves. In a 
few millions of years the reformation will be 
thorough, and newly made millionaires will 
no longer desert their chicken-coops in Peta- 
luma and head for the Queen Eleanor Block 
on Buoadway, San Francisco. Stock and 
bond barons and lordly owners of ancestral 
sandlots on Market street will be content to 
ride in Pat Calhoun 's chariots instead of 
dashing from New York to Newport in mono- 
planes. The daughters of our local nobility 
will intrust their palpitating fortunes to am- 
bitious young corner-grocers and honest plumb- 
ers ' apprentices witn an eye to legislative 
nominations. "It's coming out all right in 
the wash," as the saying goes. Keep up 
courage, dear editress of the Anarchs' Own, 
who deplores the loss to California of the 
Birdie and Tessie Fairs, the Mackays, Hatz- 
feldts, Poniatowskis, etc., etc. "Don't cry, 
little girl, don't cry." 

♦ 

"Wnat makes you so black, Tilda?" asked 
Mary Jane of the little negress. 

"Huh," said Tilda, "you'd be black, too, 
if you was born at midnight, in a dark room, 
and had a black f adder and a black mammy." 



Murphy Grant & Co. 

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Fourth Floor 



Saturday, July 27, 1912.; 



-THE WASP- 



13 



GERTRUDE ATHERTON'S 

FANTASTIC DISCOVERY. 



Queen Elizabeth's Illegitimate Son. 

BBTBUDE ATHEBTON aayfi: "Bacon 
wrote Shakespeare," and Bhe adds 
I) the informal ton i bat Bacon was t be 
son of Queen Elizabeth and Lord 
Dudley. It hasn *t been stated iu 
print how t in.' famous novelist arrived at t bis 
interesting historical conclusion! which seems 
entirely at variance with t ho well known 
facts of Bacon's birth, rise and downfall. He 
was flu.' si>n of Sir Nicholas Bacon (Baron 
Vemlam) and was burn at York House. Lon- 
don, duly 22, 1561. It is absolutely known 
that Bacon was for many years a needy and 
briefless young lawyer in Loudon. Although 
his family was influential and anxious to ad- 
vance him, he did not advance very fast. He 
used his pen to aid his purse and became rec- 
ognized as a man of great literary talents. 
What Bacon most desired, however, and what 
he schemed for tirelessly was to become at- 
torney-general, for that was a position of 
great power, with rich emoluments. It was 
not till 1607, four years after the death of 
Queen Elizabeth, that Bacon managed to get 
himself appointed even solicitor-general, a 
much lower position, and he did not become 
attorney-general until 1613. Queen Eliza- 
beth had then been dead ten years and James 
1. of England and Scotland reigned in her 
stead. 

This King James was the son of Mary, 
Queen of Scots and Lord Darnley, and the 
most superficial student of history knows that 
Queen Elizabetn beheaded the unfortunate 
Mary. Queen of Scots. Bacon, therefore, was 
indebted to the son of Elizabeth's hated rival 
for his promotion to positions he had longed 



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kit in Elizabeth's roig . but never conld at- 
tain, □ atter how inningly he schemed. 

He became the Lord " tancellor of England 
in L618 and three y; later was tried for 
ding hie high office by accepting bribes. 
He confessed his guilt ad was removed, and 
thus fell from his big estate, a lamentable 
example of a wonderfu clever and versatile 
mind, which Bel the possession of money 
above everything. He died from pneumonia 
contracted by going oui in the winter to get 
some snow to stuff a chicken. 

If this greal writer, who was never a 
great lawyer nor a just judge, bad been the 
aatural son of so powerful a queen as Eliza- 
beth, he would not have i a compelled to 

devote his literary talents to the work of a 
[iterate back in London during the years of 
a most discouraging struggle for recognition 
in public life. Time and again the attention 
of Elizabeth was directed to nis talents and 
his professed loyalty to the crown. He wrote 
works to testify to his loyalty, but as long 
as Elizabeth lived he remained in compara- 
tive obscurity. It was only when the Queen 
died that J'.aeun beg:ni to make headway in 
politics, in which he had demonstrated that 
lie was a treacherous friend as well as a cor- 
rupt judge. 

He remained the intimate friend of the 
Earl of Essex until the nobleman fell from 
royal favor and was prosecuted mercilessly 
for treason. Then Bacon was bis uitterest and 
most dangerout enemy and did more than any 
other person to bring the discreaited favorite 
to the scaffold. There is little doubt that 
Essex would have escaped with a heavy fine, 
imprisonment or banishment, had Bacon not 
urged his conviction for treason, which car- 
ried with it the penalty of beheadal. Bacon's 
true character was shown in this merciless 
prosecution of bis former intimate friend and 
benefactor, whom be was willing to hurry to 
an untimely death so that he. Bacon, could 
rise to fame and eminence by the destruction 
of the Queen's discarded favorite. 

Even after this exhibition of so-called 
"zeal" in the punishment of "dangerous 
traitors," Queen Elizabeth hesitated to make 
Bacon attorney-general, and she died without 
granting him the office he sought so eagerly 
and was willing to do anything to attain. 

Gertrude Atherton will De compelled to 
exercise a great deal of literary skill before 
she can convince students of history that the 
behavior of Elizabeth towards Bacon was 
that of a mother towards a son — even an il- 
legitimate one. In Elizabeth's day, illegiti 
mate sons oi powerful soverigns were more 
likely to get titles and princely estates than 
to be left to struggle in comparative poverty. 

That merry monarch, King Charles II., who 
reigned about fifty years after Elizabeth, left 
fifteen of his illegitimate progeny for the 
Englisn taxpayers to support. He made his 
"left-handed." offsprings dukes and count- 
esses. The list included the Dukes of South- 
hampton, Grafton. Northumberland, the Duke 
of St. Albans and the Earl of Plymouth, the 
Countesses oi Litchfield and Sussex and Coun- 
tess of Yarmouth. He made his mistresses 
duchesses and countesses and bestowed on 
them incomes befitting royal princesses, who 
kept up courts of their own. 

English history is not the only subject on 
which Mrs. Atherton has strange notions. She 



Men of fashion always have their shirts 
made to order, for they find that the ready- 
made shirts are uncomfortable, ill-fitting and 
apt to give anything but a stylish effeet. Such 
men patronize first-class establishments, such 
as that of D. C. Heger, 243 Kearny street, 
and 118 Geary street, where skilled workmen 
make shirts and underwear of perfect fit, the 
latest styles and the best of materials. A man 
is often judged by his linen, and good linen 
betokens the gentleman. 



told a New York journalist not long ago that 
she believes in astrology, hypnotism, the pow- 
er of the mental therapeutist to cure not only 
insomnia, but love. 

"An astrologer in San Francisco," she 
says, "told me not only my past but my fu- 
ture without knowing who 1 was. My life 
is unravelling according to her predictions. 
When .1 wrote 'The Conqueror' 1 had a Btrange 
feeling that I should never write another 
I k. I wrote it in response to an irresist- 
ible urge. 'i his same astrologer explained 
this by telling me that 1 belonged to the 
race of Hamilton." 

The doctrine of reincarnation also interests 
Mrs. Atherton very much she confesses. Hav- 
ing such an extensive field for mental effort, 
the talented lady should have no fears of 
growing old. Age cannot bring ennui to one 
with so many fads, even though some of them 
are as useless as the inquiry "how old is 

AlllH'.'" 



Where can you find a better advertising 
medium than THE WASP, reaching, as it 
does, over 5,000 society and club women? 
The women are tbe Duyers. 



YOUR FAMILY 

SILVERSMITH 

Every family at some time or another 
needs something in the silverware line, or 
has articles to be repaired or matched, or 
jewelry to be fixed, and doubtless would 
be glad to know of an absolutely reliable 
house, where the charges are right. Such 
a house is the John O. Bellis Silverware 
Factory, 328 Post street, San Francisco, 
where all wants of this nature can be sup- 
plied at reasonable cost. The firm enjoys 
the confidence of some of the most promi- 
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their business is the altering, resetting or 
entirely reconstructing of old family jew- 
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what transformation can be wrought on 
your old trinkets at trifling expense with- 
out impairing any of their sentimental 
value. 

For staple goods, such as toilet articles, 
tableware, etc., this firm cannot be sur- 
passed on the Pacific Coast, while their 
trophy cups and presentation pieces made 
to order are without peers. A visit of in- 
spection at 328 Post St. (Union Square) is 
invited. 




A 



Established 1853. 
Monthly Contracts, 91.60 per Month. 

NEW WORKS JUST ERECTED AT 27 
TENTH ST, S. F. 

Largest and Most Dup to Date on Pacific 
Coast. 

Wagons catl twice daily. 

Cleaning Dainty Garments Oar Specialty 

F. Thomas Parisian Dyeing & 
Cleaning Works 



HERE THE BLAME REST 




OR SEVERAL TEARS The Wasp has been 
endeavoring to arouse our citizens to pro- 
tect themselves from a repetition of the 
awful disaster of 1906. One of the strong- 
est things in the history of municipal in- 
competency and mismanagement is the 
fact that six years after San Francisco 
was almost obliterated by fire, our city is still at the mercy 
of the flames of a great conflagration. 

The water supplj 7 is more defective than ever. 
The Auxiliary Fire Protection System has been so bungled 
that it has caused the waste of millions of dollars and is 
not yet in operation. 

Some time ago the completion of the Twin Peaks reser- 
voir was celebrated by a sort of fete champetre, the munici- 
pal authorities, including the President of the Board of 
Works, Michael Casey, participating in the affair. Many 
merchants and tax-payers foolishly imagined that they were 
on the eve of a reduction of the enormous fire insurance 
rates that have prevailed since the disaster of 1906. Why 
not? The Twin Peaks reservoir was finished. A large force 
of men had long been laying the pipes of the Auxiliary sys- 
tem; what more was needed than to turn on the water, fill 
the pipes, and show the fire insurance companies that San 
Francisco had acquired a high pressure system that made 
impossible a repetition of the 1906 calamity. 

Alas for those roseate conclusions ! It was soon discovered 
that the Twin Peaks reservoir was a sieve, which wouldn't 
hold anything but sand, and as for the water pipes extend- 
ing from the sieve, many of them were still above ground, 
instead of in place. 

The Downtown Association, a body of merchants eager to 
see their city go ahead, had applied to the Underwriters for 
reduction of insurance rates. The Underwriters refused the 
request promptly and emphatically. Thereupon the Down- 
town Association appointed one of its members to investi- 
gate the matter and report thereon. He has reported that 
the High Pressure System is a failure, by reason of the de- 
fects of the Twin Peaks reservoir and other errors. Fur- 
thermore, in the words of the committeeman, who made 
the investigation, 

The High Pressure System is a failure for the reasons 
stated, and also from the fact that changes by the City 
Engineers from the plans originally approved have 
been made without consultation with the National 
Board of Underwriters. The bigotry and ignorance of 



the City Engineers is more costly than graft, as men 
practicing the latter have sufficient intelligence to oc- 
casionally give some returns for money expended. ■ 

The committeeman of the Downtown Association was not 
disposed to saddle all the responsibility for the blunders on 
Commissioner Casey. The investigator arrived at the con- 
elusion that the Engineer's Department was to be blamed 
chiefly. In the words of the investigator : — 

The person directly responsible, Mr. H. D. H. Con- 
nick, has been selected by Mr. Moore as the most com- 
petent man to scatter the fund of millions of dollars 
to be entrusted to the Exposition Directors. I have 
used the term "scatter" advisedly. The financial loss 
to the public of San Francisco to date on account of 
Mr. Connick's stewardship of the High Pressure Sys- 
tem amounts to $4,500,000 in excess of the bond issue 
of $5,200,000. * * *' 

Merchants of San Francisco should weep when they 
compare the criminal waste of funds contributed by 
them to sleepless nights spent in calculating a few 
dollars' profit from their personal transactions. In view 
of the high cost of insurance and other fixed charges, 
which militate against our successful competition with 
other cities, it is imperative that this association should 
at once adopt a course of action directed towards the 
clearing out of the City Engineer's office. 

If politics require the retention of the -incompetents, 
it would be far better to pension them at full pay to 
gain knowledge and experience otherwise than as such 
tremendous cost to our city, as has been demonstrated. 

The Wasp, beginning with the first publication of the 
plans, in October, 1908, has repeatedly pointed out the glar- 
ing blunders that were being made in the planning and 
building of the Auxiliary Fire Protection system. Time and 
time again this journal pointed out particular instances of 
error in the plans. Time and time again it charged the in- 
competence in the City Engineer's office, which was respons- 
ible for the errors in the plans. Instance after instance has 
been published in these columns during the four years since 
1908, of waste and outrageous extravagance in the expendi- 
tures made at the behest of the City Engineer's office, on 
the Fire Protection system. 

Had proper official attention been given to the charges re- 
peatedly published by The Wasp, the millions which the 
Downtown Association now finds expended and wasted, 
could have been saved. The Downtown Association should 
investigate further and find why responsible officials so 
persistently neglected to investigate the specific charges 
against the City Engineer's office, made by The Wasp. 




PASSING OF THE IDLE EICH.' 



Saturday, July 27, 1912.] 



-THE WASP 



15 



FREAKY FIRE BOATS. 

READERS OF THE WASP remember that we declare. 1 
that the Fire Boats, which were planned during the 
late administration of Mayor Taylor, were laughed at In- 
competent engineers. The Wasp said that if these Fir 
Boats were built on the plans approved by the City Eugin 
ecr's Department they would run backward instead of for- 
ward. In other words, it' a fire occurred at the Market street 
wharf and the Fire Boats began to work on il, they would 
immediately begin to back away, and keep backing till they 
wound up on the Alameda mud flats. 

The cause' of this freak was that the pumping machinery 
was improperly adjusted, and in taking water from the bay, 
with their pumps, the Fire Boats would be drawn back by 
the suction. 

The Wasp harped on this^defect in vain. The building of 
the Fire Boats on the defective plan described was carried 
on. Eventually it was discovered that The Wasp comments 
were correct, and the plans for the Fire Boats were changed. 
Changes of plans always cost more money. The Fire Boats, 
when finished, had cost the City a great deal more money 
than if built under capable supervision. One of the loeal 
railroad companies had built Fire Boats for its own use, and 
by private contract, for about half what the city of San Fran- 
cisco paid for its boats. Besides that, the railroad boats were 
good and effective, and the City's Fire Boats "are unsea- 
worthy and cannot pass a wharf or vessel in close quarters 
without collision." 

That is what has been said of them by George Wellington, 
whom the Downtown Association appointed to investigate 
the matter. Mr. Wellington is chairman of the Public Util- 
ities of the Downtown Association. Every citizen interested 
in establishing good government and stopping waste of pub- 
lic money should read Mr. Wellington's report to the Down- 
town Association. Here are a few paragraphs from the in- 
teresting report: 

The Fire Boats are unseaworthy and cannot pass a 
wharf or vessel in close quarters without collision. The 
specifications under which the boats were built, called 
for the simultaneous operation of engines and pumps, 
while the capacity of the boilers specified was not 
equal to supply the requirements. In order to control 
the course of the Fire Boats while under way, the 
position of the engines were exchanged and skags at 
an additional cost were installed. 

The proposed omission of the High Pressure Mains 
on the Embarcadero will leave the shipping wharves 
with practically no protection, as in a storm from the 
north or south, the Fire Boats could not be operated 
successfully from windward and could not, on account 
of the heat, be handled from leeward. The Fire Boats 
are botches from start to finish. 

♦ ■ 

INEXCUSABLE WASTE. 

IF THERE BE one waste of the City's money more inexcus- 
able and more outrageous than any other, it is the waste 
of the money expended directly by the Board of Supervisors 
in printing and circulating the Municipal Record. It was 
grafted on the city treasury on the pretense that it would 
publish the true record of municipal affairs. The pretense is 
a lie. It does not publish a true record of municipal affairs. 
It publishes garbled records of important matters or sup- 




IT'S A LAUGH ALL ROUND. 

presses mention of them entirely. It publishes a lot of in- 
significant items that are all treated more fully or more sat- 
isfactorily by the daily newspapers than by the official organ. 
The only use of the Municipal Record is to furnish easy 
positions for a couple of newspaper men who got tired of 
the routine grind of journalism and used their pull to make 
easy places for themselves, where they could draw regular 
salaries and grow fat. One of them is so fat he weighs 300 
pounds. The plan of the present city administration seems 
to be to find salaries for newspaper men who have grown 
weary of their professional work and wish to attach them- 
selves to the city treasury like so many barnacles. 

♦ ■ 

LET'S TRY THE RECALL. 

THE HON. HIRAM JOHNSON has already equaled, if not 
beaten the record of the Hon. William H. Langdon, 
who signalized his election as District Attorney of San Fran- 
cisco by starting his campaign for Governor, on the Hearst 
Independence League ticket. In ten long months he didn't 
do ten minutes of official work outside of the drawing of his 
salary. He attended to that regularly, you can bet ! 

The Recall should be tried on some of those officials who 
act as if they were elected to electioneer for higher offices 
and creat political machines. 

The word should be passed along to recall Hiram. He's 
one of the worst offenders, and would make the most salu- 
tary example. What's the use of the Recall, if it isn't tried 
on somebody? Let's all get busy and whoop it up. Heave-a- 
ho, my hearties ! A long pull, a strong pull, and a pull alto- 
gether, and the Hon. Hiram will find himself back in his law 
office all out of breath and anxious to get another retainer 
like the fat one which saved Dalzell Brown a life sentence. 




Vacation 1912 

A Handbook of 

Summer Resorts 

Along the line of the 

NORTHWESTERN 
PACIFIC RAILROAD 

This book tells by picture and word 
of the many delightful places in Marin, 
Sonoma, Mendocino, Lake and Humboldt 
Counties in which to spend your Vaca- 
tion — Summer Resorts, Camping Sites, 
Farm and Town Homes. 



Copies of Vacation 1912 may be ob- 
tained at 874 Market St. (Flood Build- 
ing), Sausalito Ferry Ticket Office, or 
on application to J. J. Geary, G. P. & 
F. A., 808 Phelan Building, San Fran- 
cisco. 



NEW ENGLAND HOTEL 

Located in beautiful grove about 40 rods from 
station. Beautiful walks, grand scenery; hunt- 
ing and fishing, boating, bathing, bowling and 
croquet. Table supplied with fresh fruit and 
vegetables, milk and eggs from own ranch daily. 

Adults $7 to $9 per week; special rates for 
children. 

Address F. K. HARRISON, Camp Meeker, 
Sonoma County, Cal. 



OWIN SUMMER HOME IN 

CAMP MEEKER 

Mountains of Sonoma Co. Lots $15 up. Meeker 
-uilds cottages $85 up. Depot, stores, hotels, 
.staurant, phone, post, express office, theater, 
tree library, pavilion, churches,, sawmill; 2,000 
lots sold, 700 cottages built. Sausalito Ferry. 
Address M. O. MEEKER, Camp Meeker. 



Redwood Grove 



% mile from Gueraeville; tents and cottages; 
abundance of fruit, berries; bus meets all trains. 
Rates $10-$11 per week; L. D. phone. Address 
THORPE EROS., Bos 141, Gueraeville, Sonoma 
Co., Cal. 



ROSE HILL 

HOTEL AND COTTAGES 
Camp Meeker 

Opposite depot; 20 minutes' ride from Russian 
River ; surrounded by orchards and vineyards ; 
excellent dining-room, with best cooking. Fish- 
ing, boating, swimming and dancing. Many 
good trails for mountain climbing. Open all 
year. Can accommodate 75 guests. Adults, $6 
to $10 per week; children half rates. 

Building lots for sale from $50 and up. Ad- 
dress MRS. L. BARBIER, Camp Meeker, So- 
noma County, Cal. 



The Gables 



Sonoma county's ideal family resort, just opened 
to the public. Excellent table, supplied from 
our dairy and farm. Dancing, tennis, games. 
Bus to hot baths and trains daily at Verano sta- 
tion. Rates $2.50 per day, $12 and up per 
week. Open year round. Address H. P. MAT- 
THEWSON, Sonoma City P. O., Cal. 



Hotel Rovvardennan 

OPEN ALL THE TEAR. " 
New ownership, new management, new fea- 
tures. Golf, tennis, bowling, fishing, boating, 
swimming, clubhouse. Free garage. 

Rates $17.50 to $25 per week; $3 to $4 per 
day. 

Folders and information at Peck-Judah's, or 
address J. M. SHOULTS, Ben Lomond, Cal. 



:: RIVERSIDE RESORT :: 



Country home % mile from Gueraeville; ideal 
spot; y° mile of river frontage; $8 to $12 per 
week. For particulars, MRS. H. A. STAGG, 
Proprietor, Gueraeville, Sonoma county. 



COSMO FARM 

On the Russian River; electric lighted through- 
out. Rates $10 to $12 per week. For particu- 
lars see Vacation Book or address H. P. Mc- 
PEAK, P. O. Hilton, Sonoma Co., Cal. 



RIONIDO HOTEL 

Lawn Tennis, Croquet, Shuffle Board, Swings, 
Shooting Gallery, Box Ball Alleys, also 4,000 
square feet Dancing Pavilion, unsurpassed Bathing 
and Boating, and large social hall for guests. 
Hotel ready for guests. Rates, $12 per week. 
American plan. For reservations address RIO- 
NIDO CO., Rionido, Sonoma Co., Cal. 



Summer Resorts 

AT HOME, AT THE CLUB, CAPE OB HOTEL 

CASWELL'S COFFEE 



Always Satisfactory 
GEO. W. CASWELL COMPANY 

530-532-534 Folsom St. Phone Kearny 3610 

Write for samples and prices. 



CARR'S 



NEW MONTE 
RIO HOTEL 



NEAREST TO STATION AND RIVER. 

New modern hotel, first-class in every detail 
and equipped with every modern convenience. 
Swimming, boating, canoeing, fishing, launching, 
horseback riding and driving. Hotel rates $2 
day; $12 and $14 per week. Round trip, $2.80. 
good on either the broad or narrow gauge rail- 
roads. Sausalito Ferry. Address C. F. CARR, 
Monte Rio, Sonoma Co., Cal. 



HOTEL RUSTICANO 

The hotel is just a two-minute walk from the 
depot amongst the giant redwood trees. The 
amusements are numerous — boating, bathing, 
lawn tennis, bowling, dancing, nickelodeon, and 
beautiful walks. A more desirable place for a 
vacation could not be found. .Rates, $9 to $12 
per week ; rates to families. 

For folder, address L. B. SELENGER, Prop., 
Camp Meeker, Sonoma County, Cal. 



U. S. ARMY 



TENTS 

BLANKETS, COTS, HAMMOCKS 

SPIRO HARNESS CO. 

307 MARKET STREET, S. F. 
Write for Free Catalogue. 



Saturday, July 27, 1912.] 



-THE WASP- 



i? 




IP Vol* think t hat there are no club activi- 
ties nun-, you are mistaken. Club life is 
like the brook — it "goes on forever." 
The lull in public assemblies is only a qui- 
■•ins before the bursting of a bomb. Newly 
elected presidents are appointing committees 
:uni calling committee women together. Plana 
are being formulated, polished and veneered 
with line discrimination, for the approaching 
club year promises to be the best in all the 
annuls «.!' clubdom. 

MRS. .1. \V. ORR, President of the Cali- 
fornia State Federation, is one of the 
strongest forces in this great improv- 
ed plan for the year's work. It was she who 
was largely influential in securing the Bien- 
nial for California. It has been she who has 
watched the development of the State's aff- 
airs with the discerning wisdom of a leader. 
At the State Federation, held at Paso Robles 
two months ago, Mrs. J. W. Orr was 
unanimously elected to the Presidency of 
the California State Federation. Her abil- 
ity as an executive officer is universally 
recognized, for she knows how to organize, 
to deputize, to supervise — three strong essen- 
tials for pronounced success. 
* * * 

MRS. PERCY L. SHUMAN, whose pic- 
is given, also, is President of the San 
Francisco District Federation, a ter- 
ritory represented by 69 clubs, with a mem- 




Vaughan-Fraser Photo. 
MRS. J. W. ORR. 
President of the California State Federation, and 
a leader of distinction. 



bership of ti.uuu woiim-m. Mrs. Sliuman is a 
natural leader, a woman of culture and re- 
finement, whose knowledge is the result of 
years of study and travel throughout the 
world. She has already started vigilantly to 




Kathryn Hopkins Photo. 
MRS. PERCY L. SHUMAN. 

Highly efficient as President of San Francisco 
District. 

work, with the co-operative force of a splen- 
did board. 

* * * 

AT THE LUNCHEON given recently at 
Stockton, Mrs. W, 0. Morrow, wife of 
the great California novelist, Past Pres- 
ident of the Women's Press Association, ad- 
dressed the guests. She said, in part: "The 
good which the Biennial has brought to me 
and to other women: First of all, I should 
say the spirit of camaraderie. East has met 
West, South has met North, the women all 
temperamentally different, all of them climat- 
ically different, all with different aims and 
purposes in life, and yet all united in one 
common aim — the betterment of themselves 
and the uplift of their less fortunate sisters. 
The second thing that impresses me is the tre- 
mendous earnestness of these women, their 
splendid attitude of being unafraid of any- 
thing. Another impression," continued Mrs. 
Morrow, "was that of the inquiring mind. 
The women who came wanted to know every- 
thing. For instance, how many varieties of 
the eucalyptus tree have we? 

"On the whole, the Biennial is a good 
thing. It takes women out of themselves 
into a larger, broader vision. They find that 
other women are accomplishing things, and 
they, too, want to do things. * * * An 



impulse and an impetus are given to better 

things. Nol .-ill w u i >ur freedom 

and pleasures, and we mould combine to help 

those wl annol help themselves." 

Mrs, Morrow's philosophy carries with H 
the essence of true womanl I, the dominat- 
ing l'oive of l he Biennial. 



Teacher: "Now, children, which of you can 
decline the word ' sick ' .' ' ' 

Lizzie (in a tragic voice): "Sick— worse 
dead." 



GOURALD'S 

Oriental Beauty Leaves 

A dainty little booklet of exquisitely perfumed 
powdered leaves to carry in the purse. A handy 
article for all occasions to quickly improve the 
complexion. Sent for 10 cents in stamps or 
coin. 

F. T. Hopkins, 37 Jones Street, N. T. 



WALTERS SURGICAL CO. 

SURGICAL INSTRUMENTS. 
808 Sutter St., S. P. Phon. Doug].. 4011 



Sultan Turkish Baths 

624 POST STREET 
Special Department for Ladles 

Open Day and Night for Ladies and Gen 
tlemen. 
Al. Johnson, formerly of Sutter Street 
Hamraam, has leased the Sultan Turkish 
Baths, where he will be glad to see his 
"Id and new customers. 



Blake, Mof f itt & Towne 



PAPER 



37-45 Tirst Street 

PHONES: SUTTEE 2230; 1 3221 (Home) 
Private Exchange Connecting- all Departments 



LA GRANDE & WHITES 


LAUNDRY CO. 


Office and Works, 234 12th St. 


Bet. Howard & Folaom Sta. 


SAN FRANCISCO, - CALIFORNIA 


Phones: Market 916, Home M 2044. 



Eames Tricycle Co. 




Manufacturers of INVALID 
ROLLING CHAIRS for all 

purposes. Self - Propelling 
Tricycle Ohaira for the dis- 
abled. INVALID CHAIRS. 
Wholesale and retail and 
for rent. 1714 Market St., 
San Francisco. Phone Park 
2940. 1200 S. Main Street, 
Lob Angeiee. 










"-j-J N THE next decade San Francisco will 
iV l!V be called upon to accomplish many 
?)1K> things necessary in a city aspiring to 
become the Western gateway of the 
trade of the Pacific. If the work done since 
■ 1906 in restoring the business quarter of San 
Francisco be a guarantee of what will be ac- 
complished in the coming years, our city's 
commercial pre eminence is already a foregone 
conclusion. All obstacles will be overcome. 

It was, of course, the young men who re- 
built San Francisco. That great task was ac- 
complished by the business men in the prime 
of life. On them has devolved the duty of 
meeting the rapidly changing conditions. Few 
great cities in the world have undergone such 
transitions aS San Francisco since 1906, when 
our city was thrown in a day back to almost 
the primitive order of things that existed in 
early pioneer days. 

The transfer of the retail business firms of 
San Francisco from Fillmore street and Van 
Ness avenue, where they located temporarily 
after the fire of 1906, was a task of great 
magnitude and difficulty. The Downtown As- 
sociation, a body of courageous young busi- 
ness men, smoothed the way for the removal 
of the mercantile houses from their temporary 
locations in the Western Addition to their 
new permanent buildings in what had been 
the fire-swept area. 

One of the most active leaders in the down- 
town movement was Andrew G. McCarthy, 
whose portrait appears in our Gallery of Weil- 
Known Business Men this week. Mr. Mc- 
Carthy is a notable example of the fact that 
no man need eomplain of lack of opportunity 
in this great land of ours. He has worked his 
way up diligently from a modest start in busi- 
ness life, and takes pride in the fact as do 
thousands of highly successful American busi- 
ness men. Mr. McCarthy was not forced to 



remain long on the lower rounds of the ladder. 
Few energetic and capable young men are 
left there. He rose rapidly, and for years has 
been identified in a managerial capacity with 
the famous and important firm of Sherman, 
Clay & Co., whose name has been at the head 
of the music business on the Pacific Coast 
since pioneer days. Mr. McCarthy sees noth- 




ANDREW G. MCCARTHY 

A progressive young "business man wno lias ac- 
complished things for his city. 

ing ahead for San Francisco but prosperity. 
His firm has had no complaint to make of dull 
times, even in the darkest hours of San Fran- 



"X 




THE ANGLO & LONDON 
PARIS NATIONAL BANK 



SAN FRANCISCO 






Capital $4,000,000 

Surplus and Profits $1,600,000 

Total Resources $40,000,000 

OFFICERS: 

HERBERT FLEISHHACKER .President 

SIG. GREENEBAUM Chairman of the Board 

J. FRIEDLANDER Vice-President 

O. F. HUNT Vice-President 

R. ALTSCHUL Cashier 

C. R. PARKER Assistant Cashier 

WM. H. HIGH Assistant Cashier 

H. OHOYNSKI Assistant Cashier 

G. R. BURDICK Assistant Cashier 

A. L. LANGERMAN Secretary 



Cisco's trials since 1906, and the future there- 
fore appears to them to be full of golden 
promise. Mr. McCarthy takes no active part 
in polities, though, like all good citizens, he 
is deeply interested in seeing that our city 
shall enjoy the benefits of honest and efficient 
government. He served for a term as Park 
Commissioner, an honorable office, to which 
no salary is attached, and which therefore is 
regarded as a distinction by our best citizens. 
What a boon it would be to our State if 
more public offices were without salary, so 
that they no longer would be prizes for time- 
serving and worthless politicians — the office 
of State legislator, for instance, which is now 
avoided like a pestilence by most representa- 
tive business men, and sought by many fellows 
who should be in jail as vagrants. 

Business Better Here. 
After a 10,000-mile tour of Europe in his 
machine, Richard Miller, President of the Owl 
Drug Company, returned to San Francisco 
Thursday last. "I think," said Mr. Miller, in 
discussing his trip, ' ' business generally is 
better here this summer than it is in the East 
just now." Mr. Miller was accompanied home 
by his brother, Dr. Thurlow Miller, and his 
wife. Business should be better here than 
almost anywhere in the world. No other city 
has such good prospects now as San Francis- 
co on the eve of the expediture of immense 
sums of money. Then there is the opening 



Wells Fargo Nevada 
National Bank 

Of San Francisco 

Nevada Bank Building, 2 Montgomery Street. 
N. E. Corner of Market Street. 

Capital paid up $6,000,000.00 

Surplus and Undivided Profits $5,055,471.11 



Total $11,055,471.11 

OFFICERS. 
Isaias W. Hellman, President 
I. W. Hellman, Jr., Vice Pres. 
F. L. Lipman, Vice Pres. 
James K. Wilson, Vice Pres. 
Frank B. King, Cashier 
W. MeGavin, Assistant Cashier 
E. L. Jacobs, Assistant Cashier 
O. L. Davis, Assistant Cashier 
A. D. Oliver, Assistant Cashier 
A. B. Price, Assistant Cashier 

DIRECTORS. 

1 sains W. Hellman Hartland Law 

Joseph Sloss Henry Rosenfeld 

Percy T. Morgan James L. Flood 

P. W. Van Sicklen J. Henry Meyer 

Wm. P. Herrin A. H. Payson 

John C. Eirkpatriek Chaa. J. Deering 

I. W. Hellman, Jr. Jamea K. Wilson 

A. Christeson F. h. Lipman 

Wm. Haas 

ACCOUNTS INVITED. 
Prompt Service, Courteous Attention, Unexcelled 
Faeilities. 
SAFE DEPOSIT VAULTS. 



Saturday, July 27, 1912.] 



-THE WASP- 



19 



of the Panama Canal, which will change the 
geographical position <ii" California, and place 
Ban Francisco thousands of miles nearer the 
great markets of the world. 

Largest Seller. 
The United States, next to Russia, is the 
largest seller to Germany and of her total 
imports last year our share was $319,800,000, 
against Russia's $389,000,000, our sales to the 
Empire showing a gain of more than $37,000,- 

>. and Russia's $59,000,000. The purchases 

from Russia, however, are in great part 
foodstuffs and represent more the German lack 
of home supplies and the Status of industrial 
activity. 

Very Dull.. 
The real estate market has been very dull 
this week, as is usual at. this tinTe of the 
year. Many people are away at summer re- 
sorts, and everybody is postponing action till 
the vacation days are over. 

Twin Peaks Tunnel. 
The Supervisors are making haste slowly 
with the various tunnel projects. Valuable 
time is passing and little more than talk is 
recorded. A private corporation of compe- 
tent business men could get together and set- 
tle any of the tunnel projects in one-tenth of 



Smith-Tevis-Hanford 

Inc. 

MUNICIPAL AND 
CORPORATION 

BONDS 



57 Post St., 



San Francisco 



the time the Supervisors and "experts" take 
over them. As to the "experts,"' they are 
naturally in no hurrv, for they are paid by 
the day, and the longer the job lasts the bet- 
ter for tbem. 

The Stock Market. 

Despite the summer dullness, the local 
stuck market has been lively this week wir.h 
advances in Alaska Packers and Pacific Gas 
and Electric common. The latter was a good 
thing, which many investors overlooked. The 
stock was a good buy any time during the 
past month, when it sagged a little, as most 
stocks «ln when Presidential nominating con- 
ventions are disturbing business. It was a 
certainty the stock would react, and those who 
acted on that presumption have done well. 

Alaska Packers was something of a surprise, 
for it had been suspected that the salmon 
pack would not justify an advance in the 
stock. Good news by wireless changed the 
situation. 

♦ 

SIGNIFICANT PRECOCITY. 

Some wits in the railroad business have cir- 
culated the following story about E. E. Cal- 
vin, Vice-President and General Manager of 
the Southern Pacific, whose duties have been 
enlarged considerably under the new regime: 
The future railroad magnate in his youth 
lived with his parents back in Indiana, and 
his father at an early age tested his son's 
mental inclinations. The test was made simul- 
taneously with an apple, a Bible and silver 
dollar. They were all placed on a table and 
the boy was invited into the room and 
asked which of the three things he preferred, 
or wanted, most. The father had an idea if 
his son took the apple he would give promise 
of making a good farmer or orchardist; if 
the Bible, then he was most seriously inclined; 
if the dollar in coin, then he was marked for 
a business or banking career. 

"Can I help myself, daddy?" the lad asked. 

At a nod of approval from the father, the 
boy, without more ado, pocketed the money, 
and, as he began eating the apple, placed the 
Bible on a chair so as to sit up a little higher 
at the table. Shaking his head, the father 
remarked: "Well, boy, I guess you are cut 
out for a railroad man, for you certainly want 
all the traffic in sight." 



ARMOR PLATE SAFE DEPOSIT VAULTS 

of Union Safe Deposit Company in building of 

UNION TRUST COMPANY OF SAN FRANCISCO 

Junction of Market and C'Farrell Streets and Grant Avenue 


LARGEST, STRONGEST and jfl&k 


: '^~T 


lik MOST CONVENIENTLY 


ARRANGED SAFE DEPOSIT ffl| \ 


cHU 


fr. WEST OF NEW YORK 


Boxes $4 per annum AllJJUPIL 111 L 


' IjljJf ' and upwards. 


Telephone '^Sy^ilAiagi' 


Kearny 11. 



The German Savings 
and Loan Society 

Saving! (The German Bank) Commercial 

Incorporated 1868. 

626 California St., San Francisco. Cal 

( Member of the At aoclated Saving! Banki of 
San Francisco.) 

The following Branches for Eeceipt and Pay- 
ment of Deposits only: 

MISSION BRANCH, 2572 Mission street, 
between 21st and 22nd. 

RICHMOND DISTRICT BRANCH, 601 
Clement street, cor. 7th Ave. 

HAIGHT STREET BRANCH, 1456 Haight 
street, near Masonic Ave. 



June 29th, 1912. 
Assets .... $51,140,101.76 

Capital actually paid up in Cash . 1,000,000.00 
Reserve and Contingent Funds . 1,656,403.80 
Employees' Pension Fund . . 140,109.60 
Number of Depositors . . . 56,609 

Office Hours: 10 o'clock A. M. to S o'clock 
P. M., except Saturdays to 12 o'clock M. and 
Saturday evenings from 6:30 o'clock P. M. to 
8 o'clock P. M. for receipt of Deposits only. 



ON JULY 1st, 1912 
WE WILL MOVE OUR OFFICES 



410 MONTGOMERY ST. 



Our Facilities for HanaUing 

Investment Securities 

Will be Considerably Increased 



ESTABLISHED 1858 

SUTR0&C0. 



Telephone 
Sutter 3434 



Private Exchange 
Connecting All Depts. 



J. C. WILSON & CO. 



MEMBERS: 

NEW YORK STOCK EXCHANGE 
NEW YORK COTTON EXCHANGE 
CHICAGO BOARD OF TRADE 
STOCK AND BOND EXCHANGE, S. F. 

MAIN OFFICE — Mills Building, Sou Fran 



BRANCH OFFICES — Lob AngeleB, San Die- 
go, Coronado Beach, Portland, Ore. ; Seattle, 
Wash.; Vancouver, B. C 

PRIVATE WIRE NEW YORK AND CHICAGO. 



20 



-THE WASP- 



[Saturday, July 27, 1912. 




OLD MAIDS 
DIARY * 



• OODNESS ME! How exeitable some 
people are! I was making a cup of 
^^A, tea for myself when Ethyl Gayleigh 
ran in breathless to tell me she'd got 
a letter from a friend in Rome about Virgilia 
Bogue leaving her artist husband and coming 
back to America. 

Lands sake! As if it's a surprise that any 
girl accustomed to three meals a day would 
run home to her mother from a studio where 
she has to exist on the smell of an oil rag! 

Goodness me! I knew such a sweet girl 
over in Sausalito, and she got it into her 
silly head life was a blank if she didn't marry 
a painter chap that she met up the gulch one 
day when he was waiting to study a sunset. 
So he said. Mrs. Trotter, who knows every- 
thing, says that he was dodging his landlady, 
who caught sight of him on the ferryboat. 
She was coming over to the poolrooms to bet 
some money on the races, and who should she 
see but her lodger. He legged it along the 
water-front with all the boatmen and dogs at 
his heels, and he never stopped till he 'd run 
a mile up the hills like a goat. He was a long- 
legged chap, and as thin as a rail, and you 
could no more run him down than a goat. 

Lands sake, that foolish young girl was 
married to him in a month, and when I called 
to see her she was cooking a couple of mutton 
chops as big as a ten-cent piece on an oil 
stove, on the window sill. She had a five- 
gallon coal-oil can for an oven, and when 

NOT AMISS TO A MISS— A box of candy 
when she is in the country. Can be sent by 
mail or express from any one of Geo. Haas & 
Sons' four candy stores. 



PATRICK & CO. 

RUBBER STAMPS 

STENCILS. SEALS. SIGNS AND ETC. 
660 MARKET ST., - SAN FEANCISOO 



Neal Liquor Cure 
Three ' 14 09SutterSt 

DAY phone Franklin 1098 

ADOPTED BY AUSTRALIAN GOVERNMENT 



company came to lunch she had to use the 
old rusty knife her husband had for scraping 
the paint off his hand boards. I think that's 
what he called them. The things you stick 
your thumb in to mix the paint. 

"My, my! However do you live in one 
room, and where do you sleep?" I asked her, 
for you couldn't turn around without knock- 
ing down pictures and getting turpentine all 
over your clothes. While I was talking to her 
she stuck her head in the coal-oil can to see 
how the flapjacks were baking, and — mercy 
me! — her hair caught fire. 

Oh gracious! I thought I'd never get out 
alive, for Mrs. Trotter yelled "Fire, fire!" 
out of the window, and as I was flying down- 
stairs I tripped over a line of hose and fell 
down two flights on a policeman. 

I met that poor girl last week and she's 
married now so happily to a wealthy sewer 
contractor that thinks a can of paint is wast- 
ed except it's rubbed on a fence or a barn. 
He is going to give her an electric runabout 
and a long black coat if he gets the contract 
from the Board of Works for stopping all the 
leaks in the Twin Peaks reservoir with putty. 

My! these marriages with long-haired artists! 
TABITHA TWIGGS. 



GOLF AT BTJELINGAME. 
The golf tournament of the Burlingame Country 
Club attracted a large aggregation of prominent soci- 
ety people during the past week. Many motored 
down the peninsula to witness the 
games. Some of the enthusiasts were 
Mr. and Mrs. Henry Clarence Breeden, 
Mr. and Mrs. Richard Sprague, Mr. 
and Mrs. "Ward Barron, Mr. and Mrs. 
William Duncan, Mr. and Mrs. Julian 
Thorn, Mr. and Mrs. xienry Lund Jr., 
Mr. and Mrs. A. S. Stone, Mr. and 
Mrs. Fred McNear, Mr. and Mrs. Gus 
Taylor, Mr. and Mrs. Latham McMul- 
lin. Dr. and Mrs. Max Rothschild, Cap- 
tain and Mrs. Lyman, Mr. and Mrs. 
Henry Kiersted, Mr. and Mrs. Oscar 
Cooper, Mr. and Mrs. George Pope, and 
others. 



world. One o± Miss Bull's interesting experiences 
was her visit in India, where she was one of the 
American colony who enjoyed the Durbar. 



AT DEL MONTE. 

Mr. and Mrs. H. D. Pillsbury and Miss Olivia and 
Master E. S. Pillsbury motored down to Del Monte in 
their touring car from San Francisco for a week- 
end visit. 

Mi\ M. E. Pinckard of San Rafael arrived Satur- 
day, and Mr. Arthur Evans also heard the luring 
call of Del Monte's fascination. 

Mr. and Mrs. H. J. Saunders motored down from 
the city on a little pleasure trip. Mr. Saunders is 
Second Vice-President of the Western States Life 
insurance, and he, with many others in the same line, 
expect to hold a convention some time in August. 
Aside from the pleasure that a little tour affords 
these glorious summer days, he has one eye on a 
suitable location for the meeting. 

Mr. George Wharton James, whom every one 
knows as a traveler and popular author, and at 
present the. editor of "Out West," has just depart- 
ed after a few weeks' visit on the peninsula. He 
mode his headquarters at Del Monte. The Chatau- 
quans were entertained by Mr. James by a lecture 
on the Zuni Indians. He has been a student of 
Indian life for a long time, as well as of the history 
of the early missions that form such an important 
feature in the early history of California. 



Miss Martha Calhoun has gone to her Cleveland 
home. She will not be able to attend Miss Julia 
Langhorne at her wedding, as she at first contem- 
plated. 

♦ 

Miss Camille Dorn and her sister Marion are 
spending the summer months at Lake Tahoe. 



j^Y*sr#/y#^^m^^amw\\\%«2wnmunu«S£^ 







MR. SHREVE'S NEW HOME. 
A home amounting In expenditure 
to $42,045 is to he built by George R. 
Shreve, the well-known jeweler, at 
Hillsboro. The palatial residence will 
be built near the estates of George H. 
Howard, R. M. Tobin, and others of 
the fashionable colony. The building 
will be constructed along the standard 
of high architectural wors. It is de- 
signed by George H. Howard. 



I 



§ 



SANTA CevuZ A FAIRYLAND. 

The eight-day festival at Santa 
Cruz has maintained the glowing 
promises of its press agent. It has 
proved a gala event in every respect. 
The most glowing accounts nave been 
spread by all the city visitors who 
went down to witness the pageant. An- 
other army of sight-seers will put in 
this week-end at Santa Cruz for the 
spectacular attractions, and the period 
of festivity will not end till Sunday 
night. A masked hall and promenade 
wi.I be included in Saturday night's 
program. 



Miss Editu Bull is now visiting her 
sister, Mrs. Covington Pringle, at 
Menlo Park, after her tour of the 



THE PERFECTION OF WHISKEY 
QUALITY IS ALWAYS FOUND IN 



HUNTER 

BALTIMORE 

RYE 



THE 

AMERICAN GENTLEMAN'S 

WHISKEY 



Sold at all first-class cafes and by jobbers 
WM. LAN AHA N & SON, Baltimore, Md. 



I 



i 

8 









•<3&k» 



ONE ol the notable weddings of this week is 
thai "i Miss i.nelma Parker and Henry Gail- 
laard Smart in the Hawaiian Islands, where 
some ol Miss Parker's ancestors were native 
princes mid others white planters. Her husband is 
the son uf a missionary, and she met the young 
man on a voyage fiom San Francisco to Honolulu. 
Her mother is Mrs. Fred Knight, whose husband is 
a son "i the famous Republican orator, George 
Knight, and well known in clubdom and society. 
Miss Harriet Bradford of tnis city was the bride's 
only attendant. A large company of San Francisco 
society people sailed to the Island to be in attend- 
ance at the Parkers' wedding. Mr. and Mrs. Smart 
will occupy a palatial residence at Waimea, which 
has just been completed. They will, in all probab- 
ility, winter in San Francisco. 



Weddings. 



Miss Gladys Kaighin became the bride of Mr, 
William L. Murphy on Tuesday of this week. The 
wedding of the prominent vocalist was a quiet af- 
fair, owing to the illness of her mother, Mrs. Charles 
L. Kaighin. Miss Anne Murphy was maid of honor, 
Mr. William K. White, the best man. Two cousins 
of the bride, Miss Hazel Domonske and Miss Rita 
Domonske, were bridesmaids. Dainty Alice Bart- 
lett acted as dower girl, while Master Ted Thompson 
bore the ring on a satin cushion. The ushers were 
Merton S. Price Jr. and Warren D. Allen Mr. 
Merton S. Price Sr., uncle of the bride, gave her 
away. Mrs. Murphy is the daughter of the late 
Charles J. Kaighin, one of the prominent railroad 
officials some years ago. &he is well known in 
social, club and musical circles, where her statu- 
esque beauty has been considered typical of our most 
attractive California women. Mr. Murphy owns a 
large ranch in the northern part of the State. 

Miss Anne McClelland and Mr. Howard Wells 
Isham were married at a pretty ceremony which took 
place at the St. Francis. Miss Ruth Elizabeth Mc- 
Clelland, sister of the bride, was maid of honor. Mr. 
Harry McClelland, the brother of the bride, gave 
her into the keeping of the groom. Mrs. Isham is a 
graduate of the University of California and a mem- 
ber of the Alpha Phi Sorority. She is a cousin of 
Mrs. Frederick Malcolm Eaton. Mr. and Mrs. How- 
ard Isham will reside in Pasadena. 

The wedding of Miss Nellie Prewitt, daughter of 
Judge James Prewitt of Auburn, and Mr. Arthur L. 
Williams, which occurred at tne St. Francis, was an 
interesting event. Mrs. S. Keyes of Sacramento was 
matron of honor. Mr. W. H. Cullen was best man. A 
motor car was the gift of the groom's father, and a 
shower equipping the car came from the friends of 
the bride and groom. Mr. Williams is manager of 
the Associated Oil Company at Fellows. 

Miss Sally Garlington and Lieutenant Dwight 
Chamberlain were married at St. John's Church on 
Wednesday of this week at Washington, D. C. It 
was a very attractive wedding, and socially a bril- 
liant event. Mrs. Chamberlain comes of a dis- 
tinguished family, her father being General Ernest 
A. Garlington. Many of the San Francisco social 
set are interested in this notable society event. 

Miss Hazel S. Woods, daughter of Rev. E. A. 
Woods, became the bride of Dr. Lewis. W. Hackett, 
of the Harvard Medical College, this past week, 
the wedding taking place at the pretty Woods 
home on Hillegass Ave., Berkeley. Dr. Hackett 
will become one of the faculty at the University 
of California when the fall term begins. 



August 14th has been selected by Miss Julia 
Langhorne for her wedding day, She and Lieuten- 
ant James Parker, 1'. S, X., will be married on this 
dale at St, Luke' 8 Church. It will be a brilliant 
affair, with all the impressiveness of naval and mil- 
itary attendants. Miss Marian Newhall will be the 
maid of honor. The other bridesmaids are to be 
two of our own local beauties — Misses Sara Cunning- 
ham and Louise Boyd — and Miss Duane of Philadel- 
phia, a cousin of the bride-elect. Lieut. Courtland 
Parker, stationed at Fort Riley, Kansas, who is 
a brother of the groom, will be best man. The re- 
ception at the Langhorne residence on Pacific ave- 




MRS. HENRY G. SMART (nee Parker) 

Whose wedding in Honolulu was one of the 
notable social events of the week. 



nue will be restricted to a few of the most intimate 
friends of both families. Miss Langhorne bears 
distinction of having been bridesmaid at more wed- 
dings than any other local belle. 

Another wedding on the second Wednesday in 
August will be that of Miss Grace Whittle and Mr. 
Leslie Webb Symmes of Mill Valley. This will be 
a quiet wedding, only the immediate relatives attend- 
ing. Miss Whittle is a charming debutante with a 
host of friends. She is the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. 
A. M. -Whittle. Mr. Symmes is a civil engineer of 
promise, whose interests are centered in South Amer- 
ica, where he contemplates taking his bride. 

September has been selected as the month for 
the wedding of Miss Viva Nicholson and Mr. Leon 
Clark. Miss Nicholson, a society belle of the trans- 
bay social set, is the daughter of Mr. J. H. Nichol- 
son. She is the sister of Mrs. Victor Metcalf and 
Paymaster Riehworth Nicholson, U. S. N. 

Some time in September a large wedding will be 
solemnized at the home of Mrs. Frederick Hope 
Beaver. Her niece, "Miss Ruth Casey, whose popu- 
larity is pronounced among the smart set, will be- 
come the wife of Mr. Arthur Brown. Miss Isabel 



Beaver, a cousin, and Miss Helen Ashton will be 
maids of honor. The entire bridal party has not 
yet been determined. 

'the wedding of Miss Bird Chanslor, sister of Mr. 
Joseph Anderson Chanslor of this city, and Mr. 
William Kirk Reese Jr. will be a notable event of 
Southern California. Miss Chanslor has visited San 
Francisco so often that she is virtually one of the 
local social set. She is the daughter of the late 
Mr. John Chanslor, and is related to several of the 
pioneer families of California. The wedding will 
take place Wednesday, the :!lst of this month, and 
will attract several San Franciscans to the south. 

The wedding of Miss Bessie Ashton and Mr. John 
Piggott is set for the final week in September. 



Engagements. 

BOWEN— MURGOTTEN. — Miss Mary Grace 
Bowen and Rev. Francis Clarke Murgotten, rector 
of Holy Innocents Church. Miss Bowen is the 
daughter of t-e late Dr. Horace Bowen of New 
York City. The wedding will be solemnized during 
the fall months at Trinity Church. 

BROWNE — NICHOLSON. — Miss Leona Browne 
and Mr. Robert Harvey Nicholson, The wedding will 
take place soon. Miss Browne is a member of the 
Chi Omega sorority of the State University. Mr. 
Nicholson is a son of W. D. Nicholson, former 
chief engineer of the Santa Fe, and a grandson of 
Rear-Admiral J. W, A. Nicholson, New York. 

HICKS — GROSS.— Miss Elizabeth Hicks and 
Lieutenant Robert Frank Gross, U. S. N. Miss 
Hicks is the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Frank Hicks 
of Los Angeles. She is the niece of Miss Alice 
Hager and Mrs. Lansing Kellogg. The wedding, 
which will take place in Los Angeles, will be a 
brilliant naval ceremony. 

McKEVITT— McCLATCHY.— Miss Hazel McKevitt 
and Mr. James V. McClatchy. Miss McKevitt is 
the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Frank McKevitt, and 
is identified with society in Sacramento. The wed- 
ding will take place some time during the winter 
season. 

KIRBY— WILLIAMSON.— Miss Claribel Kirby, 
daughter of Mrs. C. H. Kirby, and Mr. David G. 
Williamson. Miss Kirby is a general favorite in 
an exclusive set. Mr. Williamson is a rising young 
business man, great-grandson of "Uncle George" 
Bromley. 

LASELLE — VERDI. — Miss Marial Laselle of 
Whimsville and Mr. Minturn Verdi of New York. 
Miss Laselle is the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. C. 
W. Laselle, who formerly lived in California. She 
is a member of several prominent societies in 
Boston. Mr. Verdi, a Harvard graduate, is now 
practicing law in New York City. 

MARTIN — GILBERD. — Miss Edna May Martin 
and Mr. Frederick Murray Gilberd. The wedding 
will take place in August. Miss Martin is popular 
in the Oakland set of accomplished debutantes. 



Mrs. Clarence Kempff, who is established in at- 
tractive quarters at Mare Island, where Lieutenant 
Kempff is on duty, has been the guest of her mother, 
Mrs. Charles Brigham, who has recovered from her 
temporary illness, 



Mrs. Eleanor Martin entertained at dinner in 
honor of Mr. and Mrs. E. O. McCormick. Other 
guests were Mrs. McCormick's sister, Mrs. Henry, 
who is visiting in San Francisco, Miss Nellie Grant 
and Philip Paschel. 



22 



-THE WASP 



LSaturday, July 27, 1912. 



Two Prominent Families United. 

Although the wedding of Miss Olga Jungbluth 
and Mr. Irwin Broughton was limited to the .mem- 
bers of the family, yet much interest centered about 
the uniting of two prominent pioneer families. Miss 
Jungbluth has been exceedingly popular in society 
owing to her charming personality and her beauty. 
She was an ideal bride. Her gown of purest white 
satin was trimmed with rare old lace. The bridal 
veil was a dainty bit of gossamer tulle, and the ar- 
rangement of orange blossoms fell with particular 
grace over her beautiful hair. 

Miss Helen Hammersmith, niece of the bride, 
was the only attendant. She was dressed in pale 
pink, and carried a basket of roses, strewing the 
''petals as she preceded the bride. 

Both the bride and groom are members of well- 
known California families. Miss Jungbluth has 
lived with her grandparents, Mr. and Mrs. Nicholas 
Ohlandt, for many years. Mr. Ohlandt is a promi- 
nent financier. Mrs. i^'rank Ames and Mrs. Alfred 
Hammersmith are her aunts. 

Mr. Broughton is a graduate of the University of 
California. He is the son of a well-known banker of 
San Joaquin valley and the Mayor of Modesto, 
where young Mr. and Mrs. Broughton will make 
their home. 



Jules Restaurant 

Special Lunches 50c. or a la Carte 

Ladies' Grill and Rooms for Parties 

REGULAR FRENCH DINNER WITH 

WINE, $1.00. 

Vocal and Instrumental Music. 

MONADNOCK BUILDING 

Next to Palace Hotel 

Phone Kearny 1S12. 

All Cars Pass the Door. Elevator Service. 



f.OBEY'S GRILL 

^"^ Formerly of SUTTER ST. 

Our Specialties 

OYSTERS, TERRAPIN, CRAB STEW 
STEAKS, CHOPS 

140 UNION SQUARE AVENUE 

L. J. DeGRUCHY. M.n.itr Fbone DOUGLAS 5683 



Phones: — Sutter 1572 Cyril Arnanton 

Home C-3970 Henry Rittman 

Home C-4781 Hotel O. Lahederne 

New Delmonico's 

(Formerly Maison Tortoni) 

Restaurant and Hotel 
NOW OPEN 

Best French Dinner in the City with Wine, 51-00 

Banquet Halls and Private Dining Rooms 

Music Every Evening 

362 GEARY STREET, - SAN FEANCISCO 




lebtzaw 



HOTEL AND RESTAURANT 

04-66 Ellis Street 

Our Cooking Will Meet Tour Taste. 
Prices Will Please You. 



Wedded Amid Blossoms. 

The wedding strains that echoed through the little 
church at Sausalito last Saturday marked the nup- 
tials of pretty Miss Edith Lowe and Mr. Hans Woll- 
man. It was one of the most entrancing weddings 
of the season, the scene being a bower of blossoms 
and loveliness. Pink and lavender, the adopted col- 
ors of the brides 01 the month, were used in a pro- 
fusion of ramoling roses, asters and banks of 
ferns. 

The bride was adorable in her ivory white satin 
gown. Her lace veil, which was held in place by 
a coronet of orange blossoms, fell to the length of 
tne train. She carried a shower of lilies of the val- 
ley. 

Mrs. Eldridge Green (Marie Louise Poster) wore 
an exquisite Parisian gown of pink satin with a 
chiffon overdress of the same delicate shade. Her 
shower was of pink roses. 

In addition to a matron of honor, Miss Lowe was 
attended by a maid of honor, Miss Erna St. Goar, 
a society favorite. She was gowned in pink of a 
delicate hue, ana in her arms bore pink bridesmaid 
roses. Four friends of the bride acted as ribbon- 
bearers — Mrs. Dolly MaeGavin Fry, Miss Elsie Part 
ridge, Miss Edith Johnson, Miss Kalhryn McCrae. 
Dainty Miss Mary Rixford was flower-girl. Mr. 
Jack Lowe, brother of the bride, was best man. Mr. 
William O. Bohrmann, Mr. James Sperry, Mr. Jack 
Russell, and Mr. Thomas Claussen were ushers. 

