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Full text of "WASP (Mar.-June 1907)"

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California State Library 



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Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2012 with funding from 

California State Library Califa/LSTA Grant 



http://archive.org/details/waspmarjune1907unse 



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DEVOTED TO POLITICS, SOCIETY, FINANCE a ART 




MOTORING UNDER THE DEL MONTE OAKS 

There isn't a more delightful automobile run anywhere than a Springtime Trip down San Francisco 
Peninsula through the Santa Clara Valley with its blosoming orchards and on to Hotel Del Monte, on the 
shores of Monterey Bay. The new Garage is especially equipped with all conveniences, and the mile 
track and oiled roads are the best ever for speeding. It's the popular stop-over point for motoring trips 
between San Francisco and Los Angeles. Many families are making their permanent home at Del Monte. 



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see. These Suits and Overcoats are sold elsewhere 
for $25.00 to $30.00. Style, fit and workmanship 
guaranteed. 

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Formerly 727-729-731 Market St. SAN FRANCISCO 



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LECHTEN BROS 



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1158 McALLISTER STREET Oakland Office-- 1 164 Broadway 



F. W. KRONE, Proprietor 



The Original San Francisco 

Popular Dining Room 



NOW OPEN 
911-913 OTarrell St. 



Bet. Van Ness and Polk 



Largest and Handsomest Dining-Room in the City--An Ideal Kitchen. Former 
Patrons Invited to Call and Inspect Our New Rooms and Equipment. 



Union Lumber Company 

REDWOOD AND 
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Railroad Ties. Telegraph Poles, Shingles, 
Split Shakes, Etc. 

MAIN OFFICE : 909 M0NADN0CK BLDG. 
Phone Special 615 

Yards and Planing Mills, Sixth 
and Channel streets, San Francisco. 



La Grande Laundry 

Have resumed business with, an 
entirely modern plant prepared to 
handle our old and new patrons at 
former rates. Phone Special 1690. 



Office and Works, 234 12th st. I 

San Francisco | 




Low California Rates 

DURING MARCH AND APRIL 
FROM ALL EASTERN POINTS 

Tell your friends at home— stopovers allowed in California. 
Personally conducted excursion parties from Chicago, 
Washington, Cincinnati, Kansas City, St. Louis and New 
Orleans. Write for details to 



FLOOD BUILDING 



MANN, Dlst. Pass. Agent 
San Francisco 




Volume LVII-.No. 12 



SAN FRANCISCO, MARCH 23, 1907 



Price 10 cents 



PUBLISHER'S NOTICE 

THE WASP is published every Saturday by the Wup Publishing 
Company, at 14 1 - 143 Valencia Street. Subscriptions $5.00 per 
year, payable in advance, postage prepaid. Subscriptions to all 
foreign countries wilbin the Postal Union, $6.00 per year. The trade on 
the Pacific Coast supplied by the San Francisco News Company. Eastern 
Agents supplied by the American News Company, New York. 



THE WASP will pay for contributions suitable for its columns, and 
will endeavor to return all rejected manuscripts, but does not guarantee 
their return. Photographs will also be accepted and paid for. Address 
all communications to Wasp Publishing Company, 141-143 Valencia 
Street. San Francisco, Cal. 

TO ADVERTISERS— As the illustrated pages of THE WASP 
go to press early, all advertisements printed in the same forms should be 
received not later than Monday at noon. Changes of Advertisements 
should also be sent in on Monday to insure publication. 

Address. JAMES F. FORSTER, Business Manager. 
Telephone Market 3 1 6. 



France's Art Impresario 

An Ex-Shepherd who became 
the Ruler of Artistic Paris 

Jules Pages, the San Francisco artist who went 
to Paris and there attained considerable success 
has been frequently referred to by the local news- 
papers as an instructor in "The Academy of Julian," 
who died the other day in Paris. Many newspaper 
readers have imagined that Julian was a great figure 
in the art circle world of Paris and recognized as a 
great artist. The truth is that he was a very bad 
artist. Despite this handicap, or perhaps because 
of it, he exercised more influence in art circles in 
Paris than any of the great painters or a dozen of 
them combined. 

Julian was originally a shepherd in the South of 
France and noted in his bucolic district as a great 
wrestler. It was undecided at the outset of his 
career whether he was to become a professional 
wrestler or a professional painter. He cast his lot 
with the artists and went through the usual 
struggles of the poor student who goes to Paris to 
conquer fame and compel fortune with his brush 
and paint box. Julian's struggle was bitter and 
protracted and he finally realized that he would 
have to seek success bv other methods than practis- 
ing the art of a figurj painter. He organized a band 
of wrestlers and exhibited them in Paris with con- 



siderable success. Then he hit upon the notion of 
teaching, much a., unsuccessful actors become the 
heads of schools of acting and men who fail at all 
occupations write books telling how vast fortunes 
can be made in trade and . Deculation. 

Julian's first venture in his new line was modest 
enough. He rented rooms in the Passage des Pan- 
iii. .mas, where the lamous Markouski had taught 
two generations how to dance. 

The success of the Julian Academy wr.s rapid. 
The head of the institution had execu*iv~ ability, 
which is the rarest of talents in the art world. 

There is a story current in the ateliers of Paris 
about Julian's first pupil who was scared by the 
emptiness and loneliness of the academy. 

"Perhaps you do not like the model" said Julian, 
whose manners were always most ingratiating. 
"That is doubtless why you are nervous. Ah, she 
shall be changed if you desire." 

No, the pupil did not object to the model. On 
the contrary, the model was quite satisfactory. 

"Then," said the crafty Julian, "I can guess your 
reason. It is because you see no one here ; but that 
is really an advantage. You will be able to work 
better without neighbors and besides I did not 
engage to provide you with neighbors." 

The pupils soon came to a man who could angle 
so dexterously for them. Before long Julian rented 
more rooms and hired more models. He gave 
medals that cost but little and gave him valuable 
advertising. He was a business man and politician 
Some of the greatest homes in Paris figured on his 
combined and he became a power in the art world, 
list of professors, Bouguereau, Lefebvre, Fleury and 
Benjamin Constant, those were names to juggle 
with and Julian knew how to handle them to the 
best advantage. The fame of the ateliers of 
Julian spread far and wide and attracted pupils from 
all parts of the civilized world. 

Eventually this clever art impresario became 
powerful enough to exert an influence on the Salon 
more or less direct. His pupils began to crowd it 
and he was the primary cause in the split in the 
Societe des Artistes Finears over which Bouguereau 
presided. The secessionists headed by Meissonier 
formed a rival organization called La Societe Na- 
tionale des Beaux Arts to which belonged such 
famous painter* as Carolus Duran, Puvis de Chav- 
annes, Duez, Dagnon, Bouveret and Gervex. In 




THE WASP 



the end Julian triumphed being the greater master 
of organization and political tactics. Indeed no less 
famous an authority than Zola referring to this 
famous split in the art schools of Paris has called 
the ex-shepherd painter "A modern Tamerlane who 
directed the applause and urged his men to the 
ballot boxes." 

The two Salons have since merged but the 
schools of Julian have not lost their identity. On 
the contrary they have grown stronger and more 
popular though some famous artists condemn their 
methods as deadly to original talent. The conven- 
tional routine of the Julian schools, it is argued, 
spells ruin to genius except it be of so high an order 
that nothing can smother it. Some famous American 
and English artists have condemned the French 
method interpreted in the Julian schools with which 
Paris had become dotted before the death of the ex- 
shepherd and wrestler whose political sagacity and 
hustling qualities helped to found them. The pupils 
think and see and act like a flock of sheep, all 
impelled by the same impulse. Wm. Keith our 
great California landscape painter who has studied 
in Paris, Rome Munich, Spain and England never 
hesitates to condemn the modern French school as 
one of "decay and death." 

A great deal has been said in praise of the work 
which Jules Pages has done since he left San Fran- 
cisco and become a professor in the Julian schools 
and has succeeded in selling some pictures to the 
French government. There are critics who believe 
that Pages would have become a much greater 
artist had he shown less implicit devotion to the 
Julian method. 



Calamity Howlers Discredited 

Editor Charles Sedgwick Aiken is making Sunset 
a far better magazine than it was before the fire, 
though it was then the best American monthly pub- 
lished outside New York. It was better by far than 
the average metropolitan-born magazine. 

Mr. Aiken in the March number of Sunset, in 
which it prints some editorial comments on the good 
effects of the great fire, and one which he does not 
refer to is the further improvement of the progres- 
sive magazine he directs. 

Mr. Aiken shows in a pretty vigorous article on 
existing conditions in San Francisco that the calam- 
ity howler is only howl. There is nothing to his 
prophesies of evil omen. He admits that "the ex- 
perience of April last was rather dearly bought ad- 
vertising," but it has been productive of much good. 
Mr. Aiken says : 

"The signs of pluck and progress that followed 
were worth money to see. Banks never did such 
business before. Capital has come in, and steel 
sky-scrapers are making the City's business center 
look like a bright red forest, while reinforced con- 
crete is making every near-by creek-owning farmer 
scratch gravel." 

"Publicity pays, as a rule," Mr. Aiken asserts, and 
there is not the slightest doubt about it. Advertis- 
ing always pays, whether it be a cftizen or a city 
that stimulates a liberal flow of printers' ink. 



Stronger Than Ever 

The Firemen's Fund Insurance Company has suc- 
ceded in making itself even strongerand more popu- 
lar than before the great fire. When the flames were 
leaping skyward for days and obliterating the busi- 
ness district of San Francisco, it looked as if the 
Firemen's Fund, or any other local concern, must 
inevitably be "wiped off the map." 

"How can any local company pay twenty per cent 
of its losses after such an overwhelming catastro- 
phe?" asked every cool-headed citizen who was al- 
ready figuring on the financial effects of the disaster. 

Within a short time, however, the Firemen's Fund 
Company paid fifty per cent of its losses in cash and 
the balance in stock, and now it is paying six and a 
half per cent additional. 

The stock given to the policy holders has a good 
market value now, and as the Company is doing a 
larger business than ever the stock is sure to ad- 
vance rapidly. 

Many holders have such confidence in its future 
that they intend to keep the stock until it reaches 
at least double its present value. 

The good-will shown towards the Firemen's Fund 
Company by San Francisco policy-holders has been 
most flattering to it. Only a company which had 
completely won the confidence of the community by 
honesty and liberal dealing could have been given 
such proofs of the friendliest regard. 

It shows, too, that Californians appreciate a home 
enterprise which is conducted on progressive and 
honorable principles. Enjoying, as it does, such 
general good-will, the Firemen's Fund Iusurance 
Company is certain to attain a higher position in the 
insurance business on the Pacific Coast than ever 
before, and the citizens of San Francisco will be 
much gratified to see it take its place again at the 
head of the line, where it stood so many years. 

A great many Eastern people have visited Del 
Monte this Winter. 

aThaff.3£eitti0 & <£a 
Exclusive 
$i$h'(BrsAt Clothiers 



No Branch Slores. 



No Agents. 



We have certainly got in our large collection for the present season 
special select Fabrics, the most accurate models, that we have ever 
shown. Smart, good dressers have complimented us. Can we have 
your opinion ? 

Here's where you can find Clothes for any time or place, 
the moment- you -want-them. Garments for tradesmen, morning 
taU coats, afternoon frock coats, evening dress habits, Overwraps 
and trousers. Correct in price and fashion. 



KING SOLOMON'S HALL 

Fillmore Street, near Sutter, San Francisco 




. r, »___ ^_. 



Wen ana Women 



■ a*. \ 



Jl Weekly Summary of Social Activities and Complications 




There have boon no developments since Wilson 
Mizner returned to New York and put up at a 
hotel instead of rushing into the arms of Mrs. 
Mizner, who was formerly Mrs. Yerkes, the widow 
of the traction magnate. Wilson must make some 
kind of a decided move soon as they say his purse 
is not as plethoric as it might be. By the way the 
Yerkes estate is not panning out as rich as was 
expected. Several banks have large mortgages on 
it but still there is enough left to keep the dashing 
Wilson in fine clothes and pocket money for the 
rest of his life if he could only break up the com- 
bination that has kept his bride away from him. 

Dr. and Mrs. Butler were guests of honor yester- 
day at a reception given by President and Mrs. 
Benjamin Ide Wheeler, at Hearst Hall, Berkeley. 
1 )r. Butler is President of Columbia College 
University and is here with his wife on their 
wedding tour. They were married in New York on 
March 5th at the residence of the bride's sister, Mrs. 
Francis Kay Pendleton. Mrs. Butler was Miss 
Kate La Montague, and belongs to a wealthy and 
prominent New York family. Dr. Butler was a 
widower, first wife having died four years ago. 
Earnest La Montague who married a well known 
California girl is a relative of Mrs. Butler. 

President Butler will deliver the Charter day- 
address at the University of California. He will 
also speak at gatherings of Columbia alumni in San 
Francisco and Los Angeles. 

Several affairs were given for both Dr. and Mrs. 
Butler, the largest being the luncheon of the Home 
Club of Oakland to which a great many of the 
prominent people of Oakland and Berkeley were 
invited to meet Mrs. Butler. 

# % * 

The Mexican Minister to Cuba and Madame 
Godoy gave one of the most elaborate receptions 
of the season, on March the 11th at their residence 
in Washington, D. C. The occasion was the twenty- 
fifth anniversary of their marriage, in San Fran- 
cisco on March 11, 1882. Mme. Godoy was assisted 
in receiving by the wife of the Mexican Ambas- 
sador Mme. Creel. 

This interesting event in Washington will call 
to mind the hospitable home of the Godoys on Mis- 
sion Street in the early days. The family consisted 
of Madame Godoy, Miss Adele Godoy and Joseph 
who is now the Mexican Minister to Cuba. Every 
Tuesday evening a reception took place at the 
Godoy home, surprises were always being planned 
by this talented family. Dramatic readings took 
place and original little pieces were acted, Mr. 
Joseph Godoy and his clever sister taking part. 
They formed a dramatic club to which belonged 
Edward Belknap and several who afterwards be- 
came prominent in the dramatic and literary worlds. 
It was at a meeting of this club that Marie Bur- 



roughs, then one of the pretty Arrington girls took 
courage and recited and acted with Joseph ' iodoy a 
scene from Romeo and Juliet. 

* * * 

An extremely sad death took place during the 
week when Mrs. George J. Engelhardt passed away. 
She will be remembered as pretty Lysbeth Painter, 
who was married early last year. Since the birth 
of her baby a couple of months ago, she hovered 
between life and death. This is a sad blow to her 
aunt, Mrs. B. F. Yemans, who reared her two pretty 
nieces only to have them both die under similar 
circumstances. Miss Phoebe Painter who married 
Dr. Gardner Perry Pond died a few years ago from 
the same cause as that which occasioned young 
Mrs. Painter's death. 

Despite the protracted storm, a large number of 
people went down to Del Monte for the week end, 
and were rewarded by sunshine. Amongst those 
who registered were: Mr. and Mrs. Robert L. Cole- 
man, Miss Cana Coleman and Robert L. Coleman, 
Jr., of Burlingame, Clinton E. Worden, George A. 
Pope, Samuel G. Buckbee, Mr. and Mrs. John B. 
Metcalf, of Berkeley, Ned Greenway, Dr. Frederick 
William Clampett, of Trinity Church, and Mrs. 
Alary Austin, the clever author. 

Mr. and Mrs. G. W. Irwin, Miss Helena Irwin, 
Miss Julia Langhorne, Mr. and Mrs. Francis Caro- 
lan, Miss Mary Keeney, Miss Katrina Page Brown, 
who had all been South, stopped at Del Monte on 
their way home. 

The friends of Charles Dickman, the artist, are 
on the qui vive for him to reveal the name of the 
young lady whom rumor asserts he is engaged to 
marry. The young ladv is said to be a talented 
writer residing at El Carmel, Monterey. 



San Francisco's Finest 
Hat Store 

OPEN FOR BUSINESS WITH 

KNOX WORLD RENOWNED HATS 

SPRING STYLES ON DISPLAY 



PAUL T. CARROLL 



Mutual Bank Building 



708 Market Street 



-THE WASP- 




Photo Genthe MISS LUCY MIGHELL 

Who will be one of the summer buds 

Mrs. Florence Land May has written to The Wasp 
in reply to the letter of her former tenant Mr. Robin- 
son, who professed to be much aggrieved at certain 
statements that obtained publicity after he had shaken 
the dust of San Francisco from his shoes. Mr. Robin- 
son was one of those who skiddooed after the earth- 
quake and he never stopped till he got to New York. 
Mrs. May claimed that in the gentleman's haste to 
put three thousand miles between him and this City 
he forgot all about paying his rent and furthermore 
got some of her silver spoons and other household 
effects mixed up in his baggage. The rent bothered 
her more than anything else and she expressed her- 
self rather pointedly as to how she felt on coming- 
back to San Francisco and finding her house de- 
serted by her tenant, everything topsy-turvy and 
the precious spoons gone. 

All this and more appeared in The Wasp, which 
being the voracious chronicler of local Society, was 
constrained to publish the popular lady's complaint. 

Then appeared the "come back" of Mr. Robinson 
when in far distant New York, he read The Wasp 
and found that though gone he was not forgotten 
by his former landlady. Mr. Robinson assumed 
what may be described as the injured innocent pose, 
and pointed feelingly to his hitherto stainless reputa- 
tion as proof that he would neither renege on the 
rent, nor appropriate the spoons, knowingly or 
otherwise. To render entirely ridiculous any sus- 
picion that he was implicated in the disappearance 



of Mrs. May's tableware he averred that the spoons 
she had left in the house when he rented it, were 
only ordinary plated ones which would hardly tempt 
the cupidity of a junkman. 

To tell the truth Mr. Robinson's denial dwelt 
overmuch upon the inferior plating of those missing 
spoons and it was evident that he wished to dis- 
concert the owner by making the point that she did 
not use or possess such a thing as solid silver in 
the table service of her handsome Broadway re- 
sidence. Such an accusation, if susceptible of proof, 
would of course be frightful but happily Mrs. May 
is not disposed to rest under it. 

The popular hostess has written to The Wasp an 
exceedingly frank and somewhat voluminous reply 
to Mr. Robinson's letter, in which she disposes of 
the serious charge that her pantry was habitually 
shy of solid silver and fine linen. 

The solid silver she says she had thoughtfully 
stored away and when she rented her home to Mr. 
Robinson, she let that gentleman have the plebeian 
plated ware, which subsequent events proved to 
have been even too good for it has vanished some- 
how. Where to only the law courts can determine. 
Robinson says : Search me ! I haven't got it in my 
belongings either intentionally or by accidental 
packing up," and Mrs. May stoutly maintains that 
Robinson alone is responsible . 

She makes several points against her ex-tenant 
that would hardly stand the test of a Supreme Court 
review of the case. Robinson she declares was "an 
itinerant preacher in Ireland before coming to 
America," and has abandoned the pulpit to become 
a mining promoter. There is nothing on record to 
show any strong affinity between plated spoons 
and preachers of the itinerant or any other variety. 

Even if there were it would not prove that Mr. 
Robinson had a magnetic effect on plated ware. 
The late General Ben Butler was accused by the 
Southern people and especially of New Orleans, 
Mrs. May's home town of having looted every 
silver spoon found South of the Mason and Dixie 
line in 1862. Even if this were historically true it 
would not prove that all American Generals are 
not to be trusted within reach of a pantry. 

It is hardly likely too that any sinister connection 
between Mr. Robinson's new calling as a mining 
promoter and the disappearance of Mrs. May's 
spoons could be shown. Even in Tonopah they 

Mr. Robinson tried to make the point against 



HOTEL RAFAEL 

San Rafael, Cal. 

OPEN ALL THE YEAR ROUND 
50 Minutes from San Francisco 



The only first-class hotel in the vicinity of 
the city. American and European plan. 

R. V. HALTON, Proprietor 



-THE WASP- 




back the spoons carefully. Mrs. May develops a 
fine vein of irony in treating this phrase of the 
matter. She says : ' I have received a notice from 
hi attorney to send his creditors to him and th;.* 
he will pay hem. I know Sing Loo or Fat, I don't 
remember exactly the :".iu, will rejoice uS he he. 
shadowed me for months presenting week afu ■ 
week, a greasy looking bill of 'fifteen dollars for 
vegetables' and i nave had to prove by witnesses 
that I am not Mrs. Robinson. I hu<* about made up 
my mind I'd have to pay this vegetable peddler 
myself and thus 'lay his ghost' as I'd begun to 
dream about him and his well worn bill." 

If the matter of Mrs. May's claim should come 
to '.rial in the local courts it would be a case celebre. 



MISS MARIE CHURCHILL 



Mrs. Nathalie Dole Latham's suicide in Paris has 
of course been seized upon by the sensational news- 
papers and the circumstances exaggerated and pur- 
posely twisted to imbue it with which the yellow 
editors call "human interest. " The bare facts are 
sufficiently full of pathos without torturing them in- 
to a fabrication of lies. 

Mrs. Latham, who wa". an American portrait 
painter of some ability went to Paris to study and 
work at her profession and being very good looking 
and well dressed, attracted a good deai of attention. 
Her intimate friend was the countess De La Salle 
of whom she painted two portraits. When she 
shot herself she was painting the portrait of the 
Marquis de Berenice and that young nobleman was 
in the act of descending in the elevator from her 
studio when the fatal shot was fired. 
* * * 

This incident gave the sensationalists something 
to work on and theorier of murder, etc., were in- 



Mrs. May that she merely hired a caterer when she 
don't salt silver mines with plated ware, 
entertained in the house he subsequently rented 
from her. The lady replies that such things are 
none of his business which is undoubtedly true. 
She also scores when she says : 

"He moved out bag and baggage after the earth- 
quake and disappeared, taking with him some of 
my belongings. If my cut glass and linen were as 
worthless as he makes out, the wonder is that he 
thought them worth taking." 

She proposes she says to settle the affair in 
Court and surely that is a wise plan. Lack of space 
prevents me from printing the column or two of 
withering sarcasm with which Mrs. May disposes 
of Robinson's pretensions to be able to judge of the 
merits of fine glassware and linen since he left the 
itinerant ministry in Ireland and came to this land 
of freedom and prosperity. It is well for his peace 
of mind that he cannot read in cold type what the 
indignant lady says of him in manuscript. He might 
wish he had never turned his back on the Cove of 
Cork and sailed Westward. 

In conclusion she refers to his profession of 
eagerness to pay any creditor in San Francisco 
whom he may have overlooked in his hot haste to 
depart after the earthquake, without turning the 
house over to Mrs. May or her agents and counting 



L TOZER & SON 

FORMERLY OF 110 GEARY STREET 



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Interior Decorating, Wood Finishing 
Enameling, Painting, Etc. 



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Sales Room and Office, 1527 Pine, near Van Ness, S. F. 
Sales Room 2511 Washington, near Fillmore, S. F. 

Telephone Welt 1402 



THE WASP 



vented to explain the death of a .good looking 
woman in the prime of life. The letter she left how- 
ever for those who mirfit first find her dead showed 
clearly that the act was premeditated. Like most 
women who deliberately kill themselves she had 
dressed carefully and arrayed heiself in her best 
attire. She had very fine blonde hair and took much 
pride in it. She requested that no one should dis- 
turb its arrangement. 

The real pathos of this woman artist's death is 
supplied by the fact that she was probably driven 
to kill herself by financial distress. It turns out that 
some time ago an elderly nobleman, the Baron Von 
Kopfer had informed one of Mrs. Latham's well-to- 
do friends in New York that she was in actual need 
and a thousand francs had been sent her. This sum 
does not go far in Paris or any other large city 
where people have to keep up appearances and Mrs. 
Latham before long found herself again in want and 
in the desolation of spirit which is likely to over- 
come a woman thousands of miles from home and 
friends made an end of her unsuccessful life. This 
is one of the tragedies in the art circles of Paris 
which we hear of. Many others occur of which we 
never hear of. The American painter, male or 
female, who goes abroad to study art, that most 
inexorable of mistresses, too often overlooks the 
need of proper financial backing. There is probably 
no place in the world where a penniless foreigner 
is more helpless and pitiable than in the capital of 
France. 

At a recent tea given by Mrs. A. Palmer Dudley 
of Menlo Park, the engagement of her daughter 
Miss Frances Coon to Oliver Kehrlein of this City 
was announced. Miss Coon is a niece of the late 
Judge Coon, and also ' a niece of Mrs. Wm. F. 
McNutt and Fred and Harry Loon. Mrs. Dudley 
was Miss Cassie Adams of San Mateo, after the 
death of her first husband she married Dr. Dudley 
of New York and has resided there for years. It 
was in that city Miss Coon was educated. Mrs. 
Dudley has leased a very pretty place at Menlo 
Park, where she and her daughter are now resid- 
ing. Mr. Kehrlein is a structural engineer and was 
educated at Stanford and Columbia Universities. 
* * * 

An engagement recently announced in Berkeley 
is that of Miss Olive Chapman a former San Fran- 
ciscan to Walter Babson, who is at present engaged 
in business in the Southern part of the State. 

Mr. and Mrs. Antoine Borel and their two daugh- 
ters, Sophie and Alice, will not return to San Fran- 
cisco until next Autumn, when a double wedding 
will take place. Miss Sophie is the fiancee of Mr. 
John Lewis and her sister is engaged to Mr. Aglett 
Cotton. The Borels have spent the Winter at their 
place in Switzerland and write that they have en- 
joyed the visit very much. 

Mr. and Mrs. Isaac Burneston Owens have sent 
out invitations for the marriage of their daughter, 
Miss Lvda Burneston Owens, to Mr. George Anson 



Herrick on April 2d, at 8 :30 o'clock, at St. Luke's 

Church. A small reception will follow at the bride's 

home on Pacific Avenue. 

* * * 

Miss Ruth Morton, who is to be married to Mr. 
Parker Holt, will be another April bride. 

The officers of the Twenty-second Infantry were 
hosts at an enjoyable hop last week. The Army 
tug left the Presidio calling at all posts around the 
bay. Not the least enjoyable was the return trip 
to the City. 

Mr. and Mrs. George Sperry will soon leave, for 
a trip abroad and be gone all the Summer. Their 
attractive daughter, Miss Elsie, prefers life in Cali- 
fornia, and will be the guest of her aunt, Mrs. 
William Crocker, during her parents' absence. 

Mr. and Mrs. Fred Kellam, and their three chil- 
dren, will soon leave for the East to be gone three 
months. They have rented their home on Pacific 
Avenue .to the Langley Porters. Mrs. Kellam was 
Miss Edith Bishop, daughter of the late F. A. 
Bishop, connected for years with the Southern Pa- 
cific Company. That attractive little widow, Mrs. 
Susie Allen, is a sister. 

Mrs. Ryland B. Wallace and her son, Bradley, 
have returned from Santa Barbara, where they have 
spent several weeks. 

Madame Oda Neilsen, of the Royal Theatre of 
Copenhagen, Denmark, and Valdemar Weliamson, 
also of Copenhagen registered at the Del Monte 
during the week. Mr. and Mrs. Halvor Jacobson 
came down from San Francisco to meet them. 
While in San Francisco the distinguished actress 
is to give songs and readings in her native tongue, 
with English interpretations. 



GET AWAY FROM THE CROWD AND 

LIVE AT DEL MONTE 



While the city is overcrowded, take your family to Hotel Del 
Monte by the sea, near Monterey, and enjoy every comfort. There 
is plenty of room there and plenty to do for recreation and health. 
Parlor car leaves San Francisco 8:00 a. m. and 3:00 p. m. daily, 
direct to Hotel. Special reduced round-trip rates. For details, in- 
quire information Bureau, Southern Pacific, or of C. W. Kelley, 
Special Representative of Del Monte, 789 Market St., San Fran- 
cisco. Phone Temporary 2751. 



ANNOUNCEMENT 



Mrs. Mott - Smith Cunningham exhibitor in 
Paris Salon of 1 906 announces that her Studio 
Shop at 1 622 Pine St., a few doors from Van 
Ness Ave., is now open for the sale of her jewelry 



-THE WASP 



As marriages between wealthy American men 
and English women are rare, the coming wedding 
of George Westinghouse, Jr., and .Mis-. Evelyn 
Violet Brocklebank is much discussed in New York 
and London. Both of the affianced parlies are ex- 
tremely wealthy, for while young Westinghouse is 
the only son of the famous inventor and is said to be 
heir to a fortune of S50.000,000. Miss Brocklebank's 
father. Sir Thomas Brocklebank, is one of Liver- 
1 1's richest shipowners and many times a mil- 
lionaire. 

* * * 

Another fact of interest is that Miss Brocklebank 

has a twin sister who so exactly resembles her that 
Mr. Westinghouse has been made the subject of one 
or two good-natured practical jokes, which have 
sometimes left him in doubt as to whether he is 
paying court to his affianced or her sister. In the 
hunting field, however, he has no troubles of iden- 
tity, for the future Mrs. Westinghouse is one of the 
best riders in England, while his future sister-in- 
law does not care for either riding or driving. 

The young people have known each other socially 
for years. The real family name of the Brockle- 
bank-. is Fisher, but the name was changed by 
"royal letters patent" to Brocklebank in 1845. Sir 
Thomas Brocklebank is, socially speaking, a very 
retiring man. He succeeded his father, who was the 
first baronet, only a few years ago. Sir Thomas 
lives in a great mansion in Woolton, one of the bet- 
ter suburbs of Liverpool. He has a wonderful col- 
lection of paintings by old masters, and his other 
country seat, Childerall Abbey, is a favorite "show 
place" for Americans who spend a day or two near 
Liverpool. 



Renewal of the announcement that Mrs. Collis P. 
Huntington will soon wed her late husband's 
nephew. Henry E. Huntington, is again reported. 
going so far as to assert the marriage will take place 
very shortly in Paris. Mrs. Huntington left New 
York recently for Europe. Mr. Huntington also de- 
parted for the same destination soon after the widow 
left. It is said a home has already been purchased 
abroad, and decorators have been commissioned to 
refit and furnish it for a wedding in the near future. 
It is reported that the magnificent country home at 
Throggs Neck, and the widow's Fifth Avenue resi- 
dence will pass to her son, Archer Huntington, 
when she marries, 

* * * 

An interesting exhibition of paintings by Mr. 
Walter Cox, including some fine portraits, is now on 
view at the Kilby Art Gallery, 1652 Van Ness 
Avenue. 

* # * 

For the tenth time the poem had been returned. 
The poet raved and tore his hair out until he was 
completely bald. Great was his fury. 

"But perhaps it is not so bad after all," he solilo- 
quized, as he gazed at himself in the mirror. "With- 
out my long hair I cannot be a poet, so I think I 
will get a pick and shovel and go to work." 

And that night the poet had beefsteak for the first 
time in ten years. 

Miss Madeleine Maxwell, whose portrait appears 
in The Wasp this week, is a talented member of the 
dramatic profession and has been winning favor as 
a member of leading stock companies. 



The White House 

Easter 1907 



Attention is called to a complete line of Ready-made Suits and Wraps from the best 
model establishments of PARIS. 

A special and direct importation of French Lingerie has just arrived. A full line of Silk 
Waists, Matinees, Negligees, Silk Petticoats. 



Raphael Weill & Co., Inc. 

Van Ness Ave., and Pine St., San Francisco 



-THE WASP- 




Photo Rice MISS VILAS of Berkeley 

Mr. William O'Connor, who has been very ill in 

his apartments at the Hotel Rafael, suffering from 

tonsilitis, is now able to leave his rooms. Mr. 

O'Connor is a great favorite with the maids and 

matrons of the Hotel Rafael. 
* * * 

At the San Rafael Skating Club last week Miss 
Edith Jones had such a serious fall that she-fainted, 
her sister Miss Gladys Jones being a witness to her 
sister's accident she too fainted, for a time this 
created quite a commotion at the rink. Miss 
Dorothy Baker also had a serious fall at the rink 
and is to be seen around the Hotel Rafael on 
crutches, which she will have to use for some weeks 
to come. 

The Womans Auxiliary of the Society of Cali- 
fornia Pioneers, whose annual reception is always 
eagerly looked forward to, will this year have their 
meeting at the residence of Mrs. Jane L. Martel, 
2613 Buchanan Street, Saturday March 30th., from 
2 :30 to 6 P. M. 

Miss Helen Woolworth who has been stopping 
at the Hotel Rafael for the past six months left for 
New York last Friday. She will sail for Paris in a 
month and join Mrs. Joseph D. Redding and to- 
gether they will tour the continent, remaining away 
for the next two years. Miss Woolworth is an 
orphan, the daughter of the late banker, R. C. Wool- 
worth. Her mother died two years ago while abroad. 



The Sequoia Club will dine this evening at a 
Van Ness Cafe and subsequently adjourn to the 
club rooms to enjoy an informal entertainment 

under the direction of the dramatic circle. 

* * * 

An engagement of much interest to society on 
both sides of the bay, is that of Miss Sylvia Harris 
and Dr. Samuel Hardy of Oakland, a graduate of 
Stanford University. Miss Harris is the daughter of 
the late Dr. James Harris of Virginia City, Nevada 
as also a sister of Mrs. Benjamin G. Lathrop, the 
talented vocalist, who is in New York at present, 
but will soon return to this City. Miss Harris is a 
successful physician of this City. She is also promin- 
ent in the North Beach Settlement Club and has 
been associated with Miss Betty Ashe on chari- 
table work. They helped many poor children who 
were left destitute by the fire. Dr. Hardy will assist 
his friend Mr. Armstrong as best man at the wed- 
ding of Miss Lida Lieb in April, and during the 
coming Summer his own marriage will be 
celebrated. Dr. Hardy and his bride will reside in 
Manhattan, Nevada. 

# * * 

Miss Jane Wilshire is busily engaged buying her 
wedding outfit. She will be married early in April to 
Mr. Polhemus. Owing to the illness of Mr. Pol- 
hemus' mother it will be a very quiet home wedding. 
Mr. Polhemus has prepared for his bride a very 
attractive home in San Anselmo, where they will 
pass the Summer. Miss Wilshire has received 
some very beautiful presents from her father's 
people in the East. One gift is a gorgeous case of 
flat silver. Her collection of cups is nearing the 
100 mark. 

* - * 

Mrs. C. P. Pomeroy of San Rafael is entertaining 
her sister Mrs. Hartman of New York. 



See our 
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Stock of 



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CURIOS, KIMONAS AND FANCY GOODS 



"The Nikko" 



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908 MARKET ST. Phone Temporary 2946 San Francisco, Cat. 



THE WASP- 




MRS. AMY TALBOT 
From a minature by Mrs. Role Hooper Plotner 



At Mrs. E. Walton Hedges' dinner to Miss 
Loraine de la Montanya and Mr. Edward Davis 
last week, some decidedly original features were in- 
troduced. Over the beautiful table several cupids 
were suspended by pink satin ribbons. One of the 
mischievous imps had shot arrows through the 
hearts of two others, while behind the unerring 
bowman a smaller cupid was carrying a wedding 
ring. The favors were diminutive pots of tulips 
in the petals of some of these were contained 
appropriate verses for the guests. In others were 
hidden a ring, money and a thimble, the finding 
of which excited much interest. The lucky finder 
of the golden circle was Miss Edith Metcalf, Miss 
Maud Payne found the money which was like a 
verification of the biblical declaration that to those 
that hath shall be given as she is a great heiress. 
Miss Roma Paxton found the thimble. The con- 
fections were frozen cupids and hearts of ice cream 
and cakes. A special refrigerator had no doubt been 
used to congeal the warm blooded little gods of 
love. The company did not worry over the details 
of the dinner however but enjoyed it thoroughly. 
Amongst those present were Miss de la Montanya, 
Helen de Young, Ethel Shorb, Edith Metcalf, 
Roma Paxton, Maud Payne, Edward Davis, Percy 
Towne, Dwight Leeper, Phil Paschal, Dr. Pressley, 
and Mr. Robinson. 

The New York correspondent of a local contem- 
porary wrote on Sunday that "D. M. Delmas was 
glad to hear from London this week that Miss 
Gladys Unger, daughter of Frank Unger of San 
Francisco, has written a successful play called 
'Brinsley Sheridan' which is now being presented in 
London." He further says that the play was offered 
to E. H. Sothern a few seasons ago but he could 
not consider it owing to other engagements. This 
must be an elaboration of the curtain raiser 
"Sheridan" that Miss Unger wrote a good many 
years ago, when she was a mere school-girl, and 



which 1 believe Forbes Robertson presented in 
London. Its success was thought worthy of cable 
dispatches to all the San Francisco papers then. 
No doubt the interest felt in the young playwright 
here was largely owning to the fact that Frank 
L'nger is her father and that her mother, who after 
her divorce from L'nger, married Arthur Jules 
Goodman, the artist, who is also an ex-San Fran- 
ciscan. 

R. M. Saeltzer, treasurer of the big Northern 
California Lumber Company which has come to San 
Francisco to revolutionize the lumber industry here, 
is one of the richest men in Redding. He runs, or 
did run, the large store of Redding which supplies 
the needs of the miners up that way. His two sons 
were sent to the State University and Dudley, the 
younger married not many months ago the daughter 
of Professor Henry Senger of the college. 
* * * 

Mrs. Thomas Vivian, president of the National 
California Club of New York, used to live in San 
Francisco years ago and she still cherishes a fond- 
ness for the old City. She was prominent in musical 
circles when she lived here. Her husband, "Tom" 
Vivian, wrote a popular book or two during his 
rests from his work as special writer on the San 
Francisco Chronicle. Mrs. Alice Moore McComas, 
another of the club's officers, is the mother of the 
little vaudeville star and siffleuse, Carol McComas. 
Mrs. Walter E. Dean, late of our City's social elect, 
is a vice-president with Mrs. Alexander Del Mar, 
who lived here many years before her husband de- 
cided to take his family East to reside permanently. 

President Roosevelt is not the only one who 
objects to the designs on our gold coins. Mrs. 
Howard Gould's sister, the one who lives here and 
who married a Chinaman, suggested that a head of 
Christ should be placed on the coins for 1900. 




Announcement 

SPRING and SUMMER 

We desire to announce that our com- 
plete selection of strictly confined Imported 
and Domestic Woolens, consisting of un- 
usually attractive patterns in popular weaves and fashionable ma- 
terials, is now ready awaiting inspection. 

It gives us pleasure to state that every garment is made by 
skilled tailors, cut on stylish and artistic lines that command the 
admiration and approval of our customers. 

We cordially invite and solicit patronage, and endeavor to up- 
hold our past reputation for high-grade tailoring at moderate prices. 

McMahon, Keyser & Stiegeler 
Bros., Inc. 



Main Store 

892-894 Van Ness Ave. 

Ellis Street 




Branch 

1711 O'FarrellSt. 

at Fillmore 



-THE WASP' 



Lawrence De Foulke, the valet who stole into the 
house of Mortimer L. Schiff; the young New York 
banker, and tried to club him to death with a nine- 
pin, is likelv to get a very heavy sentence. The 
valet is a tall, slender, boyish-looking Swede, who 
came from Stockholm three years ago and claims to 
have royal blood in his veins. The police think he is 
a lunatic, and so does Mr. Schiff. His confession 
was a remarkable one. He said that he came to 
this country with the idea of making $10,000, so he 
could go back to Sweden and set up as an inn- 
keeper. 

He was attracted by Mrs. Schiff's beauty while 
serving as her husband's valet. 

"It was foolish of me," said he, "to fall in love 
with her. Of course I knew my place as a servant 
and realized my own foolishness, but it was difficult 
not to admire the lady. With the utmost respect I 
wrote Mrs. Schiff a letter and handed it to her my- 
self, not a love letter exactly, but one expressing my 
admiration for her beauty and charm. 

"The next day Mr. Schiff called me before him. 
He had my letter in his hands and I could see he 
was very angry. He simply told me I was dis- 
charge and would have to leave the house at once. 
He paid me a month's wages in advance, but the 
money didn't last long. It was four months ago 
when I was discharged. I was living in a room at 
156 East Forty-second Street. 

"Last Friday night I was hungry, out of money 
and fairly desperate. I really hadn't eaten for twelve 
hours. I walked to Mr. Schiff's house a little after 
8 o'clock with the idea of having a talk with him. 
I had called several times before, but the servants 
always told me that Mr. Schiff was not at home. I 
intended to step right up to the front door when I 
went there last Friday night and try to get a note to 
Mr. Schiff or Mrs. Schiff, thinking they would be 
sure to take pity on me and help me out. Then I 
lost my nerve and decided to get in another way." 

The valet got into the house without being seen 
and as he passed the bowling alley took a nine-pin 
with him. 

"There was a dim light in Mr. Schiff's room," said 
he, "but I saw two diamond pins on his dressing 
table and I put them in my pocket. While I was 
there I thought I might as well stay and have a talk 
with Mr. Schiff. 

"A little after 11 o'clock he came into the dressing 
room and saw me before he turned up the light. 

"'Why, Lawrence, what are you doing here?' he 
said, jumping back. 

" 'I am broke and hungry, Mr. Schiff,' I said. 

"He told me to get out of the house instantly. I 
was afraid he would call the police, so I hit him over 
the head with the ninepin. It didn't hurt him much. 
He staggered back and then threw on the electric 
light. He told me I ought to be ashamed of myself 
for acting that way.. Then he said he thought he 
would help me. 

"He told me to come down to his office at 52 Wil- 
liam Street Monday afternoon, and if I wanted to 
go anywhere he would give me a railroad ticket and 
some money. He showed me to the front door, let 
me out and put a fifty dollar bill into my hand as I 
went. 



"When I went to his office Monday afternoon 

there were two men there that seemed to be doctors. 

They watched me, asked me some questions and 

then talked to Mr. Schiff. Then a man stepped out 

from behind a desk and grabbed me, telling me I 

was under arrest." 

* * * 

Mr. Schiff says that in the main his ex-valet told 
the truth. He wrote an impertinent and foolish let- 
ter to Mrs. Schiff , which she turned over to her 
husband as soon as she got it. Mr. Schiff said that 
even after the valet had hit him on the head with 
the ninepin, he felt sorry for the young fellow, be- 
lieving his hard luck tale, but thought that the most 
sensible thing to do was to get him out of the house 
as quickly as possible, without a further row. He 
slipped the young man a $50 bill, told him to show 
up at the office of Kuhn, Loeb & Co. on the follow- 
ing Monday afternoon, and promised to help him 
further if he saw fit. 

Not even the servants knew Mr. Schiff had been 
fighting for his life with the ex-valet, and Mrs. 
Schiff, in a nearby room, heard nothing to alarm 
her. Even the private policeman, Charles Schu- 
mann, who happened to be strolling by Mr. Schiff's 
house when the banker himself opened the front 
door and let his singular burglar out, didn't think so 
much of it, because Mr. Schiff suggested to him that 
it would be a good thing if he held his tongue. 

When the valet showed up in the Tombs court 



SEASON 1907 




TOM DILLON 

Milliner for Men 

Latest Creations Just Received, $2.50 to $15.00 
VAN NESS AVE. AND McALLISTER ST. 



-THE WASP 



ii 



yesterday he was smiling and didn't appear to be 
greatl) distressed by his predicament. lie was 
dressed rather dudishly in a black derby hat, gray 
paddock overcoat, dark sack suit neatly pressed, 
blue four in hand tie, patent leather shoes and pearl 
.1 spats. He seemed to like his get up. 
* * * 

Lord Aberdare of Duffrvn, whose son married the 
actress. Camille Clifford, in London, has discovered 
that the young woman is descended from a noble 
family. \o one else has done so. however. 

Lord Aberdare learned of his sun's marriage when 
the latter and his bride appeared at the ancestral 
castle after a fast automobile trip from London, 
lie absolutely refused to recognize the bride, and 
turned the couple away. After the first burst of 
anger of the irascible old nobleman, he began to take 
an interest in his daughter-in-law, and, as he could 
n- it disinherit his son, he not only forgave the couple 
but entered upon a determined campaign to estab- 
lish a social status for the future Lady of Duffrvn 
and Ava. 

Camille Clifford was known when the family by 
whom she was adopted emigrated to America from 
Sweden some years ago as Camilla Otterson, having 
assumed the family name. Lord Aberdare an- 
nounced that he had found that she was the daugh- 
ter of a noble soldier of fortune who had been ban- 
ished from his own country and had taken the child 
with him in his flight. Then the young woman 
confessed to her father-in-law that she had been a 
servant in a fashionable household in Boston, and 
that while in the Maine woods she had formed one 
of a group of maid servants whose photograph had 
been taken by an itinerant photographer. She gave 
into the possession of Lord Aberdare the copy of 
the photograph that she had preserved. There were 
thirteen others in existence, she said, as each one of 
the group had bought a copy at $1 each. 

Lord Aberdare forwarded the copy of the photo- 
graph to the Pinkerton Detective Agency with the 
sweeping commission to find the thirteen other 
prints of the plate and the plate itself, and to destroy 
the plate immediately it came into possession of the 
detectives and send him the bits. After months of 
search all over the country the commission has been 
filled, it is said, and the precious evidence of plebian 
extraction mailed to England. Of such are the 
romances woven about the nobility these days. 

Trinity Church choir will sing the following pro L 
gram at the Greek Theater, Berkeley, Sunday af- 
ternoon, March 24th, at 4 o'clock: 

Processional Hymn — "Jerusalem the Golden" (by 
request ). 

"God Shall Wipe Away All Tears," chorus. 

"The Palms" (bass solo and chorus), Mr. Wilfred 
Glenn, soloist. 

"Behold the Master Passeth By" (contralto solo 
and chorus). Miss Elizabeth Price, soloist. 

"O Come Let Us Worship" (tenor solo and 
chorus). Mr. Charles Trowbridge, soloist. 

"Out of Heaven" (soprano solo and chorus), Mrs. 
John Darwin Gish, soloist. 



"Prepare Ye the Way of the Lord" (quartet and 
chorus); Airs. Gish, Miss Price, .Mr. Trowbridge, 
Mr. Glenn. 

Recessional Hymn — "Brightly Gleams Our Ban- 
ner'' ( Eaton), .Mr. Louis H. Eaton, director. 

Gaul's Passion Service will be sung at Trinity 

Church Good Friday night, March 29th at 8 o'clock. 

.Mrs. John Darwin Gish, soprano; Miss Elizabeth 

Price, contralto; Mr. Charles Trowbridge, and Mr. 

Edgar Dawson, tenors; Mr. Wilfred Glenn, Mr. 

James Greenwell and Mr. Wallace Hicks will be 

the soloists. Louis H. Eaton, organist and director. 
* * * 

I '.en Franklin was experimenting with his kite and 
key, 

"Wonderful !" exclaimed the curious throng, when 
they saw the electric spark on the key. "But could 
you perform the same experiment at night?" 

''Oh, yes," replied Franklin, "but I suppose I 
would have to use a night key." 

For even in those days poor Richard was known 
as the man who wrote jokes for his almanac. 

The illustrated lecture arranged for by the San 
Francisco Gas and Electric Company and delivered 
on Monday evening by Mr. A. J. Marshall of New 
York, was listened to with much interest by many 
prominent business men. The lecturer gave a num- 
ber of valuable suggestions as to the most effective 
and most approved methods of illuminating build- 
ings. Mr. John A. Britton is the president and Mr. 
S. P. Hamilton the manager of the San Francisco 
Gas and Electric Company. 



The Little 
Palace Hotel 



CORNER OF 



Post and Leavenworth Sts. 

IS OPEN 



The same excellence in cuisine and service that obtained in 
the Old Palace is duplicated in the new " Little Palace." 




Phone West 4983 



Vogel & Bishoff 

Ladies' Tailors and 
Habit Makers 

1 525 Sutter Street, San Francisco 



12 



'THE WASP 



*^lw^ 


^ 








. 



Photo Genlhe 



MISS MAZIE COYLE 
Who is prominent in the southern social set 



Kenneth Donellan, the broker who has gone in 
for motoring with such a zest, was living in the 
Palace Hotel at the time of the fire. He and his 
fam'ly occupied a large suite and on the fateful 
eighteenth had as guests some of their relatives 
who had come to town to attend the grand opera. 
They were on the top floor of the caravansary and 
when the move was made to flee they made several 
trips up and downstairs to save a few of their pos- 
sessions. They moved over the hay as soon as they 
could obtain a house there and the broker said then 
that he would never trust himself in a tall building 
again. He goes spinning in his auto every day 
though and never seems to think that there is a 
chance of danger. Its all in the way one looks at 
those things. 

Mrs. Fred Kohl is at present wearing many dark 
clothes which are very becoming to her blonde 
order of pulchritude, and at the same time cause 
her to look smaller. Mrs. Kohl is one of the few 
plump young women in Society, for most of the 



younger set are bent on getting thin and keeping 
thin. Mrs. Kohl is only twenty-three or four but 
her size gives one the impression that she is much 
older which is a great pity, for her features are 
really exquisite and increasing stoutness always 
renders such a face less beautiful. She has masses 
of lovely yellow hair which she does high and 
she has a cluster of little curls falling from beneath 
her hat for her hair is naturally curly. She is 
wearing a short, full, dark blue box coat and walk- 
ing skirt and a dark hat. At "Madame Butterfly" 
one night she was in a black spangled dress which 
suits her immensely. 

* * * 

Miss Jennie Crocker's departure for the East has 
put to an end many rumors about her possible 
engagement. I hear that the charming and popular 
young lady's closest friends say that it is very 
unlikely that she will be married before several 
years have elapsed. She is not yet twenty and 
is not keen on the subject of matrimony which is 
very sensible and lucky for a great heiress of that 



William Hooper Jouett, a bright California 
boy, but seventeen years of age has received his 
appointment to the U. S, Naval Academy at Anna- 
polis. He is the grandson of the late Major W. B. 
Hooper, and great-grandson of Mrs. Selden S. 
Wright. 

* * * 

Mr. and Mrs. William Mintzer will soon return 
from Philadelphia to their fine home on Pacific 
Avenue. Mrs. William Tewksbury the mother of 
Mrs. Mintzer will come back with them to San 
Francisco. 



Let them know! 



Your friead can reserve a room at the 

Hotel St. Francis 

when he leaves home, and find it ready 
for him when he arrives. Tell him so. 
Every comfort at hand. 



-THE WASP 



13 




Conried, who has resigned from his position as 
director of the Metropolitan Grand Opera Company, 
is not wholly without a sense of humor, as this 
story, which he told during his visit here, shows. 
Some of our local musicians were talking about old- 
fashioned concerts, and Conried said: "Some of 
your hits are well-merited. I remember one time in 
Chicago an old millionaire at whose home I was 
staying called out to his daughters: 'What a time 
you girls take getting ready for the concert. Look 
at me — a piece of wadding in each ear, and I'm all 
ready.' " 



During the Midwinter Fair, when the late Fritz 
Scheel's orchestra was the attraction at the Vienna 
Prater, the concertmaster was John Marquardt, and 
the harpist was Miss Breitschuck. A very pretty 
romance ended in the marriage of the head violinist 
and the harpist. The Marquardts were always 
favorite and prominent figures in our musical world, 
and wdien they went away on a concert trip around 
the world they were greatly missed. 
* * * 

Harry Creswall, who has presumed to criticise 
our police department, is a Southerner with the 
usual high ideals and strong sense of honor that 
are the birthright of our Southern cousins. He has 
cousins galore in society. The Thorntons, Judges, 
Brooks' and Huies being among his family con- 
nections. 



MISS A. FOSS of Berkeley 

Amongst the miniatures of well known people 
that Mrs. Plotner has painted and which attracted 
much favorable attention at her exhibition on 
Wednesday were those of Mrs. Eleanor Martin, Mrs. 
Joseph S. Tobin, Mrs. Charles Huse, Mrs. Robert 
L. Coleman and children, Mrs. Amy Talbot, Mrs. 
Geo. Pope and Mrs. Selby Hanna. 
* * * 

The late Mrs. Dunphy was a kind hearted woman. 
The day of the great earthquake, and the next day 
when Nob Hill began to burn the Dunphys were 
most kind to the poor people who had been driven 
from their homes, and were climbing the hills of 
Washington Street with their few bits of baggage. 
Miss Jennie Dunphy had an auto loaded with 
necessary baggage and supplies for the family's 
hurried flight in case the fire reached their home, 
but in the midst of her preparations she found time 
to speak an encouraging word to the poor refugees 
who sought a place to rest, and invited them to 
enter the garden and quench their thirst at the 
fountain. 

* * * 

It seems rather odd to read in one column of a 
daily that a father has been sued and forced by the 
court to pay certain moneys for the support of his 
invalid children," and in the Society columns of 
the same paper to read that one of the "invalid 
children" is in town on a visit and is being enter- 
tained by a prominent society girl. 



An enjoyable luncheon took place at the Palace 
Hotel on Thursday last when Mrs. Baker enter- 
tained ten guests at luncheon. 




1907 

CARS NOW ARRIVING 

Studebaker Bros. Co. of California 

405 Golden Gate Avenue 

Chester A. Weaver, Manager 



14 



-THE WASP - 



The last affair given by Mrs. Stuyvesant Fish 
to close the season of 1906-7 eclipsed all her other 
efforts. 

This season of gayety went out in a perfect blaze 
of light, amid showers of serpentine confetti and 
Spanish dancing. The spirit of the carnival pre- 
vailed, for it was a' Mardi Gras affair, and every 
detail of the evening's entertainment fit like a bit 
of perfect mosaic. 

It was nearly 11 o'clock before the guests arrived 
at Mrs. Fish's home, at Madison Avenue and 
Seventy-eighth Street, from dinner parties given 
by Mrs. P. Cooper Hewitt, Mrs. A. Cass Can- 
field Mrs. Richard Gambrill, Mrs. Moses Tay- 
lor Campbell, Mrs. Karrick Riggs, and T. Suffern 
Tailer. 

A wealth of flowers and palms gTeeted them, and 
after laying aside their wraps in the dressing-rooms 
on the street floor, they made their way to the 
drawing-room above, which had been converted 
into a perfect bijou of a theater for the occasion. 

Mrs. Fish, gowned in pale blue net, embroidered 
with silver, and wearing diamond ornaments and 
her beautiful turquoises, stood at the head of the 
marble staircase, near the entrance to the red room, 
to receive her friends, who passed on to the im- 
provised orchestra stalls, made up of small gilt 
chairs in the make-believe playhouse. At one end 
of the drawing-room a small stage had been erected, 
curtained with green and adorned with that spiney 
curling fish which is the Fish coat-of-arms. There 
was a tiny orchestra, carrying out the theatrical 
illusion, and below the footlights there were yellow 
flowers and tall ferns in rustic pots. 

The vaudeville performance began with a toe 
dance by Mile. Mahr, -that brought out prolonged 
applause. Next on the program came Beatrice Her- 
ford, who gave original monologues, and she in 
turn was followed by Henry de Vries, who gave his 
wonderful impersonation of the different charac- 
ters in "A Case of Arson." Miss Gertrude Hoff- 
man, of the Anna Held company,' also gave clever 
impersonations, and Clarice Vance was heard in 
some Southern songs. 

The performance ended with a Mardi Gras dance 
in costume, done by the five Spanish dancers from 
"The Rose of the Rancho." At the end of their 
number they began throwing serpentine confetti, 
first in the Spanish colors and then in red, white, 
and blue. Mrs. Fish's guests took it up, until there 
was a carnival battle between guests and dancers. 

Just then a footman appeared with hats and favors 
for the audience — gorgeous Spanish sombreros 
trimmed with imposing plumes and sequins pf gold ; 
Continental hats with paper queues, tied up. with 
black ; garden hats trimmed with all kinds of 
flowers in natural colors, all made of paper by 
French artists ; little Dutch hats, Directoires, 
Follys, Pierrots, and Egyptian headdresses, and 
with these charming little parasols that unfolded 
themselves from what appeared to be mere little 
sticks, and displayed sunset colors in fluted paper ; 
rattles, machetes that were formidable looking, but 

A lablespoonful of Abbolt's Bitters in a glass of sweetened water after meals is the 
greatest aid to diges ion known. 



turned out to be mere silver paper disguises for 
harmonicons ; little hatchets, owls, and rabbits on 
sticks, with bells inside; wife-beaters, as little soft 
paper-covered bags with handles were called; jester 
canes, and other trinkets too numerous to mention, 
but all fun-provoking and immensely clever. 

Decked in these hats and carrying their accom- 
panying toys after the Mardi Gras battle was over, 
the guesis descended to the dining-room and hall, 
where an elaborate supper buffet was served. 

A boss dressmaker who has just returned from 
Monte Carlo and Paris, says that to be smartly 
dressed this year. one must wear stripes. This au- 
thority says "you should buy your coiffure as you 
do your gown, by the piece. That's the way the 
French women do. Do )'ou suppose they iron their 
ownmair? Not a bit of it ! They wear transforma- 
tions to cover the entire head. That is marcelled 
and taken off at night, so that is the reason the 
French women have beautiful hair. As to color, 
golden brown is the popular color this summer." 

"Every one in. fashionable Paris wears puffs — just 
as many as she can find a place for on her head. 
All sleeves are Japanese. That is to say, they are 
loose at the shoulder and not clearly distinguished 
from the bodice. It is hard to tell where a sleeve 
begins. Some of the sleeves of the coats are slashed 
under the arms so that the material of a pretty vest 
shows through. Other sleeves have quantities of 
material under the arms. Still others have a sort of 
undersleeve corning out through the loose Japanese 
sleeve. 



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THE WASP 



15 



"Another startling thing is that the French 
women are no longer wearing veils. Only while 
automobiling and driving are they worn. The 
reason for this is that as veils are bad for the eyes 
and skin, they had been abandoned. Veils were 
worn principally in order to keep the hair in order. 
The French women have found, however, that it is 
not necessary to wear them for this reason. Nets 
worn over the hair, which do not interfere with the 
eyes or harm the skin, take their place. 

"All of the gowns worn on the streets are long, 
just touching' the ground. But the French women 
wear exquisite petticoats. The moment you go into 
the country over there you see short skirts, but the 
city gowns are all long except such as are made for 
the American trade, which will not take the long 
ones. 

"Brass buttons, large and small, are having a rage 
on all sorts of materials. There are nine tailor-made 
dresses to one fancy dress. The lingerie Princesse 
dress will still be the thing for summer." 
* * * 

'I'm wearied of the whirl," quoth she, 
"Henceforth the simple life for me. 

Methinks it would be very wise 
To take my breakfast ere I rise — 

Of coffee just a single cup." 

(N. B. — Her mother brought it up!) 

"And when I'm dressed," thus spoke the maid, 
"I'll hie me to the elm tree's shade. 

And with a book there I will find 

Sweet rest and comfort for the mind." 

And so in svlvin shade she read. 
i X. B. — Her mother made her bed.) 



"A daintv lunch will suit me best — 

Salad with oil Lucca dressed ; 
No steaming soup, nor heavy roast. 

But broiled spring chicken rerved on toast.'' 
She ate it all and found it good. 

(X. B. — Her mother cooked the food!) 

# # * 

The Bachelors Too Frisky 
The Bachelors' ball, the most exclusive and 
friskiest function of Philadelphia Society, ruined 
$30,000 worth of gowns. The feature of the even- 
ing was a miniature snowstorm, coming with abso- 
lute darkness, that wreaked havoc. It was a sur- 
prise, but not exactly the kind of a one that the 
buds and younger matrons of Philadelphia Society 
appreciated. The Bachelors' ball is even more ex- 
clusive than the famous Assembly of Philadelphia. 
Last year it consisted of a wonderful windstorm. 
The climax of the last affair, however, was more 
remarkable. The lights in the ballroom were sud- 
denly extinguished, and the dancers found them- 
selves in the heart of a fierce snowstorm — but the 
dance went merrily on. It became darker and then 
suddenly the paper snow turned to real, cold, actual 
snowballs, around which could be wound no ro- 
mance. For five minutes the dancers were pelted 
with these, and then suddenly the lights went up 
and the surprise was over. It was estimated that 
from $30,000 to $50,000 worth of costumes were 
ruined by the snowballs. 

* * * 

"Whin a wild young man wants to git married," 
mused the janitor philosopher, "he has to straighten 
out before he can double up." 



Removal Notice 

From and after Monday March 25, 1907 we will occupy 
our new building, 318-325 Kearny Street, near Bush 

SOME SPECIALS IN THE LEADING RETAIL 
DISTRICT FOR SALE OR LEASE 

Baldwin & Howell 



16 



-THE WASP 




One of the questions that is agitating Burlingame 
at present, besides whether to be for the grafters 
or against them, is whether or not to receive the 
Richard McCreerys when they come out from Eng- 
land. Every one is very fond of Richard McCreery, 
but some of the stony-hearted matrons are lying 
awake nights trying to figure out whether they 
should fling open their doors to the lady or slam 



them. It is a very delicate question to solve in 
California, though in an older community, where 
the lines are drawn more conventionally, it could 
be easily settled. 

* * * 

The divorce of Lady Edgerton was one of the 
interesting scandals of England last year. Sir 
Phillip Edgerton, the husband in the case, strangely 
enough objected to his wife being in love with 
another man, and refused to live with her. She 
brought suit against him to cause his return to his 
domicile, but was only partly successful. After 
the divorce Richard McCreery married the lady 
and it is said they are coming to California, as, of 
course, England is not the pleasantest place in the 
world for an American who has been divorced from 
a baronet and married again to an American, on 
account of whom the rupture occurred. 

* * * 

There are a few Burlingame matrons who are 
inflexible in their standards, but many others have 
not ideals quite so prohibitive against remarried 
divorcees when they have shown the proper peni- 
tence by marrying millionaires. To be sure the 
ordinary Mrs. Brown, Smith or Jones who gets 
a divorce with a scandal, would fare pretty badly 
at the hands of the same Burlingame ladies. In 
fact, she might enter their gates but to be stared 
at glacially. Mrs. McCreery was, however, quite 
recently Lady Grey-Edgerton, and one of her an- 
cestors was a Revolutionary general and if there 
is any one thing that Burlingame respects more 
than money, it is that in which so many of the 
newly made rich are so deficient themselves and 
that is ancestry. So when all the pros and cons are 
duly weighed and the decision reached Mrs. Mc- 
Creery will probably become the lioness of the hour. 







* 1 








< 4 - ^y >L^ 




w 


: s ; "% i 


T 


V ■ ' '^i ■ 


Y 


\ ^Vm 


* • 


" i 



MISS ELLA BENDER 
The talented amateur dramatic reader 



-THE WASP 



5oi ty will be deeply interested, however, to see 
whether the Parrotts shall deviate from their well- 
established rule when the distinguished visitor shall 
have become one of the local smart set. Hereto- 
fore the Parrotts have crossed from their visiting 
list not Only divorced women hut divorced men 
and they have never been known to deviate one 
iota from this rule, and some of their dearest 
friend-- have been heart broken to find the draconic 
law applied to them after their names figured in the 
divorce court records. Henceforth they received 
tile strong stare instead of the glad hand of good 
fellowship. 

* * * 

Captain George \V. Kirkman's application for 
release from the military prison at Fort Leaven- 
worth is like a voice from the tomb. The career of 
this bright but misguided officer brought him at 
oi.e time to San Francisco where he came after 
leaving West Point from which he had graduated 
with distinction. One of his classmates was Sydney 
Cloman, who also was stationed for a while at Angel 
Island after leaving West Point. The latter officer 
has gone up the ladder as fast as poor Kirkman 
went down and is now a military attache at London. 



lie married the widow of a very wealthy South 
The culminating scandals in Captain Kirkman's 
checkered career was his elopment with the wife 
ol a brother and the embezzlement of company 
funds. His unfortunate paramour killed herself 
when discovered by her husband in a New York 
hotel with Kirkman. The disgraced officer is now 
trying by writ of habeas corpus to get free from 
prison. He married in this City an estimable young 
woman who is a member of the best social set in 
San Francisco. She left him years ago. 
African mining man and entertains in great style at 
the English capital. 

* * * 

Professor Henry Morse Stephens has become a 
veritable lion of society in Santa Barbara where he 
is delivering a series of University Extension 
lectures on "The enlightened despotism of the Eigh- 
teenth Century. At first it was exceedingly dif- 
ficult to dispose of enough tickets for the course to 
justify the lecturer in corning every fortnight but 
now that the people have found that it is quite en 
regie to admire the learned Englishman the honor 
of entertaining him is fought for among the mem- 
bers of the elite. 




The Club House under the Pines and among the Flowers of Del Monte 
where Society takes it's Four O'clock Tea. 



The French labor leaders who have been desirous 
of emulating American methods in strikes and 
boycotts have run against a governmental snag 
which has wrecked their hopes. The Government 
threatened to use military engineers to run the 
electric plants in Paris that were shut down by the 
strikers and this of course brought the strike to an 
end. 

In the Chamber of Deputies, Mr. Jaures, the 
socalist leader demanded of the Government why 
it had denied the right of workingmen to strike 
and he denounced the interference as an abridge- 
ment of civil liberty. A strike he said was industrial 
war and the strikers had the right to adopt such 
tactics as would bring them victory. To this M. 
Clemenceau the Prime Minister replied : 

"Yes, it is war, not between two adversaries 
interfering with nobody else, but war between two 
adversaries on the backs of the passerby. No 
Government were it Mr. Jaures' own could permit 
such a war." 

Mr. Clemenceau was wrong in this statement for 
we constantly see such wars permitted by the State 
and Municipal governments of the United States. 

M. Clemenceau did not rest content with the 
declaration just quoted. He said: 

"Mr. Jaures asks us to give strikers a free course 
and would know by what right we intervene, I 
respond most simply 'By the right of society to 
existance.' 

"You would have us leave Paris at night a prey 
to robbers and incendiaries. I ask you M. Jaures, 
if as the father of a family you would. consent to 
see yours indefinitely deprived of bread? It is that 
same care that I have for Paris, it is the same 
question that I must resolve. 

"You advocate oppression of the social body by 
the minority. You intimate that we would make 
slaves of the workmen. The proper enforcement of. 
law and order permits .nothing of that kind, but 
still less would we have the workmen become 
tyrants. What we wish to defend against you is 
whatever present society has that is good and to 
prepare for what it may hereafter have that is 
better." 

Referring to the threat of the striking work- 
men that if soldiers entered the factories and took 
the strikers places, there would be bloodshed that 
night, the French Prime Minister said : 

"It is I, who, in the name of the united Govern- 
ment, have taken the responsibility for sending 
soldiers. If you do not overthrow me today I will 
do it again tomorrow." 

The Prime Minister's words evoked great 
applause and the Chamber of Deputies declared its 
confidence in the Government by a vote of 378 to 68. 

It is a significant fact "that no Parisian news- 
paper defended the policy of the strikers to in- 

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augerate terrorism and thus by defying law and 
order as is constantly done in the large cities of 
our own country force the employers to terms. 
* # * 

A New Political Deal in San Francisco 
The expose of wholesale municipal boodling imparts 
no news to the San Francisco public. All America has 
known that ever since Schmitz and Ruef obtained con- 
trol of the government of San Francisco by using the 
Union Labor party as a balance of pawer, we have had 
the worst and crookedest municipal administration in 
the history of San Francisco. 

Nearly a generation ago the Sandlotters captured the 
City government and established the record for petty 
rascality up to that date. Never before did such a 
precious lot of boodlers find themselves so admirably 
placed to loot the public treasury. 

Their watchword was "Ignorance." They main- 
tained the enlightened doctrine that an educated man 
would surely steal if trusted in public office. On this 
theory they elected hardly a man except such as could 
prove himself an ignoramus, and then they disproved 
their own doctrine most manfully. They boodled with 
more indecency and persistency than any college gradu- 
ate have ever dreamt of, much less attempted. 



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year, a handsome little souvenir booklet containing the names 
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-THE WASP- 



19 



Now, after a lapse of nearly thirty years, hi>tory re- 
peats itself by ample proofs that a working-man's party 
is the most inefficient and corrupt of all political 
parties. The reason it is so is plain. The most cor- 
rupt and unscrupulous men of all other political parties 
flock to a labor party when it attains power. They 
grasp the control and direct the ensuing campaign of 
graft. 



We have had a manifestation of that fact in the 
concentration of all the old Democratic and Republican 
grafters who could worm their way into the present 
Union Labor party of San Francisco. Ruef himself 
was for many years a loyal programmer under the late 
lioss Higgins of the Republican party. When Higgins, 
who was the most respectable of all the bosses, died, 
Kelly and Crimmins took his place and Ruef trained 
with them. So also from the Democratic -party ex- 
perienced and highly accomplished wire pullers and 
grafters worked into the control of the Union Labor 
party and presently it became, in spirit and in fact, 
an organization for graft and that only. 

For several years the Union Labor party in San 
Francisco has utterly misrepresented every honest 
workingman who belongs to it. If the Union Labor 
party represented the aims and sentiments of all the 
workingmen of San Francisco, we should be compelled 
to regard them as a lot of the worst scoundrels in 
America. Everybody knows, however, that there are 
as many honest and patriotic workingmen in San Fran- 
cisco as anywhere in the nation, but these honest and 
patriotic men have no voice in the control of the Union 
Labor party. The organized grafters who pose as 
professional workingmen and friends of the sons of 
toil, attend to the management. They have formed a 
close corporation and most of them hold fat public 
offices. Some of them hold several offices. Half a 
dozen of them are actively plotting to supersede 
Schmitz as Mayor of San Francisco and perpetuate the 
disgrace of the City. 

The expose which has followed the Grand Jury in- 
vestigation will doubtless sweep all the present com- 
bination- of grafters out of office for the Union Labor 
party of itself could not elect anybody. It never of 
itself cast over 15,000 votes at any election in San 
Francisco, and its candidates, including Schmitz, have 
been elected by the votes of Republicans and Demo- 
crats, who for one reason or another deserted their 
own parties and helped to turn over the control of the 
City to the worst gang of the three. 

With the Union Labor party thoroughly discredited 
and irremediably disgraced by Schmitz, Ruef & Co., 
our citizens will probably come to their senses and at 
the next election put in office men who will represent 
something more than organized graft. 



Bonds Not So Good Now 

Two recent despatches from Winnepeg are of 
unusual interest as showing the effect of municipal 
ownership on city bonds. The first stated that the 
province of Manitoba, of which Winnepeg is the 
chief city, had voted for public ownership of the 
telephone system by a majority of 3000. The sec- 
ond is to the effect that the City. Council of Winni- 



peg had petitioned the government not to enforce 
the act until 1908, because of the inability of the 
city to finance anything at present. The trouble is 
that the Hank of Scotland has refused to renew 
with the city its loan which is now expiring, appar- 
ently fearing the effect of municipal ownership 
on the city's ability to meet its obligations. 

London furnishes another instance of credit being 
impaired by municipal ownership. Ten years ago, 
according to the Richmond, Va., News-Leader, its 
3 per cents were quoted at par, while today they 
cannot be sold above 87, and it is admitted that 
any largje issue of them would bring the price down 
to '85. 



Dr. Redmond Payne 

Eye, ear, nose, throat, resumed practice at 9 1 5 Van Ness 
cor. Ellis, hours: 1-3; tel. Franklin 331. 



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TAILOR AND IMPORTER 

Temporarily located at 2415 FILLMORE STREET 
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20 



-THE WASP- 



The German Ambassador at Washington, Baron 
Speck von Sternburg has been advanced in his pro- 
fession as a diplomat by the fact that he has a clever 
American wife Comparatively few people know 
that the Baroness was a San Francisco girl, Miss 
Lily Langhame. 

The German Kaiser has long been desirous of 
cultivating friendly relations with the United States 
and in picking out Speck von Sternburg for the 
post of Ambassador was influenced considerably by 
the fact that the Baron had an American wife. 
This lady has helped her husband greatly and made 
him one of the most influential of the foreign 
diplomats in Washington. As a hostess of tact 
she leaves nothing to be desired. 

The best evidence of the success which the 
Baron Speck von Sternburg has attained in Wash- 
ington is the substantial raise of salary voted him 
by the thrifty German Reichstag. He has been 
raised $5,000 a year without opposition and now 
draws $30,000 a year. 

Every week the Washington newspapers contain 
paragraphs about the entertainments given by the 
California Baroness. One day it is the English 
Ambassador who is dined at the German Embassy. 
The next day some visiting German Prince is the 
guest of the Baron and Baroness Speck von Stern- 
burg. 

All this goes to prove that it is not essential to 
be to the manner born to shine as a baroness. 

It seems but a few years ago since the Baroness 
Speck von Sternburg was living with her family 
at a plain but eminently respectable boarding house 
in this City. From that period to the present her 
life has been a remarkable one. Her father, the late 
Charles E. Langhame, was a traveling salesman for 
a San Francisco clothing house and when he gave 
up that occupation he became a fruit grower on a 
small scale in Southern California. He died on his 
little ranch a few years ago. 

The Langhame girls did not remain in California 
with their father. His brother, Arthur Langhame of 
Louisville, Kentucky, who was a wealthy horse- 
breeder and land-owner, undertook the care of his 
nieces and had them carefully educated in a first- 
class school in New York. 

When the elder girl had graduated the Uncle 
sent her with her mother for a trip through Europe 
and it was on an Atlantic liner that the San Fran- 
cisco girl met the Baron Speck von Sternburg. The 
European trip was not one of pleasure altogether 
for Miss Langhame had while a child, sustained 
a fall which made her lame. It was primary to seek 
the services of an eminent European surgeon that 
she went abroad with her mother. 

The marriage of this San Francisco girl and her 
titled German husband has been a very happy one. 
She is a pronounced American and her influence in 
that respect is most marked at the German 
Embassy. It has helped to make her husband's 
relations with the President so close and friendlv 
that the English Government recently recalled Sir 
Mortimer Durand because he could not be on similar 
good terms with the chief magistrate of the 
American people. 



Miss Ivy Langhame the sister of the Baroness 
has also through her sisters position and influence 
married a titled diplomat and became the Countess 
de Farramonde. She met the Count at a tea given 
by her clever sister at the German Embassy two 
years ago. 

The younger sister Miss Violet Langhame and 
her mother are at present guests of the Baroness 
at the German Embassy at Washington. 

Mrs. Langhame was a Miss Driffield of Chicago. 



We are in the habit of criticising the phlegmatic 
methods of the Englishmen and their veneration for 
red tape, but nevertheless they dispatch govern- 
mental business with a quiet effectiveness which is 
worthy of imitation. Take that Jamaica episode for 
example: The British indulged in no hysterics over 
it. After the foolish letter of Governor Swettenham 
had been published, the English Government let 
it be known promptly that the good officer of 
America in the extending of aid and sympathy to 
the Jamaica sufferers were appreciated ; further 
that the good-will existing between England and 
the United States could not be lessened in the 
slightest by the misunderstanding between the 
Governor of Jamaica and the American Admiral. 
That closed the really important part of the 
business. The rest was comparatively trivial and in 
the line of routine. Without haste or passion 
Governor Swettenham got his walking papers. To 



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-THE WASP 



21 



an outsider it would look as if there was no friction 
whatever. The < iovernor offered his resignation as if 
the nervous shock caused by the earthquake and his 
arduous duties thereafter compelled him to seek rest 
and recuperation. The English Government accepted 
the resignation and indulged in the usual empty 
phrases about the long and excellent services rendered 
by its faithful servant, and so in a very polite way 
and with as much outward cordiality and grace as 
the proceeding would admit of, the incompetent 
Governor of Jamaica was kicked out. After all are 
not those polite pretenses and conformances to rou- 
tine the better way for highly civilized nations. 

HARVEY BROUGHAM. 



A Chat With the Kaiser 
A characteristic story may be related of Emperor 
Wilhelm ll's peculiarities. One morning he made 
a call on Count Szoegyeny, then Austrian Ambas- 
sador at Berlin. The count was dawdling over his 
breakfast when his valet announced, "his majesty, 
the Emperor." As the latter entered and took a 
chair, he said : "I have come for a glass of beer 
and a chat, as I have not seen you for so long. 
I will take a cigarette. And how is your wife?" 
At that moment the baroness entered the room, and 
the trio held a pleasant converse for some time. 
Suddenly the Kaiser looked at his watch and 
jumped to his feet. "Good gracious! Have we 
talked so long? I must use your telephone at once 
to bid the Empress good-bve, as I haven't time to 
return to the palace before starting for the maneu- 
vers. I must, however, excuse myself to my wife." 
Thereupon the Emperor rang up the Empress to 
whom he spoke as follows: "Don't be angry. I 
have chatted so long with Szoegyeny that I. must 
drive to the station from here, so I cannot give you 
my parting kiss. I am very sorry." 



Mrs. George Pope looks very well nowadays in 
a pretty blue cloth gown and blue hat which are 
very becoming to her fragile blonde beauty. Mrs. 
Breeden has a smart dark red walking suit with a 
dark red hat. With this she wears a black veil. 
Mrs. Ed Pond, who is one of the best dressed wo- 
men in Society, wears a gray walking suit and a 
toque. 



Mrs. Tom Eastland is often seen in a dark brown 
walking suit and a large beplumed brown hat. Mrs. 
J. J. Moore, her sister, is wearing a brown cloth 
suit with a cream hat trimmed with pink roses. 



Miss Constance de Young is 'one of the Society 
girls who were devout enough to go into retreat, 
but several more will retire from the world during 
Holy Week. 



Miss Inez Estudillo was given a jolly house party 
at Pleasanton last week by her aunt, Mrs. 
Dougherty. Miss Estudillo made her debute last 
year and has been the motive of much entertaining 
and is a general favorite in Society. 



Mr. Lanel, the French Consul who is leaving San 
Francisco for a higher post in New York, is one of 
the most quiet and retiring of Frenchmen, but he 
has gone out to some extent here. He likes San 
Francisco and he thinks the San Francisco girls 
are very pretty. He is a bachelor, as is the Russian 
Consul. There is a rumor that the Italian Consul 
is to be called elsewhere, as Count Naselli is soon 
leaving for Italy. 



The Walter Martins are soon to build another 
house at Burlingame, or rather, it is said that Mrs. 
Walter is to put it up with her own money, which 
she inherited from Mary Crocker Flarrison, and it 
will be one of the handsomest places at Burlingame. 



HUNTER 

BALTIMORE 

RYE 



Is Absolutely Pure 

and is Guaranteed 

under The National 

Pure Food Law. 



This confirms its reputation, 
and its great popularity de- 
monstrates that it is the pre- 
ferred whiskey of' those who 

KNOW THE BEST 
LIKE THE BEST 
BUY THE BEST 




CHARLES M. REYNOLDS CD , 

AfrentH for CaJIforDin and Newuia, 

912-aii Folaom St.. ban Francisco. Cal. 




STRICTLY BUSINESS 



Points of Interest on Trade and Finance 




The History of the Oceanic 

The misfortunes of the Oceanic Steamship Com- 
pany have been freely commented on by the Eastern 
press and opinions differ as to where the blame 
should be. The general opinion is that American 
shipowners cannot overcome the difficulties under 
which they struggle. 

The line of steamships to the antipodes had its 
beginning in the boom period just following the 
Civil War. The Pacific Mail was first in the field 
with a line from Sydney to San Francisco by way 
of Fiji and Honolulu. There was a mail contract 
then, and there was keen competition for the tour- 
ist traffic, for the Pacific Mail could land the return- 
ing colonial sooner in London than the Peninsular 
and Oriental. Along about 1880 New Zealand 
offered a mail contract and the line was altered to 
take in Auckland, with a stopping of the engines 
off Pagopago for the transfer of passengers and mail 
to Samoa. 

In the course of time the Spreckelses, then the 
dominating financial interest in Hawaii, fell out with 
the Pacific Mail and started an island line of their 
own. With the Honolulu trade cut off from them, 
the Pacific Mail had to effect a composition, as a 
result of which the Spreckelses look over the line to 
the antipodes. For many years they conducted a 
.monthly service with small and slow boats, and 
before long it became necessary to admit the Union 
Steamship Company of New Zealand to one-third 
interest in the line, that is to say, one boat of every 
three flew the burgee of the New Zealand company, 
and this steamer, was invariably better than the 
American Alameda and Mariposa. 

It became necessary to meet this competition 
within the line itself, and the Oceanic company 
built three high powered and able vessels, the Ven- 
tura, Sierra and Sonoma. Just about this time the 
annexation of Tutuila and Hawaii intervened to 
make the competition of the New Zealand boats 
impracticable under the coastwise shipping pro- 
visions of the navigation laws. With the new boats 
the Oceanic company began some six years ago 
a service of thirteen sailings in the year, a vessel 
leaving every third week. Now comes the end. 
The Oceanic company lays the blame, on Congress': 
New Zealand lays the blame on the short-comings 
of the steamship company. 

After forty years the American flag is hauled 
down on a trade route of its own discovery, and this 
is done at a time when direct competition has be- 

A Sovereign Remedy 

Dr. Parker's Cough Cure, one dose will stop a cough. It 
never fails. Try it. Sold by all Druggists. 



come impossible. The Canadian Pacific has long 
paralleled the route by its line between Victoria 
and Sydney by way of Honolulu and Fiji, and 
American trade and travel seeking to follow the old 
line must now be diverted to British bottoms and 
through British ports. 

The collapse of the Oceanic line will no doubt 
afford great satisfaction to Mr. Furuseth of the 
sailors' Union, who has been making it harder for 
shipowners for many years, and who once boasted 
that he would make the grass grow in the streets 
of San Francisco. 

* * * 

The March of Improvement 

The real estate men of San Francisco after the 
fire did not wait to secure ideal locations or to erect 
beautiful offices but got to work right away in the 
work of restoration. Now, however, they are get- 
ting into line in the matter of handsome offices. 
On Monday next Baldwin and Howell will lead the 



MUTUAL SAVINGS BANK 



706 Market St. 



OF SAN FRANCISCO 



Opp. Third 



Guaranteed Capital, $1,000,000 

Interest Paid od all Deposits 



Paid up Capital and Surplus, $620,000 
Loans on Approved Securities 



OFFICERS- James D. Phelan, Pres., John A. Hooper. V. Pres., J. K. Moffutt, 2d 
V. Pres., George A. Story, Sec'y and Cashier, C. B. Hobson, Asst. Cashier, A. E. 
Curtis, 2d Asst, Cashier. 



TONOPAH, GOLDFIELD, BULLFROG 

MANHATTAN and COMSTOCKS A specialty 



ZADIG & CO. 

STOCK BROKERS 



Formerly 306 Montgomery Street, have resumed business in their 

Own Building, 324 BUSH STREET 

Directly Opposite New San Francisco Stock and Exchange Bldg. 



FRENCH SAVINGS BANK 



OF SAN FRANCISCO 

CAPITAL AND SURPLUS. 
PAID UP CAPITAL, 
DEPOSITS JANUARY 1. 1907 



108-110 Sutler Street 

$693,104.68 

$600,000.00 

$3,772,145.83 



Charles Carpy, Pres. Arthur Lcgallet, Vice-Pres. Leon Bocqueraz, Secretary 

John Ginly. Asst. Secretary P. A. BerBerol, Attorney 



-THE WASP- 



23 



field In moving into their elegant new building on 
Kearney Street between Mush and Pine. Their 
offices are the largest and finest of any realty firm 
in the city. Other realty men will follow their 
example. 

» * * 

Clearings 
The exchanges at the Clearing House for the 
past week were $49,767,293.89 against $48,092,681.04 
for the corresponding week last year. 
* * * 

The week was a very active one with the Sav- 
ings. The demand for loans continues to increase 
but preference is given to those who are about to 
build or establish homes. Loans were quite large 
during the week — one of the largest being $500,000 
by the Hibernia Bank. Manager Kelly says that 
there is a good margin in deposits over loans and 
that the next semi-annual report will show an 
increase of $2,000,000 in deposits. After the fire 
deposits started at about $70,000 a day and con- 
tinued to increase till the figure of $160,000 was 
reached. In one instance $200,000 was deposited 
in a single day. Most of the depositors in the earlier 
days were small amounts of a few hundred dollars 
brought in by people who received it from the in- 
surance companies for furniture or clothing de- 
stroyed and which has been generally withdrawn 
since. 

* * * 

The Lumber Situation 
Deliveries of lumber have been heavy for the 
second week of the month. The strike in the North- 
ern mills however will not have an immediate effect 
on San Francisco. There are 20,000 cars of pine 
lumber that cannot be sent East for want of cars 
and that must come to California. Of course until 
that is exhausted there is no need of raising the cry 
of a lumber famine or that of a stoppage to the 
rebuilding of the City. Pine is still below the list, 
selling at $22 @ $23. The heavy rains have stopped 
building operations and the delays from this cause 
will leave the record of March much less than it 
would otherwise be. 



Where Knox Hats are Sold 
The finest Hat Store in San Francisco has 
recently been opened by Paul T. Carroll in the 
Mutual Savings Bank Building on Market Street. 
The fittings and appointments are very attractive, 
Mr. Carroll having shown his faith in the future 
of the City by expending over ten thousand dollars 
on his establishment. He has secured the exclusive 
agency of the celebrated "Knox" hats, which are 
now on display in the various spring styles. Mr. 
Carroll is well known on both sides of the bay in 
aquatic circles, being a member of the Olympic and 
Reliance Clubs and having acted as referee for 
severaj years past of the Pacific Coast amateur 
Regattas. His many friends are sure to extend to 
him the patronage which his enterprise deserves. 



A SURE FOUNDATION 



On which to build a successful future is the 
habit of methodical saving. No matter how 
small your earnings may be, open a savings 
account and deposit a portion regularly. We 
will allow you 3 1 -2 per cent interest. 

CALIFORNIA SAFE DEPOSIT 
AND TRUST COMPANY 

CALIFORNIA and MONTGOMERY STS. 

West End Branch, 153! Devisadero 

Mission Branch, 2572 Mission, near 22d 
Up-Town Branch, I 740 Fillmore nr. Sutter 



VALUABLES of all kinds 

May be safely stored at 

SAFE DEPOSIT VAULTS 

of the 

FIRST NATIONAL BANK 

Cor. Bush and Sansome Sts. 



Safes to rent from $5 a year upwards 
Careful service to customers 



Trunks $! a month 
Office Hours: 6 a. m. lo 6 p. m. 



The German Savings and Loan Society 

526 CALIFORNIA ST., San Francisco 



Guaranteed Capital and Surplus 
Capital actually paid up in cash 
Deposits, December 31, 1906 



$2,578,695,41 

1,000,000.00 

36,531,917.28 



OFFICERS -President, F. Tillmann. Jr.; First Vice-President. Daniel Meyer 
Second Viee-President, Emil Rohle; Cashier. A. H. R. Schmidl; Assistanl Cashier. 
William Herrmann; Secretary. George Tourny; Assistant Secretary, A. H. Muller. 
Goodfellow & Eells, General Attorneys. 

BOARD OF DIRECTORS -F. Tillmann. Jr., Daniel Meyer, Emil Rohte. Urn. 
Sleinhart. I. N. Waller. N. Ohlandt. J. W. Van Bergen. E. T. Kruse and W. S. 
Goodfellow. 



The day alter, you need Abbott's Bitters. Braces the nerves; sustains you throughou 
the day and makes you feel bright and cheerful. At druggists'. 



MEMBER STOCK AND BOND EXCHANGE 



J. C. WILSON 

BROKER 

STOCKS AND BONDS Kohl Bldg., 488 California St. 

INVESTMENT SECURITIES San Francisco 

Telephone Temporary 815 



24 



THE WASP- 



Bond and Stock Exchange 
There has been a moderate amount of business 
done on the Bond and Stock Exchange during the 
week although the market, in sympathy with New 
York, was affected more or less. The ghost of 
Oceanic still flits about the board room and some 
unfortunate holders are offering to sell at SO cents" 
a share. 

Spring Valley has been weak at $22.75, Bank of 
California stock has shaded off a little with $3.65 
bid. Sales of San Francisco Savings Union have 
been made at $6.30. There has been an advance in 
California Wine stock for which $91.50 has been 
bid. Sales of its 5s have been made at $98. Cali- 
fornia Fruit Canners has weakened again, $103.50 
bid . California Gas and Electric 5s sold at $98. 
There has been an upward movement in Sugar 

stocks. 

* * * 

The Banks 

One of the results of the stock panic in the East 
has been to make the local banks pull the strings 
tighter. This, however, happens at a time when 
the normal demand for money is less than usual 
as there are no crops to be moved so that the 
strain is less. The effects of the New York dis- 
turbance were felt here more than a week ago and 
at the time of the first flurry in Wall Street when 
the Clearing House Exchanges dropped to a level 
with those of 1906 for the first time since the 
opening of the year. Although this was also in 
part due to the lessened volume of sales on our 

local mining exchange. 

* * * 

Mining Stocks 

The tendency of the mining stock market has 

been downward. New developments in the mines 

are needed to give prices a lift. The industrial 

troubles in Nevada have ended for the time being 

and the Industrial Workers of the World who 

started them have been driven from the field. 



An Admirable Cafe 

On account of the demand by the tra- r eling 
public Mr. H. C. Raap proprietor of the National 
Cafe and Grill, situated at 918-920 O'Farrell Street, 
near Van Ness Avenue, has decided to keep his 
establishment open until three o'clock in the morn- 
This will accommodate the hotel and drummer 
trade, there being a good many residents in the 
immediate vicinity of the cafe, who have been un- 
able to obtain a meal after the usual hours. There 
are three separate entrances, the main restaurant 
containing thirty tables, private tables for families 
and the Grill and Bar. 

A special Merchants Hot Lunch including Tea, 
Coffee, Wine or Beer is given daily between 11 A. 
M. and 2 P. M. at 25 cents. There is a regular 
dinner at 50 cents and a special Sunday dinner at 
75 cents. Meals are served a la carte at all hours 
until 3 A. ,M. as above stated. The meats are the 
very best that can be obtained and Mr. Raap has 
been complimented on his enterprise in sparing no 
expense to make the National Cafe the rendezvous 



for lovers of good eating. The tables are specially 
arranged for the comforts of patrons, the menu is 
unrivalled and at popular prices, the wine list un- 
excelled and everything is so scrupulously neat and 
clean that it is no wonder the establishment is 
already popular. 

Mr. Raap who took charge of the Cafe in January 
last is from Martinez where he was interested in 
promotion work for Contra Costa County for the 
past twenty years. He is well and favorably known 
and has decided to make his home in this City. Mr. 
Raap is a native son, first vice-president of the Cali- 
fornia State Board of Trade, Past Master of the 
California State Grange and has a host of friends 
who wish him every success in his venture. 



Germania National Bank 

OP SAIN FRANCISCO 
IS NOW OPEN FOR BUSINESS AT THEIR NEW QUARTERS 

521 MARKET STREET, Bet. First and Second Streets 

SAN FRANCISCO, CALIFORNIA 

OFFICERS: W. A. Frederick. President; F. Kronenberg. Vice-President; 
R. F. Crist, Vice-President; F. Kronenberg. Jr., Cashier. 
Cable Address; Gel 



PHIL S. MONTAGUE, Stock Broker 

Member of S. F. Stock Exchange 

Goldfield, Tonopah, Manhattan and Bullfrog Stocks Bought and Sold. 

Write for Market Letter. 

339 BUSH STREET, STOCK EXCHANGE BUILDING 



BURNED HOMES MUST BE REBUILT 

The Continental Building and Loan Association 

Having sustained practically no loss in the recent calamity, is in a 
position to loan money to people who wish to rebuild. San Francisco 
must restore her homes as well as her business blocks. 

DR. WASHINGTON DODGE. Pres. 

GAVIN McNAB. Atty. 

WM. CORB1N, Sec. and Gen. Mgr. 



OFFICES - 



COR. CHURCH AND MARKET STREETS 
OPEN AND DOING BUSINESS 



Popular French Restaurant 



Regular Dinner 75c 

Meals a la carte at any hour 



Private Dining Rooms 

[or Banquets, etc. 




497 Golden Gate Ave. 

Comer Polk Street 



Phone Market 2315 



-THE WASP- 



25 




Lands sake ! How careless some people are ! I'm 
an honorary member of the Apothecaries' Daugh- 
ters and they went and printed my name on the 
executive committee as Mrs. Tabitha Twiggs. 
Goodness! I can't describe the shock it gave me 
when I saw it in print. I realized for the first 
time how a woman of spirit must feel when she 
sees her marriage notice in the papers. The com- 
mittee on printing won't make such a mistake 
again, I can tell you. Gracious! I'm only sorry 
I didn't say more to them, for it was gross care- 
lessness. They not only put me down on the 
printed list as Mrs. but did the same thing to other 
single young girls. Well, what do you think? In- 
stead of apologizing to us the married woman who 
was responsible for the error says : 

"Oh, what's the difference. Everybody knows 
you're all misses !" 

"Is that so," I replied. "Well I can tell you I 
didn't marry the first man that asked me like some 
people I know." 

That hit her, as Mrs. Gayleigh would say, "good 
and hard." 

I wish I could find a society composed only of 
single women. They are much nobler and broad 
minded than the married ones. 



Oh dear ! Why do the daily newspapers publish 
homely women's portraits and put under them such 
titles as "The Lovely Mrs. Brown," or "The Beau- 
tiful Mrs. Smith?" It turns their heads completely. 
It really does. Mrs. Gabbe was telling me today 
about one of them that's talking of getting a divorce 
right away. Her husband doesn't take her round 
enough, she says. She wants to show herself and 
be admired by the young men. Oh mercy! It's a 
shame she says that a lovely woman should be 
kept in the house and have her young life robbed 
of all sunshine. She's been carrying on that way 
ever since she was pictured as "The Beautiful Mrs. 
Plugg (nee Sourface)." Her husband is talking 
about bringing suit for $50,000 against the news- 
papers for alienating his wife's affections and he 
married her only for her money, for she's homelier 
than a mud fence. That's married life for you. 



Thank heaven I'm ingle and have no desire to be 
otherwise. 

Mrs. Gayleigh was in today and told me about 
another silly married woman that craves admira- 
tion. She's been down to Santa Barbara and Los 
Angeles giving teas all Winter while her husband 
has been hustling around in the San Francisco 
mud to pay her bills. She actually corresponds 
with other men. 

Oh goodness ! The other day she got her letters 
mixed and sent her husband one intended for a 
young bank clerk. It didn't bother him in the 
least. Mrs. Gayleigh says husbands with Society 
wives that are never home don't worry over trifles. 
The young man who got the husband's letter 
though was stunned. He was addressed as "You 
stingy old bear," and told to "dig up 200 plunks" 
at once. What horrible slang! If he didn't for- 
ward the money she was going to draw on him 
through the bank and see if he would dare refuse. 
Goodness me ! That letter must have worried the 
young man badly, especially as Mrs. Gayleigh says 
he is having a good deal of trouble with his tailor 
and his boarding house. The shock, she says, will 
keep him from figuring as co-respondent in a 
divorce suit this year at least. That woman has 
a most extraordinary way of looking at things. 
I never can understand her point of view. 

TABITHA TWIGGS. 



Miss Helen Woolworth has left for Europe and 
she is not coming back here for years. She is de- 
voted to life on the other side and she was very 
glad to leave here. Her friends always imagined 
that she would marry a title, but she insists upon 
being married for love instead of her fortune and 
declares that she will give no husband a penny of 
her money. 



The Auditorium 

FILLMORE STREET, Comer Page 

FRANK RITT1GSTEIN. Manager 

A SKATING PALACE 



Longest Floor Best Skating Courteous Attention to All Patrons 
Special Arrangements for Private Clubs and Parties, etc. 




Old Poodle Dog Restaurant 



824-826 EDDY STREET 

Near Van Ness Ave. 



Service better than before 
the fire 



Formerly, Bnsh and Grant Ave. 
San Francisco 



Phone Emergency 63 



26 



-THE WASP- 



Automobile News 

The automobile dealers are complaining of the 
slow deliveries of their respective cars on this Coast, 
which retards business very materially. The de- 
mand for the machines is good but contemplating 
purchasers want immediate delivery, not being 
satisfied to wait any length of time until the 
machines are received from the factories. The 
numerous washouts on the railroads account in a 
great measure for the delay. 

Mr. W. M. Gardiner, local manager of the White 
Sewing Machine Company's branch here, has re- 
cently returned from a visit to the factory of the 
company in Cleveland. He reports large sales 
throughout the country with unusually big orders 
from the Pacific Coast. He has secured additional 
shipments of the 1907 White Cars for the local 
house. Speaking of the merits of the White, a 
well known and enthusiastic autoist said that it is 
evident to the careful observer that many import- 
ant improvements have been made in the new 1907 
models. There is for example the simplified system 
of regulation enabling the merest novice to run a 
White and secure the same results as the most 
experienced operator. It is still the "Incomparable 
White" made by the "White Company." 



Thomas Henderson, vice president of the Winton 
Motor Carriage Co., accompanied by Mrs. Hender- 
son, left Cleveland recently on a leisurely trip to 
the Pacific Coast. Going and returning Mr. Hen- 
derson will visit Winton representatives in the 
larger cities of the West. 



Work on the new Winton branch in Pittsburg is 
progressing so rapidly that the building will un- 
doubtedly be ready for occupancy by April 15th. 
The structure will be one of the largest automobile 
establishments and the only manufacturer's branch 
house in Pittsburg. A site for the Winton branch 
in Detroit will be selected within the next ten days, 
and the building work will then proceed rapidly. 



How Fast Hiawatha Ran 
Determine how fast, asks Prof. Greenhill, Hia- 
watha can run from the following data : 
Strong of arm was Hiawatha ; 
He could shoot ten arrows upward 
And the tenth had left the bow-string 
Ere the first to earth had fallen. 
Swift of foot was Hiawatha; 
He could shoot an arrow from him 
And run forward with such swiftness 
That the arrow fell behind him. 
Neglecting the resistance of the air and granting 
that Hiawatha could shoot one arrow a second, the 
solution is as follows : 

The time of flight of the arrows shot upward 
must have been nine seconds. Therefore the 
velocity with which they were shot, being equal 
to the time multiplied into half the value of the 
constant of gravity, was 144 feet a second. 



Now, in shooting an arrow from him Hiawatha, 
to obtain the furthest flight, would let fly at an 
angle of 45 degrees, and by a simple trigonometrical 
calculation we therefore arrive at the fact that the 
horizontal velocity of the arrow would be rather 
less than 144 feet second, and would, in fact, be 
102 feet a second, or 70 miles an hour. Hiawatha 
would therefore have to run faster than this. Could 
he do it on a sprint? 

Again having recourse to calculation we find that 
an arrow shot at 144 feet a second would fly 216 
yards, or nearly a furlong. Hiawatha would run 
that distance in about seven seconds, so that he 
would be able to give the present holder of the 
record some 145 yards ftart. 



' 



A .— ■ 


Hi A 


GRAND » 


Wf GRAND 


FINALE Si 


M FINALE 


TO A flj 


M TO A 


CHAPTER 1| 


IS CHAPTER 


OF | 


1*1 OF 


COURSES Li 


3H COURSES 



Liqueur 



Peres ebartren 



"' ~ ■ „•■ ■ -~_" 



LIQUEUR 

Peres Chartreux 



-GREEN AND YELtOW- 



This famous cordial, now made at Tar- 
ragona. Spain, was for centuries distilled 
by the Carthusian Monks(PeresChartreux) 
at the Monastery of La Grande Chartreuse. 
France, and known throughout the world 
as Chartreuse, The above cut represents 
the bottle and label employed in the putting 
up of the article since the Monks' expul- 
sion from France, and it is now known as 
Liqueur Peres Chartreux (the Monks 
however, still retain the right to use the 
old bottle and label as well), distilled by 
the same order of Monks. who have securely 
guarded the secret of its manufacture for 
hundreds of years, and who alone possess a 
knowledge of the elements of this delicious 
nectar. 



At first-class Wine Merchants. Grocers. Hotels. Cafes 
Batjer & Co . 45 Broadway. New York. 
N. Y., Sole Agents for United States. 



THE WASP- 



27 



America's Dress Parade 

It takes place at the Royal 
Ponciana Hotel, Florida 

The Royal Ponciana Hotel al Palm 

Beach, Florida, is said by travelers to 
paradise of the moneyed aris- 
tocracy of America. The ostentatious 
and vulgar display of wealth is as 
gorgeous as a circus parade, and just 
about as refined. The Ponciana is 
one of the largest hotels in the world 
and entertains about 30.000 guests dur- 
ing the season. The lowest rate is 
$5 a day, but you can pay $100 a day. 
if spending money be your chief de- 
sire. The Hotel contains 1266 bed- 
rooms and 640 bathrooms and you can 
walk two miles in the corridors with- 
out repeating or going out of doors. 
The dining room has a floor space 
of 28,389 feet and seats 1600 people. 
There are 1400 employes including 
100 cooks, 400 waiters and 100 bell- 
boys. The meats and groceries for 
this great hotel are brought from New 
York by express. The fish, fruits and 
vegetables are obtained in Florida and 
Alabama. 

* * * 

The exhibitions of millinery and 
dress goods that are given three times 
a day at the Royal Ponciana are un- 
equalled in costliness and gorgeous- 
ness by any in the world. Nowhere 
else is there such a display of money, 
for the sake of ostentation. 

* * * 

The morning exhibition shows off 
the wealthy women at the Ponciana in 
their linens and laces. As you walk 
down the piazza you can see by the 
hundred morning dresses of Irish 
point lace that cost hundreds of dol- 
lars, and long wraps to match the 
dresses in style and cost. 

* * * 

At 11 o'clock the crowd at the 
Ponciana goes to the bathing beach 
to see the dress and the undress 
parade — the latter in particular. The 
beach is not nearly as fine as that 
at Santa Cruz and several other Cali- 
fornia resorts. The water is warm 



at all times of the- year, because the 
gulf stream comes within a mile and 
a half of the land. The surf is too 
heavy for delicate people, who prefi i 
a big swimming pool that is sur- 
rounded by a pavilion. Nearly every- 
body who goes into the surf also tries 
the po.,I for a little swim before 
dressing, and the gallery around it is 
so situated that the good-lookine om 
can show their shapes to a large 
audience. The bathing dresses are 
made for show, usually of black silk 
or satin trimmed with Irish point and 
other lace and with elaborate collars 
and cuffs. Some of the more showy 
and shapely ladies appear in bright 
colors — purple, blue and even scarlet, 
with stockings, bathing slippers and 
poke bonnets to match. It is need- 
less to say that these bathing dresses 
have been fitted to the form with 
great accuracy. Some of them appear 
to have shrunk so that they are un- 
comfortably tight. The skirts are as 
short as the law allows. 
* * 

After the morning dip the guests 
at Palm Beach take their luncheon 
and then go to the band concert 
where there is the afternoon display 
of finery for everyone to stare at. The 
hats are very elaborate and are loaded 
with gorgeous flowers and plumes, 
remarkable for their length and 
beauty. Parasols, stockings, slippers, 
gloves and fans match the costumes 
and nearly every woman has a long 
"liberty motor veil," falling over her 
shoulders, and sometimes tied over 
her hat. It isn't fashionable to get 
tanned any more. Last year and the 
year before girls went around bare- 
headed and bare-armed, but now they 
wear long gloves and, veils so that 
as little as possible of the skin may 
be exposed. 

Nearly every woman has a gold- 
netted purse with the clasp set with 
diamonds and other jewels, which of 
itself is an evidence of opulence, for 
they cost all the way from $500 up to 
$5000. 



The real dresS parade at the Royal 
Ponciana Hotel is reserved for the 

evening. It is at the dinner and in 
the rotunda where a thousand guests 
gather after dinner, that the fiercest 
rivalry of clothes and jewels takes 
place. Every evening, about 6 o'clock, 
before they go upstairs to dress, you 
will see a line of ladies standing in 
front of the cashier's window gelling 
their jewel boxes out of the safe. 
Often when rich people go away from 
home for a good time they leave their 
jewels at home, but when they go to 
Palm Beach rich women who intend 
to enter the dress contest at Palm 
Beach bring every bit of gold and 
silver and precious stones the}' have. 

* * * 

In this rivalry of the dressmakers 
and jewelers art at the Royal Ponci- 
ana Hotel the native matrons have the 
field almost to themselves. It is by 
no means a beauty show, for girls 
with the graces of a goddess are rare. 
The fat dowagers are seated com- 
fortably in the chairs, or stand around 
gossiping, while their bare necks and 
their heads blaze with diamonds. 
Many of them would like to put the 
price marks on their jewels and would 
not be hurt if one asked permission 
to read the tags. 



Some day in the not far distant 
future California will have resorts like 
the Royal Ponciana at Palm Beach 
which is supported by the rich people 
of the overflowing cities on the At- 
lantic Coast. They cannot stand the. 
cold Winters and the frightfully hot 
Summers, and flee to a temperate 
zone where they can combine lavish 
display with physical comfort. Before 
long the great Middle West will teem 
with a wealthy class, who will fre- 
quent California just as the Bos- 
toniaiis and New Yorkers resort to 
Palm Beach. The Califonva habit is 
growing rapidly. 



H. C. RAAP, Manaser 



Telephone Franklin 588 



National Cafe and Grill 

918-920 O'FARRELL ST., San Francisco 

SPECIAL MERCHANTS HOT LUNCH 25c 

Including Tea, Coffee. Wine or Beer. 1 I a. m. to 2 p. m. 

A LA CARTE al all hours. 

Regular Dinner 50c Special Sunday Dinner 75c 



.. CONEY J. HUFF 

Kadee Hammam Baths 

TURKISH AND HAMMAM BATHS 

PRIVATE ROOM AND BATH $1.00 

Open Day and Nighl 

GEARY AND GOUGH STREETS 

Strictly First Class Phone West 3725 



Qrir., 1NEW ** 

OSSIFIED 
* Directory 



OF SAN FRANCISCO'S 

LEADING BUSINESS HOUSES ^ l "" 
and PROFESSIONAL PEOPLE. 

REVISED AffJS CORRECTED WEEKLY. 





MISCELLANEOUS. 

Builders^ Exchange, 226 Oak St., S. F. 
Builders' Association, 96 Fulton St. 

ADDRESSING MACHINES. 
Elliott Addressing Machine Co., 68 Stock- 

loi< St.. S. F. 

ADVERTISING AGENCIES. 
Bolte 4 Braden, 105-107 Oak St., S. F.; phone 

Park 2JJ. 
Cooper Adv. Agency, F. J., West Mission and 

Brady sts. 
Dake Adv. Agency, Midway Bldg., 779 

Market St. Phone Temporary 1440. 
Fisher, L. P. Adv. Agency, 836 North 

Point St., S. F. ; Phone Emergency 684. 
Hadley, M. L., Advertising Agency, 26 

Clay St. 

Johnston-Dienstag Co., 2170 Post St., 

Tuttle, L. T„ 332 Delbert Block, cor. Van 

Ness Ave. and O'Farrell. 
Walker, Shirley, Advertiser. Midway 
building, 779 Market street, phone 
Temporary 1839. 

A8ENTS— MANUFACTURERS. 
Wlrtner, Jno. J., 2330 Vallejo St., S. F. 

ARCHITECTS. 
Carson, John, Vice-President and 
Manager H. C. Chivers, 1627 Sut- 
ter St. 
Chlvers, Herbert C, 1627 Sutter St., S. 
F.; Wainwrights Building, St. Louis, 
Mo. 
Curtis John M., 2601 Buchanan St., 8. F. 
Havens & Toeplce, 611-612 Mutual Savings 

Bank, 
lteed Bros. Temporary Offices, 2326 

Gough St.. S. F. 
Thos. J. Welsh, John W. Carey, associate 
architects, 40 Haight St., S. F. 
ART DEALERS. 
Galinrrh^r Bhs„ 2208 Geary St., S. F. 
Gump, S. & G., 1645 California St., b. F. 
aichussler Bros., 341 Grove si. 
ATTORNEYS. 
A. Heynemann, 2193 Fillmore St. 
Phone West 6405. 

Bahra, George H., 1901 Post St., cor. 

Fillmore. S. F. 
Campbell, Metson & Drew, 1101 Laguna St., 

cor. of Turk St., S. F. 
Dorn, Dorn & Savage, 717 Van Ness 

ave. 
Drum, J. S., 1416 Post St., S. F. 
Dlnkelsplel. Henry G. W.. 1266 Bills St., 

S. F. PHONE, WEST 2355. 
Goldstone, Louis, 1124 Fillmore St. 
Heller, Powers & Ehrman, Union 

Trust bldg. 
Hewlett, Bancroft and Ballantine, 
Monadnock Bldg., Phone Temporary 

972. 
McEnerney, Garret W-, 1416 Post St.. S.F. 
Lawlor, Wm. P., Judge, The Family 

Club, 1900 Franklin St., S. F. 
O'Callaghan. Chas. F.. 928 Fillmore Bt., 

S. F. 
Pringie & Pringle, 2219 Fillmore st. 
Ricketts, A. H. (Title Quieting Co.) 
1136 O'Farrell street. Tel. Emer- 
gency 788. 
Shadburne, Geo., D., 904 Devisadero 

at., S. F. 
Shortrldge, Samuel M., 1101 O'Farrell St., 
S. F. 



Edward B. Young, 4th Floor, Union Trust 
Bldg., S. F. Telephone, Temporary, 833. 

AUTOMOBILES AND .SUPPLIES. 

Auto Livery Co., Golden Gate and Van 

Ness Ave., S. F. 
Boyer Motor Car Co., 408 Golden Gate ave. 

Phone, Emergency 655. 
Leavltt, J. W. & Co., 441 Golden Gate 

Ave., S. F. ; 370, 12th St., Oakland. 
Lee Cuvler, 359 Golden Gate Ave., S. F. 
Middleton Motor Car Co., 550 Golden Gate 

Ave., S. F. 
Mobile Carriage Co., Golden Gate Ave. 

and Gough sts., S. F. 
Pioneer Automobile Co., 901 Golden Gate 

Ave., S. P.; and 12th and Oak sts., 

Oakland 
Uarlg Auto Co. 1377 Broadway, Oakland. 
White Sewing Machine Company, 

Market and Van Ness ave., S. F. 

BANKS. 
American National Bank, Merchants Ex. 

Bldg., S. F. 
Anglo California Bank Lt., cor. Pine and 

Sansome sts., S. F. 
Bank of California, 424 California St., 

8. F. 
California Safe Deposit and Trust Co., 

cor. California and Montgomery sts., 

8. F. 
Central Trust Co., 42 Montgomery St., 

a r 
Crocker - Woolworth National Bank. 

Crocker Bldg., S. F. 
First National Bank, Bush and Sansome 

sts., S. F. 
French Savings Bank, Union Trust Bldg., 

and Van Ness and Eddy. 
Germania National Bank, 621 Market St., 

S. F.; Phone Park 792. 
German Savings and Loan Society. 626 

California 8L, S. F. 
Halsey, N. W. & Co.. 413 Montgomery 

St., S. F. 
International Banking Corporation. 2045 
Sutter street, and 415 Montgomery 
Hibernia Savings and Loan Society, 

Jones and McAllister sts., S. F 
Humboldt Savings Bank, 626 Market St., 

S. F. 
Mechanics' Saving Bank, 143 Montgom- 
ery st, S. F. 
Metropolis Trust and Savings Bank, 

1237 Van Ness Ave. 
Mutual Savings Bank of San Francisco, 

710 Market St., opp. 3d St.. S. F. 
National Bank of the Pacific. Call Bldg., 

S. F. 
Renters Loan and Trust Co., Commercial and 

Savings Bank, 115 Hayes Street. 
San Francisco Savings Union, N. W. 

cor. California and Montgomery sts., 

S. F. 
Savings and Loan Society, 101 Mont- 
gomery St., S. F. 
Security Savings Bank, 316 Montgomery 

St.. S. F. 
Standard Bank, 1818 Market St., at 

Van Ness, S. F. 
The Market Street Bank and Safe De- 
posit Vault, Market and 7th sts., S. F. 
Union Trust Co., 4 Montgomery St., S. F. 
Wells-Fargo Nevada National Bank, 

Union Trust Bldg., S. F. 
Western National Bank, Powell and 

Market sts., S. F. 

BATHS 

Colonial Baths, 1745 O'Farrell St. 
Oriental Turkish, cor. Eddy and Liar- 
kin Streets, City. W. J. Blum- 



berg & Bro. 

BITTERS. 
Lash's Bitters CD.. 1721 Mission St., S. F 

BREWERIES. 
Albion Ale and Porter Brewery, 1007-9 Golden 

Gate Ave., S. F. 
Buffalo Brewing Co., 126-12J King st, 

S. F. ; Phone Main 1010. 
National Brewing Co., 762 Fulton St., 

S. F. 
Lochbaum, A. H. Co., 126 Kinir st, S. F.; 

Phone Main 1010. 
S. F. Breweries, Ltd.. 240 2d st, S. F. 
Rapp, Jno. & Co., Agents Rainier Beer, 

8th and Townsend sts., S. F. 

ortlDGE BUILDER;.. 

Pac. Construction Co., 17 Spear st, S. F. 

San Francisco Bridge Co., 523 Monad- 
nock Blug-. S. F. 
tlROKERS— STOCKS AND BONDS. 

tiutton. E. F. & Co., 490 California st. 

Rollins', E. H. & Sons, 804 Kohl Bldg: 
Telephone Temporary 163; a. F. 

Wilson. J. C, 488 California st, S. F. 

Sutro & Co., 412 Montgomery St.. 
S. F. 

Montague. Phil S., 339 Bush st, Stock 
Exchange Bldg. 

Zadlg & Co., 324 Bush St., S. F. 

BUILDING AND LOAN ASSOCIA- 
TIONS. 
Continental Building and Loan Associa- 
tion, Church and Market sts., 8. F. 
BUTCHERS' SUPPLIES. 
Pacirtc Butchers' Supply Co.. S15 Bry- 
ant st, bet. 1st and 2d sts.. S. F. 
CARPET CLEANING. 
Spauidlng, J. & Co., 911-21 Golden Oat* 
Ave.: Phone Park &»i. 

CLEANING AND DYEING. 
Thomas, The F. Parisian Dyeing and 

Cleaning Works, 1168 McAllister st., 

S. F. 

CLOTHIERS— RETAIL. 
Hub, The, Chas. Keilus & Co., King 

Solomon Bldg., Sutter and Fillmore 

sts.. S. F. 
Roos Bros., cor. O'Farrell and Fillmore 

sts.. S. F. 

COMMISSION AND SHIPPING MER- 
CHANTS. 

Dollar, Robert Co., Steuart street dock. 

Johnson Locke Mercantile Co., 213 Sansome 
St., S. F. 

x-laldonado & Co., Inc., 2020 Buchanan 
St., S. F.; Tel. 2830. 

The J. K. Armsby Co., The Armsby 
Bldg., cor. New Montgomery and How- 
ard sts.. S. )■ 

CONTRACTORS AND BUILDERS. 

Atlantic, Gulf and Pacific Co., 523 Monadnock 

Bldg. 
Fisher Construction Co.. 1414 Post St., 

S F 
Gray Rr~«>.. 2d st. adjoining W. F. & Co. 

Bldg.. S. F. 
S. F. Construction Co., A. E. Buckman, 

ores. ; A. I. Raisch, sec. ; 636 Market ; Tel. 

Franklin 256. 
Trounson, J., 1751 Lyon St.; also 176 Ash 

Ave., S. F. 

CROCKERY AND GLASSWARE. 
Nathan Dohrmann & Co., 1520-1550 
Van Ness ave. 



THE WASP - 



29 



DENTISTS. 
Oreian B. Burns. 2077 Sutter St.. West 6736. 
Decker, Dr. Chas. W..13I6 Sutler st 
Knox. Dr. A. J., 1615 Fillmore St.. formerly 

of Grant Bldg. 
Morffew & Peel. 1765 Pine St.. S. F. : 

Tel. West 4301; formerly Examiner 

Bldg. 
O'Connell. Dr. Robert E. and Dr. George. 

211 Divl.iadero St.. S. F. 
Albert S. V'anderhurst. 2077 Sutter St., West 

6736. 

DRV GOODS— RETAIL. 
E-nporlum. The. 1201 Van Ness Ave.. S. 

5".: pi. .me West 1361. 
Newman & Levison. Van Ness Ave. and Sutt 
\j Connor. Mottlt & Co.. Van Ness Ave 

and Pine St.. 9. F. 
City of Paris. Van Ness Ave and Wash- 
ington St.. S. F. 
White House, Van Ness Ave. and Pine 

St.. 3. F. 

ENGINEERS. 
..Mantle. Gulf & Pacific Co.. 623 Monad- 
nock Bldg.. S. F. 

EXPRESS. 
Wells. Fargo & Co. Express. Golden 
Gate Ave. and Franklin St., Fer- 
ry Bldg., and 3d St. Depot, S. F. 

FEATHERS— UPHOLSTERY. 
Crescent Feather Co.. 19th and Harrison 
sts . S. F. 

FLORISTS AND DECORATORS. 

Clels & Jacobsen, 942 Fillmore St. 

near McAllister, Phone Park 363. 

Fnnk & Parodi Co., 1215 McAllister 

street, formerly 109 Geary street, 

phone Park. 794. 

FRUITS AND VEGETABLES. 
Omey & Goetting, Geary and Polk sts., S. F. 

FUNERAL DIRECTORS. 
Carew & English. 1618 Geary St.. bet. 
Buchanan and Webster sts., S. F. ; 
Phone West 2604. 
Porter & White, 1631 Golden Gate Ave., 
3. F. ; Phone West 770. 

FURNITURE. 
A. B. Smith Co., 703 Van Ness Ave.. 

cor. Turk St., 8. F. 
Breuner, John & Co.. 1491 Van Ness Ave., 

S. F. 
Sanitary Bedding House, The, 778- 
780 Golden Gate ave., N. B. cor. 
Gough. Beds and Bedding ex- 
clusively. Tel. Emergency 596. 
GAS 8TOVES. 
Gas Co.. The, Halght and Fillmore sts., 
S. F. 

GENT'S FURNISHERS. 
Bullock & Jones Company, 801 Van Ness 

Ave., cor. Eddy sL. S. F. 
Hansen and Elrick, 1105-7 Fillmore 
St., nr. Golden Gate ave., phone 
West 5678. 

Roberts & Bayless, Men's Furnishers, 645 Van 
Ness Ave., near Turk. 

HARDWARE AND RANGES. 
Alexander-Tost Co., Pins and Polk ats.. 

S. F. 
Baker & Hamilton. 115 Berry St., near 

3d; Phone West 3689 and 3590. 
Dunham. Carrlgan & Hayden Co.. office 

131-153 Kansas st . B F. 
lis, John G. & Co., 827 Mission St.. S. F. 
Montague. W. W. & Co., Turk & Polk 
sts., S. F. 

HARNESS AND SADDLERY. 
Davis. W. & Son. 2020 Howard at. bet 

16th and 17th. S. F. 
Lelbold Harness and Carriage Co., 1214 
Golden Gate Ave.. S. F. 
HATTERS. 
Korn, Eugene, the hatter, 94 6 Van 

Ness Avenue. 
Meussdorffer. J. C. Sons. 909 Fillmore 

St.. S. F. 
Porcher. J.. 716-717 Golden Gats Avt„ 
near Franklin. S. F. : formerly Odd Fel- 
lows Bldg. 
HOSPITALS AND SANITARIUMS. 
German Hospital, Scott and Duboce 

Ave. 
Harbor View Sanatorium, Harbor 
View, S. F. 



Keeley Institute. H. L. Batchelder. 

Mgr.; 262 Devisadero St., S. F. 
McNutt Hospital, 1800 O'Farrell 8t 

S. F. 
St. Luke's Hospital. 26th and Valen- 
cia St. 

JEWELERS. 
Baldwin Jewelery Co., 1521 Sutter at.. 

and 1261 Van Ness Ave., S. K 
Bofam. Bristol. Van Ness and Sacra- 
mento st. 
Glinderman. Wm.. 1532-1534 Fill- 
more, formerly Examiner Bldg. 
Shreve & Co.. cor. Post and Grant Ave., 
and Van Nes sand Sacramento Its., S. F. 
LAUNDRIES. 
Lace House French Laundry. Cerclat A 
Co., propd. ; 1047 McAllister St.; for- 
merly at 342 McAllister; Tel. Park 881. 
La Grande Laundry, 234 12th St.. S. F. 
Palace Hotel Laundry and Kelly Laundry 

Co., Inc., 2343 Post St., phone West 5854. 
San Francisco Laundry Association. 140R 
Turk St.. S. F.; Phone West 793. 
LIME. 
Holmes Lime Co., Mutual Savings 
Bank Bldg., 710 Market St. 
LUMBER. 
Nelson. Chas. Co.. 1st and Clay ats.. 

Oakland; 144 Steuait St., S. F. 
Redwood Manufacturers Co.. Room 505 
Monadnock Bldg, S. F.. Doors, Win- 
dows, Tanks, etc. 
Slade, S. E., Lumber Co., 65 Mission 

street, S. F. 
Union Lumber Co., office 909 Mo- 
nadnock building 

MACARONI AND VERMICELLI. 
r, R. Podesta. 512 Washington at. 3. V 
MOVING AND STORAGE COMPANIES. 

Bekins' Van and Storage Co.. 13th and 

Mission sts.. S. F. ; Phone Park 169 

and 1016 Broadway. Oakland. 
St. Francis Transfer and Storage Company. 

Office, 1402 Eddy st. Tel. West 2680. 
Union Transfer Co., 2116 Market St., 

S. F. 

Notaries Public. 
Deane, Jno, J., temporarily at 2077 
Sutter street and 2464 Vallejo 
street, S. F. 

OPTICIANS. 

Mayerle, George. German expert, 1115 
Golden Gate Ave., S. F. ; Phone West 
3766. 
San Francisco Optical Co. "Spences," 
are now permanently located at 
627 Van Ness ave, between Gold- 
en Gate avenue and Turk st. 
"Branch" 1613 Fillmore near 
Geary. 
Standard Optical Co., 808 Van Ness ave., 
near Eddy st. 

PACKERS. 
Phoenix Packing Co., 118 Davis St., S. F. 
PAINTERS AND DECORATORS. 
Keefe, J. H.. 820-822 O'Farrell St., S. F., Tel. 
Franklin 2055. 

Tozer, L. & Son Co., Inc., 1527 Pine 
and 2511 Washington St., near 
Fillmore, S. F. 

PAINTS AND OILS. 

Bass-Hueter Paint Co., 1816 Market 
st. 

Paraflne Paint Co., 405 Union Savings 
Bank Bldg., Oakland; Sales Dept 
Guerrero near 15th St., S. F. 
PHOTO ENGRAVERS. 

Cal. Photo Eng. Co.. 141-143 Valencia st. 
PHYSICIANS. 

Bowie, Dr. Hamilton C, formerly 293 
Geary St., Paul Bldg.; now 
14th and Church sts. 

Bryant, Dr. Edgar R.. 1944 Fillmore 
st. cor. Pine; Tel. West 6657; Res. 
3869 Jackson St.; Tel. West 816. 

D'Evelyn, Dr. Frederick W., 2116 Cal- 
ifornia st, S. F.; and 2103 Clinton 
Ave.. Alameda. 



Thorne, Dr. W. S., 1434 Post St., S. 
F. 

PIANOS — MANUFACTURERS AND 

DEALERS. 
Bn.awln. D. H. & Co.. 2612 Sacramento 

St.. near Fillmore. S. F.; Phone West 

1869. 

RESTAURANTS. 
Marchand's. 1424 McAllister St. 
Moraghan, M. B. Oyster Co.. 1212 

Golden Gate Ave.. S. F. 
Old Poodle Dog. 824 Eddy St., near Van 

Ness ave. 



St. Germain Restaurant, 497 Golden 
Gate Ave., Phone Emergency 300. 
Swain's Restaurant, 1111 Poet St., S. F. 
Techau Tavern, 1321 Sutter St.. S. F. 
Thompson's, formerly Oyster Loaf, 

1727 O'Farrell St. 

SAFES AND SCALE? 
Herring-Hall Marvin Sale Co., office and 
salesrooms. Mission st, bet. Seventh and 
Eighth sts. ; phone Temp'y, 1037. 
SEWING MACHINES. 
Wheeier & Wilson and Singer Sewing 
Machines. 1431 Bush st, cor. Van 
Ness Ave.. S. F.; phone Emergency 
301, formerly 231 Sutter street. 
STORAGE. 
Bekins Van & Storage Co., 13th and Mission 

Sts., S. F.; Phone Market 2558. 
Pierce Rodolph Storage Co., Eddy 
and Fillmore Sts.. Tel. West 828. 

SURGICAL INSTRUMENTS AND HOS- 
PITAL SUPPLIES. 
Walters & Co.. formerly Shutts. Walters & 
Co., 1608 1 teiner St.. S. F. 

TALKING MACHINES. 
Bacigalupi, Peter. 1113-1116 Fillmore 
st. S. F. 

TAILORS. 
Lyons. Charles. London Tailor, 1432 Fill- 
more St., 731 Van Ness Ave.. S. F. ; 
958 Broadway. Oakland. 
McMahon, Keyer and Stiegeler Bros., 

Van Ness Ave. and Ellis, O'Far- 
rell and Fillmore. 

Neuhaus & Co.. Inc., 1618 Bills st- 
near Fillmore. S. F. 

Rehnstrom. C. H.. 2416 Fillmore at; 
formerly Mutual Savings Bank Bldg. 

TENTS AND AWNINGS 
1 horns F.. 1209 Mission St., corner of Eighth, 
S. F. 

Trir V» PC. 
Eames Tricycle Co.. Invalid Chairs, 2108 

Market St.. S. F. 
WINES & LIQUORS — WHOLES A T,E 
Balke. Ed. W., 1498 Eddy St.. cor. 

Fillmore. 
Blumenthal. M. & Co.. Inc., temporary 

office. 1521 Webster st. S. F. 
Butler. John & Son. 2209 Steiner st, 

S. F. 
Reynolds. Chas. M. Co., 514 Haight st, 

Pusr-orii, Fisher & Co.. 649 Turk st, S. F. 
Berman Wine & Liquor Co., family trade 

S. F. 
Siebe Bros. & Placeman. 419-425 
Larkin street. Phone, Emergency 
349. 
Weniger, P. J. & Co.. N. E. cor. Van 
Ness ave. and Ellis st. Tel. Emer- 
gency 3 09. 
Wlchman. Lute-en & Co.. formerly of 29- 
31 Battery st.. S. F. : temporary office, 
Warrisnn and Everett sts., Alameda. 
Cal.: Phone Alameda 1179. Gilt Edge 
Whiskey 

WINES AND LIOUOPS— RETAIL. 

Ferguson. T. M. Co.. Market street. 
Same old stand. Same Old Crow 
Whiskey. 
Fischer, E. R.. 1901 Mission street. 

corner of Fifteen+h. 
The Metropole.Tohn L. Herget and Wm. H. 
Harrison. Props., N. W. cor. Sutter and 
Steiner Streets.' 
Tuxedo Tho. Eddie Granev. Prop. SW 
cor, Fillmnro e^ O'FarreTl sts 

YEAST MANUFACTURERS. 
Golden Gate Compressed Yeait Co., 2401 Fill- 
more. 



30 



-THE WASP- 



Amusements 

Even as the stars in their courses 
fought against Sisera, so did Jupiter 
Pluvius exert his best efforts to put a 
crimp in the ambitions of our local 
theatrical magnates last Monday night. 
But old J. P. struck a serious snag at 
the Alcazar Theater, for though else- 
where a bare corporal's guard repre- 
sented the attendance, the new play- 
house was packed to the doors. The 
famous "Alcazar crowd" and its sisters 
and cousins and aunts turned out in a 
body, making the occasion one to be 
long remembered. 

