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Full text of "Wastewater engineering and management plan for Boston harbor - eastern Massachusetts metropolitan area emma study, technical data volume 14: public involvement"

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: WASTEWATER ENGINEERING 

AND MANAGEMENT PLAN 

FOR 

BOSTON HARBOR - EASTERN MASSACHUSETTS METROPOLITAN AREA 

EMMA STUDY 

TECHNICAL DATA VOL. 14 
PUBLIC INVOLVEMENT 




OCTOBER 1975 



WASTEWATER ENGINEERING 

AND MANAGEMENT PLAN 

FOR 

Boston Harbor - Eastern Massachusetts Metropolitan Area 

EMMA STUDY 

INDEX TO REPORT VOLUMES 



SUMMARY REPORT 

MAIN REPORT 

Technical Data Volumes 

1. Planning Criteria 

2. Engineering Criteria 

3. Industrial Process Wastewater Analysis and Regulation 
3A. Study of Certain Industrial Wastes 

3B. Study of Wastes from Large Industries 
k. Water Oriented Wastewater Utilization Concepts. 

5. Land Oriented Wastewater Utilization Concepts 

6. Formulation of Wastewater Utilization Plan 

7. Combined Sewer Overflow Regulation 

8. Urban Stormwater Management 

8A. Appendix to Urban Stormwater Management 

9. MDC Interceptor and Pumping Station Analysis and 
Improvements 

10. Deer Island Wastewater Treatment Plant Analysis. and 
Improvements 

11. Nut Island Wastewater Treatment Plant Analysis and 
Improvements 

12. Financing and Management 

13. Impact Analysis and Evaluation 
13A. Biological Impact Analysis 
13B. Socio-economic Impact Analysis 
13C. Hygienic Impact Analysis 

13D. Visual, Cultural and Design Impact Analysis 
Ik. Public Involvement 

15. Recommended Plan and Implementation Program 

16. Agency Reviews 



TECHNICAL DATA 



VOLUME Ik 



PUBLIC INVOLVEMENT 



Prepared by 

U.S. Army Engineer Division 

New England 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 
in 2013 



http://archive.org/details/wastewaterengine14mass 



PUBLIC , INVOLVEMENT PROGRAM 
TABLE OF CONTENTS 

Page 

A. PLANNING WITH THE CITIZEN 1 

B. STRATEGY FOR PUBLIC INVOLVEMENT 1 

1 # Overview of the Eastern Massachusetts Metro- 
politan Area 1 

a. Issues 1 

b. Perspectives 3 

(1) Metropolitan District Commission 3 

(2) Metropolitan Area Planning Council U 

(3) Corps of Engineers 5 
(U) Other Agencies 5 
(5) Citizens' Committee 6 

2. Components 6 

a. Committees 6 

(1) Technical Subcommittee 6 

(2) Citizens' Advisory Committee 7 

b. Puolic Meetings 7 

c. Briefings and Workshops 9 

d. Informal Contacts 11 

e. Media 11 

f . Written Materials 11 

C. CHRONOLOGICAL RECORD OF EVENTS AND RELATION TO PLAN 
FORMULATION 13 

D. PARTICIPANTS' VIEW OF PROGRAM 25 

1. Citizens' Committee 25 

2. Letters 33 

3. Newspaper Clippings 67 
k. Written Statements Received at the Final Meetings 167 



A. PLANNING WITH THE CITIZEN 

Planning means being ready for the future. When a planner tests 
his assumptions and findings on the people who will be affected if his 
work is implemented, chances are that the results will be technically 
feasible as well as socially and politically acceptable. Then the 
planner can show that he is committed to open planning. 

The process of public involvement in planning is still evolving. 
It is not enough merely to make the many segments of the public aware 
of an ongoing planning effort or to ask them to accept decisions that 
have been or are about to be made. It is essential that the public 
have a continuing opportunity to help shape those decisions in order 
to develop plans that are suited for local needs. Public support of 
such plans is certain to help ensure implementation. 

This is a report about open planning in the Boston Harbor-Eastern 
Massachusetts Metropolitan Area Wastewater Management Study. It shows 
how the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, Environmental Protection Agency, 
Corps of Engineers, Metropolitan Area Planning Council, and a Citizens' 
Committee have worked together in a wastewater management study. It 
shows how they have encouraged public response to planning data and 
assumptions as well as five different concepts for wastewater manage- 
ment. 

This report, however, is not complete. The process of open planning 
requires a continuing dialogue between planner and public, and further 
public meetings are expected. It is also beyond the scope of this 
report to record all informal contacts made during the course of the 
study. 

B. STRATEGY FOR PUBLIC INVOLVEMENT 

1. Overview of the Eastern Massachusetts Metropolitan Area 

a. Background and Issues 

Traditional planning has focused on engineering, the 
environment and economics, then — late in the process — turned to 
social and political feasibility. Open planning calls for grappling 
with all impacts of a project through public involvement early, then 
often in a planning effort. 

Preparations for public involvement began after the Common- 
wealth of Massachusetts and New England Division of the Corps of 
Engineers signed an agreement to undertake a joint wastewater manage- 
ment study in the Merrimack River Basin in Massachusetts with extension 
to the metropolitan area of Eastern Massachusetts. A technical sub- 
committee consisting of representatives of the Massachusetts Division 
of Water Pollution Control, Metropolitan District Commission, Office 



of State Planning, the Corps of Engineers, the Environmental Protection 
Agency and the Metropolitan Area Planning Council was formed, and one 
of its tasks was to undertake a public involvement program. After the 
start of the study, a Citizens' Advisory Committee and the Department of 
Public Health were added to the subcommittee. 

This Technical Subcommittee has brought together and inte- 
grated, insofar as possible, the talents of professional people from a 
variety of disciplines. It has met about once a month and its individual 
members have met more frequently to stay abreast of study progress. 

Defining the geographic limits of the Eastern Massachusetts 
Metropolitan Area presented a challenge in itself. For purposes of the 
study, it was defined as the 109 cities. and towns within a 30-mile 
radius of the City of Boston. Ninety-nine of the communities are mem- 
bers of the Metropolitan Area Planning Council, while k3 are also ser- 
ved by the Metropolitan Sewerage District as part of the Metropolitan 
District Commission. 

The number of once rural communities that have established 
social and economic ties to Boston has been increasing steadily since 
World War II. A good part of this growth was spurred on by the con- 
struction of Route 128 around the city and the subsequent location of 
aerospace-oriented electronics firms along the highway, making it 
famous as the Golden Belt. Suburban growth was also caused by the 
desire to leave the city for suburbia that accompanied post-war pros- 
perity as well as the attractiveness and convenience to industry of 
undeveloped areas in close proximity to a major transportation network. 

Although the decline of the U.S. space program had a harsh 
impact on the electronics industry and consequently on the suburban 
residents who worked for these firms, the growth is far from over. 
Between i960 and 1970, the population of the outer suburbs expanded hk 
per cent.- This population is expected to grow another 92 per cent by 
the year 2000 when it is expected to total 1,321,300. This figure 
offers quite a contrast to the i960 population of 558,000. 

Growth was not limited to the outer suburbs between i960 
and 1970.' The inner suburbs grew eight per cent in the same period to 
reach a total population of 1,368,^-00. Their population is projected 
to swell another 20 per cent by the year 2000 when l^lUjO^X) are ex- 
pected to be living in the inner suburbs. 

Suburban growth coincided with population declines in the 
core area which lost six per cent of its 1,031,600 population in i960 
by 1970. The population of the core area is projected to shrink another 
eight per cent by 2000 when it is expected to total 870,^00. 

The shift of population into previously undeveloped areas 
means an increasing demand for municipal services such as schools, roads 






and police and fire protection. All this is reflected in various state 
and local taxes and, most important, in the local property tax. Neither 
has been decreasing, and this is a period of unemployment and inflation. 
For example, the unemployment rate in the Boston Standard Metropolitan 
Statistical Area (SMSA) in June 197^ was 8.8 per cent as compared to 
7.9 per cent in June 1973. The unemployment rate for the state was 
9.0 per cent in June 197^ while it was 7»k per cent in June 1973. 
Nationally those percentages were 5.8 and 5«^> respectively. 

The shift in population also means that sewerage will be 
needed. Development has taken place in and continues to be concentrated 
in areas with soils not suited for on-lot sewage disposal systems such 
as septic tanks. The result is the creation of potential health hazards 
through the contamination of ground and surface waters. 

Other sources of pollution, of course, are industrial wastes 
and stormwater runoff, both of which intensify as suburban areas 
approach the density of urban areas. A severe problem is the overflows 
from combined sewers that collect both municipal sewage and stormwater 
runoff. 

Exclusive of lakes and ponds, major waterways and their 
hydrologic basins are Boston Harbor, Charles River, Sudbury, Assabet 
and Concord Rivers (the SUASCO Basin), Ipswich River, Mystic River, 
Neponset River, Shawsheen River and South Coastal Streams. Growth has 
concentrated pollutants in these waterways, thus impairing their natural 
ability of self -purification. Wastewater treatment facilities, however, 
can condense the natural self -purification process. 

b. Perspectives 

(l) Metropolitan District Commission 

The Massachusetts legislature established the Metro- 
politan Sewerage District (MSD) in 1889 upon the recommendation of the 
State Board of Health. The basis for the recommendation was the expan- 
sion of local sewerage which was discharging raw wastes into the Charles, 
Mystic and Neponset Rivers, hence into Boston Harbor. The original 
system of MSD sewers was put into operation in 1895. 

Today, the MSD has 1+3 member cities and towns with an 
area of about UOO square miles and a 1970 population of about two 
million people. Each municipality maintains its own sewer system sub- 
ject to the regulations of the MSD. MSD facilities include two pri- 
mary treatment plants that are operating at their 350 million gallon per 
day capacity, approximately 225 miles of trunk sewers with at least 
1,800 connections for 5>000 miles of local sewers and 11 pumping sta- 
tions with a capacity of 1,500 million gallons per day. There is also 
a new stormwater treatment station on the Charles River in Cambridge. 



The MSD comes under the administration of the 
Metropolitan District Commission, which is a department of the Common- 
wealth under the Executive Office of Environmental Affairs. The 
commission is composed of a commissioner and four associate commissioners, 
all of whom are appointed by the governor. They have the administrative 
authority to carry out the operations and policy delineated by the 
legislature. The financial operations of the MDC are like those of 
other state departments, except that member cities and towns reimburse 
all its expenditures. 

In July 1972, the Commonwealth signed an agreement 
with the Environmental Protection Agency to provide a minimum of secon- 
dary treatment at the Deer and Nut Island facilities and to eliminate 
the discharge of sludge into Boston Harbor. Other aspects of the 
agreement were that a comprehensive waste management study for the 
metropolitan area by undertaken, that alternative technologies be 
considered and that wastewater reclamation for such purposes as main- 
tenance of low flows in streams throughout the metropolitan area be 
considered. 

When the technical subcommittee on Boston Harbor was 
founded, the MDC agreed that public involvement was an important 
component of the planning process. Both the commissioner and the 
environmental planning staff have contributed to and taken part in 
the conduct of the public involvement program. 

(2) Metropolitan Area Planning Council 

As a regional planning agency, the Metropolitan Area 
Planning Council (MAPC) is a voluntary association of 99 cities and 
towns with a statutory basis in the provisions of Chapter UOB of the 
Massachusetts General Laws. MAPC functions as an advisory body in 
comprehensive planning for its member communities; it is not a govern- 
mental body and it has no authority to ensure compliance with its 
regional plans. MAPC has prepared and maintains a Regional Sewerage 
Plan that satisfies a requirement for a certain federal funding for its 
own operations and ensures grant eligibility for its member communities. 

MAPC, like other regional planning. agencies, derives 
its representativeness from officials of each community who sit on its 
governing body. Its funding comes from four major sources: assess- 
ments upon individual member communities, HUD 701 matching grants, 
contracts with federal and state agencies, and limited general state 
assistance. 

For its participation in the study, MAPC has been 
awarded two contracts. The first was to assist the MDC in the genera- 
tion of planning data and the second was to develop and carry out a 
public involvement program for the study. The source of funding for 






public involvement was the Corps of Engineers. Until December 197*+ > 
MAPC staff carried out most of the functions of coordinating all 
public involvement activities. Then, because of the Council's own 
expanded work program and the extension of the study beyond its anti- 
cipated original completion date, they were forced to diminish their 
role. They did, however, continue to participate in public involvement 
activities throughout the remainder of the study. 

(3) Corps of Engineers 

The Corps of Engineers was directed to recommend 
improvements in wastewater management in the Merrimack River Basin in 
Massachusetts as well as the Metropolitan Area of Eastern Massachusetts 
by congressional resolutions in the spring of 1972 through joint 
planning with the Commonwealth and in consultation with the Environ- 
mental Protection Agency. When the Corps of Engineers and the Common- 
wealth of Massachusetts signed an agreement to undertake a joint study 
in November 1972, it was agreed that public involvement in plan 
development would be sought through an open planning process. Guidelines 
for the process are contained in "Open Planning/The Merrimack," 
September 1971? a report prepared for the Corps of Engineers by the 
New England Natural Resources Center. 

The Corps of Engineers has provided funding and other 
support for public involvement. Its wastewater management planning 
staff have been involved in preparing for and carrying out the effort. 
Their role became increasingly active in December 197^. Along with 
the citizens' committee, they took the lead in organizing public 
meetings, workshops for local officials and other meetings with special 
interest groups. They also began publishing an information bulletin 
which helped expand the mailing list and encourage citizen response 
to the planning effort. 

{k) Other Agencies 

Other state agencies serving on the technical sub- 
committee have been the Office of State Planning, the Division of 
Water Pollution Control and the Department of Public Health. These 
agencies have contact with the public in their regular functions. 
Their staff have both subscribed to and contributed to the public 
involvement program. 

EPA has been the other federal agency on the technical 
subcommittee. The Federal Water Pollution Control Act Amendments of 
1972, Public Law 92-500, as administered by EPA, stipulate that public 
involvement be an intrinsic element in wastewater management planning. 
EPA staff have taken part in public involvement efforts. 



(5) Citizens ' Committee 

The citizens' committee has represented a sampling of 
different interests of residents of the metropolitan area. Its 
members have come from different parts of the area and represented 
environmental, academic, industrial, and commercial interests. They 
have attended technical subcommittee meetings. Their function, as 
defined by the technical subcommittee, was initially to preview and 
evaluate the public involvement program, then make recommendations on 
improving the program. As the study progressed the committee members 
became involved in the full range of issues confronting the Technical 
Subcommittee. 

2. Components 

a. Committees 

(1) Technical Subcommittee on Boston Harbor 

There was a forerunner to the Technical Sub- 
committee on Boston Harbor. The Boston Harbor Water Quality Management 
Coordinating Committee, as it was know, was sponsored by the New 
England River Basins Commission. It was formed about two years before 
the technical subcommittee and its function was to ensure coordination 
among the agencies which held responsibilities for planning or under- 
taking water pollution abatement in Boston Harbor. The coordinating 
committee disbanded in June 1973? its functions having been assumed 
by the technical subcommittee. 

Perhaps the technical subcommittee met officially 
for the first time in September 1972 after being organized upon the 
suggestion of Dr. Charles H.W, Foster, Secretary of Environmental 
Affairs for the Commonwealth of Massachusetts. The organization was 
developed about two months before the Corps of Engineers and Common- 
wealth signed an agreement to undertake a joint wastewater management 
study. Agencies represented on the subcommittee included the Metro- 
politan District Commission as chairman, the Resource Management Policy 
Council (now the Office of State Planning), the Division of Water 
Pollution Control, the Metropolitan Area Planning Council, the 
Environmental Protection Agency and the Corps of Engineers. The 
Department of Public Health joined the group in July 197^. 

The technical subcommittee has been responsible 
for the conduct of the study with the various tasks to be accomplished 
divided among the agencies. The MDC has been the lead agency; the 
efforts of the Corps of Engineers and other agencies have been to 
supplement the work of the MDC. The subcommittee has striven to work 
by consensus. It has reported to the State Technical Committee which 
in turn has reported to the State Policy Committee, then the Governor. 



The Corps of Engineers has been on the organization charts of these 
committees. All members of the subcommittee have taken part in the 
meetings to encourage public involvement and contributed to the 
strategy for public involvements. 

(2) Citizens' Committee 

The technical subcommittee agreed in September 
1973 to the formation to a citizens committee. Its members were to 
come from academic, commercial, environmental, industrial, legislative 
and other fields, and their purpose was to help the technical subcommittee 
in its public involvement program, and to make recommendations on how 
to improve it. The members were welcome to attend technical subcom- 
mittee meetings, but they were asked not to report differences of 
opinion at these meetings to the media. 

The citizens ' committee has been a sounding board 
for the engineering concepts developed by the study and for the public 
presentations of the study. Its members have taken advantage of the 
opportunity to review and comment upon engineering, institutional and 
impact assessments reports as they have become available. Their efforts 
to encourage public response came to the fore in late 197^- and early 
1975 prior to and during the recommendation of wastewater treatment 
system for the cities and towns in or contiguous to the Metropolitan 
Sewerage District. Speaking both as a committee and as individuals, 
they took part in the deliberations that led to the study's recommen- 
dations. They suggested, and helped organize workshops for public 
officials in those communities which were potentially most affected 
by the recommendations of the Technical Subcommittee. They also 
encouraged local residents to attend public meetings. 

At the fourth series of public meetings, held in 
late May and early June 1975, and the final series, held in September 
and October 1975 representatives of the Citizens' Advisory Committee 
served as program moderators. 

b. Public Meetings 

Five series of public meetings have been an integral 
part of the public involvement program of the study. The meetings 
have been held in locations that were as easily accessible as possible 
throughout the 109 community study area. All members of the technical 
subcommittee have taken part in the meetings, and the citizens' 
advisory committee has reviewed the presentations. 

The first set of six meetings was held in November 
and December 1973 • The background of the study, study goals and 
objectives, planning assumptions and available data such as population 
projections were presented. Questions focused on why sewerage was or 
would be needed as well as what land use and other controls could pre- 
vent the inevitability of sewerage. A notice of the meetings was sent 



to about 2,500 agencies, organizations and individuals. A press 
release and meeting notice were also sent to the media. One hundred 
forty-eight people attended the meetings. 

The second set of six meetings was held in May 197*+ 
after the development of the five engineering concepts (four water- 
oriented concepts and one land application concept) and the preliminary 
impact assessments. Much of the interest focused on land application, 
and few questions were asked about the water-oriented concepts. No 
adverse reaction to land application was heard until after the public 
meetings were complete, and the Corps of Engineers, together with the 
Southeastern Regional Planning and Economic Development District, held 
a meeting with the communities that would be hosts to the land appli- 
cation systems. A press briefing was held before the meetings began, 
press releases were mailed and about 2,500 meeting notices were sent 
out. One hundred thirty -one attended the meetings. 

The number of meetings was reduced to four for the 
third set, and they were held in the communities near proposed treat- 
ment facility sites. The meetings were scheduled in January 1975, 
about a month after the technical subcommittee had recommended treat- 
ment systems. Perhaps the jump in attendance to 21^ people can be 
attributed to three factors: definitive treatment systems were recom- 
mended, extensive individual contacts were made with local officials to 
ensure awareness of the meetings and informal briefings with public 
works directors, city and town engineers and other officials were held 
prior to the meetings both to offer information and gain pre-meeting 
publicity. 

The fourth round of public meetings was held in late 
May and early June 1975 in six study area communities. At these 
meetings, consultants to the wastewater study presented a recommended 
construction staging program, including alternative measures to remedy 
the problem of combined sewer overflows. They also discussed organiza- 
tional alternatives for the Metropolitan Sewerage District and several 
possible bases for the apportionment of the operating costs of waste- 
water facilities among the member municipalities. 

The meetings were attended by 273 people. 190 attended 
a single meeting held in Quincy. This meeting was acrimonious, in 
part, because of the circulation of rumors that homes would be taken 
to accommodate the recommended upgrading of the primary facilities at 
Nut Island. It was feared that this construction project would greatly 
disrupt the neighborhood bordering the Nut Island facility. Those 
who participated in the meeting were also virtually unanimous in 
opposition to any filling of Quincy Bay for the expansion of the 
treatment plant facilities to secondary treatment. 

There was a suggestion that sewage treatment be dis- 
continued at Nut Island and be moved to Peddock's Island. This pro- 
posal is currently under investigation. 



Further opposition to the study recommendations 
surfaced at the Needham meeting. In this case also, an inaccurate 
report had appeared. One of the local newspapers had reported that 
the site for a middle- Charles River treatment plant had definitely 
been selected. Consequently, there were many questions about the 
reported site, about the site selection process, and about the necessity 
and environmental impact of the recommended satellite plant. 

Those in attendance at the other meetings seemed 
generally to concur with the study recommendations. 

The fifth and final set of public meetings was held 
in late September and early October 1975 in four study area communities. 
At there meetings the modifications to the construction schedule that 
resulted from discussions with the regulatory agencies were presented. 
At the same time the procedures leading to implementations were dis- 
cussed. The recommended organization to manage the Metropolitan 
Sewer District (MSD) was presented. The final item presented was the 
results of the cost allocation study. The resultant financial impacts 
on each of the k3 communities in the MSD were presented and discussed. 

A total of 327 people attended the meetings. Of this 
total 90 attended the Wellesley meeting and 200 attended the Quincy 
meeting. The Wellesley meeting focused intently on the recommended 
Mid-Charles Advanced Waste Treatment Facility. Concerns were voiced 
relative to the location of the regional facility, the effect on the 
quality of the Charles River, and why the Mid-Charles was chosen as 
the site. The attendees at the Quincy meeting were concerned with 
present operations at the Nut Island primary treatment pland and the 
recommendations for upgrading and expansion of the primary plant and 
the extension to secondary treatment. Considerable opporition was 
voiced to filling about 26 acres of Quincy Bay to create a land area 
for the secondary treatment plant. A view was also voiced by inhabitants 
of the Quincy area that the upstream communities should treat their 
own sewage and not send wastewater to the Nut Island plant for treat- 
ment. 

c. Briefings and Workshops 

Briefings are expected to do little more than what 
their name suggests: brief and inform people. Public response to 
specific proposals may not be forthcoming. Before the second set up 
public meetings, a media briefing by the technical subcommittee was 
arranged by MAPC. Its purpose was to ask the print and broadcast 
media to publicize the study and encourage study area residents to 
attend the meetings. About 20 reporters attended, and the result was 
extensive one-time-only coverage about the meetings. 



Workshops on the other hand, are expected to generate 
a continuing dialogue between agency officials and residents. The 
technical subcommittee has offered to hold workshops upon request to 
the MDC. The citizens' committee has taken the initiative to sponsor 
aid run two workshops, one on land application and another on both 
land application and the MDC sewer connections limitations in the 
Framingham-Natick area. About 30 to kO people attended each workshop. 

The Corps of Engineers has combined the briefing- 
workshop format in meetings with cities and towns outside the 109 
community study area that would be hosts to land application systems. 
One of these meetings was sponsored by the Southeastern Regional 
Planning and Economic Development District, and about 35 people attended, 

Prior to the recommendation of treatment systems in 
December 197^+, two briefing-workshops were held for officials and 
residents of communities west of Boston where a decision about treat- 
ment systems mattered most. Then, in January 1975, after the recom- 
mendations were made and needed to be tested for public response, 
briefings for public works directors, city and town engineers and other 
officials were held in the communities directly affected by the 
systems. These briefings served many purposes; they gave opportunity 
to comment on the recommendations and provided publicity for the public 
meetings which followed. 

Subsequent to the public meetings, citizens' committee 
members sponsored a workshop to debate again the merits of a treatment 
system on the Sudbury River rather than on the Charles River where 
it was recommended. The net result of all workshops, however, was 
support for all systems recommended by the technical subcommittee. 

A second series of briefings for public officials was 
held in May 1975? prior to the public meetings, which began at the end 
of the month. Town engineers, public works directors, and others who 
pariticpated were encouraged to ask questions and to comment on the 
various study recommendations and proposals. In addition, a presenta- 
tion on the study's progress was made a luncheon meeting of the 
Associated Industries of Massachusetts. 

Prior to the final public meetings, a series of three 
public officials briefings were held in September 1975. The technical 
subcommittee's recommendations were reviewed along with the modifica- 
tions to the construction schedule and the cost allocation study. In 
mid-October 1975 a presentatL on which focused primarily on cost allo- 
cation and industrial cost recovery was made to a joint meeting of 
the environmental committees of the Associated Industries of Massachu- 
setts and the Greater Boston Chamber of Commerce. 



10 



d. Informal Contacts 

Perhaps the best way for agency officials to stay in 
touch with local sentiments lies in continuing informal contacts with 
people who make decisions about or are affected by water management 
issues. For example, the Corps of Engineers learned a great deal about 
how unpopular the land application concept was in host areas by 
staying in touch with individuals who stepped up to speak for their 
communities. All agency officials on the technical subcommittee have, 
of course, encouraged people to contact them during the public meetings. 

During the weeks preceding and following the recommen- 
dation of treatment systems, the Corps of Engineers staff stepped up 
personal contacts with local officials to be certain that they were 
abreast of study progress and to encourage attendance at upcoming 
briefings and public meetings. 

The process of contacting local officials on an indivi- 
dual basis was continued prior to the meetings in May. These personal 
contacts along with the briefings facilitate dialogue between municipal 
officials and those who are overseeing the EMMA. Wastewater Management 
Study . 

e. Media 

The mailing list for the study contains the names of 
approximately 200 newspapers, trade magazines and television and radio 
stations in the metropolitan area. Press releases and a media briefing 
have made up the effort to obtain coverage of the study. The purpose 
of coverage has been two-fold; first, to disseminate information, and 
second, to encourage people to attend the meetings. Individual contacts 
with reporters have also helped spread word about the study. Members 
of the citizens' advisory committee have suggested that "letters to 
the editor'* be written, that increased information be sent to the 
widely-read weekly newspapers and that newspaper advertisements be 
taken out. 

f . Written Materials 

The variety of different aspects and materials about 
the study made it imperative that handouts and information packets be 
prepared to give the public an opportunity to digest the different 
engineering concepts and impact assessment of the concepts before and 
after public meetings. 

At the outset of the study, the MDC sent a summary of 
study purposes to 91 municipalities and other agencies. Mailings have 
been sent to about 2,500 agencies, organizations and individuals prior 
to public meetings. A postcard was enclosed in the mailing for the 



11 



second set of meetings. If it was returned, an information packet was 
sent out to provide people with the opportunity to come to meetings pre- 
pared to discuss the concepts. This information packet, of course, was 
available at the public meetings . 

Prior to the recommendation of treatment systems, the tech- 
nical subcommittee issued a progress report to all people on the mailing 
list. This report contained all the impacts to be considered in the 
recommendations as well as the relative importance of each impact. 
Response to the report was requested before the date on which the recom- 
mendations were to be made. A description of the recommended systems 
was included in the notice for the public meetings which followed, and 
a summary handout of study status was available at the public meetings. 

An Information Bulletin was initiated in February 1975. The 
first issue contained a wrap-up of study progress and schedules, a 
description of the recommended systems, highlights of questions and 
answers asked at the public meetings and invitation for readers to con- 
tribute to subsequent issues. Although few readers took advantage of 
the opportunity to see their thoughts in print, several hundred asked 
to be added to the mailing list or to have their address updated. 

A second and third Information Bulletin were sent out be- 
fore and after the public meetings of late May and early June. The 
May Bulletin provided a capsule of issues to be discussed at the 
meetings; these were the construction-staging program, and alternative 
institutional and financial arrangements. The June Bulletin, issued 
after the meetings, included a number of the questions raised at the 
meeting with answers. This issue also gave sources for further infor- 
mation on the study. 

A final Information Bulletin was sent out in early Septem- 
ber. This issue summoned all of the Technical Subcommittee's recom- 
mendations and the modifications to the construction schedule. 

At the meetings themselves, a more detailed information 
packet was available to participants. 



12 



C. CHRONOLOGY OF EVENTS 

Date Event Attendance 

3/1U/72 The Committee on Public Works of the U.S. 

Senate adopts a resolution directing the Corps 
of Engineers, together with the Commonwealth 
of Massachusetts, to recommend improvements 
in wastewater management and alternatives 
thereto in the Merrimack River Basin in Massa- 
chusetts and the metropolitan area of Eastern 
Massachusetts . 

5/2U/72 The Environmental Protection Agency and the 
Commonwealth of Massachusetts agree that the 
Metropolitan District Commission will provide 
a minimum of secondary treatment at its Deer 
Island and Nut Island wastewater treatment 
facilities, undertake a waste management study 
of the metropolitan Boston region and eliminate 
the ocean disposal of sludge from its treatment 
facilities. 

6/1 V72 The Committee on Public Works of the U.S. House 
of Representatives adopts a resolution directing 
the Corps of Engineers , together with the Common- 
wealth of Massachusetts, to recommend improve- 
ments in wastewater management and alternatives 
thereto in the Merrimack River Basin in Massa- 
chusetts and the metropolitan area of Eastern 
Massachusetts . 

9/25/72 Technical Subcommittee Meeting on Boston Harbor 11 
in Boston. 

(This is perhaps the first official meeting of 
the technical subcommittee. It was formed at 
the request of Charles H.W. Foster, Executive 
Secretary of the Environmental Affairs, who 
also asked that the MDC expand its wastewater 
management study to the metropolitan area of 
Eastern Massachusetts. Subcommittee members 
had been meeting informally and as part of the 
Boston Harbor Water Quality Management Coordin- 
ating Group under the sponsorship of the New 
England River Basins Commission. The MDC be- 
came chairman of the technical subcommittee. 
Other members came from the Division of Water 
Pollution Control, Office of State Planning, 
Metropolitan Area Planning Council, Corps of 
Engineers and Environmental Protection Agency. 



13 



Date 



Event 



Attendance 



The Department of Public Health joined the 
subcommittee in June 197*+. During the 
months that followed, the technical sub- 
committee studied how the study should 
proceed and prepared scopes of work. It 
was eventually decided that the Corps of 
Engineers would supplement the efforts of 
the MDC, with work in public involvement, 
an industrial wastes survey, land appli- 
cation, an environmental impact statement, 
drainage and urban runoff). 

10/12/72 Technical Subcommittee Meeting on Boston 
Harbor in Boston 

10/l8/72 Technical Subcommittee Meeting on Boston 
Harbor in Boston 

10/31/72 Technical Subcommittee Meeting on Boston 
Harbor in Boston 

H/7/72 Technical Subcommittee Meeting on Boston 
Harbor in Boston 

H/13/72 Boston Harbor Water Quality Management 
Coordinating Group in Boston 

H/21/72 Technical Subcommittee Meeting on Boston 
Harbor in Boston 

11/30/72 Forum, Water Quality of Boston Harbor in 
12/1/72 Waltham 

12/18/72 Boston Harbor Water Quality Management 
Coordinating Group in Boston 

12/1U/72 Technical Subcommittee Meeting on Boston 
Harbor in Boston 

12/29/72 Technical Subcommittee Meeting on Boston 
Harbor in Boston 

l/lU/73 Boston Harbor Water Quality Management 
Coordinating Group in Boston 

1/29/73 Technical Subcommittee Meeting on Boston 
Harbor in Boston 



11 



17 



10 



13 



10 

i+0 

9 

10 
8 

9 
Ik 



Ik 



Date 



Event 



Attendance 









2/26/73 Boston Harbor Water Quality Management 6 

Coordinating Group in Boston 

3/19/73 Technical Subcommittee Meeting on Boston 20 
Harbor in Boston 

3/21/73 Boston Harbor Water Quality Management 9 

Coordinating Group in Boston 

3/30/73 Technical Subcommittee Meeting on Boston Ik 
Harbor in Boston 

V2/73 M°C Commissioner John Sears forwarded a 

letter to municipal officials of 91 cities 
and towns and interested agencies announcing 
the Boston Harbor -Eastern Massachusetts Metro- 
politan Area Wastewater Management Study 

U/17/73 Technical Subcommittee Meeting on Boston 12 
Harbor in Boston 

6/19/73 Boston Harbor Water Quality Management 6 

Coordinating Group in Boston 
(This group disbanded at this meeting; its 
functions having been assumed by the tech- 
nical subcommittee) 

7/5/73 Technical Subcommittee Meeting on Boston 10 
Harbor in Boston 

7/12/73 Technical Subcommittee Meeting on Boston 22 
Harbor in Boston 

9/21/73 Technical Subcommittee Meeting on Boston 16 
Harbor in Boston 

(The technical subcommittee agreed to form 
a citizens' committee at this meeting). 

10/12/73 Technical Subcommittee Meeting on Boston 18 
Harbor in Boston 

(The technical subcommittee agreed upon dates 
for the first round of public meetings at this 
meeting) . 

10/17/73 The first notice of public meetings for the 
study was mailed to about 2,500 agencies, 
organizations and individuals with a known 
interest in water quality in the metropolitan 
area. 



15 



Date 



Event 



Attendance 



10/25/73 Organization Meeting of Citizens' Committee 
in Boston 

10/29/73 A press release announcing the first round 
of public meetings was mailed to the media 
(print and broadcast). 

H/5/73 Citizens' Committee in Waltham. (The pur- 
pose of this meeting was twofold: first, 
organization and second, to review pre- 
sentations for the first set of public 
meetings) . 

H/6/73 A second notice of the public meetings 
was mailed to about 2,500 agencies and 
individuals. A notice to be inserted in 
community calendars of events was also sent 
to the media. 

11/15/73 Public meetings in Acton 

(This meeting was the first of six early 
stage meetings during the fall of 1973. 
The public was told of possible changes in 
the size and makeup of the MDC, land use 
projections and population projections. 
Plans to develop different wastewater 
management concepts were also described. 
Comments were invited). 

ll/20/73 Public meeting in Danvers 

12/U/73 Public meeting in Cambridge 

12/6/73 Public meeting in Newton 

12/13/73 Public meeting in Medfield 

12/18/73 Public meeting in Norwell 

l/k/'jk Technical Subcommittee Meeting on Boston 

Harbor in Boston 

I/2U/7U Citizens' Committee in Waltham 

(it was announced that alternatives would 
not be ready until March) 

2/7/7^ Technical Subcommittee Meeting on Boston 
Harbor in Boston 



15 



20 



37 



9 
35 
h3 
Ik 
10 
21 

10 

17 



16 



Date 



Event 



Attendance 



2/26/7U Technical Subcommittee Meeting on Boston 18 
Harbor in Boston 

k/k/lk Citizens' Committee in Waltham 12 

(The alternatives were explained at this 
meeting). 

b/9/jb An announcement of mid-stage meetings was 

mailed to about 2,500 agencies, organiza- 
tions and individuals with an interest in 
water quality. The agenda was to include a 
presentation of different wastewater manage- 
ment alternatives, anticipated impacts and a 
comparison of water-oriented and land-oriented 
treatment . 

l+/l2/7*+ A news release about the upcoming meetings 
was sent to media in the metropolitan area. 

U/l6/7*+ An invitation to a press briefing about the 
study was mailed to the media 

k/2<o/lh Press briefing in Boston 25 

V29/7*+ Technical Subcommittee Meeting on Boston 10 
Harbor in Boston 

5/7/7*+ Mid-stage public meeting in Acton 15 

5/9/7*+ Mid-stage public meeting in Dan vers 12 

5/l k/jk Mid-stage public meeting in Cambridge 13 

5/l5/7*+ Mid-stage public meeting in Newton 37 

5/20/7^ Mid-stage public meeting in Medf ield 25 

5/22/7*+ Mid-stage public meeting in Norwell 29 

5/29/7*+ Meeting on land application with Easton 5 

Planning Board and Selectmen 

6/5/7*+ Meeting on land application in Taunton 30 

sponsored by Southeastern Regional Planning 
and Economic Development District 

6/l3/7*+ Technical Subcommittee Meeting on Boston 21 
Harbor in Boston 



17 



Date 



Event 



Attendance 



6/2l/7*+ Technical Subcommittee Meeting on Boston 12 
Harbor in Boston 

(Preparations to evaluate the five different 
alternative concepts for wastewater manage- 
ment began at this meeting). 

7/12/7*+ Meeting of Corps' staff with Congresswoman 12 
Margaret Heckler and representatives of 
Fall River 

8/8/7*+ Technical Subcommittee Meeting on Boston 16 
Harbor in Boston (The Corps of Engineers 
recommended that further consideration of 
the land application concept as a viable 
alternative be stopped because of unfavorable 
public response. The Corps also asked that 
this be publicized) . 

8/9/7*+ Citizens' Committee Meeting in Lincoln 7 

9/19/7*+ Citizens' Committee Workshop in Natick on *+0 
land application and the MDC sewer in 
Framingham 

9/27/7*+ Technical Subcommittee on Boston Harbor in 17 
Boston 

10/15/7*+ Citizens' Committee at Charles River Water- 10 
shed Association (CRWA) offices in Newton (The 
committee urged that the public involvement 
effort be intensified subsequent to this 
meeting) 

10/l8/7*+ Technical Subcommittee on Boston Harbor 21 

ll/7/7*+ Citizens' Committee at CRWA offices in Newton 10 

ll/l*+/7*+ Briefing for public works and other local 15 
officials in Natick (The choices offered by 
the different wastewater treatment concepts 
were outlined at this meeting) for middle 
Charles River Basin communities. 

ll/l8/7*+ Technical Subcommittee on Boston Harbor in 20 
Boston (it was agreed to distribute the 
qualitative ratings used to evaluate the 
wastewater treatment concepts and their 
impacts to all names on the mailing list) 



18 



Date 



Event 



Attendance 



II/27/7U The qualitative ratings for evaluating the 
five concepts was sent to about 2,500 
agencies and individuals. It contained a 
description of the concepts, all impacts 
to be considered and the relative impor- 
tance of each impact. (Responses were 
requested) 

12/5/7^ Briefing in Medway for residents of Upper 35 
Charles River Basin communities (The choices 
for these communities were outlined at this 
meeting) 

12/12/74 Technical Subcommittee on Boston Harbor in 30 
Boston (A moderately decentralized treatment 
system for the metropolitan area was recom- 
mended. It called for upgrading and expanding 
the two primary treatment plants in the harbor 
to secondary treatment plants and building 
advanced treatment plants along the Neponset 
River in Canton and the Charles River in 
Wellesley along with a flow augmentation along 
the Aberjona River in Woburn) 

12/13/7^ Technical Subcommittee on Boston Harbor in 6 
Waltham (A public involvement strategy for 
the remainder of the study was discussed. It 
was agreed that the Corps of Engineers would 
expand its role). 

12/20/7^ A news release describing the recommended 
treatment systems was mailed to about 200 
newspapers, radio and television stations. 

12/27/7^ Technical Subcommittee on Boston Harbor in 12 
Boston (An expanded public involvement 
program was established) • 

1/3/75 Pre-public meeting briefing for public works 30 
and other officials in 10 middle Charles River 
and Sudbury River basin communities (This 
briefing, like the two that followed, offered 
local officials a preview of the public meeting 
presentations and an informal opportunity to 
comment upon the study). 

l/lO/75 Pre-public meeting briefing for public works 25 
and other officials for five Aberjona River 
area communities in Woburn 



19 



Date 



Event 



Attendance 



1/10/75 

1/10/75 

1/15/75 

1/21/75 
1/23/75 
1/28/75 
1/29/75 



2/1 V75 



2/15/75 



3/13/75 
U/17/75 

V18/75 



Pre-public meeting briefing for public works 
and other officials in five Neponset River 
basin communities in Canton 

A news release about upcoming public meetings 
is mailed 



30 



(The recommended 



Sierra Club in Cambridge 
systems were presented) . 

Public meeting in Woburn 

Public meeting in Canton 

Public meeting in Quincy 



Public meeting in Needham (Questions asked 
at the public meetings ranged from the quality 
of the effluent to the location of the advanced 
treatment facilities. The impact on downstream 
aquifers was a frequent question. Most comments 
about the recommendations were favorable). 

Citizens * Committee meeting in Framingham 
(This meeting was requested by the South 
Middlesex Legislative Caucus and the merits 
of a Sudbury River advanced treatment plant 
instead of a Charles River plant were debated). 

The first Information Bulletin was mailed to 
about 2,500 agencies, organications and in- 
dividuals (The bulletin offered space for 
readers' comments in upcoming issues, contained 
a summary of study progress, described the recom- 
mended system and asked for revisions to the 
mailing list). 

Citizens * Committee meeting at CRWA offices in 
Newton 

Meeting at Corps of Engineers with U.S.G.S., 
Water Resources Commission and A.R. Miller 
of the CAC on river flows in the Sudbury 
River in Framingham area. 

Citizens ' Advisory Committee meeting in 
Waltham (There was discussion of the next 
round of public meetings on the wastewater 
study). 



35 

h5 
39 
80 

55 



30 



12 



20 



Date 



Event 



Attendance 



U/2U/75 Technical Subcommittee Meeting on Boston 25 
Harbor in Boston. (The following items 
were on the agenda: combined-sewer over- 
flow regulation, construction priorities, 
financial and institutional arrangements, 
and next series of public meetings). 

U/25/75 Public hearing at MDC in Boston. (The 6 

disposal of sludges from the Deer and 
Nut Island Sewage treatment plants was 
considered) . 

5/l/75 Citizens' Advisory Committee meeting in 12 
Waltham. (There was further planning for 
the upcoming series of public meetings). 

5/5/75 A notice of the public meetings scheduled 
to begin in late May on the study was sent 
out to each of about 3,000 agencies, organ- 
izations and individuals . 