At the reception held at the home of the bride's 
parents, Mr. and Mrs. John_B. Lowe, a sumptuous 
wedding feast was given. Among the guests at the 
wedding were Messrs. and Mesdames Charles Jay 
Foster, Donald Jadwin, Henry Kuechler, A. W. Fos- 
ter, H. Clay Miller, Henry Milner Rideout, Henry 
C. Campbell, Edgar Van Bergen, William Klink, 
James Jenkins, Boswell King, B.. M. A. Miller, 
Christian Miller, Duval Moore, John Martin, R. C. 
Pell, Alonzo A. Watkins, Harry Akin Yeazell, Pierre 
Moore, Miss Lilian Shoobert, Frances Shoobert, 
Martha Foster, Marian Hall. Constance Davis. Beat- 
rice Howitt, Alice Oge, Kate Bennett, Margaret Bel- 
den, Edith Johnson, Ea..i Jones, Margaret Carri- 
gan, Marian Miller, Leslie Miller, Ethel Tompkins 
and Louise Howland. 



Sharon Dinner. 

One of the most elaborate dinners of the season 
was given at the Palace last Thursday evening by 
Mr. and Mrs. Frederick Sharon. The beautiful 
affair was in complement to Mr. and Mrs. Charles 
B. Alexander, Miss Janetta Alexander and Miss 
Harriet Alexander of New York City. 

On this occasion Mrs. Sharon wore one of her 
magnificent gowns, a deep old rose, brocaded with 
bright gold bands, which she wore with charming 
grace. Emerald jewelry completed the costume. 

An abundance of American Beauty roses, lilies of 
the valley, primroses and dainty ferns were used 
in the artistic table decorations. The guests included 
Mrs. John Breckinridge, Mr. and Mrs. George H. 
Mendell, Mr. and Mrs. George Kelham. Mr. and Mrs. 
Dixwell Hewitt, Miss Augusta Foute, Dr. Harry 
Tevis, Mr. and Mrs. Henry Hadley, Mr. Richard 
Tobin and Mr. Barclay. 



Mrs. Philip N. Moore, who is the guest of friends 
in Yosemite, contemplates an Alaskan trip later 
in the season. 



VISIT THE 

Cafe Jupiter 

140 COLUMBUS AVENUE 

(Formerly Montgomery Avenue) 

SAN FRANCISCO, CA1. 

.-. HOME OF MODERN BOHEMIA .-. 

WHERE YOU WILL FIND AN 

ARTISTIC ATMOSPHERE AND 

HIGH-CLASS ENTERTAINMENT 

THE MOST UP-TO-DATE TABLE D'HOTE 

DINNER 

In Town SI. 00, from 6 to 9 P. M. 

JACK McMANUS, Manager 

Reserve your table in time — Phone Douglas 2910 



TECHAU TAVERN 

Cor. Eddy and Powell Streets. 

Phones, Douglas 4700: O 8417 



A High-Class 

Family Cafe 



A DAINTY LUNCH served gra- 
* *■ tuitously to ladies every day during 
shopping hours, between 3:30 and 5 p. m. 



Under the management of A. C. Morrison 



The New 

POODLE DOG 




HOTEL and RESTAURANT 

WILL REMAIN AT CORNER 

POLK and POST 

SAN FRANCISCO. 
PHONES: Franklin 2980; Horns O 6705. 



J. B. PON J. BERGEZ O. MAILHEBUAD 
O. LALANNE L. OOUTARD 



Bergez- Frank's 

OLD 

POODLE DOG 

CO. 

Hotel and 
Restaurant 

Music and Entertainment Every Evening. 
415-421 BUSH STREET 

(Above Kearny) 
SAN FRANCISCO, OAL. 
Exchange, Douglas 2411. 





jELDOM bas there been seen in San 
Francisco a mure enthusiastic first 
nighl audience than that which greet* 
ed tlie opening of the Gilbert and Sul- 
livan revival on Sunday night. It was 
more like a joyous reunion of old friends than 
the formal presentation of a comic opera, for 
the playgoers recognized many old former 
favorites of theirs in the cast. The brawny 
Arthur Cunningham, who made such a hit in 
the old Tivoli in "Rob Roy," was there. The 
broad smile of his Gaelic countenance was as 
cheerfnl as of old when the audience vocifer- 
ously demanded a speech. A politicians' ban- 
quet could not have been more eager for ora- 
torv. It is a cheerful sign on a first night 
when the audience is not only willing but anx- 
ious to under go the ordeal 
of speech-making. It indi- 
cates more of the friendli- 
ness and enthusiasm than 
the coldly critical pose of 
the average first night audi- 
ence. 

If the house had been 
more critical than friendly 
on Sunday night at the Cort 
the presentation of "The 
Mikado" would have stood 
the test. It has not been 
customary with managers 
to put so many thoroughly 
capable people into the cast 
of a comic opera company 
brought from Broadway to 
San Francisco. De Wolf 
Hopper, Blanche Duffield, 
Eugene Cowles, George Mac- 
Farlane, Kate Condon, Ar- 
thur Aldridge, Viola Gil- 
lette, Arthur Cunningham, 
Alice Brady and Louise Bar- 
thel are an array of talent 
and distinction seldom seen 
outside a metropolitan the- 
ater. It would not be pos- 
sible to get such a cast in 
San Francisco a few years 
ago, when the theatrical 
business of the United 
States was in the grip of a 
coterie that commercialized 
it for all it was worth. 
There has been some heal- 
thy competition in recent 
years, and the playgoers are 
the beneficiaries. They get 
a good deal more for their 
money. 

The success of the Gill- 
bert and Sullivan revival 
both here and in the East- 
ern cities demonstrates once 
again that clean wit and 
humor and music of genuine 
merit never die. They may 
become stale and unpala- 
table by wearisome repeti- 
tion, but after a lapse of 
time they regain favor with 
the public. There is little 
new under the sun. Most 
things that allure the eye 
and ear are only old favor- 
ites done up in new attire. 



The Zech Opera. 

THERE is keen anticipation in musical and 
literary circles anent the three act grand 
opera by Frederick Zech Jr., director 
of the Pacific Sangerbund. The libretto has 
been written by Miss Mary Fairbrother, a lit- 
erary woman of the local colony. The opera 
depicts cue passing of the red man, the scenes 
being laid in the early America. The title is 
"Wa-kin-you," or "The Red Man." Prepar- 
ations for the production of this opera are be- 
ing made. Professor Zeen has been at work 
for the past two years, devoting conscientious 
hours to its completion. 

Miss Fairbrother is one of the best-known 
of the local writers, her lectures and her liter- 
ary efforts being distinctively of a high stand- 




ard, well grounded with an absolute knowl- 
edge of her subject. She is a recognized au- 
thority on parliamentary law and all subjects 
relative to woman's advancement. She is 
one of the most ardent of suffragists. 

Kruger Club Meets. 

AT THE regular monthly meeting of the 
Kruger Club an interesting program was 
presented. The participants were Mrs. 
Violet Fenster at the piano, and her 
brother, Mr. Lajqs Fenster, violinist. "The 
Krentzer Sonata" (Beethoven) and a suite in 
A minor (Sinding) were delightfully rendered. 
Each student is capable of giving an artistic 
interpretation, and the duo work was 'of ex- 
ceptional merit. Intuitive ability and excel- 
lent training were display- 
ed by these members of the 
Kruger Club. An increased 
membership has augmented 
the interest of this organ- 
ization. Club headquarters 
are at 310 Sutter street. 



DE WOLF HOPPER 
An old favorite who is hotter than ever in the Gilbert and Sullivan revival 



at the Cort Theater. 



At the Orpheum. 

The very highest stand- 
ard of vaudeville is certain 
]y attained in the bill an- 
nounced for next week at 
the Orpheum. 

Marguerite Haney will 
appear in B. A. Rolf e J s 
tabloid musical comedy, 
•'The Leading Lady." Miss 
Haney has only just return- 
ed from Paris, where she 
created a decided hit in the 
review at the Folies Ber- 
gere. She went abroad to 
appear in the London music 
halls, and was so successful 
that the Paris management 
secured her for the principal 
ingenue roles. Supporting 
Miss Haney, and appearing 
as leading comedian, is 
Ralpn Lynn, an English act- 
or, formerly a prominent 
member of the London Gai- 
ety Theater Company. "The 
Leading Lady" exacts for 
its presentation a company 
of ten and a special scenic 
equipment. The piece is 
full of delightful comedy, 
bright dialogue, lilting mu- 
sic and enjoyable novel- 
ties. 

Mrs. Louis James, widow 
of Louis James, one of Am- 
erica's finest tragedians, 
and herself an actress of 
distinction, will make her 
vaudeville debut in this 
city in a triangular comedy 
by Arthur Hopkins, entitled 
"Holding a Husband," in 
which she will have the 
support of those sterling 
players, Laurette Brown 
and Elwood Bostock. Mrs. 
James for several years, it 
will be remembered, played 
all the leading feminine 



24 



-THE WASP- 



LSaturday, July 27, 1912. 



roles with Mr. James, and has the distinction 
of being the youngest actress to portray the 
role of Queen Katherine in "Henry VIII." 
She subsequently starred at the head of her 
own company, and scored a great hit in the 
name part in Mrs. Frances Hodgson Burnett's 
play, ' ' Judy 'Hara. * 

The Empire Comedy Four, which also comes, 
has a splendid record. For the past fifteen 
years it has been a delight to the vaudeville 
audiences of this country and England. Joe 
Jenny, the featured member of the quartette, 
is an immense hit as an eccentric little Ger- 
man. His three associates personate respect- 
ively a dude, a tragedian and a straight. All 
their voices are good and their harmony per- 
fect. Their legitimate and original eomedy 
always compels laughter. 

Pauline Moran, one of the best singing com 
ediennes in vaudeville, willl introduce herself 
and her clever and amusing entertainment. 
Attractive in appearance, vivacious in man- 
ner, beautifully and tastefully gowned, with 
a talent and method that is essentially her 
own, she never fails to win instantaneous 
favor. 

Next week will be the last of Lew Sully, 
the Four Florimonds, and Mademoiselle Seal- 
by and Monsieur Duclos. It wil also conclude 
the engagement of David Belasco 's absolute- 
ly perfect production of ' ' The Drums of 
Oude, " which is proving a thrilling sensation. 

De Wolf Hopper as "Dick Deadeye." - 

THE Gilbert and Sullivan Festival Com- 
pany, now representing a season of re- 
vivals of those authors at the Cort 
Theater, "The Mikado" having proved a 
wonderful success during the past week, 
change their bill on Sunday evening, and will 
present tor the entire week, beginning that 
day, another opera, perhaps one of the most 
popular of the even dozen which they gave to 
the world, in "H. M. S. Pinafore." 

It has been thirty-five years since this op- 
era was first given in America. It has been 
running for a few months in London, at the 
Opera Comique prior to that time, before 
any American manager had the temerity to 
risk its production. It was feared that it was 
too British and insular, as they thought, to 
make an appeal to this country, which action 
perhaps explains why W. S. Gilbert failed to 
secure for it copyright protection in America. 

It is indeed pleasing to note that in the 
revival of Pinafore," De "Wolf Hopper will 
be seen as Dick Deadeye, Blanche Duffield 
as Josephine, Eugene Cowles as Bill Bobstay, 
Arthur Aldridge as Ralph Eackstraw, Viola 
Gillette as Little Buttercup, Arthur Cunning- 



<&R£ 



LEADING THEATRE 

Ellis and Market. 
Phone Sutter 2460. 



Last Time Tonight — "THE MIKADO" 



Beginning Tomorrow (Sunday) Night 
Second Big "Week of 
THE GILBERT AND SULLIVAN FESTIVAL CO.: 
De Wolf Hopper 
Blanche Duffield Geo. MacFarlane 

Kate Condon Arthur Aldridge 

Viola Gillette Arthur Cunningham 

Alice Brady Louise Barthel 

Eugene Cowles 
— IN — 



a 



H.M.S. Pinafore" 



Nights and Sat. Mat Prices — 50c. to $2. 
Popular Matinees "Wednesdays. 
Seats Now Selling for "Week Commencing Aug 4 — 
Sun., Mon., Tues., Wed. Mat. and Night — "Pa- 
tience"; Thurs., Fri., Sat. Mat. and Night, Sun. — 
' 'The Pirates of Penzance.' ' Week Com. Mbn., 
Aug. 12 — To Be Announced. 



ham as Sir Joseph Porter, K. C. B., and Alice 
Brady as Hebe. 

For the third week of comic opera at the 
Cort Theater it has been arranged that "Pa- 
tience'' will be given production the first halt 
of the week of August 4th, and to follow it 
with the presentation of "The Pirates of Pen- 
zance" for the final half of that same week. 



At Paatages. 

MIRTH, melody and good entertainment 
generally reign supreme at the Pan- 
tages Theater this week, crowded 
houses being in continual evidence, and the 
program including such novelties as the seven 
"Aviator Girls," with dainty Carlie Lowe, 
in their four-scene musical extravaganza; 
Max Witt 's Pour Harmonious Girls, who sing, 
dance and play a bit; Estelle Allison and her 
excellent support in her own musical playlet, 
"The question"; William Morrow, Donna 
Harries, and their midget "Cupid," present 
ing an original conceit, "Happy's Millions"; 
Si Jenks, the quaint Yankee humorist and 
philosopher, and other clever entertainers. 

An unusually bright array of attractions 
has been secured for the week commencing 
Sunday afternoon, Fred Ireland and his danc- 
ing Casino girls heading the bill. Ireland, 
who is well known in musical comedy circles, 
brings a clever little company, including Miss 
Nema Catto and P. W. Miles, and will present 
a miniature musical comedy entitled ' ' High 
Lights of Dear Old Broadway," in which they 
sing six songs with a complete change of cos- 
tume for every number. Woods' Animal Act- 
ors, comprising several dogs that do almost 
everything but talk, and lour monkeys that 
play "The Swanee River" on chimes, will 
enliven proceedings, and El Barto, styled the 
"conversational trickster," will deliver an 
original monologue as he mystifies his audience 
with extraordinary feats of prestidigitation. 
A special engagement of great interest to local 
lovers of clean, manly sport is that of Willie 
Ritchie, the popular lightweight, who is look- 
ing for championship honors that seem to be 
easily within his reach. He will offer a little 
skit, ( ' Fun in a Gymnasium, ' ' in which he 
will punch the bag, skip the rope, and do all 
sorts of training stunts, in addition to spar- 
ring three rounds with his boxing partner. 
The Four Flying Vanentinos, aerial athletes, 
who are renowned for being as daring as they 
are finished and graceful, will furnish a start- 
ling exhibition, and Ed Dale and Edith Pfeil, 
comedy singers and talkers, who have no end 
of snappy songs and small talk, will furnish 
much food for laughter. Howsley and Nichols, 
novelty comedy musicians, who play well upon 
a variety of instruments, and Sunlight Pictures 
showing many pictorial surprises, will com- 
plete a varied and entertaining program. 




NE sees more ,and more electric vehi- 
cles in use in San Francisco. In Los 
Angeles, Pasadena and the Eastern 
cities the electric models are also 
making rapid headway. There must 
be reason for this. The reason is found in 
the cleanliness and economy of the electric 
car. The electric vehicle is ideal for a lady's 
use, especially when equipped with cushion 
or non-puncture tires, as a lady is decidedly at 
a disadvantage with a punctured tire. The 
calamity of a punctured tire usually happens 
in some out-of-the-way or undesirable neigh- 
borhood. The 1913 models of the Woods' 
electric vehicles are now being shown by the 
Pacific Motor Car Company, Golden Gate 
avenue and Polk street. Mr. Harrison, in 
charge of the Woods Electrics, thus describes 
the advantages of that style of vehicles: 



"The Woods Electric car is equipped with 
special compound dual tread tires, which are 
guaranteed for 10,000 miles of service. The 
car, of course, is of special design with a 
unique spring suspension to take up all road 
vibration and jar. The tire itself is a new de- 
parture , as the makers, the Firestone Tire and 
Rubber Company, use a special compound af- 
ter a formula furnished by the engineer of the 
Woods Company, 

"The Woods car, equipped with cushion 
tires, rides easier than a light car on pneu 
matic tires, and the guarantee of 10,000 miles 
covers at least three sets of pneumatic tires,' 
or a saving of over $400 every 10,000 miles, 
not counting the inconvenience of puncture 
and cost of repairs. This style of tire has 
been almost universally adopted throughout 
the East. 

The rate for electric current throughout this 
State is particularly favorable to the electric 
vehicle industry. The average monthly cur 
rent bill for one car never exceeds $7. 

With the completion of the new State High- 
ways, California will become the greatest mar- 
ket for electric-propelled vehicles in the world. 

All through this State electric current can 
be obtained with the utmost ease and at a 
nominal cost. An immense amount of money 
is to be spent on good roads, and with perfect 
highways and ample electric power to be ev- 
erywhere obtained, travel by electric vehicles 
will be literally ideal. A lady can handle an 
electric coupe with far more safety and com- 
fort than she formerly could a pony phaeton, 
and can become the mistress of time and space 
when she wishes to be transported in any di- 
rection for shopping or social visits, or tours 
of recreation. 



Safest aud Most Magnificent Theater in America! 
WEEK BEGINNING THIS SUNDAY AFTERNOON 

Matinee Every Day 
THE HIGHEST STANDARD OF VAUDEVILLE! 
MARGUERITE I-IANET in B. A. Rolfe's Tabloid 
Musical Comedy, "The Leading Lady," with Ralph 
Lynn; MRS. LOUIS JAMiiS in the Triangular 
Comedy, "Holding a Husband"; EMPIRE COMEDY 
FOUR; PAULINE MORAN, Singing Comedienne; 
LEW SULLY; FOUR FLORIMONDS; SEALBY 
and DUCLOS; NEW DAYLIGHT MOTION PIC- 
TURES. Last Week of DAVID BELASCO'S PRO- 
DUCTION of "THE DRUMS OF OUDE." 

Evening Prices, 10c, 25c, 50c, 75c Box Seats, ?1. 
Matinee Prices (Except Sundays and Holidays). 
10c, 25c. 50c. 

PHONES DOUGLAS 70. HOME C 1570. 




!arket Street, Opposite Maaon. 
Week of Sunday, July 28. 
HERE'S A BIG SHOW: 
FREDERICK IRELAND and His Dancing CASINO 
GIRLS, Assisted by MISS NEMA OATTO; WOOD'S 
ANIMAL ACTORS; EL BARTO, the Conversational 
Trickster; HOWSLEY and NICHOLS, Novelty Com- 
edy Musicians: FOUR FLYING VALENTINOS, Sen- 
sational Aerialists; ED DALE and EDITH PFEIL, 
Comedy Singers and Talkers; SUNLIGHT PIC- 
TURES and 

WILLIE RITCHIE, 
In "Fun in a Gymnasium." 



Mat. Daily at 2:30. Nights. 7:15 and 9:15. Sun. 
and Holidays, Mats, at 1:30 and 3:30. Nights, 
Continuous from 6:30. 



PriceB — 10c, 20c and 30c 



Saturday, July 27, 19i2.j 



THE 'ASP- 



25 




READY FOR DUTY 

A few of the stalwarts of the Morse Patrol who are protecting the property interests of the San Francisco merchants. The largest patrol system of 

its kind west of Chicago. 



AT CASA DEL REY. 
The capacity of the Casa del Rey has been tested 
during the past week owing to the immense number 
of people who have visited Santa Cruz to observe 
the great Water Pageant which is such a gratifying 
success. 

Amongst the prominent San Francisco people who 
stopped at the Casa del Rey to enjoy the pageant 
were Mr. and Mrs. W. H. Morgan and Miss Eleanor 




$30 

Will Buy a 

Rebuilt 

Standard $100 

TYPEWRITER 



REMINGTON No. 6 or SMITH PREMIER No. 2 
We rent all makes of Typewriter! 

L. & M. ALEXANDER & CO. 

Exclusive Dealers 

L. C. SMITH VISIBLE Bail-Bearing Typewriter 

512 Market Street, San Fraociico, Oal. 

Phone Douglas 677 



Morgan, Mr. and Mrs. Roy Pike, Mr. and Mrs. J. B. 
Coryell, Mrs. H. McDonald Spencer of Menlo Park, 
Mayor James Rolph, Mrs. Rolph and family. Mayor 
Rolph motored over from Carmelito to attend the 
opening of the Water Pageant and to greet the winner 
of the Corinthian Club Yacht race. Additional guests 
were D. H. Payne, Mr. and Mrs. Payne of Chata 
noogn. Commodore and Mrs. Picker, Mr. and Mrs. 
Fennimore, Mr. and Mrs. Carl Heise, Dr. H. R. 
Oliver, W. Boardman,- ; Thomas Addis, A. G. "Van 
Epys, Commodore W. H. Hogg of the Corinthian 
Club, Dr. and Mrs. Howard Merrill, Mr. and Mrs. 
John Martin, Mr. Herbert Law. 

Among the many navy people who are making 
Casa del Rey their headquarters for the Water Pag- 
eant are Assistant Paymaster Arthur Middleton of 
the U. S. Denver, and his wife ; Ensign Edwin 
Guthrie and wife of the TJ. S. Denver, and Assistant 
Surgeon C. j3. Camorer and wife. 

Mrs. J. P. Sargent and Miss Sargent of Sargent's, 
California, are at the Casa del Rey for' an extended 
stay. 

♦ 

WANTED. 

More men and women who will save their 
money and do it systematically. 

The CONTINENTAL BUILDING AND 
LOAN ASSOCIATION, Market street, at Gold- 
en Gate avenue, can be of assistance to you in 
getting the home. 

EDWARD SWEENEY. President. 

WM. CORBIN, Secty. and Gen. Mgr. 



TOO EXPENSIVE. 

Two little sisters, of seven and nine, who 
were taken to see 'Othello,' were much im- 
pressed by the death scene. "I wonder if 
they kill a lady every night?" said Lucy. 

"Why, of course not, Lucy," said her sis- 
ter, "they just pretend to. It would be al- 
together too expensive to really kill a lady 
every night. 



Contracts made with HoteU and Restanranta 

Special attention given to Family Trade. 

ESTABLISHED 1876. 

THOMAS MORTON & SON 

Importers nnd Doalarp In 

COAL 

N. W. Cor. EDDY tt HYDE, San Franclico. 
Phone Franklin 897. 



Fot Health, Strength 

DAMIANA BITTERS 

Naber, Alfs & Brune, Agents. 
635 Howard St., opp. new Montgomery St. 



26 



-THE WASP 



[Saturday, July 27, 1912. 



NOTICE. 



NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN THAT JOHN C. 
LEMMER is transacting a general boiler, tank and 
iron business in this State under the name of CALI- 
FORNIA BOILER WORKS; that his principal place 
of business is the City and County of San Francisco, 
State of California ; that he is the sole owner of 
said business, and his full name is JOHN C. LEM- 
MER, and he resides at 1730 Pierce Street, in the 
City and County of San Francisco, State of Califor- 
nia. JOHN C. LEMMER. 

STATE OF CALIFORNIA, 
City and County of San Francisco, 

On this 8th day of July, in the year one thousand 
nine hundred and twelve, before me, Matthew Brady, 
a Notary Public in and for the City and County of 
San Franciseo, State of California, residing therein, 
duly commissioned and sworn, personally appeared 
JOHN C. LEMMER, known to me to be the person 
whose name is subscribed to the within instrument, 
and acknowledged to me that he executed the same. 
In witness whereof, I have hereunto set my hand 
and affixed my official seal at my office in the City 
and County of San Francisco, State of California, 
the day and year in this certificate first above writ- 
ten. 
(SEAL) MATTHEW BRADY, 

Notary Public. 
In and for the City and County of San Francis- 
co, State of California. 
"VOGELSANG & BROWN, Attorneys at Law, 20 
Montgomery Street, San Francisco, Cal. 

SUMMONS. 



IN THE SUPERIOR COURT OF THE STATE OF 
California, in and for the City and County of San 
Francisco — Dept. No. 4. 

GIUSEPPE DIRESTA, Plaintiff, vs. All persons 
claiming any interest in or lien upon the real prop- 
erty herein described or any part thereof, Defend- 
ants. — Action No. 32,371. 

The People of the State of California, to all per- 
sons claiming any interest in, or lien upon, the real 
property herein described or any part thereof, De- 
fendants, greeting : 

You are hereby required to appear and answer the 
complaint of GIUSEPPE DIRESTA, plaintiff, filed 
with the Clerk of the above entitled Court and 
County, within three months after the first publica- 
tion of this summons, and to set forth what interest 
or lien, if any, you have in or upon that certain 
real property, or any part thereof, situated in the 
City and County of San Francisco, State of Califor- 
nia, and particularly described as follows: 

Beginning at a point on the easterly line of Octavia 
Street, distant thereon thirty-one (31) feet, three (3) 
inches southerly from the corner formed by the in- 
tersection of the easterly line of Octavia Street with 
the southerly line of Lombard Street, and running 
thence southerly and along said line of Octavia 
Street twenty-five (25) feet; thence at a right angle 
easterly one hundred (100) feet; thence at a right 
angle northerly twenty-five (25) feet; and thence at 
a right angle westerly one hundred (100) feet to 
the point of beginning; being part of WESTERN 
ADDITION BLOCK Number 170. 

You are hereby notified that, unlesB you so appear 
and answer, the plaintiff will apply to the Court for 
the relief demanded in the complaint, to wit, that 
it be adjudged that plaintiff is the owner of said 
property in fee simple absolute; that his title to 
said property be established and quieted; that the 
Court ascertain and determine all estates, rights, 
titles, interests and claims in and to said property, 
and every part thereof, whether the same be legal 
or equitable, present or future, vested or contingent, 
and whether the same consist of mortgages or liens 
of any description; that plaintiff recover his cOBtB 
herein and have such other and further relief as 
may be meet in the premises. 

Witness my hand and the seal of said Court this 
20th day of June, A. D. 1912. 

(SEAL) H. I. MULCREVY, Clerk. 

By S. I. HUGHES, Deputy Clerk. 

The first publication of this summons was made in 
"The Wasp" newspaper on the 6th day of July, 
A. D. 1912. 

PERRY & DAILEY, Attorneys for Plaintiff, 105 
Montgomery Street, San Francisco, Cal. 

ASSESSMENT NOTICE. 



THE FRESNO AND EASTERN RAILROAD COM- 
PANY, a corporation organized under the laws of 
the State of California, principal place of business 
San Franri^co, Calif'n.ia. 

Notice is hereby given that at a meeting of the 
Directors held on the 1st day of July, 1912, an as- 
sessment of thirty (30 » cents a share was levied on 
the capital stock of the corporation, payable on or 
before the fifth day of August, 1912, to the Treas- 
urer of this Company, at the office of said company, 
No. 771 Monadnock Building, San Francisco, Cali- 
fornia; and that all Assessments upon this stock 
that shall remain unpaid on the fifth day of August, 
1912, shall be delinquent and advertised for sale 
at public auction, and unless payment is made be- 
fore, shall be sold on the twentieth day of August, 
1912, to pay the delinquent assessment together 
with the cost of advertising and expenses of sale. 
A. B. DODD, Secretary. 
No. 771 Monadnock Building, San Francisco, 
California. 



Mother Goose as Seen Today. 

The teacher was telling the story of Red 
Riding Hood. Sbe had described the w.oods 
and the wild animals that live there. 

"Suddenly," she said, "Red Riding Hood 
heard a loud noise. She turned around, and 
what do you suppose she saw looking at her 
and showing its snarp white teeth?' 7 

' ' Teddy Roosevelt, ' ' cried one of the boys. 
1 

"Why doesn't he go home?" 
"Because neither his wife nor the saloons 
shut up at night." 

SUMMONS. 



IN THE SUPERIOR COURT OF THE STATE OF 
California, in and for the City and County of San 
Franciseo. — Dept. No. 5. 

EUGENE 0. CRELLER, Plaintiff, vs. All persons 
claiming any interest in or lien upon the real prop- 
erty herein described or any part thereof.Defend- 
ants. — Action No. 32,212. 

The People of the State of California, to all per- 
sons claiming any interest in, or lien upon, the real 
property herein described or any part thereof, De- 
fendants, greeting : 

You are hereby required to appear and answer 
the complaint of EUGENE 0. CRELLER, plaintiff, 
filed with the Clerk of the above entitled Court and 
County, within three months after the first publi- 
cation of this summons, and to set forth what in- 
terest or lien, if any, you have in or upon that cer- 
tain real property, or any part thereof, situated in 
the City and County of San Francisco, State of 
California, and particularly described as follows: 

FIRST: Beginning at a point on the northerly 
line of Oak Street, distant thereon one hundred and 
ten (110) feet easterly from the corner formed by 
the intersection of the northerly line of Oak Street 
with the easterly line of Octavia Street, and running 
thence easterly and along said line of Oak Street 
twenty-seven (27) feet, six (6) inches; thence at a 
right angle northerly one hundred and twenty (120) 
feet to the southerly line of Hickory Avenue; thence 
westerly along said line of Hickory Avenue twenty- 
seven (27) feet, six (6) inches; and thence at a 
right angle southerly one hundred and twenty (120) 
feet to the point of beginning; being part of WEST- 
ERN ADDITION BLOCK Number 147. 

SECOND: Beginning at a point on the southerly 
line of Pine Street, distant thereon thirty (30) feet 
easterly from the corner formed by the intersection 
of the southerly line of Pine Street with the easter- 
ly line of Presidio Avenue, and running thence east 
erly and along said line of Pine Street thirty-one 
(31) feet, five (5) inches; thence at a right angle 
southerly eighty-seven (87) feet, six (6) inches; 
thence at a right angle westerly thirty-one (31) 
feet, five (5) inches; and thence at a right angle 
northerly eighty-seven (87) feet, six (6) inches to 
the point of beginning; being part of WESTERN 
ADDITION BLOCK Number 620. 

THIRD: Beginning at a point on the northwest- 
erly line of Howard Street, distant thereon two hun- 
dred and twenty-five (225) feet southwesterly from 
the corner formed by the intersection of the north- 
westerly line of Howard Street with the southwest- 
erly line of Sixth Street, and running thence south- 
westerly and along said line of Howard Street fifty 
(50) feet; thence at a right angle northwesterly 
ninety (90) feet; thence at a right angle northeast- 
erly fifty (50 ) feet ; and thence at a right angle 
southeasterly ninety (90) feet to the point of be- 
ginning. 

FOURTH: Beginning at the corner formed by 
the intersection of the southerly line of Union 
Street with the westerly line of Polk Street, and 
running thence southerly and along said line of Polk 
Street thirty (30) feet; thence at a right angle 
westerly seventy (70) feet; thence at a right angle 
northerly thirty (30) feet to the southerly line of 
Union Street; and thence easterly and along said 
line of Union Street seventy (70) feet to the point 
of beginning; being part of WESTERN ADDITION 
BLOCK Number 46. 



You are hereby notified that, unless you so ap- 
pear and answer, the plaintiff will apply to the 
Court for the relief demanded in the complaint, to- 
wit, that it be adjudged that plaintiff is the owner 
of said property in fee simple absolute; that his 
title to said property be established and quieted; 
that the Court ascertain and determine all estates, 
rights, titles, interests and claims in and to said 
property, and every part thereof, whether the same 
be legal or equitable, present or future, vested or 
contingent, and whether the same consist of mort- 
gages or liens of any description; that plaintiff 
recover his costs herein and have such other and 
further relief as may be meet in the premises. 

Witness my hand and the seal of said Court, this 
10th day of May, A. D. 1912. 

(SEAL) H. I. MULCREVY, Clerk. 

By J. F. DUNWORTH, Deputy Clerk. 

The first publication of this summons was made 
in "The Wasp" newspaper on the 18th day of May, 
A. D. 1912. 

The following persons are said to claim an inter- 
est in, or lien upon, Baid property adverse to plain- 
tiff: 

MOSES ELLIS, JR., Framingham, Massachusetts. 

KATE ELLIS, Framingham, Massachusetts. 

MARTHA E. BEAN, Framingham, Massachusetts. 

MARY F. ELLIS, Framingham, Massachusetts. 

GRACE E. HALL, Chicago, Illinois. 

PERRY & DAILEY, Attorneys for Plaintiff, 105 
Montgomery Street, San Francisco. GARRET W. 
McENERNEY and GEORGE H. MASTICK, of Coun- 
sel. 



DR. WONG HIM 

HERB CO. 

Established 1872 
Our wonderful 
herb treatment will 
positively cure dis- 
eases of the Throat, 
Heart, Liver, LungB, 
Stomach, Kidneys, 
Asthma, Pneumonia, 
Consumption, Chronic 
Cough, Piles, Consti- 
pation, Dysentery, 
Weakness, Nervous- 
ness, Tumor, Cancer, 
Dizziness, Neuralgia, 
Headache, Lumbago, Appendicitis, Rheumatism, 
Malarial Fever, Catarrh, Eczema, Blood Poison, 
Leucorrhoea, Urine and Bladder Troubles, Dia- 
betes and all organic diseases. 




PATIENTS SPEAK FOR THEMSELVES. 

Petaluma, Cal., November 11, 1911. — Dr. 
Wong Him — Dear Sir: This is to certify that 
I was sick for about three years with a compli- 
cation of troubles resulting from tuberculosis of 
the bowels and liver combined with tumor of the 
stomach. I had been given up by all the doc- 
tors of Ukiah, Mendocino county, and three 
prominent physicians of San Francisco. They all 
told me that the only chance to prolong my life 
was an operation, and that I could not live long 
under any circumstances. When I began to take 
your treatment I weighed about 75 pounds. I 
am now entirely recovered and weigh 147 pounds, 
more than I ever weighed in my life. 

I write this acknowledgment in gratitude for 
my miraculous recovery, and to proclaim to the 
public your wonderful Herb Treatment, that oth- 
ers may find help and healing. Gratefully, 
R. E. ANGLE, 
419 Third Street. 
Formerly of Ukiah. 

DR. WONG HIM 

Leading Chinese Herb Doctor 

1268 O'FARRELL ST. 

(Between Gough and Octavia) 

SAN FRANCISCO. 




EYE TROUBLES VANISH 

WHEN USING MAYERLE'S GERMAN EYEWATER for weak, tired, in- 
flamed, dull, watery, strained or discharging eyes, floating spots, crusty 
eyelids, etc. It gives instant relief. For infants or adults. At all drug- 
gists', 50c; or by mail, 65c. 

GERMAN OPTICAL SPECIALIST 

960 Market Street, San Francisco 
BC Insist on getting Mayerle's "Tpg 



Saturday, July 27, 1912. 



-THE WASP - 



a 



SUMMONS. 

IN THE SUPERIOR COURT OF THK 8TA 
California, tu and for the City and County *•■ Suu 
■ 
KD\N ARD u bIKi 
IKIED. Plaintiffs, • timing o«y in- 

■ 
ici I bed "i ,-!.;. pm i luu No. 

of the Slate of California, to all per 
auns claiming uny interest in. or lien npou, tbe real 

herein described or any pun thereof, De [ 
feiniuuts, greeting; 

Vuu are hereby required to appenr and answer the 
Sli-,v. i- it I ED and HELJ 
B1EU FRIED, plaint! of the 

mnty, wilbin three mouths 
after U 
sei forth whal 

upon that certain real property, or any part tl 
ttuuaifu in the ' iij and ' ou > ;• ol Sou i r 
ft.a.v "i ' ajiiornie 

point "ii the southwesterly line ol 
tiitina.. hereon two hundred and 

... I- -I ■ ■ 

formed by ih< 

u ! » . 1 1 | i . 

irmei i Bel South), and run- 

uiug thi ■ along aaid line ol I 

ce at a right angle 
southwestern one hundred iiuuj feet; then i 

. Lhenci 
ui a nuin angle northeasterly one hundred (100 

>ts 11 and 15, 

:■■ ■ i ■ ■■■ ihiAD a pei 

ai.i j. i bereol filed In I >f 1 be Recorde i 

uiij "i San i i 

You ure hereby notified that, unless you s« appear 

...i ui ■ will apply to the < lour! for 

the relief demanded to the complaint, to-wlt, that it 

■ ■ i hat plaintiffs ore the owners "i said 

tee simple ab i their title to 

■ be established and quieted; that the 

in and determine ■'!! estates, rights, titles 

interests and claims in and to said property, and 

every pari thereof, whether the same be legal or 

equitable, present or future, vested or contingent, 

and whether the same consist of mortgages or liens 

■ ■ i mat plaintiffs recover their costs 

herein and have such other and further relief as may 

be meet in the premises. 

Witness my hand and the seal of said Court, this 
26th day ol .nine, A. U. 19X2. 

(SEAL.) H, I. MULCREVY. Clerk. 

Hy S, 1. HUGHES, Deputy Clerk. 
The first publication of this summuns. was made 
in ' 'The w asp' ' newspaper on the 13th day of 
July, A. D, 1912. 

PERRY A n ATT, my- Attorneys for Plaintiffs, lui 
Montgomery Street, San ITrancisoo, California. 

SUMMONS. 



IN THE SUPERIOR COURT OF THE STATE OF 
California, in and for the City and County of San 
Francisco. — Dept. No. 8. 

MARGARET O'MALLEY, Plaintiff, vs. All per- 
sons claiming any interest in or lien upon the real 
property herein described or any part thereof, De- 
fendants. — Action No. 32,2li8. 

"lhe People of the State of California, to all per- 
sons claiming any interest in, or lien upon, the 
real property herein described ur any part thereof, 
Defendants, grueling: 

You are hereoy required to appear and answer 
the complaint of MARGARET O'MALLEY, plaintiff, 
filed with the Clerk of the above entitled Court and 
County, within thre months after the first publica- 
tion of this summons, and to set forth what interest 
or lien, if any, you have in or upon that certain real 
property, or any part thereof, situated in the City 
and County of San Francisco, State of California, 
and particularly described as follows. 

Beginning at a point ou tue northerly line of 
Irving (formerly "I ) Street, distant thereon ninety- 
five (95 feet easterly from the corner formed by 
the intersection of the northerly line of Irving 
Street with the easterly line of Second Avenue, and 
running thence easterly and along said line of 
Irving Street twenty-five (25) feet; thence at a 
right angle northerly one hundred and ten <110) 
feet; thence at a right angle westerly twenty-five 
(25) feet; and thence at a right angle southerly 
one hundred and ten (110) feet to the point of 
beginning: being part of OUTSIDE LAND BLOCK 
Number 672. 

You are hereby notified that, unless you bo 
appear and answer, the plaintiff will apply to the 
Court for the relief demanded in the complaint, to 
wit: That it be adjudged that the plaintiff is the 
owner of said property in fee simple absolute: thnt 
her title to suid property be established and quieted; 
that the Court ascertain and' determine all estates, 
rights, titles, interests and claims in and to said 
property, and every part thereof, whether the same 
be legal or equitable, present or future, vested or 
contingent, and whether the same consist of mort- 
gages or liens of any description: that plaintiff re- 
cover her costs herein and have such other and fur- 
ther relief as may be meet in the premises. 

Witness my hand and the seal of said Court this 
loth day of May, A. D. 1912. 

SEAL H. I. MULCREVY, Clerk. 

By J. F. DUNWORTH. Deputy Clerk. 
The first publication of this Summons was made in 



THE WASP 

Published "ekly by the 

WASP PUBLISHING COMPANY 

Office o! publication 
121 Second St., San Francisco, Cal. 

Phones— But r 789, J 2705. 

Entered at the San Francisco Poitoffice as second 

clttBK matter. 

SUBSCRIPTION RATES— In the United States. 
Canada and Mexico. $5 a year in advance; six 
months, (2.50; three months, $1.25; single 
copies, 10 cents. For sale by all newsdealers. 

FOREIGN SUBSCRIPTIONS— To countries with 
in the Postal Union, $6 par year. 



I i ■ B i on the 1st day of June, A. D. 

1 9 1 2 . 

ill.- following persons are said to claim some in- 

d ersely to plaintiff; 
FK OF ITALY (a corporation , San Francisco, 
■ nja. 
PERRY ft DAI1 I -. Attorneys for Plaintiff, 105 
ornery Street, Sail Fraucisoo, Oal. GARRET 
W. SloENERNIS* and GEORGE H. MASTICK, of 
Counsel. 



SUMMONS. 



IN THE SUPERIOR COURT OF THE STATE OF 
California, in and for the City and County of San 
i ■■..— Dept. Mo. 2. 

tfYRTLJE R. SAYLOR, Plaintiff, vs. All persons 
claiming any interest in or lien upon the real prop 
erty herein described or any part thereof, Defend- 
ants.— Ac B2.239. 

The People of the Siate of California, to all per- 
sons claiming any interest in, or Hen upon, the real 
property herein described or any part thereof, De- 
fendants, greeting; 

You are hereby required to appear and aiiBwer 
the complaint of MYRTLE R. SAYLOR, plaintiff, 
Bled with the Clerk of the above entitled Court 
and County, within three months after the first pub- 
lication of this Summons, and to set forth what in- 
terest or lien, if any, you have in or upon that cer- 
tain real property or any part thereof, situated in 
the City and County of San Fraucisco, State of 
California, and particularly described u.s follows : 

Beginning at the corner formed by the intersec- 
tion of the northerly tine of Lake Street with the 
westerly line of Seventh Avenue, and running thence 
northerly along suid line of Seventh Avenue twenty- 
five (25) feet; thence at a right angle westerly one 
hundred and fourteen (114) feet; theuce at a right 
angle southerly twenty-five (25) feet to the north 
erly line of Lake Street; and thence easterly and 
along said line of Lake Street one hundred and 
fourteen (114) feet to tue point of beginning; being 
part of OUTSIDE LAXD BLOCK Number 65. 

You are hereby notified thnt, unless you so appear 
and answer, the plaintiff, will apply to the Court 
for the relief demanded in the complaint, to-wit, that 
it be adjudged that plaintiff is the owner of the 
parcel of real property described in the complaint 
herein in fee simple absolute; that her title to 
said property be established and quiet.ed ; that the 
Court ascertain and determine all estates, rightB, 
titles, interests and claims in and to said property, 
and every part thereof, whether the same be legal 
>r equitable, present or future, vested oi contingent, 
and whether the same consist of mortgages or liens 
of any description; that plaintiff recover her costs 
Herein and have such other and further relief as 
may be meet in the premises. 

Witness my hand and the Beal of said Court this 
17th day of^VIay, A. D. 1912. 

(SEAL. H. I. MULCREVY, Clerk. 

By J. F. DUNWORTH, Deputy Clerk. 

The first publication of this summons was made 
in The Wasp newspaper on the 1st day of June, 
V D. 1912. 

PERRY & DAILISY, Attorneys for Plaintiff, 105 
Monte-ornery Street, Snn Francisco, Cal. (J ARRET 
\V HtcENERNEY and GEO RUE H. MASTICK. of 
Counsel 



SUMMONS. 



THE SUPERIOR COURT OF THE STATE OF 
California, in and for the City and County of San 
i cam isco.- - Dept, No 7. 

JOSEPH G. McVERRY, Plaintiff, vs. All persons 
claiming any interest in or lien upon the real prop 
erty herein described of any pari thereof, Defend 
ants A. -iim, No 82, 132. 

The Penple nf the Stale of California, to all 
persons claiming any interest in, or lieu upon, 



• i'.y herein described or any part there- 
ling; 
You r and answer 

. ■ 
■ 

ifter the first pubii 
cation of tin* amnio set forth what in- 

. i.y. you h;.'. 
certain 

inly of Hun mo o( 

ud particularly described an follows: 

■ 

■ 

ihence north- 

... i 

., ! | ... 

ui .i y._ rl herlj iweli 

. , 
and twent) < 120 1 feel to the wester] 
enth As e iue ; nod tin ace southerl) and slot 

■'■■■ b i rod 

1 1" i ii "' !•< a being purl oi Ol 

l. IND r.i Oi I umber 77'' 

erobj DOtiflt >i that, unless 3 ou - 1 appear 

mill answer, the plaintiff will apply to tiie Court 

for the relief demanded in the complaint, to-wit. 

that it be adjudged that plaintiff is the owner of 
Bnid proper 1 3 in fee simple absolute; thai in- Litli 
to said property be established and quieted; thai 
the Conn ascertain and determine all estates, rights, 
titles, interest and claims in and to said property, 
and every part thereof, whether the same be legal 
or equitable, present or future, vested or contin- 
gent, and whether the same consist of mortgages 
or liens of any desoription ; that plaintiff recover 
iu costs herein and bave Buoh other and further 
reliel as may be meet in the premises. 

Witness my hand and the seal of said Court, 
iin 9th das of July, A I>, 1912. 
(SEAL) H. I, MULCREVY. Clerk. 

By 11 I, PORTER, Deputy Clerk. 

The fir ' publics of this sui is was made 

in "The Wtsp" newspaper on the 20th day ol Jula 
A. D. 1912. 

PERRY & DAILEY, Attorneys f-.r Plaintiff, 105 
M gi r\ Street, San Francisco, Calif or 



SUMMONS. 



IN THE SUPERIOR COURT OP THE STATE OP 
California, in and for the City and County of San 
Francisco. — Dept, No. 10. 

NORENA M. LIBBY, Plaintiff, vs. BURR A. 
LIBBY, Defendant. — Action No. 42,622. 

Action brought in the Superior Court of the State 
of California in and for the City and County of 
San Francisco, and the Complaint filed in the office 
of the County Clerk of said City and County. 

The People of the State of California send greet- 
ing to BURR A. LIBBY, Defendant. 

You are hereby required to appear in an aetion 
brought against you by the above-named Plaintiff 
in the Superior Court of the State of California, in 
and for the City and County of San Francisco, and 
to answer the Complaint filed therein within ten 
days (exclusive of the day of service) after the 
service on you of this summons, if served within 
this City and County; or if served elsewhere within 
thirty days. 

The said action is brought to obtain a judgment 
and decree of this Court dissolving the bonds of 
matrimony now existing between plaintiff and de- 
fendant, on the ground of defendant's willful neg- 
lect and desertion, also for general relief, as will 
more fully appear in the Complaint on file, to which 
special reference is hereby made. 

And you ore hereby notified that, unless you ap- 
pear and answer as above required, the said Plaint- 
iff will take judgment for any moneys or damages 
demanded in the complaint as arising upon contract, 
or will apply to the Court for any other relief de- 
manded in the complaint. 

Given under my hand and the seal of the Superior 
Court of the State of California, iu and for the City 
and County of Snn Francisco, this 1st day of June, 
A D 1912 

(SEAL) " H. I. MULCREVY, Clerk. 

By L. W. WELCH, Deputy Clerk. 

The first publication of this summons was made 
in "The Wasp" newspoper on the 8th day of June. 
A. Ii. 1912. 

GERALD C. HATSEY, Attorney for Plaintiff 
501-502 503 California Pacific Building, San Fran- 
cisco, Cal. 



Office Hours 
9 a. m. to 5:20 p. m. 
Phone DoubIm 1501 



Residence 

573 Fifth Avenue 

Hours 6 lo 7:30 p. m 

Phone Pacific 275 

W. H. PYBURN 



NOTARY PUBLIC 

Mv Motto "ALWAYS IN" 

On parle Fiancaia Se habla Eitpano 

Office: 229 Montgomery Street 

San FraocUcn California 



&cm&e^c^c&i^cmmm 



I 





Los Angeles 




Santa Cruz 

"The Atlantic City of the Pacific Coast" 

Is planning a ] 

Wonderful Water Pageant 


$25 round trip 


(SantaFe) 

% w 




San Diego $29 round trip 




Tickets on sale daily. 


IS 


Good for return until October 31, 1912. 


For the following dates: 


Santa Fe's new train. 


JULY 20TH to JULY 28TH, INCLUSIVE ! 


fjfi e Leaves San Francisco 


Yacht Regattas— Motor Boat Races — Review of ! 


^ m daily at 4:00 p. m. 


American Battleships — Parade of Decorated I 


/\ f^(Yl^l This is California's 


Water Floats — Swimming and Rowing Con- 


/"V11& V/I finest train. 


tests — Surf Bathing — Dancing — Golf — Ten- 


KJ 


nis — Fireworks. 


On the return trip the Saint offers 


II \ 


the same superior service. 


DON'T MISS THE FUN 


Phone or call on me for reservations. 




Jas. B. Duffy, Gen. Agt., 673 Market St.. 
San Francisco. Phone: Kearny 315-J3371. 


Regular Rates at the New Hotel Casa del Rey. i 


J J. Warner, Gen. Agt., 1218 Broadway, 




Oakland. Phone: Oakland 425 


Special Low Ticket Fares 


Santa Fe 


ASK OUR AGENTS 

SOUTHERN PACIFIC 




$72.50 


Flood Building 

Palace Hotel 

Third and Townsend Street Station 


^4^ ™ ■■■ • ^^ ^^ 


Market Street Ferry Station 


■ 


SAN FRANCISCO. 




Broadway & Thirteenth Street 


TO CMIGAGO 


OAKLAND. 


AND RETURN 

on the Peerless 


1 


— __^ ________^ ™^ _ .^ B__^_ 










GOLDEN STATE 




YOSEMITE 




LIMITED 




NATIONAL PARK 

The Outing Place of California. 
SNOW-CAPPED MOUNTAINS :: THUNDERING WATER- 




A Transcontinental Delight. 




FALLS :: MIRROR LAKES AND HAPPY ISLES 

: : MASSIVE WALLS AND DOMES : : 

A Galaxy Unsurpassed 

A SMOOTH, DUSTLESS. WELL-SPRINKLED 




THIS RATE GOOD ON MANY DAYS IN JUNE, 




ROAD INTO THE VALLEY 
A Special Feature of This Season ' s Trip 




JULY, AUGUST AND SEPTEMBER. 




The waterfalls are booming full. Conditions in the Valley 
were never better than this season. Surrounding mountain 
peaks and watersheds are covered with late snows, which 




Similar Low Rates to Many Other Eastern Points 




insures a lasting flow of water. 

Why visit the commonplace resort, when the sublime and 
the beautiful beckon you. Cost of this trip is now reduced 




Return Limit October 31st, 1912 




to popular prices. Four excellent camps offer the visitor the 
most pleasing entertaiament: 

CAMP CURRY— CAMP AHWAHNEE — CAMP LOST ARROW 
SENTINEL HOTEL 








Each is charmingly and picturesquely situated on the floor 
of the valley, surrounded by the masterpieces of Nature. 




Telephone or Write Our Agents. 




It is now a quick, comfortable trip into the Valley. For 
full information or descriptive folder, address your camp or 
hotel in Yosemite, any ticket office or information bureau in 




Rock Island 




California, or 

Yosemite Valley Railroad 




Southern Pacific 




COMPANY 

MERCED, CAL. 











^C&C&C!&&33C^.^C£33C^C^ 



Vol. LXVm-No. 5. 



QMomomoiomowommmomomomKiMffimmiism®®!®. 



SAN FRANCISCO, AUGUST 3, 1912. J ^*^'<' C\ Q hi 1 Trice, 10 C< 




^V 




ESTABLISHED 1876 

The Pacific Coast Weekly 



mSm^^Bm^m^^^B^^^MmMdMM^^^^. 



TrtrTTF.Tnnn-'r r::.- 



8 



icimm^wiMowwwwiQWW, 



FREDERICKSBURG BEER 
has been "Famous Since 
1867" because of its dis- 
tinctive high qualities 



Now bottled by the brewery you 
get Fredericksburg in the home 
with all its superior natural qual- 
ities maintained. Order a case 
today from your dealer. 





^^^^^^lo^f^l^ ^^^^^^^^^EE E^S^^^^^ ^^^^ 



■"»■"»""" n u ii TiiiHHMHmr iimuTuw 



LEADING HOTELS ^ RESORTS 



Hotel St. Francis 



Turkish Baths 
12th Floor 

Ladies Hair Dressing Parlors 
2d Floor 

Cafe 

White and Gold Bestaurant 

Lobby Floor 

Electric Grill 

Barber Shop 

Basement, Geary St. entrance 



Under the Management of James Woods 



Casa del Rey 

New 300-room, fire-proof hotel loeated 
near the beach and Casino, open all year 
round. SUPEEIOB GOLFING. 

AMERICAN PLAN 

Tennis courts, good boating, bathing and 
fishing; numerous drives along the Coast 
and through the mountains. 

SANTA CRUZ BEACH HOTEL CO. 



<3dmudlr 



ilTHO. 



t ON'T put on your goods a 
Label that is not worthy 
of your years of toil. 

Good Goods sell better when 
labeled with Good Labels. We 
only print the good kind. We 
would be pleased to send samples. 



POSTEES -:- LABELS -:- CUT-OUTS 

HANGERS -:- CABTONS 

COMMERCIAL WOEK 



Schmidt Lithograph Co. 



PORTLAND 



SAN FRANCISCO 

SEATTLE LOS ANGELES 



PALACE HOTEL 

Situated on Market Street 

In the center of the Oity. 

Take any Market Street Oar 
from the Ferry. 

FAIRMONT HOTEL 

The most beautifully 

situated of any Oity 

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Take Sacramento Street Oars 
from the Ferry. 

TWO GREAT HOTELS 
UNDER THE MANAGEMENT OF THE 

PALACE HOTEL COMPANY 



Hotel Argonaut 

Society of California Pioneers' Building 
Fourth St., near Market. 

California's Most Popular Hotel 

400 Rooms. 200 Baths. 

European Plan $1.00 per day and up. 

Dining Room Seating 500 — Table d'hots 
or a la Oarte Service, as desired. 



Special Sunday Dinner, 
Including Wine, $1.00. 



EDWARD R0LKIN 
Manager. 



GEO. A. DIXON 
Ass't M'g'r. 



HOTEL VON DORN 

242 Turk St., near Jones, San Francisco 




The hotel of many comforts and excellent 

service. Steel framed, Class "A'' Fire 

Proof. Cafe of unusual merit. 

ATTRACTIVE TERMS TO PERMANENT GUESTS 




Vol. LX VI 11— No. 5. 



SAN FRANCISCO, AUGUST 3, 1912. 



Price, 10 Cents. 



.KIN IEJNGL JINK ^ . 

IV, \MlRICUS 



EW YORK POLICEMEN have taken to murder as part 
of their official activities. Every police department 
in America will become as demoralized and dangerous 
as the New York force unless our American courts of 
justice lie made respectable and respected. 

Under our present vicious system of electing judges the 
courts cannot restrain criminality and promote good govern- 
ment. .Judges cannot be re-elected if they do their duty fear- 
lessly, and if they don't do their duty without fear or favor 
they are a menace 
to the stability of 
our Republic. 

In plain English, 
we will have to 
change our judicial 
system or change 
our form of govern- 
ment from a repub- 
lic to a despotism, 
and trust in finding 
some benevolent des- 
pot to take the reins 
of power. No Am- 
erican citizen de- 
sires that. 

Instead of retro- 
grading from the po- 
sition attained by 
the founders of our 
nation, we should 
endeavor to advance 
but in recent yearn 
we have lost ground. 
Disrespect for the 
laws and contempt 
for courts have been 
inculcated by dema- 
gogues, and the 
seeds of anarchy are 
sprouting prolifically 



retained till the age of superannuation and then pensioned. By 
this plan judgeships would be made independent in their posi- 
tions. The influences surrounding them would be uplifting, in- 
stead of degrading. They would be anxious to hold their places, 
and presumably anxious to enjoy the respect of the community. 
Malefactors would fear to be brought before independent judges 
of that character, for in all probability convictions and punish- 
ment would await the offenders. 

It lias not surprised The Wasp that New York policemen have 
taken to murdering gamblers who expose their crookedness. 
From murdering gamblers and other law-breakers to murdering 
respectable citizens is not a long step for a crooked police de 
partment. Here in San Francisco policemen have committed 
burglary and highway robbery, and have protected thieves and 
shared their plunder. It rests with our citizens whether they 

want that kind of 
government, or an 
honest one, with 
life and property 
fully protected. 

The government 
of a city ,s usually 
what the people de- 
serve. 



THE cartoon on 
this page ex- 
presses the opinions 
of a great many 
Republicans as well 
as Democrats. They 
believe that both 
the Bull Moose 
statesman and the 
Grand Old Party 
are destined to take 
a trip up Salt Riv- 
er. Practical poli- 
ticians cannot figure 
out how President 
Taft can win with 
his party torn by 
factional sttrife of 
the bitterest charac- 
ter. If it were a 




— Philadelphia Record 
Policemen plan murder to protect their fair and honorable fight the President might have an even 
perquisites" as blackmailers and jails are filled with unconverted chance, but the fight waged against him is both unfair and dis- 
criminals and the penitentiaries are constantly becoming causes • honorable, 
of greater scandal, disquiet and cost. 



The Wasp has steadily and stoutly maintained that things will 
go from bad to worse unless we improve our courts of law by 
improving the status of our judges. The latter should be ap- 
pointed for long terms, and, if capable and honest, should be 



. While professing to be Republicans, the bitter enemies of the 
President are engaged in open theft of his party machinery and 
are not restrained by the slightest considerations of truth or 
common decency. 

If in the early seventies, when men's blood was still hot after 



[Saturday, August 3, 1912. 



the Civil War, it would have been unhealthy 
work for a Governor of California to aid in 
the larceny of the Republican designation 
and use it to defeat the regular nominee of 
the party. A State Executive officer attempt- 
ing such tactics would hardly have escaped 
a visit from the Vigilance Committee. 

Fortunately the people are less disposed 
in these days to use the logic of the rope or 
tar and feathers in preference to wordy argu- 
ment. Retribution in the form of the Recall 
is most likely to overtake Governor Johnson. 

On general principles, Governor Johnson 
should be recalled by the citizens whom he 
misrepresents and injures in reputation and 
pocket. He has made their State a byword 
and neglected the duties of his office most dis- 
gracefully. 

11 Most of the unworthy Governor's time has 
been devoted to bitter factional politics, in 
which the majority of his fellow-citizens have 
no direct interest. California has reached a 
stage in her development when the best ener- 
gies of her officials and people are needed to 
prepare for the changes likely to follow the 
opening of the Panama Canal and the geo 
graphical transformation of the Pacific Coast. 