* * * 

The three new leading people at the 
Alcazar "made good" in a most satis- 
factory way. From what I know of 
the female portion of the Alcazar clien- 
tele, Mr. Lytell will ere long be en- 
throned as the "matinee idol" par 
excellence of this City. Miss Lang, the 
leading lady is also a capable actress 
and a woman of strong personality. Miss 
Lovering, the ingenue, is certainly pretty 
enough, and also does very well in the 
actual work of performance. The other 
members of the cast are all old favorites 
who won their places in our hearts in 

days gone by. 

* * * 

A testimonial benefit will be tendered 
the eminent actor, James M. Ward, at 
the Colonial Theater on Monday even- 
ing, March 25th, the attraction being 
"Sapho." Mr. Ward is one of the oldest 
and best known actors in the country, 
and as he has a whole army of friends 
in this locality, the Colonial will un- 
doubtedly be packed with an enthusiastic 
audience on this occasion. Frank Bacon 
also owes considerable of his early train- 
ing to Mr. Ward's paintaking efforts. 
In his prime, Mr. Ward was connected 
with most of the foremost theatrical 
organizations in the country, having 
played with Modjeska, Booth, Forrest 
and Davenport. He was quite a favor- 
ite in this City when he was with the 
old Grand Opera House Stock Com- 
pany. 

* * * 

"Scramble Matrimony," a new comedy 
by Howard P. Taylor, has pleased large 
audiences this week at the Colonial 



^ICE CREAM 

— '1536-8 Fillmore St:.S:F. 



Theater, where an exceptionally well- 
acted performance of the funny piece 
has been given. Frank Bacon and his 
clever company of comedians are at 
their best in a play of this character. 

* * * 

The Colonial Stock Company will pre- 
sent one of the most successful dramas 
ever produced in this country next 
week, beginning Monday, March 25th. 
"Sapho," Alphonse Daudet's great play, 
will be the bill and Izetta Jewell, the 
talented leading woman, will be seen in 
the title role. Miss Jewell's artistic 
performance of Salome is still fresh in 
the memory of local theater-goers and 
in the role of Sapho the passionate wo- 
man with a scarlet past she should add 
to her reputation as a versatile actress. 
The Olga Nethersole version will be 
given in its entirety and the manage- 
ment promises a magnificent scenic pro- 
duction. The regular stock company 
will be considerably increased for this 
play. 

* * * 

"Kreutzer Sonata," Count Tolstoi's 
most successful effort, is to follow 
"Sapho" at the Colonial. 

* * * 

We are especially fortunate at present 
for the number of high class attrac- 
tions which are being presented at local 
play houses. Of these, not the least in 
any degree is "Mrs. Wiggs of the Cab- 
bage Patch." Madge Carr Cook, in the 
title role is no stranger to us, nor, for 
that matter, is Vivian Ogden, who plays 
Miss Hazy. These two, with an excel- 
lent supporting cast, including Mr. Car- 
ter who enacts the role of Hiram Stub- 
bins, contribute a production of Mrs. 
Rice's comedy drama that cannot be ex- 
celled. A tip to the wise is sufficient. 
See this show at the Van Ness Theater. 
* * * 

The efforts of that grand old war 
horse of stage management, Mr. George 
Lask, are responsible for the splendid 
production of Offenbach's comic opera, 
"The Nightingale" at the American 
Theater. This play house, by the way, 
should be a favorite resort of the music 
loving people for which San Francisco 
is noted, as Mr. Healy is maintaining 
there a company of exceptional merit 
and ability, and is doing his utmost to 
offer the best musical attractions to the 
public. 

* * * 

The Easter music at St. Dominic's 
Church will this year be specially attrac- 
tive. A new mass has been composed 
for the occasion by Dr. H. J. Stewart, 
and it will be rendered, under his direc- 



tion, by an augmented choir and large 
orchestra. The mass, which is dedicated 
to the Rev. Father Pius Driscol. O. P.. 
has been written with the purpose of 
conforming as far as possible to the re- 
cent edict of the Pope upon the subject 
of church music. There is very little 
work for the soloists, and the composer 
has relied almost entirely upon massive 
choral and orchestral effects. 
;« * * 

Andrew Bogart, who is in the cast 
of "The Girl and the Governor", the 
Broadway production in which Jeff de 
Angelis is starring, will be out here 
in a short time with the attraction. 
Bogart has done exceedingly well 
since he gave up vocal teaching to 
become a stage star. He was a pupil 
of Francis Stuart in his San Francisco 
days and went to London and New 
York with his teacher. Stuart is teach- 
ing in New York now, I believe. 
Bogart is a San Francisco boy. Many 
critics consider his voice the equal 
of Hayden Coffin's. 

FIRST NIGHTER. 



Society Personals 

Charity is certainly the fashionable 
fad during this Lenten season, in San 
Mateo as in Marin County. Burlin- 
game has started a Sewing Club. The 
members are Mrs. Thomas Driscoll, 
Mrs. Hitchcock, Mrs. Andrey Welch, 
Miss Josephine Brown and Miss Mar- 
garet Doyle. At the first meeting 
held last week at Miss Sullivan's, a 
program of benevolent work was out- 
lined. 



COLONIAL THEATRE 

McAllister near^Market J Phone Market 920 

MARTIN F. KURTIG. President and Manage 

All Market Street Cars run direct to Theater 

Week Beginning Monday, March 25 

The Colonial Stock Compaay in 

SAPHO 



Monday Night, March 25, Testimonial Benefit 
to the eminent actor James M. Ward 



PRICES: Evenings, 25c, 50c, 75c, $1.00: Satur- 
day and Sunday Matinees. 25c and 50c. BARGAIN 
MATINEE. Wednesday, all seats reserved, 25c. Branch 
Ticket Office. Kohler & Chase's, Sutter and Franklin 
Streets. 

In Preparation-KREUTZER SONATA. 



-THE WASP- 



31 




RACING 



New California Jockey Club 

Oakland Race 
Track 

SIX OR MORE RACES EACH WEEK DAY 

Rain or Shine 

Races commence at 1:40 p. m. sharp. 

For special trains stopping at the track take S. P. Ferry, 
foot of Market street: leave at 12:00, thereafter every twenty 
minutes until 1:40 p. m. No Smoking in last two cars, 
which are reserved for ladies and their escorts. 

Returning trains leave track after fifth and last races. 

THOMAS H. WILLIAMS, PresiPenl. 
PERCY W. TREAT, Secretary. 



V 




3tf38 



The best YEAST for all 
Kinds of Baking 

FRESH DAILY AT YOUR CROCER 



Palace l^otel Caundry 

AND KELLY LAUNDRY CO. INC. 

234-3 Post Streot 

A-x-o XVofxr Open 

TELEPHONE WEST 5854 

Work called for and returned on schedule 
time. 



Thompson's Formerly 



Oyster Loaf, 



Now 

Open. 



1727 O'Farrell St. 
All night service 



near Fillmore 
Popular Prices 



tThe only first-class up-to-date and modern 
Hammam Baths, built especially for 
the purpose, in the city. 



i 



Oriental Turkish Batbs 

Corner Eddy and Larkln Sts. 
Cold water plunge. 
Room including Bath, $1.00. 
Phone Franklin 653 
W. J. BLUMBERG Sc BRO.. Props. 



Letters recently received from Mrs. 
William Mayo Newhall give enthus- 
iastic accounts of the jolly times she 
and her daughters are enjoying in 
Switzerland in sleighing, etc. They 
will remain abroad till September. 
Mrs. Newhall is purchasing some very 
elaborate costumes for her two at- 
tractive daughters, Marion and Eliza- 
beth, who will make their debut in 
Society this Winter. 

* * * 

Two other well-known California 
ladies at present in Switzerland are 
Mrs. McMonagle and Mrs. Fred 
Moody, who are educating their chil- 
dren. Mrs. Newhall's young son, Mrs. 
McMonagle's son and the two sons of 
the Fred Moodys are all attending the 
same school. 

* * * 

Mrs. E. B. Cadwalader has given 
up housekeeping, and with her charm- 
ing daughter, Miss Linda, and son 
Bert Cadwalader, have taken rooms at 
the "Thomas" boarding house on 
Buchanan Street. Early next month 
Mrs. Cadwalader and Miss Linda will 
leave for the East to be gone several 
months. Miss Linda will visit Mrs. 
Bourke Cochran (nee Ide) who has 
been on a trip to Egypt, a part of her 
bridal tour. 

* * * 

A well-known Washington couple 
who have been greatly entertained 
during their stay in California, are 
Mr. and Mrs. Charles Poor, the par- 
ents of Mrs. Marion P. Maus. They 
have been spending several months 
in Monterey with Col. and Mrs. Maus, 
at their attractive quarters. Mrs. 
Poor has many relatives in this City — 
The Steeles, the Miltons, the Max- 
wells — all connected with the family 
of the late Commodore R. B. Cun- 
ningham — Mrs. Percy M. Kesseler 
(Lottie Cunningham) is a cousin of 
Mrs. Marion Maus. 



MRS. OSCAR MANSFELDT 

PIANIST 

Tel. West 314 1 80 1 Buchanan St., Cor. Suiter 



To restore gray hair to its natural 
color use Alfredum's Egyptian Henna — 
1 vegetable dye — perfectly harmless and 
the effect is immediate.. All druggists 
Bell it. Langley & Michaels Co., agents. 



SAMUEL M. SHORTRIDGE 



Attorney -at-Law 



1101 O'FARRELL ST. 
Cor. Franklin 



San Francisco, Cal. 



DR. WM. D. CLARK 

Office and Res.: 255 4 California St. 

San Francisco 

Hours — 1 to 3 p. m. and 7 to 8 p. m. 

Sundays — By appointment 

Phone West 390 

DR. H. J. STEWART 

Organist of S;. Dominic's Church and 
the Temple Sherith Israel 

TEACHER OF SINGING 

Pianoforte, Organ, Harmony and Composition. 
New Studio: 2517 California Street. Hours, 10 
to 12 and 2 to 4 daily, except Saturdays. 

LOUIS H. EATON 

Organist and Director Trinity 
Church Choir 

Teacher of Voice, Piano and Organ 

San Francisco Studio; 1678 Broadway, Phone 
Franklin 2244. 

Berkeley Studio; 2401 Channing Way, Tues- 
day and Friday. 



William Keith 



Studio 



After Dec. 1st 1717 California St. 



Contracts made with Hotels and Restaurants 
^ 'Special Attention given to Family Trade 

cmi " £? ~ ^Established 1876 ™ ; 

THOMAS MORTON & SON 

Importer of and C(~\ A I 
Dealers in W/\l-i 

N. W. Cor. Eddy and Hyde, San Francisco 
Phone Franklin 397 



Wichman, Lutgen & Co. 

Formerly of 
29-31 Batlery Streel, S. F. 

Cor. Everett and Tarrison Avenue 
ALAMEDA, CAL. 

Phone Alameda I 1 79 

GILT EDGE WHISKEY 



32 



THE WASP- 



ELECTRO 
SILICON 

Is Unequalled for 

Cleaning and Polishing 
SILVERWARE. 

Send address for a FKEE SAMPLE, or 15c. in 
stamps for a full box. 

Electro-Silicon Soap has equal merits. 
The Electro Silicon Co., 30 Cliff St-, New York, 
Grocers and Druggists sell it. 



^LEIBOLD 

HARNtSSaCAitoiAGECO. 

1214 GOLDEN GATE AVE. 

BET. WEBSTER AND FILLMORE 



a positive CATARRH 

Ely's Cream Balm 

is quickly absorbed. 
Gives Relief at Once. 

It cleanses, soothes I 
heals and protects I 
the diseased mem- 1 
brane. It cures Ca- 1 
tarrh and drives! 
away a Cold in the I 
Head quickly. Re- 
stores the Senses of ' 
Taste and Smell. Full size 50 cts. , at Drug- 
gists or by mail ; Trial Size 10 cts. by mail. 
Elv Brothers. 56 Warren Street, New York. 




HAY FEVER 



jASHSHBITTERS 

B= BETTER THAN PILLS. W 



^EREIGN REM E 




Dr. Parker's Cough Cure 
One dose will stop a cough. 
It never fails. Try it. 25c. 

AT ALL DRUGGISTS 



Waltz Me Around Willie, Latinized 

O me circumsalte Guillielme . TOYO \C I^FISI 

Circumque circumque circum! 1^^^. ^^ ^^ lVllJlJ.ll 

Saltatus soporifer, I hT^N*. 

Mella et lactifer, I HSiH ICAl^HA 

Pedes ne tangint solum, | ^^JB IV/\lk30/\ 

Simulo navem in mare laeto, »' ™ (Oriental Steamship Co.) 

Velim clamare; ohe, nave, ohe! 

Tum me circumsalte Guillielme Have Opened Their Permanent Offices at 

Circumque circumque circum! Room 240 James Flood Building 

—From the Yale Record. San Francisco 

S. S. "Hongkong Maru" 

"Yes, indeed," she answered, "I'll Wednesday, April 10, 1907 

be contented as long as love lasts." S. S. "America Maru" (calls at Manila) . . 

"Urn — yes," said the man, whose Friday, May 3, 1907 

experience had endowed him witn S. S. "Nippon Maru" (calls at Manila) . . 

some wisdom, "I guess we had bet- Friday, May 31, 1907 

ter wait Until I Can afford a regular Steamers will leave wharf, corner First and Brannan Sts., 

, ,, IP. M., for Yokohama and Hongkong, calling at Hono- 

nOUSe. 1 U 1 U| Kobe, (Hiogo), Nagasaki and Shanghai, and con- 

necring at Hongkong with steamers for Manila, India, etc. 

No cargo received on board on day of sailing. 
Her One Thought Round- trip tickets at reduced rates. 

,. T . ,, - , ., r ., r , Jght and passage apply at office, 240 James Flood 

Jennie," Said the father Of a large Building. W. H. AVERY. Assistant General Manager. 

family to his eldest daughter, "don't 

you think it about time you were 
thinking of getting married." 

"Why, father," replied the anxious 
maid, "I haven't thought of anything 
else for the past ten years." 



Peter Bacigalupi & Son 



Infallible Sign 

Clara — "What makes you think Helen 
is destined to become a spinster?" 

Maude — "Why, every night after let- 
ting down her folding bed she looks 
under it." 



Headguarters for Talking 

Machines, Records 

and Supplies 



Wasted Opportunities 

Green — "What do you think of Bul- 
lem's $50,000 failure?" 

Brown — "I think Bullem must be 
crazy." 

Green — -"Why?" 

Brown — "With his opportunities he 
should have failed for at least twice 
that amount." 



1113-1115 Fillmore Street, San Francisco 



Albion Ale or Porter 

Is a Great Flesh Builder, Tonic and Pleasant 
Drink. Pure Extract of Malt and Hops. 

BURNELL & CO. 

1007-1009 Golden Gnte Ave., Near I.aguno St. 



No More Experimenting. 

After a year of mourning the 
widower was ready to go up against 
the matrimonial game once more. 

"Dearest," he said, addressing the 
prospective No. 2, "are you sure you 
can be contented with love in a cot- 
tage?" 



Something Fierce 

"No; sah," remarked the Kentucky 
Colonel, "Arkansaw didn't agree with 
me. I was sick all the time I was there, 
sah." 

"What was the trouble?" queried the 
Ohio man. "Couldn't you drink the 
water?" 

"That was the trouble, sah," replied 
the Kentuckian. "I had to dring it. 



Dr.WONQ HIM 

1268 O'Farrell St. 

Permanently Located 

HERB DOCTOR 



Father and Mother 
Write Letter In- 
dorsing Treatment. 

SAN FRANCISCO 
March 23. 1906 

To Whom it may 
i Concern: Our three- 
year - old daughter, 
having been ill for 
some time and being 
treated by the most prominent physicians, 
gradually became worse, and was finally 
given up by them. We were then recom- 
mended to Dr. Wong Him. We started 
with his treatment and within two months' 
time our daughter was cured. 

Respectfully, 
MR. AND MRS. H. C. LIEB. 
2757 Harrison St., San Francisco 




SUMMONS 



IN THE SUPERIOR COURT OF THE 
State of California, in and for the City and 
County of San Franciico. 

JOSEPH GOETZ, Plaintiff, vi. All persons 
claiming any interest in or lien upon the real 
property herein described or any part thereof. 
Defendants. 

Action No. 720. 

The People of the State of California, to all 
persons claiming any interest in, or lien upon, 
the real property herein described or any part 
thereof. Defendants: Greeting: 



every part thereof, whether the same be legal 
or equitable, present or future, vested or con- 
tingent, and whether the same consist of mort- 
gages or liens of any description; that plaintiff 
recover his costs herein and have such other 
and further relief as may be meet in the 
premises. 

Witness my hand and the seal of said Court, 
this 8th day of January. A. D. 1907. 
(SEAL) H. I. MULCREVY, Clerk. 

By H. I. PORTER, Deputy Cleric. 



You are hereby required to appear and 
nswer the complaint of JOSEPH GOETZ. 
plaintiff, filed with the Clerk of the above 



entitled Court and County, within three months 
after the first publication of this summons, 
and to set forth what interest or lien, if any, 
you have in or upon that certa-in real prop- 
erty, or any part thereof, situated in the City 
and County of San Francisco, State of Cali- 
fornia, and particularly described as follows: 
First. Beginning at a point on the easterly 
line of Stockton Street, distant thereon thirty- 
seven (37) feet northerly from the point of 
intersection of the northerly line of Sacra- 
mento Street and the easterly line of Stock- 
ton Street, and running thahce northerly along 
■aid easterly line of Stockton Street one hun- 
dred and fifty-six (156) feet four (4) inches; 
thence at a right angle easterly sixty-eight (68) 
feet nine (9 ) inches ; thence at a right angle 
northerly eighty-one (81) feet eight (8) inches 
to the southerly line of Clay Street; thence at 
a right angle easterly along said southerly 
line of Clay Street sixteen (16) feet; thence 
at a right angle southerly seventy-five (75) 
feet six (6) inches; thence at a right angle 
easterly fifty-two (52) feet one-half (J^) inch; 
thence at a right angle southerly twelve (12) 
feet; thence at a right angle easterly eight 
and one- half (8'A) inches; thence at a right 
angle southerly fifteen (15) feet six (6) inches; 
thence at a right angle easterly thirty (30) 
feet; thence at a right angle southerly five 

(5) feet seven and one-half (7J4) inches; 
thence at a right angle easterly ninety-three 
(93) feet nine (9) inches to the westerly line 
of Waverly Place; thence at a right angle 
southerly along said line of Waverly Place 
ninety-seven (97) feet seven and one-half 
(7J4) inches; thence at a right angle westerly 
one hundred and eleven (111) feet nine (9) 
inches; thence at a right angle southerly sixty- 
eight (68) feet nine (9) inches to the north- 
erly line of Sacramento Street; thence west- 
erly along said line of Sacramento Street 
twelve (12) feet ; thence at a right angle 
northerly fifty-nine (59) feet; thence at a 
right angle westerly ninety-three (93) feet six 

(6) inches; thence at a right angle southerly 
twenty-two (22) feet; and thence at a right 
angle westerly forty-four (44) feet to the 
easterly line of Stockton Street and the point 
of beginning; being a portion of Fifty Vara 
Block number one hundred and fourteen (114). 

Second. Beginning at a point on the north- 
erly line of Vallejo Street, distant thereon 
two hundred (200) feet four and one-half 
(4J4) inches westerly from the corner formed 
by the intersection of the northerly line of 
Vallejo Street and the westerly line of Gough 
Street, and running thence westerly along 
said line of Vallejo Street one hundred and 
five (105) feet seven and one-half OVi) inches; 
thence at a right angle northerly one hundred 
and thirty-seven (137) feet six (6) inches; 
thence at a right angle easterly one hundred 
and six (106) feet eight and one-half (8#) 
inches; and thence southerly one hundred and 
thirty-seven (137) feet six (6) inches to the 
point of beginning; being part of Western 
Addition Block number one hundred and 
sixty-six (166). 

Third. Beginning at a point on the north- 
erly line of Sacramento Street, distant thereon 
one hundred and thirty (130) feet eleven (11) 
inches westerly from the corner formed by 
the intersection of the northerly line of Sac- 
ramento Street and the westerly line of 
Kearny Street and running thence westerly 
along said line of Sacramento Street nineteen 
(19) feet six (6) inches; thence at a right 
angle northerly sixty (60) feet; thence at a 
right angle easterly nineteen (19) feet six (6) 
inches; and thence at a right angle southerly 
sixty (60) feet to the point of beginning; be- 
ing part of Fifty Vara Block number ninety- 
one (91). 

You are hereby notified that, unlesi you so 
appear and answer, the plaintiff will apply to 
the Court for the relief demanded in the com- 
plaint, to-wit, that it be adjudged that plaintiff 
is the owner of said property in fee simple ab- 
solute; that his title to said property be es- 
tablished and quieted; that the Court ascertain 
and determine all estates, rights, titles, inter- 
ests and claims in and to said property, and 



The first publication of this summons was 
made in The Wasp newspaper on the 19th 
day of January, A. D. 1907. 
SUMMONS 



IN THE SUPERIOR COURT OF THE 
State of California, in and for the City and 
County of San Francisco. 

GUSTAV SUTRO. Plamtiff, vs. All persons 
claiming any interest in or lien upon the real 

troperty herein described or any part thereof, 
•efendants. 

Action No. 719. 

The People of the State of California, to all 
persons claiming any interest in. or Hen upon, 
the real propeity herein described or any 
part thereof, defendant*, greeting: 

You are hereby required to appear and 
answer the complaint of GUSTAV SUTRO, 
plaintiff, filed with the Clerk of the above 
entitled Court and County, within three 
months after the first publication of this sum- 
mons, and to set forth what interest or lien, 
if any, you have in or upon that certain real 
property, or any part thereof, situated in the 
City and County of San Francisco, State of 
California, and particularly described as fol- 
lows: 

Beginning at a point on the northerly line 
of Eddy Street, distant thereon one hundred 
and thirty-seven (137) feet six (6) inches 
easterly from the corner formed by the inter- 
section of the northerly line of Eddy Street 
and the easterly line of Taylor Street and 
running thence easterly along said line of 
Eddy Street ninety-one (91) feet, nine (9) 
inches; thence at a right angle northerly on« 
hundred and thirty-seven (137) feet six (6) 
inches; thence at a right angle westerly ninety- 
one (91) feet nine (9) inches; and thence at 
a right angle southerly one hundred and thirty- 
seven (137) feet six (6) inches to the point 
of beginning. 

You are hereby notified that, unless you so 
appear and answer, the plaintiff will apply 
to the Court for the relief demanded in the 
complaint, to-wit, that it be adjudged that 
plaintiff is the owner of said property in fee 
simple absolute; that his title to said property 
be established and quieted, that the Court as- 
certain and determine all estates, rights, titles, 
interests and claims in and to said property, 
and every part thereof, whether the same be 
legal or equitable, present or future, vested or 
contingent, and whether the same consist of 
mortgages or liens of any description ; that 
plaintiff recover his costs herein and have 
such other and further relief as may be meet 
in the premises. 

Witness my hand and the seal of said Court, 
this 8th day of January, A. D. 1907. 
(SEAL) H. I. MULCREVY, Clerk. 

By H. I. PORTER, Deputy Clerk. 

The first publication of this summons was 
made in The Wasp newspaper on the 19th day 
of January, A. D. 1907. 

SUMMONS 



IN THE SUPERIOR COURT OF THE 
State of California, in and for the City and 
County of San Francisco. 

JUDAH BOAS and A. ABRAHAMSON, 
Plaintiffs, vs. All persons claiming any interest 
in or lien upon the real property herein de- 
scribed, or any part thereof, Defendants. 

Action No. 714. 

The People of the State of California, to all 
persons claiming any interest in, or lien upon, 
the real property herein described or any part 
thereof, Defendants, greeting: 

You are hereby required to appear and 
answer the complaint of JUDAH BOAS and 
A. ABRAHAMSON, plaintiffs, filed with the 
Clerk of the above entitled Court and County, 
within three months after the first publication 
of this summons, and to set forth what inter- 
est or lien, if any, you have in or upon that 
certain real property, or any part thereof, situ- 
ated in the City and County of San Francisco, 
State of California, and particularly described 
as follows: 

Beginning at a point on the easterly line of 
Montgomery Street, distant thereon one hun- 
dred and thirty-seven (137) feet six and one- 
fourth {6\i) inches northerly from the corner 
formed by the intersection of the easterly 
line of Montgomery Street and the northerly 



line of California Street, and running thence 
easterly parallel with California Street sixty- 
four (64) feet; thence at a right angle north- 
erly one (1) foot; thence at a right angle 
easterly four (4) feet nine (9) inches; thence 
at a right angle northerly ninety-five (95) feet 
ten and three fourths (10 $4 ) inches more or 
less to the south face of a concrete wall sep- 
arating the property of the plaintiffs from the 
property of the Italian-American Bank, a cor- 
poration ; thence at a right angle westerly 
along the south line of said wall sixty-eight 
(68) feet nine (9) inches to the easterly line 
of Montgomery Street; and thence southerly 
along said line of Montgomery Street ninety- 
six (96) feet ten and three-fourths (10^) 
inches more or less to the point of beginning. 

You are hereby notified that, unless you so 
appear and answer, the plaintiffs will apply to 
the Court for the relief demanded in the com- 
plaint, to-wit, that it be adjudged that plaintiffs 
are the owners of said property in fee simple 
absolute; that their title to said property be 
established and quieted; that the Court ascer- 
tain and determine all estates, rights, titles, 
interests and claims in and to said property, 
and every part thereof, whether the same be 
legal or equitable, present or future, vested or 
contingent, and whether the same consist of 
mortgages or liens of any description; that 
plaintiffs recover their costs herein and have 
such other and further .relief as may be meet 
in the premises. 

Witness my hand and the seal of said Court, 
this 8th day of January, A. D. 1907. 
(SEAL) H. I. MULCREVY, Clerk. 

By L. J. WELCH, Deputy Clerk. 

The first publication of this summons was 
made in The Wasp newspaper on the 19th 
day of January, A. D. 1907. 

The following persons are said to claim an 
interest in, or lien upon, said property adverse 
to plaintiff: 

Names Addresses 

Ellen Maguire, San Francisco, California. 

The German Savings & Loan Society, a 
corporation, 526 California Street, San Fran- 
cisco, California. 



To Cure All Skin Diseases. Use 

DR. T. FELIX GOURAUD'S ORIEN- 

TAX CREAM, OR MAGICAL 

BEAUTIFIER. 

rt Purifies and Beautifies the Skin. 
FOR SALE BY DRUGGISTS. 

Blake, Molt & Towne 

—PAPER— 

Temporary Office 

419 11th Street, Oakland 

We are now filling all orders 
Promptly 

Pacific Butchers Supply 
Company 

315-319 BRYANT STREET 

Bet. First and Second Streets. 

Open for Business With a Full Line 

of All Supplies. 

PATRICK & CO. 



Rubber Stamps 

Stencils, Box Brands 



1543 Pine Street 



San Francisco 



F. THOMS, The Awing Man 




Canvas Work. Repairing. Canopies and Floor Covers To Rent. 

TENTS, HAMMOCKS AND COVERS 

1209 MISSION ST. Tel. Market 2194 



Carnegie Brick and Pottery Co. 

Manufacturers of 

Architectural Terra Cotta, Pressed Brick 
Vitrified and Terra Cotta Sewer Pipe Drain, Tile 

Refractory Fire Brick of all Sizes and Shapes a Specialty 

Factory; Tesla, Alameda County, Cal. 

Yards: San Francisco, Oakland and San Jose 

Office: Montgomery Block, San Francisco 



TRicrcmco. 




PHONE FELL 9911 

1808 MARKET ST. 
SAN FRANCISCO 

Illustrated Catalogue 
on Application 

Branch, 837 S. Spring St. 
LOS ANGELES 



TME PAiVIOUS 



Moraghan Oyster House 

1212 Golden Gate Avenue 
California Market 

Everything served in first-class style and at moderate prices. 
Oysters in Bottles, Oyster Cocktails and Oyster, Chicken or Squab 
Loaves for immediate delivery. 



Reduced Rates to Shippers of 

Household 
Goods 

TO AND 

FROM 

ALL POINTS 

The safe, quick and economical way in our own private 
cars. Offices in all the principal parts of the United 
States. The largest Van and Storage Co. in the world. 

Bekins Van and Storage Company 

13TM AND MISSION STS. 

Phone Market 13 San Francisco, Cal. 




VEUVE CLICQUOT 

(Sec and Brut) NO BETTER 

Cruse & Fils Freres Red and White Wines 
Acker Rhine and Moselle Wines 

AMI VIGNIER, Inc. 

PACIFIC COAST AGENT 



Temporary Office 
S. E. Cor. Broadway and Battery Sts. 



Tel. Temporary 1385 



THE EYE 



The most delicate member of 
the human body should be 
most carefully guarded, but 
in most instances is carlessly neglected, when the aid of 
skilled specialists must be employed which is often too late. 

AT 808 VAN NESS AVENUE 
THE STANDARD OPTICAL CO. 

Employ a staff of skilled eye specialists who can be consulted without cost. 



Bass-Hueter Paint Co. 



Hueter's Fine Coach and House 
Varnishes, Wood Finishes 



Paints, Oils, Brushes and Painters' Specialties 
Telephone Special 1115 1532 MARKET STREET 



I IN SAIN 

CISCO 



14 SUCCESSFUL YEARS"- 

Devoted Exclusively in Examining and Correcting 
most Complicated Cases of Defective Eyesight 

MAYERLE'S GLASSES Rest tbe Eyes> strengtben the °p tic Nerve and preserves the s; g ht 

Maycrle'S Eyewater, the greatest eye remedy in the world. 50c; by mail 65c; Mayerle's Antiseptic Eyeglass Wipers, 
to be used when glasses blur, tire or strain the eyes, 2 for 25c. No glasses leave George Mayerle's Optical Institute unless absolutely 
correct. Address all communications to George Mayerle, 1115 Golden Gate Avenue, bet. Buchanan and Webster. Phone West 
3766. Cut this out. 





Volume LVll-No. 13 



SAN FRANCISCO, MARCH 30, 1907 



Price 10 cents 



PUBLISHER'S NOTICE 

THE WASP Is published every Saturday by ihe Wasp Publishing 
Company, at 141-143 Valencia Street. Subscriptions $5.00 per 
year, payable in advance, postage prepaid. Subscriptions to all 
foreign countries within the Postal Union, $6.00 per year. The trade on 
the Pacific Coast supplied by the San Francisco News Company. Eastern 
Agents supplied by the American News Company, New York. 

THE WASP will pay for contributions suitable for its columns, and 
will endeavor to return all rejected manuscripts, but does not guarantee 
their return. Photographs will also be accepted and paid for. Address 
oil communications to Wasp Publishing Company, 141-143 Valencia 
Street, San Francisco, Cal. 

TO ADVERTISERS— As the illustrated pages of THE WASP 
go to press early, all advertisements printed in the same forms should be 
received not later than Monday at noon. Changes of Advertisements 
should also be sent in on Monday to insure publication. 

Address. JAMES F. FORSTER, Business Manager. 
Telephone Market 316. 



Plain English 



Those who give bribes are worse than the official 
grafters who accept them, we are told by several 
newspapers that cater to the sentiment of the Sand- 
lot. The law makes no such distinction. It declares 
that both are equally culpable: And so they are. 



It is highly popular to down the sordid millionaire 
or the soulless corporation who hands over large 
wads of currency to boodling Aldermen, but we 
should not forget that municipal boards are very 
often organized for graft. The Aldermen or Super- 
visors are really bands of blackmailers, under the 
leadership of a political boss who maps out the 
plan of campaign and divides the plunder. 



Under the benign influence of Ruef and Schmitz, 
almost every act of the municipal government had 
to yield boodle. The newspapers teem with sta- 
tistics of the amount of bribes paid through Ruef to 
the Supervisors. But outside of these operations a 
large aggregate amount of boodle has been 
pocketed by municipal grafters. 

The newspapers have not called attention to the 
fact, but it appears to be the true fact nevertheless, 
that humble property owners trying to rebuild their 
burned homes have been held up by the banded 



blackmailers put in office by Schmitz and repre- 
senting the patriotism and honesty of the Union 
Labor party. 



It is an absolute fact, easily proved by an examina- 
tion of the official records, that in the small matter 
of putting in the side sewers of residences, the 
property owners have been blackmailed systema- 
tically. This work has to be done under City man- 
agement though the taxpayer pays for it. The law 
is an outrageous one and the Union Labor party 
blackmailers have made the most of it. In some 
cases the work has been delayed months while in 
others, where the owners were willing to pay black- 
mail the work has been done speedily. Many a 
small property owner has bribed the official black- 
mailers to get his legal rights. If he didn't offer the 
bribe the work would not be done for him. Accord- 
ing to the logic and morals of the yellow news- 
papers those poor houseowners who put up bribes 
to save themselves from serious loss, or perhaps 
ruin, should be punished most severely. The con- 
viction and jailing of the official rascals should be a 
secondary consideration. Intelligent readers of 
those publications will not be bamboozled by such 
sophistry. 



The truth of the matter is that it has been the 
rule and not the exception, for Supervisors and 
other officials in San Francisco to conspire to black- 
mail corporations and especially those of a quasi- 
public character as such are most easily made to 
yield. Why should the average supervisor in years 
past have devoted all his time to the business of 
the city for $100 a month. In many cases Super- 
visors gave up all their private business and did 
nothing else but lay schemes to plunder the cor- 
porations and taxpayers. The men who went in 
poor or bankrupt, became prosperous on $100 a 
month. Need one ask how? The check books of the 
corporations and of many prosperous citizens could 
furnish the answer. 



The corporations and the capitalists took the busi- 
ness view of it that it was cheaper to buy off the 
rascals than fight them, and so it is. 

So in San Francisco and in every large city in 
America that is the dishonest condition of affairs, 



34 



THE WASP- 



and the reason it continues is that the boodlers are 
not afraid of the law courts. The political bosses 
control the law court and can trip up justice, except 
in rare instances of which the present prosecution 
of grafters in San Francisco is one. 



If the people of America would at once proceed to 
reform their courts by taking the judges out of 
politics, the power of the corrupt political bosses 
would be destroyed and real reform in Municipal 
Government would begin. 

* * # 

The Wasp has for years pointed out to the public 
the great danger that lies in permitting corrupt 
bosses to juggle with the law courts by nominating 
and electing judges. 



The present expose and prosecution of grafters in 
San Francisco is purely accidental. It might not 
occur again in a hundred years under our system of 
politics. Ruef was only following the tactics that 
other bosses had used for many years. Being <i 
lawyer he was more adroit than his ignorant pre- 
decessors and perhaps was more eager for the dollar 
and therefore more daring in his blackmailing 
operations. 



Had Ruef succeeded in defeating Judge Lawlor 
for the Superior Court and electing all his own 
creatures whom he had nominated for the bench, 
the present expose would be impossible. Firmly en- 
trenched in the law courts, Ruef would have his 
own grand juries and his obedient henchmen would 
draw just the names he wanted. The criminals of 
San Francisco would become their own inquisitors, 
prosecutors, judges and juries. 

I doubt very much if one in ten of the honest 
voters of San Francisco fully realizes what a peril 
this City has escaped and how narrow was the 
escape when Ruef was checked in his attempt to 
elect his own bench judges and usurp the District 
Attorney's office was checked. 



The election of Judge Lawlor astonished all 
politicians in San Francisco and none more than 
Ruef and his henchmen, for according to all political 
rules Lawlor's election was an utter impossibility, 
placed as he was on but one ticket, while Ruef's 
candidates were on a number of tickets. The honest 
voters who always resent any interference with the 
judiciary by corrupt bosses rallied to Lawlor's sup- 
port and elected him. This utterly unexpected re- 
sult had the effect of impressing the local judiciary 
with the belief that after all the people appreciate 
and are willing to reward a jurist who tries honestly 
to do his duty and does not truckle to bosses cr 
sell his honor. 



It was purely accidental however that such a man 
as Judge Lawlor should have been selected for 
special revenge by Ruef and should have defeated 
the plans of the boss and hastened his ruin. Few 
jurists have had the experience in practical politics 
that Lawlor possesses. He was for years more or 
less identified with the management of State cam- 



paigns for the Democracy and conducted Bryan's 
presidential campaign in California. He had the 
united support of the press in the late election 
and the fight he put up against Ruef was a most re- 
markable one for its vigor and skilful tactics. It is 
extremely doubtful if any other jurist in California, 
no matter how well known or able could have made 
such an uphill fight. Lawlor happened to be the 
man of all others to win against such desperate 
odds and a most fortunate thing it was for the City 
of San Francisco and the State of California that 
he was not defeated. His removal from the Superior 
bench would have been pointed to by the corrupt 
machine politicians as convincing proof that the 
judges who wish to hold their places must truckle 
to the ruling boss. 



That being established the rest would be easy for 
a man as fertile in resources as Ruef. No man how- 
ever meritorious his case could be sure of an honest 
hearing in the law courts and Mr. Ruef's enemies 
would have to take care that he did not ruin them 
in pocket or land them in the penitentiary. A boss 
having such powers as Ruef aimed at and almost 
attained would hold the lives, liberty and fortunes 
of his fellow citizens in his hand. 



Another accident which has saved San Francisco 
from utter degradation and the unrestrained tyranny 
of corrupt politicians was the interest taken in the 
expose of the grafters by Rudolph Spreckels. Not 
once in a thousand times does such a man turn up 
in municipal affairs as an agent of reform. The 
usual reformer is too often a disguised grafter who 
shouts "turn the rascals out" that he may sneak into 
office himself. 



Still another class of reform is the man who means 
well but has no money or standing and it takes 
money to prosecute boodlers. 




CHAS.KE1LUS. 

EXCLUSIVE 

HIGH GRADE CLOTHIERS 



No Branch Slores. 



No Agents. 



Every recognized merit good clothes possess is promulgated in ours. 
We "out-class" most tailors not because of price, but for Exclusive 
Styles, In using the word "tailors" we cut out "clothes-butchers." 
We refer to classy tailors, and they are very scarce. 



It doesn't make any difference in what district we're in we do 
business just the same. That speaks well for our clothes. We 
never offer yau bargains. There is "lhal something' - about our 
fashions and cut that identifies you at once as being correctly 
dressed. 



KING SOLOMON'S HALL 

Fillmore Street, near Sutter, San Francisco 



-THE WASP- 



35 



Mr. Spreckels is a banker, who can command 
attention in the business world. Me could raise the 
funds necessary to retain legal and detective talent 
to prosecute the thieves in office. Best of all he had 
no political ambition nor has he any now. He 
believes perhaps that "the post of honor is the 
private station." This is a rare combination of 
qualities in political reformers. 



Still another favorable accident was the election 
of Langdon as District Attorney, a position to 
which his legal attainments did not entitle him. 
He had no standing in the legal profession and in- 
deed to most people it was a surprise to learn 
that he had been admitted to practise law. He had 
been associated closely with the Ruef-Schmitz gang 
and everything seemed to indicate that the District 
Attorney's office was about to fall into very poor 
hands. Miraculous to state Langdon was barely 
installed in office when he began a war on the 
criminal followers of Ruef and Schmitz. For this 
he was denounced vigorously as a traitor by several 
Union Labor party leaders, including P. H. 
McCarthy, the head of the Building Trade's Council 
and special spokesman and defender of Schmitz. 



All the developments that have since taken place 
appear to indicate the Mr. Langdon is a man of 
honest instincts and that when installed in the 
position of District Attorney he realized at once 
that his political associates were organized for 
criminal purposes and he therefore made war on 
them. He has acted honorably and courageously 
and will no doubt be rewarded by the people. 



Thus by what Pool Bah calls "a set of curious 
chances" — seemingly were accidents — the tremend- 
ously powerful criminal conspiracy of Ruef and his 
official creatures has been broken up and the arch 
conspirator, not only indicted but actually lodged in 
prison before his trial has fairly been begun. The 
best laid plans of mice and men "gang aft aglee", 
and they go wrong oftenest when they are made for 
purposes, of rascality. Honesty is the best policy 
for a public officer or a private citizen. 



The decent part of the civilized world is now- 
amazed at the official degradation of San Fran- 
cisco, but let us not be down cast. The exposure of 
the scoundrels is worth untold millions to this 
and every other American City, for it proves that in 
every community there is sure to be enough latent 
decency and patriotism to overthrow the official 
grafters and land them in the penitentiary. 



Judge Coffey as presiding judge has of course been 
a strong influence for right in this remarkable trial. 
The public of San Francisco has long since come to 
regard Judge Coffey and honesty as synonymous. 
It would be unfair not to add that the Superior 
Judges with perhaps two exceptions, if not in warm 
accord with the prosecution of the grafters, have not 
been obstructive and in fact the conduct of the 
Superior Court has been from the start more meri- 
torious than that of the Supreme Bench, which at first 
seemed in spots to be lukewarm toward an earnest 
assault on Mr. Ruef's citadel of graft. 



Too much praise cannot be given to Judge Dunne 
for his conduct in the exasperating ordeal to which 
he has been subjected. He has adopted the best 
possible policy in forcing the grafters to trial and 
in not being deterred by the raising of obstructive 
technical points. Such a course is characteristic of 
an honest jurist who wishes to have the evidence 
on both sides presented as quickly as possible and 
let the jury decide. The public also is able to 
decide no matter what the verdict of a jury may be. 



Now that Mr. Heney and the Grand Jury have 
shown conclusively that the present City government 
is the most infamously corrupt in America if not in 
the English speaking world, the political party that 
put the grafters in office should be held accountable 
for their crimes. That is the rule in every free land. 
If the Republicans saddle the City with a band of 
boodlers the Republican party is held accountable. So 
too with the Democracy. So also let it be with the 
Union Labor party which has given us almost every 
one of the official scoundrels who have disgraced San 
Francisco. 



When the former Board of Supervisors was trying 
to hold Mayor Schmitz in check he declared repeatedly 
that if he had a Board in accord with him he would 
do wonders. The citizens of San Francisco to their 
lasting discredit turned a good Board of Supervisors 
out of office and elected Schmitz and all the boodlers 
who are now associated with him. The Union Labor 
party got the credit of the sweeping victory. It is 
now entitled to all the odium of- the exposure of graft 
and must stand or fall upon that record. 

AMERICUS. 



Mrs. Wiggs at the New Van Ness Theatre caught 
the fancy of the town this week. Sousa's opera, 
"The Free Lance," is next. 



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sisters who are really nice, but he is determined to 
have no handicap." 

Is it strange then, considering all this, that poor 
little newly-rich Mabelle Gillman should have denied 
her father when Society approves the forgetfulness of 
family ties? 

* * * 

I hear on good authority that any day now we may 
learn that H. E. Huntington has wedded the widow 
of his uncle, the late C. P. Huntington, for the year 
is up and both are in the East. 

H. E. Huntington is not younger than his aunt 
as many people imagine. In fact she is a year or 
two the younger. She was always devoted to him, and 
it was through her influence, it is said, that Mr. Hunt- 
ington obtained so much of his famous uncle's fortune. 
He is mad for money and power, and it is said that 
for years he has been bent on marrying his rich aunt. 

* * * 

At first Mrs. H. E. Huntington refused positively 
to grant her husband a divorce but he gave her no 
peace until she complied with his wishes. It nearly 
broke her heart when the divorce came, and even now 
it needs no extraordinary insight to human nature to 
see that the lady is one who has had a great sorrow 
in her life. Such things leave their indelible marks. 
It must be a satisfaction to her, however, to know that 
the father of her children was not attracted by a 
younger but by an older and richer woman. 




MRS. REGINALD BROOKE 

Mabelle Gilman's denial of her father seemed a 
little unique until one looks over Society, and then 
one decides that it is not alone the successful chorus 
girl who breaks up a millionaire's family and weds 
him, who gets a swelled head and publicly denies that 
she is any relation to her parents. On all sides in San 
Francisco one knows of prominent and wealthy wo- 
men who have cut their relatives because they thought 
they must draw the line somewhere. One of the 
haughtiest and wealthiest women at Burlingame within 
the past few years was humiliated by being called 
upon by the organization in her church to contribute 
to the support of her own brother, who had applied 
to them for aid, but the grand dame was equal to 
the occasion, and in polite Burlingame English told 
them to go to the bow-wows. The charitably inclined 
intruders sneaked off feeling as if they had committed 
the awful crime of lese majeste. 

Strange enough Society rather approves of young 
men and women cutting their relations and one often 
hears it said: 

"Oh, yes ; his family is impossible, but you know 
he has nothing to do with them." 

Not long since a prominent matron in speaking 
of a male climber said : 

"Oh, yes ; he is charming although his family is im- 
possible, but he has cut them all even his brothers and 



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-THE WASP- 



37 




MRS. FRANK GRIFFIN 

Sin add these surmises prove correct and H. E. 
Huntington marry his aunt he will have control prac- 
tically of all the Huntington estate, for nothing bores 
Archer Huntington as the thought of money and he 
is his mother's only heir. Mrs. Collis P. Huntington 
has a handsome figure of which she takes great care. 
She is literary and artistic in her tastes, and cares 
very little for Society. Mrs. H. E. Huntington also 
cares little for Society and she seeks association with 
people whom she likes regardless of whether they 

figure in the smart set or not. 

* * * 

The news of Juliet Crosby's death was received with 



real sorrow by thousands ut pla_\ goers in San Fran- 
cisco. The women loved the actress, who was per- 
haps the mu>t popular of her profession. When Miss 
Crosby married Fred Belasco her family opposed the 
union on account of their difference in religion. Mrs. 
Lewis, her mother, is a member of the Baptist Church, 
which is a strict sect. But the marriage proved in 
every way such a happy one that the Lewises soon 
got over their feeling in the matter. Had Mrs. 
Ilelasco's health permitted she could have risen to the 
heights of dramatic success. David Belasco would 
have starred her any time, for he had a high opinion 
of his sister-in-law's abilities. 

* * * 

An engagement which will be of great interest to 
friends here and in Sonoma County is that of Miss 
Mabel Lindsey and Dr. Jackson Temple, son of the 
late Supreme Justice, Jackson Temple. The Temples 
are amongst the oldest and best known residents of 
Santa Rosa. Dr. Temple is a graduate of the Univer- 
sity of California and is at present connected with 
the City and County Hospital. It had- been intended 
to celebrate the wedding at Trinity Chapel in this 
City in July, and was to have been an elaborate affair, 
but owing to the sudden death of Miss May Belle 
Temple, the sister of the groom, it will be celebrated 
very quietly this Summer. Miss Lindsey and her 
mother are at present residing at Mrs. Hoods in Ala- 
meda — having moved there after the fire. Miss 
Lindsey is a very pretty vivacious and accomplished 
young lady. Dr. Temple will reside in his former 
home, Santa Rosa, after his marriage. 

J. J. Moore has entirely recovered from his recent 
injuries, which he received in Los Angeles, and is 
now at his charming summer home at Fair Oaks. 



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38 



-THE WASP 



A very pretty young lady who will be a Summer 
bride is Miss Lucy Mighell, daughter of the late' 
James Philip Mighell, niece of Mr. William E. 
Mighell and grand-daughter of Mrs. Kashow, after 
whom Kashows Island was named. The fortunate 
man is Mr. Thomas J. Churchill, who comes from a 
prominent family of the South. His grand-father 
was the famous Confederate, General Churchill. 
Mrs. Churchill, mother of the groom to be was a 
Miss Hooper, daughter of Dr. T. O. Hooper, who 
served as a surgeon in the Confederate Army and in 
later years was president of the American Medical 
Society. The Churchills have only been residents of 
San Francisco a few years. They live in a charming 
home on Post Street and entertain in the true 
Southern style. Young Mr. Churchill holds a 
responsible position with the Southern Pacific 
Company. He is building a residence in San Mateo 
and will make that place his home after his mar- 
riage. Miss Lucy Mighell's portrait appears in the 
Wasp this week. 

All our society skaters will be busily engaged 
during the next week in planning rink parties 
as Mrs. Ynez Shorb White has announced that a 
masque and fancy dress ball, on skates will take 
place at the Pavilion Rink on Monday- evening, 
April 1st. Mrs. White emphatically states that all 
on the floor must wear masks but need not don 
fancy dress unless they desire to do so. Another 
rule to be strictly enforced is that all who wish to 
invite guests for that evening must send in their 
guests' names in advance, as no tickets will be 
given anybody at the door on that evening. All 
members must present their membership cards at 
the door on that evening as no one will be admitted 
to the hall without those important pasteboards. 
* * * 

Miss Marie Churchill, the pretty daughter of Mr. 
and Mrs. S. J. Churchill who will make her debut 
the coming Winter, is a prominent member of the 
younger branch of the Albert Sidney Johnstone 
Chapter, Daughters of the Confederacy. She will 
be the maid of honor at the forth coming wedding 
of her brother Mr. Thomas J. Churchill to Miss 
Lucy Mighell. 

Miss Mazie Coyle whose portiait appeared in The 
Wasp last week is a pretty Southern girl and one 
of the most graceful skaters at the Monday Even- 
ing Skating Club. Miss Mazie and Angela Coyle, 
gave a very large tea at the City of Paris Tea 
Garden during the Winter. It was an elaborate 
affair, complimentary to one of the season's brides. 
* * * 

bara is not putting on perky airs to think that it 
has a hero, and one who is about to be decorated 
by the Emperor of Germany and the King of Eng- 
land, and for his gallantry on that expedition in 
China. 

Saturday afternoon Mrs. Christian Herter had 
the relief expedition to Peking in which he took 
part. The women went wild over the bravery of the 
Admiral and his sailor lads and maybe Santa Bar- 



Among the San Francisco people who are cut- 
ting a wide swath at Santa Barbara are Mr. and 
Mrs. M. H. Hecht, who have engaged a suite of 
rooms for the remainder of the season. By the way 
I heard that Mr. Hecht's valet is the despair of the 
other servitors at the hotel where the Hechts are 
stopping. He is so filled with airs and so puffed 
up over belonging to the "City that was and that is 
to be" that the frequenters of below stairs are cast 
down and elated by turns. One thing is sure : Mr. 
Hecht is a modest man compared to "Jeames". 
* * * 

Admiral McCalla, who was reported to be dying, 
is very much alive, I am glad to state. Last week 
this gallant officer at Mrs. Christine Harter's home 
in Santa Barbara read extracts from his records of 
another literary blowout. She was fortunate enough 
to secure Father de Vey of Paris, France, to give a 
series of five lectures in his native tongue and she 
invited a group of the most exclusive women to 
head him. 

Thomas Driscoll has returned to Burlingame 
and San Francisco after leaving his wife and 
baby at Mrs. Driscoll's parents. Admiral and Mrs. 
Albert W. Bacon, of Santa Barbara, and where the 
baby is being made much of as is the custom with 
grandparents and aunties the world over. Mrs. 
Bowman H. McCalla gave a tea on Saturday after- 
noon for Mrs. Driscoll. and the stately house, with 
its immense rooms was very attractive. All Santa 
-arbara and Montecito society made its way out to 
the McCallas during the afternoon and everyone 
seemed to have a delightful half hour. Mrs. Horace 
Blanchard Chase of San Francisco, poured coffee 
and Mrs. Albert W. Bacon, Mrs. Driscoll's mother, 
looked very much at home beside the tea table dis- 
pensing its hospitalities. Mrs. McCalla had a bright 
bevy of young matrons and maids assisting her in 
receiving, conspicious among them being: Mrs. 



GET AWAY FROM THE CROWD AND 

LIVE AT DEL MONTE 



While the city is overcrowded, take your family to Hotel Del 
Monte by the sea, near Monterey, and enjoy every comfort. There 
is plenty of room there and plenty to do for recreation and health. 
Parlor car leaves San Francisco 8:00 a. m. and 3:00 p. m. daily, 
direct to Hotel. Special reduced round-trip rates. For details, in- 
quire information Bureau, Southern Pacific, or of C. W. Kelley, 
Special Representative of Del Monte, 789 Market St., San Fran- 
cisco. Phone Temporary 275 1 . 



ANNOUNCEMENT 



Mrs. Mott- Smith Cunningham exhibitor in 
Paris Salon of 1 906 announces that her Studio 
Shop at 1 622 Pine St., a few doors from Van 
Ness Ave., is now open for the sale of her jewelry 



-THE WASP 



39 



Kingsle) Man- of Boston; Mrs. Stewart Edward 
White, wife of the distinguished author: Mi>s Cora 
Bowditch, Miss Antonia Mar-in, Miss Delfina Dib- 
blee, Miss Elizabeth Livermore and Miss Stella 

McCalla. 

* * * 

Mrs. Henry T. Scott and Mrs. Joseph B. Crockett 
Stopped at Santa Barbara on their way up from 
Coronado. They attended luncheon on hoard the 
Charleston before she left Coronado for Magdalena 
bay. Xed Greenway was also a guest at the lunch- 
ei in. 



Miss Ethel Shorb is the guest of Miss Maye Col- 

burn in San Rafael. 

* * * 

Judge and Mrs. Morrow of San Rafael left 
on the 28th of this month for Europe. The Judge 
is going to consult an eminent European occulist 
as his eyes have troubled him seriously for some 
time. He will also take the waters at Carlsbad. 

* * * 

Mrs. Frank Zook, Mrs. C. P. Pomeroy, Mrs. J. 
E. Alexander, Mrs. L. L. Baker were a few San 
Rafael ladies who entertained at enjoyable bridge 
yaiiies during the past week. 

* * * 

Hotel Rafael has been crowded during the past 
week with Raymond excursionists. They seemed 
most favorably impressed with California though 
seeing it in its most unfavorable aspect, during one 
of the most disagreeable Winters on record. The 
excursionists were a very nice looking people and 
evidently represented the better classes of the 
Quaker State. 

A large and enjoyable luncheon was given last 
week by Mrs. Robert Davis of Ross Valley in 
honor of her daughter Miss Constance. Many 
charming buds from San Rafael were present. 

* * * 

Mrs. Cyrus El wood Brown gave a "coffee and 
Lenten conversazione" on Saturday last at her 
beautiful home 3301 Pacific Avenue. Among those 
present were : Mrs. Selden L. Wright, Mrs. O. D. 
Baldwin. Mrs. John McGaw, Mrs. S. W. Holloday, 
Mrs. E. B. Holloday, Mrs. Walter D. Mansfield, 
Mrs. W. B. Craig and Miss Roberta Thompson. 

* # * 

All the beauty doctors in the world could not 
persuade Alice Neilson to part with the large mole 
that some think disfigures her cheek. The little 
prima donna does not exactly consider that the 
mole adds to her beauty but she believes it means 
good luck. Moles in certain positions on the face 
or body are mascots and this mole according to the 
luck-interpreters, is particularly well placed. 

* * * 

Mrs. Harry R. Bostvvick will be hostess at an elab- 
orate bridge party on April 6th at the residence of her 
mother on Laurel Street. Invitations read half after 
one o'clock. It will be a very large affair, and the 
prizes will be very handsome. 



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40 



-THE WASP- 




Photo Ger.tSe 



MISS GERTRUDE McFARLANE 



I hear that Miss Upton of Los Angeles, who will 
soon be introduced to us as the bride of Charlie 
Dickman, the artist, is a fine pianist. The announce- 
ment that Dickman was to marry again did not sur- 
prise those of his intimates who knew of his atten- 
tions to Miss Upton. His_ former wife, Grace Pat- 
terson, who is now Mrs. Clarence Eddy, was also 
a musician, but a singer, and their temperaments 
were not at all harmonious. Charlie is a Bohemian 
of the Bohemians, and the former Mrs. Dickman is 
not in the least of that disposition. She is extremely 
happy with her present husband, who is an ideal 
mate for her, always attentive to her wishes and 
studying in all things to please her. Artists who 
have met Miss Upton tell me that she is charming 
and will be just the one to preside graciously and 
gracefully over the Di'ckman bungalow in Mon- 
terey. 

Miss Lillian Brechemin, whose engagement to 
Dr. Gillespie of New York was announced in this 
week's papers, used to attend the Girls' High School 
in this City, before her father. Dr. Brechemin, was 



ordered to the Philippines. Mrs. Brechemin sang in 
one of the church choirs and was also teacher of 
singing in the high schools. The Brechemins are 
a charming family, and in Manila made hosts of 
friends. It was in Manila that Miss Lillian made 
her formal debut in Society. 

The Rev. Mr. Morgan, who will succeed Mr. 
Weeden as rector of St. Luke's, is not a stranger in 
San Francisco, for he was at the Good Samaritan 
Mission for some time. He is an Englishman, and 
has the real British accent and manner. He came 
from Bakersfield, where he was an intimate friend 
of the Will Tevises. The report that he has an in- 
dependent fortune of recent acquisition, by inheri- 
tance, added to the fact that he is a bachelor, should 
make St. Luke's particularly popular among the un- 
married young women of Society. Grace church 
used to be in high favor among the girls of the smart 
set until Miss Susie Le Count stepped in and car- 
ried away the rector, or rather stepped to the altar 
with him. There is something eminently attractive 

in a bachelor clergyman to impressible feminines. 
* * * 

I hear that one of the artists who is "doing the 
big stuff" in Santa Barbara is Mr. Davis. He has 
one of the little group of studios in the Abadie 
Gardens. Quaint, moss-grown fences, beyond which 
a tangle of roses glow, half hiding dull gray tumble- 



Announcement 



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-THE WASP 



41 



<l"\\n walls, all crowned with hand-made red tiles. 
makes an environment fit for the artists that occupy 
the studios. There Fernand Lungren, that indom- 
itable digger; Gamble, Howard, Davis, and last but 
inn least, Alexander Marnier, who owns the places 
and whose pictures of early days are painted con 
amore. Mr. Davis' charming daughters are reign- 
ing belles at the I'otter, where they are established 
for the season, and there is scarcely a Saturday or 
Wednesday evening that they do not give a dinner, 
and each dinner ends in the guests repairing to 

the ball-room for the dance. 

* * * 

Mr>. Sheffield of Santa Barbara was nearly kept 
from the wedding of her son, Eugene Sheffield, who 
married Florence Ward in Berkeley on Saturday, 
and it was only by the greatest bit of luck that she 
was able, when the railroads proved a brittle reed, 
to get a berth on the steamer. A friend succeeded 
in securing a state-room of one of the officers — and 
I understand that the several officers made more 
from the bonuses paid them on that trip by passen- 
gers from Santa Barbara, who cared not a whit for 
the money, but who would prefer death on the rail 
or by shipwreck to remaining a day after deciding 
to go, than they could have earned by several jaunts 





MRS. JOSEPH S. TOB1N 

From a minilure by Rose Hooper Plolner 



up and down the coast. Well, as one of the gold- 
braided officers remarked while pacing the deck 
and thinking of the warm bed he had resigned at the 
call of the coin of the realm : "Tourists have their 
uses and abuses." 

Mr. Louis Martel left last Wednesday for a visit 
of several weeks to Los Angeles. It is a pity that 
Society sees so little of this wealthy and attractive 
bachelor. At all the elaborate functions of his charm- 
ing mother, Mrs. J. L. Martel, and his well known 
sisters, Miss Addie Martel, Mrs. J. M. Masten and 
Mrs. C. J. Stoval, who are constantly entertaining, he 
can never be persuaded to join in the festivities. His 
bachelor friends wonder if the trip south is at all 
significant. 



MADAME PADERNEIRES 




Announcement 

SPRING and SUMMER 

We desire to announce that our com- 
plete selection of strictly confined Imported 
and Domestic Woolens, consisting of un- 
usually attractive patterns in popular weaves and fashionable ma- 
terials, is now ready awaiting inspection. 

It gives us pleasure to state that every garment is made by 
skilled tailors, cut on stylish and artistic lines that command the 
admiration and approval of our customers. 

We cordially invite and solicit patronage, and endeavor to up- 
hold our past reputation for high-grade tailoring at moderate prices. 

McMahon, Keyser & Stiegeler 
Bros., Inc. 



Main Store 

892-894 Van Ness Ave. 



1711 O'FarrellSt. 



42 



THE WASP- 



The early week dispatches from Boston recorded 
the news that Mrs. Lucy Banning Bradbury has 
taken a matinee stage idol as her second matrimonial 
choice, one Mace Greenleaf, unknown, so far as I 
know, out this way. This knocks on the head the 
rumors current in Los Angeles for some months 
after Mrs. Bradbury went abroad that a certain 
wealthy clubman of the Southern metropolis had a 
good chance of winning her hand, and had followed 
her to Paris to press his suit. This was a good 
while after her divorce from her husband, John 
Bradbury. The lady is said to be even more 
beautiful now than in her youthful days when she 
succeeded in fascinating an Englishman who was 
temporarily residing in Los Angeles to such an 
extent that he foreswore his allegiance to his lawful 
wife and contemplated an elopement. The pair were 
not permitted to have their way and give up the 
world for love, for a merciful providence intervened 
to frustrate their plans. The pretty, foolish young 
wife who had probably overfed her mind on trashy 
literature was forgiven by her husband and taken 
back to his heart and home. The Englishman came 
to a tragic end, falling from a train and being killed, 
the act generally being commented on, if I re- 
member aright, as suicide. The Bradburys suffered 
a season of financial stringency, and went to Arizona 
and Mexico, but returned to Los Angeles richer 
than ever and Mrs. Bradbury took her place as 
leader of the inner circle of the aristocracy down 
South. She was the most popular hostess in the 
lively set and her parties were considered the most 
original and successful ever given in Los Angeles. 
* * * 

Miss Ella Bender, the clever society girl who 
quite recently gave a reading at Mrs. Homer S. 
Kings residence on Broadway is a niece of Mrs. 
E. B. Crocker of Sacramento, who was Miss 
Bender. The Benders have been very prominent in 
Nevada and Sacramento society. Their home on 
Green Street was burned in the great fire and since 
that the family has been living in Sausalito. Miss 
Bender received her first instructions in public 
reading from the late Mrs. Francis Edgerton, the 
sister of Mrs. Homer S. King. 

When Miss Bender went East last year it was 
thought she would go on the stage but she only 
took a course in elocution at the Boston School of 
Oratory. She does not need to work for a living 
and though the stage naturally possesses fascina- 
tion for her she has said positively that she will not 
become an actress but will use her talent in dramatic 
recitation alone. Mrs. Sarah Cowell Le Moyne, with 
whom she studied in Boston, is one of the finest 
Browning interpreters in America, and during her 
period of vacation from the stage gave Browning 
recitals all over this country. She gave a series for 
the Channing Auxiliary. Miss Bender took up 
Browning under Mrs. " LeM oyne and .has made a 
great success in her readings of that complex poet's 
works. The appreciation of her artistic efforts is 
best shown by the fact that her delighted -circle of 
admirers gladly pay the admission fee of a dollar a 
ticket. 



Mrs. John Taylor's gowns have been greatly 
admired during her present visit, her first since she 
was Daisy Van Ness. She designs all her frocks 
herself, I am told, and it was well known that when 
she lived here she was the most successful amateur 
dressmaker in society. She made her own hats, too, 
and they had the real Parisian air. 

Mrs. David Bixler's handsome home was the scene 
of an elaborate dinner oarty on Saturday evening 
last. Sixteen guests enjoyed her hospitality, the oc- 
casion being a birthday anniversary of her brother, 
Rothwell Hyde. Much amusement was occasioned by 
the huge cake with one bright candle, Mr. Hvde being 
too modest to acknowledge his age. All present were 
expected to guess how many candles might be added, 
as some of the guests present had danced with him 
when they made their debut, and on this occasion their 
daughters sat around this festive board. Mr. Hyde 
had to stand considerable raillery, but fortunately was 
equal to the occasion. 

The Lakeside Skating Club of Oakland has been 
revived for the Spring season, by Joseph Rosborough. 
Tuesday evenings have been set for the club's gather- 
ings. This arrangement will enable the buds from 
this City and San Rafael to join in the gayety. Five 
meetings will take place, the last -one being in June. 
* * * 

From the number of distinguished foreigners who 
have engaged rooms at the new Fairmont Hotel, San 
Francisco is evidently going to be the mecca of the 
globe-trotters this year. The commanding view which 
this hotel affords will give the tourist an idea of 
the natural beauties of our City, of which, heretofore, 
the visitor has had only a passing realization gained 
by chance glimpses of the bay and hills. As the pres- 
ence of visiting notables always prods the hospitality 



HOTEL RAFAEL 

San Rafael, Cal. 

OPEN ALL THE YEAR ROUND 

50 Minutes from San Francisco 

The only first-class hotel in the vicinity of 
the city. American and European plan. 

R. V. HALTON, Proprietor 



The Land of the Midnight Sun 

Select Summer Cruises-First Class Only -SEND for handsome illustrated Pamphlets 



HAMBURG - AMERICAN LINE 



908 MARKET ST. Phone Temporary 2946 San Francisco, Cal. 



-THE WASP 



43 



of the negligent Summer hostess the "between 

-<>m" i- not apt to be a^ « lull thi> year as usual. In 
fact there are already a number of smart dinners 
and luncheons planned t" take place at this Fair- 
mont during the "silly season 

* * * 

h was Inn a short time ago that John T. Doyle, 
the able and well-known lawyer, passed away at 
his fine residence in Menlo Park. Another death 
took place at the Doyle home on Monday last, when 
Miss Frances Doyle, the daughter, followed her 
father to the grave. Miss Doyle was an accom- 
plished young girl, with ample means to enjoy life 
and Society, but cared nothing whatever for it. 
she preferred to engage in social settlement work in 
San Francisco. She fell from a second-story win- 
dow of the Children's Hospital last April and sus- 
tained injuries from which she never recovered, and 
linalh . after great suffering, death relieved her. 
Miss Doyle is a cousin of Mr. Jack and Miss Daisy 

( lasserly of this City. 

* * * 

The latest wanderer to return is Joseph Ros- 
borough, the popular San Francisco and Oakland 
Society man. who has been the guest of General 
and Mrs. Frisbie in Mexico. Mr. Rosborough and 
some sixty Californians who were visiting Mexico 
at the same time were given an audience by Presi- 
dent Diaz. The San Francisco man was chosen to 
speak for his fellow countrymen, which he did, it is 
said, in his usual clever way. 

* * * 

The fraternal dinner which that warm-hearted 
and popular merchant prince, Raphael Weill, gives 
every year to the veterans of the "Old Guard" of 
the Bohemian Club will take place this year on 
April 13th. Those seasoned sons of Bohemia have 
no superstitious terrors of the fateful number 13. 
The invitation which has been sent out to the 
brotherhood was as follows : 

"Dear Old Brother in Bohemia: Why should 
we not meet this year? Has anything happened 
since we last met? Something did, which has en- 
deared to me all the old boys, and it is my greatest 
wish to have you join us at a banquet on April the 
13th at the Palace, to celebrate the ninetieth birth- 
day of our dear old high priest and friend, 'dear 
old Uncle George.' " 

What pranks old Father Time_ has played with 
the contemporaries of Raphael Weill since they 
were gay young fellows together away back in the 
sixties, when those annual dinners were inaugur- 
ated. "Alas the flying years," as old Horace says 
when he bewails the symptoms of aproaching bald- 
ness and the premonitory twinges of rheumatism 
that make even a gay Bohemian sedate. Old 
Charon would have to take an afternoon off and 
check off his passenger lists before he could tell 
how many of the "Old Guard" have paid their 
obolus and crossed his ferry. Two went over the 
dark river during the past year and will be sadly 
missed at the coming dinner at the Palace Hotel. 
The sudden death of S. D. Brastow lessened the at- 
tenuated ranks by one loyal and greatly beloved 



member, and recently a much younger and equally 
popular one dropped out of sight forever when 

Thei "I. >re I 'avne died. 

The list of guests to whom Mr. Weill has sent 

invitations for the dinner on the 13th proximo i> as 

i' ■Hows : 

II. R. Bloomer, X. J. Brittan, George T. Bromley, 
Hugh M. Burke, David Bush, Jennings P. ( ox, \. 
VfcFarland Davis, L. II. Foote, Clay M. Green, I. 
Gutte, R. C. Harrison. A. G. llawes. Barton Hill, 
I lorace L. Hill, Thomas Mill, J. X. 1 1. Irwin. ( leorge 
T. Ives, Charles Josselyn, John Landers, Barbour 
Lathrop, R. II. Lloyd, Jerry Lynch, Ben Clark, 
George II. Mailer. Samuel D. Mayer, James M. 
McDonald, Jasper McDonald, G. A. E. Muecke, 
\\ .men Payne, George C. Perkins, Peter Robert- 
son, Charles Warren Stoddard, Benjamin R. Swan, 
Frank L. Unger, Raphael Weill and Dr. J. Younger. 
* # * 

Mr. ami Mrs. George Sperry, who left here re- 
cently for a tour abroad, have arrived in Xew York. 




IS 
OPEN 



Corner of 

Post and 

Leavenworth 

Streets 



The same excellence in cuisine and service that obtained 
in the Old Palace is duplicated in the new 'Little Palace' 




Phone West 4963 



Vogel & Bishoff 

Ladies' Tailors and 
Habit Makers 

1 525 Sutter Street, San Francisco 




Old Poodle Dog Restaurant 



824-826 EDDY STREET 

Near Van Ness Ave. 



i belter than before Formerly, Bnsh and Grant Ave. 
the (ire San Francisco 



Phone Emergency 63 



44 



-THE WASP- 




Photo Rice 



MRS. MIDDLEHOFF 



Nordica is never so much rushed by the culturines 
of Society as are some of the musical stars that come 
this way. Nordica is charming in company but she 
does not crave the notice of the smart set and prefers 
a few friends' company to large affairs in her honor. 
She is great chums with the De Youngs, however, 
and is quite the friend of the house there. Melba, too, 
is always invited to the De Youngs when she comes 
to San Francisco, and the Burlingamites are devoted 
to Melba. Emma Eames was the prima donna over 
whom Harry Holbrook and Dr. Harry Tevis enthused 
so publicly during her first season here. The second 
time the divine Emma came West Mr. Holbrook was 
a benedict and so it was up to Dr. Harry to do most 
of the entertaining in Mrs. Story's honor. On her 
previous visit, it will be remembered, Mr. Holbrook 
hosted a dinner in the statuesque prima donna's honor 
which was thought to be the feast that decided "who's 
who" in Society here. His guests were- chosen with 
such care that many who had hoped to be invited had 
to chew the cud of disappointment for months after- 
ward. -But the next time t-he-prima donna-carae West 



— not the concert tour but in grand opera — the earth- 
quake put an untimely end to the season thereby giv- 
ing Dr. Tevis a chance to show her the generous 
measure of his hospitality at his country place. 

* * * 

Invitations are out for the marriage of Miss Nettie 
Sexton to Mr. Edwin Dow on April 6th at the resi- 
dence of the bride's father, Mr. William Sexton, on 
Washington Street. It will be a pink and white wed- 
ding, with little Miss Betty Dow, the niece of the 
groom, as flower girl. Miss Lucille Levy and Lavania 
Giesting will be bridesmaids and Wallace Dow, brother 
of the groom, the best man. The young couple after 
the honeymoon will reside with Mr. Sexton, who is 
a widower. Mr. Sexton is the well known and popu- 
lar insurance man. Mr. Dow is a member of the 
firm of the Dow Pump Works Company. Percy Long, 
the ex-City and County Attorney, married the elder 
Miss Sexton. 

* * * 

Mrs. Marguerite Hanford, who has been passing 
the Winter in an attractive flat on Broderick, with 
Mrs. E. Walton Hedges, will leave early in April 
for an extended Eastern tour. She will visit her old 
home in Montreal before her return to California. 
In the meantime Mrs. Hedges will for the coming 
month have Mrs. Florence Pfingst and Mrs. Shirley 
as her guests, until May, when Mrs. Hedges will 
leave for Plainfield, N. J. Mrs. Pfingst was a Miss 
Florence Porter, the daughter of the late John Por- 
ter, banker of Watsonville. She is a brilliant and ac- 
complished woman, having traveled extensively 
abroad. She is a linguist of rare ability, speaking 
French, German and Spanish as fluently as her 
native tongue. Her mother's magnificent country 
home in Watsonville is one of the show places 



Let them know! 



Your friend can reserve a room at the 

Hotel St. Francis 

when he leaves home, and find it ready 
for him when he arrives. Tell him so. 
Every comfort at hand. 



THE WASP * 



45 




LADY ABERDEEN 

of the surrounding country, where hospitality 
is dispensed with a lavish hand. Mr. War- 
ren R. Porter, the only son and brother, is now our 
Lieut. Governor of California. Mrs. Warren Porter 
was the pretty daughter of the Rev. Giles Eaton of 
Berkeley before her marriage. 
$ * * 

According to an English Society writer the di- 
vorced wife of Mr. Richard McCreery and his pres- 
ent wife, who was Lady Grey Edgerton, have met 
several times since the recent marriage of the San 
Francisco clubman. The first Mrs. McCreery has 
been living at Tunbridge Wells, where she has taken 
a house, as her little son is in delicate health and 
cannot live in town. The two ladies met one day 
at Claridge's restaurant, where both were taking 
lunch. Again both were at the St. James Theatre 
one evening. They sat in boxes facing each other. 
The ladies did not appear uncomfortable, but Mr. 

McCreery kept well in the background. 
* * * L 

Edgar Mills will soon start for Paris, and will 
make that place his headquarters for some time. 



Mr. Mills has always been ready to offer his ser- 
vices for any worthy charity. He has a glorious 
voice and will be greatly missed from Bohemian 
circles. While in Paris two years ago Mr. Mills 
studied under de Reszke. Apropos of the de Reszkes, 
Jean de Reszke has a much patronized singing 
school in Paris, while his brother, Edouard, has 
opened one in London, for which he charges $10.50 
for a half hour's lesson. He has all the pupils he 
can attend to. 

Another young Society girl who has recently 
taken up literature is Miss Elsie Clifford, whose 
sister was married a few months ago to Mr. Syl- 
vanus Farnum of Oakland. Mrs. Clifford is prom- 
inent in local Society. 

* * * 

Announcement cards have been received of the 
marriage of Miss Eleanor Theresa Thorne Geissler, 
daughter of Louis F. Geissler, formerly of this City, 
to Albert Joseph Diesinger, of Philadelphia, on 
March 16th, at Bellevue-Stratford Hotel, Philadel- 
phia. Miss Geissler made her debut in this City 
and shortly afterwards moved to Philadelphia with 
her parents, where a few months later her mother 
died. Since that time Miss Geissler has been keep- 
ing house for her father. Mr. Diesinger is the son 
of an old Philadelphia family, and is a wealthy New 
York stock broker. Owing to the recent death of 
Mrs. Geissler the marriage was very quiet. Miss 
Carrie Mills and Miss Grace Hammond of San Fran- 
cisco, who have been visiting Boston, went to Phila- 
delphia to attend the bride. After the wedding tour, 
Mr. and Mrs. Diesinger will reside in Cranford, 
N. J., where the groom has a handsome home. 




STUDEBAKER 

1907 

CARS NOW ARRIVING 

Studebaker Bros. Co. of California 

405 Golden Gate Avenue 

Chester A. Weaver, Manager 



46 



-THE WASP 



Emma Eames Story's action in applying for a di- 
vorce was not surprising to those who knew her, for 
she has not been on very good terms with her hus- 
band and his family in some time. When she was 
out here, her brother-in-law, Waldo Story, was in 
the City, too, but she did not see much of him. The 
Story boys were brought up in Italy, educated at 
Oxford, and it is difficult for one reared in Italy to 
accept the Anglo-Saxon standard of constancy with 
any great seriousness. Edith Story is the Marquise 
di Medici, and lives at Florence, where Julian Story 
resides. As Emma Eames earns much more than 
her husband, he will miss the loss of her income. 
William Story, the father of the Story boys, was a 
famous sculptor, who for years inhabited the Bar- 
berine Palace at Rome. He married the daughter 
of General Waldo of Revolutionary fame. His 
father was Chief Justice Story and he, himself, was 
a lawyer who had written a few law books, but he 
had no. practice and was sent abroad by the citizens 
of Boston to study art and to make a statue of his 
father, for he was always dabbling in art. When he 
returned to the United States he found life unliv- 
able. packed up his things, took his family and went 
to Rome, where he had an immediate success. He 
was a friend of the Brownings, and he wrote many 
books on art, several volumes of poetry and several 
novels. No American ever more completely -identi- 
fied himself with Italian life than he. His son, 
Waldo Story, the sculptor, was here at the time of 
the fire, and he is thinking of returning here to live. 

Two attractive sisters who are being welcomed 
back to the City are the Misses Bessie and Ardella 
Mills, who have been passing the last five months in 
New York and Washington. Miss Bessie, who has 
gained distinction as a clever writer, has had her 
songs published. 

* * * 

Dr. and Mrs. Frederick Clampett have purchased 
a bungalow at Carmel-by-the-Sea and with their 

children have passed the Winter there. 

* * * 

Box parties were numerous during the opera sea- 
son. A notable one was that chaperoned by Mr. and 
Mrs. Thomas Eastland, which included Mrs. Fred 
Kohl, Miss Virginia Jolliffe, Miss Ethel Dean, Ed- 
ward Tobin, Thornwell Mullaly and Enrique Grau. 
Mrs. Eastland wore a striking gown of pink cloth 
with picture hat covered with white plumes. Mrs. 
Kohl was a striking figure in black net and jet with 
black hat covered with white feathers. Miss Dean 
wore a dark green opera cloak over a white gown, 
and a big black hat. Miss Jolliffe's opera wrap was 
a beautiful one of Irish lace. She wore a white pic- 
ture hat. 

Mr. and Mrs. George Cadwallader chaperoned a 
party that included Miss Genevieve Harvey, Miss 
Janet von Schroeder, Harry Stetson and Cyril 
Tobin. Mrs. Cadwallader was a picture in a cafe- 
au-lait-colored frock with picture hat covered with 
white plumes. Miss von Schroeder wore pink silk, 
and Miss Harvey was also in pink. 

" If you need a bracer in the morning tiy a glass of soda and a little of Abbott's Bitters. 
You'll be surprised how it will brighten you up. 



One of the prettiest women at Del Monte this 
week is Mrs. Wilbur Gleason Zeigler, wife of the 
San Francisco lawyer and novelist. Mrs. Zeigler 
went down last Friday with her little son. 

The E. J. de Sablas are receiving much attention 
at Santa Barbara, where they have gathered around 
them a brilliant group, many of whom are from San 
Francisco and the bay cities. They — Mr. and Mrs. 
de Sabla — gave a dinner at the Casa de Brabo on 
Sunday, which was one of the most effective affairs 
of the week. After the dinner tiny senoritas danced 
the fancy steps of Spain to the tinkling strains of 
mandolin and guitar. 

An army marriage of interest to San Francisco 
people is that of Lieut. Frederick Mears, Eleventh 
Cavalry to Miss Jennie Pound Serrell, daughter of 
Mrs. R. P. P. Wainwright. The wedding will take 
place on April 6th at Fort Clark, Texas. Lieut. 
Mears is well known in San Francisco, where' his 
mother and sister reside. He is the son of the late 
General Mears. 



Cards are out for the forthcoming wedding of 
Miss Flazel Cynthia Marston, daughter of Mr. and 
Mrs. Charles Allen Marston of Alameda to Fred- 




ff? p p Any one owning 
a disc- playing 
Talking Machine of any kind, 
who will send us their name 
and address will receive, free 
of charge, each month for one 
year, a handsome little souvenir booklet containing the names 
of the latest records and a brief history of a few of the most 
prominent contributors. 

SHERMAN, CLAY & CO. ,EEyK2L 

1635 Van Ness, S. F. Broadway at 13th, Oakland 



NEW PUP RESTAURANT 

JOS. LENOIR, Proprietor 

1428 GOLDEN GATE AVENUE 



Regular Dinner $1.00 
Telephone West 75 . 



San Francisco, Cal. 



CHAS. SCHMIDT HARRY MILLING 

Bohemianism is Best Exemplified at 

THE NORTHERN CAFE 

1710 and 1712 O'FARRELL STREET 

A PLACE TO EAT AND DRINK "Ladies' Orchestra" from 6 to 12 



THE WASP- 



47 



..rick Winslow Read, the attorney of Stockton. The 
ceremony will take place on April 11th at S o'clock 
at Christ Church, Alameda. A large reception will 
follow at tile residence of the bride's parents, 1716 

Encinal Avenue. Alameda. 

* * r. 

Much In the regret of his friends. Mr. Jose Costa 
has resigned as the Consul of Uruguay at this port. 
The duties of Consul for Uruguay it is thought, will 
In performed h\ Mr. DalzeJl Brown, the well known 
financier, as Mr. Costa has expressed a desire that 
Mr. Brown should succeed him. Mr. Costa has been 
a resident of San Francisco for thirty years and is 
a very wealthy man, who has large interests both 
here and in Uruguay. He will leave in a week for 
Washington, where he will visit the Mexican 
Minister to Cuba, Joseph Godoy. From Washing- 
ton Mr. Costa will proceed to Spain and remain 
abroad a year or two. 

* * * 

By the arrival of the new Spanish Consul Antonio 
Suque with his charming wife and two children, 
San Francisco has made a distinct social gain. The 
Consul is a highly cultivated and scholarly gentle- 
man and a remarkable linguist. He and his family 
are guests at the Hotel Cecil. The Spanish 
Consulate has been located in the Montgomery 
Block, where Senor Suque will be assisted in his 
official duties by his clever associate O. M. Gold- 
aracena the Vice-Consul. 

, * * * 

As pretty Miss Linda Cadwalader will leave about 
the middle of April for an Eastern visit and be 
gone some months, man}' friends are now planning 
luncheons and dinners for this charming girl. A 
large dinner was given on Wednesday evening by- 
Miss Genevieve King, at the residence of her 
parents, Mr and Mrs. Homer S. King, on Broadway. 

* * * 

A large tea will be given by Mrs. A. W. Foster, 
at her home Fair Hills, San Rafael, on Thursday, 
April 4th, in honor of Mrs. William Foster of 
Mendocino, who has been visiting her husband's 
parents. Several pretty buds will assist in receiving 
the guests. Many people from this side of the bay 
will be present on this occasion. 

Mr. and Mrs. G. W. Elkins, of Elkins Park, Phila- 
delphia, have arrived at Del Monte in their luxurious 
private car "The Republic." Accompanying Mr. and 
Mrs. Elkins are their son, Mr. George W. Elkins and 
his bride. Miss Louisa Elkins, Miss Beulah Elkins, 
Mrs. W. L. Elkins and Mr. Fred H. Dillon. 

J. C. Edouard Noetzlin, a banker of Paris and one 
of the best known financiers of Europe, is a guest 
at Del Monte. He is making a tour of America. Mr. 
Noetzlin negotiated the great Russian loan and also 
the Pennsylvania Railroad Company's $60,000,000 
loan. His object in visiting the country is to see for 
himself the wealth of California. The great financier 
is most favorably impressed with the State. 
Monsieur Noetzlin goes to Portland, Oregon and 
then East by the way of Salt Lake. 



<>n the occasion of the opening of the Fairmont 
Hotel on April 19th, Edward M. Greenway will be 
the Master of Ceremonies, in the ballroom, so the 
success of the affair is assured. In the bright lexicon 
ol the Czar of Society, there is no such word as 
failure. I le has never yet scored one. 

A jolly party of congenial friends leave this week 
for a visit to the Hawaiian Islands, as the guests of 
Mr. and Mrs. Fred Knight. The lucky ones are: 
Mrs. Bush Finnell, Mrs. Augustus Xewell and Mrs. 
Edgar Keithley. They will be gone all Summer. Mr. 
Knight. Mr. Finnell and Mr. Xewell intend join- 
ing the party later, returning to the City with 
their wives. 



On April 3rd, Dr. and Mrs. W. A. McEnery will 
give one of their delightful dinners at their home on 
Broadway to Major William Stephenson and his 
sisters, who will leave next Friday for the Philip- 
pines. Major Stephenson and his sisters will be 
greatlv missed. 



BURNS HAMMAM BATHS 



LADIES' DEPARTMENT 
OPEN 



817 Eddy Street 



..Phone Franklin 224S 



Gas 




School 



MENU 
Wednesday, April 3 

Swedish Timbales 

Sweetbreads in Scollop Shells 

Chicken Croquettes 

Chocolate Pudding 

Mrs. Jean Sinclair 

Demonstrator 



Lectures on domestic science and the economical operation of the gas range 
every Wednesday and Friday, at 3 o'clock sharp, in the assembly room of [he Gas 
Company, at 925 Franklin street. Every user of gas invited. 

Demonstration in Bread and Cake Baking, Monday and Saturday, 2 to 4. 
The art of Bread Making is taught here so you can make your own "home-made 
bread." 

GAS COOK BOOK given to every lady attending. 

"AT YOUR SERVICE" 

The So F. Gas and Electric 
Company 

925 FRANKLIN STREET 



48 



-THE WASP 



Over the Lunch Table 

A diurnal discussion of men and things 
by three plain citizens. Scene, a mer- 
chant's cafe in the business district; 
parties to discussion: 

Jones— A pessimist. 

Brown—An optimist. 

Robinson— Don't much care either way. 

Brown — Well. I see that the grafters are in a 
pretty bad way. Looks as if Ruef would go to San 
puentin for two or three hundred years, if he's con- 
victed on half the indictments against him. 

Jones — Serve him right if he did. Schmitz and 
the whole Board of Supervisors ought to go with 
him. 

Robinson — It's a terrible revelation. 

Jones — No revelation at all. Every man, woman 
and child in San Francisco has known for six years 
that the municipal government was nothing but a 
band of grafters. 

Robinson — Do you really think that the working- 
men of this City who have supported Schmitz believed 
he was crooked? 

Jones — I don't think most of them cared one way 
or the other. They voted for him because they thought 
he would side with them and not with the employers 
in case of any trouble and thus help to keep up the 
high rate of wages. 

Robinson — Help them to keep up the high standard 
of living. Eh? 

Jones — What do you mean by a high standard of 
living? 

Robinson — The American workingmen's standard 
of living is a high standard. 

Jones — From his standpoint. Yes. 

Brown — Oh, I should say it's a high standard from 
any standpoint. 

Tones — Well let's see about that what makes it 
high? 

Brown — The wages of course. He gets the highest 
wages in the world. 

Jones — According to that theory if a Mexican peon 
got higher wages than the American laborer his stand- 
ard of living would be also higher. 

Brown — The Mexican peon doesn't live like the 
American laborer in any way. 

Jones — He eats, doesn't he? 

Brown — Yes, but not porterhouse steaks three times 
a day. 

Jones — Then a high standard of living is based 
upon the mastication of porterhouse steak three times 
a day, is it? Suppose a man is vegetarian like mil- 
lions of people in the world. Steak three times a day 
wouldn't represent a high standard to him would it? 

Brown — Oh, you can't establish a standard that will 
be regarded as high by everybody on earth. 

Jones — I beg your pardon. You can establish one 
that all civilized people will acknowledge as very 
high but it must be based on something more than 
porterhouse steak. 

i Brown — The American workingman has other ad- 
vantages than food. He wears better clothes. 



Jones — Better from his standpoint and certainly 
more expensive. But an educated East Indian or 
Persian or Turk wouldn't wear European or American 
clothes at any price. You couldn't impress them by 
a high standard based on a sack or cutaway coat and 
creased pants. 

Brown — The American workingman is better 
housed. 

Jones — That's a mere matter of opinion too. The 
tenement and the flat are regarded as atrocities by 
millions of highly civilized people. 

Brown — Well. You'll admit he has more money 
and time for amusements. 

Jones — What are his amusements. If you mean 
vaudeville shows where cheap comedians swap stale 
jokes and prize-fights where pugs swap blows, I can't 
say I am impressed by your high standard of living. 
The educated Italian who prefers opera to slapstick 
comedy would regard vaudeville as pretty low and 
the Spaniard would rather see a brutal bull-fight than 
a brutal prize-fight. So you can't establish a high 
standard on the American workingmen's amusements. 

Robinson — Well what can you establish a standard 




GOVERNOR FOLK OF MISSOURI 



-THE WASP- 



49 




FRITZl SCHEFF 

on that would be accepted the world over? 

Jones — On a combination of education, intelligence, 
honesty, industry and thrift. In all the discussions 
you hear about the American workingmen scarcely 
a word is said about these. All the talk is about the 
high wages and the short hours. Not a word about 
establishing technical schools and raising the standard 
of skill but plenty of words about preventing Ameri- 
can boys from becoming apprentices and learning use- 
ful trades. 

Brown — But don't you think that as workingmen 
Kings, when a Browning afternoon will be enjoyed. 
are well paid and have short hours, the other desir- 
able things will follow in time. 

Jones — I certainly hope so. It is easy to improve 
on the present order of things. 

Brown — How do you think they will be im- 
proved? 

Jones — If at all, it will be by the high schools and 
the universities. They are likely to create an Am- 
erican standard in which money will not be the be- 
ginning and end of everything. With such a stand- 
ard established the government will be in the hands 
of the intelligent and patriotic classes, and not as now 
very largely in the hands of the illiterates and the 
grafters. 



A Change of Heart 

Since they made their amazing recital of the graft 
in the administration the members of the Board of 
Supervisors have a new buss. Heretofore, ever 
Mnce their election, the Supervisors have "reported 
on" to Ruef; they consulted him about every move 
and no resolution or ordinance was allowed to pas* 
unless it had been approved by him ; in this way 
they protected themselves and him from the pos- 
sible chance of allowing to escape any measure or 
interest which might be made to yield more graft. 
It was from Ruef, too, that Gallagher received the 
bribe sack for distribution to his fellows. 

But that is all changed now. The Supervisors 
no longer report to Ruef, for two reasons, one being 
that Detective Burns will not let them approach the 
imprisoned boss, and the other and more important 
being that they find it more to their taste to report 
to Burns and Heney and Rudolph Spreckels. This 
was illustrated the other day when the telephone in 
Heney 's office rang and the following conversation 
took place : 

"Hello; is this Mr. Heney's office?" 

"Yes." 

"Well, this is Gallagher — Supervisor Gallagher. 
I merely called up to ask if anything were wanted of 
me today." 

"No, nothing today," was the answer from 
Heney's representative, "we'll let you know later." 




MRS. VICTOR METCALF 



Some of the labor leaders who have not been in 
complete accord with Schmitz are getting into print 
by denouncing the grafters generally, and declaring 
that they should all go to jail with the bribers as well. 
It is worthy of note, however, that those hostile 
leaders have heretofore represented a very small mi- 
nority in the Union Labor party. The influential 
leaders representing the majority were all taken care 
of by Schmitz and quartered on the City in various 
important and remunerative positions. Almost every 
union labor president with a political pull holds some 
kind of an office. The City has been governed by union 
labor presidents and other union labor leaders. Never 
before has the City had so many public officials of one 
political party. From the Mayor down, almost every 
department is filled with the most active union labor 
politicians, and the net result of this is that the gov- 
ernment is the rottenest on record. The exposures of 
boodling are the most appalling, and the evidence over- 
whelming" and conclusive that under Ruef and Schmitz 
the Union Labor party of California has been or- 
ganized for graft. 



the present Board of Supervisors were up to his 
moral and intellectual level. 



The citizens of San Francisco should ponder over 
this fact and prepare themselves to vote intelligently 
at the coming election. Until the Supervisors fell 
down and confessed their rascality Schmitz was the 
slated candidate for Mayor for the next two years. 
The question of his honesty cuts no figure whatever : 
If he were ten times the boodling rascal he has been 
represented his party leaders were ready to exert 
every influence to re-elect him. Why? Because they 
saw in Schmitz a man who was willing to grant illegal 
privileges no matter how improper as long as they 
gave him in return their political support. 



When the voters of San Francisco six years ago 
took Schmitz out of an orchestra and made him Mayor 
of San Francisco they committed a crime. They ag- 
gravated the offense when they re-elected him to a 
second term, but when they made this incompetent 
and unfit man the Mayor of this great City a third 
time they placed a stigma upon their City which it 
will take fifty years of good government to efface. 



Supervisor Boxton has been quoted by one of the 
newspapers as saying that the late Supervisor, Sammy 
Braunhart, "protected" the Pacific States Telephone 
Company. Even admitting that this insinuation of 
crookedness were true how could it help Major Boxton 
out of the deep hole into which he has apparently 
fallen with the other Supervisors. It would be better 
for him to observe the old classical maxim and "say 
nothing of the dead but what is good." Braunhart 
had his imperfections like the rest of mankind but 
it would be well for San Francisco if the average of 

Do you get up tired and feel tired all day? Try a taWe-.pooafu] o' AS'aott's Bitters in 
sweetened water before meals. At grocers and druggisK. 



While San Francisco was never before so honey- 
combined with official rascality as under this disgraced 
Union Labor administration we have had sporadic 
cases of boodling equal to the pettiest against the 
present Board of Supervisors. Not so many years 
ago there was a gang of grafters in office which be- 
came ' so inured in boodling that the members were 
in the habit of just stepping out in the open hallway 
to take bribes. In these halcyon days a German Su- 
pervisor on the street committee, not being able to 
get coin for his vote bartered it far a ham with antPhu 
grocer who wanted to violate the building ordinances 
and construct the steps of a new house so that they 
projected two feet out on the sidewalk. 



So the Supervisors are through with Ruef, and 
though they have eased their consciences by yielding 
up the shameful tale of wrong-doing they stand in 
such mortal dread of Burns and Heney that they 
are not willing to make a move without letting them 
know of it. It is quite amusing, in view of the 
earlier conduct of the Board, to see Gallagher and 
Lonergan and Boxton and the rest of them not 
daring to be seen or heard except with the consent 
of the two men whom they know have it in their 
power to send the whole delectable bunch to State's 
prison. When Heney and Burns first began the 
investigation into graft the Supervisors were as 
loud as Ruef and Schmitz in denouncing them and 
applying to them all the names they could think of; 
and when Ruef instructed them to vote Langdon 
out of office and put him in they put through the 
program as willingly as they did any of the steals 
that brought them from $750 to $5000 apiece. Hence 
the smile when Lonergan called up the other day in 
great alarm to say that one of the papers had sent 
an automobile for the purpose of taking him to the 



SWAIN'S CAFE 



1111-1113 

POST ST. 



Have added to their heretofore Excellent Equipment 

A Modern Grill Service 



With Schlitz and Wurzburger 
Beer on Draught 



Music under trie direction o 
Mr. Edgar Bayliss 



JULES' FRENCH RESTAURANT t^StJSS 

Regular Dinners served svery Evening, including Sunday, at former prices 

326 BUSH STREET 

Music on Sundays Pl-.one Temporary 1 82 1 Jiles Wiitman, Prop. 



THE WASP 



51 



office to make a statement. He asked Burns what 
he sould do about it. Burns replied. "Don't you 
go," whereupon Lonergan responded, "All right, 
Mr. Burns, I won't." 



The change that has come over public sentimenl 
is also one of the striking features that have fol- 
lowed in swift succession the wholesale confessions. 
There were many who "pooh-poohed" the investi- 
gation from the time the French restaurant cases 
were presented, saying that lleney and Burns had 
failed t" "make good" if that was the best they 
could do. They did not know that the returning of 
those indictments was merely a "blind" to cover up 
the real investigation, the developments of which 
were t" come later. Particularly among union men 
is this change of sentiment to be noted. Some of 
them were loyal in their support of the administra- 
tion when it was thought that nothing but the ex- 
tortion in the restaurant cases had been uncovered; 
but the revelations made during the past two weeks 
have turned the balance and now union men are 
Strongest in their denunciation of the men whom 
they accuse of betraying them and making of the 
Union Labor Party a synonym for graft. 



Judge Mogan, since his elevation to the Superior 
bench, is not well liked by the reporters who used 
to regard him as a "good fellow" while he was hold- 
ing forth in the Police Court. The estrangement is 
due to a little error made by the Judge the day he 
assumed the higher office. Wishing to show his 
friendliness to the reporters he sent to their room 
at the Temple Israel a box of cigars with his com- 
pliments and heartiest wishes for a continuance of 
their relations. Some of the newspapermen tried 
the cigars and wondered what they were. One less 
chivalrous than the rest took the box across the 
street to a cigar dealer and asked their price. "A 
dollar twenty a hundred," was the response. Now 
none of those reporters smoke — at Judge Mogan's 
expense. 



J. 1. Dwyer, one of the force of lawyers assisting 
Henev in the procurement of indictments against 
the grafters, was met on the street the other day by 
Father Philip O'Ryan, who said : 

"Isn't this news overwhelming? Can it be true 
that the City officials were so corrupt? Are the 
confessions of the Supervisors true?" 

"Well, I'll tell you," replied Dwyer; "take all you 
read in all the papers and believe it; then double all 
that and then double that, and then you haven't it 
all." 



Until a few days ago Herbert George, local head 
of the Citizens' Alliance, occupied the rooms ad- 
jacent to those at the St. Francis which are occu- 
pied by Elisor Biggy and his prisoner, Ruef. He 
has moved to other apartments since, but not be- 
cause he objected to the proximity to the fallen boss. 
He was asked the other day what he thought of the 
Schmitz administration now and what explanation 
he had to make of the statement made by him the 
day after the last election that he "could get more 



his crowd than from Partridge 



from Schmitz an 

and his." 

"1 believe that now just as firmly as I did then." 
replied the Citizens' Alliance man, "and events have 
justified my belief. [ meant by it that the Schmitz 
crew were so thoroughly corrupt that if we wanted 
anything from them all we would need would be to 
buy them." 

"But they were supposed to be union men." 
"Pshaw!" exclaimed George. "Why, there were 
three men on the Schmitz ticket who were Citizens' 
Alliance men ; we had none on the Partridge ticket." 



Dr. Redmond Payne 

Eye, ear, nose, throat, resumed practice at 9 I 5 Van Ness 
cor. Ellis, hours: 1-3; tel. Franklin 331. 



C. H. REHNSTROM 

TAILOR AND IMPORTER 

SPRING AND SUMMER STYLES 

NOW READY 



Formerly of 

The Mutual Savings Bank Building 



2415 FILLMORE STREET 

Telephone Wesl 5769 



"JUST A SHADE ON OTHERS' 



Weinhard 

The Peer 
of Bottle Beer 




CALIFORNIA BOTTLING CO. 



Weinhard 



SOLE BOTTLERS 



1255 HARRISON STREET 

PHONE MARKET 977 



the Delicious Beer served at Cafe Francisco, The 
Louvie, Tail's and many other Cafes 



Sl^iW^oR President's Taste 

Macaroni, Vermicelli, Spaghetti 

l_. r. PODESTA, Manufacturer S12 Waifcngton Sta>»t 



52 



THE WASP 



They are beginning to talk in Europe and the 
East about the permanent occupation of Cuba by 
United States troops. English subjects have the 
tidy sum of two hundred million dollars invested in 
Cuba, and they are very timid about being left to 
the tender mercies of Cuban patriots who have no- 
body over them. At present Uncle Sam retains a 
provisional governor at Havana, and everything 
goes along smoothly, thanks to the wholesome fear 
of the American bluejackets, who are more or less in 
evidence in Havana harbor. 



An interesting and well-authenticated story is told 
about the Cuban idea of overturning a government. 
The story was first related by a prominent and 
wealthy citizen of Havana. He was opposed to the 
Palma government and, while he did not take an 
active part in politics and was not publicly known 
as a sympathizer with the liberals, the leaders of that 
organization ascertained his sentiments and one of 
them, who is still among the most conspicuous man- 
agers of that party, went to him for financial as- 
sistance. After some preliminary conversation the 
emissary asked the capitalist if he were supporting 
the Palma government. The capitalist declared 
frankly that he was not, and then the following dia- 





ABE HUMMEL 
The convicted lawyer on whom Jerome relied 



logue took place : 

"Would you give financial assistance to a revolu- 
tion?" 

"I would. How much do you want?" 

"We need $5000." 

"What are you going to do with it?" 

"We are going to start a revolution." 

"How are you going to do it?" 

"By removing President Palma. You know there 
is a door connecting the office of the alcalde with 
the interior of the palace. I have twenty picked 
men whom I can trust and a friend of mine, who is 
employed in the alcalde's office, will give us the 
keys, so that they can gather there on the first con- 
venient night and when a suitable hour has arrived 
they can make their way quietly through the door to 
the private apartments of the family, where they 
will kill President Palma and his family and in the 
morning we will proclaim Jose Miguel Gomez presi- 
dent of Cuba." 

"Why kill the family?" 

"Because that may be necessary to prevent identi- 
fication. The president and his family sleep in ad- 
joining rooms, and it will be difficult to get to his 
bed and get away without being discovered by some 



La Boheme 



First Class Italian Restaurant 
155S BUSH ST- 

Between Van Ness and Franklin 



SPECIALTY: Italian and French Cuisine 

FEUX PIANTANIDA. Manage! 



Formerly Proprietor of the ORIGINAL COPPA 



MAYOR MOTT- - - 
Newly elected in Oakland 



Colonial Tub and Shower Baths 

BathS Ladies' Department, 8 to 12 a. m. week days 

REGULAR PRICES 
Now Open 174S O'Farrell St., near Fillmore 



-THE WASP- 



53 



member of the family." 

"I don't quite approve of that kind of a revolution," 
said the capitalist, "and I cannot promise to furnish 
any funds for such a purpose." 

"Then you are not a true friend of Cuba." was 
the a-ply. 

HARVEY BROUGHAM. 



I Wonder 
I wonder if the robin that has found himself a mate 
Sits down as soon as she is his to gravely meditate? 
I wonder if the lady bird upon some other limb 
Has charms that set him yearning, since she cannot 
be for him? 

I wonder if the lioness is never satisfied 
With any den her tawny lord is able to provide? 
I wonder if she secretly, as soon as she is mated, 
Begins to think she might have done much better 
had she waited? 

I wonder if 'tis only man that, being loved, is prone 
To think some other lovelier than she who is his 

own? 
I wonder if the woman lives who, knowing she's 

adored 
By him whose name she has to bear, is ne'er a little 

bored? . 




"Guess I'll have to dig the Canal Myself." 

From the ChicagoRccord Herald. 



Patriotic Treatment 

"How is the baby, Mrs. A.?" 

"Oh, I am dreadfully worried about him. You 
see, that careless nurse left him too near the steam 
radiator and he actually turned red." 

"Gracious !" 

"Then we rushed him out in the cool air and he 
turned white." 
"You don't mean it?" 

"Yes, and when we gave him his bath he turned 
blue." 

"Oh, I wouldn't worry over him. He is just a 
genuine American baby. Hurrah for the 'Red, 
White and Blue.' " 



Easiest Way 

The "Uncle Tom's Cabin" company was playing 
a one-night stand in a small town. 

"The ice!" cried Eliza, standing on the brink of 
the pasteboard river. "How shall I ever cross the 
ice?" 



Wedding Cakes and Fancy Ices 
and Tarts 

ECHTE* 




LECHTEN BROS. 



1242- 1244 Oevlsadero Street 

Bel. Eddy and Ellis Phone West 2526 



F. W. KRONE, Proprietor 



The Original San Francisco 

Popular Dining Room 



NOW OPEN 
91 1-913 O'farrell St. 



Bet. Van Ness and Polk 



Largest and Handsomest Dining-Roonv in the City--An Ideal Kitchen. Former 
Patrons Invited to Call and Inspect Our New Rooms and Equipment. 



BLAKE, MOFFITT & TOWNE 

PAPER 



1 400 1450 FOURTH STREET 

TELEPHONE MARKET 3014 

Private Exchange Connecting all Departments 




STRICTLY BUSINESS 



Points of Interest on Trade and Finance 




What Is the Matter With the Clearing House? 

For the past three weeks the Clearing House Ex- 
changes have not come up to their usual standard 
this year. With the exception of these weeks, the 
exchanges for the present year have been on the 
whole from four to eleven million dollars larger 
every week than those for the corresponding weeks 
in 1906 — some weeks a gain of 25 per cent has been 
scored. Last week, however, the gain was a bare 
$3,739,827.32. Another of these weeks there was a 
loss compared with last vear, while another week 
the gain was merely nominal. 

Now, what is the matter? Has business fallen 
off, or why has so sudden a check been given to the 
financial prosperity shown by the exchanges? 
There has been a dullness in business caused by 
the abnormal weather, although in most lines it 
has been fully up to that of last year and in some 
has even surpassed it. But the principal reason 
has been the withdrawal of Eastern money from 
the mining stock market of this City. This has 
been brought about by the panic. Eastern specu- 
lators had to take to cover. Brokers had to call for 
more margins and their clients, many of them, had 
to- withdraw the money deposited here for invest- 
ment and to sell the stocks that they had purchased 

in this market. 

* * * 

The Savings Banks 
The complaint of the Savings Banks in San Fran- 
cisco today is not for lack of patronage. A well- 
known bank president says that "the demand for 
loans is greater than ever before and that it is very 
hard to satisfy it. There is no end of applications. 
Every one wants to be accommodated at once. 
People who owned house or store property or had 
homes before the fire are starting to rebuild all at 
once, and all want money. Before the end of the 
year fully $150,000,000 will be needed by borrowers 

and I do not see where it is to come from." 

* * * 

The deposits being made in the Savings Banks 
are greater than ever before and in some cases have 
been doubled since the fire, but loans and with- 
drawals have been heavy and are very close to the 

amount of deposits. 

* * * 

A Great Staple 

We are now at the end of one salmon season and 
the beginning of another, and a glance at the con- 
dition of things in one of the most important lines 
of Coast industry may not be inapt. The advent of 



A Sovereign Remedy 

Dr. Parker's Cough Cure, one dose will stop a cough, 
never fails. Try it. Sold by all Druggists. 



every season is usually ushered in by predictions of 
a light pack and high prices, and 1906 was no ex- 
ception to the rule. But the pack on the Coast was 
nevertheless a large one, while prices began to de- 
scend rapidly as soon as the fact became known. 
Alaska contributed 1,200,000 to the Coast pack, 
while the total was in the neighborhood of 3,000,000 
cases with a value of $12,000,000. There was little 
or no money made in the business last year, and as 
the stock on hand is light — 150,000 cases — and the 
consumption in the East great, the market for the 
new pack is advancing and Alaska Red will bring 
$1.05 at the opening of the season, but will go up 
higher later on. 

* * * 
Alaska salmon at the present prices is cheaper 
than any description of meat, and if the run should 
be large this year all the packers will make money. 
The expenses, however, are much greater than those 
of last year — freights, wages and cans all being- 
dearer than they were a year ago. 



MUTUAL SAVINGS BANK 



706 Market St. 



OF SAN FRANCISCO 



Opp. Third 



Guaranteed Capital, $1,000,000 

Interest Paid on all Deposits 



Paid up Capital and Surplus, $620,000 
Loans on Approved Securities 



OFFICERS- James D. PheU, Pres,. John A. Hooper, V. Pres., J. K. MolTatt, 2d 
V. Pres., George A. Slory, Sec'y and Cashier, C. B. Hobson, Assl. Cashier, A. E. 
Curlis, 2d Asst. Cashier. 



TONOPAH, GOLDFIELD, BULLFROG 
MANHATTAN and COMSTOCKS A specialty 



ZADIG & CO. 

STOCK BROKERS 

Formerly 306 Montgomery Street, have resumed business in their 

Own Building, 324 BUSH STREET 

Directly Opposite New San Francisco Stock and Exchange Bldg. 



FRENCH SAVINGS BANK 



OF SAN FRANCISCO 

CAPITAL AND SURPLUS. 
PAID UP CAPITAL. 
DEPOSITS JANUARY I, 1907 



108-110 Sutler Street 

$693,104.58 

$600,000.00 

$3,772,145.83 



Charles Carpy, Pres. Arthur Legallet, Vice-Pres. Leon Bocqueraz, Secretary 

John Ginty, Asst. Secretary P. A. Bergerot, Attorney 



-THE WASP- 



55 



Business on the Bond and Stock Exchange has 
been decidedly at a discount during the week. One 
Bay there were only two transactions recorded. The 
Dullness of the week may be traced to the bad effects 
of a falling market in Wall Street. The local specu- 
lators, many of them, have all they can do to pro- 
tect their interest in the Xew York market, hence 
they have paid little or no attention to the local one. 
[There has been quite a Hop in Spring Valley, which 
has sold at $21.50. Contra Costa is quoted at $62.50 
hid. Associated < >il has dropped and has sold at 
B4Q.50, Sugar stocks have been steady. Hawaiian 
Commercial was held at $S3 bid; Paauhan at $14.75. 
Hutchinson sold at $16; < )nomea was held at $34.50 
bid ; Union at $45 asked. 

L'nited Railroads 4s dropped heavily, owing to 
facts developed in the Grand Jury investigation and 
sold down to $75. Bank Stocks are steady. Bank of 
California is held at $3f >4 bid. California Wine at 
590 asked. For California Fruit Canners $103.50 
lias been asked. For Pacific T. and T. there were 
ii" Kids and no asking figure. 



Savings Accounts 

are cordially welcomed at the Home 
Office or any of the branches of the 

CALIFORNIA SAFE DEPOSIT 
AND TRUST COMPANY 

3 I -2 per cent interest is paid on 
regular savings deposits and 3 6-10 
per cent on term deposits. 



HOME OFFICE 



CALIFORNIA and MONTGOMERY STS. 

West End Branch, 1531 Devisadero 

Mission Branch, 2572 Mission, near 22d 
Up-Town Branch, 1 740 Fillmore nr. Sutter 



The withdrawal of money from San Francisco by 
Eastern investors who have needed it to save their 
foldings in Wall Street, has demoralized the market 
ind though there have been various attempts made 
:i> keep it up it seems impossible to do so. Mean- 
while the work of development goes on. The new 
ire in Florence runs from $500 to $1000 per ton, 
while $3500 ore has been met with. In Silver Peak 
jvery day's work is adding $60,000 to the ore re- 
serves blocked out in the mine. The Tonopah Com- 
pany is now about making a clean-up. The West 
Extension in Bullfrog has shown ore running from 

?1 5,000 to $20,000 per ton. And so it goes. 

* * * 

It is to be hoped that no sane citizen will en- 
Burage the crazy agitation to annul the franchise 
if the L'nited Railroads. Every merchant and 
wage-earner is dependent for his living on the street 
Hjlroads. It is hard enough to do business now 
,vith the business district scattered in every direc- 
ion. If we cripple the Railroad Company we will, 
>nly injure ourselves seriously. Many of the bonds 
hat have been depreciated by the agitation are 
eld here in San Francisco by people of limited 
neans who bought them on investment. These 
leople are entitled to fair treatment. There is a 
iroper legal way of proceeding against the officers 
f the L'nited Railroads if they are guilty of an 
ndictable offence, but to raise a howl about con- 
seating franchises is both improper and insane, 
nd only calculated to do great injury to the 

omniunity. 

# * * 

Here on the Stock Board the market continues to 
uctuate within certain limits, the trend lately be- 
ig on the whole downward. Mohawk, of which 
here is hardlv ever a sale, has $17 bid; Tumbo has 
3.80 bid; Red Top at $3.50, while Silver Pick sold 
own to $1.17j/>, and Goldfield Combination at $8. 
Hjiopah Nevada was held at $16; Florence sold 
own to $3.40. 

Nothing will quicker revolutionize the syrtem and put new life into'il than Abbott's Bitters. 
t rJrugBms and grocers. 



VALUABLES of all kinds 

May be safely stored a) 

SAFE DEPOSIT VAULTS 

of the 

FIRST NATIONAL BANK 

Cor. Bush and Sansome Sts. 



Safes to rent from $5 a year upwards 
Careful service to customers 



Trunks $1 a month 
Office Hours: 8 a. m. to 6 p. m. 



The German Savings and Loan Society 

526 CALIFORNIA ST., San Francisco 



Guaranteed Capital and Surplus 
Capital actually paid up in cash 
Deposits, December 31, 1506 



$2,578,695,41 

1,000,000.00 

38,531,917.28 



OFFICERS - President, F. Tillman.., Jr.; First Vice-President, Daniel Meyer 
Second Viee-President, Emil Rohte; Cashier, A. H. R. Schmidt; Assistant Cashier, 
William Herrmann; Secretary, George Toumy; Assistant Secretary, A. H. Muller. 
Goodfellow & Eells, General Attorneys. 

BOARD OF DIRECTORS -- F. Tillrranr, Jr., Daniel Meyer, Emil Rohte, Ign. 
Steinhart. I. N. Walter. N. Ohlandt. J. W. Van Bergen, E. T. Kruse and W. S. 
Goodfellow. 



MEMBER STOCK AND BOND EXCHANGE 

J. C. WILSON 

BROKER 

STOCKS AND BONDS Kohl Bldg., 488 California St. 

INVESTMENT SECURITIES San Francisco 

Telephone Temporary 815 



56 



-THE WASP' 



The Absorption of Gold 

Notwithstanding the fact that the production of 
gold has increased and is increasing at an unusually 
rapid rate, the amount of gold in the leading banks 
of great money centers of the world is very little in 
excess of what it was a year ago. The question is 
what has become of the $400,000,000. Of course a 
part of if has gone into manufactures and the arts, 
but still the vast amount taken from the earth is not 
accounted for. A well-known banker of this City 
says, "last year the production of the precious 
metals reached $500,000,000 in gold and silver. 
Much of that has been distributed from London to 
countries where no account is taken of the move- 
ments of the precious metals, and, too, no statistics 
are ordinarily given of the stocks of gold in pro- 
vincial cities in Europe or of the banks of the United 
States, only the amount in the United States treas- 
ury. More, too, is held by firms and by private in- 
dividuals than there used to be. The abundance of 
gold has produced an inflation in values and what 
may be termed the floating stock is increasing be- 
cause individuals are obliged to handle more to 
meet their expenses than they were formerly." This 
is no doubt true of San Francisco, where not only 
has the stock in the banks increased largely, but 
that in the possession of private individuals as 
pocket money has increased largely also. 




General Business 

There is no doubt but that the bad weather of 
the past three months has interfered with general busi- 
ness to a certain extent, but the greater part of the 
leading wholesale houses, when spoken to on the 
subject, agree that business is very good for this 
time of year. Indeed, one wholesaler told the 
writer of these lines that business was better with 
him since January 1st than it had been at the same 
time for the two preceding years. 



Jack — "Did Miss Suddington give you an im- 
mediate answer when you proposed?" 

Tom — "No, indeed. She sent it by a messenger 
boy." 



Germania National Bank 

OP SAIN FRANCISCO 
IS NOW OPEN FOR BUSINESS AT THEIR NEW QUARTERS 

521 MARKET STREET, Bet. First and Second Streets 

SAN FRANCISCO. CALIFORNIA 

OFFICERS: W. A. Frederick. President; F. Kronenberg. Vice-President; 
R. F. Crist, Vice-President; F. Kronenberg, Jr., Cashier. 
Cable Address; Germania 



PHIL S. MONTAGUE, Stock Broker 

Member of S. F. Stock Exchange 

Goldfield, Tonopah, Manhattan and Bullfrog Stocks Bought and Sold. 

Write (or Market Letter. 

339 BUSH STREET. STOCK EXCHANGE BUILDING 



BURNED HOMES MUST BE REBUILT 

The Continental Building and Loan Association 

Having sustained practically no loss in the recent calamity, is in a 
position to loan money to people who wish to rebuild. San Francisco 
must restore her homes as well as her business blocks. 

DR. WASHINGTON DODGE, Pres. 

GAVIN McNAB. Any. 

WM. CORBIN, Sec. and Gen. Mgi. 

OFFICES -COR. CHURCH AND MARKET STREETS 
OPEN AND DOING BUSINESS 



Dr. Cortelyou's Golden Relief 

From the Washington Post 



Popular French Restaurant 



Regular Dinner 75c 

Meals a la carte at any hour 



Private Dining Rooms 

(or Banquets, etc. 




197 Cioldcn Gate Ave. 

Comer Polk Street 



Phone Market 23 15 



-THE WASP- 



57 




Monday. — My! Aren't women deceitful. Mrs. 
Mugsby has been telling me for weeks about the 
awful time there was going to be in Sausalito. They 
were going to refuse an invitation to a young matron 
of that place to a swell charity affair. Oh, dear. 
Such gossiping and conspiring in all the dark cor- 
ners to accomplish their fell purpose. And just to 
think of it. After all the plot failed miserably. The 
young woman walked in boldly in the wake of her 
mother and not one of the committee said "boo." 
They just wilted, Mrs. Mugsby says. The mother 
is one of the leaders of what they call the "Hill Set," 
and they didn't dare make a scene. If they did, the 
first thing they knew they might find themselves 
some fine day looking wistfully from the sidewalk 
at guests going into a tea they were just dying to 
attend. Well, women are queer creatures — that is, 
married women. They are always plotting terrible 
things that don't amount to shucks. 



Tuesday. — Mrs. Gayleigh came in today to bor- 
row my best prayer book. 

"Thank goodness, Ethel," I said, "you are turn- 
ing over a new leaf." 

"Oh, I don't intend to turn over many of these 
leaves, Tabby," said she. "It's only a bluff. I'm 
going up to St. Simon's on the Avenue to see the 
new rector. They say he's a lovely young man, and 
what's better, he has quite an income outside of his 
salary." 

Heavens ! I stared at the woman in amazement. 
Judging a preacher bv his looks and his income ! 
What morals ! 

"Oh, yes, Tabby," the shameless woman con- 
tinued, "all the girls in the parish will be consumed 
with piety now. I'm lucky if I get a seat next Sun- 
day." 

Really, I was speechless on hearing such senti- 
ments. Before I could collect my thoughts she 
rattled on. 

"But I suppose," said she, "he will soon get mar- 
ried and lose all his popularity. That's always the 
way with a handsome young preacher. Somebody 
captures him and just as like as not 'twill be some 
widow with lots of money. They seem to have a 



mortgage on good looking clergymen and carry 
them off before the single girls have time to lay 
their nets." 

Really, I couldn't stand it an}- longer and excused 
myself, saying I had a headache and must go and lie 
down. 

"You'd better come up on Easter Sunday your- 
self, Tabby. Who knows but you may be the lucky 
one," she called out as she went downstairs, in the 
hearing of the hired girl. 

Gracious! I was so mortified I got a real head- 
ache that staved with me all day. I really ought to 
cut that woman before she gets me in some serious 
trouble. 

Wednesday — Goodness me ! I've had enough of 
Bohemian women. Mrs. Shoddy got me invita- 
tions to the Madrone Club, where she said all the 
witty people in town meet. They're so bright that 
they hardly need any gas at their meetings, she 
says. Mrs. Gayleigh says the artists and the news- 
paper writers furnish more gas, in fact, than is 
needed. 

Well, gracious! After dinner, just think, all the 
men began to smoke in regular California style, but 
it took my breath away when several women took 
out cigarettes and lighted them just like a man. 
Heavens! I couldn't get out quick enough. Mrs. 
Gayleigh, who stayed, of course, till the end, tells 
me that after Mrs. Shoddy and myself went the 
women kept on smoking till you'd actually think 
the room was on fire. Oh dear! no more bohemian- 
ism at the Madrone Club for me. 

Thursday — Well, such an idea. Mrs. Gayleigh 
went out to the Chutes to see the opera and was 
surprised to see all the women with very high cut 
dresses. She thought 'twas on account of the cold, 
cold. 

"Oh dear, no," said Mrs. Spanker, the Pacific 
Heights Society leader. "It's on account of Lent." 

Then she went home and played bridge for big 
stakes till 2 o'clock next morning. 

Well, for the land sakes ! What people there are 
in this world. 

TABITHA TWIGGS. 



Miss Blanche Cushman of Berkeley and J. H. Wolfe 
will be married at the residence of the bride's parents 
in Berkeley on April 3d. Mr. Wolfe is a prominent 
mining engineer. 



The Auditorium 

FILLMORE STREET, Corner Page 
FRANK R1TTIGSTEIN. Manager 



Championship Trophy Cup Game 

ROLLER POLO 



Vallejo vs. San Francisco 



Friday Eve. March 29 



Grand Concert and Skating Party 
League of the Cross Cadet Band 

Skating 7:20 to 11:00 P. M. Wednesday Eve., April 3 



58 



THE WASP- 



Personalities 



The death of "Silent" Smith in Tokio on his 
honeymoon tour is an occurrence similar in some 
respects to the untimely death of Hugh Tevis in 
Japan on his wedding trip after marrying Cornelia 
Baxter. Mr. Smith was reputed to have inherited 
fifty million dollars from his bachelor uncle, who 
made his fortune by buying Chicago real estate 
just after the fire and before the boom struck the 
town. In September last Mr. Smith married Mrs. 
William Rhinelander Stewart, the divorced wife of 
William Rhinelander Stewart of New York. She 
obtained a Dakota divorce to marry the wealthy 
bachelor whose name had become linked with hers. 
Mr. Smith was a Wall street broker and unknown 
to Society before his uncle's death. Mrs. Stuy- 
vesant Fish became his Social mentor, and his 
elaborate entertainments dazzled New York. About 
two years ago it began to be rumored in his social 
set that Mrs. Stewart was likely to apply for a 
divorce and she did. 

I hear there is an awful storm brewing in San 
Rafael over the quandom Coachman Jevenesky, 
who has become the lion of the fashionable suburb 
by turning skating professor. Jevenesky skates 
divinely on one toe or ten with equal facility and 
never throws flip-flops like some of the Society 
beaux. It is not wonderful then that all the belles 
and buds who wish to. show to the best advantage 
prefer the professor with the Nihilist name, to the 
eligible but awkward squad of Society. There is 
talk of a vigilance committee and terrible deeds 
if this state of affairs should continue. No auto- 
mobile rides or invitations to the theater are to be 
extended to maids and matrons who show a decided 
preference for Javenesky after April 1st when any 
kind of foolishness is permissible. 
* =i= * 

Several years ago M. A. Gunst betook himself to 
Burlingame and builded him a house in the very 
shadow of the splendid establishments of our very 
rich and particular aristocrats. There was a great 
deal of comment among those in the smart set and 
they made no attempt to conceal their displeasure 
at the invasion of the sacred precincts by one de- 
voted to a vulgar trade. Now it looks very much as 
though Gunst had a little the best of it, and if Heney 
and Burns live up to the promises made by them 
Gunst will be one of the few wealthy men remain- 
ing at the social colony after the Grand Jury work 
is over. The peerless investigators assure us that 
before the end of this prosecution 1 of bribery and 
graft is reached there will be such an hegira of the 
wealthy and fashionable aristocrats toward Marin 
County that Burlingame will be desolated. Upon 
the homes of many of the exclusives will be posted 
such signs as "Closed during the absence of the 
owner." and "To let for a long term." But the por- 
tal of the Gunst mansion will remain open to the 
embarrassment of those who objected to the visita- 



tion of the Cigar magnate. It would be poetic jus- 
tice if Mbse erected some "General Arthur" adver- 
tising boards on the property of the absentee land- 
lords. 

Miss Margaret Stow of Santa Barbara, who has 
been the guest of the Vanderlyn Stows and of Mrs. 
Leroy Nickel has returned to her home in the South. 

A dance for extremely youthful girls will be given 
at the City of Paris Tea Garden on April 4th. This 
affair was organized by Miss Ruth Slack and Miss 
Elva de Pue. The patronesses are Mrs. Charles S. 
Wheeler, Mrs. Edgar de Pue, Mrs. Charles W. 
Slack, Mrs. John Martin and Mrs. E. D. Bullard. 
About 100 young people not yet out in society will 
be present. 

* * * 

Mrs. Fred Fenwick gave a box party followed by 
a supper on last Monday evening, her guests in- 
cluded : Mr. and Mrs. Henry Clarence Breeden, Mr. 
and Mrs. M. H. La Boyteaux, Mr. and Mrs. Edward 
Pond and William Sanborn. 

A popular bachelor, Mr. Laurence Harris, brother 
of Mrs. Andrew Carrigan, will leave next week for 
the East, while en route he will visit Captain and 
Mrs. Sturgis, at Fort Wingate, N. M. Mrs. Sturgis 
was Miss Edna Montgomery. 

Miss Helen Baker, to the regret of her friends, was 
taken ill a few days ago and brought to town from 
Hotel Rafael to the Adler Sanitarium. This is the 
second time this charming girl has been obliged to 
enter a sanitarium in the past year. It is said en- 
tering too actively into the social activities of San 
Rafael after her first serious illness proved too much 
for her constitution. 

* * * 

Mrs. Fred Chapman (Miss Katherine Powers), who 
was recently married in San Rafael, and left imme- 
diately for her home in Detroit, Mich., writes of her I 
happy life in her new surroundings. Mrs. Chapman 
is the daughter of Dr. and Mrs. George H. Powers, 
prominent people of San Rafael and this City. 

Miss Guinette Henley, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. B. 
Henley, who has recently been the guest of Mrs. 
Eleanor Martin, will leave on the transport sailing 
this week for Manila. Miss Henley will be gone sev- 
eral months. 

Invitations recently received for a large tea, which 
is to be given by a charming young lady at her at- 
tractive home in Alameda on Easter Sunday, have 
caused great commotion among her friends, as it is 
said her engagement will be announced, to a well- 
known young man whose people are wealthy resi- 
dents of Fruitvale, and whose late father was a 
director of one of the leading banks of San Fran- 
cisco. 

At the residence of Mrs. F. E. Farrington, 1829 
Arch Street, Berkeley, last week, Miss Florence 
Marshall Ward became the wife of Eugene Shef- 



-THE WASP- 



59 



field. The bride is a member of the Alpha Phi 
Sorority and graduate from the University of the 
das- of 1906. -Mr. Sheffield is a member of the 
Sigma Chi Fraternity, and a graduate with the class 
of 1904. He is a mining engineer and will take his 
bride to Alaska this summer. 

* * * 

Miss Brooke Rose, an attractive young lady of 
the exclusive set, who recently left for a trip to 
Honolulu, writes enthusiastically of her life there. 
She i- at present a guest of the Ernest Robinson's. 
very wealthy people of Makaweli, Kawai, and will 
extend her visit until late in the Fall. 

* * * 

At a recent concert given in Paris bv Dr. and Mrs. 
Younger, the guests had an opportunity of hearing 
two talented San Francisco girls, Miss Bessie Bonie, 
a singer, and Miss Sherman, a violinist. Among 
those present were Colonel and Mrs. Dodge, Mrs. 
Blumenberg of New York, Count Leon de Tinseau, 
and Holman Black. 

* * * 

Mrs. Henry Clarence Breeden gave a dinner last 
week in honor of Mr. Breeden's birthday. Her 
guests were Mrs. Butler, Mr. and Mrs. William 
Porter, Mr. and Mrs. H. M. A. Miller, Mr. and Mrs. 
Wakefield Baker, and Mr. La Barton. 

* * * 

Mrs. Fred Sharon has been the motif for a great 
deal of entertaining during her short stay here in 
her old home. Mrs. Sharon was the guest of honor 
at a recent tea given by her friend, Mrs. Harry 
Mendel!. Mrs. Sharon left last week for another 
tour abroad. Mrs. Mendell is a girlhood friend of 
Mrs. Sharon, and came out here from the South 
many years ago. 

* * * 

Mr. and Mrs. Clinton E. Worden. and Mrs. 
Towne, have recently purchased some beautiful fur- 
niture and sent it to the Del Monte, intending to 
furnish their rooms in this attractive hotel and make 
this place their home for some time to come. 

* * * 

Mrs. Bond, her three children, and her mother, 
Mrs. Dore, who have been visiting New York, the 
guests of Mrs. Philip Wooster, have returned to 
California after an absence of six months. Mrs. 
C. A. Spreckels, daughter of Mrs. Dore, entertained 
her relatives during their New York visit. 

* * * 

Mr. and Mrs. J. C. Stubbs are guests at the Palace 
Hotel, after an enjoyable visit to their daughter, 
Mrs. John Sunderland, of Reno, Nevada. 