5/19/75 Dry run of public meeting presentations at 15 
Waltham . 

5/20/75 Meeting for public officials from the Canton 18 
area in Canton. 

5/20/75 Meeting for public officials from the 18 

Wellesley area in Wellesley Hills . 

5/22/75 Meeting for public officials from inner 12 
core cities in Boston. (All three day- 
time meetings gave public officials a pre- 
view of the presentation of the general 
public of the status of the EMMA study) . 

5/28/75 Public meeting in Canton 28 

5/29/75 Associated Industries of Massachusetts 3U 
luncheon in Waltham. 

5/29/75 Public meeting in Quincy 178 

6/3/75 Public meeting in Lexington 12 

6/5/75 Public meeting in Needham U6 

6/10/75 Public meeting in Cambridge 19 



21 



Date 



Event 



Attendance 



6/12/75 Public meeting in Medway 

6/30/75 Citizens ' Advisory Committee meeting in 
Newton at CRWA office. (The group dis- 
cussed several items on the agenda at the 
upcoming meeting of the Technical Subcom- 
mittee, namely a preferred wastewater 
management structure and the issues raised 
by citizens who participated in the recent 
public meetings). 

7/2/75 Technical Subcommittee Meeting on Boston 
Harbor in Boston 

7/29/75 Presentation to the Mid-Charles Sewage 
Treatment Plant Study Committee in 
Wellesley 

9/5/75 Citizens' Advisory Committee Meeting at 
Waltham 

9/8/75 Information Bulletin mailed to 3000 

9/10/75 Technical Subcommittee Meeting in Boston 

9/15/75 Public Notice for final meetings mailed 
to 3000 

9/2U/75 Meeting with Quincy Conservation 
Commission 

9/29/75 Meeting with local elected officials and 
public administrators in Canton. 

9/29/75 Meeting with local elected officials and 
public administrators in Natick. 

9/30/75 Meeting with local elected officials and 
public administrators in Waltham. 

9/30/75 Public Meeting in Wellesley 

10/2/75 Public Meeting in Quincy 

10/7/75 Public Meeting in Canton 

lO/lU/75 Meeting with Industrial Interests in 
Waltham 



20 



Uo 



10 



20 



21 



19 



11 



90 

168 registered 
200 estimated 

17 
26 



22 



Date Event Attendance 

10/l 1 +/75 Public Meeting in Cambridge 20 






23 



D. PARTICIPANTS' VIEW OF PROGRAM 
1. Citizens' Committee 



25 




lelephone (617)527-2799 



r^u r-v . November 17, 1975 

Charles River Watershed Association 

Joseph L. Ignazio, Chief 

Planning Division 

U. S. Army Corps of Engineers 

424 Trapelo Road 

Waltham, Massachusetts 02154 

Dear Mr. Ignazio, 

Immediately prior to the final round of public meetings on 
the EMMA study, several members of the Citizens Advisory 
Committee (CAC) met to discuss reaction to the public 
participation program. Many if not all of our concerns 
were communicated to and resolved within the Technical 
Subcommittee (TS) during the course of our involvement 
with EMMA. We reiterate them here in the hope that future 
CACs and TSs will find the going less rocky, less muddy, 
and therefore more productive. 

The federal agencies on the Technical Subcommittee (the 
Corps of Engineers and the Environmental Protection 
Agency) seem much more comfortable with public participa- 
tion than do the state agencies involved in EMMA. State 
agencies, most notably the Metropolitan District Commis- 
sion, must overcome their fear of non-agency participation. 
Since the MDC appointed the CAC - presumably according to 
guidelines in Open Planning/The Merrimack - a greater 
trust in the motives and capabilities of the appointees 
is merited. Happily, CAC observed significant strides in 
that direction as the study progressed. 

Early in the program CAC members requested copies for all 
members of study documents being circulated for review and 
comment. Despite initial opposition this request was 
eventually granted, and another cause of CAC distress was 
eliminated. CACs are usually selected for geographic as 
well as disciplinary diversity and it is unreasonable to 
expect participants from a study area of 109 communities 
to share materials. In view of the fact that CAC had a 
vote on the Technical Subcommittee, reasonable access to 



2391 Commonwealth Avenue, Aubumdale, Massachusetts 02166. 

26 



the study materials was imperative. 

We were disturbed that the Massachusetts Department of 
Public Health was not a member of the Technical Subcommit- 
tee. Our plea for DPH participation met with some initial 
resistance. In due time the Department was assigned a 
seat but lack of participation was notable. In view of 
the fact that EMMA was to address wastewater management 
systems not limited to the sewer, the absence of the state 
agency with responsibility for the state sanitary code was 
incredible and unfortunate. It did little to assure us 
that all possible management systems would be addressed 
and it did little to assure us that our role as citizen 
advisors to the TS was a valid one. 

EMMA/CAC cautions against a dual role for any agency or 
participant in future efforts. Because the Metropolitan 
Area Planning Council was represented as the Regional 
Planning Agency for the study area, its simultaneous role 
as public involvement contractor suffered. Since a 
specialist in public participation was not made available 
to the study, the CAC had to question the ability of EMMA 
to provide a full public participation program. In point 
of fact, there was little affirmative effort toward the 
widespread and continuing two-way communication that we 
consider essential to involve the public. Press releases 
and notices of upcoming public meetings constituted the 
major outreach to the public. CAC pressed for a freer 
flow of solid digestible information, which had indeed 
been promised in the Plan of Study. In October 1974, CAC 
presented its views in a strongly-worded memorandum to the 
Technical Subcommittee, asking for new direction in the 
public involvement program. Consequently, the contracting 
arrangement was not extended and the program improved 
markedly when the Corps assumed responsibility for it. 
An excellent albeit tardy rapport with local interests 
developed when a full-time specialist was assigned to the 
role. 

CAC interpreted its role as a double one of advising on 
the translation of the study to the public and of relaying 
public (and its own) concerns to the study. Throughout 
the study we questioned the basic population projections 
on which the study was based. Throughout the study, we 
were disappointed that alternatives to the need for more 
sewerage were dismissed. Throughout the study we were 
unable to generate serious discussion of runoff -reducing 
measures such as porous pavement in considering problems 



27 



of combined sewer overflows. To the end we were advised 
to wait for the beginning of 208 planning. 

CAC contributions have not been without merit. As a 
result of persistent urging by CAC, available data on 
flows in the Sudbury River being augmented by discharge 
from a Framingham treatment plant versus increased flows 
in the Charles River from a mid-Charles treatment plant 
were consulted and incorporated in the final recommenda- 
tion for a mid-Charles plant. Another productive 
contribution of the CAC was its recommendation of a series 
of public official workshops. Once warmed up, the agency 
team was willing to go anywhere to make an informal 
presentation. 

It was indeed unfortunate that so much of what we tried 
to do in assisting the study from our citizen perspective 
was a test of endurance. "Open planning calls for grap- 
pling with all impacts of a project through public 
involvement early then often in a planning effort." (Page 
1, COE Report Volume 14) Had greater effort been made 
to assess local feelings as the EMMA study progressed, 
the mistrust of MDC motives and performance that disrupted 
meetings in Quincy and Needham (May -June 1975) could have 
been ameliorated. CAC trusts that the pattern of "decide 
now, spring it later" is headed for retirement. 

We trust that in future all public hearings will build 
into their agenda some flexibility for addressing local 
concerns. Certain issues are bound to generate contro- 
versy in certain locales. For the last round of public 
meetings CAC recommended giving audiences an opportunity 
to ask their questions (in writing or verbally) at the 
beginning of the meeting so they would have some assurance 
that after scheduled presentations their concerns would 
be de"alt with. Some variation of this approach would be 
in order routinely. 

At any public meeting, however structured and however 
well-attended by experts, questions will arise that defy 
answers at that time for one reason or another. EMMA 
public meetings frequently left questions unanswered, 
contributing little to public confidence in open planning. 
In some instances, however, questions were too detailed 
for the level of the study and could only be answered 
during final technical design stages not presently 
authorized. Every effort should be made to determine the 
answers called for, to develop the information sought, 
and to put it in the hands of those seeking it. Questions 



28 



raised at the public meetings have been circulated in 
Informational Bulletins, but not always the answers. 

We as a duly-appointed committee of citizens felt several 
quite unnecessary constraints during the study. 

CAC members were requested to respond to draft reports 
only through a single conduit to the agencies, and in one 
case response to a technical report was delayed for four 
months in transmission to the author agency. Greater 
trust would justify less rigid lines of contact among 
study participants, to the advantage of the study effort. 

Open planning, CAC feels, should extend to the media. 
CAC members were directed by the TS not to communicate 
differences among the agencies to the press. It was not 
our intent to generate contention. However, it was our 
hope that the media be advised of scheduled TS meetings, 
that they be encouraged to report on the developing study 
to their respective audiences. The prospect of media 
presence at TS meetings caused great distress to some TS 
members and no advance TS meeting notices were circulated 
to the media. CAC feels that the risk of misinterpreta- 
tion was less damaging to open planning than was a closed 
meeting schedule. 

Some changes in the selection process for CACs in the 
future might assure some improvement in their operation 
and effectiveness. For example, EMMA/CAC underwent 
several changes in composition, which added to the 
difficulty of coordination and detracted from continuity 
and coherence. We suggest that the basis for selection 
be a stated commitment to serve for the duration of the 
program with a mechanism for formal resignation or 
dismissal for the committee when inability to function 
fully is clearly indicated. We suggest that the crite- 
rion of representativeness be discarded, and suggest 
instead a core of hard-working individuals acting for the 
study region as a whole. In fact, EMMA/CAC strongly 
endorses the recommendations of Maria Eigerman for the 
Merrimack Valley program as described in "Merrimack 
Wastewater Management, Appendix VI", pp. 118 through 122. 

CAC lacked the services of clerical help, which put the 
burden of coordination of CAC activities on individual 
members of the committee without compensation. EMMA/CAC 
recommends that in the future citizen advisory committees 
be assigned the services of a secretary as needed. Re- 
sponsibility for notice of CAC meetings, coordination of 



29 



review comments, and formal response to questions raised 
would then be discharged equitably. 

CAC recommends a clear policy of funding the CAC role. 
Something analogous to compensation for job time loss for 
jury or National Guard duty might be investigated as a 
way to broaden the segment of the affected population 
able to serve with impunity. Expeditious reimbursement 
of out-of-pocket expenses is an absolute minimum require- 
ment. 

Despite the sometimes negative tone of the commentary, 
CAC members generally consider the involvement a positive 
experience. It is obvious that for many the role is not 
ended. Citizen participation can address the unresolved 
questions as further study efforts in wastewater manage- 
ment progress and as implementation of the various ele- 
ments proposed for construction enters the next planning 
and design stages. CSC members appreciate the importance 
of the study, the cooperation of fellow participants, and 
the opportunity to serve. We sincerely hope that our 
contribution is deemed commensurate with our commitment. 

Sincerely, 

Citizen Advisory Committee 
Boston Harbon - Eastern 
Massachusetts Metropolitan 
Area Wastewater Study 



30 



MEMBERS OF THE CITIZENS' ADVISORY COMMITTEE 



Original Members 



Name 



Organization 



Rita Barron 
Arthur Barnes 
Gale Haydock 
Paul Swatek 
A. Richard Miller 
William J. Reid, Jr 
John W. Pierce 
Henry Scammell 
Gerald R. Mimno 

Robert Heustis 
Joseph Magaldi 
James P. Loughlin 
Joseph Lawless 
James K. Rogers 



Charles River Watershed Association 
Norumbega Associates 
League of Women Voters 
Massachusetts Audubon Society 
Lake Cochituate Watershed Association 
Stoneham Public Works Department 
Essex County Greenbelt Association 
Henry Scammell Associates 
South Middlesex Area Chamber of 

Commerce 
Wellesley Board of Health 

Massachusetts State Labor Council 
Massachusetts Legislature 
Raytheon Company 



Final Members 



Name 



Rita Barron 
Arthur Barnes 
Catherine Donaher 
N. Bruce Hanes 
V/aldo Holcombe 
Madeleine Kolb 
A. Richard Miller 
Daniel Travers 

James K. Rogers 
Deborah V. Howard 



Organization 

Charles River Watershed Association 

Norumbega Associates 

Boston Harbor Associates 

Tufts University 

Neponset Valley Conservation Assoc. 

Sierra Club 

Lake Cochituate Watershed Association 

South Middlesex Area Chamber of 

Commerce 
Raytheon Company 
Massachusetts Audubon Society 



31 






D. 2. Letter; 






33 



75129 WASTEWATER MANAGEMENT- STATEMENT TO MDC AND ARMY ENH'R COHP. 

t3Y WHOM: NORMAN B. SAUNDERS IS A REGISTERED PROFESSIONAL ENGINEER IN 
MASSACHUSETTS. HIS WORK AS AN INSTRUCTOR IN A MICROBIOLOGY LABORATORY, 
STUDIES OF THF CINCINNATI WATERWORKS SYSTEM* AND OTHER WORK 
CULMINATED IN THE DEGREE OF CHEMICAL ENGINEER. BROUGHT UP ON RECYCLED 
OHIO RIVER WATER, HE 85 YEARS AGO MOVED INTO A TOWN WITH NO SEWERS IN 
ACTION UPON HIS BELIEE THAT ONE OE THE BIGGEST UNNECESSARY LOADS UPON 
SOCIETY IS SEWERS. 

THE SHINING EXAMPLE: THE NEW MARLBORO SEWAGE TREATMENT PLANT HAS 
NOTHING WRONG WITH ITS ADMINISTRATION. JOHN HARTLEY IS ONE OE THE 
SMARTEST MEN I'VE EVER MET. HE WILL GET EVERYTHING POSSIBLE OUT OF 
THE SYSTEM. OVER AND ABOVE THE COST OE THE SEWERS AND ON THE BASIS 
OF EACH PERSON USING IT, THE CAPITAL COST IS ABOUT A THOUSAND DOLLARS 
AND THE RUNNING COST PER YEAR ABOUT TEN DOLLARS IN WAGES AND ANOTHER 
TEN FOR POWER AND MATERIALS. THE SYSTEM REMOVES PHOSPHOROUS AND 
SOLIDS BUT RECOVERS NOTHING. NITROGEN IN THE EFFLUENT STILL CAUSES 
SOME PROBLEMS. THE DIFFICULTY IS IN THE CONCEPT. THE AEROBIC SYSTEM 
IS POWER HUNGRY AND ALSO BURNS UP THE POTENTIAL ENERGY IN THE INFLUENT. 



FOR COMPARISON: TAKE AN INDIVIDUAL SYSTEM, MINE. THE SEPTIC TANK AND 
FIELD SERVES FOUR PEOPLE AT ABOUT THE SAME CAPITAL COST PER PERSON FOR 
PLANT AS THE MARLBORO SYSTEM BUT WITH NO COST FOR SEWERS. THE TANK 
NEEDS TO BE PUMPED EVERY FEW YEARS AT ABOUT HALF THE LABOR COST FOR 
THEMARLBORO PLANT. MATERIAL COSTS ARE NIL. POWER COSTS ARE THE SAME 
BECAUSE THE ADJACENT GROUND-WATER IS CONTINUOUSLY PUMPED TO FERTILIZE 
GRASS WHICH IN TURN FERTILIZES THE VEGETABLE GARDEN IN COMPLETION OF 
THE CYCLE. THE FINAL EFFLUENT PROBABLY HAS LESS BIOLOGICAL AND 
CHEMICAL LOADING THAN EVEN NATURAL FOREST RUN-OFF. THE INDIVIDUAL 
SYSTEM IS GIVING BETTER PERFORMANCE AND AT LOWER COST THAN THE 
MUNICPAL SYSTEM. 

THE DIRECTION TO GO: FOR CITY OR INDIVIDUAL THE PROBLEM IS 

PROBABLY IN THE UNKNOWNS. WHAT STRANGE NON-DECOMPOSABLE ELEMENTS ARE 

WE INTRODUCING INTO THE SYSTEM? BORON, CADMIUM, LEAD, DDT, ABS, ETC. 

PERHAPS MARGIE STONE'S MASTERS THESIS AT TUFTS WILL HELP TELL US. IF 

TRACE ELEMENTS ARE NO PROBLEM, THE INDIVIDUAL SYSTEM IS PROBABLY BEST; 

IF THERE ARE PROBLEMS REQUIRING COMMUNITY HANDLING, SO BE IT. 

DO CONSIDER A SYSTEM WITH ONLY (1) GRIT REMOVAL, (2) SCREENING TO 

REMOVE PLASTICS, WOOD, ETC., (3, 4, 5) SUCESSIVE SETTLING TANKS, 

(6) DEWATERING TO EXTRACT THE SOLIDS, (7) COMPOSTING OF THEM, AND 

C8> A POND TO REMOVE NUTRIENTS. RUN THE TANKS ANEROBICALLY TO 

CATCH AND USE THE GASSES RELEASED. COMPOST THE SOLIDS SO THAT THEY 

CAN BE SOLD AS FERTILIZER. LET THE POND FILL IN WINTER AND THEN IN 

SPRING, SUMMER, AND FALL GROW DUCKWEED, WATER-HYACINTHS OR OTHER 

VEGETATION FOR HARVEST, COMPOSTING, AND USE AS FERTILIZER. 

FINALLY: SOME SUCH SCHEME TO RECOVER, NOT JUST REMOVE, THE FUEL 
VALUES AND NUTRIENTS SEEMS INDICATED IN OUR TIMES. 



3k 



AS 7; 




EASTON PLANNING & ZONING BOARD 

NORTH EASTON, MASS. 02336 




^x^ii 




June 5, 1974 



Mr. John Sears, Commissioner - ' 
Metropolitan District Comraission 
20 Somerset Street 
Boston, Massachusetts 



m 



Cr. 



C/5 I\>* ~ 



Reference: Boston Harbor-Eastern Massachusetts MetrSr 2 



Dear Mr. Sears: 



politan Area Wastewater Management study^ 

o — 



,'■'••/' Subject: Letter of Admonition 

'. "Waste Water Study Comments 

'"•■ ; '''""'The Town of Easton takes pride in its pursuit of ef- 
fective land use management. The Easton Planning & Zoning Board ac- 
cepts very seriously our obligation and responsibility to the public. 
Successful municipal planning and zoning does not merely occur. 
Maximizing the opportunities of man with the minimum unsought or 
detrimental consequences to the physical environment must be effec- 
tively and functionally studied and implemented to insure the safety, 
convenience, welfare and health of the public. • "" ' \ 

The Easton Planning & Zoning Board is totally appalled 
at the recent action taken by the M.D.C. pertaining, in particular, 
to the above referenced study. In this era of "inappropriate use 
of power" and "Big Brother" attitudes, the M.D.C, as evidenced in 
the foreward of said report, has failed to actually communicate with 
.the affected municipalities in Easton. 

The foreward states that the early stage public meet- 
ings were held in November of 1973 , and the mid-stage public hear- 
ings are being held May 7-22, 1974. Well, — doesn't the M.D.C. feel 
.that, it .is .appropriate to notify the municipalities and also furnish 
study information? Only through a coincidence on 22 May 74 in the 
p.m. involving a discussion regarding sewerage were we made aware of 
the mid- stage meeting on May 22, 1974, at the Town Hail in Norweil. 
Why didn't the M.D.C. notify Easton about the early stage public 
meetings?- -the mid-stage public meetings? — especially when the 
proposal intends to dump the Metropolitan area effluent into a Town 
oucside the Metropolitan area. 



35 






Area Wastewater Study '* ' ' ."*" . * 

. This Board immediately notified the surrounding af- 
fected communities* to send a delegate to said meeting. Even though 
Wednesday evening happened to be a heavily scheduled meeting of this 
Board we dispatched two members to attend the mid-stage meeting in 
Norwell . . 

. Our next query is why did the K.D.C. arrange for a 
meeting in Norwell? Not only is Norwell not affected, but also- it 
is not even in the area of the affected Towns, why wasn't mid- 
stage packet information sent to the various affected communities? 

Is this the type of management that can be expected 
?*°" c r n£n SV ^V n the iV1 - D - C - ? We note from the report thai 
> -U575 000 will be expended for the STUDY, of which $800,000 is 
tederal monies and $775,000 from the State. We, therefore fee] 
it appropriate to notify our Congresswomari Margaret Heckler and 
«?£? f enat ° r Qui 5 lan a * d stst ^ Representative John Ames of our 
displeasure regarding this matter by copy of this letter to them. 

Our displeasure was conveyed to the "Chair" at the 
public meeting. 

„,„ „ " e compliment the Corps of Engineers, and, in parti- 
ZrZl " es ! rs - °f vld Kenyon and James Callahan, who are members of 



"ZZ *rZT{ I an ? n ° Were unaware of circumstances surrounding 

;^e not i f ^tions-enough so the y volunteered to come to Easton the 
exu Wednesday evening to discuss the study with the Selectmen, 



!iS?J?? & 2° niR <J Board and other Town officials. We applaud' their 

n^sslon rP^r^ enl S htene f - Wlth the fUm the ^ Presented and candid 
liscussion regarding the application of spray irrigation. 

, °^ r displeasure in the administrative mode of oo-ra- 
i2LS2 ?- ^°r, haS ' in n ° Way ' influenced our constrictive 
evlew f°l n " ed b f l0W ' Wl ? ich Were mads as * result of our cursory 
eview of the report, supplementary information, and the 1-24 000 

^i e ^Presented at the above mentioned Easton meeting with the 
orps of Engineers. 

,-1 Reference (1): Mid-^tacro p^ony-t- i— ~,- ^ j 

he. Mansfield Area— i*- ind<eat*s t**£ -™S~- ? ? '.,??-* 33/ under 

vai - 1sMo ^ t ~~ ina*Caues cx^ciu approximately 365 acres are 
mailable for spray irrigation. 

afca lft „ M : 2 Reference (2): 1:24,000 map indicates aporoxi- 
c l* tl^l ° aSe / ° n ten f ° 0t cont °urs, and where the various 
reas— separate and remote from each other— are located 



'otlfi'd'also!"^ ^^ '^ ° ther ™**™^»* communities were not 



36 



Boston Harbor-Eastern Mass. Metro -3- June 5, 1974 

Area Wastewater Study ' ' ,• ™ 

Comments : 

.A The 1:24,000 map does not reflect the conditions exist- 
.■•/•; ing in Easton in 1974, and for that matter, not in the 
• "70' s". Many of the proposed areas have been built up 
with residential housing since the printing of the' map. 
It would be a natural '-assumption that areas conducive 
for spray irrigation, i.e., gently sloped wooded areas, 
would also be conducive to residential housing. 

;••.. .33 Other areas outlined on the proposed location map are 
. ^ n t k e planning stage for future development. 

: • # C Our overall assumption regarding .A & ,B above is — 
.,...-■ . Similar conditions must prevail in other affected com- 
,*;'<■ munities, and without "ownership" now, what assurance 
of future land acquisition for spray irrigation is 
there — especially after spending so much money for the 
study? 

. ,D Other large areas were directly in locations influenc- 
ing the Town wells of Easton, Norton, and the proposed 
Town well of Mansfield. These locations must be im - 
mediately dismissed from possible sites for spray irri- 
gation. 

.E Our next overall assumption regarding .D above is that 
) similar conditions could exist in other affected com- 
munities. 

.F There was no map or soil imformation presented reflect- 
ing prevailing ground water elevations. Recognizing 
the water table and ground water swelling that occurs 
(possibly a two to three foot fluctuation during the 
year), it is essential that the subsurface conditions 
in the proposed areas be known. Some of the proposed 
locations in Easton have a high ground water elevation 
and are not suitable to absorb any reasonable quantity 
.of discharged liquid within a specified period of time — 
intermittently or not! Plotting of subsurface ground 
water elevation is essential. 

# G * Our next overall assumption regarding ,F above is that 
; .similar conditions . could exist in other affected 
communities. •.-.::"••. 



37 



Boston Harbor-Eastern Mass. Metro -4- June 5, 1974 

Area Wastewater Study 

Comments (cont . ) : 

.H Consideration of costs with due regard to engineering 
economies to be presented in a table and graph is 
suggested. Concern regarding sizing of pipes and , 
1 lengths of runs with respect to potential discharge 

: areas should be clearly documented. A suggested form 

J for a cursory indicator is: 

ize Length Av. Cost/Lineal Foot Cost Available Area Q discharge 
fcipe Of Run In Place Under Roadway In Acres For Pro- potential/ 



posed Irrigation acre/day 



Then prepare graphs to reflect costs for various sizes 
of pipe with respect to known pipe Q and proposed Q/ 
acre/day, after which you establish runs to remote 
sites. 

.1 It is apparent that considerable study is necessary re- 
garding feasibility of remote sites taking into consid- 
eration .F above. 

.J Advantages to a community to accept spray irrigation?? 

.1 Tax benefit? 

.2 Loss of real estate revenue 

.3 Open space 

.4 Recreational areas in off season? winter? 

.5 Mosquitoes 

.6 Future increased Q demand due to increased population 

and 'lack of other new or available sites 
.7 Administrative, operating personnel and security 
personnel for safety — costs? 
- -.8 Floods and major storms--backup? 
.9 Agricultural use potential? 
.10 Future methane Cll> danger. Residual effect of 

entrapped gases. 
.11 Land conducive to spray irrigation is conducive 

to residential housing; hence, question misuse of 
. land. 

.K Considering ..J. 9 above, it appears that perhaps a "Sub- 
Study of Potential or Existing Agricultural Sites in 
Massachusetts" should be considered, thereby actually 
providing a benefit "crop fertilization", further re- 
view of the agricultural paragraph on pg. 47 of said 
report. 



38 



Area Wastewater Study -. ..„ 

Comments ( cont . ) ; 

.L Considering .J. 4, it appears that a thoroughly realistic 
approach is necessary with due respect to public health, 
uses, and time period and seasonal considerations. 

/'. „M Storm drainage structures throughout the Town have .been 
constructed based on a potential runoff resulting from. 
a twenty-five year storm. The contributory area to 
each drainage structure and drainage line which could 
be affected by the discharge of effluent combined with 
a 25-year storm should be thoroughly investigated to 
-' .' . ■' .___. insure safe conditions will prevail. 



.N The Massachusetts Dept. of Public Health's detailed 
comments regarding this proposal should be solicited 
by your Committee, as well as proper public distribution 
■ '. to affected communities of same. 

.0 What research was made or discussion had with the Old 
^ . Colony Planning Council with respect to sewerage in 
this area? O.C.P.C. has prepared a study regarding 
sewerage. At mid-stage it appears a lot more "homework" 
is essential. 

Certainly numerous other comments are forthcoming 
from those knowing about the study. Perhaps many more comments 
would be productive if the appropriate officials from affected com- 
munities have an opportunity to so comment. 

You will note that nowhere in the above comments have 
we rejected or endorse spray irrigation in Easton or anyplace else. 

Proceeding further on this study would appear to be 
merely an academic exercise without retracing some steps. We hope 
we have been helpful to at least provide some "food for thought" 
before pursuing haphazardly further stages of development. Also, 
recognizing the further expenditure of taxpayers' monies at this 
stage without some rethinking based on the above does not appear to - 
us as being appropriate. Further, a mid-stage report should, in 
our opinion, have incorporated the above typed comments. 

We look toward the future of this study with hope 
that appropriate effective, action and meaningful public concern is 
physically evident by the steps taken to insure same by the M.D.C. 

Sincerely, 

Edmund J. yicAdam, P.E., Chmn. 
CC: Selectmen, 3d. of CC: Hon. Margaret Heckler 
Health, Bd. of Hon. John Ames III 
Mansfield Planning Board Hon. John Quinlan 
Norton Planning Board Old Colony planning Counci.' 
Raynham Planning Board Mass. Dept. of Public Heel- 
Public Works, Dept. of 39 Martin Co^crovo, Chnui. « 7e> 



TOWN OF MATTAPOISETT 

MASSACHUSETTS 02739 
OFFICE OF THE SELECTMEN 





EPA 

Mr. John A.S. McGlennon JUN 1 4 1374 

U.S. Environmental Protection Agency 
2203 J.F.K. Federal Building 
Boston, Massachusetts 02203 

Dear Mr. McGlennon: 

i 

This is in reference to the Corps of Engineers' 
and Metropolitan District Commission's plans to dispose 
of effluent from secondary wastewater treatment plants 
upon land in Southeastern Massachusetts. 

Although, as the Board of Selectmen understand 
the plan, Mattapoisett is not directly affected, the Board 
feels that, as a member of the region it has a vital in- 
terest in major projects ajffecting member communities. 
Any plan to pump large quantities of sewage to South- 
eastern Massachusetts where it would be disposed of over 
large areas of land, polluting the land and possibly 
the ground water sources in the region, could and may 
have a serious detrimental affect even on this Town. 

The Board of Selectmen would like to be recorded 
as being completely opposed to this plan and would hope 
that a local solution to the Boston wastewater problem 
could be found. 

Very truly yours, 

For 
BOARD OF SELECTMEN. 

George M. Hall 
Executive Secretary 

GMH/cjp 



1+0 





m 




CMIAH r. CAHIR. CHAIRMAN 
|E»T H. FORNI 
tRY H. JOHNSON 



TOWN OF BOURNE 

BOARD OF SELECTMEN 
BOURNE, MASS. 02532 

TEL. 789-4486 OR 759-4487 



June 11, 197?; 







jUtA 



.1^' 



l7.i 



Paul fr. Keough, Director 

Fublic Affairs Division 

U. 3. Environmental Protection Agency 

J. F. X. Building 

Boston, Massachusetts 02203 

Dear Mr. Keough: 

Per a conversation that T have had with Mrs. Margaret 
Koskela, who spoke to you last Saturday night : 5 -t + he 
William Ruckelhsus affair, I am writing to you regarding 
the Waste Water Management Study thai: is being prepared 
for the Boston Harbor -Eastern Massachusetts Metropolitan 
Area bv the Metropolitan District Commission Pl^tiniti 0, 
Division. 

On May 22 Mrs. Koskela and I attended a public meeting 
at the 'Cashing Memorial Town Hall in Norwell regarding ths 
mid-stage reports and the plans for the treatment of the 
sewerage that is presently going through Deer and Nut 
treatment plants which service the Metropolitan District 
Area. At that meeting there were five alternatives 
proposed for the disposal of treated sewage. 

The one concept that interested us the most was the 
concept n fc umbe^ed five which proposed to spply waste water 
that had received secondary treatment onto land in eastern 
Massachusetts. This concept; in developing the land 
application is being developed by the U. 5. .*rmy Corps of 
Engineers which would bring together the Commonwealth of 
Massachusetts and the IT. 3. 2P«\ in a combined effort tc 
determine the technical feasibility of the land application 
method of disposing of sewage either by spray irrigation or 
rapid infiltration. . 

If concept five is adopted, it would mean a pipeline 
running from the Metropolitan District mea to the Town of 
Sandwich. It is stated in the report that in order * 
accomplish thi3 they would need 3*5^0 aores oT land in ""he 
Town of Bourne for rapid sand Infiltration and 13CQ acres 
for the spray irrigation method in the Town of ^n:,.' il . 



Ui 



Paul G. Keough 



Page 2 



June 11, 1 97^4- 



We feel that this concept Is totally undesireable , unfeasible 
both socially, economically and politically for the disposal 
of sewage in our area. 

The Town of Sourne is presently undertaking a sewage 
project of its own, and just as recently as May l[j , 19 7 ' x , 
raised and appropriated $67,000 to conduct a study that 
would allow us to finally make the necessary grant applications 
to the proper agencies under the new ID? a guidelines for funding, 
in order that we might start to clear up the existing sewage 
problems within cur own town. 

I would appreciate your locking into this matter for us, 
and ask that you kindly respond with any comments cr reactions 
you might have regarding this waste management study. 



Very truly vours , 




Jonn son, C h a i r m a n 
Sewerage ; .-/orks Building Committee 



k2 



Li V ' '— 



**K 



■v>.C/ 



7?3® 



T R. SHERMAN 
rive Secretary 



TOWN OF WAREKAM 



Board of 



Selectmen 



Wareham, Mass. 
Telephone 235-0300 



CLAIRE J. McWILLlAMS 

Clioirmon 

RAYMOND D. CARDOZA 

CARLETON D. HAMMOND. 

ANDREW J. McGRAW 

CHARLES N. DECAS 



June 11, 197li 



Mr# David Hewitt 

U.S. Corps of Amy Engineers 

li&U Trapelo ?„oad 

Ualtnari, I0ass« 

Dear l-:r« Hewitt: 



The "are? am Board of Selectmen through a meeting of the ' ou the astern ?.er:---n; 



-.t 



Planning '. : : Economic Development District held recently in Taunton arc ace; 
T .-:ith the cos s- bili.fr' of orooosed plans for the disposal of treated waste ■ 



airited 
rater 



tnrca smouo sourjiieas^em 



■Ssacnu.se cts 



jach a oropocj&l meets with inricdiatc disfavor anon** town officials o-ersd'tii 

further thorough study and engineering data in respect to its affect on 
th's environment. This board r .-7:.D:ies to " r o in record in recueatin-/ cor : pleti 
reports as to the detrimental affects of such a plan in this area of errte: 
recreational and agricultural usea.?e« 

Very truly -oars, 






30AHD OF SELECTMEN 



U3 




K>-c 



TOWN OF MANSFIELD 

MASSACHUSETTS 
PLANNING BOARD 



JUL Z 



mm 



June 26, 197** 



OFFICE AT 
SO WEST STREET 



Commissioner John Sears 
Metropolitan District Commission 
20 Somerset Street 
Boston, Massachusetts 

Re: Boston Harbor-Eastern Massachusetts Metropolitan Area Wastewater 
Management Study Concept £5. 

Dear Commissioner Sears: 

The Mansfield Planning Board has reviewed the MDC proposal concept #5 
for the spray irrigation alternative for handling wastewater from the 
Metropolitan Boston area. The Planning Board has also received a copy 
of a letter to you from the Easton Planning and Zoning Board relative 
to the same study. 

The Mansfield Planning Board is in complete agreement with the stand 
taken by the Easton Planning Board on this matter and feels that they 
have stated the local objectives very succinctly. 

In 1970 the U.S. Department of Agriculture prepared for the Town of 
Mansfield an operational soil study which classified the various types 
of soil within the community. Over 1/3 of the Town of Mansfield was 
classified as very poorly drained land, which would be unsuitable, for 
development. 

It should be noted that a large portion of Mansfield, approximately 
1300 acres, is proposed for the spray irrigation process. Representatives 
of the Mansfreld Tri-Tov/n Sewer Study Committee attended a meeting in 
Taunton with representatives of the Corps of Engineers. They were given 
the impression that the Corps was not aware of the ex i stance of the soil 
maps and that the proposal was based on information obtained by the 
Corps prior to 1570. It would seem only prudent that when the MDC is 
considering as one of its alternatives to utilize another area of the 
State for disposal of waste from greater Boston that prior to presenting 
its proposal it should investigate a 1 1_ of_ the facts relative to the area. 

It' should also be noted that the Massachusetts Department of Public Health 
has just approved a well site along the Canoe River very near the discharge 
point for the spray irrigation. The Towns of Easton and Norton also have 
wells in this general area. It isapparant that the location of these 
water resource facilities were not taken into consideration when this 
concept was established. The current environmental concern is relative 
to the approval of water quality. The intent of tne alternative is to 
dispose of the waste from the Metropolitan Boston area. This should not 
be done to the detriment of local water supplies. 



June 26, 197*+ 

Boston Harbor-Eastern Massachusetts Metropolitan Area Wastewater 

Management Study Concept #5. 

page 2 --** 



The Mansfield Planning Board would appreciate being kept Informed 
with the progress of this alternative. 

Very truly yours, 

MANSFIELD PLANNING BOARD 



&* \ Wh^ 



k 1 

Eleo J. Zaffini 
Chairman 

EJZ/pg 

cc: Mansfield Board of Selectmen 

Mansfield Board of Health 

Easton Planning Board 

Representative John Ames III 






U5 



Anthony Souza Catojo, Jr. 
51? Main Str?et 
Fairhaven, Mass. 



June £7, 1S74 









Congressman Gerry Sauces 
Washington 

Dear Coiirressnr.n Stuaas: 

The U. S. Amy Corp of Engineers is c oris 1 during a p^au 
to punp treat sd sewage Vusie iron Boston to areas in Bristol 
County including Dartmouth, Di^hton, Freetown ana Fall River, 

I am opposed to the use of Bristol County as a au: ping 
area for tie waste of Boston. 

As has been p .inten out in the news mer.ia, there as the 
possibility of contarr.1 nation of our underground water supplies 
and the potent is I probier. of a hi :: h nitrogen content of water 
iron the secondary treatment plants .-'hich ccuj_d pollute rivers 
ana acnes 'oy increasing plant and ai^ae growth,, 

I as^ you, as cur Congressman representing some arwas of 
Bristol County, to intercede with the U, S. Army Corps of Zn^ii'i 
eers ana to advise then that we do not -ant Boston's sewa e vis 
pumped into Bristol County, 



Yours truly, 



r? -.0 / H^ a 

1 J ' 

Anthony Souza C'atojo, Jr. 



U6 



COPY 



CITY OF FALL RIVER, MASSACHUSETTS 

02720 

INDUSTRIAL COMMISSION 

CITY HALL 

Office of the Area Code 617 

Executive Director 672-6969 



July 11, 197^ 



Congresswoman Margaret M. Heckler 
303 Canon House Office Building 
Washington, D.C. 

Dear Congresswoman Heckler: 

Attached is a copy of a Resolution which was unanimously adopted by the 
Fall River Development & Industrial Commission at its July 9> 197^ meeting, 
The Industrial Commission would appreciate your review and support of this 
Resolution. 

To provide some background, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers recently com- 
pleted a study on the useage of Fall River land for sewage wastewater from 
the Boston Harbor-Eastern Massachusetts Metropolitan Area, and among the 
recommendations contained in that study was useage of Fall River land 
to deposit sewage waste from Boston and 109 neighboring communities. 

In essence what was recommended by the Corps of Engineers was to use 
7,820 acres located in Fall River, Freetown and Dartmouth to dump its 
sewage. This recommendation was made as a fifth concept in the Corps 
proposal. The area would be spray irrigated and after the year 2000 the 
study reports it could be reclaimed as valuable property. 

I have already expressed displeasure to the Corps of Engineers over the 
recommendations and assured them that a well organized campaign to defeat 
their proposal will be initiated. 

A breakdown of the area shows ^+,915 acres located in Fall River, 2,365 
acres located in Dartmouth and 5^-0 acres in Freetown. The land is part of 
and abutting the Fall River-Freetown State Forest. 

Of that land, 1,770 is public land: 1,109 acres of the Watuppa Reserva- 
tion and 66l acres of the Fall River-Freetown State Forest. The remaining 
6,050 acres is privately owned. Forests are mainly mixed hard and soft 
woods with heights ranging from 20 to 60 feet. There are approximately 
100 buildings on the land. 



COPY 
U7 



COPY 

Under the Corps of Engineers proposal wastewater that has received secondary 
treatment will be deposited in this area. The two suggested methods of 
land application, spray irrigation and rapid infiltration have been used 
throughout the United States and have attracted attention in recent years 
as an alternative to the construction of advanced wastewater treatment 
facilities that discharge effluents into our nation's waterways. 

The effluent would be piped from the Boston area and the total daily flow 
of secondary effluent to be applied to land here is estimated at 155 million 
gallons,. 

Location of such a wastewater facility in the proposed area would not only 
be detrimental to the industrial and economic growth of the Greater Fall 
River area, but would create a potential health hazard to our citizenry. 

Granting that after the year 2000 the land being proposed may become 
valuable to a farm community, I must point out that Fall River is not a 
farm community, nor is she ever planning to become one. Fall River is an 
industrial community, the core city for Somerset, Swansea, Freetown, West- 
port and Tiverton and we have a responsibility to our own people to pro- 
tect our land and protest the use of it for a wastewater shed for the 
people of Boston. 

It is also felt that the Fall River area, because of its geographical 
location, the amount of annual rainfall and natural characteristics does 
not need sewage as a nutrient to its soil. 

Thank you for your support, and the Industrial Commission Office will be 
available to answer any questions pertaining to the U.S. Corps of Engineers 
report. 

Sincerely, 

/s/ George T. Darmody 

GTD/jf George T. Darmody 

Executive Director 
Enclosure 

cc: Mr. Joseph Byrnes 






COPY 
kQ 



COPY 



By a unanimous vote at the July 9j 197^ > Fall River Development & 
Industrial Commission Meeting, the following Resolution was adopted: 



WHEREAS, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers has recommended the Fall 
River area as a possible site for construction of a wastewater 
pond for sewage from the Boston Harbor-Eastern Massachusetts 
Metropolitan area encompassing 109 communities 

AND WHEREAS, the 7>820 acres recommended is located in the same general 
area as the Fall River Airport Industrial Park 

AND WHEREAS, the effluents being deposited will be a detriment to all 

wildlife, become a breeding ground for insects and pose an immediate 
and constant health hazard to our citizenry 

AND WHEREAS, the area's proximity to the City of Fall River's reserve 
watershed will present a constant potential danger to the city's 
drinking water supply 

AM) WHEREAS, this type of wastewater facility will act as a detriment 
to the area's ability to attract industry and therefore will be 
a hinderance to the economic growth and development of the City 
of Fall River 

BE IT RESOLVED, that all efforts to create such a wastewater facility 

be actively opposed. And monies be expended to initiate informational 
brochures and/or publications, in coordination with all other munici- 
pal departments wishing to participate, explaining the health and 
economic hazards of such a facility located in the Greater Fall 
River Area. And an effort in opposition to this facility be initiated 
and continued until such time as concept five of the Boston Harbor- 
Eastern Massachusetts U.S. Corps of Engineers plan is abandoned. 