A worthy Governor would be found organ- 
izing the business men of the State to aid in 
the building of docks, the solution of com- 
mercial problems, and a hundred other schemes 
to make California pre-eminent as a place 
for colonists to locate and capital to' seek in- 
vestment. 

California will never find her true place 
amongst the great States of the Union with 
a Hiram Johnson at the bead of State affairs. 
The man should be recalled as soon as an 
election for the purpose can be held. The 
charge against him — neglect of duty — cannot 
be denied nor palliated. Let some worthier 
man, who will attend to the duties of the 
Governor's position, take the place and draw 
the salary. Don't pay a man to call himself 
Governor and deport himself like a little howl- 
ing ward politician. 



NED HAMILTON'S BOSH. 

NED HAMILTON'S letters in the Exam- 
iner descriptive of the immense superi- 
ority of Seattle and Portland over 
"poor old San Francisco" are the quintes- 
sence of bosh. Hamilton is a very clever writ- 
er, witli a fine literary style, and no more 
knowledge of actual business affairs than a 
canary has of mathematics. 

Hearst, who is fond of Ned Hamilton, ap- 
pointed the latter business manager of the 
Examiner some years ago, and after a few 
months' service Ned resigned. A business 



manager's duties cull for a hard-headed busi- 
ness man, and wearisome details and the dull 
grind- of routine life were not to the liking of 
the wit of the Bohemian and the Family Club. 

Picking out Ned Hamilton to compile sta- 
tistical information on lighting plants, dock- 
ing facilities and commercial possibilities of 
Pacific Coast seaports is like hitching up a 
high-headed race-horse to a lumber wagon. 
Such antics are not unusual, however, in yel- 
low journalism, where it is no uncommon stunt 
to shake up an editorial department and sub- 
stitute the police reporter for the managing 
editor, and vice versa. 

If "poor old San Francisco" be as far be- 
hind Seattle and Portland as Mr. Hamilton's 
correspondence would indicate, it must be a 
disquieting thought to the correspondent that 
the Examiner has done more than its share in 
holding this city back. We have to thank the 
Examiner more than any other newspaper, 
not excepting the San Quentin and San Fran- 
cisco Bulletin, for the long reign of the walk- 
ing delegate and the wall which the Labor 
Trust has built around our city, so that we 
must live on one another. 

Notwithstanding the persistent efforts of 
professional labor agitators to make the grass 
grow in our streets, as agitator Furuseth of 
the Seamen 's Union once threatened, San 
Francisco has maintained her place as the ac- 
knowledged commercial and financial center 
and metropolis of the Paeific Coast. The Ex- 
aminer, published in "poor old San Francis- 
co," is the best-paying property that Hearst 
owns. It serves our business men properly 
that they should be repaid for their liberal 
support by a series of letters calculated to 
advertise to the world that all the jay towns 
on the Pacific Coast have outstripped us and 
that we of San Fratfcisco are a community 
of commercial and political lobsters. 

It may be only too true that we are not 
taking full advantage of our opportunities in 
San Francisco and California, but let us con- 
fine our criticisms to ' tMie dimensions of a fam- 
ily row. Let 's fight 'it' out amongst ourselves, 
and eliminate any lobsters we may find. Don't 
let us send envoys to surrounding States to 
trumpet our shortcomings, and exemplify the 
old proverb that "it's a dirty bird that be- 
fouls its own nest." 



Chief of Police White wants the Charter 
amended so that the Police Department can be 
reorganized. The poor Charter is getting to 
be a regular crazy quilt. There is a much 
easier way to reorganize the police force 
than by changing the Charter — a swift kick- 
out for some of the big guns of the department. 



HOW ARE THE MIGHTY FALLEN! 

DOWN AND OUTS of the Democratic 
party in California are lifting up their 
tombstones in the political graveyard 
and crawling around again. It is a weird 
sight to see these specters, gnashing their 
fieshless jaws like- the ghosts that chased Tarn 
O 'Shanter, and gesticulating as they did in 
the life of a generation ago. Few people 
remember them. To the average newspaper 
reader their names are meaningless. How 
quickly doth political glory evanish! 

Twenty years ago the Hon. James D. Phe- 
lan, at any powwow of Democracy, rivaled the 
omnipotence of Jove, with the clouds upon 
his brow and his toes touching the summit of 
Olympus, Subservient compatriots stood trem- 
ulously at the doors to fling them open for the 
entrance or exit of the great man. Sleek 
Supervisors and fatter policemen attended 
upon his coming and going, following respect- 
fully in his wake like the lictors at the heels 
of an ancient Roman Consul Now there is 
none so poor around the City Hall as to do 
him reverence. It is only the rising sun that 
the professional politicians worship. 

To the veterans of the Old Guard who re- 
member Mr. Phelan in the heyday of his pop- 
ularity and power, it must be a melancholy 
sight to see him with a handful of his super- 
annuated, shivering compatriots, in the cold, 
so to speak, outside the doors of the Demo- 
cratic State Central Committee. Knocks at 
that door bring only disrespectful responses. 
Chairman R. H. De Will stubbornly declines to 
be deposed. Mr. Phelan and his associates, 
old Dr. Taylor and Louis Mooser and Frank 
Gould, may hammer ever so loudly and bom- 
bard him with "resolutions," but he goes on 
complacently arranging things so that the 
Champ Clark outfit will rule the local Democ- 
racy and divide the Wilson pie in due time, 
and the original Wilsonites of the Phelan push 
won't get a smell of the tempting edibles. 

Mr. Phelan and his compatriots are doing 
their level best to duplicate in the Demo- 
cratic camp the row which has disrupted the 
Republicans. Thus far the net result is that 
Mr. Phelan appears to be farther than ever 
from restoration to the leadership in Demo- 
cratic affairs in California. 

Under Mr. Phelan *s political leadership in 
San Francisco the Democratic party went to 
pieces, and the awful union labor gang assum- 
ed control. Then the Graft Prosecution gave 
the handful of Phelanites another brief inn- 
ing, followed by a second affliction of labor 
unionism. Mr. Phelan and his compatriots 
are fully capable of paving the way for a 
third dose of the laborites. 



Thru Railroad Tickets 

Issued to All Parts of 
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1st class $10, $12, $15. 2d $6.00. Berth and Meals Included. 

The San Francisco and Portland S. S. Co. 

A. OTTINGEB, General Agent. 



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Ticket Office, 722 Mkt., opp. Call. Ph. Sutter 2344 
8 East St., opp. Ferry Bldg. Phone Sutter 2482 
Berkeley Office 2105 Shattuck. Ph. Berkeley 331 



Saturday, August 3, 1912.] 



-THE WASP- 



JAPANS GREAT EMPEROR. 

SKLI'ii.M baa any monarch seen as many 
changed conditions during his reign as 
have claimed attention in the lifetime 
of the Emperor Mutauhito, whose protracted 
illness culminated in the death of the great 
ruler this week. It will be an exceedingly for- 
tunate thing fur Asia ami mankind generally. 
if the new .Mikado be as wjse and great a 
ruler as the one just passed away. 

Observing the Japan of today, it is almost 
impossible to realize that when the Mikado 
MutSUhitO was crowned at Osaka, in January, 
1867, Japan had no telegraph system, no 
navy, no railroads. Feudalism had not yet 
been abolished. The opening of the first rail- 
road aroused 6erce popular opposition. Japan 
had a law against building sea-going ships; 
now she is competing energetically for lie 
commerce of the Pacific. 

Some of the leading events in which the 
Mikado Mutauhito had a leading hand were 
the Chinese war in L894, the revision of for- 
eign treaties in 1894, the installation of for- 
eign educated heads in the three branches 
thai went to make the nucleus of the Imperial 
University, and finally, the great Japanese- 
Kussian war of 1904-1905. He married in 
1869 the tactful Princess Haru Ko, whose 
name means Springtime, a daughter of Ichijo 
Tadaka, noble of the first rank. One son and 
several daughters were born to the Emperor 
and Empress. The heir apparent, Prince Yo- 
sliihito, was born August 31, 1879, and mar- 
ried in 1900 to the Princess Sada, daughter 
of Prince Kujo. Prince Yoshihito has three 
boys. 

The Mikado's dynasty is the oldest on earth 
dating back to the reign of Jimmu, who as- 
cended the throne in 660 B. C. The actual 
written records of the dynasty go back twelve 
hundred years, the Mikado being the 121st of 
his line, according to Japanese reckoning. 

In the lifetime of this sagacious ruler, his 
country has been lifted out of dark ages and 
placed solidly among the most enlightened 
and powerful nations in the world. History 
contains nothing to compare with such a 
complete transformation and national eleva- 
tion in the lifetime of a single ruler. 

♦ 

ABOVE THE LAW. 

LATELY there have appeared in the news- 
papers numerous references to the cases 
of John Mitchell and Samuel Gompers, 
who defied the Court of the United States, 
and have not been sent to jail for their of- 
fense. They continued to conduct a boycott 
against the Bucks Stove and Range Company 
after they had been warned to desist by the 
Supreme Court of the District of Columbia. 

To emphasize his defiance, Gompers wrote 
an article in the Federation journal he con- 
trols, and headed it "To Hell. With Your In- 
junctions." That was rather impolite lan- 
guage to use towards the most august tribu- 
nal of Justice in the Nation. Did the con- 
temptuous Gompers go to gail? Certainly not! 
Nobody expected that he would. He is walk- 
ing around as defiant as ever, though years 
have elapsed since the Supreme Court began 



to try and land him behind prison bars. Prom 
all appearances lie will go to his grave iu 
peace, withoi g an hour in jail for 

liis misconduct. 

Whenever Gompers has half an hour to 
spare, he Bits down and chats with some lop- 
eared reporter of the Associated Press, one of 
the greatest trusts in the world, and tells the 
itemizer that the Supreme Court is composed 
of •'enemies of labor," and the bitterest foe 
is judge Wright, who pronounced the just 
sentence upon him. His side-partner, John 
Mitchell, imitates (Jumpers' example, and be- 
tween them, with the aid of the Associated 
Press, they are preparing the public for the 
expected news that after years of effort the 
Supreme Court of the United .States cannot 
punish a fellow who tells it to its face to "go 
to hades and be hanged." 

But Mr. Gompers never finds time to sit 
down and tell the Associated Press reporters, 
or any other journalists, what disposal was 
made of the million dollars collected for the 
McNamara defense fund, $10,000* of which 
was sent out here in one check, to be cashed 
by the Hon. Olaf Tveitmoe and handed over 
to Clarence Darrow, who is on trial in Los 
Angeles for bribing jurors in the McNamara 
case. 

* 

A SUICIDAL ACT. 

BY TRYING to prevent independent bands 
from playing in Portland during the 
great convention of Elks, the Musicians' 
Union has committed hari-kari. 

Representatives of the unions demanded 
that no musician unstamped with the union 
hall-mark should be allowed to come to Port- 
land and play in the parade. "Consider the 
enormity of that demand," says 
the Portland Spectator. "The 
unions wished Portland to notify 
the nation that her doors were 
open to but one class of citizens, 
and that all others should be de- 
nied admittance. The unions 
wished Portland to notify the na- 
tion that she would refuse em- 
ployment to any and all who 
did not display a union label 
above the Elks' badge, and that 
those lodges that had their own 
bands or that had engaged bands 
would not be permitted to bring 
them within the city 's gates. 

The Portland committee of Elks 
stood firm against the dire threats 
of the union representatives. 
They said that the watchwords of 
their fraternal order were "Char- 
ity, justice, brotherly love, and 
fidelity," they could not vote to 
deprive their fellow-citizems of 
the right to work, whether these 
fellow-citizens were union or non- 
union men." 

The result was the Elks hired 
all the bands they required, with- 
out distinction as to union or non- 
union, and, as far as music is 
concerned, Portland is a free city. 



THE COUP DE GEACE. 

IT HAS required a Congressional enactment 
to kill fake prize tights. Congress bas 
passed & law against the transportation 
of prize-fight mo\ big picture films between 
the various States and Territories. No doubt 
the President will approve the law, and there 
will be an end of the swindles thai have been 
perpetrated on the public by the aid of the 
newspapers that have boomed them. 

The "worst on record'" was the recent af- 
fair between the negro Johnson and the white 
man Plynn, who, besides being a bogus fighter, 
exhibits under an assumed name. There 
was i, t a chance in a thousand that Flynii 
could defeat the gigantic negro. The fighters 
did not train for the match as if they ex- 
ported a serious encounter. The whole thing 
was a fake to obtain gate money and moving 
pictures that could be exhibited profitably. 

How can the sporting editors who boomed 
this swindle on the public excuse themselves! 
Some conscientious sporting writers, including 
Mr. Smith of the San Francisco Chronicle, 
pointed out the demerits of the affair, but, 
generally speaking it got an immense amount 
of free advertising, though it was as well 
known to many editors before the "fight" 
as after it that the thing was a prearranged 
humbug. 

If every prize-fighter who has taken part 
in a fake contest in San Francisco in the last 
ten years was sent to jail for conspiracy to 
defraud the public, several new wings would 
have to be added to the county jail. 



"What has been the principal expense of 
your campaign 1 ?" 

"Buying new hats to throw ioto the ring," 
replied the resolute candidate. 






\ 








I 



| HUNTER WHISKEYl 

| HIGH BALL 
\ 

REFRESHING, SATISFYING, 
4 INVIGORATING 



Sold at all first-class cafes and by jobbers 
WM. LANAHAN & SON, Baltimore, Md. 



l\\\\mw//////^ftx\uw///M\\\\\ul 



THE WASP 



[Saturday, August 3, 1912. 



EFFICIENCY DEFINED 

BY CITY SOLONS 



Another Scream in Municipal Comedy 

WHEN the Committee on Efficiency and 
Civil Service was created in January 
by the Board of Supervisors, people 
asked what important duties could be per- 
formed by the brand new organization? The 
Wasp ventured the opinion at the time that 
one- of the first and most important duties of 
-this "Efficiency" Committee would be to 
create places for a staff of favorite retainers. 
That guess has turned out to be correct, for, 
in the budget for the current year we find 
an appropriation of $10,000 for the support of 
a "Bureau of Efficiency," said $10,000 to be 
expended by Supervisors and Civil Service 
Commissioners. 

- The new "Bureau has been supplied with a 
head, who presumably will furnish the com- 
munity with, examples of what constitutes 
"efficiency" in municipal government. 

Edwin Ray Zion, whose illustrious name has 
illuminated the pages of The Wasp in connec- 
tion with various phases of political activity, 
has been selected as the "Director of the 
Bureau, ' ' with a comfortable salary of $200 
a month, to begin with. 

If this salary is not increased to $600 a 
month before the glad new year, the fine Ital- 
ian hand of Edwin Ray Zion will have lost its 
cunning. For nearly twelve years, this sterling 
and "Progressive" patriot has drawn salary 
as Deputy Tax Collector, while diligently at- 
tending to his own business as lawyer and 
bill collector, lobbyist at Sacramento, and 
untiring candidate for elective- office. And 
now the reward, which ultimately comes to all 
unselfish patriots, has come to him at last. 

A detailed statement of his various can- 
didacies for municipal and judicial offices 
would fill a page of The Wasp. When a can- 
didate for Justice of the Peace, his election 
cards, bearing the invitation to his friends 
"meet me on the Bench," edified, if not elec- 
trified the Bpt Association. Unfortunately 
for the fame of the California judiciary, a 
bench in Golden Gate Park was as near as 
the illustrious candidate got towards the goal 
of his ambition. 

At the last election, Mr. Zion's ambition 
switched from the judicial to the legislative 
wing of the municipal government, and he 
ran for Supervisor, but again the dear people 
were blind to his virtues. It required the 
joint efforts of- the Civil Service Commission 
and the Efficiency Committee of the Board of 
Supervisors to discover the superennial qual- 
ifications of this self-sacrificing patriot, and 
reward him fittingly. No one will hereafter 
be able to repeat the reproach that "Republics 
are ungrateful." 

The only fear in the mind of the public 
is that Patriot Zion may suffer mental and 
physical 'breakdown under strain of his new 
duties. It is hardly credible that he will re- 
sign his post as Deputy Tax Collector, be- 
cause heretofore he has never found it nec- 



essary to relinquish his position while attend- 
ing strictly to his own private affairs. 

Undoubtedly, as heretofore, he will still 
keep open his private office in the Monad- 
nock Building, where for years his shingle 
as an attorney has been invitingly hung out. 

It will be a sore disappointment to the peo- 
ple of the entire state if, at the approaching 
session of the legislature, Mr. Zion will not 
be once again a conspicuous figure in the 
lobby, striving for the best interest of the 
dear people, for whom he has sacrificed his 
time and energies. 

At last we have discovered the true mean- 
ing of the word "Efficiency" when applied 
to Municipal government For many long and 
hopeless years we have been groping in Egyp- 
tian darkness, but at last the light has broken 
through tne clouds. 

Edwin Ray Zion is the chosen head of the 
Bureau of Efficiency. Hallelujah! 



PREDICTS WILSON'S VICTORY. 

AS ONE of the best known journalists 
in the United States, and one whose- 
clear memory dates back to the ante- 
bellum days, the opinions' of Henry Watter- 
son, of the Louisville Courier, are worth 
reading. 

As to the outcome of the election in Nov- 
ember, Mr. Watterson has no doubt. He sums 
up the situation uniavorably to President 
Taft, whom, personally, he admires and re- 
spects, but does not regard as a wise or good 
poliitcian. Mr. Watterson remarks: 

' ' A party butchered a's the Republican 
Party, and a nominee discredited as Taft, 
cannot hope to carry the country. The Re- 
publicans are as poorly off as the Whigs were 
in 1852 and the Democrats in 1860. Roose- 
velt may split their vote wide open, half and 
half, losing them States like Massachussetts, 
Pennsylvania and Ohio. But though he 
makes a poor run of it, the force of the cur- 
rent will drive them on a sand bar and leave 
them there. Even if Taft and Roosevelt 
should be induced to withdraw — which seems 
scarcely possible — it would be the same. 
' ' Except that Roosevelt has done the job 
so neatly for the Republicans, Bryan would 
destroy the Democrats. Each is an architect 
of ruin. As it is, Bryan remains a menace, 
which will make things hum when the in- 
evitable break between him and Wilson comes 
to pass. ' ' 

+ 

THE "SPANISH HAM"— 

Leveson-Gower tells in the Strand Magazine 
how the representative of Spain at the Court 
of St. James* dines with his family on one 
occasion, and how a servant then and there 
beat all records in the art of misplacing the 
letter "h." Flinging the door open, he an- 
nounced: ' ' The Spanish Ham ' ' — making a 
perceptible pause before he added," bassador." 
The author declares that he will never forget 
the effect produced. Even the public host and 
hostess had difficulty in controling their 
laughter. i 



THE DOCTORS' TRUST. 

Phil Francis, whose editorial expressions 
while he was connected with the Stockton 
Mail were frequently quoted by The Wasp, 
has brought to the columns of the San Fran- 
cisco Call the fearlessness and candor that 
distinguished them in his former position. The 
Mail's loss is the Call's gain. A good exam- 
ple of Editor Francis' style is furnished in 
a few paragraphs relative to United States 
Senator Works, who has been flooding the 
newspaper offices of the United States with 
speeches on the "Doctors' Trust," said ora- 
tions having, of course, been printed at the 
expense of the Government, and thus distribut- 
without cost to the author. Hear what Broth- 
er Francis says of this philanthropist's hobby: 

Works demands that any ignoramus who chooses 
to do so may practise healing of the sick — and 
charge for his services. There's the nub of the 
ear — eharge for his services. 

There is no such thing as a medical trust. Any- 
body who wants to do so can practise medicine, 
Christian Science, chiropractic, naturopathy, dam- 
fulopathy, or any other kind of charlatanry he 
pleases. But he must do it for nothing. The niin- 
utt he begins to endanger the lives of the sick with 
intent to make money out of the job — whether he 
administers pills or prayers — the law stops him. 

The law says to all this sort: "If your con- 
science and your faith in your foolishness urge you 
to get others to submit to your ministrations and 
you are willing to give your time and medicines 
freely, the State will respect your convictions, and 
you can go ahead. But if you are a mere heartless 
quack, willing to cause suffering and bring about 
death through your ignorance for the sake of mak- 
ing money, you must stop." 

That's all there is to this bugaboo of medical 
freedom which Works talks about. All the scoun- 
drelly patent medicine fakers, all the cancer and 
consumption "specialists" — every sort of villainous 
and murderous rascal unhung — is in full agreement 
with the Senator who advocates freedom to murdei- 
for pay. 

He is a disgrace to the State, sitting there in the 
seat he stole, and making California absurd in the 
eyes of the nation. 



OLD 




DISTILLED BY 

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<■■ M >l> DEAL bae been 
written about the new 
bouse of the George 
Shreves al San Mateo. 
Nobody lias mentioned 
the feature »f must inter- 
est — a miniature theater, 
such as one sees in many 
Eastern homes ot the wealthy. In fact, such 
theaters have been quite the rage in the East 
tor some time. Architect Howard, who built 
the pavilion where Miss Jennie Crocker's 
wedding breakfast was given, is Mr. Shreve's 
architect. 

That Pistol Play. 

Thougn the Crocker- Whitman wedding is 
almost ancient history, the gossips are still 
talking over some of its unusual features, 
especially the exhibition of a pistol by the 
bridegroom to subdue the ardor of snapshot 
pnotographers and give pause to any anar- 
chists that might be lurking around. Threat- 
ening letters, it is said, had been written by 
anonymous spokesmen of the proletariat, who 
threatened to do things to the bridegroom. 
It needed no letters to inform him that the 
photographers would attempt to storm the cit- 
adel of social exclusiveness, and when the 
advanced guard arrived, with a hustling young 
knight of the camera in advance, he found 
himself looking into the ugly muzzle of a 
most serviceable automatic revolver. It 
seemed as large as a gatling gun to the pho- 
togiapher, and after a brief but vain effort at 
parley he betook himself out of range of the 
wedding breakfast table. Again, at the rail- 
road station, the black phiz of the big auto- 
matic revolver, held in the left fist of the 
bridegroom, made its appearance. Nobody 
attempted to test its effectiveness by edging 
up and trying a photographic shot at the bridal 
couple or by taking any other liberties. The 
moral effect of this display of aitillery has 
been pronounced. Mr. and Mrs. Whitman, 
during their visit to the McCloud River, have 
fallen into no ambuscade of tripod scouts, 
waiting to take them unawares when landing 
a three-pound trout or exchanging the senti- 
mental confidences characteristic of the first 
week after the wedding. The happy couple 
have roamed care-free through the woodlands 
and the palpitating world outside doesn't 
know whether they wore evening clothes or 
plain ordinary camping duds to dinner. It 
remains to be seen what terrible revenge the 
knights of the tripod will take for this rude 
interference with their vested rights. 

& <J* & 
His People Wealthy. 

The local society gossips that always scruti- 
nize the pedigree of a stranger who comes to 



NOTICE. 

All communications relative to nodal news 
should be addressed "Society Editor Wasp, 121 
Second Street, S. P.," and should reach this office 
not later than Wednesday to Insure publication 
in the issue of that week. 



claim one of our heiresses have come to the 
conclusion that Mr. Malcolm Whitman's fam- 
ily in the East is in the front rank socially 




MISS BARBARA JOSEPHINE SMALL 

The fiancee of Lieutenant Junius Pierce, and 
very well known in the army set. 

and financially. Mr. Whitman's father and 
uncle are interested in the textile business, 
which is one of the most important lines in 
America, and not second in importance to the 



st eel industry. Whitman pere is a shrewd 
man. whose estate should be sufficient to make 
his heirs capable of cutting a very respectable 
figure in New Fork society. And that, let 
me tell you. is no small financial achievement 
in these days of high Jiving. 

The Templeton Crockers' Gift. 

Miss Julia Langhorne, that popular bride- 
to-be, is receiving many gorgeous presents, as 
is to be expected of one who is so universal- 
ly liberal. The Templeton Crockers have al- 
ready given her their gift, which is a magnifi- 
cent diamond pendant, and she has many 
other gifts of jewels and the usual display of 
silver. 

J* & & 
Brilliant Society Wedding, 

It is said that out of compliment to the 
colors of her fiance, Miss Julia Langhorne 
has chosen blue for the shade to be worn bv 
her bridesmaids when this charming girl be- 
comes the wife of Lieutenant James Parker. 
Miss Louise Boyd and Miss Sara Gunning- 
ham will wear this dainty color, and the maid 
of honor, Miss Marian Newhall, will wear 
white. The same color scheme will be fol- 
lowed in the decorations at St. Luke's Church. 
The Langhorne mansion will also be a bower 
of white and green, with significant touches 
of blue. Only relatives and a limited number 
of intimate friends are invited to the recep- 
tion. Lieutenant Parker is attached to the s 
submarine fleet. After the honeymoon the 
bridal couple will make their home at Prov- 
incetown for a time at least. The wedding 
of Miss Julia Langhorne and Lieutenant Par- 
ker will be celebrated on the 14th of August. 

t5* (5* t5* 

Mrs. Hale at Gotham. 

Mr. and Mrs. Prentiss Cobb Hale are at 
"The Plaza," New York City, where they 
will remain until the middle of August. Upon 



HOTEL 

DEL 
MONTE 


oMteis 


PACiric 

GROVE 

HOTEL 

Pacific Grov? 


BOTH HOUSES UNDER 
SAME MANAGEMENT 

Address: 

H. B. WAENEB, 

Del Monte, - California 


A beautiful summer 

home at 
very moderate rates 


A tasty, comfortable 

family hotel. 
Low monthly rates 


^wiw 



-THE WASP 



[Saturday, August 3, 1912. 



their return Mrs. Hale will proceed directly 
to her fine country home at Shasta Springs, 
where her hospitality has been the delight of 
her many friends. 

&?■ i£* ^* 
Rich No Longer. 

The description of Henry Keilus in some 
of the daily newspapers as a "rich young 
man" was rather wide of the mark. I am 
told by persons who know, that Mr. Keilus 
has made ducks and drakes of the money 
left him by his enterprising father, the late 
Charles Keilus, the clothier. Charles Keilus 
established "The Hub" on Kearny street, 
and made a success by catering to young men 
who liked ready-made clothes of a superior 
quality. A very keen and enterprising busi- 
ness man was ' ' Charlie ' ' Keilus. He knew the 
great value of advertising and was ready to 
pay for the best positions. He was the first 
merchant in San Francisco to take space on 
the first page of the Chronicle. He paid a 
high price, but did not object as long as his 
advertisement of "The Hub" was the first 
"ad" in the newspaper. Mr. Keilus. senior, 
sent his only son, Henry, to New York to 
learn the clothier's trade "from the ground 
up, ' ' and gave the boy a handsome present 
when the lad turned out his first suit of 
clothes. The love of Clothier Keilus for his 
boy and the hopes he had for the young fel- 
low's future as a great merchant were sug- 
gestive of Charles Dickens' wonderful story 
of Dombey & Son. Clothier Keilus died rather 
prematurely. The disaster of 1906 made in- 
roads on his health and future. His son suc- 
ceeded him and has wound up his brief ca- 
reer by eloping with Miss Marie Albert, to 
whom a morning paper alludes daintily as 
"Mrs. Bloch." Mr. Bloch is a gentleman of 
somewhat sportive proclivities, and in the 
redlight district, it is said, is accredited with 
"having annexed a large share of whatever 
wealth was left to young Keilus, after the 
latter 's lavish expenditures on the stunning 
Miss Albert. It is also accepted as history in 
the half -world, 'tis said, that when the Keilus 
funds ran low, the fair objeet of the young 
merchant's infatuation gave him the mitten 
and accepted the attentions of a millionaire 
cigar man's heir. The devotion of young 
Keilus, however, was the kind one reads about 
occasionally, and this week he brought con- 
sternation to his relatives by departing hur- 
riedly for the Bast with Miss Albert. The 
lady succumbed, as ladies often do, to per- 
sistent devotion and the allurements of the 
hymeneal altar. The admirers, who have 
been left in the lurch, seem to be bearing up 
stoically under the loss. The tenderloin won't 
talk of anything else for the next week at 
least. 

Navy Nuptials. 

Many eyes are turned toward the notable 
wedding which will take place at the St. 
Francis early in the month of September. The 
contracting parties will be Miss Neva Salis- 
bury and Ensign William Keynolds, U. S. N. 
The bride is the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. 
Guy Salisbury. The ceremony will be a quiet 



one. The service is to be read by Dean Gresh- 
am of Grace Cathedral. The bride will be 
unattended. Part of their honeymoon will be 
spent at New York, where they will attend 
another wedding — that of Lieutenant W. E. 
Hall, a brother of Ensign Purnell. 

Lucky Adopted Boy. 

William Ziegler, Jr., adopted son of the 
baking powder maker, who died seven years 
ago, having just become of age, will receive 
the income from the Ziegler estate, which has 
been appraised at as much as $30,000,000. 
Young Ziegler is a student at Columbia Uni 
versity. He is a son of G. W. Brandt, for 
merly of Davenport, la., a half-brother of 
William Ziegler. The baking powder manu 
facturer adopted the boy when he was 5 years 
old. The entire income of the vast estate is 
to go to the young man. Every five years he 
is to receive a quarter of the estate until the 
principal is his. It would be interesting to 
have a correct account of how this youth, who 
has had great riehes thrust upon him, will 
get rid of some of the millions before he 
reaches middle life. 

•St J8 J* 
Bohemia Hoaxed. 

If we may believe the garrulous "Knave" 
of the Oakland Tribune, Bohemia has been im- 
posed upon in a heartless manner. According 
to the "Knave's" tale, some time ago an iron 
bell was cast for the San Diego College. It 
was a mammoth affair, and except for its low- 
caste metal resembled muchly a mission bell. 
It was not a success, either musically or me- 
chanically, as there w r as a flaw in the casting, 
and the San Diegans would have none of it. 
Then it was that John T. Gaffey. Justice F. W. 
Henshaw and Edward H. Hamilton got their 
heads together and put over the finest little 
joke that has ever been perpetrated on the Bo- 



hemian Club. Last year, after a ritual con- 
ducted by Ned Hamilton, which fairly bristled 
with grandiloquent Spanish, the bell, under the 
guise of a tocsin that had clanged out wild 
alarms against Indian risings and chimed 
peaceful calls to matins or even-songs in some 
old mission tower, was presented solemnly to 
the club. A cartoon was made of the event, 
and all but the immediate circle of Bohemia 
swallowed the hoax. Amongst those duly im- 
pressed was Vanderlyn Stow, head of the 
grove committee. So dearly did he cherish 
this bell that at vast trouble and some con- 
siderable expense the rejected casting has 
been erected within the grove itself, close to 
the dining-room, its ringing is to take the 
place of the melodious horn that erstwhile 
summoned the .hungry- Bohemians to their 
meals. Experiments made by those who have 
been staying in the grove before camp opens 
presage a goodly kick forthcoming from those 
who tent on the floor ot the valley and who 
will not want to be clanged out of their beds 
even by the holiest bell that had ever received 
its blessing of sanctity. It is said that the 
flaw has developed into a crack which en- 
larges every time the clapper whangs the iron 
sides in discordant, dissonant sound. 

t£& t&* '£* 

Wedding Postponed. 

Postponement of a wedding always causes 
a craning of necks and a flutter of inquiry. 
This is none the less the case when the wed- 
ding was to have been an army affair. The 
postponement of the marriage of Miss Bar- 
bara Small to Lieutenant. Junius Price was 
unexpected. The engagement was not. Miss 
Small had been much associated with the army 
set ever since her sister, Mrs. Arthur Fisher, 
has been living on Angel Island. Miss Small, 
a tall, blonde girl, was educated at a local 
fashionable school, and has been very popular 



f 

■■'■ 



■ 



Since the decision rendered by the United States Su- 
preme Court, it has been decided by the Monks here- 
after to bottle 

CHARTREUSE 

(Liqueur Peres Chartreux) 

both being identically the same article, under a combi- 
nation label representing the old and the new labels, 
and in the old style of bottle bearing the Monks' 
familiar insignia, as shown in this advertisement. 

According to the decision of the U. S. Supreme Court, 
handed down by Mr. Justice Hughes on May 29th, 1911, 
no one but the Carthusian Monks (Peres Chartreux) is 
entitled to use the word CHARTREUSE as the name or 
designation of a liqueur, so their victory in the suit 
against the Cusenier Company, representing M. Henri 
Lecouturier, the Liquidator appointed by the French 
Courts, and his successors, the Compagnie Fermiere de 
la Grande Chartreuse, is complete. 

The Carthusian Monks (Peres Chartreux), and they 
alone, have the formula or recipe of the secret process 
employed in the manufacture of the genuine Char- 
treuse, and have never parted with it. There is no 
genuine Chartreuse save that marie by them at Tarra- 
gona. Spain. 

At first-class iiWine Merchants, Grocers, Hotels, Cafes. 
Batjer & Co., 45 Broadway, New York, N. T. 
Sole Agents for United States. 




Saturday, August 3, 1912. J 



-THE WASP 




IN MR. McKAMAEA'S MERRY AUTOMOBILE. 
Mrs. Cora Perkins at the wheel, accompanied by Mrs. McNamara and boys. 



in society ever since her debut several seasons 
ago. She is a member of the San Francisco 
Golf Club at [ngleside, and is a devotee of the 
Scotch game. Siie runs her own electric, and 
is frequently seen about town in it. Lieuten- 
ant Price is a great friend of her brother-in- 
law, Lieutenant Arthur J. Fisher, and is an 
officer of the same regiment. It was while 
visiting Uie Fishers that Miss Small met her 
fiance. 

,Jt J« & 

Worthy of Being Staged. 

Domestic complications are so numerous 
these days that they have to be very much out 
of the ordinary to attract attention. The 
family troubles of Nicholas .1. McNamara 
eome under the heading of "most unusual." 
Mr. McNamara has succeeded in getting the 
(irand Jury to indict Mrs. Cora Perkins and 
chauffeur, Fred Patterson, for stealing his 
automobile: Mrs. Perkins, an old friend of 
Mrs. McNamara, moved into the McNamara 
abode and proceeded to oust the male bird 
from the family nest, as it were'. She ran the 
house and Mrs. McNamara, and finally took 
the irate husband's automobile, ostensibly for 
a short trip, but in reality for a tour of Eu- 
rope at Mr. McNamara 's expense. Mrs. Mc- 
Namara is rich in her own right, being the 
daughter of an old San Francisco pioneer. 
Therein lies much of the trouble. Husband 
McNamara has managed to intercept the tour- 
ists at New York, and Mrs. Cora Perkins may 
noi be so assertive n the officers bring her 
back in custody to San Francisco and she has 
to defend herself against a charge of grand 
larceny. It will be a great opportunity for 
the reporters and newspaper photographers. 
A picture of the intercepted tourists appears 
on this page. Mrs. Perkins looks very happy 
at the wheel of Husband McNamara 's ma- 
chine, and it makes even the chauffeur laugh. 
Mrs. McNamara, in the tonneau, looks serious, 
but then she has to stand the brunt of Mr. 
McNamara 's ire, and, moreover, is the treas- 
urer of the expedition. Mrs. Perkins may not 
look so care-free by the time she gets out of 
the criminal court. 



Visit of Prince Poniatowski. 

Tlic fond mammas with large aspirations 
for their young daughters are bestirring 
themselves to outdo one another in entertain- 
ments for the young Prince Poniatowski. He 
is to be the guest of the William H. Crockers, 
and will be accompanied by Miss Ethel Crock 
er when he returns home to Paris, as that 
young lady intends to take up music quite 
seriously. She has talent. The young Prince 
is the eldest of the three Poniatowski boys, 
and is extremely Frenchy in all his ways and 
ideas, having spent much of his life in the, 
French capital. His mother was formerly 
Miss Beth Sperry of Stockton, sister of Mrs, 
William IT. Crocker. Her family was rich. 
The Prince is not actually in the possession 
of a vested title, for there is no longer any 
Polish nation to give titles. Stanislaus Au 
gustus Poniatowski, from whom the Prince 
is descended, was elected King of Poland in 
1764 by the intervention- of Russia. He was 
the last King of Poland. 

Musician of the Family. 

Mr. and Mrs. Claus ISpreckels are now re- 
siding at Coronado. Young Mr. Spreckels is 
the musician of the family, and possesses real 
talent and a splendid voice. If he were not 
the son of a rich man he would certainly be 
found somewhere in the musical world, and 
probably prominent in it. He is far from 
being a bad business man either, although 
people with musical talent are usually sup- 
posed to.be devoid of a brilliant capacity for 
matters of dollars and cents. 

O* t5* t&* 

A Cafe for Fastidious Epicures. 

Tn San Francisco dining is more or less of a 
habit. The desire for a "change" lures 
many that are confirmed stay-at-homes. It 
isn't so much the satisfying a craving of the 



Gray hair restored to its natural color byAl- 
fredum's Egyptian Hernia — a perfectly harm 
less dye, and the effect is immediate. The 
most certain and satisfactory preparation for 
the purpose. Try it. At all druggists. 



palate that beckons the diner-oul a- it is the 
desire t<> humor the whims and fancies <-r the 
moment. The close observer, however, will 
notice an entirely differenl class of people al 
that most popular of all cafes — • Tait's. Iter.* 
dining i-- enjoyed because the palate is pleased 
and satisfied. There's a tc way IJ in which the 
food is cooked that seems to "touch tlie 
spot." I am nut speaking from a hungry 
man '•■ standpoint. Any! hing satisfies real hun- 
ger. Mv remark is based on the "pinion of 
the "picker' 1 — the most fastidious and «'xa«-t 
ing of epicures. Bating is a real pleasure at 
Tait's. Tin 1 novel and high-class amusement 
heard ami the artistic ami unusual decorations 
are of secondary importance. 



HOTEL 

VENDOME 

San Jose, Cal. 



One of California's 
Show Places Where 
Homelikeness Reigns 



H. W. LAKE, Manager 



5% per month 

SAVED on the investment by buying 



Alaska Refrigerator 

900,000 SOLD SINCE 1878 

We have a Test Refrigerator to prove what we 
claim for it Please call and see it. 

Pacinc Coast Agents 

W. W. MONTAGUE & CO. 

557-563 Market Street San Francisco 



Citizen'* Alliance of S»n Francisco 

OPEN SHOP 



"Tne minimum scale * of 
the union represses all ambition 
for excellence*" — Prof. Eliot. 
Harvard University. 



7 



Show me the Closed Shop 
town and I'll show the town 
flint is on the down grade. 



Citizens' Alliance Office 
Booms, Nos. 363-364-365 
Euss Bldg., San Francisco. 




10 



-THE WASP- 



[Saturday, August 3, 1912. 



Came Back Singly. 

The wonder should not be that those three 
famous Bohemians, Dr. Ainsworth, Frank lin- 
ger, and Raphael Weill, who went away like 
the inseparable "Three Musketeers," should 
be returning from Europe singly, and at inter- 
vals somewhat wide apart. The real wonder 
is that any three people ever return from a 
trip abroad except as bitter enemies for the 
remainder of their lives. If Damon and Py- 
thias had ever toured Europe together before 
the date of their display of devotion, it — the 
display — would have been recorded. A totally 
different story would be told. Dr. Ainsworth 
came back several weeks ago, TJnger ten days 
later, and Raphael Weill remains in Paris, 
the attractions of the summer jinks, with all 
its spectacular and fraternal allurements, not 
being sufficient to bring him back to the saline 
breezes of the Golden Gate. 

Libel Suit by Gaby Deslys. 

Gaby Deslys has undertaken to vindicate 
herself with music hall audiences in connec- 
tion with her suit for damages against "Gil 
Bias" for calling her a freak, and saying 
"She cannot sing and cannot dance, but only 
exhibits herself." Mile. Deslys writes: "If 
the music hall is so destitute of originality 
and wit, why do eminent dramatists intro- 
duce its features in the regular theaters, and 
why do great actors and actresses find profit 
in invading its field? The music hall perform- 
ers should not be criticised en bloc. Corneille 
wrote 'The Cid' and 'Attila' and Mme. de 
Sevigne pardoned the bad poetry of the latter 
because of the sublime beauty of the former. 
The music hall artist is never a Corneille, but 
the critics are not always Sevignes and they 
might learn a lesson rrom this. The music 
hall artist requires more originality than the 
average theater artist, because the latter is 
guided by the author in interpreting the part 
to be played. The music hall player must 
create his or her entire entertainment. If I 
am so stupid, myself, why do so many direct- 
ors seek my collaboration?" Mile. Deslys 
said she might go to America again nest 
winter. 

^* t?* ^* 

"Young man, I saw you put your arm 
around my daughter's waist last evening." 

"And I suppose you noticed how she strug- 
gled?" 



San Francisco 
Sanatorium 

specializes in the scientific care 
op liquor cases. suitable and 
convenient home in one op san 
francisco's finest residential 
districts is afforded men and 
women while recuperating from 
overindulgence. private rooms, 
private nurses and meals served 
in rooms. no name on building, 
terms reasonable. 

San Francisco Sanatorium 

Phone Franklin 7470 1911 Van Ness Ave. 
H. L. BATCHELDER, Manager. 




A PARISIAN SNAPSHOT. 

Latest photograph of Gaby Deslys in a gown to 
suit the occasion 

A Manager's Dilemma. 

John Hernan, formerly manager of the Cor- 
onado Hotel, well known, has been offered and 
has accepted his old position. He leaves the 
management of the Hotel Baltimore at Kan- 
sas City. There is an interesting story of 
bow he came to leave Coronado. When assist- 
ant manager there he was told he would be 
made manager if he would get married, but he 
shied at the penalty. Just why this condition 
was sought to be imposed on Hernan has nev- 
er been explained. He went East, where lots 
of places were offered him. Now it appears 
the Coronado people want him back and have 
given up their former notion of converting 
him to matrimony. His status as a hotel man- 
ager is very high. 

r&* i&* t&* 

An Eligible Bachelor at Large. 

Mr. Luke Kavanaugh, the millionaire, is 
planning a trip to Europe in the near future. 
Mr. Kavanaugh is known in political and 
stenographic circles as the budding J. P. Mor- 
gan of the Pacific. His touch, like that of the 
illustrious King Midas, turns everything to 
gold. Mr. Kavanaugh is the real thing as a 
financier, and plays in the greatest luek. If 
he bought a measly looking inside lot in a 
back block, ten chances to one some real es- 
tate buyer would come round inside a week 
and want to erect a fifteen-story apartment 
house on the property. He is said to own a 
good slice of several cow pastures, and has so 



many diversified and paying interests in fruit 
farms, mines, stocks and bonds, acquired by 
keen financiering, that a trip to Europe means 
no more to him than a ten-cent trip on the 
Oakland ferry. He is a man of fine presence 
and engaging manners, ^and, miracle of mira- 
cles, remains a bachelor in a city famed for 
a superabundance of feminine beauty. Now 
that the women have taken to polities, cases 
of confirmed bachelorhood amongst capitalists 
will no doubt be legislated against by impos- 
ing an enormous income tax. 

^* t?* <£* 
Eloped with a Chauffeur. 

Chauffeurs continue to De prominent figures 
in elopements and other complications of a 
more or less romantic character. Mrs. Elise 
P. Bell of Stanford, Connecticut, who has 
friends in this city, eloped the other day with 
Chauffeur Thomas N. English. Thomas is a 
well-built, good-looking chap and had been 
carrying on a flirtation with the young grass- 
widow for some time. Elopement was no new 
experience to her, for when 17, she ran away 
to New York with the schoolboy son of the 
President of the First National Bank. The 
youthful couple separated two years ago and 
Mrs. Bell went back to her parents, Mr. and 
Mrs. John B. Phillips. Mr. Phillips is treas- 
urer of a rich chemical company. He bought 
his returned daughter an automobile and built 
her a cozy bungalow on his estate, where she 
lived in company with a bachelor maid chum. 
The other morning the chum took breakfast 
alone. Elise had skipped with the chauffeur. 
He is 27 and Elise 25, and at latest accounts 
they were enjoying themselves in New York 
and preparing for a honeymoon in California. 



Any Victrola 

On Easy Terms 



Whether you get the new low price 
Victrola at $15 or the Victrola "de 
luxe" at $200, get a Victrola. At a 
very small expense you can enjoy a 
world of entertainment. Victrolas $15 
to $200. Any Victrola on easy terms. 



Sherman Ray & Co. 

Sheet Music and Musical Merchandise 
Steinway and Otlwr Fianoi. 
Apollo and Cecilian Player Pianos 

Victor Talking Machines. 

KEARNY AND SUTTEE STREETS, 

SAN FRANCISCO. 

14TH & CLAY STS., OAKLAND. 



Saturday, August 3, 1912.J 



THE WASP 



II 




BERTHA KALICH 
Tne distinguished emotional actress, who will appear next week at the Orpheum. 



American Women Lead. 

Some of the most beautiful gowns seen at 
European courts this season have been worn 
by American women who were presented. 



MORSE 

Detective and Patrol 

Service 



OPERATIVES in full dress furnished for 
weddings, receptions and other social 
functions. Uniformed officers supplied 
as ticket takers for balls, dances and 
entertainments at reasonable rates. 
Patrolmen to protect property against fire and 
depredations of thieves during absence of owner. 
Engage in all branches of legitimate detective 
service and serve legal papers in difficult cases. 



602 California St., San Francisco 

Telephone Kearny 3153. Homophone 2626 



The debutantes, of course, are rather limited 
as to colors and styles, for there is an un- 
written law that they must appear in white 
or cream and that simplicity must be the 
keynote. However, gold and silver tissues, 
jewel encrusted lace and crystal embroidered 
chiffons are used now in fastening their frocks 
so they are far prettier and daintier than the 
heavy satin and stiff silk dresses young girls 
used to wear on these occasions. For mar- 



Men of fashion always have their shirts 
made to order, for they find that the ready- 
made shirts are uncomfortable, ill-fitting and 
apt to give anything but a stylish effect. Such 
men patronize first-class establishments, such 
as that of D. C. Heger, 243 Kearny street, 
and US Geary street, where skilled workmen 
make shirts and underwear of perfect fit, the 
latest styles and the best of materials. A man 
is often judged by his linen, and good linen 
betokens the gentleman. 



ried women there is no rule, save certain reg- 
ulations regarding the train, the veil and the 

three feathers, and I liis 3 ear 1 he b1 sup >rb 

costumes were worn. Court dressmakers seem 
to have surpassed all previous efforts in the 
bewildering combinations <>i shades and fab- 
rics they have used, while glittering jewels 
have been employed us trimming for skirts 

;is well as bodices. The must beautiful gOWB 

of the season was wnm by Mrs. Barton French 
on her presentation by Mrs. Whitelaw Beid 
at one of the last courts. It was of hyacinth 
blue velvet embroidered in silver with the 
rose ,the thistle and the shamrock. The ma- 
terial was specially woven for Mrs. French. 
The skirt was draped with jewelled lace, edged 
with tiny blue blossoms. The train was of 
the velvet lined with the lace. For jewels 
Mrs. French wore only diamonds and pearls, 
and a fillet of these stones fastened the veil 
and feathers to her hair. Mrs. Barton French 
is well known in California. Her mother, 
Mrs, Arthur lnkersley, resided here, and while 
making a long visit to Del Monte, she wrote 
one of her successful books. 



Very Sensitive. 

Teacher: "Which is the mure , delicate of 
the senses?" 

Pupil: "The touch." 

Teacher: "Prove it" 

Pupil: "When you sit on a tack you can't 
hear it, you can't see it, you can't smell it, 
but it's there. " 



kToyo Kisen 
Mm Kaisha 

(ORIENTAL STEAMSHIP 00.) 

S. S. SliinyoMaru, (New). ..Saturday, Aug. 3,1912 
S. S. Chiyo Maru baturday, Aug. 31, 1912 

S. S. Nippon Maru (Intermediate Service 
Saloon. Accommodations at reduced 
rates Saturday, September 21, 1912 

S. S. Tenyo Maru, (Via Manila direct) 

Friday, September 27, 1912 

Steamers sail from Company's pier, No. 34, 
near foot, of Brannan Street, 1 P. M. for Yoko- 
hama and Hongkong, calling at Honolulu, Kobe 
(Hiogo), Nagasaki and Shanghai, and connecting 
at Hongkong with steamers for Manila, India, etc. 

No cargo received on board on day of sailing. 
Round trip tickets at reduced rates. 

For freight and passage apply at office, 4th 
floor, Western Metropolis National Bank Building, 
625 Market St. 

W. H. AVERT. Assistant General Manager. 



Ask your Dealer for , 

GOODYEAR "HIPPO" HOSE 



Guaranteed to atand 
700 lbs. Pressure 



The Best and strongest 
Garden Hose 




TRY IT AND BE CONVINCED 



GOODYEAR RUBBER COMPANY 

R. H. PEASE. Pres. 589-591-593 Market St., Sai Frurfsco 



VERY SERIOUS CHARGE: 



SOME editorial dissatisfaction with the re- 
port of the commission which investigat- 
ed the leaky reservoir on Twin Peaks 
has been expressed. There is no ground for 
adverse criticism. The commission appointed 
by Mayor Eolph performed its duties in a 
most thorough and seemingly in a thoroughly 
conscientious manner. Mayor Eolph selected 
first-class engineers to conduct the investiga- 
tion — M. M- O 'Shaughnessy, Howard C. 
Holmes, W. E. Eckart. The Mayor is to be 
commended for his selection. 

The three engineers went about their work 
systematically, and called before them and 
questioned at great length all the person who 
took part in the construction of the defective 
reservoir. Those persons were H. D. Con- 
nick, formerly the chief assistant of City En- 
gineer Manson, Wr. H. Healy of the Healy 
Construction Company, Percy Keating, a sub- 
contractor, and the inspectors for the Board 
of Works who supervised the construction of 
the reservoir. 

The commission has furnished to Mayor 
Eolph forty-seven large pages of testimony 
taken by it, and also a formidable-looking 
volume full of diagrams of the Twin Peaks 
reservoir. The conclusions of the commission 
leave no doubt as to where the blame rests 
for the defectiveness of the reservoir. It 
rests on the City Engineer's Department, 
which designed the leaky joints. 

Engineer Manson had nothing at all to do 
with the job. Mr. Manson 's status in the 
Engineer's Department seems to have been 
that of an official red-rubber stamp. His 
name was stamped on official papers, and that 
is all the connection he had with them. 

Engineer Connick testified that the reser- 
voir was designed by some of his assistant 
engineers. They decided to put a block of 
concrete under the joint. That plan, however, 
did not appeal to Mr. Connick, and, further- 
more, he said it would be quite expensive. 
He told the commission that there was abun- 
dant evidence of reservoirs that had been 



Art & Refinement are displayed In Tasteful Attire. 




-MAKERS OF- 



LADIES' GOWNS and FANCY 
COSTUMES 

420 SUTTER STREET. NEAR STOCKTON. 
Phone DOUGLAS 4964 

SAN FRANCISCO. CAL, 



Semsafcioiial Tuurini ! 

in tlhe Reservoir 

Investigation 

successfully built witn joints filled with as- 
phalt, as called for in the specifications which 
he approved for the Twin Peaks reservoir. 

Mr. Conniek was asked if he could name 
examples of reservoir joint construction simi- 
lar to that of the Twin Peaks reservoir. Mr. 




ENGINEER H. D. H. CONNICK 

Against wliom. charges of a serious nature have 
been made. 

Connick answered that "some reservoirs in 
Mexico were built in that fashion. 

Commissioner O 'Shaughnessy, in particular, 
seemed to be very dubious about exact par- 
ticulars of such construction, although he is 
known as one of the best engineers on reser- 
voir construction in the country. 

The other commissioners were also inquisi- 
tive, and finally Mr. Connick promised the 
commissioners that on July 18th he would 
submit to it the examples asked for. He fail- 
ed to keep his promise, however. 

The fact seems, therefore, plain enough 
that Mr. Connick selected a system of joint 
construction which people of experience did 
not approve, and he went ahead with the 
work in the positive, if not dictatorial, manner 
which is said to have been at the root of much 
of the trouble and delay in the construction 
of the Auxiliary Fire Protection System. On 
his own admission to the investigating com- 
mission, he changed the plans drawn by his 



subordinates, and it is a matter of record 
that by this change the Twin Peaks reservoir 
has been rendered defective, and it will cost 
more money to finish it. Already the actual 
cost of the reservoir is just about $50,000 
more than was estimated by the City Engi- 
neer's Department. The original cost, in 
round numbers, was $158,000. Its actual cost, 
therefore, exclusive of the cost of repairing 
the defective joints, is 25 per cent higher 
than the Engineer's Department had estimat 
ed. But that kind of thing is rather common. 

In its report to Mayor Eolph the commis- 
sion declares that the design of the joints 
is the Twin Peaks reservoir was faulty be- 
cause the sole support of the joint was a loose 
rock fill. Engineer Connick thought that by 
pouring hot asphaltum and concrete into the 
joints they would become water-tight. The 
experiment of tamping oakem into them with 
the asphaltum mixture was also tried, but, 
after all, the reservoir leaked at the rate of 
60,000 gallons a day. The trouble lay in not 
putting a solid concrete slab under the joints 
to uphold them when the weight of water in 
the reservoir bore down on them. Outside 
of these defective joints the workmanship of 
the reservoir was good. 

It transpired in the cross-examination of 
the witnesses that the modifications in the 
plan of the Twin Peaks reservoir were so nu- 
merous that everything was changed except 
the joints. Nobody had the hardihood to 
change those, for Engineer Connick said they 
were all right, though several authorities 
doubted their perfection. Amongst the doubt 
ing Thomases was Contractor Healy, the head 
of the Healy-Tibbetts Construction Company, 
a very large concern. 

The personal feelings engendered' between 
Mr. Healy and Engineer Connick are not those 



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TAILORS and IMPORTERS of WOOLENS 



108-110 SUTTER STREET 



above 

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French American Bank Bid's 
Fourth Floor 



SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 



Saturday, August 3, 1912.J 



THE WASP- 



13 



of brotherly love. Mr. Connick told the com- 
mission in his examination that he thought 
Healy would be willing "to do almost any- 
thing" to discredit him. 

When Healy got a chance on the witness 
stand he certainly opened up on Mr, Connick 
in startling fashion. The printed record of 
tin- testimony as taken by the commission con- 
tains the following paragraphs. The first 
paragraph is in answer to Commissioner 
O 'Shaughnessy 's inquiry as to whether Mr. 
Healy had advised Engineer Connick to use 
different construction on the Twin Peaks res- 
ervoir to prevent it from leaking. Healy said 
he was convinced it would leak. 

Mr. U 'Shaughnessy : Did you ever tell that 
to Connick or to the Board of Works'? Here 
is a $200,000 job put on the City of San Fran- 
cisco. It is of great importance. A failure 
would hurt you as much as them, and knowing 
the weakness of the design of this thing, did 
vim ever tell them that it was an impractic- 
able joint? 

Mr. Healy: My answer to that would be 
the same as we answered previously, that we 
would get ourselves in very bad favor. They 
were engineers; they were supposed to know 
their business. Nobody could tell Mr. Con- 
nick anything. There was no use of my sug- 
gesting anything. I might have thought any- 
thing, but they would scream if I said any- 
thing. 

Mr. O 'Shaughnessy: You would willingly 
submit to anything of any kind? 

Mr. Healy: I fought as hard as I could 
fight. When a man stood up and said, we 
got your money, what are you going to do? 
When there were $260,000 due us and we 
were going to follow in the wake of men he 
had broke, what could we do? I kept away 
from that just on that purpose. When lie 
prided himself on saying: "Well, I got your 
money, I broke four of them, " and prided 
himself on it, and said how much he saved 
the city. 

He said, go and go to the courts, we don't 
care. Why, it was so fierce around here a 
man would almost commit murder. We are 
not executed every morning at sunrise now, 
we have a chance for our lives now. I went 
through, Mr. 'Shaughnessy, a siege while 
that gentleman was in the office, not me alone 
but others, that 1 wouldn't go under again 
for anyone in the State of California. 

When the reservoir was practically finished 
the Board of Works got ready to exhibit its 
handiwork to the dear people at a sort of fete 
champetre on Twin Peaks. President Casey 
was on hand, his chest inflated with pride. 
The scene is described by Mr. Healy in terse 
and graphic sentences that indicate he might 
have been a star reporter if he hadn't devoted 
his talents to building bridges and converting 
wet concrete into oil tanks. Following is his 
eloquent outburst as reported verbatim et lit 
eratim in the carefully typewritten report 
presented by the investigating commission to 
Mayor Rolph, and now part of the archives 
of the municipality of San Francisco: 

Mr. Casey said it was a grand job. There 
were other engineers up there, and Doek- 



weiler was up there. He shook his head as 
to the joints. He asl d about the joints and 
I explained to him and he shook his head. 
The Japanese * Qginee from the Japanese gov- 
ernmenl told Wr. Casey and Mr. Hunt in the 
presence of Mr. Thompson that the reservoir 
wimldn 't hold water. We were just pouring 
the asphalt and then he said the joints would 
not hold water. We nave done this work 
under the most rigid inspection that ever 
was over a contract. It was so extremely 
discouraging that I have retired from the 
scene of war and told my men to do everything 
au«! anything, whether there were extras or 
not. When extras were involved, I said, go 
ahead and do it and get out. That is the 




PRESIDENT CASEY, BOARD OF WORKS. 

way it has been. I did not say the present 
officials, we have nothing against them, but 
there was one man here that was simply czar- 
like, H. D. H. Connick. 1 can prove that Mr. 
Connick deliberately, wilfully, and felonious- 
ly tried to hold me up ;for the benefit of Chas. 
C. Moore & Co., and when I would not stand 
for it he made it so disagreeable for us that 
Mr. Jordan told me we couldn't get a cent 
out of there unless 1 went up and saw Con- 
nick. He demanded $20,000 from me for C. 
C. Moore on his statement that there Was an 
alleged claim in here by C. C. Moore for al- 
leged delays caused by my ex-partner, and the 
Pumping Station on Second and Townsend 
street. I said, Connick, what have you got 
to do with this thing. It is a just claim and 
you must pay it. I said., never, and I walked 
out of his office. Mr. Jordan said I can't get 
anything unless you go out and see Mr. Con- 
nick, we're up against it. I came out to see 
Mr. Connick, and took Mr. Jordan. He then 
demanded a check for $10,000' for C. C. Mooie. 
I said, what is this, a blackmail, I thought 
you were an honest man; you are foolish to 
do anything of this kind. I said, never a 



cent. He Baid, it will cosl you $100,000 for 
penalties it" you don F t. He said, sign a check 
for $]ii,oini and he said, give it to me and I 
will get it settled for you. and when 1 would 
not stand for that there was never more raw- 
hiding by a man that was a civil engineer 
than Mr. Connick. There wasn't a more un- 
scrupulous man. He would stoop to anything 
to annoy us, to abuse us, and he told some <>\ 
his engineers to give it to him. And when they 
said we were justly entitled to extra work he 
said, "Never mind; I have got them." He 
wouldn't give us any money for work. Mr. 
Casey released a large sum of money ovei 
his head. In his otlice Mr. Manson sat along- 
side of him and had nothing to say. The 
other fellow did it all. I say, in justice to 
us, that if that is the work of a city official, 
I don't wont t o work under them. 