* # # 

Mr. William Penn Humphreys, the well-known law- 
yer, was registered this week at a Xew York hotel. 
As his trip is one purely of business Mrs. Humphreys 
did not accompany him. Mrs. Humphreys, before 
her marriage, was Miss Paula Wolf, the handsome 
daughter of a well-known capitalist. 

An interesting exhibition of paintings by Mr. 
Walter Cox, including some fine portraits, is now on 
view at the Kilby Art Gallery, 1652 Van Ness 
Avenue. 



Automobile News 



The fine weather of the past few days has given 
an impetus to the automobile business. Demonstra- 
tors now have an opportunity of displaying the 
various features of their respective machines and 
are out in full force. 

* * * 

Another former devotee of foreign cars has de- 
serted them for the ones made in his own country 
and as a consequence Norman E. Selby, once better 
known as Kid McCoy, will pilot his own Thomas 
Forty runabout during the coming season. He has 
just placed his order with Harry S. Houpt, of New 
York. 



D. L. McDonald, a Texas real-estate agent, finds 
his Winton invaluable in making land sales. "If it 
were not for this car," he says, "I simply could 
not do business, for our land is far away from rail- 
roads and trolleys, and I have yet to find a team 
of horses that could handle a load of seven pas- 
sengers at the speed and over the grass-grown 
country that the car negotiates easily." 

The United States Government report concedes 
to the White automobile its superiority over all 
othercarson account of its ease in controlling speed, 
free and smooth running and freedom from violent 
vibration. This machine attracted a great deal of 
attention at the recent show last month. Its first 
appearance in competition was in the New York- 
Rochester endurance run in 1901. The four Whites 
which started, made perfect scores. The latest 
appearance of the White in competition was last 
October in the London Tower Carriage competi- 
tion, in which the leading makers of the world were 
entered. The White Steamer received the highest 
award — a gold medal — only one other machine be- 
ing si'mularly honored. 



H. C. RAAP, Manaser 



Telephone Franklin 588 



National Cafe and Grill 

918-920 O'FARRELL ST., San Francisco 

SPECIAL MERCHANTS HOT LUNCH 25c 

Including Tea, Coffee, Wine or Beer. II a. m. to 2 p. m. 
A LA CARTE al all hours. 

Regular Dinner 50c Special Sunday Dinner 75c 



'< 



AL. CONEY J. HUFF 

Kadee Hammam Baths 

TURKISH AND HAMMAM BATHS 

PRIVATE ROOM AND BATH $1.00 

Open Day and Night 

GEARY AND GOUGH STREETS 

Strictly First Class Phone West 3725 






N^W 



(mi i fr r^ cry -7s 

LASSIFIED 




OF SAN FRANCISCO'S 

LEADING BUSINESS HOUSES ^'" 
a/vo PROFESSIONAL PEOPLE. 

REVISED AND COfeRECTEJD WEEKLY. 




MISCELLANEOUS. 

Builders' Exchange, 226 Oak St., S. F. 

Builders' Association, 96 Fulton st. 

ADDRESSING MACHINES. 

Elliott Addressing Machine Co., 58 Stock- 
ton St.. S. P. 

ADVERTISING AGENCIES. 

Bolte & Braden, 105-107 Oak St., S. F.; phone 
Park 289. 

Cooper Adv. Agency, F. J., West Mission and 
Brady sts. 

Dflke Adv. Agency, Midway Bldg., 779 
Market st. Phone Temporary 1440. 

Fisher, L. P. Adv. Agency, 836 North 
Point St., S. F. ; Phone Emergency 584. 

Hadley, M. L., Advertising Agency, 26 
Clay st. 

Johnston-Dienstag Co., 2170 Post St., 

Tuttle, L. T., 332 Delbert Block, cor. Van 

Ness Ave. and O'Farrell. . 
Walker, Shirley, Advertiser. Midway 
building, 779 Market street, phone 
Temporary 1839. 

AGENTS— MANUFACTURERS. 
Wlrtner, Jno. J., 2330 Vallejo St., S. F. 

ARCHITECTS. 
Carson, John, Vice-President and 
Manager H. C. Chivers, 1627 Sut- 
ter St. 
Chivers, Herbert C, 1627 Sutter St., S. 
F.; Wainwrlghts Building, St. Louis. 
Mo. 
Curtis, John M., 2501 Buchanan St.. S. F. 
Havens & Toepke, 611-612 Mutual Savings 

Bank. 
Reed Bros, Temporary Offices, 2325 

Gough St., S. F. 
Thos. J. Welsh, John W. Carey, associate 
architects, 40 Haight St., S. F. 
ART DEALERS. 
Gallagher Bros., 2208 Geary St., S. F. 
Gump, S. & G„ 1645 California St., S. F. 
Schussler Bros.. 341 Grove St. 
ATTORNEYS. 
A. Heynemann, 2193 Fillmore St. 
Phone West 6405. 

Bahrs, George H.. 1901 Post st., cor. 

Fillmore, S. F. 
Campbell, Metson & Drew, 1101 Laguna St., 

cor. of Turk St., S. F. 
Dorn, Dorn & Savage, 717 Van Ness 

ave. 
Drum, J. S., 1416 Post St., S. F. 
Dlnkelspiel. Henry G. W., 1265 Ellis st, 

S. F. PHONE, WEST 2355. 
Goldstone. Louis, 1124 Fillmore st 
Heller, Powers & Ehrman, Union 

Trust bldg. 
Hewlett, Bancroft and Ballantine, 
Monadnock Bldg., Phone Temporary 

972. 
McEnerney, Garret W.. 1416 Post St.. S.F. 
Lawlor, Wm. P., Judge, The Family 

Club, l'JOO Franklin St., S. F. 
O'Callaghan. Chas. F., 928 Fillmore St., 

Pringie & Prlngle, 2219 Fillmore st. 

Ricketts, A. H. (Title Quieting Co.) 
1136 O'Farrell street. Tel. Emer- 
gency 788. 

Shadburne, Geo., D., 904 Devlsadero 
st., S. F. 

Shortrldge, Samuel M., 1101 O'Farrell st, 
S. F. 



Edward B. Young, 4th Floor, Union Trust 
Bldg., S. F. Telephone, Temporary, 833. 

AUTOMOBILES AND SUPPLIES. 

Auto Livery Co., Golden Gate and Van 

Ness Ave., S. F. 
Boyer Motor Car Co., 408 Golden Gate ave. 

Phone, Emergency 655. 
Leavltt, J. W. & Co., 441 Golden Gate 

Ave., S. F.; 370. 12th st, Oakland. 
Lee Cuvler, 359 Golden Gate Ave., S. F. 
Middleton Motor Car Co., 550 Golden Gate 

Ave., S. F. 
Mobile Carriage Co., Golden Gate Ave. 

and Gough sts., S. F. 
Pioneer Automobile Co.. 901 Golden Gate 

Ave., S. F.; and 12th and Oak sts., 

Oakland 
Karig Auto Co. 1377 Broadway, Oakland. 
White Sewing Machine Company, 

Market and Van Ness ave., S. F. 

BANKS. 

American National Bank, Merchants Ex. 

Bldg., S. F. 
Anglo California Bank Lt, cor. Pine and 

Sansome sts., S. F. 
Bank of California, 424 California St., 

S. F. 
California Safe Deposit and Trust Co., 

cor. California and Montgomery sts., 

S. F. 
Central Trust Co., 42 Montgomery st, 

S. F 
Crocker - Woolworth National Bank, 

Crocker Bldg.. S. F. 
First National Bank, Bush and Sansome 

sts., S. F. 
French Savings Bank, Union Trust Bldg., 

and Van Ness and Eddy. 
Germania National Bank, 521 Market St., 

S. F.; Phone Park 792. 
German Savings and Loan Society, 626 

California st, S. F. 
Halsey. N. W. & Co., 413 Montgomery 

st, S. F. 
International Banking Corporation, 2045 
Sutter street, and 415 Montgomery 
Hlbernla Savings and Loan Society, 

Jones and McAllister sts.. S. F. 
Humboldt Savings Bank, 626 Market st, 

S. F. 
Mechanics' Saving Bank, 143 Montgom- 
ery st, S. F. 
Metropolis Trust and Savings Bank, 

1237 Van Ness Ave. 
Mutual Savings Bank of San Francisco, 

710 Market St., opp. 3d St., S. F. 
National Bank of the Pacific. Call Bldg., 

S. F. 
Renters Loan and Trust Co., Commercial and 

Savings Bank, 115 Hayes Street 
San Francisco Savings Union. N. W. 

cor. California and Montgomery sts., 

S. F. 
Savings and Loan Society. 101 Mont- 
gomery st., S. F. 
Security Savings Bank. 316 Montgomery 

st, S. F. 
Standard Bank, 1818 Market St., at 

Van Ness, S. F. 
The Market Street Bank and Safe De- 
posit Vault, Market and 7th sts., S. F. 
Union Trust Co., 4 Montgomery st, S. F. 
Wells-Fargo Nevada National Bank, 

Union Trust Bldg., S. F. 
Western National Bank, Powell and 

Market sts.. S. F. 

BATHS 

Colonial Baths, 1745 O'Farrell St. 
Oriental Turkish, cor. Eddy and Lar- 
kin Streets, City. W. J. Blum- 



berg & Bro. 

BITTERS. 

Lash's Bitters Co.. 1721 Mission Bt, S. F. 

BREWERIES. 
Albion Ale and Porter Brewery, 1007-9 Golden 

Gate Ave., S. F. 
Buffalo Brewing Co., 125-129 King st, 

S. F.; Phone Main 1010. 
National Brewing Co., 762 Fulton St., 

Lochbaum, A. H. Co., 126 Kins st, S. F. ; 

Phone Main 1010. 
S. F. Breweries, Ltd.. 240 2d St., S. F. 
Rapp. Jno. & Co., Agents Rainier Beer, 

8th and Townsend sts.. S. F. 

BRIDGE BUILDERS. 

Pac. Construction Co.. 17 Spear st, S. F. 

San Francisco Bridge Co., 523 Monad- 
nock Bldg.. S. F. 
BROKERS— STOCKS AND BONDS. 

Hutton, E. F. & Co., 490 California st. 

Rollins'. E. H. & Sons, 804 Kohl Bldg: 
Telephone Temporary 163; S. F. 

Wilson. J. C, 488 California st, S. F. 

Sutro & Co., 412 Montgomery St.. 
S. F. 

Montague, Phil S., 339 Bush st. Stock 
Exchange Bldg. 

Zadig & Co., 324 Bush St., S. F. 

BUILDING AND LOAN ASSOCIA- 
TIONS. 
Continental Building and Loan Associa- 
tion. Church and Market sts., S. F. 
BUTCHERS' SUPPLIES. 
Pacirlc Butchers' Supply Co., 316 Bry- 
ant st, bet 1st and 2d sts.. S. F. 
CARPET CLEANING. 
Spauidlng, J. & Co., 911-21 Golden Gate 
Ave.; Phone Park 59L 

CLEANING AND DYEING. 

Thomas, The F. Parisian Dyeing and 

Cleaning Works. 1158 McAllister St., 

S. F. 

CLOTHIERS— RETAIL. 
Hub. The, Chas. Kellus & Co., King 

Solomon Bldg., Sutter and Fillmore 

sts.. S. F. 
Roos Bros., cor. O'Farrell and Fillmore 

sts.. S. F. 

COMMISSION AND SHIPPING MER- 
CHANTS. 

Dollar, Robert Co.. Steuart street dock. 

Johnson Locke Mercantile Co., 213 Sansome 
St., S. F. 

itlaldonado & Co., Inc., 2020 Buchanan 
St., S. F.; Tel. 2830. 

The J. K. Armsby Co., The Armsby 
Bldg., cor. New Montgomery and How- 
ard sts.. S. V. 

CONTRACTORS AND BUILDERS. 

Atlantic, Gulf and Pacific Co., 523 Monadnock 

Bldg. 
Fisher Construction Co., 1414 Post St., 

S C 
Gray Bros., 2d st, adjoining W- F. & Co. 

Bldg.. S. F. 
S. F. Construction Co., A. E. Buckman, 

ores. ; A. J. Raisch, sec.; 636 Market; Tel. 

Franklin 256. 
Trounson, J., 1751 Lyon St.; also 176 Ash 

Ave., S. F. 

CROCKERY AND GLASSWARE. 
Nathan Dohrmann & Co., 1520-1550 
Van Ness ave. 



-THE WASP 



61 



DENTISTS. 
Oreian B. Burns, 2077 Sutter St.. West 6736. 
Decker. Dr. Chas. W.. 1316 Sutter St. 
Knox. Dr. A. J., 1615 Fillmore St., formerly 

of Grant Bldg. 
Morffew & Peel. 1765 Pine St., S. F.; 

Tel. West 4301: formerly Examiner 

Bld B . 
O'Connell. Dr. Robert E. and Dr. George, 

211 Divisadero at. S. F. 
Albert S. Vanderhurst, 2077 Sutter it.. West 

6736. 

DRY GOODS— RETAIL. 
Emporium. The. 1201 Van Neas Ave., S. 

F. ; Phone Weat 1361. 
Newman & Levison. Van Ness Ave. and Suit 
O'Connor, Moffit & Co.. Van Neaa Ave. 

and Pine at., S. F. 
City of Parla. Van Ness Ave and Wash- 
ington St., S. F. 
White House, Van Neaa Ave. and Pine 

St., 8. F. 

ENGINEERS. 
.itlantlc, Gulf & Pacific Co.. 623 Monad- 
nock Bldg.. 3. F. 

EXPRESS. 
Wells, Fargo & Co. Express, Golden 
Gate Ave. and Franklin St., Fer- 
ry Bldg., and 3d St. Depot, S. F. 
FEATHERS— UPHOLSTERY. 
Crescent Feather Co.. 19th and Harrison 
sts.. 8. F. 

FLORISTS AND DECORATORS. 

Clels & Jacobsen, 942 Fillmore St. 

near McAllister, Phone Park 363. 

Frank & Parodl Co., 1215 McAllister 

street, formerly 109 Geary street, 

phone Park, 794. 

FRUITS AND VEGETABLES. 
Omey & Goetting, Geary and Polk sts., S. F. 

FUNERAL DIRECTORS. 
Carew & English, 1618 Geary St., bet. 
Buchanan and Webster sts., S. F. ; 
Phone West 2604. 
Porter & White. 1631 Golden Gate Ave.. 
S. F. ; Phone West 770. 

FURNITURE. 
A. B. Smith Co., 702 Van Ness Ave., 

cor. Turk St., S. F. 
Breuner, John & Co., 1491 Van Ness Ave., 

Sanitary Bedding House, The, 778- 
780 Golden Gate ave., N. E. cor. 
Gough. Beds and Bedding ex- 
clusively. Tel. Emergency 596. 
GAS STOVES. 

Gas Co., The, Halght and Fillmore sts., 
B. F. 

GENT'S FURNI8HERS. 

Bullock & Jones Company. 801 Van Neas 
Ave., cor. Eddy St., S. F. 

Hansen and Elrick, 1105-7 Fillmore 
St., nr. Golden Gate ave., phon» 
West 5678. 

Roberts & Bayless, Men's Furnishers, 645 Van 

Ness Ave., near Turk. 

HARDWARE AND RANGES. 
Alexander- Yost Co., Pine and Polk sts.. 

S. F. 
Baker & Hamilton. 115 Berry St., near 

3d: Phone West 3589 and 3590. 
Dunham. Carrigan & Hayden Co.. offlcs 

131-153 Kansas St.. S. F. 
lis, John G. & Co., 827 Mission St., S. F. 
Montague. W. "W. & Co., Turk & Polk 

sts., S. F. 

HARNESS AND SADDLERY. 
Davis, W. & Son, 2020 Howard at, bet. 

16th and 17th, S. F. 
L-elbold Harness and Carriage Co., 1214 
Golden Gate Ave., S. F. 
HATTERS. 
Korn, Eugene, the hatter, 946 Van 

Ness Avenue. 
Meussdorffer, J. C. Sons, 909 Fillmore 

St.. S. F. 
Porcher. J.. 716-717 Golden Gate Ave., 
near Franklin, S. F. : formerly Odd Fel- 
lows Bldg. 
HOSPITALS AND SANITARIUMS. 
German Hospital, Scott and Duboce 

Ave. 
Harbor View Sanatorium, Harbor 
View, S. F. 



Keeley Institute, H. L. Batohelder, 

Mgr.; 262 Devlsadero St., S. F. 
McNutt Hospital, 1800 O'Farrell et. 

S. F. 
St. Luke's Hospital, 26th and Valen- 
cia St. 

JEWELERS. 
Baldwin Jewelery Co., 1521 Sutter at.. 

and 1261 Van Ness Ave., S. ». 
Bohm, Bristol, Van Ness and Sacra- 
mento st. 
Gllnderman, Win., 1532-1534 Fill- 
more, formerly Examiner Bldg. 
Shreve & Co.. cor. Post and Grant Ave., 
and Van Nes sand Sacramento ttv, S. F. 
AUNDRIES. 
Lace House French Laundry. Cerclat at 
Co., props.; 1047 McAllister St.: for- 
merly at 342 McAllister; Tel. Park 881. 
La Grande Laundry, 234 12th St.. S. F. 
Palace Hotel Laundry and Kelly Laundry 

Co., Inc., 2343 Post St., phone West 5854. 
San Francisco Laundry Association, 1408 
Turk at.. S. F.; Phone West 793. 
LIME. 
Holmes Lime Co., Mutual Savings 
Bank Bldg., 710 Market at. 
LUMBER. 
Nelson. Chas. Co., 1st and Clay sts.. 

Oakland; 144 Steuatt St., S. F. 
Redwood Manufacturers Co.. Room 506 
Monadnock Bldg. S. F.. Doors, Win- 
dows, Tanks, etc. 
Slade, S. E., Lumber Co., 65 Mission 

street, S. F. 
Union Lumber Co., office 909 Mo- 
nadnock building 

MACARONI AND VERMICELLI. 
T, R. Podesta. 612 Washington at. S. F 
MOVING AND STORAGE COMPANIES. 
Bekins' Van and Storage Co.. 13th and 

Mission sts., S. F. ; Phone Park 169 

and 1016 Broadway, Oakland. 
St. Francis Transfer and Storage Company. 

Office, 1402 Eddy St. Tel. West 2680. 
Union Transfer Co., 2116 Market St., 

S. F. 

Notaries Public. 

Deane, Jno, J., temporarily at 2077 
Sutter street and 2464 Vallejo 
street, S. F. 

OPTICIANS. 
Mayerle, George. German expert, 1115 
Golden Gate Ave., S. F.; Phone West 
3766. 
San Francisco Optical Co. "Spences," 
are now permanently located at 
627 Van Ness ave, between Gold- 
en Gate avenue and Turk st. 
"Branch" 1613 Fillmore near 
Geary. 

Standard Optical Co., 808 Van Ness ave, 
near Eddy St. 

PACKERS. 
Phoenix Packing Co., 118 Davis St., S. F. 
PAINTERS AND DECORATORS. 
Keefe, J. H., 820-822 O'Farrell St., S. F„ Tel. 
Franklin 20S5. 

Tozer, L. & Son Co., Inc., 1527 Pine 
and 2511 Washington St., near 
Fillmore, S. F. 

PAINTS AND OILS. 

Bass-Hueter Paint Co., 1816 Market 

St. 
Paraflne Paint Co., 405 Union Savings 
Bank Bldg., Oakland; Sales DepL 
Guerrero near 15th St., S. F. 
PHOTO ENGRAVERS. 
Cal. Photo Eng. Co., 141-143 Valencia St. 

PHYSICIANS. 
Bowie, Dr. Hamilton C, formerly 293 
Geary St.. Paul Bldg;.; now 
14th and Church sts. 
Bryant, Dr. Edgar R., 1944 Fillmore 
St.. cor. Pine; Tel. West 6667; Res. 
3869 Jackson st.; Tel. West 816. 
D'Evelyn, Dr. Frederick W., 2116 Cal- 
ifornia St.. S. F.; and 2103 Clinton 
Ave., Alameda. 



Thorne, Dr. W. S.. 1434 Post St., S. 
F. 

PIANOS — MANUFACTURERS AND 

DEALERS. 
Ba.uwln. D. H. & Co., 2512 Sacramento 

st.. near Fillmore, S. F.; Phone West 

1869. 

RESTAURANTS. 
Marchand's. 1424 McAllister St. 
Moraghan. M. B. Oyster Co.. 1212 

Golden Gate Ave., S. F. 
Old Poodle Dog, 824 Lddy St., near Van 

Ness ave. 

St. Germain Restaurant, 497 Golden 
Gate Ave., Phone Emergency 300. 
Swains Restaurant, 1111 Post St., S. F. 
Techau Tavern. 1321 Sutter St., S. F. 
Thompson's, formerly Oyster Loaf 

1727 O'Farrell St. 

SAFES AND SCALES. 

Herring-Hall Marvin Safe Co.. office anrf 
salesrooms. Mission St., bet. Seventh an* 
Eighth sts.; phone Temp'y, 1037. 
SEWING MACHINES. 
Whee.er & Wilson and Sinter Sewing 
Machines. 1431 Bush St.. cor. V»» 
Ness Ave., S. F.; phone Emergencj 
301, formerlv 231 Sutter street. 
STORAGE. 
Bekins Van * Storage Co.. 13th and Missioi 

Sts., S. F.; Phone Market 2558. 
Pierce Rodolph Storage Co., Edds 
and Fillmore Sts.. Tel. West 828 

SURGICAL INSTRUMENTS AND HOS- 
PITAL SUPPLIES. 
Walters fc Co.. formerly Shutts, Walters & 
Co., 1608 : teiner St., S. F. 

TALKING MACHINES. 
Bacigalupl, Peter, 1113-1116 Fillmore 
St.. S. F. 

Lvons. Charts. T I^ndon Tailor, 1432 Fill- 
more St.. 731 Van Ness Ave.. S. F., 
958 Broadway. Oakland. 

McMahon, Keyer and Stiegeler Bros., 
Van Ness Ave. and Ellis, O'Far- 
rell and Fillmore. 

Neuhaus & Co., Inc.. 1618 Ellis at 
near Fillmore. S. F. 

RehnsVom. C. H ,..2416 Fillmore , . ; 
formerly Mutual Savings Bank Bldg. 

'TENTS AND AWNINGS. 
Thorns F., 1209 Mission St., corner of Eighth, 

S F 

TPICYCLEB. 
Eames Tricycle Co., Invalid Chairs, 2108 
Market St.. S. F. 

WINES & LIQUORS— WHOLESALE 

Balke. Ed. W., 1498 Eddy St., cor. 

Fillmore. 
Blumenthal. M. & Co.. Inc.. temporary 

office 1K21 Webster St.. ». r. 
Butler John & Son. 2209 Steiner st, 

Re^nrfl'ds, Chas. M. Co.. 514 Halght st 

Ruscfni, Fisher & Co.. 649 Turk st, S. F 
Berman Wine & Liquor Co., family trade 

Siebe Bros. & Placeman. 419-425 
Larkin street, Phone, Emergency 
349 
Weniger. P. J. & Co., N. E. cor. Van 
Ness ave. and Ellis st. Tel. Emer- 
gency 309. 
WIchman. Lutgen & Co.. formerly of 29- 
31 Battery st. S. F.; temporary office, 
Harrison and Everett sts., Alanieda, 
Cal.: Phone Alameda 1179. Gilt Edge 
Whiskey. 
WINES AND LIQUORS— RETAIL. 

Ferguson, T. M. Co.. Market street. 

Same old stand. Same Old Crow 

Whiskey. 
Fischer. E. R.. 1901 Mission street, 

corner of Fifteenth. 

The Metropolejohn L. Herget and Wm. H. 
Harrison. Props., N. W. cor. Sutter and 
Steiner Streets. 
Tuxedo The. Eddie Graney. Prop.. SW 
cor. Fillmore «• O'Farrell sts 

YEAST MANUFACTURERS 
Golden Gate Compressed Yeast Co., 2401 FiH- 
more. 



62 



-THE WASP- 



Amusements 



The opera! What would Society do without it? 
Its musical interest is subordinated to clothes, but 
nevertheless the faithful ones who reck little of the 
bavardes and their sartorially descriptive effusive- 
ness, turned, struggled through the rain and slush 
away out to the far distant Chutes. For the life 
of me I cannot see how any impresario could have 
such faith in the weather to set his company down 
in the suburban sandhills in the very depth of the 
rainy season in San Francisco and expect to make 
money. I believe the San Carlo venture has been 
a losing game from the start and it would be a 
miracle were it otherwise. 

February and March are usualjy the two worst 
months in the year and rain is fatal to an opera 
season under conditions such as have existed in 
San Francisco since the fire. 

It was different in the olden days when Society 
could drive down over well-paved streets to the 
Grand Opera House and go thence for supper in 
luxurious hotels and cafes located within a few 
blocks of the theater;'' A storm under such condi- 
tions could not be a serious deterrent, but as things 
are now a March down-pour is a tragedy for opera- 
goers, who have almost to take the China steamer 
to 'reach the scene of music, light and joy. 
* * * 

And for what should fashionable and musical San 
Francisco leave its dry and warm firesides often 
enough to struggle out to the Chutes through seas 
of mire and deluges of rain — to hear Nordica, whom 
they have so often seen, and applauded popular 
Alice Nielsen at $3 per seat. Really, it is too serious 
a strain to place upon the enthusiasm of any com- 
munity, much less one which has had a year of too 
strenuous experiences already and is now sighing 
for some of its old-time ease and pleasure amidst 
pleasurable surroundings. 

So the San Carlo opera venture has passed into 
stage history as an ill-timed and unlucky venture in 
which anything but good judgment was exercised 
in the preliminary arrangements. 



As to the other array of talent which I happened 
to see in the performance of "Faust," Nordica was 
Nordica. I cannot recall anyone whose playing of 
"Marguerite" was as satisfactory. Aside from 
Madame Nordica, Madame Monti-Baldini was the 
only one whose performance distinguished her. The 
other members of the cast were mediocre if not or- 
dinary, and the orchestra was barbarous. 

What with charges of official graft, charges that 
his theatre is a dangerous fire trap and the vigorous 
boycott of the aggressive Irish, Supervisor Davis, 
the manager of the Davis Theatre, has his hands 
full. If Mr. Davis does not land in that other place 
with his supervisorial associates he is likely to land 
in bankruptcy, so many are his troubles. 

What a fool any manager is to quarrel with the 
Irish in America. No other nationality has half the 
political pull of the Irish, and when they concen- 
trate their batteries on a man who is lampooning 
their race in a fire-trap theatre built in defiance of 
all the municipal ordinances, his finish is in sight. 

While a great many educated Irishmen and Jews 
and Germans can laugh good-naturedly at the cari- 
catures of their races put on at cheap show houses 
like the Davis Theatre, thousands of others are en- 
raged by the horrible impersonations of their people. 
Nationalities that have been subjected to oppressive 
government like the Irish and Jews are particularly 
sensitive. Only the cheapest class of theatres, 
which cater to the lowest order of playgoers, en- 
courage such caricatures, and even in them the 
practice is not a paying one. With the Davis 
Theatre it is likely to prove ruinous, for the Irish 
politicians will surely have Davis' flimsy and dan- 
gerous structure pulled down by the municipal au- 
thorities. 

* * * 

The hits of the Orpheum during the week have 
been Julien Tannen's specialty, and Merri Osborne's 
playlet, "Taming an Actress." 

* * .. * 

The Auditorium is in favor as a skating place, 
despite the rainy weather of recent weeks. The 
polo games have attracted widespread interest. 



y fCE CREAM 

^1536-8 Fillmore St.. S.F. 



DR. H. J. STEWART 

Organist of S;. Dominic's Church and 
the Temple Sherith Israel 

TEACHER OF SINGING 

Pianoforte, Organ, Harmony and Composition. 
New Studio: 2517 California Street. Hours, 10 
to 12 and 2 to 4 daily, except Saturdays. 



LOUIS H. EATON 

Organist and Director Trinity 

Church Choir 

Teacher of Voice, Piano and Organ 

San Francisco Studio; 1678 Broadway, Phone 
Franklin 2244. 

Berkeley Studio; 2401 Channing Way, Tues- 
day and Friday. 



MRS. OSCAR MANSFELDT 



PIANIST 

1 60 1 Buchai 



William Keith 

Studio 

After Dec. 1st 1717 California St. 



SAMUEL M. SHORTRIDGE 

Attorney-at-Law 



i St., Cor. Sutter 



1101 O'FARRELL ST. 
Cor. Franklin 



San Francisco, Cal. 



-THE WASP- 



63 




RACING Amusements 



New California Jockey Club 

Oakland Race 
Track 

SIX OR MORE RACES EACH WEEK DAY 
Rain or Shine 

Rata commence al 1:40 p. m. sharp. 

For special trains sloppins at the track take S. P. Ferry, 
foot of Market street: leave at 1 2:00. thereafter every twenty 
minutes until 1 :40 p. m. No Smoking in last two cars, 
which are reserved for ladies and their escorts. 

Returning trains leave track after fifth and last races. 

THOMAS H. WILLIAMS. President. 
PERCY W. TREAT. Secretary. 




The best YEAST for all 
Kinds, of Baking 

FRESH DAILY AT YOUR CROCER 



Palace fiotel Laundry 

AND KELLY LAUNDRY CO. INC 
234-3 Post Street 

Are N'O'CT? Open 

TELEPHONE WEST 5854 

Work called for and returned on schedule 
time. 



Thompson's Formerly 

Oyster Loaf, op7n. 

1727 O'Farrell St., near Fillmore 
All night service Popular Prices 



T The only first-class up-to-date and modern 

• Hammam Baths, built especially for 

* the purpose, in the city. 

\ Oriental Turkish Baths 

Corner Eddy and Larkln Sts. 

Cold water plunge. 
Room including Bath.Si.oo. 
Phone Franklin 653 
W. J. BLUMBERG & BRO.. Props. 



"Kreutzer Sonata," a dramatization 
mi ("..tint Tolstoi's great >tory, will 
receive it> initial production in this 
City next Monday night at the Col- 
onial Theater. Two different ver- 
sions of this thrilling Russian play 
are heing produced with considerable 
success in the East by Blanche Walsh 
and Bertha Kalisch. "Kreutzer Son- 
ata" was undoubtedly one of Tolstoi's 
best efforts and when it was first 
published caused a most profound 
sensation. The demand for the book 
was so great that the book stores 
were unable to fill the orders. 

The play is replete with dramatic 
situations and the story dealing with 
life in Russia among the upper set 
is intensely interesting. An unfaithful 
wife who plans to elope with a farmer 
sweetheart is the thread upon which 
the story hangs. The climaxes are 
admirably conceived and Tzetta Jewell, 
the charming leading woman of the 
stock company will have another op- 
portunity to display her ability in this 
line. The cast will be considerably 
strengthened for this production, 
while the management promises some 
new and novel scenic effects. 



A famous old Sanskrit comedy, 
"The Little Clay Cart," written by 
King Shudraka about 600 A. D., win 
be presented, in English translation, 
by the English Club of the University 
of California in the Greek Theater 
at eight o'clock Saturday evening, 
April 6th. 

This is a love drama, with a politi- 
cal intrigue interwoven. Only twice 
before has the occidental world bad 
an opportunity to see this ancient 
play — at the Odeon in Paris in 1850 
and at the Royal Theater in Berlin in 
1900. The version to be presented at 
the Greek Theater is the work of 
Dr. Arthur W. Ryder, instructor in 
Sanskrit in the University of Califor- 
nia, who has published the translation 
of this play in the Harvard Oriental 
Series. 



To restore gray hair to its natural 
:olor use Alfrcdum's Egyptian Henna — 
1 vegetable dye — perfectly harmless and 
[he effect is immediate.. All druggists 
sell it. Langley & Michaels Co., agents. 



COLONIAL THEATRE 

McAllister near Market Phone Market 920 
MARTIN F. KURT1G, President and Manner 



All Market Street Cars run direct to Theater 
Week Beginning Monday, April 1 



First time in San Francisco of the dramatization 
of Count Tolstoi's Thrilling Story 

KREUTZER SONATA 

A Big Scenic Production with 
an All-Star Cast 



PRICES: Eveninas, 25c. 50c. 75c, $1.00; Satur- 
day and Sunday Matinees. 25c and 50c. BARGAIN 
MATINEE, Wednesday, all seals reserved, 25c. Branch 
Ticket Office. Kohler 6c Chase's, Sutter and Franklin 
Streets. 

Monday, April 8, "FRIENDS" 





To Cure al) Skin Diseases, 


use 




DR. T. FELIX GOURAUD'S 


Oriental Cream or Magic 


Beautifier 




It Purifies and Beautifies the 


Skin 




For Sale by Druggists 





DR. WM. D. CLARK 

Office and Res.: 2554 California St. 

San Francisco 

Hours — 1 to 3 p. m. and 7 to 8 p. m. 

Sundays — By appointment 

Phone West 390 

Contracts made with Hotels and Restaurants 
Special Attention given to Family Trade 

Established 1876 

THOMAS MORTON & SON 

Importer of and (~*(~\ A I 
Dealers in KsKJ**.L* 

N. W. Cor. Eddy and Hyde, San Francisco 
Phone Franklin 397 



Wichman, Lutgen & Co. 

Formerly of 
29-3 1 Battery Street, S. F. 

Cor. Everett and Tarrison Avenue 
ALAMEDA, CAL. 

Phone Alameda 1179 



GILT EDGE WHISKEY 



64 



THE WASP 



ENNEN'S BESK 




/ CHAPPED HANJS, CHAFING 

tnd all ■kin troubles, "vi A'///« 
'uglier in price perhaps than 

>ili s hlful nfier ohiTint lid *fter bil'h- 

Sold eTorjwhere, ormoileil on receiptor 

HinouTc (tho orleionl). Sample fret 

Mennen Company, - Newark, N. J. 



vLEIBOLD 

Harness a^ARfiiAGE co. 

1214 GOLDEN GATE AVE. 

SET. WEBSTER AND FILLMORE 



A Positive 

CURE FOR 

CATARRH 

Ely's Cream Balm 

is quickly absorbed. 
Gives Relief at Once. 

It cleanses, soothes, 

heals and protects 

the diseased membrane. It cures Catarrh 

and drives away a Cold in the Head quickly. 

Restores the Senses of Taste and Smell. 

Full size 50 cts. at Druggists or by mail ; 

Trial size 10 cts. by mail. 

Ely Brothers, 56 "Warren Street, New York. 



lASH'piITERS 

L> BETTER THAN PILLS. *J 








Dr. Parker's Cough Cure 
One dose will stop a cough. 
It never fails. Try it. 25c. 

AT ALL DRUGGISTS 



Not for His 

A prominent lawyer, who formed) » Til ill Iv I^FIVI 

practised at the bar of Kansas City, tells lWt&. 1 VlU lYlkjLill 

of a funny incident in a court thei ■< : dui I Hi^^W ,. . t1 ~,tt 

ing a trial in which a certain young l| L'BS^ft IC A I \ H A 

doctor was called as a witness. 1 1 ^^^V IfciHUlin 
Counsel for the other side, in cross- (Oriental Steamship Co.) 

examining the youthful medio, gave ut- 
terance tO Several Sarcastic remarks Have Opened Their Permanent Offices at 

,. . ., , it .... Room 240 James Flood Building 

tending to throw down upon the ability _ 

r San Francisco 

of so young a man. 

One of the questions was: ''y"ou are S. S. "Hongkong Mam" 

entirely familiar with the symptoms of Wednesday, April 10, 1907 

concussion of the brain?" S. S. "America Mara" (calls at Manila) . . 

"I am." Friday, May 3, 1907 

"Then," continued the cross-exam- S - S - "Nippon Mam" (calls at Manila) . . . 

iner, "suppose my learned friend, Mr. Friday, May 31, 1907 

Taylor, and myself were to bang our , §"?""? ™$ l™,™ wl, » rf -, c ,°,""" , Fi,st »>"|,Brannan Su., 

. 1 P. M., for Yokohama and Hongkong, calling at Hono- 

lleads together, should We get COn- lulu, Kobe. (Hiogo), Nagasaki and Shanghai, and con- 

„ • „r ., , •_ -ji, necting at Hongkong with steamers for Manila, India, etc. 

CUSSlOn Of the brain? No cargo received on board on day of sailing. 

"Your learned friend, Mr. Taylor, Round-trip tickets at reduced rates 

J ror rreight and passage apply at ottice, Z1U James Mood 

might," Suggested the young phy- Building. W. H. AVERY, Assistant General Manager. 

sician. 



Memory Helps. 

Oldbach— "What have you got that 
string tied around your finger for?" 

Oldwed — "I'm going to do some 
shopping for my wife, and the string 
is to remind me that I have a knot 
in my handkerchief." 

Oldbach— "And what is the knot 
in your handkerchief for?" 

Oldwed— "Oh, that's to remind me 
that I have a list of the things my 
wife wants on a slip of paper in my 
vest pocket." 



Limit Absolutely 

Gunner — "That grocer is the meanest 
man I ever met." 

Guyer— "Why, didn't he give you a 
pretty calendar for the month of Jan- 
nary ?" 

Gunner — "No ; he gave me a calendar 
for the month of February because it 
had three days less." 



Peter Bacigalupi & Son 

Headguarters for Talking 

Machines, Records 

and Supplies 

1113-1115 Fillmore Street, San Francisco 

Albion Ale or Porter 

Is a Great Flesh Builder, Tonic and Pleasant 
Drink. Pure Extract of Malt and Hops. 

BURNELL & CO. 

1007-1009 Golden Gate Ave., Near Laguna St. 



"Yes, he's going to train you for 
the hunting field " 

"Oh! Is that it? I thought he meant 
the sausage mill." 



Love Laughs at Zero 

They sat out on the frosty porch, un- 
mindful of the chilly blasts. 

Dreamily she gazed at the stars. 

"Up there," she said, romantically, "is 
the great dipped." 

"And down here," he laughed, snatch- 
ing another kiss, "is the 'great spoon.' " 

And Cupid came out in a fur-trimmed 
overcoat and shot another dart. 



Dr. WONG HIM 

1268 O'Farrell St. 

Permanently Located 

HERB DOCTOR 



Father and Mother 
Write Letter In- 
dorsing Treatment. 

SAN FRANCISCO 
March 23, 1906 

To Whom it may 
t» Concern: Our three- 
Ik* year- old daughter, 
having been ill for 
some time and being 
treated by the most prominent physicians, 
gradually became worse, and was finally 
given up by them. We were then recom- 
mended to Dr. Wong Him. We started 
with his treatment and within two months' 
time our daughter was cured. 

Respectfully, 
MR. AND MRS. H. C. LIEB, 
2757 Harrison St., San Francisco 





Volume LVII-No. 14 



SAN FRANCISCO, APRIL 6, 1907 



Price 10 cents 



PUBLISHER'S NOTICE 

THE WASP is published every Saturday by the Wasp Publishing 
Company, at 1 4 I - 1 43 Valencia Street. Subscriptions $5.00 per 
year, payable in advance, postage prepaid. Subscriptions to all 
foreign countries within the Postal Union. $b,0u per year. The trade on 
the Pacific Coast supplied by the San Francisco News Company. Eastern 
Agents supplied by the American News Company, New York. 

THE WASP will pay for conlributions suitable for it. columns, and 
will endeavor to return all rejected manuscripts, but does not guarantee 
ihaf return. Photographs will also be accepted and paid for. Address 
all communications to Wasp Publishing Company, 141-143 Valencia 
Street, San Francisco, Cal. 

TO ADVERTISERS— As the illustrated pages of THE WASP 
go to press early, all advertisements printed in the same forms should be 
received, not later than Monday at noon. Changes of Advertisements 
should also be sent in on Monday to insure publication. 

Address. JAMES F. FORSTER, Business Manager. 
Telephone Market 316. 



Plain English 



The testimony of Mr. E. S. Pillsbury, the well- 
known and eminent attorney, sheds a flood of light on 
the blackmailing operations of Abe Ruef and his muni- 
cipal associates connected with the government of 
Mayor Schmitz. According to Mr. Pillsbury, who 
undoubtedly told only the bare truth, Ruef had been 
holding up the Pacific States Telephone Company for 
several years. The sum of $1200 had been paid to 
Ruef every month out of the treasury of the telephone 
company for the past two years. Ruef's name was not 
on the pay rolls of the company. His monthly graft 
was charged up ag-inst the account of Theodore 
V. Halsey, but Attorney Pillsbury gave his testi- 
mony to the effect that Ruef had regularly received 
his monthly blackmail. If the payments were de- 
layed a few days, there was always a gentle re- 
minder sent to Halsey that other telephone com- 
panies were seeking to enter the local field and 
that the usual remittance of currency would be 
acceptable. 



At the time that Ruef was bleeding the Pacific 
States Telephone Company for protection against 
a rival corporation, he was planning to hold up the 
Home Telephone Company for a still larger sum, 



and finally took the money of the Home Company, 
promising to secure it a franchise, although he re- 
ceived a salary from the Pacific Stages to shut it 
out. His double dealing brought him into difficulties 
with the Pacific States people, but he managed to 
appease them, upon certain conditions, and had not 
thi graft prosecution intervened, he would probably 
be still playing one corporation off against the 
other. 



Without the co-operation of the Board of Super- 
visors and Mayor Schmitz, of course, no political 
boss could hold up corporations as did Ruef. The 
Boss and his confederates rigged up the scheme j 
of blackmail by which all were to put money in 
their purses and so it has been for thirty years in 
San Francisco. Ruef was the most avaricious and 
audacious blackmailer of all and so the expose of 
his rascality has been the most astounding. 



By what method of reasoning do certain news- 
papers and public individuals arrive at the con- 
clusion that the most culpable of all in this graft 
scandal are the rich men or corporations who paid 
the blackmail. If they didn't pay it they would be 
robbed of nearly all they possessed. 



The unpleasant position in which many prominent 
men have found themselves by yielding up to Ruef 
and his blackmailing confederates of the Union 
Labor Party may have the salutary effect of making 
rich men and corporations fight the blackmailing 
political bosses in future. If they spent as much 
money in doing that as in bribing the blackmailers 
to keep their hands off them the tribe of Ruef would 
decrease rapidly. 



Again The Wasp takes occasion to remark that 
we should appoint our judges of the law courts and 
not elect them. In that way they would be removed 
from the direct and pernicious influence of black- 
mailing political bosses and would become a real 
terror to them. See how an honest and fearless 
judge like Dunne and a prosecutor like Heney has 
brought down Ruef's citadel of graft as if it were a 
house of cards. Suppose that every judge on the 
Superior and Supreme bench were as independent 
of p.litical bosses as Judge Dunne, how impotent 







-THE WASP 



gi afters like Ruef and his confederates would 
become. The first man they tried to shake down 
might land them in the penitentiary. 



In telling his story of Abe Ruef s rapacity, Mr. E. 
S. Pillsbury furnishes no information calculated to 
surprise San Francisco people who have had any 
insight to what has been going on in this City 
several years. Ruef's hunger for money" has been 
such that he spared neither friends nor foes. 

Not very long ago a saloonkeeper in the tender- 
loin who had done many political favors for Ruef 
and accounted himself as immune from blackmail 
desired some small privilege from the powers that 
be. He applied to Ruef as a matter of form expect- 
ing that the request would be granted as soon as 
asked. He was coldly informed that he would have 
to put up $250 in cash for the favor he asked and 
had to pay it. Needless to say he expresses no deep 
sorrow over the present plight of the avaricious 
boss. 



Apropos of the discovery of a secret treasure 
chest in the house formerly occupied by Mayor 
Schmitz it is said in political circles close to the 
dishonered Mayor that he did not keep all his loose 
cash in that secret receptacle under his bed. It is 
said that before he . went to Europe a certain 
National bank in this City issued to him a draft for 
over six hundred thousands dollars, and some of 
his intimate associates were surprised that he ever 
returned from Europe. This story emanates, not 
from the Grand Jury room, or the political enemies 
of the Mayor, but from the people with whome he 
has been closely identified. It should be easy to 
prove whether any National bank issued him a 
large draft. 



Julius C. Saulman, who has protested against the 
payment of salaries to a lot of tax-eaters, who hold 
places not legally created, is one of the best- 
posted men in San Francisco as far as City Hall 
affairs are concerned. Saulman has a genius for 
spotting dishonest tax-eaters and can corner a City 
Hall grafter with the unerring persistency of a 
ferret on the trail of a terrified rat. Saulman's 
appearance causes as much cackling and com- 
motion in some City Hall departments as the 
shadow of a chicken hawk when it falls across a 
barnyard. 



City Treasurer Bontel who is requested to return 
$8500 of the City's money illegally kept by him, 
would not be in the fashion as a patriot of the Union 
Labor Party if he performed his duties without getting 
into trouble with the Grand Jury. It is to be hoped 
that by the time the next election comes around, 
the people of San Francisco will be convinced that 
it isn't the best policy to take unknown men from 
mean stations in life and elect them in a day to the 
positions of the greatest prominence and responsi- 
bility. 

In private enterprises shrewd business men do 
not go out in the street and take drivers of bakery 



wagons, cheap barkeepers, barbers, fiddlers and 
little coffee and doughnut merchants and make 
them the heads of concerns that have millions at 
stake. Yet that is what the voters of San Francisco 
are doing continually. They take unknown men 
without education, training, honesty or intelligence 
and make them the law-makers and the rulers. The 
Democrats have done it and so have the Republicans 
and the acme of public asininity has been reached 
under the sway of the Union Labor Party. 



In the event of a serious strike on the Western 
railroads it will be interesting to see the attitude 
the Washington Government will assume. In Paris 
recently when the electricians undertook to cripple 
the industries of the city, the French Government 
interposed. M. Clemenceau threatened to put 
military engineers in the places of the strikers and 
the Chamber of Deputies voted to sustain him in 
that policy. When asked by the Socialist leader M. 
Jaures, why the Government interposed, M. Clemen- 
ceau replied "By the right of organized society to 
its existence." He did not propose that the com- 
munity at large, should suffer by the quarrel be- 
tween the electrical workers and their employers. 

This is practically the policy which Secretary 
Root formulated some months ago when the 
Japanese question came up here. He declared that 
the tendency should be to prevent any fraction of 
the United States from jeopardizing the peace of 
prosperity of the whole Nation. Now if this be 
true of States it must also be true of the people of 
those States. If a State cannot be allowed to tangle 
up the American people in a quarrel, certainly no 
society or organization of capitalists or working- 
men should be permitted to involve the majority of 
the population in costly trouble. Applying this rule 
to a specific case the American Federation of Labor 
which contains only a million and a half of members 
could not be allowed by the Federal Government to 
involve the Nation in a railroad strike, injurious to 
interstate commerce." If the American Federation of 




CHAS.KEILUS& CO 
HIGH GRADE CLOTH iERS 



No Branch Stores. 



No Agents. 



We claim, and justly, too, to sell the best clothes, that appeal to men 
of taste. Our styles, beyond a doubt, are advance productions. If 
there is anything new in Fabrics and Patterns you'll find them here first. 

The progress of the art of making ready good clothes, such as 
you get here, means that the merchant tailors are gradually 
passing away. Some gentlemen still imagine that they can't be 
fitted. Why! Right here, in this shop, we can fit almost any- 
body --except you have an absence of form: then we advise the 
"surgeon tailor." 



KING SOLOMON'S HALL 

Fillmore Street, near Sutter, San Francisco 



-THE WASP- 



Labor could not do so, a mere combination of 
railroad hands certainly could not. 

This theory of subordinating the privileges of the 
few to the rights and interests of the Nation will no 
doubt be more strongly upheld in the coming years 
and especially so if President Roosevelt should be 
succeded by a Republican like Secretary Taft. 



Rufus P. Jennings has presented a very cheerful 
report of the good work accomplished during the 
past year by the California Promotion Committee. 
I have no doubt that Mr. Jennings and the gentle- 
men associated with him are earning their salaries, 
but I was somewhat surprised the other day when 
a gentleman who had just come back from a tour 
of the leading Eastern cities told me that he was 
amazed by the ignorance of the Eastern working- 
man as to the opportunities in San Francisco. The 
gentlemen in question is a well-known and very 
intelligent citizen, who has made a large fortune by 
industrial enterprises and for the past two years has 
been traveling all over the world. He is a keen 
observer and has risen from the ranks of labor him- 
self. 

Mr. Jenning's enthusiastic reports are calculated 
to give one the impression that California is 
thoroughly advertised in the Eastern cities and all 
the facts about the advantages of life here are 
generally known. Of course it is true that the rail- 
roads have done a great deal to advertise our State, 
but my friend, the retired capitalist, avers that the 
ignorance of the workingmen he interviewed in 
Boston and New York were dense and surprising. 

It would be most advisable that Boston should be 
well informed of the high wages here, for the pay of 
the Bostonians in the building trades is not nearly 
as high as it is here. Of course the Labor Unions 
here are not likely to enlighten the Bostonians or 
New Yorkers about plumbers in San Francisco get- 
ting $9 a day, -plasterers $7 and all other building 
tradesmen wages in proportion. On the contrary 
the Umions here continually discourage immigra- 
tion. 

This is quite natural, they have a fine rich field 
and are in no hurry to see it divided up for the 
benefit of new arrivals from the East. 

The general public of San Francisco however is 
desirous that the City should be rebuilt with the 
greatest possible celerity and that cannot be done 
if the Unions maintain an artificial scarcity of labor. 

Whatever influx of labor we have had since the 
fire, has been due chiefly to the free advertising our 
City got by the letters of Newspaper correspond- 
ents, all of whom have referred to the high wages 
ruling here. Newspapers advertising is the only 
true method of attracting working people to a new 
state in the hope of getting higher wages and better 
living. 

Mr. Jennings speaks in his report about the 
"bulletins of progress that are issued each month 
giving conditions in California and which are dis- 
tributed all over the world." The truth is that Mr. 
Jennings or any other promoter cannot reach one 
thousandth part of the population by circulars, that 



are reached by newspapers. It is a prodigious task 
to put out a million circulars and only one in 
twenty is ever read or reaches the right person. Yet 
the newspapers of America reach thirty millions or 
people every day and are closely read. One interest- 
ing item sent by the Associated Press from San 
Francisco to the Eastern newspaper and telling 
about the very high wages here would reach more 
readers in twenty-four hours than Mr. Jennings 
with all his best efforts at dissemination of news by 
bulletins, could reach in a year. The trouble about 
most promotion committees is that they swallow up 
too much in salaries and leave too little for the 
really effective part of the work. 



The celerity with which the arrest of Theodore 
V. Halsey followed his indictment struck terror to 
the hearts of those who have been skeptical con- 
cerning the work of the prosecution. Scarcely half 
an hour had elapsed from the time of the filing of 
the indictments in Judge Coffey's court when the 
news was flashed across the ocean from Manila : 
"Halsey under arrest, waives extradition." The 
fact that the message was signed by the head of 
the United States Secret Service in Manila was an- 
other circumstance that had a remarkable effect 
upon those who have been scornfully regarding the 
efforts of Heney and Burns, for it showed that the 
mighty arm of the United States Government was 
back of the local prosecutors and could stretch 
across the sea just as easily as across the con- 
tinent. 

AMER1CUS. 



lafiuiin 

The Piano for Musical Connoisseurs 

The marvelous Baldwin Tone once heard 
lingers in the memory forever. Simple 
Music takes on a new charm when played 
upon the Baldwin. Music Lovers every- 
where have been enraptured by the tran- 
scendent effects produced upon the 
Baldwin by a De Pachmann or a Pugno. 
Its power, vibrancy and color that delight 
us in modern Concert rooms, are found 
not only in all Baldwin Grands but in 
the Uprights as well. 

lalbuitn Itaplarj i&flottta 

Van Ness at California, Southwest Corner 

Pacific Coast Headquarters still at 
2512-14 Sacramento St., near Fillmore 




^fe/z and c Women 



^fc 




^? Weekly Summary of Social Activities and Complications 



in Washington from an incurable cancer of the neck. 
Both Mrs. Boardman and her sister, Mrs. Keyes, are 
very popular young matrons, and deep sympathy is 
felt for them in this blow which has fallen upon their 
family. 

* * * 

An esteemed contemporary which is usually well 
posted on Society affairs says that "rumor is very busy 
coupling the names of two well-known Society folk 
these days, and the little romance is discussed with in- 
terest over the tea cups. The man is a well-known and 
popular Army officer, and the lady, a widow moving 
in the most exclusive set." In this instance our con- 
temporary has not scored a centre shot, as both the 
lady and the officer deny strenuously that there is a 
solid foundation for the rumor. The lady, by the way, 
is one of the noted leaders of San Francisco Society. 
To say any more would be almost equivalent to pub- 
lishing her photograph and putting her name in large 
type under it. 

* * # 

That popular hostess, Mrs. E. Walton Hedges, did 
not carry out completely her startlingly original scheme 
of inviting seven eligible and dashing widows to meet 
at supper after the skating masque seven gay bach- 
elors of eminent social status. The supper took place 
on Monday evening, after the masquerade, and the 
seven ladies invited by Mrs. Hedges proved to be Mrs. 
Hanford, Mrs. Henry, Mrs. Pfingst, Mrs. Darragh, 
Mrs. Carr, Mrs. Gamble, Mrs. Shirley, Mrs. Towne, 
Mrs. Shorb White. The lucky men who found their 
feet under the mahogany to meet this bevy of matronly 
beauty were Lieutenant Barnes, Baron Von Horst, 
Mr. Sweeney, Mr. Robinson, Mr. Benedict Taylor, 
Mr. James Reid, Mr. Runyon, Dr. Pressley and Mr. 
Paschal. 




MRS. HENRY T. SCOTT 

From a miniture by Rose Hooper Plotner 

The death of Sidney Salisbury was one of those 
deplorable affairs that furnish the many dark shadows 
of life in great cities. The gifts of the gods in too 
much profusion prove the undoing of many a fine 
young fellow, who finds no restraining hand strong 
enough to hold him back from temptation. 

Sidney Salisbury, thanks largely to the genius of 
his very remarkable mother, found the stage of life 
set pleasantly for him. He had gifts that made him too 
popular and the doors of polite society swung open to 
him. He was a wholesome, good-looking young fel- 
low, a clever tennis player and a fine dancer whom that 
most exclusive of social sets, the Gaiety Club, wel- 
comed to all its gatherings. The young man's whole- 
heartedness made him many friends — too many, per- 
haps — and like others who lacked the necessary 
parental guidance, he began to go the pace that kills. 
He quickened it as the climax approached and thereby 
alienated himself from his sisters, Mrs. Keyes and Mrs. 
Boardman. The newspapers have already told the 
melancholy story of his suicide by inhaling gas. It 
was the culmination and the end of his troubles 
brought on by debt and dissipation. The social prom- 
inence of the unfortunate young man has thrown a 
glare of light on the tragic occurrence, but in many 
another family in San Francisco than that of Sidney 
Salisbury there are sad relatives who lament the way- 
ward course of high-spirited young fellows, who are 
hurrying to an untimely if not dishonored grave. The 
lights of the great City are flames that continually 
scorch to death. 

The proverb that misfortunes never come singly 
was verified by the lamentable death of young Mr. 
Salisbury, for a few days before that occurrence his 
sister, Mrs. Danforth Boardman, was called to the 
bedside of her father, Monroe Salisbury, who is dying 



Little I alace Hotel 



IS 
OPEN 



of 



Post and 

Leavenworth 

Streets 



The same excellence in cuisine and service that obtained 
in the Old Palace is duplicated in the new 'Little Palace' 



-THE WASP 




Pholo Frances Thompson 



MISS BROOKE ROSE 



Haig Patigian. the talented young artist, who is to 
marry Miss Hollister in September, is a brother of the 
late Horen Patigian, who did considerable work for 
The Wasp and other San Francisco publications. 
Horen Patigian was a young Russian of extraordinary 
talent and ambition for his death was most untimely 
and deplorable, for it was a distinct loss to the world 
of art. He contracted pneumonia and died after a 
very brief sickness a few years ago. Three very tal- 
ented young California artists have died at the thresh- 
old of what promised to be brilliant careers. Young 
Barhans, who went to Munich to study, died there 
of fever brought on by overwork in poor lodgings. 
He would have made a great painter. Patigian, who 
died before he was twenty-four, was a splendid 
draughtsman and had the genius of a painter. Young 
Confer, who died suddenly a few years ago from pul- 
monary trouble, was another man of remarkable tal- 
ent. San Francisco has produced more than its share 
of artists. 

& * * 

Earthquake stories are rather out of date, but that 
particular one about D. M. Delmas will never grow old. 



It deals with a chapter of Mr. Delmas' life antecedent 
in his sudden leap to national fame as the star attorney 
in the Thau case. 

On the morning of the awful earthquake of April 
rocked perilously. Mrs. Delmas, like thousands of 
others, at that moment was terror stricken. Her emin- 
ent husband was as composed as Jove sitting amidst 
the clouds of Olympus. The clash of nature's Titanic 
forces and the wreck of cities were trifles. 

"lie calm, my dear, be calm!" he exhorted. "No 
doubt this appalling phenomenon is a presage of death, 
but where can we find a more comfortable or a more 
beautiful spot in which to meet it?" 

* * * 

Miss Anita Harvey, who was bridesmaid at the 
wedding of her friend. Miss Constance Crimmins, the 
other day, came near being aunt by marriage to that 
young lady, for at one time the bachelor uncle of Miss 
Crimmins, who was out here, was a suitor for Miss 
Harvey's hand, and it was thought she might marry 
him. She chose instead Oscar Cooper, a less wealthy 
but a younger man. Miss Harvey is having a home 
wedding, because Mr. Cooper is a Protestant. It is 
expected that her sister's engagement to Mr. Stetson 
will be announced soon after the wedding. 

* * * 

Mrs. Clinton Cushing, of Washington, D. C, has 
taken a house in London, where she will reside per- 
manently. Since Dr. Cushing's death Mrs. Cushing 
has traveled constantly. Dr. and Mrs. Cushing's home 
in this City on Sutter and Taylor Streets years ago, 
was a centre of social attraction. The Cushings were 
lavish in their hospitality. 

Captain John Metcalf left last week for a short 
business trip to Honolulu. 



L TOZER & SON 

FORMERLY OF 110 GEARY STREET 



High-Class Wall Paper and Fabrics 
Interior Decorating, Wood Finishing 
Enameling, Painting, Etc. 



All Work Guaranteed 
Special Designs and Estimates 



Sales Room and Office, 1527 Pine, near Van Ness, S. F. 
Sales Room 2511 Washington, near Fillmore, S. F. 

Telephone West 1402 



THE WASP 



The April number of Sunset has been a record 
breaker in the matter of sales on the newsstands. 
Everybody in San Francisco wanted the magnifi- 
cent number containing the articles and illustra- 
tions on the restoration of San Francisco. Sunset's 
motto is indeed excelsior. It improves every 
month. 

* * * 

Mr. Muchmore, who was formerly very promi- 
nent in local Society, has returned from the East 
and is visiting Mr. and Mrs. William Lindsey Spen- 
cer at Sausalito. His wife, who was Miss Alice 
Masten, will soon arrive from the East and join 
him. 

* * * 

Dr. Riggs of the United States Navy, who was 
such a social favorite in San Francisco, and who 
set the tongues of the gossips to wagging about a 
possible engagement to a lovely blonde matron who 
is suing for divorce, has gone to his new station 
in the Orient. 



John F. Boyd gave an enjoyable bridge party on 
Tuesday last at her beautiful home. As usual, the 
prizes were very handsome. 

* * * 

A new bridge club has been organized in San 
Rafael. It held a meeting at Mrs. Le Favre's on 
Wednesday last. Among the members of the club 
are Mrs. Boyd, Mrs.' L. L. Baker, Mrs. Smedberg, 
Mrs. Hoffmann and Mrs. Madison. 

* * * 

Those popular officers of the Pensacola at Yerba 
Buena Island were hosts at an enjoyable dinner on 
Wednesday evening on board the ship. Among 
those present were Pay Inspector and Mrs. Rey- 
nolds, Mrs. Kate Shirley, Mrs. Ynez Shorb White, 
Miss Ethel Shorb, Miss Edith Metcalfe, Mrs. A. H. 
Voorhies, Mrs. Malcolm Henry, Mrs. E. Walton 
Hedges and Mrs. Marguerite Hanford. The hosts 
on this occasion were Dr. Biddle, Lieutenant 
Barnes, Dr. Stebbins, Dr. Abeken, Paymaster Hel- 
micks and Paymaster Beecher. 



The published report that Mrs. Malcolm Henry 
had applied for passage to Manila on the transport 
sailing this week caused some surprise in Society, 
as it was thought this popular and handsome 
matron would remain here pending the divorce for 
which she has applied. 

Mrs. Hermann Oelrichs has not broken with Col. 
and Mrs. Jay over her late husband's will, for Col. 
and Mrs. Jay were with her and Harry Black at 
Florida a few days ago. Mr. Black is the presi- 
dent of a New York construction company and has 
been so much in her company for the past year 
that the gossips all predict a remarriage. 

st= ^ * 

Mrs. Samuel E. Dutton, whose husband died the 
other clay in San Francisco, has been living for the 
past two years in New York with her widowed 
daughter, Mrs. Leland. and her unmarried daughter, 
Mr. Leland was a chaplain in the United States 
army that came here with a volunteer regiment 
during the Spanish war and married Miss Dutton. 
He died about a year after. Mrs. Dutton is a sister 
of Mrs. Russell Wilson. They were the King girls, 
daughters of James King "of William." Samuel E. 
Dutton was a brother of Wm. J. Dutton, the well- 
known insurance man. • 

^ % ^ 

Mrs. B. G. Lathrop, who has been visiting in 
New York, will return to San Francisco very 
shortly to attend the wedding of her sister, Miss 
Sylvia Harris, to .Dr. Hardy, which will take place 
some time this month. 

Miss Brooke Rose, whose picture appears in this 
week's Wasp, belongs to one of the oldest and most 
aristocratic families of San Francisco. She is a 
very well-known Society girl, a prominent member 
of the Society of Colonial Dames. She is at present 
in Honolulu visiting friends. 

* * ^ 

Bridge is as popular as ever in San Rafael. Mrs. 



Dr. and Mrs. McEnery gave a large dinner party 
on Wednesday evening in honor of Major Stephen- 
son, who sailed on Friday for his new station in 
the Philippines. 

* * * 

The opening of the Fairmont Hotel on April 19th 
will undoubtedly be one of the great social events 
of San Francisco. A large number of prominent 
people have reserved tables for the occasion. 
Amongst the latest to do so are Miss Jennie Blair, 
Edward M. Greenway, Thomas Magee, Marshall 
Hale, J. J. Mack, W. S. Porter, A. A. Watkins, Leo- 
pold Michaels and Nathan Bell. 

California will soon be well-represented at the 
Naval Academy at Annapolis if all the voting San 
Francisco boys are fortunate in passing the rigid 



ENJOY COUNTRY LIFE AT 

HOTEL DEL MONTE 



This is the season to take your family to Hotel Del 
Monte by the sea, near Monterey, and enjoy every comfort. There 
is plenty of room there and plenty to do for recreation and health. 
Parlor car leaves San Francisco 8:00 a. m. and 3:00 p. m. daily, 
direct to Hotel. Special reduced round-trip rates. For details, in- 
quire information Bureau, Southern Pacific, or of C. W. Kelley, 
Special Representative of Del Monte, 789 Market St., San Fran- 
cisco. Phone Temporary 275 1 . 



ANNOUNCEMENT 



Mrs. Mott- Smith Cunningham exhibitor in 
Paris Salon of 1 906 announces that her Studio 
Shop at 1 622 Pine St., a few doors from Van 
Ness Ave., is now open for the sale of her jewelry 



THE WASP 



examinations necessary to their entrance. Ralph 

C. Hani-.. n. son of Mrs. Chrystal Harrison, of this 

. is the latest appointee. Young Harrison is 

a very bright youth, who is yet in his teens. 

* * ' * 

Senator George Russell Lukens was bust at a 
large luncheon given at the Claremont Country 
Club "ii Thursday last, in honor of Mrs. Clarence 
Martin Mann. After luncheon the guests attended 
the Minetti Quartet Concert at the Greek Theater, 

Berkeley. 

* * * 

Mrs. Charles M. Sadler gave a large and fash- 
ionable tea at her residence in Alameda on last 
Sunday afternoon, when she announced the engage- 
ment of her daughter. Miss Mae Lydia Sadler, to 
Mr. Lewis Reisdon Mead of San Francisco. The 
young ladies who assisted in receiving on this occa- 
sion were Miss Ruth Sadler, Miss Flossie Sloper, 
Miss Evelyn Hussey, Miss Mazie Coyle, Miss An- 
gela Coyle, Miss Marion Mills and Miss Gertrude 
Mills. 



feared, will end in the bottomless t>it." 

* * * 

Mr. and Mrs. James Follis have left the Hotel 
Rafael, where they have been spending the Winter, 
and moved into their handsome new home in San 
Rafael. 

* * * 

Grover Cleveland, twice President of the United 
States, was 70 years old on March 17th and spent 
his birthday fishing in South Carolina, while in New 
York the flags were flying on the City Hall and the 
Mayor was suggesting that the next new public 
place of importance should be named Cleveland 
Square. There were many spirited discussions in 
New York as to why the flags were flying on the 
City Hall. Some said it was in honor of holy St. 
Patrick, and others said that the tribute was to 
Cleveland. The Hibernian janitor of the building 
settled the question quite diplomatically. '"Tis for 
both of those grate min," said he. 



The terrible Father Vaughan is as much feared by 
the smart set of London as Savonarola was bv the 
licentious aristocracy of Italy in his day. Divorced 
nobles who try to sneak up to the altar to remarry 
do so in fear and trembling of this modern John the 

Baptist who rails at the excesses of modern Societv. 
* * * 

In one of his latest sermons Father Vaughan lashed 
the fair sex for its sins and foibles. He cited dog 
worship as one of the evils of the hour, and asked: 
"Will not the practice of lavishing upon brutes love 
which should be bestowed upon a husband and child 
bring M>me horrible curse with it?" 

"During the past week," said the priest, "as a wo- 
man was taking her pet dog to a dog party she 
began to talk to the little beast in her arms in French. 
When asked why she did so, she answered: 

' 'This darling little child of mine understands 
every word I say when I speak my native tongue, 
and I should not like him to grown vain like Bertha.' 

"Yet this woman, who was wearing on her hat a 
plume torn from a living bird of paradise, did not 
realize that she was making a disgusting exhibition 
of herself. 

"While this degrading practice is on the increase, 
the birth rate is on the decrease and infant mortality 
has already reached one-fourth of the total number 
of deaths. 

"If drinking has decreased among men, it has been 
made up for by the increase among women. Mental 
deficiency is growing among them. Now blindness 
and skin, bone and nervous diseases, like locomotor 
ataxia, are becoming prevalent. 

"Do they want the causes of these evils revealed 
to them ? I read in a work sent me last week that 
wealthy business men and men of leisure are in the 
main impure and that women in the same class hold 
conversations that imply more than I care to express. 
All the large towns in Great Britain are morally on 
the down grade. England and France, embracing 
each other in an entente cordiale, are tobogganing 
together down the slimy steep which it is much to be 




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-THE WASP' 















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MISS GERALD1NE BONNER 





It has just come to light that Mrs. T. P. O'Con- 
nor, a daughter of the Lone Star State and wife 
of the well-known London journalist and Member 
of Parliament, is the author of "The Stronger Sex," 
one of the successes of the London theatrical sea- 
son. Her identity had been veiled under the name 
of "John Alexander." The great dramatic success 
follows the production of several plays from the 
pen of the gifted Texas girl. Mrs. O'Connor is 
president of the Society of Women Journalists, 
and among her successful productions are "A Lady 
from Texas," "The Lost Leader," and "Madame 



Delphyne." The talented lady is well-known in San 
Francisco where her former husband has been for 
many years connected with the newspapers. 
* * •* 

House boats are appealing to American million- 
aires at last, and this Summer they doubtless will 
be as popular on the Hudson, the Potomac, and 
other picturesque streams as they are on the 
Thames and the Cherwell. Senator and Mrs. Elkins 
intend entertaining friends on the little rivers of 
West Virginia. The Upper Potomac and the Cheat 
River are attractive for house-boat life, and they 
have numerous outlets among mountains wild and 
picturesque. Senator and Mrs. Knox shortly will 
go to Palm Beach, where they will spend a few 
weeks in the house boat of Henry Frick. Mr. Frick 
has explored every nook of the east coast of 
Florida, and he and Mrs. Frick prefer this manner 
of living to any other away from their hearthstone 
in Pittsburg. House-boat parties soon will start 
for Thomasville, Ga., with the south coast as their 
place of cruising. Mrs. Payne Whitney, who will 
occupy her uncle's home there, will entertain Mr. 
and Mrs. James Wadsworth, Jr., and their chil- 
dren and several New York friends before starting 
on a voyage of adventure in the bayou regions. San 
Francisco Bay is an ideal place for house boats, 
but so far only a few people have taken advantage 



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-THE WASP 




of the pleasures of outdoor life in an ark. If some 
fashionables would take to the amusement no doubt 
the sheltered shores of Marin County would be 
studded with arks before long. 

* # * 

Mrs. Potter Palmer is making ready for a most 
determined effort to enter the "inner circle" of King 
Edward's set this season, and her first move has caused 
considerable interest. She and her niece, the Princess 
Cantacuzene, have installed themselves at the Hotel 
du Palais, the very hotel in which the King and his 
suite were housed, at Biarritz. 

One of the jokes of last season was the "match" 
which every one declared King Edward wished to 
bring about between the Hon. Sir Schomberg Kerr 



McDonnell and Mrs. Palmer. The rumor arose 
through a jocose remark to Sir Schomberg by the 
King, who said: "Why don't you marry a really rich 
woman, like Mr-, rainier, for instance?" Sir Schom- 
berg, who is forty-six years of age, is a brother of 
the Earl of Antrim and secretary of the office of 
works. He was for years private secretary to the 
late Lord Salisbury. One of Mrs. Palmer's devoted 
suitors is Sir Algernon West, a widower of seventy- 
five, with three children, but he is now considered 
to be out of the running. Mrs. Palmer will start her 
London season in May at I lampden House, Park Lane, 
She has given up her custom of inviting royalty in 
the matter of sailing in to dinner alone before her 
guests. 

* * * 

Many of our California people will pass the 
Summer abroad the latest to join the wanderers 
are Mr, and Mrs. James Flood, who will leave in 
May to sail for Paris on June the first. Mr. Flood 
recently purchased a $12,000 automobile in which 
he will tour Switzerland with Mrs. Flood. They 
will not return to the City until late in the Winter. 

Mrs. Ella Hotaling, who has been traveling 
abroad and intended making an automobile trip 
through France, has been obliged to abandon this 
tour, on account of small pox in several towns 
on the route. Mrs. Hotaling with true California 
pride writes that she has met many travelers 
abroad, who have told her of their intentions to 
visit San Francisco next Summer. 

* * * 

Mr. and Mrs. Vincent Whitney have decided not 
to leave San Francisco and Mr. Whitney has gone 
into the real estate business. Mrs. Whitney is 
already a great pet of her mother-in- law, I hear. 
The young lady cares little for the whirl of society. 




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-THE WASP - 



Always original, the President's married daughter 
is preparing to astonish New York with a novelty in 
footgear which it is prophesied will be truly startling, 
even to Fifth Avenue. Everything in feminine attire 
is going to be symphonic pretty soon, it's predicted, 
and if that's the case Mrs. Longworth is in advance 
of the fashion. Anyway, she likes to be a symphony 
in one color or another — preferably in her favorite 
blue. She has discarded the widely copied Alice blue 
in favor of a lighter tint, but she's as fond of the 
color as ever. And now she will appear in the me- 
tropolis in baby blue shoes. Cerulean bootines have 
been worn outside the ballroom, 'tis true, but only 
by two-year-olds in recent years, anyway. Mrs. Long- 
worth's new shoes are of blue kid with cloth uppers 
of the same hue. They match her cloth gown exactly, 
and, of course, her hat and gloves. In addition, a 
blue purse will swing from her arm, and her umbrella 
or parasol, according to the weather, is to be of the 
same shade. The only relief to the prevailing blue 
will lie in the gold links on her purse. 

The large attendance of friends who listened to 
the dramatic readings of Miss Ella Bender on March 
22d showed great appreciation of this talented young 
lady's efforts. Mrs. Homer King, an early day friend 
of the family, besides throwing open her fine home 
for the occasion, invited about one hundred old Ne- 
vada friends to tea after the reading and an old- 
fashioned enjoyable time was passed for a couple of 
hours. On April 3d Mrs. Herbert Gee of Burlingame 
came to town with a party of young ladies to 
attend the second reading of Miss Bender's at Mrs. 
Kings, when a Browning afternoon will be enjoyed. 
Miss Bender reading Robert Brownings' "Pippa 
Passes." 

James P. Donahue, who is writing New York 
letters for the Sunday Chronicle is an old and re- 
liable journalist. He was educated at Santa Clara 
College and began as a reporter on the Examiner 
over twenty years ago. He has been connected with 
some leading New York journals, as well as with 
the best newspapers in California. He is unexcelled 
as an accurate reporter of conventions and legisla- 
tive bodies, having had great experience in that line. 
The Chronicle cannot fail to be well served with 
such a reliable man as Mr. Donahue acting as its 
New York correspondent. 

Every year the Shillings, the Volkmans, with 
some of their friends, come down to Del Monte for 
a family reunion and a general jollification. This 
year they chose the Easter week, and the party 
consisted of Mr. and Mrs. Carl Schilling. Rud. and 
Walter Schilling, Mr. and Mrs. William Volkman, 
Dan Volkman. Mr. and Mrs. W. H. Hannan, Mr. 
and Mrs. W. S. Davis, Kenneth Davis, Miss Davis 
and Miss Anna Bell. 

Spring has made Del Monte more beautiful than 
ever. After the storm the sunshine is much ap- 
preciated, and long walks and drives are in order. 



A favorite constitutional is the new wide board 
walk from the Bath House to Monterey. It is not 
quite completed, the eight-foot planks only being 
laid as far as the Monterey Station, but it is to 
continue on to the picturesque old Custom House. 
The view along the stretch of beach is a most 
alluring one — on both sides a sweeping curve of 
white sand ; at the right Pico Blanco, standing out 
above the blue Gavalan range and the dunes. In 
the other direction you see the fishermen's boats 
and wharves below the town, which rises up like 
a fortification, and as you look closely you see 
that there is one with mounted cannon and soldiers 
guarding the gates of the Presidio. All this can 
now be enjoyed without ploughing through thick 
sand, without dampened boots or salt-sprayed 
garments.. 

Del Monte's ball room has always been an at- 
traction, but now it combines plenty of space and 
a good floor with a perfect wall on which to hand 
pictures. The artists are delighted with its tone — 
the electric lighting and the new chandeliers, all 



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-THE WASP 



ii 



of which was changed under the direction of Eugen 
N'euhaus, who is living at Pacific Grove, and Harry 
Fonda, now of Monterey. 

A. 1). Shepanl ami Mi-- Marjnric Shepard spent 
Easter week at Del Monte. 

Mr. and Mrs. Robert Coleman, Robert L. Cole- 
man. Jr., Miss Carra Coleman and 11. R. Simpkins 

made a short visit to Del Monte this week. 

* * * 

( >ne of the prettiest weddings of the season took 
place on Tuesday evening. April 2d, when .Miss 
l.vdia Burneston Owens became the bride of George 
Anson Herrick. The ceremony took place at St. 
Luke's Church, several hundred friends being pres- 
ent. The decorations were exquisite. The bride 
made a beautiful picture in her wedding gown of 
chiffon satin and rare lace, with her flowing veil 
of tulle; she carried a shower bouquet of lilies of 
the valley. Miss Nina Currey was maid of honor. 
The bridesmaids were Miss Marion and Miss 
Jeanette Wright. Miss Anita Davis and Miss Ruth 
Morton. Mr. Herrick was supported by Hugh 
( Iwens as best man. The ushers were Alan Dia- 
mond. "Williartl Barton, Lathrop Ellinwood and 
Dr. Herbert Moore. A reception followed at the 
residence of the bride's home. After a wedding 

lour the bride and groom will reside in this City. 

* * * 

Mrs. Charles Hadenfeldt has issued invitations to 
the marriage of her daughter, Wanda Florence, to Mr. 
Henrv Clinton Melone. The wedding will take place 
on Wednesday. April the 10th at high noon, at the 
First Presbyterian Church, San Francisco. Miss Ethel 
Melone. the groom's sister, will be the only attendant, 
and Arthur Goodfellow will officiate as best man. 

After the wedding tour the young couple will reside 
at the beautiful country home of the Melones, Oak 
Knoll. Napa County, where the bridegroom's widowed 
mother and sister also reside. 

Miss Hadenfeldt is a sister of Miss Joan Hadenfeldt, 
a young woman of striking beauty, who made her 
debut at the Orpheum a few years ago, and for whom 
George Aspden, a newspaper man, committed suicide 
in his desperation over her refusal to marry him. He 
was the author of the sketch "The Cycle of Love," 
which she played on the Orpheum circuit. The hand- 
some actress is now the wife of Elmer Woodbury, a 
Southern California hotel keeper. 

Young Mr. Melone is the son of the late Drury 
Melone, whose second wife was Miss Woodward, one 
of the daughters of the celebrated founder of the 
Woodward's Gardens, a famous early-day show place 
of San Francisco on Mission Street, near Thirteenth. 
Mr. Woodward acquired a great deal of property, 
which has since become very valuable, though most of 
the large fortune he left has been lost by his heirs. 
Mrs. Melone is, of all the Woodward heirs, the 
one whose patrimony has been best preserved. Her 
late husband, Drury Melone, who was once Secretary 
of State for California, was a very shrewd man and 
for years steadfastly refused to allow the estate of his 
father-in-law to be cut up and divided amongst the 
heirs. Finally this was done, but meantime Mrs. 
Melone's share had become so valuable that she fared 
best of all the heirs. Robert J-. Woodward, Mrs. 



Melone's brother, sold all of his valuable real estate 
at a sacrifice. 

Mr. Melone's first wife was a Miss Mesick of Sacra- 
mento, and is still alive. She married again a few 
years after her separation from her first husband. 

Mrs. Melone, senior, has two sisters, Mrs. George 
Raum and Mr.. E. Hutchinson. 

* * * 

Judge W. C. Van Fleet, who has been recom- 
mended for the new United States District Judge- 
ship, is very well known both here and in Sacra- 
mento, his boyhood home. His first wife was a 
Miss Carey, who died very shortly after the birth 
of her son, Carey, who is now the well-known So- 
ciety man. The Judge remained a widower many 
years. His second wife was Miss Lizzie Crocker, 
daughter of the late Mr. and Mrs. Clark W. Crocker. 
Judge Van Fleet is a cousin of Chief Justice 
Beatty, their mothers being sisters. They were all 
well known and prominent in early days in Sacra- 
mento. 

* * * 

Mr. and Mrs. Charles Huse left last week for 
their home in Chicago. They hope to return to 
San Francisco in the very near future for a stay 
of many months. 




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12 



-THE WASP 




Portrait by Genthe 

A mature and experienced Society woman was 
recently asked what is the hardest problem a young 
girl has to solve in her social campaign for a hus- 
band. The woman of experience answered off-hand, 
"widows." 

"Young or old?" was next asked the lady. 

"That depends," said she. "The elderly widow is 
dangerous to a young man and the old stagers go 
crazy the minute they get within magnetic range of a 
frisky young widow. The poor debutante or the more 
mature bud don't seem to have a chance in a hun- 
dred with those artful widows. They angle for the 
stupid male sex so dexteriously that they have fish 
on their lines all the time." 



But of course this kind of talk is only broad gen- 
eralization. There are widows and widows. Some 
are professional heart-smashers, while others are as 
demure and domestic as a devout young quakeress. 
San Francisco has its full share of widows, young 
and old, frisky and demure, and more then its share 
of those ladies who are blessed with a large share of 
this world's goods. 

Amongst the young and charming widows who 
have places in local Society are Mrs. Langsdale, 
who was the charming Miss Sidney Smith ; the 
young and wealthy Mrs. Jane Ewell, who was Jen- 
nie Masten ; Mrs. John D. Tallant, widow of the 
banker and daughter of the late Judge Selden S. 
Wright ; Mrs. Austin Tubbs, formerly Anne Tal- 



lant ; Mrs. J. O'Neil Ries, who was Belle Brooks; 
Mrs. Walter Newhall, who was Nellie Trowbridge ; 
Mrs. Stafford Parker, who was Edith Young; Mrs. 
George Rowe, who was the charming Miss Clara 
Rice of San Francisco; Mrs. Ynez Shorb White, 
Mrs. James Sperry, Mrs. Susie Allen, Mrs. Bessie 
Riddell, who was Bessie Tilden, the daughter of 
that genial Bohemian, Joseph Tilden. She has an 
independent fortune which was inherited before her 
husband's death. Mrs. R. C. Storey, Miss Marie 
Wilson, who was scarcely a bride before she was a 
widow ; Mrs. Jimmie Robinson, who was Miss 
Carrie Hawes, daughter of the late Horace Hawes. 



One really does not think there are so many- 
widows prominent in Society here, until you begin 
to review the list. In addition to those already 
named there are Mrs. C. F. D. Hastings, widow of 
Dio Hastings, son of the late Judge. She owns 
acres upon acres around Suisun. Mrs. Murray 
Taylor, who was the fascinating May Thornton ; Mrs. 
Charles Alexander, who was one of the Carroll girls 
of Sacramento ; Mrs. Edgar Preston, mother of 
those attractive matrons, Mrs. W. Ames and Mrs. 
Williard Drown. 



Amongst the widows of more mature years there 
may be mentioned the wealthy Mrs. George Gibbs, 
Mrs. Gen. Bidwell, who gave an immense tract of 
land to the town of Chico, providing no saloon 
should be allowed ; Mrs. Veronica Baird, Mrs. 
Irving M. Scott ,Mrs. Eleanor Martin, Mrs. J. M. 
Goewy, Mrs. Abby Parrott, Mrs. Easton, grand- 
mother of Jennie Crocker, Mrs. T. M. Osment, 



Let them know! 



Your friend can reserve a room at the 

Hotel St. Francis 

when he leaves home, and find it ready 
for him when he arrives. Tell him so. 
Every comfort at hand. 



THE WASP- 



13 




widow of the late well-known lawyer, and mother 
of Mrs. Clarence Sperry; Mrs. Jane L. Martel, Mrs. 
F. F. Low, widow of the late governor and mother 
of Miss Flora Low ; Mrs. Thomas Breeze, mother 
of Mrs. Benson ; Mrs. Gardner Lawton, Mrs. Rus- 
sell Wilson, mother of Miss Emily Wilson and Mrs. 
George Cadwalader; Mrs. Henry Wetherbee, Mrs. 
M. M. Estee, Mrs. L. L. Baker, Mrs. Robert Hamil- 
ton, sister of Mr. James Carolan ; Mrs. Alexander 
Hamilton, mother of those attractive Society girls, 
Mrs. George Martin, Miss Edna and Alexander 
Hamilton ; Mrs. Henry Newhall, who was the 



daughter of Rev. .Mr. Wyatt; Mrs. Milton S. 
Latham. Mrs. Henry Crocker, widow of Henry S. 
Crocker; Mrs. Jeremiah Clark, Mrs. Hopkins, the 
mother of Mrs. Eugene Murphy and Airs. Warren 
Clark; Mrs. J. De Barth Shorb, Mrs. Annie Murray, 
widow of Sir John Murray, the English Consul at 
Maine. Mrs. Murray is very wealthy and is a 
cousin of Dr. Rafaelle Lorini, the well-known 
Society physician. There is also Mrs. E. B. Cad- 
walader, widow of George Cadwalader, the well- 
known lawyer; Mrs. William Burling, mother of 
Mrs. John Evelyn Page; Mrs. Henry L. Dodge, 
Mrs. Gale, Mrs. S. Rosenstock, mother of Mrs. 
Nuttall ; Mrs. Lincoln, widow of Jerome Lincoln; 
Mrs. Norwood, sister of J. A. Hooper, the lumber 
man ; Mrs. Joseph B. Crockett, mother of Mrs. 
Lawrence Scott. 

The list seems endless as one writes it. All 
wealthy widows and prominent in San Francisco 
Society are Mrs. John I. Sabin, Mrs William Kohl, 
Mrs. Emma Hunt, Mrs. John A. Bauer, Mrs. Nicho- 
las Van Bergen, Mrs. Lawson Adams, Mrs. Lloyd 
Baldwin, Mrs. George Bliss, Mrs. Talbot, Mrs. 
Alexander Boyd, Mrs. George L. Bradley, Mrs. 
Julian Reis, Mrs. Thomas R. Hayes. 

All those I have named are what a realist might 
call "Sod" widows, as distinguished from those to 
whom the appellation of "grass widows" is com- 
monly applied. The task of enumerating the latter 
is too great to be undertaken lightly, and the list 
grows every month. At this moment I know of at 
least six prospective grass widows who are con- 
sulting their lawyers and calculating whether it is 
better to bear the ills we have than to fly to others 
that we know not of. 




STUDEBAKER 

1907 

CARS NOW ARRIVING 

Studebaker Bros. Co. of California 

405 Golden Gate Avenue 

Chester A. Weaver, Manager 



14 



-THE WASP - 



There is about twenty years difference in the 
ages of L. R. Mead and his just-announced fiancee, 
Miss Mae Sadler of Alameda. Mr. Mead has not 
been very long a widower and so the announcement 
that he is soon to re-wed came as a great surprise 
to his old friends of the Bohemian Club and else- 
where. His wife was a most charming woman, and 
an intimate friend of Mrs. Henry Wetherbee of 
Fruitvale. The Meads used to entertain house- 
parties at their home, a roomy cottage near Byron 
Hot Springs, of which resort Mr. Mead is the 
owner. His son, Dr. Louis Durant Mead, manages 
the Springs' hotel. He lately returned with his 
wife from a trip to Tahati. Miss Sadler, who is to 
become the wife of Mr. Mead, has been out in 
Society over the bay a number of years. She is 
a pretty woman, and a bright talker. She has been 
abroad and converses entertainingly on the coun- 
tries she visited. 

The announcement of Miss Sadler's engagement 
was made at a tea to which several young women 
piominent in Society had been invited. They had no 
idea that Miss Sadler had made up her mind to marry 
Mr. Mead. 

This engagement was a double surprise to the young 
lady's most intimate friends, as a certain young man 
who had been deeply interested for many moons was 
thought to be the lucky suitor. In fact the girls re- 
ceiving were perfectly astonished when anonuncement 
of Mr. Mead's name was made. On the morning of 
the tea the unlucky youth received a telegram from in- 
timate friends, who congratulated him upon his forth- 
coming marriage, little thinking that the missive was 
calculated to have the opposite effect on his feelings 
from that intended. 

Mr. Mead is a man of affairs and one of the leading 
citizens of San Francisco. He was for many years the 
head of the Risdon Iron Works, and also owned the 
Byron Springs, which is one of the noted resorts of the 
State. Mr. Mead is a good-looking and well-preserved 
man, who dresses well and does not appear to be within 
twenty years of his age. His son, who is thirty-two, 
was married about a year and a half ago to Miss Lan- 
neau, who is a relative of Bishop Kip and belongs to a 
fine-family of South Carolina. Mr. Mead junior and 
his wife reside at Byron Springs. Mr. Mead senior 
has been a widower about a year. His wife was a Miss 
Blanch Durrant and belonged to a well-known family 
of the Dominion. The wedding of Mr. Mead and Miss 
Sadler will take place during the early summer. 

It is announced in Washington that the wedding of 
Miss Isabel Harrison Glennon, daughter of Com- 
mander and Mrs. Glennon, and Lieut. Matthew Arthur 
Cross, U. S. A., will take place Wednesday, April 17, 
at 12 o'clock at St. Thomas' Church. The engagement 
of Miss Glennon calls to mind that the hospitable and 
attractive home of the Randolph Harrisons in this City 
was the centre of the ultra-fashionable and exclusive 
set years ago. Mrs. Glennon, the mother of the bride 
to be, is a niece of Mrs. Randolph Harrison. Mrs. 

With men of affairs, Abbott's Bitters are the great tonic and aid to digestion. They are 
ecommended by hading physicians. All druggists. 



Glennon was pretty Susie Blair, who was one of a trio 
of beautiful cousins, left orphans at an early age. They 
were all reared by their aunt, Mrs. Randolph Harrison 
of this City. Mrs. Lester, who was fascinating Elsie 
Allen, now the wife of Mr. Lester, the attorney, of the 
firm of Lester and Drown of this City, was another. 
Mrs. Knapp, who was Lily Harrison, now the wife of 
Commander Knapp, was the third. 

Another member of the Harrison household was 
Miss Tazer Harrison, now Mrs. Eberle, the wife of the 
well-known navy officer. Mrs. Knapp, Mrs. Glennon 
and Mrs. Eberle were not long since resident at Mare 
Island, where .they contributed greatly to the social 
activity of that place. These three cousins are now 
prominent in Washington, D. C, where their husbands 
are all at present stationed. These ladies are related 
more or less closely to the prominent families of the 
Thorntons, Huies, Thompsons, Craigs and Salis- 
burys. 

* * * 

There are several interesting portraits in The Wasp 
this week. Miss Geraldine Bonner, whose portrait ap- 
pears this week, is the noted California author ; Miss 
Marietta Havens is one of the most prominent young 
Society women in Oakland ; Miss Mae Lydia Sadler's 
engagement to Mr. Mead, the rich iron-master, has 
just been announced ; Mrs. B. C. Lathrop is one of the 
prominent young matrons in local Society. 



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a disc- playing 
Talking Machine of any kind, 
who will send us their name 
and address will receive, free 
of charge, each month for one 
year, a handsome little souvenir booklet containing the names 
of the latest records and a brief history of a few of the most 




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A PLACE TO EAT AND DRINK "Ladies' Orchestra" from 6 to 12 



THE WASP 



15 



• in Wednesday, Vpril 3d, Miss Ruth McNutt, the 
daughter of Dr.' ami Mrs. \Y. F. McNutt, of this 
City, was married in Paris to David R. C. Brown, a 
wealthy mining man of Denver. Col. Mr. Brown is a 
widower, with two grown daughters. He has been in 
lovi with Miss McNutt for a long time, and has fol- 
lowed her from place to place, persuading her to marry 
him. She could not make up her mind, though her 
mother was very anxious for the match, it is said. 
Miss McNutt at last and rather quickly made up her 
mind. She is one of the prettiest girls in Society here. 
Two or three years ago announcement was made of 
her engagement to an army officer, who belonged to 
the well-known family of Fitzhugh Lee. Miss McNutt 
went South to visit the family, and upon her return 
her friends were surprised to hear of the broken en- 
gagement. She never could be persuaded to tell even 
her intimate friends why she suddenly broke the en- 
gagement. Miss McNutt has been abroad for some 
time, traveling with her mother and sister, Mrs. Ash- 
ton Potter. 

* * * 

Amongst the portraits in The Wasp this week is 
one of Mrs. Henry T. Scott, which is engraved 
from a miniature painted by Airs. Rose Hooper 
Plotner. Mrs. Scott, who is very prominent in the 
Burlingame social set, is the mother of Mrs. Walter 
Martin and Harry and Prescott Scott. 

Much sympathy is felt for Mrs. C. P. Pomeroy 
and Miss Christine, as Mr. Pomeroy, the well- 
known lawyer, is lying dangerously ill at his home 
on Bell Avenue, San Rafael. He was attacked with 
pneumonia about a month ago and was scarcely out 
of danger when jaundice set in. Mr. Pomeroy's 
beautiful home on Hyde Street, was burned last 
April and since that time Mr. Pomeroy and his 
family have been residing in San Rafael. Miss 
Christine recently returned from abroad. 

* * * 

Colonel Kirkpatrick is to give a large dinner to 
some of his friends this evening at the Palace Hotel. 
The Colonel is a genius for planning a perfect 
dinner. In fact Colonel Kirkpatrick does everything 
well, and that is one reason why the Palace has 
under his regime enjoyed the most enviable repu- 
tation as a perfectly conducted hotel of the highest 
class. 

* * * 

The long-talked-of Duck and Dimity dance to be 
given by the Sausalito Assembly Club, which will 
take place this Saturday evening at the San Fran- 
cisco Yacht Club, promises to be an exceedingly 
jolly affair. All Sausalito's smart set and many 
guests from town will be present. Mrs. Gaston 
Ashe and Mrs. Kilgarif have the affair in charge. 

The duck and dimity costumes, which are to 
characterize the affair this evening, suggest remi- 
niscences to the early inhabitants of the ancient 
regime in the seaside burg before the water 
front fell under the baleful sway of the poolroom 
gamblers and the crabfishers. Those were glorious 
days. The hill-tribe ruled both politically and so- 
cially, and it was a mark of eminent social dis- 
tinction to carry a lantern in the gloaming to avoid 



tumbling off the main road and landing half a mile 
down the canyon in poison oak or mud. 

* * * 

Miss Helen Chase Scoville, daughter of Mrs. 
Helen Gardiner Scoville, was married in New York 
on April 2d to Earl Talbot of San Francisco. The 
ceremony took place in St. Andrews' Church at 
Fifth Avenue and 127th Street. Mr. Talbot is the 
only son of Mrs. Amy Talbot of this City. She was 
pretty Amy Bowen before her marriage, which 
proved a very sad one. Mrs. Talbot's picture, from 
a miniature, appeared in last week's Wasp. She is 
still a beautiful woman. 

* * * 

Lieut-Colonel Louis Brechemin, United States 
Army, and Mrs. Brechemin announce the engage- 
ment of their daughter Lillian to Dr. David H. 
Moffat Gillispie of New York. The wedding will 
take place in the Autumn. Miss Brechemin has 
made many friends while in California. She is an 
attractive girl, and like her mother, is a fine vocalist. 

Saturday, April 20th, is the date set for the wed- 
ding of Miss Jane Wilshire and John Hart Pol- 
hemus. The ceremony will take place at four 
o'clock, at the residence of the bride's parents on 
Buchanan Street, and will be performed by Rev. 
Dr. Clampett. Owing to the illness of the groom's 
mother, it will be a very quiet affair. Only rela- 
tives and intimate friends being present. Miss 
Doris Wilshire will be her sister's only attendant. 
The bride and groom will pass the Summer in San 
Anselmo. 

Miss Margaret Gros has gone to Philadelphia to 
visit friends, and will rejoin her mother in New 
York, whence they will sail for Paris. 



BURNS HAMMAM BATHS 



LADIES' DEPARTMENT 
OPEN 



817 Eddy Street 



...Phone Franklin 2245 



Soda Bay Springs 

Lake Co., Cal. 

Situated on the picturesque shore of charming Clear Lake, season 
opens May 1st, finest of Boating, Bathing and Hunting. Unsur- 
passed acommodations. Terms $2.00 per day, $12.00 per week, 
special rates to families. Route, take Tiburon Ferry 7:40 a. m. 
thence by Automobile, further information address managers 

GEO. ROBINSON and AGNES BELL RHOODES 

Via Kelseyville P. O. Soda Springs, Lake Co., Cal. 



16 



-THE WASP* 




Pholo Gen the 



MRS. B. G. LATHROP 



Hard Knocks for the Socialistic Fad 
In his lecture before the students and professors 
of Columbia University, W. H. Mallock has dealt 
the Socialistic mania some hard knocks. State 
Socialism is condemned as slavery. He said : 

"Socialists demand what they call the emancipa- 
tion of labor, and by the emancipation of labor they 
mean emancipation from what they have been 
taught to call wagedom. What this cry means we 
are now able to see clearly. It means, if it means 
anything, the emancipation of the average mind 
from the guidance of any mind that is in any way 
superior to itself, or is able to enhance the pro- 



duction of an average pair of hands. 

"But these very Socialists do not propose that 
men shall relapse into the primitive condition in 
which each man works with his hands, as best he 
can, in isolation. If they are asked for an illustra- 
tion of the kind of system which they would in- 
troduce if they got their way they invariably refer 
us to a State institution like the post-office. 

"The intellectual simplicity of the men who argue 
thus is astonishing. If all production were organized 
like a State post-office there would, it is true, be no 
private capitalist ; but would the laborer have 
achieved the economic freedom, the emancipation, 
which Socialists at present take so much pleasure in 
talking about? 

"The most ardent Socialist in the world would 
very soon join in denouncing the principles of 
economic emancipation, if a postman who happened 
not to approve of Socialism threw the Socialist's 
letters into the river instead of putting them into 
his letter box. In what conceivable way, then, has 
a postman employed by the State any more econ- 
omic freedom than the messengers of a private firm? 
Nor, again, does the manner in which the labor of 
the State employee is remunerated, and by which 
the performance of his duty is secured, differ in any 
way from the wage system which prevails in a 
private firm. Conformity to the directions given 
him by some organizing authority is the condition 
of which this remuneration is awarded him ; and 
though Marx and his disciples propose to substitute 
labor checks for dollars, this is merely the wage 
system called by another name." 

Mr. Mallock referred to what the latest school of 
Socialists, including Sidney Webb and Bernard 
Shaw, are proposing as an alternative for the wage 
system — to make "an equal provision for all an 
indefeasible condition of citizenship, without any 
regard whatever to the relative specific services of 
different citizens." The rendering of such services, 
instead of being left to the opinion of the citizen 
with the alternative of starvation, would be secured 
under one uniform law, precisely like other forms 
of taxation or military service. 

"Such, then," said Mr. Mallock, "is the alterna- 
tive to the wage system put forward as the last 
word of the most intelligent Socialists of to-day 
and escape from the wage system, beyond a doubt, 
it is; but on escape into what? It is neither more 
nor less than an escape into economic slavery. For 
the very essence of the position of the slave, as 
contrasted with the wage paid laborer, in so far as 
the direction- of his industrial actions is concerned, 
is that he has not to work as he is bidden in order to 
gain a livelihood but that his livelihood, being 
assured to him no matter how he behaves himself, 
he is obliged to work as he is bidden in order to 
avoid the lash or some similar form of punishment." 



Wise Youth 

She — "Now, when you ask papa, face him like a 
man." 

He — "You bet I will. I'm not going to give him 
. a chance to kick." 







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EASTER LILLIES 



It would be very interesting if the Grand Jury 
made the saloon keepers tell how much money they 
put up to elect Schmitz the last time he ran. It 
is well known that $500 apiece was demanded from 
many saloon-men and a good many of them paid 
the money of which Ruef had the handling. This 
must have placed an immense fund in his 
possession. How much of it was spent and how 
much stuck to the finders of the collectors? 



The political sensation of the week has been the 
passing of the lie between Harriman and the President. 
Mr. Harriman's record in Wall Street, where he has 
been well known as boy and man, is that of a person 
whose primary thought and action are all for his own 
interests. That is no crime, but at the same time it is 
no recommendation to the voters of the United States 
to believe, that when Mr. Harriman bobs up as a factor 
in national politics it is solely for the nation's good, 
and not to further his own interests. The Harriman 
attack on Roosevelt is for the purpose of breaking 
down the influence of the President on the nomination 
of his successor. There will be one of the greatest 
political battles in American history over Roosevelt's 
successor. The Roosevelt policy of interference with 
great corporations has antagonized, bitterly, Mr. Har- 
riman and many men like him, who believe that it is 
their lawful privilege to set themselves above the law 
and use the public as their oyster. They will exert 
every possible influence to replace Roosevelt by a 
President who will relapse to the old order of things, 
when the combined might of capital in controlling 
national legislation was unquestioned. The people can 
be relied upon to defeat this scheme if given the 
chance, but there is the rub. They will never get the 
chance if the railroad and the other moneyed barons 
can control the national nominating conventions and 
put up the candidates they want. If the people win at 
the next Presidential election, the nation will be on a 
better footing than ever before, for all the trusts will 
be made obedient to the law. The trusts of capital are 
already more docile, and the equally great if not 
greater labor trust will at last be crushed and shown 
that it cannot violate with impunity the constitutional 
rights of the American public. 

Because the Building Trades Council, which is an- 
other name for P. H. McCarthy, has had a quarrel 
with an electrical workers' union, a strike has been 
called by McCarthy, and work has been suspended on 
the great Fairmont Hotel. Here is another fine object- 
lesson to the long-suffering and much-abused business 
men of San Francisco. 

McCarthy is. a prominent 'member of the Schmitz- 
Ruef cabinet, and has generally held one or more 
public offices by favor of the chief grafters. He it was 

For busy men and women Abbott's Bilters. A delightful Ionic and invigoralor. a beallh 
giver and a health preserver. All druggists. 



who presided some months ago at the red-flag meeting 
which passed resolutions in favor of the Idaho mur- 
derers, and which after adjournment inarched down 
Market Street under the red flag and attacked the 
police. 

Voters of San Francisco should begin to get ready 
to put McCarthy and all his political gang out of office 
next November. 



The news that until further notice mail facilities 
with Australia and New Zealand will be cut off is 
unwelcome to the people of the United States as a 
whole, and to those of California in particular. The 
government should make some arrangements for 
the continuance of our mail service with the anti- 
podes. There is no reason why it should not be 
done temporarily by way of Vancouver. The line 
from Vancouver to Sydney is supported by Eng- 
land and colonial subsidies, and it has temporarily, 
at least, knocked out the American line. Of course 
our merchants cannot give up the trade that it has 
taken so many years to establish and most of that 
trade is in American goods. The greater part of 
these is Eastern, hence the government has more 
than ordinary inducements to prevail upon Congress 
to support the line. This is a fact, not a condition, 
and in the presence of facts that threaten the very 
existence of a flourishing trade, even the most stub- 
born opponent of subsidies must needs be silent. 
The English line that will for a time at least enjoy 
much of this trade is supported by subsidies. The 
cost of running American vessels is greater than 
that of English, and it is only fair that it should be 
made up by a grant of public moneys. The manage- 
ment of the line has been hampered by labor 
troubles and strikes, and altogether its path has 
not been a smooth one. 

HARVEY BROUGHAM. 



SWAIN'S CAFE 



1111-1113 

POST ST. 



Have added to their heretofore Excellent Equipment 

A Modern Grill Service 



With Schlitz and Wurzburger 
Beer on Draught 



Mu:ic under trie direction c 
Mr. Edgar Bayliss 



JULES' FRENCH RESTAURANT £»^tJ£Z'£ 

Regular Dinners served svery Evening, including Sunday, at former prices 

326 BUSH STREET 

Music on Sundays Phone Temporary 1 82 1 Jules Wiltman, Prop. 



-THE WASP- 



19 



Skating Carnival 

While the Monday Evening Skating Club had a 
jolly time at the Fancy Masque Carnival of Monday 
evening last, and many pretty and effective costumes 
were in evidence, the affair was a bad second to the 
recent hal skating masque at San Rafael. 

Three startling costumes were the short-socked 
babies, who proved to be Miss Mazie Coyle, Miss 
Angela Coyle and Miss Ethel Amwig, who had as 
escort Oliver Lansing, clothed in the familiar Buster 
Brown costume. Late in the evening, Mr. and Mrs. 
Edwin Newhall chaperoned a party of fifteen boys and 
girls in yachting costumes. Alma Newhall being the 
captain. Edwin Newhall, Jr., on this occasion dressed 
as a young lady. Many girls from San Rafael were in 
this party, the Misses Foster, Miss Lanell and others. 
Another large party was composed of Miss Marion and 
.Miss Jeanette Wright, Miss Betsy Angus, Miss Nino 
Curry, Lieut. Anderson St. George Hope. Three light 
blue silk dominos that attracted much attention were 
discovered to be Mrs. Hanford, Mrs. Selby Hanna and 
Mrs. J. M. Gamble. Mrs. Fred McNear, as Mary had 
a little lamb, appeared leading a huge toy lamb. The 
timid beast not being used to a crowd, the fair matron 
was obliged to carry it in her arms all evening. The 
clever make-up of Mr. Joseph Carrigan caused quite a 
commotion in the early part of the evening. He was 
dressed as a trained nurse, and insisted upon doing a 
highly effective dance in which he displayed rather too 
much of his lower anatomy to suit the prudes in the 
grand stand. Tabitha Twiggs remarked it was ex- 
tremely indelicate, whereupon another remarked, 
"Where did you ever see a young lady possessing such 
large ankles, who could boast blue blood in her veins ?" 

Miss Lucy Gwin Coleman and Miss Gertrude Bal- 
lard were costumed as twins, wearing beautiful red 
broadcloth walking costumes, with green velvet col- 
lars. A handsome costume worn by Miss Ynez Estu- 
dillo, was that of a colonial lady, and Miss Marie 
Churchill as Temptation, Miss Lucy Mighell as Sis 
Hopkins, Miss Ruth Powers as a student, Miss Mary 
Shafter, Syrian fortune teller, Miss Sophie Woods, 
Queen of hearts, Miss Marie Rose Deane, a fencing 
girl, were all notable figures. Miss Ethel Shorb was 
effectively costumed as a tiger lily. 
* * * 
Soda Bay Springs 

This famous Summer resort, which will be opened 
for the season on May 1st, is situated on the pic- 
turesque shores of Clear Lake in the foothills of 
Konocti, or "Uncle Sam Mountain," in Lake 
County. It recommends itself to the pleasure-seeker 
as well as the invalid. The hotel and cottages 
have been thoroughly renovated and will accommo- 
date some 150 guests. There is an excellent large 
ball room, where "hops" can be indulged in. The 
grounds are extensive, having a shore line of two 
miles. There are fine bathing, hunting and fishing 
facilities. A splendid launch has been built to 
order expressly for excursions on the lake. One of 
the important feature will be an excellent table with 
fresh vegetables and dairy products ; also an up-to- 
date club house. Every convenience has been pro- 



\ided for the comfort of guests and ;. visit to Soda 
Bay Springs cannot fail to remain a pleasant mem- 
ory. The route is by way of the Northwestern 
Pacific Railroad, leaving the Ferry at 7:30 a. m. I In 
alighting from the train visitors tak< automobiles 
and arrive at the Springs at 2 p. in., a saving of 
nearly three hours over the old journey by stage, 
which has been superseded. A round trip ticket, 
including train and automobile, and good for six 
months, lor $9. Mr. George Robinson and Agnes 
Bell Rhoads are the managers. 



Dr. Redmond Payne 

Eye, ear, nose, throat, resumed practice at 9 1 5 Van Ness 
cor. Ellis, hours: 1-3; tel. Franklin 331. 



C. H. REHINSTROM 

Tailor and Importer 

SPRING AND SUMMER STYLES 

NOW READY 



Formerly of 

The Mutual Savings Bank Building 



2415 FILLMORE STREET 

Telephone West 5769 



'JUST A SHADE OIN OTHERS' 



Weinhard 

The Peer 
of Bottle Beer 




CALIFORNIA BOTTLING CO. 



SOLE BOTTLERS 



1255 HARRISON STREET 

PHONE MARKET 977 



Weinhard is the Delicious Beer served at Cafe Francisco, The 
Louvie, Tail's and many other Cafes 



£g££S?R>R President's Taste 

Macaroni, Vermicelli, Spaghetti 

L. R. PODESTA, Manufacturer 512 Washington Strtet 



20 



-THE WASP 




_-^if : 



i i mjim... . - * ir V -^ ! U -=— j_. 




REACHES ACROSS THE CONTINENT — From the N. Y. World 



— "« 



Home Work 

A little fellow in Altoona, Pa., not long ago 
hustled into a grocery with a memorandum in his 
hand. 

"Mr. Jones," said he, "I want fourteen pounds 
of tea at twenty-five cents." 

"All right," said the grocer, noting down the sale 
and instructing a clerk to put up the purchase. 
"Anything else, Tommy?" 

"Yes, sir. I want thirty pounds of sugar at nine 
cents." 

"Loaf sugar? All right. What else?" 

"Seven and a half pounds of bacon at twenty 
cents." 

"Anything more?" 

"Five pounds of coffee at thirty-two cents; eleven 
and a half quarts of molasses at eight cents a pint ; 
two nine-pound hams at twenty-one and a quarter 
cents and five dozen jars of pickled walnuts at 
twenty-four cents a jar." 

"That's a big order," observed the grocer, as he 
made out the bill. "Your mother wants it charged, 
or do you pay for it now?" 

The boy pocketed the bill. "Mother hasn't a 
thing to do with this transaction," said he. "It's 
my arithmetic lesson, and I had to get it done 
somehow." 



The Marquis de Favieres, notorious for his im- 
pecuniosity, called on a man of means named Bar- 
nard, and said : 

"Monsieur, I am going to astonish you. I am 
the Marquis de Favieres. I do not know you, and 
I come to borrow five hundred louis." 

"Monsieur," Barnard replied, "I am going to as- 
tonish you much more. I know you, and I am 
going to lend them." 



La Boheme 



First Class Italian Restaurant 
1558 BUSH ST- 

Between Van Neu and Franklin 



SPECIALTY: Italian and French Cuisine 

FEUX PIANTANIDA. Manaser 



Formerly Proprietor of the ORIGINAL COPPA 



(ZolOflial Tub and Shower Baths 

BathS Ladies' Department, 8 to 1 2 a. m. week days 

REGULAR PRICES 
NOW Open 1745 O'Farrell St., near Fillmore 



-THE WASP- 



21 



Grafting in England 

The reading public is well aware that crooked 
American officials are always trying to muzzle the 
press. The reason is that the liberty of the press 
in our country is the terror of gratters. 

In England there is a goodly share of grafting 
too, but the newspapers there are afraid to publish 
the facts. The newspapers know- all about it, and 
they know who are the grafters, but they do not 
dare to expose the situation, owing to the exceed- 
ingly strict libel law. 

Not so very long ago a certain speech was re- 
ported in one of the London newspapers. The 
speechmaker was indignant, for neither the subject 
matter of the speech nor the circumstances under 
which it was delivered were creditable to him, and 
he brought a suit for damages on the ground that 
the libel laws had been violated. It was not claimed 
that the speech was incorrectly reported; indeed it 
was admitted that the report was substantially 
without error, yet nevertheless heavy damages were 
awarded to the plaintiff on the grounds that the 
plaintiff's reputation had been injured and that the 
publisher could not show that the publication of 
the report was of benefit to the public. 

Under the English law a boodler cannot confess 
and escape prosecution. Some time ago it was 
suspected that members of the council of a London 
borough had been accepting bribes from contractors 
who were furnishing materials and supplies. Detec- 
tives were put upon the case and the facts were 
run down. Certain of the contractors and Council- 
men, confronted with these facts, confessed and 
promised to go upon the stand in court and testify 
to the truth. In due time one of the guilty men took 
the stand as promised, and told the story as agreed. 




Another Earthquake in San Francisco 

• From the N. Y. World 



He was immediately arrested as a criminal under 
the law as it stands, and slated for an early trial. 
This chilled the enthusiasm of the others who had 
promised to confess, and they changed their minds 
promptly and irrevocably. As the prosecution was 
thus left without witnesses the investigation was 
brought to an abrupt close. 



Foreign diplomats are not as much afraid of ask- 
ing for a raise of salary as Americans. When James 
Bryce was named for English Ambassador to 
\\ ashington he declined the honor as he could not 
afford to take it at the salary. To make it pos- 
sible for Mr. Bryce to accept the place the salary 
was raised $10,000. Sir Mortimer Durand, who pre- 
ceded Mr. Bryce, managed to save a considerable 
part of his salary as Ambassador, but the Durands 
gave only one or two formal dinners a year and 
lost touch of Washington life so much that Sir 
Mortimer lost his position. 



Wedding Cakes and Fancy Ices 
and Tarts 




LECHTEN BROS. 



1 242 - 1 244 Devbadero Street 

Bel. Eddy and Ellis Phone West 2526 



F. W. KRONE, Proprietor 



The Original San Francisco 

Popular Dining Room 



NOW OPEN 
91 1-913 O'Farrell St. 



Bet. Van Ness and Polk 



Largest and Handsomest Dining-Room in the City—An Ideal Kitchen. Former 
Patrons Invited to Call and Inspect Our New Rooms and Equipment. 



BLAKE, MOFFITT & TOWNE 

PAPER 

1 400-1 450 POURTH STREET 

TELEPHONE MARKET 3014 

Private Exchange Connecting all Departments 




STRICTLY BUSINESS 



Points of Interest on Trade and Finance 




Bond and Stock Exchange 
The past week has been a quiet one in bond and 
stock exchange circles. A good many of the pat- 
rons of the Exchange have been interested too in 
Wall Street and have not always been on the right 
side of the market. This helps to make things slow. 
Spring Valley improved somewhat during the week 
— light sales being made at $21.62^. The stock 
has not quite recovered from the depression caused 
by the resolution of the Supervisors, but it is un- 
questionably stronger. Hawaiian 5s. sold at 
$102.50. There have been some sales of United 
Railroads 4s at $75.50 — a slight improvement on the 
past week, but very slight. Alaska Packers sold 
in small lots at $41 to $40.50. Associated Oil is 
lower, selling at $39.50. California Wine is weaker 
— $87 asked. California Fruit finds bidders at 
$103.50. There has been very little change in Sugar 
stocks but the market as a whole is weak. For 
Hawaiian $83 has been bid, so here the market is 
strong. Honokaa sold at $10.50. For Hutchin- 
son $15.50 was bid and for Paauhau $14.50, and for 
Onomea $36. The transactions in these stocks have, 
however, been very small for some considerable 
time past. 

The Mines 

The opening of the San Francisco Mining Ex- 
change on Monday was quite an event. Chairman 
Turnbull had around him quite a distinguished 
company and the Board has started on its way with 
encouraging omens of success. Meanwhile the de- 
velopments in Southern Nevada continue of 
greater or less importance. 

The sales of mining stock last week were on some 
days as high as 500,000 shares. There were few 
sales of the more important stocks — for Mohawk 
$17.25 has been bid — a slight improvement. Jumbo 
was quotable at $3.85 bid, and Red Top at $4.00 
asked. Silver Pick sold at $1.25, an improvement. 
Goldfield Combination sold at $8.00, so that it had 
neither advanced nor retrograded. Florence sold 
up to $3.60. Tonopah Nevada did not change, $16 
bid. Daisy sold at $2.05. Combination Fractions at 
$4.30 to $4.40. Great Bend at $105. Tumbo Exten- 
sion at $2.22. Nevada Hills at $3.60. West End 
at $1.30. Kewanas at $1.30 to $1.40, and St. Ives 
at $1.50. There was a general feeling of improve- 
ment all through. There will be a much better 
feeling when the labor troubles are over. 

Lucky Policy Holders 
The Fireman's Fund Insurance Company of San 

A Sovereign Remedy 

Dr. Parker's Cough Cure, one dose will stop a cough. It 
never fails. Try it. Sold by all Druggists. 



Francisco has been floated off the rocks on which it 
found itself after the unparalleled disaster of April 
last. Almost everybody predicted that this local com- 
pany would become a complete wreck, with little left 
in the way of salvage. How could it pay such ap- 
palling and unprecedented losses, even though known 
to be admirably managed? In twelve months it has, 
however, paid in cash nearly sixty per cent of its losses, 
and in doing so has paid out the enormous sum of 
almost eleven million dollars. 

It has assessed, and collected from, its stockholders 
over two million dollars. This bare statement does 
not actually represent what the local company has 
done, for it played on policy holders none of the 
scurvy tricks of some of the foreign companies. Many 
of these scaled down the claims of policy holders 
twenty-five per cent before attempting to pay their 
losses. 

The Fireman's Fund Company appraised its losses 
at their face value. Nothing could be fairer or more 
liberal, and on that appraisement the company has 



MUTUAL SAVINGS BANK 



706 Market St. 



OF SAN FRANCISCO 



Opp. Third 



Guaranteed Capital, $1,000,000 

Interest Paid on all Deposits 



Paid up Capital and Surplus, $620,000 
Loans on Approved Securities 



OFFICERS-- James D. Phelan, Pres.. John A. Hooper, V. Pres., J. K. Moffatt, 2d 
V. Pres., George A. Story, Sec'y and Cashier, C. B. Hobson, Assl. Cashier, A. E. 
Curtis. 2d Asst. Cashier. 



TONOPAH, GOLDFIELD, BULLFROG 
MANHATTAN and COMSTOCKS A specialty 



ZADIG & CO. 

STOCK BROKERS 



Formerly 306 Montgomery Street, have resumed business in their 

Own Building, 324 BUSH STREET 

Directly Opposite New San Francisco Stock and Exchange BIdg. 



FRENCH SAVINGS BANK 



OF SAN FRANCISCO 



108-110 Sutter Street 



CAPITAL AND SURPLUS, $693,104.68 

PAID UP CAPITAL, $600,000.00 

DEPOSITS JANUARY 1. 1907 $3,772,145.83 

Charles Carpy, Pres. Arthur Legallet, Vice-Pres. Leon Bocqueraz, Secretary 

John Ginty, Asst. Secretary P. A. Bergerot. Attorney 



-THE WASP- 



23 



already paid nearly sixty cents on the dollar in cash, 
and besides given stock for the balance. This stock is 
rapidly appreciating in value. At the lowest possible 
calculation the policy holders of the Firemen's Fund 
have already, therefore, fared far better than nine- 
tenths of the people who were insured in some of the 
so-called "dollar for dollar" companies. 

The Fireman's Fund Company is doing a fine busi- 
ness and any policy holder who keeps his stock for 
some time is likely to make money thereby. 

It certainly will be a great triumph for this deserv- 
ing company if its policy holders should, in a short 
time, have received not only a hundred cents on the 
dollar of their full losses, but a hundred and twenty 
cents. This would be equal to a payment of ISO per 
cent by some of the companies that first scaled down 
their appraised losses and then paid from 75 to 90 per 
cent of the appraisements. 

It seems to have become a matter of local pride in 
San Francisco to see the Fireman's Fund Insurance 
Company reestablished more firmly than ever, and that 
i- now an accomplished fact. The company starts out 
again with unimpaired record and ample capital. 

Insurance Rates 

There is no doubt that in particular cases present 
insurance rates add much to the cost of running a 
business or handling a property. For frame build- 
ings in the burned district from 5 to 8 per cent, is 
charged when they are used for dwellings. The dif- 
ference is due to location and other circumstances. 
Thus an S8000 building costs at the lowest rate $400 
a year or $33.33 2-3 a month. Here the rate is 
doubled and the additional cost has to be added to 
the rent. This without taking into account the 
increased cost of building is a sufficient excuse for 
the landlord in the districts that were swept by the 
fire, but outside of it the rate is $1.00 to $1.40. 
Here the increase on an $8000 building would make 
a difference of only about $32 or $2.66 a month. 
This is not excessive. 

Mr. Ryan's Successor 

That highly efficient and popular railroad man, the 
late R. X. Ryan, has been succeeded by J. J. Geary, 
who had been associated with Mr. Ryan since his con- 
nection with the Northwestern Pacific Railroad Com- 
pany. Mr. Geary is now the acting General Passen- 
ger and Freight Agent and had been discharging those 
duties for some time as Mr. Ryan's illness was a pro- 
tracted one. The loss of his wife, which occurred a 
few weeks ago, no doubt hastened the demise of the 
able and conscientious railroad manager, whose death 
is deplored by a large circle of friends. 

The California Insurance Co. 

This company which stood the brunt of the fire 
so heroically is adding $400,000 to its resources and 
should receive the unqualified support of the busi- 
ness community. It is a worthy successor of its 
namesake the old California, which had so success- 
ful a career in past days. 

The first thing in the morning, if you need a bracer, should be a tablespoonful of Abbott's 
Bitters in an ounce of sherry or a glass of soda. Try it. 



CALIFORNIA SAFE DEPOSIT 
AND TRUST COMPANY 

For the greater convenience of its patrons 
has established branches in various parts 
of the city. The company 

Cordially Invites You 
to Open an Account 

at any one of these or at the Home Office. 
2 per cent interest paid on deposits subject 
to check and 3 1-2 per cent on regular 
savings accounts. 



HOME OFFICE 



CALIFORNIA and MONTGOMERY STS. 

West End Branch. 1531 Devisadero 

Mission Branch, 2572 Mission, near 22d 
Up-Town Branch, 1740 Fillmore nr. Sutter 



VALUABLES or all kinds 

May be safely stored al 

SAFE DEPOSIT VAULTS 

of the 

FIRST NATIONAL BANK 

Cor. Bush and Sansome Sts. 



Safes to rent from $5 a year upwards 
Careful service to customers 



Trunks $1 a month 
Office Hours: 8 a. m. to 6 p. m. 



The German Savings and Loan Society 

526 CALIFORNIA ST., San Francisco 



Guaranteed Capital and Surplus 
Capital actually paid up in cash 
Deposits, Decetnbei 31, 1906 



$2,578,695,41 

1,000,000.00 

38,531,917.28 



OFFICERS -- President, F. TiUmann, Jr.; First Vice-President, Daniel Meyer 
Second Viee-President, Emil Rohte; Cashier, A. H. R. Schmidt; Assistant Cashier, 
William Herrmann; Secretary, Georae Toumy; Assistant Secretary, A. H. Mullet. 
Goodfellow & Eells, General Attorneys. 

BOARD OF DIRECTORS - F. Tillmann. Jr.. Daniel Meyer, Emil Rohte, Ittn. 
Sleinhart, 1. N. Waller, N. Ohlandt, J. W. Van Berjen. E. T. Kmse and W. S. 



MEMBER STOCK AND BOND EXCHANGE 
MEMBER SAN FRANCISCO MINING EXCHANGE 

J. C. WILSON 

BROKER 

STOCKS AND BONDS Kohl Bldg., 488 California St. 

INVESTMENT SECURITIES San Francisco 

Telephone Temporary 815 



24 



-THE WASP' 



Will Cause a Boom 

i If the Congressional Committee which visited 
Panama be not misinformed the Canal will be com- 
pleted in eight years and will prove a much less 
difficult task than was anticipated-. Its completion 
will have the effect of making San Francisco a very 
large city and should have an extraordinary effect 
on real estate values here. 

The Rich Man's Panic 
The recent panic in Wall Street like the great 
fire which swept San Francisco last year appears to 
have been most disastrous to the very rich men. It 
isn't every day that such capitalists as John Jacob 
Astor, Robert W. Goelet and Cornelius Vanderbilt 
are cinched to the tune of between eight and nine 
millions of dollars. That is the aggregate of the 
losses of these three solid citizens, as appraised by 
Wall Street rumors. This rich man's gambling 
panic does not seem to have lessened the real 
prosperity of the Nation so far. 

Building Up the City 

Said a bank president last week in answer to the 
question "how is the demand for money?" "It is very 
great — everybody wants money now. They have 
come to the conclusion to build to improve their prop- 
erty, and they all want to do it at once. It would take 
at least $300,000,000 to carry out their ideas, of which 
$100,000,000 will be wanted this year. The Savings 
Banks will do all they can to help the rebuilding of 
the City, but they cannot do it all." 

Will Bank Exchanges Decline 
It is intimated in some quarters that bank exchanges 
may fall away during the rest of the year. The 
reasons assigned for this are the losses by floods and 
the completion of insurance payments. But the latter 
has been practically settled since the first of the year 
and would have made its effect felt in January and 
February. These two months were, however, far 
ahead of the same months in 1906. It is true the 
March record came very close to that of last year, but 
the cause can be traced to the effect the Wall Street 
panics had on the speculative movement here and to 
the interference with business, which the long pro- 
tracted storm had caused. 

INVESTOR. 



A Pretty Souvenir 

The Continental Building & Loan Association 
has issued a very pretty souvenir in the form of a 
card suitable for hanging in a guest room. Mr. 
Corbin, the manager of the Association, got the 
idea from a friend, who when visiting Scotland 
recently, stopped for the night at one of the hos- 
pitable homes for which that country is noted. He 
was assigned to the spare bedroom at the time of 
retiring, and just as he was preparing to put out 
the light, his eyes caught sight of this particular 
poem hanging by the side of his bed. The words 
were so good, the sentiment so pure, and the time 
(bed-time) so appropriate, that it made him sleep 
sweeter than he had ever slept before. On arising 



in the morning he copied the poem and gave it to 
Mr. Corbin on his return to America. The enter- 
prising manager of the Continental thought it 
would be a good idea to send it to his patrons and 
so he had it printed in gold and it makes a very 
pretty souvenir. 

Many readers of The Wasp are no doubt familiar 
with the poem : 

Sleep sweetly in this quiet room, 

Oh thou my honored guest ; 
And let no mournful yesterday's 

Disturb thy peaceful rest. 

Nor let tomorrow break thy rest 

With dreams of coming ill, 
Dame Nature watches over thee, 

Her love protects thee still. 

Dismiss the world and all its cares, 

Put out each glaring light, 
The stars are watching overhead, 

Sleep Sweetly then. 

GOOD NIGHT. 



Germania National Bank 

OF SAIN FRANCISCO 
IS NOW OPEN FOR BUSINESS AT THEIR NEW QUARTERS 

521 MARKET STREET, Bet. First and Second Streets 

SAN FRANCISCO. CALIFORNIA 

OFFICERS: W. A. Frederick, President; F. Kronenberg, Vice-President; 
R. F. Crist, Vice-President; F. Kronenbers, Jr.. Cashier. 
Cable Address; Germania 



PHIL S. MONTAGUE, Stock Broker 

Member of S. F. Stock Exchange 

Goldfield, Tonopah, Manhattan and Bullfrog Stocks Bought and Sold. 
Write for Market Letter. 

339 BUSH STREET, STOCK EXCHANGE BUILDING 



BURNED HOMES MUST BE REBUILT 

The Continental Building and Loan Association 

Having sustained practically no loss in the recent calamity, is in a 
position to loan money to people who wish lo rebuild. San Francisco 
must restore her homes as well as her business blocks. 

DR. WASHINGTON DODGE, Pr«. 

GAVIN McNAB, Atty. 

WM. CORBIN, Sec. and Gen. Mgr. 

OFFICES -COR. CHURCH AND MARKET STREETS 
OPEN AND DOING BUSINESS 



Rooms 7 to 11 



Telephone i'mpy. 1415 



W. C. RALSTON 

Stock and Bond Broker 

Member San Francisco Stock and Bond Exchange 
Mining Stocks a Specially 



Bedford McNeill 
Western Union 
Leibera 



368 BUSH STREET 

San Francisco 



-THE WASP - 



25 




Friday. — Well, dear me ! What silly things young 
girls are. One of them was telling today at Mrs. 
Shoddy's tea about the lovely time she had at Del 
Monte and the awfully nice man she had such a des- 
perate flirtation with. Goodness me ! She came right 
out with the man's name and kept repeating it, though 
I could see the woman that sat next to her kicking her 
on the feet to shut her up. When we came away Mrs. 
Gayleigh said : 

"Did you ever see such a fool as that girl?" 

"The idea," said I, "of her talking of such things in 
public." 

"Yes, and the man's wife was sitting right there, 
listening to every word of it. Didn't you see me kick 
her. I bet her shins are black and blue. But it didn't 
do any good." 

"She'll feel mighty cheap when she finds out what 
a fool she made of herself," said I. 

"Not a bit," said Mrs. Gayleigh. "That kind of a 
girl is too full of conceit to have anything like that 
worry her. She'll just be tickled to death that she 
made some other woman jealous." 

Gracious ! I hope that husband gets what's coming 
to him. It does me good to see the villains Gripped up 
and exposed once in a while. I suppose his wife is a 
lovely woman. That's always the way. It's the 
reprobates that go around passing themselves off as 
gay bachelors and winking at every girl they meet that 
have the most devoted and amiable wives. I've noticed 
it and that's one reason I've kept from marrying. 