COPY 



k 9 






tK" '•-"•I 

r • 

/J 



FRANCIS W. SARGCNT 
GOVERNOR 



ARTHUR W. BROWNELL 
COMMISSIONER 



P 



/00 ffavJnc/yc 3?scU 38oi/o» 0J£0£ 



July 16, 1974 



George T. Darmody, Executive Director 

Industrial Commission 

City Hall 

Fall River, Massachusetts 02720 

Dear Mr. Darmody: 

Your concern for the Corps of Engineers' proposal to use the 
Fall River are a for land treatment of the sewerage from the Boston 
area has also been expressed by other comnunities within the area. 

The Corps of Engineers' proposal is only that - a proposal for 
land treatment of treated sewage'.. The Corps was charged to study 
alternate methods of advanced treatment of sewage of the Boston area 
and one of the alternatives was the land treatment method. The Corps 
made other proposals but the >n]y one that really everyone has heard 
about is the land treatment. 

This Department has expressed grave concern for the Corps' 
proposal and question the practicality of such a proposal and the 
overall cost of the project. On paper, the alternative of land treat- 
ment may look good, bit in reality it may not work. 

We will continue to monitor the Corps' study and we will expresi 
your concern to the Corps along with our's over their land treatment 
proposal. 

Sincerely yours, 



Ql^^^husl 



Ar Lhu r W . Browne 1 1 
Commissioner 



50 




(Uoftm of Sfoau&ea, iHassacltuseits 



( ) ffi ( : k o v s J : i .1 : ( "I'M k s 



f^U 



ARTHUR E. SCHNEIDER. Chairman 
ROBERT F. KELLIHER. Clekk 
JOHN C. LUND 



July 17, 1974 



U.S. Army Corps of Engineers 

2L24 Trapelo Road 

wa 1 tham , Ma s 3 a c hu setts 



Gentlemen: 

At a Meeting held on Tuesday July 16, 197U the Selectmen 
voted to endorse the resolution adopted by the Pall River 
Industrial Commission on July 9, 1971]- pertaining to the con- 
struction of a wastewater pond for sewage in the Fall River 
area.- 



Very truly yours, 



Calvin L. Gardner 
Executive Secretary 
by direction 
Board of Selectmen 



CLG/alm 

cc: P.R. Industrial Coram, 



51 



fir .u.":uv£ kl 

- •- >« 






City of Fall River, Massachusetts 







QS±ifS 



WATUPPA WATER BOARD 



July 18, 19714- 



Industrial Commission 
City Hall 

123 North Main Street 
Fall River, Massachusetts 

De8r Mr. Darmody: 

The W8tupp8 Water Board at its July l5> 1971+ meeting went on 
record as opposed to the dumping of any potentially dangerous 
and harmful materials 5n to the vicinity of the North Watuppa 
Pond watershed. With the proclamation they are automatically 
opposed to the plan of the U. S. Army Corps of Engineers for 
the dumping of effluents in an area bordering Fell River 1 s 
watershed. 

S5r>c>rely, 

WATUfPA WATER BOARD 

* L ^j 

J/fsephiS, Rego Jr. 
water Registrar and tS 
x tflerk of the Water Board 

JSR/cc 




52 



fl. 



The Commonwealth of Massachusetts 

EXECUTIVE DEPARTMENT 
STATE HOUSE . BOSTON 02 133 



■r*7» 

FRANCIS W. SARGENT 
GOVERNOR 



July 2 3, 1974 



Dear Mr. Darmody: 

Thank you very much for your recent letter 
on the possible usage of Fall River land tor sewaqe 
wastewater and for sending me the copy of the Resolution 
adopted by your Development and Industrial Commission. 

As you know, the Fall River site is one of 
eight, possible alternatives being considered. State 
officials are very sensitive to the feelings of local 
communities on this matter. No decision will be 
made without thorough consideration of the views of 
all concerned. 

I have forwarded your letter to Vincent 
Ciampa of the Office of State Planning and Management 
-for- his information. 

V7ith best wishes, 

:&? Sincerely, s. 



Mr. George T. Darmody 

Executive Director 

Industrial Commission 

City Hall 

Fall River, Massachusetts 02720 



53 




(Crlg of 3[ail JHmer, Massachusetts 



OFFICE OF THE 
EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR 



02720 

INDUSTRIAL COMMISSION 

CITY HALL 

AREA CODE 6 
672-6999 

July 31, 1974 



Colonel John H. Mason 

U.S. Army Corps of Engineers 

New England Division 

424 Trapelo Road 

Walt ham, Massachusetts 02154 

Dear Colonel Mason: 

Thank you for your informative letter of July 26, i°74, concerning 
the Boston Harbor -Eastern Massachusetts Metropolitan Area Wastewater 
Management Study. However, the Fall River Development & Industrial 
Commission is not yet satisfied. 

Noting that the first four concepts of the study call for discharge 
of treated effluents into the waterways, the Greater Fall River 
Area is not the fifth concept, but the first concept that "specifies 
land application to achieve advanced treatment after a minimum of 
secondary treatment". 

I point to paragraph nine of your letter, "All five concepts will 
be analyzed and evaluated for their aesthetic, biological, hygienic 
and socio-economic impacts. If the assessment of any of the 
concepts proves adverse, that concept will be eliminated from 
active consideration." 

May we point out aesthetically, the land under consideration is 
an area which is part of a preserved forest, which is aesthetically 
beautiful and the proposed wastewater facility would turn that 
beauty into ugliness. 






Biologically, the area contains an abundance of wild life and 
approximately 100 homes. A wastewater facility in this area 
would not only create the costly task of relocating these families, 
but would also put the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers in the position 
of judge, pronouncing the death penalty on many of the animals 
inhabiting the area. 



^ 



-2- 



Please analyze and evaluate the hygenic impact very closely and 
assure the people of the City of Fall River that a wastewater 
facility of this type will not become a breeding ground for mosquitoes 
and other insects nor will it produce a virulent virus, which 
may have an affect on all surrounding communities. 

May we also point out that the area being proposed is in the 
same area as the Fall River Airport Industrial Park, and it is 
the strong feeling of this agency that the wastewater facility 
suggested will have a detrimental affect on the economic growth 
of the Greater Fall River Area. 

In addition, we also fear that the wastewater facility's proximity 
to our domestic water supply could provide a source of pollution 
and create an enormous adverse affect upon the entire population. 

Therefore, because this concept will have an adverse affect, we 
respectfully suggest the fifth concept of your proposal be 
eliminated from further consideration. 

Further reference is made to the first sentence in paragraph 10, 
"Public opposition to one of the concepts will also cause its 
elimination." Attached please find copies of communications 
received by this agency expressing opposition to your fifth 
concept proposal. 

May I also point to opposition recorded during a meeting at 
U.S. Representative Margaret M. Heckler's office on July 12 , 1974. 
Congresswoman Heckler told your representatives that if 3,000 
people were needed to display opposition from Fall River, your 
agency could see that type of demonstration. 

It is my belief that this agency could also supply 3,000 people 
opposing concept five of your proposal to enhance the Honorable 
Mrs. Heckler's group. 

The Fall River Development and Industrial Commission feels that 
it has shown the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers sufficient opposition 
to justify a Corps announcement to eliminate the proposal from 
further consideration. 

Reference first paragraph of this letter -■ Then we will 

be satisfied. 

Sincerely, 

George T. Darmody _^ 
Executive Director 
cc : David Hewitt 

U.S. Representative Margaret M. Heckler 

55 



F 



SOVTH MIDDLESEX AREA C 



f 



Ca.4\fBl 






ER OF COMMERCE 



109 CONCORD STREET 

FRAMINGHAM MASSACHUSETTS 01701 

TEL 617 879 5600 



August 14, 1974 



Mr. John R. Harrington 
Metropolitan Area Planning Council 
44 School Street 
Boston, Massachusetts 02108 

Dear Mr. Harrington: 

I appreciate the Citizen's Advisory Committee receiving draft 
reports of the Eastern Massachusetts Metropolitan Area Waste 
Water Management Study. I have read the more organized reports 
cover to cover and skimmed those others which go into great 
detail about very specialized subjects. My primary interests 
have been: 1) proposals concerning the western suburbs, 
2) general treatment of industry, 3) and who is going to pay 
for proposed improvements. 

Concerning the western suburbs, I would like to make two points. 
In general the area is characterized by the growth towns of 
Natick, Framingham and Ashland and the non-growth towns sur- 
rounding these* Natick, Framingham and Ashland would like to 
have more sewer capacity as soon as possible. I do not see in 
the draft reports any kind of priority which would indicate how 
the problems in these three towns could be quickly attended to. 
Meanwhile, the non-growth towns don't want sewers as the absence 
of sewers is the legal basis for the large lot zoning these towns 
are using as their major land use policy. 

The towns that don't want sewers do want to know how they can 
keep septic tanks working and what standards to apply to mini- 
systems for downtown and package systems for isolated condominiums 
For all the money being spent on EMMA, it is not answering the 
questions which the western suburbs have. 

Concerning industry, the largest companies in our Chamber are 
acutely sensitive to water costs; we have learned of substantial 
reductions in water usage through adoption of conservation 
techniques. In as much as the capital costs anticipated by the 
study will be passed on to the users, there will be extensive 
shrinkage in demand by our large water users. I have not seen 
thi3 reflected in your demand projections. 



56 



Page 2 



Relative to who will pay, our organization finds the projected 
capital costs a frightening prospect. These costs must be 
considered in context with other billions required for water 
supply, transportation, and such items as modernizing inner 
city schools and public pensions. I do not see in the drafts 
any consideration of a least cost alternative. 

I am in the process of summarizing some of the reports to 
better inform town officials of the progress of the waste water 
study and will keep you informed of any reaction I get from 
our towns. 

Yours truly, 

Gerald R. Mimno 
Director of Planning 



CCs Martin F. Cosgrove 
Martin Weiss 



57 




872-3559 



DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC WORKS 

Framingham, Massachusetts 



COMMISSIONERS 

SUE GALVIN, CHAIRMAN 
LAWRENCE H. GIARGIARI, CLERK 
JOHN F. JORDAN 

December 5, 1974 



Mr. John Harrington 
Metropolitan Area Planning Council 
44 School Street 
Boston, Mass. 02108 



Dear Mr. Harrington: 

We are writing to you to submit our comments on the progress 
report on the Boston Harbor-Eastern Massachusetts Wastewater 
Management Study issued by Colonel John H. Mason of the 
Army Corps of Engineers on November 27, 1974. 

We urge the adoption of Concept 1 - Upgrading Systems of the 
Existing Deer and Nut Island Treatment Plants. We feel, as 
we have stated previously, that Framingham formerly had its 
own treatment system but that subsequently, when we were 
presented with the opportunity to join the MDC's South ^metro- 
politan sewer system we were convinced that .we could sell 
the land where our treatment plant had been located, without 
concern for the future discharge of sewage. 

We also feel that the time element is a major factor in 
selecting Concept 1, the more so since the two present 
systems could be improved and maintained for approximately 
the same cost as the other concepts. There is no question 
in our minds but that by choosing Concept 1 we would remedy 
the problem much sooner than by use of any other concept. 
We base this thinking on the statement that Concept 1 could 
be completed in five years, while other concepts could take 
as long as twelve years. 

We realize that there are some good reasons for considering 
the concept of putting wastewater back into the ground. 
However, we want to point out that any treatment plant built 
in or near Framingham would be in a location which would 
require us to reverse the direction of flow in our trunk 
lines. 

Perhaps it should be agreed that anyone developing a sewer 

system in the future should join a regional system, but for 

those already in the MDC, Concept 1 appears to be the best 
solution. 

We are enclosing copies of weekly records of sewer flows 






58 



Mr* John Harrington 

Metropolitan Area Planning Council Page 2. 



from Framingham. The first study was made by Haley & Ward, Inc., 
engineers; the second was made by our own personnel. 

Very truly yours, 

BOARD OF PUBLIC WORKS 




ds C/&£,Cs¥'kS 



Sue Galvin, Chairman 



SG:CAH:jp 
Enc. 



59 



•or c-.y ~» ~ • *•' 

! VVALTKaW.V.'ASS. 02154 

Phone (517) £90-3930 
tropolitan District Cordis s ion ^ 

i Son; arset jjtr-aet, Room 407 » Sewer Dl v 
iston, Mass. 02103 



LUiUu Ji^L-v. ^Li Liuv.U.jv;^,.i/ut]lj lS^LJ 



J »ATf. 

i 

! AfU'NIlO 

i 
fan 



-i&Tch 3, 1974 



Sewage Flows to MDC at Frarainghaia 



s i: 



iVE ARE SENDING YOU iX Attached G Under separate cover via 

D Snop drawings G Prints □ Plans □ Samples 
□ Copy of Setter ' G Change order G 



.the following items: 



G Specifications 



n.ATt 



NO. 



DESO.rt:S»TtON 






I Flow measurements into the MDC Sevrer at Framinghaia, 



J Lffog-t fa o ' week o £4&gafe--3.- ? T —ln8-l-^r-i974 









G Resubmit copies for approval 

O Submit copies for distribution 

G Return corrected prints 



E TRANSMITTED as chocked bolow. 
G For approval G Approved as submitted 

{$■ for your use G Approved as noted 

(£. As requested G Returned for corrections 

G For review and comment G , 

G FOR BiOS DUE L_19 G PRINTS RETURNED AFTER LOAN TO US 

Flow at location "A." is by dept h measurement in 42" sevrer, and i ncludes 

the Tov;n of Ashland discharge. 



?Io'£ a t Jl oca t Ion "3" is "by Parahall Fl'jr.;e laeasureiTienb . "_ 

Flow at location "C" , is estim ated by ch servation, subject _tq corjre et ion 






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III 




WAREHAM FIRE DISTRICT 

271 MAIN ST., WAREHAM, MASS. D2571 

295-0450 



December 10, 1974 






Mr. John Harrington 
Metropolitan Area Planning Council 
44 School Street 
Boston, MA 02108 

Dear Sir: 

The Wareham Board of Water Commissioners was represented 
by its Chairman, Gilbert C. Phinney, at a meeting sponsored by 
the Southeastern Regional Planning and Economic Development 
District at which the U. S. Army Corp, of Engineers presented 
the proposal for the disposal of sewage effluent from the 
Boston Metropolitan District by the living filter method in 
areas in close proximity to the Wareham Fire District water 
shed area. 

At that time opposition was voiced due to the concern that 
undesirable materials such as heavy metals, nutrients, odors, 
tastes, viruses, etc., might ultimately saturate the area and 
enter into the ground water aquifer which we have reason to 
believe is of some considerable capacity and therefore of great 
value to this community. 

No assurance was given that in the long term this would 

not be the effect. We feel that there is also the possibility 

that changes in the ground water levels and flows might also 
have an adverse effect. 

We wish therefore to enter this as a formal objection to 
the implementation of Concept 5 as proposed in the Boston 
Harbor - Eastern Massachusetts Metropolitan Area Waste Water' 
Management Study as being totally unacceptable to this community 
and the War.eham Fire District. 

Very truly yours, 

WAREHAM FIRS DISTRICT 

Board of Water Commissioners 

Gilbert C. Phinney, Chairman 

GCP:hs 

63 



-v.- \.^'- :-;\..*K i "'\ " 



•sr.?:*> '•■*- •. -v. . **' f : -• \ 

v ;-.•»•* -.- .-•■- : ^- ' „ ;• ..... -: <,, 

'. fill "Sf .'O '".'< ■ '*,.».-■•' _j> 

• . ? % ■,•.<*■ "^ * ■ ■' ■ • -•■ " V 



I own ot South boroujfi 

IN WORCESTER COUNTY, 
COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSET 

BOARD OF SELECTMAN 

TOWN HALL • SOUTHBOROUGH, MASSACHUSfTS 
Phone (617) 485-0710 






tn** 




December 11, 197^ 



Kr, John Harrington 
Metropolitan Area Planning Council 
Vft School Street 
Boston, KA. 02108 

Mr. Harrington, the Board of Selectmen has reviewed the five concepts! 
for Wastewater Management in the Eastern Mass. Metropolitan Area, 
and at this time the Selectmen officially favor Concept #3 - A 
Regional Plan for the Expansion of Deer and Nut Islands Service Area. 

While the Selectmen officially favor this concept, they are pleased 
to note that all five study concepts include the -Town of Southborough 
and some sort of a regional concept. 

The Selectmen, therefore, offer their official support both to 
Concept #3 an 3- "to "the entire process and wish to be kept informed of 
any additional activity in regard to this process. 

I 



ii 



I 





A . Lundblc 
nistrative Assistant 



jal/mrp 



61+ 



At the Cross Roads of No v.- England 






m SIERRA ClXfB • Neco eDGlaod ChapteR 

14 BEACON STREET, ROOM 779, B05TON , MASSAC HUSETTS, 021 08 • 617-227-5339 



December 19, 1974 

. John Harrington 

tropolitan Area Planning Council 

School Street 

stem, Massachusetts, 02108 

ir Mr. Harrington: 

The events of the past two weeks concerning the selection of a long range plan 
wastewater management for Eastern Massachusetts warrant some comments. 

The very close vote which took place last week indicates that there are several 
ns which are not well enough defined and understood. Intelligent decisions can not 
-nade until all the facts or at least more facts are known. I would like to offer the 
ywing thought for your consideration. 

First, as a general principle containment of wastewater in the watershed of 
•{in is desirable and in some cases necessary basis of the plan. This raises 
iy questions: What are the long range effect of withdrawing water from the Svdbury 
ervoir and transfering it to Boston Harbor? What is the level of treatment needed 
hat wastewater can be safely discharged into the Sudbury? What is the long range 
prediction for the Charles and Sudbury? What is happening to underground 
lifers? The answers to these and many more questions must be known before 
tjlligent decisions can be made concerning the Wastewater Management Plan. 

Second, while the need for increased sewage facilities for Framingham etc. is 
( gnized such pressure should not force a plan whose long term implications have 
been well studied. A decision that is hastily made may cause even more serious 
clems at some later date. - • 

Third, discharge of sewage within the watershed of origin is sound water supply 
ligement as well as sound wastewater management since the possibilities of re- 
ftng are not rendered impossible. The supply of water must be considered in the 
fe breath with the discharge of water. 

I urge that the final decision on which plan to eventually adopt is deferred until 
■bate answers are available to the types of questions which have been raised in 
■letter. 

Sincerely, 

KlOld Conn. Path Robert E. Zimmerman, Political Action Ch 

jehingham, Ma. 01701 Thoreau Group, Sierra Club 

luSETTS STATS GROUP -VERMONT STATE GROUP '"*Zaf !!£!$??! IVqu^ 

K COUNTY C'liip CENTPAL VERMONT CROUP M N A .> N O C K GROJf 

IlER BOSTON G^OUP CHAMPIAIN VALLEY GROUP UPPE;'. VALvCY GROUP 

W-AU GROUP CONNECTICUT VavLEY GROUP 'MAINE CiOW? 

iLlYOXE GROUP OTTER VALli* GROUP -RHODE ISlArO 

RtNJPc GROUP 

Printed or 100% fte:yclerl hope.- Pleoie rum over »-jr inond noi* 



vice p?<esio:nts 
MS. LOUISE BONAR 

1ST VICE PRESIDENT 

MRS. CAROL McA'NULTY 
2ND VICt PRESIDENT 

MISS LI3BY BLANK 
3RD VlCf PRESIDENT 



LEAGUE OF WOMEN VOTERS OF BOSTON 

7 WATER STREET 

Corner of Washington Street 

BOSTON, MASSACHUSETTS 02109 

TELEPHONE 723 4583 

MRS. ELIZABETH HARTL. PRESIDENT 



MRS. SELMA LAMKIN 
TREASURER 

MRS. GAUNZETTA MITCHI 
RECORDING SECRETARY 



December 26, 1974 



Mr. John Harrington 

Metropolitan Area Planning Council 

44 School Street 

Boston, Massachusetts 02108 

Dear Mr. Harrrington: 

The Boston Harbor Committee of the League of Women 
Voters of Boston /as studied with interest the alternatives 
outlined in the November 27 Progress Report of the Boston 
Harbor-Eastern Massachusetts Wastewater Management Study. 
Though we understand the implications and effects outlined in 
the report, we believe we do not have the technical competence 
to make specific recommendations. 

One of the prime concerns of this committee is the im- 
provement of the quality of Boston Harbor water. V/e are 
concerned that the maximum enlargement of the area serviced 
by Deer and Nut Islands Treatment Plants, Concept 3, may not 
be in the interest of improved water quality in the harbor. 
V/e urge -the Technical Subcommittee to recommend an alterna- 
tive that is beneficial to the water quality of the harbor as 
well as that of the rivers flowing into it. 

Thank you for your consideration. 

Sincerely yours, 

Chairman 
Boston Harbor Committee 



66 






D. 3» Newspaper Clippings 



67 



City Post 

Marlboro, MA "~7 . . , 

25 Oct 73 Area Wastewater 

Also in: Study Series To 

Assabet Valley Beacon Begin in ActOn 

Acton, MA ALTON —A study to deter- 

25 Oct 73 mine solutions to the 

wastewater management needs 
of the metropolitan Boston area 
is being conducted by The 
Common wealth of 
Massachusetts, Metropolitan 
District Commission, and the 
U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, 
Colonel John H. Ma&on of the 
Corps of Engineers announced 
this week. This effort is the 
result of a need to determine tho 
future requirements of the 
'Metropolitan Sewerage District 
• facilities, and of a 
.Congressional authorization to 
the Corps of Engineers. The 
progress of the study is being 
directed by a joint State, 
Federal and regional sub- 
committee, he said. 
; Federal and State agencies 
responsible for conducting tha 
"studyhave asked the j 
Metropolita n Ar eLa^Pjaoniftg I 
Council to as sist them in in- ' 
lorrmng* ana involving the ] 
public of the study area. Tha j 
■area is comprised of 109 com*- j 
-munities, 43 of which are j 
: currently members of the j 
^Metropolitan Sewerage 
District 

> As part of the public in- 
volvement effort, an initial 
series of six meetings has been 
scheduled. At these meetings, 
detailed description of the 
scope, nature, and objectives of 
the study will be presented. 

The meetings will offer 
citizens an opportunity to 
review the planning assump- 
tions and criteria from which 
fuiure wastewater Hows will be 
derived, and present their 
views, to influence the 
development of wastewater 
management systems that 
'satisfy Federal and State 
crit?na, and help to meet other 
regional and local needs. 

The first meeting will be held 
at the Acton-Boxborough 
Regional High School, of 
Keyword Read and Charter 
Road, in Acton on November 15, 
137J_at^>LD p.m. „- > - s 

68 



Harbor 
Planning Meeting 



Mirror 
Hingham, MA 
26 Oct 73 
Also in: 

News Mirror j 

Hull, MA BOSTON -The) 

->L r> nx Commonwealth of ^ 

26 Oct 73 Massachusetts, Metropolitan \ 

District Commission, and the I 
U.S. Army Corps, of Engineers, i 
are conducting ** a study to i! 
determine solutions to the 
wastewater management needs of !; 
the metropolitan Boston area, i 
This effort is the result of a need : 
to determine the future 
requirements of the Metropolitan j. 
Sewerage District facilities, and jt 
of a Congressional authorization \ 
to the Corps of Engineers. The i 
progress of the study is directed • 
by a joint State, Federal and \ 
regional subcommittee. 

The Metropolitan Area 
Planning Council has been i 
requested by the Federal and | 
State agencies responsible for j 
conducting the study to assist 
them in informing and involving 
the public of the study area. The 
area is comprised of 109 
communities, 43 of which are 
currently members of the 
Metropolitan Sewerage District. 

As part of the publicT 

involvement effort, an initial 

'scries of six meetings has been 

. scheduled. At these meetings, a 

detailed description of the scope, 

• nature, and objectives of the 

study will be presented. 

These meetings will also offer* 

you an opportunity to review the 

planning assumptions and criteria 

; from which future wastewater 

flows will be derived. 

We know that you are 
interested in the quality of the 
water in the Boston Harbor - 
•Eastern Massachusetts 
Metropolitan Area, and want a 
chance to present your views, to 
influence the development of 
wastewater management systems 
that satisfy Federal and State 
criteria, and help lo meet other . 
regional and local needs. We urge 
you to attend one or more of 
these meetings. 

We have scheduled the first 
meeting at the Acton- 
Boxboroueh Regional High 
.School at the intersection of 
Hayw.iru Rodd and Charter Road 
in Acton on November < 5 at 8:00 
P.M. 

69 



Bedford Patriot 
Bedford, MA 
I Nov 73 




(A.MlMff'(H 





(selected excerpt) 



The Commonwealth, • 
Metropolitan District Commission. . 
and thV^* L'S- Army . Corps- . of , 
Engineers are conducting a. study ' 
to determine solutions to the*' 
wastewater management needs of * 
tee metropolitan Boston area? This*,, 
effort is the result of a need" to 
determine the future requirements 4 - 
ef the Metropolitan Sewerage-' 
District facilities, and of a Con- 
gressional authorization -.to the-' . 
Corps of Engineers. The progress :; 
of the study is. directed, by a joint: j 
State, Federal and regional- sub- 
committee. ;•* I*.-'-"* "i"- : -\t- -""J 

The iMetrcpolitan Area Planning,. j 

(Vittrri}, h'n.iwii'rivptUB BO tHVui 

Federal and. State agencies-! 
responsible for conducting the';! 
study to assist them in informing , 
and involving the public of the - ■ 
study area. The area is comprised " 
of 109 communities, 43 of which are* ; 
currently ra e m b-er s ■ . of the. I 
Metropolitan Sewers ge District-; w.-j 
■ As part oi the public ihvol yemeat. i 
effort, an initial series of six meet- vj 
ingshas been scheduled. At^ these V 
meetings,. a cetailed description^*^; 
the scope, nature, and objectives of _,' j 
the study wiilbeTJresented^ : \ . "' •• "| j 
The first meeting will be held at 'j 
the Actoa-Boxborougb Regional" J; 
High School on Nov.. 15 at 2 p itf. • • % ;\ ' t 



Tired, of bumping oW .Bedford ■« 
st. in ycur car on tbe^way to Route • 
l£8? "',- ; '•;.:■ ; vvi v---.~l£/ 
. .The patching job done* by . the J 
Lexington- Bedf ord.^rellef "il e wef "j 
contractot is to be repaired. 1 ac* - m 
cording .' to ■ the- selectmen,: 'who- i- 
receiveda iettsr of complaint from ; 
Charl es Mistretta , 7 district . 4 •'. 
engineer of the Stats BepC of . 
Public Works. - \- '*-?>'h:-. ^T-^*- 

ThSoard asxed DPW Supt Xeov.| 
Pedersen to contact the. Sub- 
contractor who did ihe patch job*v- '; 



70 



• Watergate Judge John J; Sirica - 
turned away from questioning . s 
reporters and photographers last I 
week to listen to the fife and drum ; 
music of the Bedford Minuteman '-"< 
Companyr "'v : "^J-.'"' "" '"'ViJjK^rti t. 
The wiinutemea were the only 
company invited. to perform at the. I 
American Judges Association con- j 
venSbn held at the Sutler Hiltcn | 
. Hotel hi Boston. 

Captain Lloyd. Walker and his 
xainutsmen marched" '&. with, the . 
bead table guests -including Judge j 
Sirica - and gave a brief history of j 
• lie Bef!?ord flag before playing 
their reusing Colonial music. « 

The minateman company felt 

honored to perform, and later saw 

themselves on network television. 

According to one member cf the 

company, many cf the famous 

judges present asked the group 

.about the flag and their Colonial 

; styled cos ^urn-s. • . 

- Jted2» John Forte and wife 

i Priscflfa of 4 The Great rd. were , 

^orig the 3C0jed£es present • J 



Enterprise-Sun 
Marlboro, MA 
8 Nov 73 
Also in: 
Sun 
Hudson, MA 




. Marlboro's population will 
have reached 35,300 with a 
work force of 11,200 people, in 
another 20 years. By that tuns 
Hudson will employ 5,200 
workers in a community of 
26,500 people. 

Berlin in 20 years will have 
grown to a town of 5,400; 
Bolton will still be the smaller 
with a total near the 4,700 
figure; Stow should have; 
reached a population of 6,600; \ 
and Soutbboro should have i 
9,400 residents. 

With statistics reaching into 
the year 2000 and ail the way 

Xto 2020 (when many under 
today will- be numbered 
among the senior 1 citizens) and 
■2050 (when- Jaflly •• /f&*s 
genera ti on , sVcKUdren / i are>,; 
likely to remain )„ .the .survey;' 
is trying to determine the Img] 
:•■ range - sewage and -water*-] 
needs for, the region for the | 
nexraO've^raYV.- .,., " -.,'Hu 
Its planv^muit inclcfd*:, 
services lor \?jfr -prnknt-,) 
population of 2 miihanr -people '■ i 
in which individual com- 
munities could double and ! 
triple in population by the : 
year 2020 - let alone 2060 • on 
Van area which remains the ! 
\ame 400 scuare mile*. > ; 
The Wastewater 
Engineering and Management 
study encompasses the 
Eastern Massachusetts 
Metropolitan Area - extending 
as far west as Bolton, Berlin, 
Northboro, and Westboro; as 
far north as Boxford, Ipswich, 
and Rockport; Bellingham 
and Wrentham to the south- 
west and Pembroke and 
Duxbury on the southeast. 




©recasts 




ation explosion 



When Congress in mid - 1972 
asked the U.S. Army Corps of 
Engineers to plan im- 
provements in wastewater 
management for Boston 
Harbor • and Eastern 
Massachusetts, the Corps 
developed a technical sub- ' 
committee. The sub- ; 
committee, includes the En- 
vironmental Protection 
AgenCy, the Me tropohtn:_ 
Area ; Planning Councj l, the~j 
Massach use tts'TJ vison of ' 
Water Pollution Control, the 
Office of State Planning and 
Management and the 
Metropolitan ^istrict Com- 
mission. (Wastewater is a 
term for domestic sewage, 
stormwater and Industrial 
wastes). - 

All these agencies, besidea 
plotting what to do with 

wastewater for the nexi 11 
years, will also be working to I 
bring the Commonwealth 
toward the goals of the M'l 
Federal Water Pollutioi 
Control Act Amendment. 

The 1972 Pollution Control 
Act stipulates that waters be 
clean enough for fishing ard 
swimming by mid - 1983 a/d . 
reach zero pollutant discharge I 
by 1985. 

According to David ,C. 
Kenyon of thu Army Corps )f j 
Engineers located in Waltha.n j 
the study scheduled f>- 
completion in September 1971 
will propose: 

1 - possible changes in the j 
size and make - up of the 
Metropolitan Sewage District. 

2 - treutment plants 
providing a minimum of 
secondary treatment at Deer 
and Nut Islands (in Boston 
Her or/ 



3 - Advanced regional plants 
for wastewater treatment. 
These will be in addition to the 
local plants now required 
under previous clean water 
laws and meeting the 
requirements of the 1972 
Pollution Control Act. 

4 - ways to use reclaimed 
wastewater 

5 - how to pay for the*.- 
advanced plants 

6 - who will pay for these ' 
plants --< ».*" • 

However, Kenyon points out 
the study will not: 

1 - resolve the Individual 
sewage problems of each of 
the 109 communities. State 
and local governments must 
do this. >■ 

2 - Change the present EPA 
schedule for state im- 
plementation Of goals set up 
by the Division of Water 
Pollution Control. 

3 - Begin immediate con- 
struction of advanced 
wastewater treatment plants.. 

4 - require communities to 
become part of the present 
Metropolitan Sewage District 

Marlboro, for example, la 
not part of the Metropolitan 
District and with ltsr two 
sewage plants for secondary 
and tertiary treatment Is self r 
sufficient enough without the 
District's help (although it 
does share water on a District 
basis. 

When the soon - to - be 
completed easterly sewage 
plant in Marlboro is at lasf 
finished, it will be »'one of the 
most sophisticated on the 



whole Eastern coast," boasts 
Marlboro's DPW Heed Paul 
Sharon. 'Already (roiepe from 
Tufts, Nortbeaetarn, and ether 
local universities have begun 
touring the facility which wfll 
provide tertiary' sewagej 
treatment. 

Tertiary -treatment is the 
ultimate- - removing 
phosphates and nitrates.. 
(Nitrates while not obvious in 
any but chemical tests can, 
cause brain damage in con- 
centrated amounts). 

The treatment. . plants si" 
Boston Harbor on Deer and 
Nut Islands are functioning 
presently as primary treat- 
ment plants - a plant which 
does little more than remove 
the solid wastes. The survey 
hopes that they will become 
at least secondary with 
chemical's, aeriatlon or 
filtering toTiemeve-more of the 
pollutants., lift:* ; 

After the present study of 
the Eastern » MaasachoseOSi 
re si on Is concluded, tha Carpi 
has proposed toother phase of 
study dealing specifically with 
the- problems el ths- harbor 
pe'rtaining to •errculstion, 
bottom depeeJts, and 
paHntton^ x . 



Nashoba Free Press 

Acton, MA 

8 Nov 73 

Also in: 

Assabet Valley Beacon 

Independent 

Littleton, MA 



^Public Asked For Input In 
Wastewater Management Study 



ACTON — The first ol a series 
oi open planning meetings to 
obtain the public's views on 
wastewater management is 
scheduled lor Thursday, 
November 15, in the cafeteria of 
the Acton-Boxboiough Regional 
High School in Acton. At this 
meeting, residents of 23 area 
communities are urged to 
participate in the Boston 
Harbor-Eastern Massachusetts; 
planning study covering 109 
communities inhabitated by 3 
million peopl* within a 30-mile 
radius ot Boston. 

The communities involved in 
the Acton session are« Acton, 
Berlin, Billerica, Bolton, 
Boxborough,. Carlisle, 
Clwlmsford, Concord, 
Hopkinton, Hudson, Lincoln, 
Littleton, Marlborough, 
Maynard, Northborough, 

Southborough, Stow, Sudbury, 
Tewksbury, Wayland, West- 
borough, Westford and Weston. 

(The other five meetings in 
the series will be announced as 
soon as arrangements have 
been completed. Subsequent 
series of meetings will be held 
throughout the -study.) 

The (2 million clean water 
planning effort ' is aimed at 
developing alternatives for 
treatment of domestic sewage 
and other wastewater as 
required by the 1972 Federal 
Water Pollution Control Act 

The study will produce a 



blueprint lor upgrading Boston 
Harbor, major waterways in> 
Eastern Massachusetts and 
possible reuse for Hie renovated 
water. - 

The public meetings are 
sponsored by Metropolitan 
District Commission; 
Metropolitan Area Planning- 
Council and U.S,.Anny Corps of 
Engineers, which £r® among 

* the agencies participating in the 

study. The stcdy costs are 

jointly financed by the MDC and 

the Corps. 

Other participating agencies 

■ are Massachusetts ^Division-"- of 
Water Pollution Control, 



iMassachuset^ 



Ice of Ctate 



Planning and Management and 
U.S. Environmental Protection. 
Agency. " ,: "'"'. ''.'■''< 
Rmohaftix is foem* ©laced on 



open planning, a process Hurt 
involves people from the study 
area in the decisionmaking 
process to deterraine the mosi, 
viable methods of wastewater 
management. These choices 
will affect the quality of water 
in Eastern Massachusetts for 
generations to come. 

All these agencies, however, 
wu7 not - and cannot - mak« 
decisions about wastewater 
management for the 
metropolitan area without 
substantia! public participation,' 
and opan planning begins wttb 
Shi* initial meeting. 

For further information, 
please contact Mr. Martin 
Weiss, director of an- 
vironmestaJ planning of the 
Metropolitan District Com-! 
mi«skm. at 727-380. . ... Vi 



72 



Citizen 
Sudbury, MA 
8 Nov 73 



/ PUBLIC OPINION i 
AT ACTON 

The first of a series of opei 
planning meetings to obtain th» 
public's views, on wastewater 
management is scheduled for 
Thursday, November la, in thci 
cafeteria of the Actonv 
Boxborough Regional High) 
School in Acton. At thisi 
meeting, residents of 2? area 
communities are urged to} 
participate in the Boston* 
Harbor-Eastern Massachusetts! 
planning study * covering 10»i 
communities inhabitated by Z 
million people within- a 30-mile 
radius of Boston... 

The communities involved in. 
the Acton session are: Acton, 
Berlin, - Billericai^ Bolton; 
Boxboroug te-jJ/'Ca rli s le ,, 
Chelmsford^^Concord,. 
Hopkinton; Hudsoo; Lincoln, 
Li ttletony -Marlborough, 
Maynard; rNorthborough^j 
Southborougtc-Sto^/^Stsdbury^ 
Tewksbury. Wayland, West~* 
borough,. Watford and Weston^ 
(The other five* meetings in 
the series will be announced as 
soon as arrangements, have 
been completed. Subsequent 
series of meetings' will be held 
throughout the study.) 

The $2 million clean water 
planning effort is* aimed at 
developing alternatives for 
treatment of domestic sewage 
and other wastewater as 
required by the 1972 Federal 
Water Pollution Control Act ^ 



The study will produce- a 
blueprint for upgrading Boston 
Harbor, major waterways in 
Eastern Massachusetts and 
possible reuse for the renovated 
water. * 

The public meetings are 
sponsored by Metropolitan 
District Commission/ 
Metropolitan A rea^kmn^ftq, 
Council^and^UTa" Army Corps of. 
Engineers, which are among 
the agencies participating in the- 
study. The study costs are 
jointly financed by the MDC and- 
the Corps. 

Other participating agencies 
are Massachusetts Division of 
Water Pollution Control, 
Massachusetts Office of State 
Planning and Management and 
U. S. Environmental Protection 
Agency. 

Emphasis is being placed on 
open planning, a process that 
involves people from the study 
area in the decision-making 
process to determine the most 
viable methods of wastewater 
rri 3rt3 < *£ r *^2r k L twqco c Ho * a cs 
wiil affect the quality of water 
in Eastern Massachusetts for 
generations to come. 

All these agencies, however, 
will not -- and cannot - make 
decisions about wastewater 
management for the 
metropolitan area without 
si&siavviiai public participation, 
egl.oj with &ia initial meeting. 
For further information, 
please contact Mr. Martin 
Weiw, director of en- 
vironmental planning cf the 
Metropolian District Com- 
mission, si i27-S?3<.v 



.- -J 



73 



Minute Man 

Lexington, MA 

8 Nov 73 

Also in: Fence Viewer-Sudbury, MA 

He raid -Belmont, MA 

Times -Union r Burlington, MA ••»..• .•--; 

7 Area Townt/j 
involved infe^ j 
Water St udyjd 

Seven area towns wiJI be in4 
volved jri the first of a series of] 
open -planning meeting s> on! 
wastewater management to be* 
held .Tat* the Acton-Boxbrougbj 
Regional High School i» Actoni 
on Thursday, Nov; 15^*i«5g^£j 

The' local communities'par^ 
tidpaibig* are Acton, Billerica^ 
Boxborough, Carlisle, Coucord,. 
Lincotaand SudDwr^ •?» £*£"?? 

Residents are urged to par- 
ticipate in >t£» Boston Harbor*' 
Eastern Massachusetts .plan- 
ning study - a $2 million clean 
water planning effort aimed at 
developing alternatives for 
treatment of domestic sewage 
and other wastewater as ..re- 
quired by- the 1972 Federal 
Water Pollution Control Acfcv- 

The study will produce "a . 
blueprint for upgrading Boston 
Ha rbor,^ major waterways, in; 
Eastern^ Mass. and possible* 
reuse for the renovated water. I 

The -public meetings^ a re; 
sponsored by the Metropolitan 
District: C o m m i ss ion, . 
Met ropolitan Ar»^ pia^pin^ 
Ccuiicii . and the U.S. Army* 
Corps of Engineers. The study 
costs are financed by the MDC 
and the Corps. 

Other agencies involved are 
the Massachusetts Division of 
Wa tsr Pollution Control, 
Massachusetts Office of State 
Planning and Management and 
U.S. Environemntal Protection 
Agency, f 



7^ 



Northboro Star 
Acton, MA 
8 Nov 73 



\ 



jyorthborough Invited To Area 
Wastewater Planning Meeting : 



-??'Z<r*9ponaQs*i:f by Metropolitan 



AREA — • 
The first of a series oT'.opea .District -^Commission, 

planning meetings tO Obtain th«. M»frr»pnlifan Arf}f> Panning 

public's views on wastewater 11 - Couycii and U.5. Army Corp* of 
management is scheduled for-. E^g/neers, which are among 
Thursday, November 15, in the* the agencies participating in the- 
cafeteria of the : Actons study; The study costs are 
Soxborough Regional „High jointly financed by the MDC and 
School in Acton. - yyp&gfegfi the Corps^£>v^> . >\-^ : ^ : --*? 

At this meeting, residents of^t* Other- participating ag< 
23 area communities are urged 
to participate in the Boston *. 
Harbor-Eastern Massachusetts 
planning study covering 109 
communities inhabitated by 3 * 
million people wuian a 30-mile 
radius of Boston. *i 

The communities involved is 
trie Acton session are: Actea, 
Berlin, Billerica, Bolton, 

Boxborough, Carlisle, 

Chelmsford, Concord, 

Hopkinton, Hudson, Lincoln, 

Littleton, Marlborough, 

Maynard, Northborough. 