Mr. Jordan: That explains why we didn't 
make any suggestions to him. 

Mr. Healy: I wrote him a letter. He sent 
for me and threatened me, and big as 1 am 
his threats went, and when he broke the 
other four men he told me he would do the 
same to us, and he meant it. I let it go with 
instructions to my men to do an}'thing and 
everything, not looking to the cost, relieving 
ourselves of the continuous headaches forced 
on us by Mr. Connick. 

Considering that Mr. Healy is the head of 
one of the largest construction companies on 
the Pacific Coast, and is regarded as a thor- 
oughly responsible man, such charges as he 
has rattled off before Mayor Rolph 's investi- 
gating commission cannot be classified and 
disposed of as airy nothings. They are very 
serious charges and call for a reply from the 
object of Mr. Healy 's accusations or an inves- 
tigation by the Grand Jury. There has been 
too much talk about the intimidation of con- 
tractors and of favoritism in the award of 
city contracts, and it is about time that it re- 
ceived official notice. 



YOUR FAMILY 

SILVERSMITH 

Every family at some time or another 
needs something in the silverware line, or 
has articles to be repaired or matched, or 
jewelry to be fixed, and doubtless would 
be glad to know of an absolutely reliable 
house, where the charges are right. Such 
a house is the John O. Bellis Silverware 
Factory, 328 Post street, San Francisco, 
where all wants of this nature can be sup- 
plied at reasonable cost. The firm enjoys 
the confidence of some of the most promi- 
nent families of the State. A feature of 
their business is the altering, resetting or 
entirely reconstructing of old family jew- 
elry into modern styles. It is wonderful 
what transformation can be wrought on 
your old trinkets at trifling expense with- 
out, impairing any of their sentimental 
value. 

For staple goods, such as toilet articles, 
tableware, etc., this firm cannot be sur- 
passed on the Pacific Coast, while their 
trophy cups and presentation pieces made 
to order are without peers. A visit of in- 
spection at 328 Post St. (Union Square) is 
invited. 



ANNIHILATING 




HIS week has witnessed an extension 
of the Federal Telegraph Company 
commercial service from this eity to 
Hawaii. A few months ago this com- 
pany, using its own instruments in an inter- 
island wireless station at Honolulu, passed 
messages between it and its San Francisco 
wireless station near the Cliff House, thereby 
demonstrating the practicability of the Poul- 
sen system of wireless telegraphy for com- 
mercial service over the widest ocean span yet 
undertaken. It is 2,100 sea miles from San 
Francisco to Honolulu. The wireless telegraph 
bridge across the Atlantic Ocean is only 
1,800 sea miles. 

The local wireless station near the Cliff 
House had, however, not been built for eon- 
ducting a regular commercial 'Service with 
Honolulu, and it was necessary, besides build- 
ing a plant at Honolulu, to build a larger plant 
here before undertaking it. This the company 
has since done at South San Francisco. Two 
towers 440 feet high and 600 feet apart have 
been erected. Between th.-nri is suspended 
seven miles of antenna wire by which the elec- 
tric telegraph impulses are passed to and re- 
ceived from the air. Beneath /he anlenna 
wires on the ground are thre3 small frame 
buildings which house the wireless telegraph 
instruments. One contains a duplicate instal- 
lation of motor-generator transformers, which 
take an alternating electric current generated 
200 miles away from the fall of some Sierra 
mountain stream and transforms it to 600 
volt direct electric current, the same as that 
which runs the trolley cars, for the wireless 
service. The other two buildings contain the 
sending and receiving instruments of the tele- 
graph. 

Though the plant is simple and unpreten- 
tious in appearance, it is the latest and most 
up-to-date installation in the world. The tow- 
ers are the highest. Wood is used in their 
construction in place of steel, improving the 
insulation of the antenna wire. They are 
built three-sided in place of four-sided, mak- 
ing them less costly. 

The sending and receiving telegraph instru- 
ments include a marvelous amplifier of the 
wireless signals picked up by the antennae from 
the air. It is an absolutely new invention 
made by Dr. Lee DeForrest, who is retained 
by the Federal Telegraph Company to devise 
improvements to its system. The instrument 
itself is a tiny incandescent electric-light bulb. 
The faint electric current picked out of the 
air by the antennae pass through the filament 
in the bulb, and as the electric wave lengths 
of the current change with the signals made 
by the distant sending operator a correspond- 
ing change is made in the amount of heat im- 
parted by the incandescent filament to the 
highly attenuated gas in the bulb. 

The heat given to the gas from the filament 
in the wireless circuit is in turn given up by 
it to a second filament in the bulb and be- 
comes again an electric current, only of a 
shorter wave length, and on a separate and 
all-wire circuit. The change in the wave 



San Francisco 

Talks to Hawaii 

By Wireless 

length has the effect of amplifying the sound 
of the signals, which become heard through 
a telephone receiver on the all-wire circuit. 
Practically, to the Poulsen system of wireless 
the amplifier invented by Dr. DeForrest bears 
the same instrumental relation as the il relay" 
instrument to the original Morse telegraph. 
Commercially, it extends the limit of distance 
of wireless transmission and reduces its cost. 
Another novel receiving and sending instru- 
ment of the station is the duplex mechanism, 
also the invention of Mr. DeForrest, by which 



two operators send each a message in the 
same direction simultaneously. It is a simple 
device which makes this possible. Two com- 
mutators, insulated from each other, are driv- 
en on the same line shaft. The wave length 
of the current through each is different. The 
commutators make and break each current 
circuit 500 times a second, but alternately 
with each other. The operators working each 
line thus divide every second of time, and 
the use of the line between them 500 times a 
second, and the selector instruments at the 
receiving station being tuned to the sending 
instruments, each selector takes its own sig- 
nals only to the receiving operator. The 
result is two messages transmitted by the 
same current in the time of one through di- 
viding the time of use of the air and the cur- 
rent between two operators. Commercially 




FEDERAL COMPANY'S LOFTY TOWERS. 
They stand on San Bruno Point, San Mateo County, and are 440 feet high. 



Saturday, August 3, 1912. J 



-TNE VASP 



15 



the result is to double the output of the ser- 
vice and earning power of t li e Poulsen system 
of wireless telegraph plOntB, 

The third novelty In the station is a mech- 
anism, the invention of Professor Puiilsenof 
Denmark, which takes the place of operators 
who, in the Poulsen system, use the Morse 
telegraph instruments and the Morse or some 
other code of signala The messages are first 
punched in a narrow tape by an operator 
working a three-key device like an abridged 
typewriter. The tape is then fed into a send- 
ing mechanism which puts out electric signals 
corresponding to the punching of the tape at 
the rate 01 200 and even 300 words a minute. 
At the receiving station the electric signals 
pass through an extremely fine gold wire set 
in what electricians call a magnetic field. The 
effect of the electric signals passing in the 
wire through this magnetic field is to cause 
the current in the latter to bend the wire. 
The wire being at the same time in the illu- 
minated field of a microscope, its successive 
signaling bends are magnified and projected 
on photographic tape, which, moving continu- 
ously, passes through a developing and fixing 
bath, and is turned out a printed record from 
which the messages are translated. 

The three mechanisms which have been de- 
scribed mark a tremendous advance in the com- 
mercializing of the original wireless telegraph 
invention first made possible by the discovery 
of the Hertzian electric waves. The Poulsen 
system of wireless telegraphy operated with 
them by the Federal Telegraph Company has 
all the capacity for service and a greater de- 
gree of reliability in giving it than the Morse 
telegraph system has over land, and a very 
much greater capacity and more reliability 
than any cable telegraph across water. The 
wireless service over land, which has now been 
given for several months between Seattle and 
Wan Francisco, Los Angeles and Chicago, has 
been remarkably satisfactory in every respect, 
not the least of which has been its lower 
charges to patrons. The first day 's work from 
the new South San Francisco station to Hono- 
lulu proved its greater capacity for across- 
ocean service over the cable. Where the high 
charges and low speed of transmission have 
kept press dispatches by the cable down to a 
hundred words or so daily, eighteen hundred 
words of press dispatches were sent by wire- 
less from this city and published in the Hono- 
lulu Sunday papers. 

Commercial telegraph service by wireless is 
today as fixed an institution in the conduct of 
e very-day business as the Morse telegraph. 
It has come into existence more rapidly even 
than knowledge of it has become diffused 
among the people, Nothing could have more 
deliciously illustrated this than the editorial 
in Sunday morning's Chronicle which com- 
mented .on "the report from London of the 
discovery of a new method of sending long- 
. distance" wireless telegraph messages by means 
of controlling a continuous (electric) wave," 
while people in Honolulu were reading San 
Francisco news sent them from San Francisco 
by the "new method" of wireless which the 
Chronicle had just heard of from London. 




THE COY CANDIDATE. 
'I will accept the nomination if unanimously tendered 



BIRDS OF A FEATHER. 

WHAT is the difference between Boss 
Roosevelt and Boss Lorimer or Boss 
Cox? That question is asked by 
Henry Watterson in the Louisville Courier- 
Journal. Answering the question, Mr. Wat- 
terson says: "There is no difference except 
of exposure and degree; between Boss Bryan 
and Boss Murphy and Boss Sullivan and Boss 
Taggart, except in assumption and gift of 
gab. It was Murphy and Sullivan and Tag- 
gart at last who gave Wilson the two-thirds 
vote at Baltimore that should have gone to 
Clark the moment he got a majority, and 
would have gone to him if Brypn, equally 
dissimulative as to both Wilson and Clark, 
had not been playing for a deadlock, with the 
hope that, worn out, the convention would 
turn to him. I do not wonder that he at 
least now hates these particular Bosses, for 
they did do him to a turn. 

"Bryan takes Tammany for his immediate 
red rag. But, in 1900, when he ran a second 
time for President, he and Croker were as 
thick as thieves, and in 1908, when he was 
again a candidate and had an ax to grind, he 
found nothing to object to in Murphy. Nor 
in the latter year was he shocked by Roger 
Sullivan or Tom Taggart. He took, and was 
glad to take, all they had and could give. 
The scene shifts in 1912. He wanted to 
confuse and delay the proceedings of the 
Baltimore Convention. He wanted to ex- 
ploit himself, and cared not what kind of a 
fire-brand he used for the purpose. Yet, the 
work done — not precisely as he had planned 
— the exclamation against Bossism and the 
Bosses drops to a whisper. They are asked 
to come into camp — some of them invited to 
sit at table. 

"How is Mr. William Barnes of Albany 



more of a Boss than Mr. Theodore Roosevelt 
of Oyster Bay? Both are Harvard men. Mr. 
Barnes is as well born as Mr. Roosevelt. The 
one rs a steadfast, conscientious partisan — er- 
i onions in his beliefs, as I think, but cour- 
ageous, consistent, and sincere — the other a 
faker of what he thinks attractive wares. 

"Both Boss Bryan and Boss Roosevelt are 
loud in their proclamation of what they call 
'Progressivism.' What is it? Sound and 
fury signifying some cheat which Orator Puff 
would rtut upon his hearers. Puff Roosevelt 
means it one way and Puff Bryan quite an- 
other way. Neither could explain the dif- 
ference nor for a moment stand an A B C 
catechism. Each of them has employed it 
and profited by it." 



REWARD OF EFFICIENCY. 

BERMINGHAM, Superintendent of En- 
gines in the Fire Department, reported 
to the Board of Fire Commissioners that 
he had made changes in the City's two fire 
boats, which effected a saving of $500 a month 
in the fuel oil bill for keeping steam up in 
their boilers. The Board of Fire Commiss- 
ioners, without authority from the Charter, 
immediately appointed two additional engin 
eers and an additional fireman to the crews 
of the fire boats. The salaries of these new 
employees will just about be paid by the $000 
which Mr. Bermingham's efficiency saved. 
Mr. Bermingham, having broken the unwrit- 
ten law of the municipal office holders union, 
by undertaking to save public money, loses 
his job. The Fire Commissioners have put 
him on trial for having once voted in Oak 
land — penalty made and provided to fit the 
crime, being removal from office. 



The pessimist never gets so far as hoping 
to have his hopes realized. 




Vacation 1912 

A Handbook of 

Summer Resorts 

Along the line of the 

NORTHWESTERN 
PACIFIC RAILROAD 

This book tells by picture and word 
of the many delightful places in Marin, 
Sonoma, Mendocino, Lake and Humboldt 
Counties in which to spend your Vaca- 
tion — Summer Resorts, Camping Sites, 
Farm and Town Homes. 



Copies of Vacation 1912 may be ob- 
tained at 874 Market St. (Flood Build- 
ing), Sausalito Ferry Ticket Office, or 
on application to J. J. Geary, G. P. & 
F. A., 808 Phelan Building, San Fran- 
cisco. 



NEW ENGLAND HOTEL 

Located in beautiful grove about 40 rods from 
station. Beautiful walks, grand scenery; hunt- 
ing and fishing, boating, bathing, bowling and 
croquet. Table supplied with fresh fruit and 
vegetables, milk and eggs from own ranch daily. 

Adults $7 to $9 per week; special rates for 
children. 

Address F. K. HARRISON, Camp Meeker, 
Sonoma County, Cal. 



OWN SUMMER HOME IN 

CAMP MEEKER 

Mountains of Sonoma Co. Lots $15 up. Meeker 
\iilds cottages $85 up. Depot, stores, hotels, 
.staurant, phone, post, express office, theater, 
free library, pavilion, churches,, sawmill; 2,000 
lots Bold, 700 cottages built. Sausalito Ferry. 
Address M. O. MEEKER, Camp Meeker. 



Redwood Grove 



% mile from Guerneville; tents and cottages; 
abundance of fruit, berries; bus meets all trains. 
Rates $10-$11 per week; L. D. phone. Address 
THORPE BROS., Box 141, Guerneville, Sonoma 
Co., Cal. 



ROSE HILL 

HOTEL AND COTTAGES 

Camp Meeker 

Opposite depot; 20 minutes' ride from Russian 
River ; surrounded by orchards and vineyards ; 
excellent dining-room, with best cooking. Fish- 
ing, boating, swimming and dancing. Many 
good trails for mountain climbing. Open all 
year. Can accommodate 75 guests. Adults, $6 
to $10 per week; children half rates. 

Building lots for sale from $50 and up. Ad- 
dress MRS. L. BARBIER, Camp Meeker, So- 
noma County, Cal. 



The Gables 



Sonoma county's ideal family resort, just opened 
to the public. Excellent table, supplied from 
our dairy and farm. Dancing, tennis, games. 
Bus to hot baths and trains daily at Verano sta- 
tion. Rates "$2.50 per day, $12 and up per 
week. Open year round. Address H. P. MAT- 
THEWSON, Sonoma City P. O., Cal. 



Motel Rowardennan 

OPEN ALL THE YEAR. 

New ownership, new management, new fea- 
tures. Golf, tennis, bowling, fishing, boating, 
swimming, clubhouse. Free garage. 

Rates $17.50 to $25 per week; $3 to $4 per 
day. 

Folders and information at Peck-Judah's, or 
address J. M. SHOULTS, Ben Lomond, Cal. 



:: RIVERSIDE RESORT :: 



Country home ^4 mile from Guerneville; ideal 
spot; y» mile of river frontage; $8 to $12 per 
week. For particulars, MRS. H. A. STAGG, 
Proprietor, Guerneville, Sonoma county. 



COSMO FARM 

On the Russian River; electric lighted through- 
out. Rates $10 to $12 per week. For particu- 
lars see Vacation Book or addresB H. P. Mc- 
PEAK, P. O. Hilton, Sonoma Co., Cal. 



RIONIDO HOTEL 

Lawn Tennis, Croquet, Shuffle Board, Swings, 
Shooting Gallery, Box Ball Alleys, also 4,000 
square feet Dancing Pavilion, unsurpassed Bathing 
and Boating, and large social hall for guests. 
Hotel ready for guests. Rates, $12 per week. 
American plan. For reservations address RIO- 
NIDO CO., Rionido, Sonoma Co., Cal. 



Summer Resorts 

AT HOME, AT THE CLUB, OAPE OE HOTEL 

CASWELL'S COFFEE 

Always Satisfactory 

GEO. W. CASWELL COMPANY 

530-532-534 Folsora St. Phone Kearny 3610 

Write for samples and prices. 



CARR'S 



NEW MONTE 
RIO HOTEL 



NEAREST TO STATION AND RIVER. 

New modern hotel, first-class in every detail 
and equipped with every modern convenience. 
Swimming, boating, canoeing, fishing, launching, 
horseback riding and driving. Hotel rales $2 
day; $12 and $14 per week. Round trip, $2.80. 
good on either the broad or narrow gauge rail- 
roads. Sausalito Ferry. Address C. F. 0ARR, 
Monte Rio, Sonoma Co., Cal. 



HOTEL RUSTICANO 

The hotel is just a two-minute walk from the 
depot amongst the giant redwood trees. The 
amusements are numerous — boating, bathing, 
lawn tennis, bowling, dancing, nickelodeon, and 
beautiful walks. A more desirable place for a 
vacation could not be found. Rates, $9 to $12 
per week; rates to families. 

For folder, address L. B. SELENGER, Prop., 
Camp Meeker, Sonoma County, Cal. 



U. S. ARMY 



TENTS 

BLANKETS, COTS, HAMMOCKS 

SPIRO HARNESS CO. 

307 MARKET STREET, S. F. 
Write for Free Catalogue. 



Saturday, August 3, 1912. J 



-TNEWASP^ 



i? 



The Clue 



OMAN 



Notes and Comment by Mrs. Norman Martin. 



IF. PEBCHANCE. you are beset with doubts 
and difficulties, and wish to probe into 
the future, consult not the oracles, but 
hasten unto the modern club woman. 
Without a tremor of indecision she will re- 
veal enough cheerful prospectus to incite your 
mental thrift far into the halcyon days of 
1915. 

One of tlio most practical of these optim- 
istic progressive women whom you will find 
is the newly-elected President of the Califor- 
nia Club, .Mrs. A. P. Black. Endowed with 
a wholesome personality, an abundance of 
well' directed energy, together with that val- 
uable asset, common sense, she ushers you 
immediately into the realm of realism. For 
Mrs. Black is no dreamer. 

"My highest ambition," says Mrs. Black, 
in speaking of her work, "is to maintain the 
high standard of the California Club in all 
lines for the uplift and betterment of its 
work with and for the public. That is no 
meager task. And while I intend," continued 
Mrs. Black, "to keep up the status of its 
civic work, yet the home life of the club will 




MRS. A. P. BLACK 

President of the California Club, whose adminis- 
tration presages success. 



be stimulated n il h all the best incentives 
which we can bring to bear in thai direction." 

* * * 

MRS BLACK is planning to introduce a 
new note in the call for the Sunday 
Assembly. It will be something after 
the manner of tin* Open Door of the Chicago 
Woman's "lull. On the first Sunday of each 
month the club doors will be open not only 
for the business womenj but whosoever will, 
may come. Each department of the Club 
will furnish one prugramme during the 
year, and thus a diversity of issues will be 
presented. So that while on the surface 
there may appear a variety of things, yet at 
the center there will be unity of purpose. 
Mrs. E. L. Baldwin, whose work as a most 
efficient club leader is known, will have eharge 
of this department. 

ABOARD of energetic workers, all of 
whom are experienced and know the 
technique of club life, will uphold 
Mrs. Black in her plans. The officers are: 
President, Mrs. A. P. Black; 1st Vice-Presi- 
dent, Mrs. James Crawford; 2nd Vice-Presi- 
dent, Mrs. W. S. Leake; Recording Secretary, 
Mrs. H. C. Tibbitts; Corresponding Secretary, 
Mrs. J. S. A. Macdonald; Financial Secretary, 
Mrs. Loron E. Barnes; Treasurer, Mrs. Vir- 
ginia S. Bradley; Directors: Mrs. Joseph Pel- 
tier, Mrs. E. M. North-Whitcomb, Mrs. L. A. 
Hayward, Mrs. D. C. Farnham, Mrs. Thomas 
L. Hill, Mrs. Arthur Cornwall, Mrs. F. M. 
Sponogle, Mrs. Arthur Flood. 

Chairmen of Committees: Reception, Mrs. 
J. F. Reef; House, Mrs. A. G. Boggs; Cour- 
tesy, Mrs. Aaron Sloss; Decorating, Mrs. R. P. 
Merillion; Tea, Mrs. D. B. Plymire; Program,. 
Mrs. J. C. Crawford; Sunday Assembly, Mrs. 
E. L. Baldwin. 

Chairmen of Departments: Education, Mme. 
Emilie Tojetti; Civics, Mrs. Louis Hertz; 
Social Science, Miss Margaret Curry; Out- 
Door Art League, Mrs. George T. Marsh; 
Educational Department, Sections: Literature, 
Mrs. C. F. Stanton; Choral, Mrs. Rufus Steele; 
Players, Mrs. Orlow Eastwood; Whist, Mrs. 
Henry Bernhard; Parliamentarian, Miss Mary 

Fairbrother. 

* * * 

ALTHOUGH the California Club is one of 
the largest clubs in the city, yet the 
President, Mrs. A. P. Black, is ambi- 
tions to bring the membership up to the one 
thousand mark. She probably will, for her 
thoughts fly like a Marconi wireless. One 
great achievement of the California Club is 
its property ownership, for now the attractive 
club house on Clay street belongs to ■ the cor- 
porated club, absolutely free from debt. 

The first meeting of the club will be held 
on Tuesday, September 3rd. The programme 




MRS. J. DELAMATER JESSUP 

President of the Corona Cluh, who is styled 

"the thinker." 

will be given by the chairman of that com- 
mittee, Mrs. J. C. Crawford. 

* * * 

THE CORONA CLUB, of which Mrs. J. 
Delamater Jessup is the President, ranks 
as one of the largest of our local clubs. 
The woman at the helm has just been elected 
for a secoind term, which is not the platform 
of Corona legislation. One term is usually 
the allotted service, but the splendid success 
of the "woman who thinks," as Mrs. Jessup 
has been termed, merited a repetition. She 
has won by her judicious management, her 
wisdom, her wit; and when one questions her 
as to her plans for the future, she is excep- 
tionally modest of her merits. ' ' My ambition, ' ' 
returned the genial President of 200 women, 
"converges in the ownership of our club home. 

(Continued on page 20.) 



LA GRANDE & WHITES 


LAUNDRY CO. 


Office and Works. 234 12th St. 


Bet. Howard & Folsom Sta. 


SAN FRANCISCO, CALIFORNIA 


Phones: Market 916, Home M 20«». 



Eames Tricycle Co. 

Manufacturers of INVALID 
ROLLING CHAIRS for all 
purposes. Self - Propelling 
Tricycle Ohairs for the, dis- 
abled. INVALID CHAIRS. 
Wholesale and retail and 
for rent. 1714 Market St., 
San FranciBco. Phone Park 
3910. 1200 S. Main Strut, 
Los Angeles. 







tsyk \ 




m^^^'"&' 



«,- 



£Ka 






OUR leading business men are divided on 
the question of giving American ships 
free use of the Panama Canal. Usually 
in San Francisco our "leading business men" 
discuss important questions from a political 
or sentimental standpoint instead of a com- 
mercial one. Prom the purely monetary stand- 
point, there isn't any argument in favor of 
giving a monopoly of the Panama Canal to 
American shipping. Such a move would be 
financial idiocy for San Francisco. 

It is to San Francisco 's advantage as a 
great natural seaport to attract all the ship 
ping that can be induced to come here — Eng- 
lish, French, German, Italian — any kind. The 
more, the merrier. Every ship that casts 
anchor helps to increase the trade of our port 
and gives our merchants the benefit of compe- 
tition. Suppose that American ships only 
have free use of the Canal, what then? At 
present there is no American merchant marine 
worth speaking about. But it is expected that 
the free use of a $400,000,000 canal will make 
American shipping profitable and cause an 
immense increase of American ships. "Will it? 
What about the ever industrious labor agi- 
tator, who will get busier than ever in promot- 
ing strikes and boycotts, and demanding leg- 
islation from Congress to raise wages, shorten 
hours and make the operation of American 
ships hazardous or unprofitable? 

Opportunity for Demagogues. 

Rest assured the agitator will flourish. He 
will have a strong argument to support his 
demands. He will point out that the people 
of America have contributed $400,000,000 to 
construct the Panama Canal, and given free 
use of it to a favored set of ship-owners. It 
will be like the agitators' argument against 
the steel barons of Pittsburg — that the high 
protective tariff gives them a monopoly and 
therefore the American workingmen should 



share in the profits, and therefore, also, the 
labor agitator should be continually in evi- 
dence, making all the. trouble possible be- 
tween employer and employe. 

The Reason Why. 

The American merchant marine has been 
driven from" the seas because of restrictive 
laws and the high cost of labor that make it 
impossible for American owners to compete 
with foreigners. Except by liberal subsidies 
or other aid, American shipping cannot hold 
its own against foreigners in the carrying 
trade of the Pacific, and just as surely as such 
government aid is given and ship-owners are 
made a favored class, there will be ceaseless 
labor agitation for special laws of Congress 
to crush the favorites. 

There is no reason to believe that ship- 
owners, favored by Congress and enjoying free 
use of the Panama Canal, would not combine 
in a trust just as quickly as railroad compan- 
ies of steel magnates. One of the greatest 
trusts in the world has been the Atlantic 
steamship combine. 

America Would Iiose. 
Everything considered, it will be to San 
Francisco's greatest commercial advantage 
to have the Panama Canal thrown open to the 
ships of all nations on equal terms, as the 
Hay-Pauncefote treaty provides. There isn't 
the slightest question that if the matter be 
ever carried to The Hague for adjudication 
we will lose the case. We haven't a leg to 
stand on in any honest international court, 
and every clever Senator in Washington is 
well aware of that fact. Section III of the 
Hay-Pauncefote treaty declares: — 

The canal shall be free and open to the 
vessels of commerce and of war of all na- 
tions on terms of entire equality, so that 
there shall be no discrimination against 
any such nation, or its citizens or subjects, 




THE ANGLO & LONDON 
PARIS NATIONAL BANK 



SAN FRANCISCO 



Capital $4,000,000 

Surplus and Profits $1,600,000 

Total Resources $40,000,000 

OFFICERS: 

HERBERT FLEISHHACKER President 

SIG. GREENEBAUM Chairman of the Board 

J. FRIEDLANDER Vice-President 

C. F. HUNT Vice-President 

R. ALTSCHUL Cashier 

O. R. PARKER Assistant Cashier 

WM. H. HIGH Assistant Cashier 

H. CHOTNSKI Assistant Cashier 

G. R. BURDICK Assistant Cashier 

A. L. LANGERMAN Secretary 



in respect of the conditions or charges 
of traffic or otherwise. 

During all the time this treaty was under 
consideration in the Senate no man was ever 
bold enough to claim that Section III was 
open to the construction that the word "all" 
did not include the United States. Not only 
was such claim not made, but by a vote of 
43 to 27 the Senate declared against any 
such policy. The question was brought to a 
direct vote when Senator Bard of California 
offered the following amendment: — 

Article III. The United States reserves 
the right in the regulation and manage- 
ment of the canal to discriminate in re- 
spect to charges of traffic in favor of ves- 
sels of its own citizens engaged in the 
coastwise trade. 

Upon this the vote was taken, and the 
amendment was lost, the vote of the Senate 
standing 43 to 27. 

The United States is in duty and in honor 
bound to throw the Panama Canal open to 
the world on equal terms as a benefit to all 
mankind. San Francisco would be one of the 
greatest gainers by such a policy. 



Beal Estate Prospects. 

The conditions favorable to a revival of in- 
terest in the realty market are improving. For 
two years the conditions have been most un- 
favorable. 

An active real estate market depends on the 



Wells Fargo Nevada 
National Bank 

Of San Francisco 

Nevada Bank Building, 2 Montgomery Strict. 
N. E. Corner of Market Street. 

Capital paid up . 96,000,000.00 

Surplus and Undivided Profits $5,055,471.11 



Total $11,055,471.11 

OFFICERS. 
Isftiau W. Hellman, President 
I. W. Hellman, Jr., Vice Pres. 
F. L. Lipman, Vice Prei. 
James K. Wilson, Vice Pres. 
Frank B. King, Cashier 
W. McGavin, Assistant Cashier 
E. L. Jacobs, Assistant Cashier 
O. L. Davis, Assistant Cashier 
A. D. Oliver, Assistant Cashier 
A. B. Price, Assistant Cashier 



DIBECTOES. 



Isaias W. Hellman 
Joseph Sloss 
Percy T. Morgan 
F. W. Van Sieklen 
Wm. F. Herrin 
John C. Kirkpatrick 
I. W. Hellman, Jr. 
A. Christeson 
Wm. Haas 

ACCOUNTS 



Hartland Law 
Henry Bosenfeld 
James L. Flood 
J. Henry Meyer 
A. H. Payson 
Chas. J. Deering 
James K. Wilson 
F. L. Lipman 



Prompt Service, Courteous Attention, Unexcelled 
Facilities. 
SATE DEPOSIT VAULTS. 



Saturday, August 3, 1912.] 



-THE WASP- 



19 



The German Savings 
and Loan Society 

Saving! (The German Bank) Commercial 

Incorporated 1868. 

626 California St., San Francisco. Cal 

(Member of the Associated Saving! Bunk* nt 
San Francisco.) 

The following Branches for Receipt and Pay- 
ment of Deposits only: 

MISSION BRANCH, 2572 Mission street, 
between 21st and 22nd. 

RICHMOND DISTRICT BRANCH, 601 
Clement street, cor. 7th Ave. 

HAIGHT STREET BRANCH, 1456 Haight 
street, near Masonic Ave, 



June 29th, 1912. 
Assets .... $51,140,101.75 

Capital actually paid up in Cash . 1,000,000.00 
Reserve and Contingent Funds . 1,656,403.80 
Employees' Pension Fund . . 140,109.60 
Number of Depositors . . . 56,609 

Office Hours: 10 o'clock A. M. to 3 o'clock 
P. M., except Saturdays to 12 o'clock M. and 
Saturday evenings from 6:30 o'clock P. M, to 
8 o'clock P. M. for receipt of Deposits only. 




Established 1853. 
Monthly Contracts, $1.60 per Month. 

NEW WORKS JTJST ERECTED AT 27 
TENTH ST, 8. F. 

Largest and Most Uup-to-Date on Pacific 
Coast. 

Wagons call twice daily. 

Gleaning Dainty Garments Our Specially 

F. Thomas Parisian Dyeing & 
Cleaning Works 



attitude of the savings banks. When the sav- 
ings banks are vei iberal in liMiiling nuun'v 

on montgages, real i state advances. 

For several years the local savings banks 
have been very conservative in lending money 
on real estate. Thai was wise of them. The 
principal [oca! savings banks have always 
been very prudent. In fact, their manage 
menl lias been admirable. The best proof of 
that is the strength they have shown in times 
of panic. 

The local banks have lately found that 
deposits exceed the demand for loans. If 
I his should keep up, savings bank interest will 
drop somewhat ami speculation in real estate 
will certainly increase. That is -what a. ways 
occurs when the savings banks deem it ad- 
vantageous to become more liberal in loans, 

Rise in Sugar Stocks. 
The rise in Hawaiian sugar stocks indicates 
that the Bristow tariff bill, passed by the 
Senate, does not hurt the Hawaiian planters, 
Some local brokers thought the sugar stocks 
would drop and Eastern predictions were sim- 
ilar. The adoption of the Bristow tariff would 
remove sugar from politics, and for that rea 
son the stock has been buoyant. If you want 
to depress any stock put it into politics. 

Associated Oil. 
Associated Oil displayed an upward tend- 
ency this week at 44. Vice-President and 
Manager W. S. Porter has been sick again in 
a local hospital, and his health is such that 
rumors of his retirement are afloat. In that 
event President Sproule of the Southern Pa- 
cific would fill the place. 

Pacific Gas and Electric. 
The indications are that Pacific Gas and 
Electric will make a splendid showing this 
year, with net earnings of nearly half a mil- 
lion over last year's figures. The manage- 
ment of this corporation is admirable. 



"How's the new magazine coming on, old 
man ? ' ' 

"Pine! Talk about variety! There's been 
a different crowd in charge of every issue. 
The promoters got out the first number, the 
owners the second, the poor suckers they un- 
loaded onto the third, the receiver the fourth, 
the Stockholders' Protective League this 
month 's, and the government postal authori- 
ties next!" — 'Puck. 



ARMOR PLATE SAFE DEPOSIT VAULTS 

of Union Safe Deposit Company in building of 

UNION TRUST COMPANY OF SAN FRANCISCO 

Junction of Market and C'Farrell Streets and Grant Avenue 



LARGEST, STRONGEST and 

ARRANGED SAFE DEPOSIT 

Boxes $4 per annum 

Telephone 




MOST CONVENIENTLY 
WEST OF NEW YORK 
and upwards. 

Kearny 11. 



She Didn't Understand. 

A dealer was explaining to a prospi i 
woman purchaser tin- propelling mechanism 
of :i bicycle. 

••I understand thai perfectly, "■ she said at 
last. "Now whai makes the front wheel go 
round .' ' ' 



WE HAVE MOVED OUR OFFICES 

TO 

410 MONTGOMERY ST. 



Our Facilities for Handling 

Investment Securities 

Are Considerably Increased. 



ESTABLISHED 1858 

SUTR0&C0. 



Telephone 
Sutter 3434 



Private Exchange 
Connecting All Depts. 



J. C. WILSON & CO. 



MEMBEBS: 

NEW YORK STOCK EXCHANGE 
NEW YORK COTTON EXCHANGE 
CHICAGO BOARD OP TRADE 
STOCK AND BOND EXCHANGE, S. P. 

MAIN OFFICE — Mills Building, Sail Fran 



BRANCH OFFICES — Los Angeles, San Die- 
go, Coronado Beach, Portland, Ore.; Seattla, 
Wash. ; Vancouver, B. C. 

PRIVATE WIRE NEW YORK AND CHICAGO. 



Blake, Mof fitt & Towne 

PAPER 



37-45 First Street 

PHONES: SUTTEE 22S0; J 3221 (Home) 

('rival* Exchange Countering all Departments. 



Sultan Turkish Baths 

624 POST STEEET 
Special Department for Ladles 

Open Day and Night for Ladies and Gen 
tleraen. 
A I John bo n, formerly of Sutter Street 
Lin m mam, has leaded the Sultan Turkish 
i -ii i b where he will he triad to see hm 
nld and new diatom**™. 



WALTERS SURGICAL CO. 

SURGICAL INSTRUMENTS. 
»»3 Sutter St., S. F. Phone Douglas 1011 



i ONSIDERIXG that this is the height of the 
summer season, the number of society 
events that are taking: place is most re- 
markable. Next winter will probably be 
the gayest San Francisco has ever seen. 
The wedding of Mrs. Sarah Stetson Winslow and 
Colonel. Hamilton- S. "Wallace was one of the notable 
events of the week, owing to the prominence of the 
bride and bridegroom. It was a strictly quiet affair, 
only the relatives and a few of the very intimate 
friends being present. Mrs. Winslow was attended 
by her two daughters, Miss Marie Louise and Miss 
Ruth "Winslow. 



Engagement of Rxiss Innes Keeney. 
Society has been much interested in the announce- 
ment of the engagement of Miss Innes Keeney -and 
Mr. Willard C. Chamberlin. The announcement was 
not unexpected, as Mr. Chamberlin' s attentions to 
the popular young society girl have been most de- 
voted. Miss Keeney has been stopping at Miramar 
during the summer, and it was there she met Mr. 
Chamberlin a short time ago. Miss Keeney is the 
daughter of Mrs. Charles Macintosh Keeney of San 
Francisco. Mr. Chamberlin is a young Eastern man, 
a Harvard graduate, and a son of a prominent Boston 
capitalist. He has been a resident of San Francisco 
for some time, as the agent of an Eastern manufac- 
turing firm. Mr. Chamberlin is popularly known 
as the Adonis of the San Francisco business world. 



Eaby Parties. 
Baby parties seem to be quite the rage these days. 
Some weeks ago Mrs. Oliver Kehrlein. who was 
pretty Frances Coon, gave a large party for her 
three small children, ana the guests motored to her 
home at Menlo from inr and near;, and very elabor- 
ate entertainment was provided them. On August 
2nd the Charles Merrills are planning a similar af- 
fair at their home in Menlo, and it is being eagerly 
anticipated by all the belles and beaux of several 
years to come. They will include the Harry Bates 
boys, the two little John Breuner girls, the Kehrlein 
children, the Covington Pringles' little Miss and 
many others. 



"Weddings. 

The wedding of Miss Ramona Lang, daughter of 
Mr. and Mrs. George Lang, and Mr. Frederick Wil- 
liam O. Grosser took place at the Lang home on Fell 
street, Wednesday evening, July 31st. The bride, 
who is an. attractive member of the younger social 
set, was oeautiful in her bridal gown of white satin 
and lace. A long tulle veil, fastened with a coronet 
of orange blossoms, fell to the length of the train. 
She carried a shower garland of bride roses. Miss 
Alma Lang, sister of the bride, was maid of honor. 
She was dressed in white, and carried a graceful 
bouquet of pink roses. Master Harry Kenny was 
ring-bearer. Mr. Dean fccovel was best man. Miss 
Lang was given into the keeping of the groom by 
her father, Mr. George Lang, a retired merchant. 
Mrs. Lang, mother of the bride, was beautifully 
attired in a gown of catawba silk. The Lang home 
was a bower of pink and white blossoms, the colors 
of the bride. 

An interesting wedding took place on Tuesday of 
last week, when Miss Ina Maude Hedger of Marys- 
ville became the wife of Major Charles Frederick 
Wells. The bride is well known in the society of 
the Sacramento valley, where she has been active 
in social events. The members -of- -the -immediate 
family who attended the ceremony were Mrs. James- 



ina H. Wells of Oakland, Mrs. Hedger, Miss Clara 
E. Hedger, Miss Ada Hedger, Gerald Brook Tray- 
ner of Marysville, Mrs. Mary I. Syfert of Oakland, 
and Mrs. Russell Kiunicutt. The wedding took 
place at the new home which the groom had pre- 
pared for his bride. 

Miss Bird Chanslor and Mr. William Kirk Reese 
were married at the home of the bride's mother, 
Mrs. John Chanslor, on Harvard Boulevard, Los 
Angeles, on Wednesday, the 31st. The bride is 
well known in San Franciseo, where she has been 
the guest of honor at a number of social events 
since the announcement of her engagement. She 




MISS INNES KEENEY. 

Whose engagement to Willard C. Chamberlin 

has been announced. 

is a sister of Mrs, Joseph Anderson Chanslor of this 
city and niece of Mr. and Mrs. Frederick Kimble. 
Mr. Reese is the son of Mr. and Mrs. W. K. Reese, 

A pink and white wedding formed the scene for 
the hymeneal feast which was held at the home of 
Mr. and Mrs. Walter Sumner Upham when their 
daughter, Miss Daisy May Upham, became the wife 
of Mr. Harmer William Countryman. Dainty Miss 
Muriel Upham, gowned in a lace frock, attended the 
bride as flower-girl. Mr. Walter Upham Jr. was 
best man. 

The wedding of Miss Kathryn Sydney Marsh and 
Mr. Harvey Morrell took place Thursday evening 
at the home of the bride's mother, Mrs. Lillian 
Marsh. 

Miss lidna Duff and Mr. John S. Lintner were 
married at St. John's Episcopal Church on Wednes- 
day afternoon of the past week. The youiig couple 
will live in Chihuahua, "Mexico. 

Miss Ethel Breiling, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. 
Frauk Breiling, and Mr. Ire J. Defount were mar- 
ried at the Church of Sacred Heart on Monday even- 
ing of last week. Mrs. Louis Schultz was matron 



of honor and wore a gown of pink satin. She car- 
ried pink roses in her arms. Mr. Charles Miller 
was best man. The bridal gown was of white crepe 
de meteor. A coronet of orange blossoms fastened 
the tulle veil, and in her arms the bride bore a show- 
er bouquet of bride roses. 

Miss Etelka Tromboni and Mr. Charles S. L. Med- 
licott were married at St. Stephen's Episcopal 
Church on Saturday afternoon of the past week. 
Miss Lottie Luttrell was maid of honor, and Mrs. 
Orville Jones was matron of honor. Mr. Charles 
Newman was best man. Mrs. Medlicott is the 
daughter of Mr. and Mrs. M. Tromboni of Mill 
Talley. 

A pretty wedding was solemnized last Sunday 
evening when Miss Lillie Reuffert and Mr. Thomas 
Franche were married in the home of the bride's 
mother. The bride's gown was of white ivory silk 
with which she carried a graceful bouquet of white 
carnations. Miss Bertha Reuffert, a sister of the 
bride, was dressed in a becoming gown of pale pink 
Mr. Maurice Allen was best man. 

A pretty home wedding took place last Wednes- 
day evening when Miss Kathryn Lechens became 
the wife of Mr. Arthur A .Mansfield. The bride 
is the daughter of the late Mr. John H. Lechens. 
The groom is the son of Mr. G. E. Mansfield. 

Miss OIlie M. Ellsworin and Mr. John Murness 
were married on the 12th of this month. 

The wedding of Miss -joretta Cummings and Mr. 
Peter Bery took place at the close of the past 
week at the home of Mrs. B. Frazer. 

A wedding of general interest was solemnized in 
San Mateo last Saturday week when Miss Dorothy 
Chalmers became the wife of Mr. Joseph F. Coll. 
The bride is the daughter of Mrs. E. T. Chalmers, 
widow of the late Dr. W. P. Chalmers. The bride 



THE CLUB WOMAN. 



(Continued from page 17.) 

Perhaps this can be accomplished this year." A 
hopeful light darted into her eyes as she spoke. With 
sueh a leader, and with the substantial "nest" al- 
ready banked, it now looks as if Corona will soon 
be paying taxes on a cozy cottage of its own. 

The members of the executive board serving with 
Mrs. Jessup are: First Vice-President, Mrs. Harold 
Seager; Second Vice-President, Mrs, Alfred Mc- 
Cullough ; Recording Secretary, Miss Emma Van Ber- 
gen; Corresponding Secretary, Mrs. Charles Lewis; 
Treasurer, Miss Laura Collins; Directors — Mrs. R. 
B. Phillips, Mrs. E. B. Carson, Mrs. Robert Dunbar, 
Mrs. C. M. Emerson, Mrs. Horace Sexton; Custodian 
Log Book, Miss Daisy Salter; Auditor, Mrs. E. G. 
Bagot ; Book Review, Mrs. Clive Augustus Brown ; 
Parliamentarian, Mrs. Annie Little Barry. 

Chairmen of Committees : Reception, Mrs. James 
Ellison; Hospitality, Mrs. James Treadwell ; Music 
Mrs. Elizabeth Peltret ; Household Economics, Miss 
Frances Meeker; Club House Fund, Mrs. E. D. 
Knight; Club Pin, Mrss. A. L. Boynton. 

The opening meeting of the Corona Club will be 
held on Thursday, September 12th. The initial pro- 
gramme, under the direction of Mrs. James Tread- 
well, will consist of a lecture on "Color Music," by 
Miss Olive Wilson, a subject which has aroused much 
interest especially along the lines of child culture. 
Echoes from the Biennial will resound with new vigor 
when the hospitable doors of Corona swing open. 



Saturday, August 3, 1912.] 



-THE WASP- 



21 



i :i member ol a sorority Bel and very prominent 
in ill-- social affaire <>i San Mateo life. The proom 
^ p member ol the Peninsula OIuq. His business 
are with the wholesale jeweler's firm fir 
Krementa A Co. Miss Alt a Wall attended the 
bride us maid *>f honor, whili? Mr. J. Morris Clial- 
mere, brother ol the bride, was best man. Mr and 
Mi' Coll will reside at Ban Mateo, where a do 
llghtfnl Dome im* been built f«>r them. 

Arthur Brisbane, editor of the Now Yurk Evening 
Journal, and Miss Proehe Cary, daughter »f Mr. 
Seward Gary, were married "ii Tuesday, July 30th, 

; t l Calvary Church, New Y..rk Citj 



Engagements. 

ALLAN— HUNTER.— Miss Mabolle Allan and Mr, 
Thomas Hunter. The wedding will tnko place 
within tin- aexl few weeks. 

COFFIN— GREENE.— MiBS Natalie Coffin and Mr. 
Crawford Greene. Miss Coffin is the daughter of 
Mrs. James Coffin of San Rafael. The wedding will 
lake place in August. 

GREEN— CROSS. — Miss Helen Green and Mr. 
Robert W, Cross. Miss Helen Groon is the daugh- 
ter 'if Professor R. L, Green. She is a Stanford 
graduate. Mr. Cross is a graduate of the Univer- 
81 1) of California and is now in the office of Wil- 
liam Spronle, President of the Southern Pacific 
Company. He was at one time editor-in-chief of 
the Occident, a magazine published by the student 
body. The wedding will take place this autumn. 

HE SKINS — SESKINS. — Miss Dora Heskins and 
Mr. II. Heskins. The bride is the daughter of 
Mr. and Mrs. B. Heskins. She is an accomplished 
pianist, and has traveled extensively in Europe and 
the Orient. Mr. Heskins is a merchant of this 
city. The wedding will take place in the fall. 

JACOBS — CASTER. — The engagement of Miss 
Sarah Jacobs and Mr. Samuel Caster. The wedding 
day is not announced. 

KENDALL— BELLAMORE. — Miss Muriel Kendall, 
daughter of Mr. and Mrs. George Kendall of Grimes 
Hill. N". Y., and Mr, David H. Bellamore, son of Mr. 
and Mrs. David G. Bellamore. Miss Kendal] is pop- 
ular in Eastern society. Mr. Bellamore was formerly 
nf San Francisco and San Mateo. The wedding will 
lake place in October at the home of the bride's 
parents. The honeymoon will probably be spent in 
California. 

KRAFT — GUNN. — Miss Ernestine Kraft and Mr. 
George Gunn will be married during the month of 
September at the home of Mr. and Mrs. Joseph 
Birmingham. Miss Kraft is a sister of Mrs. Bir- 
mingham. Pretty Miss Alma Birmingham will be 
the maid of honor at this interesting wedding. 
McBRIDE— BAXTER.— Mrs. George Wickliffe Mc- 
13 ride of Portland, Oregon, and Mr. George Perkins 
Baxter of Berkeley. 

SMALL — PIERCE. — Miss Barbara Josephine 
Small and Lieutenant Junius Pierce. Miss Small 
is the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. H. J, Small, a 
Southern Pacific official. Mrs. A. G. Fisher, wife of 
Lieutenant Fisher of the Fourteenth Cavalry, Fort 
McDowell, is Miss Small's sister. Lieutenant Pierce 
is stationed at Fort McDowell. The wedding will 
take place in January. 

SPRAGUE — POOL. — Miss Isabel Sprague and 
Mr. William Pool. Miss Sprague is the daughter 
of Mr. and Mrs. Richard Sprague, whose beautiful 
home is at Menlo Park. Mr. Pool is an attorney 
of New York City. The Pool estate is near Rich- 
mond, Virginia. The wedding will be an event of 
the fall. 

TURNER — JONES. — Miss Marion Turner and Mr. 
Axton F. Jones. Miss Turner is the daughter of 
Captain and Mrs. L. H. Turner of Berkeley. Mr. 
Jones is a well-known capitalist of Northern Cali- 
fornia, lie is a graduate of the University of Cal- 
ifornia, where he was a member of the Delta Kappa 
Epsilon. The wedding will take place in August. 



Recent Events. 
The Misses Sara, Mary and Elizabeth Cunning- 
bam, with their mother, Mrs. Mary Hale Cunning- 
ham, gave a charming luncheon in the Palm Garden 



of the Palace in complimentary return to the many 
functions to which tnej have been the honored 
guests Bince their visil in San Francisco. Thoy 
will remain in the city until afi<-r the wedding "f 
Miss Julia Langhorno. 

Miss Isabel Sprague, the bride elect, was the 
motif of Mrs. Eleanor Martin's tea this past week. 
Karon and Baroness Von Schrbader, Mr, ami Mrs. 
Downey Harvey, Miss Nellie Grunt and Mr. Chap- 
man Grant were guests. 

Mrs. James Olis and the Misses Cora and Fred 
cricks "'i* gave a dinner in honor of Mr. and Mrs. 
Krnc.sl Stillman Ol New York, on Friday evening. 
Mrs. Stillman was formerly Miss Mildred Whitney. 

A delightful card party was given at Mure Island 
on 'ihursday of this week by Mrs. Joseph Fyffe in 
compliment to Mrs. Mary Roland Weyburn Sehu 
mmiii, wife of the former paymaster of the l\ S. S. 

California. Mrs, Schumann was Miss Helen Sulli- 
van, daughter of Judge and Mrs. J. F. Sullivan. 

Mrs. Benjamin I. Conant was hostess at a pretty 
luncheon given in honor of Miss Mabelle Allan, 
whose engagement to Mr, Thomas Hunter is an- 
nounced in this issue m The Wasp. The luncheon 

I ame a "shower" party for the bride-elect. Those 

among the guests were Mrs. John G. Watson, Mrs. 
Emil Hirschfeld, Mrs. E. M. Evers, Mrs. Frank 
Mueller, Mrs. John W. King, Mrs. Frank A. Oehm, 
Mrs. Benjamin 1. Conant, Miss Helen Conant, and 

Miss Ghristobel Gray. 

A delightful luncheon was given at the St. Fran- 
cis by Mrs. Henry Dodge and her mother, Mrs. W. 
Gale, in honor , of Mrs. Walter Remington-Quick, 
who departed for the East on Wednesday. 

Mis. Eleanor Martin gave a dinner in honor of 
Major and Mrs. Carroll ue Forest Buck as a fare- 
well tribute. The quests at Mrs. Martin's tea 
were Major and Mrs. Buck, Baroness von Rosenwig, 
Miss Nellie Grant, Miss May Mullen, Miss Rose 
Nieto; Messrs, Chapman Grant, Edwin Richter, 
Charles Appelgate, William J. Byrne, Baron von 
Schroeder and Lieutenant William Mclntyre. 



The Card Basket. 

Colonel D. S. Dorn has returned from Tahoe Tav- 
ern, where be has been visiting with his two daugh- 
ters, who are spending the summer at Tahoe. 

The arrival of Mr. and Mrs. Frederick Vande- 
venter Stott of New York is noted. They are 
visiting Mr. and Mrs. Tirey L. Ford, the parents 
of Mrs. Stott. 

Paymaster and Mrs. Roland Schumann have taken 
a house at Vallejo. Mrs. Joseph Fyffe has issued 
invitations for a card, party for the afternoon of 
August 1st for Mrs. Schumann, and Mrs. Charles 
M. Ray and her niece, Miss Nina Blow, gave an 
elaborate bridge tea in her honor. 

Miss Cora Smith has returned from Inverness, 
where she was the guest of Miss Isabel Beaver. 
During the coming winter, Miss Smith will entertain 
a good deal at the family residence on California 
street, which was formerly the home of the Russell 
Wilsons. 

Mrs. J. E. Birmingham and Miss Birmingham 
have taken a cottage at Miramar. The marriage of 
Mrs. Birmingham's sister, Miss Ernestine Kraft, 
and George Gunn will take place September 10th 
at the Birmingham home. 

Mr. and Mrs. Horace Pillsbury have enjoyed a 
week's outing at the McCloud River Country Club. 
Next month Mrs. Pillsbury will visit her parents, 
General and Mrs. Taylor, in Massachusetts, for a 
month, and take her three children. 

Mr. ana Mrs. Marshall Harris and son, Russell 
Harris, have been spending their vacation at their 
attractive summer home at Hilton on the Russian 
River. 

Mrs. George Howard is chaperoning a delightful 
aggregation of young people at the Hotel Potter, 
Santa Barbara. In the party are Miss Ethel Oock- 



The Italian-Swiss Colony's TIPO, Zinfan- 
del and Burgundy are California's finest red 
wines. They are sold everywhere. 



er, Will II Crocker, Edmunds Lyman and little 
Prince Poniato w ski, Miss 1 1 1 1 1 <■ a Reeney, who is 

Bpending the summer at Miramar. and Austin Moore, 

who bus recently returned from his East am ichool 
join these young people in many ol their pleasures 

Mr George Howard was also oi the party. 

Mrs. Clive Brown and her two interesting sons. 
I Midlcy Brown and Albert I'mwn, have boon sum- 
merini: near the Russian River. A larce company 
• if fraternity friends have enlivened the pleasures 

of i lii 'M' summer Jaunt. 

Mr. Ansel Roi.ison motored t" Santa Cruz to 

a I tend the in t ere stint: events of the seaside. Mr. 
Harry Arnold returned with Mr. Robison after a 
brief sojourn at Casa del Rev. 



DR. H. J. STEWART 

Begs to announce that he has removed his music 
studio to the Gaffuey Building, 376 Sutter Street, 
between Grant Avenue and Stockton Street. 
Office hours, from ten to twelve, and from two to 
four, daily. 

Telephone Douglis 4211. 



LOUIS CREPAUX 

MEMBER PARIS GRAND OPERA 




FOR SINGING AND SPEECH 

French phoneticB, configuration and placing of 
the phonetic sounds enabling the scholar to sing 
or speak in French with the purest ' 'Indre et 
Loire" accent. 

French repertoire in songs from Lully to 
Debussy. Italian tone placing, Toweling and 
syllabation. Italian repertoire in songs from 
Carissimi to Puccini. Studio recitals. 

251 Post St., 4th Floor Mercedes Building, 

Reception hours — 11:45 to 12, and 8 to 4, ex- 
cept Wednesday. Wednesday in Maple Hall, 
Oakland. 



'How to get rich g.uick" we know not; 
How to teach languages, we do know. 



To improve your mother tongue, 
study a sister tongue. 

THE LARCHER AND MOE 
School of Languages 

CALL OR SEND FOR 0IR0CLAR, 

162 Post Street at Grant Avenue. 

Office Phone, Douglas 2859 



TRANSLATION FROM AND INTO ANT 
LANGUAGE. 



H E ALDS 

BUSINESS COLLEGES 

HOME OFFICE -425 M C ALLISTER 5T..S.F. 



Neal Liquor Cure 
Three wosSutterSt. 

DAY phone Franklin 1098 

ADOPTED BY AUSTRALIAN GOVERNMENT 



22 



•THE WASP^ 



[Saturday, August 3, 1912. 



Jules Restaurant 

Special Lunches 50c. or a la Carte 

Ladies' Grill and Kooms for Parties 

REGULAR FRENCH DINNER WITH 

WINE, $1.00. 

Vocal and Instrumental Music. 

MONADNOCK BUILDING 

Next to Palace Hotel 

Phone Kearny 1812. 

All Cars Pass the Door. Elevator Service. 



GOBEY'S GRILL 

^^ Formerly of SUTTER ST. 
Our Specialties 

OYSTERS, TERRAPIN, CRAB STEW 
STEAKS, CHOPS 

140 UNION SQUARE AVENUE 

L. J. DeGRUCHY, Man., er Phone DOUGLAS 5683 




] elmaw 



HOTEL AND RESTAURANT 

54-66 Ellis Street 

Our Cooking Will M«et Your Taste. 
Prices Will Please Ton. 



ANTIQUE 1 


EFFECTS 






with Garden Fur- 




iF^Ra! 


niture in Pompeiian 




Stone. We pro- 




■v rp"! } ■ ffts 


duce Fountains, 




Bffii^fil 


Seats, Pots, Vases, 
Benches, Tab'es, 




fcr™'*^ „' "'T^B i 


Sun Dials, etc. 




v ftflBMtfLf'O^ii 






PS?1 


Sarsi Studios 


123 OAK STREET 




Near Franklyo 







NORTH GERMAN LLOYD 

All Steamers Equipped with Wireless, Submarine 

Signals and Latest Safety Appliances. 

First Cabin Passengers Dine a la Carte without 

Extra Charge. 

NEW YORK, LONDON, PARIS, BREMEN 

Fast Express Steamers Sail Tueadays 

Twin-Screw Passenger Steamers Sail Thursdays 

S. S. "GEORGE WASHINGTON" 

Newest and Largest German Steamer Afloat 

NEW YORK, GIBRALTER, ALGIERS, 

NAPLES, GENOA 

Express Steamers Sail Saturdays 

INDEPENDENT TOURS AROUND THE WORLD 

Travellers' Checks Good all over the World 

ROBERT CAPELLE, 250 Powell St. 