Well, goodness me ! How fickle young girls are. 
Mrs. Gabbe and Miss Gushwell were in to see me 
today. They were telling me all about an Alameda 
girl that gave a tea, as everybody thought to an- 
nounce her engagement to a nice young man in 
Fruitvale. Well what does she do but turn around 
and announce that she is going to marry Mr. 
Meadow, who is old enough to be her grandfather. 

"I suppose the old man is rich ?" I remarked when 
Miss Gushwell and Mrs. Gabbe, who were at the 
tea, told me all about it. 

''He's suspected of wealth, but he mightn't be so 
guilty as people think," said Mrs. Gabbe. 

Then they went on talking about all the San 
Francisco and Oakland people, that have married 



f<T money and got badly fooled. 

Goodness me! I should think a lot of people's 
ears would have burned. 

Mrs. Gabbe, who remembers away back to '49, 
says that one of the worst cases on record was 
when old Colonel Brannigan married the most 
beautiful Norwegian blonde in the Mission. She 
was pretty enough to make every man on the street 
stop and gaze after her, and the old Colonel was 
homely enough to stop every clock he looked at. 
He was a chambermaid in a livery stable, Mrs. 
Gabbe says, before he made a lot of money in 
the stock market. Then he bought a mansion on 
Nob Hill and used to drive to the matinees in a 
coach and four. The style he put on was killing. 
Well goodness me! It all amounted to nothing. 
Mrs. Gabbe says they rigged up a game on him 
in the stock market and took all his money away 
and now the beautiful wife is working for her living. 
Oh mercy ! 

Gracious, if I married an old bear for his money 
and got fooled I'd feel terrible. But pshaw, I 
wouldn't marry the best man that ever lived if he 
had millions. 

TABITHA TWIGGS. 



J. F. Rossi Resumes Business 
The many friends and patrons of John F. Rossi, 
the well-known and popular merchant will be 
pleased to learn that he has entirely recovered from 
the serious accident he met with on the fateful 
18th of April last. He was incapacitated from at- 
tending to any business for many months, but he 
has now got into harness again and has opened a 
well-appointed and handsome retail liquor store 
at his former location on Washington Street near 
Front. 

"Purity" is the standard under which Mr. Rossi 
has made his establishment noted among consumers 
of this City for over a generation. He has paid 
every attention to the household trade and handles 
the celebrated double stamp Belmont Whisky, the 
famous Loveland Rye and the Italian-Swiss Col- 
ony Wines in addition to the best brands of do- 
mestic and imported case goods. At the present 
time J. F. Rossi is busy receiving congratulations. 



Popular French Restaurant 



Regular Dinner 75c 

Meals a ta carte at any hour 



Private Dining: Rooms 

[or Banquets, etc. 




497 Golden Gate Ave. 

Comer Polk Street 



Phone Market 2315 



26 



-THE WASP 



WWMWrtMSfflM 



^miiitamama^m^ai»MMM»MM«M»iF : 



Fireman's Fund Insurance Company 
of San Francisco, Cal. 




JOTWITHSTANDING its tremendous losses in trie San 
Francisco disaster, this veteran company has been restored to 
splendid financial strength. Cfllts stockholders have paid into 
the company an assessment of over $2,000,000 in cash. 
€JAt no time since the San Francisco disaster of April 1 8, 
1 906, have its agents or policy holders been left unprotected or uncared for. 
fJThrough the medium of a new Corporation, the safety of its outstanding policy 
holders has been secured and guaranteed, ^f All losses that have occurred since 
the San Francisco conflagration have been paid promptly in full and in cash. 
<JThe Company has paid and discharged on account of the San Francisco con- 
flagration, the enormous sum of $ 1 0,800,000.00. Being the largest amount 
of loss ever sustained by any insurance company in the history of 
underwriting. <JThe rehabilitated Fireman's Fund Insurance Company 
now presents to its Agents and to the public the following statement of its 
financial condition: 

ASSETS 

Bonds, Stocks, Mortgages and other Approved Securities . . $5,772,374.28 

LIABILITIES 

Reserve for Additional Dividend to San Francisco Claimants 

Reserve for Outstanding Losses 

Reserve for Unearned Premiums on Outstanding Policies 
Capital Stock paid up in cash 



$ 650,000.00 

291,653.00 

2,702,606.75 

1 ,600,000.00 

528,114.53 



Net Surplus 

Total $5,772,374.28 

SURPLUS TO POLICY HOLDERS ...... $2,128,114.53 



WM. J. DUTTON, President BERNARD FAYMONVILLE, Vice-President 

J. B. LEVISON, Second Vice-President and Marine Secretary LOUIS WEINMANN, Secretary 

THOMAS M. GARDINER, Treasurer 



MMItMMMMMMMMMMilHM^^ 



THE WASP- 



27 



Automobile News 

The $6000 match made by the Pope-Hartford and 
i Hdsmobile representatives here terminated by the 
latter car reaching San Francisco from Los' An- 
geles last Saturday morning, having got through 
the fearful roads caused by rain storms and wash- 
outs in safety. The Pope-Hartford met with dis- 
aster in the Tejon Canyon forty-five miles from 
Bakersfield, where the rear axle was badly sprung 
and the car was put practically out of the race at 
that point. The Elmore car, another entry in the 
hazardous race, was stalled several miles in the 
rear of the Pope-Hartford car. Thus ends the first 
chapter in this much talked of race, the Oldsmo- 
bile taking all the honors ami incidentally the cash. 

* * * 

During last year's selling season the White Co. 
manufactured and sold more automobiles by a 
liberal margin than any other maker of large tour- 
ing cars in the world. This has been the case for 
several years past. While they are naturally grati- 
fied at this numerical demonstration of the popular- 
ity of the White Steamers they take much more 
pride in the fact that their cars are purchased by 
individuals who are particularly well fitted to make 
an intelligent choice. The sales up to the present 
time have far exceeded the most sanguine expecta- 
tions of the Company and they bid fair to run far 
ahead of last season. 

For a family auto there is none better than the 
White Steamer. Instead of starting with a heavy 
crank the White starts, not uncertainty, but posi- 
tively, at the flash of a match and three minutes 
later, can be on the road. After steam has once 
been raised, the car may then be started and 
stopped, left standing for hours and restarted at 
will. Simplicity pervades it throughout. 

* * * 

Herbert Dee, of Oakland, was showing his new 
Oldsmobile to a number of admiring friends before 
the "U Auto" cafe in Oakland last Friday, when a 
mild appearing gentleman came up and, after com- 
plimenting him upon his car, its racy appearance, 
etc., suggested to Dee he heard it was customary 
to have a number on the back of the machine and 
asked him why he didn't have one. "Oh," said 
Dee, "they are not particular over here.- I run that 
way all the time." "All right," replied the mild 
appearing one, "you may take me down to the City 
Hall and tell that little story to the booking ser- 
geant." Now, when any one wants to talk to Dee, 
they must give their name, address and occupation. 

* * * 

One of the interesting social events for this 
Saturday afternoon is the bridge party to be given 
by Mrs. Harry Bostwick at her mother's home at 
the corner of Washington and Laurel Streets. 
Several guests will come in later to tea at 4 o'clock. 

* * # 

In Florida 
"Are there an) r sharks around here, Captain?" 
"I don't know. Never stopped at the hotel." 



An interesting exhibition of paintings by Mr. 
Walter Cox, including some fine portraits, is now on 
view at the Kilby Art Gallery, 1652 Van Ness- 
Avenue. 



LIQUEUR 



Peres Chartreux 



CREEN AND YELLOW 




Liqueur 

Peres Chartreux 




The Choicest 

After - Dinner 

Liqueur 



This cut represents the bottle and label 
employed in the putting up of the 
article since the removal of the 
Carthusian Monks from the Monastery 
of La Grande Chartreuse in France 
to Tarragona, Spain. 



At first-class Wine Merchants, Grocers, Hotels, Cafes, 

Batjer & Co., 45 Broadway, New York, N, Y. 

Sole Agents for United States. 



H. C. RAAP, Manager 



Telephone Franklin 588 



National Cafe and Grill 

918-920 O'FARRELL ST., San Francisco 

SPECIAL MERCHANTS HOT LUNCH 25c 



Including Tea, Coffee, Wine or Beer. 1 1 a. 
A LA CARTE al all hours. 



Regular Dinner 50c 



to 2 p. m. 
Special Sunday Dinner 75c 





\L. CONEY J. HUFF 




Kadee Hammam Baths 


». 


TURKISH AND HAMMAM BATHS 

PRIVATE ROOM AND BATH $1.00 

Open Day and Night 

GEARY AND G0UGH STREETS 

itricdy Fim Class Phone West 3725 J 



.ASSIFIED 

* "Directory 




F SAN FRANCISCO'S 

LEADING BUSINESS HOUSES 
and PROFESSIONAL PEOPLE. 

REVISED AlfG CO&RECTEJd WEEKLY. 




MISCELLANEOUS. 

Builders' Exchange, 226 Oak St., S. F. 

Builders' Association, 96 Fulton St. 

ADDRESSING MACHINES. 

Elliott Addressing Machine Co., 68 Stock- 
ton St.. S. F. 

ADVERTISING AGENCIES. 

Bolte & Braden, 105-107 Oak St., S. F.; phone 
Park 289. 

Cooper Adv. Agency, F. J., West Mission and 
Brady sts. 

Dake Adv. Agency, Midway Bldg., 779 
Market st. Phone Temporary 1440. 

Fisher, L. P. Adv. Agency, 836 North 
Point St.. S. F.; Phone Emergency 684. 

Hadley, M. L., Advertising Agency, 26 
Clay st. 

Johnston-Dienstag Co., 2170 Post St., 

Tuttle, L. T„ 332 Delbert Block, cor. Van 

Ness Ave. and O'Farrell. 
Walker, Shirley, Advertiser. Midway 
building, 779 Market street, phone 
Temporary 1839. 

AGENTS— MANUFACTURERS. 
Wlrtner, Jno. J., 2330 Vallejo St., S. F. 

ARCHITECTS. 
Carson, John, Vice-President and 
Manager H. C. Chivers, 1627 Sut- 
ter St. 
Chivers, Herbert C, 1627 Sutter St., S. 
F.; Walnwrlghts Building, St. Louis, 
Mo. 
Curtis John M., 2601 Buchanan St.. S. F. 
Havens & Toepke, 611-612 Mutual Savings 

Bank. 
Reed Bros, Temporary Offices, 2326 

Gough St.. S. F. 
Thos. J. Welsh, John W. Carey, associate 
architects, 40 Haight St., S. F. 
ART DEALERS. 
Gallagher Bros., 2208 Geary st, S. F. 
Gump, S. & G., 1645 California St., S. F. 
Schussler Bros., 341 Grove St. 
ATTORNEYS. 
A. Heynemann, 2193 Fillmore St. 
Phone West 6405. 

Bahrs, George H., 1901 Post st., cor. 

Fillmore. S. F. 
Campbell, Metson & Drew, 1101 Laguna St., 

cor. of Turk St., S. F. 
Dorn, Dorn & Savage, 717 Van Ness 

ave. 
Drum, J. S., 1416 Post st, S. F. 
Dlnkelsplel. Henry G. W., 1266 Bills st, 

S. F. PHONE, WEST 2355. 
Goldstone, Louis, 1124 Fillmore st 
Heller, Powers & Ehrman, Union 

Trust bldg. 
Hewlett. Bancroft and Ballantine, 
Monadnock Bldg., Phone Temporary 

972. 
McEnerney, Garret W., 1416 Post St.. S.F. 
Lawlor, Wm. P., Judge, The Family 

Club, 1900 Franklin st., S. F. 
O'Callaghan. Chas. F., 928 Fillmore St., 

Pringie & Pringle, 2219 Fillmore st. 

Ricketts, A. H. (Title Quieting Co.) 
1136 O'Farrell street. Tel. Emer- 
gency 788. 

Shadburne, Geo., D., 904 Devisadero 
St., S. F. 

Shortridge, Samuel M., 1101 O'Farrell st, 
S. F. 



Edward B. Young, 4th Floor, Union Trust 
Bldg., S. F. Telephone, Temporary, 833. 

AUTOMOBILES AND SUPPLIES. 

Auto Livery Co., Golden Gate and Van 

Ness Ave., S. F. 
Boyer Motor Car Co., 408 Golden Gate ave. 

Phone, Emergency 655. 
Leavltt, J. W. & Co., 441 Golden Gate 

Ave., S. F. : 370, 12th St., Oakland. 
Lee Cuvler, 359 Golden Gate Ave., S. F. 
Middleton Motor Car Co., 550 Golden Gate 

Ave., S. F. 
Mobile Carriage Co., Golden Gate Ave. 

and Gough sts., S. F. 
Pioneer Automobile Co., 901 Golden Gate 

Ave., S. F. ; and 12th and Oak sts., 

Oakland 
Karig Auto Co. 1377 Broadway, Oakland. 
White Sewing Machine Company, 

Market and Van Ness ave., S. F. 

BANKS. 

American National Bank, Merchants Ex. 

Bldg., S. F. 
Anglo California Bank Lt., cor. Pine and 

Sansome sts., S. F. 
Bank of California, 424 California St., 

S. F. 
California Safe Deposit and Trust Co., 

cor. California and Montgomery sts., 

S. F. 
Central Trust Co., 42 Montgomery st., 

s F 
Crocker - Woolworth National Bank, 

Crocker Bldg.. S. F. 
First National Bank, Bush and Sansome 

sts., S. F. 
French Savings Bank, Union Trust Bldg., 

and Van Ness and Eddy. 
Germania National Bank, 621 Market St., 

S. F.; Phone Park 792. 
German Savings and Loan Society, 626 

California st, B. F. 
Halsey. N. W. & Co., 413 Montgomery 

St. S. F. 
International Banking Corporation, 2046 
Sutter street, and 415 Montgomery 
Hlbernia Savings and Loan Society, 

Jones and McAllister sts.. S. F. 
Humboldt Savings Bank, 626 Market st, 

S. F. 
Mechanics' Saving Bank, 143 Montgom- 
ery st, S. F. 
Metropolis Trust and Savings Bank, 

12 37 Van Ness Ave. 
Mutual Savings Bank of San Francisco, 

710 Market St., opp. 3d st, S. F. 
National Bank of the Pacific, Call Bldg., 

S. F. 
Renters Loan and Trust Co., Commercial and 

Savings Bank, 115 Hayes Street. 
San Francisco Savings Union, N. W. 

cor. California and Montgomery sts., 

S. F. 
Savings and Loan Society, 101 Mont- 
gomery St.. S. F. 
Security Savings Bank, 315 Montgomery 

St., S. F. 
Standard Bank, 1818 Market St., at 

Van Ness, S. F. 
The Market Street Bank and Safe De- 
posit Vault. Market and 7th sts., S. F. 
Union Trust Co.. 4 Montgomery st, S. F. 
Wells -Fargo Nevada National Bank. 

Union Trust Bldg., S. F. 
Western National Bank, Powell and 

Market sts., S. F. 

BATHS 

Colonial Baths, 1745 O'Farrell St. 
Oriental Turkish, cor. Eddy and Lar- 
kin Streets, City. W. J. Blum- 



berg & Bro. 

BITTERS. 

Lash's Bitters Co.. 1721 Mission st, S. F. 

BREWERIES. 
Albion Ale and Porter Brewery, 1007-9 Golden 

Gate Ave., S. F. 
Buffalo Brewing Co., 126-129 King at, 

S. F.; Phone Main 1010. 
National Brewing Co., 762 Fulton St., 

S. F. 
Lochbaum, A. H. Co., 125 King St., 8. F. ; 

Phone Main 1010. 
S. F. Breweries, Ltd.. 240 2d St., S. F. 
Rapp, Jno. & Co., Agents Rainier Beer, 

8th and Townsend sts.. S. F. 

oKIDGE BUILDERS. 

Pac. Construction Co., 17 Spear St., S. F. 

San Francisco Bridge Co., 623 Monad- 
nock Bldg.. S. F. 
BROKERS— STOCKS AND BONDS. 

Hutton, E. F. & Co., 490 California st. 

Rollins'. E. H. & Sons. 804 Kohl Bldg; 

Telephone Temporary 163; S. F. 
Wilson. J. C. 488 California st. S. F. 
Sutro & Co., 412 Montgomery St.. 

S. F. 
Montague. Phil S., 339 Bush St.. Stock 

Exchange Bldg. 
Zadlg & Co., 324 Bush St., S. F. 

BUILDING AND LOAN ASSOCIA- 
TIONS. 
Continental Building and Loan Associa- 
tion, Church and Market sts., 8. F. 
BUTCHERS' SUPPLIES. 
Pacldc Butchers' Supply Co., 316 Bry- 
ant st, bet 1st and 2d sts.. 8. F. 
CARPET CLEANING. 
Spauidlng, J. & Co., 911-21 Golden Oat* 
Ave.; Phone Park SSL 

CLEANING AND DYEING. 
Thomas, The F. Parisian Dyeing and 
Cleaning Works. 1168 McAllister St.. 
S. F. 

CLOTHIERS— RETAIL. 
Hub, The, Chas. Kellus & Co., Kin« 

Solomon Bldg., Sutter and Fillmore 

sts.. S. F. 
Roos Bros., cor. O'Farrell and Fillmore 

sts., S. F. 

COMMISSION AND SHIPPING MER- 
CHANTS. 

Dollar, Robert Co., Steuart street dock. 

Johnson Locke Mercantile Co., 213 Sansome 
St., S. F. 

..la) don ado A Co., Inc., 2020 Buchanan 
st, S. F.; Tel. 2830. 

The J. K. Armsby Co., The Armsby 
Bldg., cor. New Montgomery and How- 
ard sts.. 8. F. 

CONTRACTORS AND BUILDERS. 

Atlantic, Gulf and Pacific Co., 523 Monadnock 

Bldg. 
Fisher Construction Co., 1414 Post st, 

S F 
Gray Rros.. 2d st, adjoining W. F. & Co. 

Bldg.. S. F. 
S. F. Construction Co., A. E. Buckman, 

ores. ; A. J. Raisch, sec; 636 Market; Tel. 

Franklin 256. 
Trounson. J., 1751 Lyon St.; also 176 Ash 

Ave., S. F. 

CROCKERY AND GLASSWARE. 

Nathan Dohrmann & Co., 1520-1550 
Van Ness ave. 



-THE WASP 



29 



DENTISTS. 
Oreian B. Burns. 2077 Sutter St.. West 6736. 
Decker, Dr. Chas. W., 1316 Sutter St. 
Knox. Dr. A. I.. 1615 Fillmore St., formerly 

of Grant Bldg. 
Morffew 4 Heel. 1766 Pine sL. S. F.: 

Tel. West 4301: formerly Examiner 

Bldg. 

O'ConneM. Dr. Robert E. and Dr. George. 
211 Dcvlsadero at, S. P. 

Albert S. Vanderhurst, 2077 Sutter St.. West 
6736. 

DRY GOODS— RETAIL. 

Emporium. The. 1201 Van Ness Ave., S. 
F.; Phone West 1361. 

Newman & Levison. Nan Ness Ave. and Sutt 

O'Connor. Mofflt A Co.. Van Ness Ave. 
and Pine St., S. F. 

City of Paris. Van Ness Ave and Wash- 
ington St., S. F. 

White House, Van Ness Ave. and Pine 
It, S. F. 

ENGINEERS. 
.Ulantlc. Gulf & Pacific Co.. 623 Monad- 
nock Bldg.. 3. F. 

EXPRESS. 
Wells. Fargo A, Co. Express. Golden 
Gate Ave. and Franklin St., Fer- 
ry Bldg., and 3d St. Depot. S. F. 
FEATHERS— UPHOLSTERY. 
Crescent Feather Co., 19th and Harrison 
sts.. 8. F. 

FLORISTS AND DECORATORS. 

Clels & Jacobsen, 942 Fillmore St. 

near McAllister, Phone Park 363. 

Frank &. Parodi Co., 1215 McAllister 

street, formerly 109 Geary street, 

phone Park, 794. 

FRUITS AND VEGETABLES. 
Omey St Goetting, Geary and Polk sts., S. F. 

FUNERAL DIRECTORS. 
Carew & English. 1618 Geary St.. bet. 
Buchanan and Webster sts.. S. F. ; 
Phone West 2604. 
Porter & White. 1631 Golden Gate Ave., 
S. F. ; Phone West 770. 

FURNITURE. 
A. B. Smith Co.. 702 Van Ness Ave.. 

cor. Turk St., 8. F. 
Breuner. John & Co.. 1491 Van Ness Ave., 

Sanitary Bedding House, The, 778- 
780 Golden Gate ave., N. B. cor. 
Gough. Beds and Bedding ex- 
clusively. Tel. Emergency 596. 
GAS STOVE8. 

Gas Co.. The. Halght and Fillmore sta., 
8. F. 

GENTS FURNISHERS. 

Bullock & Jones Company, 801 Van Ness 
Ave., cor. Eddy sL, S. F. 

Hansen and Elrick, 1105-7 Fillmore 
St., nr. Golden Gate ave., phone 
West 5678. 

Roberts & Bayless, Men's Furnishers, 64S Van 
Ness Ave., near Turk. 

HARDWARE AND RANGES. 
Alexander- Yost Co., Pine and Polk ata.. 

8. F. 
Baker A Hamilton. 115 Berry at, near 

3d; Phone West 3689 and 3690. 
Dunham. Carrigan & Hayden Co., office 

131-153 Kansas St.. 3. F. 
lis, John G. & Co., 827 Mission St.. S. F. 
Montague, W. W. & Co., Turk & Polk 
sts., S. F. 

HARNESS AND SADDLERY. 
Davis, W. & Son. 2020 Howard at, bet 

16th and 17th. S. F. 
Lelbold Harness and Carriage Co., 1214 
Golden Gate Ave., S. F. 
HATTERS. 
Korn, Eugene, the hatter, 946 Van 

Ness Avenue. 
Meussdorffer. J. C. Sons, 909 Fillmore 

St.. S. F. 
Porcher, J., 715-717 Golden Gate Ave., 
near Franklin, 3. F. ; formerly Odd Fel- 
lows Bldg. 
HOSPITALS AND SANITARIUMS. 
German Hospital, Scott and Duboce 

Ave. 
Harbor View Sanatorium, Harbor 
View, S. F. 



Keeley Institute, H. L. Batehelder, 

Mgr.; 262 Devisadero St., S. F. 
McNutt Hospital. 1800 O'Farrell at. 

S. F. 
St. Luke's Hospital, 26th and Valen- 
cia St. 

JEWELERS. 
Baldwin Jewelery Co., 1621 Sutter al- 
and 1261 Van Ness Ave., 3. *. 
Bohm, Bristol, Van Ness and Sacra- 
mento St. 
Glinderman, Win., 1532-1534 Fill- 
more, formerly Examiner Bldg. 
Shreve & Co.. cor. Post and Grant Ave., 
and Van Nes sand Sacramento sts., S. F. 
:.AUNDRIES. 
Lace House French Laundry. Cerclat & 
Co.. propj. : 1047 McAllister at; for- 
merly at 342 McAllister; Tel. Park 861. 
La Grande Laundry. 234 12th at. S. F. 
Palace Hotel Laundry and Kelly Laundry 

Co., Inc., 2343 Post st„ phone West 58S4. 
San Francisco Laundry Association, 1408 
Turk st, S. F.; Phone West 793. 
LIME. 
Holmes Lime Co., Mutual Savings 
Bank Bldg., 710 Market St. 

LUMBER. 
Nelson, Chas. Co.. 1st and Clay sts.. 

Oakland; 144 Steuait St., S. P. 
Redwood Manufacturers Co., Room 506 
Monadnock Bldg, 3. F., Doors, Win- 
dows, Tanks, etc. 
Slade, S. E., Lumber Co., 65 Mission 

street, S. F. 
Union Lumber Co., office 909 Mo- 
nadnock building 

MACARONI AND VERMICELLI, 
t. R. Podesta. 612 Washington at S. F 
MOVING AND STORAGE COMPANIES. 
Beklns' Van and Storage Co., 13th and 

Mission sts.. S. F. ; Phone Park 169 

and 1016 Broadway. Oakland. 
St. Francis Transfer and Storage Company. 

Office, 1402 Eddy St. Tel. West 2680. 
Union Transfer Co., 2116 Market St., 

S. F. 

Notaries Public. 

Deane, Jno, J., temporarily at 2077 
Sutter street and 24 64 Vallejo 
street, S. F. 

OPTICIANS. 
Mayerle. George, German expert, 1115 
Golden Gate Ave., S. F. ; Phone West 
3766. 
San Francisco Optical Co. "Spences," 
are now permanently located at 
627 Van Ness ave, between Gold- 
en Gate avenue and Turk st. 
"Branch" 1613 Fillmore near 
Geary. 
Standard Optical Co., 808 Van Ness ave., 
near Eddy st. 

PACKERS. 
Phoenix Packing Co., 118 Davis St., S. F. 
PAINTERS AND DECORATORS. 
Keefe. J. H., 820-822 O'Farrell St., S. F., Tel. 
Franklin 2055. 

Tozer, L. & Son Co., Inc., 1527 Pine 
and 2511 Washington St., near 
Fillmore, S. F. 

PAINTS AND OILS. 
Bass-Hueter Paint Co., 1816 Market 

st. 
Paraflne Paint Co., 405 Union Savings 
Bank Bldg., Oakland; Sales Dept 
Guerrero near 15th St., S. F. 

PHOTO ENGRAVERS. 
Cal. Photo Eng. Co., 141-143 Valencia St. 

PHYSICIANS. 
Bowie, Dr. Hamilton C, formerly 293 
Geary St., Paul Bldg.; now 
14 th and Church sts. 
Bryant, Dr. Edgar R.. 1944 Fillmore 
st. cor. Pine; Tel. West 6667; Res. 
3869 Jackson St.: Tel. West 816. 
D'Evelyn, Dr. Frederick W.. 2116 Cal- 
ifornia St.. S. F.; and 2103 Clinton 
Ave.. Alameda. 



Thorne, Dr. W. S., 1434 Post St., S. 
F. 

r-IANOS — MANUFACTURERS AND 

DEALERS. 
Ba.awln. D. H. & Co.. 2612 Sacramento 

st.. near Fillmore. S. F.; Phone West 

1869. 

RESTAURANTS. 
Marchand's, 14J4 McAllister St. 
Moraghan, M. B. Oyster Co., 1212 

Golden Gate Ave., S. F. 
Old Poodle Dog, 824 Eddy St., near Van 

Ness ave. 



St. Germain Restaurant, 4 97 Golden 
Gate Ave., Phone Emergency 300. 
Swain's Restaurant, 1111 Post St., 8. F. 
Techau Tavern. 1321 Sutter St., 8. F. 
Thompson's, formerly Oyster Loaf, 

1727 O'Farrell St. 

SAFES AND SCALES. 
Herring-Hall Marvin Safe Co.. office ant* 
salesrooms, Mission St., bet. Seventh ant 
Eighth sts.; phone Temp'y, 1037. 
SEWING MACHINES. 
Whee.er & Wilson and Singer Sewing 
Machines, 1431 Bush St., cor. Vai 
Ness Ave., S. F. ; phone Emergencj 
301, formerly 231 Sutter street. 
STORAGE. 

Bekins Van ft Storage Co., 13th and Missioc 

Sts., S. F.; Phone Market 2558. 
Pierce Rodolph Storage Co., Eddy 
and Fillmore Sts., Tel. West 828 

SURGICAL INSTRUMENTS AND HOS' 

PITAL SUPPLIES. 
Walters ft Co., formerly Shutts, Waltera It 
Co., 1608 : leiner St., S. F. 

TALKING MACHINES. 
Bacigalupi. Peter, 1113-1116 Fillmore 
st. S. F. 

TAILORS. 
Lyons. Charles, London Tailor, 1432 Fill- 
more St.. 731 Van Ness Ave., S. F.; 
958 Broadway. Oakland. 
McMahon, Keyer and Stiegeler Bros., 

Van Ness Ave. and Ellis, O'Far- 
rell and Fillmore. 

Neuhaus & Co., Inc., 1618 Ellis it 
near Fillmore. S. F. 

Rehnstrom, C. H.. 2415 Fillmore it.; 
formerly Mutual Savings Bank Bldg. 

TENTS AND AWNINGS. 
Thorns F., 1209 Mission St., corner of Eighth, 
S. F. 

TRICYCLES. 
Eames Tricycle Co., Invalid Chairs, 2108 
Market St.. S. F. 

WINES & LIQUORS — WHOLESALE 

Balke. Ed. W., 14 98 Eddy St., cor. 

Fillmore. 
Blumenthal. M. & Co.. Inc., temporary 

office. ir>21 Webster st. S. F. 
Butler John & Son. 2209 Stelner at, 

Revnoi'ds. Chas. M. Co., 514 Halght at 

S. F. 
Rusconl, Fisher & Co., 649 Turk st, 3. F 
Berman Wine & Liquor Co., family trade 

Siebe Bros. & Placeman, 419-425 
Larkin street, Phone, Emergency 
349. 
Weniger. P. J. & Co., N. E. cor. Van 
Ness ave. and Ellis st. Tel. Emer- 
gency 309. 
Wlchman. LutEen & Co.. formerly of 29- 
31 Battery st. R. F.; temporary office, 
Harrison and Everett sts., Alameda, 
Cal.: Phone Alameda 1179. Gilt Edge 
Whiskey 
WINES AND LIQUORS— RETAIL. 

Ferguson, T. M. Co., Market street. 
Same old stand. Same Old Crow 
Whiskey. 
Fischer, E. R.. 1901 Mission street, 

corner of Fifteenth. 
The Metropole.John L. Herget and Wm. H. 
Harrison. Props., N. W. cor. Sutter and 
Steiner Streets. 
Tuxedo. The. Eddie Graney. Prop.. SW 
cor. Fillmore ^ O'Farrelt ptp 

YEAST MANUFACTURERS. 
Golden Gate Compressed Yeast Co.. 2401 FiB- 



30 



THE WASP- 



Amusements 



L. R. Stockwell, one of the oldest 
and most popular comedians that has 
ever appeared in this City, has been 
prevailed upon to once more appear 
in one of his favorite roles. Mr. 
Stockwell will present "The Cricket 
on the Hearth" at the Colonial for 
one week, beginning next Monday 
night. The star will be seen as Caleb 
Plumber and will be supported by 
the members of the Colonial Stock 
Company. It was in this character 
that the late Joe Jefferson achieved 
so much success. The production 
will be elaborately staged and the 
many friends of the veteran comedian 
are planning to give him a rousing re- 
ception at the opening performance. 

"Kreutzer Sonata," the strong Rus- 
sian drama which opened so aus- 
piciously Monday last, is pleasing 
large audiences at the Colonial this 
week and will continue to be the at- 
traction up to and including Sunday 
night, with Saturday and Sunday 
matinees. Izetta Jewell does some 
exceutionally clever emotional work 
as Olga Nevel. A. Burt Wesner 
shares the honors with the star. 
Frank Bacon does what he is called 
upon to do in his usual inimitable 
manner, while the balance of the com- 
pany are well cast. 

* * * 

A Tschaikowsky violin concerto, 
with Alexander Petschnikoff, the Rus- 
sian violinist, as the soloist and with 
the accompaniment of the full Uni- 
versity Orchestra, will be the particu- 
lar novelty of the next symphony 
concert, to be given in the Greek 
Theatre by the University Orchestra 
at 3 o'clock Thursday afternoon, April 
11th. Mr. and Mrs. Petschnikoff will 
also play, with the University Or- 
chestra, the Mozart Concertante Sym- 
phonie for violin and viola, never be- 
fore given by any San Francisco sym- 
phony orchestra. Only once before 
has the University Orchestra partici- 
pated in the rendition of a concerto — 
a month ago, when Moriz Rosenthal, 
the Austrian pianist, was the soloist. 

The University Orchestra is to play 




also the First Symphony by Schu- 
mann. The recent programmes of the 
University Orchestra have been de- 
voted to ultra modern music — to 
Richard Strauss, the bete noire of the 
devoted classicist, to Debussy, a rep- 
resentat've of present-day French 
composition, and to the Slavic inno- 
vators, such as Rimsky-Korsagow, 
Naprawnik, and Seroflf. This next 
programme, with Schumann and 
Mozart as its principal composers, 
will delight the hearts of those who 
love best of all the older masters, 
while the addition of a Tschaikowsky 
concerto supplies the modern note as 
well. 

Petschnikoff, as soloist for the day, 
will play an Amati, famous among vio- 
lins and reputed of extraordinary 
sweetness and charm of tone. 



On Thursday week — April 18th — the 
students of the University are to pre- 
sent in the Greek Theatre the stately 
Eschylean tragedy, the "Eumenides," 
in the original Greek, with the beauty 
and dignity that the columned stage 
of the Greek Theatre makes possible. 



On Thursday, April 25th, the Uni- 
versity Chorus, with the accompani- 
ment of the University Orchestra, will 
present Rheinbergers Christoforus, 
and the present season of concerts and 
plays in the Greek Theatre will close 
with two more symphony concerts, 
on May 2d a symphony cencert with 
Hekking, the 'cellist, as soloist, and 
on May 9th with a programme wholly 
from the works of Richard Wagner 
and Richard Strauss, the two moderns 
who most have affected recent de- 
velopments in the art of music. 



She (after accepting him) — "And you 
have a rich bachelor uncle?" 

He— "Yes." 

She — "Mamma is a widow, you. 
know." 

He— "Well?" 

She — -"Can't we induce them to marry 
and thus keep the money in the family?" 



"In Arkansaw" is ihe play which 
is in its second week at Ye Liberty 
Theater in Oakland. It is from the 
pen of H. C. Cottrell, the stage man- 
ager of that play house. The enor- 
mous revolving stage of Ye Liberty, 
eighty-five feet in diameter, is used 



to good advantage in the farm scene. I 
Horses, cows, sheep and other farm 
animals play a large part in the en- 
semble of this scene. William Blair, ' 
to whom much of the credit for the 
staging of this performance belongs, ] 
is one of the head men in his profes- I 
sion. Altogether the performance is 1 
a notable one in the annals of stage j 
setting on the coast. 

* * * 

"Fantana" at the American Theater a 
is a very enjoyable performance. By 
this I do not mean that the perfor- I 
mance I saw on Easter day is a per- 
fect production. Far from it. It was I 
extremely crude in spots, nor were I 
the spots infrequent. At the same 
time, the piece has possibilities which 
in a few performances should have I 
been seized upon by the actors. No j 
doubt by now they have done so. ) 
The comedy element in "Fantana" is I 
of the delicate and refined order. 1 
There is none of the boisterous slap I 



DR. H. J. STEWART 

Organist of S;. Dominic's Church and 
the Temple Sherith Israel 

TEACHER OF SINGING 

Pianoforte, Organ, Harmony and Composition. 
New Studio: 2517 California Street. Hours, 10 
to 12 and 2 to 4 daily, except Saturdays. 

LOUIS H. EATON 

Organist and Director Trinity 
Church Choir 

Teacher of Voice, Piano and Organ 

San Francisco Studio; 1678 Broadway, Phone 
Franklin 2244. 

Berkeley Studio; 2401 Channing Way, Tues- 
day and Friday. 



MRS. OSCAR MANSFELDT 

PIANIST 

Tel. West 314 1801 Buchanan Si., Cor. Sutler 



William Keith 

Studio 

After Dec. 1st 1717 California St. 



SAMUEL M. SHORTRIDGE 



Attorney-at-Law 



1101 O'FARRELL ST. 
Cor. Franklin 



San Francisco, Cal. 



-THE WASP- 



31 




RACING 



New California Jockey Club 

Oakland Race 
Track 

SIX OR MORE RACES EACH WEEK DAY 
Rain or Shine 

Races commence al 1:40 p. m. sharp. 

For special Irains slopping at ihe tract lake S. P. Ferry, 
fool of Market street: leave at 12:00. thereafter every twenty 
minutes until 1 :40 p. m. No Smoking in last two cars, 
which arc reserved for ladies and their escorts. 

Reluming trains leave track after fifth and last races. 

THOMAS H. WILLIAMS. President. 
PERCY W. TREAT. Secretary. 




The best YEAST for all 
Kinds of Baking 

FRESH DAILY AT YOUR CROCER 



Palace fiotelEaundry 

AND KELLY LAUNDRY CO. INC. 

2343 Post Streot 

-A-x-o KTcwr Open 

TELEPHONE WEST 5854 

Work called forand returned on schedule 
time. 



Thompson's Formerly 

T f Now 

:er .Loai, open. 

near Fillmore 
Popular Prices 



Oyste 



1727 O'Farrell St. 
All night service 



f The only first-class up-to-date and modern 
7 Hammain Baths, buill especially for 

the purpose, in the city. 

Oriental Turkish Baths 



Corner Eddy and Larkfn Sts. 
Cold water plunge. 
Room including Bath, $1.00. 
Phone Franklin 653 
W. J. BLUMBERG & BRO., Props. 



~tick tommy rot which tends to bore 
sensible person to tiie utmost 
extreme. The lines are original and 
bright, anil the few interpellation; by 
Teddy Webb do little, if any, harm. 
In fact. I think that one of the fun- 
niest happenings took place in the 
audience. My friend of the itching 
palm, Supervisor Gallagher, was pres- 
ent and appeared somewhat uncom- 
fortable when a reference to the 
Grand Jury was made on the stage. 
Later on, wdien a fling at Abe Ruef 
was indulged in, Mr. Gallagher 
quietly withdrew, "Sic transit gloria 
mundi." James' $26,250 must have 
been in the same frame of mind when 
he "put through" the removal of 
Keane, secretary „f the Board of Su- 
pervisors on Monday. I note in the 
"Help Wanted" columns of a local 
daily that circus performers are 
wanted for a circus going East. "Big 
Jim" should obtain a ticket-of-leave 
from the Grand Jury and' join the 
show as an acrobat. As Raymond 
Hitchcock used to sing in "The Yan- 
kee Consul": "Isn't it funny what a 
difference a few hours make." 
* * * 

Florence Sinnott, the newly im- 
ported soubrette, is the bright par- 
ticular star of "Fantana." Dainty 
and chic, with a personal charm that 
carries from back drop, out over the 
footlights to the very lobby, she sings, 
talks and dances in a manner that 
convinces the auditor that she is the 
best as well as the most attractive 
soubrette that has ever appeared in a 
local production. She is a splendid 
team mate for Webb, who has, in 
this piece, a role that suits him to 
perfection — suits him as no other has 
since he played Sammy, the Tiger 
in "The Toreador" at the old Tivoli. 

Joe Miller, as Henri Pasdoit, the 
bogus count, does a clever piece of 
character work in this production. 
This is also his first appearance here, 
but he has a record behind him that 
would vouch for his ability, if his 
exceedingly clever work in "Fantana" 
needed further guarantee. 

Miss Beatty possesses a trifle too 
much embonpoint to flit girlishly 
about as Fantana should, but even at 
that her singing is excellent. Carl 
Haydn makes a manly lieutenant and 
his fine voice is heard to advantage. 
Mr. Wallerstedt also acquits himself 
with credit. 

The musical numbers are all good 
but those that stand out strongly are 
"Drop in On Me at Luncheon," "The 



COLONIAL THEATRE 

McAllister near Market Phone Market 920 

MARTIN F. KURTIG, President and Manager 



All Market Street Cora run direct to Theatre 

Week Beginning Monday, April 8 

Special Engagement of San Francisco's 
Popular Comedian 

L. R. STOCKWELL 

Supported by the Colonial Stoclc Company in 

Cricket on the Hearth 

Joe Jefferson's Great Success 



PRICES: Evenings, 25c, 50c, 75c. $1.00; Satur- 
day and Sunday Matinees, 25c and 50c. BARGAIN 
MATINEE, Wednesday, all scats reserved, 25c, Branch 
Ticket Office, Kohlcr & Chase's, Sutter and Franklin 
Streets. 

Monday, April 15, "Love's Tournament" 



DR. WM. D. CLARK 

Office and Res.: 2554 California St. 

San Francisco 

Hours — 1 to 3 p. m. and 7 to 8 p. m. 

Sundays — By appointment 

Phone West 390 

Contracts made with Hotels and Restaurants 
Special Attention given to Family Trade 

Established 1876 

THOMAS MORTON & SON 

Importer of and PA A I 
Dealers in \*\Jrll- 

N. W. Cor. Eddy and Hyde, San Francisco 
Phone Franklin 397 



Wichman, Lutgen & Co. 

Formerly of 
29-31 Battery Street. S. F. 

Cor. Everett and Tarrison Avenue 
ALAMEDA, CAL. 

Phone Alameda I 1 79 



GILT EDGE WHISKEY 



To restore gray hair to its natural 
color use Alfredum's Egyptian Henna — 
a. vegetable dye — perfectly harmless and 
the effect is immediate.. All druggists 
sell it. Langley & Michaels Co., agents. 






32 



-THE WASP 



ELECTRO 
SILICON 

Is Unequalled lor 

Cleaning and Polishing 
SILVERWARE. 

Send address for a FREE SAMPLE, ov 15c. in 
stamps for a full bos. 

Electro-Silicon Soap has equal merits. 
The Electro Silicon Co., 30 Cliff St., New York. 
Grocers and Druggists sell It. 



vLEIBOLD, 

Harness &|arr!age co- 

1214 GOLDEN GATE AVE. 

BET. WEBSTER AND FIUMORE 



A p c °Jp e CATARRH 

Ely's Cream Balm 

is quickly absorbed. 
Gives Relief at Once. 

It cleanses, soothes 
heals and protects 
the diseased mem- 
brane. It cures Ca- 
tarrh and drives 

away a Cold in the I _ .. 

Head quickly. 1 UflY FFVFR 
stores the Senses of •■" ■ ■ fc w fall 
Taste and Smell. Full size 50 cts. , at Drug- 
gists or by mail ; Trial Size 10 cts. by mail. 
Elv Brothers. 56 Warren Street, New York 



ASH SHBITTtRS 




O^REIGN R EM£nt 


rV 3 


V _rf«9»' \ 






F "a 

DOCTOR 






fcli 


KB* 






If 


COUGH/I 
cold 

AND 

GRIP 
CURE 

254 




Dr. Par 


Iter's Cou 


gh Cure 


One dose will stop a cough. 


It never fails. Try it. 25c. 


AT ALL DRUGGISTS 



Farewell Waltz," "Darby and Joan," 
"My Rickshaw of Bamboo," and "Just 
My Style." Thfs last, by the way, is 
a melody that has become the rage 
of two continents. Yes, taken all in 
all, "Fantana" is well worth seeing. 

¥ * * 

Joe Cawthorne defies the theory 
and practise of Dr. Osier. His youth 
and the puppyhood of Heck are al- 
most synonymous. He reminds me 
of a progressive jack-pot that rises 
from jacks to aces and back again. 
I have seen him in all roles from 
near-minstrelsy to Mother Goose, and 
now, lo and behold! the festive 
Joseph blooms like the century plant 
as a recurrent star of comic opera. 

Of "The Free Lance" Joe is the 
whole show. Miss Nella Bergen and 
the others are "also rans;" but Joe 
is "IT." When he is "on stage" "The 
Free Lance" moves. Exit Joe, and it 
droops. Sousa's music, however, is 
Sousaesque- enough to give the piece 
an individuality that makes attend- 
ance worth while. 

* * * 

Barney Bernard seems to have 
patched up his differences with Kolb 
and Dill so a revival of "Fiddle-de- 
dee" holds the boards at what The 
Call terms, ham Davis' firetrap. With 
due deference to The Call's sinister 
forebodings as to the ultimate fate 
of Davis' patrons, "Fiddle-de-dee" is 
quite as amusing as it ever was and 
I would just as soon risk a singeing 
to see the show. I wonder if The 
Call would be as pessimistic if Davis 
restored his patronage to the adver- 
tising columns of Mr. Spreckels' jour- 
nalistic experiment. 

"The Love Route" at the Alcazar 
is a pretty play, prettily staged and 
acted. 

* * * 

The Orpheum keeps up the stan- 
dard of its attractions to the high 
level set since its removal down town. 

* * * 

Match games of roller polo' are 
the chief attraction at the Auditorium 
Rink these days. As a skating place 
for ladies in the day time the rink 
maintains its great popularity. 

* * * 

The baseball season reopens toaay 
at the now grounds at Fifteenth and 
Valencia btreets. The district has 
been greatly improved since the fire. 
A new theater is being constructed 
in this locality also. 

"THE FIRST NIGHTER." 



ti 



T0Y0 KISEN 
KAISHA 

(Oriental Steamship Co.) 



Have Opened Their Permanent Offices at 

Room 240 James Flood Building 

San Francisco 

S. S. "Hongkong Mam" 

Wednesday, April 10, 1907 

S. S. "America Maru" (calls at Manila) . . 

Friday, May 3, 1907 

S. S. "Nippon Maru" (calls at Manila) . . . 
Friday, May 31, 1907 

Steamers will leave wharf, comer First and Brannan Sts., 
I P. M., for Yokohama and Hongkong, calling at Hono- 
lulu, Kobe, (Hiogo), Nagasaki and Shanghai, and con- 
necting at Hongkong with steamers for Manila, India, etc. 

No cargo received on board on day of sailing. 

Round- trip tickets at reduced rales. 

For Freight and passage apply at office, 240 James Flood 
Building. W. H. AVERY, Assistant General Manager. 



Peter Bacigalupi & Son 

Headguarters for Talking 

Machines, Records 

and Supplies 

1113-1115 Fillmore Street, San Francisco 

Albion Ale or Porter 

Is a Greal Flesh Builder, Tonic and Pleasant 
Drink. Pure F-xtract of Malt and Hops. 

BURNELL & CO. 

1007-1009 Golden Gate Ave., Near Laguna St. 



Dr. WONG HIM 

1268 O'Farrell St. 

Permanently Located 

HERB DOCTOR 



Father and Mother 
Write Letter In- 
dorsing Treatment. 

SAN FRANCISCO 
March 23. 1906 

To Whom it may 

r Concern: Our three- 
year- old daughter, 
having been ill for 
some time and being 
treated by the most prominent physicians, 
gradually became worse, and was finally 
given up by them. We were then recom- 
mended to Dr. V/ong Him. We started 
with his treatment and within two months' 
time our daughter was cured. 

Respectfully, 
MR. AND MRS. H. C. LIEB, 
2757 Harrison St., San Francisco 





Volume LVII-No. 15 



SAN FRANCISCO. APRIL 13, 1907 



Price 10 cents 



PUBLISHER'S NOTICE 

THE WASP .5 published every Saturday by the Wasp Publishing 
Company, at 141-143 Valencia Sireet. Subscriptions $5.00 per 
year, payable in advance, postage prepaid. Subscriptions to all 
foreign countries within the Postal Union, $6.00 per year. The trade on 
the Pacific Coast supplied by the San Francisco News Company. Eastern 
Agent* supplied by the American News Company, New York. 

THE WASP will pay for contributions suitable for its columns, and 
will endeavor to return all rejected manuscripts, but does not guarantee 
their return. Photographs will also be accepted and paid for., Address 
all communications to Wasp Publishing Company, 141-143 Valencia 
Street, San Francisco, Cal. 

TO ADVERTISERS— As the illustrated pages of THE WASP 
go to press early, alt advertisements printed in the same forms should be 
received, not later than Monday at noon. Changes of Advertisements 
should also be sent in on Monday to insure publication. 

Address, JAMES F. FORSTER, Business Manager. 
Telephone Market 316. 



Plain English 



The defeat of Mayor Duune in Chicago was an 
awful blow to Socialism, Hearstisrn and the labor- 
unionism in polities. All were combined to re-elect 
the Mayor, who went into office on the issue that the 
people should own the public utilities. Socialism has 
had set-backs in every direction during the past twelve 
months. Germany, where it has been on the increase 
for years, gave it a kick. Hearst met his Waterloo in 
New York, and now Chicago, the hotbed of anarchy 
and the worst governed municipality in the civilized 
world, San Francisco not excepted, has defeated 
Mayor Dunne and elected a Republican Mayor, who 
is pledged to oppose nearly every ism the defeated 
Democratic candidate stood for. 

The American Federation of Labor aided Mayor 
Dunne to the fullest. The day before the election, 
Emmet T. Flood, the general organizer of the Federa- 
tion, published the statement in the leading Chicago 
newspapers that "all the union labor men of Chicago 
are with Mayor Dunne. They will vote for him almost 
■to a man." 



places which employed only union labor, and Mayor 
Dunne got overwhelming majorities. Despite the 
strong support given him by the union labor poli- 
ticians, however, and apparently of the members of 
labor unions. Mayor Dunne was defeated in a most 
decisive manner. 



The unavoidable inference is that in the city of Chi- 
cago, strong union labor city though it be, the unions 
cannot elect a mayor unless they are aided by other 
citizens not enrolled in the American Federation of 
Labor. 



A moment's reflection will show that the union labor 
vote of America, unaided, is but a puny force in any 
great political contest where the American people may 
be fully aroused to go to the polls and express their 
preference. The Ml membership of the American 
Federation of Labor is only a million and a half, and 
fifty per cent, of these members are foreigners who 
have no votes. There are ten millions of people en- 
gaged in agriculture alone, and none of them belong 
to the Federation of Labor. 



In this great nation of eighty millions of people, 
the political strength of the Federation of Labor is 
insufficient of itself to accomplish much. It has been 
so skillfully handled, however by shrewd politicians 
that the American public overrates the strength im- 
mensely, the strength of the organization, and gives it 
credit for victories that it has never won. 

We have had a fine example of this in San Fran- 
cisco, where the Union Labor party of itself has cast 
over eleven thousand votes, and yet has been accred- 
ited with electing Sehmitz three times, though in any 
year when only two candidates ran, it required thirty 
thousand vote's to give a majority. How could the 
Union Labor party of eleven thousand citizens give 
Sehmitz thirty thousand votes ? It never did. Other 
interests and influences were exerted for Sehmitz and 
helped to make up his majority, and the Union Labor 
party got the credit of a victory it could never have 
won. 



Straw votes were taken in many factories and other 



We now hear a great deal in San Francisco about 
the thousands of mechanics who are coming here, at- 
tracted by the high wages, and we are told that at the 



-THE WASP 



next election their votes will be potent to elect all 
the Union Labor candidates that may be nominated. 
There is more exaggeration and bluff than plain truth 
in such statements. Workingmen are coming here in 
great numbers, itfis true, but a large majority of them 
are foreigners. 'A visit to any large building in 
course of construction will show you how numerous 
are the alien tradesmen. 

The other day I desired to speak with the superin- 
tendent of a prominent construction company and 
asked half a dozen carpenters if they had seen him 
around the building. The men were all Swedes and 
Germans and most of them could speak but little 
English. A very intelligent young American laborer, 
who in appearance and speech was far superior 
to the mechanics around him, gave the informa- 
tion I required. This man spoke like a person of edu- 
cation, yet he was performing the commonest drudgery 
for $2.50 a day, while the foreign mechanics were paid 
from $5 to $6 a day. Everywhere in this city you can 
find similar instances. The foreigner is the highlv 



paid building mechanic who belongs to the union, and 
the educated American is handling the shovel or pack- 
ing boards on his back to the carpenters, and glad to 
do it for enough to keep body and soul together. When 
it comes to election day, the union labor politicians 
who want City Hall jobs cannot vote the foreign 
mechanics, and they are by no means sure of the 
American laborer's vote. He may have intelligence 
enough to reflect that when he was a boy and might 
have learned a trade, he was prevented by rigid union 
rules that exclude American boys from the constitu- 
tional right to enter any workshop as apprentices, and 
thus fit themselves for the struggle of life. 

Before many years, the fathers and mothers of 
America will become fully aroused to the great crime 
against the youth of our nation which prevents them 
from learning good trades and forces them into the 
ranks of degraded labor, or else makes loafers and 
criminals of them. 

Not every young man without a trade and with only 
a common school education to rely upon can become a 

) 




BRIDGE-From N. Y. Life 



-THE WASP- 



nk president or a captain of industry. The average 
mill, deprived of a trade ami left to hustle in the 

nUs of common manual labor, stands an excellent 

an if becoming a hobo in his youth, a member of 

■ mty poorhouse in his age, ami a truant of the 

itter's field when death ends lii.s wretched career. 

AMER1CUS. 



City lie brought considerable of the atmosphere 
along with him." 



Wasp Portraits 

Among the portraits appearing in this week's 
Wasp are the following well known society ladies 
and prominent members of the "Colonial Dames" 
Mrs. Selden S. Wright, .Mrs. Walter D. Mansfield. 
Mrs. Arthur Dudley Cms*., Mrs. F. liurke Holladay, 
Mrs. Louise Wright McClure, Mrs. S. W. Bolliday. 

Mrs. Seldon S. Wright the president of the 
Colonial Dames is one of the most remarkable 
women in the country. Though the great grand- 
mother of a boy old enough to be named for an 
appointment to Annapolis, she is as bright mentally 
and as alert physically as a woman of forty. 

Mrs. Siebe whose portrait appears this week is 
one of the handsome young matrons of this City. 

Miss Frances Wilson whose picture appears in 
this week's Wasp is a talented member of the 
Mansfield Club, who has distinguished herself by 
her wonderful musical ability. 



Hugh Hume has exemplified an old adage "once 
a newspaperman always one." Hugh is now publish- 
ing in Portland a weekly journal called "The 
Spectator." It is a first class publication, well 
written, well printed and deserves the hearty sup- 
port of the city where it is issued and which never 
before could boast of such a journal. 



Scene the Park Hotel. Alameda. E. K. Taylor 
the newly elected Mayor is seated at dinner. Enters 
in hot haste an election badge pinned to a man who 
dashes up the Mayor grabs his hand and while try- 
ing to shake it off his body proclaims : 

"Well, we didn't do a thing to 'em, eh? Snowed 
'em under, well I guess yes." 

All the guests stare in open-eyed astonishment 
for none of them knows the boisterous statesman, 
who seems desirous to be regarded as the Hotspur 
of the campaign just closed. 

While guesses are being swapped all round as to 
the newcomers identy a quiet individual in a corner 
remarks to his friend : 

"That chap — Oh that's Ruhlman — never heard of 
him? Well, that's strange. Lindholm & Co., the 
Frisco furniture people could tell you all about 
him." 

"He seems to have been quite a factor in the 
campaign judging by the way he talks to the new 
Mayor" replies the 'friend. 

"He must have been inasmuch as he's only four 
months in the State and it takes a year's residence 
in California to vote. But then he's from Chicago. 

"His manner is quite breezy." 

"Yes — when he packed his grip in the Windy 



"Little Billee" Wright — or W. Spencer Wright, as 
his professional and proper name is — is making good 
in Xew York as all his friends here expected he would. 
He is still working for the Paul Elder Company and 
his letter-designs and illuminations are winning him 
praise and. what is better, sheckels. Wright belonged 
to the Coppa clique of artists and had his studio in 
the same building in Merchant Street where Mrs. 
Mersfelder and others were housed. Like them, he 
lost all his belongings, but did not lose his courage 
and talent. Wright is the younger sou of Ben C. 
Wright, for many years church editor of the Bulletin 
and later of the Chronicle. His brother Allan is a 
lawyer and prominent in Society. The Wrights' home 
on Gough Street was spared by the fire but was 
slightly injured by dynamite. 



lust as all was in readiness for the wedding of 
Miss Anita Harvey to Oscar Cooper on April 17th 
words comes from New York of the illness of the 
young lady. I hear that she has undergone the 
mastord operation for the ear and is not expected 
to be able to leave the hospital for at least a month. 
The wedding has therefore been postponed in- 
definitely. 



Gumps for Art 
They have been making numerous improvements at 
Gump's store at 1645 California Street, near Van Ness, 
and it is now as attractive to admirers of art as was 
the famous old place on Geary Street before the fire. 
The result of Alfred Gump's business trip to Europe 
is visible in many ways in the new store, as the firm 
is continually seeking the latest and best to be found 
in he studios and ateliers of the old world. In Orien- 
tal art goods, too, Gump's is unrivalled. The claim of 
his firm to be the only western one to encircle the 
globe in research for the finest in art is eminently cor- 
rect. 




CHAS.KE.1LUS& CO 

< EXCLUSIVE 

HIGH GRADE CLOTHIERS 

No Branch Slores. No Agents. 

By reason of quality our trade increases. When we put our name 
on our smart garments, you can depend upon it that that quality goes in. 
Our ambition is to sell the best clothes made. We believe wer'e 
doing it. 

This is the birthplace of newest fabrics and styles, this season 
in particular, our models are superb. They are the products of 
the best clothes institntions. While our prices may be higher 
than those of "Qyack Clothiers" our values are assured. 



KING SOLOMON'S HALL 

Fillmore Streei, near Sutter, San Francisco 




Men and^Wonien 



J$ Weekly Summary of Social Activities and Complications 





MRS. E. BURKE HOLLADAY 

General Mae Arthur's transfer from the command of 
the Pacific division to Milwaukee was by his own re- 
quest. The General found it impossible, while dis- 
charging the manifold duties of commander ?in-ehief 
of the important military division with headquarters 
at San Francisco to carry out his cherished scheme of 
completing the elaborate report he was charged to 
make by the War Department upon the results of his 
long trip of inspection in the Orient. The preparation 
of this elaborate report, it is thought, will occupy the 
remaining years of the General's active service, and, 
as things are moving fast in the Orient just now, the 
report may be ancient history by the time it is ready. 
The General is an able man, but almost too conscien- 
tious. 

By the way, when the General does retire, he will 
buy a home in Milwaukee, his native city, and remain 
there for the remainder of his life. 
* * * 

The popular Mrs. Duneen Draper, of Lexington, 
Kentucky, before leaving Santa Barbara the other 
day for her home, gave a tea to Mrs. Chauneey Wins- 
low of San Francisco. Mrs. William Miller Graham, 
Mrs. Harry Dater, Jr., and Miss Bisphem poured tea, 
and about one hundred women and men dropped in, 
Governor and Mrs. Herrick of Ohio being among the 
number. Mrs. Winslow also shared the honors at a 



dinner given the same evening at the Potter by Miss 
Bispham, of Washington, D. C., and Mrs. Harold 
Richardsv/n, Governor Herrick and Mrs. Herrick being 
the honored guests. Other affairs have been given for 
Mrs. Winslow, and still others are planned. 

William A. Dunlap, whose engagement to Miss Lav- 
ender Byers, a fascinating manicure artist connected 
with a New York fingernail studio, occasioned such a 
thrill along Broadway, is not the famous hatter, but 
the famous hatter's son. There is big money in hats. 
Young Mr. Dunlap, at 36 years, finds himself, thanks 
to his dad, a large Nevada mine owner and all sorts of 
a bondholder. He has had previous experience in 
matrimonj^. Twelve years ago he married Miss Lulu 
B. Freer of Monticello, New York, after a brief but 
romantic courtship, and kept dark the secret of his 
wedding for months. The happy pair quarreled, as 
happy pairs that romantically marry will sometimes 
do. 

The second choice of the famous hatter's son is of 
the Gibsonesque type, under eighteen, tall and slender, 
and was born in Hackneydown, England. The major- 
ity of immigrants from England are either the sons of 
noblemen and country squires or the daughters of dis- 
tinguished clergymen of the Episcopal church. Miss 
Byers' family, too, can boast of aristocratic connec- 
tions, and, as it is highly fashionable in the smart 
London set just now to earn one's own living, she 
became a manicurist in a Broadway shop. Male pa- 
trons nocked to the place and laid their hearts on 
her table, so to speak, but it took the wnirlwmr 1 court- 
ship of the hatter with the famous name to win the 
prize. He had his nails manicured on a Thursday 
and feasted his eyes for the first time on the fair 
English girl, while the owner of the shop deftly 



Little lalace Hotel 



is 

OPEN 



Corner o£ 

Post and 

Leavenworth 

Streets 



The same excellence in cuisine and service that obtained 
in the Old Palace is duplicated in the new 'Little Palace' 



-THE WASP 




MRS. LOUISE WRIGHT McCLURE 



the western edge of civilization, we must have set up 
a pretty high standard of artistic merit or else the 
glorious climate forces talent. 



The Eastern papers are making a great fuss over 
the engagement of young Westinghouse, of Pittsburg, 
t«i Miss Evelyn Violel Brocklebank, the daughter of 

Sir Thomas ami Lady Brocklebank, of Liverpool, Eng- 
land. The young man is the son of the noted Westing- 
house, of electric motor fame, and belongs to Pittsburg, 
that city famous f ir smoke, millionaires and scandal- 
ous divorces. Young Westinghouse got an attack of 
typhoid fever, which is quite natural in Pittsburg, and 
his English fiancee, like the heroine of a novel, flew 
across the Atlantic to his bedside. Pittsburg went 
into ecstaeies and the smoke-grimed citizens read little 
for weeks but romances about the first meeting of the 
ironmaster's son and the Liverpool millionaire's 
daughter. Happily, everybody survived it, and, 
though the strain must have been awful on the men- 
tality of Pittsburg, the crop of divorce, and murders 
was no larger than usual for the month. Mr. Westing- 
house, it is pleasant to relate, is well again and Miss 
Brocklebank has recrossed the seas and is safe once 
more with her distinguished parents at "The Hollies," 
outside Liverpool, which in several respects is pretty 
nearly as undelightful a town to live in as smoky 
Pittsburg. The wedding is to take place next year. 
# * * 

C. D. Robinson, the well-known artist who had the 
distinction of being one of the few artists in town 
who painted the fire as it went on, is now engaged in 
painting an enormous picture of the fire to be sent 
East and to Europe for purposes of exhibition. 



wielded her files and scissors on his digits. Next day 
he called again, and once more fell into the wrong 
hands. On Saturday he came determined to win, and 
dashed straight to Miss Byers' table. His fingers hav- 
ing been manicured, he prolonged the joyous moments 
by having his face massaged, and when he paid his 
check he had progressed so far that the high-born 
manicuress had consented to take supper with him. 
Over that feast of love he proposed marriage. Miss 
Byers being under age, the consent of mamma had to 
be asked. The good woman, though taken aback by 
the suddenness of the request, was equal to the emer- 
gency, and after she gave her blessing she clinched 
matters by telling the secret to some close friends, 
who at once rang up the newspapers. So the amorous 
hatter, who had planned to keep the affair very dark, 
got even more of a surprise than his Broadway friends 
when they read all about it next day. 
^ # # 

Gordon Ross, who did such clever work for the 
Sunday Chronicle, and who resided with his pretty 
wife and interesting little girl in Sausalito, is drawing 
for the Xew York Times and making a fine reputation 
in the matropolis. Every artist and writer who has 
been accounted a good one here and has moved to New 
York, has scored a success in that larger circle. In 
fact, some of those who have been considered rather 
mediocre in San Francisco have done well in the me- 
tropolis. All of which proves that for a raw town on 



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FORMERLY OF 110 GEARY STREET 



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Interior Decorating, Wood Finishing 
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Sales Room and Office, 1527 Pine, near Van Ness, S. F. 
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Telephone West 1402 



■THE WASP 



The death of Florence Uhlhorn Duprey was not a 
surprise to her friends who knew that she had been dy- 
ing of cancer for several years. She was a full 
sister to Mrs. Ashton Stevens and half sister to Ger- 
trude Atherton. They were three very handsome sis- 
ters. Eugene Duprey, her husband, died about a year • 
ago. She leaves one little daughter. The Uhlhorn 
family is one of the best known in New York City 
and she was related through her father to many of 
the old Dutch families. On her mother's side she 
was the grand-daughter of Stephen Franklin, and the 
great great grand niece of Benjamin Franklin. 

Mrs. Duprey was married twice. Her first husband 
was Jack Craig, who belonged to a good family here. 
He was what is popularly known as a "good fellow" 
and like many others died young and not in the best 
of circumstances. He was a wonderful penman and 
in his adverse condition was tempted to put the name 
of the late Irving M. Scott to a check. Mr. Du- 
prey was also married twice. His first wife was a 
Miss Hiller, a member of a very well-known family. 
The couple were divorced after living many years 
together and rearing a family. 

The marriage of Miss Ruth McNutt and Mr. 
Brown marks a union of June and December. The 
groom is very rich. The McNutt family have con- 
tracted several wealthy marriages. Maxwell McNutt 
married one of the rich Treadwell girls, and "Mamie" 
McNutt, as she is called, married Ashton Potter, the 
son of Howard Potter of New York, and brother 
of James Brown Potter. Ashton Potter came here 
as a lieutenant of the United States Army on the way 
to Manila and fell in love with Miss McNutt. The 
handsome young lady and her mother accompanied 
by Mrs. Robinson Reilly went to Manila and there 
Lieutenant Potter and Miss McNutt were married. 
The bride's health suffered in the climate of the Philip- 
pines and she came back after a residence of a year 
or so much altered in appearance from the handsome 
girl she was when she left San Francisco. Military 
life, with its changes from one post to another, did 
not please young Mrs. Potter, and she insisted that 
her rich husband should resign. It is a tradition 
around the posts that she absolutely refused to know 
army people and she wondered what they meant by 
calling on her. Miss Ruth McNutt, who went to 
see her sister at one of the posts, met Fitzhugh Lee, 
the son of General Lee, fell in love with him, and 
against the wishes of her family, became engaged to 
him. However the engagement did not last very long 
and was broken. There seemed to be no hard feel- 
ings over the matter however, as the McNutts enter- 
tained Fitzhugh Lee's mother when she came out here 
about two years later. The Lees like many distin- 
guished Southern people, have more family pedigree 
than wealth. Miss McNutt's marriage to Mr. Browne 
is eminently satisfactory to Mrs. Potter and Mrs. Mc- 
Nutt. Mrs. Brown will pass her time between Denver, 
New York and Europe, for Mr. Brown is an English- 
man and travels a great deal. 

Dr. H. J. Stewart, whose mass was the feature of 



the Easter services at St. Dominic's, is an example 
in pluck and ambition. He once showed his love 
for his adopted city by resigning a lucrative post 
as organist ■ in one of Boston's big churches ; his 
heart called him back to San Francisco. He showed 
it again when, after the destructive 18th of April 
he found himself homeless and despoiled of his 
accumulations of more than two-score years, he yet 
would not leave for more cheerful work-fields which 
beckoned him with gold-lined, welcoming hands. 
Lots of others, in his place, after such heavy losses 
in earthquake and fire, would have shaken the dust 
of the strickened city from their oxfords with a 
murmured "23." Dr. Stewart wasn't built that way. 
He was the first burnt-out musician, I believe, to 
come over here and establish himself in a studio 
near the ruins. This mass is the first work he has 
had publicly performed since the calamity, all his 
other manuscript compositions having been de- 
stroyed. 

* * * 

I have often wondered, by the way, why those 
bright comic operas, three of them, that Dr. Stewart 
wrote to librettos by respectively Dan O'Connell, 
Peter Robertson and Clay Greene, should never 
have made fortunes for their authors and composer. 
"Bluff King Hal" was a big success as presented by 
the amateurs of the Bohemian Club, with Mrs. 
Grace Dickman and Mrs. Mary Wyman Williams in 
the cast, and so was "His Majesty" which was later 
given a long season at the Tivoli, with Gracie 
Plaisted, Tillie Salinger, Ferris Hartman and other 
brilliant singers. The third ran for quite awhile at 
the Grand Opera House, presented by the South- 
well Opera Company. Why were they never pushed 
to financial profit in the East and Europe? It seems 
a pity that so much wit and melody should have 
been wasted upon purely local audiences. 



ENJOY COUNTRY LIFE AT 

HOTEL DEL MONTE 

This is the season to take your family to Hotel Del 
Monte by the sea, near Monterey, and enjoy every comfort. There 
is plenty of room there and plenty to do for recreation and health. 
Parlor car leaves San Francisco 8:00 a. m. and 3:00 p. m. daily, 
direct to Hotel. Special reduced round-trip rates. For details, in- 
quire information Bureau, Southern Pacific, or of C. W. Kelley, 
Special Representative of Del Monte, 789 Market St., San Fran- 
cisco. Phone Temporary 275 1 . 



ANNOUNCEMENT 



Mrs. Mott - Smith Cunningham exhibitor in 
Paris Salon of 1906 announces that her Studio 
Shop at 1 622 Pine St., a few doors from Van 
Ness Ave., is now open for the sale of her jewelry 



-THE WASP 



The tea given by the A. \V. Fosters' was, as is 
usual with the Marin County carl and countess 
when they dispense hospitality, a most democratic 
affair. Mrs. Foster is a lesson to snobs i'>r she never 
neglects an old friend, whatever her social standing, 
v. hen she sends out invitations for a [unction. The 
consequence is that there is plenty of cheerful 
converse and an entire lack of Stiff formality. All 
the Foster children have been brought up to be 
nice to everybody and not to reckon lack of bank 
account and stylish clothes against anybody when 
it comes to shaking hands. They are a perpetual 
rebuke to the snobbish Burlingamites and some of 
their own neighbors in San Rafael, whose names 
1 need not particularize. 

* * * 

Harry Stetson, whose engagement to Miss 
Harvey, the younger of Downey Harvey's 
daughters, is at this time of writing daily expected to 
be announced, has always been regarded as one of the 
most elusive bachelors in Society. He was once 
popularly supposed to be the fiance of Miss Ella 
Hobart, because of a mutual taste for tennis and 
Gibson pictures, which made them constant com- 
panion-, but Miss Hobart married Charlie Baldwin, 
and that rumor had to die the death. Then it was 
thought that he and Miss Olive Holbrook might be 
a happy pair, but again the marriage of the lady to 
another quashed the report. Harry Stetson is an 
all-round athlete, a fearless polo player, agile at 
tennis and golf, and great at steering a motor-car. 
He is rich and, though not handsome, is dis- 
tinguished looking. He has the qualities that please 
women, and there is more than one society girl who 
envies Miss Harvey. 

* * * 

A. A. McCurda, who has just been appointed 
president of California College in Highland Park, 
is as well-known in musical as in educational 
circles, though the papers in mentioning his appoint- 
ment did not touch on his musical accomplishments. 
He belongs to a prominent quartet and is choir 
leader in the First Baptist church. 

* * * 

James Graham Stokes, the New York multi-mil- 
lionaire, who married the Jewish cigarette worker, 
Rose Pastor, it' is said will soon visit California. 
He comes of the eccentric Stokes family, which is 
not content with living the life of the conventional 
New York smart set. One of them is a clergyman, 
one is the owner of fast horses. One of the girls 
married a settlement worker, and James Graham 
Stokes, who is a Socialist, has passed years in the 
New York settlements. Curiously enough, after 
he married a daughter of the people he gave up his 
life in the settlements, and many are wondering if 
it was not the daughter of the people who tired of 
living so close to the soil, for he for many years had 
chosen that life as his. Air. and Mrs. Stokes and 
Mr. and Mrs. English Walling (Anna Strunsky) are 
great friends and lived together in the same settle- 
ment in New York. 

* * * 

The dance for young people \yhich Mrs. Charles 
Slack. Mrs. Martin and Mrs. de Pue arranged to take 



place last week at the Paris Tea I ,arden, was a delight- 
ful affair, and the participants who have not yet made 
their formal bow to Society enjoyed themselves thor- 
oughly. A dainty supper was served after the dance 
\mong those present were Miss Ruth Slack. Miss 
Edith Slack, Miss Klva de Pue, Miss Helen Smith, 
Miss Eleanor Marcin. Miss Natalie Hunt. Paige Mont- 
eagle. Alan Van Fleet, Herbert ( iould, Eyre Pinckard, 
and others. 



Mrs. Clarence Martin Mann is to give a dinner to 
Mr. and Mrs. J. G. Phelps Stokes, the Socialistic 
apostles who have come to the ultimate West. In 
deference to the tastes of the guests, who are supposed 
to be keen on the simple life, the dinner will not be 
on the scale of magnificence for which Mrs. Mann is 
justly famous. Mrs. Mann's father, the late Win. 
S. Gage, and the father of Mrs. Stokes were, I believe, 
old friends in New York, if not relatives. 
* * * 

Two well-known young ladies left last week for the 
East and Europe, the Misses Helen and Virginia 
Gibbs. Mrs. Paul Bancroft made them the motif for 
a large card party just prior to their departure. 



8 



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HUNTER 



§ 



BALTIMORE 



RYE 



THE PEOPLE'S PURE, PERFECT 

AND 

MOST POPULER WHISKEY 



CHARLES M. REYNOLDS CO. 
Agenls for Californi 
912-914 Folsom St.. S 



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VW OWA\\l\\\\1^///A r ^< 



and Nevada K 

i Francisco, Cal. tr 

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-THE WASP 




MRS. S. W. HOLLADAY 

Lady Mary Ward, who has been in New York dur 
ing the Lenten season, has been the recipient of no end 
of attention on the part of the smart set, who have 
entertained her continuously, though quite informally, 
at luncheons and theater parties. She is here with her 
husband, the Hon. Bobbie Ward, who is the younger 
brother of Lord Dudley, former viceroy of Ireland. 
With the party, which arrived in this country some 
weeks ago, came the Hon. Robert's sister, Lady Wol- 
verton, and Lord Wolverton. 

Lady Mary is a granddaughter of the Duchess of 
Devonshire by her first marriage to the Duke of Man- 
chester. She is a disciple of the severe in clothes 
rather than the ornate. At the opera, where she was 
entertained many times, she wore on one occasion a 
simple white satin princess and very few jewels. In 
company with Miss Gladys Mills one morning on the 
avenue, she was. dressed in a tailor-made royal blue 
broadcloth, with a short jacket and walking skirt, 
trimmed only with broad black braid. Her picture 
hat of dark blue velvet was trimmed high on one side 
with coquel plumes. 

♦ * * 

The Princess Chimay's romance has been in a 
measure repeated by the elopement of the Hungarian 
Countess Vilma Testetics with a Gypsy fiddler, who 
fascinated her by his wild hair and his playing in the 
orchestra of a cafe chantant in Munich. The father of 
the Countess, it is said, offered the Gypsy fiddler 
$5,000 to stop his love-making. The whole bunch 
should come to this country and exhibit in the dime 
museums. A count from Hungary who has $5,000 to 
throw away on anything, or a gypsy fiddler who could 



reject an offer of $5, much less $5,000, are amongst the 
wonders of the twentieth century. 
* * * 

Worthy of imitation was the secret philanthropy of 
the late Sir Frances Tress Barry, an English member 
of Parliament, who for twenty-three years sent a 
bright new silver sixpense on Christmas to every child 
in the London poorhouses and poorhouse schools. 
The money was sent anonymously to Henry Labou- 
chere, the editor of the London weekly paper Truth, 
and with the contribution came regularly a five-pound 
note to pay the cost of distribution. Labouchere 
wished to thank the donor personally, ^ut never dis- 
covered his identity until it was revealed by the phil- 
anthropist's death. Of late years the gift had been 
sent to 11,000 children. So in the twenty-three years 
his veiled charity must have cost him at least $25,000. 
No doubt he got much more than the worth of it in the 
satisfaction that came of a good deed. 

M. Bonnat, the great French portrait painter who 
has just completed a portrait of President Fallieres, 
is now seventy-four years old and says that this is the 
last portrait he shall paint. He says he has earned a 
little rest. He has painted all the Presidents in suc- 
cession except MacMahon and Casimir-Perier. Our 
great local painter, Wm. Keith, is pretty nearly as 
old as Bonnet, and so far from seeking rest, his 
friends have to put weights on him to keep him from 
working day and night. Such a glutton for work 
was never heard of. It is his pleasure and pastime, 
and, as in most men of that temperament, abides to 
the end. 

The famous old masters were called prodigious 
workers and turned out innumerable pictures. Of 



Gas 

Cooking 

School 



A sample dinner pre- 
pared at a minimum 
cost (5 cents) for fuel. 



MENU 

Wednesday, April 17 

Cream of Pea Soup 

Broiled Steak 

Baked Potatoes 

Scolloped Tomatoes 

Salad 
, Mock Charlotte 



Mrs. Jean Sinclair, Demonstrator 

Lectures on domestic science and the economical operation of the gas range 
every Wednesday and Friday, at 3 o'clock sharp, in the assembly room of the Gas 
Company, at 925 Franklin street. Every user of gas invited. 

Demonstration in Bread and Cake Baking, Monday and Saturday, 2 to 4. 
The art of Bread Making is taught here so you can make your own "home-made 
bread." 

GAS COOK BOOK given to every lady altending. 

"AT YOUR SERVICE" 

The S. F. Gas and Electric 
Company 

925 FRANKLIN STREET 



-THE WASP- 




MRS. SELDEN S. WRIGHT 
President Society of Colonial Dames of America 

modern painters who attain great fame, the most pro- 
lific, perhaps, was Turner. He left a \ery large col- 
lection of paintings and sketches, which netted an 
immense sum. Keith had several thousand paintings 
and sketches piled up when the fire swept through his 
studio last April. While the collection was still blaz- 
ing, the veteran painter, who had been driven from 
San Francisco by the flames, had resumed work in 
his other studio in Berkeley. This is a record for in- 
dustry which is unmatchable. Keith's laborious and 
successful life certainly has verified the current pro- 
verb. "Labor Omnia Vincet. " 



When Mark Twain, twelve years ago, found himself 
bankrupt by the failure of the publishing house in 
which he held a large interest, he declared that he 
would pay his debts by a lecture tour round the 
world. He was 60 years old at the time. Not only 
did the proceeds of the tour wipe out all the humor- 
ist's debts, but they left him enough to live on. He 
has just bought a 180-acre farm near West Redding, 
Connecticut, where he is erecting a residence, and will 
use it as a permanent home for his family, as it is 
easily accessible from New York. His youngest daugh- 
ter is an invalid. The venerable author expects to end 
his days in this home on the crest of a hill on his 
modest farm. Usually when Mark Twain is referred 
to by Eastern publications the fact is mentioned that 
he began as a reporter on the Territorial Enterprise in 
Virginia City, Nevada. The fact is never mentioned 
that he also worked on the Call in San Francisco. 
* # * 

Hon. James Bryee, the new English Ambassador, is 
a gallant champion of the American woman. "She is 



the intellectual equal, if aol the superior, of the Amer- 
ican man," declares Mr. Bryce. "Her opinion," he 
says, "is understood by both sexes to be worth as 
much as the man's. More often man not she takes 
the burden of conversation from him. darting along 
with a gay vivacity which puts slower wits to shame." 

Ami this "gay vivacity" is no screen for inward 
vacuity. She bus declares .Mi'. Bryce, "a livelier 
interest in the things of the mind." "Three causes 
combine to create among American women a higher 
average of literary taste and influence than exists 
anywhere else. These are the educational facilities 
they enjoy, the recognition of the equality of the sexes 
in the whole social and intellectual sphere, and the 
leisure they possess in comparison with men." Not 
only is the "provision for woman's education ampler 
and better than in any European country," but the 
women make full use of their chances. 

According to Mr Bryce, "the American nation as a 
whole owes to the active benevolence of its women and 
their zeal in promoting social reforms benefits which 
European customs would scarcely permit women to 
confer. In no other country has woman borne so con- 
spicuous a part in the promotion of moral and philan- 
thropic causes. Nowhere else has she attained to a 
fuller participation in the work of the world. Those 
who know the work they have done and are doing 
in many a noble cause will deeply admire their energy, 
their courage and self-devation." Mr. Bryce has more 
to say in this strain, and when he has done supporting 
his eulogy with concrete instances, the caitiff knight 
has doubtless bitten the dust. 

* * # 

"I have sent thousands of dollars advertising 
my patent bathtub," confessed the manufacturer, 
"but it doesn't seem to take with the public." 

"No wonder," rejoined the wise guy. "You 
neglected to put a picture of a pretty woman in 
vour advertisements." 




Announcement 

SPRING and SUMMER 

We desire to announce that our com- 
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and Domestic Woolens, consisting of un- 
usually attractive patterns in popular weaves and fashionable ma- 
terials, is now ready awaiting inspection. 

It gives us pleasure to state that every garment is made by 
skilled tailors, cut on stylish and artistic lines that command the 
admiration and approval of our customers. 

We cordially invite and solicit patronage, and endeavor to up- 
hold our past reputation for high-grade tailoring at moderate prices. 

McMahon, Keyser & Stiegeler 
Bros., Inc. 



Main Store 

892-894 Van Ness Ave. 

at Ellis Street 



Branch 

1711 O'FarrellSt. 



10 



THE WASP- 



Colonel Kirkpatrick's trip to Europe is under- 
taken for the purpose of learning the very latest 
things in the hotel business. The Colonel's obser- 
vations will be turned to account in the new Palace 
Hotel, which will undoubtedly be one of the finest 
in the matter of construction and the best con- 
ducted in the world. 

Colonel Kirkpatrick is a man of remarkable ex- 
ecutive ability and accomplishes the greatest amount 
of work with the least fuss. The old Palace Hotel 
was a model place in every respect, yet the Colonel 
was never aggressively or obtrusively in evidence. 
Now and then you caught a glimpse of him passing 
in a leisurely way through the hotel and apparently 
not noticing anything. As a matter of fact the 
Colonel is Argus-eyed and every retainer who has 
served under him knows that if he neglects his duty 
he will be seen and called to account. The Colonel 
himself never stops to point out the small de- 
ficiencies. He passes on as if he saw nothing, but 
just as sure as fate, the delinquent retainer will be 
hauled over the coals before the day is over by the 
head of the department. The smallest omission in 
the routine of the hotel is sure to be noted at once 
by the watchful Colonel, and equally certain to be 
corrected promptly. This is what makes for perfect 
discipline and that was the secret of the success and 
the popularity of the old Palace Hotel. The tem- 
porary Palace Hotel at once took on the same char- 
acter, and so will any establishment over which 
Colonel Kirkpatrick presides. His going away to 
Europe was made the occasion for a farewell ban- 
quet at the Post Street temporary Palace Hotel. 
The affair, which was most fraternal and enjoyable, 
was arranged by J. Downey Harvey, who is himself 
a most genial companion, Harry Stetson, Mr. 
Michaels, the physical featherweight of the legal 
profession ; Walter Hobart, Dr. MacMonagle and 
Grant Selfridge. This bunch could arrange a feast 
fit for LucuIIus. 

* * * 

There is another man in San Francisco who has 
been engaged in the entertaining of the public 
though on a different line from Colonel Kirkpatrick, 
and who has the same keen eye for details. And an 
eye for details is the secret of business success. 
The man I refer to is Jake Techau, who has started 
a number of large restaurants and made every one a 
paying property where nine out of ten men would 
have failed. The way he established Techau's 
Tavern on Mason Street was little short of a mir- 
acle, considering all the difficulties attending the 
conversion of an old church into an after-theatre 
resort, and in the midst of unending labor strikes. 

Techau sold out before the fire and is now an im- 
patient man of leisure, like all active business men 
who seek rest. Rest for such people means rush, 
and is only a dream, for they keep on hustling in 
some way till the end. 

After the fire Techau went into a much-fre- 
quented uptown cafe to have lunch and found one 
of his former stewards acting as manager. The 
new manager was priding himself that he was run- 
ning the place in great shape, and told the veteran 
restaurateur as much.- 

"Yes, you're doing pretty good," said Techau, 



"but why don't you keep the place clean ?" 

"Clean ! Why, 'tis clean. What's the matter 
with it ?" protested the manager. 

"Look at those chairs over there," said Techau. 
"Don't you see there's a couple of specks of dust on 
the lower rungs ?" 

"You might see them with a magnifying glass," 
replied the manager. 

"Well, that's just it. If you want to succeed in 
business you must look at things through a magni- 
fying glass. Now, when I came in here I found a 
piece of mashed potato fully as big as the head of a 
pin on this chair I'm sitting on. Have you fired the 
waiter that neglected to wipe off the chair carefully 
when the last customer left?" 

"No, I haven't." 

"Well, you should, the next time he does it. Now 
another thing I noticed right off when I came in 
was — " 

But the manager couldn't stand any more of it 
and skipped. 

* * :|i 

These are lovely Spring days at Del Monte and 
many people from the bay cities are taking advan- 
tage of them to visit the famous hotel. Mrs. 
George McNear, Jr., took her children down for 
a few days. Mrs. Ella Morgan is preparing to re- 
main all the Summer. Miss Alice Warner and 
Miss Marjorie Shepard, who are attending Miss 
Head's school in Berkeley, spent their Easter vaca- 
tion at Del Monte. A. D. Shepard was down for a 
few days. Professor R. E. Allardice, of Stanford, 
who is a golf enthusiast, often goe* to Del Monte 
for the week end. Prof, and Mrs. R. M. Lasen, of 
Stanford, were recent visitors. Captain Frank L. 
Winn, who was down last week, expects that he 
will be ordered to accompany General MacArthur 
to Milwaukee. Harry C. Sessions spent the week 



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The Auditorium 

FILLMORE STREET, Comer Page 
FRANK RITT1GSTEIN, Manager 

A SKATING PALACE 



Longest Floor Best Skating Courteous Attention to All Patrons 
Special Arrangements for Private Clubs and Parties, etc. 



-THE WASP « 



with his mother; and Mrs. Charles Stewart Cushing 
was the guest of Mrs. Sessions. Mr. and Mrs. 
Daniel Marx i M i:-s Reine Weill) are enjoying their 
honeymoon at Del Monte. Amongst the Berkeley 

\ i>it"r- are Mr. and Mrs. John I!. Metcalf and 
George D. Metcalf. Miss Dita Bradley, Mr. and 
Mrs. C. H. McCullough, W. C. Colson and i leorge 
W. Phelps were als. ■ down from the University 
town. Come Oakland visitors are Mr. and .Mrs. 
Henry Stern. Win. J. Wilkinson, Mr. and Mrs. 
George M. Condit and Miss Virginia Deaver, Miss 
Vgnes Rendegard, 0. W. Wiles and M. S. Arm- 
strong. Edward W Howard and Frederick S. 
Whitwell, of San Mateo, were at Del Monte last 
week. 

The number of Eastern visitors to I VI Monte is 

still large. 

# * * 

Local society is to lose Mrs. E. Walton Hedges, at 
least temporarily, for this popular matron will de- 
part on May 3d Eor her husband's home in Plainfield, 
New Jersey. Dr. Hedges is a prominent member of 
the International Medical Society and that important 
body will soon hold its annual convention at; Atlantic 
City, which is one of the great summer resorts of the 
other side- of the continent. You can see more people 
in a day at Atlantic City than in the whole season at 
Santa Cruz. Master Sunday in Atlantic City is a 
sight, to remember. Mrs. Hedges will be on the recep- 
tion committee at the coming convention of the In- 
ternational Medical Society. Yesterday being Mrs. 
Hedges' birthday, her sister, Mrs. Clarence Breeden, 
gave a large dinner anil theater party in her honor. 
On last Tuesday evening Mrs. Hedges gave a bridge 
party for Miss Doran, sister of Mrs. Marix, wife of 
Captain Marix. who is stationed at Yerba Buena 
Island. Miss Doran will pass the summer in Cali- 
fornia. 

# * * 

I have been asked to correct the statement that 
Mrs. Ynez Short White had started a fencing class. 
She has no such idea. Miss Ethel Short, who has 
been spoken of as being so proficient with the foils, 
knows nothing about the art of fencing, except it 
might be with Cupid. 

# * # 

The friends of Miss Nettie Sexton are still talking 
of the rare and gorgeous presents she received on 
the occasion of her marriage last Saturday evening 
to Mr. Edwin Dow. The souvenirs she herself pre- 
sented to her bridesmaids are gold cresent pins set 
with rare pearls. Seldom has a bride received more 
numerous or costly remembrances where the wedding 
was confined to intimate friends and relatives. The 
popularity of this charming young girl has been thus 

testified to in a most convincing manner. 

# # # 

A novel and rather amusing scene not on the pro- 
gramme the night of Miss Burnie Owens' wedding to 
Geo. Herrick was furnished by the impromptu il- 
lumination of the church. The accident to the San 
Francisco Gas and Electric Company's plant left the 
city in darkness. What was to be done? The inven- 
tive genius who always saves the day at such a mo- 
ment was fortunately not missing. A dozen street- 



car headlights were hastily obtained and their com- 
bined affulgence made the wedding scene a brilliant 
affair, literally and figuratively. But it looked de- 
cidedly funny and primitive to see such expedients 
in use at a smart wedding in a fashionable church. 



The social climbers never tire. 1 witnessed an 
amusing scene the other day at that charity affair at 
the Centra.] Theater. One of the actors in this scene 
not on the stage was a young and much celebrated 
matron, who moves in the smart set. The other was 

an old lady, who has more money than position and 

is dying to cut a dash amongst the top-notchers. 

Finding herself rubbing elbows with the young 

woman, the venerable climber leaned over and said: 
"You don't remember me, Mrs. Dasher, do you?" 
The lady addressed lifted her eyebrows and said 

politely that her memory was equal to the task. 

"Why, I knew you so well when you were Miss 

Millyuns," persisted the old lady, who is fully thirty 

years the older. 

The young matron looked the stranger over care- 
fully. 

"I think I do remember you now. Why. yes. 
You're Mary McPap, my old nurse, arn't you?" 
Tableau. ' 



HOTEL RAFAEL 

San Rafael, Cal. 

OPEN ALL THE YEAR ROUND 

SO Minutes from San Francisco 

The only first-class hotel in the vicinity of 
the city. American and European plan. 

R. V. HALTON, Proprietor 




Phone West 4983 



Vogel & Bishoff 

Ladies' Tailors and 
Habit Makers 

1 525 Sutter Street, San Francisco 




Old Poodle Dog Restaurant 



824-826 EDDY STREET 

Near Von Ness Ave. 



Service better than before Formerly, Bnsh and Grant Ave, 
the fire San Francisco 



Phone Emergency 63 



12 



-THE WASP- 




MRS. WALTER D. MANSFIELD 

Prince Robert de Broglie, who was recently starving 
in New York, with his alleged wife, and who is at 
present earning a precarious livelihood in Europe by 
showing himself before the footlights of cheap cafes 
chantant and vaudeville shows, while the American 
soi-disant Princess de Broglie sings a couple of songs, 
has now become an outlaw and an exile from France, 
where a warrant is out for his arrest the very moment 
that he ventures to set foot on French territory. The 
offense with which he is charged is desertion from the 
military which, under the French law, citizens are com- 
pelled to render. The Prince had contracted with one 
of the cheap cafes chantant of Paris to appear with 
his American wife in vocal duets, but the military 
prosecution caused him to skip. The wife is described 
as a very handsome woman. She was Miss Estelle 
Alexander of New York before she took the title of 
Princess. It is said that the Prince committed bigamy 
in marrying her. as he already had a wife, the Bar- 
oness Madeline des Landes, whom he married in Eng- 
land. The union was not recognized in France, how- 
ever, as the Prince had not secured the consent of his 
parents. As he was over twenty-one when the mar- 
riage took place it was valid in England. The name of 
de Broglie possesses special interest to Americans as 
one of its most distinguished members, Prince Victor 
de Broglie, served through the war of independence in 
this country, as a lieutenant of General the Marquis 
de Lafayette. He was afterward guillotined by Robes- 
pierre in 1794. His son married the daughter of the 
celebrated Mme. de Stael, and the present and sixth 
Duke de Broglie is her great-grandson. He is a sailor 
by profession, and retired some years ago from the 
navy with the rank of lieutenant. 
* * * 

The Easter hat is the paramount question now, 
so the views of a woman, straight from Nice and 
other Winter resorts of the blessed, are listened to 
here with due reverence. Says this woman, who 
is a friend of Larv Isabel Howard, now in this 



country : "American women are the only ones who 
dread the girlish in the headgear. Now, in Paris a 
woman with marriageable daughters, and even with 
granddaughters, calmy takes the simple shape with 
rosebuds and other emblems of the opening bud. 
Also, she lets the youngsters select anything they 
want. The round hat, garlanded with small roses, 
with knots of pink ribbon and tulle, will, with 
artistic treatment of the face, make the woman of 
forty look under twenty. The Princess of Wales 
who is known to be past her first youth and facing 
forty, habitually wears the most juvenile pinks, 
blues, and whites, with all the girlish trimmings 
imaginable. The way to do it is to ask the milliner 
for a hat for your sixteen-year-old daughter, have 
it boxed at once and depart. The hat which the 
artist designs for sweet sixteen is the thing, not 
one trimmed up girlishly for any age. The European 
women have mastered this art, and are far ahead 
of their American sisters. 



A New York fashion writer tells how some of the 
richest and most noted society women appeared at 
the Metropolitan Opera House on a gala night. 

"Mrs. Clarence Mackay who made her first public 
appearance since the birth of her little son on Jan. 
28th wore a black chiffon gown and her dark hair 
showed a filet-like tiara in Greek key pattern of 
diamonds, the band not being over an inch and a 
half wide, the diamonds being of the same size, 
apparently. On the corsage gleamed a large ir- 
regularly shaped bowknot with two curving ends 
in large and small diamonds. Her three-quarter 
length coat was of black velvet, half covered with 



Let them know! 



Your friend can reserve a room at the 

Hotel St. Francis 

when he leaves home, and find it ready 
for him when he arrives. Tell him so. 
Every comfort at hand. 



-THE WASP- 



13 




MRS. ARTHUR DUDLEY CROSS 

band embroidery done in black silk. It had a 
straight back and iron, and the sleeves, also straight. 
were faced up inside for several inches with ermine 
fur. The collar, some eight inches wide, was of the 
sort that is turned up high about the face, or else 
is laid flat on the coat, and this, too, was faced 
with ermine, that showed a flat collar eight inches 
wide when it was turned over the coat. The two 
ends of each side front of this ermine collar were 
cut in rounded tabs, the upper one being shorter to 
make the collar fit. 

"Mrs. Edmund C. Randolph, slender and alert 
with a noticeable simple, quaint coiffure, and Mrs. 
Richard Stevens, wearing an imposing crown with 
the points topped by large pearls, were two fasci- 
nating ladies entertaining in a box. They had many 
callers and evidently were ready with bright replies 
for all comments and sallies. One noticed the sparkle 
of wit as well as that of the jewels. The Countess 
of Strafford was as much interested as her hostess. 
the always much interested Mrs. William Douglas 
Sloane. Mrs. James A. Burden, jr. (Adele Sloane), 
in a soft black silk gown and wearing her sable 
cloak, arrived with Mrs. Sloane, but listened to the 
opera from the 'dark red shadows' in the back of 
the box. 

"Mrs. J. Pierpont Morgan, in a gown that was 
either white or very pale gray, had Miss Janet 
McCook in her party. Her silver-gray hair parted 
over her forehead had only a simple ornament, but 
she wore a beautiful pearl collar, below which there 
hung a single strand of diamonds. Mrs. Adolph 
Ladenburg with a high white aigrette in her hair, 
sat shoulder to shoulder with that other sports-lov- 
ing young woman, Mrs. Tames B. Eustis, who was 
very smart in all black. Mrs. Harry Payne Whitney 
who, with Mr. Whitney and Miss Dorothy Whitney, 
expected to leave for Aiken this week, was present 



raring a simple satin gown. < inc of Mrs. John J. 
Wysong's guests was Airs. Alfred Kessler. She 
wore black, while her sister, tin- Countess of Straf- 
ford wore a dark blue gown, apparently black. Mis. 
Robert Goelet. in a modified empire gown of silver- 
gray satin, with a high while ornament in her 
hair, vivaciously entertained a party of young mar- 
ried people, including Mrs. Forsythe Wickes, who 
was noticed in her beautiful red opera-cloak when 
she entered. Miss Rosamond Street, in a cerise 
gown with flowers in her corsage, was one of the 
prettiest of the fair-haired girls present, and Miss 
Janet Fish, wearing a pailletted gown of sapphire 
blue with the usual quaint ribbon around her neck, 
won compliments from the critics below. 

The artist was being shown about the multi- 
millionaire's stables by the proud owner. You 
know what a millionaire's stables nowadays are 
like — floors and walls of translucent white tiles, 
drinking fountains of marble, .mahogany mangers 
silver trimmings, and so forth and so on. 

"Well, said the millionaire, proudly, "is anything 
lacking?" 

" '1 can think of nothing,' said the artist, 'ex- 
cept a sofa for each horse.' " 

* * * 

Mrs. Francis Carolan, who usually sets the fashions 
at Burlingame, has abandoned her favorite color, 
black. This Spring she is wearing a parrot green hat 
with a grey gown which is very smart. Mrs. Caro- 
lan's friend, Mrs. Walter Hobart. is also wearing 
green, and she has a green velvet dress. 




STUDEBAKER 

1907 

CARS INOW ARRIVING 

Studebaker Bros. Co. of California 

405 Golden Gate Avenue 

Chester A. Weaver, Manager 



14 



-THE WASP 



That highly exclusive organization, the National 
Society of Colonial Dames of America, has, since 
1895, given an annual breakfast which has served as 
a reunion of the members resident in California. 
Last year the breakfast was given in the Sorosis Club, 
which the fire of April wiped out. This year the 
gathering took place at Tait's Cafe, ninety-five mem- 
bers and guests attending. The decorations and 
general arrangements were on the colonial style. Re- 
porters being an unknown quantity at festive gather- 
ings of clubwomen in those far off days, all ordinary 
itemizers were rigidly excluded, but the Wasp, which 
is always exceptional in the recording of social 
events, is cognizant of every detail. 

The piece de resistance of the menu was chicken a 
la Maryland, and this was flanked by colonial dishes 
in abundance. 

His Grace Bishop Nichols delivered the invoca- 
tion, which was followed by an eloquent speech of 
welcome by Mrs. Selden S. Wright of the Virginia 
Society. 

Mrs. C. Elwood Brown of the New Jersey Society 
was toasrmistress and responses were made as follows : 
"Ye Daffodils, Cowslips, Lavender and Thyme, " by 
Mrs. Leigh Richmond Smith of the Massachusetts 
Society: "Old Time Posies," by Mrs. Laurilla M. 
Hathaway of the Massachusetts Society; "Fruits, 
Herbs and Sun Dials," by Mrs. Grace Goodyear Kirk- 
man of the Connecticut Society. 

The officers of the Society are: President, Mrs. 
Selden S. Wright; vice-presidents, Mrs. C. Elwood 
Brown and Mrs. J. Goddard Clark; hon. vice-presi- 
dent, Mrs. Charles H. Hedges; corresponding secre- 
tary, Mrs. Walter D. Mansfield; treasurer, Mrs. 
George E. Whitney; registrar, Mrs. J. D. Tallant; 
historian, Mrs. W. A. Brewer ; genealogist, Miss Sarah 
Louise Kimball. 

The California Society of Colonial Dames was the 
first to be organized outside of the thirteen original 
Colonial States. Mrs. Selden S. Wright was ap- 
pointed in 1895 by the national president, Mrs. 
Howard Townsend of New York, to organize the so- 
ciety in California; and for twelve years has been the 
president of the local branch, the members refusing 
to let her resign. 

The Society of Colonial Dames receives no applica- 
tions for membership, as that is gained solely by in- 
vitation. Eligibility to the Colonial Dames Society 
is derived from lineal descent from high officials 
who came to this country before 1750, and closes with 
the signers of the Declaration of Independence. 
Revolutionary service carries with it no eligibility 
whatever. 

Among the prominent Californians who belong to 
the Society of Colonial Dames are Mrs. Louis Aldrich, 
Mrs. Wm. Ashburner, Mrs. Wm. T. Baggett, Mrs. 
Wm. H. Beatty, Mrs'. T. Z. Blakeman, Mrs. John F. 
Boyd, Mrs. Wm. A. Brewer, Mrs. C. Elwood Brown, 
Mrs. Wm. Craig, Mrs. Arthur D. Cross, Mrs. Sidney 
B. dishing, Mrs. Harvey Darneal, Mrs. Horace Davis, 
Mrs. Henry Glass, Mrs. 'Edwin S. Newhall, Mrs. E. B. 
Holladay, Mrs. S. W. Holladay, Mrs. George H. Hell- 
mann, Mrs. Mansfield Lovell, Mrs. Louise Wright 

Cellarette. side-board, sleeping car or ocean steamer kit is incomplete without Abbott's 
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McClure, Mrs. Stuart Selden Wright, Mrs. William C. 
Peyton Mrs. William L. Kip, Mrs. S. C. Huse, Mrsl 
John F. Rodgers, Mrs. Nannie Rodgers, Mrs. 
Brooke Rose, Mrs. Vanderlyn Stow, Mrs. William A. 
Thompson, Mrs. Henry L. Van Winkle, Mrs. Sidney!) 
M. Van Wyck, Mrs. George E. Whitney, Miss Anna 
B. Wright, Mrs. Brooke M. Wright, Mrs. Rosa Hoop- 
er Plotner. Mrs. George Kirkman, Mrs. Percy Moore,', 
Mrs. John R. Jarboe and many others. 

The couple who got married on a California street 
car stole a march on the reporters, for not a word of 
it got into the daily newspapers. It was certainly a 
novel conceit to use a street car as the vehicle to carry 
them over the line of single blessedness into the stale 
of matrimony. As the car was rolling downtown the 
couple stood up suddenly with the best man and 
bridesmaid, the minister rattled through the servic* 
and presto, the deed was done. Then the laughing 
wedding party got off and hastened away, presumably 
to the wedding lunch, for the hour was late even foffl 

a wedding breakfast. 

* * •* 

Mrs. Florence Pflngst arrived in town during the 
week on a visit to Mrs. E. Walton Hedges. Mrs. 
Pflngst and Mrs. Shirley will remain as her guests 
until this charming lady starts for the East. Many 
entertainments are being planned by this attractive 
trio of matrons. 




FR F" F ^ ny . one own ' n § 
a disc- playing 

Talking Machine of any kind, 

who will send us their name 

and address will receive, free 

of charge, each month for one 

year, a handsome little souvenir booklet containing the names 

of the latest records and a brief history of a few of the most 

prominent contributors. 



SHERMAN, CLAY & CO. 



STE1NWAY PIANOS 
Victor Talking Machines 



1635 Van Ness, S. F. 



Broadway at 13th, Oakland 



NEW PUP RESTAURANT 

JOS. LENOIR; Proprietor 

1428 GOLDEN GATE AVENUE 



Regular Dinner $1.00 
Telephone West 75 



San Francisco, Cal. 



CHAS. SCHMIDT 



HARRY MILLING 



Bohemianism is Best Exemplified at 

THE NORTHERN CAFE 

1710 and 1712 O'FARRELL STREET 

A PLACE TO EAT AND DRINK "Ladies' Orchestra" from 6 to 12 



THE WASP 



15 



A wedding of interest took place in Berkeley on 
Wednesday last when Miss Blanche ('ashman, daugh- 
ter of Mr. and Mrs. Edwin Burke Cushman. and 
Mr. J. II. C. Wolfe of this city and Tonopah were 
married. Rev. Cecil Marrack officiated. The bride is 
well known in Berkeley society. Mr. Wolfe is a min- 
ing engineer. 

* • • 

The Paris Tea Garden has been the seene of a 
number of very delightful and fashionable a (fairs this 
winter. The dance given last week by the Friday 
Evening Club was like all the parties of this club, a 
very jolly affair. The patronesses are Mrs. J. P. 
Langhorne, Mrs. Wakefield Baker, Mrs. Louis Mon- 
teagle, Mrs. George Moure, Mrs. Geo. Ashton. A 
dainty supper closed an enjoyable evening. 

* • * 

Berkeley Chapter of the Phi Chi fraternity gave 
a delightful ball at the Paris Tea Garden last week 
and the Unitarian Club of California celebrated the 
Sixteenth Ladies' Night there. Addresses were made 
by Prof. Francis G. Peabody of Harvard University, 
and Prof. William Frederic Badi of the Pacific Theo- 
logical School. 

* *> * 

Miss Emily Marvin will be married to Roy Somers 
on April 20th at St. Luke's Church at 8:30 a. m. 
Owing to a death in the groom's family, the wedding 
will be very quiet, only a few intimate friends will 
be entertained at the bride's home. The bride will 
be attended by her sister, Miss Marion Marvin, as 
maid of honor, and Miss Maude Payne, Miss Ruth 
Casey, Miss Marie Brewer, Miss Floride Hunt as 
bridesmaids. The best man on this occasion will be 
Frank Somers, the groom's brother. [The ushers 
will be Edward Robinson of Los Angeles, Carlton 
Curtis, Harold Plummer and Charles Norris. 

* # # 

At a charming tea recently given by Mr. and Mrs. 
A. A. Watkins of Sausalito, they announced the en- 
gagement of their attractive daughter Mabel to Capt. 
Orrin Rawson Wolfe, U. S. A., of the Twenty-second 
Infantry. The wedding will take place in June. Miss 
Watkins made her debut three years ago and has been 
a general favorite in Sausalito society, as also in this 
city. She was assisted in receiving at her recent 
tea by Mrs. Watkins, Mrs. Battams, Mrs. Frank Find- 
ley, Miss Edith Cutter, Miss Edith Miller and Miss 



Etalka Williar. Many quests from 
the bay were present. 



bulh sides of 



Mrs. .J. C. Jordan, who has been dazzling local 
society by the originality and magnificence of her en- 
tertainments, leaves tomorrow for the East and Eu- 
rope, where it is possible she may be joined later in 
the summer by her friend, Mrs, Hedges. Mrs. Han- 
Cord, who has been occupying an attractive flat with 
Mrs. Hedges during the winter, is also going East 
tomorrow. She hopes to arrange her schedule so as 
to make a visit abroad before returning to California 
next winter. Mrs. Hedges will also return next win- 
ter to take part in the social activities. 
• • • 

The Engineer Officers, U. S. A., will give a large 
hop in their new barracks room, Fort Mason, on 
April 20th. On the 19th the officers at Yerba Buena 
Naval Training Station will be hosts at an enjoy- 
able dance on that evening. Every Thursday evening 
the officers of the Twenty-second Infantry are hosts 
at a hop, many society people going over to the Island 
from the cities around the bay. In about two weeks 
the officers of Alcatraz will be hosts at an enjoyable 
dance. 



On Tuesday last, April 9th, Mrs. Humphreys, wife 
of Capt. Humphreys, U. S. A., gave a large luncheon 
at her home, Alcatraz Island. Many prominent so- 
ciety women from this city were guests of this charm- 
ing hostess. 

One of the most elaborate bridge parties of the 
season was given by Mrs. Malcolm Menry on last 
Saturday, at the residence of her parents, Dr. and 
Mrs. A. H. Voorhies. The guest of honor was Mrs. 
Jocelyn, wife of Colonel Jocelyn, who is visiting here. 
The prize winners were Mrs. James H. Bull, Mrs. 
Stephen Jocelyn, Mrs. Butters, Mrs. Henry L. Dodge 
and Mrs. Henry Mendell, Jr. Among those present 
were Miss Jocelyn, Mrs. Henry L. Dodge, Mrs. Rich- 
ard Bayne, Mrs. Hellman, Mrs. M. H. de Young, Mrs. 
James II. Bull, Mrs. W. A. McEnery, Miss McEnery, 
.Mrs. Jordan, Mrs. E. Walton Hedges, Mrs. Henry 
Clarence Breeden, Mrs. George H. Mendell, Mrs. 
John Rodgers Clark, Miss Dean and Mrs. Butters. 

I hear that the published statement, that Mrs. 
Henry contemplates a trip to the Orient is wholly 
without foundation. 



$)attl Bancroft 

ffiral tEstatr anil iFtnanrial Agrnt 

i^inh rlasa tBiuunras anfi Sraiurnttal Jlrmjrrtyt a ^pcrialtu 
^parr in new Sanrrnft Swifting arranaffi tn suit Srttanls 



iCnana Eraara JlmirstmrntB 



T31 iHnrkrt S'trrrl 



16 



-THE WASP- 

















|| jg| 




wjH 








aSI 


I M 










^KV^^^fl 












iXi 


9k. 





FLORENCE SINNOTT 
A pretty soubrette who brightens the local stage 

Mr. Lanel, who has been promoted to be French 
Consul General to New York, is the first French 
Consul who in a long time has not been reduced in 
rank, for the French Colony .here is not easy to please. 
Mr. de la Lande was very glad to leave here, and two 
of his successors came to an unhappy end. The Mar- 
quis de Trobiand got grey at his post here, and was 
finally forced to beat an inglorious retreat. I believe 
on; of the Marquis' Paris friends told a visiting Cali- 
fornian that the antipathy to his noble compatriot was 
based on his refusal to get the decretion of the Legion 
of Honor for every French restaurant keeper in town. 
The local purveyors of frog-legs and rum omelets on 
the other hand declared that the Marquis was a pig 
of an aristocrat, and anyhow the Marquis slid down 
the diplomatic scale instead of up, and in middle life 
was relegated to an obscure post in Spain which paid 
him about a thousand a year. 

When Monsieur Lanel arrived here to relieve the 
unpopular Marquis the French greeted him with that 
effusiveness so characteristic of the nimble Celtic tem- 
perament. The Consul took it all in and indulged in 
no bursts of oratory that might cause people to think- 
that another Mirabeau had arisen. The new Consul 
was petted in American drawing rooms, but he never 
made a more personal remark than, "It's a beautiful 
day." "Do you think it will rain tomorrow?" or Cali- 
fornia is a beautiful State." The Americans said, 
"What a droll Frenchman." The French said, "Mais, 



that Consul is an imbecile. Why does he not exhibit 
more decision." 

Shrewd observers noticed that the Consul got 
mixed up in no feuds. He was always courteous and 
was a genius for keeping his mouth shut at inop- 
portune moments. Now his reward has come. He 
has performed the perilous feat of living in the French 
Colony for five years without getting into trouble 
with anyone. His government regards him as a jewel 
among diplomats and there is no limit to what he 
may not achieve by silence and sawing wood. 

ENTRE NOUS. 



Eva — "And is she really so very much in love 
with him?" 

Katharine — "Is she? Why, she actually believes 
that every blot in his love letters was intended 
as a kiss." 




MRS. JOHN SIEBE 




IRENE OUTTRIM 
One of the noted members of the Local Stock Talent 




■■:$&, :-..gi,:: , 



an 




jj $r'-:."i' ■#£■■ :^..?..«y<fe_-:.:j ;";■---.■: b^' -scgw ",^ .-^ J j^£'r_^3i.._ ,, ^v.- : ;;Vi">: 



&rank, Criticism cf Current Stents 




After the war closed the German government en- 
tered into negotiations with Spain for the purchase 
of all her possessions in the Pacific. The price was 
fixed at twenty-three millions of dollars and the con- 
tract was practically closed when the facts became 
known to the British government. Queen Victoria 
sent a second message to President McKinley, and by 
a singular coincidence it also came on a Sunday. 
Lord Pauncefote went to the White House on Sunday 
afternoon to deliver it. This time he said that he 
was instructed by her majesty to advise the President 
that the British government would sincerely deplore 
any disposition of the Philippine Archipelago that 
removed the islands from the jurisdiction of the United 
States. He told the President about the negotiations 
between Spain and Germany and explained the reasons 
why Great Britain and other European powers could 
not permit the Kaiser to obtain such a solid foothold 
in the Pacific. McKinley immediately cabled the 
facts and appropriate instructions to the American 
peace commissioners at Paris and that is the reason 
the United States paid $20,000,000 for an archipelago 
in the Pacific that it did not want, and cannot get rid 
of. That "white man's burden" was placed on our 
shoulders by Great Britain. Germany purchased the 
Caroline Islands and the other remaining Spanish 
possessions in the Pacific for $3,000,000. 

It is considered quite probable in Washington that 
King Edward may openly favor the acquisition of 
Cuba by the United States just as his mother did 
the purchase of the Philippines by us. The geograph- 
ical location makes Cuba practically part of this 
nation, and the natives seem, unable to solve the 
problem of self-government for many years to come. 
A large part of the population is made up of illiterate 
negroes. 



As the Italians are pouring into the United States, 
and California has a very large colony of them, it is 
interesting to know that, according to recent statistics, 
they are the most temperate people in Europe. Ger- 
many, which is a beer drinking and not a whisky 
drinking nation, consumes proportionately almost five 
times as much alcohol as Italy. France, which is an- 
other temperate nation, absorbs nearly four times as 
much alcohol as Italy. This is the relative consump- 
tion per capita of alcohol. In the matter of divorces, 
separations, illegitimate births, outrages against public 
decency and suicides, Italy's percentage is below that 
of both France and Germany. Germany and Italy 
have both a very small rate of divorces and separa- 
tions, and France a very high rate — almost ten times 
that of the other two countries. Strange to say that, 
with all its temperance and moderation in other re- 
spects, Italy's record for murder and wounding is far 
higher than that of France or Germany. The pro- 
portion per 1,000 inhabitants is 1.46 in France, .80, in 



Germany, and 8.42 in Italy. Evidently the modern 
Italian has preserved a good deal of his old Roman 
ancestors' quickness of temper and readiness to use 
his weapons. High as the Italian record is in this 
respect, our own record of murder in the United States 
is unfortunately higher. Taking all his traits into con- 
sideration, his great temperance, his good physique, 
his domestic virtues and his thrift and industry, the 
Italian should prove one of the most useful of the 
immigrants that come to our shores, and with the new 
opportunities here offered ought to become an impor- 
tant factor in the industrial, commercial and political 
life of the republic. 



An exhibition of Paintings of Indian Life by Grace Hudson, will be held 
from April 17th to 27th at the Schussler Gallery, 1218 Sutter Street. 



FAIRMONT HOTEL 



SAN FRANCISCO 



Dinner De Luxe, 6 p. m. 

EVENING OF APRIL 1 9TH 
ALL TABLES MUST BE RESERVED 
SUPPER SERVED TILL MIDNIGHT 



CONCERT BY THE FAIRMONT ORCHESTRA 



SWAIN'S CAFE p'ost'st. 

Have added to their heretofore Excellent Equipment 

A Modern Grill Service 



With Schlitz and Wurzburger 
Beer on Draught 



Music under the direction o 
Mr. Edgar Bayliss 



A tables poonful of Abbott s Bitters in 
greatest aid <o digest on known. 



glass of sweetened water after meals is the 



JULES' FRENCH RESTAURANT ^JSnfcJSZ 

Regular Dinners served svery Evening, including Sunday, at former prices 

326 BUSH STREET 

Music on Sundays Phone Temporary 1821 Jules Wiltman. Prop 



-THE WASP- 



19 



The Nevada Legislature is modest in only asking 

that the i nties of Inyo, Mono, Alpine, Lassen and 

Modoc be taken from California and made part of 
Nevada. Why not extend the list and take in all the 

norther unties, including San Francisco. In that 

way Nevada ■•■•utd train so £ the population ii lias 

been Losing Eor the pasl twenty years. Some time ago 
it became a serious question whether it was fair to 
allow her a representation of two senators in the 
United Stairs Senate. The rush to the minis of 
Southern Nevada has slightly improved her statistics 
of population, but hardly enough to justify her in 
absorbing California. This demand Eor five of our 
mining counties looks like a come-back for our talk 
alioiit using the waters of Lake Tehoe, half of which 
inland sea belongs to Nevada. 

HARVEY BROUGHAM. 



The house which William Ellis Corey, president of 
the United States Steel Corporation, is said to have 
purchased in New York for Mabelle Oilman, the act- 
ress, stands on a lot only 25x100 feet on Fifth avenue, 
Earing ( Vntral Park. It is in the midst of a cluster of 
millionaires' mansions. A property of that size in 
New York is considered large and only millionaires 
can buy it. Here we have been used to fifty-vara 
corners and some stately old houses have had whole 
blocks to themselves. But that order is changing, and 
the flat dweller is becoming omnipresent. It seems to 
lie settled that Corey will rush on his fate, and, despite 
all criticism, marry Miss Oilman and install her in 
this newly bought Fifth avenue mansion. 



.Macon officiating, Miss Dora Tate, was maid of 
ir. .Miss Pearl Swanton of Santa Cruz and ill--. 
Nellie Vance of San Francisco were bride's maids. 
.Mr. and Mrs. McCafferty will reside in Oakland. 



Mrs. William A. McEnery and her sister Miss 
Threasa McEnery gave one of the largest bridge 
parties of the season, on Tuesday afternoon last. 
At which they entertained sixt) | :Sts. 



Mr. and Mrs. George Gardiner arrived recently 
from theii Lome in Cleveland, Ohio, and are visiting 
in Sausalito, as the guests of Mrs. Finley, the mother 
of Mrs. Gardiner. This is Mrs. Gardiner's first visit 
to her old home since her marriage three years ago. 



I hear from New York that young Louis Bru- 
guiere is immensely popular and that not only 
widows, divorcees and matrons throw themselves at 
his feet, but maidens themselves. Society is trying 
to decide whether he intends to wed Gladys Vander- 
bilt, daughter of Mrs. Cornelius Vanderbilt, or 
Laura Swan, daughter of Mrs. Elisha Dyer by her 
Baltimore husband, from whom she is divorced. 
Both will be heiresses to vast sums of money some 
fine day, and either is an extremely good match, 
although neither has great claims to beauty. Miss 
Vanderbilt is rather artistically inclined, as are the 
Bruguieres, and so she and Louis have much in 
common. Louis is scarcely known in San Fran- 
cisco, for he never returned here after he went to 
Harvard about ten years ago. He studied law in 
New York, but my impression is that Society so 
captivated his mind that he gave up all idea of being 
admitted to the bar. He is one of the handsomest 
men at Newport and his good looks and charming 
manners win his way wherever he goes. Mrs. Bru- 
guiere, his mother, has been with him for several 
years. The Bruguieres fit. very easily into New 
York life, for their father came from there and be- 
longed to one of the best- old French families of the 
set in which the Durands and La Montagnes move. 



On Thursday April 11th, Miss Lucille Dunham 
was married to Mr. Frank McCafferty, at the 
residence of her parents in Oakland. Rev. Clifton 



C. H. REHNSTROM 

Tailor and importer 

SPRING AND SUMMER STYLES 

NOW READY 



Formerly of 

The Mutual Sa\ir.gs Bank Building 



2415 FILLMORE STREET 
Telephone West 5769 



'JUST A SHADE ON OTHERS' 



Weinhard 

The Peer 
of Bottle Beer 




CALIFORNIA BOTTLING CO. 



SOLE BOTTLERS 



1255 HARRISON STREET 

PHONE MARKET 977 



Weinhard is the Delicious Beer served at Cafe Francisco, The 
Louvre, Tail's and many other Cafes 



g^JgfRjR President's Taste 

Macaroni, Vermicelli, Spaghetti 

L. R. PODtSTA, Manufacturer 512 Waibington Street 



20 



THE WASP- 




Photo Gembe MISS FRANCES WILSON 

Some years ago The Wasp advised a tax be 
placed upon every gun used in shooting game and 
on every rod used in angling for game fishes. Several 
sporting editors and local sportsmen worked them- 
selves into a fit over the suggestion as highly un- 
American if not actually infamous. Time sets all 
things right however and I note that the editors and 
the sportsmen have now come to think that a tax 
of $1 on every gun used in killing game would be a 
very good thing. 

It would not be bad for a starter but the tax 
should be $2.50 and not $1. Anv man who can 
afford the time and expense to hunt quail or grouse 
or snipe can pay $2.50 for a license and the money 
will help to pay wardens to protect the game of 
the State, which should be one of its valuable assets. 
The State of Maine makes a great deal cf monev 
out of its game. 



Every man who fishes for trout and salmon 
should also be taxed. You and I and all the other 
taxpayers dear reader, put up our good money to 
pay for the propagation of game fishes and the 
stocking of streams with them. Why not make the 
man who gets all the fun of catching them, if it's 
fun to him, pay for the pleasure. Cigar makers or 
brewers or distillers do not go and stock saloons 



or hotels with cigars, beer or spirits for him to drop 
in and enjoy them witho it paying a cent. Every 
trout planted in a stream and watched by a fish- 
wc.-den costs money to the taxpayers. Let the 
sportsman pay for his fun. Every true sportsman 
will be found willing to do it and every pot hunter 
will be found protesting that the tax is an out- 
rage. But the money collected will help to swell the 
funds available for paying fish-wardens and it is 
necessary to employ such officers. The fish supply 
of the State of California is very valuable. 



Several years ago The Wasp pointed out that the 
Fish Commissioners were neglecting their duty by 
not protesting loudly against the wholesale 
slaughter of striped bass, which were planted in 
these waters some twenty years ago by the late 
B. B. Redding, father of J. D. Redding, the well- 
known lawyer and clubman. It was against the law 
to catch striped bass for severa. years and in that 
time they multiplied amazingly. As soon as it 
became lawful to catch them, the markets were 
filled with tons of them. In season and out of 
season the slaughter was continued and in five 
years this splendid table fish has become so scarce 
that another year or so will see them almost ex- 
terminated. It was argued, stupidly, that the fish 
could not be exterminated, though Italian fishermen 
with seines, hundreds of yards long swept the 
bays and sloughs incessantly and took the fish 
large and small. Now the sight of a fine striped 
bass in a San Francisco fish market is rare and 
the public has lost a valuable supply of cheap food, 
which with a little care and by the exercise of a 
little intelligence could be preserved for all time. 
To make up for their apathy the Fish Commissioners 
now want a hatchery established so that striped 
bass can be propagated at public expense for the 
benefit of Mr. Paladine and his associates of the 
fish monopoly. You and I kind reader will get it in 
the pocket again by this expedient for fish hatcheries 
cost money. The crops of bass and salmon we pay 
to raise, are gathered bv the industrious net fisher- 
men. It is a very profitable industry indeed. How 
could it be otherwise. It would be a verv fine 
scheme if the State raised cattle by the thousands 
and then turned them out on free ranges where 
a meat moi.opolv could send in its cowboys to 



La Boheme 



First Class Italian Restaurant 
1558 BUSH ST. 

Between Van Ness and Franklin 



SPECIALTY: Italian and Trench Cuisine 

FEUX PIANTANIDA, Manager 
Formerly Proprietor of the ORIGINAL COPPA 



Colonial Tub and Shower Baths 

BathS Ladies' Department, 8 to 1 2 a. m. week days 



Now Open 



REGULAR PRICES 
1745 O'Parrell St., near Fillmore 



-THE WASP- 



21 




COL. K1RKPATRICK 

round them up and drive them off to the slaughter 
houses. Really the loads that are put on the honest 
taxpayer in this Republic of ours make him the 
most patient and long suffering ass in Christendom. 
And we all pay taxes directly or indirectly. If you 
don't pay it on real estate, you do in rent to the 
landlord who is assessed. 



Captain Mooney keeps on arresting saloon 
keepers for selling liquor to women and then Judge 
Conlan and the other high minded jurists of the 
Police Court dismiss the cases on "technical" 
grounds and the newspapers tell us the "captain is 
discouraged. The proceeding is all wrong. The 
ai rests are not made at the right end of the chain. 
Let them begin on Chief Dinan and a couple of 
Police Judges and land them where 'they belong 
rightfully and Captain Mooney or any other police 
officer will find no difficulty in enforcing the laws. 



Just the Opposite 
"How is your brother, Harker?" 
"Oh, he is in a business that will open your eyes.' 
"You don't say! What is it?" 
"Why, he sells alarm clocks.' 
"That's funny. My brother 
will close your eyes." 
"Really? What is it?" 
"Why, he markets onions." 



in a business that 



Woes of the Newly Rich 
Stubb — "Yes, old Justrich is going to Paris to 
select some art and he is going to carry that young 



man with him." 

I'enn — "Ah, 1 see. The young man is a connois- 
seur?" 

Stubbs — "No, old Justrich says he is the connois- 
seur, but he is going to take the young man along 
to pronounce the word when he wants to use it." 



Keeping Still 

"From Kentucky, eh?" said the young drummer 
in the hotel lobby. "Well, is it true they really 
make moonshine whisky in Breathitt County?" 

"It may be, pardner," replied the tall gentleman 
in the wide hat, "but you better not breathe it if 
you happen to be around there." 



Gentle Hint 
"Yes," sighed the heavy tragedian, 

rough time in Bacon Ridge." 

"Really?" replied the sweet singer. 

audience 'hand you a lemon?' " 
"No, they handed us an egg." 
"What did that mean?" 
"Thev wanted us to 'beat it.' " 



'we had a 
"Did the 



Wedding Cakes and Fancy Ices 
and Tarts 




LECHTEN BROS. &&%% 



244 Devlsadero Street 

Phone West 2526 



F. W. KRONE. Proprietor 



The Original San Francisco 

Popular Dining Room 



NOW OPEN 
91 1-913 O'Farrell St. 



Bet. Van Ness and Polk 



Largest and Handsomest Dining-Room in the City--An Ideal Kitchen. Foi 
Pal'ons Invited to Coll and Inspect Out New Rooms and Equipment. 



BLAKE, MOFFITT & TOWNE 



PAPER 



1400-1450 FOURTH STREET 

TELEPHONE MARKET 3014 

Private Exchange Connecting all Departments 




STRICTLY BUSINESS 



Points of Interest on Trade and Finance 




Much capital and energy are being applied to the 
development of suburban properties. What The 
Wasp has been prophesying for years about the San 
Mateo Valley has come true. The flood of suburban 
dwellers promises to cover the entire valley with 
the homes of people who do business in San Fran- 
cisco. 

The Leland Improvement Company's project to 
sub-divide a tract of 1000 acres below Palo Alto, 
and adjoining the Leland Stanford University 
promises to give a fresh boom to that already very 
flourishing district. The improvement of Palo Alto 
has been even more remarkable than that of Berkeley 
which real estate men regard as phenomenal. In 
a few years Palo Alto has changed from a village 
to one of the important towns of California and it 
can boast of a class of residents, which would do 
credit to any comunity. Such towns become 
magnets that attract other people of the better 
classes and after a while they establish good 
government so firmly that the character of their 
town becomes established. 

The rapidly improving, and now excellent train 
and car service down the San Mateo Valley is 
sure to have the effect of making every man who 
can afford a modest home do business here and 
sleep in the country. This is a peculiarity of large 
cities and the greater they grow the more marked 
becomes the desire of their business people to 
escape_ from the din and flurry and seek quiet sub- 
urban homes. San Francisco will develop this 
habit more rapidly than New York, for our suburbs 
in the Southern direction are not only very acces- 
sible but very beautiful and will become more so 
every year as people of means settle along the 
valleys and build pretty homes and plant shade 
trees and gardens. 

The Leland Improvement Company was founded 
by W. B. Nash the cashier of the Market Street 
Bank and a number of well-known business men 
are associated with him in the undertaking. They 
propose to create an ideal residence and industrial 
city with thirty-seven miles of streets laid with 
smooth bitumonous pavements, cement sidewalks, 
an artistic park system and a main boulevard 150 
feet broad with a double driveway lined with six 
rows of palm trees. This ideal town we are assured 
is to have what Palo Alto, by the way, has never 
yet produced — a fine modern reinfoced concrete 
hotel of 350 rooms with a roof garden over its 
entire length of 600 feet. The ambitious plans of 

A Sovereign Remedy 

Dr. Parker's Cough Cure, one dose will stop a cough. It 
never fails. Try it. Sold by all Druggists. 



Mr. Nash and his associates contemplate the 
erection of a library, gymnasium, public baths and 
opera house — in fact every detail which is con- 
sidered necessary to a perfect city but is seldom 
attained. The streets are not to be torn up as the 
feed wires and pipes will be laid in subways owned 
by the Improvement Company itself. Part of the 
1000 acres to be thus elaborately developed will be 
sold for factory sites and connected with the water 
front and the railroad. The residential part of the 
town will however have no railroads. An auto- 
mobile service will furnish the inhabitants trans- 
portation at a minimum cost. 

All this is certainly most alluring and as Mr. 
Nash and his associates are practical men they no 
doubt feel assured that they can develop their plains. 

They are not the first to conceive the project of 
an ideal town in the Valley, but the time jwas 
never so favorable to the scheme as now. It Will 
be interesting to watch the development of their 
plans. 