Southborough, Stow, Sudbury, 

Tewksbury, Wayland, West- 
borough, Westford and Weston. 
The $2 million clean water 

planning effort is aimed at 

developing alternatives for 

treatmeot of domestic sewage 

and other wastewater as 

required by the 1972 Federal 

Waler Pollution Control Act 
The study will produce a 

blueprint for upgrading Boston 

Haroor, major waterways in 

Eastern Massachusetts and 

possible reuse for the renovated 

water. 
The public meetings are^ 



ar«r Massachusetts Division of 
Watery Pollution Control, 
Massachusetts Office of State 
Planning and Management and 
U.S. Environmental Protection 
Agency. - ?„. * 

Emphasis is being placed on 
open planning, a process that 
involves people from the stuay 
area in the decision-making 
process to determine the most 
viable methods of wastewater 
management. These choices 
will affect the quality of water 
in Eastern Massachusetts for 
generations to come. 

All these agencies, however, 
will not - and cannot - make 
decisions about wastewater! 
management for the; 
metropolitan area without' 
substantial public participation} 
and open planning begins with 
this initial meeting. ! 

For further information 
please contact Mr. Martin 
Weiss, director of en- 
vironmental planning of th 
Metropolitan District Com 
mission, at 727-8880. I 



75 



r^ 



1 



ow 



South MiddLesex News 
Framingham, MA 
16 Nov 73 -n 







i'.i )oJ|\.\:)\.\IS 
i i ilii- N» \\ . Staff 

AL'iV * • Public \a- 
\ olviiii: ' will be a major 
lay l.' U:t success ol a large! 
federal ami state project! 
d< signed to clean up the' 
waterways of eastern! 
Massachusetts by 1085. 

Local participation was 
stressed at a meeting last; 
night at the Acton- : 
Boxborough Regional, 
School which presented the 
goals and preliminary work 
on the project which is, 
scheduled to be completed 
by January 1973. 

Speaker Martin Weiss of. 
:iie Metropolitan District! 
Commission fi'.iDC) told an: 
audience ol Mi people that 
Hie project has a manda.te to 
clean up Boston Harbor and 
eastern state v.aterways by ' 
1985, to achieive v.herever| 

possible water that is clean 
enough for swimming, other 
recreational uses and the 
protection nf fish shellfish 
and wildliie by 1983, to 
develop alternatives for 
sewerage and wastewater 
treatment -and to study 
reclamation methods for the 
reuse of nutrients found in ; 
wastewater. 

I 

The study project has i 
received funding of $2 - 
million. Weiss said, and is; 
supported by the 1972 
lideral Water Pollution | 
Control Act. 

The act, which has the i 
strongest anti-pollution 
measures to dale, is basis 
ini the study which will 
ailed lu'j communities with 
a i urreui population of s 
million Wilmn a ;;o-niilc 
radius ol Boston; Weiss said. 



© 




get 



in water 



lie said the project is a 
response to the fact that 
many state waterways are 
nothing more than open 
sewers and that current 
means of sewerage tran- 
sport and treatment are 
expected to be inadequate 
by the end of the century. 

Groups involved in the 
project and represented at 
the meeting were the MDC, 
the Army Corps of 
Engineers (ACE), the 
Metropolitan Area Planning • 
Council (MAPC), the state 1 

Division of Water Pollution ' 
Control (DWPC), the state 
office of Planning and 
Management (OPM), and 
' the federal Environmental 
Protection Agency (EPA). 
ACE representative. 
David Kenyon told the 
audience: "Open planning 
and local participation is the 
only way to build something 
in your backyard and not 
have you say 4 we dop't want 
it.'" ' v ' Vi- 

lli response to questioning 
by officials from Acton,, 

Littleton and other area 
towns, Kenyon said that 
a r ea - i n dus t r i es , 
municipalities and the state 
will be included in several 
plans "under consideration 
for financing the con- 
struction and maintenance 
of, study recommendations, 
specific t plans, will best 
^provide • management, 
financing and construction 
for plan's and facilities to 
carry and treat sewerage, 
new systems for storm 
water drainage and plants 

'76 





for reclaiming valuabl. 
chemicals and mineral; 
from wastewater. 

•All recommendations wil 
have to receive approva 
and some iunding'from the 
legislature, Weiss said. 

Weiss also said thai 
decisions concerning area 
transfer from septic tanks tc 
sewers may be left to the 
localities involved. But, 
Weiss said, if and when the 
transfer is required, she 
study will provide plans foi 
connecting new sewers intc 
the MDC system. 

Last night's preliminary 
meeting covered Hopkinton, 
Hudson, Marlboro, Nor- 
thboroough. Southborough, 
Sudbury, Way land. Wcat 
boro and 15 other area cKifi 
and towns. No officials froii 
Marlboro, Hudson. Nor 
thborough or SouUiborouul 
attended. 



New England Construction 
Lexington, MA 
L9 Nov 73 



MDC And Armv Engineers !M "«»p«% «•.«»«'■■■• -'I •■Jtjwti*«s of the 

. ., , . \ v . .-tudv will !><• |i!i--'iilf<l. 

Are Studying Wastewater T j' lt .,, : In ,.,.,mg> ui || a j Sll fr„ an 

Management Needs Here opporiwnit) it. review the planning 

assumption* and criteria from which 
The Commonwealth of Massachtt- future wastewater Hows will he de- 
setts. Metropolitan District Commis- rived. 

sion. and the I". S. Army Corps of The first meeting at tin- Vton- 

Engirieiers. are ronducting a study to BoxboTou-Ji Regienal High School in 

determine solutions to the wastewater Acton was !i.|,| on November 15. 

management needs of the metropolis 

tan Boston area. 

This effort is the result of a need to 

determine the future requirements of 

the Metropolitan Sewerage District. 

facilities, and of a Congressional 

authorization to the Corps of Engi- ■ 

nee I-. 
The progress of the study is! 

directed by a joint State. Federal and; 

regional subcommittee. I 

The Metropolitan Area Planning 
Council has been requested by the) 
Federal and Stale agencies respon-| 
sible for conducting the study to- 
a>si>t diem in informing anl involv-j 
ing the public of the study area. The; 
area i- comprised of l<>9 communij 
ties. 13 of which are currently 
members of the Metropolitan Sewer) 
age Di.-trict. 

\> part of the public involvcmen' 
effort, an initial series of six meeting) 
has been seheduled. At these meet, 
ing?. a detailed description of thj 



77 



The Patriot Ledger 
Ouincy, MA 
20 Nov 73 



Wastewater Management 
Public Meetings Listed 



BOSTON — Three pubHc meet- 
ings for residents of area towns 
will be held in December to study 
and develop wastewater manage- 
ment systems within Eastern 
Massachusetts. 

The Boston-Harbot-HEastern 
Massachusetts study is being con- 
ducted jointly by the Metropolitan 
District Commission and the U.S. 
Army Corps of Engineers. The $2 
million study will produce a blue- 
print for upgrading Boston Har- 
bor, major waterways in Eastern 
Massachusetts and possible reuse 
for the renovated water and will 
develop alternatives for treat- 
ment of domestic sewerage and 
other wastewaters required by 
the 1972 Federal Water Pollution 
Control Act 

At 8 p.m. Dec. 6, a meeting 
will be held at Newton City Hall. 
War Memorial Auditorium, at the 
intersection o f Commonwealth 



Ave. and Chestnut St. Residents 
of the following communities are 
urged to participate: 

Braintree, Canton, Dedham, 
Hingham, Holbrook, Milton, 
Needham, Norwood, Quincy, Ran- 
dolph, Stoughton, W a 1 p o 1 e 
Wellesky, Westwood, Weymouth, 
Ashland, Framingham, N a t i c k 
and Newton. 

Another meeting for residents 
of Foxboro, Medfield, Sharon, 
Bellingham, Dover, Franklin. 
Holliston, Medway, M i 1 f o r d 
Mi llis, .Norfolk, She r born andj 
Wrentham is scheduled at 8 p.m.' 
Dec. 13 at Medfield High School 
auditorium, Pond Street 

At 8 p.m. Dec. 18 a public 
meeting will be held at the South 
Shore Natural Science Center, 
Jacobs Lane, Norwell, for resi- 
dents of the following com- 
munities: Avon, Cohasset, Dux- 
bury, Hanover, Hull, Marshfield, 
Norwell, Pembroke, Rockland 
and Scituate. 

Another meeting for com-i 
munities north of Boston, inchid4 
ing Cambridge and Somerville, as 
well as Boston, will be held at 
8 p.m. Dec. 4 at Cambridge City 
Hall council chambers, 795 Mass. 
Ave. 



78 



Assabet Valley Beacon 
Acton, MA 
22 Nov 73 



ruDiic Asked To Aid In 



^s 



Wastewater Management Study! 



AREA — Questions lion) the 
audivnce at a meeting on 
wastewater management in 
Acton last week were addressed 
to a panel of representatives 
irom the Army Corps of 
Engineers, Metropolitan 
District Commission^j^und 
Metropolitan Ar>e ^"J^^Eing 
Council. These agemne&'^are- 
involved in a planning 'effort to 
clean up Boston Harbor and find 
solutions to sewage disposal 
problems in the entire i 
metropolitan area of Eastern I 
Massachusetts, (see separate j 
article;. 

Acton Selectman Stephan | 
Lewis asked whether a town j 
such as Acton might be required | 
to install a townwide sewerage 
system. He was told j 

:hat the purpose ol the study is ' 
not to tell you when to put in a j 
sewerage system, but how J 
wastewater lrom such a system 
will be treated." The decision to 
switch from septic tanks will 
depend more on local problems 
and recommendation* trom the 
'peal board of health, he was 
advised 

Metropolitan Area Planning] 
Council representative John 
Harrington commented that | 
MAPI.' oilers technical 
assistance to communities on i 
development of sewerage i 
system plans. 

Duncan Brown ot the Box-! 
borough Board* ol Health Ad- 
visory Committee asked howj 
projections on gallons per/ 
The? hydrologic cycle begins j 
with evaporation from oceans j 
and lakes. Clouds form, and 
under the right climatic con- 
ditions release precipitation. I 
The rain or melting snow either 
percolates into the soil 
recharging groundwater, or 
flows overland to collect in 
streams and rivers. Aeration 
breaks down and treats limited 
amounts of organic waste as a 
stream flow*; to the ocean. 
Human activities are now 
contributing more pollution 
than a water system's natural 
capacity can accommodate, 
Harrington said, and as a 
•esult, som*» waterwavs are 
ittle more than open sewers. 



Population growth and ad- 
vanced technology have con- 
tributed additional and more 
complex waste, requiring 
construction of more extensive 
and complex treatment 
facilities, Harrington further 
explained. Several alternative 
treatment methods will be 
examined in the study. • 

The Commonwealth's 1972 
Environmental Capital Outlay 
provided funds for the 
Metropolitan District Com- 
mission to undertake the 
wastewater study, said Martin 
Weiss of MDC. Under the ad-! 
ministration of* MDC, THE; 
Metropolitan Sewerage 
District, established in 1889, j 
serves 43 communities and a | 
population of almost two million | 
in the Greater Boston area. 
Existing sewage trealr.ienti 
facilities are reaching their i 
installed capacities. Weiss said, j 
and must he improved tc meet 
requirements of Federal 
legislation. { 

In addition to the Federa 1 j 
goals for clean water, the 
Wastewater Study should result 
in recommendations far 
management of sewnse In the 
Metropolitan area for Uie next 
eighty years, according to 
David C. Kenyon o the Army 
Corps of Engineers. Fr >j actions 
of population, employment, 
land use, water qi aiky and 
consumption, and wa.s'e !o-' ,J ^ 
have been made to cover that 
'span of time, he saM. Another 
objective of the study i« to 
determine whe her the in<* 
communities will rr.&ke up on? 
sewerage district r>r t:-e pr°a 
will he divided m ) re'-erai 



smaner districts, "for eacn 
district a variety of waste 
treatment systems will be 
examined.*' Kenyon explained. 
Computer modeling and other 
techniques are being used in an 
"all-out" effort to solve the 
problem of combined sewer 
overflow of both raw sewage 
and stormwater, one of the most 
severe problems in Eastern 
Massachusetts. Kenyon said. 
He also pointed out that in- 
dustry is required by Federal 
law to pay its "fair share" for 
wastewater treatment. A basis 
for charging industries for 
treatment of their waste should 
be another result of the study, 
he said. 

Kenyon also said that the 
choice of systems will be based 
on environmental, aesthetic, 
hygienic and socio-economic 
impact and will probably 
require some "tradeoffs." "To 
make these choices, we must 
learn and understand the desire 
of the people of Eastern 
Massachusetts." he said, "We 
want to develop systems that 
are best for you and your 
community." 

Public participation meetings 
will be held after the first rf the 
year and as technical efforts to 
develop alternative systems, 
are completed. The program 
also offers a speaker's bureau 
and technical workshops for 
discussion of social and 
eo'.ccical asDects of the study, 
through the Environmental 
Planning office of y>.DC, TV- 

mo 



79 



Sun 

Quincy, MA 
6 Dec 73 



V 



Waste Water Management 
Meeting To Be Held tonight 



A series of six.qperi meetings 
to inform residents of jQiiincy 
and surrounding communities-on 
future plan* for wastewater 
management in the metropolitan 
Boston area will start, tonight 
(Thursday) at 8 p.m., at Newton 
War Memorial Auditorium. 

The meetings are -planned to 
inform the public of a study 
being conducted* ; by* the 
Commonwealth of Mass. and the 
U.S. Army Corps of Engineers 
along with the Metropolitan 
District Commission to 
determine future requirements 
of the Metropolitan Sewerage 
District facilities which Quincy 
uses. .■;.> : . 

The meetings- offer concerned 
citizens a chance to review and 
influence the planning 
assumptions and criteria from 
which future sewerage flows will 
be planned. ':'•[ ^ . - 

The agencies conducting the 
study have requested formation 
of the " Mc^toPojitjBi "fir- 1 * 

Planning, ^mytfn| try a«cutt in 

informing and involving the 
people in the study area,. The 
area is comprised of 109 
communities,, < 43 ~ of which arc 
currently - : members r^of > the 
Metropolitan Sewerage- District, 
mcludmg^Qumcy^^^'vv- -^ 
The, Metropolitan^' Area 
PI anniiut -. Council; _ urges/ ? all 



interested people in the area to 
attend.*" 1 *-" 



80 



Advocate 
Arlington, MA 
6 Dec 73 



Engineer Attends 
Wastewater Studv 

m 

Town Engineer Robert Higgins recently 
attended a meeting at the Acton-Boxborough 
Regional High School in connection with a 
study by the Commonwealth of Mass. the 
MDC and the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers 
lo determine a solution to the wastewater 
management needs .of the metropolitan 
Boston area. 

The study has come about as the result of a 
need to determine the future requirements of 
the Metropolitan Sewerage District facilities 
and of a Congressional authorization to the 
Corps of Engineers. 

Today there are 43 cities and towns in the 
Metropolitan Sewerage District, and the 
population served is almost 2 million people 
from an area greater than 400 square miles. 

To coordinate the metropolitan Boston 
study with other statewide projects, a 
Technical Subcommittee on Boston Harbor 
Eastern Mass. was formed. The committee is 
composed of the Corps of Engineers, 



Environmental Protection Agency, 
Metropolitan Area Planni ng Co uncil, Mass. 
Division o f Wq | <« " I' ullutlMi i.mTI rol. Office of 
State Planning and Management and MDC. 

The Committee formulated a joint work 
program, and with the engineering firm it has 
completed a detailed scope of work for the 
entire project. 

The study area comprises 109 
municipalities. The concept is to look into the 
best solutions for providing sewerage 
facilities for these cities and towns. However, 
this does not necessarily mean that every one 
of these communities are to become members 
Of the Metropolitan Sewerage District. 

Higgins explained that several presen- 
tations relative to the proposals were given at 
the meeting held in Acton. He added that 
citizen and group participation in the 
program were suggested. 

A second meeting was scheduled for Nov. 
20 in Danvers, a third on Dec. 4 in Cambridge, 
and a fourth in Newton on Dec. 6. * 

Four major engineering alternatives will 
be examined tn esfaHipb limits and systems 
for the Eastern Mass. Metropolitan area. 

Incjuded are; ?Y« expansion of the present « 
MeUrooolitan Sewerage District with im-'i 
provements onK' to kbe existing'sejr'ice area. 

Limited expansion, possibly adding 1&: 
more communities, or contraction deleting; 
some outlving communities. 

Ultimate expansion to include the entire 
study area. 

No District, a decentralized system with M 
region* i concent- J 



81 



South Middlesex News 
Framingham, MA 
7 Dec 73 



Porous pavement 



News Natick Bureau 

NEWTON — Porous 
pavement could be the thing 
of the future. 

Metropolitan District 
Commissioner John Sears is 
looking into that eventuality 
as a solution to what he 
termed one of the major 
foreseeable problems in 
water management. 

The MDC„\ the 

Metr opolitan Area Plann ing 
Coun cTTanQ the - u.zT'ftrmv 
Corps of Engineers ire 
sponsors-* of - the 
Regional Wastewater 
Management STudy, a long- 
range planning tool which 
involves regional meetings 
to be heid>in various towns. 
— etrnrmTssionet Sears' 
comments came at the first 
such meeting, held last 
night in Newton. { 

Study projections 
calculate as far ahead as the 
year 2050 and Sears noted 
that the projections in some 
cases are "like trying to 
predict what today's world 
would be like from the year 
1889." However, while the 
projected town populations 
and similar data may be 
offset by unforeseeable 
developments, he said, 
identification of the an- 
ticipated problem areas 
remains valid to a certain 
extents I ",V . 0M 



«3 



Sears said one of the first 
problems is obvipjusly going 
to be groundwater 
depletion. 

If groundwater is used 
and not replaced at the 
projected rates, according 
to data presented at the 
meeting, the Charles River 
flow level by 1980 would be 
at zero level for 14 days per 
year. 

One of the things Sears 
said he finds alarming is the 
way in which one precious 
resource, rainwater, is 
channeled into catchbasins 
and wasted. Meanwhile, he 
said, the MBC lines are 
already facing the problem 
of overuse. 

The most hopeful solution 
to this groundwater 
depletion w ould seem now to 
be porous asphalt, Sears 
said. Such asphalt is being 
manufactured and could be 
marketed within the near 
future. However, testing on 
the substance, which would 
look and act like the asphalt 
now in use on roadways 
except for its ability to 
absorb water, has to date 
not included testing on its 
resistance to New England 
winters. The first usage the 
new material is likely to see 
will be in Texas or Florida, 
according to data presented 
at the meeting. * 



82 



Patriot L dger 
Quincy, MA 
7 Dec 73 



Waste Water Usable, 
Newton Group Told 



By USA RREMS 
Patriot ledger C:>r*e«tpondent 

NEWTON — 'Two things we 
have discovered about sewage 
treatment, over the years are that 
waste water is an asset — we 
can use it — and that v/e should 
leave water pretty much v/hern 
we find it. Moving it arr>und too 
much for treatment upsets the 
balance of nature," Metropolitan! 
District Commissioner John W. ! 
Sears said last night. 

Initial! F'ndings 

Representatives of the | 
Metropolitan District Commission j 

<MDC). Mptmnojjtg ir Aroa Plan- j 

ni ng Counc il (JViA'PC), ana the I 
U.i'- Ai m^ Corps of Engineerjl 
last night presented initial Sad- ! 
ings and projections of the east 
e r n Massachusetts wastewater 1 
management study to 60 interest- 
ed citizens at the Newton City Hall 
War Memorial Auditorium. 

The study, authorized by the 
federal Environment Outlay Act, 
of June 1972, will first project j 
waste water treatment re***" of] 
109 eastern Massachusetts com- \ 
munities for the nest P<) years' 
based op anticipated poptdatioirj 
distribution and* ^mplcyment pat- 1 
terns. Commissioner Sears saw. i 

The second phase of the study ! 
will iicludi , *" v:r '5!rc l * of various 
technical solution? to the pro- 
blems of treating waste water. 

The final step of the study wil» 
be to recommend the best of thei 
solutions for implementation, ad-< 
der" ;,'r. Sears. 

During a question and answer] 
period, A. Richard Miller, *• 
private consulting physicist andj 
member of the Natick ConaervaH 
tirn Commission. su^geste^ one] 
way to | <eec water from Ffowiafe] 
out of an are* woufcj he to os#| 
porous surfacing on rosde 
parking lots. 

A thinner coating "** asatal 
pebble used In wrfacing wiU| 
mean rain water could drain 
through road surfacing "stead of 
running off, Mr. MfH»- said. 

"Porous surfacing soond* very 
promising so far, but r^ds to 
-**Mv how it reacts tc frost .^nd 



heavy use so far are almost lack- 
in?," Mr. Miller added. 

Mrs. Rita Barron, executive 
director of the Charles Ri v er 
Watershed Association, suggested 
that while future waste water 
needs are being researeh?d, it isj 
a good time to identify exactly 
where all the area's water, 
recharge areas are located. 

She added that this is impor- 
tant to know so that they can 
be left in their natural state, 
and not drained snd built 
over. 

David C. Keayon. of doe 
U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, 
said that the Corps is doing a 
review of geological ard other 
studies to get a better idea of 
water resources, including where 
rerbarge areas are. 

77*»stwood sewer commissioner 
Lester Gaynor expressed concern 
over the study's projected growth 
figures for the south west area 
of the state. 

"Where are we going to get the 
water for all those people?'" he, 
asked. 

Commissioner Sears responded! 
that the MDC is doing a separate) 
concurrent study on water.) 
resourc*"?. 

"Essentially their job j> toj 
fluormcope eastern ?**ssach»~ 
setts," he said. I 



and* 
*onl 






The Newton Times 
Newton, MA 
12 Dec 7 



Sewerage slows Charles' flow I 
and still water runs rotten \ 



Will the Charles River reverse 
direction between Natick and 
Waltham in the future? According 
to A. Richard Miller, consulting 
physicist and Executive Director 
of the Lake Cochituate Watershed 
Association, we may eventually 
have not only zero but negative 
flow on this stretch of the Charles, 
if we do not stop dumping so 
much waste water. 

Miller raised the question at a 
hearing called by John Sears, 
chief Metropolitan District 
Commissioner, on wastewater 

management for 19 communities 
in the Boston Harbor-Eastern 
Massachusetts area. 

Rita Barron of the Charles 
River Watershed Association 
recommended that wastewater be 
kept within the watershed where 
it originates. New theories cir- 
culating among conservationists 
attribute some water mismanage- 
ment crises to the practice of 
collecting water from one water- 
shed region and dumping it into 
another. Sewage treatment 
plants make the situation worse. 

"Man's activities," summarized 
MDC planner John Harrington, " 
"have produced more pollution 
than the natural system can 
accommodate." No self -purifi- 
cation exists in most parts of the 
globe any more. Too often, 
rivers are used to carry off wastes, 
and waterways become open * 
sewers, necessitating sewage 
treatment. The original MDC f 
plants at Deer and Nut Islands 
provided only primary treatment' 
(separating out settlable_ solid 
from liauid effluent). Only_ * 



recently has it become mandatory 
to treat liquid effluent. Since 
then, Sears said, almost 20 clam 
beds in the Boston Harbor area 
have been reopened. Modern- 
ization of Nut and Deer will 
include secondary treatment,, in 
which bacteria consume the or- 
ganic parts of wastes, after the 
solids settle out. 

The Dec. 6 session was. one of 
six during November and Decem- 
ber seeking input, as requested 
by federal and state agencies- __; 
from citizens of the affected area 
comprising 109 communities. ~ £',,; 
bounded by Boston Harbor, :; ' 
Brockton, Bellingham , Hclliston, 
Boxboro, Chelmsford and Andover 
Only 43 of these currently belong 
to the MDC Sewerage district, 
the base system needing modern- 
ization and expansion. 

According to Sears, Deer and 
Nut are in trouble* The original \ 
district, now 80 years old, was 
created in 1889 and began opera- 
ting in 1895 at Deer Island. JJa^f' 
is essentia] lv the same today. . -, 

M—rtin Weiss of MDC revealed 
that the MDC sewerage serves — 
almost tvo million people over ' 
400 square mixes, with 11 pma*- 
ping stations and two large treat- 
ment plants. Operation now cost* 
almost $7 million per year. 'vAi 
storm water treatment station at 
BU Bridge ia a recently-added V 
installation to process water- be^^- 
fore it adds pollutants to the 



Charles. 



■■-**-. 



PrisciHa 



V 



Patriot LEdger 
Quincy, MA 
15 Dec 73 



Energy Crisis Expected To Slow ' 
Population, Employment In Area 



BOSTON — The energy crisis] 
is expected to slow ponuJationj 
growth sfcd employment gaias in 
Boston and subsjrbs in tte»-?ext| 
decade,> according to^a prals-i 
minary draft forecast conducted! 
by the Metropolitaa»-Area* Flaa- I 
ning CounciL —■ - 

yr ''p'iminary . sjsvf^y on-i 
ducted by the MAP*? and/Metcaif 
and Eddy for the MDC/a* parti 
of the Boston Harbcp-F^ataT! ' 
Massachusetts Waste:? at er! 
Management Study waemads is! 
October Mors the exr^nt e$ taei 
fuel oil rhortages bad been- an-j 
nounced by the Administration. [ 
However, the consultants hadi 
made their projection3 in the pre- i 
Liminary draft on the impending ! 
reduction of fuel available for the j 
area. 



The MAPC survey includes 109 
communities ss far west as the 
3*rtehir*s ?M as far south as 
Fcrboirv, Bridgewater. and Dux- 
bcry including " most .of The 
Patriot Ledger circulation area 
with the exception of Plymouth. 
Kingston; Abington, Whitman and 
Hansonr - 

The study- found that the fac- 
tors that are expected to have 
a negative effect on the economy 
are the cost of fuel which, is 10 
to 20 per cent above the national 
average, with industrial power 
costs U>-per cent above the na- 
tional average. 

The lack of natural resources 
in the state; the cost of living 
that is above the national 
average; the high state and local 
taxes; the high cost of unskilled 



i 

I labor; .and the low expenditures 

jrcade for public education are 

I factors cited that will put a dam-! 

i per on employment oooortuniiiesi 

in the state from the period frorai 

197R to 1990, according to a sum-i 

mary of the projections. 

High unemployment, welfarei 
payments and taxes are not ex-l 
pected to be alleviated until after 
1980. Unemployment is expected 
to increase in manufacturing, 
particularly in paper, leather, 
and electrical machinery chiing 
tae next decade. 

.Hbw»Ver ( insurance, medic:! 
services, private education and 
business services wul continue to 
be the most important non- 1 
manufacturing export industries. I 
♦Finance, real estate, business; 
and professional service* will ex-. 
perience rapid growth and! 
tourism is expected to increase; 



85 



Negative SMe 
But other factors on the' 
negative side of the regionall 
economic picture will be a reduc- 
tion in federally subsidized] 
research programs and hefty j 
decreases in defense-related in— J 
custr.es which will add to the; 
unemployment figures; In ■ addi- j 
lion, the state'? strjigent en»| 
vironmentai protection regula- ! 
tions ars expected to discouras« 
new industry and manufacturing. 

The study found that not only 
are wages for unskilled labor 
higher than the national average, 
there will be a surplus of white 
coiiar workers adding to the 
unemployment statuses. 

The slowdown ia 'be potmiatim; 
growth in the MAPC area is 
based on low<*r birth rate' 
assumptions. The birth rate is\ 
projected at about a 2 per cent! 
increase Tno pr oj ecti o n of the 
Dumber of people moving into the j 
region varies from an additional) 
five to 10 thousand through the 
year 20oo. 

In the Southeast area of the! 

regfoo. studied, a population in-' 

. crense of S7.6 per cent is p-o-, 

: jected from the year 1970 to the i 

year 2025. about 10 per cect more j 

iriAl the increase forcasted far 

; the whole MAPC region. 

These forecasts of population 
growth azd the employment 

'decline c.re l^inc evaluated by 
the MAPC ^nd sre expected to 

1 be r-.'ired, according ro a staff' 

Spokesman. 



Huw to keep 

water clean 
years 

By Clayton Jones - 

Staff writer of 
The Christian Science Monitor 

Boston 

'Tomorrow's water-pollution prob- 
dins may be on the way to solution — 
but what about the day after tomor- 
row? . 

In the 2l3t century, projections 
indicate, more than 4 million people i 
will be generating wastes that could 
re-pollute Boston Harbor and its 
tributaries. .::.": .•'". 

Mindful oi federal requirements for 
zero-discharge, oi pollutants into wa- 
terways by 1985, state sewerage plan- « 
ners are going a step further and 
beginning- to decide how wastewater -} 
is to be managed for the next 80 years.r^ 

But to do that, state officials say - 
they have had to- forecast the size, ; 
shape, and makeup of eastern Maa-^- 
sacnusetts for the 21st century. — --' 

Using conputers, census figures; 
and past projections, the Metropolis " 
tan Area Plann ing Coun cil" (MAPC)*--* 
completed sucn a .study^and for- the ; 
past tew months has been airing tt at 
public-meetings in thfc Boston sub- ■ ■ 
urbs.- 

Data to aid coordination . • ;. 

This information, planners- reason-, 
will help them coordinate future sew- 
age treatment on the Mystic, Charles, 
and Neponset Rivers that funnel- 
through the Boston drainage basin. 

As it. now flows, some towns and 
cities — outside the Inner 43 of the 
Metropolitan Sewage District — have- 
not forecast the effects of their pot* - 
luted waters on surrounding commu- . 
nines — and, officials note, the- effect 
on the overloaded and "inadequate'.* . ■• 
Nut and Deer Island treatment plants » ! 
in Boston Harbor. * 

Sewage from more- than 2 million--- 
people now passes through these- 
plants which use outdated primary- - 
treatment, said a MAPC official. 

Public meetings held in the region 
in the last three months have stressed 
one point: Those Boston -suburbs- 
which will be expanding the most in . 
the next 80 years are the ones with the 
worst or no sewage treatment. 

These are the suburbs around Inter- 
state 433 where population will be 
increasing while Boston's population 
will be decreasing. 

Population will climb to somewhere 
between 4.1 and 5.2 million people in 
2050 for the 109 communities sur- 
rounding Boston, said John Harrtng* 
ton of MAPC. as compared with the 
present population of 3.3 million. 2— 
Continued on 4B 



Christian Science Monitor 
Boston, MA 
4 Jan 74 



Continued from 4A £ / 

But.the study projected, New En- 
gland will suffer a slower growth in 
employment and business between 
1370 and 1990 compared with the ■ 
remainder of the U.S. .. 

Citizen reaction to these forecasts 
gsnerally haj been one of "Where wili , : 
everyone live?" and "How many . 
more sewers will this mean for my - 
town?" 

But, says Mr. Harrington, fore-* 
casting for a specific community Is 
not nearly as accurate as projecting 
conditions for a region. Towns will be 
asked to take a regional approach, to ■ 
their problems and solutions. 

With a year to go before the entire 
$1.2 million Waste water engineering 
and management study Is presented 
for public acceptance again, planners - 
sav the work will : 

• Propose secondary treatment ' 
for the sewage Hewing to Deer and 
Nut Island plants. 
' • Suggest advanced regional 



86 



plants lor waaui waur- uw»w»»i t . _ 
This is in addition to the local plants 
now required under the Federal Wa- 
ter Pollution Control act of 1972. It_ 
also includes the Idea of piping sew« 
age inland — up to 100 miles from 
Boston— to be sprayed over farm; 
forest, and recreation land and puri- 
fied by filtering through the top soil. . 

• Present possible' changes In the 
number of cities and towns now 
Included in, the Metropolitan Sewage 
District " .. : • ; : — 

• Offer- ways' to use reclaimed 
waste water. "Waste water is a 
resource. We can use it," said MDC 
Commissioner John W. Sears at a 
meeting of citizens in Newton last* 
week. 

• Propose how and who- will pay 
for new treatment plants. Federal 
guidelines for financing municipal 
plants now are 75 percent federal. 15 
percent state, and 10 percent local. 
Industry, too, must pay Its "fair 
share" for treating its wastes, says 
the federal law. • *" 1 



Globe 

Boston, MA 
22 Jan 74 



Boston casts its sludge to the sea 



9 ! 



hoping it will stay there 



3y R. S. Kindlebergcr 
lobe Staff 

While New York City 
forties about, a massive 
eel of sewage sludge that 
cientisls believe could 
/ash up on Long Island 
caches in as little as three 
eats, this area continues 
) pump its sludge into 
oston Harbor. 

Boston, New York and • 
hiladclphia are bclievecl * 
ic only major cities in 'the 
mntry that still practice 
:ean sludge disposal' ' 
ould the environmental 
saster feared in New - 
ork happen here? 

Boston's sludge dis- 
largc, estimated at 140 
ns a day from the Deer 
vi Nut Island? !; cement 
ants, is mu;!i smaller 
an New York's. Ard un- 
<c Now V(ir) . t ; u.- area 
»n>p? its dredging spoils 



in a separate area, some 15 
miles east of Lynn. 

But Dr. Guy C. McLeod, 
a New England Aquarium 
biologist who has probably 
studied Boston Harbor as 
much as anyone, does not 
rule out the possibility 
that a century's buildup of 
harbor sludge could invade 
Boston area beaches. 

"Until a very good study 
is done, you can't really 
predict where this stuff 
will end up. But you can 
assume .there's substantia] 
transport," McLeod said. 

"This stuff" is a murky 
mixture of digested sew- 
age solids, oil, trace metals 
and pesticide residues. It 
contains human viruses 
and huge counts of fecal 
col if mm b~.clevia. One sci- 
entist dc^ribed the mess 
as rrscmbung black may- 
onnaise. 
McLeod estimates that 



as much as 10 square miles 
of Boston Harbor floor are 
blanketed with sludge 
buildup, at depths of three 
to four feet in many 
places. . *> 

"You get metal' concen- 
trations that would almost 
make it worthwhile to 
mine the ocean floor, if 
you could separate the 
metals," McLeod said. 

"We can identify resi- 
dues of at least 90 differ- 
ent types of pesticides. Wef » 
can identify almost any 
metal you want to name." 

At a legislative hearing 
in 1972, McLeod predicted 
continued, dumping of- 
large ■ amounts of sludge 
would eventually destroy I - 
the harbor. Already frarts; 
of it can barely sustain 
life, and shellfish harvest- 
ing is banned or restricted 
throughout the harbor be- 
cause of pollution. 
. The Metropolitan Dis 1 



trict Commission (MDC) 
has yielded to Federal 
pressure and agreed to end 
the sludge discharges by 
May. 1, 1P7Q. Plans are 
going ahead for an incine- 
rator to burn the sludge 
instead 

In the past the MDC has 
justified its disposal prac- 
tice on grounds that the 
sludge, mixed with chlori- 
nated waste- water, is 

flushed to sc;i only on the 
outgoing tide and there- 
fore is carried away. 

But studies have sliown 
that at least 20 percent of 
it is washed back into the 
harbor, according to Mc- 
Lcnd. 



87 



Patriot Ledger 
Quincy, MA 
18 Apr 74 



$1B Regional Sewage 
Treat^^SystemlJrged 



Federal and state agencies 
will recommend $1 billion 
rationalization o f sewage 
facilities in Greater Boston in 
a study to be released next 
Friday. 

Urging Smaller System 

The Army Corps of Engineers, 
Metropolitan Area Planning 
Commissiuu diiU 'Metropolitan 
District Commission are 
suggesting contraction of the 
present 109-community system 
which now has only two- major 
outfalls — at Deer Island, 
Winthrop, and Nut Island, 
Quincy. 



The two systems are grossly 
overloaded and cannot property 
handle sewage from the areas* 
according to the report, and 
must be complemented by 
auxiliary sewerages in the 
outlying communities. 

The three agencies plan a 
public meeting next week to 
outline material from the report 
including environmental impact 
of the present system and the 
proposed new regionalization. ., 

The report recommends in- 
stitution of secondary treatment 
at all facilities. : -.. >4 



Item 

Wakefield, MA 
19 Apr 74 



Meetings Scheduled on 
Sewage Treatment Plans 



During the month of May 
local officials and interested 
citizens from Wakefield will be 
participating in a series of 
meeting on alternative regional 
sewage treatment plans, 

developed by the Boston 
Harbor-Eastern Massachusetts 
Wastewater Management 
Study. - v 5 

The meetings are designed to 
further encourage public^ ' 
participation in the selection of ■ 
areawide wastewater 
management plans. 

On Thursday, May 9 at 8 p jxl 
at the Riverside School in 
Danvers the program for the 
evening will include a 
presentation of preliminary 
plans illustrating alternative 
regional treatment systems to 
serve through' the year 2000. 

These public meetings, 
organized through the 
Metropolitan Area Plannin g 
Co uncil, will attempt to tran- j 



slate the technical aspects of 
the study into layman's terms 
and to relate engineering. op- 
tions to key issues raised by 
local governments. Local of- 
ficials, special interest groups 
and individual taxpayers are 
urged to become involved in the 
evaluation and selection 
process to determine the future 
expenditure of public funds. 



89 



South Middlesex News 
Framingham, MA 
23 Apr 1974 



Regional sewage . 
plans to be mulled 

Six meetings in May will be through the year 2000 will be 
held throughout Eastern shown. 
Massachusetts gauging public The M assachusetts ftp** 
reaction to an ongoing study of Pl anning Council said it wilP 
alternative regional sewage cosi $1 ouiion n>*~ construct 
treatment plans. ■ ' water-oriented disposal system 

Preliminary -plans regionally for the 109 involved 
illustrating the proposals communities, which include 

^Ashland,. Framingham r 

"Hopkinton, Hudson, Marlboro, 

Northborough, South borough, 

Natick, Sudbury, Wayland, 

. Wcstboro, Holliston, Medway, 

Milford, Millis. 

The 8 p.m. meetings will be 
held May at Acton-Boxborough 
Regional High School, May 9 at 
Riverside School, Danvers; 
May 14 at Cambridge City Hall; 
May 15 at War Memorial 
Auditorium, Newton; May 20 at 
Medfield High School; and May 
22 at Cushing Memorial Town 
Hall, Norwell. 

MAPC and the U.S. Army 
Corps of Engineers joined with 
the Metropolitan District 
Commission and other agencies 
in preparing the plans. . 



90 





^JUI the many splendid ways to enjoy 
the outdoors become so possible, so 
necessary on- warm spring days. In two 
weeks the buds will, be leaves and the 
harshness of • winter a rare memory. : 
Stretching into that.yzarm sun, circulating 
mightily with life /it's good, so good to 
be alive.. „ v f *r£\ if*- '-:. ~>. ^r^'r^ : ^-. 

WHERE IS THE RIGHT PLACE TO 
PUT AN AIRPORT? If you live a football 
field's length from the. fence of the South 
Weymouth Naval < Air Station, you'd 
violently insist that wasn't the place. If 
>cu have a summer home on a hillside 
overlooking a verdant valley down toward 
Plymouth, you'd say that valley was not 
the "place. If you're a businessman on the 
south shore who does a lot of flying, 
you'd say Logan's becoming an 
>-?j>c<ssibility. And if you lived in Chelsea 
w^ any of the communities bordering 
j^an, you'd say the airport never should 
have been put there. 

Where is the right place to put an 
airport? On a flock of aircraft carriers 
tethered offshore? In a distant rural spot? 
No, aircraft carriers get tossed around in 
storms and rural spots don't remain rural 
when something like an airport is built. 
And who wants the airport to be a 
hundred miles away? 

There is no perfectly right place to : 
build an airport, just as there's no right 
place for roads, rail lines, and any other 
modern communication setup that 
produces noise and chemical pollution, 
disfigures the countryside and is a safety 
hazard. 

But planes are here to stay, in ever 
changing forms, and more airports will be 
needed to service more people. Especially 
on the south shore, which could have- 
nearly a million residents by early in the 
21st century. Maybe by that time the 
plane will have been tamed - it'll be a 
totally safe, clean, quiet vehicle you 
wouldn't mind having a football field 
away. We think that is where the emphasis 
should be - on technological improvement 
of the plane. And until then, who could 
b'ame the people who enjoy life in 
Weymouth from becoming a mite panicky 
when the state suggests that 747's or 
DC-10's should be allowed to perch on 
the runways of the South Weymouth 
Naval Air Station. 



homes bordering the bays seep pollutants 
from cesspools and septic tanks into those 
- - bays. Those pollutants mingle with sewage 
i from nearby towns and add to the overall 
>;Cmire_of the waters of the greater Boston 
region.: You can't clam the mud flats 
around the- bays of Hull. And it takes a 
r^husky;, storm. _to flush out inlets to the. 
tTipoinfr where swimming doesn't leave a. 
rtr foul taste in the mouth. - — 

— By 1985, however, Hull will have to [ 
' " clean-up its sewage mess because the 1972 
"--'Federal Water Pollution Act Amendments . 
—,. require that discharge of pollutants into 
J.: the' metropolitan area's waters be 
"~- ; eliminated. And within ten years all the . 
waters around Hull will have to reach 
quality levels to allow completely safe 
fishing and swimming. 

The Metr opolitan Area Plan ning 
Council (MAPCTestimates that the cost to 
cle an u p Hull "and all the other 109' 
communities and industries of the " 
metropolitan area will be around $1 
billion: The MAPC, in concert with the 
U.S. Army Corps of Engineers and other., 
agencies involved in the Boston Harbor - . 
Eastern Massachusetts Wastewater 
: Management Study T will begin in May 
releasing, to the public some of the 
findings of the study. We'll digest their 
opinions and pass them on to you. We 
hope that you're interest will be- piqued to 
the point where you -take an active 
interest in cleansing and preservation of 
the south shore's most valuable natural 
resources - the waterways and the coasts 



Mirror 
Hingham, MA 
24 Apr 74 



Townsman 
Wellesley, MA 
25 Apr 74 



P 



ublic Meetings Examine Sewage Treatment 



Citizens are invited to par- 
ticipate in a series of six meetings 
on alternative regional sewage 
treatment plans, developed by the 
Boston Harbor Eastern 
Massachusetts Wastewater 
Management Study. 