Gen'l Pacific Cout Agent Near St. Francin Hotel 

and Geary St. 
Telephones: Kearny 4794 — Home O 3725 



Entertains School Friends. 
The attractive home of Miss Ysabel Arguello at 
Los Encinitos, Monterey, has been the scene of 
many charming festivities during the summer weeks. 
Miss Arguello, a popular debutante, has been enter- 
taining her school friends in a delightful way. Among 
her guests have been Misses Ynez Marion, Geraldine 
Flood, Jean Fottrell, Louise Queen, Leonore Burnett, 
Blanche Canhaje, Anna O Neil; Merrs. William Fot- 
trell, George Lylem, George Nelson, Robert Flood, 
Marc O'Neil, Francois Canhaje, D. D. Flore and 
Charles Knight. ■ 



C. C. Moore, Host. 
Mr. and Mrs. Charles Moore have been entertain- 
ing their friends at Santa Cruz during the delightful 
Water Carnival. The Moore float was one of the 
most attractive at the water pageant. Among their 
guests for _the week-end at their country home were 
Judge and Mrs. Curtis Lindley, Mr. and Mrs. Wil- 
liam Sesnon, and Mr. and Mrs. Marshall Hale. 



Assisted in Receiving. 
Mesdames Henry Bo thin, H. M. Postley, Louise 
Jones, John M. McCluny, E. A. Potter, Henry Mc 
Kee, Joel Remington Fithian and Harold Sidebotham 
assisted in receiving at tne lawn party given by Mrs. 
Milo Potter and Miss Nina Jones at the Hotel Pot- 
ter. The younger girls who assisted were Misses 
Gladys Keeney, Allison, Innes Keeney, Wilshire, 
Almy, Kaime, Cunane, Bispham, Margaret Doe, Park. 
Marjory dull and Ethel Crocker. 



Popular iselle. 

Miss Augusta Foute has been both hostess and 
guest at many elaborate functions of the past week. 
The pretty tea at the Palace, at which Miss Foute 
presided on Wednesday of the past week, was given 
in honor of the Misses Alexander of New York. 
These two captivating girls have charmed our local 
set. Many out-of-town society belles came home for 
this attractive event. The guests were: Mrs. Charles 
Mills, Miss Henrietta Blnnding, Miss Mauricia Mint- 
zer, Miss Ethel Crocker, Miss Ysabel Chase, Miss 
Ysabel Sprague, Miss Sara Cunningham, Miss Janet 
Coleman, Miss Marian Zeile, Miss Julia Langhorne, 
Miss Leslie Page, Miss Rnoda Pickering, Miss 
Louise .boyd and Misses Cora and Frederika Otis. 

Miss Foute has been the guest of Mr. and Mrs. 
Frederick Sharon at their home near Menlo Park, 
during this week. 



Mr. and Mrs. John D. Spreckels, who returned 
last Monday from Alaska on their Yacht Venetia, 
will sail this week for their home at Coronado. 



VISIT THE 



Cafe Jupiter 



140 COLUMBUS AVENUE 


(Formerly Montgomery Avenue) 


SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 


.-. HOME OF MODERN BOHEMIA .-. 



WHERE YOU WILL FIND AN 

ARTISTIC ATMOSPHERE AND 

HIGH-CLASS ENTERTAINMENT 

THE MOST UP-TO-DATE TABLE D'HOTE 

DINNER 

In Town $1.00, from 6 to 9 P. M. 

JACK McMANUS, Manager 

Reserve your table in time — Phone Douglas 2910 



-Sutter 1572 
Home O-3970 
Home C-4781 Hotel 



Cyril Arnanton 
Henry Rittman 
O. Lahederne 



New Delmonico's 

(Formerly MaiBon Tortonit 

Restaurant and Hotel 
NOW OPEN 

Best French Dinner in the City with Wine, $1.00 

Banquet Halls and Private Dining Rooms 

Music Every Evening 

362 GEARY STREET, - SAN FRANCISCO 



TECHAU TAVERN 

Cor. Eddy and Powell Streets. 

PhoneB, Douglas 4700: O 8417 



A High-Class 

Family Cafe 



A DAINTY LUNCH served gra- 
^ *■ tuitously to ladies every day during 
shopping hours, between 3:30 and 5 p. m. 



Under the management of A. C. Morrison 



The New 

POODLE DOG 




HOTEL and RESTAURANT 

WILL REMAIN AT CORNER 

POLK and POST 

SAN FRANCISCO. 
PHONES: Franklin 2960; Horns C 6705. 



J. B. PON J. BERGEZ O. MAILHEBUAU 
O. LALANNE L. OOUTARD 



Bergez- Frank's 

OLD 

POODLE DOG 

CO. 

Hotel and 
Restaurant 

Music and Entertainment Every Evening. 
415-421 BUSH STREET 

(Above Kearny) 
SAN FRANCISCO, OAL. 
Exchange, Douglas 2411. 





poi t rayals 
• • Kreutzer 

Vinina,' ' 
and "The 



THE OBPHEUM for next week will be 
the means ><i introducing to San Fran- 
cisco audiences Madame Bertha Kalich, 
the greal emotional actress who took New 
Vurk by storm by her marvelous 
lit" the principal feminine roles in 
Sonata,' ' ' ' Fedora," "Monnn 
' ' Cora, ' ' ' ' Sapphon and Phaon, 
Unbroken Road." Although a stranger here, 
her fame is well known, for since the advent 
i>t' Bernhardt and Duse, no actress has created 
:is big a sensation. Madame Kalich has 
selected for h<-r vaudeville engagement an 
intense one-act play entitled "A Light from 
St. Agnes," which she has singed with great 
accuracy and care, and has secured for her 
Support those sterling art- 
ists, John Booth and John 
Harrington. 

" Lydia Nelson and Her 
Boys and Girls," who have 
only just come to this 
country, will present an 
English dancing novelty. 
Miss Nelson is an accom- 
plished solo dancer, and her 
young associates are clever 
and nimble. Between their 
terpsichprean efforts! the 
quintette sing two songs 
written especially for them. 

Chick Sale, a clever com- 
edy protean actor, will ap- 
pear in his decidedly orig- 
inal and novel conception 
of "A Country School En- 
tertainment, ' in which he 
reveals a versatility that is 
remarkable, in the twink- 
ling of an eye and without 
the aid of facial make-up 
he presents youth and old 
age. Mr. Sale has made an 
emphatic hit in all the prin- 
cipal cities of the East and 
has scored heavily in the 
theaters of the Orpheum 
Circuit he has appeared in. 

Kathi Gultini, famed all 
over Europe as "The Lady 
Juggler," a pretty and vi- 
vacious little Viennese, will 
perform remarkable feats 
with a finesse and dair.li- 
ness, it is said, that has 
never been equalled by any 
of the sterner sex. 

Next week will be the 
last of Marguerite Haney 
and Company in "The 
Leading Lady"; Pauline 
Moran, the clever and ver- 
satile singing comedienne; 
the Empire Comedy Four, 
and Mrs. Louis James in 
"Holding a Husband." 

Moving Pictures. 
The great success of the 
Rainey Hunt Pictures at 
the Cort Theater has shown 
tha't the public is eager for 
motion pictures of an edu- 
cational character. That 
the motion picture industry 



si ill is hi its infancy, ami thai the future 
holds forth wonderful possibilities for educa- 
ti.i. and enlightenment by Ihc use of moving 
pictures, is the belief. The old demand for 
simply amusement is changing steadily, and 
now patrons want films of an educational 
character, depicting travel, BCienl ilic ex pen 
in en t a and currenl events from all over the 
world. 

The picture show has cease I t» be ;< child's 
resort, and now is visited with keen interest 
by the adult. The characters of the pictures 
shown also is improving. At first only simple 
drama was attempted. Now the masterpieces 
of the English and foreign languages are be- 
ing flashed on canvas nightly all over the 



land. Pictures are being taken in mid- ocean 
and thousands of feet in the air from bal- 
loons and monoplanes. When one stops to 
consider the short time in which the photo- 
play has been in existence, its development 
nas been truly marvelous. The future devel- 
opment Of the so-called "moving pictures" 
will be even more marked. The American peo- 
ple are destined to receive one great surprise 
after another in this direction. 




Moral Reform Films. 
Arthur Burrage Farwell and other Chicago 
reformers are jubilant over a series of motion 
pictures which are b"ing shown exposing all 
forms of modern gambling devices. It is their 
contention that many peo- 
ple who are constantly be- 
ing swindled will see in this 
way, as they would in no 
other, the fruitlessness of 
trying to beat a "house 
game.'' They believe the 
pictures will in a great 
measure help them in the 
reforms for which they 
stand. 

The films deal with the 
trickery on the fat-famed 
electric roulette wheel, the 
crap table, the faro bank, 
with card games and near- 
ly every popular form of 
gambling. The public is 
shown the inside of numer- 
ous games, how they are 
operated and how the odds 
are always against them. 

Coupled with the expose 
is a thread of a human in- 
terest story which tends to 
show the utter hopelessness 
and ultimate wreck which 
comes to the average man 
wno endeavors to play 
against the sharks who have 
all the help of invention 
and science to keep them 
from losing. 



BLANCHE DUFFIELD 

The delightful prima donna, with the Gilbert & Sullivan Festival Company 
creating a genuine following among music lovers. 



at the Cort, who is 



Their Ages. 
Nat Goodwin was bom 
in Boston fifty-four years 
ago, and looks all of it plus. 
James J. Hackett soon will 
be 42, but holds his youth- 
fulness well. Jefferson de 
Angelis was born in San 
Francisco 52 years ago, 
but owns up to his age with 
a comically wrjy face. 
Frank Daniels is turned 50. 
Frederic de Belleville, one 
of the best of the older gen- 
eration of actors well known 
in America, was born in 
Belgium in 1850. Henry E. 
Dixey is a 51-year-old Bos- 
tonian. Lew Dockstader is 
above 50. John Drew, that 
ever-juvenile grandfather, 
is approaching 58. Robert 
Edeson saw the light in Bal- 
timore nearly 43 years ago, 
and, oddly enough for an 



24 



-THE WASP- 



[Saturday, August 3, 1912. 



actor of the leading-man variety, looks it. 
Maciyn Arbuckle, as breezy off the stage as 
Texas, his native state, is forth-1'our. Erwin 
Arden approaches his forty-seventh milestone. 
Dustin Farnum looks considerable youngei 
than his thirty-five years, despite his statu. c- 
and bulkiness. William Faversham looks a? 
old as he is, and he is nearly forty-three. 

"Patience" Next at Cort. 

THE Gilbert and Sullivan Festival Com- 
pany, with DeWolf Hopper, Blanche 
Duffleld, Eugene Cowles, Ueorge Mac- 
Farlane, Arthur Aldridge, Kate Condon, Viola 
Gillette, Arthur Cunningham, Alice Brady, 
and Louise Barthel, now filling the Cort Thea- 
ter, the second week of their phenomenal en- 
gagement, in "Pinafore," announce a change 
of program on Sunday evening next, when 
"Patience" will have its turn. This opera 
will be sung on Sunday, Monday, Tuesday and 
Wednesday n^ght, and at the Wednesday mat- 
inee. On Thursday night "The Pirates of 
Penzance ' ' will be given production, to re- 
main for the rest of the week. 

It is, indeed, more than a pleasure to have 
this fine organization in our midst, and high 
praise is certainly due to the management who 
conceived and carried out the idea, for these 
revivals have proved a treat and a joy to all 
classes of theater-goers. The success of the 
undertaking serves to further prove that the 
good things of the theater never die. 

The revivals which we have already heard, 
"The Mikado," which was sung last week, 
and "Pinafore," which is this week's offer- 
ing, have established the fact that the wit and 
satire of Gilbert and the melodic charm and 
vivacity of Sullivan still preserve their po- 
tency to the fullest degree. While great 
credit must be given to Sullivan, as is his due, 
for the musical setting that he gave to the 
whimsical books of Gilbert, it is a fact that 
Gilbert himself conceived, with a wealth of 
imagination, the ideas that his coworker crys- 
tallized into the melodious forms by which 
they are popularly remembered. 

At Pantages. 

THINGS are humming at the Pantages 
Theater this week, crowded houses be- 
in evidence every afternoon and even- 
ing, the current bill just seeming to hit the 
popular fancy, including, as it does, Fred Ire- 
land, and his limber-limbed Casino Girls, pre- 
senting "High Lights of Dear Old Broad- 
way"; El Barto, the amusing and mystify- 



CSB£ 



LEADING THEATRE 

Ellis and Market. 
Phone Sutter 2460. 



Last Time Tonight — "PINAFORE" 



Beginning Tomorrow (Sunday) Night 

Third Big Week of the 

GILBERT & SULLIVAN FESTIVAL CO. 

De Wolf Hopper 
Blanche Duffield Geo. MacFarlane 

Kate Condon Arthur Aldridge 

Viola Gillette Arthur Cunningham 

Alice Brady Louise Barthel 

Eugene Cowles 



— IN 



66 



99 



PATIENCE 

Which will he given on Sun., Mon., Tries., and Wed. 
Nights and Wed. Mat., and 

"The Pirates of Penzance" 

Which will he given on Thurs., FrL, Sat. and Sun. 
Nights and Sat. Mat. 



Nights and Sat. Mat. Prices — 50c. to $2, 
Popular Matinees Wednesdays. 



Week Com. Mon., Aug. 12 — To he announced. 



ing "conversational trickster"; the Four Ply- 
ing Valentinos, aerial marvels; Willie .Ritchie, 
the promising young light-weight, in "Pun 
in a Gymnasium"; Wood's Animal Actors, in 
a problem comedy playlet, and other bright 
features. 

The program prepared for the week com- 
mencing Sunday afternoon contains an ideal 
array of vaudeville, headed by Taylor Gran- 
ville's sensational scenic offering, "The Hold- 
Up, " described at a genuine thrill from begin- 
ning to end. The act carries six stage hands 
of its own, and the effects of slow Amoving 
freights and whizzing passenger trains are 
said to be surpassed by none, whether pre- 
sented on the legitimate or the vaudeville 
stage. The hissing, screaming freight, pro* 
pelled by its own steam, is a wonderful piece 
of stagecraft, to say nothing of the "Lim- 
ited" dashing across the stage at the actual 
speed of sixty miles an hour. "The Hold-Up" 
will be presented by Percival Lennon and ca- 
pable support. The four Janowskys, one of 
whom is of the gentler sex, will offer the re- 
fined gymnastic entertainment which has won 
them fame all over Europe; and M. Bankoff 
and Lulu Belmont, agile Russians, will pre- 
sent a series of international dances. Wil- 
helmi, an original and talented impersonator 
of famous composers and musicians of note, 
will appear with his Imperial Yacht Orches- 
tha, one of the finest musical organizations in 
vaudeville, appearing in eight different roles 
and giving a half-hour of high-class music. 
Howard and Dolores, the gentler member of 
the duo appearing as "The Rag-Time Model 
Girl," will offer a novel and pleasing enter- 
tainment, and the "All Star Trio," composed 
of three young men with phenomenal voices, 
are expected by the management to create 
a sensation. Bert Liennon, who impersonates 
several well-known actors, making up for his 
characters in full view of the audience, and 
Sunlight Pictures, showing a variety of ex- 
clusive subjects, will complete a varied and 
interesting bill. 



Was a Success. 

THE Bazar held under the auspices of the 
Gatholie congregation of Mill Valley, 
July 27th, to whom Rev. Father Sesnon 
ministers, was an unqualified success, bringing 
forth some excellent talent to assist the cause. 
Miss Myrtle Donelly was a favorite with all, 
not only for her artistic performance, but also 
her personal charms.' Her popularity was ac- 
knowledged by those present in the presenta- 
tion to her of a beautiful gold watch and 
chain. Miss Donelly is a talented member of 
the Kruger Piano Club, and will be heard in 
a mixed recital to be given at an early date 
in Berkeley. 



PROMINENT PEOPLE AT DEL MONTE. 

From all indications, Del Monte will he deluged 
with members of the smart set and players of golf 
in the "carnival" which is to hold sway throughout 
September. Then there's a class who love Del Monte 
whether there's anything doing or not, and they 
spend many months in the year enjoying it. There's 
Mrs. Henry Schmieden, Miss Flora Low, Miss Elea- 
nor Morgan, Mrs. Robert Hays Smith and family, 
Mrs. J. C. Breckenridge and son, Mr. J. W. Byrne 
and his mother (Mrs. Margaret Irvine), Mr. and 
Mrs. C. A. Laton, Mr. and Mrs. C. A. Laton, Mrs. 
Clinton E. Worden and her mother (Mrs. A. N. 
Towne), Mrs. Andrew M. Lawrence and her daugh- 
ter Edna of Chicago, Mr. and Mrs. J. Parker Whit- 
ney, Mrs. R. P. Schwerin, son and daughter, Mr. O. 
A. Robertson, as well known in St. Paul as in San 
Francisco, whose wife and daughters are summering 
at Del Monte; the L. L. Corys, the Frank Proctors, 
the George A. Popes, Mr. 0. E. Hotle, Mr. and Mrs. 
R. S. Shainwald, Mr. and Mrs. Jerome Hart, Mrs. 
Samuel and Miss Jennie Blair, Mr. and Mrs. Harry 
Stetson. 

Among those who ha^rooms engaged for August 
and September are the C. B. Alexanders of New 
York; T. D. Girvins, San Mateo; Mr. and Mrs. 



Perry Eyre, Mr. and Mrs. George Newhall, Mr. and 
Mrs. Alfred S. Tubbs and Tallant Tubbs, the Oscar 
Coopers, Mr. and Mrs. Ward Barron, Mr. and Mrs. 
Hugh A. Bain, Mrs. W. Jj. Tevis and family, Mrs. 
B. Ruppin and daughters, Dr. and Mrs. Self ridge, 
the W. C. Duncans and Miss Chase, the F. L. 
Johnsons, W. H. La Boyteaux, the A. L. Stones, 
Mr. and Mrs. J. J. Crooks, the Alexander Fields, 
Mr. and Mrs. Dennis Searles, Mr. and Mrs. Robert 
Y. Hayne, Mr. and Mrs. Samuel Hopkins, the W. S. 
Martins, me Wm. H. Crockers, the Templetou Orock- 
ers, Mr. and Mrs. J. P. Neville, Mr. and Mrs. Jas. 
L. Flood, Mr. and Mrs. T. B. Eastland, the Welling- 
ton Greggs, Mr. ana Mrs. C. B. Wingate, Mr. and 
Mrs. Gus Taylor, Mr. and Mrs. F. McNear, Mr. and 
Mrs. G. S. Garrett, Mr. and Mrs., George H. Tyson. 
Mr. Stewart M. Lowery is also coming in September. 
There is a long list of southern players of golf 
coming en masse, but the best known are Mr. E. S. 
Armstrong, Mr. E. T. Stimson, Dr. Guy Cochran, 
Mr. E. B. Tufts, Mr; F. H. Edwards, Dr. West 
Hughes, Jack Jevne, J. H. MeCluney, F. L. Miller, 
Sam Parsons aud Miss Parsons and O. J. Parker. 

Mr. Samuel Naphtaly of San Francisco arrived 
for the week-end with his family, who have been en- 
joying several weeks' outing at Lei Monte. They 
have all returned home. 

Mr. and Mrs. Melville Schweitzer are making an 
extended visit. They shipped their electric car 
down for daily spins over the famous drives and 
scenic winding roads about the peninsula. 

A herd of purple "Elks," over two hundred, 
stampeued in Monterey county, traveling in the di- 
rection of Del Monte, and rushed through the spa- 
cious halls directly into the Assembly room, and 
when last seen were charging voraciously, but con- 
tentedly, over the banquet table. 



Safest and Most Magnificent Theater in America I 

WEEK BEGINNING THIS SUNDAY AFTERNOON 

Matinee Every Day 

A VAUDEVILLE REVELATION! 

BERTHA KALIOH in 
"A LIGHT FROM ST. AGNES" 
(Her First Appearance in this City) ; LYDIA NEL- 
SON and Her Boys and Girls, English Specialty 
Dancers; CHICK SALE, Comedy Protean Enter- 
tainer; KATHI GULTINI, the Lady Juggler; MAR- 
GUERITE HANEY & CO. in "The Leading Lady," 
with Ralph Lynn; EMPIRE COMEDY FOUR; 
PAULINE MORAN; NEW DAYLIGHT MOTION 
PICTURES. Last Week MRS. LOUIS JAMES in 
"Holding a Hushand.' ' 

Evening Prices, 10c., 25c, 50c, 75c. Box Seata, $1. 
Matinee Prices (Except Sundays and Holidays), 
10c, 25c 50c. 

PHONES DOUGLAS 70. HOME C 1570. 




Market Street, Opposite Mason. 
Wees: of Sunday, August 1th: 
Taylor Granville's 
"THE HOLD-UP," 
A Romance of the Great Southwest; 
4 JANOWSKYS, Refined Gymnasts; MONS. BANK- 
OFF and LULU BELMONT, International Dancers; 
WILHELMI and the IMPERIAL YACHT ORCHES- 
TRA; HOWARD and DOLORES, Singing Enter- 
tainers; THE ALL STAR TRIO, Vocalists Supreme; 
BERT LENNON, Impersonator of Actors, and SUN- 
LIGHT PICTURES. 



Mat. Daily at 2:30. Nights, 7:15 and 9:15. Sun. 
and Holidays, Mats, at 1:80 and 3:30. Nights, 
Continuous from 6:80. 



Prices — 10c, 20c and 80c 



Saturday, August 3, 1912.] 



-THE WASP- 



25 




HO 

MAIDS 

DIARY -• 



¥&^ ANDS SAKE! I don't see for the life 
of me why there's such a fuss about 
Gertrude At her ton saying women 
have no more brains than an oyster, 
AM the oysters I've seen were quiet, harmless 
things that were willing to attend to their own 
business and let Other people alone. Goodness 
me! J don't know as Gertrude herself would 
average up so fine with a good fat oyster. 
sin- smokes cigarettes, and don't hide behind 
the hotel curtains to do it. Nobody ever saw 
an oyster, male or female, smoking cigarettes. 
1 don 't believe even an oyster in a French 
restaurant would. 

Who ever saw an oyster leaning over the 
back fence talking scandal to her next-door 
neighbor? Goodness met there's lots of wo- 
men I know could improve their minds and 
morals by copying a decent, self-respecting 
oyster. 

Lands sake! I believe it would crack the 
shell of any female oyster if she tried to tell 



SWEETS IN THE COUNTRY —Candies are 
doubly appreciated in the country. Send a 
box to your friends on their vacation. Can 
be sent from any of Geo. Haas & Sons' four 
candy stores. 




\ JAMNESE ARTam BRT 110009. 



EXCLUSIVE DESIGNS IN 

EMBROIDERED 

WAIST PATTERNS AND KIMONOS 



157-159 GEARY STREET 

Bet. Grant Avenue and Stockton St. 

Branch Store: 152 Kearny Street 
San Francitco 



such whoppers tu tioi liueband ..» I've beard. 
Mrs. Mugaby nevei comes within $15 of tell- 
ing Mi. Mugaby the price she pays for her 
hats — though it don 'I make much difference, 
;i- Mr. fifugsbj wouldn't pay for them any- 
how. It's against his principles to pay for 
anything. 

Next time I see Gertrude at our Ethical Ef- 
fort Club I 'II tell her what 1 think of hei 
oysteT comparison. Goodness me! 1 see thai 
she 'a wearing i hose shameless I ight dresses 
all the women have. Lands sake! Does any- 
body suppose a modest oyster, the mother of 
a family, would think of going around in the 
mud with a piece oi glass in her shell so every 
shrimp in the hay could see her shape? In- 
deed, she wouldn't! Gertrude and the rest ot 
them that arc proud of their shapes would do 
well to copy the poor modest, decent oyster, 
that shuts herself: up in a thick, hard shell 
you can hardly break with an ax. The sum- 
mer winds almost take the dresses off the 
women I see walking along Market street, so 
they remind me of the shameless statues 1 
saw up in the Art School. 

I'm really astonished at Gertrude to talk 
the way she has. It's very foolish. She 
must be thinking of getting married again. 
Women ain't responsible when they get such 
a notion in their heads. There are no sensible 
women over 40 except the single ones. 

I told Ethel Gayleigh so, and she said I'd 
better read what the preacher said about 
Helen Gould and old maids generally — they 
ought, all be taken out and cut up for chicken 
feed or to mend the roads with. Goodness 
me! Such language in the pulpit! 

I got the paper and tried to read what the 
preacher said, but 'twas shocking. HeavensI 
Advising Miss Gould ,V,|q seek a mate incog- 
nito in the backwoods"! Such shamelessness! 
Horrible! And saying "no woman had done 
her duty to the world till she had borne chil- 
dren"! Heavens! What indelicate subject 
will we hear discussed iiejit in public? 

I laid the paper away, for I was afraid 
somebody might catclrme reading it. 

TABITHA TWIGGS. 

♦ 

AT CASA DEL REV. 

The popularity of Casa del Rey increases steadily. 
During the past week many prominent San Fran- 
cisco people motored down to Santa Cruz and regis- 
tered at Casa del Rey. The register of the hotel 
looked like the roll of California society. The East- 
ern visitors to Santa Cruz have been very numerous 
this year. To Casa del Rey by motor car is a de- 
lightful trip. 



When a girl begins to call a man by his 
first name it is a pretty good sign she has 
designs on his last. 

♦ 

POWER OF MONEY 
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lack of it divides the world into two classes. 
To which class do you belong? Every mem- 
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ciation belongs to the Money Class. 

The CONTINENTAL BUILDING AND 
LOAN ASSOCIATION, Market street, at Gold- 
en Gate avenue, can be of assistance to you in 
getting the home. 

EDWABD 8WEENEY. President. 

WM. CORBIN, Secty. and Gen. Mgr. 



Contracts made with HotsU md KnUuranii 

Spaclftl attention given to Family Trada 

ESTABLISHED 1870. 

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Importer! and Daalara Id 

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Phons Franklin 897. 



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PHONE PARK 263. 



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Phone Douglas 677 



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560 MARKET ST., 



SAN FRANCISCO 



26 



-THE WASP- 



[Saturday, August 3, 1912. 



NOTICE. 

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN THAT JOHN C. 
LEiVlMER is transacting a general boiler, tame and 
iron business in this State under the name of CALI- 
FORNIA BOILER WORKS; that his principal place 
of business is the City and County of San Francisco, 
State of California; that he is the sole owner of 
said business, and his full name is JOHN C. LEM- 
MER, and he resides at 1730 Pierce Street, in the 
City and County of San Francisco, State of Califor- 
nia JOHN C. LEMMER. 

STATE OF CALIFORNIA, 
City and County of San Francisco, 
ss. 

On this 8th day of July, in the year one thousand 
nine hundred and twelve, before me, Matthew Brady, 
a Notary Public in and for the City and County of 
San Francisco, State of California, residing therein, 
duly commissioned and sworn, personally appeared 
JOHN C. LEMMER, known to me to be the person 
whose name is subscribed to the within instrument, 
and acknowledged to me that he executed the same. 

In witness whereof, I have hereunto set my hand 
and affixed my official seal at my office in the City 
and County of San Francisco, State of California, 
the day and year in this certificate first above writ- 
ten. 

MATTHEW BRADY, 

Notary Public. 
In and for the City and County of San Francis- 
co, State of California. 

VOGELSANG & BROWN, Attorneys at Law, 20 
Montgomery Street, San Francisco, Cal. 

SUMMONS. 



(SEAL) 



IN THE SUPERIOR COURT OF THE STATE OF 
California, in and for the City and County of San 
Francisco — Dept. No. 4. 

GIUSEPPE DIRESTA, Plaintiff, vs. All persons 
claiming any interest in or lien upon the real prop- 
erty herein described or any part thereof, Defend- 
ants. — Action No. 32,371. 

The People of the State of California, to all per- 
sons claiming any interest in, or lien upon, the real 
property herein described or any part thereof, De- 
fendants, greeting : 

You are hereby required to appear and answer the 
complaint of GIUSEPPE DIRESTA, plaintiff, filed 
with the Clerk of the above entitled Court and 
County, within three months after the first publica- 
tion of this summons, and to set forth what interest 
or lien, if any, you have in or upon that certain 
real property, or any part thereof, situated in the 
City and County of San Francisco, State of Califor- 
nia, and particularly described as follows: 

Beginning at a point on the easterly line of Octavia 
Street, distant thereon thirty-one (31) feet, three (3) 
inches southerly from the corner formed by the in- 
tersection of the easterly line of Octavia Street with 
the southerly line of Lombard Street, and running 
thence southerly and along said line of Octavia 
Street twenty-five (25) feet; thence at a right angle 
easterly one hundred (100) feet; thence at a right 
angle northerly twenty-five (25) feet; and thence at 
a right angle westerly one hundred (100) feet to 
the point of beginning ; being part of WESTERN 
ADDITION BLOCK Number 170. 

You are hereby notified that, unless you so appear 
and answer, the plaintiff will apply to the Court for 
the relief demanded in the complaint, to-wit, that 
it be adjudged that plaintiff is the owner of said 
property in fee simple absolute; that his title to 
said property be established and quieted; that the 
Court ascertain and determine all estates, rights, 
titles, interests and claims in and to said property, 
and every part thereof, whether the same be legal 
or equitable, present or future, vested or contingeut, 
and whether the same consist of mortgages or lienB 
of any description; that plaintiff recover his coBts 
herein and have such other and further relief as 
may be meet in the premises. 

Witness my hand and the seal of said Court this 
20th day of June, A. D. 1912. 

(SEAL) H. I. MULCREVY. Clerk. 

By S. I. HUGHES, Deputy Clerk. 

The first publication of this summons was made in 
"The Wasp" newspaper on the 6th day of July, 
A. D. 1912. 

PERRY & DAILEY, Attorneys for Plaintiff, 105 
Montgomery Street, San Francisco, Cal. 



Valuable Information 

OF A BUSINESS, PERSONAL or SOCIAL 

NATURE FROM THE PRESS OF 

THE PACIFIC COAST. 

ALLEN'S 

Press Clipping Bureau 

88 FIRST STREET 

Telephone Ky. 392. 
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SAN FRANCISCO, 



CALIFORNIA 



A Hint to the Parson. 

THE GOOSE had been carved and every- 
body had tasted it. It was excellent. 
The negro minister, "who was the guest 
of honor, could not restrain his enthusiasm. 

' ' Dat ' s as fine a goose as I ever see, Brud- 
der Williams," he said to his host. "Whar 
did you get such a fine goose?" 

"Well now, pahson," replied the carver of 
the goose, exhibiting great dignity and reti- 
cence, "when you preaches a speshul good 
sermon I neber axes you whar you got it. 1 
hopes you will show me dat same considera- 
tion. ' ' 

SUMMONS. 

IN THE SUPERIOR COURT OF THE STATE OF 
California, in and for the City and County of San 
Francisco. — Dept, No. 5. 

EUGENE J. CRELLER, Plaintiff, vs. All persons 
claiming any interest in or lien upon the real prop' 
erty herein described or any part thereof.Defend- 
ants. — Action No. 32,212. 

The People of the State of California, to all per- 
sons claiming any interest in, or lien upon, the real 
property herein described or any part thereof, De- 
fendants, greeting : 

You are hereby required to appear and answer 
the complaint of EUGENE C. CRELLER, plaintiff, 
filed with the Clerk of the above entitled Court and 
County, within three months after the first publi- 
cation of this summons, and to set forth what in- 
terest or lien, if any, you have in or upon that cer- 
tain real property, or any part thereof, situated in 
the City and County of San Francisco, State of 
California, and particularly described as follows: 

FIRST: Beginning at a point on the northerly 
line of Oak Street, distant thereon one hundred and 
ten (110) feet easterly from the corner formed by 
the intersection of the northerly line of Oak Street 
with the easterly line of Octavia Street, and running 
thence easterly and along said line of Oak Street 
twenty-seven (27) feet, six (6) inches; thence at a 
right angle northerly one hundred and twenty (120) 
feet to the southerly line of Hickory Avenue; thence 
westerly along said line of Hickory Avenue twenty 
seven (27) feet, six (6) inches; and thence at a 
right angle southerly one hundred and twenty (120) 
feet to the point of beginning; being part of WEST- 
ERN ADDITION BLOCK Number 147. 

SECOND: Beginning at a point on the southerly 
line of Pine Street, distant thereon thirty (30) feet 
easterly from the corner formed by the intersection 
of the southerly line of Pine Street with the easter- 
ly line of Presidio Avenue, and running thence east 
erly and along said line of Pine Street thirty-one 
(31) feet, five (5) inches; thence at a right angle 
southerly eighty-seven (87) feet, six (6 inches; 
thence at a right angle westerly thirty-one (31) 
feet, five (5) inches ; and thence at a right angle 
northerly eighty-seven (87) feet, six (6) inches to 
the point of beginning; being part of WESTERN 
ADDITION BLOCK Number 620. 

THIRD: Beginning at a point on the northwest- 
erly line of Howard Street, distant thereon two hun- 
dred and twenty-five (225) feet southwesterly from 
the corner formed by the intersection of the north- 
westerly line of Howard Street with the southwest- 
erly line of Sixth Street, and running thence south- 
westerly and along said line of Howard Street fifty 
(50) feet ; thence at a right angle northwesterly 
ninety (90) feet; thence at a right angle northeast- 
erly fifty (50 feet; and thence at a right angle 
southeasterly ninety (90) feet to the point of be- 
ginning. 

FOURTH: Beginning at the corner formed by 
the intersection of the southerly line of Union 
Street with the westerly line of Polk Street, and 
running thence southerly and along said line of Polk 
Street thirty (30) feet; thence at a right angle 
westerly seventy (70) feet; thence at a right angle 
northerly thirty (30) feet to the southerly line of 
Union Street; and thence easterly and along said 
line of Union Street seventy (70) feet to the point 
of beginning; being part of WESTERN ADDITION 
BLOCK Number 46. 



Y'Mi ;ire hereby notified that, unless you so ap- 
l>f;ir and answer, the plaintiff will apply to the 
Cniirt for the relief demanded in the complaint, to- 
wil, that ii he adjudged that plaintiff is the owner 
of said property in fee simple absolute; that his 
tille lo said property he established and quieted; 
that the Court ascertain and determine all estates, 
rights, titles, interests and claims in and to said 
property, and every part thereof, whether the same 
be legal or equitable, present or future, vested or 
contingent, and whether the same consist of mort- 
gages or liens of any description; that plaintiff 
recover his costs herein and have such other and 
further relief as may be meet in the premises. 

Witness my hand and the seal of said Court, this 
10th day of May, A. D. 1912. 

(SJSAL) H. I. MULCREVY, Olerk. 

By J. F. DUNWORTH, Deputy Clerk. 

The first publication of this summons was made 
in "The Wasp" newspaper on the 18th day of May, 
A. D. 1912. 

The following persons are said to claim an inter- 
est in, or lien upon, said property adverse to plain- 
tiff: 

MOSES ELLIS', JR., Framingham, Massachusetts. 

KATE ELLIS, Framingham, Massachusetts. 

MARTHA E. BEAN, Framingham, Massachusetts. 

MARY F. ELLIS, Framingham, Massachusetts. 

GRACE E. HALL, Chicago, Illinois. 

PERRY & DAILEY, Attorneys for Plaintiff, 105 
Montgomery Street, San Francisco. GARRET W. 
McENERNEY and GEORGE H. MASTICK, of Coun- 
sel. 



DR. WONG HIM 
HERB CO. 

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Weakness, Nervous- 
ness, Tumor, Cancer, 
Dizziness, Neuralgia, 
Headache, Lumbago, Appendicitis, Rheumatism, 
Malarial Fever, Catarrh, Eczema, Blood Poison, 
Leucorrhoea, Urine and Bladder Troubles, Dia- 
betes and all organic diseases. 




PATIENTS SPEAK FOR THEMSELVES. 

Petaluma, Cal., November 11, 1911. — Dr. 
Wong Him — Dear Sir: This is to certify that 
I was sick for about three years with a compli- 
cation of troubles resulting from tuberculosis of 
the bowels and liver combined with tumor of the 
stomach. I had been given up by all the doc- 
tors of Ukiah, Mendocino county, and three 
prominent physicians of San Francisco. They all 
told me that the only chance to prolong my life 
was an operation, and that I could not live long 
under any circumstances. When I began to take 
your treatment I weighed about 75 pounds. I 
am now entirely recovered and weigh 147 pounds, 
more than I ever weighed in my life. 

I write this acknowledgment in gratitude for 
my miraculous recovery, and to proclaim to the 
public your wonderful Herb Treatment, that oth- 
ers may find help and healing. Gratefully, 
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419 Third Street. 
Formerly of Ukiah. 

DR. WONG HIM 

Leading Chinese Herb Doctor 

1268 O'FARRELL ST. 

(Between Gough and Octavia) 

SAN FRANCISCO. 




EYE TROUBLES VANISH 

WHEN USING MAYERLE'S GERMAN EYEWATER for weak, tired, in- 
flamed, dull, watery, Btrained or discharging eyes, floating spots, crusty 
eyelids, etc. It gives instant relief. For infants or adults. At all drug- 
gists', 50c; or by mail, 65c. 

GERMAIN OPTICAL SPECIALIST 

960 Market Street, San Francisco 
Insist on setting Mayerlc's *^PC 



Saturday, August 3, 1912.] 



-THE WASP 



27 



SUMMONS. 

IN THE SUPERIOR COURT OK THE STATE OF 
California, iu and fur the OltJ sutl County of San 

\U1> W. 61E< 
FRIED, FlaintuVs, rs. All i-trs'-iiih claiming aj 
tere»t in or hen UpOD tfai 

d *>r uny purl thureuf, Defendants. — Action Mo. 
82,392 

The People of the State of California, to all per- 
•one claiming any interest in, or lien upon, the real 
property herein described or any part thereof, De- 
fendants, greeting: 

You tire hereby required to appear and answer the 
Complaint of LlnVAUi' \\ D uud HELEN 

plain tiff a, filed n | I 

after Lfc and to 

set furih what Interest or lien, if uti>. jou have u. or 

upon thai curtain real property, or uny purl thereof, 

tuid County uf San Prat 

Btate oi California, and particularly described as 

follOWl : 

Beginning at -> point on the southwesterly line of 
Elstant ihereoo two hundred and 
twentj D reel southeasterly from the corner 

formed by thi in of the southwesterly line 

.-.nil the southeasterly line of Jen 
nlngs Street (formerly "J'' Street South), mid run- 
ning tin ISterl} ulong bitid Hue of Gilinun 
Avenue MtJ [60] n.i. thence at a right angle 
southwesterly one hundred (1UU) feet; thence at a 
right angle northwesterly tifty loU) feet; and thence 
at a right angle northeasterly one hundred (luu. 
feet to the point of beginning ; being tots it and 15, 
in block 661, bay PARK HOMESTEAD, as por 
map thereof tiled in the oflice of the Recorder of the 
City and County of San Francisco, March li, 1872. 

You are hereby notified that, unless you so appear 
and answer, the plaintiffs will apply to the Court for 
the relief demanded in the complaint, to-wit, that it 
be adjudged that plaintiffs are the owners of said 
property in fee simple absolute; that their title to 
said property be established and quieted; that the 
Court ascertain and determine all estates, rights, titles 
interests and claims in and to said property, and 
every part thereof, whether the same be legal or 
equitable, present or future, vested or contingent, 
and whether the same consist of mortgages or Hens 
of any description; that plaintiffs recover their costs 
herein and have such other and further relief as may 
be meet in the premises. 

Witness my hand and the seal of said Court, this 
26th day of June, A. D. 1912. 

(SEAL) H. I. MULCREVY, Clerk. 

By S. I. HUGHES, Deputy Clerk. 

The first publication of this summons was made 
in "The Wasp" newspaper on the 13th day of 
July, A. D. 1912. 

PERRY & DAILEY, Attorneys for Plaintiffs, 105 
Montgomery Street, San FrauciBCo, California. 

SUMMONS. 



IN THE SUPERIOR COURT OF THE STATE OF 
California, in and for the City and County of San 
Francisco. — Dept. No. 8. 

MARGARET O'MALLEY, Plaintiff, vs. All per- 
sons claiming any interest in or lien upon the real 
property herein described or any part thereof, De- 
fendants. — Action No. 32,228. 

The People of the State of California, to all per- 
sons claiming any interest in, or lien upon, the 
real property herein described or any part thereof, 
Defendants, greeting : 

You are hereby required to appear and answer 
the complaint of MARGARET O'MALLEY, plaintiff, 
filed with the Clerk of the above entitled Court and 
County, within thre months after the first publica- 
tion of this summons, and to set forth what interest 
or lien, if any, you have in or upon that certain real 
property, or any part thereof, Bituated in the City 
and County of San Francisco, State of California, 
and particularly described as follows. 

Beginning at a point on tue northerly line of 
Irving (formerly "I") Street, distant thereon ninety- 
five (95 feet easterly from the corner formed by 
the intersection of the northerly line of Irving 
Street with the easterly line of Second Avenue, and 
running thence easterly and along said line of 
Irving Street twenty-five (25) feet; thence at a 
right angle northerly one hundred and ten (110) 
feet; thence at a right angle westerly twenty-five 
(25) feet; and thence at a right angle southerly 
one hundred and ten (110) feet to the point of 
beginning; being part of OUTSIDE LAND BLOCK 
Number 672. 

You are hereby notified that, unless you so 
appear and answer, the plaintiff will apply to the 
Court for the relief demanded in the complaint, to- 
wit: That it be adjudged that the plaintiff is the 
owner of said property in fee simple absolute; that 
her title to said property be established and quieted; 
that the Court ascertain and' determine all estates, 
rights, titles, interests and claims in and to said 
property, and every part thereof, whether the Bame 
be legal or equitable, present or future, vested or 
contingent, and whether the same conBist of mort- 
gages or liens of any description; that plaintiff re- 
cover her costs herein and have such other and fur- 
ther relief as may be meet in the premises. 

Witness my hand and the seal of said Court this 
16th day of May, A. D. 1912. 

SEAL H. I. MULCREVY, Clerk. 

By J. F. DUNWORTH, Deputy Clerk. 
The first publication of this Summons was made in 



THE WASP 

Published weekly by the 
WASP PUBLISHING COMPANY 

Office of ; iblicatlon 
121 Second St., San Francisco, Cnl. 

Phones — Butter 780, J 2705. 

Entered at the San Francisco Postotfice as second- 
class matter. 

SUBSCRIPTION BATES— In the United States, 
Canada and Mexico, $5 a year in advance; six 
months, $2.50; three months, $1.25; single 
copies, 10 cents. For sale by all newsdealers. 

FOREIGN SUBSCRIPTIONS— To countries with 
In the Postal Union, $0 per year. 



nap newspaper on the 1st day of June, A. D. 

isia. 

The following persons are said to claim some in- 
terest in said real property adversely to plaintiff; 

BANK OF ITALY (u corporation), San Francisco, 
California. 

PERRY & DAILEY, Attorneys for Plaintiff, 105 
Montgomery Street, Son Francisco, Cal. GARRET 
W. McENERNEY and GEORGE H. MASTIOK, of 
Counsel. 



SUMMONS. 



IN THE SUPERIOR COURT OF THE STATE OF 
California, in and for the City and County of San 

Francisco. — Dept. No. 2. 

MYRTLE R. SAYLOR, Plaintiff, vs. All persons 
claiming any interest in or lien upon the real prop- 
erty herein described or any part thereof, Defend- 
ants. — Action No. 32,239. 

The People of the State of California, to all per- 
sons claiming any interest in, or lien upon, the real 
property herein described or any part thereof. De- 
fendants, greeting: 

You are hereby required to appear and answer 
the complaint of MYRTLE R. SAYLOR, plaintiff, 
filed with the Clerk of the above entitled Court 
and County, within three months after the first pub- 
lication of this Summons, and to set forth what in- 
terest or lien, if any, you have in or upon that cer- 
tain real property or any part thereof, situated in 
the City and County of San Francisco, State of 
California, and particularly described as follows: 

Beginning at the corner formed by the intersec- 
tion of the northerly line of Lake Street with the 
westerly line of Seventh Avenue, and running thence 
northerly along said line of Seventh Avenue twenty- 
five (25) feet; thence at a right angle westerly one 
hundred and fourteen (114) feet; thence at a right 
angle southerly twenty-five (25) feet to the north- 
erly line of Lake Street; and thence easterly and 
along said line of Lake Street one hundred and 
fourteen (114) feet to tne point of beginning; being 
part of OUTSIDE LAND BLOCK Number 65, 

You are hereby notified that, unless you so appear 
and answer, the plaintiff will apply to the Court 
for the relief demanded in the complaint, to-wit, that 
it be adjudged that plaintiff is the owner of the 
parcel of real property described in the complaint 
herein in fee simple absolute; that her title to 
■aid property be established and quieted; that the 
Court ascertain and determine all sstates, rights, 
titles, interests and claims in and to snid property, 
and every part thereof, whether the same be legal 
or equitable, present or future, vested or contingent, 
and whether the same consist of mortgages or liens 
of any description; that plaintiff recover her costs 
herein and have such other and further relief as 
may be meet in the premises. 

Witness my hand and the seal of said Court this 
17th day of May, A. D. 1912. 

(SEAL) H. I. MULCREVY, Clerk. 

By J". F. DUNWORTH, Deputy Clerk. 
The first publication of this summons was made 
in The Wasp newspaper on the 1st day of June, 
A. D. 1912. 

PERRY & DAILEY, Attorneys for Plaintiff, 105 
Monte-ornery Street, San Francisco, Cal. GARRET 
W. McENERNEY and GEORGE H. MASTIOK, of 
Counsel. 



SUMMONS. 



THE SUPERIOR COURT OF THE STATE OF 
California, in and for the City and County of San 
Francisco. — Dept. No. 7. 

JOSEPH G. McVERRY, Plaintiff, vb. All persons 
claiming any Interest in or lien upon the real prop- 
erty herein described or any part thereof, Defend- 
ants. — Action No. 32,432. 

The People of the State of California, to all 
persons claiming any interest in, or lien upon, 



the rent property herein described or any part there- 
of Defendant!] creeling: 

You are hereby required tu appear and answer 

in three months after the first . 
cation of this summons, and to set forth what in- 
terest or lien, if uny, you have in or upon that 
certain real property, or any pari thert 
in the City and County of San Francisco, Stuto of 
CaUfornla, and particularly described as follows: 

■ 
line of Law toi 
- iterly line ol Lvenua, 

and i tinning Lb said line <>f 

i two hundred 
easterly line ol Twelfth Avenue; thence north- 

d 111 ' Twi 

Inches . then* it angle 

easterly one hundred and twei ' -hence 

rtherly twelve (12) feet, six (0) 

." a i i ■ ■ 

and twenty (120) feet to the westerly line of Elev- 
enth Avenue; and tl ■-■ Ii.rly end along mud 

Hoe "i Eleventh Avenue one hundred (100) I 

the i il ol lelng part of OUTSIDE 

■ 

Yoi ■rind that, unless you so appear 

and answer, the plaintiff will apply to the Court 
for the relief demanded in the complaint, to-wit, 
that it be adjudged that plaintiff is the owner of 
said propertj in fee Bimple absolute; that ins title 
to said property be established and quieted; that 
the Court ascertain and determine all estates, rights, 
titles, interest and claims in and to said property, 
and every part thereof, whether the same be legal 
or equitable, present or future, vested or contin- 
gent, and whether the Bame consist of mortgages 
or liens of any description ; that plaintiff recover 
his costs herein and have sucb other and further 
relief as may be meet in the premises. 

Witness my hand and the seal of said Court, 
this 9th day of July, A. D. 1912. 
(SEAL) H. I. MULCREVY, Clerk. 

By H. I. PORTER, Deputy Clerk. 

The first publication of this summons was made 
in 'The Wtsp" newspaper on the 20th day of July, 
A. D. 1912. 

PERRY & DAILEY, Attorneys for Plaintiff, 105 
Montgomery Street, San FranciBco, California. 



SUMMONS. 

IN THE SUPERIOR COURT OF THE STATE OF 
California, in and for the City and County of San 
Francisco.— Dept. No. 10. 

NORENA M. LIBBY, Plaintiff, vs. BURR A. 
LIBBY, Defendant. — Action No. 42,622. 

Action brought in the Superior Court of the State 
of California in and for the City and County of 
San Francisco, and the Complaint filed in the office 
of the County Clerk of said City and County. 

The People of the State of California send greet- 
ing to BURR A. LIBBY, Defendant. 

You are hereby required to appear in an action 
brought against you by the above-named Plaintiff 
in the Superior Court of the State of California, in 
and for the City and County of San Francisco, and 
to answer the Complaint filed therein within ten 
days (exclusive of the day of service) after the 
service on you of this summons, if served within 
this City and County; or if served elsewhere within 
thirty days. 

The said action is brought to obtain a judgment 
and decree of this Court dissolving the bonds of 
matrimony now existing between plaintiff and de- 
fendant, on the ground of defendant's willful neg- 
lect and desertion, also for general relief, as will 
more fully appear in the Complaint on file, to which 
special reference is hereby made. 

And you are hereby notified that, unless you ap- 
pear and answer as above required, the said Plaint- 
iff will take judgment for any moneys or damages 
demanded in the complaint as arising upon contract, 
or will apply to the Court for any other relief de- 
manded in the complaint. 

Given under my hand and the seal of the Superior 
Court of the State of California, in and for the City 
and County of San Francisco, this 1st day of June, 
A. D. 1912. 

(SEAL) H. I. MULCREVY, Clerk. 

By L. W. WELCH, Deputy Clerk. 

The first publication of this summons was made 
in "The Wasp" newspaper on the 8th day of June, 
A. D. 1912. 

GERALD O. HAIoiEY, Attorney for Plaintiff, 
501-502-503 California Pacific Building, San Fran- 
cisco, Cal. 



Office Hours 
9 a. m. to 5:20 p. m. 
Phone Doualai 1501 



Redden ce 
573 Fifth Avenue 
Hour* 6 to 7:30 p. m. 
Phone Pacific 275 

W. H. PYBURN 
NOTARY PUBLIC 

My Motto "ALWAYS IN" 

On parle Francaii Se habla Eiptno 

Office: 229 Montgomery Street 
Smi Franciaco California 



Los Angeles 



$25 round trip 



SantaFe 



San Diego $29 round trip 

Tickets on sale daily. 

Good for return until October 31, 1912. 

Santa Fe's new train. 



Angel 



Leaves San Francisco 
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This is California's 
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ATTRACTIVE TERMS TO PERMANENT GUESTS 




Vol. LXVTTI— No. 6. 



SAN FRANCISCO, AUGUST 10, 1912. 



Price, 10 Cents. 



Plae 



NGLISH. 

BY AMERICUS 



MARVELOUS DISCOVERY ! ! 

PORTOLA AM) PIZARRO and all the other explor- 
ers of the Ultimate West have been outdone. John 
( '. Freeman, engineering expert engaged by the city at 
$250 a day, has discovered a Hatch Hetehy reservoir 
sile in the very heart of San Francisco. He discovered 
a real gold mine when he got on the city payroll, lie 
announced his latest discovery as mysteriously as if the 
reservoir site was the buried pirate's 
treasure on Cocos Island. His sisters 
and his cousins and his aunts — Mayor 
Kolph, Commissioner Alike Casey. 
City Engineer Manson, Supervisor 
Vogelsang. Supervisor Payot. Father 
.Murdock and the rest of them — held 
their breath and crossed their hearts 
on the secret for five dreadful long 
days. Then, with verve and nerve, 
and all together, the Admiral an,d his 
sisters, his cousins and his aunts, 
Dick Deadeye, and all of the munici- 
pal Pinafore crew, broke loose in the 
chorus. "Wow. wow, wow! You, 
you, you ! We, we, we ! We are We ! 
We, we! Great is We's Discovery! 
We, we! 

Suppose we take a long, deep breath, give our ears a 
rest from the "We, we!" chorus, and rub our eyes open 
on the Great Discovery of Admirable Freeman, K.C.B. 
It is obvious at first bat that the Admiral must have got 
through Glen Park and around Mayor Pinther without 
a public reception, and its hoi polloi gathering of news- 
paper artists and reporters. That in itself is an adven- 
ture when you know Glen Park and its Mayor Pinther. 

Then he ventured into the heart of the Twin Peaks 
mountain, an uninhabited land within three miles of the 
City Hall — taking the City Hall as gone or coming — 
and alone with Nature, in the heart of the terra incog- 
nito, had a watery vision which, waking, he brought 



back to earth with himself and whispered it to the 
chosen few in his confidence. 

And this is his vision. He saw San Miguel ravine with 
a dam. The wall of concrete was 134 feet high, and 
made a Heteh Hetehy reservoir which covered thirty 
acres and held 500,000,000 gallons of Heteh Hetehy 
water .SS") feet above the sea level. Around the lake his 
vision showed a wide down-sloping road of the kind 
.made in Norway. 

The visionist seems to have made no note of the length 
of mass of the dam, or its cost. 

In Pinafore it is the Admiral who says ' ' Dam ! ' ' Ad- 
mirable Freeman says it once — "Dam 134 feet high." 
Pity 'tis, he has not said it three times 
more — "Dam long!" "Dam wide!" 
"Dam cost!" 

For, believe us, children of the fog 
belt, who buy municipal visions, the 
dam of Admirable Freeman's 500,- 
000,000-gallon reservoir is 1,000 feet 
long, 700 feet wide, and cost — say, 
it's a dam higher, longer, wider, 
massier and classier than Spring Val- 
ley's Crystal Springs dam, which 
cost, so Herman Sehussler declares, 
.+2.834,517.03. Now what will be the 
cost of Admirable Freeman's dam 
when it is all built by the same dam 
builders already found guilty of con- 
structing a sieve instead of a reser- 
voir on the top of Twin Peaks. 
Another guess at the answer to a problem in simple 
arithmetic, children of the San Francisco mist : If five 
feet of water and $8,000 can leak out through the Con- 
nick section floor joints of the Twin Peaks reservoir 
in five hours, without soaking any politician, what will 
be the life insurance rate for Mayor Pinther, living in 
Glen Park, below Admirable Freeman's 400-feet-alti- 
tude-500,000,000-gallon reservoir 1 

The Wasp has pointed out repeatedly that the man- 
agement of the Heteh Hetehy enterprise is more sug- 
gestive of a Kolb and Dill farce than a serious under- 
taking involving the expenditure of immense sums. 
The incompetency of municipal government has never 




DISCOVERER FREEMAN. 



-THE WASP- 



[Saturday, August 10, 1912. 



been more convincingly shown than in 
developing the plans to bring water 
from the Sierras to San Francisco — no 
very difficult engineering feat. Los An- 
geles and San Diego have solved, suc- 
cessfully, more difficult problems of 
municipal water supply. 

♦ 

FREEMAN'S BELATED FIND. 

OVER forty years ago, the reservoir 
site discovered by Explorer Free- 
man was the subject of investigation 
and discussion. The municipal reports 
of San Francisco contain exact infor- 
mation about the matter. Those Boards 
of Supervisors in early days, let me tell 
you, were no mutts. Several of the ear- 
ly day Mayors of San Francisco were 
real men of affairs. It will be well for 
our city if present and future City Fa- 
thers measure up to the standard of' 
those old timers, who laid the founda- 
tions of our seaport. 

Hermann Schussler, who is just as 
good an engineer, if not better, than 
Mr. Freeman, with his $250 a day, ex- 
amined this Glen Park reservoir site as 
long ago as 1866 and advised the Spring- 
Valley Company not to use it. Mr. 
Schussler 's reasons were good ones, 
the cost of the dam would be excessive 
in proportion to the amount of water 
that could be stored, the water could 
not be kept from polution, and most 
serious reason of all, the dam might 
burst as the Johnstown dam, and cause 
a calamitj r . 

Mr. Scowden, an able engineer, re- 
ported against the use of the dam as 
long ago as 1875, the Board of Super- 
visors having appointed him to look 
into the water question. Mr. Scowden 's 
report appeared in the municipal rec- 
ords for the fiscal year 1874-5. 

The late Colonel Mendall, one of the 
best-known engineers of his day, exam- 
ined the Glen Park canyon reservoir 
site in 1877 and reported on it to the 
Board of Supervisors. 

In the face of these facts, which 



should be known to the city authorities, 
and particularly to Mr. Manson, Engin- 
eer Freeman is allowed to pose, at $250 
a day, as the discoverer of a grand res- 
ervoir site, which nobody ever had the 
gumption to find, till he ran out to Glen 
Park one day in an automobile and 
saw it. 

+ 

EVIDENTLY A REAL ESTATE 
DEAL. 

THE RESERVOIR for Hetch Hetchy 
water, located by Mr. Freeman, 
back of Glen Park, is the most remark- 
able scheme which has yet been grafted 
on the municipal water supply project. 
It passes understanding how any sane 
engineer would propose to build a dam 
134 feet high to hold only 150.000,000 
gallons. The Crystal Springs dam at 
102 feet height, holds 19,000,000,000 
gallons. It cost nearly $3,000,000. The 
proposed 134-foot dam would cost a 
larger sum, and hold only a thirty- 
eighth part of the water. The state- 
ment in Mr. Freeman's report to the 
Mayor, recommending the project, is 
misleading in its reference to Spring 
Valley's city reservoir capacity. "While 
it has only 90,000,000 capacity in serv- 
ice, it has in reserve a site of 200,000,- 
000 capacity near Ingleside, and can 
add 100.000,000 gallons capacity to Lake 
Honda. Both capacities can be buill 
when needed at a small fraction of the 
cost of Mr. Freeman's undesirable 
scheme. It is charity to Mr. Freeman 
to call his reservoir scheme idiotic. Thp 
only alternative is to call it a real es- 
tate bunco game on the City. 



Since the preceding articles on this 
page were written, Marsden Manson 
has resigned as City Engineer. 

♦ 

It is now considered certain in polit- 
ical circles that the resignation of Man- 
son will be followed by the removal of 
Board of Works Commissioners Casey 
and Laumeister. 



MR. MANSON 'S RESIGNATION. 

CITY ENGINEER MANSON 'S resig- 
nation on Wednesday was due to 
the fact that he feared he would be dis- 
missed if he attempted to remain any 
longer. Under Hanson's administration 
a couple of million dollars of the Hetch 
Hetchy bond money has been flung away 
as uselessly as if thrown into the bay 
Never before has such a powerful ring 
held control in the City Engineer's De- 
partment. The absolute silence of the 
daily press with regard to the malad- 
ministration and suspicious waste of 
money in the Engineer's Department 
has enabled the ring to carr}' on its 
schemes of extravagance, and help in 
emptying the city treasury. 