MUTUAL SAVINGS BANK 



706 Market St. 



OF SAN FRANCISCO 



Opp. Third 



Guaranteed Capital, $1,000,000 

Interest Paid on all Deposits 



Paid up Capital and Surplus, $620,000 
Loans on Approved Securities 



OFFICERS- James D. Phelan, Pres,, John A. Hooper. V. Pres.. J. K. Moffatt, 2d 
V. Pres., George A. Story, Secy and Cashier, C. B. Hobson, Asst. Cashier, A. E. 
Curtis, 2d Asst. Cashier. 



TONOPAH, GOLDFIELD, BULLFROG 

MANHATTAN and COMSTOCKS A SPECIALTY 



ZADIG & CO. 

STOCK BROKERS 

Formerly 306 Montgomery Street, have resumed business in their 

Own Building, 324 BUSH STREET 

Directly Opposite New San Francisco Stock and Exchange Bldg. 



FRENCH SAVINGS BANK 



OF SAN FRANCISCO 

CAPITAL AND SURPLUS, 
PAID UP CAPITAL. 
DEPOSITS JANUARY 1, 1907 



108-110 Sutter Street 

$693,104.68 

$600,000.00 

$3,772,145.83 



Charles Carpy, Pres. Arthur Legallet, Vice-Pres. Leon Bocqueraz, Secretary 

John Ginty, Asst. Secretary P. A. Bergerot, Attorney 



-THE WASP- 



23 



Belasco's Fine Hand 

The fine hand of Dave Belasco, which directs a 
publicity bureau as well as blue-pencils and im- 
proves plays, evidently dictated the dispatch last 
week accrediting Frances Starr with having turned 
down a Milwaukee millionaire in favor of a plain 
actor. James Durkin. Not that Miss Starr is not 
charming enough to have fascinated twenty 
millionaire brewers, for she is quite able to have 
accomplished that feat, as those who remember her 
at the Alcazar are willing to swear. But to let us 
know that she is betrothed to James Durkin, the 
leading man at the Alcazar when she was ingenue 
and who was largely the cause of her leaving us — 
that is where the cleverness of the dispatch lies. 
Mr. Durkin was married when he played leads at 
the local theatre. Miss Starr said he was her fate, 
and that it was not her fault that he should have 
fallen in love with her while there was a Mrs. 
Durkin in the way. No doubt fate has been kind 
and relieved Durkin of his matrimonial partner 
through natural means or the divorce court. Since 
.Miss Starr was a universal favorite when she was 
with us. uj) to the time of the Durkin episode, I 
presume nobody will grudge her happiness. She is 
a star now in stage language as well as by birth, 
and has won praise all along the line in the play 
Belasco made out of Dick Tully's old "Juanita of 
San Juan." 



Mr. and Mrs. Joseph K. Carlisle have announced the 
marriage of their daughter, Florence, to Leslie 
W'eedon llroughton, on Wednesday evening, April 
10th, at Rose Cottage, Sausalito. 



Mrs. Henry Fortman of Alameda will leave the first 
of May for a trio abroad, to be gone several months. 



An engagement recently announced followed by 
a speedy marriage was that of Miss Grace Hilborn 
of Pasadena and A. L. Jenkins of San Francisco. 
They were married on Friday April 12th. Miss 
Hilborn is the daughter of the late S. G. Hilborn, at 
one time a congressman from the Third California 
District. Mr. Jenkins is well known in San Fran- 
cisco business circles. 



The dance at the Naval Training Station, Yerba 
Buena Island last week was one of the largest 
affairs of the year. Two hundred invitations were 
issued. Among the guests were officers from the 
Buffalo, Milwaukee and Albatros. Captain James 
H. Bull, commandent of the Training Station led 
the grand march with Miss Marjorie Bull. The 
Training Station band furnished the music. 



Miss Critic — So she was led to the altar at last. 

Miss Spite — Led! Led! I guess you didn't see 
her. She didn't have to be led. When she started 
down the isle you couldn't have headed her off 
with a regiment of cavalry. 

It's the proper thins to take Abbott's Bitters with a glass of sherry or soda before meals: 
gives you an appetite. At all druggist;. 



SAVE A LITTLE 

Save regularly and systematically and 
deposit your savings with the 

CALIFORNIA SAFE DEPOSIT 
AND TRUST COMPANY 

We pay 3 1-2 per cent interest on 
regular savings deposits and 3 6-10 
per cent on term deposits. 
Your account will be welcome. 




HOME OFFICE 



CALIFORNIA and MONTGOMERY STS. 

West End Branch, 1531 Devisadero 

Mission Branch, 2572 Mission, near 22d 
Up-Town Branch, 1740 Fillmore nr. Sutter 



VALUABLES op all kiinds 

May be safely stored at 

SAFE DEPOSIT VAULTS 

of the 

FIRST NATIONAL BANK 

Cor. Bush and Sansome Sts. 



Safes lo rent from $5 a year upwards 
Careful service lo customers 



Trunks $1 a month 
Office Hours: 8 a. m. to 6 p. m. 



The German Savings and Loan Society 

526 CALIFORNIA ST., San Francisco 



Guaranteed Capital and Surplus 
Capital actually paid up in cash 
Deposits. December 31, 1906 



$2,576,695,41 

1,000,000.00 

38,531,917.28 



OFFICERS - President, F. Tillmann, Jr.; First Vice-President, DanieJ Meyer 
Second Vice-President, Emil Rohte; Cashier. A. H. R. Schmidt; Assistant Cashier. 
William Herrmann; Secretary, George Toumy; Assistant Secretary. A. H. Muller. 
Goodfellow & Eells, General Attorneys. 

BOARD OF DIRECTORS -F. Tillmann, Jr.. Daniel Meyer. Emil Rohte. l|rn. 
Steinharl. I. N. Walter, N. Ohlandl, J. W. Van Bergen. E. T. Kruse and W. S. 
Coodfellow. 



MEMBER STOCK AND BOND EXCHANGE 
MEMBER SAN FRANCISCO MINING EXCHANGE 

J. C. WILSON 

BROKER 

STOCKS AND BONDS Kohl Bldg., 488 California St. 

INVESTMENT SECURITIES San Francisco 

Telephone Temporary 815 



24 



-THE WASP- 



A FEW WORDS TO THE WISE 

The Navy Department is about to advertise in the 
newspapers for recruits. It formerly used posters 
on the dead walls and found that system unsatisfac- 
tory. It will find newspaper advertising a hundred 
times better. Every sane business man who wants to 
reach the general public uses the newspapers and finds 
that such advertising pays. Of course, one must use 
judgment in selecting the newspapers. 

Many of our business men waste a great deal of 
money by using poster advertising almost exclusively. 
It is one of the most expensive methods, yet some 
business men labor under the delusion that it is cheap. 
So also with circulars. They are costly and ineffective 
when an advertiser wishes to reach the general public. 
In selecting newspapers, an advertiser should know 
what class he wants to reach. Thus, for instance, a 
journal like the San Francisco Chronicle will surely 
give good returns if you advertise to attract the better 
classes. I have a friend who deals in real estate, and 
he swears by the Chronicle. Not long ago he adver- 
tized in the Chronicle a $16,000 property and got a 
dozen answers from likely buyers. To test the merits 
of another large morning paper, which claims an 
immense circulation, my friend inserted in it the same 
advertisement, word for word, for the same length of 
time, and got no answers at all. The newspaper in 
question no doubt has a large circulation, but evi- 
dently does not reach the people who are able to buy 
pieces of property worth $16,000. 

Just before the fire last April my real estate friend 
put a small reader in the Chronicle advertising a good 
piece of property and got over a hundred answers. 
At that time the market was booming. He tried other 
morning papers, but without anything like the same 
result. He sold the property to one of the men who 
answered through the Chronicle. 

These are absolute facts and not published for the 
purpose of underrating other newspapers to benefit 
the Chronicle, but are related to show that the quality 
of a newspaper circulation is the important consider- 
ation. Some papers are read and supported by the 
people of intelligence, culture and wealth, and some 
by the rabble. An intelligent advertiser will find that 
it pays best to use the medium that reaches the 
people whose trade he desires. 

But on general principles newspaper advertising- 
gives more satisfactory results to the advertiser, and 
is far cheaper in the end, than any other kind. This is 
why the great advertiser of the world, who spends 
millions in publicity, uses newspapers and periodicals 
exclusively. You never see their names on dead walls. 



THE PROSPECTIVE SKYSCRAPER. 

There is a good deal of talk about monster sky- 
scrapers that are to be erected soon, but the labor 
conditions will have to be improved before we see them 
towering up in every direction. The demand for fire- 
proof buildings is growing greater, but property own- 
ers must see some profit in building or they will not 
improve their holdings. So far a most creditable 
amount of work has been done in the downtown dis- 
trict, but men engaged in the building industtry on a 
large scale declare that the difficulties are increasing 



instead of becoming less. We must get rid of all the 
labor demagogues in public office before the work of 
building skyscrapers can be started in earnest. There 
could be no satisfactory progress in a city where the 
government was run for graft and the main object was 
to cinch the employer and the property owner. That 
is partly stopped now by the indictment of Ruef and 
Schmitz. If half a dozen of the official grafters could 
be sent to the penitentiary and the rest kicked out of 
office, San Francisco would grow as if by magic. 



COMPLETION OF YOSEMITE RAILROAD 

The new steam railroad between Merced and Yosem- 
ite will be in operation this summer and will make 
the great valley a more famous resort than ever. Al- 
ready there is talk of H. E. Huntington's running 
an electric road into the valley from Fresno. Surveys 
are being made for it. The Tevises, W. H. Crocker, 
and local capitalists are entitled to the credit of 
having run this first steam railroad from Merced into 
the valley. 



Germania National Bank 

OP SAM FRANCISCO 

IS NOW OPEN FOR BUSINESS AT THEIR NEW QUARTERS 

521 MARKET STREET, Bet. First and Second Streets 

SAN FRANCISCO, CALIFORNIA 

OFFICERS: W. A. Frederick, President; F. Kronenberg. Vice-President; 
R. F. Crist, Vice-President; F. Kronenberg, Jr., Cashier. 
Cable Address: Germania 



PHIL S. MONTAGUE, Stock Broker 

Member of S. F. Stock Exchange 

Goldfield, Tonopah, Manhattan and Bullfrog Stocks Bought and Sold. 

Write (or Market Letter. 

339 BUSH STREET, STOCK EXCHANGE BUILDING 



BURNED HOMES MUST BE REBUILT 

The Continental Building and Loan Association 

Having sustained practically no loss in the recent calamity, is in a 
position to loan money to people who wish to rebuild. San Francisco 
must restore her homes as well as her business blocks. 

DR. WASHINGTON DODGE, Pres. 

GAVIN McNAB. Atty. 

WM. CORBIN, Sec. and Gen. Mgr. 

OFFICES -COR. CHURCH AND MARKET STREETS 
OPEN AND DOING BUSINESS 



Rooms 7 to 11 




Telephone Trapy, 1415 




W. 


C. 


RALSTON 




Stock a 


nd Bond Broker 




Member San Francisco Stock and Bond Exchange 
Mining Stocks a Specialty 


Codes 


Bedford McNeill 
Western Union 
I Leibers 


368 BUSH STREET 

San Francisco 



THE WASP 



25 




Saturday — Goodness! Why don't men leave their 
whiskers mi or keep them shaved oft' all the time so 

yon ran know tlirui.' [ was going down Van Ness 
avenue today and mel a stout man I thought was 
Deacon Fish, with his whiskers shaved oft'. Lands 
sake! Twasn't the Deacon at all, and I never knew 
it till I'd shaken hands with him. Oh. heavens! He 
had ;i strong foreign accent, and, my! how he smelled 
of beer and tobacco. lie said he couldn't remember 
my name, but knew my face well. He held on to my 
hand and wanted to know if I'd been in to see his new 
place, and then he handed me a card with saloon 
printed on it. Heavens! What would I do if some of 
my friends came along. I don't know how I got away 
from the awful man. As I ran down the street I 
heard him shouting after me: "Hold on till I intro- 
duce you to mein friend, Jake Stein." Oh, my! How 
my poor head aches. I've drank ten rups of tea al- 
ready, and it's still splitting. 



Sunday. — How coarse marriage makes a woman in 
every fibre. The Count Raviola met several of us on 
the avenue today as we walked home from church, 
where we listened to a sermon by that handsome new 
clergyman all the girls are raving over. Mrs. Gay- 
leigh got the poor Count chatting at once, and, though 
he speaks the most terrible English, she had the nerve 
to tell him that anyone would think he was from 
Boston, his accent was so lovely. 

He tried to explain that the reason he spoke such 
perfect English — oh, mercy ! — was that some American 
lady was teaching him, but, oh, gracious! what the 
man said was awful. 

"I speeka eet gooda so," said he, "because I hava 
Merican meestress." 

Goodness! I was ashamed to death ! Those women 
just roared. Mrs. Gayleigh, of course, was the worst. 
Instead of passing it over, she kept the poor count 
telling all about his "meestress," and every time he 
used the word those married women just laughed 
louder. If marriages are made in heaven, all I can say 
is that they don't make the married women an- 
gels. I got away from this crowd as quickly as possi- 
ble and came home and spent a comforting afternoon 
reading the "Pilgrim's Progress." 



Monday Mrs. Gebbe came in today to tell me 
about Mrs. Shoddy being blacklisted by the Colonial 

Dauies. who are to have a great breakfast this week. 
They're awfully exclusive, it. seems, and unless your 
great-great-grandfather was some high government of- 
ficial you can't gel in. Mrs. Shoddy paid $75 to some 
man in Boston that found a pedigree dating back 
to an ancestor who sold a bale of hay to Paul Beyere 
after bis famous ride. For $.") more she could have got 

an ancestor that gi med Paul's horse, ami for $7.50 

additional one of the boatmen that rowed George 
Washington over the Delaware. But, no! She's that 
mean she won't spend a cent more than is actually 
necessary. My! Wasn't she hopping mad when the 
Colonial Dames sprung that new rule on her that the 
ancestors must be high officials. Mrs. Gebbe says 
she's going to apply for admission to the Cousins of 
the Confederacy, as she can prove that her father was 
born in South San Francisco. 

Tuesday. — It did me good today when Mrs. Gay- 
leigh told me that all the clubmen in town are just 
seared to death since they read about that woman 
that aroused her husband's jealousy by talking in her 
sleep. It appears that she told so much that her hus- 
band concluded he had better watch her, and the very 
next night he caught her flirting with some man, and 
they had a shooting scrape. Isn't it terrible? Oh, 
my ! Mrs. Gayleigh says that a lot of the Bohemian 
Club men that never went home before till 2 a. m. 
go to bed now with the chickens, and you couldn't get 
them to eat Welsh rabbit or broiled lobster for supper 
if you gave them the town. No one that talks in his 
sleep, she says, is safe if he eats anything heavier than 
weak tea and toast before going to bed. Goodness ! I 
should think from all she's told me that weak tea 
would give some of those clubmen delirium tremens. 



The Horace Blanchard Chases are staying at Mira- 
mar, where they have a very picturesque cottage. Mrs. 
Chase has been there for weeks and Mr. Chase went 
clown Easter week. Santa Barbara society has been 
very attentive to them. The other day Mrs. Chase 
gave a luncheon of eight covers. The guests present 
were Mr. and Mrs, William Miller Graham, Mr. and 
Mrs. Harry Dater. Jr., Mrs. Arthur Lord and C. C. 
Felton. 



Popular French Restaurant 



Regular Dinner 75c 

Meals a la carle al any hour 



Private Dining: Rooms 

for Banquets, etc. 




497 Golden Gate Ave. 

Comer Polk Street 



Phone Market 2315 



26 



-THE WASP 



Of Social Interest 



The concert for the benefit of the organ fund of St. 
Dominic's church, will take place at Tait's this evening 
from eight to eleven and will doubtless attract a large 
audience. Miss Florence Roberts will recite the cele- 
brated "Ballad of Despair," by Bemberg. Others who 
will take part are Miss Camille Frank, Mrs. Thomas 
Nunan, Mrs. J. E. Birmingham, Miss Elsie Arden, 
Miss Viola Van Orden, T. G. Elliott, Frank Figone, 
Harold Pracht, Harry Samuels, violinist, and Theo. 
Marc, cellist. Mile. Blanche Leviele will tell stories 
from the French, and Mrs. E. J. Birmingham will sing 
an obligato, with violin, cello and piano accompani- 
ment by I. Fewster, Theo. Marc and Dr. H. J. Stewart. 
Dick Hotaling will auction off the tables. The pat- 
ronesses of the affair are Mrs. Eleanor Martin, Mrs. 
J. M. Dricoll, Mrs. De Young, Mrs. Stanley Stillmann, 
Mrs. Ed. L. Eyre, Mrs. Ortmann, Mrs. Walter Dean, 
Mrs. Lansing Kellogg, Mrs. Ynez Shorb White, Miss 
Alice Hager, Mrs. J. M. Allen and Mrs. Fred Pick- 
ering. The patrons are Ed. M. Grieway, Fred. 
Greenwood and Jas. D. Phelan. 

* * * 

All the arrangements for the promenade concert at 
the Fairmont Flotel next Tuesday evening, under the 
direction of Dr. H. J. Stewart, are complete, and the 
event will beyond question be the greatest charitable 
affair given up to this date in San Francisco. It is no 
exaggeration to say that all the ladies of influence in 
San Francisco are working for it and many of them 
have had a wide experience in arranging such affairs 
so as to insure success. Society en masse will attend this 
great concert, which is for the benefit of the San 
Francisco Nursery for Homeless Children, The Doc- 
tors' Daughters, and the San Francisco Polyclinic. 
Among those taking part in the musical program will 
be the Stanford and Berkeley Glee Clubs, the De Koven 
Glee Club, the Swedish Singing Society, the Fairmont 
Hotel Orchestra, Mrs. Bermingham, Miss Helen 
Heath, Miss Camille Frank, Mrs. Charles Camm, Mrs. 
Markt, Miss Virginia Pierce, and Mr. Romeo Frick. 
The arrangements for the concert have been made by a 
joint committee of ladies from the three charities in- 
terested, of which Mrs. H. de Young is the head. 

* * * 

A wedding of interest to old Californians took 
place in Washington, D. C, on April 4th, when Miss 
Frances Williams, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Garner 
Williams of California and South Africa was mar- 
ried to William Wallace Mein, also of California and 
South Africa. The ceremony was performed at noon 
in St. Thomas' Episcopal Church by Rev. C. Ernest 
Smith, before a company of distinguished guests 
prominent in Washington society. The ushers were 
Representative Butler Ames of Massachusetts, Fred 
Faust Thomas Riggs, Jr., and Clarence Follis of 
California. The maid of honor was the bride's sister, 
Miss Gertrude Williams. 

Mr. and Mrs. Gamer Williams were well known 
and prominent in early day society in San Fran- 
cisco. Wr. Williams is a brother of Mrs. Thomas C. 
Van Ness and uncle of those two popular matrons, 



Mrs. William Denman, the former Miss Leslie Van 
Ness, and Mrs. John Taylor, who was attractive 
Daisy Van Ness. Mrs. Robert Williams of South 
America is also a brother. All early day Califor- 
nians will remember the two beautiful Gluyas girls, 
of Napa and San Francisco. One married Robert 
Williams and the other married James M. Thompson. 
Mr. Gluyas, the father, held some important Federal 
positions here in early days. Mrs. Robert Williams is 
living in New York at present, having recently re- 
turned from abroad, where she was educating her 
children. One son, a bright young man, is taking 
a mining covtrse at Columbia College. Mrs. Williams 
and Mrs. John Tallant, together with their daughters, 
Miss Elsie Tallant and Miss Queen Anne Williams, 
have been enjoying the pleasures and sights of New 
York together. 

Miss Nonie Williams married a very wealthy gen- 
tleman from Finland, whom she met while traveling 
abroad. Mrs. Chambers, another daughter, is the 
brilliant woman journalist "Kate Carew," at pres- 
ent engaged by a New York paper, together with her 

literary husband. 

* * * 

Miss Evelyn Norwood and Miss Ethel Lincoln, who 
had been at Del Monte, have returned to town. 



BURNS HAMMAM BATHS 



LADIES' DEPARTMENT 
OPEN 



817 Eddy Street 



..Phone Franklin 2245 



Soda Bay Springs 

Lake Co., Cal. 

Situated on the picturesque shore of charming Clear Lake, season 
opens May 1st, finest of Boating, Bathing and Hunting. Unsur- 
passed acommodations. Terms $2.00 per day, $12.00 per week, 
special rates to families. Route, take Tiburon Ferry 7:40 a. m. 
thence by Automobile, further information address managers 

. GEO. ROBINSON and AGNES BELL RHOODES 

Via Kelseyville P. O. Soda Springs, Lake Co., Cal. 



j. r. rossi 

Domestic'*"' 1 Wines, Liquors and Cigars 

Depot of Italian-Swiss Colony Wines 

Specialties: Belmont, Jesse Moore, A. P. Hotaling's O. P. S., Loveland Rye, 
King \Vm. Fourth Scotch, Glenrosa Scotch, Dew of the Grampian?, A. V. H. 
Gin, Buchu Gin, Cognac Brandy, Bisquit Dubouche Cognac, Fernet Branca 
Italian Vermuth, French Vermuth. 

217-219 Washington St., Bet. Front and Davis 



-THE WASP- 



27 



Automobile News 

Within thirty days a new and distinctive type of 
highpower runabout will be on the market.' It is 
the product of the E. R. Thomas Motor Company 
of Buffalo, X. Y.. and is in answer to a demand 
for tliis class of car and of this make that has been 
insistent since the buying season began last fall. 
The most distinctive feature of the new model is 
a special motor of great power with four cylinders 
cast seperately and a five bearing crank shaft. The 
other features follow the general lines of the well 
known Thomas Fiver and include two sepcrate and 
independent systems of ignition, a transmission 
with four speeds forward and reverse, three disc 
metallic clutch, drop forged I-beam axles, front 
and rear, and double side chain drive with 36-inch 
wheels. The double ignition system includes a 
Bosch imported magneto and batteries working 
through an Atwater-Kent spark generator each 
with a seperate set of spark plugs. The new run- 
about will seat three, two in front and one in a 
rumble seat in the rear where the tool box will also 
be located. The price of this car is $4,000. Tests of 
the new model car have been in progress at Buffalo 
during the past sixty days and have shown that it 
developes great speed and power and has the quality 
of reliability to a marked degree. 

* * * 

Mrs. William K. Vanderbilt Jr.. has recently 
purchased one of the new White steamers. This 
car will be the third successive model of this make 
which she has owned. Mrs. Vanderbilt is at present 
in Europe, and the order for the car was given to 
the White garage in New York by her sister, Airs. 
< klrichs. When making the purchase Mrs. Oelrichs 
explained that Mrs. Vanderbilt has been touring in 
England with her sister-in-law, the Duchess of 
Marlborough, in the latter's White steamer, and, 
learning from the manager of the White branch in 
London that only a few of these cars remained un- 
sold, she cabled to her sister to make the purchase 
for her at once. Although her husband has a garage 
full of high-power foreign cars. Mrs. Vanderbilt 
has always shown a marked preference for the 
\\ liite, and this is the only make which she tries 
to drive herself. She is frequently seen scurring 
along the Long Island highways in her White at a 
pace which makes the drivers of the sterner sex sit 
up and take notice. 

John H. Gibson, of Des Moines, drove his model 
K Winton 22,000 miles with great enjoyment, there- 
by adding fresh evidence of Winton reliability, 
"Another 22,000 miles on top of this," says Air. 
Gibson, "will not hurt her any." 

# * * 

Many of the factories find themselves overrun 
with orders for immediate shipment, and for lack of 
ability to meet the demands placed upon them are 
losing orders. Others being more fortunate are 
able to cope with conditions, showing that their 
early claims for prompt shipment have not been 



exaggerated. This is the case with the II. H. Frank- 
lin Manufacturing Company, who are shipping 
seventy-two cars a week, a large percentage of 
which is the Type 1 >. with a considerable number 
of the six-cylinder cars, similar in construction to 
the trans-continental car and the Chicago-New 
York record breaker. 

* * * 

A distance of 16,835 miles in rental service, and 
still doing business every day. is the record of a 
Winton Model K owned by the Hub Rental Co.. at 
Los Angeles. 

* * * 

After a thorough inspection of all the 1907 
models shown in the salesrooms of that city the 
Pittsburg Elks decided by a unanimous vote to 
buy a Thomas Flyer. The committee was composed 
of experts who are either members of the lodge or 
were asked to serve by it. The car will be the 
grand prize to be given away at the Elks carnival to 
be held soon. 

One of the minor changes made in the construc- 
tion of the Thomas Flyer this year, but one which 
shews the care taken in making every possible 
improvement, is the placing of the ratchet of the 
back stop safety device inside the rear hubs in- 
stead of on the outside rim. By this change of 
location the ratchet is protected from dust and mud 
which might tend to clog it. 

Mr. and Mrs. J. H. Mackenzie made a trip to 
Santa Cruz on Friday last, going via Gilroy, in 
their model "A" Oldsmobile. They report the roads 
in a deplorable condition. In several places the 
water was so deep that it was above the hubs. At 
one point on the route, they met a man with a cart 
who stopped them and insisted that they do not 
try to go further — that it would be absolutely im- 
possible for them to get through. "I have had such 
good luck so far in fording streams and getting 
through bad roads, that I am no longer afraid of 
any of them," said Mr. Mackenzie, and thev arrived 
in Santa Cruz very much pleased with the per- 
formance of the car. 



H. C. RAAP. Manatjet 



Telephone Franklin 568 



National Cafe and Grill 

918-920 O'FARRELL ST., San Francisco 

SPECIAL MERCHANTS HOT LUNCH 25c 



Including Tea, Coffee, Wine or Beer. I I a. 
A LA CARTE al all hours. 



Regular Dinner 50c 



Special Sunday Dinner 75c 



AL. CONEY J. HUFF 

Kadee Hammam Baths 

TURKISH AND HAMMAM BATHS 

PRIVATE ROOM AND BATH $1.00 

Open Day and Nishl 

GEARY AND GOUGH STREETS 

Striclly First Class Phone West 3725 



J 




DIRECTORY 



OF LEADING BUSINESS HOUSES AND PROFESSIONAL PEOPLE 




MISCELLANEOUS. 

Builders' Exchange, 226 Oak St., S. F. 

Builders' Association, 96 Fulton St. 

ADDRESSING MACHINES. 

Elliott Addressing Machine Co., 68 Stock- 
ton St.. S. F. 

ADVERTISING AGENCIES. 

Bolte & Braden, 105-107 Oak St., S. F.; phone 
Park 289. 

Cooper Adv. Agency, F. J., West Mission and 
Brady sts. 

Dake Adv. Agency, Midway Bldg., 779 
Market St. Phone Temporary 1440. 

Fisher, L. P. Adv. Agency, 836 North 
Point St., S. F. ; Phone Emergency 584. 

Hadley, M. L., Advertising Agency, 26 
Clay st. 

Johnston-Dienstag Co., 2170 Post St., 

Tuttle, L. T., 332 Delbert Block, cor. Van 
Ness Ave. and O'Farrell. 

Walker, Shirley, Advertiser. Midway 
building, 779 Market street, phone 
Temporary 1839. 

AGENTS— MANUFACTURERS- 
Wlrtner. Jno. J., 2330 Vallejo St., S. F. 

ARCHITECTS. 
Carson, John, Vice-President and 
Manager H. C. Chivers, 1627 Sut- 
ter St. 
Chivers. Herbert C. 1627 Sutter St., S. 
F.; Wainwrights Building, St. Louis, 
Mo. 
Curtis John M., 2601 Buchanan St.. S. F. 
Havens &. Toepke, 611-612 Mutual Savings 

Bank. 
Reed Bros, Temporary Offices, 2325 

Gough St., S. F. 
Thos. J. Welsh, John W. Carey, associate 
architects, 40 Haight St., S. F. 
ART DEALERS. 
Gallagher Bros., 2208 Geary St., S. F. 
Gump, S. & . G., 1645 California St., S. F. 
Schussler Bros., 341 Grove St. 
ATTORNEYS. 
A. Heynemann, 2193 Fillmore St. 
Phone West 6405. 

Bahrs, George EL, 1901 Post St., cor. 

Fillmore. S. F. 
Campbell, Metson & Drew, 1101 Laguna St., 

cor. of Turk St., S. F. 
Dorn, Dora & Savage, 717 Van Ness 

ave. 
Drum, J. S., 1416 Post st, S. P. 
Dinkelspiel, Henry G. W., 1266 Ellis St., 

S. F. PHONE, WEST 2355. 
Goldstone, Louis, 1124 Fillmore st. 
Heller, Powers & Ehrman, Union 

Trust bldg. 
Hewlett, Bancroft and Ballantine, 
Monadnock Bldg., Phone Temporary 

972. 
McEnemey, Garret W., 1416 Post St., S.F. 
Lawlor, Wm. P., Judge, The Family 

Club, 1900 Franklin St., S. F. 
O'Callaghan. Chas. F., 928 Fillmore St., 

Pringie & Pringle, 2219 Fillmore st. 

Ricketts, A. H. (Title Quieting Co.) 
1136 O'Farrell street. Tel. Emer- 
gency 788. 

Shadburne, Geo., D., 904 Devisadero 
St., S. F. 

Shortrldge. Samuel M., 1101 O'Farrell st, 
S. F. 



Edward B. Young, 4th Floor, Union Trust 
Bldg., S. F. Telephone, Temporary, 833. 

AUTOMOBILES AND SUPPLIES. 

Auto Livery Co., Golden Gate and Van 

Ness Ave., S. F. 
Boyer Motor Car Co., 408 Golden Gate ave. 

Phone, Emergency 655. 
Leavitt, J. W. & Co., 441 Golden Gate 

Ave., S. F.; 370, 12th st, Oakland. 
Lee Cuvler, 359 Golden Gate Ave., S. F. 
Middleton Motor Car Co., 550 Golden Gate 

Ave., S. F. 
Mobile Carriage Co., Golden Gate Ave. 

and Gough sts., S. F. 
Pioneer Automobile Co., 901 Golden Gate 

Ave., S. F. ; and 12th and Oak sts., 

Oakland 
Karig Auto Co. 1377 Broadway, Oakland. 
White Sewing Machine Company, 

Market and Van Ness ave., S. F. 

BANKS. 

American National Bank, Merchants Ex. 

Bldg., S. F. 
Anglo California Bank Lt. cor. Pine and 

Sansome sts.. S. F. 
Bank of California, 424 California st, 

S. F. 
California Safe Deposit and Trust Co., 

cor. California and Montgomery sts., 

S. F. 
Central Trust Co.. 42 Montgomery st. 

s F 
Crocker - Woolworth National Bank, 

Crocker Bldg., S. F. 
First National Bank, Bush and Sansome 

sts., S. F. 
French Savings Bank, Union Trust Bldg., 

and Van Ness and Eddy. 
Germania National Bank, 621 Market St., 

S. F.: Phone Park 792. 
German Savings and Loan Society, 626 

California 8t. 8. F. 
Halsey, N. W. & Co., 413 Montgomery 

International Banking Corporation, 2045 
Sutter street, and 415 Montgomery 

Hibernia Savings and Loan Society, 
Jones and McAllister sts.. S. F. 

Humboldt Savings Bank, 626 Market st, 
S. F. 

Mechanics' Saving Bank, 143 Montgom- 
ery st, S. F. 

Metropolis Trust and Savings Bank, 
12 37 Van Ness Ave. 

Mutual Savings Bank of San Francisco, 
710 Market St.. opp. 3d St.. S. F. 

National Bank of the Pacific. Call Bldg., 
S. F. 

Renters Loan and Trust Co., Commercial and 
Savings Bank, 115 Hayes Street. 

San Francisco Savings Union. N. W. 
cor. California and Montgomery sts., 
S. F. 

Savings and Loan Society, 101 Mont- 
gomery st, S. F. 

Security Savings Bank, 316 Montgomery 
St.. S. F. 

Standard Bank, 1818 Market St., at 
Van Ness, S. F. 

The Market Street Bank and Safe De- 
posit Vault, Market and 7th sts., S. F. 

Union Trust Co., 4 Montgomery st, S. F. 

Wells-Fargo Nevada National Bank, 
Union Trust Bldg., S. F. 

Western National Bank, Powell and 
Market sts.. S. F. 

BATHS 

Colonial Baths, 1745 O'Farrell St. 
Oriental Turkish, cor. Eddy and Lar- 
kin Streets, City. W. J. Blum- 



berg & Bro. 

BITTERS. 

Lash's Bitters Co.. 1721 Mission st, S. F. 

BREWERIES. 
Albion Ale and Porter Brewery, 1007-9 Golden 

Gate Ave., S. F. 
Buffalo Brew;-ig Co., 125-129 King st, 

S. F. ; Phone ulaln 101U. 
National Brewing Co., 762 Fulton St., 

S. F. 
Lochbaum, A. H. Co., 125 Kins St., S. F. ; 

Phone Main 1010. 
S. F. Breweries. Ltd.. 240 2d st, S. F. 
Rapp, Jno. & Co.. Agents Rainier Beer, 

8th and Townsend sts., S. F. 

oi-tlDGE BUILDERS. 

Pac. Construction Co., 17 Spear St., S. F. 

San Francisco Bridge Co., 523 Monad- 
nock Bldg., S. F. 
UROKERS— STOCKS AND BONDS. 

tuition, E. F. & Co., 490 California st. 
S. F. 

Rollins, E. H. & Sons. 804 Kohl Bldg: 
Telephone Temporary 163: S. F. 

Wilson. J. C. i8S California St. S. F. 

Sutro & Co., 412 Montgomery St.. 
S. F. 

Montague, Phil S., 339 Bush St.. Stock 
Exchange Bids. 

Zadig & Co., 324 Bush St., S. F. 

BUILDING AND LOAN ASSOCIA- 
TIONS. 
Continental Building and Loan Associa- 
tion. Church and Market sts.. S. F. 
BUTCHERS' SUPPLIES. 
Pacific Butchers' Supply Co.. 315 Bry- 
ant st. bet. 1st and 2d sts.. S. F. 
CARPET CLEANING. 
Spauidlng, J. & Co.. 911-21 Golden Qatt 
Ave.; Phone Park KfcL 

CLEANING AND DYEING. 
Thomas, The F. Parisian Dyeing and 
Cleaning Works. 1168 McAllister st, 
S. F. 

CLOTHIERS— RETAIL. 
Hub, The, Chas. Kellus & Co., King 

Solomon Bldg., Sutter and Fillmore 

sts.. S. F. 
Roos Bros., cor. O'Farrell and Flllmorfl 

sts., S. F. 

COMMISSION AND SHIPPING MER- 
CHANTS. 

Dollar, Robert Co.. Steuart street dock. 

Johnson Locke Mercantile Co., 213 Sansome 
St., . S. F. 

.Aaldonado & Co., Inc., 2020 Buchanan 
St., 3. F.; Tel. 2830. 

The J. K. Armsby Co., The Armsby 
Bldg., cor. New Montgomery and How- 
ard sts.. S. K. 

CONTRACTORS AND BUILDERS. 

Atlantic, Gulf and Pacific Co., 523 Monadnock 

Bldg. 
Fisher Construction Co., 1414 Post St., 

S F 
Gray Brox., 2d st, adjoining XV. F. & Co. 

Bldg.. S. F. 
S. F. Construction Co., A. E. Buckman, 

ores. ; A. J. Raisch, sec. ; 636 Market ; Tel. 

Franklin 256. 
Trounson, J., 1751 Lyon St.; also 176 Ash 

Ave., S. F. 

CROCKERY AND GLASSWARE. 
Nathan Dohrmann & Co., 1520-1550 
Van Ness ave. 



-THE WASP- 



29 



DENTISTS. 
Oreian B. Burns, 2077 Sutler St., West 6736 
Decker, Dr. Chat. W., 13)6 Sutter st. 
Knox. Dr. A. I., 1615 Fillmore St., formerly 

of Grant Bldg. 
MorfTew 4 Peel. 1765 Pine at, S. F. ; 

Tel. Went 4301: formerly Examiner 

Bldg. 
O'Connell. Dr. Robert E. and Dr. George, 

211 Dcvldadero St., S. F. 
Albert S. Vanderhurst, 2077 Sutter St., West 

6736. 

DRY GOODS— RETAIL. 

Emporium. The. 1201 Van Ness Ave., S. 
F. ; Phone West 1361. 

Newman & Levison. Van Ness Ave. and Sutt 

O'Connor. Mofflt & Co., Van Ness Ave 
and Pine St., S. F. 

City of Paris. Van Ness Ave and Wash- 
ington St., S. F. 

White House, Van Ness Ave. and Pine 
»t.. S. F. 

ENGINEERS. 

.itlantlc, Gulf & Pacific Co., 523 Monad- 
nock Bldg., 8. F. 

EXPRESS. 
Wells, Fargo Sc Co. Express. Golden 
Gate Ave. and Franklin St., Fer- 
ry Bldg., and 3d St. Depot, S. F. 
FEATHERS— UPHOLSTERY. 
Crescent Feather Co., 19th and Harrison 
sts., S. F. 

FLORISTS AND DECORATORS. 

Clels & Jacobsen. 942 Fillmore St. 

near McAllister, Phone Park 363. 
Fnnk & Parodi Co., 121 1 McAllister 

street, formerly 109 Geary street, 

phone Park, 794. 

FRUITS AND VEGETABLES. 
Omey & Goetting, Geary and Polk sts., S. F. 

FUNERAL DIRECTORS. 
Carew & English. 1618 Geary St.. bet. 
Buchanan and Webster sts., S. F. ; 
Phone West 2604. 
Pof.er & White. 1531 Golden Gate Ave., 
S. F. ; Phone West 770. 

FURNITURE. 
A. B. Smith Co., 702 Van Ness Ave., 

cor. Turk St., S. F. 
Breuner, John & Co., 1491 Van Ness Ave., 

S. F. 
Sanitary Bedding House, The, 778- 
780 Golden Gate ave., N. E. cor. 
Gough. Beds and Bedding ex- 
clusively. Tel. Emergency 5 96. 
GAS STOVES. 
Gas Co.. The. Halght and Fillmore sts.. 
S. F. 

GENT'S FURNISHERS. 
Bullock & Jones Company, 801 Van Ness 

Ave., cor. Eddy St., S. F. 
Hansen and Elrick, 1105-7 Fillmore 
St., nr. Golden Gate ave., phont 
West 5678. 

Roberts & Bayless, Men's Furnishers, 645 Van 

Ness Ave., near Turk. 

HARDWARE AND RANGES. 
Alexander- Yost Co., Pine and Polk sU., 

8. F. 
Baker & Hamilton. 115 Berry St., near 

3d; Phone West 3589 and 3590. 
Dunham. Carrlgan & Havden Co., office 

131-153 Kansas st. S. F. 
lis, John G. & Co., 827 Mission St., S. F. 
Montague. W. W. & Co.. Turk & Polk 

sts.. S. F. 

HARNESS AND SADDLERY. 
Davis. W. & Son. 2020 Howard st, bet. 

16th and 17th, S. F. 
Lelbold Harness and Carriage Co., 1214 
Golden Gate Ave.. S. F. 
HATTERS. 

Korn, Eugene, the hatter, 946 Van 

Ness Avenue. 
Meussdorffer, J. C. Sons, 909 Fillmore 

St. S. F. 
Porcher. J.. 716-717 Golden Gate Ave., 
near Franklin. 8. F. ; formerly Odd Fel- 
lows Bldg. 
HOSPITALS AND SANITARIUMS. 

German Hospital, Scott and Duboce 

Ave. 
Harbor View Sanatorium, Harbor 

View, S. F. 



Keeley Institute, H. L. Batehelder, 
Mgr.; 262 Drvlsadero St., S. r\ 

McNutt Hospital, 1800 O'Farrell at 
S. F. 

St. Luke's Hospital, 26th and Valen- 
cia St. 

JEWELERS. 
Baldwin Jewelery Co., 1521 Sutter St.. 

and 1261 Van Ness Ave.. S. r. 
Bohm, Bristol, Van Ness and Sacra- 
mento st. 
Gllnderman, Wm„ 1532-1534 Fill- 
more, formerly Examiner Bldg. 
Shreve & Co.. cor. Post and Grant Ave., 
and Van Nes sand Sacramento Its., S. F. 
AUNDHIES. 
Lace House French Laundry, Cerclat & 
Co., props.; 1047 McAllister st ; for- 
merly at 342 McAllister; Tel. Park 881 
La Grande Laundry, 224 12th st, S. F. 
Palace Hotel Laundry and Kelly Laundry 

Co.. Inc., 2343 Post St., phone West 5854. 
San Francisco Laundry Association. 1408 
Turk st. S. F.; Phone West 793. 
LIME. 
Holmes Lime Co., Mutual 
Bank Bldg., 710 Market 

LUMBER. 
Nelson. Chas. Co.. 1st and Clay sts. 

Oakland; 144 Steuait St., S. F. 
Redwood Manufacturers Co., Room 505 
Monadnock Bldg. S. F.. Doors. Win- 
dows, Tanks, etc. 
Slade, S. E., Lumber Co.. 65 Mission 

street, S. F. 
Union Lumber Co., office 909 Mo- 
nadnock building 



Thorne, Dr. W. S., 
F. 



1434 Post St., S. 



Savings 



MACARONI AND VERMICELLI. 
r, R. Podesta. 612 Washington st. S V 
MOVING AND STORAGE COMPANIES. 
Beklns' Van and Storage Co.. 13th and 

Mission sts.. S. F. ; Phone Park 169 

and 1016 Broadway, Oakland. 
St. Francis Transfer and Storage Company. 

Office, 1402 Eddy st. Tel. West 2680. 
Union Transfer Co., 2116 Market st, 

S. F. 

Notaries Fublic. 

Deane, Jno, J., temporarily at 2077 
Sutter street and 2464 Vallejo 
street, S. F. 

opticians. ' 

Mayerle, George, German expert. 1115 
Golden Gate Ave., S. F.; Phone West 
3766. 
San Francisco Optical Co. "Spences," 
are now permanently located at 
627 Van Ness ave, between Gold- 
en Gate avenue and Turk st. 
"Branch" 1613 Fillmore near 
Geary. 
Standard Optical Co., 808 Van Ness ave., 
near Eddy St. 

PACKERS. 
Phoenix Packing Co., 118 Davis st, S. F. 
PAINTERS AND DECORATORS. 
Keefe, J. H., 820-822 O'Farrell St., S. F., Tel. 
Franklin 2055. 

Tozer, L. & Son Co., Inc., 1527 Pine 
and 2511 Washington St., near 
Fillmore, S. F. 

PAINTS AND OILS. 

Bass-Hueter Paint Co., 1816 Market 
st. 

Paraflne Paint Co.. 405 Union Savings 
Bank Bldg.. Oakland; Sales Dept 
Guerrero near 15th St., S. F. 
PHOTO ENGRAVERS. 

Cal. Photo Eng. Co., 141143 Valencia St. 
PHYSICIANS. 

Bowie, Dr. Hamilton C, formerly 293 
Geary St.. Paul Bldg. ; now 
14th and Church sis. 

Bryant. Dr. Edgar R.. 1944 Fillmore 
St.. cor. Pine; Tel. West 5667; Res. 
3869 Jackson St.: Tel. West 816. 

D'tivelyn, Dr. Frederick W., 2115 Cal- 
ifornia St., S. F.; and 2103 Clinton 
Ave., Alameda. 



r-IANOS — MANUFACTURERS AND 

DEALERS. 
rJu.uWln, D. H. & Co.. 2612 Sacramento 
st. near Fillmore. S. F.; Phone West 

1S69. 

RESTAURANTS. 
Marchnnd's, 14J4 McAllister st. 
Murughan. M. B. Oyster Co., 1212 

Golden Gate Ave.. S. F. 
Old Poodle Dog, 824 Eddy St., near Van 

Ness ave. 



St. Germain Restaurant, 4 97 Golden 
Gate Ave., Phone Emergency 300. 

Swains Restaurant, 1111 Post St., S. F. 

Techau Tavern. 1321 Sutter St., 8. F. 

Thompson's, formerly Oyster Loaf, 
1727 O'Farrell St. 

SAFES AND SCALES. 
Herring-Hall Marvin Safe Co.. office an<~ 
salesrooms. Mission St., bet. Seventh ani 
Eighth sts.; phone Temp'y, 1037. 
SEWING MACHINES. 
Wheeier & Wilson and Singer Sewing 
Machines. 1431 Bush st, cor. Vai 
Ness Ave., S. F. ; phone Emergencj 
301, formerly 231 Sutter street. 
STORAGE. 

Bekins Van & Storage Co., 13th and Misciox 

Sts., S. F.; Phone Market 2558. 
Pierce Rodolph Storage Co., Eddy 
and Fillmore Sts., Tel. West 828 

SURGICAL INSTRUMENTS AND HOS' 

PITAL SUPPLIES. 
Walters & Co., formerly Shults, Walter! k 
Co., 1608 L teiner St., S. F. 

TALKING MACHINES. 
Bacigalupi, Peter, 1113-1115 Fillmore 
st, S. F. 

TAILORS. 
Lyons, Charlos. London Tailor, 1432 Fill- 
more St., 731 Van Ness Ave., S. F.; 
958 Broadway. Oakland. 
McMahon, Keyer and Stiegeler Bros., 

Van Ness Ave. and Ellis, O'Far- 
rell and Fillmore. 

Neuhaus & Co., Inc., 1618 Ellis st 
near Fillmore. S. F. 

Rehnstrom. C. H.. 2415 Fillmore st; 
formerly Mutual Savings Bank Bldg. 

TENTS AND AWNINGS. 
Thorns F., 1209 Mission St., corner of Eighth, 
S. F. 

TRICYCLES. 
Eames Tricycle Co., Invalid Chairs, 2108 

Market St.. S. F. 
WTNES & LIQUORS — WHOLESALE 
Balke. Ed. W., 1498 Eddy St., cor. 

Fillmore. 
Blumenthal. M. & Co.. Inc.. temporary 

office. 1521 Webster st. S. F. 
Butler. John & Son, 2209 Steiner st, 

Revnnids. Chas. M. Co., 614 Halght »L 

S. F. 
Rusconi, Fisher & Co.. 649 Turk st. S. F 
Berman Wine & Liquor Co., family traoff 

S. F. 

Siebe Bros. & Placeman, 419-425 
Larkin street. Phone, Emergencj 
349. 
Weniger, P. J. & Co., N. E. cor. Van 
Ness ave. and Ellis st. Tel. Emer- 
gency 3 09. 
Wichman. Lutgen & Co.. formerly of 29- 
31 Battery St.. S. F.: temporary office, 
Harrison and Everett sts., Alameda, 
Cal.: Phone Alameda 1179. Gilt Edge 
Whiskey 
WINES AND LIQUORS— RETAIL. 

Ferguson, T. M. Co., Market street. 

Same old stand. Same Old Crow 

Whiskey. 
Fischer, E. R.. 1901 Mission street, 

corner of Fifteenth. 

The Metropolejohn L. Herget and Wm. H. 

Harrison. Props., N. W. cor. Sutter and 

Steiner Streets. 
Tuxedo. The. Rddio Orpmev. Pron. SW 

COr. Fillmrvrrt t n-FsTT-ell st = 

YEAST MANUFACTURERS 
Golden Gate Compressed Y^-ast Co.. 2401 Fill- 



30 



THE WASP- 



Amusements 



For the week beginning Monday 
night, April 15th, the Colonial Stock 
Company will be seen in Milton 
Royle's successful four-act comedy- 
drama, "Friends," the play in which 
the author himself scored such a big 
hit when it was first produced. 
"Friends" is an intensely interesting 
play of American life in New York, 
and every character admirably por- 
trays life as it is lived. The piece 
will be mounted in most elaborate 
fashion. Monday night will also mark 
the local debut of Morgan Wallace, 
the new leading man engaged by 
Manager Kurtzig to replace Wilfred 
Roger, who is now starring in "Sa- 
lome." Mr. Wallace has played with 
E. H. Sothern, Julia Marlowe, Jos- 
ephine Cohan, Madame Kalich, Wil- 
ton Lackaye, and Max Figman. He 
has also taken most important parts 
in such high-class stock companies 
as Belasco's, Keith's, Huntington, 
Ulica and Crawford. Miss Jewell, the 
talented leading woman, will also be 
in the cast, as well as Frank Bacon, 
A. Burt Wesner, Norval McGregor, 
Walker Graves, Jr., R. Peralta-Ga- 
lindo, Bessie Bacon, Jane Jeffery, and 
the balance of the company. 
* * * 

To the person of ordinarily happy 
disposition the dramatic efforts of 
Florence Roberts are somewhat ag- 
gravating. It seems to me that an 
actress of the undoubted ability of 
Miss Roberts could spend her time 
and her talents much more profitably 
than enacting the sordid dramas to 
which she seems addicted. 

Of course we all know that there 



ICE CREAM 

— ^1536-8 Fillmore St., S.F. 



La Grande Laundry 



Have resumed business with an 
entirely modern plant prepared to 
handle our old and new patrons at 
former rates. Phone Special 1690. 

Office and Works, 234 12th St. 



ban rrancisco 



is enough sordiclness in real life, and 
it is hardly fitting that I should enter 
here into the advisability of producing 
such dramas. What I do quarrel with 
is Miss Roberts predilection for ap- 
pearing in such plays exclusively. 

Margaret Anglin and Blanche Bates 
are emotional actresses, but they re- 
frain from day in and day out pro- 
duction of the class of dramas which 
Miss Roberts favors. I remember 
Miss Anglin's repertoire during her 
last visit here. "Zira" was an abso- 
lutely emotional drama. "The Lady 
Paramount" was far from it, while 
the third piece was an absolute 
comedy. Contrast with this Miss 
Roberts' repertoire: "The Strength of 
the Weak," "Marta of the Lowlands/' 
and the like. All sordid. 

As a sarcastic friend of mine says, 
"I hate to see Miss Roberts always 
groveling about in the dirt." And the 
worst of it is that his remarks are 
just, though somewhat severe. 

* * * 

The Augustin Daly Opera Company 
is presenting a somewhat musty pro- 
duction in "The Country Girl." It 
is a distinctively British musical 
comedy in both scene and song and 
dialogue, and while some of the num- 
bers are catchy it leaves no lasting 
impression. I hope "The Cingalee" 
will be better. 

* * * 

"The Pit" at the Alcazar is alarm- 
ingly strenuous for that genteel play- 
house. Miss Lang and Mr. Lytell 
seem to be somewhat out of their 
depth in this society drama which 
verges on melodrama. "The Pit" does 
not compare at all favorably with last 
week's production, "The Love Route." 

* * * 

Barney Bernard seems to be the 
attraction at the Davis Theater, 
where Kolb and Dill were becoming 
somewhat stale. Barney, in himself, 
however, is somewhat of a "lemon" 
and wouldn't be worth going across 
the street to see without his German 
co-workers. "Fiddle-de-dee" is also 
stale. It is time for Kolb and Dill 
to give us something real brand 
NEW. 

* # # 

"Fantana" at the American Theater 
is by far the best thing yet produced 
at that pretty little play house. Miss 
Sinnott, the new soubrette, and Joe 
Miller, the clever character actor, are 
a great addition to the company. To 
my mind, Miss Ruby Norton is amply 




DR. H. J. STEWART 

Organist of S;. Dominic's Church and 
the Temple Sherith Israel 

TEACHER OF SINGING 

Pianoforte, Organ, Harmony and Composition. 
New Studio: 2517 California Street. Hours, 10 
to 12 and 2 to 4 daily, except Saturdays. 

LOUIS H. EATON 

Organist and Director Trinity 

Church Choir 

Teacher of Voice, Piano and Organ 

San Francisco Studio; 1678 Broadway, Phone 
Franklin 2244. 

Berkeley Studio; 2401 Channing Way, Tues- 
day and Friday. 



MRS. OSCAR MANSFELDT 

PIANIST 

Tel. West 314 1801 Buchanan Si.. Cor. Sutler 



William Keith 



Studio 



After Dec. 1st 1717 California St. 



SAMUEL M. SHORTRIDGE 

Attorney-at-Law 



1101 O'FARRELL ST. 
Cor. Franklin 



San Francisco, Cal. 



Union Lumber 
Company 

REDWOOD AND 
PINE LUMBER 

Railroad Ties, Telegraph Poles, 
Shingles, Split Shakes, Etc. 

MAIN OFFICE: 909 MONADNOCK BLDG. 

Phone Special 6 1 5 

Yards and Planing Mills. Sixth and Channel Sts. 
San Francisco 



PATRICK & CO. 

Rubber Stamps 

Stencils, Box Brands 

1543 Pine Street San Francisco 



-THE WASP- 



31 




RACING 



New California Jockey Club 

Oakland Race 
Track 

SIX OR MORE RACES EACH WEEK DAY 
Rain or Shine 



Races commence at 1 :40 p. i 



sharp. 



For special trains stopping at the track take S. P. Ferry, 
fool of Market street: leave at 12:00, thereafter every twenty 
minutes until 1:40 p. m. No Smoking in last two cars, 
which are reserved for ladia and their escorts. 

Returning trains leave track after fifth and last races. 

THOMAS H. WILLIAMS, President. 
PERCY W TREAT, Secretary. 







The best YEAST for all 
Kinds of Baking 

FRESH DAILY AT YOUR GROCER 



Palace fiotel Laundry 

AND KELLY LAUNDRY CO. INC 

234-3 Post Street 

A^ -r»f> No"wr Open 

TELEPHONE WEST 58S4 

Work called for and returned on schedule 
time. 



Thompson's Formerly 

ter Loaf, 



Oyste 



Now 
Opeu. 



1727 O'Farrell St., near Fillmore 
All night service Popular Prices 



+ The only first-class up-to-date and modern 
f Hammani Baths, built especially for 

the purpose, in the city. 

t Oriental Turkish Baths \ 

Corner Eddy and Larkin Sts. 
Cold water plunge. 
Room including Bath, Sr.oo. 
Phone Franklin 653 
W. J. BLUMBERG & BRO.. Props. 



deserving of mention. Sin- i- pretty, 
nil and can sing. I prophecy 
that -lu- will in- ! eard from ere long. 
Gladys Graham is another young 
lady of ability wliose light has been 
hidden of late. Merc's to its early 
reappearance. 

* * * 

The only daughter of the multimil- 
lionaire was green with envy when she 
gazed upon the startling millinery of 
Iter rival. 

"The idea!" she exclaimed, wrath- 
fully. "Just to be bizarre she has had 
her hat trimmed with silver pheasants." 

Then after a pause: 

"But I shall eclipse her yet. Just 
wait." 

And, going to the telephone, she or- 
dered her milliner to decorate the most 
expensive Paris creation with gold 
eagles. 

* * * 

"Where arc you going, old chap?" 
asked the first youth. 

"Going to send Myrtilla a kiss through 
the telephone," replied the second youth. 

"Why, you are slow. Don't you know 
a kiss through the telephone loses its 
flavor?" 

"Just why I am using the telephone, 
old man. I have been eating onions." 

* * * 

"These bridge disasters are terrible," 
remarked the man who was reading of 
bridges being swept away by the river 
floods. 

"I should say so," replied his friena; 
"my wife lost all of her year's pin 
money in a game of 'bridge' last night." 

* * * 

"Beg pardon, sir," said the barber, 
scrutinizing the proffered tip, "but this 
dime is mutilated. It is full of hacks." 

"So was your razor," chuckled the 
humorous patron, as he hurried out. 

* * * 

Green — "What do you mean by say- 
ing John Brown is a distant relative 
of yours? I thought he was your 
brother." 

Brown — "Well, there are twelve 
children in our family. He's the old- 
est and I'm the youngest." 

* * * 

"Nazareth," the Passion Play writ- 
ten by Clay M. Greene and presented 
at Santa Clara College during the gold- 
en jubilee celebration in 1901, and re- 
peated in May, 1903, will be reproduced 
at Santa Clara next month on an 
elaborate scale, which justifies the 
comment of Charles Warren Stoddard, 
the poet, that Santa Clara is the Ober- 



COLONIAL THEATRE 

McAllister near Market Phone Market 920 
MARTIN F. KURTIG. President and Manaaer 



All Market Street Cars run direct to Theatre 

Week Beginning Monday, April 15 



Milton Royle's National Success 

FRIENDS 

First Appearance of Morgan Walace sup- 
ported by Izetta Jewell, Frank Bacon and 
the full strength of the Colonial Stock Co. 



PRICES: Evening. 25c, 50c, 75c. $1.00; Satur- 
day and Sunday Matinees. 25c and 50c. BARGAIN 
MATINEE, Wednesday, all seals reserved, 25c. Branch 
Ticket Office, Kohler & Chase's, Sutter and Franklin 
Streets. 



DR. WM. D. CLARK 

Office and Res.: 2554 California St. 

San Francisco 

Hours — 1 to 3 p. m. and 7 to 8 p. m. 

Sundays — By appointment 

Phone West 390 

Contracts made with Hotels and Restaurants 
Special Attention given to Family Trade 

Established 1876 

THOMAS MORTON & SON 

Importer of and f""'f*^ A f 
Dealers in ^VZ-rtJ-. 

N. W. Cor. Eddy and Hyde, San Francisco 
Phone Franklin 397 



Wichman, Lutgen & Co. 

Formerly of 
29-31 Battery Street, S. F. 

Cor. Everett and Tarrison Avenue 
ALAMEDA, CAL. 

Phone Alameda I 1 79 

GILT EDGE WHISKEY 



To restore gray hair to its natural 
color use Alfrcdum's Egyptian Henna — 
i vegetable dye — perfectly harmless and 
the effect is immediate.. All druggists 
sell it. Langley & Michaels Co., agents. 



32 



-THE WASP- 



ENNENS 




CM , C BORATED 
tll3 TALCUM 



CHAFING 

A little 



Gerhard Mermen Company, 



CHAPPE3 HANJS 

all skin troubki 
'icr iit price perhap. 
'titioits, but a reason for it 
hlful ni:er Bhavim nod after bi 

ien'» tlho oricinal). Sample /i 
Newark, N. 



cLEIBOLD, 

Harness &$RRime c o. 

1214 GOLDEN GATE AVE. 

BET. WEBSTER AND FILLMORE . 



A Positive 

CURE FOR 

CATARRH 

Ely's Cream Balm 

is quickly absorbed. 

Gives Reliet at Once. 
It cleanses, soothes, 
heals and protects 
the diseased membrane. It cures Catarrh 
and drives away a Cold in the Head quickly. 
Bestores the Senses of Taste and Smell. 
Full size 50 cts. at Druggists or by mail ; 
Trial size 10 cts. by mail. 
Ely Brothers, 56 Warren Street, New York. 



ASHSHBITTERS 

. BETTER THAN PILLS. W 




^REIGN R£ Me/>( 


h 


V -»•*- \ 








F DOCTOR >. , . 






pAj R itf^ 




I 


COUGH/! 
COLD 

AND 

GRIP 
CURE 

t 25 *, 




Dr. Par 


ker's Con 


gh Cure 


One dose will stop a cough. 


It never fails. Try it. 25c. 


AT ALL DRUGGISTS 



ammerzon of America. No doubt this 
coming Passion Play will attract a 
great deal of attention and be a most 
impressive spectacle. For this year's 
cast many of the former actors have 
returned to their original roles, among 
them being John J. Ivancovich, as 
Judas; James A. Bacigalupi, as 
Jechonias, and Joseph Farry, as Dath- 
ian. There are thirty-five speaking 
parts in the play, and 175 students and 
members of the alumni will participate 
in the production. 

I should judge by the tone of the 
New York newspapers that Mme. 
Calve is not the singer she was. The 
Sun's musical critic said: 

Mme. Calve made her second appear- 
ance in West Thirty-fourth street yes- 
terday afternoon at the Manhattan 
Opera House, singing Santuzza in Mas- 
cagni's "Cavalleria Rusticana." A 
large audience greeted her and ap- 
plauded an old favorite whose reputa- 
tion signified more than her present 
abilities. Her interpretation of the 
wronged Sicilian girl was disappoint- 
ing to those who recalled its former 
dramatic and vocal qualities. 

Mme. Calve was never absolutely 
certain as to pitch, and yesterday af- 
ternoon she was mostly uncertain. 
Her singing of the incisive music of 
Mascagni was characterized by poor 
quality of tone and by prevailing in- 
accuracy of intonation. Her lower 
tones were hollow and hard and her 
upper ones exceedingly shrill and un- 
musical. Only in the middle voice was 
there a trace of the warm color which 
used to imbue every impersonation 
with sensuous charm, even when the 
delivery was questionable in respect 
to style. 

It used to be a failing of Mme. Calve 
to sing sharp, but yesterday she ap- 
peared to be singing with continual 
effort which made it impossible for her 
to rise to the pitch. She sang flat so 
much that at times listening to her be- 
came a feat of endurance. The com- 
bination of unpleasant tone and false 
intonation rendered her delivery of the 
music merely a display of rude 
strength with but little vocal beauty 
to commend it. Furthermore, she 
forced her voice so much that any- 
thing like a moderate seemed to be 
beyond her reach. 

Her action, too, was no so full of 
detail and significance as it used to be. 
The lithe and sinuous grace of former 
days was missing. 

"THE FIRST NIGHTER." 



ti 



T0Y0 KISEN 
KAISHA 

(Oriental Steamship Co.) 



Have Opened Their Permanent Offices at 

Room 240 James Flood Building 
San Francisco 

S. S. "Hongkong Maru" 

Wednesday, April 10. 1907 

S. S. "America Maru" (calls at Manila) . . 

Friday, May 3, 1907 

S. S. "Nippon Maru" (calls at Manila) . . . 
Friday, May 31, 1907 

Steamers will leave wharf, corner First and Brannan Sis., 
I P. M., for Yokohama and Hongkong calling at Hono- 
lulu, Kobe, (Hiogo), Nagasaki and Shanghai, and con- 
necting at Hongkong with steamers for Manila, India, etc. 

No cargo received on board on day of sailing. 

Round- trip tickets at reduced rates. 

For Freight and passage apply at office, 240 James Flood 
Building. W. H. AVERY, Assistant General Manager. 



Peter Bacigalupi & Son 

Headguarters for Talking 

Machines, Records 

and Supplies 

1 1 13-1 115 Fillmore Street, San Francisco 

Albion Ale or Porter 

Is a Great Flesh Builder, Tonic and Pleasant 
Drink. Pure Extract of Malt and Hops. 

BURNELL & CO. 

1007-1009 Golden Gate Ave., Near Lacuna St. 



Dr.WONQ HIM 

1268 O'Farreil St. 

Permanently Located 

HERB DOCTOR 



Father and Mother 
"Write Letter In- 
dorsing Treatment. 

SAN FRANCISCO 
March 23. 1906 

To Whom it may 
^Concern: Our three- 
year - old daughter, 
having been ill for 
some time and being 
treated by the most prominent physicians, 
gradually became worse, and was finally 
given up by them. We were then recom- 
mended to Dr. Wong Him. We started 
with his treatment and within two months 
time our daughter was cured, 

Respectfully, 
MR. AND MRS. H. C. LIEB. 
2757 Harrison St., San Francisco 





*££ 



^, 



Volume LVII-No. 16 



SAN FRANCISCO, APRIL 20, 1907 



Price 10 cents 



PUBLISHER'S NOTICE 

THE WASP is published every Saturday by the Wasp Publishing 
Company, ai 1 4 1 - 143 Valencia Street. Subscriptions $5.00 per 
year, payable in advance, postage prepaid. Subscriptions to all 
foreign countries within the Postal Union, $6,00 per year. The trade on 
the Pacific Coast supplied by the San Francisco News Company. Eastern 
Agent* supplied by the American News Company, New York. 

THE WASP will pay for contributions suitable for its columns, and 
will endeavor to return all rejected manuscripts, but does not guarantee 
their return. Photographs will also be accepted and paid for. Address 
all communications to Wasp Publishing Company, 141-143 Valencia 
Street. San Francisco, Cal. 

TO ADVERTISERS— As the illustrated pages of THE WASP 
go to press early, all advertisements printed in the same forms should be 
received not later than Monday at noon. Changes of Advertisements 
should also be sent in on Monday to insure publication. 

Address. JAMES F. FORSTER. Business Manager. 
Telephone Market 316. 



Plain English 



The New York Times, which is a very ably edited 
journal and a splendid newspaper, has obtained the 
expressions of a great number of editors on the popu- 
laiitv of President Roosevelt. All sections of the 
United States have been addressed by the Times and 
the answers denote that if the editors of America could 
have their way, Theodore Roosevelt would be forced 
to become the next President of the United States. 
Fully seventy-five per cent of the editors inform the 
Times that Mr. Roosevelt's popularity is "greater than 
ever." Some editors say that the Harriman affair, in 
which the Piesident and the railroad magnate politely 
declared "you're another," has helped rather than 
injure Mr. Roosevelt. Many of the journalists com- 
ment on the extreme popularity of the President 
amongst Democrats. This is really the secret of Mr. 
Roosevelt's strength. Since Bryan and Hearst scared 
all the decent conservative Democrats out of the party 
the leaderless Jeffersonians have had no one to follow 
but Roosevelt. His sturdy Americanism as exempli- 
fied in many ways has given patriotic Democrats much 
satisfaction and comfort. He has brought the rail- 
road barons to realize that they are not above the law, 
and his utterances and actions have given the equally 
dangerous labor trust no comfort but. much uneasiness. 



He recently caused a sensation in labor circles by 
publicly coupling the names of E. H. Harriman and 
Moyer and Haywood, who are charged with the hor- 
rible murders in Idaho. 



Although Moyer, Haywood and Pettibone, the 
officers of the Western Federation of Miners, are 
charged with many atrocious crimes, hardly a news- 
paper in America has dared to mention the facts of 
their case and even the slightest allusions to it are rare. 
This week they will be placed on trial in Boise City, 
Idaho, for the assassination of Governor Steunenberg, 
who was blown to pieces at his own gate by a bomb 
placed there by Harry Orchard, who declares he was 
hired to commit that and many other crimes by the 
officers of the Western Federation of Miners. One of 
Orchard's murderous exploits was to kill and wound 
about thirty non-union miners by blowing up a rail- 
road platform. 



Organized American labor has since the day Moyer, 
Haywood and Pettibone were arrested, assumed that 
these men are innocent and are being railroaded to 
prison by the mine owners of Idaho. The many 
crimes which were committed — the blowing up of 
mines and of non-union miners, and finally the killing 
of Governor Steunenberg are all charged by organized 
labor to the mine owners. These fiends in human 
form we are asked to believe concocted the whole 
hellish plot and injured their own property and finally 
assassinated their friend, Governor Steunenberg, so 
that the Western Federation of Labor might be broken 
up and the wages of the union miners reduced. 



On such an assumption every union man in America 
has been taxed to supply the largest defense fund ever 
raised in the world, for men charged with horrible 
crimes. For two years the best legal talent in America 
has been fighting to prevent the trial of Moyer, Hay- 
wood and Pettibone. One of the lawyers for the de- 
fense is Patterson of Colorado, who is said to have 
had a retainer of $10,000 a year from the Western 
Federation of Miners, and who found the votes of that 
organization very powerful in electing him to the 
United States Senate. 



That President Roosevelt should mention Moyer, 
Haywood and Pettibone in the list of people dangerous 
to the public good, naturally caused a great stir it; 



THE WASP- 



labor circles, and he has been denounced more or less 
bitterly by the more hot-headed leaders, and prin- 
cipally by the foreign socialistic element. At a meet- 
ing of the Central Federated Union in New York the 
other day, the President was arraigned for his ex- 
pression. It was declared to be only proper to refrain 
from opinions of the guilt of Moyer and his com- 
panions until the case is decided, but the unions have 
themselves already decided that the men are innocent 
and are collecting an immense fund on that theory. 
The prosecution is denounced as a band of blood- 
thirsty scoundrels who would railroad innocent men to 
jail, though it has taken two years since their arrest to 
get them to the first stage of the trial. In addition to 
this the present Governor of Idaho has received hun- 
dreds of letters threatening him with the same fate as 
Steunenberg unless the prosecution be abandoned. 

In view of these facts it is not remarkable that as 
outspoken a man as President Roosevelt should have 
classified Moyer and Haywood as he did, and it is this 
candor in his treatment of the people whom he regards 
as enemies to the public welfare and to the principles 
of true American liberty that make Mr. Roosevelt so 
strong with the independent voters of the United 
States. Of these there is a great host that grows 
stronger every year, and in its ranks can be found 
thousands of intelligent union workingmen who vote 
on election day as their consciences dictate and not 
as any political boss may order. 



It is said on good authority that managing 
editor Fremont Older of the Bulletin withdrew his 
charges against editor Barrett and W. R. Hearst 
of the Examiner, because the Examiner threatened 
to desert the reform movement. The Examiner 
created and elected Schmitz and has never been 
regarded as in full accord with the Grand Jury 
investigation. The editors have sneered at it open- 
ly and gone so far as to try and place Rudolph 
Spreckels in an unpleasant position. 

Editor Older went to Washington a month after 
Schmitz was elected the last time, and induced 
Francis Heney to come here. He also had. a talk 
with President Roosevelt and persuaded him that 
the graft so rampant in this City extended even 
into the federal service. To the President's in- 
terest in the reform movement is due the engage- 
ment of Heney and Burns in the prosecution of 
the organized bandits who have held this city in 
their grip for several years. 

Mr. Older wisely concluded that the public in- 
terests would be better observed by concentrating 
action against Ruef, Schmitz & Co., than in 
expending effort to indict the editor and the pro- 
prietor of the Examiner for alleged ballot-box 
stuffing, and so he withdrew his serious charges 
against Barrett and Hearst. 

AMERICUS. 



Wasp Illustrations 

Mrs. Edgar Peixotto whose portrait appears in 
"The Wasp" this week, is the wife of the well 
known attorney. Mrs. Jack London is the wife 
of the socialistic lecturer and alleged novelist. Mrs. 
Crowe, Mrs. Blanche Tisdale and Miss J. A. Tuschu 
are all prominent in society on the other side of 
the bay. Miss Bessie Bacon is known to and 
admired by all theatre-goers. Mrs. Spencer Eddy 
was the beautiful heiress, Miss Lurline Spreckels. 
Miss Etelka Wilbar is prominent in local society 
here. Her engagement to Lieutenant Max Garber, 
U. S. A., was recently announced. Mrs. O. H. 
Burridge is prominent in Santa Barbara society, 
and is famous for having made chicken raising a 
paying enterprise. The pretty little native daughter 
whose portrait is printed is the daughter of J. F. 
Rossi, a merchant of this city. 

The ladies photographed in a Winton automobile 
are Mrs. De Young with associate committee mem- 
bers of the successful charity concert at the Fair- 
mont Hotel ranged around her. Mrs. De Young 
sits at the wheel and noticeable in the group are 
Mrs. W. D. O'Kane, Mrs. Herman Whirlow, Mrs. 
W. D. Fennimore, Mrs. J. D. Clark, Mrs. Jacob 
Bertz and Mrs. Martin Regenberger. 

David Roch, the successful real estate operator, 
won the fine automobile at the raffle. 

Judge Sloss whose portrait is printed is the highly 
esteemed young supreme judge. 



Mr. Paul Verdier, of the City of Paris, has been 
the recipient of a very beautiful testimonial from 
his employes. Mr. Verdier is going to Europe for 
several months and as a mark of their esteem his 
City of Paris employes presented him with a mag- 
nifiicient loving-cup of strapped silver. On one 
side is inscribed "Presented to Paul Verdier by the 
employes of the City of Paris, San Francisco." On 
the other side are the words, "Bon Voyage, April 
18, 1907", and the graven figure of a viking. The 
presentation was made in a most graceful manner 
by Mr. George M. Lonergan at a supper given in 
the Paris Tea Garden to all of Mr. Verdier's em- 
ployes. The parents and sister of Mr. Verdier were 
out here on a visit last April and went through the 
startling vicissitudes of the great calamity. They 
reutrned to Paris six months ago. 



Mr. Charles E. Gibbs, who died in this City 
on Monday last, was a well-known pioneer. His 
daughters, Mrs. Hooke and Mrs. Fred Johnson, and 
Miss Helen and Virginia Gibbs, are prominent in 
social circles here. They are exceedinly charitable 
people. The two young ladies left last week for a 
tour abroad intending to be gone six months and 
had just arrived in New York where they will re- 
ceive the sad news of their father's death. Mr. 
Gibbs was a brother of the late George Gibbs. He 
was a man 75 years of age. 



The concert at Tait's for the benfit of the organ Mrs. Lester Herrick gave a large and enjoyable 

fund of St. Dominicks church was a great success, bridge party at her home on Steiner Street on 

Thanks to the energy of the patronesses and the Tuesday last. Dainty refreshments and handsome 

splendid musical ability of Dr. H. J. Stewart. prizes closed an exciting game. 



-THE WASP- 




Wednesday — <>h, clear! Those awful rents will 
drive me mad. 1 received notice of another raise to- 
d:iy. That's the third in three months. I went out 
to look for an apartment with Mrs. Gebbe, and at one 
place we saw them taking in a lounge through a 
fourth-story window. Heavens! The flat was so 
small that the chairs were all that could be carried 
up the stairs. 

"I'll bet the rent is big enough, though," Mrs. 
Gebbe remarked. 

That woman knows everything. She could tell half 
a block off that the lounge was one given to a rich 
young bride who married a month ago, and if I'd 
asked her I suppose she could have told me the price. 

It's only millionaires who can afford a flat where 
the furniture doesn't have to be taken in through the 
windows now,, she says. 

Another thing she told me was that the landlords 
are thinking of making a new rule to charge by the 
cubic inch instead of so much a room. Oh, gracious! 
I may have to camp out this summer and I've got no 
one to chaperone me. 

Thursday — We were talking today about that 
wild juryman, Miles Wayward, and Mrs. Garleigh 
said that he is not the only one that is giving his 
relatives bunches of gray hair. One of her club- 
men friends went home from the Fairmont Hotel 
concert on Tuesday night in an auto and visited so 
many cafes on the way that he fell asleep in the 
car and wouldn't get out. Mercy on me! 

"Let me snooze," said the inebriated youth. 

"Well, goodness me! What do you think? The 
chauffeur just did as he was told and fell asleep him- 
self dreaming of the lovely time he'd have in the 
morning when he woke the young man up and pre- 
sented his bill for $5.00 an hour. Oh, gracious ! 
Well the young man woke up first and sneaked 
into his apartment house, and goodness me, such a 
time as there was. The chauffeur raised a fearful 
i row." 

"I demand" said he to the landlady, "that you 
give me the name of the young man that came 
home with an elegant jag last night." 

"You foolish fellow." the landlady replied. 
There's eighty -seven young men in this respectable 



Ik inse and every mother's son of 'em came home that 
way last night. Skiddoo !" 

Mrs. Gayleigh says sure as fate that chauffeur 
will run over somebody purposely sunn, he's so 
hopping mad. 

Friday — Hear me! What an awful thing money 
is. I was up to the charity tea of the Dorcas So- 
ciety today and Mrs. Weeds came in and sat near 
us. Iler husband was buried last week. 

Mrs. Shoddy asked us in a whisper if < >ld Weeds 
had left the widow well off. 

"Oh, fabulously wealthy", said Mrs. Gabbe, who 
likes to exaggerate everything. "You know that 
he was right in with the municipal grafters from 
the start." 

"Poor dear," said Mrs. Shoddy sympathetically, 
"I must go and ask her to my bridge party tomor- 
row." 

"Those words, "fabulously wealthy,' worked like a 
charm," snickered Mrs. Gabbe, as the leader of so- 
ciety went over to comfort the widow. 

Gracious! What an age we live in. 

TABITHA TWIGGS. 



The great promenade concert with which the 
Fairmont Hotel was opened not only came up to 
the highest expectations of the enthusiastic pro- 
moters but exceeded them. The ladies who got up 
the affair for the benefit of several most deserving 
charities are entitled to the highest praise. The 
affair netted nearly $25,000 for charity. The do- 
nations alone amounted to $10,000, and $8,000 were 
taken in for the sale of admission tickets. The 
raffle for the splendid Winton automobile, which 
was won by David Rich, the well-known real estate 
man, contributed $4500 to the grand total. 

No hotel could have had a more auspicious 
opening and the Hotel Fairmont management can- 
not complain that the inaugural night was not in 
every respect one that should give Messrs. Law 
and their able staff the utmost satisfaction 




CHAS.KE.1LUS& CO 

EXCLUSIVE 

HIGH GRADE CLOTHIERS 

No Branch Stores. No Agents. 

We've added another floor to our exclusive shop. Had to have 
more room to re- habilitate in detail our ju.tly celebrated dress clolhes 
studio. Dispensing good clothes at correct values creates legitimate 
prosperity. 

We are out-and-out clothiers. Mens clothes here—nothing 
eke. The class of clothes we sell doh't necessitate gift offeringr. 
We warrant solid, sound values. While our prices may appear 
high, they're consistent with qualities—no guessing contest or 
subterfuge here. We let "Lottery Clothiers" do that stunt. 



KING SOLOMON'S HALL 

Fillmore Street, near Sutter, San Francisco 




WejiandMbmen 



Jl Weekly Summary of Social Activities and Complications 





Pholo Genlhe MRS. EDGAR PEIXOTTO 

It has transpired that Mrs. James E. Martin, the 
wealthy New York widow who leased her Fifth 
Avenue mansion to William Ellis Corey, the head of 
the United States Steel Trust, refused to lease it to the 
steel magnate at all if he intended to occupy it as a 
bachelor. She insisted that the lease should specify 
that the mansion is to be occupied by "Mr. and Mrs. 
Corey." Mr. Corey has no wife at present, so it is as 
good as settled that Miss Maybelle Gilman, the actress, 
with whom the trust president has been so deeply in- 
fatuated, will be the mistress of the Fifth Avenue 
abode. The house is rented furnished and leased for 
one year. Mr. Corey has done himself no particular 
good by his amatory complications. Public sentiment 
has been altogether with the wife who stood by him 
from the days when he was neither rich nor well 
known, and who was forced to divorce him by reason 
of the great scandal in which he involved her. 

Mrs. Martin's object in specifying that her Fifth 



Avenue mansion should be occupied by "Mr. and Mrs. 
Corey" is plain. She did not want to have Mr. Corey's 
fiancee installed in the house until the wedding bells 
shall have rung for her. It might not do her property 
any particular good to be made the focus of a newly- 
stirred scandal which has hitherto revolved around 

Miss Gilman's Parisian residence. 

# * * 

Army men have been much interested in the court- 
martial of Major Francis P. Fremont, U. S. A., son of 
the famous Generaljohn C. Fremont, who got into such 
serious trouble by doing up several banks that honored 
his promissory notes. The Major is about fifty years 
old. Some time ago he was divorced by his wife, who 
later married Captain Woodbury, a well-known army 
surgeon. He has one son, Benton, a youth about 
twenty years old. Major Fremont is in the neighbor- 
hood of fifty years old. He borrowed in all about 
$4000, which he got by giving thirty and sixty-day 
notes for the amount of his monthly salary of $291.67. 
The National Bank of Plattsburg, N. Y., and the First 
National of Pittsburg resolved to place the gallant son 
of Mars on the carpet for conduct unbecoming an 
officer and a gentleman, and directed the attention of 
the War Department to his peculiar financiering. The 
War Depaitment, on finding that the notes were made 
payable as a rule on the day that Major Fremont's 
check was due, construed his actions as a violation of 
army regulations, which forbid an officer to assign pay 

that is yet to be earned. 

* # * 

It is said that he won the confidence of the cautious 
bankers by representing falsely that he owned valuable 
water-front property in San Francisco, which his 
famous father acquired in early days. Fremont Street 
is called after the old General. The gay Major also 






e Little I alace Hotel 



IS 
OPEN 



Corner o£ 

Post and 

Leavenworth 

Streets 



The same excellence in cuisine and service that obtained 
in the Old Palace is duplicated in the new 'Little Palace' 



-THE WASP- 




Phoio Genthe 



MRS. JACK LONDON 



declared that he possessed plantations in Cuba which 
have turned out to be like the airy palace of Claude 
Melnotte by the Lake of Como. The Major tried to 
give his creditors the slip quite artfully by seeking to 
be declared a bankrupt, but the alert bankers headed 
him off there. They made the point that the bank- 
ruptcy act does not apply to army officers and also be- 
cause his debts were incurred by downright crooked- 
ness and desire to defraud. Whether the bankruptcy 
act applies to army officers or not, I cannot say. I am 
unable to see why the profession of arms should 
exempt a man from its operation any more than might 
any other calling. However, the influence of the 
bankers was sufficient to Dring the gallant Major face 
to face with the unpleasant ordeal of a court-martial 
at Governor's Island. The Major is well known in 
this bailiwick. 

% * * 

Madame Bavarde, in describing the fads and fancies 
of the local smart set, attributes to dear old Ned a craze 
for collecting miniatures, and says that he has com- 
menced on his second lot. That first art collection of 
the social czar had more panel pictures than miniatures 
in it. for the ladies of the ballet cannot get all their 
attractions into an abbreviated photo. Ho,w many 
romances were contained in that first elaborate collec- 
tion, which went up in smoke last April. How can the 
second assortment ever equal that which the flames 
devoured, for as our school-day copybooks informed 
us, "Art is long but Life is short." The chorus, peren- 
nial in its art goes on forever capering with the exuber- 
ance of a young goat, but its admirers grow bald, fat 
and sixty, and finally lose all appreciation of the fine 
lines of the female form divine. A man who at three- 
score could begin and hope to gather a second grand 



collection of stage beauties' pbotos, each enshrined in 
a tender memory, would make a good mate for Rider 
Haggard's "She." 

* * * 

The death of Judge Lawlor's sister, Katherine, in 
New York after a brief illness has been announced. 
Although the Judge has spent the last twenty-five 
years in California, he retains a strong affection for 
his folks and has twice made short visits to them. 
He contemplated another trip to New York this 
summer and was anticipating a longer visit to his 
relatives, so the news of his sister's death is quite 
a shock to him. 

* * * 

James I'. Donahue, the reliable New York cor- 
respondent of the Chronicle, described in his latest 
letter how Colvin B. Brown, manager of the Cali- 
fornia Promotion Committee's Eastern bureau is 
hustling for this State. Mr. Brown has started a 
series of "Dutch treat" dinners at an Italian res- 
taurant on Forty-first Street, which all the floating 
Bohemian element attends, including Will Irwin, 
Henry Kowalsky, Henry Todd, et id genus omne. 
This is joyful news to the business men of California 
who are putting up so liberally for the Promotion 
Committee. It will bring them such a lot of husky 
plasterers, carpenters, plumbers and horny-fisted 
colonists to take up small farms and develop the 

State. Oh yes, oh yes. 

* * * 

Miss Ethel Shorb leaves next week for a visit to 
Mrs. W. B. Hooper at her delightful summer home, 
Mountain View. Mrs. Hooper is a brilliant, witty 
woman — one of the attractive wealthy widows of San 
Praneisco. I hear that she contemplates giving many 
week end parties this summer. 



L TOZER & SON 

FORMERLY OF 1 10 GEARY STREET 



High-Class Wall Paper and Fabrics 
Interior Decorating, Wood Finishing 
Enameling, Painting, Etc. 



All Work Guaranteed 
Special Designs and Estimates 



Sales Room and Office, 1527 Pine, near Van Ness, S. F. 
Sales Room 2511 Washington, Dear Fillmore, S. F. 

Telephone Weil 1402 



•THE WASP - 



Miss Jennie Blair, who was one of the prime 
movers in the entertainment that opened the Hotel 
Fairmont, and which incidentally added dollars to 
the treasuries of several charities, is one of the 
richest bachelor maids in Society. Her father, Cap- 
tain Samuel Blair, amassed a large fortune and 
though his widow and daughter have always spent 
money liberally they were not spendthrifts and 
consequently the earthquake did not so materially 
curtail their incomes as it did those of others of their 
set. Miss Blair has another fad besides charity — 
shecollects slippers, not real slippers of kid but 
models of the shoes worn by famous beauties. I 
imagine her collection of silver slippers was lost 
in the fire that destroved her home, for I have 
heard nothing of it of late. 

* =;= * 

The Doctor's daughters, of which Miss Blair is 
a shining light, was originally formed by Dr. Mac- 
kenzie of the First Presbyterian Church ; the young 
ladies banded themselves together to do good work 
in his name. Miss Gertrude Severance was one of 
the original members. She was a beautiful girl, 
tall and brunette, and was an intimate friend. of 
Miss Blair. Her father was appointed Minister 
to Hawaii by the President. He took his family 
to Honolulu to live, and I believe Gertrude married 
there. The two Stetson girls — Sallie (Mrs. Wins- 
low), and Nellie (Mrs. Oxnard) — were original 
Doctor's daughters, and so were the Crocker sis- 
ters — Mrs. Van Fleet, Mrs. McCreary and the late 
Mrs. Sam Buckbee. 

* * * 

About the same time that Dr. Mackenzie was 
fathering this little charitable club, the First Con- 
gregational Church, through the efforts of Mrs. 
Breyfogle, organized an almost similar club, the 
Helping Hand Society, with Mrs. James Alva Watt 
and some of her friends as leading workers. The 
Helping Hands used to give very stunning enter- 
tainments at which Society was pleased to assist. 

One of the gifts received by "Uncle" George 
Bromley on his 90th birthday was a bottle of white 
wine that survived the earthquake and fire in a 
down-town wine vault. The bottle is quite a cur- 
iosity being coated with a thick dust burnt in. 

Mrs. Guy Scott, who is visiting her parents, Dr. 
and Mrs. Voorhies, for a week or two on her way 
East with her husband and children, was the beauty 
of the four Voorhies' sisters. Though the youngest 
she is now a substantial looking matron with four 
children. 

* * * 

The Girls' High School Alumnae will meet this 
Saturday to eat and exchange reminiscences, but one 
of the brainiest of the Alumnae will not be present. 
This is Miss Jean Klink — by the way, she writes 
herself "Jane" now. Miss Klink was lately appointed 
Professor of Sociology in the American International 
College of Springfield, Illinois. She was once a school 
teacher here but took a course at the University of 
California, after teaching a short time, and graduated 
with honors. Then she went East and the next heard 
of her she was working as a domestic in Boston 



homes, to find out for herself the true inwardness of 
the servant question. Her views were published in 
the Atlantic Monthly. Miss Klink has made studies 
of several branches not laid down in a college curri- 
culum. For instance she studied palmistry and the 
handmarks in their relation to criminal characteristics, 
as Pudd'nhead Wilson studied thumb-prints. 

The death of "Silent Jim" Smith was a lesson to 
our local bachelor millionaires who have not yet be- 
gun to live and enjoy their wealth. "Silent Jim" 
began to search out the joy of living till too late in 
life. Perhaps he was still young enough to take 
some pleasure out of his first steps in New York 
Society, but after all it is only between the age of 
eighteen and thirty that one can grasp the best life 
has to offer. After thirty enthusiasm has evaporated. 
It seems a thousand pities that $2S0,000,000-Smith 
should not have met his matrimonial fate earlier in 
life, for when he did find her and lost his heart he 
had to wait until she got rid of her then husband 
before he could call her his. All his millions could 
not dissolve those strong bonds that bound her to 
William Rhinelander Stewart until the courts had 
attended to the matter. And that is why I ask our 
local bachelor millionaires to pav heed to the sad 
end of "Silent Jim," dead before he really lived. Man 
must marry before he may be said to have gathered 
all the sheaves in life's wheat field. There are some 
nice girls and pretty widows who would no doubt 
be very glad to help those popular bachelors James 
Phelan, Louis Sloss, Dr. Harry Tevis and some others 
of our unattached millionaires to spell matrimony. 
* * * 

John Brenner's ex-partner, "Ed" Bowes, went to 
Tacoma without announcing his engagement, and the 
tabbies were much disgusted at his omission. They 
had been having him engaged for some months and 



ENJOY COUNTRY LIFE AT 

HOTEL DEL MONTE 



This is the season to take your family to Hotel Del 
Monte by the sea, near Monterey, and enjoy every comfort. There 
is plenty of room there and plenty to do for recreation and health. 
Parlor car leaves San Francisco 8:00 a. m. and 3:00 p. m. daily, 
direct to Hotel. Special reduced round-trip rates. For details, in- 
quire information Bureau, Southern Pacific, or of C. W. Kelley, 
Special Representative of Del Monte, 789 Market St., San Fran- 
cisco. Phone Temporary 2751. 



ANNOUNCEMENT 



Mrs. Mott- Smith Cunningham exhibitor in 
Paris Salon of 1 906 announces that her Studio 
Shop at 1 622 Pine St., a few doors from Van 
Ness Ave., is now open for the .sale of her jewelry 



■THE WASP 



tu one particular Society girl. Mr. Bowes is going 
to boom Tacoma with some capitalists with whom he 
has identified himself. There arc- a great many prettj 
English girls in Tacoma and the tabbies begin to fear 
that then- is no longer hope that Mr. Bowes will 

cl se a bride in the city where he made his start 

in life. 

* * * 

"Pidgie," otherwise Griffith, Kinzie arrived from 
the East this week and has been hunting up his old 
friend- ever since. He finds them hard to locate, but 
in locating the new quarters of the Press Club he 
managed to feel less a stranger here. "Pidgie" is a 
life member of the Press Club and also belongs to 
the Olympic, the Elks and the San Francisco Art 
Association. He is one of the rich bachelors of the 
Unitarian set. 

* * * 

Mr. and Mrs. John Charles Adams of Oakland have 
sent out cards announcing the arrival of "Master 
Adams" on March 17th. This is the second boy in 
the John Charles branch of the Adams clan though 
they have three little girls. Mrs. Adams was 
Ernestine Haskell before her marriage, and is re- 
garded as one of the most beautiful brunettes in 
Societv on both sides of the bay. 

* * * * 

Mr. and Mrs. Edgar Peixotto and their children, 
nurses, maids, goods and chattels are installed in one 
of the prettiest flats on Presidio Heights, in the 3800 
block. Mrs. Peixotto is even handsomer now than 
when she came here as a bride, and her children are 

much like her. 

* # * 

The late Charley Strine was a great friend to news- 
paper men, and was never haughty in his dealing with 
the press as so many impresarios are. But Strine was 
at one time a newspaper man himself, before he be- 
gan doing press work for concert and operatic enter- 
prises and from that occupation gradually became 
managerially interested in stars. When he was at 
the Tivoli he brought his wife and little girl to San 
Francisco, and they lived in Pine Street near Octavia. 
Mr. Strine was extremely fond of his family and 
especially made a pet of his pretty little daughter. 

An old timer, who has a pedigree of our smart set 
at his tongue's end, makes objection to a paragraph 
that appeared in last week's Wasp, anent Louis Bru- 
guiere and the Newport smart set. The old timer 
says that it is stretching a point to say that the Bru- 
guieres belong to one of the "best old French fam- 
ilies," when Louis Bruguiere's paternal grandfather 
was a gardener. The Sathers considered it a terrible 
mesalliance when Josephine married Mr. Bruguiere. 
But all the Bruguiere boys are distinguished looking 
so there may be something in the idea that their 
French blood is blue. Moreover are we not all de- 
scendants from the first gardener. 

* ' * * 

Mrs. Fred Kohl gave one of the most elaborate 
luncheons of the season on last Sunday at the 
Burlingame Club, in honor of Mr. Rice of Boston, 
who came out here to be the best man at the 
Harvey-Cooper wedding. There, were eighteen 



guests present. Mr. Rice was a college chum of 
( Iscar Cooper. He is a young gentleman with very 
polished manners and made a most favorable im- 
pression. After luncheon Mr. Stetson took for a 
spin in his handsome auto Miss Genevieve Harvey, 
Miss Linda Cadwalader and Mr. Rice. Miss 
Harvey had the front seal, a fact of which due 
notice was tkaen. The party spent the afternoon 
at the golf links. Mr. Rice returned during the 
week to his home in Boston, as the wedding of 
Miss Harvev and Mr. Cooper has been postponed 

indefinitely owing to the voting ladv's illness. 

# # • 

Mrs. E. B. Cadwalader and her attractive 
daughter. Miss Linda, will leave early in May for 
a prolonged Eastern tour. Their first stop will be 
in Chicago, where they will be the guests of Gen- 
eral Greely, after which Miss Linda will go to 
Xew York to visit her friend, Mrs. Bourke Cochran, 
nee Ide, while Mrs. Cadwalader will visit her son 
in Iowa. 



MOST 
ANCIENT 

AND 
GLORIOUS 

OF 
CORDIALS 




MOST 
ANCIENT 

AND 
GLORIOUS 

OF 
CORDIALS 



LIQUEUR 

Peres Chartreux 

GREEN AND YELLOW 

This famous cordial, now made at Tarragona, Spain, was 
for centuries distilled by the Carthusian Monks (Peres Char- 
treux) at the Monastery of La Grande Chartreuse, France, and 
known throughout the world as Chartreuse. The above cut 
represents the bottle and label employed in the putting up of the 
article since the Monks' expulsion from France, and it is now 
known as Liqueur Peres Chartreux (the Monks, however 
still retain the right to use the old bottle and label as well), 
distilled by the same order of Monks, who have securely 
guarded the secret of its manufacture for hundreds of years, and 
who alone possess a knowledge of the elements of this delicious 
nectar. 

At first-class Wine Merchants, Grocers, Hotels, Cafes, 

Batjer & Co., 45 Broadway, New York, N. Y. 

Sole Agents for United States. 



-THE WASP- 




Pholo Belle Oudry 



MRS. CROWE of Oakland 



Any Californians who visit New York should 
carry some large railroad spikes with them and nail 
up the doors of their bedrooms against sneak 
thieves. How simple Mayor Schmitz ever got 
through without losing all the contents of the plush- 
lined box is a wonder, seeing that Abe Ruef was 

fooled so easily. 

* * * 

The recent robbery of Boss Cox in Cincinnati was 
an ordinary bit of metropolitan hotel thievery, but 
it astonished the countryman. He couldn't make 
out how he lost $8000 and neither can the detectives, 
who are evidently the same breed of sleuths as we 
have. Mrs. Cox gave the Boss $8000 worth of 
jewelry to keep safely for her, and he put it in a 
small bag and slipped it into the hip pocket of his 
trousers. He put the garment on a chair close to his 
bed and when he got up in the morning the bag of 
rings was gone. So was his purse who $800 in 
greenbacks. The door of the room was locked, yet 
the valuables had been spirited away. Mr. Cox and 
his sorrowing wife made loud complaint to the man- 
agement of the Hotel Knickerbocker, but that pro- 
ceeding is waste of time in New York. They always 
tell you that you must have been robbed on the 
street cars, or insinuate that you have been playing 
against some bucket shop. The robbery of a politi- 
cal boss is the most contemptible of crimes. Is there 
no honor amongst gentlemen? 



That was a very funny mistake which the 



newspapers made in announcing the marriage of A. 
Aronson, the real-estate operator, to Mrs. Rosen- 
thal, the celebrated "Diamond Queen." Mr. Aron- 
son no doubt failed to see the joke, for several 
powerful reasons. In the first place, he hadn't mar- 
ried the buxom toba'ccpnist, but Miss Nettie Rosen- 
thal, the sister of his former wife, who died four 
years ago, and who has been a member of the Aron- 
son household since her childhood. 

The famous lady who was mentioned as having 
married the capitalist was one of the celebrities of 
old San Francisco. Something like thirty years ago 
she and her husband kept a cigar store on Mont- 
gomery Street, near Sacramento, so she can be no 
spring chicken by this time. She has had some 
matrimonal experience, and amongst others mar- 
ried a wandering count, who did not prove entirely 
satisfactory, though his title was a good advertise- 
ment of the tobacco shop. Mrs. Rosenthal's habitual 
display of jewelry won her the sobriquet of "The 
Diamond Queen." After the fire she got into 
trouble in Berkeley, where a storekeeper accused 
her of getting some of his goods mixed up with her 
own. Mr. Aronson must have received many con- 
gratulations from his friends when it was announced 
that he had married this distinguished lady. 

Mr. Aronson was originally a furniture dealer on 
Stockton Street, near Vallejo. He prospered by 
close attention to business and became a capitalist, 
but his large coups were all made during the past 
six years. He was the first man to see that there 
was big money in taking unimproved downtown 
property and erecting modern buildings on it. He 
put up a number of structures and sold them quickly 
and may be said to have started the boom in that 
line. He soon had several enterprising imitators. 
The fire caused him to lose heavily. He is a very 
well-preserved, good-looking man and attributes his 
good physical condition to salt-water bathing. Be- 
fore the fire he took a long swim every day in the 
Lurline Baths tank before walking home to his 
dinner. There are several prominent San Fran- 
ciscans who have great faith in the virtues of salt 
water as an invigorator and preserver of youthful 
vitality. 



Dr 



A Skin of Beauty is a Joy Forever. 

T. Felix Gouraud's Oriental 

Cream or Magical Beautifier 

Purifies as well as beautifies the skin. No other cosmetic will do it. 

Removes Tan, Pimples, Freckles, Moth 
Patches, Rash and Skin Diseases, and 
every blemish on beauty, and defies de- 
tection. On its virtues it has stood the 
test of 58 years; no other has, and is so 
harmless we taste it to be sure it is prop- 
erly made. Accept no counterfeit or simi- 
lar name. Dr. L. A. Sayre said to a lady 
of the haut-ton (a patient) "As you ladies 
will use them, I recommend "Gouraud's 
Cream' as the least harmful of alT the 
skin preparations. " One bottle will last 
six months using it every day. GOUR- 
AUD'S POUDRE SUBTLE REMOVES 
SUPERFLUOUS HAIR WITHOUT IN- 
JURY TO THE SKIN. 
FRED T. HOPKINS, Prop'r, 37 Great Jones street, N. Y. 
For sale by all druggists and Fancv-goods Dealers throughout the United 

States, Canadas and Europe. ^J^T - Beware of base imitations. $1,000 

reward for arrest and proof of auy one selling the same. 




-THE WASP- 




Photo Bdle Oudry MISS BLANCHE TISDALE of O Jtland 

The action of Oliver N. Moxey against Attorney 
Chapman shows what a risky thing it is to plunge 
into a lawsuit. Incidentally the case reveals how 
much Moxey stood to get by marrying the old lady 
who became infatuated with him when he was act- 
ing as instructor in Hoover's academy of physical 
culture on Market Street, near Tenth. 

# * * 

Hoover had a plan of converting sedate and pudgy 
females into young Venuses by kicking up their 
heels and doing other stunts in knickerbockers. It 
was a weird sight to see all the hoary antiquities in 
his gymnasium going through their calisthenics in 
the hope of baffling old Father Time. Moxey was 
Hoover's right-hand man and an old lady from Bos- 
ton, who lived in the St. Nicholas Hotel became 
wild over him. Her children tried to squelch the 
romance with the usual result. The infatuated 
matron became wilder than ever about her young 
suitor, and so they were married. Now Moxey 
wants Attorney Chapman to pay him about forty- 
seven thousand dollars which he avers that attorney 
collected from the sale of Mrs. Moxey's valuable 
property in Boston. 

* * * 

The attorney candidly admits that he collected 
all the money as figured out by Moxey. The total 
reached the tidy sum of nearly one hundred and 
fifty-three thousand dollars, which isn't so bad for a 
Boston estate. When the attorney charged off all 
the expenses, however, Moxey was in his debt in- 
stead of it being the other way. There was a very 
bitter lawsuit, as Mrs. Moxey's Boston relatives 
wanted to have her declared incompetent and the 
property placed out of her reach. The court did de- 
clare her incompetent, but later on she was declared 
competent and all this represented a great expendi- 



ture of time and talent by Attorney Chapman, for 
which he charged some forty- four thousand dollars. 
The estate has been swallowed up in litigation. It is a 
very old story in a new form. Mrs. Moxey, prior to 
her marriage to the physical culturist, was enjoying 
an income of $4000 from her property, but that was 
not enough to satisfy her. She had the feminine 
desire to be loved and for herself and preferably by a 
young man, and she got her wish. Poor woman. 
There is nothing more valuable in this world than 
to know when you are well off. But so few know it. 



The marriage of Miss Wanda Hadenfeldt and 
Henry Clinton Melone was celebrated at high noon 
on Wednesday April 10th at the First Presbyterian 
Church. Miss Ethel Melone was bridesmaid and 
Arthur Goodfellow best man. The ushers were 
Benjamin Deane, James Deane, Philip Paschel and 
Carl Hadenfeldt. The small nephew of the bride was 
the ring bearer. The bride, who is a beautiful girl, 
looked doubly so in her wedding robes of point lace 
applique. Her prettiest adornment, however was a 
wonderful Armenian wedding veil of silver, the gift 
of an Armenian girl friend. It was most effective as 
the shimmering silver falling over the rare lace of the 
wedding gown, made a pretty picture. An elaborate 
wedding breakfast followed at the Palace Hotel. Mr. 
and Mrs. Melone will be at home after May 1st, at 
Oak Knoll, the Summer home of the Melones, but 
will spend the coming Winter in town. 

* :': * 

Miss Ella Bender netted a handsome sum by her 
recent dramatic readings at the residence of Mrs. 
Homer S. King on Broadway. I understand that 
Miss Bender has no difficulty in getting $50 for an 
hour's reading at an afternoon affair. 




Announcement 

SPRING and SUMMER 

We desire to announce that our com- 
plete selection of strictly confined Imported 
and Domestic Woolens, consisting of un- 
usually attractive patterns in popular weaves and fashionable ma- 
terials, is now ready awaiting inspection. 

It gives us pleasure to state that every garment is made by 
skilled tailors, cut on stylish and artistic lines that command the 
admiration and approval of our customers. 

We cordially invite and solicit patronage, and endeavor to up- 
hold our past reputation for high-grade tailoring at moderate prices. 

McMahon, Keyer & Stiegeler 
Bros., Inc. 



Main Store 

892-894 Van Ness Ave. 

at Ellis Street 



1711 O'FarrellSt. 

at Fillmore 



10 



-THE WASP- 



The friends of Mr. and Mrs. Samuel Shortridge 
will regret to hear that Mrs. Shortridge has been 
so very ill that it was deemed advisable to remove 
her to a sanitarium. She was suddenly attacked by 
some kind of a febrile malady. Typhoid fever has 
been very prevelent on account of the awful water 
supply by Spring Valley and it was feared that Mrs. 
Shortridge's illness might develop into something 
of that kind. 

* * * 

H. L. Ricks of Eureka announces the engagement 
of his daughter Adaline to Walter Montgomery 
Murphy, of Detroit, Mich. Miss Ricks is the niece 
of Mr. Barclay Henley the well known lawyer of 
this City, and made her debut at a recent tea given 
by Mrs. Henley. Mr. Murphv is the son of the 
millionaire lumberman A. M. Murphy of Detroit, 
and looks after his father's interests in California. 
The wedding will take place early in June. 

* * * 

Before her departure for the East last week, Mrs. 
Hanford was the guest of honor at a tea given by 
Mrs. Selby Hanna. Although informal, it was an 
elaborate affair and the costumes of the ladies were 
of rare elegance. On the following morning as 

Mrs. Hanford arrived at the ferry to take the boat 
on her Eastern journey, what was her horror to 
discover that the stupid expressman had taken her 
carefully packed dress suit cases to Third and 
Townsend Streets. Telephone messages being of 
no avail, Mrs. Hanford was obliged to start on her 
trip minus even a tooth brush and trust to luc 1 ' to 
purchase such articles as best she could en route 
until the grip could be forwarded. 

=i: * * 

All Mr. Selby Hanna's friends are grieved to 
hear that he is ill again. He but recently recovered 
from a severe attack of grip. 

Miss Loraine de la Montanya is very busy these 
days preparing for her wedding to Mr. Edward 
Davis, which takes place early in June. I am told 
her wardrobe is one of unusual beauty and elegance. 

* * * 

The Engineer Officers, U. S. A., will give a large 
hop in their new barracks room at Fort Mason 
this Saturday evening. This will also be the occa- 
sion of the last appearance here of Major-General 
and Mrs. MacArthur, as they leave soon for the 
East. 

Mrs. Ynez Shorb White's skating club met last 
Monday evening, all the buds and belles attired in 
their Summer costumes, their hats trimmed in flow- 
ers and fruits. The masculine contingent was large 
and distinguished. A lady remarked, a noticeable 
feature of skating rinks is the manner in which it 
rejuvenates beaux and belles who were prominent 
in society when the water came up to Montgomery 
Street. It was a matter of comment at last Monday 
night's skating party that Mr. Everett Bee carries 
his age most marvellouslv. He is as airy as a 
zephyr floating around the rink with buds of 
eighteen. Mr. McAfee also held his own well twixt 
boy and youth, which was apparent in the grand 



march. So it is true age is a matter of feeling, not 
years. Mr. Paschal and Mr. Robson of the younger 
generation skated for all they were worth the entire 
evening. Dr. Bruce Foulkes seemingly desperately 
determined to reduce his increasing avoirdupois, 
skated with unceasing energy until a pretty girl 
tripped him up, and Oh my, what a mighty fall 
there was. The hall trembled and caused the 
nervous ones to have momentary visions of another 
eighteenth of April. Mrs. Frederick Palmer, just 
returned from abroad, skated gracefully all the 
evening, showing off to advantage her costume 
with the stamp of Paris upon it. As there is to be 
but one more meeting, everybody skated with added 
zest. Mrs. White never looked prettier than in her 
becoming Summer costume. 

* * * 

Mr. A. N. Drown and his daughter, Miss Newell 
left last week for the East and Europe. It will 
be six months before local society sees them again. 
Mr. and Mrs. S. H. Boardman, who have been 
occupying Mr. Drown's home since their own 
beautiful home was burned, have taken a house 
in San Anselmo for the summer. 

* * * 

Mrs. Stuart Rawlings has recently come to the 
city from her home in Mexico, on a visit to her 
parents Dr. and Mrs. Alexander Warner. Mr. 
Rawlings has extensive mining interests in Mexico. 

* * # 

Mrs. Clarence Breeden's dinner and theatre party, 
which took place last week in honor of her sister 
Mrs. Hedges, was a most enjoyable affair. The 
party included Mr. and Mrs. Breeden, Mr. and Mrs. 
Ed. Pond, Mrs. R. P. Schwerin, Miss Sara Drum, 
Lieut. Com. Halsted, U. S. A., Edward M. Green- 
way and Mr. Woodruff. 

* * * 

Hotel Rafael as usual will be crowded this Sum- 
mer. The latest to engage apartments for the sea- 
son are Mr. and Mrs. Henry Foster Dutton. 



9 



An Exhibition of Paintings 
of Indian Life 



By GRACE HUDSON 



Will be held from April 17 to 27 at the 

SCHUSSLER GALLERY, 1218 SUTTER ST. 



The Land of the Midnight Sun 

Select Summer Cruises-First Class Only-SEND for handsome illustrated Pamphlets 

HAMBURG - AMERICAN LINE 



908 MARKET ST. Phone Temporary 2946 San Franciico, Cal. 



THE WASP 



I! 



Tlarc is much speculation in local Society as 
t" whether the well-known heiress, who left sud- 
denly for New York recently on the eve of her 
marriage, will change her sudden resolution not 
to wear her trousseau. I believe it was almost 
finished, and the friends of the bride-to-be were 
anxiously looking for the invitations, when they 
were amazed t" read in the newspapers that the 
ladv had packed her trunk and gone East. She can 
go anywhere she pleases, as she is in the enjoyment 
of an income of about a couple of thousand dollars 
a month. The prospective groom is the son of a 
famous statesman who once ran for the distin- 
guished office of Vice-President of the United 
States, lie is a polished gentleman and esteemed 
by his large circle of friends. The young lady who 
has thus suddenly halted at the foot of the altar, 
so to speak, was once before a prospective bride, 
but at the last moment the engagement was called 
off much to the surprise and disappointment of 
Societv. When a girl has an income of twenty 
thousand a year, or thereabouts, she is usually not 
the easiest prize in the world to win. However she 
may change her mind again and let the wedding 
bells ring. 

* * * 

The recent Scoville-Talbot wedding at New 
York was a fashionable affair. Miss Helen Chase 
Scoville, the bride, is the daughter of Mrs. Helen 
M. Gardner Scoville of New York. The bridegroom 
is the son of Mrs. A. X. Talbot, now of Washing- 
ton, formerly of this City. He is a graduate of 
Stanford University. One of the bridesmaids was 
Miss Elsie Kimble of San Francisco, who went 
East to attend the wedding. Mrs. Amy Talbot, the 
groom's mother, was formerly pretty Miss Amy 
Bowen, daughter of the well-known member of the 
wholesale grocery firm of Goldberg-Bowcn & Co. 

* * # 

The death of J. Henley Smith of San Francisco 
reminds one that the old generation of Californians 
has almost passed out of sight and memory. Few 
of the present day politicians or people in Society 
remember Mr. Smith, who was a handsome man, 
and very prominent in the social world. He was 
one of the best dressed men in the City. Mr. 
Smith, with his air of distinction, his fashionable 
clothes, and high social connections, would be a 
strange contrast to the present combination of 
grafters that comprise the Board of Supervisors. 

* * * 

Mr. Smith was elected in the days when the 
Southern wing of the Democracy still held the reins 
of power and dictated nominations. He had fought 
on the Confederate side in the Civil War and was 
the great-grandson of John Henley, who was one 
of the signers of the Declaration of Independence. 
He held several prominent positions in the business 
community of San Francisco, and was the original 
organizer and vice-president of the Pacific Transfer 
Company and the United Carriage Company. Mr. 
and Mrs. Smith lived for many years at the old 
Occidental Hotel and were very prominent in the 
exclusive Southern social set. Mrs. Henley was a 



Miss Rebecca Young of Baltimore, 

* * * 

For the past liften years the 1 Icnlev-Smiths had 
been absent from San Francisco. They made their 
home in Washington, D. C, and occupied a promi- 
nent place in the Society of the Capital. Mr. Hen- 
ley retired from active business ten years ago, 
having acquired an ample fortune. His death oc- 
curred at the Anglo-American Hotel, Florence, 
while he was traveling in Europe. His wife and 
sister were with him. Mr. Smiths health had been 
precarious for some time. 

* * # 

Mrs. J. C. Jordan has been the motive of much 
entertaining during the short time remaining before 
her departure for the East and Europe. 

Mrs. James H. Bull has issued invitations for 
a bridge breakfast at her home on Yerba Buena 
Island, on April 23rd. Sixteen guests will be en- 
tertained on this occasion. 

* * # 

Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Anderson Chanslor are 
enjoying the sights of New York. Miss Elsie 
Kimble, sister of Mrs. Chanslor, was one of the 
bridesmaids at the Scoville-Talbot wedding which 
took place in New York on April 3rd, and for which 
event Mr. and Mrs. Chanslor went East. 



HOTEL RAFAEL 

San Rafael, Cal. 

OPEN ALL THE YEAR ROUND 

SO Minutes from San Francisco 

The only first-class hotel in the vicinity of 
the city. American and European plan. 

R. V. HALTON, Proprietor 




Phone West 4983 



Vogel & Bishoff 

Ladies' Tailors and 
Habit Makers 

1525 Sutter Street, San Francisco 




Old Poodle Dog Restaurant 



824-826 EDDY STREET 

Near Van Ness Ave. 



Service beller than before Formerly, Bnsh and Grant Ave. 
ihe fire San Francisco 



Phone Emergency 63 



12 



-THE WASP- 




Phoio Belle Oudry BESSIE BACON 

A handsome and talented member of the 
Colonial Theatre Stock Company 



The New York Court of Appeals has decided 
that Howard Gould must pay Architect Abner J. 
Haydel something more than $30,000 for the plans 
for Castle Gould at Sands Point, L, I., and inci- 
dentally for the deep wound which was inflicted on 
Mr. Haydel's feelings when Mrs. Gould called him 
a "damn architect." The Court of Appeals refused 
to reopen the case. The Gould's housebuilding 
troubles were first aired in court two years ago. 
The jury gave the architect a verdict of $24,183.75. 
The cost of carrying the case through the higher 
courts has added something over $6000 to the orig- 
inal sum. Castle Gould was planned to be an exact 
reproduction of Kilkenny Castle in Ireland. The 
Goulds didn't like the plans and at the first trial 
of the case Haydel's counsel told the Court that an 
interview with Mrs. Gould at the Waldorf had 
ended when she told her servant to "throw the 
damned architect out." It is not of record that he 
waited for this assistance in making his exit. 
* * * 

The sale of the late Stanford White's collection 
of carvings, bronzes, tapestries, etc., attracted a 
highly distinguished company of bidders to the 
White residence at 121 East Twenty-first Street, 
New York, where the auction was held. While the 
sale was in progress Mr. White's slayer was on trial 
for his life in another New York building. Admis- 
sion to the sale was by card only, and cards were 
hard to secure at the rooms of the American Art As- 
sociation. Among the bidders were Mrs. Harry 
Payne Whitney, Mrs. Robert Goelet, Mrs. Worth- 
ington Whittredge and Miss Whittredge, Mrs. 
George Bliss and Miss Bliss, David Belasco and 
William R. Hearst. 



The auctioneer had arranged hanging green vel- 
vet curtains and a slender legged stand in one end of 
the music room on which to display the various art 
objects. As each number was called out two liveried 
negroes appeared from behind the green curtains 
with the carving or candle branches and supported 
them under a group light on the little stand before 
the green plush. The sale was brisk. A majolica 
statue of Venus brought $160. David Belasco paid 
$330 for two old-fashioned powder horns heavily 
embossed and fringed with faded red. There was a 
great assortment of brasses. Fully a dozen Dutch 
warming pans went at prices ranging from $25 to $40. 
There were church plaques from Spanish cathedrals 
and Dutch churches, and Italian monstrance 
and a Louis XV. monstrance. an antique 
wall clock, which likewise appealed to Mr. Belasco. 
Mr. Hearst bought in one of the Italian plaques. 
Two Spanish silver chancel lamps brought $840. 
C. N. Coolidge, the artist, paid $300 for an old ruby 
red Genoese altar cloth. Two Henry II. tapestry 
pillows brought $335. An old cushion which would 
be dear at $30 was sold for $170. The fact that Mr. 
White as an art connoisseur should have bought it 
seemed to quadruple the price of the article. David 
Belasco paid $105 for a red velvet Genoese embroi- 
dered despatch bag, which will no doubt figure as 

one of the properties of some Belasco drama. 
# * * 

The barber who was elected to the New Jersey 
Legislature and wants a bill passed taxing men who 
wear whiskers, has caused more of a stir than he 
thought possible. A graded tax has been suggested 
as some whiskers are more of an offense than others 
to the eye of a tonsorial artist. For the purposes of 
taxation the whiskers have been classified as fol- 



Let them know! 



Your friend can reserve a room at the 

Hotel St. Francis 

when he leaves home, and find it ready 
for him when he arrives. Tell him so. 
Every comfort at hand. 



■THE WASP- 



13 




Pholo Belle Oudry MISS S. A. TUSCHER of Oakland 

lows : Plain whiskers, earguards, face fins, weather- 
cocks, face fungus, holdalls, hearth rugs, cutlets, 
paint brushes and the whiskerette. As moustaches 
should also be taxed for the same statesmanlike 
reason that barbers must have work, they have also 
been classified. The different orders are: Plain 
moustaches, the inverted eyebrow, the walrus, .and 
the soup-strainer. While a modified moustache like 
an inverted eyebrow might escape with a tax of 
$5 a year the wearer of a fierce "walrus" or a "soup- 
strainer" should be considered lucky if let off with 

less than $100. 

# # * 

Pittsburg became so restive under the taunt that it 
produces more millionaires and scandals than any city 
in America, that the Chamber of Commerce got up a 
list of spotless citizens. Every man was to have a 
character eighteen carats fine and warranted to stand 
the acid of hostile criticism. All the saints were to be 
embalmed in a beautiful book, which was to be opened 
at a grand dinner given by the Chamber of Commerce 
the other day. Lo and behold, when the festive event 
took place the book of saints was found to contain 
only twenty-eight pictures and certificates of good 
character. For a city of about half a million inhabi- 
tants this was a pretty bad showing. San Francisco, 
even with the Grand Jury raking all the millionaires' 
clubs with a fine-tooth comb, could do better than that. 
Now comes the distressing news that the list of spot- 
less Pittsburgers has to be reduced as one of the 
righteous twenty-eight has gone and got married to a 
divorcee, and social Pittsburg is much perturbed over 
the wedding. The recreant is named Nevin and is a 
rising young composer. The lady in the case was a 
Mrs. Mazy Lyman Dean. About twelve years ago she 
came to Pittsburg as governess in, a lawyer's family 



and married Dr. Dean, who was the family physician. 
Composer Nevin had been a schoolmate of the Doctor, 
so what was more natural than that he should become 
a frequent visitor to the Dean home. Equally natural 
in Pittsburg, perhaps, was it, that he should develop a 
tender regard for Mrs. Dean and that her husband 
should give him a walloping. The divorce which 
followed was also in the regular order of things Pitts- 
burgian. Great secresy was maintained in the trial of 
the case and by some hook or crook all the papers were 
spirited away from the courthouse. Now that the 
righteous Mr. Nevin has married the divorcee all the 
facts come out and Pittsburg is in tears. It has only 
twenty-seven leading citizens entitled to wear tin halos 
on the public streets, and no one can tell what minute 
some of the saintly twenty-seven may stub his toe and 
break his trade-mark. 

Chief Justice Beatty left the City last week to 
attend court in Los Angeles. Mrs. Beatty did not 
accompany him, but left the following day to visit 
her son Oscar Beatty and wife at their beautiful 
home at Woodside. In the meantime Mrs. Brooke 
M. Wright, their attractive daughter, will have Miss 
Daisy Polk as her guest at the Beatty home on Octavia 
Street. 

* # * 

The D. A. Benders have leased the Hoffmann 
residence in San Rafael and will pass the Summer 
there with their daughters Miss Ella and Miss Cherry. 

* * * 

Mr. and Mrs. E. Burke Holladay are entertaining 
Miss Pardee, a very interesting yoimg lady from the 
East, who will spend some time in San Francisco. 




STUDEBAKER 

1907 

CARS NOW ARRIVING 

Studebaker Bros. Co. of California 

405 Golden Gate Avenue 

Chester A. Weaver, Manager 



14 



-THE WASP 



Uncle George Bromley's birthday dinner which 
was given by Raphael Weill was of course a great 
success. Mr. Weill never gave a dinner which was a 
failure. There were about fifty guests and John 
Lander's was the toast master. Ned Hamilton declared 
that "Raphael Weill's dinners speak for him, and 
dinners around the world are eloquent of him" — 
Which is indeed true, for dishes from Paris to San 
Francisco are named a la Raphael Weill. Benjamin 
Ide Wheeler made the best speech and attributed the 
youthful spirit of the ninety year old philosopher to 
his laughter at the foolishness of those who under- 
standing little of the universe make such a serious 
business of living. He went on to say that Uncle 
George had passed ninety years in the University of 
Goodfellowship, and then Dr. Wheeler went through 
the ceremony of conferring on the veteran Bohemian 
the degree of L. L. D. which he metamorphosed into 
Doctor of Laudable Lawcosness. 
* * * 

Harry Melvin of Oakland opened his remarks with 
"when I left the Metropolis this evening." The idea 
of Oakland being the metropolis was certainly worth 
a laugh. Continuing his remarks the Judge said that 
when he entered the University years ago he received 
a letter from Uncle George saying: "I am glad you 
are going to a University — I never had an opportunity 
to go to a University. The nearest I ever came to it 
was being second mate on a schooner that was carry- 
ing granite for Gerard College. 

Ned Hamilton read the "Round Robin" that came 
out from the Lambs to Uncle George and he said he 
been asked to do so because of his sonorous voice 
and his empty head. When he came to the names of 
the signers, he said : 

"I will now turn these over to my friend Louis Sloss 
because as he has had most of them on I. O. U's, he 
will be able to decipher them better than I can." 

Uncle George said that as he listened to all the 
kind things said about him he grew so puffed up that 
by the time the dinner was over he felt that he should 
speak to no one, but himself. He said it reminded 
him of the time when he went as Consul to Tsin 
Tsin, in China, and they had never before realized 
what a Consul was really like. They had never seen 
any one like him except General Grant, when that 
great soldier was on his tour of the world, and there 
was considerable doubt in the Chinamen's minds 
whether the Consul was not the greater man. Uncle 
George has had more dinners given him than any one 
in San Francisco and yet he alwavs receives them in 
the same graceful way. Raphael Weill was to have 
left for Paris a year ago, but the earthquake and fire 
changed his olans as they did those of many others, 
i he past year has been an eventful one for the famous 
merchant and having arranged his affairs in satis- 
factory shape he gave the dinner on Saturday night 
which was at once a tribute to Uncle George and au 
revoir to his friends of the Bohemian Club and the 
"old guard" in particular. He left on Thursday for 
Europe. 

' Nothing will quicker revolutionize the system and put new life into it than Abbott s Bitters 
At druggists and grocers. . 



Miss Maude Payne is one of the luckiest girls alive 
and her mother Mrs. Eugene Freeman is as generous 
and thoughtful as a fond parent can be. Miss Payne 
is what may be described as terribly good looking and 
she spends real money as if 'twere the stage article. 
Forty dollars for a plain linen washed skirt doesn't 
cause her a pang. Not long since the mother of 
this fortunate young lady said to her when her birth- 
day anniversity came round. 

"Maude have you everything you want?" 

"Everything Mother" was the reply. 

Then Mrs. Freeman led the girl over to the window 
before which stood a ravishingly lovely 1907 auto- 
mobile. 

"But you haven't an automobile," said the fond 
parent. 

"No, but you have mother" 

"That's not your own though." 

"No, that's one thing I haven't." 

"How do you like that car?" 

"I love it." 

"That's yours" said Mrs. Freeman. 

They say : "It's better to be born lucky than rich '" 
but a combination of both can't be beaten. 
* * * 

Mrs. Raymond Burns, the wife of young Burns, 



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-THE WASP 



15 



the son of the famous detective is a cousin of A. S. 
Lilley, who married Miss Juliet William-., sister of 
Mrs. Walter riobart. Mr. Burns was horn in Colum- 
bus, Ohio, where the Lilleys live and whence the 

Williams' family hail. 

* * * 

The A. A. Moores after Mrs. Moore finishes her 

buildings are going to make a tour of the world. 

* * * 

James Follis has decided to become a resident of 
Marin County, and is running for office of trustee of 
the town of San Rafael, which burg is at present in 
the throes of a campaign. 

* * * 

General L. P. Jocelyn, who has just retired from 
the Fourteenth Infantry, is at Del Monte with Mrs. 
Jocelyn, Miss Jocelyn and Mrs. Hume. A number 
of the officers of the Monterey Presidio have been 
over to pay their respects to General Jocelyn, who 
is very popular in both army and social circles. 

* * * 

Mrs. George W . Kingsbury, of San Francisco, 
with Mrs. William H. Devlin, of Sacramento, are 

at Del Monte to remain several weeks. 

* * * 

George Heazleton has been putting in a few days 
at Del Monte, and enjoying the pleasures of the 
fine golf links. 

:!: * * 

Horace Piatt and A. D. Shepard were at Del 
Monte for the week end. Other well known people 
who registered during the week were John Caffrev, 
C. S. Aiken, D. Ghirardelli, F. M. Ames, H. K, 
Montgomery, A. E. Hughes, J. S. Dinkelspeil, S. B. 
Dinkelspeil, S. D. Gordon, Max Lorenz, T. W. 
Read, Dr. H. O. Hornett, F. F. Runyon, H. A. 
Klyce, William Kelley, J. Brewster, F. E. Booth 
and John G. lis. 

Mr. and Mrs. Rawlinson M. Reade, and Mr. and 
Mrs. R. L. Laughlin are two young couples now 
at Del Monte. Mrs. Reade is a neice of Parker 

Whitney, and a very attractive girl. 

* # *' 

Miss Claire Sweigert, daughter of the well known 
capitalist surprised all her friends by quietly marry- 
ing Mr. John J. Clayton on the 9th inst. Almost 
everybody expected that she would be a June bride. 
The groom is the son of the late James A. Clayton 
of San Jose, a prominent real estate operator. Rev. 
Dr. Guthrie was the officiating clergyman at the 
wedding. Neither the bride nor the groom had any 
attendants. The young couple will live with Mr. and 

Mrs. Sweigert on Presidio Avenue, 
e * # 

Mrs. Rosa Hooper Plotner has started a class for 
miniature painting, which meets every Wednesday 
afternoon from 2 to 5 o'clock, at her studio 1625 
California Street. Mrs. Plotner has many new orders 
for miniature painting that take up so much of her 
time and will devote Saturday afternoons to informal 
teas at which she will receive her friends. 

An exhibition of Paintings of Indian Life by Grace Hudson, will be held 
from April 1 7th to 27th at the Schussler Gallery, 1218 Sutter Street. 



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NORTH END 



16 



-THE WASP 




MRS. SPENCER EDDY CLurline Spreckels) 

The New York Sun, which devotes a great deal of 
attention to painters and their work, refers as fol- 
lows to the collection of pictures which Mr. Keith 
sent recently to one of the leading New York 
dealers : 



half a dozen others it is marked sold. There are some 
very harmonious examples, like No. 20, "The Berkeley 
Hills" (Cal.) ; or the beautiful "Gray Day, San 
Ramoan Valley" — also sold. Mr. Keith is happy in 
his portrayals of misty, golden mornings. The 
"Autumn, Sonoma Creek" (No. 6), a tranquil pool 
reflecting an early evening sky, would have pleased 
Diaz. This exhibition is attracting many lovers of 
art who are not in the mood for brilliant virtuosity or 
the blistering sunshine paint of the new men. 

* * * 

The New Yorkers have been trained by innumer- 
able exhibitions to regard "blistering sunshine" as the 
real thing in art, the true tone and the quality which 
denotes the complete mastery of the painter over his 
subject. It is very significant however that Keith's 
low-toned pictures, which are so suggestive of many 
of the old masters, sell as readily in New York as in 
San Francisco. The Sun's criticism on one of Keith's 
pictures that it "would have pleased Diaz" is praise -in- 
deed. Any picture which could please Diaz would 
please for all time. If it did not possess the essentials 
of true beauty and perfect technique a master like 
Diaz would condemn and not commend it. The sombre 
pictures of Wm. Keith will live and be treasured 
when thousands of "blistering sunshine" studies will 
be hung in the attics, or thrown in ash barrels and the 
world of art will have forgotten whether the painter's 
themselves were living or died peacefully ' in their 
beds. 

* * * 

It is rather amusing to read the Sun's reference 
to the "physical effort" expended by Keith in painting 



"At the Macbeth Gallery, 450 Fifth Avenue, are 
now hung two dozen landscapes of the veteran Cali- 
fornia painter, William Keith. In the San Francisco 
disaster Mr. Keith, who is not far from 70, lost the 
work of years. He was not dismayed, as this pres- 
ent collection testifies. In less than twelve months 
he painted these pictures, and, apart from the physi- 
cal achievement, there is no sign of haste, no lack 
of finish. As you enter Mr. Macbeth's rear gallery 
you are sensible of a gracious, dark scheme of color. 
Sombre in color rather than in spirit are the Keith 
canvases. He is not modern. He does not disturb 
the optic nerve in tone or theme. He is a tonalist, 
who loves a full, rich pate — flowing brush work and 
a poetic situation. Too often the note of senti- 
mentality obtrudes ; but other days, other ways. A 
glance at the handsome, distinguished head of Keith, 
a head in its form not unlike Meissonier's though 
more romantic in the expression, tells you that 
here is a painter who early conceived a particular 
ideal of beauty and has never modified it throughout 
the years. Realists, impressionists, symbolists, in- 
timists, have come and gone, but Keith still paints as 
he painted forty years ago. And, after all, it is 
something to stick to one's standards. He has 
studied Gainsborough, Diaz, Constable ; but he 
paints only in California, so his subject matter is 
fresher than the English or French masters. "Ap- 
proaching Storm" — you see the white thunder heads 
over the treetops — is a satisfying composition. With 




MISS ETELKA WILUAR 



-THE WASP- 



17 



two dozen pictures in twelve months. It might have 
taxed the old veteran's staying powers if he had been 
compelled to paint them in two weeks, but I should 
hate to bet a thousand dollars that he couldn't pro- 
duce them in that time. The well-known fact in local 
art circles is that Keith can paint a first class and 
highly finished picture while the average artist is 
wondering how to start on it. 