Meetings have been scheduled 
for the following dates and- 
locations: May 7, Acton- 
Boxborough Regional High School, 
Charter Road, Acton; May 9, 
Riverside School, Liberty Street, 
Danvers; M;iy 14, Cambridge City 
Hall, City Council Chambers, 795 
Massachusetts Ave., Cambridge; 
May 15, War Memorial 
Auditorium, City Hall, 1000 Com- 
monwealth Ave., Newton; May 20, 
■ ?<Iedfield High School Auditorium, 
Pound Street, Medfield; May 22, 
Cashing Memorial Town Hall, 673 
Main Street, Norwell. Time is 8.00 
p m. 

Under Federal mandate, the 
waters (tributaries, rivers, har- 
bors) of the eastern Massachusetts 
region are expected to be fit for 
water recreation and the~ propaga- 



tion of fish by 1983. The 
Amendments of the Federal Water 
' Pollution Control Act of 1972 also 
sets a goal which calls for the dis- 
charge of pollutants into the 
metropolitan area's waters to be 
eliminated by 1985. 

The program for the public ses- 
sion will include a presentation of 
preliminary plans illustrating 
alternative regional treatment 
systems to serve through the year 
2000. These systems have been 
designed to meet the standards 
mandated by the Federal Water 
Pollution Control Act 
Amendments. 

The plans, developed by the 
Metropolitan District Com- 
mission, the U.S. Army Corps of 
Engineers and other participating 
agencies, include four water- 
oriented wastewater disposal 
systems, as well as a land-oriented 
system for advanced treatment of 
effluent from inland areas. Discus- 
sion will also focus on the types of 
impacts these alternative plans 
will have on the physical, social 



and economic environment of in- 
dividual municipalities, and the 
region as a whole. 

In order to meet federal re- 
quirements, it is estimated that 
total capital costs involved in 
constructing water-oriented dis- 
posal systems will be on the order 
of $1 billion. Eligible capital costs, 
not including operation and 
maintenance, will qualify for 75 
percent federal and 15 percent 
state financial assistance. The 
remaining 10 percent is expected 
to be provided by local cities and 
towns. 

These public meetings, organiz- 
ed through the Metr opolitan Area 
Plan ning Counc il, wilJ attempt to 
translate the technical aspects of 
the study into layman's terms and 
to relate engineering options to 
key issues raised by local 
governments. Local officials, 
special interest groups and in- 
dividual taxpayers are urged to 
become involved in the evaluatioci 
and selection process to determine^ 
the future expenditure of publi* 
funds. :■'<,•', J 



Other participating agencies 
include the Massachusetts Divi- 
sion of Water Pollution Control 
the Massachusetts Office of State 
Planning and Management and the 
U.S. Environmental Protection 
Agency. 






Journal 

Concord, MA 

25 Apr 74 

Also in: 

Minute Man-Lex 

Fence Viewer- 
Sudbury 

Times -Union- 
Burlington 

Citizen-Belmont 



Acton to host j 
wastewater .i«* 
study series 

Acton will host the first of a 
series of six meetings on alter- 
native regional sewage treat 
ment plans developed by the'. 
Boston Harbor-Eastern Mass.' 
Wastewater Management' 
Study, according to the! 

Metropolitan Arpa Pjanninfl 

Council. j 

TEe" meeting will be held in | 
the Acton-Boxborough 
Regional High School on ' 
Charter rd., on Tuesday, May 7 
at 8 p.m. All Minute-man 
towns are in the study area. 

The meetings are designed 
to further encourage public 
participation in the selection of 
areawide wastewater manage- 
ment plans. 

The program for the evening 
v/ill include a presentation of 
preliminary plans illustrating 
alternative regional treatment 
systems to serve through the 
year 2000. These systems have 
been designed to meet the 
standards mandated by the 
Federal Water Pollution 
Control Act Amendments of, 
1972. The plans, developed by' 
the Metropolitan District Com- j 
mission, the U.S. Army Corps ! 
of Engineers and other par- { 
ticipating agencies, include ' 
four water-oriented 
wastewater disposal 'systems, 
as'' well, ^5. a" land-Oriented 
system "for' advanced. 1 treat- 
ment of effluent from" inland 
ireas. Discussion will also 
T ocus on the types of impacts 
hese alternative plans will 
lave on the physical, social 
ind economic environment of 
ndividual municipalities, and ; 
lie region as a whole. 
In order to meet federal re- 
uirements, it is estimated 
lat total capital costs involv- j 
d in constructing water- | 
ricnted disposal systems will 
e on the order of $1 billion, 
ligible capital costs, not 
lduding operation and^ 
•atntenance, will qualify for 
percent federal and 15 per- 
:nt state financial assistance. 
le remaining 10 percent is ex- 
■cted to be provided by local 
lies and towns. 
These public meetings, 
ganized through the 
jtropolitan Area Planning 
>uncil, will attempt to 
inflate the technical aspects 
the study into layman's 
ms and to relate er.gineer- 
' options to key issues raised 



by local govern- i 
ijfients. 

bfficials, special interest j 
groups and individual tax- H 
payers are urged to become in- 
volved in the evaluation and I 
selection process to determine I 
the future expenditure of 
public funds. ^ 



Q? 



Advocate 
Arlington, MA 
25 Apr 74 



Meetings Scheduled 
On Regional Sewage 

During the month of May officials and 
residents are invited to a- series of six 
meetings on alternative regional sewage 
treatment plans developed by the Boston 
Harbor-Eastern Massachusetts Wastewater 
Management Study. 

The meetings, organized through the 
Metropolitan Area Pl anning Council, will 
inclucW presentation ol preliminary plans 
illustrating alternative regional treatment 
systems designed to meet Federal Water 
Pollution Control Act standards. 

The 8 p.m. meetings are scheduled : May 7, 
Acton-Boxborough Regional High School; 
May 9, Riverside School, Danvers; May 14, 
Cambridge City Hall; May 15, War Memorial 
Auditorium, Newton; May 20, Medfield High 
School; May 22, Town Hall, Norwell. 



Assabe 
B e a c on 
Acton, 
26 Apr 



t valley Wastewater Management Study 
MA To Hold Local Area Meeting 



74 AREA — Under Federal 

mandate, the waters 
(tributaries, rivers, harbors; of 
the eastern Massachusetts 
region are expected to be fit tor 
water recreation and the 
propagation of fish by 1983. The 
Amendments of the Federal 
Water Pollution Control Act of 
1972 (PL 92-500) also set a goal 
which calls for the discharge of 
pollutants into the metropolitan 
area's waters to be eliminated 
by L«j5. 

How will the 109 communities 
and numerous industries within 
the region comply with the 
goals of this Federal law? To 
achieve these goals, what costs 
will be passed down to the 
taxpayer and what benefits can 
he expect to derive from -the 
implementation of. water 
quality programs? 

The U.S. Army Corps of 
Engineers, the Metropolitan 
District Commission, and other 
agencies participating in the 
Boston Harbor-Eastern 
Massachusetts Wastewater 
Management Study will have 
some answers to these very 
critical questions when they 
meet with residents on 
Tuesday, May 7 at 8 p.m. in the 
Acton-Boxborough Regional 
High School. 

Using water quality 
requirements set up by the 
United States Environmental 
Protection Agency, the 
Massachusetts Division of 
Water PollutiofT Control and 
information gathered irom 
local concerns by the 
Metropolitan Ar.ea Plannin g 
Councitr^engineering alter- 
natives have been developed for 
meeting the region's water 
quality requirements through 
the year 2000. 

Choosing among these dif- 
ferent courses of action is not a 
job for the professionals alone. 
Local officials, special interest 
groups and the individual 
taxpayer have the right and 
obligation to become involved in 
the evaluation and selection 
process. 

The meeting is designed to 
further encourage public 
participation in the selection of 
areawide wastewater 



management plans. 

The program for the evening 
will include a presentation of 
preliminary plans illustrating 
alternative regional treatment 
systems to serve through the 
year 2000. These systems have 
been designed to meet the 
standards mandated by the 
Federal Water Pollution 
Control Act Amendments of 
1972. The plans, developed by 
the Metropolitan District 
Commission, the U.S. Army 
Corps of Engineers and other 
participating agencies, include 
four water-oriented wastewater 
disposal systems, as well as a 
land-oriented system for ad- 
vanced treatment of effluent 
from inland areas. Discussion 
will also focus on the types of 
impacts these alternative plans 
will have on the physical, social 
and economic environment of 
individual muriicipa'iitjes, ana 
the region as a whole. 

In order to meet federal 
requirements, it is estimated 
that total capital costs involved 
in constructing water-oriented 
disposal systems will be on the 
order of $1 billion. Eligible 
capital costs, not including 
operation and maintenance, 
will qualify for 75 percent 
federal and 13. • percent "state 
financial assistance. The 
remaining 10 percent, is^ex--- 
pected to be provided by local 
cities and towns. 

These public meetings, 
organized through the 
Metropolitan Area Planning 
Council, will attempt to tran- 
slate the technical aspects of 
the study into layman's terms 
and to relate engineering op- 
tions to key issues raised by 
local governments. Local of- 
licials, special interest groups 
and individual taxpayers are 
urged to become involved in the 
evaluation and selection 
process to determine the future 
expenditure of public funds. 

Other participating agencies 
include the Massachusetts 
Division of Water Pollution 
Control, the Massachusetts . 
OUice of State Planning and 
Management and the U.S. -. 
Environmental Protection 
Agency. • - / 






He raLd -American 
Boston, MA 
27 Aor 74 



4 Sewerage Plans to Be Heard 



The Metro politan A r e a 
Planni ng Cou ncil yesterday 
announced a series of six 
meetings throughout eastern 
Massachusetts to obtain 
public reaction to four pro- 
posed plans to upgrade the 
sewerage systems and treat- 
ment facilities in y09 com- 
munities. 

The meetings will be held: 
Tuesday, May 7, Acton- 
Boxborough Regional High 
School, Acton; Thursday, 
May 9, Riverside School, 
Liberty St.. D a n v e r s : 
Tuesday, May H, Cambridge 
Cirh Hall; Wednesday, May 
13, Newton City HalU. Mon- 



day, May 20. Medfield High 
School, and Wednesday, May 
22, Cushing Memorial Town 
Hall, Norwell. 

Forty-three of the 109 com- 
munities involved are in the 
Metropolitan Sewerage 
District. These 43 communi- 
ties have a population 6f 
almost 2 million persons and 
occupy an area of more than 
400 square miles. 

The hearings are in con- 
junction with a study being 
undertaken by the MDC, the 
Army Corps of Engineers, 
Metropolitan Area Planning 
Council, Office of State Plan- 
ning and Management, 



Division of Water Pollutio - 
Control and Environments 
Projection Agency. ■ 

The study is aimed ' « 
meeting a federal mandat 
that the 109 communitie 
upgrade the quality of thei 
waterways to "fishable" an 
"swimmable" levels in lei 
than 10 years. 

The 1972 Federal Wat! 
Pollution Control Act ameer: 
ments also set a goal whic 
calls for the discharge ( 
pollutants into t'h 
metropolitan area's waters I 
be eliminated by 1985. 



96 



Sunday Post 
Lynn, MA 
28 Apr 74 



Future Water Waste Treatment \ 
lanning Meeting. On May 9 



DANVERS — During the 
month of May local officials and 
interested citizens from 109 
communities are invited to 
participate in a series of six 
meetings on alternative regional 
sewage treatment - plans, 
developed by the Boston Harbor 
— Eastern Massachusetts waste 
water management jstudy. 

North Shore area meeting will 
be held Thursday, May 9, at the 
Riverside school, Liberty st, 
Danvers, at 8 p.m. 

The program for the evening 

will include a presentation of 

preliminary plans illustrating 

alternative regional treatment 

systems to serve through the' 

year 2000. These systems have 

been designed to meet the 

standards mandated by the 

"ederal Water Pollution Control 

\d amendments of 1972. The 

>lans, developed by the 

Metropolitan District Com- 

aission, the U. S. Army Corps of 

)ngineers and other par- 

eipating agencies, include four 

ater-oriented wastewater 

sposal systems, as well as a 

nd- oriented system for ad- 

;nced treatment of effluent 

om inland areas. Discussion 

U also focus on the types of 

.pacts these alternative plans 

11 have on the physical, social 

d economic environment of 

lividual municipalities, and 

region as a whole. . 



These public meetings,! 
organized through the] 
M etropolitan Area Plann ing 
Counc il, will attempt 10 translate 
the technical aspects of the study 
into layman's terms and to-relate 
engineering options to key issues 
raised by - local governments. 
Local officials, special interest 
groups and individual taxpayers 
are urged to become involved in 
the evaluation and selection 
process to determine the future 
expenditure of public funds. 

Other participating agencies 
include the Massachusetts 
Division of Water Pollution 
Control, the Massachusetts 
Office of State Planning and 
Management and the U. S. En- 
vironmental Protection Agency. 






Patriot Ledger 
Quincy, MA 
?9 Apr 74 



MAPC Presenting Waste Treatment Plans 



BOSTON — Four concepts of 
wastewater treatment engi- 
neering plans, designed to 
meet a federal clean water 
mandate by 1985, will be 
presented to the metropolitan 
area communities in a series of 
meetings by the M etropol itan 
Area Planning Council next 



month*?* 

Area meetings have been 
scheduled on Monday, May 20, 
at Medfield High School 
Auditorium, Pond Street, 
Medfield: and Wednesday, May 
22, Cushing Memorial Town 
Hall, 673 Main Street, Norweil; 
both at 8:00 p.m. 

Comznests Asked 

Tie 109 communities will be 
asked to comment on and 
question the four preliminary 
concepts that have evolved from 
the first part of a study con- 
ducted by the MDC, the Army 
Corps of Engineers and other 
agencies participating in the 
Boston Harbor-Eastern Massa- 
chusects Wastewater 
Management Study. 

Another sries of meeting will 
be held in December or January 
with more detail and definitive 
recommendations. The MDC 
will make application for 
necessary grants for con- 
struction in 1975 after the final 
plan has been selected. 

According to John Harringtoa 
of the MAPC. the capital costs 
for the^ treatment facilities and 
major interceotor sewers range 
from $970 to $1,130 million. The 
most centralized system, costing 
an estimated $S80 "million would 
be the maximum expansion of 
the Deer and Nut Islands p 
treatment plant service. The 
most decentralized system, with 
six additional regional systems, 
is estimated at $1,130 million. 
Th* funding would by 75 per 
cent federal, 15 per cent state, 
and 10 per cent local. 

— Concept One proposes ' 



upgrading the MDC Nut and 
Deer Island wastewater 
treatment plants to ultimately 
serve 50 communities including 
the core cities of Boston, 
Cambridge, • Chelsea, EveretC 
and Somerville. Service would 
be provided to Hopkinton, 
Lincoln, Lynnfield, Sharon and 
Weston to include 48 cities and 
towns. The remaining 59 
communities of the region would 
be served by regional and 
municipal systems.. * •• ; 

" Area regional - plants under 
consideration would be located 
in Medfield, Scituate, Rockland 
and Cohasset; expanding the 
existing municipal plants to 
regional plants. 

Service Area 

—Concept Two would reduce 
the service area of the Deer 
' and Nut Islands treatment . 
plants to 32 communities and ,- 
create five additional regional 
treatment systems. Area 
communities would include 
Brain tree,- Dedham (in part), 
Hingham, Holbrook, Milton (in 
part), Quincy, Randolph, and 
Weymouth, with tributaries to 
Nut Island- 
Regional systems proposed in 
the area would be established} 
in Dednam, Needham, I 
Wellesley, Canton, Norwood, 
Sharon, Stoughton, Walpole, and 
Westwood. 

—Concept Three- would- extend 
the Deer and Nut Island 
treatment plants to serve 58 
communities, including 
Hopkinton, Lincoln, Lynnfield, 
Sharon and Weston as well as; 
communities that lie within the | 



Upper Charles River basin and 
that are located around the 
present MDC water supply 
reservoir in the Sudbury River 
basin. 

-Concept Four -. would 
decentralize the present system 
tributary to the Nut and Deer 
Island treatment plants by 
developing six additional 
regional systems within the 
present service area of the 
MDC. • - . : _ : . 

i Deer, Not Islands -«. ; 

Deer and Nut Island plants 
would serve 24 communities, 
including Braintree, Dedham (in 
part), Hingham, Holbrook, 
Milton (in part) Quincy, Ran- 
dolph and Weymouth. 

Possible regional systems in 
the area would be located in 
Dedham, Needhara, Wellesley, 
Canton, Norwood, Sharon, 



Stoughton, Walpole, and 
Westwood. 

David Kenyon, a spokesman 
for the Army Coprps of 

-Engineers, noted that the stndy 

.'revealed the use of land for 
assimilating wastes as an 
alternative to bulding extensive 
advanced treatment plants on 
river banks was limited by the 
fact there is only 16.000 acres 
available ' for all • 109 corn- 

^munities in the study area. Also 
salt water, in the coastal 

; community sewers eliminates 
the possibility of land use. 









News 

Milford, MA 
L May 74 



'Wastewater Treatment 
Meeting To Be In Medfield 



MEDFIELD — Four plans for 
wastewater treatment engineer- 
ing, which were designed to meet 
a federal clean water mandate by 
1985, will be presented to area 
communities in a series of 
meetings by the Metropolitan 
Area Planning Council ('Maji u; 
beginning next month. 

The area gatherings will begin 
with a meeting on Monday May 
20 at Medfield High School 
Auditorium, Pond street. At 
these meetings 109 communities 
will be asked for their opinions 
and comments on the four 
preliminary concepts that have 
evolved from the first part of a 
study conducted by the 
Metropolitan District Commis- 
sion, the Army Corp. of 
Engineers and other agencies 
participating in the Boston 
Harbor-Eastern Massachusetts 
Wastewater Management Study. 

The followup series of 
meetings will be held in 
December and January for a 
more definitive recommendation 
on which program to follow. The 
MDC will make application for 
the necessary grants for con- 
struction in 1975 after the final 
plan has been chosen. 



Central System 
John Harrington of the MAPC 
has estimated that the capital 
costs for the treatment facilities 
and interceptor sewers range 
from $970 to $1,130 million. 

The most centralized system, 
costing an estimated $980 million 
would be the maximum expan- 
sion of the Deer and Nut Islands 
treatment plant service. The 
most decentralized plan, in- 
cluding the addition of six 
regional systems, is estimated at 
$1,130 million. The funding would 
be 75 percent federal, 15 percent 
state and 10 percent local. 

Use of Land 

David Kenyon, a spokesman 
for the Army Corp of Engineers, 
notes that the study revealed the 
use of land for assimilating 
wastes, as an alternative to 
building extensive advanced 
treatment plants on river banks, 
was limited by the fact that there 
are only 16,000 acres available 
for all 109 communities in the 
study area. 

Also salt water in the coastal 
community sewers eliminates/ 
the possibility of land use in these 
areas. ^ 






Chronic Le 

Ipswich, MA 

2 May 74 

Also in: News -Amesbury, MA 

Messenger-Marblehead, MA 



Donvers meeting to eye 
wastewater disposa 



During the month of May 
local officials and interested 
citizens from 109 communities 
are invited to participate in a 
series of six meetings on 
alternative regional sewage 
treatment plans, developed by 
the Boston Harbor - Eastern 
Massachusetts Wastewater 
Management Study. 

Included in the study area 
are the towns of Boxford, 
Danvers, Hamilton, Ipswich, 
Topsfield, and Wenham. 

The meetings are designed 
to further encourage public 
participation in the selection 
of area-wide wastewater 
management plans. One of the 
meetings has been set for May 
9 at 8 pjn. at the Riverside 
School, Liberty street, 
Danvers. 

The program for the 
evening will include a 
presentation of preliminary 
plans illustrating alternative 
regional treatment systems to 
serve through the year 2000. 
These systems have been 
designed to meet the stan- 
dards mandated by the 
Federal Water Pollution! 
Control Act Amendments of | 
1972. The plans, developed by | 
the .Metropolitan District i 
Commission, the U. S. Army 
Corps of Engineers and other 
participating agencies, in- 
clude four water -oriented 
wastewater disposal systems, 
as well as a land-oriented 
system for advanced treat- 



ment of effluent from inland 
areas. Discussion will also 
focus on the types of impacts 
these alternative plans will 
have on the physical, social 
and economic environment of 
individual municipalities, and 
the region as a whole. 

In order to meed federal 
requirements, it is estimated 
that total capital costs in- 
volved in constructing water- 
oriented disposal systems will 
be on the order of $1 billion. 
Eligible capital costs, not 
including operation and 
maintenance, will qualify for 
75 percent federal and 15 
percent state financial 
assistance. The remaining 10 



MetroDoii 
CounI 
translate 
aspects of 



percent is expected to be 
provided by local cities and 
iowns. 

These public meetings, 
organized through the 
•ea Planning 
•ill attempt to 
the technical 
the study into 
layman's terms and to relate 
engineering options to key 
issues raised by local 
governments. Local officials, 
special interest groups and 
individual taxpayers are 
urged to become involved in 
the evaluation and selection 
process to determine the 
future expenditure of public 
funds. 



LOO 






Hull=Nantasket Times 
Hull, MA 
2 May 74 



Meetings On Sewage Treatment Plans 



During, the month of May 
local officials and interested 
citizens from 109 communities 
are invited to participate in a 
series of six meetings on 
alternative regional sewage 
treatment plans, developed by 
the Boston Harbor - Eastern 
Massachusetts Wastewater 
Management Study. The meeting 
for the South Shore Area will be 
May 22, Town Hall, Norwell. 

The meetings are designed to 
further encourage public 
participation in the selection of 
area wide wastewater 
management plans. 

The program for the evening 
will include a presentation of 
preliminary plans illustrating 
alternative regional treatment 
systems to serve through the 
year 2000. These systems have 
been designed to meet the 
standards mandated by the 
Federal Water Pollution Control 
Act Amendments of 1972. The 
plans, developed by the 
Metropolitan District 
Commission, the U.S. Army 
Corps oi Engineers and other 
participating agencies, include 
four water-oriented wastewater 
disposal systems, as well as a 
land-oriented system foi 
advanced treatment of effluent 
from inland areas. Discussion 
will also focus on the types ot 
impacts these alternative plan; 
will have on the physical, social 
and economic environment of 
individual municipalities, and 
the region as a whole. 

In order to meet federal 
requirements, it is estimated that 
total cup:tj] costs involved in 
constructing water-oriented 

d;spo^ai systems will be on the 
order oi SI billion. Eligible 
cjpit^; costs, not including 
operation and maintenance, will 
qualify for 75 percent federal 
jnd 15 percent state financial 
assistance. Th^ remaining 10 
percent is expected to be 
provi'icd by local cities and 
towns. 

Th'.'.t' public meetings. 
organized through the 



Council, will attempt to 
translate the technical aspects of 
the study into layman's terms 
and to relate engineering options 
to key issues raised by local 
governments. Local officials, 
special interest groups and 
individual taxpayers are urged to 
become involved in the 
evaluation and selection process 



to determine the future 
expenditure of public funds 

Other participating agencies 
include the Massachusetts 
Division of Water Pollution 
Control, the Massachusetts 
Office of State Planning and 
Management and the U.S. 
Environmental Protection 

Agency. 



includes MM area 



Hicials imveal 



jR 



iaijrraaasii3a.€- ssirai 



o 



-i 



7 " 



^£i 






a 



by Dick Solito 

The Minute-man area towns are situated 
near the geographical center of IC9 com- 
munities included - in. a monumental, st.3 
million wastewater management study which 
proposes sewerage treatment facilities es- 
timated tn.cost about ?1 billion. 

The wraps were taken off the study, which is 
about ijO percent completed, at a new3 
cor.cerence at Metro politan Aiv a Planning 
Cou nsi] (MA PO heaefquartorr, m"~Bos..on o.r 
April" 26. ^ • ,-•.■-' ... ' 

Besides the MAPC, the study team includes 
the Metropolian District Commission (Mi)C), 
the Army Corps of Engineers, Lhe Office of 
State Planning and Management, the Division 
of Water Pollution Control and . the F.c- . 
vironmtmtul Protection Agency. 

They are conducting the "Eastern 
Massachusetts-Boston Harbor Wastewater 
Management Scudy" with the avowed intention 
• of meeting the Federal Water Pollution 
Control Act mandate that calls fo** the el. : mlna-> 
tion of discharge of pollutants into tne . 
metropolitan area's waters byliJ:?5. ■ • . 

The cities and towns involved a:. - *o are re- 
quired to improve the- quality of cheir 
waterways to "fishable" and "swimmahle" 
levels in less than 10 years. ■-•.'-. 

The MDC's goal is to eliminate the discharge 
of digested sludge from the Deer Island and 
Nut Island treatment plant3 into Boston Har- 
bor and to provide a minimum of secondary 
treatment for all wastes discharged hy these 
plants. .-,.... • • -• • - 

The study team has outlined four alternative 
systems or concepts, plus the possibility of a 
land treatment solution currently under ex- 
amination. -...-■. 

The concepts weigh the possible expansion of 
MDC treatment plants to serve more ' 
municipalities and construction of inland 
facilities to discharge highly treated effluents 
if"'; the Mystic, Charles orNspouset Rivers, or 
combination of these. 

"Satellite" plants, it is believed, co'.;M 
relieve the pollution !oid on Boston K.'.r'cL'r an 1 
'., .-""i'.'j increased riaw to th livers especia'iy 
during ':>•.• drier summer months, and preclude 
the need cf installing large relief se'.vers for 
the present system. 

MAPC spcV.esm .n John Harrington ra:d tr.e 
r:fed tor and cost of the system am "cf serious 
Concern (0 the cities end 'owns." He noLc-d that 
: .; addition to the ?1 billion for m'-.jor capital 
Lrpen.se? referred to earlier for improvement 
'\ '.hm the MDC, the cost could equd another 
billion for "local collation systems for 



<5 



"" o 







1 



communities outside the MDC sewerage dis 

trict."; - • . . . -. .■ .■ --rr ••; 

Only 43 of the iG9 municipalities in the stud 
area are in f he MDC system. 

In oider to include public participation in the 
choice of system and facilities for wastewater 
management, Hauingion said a series of 
• public meetings will be held so that the citizens 
may "help us decide how their tax money- is 
spent." -. • . ; - •• - . 



Acton briefing 



-:i 



Tee first pubiic hearing will be hsld in Acton 
at the Acten-Boxb-jreugh Regional High School 
on Tuesday, May 7 at p.m. . 

Minute-man area towns figure in all of thai 
conceals envisioned by toe study groups. Area 
towns which are in the MDC system are Bed- 
ford, Belmont, Burlington and Lexington and 
alt have town sewers ranging, from fully 
sewervd to partly itwered. 

Towns outs'de the MDC, with no town 
sewers, are Acton, Carlisle, Lincoln and Sud- 
bury; Concord, about 60 percent sewered and 
Billerica, 93 percent sawered. 

Coi.'Cept I calls for the upgrading of 
sewerage facilities of the 43 communities 
within the MDC and extension of MDC 
interceptors to seven other communities- 
inc ; uding Lincoln. Since there are less treat- 
ment facilities involved,, this would cost $37'1 
million. • - '" 

This concept also reises the possbility r*f es- : 
tabli^hing a set of regional and municipal 
systems outside the srea served by "Deer zi:d x 
Nut Islands treatment plants. - 

Of' local interest is the suggestion of a new, j 
largnr treatment facility than the present one! 
in Concord to serve Acton and several other; 
communities. ', 

Also, Lhe municipal system, in' Eilleiica 
would become regional after 20G0 to combined 
■with Carlisle. 

A new regional plant would be built in Sud- 
bury to serve th^t town and Wayiand. i 
Tnese three loco!, regional system;" are part, 
of each of the concepts." 

Trie drainage basin far theCcitoid-^Lilvricai 
facilities *s the Cncord River a,;d th^t ior the! 
Si'dbury plant would be the Sudbury River. 

Concept 2 wou'.j reduce the enisling MDC 
service area to 32 towns and create five ad- 
ditional regional treatment systems. The 
approximate cost of th? plan is $: C">0 bi'lion. 
The four a:ea towns within thv MDC would be 
.itro;:^ the 32 communities continued to be 



Cont'-^^d >j\ 1*5 



Continued 



102 






Continued from 



Hfcsaer 



disposal steely 






- 



served by the Dser Island and Nut Island treat- 
ment plants. 

None of the regional systems would be built 
within area communities. However, Lincoln 
would be served by a plant which would be 
located In Watertown_ ■■ . 

Concept 3 is an expansion of Concept 1 and 
would include SO communities, including Lin- 
coln. Its cost is estimated at $080 million. 

Concept 4 would decentralize the present 
system by developing six additional regional 
systems within the present service area of the 
MDC at a cost of 51.130 billion. . - 

Burlington would be served by a treatment 
plant in Woburn, Lincoln by the plant in Water- 
town and Bedford, Belmont and Lexington by a 
plant in Medford. 

Impact on rivers 

The study discusses impacts on aqiatic. en- 
vironment on the Assabet, Concord and Sud- 
bury Rivers. .:■"•.-. 

It states the Assabet will benefit from the ad- 
dition of "substantial flow" during periods of 
low flow as the result of a plant in Marlboro. 
The new water level will Increase aqu3tic 
plant life and "a' rich source of nutrients" 
depending on the efficacy of wastewater 
treatment. 

There would be "a significant environmental 
improvement in polluted Nagog Brook" as the 
result of a treatment plant and intercepting 
sewer system on the Concord River, the study 
said. It also said ammonia from the plant may 
produce localized toxic effects, similar to that 
of the Marlboro plant on the Assabet River. 

Wastewater. from . the Sudbury River 
watershed will Le discharged to Boston Harbor 
after treatment at Nut Island, thus the impact 
is believed to be neutral. 

One of the speakers at the MAPC briefing, 
David C. Kenyon of the Corps of Engineers, 
discussed land application as an alternative to 
building extensive advanced treatment plants. 

Kenyon said there is nothing new about land 
application as fit is the oldest form of waste 
treatment known ttf man." ■■*•- - 

He added,/ "Bat , to take our present water- 
borne wasteland apply it to laud rather than 
dumping it into streams is new." 

Kenyon said there are restrictions to land 
application under the present circumstances 
since at least 1CO.CCO acres and up to §00,009 
acres would he needed if the system were to be 
used for all 1U9 communities in the study. Ac- 
tually, he said, there are only 15,000 acres 
within the study area that appear to be suitable 
for land application. - 



MDC spokesman Martin Cosgrova explained 
that the MDC sewer facilities include approx- 

i imately 225 miles of trunk sewers serving 5.0C0 
miles of local sewers. The district has 11 
pumping stations, four headworks and the two 

', large-scale primary treatment plants at Deer 

| Island and Nut Island. 

The plants have an average daily treatment 

1 capacity of more than 450 million gallons, with 
a combined capability of handling maximum 

! flows at the rate of 1.2 billion gallons a day. 
Cosgrove said, "The primary reascn toe 

; MDC hns undertaken thin vrestsvrater manage- 

1 rr.ont ar.d engineering study is that n«?.ny of the 

; existing Metropolitan, Sewerage District 
facilities have reached their installed capacity. 
The time h3S come to determine if the ?vISD 
system Should he expanded, contracted cr re- 
main at its present size. In any event, because 

i of both increasing population and water con- 

I sumption, additional facilities must be 

■ constructed." 

Other sneakers besides Harrington, Kenyon 

and Cosgrove* were Martin Weiss of the MDC 
, > ___ _ _ „. . . 

and Daniel McGiliicudciy of the Office of State 

i Planning and Management. -• - ■•- 

" They said j'5 percent of ths project costs 

would be pr.J by the federal government, 15 

percent by 'be state and 10 per cent by the local 

community. 

Other comments included the point that: 

. The purpose of the plants inland is to'dis- 

charge effluent, after suitable treatment, into 

rivers oper? f ing under a regional system. 

J . The advantage of satellite plants is that 

i wastewater ic generated from sources outside 

I the river and added to the river basin itself. 

. The purpose of wastewater management is 
to improve the quality of the water. 

. Issues might arise over where treatment 
plants, which will require five to 10 acres, will 
be placed. 

. Th? greater water flow in rivers, especially 
during the low How periods, would be swim- 
mable and possibly drinkable with proper 
treatment. . . ■ 

It was also suggested that there are certain 
degrees of pollution throughout the study area. 

One speaker said, "Every river in the study 
area is in trouble new. Without this study all 
will be in move, trouble. We are trying to head 
off a crisis." ; 



Minute Man - Bedford, Mass. 5/2/74 



103 



Item 

Wakefield, MA 
3 May 74 



Public Meeting 
On Water 
Pollution Control 

Under Federal mandate, the 
waters (tributaries, rivers, 
harbors)of the eastern 
Massachusetts region are 
expected to be fit for water 
recreation and the propagation 
of fish by 1983. The Amend- 
ments of the Federal Water 
Pollution Control Act of 1972 



9 (PL92-600) also set a goal which 

V calls for the discharge of 

pollutants into the metropolitan 

area's waters to be eliminated 

by 1985. 

By mid-spring, the I J. S._ 

Army Pnfpg ' flf ^ n ginPPr«, thp 

Metropolitan District Com- 
mission, and other agencies 
participating in the Boston 
Harbor-Eastern Massachusetts 
Wastewater Management 
Study wM begin to have some 
answers to these very critical 

/questions. Using water quality 
requirements set up by the 
United States Environmental 
Protection Agency, the 
Massachusetts Division of 
Water Pollution Control and 
information gathered from 
local concerns by the 
Metropolitan Area Planning 
Council, engineering alter- 
natives have been developed for 
meeting the region's water 
quality requirements through 
the year 2000. 

Choosing among these dif- 
ferent courses of action is not a 
job for the professionals alone. 
Local officials, special interest 
groups and the individual 
taxpayer have the right and 



obligation to become involved 
in the evaluation and selection 
process. 

Beginning in May, a series of 
public meetings will be con- 
ducted by the agencies involved 
to encourage citizen par- 
ticipation in the decision- 
making process. 



A meeting has been 
scheduled for Thursday, May 9 
at 8 p.m. at the Riverside 
School on Liberty st in Danvers. 

The six public meetings will 
attempt to translate the 
technical aspects of the study 
into layman's terms and to 
relate engineering options to 
the key issues raised by local 
governments. 



y 



iou 



Globe XA Public to aid 

Boston, MA . < 

5 May 74 i n planning 
sewage war 

By Evelyn Keene 
Globe Correspondent " -? - 

The sewage created by 
109 cities and towns in 
eastern Massachusetts 

during the next 50 to 80 
years is among current 
topics of concern to sever- 
al Federal and state agen- 
cies. 

. Public officials point out. 
that in the past the sewage 
problem was something 
municipalties usually del- 
egated to engineers and 
planners. 

However, the Federal 
Water Pollution Control 
Act, enacted in 1972, is 
about to bring about some 
major changes in the ap- 
proach to the sewage 
problem. The law calls for 
public participation in 
planning elimination of 
pollutants in the nation's 
navigable waters by 1985. 

The Federal law also re- 
quires by 1983 the rivers, 
harbors and tributaries of 
the eastern Massachusetts 
region be fit for water 
recreation and fish propa- 
. gation. 



• The Metropolitan Area 
Planning Council (MAPC) 
is surging the public to at- 
tend any of six • public 
meetings being held this . 
• month throughout western j 
'Massachusetts to learn ! 
more about sewage prob- 
, lems and participate in fu- 
ture sewage plans. 

One of the major prob- , 
lems of the future is the 
'Metropolitan District 

Commission's (MDC) . 

sewer system. Existing : 
MDC sewer facilities serve 
.43 cities and towns with a 
population of more than 
two million in an area 
greater than 400 square 
miles. There are 225 miles , 
of MDC trunk lines, serv- ' 
ing 5000 miles of local 
sewer lines,- with 11 
pumping stations, and two 
large-scale primary sew- 
age treatment plants at 
' Deer Island and Nut Is- 
land in Boston Harbor.. 
i,' But now these facilities 
have reached their capaci- 
ty. Martin Cosgrove, the i 
•MDC's chief engineer, i 
;!says: "The time has come. 
1 to determine whether the 
■{Metropolitan sewer system 
- should be expanded, con- 
-'tracted, or remain at its 
present sij"».'.'.. . • - •' " 



10^ 



A wastewater raanage- 

• raent'sfudy was undertak- 
en "by an engineering firm 

.with the aid of a technical 
committee consisting of 

'representatives of the 
MDC, the Army Corps of 
Engineers, the Environ-. 

[mental Protection Agency, 
MAPC, the State Division 
of Water Pollution Control 

.and.' the Office of State 
Planning and Manage- 
ment .^ • . ;.-.• 

i. The study group ha3 

•recommended four alter- 
native plans of action that 
range in cost from $970 

■ million to $1.30 billion. In 
carrying out such a project 

-.75 percent of the costs of 
new sewage treatment fa- 
cilities will be assumed by 

-the Federal government, 
15 percent by the- state,' 
and 10 percent-byithe mur 
nicipalities^ 4 *■>• ■ ' V **■ r 
• The- .1' "four alternative 
plans recommended by the 
six-agency committee are: 

• 'r-Nd expansion of the 
Metropolitan Sewerage 
District, with improve- 
ments only to the existing 
areas. 

— Limited expansion, 
possibly adding 16 more 
communities to the pres- 
ent 43, or contraction de- 
leting some outlying com- 
munities. ..*•»•• 

— Ultimate expansion to 
109 communities. 

— No- District; — a cen- 
- tralized system with a re- 
gional system of satellite 
sewage treatment plants 
.in local communities. 

The MAPC meetings are 
scheduled for 8 p.m. at the 
following places: 

May 7 — ActOn-Boxboro 
Regional High School, 
Charter road, Acton. 

May 9 — Riverside 

School, Liberty ' street, 
Danvers. *~ 

May 14— Cambridge 

City Hall, City Council 
Chambers, 795 Massachu- 
setts av. 

May 15 — War Memorial 
Auditorium, City Hall, 
1000 Commonwealth av., 
Newton. 

• May 20— Medfield High 
School Auditorium, Pound 
street. i 

May 22 — Cushing Me- 
morial Town Hall, ' 673 
Main sL, Norwell. 



New England Construction 
Lexington, VA 

8Ma y 74L oca | Officials and Interested Citizens 
Are Invited to Participate in Meetings 
on Regional Sewage Treatment PJans 



During the month of May local 
official* and interested citizens from 
109 communities are invited to partic- 
ipate in a series of six meetings on 
alternative regional sewage treatment 
plans, developed by the Boston Har- 
bor — Eastern Massachusetts Waste- 
water Management Study. 

The meetings *are designed to 
further encourage public participa- 
tion in the selection of areawide 
wastewater management plans. 

The program for each evening will 
include a presentation of preliminary 
plans illustrating alternative regional 
treatment systems to serve through 
the year 2000. 

These systems have been designed 
to meet the standards mandated by 
the Federal Water Pollution Control 
Act Amendments of 1972. The plans, 
developed by the Metropolitan Dis- 
trict Commission, the U. S. Army 
jCorps of Engineers and other partic- 
ipating agencies, include four water- 
oriented wastewater disposal systems, 
as well as a land-oriented system for 
advanced treatment of effluent from 
inland areas. 

Discussion will also focus on the 
types of impacts these alternative 
plans will have on the physical, social 
and economic environment of indi- 
vidual municipalities, and the region 
as a whole. 

In order to meet federal require- 
ments, it is estimated that total 
capital costs involved in constructing 
water-oriented disposal systems will 
he on the order of SI billion. 



Eligible capital costs, not including 
operation and maintenance, will qual- 
ify for 75 per cent federal and 15 per 
cent state financial assistance. The 
remaining 10 per cent is expected to 
be provided by local cities and 
towns.. 
, These public meetings, organized 
through the MetropoJhan_Acea— PJan- 
ning Coun cil, w ill attempt to translate 
die technical aspects of the study into 
layman's terms and to relate engi- 
neering options to key issues raised 
by local governments. 

Local officials, special interest 
groups and indi\idual taxpayers are 
urged to become involved in the 
evaluation and selection process to 
determine the future expenditure of 
public funds. . 

Participating 

Other participating agencies in- 
clude the Massachusetts Division of 
Water Pollution Control, the Massa- 
chusetts Office of State Planning and 
Management and the-U. S. Environ- 
mental. Protection Agency. 

The meetings in each instance will 
get under way at 8 p.m. 

The first one is scheduled for May 
7 at the Acton-Boxborough Regional 
High School, Charter Road. Acton. 
On May 9 the Riverside School on 
Liberty Street in Danvers will be the 
site. 

A May 14 meeting has been 
scheduled for Cambridge City Hall, 
City Council Chambers, 795 Ma*s. 
Ave. Cambridge, with another on the 
following evening at War Memorial 
Auditorium, City Hal!. 1000 Com- 
monwealth Ave.. Newton. 

The two final sessions are sot for 
May 20 at the Medfield High School 
Auditorium, Pound Street. Med field 
and Cushing Memorial Town flail, 
673 Main Street, Norwell on May 
22. 