For two years Manson and his associ- 
ates, who have made a political asset of 
the Hetch Hetchy scheme, have been 
trying to dodge an open investigation 
of their official proceedings. Conceal- 
ment is not possible much longer, be- 
cause the Board of U. S. Army Engi- 
neers is in San Francisco now to wind 
up the investigation. 

The stage having been reached where 
Mr. Manson must face the music and 
tell right out in open court, as it were, 
what he has done to get Hetch Hetchy, 
and how much he has accomplished for 
the $2,000,000 of bond money expended, 
he hands in his resignation. 

A resignation under fire is usually 
equivalent to an admission of the truth 
of the charges. 

All that The Wasp has said in con- 
demnation of the costly management of 
the Engineer's office under Mr. Manson 
is true. The management of the Engi- 
neer's office and of the Board of Works 
has been injurious to our city and to 
every business man and property-owner 
therein. For that reason, and for that 
alone, The Wasp has devoted a great 
deal of space to the exposure of the 
incompetence and extravagance. Under 
the McCarthy administration it was use- 
less to hope for reform, but when Mayor 



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Berkeley Office 2105 Shattuck. Ph. Berkeley 331 



Saturday, August 10, 1912.] 



-THE WASP - 




MAGNIFICENT TKOPHIES. 
Display of fine prizes for the winners of the Del Monte Golf Tournament, to be held Sept. 7th to 21st. Prizes on exhibition at Shreve 



Rolph came into office we hoped that 
his eyes would be opened to the real 
state of affairs in the Board of Works 
and the City Engineer's office, and that 
he would apply drastic remedies. 

The Mayor has not gone at the task 
in a hurry. He has taken his time. 
Stepping from commercial life right 
into the hurly-burly of a trying politi- 
cal position, Mayor Rolph has been at a 
great disadvantage. The men around 
him and the conditions were all new to 
him. Evidently, he has become con- 
vinced that the general dissatisfaction 
with the Board of "Works was based on 
good reasons, and so we find City Engi- 
neer Marsden Manson suddenly hand- 
ing in his resignation and retiring to 
private life. Before he severs his con- 
nection with the City Government he 
should, amongst other matters, be ask- 
ed to explain to the Grand Jury why he 
advocated the payment to Ham Hall of 
a million dollars for Cherry Creek wa- 
ter rights that were offered to the Tay- 
lor Board of Supervisors for a quarter 



of a million, and to which Mr. Hall 
could not give legal title. 

In his letter of resignation to the 
Hon. Casey, President of the Board of 
Works, Mr. Manson says that "the op- 
position to holding the great rights 
to and ownership in Hetch Hetehy res- 
ervoir have not ceased, and these rights 
are put in serious jeopardy by the order 
of Secretary Ballinger. " 

The rights are not in more jeopardy 
now than they ever were. The only 
difference is that the public is nearer 
to hearing the whole truth about the 
bungling work done in furthering the 
Hetch Hetehy scheme, and before the 
story comes out in all its fullness Mr. 
Manson ducks. In the language of the 
day, he. passes the buck — an act in 
which he, like the Hon. Casey, is most 
proficient. He says in his letter of res- 
ignation that the Hetch Hetehy matter 
is "in the able hands of Mr. John R. 
Freeman, selected by this office as con- 
sulting engineer." 

Mr. Manson doesn't add "consulting 



engineer at $250 per day." Mayor 
Rolph is to be congratulated on the 
loss of his City Engineer, and if the rest 
of the bunch of " experts, "hand-picked 
by Manson, packed their grips and de- 
parted for the wild and woolly East 
whence they came, San Francisco would 
be none the loser. 

-¥ 

OAKLAND BECOMING SANE. 

OAKLAND is evidently regaining 
its senses. It has declined to re- 
call Mayor Mott just to oblige a bunch 
of office-seekers and anarchists. The 
office-seekers were the real mischief- 
makers, though the newspapers, with 
their usual obtuseness, put all the 
blame on the T. W. W. and the Social- 
ists. The I. W. W. are only uncaged 
tramps and have no more political in- 
fluence than a chunk of corn beef on a 
free-lunch counter. The so-called "So- 
cialists" are mostly dreamers who have 
nothing in common with the I. W. W. 
(I Won't Work) gang. A lot of hungry 
politicians were at the bottom of it. 



%<r^* mc&~l$?>g 







FULL PARTICULARS of the wedding of 
Miss Thelma Kalailu Parker and Mr. 
Henry Gilliard Smart, which have been 
sent me by a Honolulu correspondent, leave no 
doubt that it was one of the most picturesque 
wedding's ever seen in the Hawaiian Islands. 
The scene of the wedding was the Parker 
ranch house at Waimea, and the affair was 
doubly interesting as being a celebration of 
the nuptials of the mistress of the great estate 
and of her coming of age. 

The day passed in preparation for the cere- 
mony. The horse-racing, the rope contests 
and the games of the cowboys, which occupied 
the days preceding, and finally the wedding 
ceremony itself, were perfect of their kind. 

The ceremony was performed in the living 
room of the ranch house. This room comfort- 
ably held the hundreds of guests. It had been 
transformed into a bower of white and green 
beauty, in the semblance of a church, with 
aisle, chancel and altar, constructed entirely 
of eucalyptus and bamboo greens, massed with 
white asters. Down the length of the room 
an aisle was formed by twelve low pillars of 
feathery bamboo and eucalyptus, massed with 
fresh white asters, each surmounted by huge, 
airy butterfly bows of white maline, with 
sprays of asparagus plumosis. Wide white 
satin ribbons connected each pillar, which was 
massed at its base with a profusion of white 
asters, and led to the chancel, also of euca- 
lyptus and bamboo, with asters and butterfly 
bows. A large altar was erected between tall 
windows outlined for two feet with euca- 
lyptus and white asters, each surmounted with 
enormous bows of white maline. The altar 
was hung with cloth of silver, over which fell 
cloth of fine linen and heavy Byzantine cluny 
lace. A tall silver candelabra adorned the 
center, while on either side stood four tall 
cut-glass candlesticks. Before the altar a sin- 
gle low step was built upon which rested a 
long pillow of silver cloth, white tulle bows 



NOTICE. 

All communications relative to social news 
should be addressed "Society Editor Wasp, 121 
Second Street, S. F.," and should reach this office 
not later than Wednesday to insure publication 
in the issue of that week. 



gracing the corner, while at either end tall 
palms, massed with greenery and asters, were 
also surmounted by bows of white maline and 
sprays of graceful asparagus" ferns. 

Overhead wreaths of smilax were gracefully 




MRS. HENRY G. SMART (nee Parker) 

Her wedding rivaled the picturesqueness of 
Hawaiian royalty. 

festooned in a triangular arrangement, caught 
here and there with bows and soft streamers 
of white maline, from which escaped sprays 



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of smilax. The numerous doors and windows 
of the living room were outlined in eucalyptus 
greens, and caught above with huge maline 
bows. 

t5* l5* iy* 

"Here Comes the Bride." 

PRECISELY at eight o'clock the bridal 
procession entered the room, to the 
strains of the well-known "Lohengrin 
Wedding March." This beautiful march was 
played and sung by Ernest Kaai and six of his' 
talented musicians. The bridesmaids were Miss 
Aileen Maguire of Hilo and Miss Charlotte 
Dowsett of Honolulu, both cousins of the 
bride. They were gowned in a soft tone of 
yellow crepe de meteor, made with dainty 
over-jackets of cream shadow lace, caught in 
soft folds at the back with a heavy pearl or- 
nament suspended therefrom. They carried 
large bouquets of pink hydrangeas, veiled in 
yellow tulle, with bows and streaming ends. 
Dainty pearl caps, adorned with a heavy pearl 
ornament falling over one side and a tiny 
gold rose over the other ear, completed the 
strikingly lovely effect. 

The maid of honor was Miss Harriet Brad- 
ford of San Francisco, who followed the 
bridesmaids. She is a tall, graceful girl, and 
her beautiful satin gown of pale blue char- 
tneuse satin with long train suited her type of 
beauty to perfection. The bodice was draped 
in white shadow lace, caught at one side with 
a cluster of gold and pale blue chiffon roses. A 
long, square train fell from one shoulder and 
was adorned with a soft arrangement of chif- 
fon and gold roses. She carried a beautiful 
bridal bouquet of light blue hydrangeas, veiled 
in soft pale blue tulle, with huge bow and 
streamers. A simple bandeau of chiffon and 
roses adorned her graceful coiffure. 

Both the maids of honor and the bridesmaids 
wore the gifts of the bride. To the former was 
given a goldlavalliere, with pearl pendants; 
and to the bridesmaids were also gold chains 
with pearl and sapphire drops. 

The bride came last, leaning upon the arm 
of her stepfather, Fred S. Knight, who came 
down from San Francisco to give her into 
the keeping of her husband. At the altar she 
was joined by the bridegroom, who was sup- 
ported by Robert McCorriston as best man. 
Edmund Hedemann and Charles .K Stillman 
acted as ushers. 

Picture of Loveliness. 

THE BRIDE was a picture of loveliness 
in her bridal robes. Her gown was a 
creation of heavy white charmeuse, 
cloth of silver, rose point and duchesse lace, 
caught with clusters of orange blossoms. A 
long square train fell from the left shoulder 
and was edged with diamond trimming, while 



Saturday, August 10, 1M2.J 



-THE WASP- 



the other side of the bodice was draped with 

duchesse lace, whiob Eel] in graceful festc a 

down the front of tin 1 skirt and wae caught 

in the knees with orange blose b. A tulle 

cap, edged across the *■:« »-u with rose point 
lace, fell charmingly over her neck, while a 

wreath nt' orange bloBS a framed her face, 

the conventional bridal veil falling in long 
folds tn the edge of the train, where it was 

caught with tulle bows and diamond tri Ing. 

sin- carried a shower bridal bouquet of fra- 
grant orange blossoms and white orchids, tied 
in chiffon ribbon bows and streamers, and 
wore the gift of the groom, a handsome bar 
pin "t" sapphires and diamonds, and a laval- 
Here of platinum and diamonds, a birthday 
gift from her mother. 

The impressive double-ring service of the 
Episcopal Church wms performed, the Rev. 
I'. W. Merrill of Kohala officiating. At the 
conclusion of the ceremony the good wishes 
and congratulations were bestowed before the 
altar, where the bride received her relatives, 
friends and cowboys and their wives. During 
this reception the orchestra played and sang 
a sung in Hawaiian composed for the occasion. 

J* J* v* 

A Real Luau. 

FOLLOWING Till': RECEPTION, all as- 
sembled adjourned to the lanai, which 
was specially constructed, and the crowd 
of nearly one thousand sat down to a real 
luau. The roof of the lanai was hung in a 
dense mass of eucalyptus, from which were 
suspended scarlet paper bows and streamers, 
while the walls were banked with tall bamboo 
and ferns. The bride's table was at the head 
of the room, and here covers were laid for the 
bridal party and close relatives. The orches- 
tra played, and toasts were given to the cou- 
ple by the Rev. Merrill, Colonel Sam Parker, 
grandfather of the bride; Robert McCoriis- 
ton, best man, Prince Kalanainaole, Mr. Al- 
fred W. Carter, former guardian 'and present 
trustee of the Parker estates. Mr. H. R. 
Trent, who represented the bridegroom's fam- 
ily, gave a toast to the absent parents, Rev. 
and Mrs. R. E. Smart of Boydton, Virginia. 
Mrs. F. S. Knight, the bride's mother, pro- 
posed a toast to Mr. Ernest N. Parker, which 
was drunk with a cheer, for it was to him that 
the great event owes its artistic beauty of 
design and much of its execution, from the 
bridal gowns to the minutest detail of the 
decorations. Dancing then followed the luau 
until the small hours of the morning. 

Mrs. Fred S. Knight of San Francisco, 
mother of the bride, looked wonderfully hand- 
some in a striking gown of yellow charmeuse. 
with over-jacket of heavy Irish chochet lace, 
touches of velvet and pearl trimmings. Hei 
ornaments were diamonds and pearls, and she 
wore a gold bandeau and aigrette in her coif- 
fure. 

Mrs. S. Molyneux Wortkington of San 
Francisco, sister of the bride 's mother, looked 
beautiful in a gown of white chiffon over 
white satin, adorned with gold lace and white 
marabou. In her dark hair she wore a soft 
yellow aigrette in a bandeau of lovely pas- 
sementerie, and her ornaments were diamonds. 

Princess Kalanianaole wore a lovely gown 



of lav e m, I rimmed w it b black pearls 

and old gold. Mr-, frank Woods looked mag 
aificenl in a gown ..)' yellow brocaded satin, 
embroidered in pearls and gold, the bodice 

embellished with :i rare old rose point 1: 

which reached to 'in- bottom of the train. 
Mrs. Carl A. Widemann won- an elaborate 

gown ..r old i heavily embroidered. 

Tin- bridal pint;. . which was composed of 

i Bins and dearesl friends of the bride 

and bridegroom, were Miss Harriet Bradford 
of San Francisco, maid of honor, Miss Aileen 
Maguire of Hilo, Miss Charlotte Dowsett of 
Honolulu; bridesmaids: Miss May Biven of 
s.in Francisco, Miss Beryl Hunter-Jones, Miss 
Crichton Hunter-Jones, Miss Margaret Hind. 
Miss M.iioi Hiri. I of Kunu, Miss Eva Hind 
and Miss Maude Hind of Berkeley, Mr. Rob- 
erl Mi'i 'orriston, best man; Mrs. Edmund 
Hedemann and Mr. Charles R, Stiilman, ush- 
ers; Mr. Krnesl N. Parker. Mr. Guy Mac- 
farlane, Mr. Arthur Cay, Mr. Duncan Smith 
of Xew York, and Mr. T. H. Jones. 

-.* <•« dt 
Mary Garden Lost. 

MARY GARDEN lost her appeal from a 
judgment of the French courts requir- 
ing her lo pay to M. Marcus, an im 
presario, the sum of $2,000 because of a 
breach of contract in the year 1906. The im- 
presario had engaged Miss Garden to sing for 
him at $300 a night and 35 per cent, of the 
gross receipts. It appears from the evidence 
that Miss Garden broke this contract to go 
to New York and sing for Mr. Hammerstein 
at $1,200 a night. 

,•* < ■< 
A Real Baronial Hall. 

WENTWORTH-WOODHOUSE, the coun- 
try seat oi Lord and Lady Fitzwil- 
liam, where King George and Queen 
Mary are visiting at the present time, is a 
type of English mansion which is going out 
of fashion. Its splendor is suggestive of the 
centuries before the advent of suffragettes, 
when the lord of the manor was almost a 
despotic monarch himself, and lived in baron- 
ial style. Wentwortn-Woodhouse is a splendid 
place, with a facade 600 feet long and having 
a handsome portico in the center. This man- 
sion, or rather palace, has a vast hall like 
those in great Roman palaces, around which 
the principal rooms are arranged. Sixty 
guests can be entertained in the house with- 
out discomfort, and 120 can be dined without 
crowding. The house contains a great pic- 
ture gallery, in which some of the finest Van 
Dycks in the world are hung. There is a mag- 
nificeut library and collections of prints, en- 
gravings and other objects of art. One of 
the curiosities of the place is the famous 
suite of cellars with groined roofs like an old 
crypt. In these is to be found a brand of old 
October ale so potent that it is drunk only 
in wine glasses. 

Jt Jt £ 
More Woe for the Rich. 

A GOOD many people in this world don 't 
like to see anybody richer than them- 
selves. That being the case, the in- 
come tax is regarded by them as a blessing. 



It will give tlie multimillionaires a good, 
bard swat. Oh. juv! People with small in- 

tea under $5,000 won't be taxed at all. 

Mure and more joy! Hut there is a rather 
black edge to this silver cloud,' fur we all 
know that in Europe they sock you on any in- 

come ynu possess. Ami we are i Btantly 

copying Europe and trying to improve on all 
its contrivances fur making the tax-gatherers' 
job easier. So it 's safe to wager that it will 
nut In- lung till the man with any income nt 
.ill will find tlu- Government reaching oul ami 

:u \ing a nice slice of it to pay the salaries 

of tin' ever-growing army of government em- 
ployes. 

There is another feature of this income tax 
which is not calculated to give delight to an 
industrious citizen striving with a small in- 
come I" make both ends meet. The proposed 
income tax law, as they call it euphemistical- 
ly in 1 'ongress, imposes a tax on the incomes 
of all citizens engaged in business, but not 
on the citizens who have no occupation. In 
other words, if you be a merchant, doctor, 
or lawyer earning $5,000 a year by diligent 
attention to your business, the tax collector 
can demand a slice of your income. But if 
you happen to belong to the remittance-man 
class and devote your days and nights to un- 
broken idleness, your income passes untouch- 
ed. The proposed law may therefore be called 
''An Act for the Promotion and Encourage- 
ment of Idleness." 

Among the Californians who would be call- 
ed upon to pay heavy income taxes under the 
law pending in Congress are William II. 
I 'rocker, Mrs. Phoebe A. Hearst, I. W. Hell- 
man, Mrs. Abby Parrott, John D. and Adolph 
B. Spreckels, Henry Miller, James L. Flood. 

^5* t?* ^* 

By nature some men are hot and some are 
cold. Where one man has money to "burn, an- 
other will freeze on to it. 



WILLIAMS 


— AND— 


HUMBERT 


SHERRIES 


JEREZ, SPAIN 


For Quality, the Best. 


Nine Grades 


Charles Meinecke & Co. 


Agent* 


314 Sacramento St. San Francisco 



-THE WASP- 



[Saturday, August 10, 1912. 



Notable Wedding. 

THESE was nothing small about the pres- 
ents from Mr. Frank Daroux to bis 
blushing bride, Mrs. Tessie Wall (nee 
Donohue). The wedding was an event of the 
keenest interest, as the contracting parties, 
while never identified with the Greenway set, 
have been well known to a large number of 
our prominent society people. Mr. Daroux 
endeavored for several years to lift Sausalito 
to a position of metropolitan importance by 
conducting one of the largest and most pros- 
perous poolrooms in the West. With strange 
and unaccountable perversity, the residents 
of The Hill, who run insurance offices and 
commission houses and various important mer- 
cantile concerns in San Francisco, and live in 
Sausalito, tried to close Mr. Daroux 's popular 
establishment and thereby inconvenience half 
the population of San Francisco, which cross- 
ed the ferry daily to "play the ponies." For- 
tunately, the Town Council of Sausalito was 
composed of citizens of true civic pride who 
were open to logical arguments. They resist- 
ed the attempt to run their municipality on 
a "reactionary" plan and stuck to their 
guns, though several times it looked as if 
some of them would land in the penitentiary, 
so bitter was the contest waged on them by 
the Hill Tribe. In the end, however, civic 
pride and progress succumbed and the doors 
of Mr. Daroux 's highly popular establishment 
closed. The disgusted owner brushed the 
plentiful dust of Sausalito from his shoes, and 
taking the paraphernalia and capital from 
the ungrateful town for which he had done 
so much, undertook to establish himself in 
business within stone's throw of police head- 
quarters in San Francisco. Here again the 
reactionary spirit of the age got in its deadly 
work, and, following some caustic articles in 
the meddlesome newspapers, the authorities 
raided all the gambling joints in town, and 
Mr. Daroux 's efficient force of clerks had to 
peddle lottery tickets or start Bull Moose 
clubs to earn an honest living. 

Mr. Daroux contemplated a return to his 
native city of Sacramento, where as a polit- 



Art & Refinement are displayed In Tasteful Attire. 




-MAKERS OF- 



LADIES' GOWNS and FANCY 
COSTUMES 

420 SUTTER STREET. NEAR STOCKTON. 

Phone DOUGLAS 4964 

SAN FRANCISCO. CAL, 



ieal boss he had laid the foundations of his 
capricious fortune; but Sacramento, like other 
misguided communities, has become tainted 
with reactionary virus and is raving about 
the necessity of enforcing laws because they 

happen to be on the statute books. 

* * * 

With idleness oi"~ personal talents and large 
capital thus forced upon him, nothing was 
more natural than that Mr. Daroux 's thoughts 
should turn to the peace and quiet of matri- 
mony; and the recent wedding of Mrs. Wall 
(nee Donohue) was the happy sequel. The 
bridegroom's gifts to the bride were a $10,000 
necklace and a $15,000 residence. The wed- 
ding cake weighed almost as much as the 
bride. The hundred and fifty guests who as- 
sembled in the upper rooms of one of our 
most popular cafes included the ereme de la 
creme of civic activity, patriotism and prog- 
ress. Finance was represented by Mr. James 
Coffroth, commerce by Mr. Matthew Tierney 
of the noted firm of Proth & Tierney. Poli- 
tics had so many illustrious exemplars that 
to name them would be like printing in ad- 
vance the roll-call or the next Legislature. 
In sending out 500 wedding invitations, few 
old friends had been overlooked by the bride 
and groom, and the responses were most grat- 
ifying. 

Mr. and Mrs. Daroux arp undecided whether 
to locate in Ross or Hillsborough when they 
return from their honeymoon. There are 
several attractive villas in Boss that ean be 
had at a bargain, but property is held at 
rather fancy figures at Hillsborough at pres- 
ent. Burlingame is becoming impossible as 
a fashionable residence locality on account 
of the rush of commuters. 

Mr. Daroux was one of the most intimate 
friends of the late Charlie Fair, son of United 
States Senator James G. Fair, and brother of 
Mrs. Hermann Oelrichs and Mrs. W. K. Van- 
drebilt Jr. He took a very aetive part in 
straightening out the legal complications that 
followed the death of {Senator Fair, when the 
heirs wished to break - the trust clause and 
get their hands on the coin — which they did. 
If Mr. and Mrs. Daroux should extend theii 
honeymoon trip to New York and Newport, 
they would no doubt be the motif of much 
entertaining in the most fashionable circles 
of Gotham society. 

Another Separation. 

THE early prediction of friends that the 
marital troubles of the Ernest Porters 
would be settled by a reconciliation, 
have not so far given any indication of being 
realized. In fact, it looks now as if the sep- 
aration was more apt to end in the divorce 
court than in a reconciliation. Mrs. Porter, 
who spent the foremost part of the summer 
in the Yosemite Valley, has gone to the new 
Berkeley home of her mother, Mrs. E. J. 
Dodge, while Porter is living in this city. 
The attractive Porter home on San Jose ave- 
nue in Alameda is leased to tenants, and the 
palatial Dodge home, also in Alameda, which 



was occupied by the Porters just before the 
separation, has teen closed and left with a 
care-taker. Porter is the manager of the E. 
J. Dodge Company, succeeding to the manage- 
ment of the big concern upon the death of 
his father- in -la w ; about a year ago. The 
Dodge Company is one of those big lumber 
and shipping concerns owning vast redwood 
acreages, large mills and a fully occupied line 
of steam schooners. The wedding of Porter 
and Jessie Dodge, few years ago, was one 
of the leading society weddings of the season 
in the bay cities. The young folks had posi- 
tion and wealth, and appeared to start mar- 
ried life under especially favorable auspices. 
Intimate friends intimate that Mrs. Porter, 
endowed with a strong, not to say stubborn, 
will, did not take kindly to certain plainly 
expressed wishes of her liege lord as to the 
line of social action she should take. There 
was never any scandal or hint of trouble 
other than a decided difference of opinion on 
mutual and intimate subjects. Mrs. Porter 
went to her mother, and Porter took quarters 
in this city, continuing as manager of the 
business interests owned chiefly by his moth- 
er-in-law and wife, and others interested in 
the E. J. Dodge estate. 

«** £t J* 
Unique Distinction. 

MPS. M. V. B. MacAdam, the mother of 
Miss Katherine MacAdam, who is so 
popular in local society, has earned 
the unique distinction of being a very suc- 
cessful real estate operator. Her specialty is 
high-class residence property, but she has 
managed some large deals in business proper- 
ty as well. 



CANDY SENT TO THE COUNTRY.— A 
box of candy is always welcomed by friends 
in the country. Easily sent by express from 
any one of George. Haas & Sons' four candy 
stores. 



YOUR FAMILY 

SILVERSMITH 

Every family at some time or another 
needs something in the silverware line, or 
has articles to be repaired or matched, or 
jewelry to be fixed, and doubtless would 
be glad to know of an absolutely reliable 
house, where the charges are right. Such 
a house is the John O. Bellis Silverware 
Factory, 328 Post street, San Francisco, 
where all wants of this nature can be sup- 
plied at reasonable cost. The firm enjoys 
the confidence of some of the most promi- 
nent families of the State. A feature of 
their business is the altering, resetting or 
entirely reconstructing of old family jew- 
elry into modern styles. It is wonderful 
what transformation can be wrought on 
your old trinkets at trifling expense with- 
out impairing any of their sentimental 
value. 

For staple goods, such as toilet articles, 
tableware, etc., this firm cannot be sur- 
passed on the Pacific* Coast, while their 
trophy cups and presentation pieces made 
to order are without peers. A visit of in- 
spection at 328 Post St. (Union Square) is 
invited. 



Saturday, August 10, 1912.] 



THE WASP- 



Millionaires in Seclusion. 

THE sudden change In the plans of Mr. 
and Mrs. Malcolm Whii man < Miss Jennie 
Crocker) was dne, it is said, to a de- 
sire to gel "ut nt' the limelight till the celeb- 
rity oi their wedding shall have been Bome- 
what forgotten by the public. They enjoyed 
perfect seclusion :it the McCloud Country 
Ulub, when' they went for their honeymoon. 
The place is probably as unique and beautiful 
a country club property as can be found in the 
entire United States. The club is -~> or 30 
miles from Shasta Springs ami about the 
aame distance from Dunsmuir and Castle 
f'ra^s. It is reached by a private toll road 
leading '" the McCloud River from Castle 
Crags. The tull road was formerly a logging 
railway, and was purchased by Thomas Wil- 
liams, Mrs. Phoebe Hearst, Charles Wheeler, 
Clarence Waterhouse, Bishop and one or two 
others, for $72,000, to furnish a short and 
private auto road to the magnificent country 
homes these people own on the McCloud Riv- 
er. This road has been made into an ideal 
driveway for vehicles of nil sorts, though the 
stiff tolls, ranging from $2.50 for two-seated 
carriages to $5 for autos, discourages general 
travel, as evidently the owners hoped for 
when they established the toll schedule. Those 
customers using the road are permitted to go 
as tar as the gate at the Williams property. 
This gate is locked, but travelers are allowed 
to go through the fence and make their way 
down to the river and eat lunch. Formerly 
i he McCloud River elite "went to Sisson by 
train, and then either by the McCloud River 
Railway or auto to McCloud. Now they stop 
at Castle Crags, where the Pacific Improve- 
ment Company still owns the major portion 
of an original half-million-acre tract, and cut 
the railway journey to Sisson an hour and a 
half short, as well as avoid an additional 
hour's wait at Sisson for the McCloud River 
train to start. Bowling swiftly along in big, 
powerful motor cars, over their own road, the 




i 



ViV / 



EXCLUSIVE DESIGNS IN 

EMBROIDERED 

WAIST PATTERNS AND KIMONOS 



157-159 GEARY STREET 

Bet. Grant Avenue and Stockton St. 

Branch Store: 152 Kearny Street 
San Francisco 



McCloud colony can reach home in from 60 
i" :'" minutes. 

Whitman and his bride left their private 
car, Mikasa, at Castle • "r:i«-. and went bj 
auto iiver the toll road. At Castle Crage an 

11 Id homes ol thi bride's father and uncle, 

Charles and George Crocker. One of them 

has since I sold to a Mr. Baker. Both the 

remaining Crocker In. me and the Baker house 
are leased t" the Castle Crags Hotel manage- 
ment and are now t nted by summer guests. 

After the private ear was sidetracked at 
Castle Crags, it wns hauled on to division 
headquarters at Dunsmuir and sidetracked in 
charge of an old colored retainer of the Crock 
Br household, presumably the early-day porter 
who had charge of the ear when Crocker pere 
used it in Ms railroad travels, .lust across 
from the track on which the Mikasa stood is 
another sidetrack, and all last week the bat- 
tered and mangled hulk of a giant wrecked 
locomotive stood there. On the day that the 
bridal car, with all its suggestion of vast 
wealth and every material happiness, reached 
Dunsmuir, the wrecked locomotive was hauled 
into the yards from the Klamath branch line, 
where it had turned turtle and scalded its 
engineer to death. It would be hard to find 
a more striking illustration of happiness and 
riches, and ruin and disaster, than that con- 
veyed by the car with its rich trappings and 
the battered engine and its human tragedy. 

Jt Jt J« 
A Large House Party. 

THE quarter-million-dollar home of Mrs. 
Phoebe Hearst on the McCloud is peo- 
pled at the present time by a house 
party of 4CI guests, who were met at Castle 
Crags by the Hearst autos, including an auto 
baggage and supply truck. Mrs. Hearst is 
putting the finishing touches to a fifteen-room 
servants' lodge on her property, and an army 
of artisans from San Francisco have been at 
work on the building for the last two or 
three months. Mrs. Hearst's acreage is small, 
especially when compared to the Waterhouse, 
Wheeler and Williams holdings. She has 
but 40 acres, while Waterhouse owns several 
thousand acres and Wheeler is credited with 
owning two miles of river frontage. 

&?* <<?• c5* 

The Chosen Place. 

IT IS a significant and noteworthy fact that 
Tait's was the cafe chosen to give the son 
of the first President of the new Chinese 
Republic an idea of how a modern American 
restaurant was conducted. The gentleman in 
question and his large party had lunch there 
last week. It seems that every distinguished 
visitor to San Francisco is taken to this pop- 
ular cafe. The place has a reputation of 
knowing how best to cater to particular pa- 
trons. Catering to a medley of temperaments 
and pleasing all is an art that is not to be 
underrated, and the Tait management has it 
down to perfection. 

TIPO (RED OR WHITE), 

California 's ideal table wine. For sale 
everywhere. 



Good for Yerba Buena. 

LIEUTENANT AM- MBS, ALBERT Bl 
are really to be stationed on 1 1 
Island, as they >>:- o been ardenl Ij hop 

ing. Mrs. Rees 1 1 Ji nnie Lee \' will be 

great addition t o all the affairs around the 

bay, and Will wake Up all sleepy Wrlm I'.nena. 

Mrs. Bees made .'i very striking figure oul in 
the Orient, with all her beautiful clothes, ami 
was i lie recipient of much attention during 
her stay there. It is expected thai her inti- 
mate friend, Airs. Carlo Baron (formerly Por 
tola queen) will come out and visit her. I 
hear that there is no question thai Mrs. 

Baron and her Ctalian husband have not found 
married life all sunshine and roses, and her 
visit to her father now in New York is to be 
the beginning of an indefinite separation. 



HOTEL 

VENDOME 

San Jose, Cal. 



One of California's 
Show Places Where 
Homelikeness Reigns 



H. W. LAKE, Manager 



5% per month 

SAVED on the investment by buying 

THE 

Alaska Refrigerator 

900,000 SOLD SINCE 1878 

We have a Test Refrigerator to prove what we 
claim for it Pleaae call and see it. 

Pacinc Coast Agents 

W. W. MONTAGUE & CO. 



557-563 Market Street 



San Francisco 



LOUIS CREPAUX 

MEMBER PARIS GRAND OPERA 



FREMCHPHONETKSCHOOL 



FOR SINGING AND SPEECH 

French phonetics, configuration and placing of 
the phonetic Bounds enabling the scholar to sing 
or speak in French with the purest "Indre et 
Loire' ' accent. 

French repertoire in songB from Lully to 
Debussy. Italian tone placing, voweling and 
syllabation. Italian repertoire in songs from 
Cnrissimi to Puccini. Studio recitaU. 

251 Post St., 4th Floor Mercedes Building, 

Reception hours — 11:45 to 12, and S to 4, ex- 
cept Wednesday. Wednesday in Maple Hall, 
Oakland. 



10 



THE WASP- 



[Saturday, August 10, 1912. 



Vacancy in the Pacific-Union. 

THOSE merry millionaires who 
compose the membership of 
the Pacific-Union Club, the s>o 
cial male organization of superlative 
eminence on the Pacific Coast, are 
in an unusually happy mood. They 
see an opportunity to get rid of a 
brother whose resemblance in some 
respects to the thrifty nobleman in 
' l Mrs. Warren's Profession ' ' has 
been a cause of considerable worry 
in clubdom. His private affairs have 
been better fitted for description in 
a police gazette than in a family 
journal, inasmuch as he has figured 
as the financial backer of ladies 
whose names never come under the 
scrutiny of Mr. Greenway 's cotillon 
committees. Intimate association 
with red lights and tall bottles do 
not necessarily exclude the associa- 
tion of clubdom. It is an unwritten 
rule of all clubs that members shall 
not delve into the hidden corners of 
a man's life and yank out all kinds 
of gibbering skeletons. As long as a 
man conforms to the rules of the or- 
ganization and the outward and vis- 
ible signs of decency within the club, 
his behavior outside is largely his 
own business, unless he may acquire 
utterly scandalous notoriety. It is 
not comme il faut to air unclean lin- 
en, and then, too, we all respect, 
more or less, the old saying about 
people who live in glass houses. So 
there really was no valid cause for 
dropping the undesirable Pacific- 
Union clubman until recently, when it trans- 
pired that he was sadly in arrears for his 
club dues. This fortunate circumstance was 
seized upon, and with all speed a polite little 
notice found itself in the delinquent's hands 
requesting his withdrawal. He is quite well 
known in society, and for that reason the 
tongues of the gossips are wagging in lively 
style. 

t^* *&* t?* 
A Bachelor Maid Marries. 

MISS RUTH CASEY, whose wedding on 
Thursday evening to Arthur Brown 
was one of the large affairs of the 
summer season, is an heiress of considerable 




MRS. SHANNON RICHARDS BRUNTSCH 
Dashing widow whose elopement created a sensation in Alameda. 



Lord Clifton and Bride. 

LORD CLIFTON, whose picture 
and that of his bride and her 
little brother, who served as 
ring-bearer, appear in The Wasp 
this week, is the son and heir of 
Lord Darnley, a nobleman famous for 
his cricket playing. Lord Darnley 
is an Earl whose title dates back to 
1775. His son is 26 years old. The 
bride 's gown was made of white vel- 
vet, as the London climate is rather 
uncertain for wedding displays. The 
ceremony took place at St. Margar- 
et's, Westminster. The nine brides- 
maids wore laurel wreaths and car- 
ried sweet-pea bouquets. As usual 
after most weddings of the nobility 
and the aristocracy of the first rank, 
the wedding party po ( sed for their 
photographs and gave them to the 
society journals for publication. 
There is not so much of the affecta- 
tion of "exclusiveness" about those 
European people of fashion as one 
may observe in our own country, 
where the daughters of shopkeepers 
ape the airs of grand duchesses. 

Back from Honeymoon. 

COLONEL AND MRS. HAMIL- 
TON WALLACE have return- 
ed to town from their honey- 
moon, which they spent at the Vir- 
ginia Hotel, Long Beach, and are 
looking for an apartment for the 
winter. Col. Wallace is the chief 
paymaster here, and expects to be 
on the Coast for some time longer. 



San Francisco 
Sanatorium 

specializes in the scientific care 
op liquor oases. suitable and 
convenient home in one of san 
francisco's finest residential 
districts is afforded men and 
women while recuperating from 
overindulgence. private rooms, 
private nurses and meals served 
in rooms. no name on building, 
terms reasonable. 

San Francisco Sanatorium 

Phone Franklin 7470 1911 Van Ness Ave. 
H. L. BATOHELDER, Manager. 



r 



importance. Her .tat her and mother are both 
dead. She has lived alone for several years 
at her own attractive home in Sao Rafael, 
where she and her husband will make their 
home. Two years ago she invited her most 
intimate friend, Helen Ashton, to go abroad 
with her, and they remained away for almost 
a year, traveling about Europe and improving 
their minds, Mr. Brown has been out here 
for several years with a large steel concern, 
and will continue to make his home here. 

& <£ & 
Harry Thaw's Fight for Liberty. 

HE trials of Harry Thaw and the court 
proceedings to regain his freedom fill 
thirty volumes. It is estimated that the 
killing of White has cost the Thaw family 
more than $1,000,000, and the end is not yet, 
for another attempt will certainly be made 
to set him free. Some of the lawyers in the 
case have been retained by the year. Their 
duty is to keep up the fight, to battle dog- 
gedly, and never let the struggle lag. Law- 
yers who have been interested in the case 
are of the opinion that Thaw's position is 
hopeless and that he will have to remain 
among the criminal insane for the rest of his 
life. Thaw shot and killed Stanford White 
on June 25, 1906. He was found not guilty 
on the ground that he was insane when he 
fired the fatal shot. That was Feb. 1, 190S. 
Three days later his fight for freedom began. 



Any Victrola 

On Easy Terms 



Whether you get the new low price 
Victrola at $15 or the Victrola <( de 
luxe" at $200, get a Victrola. At a 
very small expense you can enjoy a 
world of entertainment. Victrolas $15 
to $200. Any Victrola on easy terms. 



Sherman Ray & Co, 

Sheet Music and Musical Merchandise. 
Steinway and Otflnr Pianos. 
Apollo and Cecilian Player Pianos 

Victor Talking Machines. 

KEARNY AND SUTTER STREETS. 

SAN FRANCISCO 

14TH & CLAY STS., OAKLAND. 



Saturday, August 10, 1912.] 



THE WASP- 



II 



Alameda Discusses It. 

ALAMEDA Bociety i^ busy over the tea- 
cups discussing the latest morsel of 
Bocial-matrimoniaJ news- tin' sudden 
marriage at Sacramento of Herbert A. 
Bruntsch and Mrs. Shannun Biohards. Mr. 
Bruntsch is a member of t lie well-known 
Bruntsch family of Alameda, his mother being 
a wealthy woman, and his sister, Mrs. Tosca 
Sales, being a general favorite in the bay 
cities, as well as a bride of a few weeks. 
Brnntsch's elder sister, Marguerite Bruntsch, 
has reached a high plane as an opera singei 
abroad. But, after all, Bruntsch is merely 
the bridegroom, and chief interest centers 
about his beautiful bride, who was a dashing 
Southern widow until Bruntsch married her. 
ller mother, Mrs. Emily P. Mhoon, is a Cali- 
t'nrnian, and the daughter of the late J. M. 
Eckfeldt, who founded and owned the Califor- 
nia Wire Works, and who left a large estate 
at his death. Eckfeldt is remembered by old- 
timers as an early-day official in the San 
Francisco Mint, who invented and built sev- 
eral minting machines now in use in the dif- 
ferent mints in the United States. His death 
occurred twenty-five years ago. His daugh- 
ter married into an old Southern family, fam- 
ed as extensive plantation owners. Four 
years ago Mrs. Mhoon brought her daughter, 
whose first husband, Dr. Henry Bichards of 
Chicago, had just died, to Alameda to live. 
The young widow, as soon as she became ac- 
quainted and threw off her mourning, became 
a warm favorite with those who knew her. 
She is a talented musician, and both plays 
and sings with more than average skill. She 
is a pronounced blonde. Her striking beauty 
makes her notable even in large companies of 
striking and well-dressed women. Young 
Bruntsch is said to have paid assiduous court 
to the fair young widow for a year, but man- 
aged to keep his love affair a close secret. 

Magnate Hawley's Pictures. 

UNDEB the pencils of the appraisers, who 
estimated the estate of the late Edwin 
Hawley, the successor of E. H. Harri- 
man, in the railroad business, Mr. Hawley's 
estate of sixty millions has shrunk to a little 
over five million dollars. The railroad mag- 
nate held a small amount of real estate, and 
of that his residence in New York was valued 
at $105,000. Seven-eighths of his estate was 



MORSE 

Detective and Patrol 

Service 



JPERATIVES in full dross furnished for 
weddings, receptions and other social 
functions. Uniformed officers supplied 
as ticket takers for balls, dances and 
entertainments at reasonable rates. 
Patrolmen to protect property against fire and 
depredations of thieves during absence of owner. 
Engage in all branches of legitimate detective 
service and serve legal papers in difficult cases. 



602 California St., San Francisco 

Telephone Kearny 8158. Homophone O 2620 




LORD AND LADY CLIFTON 

As they posed for the camera after their wed- 
ding in London, which was an event of great 
social prominence. 

represented by stocks and bonds, his largest 
investment — three millions — being in the 
Chesapeake & Ohio Bailroad. 

Mr. Hawley was a bachelor and died in- 
testate. So far, $50,000 has been paid to 
Miss Emma C. Cameron, who was known as 
his "niece and housekeeper. It has been 
disclosed, in the probate proceedings, how- 
ever, that the lady is really Miss Emma C. 
Sturgess. After the death of Mr. Hawley, 
she was in possession of his country home 
on Long Island and refused to surrender it 
until the check, which Mr. Hawley had given 
to her some time before his death, was cashed. 

Death crept unawares on Mr. Hawley. He 
had made a will, dividing his estate amongst 
his sisters, brothers, nephews and real niece, 
Miss Mary Crandall Page, but had not signed 
the document, as he did not realize how close 
he was to the grave. In this unsigned will, 
Mr. Hawley disinherited his nephew, Fred 
H. Crandall, but the latter has obtained a 
share of the estate. 



The railroad magnate was a patron of art. 
Among In. paintings wi a portrait of Lady 

Fullerton, by Baebnrn, worth $10, ; g 

vas bj Diaz, valued at $7,500; two pic 
of Arabs and horses, by Schreyor, ' valued al 
$12,500 and two of L'Heimitt, worth $6,000. 
II is library was valued at $2,250, whiol i 
above the average of wealth; pooph 

brariee in ' country. No valuable picture 

by native artists figured in Mr. Hawley's 
collection, and he seems to have followed 
the prevailing custom of American million- 
aires in buying paintings for the signatures 
on them. However, it is better to buy paint 
ings in thai way than not at all. 

* ,< Jt 
She Was in a Hurry. 
At a lecture, a well-known authority on 

nomles mentioned the fact that in some 

parts of America the number of men was 
considerably larger than that of women, and 
he added, humorously: "I can therefore rec- 
ommend tne ladies to emigrate to that part." 
A young lady seated in one of the last rows 
of the auditorium got up and, full of indigna- 
tion, left the room rather noisily, whereupon 
the lecturer remarked: "I did not mean that 
it should be done in such a hurry." 

t&r* t&& t&& 

Going into the homes of 5,000 society and 
club women, THE WASP is one of the best 
advertising mediums for merchants who desire 
to reach people who have money to spend. 



[w^Toyo Kisen 

jf^j| Kaisha 

(ORIENTAL STEAMSHIP CO.) 
S. S. Chiyo Maru Saturday, Aug. 31, 1912 

S. S. Nippon Maru (Intermediate Service 
Saloon. Accommodations at reduced 
rates Saturday, September 21, 1912 

S. S. Tenyo Maru, (Via Manila direct) 

Friday, September 27, 1912 

S. S. Shinyo Maru, (New). ..Saturday, Oct. 19, 1912 

Steamers sail from Company's pier, No. 84, 
near fool of Brannan Street, 1 F. M. for Yoko- 
hama and Hongkong, calling at Honolulu, Kobe 
(Hiogo), Nagasaki and Shanghai, and connecting 
at Hongkong with steamers for Manila, India, etc. 

No cargo received on board on day of sailing. 
Round trip tickets at reduced rates. 

For freight and passage apply at office, 4th 
flocr, Western Metropolis National Bank Building, 
625 Market St. 

W. H. AVERY, Assistant General Manager. 



Ask your Dealer for 

GOODYEAR "HIPPO" HOSE 



Guaranteed to stand 
700 lb*. Pressure 



The Best and strongest 
Garden Hose 




TRY IT AIND BE CONVINCED 



GOODYEAR RUBBER COMPANY 

R. H. PEASE, Prei. 559-591-593 Market St., Saa Fruciico 



THE WASP- 



H'fjin 



[Saturday, August 10, 1912. 



Gertrude Atherton's Coming Book. 

GEETEUDE ATHEETOJST contemplated 
the writing of a novel on the woman 
suffrage question before she lost her 
temper with those of her sex in San Francis- 
co and compared their intellectuality and civic 
pride to those of an oyster. Gertrude will 
probably give the novel a slightly different 
twist since it transpired by the registration 
statistics that not more than twenty per cent 
of the women care to vote. Eighty per cent 
would prefer to remain at home or go to the 
matinee rather than devote their time to poli- 
tics. 

In the majority of San Francisco homes it 
has been the same story of woman's natural 
disinclination to mix with the jostling crowd 
in the political arena and get her feathers 
ruffled and her skirts bedraggled. Fathers, 
husbands and brothers and reluctant women 
have argued that their daughters, wives and 
sisters should do their civic duty by going to 
the polls, but with all the arguing by rela- 
tives and the city government a miserable 
minority only has been aroused to political 
activity. It is plain that the women of Cali- 
fornia are like those of Colorado, where, after 
eighteen years, the women are disinclined to 
use their suffrage privilege. The most desir- 
able women citizens do not go in a large ma- 



he returns. Mr. Giannini is a fine example 
of the old proverb that "youth will be serv- 
ed. ' ' You can 't keep an ambitious young 
man back. The growth of the Bank of Italy 
under his management has been most remark- 
able. I hear that the growth of the branch 
of the Bank of Italy, at the corner of Market 
and Mason streets, has exceeded all expecta- 
tions. 

Jit -J* ,* 
An Expensive Drink. 

SOME City Hall clerks were discussing the 
resignation of Dr. Washington Dodge to 
become vice-president of the Anglo, 
London and Paris National Bank. They all 




jority to the polls, but the least desirable 
class does. 

It is rather a difficult task for the equal 
suffragists to change woman 's traits in a mo- 
ment by the passage of a law giving them the 
right to contest in the management of public 
affairs. For thousands of years civilized wo- 
men have been taught to emulate the clinging 
vine, and now by a wave of the suffragette 
wand they are all to be transformed into 
sturdy oaks. Perhaps. 

<£ «St jf 
Doing Europe Thoroughly. 

THAT very energetic public man of San 
Francisco, A. P. Giannini, Vice-Presi- 
dent of the Bank of Italy, is certainly 
making a systematic tour of Europe. He has 
visited all of the important cities and will be 
a fund of information on civic matters when 



agreed he was a strict disciplinarian, 
though a just and considerate mana- 
ger. One clerk told how he had 
sneaked out to take a drink during 
working hours. He had stayed out 
late the night before and needed a bracer. 
Seeing an opportunity to slip out, he did so, 
and was coming back after his nip when he 
ran into the Assessor himself. 

"What are you doing out on the street dur- 
ing office hours?" asked Dodge. 

The clerk owned up, thinking it better to 
tell the truth. "I wanted a drink pretty bad, 
Doctor," he said, in apology. 

"I don't doubt it," said the Doctor, and 
without raising his voice he added: "As 
you're in such an exhausted condition you can 
take three weeks ' vacation. ' ' 

"Gee!" said the clerk, narrating the affair; 
"that was the dearest drink I ever took." 

*£• c^% c£* 

Mrs. Tinkle: "Did you ever see the Great 
Divide ? ' ' 

Mrs. Dimple: " (Veil, I've been to Beno 
three times." 



Voters Alert. 

IT WOULD appear that our San Francisco 
women who do realize the value of suf- 
frage are not sleeping — nor do they emu- 
late the stolid oyster. For everything is being 
done among the enthusiastic voters to in- 
spire others to go and do likewise. Those 
who are sprinkling ginger in the ranks are 
Mrs. Lillian Coffin, President of the New Era 
League; Mrs. Jennie Leland Durst, chairman 
of the committee, Mr. Goodman Loewenthal, 
end the ensuing loyal followers: Mrs. George 
Sperry, Mrs. J. W. Felt, Mrs. A. M. Hewitt, 
Mrs. F. H. Dodge, Mrs. Sarah Noah, Miss Eliz- 
abeth Hall, Mrs. Francis Braeken, Mrs. A. 
Cotton, Dr. Blanche L. Sanborn, Mrs. Emma 
D. ' Taylor, Dr. E. L. Cox, Miss Cora May, 
Mrs. E. C. Duncan, Mrs. Dupuy, Mrs. E. F. 
Graser, Mrs. E. F. Collins, Miss A. Thompson, 
Miss Alma Drum, Mrs. E. Kimball. Miss M. 
Webster, Mrs. A. F. Halsey, Mrs. Furderer, 
Mrs. P. A. Peshow, Miss Clapp, Mrs. A. C. 
Boggs, Mrs. A. Barilla, Mrs. Nettie Hamilton, 
Mrs. Ella M. Higby, Mrs. M. E. Hall, Mrs. 
Hazel S. Johnson, Mrs. A. E. Kaeser, Mrs. 
Bert Lazarus, Mrs. Belle Eohrhand, Mrs. Eufus 
Steele, Mrs. Spozio, Mrs. W. E. Secombe, Mrs. 
A. M. Wora. Mrs. L. Lerme, Miss Archer, Mrs. 
D. Havens, Mrs. D. F. S. Shaefer, Miss Sophie 
Clough, Miss Katherine Siering, Mrs. Marie 
Bollo, Mrs. Stevenot, Miss Alice Sweeney. 
Mrs. Augusta Jones, Mrs. Fanny Deutsch, 
Mrs. E. H. Healy, Mrs. Helen Moore, Mrs. E. 
T. Ware, Mrs. D. K. Farr, Mrs. S. Beisner, 
Mrs. Eosetta Bradley, Miss Katherine John- 
son, Miss Mary Fairbrother, Miss Laura Mo- 
leda, Mrs. McKinley, Mrs. C. A. Moores, Miss 
Katherine Fennessy, Mrs. Grace Calkins. 

— ♦ 

THE WASP reaches 5,000 society and club 
women regularly. We will soon reach twice 
as many. Subscribe for THE WASP and get 
the interesting news that women look for. 



Murphy Grant & Co. 

JOBBERS OF DRY GOODS 

NEW GOODS CONSTANTLY 
ARRIVING AND ON SAXE 
AT OUR NEW BUILDING 

134-146 Bash St. N.E. Cor. Sansome, S.F. 



SPRING WOOLENS NOW IN 

H. S. BRIDGE & CO. 

TAILORS and IMPORTERS of WOOLENS 



108-110 SUTTER STREET 



above 

Montgomery 



French American Bank BId'g 
Fourth Floor 



SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 



Saturday, August 10, 1912.] 



THE WASP 



13 



DESCRIPTION OF THE 

BIPED WITH THE COIN. 



]'.\ Lionel Josaphare. 

[The following article ie an extract from a ?ory 
clever book, "The World of Suckers." Lionel 
Josaphare, formerly ol The Wasp staff, and now eu- 
. . ,i in literary work in New York, is the uuthur 

of t lie work. Mr. Josaphare is b i i of distinction 

ns well as a master of humor and satire. He was 
a lawyer by profession, hut preferred journalism. 
Mr, Josaphurt' 1ms had a wide experience iu journal- 
ism in New York and other large cities.] 



EVEBYBOD'X knows that a biped is a liv- 
ing creature with two feet, But nut 
everybody knows how many corns the 
human biped lias on eacn foot. The corn is 
a pressure of that realistic circumstance 
teimed civilization, ;uid is frequently used 
metaphorically foT discomfort; while warts 
are a gift from splendid nature. Su we may 
infer that fingers and toes, whether meddling 
with frog-pools or tuddliug through city 
streets, should neither point too proudly nor 
kick too vigorously at natural or artificial 
beauties. For the present it suffices to say 
that the biped with full pockets is civiliza- 
tion's masterpiece; the naked biped, without 
a cent in his hand, is merely a work of God. 

.Now, the two legs of 'the male biped must 
have been given him primarily for the purpose 
of wearing trousers, in which are two pockets 
especially adapted for the distribution of 
coin. 

In all society, the most estimable biped is 
the lather of the family, sometimes referred 
to as Paterfamilias. 

When most characteristic and attentive to 
his duties, the Paterfamilias has very little 
brilliance and strut. He is not given much 
to laughter, as any display of geniality on his 
part will immediately be opportunitied by 
some one looking for a long-time loan. He 
criticises many customs of the folks and is 
allowed to apologize and do pennance on a 
cash basis. When he cannot have his way, 
he goes to sleep. This gives him a moony 
rather than a sunny disposition; and, while 
he may be the head of the firm, he is the sore- 
head of the family. Occasionally some of the 
family allow Paterfamilias to accompany them 
to the theater, if he pays for the tickets. 

On election days. Paterfamilias votes for 
men whom he has never seen, and who have 
no wish to see him. On election night, he 
shouts himself stiff in the neck while the pre- 
cincts are being counted; then he returns 
home like a person who has witnessed a 
very sad and moral drama. 

On Christmas, he is presented with some 
fancy socks, fancy slippers and fancy senti- 
ments, all of which he has needed for months. 
These gifts represent the dregs of the many 
dollars Paterfamilias has allowed his family 
for the holidays, and were bought just as the 
stores were closing up. 

The Biped with the Coin arises in the 
morning when the rest of the family are 
perfuming their pillows with the breath of 
dreams, He arrives downtown on schedule 



time, for which he assumes great credit. Just 
what Paterfamilias does downtown, how he 

bs people to part with their money, and 
how lie manages to insinuate himself into the 

g i graces of business associates, is a mys 

tery to his family. Vet there he is, every 
, with the coin, handing it out like a 
conjurer to all the yearning giraffes at home, 
and fearful oJ telling them that he has seen 
a tobacco that cost:-, somewhat more than the 
old brand. 

At the thrilling moment after dinner, the 
eldest daughter circum fluctuates herself about 
his chair, clears her larynx and gurgles into 
the subject of gowns. The youngerpowder 
puff artist languishes with the blues until 
Artful Dad elicits the fact that last season's 
bat might disturb the Peace of God on the 
coming Sabbath. The boys .grapple their 
share; and the lady-wife puts in a resolution 
for the Pater's payment of another bill at 
his office instead of her defraying the same 
from her weekly stipend. 

Throughout the month, Paterfamilias has 
no lack of manual exercise with the coin. 
Come pink and green tickets for benefit per- 
formances of pink and green ladies who sing, 
Louis XIV bouquets for brides and graduates, 
presents for departing friends, boxes of candy 
for hungry ones, donations to charity-bazaars, 
silver sprinkling for the church's velvet-lined 
basket, money for books, music, repairs, treats 
and many other oddities of importance to 
the general public and the improvement ol 
the family. 

To have beheld him in the days of i is 
courtship — ambitious and vain, and even 
flattered (think of it, flattered) by those who 
knew him — one could hardly have foreseen 
that he would become nothing more than a 
Paterfamilias. And yet, perhaps at that time, 
he stepped on the wrong standpoint and was, 
as a lover too, a Biped with the Coin. He 
fancied he was getting something in troy 
weight. Not every youth looks or feels the 
part he is to fill in later life. And so the 
change from lover to Paterfamilias is on? of 
those comicalities that Pate loves to paint 
when she needs valentines. 



The Warrior's Request. 

ADJUTANT - GENEKAL NATHAN B. 
FOREST of the "United States of Con- 
■ federate Veterans told at a banquet in 
Memphis a military anecdote. 

"A handsome young soldier," he said smil- 
ing, "lay in the last agony upon a battle- 
field. To the friend bending over him he 
murmured, hoarsely: 

" 'Tell Caroline my last thoughts were of 
her. Say I died with her portrait pressed to 
my lips.' 

"He gulped and added: 
" 'Tell Minnie and Grace and Harriet the 
same thing.' " 

+ 

It takes a strong-minded woman to hold 
her tongue. 

* 

Where can you find a better advertising 
medium than THE WASP, reaching, as it 
does, over 5,000 society and club women? 
The women are the buyers. 



Books AND Auatlhors 



IN \ recently published article on the humor 
and sal ire "J" ' Ibarles I hckene and Sii 
William S. Gilbert, it has been pointed 
«>ut that Gilbert has triumphed as a humorist. 

■'It is not so certain,'' Mr. Chesterton say-, 
"thai Gilbert has triumphed as a satirist. In 
'The Mikado,' Gilbert pursued and persecuted 

tl vile "t modern England till they had 

literally aot a log to stand on; ; exactly as 
Swift did under the allegory of 'Gulliver's 
Travels.' Jet it is the solid and comic fact 
that 'The Mikado' was actually forbidden in 
England for the first time, because it was a 
satire on Japan! 1 doubt if there was a singli 
juke in the whole play that fits the Japan- 
ese. But all the ]Okes in the play fit the 
English, if they would put on the cap. The 
great creation of the play is Poo-Bab. I 
have never heard, 1 do nut believe, that the 
combination of inconsistent functions is spec- 
ially a vice of the extreme East. I should 
guess the contrary; 1 should guess that the 
East tends to split into steady and inherited 
trades or castes; so that the torturer is al- 
ways a torturer and the priest a priest. But 
about England, Poo-Bah is something more 
than a satire; he is tne truth. It is true of 
British politics (.probably not of Japanese) 
that we meet the same man twenty times as 
twenty different officials. There is a quarrel 
between a landlord, Lord Jones, and a rail- 
way company presided over by Lord Smith. 
Strong comments are made on the case by a 
newspaper, (owned by Lord Brown,) and 
after infinite litigation it is sent up to the 
House of Lords, that is,. Lords Jones, Smith 
and Brown. Generally the characters are 
more mixed. The landlord cannot live by 
land, but does live as director of the rail- 
way. The railway is so rich that he buys the 
newspaper. The general result can be ex- 
pressed only in two syllables (to be uttered 
with the utmost energy): Pooh-Bah!" 

According to official reports the six best 
sellers during the month are: 1. The "Har- 
vester," Gene Stratton-Porter; 2. "Frau, " 
John Breckenridge Ellis; 3. "A Hoosier Chron- 
icle," Meredith Nicholson; 4. "The Street 
Called Straight," Anon; 5. "The Melting of 
Molly, ' ' Daviess ; 6. " The Man in Lou ely 
Land," Bosher. 

Best sellers in San Francisco: 1. "The Street 
Called Straight," Anon; 2. "The Harvester," 
Gene Stratton-Porter; 3. "Tante, " Sedgwick; 
4. "Queed, " Henry Sydnor Harrison; 5. "Ju- 
lia France and Her Times," Gertrude Ather- 
ton; 6. "Mother," Kathleen Norris. 