* * * 

Mrs. Bowditch Morton has been in town for the 
first time since her divorce several years ago from 
Dr. Morton, who was of a famous New York family 
and who gave Mrs. Morton who was a dream of a 
dark-eyed woman the entree to the Burlingame set. 
There she became a pal of Mrs. Frank Carolan. 
Nothing more was necessary for social success than 
after Mrs. Morton got her divorce there were rumors 
that she was to marry a noted polo player, but instead • 
she went to Europe and remained for some time. Now 
she is at Goldfield, Nevada, with her father, Mr. Smith 
a wealthy mine owner and she will remain there for 
some time. When she went away Mrs. Morton was 
a dazzling brunette, but she came back a blonde to 
the grief of her friends for those transformations 
seldom add to the attractiveness of a really pretty 
woman. 



Mrs. de Young and daughters are thinking of leav- 
ing soon for Europe, where they will spend some 
months. The de Young girls always come back with 
trunks full of gowns for the Winter season. 
• * » 

Miss Amy Porter whom the newspapers have re- 
ferred to as visiting the Dumonts at Palm Beach, 
Florida, is the daughter of Mrs. J. N. Porter of 
Sacramento who was Miss Minnie Clarke, daughter of 
C. W. Clarke, the rich cattle raiser and land owner. 
His partner was Senator Fred Cox. The Clarkes live 
in a beautiful home on Presidio Terrace, where Mr. 
A. S. Baldwin and Mrs. Baldwin nee Clarke also 
reside. Miss Porter and her mother have traveled 
abroad a grate deal. The late Jack B. Wright, the 
well known railroad manager married Laura Clarke, 
the youngest of the Clarke sisters. 

ENTRE NOUS. 



"According to this book," said Mrs. DeStyle, 
"seals sometimes shed tears just like men do." 

"I don't see why they should," rejoined her 
husband. "They don't have to pay for sealskin 
jackets." 




THE WINTON WHICH WAS WON 
Mrs. DeYoung at the Wheel, surrounded by committeewomen of the Tri-Fold Charity Concert at the Fairmont Hotel 




— nr 



GHan 



i«. 



&mnfc Criticism of Current Stents 




Union Labor's attempts to side-step responsibil- 
ity for the government by banded plunderers, to 
which San Francisco must submit, till some of them 
are in jail, are as much a discredit to it as anything 
that has occurred. To be game and honest, even 
when mistaken, is a virtue that atones in some 
degree for error, but, the workingmen of San Fran- 
cisco, who have been so fearful of an administration 
that would enforce the laws without fear or favor, 
in time of strikes as well as during industrial 
peace, that they were willing to let Abe Ruef do 
a lot of plundering — this crowd is doing the baby 
act now by asking everyone to believe that union 
labor had no part in it, and is to be commiserated 
for its unfortunate position, not blamed. 

For some years past the average workingman 
has voted for the Schmitz gang, in spite of all 
evidence that could be put before him that graft 
was rampant. 



"The other fellows would steal if they were in," 
he has said, "and anyway we'll not have policemen 
on the trucks while Schmitz is mayor." 

Now that they know Schmitz has betrayed them, 
now that the astounding tale of the career of the 
Reuf crew of pirates has been unfolded, union 
labor is solicitous that all shall know Schmitz and 
his crowd were never a union labor administration. 
The papers are helping them out of course, but 
deceiving no one. Livernash is fulminating against 
the gangsters and showing that union labor is 
blameless. He is trying to immortalize Casey and 
Furuseth and such leaders, who by the way never 
had the courage to fight the men who were mis- 
leading the workingmen, that they might black- 
mail and rob and betray. The daily press generally 
joins in a chorus for the prosecution of the "big 
fellows," whose riches corrupted the poor, weak 
supervisors. 



By all means prosecute the bribers, but waste 
no tears over the corrupted officials, who have been 
as greedy and wolf-faced a crowd of theives as 
ever set out to plunder and stop at nothing. And 
their elevation to office is a stigma union labor 
must bear and high-sounding resolution will not 
alter the fact. 



Doubtless new union labor politicians will try 
to seize the power wrenched from Ruef and 
Schmitz. P. H. McCarthy and O. A. Tveitmoe 
are a pair that will probably make a try for it 
unless the electricians keep them too busy trying 
to maintain their labor trust in the building trades. 
They will fail, for they have no following outside 
the building trades. Furuseth and Casey, and 



Macarthur, are men who fear the bad effects of 
politics on the union labor cause, and none of them 
is likely to consent to become a candidate. Any 
of them would be snowed under this year. No 
candidate taken from amongst the bunch of San 
Francisco labor leaders will have a ghost of a 
chance this year. Every man with a following has 
been holding one or more offices under Schmitz 
and is more or less tarred with the same brush 
that has besmeared the magisterial fiddler. The 
others, who were given no offices because they 
belong to the order of cranks, or have no following, 
can not get the nomination, and if they did it would 
only prove to be a political gold brick. 



There is much discussion in San Francisco as to 
whether the disagreement of the jury in the Thaw case 
was a triumph or defeat for Delmas. It is evident that 
the other lawyers in the case who are jealous of the 
clever San Francisco barrister would like to have it 
understood that Thaw should have been acquitted. 
For myself I think that the young Pittsburger is lucky 
that he has not been hurried along to the deadly 
electric chair. If ever anybody committed a deliberate 
murder he did and at the outset of the trial most 
people thought he would be lucky if he got off with a 
verdict of murder in the second degree, Delmas 
made the most of the case and should be credited 
with having scored a success in getting his client 
a disagreement. 

There was a touch of his first choice of a profes- 
sion, which showed itself in Mr. Delmas' action 
when in describing Harry Thaw after he had 
killed Stanford White, the lawyer stretched out 
his arms like a priest after a sacrificial ceremony. 
Long years ago when Mr. Delmas was at 
the Jesuit College of Santa Clara he studied to be 
a priest and the Jesuit fathers thought that it was 
his vocation. He was most pious and it was not 



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-THE WASP- 



19 



until he was nearly read} to enter Yale that he decided 
to live in the world instead of a monastery. 



lames (iillis. who died in Sonora on April 13th, 
Las a famous old pioneer and i-. said to have been 
the original of Iiret Harte's "Truthful James." 
lie was a great friend of the novelist in the early 
mining days. Mr. Gillis was the brother of Mrs. 
Henry Williams of this city, whose husband the 
late Henry Williams was president of the Cali- 
fornia Safe Deposit Company for years. Henry- 
Alston Williams is a nephew. 

John Butler, whose death at Rome has been an- 
nounced, was immensely popular with the sports- 
men of San Francisco and was known on every 
fishing stream in California. He was a thoroughly 
Americanized Englishman and as honest a man as 
ever lived. < »ld Izaak was not more devoted to 
"the gentle art" than John Butler, and every 
festive gathering of the riy-casters found the genial 
old veteran as gay as a boy of eighteen. He was 
the father of the late Miss Ella Butler, a remark- 
able talented girl, who had a great success in 
vaudeville. His aged wife, to whom he was much 
attached died two years ago. Mr. Butler leaves 
one son, Bonis Butler, who had been his active 
partner for several years, and a daughter, Mrs. 
A. II. Rising. Few men had more sincere friends 
or will be as much missed as genial and honest 
John Butler. 



Mrs. Daniel E. Hungerford, the mother of Mrs. 
John \V. Mackay, died in Rome la>t week at the 
age of 84 years. Mrs. Hungerford had made her 
home with Countess Telfener, her daughter, who 
had been a widow for a number of years. The 
Countess was educated at the College of Notre 
Dame in San Jose,, and was much loved by her 
school companions. When yet a young girl she 
went abroad with her sister, Mrs. John W. Mackay. 
Her marriage was said to have been a very happy 
one. Colonel Hungerford, the father, died in Rome 
in 1896. He served in the Civil War and headed 
the Twenty-sixth Regiment of the New York Vol- 
unteers. 



\ noteworthy feature of the clebration of the 
high mass last' Sunday at Sacred Heart, Oakland, 
was the singing of a solo by Mr. Joseph 
Rosborough, the well known member of the Bo- 
hemian Club. Miss Amelia Maytorena assisted 
with a violin obligato. The organist was Miss Lily 
Arrillaga. 



The Allalba Cottilon held its last dance this sea- 
son on Saturday evening. The Paris Tea Garden 
was daintily decorated for the occasion and mem- 
bers of the "club asked many guests. A few of those 
present were Miss Etta Kreutzmann, Estella Rud- 
dock Marv Shaife. Elsa Kempff, Rose Gardner, 
Emma Bazet, the Misses Reddin, Harry Hund Ar- 
thur Skaufe. Bernard A. Schmidt. Endicott Gard- 
ner and Ernest West. 



A well-known young girl here, not yet out of her 
teens has been in love with a youth from Fresno, 
whose father is a physician. The young man him- 
self is in a trade. He keeps a candy store and his 
sweetheart's family deem the occupation not quite 
elevated enough for a future son-in-law. The love- 
stricken bud informed her parents of her determina- 
tion to marry. A stormy scene took place with 
the result that the daughter fled the house, took 
refuge at a girl friend's home, and left the next 
morning for the South, where it is said the marriage 
was to take place. All her friends are waiting at 
this writing to hear from her, and the parents are 
distracted. 



C. H. REHNSTROM 

Tailor and Importer 

SPRING AND SUMMER STYLES 

NOW READY 



Formerly of 

The Mutual Savings Bank Building 



241S FILLMORE STREET 

Telephone West 5769 



'JUST A SHADE ON OTHERS' 



Weinhard 

The Peer 
of Bottle Beer 




CALIFORNIA BOTTLING CO. 



SOLE BOTTLERS 



1255 HARRISON STREET 

PHONE MARKET 977 



Weinhard is the Delicious Beer served at Cafe Francisco, The 
Louvre, Tail's and many other Cafes 



^r^e^or President's Taste 

Macaroni, Vermicelli, Spaghetti 

1_. R. PODESTA, Manufacturer 512 Waihington Strtt 



20 



-THE WASP 



The Japanese and Korean Exclusion League is 
giving a few weak kicks just to show it is merely 
dead and not so far decayed as to be unduly odor- 
iferous. Students of history may or may not have 
noticed that the exposure of all the municipal 
grafters by the Grand Jury and the collapse of the 
Japanese and Korean League were simultaneous 
Several eminent patriots, whose eloquence helped to 
stimulate the League, are now so busy dodging 
prosecution by Mr. Heney that they have no time 
for international statesmanship. The public hears 
no more of the Yellow Peril and incidentally it may 
be remarked that you can't see one of the Mikado's 
subjects anywhere outside the bounds of a few blocks 
in the Western Addition, where they all concen- 
trated after the fire. They are so scarce that you 
can't get a Jap to cook for you or clean your house 
or wash your windows for love or money. In a 
month there will be a howl from the fruit raisers 
who see their crop likely to rot on the trees for want 
of help to pick and pack it. The Japanese problem 
in California has never been anything but a political 
one, manufactured by demagogues who want office, 
and no one knows that better than the employers of 
California and the farmers in particular. When you ' 
cannot get Japanese for 35 cents an hour — $2.80 a 
day — to wash your windows or sweep your floors' in 
San Francisco, there can be no deluge of cheap 
coolie labor threatening to submerge us. 



the very night when the National Democratic Club 
held its festivities in the Hotel Waldorf and listened 
to the eloquence of Judge Alton B. Parker and some 
prominent Southern statesman. From this "feast of 
reason and flow of soul," Mr. Bryan also was 
missing. Fraternal harmony would not seem to be 
the dominant characteristic of the National Democ- 
racy just at present. 



Mr. Elmer C. Leffingwell has been describing to 
the reporters all the trouble the Board of Education 
has had in evicting squatters from the City's prop- 
erty at the corner of Fifth and Market Streets. If 
Mr. Leffingwell would tell the reporters how the 
trespassers came to squat there in the first instance, 
and what political pull they relied on to enable them 
to use public property unlawfully, it would make it 
much more interesting. 



It will be very hard to classify Mr. Wm. R. Hearst 
politically before many more years shall have 
passed. According to the reports emanating near the 
White House, he is in cohorts with E. H. Harriman 
to manipulate the next Republican National Con- 
vention and elect some reactionary like Foraker of 
Ohio. In the last election in New York he was 
neither fish, flesh nor red herring, so to speak. One 
day he was a Tammany Democrat, the next the 
idol of the wild-eyed Socialists, and the day after an 
Independence Leaguer with his knife out for Tam- 
many and all allied thereto. The other day he re- 
fused to put his elongated extremities under the 
same Democratic banquet board with his old friend 
and co-worker in the cause of class-hatred, Wm. 
Jennings Bryan. Mr. Hearst, in declining the 
honor, didn't even take the trouble to give a reason 
beyond stating that it would be impossible for him 
to attend. His declination did not, it seems, occa- 
sion any surprise to the friends of Mr. Bryan. In 
order to show that he was not missing anything by 
refusing the invitation to the Bryan dinner, Mr. 
Hearst got up one of his own and gathered around 
him the remains of his Independence League cab- 
inet. Significantly enough, he gave the dinner on 



There is no reason why English influence should 
not have as much influence on the Cuban situation 
as it had on the Philippine. Had it not been for a 
message Queen Victoria sent to President McKinley 
one Sunday afternoon, Germany would have been 
bearing that "white man's burden" instead of the 
United States.. Lord Pauncefote made two visits to 
the White House during the McKinley administration 
to deliver personal messages from Queen Victoria. 
The first was on the afternoon of the Sunday follow- 
ing McKinley's proclamation calling upon Spain to 
get out of Cuba. When Victoria read his proclama- 
tion, she cabled Lord Pauncefote to tell the President 
that the British government would sustain him in 
every effort he made to carry out the policy fore- 
shadowed by his announcement. No message was ever 
more welcome, because just at that time, there were 
grave doubts whether France, Austria and Germany 
would permit us to interfere in Spanish colonial 
affairs. With Great Britain behind us, we knew that 
there would be no interference, and when the people 
of Spain heard that news they stoned the British 
legation in Madrid. And the Spaniards declare to 
this day that they would have whipped the United 
States if England had not interfered to protect us. 

HARVEY BROUGHAM 

Strenuous Treatment 

"Grandpa had the lumbago the other day." 
"Indeed! What did they do for him?" 
"Oh, they used the old-fashioned remedies. They 
soaked his feet in a tub and put ten home-made plas- 
ters and poultices on him. Then they dosed him 
with herb teas until he was red as a beet. After the 
lumbago was gone they put him in bed and sent for 
the doctor." 

"Gracious, what did they need the doctor for?" 
"Why, to cure him of the effects of the old- 
fashioned remedies." 



La Boheme 



First Class Italian Restaurant 
1558 BUSH ST. 

Between Van Neu and Franklin 



SPECIALTY: Italian and Trench Cuisine 

FEUX P1ANTAN1DA. Man.ne, 



Formerly Proprietor of the ORIGINAL COPPA 



Colonial Tub and Shower Baths 

BatllS Ladies' Department, 6 to 12 a.m. week days 

REGULAR PRICES 
Now Open 1745 O'Farrell St.. near Fillmore 



-THE WASP 



21 




A Young Native Daughter 

Sorry He Spoke 

"Maria," remarked Growler, over his coffee and 
eggs, "this paper says that in New York and Wash- 
ington the ladies carry Roosevelt bears as a fad. 
Why don't you get a bear?" 

"Because," replied Mrs. Growler quietly, "I got a 
bear when I got you." 

And then Growler said he thought it was time to 
catch a train. 



Financial Failure 

First Stranger — "Do you consider marriage a 
failure ?" 

Second Stranger — "You bet I do." 

First Stranger — "By the way, how long have 
you been married?" 

Second Stranger — "Never married at all ; but I 
once proposed to an heiress and she gave me the 
frosty digit." 



He Believed Her 
She had just finished telling him that he was the 
first man she had ever kissed. 
"Well, well !" he exclaimed. 
"Do you presume to doubt me?'' she asked, in- 



dignantly. 

"Oh, no," he replied, "but I was just wondering 
how you managed to do it so well without practice." 

There to Stay 

"Well," said the tattoo artist, as he dropped his 
needle, "I have put an elephant on your arm and a 
ship on your chest and now I want my money." 

"I ain't going to pay you a cent, lad," chuckled 
the old salt, "and what is more, I have the advantage 
of you." 

"In what way?" 

"Why, you can't take it out of my hide." 

And above the deep baying of the hounds came 
a shrill voice from the gallery : 

"Aw, git a pair of ice skates!" 



By the Old Piano 

Jack — "You are not playing very loud this even- 
ing?" 

Eva — "No, I am afraid of disturbing the neigh- 
bors. There are some keys I only touch at night." 

Jack — "Ah, I see. They are night keys." 



Wedding Cakes and Fancy Ices 
and Tarts 

iECHTfIL 




LECHTEN BROS. £&%& Dev^ , ^,, 



Phone West 2526 



F. W. KRONE, Proprietor 



IThe Original San Francisco 

Popular Dining Room 



NOW OPEN 
91 1-913 O'Farrell St. 



Bet. Van Ness and Polk 



Largest and Handsomest Dining-Room in the City--An Ideal Kitchen. For 
Paeons Invited to Call and Inspect Our New Rooms and Equipment. 



BLAKE, MOFFITT & TOWNE 



PAPER 



1400-1450 FOURTH STREET 

TELEPHONE MARKET 3014 

Private Exchange Connecting all Departments 



= . . . 




A 


STRICTLY BUSINESS 


§ 




o 




^jpr 


Points of Interest on Trade and Finance 









Eastern Money in San Francisco 

It will certainly take Eastern money to help in 
the rebuilding of San Francisco. The Equitable, 
the New York Life and the New York Mutual are 
all mentioned as amongst the companies that may 
lend money here. The Prudential according to a 
leading bank president is in the field now. It will 
loan money on realty but then there is a string to 
it. If they let you have $100,000 as a loan on your 
property, they will give you $75,000 in cash and 
the balance in insurance on your life. 

A Big Week 

The savings banks are loaning out money quite 
liberally. During the past week the accomodations 
amounted to $1,300,000. The largest loan was 
$300,000. There was another of $250,000. 

The money market here has become tight while 
in New York money has been easier. These finan- 
cial fluctuations are like waves. We feel the effect 
of those that start in New York a month or so 
after the disturbance. Our local bankers have 
always been very conservative and whenever they 
think there is a financial gale brewing they take in 
sail promptly. The impression in Eastern circles 
is that there has been so much talk about hard 
times coming, that they won't come. They generally 
sneak in unannounced. Besides why should we 
have hard times with the country producing 
abundant crops and all labor well employed. 

What That Fifty Millions Did 

The United States Treasury has a surplus of 
$50,000,000 derived mainly from duties on imports. 
The leading financiers of New York were unceas- 
ing in their efforts to have the government deposit 
this amount in the National banks so as they could 
borrow it out again and stave off the impending 
crash in stocks. At last they succeeded, but not 
before they had received a big scare. Meanwhile 
arrangements were made by New York financiers 
to borrow in London and much gold was secured 
for shipment to New York. 

More or less of this English gold was sent to 
New York but when it became apparent that our 
government would help the perturbed New York 
speculators the flow of the yellow metal across the 
Atlantic was stopped. This occurred none too 
soon however, as the flurry on Wall Street had 
caused much financial disturbance in Europe. Dis- 
counts rose to seven per cent in Germany. The 

A Sovereign Remedy 

Dr. Parker's Cough Cure, one dose will stop a cough. It 
never fails. Try it. Sold by all Druggists. 



banking firm of Lazard Freres, who are well known 
in San Francisco, had several million dollars ready 
for shipment and made $10,000 by the difference in 
the price of exchange between the time they bought 
and sold. 

The financial situation on the whole has much 
improved within the year. The banks belonging 
to the New York Clearing House have $19,000,000 
of surplus over reserve, where as a year before they 
were a little over two million dolars short of having 
enough reserves. There is $50,000,000 more gold in 
the United States Treasury than there was a year 
before. The business of the country has grown 
largely in the year and it takes more monfiv to carv 
it on — that is all. And speaking of this reminds me 
that the amount of monev in circulation in the 
country, most of it gold, is largely in excess of what 
it ever was before, being somewhat above three 
billions of dollars or 443 per capita nearly. 

Prices are in general higher and it takes more 



MUTUAL SAVINGS BANK 



706 Market St. 



OF SAN FRANCISCO 



Opp. Third 



Guaranteed Capital, $1,000,000 

Interest Paid on all Deposits 



Paid op Capital and Surplus, $620,000 
Loans on Approved .Securities 



OFFICERS-- James D. Phelan, Pro,, John A. Hooper, V. Pres.. J. K. Moffatt, 2d 
V. Pres., George A. Story, Sec'y and Cashier, C. B. Hobson, Asst. Cashier, A. E. 
Curtis, 2d Asst. Cashier. 



TONOPAH, GOLDFIELD, BULLFROG 
MANHATTAN and COMSTOCKS A specialty 

ZADIG & CO. 

STOCK BROKERS 

Formerly 306 Montgomery Street, have resumed business in their 

Own Building, 324 BUSH STREET 

Directly Opposite New San Francisco Stock and Exchange Bldg. 



FRENCH SAVINGS BANK 



OF SAN FRANCISCO 

CAPITAL AND SURPLUS, 
PAID UP CAPITAL, 
DEPOSITS JANUARY 1. 1907 



108-110 Sutter Street 

$693,104.68 

$600,000.00 

$3,772,145.83 



Charles Carpy, Pres. Arthur Legallet, Vice-Pres. Leon Bocqueraz, Secretary 

John Ginty, Asst. Secretary P. A. Bergerot, Attorney 



THE WASP- 



23 



monej to do business. This results Erom the great 
addition of gold to the circulation in all civilized 
o'untries bv reason of the large yield of the mines. 



On Change 

There was a little, very little more activity in 
the Bond and Stock Exchange during the past 
week than in the previous one. As usual bonds 
formed the staple of business. Spring Valley 4- 
sold at $89.25, rather low. The Stock sold in the 
Board at $21.62j/2. A good many shares of 
Associated Oil sold at $43.25 during the week. 
United Railroads sold at $75.75. Sugar stocks held 
their own, Hawaiian Commercial being quoted at 
$83. Paauhau sold at $14.50. Onomea at $36.25 and 
Hutchinson at $15.50. 

California Safe Deposit sold at $128.50, while 
for Bank of California. $361 was bid. Alaska 
Packers sold at $41.50. For California Fruit Can- 
ner's $103.50 was bid and for California Wine 
§84.50. Gas and Electric sold at $82.50. 



The Mines 
The market for mining stocks differed in no 
important particular from that of other weeks. 
There was enough margin of gains and losses on 
different days just to make a market while a large 
number of shares of stock changed hands. But 
there was no essential change in the market or 
important developments in the mines. 



Sugar Up 

The Sugar Market has been advancing steadily 
abroad and this week the Crockett Refinery put up 
the price 20 points and was promptly followed next 
morning by the Western. Sugar Stocks should 
advance. 



The French American Bank 
The French American Bank in its new home is 
quite a contrast to its surroundings. It continues 
to increase its resources — deposits being in excess 
of withdrawals. It is doing its share in rebuilding 
the city. Its assets January 1st were $2,641,549. 
93. The president is Chas. Carpy. The vice-presi- 
dents, Arthur Legallet and Leon Bocqueraz, the 
cashier, John Ginty, the assistant cashier, M. Girard. 



The French Savings Bank 
The assets of this bank were $4,483,345.11 on Jan- 
uary 1st. Its deposits were $3,772,145.11. The 
president is Charles Carpy, the vice-president, Ar- 
thur Legallet. The secretary, Leon Bocqueraz. Its 
last dividend was at the rate of 3J4 per cent. Its 
next is expected to be at the rate of 3^4 per cent. 

INVESTOR 



Mr. and Mrs. Fred Sharon, who arrived in New 
York last week and stopped at the St. Regis, will 
sTail this week for Europe, and spend the Summer 
in France, returning here, in the Autumn, when 
their new home in San Mateo will be completed. 

The day after, you need Abbott's Bitters. Braces the nerves; sustains you throughout 
day and makes you feel bright and cheerful. At druggists. 



SAFE DEPOSIT BOXES 



Absolute safety for your important papers or valuable 
personal property is afforded by the Safe Deposit 
Boxes and Vaults of the 

CALIFORNIA SAFE DEPOSIT 
AND TRUST COMPANY 

They are convenient of access and there are private 
rooms for examination of papers, etc. Rates are very 
reasonable. 



HOME OFFICE 



CALIFORNIA and MONTGOMERY STS. 

West End Branch, 1531 Devisadero 

Mission Branch, 2572 Mission, near 22d 
Up-Town Branch, 1740 Fillmore nr. Sutter 



VALUABLES op all kinds 

May be safely stored at 

SAFE DEPOSIT VAULTS 

of the 

FIRST NATIONAL BANK 

Cor. Bush and Sansome Sts. 



Safes to rent from $5 a year upwards 
Careful service to customers 



Trunks $1 a month 
Office Hours: 8 a. m. to 6 p. m. 



The German Savings and Loan Society 

526 CALIFORNIA ST., San Francisco 



Guaranteed Capita] and Surplus 
Capital actually paid up in cash 
Deposits, December 31, 1906 



$2,578,695,41 

1,000,000.00 

38,531,917.28 



OFFICERS - President, F. Tillmann, Jr.: Finn Vice-President, Daniel Meyer 
Second Viee-President, Emil Rohte: Cashier, A. H. R. Schmidt; Assistant Cashier, 
William Herrmann; Secretary, George Toumy; Assistant Secretary, A. H. Muller. 
Goodfellow & Eells, General Attorneys. 

BOARD OF DIRECTORS -F. Tillmann. Jr., Daniel Meyer, Emil Rohte, Inn. 
Steinhart. 1. N. Waller. N. Ohlandt. J. W. Van Bersen. E. T. Kruse and W. S. 
Goodfellow. 



MEMBER STOCK AND BOND EXCHANGE 
MEMBER SAN FRANCISCO MINING EXCHANGE 

J. C. WILSON 

BROKER 

STOCKS AND BONDS Kohl Bldg., 488 California St. 

INVESTMENT SECURITIES San Francisco 

Telephone Temporary 815 



24 



-THE WASP- 



The Torrens System 

HIGHLY UNSATISFACTORY EVERYWHERE 
IT HAS BEEN TRIED. 



i The real estate market has been dull for months 
and there seems to be an idea that the application of 
the Torrens System would act as a strong stimulant. 
The theory of the Torrens system is beautiful, but 
unfortunately all beautiful theories do not work 
equally well in practice. The truth about the Tor- 
rens system is that it has not worked well anywhere 
in the United States, and it is rather Utopian to ex- 
pect that San Francisco, with its miserable govern- 
ment, will prove an exception. 

The theory of the Torrens system is that it will 
expedite, cheapen and simplify the sale of real 
estate so that a person can turn a house and lot into 
cash or borrow money on it about as easily as one 
can on gilt edge bonds. The County Recorder is to 
be the magician to do the trick. His certificate will 
be all that is necessary to prove ownership. 

To start with, you must get a valid title. This 
can be done under the McEnerney Act, by which 
the Superior Court can give you valid title. Having 
this valid title no more abstracts and searches and 
legal opinions will be needed. You take your court 
judgment of valid title to the County Recorder and 
he issues you his certificate. When you sell the 
property the buyer gets his certificate and when he 
sells it the next fellow gets a new certificate. All 
through the Recorder's office. 

Could anything be more beautiful. A says to B at 
lunch, "I'll buy that lot of yours on Market Street 
for $5000 a front foot." 

"It's yours," says B, and forthwith they pay their 
bill, tip the waiter, and if no blockade occur on the 
United Railroads, they hie them to the Recorder's 
office, get the sale registered. A walks off with his 
brand new certificate and B with a fat check in his 
pocket and all is lovely . 

If A should wish to raise money on his new pur- 
chase he takes his Recorder's certificate down to 
some hard-fisted banker and that personage, after 
glueing his eye on the document to see that it is 
O. K., orders the cashier to hand out the Mazuma. 

If County Recorders and their offices were all that 
the community could wish, tilings might work as 
beautifully as described. But, unfortunately, while 
grafters are thick as flies in every municipal govern- 
ment from Alameda to Hoboken, and carelessness 
and stupidity are more notable than care and intelli- 
gence in municipal departments, no prudent man 
will pin his faith on a County Recorder's certificate 
for a land purchase. 

The Torrens system has been tried in Illinois, 
Oregon, Minnesota and the Canadian Province of 
Ottawa and nowhere has it commended itself. 

In Chicago the Torrens law went into operation 
in 1899. In eight years 2000 pieces of property have 
been registered, representing a total valuation of 
$10,000,000. It takes from thirty to thirty-five days 
to get a title through, provided the applicant 
promptly and cheerfully renders his assistance in 



curing any defects that may be discovered. 

The system was used so little in Chicago that 
finally a law was passed requiring estates to register 
their real estate. This has been opposed as inviting 
attacks on titles when they pass to widows and 
orphans and cannot be defended. The system has 
received little if any indorsement, and buyers gener- 
ally have refused to accept Torrens titles. Those 
who register their properties are obliged to go to the 
additonal expense of guaranteeing their titles with 
title insurance companies. 

In 1903 the number of deeds recorded under the 
old method was 147,998. Under the Torrens system 
only 410 were filed. Last year 972 were filed under 
the Torrens law and the value of the property thus 
recorded was onlv one million seven hundred thous- 
and. That doesn't look like a boom for the Torrens 
system in Chicago. 

In Minneapolis the Torrens system has been in 
operation since 1901. During the first four years 
only 349 original certificates of registration were 
filed and 252 reissues made. March, 1906, the 
number of examiners was cut down from three to 
one. On December 30, 1905, the County Commis- 
sioner commented on the bill of the County Exam- 
iner of Titles Westfall as follows : 

"If there ever was a rank farce perpetrated, this 
Torrens law is it. Here is Ramsey County paying 
to this examiner official fees averaging $200 and 
over monthly and a salary of $50 per month — for 
what? In order that private individuals, owners of 
property may have their titles examined free of 
charge. On what score has any person the right to 
have the county pay out its money for attending to 



PHIL S. MONTAGUE, Stock Broker 

Member of S. F. Slock Exchange 

Goidfield, Tonopah, Manhattan and Bullfrog Stocks Bought and Sold. 
Write for Market Letter. 

339 BUSH STREET, STOCK EXCHANGE BUILDING 



BURNED HOMES MUST BE REBUILT 

The Continental Building and Loan Association 

Having sustained practically no loss in the recent calamity, is in a 
position to loan money to people who wish to rebuild. San Francisco 
must restore her homes as well as her business blocks. 

DR. WASHINGTON DODCE. Pres. 

GAVIN McNAB. Any. 

WM. CORB1N, Sec. and Cen. M»r. 

OFFICES -COR. CHURCH AND MARKET STREETS 

OPEN AND DOING BUSINESS 



Rooms 7 to 11 



Telephone Tmpy. 1415 



W. C. RALSTON 

Stock and Bond Broker 

Member San Francisco Stock and Bond Exchange 
Mining: Stocks a Specialty 



Bedford McNeill 
Western Union 
Leibers 



368 BUSH STREET 

San Francisco 



■THE WASP 



25 



his private business? I believe this is money thrown 
ftway. 

"It has cost the county something like $3500 this 
year to pay this official his fees and salary, and the 
county, I understand, has derived out of the propo- 
sition the magnificent sum of $189.81." 

Ohio passed its law in 1896. It was declared un- 
constitutional by the Supreme Court in 1897, and 
the law was repealed in 1898, since when no effort 
has been made to pass a constitutional law. 

In Oregon the law has been in operation since 
1901, but is used so little that advocates are trying 
to get it made compulsory so as to force its general 
adoption. 



Hatton the Sphinx 

Probably the Grand Jury never had a more sphinx- 
like witness to deal with than George F. Hatton. 
One of Hatton's closest friends once said to me that 
he did not believe that he really knew George, that 
though they had been chums for years, and had 
worked side by side, he never felt that he knew Hatton 
so well as Hatton knew him. He has a personal 
magnetism that draws friends to him without effort. 
His old offices in the Crocker building used on some 
afternoons to be filled with men who dropped in 
merely to pass the time of day, and particularly did 
newspaper men enjoy such calls. For Hatton always 
has "good stuff" to tell the boys, stuff that makes 
good copy for the paragraphers and news purveyors. 
He used to write a letter himself, in the Oakland 
Tribune, on political subjects, before he became so 
close to the political powers that be. 

Mr. Hatton is not an American, though he has be- 
come so prominent in California politics. He is 
English, or rather, Irish, though his family is best 
known in London. If he liked, he could sport a crest 
on his stationery, and the F in his name really stands 
for the hyphenized Finch-Hatton which is his family 
name. But the man who managed Senator Perkins' 
campaigns disdains hyphens and he is more republi- 
can in his ideas than are some of his associates who 
were born on this side of the Atlantic. One of the 
standing jokes with Hatton's "Cabinet" camarades is 
his penchant for jewelry. No other man outside of 
the red-light district habitues would dare to sport rings 
and scarfpins and such gew-gaws, but George F. Hat- 
ton would not be himself without his ornaments. When 
the cartoonists scratch off caricatures of Hatton they 
magnify his jewel-habit. Before the disaster he used 
to put all his spare cash into the purchase of diamonds 
and he had a tin box devoted to them that he kept in 
his office. There must have been over ten thousand 
dollar's worth, all shapes and sizes. Their owner's 
heart was well-nigh broken because the diamonds 
were lost ; it was impossible to climb to the eighth 
floor of the building and attempt a rescue. Even 
Raffles would have balked at such an ascent. 

"Hatton's luck" is a proverb with sportsmen over 
Emeryville way. He has a "system," it is understood, 
that knocks all others to smithereens. When he at- 
tends a race meeting it is fun to watch the men who 
hover a few feet back of him, eyes and ears alert to 



catch hints from his play. To be sure he doesn't al- 
ways win, but he gets his share. 

Hartley Peart, his friend, colleague and secretary, 
appears more English than his chief, but I believe he 
is a native of New England. He is seldom seen 
without his pipe, for he shares the affection of Barrie 
and Jerome K. Jerome for that form of smoking the 
fragrant weed. 



Miss Ethel G. Rockefeller, daughter of Mr. and 
Mrs. William Rockefeller, one of the greatest heir- 
esses in America, is engaged to be married to 
Marcellus Hartley Dodge. Miss Rockefeller, who 
made her debut a couple of Winters ago, is a niece 
of John D. Rockefeller. She has two brothers, 
William G. Rockefeller and Percv A. Rockefeller, 
each of whom married one of the Stillman girlsi 
She goes about a good deal in Society, but, like 
all her family, is domestically inclined. A clever 
horsewoman, she has exhibited at some of the 
country horse shows, and she is fond of outdoor 
sports. She spends much of her time at the Rocke- 
feller country home. The family's town residence 
is at 689 Fifth Avenue, New York. Mr. Dodge, 
who lives with his grandmother, Mrs. Hartley, at 
232 Madison Avenue, is popular in Society. He in- 
herited great wealth while still at college from his 
grandfather, the late Marcellus Hartley, whose for- 
tune was estimated at $60,000,000. The bulk of 
this fell to young Dodge, who found himself while 
an undergraduate elected to the directorate of the 
International Banking Company and a trustee of 
the Equitable Life Assurance Company. He was 
president of his class, manager of the track team 
of the Y. M. C. A., and coxswain of his class crew. 
On his graduation in 1903 he, with his aunt, Mrs. 
Helen Hartley, Jenkins, gave a $300,000 dormitory 
to Columbia University as a memorial to his 
grandfather. 

A year ago young Dodge took a party of friends, 
including several college professors, on a trip up 
the Amazon on his yacht Wakiva, stopping on the 
way at Cuba and Porto Rico. No date has been 
mentioned for the wedding, but this will probably 
not be long delayed after the formal announcement 
of the engagement. 



Popular French Restaurant 


Regular Dinner 75c 

Meals a la carte at any hour 


Private Dining Rooms 

for Banquets, etc. 


?S^ <^-w 






497 Golden Gate 

Comer Polk Street 


Phone Markel 2315 



26 -THE WASP 



The Viavi System of Treatment 

ITS BASIC PRINCIPLES 

VIAVI STANDS FOR— 

<|An intelligent, recognition of the fundamental laws of physical well- 
being. Observance of these laws means health. The penalty of their violation 
is ill health. An immense amount of needless suffering is the result of igno- 
rance. Most of it could be avoided by a knowledge of the facts as they are. 
VIAVI STANDS FOR— 

<JA dissemination of these facts. 

t§ For health and happiness in the family and the home. 

<JFor healthy fatherhood, motherhood and sturdy babyhood. Viavi be- 
lieves that motherhood is the highest honor to which a woman can attain. 

<| For Nature as the sole curative power. No man or medicine can cure. 
The best that one can do is either to get out of Nature's way or to furnish her 
such assistance as she may need. 

C|In the "Boston Medical and Surgical Journal," under date of Novem- 
ber 29, 1906, a prominent Massachusetts physician says this : ' ' Nature is the 
real curative agent. ' Nature alone can heal. This is the highest law of practi- 
cal medicine and the one to which we must adhere. Nature creates and main- 
tains. She must, therefore, be able to cure.' The physician then really can do 
little more than to supply for his patient the most favorable conditions and 
materials with which Nature is to work. ' ' 

<| ' ' First, perhaps, we should name the blood as the agent which supplies 
all the material from which tissues are built and from which the glands of the 
body elaborate their secretions. The same blood stream is the principal agent 
for tearing down and removing the old and obstructing material. An emi- 
nent clinician has well remarked, 'it is the blood that heals.' " 

<| ' ' Second in importance in the work of reconstruction of the body is the 
part played by the nerves, as the nervous system dominates all the phenomena 
of organic life. It is well said, 'The cells are the artisans in the organs' work- 
shop, but the nerves are the overseers.' Hence it is often necessary in the 
work of therapeutics to rouse the nervous system to more vigorous work." 

•J In the "New York Medical Journal," December 16, 1906, a Philadelphia 
physician has this to say : "No cell can be sick or diseased, except as a result 
of a direct injury, if it be supplied with the proper quality and quantity of 
blood and have its waste products properly removed." 

"All curative measures must be directed to the restoration of the normal 
quality, and quantity of blood to the part or parts effected." 

THIS HAS BEEN VIAVI DOCTRINE FOR TWENTY YEARS 

<J Viavi is not a cure-all. Within the range which it covers, however, it is 
an effective aid to Nature in removing the cause of suffering. 

<| Vis.vi stands for natural as opposed to operative measures. It does not 
claim that an operation never is necessary. At its best, however, it is a bad 
last resort, and an unnecessary or reckless operation is as criminal as homi- 
cide. 

CJ Viavi condemns the reckless surgical tendency. to unsex womanhood. 
VIAVI STANDS FOR— 

<fl The education of young manhood and womanhood in matters vital to 
their physical well-being. 

The uprooting of the tradition which makes health vulgar and intelli- 
gence vicious. 

THE ANNIVERSARY OF THE CATASTROPHE OF APRIL I8TH FINDS VIAVI 
IN ITS NEW HOME ON PINE STREET, EAST OF STOCKTON, TO VISIT 
WHICH IT CORDIALLY INVITES ITS FRIENDS, OR THOSE WHO MAY BE 
INTERESTED IN THIS NATURAL SYSTEM OF TREATMENT. 



-THE WASP- 



27 



Automobile News 



The new Model "G" White steamer is a larger, 
roomier ami much more powerful car than any 
previously manufactured. It is conservatively 
rated at 30 steam horsepower. Purchasers may 
choose between a Pullman body, seating seven, and 
a touring body, seating five, and having ample 
provision for carrying baggage. 

The Model "II." White is a .car that follows elos- 
ly the lines of the highly popular and successful! 
Model "1'"". but with shorter wheel-base and certain 
other changes and improvements. The White peo- 
ple maintain that their car is the simplest one on the 
market in operation, in number of parts and ever) 
particular where simplicity is a criterion. 

.Mr. S. ( ). Johnson, of the McCloud River Lumber 
Company, McCloud, Cal., and owner of two Thomas 
"Flyers," recently returned from Honolulu, where he 
had one of his "Flyers" with him and toured between 
two and three thousand miles on the Islands. He 
states the roads there are ideal, being made of coral 
and shells, and that he had a most delightful trip. 

Mr. and Mrs. W. C. Ish, of Goldfield, are visiting 
in this City for a few days and on Sunday last 
made a trip around the bav in their Model ' 
Olds. 

The .Model "M" Winton, ordered by Mr. W 
Tubbs. arrived from the factory and will be 
livered to Mr. Tubbs this week. 

Messrs. Louis Metzeger, W. F. Fries and Roy 
Francis of San Francisco, and United States Sen- 
ator George D. Nixori and Mr. W. J. Stoneham of 
Tonopah, Nevada, last week purchased Thomas 
"Flyers" from the Pioneer Automobile Company. 

Mr. R. M. Tobin's Thomas Limousine arrived 
from the factory and was delivered to him on 
Tuesday of this week. This car is one of the most 
exquisite machines ever shipped to this Coast. 



'A" 

B. 

de- 



New Branch Just Opened 
For the convenience of the public the San Fran- 
cisco Gas and Electric Company has opened elegant 
new offices and show rooms at Polk and Sutter 
streets, where will be be displayed gas and electric 
appliances. Amongst other innovations there will 
be installed original lines of electric lighting and 
instantaneous hot water heaters. Mr. S. P. Hamil- 
ton, the superintendent of the Gas Contract De- 
partment, will be in charge and will have his head- 
quarters there. 



Art in Wall Paper 
The demand for wall paper in all its varieties 
has grown with great rapidity in San Francisco, 
and here as elsewhere, art and fashion assert their 
sway, and the patterns, in variety of design and 
richness, may be called veritable works of art. The 
most expensive descriptions turned out by the man- 
ufacturers of the East find a ready market here. To 
know of the wonderful beauty of some of the wall 
papers now in use one must visit the emporium of 



L. Tozer & Son. of 1527 Pine street near Van W-ss. 
or at 2511 Washington Street, near Fillmore, where 
every attention is paid by those in charge to the 



The opening of the Fairmont Motel was the first 
event since the great fire to give San Francisco 

some of its old time gaiety, This was apparent 
in the leading uptown places and most noticeably 
in the temporary Palace Hotel, corner Post and 
Leavenworth Streets. This popular place took 
on the semblance of the old Palace on gala nights 
before the fire. The Palace has a strong hold on 
the affections of the best class of people in San 
Francisco. 



Soda Bay Springs 

Lake Co., Cal. 

Situated on the picturesque shore of charming Clear Lake, season 
opens May 1st, finest of Boating, Bathing and Hunting. Unsur- 
passed acommodations. Terms $2.00 per day, $12.00 per week, 
special rates to families. Route, take Tiburon Ferry 7:40 a. m. 
thence by Automobile, further information address managers 

GEO. ROBINSON and AGNES BELL RHOODES 

Via Kelseyville P. O. Soda Springs, Lake Co., Cal. 



H. C. RAAP, Manager 



Telephone Franklin 588 



National Cafe and Grill 

918-920 O'FARRELL ST., San FrancUco 

SPECIAL MERCHANTS HOT LUNCH 25c 

Including Tea. Coffee. Wine or Beer. II a. m. to 2 p. m. 
A LA CARTE at all hours. 



Regular Dinner 50c 



Special Sunday Dinner 75c 



AL. CONEY 



J. HUFF 



Kadee Hammam Baths 

TURKISH AND HAMMAM BATHS 

PRIVATE ROOM AND BATH $1.00 

Open Day and Night 

GEARY AND GOUGH STREETS 

Strictly First Class Phone West 3725 



/ 



Established 1890 

J. F. ROSSI 

D°„m«Xic nd Wines, Liquors and Cigars 

Depot of Italian-Swiss Colony Wines 

Specialties: Belmont, Jesse Moore, A. P. Hotaling's O. P. S., Loveland Rye, 
King Wm. Fourth Scotch, Glenrosa Scotch, Dew of the Grampians, A. V. H. 
Gin, Buchu Gin, Cognac Brandy, Bisquit Dubouche Cognac, Fernet Branca 
Italian Vermuth, French Vermuth. 

217-219 Washington St., Bet. Front and Davis 




DIRECTORY 



OF LEADING BUSINESS HOUSES AND PROFESSIONAL PEOPLE 




ADVERTISING AGENCIES. 

COOPER ADV. AGENCY, F. J., West Mis- 
sion and Brady Sts. 

DAKE ADV. AGENCY, Midway Bldg., 779 
Market St. Phone Temp'y 1440. 

FISHER, L. P. ADV. AGENCY, 836 North 
Point St., S. F. ; Phone Emergency 584. 

JOHNSTON-DIENSTAG CO., 2170 Post St., 
S. F. 

ARCHITECTS. 

REID BROS, Temporary Offices, 2325 
Gough St., S. F. 

THOS. J. WELSH, JOHN W. CAREY, asso- 
ciate architects, 40 Haight St., S. F. 

ART DEALERS. 

GUMP, S. & G„ 1645 California St., S. F. 
SCHUSSLER BROS., 1218 Sutter St. 

ATTORN EVS. 
DORN, DORN & SAVAGE, 717 Van Ness 

Ave. 
DINKELSPIEL, HENRY G. W., 126-5 Ellis 

St., S. F. Phone West 2355. 
HEWLETT, BANCROFT AND BALLAN- 

TINE, Monadnock Bldg. ; Phone Temp'y 

972. 
EDWARD B. YOUNG, 4th Floor, Union 

Trust Bldg., S. F. Telephone, Temp'y 833. 

AUTOMOBILES AND SUPPLIES. 

PIONEER AUTOMOBILE CO., 901 Golden 
Gate Ave., S. F. ; and 12th and Oak Sts., 
Oakland. 

WHITE SEWING MACHINE CO., Market 
and Van Ness Ave., S. F. 

AUTO LIVERY CO., Golden Gate and Van 
Ness Ave., S. F. 

BOYER MOTOR CAR CO., 408 Golden Gate 

' Ave. Phone, Emergency 655. 

LEE CUYLER, 359 Golden Gate Ave., S. F. 

MIDDLETON MOTOR CAR CO., 550 Gol- 
den Gate Ave., S. F. 

MOBILE CARRIAGE CO., Golden Gate 
Ave. and Gough Sts., S. F. 

PACIFIC MOTOR CAR CO., 376 Golden 

Gate Ave. • 

BANKS. 

ANGLO-CALIFORNIA BANK, Ltd., cor. 
Pine and Sansome Sts., S. F. 

CALIFORNIA SAFE DEPOSIT AND 
TRUST CO., cor. California and Montgom- 
ery Sts., S. F. 

CENTRAL TRUST CO., 42 Montgomery St., 
S. F. 

FIRST NATIONAL BANK, Bush and San- 
some Sts., S. F. 

FRENCH SAVINGS BANK, 108 Sutter St., 
and Van Ness and Eddy. 

GERMAN SAVINGS AND LOAN SO- 
CIETY, 526 California St., S. F. 

HALSEY, N. W. & CO., 413 Montgomery 
St., S. F. 

HIBERNIA SAVINGS AND LOAN SO- 
CIETY, Jones and McAllister Sts., S. F. 

MUTUAL SAVINGS BANK OF SAN 
FRANCISCO, 710 Market St., opp. 3d St., 
S. F. 

SAN FRANCISCO SAVINGS UNION, N.W. 
cor. California and Montgomery Sts., S. F. 

SECURITY SAVINGS BANK, 316 Mont- 
gomery St., S. F. 

THE MARKET STREET BANK AND 
SAFE DEPOSIT VAULT, Market and 7th 
Sts., S. F. 

UNION TRUST CO., 4 Montgomery St., S. F. 

WELLS FARGO-NEVADA NATIONAL 
BANK, Union Trust Bldg., S. F. 



BREWERIES. 

ALBION ALE AND PORTER BREWERY, 

1007-9 Golden Gate Ave., S. F. 
S. F. BREWERIES, LTD., 240 2d St., S. F. 

BRIDGE BUILDERS. 
ROLLINS, E. H. & SONS, 804 Kohl Bldg. ; 

Telephone Temp'y 163; S. F. 

BROKERS— STOCKS AND BONDS. 

MONTAGUE, PHIL S., 339 Bush St., Stock 

Exchange Bldg. 
ZADIG & CO., 324 Bush St., S. F. 
WILSON, J. C, 488 California St., S. F. 

BUILDING AND LOAN ASSOCIA- 
TIONS. 

CONTINENTAL BUILDING AND LOAN 

ASSOCIATION, Church and Market Sts., 

S. F. 
BUILDERS' EXCHANGE, 226 Oak St., 

S. F. 
BOLTE & BRADEN, 105-107 Oak St., S. F. ; 

Phone Market 2S37. 

CARPET CLEANING 

SPAULDING, J. & CO., 911-21 Golden Gate 
Ave. ; Phone Park 591. 

CLOTHIERS— RETAIL. 

HUB, THE, Chas. Keilus & Co., King Solo- 
mon Bldg., Sutter and Fillmore Sts., S. F. 

COMMISSION AND SHIPPING MER- 
CHANTS. 

JOHNSON LOCKE MERCANTILE CO., 

213 Sansome St., S. F. 
MALDONADO & CO., INC., 2020 Buchanan 

St., S. F. ; Phone West 2800. 

CONTRACTORC AND BUILDERS. 

FISHER CONSTRUCTION CO., 1414 Post 

St., S. F. 
TROUNSON, T., 1751 Lyon St.; also 176 

Ash Ave., S. "F. 

CROCKERY AND GLASSWARE. 

NATHAN DOHRMAN CO., 1520-1550 Van 
Ness Ave. 

DENTISTS. 

KNOX, DR. A. T., 1615 Fillmore St., formerly 
of Grant Bldg. 

DRY GOODS— RETAIL. 

CITY OF PARIS, Van Ness Ave. and Wash- 
ington St., S. F. 

WHITE HOUSE, Van Ness Ave. and Pine 
St., S. F. 

EXPRESS. 

WELLS, FARGO & CO. EXPRESS, Golden 
Gate Ave. and Franklin St., Ferry Bldg., 
and 3d St. Depot, 'S. F. 

FEATHERS— UPHOLSTERY. 

CRESCENT FEATHER CO., 19th and Harri- 
son Sts., S. F. 

FUNERAL DIRECTORS. 

OMEY & GOETTING, Geary and Polk Sts., 

S. F. 
CAREW & ENGLISH, 1618 Geary St., bet. 

Buchanan and Webster Sts., S. F. ; Phone 

West 2604. 
PORTER & WHITE, 1531 Golden Gate Ave., 

S. F. ; Phone West 770. 

GAS STOVES. 

S. F. GAS & ELECTRIC CO., Franklin and 

Ellis Sts. 

GENT'S FURNISHERS. 
BULLOCK & JONES COMPANY, 801 Van 

Ness Ave., cor. Eddy St., S. F. 



HANSEN & ELRICK, 1105-7 Fillmore St., 
nr. Golden Gate Ave. ; Phone West 5678. 

HARDWARE AND RANGES. 

ILS, JOHN G. & CO., 827 Mission St., S. F. 
MONTAGUE, W. W. & CO., Turk and Polk 
Sts., S. F. 

HARNESS AND SADDLERY. 

DAVIS, W. & SON, 2020 Howard St., bet. 

16th and 17th, S. F. 
LEIBOLD HARNESS AND CARRIAGE 

CO., 1214 Golden Gate Ave., S. F. 

HATTERS. 

DILLON, TOM, Van Ness Ave. and McAllis- 
ter St. 

HOSPITALS AND SANITARIUMS. 

KEELEY INSTITUTE, H. L. Batchelder, 
Mgr. ; 262 Devisadero St., S. F. 

JEWELERS. 

BALDWIN JEWELRY CO., 1521 Sutter St., 

and 1261 Van Ness Ave., S. F. 
SHREVE & CO., cor. Post and Grant Ave., 

and Van Ness and Sacramento St., S. F. 

".AUNDRIES. 

LA GRANDE LAUNDRY, 234 12th St., S. F. 

PALACE HOTEL LAUNDRY and KELLY 
LAUNDRY CO., INC., 2343 Post St. 
Phone West 5854. 

UNION LUMBER CO., office 909 Monad- 
nock Bldg. 

MOVING AND STORAGE COMPANIES. 

BEKINS' VAN AND STORAGE CO., 13th 

and Mission Sts.. S. F. ; Phone Market 13 

and 1016 Broadway, Oakland. 
ST. FRA..CIS TRANSFER AND STORAGE 

COMPANY, Office 1402 Eddy St.; Tel. 

West 2680. 

Notaries Public. 

DEANE, JNO. J., N. W. cor. Sutter and 

Steiner Sts.; Phone West 7261. 
WARE, JOHN H„ 307 Monadnock Bldg., 

Depositions carefully attended to. Phone 

Temp'y 972. 

OPTICIANS. 

MAYERLE, GEORGE, German expert, 1115 

Golden Gate Ave., S. F. ; Phone West 3766. 
SAN FRANCISCO OPTICAL COMPANY, 

"Spences," 627 Van Ness Ave. ; "Branch," 

1613 Fillmore. 
STANDARD OPTICAL CO., 808 Van Ness 

Ave., near Eddy St. 

PACKERS. 

KEEFE, J. H., 820-822 O'Farrell St., S. F.; 

Tel. Franklin 2055. 
TOZIER, L. & SON CO., INC., 1527 Pine 

and 2511 Washington St., near Fillmore, 

S. F. 

PAINTS AND OILS. 

BASS-HUETER PAINT CO., 1532 Market 
St. 

PHOTO ENGRAVERS. 

CAL. PHOTO ENG. CO., 141-143 Valencia 
St. 

PHYSICIANS. 

BOWIE, DR. HAMILTON C, formerly 293 

Geary St., Paul Bldg., now 14th and Church 

Sts. 
BRYANT, DR. EDGAR R., 1944 Fillmore 

St., cor. Pine; Tel. West 5657. 
D'EVELYN, DR. FREDERICK W., 2115 

California St., S. F. 



-THE WASP- 



29 




MRS. O. H. BURBRIDGE 

Indian Complications 
Refusing to occupy a coffin which 
her husband had purchased for her 
at a bargain when she was ill, Jos- 
ephine Dog Soldier swears in her 
divorce petition that Dog Soldier, a 
Rosebud Indian, threatened to shoot 
her to permit funeral arrangements 
to proceed as planned. He finally 
drove her from home. 



This is but one of twenty divorce 
suits started by Rosebud Indians for 
trial at the forthcoming term of State 
Court. It is the tirst session since 
the abolition of the Indian Court, and 
the order f<<r all Indian cases to be 
tried by whites. 

James Ghost Hawk asks a divorce 
from Bessie, and the custody of their 
only child, Mollie Three-Thighs- 
Ghost-Hawk. The accusation is that 
the wife eloped with Walking Soldier. 
Another elopement figures in the case 
of Alice Good-Muskrat against 
Henry, who is charged with running 
away with Alora Walks-as-She- 
Jumps. Plaintiff wants her maiden 
name of Alice High-Kicker restored. 



yourself almost as ridiculous as if you 
were to spell tho with a ugh." 



But One Deduction 
The Clergyman — You should seek 
work, my friend. You know Satan 
finds employment for idle hands. 

The Hobo — T'anks, kind sir. Many 
times before I've been told to go ter 
de devil, but never in such dipply- 
matic langwidge. 



In Brooklyn 

Park Slopely— What! A death in 
the Remsen family! This is terribly 
sudden! Who is it? 

Livingston Adams — Mrs. Remsen's 
eldest rubber plant died early this 
morning, before they could get a 
florist. 

Simplicity, Ad Infinitum 

"Divorce?" repeated the man of the 
future, with a laugh. "Oh, bless me, 
no. There are no divorces any more. 
Everybody goes in for the simplified 
morals, now. Why, if you were to 
try to get a divorce, you would make 



Excused 

Foreman Waterville Hose Com- 
pany No. 1 — Hurry up an' come on, 
Si! Woolsey's barn's hurnin'. 

The Newest Volunteer — Sorry, 
Heck, luii I can't. Both m'red shirts 
are in the wash. 



At the Butcher's 
"Some venison today, ma'am?" 
"No, I don't care for it." 
"But it's very cheap, ma'am." 
"It may be cheap, but venison is 
deer at any price." 




JUDGE SLOSS 



THORNE, DR. W. S., 1434 Post St., S. F. 
BALDWIN, D. H. & CO., 2512 Sacramento 
St., and Van Ness at California. 

RESTAURANTS. 

MORAGHAN, M. B., OYSTER CO., 1212 

Golden Gate Ave., S. F. 
OLD POODLE DOG, 824 Eddy St., near 

Van Ness Ave. 
ST. GERMAIN RESTAURANT, 497 Golden 

Gate Ave.; Phone Market 2315. 
SWAIN'S RESTAURANT, 1111 Post St., 

S. F. 
THOMPSON'S, formerly Oyster Loaf, 1727 

O'Farrell St. 

SAFES AND SCALES. 

HERRING-HALL MARVIN SAFE CO., 
office and salesrooms, Mission St., bet. 
Seventh and Eighth Sts. ; Phone Market 
1037. 

SEWING MACHINES. 

WHEELER & WILSON and SINGER SEW- 
ING MACHINES, 1431 Bush St., cor. 
Van Ness Ave., S. F. ; Phone Emergency 
301 ; formerly 231 Sutter St. 

STORAGE. 

BEKINS VAN & STORAGE CO., 13th and 
Mission Sts., S. F. ; Phone Market 2558. 



PIERCE RUDOLPH STORAGE CO., Eddy 

and Fillmore Sts.; Tel. West 828. 
SURGICAL INSTRUMENTS AND HOS- 
PITAL SUPPLIES. 

WALTERS & CO., formerly Shutts, Walters 
& Co., 1608 Steiner St., S. F. 

TALKING MACHINES. 

BACIGALUPI, PETER, 1113-1115 Fillmore 
St., S. F. 

TAILORS. 

LYONS, CHARLES, London Tailor, 1432 
Fillmore St., 731 Van Ness Ave., S. F. ; 958 
Broadway, Oakland. 

McMAHON, KEYER AND STIEGELER 
BROS., Van Ness Ave. and Ellis, O'Farrell 
and Fillmore. 

REHNSTROM, C. H., 2415 Fillmore St., for- 
merly Mutual Savings Bank Bldg., S. F. 

TENTS AND AWNINGS. 

THOMS, F„ 1209 Mission St., corner of 
Eighth, S. F. 

TRICYCLES. 

EAMES TRICYCLE CO., Invalid Chairs, 
1808 Market St., S. F. 

WINES & LIQUORS — WHOLESALE 

,BALKE, ED. W., 1498 Eddy St., cor. Fill- 
more. 



BUTLER, JOHN & SON, 2209 Steiner St., 

S. F. 
REYNOLDS, CHAS. M. CO., 912 Folsom 

St., S. F. 

RUSCONI, FISHER & CO.. 649 Turk St., 
S. F. 

SIEBE BROS. & PLAGEMAN. 419.425 
Larkin St. ; Phone Emergency 349. 

WENIGER, P. J. & CO., N. E. cor. Van 
Ness Ave. and Ellis St. ; Tel. Emergency 
309. 

WICHMAN, LUTGEN & CO., Harrison and 
Everett Sts., Alameda, Cal. ; Phone Ala- 
meda 1179. 

FERGUSON. T. M. CO., Market Street. 

Same old stand. Same Old Crow Whiskey. 
FISCHER, E. R., 1901 Mission St., cor. of 

Fifteenth. 
THE METROPOLE, John L. Herget and 

Wm. H. Harrison, Props., N. W. cor. Sutter 

and Steiner Sts. 
TUXEDO, THE, Eddie Granev, Prop., S. W. 

cor. Fillmore and O'FarreTI Sts. 

YEAST MANUFACTURERS. 
GOLDEN GATE COMPRESSED YEAST 

CO.. 2401 Fillmore. 
STERLING OIL CO., 1491 Post St., cor. 

Octavia, S. F. 



30 



THE WASP- 



Amusements 



"Moths," a dramatization of Ouida's 
famous novel, one of the most success- 
ful as well as powerful dramas ever 
produced in this country, will be the 
offering at the Colonial Theater for 
the week commencing Monday evening, 
April 22d. The Wallack Theater, New 
York, version of this delightful play 
will be used with an exceptionally strong 
and well balanced cast, including Frank 
Bacon, one of the most popular comed- 
ians that has ever appeared here. One 
of the features in connection with the 
presentation of this drama will be' the 
staging. George Lask, acknowledged to 
be one- of ---the greatest stage directors 
in the profession, having been specially 
engaged to look after this end of the 
production. 

"Moths" is highly dramatic but re- 
plete with bright comedy scenes, being 
equal in merit and interest to "The 
Charity Ball" and "The Wife." It was 
first played here by the original New 
York Company and later by the Fraw- 
ley Company at the Columbia Theater. 
* * * 

There can be no better indication of 
the rehabilitation of our City than is 
afforded by the theatrical situation at 
present. This is especially significant 
in view of the fact that one year ago 
today every theater in town, with the 
exception of that at the Chutes was 
destroyed utterly. Today we have more 
theaters and better ones, as well as a 
greater diversity of high class attrac- 
tions than we ever had before. 

The captious theater-goer can find no 
cause for complaint today. Is his taste 
for vaudeville? The Orpheum and a 
half dozen smaller houses are there to 
cater to it. In musical comedy the 
American, The Van Ness or the Davis, 
all are drawing well, and in utter 
tragedy we have Miss Roberts in "Maria 
Rosa" at the Novelty. 

The Alcazar this week excels in 
comedy with Leo Dietrichstein's farce 
"All on, Account of Eliza," and the 
Colonial with the comedy drama 
"Friends." Out at the Chutes they have 
another comedy drama "In Arkansaw," 



v ICECREAM 
-0536^8 Fiu.MOSEST:,SiR s 



while the Central is still the home of 
the strictly up-to-date "melo-drammer" 
with the "Gambler of the West." 

Even the circus has come to town, and 
baseball flourishes like the green bay 
tree. Surely this is a supremely good 
showing to be made by a City that ex- 
actly one year ago lay in ruin and devas- 
tation. 

* * * 

"The Cingalee" at the Van Ness 
Theater is much better than the "Coun- 
try Girl." The music is brighter and 
prettier, the dialogue better, and the 
scenery and costumes superb. Ray- 
mond Hitchcock will give one return 
performance of "The Yankee Tourist" 
there on Sunday, and on Monday night 
Lillian Russel will open in "The 
Butterfly." 

* # * 

"All on Account of Eliza," as is pre- 
sented to big houses at the Alcazar. It 
is one of the funniest farce comedies 
ever presented here and is well suited 
to the capabilities of the stock com- 
pany at the pretty new play house. 

-,; * * 

"The Tenderfoot" at the American is 
strongly reminiscent of old Tivoli days. 
The music is as catchy and tuneful as 
ever. It is rumored that the Frawleys 
are coming for a season at the Amer- 
ican. 

* * # 

The Orpheum continues to present 
excellent vaudeville. Jimmy Brockman, 
the sweet singer, is, to my mind, the best 
feature on the bill. 

* * * 

Morgan Wallace, the Colonial's new 
leading man, who replaces Wilfred 
Roger, has proven a great find. Mr. 
Roger has gone on a tour with "Sa- 
lome," and while we shall miss him, 
his place is most acceptably filled by 
Mr. Wallace. The other members of 
the Colonial stock are all well cast in 
"Friends," and Miss Jewel and Frank 
Bacon, Norval MacGregor and JSurt 
Wesner — all are at their best. 

* * * 

Bishop's players are doing a good 
business at the Chutes in the rural 
comedy drama, "In Arkansaw." 

There was a peculiar sound from 
the direction of the woods as the 
member of the Birdlover's Society sat 
in the window of her friend's country 
home one summer afternoon. 

She quickly took her, small "Bird 
Guide" from her ever present bag, 
and rapidly turned the leaves. At 



last she paused with a smile of satis- I 
faction, and listened, with her finger 
between two leaves of the little book, 
till the sound came again. 

When it was repeated an expression 
of doubt fitted across her features, but ■ 
still she was hopeful. 

"You probably know many of the * 
bird notes, living so near the woods 
and in such a quiet spot," she said to ■ 
her friend. "Can you tell me what 
bird that is?" 

"That said her friend, briefly, "is 
our goat. We shall have to move him 
further off." 

* * * 

At one time there lived in Worces- 
ter, Mass., an old negro who had a ] 
tremendous influence, religious and I 
political, in the settlement where he : 
lived. He occupied a Ht L le house 
owned by a prominent banker, but 
had successfully evaded the payment 
of rent for many years. No trouble 
came, however, until the banker was 



DR. H. J. STEWART 

Organist of S;. Dominic's Church and 
the Temple Sherith Israel 

TEACHER OF SINGING 

Pianoforte, Organ, Harmony and Composition. 
New Studio: 2517 California Street. Hours, 10 
to 12 and 2 to 4 daily, except Saturdays. 

LOUIS H. EATON 

Organist and Director Trinity 
Church Choir 

Teacher of Voice, Piano and Organ 

San Francisco Studio; 1678 Broadway, Phone 
Franklin 2244. 

Berkeley Studio; 2401 Channing Way, Tues- 
day and Friday. 



MRS. OSCAR MANSFELDT 

PIANIST 

Tel. West 314 1801 Buchanan Si.. Cor. Sutler 



William Keith 



Studio 



After Dec. 1st 1717 California St. 



SAMUEL M. SHORTRIDGE 

Attorney-at-Law 

1101 OTARRELL ST. 

Cor. Franklin San Francisco, Cal. 




-THE WASP- 



31 



RACING 



New California Jockey Club 

Oakland Race 
Track 



SIX OR MORE RACES EACH WEEK DAY 
Rain or Shine 

Races commence at 1:40 p. m. sharp. 

For special trains slopping ol ihe iraclc take S. P. Ferry, 
foot of Market street: leave at 1 2:00, thereafter every twenty 
minutes until I .40 p. m. No Smoking in last two cars, 
which are reserved for ladies and their escorts. 

Reluming trains leave track after fifth and last races. 

THOMAS H. WILLIAMS, President. 
PERCY W. TREAT. Secretary. 




The best YEAST for all 
Kinds of Baking; 

FRESH DAILY AT YOUR GROCER 



Thompson's Formerly 



Oyster Loaf, 



Now 
Open. 



1727 O'Farrell St., near Fillmore 
All night service Popular Prices 



▼ The only first-class up-to-date and modern 

t* Ham mam Baths, built especially for 
the purpose, in the city. 

♦ Oriental Turkish Baths 

I Corner Eddy an J Larkin Sts. 

w Cold water plunge. 

t Room including Bath, Si. oo. 

♦ Phone Franklin 653 

♦ W. J. BLUMBERG & BRO., Props. 



PATRICK & CO. 



Rubber Stamps 

Stencils, Box Brands 



1543 Pine Street 



San Francisco 



nominated to run for ■> political office. 
The next day the old negro came hob- 
bling into hi- office. 

"Well. Sam," said the hanker, "I 
suppose you've come in to pay me 
some rent." 

"Oh, no, bos,," replied the old man. 
"I's jnst come in to say I's glad yo is 
nominated, and I'll tell de rest of 
dese no 'count niggers to vote for 
fo' you, an to mention to you at the 
same time dat de roof of my house 
is a-lcakin' an' if it ain't fixed I'll have 
to move out directly. 



The multibillionaire was in great 
agony when he found he would 
probably be compelled to die rich. 

"Money," he exclaimed, piteously; 
"nothing but money! Is it not a 
punishment?" 

"Yes," replied the beggar at the 
gate, "and I call it capital punish- 
ment. Suppose you give me your 
wealth and die a happy man?" 

But the multibillionaire shook his 
head. 

"No," he answered dolefully, "when 
a man is condemned to capital punish- 
ment he generally deserves it, so I 
shall take my medicine like a man." 

And then he called out his $10,000 
bulldogs and drove the beggar off 
the premises. 



"Who is your favorite composer?" 
inquired the artistic person. 

"I can't say just at this moment," 
answered Mr. Comrox, with an ap- 
pealing glance at his wife, "but it's 
somebody whose music I can't re- 
member and whose name I can't pro- 
nounce." 

* * * 

Amelia Bingham, the actress, who 
is so well known here, made an awful 
fizzle in New York in her new play, 
"The Lilac Room," which was written 
by Beulah Dix and Evelyn Greenleaf 
and damned by every competent critic 
in Gotham. So severe were the roasts 
given Miss Bingham that she took to 
her bed and missed one performance, 
which proceeding caused it to be said 
that she was afraid to appear. She 
showed up the next night and contra- 
dicted the report by a speech, in 
which she said: 

"When I took this play I thought 
I had a good property. I have no 
right to complain, for out of six 
plays I have selected five money 
makers. No one can tell what a play 



COLONIAL THEATRE 

McAllister near Market Phone Market 920 
MARTIN F. KURTIG. President and Manaaer 



All Market Street Cars run direct to Theatre 

Week Beginning Monday, April 15 

The Wallack Theater, New York Version 
of Ouida's Famous Novel 



MOTHS 



An Emotional Drama in Three Acts 



PRICES: Evening. 25c. 50c, 75c, $1.00; Satur- 
day and Sunday Matinees, 25c and 50c. BARGAIN 
MATINEE, Wednesday, all seats reserved, 25c. Branch 
Ticket Office, Kohler & Chase's, Sutter and Franklin 
Streets. 



DR. WM. D. CLARK 

Office and Res.: 2554 California St. 

San Francisco 

Hours — 1 to 3 p. m. and 7 to 8 p. m. 

Sundays — By appointment 

Phone West 390 



Contracts made with Hotels and Restaurants 
Special Attention given to Family Trade 

Established 1876 

THOMAS MORTON & SON 

Importer of and /""/"l A I 
Dealer, in \AJJ\L. 

N. W. Cor. Eddy and Hyde, San Francisco 
Phone Franklin 397 



Wichman, Lutgen & Co. 

Formerly of 
29-31 Battery Slreel, S. F. 

Cor. Everett and Tarrison Avenue 
ALAMEDA, CAL. 

Phone Alameda I 1 79 

GILT EDGE WHISKEY 



To restore gray hair to its natural 
color use Alfrcdums Egyptian Henna — 
a vegetable dye — perfectly harmless and 
the effect is immediate., All druggists 
sell it. Langley & Michaels Co., agents. 



32 



-THE WASP- 



ELECTRO 
SILICON 

Is Unequalled lor 

Cleaning and Polishing 
SILVERWARE. 

Send address for a FREE SAMPLE, ov 15c. in 
fitamps for a full bos. 

Electro-Silicon Soap has eqoal merits. 
The Electro Silicom Co., 30 Cliff St., New York, 
Grocers and Druggists sell it. 



cLEIBOLD, 

Harness & carriagTco. 

1214 GOLDEN GATE AVE. 

BET. WEBSTER AND FILLMORE 



A p c °j* ive CATARRH 

Ely's Cream Balm 

is quickly absorbed. 
Gives Relief at Once. 

It cleanses, soothes I 
heals and protects I 
the diseased mem- 
brane. It cures Ca- I 
tarrh and drives! 

away a Cold in the I 

Head quickly. Lii-UAy FFVFR 
stores the Senses of Mfl I Ft! bit 
Taste and Smell. Full size 50 cts. , at Drug- 
gists or by mail ; Trial Size 10 cts. by maiL 
Elv Brothers. 56 "Warren Street. New York 



1ASH5HBIITERS 

I- BETTER THAN PILLS. KJ 








Dr. Parker's Cough Cure 
One dose will stop a cough. 
It never fails. Try it. 25c. 

AT ALL DRUGGISTS 



will be — or Charles Frohman wouldn't 
have refused 'The Lion and the 
Mouse,' would he? 

"I played this play for six months 
on tour to profitable business. But I 
admit that most of the stops were 
one-night stands, and that the house 
was sold out in advance. If you want 
to learn the truth about a piece you 
must come home to find it out. If I 
have a bad piece of property I am 
glad that my friends on the New York 
papers have had the kindness to tell 
me that I am wasting my time. 

"They have said that the play is 
bad, that I am bad, and that the pro- 
duction is bad," continued the actress. 
"In addition to all this, I have to- 
night received a telegram from the 
authors saying that they are going to 
get an injunction. They say that I 
have added lines. Well, I have added 
lines — and it is a blessed good thing 
I did, too. If you don't believe that 
come to my house, and see the orig- 
inal manuscript. If there is any in- 
junction lying around loose nothing 
would please me better than to have 
them come and serve it on me." 

Everybody applauded the plucky 
actress but the two authors, who 
happened to be in the house. They 
got up in a huff and flounced out. 

"THE FIRST NIGHTER." 



, SUMMONS 

IN THE SUPERIOR COURT OF THE 
State of California, in and for the City and 
County of San Francisco. 

SIDNEY W. SCOTT, Plaintiff, vs. ISABELL 
SCOTT, Defendant. 

Action brought in the Superior Court of 
the State of California in and for the City 
and County of San Francisco, and the com- 
plaint hied in the office of the County Clerk 
of said City and County. 

The People of the State of California, send 
greeting to ISABEL SCOTT, Defendant. 

You are hereby required to appear in an 
action brought against you by the above 
named Plaintiff in the Superior Court of 
the State of California, in and for the City 
and County of San Francisco, and to answer 
the Complaint filed therein within ten days 
(exclusive of the day of service) after the ser- 
vice on you of this Summons, if served within 
this City and County ; or if served elsewhere 
within thirty days. 

The said action is brought to obtain a 
judgment and decree of this Court dissolv- 
ing the bonds of matrimony now existing 
between Plaintiff and Defendant, on the 
ground of Defendant's wilful desertion of the 
Plaintiff; also for general relief, as will 
more fully appear in the Complaint on file, 
to which special reference is hereby made. 

And you are hereby notified that, unless 
you appear and answer as above required, 
the said Plaintiff will take judgment for any 
moneys or damages demanded in the Com- 
plaint as arising upon contract, or will apply 
to the Court for any other relief demanded 
in the Complaint. 

Given under my hand and the Seal of 
the Superior Court of the State of California, 
in and for the City and County of San Fran- 
cisco, this 16th day of March, A. D. 1907. 
(SEAL) H. I. MULCREVY, Clerk. 

By L. J. WELCH, Deputy Clerk. 
JOSEPH H. TAM, Attorney for Plaintiff, 

San Francisco, Cal. 

Action No. 7076. 



TOYO K1SEN 
** KAISHA 



n*i 



(Oriental Steamship Co.) 



Have Opened Their Permanent Offices at 

Room 240 James Flood Building 

San Francisco 

S. S. "America Mam" (calls at Manila) . . 

Friday, May 3, 1907 

S. S. "Nippon Maru" (calls at Manila) . . . 

Friday. May 31, 1907 

S. S. "Hongkong Maru" 

Friday, June 28, 1907 

Steamers will leave wharf, comer First and Brannan Sts., 
I P. M., for Yokohama and Hongkong, calling at Hono- 
lulu, Kobe, (Hiogo), Nagasaki and Shanghai, and con- 
necting at Hongkong with steamers for Manila, India, etc. 

No cargo received on board on day of sailing. 

Round- trip tickets at reduced rates. 

For Freight and passage apply at office, 240 James Flood 
Building. W. H. AVERY, Assistant General Manager. 



Peter Bacigalupi & Son 

Headguarters for Talking 

Machines, Records 

and Supplies 

1113-1115 Fillmore Street, San Francisco 

Albion Ale or Porter 

Is a Great Flesh Builder, Tonic and Pleasant 
Drink. Pure Extract of Malt and Hops. 

BURNELL & CO. 

1007-1009 Golden Gate Ave., Near Laguna St. 



Dr.WONQ HIM 

1268 O'Farrell St. 

Permanently Located 

HERB DOCTOR 



Father and Mother 
Write Letter In- 
dorsing Treatment. 

SAN FRANCISCO 
March 23, 1906 

To Whom it may 
\ Concern: Our three- 
year - old daughter, 
. .._.. having been ill for 

some time and being 
treated by the most prominent physicians, 
gradually became worse, and was finally 
given up by them. We were then recom- 
mended to Dr. Wong Him. We started 
with his treatment and within two months' 
time our daughter was cured. 

Respectfully, 
MR. AND MRS. H. C. LIEB, 
2757 Harrison St., San Francisco 





PUBLISHER'S NOTICE 

THE WASP is published every Saturday by the Wasp Publishing 
Company, at 141-143 Valencia Street. Subscriptions $5.00 per 
year, payable in advance, postage prepaid. Subscriptions to all 
foreign countries within the Postal Union. $6.(X) per year. The trade on 
ihe Pacific Coast supplied by the San Francisco News Company. Eastern 
Agents supplied by the American News Company, New York. 

THE WASP will pay for contributions suitable for its columns, and 
will endeavor to return all rejected manuscripts, but does not guarantee 
their return. Photographs will also be accepted and paid for. Address 
all communications to Wasp Publishing Company, 141-143 Valencia 
Street. San Francisco, Cal. 

TO ADVERTISERS— As the fluslrated pages of THE WASP 
go to press early, all advertisements printed in the same forms should be 
received, not later than Monday at noon. Changes of Advertisements 
should also be sent in on Monday to insure publication. 

Address, JAMES F. FORSTER, Business Manager. 
Telephone Market 316. 



will be the effect if the carmen strike next month. 
Many employers may prefer to close their places and 
thus lose only their rent. In fact, it has been suggested 
that if the carmen strike the employers will at once lay 
off their employes in every line and keep their stores 
and factories closed until the railroads resume opera- 
tions. 



Plain English 



For the first time in years this Spring finds unskilled 
labor so plentiful that laborers are offering $3 a head 
to employment agents in Chicago and New York to 
obtain work for them at $1.50. The great railroads 
have paused in their operations and the thousands of 
men they needed for track-laying are seeking work in 
other directions. The rate for common labor in the 
East this year is about SO cents a day less than last, 
with the demand slack. Things are getting down to 
the normal after several years of headlong and unpre- 
cedented prosperity. The nation cannot go back, for 
its resources are as great as ever, but it can lessen its 
feverish energy for a year. Many shrewd business 
men say that such a breathing spell would do no harm. 



The strike of the carmen for greatly increased 
wages would be most inopportune, as wages have a 
tendency to drop in all the large cities of the East, and 
money has become tight. A corporation like the 
United Railroads, which is heavily mortgaged and 
must pay its interest regularly, cannot afford to give 
carmen $3 a day for eight hours work. It is true that 
hod-carriers get nearly twice that amount in San 
Francisco, and plasterers and plumbers have been paid 
from $7 to $8 a day, but such wages cannot be kept 
up, and are only temporary. A corporation like the 
United Railroads cannot raise its men's wages one 
day and drop them the next. It must fix a scale which 
will be as nearly permanent as possible, and leave the 
company a sure margin of profit to meet its regular 
expenses and all extraordinary ones that may be in- 
curred. 



The wages now paid carmen in San Francisco are 
the highest in America, and that is equivalent to saying 
that they are the highest in the world. Carmen's work 
is trying and needs intelligence, but it is not a skilled 
trade which requires years of apprenticeship. Any 
fairly intelligent laborer might become a competent 
motorman in a month, and a good conductor can be 
produced out of very ordinary material in two months. 
It is fair, then, to assume that the average carman is 
not over twenty-five per cent superior in any way to 
the average laborer. If so, what should be his wages? 
Let us see what the ruling rate is in the Eastern States 
at present. 



The talk of a street-railway strike next month is 
what might be expected. For months there has been a 
continuous howl about the United Railroads and sug- 
gestions of confiscating their franchise. All this has 
been most ill-advised, for anything which "reduces the 
efficiency of our street-railway system is a blow at the 
entire business of San Francisco. Immediately after 
the fire last year we saw that without street railways 
in operation the business of the City stopped. Such 



A year ago laborers were so scarce at $2.25 a day 
that the labor agencies were unable to meet the de- 
mand. This Spring the employment agencies are 
thronged by laborers, eager to get work at $1.50 a 
day. Track-layers this year get from $1.40 to $1.60 a 
day and there are more than are needed. Admitting 
that the average carman should get 25 per cent more 
than the average track layer, the wages for carmen 
would according to that be from $1.75 to $2 in the 



-THE WASP 



East. Let us say it eosts more to live here than in the 
East, though that is very doubtful, for New York and 
Chicago are very expensive places in which to reside. 
Allow 25 per cent more for living in San Francisco 
and the highest wages of the local carmen would be 
$2.25 a day. They want $3 for an eight-hour day 
and make this demand on a falling labor market and 
when money is becoming scarce for the first time in 
seven years. The demand does not seem to be 
prompted by wisdom on the part of the carmen, and 
it is very unlikely that so determined and shrewd a 
man as Mr. Calhoun will grant it. 



Following is President Roosevelts reply to the Illinois 
socialist who complained because the President had 
spoken disparagingly of Moyor, Haywood and Petti- 
bone, who are charged with the atrocious assassination 
of Ex-Governor Steunenberg of Idaho. The unions 
throughout the Nation have been assessed to raise an 
immense defense fund for the accused men. President 
Roosevelt's letter is the most outspoken declaration 
that has ever come from the White House in answer to 
the complaint of a labor leader. 

"April 22, 1907 — Dear Sir: I have received your 
letter of the 19th instant, in which you inclose the 
draft of formal letter which is to follow. I have 
been notified that several delegations bearing sim- 
ilar requests are on the way hither. In the letter 
you, on behalf of the Cook County Moyer-Haywood 
conference, protest against certain language I used 
in a recent letter, which you assert to be designed 
to influence the course of justice in the case of the 
trial for murder of Messrs. Moyer and Haywood. 
I entirely agree with you that it is improper to 
endeavor to influence the course of justice, whether 
by threats or in any similar manner. For this rea- 
son I have regretted most deeply the action of such 
organizations as your own in undertaking to accom- 
plish this very result in the very case of which 
you speak. For instance, your letter is headed 
'Cook County Moyer-Haywood-Pettibone Confer- 
ence," with the headlines : 'Death cannot, will not 
and shall not claim our brothers.' This shows that 
you and your associates are not demanding a fair 
trial or working for a fair trial, but are announcing 
in advance that the verdict shall only be one way, 
and that you will not tolerate any other verdict. 
Such action is flagrant in its impropriety, and I join 
heartily in condemning it. 

"But it is a simple absurdity to suppose that 
because any man is on trial for a given offense he 
is therefore to be freed from all criticisms upon his 
general conduct and manner of life. In my letter 
to which you object I referred to a certain prominent 
financier, Mr. Harriman, on the one hand and to 
Messrs. Moyer, Haywood and Debs on the other as be- 
ing equally undesirable citizens. It is as foolish to as- 
sert that this was designed to influence the trial 
of Moyer and Haywood as to assert that it was 
designed to influence the suits that have been 
brought against Mr. Harriman. I neither expressed 
nor indicated any opinion as to whether Messrs. 
Moyer and Haywood were guilty of the murder of 
Governor Steunenberg. If they are guilty they cer- 
tainly ought to be punished. If they are not guilty 



they certainly ought not to be punished. 

"But no possible outcome either of the trial or 
the suits can affect my judgment as to the unde- 
sirability of the type of citizenship of those whom 
I mentioned. Messrs. Moyer, Haywood and Debs 
stand as representatives of those men who have 
done as much to discredit the labor movement as 
the worst speculative financiers or most unscrupu- 
lous employers of labor and debauchers of Legis- 
latures have done to discredit honest capitalists 
and fair dealing business men. 

"They stand as the representatives of these men, 
who by their public utterances and manifesto; by 
the utterances of the papers they control and in- 
spire, and by the words and deeds of those asso- 
ciated with or subordinate to them, habitually 
appear as guilty of incitement to or apology for 
bloodshed and violence. 

"If this does not constitute undesirable citizen- 
ship, there certainly would never be any desirable 
citizens. The men whom I denounce represent the 
men who have abandoned that legitimate movement 
for the uplifting of labor, with which I have the 
most hearty sympathy ; they have adopted prac- 
tices which cut them off from those who lead this 
legitimate movement. In every way I shall support 
the law abiding and upright representatives of 
labor, and in no way can I better support them 
than by drawing the sharpest possible line between 
them upon the one hand and on the other hand 
those preachers of violence, who are themselves the 
worst foes of the honest laboring man. 

"Let me repeat my deep regret that any body 
of men should so far forget their duty to their 
country as to endeavor by the formation of societies 
and in other ways to influence the course of justice 
in this matter. I have received many such letters 
as yours. Accompanying them were newspaper 
clippings announcing demonstrations, parades and 
mass meetings designed to show that the represen- 



IS 




CHAS.KEILUS& CO 

EXCLUSIVE 

HIGH GRADE CLOTH I ERS 



No Branch Slores. No Agents. 

The most perfect garments human talent can produce are right here 
in our stock. The best clothes makers contribute their genius. The 
ideas of style we offer are emblems of their art with every qualification 
that make good dressers. 

The satire of merchant tailors who try to cope with the 

progress of _good make-up clothes of to-day are in reality 

burlesquers". They make all sorts of freaks but the art brain 

is noticeably absent. The salaries paid to designers who cut 

the kind of clothes we sell would bankrupt a thousand tailors. 



KING SOLOMON'S HALL 

Fillmore Street, near Sutter, San Francisco 



-THE WASP 



gatives of labor, without regard to the facts, de- 
mand the acquittal of Messrs. Haywood and Moyer, 
when such meetings can, of course, only be de- 
signed to coerce Court or jury in rendering a ver- 
dict, and they therefore deserve all the condemna- 
ti. hi which you in your letter say should be awarded 
to those who endeavor improperly to influence the 
course of justice. 

"You would, of course, be entirely within your 
rights if you merely announce that you thought 
Messrs. Moyer and Haywuod were 'desirable citi- 
zens.' though in such ease I should take frank issue 
with you and should say that, wholly without re- 
gard to whether or not they are guilty of the crime 
for which they are now being tried, they represent 
as thoroughly an undesirable type of citizenship as 
can be found in this country — a type which, in the 
letter to which you so unreasonably take excep- 
tions, I showed, not to be confined to any one class, 
but to exist among some representatives of great 
capitalists, as well as among some representatives 
of wage workers. 

"In that letter I condemned both types. Certain 
representatives of the great capitalists in turn con- 
demned me for including Mr. Harriman in my con- 
demnation of Messrs. Moyer and Haywood. Cer- 
tain of the representatives of labor, in their turn, 
condemned me because I included Messrs. Moyer 
and Haywood as undesirable citizens together with 
Mr. Harriman. I am as profoundly indifferent to 
the one condemnation in one case as in the other. 
I challenge as a right the support of all good 
Americans, whether wage-earners or capitalists, 
whatever their occupation or creed, or in whatever 
portion of the country they live, when I condemn 
both the types of bad citizenship which I have 
held up to reprobation. It seems to me a mark of 
utter insincerity to fail thus to condemn both and 
to apologize, for either robs the man thus apologiz- 
ing of all right to condemn any wrongdoing in 
any man, rich or poor, in public or in private life. 

"You say you ask for a 'square deal' for Messrs. 
Moyer and Haywood. So do I. 'When I say 'square 
deal' I mean a square deal to everyone; it is equally 
a violation of the policy of the square deal for a 
capitalist to protest against denunciation of a capi- 
talist who is guilty of wrong-doing as for a labor 
leader to protest against the denunciation of a labor 
leader who has been guilty of wrong-doing. I stand 
for equal justice to both, and so far as in my power 
lies I shall uphold justice whether the man accused 
of guilt has behind him the wealthiest corporations, 
the greatest aggregation of riches in the country. 
or whether he has behind him the most influential 
labor organization in the country. Very truly 
yours, "THEODORE ROOSEVELT." ' 



I understand that it cost the Hotel Del Monte $5,000 
to prepare for the permanent exhibition of paintings 
by California Artists which is now attracting so much 
attention. All the noted artists are represented. Even 
Keith who usually refuses to exhibit anywhere has two 
fine pictures on view. The spacious ball room of the 
Hotel makes a splendid picture gallery, the walls 



having been toned for the purpose under artistic 
supervision. This permanent exhibition at Del Monte 
means much for the artist> of California and they have 
to thank Mr. A. D. Shepard for it. Charles Sedgwick 
Aiken is secretary of the exhibition. Dr. Genthe, chair- 
man and Mr. Fred Woodworth, curator. This exhibi- 
tion should become of National reputation soon. 



New Location of the Poodle Dog 
Those who enjoy good living will rejoice to learn 
that the Xew Poodle Dog Restaurant and Hotel 
has located permanently and centrally at the corner 
of Polk and Post Streets. The grill and cafe en- 
trance is on Post Street and the hotel entrance on 
Polk Street. The establishment opened for busi- 
ness on Wednesday evening, and henceforth will 
be Mecca of all epicures, for the experienced cater- 
ers who preside over the Poodle Dog, employ none 
but culinary artists of the first rank. No earth- 
quake cookery ever defiles the cuisine of the Poodle 
Dog. The chef was for years head of the famous 
Palace Hotel staff and his assistants are experienced 
artists. E. Yialette, one of the managers, was di- 
rector of the famous old Poodle Dog at Mason and 
Eddy Street, and his associates, Theo. Soulages and 
A. Bouysson, are men who know all about con- 
ducting a first-class restaurant and hotel. Their 
fine grill room, where meals are served either table 
d'hote or a la carte, is capable of seating 150 people 
comfortably, and the hotel contains thirty-six suites 
with bath in each and elegantly furnished. Tour- 
ists and travelers of all kinds will find this centrally- 
located hotel a boon and delight. The proprietors 
have taken a lease for ten years, so they mean busi- 
ness on the most finished plan and will certainly 
meet with great success. 



Grand Prix 
Paris 1900 

Legion 

of 

Honor 



THE ARTISTIC STANDARD OF THE WORLD 





The 



lafiiuin 



Piano 



Pre-eminent for Tone-beauty and Acoustic qualities. 

You are invited to call at our display -rooms 1569 Van Ness, cor. California 



The 

Grand Prize 

St. Louis 

1904 






MenandMomen 



A Weekly Summary of Social Activities and Complications 





MRS. CLARENCE MARTIN MANN 

Willard Merrall, whose marriage with Miss Hope 
White, daughter of the Kellogg Whites of Berkeley, 
was an event of last week in Berkeley, enjoys the 
distinction of being the real "Gibson Man." You 
can see his picture any time in any collection of the 
Gibson pictures. He was the model for the Gib- 
son man. I have heard that Mr. Merrall, who is in 
the First National Bank of Berkeley, is a friend of 
artist Charles Dana Gibson, who admired his fine 
proportions and idealized him in his sketches as 
the "American man." The marriage of Miss White 
and Mr. Merrall was celebrated in Clovne Court 



and was quite the smartest wedding that has taken 
place in Berkeley for many a moon. 

From a correspondent in Southern California IJ 
learn that Ashton Stevens is very much improved 
in health and may return soon to take his place 
on the Examiner. Stevens has spent nearly a year 
recuperating in Santa Barbara, living the simplest 
and quietest of lives, reading a little but spending 
nearly all the time in the open air. His wife is] 
with him. 

* * * 

A correspondent in New York writes me that a 
tale is current there that Evelyn Nesbit Thaw's! 
father and brother, who were not mentioned in any! 
of the stories told of her antecedents during the 
trial, are still living in Scotland. The father is a 
plate-layer on a railway in Stirlingshire and the! 
brother works in an iron foundry. The father says 
that his wife deserted him one day and went across 
the seas with her four youngest children and .the ■ 
next heard of her she had a place as cook in Ham-1 
ilton, Ontario. This knocks on the head the gen- 
erally believed story that Evelyn was born inl 
Virginia and her father was a lawyer. 

George Ade was only in town a few days, staying 
at the Majestic with four companions, but a fe™ 
good fellows had the chance of meeting him and 
hearing some of his stories. He told one about 
when he was in Monte Carlo, recently, when he saw 
a young man in American clothes, a young woman 
in American clothes and a boy in American clothes.! 

"I'm going to play," said the young woman, "I'm I 
going to risk five francs. I'm going to risk it on; 







Little 1 alace Hotel 




IS 
OPEN 


Corner ot 

j Post and 

Leavenworth 
Streets 




The same excellence in cuisine and service that obtained 
in the Old Palace is duplicated in the new 'Little Palace' 





-THE WASP- 




MRS. LUCIUS ALLEN 

my age." She ran her eyes over the three columns 
)f figures and set a five franc piece on 18. 

"Rien ne va plus," said the croupier, and the little 
Spite ball wheeled around, clattered a bit and 
rested finally on 28. 

"Gosh hang it," cried the girl, looking at the 
young man in American clothes, "I've lost. Eigh- 
teen didn't win a thing." 

"Say, Minnie," said the little brother, it's a pity 
you didn't bet your real age. You'd have won 
then, wouldn't you?" 

Ade said that when he was in London one of his 
hostesses asked him if the women of his country 
smoked. His reply was: "The women don't, but 
the ladies do." 

There was not such a large and complete 

gathering of the Girls' High Alumnae on 

Saturday as there might have been if the notices 

had been sent out to everyone of the graduates. 

Most of those who registered last year were not 

notified of the meeting and so until the affair was 

over they knew nothing about it. One of the best 

speeches was made by Mrs. Scipio Craig, who as 

Mrs. Hoffman used to be of the High School's 

faculty years ago. Mrs. James Alva Watt was 

among the singers who rendered solos. 
# # * 

Mrs. Grace Hudson, who is holding an exhibition 
of her pictures, was the first to bring the little 
Indian babies into popularity as subjects for paint- 
ings. The pappoose in its basket cradle that the 
California Northwestern Railway uses on one of 
its booklets as die cover design, was from a "Hudson 



pappoose." Mrs. Hudson is a I'kiah girl, a sister 
of Grant Carpenter, lawyer and newspaper man, 
and as she lived for years in Mendocino County 
she had g 1 opportunity of studying the Mendo- 
cino Indian on his native heath. 

* • * 

I'kiah has produced quite a number of clever 
writers and a few aniM> to help make fame for our 
State. Anna Morrison Reed, the poetess, is a 
Ukiah woman, or rather from Laytonville, though 
she publishes her paper, the Northern Crown, in 
I'kiah. ( Ine <>f Mrs. Reed's daughters married Hit- 
tell, the historian. 

* ••■ * 

.Mr. and Mrs. Leigh Larzalere are domiciled at 
the Fairmont as permanent guests. Mrs. Larzalere 
is one of the best-gowned women in San Francisco, 
and at the ball celebrating the hotel's opening she 
wore a stunning costume. She is a brunette 
with extremely fair skin that forms a striking con- 
trast to her dark hair and eyes. The Larzaleres 
were among the "burnt out" of last April. 

* •:: * 

Mrs. Hermann Oelrichs for some time refused to 
sell the Fairmont Hotel. I have heard it was her 
mother's (Mrs. Fair) cherished desire to build a 
grand hotel on the hill. Mrs. Fair built a fair- 
sized one, the Bella Vista, but she always wanted 
to erect a larger one. Her children, in projecting 
the Fairmont, were therefore but carrying out their 
mother's plan. 



iMHi»«g»iwi}saMMa»Ma 






....■'MfyflWIiH 




ARE YOU NOT INSPIRED WITH 
A LOVE FOR THE COLONIAL 



In looking at a 
a room such as 
this? 



/~\UR carefully selected stock of Wall Papers and 
^- * Fabrics is replete with attractive things and at 
such small attractive prices. We will gladly assist you 
in your decorating if you will favor us with a call. 



L. TOZER & SON CO. 

INTERIOR DECORATORS 

1527 PINE STREET. Bet. Van Ness and Polk, S. F. 
187 TWELFTH STREET, Near Madison, 

CTiBBliMlMiilMlllllMMMIllimillBaSl 





From London comes the news that Mrs. Northesk 
(Northwest?) Wilson, lecturing there on colors and 
music, one in terms of t'other, avers that Melba's 
voice is blue splashed with purple. Forbes Robertson, 
said the lecturer, has a violet voice speckled with 
green, which is the color of the depressed. 

We should like to get a paint brush and describe a 
few voices. We know somebody with a blond voice, 
and another that is blond enough for all practical 
purposes, but has a tendency to dark brown at the 
roots. There's Hearst : His voice we should paint as 
gamboge with cute little speckles of tomato antique 
and raw umber. Ruef's vocals are black and tan, with 
a tiny spot of white in the lower left-hand corner. 
Schmitz's enunciation is a sort of drab, beautifully 
rococoed with scarlet. There is a judge with a bottle- 
green voice, which we might also attribute to Carrie 
Nation. Calve's is carmine. Lawyer Ach's is a 
shrimp-pink with lemon-hued polka dots alternating 
with rich brassy barnacles and a border of forget-me- 
nots. Supervisor Boxton's is invisible blue, with 
stripes in lighter tone. 

Mrs. Wilson, we dedicate this effusion lovingly to 
you. Your voice is the real sky-blue, without a cloud. 

The floral decorations at Miss Jane Wilshire's wed- 
ding to John Hart Polhemus, on last Saturday, were 
artistic in the extreme. The bay window where the 
bridal couple stood, was decorated with smilax en- 
twined with golden cord, from which cloth of gold 
roses were profusely scattered. During the ceremony 
the roses and vines kept gently swaying, making an 
effective picture. Baskets in the shape of hearts, cut 
from golden paper, and filled with roses enhanced the 
pleasing effect. 

Rev. Dr. Clampett, of Trinity Church, performed 
the ceremony. Miss Doris Wilshire was the bride's 
only attendant. Thomas C. Van Ness, Jr., was the 
best man. 

The ushers were Edward Polhemus, Dr. Alfred B. 
Spaulding, Joseph L. King, and Ernest McCormick. 

The presents were of unusual elegance, comprising 
rare laces, Persian rugs, silver, china, and many valu- 
able jewels. Mr. Polhemus gave his bride a pin of 
sapphires and pearls. Mrs. Wilshire, the mother, 
presented a diamond pendant, Mr. Roth Hyde a 
brooch of rare pearls. 

The bride had always expressed a desire for a 
horse shoe pin, deeming it a lucky gift, so Miss Ruth 
Adams, aware of the fact, gave her a handsome pearl 
and gold horse shoe pin. 

From the East were sent valuable rugs, paintings 
and silver. Seldom has bride received handsomer 
tokens. 

When the bride tossed her bouquet, Miss Jolliffe 
captured the portion with the ring attached. Miss 
Constance De Young found the thimble. Before start- 
ing on their wedding tour the bride and groom went 
to say goodbye to the groom's mother, who was too 
ill to attend the wedding. 

When a man is an ex-Mayor, an ex-husband, 88 
years old, has a six-cylinder income, and is known as 
"Uncle," he deserves all the kind treatment he asks 
for. So claims John Bryson, who fulfills all the above 
requirements, and is from Los Angeles besides. The 



kind treatment is accordingly bestowed by Mrs. Gladys 
L. Lambertson in the professional capacity of nurse. 
Both nurse and charge are divorcees. Obviously the 
matter is one for humanitarian remark, not legal in- I 
tervention. Bryson's former wife and his eldest son, j 
however, have brought suit to have the old gentleman 
declared mentally incompetent. With 88 annual nicks 
from Father Time, Bryson asserts himself still able 
to retain and make fortunes, and that none of his sonsH 
can, much less afford a nurse. 

The family on their part fear that the nurse's fee 
is amounting to $4000 a month, income of the Bryson .; 
Block in the navel orange town ; also that the 88-year- 
old has at times handed her little tips, one the Bonnie 
Brae house, in which she has been living; and in addi- 
tion is arranging to leave her all the rest of hisM 
property when Death will have some to expert Time's | 
accounts. 

You guess right, that all this is denied by UncleH 
John's retinue, who aver that Mrs. Bryson received her Ji 
share at divorce thirteen years ago. If this latter be j 
true, one must say that even the mentally incompetent 11 
can be independent to have nurses, autos, theatres and IS 
dinners for whatever they wish to pay. Besides an J! 
88-year-old sport would be a good advertisement for 1 1 
Los Angeles. 



Original Coppa 

Formerly at 622 Montgomery Street 



IN BUSINESS AGAIN 
423 PINE STREET, Bet. Kearny and Montgomery 

SPECIAL DISHES EVERY DAY 

PRIVATE ROOMS FOR FAM1UES UP-STAIRS 

SERVICE UNSURPASSED 



Phone Temporary 623 



JOE COPPA, Proprietor 



ENJOY COUNTRY LIFE AT 

HOTEL DEL MONTE 



This is the season to take your family to Hotel Del 
Monte by the sea, near Monterey, and enjoy every comfort. There 
is plenty of room there and plenty to do for recreation and health. 
Parlor car leaves San Francisco 8:00 a. m. and 3:00 p. m. daily, 
direct to Hotel. Special reduced round-trip rates. For details, in- 
quire information Bureau, Southern Pacific, or of C. W. Kelley, 
Special Representative of Del Monte, 789 Market St., San Fran- 
cisco. Phone Temporary 2751. 



ANNOUNCEMENT 



Mrs. Mott- Smith Cunningham exhibitor in 
Paris Salon of 1906 announces that her Studio 
Shop at 1 622 Pine St., a few doors from Van 
Ness Ave., is now open for the sale of her jewelry 



THE WASP 



The following poem was wnllen by Miss M. Florence Wendling 
of ihe Hamlin School 



&f>e 



9®te$feu6e 



There was a young man with a critic's eye, 
Who fell in love with a maiden shy, 
And this, you see, was the reason why, 
She bought her things 

AT THE WHITE HOUSE. 
Her suit was of the latest shade, 
You could see in a minute 'twas Paris made; 
By the style it gave to the pretty maid, 
You'd know it was bought 

AT THE WHITE HOUSE. 
Her waist beneath her cutaway coat 
Of exquisite taste and elegance spoke. 
Her belt and real-lace collar denote 
That they also were bought 

AT THE WHITE HOUSE. 
As the man and the maid walked past the door, 
He said, "I am told that in this big store 
They've furniture, bric-a-brac, rugs galore. 
Such lovely things you ne'er saw before, 
Let's buy ours now 

AT THE WHITE HOUSE." 
The maiden blushed and made reply — 
"Oh! this is so sudden! but I think that I 
To resist the temptation will not even try," 
And so they stopped 

AT THE WHITE HOUSE. 
In the haberdashery he found a tie, 
And then other things so pleased his eye, — 
"For the happy day," he said, "I'll buy 
My things right here 

AT THE WHITE HOUSE." 
Quoth the maiden shy, "Here above every place, 
I am suited in silks, gloves, ribbons and lace, 
For no other store can as yet keep pace 
With the stock that they have 

AT THE WHITE HOUSE." 
Brushing aside a lock of hair, 
She said — "Did you ever see linens so rare? 
Such patterns and texture so fine! I declare 
We'll have to buy ours 

AT THE WHITE HOUSE." 
Spoke the man and the maid as a single voice 
To Raphael Weill — "Such a line and so choice! 
You surely have cause, indeed, to rejoice 
At the unequalled stock 

AT THE WHITE HOUSE." 
He replied — "In Europe twelve buyers we keep. 
Who, alert and keen, are never asleep. 
For fifty-two years these mysteries deep 
Have been solved by them 

AT THE WHITE HOUSE." 





N.Wcor.VanNess&Pine 



-THE WASP- 




Photo Genlhe 



JACK LONDON 



Jack London denounces the collection of the bills 
against his little boat, "The Snark," as a bourge- 
ois trick. , On the high moral plane, which ordinary 
mankind has not yet reached, but which Jack 
touches daily with his dome of thought, there are 
no such awkward distinctions as mine and thine. 
It is all ours. Everything is in common and base 
is the slave who pays. 

In the world of ideal Socialism of which Jack 
London is an advanced guard he could fit out a 
whole fleet of "Snarks" without being bothered by 
writs of attachment that had to be satisfied before 
he could weigh anchor. Somebody would some- 
how supply him with spars and sails and provisions 
for his seven years' voyage while he sat on the 
wharf and smoked cigarettes. At the psychological 
moments he would step aboard and sail away amidst 
showers of bouquets and good wishes. Not one 
distressing word about bills would mar the har- 
mony of the occasion. 

Such a high-minded idealist as Mr. London must 



therefore have received a horrible jar when bills 
aggregating about $3000 were slammed under his 
nose. "The Snark" was nailed fast to the wharf 
by a writ of attachment issued from the United 
States District Court. To designate such a scurvy 
conduct as "a bourgeois trick" is the limit on mod- 
eration. Job himself could not be more patient 
under unmerited affliction. If Mr. London had 
mustered his hundred or so of faithful disciples on 
the Pacific Coast, and precipitated the downfall of 
capitalism and the destruction of established gov- 
ernment which they have scheduled for 1919 he 
would have served the Federal power and his sordid 
creditors just right. Fortunately for the common- 
wealth of individualistic greed, the novelist kept 
cool and drew his check-book instead of his re- 
volver. In the beautiful school-boy cheirography 
for which he is noted he wrote check after check 
until all the attachments were all lifted and "The 
Snark" was free to pull out into the stream and 
complete the final preparations for her seven-year 
cruise. 

As Mr. London made his literary start writing a 
scornful letter to a dunning grocer it is eminently 
proper that he should sustain his celebrity by get- 
ting into trouble with the tradesmen who have 
equipped "The Snark." It is something like seven 
years since the novelist and his Oakland grocer had 
that memorable tilt. The purveyor of. bread and 
coffee had seen the arrears grow until they reached 
the alarming sum of $30. That might be a baga- 
telle to Mr. London nowadays when he can draw 
checks for $3000 to free his yacht from attachments; 
but in that early period when large wads of re- 
turned manuscript came more regularly than drafts 
from his publishers, thirty "bucks" represented i 
wealth. The novelist's letter of hot defiance and : 
scathing sarcasm was enough to turn the grocer's 
rolls of butter into liquid axle grease. Not only ; 
did Mr. London refuse to pay the bill or set the 
date when the grocer might expect something on i 
account, but he withdrew his patronage there and i 
then from the presumptious creditor. He let the < 
varlet understand clearly that it was a privilege to i 



F. THOMS, The AWNING MAN 




Canvas Work. Repairing. Canopies and Floor Covers To Rent. 

TENTS, HAMMOCKS AND COVERS 

1209 MISSION ST. Tel. Market 2194 



-THE WASP- 




Motti 



["he more you're in public, fame closer 



MISS LEILA SHELBY 

supply groceries to a man of genius without receiv- 
ing cash for them, and if he was too dull to com- 
prehend that fact it was a meritorious task to 
sharpen his intellect by lessening his profits. So 
the novelist's unpaid bills he might paste in his hat 
for a reminder, or put them in the salt mackerel tub 
for preservation. Future patronage from Jack Lon- 
don, esquire, author and lecturer on socialistic 
ethics, he need never more expect. Strange to say 
the grocer instead of going out and hanging him- 
self in the hay-barn by his suspenders went and 
hired an attorney to sue the novelist in the Justice's 
Court. Jack London at once became illustrious in 
the world of letters and ever since has moved in 
an orbit of fat checks, and regular meals. The 
existence and habits of corner grocers have no 
further interest for him. 

OUR JACK IS LIBELED. 

Come, children, I'll tell you a tale of Jack London; 

Of speeches and stories he's many a ton done. 

A skipper of note he became with the "Snark"; 

His creditors feared he would skip in the dark. 

They thought, had he done so, each dollar he still 
owes 

Would outlaw at sea with each lap of the billows. 

But Jack had the money he got from the editors 

For writing such essays as "Down with the Credi- 
tors !" 

A Socialist he, of the people? That's raw. 

When he censured the villians, he cried "You're 
bourgeois !" 

Do you think the affair will chagrin our Jack? No 
sir, his 



(He leapt into fame by not paying for groceries.) 

* * * 

The Marie Antoinette lintel in New York has 
been so famous for social oddities that there was 
little surprise when its wine check clerk turned out 
to be an Italian count. And nothing extraordinary 
of course that a count should place a plain gold 
band on the finger of an heiress, should his finances 
be equal to that expense. 

Count Ferouli was given the title because he 
looked the part. He was knighted by the waiters 
of the Marie Antoinette and Waldorf-Astoria. 
Which is all to his favor, for some pedigreed counts 
do not tip the scales of beauty to an ounce. 

Miss Ioma Meyer, heiress to a several hundred 
thousand dollar estate, admired the count's air. His 
every word, every gesture manifested that impal- 
pable yet unmistakable thing called air. His attire 
had it too. His fortunes and his title were that 
intangible thing called air. The Countess Ferouli's 
parents died within the last few years, leaving her 
a home in Whitehall, New York, and a cottage at 
Saratoga. 

The wedding was quiet, news of it being broken 
first to the manager of the Marie Antoinette, and 
thence given broadcast. Friends of the countess 
are now wondering if a frankly imitation count 
may not prove in the end more of a treasure than 
some of the genuine ones have been. The trouble 
with most of them have been : Not enough count 

and too many countesses. 

* * * 

Mrs. James H. Bull, who has gone south, will spend 
two or three weeks in Santa Barbara, visiting old 
friends. Mr. and Mrs. Clinton B. Hale have taken the 
fine house belonging to Captain and Mrs. Bull on 
Upper State Street, and will remain there for several 
months. 




Announcement 

SPRING and SUMMER 

We desire to announce that our com- 
plete selection of strictly confined Imported 
and Domestic Woolens, consisting of un- 
usually attractive patterns in popular weaves and fashionable ma- 
terials, is now ready awaiting inspection. 

It gives us pleasure to state that every garment is made by 
skilled tailors, cut on stylish and artistic lines that command the 
admiration and approval of our customers. 

We cordially invite and solicit patronage, and endeavor to up- 
hold our past reputation for high-grade tailoring at moderate prices. 

McMahon, Keyer & Stiegeler 
Bros., Inc. 



Main Stoic 

892-894 Van Ness Ave. 

at Ellu Street 



1711 O'FarrellSt. 

at Fillmore 



10 



-THE WASP- 



Santa Barbara is on the eve of a gay month, for 
the Milwaukee is in the channel and the other ships 
of the Pacific Squadron are to join her the third 
of May, after which they will all stay for probably 
three weeks. Such preparations as go on when- 
ever the bluecoats arrive, and such entertainments 
as are given them ! 

* * * 

Three engagements marked Santa Barbara's Society 
group last week. The first on the list is that of 
Augustus B. Higginson and Miss Ednah Sherman 
Girvan. Mr. Higginson is a noted architect with a 
handsome home in the Montecito. He has been a 
widower for several years, and Miss Girvan is the 
second cousin of his first wife. She is a noted jeweler, 
fashioning all sorts of beautiful things from metal and 
using semi-precious jewels in most picturesque way. 
The wedding will take place next month, whereat there 
is much rejoicing. 

Miss Anna Howard is engaged to Wymond Brad- 
bury, a son of Dr. and Mrs. Edwin P. Bradbury, of 
''Las Tunas", Montecito, and his brother, Edwin 
Bradbury, Jr., is betrothed to Miss Howard's cousin, 
Miss Vira Norris of Pasadena. The Howards are at 
the very head and front of the old aristocracy of Santa 
Barbara and Miss Howard is a most popular young 
woman. The Bradburys are mightily pleased with 
the matches. 

* * * 

Mrs. Charles H. Hopkins, one of Santa Barbara's 
wealthiest and most aristocratic matrons, is spend- 
ing two months in San Francisco. 

* * * 

The latest news of Mrs. Horace Hill reports her 
serious illness in Philadelphia, where she has been 
passing the Winter. Both Mr. and Mrs. Hill regret 
exceedingly their hasty sale of their beautiful home on 
Laguna Street, which Mr. Miller purchased after the 
fire. I am told they long for California and will re- 
turn to San Francisco to live in the near future. 

Miss Amy Gunn left last week to visit friends in 
the southern part of the State. 

Before leaving for her home in Washington, D. 
C, Miss Emma Mullan confirmed the report of her 
engagement to Senator Russ Lukens of Alameda. 
Miss Mullan is a great friend of Mrs. Eleanor Mar- 
tin, and has spent much time at this hospitable 

home, where she met Senator Lukens. 

* * # 

A wedding, which will be on an elaborate scale, 
will be celebrated in San Jose on April 30th, when 
Miss Lida Lieb, the daughter of Judge and Mrs. 
S. F. Lieb, will be married to Mr. Armstrong of 
Nebraska. Many guests from this City and Oak- 
land will go to the Garden City for the event. Judge 
Lieb's residence on the Alameda in San Jose is one 
of the handsomest places in Santa Clara Valley and 
well adapted for entertaining. 

* * # 

Miss May Foulkes gave an informal but most 
dainty appointed tea at her home on Spruce Street 
last week in honor of Mrs. Guy Leavitt, who passed 
through the City with her husband on her way to 
Boston, where they will take up their permanent 



residence. Mrs. Leavitt was the former attractive 
Society girl, Miss Julie Reed, daughter of Captain 
and Mrs. Reed, U. S. A., well known in army cir- 
cles. This is Mrs. Leavitt's first visit since her 
marriage four years ago. The tea was a pretty 
reunion of girl friends. An amusing feature of 
the affair was that it proved to be like the play of 
Hamlet with the Prince of Denmark left out of the 
cast. Owing to a blockade on the street railway the 
guest of honor was one of the last to arrive. 

* * * 

A recently announced engagement is that of Miss 
Beda Sperry of this City, and Charles A Bodwell 
of Lakeville, Sonoma County. The bride to be is 
a daughter of Mrs. Austin Sperry of this City and 
sister of Dr. Mary Sperry and Horace B. Sperry, 
also a cousin of Mrs. W. H. Crocker. Mr. Bodwell 
is the owner of the Bodwell ranch near Petaluma. 

* * * 

Mr. and Mrs. Fred Kohl have been spending the 
week in town as the guests of Mrs. William Kohl. 

* * * 

Mrs. Sylvanus Farnham gave a luncheon on 
Wednesday to Miss Emily Marvin and her bridal 
party. Miss Elsie Clifford entertained the guests of 
her sister Mrs. Farnham on the same afternoon at 
bridge. Miss Marvin will be married next week. 

* * # 

At her attractive Summer home, Fair Oaks this 
Saturday, Mrs. J. B. Coryell will entertain the 
Woman's Auxiliary of the Society of California 
Pioneers. The guests are to leave the City at 11 :30 
A. M. returning at 5 P. M. Conveyances will meet 
guests on arrival of the train. A glorious time will 
be had. 

Miss Emily Marvin who will be married to Roy 
Somers the last of this month, is being extensively 
entertained. Miss Emily Johnson gave an elaborate 
luncheon in honor of the fair bride-to-be. 



W/if f *a*» Medical Springs 



Lake County 



WITTER SPRINGS HOTEL Open Entire Year 

Main Office of the Hotel Removed to 
647 Van Ness Avenue, San Francisco 

Witter Water Cures Liver Complaints 



The Land of the Midnight Sun 

Select .Summer Cruises - First Class Only- SEND for handsome illustrated Pamphlets 

HAMBURG - AMERICAN LINE 



908 MARKET ST. Phone Temporary 2946 San Franci.co, Cat. 



-THE WASP 



ii 



Miss Mary Louise Foster and her cousin Miss 
Mina Van Bergen gave a children's party to sixty 
young misses and youths yet in their early teens, 
on last Saturday evening at "The Hacienda" the 
handsome home of the C. J. Fosters in Ross Valley. 
The Hacienda, stands in a tract of eleven acres, 
beautifully improved and is an admirable home for 
entertaining. Guests from San Rafael and all over 

the valley were present. 

* # * 

Mrs. E. Walton Hedges entertained at a delightful 
dinner and bridge partv on Thursday the 18th inst. 
Handsome prizes fell to Capt. Bull, Mr. Hanna and 
Mrs. Pfingst. 

W. F. Herron, editor of the Sequoia, received an 
up-to-date advertisement by the refusal of the Palo 
Alto co-eds to read the issue in which appeared his 
poem. "Bathsheba." Some people have the power 
of making anything a sudden success merely by 
withdrawing themselves from it. The result in this 
case was that three San Francisco publishing 
houses raced after the author. 

Dr. Charles Gardiner, Stanford's chaplain, states 
that the poetical version of the Bible story omits 
the moral, the arraignment of David by Nathan, 
and therefore constitutes a grave literary offense. 
We are used to think the other way : that a moral 
is considered poor art. It is left to the reader. 

The most interesting thing about "Bathsheba" is 
the refusal of the co-eds to peruse it ; the next best 
question, how many of them have actually not read 
it? And lastly, who held out the longest? 

BATHSHEBA IN PALO ALTO. 
Dear co-eds, why seek ye so quickly to quarrel 
About a poor poem that's lacking a moral . J 
Why is all this flutter and fury and fumin' 
About an old king and a bold army woman? 
You've frequently read without showiifg dismay,oh, 
Of scandals like that, right here at Vallejo. 
Of course, it was wrong, when the king saw Bath- 
sheba, 
To wigwag his hand and say, "Come, meine liebe." 
Especially, knowing the dame had a hubby, 
The best we can say is, Dave's actions were 

scrubby. 
But why put the hemlock of scorn in the cup 
Of the brave Stanford bard who showed Israel's 

bard up? 
If you say unto Herron, "We'll none of your 

gravy," 
It seems that your sympathy must be with Davie. 



Now that we have two April 18ths to remember, 
the second a day of some comfort, that date does 
not bear the same sinister aspect with which the 

City viewed it for a year. 

* * * 

The mariage of Miss Gertrude V. Gabbs to Frank 
W. Erlin will be celebrated quietly today, Saturday, 
at the home of the bride's mother, Mrs. Cora Clinton 
Gabbs in Escalle. The ceremony, will be performed 



out of doors and Archbishop Emery will officiate. 
Miss Gabbs is the daughter of the late Albert Gabbs, 
a well known mining expert. She has been for some 
time connected with journalism in this City. Mr. 
Erlin is with the firm of Itaker & Hamilton. 

* • • 

The Hotel Del Monte will of course be a focus 
of social activity during the Summer, for this un- 
equalled resort offers every opportunity for out- 
door enjoyment and indoor comfort. 

* * * 

The State Convention of the doctors at Del Monte 
caused the automobiles to whirl between San Fran- 
cisco and Monterey and the weather was perfection 
and the roads fine. Many of the Medicos took their 
families with them and the great hotel was filled 
to overflowing. 

* * * 

Captain and Mrs. Lawrence H. Westdahl are 
spending their honeymoon at Del Monte. Mrs. 
Westdahl was Miss Alma Irene Sevening, whose 
pretty wedding took place last week at the home of 
her sister, Mrs. Franz Collischon, of Alameda. Mr. 
and Mrs. Anson Herrick are another happy young 

couple at Del Monte. 

* * * 

Mrs. Harry M. Sherman and her children are 
at Del Monte with her mother, Mrs. Jonalton Kittle, 
and Mrs. Benjamin Dibble. 



HOTEL RAFAEL 

San Rafael, Cal. 

OPEN ALL THE YEAR ROUND 

50 Minutes from San Francisco 

The only first-class hotel in the vicinity of 
the city. American and European plan. 

R. V. MALTON, Proprietor 




Phone West 4983 



Vogel & Bishoff 

Ladies' Tailors and 
Habit Makers 

1 525 Sutter Street, San Francisco 




Old Poodle Dog Restaurant 



824-826 EDDY STREET 

Near Van Ness Ave. • 



Service better than before 
the fire 



Formerly, Bnsh and Grant Ave. 
San Francisco 



Phone Emergency 63 



12 



-THE WASP- 




RICHARD M. HOTAUNG 

In "Mrs. Warren's Profession," Bernard Shaw 
sketches a degenerate Englishman of title, who in- 
vests his money in Mr. Warren's "private hotels," 
and thereby obtains high interest on his money. 
Shaw's study is no doubt photographic in its ac- 
curacy. The novelist doubtless knows some de- 
graded nobleman who uses his money in the man- 
ner described. It is not necessary to go all the 
way to London to find people of more or less social 
prominence who derive large incomes from infa- 
mous and criminal enterprises. Here in San Fran- 
cisco it would be easy to name persons, who like 
Shaw's depraved man of title keep up the appear- 
ance of respectability on money, directly or indi- 
rectly, drawn from the earnings of fallen women. 
•The wave of civic reform which is sweeping over 
the United States, if not the entire world, is lay- 
ing bare the secrets of many such people. 

In days not so long gone by the possession of 
wealth silenced all criticism as to how it was ac- 
quired. As long as a man or woman could show 
a bank account of a million dollars Society opened 
its doors to the possessors, and held it to be bad 
form to ask questions about the new-comer's ante- 
cedents. 

* * ^c 

There is a charge in the public estimate of wealth 
and the owners of great fortunes have themselves 
caused it. The richest, like John D. Rockefeller 
and Andrew Carnegie, seem to be oppressed by 



their mountains of gold and eager to give part of 
them for philanthropic work. 

* * * 

But to find the really worthy objects of charity 
and to have the gifts accepted with a good grace 
are problems that worry the billionaires. Is their 
vast wealth worth all the cares it creates ? The 
world is beginning to answer in the negative and 
to take a saner view of life. So far only the mi- 
nority takes this philosophic view, but the minority 
of today may grow into the majority of another 
generation. 

Beyond question the money madness of our peo- 
ple is declining and every year a larger proportion 
tries to get more out of life, and fewer work with 
insane absorption at the task of accumulating vast 
fortunes for lawyers to fight over and heirs to 
squander. The growing sanity of the public on 
money causes the better classes to become more 
and more critical of the methods by which large 
fortunes are acquired. An example of this has been 
furnished by the indictment of several very promi- 
nent Southern capitalists for conducting the Hon- 
duras Lottery, which is the successor to the old 
Louisiana Lottery. General Pierre G. T. Beaure- 
gard, who was for years commander of drawings 
of the Louisiana Lottery Company, was regarded 
as one of the leading citizens of New Orleans. Pub- 
lic opinion in Louisiana would regard his occupa- 
tion quite differently today'. The Louisiana Lottery 
Company obtained a twenty-five-year charter from 
a reconstruction legislature. 

* * * 

Notwithstanding the lawful character given to 






Let them know! 



Your friend can reserve a room at the 

Hotel St. Francis 

when he leaves home, and find it ready 
for him when he arrives. Tell him so. 
Every comfort at hand. 



-THE WASP- 



13 




THE LATE LOUIS MORRISON 

the Louisiana Lottery by its State Charter the bet- 
ter sentiment in Louisiana in later years condemned 
the enterprise and even the social position of Gen- 
eral Beauregard was lowered thereby. Another 
prominent citizen who had been a principal owner 
in the lottery was Charles T. Howard. The Louis- 
iana Jockey Club, which ran the famous Metarie 
race track, actually blackballed Howard, because 
of his connection with the Louisiana Lottery. 
Howard sold the mansion he had built in New Or- 
leans and went to reside elsewhere. His wife tried 
to make amends for her husband by building 
churches and doing charitable work. 

The Louisiana Lottery made millions for its 
stockholders and like all such enterprises was un- 
fair to its patrons. The unsold tickets were always 
put in the wheel and often drew the prizes. Its re- 
ceipts were about $4,000,000 a month in its palmy 
days. 

* * :(: 

The Honduras Lottery is the old Louisiana Lot- 
tery transplanted in another land to evade the laws 
of the L'nited States. In this it has not been en- 
tirely successful as twenty-five indictments have 
been returned against the stockholders, some of 
whom move in the millionaire sets of New York 
and New Orleans. Its profits have been about 
$6,000,000 a year. Evidence showing an organiza- 
tion throughout the country has been gathered by 
the Government through its raids and the admis- 
sions of some of the men implicated. This organ- 



ization called for huge expenditures all the way 
along the line, but even after they were paid there 
was plenty left for the men "higher up." When 
the cases are tried, it is said, the country will be 
astonished at the revelations of the widespread 
operations of this big gambling scheme, despite all 
the efforts of the Government to stop them. 
* * * 

A Professor Hopkins of Yale, an American 
Oriental Society, and a session in Philadelphia, 
might not be a promising combination. It proved 
a treatise on the kiss in ancient India. The popu- 
larity of the kiss has never been attributed to its 
long-standing usage. Yet it is pleasant to know- 
that precedent could be established if necessary. 
And those primeval people had very little — no auto- 
mobiles, no moving pictures, no French restau- 
rants; it was only just to them that they should 
have kisses. Of course, that clime has always been 
famous for diamonds and rubies, and thereby may 
be some clue to the beginning of the custom. 

However, the professor thinks there was a time 
when there were no kisses on the face of the earth, 
as the records disclose none in the early period he 
cites. The logic is not sound, though it smacks of 
some ratiocination. Imagination could smack 
sweeter. 



Mrs. Martin Lalor Crimmins will shortly arrive 
from the Philippines with her children on a visit to 
her mother, Mrs. Cole, and sister, Mrs. Charles 
McCormick. Capt. Crimmins' regiment the Six- 
teenth Infantry will not leave until the middle of 
August. 




STUDEBAKER 

1907 

CARS NOW ARRIVING 

Studebaker Bros. Co. of California 

405 Golden Gate Avenue 

Chester A. Weaver, Manager 



14 



-THE WASP 



The marriage of Jane Wilshire and Jack Pol- 
hemus came near being postponed at the last mo- 
ment because of the critical illness of Mrs. 
Polhemus, who was hovering between life and 
death for several days preceding the wedding. The 
guests were not allowed however to know of the 
critical state of Mrs. Polhemus and so the wedding 
occurred according to schedule. 

* * * 

The handsome and aristocratic-looking Father 
Sesnon will no longer be the swell of the Roman 
Catholic Church in California, for the new bishop 
who succeeds the late Archbishop Montgomery is 
a scion of royalty itself, being the uncle of the 
King of Portugal. Judging by the way Santa Bar- 
bara Society tumbled over itself to lionize that 
courtly monk who has been lecturing down there, 
local Society, which is a shade less exclusive than 
that of the Channel City, will try to monopolize 
the clerical prince who has come amongst us. 
Smart brides intent on having ultra smart wed- 
dings will have the opportunity of their lives. They 
may not only succeed in having the scholarly and 
dignified Archbishop Riordan perform the cere- 
mony but may induce the mitred uncle of a reign- 
ing king to assist in the ceremony. Such a pros- 
pect would be enough to tempt a Puritan maiden, 
Priscilla of the smart set, to turn proselyte — that 
is if the smart set be speckled by any Puritan 
Priscillas. However that may be it is a foregone 
conclusion that there will be keen rivalry for the 
distinction of being the first in San Francisco to 
have a royal prince officiate in sacerdotal robes 
at a wedding. 

* * * 

It was certainly a shrewd stroke of the pontificial 
power to send such a prelate to San Francisco, 
where it happens that a number of the oldest and 
socially most prominent families belong to the 
Catholic faith. Burlingame is particularly strong 
in such and it was to Mrs. Francis Carolan, the 
queen of Burlingame, so to speak that the princely 
bishop brought his social passports in the shape 
of letters from Charles Page Bryan, the American 
Minister at Portugal. The new bishop will there- 
fore become acquainted with Burlingame first and 
the rest of San Francisco Society will be eager to 
see him after such .a debut. 