106 



Herald 
Danvers, MA 

9 May 74 

Also in: Tri-Town Transcript 
Topsfield, MA 

3 May 74 



'Danvers meeting to eye 



ter dispose 



During Ihe month of May 
local officials and interested 
citizens from 109 communities 
are invited to participate in a 
series of six meetings on 
alternative regional sewage 
treatment plans, developed by 
the Boston Harbor - Eastern 
Massachusetts Wastewater 
Management Study. 

Included in the study area 
'are the towns of Boxford, 
Danvers, Hamilton, Ipswich, 
Topsfield, and Wenham. 

The meetings are designed 
to further encourage public 
participation in the selection 
cf area-wide wastewater 
management plans. One of the 
meetings has been set for May 
9 at 8 p.m. at the Riverside 
School, Liberty street, 
Danvers. 

The program for the 
^evening will include a 



presentation of preliminary 
plans illustrating alternative 
regional treatment systems to 
serve through the year 2000. 
These systems have been 
designed to meet the stan- 
dards mandated by the 
Federal Water Pollution 
Control Act Amendments of 
1972. The plans, developed by 
the- Metropolitan District 
Commission, the U. S. Army 
Corps of Engineers and other 
participating agencies, in- 
clude four water-oriented 
wastewater disposal systems, 
as well as a land-oriented 
system for advanced treat- 
ment of effluent from inland 
areas. Discussion will also 
focus on the types of impacts 
these alternative plans will 
have on the physical, social 
anH economic environment of 
individual municipalities, and 
the region as a whole. 



In order to meet federal 
requirements, it is estimated 
that total capital costs in- 
volved in constructing water- 
oriented disposal systems will 
be on the order of $1 billion. 
Eligible capital costs, not 
including operation and 
maintenance, will qualify for 
75 percent federal and 15 
percent state financial 
assistance. The remaining 10 
percent is expected to be 
provided by local, cities and 
towns. 

These public meetings, 
organized through the 
Met ropolitan Area Pl an ning 
Council, will attempt to 
translate the technical 
aspects of the study into 
layman's terms and to relate 
engineering options to key 
issues raised by local 
governments. 



10? 



Assabet Valley Beacon 
Acton, MA 



9 May 74 .. 

Wastewater SVlanagement Alternatives 
Presented In Regional Meetings 



1 



ACTON — About twenty 
people attended a regional 
/briefing session on the Boston 
Harbor-Eastern 
Massachusetts Wastewater 
Management Study at Acton- 
•Bcxborough Regional High 
School Tuesday night. The 
study, conducted jointly by the 
Metropolitan Di,slrict Com- 
mission (MDC), the Army 
Corps of Engineers, the 
'f"T'-pV - iri i\7ji Plnnnlnfl 
Cpir° : l tiUAPC) and other state 
and federal agencies, is in- 
tended to determine the future 
size of the Metropolitan 
Sewerage District (ad- 
ministered by ,MDC) and to 
prdpcse and evaluate advanced 
wastewater management 
systems for 109 communities in 
Eastern Massachusetts. 

"Wa;er clean enough for 
swimming ... and clean enough 
for the protection and 
propagation of fish, shellfish 
and wildlife" by 1983, and "no 
duy.-harge of pollutants into the 
Na jions waters" by li£5, are the 
goals, ao established in the 
Federal. Water Pollution' 
Control . Act Amendments of 
1972. 

MDC maintains primary 
treatment plants at Deer and 
Nut Islands in Boston Harbor as 
well as alout 223 miles of trunk 
ii.- 1 .-,^ :i ?'j.T!ciR3 stations anc". 
lour headworks. r The primary' 
'reatrr^nt plants'are operating" 
at lull capacity and MDC plans', 
to upgrade them with secondary 
treatment plants. Under the 
guidance of four alternative 
engineering concepts, which 
were explained at the meeting, 
towns in Eastern 

Massachusetts were studied to 
determine sewerage needs and 
how they relate to the Deer and 
Km Islands treatment systems. 

Concept 1 cails far upgrading ; 
the MDC sewerage facilities to 
provide for future needs within 
its " present" service area, 
utilizing regional and municipal ■ - 



systems to serve the remaining 
communities within the study 
area. The systems considered 
for servicing the remaining 
communities are based on 
retaining wastewater in the 
basin of origin. The cost of 
providing treatment facilities 
and intermunicipai interceptor 
sewers would be approximately 
$10C6 Million. 

Under Concept 1, Acton, 
Boxborough, Concord, Part of 
Littleton, and Maynard would 
possibly be served by a regional 
system (under "active con- 
sideration") based in Concord- 
Concept ' 2 would involve a 
"limited expansion or con- 
traction of the Deer and Nut 
Islands treatment plant service 
area." Communities outside the 
present MDC treatment plants 
service area would be served by 
regional systems as in Concept 
1. The cost of providing treat- 
ment facilities and in- 
termunicipai interceptor 
sewers under Concept 2 would 
be approximately $1038 million. 
In Concept 3, maximum 
expansion of the Deer and Nut 
Islands treatment area would 
include those communities that 
are not presently served and 
that 'are naCurally tributary to 
the existing system. Service 
would not be extended to those 
municipalities that are not 
"naturally tributary," since it 
is felt that the needs of these 
municipalities would be better 
provided lor through developing 
regional and municipal systems 
within their drainage basin. 
Under this plan, the Deer and 
Nut Islands treatment piants, 
which presently serve 43 
communities, would be ex- 
panded to serve 58 com- 
munities. Cost of Concept 3 is' 
approximately $1105 million. 
Concept 4 would achieve 
"decentralization" of the 
present system by developing. 
six additional regiooal systems 
within the present service ar 



of the Metropolitan District 
System. The Deer and Nut 
Islands wastewater treatmenl 
plants would then serve 24 
communities. Cost of Concept 4 
is estimated at $1123 million. 
The six Potential plant locations 
within the service area are 
Framingham, Dedham, Can- 
ton, Watertown and Woburn. 

Concept 5. The Army Corps of 
Engineers is developing an 
alternative, concept called 
"land application," which in- 
volve "spray irrigation" and 
"rapid infiltration" methods of 
disposing of wastewater that 
has received secondary 
treatment on land. 

The land application method 
of disposal, as explained in the 
information, packet distributed 
at the meeting, "combines the 
natural forces of air, soil, and 
•vegetation to remove the 
nutrients and most suspended 
solids that remain in water 
after secondary treatment. In 
the process, the renovated 
water can be collected for reuse 
elsewhere or allowed to sup- 
plement groundwater supplies. 
The nutrients and other organic 
substances in the water 
stimulate plant growth and 
enrich the soil where they have 
been applied." 

"In spray irrigation, the 
nartiallv renovate wastewater 

^is sprinkled on forested and 
agricultural areas that have 
permeable loamy soils. The 
water seeps down through the 
ground and is either collected or 
becomes part of the ground- 
water. In the forest, the 
nutrients in the water are 
recycled through the trees, the 
leaves, other vegetation and the 
forest floors. In agricultural 
areas the nutrients are drawn 
into plant roots and earned off 
in such harvested crops as hay. 
In rapid infiltration, the , 

"partially renovated wastewater 
is applied in measured volumes j 
to permeable sandy beds. The 



Cleansing of the water 
completed as it passes throw 
at least 20 or 30 feet of sand aj 
gravel to either a collect 
system or the groundwaif 
Nutrients are carried away 
grass and other plants grov 
and harvested in the applicai 
beds." . 

Slides of these processes we 

shown at the meeting. 

response to questions from i 

audience, representatives of i 

Corps of Engineers said that t 

Mass. Department of Pub 

Health is "receptive" to t 

j concept of land application, t 

; would require demonxtra:, 

* project with a "proved' fine 

' three years" before approvi 

the method for a mimic;; 

system. A small land a 

plication project in Falmouth 

being studied and a demc 

strauon project is being cj 
ducted in Muskegan, Michizj 
Two other points made in 
Information Packet are theii 
thai "Recreational and oil 

' uses ... would be compel; 
with the implementation oi 
land application system," i 
"If the concept proves 
cepiable, appropriate 
stitutional and financ 
arrangements will be need 
These arrangements shot 
include reimbursement for i 
land as well as options 
communities that are hosu 
land application systems to ji 
the systems." 

The "preliminary capitalc 
estimate" for the facilu 

'•qeeded in Concept 5 

•$r*)31,(XX),00U. 
XJlher public meetings 
scheduled" this month in D 
vers -"tThursday, May 
Cambridge, Newton, Medii 
and Norwell. 



ioe 



„ • •»- r-> 1/ 4- rw:~ 

Under federal mandate, 109 
cities and towns of the Greater 
Bosron region will be required to 
upgrade the qualicy of theirwater- 
ways to "fishable' and "swim- 
able' levels in less than lOyears. 
The 1972 Federal Water Pollution 
Control Act Amendments also set. 
a goal which calls for the dis- 
charge of pollutants into the 
metropolitan area's waters Co be | 
eliminated by 1985. j 

tt is estimated that the total 
capital costs involved in con- 
structing the wastewater treatment 
facilities required to meet these l 
federal, standards by the 1985 f 
deadline will be on the order of 
$1 billion for the study area. 
How will the 109 communities ! 
and numerous industries within the ; 
region comply with the goals of 
this federal law? To achieve the : 
required water quality levels, what i 
costs will be passed down to the I 
taxpayer and what benefits can he j 
expect to derive from the imple- j 
mentation of water quality pro- 
grams? 

Beginning in May the Metropol- 
itan District Commission, the U.S. 
Army Corps of Engineers and 
other agencies participating in the 
Boston Harbor - Eastern Massa- 
chusetts Wastewater Management 
Srudy began getting some answers 
to these very critical questions. 

Todd/ there are 43 cities and i 
towns in the Metropolitan Sewer- 
age District, the population served 
is almost 2 million people from 
an are^ greater than 400 sq. miles. • 
The Metropolitan Sewer District 
facilities include approximately 
225 miles of trunksewers. serving 
nearly 5,000 rruiesof local sewers. 
The district has 11 pumping sta- 
tions, four headworks, and two 
large - scale primary treatment 
p!?:t~s or Qe-r Isiar.- and Nut Iz- > 
tend. These plants have an average 
djily treatment capacity of more 
than 450 million gallons per day, ' 
with a combined capabiiityof hard- i 
i'.->2 maximum flews at the rA:e of 
' '*..< billion i;;uior.si per day, 

Tne primary reason the Metre— 
pelican District Commissico has 
undertaken this wastewater man- 
ajer.ient and engineering study 
is thai many of ihe existing Met- 
ropolitan Sewerage District facil- 
ities have reached their ••v.tirtsi 
capacity. The time has come to 
determine if the MSD system 
should be expanded, contracted, 
or remain at it3 present size. 
In any event, because of both in- 
creasing population andwatercon- 
surrption, additional facilities 
must be constructed. 



KAPC Studies Methods Jo Upgrade Waterway's 

A second reason for making a 
. study at this time is that the Dis- 
trict's treatment facilities must 
be improved to meet recently en- 
acted federal legislation, Public 
Law 92-500, the Water Pollution 
Control Act Amendments of 1972. 
Among other requirements of this 
act are industrial cost recovery, I 
user charges, industrial pretreat- 
ment, enforcement of regulations; 
all of which require that new 
methods and procedures must be 
developed to administer a' large j 
regiocal wastewater system that 
now serves the 43 cities and towns. 
This Engineering and Manage- 
ment Study is also part of a pro- 
gram agreed to with the U.S. En- j 
vironmental Protection Agency. ' 

Under the program, the MDC is 
committed to eliminating the dis- 
charge of digested sludge from the 
Deer Island and Nut Island treat- 
ment plants into Boston Harbor, 
and, to provide a minimum of 
secondary treatment for all wastes 
discharged from these plants. 
Some basic questions to be an- 
swered by the study are: 

—How best can the waters in 
the Eastern Massachusetts Metro- 
politan area by managed as a 
precious resource? 

— What will be future levels of 
population, water consumption, 
employment, economic activity and 
lar.d use? These ingredients are 
necessary to determine sewerage 
system requirements for the next 
50-80 years. 

— What is the magnitude of the 
combined sewer overflow problem 
and what are the possible sol- 
utions? Although there is agree- 
ment that this is a major source ' 
of pollution to Boston Harbor, the- 
problem has yet to be quantified. I 

— Should the MDC treatment 
plants be expanded to serve more 
municipalities or should inland 
faculties be built discharging 
highly treated effluents into the 
Mystic, the Charles, or the Nep— 
onset Rivers? Satellite plants 
could relieve the pollution load 
on Boston Harbor, provide low 
. Cow augmentation, to_these rivers, - 
and preclude the necessity of in- 
stalling large relief sewers for 
the present system. 

— What is the order of pri- 
orities? Which facilities should be 
built first? What legislation will 
be required to implement the study 
recommendations? 

These are just a few of the many 
questions that have to be looked at 
in order to meet some of the pub- 
lic demands for a better environ- 
ment. 

109 



Quality 



The Boston drainage basin has 
three major rivars, the Mystic, 
Charles and Neponset, which fun- 
nel through Boston andemnrv.th«»ir 
accumulated liows and impurities 
into Boston Harobr. Priortol889, 
the increased expansion of local 
sewer systems discharging their 
wastes directly into these rivers 
gave rise to considerable public 
concern. While the need for com- 
mon- acrion was ciearly indicated^" 
voluntary cooperation bytheinter- 
ested municipalities surrounding 
the core City was rot attainable. 
Accordingly, in 1889 at the re- 
quest of the Legislature, the State 
Board of Health completed an ex- j 
haustive investigation and recom- 1 
mended passage of the act estab- 
lishing the Metropolitan Sewerage 
District. 

After having the responsibility 
of providing sewer service for the 
past 80 years, the M.D.C. is now 
planning for the next £K3 years. 
The public demands not only clean- 
er waters but unified management 
of water as a precious resource. 
How far this type of management! 
should extend geographically for. 
the Metropolitan Sewerage Dtis-j 
trict is a complex question that 
will be resolved through the plan-' 
ning effort now in progress for the! 
Eastern Massachusetts Metropol-i 
itan Area. 

Includsd In the agreement are 
the requisite comprehensive en-i 
gineericg and management studies, 

-An engineering report has been 
completed on the disposal of sludge 
by the firms of Havens & Emerson, 
They investigated various disposal 
methods such as land disposal, 
Incineration and intermediate air 
oxidation. Ttey recommend incin- 
eration. The report is being eval-i 
listed 

Tne consulting engineering firm' 
of Metcaif Si Eddy was engaged to 

'undertake the engineering and 
management studies. The Corps 

■of Engineers has received con- • 
gressional authorization to partic- 
ipate with the Commonwealth in 
a Joint wastewater management 
study fcr-the Boston metropolitan 
area. 

To coordinate the metropolitan 
Boston study with other statewide 
projects, a Technical Subcom- 



Continued 



mlttee on Boston Harborand East- 
ern Massachusetts was formed, 
The committee includes the fol- 
lowing agencies: Corps of Engin- 
eers; Environmental Protection 
Agency; Metropolitan Area Plan- 
ning Council; Massachusetts Div- i 
islon of Water Pollution Control; 
Office of State Planning; and Ma n.- j 
agement; Metropolitan District , 
"CGffTmTso i o n. 

The Committee formulated a 

joint work program, and with the 
engineering firm it has completed j 
a detailed scope of work for the 
entire project. 

The study area comprises 109 
municipalities. The concept is to 
look into the best solutions for pro- 
viding sewerage facilities for these 
cities end towns. 

In order to assist in developing 
basic data for detailing sewerage 
systems, the management firm of 
Peat, Marwick, Mitchell L Co. 
was engaged as a subcontractor 
to Metcalf & Eddy. Forecast.", of 
population,' water consumption, 

"~rr~~^7.C7 erwfTmlC U-iTv i'.y :::ii 



land use for che study area h." f ye ! 
been made for the years 19iH), 
2020 and 2050. 

Four major engineering altern- i 
atives will be examined to estab- 
lish limits and systems for the j 
Eastern Massachusetts Metropol- 
Ttan~area.~ Thss'eare: ^~ ~ 

1. No expansion of the present 
Metropolitan Sewerage District 
with Improvements only to the ex- j 
is ting service area. 

2. Limited expansion, possibly 
.adding 16 more communities, or ! 

contraction deleting some outlying j 
communities. 

3. Ultimate expansion to include . 
the entire study area. 

4. No District, a decentralized j 
system with a regional concej I 

For each of these alternative I 
consideration will be given to ad 
vanced treatment facilities, Ian 
disposal of effluents, and re-us« 
and reclamation of wastewater. Al- ! 
ternatives for sludge processing at ' 
inland treatment plants will in-, 
dude taking a look at centralized' 
facilities and also facilities for\ 
mixing both sludge and refuse. 

Environmental, social, and 
economic Impact analysis will be 
made and integrated with the cost 
effectiveness of the major altern- 
atives. 

Following the selection of the 
most desirable systems forwaste- 
water management in the Eastern 
Massachusetts Metropolitan Area, 
a preliminary engineering plan 
will be developed to provide the 
required treatment of the Deer Is- 
land and Nut Isiand wastewater 
flows. 



A major source of pollution to 
Boston Harbor and its tributaries 
has been identified as the network 
of combined sewer overflows. 
Computer modeling and simulation 
techniques will be used to make . 
an all-oift approach at solving this , 
problem. The model will be used ' 
to determine not only the quantity 
and quality of the combined sew- 
age at various overflow structures, 
but will measure its effect on the 
receiving waters In coordination 
with other on-going modeling ef- 

t^auwiHu atiutiUi^i wlfl'fcc ultfuul 

serious consideration and evoj- ' 
uated against established crit-ca, 
'Alternative rote structures will 
be developed on the basis of flow, 
assessed value, population equiv-' 
alent living units, planned usage, 1 
provisions for combined sewer 
~bv fcrfl6w3~,~gr.d^~mtfus ti iai vas test ■ 
Alternative financial arrange- 
ments and methods of financing 
will be thoroughly Investigated, 

Finally, a public participation ; 
program or what is termed "open 
planning" Is being started. This j 
is being directed by Metropolitan | 
Area Planning CouncJl.whoispro- j 
.vidlng the link between the study I 
and the communities. The M.D.C. ! 

VjlJj assume a leading role in pub- 
lic presentations Jointly with live 
Corps of Engineers. * . 

There will be a Citizen's Ad- ' 
visory Committee of 7 members, 
to assist the technical subcom- • 
mittee in preparing rhe proposed 
public participation program and 
to evaluate the program In terms of 
its effectiveness. 

There will be 6 public meetings 
In the study area running from 
, Nov. 15 to Dec 13. | 



Boston Marine Guide - Boston, Mass 

5/10/74 



110 



Herald 
Danvers, MA 

9 May 74 

ALso in: Tri-Town Transcript 

_ Topsfieid, MA u 8 May 74 

eits will discuss 




regional sewage treatment plans 



During the racnth of May for 73 percent federal and 15 translate the technical aspects process to determine the 
local officials and interested percent state financial of the study into layman's future expenditure of public 
citizens from 109 communities assistance. The remaining 10 terms and to relate funds. 

are invited to participate in a percent is expected to be engineering options* to key Other participating 
series of six meetings on provided by local cities and issues raised by local agencies include the 
alternative regional sewage towns. governments. Local officials, Massachusetts Division of 

t-eatment plans, developed by -These public meetings, special interest groups, and Water Pollution Control, the 
the Boston Harbcr - Eastern organized through the individual taxpayers are Massachusetts pffice of State 
Massachusetts Wastewater Metropolitan Area Planning urged to become involved in Planning and Management 
Management Study. A Council, will attempt to the evaluation and selection and the_U.S.._ Environmental- 
meeting will take place at 8- ~ '" Protection Agency. "' 

p.m. on May 20 at Medfield ~' " 

High School. 

. The meetings are designed 

3 further encourage public 

participation in the selection 

of areawide wastewater 

management plans. 

The program for the 
evening will include a 
presentation of preliminary 
plans illustrating alternative 
regional treatment systems to 
serve through the year 2000. 
Tnese systems have been 
designed to meet the 
standards mandated by the 
Federal Water Pollution 
Control Act Amendments of 
1972. The plans, developed by 
the Metropolitan District •, 
Commission, the U,S_ Ar my 
Corp s of Engin eers/^and other • 
parf/R'ip'atrng* agencies, 
include four water-oriented 
wastewater disposal systems, 
as well as a land-oriented I 
system for advanced 
treatment of effluent from I 
inland areas. Discussion will \ 
also focus on the types of J 
impacts these alternative j 
plans will have on the ! 
physical, social, and economic ' 
environment of individual { 
municipalities, and the region " 
as a whole. t 

In order to meet federal ] 
requirements, it is estimated 
that total capital costs 
involved in constructing 
water-oriented disposal 
systems will be on the order of 
Si billion. Eligib'e capital, 
costs, net including operation 
and maintenance, will qualify. ; 

111 





un 

Marge Koskela 



ourne " 



Several weeks ago, I was 
handed a press release which 
read in part — "Metropolitan 
Boston wastewater disposal 
plans may include Cape Cod it 
was learned this week by the 
Cape Cod Planning and 
Economic Dev. Coram. The 
Boston Harbor-Eastern Mass. 
Area Wastewater Management 
Study involving 109 

metropolitan Boston com' 
munities is currently holding 
public hearings on its proposals. 
"One of the study's five 
proposals involves disposal of 
waste water (effluent) on the 
land through spray irrigation or 
rapid infiltration techniques. 
Th'^e techniques require a 
considerable amount of land 
and the Study suggests that 
certain areas outside of the 
metropolitan area such as Cape 
Cod may be suitable for spray 
irrigation sites. Two specific 
areas in Sandwich and Bourne 
containing over 5,000 acres have 
been indicated as possible 
osal sites." The underlining 
is mine. 

I inquired of a member of the 
Commission while I was down 
at the college listening to Matt 
Connelly on Federal 

management of the coastal 
areas just what it could mean. 
He reassured me by saying, 
"well, you know ' those 
meetings, sometimes someone 
just out of the blue says, "Why 
ftot pipe it to the Cape, and a 
new study is born" . . . 

Well, I went along in part but 
jumped at the chance to ac- 
1 company selectman Barry 
.Johnson to Nonvell to hear thisi 
proposal. Hang onto your hats 
kids. This wasn't an o. r f the cuff, 
airy-fairy light and airy'fan- 
tasy, its a darn serious one- 
million-and-tfcree funded FACT. 
Pipe to the C3pe, why it's, the 
•-.t thing in the world, ac- 
cording to K-e proponents, fly it. 
across :he Canal 9 ?, don't have 
to ... e a .welve-inch 
■os . .- urne Brid 

1 
• < •-. iirirry neer* 



Corps men that we'd even been 
told to microwave Cable TV 
because the bridge wouldn't 
stand it, no response, we still 
went on discussing, seriously 
mind you, the proposition that 
109 or 119 communities will send 
their sewerage via a pipeline to 
Myles Standish Forest, where 
the first big dump will occur, 
then to Bournedale, where 
another dump will be set up, 
and across Bourne bridge to 
Sandwich. 

One thing I made very clear 
to the members of the panel. I 
don't appreciate the attitude 
they took that they had com- 
municated with the REGIONAL 
planning agent for this area. 
REGIONAL my foot, when you 
go to Barnstable and skip over 
the communities who have been 
selected to be the "recipients" 
in this deal, youaredeliberately 
evading. I was pleased that 
Barry took the bull by the horns 
and made sure that open 
hearings will be held in THIS 
area, not Hyannis. 

I was again astounded when 
someone asked for a timetable 
and March 1 next was offered as 
a possibility for im- 
plementation. Now, do you see 
why I constantly urge you to 
attend hearings. Go, go. I know 
I sound like a demented yoyo 
most of the time, but can you | 
see what's apt to happen? 

I told one pretty gal whom 1 1 
regard as intelligent and her | 
reply took my breath away, : 
"Oh, good, my cesspool over- 
flows every week and that'll , 
stop it". I patiently went back' 



and said "Dearie, you're the 
RECIPIENT not the injured 
party in this little charade. 
Well., when it percolated, she 
went up like a skyrocket. But do 
you see what I mean. 

It's like Solid Waste Disposal, 
sure, sure, go ahead, just don't 
put it in my town*. I know you'U 
have a factual statement from 
Barry, who almost blew a 
gasket when he hears some of 
the proposal, too, so I don't feel 
I'm being an alarmist. This is 
just my way of getting your 
attention focused on what can 
happen. 

Martin Weiss led the meeting 
with Mr. Callahan of the U.S. 
Engineers doing the slide 
presentation that shows how 
they spray lumbering projects 
in Pennsylvania, the wildlife out 
west, and recreation parks. 
When rbroached the subject to" 
the Planning Board, one scamp 
whom you all know for his elfin I 
sense of humor said, "Oh,! 
whoopee, we can go over to the 
Scenic Park and watch the 
pretty colors the oil makes 
coming out of the fountains,' 
huh? " Seriously folks, you mus^ 



Courier 
Wareham, MA 
29 May 74 



take a good, long look at uit 
proposition. When they said t 
million and three they werer,'; 
talking jelly beans, and wh« 
they made the statement thj 
they were about half way thru 
your arithmetic work as well* 
mine did?? So you figure a hi 
million has gone into l: 
already, not likely to 
abandoned just because 
fuddy duddy old towns j 
want it, right?? 

Alternate systems whci 
collector projects would leaj 
this back to the Charles, 
and Merrimack rivers v 
discussed, but you know without 
half a eye, the sandy, expassa 



of Cape Cod just made 
eyes light up. 

They talked MAPC and thq 
talked Environment! Impact 
and everything else, but itcani ir 
down to the basic, Sandwich anli Wl 
Bourne are going to be asked a DSl 
(Cont. ^ageA^ 



11? 



Bourne is 
tagged for 
Boston's 
wastes 

The towns of Bourne, Sandwich, 
Carver and Plymouth may receive 
wastewater from 109 communities in 
the Boston area if q U.S. A rmy Corps 
of Engin eers study proposal is 
i carried through. 

The Corps plan, one of five alter- 
natives on how to handle wastewater 
management problems anticipated 
for the Metropolitan Sewerage 
District by the year 2000, recom- 
mends piping treated effluent to 
specific sites in southeastern 
Massachusetts and applying the ef- 
fluent to vast stretches of land by 
either "spray irrigation" or "rapid 
infiltration" methods. 

Specific sites suggested for some of 
the projected 155 million gallons of 
secondary effluent each day include 



Courier 

Wareham, MA 
29 May 74 



Myles Standish Forest in Carver- 
Plymouth, an area in Bourne just 
north of the Cape Cod Canal and an 
area in the middle of Sandwich. 

According to the study just released 
earlier this month: 

— In the spray irrigation method, 
recommended for the Carver and 
Sandwich sites, "the partially 
renovated wastewater is sprinkled on 
forested and agricultural areas that 
have permeable soils . . . seeps down 
through the ground and is either 
collected or becomes part of the 
groundwater." 

— In rapid infiltration method, 
recommended for the Bourne site, 
"the partially renovated waste water 
is applied in measured volumes to 
permeable sandy beds." 

Breakdown of the total land mass of 
20,000 acres suggested for land ap- 
plication sites outside the 
metropolitan study area allocates: 
Plymouth-Carver, 5,000 acres; 
Bourne, 3,500 acres; Sandwich, 1.300 
acres; Freetown, 7J500 acres; and 



li- 



tres, 
tied "1 



Mansfield 2.000 a 

The study, entitled "Boston Harbor 
— Eastern Massachusetts 

Metropolitan Area Wastewater 
Management Study". is the 
cooperative effort of the Com- / 
monwealth of Massachusetts, the | 
Metropolitan District Commission. 
the Environmental Protection 
Agency and the U.S. Army Corps of 
Engineers. 

It states that "a land application 
system must be carefully managed to 
prevent viral or bacterial con- 
tamination of the soils and ground- 
water", but added that surveys of 
existing land application systems 
"found no mention of specific health 
hazards and found little concern over 
threats to the health of those who 
come in contact with land-applied 
wastewater." 

A public meeting to discuss the land 

application method and its effects will 

be held June 5. at 7:30 p.m. at the E 

Pole School. Route 140. Taunton. The 

/'meeting is sponsored by SRPEDD 

I and will keynote representatives of 

I the U.S. Army Corps of Engine 

\ It- 1 Ran* 



Enterprise 
Brockton, MA 
4 June 74 



RAYNHAM 



" Louise Porter, 824-4368 Brent Jcquet, 878-8944 

ConCom Mulls Status 
Of Subdivision Wetland 



i 



RAYNHAM — Conservation 
Commission members studied 
the town soil survey at. their 
regular meeting Monday night 
in an effort to determine the 
wetland status of several sec- 
tions of a proposed 94-lot sub- 
division to be called King 
Phillip Estates. . 

Commission Chairman 
Arthur G. Lazarus Jr.. said that 
several members will also con- 
duct an on-site investigation of 
the property this week. He said 
a commission statement on the 
matter will be presented at a 
special meeting scheduled by 
the Planning Board for Monday 
night at 8 p.m. 

The developer of the sub- 
division, Ervin E: Chickering 
Jr., has also been asked to at- 
tend the meeting. 

In other business, the board 
issued an order of 15 conditions 
that must be met if any further 
construction is begun on a 
house on King Phillip St. being 
built by Chickering. The action 
follows a hearing conducted by 
the commission. The house is 
being built on the edge of the 
Pine Swamp. 
^ It was announced that the 



state will hold a hearing on a 
proposed sewerage treatment 
and disposal plan on June 5 at 
7:30 p.m. at the Elizabeth Pole 
School in Taunton. 

According to Lazarus, an. 
Army Corps of Engineers 
propojul wuuH inlnliUsh a 
treatment plant for Boston 
waste water in one of five 
Southeastern Massachusetts 
sites. He said plans call for the 
sewerage to be piped down to 
the plant for disposal. If con- 
structed, the facility would 
treat 155 million gallons of 
waste material a day. 

In other business, plans were 
announced for a June 15 
Taunton River canoe trip for 
commission members. The 
trip, which is expected to take 
about three hours, will begin 
near Church St. and end around 
the Rte. 24 bridge. 

The commission's new 
bylaws were distributed at the 
Monday night meeting. Chair-, 
man Lazarus said he wanted 
each member to study the new 
laws before voting on them at 
the next meeting. 

Chairman Lazarus reported 
that he and John Welch, a com- 
mission member, had re- 
marked the trail through the 
Locust St. State Forest. Headd- 
" ed that they planted a white 
lilac tree near the entrance 
only to have the tree stolen the 
next week. 

Committee member Joseph 
T. Ferreira said that he will in- 
stall poles for the entrance sign 
on Saturday. A trail guide for 
the park is reported to be ready 
for publication* 



111+ 



Herald News 
Fall River, MA 
4 June 74 



Effluent Disposal in Area 
To Be Discussed Tonight 



The Southeastern Regional 
Planning and Economic 
Development District has 
notified Freetown selectmen of 
a meeting at 7:30 tonight at 
the Elizabeth Pole School in 
Taunton, open to the public, at 
which David Hewitt of the U.S. 
A rmy Cor ps of Engineers will 
givf' a lJitisuilulion on the 
proposal to dispose of effluent 
from secondary wastewater 
treatment plants upon land in 
southeastern Massachusetts. 

Tentative locations for 
disposal are at the Mansfield- 
Norton, Fall River-Freetown, 
and Plymouth-Carver and 
Bourne boundaries and also in 
Sandwich on Cape Cod. 

Approximately 155 million 
gallons of treated wastewater 



from the Boston ;»rea would ba 
subjected to land disposal in 
Southeastern Massachusetts. 

The Fall River-Freetown 
disposal site is located in the 
State Forest. This is the second 
largest of the proposed sites, 
composed of 7,820 acres — 
3,109 acres in the Watuppa 
Reservation, 661 in the State 
Forest and the rest privately 
owned land. 

Under the plan, treated 
wastewater would be pumped 
from the Boston area through 
tunnels and pipes, and when 
it arrives in this area, it would 
be sprayed into the air and 
allowed to percolate into the 
soil, where phosphates and 
nitrates in the water can be 
used as nutrients. \ 



115 



Poor Bill's Almanac 
West^ort, MA 5 June 74 



s 



Boston Waste May Come 
To Southeastern Mass. 



The U.S. Army ...Cgmfi-Qf. 

* Enginejgr^ and 'the Metro- 
j politan District Commis- 

«! sion are completing* a plan 
^ for the treatment and dis- 
posal of metropolitan Bos- 
ton's waste water. The 
3 Corps and the MDC have de- 

• veloped five alternatives . 
One of these alternatives 
is of concern to the resi- 
dents of southeastern Mas- 
sachusetts . 

It provides for the ap- 
plication of effluent from 
secondary waste water 
treatment plants upon 
land in southeastern Mas- 
sachusetts. Tentative lo- 
cations for disposal are 
at the Mansfield-Norton. 
Fall River-Freetown, and 
Plymouth-Carver and Bourne 
boundaries , and also in 
Sandwich on Cape Cod. 

The Zoning, Land Use 
and^ Environmental Planning 
Committee, and the Public 
Utilities Committee of 
SRPEDD are sponsoring a 
public meeting today at 
which time Mr. David He- 
witt of the Army Engineers 
will be present to discuss 
this alternative and its 
effects. The meeting will 
be held at 7:30 p.m. at 
the E. Pole School, Route 
140, Taunton, Massachu- 
setts. 

Approximately 155 mil- 
lion gallons of treated 
waste water from the Bos- 
ton area would be subject 
to land disposal in south-,' 



eastern Massachusetts if 
this alternative is cho- 
sen. 

SRPEDD did not partici- 
pate in the developement 
of this proposal, nor 
does SRPEDD endorse this 
proposal. SRPEDD is spon- 
soring this public meeting 
so as to provide local 
communities with informa- 
tion and the opportunity 
to comment. 

For further information 
contact Juan Mariscal at 
636-8944. 



116 



Stand a rd I i mos 
New Bedford, MA 
5 June 74 



Waste sites 
meeting set 

An Ar my Corps of En gineers plan to dis- 
pose of freaiea Boston* waste water on 
land in southeastern Massachusetts will 
be the subject of a public meeting at 7:30 
tonight at the Pole School, Route 140, in 
Taunton. 

The Army plan, one of five alternatives 
proposed, calls for secondary waste water 
to be disposed on sites in the Plymouth- 
Carver, Fall River-Freetown, and 
Mansfield-Norton areas, including sites in 
state forests and private land. Cape sites 
are also proposed. 

The plan will be explained by David 
Hewitt of the Corps of Engineers. The 
Army developed the plan for )he 
Metropolitan District Commission. 



/ 



News and Foxboro Times 
Mansfield, MA 
o June 74 



City plans wastewater 
disposal area here 



The Mansfield-Norton area is 
one of five locations presently 
under consideration by the U. S. 
Arm y Corps fif F |nginpprg anc j 

the 'Metropolitan District 
Commission's a disposal area 
for effluent from secondary 
treatment plants handling 
Boston's wastewater. 

Approximately 155 million 
gallons of treated wastewater 
from the Boston area would be 
subjected to land disposal in 

Other tentative locations for 
such disposal include Fall 
River-Freetown, Plymouth- 
Carver, Bourne and Sandwich. 



southeastern Massachusetts if 
this area is chosen. 

Meetings were scheduled for 
last evening in Taunton with the 
zoning, land use, environmental 
planning and public utilities 
committee of the Southeastern 
Regional Planning and 
Economic and Development 
District. 

SRPEDD has noted that it did 
not participate in the 
development of this proposal, 
nor does it endorse it. SRPEDD 
sponsored the public meeting in 
order to provide local com- 
munities with information and 
the opportunity to comment. 









OLd Colony Memorial 
Plymouth, MA 
6 June 74 



Boston sewage 
may be headed 
for Plymouth 

PLYMOUTH — On June 5, 
a meeting for area residents 
will be held to discuss U.S. 
Army Corps of Engineers' 
plan s fur — disputing — 5P 
Boston's sewage in the 
Plymouth-Carver area. 

The Corps and the 
Metropolitan District 
Commission (MDC) are 
currently completing a plan 
for the treatment and 
disposal of metropolitan 
Boston's wastewater. One of 
the alternatives under con- 
sideration is that of the 
disposal of approximately 155 
million gallons of treated 
wastewater in land disposal 
areas sited in southeastern 
Massachusetts. Tentative 
locations for disposal are 
Mansfield-Norton, Fall 
River-Freetown, and 
Plymouth-Carver and Bourne 
boundaries and also in 
Sandwich on Cape Cod. 

The Zoning Land Use and 
Environmental Planning 
Committee of the 

Southeastern Regional 
Planning and Economic 
Development District (SR- 
PEDD) is opposed to the plan 
and will hold a public meeting 
at which time David Hewitt of 
the Army Corps will explain 
the project. Residents are 
urged to attend the meeting 
on June 5 at 7:30 p.m. at the 
E. Pole School, Route 140, 
Taunton, Mass. 



11' 



Journal. 

Providence, RI 
6 June 74 



^ Sewage 
to return 
to land 



By CHRISTINE KANE 

Journal-Bulletin Staff Writer 

Treated sewage from the 
Boston area— up to 155 million 
gallons per day— may one day 
be piped to five sites in south- 
eastern Massachusetts, to 
eventually be reapplied to the 
land. 

Dispersal facilities would be 
built on the Fall River-Fuee- 
town line, the Plymouth- 
Carver line, the Bourne- 
Wareham line, near the Cape, 
Cod Canal the Mansfield-Nor- 
ton-Easton juncture, and in 
Sandwich. The largest site, 
7,500 acres, is in the Fall 
River area. 

The "land application" plan 
is one of five proposals now 
being considered as a means 
of dealing with future waste- 
water management in the 
Boston Harbor-Eastern Mas- 
sachusetts area. 

The plan was presented last 
night at a public meeting of 
the Southeastern Regional 
Planning and Economic De- 
velopment District (SR- 
PEDD). 

David C. Kenyon and Rob- 
ert Satterwhite, both from the 
Army Corp s of Engineers , 
ftelded" discreetly hostile ques- 
tions from the audience of 50, 
gathered at the Elizabeth 
Pole School in Taunton. The 
Army Corps is one of six 
agencies involved in long- 
range planning for dispersal 
of the metropolitan area's ef- 
fluents. 



Although the administrative 
and financial details of the 
proposal have not been 
worked out, Kenyon said 44 
communities in the Boston 
area would probably purchase 
the waste treatment service 
from those southeastern com- 
munities involved. 

On four sites the waste- 
water, which would receive 
;*econdary sewage treatment 
Vould be returned to forests 
lor farm land, through irriga- 
tion spraying. Kenyon said 
'the organic materials in the 
' ; waste would seep through the 
Jfenl and be reabsorbed by 
plant growth, enriching the 
'land without doing it damage. 
!|, On the Bourne-Wareham 
*site the effluent would be fil- 
tered through sandy beds, 20- 
t'30 feet deep. In this "rapid fil- 
|tration" technique, the water 
% would be recycled and the fa- 
ltered wastes disposed of, per- 
haps for solid landfill. 
\ Satterwhite said the spray- 
</ing irrigation concept differs 
'from traditional methods of 
|waste treatment in that it 
•"recycles a valuable re- 
' source, the organic nutrients 
found in wastewater." Txadi- 
*tional methods concentrate on 
^cleaning and recycling the 
Iwater without reusing the 
|solid waste materials in the 
^effluent. 

| He said the land application 
"of waterwaste has been used 
|*or 80 years in Australia but 
fthe concept is unpopular in 
tthis country. 

" If the land application plan 
£k ever implemented, it , will 
'"initially cost over one billion 
' dollars. 

Martin Weiss of the Metro- 
politan District Commission 
said the six cooperating agen- 
cies will decide in three or 
four weeks which components 
of the five proposals are polit- 
ically and economically feasi- 
ble. Final plans for metropoli- 
tan waterwaste treatment 
probably won't be ready until 
I January, 1975, Weiss said. J 



120 



Standard Times 
New Bedford, MA 
6 June 74 



Area skeptical of Bostoi 



By FRANK ROYLANCE 
Standard-Times Staff Writer 

TAUNTON —'Representatives of area 
communities reacted with skepticism last 
night to a proposal by the Tr Jr, flmyrrgrp 1 ; 
of Engineers to pump 155 "million gallons 
of treated Boston-area sewage per day to 
disposal sites in southeastern 
Massachusetts. 

The scheme is one of five possible 
solutions to metropolitan Boston's 
wastewater problems under preliminary . 
study by the multi-agency Boston Harbor- 
Eastern Massachusetts Metropolitan Area 
Wastewater Management Study. 

Proposed disposal sites include land in 
Dartmouth, Freetown, Fall River, 
Plymouth, Wareham, and Bourne, as well 
as 14 other communities. 

Area spokesmen questioned David 
Kenyon and Robert Satterwhite of the 
Corps of Engineers about why the Boston 
area shoud turn to southeastern 
Massachusetts as a disposal site; what 
benefits, if any, this region would receive 
from the scheme; how area wells and' 
cranberry crops would be affected, and 



what safeguards would be built into the 
system. 

Kenyon and Satterwhite provided 
answers where they could, but emphasized 
the scheme was in early study stages, and 
that all the answers were not yet 
available. 

No one in the audience of about 50 ex- 
pressed any enthusiasm for the proposal, 
and several dismissed it outright. 

Edmund B. Staples of Wareham, a 
regional commissioner on the 
Southeastern Regional Planning and 
Economic Development District Com- . 
mission, which sponsored the meeting, 
and Gilbert Phinney, Wareham Water 
Commissioner, both expressed concern 
for their town's water resources and the 
cranberry industry. 