Alice Hegan Bice, author of "Mrs. Wiggs 
of the Cabbage Paten," has written a new 
book called "A Eomance of Billygoat Hill." 



Citizen's Alliance of S»i 



OPEN SHOP 



"The minimum scale * of 
the union represses all ambition 
for excellence." — Prof. Eliot. 
Harvard University. 



7 



More than fifty per cent, of 
the union membership is held 
in line by threats of physical 
violence. 



Citizens' Alliance Office 
Booms, Nos. 363-364-365 
Buss Bldg., San Francisco. 




AYOR ROLPH 




TAKE. 



MAYOR ROLPH is so busy that some- 
times lie cannot leave his office to 
get Ms lunch. The newspapers have 
stated that fact. He goes to his 
office at 7:30 a. m. and remains till late in the 
night. Yet things do not run smoothly. He 
finds it very difficult to even have the streets 
swept properly. 

If our conscientious but lenient Mayor had 
followed the friendly advice given him by The 
Wasp, when he took office, he need not work 
half so hard, and the results would probably 
be twice as satisfactory. 

The Wasp advised the Mayor to dismiss 
Casey and Manson, as the first and most im- 
portant reform in his administration. He 
has not done so. Casey and Manson are in 
office making excuses as usual, and putting the 
sins of omission or commission on others. If 
they remain in office they will discredit the 
Eolph administration and help to bring back 
on our long-suffering city the fearful curse of 
a third UDion labor administration. 
* * * 

MANSON and Casey did more than any 
other two men to discredit the McCar- 
thy administration, though that was 
no difficult task. One of the worst mistakes 
McCarthy made when he became Mayor, was 
to swerve from his determination to evict 
Manson and put another engineer in his place. 
The man had been selected, but at the critical 
moment McCarthy hesitated and was lost. 
Manson was allowed to remain, because Mc- 
Carthy believed that in keeping him on the 
City's payroll the advocates of Hetch Hetchy 
would be placated, and the so-called "Good 
Government" party would support the Mc- 
Carthy administration for re-election. 

The result of McCarthy's blunder was that 
nothing was done to buy Spring Valley or 




g ffl Fjy- 



A RUBBER-STAMP OFFICIAL. 

acquire Hetch Hetchy, and at the end of two 
years the decent people rose in anger and 
tiling out the Union Labor gang. They were 
a eood riddance. 



THE Eolph administration has four years 
— forty-eight months — to run. Seven 
months have passed and Manson has made 
no further headway in solving the water prob- 
lem than to pay a million dollars to Ham Hall 
for the Cherry Creek water shed, which was 
offered to the Taylor administration for a 
quarter of a million, and was originally 
hawked around San Francisco for fifty thous- 



advised the hasty purchase of the property, 
and Auditor Boyle, who swore, before election, 
he would never sanction such a grab, approved 
it and let the money be hogswoggled. If we 
had the right kind of a Board of Supervisors 
and the proper kind of a Grand Jury, some of 
the official gentlemen, who figured in this 
dubious transaction would be made to walk 
the plank. 

* * * 

OUR worthy, Mayor is an honest man, who 
would like to make our City government 
perfect and prosperous, but he will 
never succeed in making it tolerable as long 
as he permits politicians like Casey and Man- 




LETTING HIM DO IT ALL, 



and dollars. It has been stated on the author- 
ity of prominent citizens that Mr. Manson 
obtained an option on the property for $340,- 
000. This charge has never been publicly 
refuted by Mr. Manson, although it certainly 
calls for an answer, as people naturally in- 
quire why the City of San Francisco should 
pay a million dollars for water rights that 
were practically bonded to it for much less 

than half a million. 

* * * 

IF ANYTHING ever called for a searching 
investigation, it is the record of the trans- 
actions by which Ham Hall got a million 
dollars out of the treasury for water rights 
that were offered to the City for a quarter of 
a million. To make the matter worse, Mr. 
Hall could not give legal title to the water 
rights, because they are in litigation, and 
even the taxes on the property were left in 
dispute. Yet Mr. Manson and his associates 



son to run the Board of Works. Great cap- 
tains of industry command success by picking 
the first-class men to fill the important posi- 
tions. How absurd it would appear to a real 
captain of industry to have Casey and Manson 
trotting into his office week after week, and 
year after year, explaining that the reason 
the sewers are not built quickly, the streets 
swept properly, and the municipal water prob- 
lem solved satisfactorily is that the office boy 
is too busy to attend to the work. That's 
about what the excuses of Casey and Manson 
amount to. They shift the responsibility to 
irresponsible subordinates, as if the heads of 
departments are not responsible for everything 
done by them. A hustling captain of industry, 
who knew his business, would lay down the 
law to- the Caseys and Mansons in one straight 
talk. There would be no more hitches and 
delays. He wouldn 't waste five minutes of 
his valuable time talking to subordinates, 



Saturday, August 10, 1912.] 



-THE WASP 



15 



when be could touch the bell, call iiis heads 
of departments before him and tell them to 
show satisfactory results speedily or gel their 

walking piipers. • 

OIK worthy Mayor cannot claim thai En- 
gineer Hanson ia retained because to 
dismiss him would endanger the Hetch 
Hetchy scheme. H was shown in the recent 
investigation of the leaky reservoir on Twin 
Peaks that Mr. Manson's position iu the 
Engineering Department was largely that of 
a rubber stamp. His "right hand,'' as Mr. 
Hanson called his deputy, Coimirk. attended 
to most things, and whenever the Chief En- 
gineer's name was required to any important 
document the "right hand" reached out for 
the red-rubber stamp, bearing Mr. Manson's 
name, and used it. Advocates of high pay 
for public servants have maintained that Mr. 
Manson's position is underpaid, but it is hard 
to understand why the salary should be raised 
when a twenty-cent red-rubber stamp per- 
forms so many of the most important duties. 
The Engineer's office should be designated in 
the annual budget as the "Red Rubber 
Stamp Department." 



Comical Sfcoirafcs 
by Honest John 



gj | UN EST" John Edmund McDougald 
| J is the Treasurer of the City and 
County of ban Francisco. Every- 
body knows that. Not so many were aware 
that he is a humorist of the first order, till 
they read of it in a morning newspaper. Ac- 
cording to the newspaper account, His Honor 
the Mayor found a large sack of iron washers 
doing duty as $20 pieces in the Treasury. 
The Mayor, it seems, was counting the coin 
to see that it was all right, when suddenly 
the sack of stage money was unearthed. It 
gave the examiners a shock, only equalled 
by the famous discovery that $116,000 had 
mysteriously vanished after the Hon. James 
Duval Phelan had "hefted" the money, in- 
stead of counting it as the law provided, 

"Honest" John laughed gaily when the 
bag of iron washers was emptied on the count- 
er the other day, and the eyes of the exam- 
iners bulged in surprise. 

11 The joke is on you fellows," he chuckled. 
"I've had that bag of fake money staked 
out to fool you. I've been trying to catch the 
Mayor for a month with that fake bag, but 
he wouldn't bite." 

The keen wit of the Treasurer has no doubt 
been appreciated by all the tax-payers who 
read of the humorous incident. The City 
Treasury is not exactly the place one would 
look for vaudeville stunts. It is a very ser- 
ious matter, that of looking after the millions 
of public money, but our City Treasurer can 
be excused for regarding it is a joke. "Why 
. should he not think lightly of it. Nobody 
seemed to pay the slightest attention to the 
loss of $37,600, which disappeared one day 



from Treasnr< McDougald 's custody. -\>-i 
even a bag oi i mere was lefl in place 

"t the vanished coin. Later on, the sum of 

- ,; -. < took fligbi ad never came back, A 

bookkeeper was Beni to San Quentin for five 
years for thai embezzlement, and is now oui 

on parole, after serving less than two years 
of hi- Bentenci <o\ a cenl of t he stolen 
money has been i itored to the treasury. 
That is the joke. No doubt the taxpayers 
enjoy the humor of the affair immensely, 
when they look at their tax bills. The char- 
acter of the City and County Treasury as an 
institution for the development of humor, and 
the presentation of comic stunts cannot be 
interfered with. 

In former years the City and County Treas- 
urer was not regarded as an annex of the 
Orpheum, nor was juggling with the public 
coin considered a star performance. Head- 
liners in that specialty wished that they had 
turned their talents to some different line of 
endeavor. 

It is of record that when Charles Hubert 
was Treasurer in 1878, his chief deputy be- 
came a defaulter to the amount of $20,000. 
AVhat did he do when the embezzlement was 
discovered? Did he hold levees in the county 
jail, and discuss with sympathetic lady re- 
porters the psychology of crime, and accept 
an engagement to write essays for the Bul- 



letin while in San Quentin, and lake a 

\ iile engagemenl as a ion as he gol pa 
Alas, do! Sad to relate, in those dark 
people bad i misconcepl ion oJ i lie i rui 
, tions of crime and honesty and the duties 

of those who don 't steal to I be i pie oi 

higher mentality, who have thrown the ten 
commandments in the ash barrel. 

As soon as the newspapers published an 
account of the defalcation in Treasurer iin 
bert 's office, the defaulting Deputy Treas- 
urer committed suicide to escape the officers 
of the law, who were on his track. The hon- 
est Treasurer sold his property on Sutter 
street to make good the defalcation. The 
City did not lose a cent. 

There were fewer schools and colleges in 
those days, less churches, . and no Common- 
wealth Club to stir the public conscience, 
and yet the public conscience was able to 
discern clearly the difference between right 
and wrong. 

* 

WHAT IS NEEDED. 

MICHAEL CASEY told the Mayor that, 
although he had been in office fully 
nine years, he has never yet been able 
to find out why the streets are not kept clean, 
all of which goes to show that a new broom 
is sadly needed to sweep the streets, and in- 
cidentally to sweep Michael out of his job. 




HONEST JOHN 

Under whose management some remarkable vaudeville stunts in the City and County Treasury 

have been pulled off. 




Vacation 1912 

A Handbook of 

Summer Resorts 

Along the line of the 

NORTHWESTERN 
PACIFIC RAILROAD 

This book tells by picture and word 
of the many delightful places in Marin, 
Sonoma, Mendocino, Lake and Humboldt 
Counties in which to spend your Vaca- 
tion — Summer Resorts, Camping Sites, 
Farm and Town Homes. 



Copies of Vacation 1912 may be ob- 
tained at 874 Market St. (Flood Build- 
ing), Sausalito Ferry Ticket Office, or 
on application to J. J. Geary, G. P. & 
F. A., 808 Pbelan Building, San Fran- 
cisco. 



NEW ENGLAND HOTEL 

Located in beautiful grove about 40 rods from 
station. Beautiful walks, grand scenery; hunt- 
ing and fishing, boating, bathing, bowling and 
croquet. Table supplied with fresh fruit and 
vegetables, milk and eggs from own ranch daily. 

Adults $7 to $9 per week; special rates for 
children. 

Address F. K. HARRISON, Camp Meeker, 
Sonoma County, Cal. 



OWN SUMMER HOME IN 

CAMP MEEKER 

Mountains of Sonoma Co. Lots $15 up. Meeker 
niilds cottages $85 up. Depot, stores, hotels, 
*staurant, phone, post, express office, theater, 
free library, pavilion, churches,, sawmill; 2,000 
lots sold, 700 cottages built. Sausalito Ferry. 
Address M. O. MEEKER, Camp Meeker. 



Redwood Grove 



% mile from Guerneville; tents and cottages; 
abundance of fruit, berries; bus meets all trains. 
Rates $10-$11 per week; L. D. phone. Address 
THORPE BROS., Box 141, Guerneville, Sonoma 
Co., Cal. 



HILL 

HOTEL AND COTTAGES 
Camp Meeker 

Opposite depot; 20 minutes' ride from Russian 
River; surrounded by orchards and vineyards; 
excellent dining-room, with best cooking. Fish- 
ing, boating, swimming and dancing. Many 
good trails for mountain climbing. Open all 
year. Can accommodate 75 guests. Adults, $6 
to $10 per week; children half rates. 

Building lots for sale from $50 and up. Ad- 
dress MRS. L. BARBIER, Camp Meeker, So- 
noma County, Cal. 



The Gables 



Sonoma county's ideal family resort, just opened 
to the public. Excellent table, supplied from 
our dairy and farm. Dancing, tennis, games. 
Bus to hot baths and trains daily at Verano sta- 
tion. Rates $2.50 per day, $12 and up per 
week. Open year round. Address H. P. MAT- 
THEWSON, Sonoma City P. O., Cal. 



Hotel Rowardennan 

OPEN ALL THE YEAR. 

New ownership, new management, new fea- 
tures. Golf, tennis, bowling, fishing, boating, 
swimming, clubhouse. Free garage. 

Rates $17.50 to $25 per week; $3 to $4 per 
day. 

Folders and information at Peck-Judah'B, or 
address J. M. SHOULTS, Ben Lomond, Cal. 



:: RIVERSIDE RESORT :: 



Country home *4 mile from Guerneville; ideal 
spot; Vz mile of river frontage; $8 to $12 per 
week. For particulars, MRS. H. A. STAGG, 
Proprietor, Guerneville, Sonoma county. 



COSMO FARM 

On the Russian River; electric lighted through- 
out. Rates $10 to $12 per week. For particu- 
lars see Vacation Book or address H. P. Mc- 
PEAK, P. O. Hilton, Sonoma Co., Cal. 



RIONIDO HOTEL 

Lawn Tennis, Croquet, Shuffle Board, Swings, 
Shooting Gallery, Box Ball Alleys, also 4,000 
square feet Dancing Pavilion, unsurpassed Bathing 
and Boating, and large social hall for guests. 
Hotel ready for guests. Rates, $12 per week. 
American plan. For reservations address RIO- 
NIDO CO., Rionido, Sonoma Co., Cal. 



Summer Resorts 

AT HOME, AT THE CLUB, OAFE OB HOTEL 

CASWELL'S COFFEE 



Always Satisfactory 
GEO. W. CASWELL COMPANY 

530-532-534 Folsom St. Phone Kearny 3610 

Write for samples and prices. 



CARR'S 



NEW MONTE 
RIO HOTEL 



NEAREST TO STATION AND RIVER. 

New modern hotel, first-class in every detail 
and equipped with every modern convenience. 
Swimming, boating, canoeing, fishing, launching, 
horseback riding and driving. Hotel rates $2 
day; $12 and $14 per week. Round trip, $2.80. 
good on either the broad or narrow gauge rail- 
roads. Sausalito Ferry. Address C. F. CARR, 
Monte Rio, Sonoma Co., Cal. 



HOTEL RUSTICANO 

The hotel is just a two-minute walk from the 
depot amongst the giant redwood trees. The 
amusements are numerous — boating, bathing, 
lawn tennis, bowling, dancing, nickelodeon, and 
beautiful walks. A more desirable place for a 
vacation could not be found. Rates, $9 to $12 
per week ; rates to families. 

For folder, address L. B. SELENGER, Prop., 
Camp Meeker, Sonoma County, Cal. 



Send for Our Select List of 
EIGHTY CALIFORNIA PAPERS 

You can insert display 

ads in the entire list for 

EIGHT DOLLARS AN INCH 



The Dake Advertising Agency, Inc, 



432 So. Main St. 
LOS ANGELES, OAL. 



12 Geary St. 
SAN FRANCISCO. 



-TtlE WASP 




I? 



CLUB LIFE is not all reform work along 
a prescribed propaganda. Not is ir 
it all politics; nor yet all civic work; 
nor even all philanthropic. There is 
an aesthetic side, none the lesa beneficent, 
which acta as a lever, raising the standard 
of concent ric force. 

One of tlio must influential among the lead- 
ers in the educational and musical circles of 
our leading clubs is Madame Emilie Tojetti, 
whose picture is given in tins week's issue 
of The Wasp. Madame Tojetti is eh airman 
of the educational department of the Cali- 
fornia Club, and has under her direction the 
various sections, including the dramatic, art 
and niusie sections. 

"There is so much to be accomplished in 
this work," said Madame Tojetti. ''My very 
heart is in it all. 1 wanted to encourage 
musical people, and especially our local com- 
posers, all that I possibly can. 

"Let us have all the compositions by our 
Californians that we can find, for I heartily 




Vaughan-Fraser Photo. 
MME. EMILIE TOJETTI 
Who Is a strong sponsor for local creative work. 

believe in encouraging every line of creative 
work, right here, now," added the leader, 
emphatically. 

"Even if it be ragtime 1 ?'' was interposed. 

"Ragtime is not bad. That is, the music 
and the rhythm of this syncopated music is 
not offensive. In fact, it is attractive. But 
it is the words, the low, degenerate words, 
that make ragtime music unfit for the draw- 
ing room and the club, and absolutely de- 
moralizing to the young, 

"The modern, touch is found iu all this 
music, which would be welcomed everywhere 



11 the phrasing were onlj a- rhythmical ami 
clean. ' ' 

Madame Tojetti is Chairman of the state 
Committee on Music, also, and at one of the 
morning conferences of the "Channing' 1 not 
h>ng ago, she presented a thesis on the "De- 
velopment Of Folli Song. " 

• * » 

PROMINENT in the social and literary cir- 
cles hi' several of our local clubs is the 
name of Mis. Clarence Grange, whose 
picture is given. She is identified in the clubs 
of which she is a member as one of the most 
enthusiastic and gracious. In the "Cap and 
Bells" Club, Mrs. Grange is always one of 
the prominent speakers, and her voice is 
heard on thoughtful themes in the Laurel 
Hall Club, the California Club and the Pacific 
Coast Women's Press Association. 

"I prefer to listen rather than to talk/' 
was the remarkable statement made by this 
charming club woman. "I love good books, 
good music, good pictures, in fact, everything 
that is beautiful, and I find so much of it 
here at home," enthusiased Mrs. Grange, who 
returned from abroad recently. Her home 
on Broadway is often the scene of her 
gracious hospitality, and plainly presents her 
appreciation of all that is beautiful. 

Club Luncheon at San Mateo. 

THE THURSDAY CLUB, composed of 
Burlingame and San, Mateo ladies, gave 
a complimentary luncheon* at the Pen- 
insula Hotel, limited to members only. The 
guests of honor were: Mrs. Percy L. Shuman, 
President of the San Francisco District; Mrs. 
Frederick Colburn, Chairman of the Pro- 
gramme Committee, Thursday Club; Mrs. 
Eugene de Veer, Assistant Curator of the 
Oakland Academy. Mrs. Eugene McClellan 
presided as toastmaster, and those who re- 
sponded to toasts were: Mrs. Charles McCar- 
thy, Mrs. Henry Hagen, Mrs. S. D. Merle, 
Past-president of the San Mateo Club. Poig- 
nant speeches in response were made by 
Mrs. Vickerson, President of the Thursday 
Club, Mrs. Colburn and Mrs. de Veer. Among 
those present were: Mesdames S. J. Bingham, 
Fred J. Breckenridge, Charles J. Brown, F. 
H. Colburn, Finlay Cook, C. E. Douglass, 
Albert Gunn, Henry "W. Hagen, E. A. Hardy, 
A. F. Hess, E. E. Johnson, L. Berton Law- 
rence, Charles F. McCarthy Eugenia McClel- 
lan, Kenneth McLeod, Samuel D. Merk, Dr. 
Florence Power, Percy L. Shuman, Eugene 
de Veer, John M. Vickerson, Henry W. Wieg- 
ersom The final toast was given by Mrs. 
Eugenia McClennan, who said: "To the 
Thursday Clubwoman — May she be welcome 
in every home, liked in many, loved in a few, 
and adored in one." 




A'mishan-Frnser Photo. 
MBS. CLARENCE GRANGE 
Prominent in the literary and social sets of 
energetic women. 

Just Wanted to Prove it. 

THE father of several boys was recently 
busily engaged in writing, sitting near 
the window, when he heard a shrill cry 
of "Dad, Dad!" from his youngest-born, who 
was playing with neighbors' children outside. 
"What a trial my children are! " murmured 
the distinguished man, as he thrust his head 
out of the window. "Well, boy," he asked, 
" what is it? " 

Whereupon the hut, who was standing in 
the center of a group of youngsters, replied: 

"Willie Johnson wouldn't believe that you 
hadn't a hair' on your head. That's all, Dad." 



Even the people who think twice before 
they speak often nave another think coming 
to them. 



Where can you find a better advertising 
medium than THE WASP, reaching, as it 
does, over 5,000 society and club women? 
The women are the buyers. 



LA GRANDE & WHITES 


LAUNDRY CO. 


Offlcs and Works. 231 12th St. 


Bet. Howard Ss Foloom StB. 


SAN FBANOISOO, CALIFORNIA 


Phonea: Market 916, Home M 20*4. 



Eames Tricycle Co. 

Manufacturers of INVALID 
ROLLING CHAIRS for all 

purposes. Self - Propelling 
Tricycle Chairs for the dis- 
abled. INVALID CHAIRS. 
Wholesale and retail and 
for rent. 1714 Market St., 
San Francisco. Phone Park 
2940. 1200 S. Main Street, 
Los Angeles. 




THE summer dullness continues to affect 
the local realty market. Now is the 
time when bargains can be picked up. 
G. H. Umbsen & Co. will test the market by 
an auction, on August 19th, of some choice 
properties, including the northwest corner of 
Kearny and Sutter streets. It is seldom that 
property of this class comes into the market. 
Before the fire in 1906, a Kearny street corner 
so close t o Market street, and improved with 
a new three-story mezzanine and basement 
building, would cause lively competition 
amongst buyers. It remains to be seen what 
will happen when this high-class property is 
offered at auction on the 19th inst. The 
building is under lease till December 31, 1916. 
Jas. E. Jackson, who occupies the ground 
floor mezzanine and basement, pays $800 per 
month tinder secured lease, The upper floors 
are also tenanted. The building will carry 
three additional stories. Kearny street will 
remain one of the great business arteries of 
San Francisco, no matter what changes may 
occur in the new alignment of business locali- 
ties. Kearny street commands the districts 
north and south of Market street that will 
continue to increase in population. 

G. H. Umbsen & Co. will also offer at auction 
on August 1st a new five-story and basement 
Class C building and lot 25x137, southeast 
corner of Bush street and Mary lane, near 
Kearny street. The entire building is leased 
to one tenant at $500 a month. This also is 
a very desirable property. 

The southwest corner of Polk street and 
Pacific avenue, a lot 90x80, will be offered by 
Umbsen & Co. at their forthcoming auction on 
the 19th inst. Polk street is one of the thor- 
oughfares that have regained their old status 
rapidly since the fire of 1906. The lot offered 
by Umbsen & Co. is a choice one. It is part 
of the estate of the late John L. Norton. 



Some lots on Hayes street will also be sold. 
They are part of the Seyden estate. 

A very choice apartment site, southwest cor- 
ner of "Washington and Franklin, in the midst 
of many fine houses, will be offered by Umb- 
sen & Co. The lot is 55x137:6. 

Some attractive holdings in the Easton ad- 
dition, Burlingame, will be put up at auction. 




DR. WASHINGTON DODGE 

Who resigned from tlie office of Assessor to 
become Vice-President of the Anglo and 
London Paris National Bank. 

The lots are large, and on one- there is a cozy 
bungalow of five rooms and bath. 

Investors will watch this auction by Umbsen 



> 




THE ANGLO & LONDON 
PARIS NATIONAL BANK 



SAN FRANCISCO 



Capital $4,000,000 

Surplus and Profits $1,600,000 

Total Resources $40,000,000 

OFFICERS: 

HERBERT FLEISHHAOKER President 

SIG. GREENEBAUM Chairman of the Board 

J. PRIEDLANDER "Vice-President 

O. P. HUNT Vice-President 

R. ALTSCHUL CaBhier 

C. R. PARKER Assistant Cashier 

WM. H. HIGH . Assistant Cashier 

H. CHOTNSKI Assiatant Cashier 

G. R. BURDICK Assistant Cashier 

A. L. LANGERMAN Secretary 



& Co. with keen interest, as the properties 
are representative of so many desirable local- 
ities. Auctions are sometimes little more 
than a sale of "junk," but in this case the 
cream of business property and apartment 
sites is offered in the shape of fine corners. 
There is sure to be a large attendance of bid- 
ders at G. H. Umbsen & Co. 's salesrooms on 
Montgomery street on the 19th inst, and who- 
ever gets one of the choice properties at a fair 
market price can consider that he has made 
money. Property will never be any lower in 
San Francisco. 

It is a certainty that real estate values 
must increase in the next few years in San 
Francisco, facing as we do the boom that must 
come with the opening of the Panama Canal 
and the inauguration of the Panama-Pacific 
International Exposition. 

From Assessor to Banker. 
Dr. Washington Dodge is one of the few 
municipal officials who conducted his office 
like a private concern. No visitor to the As- 
sessor's office ever found the clerks sitting 
around loafing and smoking. A bank could 
not have been conducted in a more orderly 
manner than Dr. Dodge conducted his impor- 
tant office. The result was that the citizens 
elected Dr. Dodge year after year to the posi- 
tion of Assessor, and now he has left the 
public servic.e to become vice-president of 
one of the most prosperous and progressive 



Wells Fargo Nevada 
National Bank 

Of San FranolBoo 

Nevada Bank Building, 2 Montgomery Street. 

N. E. Corner of Market Street. 
Capital paid up 96,000,000.00 

SurphiB and Undivided Profits. .. .$5,055,471.11 



Total $11,055,471.11 

OFFICERS. 
Isaias W. Hellman, President 
I. W. Hellman, Jr., Vice Prea. 
F. L. Lipman, Viae Pres. 
James K. Wilson, Vice Pres. 
Frank B. King, Cashier 
W. McGavin, Assistant Cashier 
E. L. Jacobs, Assistant Cashier 
C. L. Davis, Assistant Cashier 
A. D. Oliver, Assistant Cashier 
A. B. Price, Assistant Cashier 

DIRECTORS. 
Isaias W. Hellman Hartland Law 

Joseph Sloss Henry Roasnfeld 

Percy T. Morgan James L. Flood 

F. W. Van Sicklen J. Henry Meyer 

Wm. F. Herrin A. H. Payson 

John C. Kirkpatriek Chas. J. Deering 

I. W. Hellman, Jr. James K. Wilson 

A. Ohristeson F. L. Lipman 

Wm. Haas 

ACCOUNTS INVITED. 
Prompt Service, Courteous Attention, Unexcelled 
Facilities. 
SAFE DEPOSIT VAULTS. 



Saturday, August 10, 1M2.] 



-THE WASP ~ 



The German Savings 
and Loan Society 

Saving! (The German Bank) Commercial 

Incorporated 1868. 

626 California St., San Francisco. Cal 

(Member of the Associated Saringi Banki of 
San Francisco.) 

The following Branches for Receipt and Pay- 
ment of Dope-Bits only: 

MISSION BRANCH, 2572 Mission street, 
between 21st and 22nd. 

RICHMOND DISTRICT BRANCH, 601 

Clement street, cor. 7th Ave. 

HAIGHT STREET BRANCH, 1456 Haight 
street, near Masonic Ave. 



June 29th, 1912. 

Assets .... $51,140,101.76 

Capital actually paid up In Cash . 1,000,000.00 
Reserve and Contingent Funds . 1,656,403.80 
Employees' Pension Fund . . 140,109.60 
Number of Depositors . . . 56,609 

Office Hours: 10 o'clock A. M. to 3 o'clock 
P. M.. except Saturdays to 12 o'clock M. and 
Saturday evenings from 6:30 o'clock P. M. to 
8 o'clock P. M. for receipt of Deposits only. 











_S^ 




M 
NE? 

Lar| 

W 
O 

F. 


Established 1853. 
onthly Contracts, $1.60 per Mon 

7 WORKS JUST ERECTED A' 
TENTH ST, S. F. 

est and Most Uup-to-Date on P 
Coast. 

agona call twice daily. 

eaning Dainty Garments Our Spec 

Thomas Parisian Dyeinj 
Cleaning Works 


th. 
P 27 

acifle 
ialty 



banks on fcbi i tr was a 

cious move of the directors of the Anglo, 
London and Paris National Bank t" offer Dr. 
Dodge an important position, and will un- 
doubtedly add i" the prestige mul the liiiitn 
eial success of theii bank. The Assessor's 
office, under Dr. Dodge, was one of the Cew 
departments of the municipal government 
which has no! Bhown enormously increased 
cosl o'f operation in the pasl ten years. With 
.-in increased amount of clerical work, Assess 
or Dodge kept down the expenses of his office. 
Thai he will be as successful in the banking 
business as in private life is a foregone con- 
clusion. 

Stocks. 

One of the most noticeable features of the 
local stock market this week has been the 
low price of Associated Oil, which went below 
i he 13 mark, and even then showed signs ot 
weakness. There is no stock on the list of 
the local exchange which lias disappointed in- 
vestors more than Associated Oil. It isn't 
t lie outsiders, altogether, who have been dis- 
appointed, either. The insiders have lost 
money on the stock. It is well known mi the 
street that insiders who would be expected 
to know all about the condition of the com- 
pany and the prospects of dividends bought. 
the stock at 55 just before it began to slide 
down. There isn't the slightest doubt that 
they lost money. Associated Oil at the pres- 
ent price certainly looks like a good buy. 
The control of the company has passed en- 
tirely to eastern hands, and when the con- 
ditions are right, the stock will be moved up 
a good many points. It is worth while to keep 
an eye on Associated Oil. 

Spring Valley stock has been weak lately, 
owing to the activity on the part of the 
politicians, who are pushing the Hetch Hetchy 
municipal water scheme. There is a hitch in 
the deal to sell the Spring Valley property to 
the City for $43,000,000}. Eventually the 
City will be forced to buy Spring Valley at a 
fair figure, as the Hetch Hetchy water will 
not be brought here in ten years, if ever, by 
the incompetent politicians that generally run 
the City government. 

The market for local municipal bonds at 
less than 5 per cent, is also dropping, and that 
will tangle up the politicians' wild schemes. 



ARMOR PLATE SAFE DEPOSIT VAULTS 

of Union Safe Deposit Company in building of 

UNION TRUST COMPANY OF SAN FRANCISCO 

Junction of Market and G'Farrell Streets and Grant Avenue 



LARGEST, STRONGEST and 

ARRANGED SAFE DEPOSIT 

Boxes $4 per annum 

Telephone 




MOST CONVENIENTLY 
WEST OF NEW YORK 
and upwards. 

Kearny 11. 



Mixing-up in Dining and Leaving. 

"Waiter," >-:ii<l a traveler in an Erie Bail- 
road restaurant, '*did you sa} I bad 20 min- 
utes to wan. or thai il was 20 minutes to Bf 

"Nayter. (| i said ye liad - inutes ti» at<- 

an 1 that's all ye 'li'l uave. Ver train's just 
gone. ' ' 



WE HAVE MOVED OUR OFFICES 
TO 

410 MONTGOMERY ST. 



Our Facilities for Handling 

Investment Securities 

Are Considerably Increased. 



ESTABLISHED 1858 

SUTR0&C0. 



Telephone 
Sutter 3434 



Private Exchange 
Connecting 1 All Depts. 



J. C. WILSON & CO. 



MEMBERS: 

NEW YORK STOCK EXCHANGE 
NEW YORK COTTON EXCHANGE 
CHICAGO BOARD OF TRADE 
STOCK AND BOND EXCHANGE, S. F. 

MAIN OFFICE— Mills Building, San Fran- 
cisco. 

BRANCH OFFICES — Lob Angeles, San Die- 
go, Coronado Beach, Portland, Ore. ; Seattle, 
Wash. ; Vancouver, B. O. 

PRIVATE WIRE NEW YORK AND CHICAGO. 



Blake, Moffitt & Towne 

PAPER 



37-45 First Street 

PHONES: SUTTER 2230; J 3221 (Home) 

Private Exchange Connecting all Departments. 



Sultan Turkish Baths 

624 POST STREET 
Special Department for Ladies 

Open Day and Night for Ladies and Gen- 
tlemen. 
Al. Johnson, formerly of Sutter Street 
Hammam, has leaBed the Sultan Turkish 
Baths, where he will be glad to see his 
old and new customers. 



WALTERS SURGICAL CO. 

SURGICAL INSTRUMENTS. 
R09 Sutter St., S. P. Phone Douglas 4011 



ONE of the prettiest affairs of the week was giv- 
en at the MacAdam home on Jackson street, 
Wednesday evening. Miss Katherine Mac- 
Adam was presiding hostess at the bridge party ar- 
ranged for her cousin, Mrs. Earl Shipp. Many of the 
local smart set competed in the pleasures of the 
games and extended greetings to the honorary guest. 
The guests were Miss ila Sonntag, Miss Maye Col- 
burn, Miss Hattie Schultz, Miss Ethel Thomdyke, 
Miss Helen Adams, Mr. George Shaner, Mr. George 
Hall, Mr. Alfred Harwood, Mr. Clarence Coonan, 
Mr. Courtney Moore, Ensign H. Waddington, TJ. S. 
X., Cordova de Garmendia, Mr. and Mrs. Thomas 
Minturn Jr. 



Weddings. 



Because of her interesting family connections the 
wedding of Miss Ruth Casey has been a subject 
much discussed by the bride's many friends. The 
marriage ceremony took place at the home of Mr. 
and Mrs. Frederick Beaver, the latter of whom is 
the bride's aunt, on Thursday evening, August 8th, 
at 9 o'clock, \vnen pretty Ruth Casey became Mrs 
Arthur Brown she was attended by her handsome 
cousin, Miss Isabel Beaver, and Miss Helen Ashton. 

Mrs. Frederick Beaver and the mother of Ruth 
Casey, who died some time ago, were sisters, being 
two of the daughters of Millionaire Pierce, whose 
large rancn was one of the richest lands in Santa 
Clara county. Mrs. FranK Madison was another sis 
ter. The mother of the three Pierce girls, died some 
years ago, and Pierce married a second time. Miss 
Mildred Pierce, a daughter by this marriage, is 
traveling in Europe previous to her debut in society. 

Upon their return from their honeymoon Mr. 
Brown and his bride will reside in San Rafael, where 
a large colony of young couples are making their 
homes. 



The wedding of Mrs. Augusta Moule and Mr. 
Perry Morton was one of the events of the past 
month. Mrs. Morton was formerly of Pendleton. Or. 
She is the daughter of Major Lee Moorhouse of 
Pendleton, Or., clerk of the Supreme Court of Ore- 
gon. Mr. Morton is a brilliant lawyer, well known 
in this city. He is the son of the late John M. 
Morton, at one time Consul-General to Hawaii, and 
afterward Collector of the Port of San Francisco, 
and is now special United States Attorney in Ore- 
gon, and also supervising attorney for the United 
States reclamation service in Oregon, California and 
Nevada. He and his bride are located at the St. 
Francis for a brief sojourn, as they will make their 
home in Portland, Oregon. Mr. Morton is related 
to Mrs. Norman Collyer of this city. 



Miss Gladys Adeline Brown became the wife of 
Mr. Joseph B. Dryden on Thursday evening of last 
week. The pretty home of the bride's aunt. Mrs. 
William Hawthorne, was decorated in pink and white 
blossoms for the happy event. The bridal gown 
was of shimmering satin richly trimmed with rare 
lace. In her arms the bride carried a shower gar 
land of roses. Miss Marietta Hawthorne, attired 
in pale pink satin, was maid of honor. The brides- 
maids were Miss Ruby Brown and Miss Genevieve 
Brown, sisters of the bride. Their gowns were of 
pink chiffon, augmented by shower bouquets of pink. 
Dainty Miss Veryle Burns, the bride's little cousin, 
was flower-girl. The best man was Daniel P. Hag- 
maier. The bride is the daughter of Mr. Frank R. 
Brown, who is connected with the Alaska Commer- 
cial Company. Mr. Joseph B. Dryden is secretary 



of the Supreme Court of California. He is the son 
of Mr. and Mrs. George H. S. Dryden. His father 
is also connected with the Supreme Court. 



On Saturday evening, August 10th, Miss Mildred 
Wood will become the bride of Mr. Melville Erskine. 
The attractive home of Mrs. Catherine Wood, mother 
of the charming young bride, will be a bower of 
roses and the choice blooms for which San Rafael 
is renowned. Many friends of the contracting par- 
ties from Ross "Valley and Berkeley will assemble 
at the Woods home to witness the ceremony. Miss 
Wood is one of the most popular young women of 
Marin county, where she has lived for many years 
with her mother and brother, Mr. Parker Wood. 
She is an ardent philanthropist, taking an active 
interest in the settlement work of children. Mr. 
Erskine is the son of Mr. and Mrs. William Erskine, 
now located in Berkeley, and granclson of the late 
Dr. John Morse, a physician of pioneer days. 



The wedding of Mrs. Edna Cohn and. Mr. Fred 
Belasco took place this past week. Mr. Belasco is 
of Belasco and Mayer, proprietors of the Alcazar 
Theater Among the wedding guests were Mrs. 
Sarah Mayer and Mrs. Edward Herenghi, sisters to 
Belasco ; Emanuel B. Mayer, his nephew ; Edward, 
Henry and Walter Belasco, his brothers; Mr. and 
Mrs. David Warfield, Henry H. Davis, Mr. and Mrs. 
George Davis, Mr. and Mrs. Sylvain bchnaittacher, 
Mrs. Charles J. Behlow Jr., sisters of the bride; S. L. 
Marks, her uncle, and Dr. and Mrs. Nieto. The 
friends of Belasco were greatly surprised when they 
learned of his marriage. It had not been generally 
known that he contemplated matrimony. 



When the U. S. S. California reaches Honolulu 
this week a pretty wedding will take place which is 
of interest to the local society set, the bride being 
Miss Ray Bell, and the groom Ensign Paul Marshall. 
The wedding will take place at the home of the 
bride's mother, Mrs. J. N. Bell. The groom will 
return to San Francisco on the California, the bride 
following immediately on a liner. For a time at 
least their home will be at Mare Island. 



The wedding of Miss Bertha Josephine Hemphill 
and Mr. Douglas Lindsay Pringle took place on 
Wednesday of last week. Dr. John Hemphill, uncle 
of the bride, performed the ceremony. 



Engagements. 



BRILLIANT — HERTZOG. — Miss Sadie Brilliant 
and Mr. Leon Hertzog of San Diego, Miss Brilliant 
is the daughter of Mrs. A. Brilliant. 

CUNNINGHAM — SARGENT. — Miss Mary Cun- 
ningham and Mr. Murray Sargent. Miss Cunnighain 
is the daughter of Mrs. James Cunningham and 
sister of Miss Sara and Miss Elizabeth Cunningham. 
She is a cousin of Miss Evelyn and Miss Genevieve 
Cunningham, daughter of Mrs. James Athearn Fol- 
ger. Mr. Sargent is a son of Mr. and Mrs. Henry 
B. Sargent of New Haven. He is a graduate of 
Tale, class of '05. The wedding will take place 
in New York this winter. 

ELIOT — PIERCE. — Miss Ruth Eliot and Mr. Rog 
er Pierce. Miss Eliot is the granddaughter of Dr. 
Charles W. Eliot of Harvard. Mr. Pierce is a grad- 
uate of Harvard, class of '04. The engagement was 
announced in San Francisco this week, while the 
Eliot party was touring the world. When the 
Eliots reach their home. Mount Desert, Me., the 
plans for the wedding will be formulated. 



JACKSON HICKEY. — Miss Ethel Jackson and 

Mr. Frederick Hickey. Miss Jackson is the daugh- 
ter of Mr. and Mrs. Robert Jackson. Mr. Hickey 
is a prominent mining expert and is a graduate of 
the University of California. The wedding will 
take place soon, at the Crossways? after which the 
bridal couple will tour the world. 

JAMES — KLINE. — Miss Gladys James and Lieu- 
tenant James W. Kline, U. S. N. Miss James is 
the daughter of the late Mr. Nathaniel James and 
Mrs. James of Washington, D. C, formerly of San 
Francisco. Lieutenant Kline is on the staff of 
Rear-Admiral Reynolds of Bremerton. The wedding 
will take place in the fall. 

KELLEY — GARTHWAITE. — Miss Edith Kelley 
and Mr. J. W. Garthwaite. Mr. Garthwaite is the son 
of Mr. W, W. Garthwaite, President of the Oakland 
Bank of Savings. 

MAYHEW — COBB. — Miss Emelita Mayhew and 
Mr. William R. Cobb. Miss Mayhew is the young- 
est daughter of Mr. H. Allen Mayhew. She is a 
graduate of the University of California, class of 
'11. Mr. Cooo is a civil engineer, a member of 
the Phi Sigma Kappa. He is the son of W. H. 
Cobb, an attorney of San Francisco. The wedding 
will take place this fall. 

UYATT — KAPLAN. — Miss Rose Uyatt and Mr. 
Joseph Kaplan of New York City. Miss Uyatt is 
the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. S. Uyatt. The wed- 
ding will take place in tne fall. 

WEINBERG — TURLOCK. — Miss Mildred Wein- 
berg and Mr. A. Samuel Turlock. Miss Weinberg 
is the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. M. Weinberg. 

WELCH— CULVER.— Miss Martha E. Welch and 
Mr. A. Hj Culver. Miss Welch is the daughter of 
Mr. and Mrs. R. L. Welch of Colusa, who are now 
at the Palace. Mr. Culver is the head of the land 
department of the Sacramento Valley Irrigation 
Company. The wedding will take place in Septem- 
ber at St. Stephen's Church, Colusa. 



Announcement. 
The wedding of Miss Natalie Coffin and Mr. 
Crawford Greene, whose engagement was announced 
in last week's issue of The Wasp will be married 
on Saturday, August 24th at St. John's church, Ross. 
Miss Sara Coffin will be her sister's maid of honor. 
The bridesmaids will be Miss Helen Chesebrough 
and Miss Virginia Newell Drown. Mr. John C. 
Kittle will be best man. Dr. James Whitney and 
Mr. Chauncey Goodrich will be ushers. 



Crocker Dinner. 
The dinner which was given by Mr. and Mrs. 
Charles Templeton Crocker at Pebble Beach Lodge 
this past week was as novel and iu teres ting as it 
was delicious and appetizing. After the splendid 
repast the guests assembled in the ballroom and 
passed the remainder of the evening in the pleas- 
ures of a dance. A party of merry guests were 
included in the list of society people from the Pen- 
insula, Del Monte, the cottages at Monterey and 
from Del Norte. 



Pleasant Surprise. 
Old-fashioned surprise parties are as rare in these 
days of carnation functions as old-fashioned sweet- 
smelling pinks. And so the genuine "surpris ;" at 
the Presidio on Monday evening which was "sprung - ' 
in honor of Mrs. K. J. Hampton, wife of Quarter- 
master Hampton, was genuinely delightful. Mrs 
Hampton is as popular at the Presidio as the Major 



Saturday, August 10, 1M2.] 



THE WASP- 



21 



himself, and so her birthday gave the empl i ■ 
the Q. M. D. office just on opportunity to tell In r 
80 — with their gift, a beautiful bronie l 

Then the old-fashioned surprise p<t»ty hold 
in the whole-souled way which marks Each 
I'll, l'iksis ;it this happy affair were Colonel and 
Mrs. Wisser, Colonel and Mrs. l h I and 

Mrs, Prick, Captain and Mrs. Waldria, Captn-n i.mi 
Mrs. M-etcalfw, Captain and Mrs. Chttppoloar, Cap 
lain and Mrs. W.-rt inlx'iiki-r. Lieutenant and Mrs. 

Knight, Major and Mrs, Davis, Captain Bealy, Miss 

Holland, Captain and Mrs n s. Captain and Mrs. 

Connell, W. 8. Muliin, Miss Taylor, and Captain 
Piatt. 



Will Wed Virginian. 
Miss [gabe! Sprague will be greatly missed from 
the social set, where she bad I a a general favor- 
ite, for when she becotneB Mrs. William Poul, her 
home will be in Virginia, Although his profession 
us mi attorney places Mr, Pool among the New 
Sorkers, yel his enthusiasm for hunting mid cross- 
conntry riding makes his Virginia estate his great- 
est attraction. The old Virginia homestead is being 
remodeled, and it is here that Mr, Pool will take bis 
bride. She, too, is fond of the limit, and so will 
take an interest in the Bport in which Mr, !'<>"l is 

a recognized adept. A park of hea tries mid many 
famous hunting hounds, with a stable of trained 
hunters are a part of the equipment at the Pool 
hunting quarters. 



Rumors of Rumors. 
When the faintest rumor of an engagement Bn- 
circles the athletic Miss Sears, how it multiplies i 
If it were not so, Miss Sears would probably stamp 
an impetuous, sprinting foot and say, No! If it be 
so, the lady questioneu does not choose to say so. 
Hence confonnding rumors. That Eleanor Sears and 
Harold S. Vanderbilt have found many congenial 
moments riding, yachting, golfing and touring to- 
gether cannot be denied. Neither has the engage- 
ment. But let us give smiling Mies Sears the 
chance to tell us what, perhaps, we already know. 



Golf Enthusiasts. 

Large aggregations of golf enthusiasts welcomed 
the trophy tournaments at the Burlingame Country 
Club during this past week. Two cups were tempt 
ingly displayed to spur the contestants. One prize 
is the Mrs. Malcolm Douglas Whitman cup — the 
other the Shreve cup. 

Among the prominent society people were Messrs. 
and Mesdames Laurance Irving Scott, Ward Bar- 
ron, Oscar Cooper, Walter Martin, Norris King 
Davis, Thomas A. Driscoil, Remi Pierre Schwerin, 
James Athearn Polger, William Geer Hitchcock, 
John Drum, Templeton Crocker, Augustus Taylor 
Eugene Murphy, Charles jy. Mcintosh, Eugene Lent, 
Christian de Guigne Jr., Osgood Hooker, Captain 
A. H. Payson, Messrs. Pelton Elkins, H. C. Breeden 
and John Parrot t Jr. 



Miss Grant's Tea. 
The tea given by Miss Nellie Grant in compliment 
to Mrs. Ean Shipps (Anna Weller) at the Palace 
this week was a delightful affair. 



Theater Party. 
With her usual grace, Mrs. Frances Wright has 
been entertaining Mrs. William Beckman, a society 
matron of Sacramento, this week. A theater party 
formed the plan of Monday's pleasure. It was 
followed by an interesting after-theater gathering. 



Lawn Party, 
Mrs. Milo Potter and Miss Nina Jones presided at 
a lawn party at the Hotel Potter on Saturday last. 
The parly was given in honor of Miss Ethel Crocker, 
daughter of Mr. and Mrs. William H. Crocker. The 
guests at this delightful affair were the Misses Mar- 
guerite Doe, Down, Eleanor Park and Aileen Finne- 
gan ; and Messrs. George Howard J„ Edmund Ly- 
man, Walker, William Crocker Jr., and Prince Poni- 
a towski. 



Dinners. 
Mr. and Mrs. George H. Hellman entertained at 
dinner in honor of Mrs. George La Parge of Van- 



couver, at the Hellman home on California street, 
during the past week. 

Card Basket. 

A luncheon in honor >i Mrs, Patrick Calhoun was 
given Wednesday by Mr-*. Prank Deering at her 
home an Russian Hill. 

Two interesting bachelors, Mr. John Qallois and 
Mr. Ferdinand Theriot, arc located al a cozy bunga- 
low in San Mateo. 

Mr, and Mrs. Samuel Hopkins will reside at tin- 
Hop kins house, "ii California street, with the elder 
Mr. and Mrs. K. Hopi ins, 

Miss MacAdam has just returned from Castella, 
where she was the guesl of her uncle. Judge Charles 
L. Weller, and Mrs. Weller. Mrs. Karl Sbipp, for- 



Weller, has been the complimentary 
guesl of a number oi affairs previous to hex depi 
for Annapolis, which will be within thi 
■ 

Mrs Philip Lansdale is visiting her pat 
and Mrs, William Ford Nichols.' Mn 
dale's two beautiful children are with her. 

Mr. and Mrs. Frederick kohl have reached Bar 
Harbor, Maine, where they will remain a short time 
before returning home. The Kohls will go to 
Ban Mateo homo for (no winter. 



Large Bridge Party. 
Perhaps the mosl elaborate partj of the Inst week 
was the complimentary bridge afternoon al the home 

ol Miss Mildred Porter of the Adams Point district, 



G. H. UMBSEN & CO. 

20 MONTGOMERY STREET, S. F. 



A 



AUCTION! 
AUCTION! 



AUCTION! 
AUCTION! 



Referee and Executor Sale of Properties at Our Salesroom, 

Monday, August 19th - - - - At 12 'Clock Noon 

BY ORDER OF REFEREE 



No. 1. — New 3-story and mezzanine and base- 
ment, steel, class "C" building and lot 36:6x 
57:5 feet, at Northwest corner of Kearny and 
Sutter Streets and Clara Lane. 3 frontages. 
Entire building very light. Ground floor, mezza- 
nine and basement tented to Jits. R. Jackson to 
Dec. 31, 1916, at $800 per month, under secured 
lease, for clothing store (with option of 5 
years more at $1,500 per month for entire build- 
ing). Upper part leased to Dec. 31, 1916, at 
from $150 to $425 to Max Arnovitch. Building 
will carry 3 auditional stories. Average month- 
ly rental, $1,157, to Dec. 31st, 191*5. Leases on 
inspection at our office. 



No. 2. — New 5-story and basement class "C" 
building and lot 25x137:6 feet, situate Southeast 
corner of Bush Street and Mary Lane, near Kear- 
ny Street; entire building leased to one tenant 
at $500 per month. 



THESE PROPERTIES 
MUST BE SOLD 




TERMS OF SALE: — Thirty days allowed for settlement and to complete purchase. A Deposit 
of ten per cent, of the purchase money invariably required on tne fall of the hammer or announce- 
ment of sale: balance of cash payment on delivery of deed; and . not so paid (unless for defect 
of litle) then said ten per cent to be forfeited and the sale to be void. 



Taxes 



the Fiscal Year ending June 30th. 1913, to be prorated. 



22 



-THE WASP - 



[Saturday, August 10, 1912. 



Jules Restaurant 

- Special Lunches 50c. or a la Carte 

Ladies' Grill and Booms for Parties 

REGULAR FRENCH DINNER WITH 

WINE, $1.00. 

Vocal and Instrumental Music. 

MONADNOCK BUILDING 

Next to Palace Hotel 

Phone Kearny 1812. 

All Cars Pass the Door. Elevator Service. 



The New 



POODLE DOG 




HOTEL and RESTAURANT 

WILL REMAIN AT CORNER 

POLK and POST 

SAN FBANCISOO. 
PHONES: Franklin 2960; Horn! G 6705. 




ei/tuwv 



HOTEL AND BESTAUEANT 

54-56 Ellis Street 

Our Cooking "Will Meet Your Taste. 
Prices Will Please Ton. 



NORTH GERMAN LLOYD 

All Steamers Equipped with Wireless, Submarine 

Signals and Latest Safely Appliances. 

First Cabin Passengers Dine a la Carte without 

Extra Charge. 

NEW YORK, LONDON, PARIS, BREMEN 

Fast Express Steamers Sail Tuesdays 

Twin-Screw Passenger Steamers Sail Thursdays 

S. S. "GEORGE WASHINGTON" 

Newest and Largest German Steamer Afloat 

NEW YORK, GIBRALTER, ALGIERS, 

NAPLES, GENOA 

Express Steamers Sail Saturdays 

INDEPENDENT TOURS AROUND THE WORLD 

Travellers* Checks Good all over the World 

ROBERT CAPELLE, 250 Powell St. 

Gen'l Pacific Coast Agent Near St. Francis rUtel 

and Geary St. 

Telephones: Kearny 4794 — Home O 3725 



Oakland. The beautiful affair was planned for Miss 
Hazel Laymance, Miss Onristine Turner and Miss 
Ldith Porter. Oakland society, richly gownned, at- 
tended in large numbers, adding u distinctive blend- 
ing of eolor and beauty to the pretty surroundings. 
Among those who enjoyed Miss Porter's hospitality 
were Miss Nellie Adams, Miss Camille Adams, Miss 
Marguerite Anioss, Miss Marianne Brown, Miss Lil- 
lian Barnard, Mrs. John Britton Jr., Miss Mildred 
Boyne, Miss Letitia Barry, Miss Anita Crellin, Miss 
Katherine Crellin, Miss Dorothy Capwell, Miss Isa- 
belle Culver, Miss Olive Cutter, Miss Katheryn Cul- 
ver, Mrs. Roy Cowles, Miss Marjorie C'oogan, Miss 
Jessie Craig, Miss Katherine Carlton, Miss Margar- 
et Duruey, Miss Ruth Everson, Mrs. Herbert Ers- 
kiue, Miss Yarina Emmert, Mrs. George H. Freear, 
Miss Margaret Griffith, Miss Marion Gay of Sacra 
niento, Miss Carmen Ghirardelli, Miss Einilie Har- 
rold, Miss Edim. Harmon, Miss Aimee, Jorgensen, 
Miss Lorraine Jordan, Mrs. Milton Johnson, Miss 
Grace Laymance, Miss Hazel Laymance, Miss Eliza- 
beth Latham, Miss Marie McHenry, Miss Liela Sic- 
Kibben, Mrs. John McLellan, Miss Vivienne Moors, 
Miss Mabel Moller, Miss Marion Mitchell, Miss 
Edith Porter. Miss Marjorie Porter, Miss Gertrude 
Postel, Mrs. Byron Paul, Miss Carol Pardee, Miss 
Madeline Pardee, Miss Marguerite Parr, Miss Edith 
Pence, Miss Virginia Pinkston, Miss Dorothy Phil- 
lips, Miss Juliette Perrin, Miss Helen Runyon, Miss 
Lenore Salsig, Miss Gertrude Strum, Miss Caroliu 
Teichert of Sacramento, Miss Christine Turner, Miss 
Dorothy Thompson, Miss Dorothy Taylor, Miss Reid 
Venable, Miss Lois Voswinkel, Miss May Van March 
of- Sacramento, Miss Florence Wendling, Miss Helen 
Weston, Miss Margaret Witter, Miss Bessie Yates, 
Miss Fannie Whitman, Miss Heilbron of Sacramen- 
to, Miss Helen Sutphen, Miss Mary Keyes, Miss 
Mildred Knox, Miss Florence Ramsey,, Miss Gwendo- 
lyn Woodward, Miss Helen Bannon, Miss Alice 
Hiestand, Miss Katherine McElrath, Miss Frances 
Sherman, Miss Helen Hiller, Miss Harriet Newman, 
Miss Hazel Lawton, and Mrs. D. H. Porter. 

T 

LIVELY TIMES AHEAD. 

August and September are to be very lively months 
in Santa Cruz. A big day has been planned for 
the first of September. Labor Day and Admission 
Day will be celebrated. September will have many 
attractions to lengthen out the season. 

This Saturday night the annual banquet of the 
Ambassadors, the organization of commercial travel- 
ers, takes place at the Casino Grill, and the doings 
of the evening will be lively. 

August 15-18 is the date for the golf tournament 
at Casa del Rey. August 1617 the Bench Show 
of the Santa Cruz Kennel Club takes place on the 
board walk. August 24th the auto run from San 
Francisco will be the Jig event. Then comes Sep- 
tember with the tian Jose Elks, and friends will be 
here on the 1st and 2nd. 

From September 2nd to 9th the Fraternal Broth 
erhood hold their big outing at Santa Cruz. It is 
to include these two latter dates that Swanton plans 
to have a festival or feast of lanterns. On the bay 
in front of the Casino all boats which enter will 
be decorated with lanterns. The Beach Company 
will give prizes for the best decorated boats. The 
beach front will be lined with lights, and the build- 

( Continued on page 26.) 



VISIT THE 



Cafe Jupiter 



140 COLUMBUS AVENUE 

(Formerly Montgomery Avenue) 

SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 

.-. HOME OF MODERN BOHEMIA .-. 

WHERE YOU WILL FIND AN 
ARTISTIC ATMOSPHERE AND 
HIGH-CLASS ENTERTAINMENT 

THE MOST UP-TO-DATE TABLE D'HOTE 

DINNER 

In Town 51.00. from 6 to 9 P. M. 

Reserve your table in time — Phone Douglas 2910 



TECHAU TAVERN 

Cor. Eddy and Powell Streets. 

PhoneB, Douglas 4700: 8417 



A High-Class 

Family Cafe 



A DAINTY LUNCH served gra- 
* *■ tuitously to ladies every day during 
shopping hours, between 3:30 and 5 p. m. 



Under the management of A. C. Morrison 



f.O BEY'S GRILL 

^^ Formerly of SUTTER ST. 
Our Specialties 

OYSTERS, TERRAPIN, CRAB STEW 
STEAKS, CHOPS 

140 UNION SQUARE AVENUE 

L. J. DcGRUCHY, Msnwar Phone DOUGLAS 5683 



J. B. PON J. BERGEZ O. MAILHEBUAU 
O. LALANNE L. OOUTABD 



Bergez-Frank's 

OLD 

POODLE DOG 

CO. 

Hotel and 
Restaurant 

Music and Entertainment Every Evening. 
415-421 BUSH STREET 

(Ahove Kearny) 
SAN FRANCISCO, OAL. 
Exchange, Douglas 2411. 




Phones: — Sutter 1572 Cyril Arnanton 

Home 0-3970 Henry Rittman 

Home 0-4781 Hotel O. Lahederne 

New Delmonico's 

(Formerly Maison Tortoni) 

Restaurant and Hotel 
NOW OPEN 

Beat French Dinner in the City with Wine, 91.00 

Banquet Halls and Private Dining Rooms 

Music Every Evening 

362 GEARY STREET, - SAN FRANCISCO 



DO IT NOW. 

Subscribe for THE WASP :: $5.00 per Yenr 




At the Orpheuni. 