Amongst the most prominent Catholic families 
here are the Tobins, the Martins and the Parrotts. 
Mrs. Will Tevis, as a Pacheco, is of course a devout 
Catholic, and Mrs. Rudolph Spreckels is also of that 
faith. There are few cities in America where the 
Catholic Church has more socially prominent and 
wealthy members than San Francisco. A good 
many of Father Yorke's constituency were in hopes 
that the honor of succeeding Bishop Montgomery 
would fall to him, but it is evident that the Vatican 
has not been as much impressed by the brilliancy 
of his talents as are his south-of-market-street ad- 
mirers. Although the Catholic Church has a larger 

For busy men and women Abbott's Bitters. A delightful tonic and invigorator, a health 
giver and a health preserver. All druggists. ___ 



membership amongst the working classes than any 
other Christian denomination, its tendencies have 
for a thousand years been aristocratic, and even 
here in our democratic nations it prefers to cultivate 
the favor of the latter classes than to play to the 
mob. 

* * * 

Mother, may I go out and marry? 

No, my darling daughter. 
Wait a few months and become a June bride ; 
• Until then, don't go near the water. 

And do, do, my huckleberry do, 

Remember what you do do. 
With contraband weddings and quick wooers why 
do? 

Remember and do as I do. 

And the daughter did, on a technicality, so that 
she was soon heard saying, Come in, the water is 
fine. Miss Ethel Wilson, a banker's daughter of 
New York, discovered that her mother's marriage 
had been an elopement ; so she followed the leader 
exactly. All would have gone merrily as a real, 
widely advertised wedding bell, with bridesmaid 
and beauty roses, had not the elopers lost the 



BURNS HAMMAM BATHS 



LADIES' DEPARTMENT 
OPEN DAY AND NIGHT 



817 Eddy Street 



...Phone Franklin 2245 




A Steinway $525 
Piano for - 



Called ihe Steinway " Vertegrand " — it is 
upright with all the features of the higher 
priced Steinways, but with an inexpensive 
although substantial case. A piano for those 
who want a Steinway but who cant afford to 
[o pay for elaboration. On installments if 
you wish. 



SHERMAN, CLAY & CO. 



Steinway Agents 



1635 Van Ness Ave., Sao Francisco 



Broadway at 13th, Oakland 



CHAS. SCHMIDT HARRY MILLING 

Bohemianism is Best Exemplified at 

THE NORTHERN CAFE 

1710 and 1712 O'FARRELL STREET 

A PLACE TO EAT AND DRINK "Ladies' Orchestra" from 6 lo 12 



THE WASP 



15 



marriage certificate. The groom, Edmund Putnam, 
one of G. P. Putnam's sons, the New York pub- 
lishers, kept worrying about that marriage certificate 
until he felt he must go back to Chaplain Warren 
and get another. He feared the missing document 
might go into some sort of spontaneous combustion 
and end his marital career, which he was just begin- 
ning at a cafe. Also the little slip of paper might 
fall into wrongful hands. It did. No sooner lost 
than found by a meddler, who conveyed it to papa. 
Papa, as President of the Lincoln Trust Company, 
took up his telephone and quoted the rules to young 
Putnam. He was so excited he wanted every- 
body, the Chaplain included, to change their votes. 
But with two certificates, the couple took the honey- 
moon trail, and nothing but death or ennui will 

ever part them. 

* * * 

Those California beaux seem to walk right into 
the good graces of the New York smart set as 
soon as they set foot in Gotham. Sherrill Schell, 
so well known and popular in San Francisco So- 
ciety, seems to be mingling with the smartest in 
New York, for "Cholly Knickerbocker" says in one 
of the large New York dailies : 

"Society is becoming accustomed to shocks, vary- 
ing from the latest escapades of young millionaires 
to the reported heart concerns of pretty widows; 
but Sherrill Schell, a prominent San Franciscan, is 
the hero of the very latest Society shock. 

"The other night, at Delmonico's, Mrs. Oliver 
Harriman handed to Mr. Schell an electric lighted 
parasol, as a cotillion favor. 

"Mr. Schell simply couldn't become interested in 
anything else until he took a peep at the works. 
He does not take on when hurt, so he did not 
scream, in fact, his language, though Heavens 
knows what he said mentally, was almost apolo- 
getic. At any rate, no action for damaged feelings 
is contemplated. The Californian learned consid- 
erable from his investigation." 
# * * 

The Fairmont Hotel certainly opened in a blaze of 
social glory when Mrs. Cornelius Vanderbilt and her 
party from New York inscribed their names on the 
vergin page of the register. Mrs. Vanderbilt is the 
mother of young Cornelius Vanderbilt who married 
Miss Grace Wilson of New York. Mrs. Shephard of 
the party, was a Vanderbilt. Miss Gladys Vanderbilt 
is one of the richest heiresses of New York. The dis- 
tinguished guests left for the East by way of Portland 
last Saturday night in their special car. 

Should the Palace Plotel people lease the Fairmont 
Hotel for $105,000 a year plus the taxes and insurance, 
the Messrs.Lawswillbe entitled to congratulations and 
no doubt so will be the lessees. Starting a great hotel 
is a gigantic feat, calculated to try the purse, patience 
and talents of any man on earth and especially one not 
used to the business. The Palace Hotel people have 
experience, great prestige and ample resources, and 

An exhibition of Paintings of Indian Life by Grace Hudson, will be held 
from April 17th to 27th at the Schussler Gallery, 1218 Sutter Street. 



would beyond doubt make the Fairmont a paying in- 
vestment at once and one of the best conducted places 

in America. 

* * # 

Mr. I Ialton has retired from the management of the 
Hotel Rafael to engage in another line of business. 
Mr. I". N. Orpin the new manager who has been in 
charge for several months has become so very much 
of a favorite by his ability and urbanity that every- 
body is delighted at his flection to fill the vacancy. 

* * * 

Mr. and Paul Bancroft will spend the coming Sum- 
mer at the beautiful Bancroft ranch near Concord. Mr. 
and Mrs. Herbert H. Bancroft and Miss Lucy, will 
also remain during the entire Summer, as also Paul 
and Philip with their families. 

* * * 

The old timer, who writes that Louis Bruguiere's 
paternal grandfather was a gardener, apparently 
does not know what he was talking about. The 
Bruguieres in New York were friends of the Ward 
McAllisters thirty-five years ago and that puts an 
end to the statement that Louis' grandfather was 
a gardener, for Ward McAllister was not suffi- 
ciently democratic to seek his associates amongst 
the horny-fisted sons of toil. An old-timer from 
New York tells me that all the New York set re- 
ceived Louis Bruguiere so cordially because his 

grandfather knew theirs. 

* * * 

The Lillian Russell engagement helped to 
emphasize the fact that San Francisco is as gay as 
ever socially. There were theatre and supper 
parties galore. Mrs. La Boyteaux gave a dinner 
followed by a box party. Her guests included Mr. 
and Mrs. Clarence Breeden and Mrs.. Henry Foster 
Dutton. 







Now Open 

The New 


E5T 


3§L 


Poodle Dog 
Restaurant 


Hf'J--, 




and Hotel 


m, d Ik / 




N. W. Comer 
Polk and Post Sts. 

San Francisco 


*!Al ^""~ 







muemzco 




PHONE FELL 991 1 



1808 MARKET ST. 
SAN FRANCISCO 



Illustrated Catalogue 

on Application 



Branch, 837 S. Spring St. 
LOS ANGELES 



16 



-THE WASP 




PWolo Genthe 



MISS MAY RE1S 



Miss Edwinna Hammond recently left for 
Arizona, where she will remain some time with 
her brother, who goes for the benefit of his health. 

The space writer is always glad to record the do- 
ings of the Woman's Interdenominational Mission- 
ary Union of the District of Columbia. The title 
of the organization is not only longer than usually 
falls to the lot of the scribe who is paid on the 50- 
vara plan, but the word "Interdenominational" 
takes up space for three words and causes a three- 
ply smile to displace a little professional cynicism. 
* * * 

Fifty thousand women of that Union have lately 
resented the statement of Senator Reed Smoot in 
which he said that the ladies have discontinued 
their hostility toward him. By formal resolution 
the hostility is declared continuous. 

But the bullet which put Stanford White into 
"Thanatopsis" gave New Yorkers a fashionable 
auction ; and his antiques were divided among 



them, at prices a la mode. Artistically, Society did 
not confirm Harry K. Thaw's plea that the deceased 
architect was an enemy to that body. 

The picture sale aggregated $51,532, and with! 
the house furnishings amounted to $177,337. A 
portrait of the Earl of Dorset, early Spanish school, 
brought $3200; a sofa pillow, perhaps of the 
Evelyn Nesbit school, $170. Mrs. Payne Whitney 
blew herself for $100, taking an old China oviform 
jar. 

David Belasco, George Crocker, Mrs. Harry 
Payne Whitney, Elsie de Wolfe, Imperial Commis- 
sioner of the Shah of Persia, H. H. Topakyan, I. 
N. P. Stokes, Mrs. Robert Goelet, and the Prince- 
ton Club also bought. 

% :•: * 

The Carnegie smile and the Rockefeller leer have 
been exchanged by typewritten letter. John D. dic- 
tated : "Hearty congratulations for your grand ef- 
forts to help your fellow men." And Andrew: 
"Many thanks, fellow-worker, in the task of dis- 
tributing surplus wealth." 

The operatic tendencies of the Emperor of Japan 
have never been given much attention, as far as 
we know. Politically, though, an Emperor's mu- 
sical tastes have some weight. The Mikado does 
not fancy the tricksy comic opera that bares his 
name. His esthetic embassy in London have inti- 
mated that the revival of "The Mikado" in Eng- 
land's capital is unnecessary, inadvisable. There- 
fore, a $25,000 production has been sacrificed to in- 
ternational good will. 

Sullivan, when composing the music, was hoaxed 
into using a coarse song of the tea-houses for 
the Japanese National Anthem as entrance music 
for the Mikado. It was like making England's 
monarch enter to "Razzle Dazzle," or peradventure 
worse than that, for all one knows of the subtler 
meanings of Japanese tea-house odes. 

Comic opera themes have ever made a scapegoat 
of diplomacy and kings ; but here the goat be- 
came owner of some battle-ships. Perhaps, if Siam 
should rise to a world power, we would lose 
"Wang." 

* * * 

Sarah Bernhardt has always had a complete work- 
ing knowledge of that embodiment of art known 
to the world as the "Divine Sarah." She is now 
tempted with the Grand Cross of the Legion of 
Honor. Certain officials have desired her to accept 
the distinction, which is accredited to her not as 
a tragedienne but a "professor." The distinction 
between the two terms seems to be merely one 
between the generic and the specific. Honor is fre- 
quently technical. In this case it insinuates that 
Sarah's technique is not quite honorable — honor- 
able in the sense of the intended decoration. 

To this, Bernhardt in the stage part of "Adrienne 
Lecouvrier" makes reply : "I am one of the high 
priests of my age. Do you know what my art is? 
Think you I will turn from it? It is noble, inspir- 
ing. It educates. It preaches sweetly what is 



-THE WASP- 



17 




Photo Genthe 



MRS. GASTON M. ASHE 



rudely preached in other ways. It evokes vice, but 
only to put vice to shame. It sings the beauty of 
life. It glorifies God. It awakens patriotism. It 
knocks at all brains, at all hearts. It moves, trans- 
ports, electrifies. It chastens, scourges, pardons." 

So too the audience thought, and gave applause 
that resounded to the gods on Olympus. 

The Battle of Cocktails goes brightly on as 
Washington club men sit and bedate of Perry Bel- 
mont's difficulty in entering the Chevy Chase Club. 
Belmont was not blackballed ; his friends whisked 
away his name to prevent such a calamity. The 
unsuccessful applicant blames President Roosevelt 
for the affair. The brilliancy in laying the onus 
of mischief on Theodore has worn off within the 
last two or three seasons. The practice has become 
hackneyed. Still, a man who has some truth to 



express is not always concerned about its sparkling 
originality. 

* * * 

When Belmont was in Paris, the home of sin- 
cerity, he was heard to remark that he did not 
think Roosevelt is sincere. After that, it was in 
some way hinted to him to forget the combination 
on the White House door. One of his enemies is 
Thomas Xelson Page, the author. Page's outlook 
on Society is a condemnation of the frivolous 
class which he claims Belmont occupies. Besides 
that, the outlook of Page's home in Washington 
is on a triangular piece of ground which he had 
desired be reserved by the government as a park, 
but which Belmont now occupies, too, with the in- 
tention of building. 

The millionaire will again submit his name when 
his friends tell him that victory is winged his way. 

* * * 

In the rooms of the Fontenelle Club, Omaha, the 
picture of John M. Thurston, ex-Senator from Ne- 
braska, is turned to the wall. Pasted on the back 
of the canvas is a newspaper clipping showing why. 
The why is an anti-Roosevelt speech which Thurs- 
ton delivered in Philadelphia. While the Senator 
is pleased enough to wear his Roosevelt sentiments 
on his back, the vista between the portrait and the 
Republican club wall is not enchanting. 

* * * 

The Countess Eliza De La Vaulx, who died the 
other day in Paris of pneumonia, had just returned 
from an American trip with her daughters, Miles. 
Clothilde and Louise De La Vaulx. They visited 
relatives in St. Louis and Orange, N. J. She was 
born in St. Louis in 1864, and was the daughter of 
Patrick M. Dillon, one of the first of St. Louis' mer- 
chants. The late John A. Dillon, a newspaper man, 
of St. Louis and New York, was her brother. Her 
husband was the late Roger, Count De La Vaulx, of 
Rosoy Aisne, formerly of the Papal Zouaves and hon- 
orary captain in the French army in 1867. 

* * * 

Andrew Bogart, the famous San Francisco bari- 
tone, is back at his home in Buchanan street and 
his friends who planned to give him a rousing 
welcome at the opening night of the Jefferson De 
Angeles Opera Company's engagement, at the Van 
Ness Theatre in June, will be disappointed. The 
company closed its season at New Orleans last 
week. Mr. Bogart has not sung in his native city 
since his debut in "The Senerade," in the old 
Tivoli three years ago. Meantime he has sung 
in opera in England and studied for six months in 
Florence with the celebrated Vannuccini. 

Miles Baird, whose forgery of a check with at- 
torney John S. Partridge's name attached thereto 
brought him into more notoriety, has been through 
the divorce court too. His wife, who was the 
exceedingly pretty Miss Ruth Jackson, had the 
marital bonds severed. The lady is half Spanish 
and on the mother's side is descended from one 
of the old Spanish governors. 

ENTRE NOUS. 



District Attorney Langdon is on record with the 
announcement that he will not be a candidate for 
Mayor, and that he desires nothing but to succeed 
himself in his present office that he may continue 
the work on which he is now engaged in driving 
to jail the grafters that infest the City. His an- 
nouncement was publicly made at the banquet of 
the merchants at the Fairmont on the anniversary 
of the earthquake and is therefore to be considered 
as having more weight than if had been delivered 
in the way of an interview to the press. Langdon 
made a frank and open disclaimer that he is seek- 
ing to lift himself into the Mayoralty by his pro- 
secution of the grafters and declared that he does 
not want the office out of which he is seeking to 
drive Schmitz. 



This declaration by Langdon will go a long way 
toward disproving that charge that the "whole 
thing is a political scheme", a statement which 
has been hurled about the heads of the prosecutors 
by the grafters ever since the investigation was 
begun. There has been frequent repetition of the 
expression that Hearst through Langdon was at- 
tempting to turn the prosecution to his political 
account by electing Langdon to the Mayoralty and 
filling all the appointive offices with Hearst men. In 
fact, Hearst gave color to this belief by publishing 
in his Chicago paper a full page in which Langdon 
was hailed as the one who had taken the initiative 
in the prosecution and to whom all the credit be- 
longed. 

Many thought at the time that Hearst had gone 
too far in this matter, as the boosting of Langdon 
gave the cold shoulder to Rudolph Spreckels, 
Fremont Older, Francis J. Heney and all the others 
who had labored for months on the investigation 
before Langdon was even made aware that an in- 
vestigation was on. But now Langdon is out with 
a flat declaration that he does not want the Mayor's 
office, so the prosecution will go on smoothly and 
there will be no lack of . brotherhood among those 
who are enlisted in the work. 



It would not require the cleverness of Detective 
Burns to discover that Langdon acted the part of 
a good Indian in going up to that banquet and de- 
livering himself of his disavowal of political seek- 
ing. It is strongly suspected that the leaders in the 
prosecution told Langdon that the announcement 
was due from him in order to allay the suspicion 
that the investigation was merely political, and that 
Langdon obeyed their orders in making the an- 
nouncement that was desired of him. 

Wilh men of affairs, Abbott's Bitters are the great tonic and aid to digestion. They are 
ecommended by hading physicians. All druggists. 



Anyone seeing Supervisor Sanderson on thel 
Streets of Palo Alto these Summer days would find 
it hard to believe the tear-dripping stories of a part 
of the yellow press that he is "on the verge of 
death", and that the ravages of consumption are 
about to carry him to a grave unlined by the profits 
of graft. Sanderson may be a sick man, but he 
certainly does not look the part of the death-bed 
confessor. Many are inclined to believe that his 
condition was- represented to him by the shrewd 
detectives to be much worse than it really is in 
order to get from him the evidence which proved an 
entering wedge for the dragging out of confessions 
from all the rest of the bunch of grafters whose 
hands are soiled with corporation bribes. 



The decision of the graft investigators to give the 
supervisors complete immunity in return for their 
confessions is. having a bad effect in more ways 
than one. It is a shocking example to set before the 
youths who are being taught in the public schools 
the wisdom of ethics and a high order of honesty in j 
public office. But worse than that it has emboldened 
the supervisors to such a point that in addition to 
strutting the streets and boasting of their ac- 
complishments, they are planning all sorts of new 



flattl Sattrrnft 

Ileal Estate 

anil ifltnattrtal Agwtt 
?25 Mattel g-t. 



Eoatio - SJraBPB - 3mir-utmrnta 



SWAIN'S CAFE 



1111-1113 

POST ST. 



Have added to their heretofore Excellent Equipment 

A Modern Grill Service 



With Schlitz and Wurzburger 
Beer on Draught 



Music under the direction o 
Mr. Edgar Bayliss 



JULES' FRENCH RESTAURANT S**£*£SS, 

Regular Dinners served svery Evening, including Sunday, at former prices 

326 BUSH STREET 

Music on Sundays Phone Temporary 1 82 1 Jules Wittman, Prop, 



THE WASP' 



19 



ways to enrich themselves at the expense of the 
public. 



The latest scheme of the boodling gang is in 
connection with the reorganization of the amateur 
fight clubs. Sixteen of the supervisors (Tveitmoe 
and O'Neill being out of it i have organized eight 
clubs which will ask for permits for the carrying on 
of amateur boxing contests in the City. Two super- 
visors belong to each club and there is a third 
member of each club, too, who is an outsider, and 
in whose name all the business of the club is 
transacted. The supervisors are silent partners and 
the stock is equally divided in each club, each super- 
visor and each outsider having one-third. 



The supervisors plan to get very rich from the 
profits of the fights. They have long cast hungry 
eyes at the spoils of the fighting game which are 
known at large, the success of CofFroth, Graney and 
Britt having convinced them that it was a game 
wi irth the candle. So through these amateur clubs 
they plan to grab the entire fighting business and 
divide the profits. They ought to be on their way to 
San Quentin. It is a disgrace to the community to 
have such men making its municipal ordinances. 



I think Mr. Heney and the public-spirited gentle- 
men associated with him in the cleansing of the 
City government should be very careful lest im- 
munity to the self-confessed grafters may not prove 
a boomerang. Uncompromising prosecution of the 
rascals, even though they be restrained by the 
end. Thousands of good citizens in San Francisco 
chafe under the disgrace of being governed by such 
rascals, even though they be restrained by the 
terror of prosecution for felony. Any sort of a 
peaceful compact with such people is dangerous. 
The safer course is usually to treat them as pirates 
with whom there can be no compromise and take 
the speediest means to land them in jail. If the 
decent people become disgusted by seeing those 
municipal boodlers left unmolested in office, no one 
can tell how the vote may go at the next election. 



The N. S. G. W. has undergone a sort of pre- 
cipitation and come up translucent again, leaving 
Abe Ruef in the sediment. While this sediment is 
being tried by a jury of his peers, Gallagher is still 
a Native Son. The difference is, Gallagher has con- 
fessed, and Ruef has not. The logic may be confus- 
ing to some ; but one should not ask too much in these 
reconstruction days. We have learned that there are 
degrees of crime and complicity. This explanation 
floats down the River of Truth like a swan, and disap- 
pears. But Ruef is no longer a Native Son. He 
might as well have been born on the moon, the asso- 
ciation has so little use for him. California disowns 
him, yet will not give up possession. 



From the standpoint of a thriller, in the eyes of an 
epicure of sensation, graft news is having a few dull 
moments now. At first the exposure was exciting. 
Ruef's appeals all on account of the elisor were in- 



teresting. Shortridge's contempt and Ach's ptomaines 
retained one's attention. But there is a general de- 
mam 1 for something new. This is said in no spirit 
of mischief. Anti-Ruefism was a high sea when the 
indictments began. But after all, public feeling is 
merely dramatic instinct. Ami woe is unto the man 
who gives it a throb one day and on the second day 
fails to give two throbs, and so on. For a real shocker, 
why not prove somebody innocent ? 



The demand by the Legislature of Minnesota that 
President Roosevelt shall accept a third term indicates 
that the movement to compel the President to forget 
his promise is likely to become very strong. ., 



C. H. REHNSTROM 

Tailor and Importer 

SPRING AND SUMMER STYLES 

NOW READY 



Formerly of 

The Mutual Savings Bank Building 



2415 FILLMORE STREET 

Telephone West 5769 



'JUST A SHADE ON OTHERS" 



Weinhard 

The Peer 
of Bottle Beer 




CALIFORNIA BOTTLING CO. 



SOLE BOTTLERS 



1255 HARRISON STREET 

PHONE MARKET 977 



Weinhard is the Delicious Beer served at Cafe Francisco, The 
Louvie, Tail's and many other Cafes 



crocerpor President's Taste 

Macaroni, Vermicelli, Spaghetti 

L. R. PODESTA, Manufacturer 512 Washington Strut 



20 



THE WASP- 



put through it has no need to appeal to Tveitmoe. 




Photo Genthe 



UNCLE GEORGE BROMLEY 



That eminent thinker and spieler, O. A. Tveitmoe, 
who was so ready only a few months ago to hurl de- 
fiance at President Roosevelt and to wire red-hot 
messages to Mayor Schmitz at Washington that there 
must be no sui render on the Japanese question, is a 
very much subdued person just now. So much so, in- 
deed, that he did not reply with his usual crushing 
weight of argument to Secretary Root's speech on the 
Japanese controversy. His Japanese and Korean Ex- 
clusion League has forgotten when and where it meets, 
and Tveitmoe is sticking pretty close to his labor union 
job and saying as little as possible. 



Tveitmoe broke into public office at a most unfor- 
tunate time. He has been put in the position of a 
rabid champion of Schmitz and Ruef just at the time 
when the confessions of the Supervisors disclosed to 
the world what a precious pair of thieves Gene and 
Abe have been. The swag was all distributed before 
he got within reach of it, and now he must walk or 
take a street car while Gallagher, Boxton and a lot 
more of the Schmitz pirates whirl about in their own 
automobiles. And the illustrious exclusionist has not 
even the satisfaction of being of importance to the 
Grand Jury. The "big stick" dismisses Keane and 
O'Grady and other Ruefites without a word to Tveit- 
moe. If it wants a measure for decent government 



Also Tveitmoe is subdued by virtue of a crack on 
the jaw which a painter hit him because he had abused 
the wood-dauber in his labor journal. Tveitmoe is a 
huge fellow, with hands like hams, but when the 
painter, two-thirds his size, cut loose at him, the 
Swedish giant fairly frizzled up and sat where the 
painter put him until interfering friends made it safe 
for the flabbergasted statesman to get up. 



P. H. McCarthy, also, is beginning to be a name but 
little heard. He and his clique have not the courage 
to denounce the grafters, and they dare not any longer 
assert confidence in the integrity of the labor union 
administration they so stoutly upheld and praised 
through years of public plunder. 



Myrtile Cerf, the faithful henchman of Abe Ruef, 
is much aggrieved. The Grand Jruy will not indict 
him. It just ignores him. He is too small for them 
even to take a good swift kick at and he is sore about 
it. He would like to be a martyr, to be indicted along 
with Ruef and Schmitz and the millionaires who 
bribed them, to be right in the lime-light as a man who 
was such a thorough-going crook that he would rather 
go to jail with Ruef than desert his standard for an 
instant. But Myrtile is small fry. The Grand Jury 
can't waste time with him and he fairly hates that 
Grand Jury for its lack of consideration. 



Supervisor Lonergan is the first of the bribed Super- 
visors to be kicked out by his associates. The Bakery 
Wagon Drivers' Union refused to re-elect him as its 
delegate to the Labor Council. The Blacksmiths' 
Helpers' Union re-elected Supervisor Furey, after his 
confession of crime, both as its president and delegate 
to the council. Mike Coffey, the ex-Buckley lamb and 
perennial agitator, is still the delegate of the Hack- 
men's Union, though he has confessed his crimes and 
treason to union labor. 



Lonergan has the distinction of being the only one 
of the piratical band who has broken away from Grand 
Jury restraint long enough to tell his story of admin- 
istration crime to a newspaper. The Examiner got 
his story through the combined talents of its news 
editor, John P. Barrett, and an office boy. Barrett's 



La Roheme 



First Class Italian Restaurant 
155S BUSH ST- 

Between Van Neil and Franklin 



SPECIALTY: Italian and French Cuisine 

FEUX PIANTANIDA. Manager 



Formerly Proprietor of the ORIGINAL COPPA 



Colonial Tub and Shower Baths 

BathS Ladies' Department, 8 to 12 a. m. week days 

REGULAR PRICES 
Now Open 1745 O'Farrell St., near Fillmore 



-THE WASP- 



21 



father is foreman in a bakery owned by the office 
boy's father and Loncrgan used to drive a wagon for 
the same establishment. The Examiner sent the office 
boy out to find Loncrgan and he got him and brought 
him in. Then Lonergan, by some mysterious influ- 
ence, was induced to talk. Barrett wrote the inter- 
view and it was the best piece of reading that has been 
turned out since the graft exposure began. 



Secretary Root's discussion of the Japanese con- 
troversy made the State rights cry of the exclusionists 
sound very ridiculous. His argument was very close 
and proved conclusively that State rights will not give 
any State the power to cancel treaty provisions law- 
fully made by the President and ratified by the Senate 
of the United States. 



The Federal Government is the sole treaty-making 
power and valid treaties annul State laws not con- 
sistent with their provisions. Treaties with "most 
favored nation" clauses have been held valid from the 
earliest years of the nation. Under the treaty with 
Japan, if California admits other aliens to her public 
schools she must admit the Japanese. California may 
exclude all aliens or may choose to have no public 
schools under the cherished reserved right doctrine. 
Hut Root shows that the one thing she was doing was 
the very thing she had no warrant under the Constitu- 
tion to do. 



It is rather amusing to see some stalwart Republican 
editors in San Francisco fighting so fiercely for the 
sacred doctrine of State rights. Twenty years ago it 
was the custom of most Republican editors to sneer 
at State rights as something that had no magic outside 
of the Solid South. When the Solid North convinced 




the Confederacy that it could neither keep slaves nor 
set up its own government, the doctrine of State rights 
was knocked endways. It went the way of many an- 
other doctrine into the historical ash barrel and be- 
came but a recollection. 



As a matter of fact the doctrine of State rights was 
originally invented to give a handful of men the power 
to rule the country. When the landed aristocracy of 
the South saw the Northern constituencies of shop- 
keepers and mechanics becoming so numerous as to 
dominate the national legislature, the blue-blooded 
planters became more intensely devoted than ever to 
the State rights doctrine. The war made an end of it. 
and the new doctrine is and will be one for all and all 
for one. No section of the United States will be 
allowed to jeopardize the peace or prosperity of the 
entire nation, nor will any set of men banded together 
to enjoy special privileges be allowed to oppress the 
public, and rob their fellow citizens of their constitu- 
tional rights. 

HARVEY BROUGHAM 



Wedding Cakes and Fancy Ices 
and Tarts 

-ECHtiE 




LECHTEN BROS 



1242- 1244 Devlsadero Street 

Bel. Eddy and Ellis Phone West 2526 



F. W. KRONE, Proprietor 



[The Original San Francisco 

Popular Dining Room 



NOW OPEN 
91 1-913 O* Far re II St. 



Bet. Van Ness and Polk 



Largest and Handsomest Dining-Room in the City--An Idea) Kitchen. Former 
Pat* ons Invited to Call and Inspect Our New Rooms and Equipment. 



An Eastern View of It— Horn Milwaukee Sentinel 



BLAKE, MOFFITT & TOWNE 



PAPER 



1400-1450 FOURTH STREET 

TELEPHONE MARKET 3014 

Privale Exchange Connecting all Departments 




STRICTLY BUSINESS 



Points of Interest on Trade and Finance 




The money tightness has affected the operations 
of the Bond and Stock Exchange. The business 
however showed some improvement on previous 
weeks but was on the whole devoid of any great 
activity. Bank Stocks were rather stronger. Bank 
of California selling at $362, an advance of $1. 
California and North Western S's sold at $108. 
Alaska Packers went up a couple of dollars to 
$43.25. United RR's weakened to $75.25. Spring 
Valley sold at $21.25, a slight reduction, but went 
up again to $21.62j4. 

There were sales of California Wine at $83, a 
reduction, but it rallied again. Associated oil was 
lower, $42.75. Pacific Electric S's brought $107.50. 
Spring Valley 4's sold at $89.75, Sugar Stocks weak- 
ened in some instances. For Hawaiian $82. was bid. 
Paauhau sold down to $14.25. Hutchinson kept 
firm at $15.75. Makaweli sold at $29 @ $29.50. 
Onomea had $35.75 bid. Union $42.50, while Hon- 
okaa sold at $10.87>4. 

Mutual Electric still sells in a small way and the 
other day a lot of 100 shares brought $13. But 
these are not good days for gas or water securities. 



A Great Source of Wealth 

California sells in the markets of the East from 
forty-five to fifty million dollars' worth of fruit 
yearly and will reach the latter figure this year. 
We send besides a large quantity of vegetables. 
The amount this year will probably be eleven 
million dollars worth. 

Dollar Wheat 

The movement in favor of holding wheat till it 
reaches a dollar a bushel has been gaining great 
headway during the past year and soon will have 
taken good hold in California. It is just a farmer's 
trade union and Canada is helping the scheme 
along.' 

A dollar a bushel was formerly a not unusual 
price in this State. Such a price would again give 
an impetus to wheat production in California. 
Wheat which was our greatest crop has of late 
years come to be one of our smallest. We formerly 
exported as much as 50.000,000 bushels in a single 
year. Such a crop would require a fleet of six 
hundred vessels of 1500 tons each to carry it to 
market. 



The Mines 

The one satisfactory feature that characterizes 

A Sovereign Remedy 

Dr. Parker's Cough Cure, one dose will stop a cough. It 
never fails. Try it. Sold by all Druggists. 



this week's operations in the Southern Nevada min- 
ing camps is the cessation of the labor troubles. 
This at once produced a favorable effect on the 
market. The next thing is the weeding out of the 
wild cat stocks. This must be done by the ex- 
changes. Goldfield stocks gained as much as a 
dollar over the week preceding though the merger 
fell off to $8.75. Mohawk went down as low as $15. 



No Strike 

I understand that the majority of the carmen are 
averse to a strike. They realize that they are getting 
good wages and that the great boom in the labor 
market has reached its turning point. If the matter 
were left to those men there would be no strike. It 
is to be hoped their influence will prevail for they 
understand pretty well that the strike idea is worked 
up by political grafters who would welcome any] 
disturbance that might divert attention from their 



MUTUAL SAVINGS BANK 



706 Market St. 



OF SAN FRANCISCO 



Opp. Third 



Guaranteed Capital, $1,000,000 

Interest Paid on all Deposits 



Paid op Capita] and Surplus, $620,000 
Loans on Approved Securities 



OFFICERS- James D. Phelan. Pres,. John A. Hooper, V. Pres.. J. K. Moffatt, 2d 
V. Pres., George A. Story, Sec'y and Cashier, C. B. Hobson, Asst. Cashier, A. E. 
Curtis, 2d Asst. 'Cashier. 



TONOPAH, GOLDFIELD, BULLFROG 
MANHATTAN and COMSTOCKS A specialty 



ZADIG & CO. 

STOCK BROKERS 

Formerly 306 Montgomery Street, have resumed business in their 

Own Building, 324 BUSH STREET 

Directly Opposite New San Francisco Stock and Exchange Bldg. 



FRENCH SAVINGS BANK 



OF SAN FRANCISCO 

CAPITAL AND SURPLUS, 
PAID UP CAPITAL. 
DEPOSITS JANUARY I. 1907 



108-110 Sutter Street 

$693,104.68 

$600,000.00 

0.772,145.83 



Charles Carpy. Pres. Arthur Legallel, Vice-Pres. Leon Bocqueraz, Secretary 

John Ginty, Asst. Secretary P. A. Bergerot. Attorney 



-THE WASP- 



23 



inefficiency and dishonesty. The United Railroads 

bond* ami .slocks arc Mire to advance in the event 
of the carmen being sensible enough to avoid a 
strike. 



Call Loans 
The capitalists of the City every now and again 
make a turn in the New York market when money is 
badly needed there. 

"They can do it with more safety than they can 
here," said a leading banker to me the other day. "In 
New York a call loan is a call loan — here you have to 
call for the loan pretty frequently and in the end have 
to take legal steps to recover it. That has been our 
experience sometimes." 

In New York, however, a call loan is a call loan 
and is always paid on demand. There are banks there 
that insure the payment of call loans for yi per cent, 
so that a capitalist of this City, when call money brings 
15 per cent, is sure of 14j/> per cent and his money 
back whenever he wants it. If it is 10 per cent he gets 
9^4, if it is 5 per cent he gets 4yi. There is always a 
big demand for these loans in New York. They are 
gamblers there. Only a small minority speculate here 
in stocks. Hence the attraction that Wall Street has 
for our capitalists. 



The Building Prospects 
The value of new building contracts recorded for 
the week was slightly in excess of $800,000, while the 
loans on realty for the week, in round numbers, 
reached almost a million dollars. This indicates that 
April will be as good a month as March. None of the 
loans made during the past week were very large — all 
below $100,000. Deposits continue to be large, but 
withdrawals and loans are also large and the latter 
are necessarily restricted. 



"L'ltalia," the representative daily of Latin San 
Francisco and the Pacific Coast, has issued a special 
edition, commemorating the disaster of April 18th 
and Italian participation in the ensuing year of 
progress. An elaborate cover drawing and sixty 
pages of special articles, business statistics and 
wholesome enthusiasm makes a creditable showing 
of the post-seismic energy that many have noted in 
the Italian quarter. In fact, it has been remarked 
that nowhere has been shown a district displaying 
wider rebuilding activity than North of Montgomery 
Avenue. Ettore Patrizi is an up-to-date editor, and 
succeeded in making up and printing the entire 
edition in the press rooms and offices of "LTtalia." 
An enterprising journal of the high character of 
L'ltalia is a great aid to the Italian Colony and 
helps to bring it into close touch and thorough 
harmony with the American community. 



With the collapse of the Oceanic Steamship Com- 
pany it might be expected that Australian trade would 
receive a temporary set-back. Still it was hard to see 
that the revenue and subsidies attached to a carrying 
worth roughly three million dollars a year should be 
surrendered without a struggle 

Do you get up Bred and feel tired all day? Try a tablespoonru of Abbott's Bitters in 
sweetened water before meals. At grocers and druggists. , 



CALIFORNIA SAFE DEPOSIT 
AND TRUST COMPANY 



Cordially invites you to open an account 
at their Home Office or branch most 
convenient to you. Liberal interest is 
paid on all forms of accounts, and our 
customers are accorded every courtesy 
consistent with conservative banking prin- 
ciples. 



HOME OFFICE 



CALIFORNIA and MONTGOMERY STS. 

West End Branch, 1531 Devisadero 

Mission Branch, 2572 Mission, near 22d 
Up-Town Branch, 1 740 Fillmore nr. Sutter 



VALUABLES of all kinds 

May be safely stored at 

SAFE DEPOSIT VAULTS 

of the 

FIRST NATIONAL BANK 

Cor. Bush and Sansome Sts. 



Safes to rent from $5 a year upwards 
Careful service to customers 



Trunks $1 a month 
Office Hours: 8 a. m. to 6 p. m. 



The German Savings and Loan Society 

526 CALIFORNIA ST., San Francisco 



Guaranteed Capital and Surplus 
Capital actually paid up in cash 
Deposits, December 31, 1906 



$2,578,695,41 

1.000,000.00 

38,531,917.28 



OFFICERS - President. F. Tillmann. Jr.; First Vice-President. Daniel Meyer 
Second Viee-President, Emil Rohte; Cashier, A. H. R. Schmidt; Assistant Cashier, 
William Herrmann; Secretary, George Toumy; Assistant Secretary, A. H. Muller. 
Goodfellow & Bells, General Attorneys. 

BOARD OF DIRECTORS -F. Tillmann, Jr.. Daniel Meyer, Emil Rohte, Ijtn. 
Steinhart. 1. N. Waller. N. Ohlandt. J. W. Van Bersen, E. T. Kruse and W. S. 
Goodfellow. 



MEMBER STOCK AND BOND EXCHANGE 
MEMBER SAN FRANCISCO MINING EXCHANGE 

J. C. WILSON 

BROKER 

STOCKS AND BONDS Kohl BIdg., 488 California St. 

INVESTMENT SECURITIES San Francisco 

Telephone Temporary 8 1 5 



24 



-THE WASP- 



Jim Hill's Retirement 

Although Jim Hill has resigned as president of 
the Great Northern Railroad, in favor of his son 
L. W. Hill, the veteran magnate will not cease to 
be an influence in the management of the affairs 
of the corporation. The Great Northern has been 
so distinctly a James J. Hill enterprise and its 
prosperity has been considered so largely due to 
his personal management that it has been deemed 
advisable that every arrangement be made for a 
continuation of his policies. It had been under- 
stood for some time that whenever Mr. Hill re- 
tired he would be succeeded by his son, Louis W. 
Hill. The latter is a Yale graduate who on leaving 
college entered the operating department of the 
road and has since perfected himself in the school 
of railroading. He is now vice-president of the 
Great Northern, with offices in St. Paul, and is con- 
sidered a very capable railroad man. Gradually, 
it is expected, he will take upon himself more and 
more of the responsibility of the management, 
though it will doubtless be long before James J. 
Hill's position as chairman of the board becomes 
a nominal office. Mr. Hill is said to have felt that 
the time was propitious for him to withdraw when 
last fall he had made arrangements for the issue of 
$60,000,000 new stock and had completed the lease 
of the ore lands to the Steel Corporation. It is 
believed his withdrawal would have been announced 
then had not the Minnesota State authorities at- 
tacked the legality of the stock issue. 



The policy of the Savings banks is most conservative, 
and for that reason there is no immediate prospect of 
a wild boom in building. There cannot be unless the 
banks become very liberal in giving accommodations. 




The next Republican National Convention—From N. Y. World 



The fall in price of pine lumber is significant. It has 
been explained that the fall is due to lack of railroad 
facilities to transport the lumber to the Eastern 
markets. The fact is that the stock of lumber in local 
yards is increasing and the first wild rush to build at 
any price is over. Next look out for the drop in the 
ridiculously high wages paid in the building trades, and 
also to plumbers. 



Long Term United States Bonds Offered 

The United States Treasury Department stands 
ready to refund $50,000,000 of the outstanding 4 
per cent loan of 1907 into long term 2 per cent 
bonds between now and June 30th, the end of the 
fiscal year. The residue of the loan, after the re- 
funding, has been completed, and will be held for 
redemption and will cease to bear interest July 
2d next. Owners of the bonds in question are at 
liberty to retain the securities, but they will receive 
no interest. The whole outstanding loan amounts 
to a little more than $100,000,000. The amount 
outstanding on December 1st of last year, which 
was $116,000,000, has been reduced lately by pur- 
chases under various circulars issued by the Secre- 
tary of the Treasury to relieve the money market. 



Mrs. Cornelius Vanderbilt gave a hint of her inten- 
tion of purchasing an estate near Santa Barbara the 
other day while she was there and the property owners 
of the Montecito and of the little city itself have be- 
come dizzy over the idea. 

INVESTOR 



PHIL S. MONTAGUE, Stock Broker 

Member of S. F. Stock Exchange 

Goldfield. Tonopah, Manhattan and Bullfrog Stocks Bought and Sold. 
Write for Market Letter. 

339 BUSH STREET, STOCK EXCHANGE BUILDING 



BURNED HOMES MUST BE REBUILT 

The Continental Building and Loan Association 

Having sustained practically no loss in the recent calamity, is in a 
position to loan money to people who wish to rebuild. San Francisco 
must restore her homes as well as her business blocks. 

DR. WASHINGTON DODGE. Pr«. 

GAVIN McNAB. Any. 

WM. CORBIN, Sec. and Gen. Mgr. 

OFFICES- COR. CHURCH AND MARKET STREETS 
OPEN AND DOING BUSINESS 



Rooms 7 to 11 



Telephone Tmpy. 1415 



W. C. RALSTON 

Stock and Bond Broker 

Member San Francisco Stock and Bond Exchange 
Mining Stocks a Specialty 



Code 



Bedford McNeill 
Western Union 
Leibers 



368 BUSH STREET 

San Francisco 



-THE WASP- 



25 




Saturday — Dear me. I believe I won't be able to 
get a hat this year! I can't make out those mil- 
liners. Whatever has got into them since the fire. 
I was in Bluefeather's today with Mrs. Gavleigh 
looking at some hats. Such prices! Oh mercy! 
They took my breath away and the milliners didn't 
care whether you bought or not. Mrs. Gayleigh 
says they've made so much selling $3 hats for $45 
that it's a compliment for them to take your money. 

The girl that waited on us at Bluefeather's made 
me very nervous. I could see the poor thing was 
out of her head and imagined that she was Mrs. 
Yanderbilt. She got worse every minute. She 
said the cheapest hat they had was $35 and they 
only kept it as an accommodation to Society leaders 
from Oakland and Alameda. They might jump off 
the ferryboat if they had to go back without a 
San Francisco creation. Oh gracious ! 

When I told her I'd worn nice hats all my life 
and never paid over $4.50 for one she screamed 
and ran to the back of the store. Mrs. Gayleigh 
said she thought the girl must be going to tele- 
phone to the police. 

"They stand in with all the bunko games in town 
now," said she. 

Heavens! I got out of that store mighty quick. 
Dear me ! Where on earth am I going to get a 
Summer hat? 



Sunday. — Well such a woman as Mrs. Gabbe is ! 
She hears everything. She told me today about 
the funeral of old Skinner who left his family nearly 
a million. He's been dead only a few weeks and 
his family are getting fat already. He preferred to 
die at Vallejo, because the coffin trust isn't estab- 
lished there and caskets are twenty per cent 
cheaper. Young Skinner told Mrs. Gabbe at the 
funeral that 'the coffin he bought for $85 in Vallejo 
he couldn't buy less than $115 in San Francisco. 
After they'd figured the cost of bringing the re- 
mains down as slow freight, they found that the 
old man was $7.30 ahead by dying where he did. 
Oh mercy ! Did you ever hear of such a thing ! 

The widow is undecided whether to go to Europe 
next month or wait until she gets married again 



and take it in on her honeymoon. 1 didn't like 
the remark a bit that Mrs. Gabbe made when she 
was telling me all about it. 

"Tabby." said she. "isn't it a shame that old hens 
like that have husbands to burn while a nice wo- 
man like you can't get even one!" 

The idea! As if I ever gave a thought of mar- 
riage, or would take the best man that ever lived! 



Monday. — Dear me! Those old married women 
of fifty are awful, when they get giddy. Mrs. 
Mugsby tells me that all Ross Valley is talking 
about one that thinks she's sixteen and single. She 
is seen around a great deal with a young army 
officer who must be supposed to be feeble-minded 
and shortsighted. Her husband met her for the 
fourth time last week walking in a bosky dell with 
the young lieutenant, and what do you think lie 
said? 

"Hello, mommer! Is this your young grandson 
from West Point I've heard so much about?" 

Oh my! Mustn't it have made her mad. Mrs. 
Mugsby says she's going to apply at once for a 
divorce on the grounds of extreme cruelty. 

TABITHA TWIGGS. 



you 



This bit of repartee was indulged in at the Ruef 
trial before Judge Dunne the other day : 

Attorney Ach. examining a juror: "Have 
ever visited any of the French restaurants?" 

Juror: "Yes, I have at times." 

Ach : "How often ?" 

Juror: "Well, I can't say; not very often." 

Ach : "Well, about how often ? As often as I do, 
for instance, every day?" 

Hiram Johnson, interrupting: "Oh! for Heaven's 
sake, Mr. Ach, please do not inject your personal 
habits into the record of this case." 



One of the most delightful teas of the season, al- 
though totally informal, was given last Saturday after- 
noon by Mrs. Rosa Hooper Plotner, at her artistic 
studio on California Street, many artists and friends 
dropping in during the afternoon. 



Popular French Restaurant 



Regular Dinner 75c 
Meals a la cane at any ho 



Private Dining Rooms 

for Banquets, etc. 




497 Golden Gate Ave. 

Comer Polk Street 



Phone Martel 2315 



26 



-THE WASP 



Of Social Interest 



Mr. and Mrs. Henry Bothin will pass the summer 
in Ross Valley. 

Miss Ruth Morton whose marriage to Mr. Parker 
Holt took place at the Morton home on Thursday, 
is the granddaughter of Win. T. Garratt, who was 
one of the Mayors of San Francisco, in the days 
when respectable citizens aspired to that office. The 
Holts are also an old and respected pioneer family. 
Miss Mabel Watkins and Capt. Orrin R. Wolfe, 
Twenty-second Infantry, U. S. A., will be married 
on Tuesday, June 11th, at Christ Church, Sausalito. 
A reception will follow at the residence of her 
parents Mr. and Mrs. A. A. Watkins. Mrs. Frank 
Finlay will be matron of honor, a bevy of pretty 
Sausalito girls will be bride's maids. 

The marriage of Miss Ida Larkey and John 
Benjamin Jordan has been named for May 8th. It 
will be a large affair at a prominent church in 
Oakland and will be followed bj' a reception. 

Mrs. George H. Hellmann has closed her 
attractive home on Belle Avenue, San Rafael, and 
will pass the next three months at her mountain 
home, ten miles above Healdsburg. Many friends 
have already been invited by this hospitable hostess 
to visit her during the Summer. 

Mr. and Airs. Willard Merrall are spending their 
honeymoon at Monterey. The bride, who is the 
daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Kellogg A. White of 
Berkeley, is accomplished and popular. She is an 
expert horsewoman. The young couple will reside 
in Berkeley, where Mr. Merrall is connected with 
the First National Bank. 

Mrs. Cornelius Vanderbilt, Sr., Miss Gladys 
Vanderbilt, Miss Cameron, Mrs. Shepard and Mrs. 
E. F. Babcock, who are touring the country in Mrs. 
Vanderbilt's private car, "The Wayfarer," stopped 
over at Del Monte to take the Seventeen Mile Drive, 
the fame of which is spread throughout the East. 

Mr. and Mrs. Frank H. Johnson, formerly Carmen 
Selby, will leave early in June for their long con- 
templated trip across the continent. They have 
changed their minds with regard to taking their 
tiny daughter with them, and will leave her with 
relatives in San Rafael. When the baby was only 
a few months old, they took it on a long automobile 
trip in, the mountains. That doubtless convinced 
them that babies and long motor trips do not go 
well together. 

The last sitting of the Card Club which meets 
throughout the Winter season in San Rafael, was 
held last week at the residence of Mr. and Mrs. 
Vincent Neal. This Club is composed of experts. 
After an enjoyable game, followed by a dainty 
supper, handsome prizes were distributed. Mr. and 
Mrs. Neal have recently moved into their attractive 
new home in San Rafael. 

On Monday evening Mr. and Mrs. J. M. Gamble 
gave a circus party, followed by a supper at Taits. 

The week has been taken up with bridge dinners, 
theaters and suppers. 



On Tuesday evening Mrs. J. Eugene Freeman 
gave a bridge party. 

Wednesday Mrs. Eugene Bresse was hostess at 
bridge. 

On Thursday Mrs. Clarence Breeden gave a 
large bridge party in honor of her sister Mrs. E. 
Walton Hedges. 

Mrs. H. E. Huntington gave a dinner for Mrs. 
Hedges at the Palace Hotel last Monday and a 
theater party after. The Company occupied boxes 
and witnessed Lillian Russell's performance. A 
supper followed. On Thursday May 2nd, Mrs. 
Hedges will be at home both afternoon and even- 
ing to say adieu to her many friends in this City, 
as she leaves next day to rejoin her husband and 
family in the East. 

A great deal of entertaining has been done in 
honor of Capt. Cafferrey, who recently came to San 
Francisco. He is English and a friend of Dr. and 
Mrs. McEnery. They were all guests of Captain 
An enjoyable picnic was also given on Mare Island 
in his honor. 




MORE THAN 50 YEARS AGO 

HUNTER 
WHISKEY 



WAS PUT UPON THE MARKET, 
AND EVERY YEAR ADDS TO 
ITS SPLENDID REPUTATION. 
RIPENED BY AGE, ITS MEL- 
LOWED EXCELLENCE REMAINS 
ABSOLUTELY UNSURPASSED. 



CHARLES M. REYNOLDS CO. 

Agents for California and Nevada 

912-914 Folsom Si.. San Francisco, Cat 






-THE WASP- 



27 



'['he ball given at Alcatraz Island by the officers 
and ladies of the Twenty-second Infantry in honor 
of the newl) arrived officers of the Fourteenth 
Cavalry, was a brilliant affair. The dance took 
place in the Imp room of the now barracks. A 
large crowd from all points around the bay attended. 
Mrs. Ynez Shorb White chaperoned a merry party. 

The Aloha Xui pave its last cotillion on Thurs- 
day, April 18th, tinder the able leadership of Mr. 
Milliliter at the Paris Tea Garden. 

The I'aris Tea Garden was the scene of the first 
dance of the Yorktown Society April 20th and 
proved to be a brilliant affair. It was under the 
patronage of Mrs. J. McHenry, ]r., Mrs. G. E. 
Mayhew, Mrs. j. Orr. Mrs. A _ . Raisch, Mrs. W. 
Halstead, Mrs. W. T. Baggett, and Mrs. C. A. 
Warren. 

A dainty club luncheon and afternoon will be 
given today at the Paris Tea Garden, by the ladies 
of the Forum Society. 

Mr. and Mrs. James L. Flood sailed from Xew 
York during the week and will pass the Summer in 
Europe. 

Although Mrs. Huntington spent all last Summer 
abroad she is contemplating another European tour, 
in which she will be gone until late in the Autumn. 

Late California arrivals in Paris are Mrs. C. O. 
Alexander and Miss Berger. who are enjoying a 
tour around the world.' They are with Mr. and Mrs. 
C. A. Spreckels and Mrs. Irvine and expect to re- 
main abroad all Summer. 

Mrs. Bull's breakfast bridge for Mrs. James C. 
Jordan, took place at her home on Yerba Buena 
Island on Tuesday last. Sixteen guests were enter- 
tained. After the game an informal tea was held 
from 4 to 7 o'clock. 

On Friday afternoon last. Mrs. Marix, wife of 
Capt. Marix of Yerba Buena Island gave a large 
luncheon to Florence Roberts, the noted actress. 
Many ladies from this City went to the Island to 
attend the affair. 



Automobile News 

The "White" Company is justifiably proud of its 
Model "G" thirty horse power car. It is roomy and 
luxurious, almost like a little parlor on pneumatic tires. 
Its improvements and interesting details make it a 
delight to the expert and yet prove a simple matter to 
the amateur. There is no back-breaking hand-pump- 
ing of tires on this machine. Uniform steam pressure 
is maintained. 



the making, will be greater and better than ever 
before. There are wonderful business opportunities 
on the Coast for young men of ability, especially 
in the sale of automobiles. Motor cars have so 
emphatically demonstrated their usefulness under 
severe conditions, in cities, country and mining 
camps, that sales are made to far Western buyers 
with considerable less effort than in the East, 
where details rather than general practicability 
wield an influence out of proportion to their im- 
portance. Western buyers lack nothing in shrewd- 
ness and they demand the best cars, but what they 
demand above all else — in their level-headed way — 
is power and durability." 



Soda Bay Springs 

Lake Co., Cal. 

Situated on the picturesque shore of charming Clear Lake, season 
opens May 1st, finest of Boating, Bathing and Hunting. Unsur- 
passed acommodations. Terms $2.00 per day, $12.00 per week, 
special rates to families. Route, take Tiburon Ferry 7:40 a. m. 
thence by Automobile, further information address managers 

GEO. ROBINSON and AGNES BELL RHOODES 

Via Kelseyville P. O. Soda Springs. Lake Co., Cal. 



H. C. RAAP, Manage. 



Telephone Franklin 588 



National Cafe and Grill 

918-920 O'FARRELL ST., San Francisco 

SPECIAL MERCHANTS HOT LUNCH 25c 

Including Tea, Coffee, Wine or Beer. 11 a. m. to 2 p. m. 
A LA CARTE al all hours. 



Regular Dinner 50c 



Special Sunday Dinner 75c 



J. HUFF 



Kadee Hammam Baths 

TURKISH AND HAMMAM BATHS 

PRIVATE ROOM AND BATH $1.00 



Open Day and Night 

GEARY AND GOUGH STREETS 



Strictly First Cla: 



Phone West 3725 



Thomas Henderson, Vice-president of the Li- 
censed Association of Automobile Manufacturers 
and of the VVinton Motor Carriage Co., has re- 
turned to Cleveland from a month's trip through 
the far West. 

"I was astonished," he says, "at the remarkable 
prosperity of the Western country, particularly of 
the Pacific Coast section. San Francisco, now in 

Experienced tutor, having college education desires a few pupils, in 
mathematics, languages, etc. Especially college entrance examinations. 
Address: D. H. Coddington, 1431 Webster Street, San Francisco. 



Established 1890 



J. F. ROSSI 

Dome g .t , ic a " d Wines, Liquors and Cigars 

Depot of Italian-Swiss Colony Wines 

Specialties: Belmont, Jesse Moore, A. P. Hotaling's O. P. S., Loveland Rye, 
King Wm. Fourth Scotch, Glenrosa Scotch, Dew of the Grampians, A. V. H. 
Gin, Buchu Gin, Cognac Brandy, Bisquit Dubouche Cognac, Fernet Branca 
Italian Vermuth, French Vermuth. 

217-219 Washington St., Bet. Front and Davis 




MISCELLANEOUS. 
BUILDERS' EXCHANGE.' 226 Oak St., 

S. F. 

ADVERTISING AGENCIES. 
BOLTE & BRADEN, 105-107 Oak St., S. F. ; 

Phone Market 2837. 
COOPER ADV. AGENCY, F. J., West Mis- 
sion and Brady Sts. 
DAKE ADV. AGENCY, Midway Bldg., 779 

Market St. Phone Temp'y 1440. 
FISHER, L. P. ADV. AGENCY, 836 North 

Point St., S. F. ; Phone Emergency S84. 
JOHNSTON-DIENSTAG CO., 2170 Post St., 

S. F. 

ANTIQUE DEALERS. 
THE LOUIS XIV. Curios, Objects d'Art, 

Miniatures, Paints, Porcelains, Jewels, etc., 

C. V. Miller, 1117 Post, near Van Ness. 

ARCHITECTS. 

REID BROS, Temporary Offices, 2325 

Gough ot., S. F. 
THOS. J. WELSH, JOHN W. CAREY, asso- 
ciate architects, 40 Haight St., S. F. 
ART DEALERS. 
GUMP, S. & G., 1645 California St., S. F. 
SCHUSSLER BROS., 1218 Sutter St. 

ATTORNEYS, 
DORN, DORN & SAVAGE, 717 Van Ness 

Ave. 
DINKELSPIEL, HENRY G. W., 1265 Ellis 

St., S. F. Phone West 2355. 
HEWLETT, BANCROFT AND BALLAN- 

TINE, Monadnock Bldg.; Phone Temp'y 

972. 
EDWARD B. YOUNG, 4th Floor, Union 

Trust Bldg., S. F. Telephone, Temp'y 833. 
AUTOMOBILES AND SUPPLIES. 
PIONEER AUTOMOBILE CO., 901 Golden 

Gate Ave., S. F. ; and l2th and Oak Sts., 

Oakland. 
WHITE SEWING MACHINE CO., Market 

and Van Ness Ave., S. F. 
AUTO LIVERY CO., Golden Gate and Van 

Ness Ave., S. F. 
BOYER MOTOR CAR CO., 403 Golden Gate 

Ave. Phone, Emergency 655. 
LEE CUYLER, 359 Golden Gate Ave., S. F. 
MIDDLETON MOTOR CAR CO., 550 Gol- 
den Gate Ave., S. F. 
MOBILE CARRIAGE CO., Golden Gate 

Ave. and Gough Sts., S. F. 
PACIFIC MOTOR CAR CO., 376 Golden 

Gate Ave: 

BANKS. 
ANGLO-CALIFORNIA BANK, Ltd., cor. 

Pine and Sansome Sts., S. F. 
CALIFORNIA SAFE DEPOSIT AND 

TRUST CO., cor. California and Montgom- 
ery Sts., S. F. 
CENTRAL TRUST CO., 42 Montgomery St. 

S. F. 
FIRST NATIONAL BANK, Bush and San 

some Sts., S. F. 
FRENCH SAVINGS BANK, 108 Sutter St. 

and Van Ness and Eddy. 
GERMAN SAVINGS AND LOAN SO 

CIETY, 526 California St., S. F. 
HALSEY, N. W. & CO., 413 Montgomery 

St., S. F. 
HIBERNIA SAVINGS AND LOAN SO- 
CIETY, Jones and McAllister Sts., S. F. 
MUTUAL SAVINGS BANK OF SAN 

FRANCISCO, 710 Market St., opp. 3d St., 

S. F. 



SAN FRANCISCO SAVINGS UNION, N.W. 
cor. California and Montgomery Sts., S. F. 

SECURITY SAVINGS BANK, 316 Mont- 
gomery St., S. F. 

THE MARKET STREET BANK AND 
SAFE' DEPOSIT VAULT, Market and 7th 
Sts., S. F. 

UNION TRUST CO., 4 Montgomery St., S. F. 

WELLS FARcO-NEVADA NATIONAL 
BANK, Union Trust Bldg., S. F. 

BREWERIES. 
ALBION ALE AND PORTER BREWERY, 

1007-9 Golden Gate Ave., S. F. 
S. F. BREWERIES, LTD., 240 2d St., S. F. 

BROKERS— STOCKS AND BONDS. 
MONTAGUE, PHIL S., 339 Bush St., Stock 

Exchange Bldg. 
ROLLINS, E. H. & SONS, 804 Kohl Bldg.; 

Telephone Temp'y 163; S. F. 
ZADIG & CO., 324 Bush St., S. F. 
WILSON, J. C, 488 California St., S. F. 
BUILDING AND LOAN ASSOCIATIONS. 
CONTINENTAL BUILDING AND LOAN 

ASSOCIATION, Church and Market Sts., 

S. F. 

CARPET CLEANING. 
SPAULDING, J. & CO., 911-21 Golden Gate 

Ave.; Phone Park 591. 

CLOTHIERS— RETAIL. 
HUB, THE, Chas. Keilus & Co., King Solo- 
mon Bldg., Sutter and Fillmore Sts., S. F. 

COMMISSION AND SHIPPING MER- 
CHANTS. 
TOHNSON LOCKE MERCANTILE CO., 

213 Sansome St., S. F. 
MALDONADO S: CO., INC., 2020 Buchanan 

St., S. F. ; Phone West 2800. 

CONTRACTORS AND BUILDERS. 
FISHER CONSTRUCTION CO., 1414 Post 

St., S. F. 
TROUNSON, J., 1751 Lyon St.; also 176 

Ash Ave., S. F. 

CROCKERY AND GLASSWARE. 
NATHAN DOHRMAN CO., 1520-1550 Van 
Ness Ave. 

DENTISTS. 
KNOX, DR. A. J., 1615 Fillmore St., formerly 
of Grant Bldg. 

DRY GOODS— RETAIL. 
CITY OF PARIS, Van Ness Ave. and Wash- 
ington St., S. F. 
WHITE HOUSE, Van Ness Ave. and Pine 
St., S. F. 

EXPRESS. 
WELLS, FARGO & CO. EXPRESS, Golden 
Gate Ave. and Franklin St., Ferry Bldg., 
and 3d St. Depot, S. F. 

FEATHERS— UPHOLSTERY. 
CRESCENT FEATHER CO., 19th and Harri- 
son Sts., S. F. 

FRUITS AND VEGETABLES. 
OMEY 6fc GOETTING, Geary and Polk Sts., 
S. F. 

FUNERAL DIRECTORS. 
CAREW & ENGLISH, 1618 Geary St., bet. 
Buchanan and Webster Sts., S. F. ; Phone 
West 2604. 
PORTER & WHITE, 1531 Golden Gate Ave., 
S. F. ; Phone West 770. 

GAS STOVES, 
S. F. GAS & ELECTRIC CO., Franklin and 
Ellis Sts. 



GENT'S FURNISHERS. 
BULLOCK & JONES COMPANY, 801 Van 

Ness Ave., cor. Eddy St., S. F. 
HANSEN & ELRICK, 1105-7 Fillmore St., 

nr. Golden Gate Ave. ; Phone West 5678. 

HARDWARE AND RANGES. 
ILS, JOHN G. & CO., 827 Mission St., S. F. 
MONTAGUE, W. W. & CO., Turk and Polk 
Sts., S. i'\ 

HARNESS AND SADDLERY. 

DAVIS, W. & SON, 2020 Howard St., bet. 
16th and 17th, S. F. 

LEIBOLD HARNESS AND CARRIAGE 
CO., 1214 Golden Gate Ave., S. F. 
HATTERS. 

DILLON, TOM, Van Ness Ave. and McAllis- 
ter St. 
HOSPITALS AND SANITARIUMS. 

KEELEY INSTITUTE, H. L. Batchelder, 
Mgr. ; 262 Devisadero St., S. F. 
JEWELERS. 

BALDWIN JE.WELRY CO., 1521 Sutter St., 
and 1261 Van Ness Ave., S. F. 

SHREVE & CO., cor. Post and Grant Ave., 
and Van Ness and Sacramento St., S. F. 

LAUNDRIES. 
LA GRANDE LAUNDRY, 234 12th St., S. F. 
PALACE HOTEL LAUNDRY and KELLY 

LAUNDRY CO., INC., 2343 Post St. 

Phone West 5854. 

LUMBER. 
UNION LUMBER CO., office 909 Monad- 
nock Bldg. 
MOVING AND STORAGE COMPANIES. 
BEKINS' VAN AND STORAGE CO., 13th 

and Mission Sts., S. F. ; Phone Market 13 

and 1016 Broadway, Oakland. 
ST. FRA..CIS TRANSFER AND STORAGE 

COMPANY, Office 1402 Eddy St.; Tel. 

West 2680. 

NOTARIES PUBLIC. 
DEANE, JNO. T., N. W. cor. Sutter and 

Steiner Sts.; Phone West 7261. 
WARE. JOHN H„ 307 Monadnock Bldg., 

Depositions carefully attended to. Phone 

Temp'y 972. 

OIL COMPANIES. 
STERLING OIL CO., 1491 Post St., cor. 

Octavia, S. F. 

OPTICIANS. 
MAYERLE, GEORGE, German expert, 1115 

Golden Gate Ave., S. F. ; Phone West 3766. 
SAN FRANCISCO OPTICAL COMPANY, 

"Spences," 627 Van Ness Ave.; "Branch," 

1613 Fillmore. 
STANDARD OPTICAL CO., 808 Van Ness 

Ave., near Eddy St. 

PAINTERS AND DECORATORS. 
KEEFE. J. H., 820-822 O'Farrell St., S. F.; 

Tel. Franklin 2055. 

TOZER, L. & SON CO., INC., 1527 Pine 

and 2511 Washington St., near Fillmore. 

PAINTS AND OILS. 

BASS-HUETER PAINT CO., 1532 Market 

St. 

PHOTO ENGRAVERS. 
CAL. PHOTO ENG. CO., 141-143 Valencia 
St. 

PHYSICIANS. 
BOWIE, DR. HAMILTON C, formerly 293 
Geary St., Paul Bldg., now 14th and Church 
Sts. 



-THE WASP 



29 



BRYANT, DR. EDGAR R., 1944 Fillmore 

St.. cor. Pine; Tel. West 5657. 
D'EVELYN, DR. FREDERICK W., 2115 

California St., S. F. 
THORNE, DR. W. S., 1434 Post St., S. F. 

PIANOS— MANUFACTURERS AND 
DEALERS 
BALDWIN. D. H. & CO., 2512 Sacramento 
St., and Van Ness at California. 

REAL ESTATE 
IIIl KS & MACK. Rial Estate n ' I 

surance, 2091 Fillmore Si. I'll West 

7287. 

RESTAURANTS. 

MORAGHAN, M. B., OYSTER CO., 1212 

Golden Gate Ave., S. F. 
OLD POODLE DOG, 824 Eddy St., near 

Van Ness Ave. 
ST. GERMAIN RESTAURANT. 497 Golden 

Gate Ave.; Phone Market 2315. 
SWAIN'S RESTAURANT, 1111 Post St., 

S. F. 
THOMPSON'S, formerly Oyster Loaf, 1727 

O'Farrell St. 

SAFES AND SCALES. 
HERRING-HALL MARVIN SAFE CO., 
office and salesrooms. Mission St., bet. 
Seventh and Eighth Sts. ; Phone Market 
1037. 



SEWING MACHINES. 
WHEELER & \. ILSON and SINGER SEW- 
ING MACHINES, 1431 Bush St.. cor. 
Van Ness Ave., S. F. ; Phone Emergency 
301; formerly 231 Sutter St. 
STORAGE. 
BEKINS VAN & STORAGE CO., 13th and 

Mission Sts.. S. V.: Phone Market 2558. 
PIERCE RUDOLPH STORAGE CO.. Eddy 

and Fillmore Sts. ; Tel. West 828. 
SURGICAL INSTRUMENTS AND HOS- 

PITAL SUPPLIES. 
\\ U.TERS & CO., formerly Shutts, Walters 
& Co., 1608 Stciner St., S. F. 

TALKING MACHINES. 
BACIGALUPI, PETER, 1113-1115 Fillmore 
St., S. F. 

TAILORS. 
LYONS. CHARLES. London Tailor, 1432 
Fillmore St., 731 Van Ness Ave., S. F. ; 958 
Broadway, Oakland. 
McMAHON, KEYER AND STIEGELER 
BROS.. Van Ness Ave. and Ellis, O'Farrell 
and Fillmore. 
REHNSTROM, C. II., 2415 Fillmore St.. for- 
merly Mutual Savings Bank Bldg., S. F. 
TENTS AND AWNINGS. 
TIIOMS. F., 1209 Mission St., corner of 
Eighth, S. F. 

TRICYCLES. 
EAMES TRICYCLE CO., Invalid Chairs, 
1808 Market St., S. F. 



WINES AND LIQUORS— WHOLESALE. 

BALKE, ED. W„ 1498 Eddy St., cor. Fill- 
more. 

BUTLER. JOHN & SON, 2209 Stciner St., 
S. F. 

REYNOLDS, CHAS. M. CO.. 912 Folsom 
St.. S. F. 

RUSCONI. FISHER & CO.. 649 Turk St., 
S. F. 

SIEBE BROS. & PLACEMAN. 419-47' 
Larkin St. ; Phone Emergency 349. 

WENIGER, P. J. & CO., N. E. cor. Van 
Ness Ave. and Ellis St.; Tel. Emergency 
309. 

WICHMAN, LUTGEN & CO.. Harrison and 
Everett Sts., Alameda, Cal. ; Phone Ala- 
meda 1179. 

WINES AND LIQUORS-RETAIL 

FERGUSON, T. M. CO.. Market Street. 
Same old stand. Same Old Crow Whiskey. 

FISCHER, E. R., 1901 Mission St., cor. of 
Fifteenth. 

THE METROPOLE. John L. Herget and 
Wm. H. Harrison, Props., N. W. cor. Sutter 
and Steiner Sts. 

TUXEDO. THE. Eddie Graney, Prop., S. W. 
cor. Fulmorc and O'Farrell Sts. 

YEAST MANUFACTURERS. 
GOLDEN GATE COMPRESSED YEAST 
CO.. 2401 Fillmore. 



[February 25, 1905. 



THE WASP 



275 




A CARTOONISTS PROPHECY 
This Cartoon was published in "The Wasp" over two years ago, when Schmitz and Ruef seemed immune from danger. 



30 



-THE WASP- 



Amusements 



And once again, airy, fairy Lillian 
is among us. I believe that there 
never has .been a reviewer yet who 
in writing of Miss Russell has omitted 
to qualify her as "airy" and "fairy." 
I refuse to be an exception. 

To see Miss Russell in "The Butterfly" 
marks a distinct epoch in one's life. 
We all remember her as she was in 
other days. Those of us who were 
fortunate enough to have had time 
and money for Eastern trips probably 
best remember her as she appeared 
in the Weber and Field musical bur- 
lesques. Still others whose memories 
serve them well can tell of her com- 
paratively youthful days when she 
frisked before the footlights fifteen 
or sixteen years ago. 

In "The Butterfly" one becomes 
aware of preconceptions gone away. 
Miss Russell retains, it is true, some 
of her prima donna mannerisms, but 
beyond that and her remarkable 
beauty, she has not one symptom of 
former times in evidence. As an 
artist in portraying a character role, 
she is superb. 

"The Butterfly" is windy in the 
extreme, I can forgive extreme lo- 
quacity when it finally arrives some- 
where, but this piece reminds me of 
a certain ''coon song," entitled "Noth- 
ing From Nothing Leaves YOU," 
and the "YOU" in this case is Lil- 
lian Russell. She is the whole show, 
with beauty, and her remarkable 
voice. Her able presentation of her 
somewhat languid role is all there is 
to it. 

To consider the other members of 
the company is a waste of time. They 
are all puppets, but to see Miss Rus- 
sell is worth while for anyone. 
* * * 

Florence Roberts gave a complete 
presentation of Sapho at the Novelty 
Theater this week. I say "complete" 
with deliberation, for there seems to 
be not one salacious detail of Daudet's 
nauseating drama left out. If Miss 
Roberts don't change the character 
of her plays ere long a movement 



&• Candies 

s^ AND , 

ICE CREAM 

'1536-8 Fillmore ST..S.F. 



ought to be set afoot to suppress her. 
It is a relief to know that the house 
will be well ventilated next week with 
a splendid production of "Robin 
Hood." 

* * * 

"There and Back" is a hilarious 
farce comedy which was splendidly 
done by the Alcazar people this week. 
The entire company was acceptably 
cast. 

* * * 

Izetta Jewel and the other mem- 
bers of the Colonial Stock Company 
will have an unusually fine oppor- 
tunity during the coming week in 
David Belasco's revised edition of the 
dramatic novel in four chapters "La 
Belle Russe/' the highly emotional 
drama in which Jeffries Lewis, Clara 
Morris and Rose Coghlan starred 
with so much success. The play has 
been brightened up and under the 
direction of such a capable and 
skilled stage director as George Lask, 
will receive a most artistic presen- 
tation. 

"La Belle Russe" was written by 
Peter Robertson and David Belasco 
.and was first produced at the old 
Baldwin Theater with Jeffries Lewis, 
Osmond Tearle, Gerald Eyre, John 
W. Jennings and Jean Clara Walters 
in the cast. It scored such a tre- 
mendous hit that the play was imme- 
diately put on at Wallack's Theater, 
New York, with Rose Coghlan as 
Geraldine. During its New York run 
the great emotional actress, Clara 
Morris, saw it and became so im- 
pressed with the merits of the pro- 
duction that she closed a deal where- 
by she secured the road rights to 
produce it and toured in it for several 
seasons. It is such a powerful drama 
that David Belasco two years ago 
in looking around for a new vehicle 
for Leslie Carter decided to re-write 
it and it is this version of "La Belle 
Russe" that will be put on at the 
Colonial Theater Monday night. 

This production is in keeping with 
the new policy of the management 
of the Colonial to put on standard 
plays that have proven successful. 
"Moths" which is pleasing large 
audiences this week is the first of a 
series of high-class plays that are 
underlined for an early staging at 
this theater. 

* * * 

The University Orchestra will give 
the Twentieth Symphony Concert, 
with Anton Llokking, the 'cellist, as 



soloist, in the Greek Theater of the 
University of California at 3 o'clock 
Thursday afternoon, May 2d. Mr. 
Hokking is a musican of brilliant 
reputation and his concerts in San 
Francisco some months ago won the 
highest praise. He will play the 
D'Albert Concerto for the Violincello. 
The Symphony which Conductor J. 
Fred. Wolle has chosen for the day 
is the Second Symphony of Brahms. 
The Symphony and the Concerto will' 
be followed by an Italian Serenade, 
by Wolf, and by the Berlioz Over- 
ture, "A Roman Carnival." 

After next Thursday's concert but 
one more symphony concert remains 
of the present University series. This 



To Cure all Skin Diseases, use 

DR. T. FELIX GOURAUD'S 
Oriental Cream or Magic Beautifier 

It Purines and Beautifies the Skin 
For Sale by Druggists 



DR. H. J. STEWART 

Organist of S;. Dominic's Church and 
the Temple Sherith Israel 

TEACHER OF SINGING 

Pianoforte, Organ, Harmony and Composition. 
New Studio: 2517 California Street. Hours, 10 
to 12 and 2 to 4 daily, except Saturdays. 

LOUIS H. EATON 

Organist and Director Trinity 

Church Choir 

Teacher of Voice, Piano and Organ 

San Francisco Studio; 1678 Broadway, Phone 
Franklin 2244. 

Berkeley Studio; 2401 Channing Way, Tues- 
day and Friday. 



MRS. OSCAR MANSFELDT 

PIANIST 

Tel. West 314 180! Buchnnan Si.. Cor. Suller 



William Keith 

Studio 

After Dec. 1st 1717 California St. 



SAMUEL M. SHORTRIDGE 

Attorney-at-Law 

1101 O'FARRELL ST. 

Cor. Franklin San Francisco, Cal. 



-THE WASP- 



31 




RACING 



New California Jockey Club 

Oakland Race 
Track 

SIX OR MORE RACES EACH WEEK DAY 
Rain or Shine 



Races commence at 1 :40 p. 



sharp. 



For special trains stopping at the track lake S. P. Ferry, 
fool of Market street: leave at 1 2:00, thereafter every twenty 
minute* until 1 :40 p. m. No Smoking in last two ears, 
which are reserved for ladies and their escorts. 

Returning trains leave track after fifth and last races. 

THOMAS H. WILLIAMS, President. 
PERCY W. TREAT, Secretary. 




The best YEAST for all 
Kinds of Baking 

FRESH DAILY AT YOUR GROCER 



Thompson's Formerly 

Oyster Loaf, opTn. 

1727 O'Farrell St., near Fillmore 
All night service Popular Prices 



The only first-class up-to-date and modern 

Hammam Baths, built especially for 

the purpose, in the city, 

t Oriental Turkish Baths 

Corner Eddy and Larkln Sts. 

Cold water plunge. 
Room including Balh, Si.oo. 
Phone Franklin 653 
W. J. BLUMBERG & BRO., Props. 



PATRICK & CO. 



Rubber Stamps 

Stencils, Box Brands 



1543 Pine Street 



Sao Francisco 



i> announced for 3 o'clock Thursday 

afternoon. May "tli, when Conductor 
Wolle and hi^ men will close the 
year's events in the Greek Theater 
with a Wagner-Richard Strauss pro- 
gram, 

THE FIRST NIGHTER. 



To kiss a miss may lead to bliss, 

To kiss amiss may lead to this: 
Your kiss may miss miss, which I wis 
Would seem to miss to he remiss, 
But chance like this you'd not dismiss 
To even kiss a miss amiss! 

— New York Life. 

* * * 

Prepring for the Worst 
A French gentleman anxious to 
find a wife for a nephew went to a 
matrimonial agent, who handed him 
his list of lady clients. Running 
through this he came to his wife's 
name, entered as desirous of obtain- 
ing a husband between the ages of 
twenty-eight and thirty-five — a blond 
preferred. Forgetting his nephew, he 
hurried home to announce his dis- 
covery to his wife. The lady was 
not at all disturbed. "Oh, yes," she 
said, "that is my name. I put it down 
when you were so ill in the Spring 
and the doctors said we must prepare 
for the worst." 

* * * 
Jailyard Persiflage 

There were two prisoners in the 
jail. One was in for stealing a cow. 
The other was in for stealing a watch. 

Exercising in the courtyard one 
morning, the first prisoner said taunt- 
ingly to the other: 

"What time is it?" 

"Milking time," was the retort. 

No Somnambulist 

Finley Peter Dunne, author of "Mr. 
Dooley," is an occasional visitor at 
a certain academy not far from New 
York. On a recent visit there he was 
accompanied by a well-known banker, 
who, being impressed by the beauti- 
ful surrounding country, suggested 
that they should take a walk the next 
morning at six o'clock. 

"Thank you," replied Mr. Dunne, 
"but I never walk in my sleep." 

* * * 

The ardent Frenchman looked ten- 
derly at the fair young mistress of 
his soul. "Je t'adore!" he murmured. 
"Maybe I'd better," she returned. 
"You can't never tell who's listening- 
in this yere house." 



COLONIAL THEATRE 

McAllister Dear Market Phone Market 920 
MARTIN F. KURTZIG. President and Manner 



All Market Street Cars run direct to Theatre 
Week Beginning Monday, April 29 



David Belasco's Story of Double Life 
The Celebrated Play in Four Chapters 



La Belle Russe 



Splendid Cast--Superb Eff.cs--New Scenery 



PRICES: Evenings, 25c, 50c, 75c. $1.00; Satur- 
day and Sunday Matinees. 25c and 50c. BARGAIN 
MATINEE, Wednesday, ail seats reserved, 25c. Branch 
Ticket Office, Kohler & Chase's, Sutler and Franklin 
Streets. 



DR. WM. D. CLARK 

Office and Res.: 2554 California St. 

San Francisco 

Hours — 1 to 3 p. m. and 7 to 8 p. m. 

Sundays — By appointment 

Phone West 390 



Contracts made with Hotels and Restaurants 
Special Attention given to Family Trade 

Established 1876 

THOMAS MORTON & SON 

Importer of and |*"*/"\ A I 
Dealers in \*KJrkLt 

N. W. Cor. Eddy and Hyde, San Francisco 
Phone Franklin 397 



Wichman, Lutgen & Co. 

Formerly'"of 
29-31 Battery Street, S. F. 

Cor. Everett and Tarrison Avenue 
ALAMEDA, CAL. 

Phone Alameda I 1 79 



GILT EDGE WHISKEY 



To restore gray hair to its natural 
color use Alfrcdum's Egyptian Henna — 
i vegetable dye — perfectly harmless and 
the effect is immediate. All druggists 
sell it. Langley ft Michaels Co., agents. 



32 



-THE WASP- 



ENNEN'S 




BO RATED 
TALCUM 






/ CHAPPED HANJS, CHAFING 

n-.d all skin troubles. " A little 
ligher in price perhaps than 

Ic.l3htr.il Bfler BbavInT nnd ittrr bath- 
Sold eTBrjTlicrt.ormaileilonreB'iptof 
25o. G«t Mennen'* <:ho orlcloal). Sample free 

I Gerhard Mennen Company,'" - Newark, N. J. 



vLEIBOLD, 

NARNESS|$RBlAGtC& 

1214 GOLDEN GATE AVE. 

BET. WEBSTER AND FILLMORE 



A Positive 

CURE FOR 

CATARRH 

Ely's Cream Balm 

is quickly absorbed. 
Gives Relief at Once. 

It cleanses, soothes, 

heals and protects 

the diseased membrane. It cures Catarrh 

and drives away a Cold in the Head quickly. 

Restores the Senses of Taste and Smell. 

Full size 50 cts. at Druggists or by mail ; 

Trial size 10 cts. by mail. 

Ely Brothers, 56 Warren Street, New York. 



lASHSHBITIERS 

la BETTER THAN PILLS. W 




s0 VEgggN R EM Et}y 




Dr. Parker's Cough Cure 
One dose will stop a cough. 
It never fails. Try it. 25c. 

AT ALL DRUGGISTS 



No Haircuts 

"People don't seem to appreciate ro- . TOYO lflQFlW 

mance these cold unsentimental |^^_^ I \J M. \J lYlOI-jl 1 

days," sighed the man with the vol- I ^fc^S^^ 

umne of Byron in his pock, i "1 I H^^S \T A I\|-l A 

told that chap on the back platform I I^^^B IV/\llJil/\ 

what a great thing it would be if " ^ (Oriental Steiunship Co.) 
every man was a poet, and he wanted 

tO fight." Have Opened Their Permanent Offices at 

"No wonder," laughed the cohduc- Room 240 James Flood Buildin S 

tor. "That chap is a barber." San Francisco 

S. S. "America Maru" (calls at Manila) . '.f 

In Old Egypt Frida )'' Ma y 3 - l907 

The camel express had come and S - S - "Nippon Maru" (calls at Manila) . . . 

gone and still Mark Antony had not Frida y' M *y 3I ' ,907 

arrived S ' S ' "Hongkong Mam " 

, , Friday, June 28, 1907 

rour ong months since he was c . -m t. j u- . j a c. 

° steamers will leave wharf, comer rirst and Brannan Sts., 

Iipta " cnM-ip/T riflAmti-^ "iurl li .* I P. M., for Yokohama and Hongkong, calling at Hono- 

here, SObbed Lleopatra, and he lu]Ui Kobef ( H i OB o). Nagasaki and Shanghai, and con- 

promised to return in a few Weeks. I neenng at Hongkong with steamers lor Manila, India, etc. 

No cargo received on board on day ot sailing. 

WOIlder if anything has happened to Round- trip rickets at reduced rales 

ror rraghl and passage apply at omce, Z4U James Mood 

him Can it be OOSsible " Building. W. H. AVERY, Assistant General Manager. 

"Can what be possible, your maj- 

esty? asked one of the court ladies P e t er Baciffalupl & Soil 

The great queen turned very pale. 

"Can — can it be possible that he Headguarters for Talking 

smoked some of those Egyptian cig- Machines, Records 

arettes he bought at the pyramids. If and Supplies 

so, his doom is sealed." .... 111E . r .|| c . . e i? 

1113-1115 Fillmore Street, San Francisco 

Calling the swiftest Egyptian run- I 

ner, she dispatched him to Rome to m . _ 

find out the truth. Albion Ale or Porter 



SUMMONS 

IN THE SUPERIOR COURT OF THE 
State of California, in and for the City and 
County of San Francisco. 

SIDNEY W. SCOTT, Plaintiff, vs. ISABELL 
SCOTT, Defendant. 

Action brought in the Superior Court of 
the State of California in and for the City 
and County of San Francisco, and the com- 
plaint hied in the office of the County Clerk 
of said City and County. 

The People of the State of California, send 
greeting to ISABEL SCOTT, Defendant. 

You are hereby required to appear in an 
action brought against you by the above 
named Plaintiff in the Superior Court of 
the. State of California, in and for the City 
and County of San Francisco, and to answer 
the Complaint filed therein within ten days 
(exclusive of the day of service) after the ser- 
vice on you of this Summons, if served within 
this City and County; or if served elsewhere 
within thirty days. 

The said action is brought to obtain a 
judgment and decree of this Court dissolv- 
ing the bonds of matrimony now existing 
between Plaintiff and Defendant, on the 
ground of Defendant's wilful desertion of the 
Plaintiff; also for general relief, as will 
more fully appear in the Complaint on file, 
to which special reference is hereby made. 

And you are hereby notified that, unless 
you appear and answer as above required, 
the said Plaintiff will take judgment for any 
moneys or damages demanded in the Com- 
plaint as arising upon contract, or will apply 
to the Court for any other relief demanded 
in the Complaint. 

Given under my hand and the Seal of 
the Superior Court of the State of California, 
in and for the City and County of San Fran- 
cisco, this 16th day of March, A. D. 1907. 
(SEAL) H. I. MULCREVY, Clerk. 

By L. J. WELCH, Deputv Clerk. 
JOSEPH H. TAM, Attorney for Plaintiff, 

San Francisco, Cal. 

Action No. 7076. 



Is a Great Flesh Builder, Tonic and Pleasant 
Drink. Pure Extract of Matt and Hops. 

BURNELL & CO. 

1007-1009 Golden Gate Ave., Near Logunn St. 



Dr. WONG HIM 

1268 O'Farrell St. 

Permanently Located 

HERB DOCTOR 



Father and Mother 
Write Letter In- 
dorsing Treatment. 

SAN FRANCISCO 
March 23. 1906 

To Whom it may 
^Concern: Our three- 
year • old daughter, 
having been ill for 
some time and being 
treated by the most prominent physicians, 
gradually became worse, and was finally 
given up by them. We were then recom- 
mended to Dr. Wong Him. We started 
with his treatment and within two months 
time our daughter was cured. 
Respectfully, 
MR. AND MRS. H. C. LIEB, 
2757 Harrison St., San Francisco 





THE WASP is published every Saturday by the Wasp Publishing 
Company, al 141 -143 Valencia Street. Subscriptions $5.00 per 
year, payable in advance, postage prepaid. Subscriptions to all 
loreign countries within the Postal Union, $6.00 per year. The trade on 
the Pacific Coast su pplied by the San Francisco News Company. Eastern 
Agents supplied by the American News Company, New York. 

THE WASP will pay lor contributions suitable for its columns, and 
will endeavor to return all rejected manuscripts, but does not guarantee 
their return. Photographs will also be accepted and paid for. Address 
all communications to Wasp Publishing Company, 141-143 Valencia 
Street. San Francisco, Cal. 

TO ADVERTISERS—As the illustrated pages of THE WASP 
go to press early, all advertisements printed in the same forms should be 
received not later than Monday al noon. Changes of Advertisements 
should also be sent in on Monday to insure publication. 

Address. JAMES F. FORSTER. Business Manage!. 
Telephone Market 316. 



as there is of the ocean. We have had the flood 
for many years and it should not surprise or dismay 
anybody if we have the ebb for a while. It will 
give people time to breathe and think and a good 
many of our citizens need such a pause. Some of 
them have lost their sense of proportion, so fast 
have they been carried along on the crest of the 
wave of prosperity. 



Plain English 



Several Eastern newspapers that are controlled 
by Wall Street influences are making a great deal 
out of the suspension of new construction work by 
the railroads. They think it will impress President 
Roosevelt and the voters of the United States, with 
the conviction that the railroads can make good 
or hard times by going ahead, or calling a halt. 
This does not look to me like wisdom. If we should 
have a spell of hard times I don't think it would 
be advisable to have the thousands of unemployed 
men believe that it was deliberately and unnecessar- 
ily caused by the railroads, or any other combina- 
tion of capital. 

There is no good reason why we should expect 
a spell of hard times. We may look for a gradual 
subsidence of the great boom which has made work 
so abundant, and wages so high for the past eight 
years. That certainly followed in the regular order, 
the long depression which was brought about by 
the free silver craze and Bryan's organization of 
all the disaffected elements. No nation however 
great its resources can maintain a perpetual indus- 
trial or commercial boom. 

There is an ebb and flow of the financial tides, 



The railroad financiers, who have been buying 
roads for ten or fifteen millions and capitalizing 
them for sixty or a hundred and putting most of 
that money in their own pockets, have certainly 
lost their sense of proportion. So too have the 
trades unionists, who have doubled their wages by 
restricting membership and shutting out appren- 
tices. The business men who have formed combi- 
nations to gouge the public, are also troubled with 
a derangement of their sense of proportion. A 
period of lessened rush will help them all to get 
down to legitimate and solid business, and the 
country will be all the better for it in a very short 
time. 

It is foolish to think that any change can stop 
all the wheels of industry and commerce in a nation 
of eighty millions of courageous, progressive and 
energetic people. If we have the expected breathing 
spell it will be soon followed by another revival of 
activity in trade and manufactures as great if not 
greater than ever before. 



Mayor Schmitz is fast becoming a social outlaw. 
Some few radicals still quote that a man is inno- 
'cent in the eyes of the law until he is proved guilty, 
but they are few in number. In the eyes of the great 
majority of residents of the City of which he is 
Mayor, the City of his birth, the City for which he 
has professed such deep love, Eugene Schmitz is 
regarded as a criminal. His ascension of the social 
ladder is stopped. Neither millionaires, musicians, 
nor brick-layers care to be caught hobnobbing with 
him now. 

When Fillmore Street was gay with bunting and 
crowded from McAllister to California on the night 
of April 18th, Schmitz had the bad taste to show: 
himself prominently along that thoroughfare in an 
automobile with a couple of boon companions. His 
demeanor at the start showed plainly that he ex- 



THE WASP 



pected an ovation. He hoped that his numerous 
attempted diversions of public attention to other 
things than graft, the false cry of Citizens' Alliance 
persecution, the friendship of his administration for 
the tenderloin element, and such influences would 
make him still the idol of the masses. But not a 
cheer was raised for him anywhere along the 
street. He was conspicuous as ever, a fine figure 
of a man in his silk hat. Every one saw him but 
no one cheered. In fact there was much subdued 
muttering. Schmitz knows at last that his race 
is run. The best he can hope for now is obscurity. 
What a lesson for those who think that public office 
is onlv a chance to graft. 



on to establish a good stiff tariff on everything he 
sells, but that will be secondary consideration if 
the viands be excellent and the service first class. 



Roosevelt's hold upon the American people is 
strikingly illustrated by the .declarations the other 
day of three United States Senators for him for a 
third term. On the same day La Follette in San 
Francisco, Flint in I.os Angeles and Beveridge 
ome where in the East all came out strongly for 
him, right in the face of Harriman denunciation 
on the one hand and labor union hysterics over the 
"undesirable citizens" classification of Moyer and 
Haywood on the other. The President undoubtedly 
makes some mistakes, but he is doing his best to 
correct many grave abuses. He is the great, the 
fearless and tireless enemy of graft and class ty- 
ranny and the people know it and are with him. 
Probably no influence strong enough can be brought 
to bear to make him accept a third term, but the 
allegiance of the people to him will not be shaken 
by the combined assaults of Hearst, Harriman, 
Foraker, and the men who say Moyer and Hay- 
wood must and shall not be punished irrespective 
of their guilt. 



The Cliff House. in early days was sacred to a 
fast set which made money easily and quickly spent 
it as it came. There were no street-car lines in 
those days and noboby visited the seaside resort 
except people who owned teams or hired them to 
ride out there over the seven miles of good road. 
Flush stock gamblers paid twenty-five cents a drink 
for whisky without being particular as to the brand, 
and the wine-drinking gang was equally easy to 
please. The house was run on the theory that 
people who went there had no other place to go 
with their teams and that was about the truth of it. 
San Francisco, however, changed wonderfully in 
the decade before the fire of last April and the ocean 
beach evoluted from a lonely strand to a public re- 
sort connected with the heart of a great city by 
rapid electric car lines. Mine host Wilkins was 
unlucky enough to come on the scene when the 
change was in progress and the old order -was giving 
place to the new. He didn't seem to have the Na- 
poleonic genius necessary to wipe out all the tra- 
ditions of the Cliff House and make a fresh start 
on new lines. There must be a fortune in- the place 
for some man who has the right ideas about running 
it and perhaps Tait is the chap. It will be interest- 
ing to watch the developments. He can be relied 



1 think there cannot be any doubt as to the 
effect of President Roosevelt's fearless and most 
admirable reply to the Chicago Anarchist who ob- 
jected to the President's classification of Moyer 
and Heywood with E. H. »Iarriman as "undesir- 
able citizens." Organized labor in the United States 
has been assessed for a year past to provide a de- 
fence fund for Moyer, Heywood and Pettibone, 
who are charged with a series of cold-blooded and 
brutal murders. The labor leaders of this country 
have already pronounced these defendants innocent 
though the testimony against them seems to be 
overwhelming. The prisoners "must and shall not 
be found guilty" declare the heads of organized 
labor, and so far have they intimidated the press 
of the United States that only about four daily 
papers dare to discuss the matter at all. 

Never before in America were three men charged 
with a series of such terrible and desperate crimes 
and never was such an immense fund raised by 
assessment to prevent their prosecution. 

Inasmuch as the accused men are the heads of 
a labor union it is held by the labor leaders of the 
United States that they cannot be guilty, should 
not be tried, and must not be convicted. The only 
inference to be drawn from this defiant declaration 
is that the leadership of organized labor has passed 
into the hands of men who set themselves above the 
law and claim privileges denied to all people out- 
side their organization. Such is the fact, generally 
speaking. 

The aggressive element which aims to control 
organized labor in *\merica is ostensively Socialistic 
but in reality Anarchistic. It would not do for its 
leaders to call themselves Anarchists and flaunt the 



It 




CHAS.KEILUSS- CO 

EXCLUSIVE 

HIGH GRADE CLOTH I ERS 



No Branch Stores. No Agents. 

Every yard of cloth used in making our clothes absolutely first-class. 
We order from, good makers. Nothing too good for us to give our 
clientele. There are some clothes classed as "secoeds", they find no 
home here. 

This exclusive men's clothes shop has a great many advantages 
over ordinary "clothes hasheries". We thoroughly understand 
when garments are correct. We never question price. We get 
the best "Clothes Colleges" have. Never buy unseasonable 
styles, condemned fabrics, mistakes or miscuts. 



KING SOLOMON'S HALL 

Fillmore Street, near Sutter, San Francisco 



THE WASP- 



red Mag as that would at once array against them 
many forces that arc now dormant. They there- 
fore proclaim themselves advocates of Socialism 

ami at the same time violate all its principles. 

Socialism, theoretically, is an ideally perfect form 
of government under which all men arc on an 
equality. Fierce and selfish competition is elimi- 
nated and the world uplifted by the cultivation of 
the fraternal and patriotic spirit. 

The Socialists, who arc so aggressive in the 
labor movement in America, cultivate the fraternal 
and patriotic spirit in a most extraordinary manner. 
They war relentlessly on all workers outside their 
own organization and exclude American boys from 
the workshops so that they may not learn trades and 
increase their chances of becoming useful and pros- 
perous citizens. 

These so-called Socialists have decided that it 
i- a crime for one of their members to enlist in the 
militia. At the same time it is well known that 
in Pennsylvania and other strongholds they are 
arming secretly so as to resist the lawful authorities. 
and if possible overturn our government, inaugu- 
rate anarchy and confiscate all property for division 
Imongst themselves. 

That is their program and any man who has 
given the subject serious consideration cannot for 
a moment be in doubt of it. The Washington 
authorities are not in any mental fog on the matter. 
They understand it fully and they know that the 
tremendous effort being made to prevent Mover, 
I ley wood and Pettibone from going to trial or be- 
ing convicted is not the work of the honest toilers 
of the United States. Scarcely one man in a thou- 
sand, of the million and a half of members in the 
American Federation of Labor, has a word to say 
about its management. A mere handful! of men 
run the organization just as a few wirepullers run 
the finances and -the politics of our nation. The 
board of directors which controls the American 
Federation of Labor has not been changed in seven- 
teen years. The same set of men, or their represen- 
tatives have controlled the organization during that 
period. 

Thus far the avowed Anarchists have not been 
able to seize the reins of power, but they live in 
high hopes of doing so. Their influence was pow- 
erful enough when they rallied to the support of 
Mover and Heywood and their associates to free 
the heads of the Federation of Labor to join in 
the movement. 

A year or two before Ex-Governor Steunenberg 
of Idaho was blown to pieces by a bomb at his own 
door, Moyer and his fellow officers of the Western 
Federation of Miners had left the American Fed- 
eration of Labor, and became loud in their denun- 
ciations of it. Their hostile expressions about 
< lumpers and the American Federation of Labor 
were frequently quoted in the Colorado and Idaho 
newspapers. 

When Harry ( Irchard. the professional assassin. 
made his appalling confession of crime alleged to 
have been done by him in obedience to the orders 
of Mover. Hevwood and Pettibone, all the Anar- 



chists in America rallied to the aid of the accused 
men. The boldness and brutality of the crimes 
laid by (Irchard at their doors made the accused 
labor officials heroes and patriots in the eyes of 
their sympathizers. Mow powerful the influence 
of those sympathisers must have been in the 
American Federation of Labor is shown by the as- 
sessment of every member to pay lawyers for the 
defense of Mover, Hevwood and Pettibone — the de- 
fense of men who not long ago were the avowed 
enemies of the organization and endeavoring to 
cast discredit upon and destroy it. 



President Roosevelt's letter to the Chicago Anar- 
chists has practically served notice on the leaders of 
organized labor that their turn is coming next. The 
labor trust will not be allowed to enjoy special and 
unconstitutional privileges any more than the oil trust 
or the railroad combines. If John D. Rockefeller 
and E. H. Harriman cannot be permitted to crush 
out opposition in trade why should the American 
Federation be allowed to monopolize the labor market 
in a nation of eighty millions of people. There is 
no question as to the Federation being just as much 
of a trust as any combine of capital. It exceeds all 
other trusts in the boldness of its unconstitutional oper- 
ators and their extent and has capped the climax 
by declaring, as in the Moyer and Heywood case, that 
the criminal courts shall not treat its members like 
ordinary citizens. President Roosevelt's ringing reply 
is. figuratively speaking, the first gun fired at Fort 
Sumter. We may look for war along the labor 
union front from New York to San Francisco very 
soon, and when it is over the Constitution of the 
United States will be found more firmly established 
than ever 



for COUNTRY HOMES 
AND BUNGALOWS 



T ATEST effects in ENGLISH, FRENCH 
Li and DOMESTIC WALL PAPERS, CRE- 
TONNES, TAFFETAS, CASEMENT 
MATERIAES, PLAIN and FANCY NETS 
are now being displayed by us. Many of the 
patterns are in stock for immediate delivery. 

We are showing an excellent assortment of 
WILLOW and MAHOGANY FURNITURE 
upholstered in CRETONNES and TAFFETAS. 






L. KREISS & SONS 

Dealers in Mahogany, Oak and Maple Furniture 




1219-1221-1223 POST ST., Above Van Ness Ave. 





7? and 




M^u- 



& 



A Weekly Summary of Social Activities and Complications 





CECIL COWLES 
A young local pianiste of phenomenal talent. 



It is well that San Rafael and Petaluma have not 
the military equipment of Rome and Carthage ; 
otherwise we should have a dark whirling imbroglio 
into which East and ^'est would be drawn, and the 
Japanese question go down in the chaos like a 
bumble bee in boiling molasses. Total disarmament 
is their salvation now — disarmament and the bring- 
ing of Javeniski to neutral territory. If you are a 
student of Society, you will remember that Javeniski 
was a coachman in San Rafael, statuesque and im- 
movable on his seat, yet ignored by high-priced 
citizens, until he became a skating instructor. Then 
the fashionables took turns in his arms while he 
taught them to glide over the maple as gracefully 
as Jack Frost o'er a winter landscape. 

Even Kings have favorites : so why not 
Javeniski? Thereof did he fall. He was deposed, 
destroyed by the minions on whom he had bestowed 
his favors. Like Coriolanus he was mostly pride, 
and the rest revenge. To Petaluma, aye, to yon 
eternal-shimmering, classic, imperial, plymouth- 
rock and leghorn Petaluma. There he established a 
skating rink. There he taught the egg-pickers to 
do the roll glorious. But that is not the worst of it. 
He tutored the simple farm-girls, the bucolic 
beauties, the Arcadian shepherdesses, the freckled 
hen-herders, into the same elegant graces he had 
shown the damsels of San Rafael. But he made it 



personal. He would say, "Come hither, Amaryllis, 
heed unto the very pirouette which I taught Miss 
Cladys van Slamme." "Look you, Lulu, this is the 
whirlaway I did inculcate unto that world-re- 
nowned Victorienne de Vere-Vaux. It is now yours. 
Let us excel the San Rafael haughticrats." Perhaps 
such perfidy should not be lightly narrated. If 
traged} r should ensue, we should be afflicted with 
remorse for having failed to view the matter with 
due solemnity. Like Coriolanus, Javeniski said, 
"I shall not return until I am sent for." The question 
is. will they send for him? And after that, is it not 
barely possible that Petaluma has had an advance 
in culture which may make it San Rafael's most 
terrific competitor for some time to come? 

San Francisco is well constituted to make history, 
but has little of the art of writing it. We are not 
taking pains to answer the questions posterity will 
ask, nor diligently watering the .spot where futures 
will see the laurel. Somewhat suddenly the other 
day came the thought that, one of the City's most 
picturesque figures is Judge J. C. B. Hebbard. He 
does not receive as much bolt-upright praise as Mr. 
Heney, yet is undeniably a rarer type. Honest men 
who will prosecute crime are met here and there 
every now and then. But where will you find a 
Court who appears suddenly in one place with a 
six-shooter, and in another with a volume of poetry? 
Creating a rough-house one minute and discoursing 
art the next. Half cowboy, half scholar, and all 
interesting. In hotels, vociferating a visionary 
revenge ; on the bench excusing his vagaries in 
wine. Jocular, abstruse, melancholy, generous, 
independent, romantic. 









Little I alace Hotel 


1 


IS 
OPEN 


Corner o£ 

Post and 

Leavenworth 

Streets 


The same excellence in cuisine and service that obtained 
in the Old Palace is duplicated in the new 'Little Palace* 



-THE WASP' 




Phoio Goiht MRS. MARGUERITE HANFORD 

Interesting men are historically a richer posses- 
sion than those who make honesty a specialty. 
Hebbard is tragi-comedy ; Heney is melodramatic. 
Hebbard is a character study; Hehey merely a hero. 
We should have many Heneys; there is but one 
Hebbard. Some Sunset Thackeray, Scott or Dumas 
may discover this blithe judiciary and make him the 
characteristic man of our epoch. While we are 
dodging the bullets (which he has not yet fired) 
let us appreciate his artistic possibilities. 
* * * 

Wanted — By a European monarch, to correspond 
with an American girl (daughter of a Trust Monster 
preferred) : object, matrimony, civil war in Spain, 
and a throne. Send photograph of bankbook to 
Don Jaime, Prince de Bourbon ; business address, 
care of the Moulin Rouge, Paris. 

Here is a chance for some daughter of finance to 
throw a few duchesses and countesses into social 
hysterics. It will take but a few millions to become 
queen pretender to the Spanish throne. Then, if 
the Carlists are successful, palaces, scepter, crown 
jewels, blue blood. Some hurry in sending your 
name is advised, as there is already a list of eligibles. 
The crown may eventually go to Miss P.lanche 
Lervy Shoemaker, daughter of the Xew York 
banker. She is one most prominently mentioned. 

A Carlist army would not require much food per 



man. A few speckled beans, and they could loot 
the wine from shop-, as they .^j along. Should you 
tl\ to Paris without notice, go to iIk' Rue Benjamin 
Godard, a new Rue off the Square Lamartine. Any 
(Airli>i hanging around the corners will direct you 
to the fifth floor of an apartment house, where you 
will meet the would-be king and your royal sister, 
the Princess of .\>tnrias (pretending) and make 
arrangements for the coronation. 

* :■■• * 

It is quite a tax upon the skill of the artist and 
caterer these days to furnish hosts with new ideas. 
One of the most artistic of decorations was in 
evidence at the luncheon Mrs. Richard Queen re- 
cently gave to Miss Louise Redington, a prospective 
bride. An electric fountain surrounded by a 
wealth of pink roses, ferns and sea shells, played 
in the center of a large round table, over which 
was spread a cloth embroidered with pink rose 
buds. Ten guests were present. 

* * * 

The San Francisco Yacht Club had a jolly dance 
at Sausalito last Saturday afternoon, followed by 
many dinners; later jinks were held. The patron- 
esses of this dance were Mrs. Wm. Lindsley 
Spencer, Mrs. W. R. Harrison, Mrs. Chas. Shiels, 
Mrs. Geo. E. Billings, Mrs. J. R. Hanify and Mrs. 
Emmett Rixford. All these young matrons are 

well known in Sausalito's exclusive set. 

* * * 

The wedding of Miss Stella McCalla and Mr. 
Slayton will take place in the near future and be 
one of the social events of Santa Barbara. 




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187 TWELFTH STREET, Near Madison, Oakland 



THE WASP- 



Miss Winifred Burdge who recently announced 
her engagement to Walter Dayton Cole, an attorney 
of Tonopah, Nev., is a sister of Mrs. Bernard P. 
Miller; both are well known in exclusive circles of 
Oakland. Mrs. Burdge. a ward of Frank M. Smith, 
has been identified with relief work. It was while 
giving her services to the public and engaged in 
caring for the suffering that she first met Mr. Cole. 
He is a graduate of Ann Arbor, Michigan, and 
member of a prominent mining firm of Nevada. No 
date has been set for the wedding. 
* # * 

Mrs. Bobby Harrison gave a charming tea on 
Sunday last at her home on Green Street, in honor 
of Miss Richardson, a member of the Lillian 
Russell Co. Mrs. Harrison will soon leave for San 
Rafael where she will pass the Summer. Mr. Allen 
Wardner, the brother of Mrs. Harrison, an eligible 
Society man here, Mr. Allen Wright and Mr. John 
F. Bowie, will spend some time in San Rafael, 
having pitched a tent on the grounds of Mrs. 
Harrison's Summer home. 

The last meeting of the San Rafael Skating Club 
held a week ago, was preceded by many dinners. 
An unusual crowd was present. Miss Louise Boyd 
had as her guests from the City, Miss Genevieve 
King, Miss Emily Parrott, Miss Barbara Parrott 
and Frank King. Mr. and Mrs. Boyd chaperoned 
the party. Miss Genevieve Harvey was a guest of 
the Von Shroeders at the Hotel Rafael that evening, 
going later with a merry party to the Skating Rink. 
The Club has been discontinued for the present, 
though many of the younger members expect to 
gather and enjoy themselves every Wednesday 
evening during the Summer months. 

It is with sincere regret that Mrs. Dan Shaen's 
friends read of the death of her little baby boy, at 
the children's hospital on Sunday last. Mrs. Shaen 
was attractive Ursula Stone, daughter of Mr. and 
Mrs. C. B. Stone, sister of Mrs. Florence Darrah, 
and niece of Mrs. L. L. Baker. She is a general 
favorite in Society and recently returned from the 
Philippines, where she has been since her marriage 
a couple of years ago. While awaiting the arrival 
of her husband, she has been residing with her 
parents in this City. 

* * * 

Mr. and Mrs. Harry Poett and their little son 
have been visiting Mr. and Mrs. James Carolan at 
the Hotel Rafael. Mrs. Poett was the former pretty 
Genevieve Carolan. 

A young matron who is being welcomed by her 
friends and relatives in San Rafael, is Mrs. Allen 
Lewis of Portland, Oregon, who is visiting her 
sister, Mrs. George Boyd. Mrs. Lewis was the 
well known society girl Miss Dottie Kittle, daughter 
of Mrs. N. Kittle and niece of Mrs. A. W. Foster, 
and once was a champion tennis player here, easily 
beating all records, and winning many trophies. 

A wedding of interest on both sides of the bay 



took place on Saturday evening last in Oakland, 
when Miss Anita Oliver was married to George C. 
Jensen of Alameda. Rev. C. R. Brown of the Con- 
gregational Church performed the ceremony. Miss 
Oliver is the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. William 
Letts Oliver, who are among the best known 
residents of Oakland. The invitation list to the 
Church was very large, but the reception at the 
Oliver residence on Vernon Heights was confined 
to relations and intimate friends. The bride was 
attended by Miss Ruth Wilder, Miss Ruth Kales of 
Oakland, Miss Catherine Allen and Miss Helen 
Cole of San Francisco. Lee Robinson was best 
man. The ushers were Harold and Leslie Oliver, 
brothers of the bride, Dr. Gaskill and Ralph Jones. 
Mr. and Mrs. Jensen will reside in their own home 
on Vernon Heights, which was the gift of Mr. 
Jensen, Sr. 

A motoring party in three automobiles, left last 
week for a trip through Sonoma valley. The three 
cars contained Mr. and Mrs. George A. Newhall. 
Mr. and Mrs. Edward Pringle, Mr. and Mrs. 
Laurence Scott, Mr. and Mrs. George Lent, Mr. and 
Mrs. Robert Coleman, Mr. and Mrs. Harry W. 
Poett, and Harry Simpkins. 

* * & 

The San Rafael Bridge Club, meeting every two 
weeks and composed of many fashionable matrons 
of that burg, gathered last at the residence of Mrs. 
John S. Partridge. The members are Mrs. Part- 
ridge, Mrs. Frank B. Anderson, Mrs. Southard Hof- 
fann, Mrs. Dibble. Miss Towle, Mrs. L. L. Baker, 
Mrs. Madison, Mrs. John Crooks, Mrs. VV. R. 
Smedberg, Mrs-. Pence and Mrs. Zook. 

Miss Carrie Gevin, took apartments at the Hotel 
Rafael during the week and will remain there all 
Summer. 



ENJOY COUNTRY LIFE AT 

HOTEL DEL MONTE 



This is the season to take your family to Hotel Del 
Monte by the sea, near Monterey, and enjoy every comfort. There 
is plenty of room there and plenty to do for recreation and health. 
Parlor car leaves San Francisco 8:00 a. m. and 3:00 p. m. daily, 
direct to Hotel. Special reduced round-trip rates. For details, in- 
quire information Bureau, Southern Pacific, or of C. W. Kelley, 
Special Representative of Del Monte, 789 Market St., San Fran- 
cisco. Phone Temporary 275 1 . 



ANNOUNCEMENT 



Mrs. Mott- Smith Cunningham exhibitor in 
Paris Salon of 1 906 announces that her Studio 
Shop at 1 622 Pine St., a few doors from Van 
Ness Ave., is now open for the sale of her jewelry 



THE WASP 



San Rafael is becoming crowded with Summer 
ts and dinners, drives and bridge parties take 
place daily. Mr. ami Mrs. Henry Foster Dutton, 
who arc stopping at the Hotel Rafael, recently gave 
a dinner at Pastori's. Their guests were Mr. and 
Mrs. Jules Brett, Mr. and Mrs. Wakefield Baker, 
Mr. and Mrs. Henry Clarence Breeden. Late in the 
week the same party left for Del Monte, on an 
automobile tour remaining over Sunday. 
* * * 

San Rafael is much interested in its forthcoming 
series of concerts beginning on Ma\ lltli and 
organized by well known young ladies under the 
name of the Grace Freeman String Quartette. 'The 
members are Miss Grace Freeman, 1st Violin; Miss 
Miriam Hall, 2nd Violin ; Miss Lillian Spink. Viola; 
Miss Lucy Fuhrer, Cello. 

Let us try to be serious with the Log Show. 
There was a provoking desire to grin as soon as one 
entered the door. A number of last years quips and 
puns came to mind, and one wondered if his friends 
had beard of them, or if he might safely work off 
one or two. Society took more than a passing 
interest in the affair and on the days of judging, the 
grand stand was filled with maids and matrons, to 
hear what lucky dogs or rather owners were 
awarded prizes. However there were many sur- 
prises, as a number of hitherto invincible canines 
were defeated. Miss Jennie Crocker, who came in a 
special car from Xcw York to enter her dogs for 
the Show was disappointed in her prize Boston 
terrier, which was defeated by Mrs. W. H. Deming's 
pet in three different competitions. Three beatings 
for a champion was certainly plenty. Miss Crocker 
carried off prizes in other classes, but I believe her 
pride was in the Boston terrier class, so her luck 
outside that competition was not enough to atone 
for the disappointment. Other prominent society 
people who exhibited five dogs and carried off 
ribbons were Mrs. George Newhall and Miss 
( renevieve Harvey. Amongst the society people 
seen around the judging ring were: Mrs. W. H. 
Taylor, Mrs. Gus. Taylor. Mrs. Chesebrough and 
Miss Helen Chesebrough, Capt. and Miss Margery 
Bull, Mrs. McEnery, IMiss Jennie Crocker, Miss 
Harney, Mrs. Henrv Bothin, Miss Maud Payne. 
Miss Ethel Deane, "Miss Isabel McLaughlin, Mrs. 
Fred Palmer. Miss May Foulkes, Mrs. Rav Talyor, 
Mrs. R. Porter Ashe. 

There has always been some misgiving as to what 
a prize dog actually is. None save the owners and 
the judges seem to know. Blood sometimes tells 
the desparity between an animal that has the benefit 
of nursemaid and French dinners and one that 
roams the streets like a waif. But as between two 
dogs that have a slight variation in curvature of 
the tail, the question of awarding prizes is, as the 
losers declare, a matter of very close margin. And 
as for a close margin in dogs, why at all ? But 
these fine distinctions cut no figure with the crowd 
which goes to an affair because it has the social 
stamp upon it. Not one in a hundred understands 
the libretto of Italian Opera, but the town goes into 



ecstas) over it nevertheless. 

* * * 

Dr. II. J. Stewart's new mass in I) minor, com- 
posed for the Easter service of St. Dominic's 

Church, will be repeated on Sunday. May 5th, by 
the regular choir augmented with a number of 
extra voices and accompanied by a full orchestra. 
The soloists are Mrs. 11. Apple, Miss Leola Spofford 
Stone, Mr. T. G. Elliott and Mr. Harold Pracht. 
Dr. Stewart has composed a special offertory for 
the occasion, to the words of the hymn "Coelestis 
L'rbcs Jerusalem." , 

* * * 

The goodly countenances around the Forum 
Club's Annual Breakfast refuted the idea that the 
word "annual" has any more than a festive signifi- 
cance. The Paris Tea Garden, last Saturday, was 
the scene of their toasting, which was done in song. 
"Spring," "Absent Ones," "Patriotism," and "Guid- 
ing: Star" were responded to by Mrs. J. J. Apple. 
Mrs. Freygand and Mrs. Wetmore. A loving cup 
was presented to Mrs. Fredericks, the retiring 
president. 



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-THE WASP 




Los Angeles beating the Military Team in the recent Polo Tournament 



Mr. and Mrs. George Cadwalader have been en- 
termained a good deal since their recent wedding. 
That .most eligible and popular bachelor, Knox 
Maddox, gave a theater party for them last week. 
Miss Linda Cadwalader, who was one of the guests. 
will leave for the East soon. 



highly respected Californians. Young Fritz Hinck- 
ley was the first husband of Miss Florence Blythe, 
the great heiress, who is now Mrs. A. A. Moore. 
Mr. Hinckley died rather suddenly about a year 
after his wedding, having been seized with an at- 
tack of appendicitis. 



Mr. Knox Maddox gets part of his name from his 
mother, who was Miss Virginia Knox, the only 
child of Air. Knox, a banker in Santa Clara County 
and very wealthy. She married Colonel C. H. 
Maddox, a handsome Southerner, who represented 
Santa Clara County in the Legislature at the time 
when the rich Barney Murphy of San Jose was such 
a power in Democratic politics. The Maddoxes 
bought the fine old Joshiah Belden mansion in San 
Jose and lived there for many years. The place 
was sold to the syndicate which has erected the 
Hotel Vendome on the site of the old home. Mrs. 
Maddox lost both her daughters. One child died 
in Europe while she was traveling with her hus- 
band and mother. The death of her daughter Mil- 
dred some years ago was a heavy affliction to the 
esteemed lady. Knox Maddox is a Harvard grad- 
uate. Through his mother and grandmother he 
will some clay inherit a large fortune. 
* * * 

It was no surprise to her friends when they read 
that Mrs. Mary G. Hinckley had sued her husband, 
Harry Gray Hinckley, for a divorce. Mrs. Hinckley 
was Mamie Grayson of Oakland, daughter of the 
well known cattle king. The late Robert Grayson 
was her brother. Mr. Hinckley is a son of Air. 
Hinckley of the Fulton Iron Works. Airs. Hinck- 
ley has supported herself for the past five years by 
keeping boarders, first in the Williams' house on 
( ktavia Street, and before the fire she had just 
bought and renovated the Plymouth Hotel. I have 
been informed it was her father-in-law who fur- 
nished the money for her enterprise. The Hinck- 
leys have been married for twenty-three years and 
have five children, the eldest being nineteen years 
of age. Airs. Grayson died a year or two ago and 
was deeply mourned by her family and friends. She 
had been identified with the social life of Oakland 
since early days, the Graysons being old and 



It was a great compliment to Willis Polk to have 
been invited by the United States Government to 
take part in the preparation of plans for the new 
building of the Bureau of American Republics, 
which is to be erected in Washington. Only ten 
architects in America were invited by Secretary 
Root to take part in the competition. Air. Polk is a 
very busy man these days in San Francisco and was 
compelled to decline the honor. As the local repre- 
sentative of D. H. Burnham & Co. he has his hands 
full with important construction work. Competi- 
tion in drawing plans for great buildings is no new 
thing for Mr. Polk. He won three open compe- 
titions against the best architects of America while 
he was in the East, for several years, and associated 
with that most famous of architects, Dan H. Burn- 
ham. Air. Polk is a genius in his line. 



F. THOMS, The AWNING MAN 




Canvas Work. Repairing. Canopies and Floor Covers To Rent. 

TENTS, HAMMOCKS AND COVERS 

1209 MISSION ST. Tel. Market 2194 



-THE WASP- 




Burlingame defeating Los Angeles in the Polo Tournament 



General Arthur MacArthur has been given numer- 
ous evidences of the high regard which is enter- 
tained for him by local associations of prominent 
people such as the Pacific Union and other clubs. 
The dinner given in his honor by the Pacific Union 
was a particularly representative affair. The Gen- 
eral is a man of the highest character and deserves 
all the honors that can be showered upon him. 

With General and Mrs. MacArthur has gone Col- 
onel Frank L. Winn. Miss Dora Winn did not ac- 
company her father but remained with her grand- 
parents, Mr. and Mrs. George Boardman. Colonel 
Winn has been a widower many years. The pretty 
Miss Dora Boardman, whom he married, died a few 
days after the birth of her baby, and the little one 
was tenderly reared by grandparents. 



When Cheever was brought up before the judge 
the next day Coey was present. His ire had van- 
ished in the meantime, especially since his car had 
not been hurt in any way. 

"I don't want to be hard on him, judge," he said, 
"but I do think something should be done to teach 
him a lesson. I am willing to let him work out his 
bill with me. We need a washer and he can have 
the job." 

Cheever jumped at the chance and, the judge be- 
ing willing, the young man was soon industriously 
scrubbing dust and mud from the Flyers stored in 
Coev's garage. 



Harry Pendleton will, as usual, pass the summer at 
the Hotel Rafael. 



From being the proud occupant of a luxurious 
sixtv-horse-power limousine to a lowly job as auto- 
mobile washer is the remarkable reversal of position 
recently suffered by George Cheever, Jr., of An- 
dover, Mass.. and to make the drop all the more 
momentous for him the young man managed to 
negotiate it within the short space of twenty-four 
hours. 

Cheever landed in Chicago a short time ago and 
put up at the Auditorium Annex, where he engaged 
an expensive suite of rooms. A few days after his 
arrival he went to the desk and inquired whether 
he could rent an automobile. C. A. Coey, the 
Chicago representative of the Thomas cars, and 
who conducts an automobile livery business on the 
side, happened to be at the desk at the same time 
and to him the clerk referred Cheever. Coey was 
so taken up with the young man that he offered him 
his personal car, a white limousine, trimmed in gold. 

Cheever was delighted, so pleased, in fact, did he 
appear that he did not return that day and it was 
well into the second day before the warrant the 
somewhat worried Coey had had sworn out reached 
him. 




Announcement 

SPRING and SUMMER 

We desire to announce that our com- 
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and Domestic Woolens, consisting of un- 
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It gives us pleasure to state that every garment is made by 
skilled tailors, cut on stylish and artistic lines that command the 
admiration and approval of our customers. 

We cordially invite and solicit patronage, and endeavor to up- 
hold our past reputation for high-grade tailoring at moderate prices. 

McMahon, Keyer & Stiegeler 
Bros., Inc. 



Main Store 

892-894 Van Ness Ave. 

at Ellis Street 



1711 O'Farrell St. 

at Fillmore 



-THE WASP- 



The opening recital for the new organ recently 
built by the Austin Organ ' Company of Hartford, 
Connecticut, for the First Congregational Church, 
will be given on Monday evening, May 6th, b} r Dr. 
H. J. Stewart, assisted by Miss Camille Frank, 
Miss Elsie Arden, and Samuel D. Mayer, organist 
of the church. The program is as follows : First 
Sonata, in F minor, Mendelssohn ; Communion in 
F, Grison ; Barcarolle in A, Hofmann ; Polonaise 
in A, Chopin; "In Paradisum" and "Fiat Lux," 
Dubois ; Grand March, Pomp and Circumstance. 
Elgar. 

$ * ^ 

Mr. Charles Keilus, of the "Hub," is on his way- 
East to study styles of the coming season. Mr. 
Keilus is one of those progressive merchants who 
knows the advantage of seeing - yearly what the 
great East is doing. 

Geraldine Bonner has gone East to remain for a 
year or so but she intends coming back to get into 
touch with California atmosphere, which she loses, 
she says, when she remains away too long. Miss 
Bonner is at work on a novel of old California life 
with which she expects to make a hit. 

* * * 

Miriam Michelson is home for a short stay, but 
she will leave very soon for Europe, where she 
intends to remain for some months, but she will 
be back again in the Fall. She has more work con- 
tracted for than she can finish. 

Eleanor Gates, whose "best story" is being so 
widely advertised by Editor Aiken of Sunset, should 
write the story of her own life, or rather her love 
story, for that would make splendid reading. It 
was seven }'ears ago that Ma}' Eleanor Gates, as 
she wrote herself then, was working for the Oakland 
Enquirer. One da}' she was sent to "do" what 
was either a murder or a suicide in Berkeley. That 
same day, "Dick" Tully, who was the Enquirer's 
representative in Berkeley, had gone to the matinee 
in San Francisco, and that was why Miss Gates 
was sent on the detail. It was the famous Brandes 
case, and Miss Gates had stumbled on one of the 
most interesting stories she had ever worked on 
up to that time. Brandes had murdered his little 
daughter by beating" her so cruelly that she died 
from her injuries. But it was alleged that the little 
girl had killed herself. 

* * * 

Miss Gates did not believe the suicide theory and 
when young Tully finally turned up after the mati- 
nee was over she set him to hunt up details of the 
Brandes family, ordering him about just as if* she 
had been his city editor, and while he did her bid- 
ding she wrote that part of the story she had 
gleaned herself. Between them they wrote one of 
the most sensational newspaper stories that the 
Enquirer had ever published, and it led to the trial 
and conviction of the unnatural father who was sent 
to jail for ten years. I believe he was recently 
released. It was shortly after this that Tully and 
Miss Gates both entered the Universitv at Berkelev 



as students. They were sweethearts then, for the 
meeting over the Brandes story had resulted in a 
case of love at first sight. They were married 
some time later, secretly, during Tully 's senior year, 
but until their college life ended they did not tell 
a soul of their union. It has turned out one of 
the most harmonious marriages on record. 



Professor Henry Morse Stephens really ought to 
make a home for himself in Santa Barbara, for 
the people are simply crazy over him there. Ther 
fight for the privilege of having him as guest dur- 
ing the day and night that he is there giving his 
lecture, and he could visit for a year and still find 
that there were others soliciting the honor. He 
stayed with Dr. and Mrs. Alexander Boyd Dore- 
mus while in the Channel City last week, and when 
he returns to speak before the California Bankers' 
Association, the dear knows what will happen. 1 
hope that he may not be put up to the highest 
bidder. It must be oppressive to be so great a 
favorite with the intellectual. 



HOTEL RAFAEL 

San Rafael, Cal. 

OPEN ALL THE YEAR ROUND 

SO Minutes from San Francisco 

The only first-class hotel in the vicinity of 
the city. American and European plan. 

F. N. ORPIN, Lessee and Manager 



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Medical Springs 

Lake County 



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Main Office 647 Van Ness Ave., San Francisco 

Call or wrile for booklets and general information. 
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908 MARKET ST. Phone Temporary 2946 San Francisco, Cal. 



-THE WASP 



ii 



Santa Barbara and Montecito arc very proud of 
Mrs. Deming Jarves, of "The Breakers," Montecito, 
who has been abroad with her husband since Spring, 
motoring through Europe, and who was heard ol 
recentlj as the winner in the Cannes Golf Tourna- 
ment, when she carried off the (.rand Duke Mich- 
ael's prize in the women members' handicap event, 
the troph) consisting of a solid gold tea service, of 
seven pieces, enameled in deep red. and with raised. 
finely carved flowers on the outside. Mrs. Jarves 
also won the Duchess of Devonshire's prize, a hand- 
some gold jewel case. The tea service is highly 
prized and many ladies go From England each year 
to try for it. ( Inly once before has such a triumph 
come to America and that was in 1896, when Mrs. 
Franz Zerrahn of Boston, formerly Miss Whitney, 
carried off the prize. The Dannes golf club was 
started in 1890 by the Duke of Cambridge, who was 
its first president. The Grand Duke Michael is 
now president. 

Mrs. Bowman II. McCalla gave a canyon party 
the other day at her home in Santa liarbara, when 
fully 250 of the fashionable people of that city 
and Montecito were present. The affair was so 
different from the ordinary garden fetes that it 
made quite a little babble of conversation and in 
strict confidence it may be said that every young 
matron and belle had on the prettiest shoes that 
ever gladdened the eyes. Of course it is not very 
good for high heels to scramble up and down the 
rugged canyon paths and they may have suffered 
but it is not every day that their wearers get the 
opportunity. Mrs. Albert W. Bacon, Mrs. Dris- 
coll's mother, poured tea; Miss Nellie Stow poured 
coffee; and Miss Antonia Marin served ice cream. 
Mrs. McCalla was assisted by Miss Stella McCalla, 
Miss Elizabeth Livermore, Miss Davis. Miss Ednah 
Davis, Miss Cora Bowditch, Miss Callahan and her 
sister. Miss Marian McElrath, and a few other San 
Franciscans, which goes to prove that those from 
the City on the Bay are loyal to their old towns- 
people. 



with "copy," the editor of the Cosmopolitan will 
yell "copy" and "boy" in vain. 

Therein, Tack made almost an error. He could 
write for none more appropriately than the an- 
archist readers of the Cosmopolitan, who will think 
the "Snark" the first vessel that ever carried an 
author to the South Seas. India and thereabout- 
When the adventurer comes upon the footprints 
of Robert Louis Stevenson, Rudyard Kipling and 
Lafcadio Hearn, he had better not send his impres- 
sions to the 25 and 35 cent magazines but, depart- 
ing, leave behind him, long, hurried, pell-mell foot- 
prints i in the sands of time. 



23 Candle Power Gas 

Brilliant Electric Light 

Good Service 



ARE YOU GETTING ALL THREE? 



WE WANT TO KNOW- 

If you are not getting a full flow of clean, rich gas. 
If your lights are not entirely satisfactory. 
If your gas appliances are not efficient and need adjustment. 
If you have any complaint which ha's not received full and 
courteous attention. 