The Army representatives admitted, 
they had no information on the effect of 
nutrients from treated wastewater on 
cranberries. 

Joseph Arruda of Fall River Mayor 
Wilfred C. Driscoll's staff called the 
scheme "preposterous", although he ad- 



mitted he had had only a superficial ex- 
posure to it and had no knowledge of the 
scientific principals involed. 

A spokesman for the Town of MansfieK 
gave Kenyon a firm "no" on the proposal, 
saying Mansfield had "enough problems of 
its own" with sewage disposal. 

The Army scheme calls for 155 million 
gallons of wastewater a day to be pumped 
from secondary sewage plants in 
metropolitan Boston to on-land disposal 
• sites in rural sections. 

The Fall River-Freetown site includes a 
total of 7,820 acres, with 1,770 acres on the 
Watuppa Reservation and the Freetown- 
Fall River Stale Forest, and 2,365 acres in 
Dartmouth. 

The Plymouth site totals 8,356 acres. 
with 600 acres in Wareham and 3,660 acres 
in the Myles Standish State Forest. 
Another site includes another 1,150 acres 
of Plymouth land. 

On these sites, the wastewater would be 
released by "spray-irrigation", at a rate 
designed to allow natural plant and 
chemical action to Durifv the waste. The 



121 



Herald News 
Fall River, MA 
8 June 74 



Seen Crawling with Infectious Material 

Waste Pond in Freetown 'Shocking' 



The .Army-' Corps of 
Engine ers is interested in 
Dunding a pond on some 7,500 
acres of woodland in Freetown, 
near the Fall River line. 
However, the pond would not 
be used for recreation but would 
be filled by a daily flow of 150 
million gallons of waste water 
from Metropolitan Boston. 

Joseph Arruda, management 
research specialist in the office 
of Mayor Driscoll, called the 
engineering plan "one of the 
most incredible things I have 
ever heard" when he spoke 
against the plan at a meeting 
of the Southeast Regional 
Planning and Economic 
Development District this week. 

Arruda calls the proposal 
"absolutely shocking" and says 
he is stunned that the Army 



Corps of Engineers could make 
such a suggestion without in- 
vestigating the potential of 
mosquito and insect in- 
festations. 

He sees the plan as a 
potential health hazard of 
tremendous magnitude despite 
assurances by the Army 
engineers that continued 
treatment could eliminate 
problems. 

"No consideration has' been 
given to the side effects of this 
preposterous proposal," Arruda 
declared. He added that even 
with chlorine treatment, the 
virus and bacterial content of 
the pond could pose a 
dangerous health condition. 

"The argument posed by the 
Army engineers is that in the 
Midwest secondary treated 
waste water is applied to crops 
and that Boston's sewage would 
'be a valuable asset to this area's 
soil." Arruda remarked. 

He continued that such an 
argument is ludicrous at best 
since this region has a natural 
replenishment of the nutrients 
in the soil because of the 
amount of rainfall. 

Arruda pictured the scene of 
a pond "crawling with in- 
fectious material" and located 
some two or three miles from 
the city's northernmost section. 

"The Army engineers' plan 
would lay waste to the land, 
as it filled annually with some 
50 billion gallons of treated 
sewage from Metropolitan 
Boston. 

He further indicated that the 
engineers did not provide any 
information as to the pond's 
effect on the area's water table. 

Arruda said the Army 

engineers could have been 

."doing some fancy footwork" 

I in indicating that the 

^suggestion was part of a five 



year study of disposing of 
Metropolitan Boston's treated 
waste water. He said that a 
selection of alternatives is due 
in three weeks, and he is 
concerned that action will be 
taken without proper con- 
siderations for the health and 
safety of area residents. 

The management research 
specialist said the Army 
engineers have come up with 
a proposal "that leaves many 
serious questions unanswered 
and no guarantees." He said 
the proposal is "based on 
superficial studies. 

He observed that the Army 
engineers pointed out that in the 
Midwest, farmers pay for such 
treated waste water as fer- 
tilizer. Arruda commented: "I 
told them (the engineers) that 
if the treated waste water was 
that valuable, they should 
package it and sell it. but not 
store it here." 

Arruda commented that the 
engineers were implying that 
this area would benefit from 
storing Boston's waste water. 
He remarked "That's awful 
hard to swallow." 

He said that the proposal 
"sounds like a crude joke but 
few people are laughing at the 
prospects of having a bacteria- 
infested pond in their midst." 

The Army engineers 
prepared an "information 
packet" on waste water 
management in which the plan 
was explained. The Fall River 
- Freetown area was one of 
several recommended locations 
where the waste water would 
be piped and is the second 
largest area proposed for 
utilization. Only Plymouth is 
proposed for a larger dumping 
area with 8,356 acres 3.G60 
acres of which arc located in, 
Myles Standish State Forest. 



122 



Standard Times 
New Bedford, MA 
11 June 74 



Dartmouth 
delays plea 
for museum 

Dartmouth selectmen got a request last 
night to give temporary custody of the un- 
used Smith Neck School to the bicenten- j 

• nial committee. / 

Kenneth P. Harrison, committee chair- \ 
.man, asked that his committee be given 
temporary custody of the former school 
for use as a museum in conjunction with 
the bicentennial celebration. 

However, selectmen indicated they did 
not want to release the structure on a tem- 
porary basis and no decision was made. 

In a related matter, selectmen ap- 
pointed Harrison and Mrs. Regina Rebello 
to fill two vacancies on the historical com- 
mission. 

• In other business, selectmen: 
DISCUSSED the request of Mr. and 

Mrs. Edwin Bushnell, summer residents 
from out of state, for a shellfish permit 
but took no action on the request. 

WILL MEET with the Park Board and 
School Department representatives to dis- 
cuss having a curfew at school 
playgrounds and town parks after receiv- 
ing reports of drinking at several 
locations. 

WILL ASK the Health Board, Public 
Works Department and town planner to 
get facts on the Ar my Corps of Engine ers' 
proposal to pipe walte water into tnellrea 
from Boston. 

WILL DISCUSS requirements and 
regulations with the .police regarding 
special police Officers, after receipt 
new rules from the chief. 



ceipt of 



123 



/ 



Sewage Site in County 



Gazette 
Taunton, MA 
13 June 74 



, LARRY LAUGHUN 

Gazette Staff Reporter 

FALL RIVER — A concept 

to pump treated sewage from 

the Boston area to 

Southeastern Mass. received 

the avowed opposition of 
Congresswoman Margaret M. 
Heckler ( R-Wellesley) during 
a conference in her Postal 
Building office here yester- 
day. 

Mrs. Heckler 
representatives of the ^ 
Corps of Engineers that" tn 
" frWij "lutuilj, ou trageously 
unacceptable." "*""«/ 

The idea, and it was 



told 



Protested 



stressed that it is still only an , 
_idea is to pump treated waste 
"from 109 communities in the 
northeast section of the state 
into Fall River, Dartmouth 
and Freetown where it will be 
used as fertilizer on forest and 
crop lands. 

The concept is of five 
disposal systems developed by 
the Corps in conjunction with 
the Environmental Protection 
Agency, the state, and 
regional planning groups as 
part of a two-year study begun 
in early 1973. 

David Kenyon, an engineer 
in the Corps' ' planning 
division, said the study was 
authorized to be generated 
over the next 80 years." Under 
law, he added, "all possible 
ways of preserving the quality 
df water must be in- 
vestigated, " including the 
land treatment system calling 
for the use of land in Bristol 
County. 

Four Other Concepts 

Under the other four con- 
cepts that have come out of 
the study, wastes would be 
treated and disposed of in the 
Metropolitan Boston area 
where they originate. 

Each of the plans would cost 
approximately one billion 
dollars to implement with the f 
money coming from combined J 
federal and state sources. 
Kenyon, said. Localities in- 
volved in the systems would 
also contribute a small per- 
centage. 

ITie pumping concept would 
call tor a pipeline to be in- 
stalled from the Boston area 
to the land application sites. 
The tentative route of the line 
shows one branch crossing the 
eastern section of Taunton and 
Berkley along Route 24 into 
Freetown while another 
traverses the length of Mid- 
dleboro. Otherwise, none of 
the communities in Greater 
Taunton would be directly 
involved in the system. 

Southest Distance 
Kenyon said. "The 
geological and soil resources 
of the entire state were 
examined with particular 
attention paid to the ea.st<pn 
part of the logical reason inat 



it is the shortest distance 
possible for pumping the 
wastes." He said Southeastern 
Massachusetts also provides 
the large amounts of unused 
acreage need for land 
treatment. 

Unfortunately, as Kenyon 
pointed out, the same lands 
that are good for development 
are also the best for treat- 
ment. 

Describing the land 
treatment concept, Kenyon 
said the sewage receives 
secondary treatment and is 
chlorinated before being sent 
down the pipeline. When it 
arrives, the waste is applied to 
the land either by simple 
spraying or by being poured 
onto sandy beds. 

While filtering down 
through the soil, nutrients are 
removed from the wastes and 
used by vegetation. The 
cleansed water can then be 
collected or allowed to become 
part of the groundwater. 

Fall River officials, 
however, are deeply con- 
cerned about the prospect 
because one of the application 
areas mentioned in the con- 
cept is the Watuppa Pond 
Reservation which is near the 



city's reservoir at Watuppa i 
Pond. The site is about 12 
miles from Taunton's water 
source at Assawompsett 
Pond. 

Kenyon assured officials 
that all possible safeguards 
against water pollution are 
part of the concept. 

Forget Bristol County 

The land treatment sites 
would occupy about 4,915 
acres in Fall River, 2.H65 in 
Dartmouth and 540 in 
Freetown. 

Mrs. Heckler urged the 
engineers to forget about the 
concept involving Bristol 
County and concentrate on the 
remaining four. "This area 
cannot become a place for 
dumping refuse from Boston," 
she stated, promising to 
"initiate a torrent of op- 
position" if the concept is 
taken seriously. "This is 
unfair to these communities." 

Kenyon indicated that there 
is little cause for concern at 
this point, noting that "we're 
still in the early stages of 
developing this plan. We're 
not going to force anything on 
anybody." 

The study, he added, is still 
a year away from completion. 



21 1 



Xrmy May A bandon Area 
Waste Water Pond Plan 



\ representative of the U.S. 
my Corps of Engineers has 
"hut conWflcd abandonment 
a proposal to utilize a 
linn of Fall River, Freetown 
I Dartmoi'ih for disposal of 
ste ■• iter originating in 
in Boston. 

Kenyon, study leader 
corps, said here Friday 
lit he believes the corps will 
op the plan. 

Kenyon was put on the 
fensive at a meeting called 
U.S. Rep. Margaret M. 
■-ckler and held in her Post 
fice suite. Several municipal 
vernment officials attended. 
Mrs. Heckler, asserted her 
tfil opposition to any plan that 
mid bring effluent from 
istnn to I he Freetown-Fall 
vor Slate Forest area. She 
is supported by the city 
legation. 

About a month ago, it 
came known that the corps 
is interested in building a 
nd on some 7,500 acres of 
nd in this area. The pond 
xild.be tilled by a daily flow 



of 150 million gallons of waste 
water from Boston. 

Kenyon noted, Friday, that 
the idea was but one of five 
possibilities advanced to handle 
the sewage disposal problem. 
The other four proposals would 
not involve transportation of 
waste out of the metropolitan 
area. 

He said he recognized Hie 
conflict in land use — for 
economic growth or sewage 
disposal — and noted that a 
decision must be made as to 
how to utilize limited resour- 
ces. 

Venturing art opinion of his 
own, Kenyon indicated i; would 
not be wise to carry out the 
plan for' a waste-water pond 
here. 

In several instances, he 
declared it would be for the 
people to determine the onl-* 
come. The corps of engineers, 
he added, was merely 
presenting information and a 
study position. "We're not going 
to force anything on anybody," 
Kenyon responded at one point. 

The corps, nevertheless, has 



cited the value of recycling 
treated wastes to provide 
nutrients for the soil. 

Mrs. Heckler remarked that 
she was gratified to hear 
that the public would h.- I he 
ultimate decision-maker. 
She' said she knows how the 
people of Greater Fall River 
will decide. 

Branding the plan as "totally 
unacceptable," the congress- 
woman warned that she would 
"personally initiate a torrent of 
objections" to the pumping of 
waste water into the Fall 
River - Freetown - Dartmouth 
section. 

Furthermore, Mrs. Heckler 
labeled the proposal as unfair 
to this area — a part of !hr 
state which is trying to bounce 
back from economic reverses. 

Maintaining thai she favors 
a study of the waste disposal 
problem and even recycling. 
Mrs. Heckler stood adamant in 
her position that the effluent 
would not be "delivered into-; 
my (congressional) district." 

Fall River Industrial Agent 
Continued on I'age H - ") 



Herald News 
Fall River, MA 
13 June 74 



•r™. 




U.S. Rep. Margaret >!. Heckler conducts h meeting on the propose* >\a*tr uatrr pond con 
atruction here. Identifiable, clockwise, are Steven Caruso, Redevelopment AuthnriU staff en- 
gineer: Asistant Water Supt. Michael Risrko: Mrs. Heckler; David Kcnvnn: and James Callahan. 
< hi<r ,r (he corps* wastewater «tudics branch. Herald News Photo 

Army Engineers May Drop Pond Plan — 

Continued from rane^T pact of a waste-water pond. benefits of u- 

As envisioned bv the corps recycling. And Kcnvon 

George T. Darmody and of p n gj ncerSi , he p^ wn ,,| d cautioned thai the corps 

Assistant Water Superintendent he used for "spray irrigation" doesn't wan' I e Fa'1 

Michael Biszko expressed ap- ov er 1915 acres of land in Fall River - Freetown - Dartmouth 

prenhension about possible and 2.365 acres in Dartmouth. pond possibility, onlv to bo 

harmful effects to IhJ North River. !>10 acres in Freetown faulted in the future if the da> 



Watuppa Pond and Copicut Kenyon said the corps is 

Reservoir watersheds. currently engaged in a full 

Biszko noted, too. that long range of environmental impact 

range plans could include ex- studies." 



By early to mid 19T 
eei ps' conclusive report will be 
available. Kenyon went on. He 
said, however. that pu'tlic 



comes when people rcgrri 
they turned (ft 

The study leader fell that a 
hybrid plan may i 
the best of the five alternative* 

In a ouick response to thai 
statement. Mrs. Heck - 
sistcd that - 1 I plan 



12' 



pansion of water resources into 
Freetown. Darmody spoke of 
I he city's North End as about 
the only section left for indus- 
trial growth. hearings will be scheduled long to build a pond here would be 

Steven Caruso, staff engineer before then — tentatively this desirable 
loi the Redevelopment fall. Such an idea "*ould constitu'^ 

Authority, also voiced con- He explained that a study • a de\ a 
cern about the potential im- committee is looking into the she concluded. 



Old Colonial Memorial 
Plymouth, MA 
13 June 74 



ot£? iANK . S ** ,he Army Corn. 

su r^r rC8rv , er • rea »«•**. 



126 



Standard Times 
New Bedford, MA 
L5 June 74 



Disoo 












v*» *J 



It was a straightforward enough 
proposal by the U.S . Army C prj is of 
Engineers to officials of 20 
Southeastern Massachusetts com- 
munities 

Tiie Greater Boston area would 
pump 155 million gallons of treated 
waste water in one or more proposed 
disposal sites in Southeastern 
Massachusetts. 

fne proposeu sues inciude large 
tracts in Dartmouth, Freetown, Fail 
River, Piyrnoucn, Wareheirn and 
Bourne. 

in return, the communities involved 
would receive whatever economic 
benefits may he denveo train such ac- 
tivities as recovering nutrients .\ .... 
the purified waste wa.er 

Unfortunately the Arm) Corps of 
Engineers represent*, ves who 
broaehed uie subject w« n an es- 
timated 50 officials of communities .n 
the region vvere long oi. glowing 
genei.dities and short on specifics. 

Among otner things, me Army 
spokesmen said: 

—They have no information ui the 
effect of nutrients horn treated waste 
Water on cranberries. 

— .\o figures vei are avahaDie >.. 
the possioie economic benefits to ii»v 
region 

—Questions about viruses, heavy 



metal industrial waste a in. otner 
byproducts of such a system cauiio< ^e 
answereu because, among otwer 
things, scientists stilt do not under- 
stand them thoroughly. 

One of the Army official iolu ■..' a 
Lubbock, Tex farmer wiio iias .mow- 
ed that city to use ins land for disposal 
purposes for .ae iast thi'ee decaoes — 
and became a millionaire in the 
process. 

The Luahock nev/spaper told The 
Standard-Tunes the fanner noes ex- 
ist, although tae editor could not es- 
timate his ... .. wortii or ins pi out from 
tiie waste-water venture. 

Assuming the bene. its are *s 
widespread and generous as in- 
dicated, we feel tiie camiuuuities tnat 
generate tiie waste water should o« 
allowed to reap anv profits ueriveu 
fro... a treatment system. 

Tiierc are large undeveloped tracrs 
of land in Greater Boston - Waltham, 
Weston, Lincoln and Belmont come to 
mind— not to mention the uninhaoued 
islands in Boston Haroor. 

The Annv woulo be weil ad^ .sei. io 
consider tiie^e possibilities uis. 

beiore turning its eyes towaru 
Southeastern Massachusetts, par- 
ticularly since officials arc talking m 
terms of a $1 million feasibility stuuv . 



127 



Standard Times 
New Bedford, MA 
15 June 74 



f 






mmmMk 




/i 
2 5?6^T IHIKK Y/£ WANT IT, ^oLPlER. 



128 



Transcript 

North Adams, MA 

25 June 74 



Three-pronged benefits 

Spraying sewage on lanji studied 



BOSTON (AP) — A federal agency is 
studying the idea of spraying partially 
treated sewage over vacant land, with 
the three-pronged benefit of cleaning up 
polluted waterways, enriching the soil 
and providing drinkable water. 

The process is called land application 
and involves the use of air, soil and 
plants to help man break down his waste 
products. 

Dave Hewitt, a spokesman for the 
Army Corps of Engineers, says the 
paetiallv treated waste water can be ab- 
sorbed by the soil and plants on vacant 
land in eastern Massachusetts. As the 
waste breaks down, clean water is left to 
filter down to ground water supplies. 

Researchers on the billion-dollar plan 
— which looks 80 years into the future — 
say the water would be pure enough to 
drink. 

"I would, of course, expect us to 
monitor the water for several years 
before we would let anyone drink it," 
says Hewitt. "The water that does seep 
down to the ground water would pose no 
problems at all." 

The land application plan is one of five 
programs being considered by the Corps 
and the Metropolitan District Commis- 
sion to bring eastern Massachusetts in 
compliance with the 1972 amendments 
to the Federal Water Pollution Control 
Act. 

The law sets 1983 as a deadline to 
make waterways safe for recreational 
use and fishing. By 1985, any discharge 
of pollutants into waterways would be 
barred. 

Hewiti says land application would be 
ideal for vacant areas. 

"We would suggest... state forests, 
park land," he says. "The process is 
very appropriate for use in recreational 
lands with no danger to people or 
wildlife." 



However the plan poses a problem of 
land availability. 

Hewitt says 100,000 to 500,000 acres of 
vacant land would be needed for the land 
application program — and that kind of 
open space may not be available in the 
109-community area under study. 

The 109 communities make up the 
Eastern Massachusetts Metropolitan 
Area, bounded roughly by Interstate 495 
on the west, Boxford on the north, and 
Duxbury to the south. 

Sewage from the eastern 
Massachusetts towns and cities even- 
tually drains into Boston Harbor — and 
the MDC's environmental affairs 
director, Martin Weiss, says the two 
sewage treatment plants on the harbor 
are operating at nearcapacity levels. 

The MDC encompasses 43 com- 



munities in its treatment area, which 
lies within the 109-community 
metropolitan area. , 

One MDC proposal under study would 
cut the district from ^3 to 24 towns, with 
satellite treatment plants serving areas 
cut out of the district. 

Another MDC plan calls for the con- 
struction of a sewage treatment plant in 
the Framingham area, taking some of 
the load off one of the harbor facilities, 
the Deer Island plant. 

The second MDC plant is on Nut 
Island. 

Weiss says the MDC studies were 
undertaken "to determine whether we 
want to expand or contract these 
facilities. We have to see how many 
communities we should be servicing." 



129 



South Middlesex News 
Framingham, MA 
25 June 74 



Area waste solution? 



Spraying sewagg^on vacant lan( 



By STEPHEN C. KARNAS 

BOSTON (AP) - A federal 
agency is studying the idea of 
spraying partially treated sew- 
age over vacant land, with the 
three-pronged benefit of clean- 
ing up polluted waterways, en- 
riching the soil and providing 
drinkable water. 



The process is called land ap- 
plication and involves the use of 
air, soil and plants to help man 
break down his waste products. 

Dave Hewitt, a sp okesma n for 

the rtrjriY Hnrp I' BHgneere, 

says the partially treated waste 
water can be absorbed by the 
soil and plants on vacant land in 



eastern Massachusetts. As the 
waste breaks down, clean water 
is left to filter down to ground 
water supplies. 

Researchers on the billion- 
dollar plan — which looks 80 
years into the future — say the 
water would be pure enough to 
drink. 



"I would, of course, expect us 
to monitor the water for several 
years before we would let 
anyone drink it," says Hewitt. 
"The water that does seep down 
to .the ground water would pose 
no problems at all." 

The land application plan is 
one of five programs being con- 



sidered by the Corps and the 
Metropolitan District Commis- 
sion to bring eastern Massachu- 
setts in compliance with the 
1972 amendments to the Federal 
Water Pollution Control Act. 

The law sets 1983 as a dead- 
line to make waterways safe for 
recreational use and fishing. By 



1985, namy-,' discharge of 
pollutants into waterways 
would be barred. 

Hewitt says land application 
would be ideal for vacant areas. 
"We would suggest. ..state 
forests, park land," he says. 
"The process is very appro- 
priate for use in recreational 

-Hands with no danger to people 
or wildlife." 

However the plan poses a 
problem of land availability. 

Hewitt says 100,000 to 500,000 
acres of vacant land would be 
needed for the land application 
program — and that kind of 

I open space may not be avail- 

I able in the 109-community area 

I under study. 



The 109 communities make up 
the Eastern Massachusetts 
Metropolitan Area, bounded 
roughly by Interstate 495 on the 
west, Boxford on the north, and 
Duxbury to the south. 

Sewage from the eastern 
Massachusetts towns and cities 
eventually drains into Boston 
Harbor — and the MDC's envi- 
ronmental affairs director, 
Martin Weiss, says the two 
sewage treatment plants on the 
harbor are operating at near- 
capacity levels. 

The MDC encompasses 43 
communities in its treatment 
area, which lies within the 109- 
community metropolitan area. 



One MDC proposal under 
study would cut the district 
from 43 to 24 towns, with satel- 
lite treatment plants serving 
areas cut out of the district. 

Another MDC plan calls for 
the construction of a sewage 
treatment plant in the Fram- 
ingham area, taking some of the 
load off one of the harbor 
facilities, the Deer Island plant 

The second MDC plant is on 
Nut Island. 

Weiss says the MDC studies 
were undertaken "to determine 
whether we want to expand or 
contract these facilities. We* 
have to see how many commu- 
nities we should be servicing." 



130 



News -Tribune 
Waltham, MA 
25 June 74 



Study treated sewage usage 



By STEPHEN C. KABNAS 

BOSTON (AP) — A federal 
agency is studying the idea of 
spraying partially treated sew- 
age over vacant land, with the 
three-pronged benefit of clean- 
ing up polluted waterways, 
enriching the soil and providing 
drinkable water. 

The process is called land ap- 
plication and involves the use 
of air, soil and plants to help 
man break down his waste 
products. 

Dave Hewitt, a spokesman for 
the Army Corps of Enginee rs, 
says the partially treated waste 
water can be absorbed by the 
soil and plants on vacant land 
in eastern Massachusetts. As the 
waste breaks down, clean water 
is left to filter, down to ground 
water supplies. 

Researchers on the billion- 
dollar plan — which looks 80 
years into the future — say the 
water would be pure enough to 
drink. 

"I would, of course, expect 
us to monitor the water for sev 
eral years before we would let 
anyone drink it," says Hewitt 
"The water that does seep down 



c 



to the ground water would pose 
no problems at all." 

The land application plan is 
one of five programs being con- I 
sidered by the Corps and the 
Metropolitan District Commis- 
s i o n to bring eastern 
Massachusetts in compliance 
with the 1972 amendments to the 
Federal Water Pollution Centre* 
Act. 

The law sets 1983 as a dead- 
line to make waterways safe for 
recreational use and fishing. By 
1985, any discharge of pollutants 
into waterways would be barred. 

Hewitt says land application 
would be ideal for vacant areas. 
We would suggest . . . state 
forests, park land," he says. 
"The process is very appro- 
priate for use in recreational 
lands with no danger to people 
or wildlife." 

However the plan poses a 
problem of land availability. 

Hewitt says 100,000 to 500,000 
acres of vacant land would be 
needed for the land application 
program — and that kind of 
open space may not be available 
in the 109-community area under 
study. 



area unde 



131 



Press 

Bristol, CT 
?5 June 74 



Land Application Studied 



BOSTON (AP) - A federal 
agency is studying the idea of 
spraying partially treated sew- 
age over vacant land, with the 
three-pronged benefit of clean- 
ing up polluted waterways, en- 
riching the soil and providing 
drinkable water. 

The process is called land ap- 
plication and involves the use 
of air, soil and plants to help 
man break down his waste 
products. 

Dave Hewitt, a spokesman 




sorbed by the soil and plants on 
vacant land in eastern Mas- 
sachusetts. As the waste 
breaks down, clean water is 
left to filter down to ground 
water supplies. 
Pure .Enough To Drink 
* Researchers on the billion- 
[ dollar plan — which looks 80 
Vj^ears into the future —say the 



water would be pure enough to 
drink. 

"I would, of course, expect 
us to monitor the water for sev- 
eral years before we would let 
anyone drink it," says Hewitt. 
"TTie water that does seep 
down to the ground water 
would pose no problems at 
all." 

The land application plan is 
one of five programs being con- 
sidered by the Corps and the 
Metropolitan District Commis- 
sion to bring eastern 
Massachusetts in compliance 
with the 1972 amendments to 
the Federal Water Pollution 
Control Act. 
1983 Deadline 

The law sets 1983 as a dead- 
line to make waterways safe 
for recreational use and fish- 
ing. By 1985, any discharge of 
pollutants into waterways 
would be barred. 

Hewitt says land application 



132 



would be ideal for vacant 
areas. 

"We would suggest... state 
forests, park land," he says. 
"The process is very appro- 
priate for use in recreational 
lands with no danger to people 
or wildlife." 

However the plan poses a 
problem of land availability. 

Hewitt says 100,000 to 500,000 
acres of vacant land would be 
needed for the land application 
program — and that kind of 
open space may not be avail- 
able in the 109-community area 
under study. 

The 109 communities make 
up the Eastern Massachusetts 
Metropolitan Area, bounded 
roughly by Interstate 495 on the 
west, Boxford on the north, and 
Duxbury to the south. 

Drains Into Harbor 

Sewage from the eastern 
Massachusetts towns and 
cities eventually drains into 
Boston Harbor — and the 
MDC's environmental affairs 
director, Martin Weiss, says 
the two sewage treatment 
plants on the harbor are 
operating at nearcapacity 
levels. 

The MDC encompasses 43 
communities in its treatment 
area, which lies within the 109- 
community metropolitan 
area. 

One MDC proposal under 
study would cut the district 
from 43 to 24 towns, with satel- 
lite treatment plants serving 
areas cut out of the district. 

Another MDC plan calls for 
the construction of a sewage 
treatment plant in the Fram- 
ingham area, taking some of 
the load off one of the harbor 
facilities, the Deer Island 
plant. 

The second MDC plant is on 
Nut Island. 



News 

Gardner, MA 
25 June 74 



Pollution Cleanup 
Studied By Agency 



^ 



By STEPHEN C. KAUNAS 

Associated Press Writer 

BOSTON (AP) — A federal 
agency is studying the idea of 
spraying partially treated sew- 
age over vacant land, with the 
three-pronged benefit of clean- 
ing up polluted waterways, en- 
riching the soil and providing 
drinkable water. 

The process is called land ap- 
plication and involves the use 
of air, soil and plants to help 
man break down his waste 
products. 

Dave Hewitt, a spokesman 
for the Ar my Corp^of Enei - 
neers, says tne partiany 
treyi^G" waste water can" be ab- 
sorbed by the soil and plants on 
vacant land in eastern Mas- 
sachusetts. As the waste breaks 
down, clean water is left to fil- 
ter down to ground water sup- 
plies. 

Researchers on the billion- 
dollar plan — which looks 80 
years into the future — say the 
water would be pure enough to 
drink. 

"I would, of course, expect us 
to monitor the water for sev- 
eral years before we would let 
anyone drink it," says Hewitt. 
"The water that does seep 
down to the ground water 
would pose no problems at all." 

The land application plan is 
one of five programs being con- 
sidered by the Corps and the 
Metropolitan District Commis- 
sion to bring eastern Massachu- 
setts in compliance with the 
1972 amendments to the Feder- 
al Water Pollution Control Act. 

The law sets 1983 as a dead- 
line to make waterways safe 
for recreational use and fish- 
ing. By 1985, any discharge of 
pollutants into waterways 
would be barred. 

Hewitt says land application 
would be ideal for vacant 
areas. 



"We would suggest. ..state 
forests, park land," he says. 
"The process is very appro- 
priate for use in recreational 
lands with no danger to people 
or wildlife." 

However the plan poses a 
problem of land availability. 

Hewitt says 100,000 to 500,000 
acres of vacant land would be 
needed for the land application 
program — and that kind of 
open space may not be avail- 
able in the 109-community area 
under study. 

The 109 communities make 
up the Eastern Massachusetts 
Metropolitan Area, bounded 
roughly by Interstate 495 on the 
west, Boxford on the north, and 
Duxbury to the south. 

Sewage from the eastern 
Massachusetts towns and cities 
eventually drains into Boston 
Harbor— and the MDC's envi- 
ronmental affairs director, 
Martin Weiss, says the two 
sewage treatment plants on the 
harbor are operating at near- 
capacity levels. 

The MDC encompasses 43 
communities in its treatment 
area, which lies within the 109- 
community metropolitan area. 

One MDC proposal under 
study would cut the district 
from 43 to 24 towns, with satel- 
lite treatment plants serving 
areas cut out of the district. 

Another MDC plan calls for 
the construction of a sewage 
treatment plant in the Fram- 
ingham area, taking some of 
the load off one of the harbor 
facilities, the Deer Island plant. 

The second MDC plant is on 
Nut Island. 

Weiss says the MDC studies 
were undertaken "to determine 
whether we want to expand or 
contract these facilities. We 
have to see how many commu- 
nities we should be servicing." > 



133 



Gazette 

Worcester, MA 
25 June 74 



(Spraying of SewageN, 
Is Studiecyar State 



The Associated Press 

B S T N-A federal 
agency is studying the idea of 
spraying partially treated 
sewage over vacant land, with 
the three-pronged benefit of 
cleaning up polluted water- 
ways, enriching the soil and 
providing drinkable water. 

The process is called land 
application and involves the 
use of air, soil and plants to 
help man break down his 
waste products. 

Dave Hewitt, a spokesman 
for the Ar my Corps o f Engi- 
n e e r s , says the^"partially 
treated "waste water can be 
absorbed by the soil and 
plants on vacant land in east- 
ern Massachusetts. As the 
waste breaks down, clean wa- 
ter is left to filter down to 
ground water supplies. 

Researchers on the billion- 
dollar plan — which looks 80 
years into the future — say 
the water would be pure 
enough to drink. 

"I would, of course, expect 



us to monitor the water for 
several years before we would 
let anyone drink it," says 
Hewitt. "The water that does 
seep down to the ground wa- 
ter would pose no problems at 
all." 

The land application plan is 
one of five programs being 
considered by the Corps and 
the Metropolitan District 
Commission to bring eastern 
Massachusetts in compliance 
with the 1972 amendments to 
the Federal Water Pollution 
Control Act. 

The law sets 1983 as a dead- 
line to make waterways safe 
for recreational use and fish- 
ing. By 1985, any discharge of 
pollutants into waterways 
would be barred. 

Hewitt says land application 
would be ideal for vacant 
areas. 

"We would suggest... state 
forests, park land," he says. 
"The process As. very appro- 
priate for use! in recreational 

Turn to StRAYING, Page Two/ 



Spray 




Continued Frlm Page One 

lands with Ao danger to 
people or wildlife." 

However, the plan poses a 
problem of land availability. 
Hewitt says 100,000 to 500,- 
000 acres of vacant land 
would be needed for the land 
application program — and 
that kind of open space may 
not be available in the 109- 
community area under study. 
The 109 communities make 
up the Eastern Massachusetts 
Metropolitan Area, bounded 
roughly by Interstate 495 on 
the west, Boxford on the 
north, and Duxbury to the 
south. 

Sewage from the eastern 
Massachusetts towns and 
cities now eventually drains 
into Boston Harbor— and the 
MDC's environmental affairs 
director, Martin Weiss, says 
the two sewage treatment 
plants on the harbor are oper- 
ating at near-capacity levels. 
The MDC encompasses 43 
communities in its treatment 
area, which lies within the 
109 - community metropolitan 
area. 

One MDC proposal under 
study would cut the district 
from 43 to 24 towns, with sat- 
ellite treatment plants serving 
areas out of the district. 

Another MDC plan calls for 
the construction of a sewage 
treatment plant in the Fram- 
ingham area, taking some of 
the load off one of the harbor 
plants on Deer Island. 

The second MDC plant is on 
Nut Island. 

Weiss says the MDC studies 
were undertaken "to deter- 
mine whether we want to ex- 
pand or contract these facil- 
ities. We have to see how 
many communities we should 
be servicing." 



k 



\3h 



Call 

Woonsocket, RI 
25 June 



In About 80 Years 



land Application Plan' 
Seen Aiding Water Supply 



BOSTON (AP) - A federal 
agency is studying the idea of 
spraying partially treated sew- 
age over vacant land, with the 
Ihree-pronged benefit of clean- 
ing up polluted waterways, en- 
riching the soil and providing 
drinkable water. 

The process is called land 
application and involves the 
use of air, soil and plants to 
help man break down his waste 
products. 

Dave Hewitt, a spokesman 
for the Ar my Corps of E ngi- 
neers, says tne partially 
treated waste water can be ab- 
sorbed by the soil and plants on 
vacant land in eastern Mas- 
sachusetts. As the waste 
breaks down, clean water is 
left to filter down to ground 
water supplies. 

Researchers on the billion- 
dollar plan — which looks 80 
years into the future — say the 
water would be pure enough to 
drink. 

"I would, of course, expect 
us to monitor the water for sev- 
eral years before we would let 
anyone drink it," says Hewitt. 
"The water that does seep 
down to the ground water 
would pose no problems at all." 

The land application plan is 
one of five programs being 
considered by the Corps and 
the Metropolitan District 
Commission to bring eastern 
Massachusetts in compliance 
with the 1972 amendments to 
the Federal Water Pollution , 
Control Act. / 



The law sets 1983 as a dead- 
line to make waterways safe 
for recreational use and fish- 
ing. By 1985, any discharge of 
pollutants into waterways 
would be barred. 

Hewitt says land application 
would be ideal for vacant 
areas. 

"We would suggest... state 
forests, park land," he says. 
"The process is very appro- 
priate for use in recreational 
lands with no danger to people 
or wildlife." 

However the plan poses a 
problem of land availability. 

Hewitt says 100,000 to 500,000 
acres of vacant land would be 
needed for the land application 
program — and that kind of 
open space may not be avail- 
able in the 109-community area 
under study. 

The 109 communities make 
up the Eastern Massachusetts 
Metropolitan Area, bounded 
roughly by Interstate 495 on the 
west, Boxford on the north, and 
Duxbury to the south. 

Sewage from the eastern 
Massachusetts towns and cities 
eventually drains into Boston 
Harbor — and the MDC's envi- 
ronmental affairs director, 



Martin Weiss, says the two 
sewage treatment plants on the 
harbor are operating at near- 
capacity levels. 

The MDC encompasses 43 
communities in its treatment 
area, which lies within the 109- 
community metropolitan area. 

One MDC proposal under 
study would cut the district 
from 43 to 24 towns, with satel- 
lite treatment plants serving 
areas cut out of the district. 

Another MDC plan calls for 
the construction of a sewage 
treatment plant in the Fram- 
ingham area, taking some of 
the load off one of the harbor 
facilities, the Deer Island 
plant. 

The second MDC plant is 3 on 
Nut Island. 

Weiss says the MDC studies 
were undertaken "to deter- 
mine whether we want to ex- 
pand or contract these 
facilities. We have lo see how 
many communities we should 
be servicing." 



135 



Hampshire Gazette 
Northampton, MA 
25 June 74 



Triple benefits 
in water study 
being explored 



BOSTON (AP) - A federal 
agency is studying the idea of 
spraying partially treated sew- 
age over vacant land, with the 
three-pronged benefit of clean- 
ing up polluted waterways, en- 
riching the soil and providing 
drinkable water. 

The process is called land ap- 
plication and involves the use 
of air, soil and plants to help 
man break down his waste 
products. 

Dave Hewitt, a spokesman 
for the A rmy Corps of Engi- 
neers, Serys > tfte ' partially 
treated waste water can be ab- 
sorbed by the soil and plants on 
vacant land in eastern Mas- 
sachusetts. As the waste breaks 
down, clean water is left to fil- 
ter down to ground water sup- 
plies. 

Researchers on the billion- 
dollar plan — which looks 80 
years into the future — say the 
water would be pure enough to 
drink. 

"I would, of course, expect us 
to monitor the water for sev- 



eral years before we would let 
anyone drink it," says Hewitt. 
"The water that does seep 
down to the ground water 
would pose no problems at all." 

The land application plan is 
one of five programs being con- 
sidered by the Corps and the 
Metropolitan District Commis- 
sion to bring eastern Massachu- 
setts in compliance with the 
1972 amendments to the Feder- 
al Water Pollution Control Act. 

The law sets 1983 as a dead- 
line to make waterways safe 
for recreational use and fish- 
ing. By 1985, any discharge of 
pollutants into waterways 
would be barred. 

Hewitt says land application 
would be ideal for vacant 
areas. 

"We would suggest... state 
forests, park land," he says. 
"The process is very appro- 
priate for use in recreational 
lands with no danger to people 
or wildlife/' 

However the plan poses a 
problem of land availability. 



136 



Transcript Telegram 
Holyoke, MA 
25 June 74 



Plan Under Study To Make Use 
Of Sewage Wastes And Water 



BOSTON (AP) - A federal 
agency is studying the Idea of 
spraying partially treated sew- 
age over vacant land, with the 
three-pronged benefit of clean- 
ing up polluted waterways, en- 
riching the soil and providing 
drinkable water. 

The process is called land ap- 
plication and involves the use 
of air, soil and plants to help 
man break down his waste 
products. 

Dave Hewitt, a spokesman 
for the A rmy Cor ps of Engi- 
neers, says [He -> partially 
treated waste water can be ab- 
sorbed by the soil and plants on 
vacant land in eastern Mas- 
sachusetts. As the waste breaks 



down, clean water is left to fil- 
ter down to ground water sup- 
plies. 

Researchers on the billion- 
dollar plan — which looks 80 
years into the future — say the 
water would be pure enough to 
drink. 

"I would, of course, expect us 
to monitor the water for sev- 
eral years before we would let 
anyone drink it," says Hewitt. 
"The water that does seep 
down to the ground water 
would pose no problems at all." 

The land application plan is 
one of five programs being con- 
sidered by the Corps and the 
Metropolitan District Commis- 
sion to bring eastern Massachu- 



setts in compliance with the 
1972 amendments to the Feder- 
al Water Pollution Control Act. 

The law sets 1983 as a dead- 
line to make waterways safe 
for recreational use and fish- 
ing. By 1985, any discharge of 
pollutants into waterways 
would be barred. 

Hewitt says land application 
would be ideal for vacant 
areas. 

"We would suggest... state 
forests, park land." he says. 
"The process is very appro- 
priate for use in recreational 
lands with no danger to people 
or wildlife." 

However the plan poses a 
problem of land availability. 



137 



Recorder 
GreenfieLd, MA 
25 June 74 



Partially Treated 
Sewage May Be Used 



\ 



By STEPHEN C. KAUNAS 
Associated Press Writer 

BOSTON (AP) — A federal 
agency is studying the idea of 
spraying partially treated sew- 
age over vacant land, with the 
three-pronged benefit of clean- 
ing up polluted waterways, en- 
riching the soil and providing 
drinkable water. 

The process is called land ap- 
plication and involves the use 
of air, soil and plants to help 
man break down his waste 
products. 

Dave Hewitt, a spokesman 
for the Army Corps of En gi- 
neers, says the partially 
treated waste water can be ab- 
sorbed by the soil and plants on 
vacant land in eastern Mas- 
sachusetts. As the waste breaks 
down, clean water is left to fil- 
ter down to ground water sup- 
plies. 

Researchers on the billion- 
dollar plan — which looks 80 



years into the future — say the 
water would be pure enough to 
drink. 

"I would, of course, expect us 
to monitor the water for sev- 
eral years before we would let 
anyone drink it," says Hewitt. 
"The water that does seep 
down to the ground water 
would pose no problems at all." 