THE ORPHBUM offers for next week a 
program which lias never been surpass- 
ed in vaudeville. \V. II. St. James, 
who will be remembered for his acting with 
Dustin Farnum in "Cameo Kirby." and as 
the Squire in "Way Down East,'' will appear 
in a comedy playlet by Byron Ongley, entitled 
"A Chip .it' the old Block.' 3 Mr. Ongley is 
the author of "Brewster's Millions" aud co- 
author of "The Typhoon." in his latest ef- 
fort, "A Chip of the Old Block," he is said 
ti> maintain his high reputation and to pro 

s.mii a st amusing character in the person 

of a father who is delighted that his son sin- 
cerely flatters him by imi- 
tating him in every way. 
Mr. St. James is said to be 
inimitable in this amusing 
role. He will have the sup- 
purr of John Moore, Walter 
Jenkins, J. C. Davis, and 
Laura Dacre. 

Charley Case, "The Fel- 
low who Talks about His 
Father,'' will be a droll 
feature of the coming bill. 
Quite a while has elapsed 
since his last visit here, but 
he is still remembered as 
one of the most enjoyable 
of monologists. 

William Burr and Daphne 
Hope, immense favorites of 
the English music halls, 
come with a clever, melodi- 
ous and enjoyable .skit, "A 
Lady, a Lover and a 
Lamp." They are excellent 
singers and amusing come- 
dians. At the rise of the 
curtain the couple are dis- 
covered under the glow of 
a big lamp. They discuss 
in song and bright dialogue 
the sort of love that each 
pictures as ideal. The man 
is humorous, while the girl 
sings earnestly of the ten- 
der passion. Among the 
songs introduced is "Into 
.Dreamland, ' ' which made 
a big "hit in London vaude- 
ville theaters. 

Martin Johnson's wonder- 
ful South Sea Islands Trav- 
elogues will be exhibited 
for the first time in this 
city, and its engagement is 
limited to one week. Mr. 
Johnson was the only man 
that left San Francisco 
with Jack London on his 
famous little 45-foot yacht, 
"Snark,"that remained on 
the entire voyage, spending 
two and a half years among 
the islands oi the South Pa- 
cific, making photographic 
records of their une>ilized 
inhabitants. His travel- 
ogues depict cannibals, their 
wars, worships and tribal 
life. Hunting mammoth 
crocodiles and turtles, catch 



bead-hunters, the midgets of Borneo, savage 

methods of warfare, tropical vegetation and 

fruits. 

Next week will be the last of Chick Sale 
in his comedy protean entertainment; Lydia 
Nelson and her boys and girls, and Kathi Gul- 
tini, "The Lady .higgler." It will also he 
the final one of Bertha Kalich, conceded to be 
the greatest actress now appearing before the 
American public, who is repeating the bril- 
liant success in this city she scored in New 
York. Madame Kalich has created quite a 
furore by her artistic, thrilling and compelling 
impersonation of the French Creole Toinette 
in the playlet, "A Light from St. Agnes." 




Interesting News. 

FB. BENSON, tin- well-known Shakes- 
pearean actor has announced in Lou- 
• don I hat he has been engaged by rep- 
resentatives of the Panama (Janal Exposition 
in San b'rancisco in L915 to "invent and de- 
sign the greatest and most magnificent pag- 
eant the world has ever seen. " In telling 
how this came about, Mr. Benson said: 

"The beginning was at Stratford-on-Avon. 
We were holding the usual celebration this 
year, and two California gentlemen, who 
made the pilgrimage to Stratford, approached 
me. They talked about the 1915 exhibition, 
and said they wanted it to be something more 
than a show of canned 
goods on shelves, They 
wanted to get an idea into 
that exhibition and thought 
1 could help tnem. Well, 
we went over the various 
points, the opening of the 
Panama Canal, the hundred 
years of peace, the making 
of California, and the re- 
building of San Francisco 
after the earthquake, and 
my American friends gave 
me the hint 1 wanted. 

" 'All these achieve^ 
nienl s, ' ' they said, ' have 
been made possible because 
we, like you, are of the 
Island race. The things you 
pride yourselves' on, your 
great wars, victories, free- 
dom and love of home — all 
these are ours as well as 
yours, and the wall is down 
that parted our fathers. 
Young Americans no long- 
er begin the study of his- 
tory at the year 1760. The 
great story of England 
from the beginning is put 
before them. We have 
hen rd the voice of America, 
and that voice is the call 
of blood. ' 

"That was the hint I got 
and [ am going to make 
the San Francisco rj a g eant 
of 1915 the story and pic- 
ture the celebration of the 
history, work and triumph 
of the great Anglo-Celtic 
race. . When Mrs. Benson 
aud 1 go to San Francisco 
we will work with the di- 
rectors of the Exposition 
and the Bohemian Club. 
They have raised between 
them something like $40,000 
to make the celebration a 
worthy one. Between their 
energy and business capac- 
ity, and what they are good 
enough to call the artistic 
talents of my wife and my- 
self, we hope to make the 
pageant beyond all compar- 
ison, the most magnificent 
show that has ever been 
seen, and we hope that by 
it the feeling of friendship, 



ing flying fish, dances of the WILLIAM BURR AND DAPHNE HOPE, WHO WILL APPEAR NEXT WEEK AT THE ORPHEUM. or kinship, rather, between 



24 



-THE WASP- 



[Saturday, August 10, 1912. 



t lie two parted branches of this great family 
inav lie much strengthened and rendered 
family may be strengthened and rendered 
more cordial and more intimate. Let Eng- 
lishmen and Americans see manifested before 
them the great fact that they are all one 
people, that each nation be convinced that 
it shares in the achievements and victories 
of the other. ' ' 



At the Cort. 

THE success of the season of Gilbert and 
Sullivan opera at the Cort has been 
truly phenomenal, and capacity houses 
have prevailed during the past week, as in 
the two weeks previous. The notable nature 
of the company and production have made 
for this success. The fact remains uncontra- 
dictable that San Francisco has never had 
light opera interpreted in such admirable fash- 
ion as is being furnished by the star cast from 
the New York Casino. 

The fourth, and what must be the final, 
week of the engagement of this organization 
starts with Sunday night 's performance of 
"The Pirates of Penzance," which will mark 
the last presentation of this popular Gilbert 
and Sullivan opera. 

On Monday and Tuesday nights "The Mi- 
kado'' will be the bill. The production of 
this opera during the first w T eek of the en- 
gagement created something approaching a 
furore. Popular "Pinafore" will be given 
on the Wednesday matinee and on Wednesday 
and Thursday nights, while Friday is to be 
given over to satirical "Patience." The en- 
gagement will terminate with the matinee and 
evening performances of Saturday, August 
17th, when "The Mikado" will be repeated. 

DeWolf Hopper, Blanche Duffield, Eugeue 
Cowles, George MacFarlane, Kate Condon, 
Arthur Aldridge, Viola Gillette, Arthur Cun- 
ningham, Alice Brady, and Louise Barthel 
will be seen in the same roles interpreted by 
them in the previous productions of the Gil- 
bert and Sullivan masterpieces. 

On Sunday night, August 18th, comes "Ba- 
by Mine, ' ' the great Margaret Mayo laugh- 
maker, with Marguerite Clark and Ernest 
Glendinning in the cast. It will be remember- 
ed that this merry comedy dedicated the Cort 
last September. 



At Pantages. 

THE attendance at the Pantages Theater is 
unusually good this week, the bill being 
of a particularly attractive sort, includ- 
ing Taylor Granville's very realistic scenic 
production, "The Hold-Up, M with its wonder- 
ful train effects; the clever imitator of fa- 



CQB£ 



LEADING THEATRE 

Ellis and Market. 
Phone Sutter 2460. 



4th and POSITIVELY LAST WEEK 

of the 

GILBERT & SULLIVAN FESTIVAL CO. 

De Wolf Hopper 
Blanche Duffield Geo. MacFarlane 

Kate Condon Arthur Aldridge 

Viola Gillette Arthur Cunningham 

Alice Brady Louise Barthel 

Eugene Cowles 



Tonight and Sunday — "THE PIRATES OF PEN- 
ZANCE." 

Monday and Tuesday — "THE MIKADO." 

Wednesday Matiuee and Night and Thursday — 
■'PINAFORE." 

Friday — "PATIENCE." 

Saturday Matinee and Night — "THE MIKADO." 



Nights and Sat. Mat. Prices — 50c. to $2. 
Popular Wednesday Matinee. 

Commencing Sunday, August IS — "BABY MINE, 1 
with Marguerite Clark. 



nious composers, Wilhelmi, and his Imperial 
Yacht Orchestra; the "All Star Trio," who 
sing the old and new songs in splendid style; 
Alice Berry, the doll comedienne; the Jan- 
'kowsky troupe of acrobats; Howard and Do 
lores, magnetic ragtime singers, and Bankoff 
and Belmont, versatile dancers. 

Another carefully prepared program will be 
offered on Sunday, when San Franciscans will 
have an opportunity of laughing at Frank 
Bush, who is easily the best story-teller and 
character impersonator on the vaudeville 
stage. He has a style absolutely his own that 
has successfully kept him before the public 
for a great many years. The Tokio Miyako 
Troupe, the first Japanese to play the Pan- 
tages circuit, are said to present the most as- 
tounding gymnastic act on the road, one of 
the little brown men particularly distinguish- 
ing himself by ascending a twelve-foot ladder 
on his head without the aid of his handr*. 

Mr. and Mrs. William Morris, who are well 
and favorably known on the legitimate stage, 
and who are taking a little "flyer" into 
vaudeville, will offer their jolly playlet, "The 
Lady Down Stairs," abounding in bright lines 
and amusing situations; and the Three Mad- 
caps, English acrobatic dancing girls, will go 
through some hurricane terpsichorean evolu 
tions that are said to be as graceful as they 
are unique. The Clipper Quartet, good sing- 
ers who couple their harmonies with no end 
of good, clean comedy, will appear for the 
first time here; and the Mayers, a lively sing- 
ing and dancing couple, will continue to en- 
liven proceedings. A special feature will be 
an International Cake Walk, under the direc- 
tion of Gertrude Kulalie, in which couples rep- 
resenting the most important nations will have 
a good, old-fashioned competition, such as has 
not been seen here in many a day. The cake- 
walk will be beautifully costumed and pranced 
to particularly catchy music. Sunlight Pic- 
tures will complete the bill. 

Carl Seed, John Cort's private secretary, is 
officiating as acting manager of the Cort The- 
ater during the absence of Homer F. Curran, 
the manager, who is now East on bis vacation. 
Although a young man, Keed has attained 
an enviable position in the theatrical world. 
His rise has been rapid. Beed is manager of 
the Moore Theater in Seattle in addition to 
being Mr. Cort 's private secretary. He is 
also in charge of the box offices of the entire 
Cort circuit, and devotes considerable of his 
energies in this direction. Eeed will remain 
here till the end of the month. 



a: , **5&/r# **^.- .,_.- ; 



ENTHUSIASTIC over the possibilities of what 
is known as the southern route for coast- 
to-coast tourists, Dr. S. S. Crow and A. 
Faulkner of Los Angeles have just completed a 
motor-car trip from that city to New York. The 
two men took the trip as a vacation in Dr. Crow's 
48-horse-power Pierce Arrow runabout. They 
made no attempt to establish any records, but stop- 
ped at several places for visits with friends and 
relatives and for sight-seeing. They left Los An- 
geles on June 5th and arrived in New York on July 
8th. Of tuis time they spent 17 days on the road. 
1 'We followed the southern route as far as St. 
Louis," said Dr. Crow, "and then branched north 
to Chicago, as we wanted to visit the Pierce-Arrow 
factory at Buffalo for a day. We thought we could 
do this more easily by going there on our way 
East, than by going direct to New York, and then 
touring back. 

"Within the next few years I believe the south- 
ern route, which leads through Yuma, Phoenix, 
Globe, Spririgville and Trinidad, Colorado, will be 
in excellent condition for tourists, and when it is it 



will be preferred by most ocean- to-ocoau tourists. 
Most of the transcontinental tourists now choose 
the northern route. But this is only open during 
the summer months. During the winter many parts 
of it are impassable. The southern route will be 
open the year round. Eastern people have little 
idea of the extent of the road work that is being 
done in some of the less thickly populated States 
in the West. Arizona and New Mexico are interest- 
ed in this work to a remarkable degree. New Mex 
ico has adopted the plan of working its convicts 
on the roads, and the progress made is surprising. 
There are roads in New Mexico that compare fa- 
vorably with the finest of the boulevards in the 
East." 

Why cannot the convicts in California be em- 
ployed on the roads? It would be a good solution 
of a problem that puzzles the advocates of true 
prison reform. Road-making would not do the 
convicts any harm and would do the State much 
good. 



Mr. and Mrs. W. H. Talbot, Miss Talbot, W. 0. 
and Eric Talbot are guests of Mrs. H. Darneal at 
the Casa del Rey. The party motored down from 
San Mateo for the week-end. 



A fishing party, consisting of Dr. and Mrs. West- 
phal, W. C. and R. B. Muraock, W. D. Burlingame, 
J. A. Hawkins, motored down last week from San 
Francisco for a few days' stay. Saturday morning's 
catch amounted to twenty-nine salmon, all averag- 
ing over ten pounds. 



What a man says to his wife goes — if he is us 
ing a telephone. 



Safest and Most Magnificent Theater in America! 

WEEK BEGINNING THIS SUNDAY AFTERNOON 

Matinee Every Day 

POSITIVELY LAST WEEK OF BERTHA KALICH 

in "A LIGHT FROM ST. AGNES." 

GREAT NEW SHOW. 

W. H. ST. JAMES and PLAYERS in Byron Ong- 
ley's Comedy Playlet, "A Chip of the Old Block"; 
CHARLEY CASE, "The Fellow Who Talks About 
^is Father"; WILLIAM 3DR.R and DAPHNE 
HOPE, in "A Lady, a Lover and a Lamp"; MAR- 
TIN JOHNSON'S TRAVELOGUES, Wonderful 
Stories and Pictures of Savage Life in the Far-off 
South Sea Islands (One Week Only); LYDIA NEL- 
SON ana HER BOYS AND GIRLS; KATHI GUL- 
TINI; NEW DAYLIGHT MOTION PICTURES; 
CHICK SALE, Comedy Protean entertainer. 

Evening Prices, 10c, 25c, 50c, 75c Box Seats, $1 
Matinee Prices (Except Sundays and Holidays). 
10c, 25c- 50c. 

PHONES DOUGLAS 70. HOME 1670. 




Market Street, Opposite Mason. 
Week of August 11th: 

EXCEPTIONAL ATTRACTIONS! 
FRANK BUSH, World's Foremost Story-Teller; 
TOKIO MIYAKO TROUPE, Astounding Acrobats; 
CLIPPER QUARTET, Original Singing Comedians; 
THE 3 MADCAPS, English Dancing Girls; MR. aou 
MRS. WILLIAM MORRIS, Presenting "The Lady 
Down Stairs"; THE MAYERS, Singing and Danc- 
ing Comedians; SUNLIGHT PICTURES, and 

INTERNATIONAL CAKEWALK! 



Mat. Daily at 2:30. Nights, 7:15 and 9:15. Sun. 
and Holidays, Mats, at 1:30 and 3:30. Nights, 
Continuous from 6:80. 



Prices — 10c, 20c. and 80c 



Saturday, August 10, 1912. 1 



-THE WASP - 



25 




OLD MAID'S 
DIARY -• 




ELL, DEAS ME! I'm kept so busy 
reading about divorces that I'm 
way behind in my civic work. I 
don't know whether Mayor Mott of 
Oakland was recalled or not, or if the gentle- 
man Moose or President Taft is elected yet. 
Lands sake! you'd require a secretary to keep 
I rack of political elections these days, let 
alone club affairs. Sometimes 1 think 'twould 
t't.' just as well to let those blundering men 
keep on running polities — even it' they do 
make such a mess of it. 

Mrs. Trotter was in to see me this after- 
noon. My, hasn't she been busy running 
around! So many weddings and engagements! 
She says the divorce crop next year will be 
immense. 

One of her young married friends has been 
to see a lawyer. Goodness me, such- deception 
as was practised on her! She told all her girl 
friends that she would never marry anything 
less than a millionaire who could give her a 
fine limousine to go shopping. And she threw 
over such a nice young man who could only 
support a motorcycle. He had the nerve to 
ask her to go riding with him. Gracious! She 
said if 't wasn't that her pet Boston bull 
might hurt his teeth on the young man 's leg- 
gings she'd turn him loose. Goodness me! ain't 
girls spicy nowadays? I'd no more talk to a 
young man that way when I was 18 than I'd 
bite my tongue off. 

Well, she married voung Bondsley, the 



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banker's sun, thai came around to \isit lier 
in a swell limousine with a big "B" on il 
as large as your lial And what d'ye think.' 
'Twasn'l lii- car al all, IK- just hired it by 
tin- hour from Kelly, the stableman, who keeps 

a mail liusv with a glue pol Sticking gilt niun- 

ograms on hired autos and buggies. Lands 
sake, isn '1 this a deci M ul age! 

The worst of ii is that the young man with 
tin* motorcycle lias made loads of money since 
the girl throw him over. He was so wild at 
her jilting him be flew around the country 
Like mad and tried to run down a street car, 
and he got so iiuu-n damages he's Btarted out 
as an oil operator. Luck just chases him, 
ItfrS, Trotter says, [f he bored down amongst 
a lot of oil cans in a vacant lot he M strike 
a gusher, she says, lie "s engaged to three 
of Mis. Bondsley 's friends that move in the 
most exclusive society, and he sends each of 
them a bushel of orchids before breakfast and 
takes them in turns riding in his 160-horse- 
pnwer limousine. Every time Mrs. Bondsley 
looks out the window and sees him fly by on 
his way to the Ocean Beach she feels like 
ringing up her lawyer and telling him to file 
divorce papers at once. And to make matters 
worse, her husband is one of them that says: 
''Where's that quarter 1 gave you two weeks 
ago? Lands sake, you haven't squandered it 
already?" 

I always did say that no woman should 
marry for money. But, goodness me! why 
should any sane woman marry at all ? I'm 
convinced no sane woman ever does. If she's 
not raving mad when she goes to the altar — 
halter, I should say! — she's surely that way 
after the ceremony. That's my firm belief. 

TABITHA TWIGGS. 

♦ 

Mr. and Mrs. Ralph Bias and tneir son, young 
Billy Bias, have returned from their trip to Santa 
Cruz, where they were the guests at the Bias 
home on Terrace Hill. Mr. Bias is the son of 
"Billy" Bias, one of the best-known and honored 
citizens of Santa Cruz county, 

♦ 

Mr. and Mrs. Oliver Dibble have rented a place 
at Menlo Park for several months. 

NOTICE TO CREDITORS. 
No. 13,815. Dept. 10. 

ESTATE OP MARGARET COLLINS, DECEASED. 

Notice is hereby given by the undersigned, M. J. 
Hynes, Administrator of the estate of MARGARET 
COLLINS, deceased, to the creditors of and all per- 
sons having claims against the said deceased, to ex- 
hibit them with the necessary vouchers within four 
(4 1 months after the first publication of this notice 
to the said Administrator, at his office, room 858 
Phelan Building, San Francisco, California, which 
said office the undersigned selects as the place of 
business in all matters connected with said estate 
of MARGARET COLLINS, deceased. 

M. J. HYNES, 
Administrator of the estate of MARGARET 
COLLINS, deceased. 

Dated, San Francisco, August 6, 1912. 

CULLINAN & HICKEY, Attorneys for Adminis- 
trator, 858 Phelan Building, San Francisco, Cal. 

LOAFING MEN 

And loafing money never did any community 
any good. The millions of dollars invested 
in the Continental Building and Loan Associ- 
ation have built thousands of homes. 

The CONTINENTAL BUILDING AND 
LOAN ASSOCIATION, Market street, at Gold- 
en Gate avenue, can be of assistance to you in 
getting the home. 

EDWARD SWEENEY, President. 

WM. CORBIN, Secty. and Gen. Mgr. 



Gray bait restored to its m tural i 
frodum's Egyptian Henna a perfectly 
toss dye, and the immediate. The 

mosl certain and satisfactory on for 

the purpose. Try it. Al all druggists. 





DR. H. 


J 


STEWART 




Begs to announce that he has removed hi 
studio to the Gaffney Building, 376 Sutter 
between Grant Avenue and Stockton 
Office hoars, from ten to twelve, and from 


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Street, 
Street, 
two to 


four, 


daily. 












Teleph 


one 


Douglas 


4211. 





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How to teach languages, we do know. 



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study a sister tongue. 

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School of Languages 

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Office FboDe, DouglaB 2859 



TRANSLATION FROM AND INTO ANT 
LANGUAGE. 



HEALDS 

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HOME OFFICE -425 M C ALLI5TER ST..S.F. 



Contracts made with Hotela and ReatauranU 

Special attention given to Family Trade. 

ESTABLISHED 1876. 

THOMAS MORTON & SON 

Importers and Dealers in 



COAL 



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Phone Franklin 807. 



For Health, Strength 

DAMIANA BITTERS 

Naber, Alfs & Brune, Agents. 
635 Howard St., opp. new Montgomery St. 



PATRICK & CO. 

RUBBER STAMPS 

STENCILS. SEALS, SIGNS AND ETC. 
660 MARKET ST., - SAN FRANCISCO 



Neal Liquor Cure 
Three wosSutterSt 

DAY phone Franklin 1098 

ADOPTED BY AUSTRALIAN GOVERNMENT 



26 



-THE WASP- 



[Saturday, August 10, 1912. 



SOCIAL LIFE. 



(Continued from page 22. t 
ings will be decorated with lanterns. There will 
be special floating fireworks, something new. There 
will be constructed a ship fifty feet long, from which 
fireworks will be displayed, and on the final night 
this ship will be burned, making a very pretty ap- 
pearance. 



AT CASA DEL REY. 

Mr. and Mrs. James Doolittle of Sau Mateo have 
been guests at the Casa del Bey. Mr. Doolittle is 
the manager and proprietor of the well-known Penin-. 
sula Hotel at San Mateo. His visit to Santa Cruz 
this time is for a few days' rest and recreation. 

Mr. and Mrs. Bert Wertheinier have taken apart- 



3UMMONS. 

IN THE SUPERIOR COURT OF THE STATE OF 
California, in and for the City and County of San 
Francisco. — Dept. No. 3. 

MURRAY F. VANDALL, Plaintiff, vs. All persons 
claiming any interest in or lien upon the real prop- 
erly herein described or any part thereof. Defend- 
a. us. — Action No. 32,539. 

The People of the State of California, to all per- 
sons claiming any interest in, or lien upon, the real 
property herein described or any part thereof, De- 
fendants, greeting: 

You are hereby required to appear and answer 
the complaint of MURRAY F. YAXDALL, plaiutitf, 
filed with the Clerk of the above entitled Court 
and County, within three monthB after the first pub- 
lication of this Summons, and to set forth what in- 
terest or lien, if any, you have in or upon that cer- 
tain real property or any part thereof, situated in 
the City and County of San Francisco, State ol 
California, and particularly described as follows: 

Beginning at a point one hundred (100) feet 
southerly troin the southerly line of Clement street 
and one hundred and nineteen (119) feet, four {±> 
inches westerly from the westerly line of 
seventeenth avenue, measured respectively along 
lines drawn at right angles to said lines of 
said streets, and running thence westerly and par- 
allel with said line of Clement street eight (8 1 
inches; thence at a right angle southerly and par- 
allel with said line of Seventeenth avenue three, 
hundred and fifty (350) feet ; thence at a right 
angle easterly eight (8) indies; and thence at a 
right angle northerly three hundred and fifty (350) 
ieei iu the point oi beginning; being part of Out- 
side Land Block Number 198. 

You are hereby notified that, unless you so appear 
and answer, the plaintiff will apply to the Court 
for the relief demanded in the complaint, to-wit, that 
it be adjudged that plaintiff is the owner of said 
property in fee simple absolute; that his title to 
aaifl property be established and quieted; that the 
Court ascertain and determine all astates, rights, 
titles, interests and claims in and to said property, 
and every part thereof, whether the same be legal 
or equitable, present or future, vested oi contingent, 
and whether the same consist of mortgages or liens 
of any description; that plaintiff recover his costs 
tterein and have such other and further relief as 
may be meet in the premises. 

Witness my hand and the seal of said Court this 
31st day of July, A. D. 1912. 

(SEAL) H. 1. MULCREVY, Clerk. 

By J. F. DUNWORTH, Deputy Clerk. 

The first publication of this summons was made 
in The Wasp newspaper on the 10th day of August, 
A. D. 1912. 

The following persons are said to claim an in- 
terest in, or lien upon, the said property adverse 
to plaintiff: 

The German Savings and Loan Society, (a cor- 
poration) San Francisco, California. 

Fernando Nelson, ban Francisco, California. 

PERRY & DAILEY, Attorneys for Plaintiff, 105 
Montgomery street, San Francisco, Cal. 



Valuable Information 

OF A BUSINESS, PERSONAL or SOCIAL 

NATURE FROM THE PRESS OF 

THE PACIFIC COAST. 

ALLEN'S 

Press Clipping Bureau 

88 riRST STREET 



Telephone Ky. 392 
J 1538 



SAN FRANCISCO, 



CALIFORNIA 



ments at the Casa del Roy for a few weeks' stay, 
registering from Sacramento. Mr. Wertheimer is a 
well-known business man. 

Mr. and Mrs. Frank Jaynes and Dr. and Mrs. 
William A. Martin make up a very delightful party 
who are again visiting Santa Cruz, registering at 
the Casa del Rey. 

Mr. and Mrs. Goldstein, Master Edgar and Miss 
Edith Goldstein are at tne Casa del Rey for the 
month of August. Mr. Goldstein is a well-known 
Sau Francisco business man, and is president of 
the California Fruit Canners' Association. 

Mr. B. H. Henderson and Rufus G. Smith, promi- 
nent oil men from Bakersfield, who are occupied 
with big things in that vicinity, have joined their 
families at the Casa del Rey, where they will re- 
main the rest of the season. 



AT DEL MONTE. 

Mrs. D. T. Murphy, Mrs. Eugene Murphy, with 
Miss Gertrude and nurse, went to Del Monte Satur- 
day for an extended visit, and Mr. Clinton Worden 
goes every week-and with his family. 

Del Monte is one of the favorite places for the 
army people. Major F. H. Sargent joins his wife 
and daughter regularly. Mr. and Mrs. C. W. McClure 
and Mr. and Mrs. E. J. Nowlen of the U. S. Army 
also spent the week-end at this resort. Mr. C. S. 
Stanton of the Examiner is a guest. 

Mr. and Mrs. Samuel Hopkins of Menlo Park ar- 
rived Saturday in their car. 

Mr. and Mrs. H. C. Breeden of Burlingame joined 
their friends at Del Monte Saturday. 

Mr. Stewart Lowery of Burlingame goes down 
often and plays golf persistently. Mr. and Mrs. E. 
H. Griffen of San Francisco, with some' Louisville 
friends, spent last week at Del Monte; also Mr. and 
Mrs. W. J. Woodsile. 

There is such a desire to get out in the quiet 
woods and live within hearing of the breakers that 
this summer the accommodations at Rancho del Monte 
and Pebble Beach Lodge are taxed to their utmost. 
In fact, if there were several more cottages similar 
to the one Mayor Rolph and his family occupy near 
the Lodge, they would all be filled. Painters and 
authors have in turn spent the spring and summer 
season there. The Rancho del Monte is being en 
larged and improved — there's where you get those 
home-cooked chicken uinners. The Lodge is nearer 
the hotel, and for the next ten weeks will be the 
scene of many a family gathering and pleasant little 
dinner party, with an occasional dance. 

Amongst the visitors from the southern part of the 
State is J. Whitcomb, a prominent landowner. 

Sylvain Schuhl, L. Alexander, Mrs. B. Ruppin, 
with Misses Florence and Edith Ruppin. have ar- 
rived for a two weeks' visit. 



SANTA CRUZ DOG SHOW. 

Entries closed Monday. August 5th, for the Santa 
Cruz Dog Sjiow. A hundred trophies have been of- 
fered, and with James Mortimer, the premier dog 
expert, of the country, for judge, the success of the 
show is assured. 

The dogs of Mrs. Malcolm D. Whitman (formerly 
Miss Jennie Crocker) will not be entered for com 
petition. 

Additional prizes have been posted by Miss Alice 
Wilkins, Mrs. E. F. Brown, Miss Jean Forgeus, the 



Bulldog Breeders' Association, John Martin, Warren 
Porter, Mayor Rolph of Sau Francisco, Mrs. Fred 
Kohl, Mrs. C. J. Lindgren, Col. Walter Martin, Judge 
Carroll Cook, Harry Hastings, Charles Conlisk, Mrs. 
J. P. Norman, Mrs. D. T. Murphy, Miss Lydia Hop- 
kins, Mrs. Hal JJiggs, Mrs. H. F, Anderson, Mrs. 
Norman J. Stewart, Mrs. Leon L. Ross, Mrs. W. W. 
Stetheimer, and others. 

John Martin is president of the Santa Cruz Ken 
nel Club, under whose auspices the show will be 
given. 

♦ 

DEL MONTE TOURNAMENT. 

The Del Monte prizes for the fall tournament are, 
if possible, more elegant than ever. There is a 
very large number of them, and they are now and 
will be on exhibition in Shreve's, on Grant avenue, 
for the next ten days. 

4 

CURRIER'S NEW STUDIO. 
E. W. Currier, the well-known artist, has moved 
his studio from 57 Post street to 220 Post street, 
5th floor, Hirsch and Kaiser building. Visitors wel- 
come Thursdays and Saturdays from 2 to 5 p. m. 



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Petaluma, Cal., November 11, 1911. — Dr. 
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I was sick for about three years with a compli- 
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SAN FRANCISCO. 




EYE TROUBLES VANISH 

WHEN USING MAYERLE'S GERMAN EYEWATER for weak, tired, in- 
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dfcnrg? iHagrrl? 

GERMAN OPTICAL SPECIALIST 

960 Market Street, San Francisco 
99"* Insist on getting Mayerle's "7P( 



Saturday, August 10, 1M2.; 



'THE WASP 



n 



SUMMONS. 

IN TILE SUPERIOR COURT OK THE STATE OF 

California, in and fur the City and County of Sao. 

. >ept. No, 2. 

\K1> W. bl tid HELEN SI EG 

PRIED, Plaintiffs, %- .\n persona claiming any "i 

ln ur lieu Dpi 

■ 

The People of the State of California, to all per 
ions claiming any Interest in. or lien upon, the real 
property herein described or any part thereof, De- 
fendants, greeting : 

You are hereby required to appear and answer the 
■ .. . . ut'KlED and H 

Glerk of the 
■ ■ 
after the oral publication of this summons, end to 
set forih what int. i " aay, you ti.-i v ■ 

■ 
situated in the I I County of Ban Pre 

if California, and particularl) i 

inning si a point on the southwesterly 

in iwu hundred unci 
twenty-five (225) ^ i ; rly from the corner 

formed by the intersection of the southwesterly Line 
of Gihnau Avenue with the southeasterly line of Jen 
niugs Bti rly "J" Strei 

ulng tb along haul lii 

ce at u right angle 
southwesterly one hundred (100 oee at a 

right in ilerly fifty (5u> fei I 

m a right angle northeasterly one hundred (100 j 
feet to the point ol beginning; being lots 14 and 15, 
in bio ue per 

i ranciBco, March -, l 
You are hereby notified that, unless you so appear 
and answer, the plaintiffs will apply to the Court for 
the relief demanded in the complaint, to wit, that it 
be adjudged that plaintiffs sre the ■ 
properl y in ft that their title to 

hi ii .i nil (i ieted ; that the 
bid and determine all estates, rights, titles 
interests and claims in and to said property, and 
every part thereof, whether the same be legal or 
equitable, present or future, vested or contingent, 
and whether the same consist of mortgages or liens 
of any description; that plaintiffs recover their costs 
herein and have such other and further relief as may- 
be meet in the premises. 

Witness my hand and the seal of said Court, this 
26th day of June, A. D. lttli:. 

(SEAL) H. I. MULCREVY, Clerk. 

By S. I. HUGHES, Deputy Clerk. 
The first publication of this summons was made 
he Wasp" newspaper on the 13th day of 
July, A. D, 1912. 

PERRY & DAILEY, Attorneys for Plaintiffs, 105 
Montgomery street, San Francisco, California. 

SUMMONS. 



IN THE SUPERIOR COURT OP THE STATE 
of California, in and for the City and County of 
San Francisco. — Dept. No. 7. 

MICHAEL U u;i [RE and BRIDGET MAGUIRE, 
Plaintiffs, vs. All persona claiming any interest in 
or lien upon the real property herein described or 

any part thereof. Defendants. — Action No. 3 2,4 7 7. 

The People of the State of California: To all 
persons claiming any interest in, or lien upon, the 
real property herein described, or any part thereof, 
defendants, greeting : 

You are hereby required to appear and answer the 
complaint of MICHAEL MAGUIRE and BRIDGET 
.MAGUIRE, plaintiffs, filed with the clerk of the 
above-cutitled Court and County, within three 
months after the first publication of this summons, 
and to set forth what interest or Hen, if any, you 
have in or upon that certain real property, or any 
part thereof, situated iu the City and County of San 
Francisco, State of California, and particularly 
described as follows: 

First: Beginning at a point on the northerly line 
of Union street, distant thereon sixty-two (62) 
feet, six (6) inches easterly from the corner formed 
by the intersection of the northerly line of Union 
street with the easterly line of Sterner street, and 
running thence easterly along said line of Union 
Btreet twenty-five (25) feet; thence at a right angle 
northerly eighty-seven (87) feet, six (6) inches; 
thence at a right angle westerly twenty-five (25) 
feet ;and thence at a right angle southerly eighty-seven 
(87) feet, six (ti) inches to the point of beginning; 
being part of Western Addition, Block Number 344. 

Second: Beginning at a point on the westerly 
line of Twenty-second avenue, distant thereon one 
hundred and twenty-five (125) feet southerly from 
the corner formed by the intersection of the west- 
erly line of Twenty-second avenue with the southerly 
line of Point Lobos avenue, and running thence 
southerly along said line of Twenty-second avenue 
seventy-five (75) feet; thence at a right angle 
westerly one hundred and twenty (120 1 feet; thence 
at a right angle northerly seventy-five (75) feet; 
mid tn en I'm at a right angle easterly one hundred 
and twenty (120) feet to the point of beginning; 
being part of Outside band Block Number 262. 

You are hereby notified that, unless you so appear 
and answer, the plaintiffs will apply to the Court for 
the relief demanded in the complaint, to-wit, that i' 
be adjudged that plaintiffs are the owners of said 
property in fee simple absolute; that their title to 
said property be established and quieted;that the Court 



THE WASP 

Published weekly by the 
WASP PUBLISHING COMPANY 

Office of publication 

121 Second St., San Francisco, Cal. 

Phones— Sutter 789. J 2705. 

Entered at the San Francisco Poatoffice as second 
class matter. 

SUBSCRIPTION RATES — In the United States, 
Canada and Mexico, $5 a year in advance; six 
mouths, $2.50 ; three months, $1.25 ; single 
copies, 10 cents. For sale by all newsdealers. 

FOREIGN SUBSCRIPTIONS— To countries with 
in the Postal Union, $6 per year. 



ascertain and determine all estates, rights, titles, in 
tenets and claims in and to said property, and every 
part thereof, whether the same be legal or equitable, 
present or future) vested or contingent, and whether 
the same consist of mortgages or liens of any de- 
scription: thai plaintiffs recover their costs herein and 
have such other and further relief as may be meet 
imises. 

Witness my hand and the seal of said Court, this 
isrh day of July. A. D. 1912 

(SEAL) H. I. MULCREVY, Clerk. 

r... .ii in \\\ ORTH, Deputj Clerk, 

The first publication of this summons was made 
in Che Wasp uowspaper on t lie loth day of August, 
A. D. 1913. 

PERRY & DAILEY, Attorneys for Plaintiffs, 105 
Montgomery St., San FranolBCO, Cal. 



SUMMONS. 

IN THE SUPERIOR COURT OF THE STATE OK 
California, in and for the City and County of San 
Fro nciscc I >ept. No. 4. 

GIUSEPPE DIRESTA, Plaintiff, vs. All persons 
claiming any interest in or lien upon the real prop- 
erty herein described or any part thereof, Defend- 
ants. — Action No. 32,371. 

The People of the Slate of California, to all per- 
sons claiming any interest in, or lien upon, the real 
property herein described or any part thereof, De- 
fendants, greeting; 

You are hereby required to appear and answer the 
complaint of GIUSEPPE DIRESTA, plaintiff, filed 
with the Clerk of the above entitled Court and 
County, within three months after the first publica- 
tion of this summons, and to set forth what interest 
or lien, if any, you have in or upon that certain 
real property, or any part thereof, situated in the 
City and County of San Francisco, State of Califor- 
nia, and particularly described as follows: 

Beginning at a point on the easterly line of Octavia 
Street, distant thereon thirty-one (31) feet, three (3) 
inches southerly from the corner formed by the in- 
tersection of the easterly line of Octavia Street with 
the southerly line of Lombard Street, and running 
thence southerly and along said line of Octavia 
Street twenty-five (25) feet; thence at a right angle 
easterly one hundred (100) feet; thence at a right 
angle northerly twenty-five (25) feet; and thence at 
a right angle westerly one hundred (100) feet to 
the point of beginning; being part of WESTERN 
ADDITION BLOCK Number 170. 

You are hereby notified that, unless you so appear 
and answer, the plaintiff will apply to the Court for 
the relief demanded in the complaint, to-wit, that 
it be adjudged that plaintiff ia the owner of said 
property in fee simple absolute; that his title to 
said property be established and quieted; that the 
Court ascertain and determine all estates, rights, 
titles, interests and claims in and to said property, 
and every part thereof, whether the same be legal 
or equitable, present or future, vested or contingent, 
and whether the same consist of mortgages or liens 
of any description; that plaintiff recover his costs 
herein and have such other and further relief as 
may be meet in the premises. 

Witness my hand and the seal of said Court this 
20th day of June, A. D. 1912. 

(SEAL) H. I. MULCREVY, Clerk. 

By S. I. HUGHES, Deputy Clerk. 

The first publication of this summons was made in 
"The Wasp" newspaper on the 6th day of July, 
A. D. 1912. 

PERRY & DAILEY, Attorneys for Plaintiff, 105 
Montgomery Street, San Francisco, Cal. 

SUMMONS. 



THE SUPERIOR COURT OF THE STATE OF 
California, in and for the City and County of San 
Francisco. — Dept. No. 7. 

JOSEPH G. McVERRY, Plaintiff, vs. All persons 
claiming any interest in or lien upon the real prop- 
erty herein described or any part thereof, Defend- 



■ . : ■ 

e Of the State of California, to all 
persons claiming any interest in, or lieu upon, 
property herein described or any part there- 
of Defendants, greeting: 

You are hei n d to appear and answer 

■ 

■ 
in three months aft. 
cation of ibis summons, and to set forth what in- 
Ot lien, if any, you have in ur upon that 
certain real property, or any part thereof, litnated 
in the City and County of San Francisco, State of 
California, and particularly described as follows: 

.. tersec' 
line of Lawton (formerly "L "j 
i Eleventh v 

an«l r 

i two hundred end forty (2*0 i 

nth Avenue, thence north- 
erly ai 

■ 

d end twenty (120) feet ; I 

rtherly twelve (12) feet, six (6) 

... 

•"" l twenty I 120 I reel I ■ westei Ij i 

I along said 

Eleventh Avon ■ hundred (100) feet to 

part of OUTSIDE 

rg 

otified that, unless you so uppoar 
and answer, the plaiutiff will apply to the Court 
for the roliof demanded in the complaint, to-wit, 
that it be adjudged that plaintiff iB the owner of 

roperty in fee simple absolute ; thai hi 
to said property be established and quieted; that 
the Court ascertain and determine all estates, rights, 
titles, interest and claims in and to said property, 
and every part thereof, whether the same be legal 
or oquitable, present or future, vested or contin- 
gent, and whether the same consist of mortgages 
or liena of any description; that plaintiff recover 
his costs herein and have such other and further 
relief as may be meet in the premises. 

Witness my hand and the seal of said Court, 
this 9th day of July, A. D. 1912. 
(SEAL) H. I. MULCREVY. Clerk. 

By II. I. PORTER, Deputy Clerk. 

The first publication of this summons was made 
in "The Wtsp" newspaper on the 20th day of July, 
A. D. 1912. 3 ' 

PERRY & DAILEY, Attorneys for Plaintiff, 105 
Montgomery Street, San Francisco, Oalifo 

SUMMONS, 



IN THE SUPERIOR COURT OF THE STATE OF 
California, in and for the City and County of San 
h ranciBco. — Dept. No. 10. 

NORENA M. LIBBY, Plaintiff, vs. BURR A. 
LIBBY, Defendant. — Action No. 42,622. 

Action brought in the Superior Court of the State 
of California in and for the City and County of 
San Francisco, and the Complaint filed in the office 
of the County Clerk of said City and County. 

The People of the State of California send greet- 
ing to BURR A. LIBBY, Defendant. 

You are hereby required to appear in an action 
brought against you by the above-named Plaiutiff 
m the Superior Court of the State of California, in 
and for the City and County of San Francisco, and 
to answer the Complaint filed therein within ten 
days (exclusive of the day of service) after the 
service on you of this summons, if served within 
this City and County; or if served elsewhere within 
thirty days. 

The said action is brought to obtain a judgment 
and decree of this Court dissolving the bonds of 
matrimony now existing between plaintiff and de- 
fendant, on the ground of defendant's willful neg- 
lect and desertion, also for general relief, as will 
more fully appear in the Complaint on file, to which 
special reference is hereby made. 

And you are hereby notified that, unless you ap- 
pear and answer as above required, the said Plaint- 
iff will take judgment for any moneys or damages 
demanded in the complaint as arising upon contract 
or will apply to the Court for any other relief de- 
manded in the complaint. 

Given under my hand and the seal of the Superior 
Court of the State of California, in and for the City 
and County of San Francisco, this 1st day of June, 

(SEAL) H. I. MULCREVY, Clerk 

m. „ fi y L - w - WELCH, Deputy Clerk. 

The first publication of this summons was made 

m The WaBp" newspaper on the 8th day of June, 

A. \*. 19X2. 

GERALD C. HATSBT, Attorney for Plaintiff 
501-502-503 California Pacific Building, San Fran- 
cisco, Cal. 



Office Hour. Residence 

|a. m. 10 5:20 p. m. 573 Fdth Avenue 

Phone DouaU. 1501 Hour. 6 lo 7:30 p. m 

Phone P.dte 275 

W. H. PYBURN 

NOTARY PUBLIC 

My Motto "ALWAYS IN" 
On pule Fraocait Se h.bla Eip.no 

Office: 229 Montgomery- Street 

San Fran.ci.co California 



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The Saint : on return trip offers same 
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Phone or call on Hie for reservations. 

Jas. B. Duffy, Gen. Agt., 673 Market St., 
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yosemite 
national park 

The Outing Place of California. 

SNOW-CAPPED MOUNTAINS : : THUNDERING WATEE- 

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:: MASSIVE WALLS AND DOMES :: 

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A SMOOTH, DUSTLESS, WELL-SPRINKLED 

ROAD INTO THE VALLEY 

A Special Feature of This Season's Trip 

The waterfalls are booming full. Conditions in the Valley 
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Why visit the commonplace resort, when the sublime and 
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It is now a quick, comfortable trip into the Valley. For 
full information or descriptive folder, address your camp or 
uotel in Yosemite, any ticket office or information bureau in 
California, or 

Yosemite Valley Railroad 

COMPANY 

MERCED, CAL. 



i3333£&2C&X23XmmS^ 



Vol. LXVUI— No. 7. 



SAN FRANCISCO, AUGUST 17, 1912. 



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Vol. LX VI II— No. 7. 



SAN FBANCISCO, AUGUST 17, 1912. 



Price, 10 (JentB. 



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UY AMERICUS 



i OME statesman who has been keeping tab on the days' 
work of the Hon. Hiram Johnson lias figured out that 
the eminent statesman has devoted 100 days to the 
duties of his office since he was elected. I confess that 
it surprises me that Hiram has wasted that much of his valuable 
time earning his salary as Governor of California when he could 
draw it just as easily without even going near his office. It is 
bad policy to educate the people to the idea that public officials 
are elected to perform public duties and neglect their own 
affairs. The contrary is 

the true principle, and has ^7^. ^^£* liA ^\ -^ jS 
been exemplified admirably ^» 
by the Hon. Hiram and oth- ^ 

id 



er illustrious citizens in 
California, including the 
late "Wm. H. Langdon and 
that other self-sacrificing 
patriot, Edwin R. Zion. 

Cynics may remark that 
"republics are ungrate- 
ful, ' ' but we have pot 
found it so in San Francis- 
co. 

Mi. Langdon, having 
stoutly resisted all attempts 
to drag him to his desk in 
the District Attorney's of- 
fice, to waste his precious 
time in trying to jail 
thieves and hang murderers, 
was rewarded in the third 
month of his official term 
by the nomination for Gov- 
ernor of California. That 
discriminating! judge of 
civic worth, the Hon. Wm. 
R. Hearst, selected Mr. 

Langdon for the honor, and from the hour of his nomination on 
the Hearst ticket till election day in November Mr. Landgon 
drew his salary as District Attorney for riding around the State 
in a city -bought automobile canvassing for votes. It was such 
an edifying example of civic pride and purity that after Mr. 
Langdon got walloped at the polls the public consoled him by 
making him the High Cockalorum of the Graft Prosecution, 
with special powers to employ as many of his friends and rela- 
tives as he wished, and draw as much money from the public 




A SURPRISE PARTY 



treasury as he said he required. Mr. Langdon entered public 
office as a needy pedagogue, and left it in a few years as the 
affluent owner of several automobiles, not counting those which 
the city kept for his week-end outings. 

Not as eminent in the profession of vote-getting as former 
District Attorney Langdon, or the very eminent incumbent 
of the Governor's office, but filled with a similar spirit of civic 
pride, is the Hon. Edwin Ray Zion, now head of the newly creat- 
ed Bureau of Efficiency. It costs the city $10,000 to begin with, 
and will probably cost $10(1, 111.111 to finish up on. Mr. Zion, like 
some of his illustrious prototypes in public office, nas never been 
charged with straining his back or arms in preference to his 
conscience. He has long been noted in political circles as an 
exponent of the principle that "public office is a private snap," 
and the shorter the hours the lighter should be the work and 
the larger the pay. His fertile brain was one of the first to 

conceive the advisability of 
a City Hall clerks' combi- 
nation for long summer va- 
cations, six hours ' daily 
work, and a holiday on Sat- 
urday with full pay. His 
literary labors in writing 
pamphlets to promote his 
philanthropic schemes would 
have prevented his regular 
daily attendance as a Dep- 
uty Tax Collector. But to 
Mr. Zion 'a credit be it said, 
he has never made a stren- 
uous effort to perform his 
official duties at thle ex- 
pense of his private fads 
and interests. 

At every election Mr. 
Zion turns up as a candi- 
date for public office, and 
between his political cam- 
paigns busies himself as an 
attorney in his office in the 
Monadnock Building, or in 
the lobby of the State Leg- 
islature when that august 
body is in session. 
The statistician who figured out that the Hon. Hiram has 
worked only 100 days at Sacramento since his election as Gov- 
ernor would have a hard time figuring that Mr. Zion has worked 
at all since he became a City Hall deputy. His intermittent 
and semi-occasional appearance for all-day work at his desk 
in the Tax Collector's office have been so rare as to be the sub- 
jects of newspaper publications. He has done more than any 
other one clerk in the City Hall to absolve toiling humanity 
from the primal curse of hard work. His bright example has 



THE WASP- 



[Saturday, August 17, 1912. 



given hope that we are rapidly nearing the 
millennium, when everybody will hold a public 
office, with no duties more onerous than 
cashing a pay warrant once a month. 

In Mr. Zion's case, as in that of the patriot- 
ic Langdon, civic virtue has brought its well- 
deserved rewards. When the Board of Super- 
visors, the other day, created the Bureau of 
Efficiency to conceal its own inefficiency, no 
doubt, whom did the sapient city fathers 
select to run the concern? Who but Zion, 
whose record dims that of our Governor, with 
his laborious record of 100 days on the job 
since the people elected him 600 days ago. 

The Vice-Presidency of the United States 
would be but a poor reward for Governor 
Johnson's efforts in behalf of "progressive" 
government, which is now well understood to 
mean rapid progression of the taxpayers in 
the direction of the almshouse. By the aid of 
the Zions and Johnsons in office and anxiously 
looking for other offices, while the people foot 
the bills, the march of the taxpayers will 
soon become a gallop. Every day we get 
nearer to the interesting condition where the 
chief industry of the nation will be politics, 
and the great majority will draw salaries 
from the State for doing nothing for it. 



SADLY NEEDED. 

NOW that we have a Bureau of Efficiency, 
created by the wisdom of City Fathers 
Muidoek, Gianhini, Andy Gallagher, 
Murphy and Grandpa Payot, would it not be 
a judicious move to creat a Bureau of Defi- 
ciency? There is likely to be much more 
for the latter to attend to than for the for- 
mer. Efficiency in city government in the 
United States, or anywhere else, there never 
can be while every tramp's vote counts as 
much ,as that of the best citizen. Efficiency 
is a pipe-dream when every drunken bum can 
walk up to the ballot-box and vote for an 
issue of twenty or a hundred million dollars ' 
worth of bonds, and saddle the debt on the 
community in which the loafers have no hon- 
est interest. 

Municipal government, with the universal 
franchise as a perquisite, is a ghastly joke, 
and must end in the deterioration of the com- 
munities that persist in conducting it on such 
a senseless plan. 

A Bureau of Deficiency would therefore be 
a desirable addition to the list of expensive 
ornaments that now decorate the pay-roll of 
our municipality. Unlike the Bureau of Effi- 
ciency, which can deal only with foolish 
themes, the Bureau of Deficiency will deal 
with actual facts. For instance, there is the 
fact that we have spent twice what we fig- 



ured on for our Auxiliary Fire Protection Sys- 
tem, and it isn 't finished yet, and high insur- 
ance rates are giving our merchants frightful 
headaches. - " 

We have to make good a deficiency caused 
by repairing the Twin Peaks reservoir, which 
turned out to be a sieve after Manson and 
Connick finished its engineering. 

We will have nice, healthy deficiencies on 
our Geary Street Municipal Railroad and our 
municipal water supply, and everything else 
municipal just as long as the community 
sticks to the foolish notion that the votes of 
the mob should control the city government 
and make it a matter,, of pothouse politics, in- 
stead of strict business on a sound dollar-and- 
cents basis — the business ,of ■ giving the citi- 
zens protection of life and property for the 
least money. 



Af termraath off 



THE CITY IN THE TOILS. 

UNITED STATES JUDGE FARRING-TON, 
whose honesty and judgment have been 
unquestioned, decided that the Spring 
Valley Water Company 's property was worth 
$26,000,000. Since then the Company's plant 
must have suffered some deterioration. That 
deterioration is probably offset by expend- 
itures of the Company on its property since 
.Judge Farrington 's decision. 

Our City Government has seen fit to offer 
the Spring Valley Company $38,500,000 for 
this property, which an able and disinterested 
United States Judge said was worth only 
$26,000,000. Moreover, since Judge Earring- 
ton's decision, it has become apparent that 
the Spring Valley Company has not nearly as 
large a water supply as it claimed. Engineer 
John R. Freeman 's recent report cut down the 
amount greatly. 

In view of these undisputed facts, it is 
impossible to understand why the city should 
offer the Spring Valley speculators $38,500,- 
000. They bought the properly as a stock 
speculation, and have managed it as such 
with utter disregard of the public. San Fran- 
cisco was burned in 1906 because the main 
pipe of the Spring Valley Company, which 
rested on rotted wooden trestles in the San 
Bruno marsh, fell and burst. Since then 
nothing has been done by the Spring Valley 
Company to avert another catastrophe by 
fire. 



We citizens of San Francisco owe no debt 
of gratitude to the Spring Valley Company 
and the stock speculators who hold it like 
Shylock, demanding their last ducat. "Never- 
theless, we should treat the Company with 
fairness and even liberality. It is proper 
cities should pay generously for property util- 
ities they wish to acquire by bargain or con- 
demnation. 

If San Francisco offered the Spring Valley 
Company $5,000,000 more for the company's 
property than Judge Farrington decided it 
was worth, the offer should be regarded as 
liberal. 

The Spring Valley people themselves offered 
to sell to the city for $35,000,000 a few years 
ago. That is $9,000,000 more than the United 
States court said the property was worth. 
Nine million dollars is a lot of money, even 
when public money. The interest on it as 5 
per cent is $450,000 a year. How many use- 
ful things could be done with $450,000 a 
year under wise management! 

The present' offer of $38,500,000, besides the 
$1,500,000 of impounded water rates — $40,- 
000,000 in all — is an excessive price. It is 
$5,000,000 more than the Spring Valley people 
offered to sell for when their water supply 
was supposed to be much greater than it is 
now positively known to be. We know now, 
absolutely, that the Spring Valley supply is 
insufficient for San Francisco, before the Ex- 
position is opened. It would therefore be 
necessary, after we bought the property for 
$40,000,000, to expend a large sum to make 
the water supply sufficient. 

First of all, the Calaveras dam would have 
to be built. The building of this Calaveras 
dam and the laying of a 6%-foot steel pipe 
from the dam to Crystal Spring reservoir will 
cost $11,660,000, according to Spring Valley 
figures of ten years ago. Building extensions 
of city mains will cost $2,200,000 according 
to figures furnished the Supervisors several 
months since. 

The actual cost to the people of San Fran- 
cisco will, therefore, be $53,860,000, and not 
$38,500,000. Figure it up for yourself. Any 
schoolboy can do so. 

And mind you, kind reader, after the vast 
sum of $53,860,000 shall have been spent to 
buy the Spring Valley outfit, and put it into 
workable condition, San Francisco will have 
only a patched-up and insufficient water sup- 
ply. We will not have one gallon of that 
beautifully pure water from Heteh Hetchy 
which Mayor Phelan and his bright star, 
Marsden Manson, and other impressionable 
theorists, promised us more than twelve long 
years ago— the healthful, untainted water 



Thru Railroad Tickets 

Issued to All Parts of 



TOR PORTLAND 

1st class $10, $12, $15. 2d $6.00. Berth and Meals Included. 

The San Francisco and Portland S. S. Co. 

A. OTTINGER, General Agent. 



3 

BEAR 

BEAVER 

ROSE CITY 

Sailings Every 6 Days. 



United States, Canada and Mexico 

Id Connection with These Magnificent Passenger Steamers 

FOR LOS ANGELES 

1st class $7.35 & $8.35. 2d class $5.35. Berth & meals included 

Ticket Office, 722 Mkt., opp. Call. Ph. Sutter 2344 
8 East St., opp. Ferry BIdg. Phone Sutter 2482 
Berkeley Office 2105 Shattnck. Ph. Berkeley 331 



Saturday, August 17, 1912. 



-THE WASP 



from the mountain snows which we were to 
roceh «.' ' • without COSl ' * t<> us. Those were 
the words. 

The citizens of San Francisco could be for- 
given if they rose up in their just indignation 
and tarred and feathered every bungler who 
for the past twelve years lias muddled the 
water problem] till now we find ourselves up 
against tins egregious proposition: 

Acquire Spring Valley and improve it at a 
cost of $53,860,000, and be still without a 
proper water supply. 

We shall still be without a proper water 
supply, for even the building of the Calaveras 
dam will nut give the .Spring Valley plant an 
adequate supply for the growing needs of 
San Francisco, This city should have a moun- 
tain supply of water, aud could have secured 
one long ago had the water project been in 
competent hands instead of being an asset 
for a band of little politicians in the City 
Hall who have used it to keep themselves in 
office and to feather their nests. 

Fur several years The Wasp has striven to 
expose those political tricksters and arouse 
public sentiment, and has been the means of 
turning the calcium light of investigation up- 
on them. 

The Wasp has frequently asserted that these 
politicians never seriously intended lo g»>t 
Hetch Hetchy or any other mountain supply 
for San Francisco, although they have spent 
$2,000,000 of Hetch Hetchy bond money. 
What they seemed to be aiming at, and what 
The Wasp charged they were trying to do all 
the time, was to so arrange things that in the 
end the city would b,e placed in such a predic- 
ament that it would be forced to buy out 
Spring Valley in a hurry and at any price 
the speculators were willing to accept for it. 

That is the actual condition today. Some- 
thing must be done, and done in a hurry, and 
therefore be done not well nor wisely. 

It has happened that the crisis has come 
during the administration of Mayor Rolph, 
though he did not create the undesirable con- 
ditions that now exist and should not be 
blamed for them. 



THE TAXATION OF UNIONS CONTINUES. 

ON JULY 31st the Labor Council of San 
Francisco adopted resolutions to do- 
nate the sum of $10 per month for six 
months to the Mutual Aid and Employment 
Bureau. This is business which should be 
transacted by the unions themselves, but the 
bureau has been established for the purpose 
of laying ano'ther tax on the patient back 
of the labor donkey. In addition, a special 
committee consisting of Brothers Nolan, Mc- 
Guire and McLaughlin, assisted by the prog- 
nathous McCarthy and the delectable McDon- 
ald of the Building Trades Council, were paid 
their expenses for a junket to San Quentin, in 

Going into the homes of 5,000 society aud 
club women, THE WASP is one of the best 
advertising mediums for merchants who desire 
to reach people who have money to spend. 



a futile attempt to browbeat Warden Hoyle. 
Another means of drawing money out of the 
pockets .»(' labor is the appointment of a cum 
mittee consisting of the much-indicted Tveit- 
moe, Johannson and Clancey to extend the leg 
of labor and deplete the sack of the poor in 
the attempt at obtaining backsheesh to defend 
the much-indicted. 

These highwaymen will devise ways and 
means to pick the pockets of the members 
without making them squeal too hard. 

Tveitmoe, in his "organized labor," calls 
upon those whom he so readilv bleeds for 



more blond money, but as yet he has given no 
account of the thousands of dollars collected 

for the MeXamaras and the special $1n, 

fund which Harrow says he paid him, 
4 — 

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