WE HAVE EXPERT INSPECTORS- 

A full corps of trained men who are at your service day 

and night. 
Let us know if anything is wrong. 



"AT YOUR SERVICE'' 

The San Francisco Gas and Electric Company 

925 FRANKLIN STREET 



500 HAIGHT ST. 
2965 SIXTEENTH ST. 



1260 NINTH AVE. 
421 PRESIDIO AVE. 



It is said that Willie Hearst and Jack London 
are no longer on good terms. The break should 
be advantageous to both of them. It will make 
both more popular with the Socialists: Hearst, be- 
cause Jack is thought to be turning plutucrat ; and 
London, because it will mean a financial loss, the 
ideal of all Socialists. 

Hearst's Cosmopolitan Magazine, the organ of 
biff-bang pessimism, includes most of London's 
audience. He may now perforce turn to the 
Century, organ of bouquet optimism. The author 
refuses to go around the world placarded with 
Journal. So he will not write for the Cosmopolitan 
the articles which that magazine has been prefac- 
ing and pre-illustrating for some months. "For 
Cosmopolitan readers only," they advertised, in- 
tending to sustain interest in the articles for seven 
years, the schedule of the cruise. But now, when 
the Captain of the "Snark" rushes into some port 




Phone West 4983 



Vogel & Bishoff 

Ladies' Tailors and 
Habit Makers 

1 525 Sutter Street, San Francisco 




Old Poodle Dog Restaurant 



824-826 EDDY STREET 

Near Van Ness Ave. 



Service better than befoi 
the fire 



Formerly, Bnsh and Grant Av« 
San Francisco 



Phone Emergency 63 



12 



-THE WASP- 



T. A. Drirc 



F. J. Carcldn 



Waller S. Hobarl 




The Victorious Burlingame Polo Team 
Winners of the recent Tournament in the South 



There is a ghost at Lyndhurst, the family man- 
sion of the Thaws. It is not of the late unlamented 
Stanford White, but a lady ghost. She has been 
in the haunting business since the Spring of 1902, 
previous to that time being the wife of a Presby- 
terian minister in Kentucky and related to Mrs. 
William Thaw. On a visit to Lyndhurst she ap- 
propriated death to herself with a rope and was 
found hanging in the bathroom. News of the affair 
was muffled by influential friends ; but the departed 
soon became chief of the Ancient Order of Skele- 
tons with headquarters in the family closet. The 
old lady Thaw desires to sell the place and the 
hereditaments corporeal and incorporeal, as she has 
grown superstitious. 

It is said that Harry Thaw frequently urged the 
sale, and would never sleep there without a light 
in his room. Spooks have always had idiosyncra- 
cies. The use of cocaine and morphine in some way 
attracts their supernatural instincts. Every time 
young Thaw, high-life weary and money-spent, re- 
turned home for the gold cure, the spectre would 
come hankering around and do the dance of the 
seven veils at his bedside in the purple-playing shad- 
ows of the night. 

* * * 

Miss Helen and Miss Bessie Ashton have been 
visiting at the Hotel Rafael recently. These two 
girls are general favorites and are always welcome 
guests at San Rafael, where they are the recipients 

of much entertaining. 

* % % 

Mrs. Beaver and the Misses Beaver, who have 
been residing in Berkeley since their old home on 
Taylor Street was burned, will soon buy and build 
on this side of the bay. 



At a delightful tea given in Sausalito last week, 
Mrs. Robbins made Miss Mabel Watkins, who will 
be a June bride, the guest of honor. Miss Williar 
looked very happy upon this occasion, both these 
girls have been the motif of much entertaining. 
Miss Williar has not yet named her wedding day. 



Let them know! 



Your friend can reserve a room at the 

Hotel St. Francis 

when he leaves home, and find it ready 
for him when he arrives. Tell him so. 
Every comfort at hand. 



-THE WASP- 



13 




A Society Muster in the Southland 

Charles W. Clark's horse beating Dr. E. J. Boescke's for the A. B. Spreckels Challenge Cup 

at the Country Club Course, Coronado 



Marie Corelli is happy as a Peace Congress these 
days, on hearing that the absinthe habit is feeling 
the iron heel of virtue in Europe. Marie's "Worm- 
wood" was ostensibly a reckless, record-breaking 
spurt of reform. But the work skidded. Thousands 
who read that book, and to whom absinthe was but 
hearsay, went to the decadent beverage for a new 
sensation. They yearned to see gamboge tigers 
with ombre stripes following them at eve from the 
streets to their stairways. They longed for visions 
of classic marble hung with immortelles, at the price 
of a few cents. Loss of appetite, hallucinations, 
ranting fancies, patent medicine symptoms made 
lovely, became widespread expectations, especially 
among the Bohemian class. To sip grandeur from 
the reseda drink they believed possible on the word 
of the author. But the only elation some of them 
experienced was the inability to walk through a 
crowd without disturbing the peace: also, perhaps, 
farce-comedy slumps in the coin pocket. They 
therefore voted Marie a goddess of false hopes and 
a faker. 

The fault lay in the fact that the Anglo-Saxon is 
too practical and has too big an appetite to make 
an ideal lunatic. Parisians know the art of being 
insane without going crazy. A French workingman 
can go through his work on a bubble omelet, an 
absinthe and a little quinine. At eve. he satisfies 
his patriotism with a riot or a naughty song. But 
Americans want more for their money. Few vices 
are ever crushed out.. Let them flourish in France,' 
where the people know how to use them to advant- 
age and glory. 

Miss Lita Schlesinger planned a pleasant sur- 
prise for her friends last week. She invited a 
number for bridge and during the afternoon an- 
nounced her engagement to Rev. John Rowland 



Lathrop, pastor of the First Unitarian Church of 
Berkeley. Miss Schlesinger is the daughter of Mr. 
and Mrs. A. C. Schlesinger of Oakland, well known 
in the social set there. Mr. Lathrop is a graduate 
of Harvard, also of the Leadville Theological 
School. Since his coming from his home in Jackson, 
Miss., he has made many friends in Berkeley. 
Although no date has been set, the wedding, it is 
said will occur in the near future. 




STUDEBAKER 

1907 

CARS NOW ARRIVING 

Studebaker Bros. Co. of California 

405 Golden Gate Avenue 

Cbwtcr A. Weaver. Manager 



14 



-THE WASP- 



Mrs. W. G. Henshaw of Oakland is receiving 
much attention at the Potter, in Santa Barbara. 
She is accompanied by several Oakland women. 
* * * * 

Miss Sydney Davis, who is at Santa Barbara, 
was painted by Carle J. Blenner of New York just 
before he took his departure for Gotham. She posed 
in an easy chair, her hands filled with great pink 
roses, and a bower of the same blossoms making 
a background for the figure in a white gown. On 
her head is a gyps)' hat, with roses wreathing the 
crown and peeping from the brim. I hear that her 
distinguished father is greatly pleased with the 
picture. 

Denver has a restaurant where a man can win a 
bride between the salad and the entree. It is near 
the Denver Court House, whose statesmen say the 
proprietress knows how to make a good meal as 
well as a match. In order to get Societv in action, 
she endeavored to insert the following delicious ad 
in the newspapers. But the managers wiggled and 
refused. Here it is, and the ad-writer for the 
Caliph Haroun al Raschid could not have done 
better: 

"Wives furnished for eligible gentlemen without 
delay. Why waste time in writing and exchanging 
photographs? Our combination cafe and marriage 
bureau saves time and brokers' commissions. Meet 
your wife at the dinner table. Get something good 
to eat and get acquainted at the same time. You'd 
have to eat somewhere, anyhow. Let us know by 
phone the kind you prefer, and we will do the rest. 
Cozy corners, soft lights and dream)' music with- 
out extra charge. .Finest a la carte service in the 
City. Get in now while the good ones last. You'll 
never be any younger." 

The pousse cafe courtship is not a bad idea. It 
might not produce as stalwart a country vote as the 
old oaken bucket plan. Still, as the lady says they 
must eat somewhere, so they will marry somewhere. 
Why not among themselves? 

The interior of the home which William E. Corey 
has furnished for Maybelle Gihnan is an extrava- 
ganza of color and upholstery. Mrs. Elizabeth 
Corey-Riggs, sister of the steel magnate, guided a 
few reporters through the establishment ; so it 
looks as if May 7th, set for the wedding in Paris, is 
no press agent's story. Descriptions from New 
York certainly make it a gay shack where this co- 
respondent will reside. No bed room of mirrors or 
plush-covered swing is mentioned ; but there is an 
array of buff and gold, rose and cream, splashed 
damask, huge roses, white marbles, mahogany sur- 
faces, carved legs, draperies, divans, pillows and 
lounging places. 

Corey has defiantly stated that Society must re- 
ceive his bride. There is a dream of beauty in that 
word "must." Why must? Otherwise, what will he 
do? Will he quit making steel and let Society go 
short on carving knives for a while? It may be 



that only the defied ones know what he is talking 
about. He might happen to know who is trembling 
when he says, You must. It might just be a case of, 
It's time for all good fellows to stand in together. 
Which reminds us of the old, old questions : What 
is a good fellow? and. Why does he cross the road? 

The "Old Timer" has been squelched as a 
searcher of ancestors. Emile Brugiere, writing to 
the Wasp from Monterey, replies to him as follows : 

"I am not surprised that the Old Timer should 
doubt that I even had a paternal grand-father, as 
such is a scarcity in some of the Smart Set of San 
Francisco. My paternal grand-father, Amadee de 
Brugiere, was born in the south of France in a 
town that still bears the name of Brugiere. His 
great grand-father was the Baron de Sorson, a man 
of great cultivation. His translation of Shakespeare 
into French and Chinese, and other works of his, 
both historical and scientific, are still referred to in 
libraries fortunate enough to possess these books. 
The original volumes are in my mother's home at 
Newport, R. I. On coming to America, he decided 
to drop the "de," believing that a man of noble birth 
should not advertise the fact in a democratic 



BURNS HAMMAM BATHS 



LADIES' DEPARTMENT 
OPEN DAY AND NIGHT 



817 Eddy Street 



...Pbone Franklin 2245 




A Steinway $525 
Piano for 



Called the Sleinway " Vertegrand '---it is 
upright with all the features of the higher 
priced Sleinways, but with an inexpensive 
although substantial case. A piano for those 
who want a Steinway but who can't afford to 
to pay for elaboration. On installments if 
you wish. 



SHERMAN, CLAY & CO. 



Steinway Agents 



1635 Van Ness Ave., San Francisco 



Broadway at I3th, Oakland 



A lahlespoonful of Abbott's Bittei 
greatest a»d '•) digest on known. 



glass of sweetened water after meals is the 



CHAS. SCHMIDT HARRY MILLING 

Bohemianism is Best Exemplified at 

THE NORTHERN CAFE 

I7I0 and I7I2 O'FARRELL STREET 

A PLACE TO EAT AND DRINK "Ladies' Orchestra" from 6 to 12 



-THE WASP 



13 



country, lie- was a merchant in New York City. 
I lis vessels sailed t" the Four corners of the world, 
and in those days he did a business of over a million 
dollars a year. Iris not very difficult for the wise 
■ Timer to look up the histor) of Amadee de 
Brugiere in the History of Merchants of New York 
City; and if the ' >1<1 Timer who has a pedigree of 
niir Smart Set on his tongue's end, should desire 
any further information regarding my family histor) 
on the paternal or maternal side. I would he pleased 
to furnish him some, free of cost, even in this com- 
mercial age." 

* * # 

Mrs. Ynez Shorh White's Skating Club, held the 
final meeting of the season on last Monday night. 
( >uing to the Bachelor's Ball, which took place in 
Berkeley on the same evening, many prominent 
skaters were missed. Mr. Aimer Newhall and 
Southard Hoffmann, however, led a jolly crowd 
from San Rafael. Mrs. John Metcalf is as yet too 
timid to venture upon the floor without an in- 
structor, but by the time Capt. Metcalf returns from 
his tour, he will note great improvement, as his 
wife took her first lessons in skating on the eve of 
his departure. Miss Irene Sabin, who lately 
returned from the East, was present and was the 
recipient of much attention. Miss Ethel Shorb 
looked extremely pretty in a light summer gown. 
Miss Bates is an untiring skater. Mr. Paschal, Mr. 
Robson. Mr. Vogel, Mr. Bee, Mr. McAfee scarcely 
paused during the entire evening. Mr. Lester 
r.urnette. and Mr. Punnitt, each tangled themselves 
ftp most gracefully and like William the Conqueror, 
laid hold of the floor with both hands, but joined 
agreeably in the laugh. It was suggested by some 
of the ladies on leaving the hall, that a vote of 
thanks and some testimonial of appreciation be 
presented to Mrs. White, for her kindness during 
the season. Totally oblivious of self, she sees that 
all her guests have a good time. 

* * * 

The many friends of Mrs. Samuel Shortridge will 
be grieved to hear that she has been removed to 
the Livermore Sanitarium, where her condition 
remains so serious as to cause her husband and 
family great anxiety. It is hoped the perfect quiet 
and rest will entirely restore her health'. 

* * * 

A marriage which was quietly celebrated last 
Saturday, was that of Mrs. Mabel Moore Eaton 
and Jesse Wilber Glover, U. S. R. C. S. The 
ceremony was performed at the home of Rev. Brad- 
ford Leavitt, of the First Unitarian Church. Capt. 
Glover is commander of the revenue cutter Thetis. 
After a short wedding tour, he will leave on Mav 
15th for Point Barrow, Alaska. The bride was the 
widow of Ward Eaton, brother of Lloyd Eaton 
and son of Mr. and Mrs. Fred Eaton of this Citv. 
Ward Eaton died in Tonopah, Nevada about two 
years ago. Mrs. Fred Eaton was Miss Rose Miller, 
of San Jose, sister of Mrs. George Ladd, who after 
the death of Mr. Ladd. went East and abroad, and 
while on her travels, she married a Mr. Mitchell, 
some years her junior. But the match proved a 



ver) happy one. They are now living in the East. 

* * * * 

Mr. and Mrs. William J. Dutton, and Miss Mollie 
will leave the Citj early in August for a tour abroad 
They will visit the Orient, thence journey to 
Egypt and Europe, during an absence of about a 
year. 

Judge Sloss has been enjoying a few day-, rest 
at Santa Barbara and was the host at a small 
luncheon at Montecito the other day. 

* * # 

Mr. and Mrs. Jules I'.rett, who, when in California, 
makes Hotel Rafael their home, will soon leave for 
a trip to Mexico and be gone several months. 



The Potter 



Fronting the Ocean in cool Santa Barbara. A daylight ride 
through the prettiest country in the world. Most picturesque coast. 
Golf, polo, tennis, fishing, automobiling, surf bathing, yachts and 
launches and horse-back riding. See the Santa Barbara Mission 
(still in use). Hope Ranch, Channell Islands, Le Cumbre trail and 
a thousand other things that will interest you. Accommodations for 
1200. Rates May 1st to January 1st, $2.50 per day and upwards 

Our representative, at 789 Market street, phone Temporary 275 I 
will show you floor plans, secure your transportation and attend to 
other details of travel. Reduced round trip rates good for thirty days. 




Now Open 

The New 
Poodle Dog 
Restaurant 
and Hotel 



N. W. Corner 
Polk and Post Sts. 

Sao Francisco 




PHONE FELL 9911 



1808 MARKET ST. 
SAN FRANCISCO 



Illustrated Catalogue 
on Application 

ich, 837 S. Spring St. 
LOS ANGELES 



16 



-THE WASP 




MRS. CHAS. E. HUGHES 
Wife of the Governor of New York who defeated Hearst. 



Our office boy is compiling a set of statistics to 
determine what occupation a poor girl might enter 
with most favorable chances of meeting and marry- 
ing a millionaire. The records thus far give chorus 
girls the first place, with trained nurses second. His 
method may be inaccurate, for he gets his data not 
only from the society columns but includes the 
heroines of popular songs. In might have been 
this practice that placed waitresses third on the 
winning list. But last week he tallied one from 
real life in the latter's score. 

Hitherto the name of Miss Jennie Donohue has 
not been featured in the social page, but will when 
the lady goes East as the wife of F. E. Boris, a 
high-rater among Pittsburg brokers. Down at 



Catalina Island she has been wasting her smiles 
among the Tuxedoless johnnies who would wait for 
her after 8 P. M. at the back door of the Hotel 
Metropole. The prices of rubies, pearls and roses 
must go up considerably before we deign use them 
as attributes of her lips, teeth and complexion. 
And as for starry eyes, none of your common, 
ordinary stingy stars seen from City thoroughfares, 
but those of amethystine ray that glow in the 
mellow firmament above an Oriental rose garden or 
the alligator streams of Jacksonville. Florida, her 
native burg. 

* * * 

The engagement of Miss Mary Patten to the 
Danish Minister, Mr. Constantin Brun, has been 
rumored in Washington and neither been affirmed 
nor denied by the parties most interested. Miss 
Patten, the eldest of five daughters, is rapidly near- 
ing that mysterious age when it is impossible to 
classify an unmarried woman. The young girls 
look on her as a being of another world and the 
married women with grown children exclaim when 
the}' see her name in the Society columns, "Oh, my. 
Why I went to school with May at Miss Bird's 
so many years ago." But like May herself they 
stop short at counting the years. 

The Patten sisters are the daughters of the late 
Edward Patten and Mrs. Patten of Virginia City, 
Nevada. Mr. Patten was a miner and accumulated 
a great fortune. After his death his widow came 
to San Francisco, where she and her family lived 
in very expensive style. She placed her five 
daughters in the College of Notre Dame, San Jose, 
and later on took them to the convent of Notre 
Dame, Paris, where they remained so long in the 
completion of their education that the sisters wrote 
to Mrs. Patten that the young ladies had passed the 




Miss May Sutton in a lively Tennis Game at Coronado 



-THE WASP- 



17 



school-girl stage and sin mid be launched in Society. 

This she did and soon after purchased a fine house 
in Washington, which has since become a center of 
social interest at the capital. The wits of Wash- 
ington termed the Patten home on Massachusetts 
Avenue "The Irish Legation." but such shafts did 
not deter the Californians, and they have stormed 
successfully, the citadel of Washington exclusive- 
ness. Mary, the eldest girl, was once reported as 
engaged to Bourke Cochran. Augusta, the second 
daughter, married Congressman J. .Milton Glover 
and ha.- been divorced. Edith, whose name is now 
spelled Edythe by the Washington Society report- 
er-, married General Corbin. The other daughters, 
Josephine and Nellie, are unmarried. The social 
campaign of this noted family has therefore not 
been distinguished by many brilliant matrimonial 
alliances. The Patten sisters are noted in Washing- 
ton for their keen wit. of which Society is more 
or less apprehensive. Lord Bacon, in one of his 
famous essays, tells us that people of keen wit 
should consider that their victims have long mem- 
ories. 

Mr>. Patten died many years ago and divided her 
large estate amongst her daughters, who have stead- 
ily steered their social course by the needle point 
of their ambition to move amongst the elect ol 
Washington. 

* * * 

Emma Eames and her husband have been 
judicially subdivided. ( )n the other hand May 
Yohe recently telephoned to the Little Church 



around the Corner that her third was ready with the 
dominie's fee. Boni de Castellane has appealed 
from the countess' divorce. Lillian Russell is here 
in our City attending strictly to business. If she 
were not, we would have heard of the fact a week 
before her arrival. 

Eames has such a Minervalike personality that 
a divorce has no effect upon her, even in the sight 
of that most fastidious institution in the world, 
yellow journalism. Yohe is not as fortunate. She 
is frequently kept after school by Mrs. Grundy for 
refusing to do homework. In her behalf an 
emergency call was sent to the pastor for a mid- 
night ceremony. The other party is I. Newton 
Brown, claimed by both New York and Phil- 
adelphia. Reason for the haste is not given. Surely 
no one objected to Mrs. Hope-Strong acquiring 
another home. And no wise parent would frustrate 
Mr. Brown, as the marriage could not be viewed to 
run more than a season at the Casino anyway, and 
might be cheaper in the end. However, the Little 
Pastor around the Corner was not at his post, and 
a still alarm was sent in to a clergyman who is 
famous for marriages at all hours. But he failed to 
respond this time. The hotel clerk thought he 
would be calling May's bluff by suggesting an 
alderman to do the exercises. Whereupon she asked 
for a continuance, and went with Mr. Brown to the 
Champagne Springs on Broadway. 

ENTRE NOUS. 





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GRACE FREEMAN STRING QUARTETTE 




■ <■.#«'.'-. M" „ .•.'.-■.■-.■-..■*.: "i 



Pablw9M Mtd^Jmifs 



as^. 



,^f: -■_ >i -jS> , ..-.,^l:t.^fe; 



szrassssaa: 



£/rhnk, Criticism cf Current Stents 




Why doesn't Schmitz get up a weird and wooly 
tale like P. H. McCarthy's about a conspiracy to 
chloroform and murder him. A story of that sort 
about secret agents of the Mikado laying for him 
with carboys of chloroform and razor-edge butcher- 
knives might lift him temporarily out of the deep 
shadow of the penitentiary. 



The Call's notable scoop of the stenographic re- 
port of the confessions of the Supervisors came like 
a thunderclap in a clear sky. The Examiner, 
Chronicle and Bulletin had regarded that testimony 
as' hermetically sealed and overlooked the one 
chance of breaking into it. The Call got its scoop, 
not from Rudolph Spreckels, nor Heney, nor Lang- 
don, but from Louis Glass, who demanded the testi- 
mony on which the indictment against him was 
returned. It will be remembered that the Call's 
great scoop covered only the telephone bribery 
story. That of course was the only testimony fur- 
nished to Glass. 



A good many people here imagine that Kearny 
Street was named after the late Dennis Kearney, 
and they invariably spell it with an "e" in the last 
syllable. But Kearny Street was not named after 
the agitator, but after General Phil Kearny, who 
was out here before most of us were born. Prop- 
erly pronounced it is "Karny," like Kate who "lived 
by the banks of Killarney." 



James Henry Smith, now "Silent" forever, has 
bequeathed more money than silence to his rela- 
tions, and there is likelihood of some sonorous 
probating over his estate. His sister. Lady Cooper, 
putdown an unfinished cutlet and left London like 
a one best bet, on learning the widow was on her 
way to New York. Accompanying the English 
matron, is Sir George Alexander Cooper, with 
Smith's will and the moneybags to bring home the 
winnings. The Coopers have been pegging along 
with a meagre $50,000,000, which milady inherited 
from "Chicago" Smith. With "Silent's" money she 
would have about a hundred millions, and be the 
richest thing in hairpins that Society editors can 
remember. 

Mrs. "Silent," soothed and petted by the Duke 
and Dutchess of Manchester, arrived here last Sun- 
day. She is said to have been "cut off" with 
$5,000,000. One of her New York friends, claiming 
more information than theory, states there are ex- 
pectations of another heir with the widow who is 
now more forty than fair and fat. Thi= little pilgrim, 
unprovided for in another will, would be stronger 

lis the propel thing to take Abbotts Bitters with a glass of sherry or soda before meals: 
gives you an appetite. At all druggists. 



than all the lawyers of New York to break the testa- 
mentary document merely by uttering its birth-cry. 
In any event, the prospects for a contest are bright 
as a diamond sunburst. There are at least six 
surviving heirs, outside of Lady Cooper. The spoils 
would seem sufficient to make victors of all con- 
cerned. Yet when a little lopsidedness in the division 
can make one woman the richest in the world, the 
denouement is interesting enough to give the 
posthumous heir the birth-mark of a lemon on its 
funny-bone. 



The returns for 1906 from the Hamburg- 
American, the North-German Lloyd and the 
Cunard lines show the largest profits in theirj 
history. The Hamburg-American line, however, in 
some of its branches shows a falling off in returns 
and has felt the keen edge of Japanese competition 
in the far East. This last in itself is quite signific- 
cant and indicates what is in store for ourselves. 
The Wasp has several times pointed out the im- 
possibility of our competing with Japan in the 
ocean carrying trade on the Pacific. Not only is 
the American shipowner handicapped by costly 
ships and high wages, but he is at the mercy of] 






C. 1-1. REMINSTROM 

Tailor and Importer 

SPRING AND SUMMER STYLES 

NOW READY 



Formerly of 

The Mutual Savings Bank Building 



2415 FILLMORE STREET 

Telephone West 5769 



SWAIN'S CAFE 



1111-1113 

POST ST. 



Have ar^ded to their heretofore Excellent Equipment 

A Modern Grill Service 



With Schlitz and Wilrzburger 
Beer on Draught 



Music under the direction o 
Mr. Edgar Bayliss 



JULES' FRENCH RESTAURANT £**tt*2S. 

Regular Dinners served svery Evening, including Sunday, at former prices 

• 326 BUSH STREET 

Music on Sundays Phone Temporary 1821 Jules Witlman, Prop. 



-THE WASP- 



19 



labor agitators, who strive day and night to ruin 
his business. When he appeals to the courts to 
stop their lawless acts, he obtains no redress. 



the Colorado Senator. The young couple, it is 
said, had long; been secretly engaged. 



\i tin- writing the carmen are undecided whether 
to strike or not. It is to be Imped that they may 
disregard the advise of their false friends and remain 
at work for the strike would be a bad thing for the 
City and equally SO for the strikers. The wave of 
prosperity is subsiding" in the Kasl and wages there are 
falling. In I'ittslmrg, which is one of the most pros- 
perous of Eastern cities plasterers gel only $3 a day 
and expect that rate to he reduced. Painters and 
carpenters are also over numerous and their wages 
are inclined to drop. Common laborers are idle in the 
thousands and eager for work at $1.40 a day. Ten 
thousand men could be found in the Eastern cities 
eager to take the carmen'-, places here, if permitted to 
work. It is not likely that Mayor Schmitz will have 
much to say as to the repression of violence if the 
strike should occur. If the matter be passed up to 
< iovernor ( lillett, that official would not be chary about 
using militia, and Major General Funston might be 
made a factor in the quarrel if the militia failed. The 
public sentiment is strongly against the strike and the 
carmen will receive little sympathy should the mer- 
chants of the City close their stores, and lay off thou- 
sands of clerks, there being do business to justify their 
employment. There can be no business in a City like 
this when the street cars cease to run. It is to be hoped 
that the carmen will realize that they are now the best 
paid railroad hands - in America and avoid the 
mountain of trouble a strike would bring on them 
and their fellow citizens. 

HARVEY BROUGHAM 



San Francisco pleasure seekers will be delighted to 
learn that the Hotel Vendome has reopened and is 
more attractive and comfortable than ever. It has 
been rebuilt on lines that make it earthquake proof, 
and has a complete system of scientific plumbing, new 
bathrooms, telephones in every room and vacuum air 
cleaning. With its beautiful grounds, bowling alleys, 
tennis courts and magnificent bathing pavilion, it is an 
ideal summer resort, only an hour's ride from the City. 
Thirty-five trains daily connect it with San Francisco. 



At an elaborate luncheon given recently at Wash- 
ington. Pa., by Miss Amy Dunlap, the engagement 
of Miss Helen Dent Wreneshall to Chaffee Grant, 
of San Diego, Cal., was announced. Miss Wrene- 
shall is the third daughter of the late Edward 
Wreneshall. Mr. Grant is the eldest son of 
Ulysses S. Grant, Jr., of San Diego, and is a grand- 
son of General Grant and of the late Senator 
Chaffee of Colorado. With the announcement of 
this engagement old memories will be revived, when 
U. S. Grant. Jr., was in San Francisco, about 
twenty-five years ago. It was on this occasion his 
own engagement was announced to a well-known 
heiress. Later the engagement was dissolved, and 
young Grant married Miss Chaffee, daughter of 



Miss Lita Schlessinger, whose engagement was 
announced this week, is quite a young girl. She 
is very musical and has a fine voice which has been 
well cultivated. She is a sister of one of the most 
popular youths over the bay, ( )sear Schlessinger. 
Their mother was one of the Sawyer sisters, one 
of them being Mrs, Calvert Meade of ( lakland. 



Wedding Cakes and Fancy Ices 
and Tarts 




LECHTEN BROS. 



mo'jH' 



1242- 1244 Devlsadero Street 

Bel. Eddy and Ellis Phone Wesl 2526 



'JUST A SHADE ON OTHERS' 



Weinhard 

The Peer 
of Bottle Beer 




CALIFORNIA BOTTLING CO. 



SOLE BOTTLERS 



1255 HARRISON STREET 

PHONE MARKET 977 



Weinhard is the Delicious Beer served at Cafe Francisco, The 
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gg&^BoR President's Taste 

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l_. r. PODESTA, Manufacturer 512 Waihington Str»»t 



20 



-THE WASP^ 



McCarthy's Croak 

Fearsome Tale of a Labor Financier 

It was a Labor Financier, 

Who stoppeth one of three. 

"By thy red mustache and eyes that flash, 

Now wherefore stopp'st thou me?" 

He raises his Trades Council hand; 
"There was a plot," quoth he. 
"Skiddoo, McCarthy," said the friend. 
But P. H. took "no 23". 

The friend stood by the rosewood bar, 
And sipped his cool steam beer ; 
And thus spoke on P. H. McC. 
That bright-eyed financier : 

"The votes were cast, the town aghast ; 
Merrily did we join. 
In City Hall and Bricklayers' Ball, 
To use the City's coin. 

"But the grand jury came, and they 
Were virtuous and strong. 
They brought indictments by the ream 
They've kept up right along. 

"The graft was here, the graft was there, 
The graft was all around ; 
It leapt from pits of shame to Schmitz 
And people wide renowned. 

"Things grew so loose, our Union goose 
That laid the golden egg, 
Grew fat on graft, as loud we laughed 
And pulled the City's leg. 

"It ate the food it ne'er had ate, 
And round and round it flew. 
The City it half threw a fit, 
But Ruef he steered us through. 

"A good trade wind sprang up behind; 
The big fat goose did follow, 
And every day, for food or play, 
Came to the Mayor's hollo. 

"God save thee, Labor Financier; 
Why look'st thou like the deuce?" 
"I must not cavil ; with my gavel, 
I killed our big fat goose.' 

"Ah, I had done a hellish thing, 
But I didn't care a peg. 
And all averred I had killed the bird 
That laid the golden egg. 

"Day after day, day after day. 
I stood without emotion. 
As idle as a painted fish 
Upon a painted ocean. 



"Except that when they needed help 
For Jerry, Gene or Abe, 
At their caprice I spoke my piece, 
As guiltless as a babe. 

"Heney, Heney everywhere, 
And all the Boards did shrink 
The Supervisors and Police 
And Railroads, too, I think. 

"There passed a time, a weary time ; 
A warning came to me ; 
And what is more, one day I saw 
A dark conspiracy. 

"A house close to a lonely swamp 
They rented in false name ; 
Then bought a rope and chloroform 
And sponge to use the same. 

"Oh, horrid to be gagged and bound! 
(To me a gag's the dickens) 
Kidnapped, forlorn, from night till morn, 
Awhile the foul plot thickens. 

"The plotters they did plot their plots, 
With poison, gun and thud. 
I heard them come with fee-faw-fum. 
To smell my Union blood. 

"With growl and curse, they brought the hearse 
Right up to where I dwell. 
With caution, I did not reply 
To the electric bell. 



"Alone, alone, all, all alone, 

Alone in a dark, dark hall. 

The Black hand outside, that wants my 

To the keyhole then I crawl. 



hide : 



La Boheme 



First Class Italian Restaurant 
1558 BUSH ST- 

Between Van New and Franklin 



SPECIALTY: Italian and French Cuisine 

FELIX PIANTANIDA. Mana S er 



Formerly Proprietor of the ORIGINAL COPPA 



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BathS Ladies' Department, 8 to 12 a. m. week Jays 

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AGUA CALIENTE SPRINGS 



Send your family to the nearest Hot Sulphur Springs to San Francisco. 
First-class accommodations. Special rates to families. No staging. 
Four trains daily. Fare round trip $1.65. Tiburon ferry or Oakland; 
two hours' ride. Address THEODOR RICHARDS, Agua Caliente, 
Sonoma County. California. 



-THE WASP- 



21 



"About, about, with fear and doubt, 
The death-chills danced all night. 
And every word my spirit heard 
i 'as >i 'I o'er me like a blighl 

'"They arc not carpenters,' I thought. 
'Bricklayers, nit : hodcarriers, nix! 
By Herbert George! they arc none but 
Electric Workers \'o. 6.' 

['For I from them a whisper heard: 
'The batteries have given out.' 
\i>\\ who except with bells adept. 
Such things would know about? 

"1 went unto the Building Trades, 
And, by the Wizard of ( >z ! 
Each man in place, and on each face, 
An eight-hour wink there was. 

"The Council band each waved his hand; 
It was a woeful sight. 

Thev closed their teeth and grinned beneath. 
The beggars would not bite. 

"Anil thus I go from man to man; 
I have strange power of speech. 
My tale I tell, for I know well 
The lobster I can teach. 

"IK- worketh well who grafteth well; 
(With rich and poor he canl" 
The morrow morn his friend arose, 
A gladder and a badder man. 



Everett Lloyd, editor, custodian, engineer and 
rakeman of the Tramp Magazine, dropped joy- 
msly into the Wasp office last Saturday afternoon, 
ust as we were officially forgetting all about wed- 
ftgs, diamonds and teas for the week. Lloyd is 

heavyweight, smooth-shaved tramp, reminding 
ne of Ysaye. the violinist. Nothing but his blue 
annel shirt would indicate he is not on the Cotil- 
ton List. He invited George W. Entre Nous out 
or a drink and informed us how to edit magazines 
rom a brake-beam. He does not do that him- 
elf, but could if he were without the money for 

Pullman. Lloyd is a friend of Jack London, and 
ecentlv joshed the Klondyke Lad on the subject 
f hoboisni, saying that Jack's road life is all poppy - 
ock. whatever that may mean. San Francisco will 
ave an issue of this vagabondiana in about a week. 
Vhereupon the tramp editor will take his well 

aveled smile and his advertising contracts to Los 

ngelcs. 

Hansen's painting "A Comanche Chief's Return" 
as just been sold in Santa Barbara to the Count 
iQShkoff, of Moscow, Russia, who with the Countess 
as been at the Potter for a brief stay. The Count 
dtnires Mr. Hansen's work immensely. The 
mint came over here because political matters 



made it rather warm in his own country, but things 
have Settled down now and lie is g"iug back. They 
will leave for the east this week. 



Dr. Arnold Genthe, who could have photographed 
a gorgon and made her look not only sentimental but 
intellectual, possesses a volume of George Sterling's 
poems with complimentary quatrian on the fly-leaf. 
Sterling who interpreted the heavens in his 
"Testimony of the Suns," is as much at home along 
the Galactic Circle as some of us are on Van Ness 
Avenue. So his statements of light and shade are 
authoritative. These are the lines to Genthe: 

"Master of light, thy mind to beauty true. 

Hath taught a nobler service to the ray. 

And mingling subtler shadows with the day 

Hath shown to art a country fair and new." 



The Jack Spreckels are going to have a country 
home of their own and are building in San Rafael 
where they intend to live in the future. At first papa 
Spreckels was like a Spartan father with the young 
people, giving them very little money, but now they 
have everything they want, a town house and a country 
house. Mrs. Jack is another handsome member of the 
house of Spreckels, which has so many good looking 
members already. 



Mr. and Mrs. Robert Harrison have rented a 
house on Petaluma Avenue, San Rafael, for the 
Summer, and will move over early in May. 



Original Coppa 



Formerly at 
622 Montgomery 



IN BUSINESS AGAIN AT 
423 PINE ST., Bet. Kearny and Montgomery 



Special Dishes Every Day 

Private Rooms for Families Up-Stai 

Service Unsurpassed 



JOE COPPA, Proprietor 

Phone Temp. 623 



F. W. KRONE, Proprietor 



The Original San Francisco 

Popular Dining Room 



NOW OPEN 
9 1 1-913 O'Parrell St. 



Bet. Van Ness and Polk 



Largest and Handsomest Dinins-Room in the City--An Ideal Kitchen. Former 
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BLAKE, MOFFITT & TOWNE 

PAPER 



1400 1450 FOURTH STREET 

TELEPHONE MARKET 3014 

Private Exchange Connecting all Departments 



ifr 




STRICTLY BUSINESS 



Points of Interest on Trade and Finance 




Bond and Stock Exchange 
Trading was light this week owing to the tight- 
ness of the money market and the fears of labor 
strikes that might tie up the business of the City. 
The weaker stocks felt the depression most and 
Spring Valley, which has been groggy for some 
time was very wobbly. Captain Payson's open con- 
fession of the tragic condition of the affairs of the 
Water Company has had the worst effect of course 
on the stock. The confession should not have sur- 
prised anybody however for it has been notorious 
for a long time that the Spring Valley has been 
one of the worst managed corporations in America. 
People who have had very little financial interest 
in it beyond drawing salaries have been in control, 
with the usual result in such cases. I would not, 
however, advise any holder of Spring Valley to 
sacrifice it at present prices. 



New San Francisco 

I hear that the Palace Hotel Company is by no 
means decided whether to rebuild a great hotel on 
the site of the old Palace, or to erect a fine office 
building there. The Palace people have now a lease 
of the Fairmont and will certainly make that a 
famous and successful house, and there is talk of 
their controlling the St. Francis. It requires a great 
deal of hard thought to decide how New San Fran- 
cisco is going to reshape the business districts in 
the next ten years. One thing which is certain, is 
that Market Street will remain the artery of the 
City and be an ideal location for office buildings 
and great retail places like the Emporium, Hales, 
and firms that cater to the general public. The 
location of the White House at the corner of 
Grant Avenue and Sutter Street will have a power- 
ful influence in anchoring the fashionable shopping 
district around it. The rebuilding of the Palace 
Hotel would also tend to keep the shopping dis- 
trict down town. 

It is almost certain however that New San Fran- 
cisco will be different from the old in the matter 
of having nine-tenths of its retail business trans- 
acted in the area of a few blocks down town. 
Since the fire the Mission has developed an immense 
local trade and stores that formerly paid $75 a 
month now pay $250 and $300 a month. There 
are banks and theaters in the Mission and at night 
Mission Street from Sixteenth to Twenty-seventh 
is filled with people and brilliant with the lights of 

A Sovereign Remedy 

Dr. Parker's Cough Cure, one dose will stop a cough. It 
never (ails. Try it. Sold by all Druggists. 



well-patronized stores. I do not see how these 
smaller shops are to be again attracted down town. 
The}' are now located in the midst of their patrons 
and most assuredly the Mission will grow and de- 
velop very rapidly. 

So also in the Western Addition where Fillmore 
Street has become a busy thoroughfare and Van 
Xess Avenue has entirely changed its character. 
Polk Street is growing in importance very rapidly! 
and all these streets will certainly retain a consider- 
able share of trade even when the great firms go 
down town again. 

It becomes clearer every month that in future 
San Francisco will have several important busi- 
ness districts instead of one. and as in larger citiesi 
of the East and Europe, the classes of business! 
done in these districts will be different. Thus 
down town we will have the great department 



MUTUAL SAVINGS BANK 



706 Market St. 



OF SAN FRANCISCO 



Opp. Third 



Guaranteed Capital, $1,000,000 

Interest Paid on all Deposits 



Paid up Capital and Surplus, $620,000 
Loans on Approved Securities 



OFFICERS- James D. Phelan, Pres,, John A. Hooper, V. Pres., J. K. Moffatt. 2d 
V. Pres., George A. Story, Sec'y and Cashier, C. B. Hobson, Asst. Cashier, A. E. 
Curtis, 2d Asst. Cashier. 



TONOPAH, GOLDFIELD, BULLFROG 
MANHATTAN and COMSTOCKS A specialty 



ZADIG & CO. 

STOCK BROKERS 

Formerly 306 Montgomery Street, have resumed business in their 

Own Building, 324 BUSH STREET 

Directly Opposite New San Francisco Stock and Exchange Bldg. 



FRENCH SAVINGS BANK 



OF SAN FRANCISCO 

CAPITAL AND SURPLUS. 
PAID UP CAPITAL. 

DEPOSITS JANUARY I, 1907 



108-110 Sutter Street 

$693,104.68 

$600,000.00 

$3,772,145.83 



s Carpy, Pres. Arthur Legallet, Vice-Pres. Leon Bocqueraz, Secretary 

John Ginty. Asst. Secretary P. A. Bergerot, Attorney 



-THE WASP- 



23 



stores and dryg 1- houses, etc., that expect to 

draw trade from all sections. They will need the 
m<>-t central and accessible location possible, and 
that is on Market Street or verj close l" it — say a 
few blocks. Such a location will give them also 
some of the Oakland, Alameda and Berkeley trade 
a- well as that of the \\ estern Addition and the 
Mission. The great office buildings, the financial 
houses, and insurance firms, will cluster down town. 
The future theatrical center will however be up- 
town and I should locate it at the junction of Ninth 
and Market Streets as being the most central. It 
can he reached by car lines from all points. 



Our Commerce With the Orient 
The liner "Korea" had a cargo valued at $4(W.- 
250, of which $279,182 was for Japan and $93,7.52 
for China. The total of course compares unfavor- 
ably with totals when the Russo-Japanese war was 
in full blast. But this should be expected. The 
cargo was made up principally of Eastern products 
and manufacturers such as machinery, cotton, do- 
mestics, milk, ginsey and machinery. The Pacific 
Coast had little to do with the cargo beyond the 
handling at this end. There were a few odds and 
ends in salmon and canned and dried fruit from this 
State but not enough to make any fuss about. It 
never has been very different. We indeed sent 
a whole steamer load of flour by the tramp steamer 
"Arabia" a few years ago. This was a respectable 
cargo valued at $250,000 and over, but that was 
our best. Oregon and Washington took the flour 
trade away from us. They were helped by the 
fact that our steamers never had space enough 
tainty. One never could tell when he could get 
to render the shipment of flour anything of a cer- 
your flour off and the Chinese merchants never 
knew when he was likely to receive it, so the trade 
declined. We have a good many things to accom- 
plish before we can enjoy that "vast trade with 
the Orient" of which we hear so much talk and 
see so few evidences. San Francisco has been 
asleep as far as regards her commerce. The few 
merchants who have tried to establish extensive 
commercial relations with the foreign ports have 
found that between various harbor dues, tireless 
labor agitators, blackmailing politicians and other 
enemies of the public good they could do better 
with their money and energy in other enterprises. 
It is time for our merchants and citizens generally 
to wake up and make this the great seaport it 
should be. 



and a perfectly safe place in which to keep your 
ioipcrtant papers or valuable personal property would 
be o.ie cf our 

SAFE DEPOSIT BOXES 

They are absolutely fire-proof and burglar-proof. 
Private rooms are provided for examination of 
papers, etc. Rates very reasonable. 

CALIFORNIA SAFE DEPOSIT 
AND TRUST COMPANY 




HOME OFFICE 



CALIFORNIA and MONTGOMERY STS. 

West End Branch, 1531 Devisadero 

Mission Branch, 2572 Mission, near 22d 
Up-Town Branch, 1740 Fillmore nr. Sutter 



VALUABLES or all kinds 

May be safely stored al 

SAFE DEPOSIT VAULTS 

of (he 

FIRST NATIONAL BANK 

Cor. Bush and Sansome Sts. 



Safes to rent from $5 a year upwards 
Careful service lo customers 



Trunks $1 a month 
Office Hours: 8 a, m. to 6 p. m. 



The German Savings and Loan Society 

526 CALIFORNIA ST., San Francisco 



Guaranteed Capital and Surplus 
Capital actually paid up in cash 
Deposits, December 31, 1 906 



$2,578,695,41 

1,000,000.00 

38,531,917.28 



OFFICERS - President, F. Tillmann. Jr.; Firs! Vice-President. Daniel Meyer 
Second Viee-President. Emil Rohte; Cashier, A. H. R. Schmidt; Assistant Cashier, 
William Herrmann; Secretary, George Toumy; Assistant Secretary, A. H. Muller. 
GoodfeUow & Eells, General Attorneys. 

BOARD OF DIRECTORS -- F. Tillmann, Jr., Daniel Meyer. Emil Rohte, Ign. 
Steinhart, I. N. Walter, N. Ohlandt. J. W. Van Bergen, E. T. Knise and W. S. 



What the Savings Banks Show. 
The report of the twelve San Francisco Saving's 
Banks is most significant. For the first time in 
years they show a falling off in the total of deposits 
in the twelve. The shrinkage in resources is only a 
little over two and a half millions, and in deposits over 
three millions. A good many people have taken their 
money out of the Savings Banks to rebuild their burned 
homes. Some people have no doubt left the State. 

The first thing in the morning, if you need a bracer, should be a lablespoonful of Abbott's 
Bitters in an ounce of sherry or a glass of soda. Try it. 



MEMBER STOCK AND BOND EXCHANGE 
MEMBER SAN FRANCISCO MINING EXCHANGE 

J. C. WILSON 

BROKER 

STOCKS AND BONDS Kohl Bldg., 488 California St. 

INVESTMENT SECURITIES San Francisco 

Telephone Temporary 815 



24 



-THE WASP 



I have several times in these columns given my 
San Francisco readers the comforting assurance that 
we never again will have the good old times in San 
Francisco, when one could live for next to nothing. 
Don't you remember when one could get enough 
muttom chops for ten cents to feed a large family 
and a fine fat and juicy porterhouse steak could be 
annexed at any butcher stall for twenty-five cents. 
For fifty cents one could lunch sumptuously in a 
good restaurant and seventy-five cents guaranteed 
one a dinner fit for an epicure. Alas, these are only 
memories now and what is worse they will grow 
more shadowy. Like New York and Chicago and 
London and all the other large cities of the white 
man the cost of living keeps on advancing steadily 
and thus keeping pace with the higher and higher 
rents. 

Here are the late April quotations from the New 
York market. They may console San Franciso 
heads of families who groan over the prices now rul- 
ing here : 

Asparagus was from $1 to $1.25 a bunch in New 
York and small bunches at that. Here the whole- 
sale price was 12^ cents a pound for first quality. 
Peas sold for 25 cents a quart in New York and 
for one quarter of that price here. A cauliflower costs 
75 cents in New York and new potatoes 25 cents 
a quart. If a San Francisco housekeeper was 
charged a quarter for a quart of potatoes she would 
yell for the police. We are much better off here 
yet than the New Yorkers notwithstanding the high 
prices. Wages are higher in all lines than in New 
York and the cost of food is much less. Rents seem 
very high but our people have been accustomed to 
low rents in the very heart of the City. Poor peo- 
ple cannot afford to live in the heart of New York 
except in such overcrowded tenements as have 
never been seen in San Francisco. 

The San Francisco public has been delighted to 
learn that the Cliff House has changed hands. 




Justice— Must I Wade Through It Again?— From N. Y. World 



Mine host Wilkins, who personally is a most charm- 
ing man, is anything but a delightful host, and has 
never seemed to know where he was at, since he 
took charge of the famous old resort. Instead of 
being an excellent advertisement for San Francisco 
it has been the reverse. Wise men refrained from 
taking their visiting friends there lest the strangers 
might carry away a too unfavorable impression of 
San Francisco. 



The Price of Lumber 
Pine lumber lately' has been sold as low as as 
$19.00 for San Francisco cargoes — a decline of six 
dollars per M. feet. The cause of this is the failure 
of the Hill roads to find cars to make the shipments 
east. Redwood has not been affected. 

INVESTOR 



Enough to Make Him Wild 

"How in the world did you get the public to be- 

ii?' " asked the 



lieve you had a genuine 'wild 
museum manager. "[ billed a 



but no 



ild man,' 
one would believe he was really wild." 

"Oh, it was dead easy with my 'wild man,' " 
chuckled the manager of the side-show. "I added 
on the bills that he had 200 wives and no one could 
doubt that he was wild." 



Strenuous Hints 

"You must pardon me for calling in my business 
suit," said the young man. "I was detained down- 
town and had no time to go home and dress." 

"Oh, that's all right," rejoined the fair maid. 
"When a man has a business suit on he usually 
means business." 



PHIL S. MONTAGUE, Stock Broker 

Member of S. F. Stock Exchange 

Goldfield. Tonopah, Manhattan and Bullfrog Stocks Bought and Sold. 

Write for Market Letter. 

339 BUSH STREET, STOCK EXCHANGE BUILDING 



BURNED HOMES MUST BE REBUILT 

The Continental Building and Loan Association 

Having sustained practically no loss in the recent calamity, is in a 
position to loan money to people who wish to rebuild. San Francisco 
must restore her homes as well as hei business blocks. 

DR. WASHINGTON DODGE. Ptes. 

CAVIN McNAB. Any. 

WM, CORBIN. Sec. and Gen. Mar. 



OFFICES - 



COR. CHURCH AND MARKET STREETS 
OPEN AND DOING BUSINESS 



Rooms 7 to 1 1 



Telephone Tmpy. 1415 



W. C. RALSTON 

Stock and Bond Broker 

Member San Francisco Stock and Bond Exchange 
Mining Stocks a Specially 



Bedford McNeill 
Western Union 
Leibers 



368 BUSH STREET 

San Francisco 



-THE WASP- 



25 



BY JOVE— SPRING. 

Immortal critics of the seribes who sing, 

Vouchsafe unto the editorial "we" — 
Or "us" — to use a little ink on "Spring;" 

For it is here : its signs of life we see. 

Oh, Spring, (our poems always start with "Oh!") 

Your colors fly on every hill and twig. 
I in hatband, hosiery and vest they show; 

The picnic maid benzines her last year's rig. 

All special-trained and eke excursion-boated, 
With golden peanut, popcorn white and red. 

The Sunday-off man, flushed, beer-stained and bloated. 
Returns at night with w 1-ticks on his head. 



He it perfectly understood at the outset that the 
dog is alive. It is needless to skim and stir the 
reader's milk of human kindness into a wild whipped 
cream of misgiving. The dog is alive. It might 
have been otherwise. Flora might have made one 
misstep and had her yelping soul hurled into — but 
what's the use? the dog is alive. Flora is a Brooklyn 
half-caste. St. Bernard and mastiff. She was owned 
by Schultz and stolen by Schmidt. Now Schmidt 
(soft tremulo on the violins, please) is a sausage 
maker. The dog was missing for a week, at the 
end of which time the searchers trudged with heart- 
rending steps to the bologne foundry. Several 
chapters might be meet and fit here. But, Kismet, 
Kismet, the dog is alive. 



We watch the jocund mix-up in the train, 
The windows broken and the seats upset ; 

The blithe coarse jest, to which the roughs are fain; 
The low, sweet thud, as cheek by fist is met. 

We note the scarlet runner 'neath the nose, 
The purple shadow o'er the puffy eye. 

Gladsome withal, we watch the fellows doze 
Quite upside down, full weary by and by. 

And at the ferrv, with their ears yet warm. 

They to the Harbor Hospital repair. 
Odors of lager and iodoform 

Allure the nonchalant reporter there. 

Heigho ! We drink your health, sensational Spring. 

Here's looking at you, from our busy desk. 
Poppies and picnics may you ever bring. 

And Monday stories of a turn grotesque. 



Mr. Arthur Brisbane, patentee and owner of the 
brisbaneful editorial, urges the readers of the Hearst 
papers to buy real estate. "Buy a lot to build on," he 
writes. "Buy two or three more adjoining. Build 
your own home. Hold on and gradually build two or 
three other houses to rent." 

It looks so easy, we hate to do it. Brissy is in such 
a defenseless position, it is almost a shame to thwack 
him. Let us withhold the obvious rebuke, and wonder 
into the causes that led to his downfall. Did James 
Gordon Bennett insinuate that not one of Hearst's 
readers owns his own home ? Is this the only way 
Brisbane can appeal to the landlord class — by making 
one of his own? Perhaps the whole thing is a typo- 
graphical error. He might have meant, "Buy a hall 
to speak in. Buy two or three more adjoining. Build 
your own Democratic Club. Hold on and gradually 
build one or two other Democratic Clubs to rent." 



When the Grand Duke Nicholas was returning 
from Tsarkeo-Selo (Czar's Rest) and was within 
thirteen miles of St. Petersburg, his train was 
stopped by a fusillade of bullets. Melodrama on a 
gigantic scale is still playing in Russian politics. 
From a spectator's standpoint, we have become 
weary of their bombs and bored with dynamite. A 
little witty dialogue or sentimental reverie would 
be gratifying. 



Pepperish 

"John." said Mrs. Stubb, as she glanced over the 
Washington dispatches, "is Uncle Joe Cannon, the 
speaker of the house?" 

"Yes." replied Mr. Stubb, hurriedly swallowing 
his coffee, "but I don't think he could be speaker of 
this house?" 

"Why not?" 

"Because you wouldn't give him the chance." 

And then John made a dash for the office without 
even removing the egg from his mustache. 



Jt Skin of Beauty is a Joy Forever. 

Dr. T. Felix Gouraud's Oriental 

Cream or Magical Beautifier 

Purities as well as beautifies the skiu. No other cosmetic will do it. 

Removes Tan, Pimples, Freckles, Moth 
Patches, Rash and Skin Diseases, and 
every blemish on beauty, and defies de- 
tection. On its virtues it has stood the 
test of 58 years; no other has, and is so 
harmless we taste it to be sure it is prop- 
erly made. Accept no counterfeit or simi- 
lar name. Dr. L- A. Sayre said to a lady 
of thehaut-ton (a patient) "As you ladies 
will use them, I recommend 'Gouraud's 
Cream' as the least harmful of all the 
skin preparations." One bottle will last 
six months using it every day. GOUR- 
AUD'S POUDRE SUBTLE REMOVES 
SUPERFLUOUS HAIR WITHOUT IN- 
JURY TO THE SKIN. 
FRED T. HOPKINS, Prop'r, 37 Great Jones street, N. Y. 
For sale by all druggists and Fancv-goods Dealers throughout the United 

States, Canadas and Europe. &Jff~ Beware of base imitations. $ 1,000 

reward for arrest and proof of auy one selling the same. 




Popular French Restaurant 

Regular Dinner 75c Private Dining Rooms 

Meals a la carte at any hour for Banquets, etc. 




497 Golden Gate Ave. 

Comer Polk Street 



Phone Market 2315 



26 



-THE WASP 



Of Social Interest 



A wedding of great interest, both here and in 
San Jose, took place on Tuesday evening, at the 
residence of Judge and Mrs. S. F. Leib on the Ala- 
meda, in San Jose, when their daughter Lida was 
married to Charles Dorsey Armstrong, a business 
man of Omaha, Nebraska. The Leib mansion, one 
of the handsomest in the ' larden City, had several 
hundred guests. The lare - rounds were ablaze with 
'lights, and everything was ,..u an elaborate scale. Rev. 
Lefevre of Los Angeles performed the ceremony. The 
bridesmaids were Miss Hermita Moore, Miss Furst 
Bowman, Miss Bessie Henry and Miss Hazel Park. 
Mrs. William Hammond Wright, the bride's sister, 
was the matron of honor ; Dr. Hardy of Nevada, best 
man ; ushers, Messrs. Roy Earl, Frank Leib and 
Charles Field. The cushion bearers were little Frank 
Furst and Katharine Dunne ; the ribbon bearers, 
Dorothy Dunne, Josephine Dunne, Elsie Furst, Helen 
Pierce, Jerome Rucker and Jerome Bowden. Mr. 
and Mrs. Armstrong will reside in Nebraska. Dr. 
Hardy, who supported Mr. Armstrong on this occa- 
sion, will soon lead to the altar Miss Sylvia Harris, 
daughter of the late Dr. Harris, and sister of Mrs. 
Benjamin G. Lathrop. Miss Daisy Polk, who went 
to San Jose for the Armstrong-Leib wedding, re- 
mained several days a guest at the Leib home. Mrs. 
Selden S. Wright also attended. Mrs. Wright's son, 
William Hammond Wright, professor of astronomy 
at the Lick Observatory, married the second daughter 
of Judge and Mrs. Leib. 



( )wing to the continued illness of Mrs. Polhemus, 
Sr., Mr. and Mrs. John Hart Polhemus, were 
obliged to cut short their wedding tour. They 
returned to the City on Sunday last, going to the 
residence of Mr. and Mrs. W. B. Wilshire on 
Buchanan Street, parents of the bride. Mr. and 
Mrs. Polhemus have been disappointed in regard 
to the summer home, which they expected to occupy 
in San Anselmo. The owners of the cottage 
changed their minds and suddenly concluded not 
to rent the place, thus leaving this interesting couple 
in the lurch. Subsequently a home was found in 
Mill Valley, where they will pass a short season. 

A large party composed of our most exclusive 
Southern ladies left the City on Tuesday morning' 
for Monterey, to attend the Convention of the 
California Division o'f the Daughters of the Con- 
federacy. The Convention called to elect new 
officers, opened on Wednesday, Mrs. Stevens, wife 
of Judge Stevens of Los Angeles, presiding. Among 
those elected delegates to the Convention and at- 
tending from this City were, Mrs. Seldon S. Wright, 
Mrs. J. De Barth Sriorb, Mrs. Ynez Shorb White, 
Mrs. W. D. Mansfield, Mrs. Randolph Miller, Mrs. 
Jones. Mrs. W. B. Pritchard, Mrs. George Theobald, 
accompanied by many ladies of the Chapter. Many 
of these ladies stopped at the Hotel Del Monte. Mrs. 



John P. Pryor of Pacific Grove, a prominent Con- 
federate-daughter, entertained a large house party. 
Picnics, luncheons, the seventeen mile drive, and a 
glorious time was enjoyed by the visiting delega- 
tion. Several of the ladies stopped in San Jose on 
Tuesday to attend the Lieb-Armstrong wedding, 
and left next morning for Monterey. 

The college town has seldom witnessed a prettier 
party than the one the Berkeley Bachelors gave on 
Monday evening last. The hosts on this occasion 
had the able assistance of the most prominent 
ladies in Berkeley, including Airs. Benjamin Ide 
Wheeler, Airs. O. P. Evans, Mrs. Clinton Day, Mrs. 
R. Van Paterson, Mrs. John Galen Howard, Mrs. 
Warren Gregory and many others. Dancing was 
kept up until a late hour. Many buds from this 
City, Oakland and all points around the bay being- 
guests of these popular bachelors. 

Mrs. Norman McLaren, assisted by Mrs. James 
Otis, gave a. picnic last week to some fifty children, 
taking them to Verba Buena Island. Mrs. McLaren 




A SINGLE ORDER OF BOTTLES OF 



HUNTER 
WHISKEY 



IF PLACED END TO END 
WOULD REACH FROM 

BALTIMORE 

TO 

CHICAGO 

THIS GIVES SOME IDEA 
OF THE MAGNITUDE 
OF ITS POPULARITY 



CHARLES M. REYNOLDS CO. 

Agents for California and Nevada 

912-914 Folsom St.. San Francisco. Cal. 



i«tMi»««l{MM«IMl<Mi«fe<mWW&^ 



-THE WASP- 



27 



was the former attractive Miss Linie Ashe, sister of 
k. Porter \-1k-. Her young daughter, who will in 
a few years be a debutante, is said to inherit from 
her mother's family that gift of quickness of 
repartee for which the \slie family is noted, 
especially Mrs. Sewell, who was Nellie Ashe. 

* * * 

Mis> Emily Marvin and Roy Somers were 
quietly married on Tuesday evening last, at St. 
Luke's Church, Rev. Edward Morgan officiating. 
Owing in a recent death in the groom's family, 
the guests at the reception were limited to a few 
intimate friends. Miss Marion Marvin attended her 
sister as maid of honor. Miss Floride Hunt. 
Miss Ruth Casey, Miss Marie Brewer and Miss 
Maud Payne were bridesmaids. Frank Somers, the 
groom's brother, was best man. The ushers were 
Charles Xorris. Edward Robinson of Los Angeles. 
Harold Plummer and Carelton Curtis. After a 
wedding tour, the bride and groom will reside in 
this City. 

* * * 

Mrs. Douglas Sloane Watson and her children 
will leave early in May for a stay at the Hotel 
Potter, Santa I'arbara. 

* • * 

Mrs. Joseph Pelican Coryell, who so hospitably 
entertained the Society of California Pioneers' 
Auxiliary at her lovely country-place in Menlo Park. 
is one of the beauties of her set. She at one time 
cherished an ambition to become an actress but 
that was long before she met Mr. Coryell and 
became a convert to domestic life as opposed to a 
career. She is devoted to her husband and chil- 
dren, but manages to entertain a good deal. Mrs. 
Coryell is the daughter of the late Dr. Isaac Jessup, 
the pioneer dentist, and her mother was one of the 
beautiful Wilburn sisters of Sacramento. Another 
of the sisters, now a widow, married Mr. P.rown, 
and her daughter Daisy is the wife of "Clem" 
Horst. P>aron von Horst's brother. 



Automobile News 

Winthrop E. Scarritt, former president of the 
American Automobile Association and a governor 
of the A. C. A., declares that the condition of the 
pavements in most American cities "is barbarious." 
Mr. Scarritt traveled all over Europe last Summer 
and he says that he had not discovered a city, town 
or village with streets in such wretched condition 
as are New York's. "If the city's reputation for 
civilization rested on the condition of its streets. 
New Yorkers would be classed with the Fiji Isl- 
anders." What would he say about the San Fran- 
cisco streets? 

Recent purchases of Oldsmobiles from the Pioneer 
Automobile Company are Messrs. H. F. Mordoff, J. 
Ford, E. Fitzgerald and Witt. Ryfkogel. of San Fran- 
cisco ; E. P. Wood, of Tonopah, and R. A. Bekar, of 
Yreka. 

The new twenty steam horsepower White runabout 
is a wonder. It is swift as the wind, .strong as a loco- 



motive, and as easy to control as a gentle hors 
a boon to the business world. 



Wasp Illustrations this Week. 
A dainty portrait study of Miss Cecil Cowles ; Mrs. 
Marguerite Hanford, the well known society woman 
now on a six months tour East and abroad: four 
dashing views of the recent Polo Tournament and 
Races at the Country Club, Coronado, with some of 
our best known society men ahorseback; Mrs. Charles 
E. Hughes, wife of New York's Governor; Miss May 
Sutton at the net in an exciting moment ; The ( irace 
Preeman String- Quartette: 1st violin. Miss Grace 
Freeman: 2nd violin, Miss Miriam Hall; viola. Miss 
Lillian Spink; cello. Miss Lucy Fuhrer. Their first 
concert, to take place in San Rafael. Mav 11th. will be 
a fashionable affair. 



Soda Bay Springs 

Lake Co., Cal. 

Situated on the picturesque shore of charming Clear Lake, season 
opens May 1st, finest of Boating, Bathing and Hunting. Unsur- 
passed acommodations. Terms $2.00 per day, $12.00 per week, 
special rates to families. Route, take Tiburon Ferry 7:40 a. m. 
thence by Automobile, further information address managers 

GEO. ROBINSON and AGNES BELL RHOODES 

Via Kelseyville P. O. Soda Springs, Lake Co., Cal. 



H. C. RAAP, Manage. 



Telephone Franklin 588 



National Cafe and Grill 

918-920 OTARRELL ST., San Francisco 

SPECIAL MERCHANTS HOT LUNCH 25c 

Including Tea, Coffee. Wine or Beer. 1 1 a. m. to 2 p. m. 
A LA CARTE at all hours. 



Regular Dinner 50c 



Special Sunday Dinner 75c 



AL. CONEY 



J. HUFF 



Kadee Hammam Baths 

TURKISH AND HAMMAM BATHS 

PRIVATE ROOM AND BATH $1.00 



Open Day and Night 

GEARY AND GOUGH STREETS 



Strictly First Cla; 



Phone West 3725 



Telephone _ 



Established 1890 



J. F. ROSSI 

D°.mif.Sc , " d Wines, Liquors and Cigars 

Depot of Italian-Swiss Colony Wines 

Specialties: Belmont, Jesse Moore, A. P. Hotaling's O. P. S., Loveland Rye, 
King Wm, Fourth Scotch, Glenrosa Scotch, Dew of the Grampians, A. V. H. 
Gin, Buchu Gin, Cognac Brandy, Bisquit Dubouche Cognac, Femet Branca 
Italian Vermuth, French Vermuth. 

217-219 Washington St., Bet. Front and Davis 




DIRECTORY 



OF LEADING BUSINESS HOUSES AND PROFESSIONAL PEOPLE 




MISCELLANEOUS. 

BUILDERS' EXCHANGE, 226 Oak St., 
S. F. 

ADVERTISING AGENCIES. 

BOLTE & BRADEN, 105-107 Oak St., S. F. ; 
Phone Market 2837. 

COOPER ADV. AGENCY, F. J., West Mis- 
sion and Brady Sts. 

DAKE ADV. AGENCY, Midway Bldg., 779 
Market St. Phone Temp'y 1440. 

FISHER, L. P. ADV. AGENCY, 836 North 
Point St., S. F. ; Phone Franklin S84. 

JOHNSTON-DIENSTAG CO., 2170 Post St., 
S. F. 

ANTIQUE DEALERS. 

THE LOUIS XIV. Curios, Objects d'Art, 
Miniatures, Paints, Porcelains, Jewels, etc., 
C. V. Miller, 1117 Post, near Van Ness. 
ARCHITECTS. 

REID BROS, Temporary Offices, 2325 
Gough St., S. F. 

THOS. J. WELSH, JOHN W. CAREY, asso- 
ciate architects, 40 Haight St., S. F. 
ART DEALERS. 

GUMP, S. & G„ 1645 California St., S. F. 

SCHUSSLER BROS., 1218 Sutter St. 
ATTORNEYS, 

DORN, DORN & SAVAGE, 717 Van Ness 
Ave. 

DINKELSPIEL, HENRY G. W„ 1265 Ellis 
St., S. F. Phone West 2355. 

HEWLETT, BANCROFT AND BALLAN- 
TINE, Monadnock Bldg. ; Phone Temp'y 
972. 

EDWARD B. YOUNG, 4th Floor, Union 
Trust Bldg., S. F. Telephone, Temp'y 833. 

GOLDSTONE, LOUIS, 1012 Fillmore St. 
Phone Park 864. 

MAROIS, T. M., 1756 Fillmore St., S. E. cor. 
Sutter. Phone West 1503. 

KING, CHAS. TUPPER, 1126 Fillmore St. 
AUTOMOBILES AND SUPPLIES. 

PIONEER AUTOMOBILE CO., 901 Golden 
Gate Ave., S. F. ; and r2th and Oak Sts., 
Oakland. 

WHITE SEWING MACHINE CO., Market 
and Van Ness Ave., S. F. 

AUTO LIVERY CO., Golden Gate and Van 
Ness Ave., S. F. 

BOYER MOTOR CAR CO., 408 Golden Gate 
Ave. Phone, Franklin 655. 

LEE CUYLER, 359 Golden Gate Ave., S. F. 

MIDDLETON MOTOR CAR CO., 550 Gol- 
den Gate Ave., S. F. 

MOBILE CARRIAGE CO., Golden Gate 
Ave. and' Gough Sts., S. F. 

PACIFIC MOTOR CAR CO., 376 Golden 
Gate Ave. 

BANKS. 

ANGLO-CALIFORNIA BANK, Ltd., cor. 
Pine and Sansome Sts., S. F. 

CALIFORNIA SAFE DEPOSIT AND 
TRUST CO., cor. California and Montgom- 
ery Sts., S. F. 

CENTRAL TRUST CO., 42 Montgomery St., 
S. F. 

FIRST NATIONAL BANK, Bush and San- 
some Sts., S. F. 

FRENCH SAVINGS BANK, 108 Sutter St., 
and Van Ness and Eddy. 

GERMAN SAVINGS AND LOAN SO- 
CIETY, 526 California St., S. F. 

HALSEY. N. W. & CO., 413 Montgomery 
St., S. F. 



HIBERNIA SAVINGS AND LOAN SO- 
CIETY, Jones and McAllister Sts., S. F. 

MUTUAL SAVINGS BANK OF SAN 
FRANCISCO, 710 Market St., opp. 3d St.. 
S. F. 

SAN FRANCISCO SAVINGS UNION, N.W. 
cor. California and Montgomery Sts., S. F. 

SECURITY SAVINGS BANK, 316 Mont- 
gomery St., S. F. 

THE MARKET STREET BANK AND 
SAFE DEPOSIT VAULT, Market and 7th 
Sts., S. F. 

UNION TRUST CO., 4 Montgomery St., S. F. 

WELLS FARuO-NEVADA NATIONAL 
BANK, Union Trust Bldg., S. F. 

BREWERIES. 
ALBION ALE AND PORTER BREWERY, 

1007-9 Golden Gate Ave., S. F. 
S. F. BREWERIES, LTD., 240 2d St., S. F. 

BROKERS— STOCKS AND BONDS. 
MONTAGUE, PHIL S., 339 Bush St., Stock 

Exchange Bldg. 
ROLLINS, E. H. & SONS, S04 Kohl Bldg. ; 

Telephone Temp'y 163; S. F. 
ZADIG & CO., 324 Bush St., S. F. 
WILSON, J. C, 488 California St., S. F. 
BUILDING AND LOAN ASSOCIATIONS. 
CONTINENTAL BUILDING AND LOAN 

ASSOCIATION, Church and Market Sts., 

S. F. 

CARDS, INVITATIONS, ETC. 
WOOD, GEO. M. & CO., engravers, 1067 

O'Farrell St., above Van Ness. 
CARPET CLEANING. 
SPAULDING, J. & CO., 911-21 Golden Gate 

Ave. ; Phone Park 591. 

CLOTHIERS— RETAIL. 
HUB, THE, Chas. Keilus & Co., King Solo- 
mon Bldg., Sutter and Fillmore Sts., S. F. 

COMMISSION AND SHIPPING MER- 
CHANTS. 
JOHNSON LOCKE MERCANTILE CO., 

213 Sansome St., S. F. 
MALDONADO & CO., INC., 156 Hansford 

Bldg., 268 Market St. Phone Temp'y 4261. 

CONTRACTORS AND BUILDERS. 
FISHER CONSTRUCTION CO., 1414 Post 

St., S. F. 
TROUNSON, J., 1751 Lyon St.; also 176 

Ash Ave., S. F. 

CROCKERY AND GLASSWARE. 
NATHAN DOHRMAN CO., 1520-1550 Van 
Ness Ave. 

DENTISTS. 
KNOX, DR. A. r., 1615 Fillmore St., formerly 

of Grant Bldg. 
TWIST, DR. J. F., 1476 Eddv, nr. Fillmore 

St. Phone West 5304. 

DESKS AND CHAIRS. 
PHOENIX DESK & CHAIR CO., office fur- 
niture, 153S Market St., west of Van Ness. 
Phone Market 2393. 

DRY GOODS— RETAIL. 
CITY OF PARIS, Van Ness Ave. and Wash- 
ington St., S. F. 
WHITE HOUSE, Van Ness Ave. and Pine 
St., S. F. 

EXPRESS. 
WELLS, FARGO & CO. EXPRESS, Golden 
Gate Ave. and Franklin St., Ferry Bldg., 
and 3d St. Depot, S. F. 



FEATHERS— UPHOLSTERY. 
CRESCENT FEATHER CO., 19th and Harri- 

son Sts., S. F. 

FIRE AND EARTHQUAKE PHOTOS. 
RUE, JAMES O., 1067 O'Farrell St. Phone 

Franklin 2603. 

FRUITS AND VEGETABLES. 
OMEY & GOETTING, Geary and Polk Sts., 
S. F. 

FUNERAL DIRECTORS. 
CAREW & ENGLISH, 1618 Geary St., bet.j 
Buchanan and Webster Sts., S. F. ; Phone 
West 2604. 
PORTER & WHITE, 1531 Golden Gate Ave., 
S. F. ; Phone West 770. 

GAS STOVES, 
S. F. GAS & ELECTRIC CO., Franklin and 
Ellis Sts. 

GENT'S FURNISHERS. 
BULLOCK & JONES COMPANY, 801 Van 

Ness Ave., cor. Eddy St., S. F. 
HANSEN & ELRICK, 1105-7 Fillmore St., 
nr. Golden Gate Ave. ; Phone West 5678. 
GOLD AND SILVER PLATING. 
BELLIS, JOHN O., Mfg, gold and silver- 
smith, 1624 Galifornia St., nr. Van Ness. 
Phone Franklin 2093. 

HARDWARE AND RANGES. 
ILS, JOHN G. & CO., 827 Mission St., S. F. 
MONTAGUE, W. W. & CO., Turk and Polk 
Sts., S. I'. 

HARNESS AND SADDLERY. 

DAVIS, W. & SON, 2020 Howard St., bet. 

16th and 17th, S. F. 
LEIBOLD HARNESS AND CARRIAGE 

CO., 1214 Golden Gate Ave., S. F. 
HATTERS. 
DILLON, TOM, Van Ness Ave. and McAllis- 
ter St. 
HOSPITALS AND SANITARIUMS. 
KEELEY INSTITUTE, H. L. Batchelder, 

Mgr. ; 262 Devisadero St., S. F. 
JEWELERS. 
BALDWIN JuWELRY CO., 1521 Sutter St., 

and 1261 Van Ness Ave., S. F. 
SHREVE & CO., cor. Post and Grant Ave., 

and Van Ness and Sacramento St., S. F. 
SCHMIDT, R. H. & CO., 1049 Fillmore St., 

nr. McAllister St. Phone Park 1209. 
LAUNDRIES. 
LA GRANDE LAUNDRY, 234 12th St., S. F. 
PALACE HOTEL LAUNDRY and KELLY 

LAUNDRY CO., INC., 2343 Post St. 

Phone West 5854. 

LIFE INSURANCE. 
HUNTINGDON, ARTHUR P., 925 Golden 

Gate Ave. Phone Park 515. 
LUMBER. 
UNION LUMBER CO., office 909 Monad- 
nock Bldg. 
MOVING AND STORAGE COMPANIES. 
BEKINS' VAN AND STORAGE CO., 13th 

and Mission Sts., S. F. ; Phone Market 13 

and 1016 Broadway, Oakland. 
ST. FRA..CIS TRANSFER AND STORAGE 

COMPANY, Office 1402 Eddy St.; Tel. 

West 2680. 

NOTARIES PUBLIC. 
DEANE, JNO. J., N. W. cor. Sutter and 

Steiner Sts. ; Phone West 7291. 
WARE, JOHN H„ 307 Monadnock Bldg., 

Depositions carefully attended to. Phone 

Temp'y 972. 



-THE WASP- 



29 




OFFICES AND WHOLESALE DEPOT 

SOUTHWEST COR. CALIFORNIA AND FRONT STS. 

= SAN FRANCISCO, CALIFORNIA = 

APRIL TWENTY - NINTH. NINETEEN HUNDRED AND SEVEN 



Comedian Boarder 

The landlady was much disturbed when she lost 
sonic of her boarders, including the star. But she 
Found a ray of hope in the comedian boarder. 

"I hope. Mr. Highball," she exclaimed at break- 
fast, " that you will stick by me." 

"Yes. madam," replied Mr. Highball, dramatic- 
ally, "I will stick by you through thick and thin." 

"Thick and thin?" 

"Yes, thick coffee and thin soup." 



Burning Pity 

"What use did you make of my great effusion 
entitled "The Cry of Battle?" asked the tall bard in 
the editorial rooms. "I tell you, there was fire in 
that poem." 

"Indeed, there was," replied the busy editor, "and 
so I just reversed it." 

"Reversed it? In what way?" 

"Why, now the poem is in the fire." 



His Favorites 

The fair tourist was keenly dissapointed. "I 
tried to interest Senator Boodle in the mountain 
passes," she said, bitterly, "but the senator wouldn't 
even look up from his paper." 

"Why didn't you mention railroad passes? 



whispered the conductor, 
ten feet.' 



"He would have jumped 



Impecunious Bards 

"Do you know anything about the poetical fire?" 
asked the interviewer. 

"I must confess that I do not," sighed the garret 
bard. Very few poets can afford a fire." 



OIL COMPANIES. 
STERLING OIL CO., 1491 Post St.. cor. 
Octavia, S. F. 

OPTICIANS. 
MAYERLE. GEORGE, German expert, 1115 
Golden Gate Ave., S. F. ; Phone West 3766. 
SAN FRANCISCO OPTICAL COMPANY, 
"Spences," 627 Van Ness Ave. ; "Branch," 
1613 Fillmore. 
STANDARD OPTICAL CO., 808 Van. Ness 
Ave., near Eddy St. 

PAINTERS AND DECORATORS. 
KEEFE, J. H., 820-822 O'Farrell St., S. F. ; 

Tel. Franklin 2055. 

TOZER, L. & SON CO., INC., 1527 Pine 

and 2511 Washington St., near Fillmore. 

PAINTS AND OILS. 

BASSHUETER PAINT CO., 1532 Market 

St. 

PHOTO ENGRAVERS. 
CAL. PHOTO ENG. CO.. 141-143 Valencia 
St. 

PHYSICIANS. 
BOWIE. DR. HAMILTON C, formerly 293 
Geary St., Paul Illdg.. now 14th and Church 
Sts. 
BRYANT, DR. EDGAR R., 1944 Fillmore 

St., cor. Pine; Tel. West 5657. 
D'EVELYN. DR. FREDERICK W., 2115 
California St., S. F., and 2103 Clinton Ave.. 
Alameda. 
THORNE, DR. W. S., 1434 Post St., S. F. 
POTTS. DR. JOHN S., 1476 Eddy St. Phone 
West 1073. Residence, Hotel Congress, 
Ellis and Fillmore. Phone West 4224. 
PIANOS— MANUFACTURERS AND 
DEALERS. 
BALDWIN, D. H. & CO.. 2512 Sacramento 
St., and Van Ness at California. 
REAL ESTATE. 
HICKS ,\ MACK. Real Estate and In- 
surance. 2091 Fillmore St. Phone West 
7287. 



RESTAURANTS. 
MORAGHAN, M. B., OYSTER CO., 1212 

Golden Gate Ave., S. F. 
OLD POODLE DOG. 824 Eddy St., near 

Van Ness Ave. 
ST. GERMAIN RESTAURANT, 497 Golden 

Gate Ave.; Phone Market 2315. 
SWAIN'S RESTAURANT, nil Post St., 

S. F. 
THOMPSON'S, formerly Oyster Loaf, 1727 

O'Farrell St. 

SAFES AND SCALES. 
HERRING-HALL MARVIN SAFE CO., 

office and salesrooms, Mission St., bet. 

Seventh and Eighth Sts. ; Phone Market 

1037. 

SEWING MACHINES. 
WHEELER & WILSON and SINGER SEW- 
ING MACHINES, 1431 Bush St., cor. 

Van Ness Ave., S. F. ; Phone Franklin 

301; formerly 231 Sutter St. 
DOMESTIC SEWING MACHINES, J. W. 

Evans, Agent. 1658 O'Farrell St., nr. Fill- 
more. Phone West 3601. 
STORAGE. 
BEKINS VAN & STORAGE CO., 13th and 

Mission Sts., S. F. : Phone Market 13. 
PIERCE RUDOLPH STORAGE CO., Eddy 

and Fillmore Sts. ; Tel. West 828. 
SURGICAL INSTRUMENTS AND HOS- 
PITAL SUPPLIES. 
WALTERS & CO., formerly Shutts, Walters 

& Co., 1608 Steiner St.. S. F. 

TALKING MACHINES. 
BACIGALUPI, PETER, 1113-1115 Fillmore 

St., S. F. 

TAILORS. 
LYONS, CHARLES, London Tailor, 1432 

Fillmore St., 731 Van Ness Ave., S. F. ; 958 
» Broadway, Oakland. 
McMAHON, KEYER AND STIEGELER 

BROS., Van Ness Ave. and Ellis, O'Farrell 

and Fillmore. 



REHNSTROM, C. H„ 2415 Fillmore St., for- 
merly Mutual Savings Bank Bldg., S. F. 

TENTS AND AWNINGS. 

THOMS, F., 1209 Mission St., corner of 
Eighth, S. F. 

TRICYCLES. 

EAMES TRICYCLE CO., Invalid Chairs, 
1808 Market St., S. F. 

WINES AND LIQUORS— WHOLESALE. 

BALKE, ED. W., 1498 Eddy St., .cor. Fill- 
more. 

BUTLER, JOHN & SON, 2209 Steiner St., 
S. F. 

REYNOLDS, CHAS. M. CO., 912 Folsom 
St., S. F. 

RUSCONI, FISHER & CO.. 649 Turk St., 
S. F. 

SIEBE BROS. & PLAGEMAN. 419-42S 
Larkin St.; Phone Franklin 349. 

WENIGER, P. J. & CO., N. E. cor. Van 
Ness Ave. and Ellis St.; Tel. Franklin 309. 
309. 

WICHMAN, LUTGEN & CO., Harrison and 
Everett Sts., Alameda, Cal. ; Phone Ala- 
meda 1179. 

WINES AND LIQUORS-RETAIL 

FERGUSON, T. M. CO., Market Street. 
Same old stand. Same Old Crow Whiskey. 

FISCHER, E. R„ 1901 Mission St., cor. of 
Fifteenth. 

THE METROPOLE, John L. Herget and 
Wm. H. Harrison, Props., N. W. cor. Sutter 
and Steiner Sts. 

TUXEDO, THE, Eddie Graney, Prop., S. W. 
cor. Fillmore and O'Farrell Sts. 

YEAST MANUFACTURERS. 
GOLDEN GATE COMPRESSED YEAST 
CO.. 2401 Fillmore. 



30 



-THE WASP- 



Amusements 



"On "Change," a farce in three acts 
newly adapted from the German of 
Van Moser, played with such great 
success by the Augustin Daly Com- 
pany under the title of "The Big 
Bonanza." will be produced at the 
Colonial Theater on Monday evening. 
May 6th. It is one of the funniest 
farces dealing with the ups and downs 
of the stock market that has ever 
been staged. In fact, it was such a 
clever farce, that Daly engaged an 
all-star cast to play it, including John 
Drew, Ada Rehan, James Lewis, Otis 
Skinner. Isabel Irving, Joseph Hol- 
land and Mrs. Gilbert. 

As the mild Professor Senaca Pick- 
ering Peck, the man who attempts to 
"bull the market," Frank Bacon 
should make his audience split its 
sides with laughter. The character 
is admirably suited to Bacon's pecul- 
iarly dry humor and droll demeanor, 
and the popular comedian will no 
doubt score one of the greatest hits 
of his career in the part. The "Bear" 
of the stock exchange will be por- 
trayed by that versatile character 
actor, A. Burt Wesner. The full 
strength of the company will be seen 
in the cast, including Izetta Jewel, 
Maud Odelle. Effie Bond, Jane Jeffery. 
Orral Humphreys, Walker Graves, 
Jr., and all of the other favorites. 

Orral Humphreys, who has been on 
a tour with the Creston Clarke Com- 
pany, will rejoin the Colonial Stock 
Monday and his return will be wel- 
come news to his many admirers, as 
his conscientious and able work at 
this theater has won for him a warm 
spot in the hearts of the patrons of 
the new home of stock productions. 

The elegantly staged and well-acted 
drama, "La Belle Russe," is proving a 
big drawing card this week. The 
Belasco play will be presented for the 
last time Sunday night, with Saturday 
and Sunday matinees. 
.* * * 

"Robin Hood," as interpreted by 
Manager Healy's all star cast at The 



ICECREAM 

^1536-8 Fillmore St:. S.F. 



Novelty this week, is hardly a Bos- 
tonian production, but even at that 
it is pretty good to look at and to 
listen to. While it lacks the atmos- 
phere of the old Tivoli, even, it pos- 
pesses redeeming features, not the 
least of which is Miss Florence Sin- 
nott, the exceedingly clever little girl 
who plays the ingenue role as well 
as she does soubrettes. Her Annabel 
far exceeds that of Dora De Felipe, 
and that is saying a good deal, for 
while Miss De Felipe was homelier 
than it was right for her to be. she 
certainly could sing. For chic and 
daintiness Miss Sinnott is a real reve- 
lation, and she unconsciously glorifies 
her role to a degree far in excess of 
my expectations. 

Mr. Healy sprang another surprise 
on his auditors in the person of Oliver 
Lenoir, who sings the role of Will 
Scarlett, the armorer. Mr. Lenoir 
has a wonderful voice, and his render- 
ing of the famous "Armorer's Song" 
is worth going miles to hear. This 
young man, by the way, is, like the 
famous MacDonald. a blacksmith by 
trade, and discovered his talent for 
music while in the railroad shops in 
Sacramento. I prophesy big things in 
' Mr. Lenoir's future careen 

Teddy Webb was a better Sheriff 
of Nottingham than I thought he 
would be. He was hardly a Barna- 
bee or even a Willard Simms, but he 
got the humor out of the part which 
is the main thing, and he dropped 
some of his mannerisms which tend 
to be somewhat boresome. Aida 
Hemmi covered herself with glory by 
her thorough rendering of the role 
of Maid Marian. One thing I have 
noticed about Miss Hemmi is that 
no matter how full the house is, or 
how empty, she gives the same fin- 
ished performance at all times. She 
is a hard and conscientious worker, 
and she has the ability to back it up 
with. Maud Beatty was an excellent 
Alan-a-Dale. Her singing of "O 
Promise Me" was the best thing in 
the show, though J. Albert Waller- 
stedt won much applause with his 
"Brown October Ale." Carl Haydn 
made an excellent Robin Hood. His 
voice is growing stronger and its 
purity which was somewhat impaired 
by a slight throat affection during 
the few weeks past has now regained 
its tone and quality. George Kunkel 
as Friar Tuck had an excellent 
comedy part which he made the most 
of as did Aimee Leicester as Dame 



Durden. 

• The "Robin Hood" music is melody 
of which one never grows tired. It is 
my favorite light opera, and I think 
that most people will agree with me 
in this. The piece is admirably 
staged, with quite satisfactory atten- 
tion to detail. It will be followed next 
week by "The Serenade" or "Fan- 
tana." 

* * * 

"The Admirable Crichton" is the 
Alcazar offering and it is up to the 
mark set by this competent company. 
It is as well staged as it was in the 
old days of O'Farrell Street, and Ber- 
tram Lytell does fine work in the role 
of Crichton. The other members are 
all well cast and from present indica- 
tions the piece should have a longer 
run than the usual week. 

* * * 

A spectacular production always 
seems to me to be an awful lot of 
bother for a mighty little result. When 



DR. H. J. STEWART 

Organist of S;. Dominic's Church and 
the Temple Sherilh Israel 

TEACHER OF SINGING 

Pianoforte, Organ, Harmony and Composition. 
New Studio: 2517 California Street. Hours, 10 
to 12 and 2 to 4 daily, except Saturdays. 

LOUIS H. EATON 

Organisl and Director Trinity 
Church Choir 

Teacher of Voice, Piano and Organ 

San Francisco Studio; 1678 Broadway, Phone 
Franklin 2244. 

Berkeley Studio; 2401 Channing Way, Tues- 
day and Friday. 



MRS. OSCAR MANSFELDT 

PIANIST 

Tel. Well 314 1 80 1 Buchanan St.. Cor. Sillier 



William Keith 

Studio 

After Dec. 1st 1717 California St. 



SAMUEL M. SHORTRIDGE 

Attorney -at- Law 



1101 O'FARRELL ST. 

Cor. Franklin San Francisco, Cal. 



-THE WASP- 



31 




RACING 



New California Jockey Club 

Oakland Race 
Track 



|SIX CR MORE RACES EACH WEEK DAY 
Rain or Shine 



Races commence at 1 40 p. 



sharp. 



For special trains stopping at the track lake S. P. Ferry, 
[oot of Market street: leave at 1 2:00, thereafter every twenty 
minutes until 1 :40 p. m. No Smoking in last two cars, 
which are reserved for ladies and their escorts. 

Returning trains leave track after fifth and last races. 

THOMAS H. WILUAMS. President. 
PERCY W. TREAT, Secretary. 




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FRESH DAILY AT YOUR GROCER 



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Oyster Loaf, 



Nov 
Open. 



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All night service Popular Prices 



tThe only first-class up-to-date and modern 
Ham mam Baths, built especially for 
■* the purpose, in the city. 

I Oriental Turkish Baths 

I Corner Eddy and Larkin Sts. 

• Cold water plunge. 

y Room including Bath, Si.oo. 

♦ Phone Franklin 653 

* W. J. BLUMBERG & BRO.. Props. 



PATRICK & CO. 



Rubber Stamps 

Stencils, Box Brands 



1543 Pine Street 



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a production such as "A Midsummer 
Night's Dream" take- the boards, my 
observation is apt to be tempered with 
sympathy for the management ami 
for the performers, Of course, the 
question of whether ii is worth while 
or not is purely the business of the 
management, and might he regarded 
in 1 lie cold-blooded light of "\\ ho 
Cares," but nothing tike that is apt 
1-. enter into the mind of the spec- 
tator at the Van Ness Theater. Ad- 
miration is the dominant note. 

To say that the piece is completely 
Staged is not enough. It is sumptu- 
ously staged, and perfection is in 
every detail from Miss Annie Russell 
in her role of Puck:, down to the 
smallest mechanical effect. 

[n no other piece that I have seen 
do 1 recall such harmony in every 
particular. The company is well 
trained; as a football player would 
say, "their teamwork is good." It is 
a big company at that, and it is gor- 
geously costumed and surrounded 
with a scenic setting that is a gem 
of beauty. But Miss Annie Russell 
herself makes the show the success 
it undoubtedly is, and were it not 
for her the rest of the piece would be 
as empty as a blown egg shell. Tt 
is not art on her part that makes her 
triumph — at least I think it is not 
art; it seems to me to be more a 
triumph of personality. For if ever 
a woman was endowed by Nature to 
play the role of Puck it is Annie 
Russell. 

Miss Russell's personality fits the 
part to a nicety. She has the voice, 
and the sprightliness to carry her 
roguery to every auditor and she cer- 
tainly does it. In her the poetic con- 
ception of the magic elf is fully real- 
ized. In her Puck lives and moves 
and has his being. The rest of the 
principals are good, but nothing extra 
John Bunny is good as Bottom, Lan- 
sing Rowan makes a good Helena 
and Catherine Proctor in the role 
of Hermia does well. "Midsummer 
Xight's Dream" is by far the best 
show yet seen in this City since "Ben 
Hur." 

* * * 

"Sporting Life" is a somewhat 
strenuous drama. A capable stock 
company has been engaged for a 
four-weeks' season at the American 
Theater to produce this and other 
high class dramas. 

THE FIRST NIGHTER. 



COLONIAL THEATRE 

McAllister near Market Phone Market 920 
MARTIN F. KURTZIC, Pr«idenl and Mana B er 



All Market Street Cars run direct to Theatre 

Week Beginning Monday, May 6 

The Hilarious Up-to-Date Farce 
in Three Acts 



u 0n Change" 



Frank Bacon as Professor Peck 
"Buy Trunks! Trunks! Trunks!" 

PRICES: Eveninss, 25c. 50c, 75c. $1.00; Satur- 
day and Sunday Matinees, 25c and 50c. BARGAIN 
MATINEE, Wednesday, all seats reserved. 25c. Branch 
Ticket Office, Kohler & Chase's. Suiter and Franklin 
Streets. 



DR. WM. D. CLARK 

Office and Res.: 2554 California St. 

San Francisco 

Hours — 1 to 3 p. m. and 7 to 8 p. m. 

Sundays — By appointment 

Phone West 390 



Contracts made with Hotels and Restaurants 
Special Attention given to Family Trade 

Established 1876 

THOMAS MORTON &SON 

Importer of and (~*C\ A I 
Dealers in \*\JM* 

N. W. Cor. Eddy and Hyde, San Francisco 
Phone Franklin 397 



Wichman, Lutgen & Co. 

Formerly of 
29-31 Battery Street. S. F. 

Cor. Everett and Tarrison Avenue 
ALAMEDA, CAL. 

Phone Alameda 1179 

GILT EDGE WHISKEY 



To restore gray hair to its natural 
color use Alfreditm's Egyptian Henna — 
a vegetable dye — perfectly harmless and 
the effect is immediate. All druggists 
sell it. Langley & Michaels Co., agents. 



32 



THE WASP 



ELECTRO 
SILICON 

Is Unequalled lor 

Cleaning and Polishing 
SILVERWARE. 

Send address for a FKEE SAMPLE, o'- 15c. In 
Stamps for a full box. 

Electro-Silicon Soap haa equal merits. 
The Klectro Silicom Co., 30 Cliff St., New York. 
Grocers and Druggists sell it. 

California Vehicle & Harness Co. 

Successors to 



rLEIBOLD, 

Harncss & CARRJXgeCO. 

1214 GOLDEN GATE AVE. 

BET. WEBSTER AND FILLMORE 



A p c °j* ive CATARRH 

Ely's Cream Balm I 

is quickly absorbed. 
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It cleanses, soothes I 
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Head quickly. Re-UAV FFVFR 
Btores the Senses of ■■** ■ ■■■¥■»■■ 
Taste and Smell. Full size 50 cts. , at Drug- 
gists or by mail ; Trial Size 10 cts. by mail. 
Elv Brothers. 56 Warren Street, New York. 



UM5HBITIERS 

L. BETTER THAN PILLS. W 




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AT ALL DRUGGISTS 



Awakening Him 

The honeymoon was over and the , Tf^'Vf^ VfQEW 

cupboard was bare. M^aw 1 V/ I V/ tVlOEill 

"Don't worry, darling," said tin I ^^^2^. 

romantic husband, as he opened the | i"^^^^«a \C A I^H A 

piano; "remember, music is the food I f^S^^W llillk/llfl 

°f love -" (Oriental Steamship Co.) 

The practical little wife shook her 

head. Have Opened Their Permanent Offices at 

"But if you really think music is Room 240 James Flood Building 

the food of love," she responded. . San Francisco 

"perhaps you can step around and get S . S. "America Mam" (calls at Manila) . . 

the butcher to give you a beefsteak Friday, May 3, 1907 

for a mere song." S. S. "Nippon Mam" (calls at Manila) . . I 

Then the long-haired genius woke Friday, May 3 1 , 1907 

Up. S. S. "Hongkong Mam" I 

Friday, June 28, 1907 

_,, T - ir , Steamers will leave wharf, corner First and Brannan Sis., 

Ine Last Word | p. M., for Yokohama and Hongkong, calling at Hono- 

. ... lulu, Kobe, (Hiogo), Nagasaki and Shanghai, and con- 

At a performance Of Olie Of the necting at Hongkong with steamers for Manila, India, etc. 

. No cargo received on board on day of sailing. 

sllOWS Which has enjoyed more than Round- trip tickets al reduced rates. 1 

For Freight and passage apply at office, 240 James Flood 

the USUal length OT run a night Or Building. W. H. AVERY, Assistant General Manager. 

two ago there was a young man ap- 
parently in the last stages of a jag. 
As the leading woman reached the 
climax of one of the acts she said: 
"It's the woman that pays — pays — 
pays." 

"One moment, please," interrupted 
the inebriated one, rising in his seat, 
"I'd like to argue that point with 
yuu." 



Peter Bacigalupi & Son 

Headguarters for Talking 

Machines, Records 

and Supplies 

1113-1115 Fillmore Street, San Francisco 

Albion Ale or Porter 



SUMMONS 

IN THE SUPERIOR COURT OF THE 
State of California, in and for the City and 
County of San Francisco. 

SIDNEY W. SCOTT, Plaintiff, vs. ISABELL 
SCOTT, Defendant. 

Action brought in the Superior Court of 
the State of California in and for the City 
and County of San Francisco, and the com- 
plaint filed in the office of the County Clerk * 
of said City and County. 

The People of the State of California, send 
greeting to ISABEL SCOTT, Defendant. 

You are hereby required to appear in an 
action brought against you by the above 
named Plaintiff in the Superior Court of 
the State of California, in and for the City 
and County of San Francisco, and to answer 
the Complaint filed therein within ten days 
(exclusive of the day of service) after the ser- 
vice on you of this Summons, if served within 
this City, and County; or if served elsewhere 
within thirty days. 

The said action is brought to obtain a 
judgment and decree of this Court dissolv- 
ing the bonds of matrimony now existing 
between Plaintiff and Defendant, on the 
ground of Defendant's wilful desertion of the 
Plaintiff; also for general relief, as will 
more fully appear in the Complaint on file, 
to which special reference is hereby made. 

And you are hereby notified that, unless 
you appear and answer as above required, 
the said Plaintiff will take judgment for any 
moneys or damages demanded in the Com- 
plaint as arising upon contract, or will apply 
to the Court for any other relief demanded 
in the Complaint. 

Given under my hand and the Seal of 
the Superior Court of the State of California, 
in and for the City and Countv of San Fran- 
cisco, this 16th dav of March, A. D. 1907. 
(SEAL) H.' I. MULCREVY, Clerk. 

By L. J. WELCH, Deputy Clerk. 
JOSEPH H. TAM, Attorney for Plaintiff, 

San Francisco, Cal. 

Action No. 7076. 



Is a Great Flesh Builder, Tontc and Pleasant 
Drink. Pure Extract of Malt and Hops. 

BURNELL & CO. 

1007-1009 Golden Gate Ave., Near Lagnna St. 



Dr.WONQ HIM 

1268 O'FarreH St. 

Permanently Located 

HERB DOCTOR 



Fattier and Mother 
Write Letter In- 
dorsing Treatment. 

SAN FRANCISCO 
March 23. 1906 

To Whom it may 
^s&Concern: Our three- 
Bl» year - old daughter, 
having been ill for 
some time and beins 
treated by the most prominent physicians, 
gradually became worse, and was finally 
given up by them. We were then recom- 
mended to Dr. Wonp Him. We started 
with his treatment and within two months' 
time our daughter was cured. 

Respectfully, 
MR. AND MRS. H. C. L1EB. 
2757 Harrison St., San Francisco 





Volume LVIl-.No. 19 



SAN FRANCISCO. MAY II, 1907 



Price 10 cents 



PUBLISHER'S NOTICE 

THE WASP is publ.shed every Saiurday by the Wasp Publishing 
Company, at 141-143 Valencia Street, Subscription* $5.00 per 
year, payable in advance, poslase prepaid. Subscriptions to all 
foreign countries within the Postal Union, $6.00 per year. The trade on 
the Pacific Coast supplied by the San Francisco News Company. Eastern 
Agents supplied by the American News Company, New York. 

THE WASP will pay for contributions suitable for its columns, and 
will endeavor to return all rejected manuscripts, but does nol guarantee 
their return. Photographs will also be accepted and paid for. Address 
all communications to Wasp Publishing Company, 141-143 Valencia 
Street, San Francisco, Cal. 

TO ADVERTISERS— As the illustrated pages of THE WASP 
go to press early, all advertisements printed in the same forms should be 
received, not later than Monday at noon. Changes of Advertisements 
should also be sent in on Monday to insure publication. 

Address, JAMES F. FORSTER. Business Manager. 
Telephone Markel 3 16. 



Plain English 



General Leonard Wood, in command of the mili- 
tary forces in the Philippines, seems to be unduly 
prone to have his dignity ruffled by the sassy 
language of his understrappers. He has charged 
a civil employe named F. S. Cairns with disrespect- 
ful language. Some years back in Cuba the pre- 
sumptous Cairns had trouble with the Medico-Gen- 
eral and when the twain met again in the Philip- 
pines the civil retainer was still most uncivil. So 
General Woods has formally notified the higher 
authorities at Washington of the crime, much as 
he did when Captain L. M. Koehler of the Fourth 
Cavalry was charged by him with disrespectful 
language and court-martialed. A major-general 
should be able to preserve his dignity without in- 
voking the strong arm of the Federal power to 
protect it from every underling who gets gay. 

There appears to be an undercurrent of dissatis- 
faction in military circles owing to the speed of 
General Leonard Wood's rise. This fortunate 
warrior was born in New Hampshire forty-seven 
years ago, studied medicine at Harvard and became 
an assistant-surgeon in the Army in 1886. In 1898 
while still in the medical profession Dr. Wood re- 



cruited the Rough Riders and three years later 
became a Major-general in the United States Army. 
This meteoric rise would impress even the con- 
quering army of Napoleon, where every corporal 
was supposed to carry the baton of a field-marshal 
in his knapsack, figuratively speaking. 

General Wood has now been selected to command 
the Department of the East with headquarters at 
Governor's Island, while General Arthur Mac- 
Arthur, with his long military record, has been 
consigned to the obscurity of Milwaukee, where 
he will be neither in the public nor the military 
eye very much henceforth. 

MacArthur served in the Civil War and took part 
in many important actions including Stone River, 
Missouri Bridge, Perryville, and Atlanta. He was 
promoted to a colonelty for gallantry and efficiency 
in actual service and was appointed first lieutenant 
in the regular army in 1866. He has since risen 
without political favor to the position of lieutenant- 
general. 

Perhaps the powers-that-be have discovered in 
General Wood genius military that wipes out all 
rules of routine promotion and precedure. Caesar, 
who proved to be one of the great soldiers in 
history, never saw a pitched battle till he was forty, 
and up to that age, like our famous fellow citizen, 
Sam Shortridge, devoted most of his talents to 
perfection in oratory. A doctor's training, like that 
of Leonard Wood, would however be more in keep- 
ing with a soldier's murderous trade than tickling 
the e^rs of the multitude with fine rhetoric. 



The labor unions will have the opportunity 
to show just what they amount to, politically, next 
year when the National vote is cast for a new President. 
If Roosevelt be not the Republican nominee, some one 
whom he favors will be the standard bearer. The Wasp 
pointed out recently that in a National election the 
labor union vote is not a formidable one for its total 
strength is not over seven hundred thousand. The 
farmers' vote alone is infinitely more important. In the 
last Presidential election Roosevelt was quietly opposed 
by organized labor in the large cities, yet his majority 
was immense. Even in our local State election last year 
Governor Gillett, though blacklisted by Gompers and 
denounced by the labor leaders of San Francisco was 
easily elected. 



THE WASP 



The European newspapers have not been sparing 
in their criticism of American court procedure, as 
shown in the Thaw trial. It appears most prepos- 
terous to European lawyers, judges and journalists 
that more than a week should be consumed in the 
trial of any citizen for murder. 

What will our European critics say of the Mover, 
Haywood and Pettibone case, which has not yet 
been commenced, though the defendants have been 
in jail for a year, and are charged with a series of 
the most desperate crimes. It is now given out 
by the defendants' attorneys that the trial will last 
at least three months. It should not last over two 
weeks. 

It took several years to send to the gallows 
Soeder. the cold-blooded murderer who brought his 
ignorant and confiding brother-in-law here from 
Germany, insured his life and then took him out 
and butchered him like a sheep on a lonely street 
of San Francisco. 



Many months ago San Francisco was horrified 
by a series of daylight murders, the victims being 
shopkeepers, who were struck clown in their own 
stores, beaten to death and robbed. By a mere 
accident, the desperate assassins were arrested, and for 
several weeks were made the heroes of the hour. The 
newspapers were full of their pictures, their doings 
and their sayings and no doubt it will take as long 
to get these malefactors to the scaffold as it did 
to make Soeder pay the penalty of his most infa- 
mous crime. 

Our jails are crowded with red-handed assassins, 
and when I say our jails, I mean all American 
jails from New York to San Francisco. There is 
no respect for the law and the most desperate and 
dangerous criminals are brought tardily to the bar 
of justice, only by the most strenuous efforts, and 
not once in a dozen cases given the punishment 
thev deserve. 



In San Francisco now, is exhibited the unparall- 
eled spectacle of a set of confessed boodlers sitting- 
in the municipal legislature and making the laws 
for the City they have robbed and disgraced. There 
seems to be no way to remove these rascals or the 
Mayor, who has been the head and front of the 
criminality, and who is laden down with indict- 
ments. 

Not only can these malefactors be not removed 
from office, but the courts of law are powerless to 
bring them to trial, speedily, and thus in a measure 
conciliate decent public opinion. 

Months ago Ruef and Schmitz were indicted, and 
yet at this writing the Superior Court has been 
unable to obtain a jury to try either of them. 

All this affords proof conclusive that the ma- 
chinery of justice has broken down in the United 
States, and our land has become a lawless one. 

Every day it becomes worse and will continue 
to do so unless we change our system of electing 
judges. 



That is the evil which underlies the lawlessness 
of our nation, and saps the vitality of justice. 

We make our judicial positions prizes for poli- 
ticians, and insist that judges shall seek the favor 
of corrupt machine politicians in order to obtain 
their nominations. If they do not knuckle to the 
bosses they cannot get on their party tickets, and 
be elected. 

The judges should all be appointed. They should 
hold their positions for life, and be pensioned on 
being retired. They should be liberally paid and 
thus the courts would become respected and the 
laws be enforced. All enemies of the public peace, 
or welfare, would be punished speedily and our 
nation instead of being pointed out as the most 
lawless would become respected and admired as 
one well governed and law abiding. 



If we do not adopt some reform of that kind we 
can rest assured that things will go from bad to 
worse, and out of the strife of the classes and the 
masses will grow civil war, more or less serious. 
From that will spring a military despotism in the 
iron grasp of which the republic may long remain. 

It is very evident that when the civil authorities 
cease to be respected, and the civil law no longer 
operative, the control must pass into the military 
branch of government. Already we see that ex- 
emplified in San Francisco, where the law-abiding 
citizens are more afraid of the police and their 
elected municipal officials than the professional 
criminals. Our merchants rest their ultimate hopes 
on the military and in their secret hearts long to 
see the uniformed sentries patroling the streets once 
more. 

That is a bad state of affairs. None could be 
worse, for the interference of the military in the 
police work of a commonwealth is always improper 
and revolutionary. The duty of the soldiers is to 



X 




CHAS.KE1LUS& CO 

EXCLUSIVE 

HIGH GRADE CLOTH I ERS 



No Branch Slores. No Agents. 

Clothes are commodities and sold in open market. Anybody can 
buy cloth but, it takes brains, you bet, to make "Classy Clothes" that 
are so different. Such makes can be counted on the fingers of one hand 
and then have some to spare. 

No patent needed to make clothes but there's a heap of gray 
matter required to build them "just so." We are in touch with 
clothes makers that cater only to smart dressers. We use their 
cleverproducrions. That's why there's no bargains here. 
There's plenty "bargain stores" without us, Our destiny lies in 
reputation. 



KING SOLOMON'S HALL 

Fillmore Street, near Sutter, San Francisco 



-THE WASP- 



fight a foreign foe and not support the weak arm 
of the civic power. The civil authorities should 
be amply able t" '1" that themselves, and unless cor- 
rupt, inefficient or cowardly can always do so. In 
San Francisco the civil authorities possess all 
three characteristics; so we see a complete collapse 
of law and order and no hope of permanent im- 
provement while the incompetents remain in power. 
Even after they shall have been removed by the 
vote of the people other rascals may take their 
places. 

All this would be obviated if we had a set of 
judges placed above the influences of professional 
politicians. The law-breakers who come before 
them for punishment would be sure to receive it 
and the community would soon learn that dis- 
obedience of the laws meant serious loss of money, 
liberty or life. 



P. II. McCarthy, he of the lurid imagination, has 
not deceived many persons by his great kidnapping 
yarn, and workingmen are not worrying whether or 
not he is to be another Charlie Ross. Outside of 
the liuilding Trades Council McCarthy has not a 
particle of influence. In the Building Trades Coun- 
cil, anything P. H. does is acclaimed. To men of 
the Tveitmoe type. McCarthy is the wisest, most elo- 
quent and most fearless of men. Recently when at 
an Exclusion League meeting the Japanese contro- 
versy was under discussion, McCarthy applied a 
vile name to the President of the United States and 
not one of his hearers had the decency to resent 
the indignitv. 



A hero of the fierce fighting of Tuesday after- 
noon is P. H. McCarthy. President of the Building 
Trades Council, the whilom victim of the terribly 
"conspiracy" to kidnap and incarcerate him in a 
lonelv house on the sand dunes fronting the ocean. 
McCarthy is telling those who have time to listen 
to him how he had a horse shot under him by the 
"hired strike-breakers." The tale is partly true, that 
is the faithful beast was shot and, technically, it 
was "under" McCarthy at the time, but unfortu- 
nately for the purposes of history the horse was 
hitched at the sidewalk while McCarthy, far above 
the raging battle, viewed the fight from a third- 
story window. After the smoke had cleared away 
the hero of a thousand jaw-fights descended cau- 
tiously from his perch and though his noble charger 
was all but inanimate sausage meat compelled the 
wounded Bucephalus to haul him to his home. 

It is interesting to note that McCarthy viewed the 
battle from a high window. He was not down 
on the street counselling the men to keep peace and 
stop the destruction of property. Though he has 
always maintained that he was for peace in the 
labor world, his voice was not raised during the 
whole of that battle. We should have expected to 
hear of him sallying forth like a knight, bestride 
the horse, stridently calling upon his fellow union- 
ists to quit throwing bricks and stop the destruc- 
tion of the railroad company's private property. 
But no, away up above the thunder of the captains 
and the shouting, peeking from behind the shutter 



of a third-story window, far from the scent of pow- 
der and out of range of the rattling bricks, stood 
the heroic P. 11.. leaving his steed below to catch 
the stray bullets. 

But let no carping historian of transient or future 
events rob McCarthy of the credit due him. It 
has to be recorded that the room from which he 
caught the whiff of battle is the headquarters of 
the Japanese and Korean Exclusion League, that 
noble, patriotic organization formed by McCarthy 
and Tveitmoe which came near causing serious 
trouble between this country and Japan. So Mc- 
Carthy was in a suitable refuge; he went that far 
in showing his interest in the cause of labor. 



Santa Cruz is Booming 

Santa Cruz is taking its proper place as one of 
the great pleasure resorts of the Pacific Coast. 
For years it lay dormant, doing nothing to attract 
attention to its many advantages, but all its list- 
lessness has gone. It is now a live bustling town 
fully determined that the Pacific Coast shall know 
all about its million-dollar Casino, its mammoth 
bathing pavilion, tent city, amusement park, scenic 
railway, floating palace, perfect restaurant and 
hotel accommodations and all the other necessaries 
and delights of a popular seaside resort. Fred W. 
Swanton, the energetic and popular manager of 
the Sea Beach Company, has dispatched a corps 
of boomers to tour the State and illustrate by 
lectures and magic lantern shows all the pleasures 
that await visitors to Santa Cruz this year. On 
the added improvements for 1907 over a million 
dollars have already been spent. Such enterprise 
must bring ample rewards. The great Casino is 
in the closing stages of construction. 



™R COUNTRY HOMES 
AND BUNGALOWS 



LATEST effects in ENGLISH, FRENCH 
and DOMESTIC WALL PAPERS, CRE- 
TONNES. TAFFETAS. CASEMENT 
MATERIAES. PLAIN and FANCY NETS 
are now being displayed by us. Many of the 
patterns are in stock for immediate delivery. 

We are showing an excellent assortment of 
WILLOW and MAHOGANY FURNITURE 
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Dealers in Mahogany, Oak and Maple Furniture 
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^? Weekly Summary of Social Activities and Complications 





MISS DOROTHY TARPEY 

The most surprising thing about the Yerkes- 
Mizner divorce case is that it was not instituted 
sooner. The first we heard in connection with the 
marriage was that the widow of the traction mag- 
nate refused to live with her new husband. It was 
supposed then that the groom was dissatisfied with 
his amount of traction on the assets of the concern. 
The suddenness of their disagreement reminded one 
of the burlesque wedding in "Wang," wherein that 
ludicrous knave, ere the hands of the high-priest are 
lowered from the blessing, turns to the bride gruffly 
with, "Hand over the chest. Am I not your chest- 
protector?" 

Y\ ilson Mizner's post-ceremonial rejection was, 
all in all, one of the oddest events within the mem- 
ory of the recording angels. Mrs. Yerkes acted as 
if she had not understood the purport of a marriage 
ceremony and was dazed when Mizner sought to 
live in the same house with her. Of course, there 
is. from her point of view, some unromantic fact 
in the case, there from the outset, of which the 
long-suffering public has no view at all. That there 
is a co-respondent in the proceedings, and that 
Mrs. Mizner has had her defendant shadowed by 
detectives ever since the marriage, is not enlighten- 



ing. These matters are merely pretexts to obviate 
the real objectionable feature. There is something 
weirdly unprecedented in a bride calling in the aid 
of a Detective Agency prior to the honeymoon, even 
though she suspected her gallant of being an ad- 
venturer. 

"I despise the name of 'Mizner,' " she declares. 
Still, when we come to compare them : Mizner — 
Yerkes, there is a reasonable doubt as to which is 
the more delectable. The tall defendant admits that 
his wife will win the suit ; and he knows, O Sake, 
he knows. 



Just six of them — aggregating $250,000,000 worth 
of widow, figured out on a hard cash basis. They 
are Mrs. Hetty Green, Mrs. Russell Sage, Mrs. 
James Henry Smith, Mrs. Anne Weightman Wal- 
ker, Mrs. Marshall Field, and Mrs. Marshall Field, 
Jr. They constitute the most conspicuous and 
wealthiest sextet in the country, though not uni- 
formly as attractive as the Floradora six. In a 
four-handed game, the Smith-Walker-Sage-Green 
combination could perhaps of themselves make the 
quarter of a billion jack pot, should they put up 
their last pennies. Strictly, the flammiferous figure 
of $65,000,000 is not yet creditable to Mrs. Smith, 
as the title to most of "Silent" Smith's money is 
claimed to blaze in the tiara of Lady Cooper. This 
fortune, added to her present pile, would make the 
English woman the highest female coin-stacker on 
the circumforaneous globe. From another stand- 
point, it would be a needless and second paying for 
her prefixitive of "Lad}'," with American money. 

That the purchasing of titles by American women 
merits taxation was recently suggested by Paul 











e Little I alace Hotel 




1 


IS 
OPEN 


Corner o£ 

Post and 

Leavenworth 

Streets 




The same excellence in cuisine and service that obtainec 
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-THE WASP 




MISS FRANCES STEWART 

Morton, president of the Equitable Life Assurance 
Company. To this there has been no wide-spread 
dissent south of Market Street. Whatever the 
feasibility of such a law, the deputies who should 
have charge of the collection (and we presume it 
would require several for the dignity of the office) 
would not do a rushing business, but spend most 
of their time eating peanuts or engaged in whatever 
pastimes it is in the wild, free nature of deputies to 
rotundifoliate. That's the word. 

Lansing Rowan, with Annie Russell, is a Califor- 
nia girl. She made her debut with the Frawleys 
about the same time that Blanche Bates was trying 
out as a leading woman with the same company. 
Miss Rowan has a stunning figure and dresses well. 

Annie Russell was Nat Goodwin's leading lady 
for a time, about ten years ago. That was when 
Nathaniel C. was playing in old comedies like "Lend 
Me Five Shillings" and "David Garrick." . 

Society dressed very simple for the dog show. 
Three or four of the Joliffe sisters were there almost 
every night and they wore tailor-mades as a rule. 
Mrs. Frank Carolan was not in the showing this 
year; generally she is a most enthusiastic exhibitor. 
Boston terriers seem to be more popular than Amer- 
ican foxhounds with the Society people. A season 
ago every Burlingamite was mad over foxhounds. 
A season or so prior to that the French bull was 



the favorite. After Richard Harding Davis wrote 
"The l!ar Sinister" there was quite, a boom in 
French bulls. 

* * * 

Miss Mathilde Van Rensselaer, a New York 
Society bud, who can boast more Dutch market 
gardeners and grocers in her ancestry than all the 
Astors since John Jacob, has become a real estate 
broker. She has been given a position by an en- 
terprising firm which thinks her acquaintance with 
Society people will enable her to sell country homes 
and rent city ones by the dozen. Several San 
Francisco women have made quite a success in real 
estate speculation. 

All the golf players of the Pacific Coast will as- 
semble at Hotel Del Monte for the week beginning 
Saturday, May 11th. The specially drawing event 
is the tournament of the Pacific Coast Golf Asso- 
ciation, which will be held on Friday, Saturday and 
Sunday, May 17th, 18th and 19th. A crowd of peo- 
ple are going down for preliminary plays. An in- 
vitation has been extended to crack clubs of Vic- 
toria, Seattle, Tacoma and Portland, as well as the 
clubs in the Association at Los Angeles, San 
Diego and San Francisco. The outlook is for the 
biggest crowds of golf experts that have ever met 
on these links. Incidentally, a number of art pat- 
rons are planning to take advantage of this event 
to go down and see the new exhibition of Cali- 
fornia paintings, which opened a few weeks ago 
in the Del Monte ball room. Critics say it is one 
of the best exhibitions ever given on the coast. 







mmm mimmwrnv - ' . ^wm 






°i*< 



EftM 



ARE YOU NOT INSPIRED WITH 
A LOVE FOR THE COLONIAL 



In looking at a 
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187 TWELFTH STREET, Near Madison, Oakland 



-THE WASP « 



Mrs.Louis H. Long has created quite a stir down in 
Santa Barbara, where she got up Oscar Wilde's play 
"The Importance of Being Earnest," for the benefit of 
the public library of that city. Mrs. Long herself 
took one of the leading parts, the dowager Lady 
Brackwell, and she is a brilliant success on the stage. 
With her haughty British stare and her clever and 
supercilious handling of a lorgnette she brought down 
the house, which was filled with the elite of Californian 
Society. I hear that Mrs. Long had a hard time get- 
ting things in working order and she says that other 
places are not possessed of the spirit of her own San 
Francisco, which gives with both hands to charity. 

During his stay at the Potter in Santa Barbara, 
John Hooper gave a dinner at the Casa de Brabo ; those 
for whom covers were laid were all San Franciscans, 
staying at the hotel or keeping house in the city. Mr. 
Hooper had engaged a box at the Potter Theatre for 
the play given by Mrs. Long but as he was obliged 
to return to the City on business of importance he 
invited a party including the Davis' to occupy the box 
and a merry group it was too. 



Mrs. Gaston Ashe has been benefited financially by 
the very rich Winter, as another fine crop is assured 
to her this year on her ranch near Hollister. Those 
California landowners make money in large bunches 
when thej' get a few good seasons in succession and 
the bankers who have had liens on the crops of the 
Ashe ranch for years will get no interest next harvest. 
Every dollar of incumbrance has been wiped out and 
Mrs. Ashe is again in receipt of a splendid income, a 
fact which will give her many friends in Society the 
keenest pleasure. The extensive acres she owns in 
San Benito County were left to her by her father, Mr. 
Bolado. She has left Sausalito with her two young 
sons and for the next six months will reside on her 
ranch. 



gamblers to claim blood relationship and win the 
disputed shekels. Much mud was heaped up to be 
flung upon the girl who had devoted years of her 
life to the care of the unhappy and ill-fated heiress 
and it was even intimated that she might have had a 
hand in the tragic death of her ward. Some of the 
mud stuck however, and the verdict was favorable 
to her. The mother of Mis& Dolbeer also met an 
untimely death. One day when the future heiress 
was a baby her mother was found by her husband 
weltering in her gore having shot herself in her own 
home on Lombard Street. Neighbors rushed in when 
the horrified husband raised an alarm but the woman 
was past all aid. Ill health and the meloncholia pro- 
duced thereby were believed to be the causes of the 
suicide and inherited tendency had doubtless much to 
do also with the tragic termination of Miss Dolbeer's 

existence. 

* * * 

The Seventh Annual Convention of the California 
Division of the United Daughters of the Confederacy, 
took many distinguished visitors to Hotel Del Monte. 
Mrs. W. B. Pritchard, Honorary National President, 
who is the daughter of General Albert Sidney Johns- 
ton, was accompanied by Miss Elsie J. Pritchard. Mrs. 
J. de Barth Shorb, President of the Albert Sidney 
Johnston Chapter, Mrs. Inez Shorb White and Mrs. 
W. M. S. Beede went down together. Other delegates 
who stopped at Del Monte were Mrs. Alfred Hunter 
Voorhies, National Vice-President, Mrs. W. D. Ride- 
out, Mrs. Alexander R. Jones, Mrs. Randolph C. 
Miller, Miss Kathryn Bacon, Miss M. H. Foulkes, 
Mrs. Samuel McCartney. Mrs. E. B. Grace. Mrs. 
Antoinette deC. Stearns, Mrs. Frank Kimmell, of the 
Joseph Le Conte Chapter, Berkeley, Mrs. J. Charles 
Harris, Miss Lydia Lee Dozier and Mrs. M. L. Morris, 
of Oakland. Mrs. Albert M. Stephens, wife of Judge 
Stephens of Los Angeles, was one of the first arrivals. 
Mrs. Stephens is the President of the State Division. 



The announcement that Mrs. Ida Moody, Mr. and 
Mrs. Frederick Moody and Mrs. Ray Sherman have 
decided to reside permanently in France has naturally 
created the impression that the notoriety attendant on 
the famous Dolbeer will case has led to their decision. 
The Dolbeer case brought into the limelight a lot of 
disagreeable biography and geneology which could 
not have been very pleasing to a lady like Mrs. Moody 
occupying a prominent place amongst the Colonial 
Dames and in other branches of exclusive Society. 
Mrs. Moody was left quite wealthy by her husband, a 
well known capitalist who died some years ago. The 
family lived in fine style on Lombard Street. Mrs. 
Moody's sister was the late Mrs. Dolbeer, mother of 
the ill-fated Miss Bertha Dolbeer. who was killed by 
falling from the window of a New York hotel, at 
which she was stopping with her companion. Miss 
Etta Warren, to whom the rich girl willed all her 
fortune. The will of course caused a bitter contest 
and relatives who had never taken any interest in 
Miss Dolbeer in her life became intensely centered on 
the division of her money amongst them. Out of a 
depth of Social obscurity which the lorgnettes of Nob 
Hill had never penetrated arose saloon keepers and 



ENJOY COUNTRY LIFE AT 

HOTEL DEL MONTE 



This is the season to take your family to Hotel Del 
Monte by the sea, near Monterey, and enjoy every comfort. There 
is plenty of room there and plenty to do for recreation and health. 
Parlor car leaves San Francisco 8:00 a. m. and 3:00 p. m. daily, 
direct to Hotel. Special reduced round-trip rates. For details, in- 
quire information Bureau, Southern Pacific, or of C. W. Kelley, 
Special Representative of Del Monte, 789 Market St., San Fran- 
cisco. Phone Temporary 2751. 



ANNOUNCEMENT 



Mrs. -Mott - Smith Cunningham exhibitor in 
Paris Salon of 1 906 announces that her Studio 
Shop at 1622 Pine St., a few doors from Van 
Ness Ave., is now open for the sale of her jewelry 



THE WASP 



( Ither Los Angeles delegates at Del Monte were Mrs. 
Mathew S. Robertson, President of the Los Angeles 
Chapter, and from Redlands, Mrs. C. L. Gengsay and 
Mrs, E. A, Stowe, of the General John II. Morgan 
Chapter. Mr-.. J. T. Bell, ['resident of the General N. 
Bedford Forest Chapter. <>f Visalia. was at Del Monte 
during the Convention, so was Mrs. Seldon S. Wright. 
President Emeritus, and Organizer of the United 
Daughters of the Confederacy on the Pacific Coast, 
and Mrs. George Theobald. They were the guests of 
Mr-. J. P. Pryor. Mrs. Pryor. though now living in 
Pacific Grove, was elected a delegate from the Albert 
Sidney Johnson Chapter, of which she has long been 
an important member. Mrs. Jackson Hatch, President- 
elect of the State Division, and Mrs. W. B. Hill, both 
of San Jose, were entertained during the Convention 
by Mrs. George F. Bodfish at her home in the Grove. 
In honor of the delegates, a reception was given in 
the Del Monte ball room. Many army men attended 
and brass buttons and gold lace added to the 
brilliancy of the picture. The paintings in the new 
gallery were greatly admired. This permanent ex- 
hibition is a fine feature and attracts general atten- 
tion. 

* * * 

Mrs. W. G. Stafford and Miss Marjorie Stafford, 
wife and daughter of W. G. Stafford, the well known 
I !i ihemian Clubman, will soon leave for a tour abroad. 
Mrs. Stafford was Miss Cornelia Houseman, sister of 
Mr. John I. Houseman, and relative of Warren and 
the late Theodore Payne. Mrs. Stafford recently 
recovered from the effects of a serious fall, which 
occurred while stepping off a car in Berkeley. The 
trip abroad is taken for the benefit of her health. Miss 
Marion Froelich, the artist will accompany Mrs. Staf- 
ford, and they will go direct to Paris. Mr. Stafford, 
himself is an acknowledged connoisseur of paintings. 

Miss Harriet Jolliffe's sudden departure has been 
for the purpose of visiting her cousin Mrs. Robert 
Cryan, whose husband recently died at Bray in the 
South of Ireland. Mrs. Cryan was Miss Minnie 
Mathews of Oakland, where she was married. She 
went abroad several years ago, and has been away 
ever since. Miss Frances Jolliffe will join her sister 
in a few weeks. 

A Wedding of interest which took place last week 
was that of Miss I Florence C. Aiken and Dr. Beverly 
S. Xourse. The bride is the daughter of the late 
Mrs. Antoinette Aiken of Rancho la Jota, and sister of 
Charles Sedgwick Aiken, the clever editor of the 
Sunset Magazine. The wedding was quiet, only 
relatives and a few intimate friends being present. 
It was the culmination of a boy and girl friendship, 
begun at the University of California, from which 

. place the 'young couple graduated with honor. The 
ceremonv was performed by Dr. Hemphill. The 
quartet of pretty little maidens who attended the 
bride were Miss Edith Bradbury, Miss Aimee Raisch, 

. Miss Linda Bryan and Miss Leila Raisch. The 
groom's best man was Dr. Joseph Fife. Dr. Nourse is 
the son of George F. Nourse, well known in the literary 
world. After a short wedding tour the couple will 
reside in this city, where Dr. Xourse will practice. 



Mr. and Mrs. Carter P. Pomeroy, who have been 
residing in San Rafael since the calamity, will shortly 
leave for a trip to the Grand Canyon, Col. Mr. 
Pomeroy has but recently recovered from a serious 
illness and this trip is for the benefit of his health. 
Miss Christine Pomeroy will not accompany her 
parents, but will be the guest of friends in town. 
* * * 

In a very interesting letter from a lad)- who has 
travelled considerably abroad and is still a wanderer, 
she tells of the different characteristics of the places 
and people. Of Dresden she mentions especially 
the close economv of the shopkeepers ; often when 
delivering a bundle the messenger boy waits for the 
wrapping paper and string to take back to the 
store. She speaks also of the fruits and flowers 
within easy grasp of passing school children, who 
are so well trained they would never dream of 
touching the same. There is perfect order and 
discipline. Rules are rigid indeed. When selling a 
bicycle the shopkeeper hands the purchaser a set of 
rules, which informs him where and when he may 
ride. Otherwise than in our City, life and limb are 
not endangered by the small boy. It would not hurt 
to have some of the Teutonic rules here, though a 
full dose of them would cause a revolution. 

In Berlin, if you happen to throw a piece of 
paper out of the window, the eagle eye of 
some policeman ever on the alert will immediately 
detect it. Your front door bell will ring and forth- 
with you may be marched to the police station. A 
witty California girl wrote in answer to the letter of 
her mother who feared her daughter would get lost 
in some of the towns around Berlin, "Your anxiety 
is needless, for my name, description and address is 
upon every police book in Berlin." 



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-THE WASP - 




MRS. LAWRENCE SCOTT 

Young Mr. Loring Pickering, who took his initial 
dip into journalism this week when he entered as 
a "cub" on the local staff of the Bulletin in order 
to acquaint himself with the details of reporting 
and editing "from the ground up," is the son of the 
late Loring Pickering, editor and part proprietor of 
the Call for many years. Mr. Pickering was in his 
day, one of the best known journalists in California 
and one of the most successful.