The land application plan is 
one of five programs being con- 
sidered by the Corps and the 
Metropolitan District Commis- 
sion to bring eastern Massachu- 
setts in compliance with the 
1972 amendments to the Feder- 
al Water Pollution Control Act. 

The law sets 1983 as a dead- 
line to make waterways safe 
for recreational use and fish- 
ing. By 1985, any discharge of 
pollutants into waterways 
would be barred. 

Hewitt says land application 
would be ideal for vacant 
areas. 



"We would suggest... state 
forests, park land," he says. 
"The process is very appro- 

Eriate for use in recreational 
inds with no danger to people 
or wildlife." 

However the plan poses a 
problem of land availability. 

Hewitt says 100,000 to 500,000 
acres of vacant land would be 
needed for the land application 
program — and that kind of 
open space may not be avail- 
able in the 109-community area 
under study. 

The 109 communities make 
up the Eastern Massachusetts 
Metropolitan Area, bounded 
roughly by Interstate 495 on the 
west, Boxford on the north, and 
Duxbury to the south. 

Sewage from the eastern 
Massachusetts towns and cities 
eventually drains into Boston 
Harbor — and the MDC's envi- 
ronmental affairs director, 
Martin Weiss, says the two 
sewage treatment plants on the 
harbor are operating at near- 
capacity levels. 

The MDC encompasses 43 
communities in its treatment 
area, which lies within the 109- 
community metropolitan area. 

One MDC proposal under 
study would cut the district 
from 43 to 24 towns, with satel- 
lite treatment plants serving 
areas cut out of the district. 

Another MDC plan calls for 
the construction of a sewage 
treatment plant in the Fram- 
ingham area, taking some of 
the load off one of the harbor 
facilities, the Deer Island plant. 

The second MDC plant is on 
Nut Island. 

Weiss says the MDC studies 
were undertaken "to determine 
whether we want to expand or 
contract these facilities. We 
have to see how many commu- 
nities we should be servic 



138 



Foster's Democra 
Dover, NH (, 

25 June 74 



/Agency Studies 

{ Vy --IrJ Wa 



Water Program 



By STEPHEN C. KARNAS 
Associated Press Writer 

BOSTON (AP) - A federal 
agency is studying the idea of 
spraying partially treated sew- 
age over vacant land, with the 
three-pronged benefit of clean- 
ing up polluted waterways, en- 
riching the soil and providing 
drinkable water. 

The process is called land aD- 
plication and involves the use 
of air. soil and plants to help 
man break down his waste 
products. 

Dave Hewitt, a spokesman 
for the Ar^y Cnrp* nf F n? ,. 
neers. s 3vs the partially 
"Created waste water can be ab- 
sorbed by the soil and plants on 
vacant land in eastern Mas- 
sachusetts. As the waste breaks 
down, clean water is left to fil- 
ter down to ground water sup- 
plies. 

Researchers on the billion- 
dollar plan — which looks 80 
years into the future — say the 
water would be pure enough to 
drink. 

"I would, of course, expect us 
to monitor the water for sev- 
eral years before we would let 
anyone drink it." says Hewitt. 
"The water that does seep 
down to the ground water 
would pose no problems at all." 

The land apolication plan is 
one of five programs being con- 
sidered by the Corps and the 
Metropolitan District Commis- 
sion to bring eastern Massachu- 
setts in compliance with the 
1972 amendments to the Feder- 
al Water Pollution Control Act. 

The law sets 1983 as a dead- 
line to make waterways safe 
for recreational use and fish- 
ing. By 1985. any discharge of 
pollutants into waterways 
would be barred. 

Hewitt says land application 
would be ideal for vacant 
areas. 

"We would suggest... state 
forests, park land. " he says. 
"The process is very appro- 
priate for use in recreational 
lands with no danger to people 
or wildlife." 

However the plan poses a 
problem of land availability 

Hewitt says 100.000 to 500.000 / 
acres of vacant land would bey 
needed for the land application 
program — and that kind^/m 



open space may not be avail- 
able in the 109-community area 
under study. 

The 109 communities make 
up the Eastern Massachusetts 
Metropolitan Area, bounded 
roughly by Interstate 495 on the 
west. Boxford on the north, and 
Duxbury to the south. 

Sewage from the eastern 
Massachusetts towns and cities 
eventually drains into Boston 
Harbor — and the MDC's envi- 
ronmental affairs director. 
Martin Weiss, says the two 
sewage treatment plants on the 
harbor are operating at near- 
capacity levels. 

The MDC encompasses 43 
communities in its treatment 
area, which lies within the 109- 
community metropolitan area. 

One MDC proposal under 
study would cut the district 
from 43 to 24 towns, with satel- 
lite treatment plants serving 
areas cut out of the district. 

Another MDC plan calls for 
the construction of a sewage 
treatment plant in the Fram- 
ingham area, taking some of 
the load off one of the harbor 
facilities, the Deer Island plant 

The second MDC plant is on 
Nut Island. 

Weiss says the MDC studies 
were undertaken "to determine 
whether we want to expand or 
contract these facilities. We 
have to see how many commu- 
nities we should be servicing." 



139 



Journal. 

Lewiston, Maine 
25 June 74 



f 



Fecjf ral Agency Studies Spraying 
Sew&ge On Vacant Mass. Land 



By STEPHEN C. KARNAS 
Associated Press Writer 

BOSTON (AP) - A federal 
agency is studying the idea of 
spraying partially treated sew- 
age over vacant land, with the 
three-pronged benefit of clean- 
ing up polluted waterways, en- 
riching the soil and providing 
drinkable water. 

The process is called land ap- 
plication and involves the use 
of air, soil and plants to help 
man break down his waste 
products. 



ter down to ground water sup- 
plies. 

Researchers on the billion- 
dollar plan — which looks 80 
years into the future — say the 
water would be pure enough to 
drink. 

"I would, of course, expect us 
to monitor the water for sev- 
eral years before we would let 
anyone drink it," says Hewitt. 
"The water that does seep 
down to the ground water 
would pose no problems at all." 

The land application plan is 



Dave Hewitt, a spokesman one of five programs being con 
for the Army Cor ps of Engi- s idered by the Corps and the 
neers. _ sflVS'" 'ItH! UaTllallV 'Metropolitan District Commis- 
treated waste water can be ab- sion to bring eastern Massachu- 
sorbed by the soil and plants on setts in compliance with the 
vacant land in eastern Mas- 1972 amendments to the Feder- 
sachusetts. As the waste breaks al Water Pollution Control Act. 
.down, clean water is left to fil- The law sets 1983 as a dead- 



f line to make waterways safeN 
for recreational use and fish- 
ing. By 1985, any discharge of 
pollutants into waterways 
would be barred. 

Hewitt says land application 
would be ideal for vacant 
areas. 

"We would suggest... state 
forests, park land," he says. 
"The process is very appro- 
priate for use in recreational 
lands with no danger to people 
or wildlife." 

However the plan poses a 
problem of. land availability. 

Hewitt says 100,000 to 500,000 
acres of vacant land 1 would be 
needed for the land Application 
program — and that kind of 
open space may not be avail- 
able in the 109-community area 
under study. 

The 109 communities make 
up the Eastern Massachusetts 
Metropolitan Area, bounded 
roughly by Interstate 495 on the 
west, Boxford on the north, and 
Duxbury to the south. 

Sewage from the eastern 
• Massachusetts towns and cities 
'eventually drains into Boston 
Harbor — and the MDC's envi- 
ronmental affairs director, 
Martin Weiss, says the two 
sewage treatment plants on the 
harbor are. operating at near- 
capacity levels. 

The MDC encompasses 43 
communities in its treatment 
area, which lies within the 109- 
community metropolitan area. 

One MDC proposal under 
study would cut the district 
from 43 to 24 towns, with satel- 
lite treatment plants serving 
areas cut out of the district. 

Another MDC plan calls for 
the construction of a sewage 
treatment plant in the Fram- 
ingham area, taking some of 
the load off one of the harbor 
facilities, the Deer Island plant. 

The second MDC plant is on 
Nut Island. 

Weiss says the MDC studies 
were undertaken "to determine 
whether we want to expand or 
contract these facilities. We 
have to see how many commu 
nities we should be servicing 



; 



li+o 



Times -A r^us 
Fi-arre, VT 

<^5 June 74 



Land Application Process 
Considered For Bay State 



BOSTON (AP) — A federal 
igency is studying the idea of 
spraying partially treated sew- 
ige over vacant land, with the 
hree-pronged benefit of cleaning 
jp polluted waterways, en- 
•iching the soil and providing 
irinkable water. 

The process is called land ap- 
plication and involves the use of 
air, soil and plants to help man 
break down his waste products. 

Dave Hewitt, a spokesman for 
the Ar n n Y florps of Engineers 
says the partially treated waste 
water can be absorbed by the soil 
and plants on vacant land in 
eastern Massachusetts. As the 
waste breaks down, clean water 
is left to filter down to ground 
water supplies. 

Researchers on the billion- 
dollar plan — which looks 80 
years into the future — say the 
water would be pure enough to 
drink. 

"I would, of course, expect us 
to monitor the water for several 
years before we would let anyone 
drink it," says Hewitt. "The 
water that does seep down to the 
ground water would pose no 
problems at all." 

The land application plan is 
one of five programs being con- 
sidered by the Corps and the 



Metropolitan District Commis- 
sion to bring eastern Massachu- 
setts in compliance with the 1972 
amendments to the Federal 
Water Pollution Control Act. 

The law sets 1983 as a deadline 
to make waterways safe for 
recreational use and fishing. By 
1985, any discharge of pollutants 
into waterways would be barred. 

Hewitt says land application 
would be ideal for vacant areas. 

"We would suggest... state 
forests, park land," he says. 
"The process is very appropriate 
for use in recreational lands with 
no danger to people or wildlife." 

However the plan poses a 
problem of land availability. 

Hewitt says 100,000 to 500,000 
acres of vacant land would be 
needed for the land application 
program — and that kind of open 
space may not be available in the 
109-community area under 
study. 

The 109 communities make up 
the Eastern Massachusetts 
Metropolitan Area, bounded 
roughly by Interstate 495 on the 
west, Boxford on the north, and 
Duxbury to the south. 



Sewage from the eastern 
Massachusetts towns and cities 
eventually drains into Boston 
Harbor — and the MDC's envi- 
ronmental affairs director, 
Martin Weiss, says the two 
sewage treatment plants on the 
harbor are operating at near- 
capacity levels. 

the MDC encompasses 43 
communities in its treatment 
area, which lies within the 109- 
community metropolitan area. 

One MDC proposal under study 
would cut the district from 43 to 
24 towns, with satellite treatment 
plants serving areas cut out of 
the district. 

Another MDC plan calls for the 
construction of a sewage 
treatment plant in the Fram- 
ingham area, taking some of the 
load off one of the harbor 
facilities, the Deer Island plant. 

The second MDC plant is on 
Nut Island. 

Weiss says the MDC studies 
were undertaken "to determine 
whether we want to expand or 
contract these facilities. We have 
to see how many communities 
we should be rwviHw* " 



V 



141 



Herald News 

Fall River, MA 
2 5 Juno 74 



Freetown Being Considered 
For Storage of Partially 
Treated Boston Sewage 

BOSTON (AP) A federal man break down his waste 
agency is studying the idea of products. 

spraying partially treated sew- Dave Hewitt, a spokesman 
age over vacant land, with the for the Ar ray Corps of Engi- 
three-pronged benefit of clean- neers, says the partially 
ing up polluted waterways, en- floated waste water can be ab- 
riching the soil and providing sorbed by the soil and plants on 

vacant land in eastern Mas- 
sachusetts, As the waste breaks 
down, clean water is left to fil- 



drinkable water. 

Freetown is one of the areas 
being considered for an experi- 
mental "waste pond." Some 
7,500 acres of woodland would 
he used. It would be filled by a 
daily flow of 150 million gallons 
of • waste water from Metro- 
politan Boston. 

The proposal was strongly 
criticized on June 8 by Joseph 
Arruda, management research 
specialist in Mayor Driscoll's 
office in Fall River. 

Arruda called it one of the 
most incredible plans he'd ever 
heard. He voiced his criticism 
at a meeting, of the Southeas- 
tern Regional Planning and 
Economic Development Dis- 
trict. He termed the proposal 
"absolutely shocking," and a 
"potential health hazard of tre- 
mendous magnitude." He com- 
plained that no consideration 
had been given to side effects 



ter down to ground water sup- 
plies. 

Researchers on the billion- 
dollar plan — which looks 80 
years into the future —say the 
water would "be pure enough to 
drink. 

"I would, of course, expect us 
to monitor the water for sev- 
eral years before we would let 
anyone drink it," says Hewitt. 
"The water that does seep 
down to the ground water 
would pose no problems at all." 

The land application plan is 
one of five programs being con- 
sidered 'by the Corps and the 
Metropolitan District Commis- 
sion to bring eastern Massachu- 
setts in compliance with the 
1972 amendments to the Feder- 
al Water Pollution Control Act. 

The law sets 1983 as a dead- 



of "this preposterous proposal." line to make waterways safe 
The process is called land ap- for recreational use and fish- 
plication and involves the use j n g. By 1985, any discharge of 
of air, soil and plants to help 



Continued on Pasre 



\ pollutants into waterways 

would be barred. 

Hewitt says land application 
would be ideal for vacant 
areas. 

"We would suggest...state 
forests, park land," he says. 
"The process is very appro- 
priate for use in recreational 
lands with no danger to people 
or wildlife." 

However the plan poses a 
problem of land availability. 

Hewitt says 100,000 to 500,000 
acres of vacant land would be 
, needed for the land application 
program — and that kind of 
open space may not be avail- ( 
able in the 109-comm;unity area 
under study. 

The 109 communities make 
up the Eastern Massachusetts 
Metropolitan Area, bounded 
roughly by Interstate 495 on the 
west, Boxford on the north, and 
Duxbury to the south. 

Sewage from the eastern 
Massachusetts towns and cities 
eventually drains into Boston 
Harbor — and the MDC's envi- 
ronmental affairs director, 
Martin Weiss, says the two 
sewage treatment plants on the 
harbor are operating at near- 
capacity levels. 

The MDC encompasses 43 
communities in its treatment 
area, which /lies within the 109- 
community metropolitan area. 

One MDC proposal under 
study Would out the district 
from 43 to 24 towns, with satel- 
lite treatment plants serving 
areas cut out of the district. 

Another MDC plan calls for 
the construction of a sewage 
treatment plant in the Fram- 
ingham area, taking some of 
the load off one of the harbor 
facilities, the Deer Island plant. 

The second MDC plant is on 
Nut Island. 

Weiss says the MDC studies 
were undertaken "to determine 
whether we want to expand or 
contract these facilities. We 
have to see how many commu- 
nities we should be servicing." 



lh? 



Standard Times 
New Bedford, MA 
26 June 74 



Sewage treatment plan studied 



BOSTON (AP) — A~federal agency is 
studying the idea of spraying partially 
treated sewage over vacant land, with the 
three-pronged benefit of cleaning up 
polluted waterways, enriching the soil and 
providing drinkable water. 

The process is called land application 
and involves the use of air, soil and plants 
to help man break down his waste 
products. 

Dave Hewitt, a spokesman for t he Army 
Corps of Engineers , says the partially 
trtHTled wdSUT taa'UU 1 ran be absorbed by 
the soil and plants on vacant land in 
eastern Massachusetts. As the waste 
breaks down, clean water is left to filter 
down to ground water supplies. 

Researchers on the billion-dollar plan— 
' which looks 80 years into the future — say 
the water would be pure enough to drink. 

"I would, of course, expect us to 
monitor the water for several years before 
we would let anyone drink it," says 
Hewitt. "The water that does seep down to 
the ground water would pose no problems 
at all." 

The land application plan is one of five 



programs being considered by the Corps 
and the Metropolitan District Commis- 
sion to bring eastern Massachusetts in 
compliance with the 1972 amendments to 
the Federal Water Pollution Control Act. 

The law sets 1983 as a deadline to make 
waterways safe for recreational use and 
fishing. By 1985, any discharge of 
pollutants into waterways would be 
barred. 

Hewitt says land application would be 
ideal for vacant areas. 

"We would suggest... state forests, park 
land," he says. "The process is very 
appropriate for use in recreational lands 
with no danger to people or wildlife." 

However the plan poses a problem of 
land availability. 

Hewitt says 100,000 to 500,000 acres of 
vacant land would be needed for the land 
application program — and that kind of 
open space may not be available in the 109- 
community area under study. 

The 109 communities make up the 
Eastern Massachusetts Metropolitan 
Area, bounded roughly by Interstate 495 on 
the west, Boxford on the north, and Dux- 
bury to the south. 

Sewage from the eastern Massachusetts 
towns and cities eventually drains into 
Boston Harbor — and the MDC's envi- 
ronmental affairs director, Martin Weiss, 
says the two sewage treatment plants on 
the harbor are operating at nearcapacity 
levels. 

The MDC encompasses 43 communities • 
in its treatment area, which lies within the 
109community metropolitan area. 

One MDC proposal under study would! 
cut the district from 43 to 24 towns, with/ 
satellite treatment plants serving areas 
cut out of the district. / 



Another MDC plan calls for the 
construction of a sewage treatment plant 
in the Framingham area, taking some of 
the load off one of the harbor facilities, the 
Deer Island plant. 

The second MDC plant is on Nut Island. 

Weiss says the MDC studies were under- 
taken "to determine whether we want to 
expand or contract these facilities. We 
have to see how many communities we 
should be servicing." 



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Sewage 
May Help 
Enrich Soil 



BOSTON (AP) — A federal 
agency is studying the idea of 
spraying partially treated 
sewage over vacant land, with 
the three-pronged benefit of 
cleaning up polluted waterways, 
enriching the soil and providing 
drinkable water. 

The process is called land ap- 
plication and involves the use 
of air, soil and plants to help 
man break down his waste pro- 
ducts. 

David Hewitt of Cohasset, a 
spokesman for the Army Corps 
of Engineers, says the partially 
treated waste water can be 
absorbed by the soil and plants 
on vacant land in eastern 
Massachusetts. As the waste 
breaks down, clean water is left 
to filter down to ground water 
supplies. 

Researchers on the billion- 
dollar plan — which looks 80 
years into the future — say the 
water would be pure enough to 
drink. 

"I would of course, expect us 
to monitor the water for several 
years before we would let 
anyone drink it," says Hewitt. 
"The water that does seep down 
to the ground water would pose 
no problems at all." 

The land applications plan is 
one of five programs being con- 
sidered by the Corps and the 
Metropolitan District Com- 
mission to bring eastern 
Massachusetts i n compliance 
with the 1972 amendments to 
the Federal Water Pollution 
Control Act. 

The law sets 1983 as a 
deadline to make waterways 
safe for recreational use and 
fishing. By 1985, any discharge 
of pollutants into waterways 
would be barred. 

Hewitt says land application 
would be ideal for vacant areas. 

"We would suggest.. . . state 
forests, park land," he says. 
"The process is very ap- 
propriate for use in recreational 
lands with no danger to people 
or wildlife." 

Hewitt says 100,000 to 500,000 
acres of vacant land would be 
needed for the land application 
program — and that kind of 
open space may not b e 
available in the 109-community 
area under study. 



c -om-ord nh ' v Water Plan Studied 

26 June 74 






For Eastern Mass. 



BOSTON (AP) - A federal 
agency is studying the idea of 
spraying partially treated sew- 
age over vacant land, with the 
three-pronged benefit of clean- 
ing up polluted waterways, en- 
riching the soil and providing 
drinkable water. 

The process is called land ap- 
plication and involves the use 
of air, soil and plants to help 
man break down his waste 
products. 

Dave Hewitt, a spokesman 
for the ArmvjCorps nf Engi- 
neers, says the partially 
treated waste water can be ab- 
sorbed by the soil and plants on 
vacant land in eastern Mas- 
sachusetts. As the waste breaks 
down, clean water is left to fil- 
ter down to ground water sup- 
plies. 

Researchers on the billion- 
dollar plan — which looks 80 
years into the future — say the 
water would be pure enough to 
drink. 

"I would, of course, expect us 
to monitor the water for sev- 
eral years before we would let 
anyone drink it," says Hewitt. 
"The water that does seep 
down to the ground water 
would pose no problems at all." 

The land application plan is 
one of five programs being con- 
sidered by the Corps and the 
Metropolitan District Commis- 
sion to bring eastern Massachu- 
setts in compliance with the 
1972 amendments to the Feder- 
al Water Pollution Control Act. 

The law sets 1983 as a dead- 
line to make waterways safe 
for recreational use and fish- 
ing. By 1985, any discharge of 
pollutants into waterways 
would be barred. 

Hewitt says land application 
would be ideal for vacant 
areas. 

"We would suggest... state 
forests, park land," he says. 
"The process is very appro- 1 
priate for use in recreational/ 
lands with no danger to peoplrf 
or wildlife." J 



However the plan poses a 
problem of land availability. 

Hewitt says 100,000 to 500,000 
acres of vacant land would be 
needed for the land application 
program - and that kind of 
open space may not be avail- 
able in the 109-community area 
under study. 

The 109 communities make 
up the Eastern Massachusetts 
Metropolitan* Area, bounded 
roughly by Interstate 495 on the 
west, Boxford on the north, and 
Duxbury to the south. 

Sewage from the eastern 
Massachusetts towns and cities 
eventually drains into Boston 
Harbor — and the MDC's envi- 
ronmental affairs director, 
Martin Weiss, says the two 
sewage treatment plants on the 
harbor are operating at near- 
capacity levels. 

The MDC encompasses 43 
communities in its treatment 
area, which lies within the 109- 
community metropolitan area. 

One MDC proposal under 
study would cut the district 
from 43 to 24 towns, with satel- 
lite treatment plants serving 
areas cut out of the district. 

Another MDC plan calls for 
the construction of a sewage 
treatment plant in the Fram- 
ingham area, taking some of 
the load off one of the harbor 
facilities, the Deer Island plant. 

The second MDC plant is on 
Nut Island. 

Weiss says the MDC studies 
were undertaken "to determine 
whether we want to expand or 
contract these facilities. We 
have to see how many commu-^ 
nities we should be servicing.''. ' 






Planning the future 

by Wesley J. Ewell, Dartmouth Planner 



The Chronicle 
Dartmouth, MA 
4 July 74 



BOSTON SEWAGE 

The Army Corps of 
Engineers has proposed 
taking treated sewage from 
metropolitan Boston and 
spraying it into the woods of 
Freetown and North Dart- 
mouth. A spokesman for the 
mayor of Fall River has 
called the plan preposterous 
while admitting he knew 
nothing about it. Other area 
officials, including Dart- 
mouth Selectmen, are wary 
of the proposal, but wisely 
want to know more about it. 
The plan in question is one 
of five suggested for long- 
range development of 
sewerage in greater Boston. 
The first four plans are all 
conventional plans for 
sewage treatment and 
discharge into streams. The 
fifth plan is offered as an 
alternative that would 
"recycle" the water supply 
by putting it back into the 
ground. 

Under this plan, sewage 
from the outlying suburbs, 
from Reading to Stoughton, 
would be treated at local 
plants scattered throughout 
the area. Liquid wastes from 
the treatment plants would be 
piped to disposal sites in 
Freetown, Dartmouth, 
Plymouth and Sandwich. The 
liquid wastes would then be 
sprayed onto the land with 
normal irrigation equipment, 
where it would be filtered by 
the soil and vegetation before 
returning to the ground water 
supply. 

The concept is known as 
Land Filter Disposal. It has 
been used for years in 
Europe, England, Texas, and 
several thousand other 
places. Pennsylvania State 
University has been using 
this system for ten years. 
They dispose of all the wastes 
from the university and its 
host town of State College by 
spraying it over fields and 
into woods near the campus. 
They also lead in research 
and development of land 
filter disposal 



1^7 



( 



Two years ago I attended a 
four-day seminar on the land 
filter method at Penn State. 
While there I watched the 
system in operation and was 
surprised by many of the 
things I saw. Spruce trees , 
three times the height of 
similar trees in unsprayed 
control plots; fields of dense, 
tall, and super-productive 
corn stalks; acid mine 
tailings transformed into 
productive topsoil; and deer, 
rabbits and birds living in the 
woods that were sprayed! 
regularly. The biggest sur- 
prise was the location of the 
University's water supply 
wells just a few hundred 
yards downhill from the 
disposal area. In ten years of 
operation, they have never 
been contaminated. 

The Penn State system is a 
perfect model, however, and 
may not be typical of what we 
would get here. Their treated 
waste is nearly pure enough 
to drink before it is sprayed, 
their researchers are con- 
stantly working to improve 
the operation, and every step 
is carefully and continually 
monitored. 

I have seen other systems 
that were not as good. 
Seabrook Farms (the Birds- 
eye people) spray their 
wastewater into the woods 
with such force and volume 

that the trees have all died, 
and swamps have developed 
where the water table was 
once 50 feet below the sur- 
face. But even this sloppy 
system has not contaminated 
the ground water supply. 

What will become of the 
Army's proposal? Probably 
nothing. It has the potential of 
increasing our ground water 
supply, renewing worked-out 
farmland, and taking some 
pollution out of the 
metropolitan area. But it is 
not the cheapest alternative, 
and it is certainly un- 
conventional. More likely, 
they will simply up-date their 
present disposal plants. It is 
too soon to discount the plan 
completely, though, and we 
will be keeping a close watch 
over its progress in the 
coming months. 



The Standard Times 
New Bedford, MA 
14 Aug 74 



Scrapping of waste 
dumping denied 



WALTHAM - A spokesman for the U.S. 
Army Corps of Engineers this morning 
denied a report in a Providence newspaper 
that a proposal to dump treated Boston 
sewage on land in Fall River, Freetown 
and Dartmouth had been scrapped. 

Lt. Col. Arcade G. Boivin, an assistant 
division engineer at the Corps' New 
England Division headquarters in 
Waltham, said study would continue on the 
proposal to pipe 155 million gallons a day 
from 109 eastern Massachusetts com- 
munities to 10 land disposal sites in 
Southeastern Massachusetts. 

Boivin admitted, however, that in view 
of negative public reaction to the proposal, 
"it doesn't appear this one is going to fly." 

Other disposal sites being considered 
include land in Plymouth, Wareham and 
Bourne. 

The proposal is one of five being studied 
in connection with the Boston Harbor- 
Eastern Massachusetts Metropolitan Area 
Wastewater Management Study. The 
study is being conducted by federal, state 
and regional agencies and administered by 
the Metropolitan District Commission. 



The other four proposals call for expan- 
sion or development of wastewater treat- 
ment facilities within the 109 communities 
directly involved in the study. 

Announcement of the piping of waste 
into Southeastern Massachusetts brought 
quick official criticism. 

Boivin said the Corps was not dropping 
"Concept 5", as it is known as an "alter- 
native to be considered and rendered in ' 
the final report." 

He said the corps would continue to 
study the "geographic, physical, hygenic 
and aesthetic impact" of the concept, 
including the tone of local reaction to the 
proposal. The corps is "very sensitive to 
public reaction," Boivin said. 

A progress report on the study would be 
issued "in a week or two" and would be 
widely distributed to let the public know 
where the project stands, he noted. ■ 

The final report on Concept 5 would be 
issued probably next June, Boivin said. 

"Our obligation is to continue this 
thing," he said. Perhaps 10 years from 
now, he added, public attitudes will have 
changed and the finished study will be 
available for reconsideration. 



ll*8 



South Middlesex Daily News 
Framingham, MA 
19 Aug 74 



Natick meeting 
to air area 
sewer questions 



NATICK - The Lake 
Cochituate Watershed 
Association (LCWA) and the 
Thoreau Group of the Sierra 
Club will host a public meeting 
on Thursday at 8 p.m., con- 
cerning regional sewer needs 
and proposals to accommodate 
future demands. 

The meeting will be at the 
Morse Institute, located one 
block east of Rte. 27 on Rte. 135 
in downtown Natick. 

In the light of the Eastern 
Massachusetts Metropolitan 
Area Wastewater Management 
Study on this region's future 
sewage plan, the meeting will 
focus on study projections for 



South Middlesex communities 
and adjacent towns in the 
SUASCO and Charles River 
watershed areas. 

Among topics to be con- 
sidered is the controversial 
wastewater recycling, which is 
the application of treated 
wastewater to the ground in- 
stead of into a waterway, 
utilizing nutrients fro crop 
growth and naturally-filtered 
water for local groundwater 
recharge. 

Representatives of various 
state and local agencies will be 
present to respond to audience 
questions and comments. 



~i.k° 



South Middlesex Ne\v 

Framin 

15 Sept 



.lddlesex Ne ir ,s '"••''} • 

gha m , *u Area sewer meeting 

74 . . • p 

in Natick Thursday 



NATICX — Officials from a wide area of South 
Middlesex towns are expected to attend a sewerage 
study meeting here next week, according to one of the 
officials sponsoring the program. 

South Middlesex Area Chamber of Commerce 
Planning Director Gerry Mimno has contacted 
departments of public works and planning board of- 
ficials, asking them to come to the meeting, said A. 
Richard Miller, executive director of the Lake 
Cochituate Watershed Association. 

The meeting, Thursday, Sept. 19 at 8 p.m. in the 
Morse Institute Library, E. Central St., Natick, is an 
"experiment" designed to get citizen and official input 
into Metropolitan Area Planning Council (MAPC) 
plans foi Tuturo-astaMui senugt ? - ■ 

Miller and Mimno have both stated growth in the 
South Middlesex area will be hampered by the lack of 
adequate sewerage, predicting a critical shortage of 
adequate disposal methods within two years. 

Some of those methods — particularly controversial 
ones like recycling waste water by spraying it over 
open land— will be discussed at the Thursday meeting. 
Officials in towns bordering the Charles River, in- 
cluding Sherborn, Medfield, Millis and Medway, will 
be asked to attend by the Lake Charles River Water- 
shed Association, Miller said. 

Miller said he hopes for attendance from citizens and 
officials from towns throughout the South Middlesex 
Area. 

•Representatives of Metcalf and Eddy, the 
engineering consultant firm handling the Metropolitan 
District Commission study concerning the future of 
MDC sewerage, and state officials will be on hand to 
answer technical questions, but sponsoring groups do 
no want the meeting to get "bogged down" with 
technical discussion, Miller said. 

Included in the presentation will be a film, "Our 
Wastewater Bonanza," which Miller said will be 
"exciting to any environmentalist." 

"To my knowledge," he said, "it will be the first time . 
anyone from the general public will be able to see the 
film." 

Two public hearings have been held on the future 
possibilities for sewage, Miller said, but the Thursday 
meeting will be the first one set-up and run by local 
rather than state officials. 

Miller said the Citizens' Advisory Committee to the 
MAPC Eastern Massachusetts Metropolitan Area 
(EMMA) waste water study suggested local officials 
would have a better idea of what issues appeal to 
residents in their area. 
"This meeting was set up as an experiment," Miller 

said "to see if the format will work." 



150 



Patriot Ledger 
Quincy, MA 
2 Dec 74 







Sewage 




• BOSTON — After a long- 
study, a technical subcommittee 
will make - recommendations 
Dec. 12 on five proposals, each 
costing a minimum of $1 billion, 
for future wastewater treatment 
needs of 109 communities in the 
metropolitan Boston area. 

The sweeping recom- 
•mendations, prompted by a 
federal order, will lead to the 
selection of one plan to upgrade 
the sewage treatment systems 
now operated at Nut Island and 
Deer Island. 

The Eastern Massachusetts 
Metropolitan - Area Wastewater 
Management. Study has been 
anticipated to require major 
capital investment and ex- 
pansion of the present ' 
Metropolitan Sewerage. District 
(MSD) of 43 communities. > -. 

The estimated cost of the 
plans range from $1 billion to 
$1.18 billion, and estimated 
annual operation and main- 
tenance costs vary from §35 
million to $64 millions .' .... 

Concept I would upgrade MSD 
treatment facilities at Deer and 
Nut Islands and add five 
communities to - the /district. 
Upgrading treatment facilities 
and intermunicipal - interceptor 
' sewers would cost SI billion, 
and annual operation and 
maintenance would cost .$33. 
million.- - - - — 

A second plan would reduce 
the service area tributary to the 
Deer and Nut Islands plants, to 
32 communities by creating five 
additional . regional treatment 
systems, including two new 
treatment facilities in Canton. 
The other new facilities would 
be in Watertown, Dedham and 
Framingbam. 

This plan would cost $1.04 
billion, and operation and 
maintenance annually is 
estimated at S58 million. 

Concept in would extend the 
Deer and Nut Islands plants 
service area to include the 
Charles River Basin and 



communities adjacent to present 
MDC water supplies in the 
• Sudbury River Basin. The 59 
■ communities would be served 
by two MSD treatment plants. 
' The treatment facilities and 
interceptors would cost $1.1 
billion to build and $35 mini ng 
annually to operate.. 
. The fourth plan would 
decentralize the present system 
of the Deer and Nut Islands 
-plants by developing six ad- 
ditional regional systems within 
the present MSD service area. 
The number of communities 
served by the two MSD plants 
would be reduced to 24; 

The six additional systems 
with treatment facilities would 
be located at Woburn, Medford, 
Watertown, Dedham, Canton, 
and Framingham. 
. The plan to decentralize would 
cost $1.12 billion to implement* 
and estimated annual operation 
and maintenance would be $64 
million. 

', Concept V would collect the : 
effluent of five of the regional - 
systems proposed in Concept IV 
; and, convey it -to southeastern 
Massachusetts- for further 
treatment instead of providing 
advanced treatment within the 
five systems. Land application 
may be feasible in some cases 
on a small scale within the • 
study area, according to the 
report - " '*:•""" 

This plan would cost $1.16 
billion, with annual operation 
cost estimated at $36 million. 

The subcommittee preparing 
the recommendations consists of 
representatives of the 
Metropolitan District Com- 
mission; members of the 
Metropolitan^ Area Plannin g 
C o u n c i rr^RTe; iMerai "En- 
vir o B naniital "Protection Agency, 
♦he U.S. Army Corps of 
Engineers, the state Division of 
Water Pollution Control, the 
state Department of Public 
Health, the Resource 
Management Policy Council and 
a citizens advisory committee. ' 



151 



Sewer-expansion study 

visualizes expenditure 

of at least $ 1 billion 

• MDC, state, and federal agencies outline 
lohg-term plans for Boston-area suburbs 



By Richard Hill 

Staff writer of 
The Christian Science Monitor 

Pramlngham, Man. 

Suburbanites are going to watch a 
few of their tax dollars almost liter- 
ally go down the drain in the next few 
years to pay for expanding sewer 
facilities In the Boston area. 

At least $1 billion will be required to 
build adequate sewer lines tor the 
metropolitan Boston area. In addi- 
tion, taxpayers will have to put up 
another $86 million to $64 million 
annually to operate and maintain an 
upgraded sewerage system. 

These estimates were produced by 
a $1.2 million waste-water manage- 
ment study being conducted by the 
Metropolitan District Commission 
(MDC) with seven other state and 
federal agencies to determine the 
sewerage needs of 109 cities and 
towns in eastern Massachusetts for 
the next 50 to 80 years. 

Agencies to choose concept 

Next week the government agen- 
cies, after nearly two years of work, 
will choose a sewer-development con- 
cept they consider best suited to meet 
sewerage problems for the area. 
After public hearings on the concept 
early next year, planners hope their 
recommendations will be imple- 
mented by state and federal policy- 
makers. 

Of five concepts studied, the plan 
most favored at the present time calls 
for upgrading MDC sewerage facil- 
ities to provide for future needs within 
the district's present service area of 
43 communities. 

The project would utilize regional 
and municipal systems to serve the 
remaining towns and cities within the 
study area. Five additional commu- 
nities — Lynnfield, Lincoln, Weston, 
Sharon, and Hopklnton — would be- 
come part of the MDC's Deer and Nut 
islands treatment-plant service area. 

Coat of building treatment facilities 
and interceptor sewers under the plan 
would be $1 billion, with an additional 
annual operation and maintenance 
expense of $38 million. 



Christian Science 
Monitor 
Boston, MA 
4 Dec 74 



Regional plants proposed 

Another concept being seriously 
considered would decentralize the 
present MDC system serviced by the 
treatment plants at Deer and Nut 
islands. Six regional treatment plants 
- which would be built at Woburn, 
Medfard, Watartown, Fmmingham, 
Dedhasn, a*4 C a ne s n - wvoid reduce 
the number of communities serviced 
by the two island facilities to 24. 

Estimated annual operation and 
maintenance cost for the system 
would run about $64 million after an 
Initial building cost of $1 . 12 billion. 

To pay for the initial sewerage line 
expansion and facility construction, 
the federal government would put up 
75 percent of the cost, the state would 
provide 15 percent, and each munici- 
pality would chip in 10 percent. 

"One of the things bothering us 
right now is that the Environmental 
Protection Agency requires that a 
sewer-use charge be established be- 
fore federal funds can be put Into a 
project of this type," explained Mar- 
tin F. Cosgrove of the MDC's sewer 
division, who is chairman of the 
study's technical subcommittee. 

MDC lacks authority 

"People living In the communities 
to be serviced would have to be 
charged for sewer use. Right now the 
MDC does not have the authority to 
make towns and cities impose this 
charge." 

A bill will be filed In the 1975 
Legislature, according to Mr. Cos- 
grove, to give the MDC authority to 
force cities and towns to charge a 
sewer-use fee. If municipalities still 
did not charge residents, the MDC 
would be able to impose its own 
charge. 

Although a final proposal has not 
been made as to how to best meet 
future sewer needs, the study already 
has met with some criticism. 



152 



Study Hitt b— 1 questioned 



"The study skips over the 
of what Is to be sewered ant Jsat 
examines how the area will be sew 
ered," contends Gerald R. Mlmno, 
director of planning tor the South 
Middlesex Chamber of Commerce. 
"It assumes that everything will b# 
sewered." 

Mr. Mlmno explained that towns 
wanting to control growth would loss 
one of the major mechanisms they 
use for preserving one-acre and two- 
acre zoning if they received addi- 
tional sewer capacity. 

Mr. Cosgrove says, however, that 
each community has been taken into 
consideration. "With present growth 
rates and our present water-pollution 
problems; eventually every commu- 
nity will have to be sewered prsperly. 
It's Just* matter of time." 



Courier 

Wareham, MA 
4 Dec 74 




oston's wastes -may 

not flow 




The Eastern Mass. Metropolitan 
Area Wastewater Management Study 
has under consideration five concepts 
for managing future wastewater flows 
from 109 cities and towns in the 
metropolitan Boston area. 

On Dec. 12 the systems best suited to 
the future needs for wastewater 
treatment will be recommended and 
subsequently submitted to State and 
Federal policymakers for im- 
plementation. . * 

The study encompassed a range of 
wastewater treatment systems; the 
most controversial for Cape Cod is 
concept five, a plan to collect the ef- 
fluent of five regional systems and 
convey it to southeastern 
Massachusetts for further treatment in 
lieu of treatment on site. 

Twenty-three factors were con- 
sidered in evaluating the concepts. 
Concept five, for which construction 
costs are estimated at $1.16 billion and 
annual operation and maintenance of 
$36 million, scored highest in both 
engineering and environmental factors. 
In this particular study, the higher the 
score the less desirable the concept. 

Receiving the lowest or most 
desirable score was concept one — 
upgrading the Metropolitan District 
sewerage facilities to provide for future 
needs within its present service area of 
43 communities, and utilizing regional 
and municipal systems to serve the 
remaining communities within the 
study area. 

It is estimated that construction of 



facilities would be $1 billion with annual 
operation and maintenance at $38 
million. 

Rated next was concept two which) 
would reduce the service area tributary- 
to the Deer and Nut Islands treatmen ; 
plants to 32 communities by creating; 
five additional regional treatmen : 
systems within the present MSD ser 
vice area. 

Approximate cost of concept two i- 
$1.04 with operation and maintenance 
pegged at $56 million annually. 

Third ranking was concept three ; 
which would extend Deer and Nut 
Islands treatment plants service area 
by increasing the present limits to 
include the Charles River Basin in its 
entirety and communities adjacent to 
present MDC water supplies in the 
Sudbury River basin. 

Estimated pricetag for concept three ; 
is $1.1 billion with annual operation and 
maintenance at $35 million. 

Concept four would decentralize the 
present system tributary to the Nut and 
Deer Islands treatment plants by 
developing six additional regional 
systems within the MDC service area. 

Estimated cost for this concept is 
$1.16 billion and yearly operational 
costs of $36 million. 

Public discussion on the concept is 
still sought Comments may be directed 
before Dec. 12 to John Harrington, 
Mph T_Pft 1itan ^re a Planning C ouncil, 44 
School St., Boston liilob or pnone 5'i3- 



2454. 



Gretta Estey 



153 



Suburban Press and Recorder 
Natick, MA 
5 Dec 74 



Open meeting held 

on wastewater treatment 



Local officials and the 
citizens of 16 communities 
are invited to attend a 
meeting to discuss 
alternative wastewater 
treatment proposals for the 
area. The meeting, on Dec. 5 
at 8 p.m. in the Town Hall at 
155 Village Street, Medway 
L'iS been arranged by the 
Metropolitan Area Planning 
Council on behalf of the; 
Technical Subcommittee! 
which is conducting the 
study. 

Ihe Subcommittee, 

consisting of representatives, 
o: the Metropolitan District 
Commission. Corps of 
K n g i n e e r s , ' U.S. 
:• iivironmental Protection 
\fcency, Metropolitan Area 
Planning Counc il, Massu- 
< ! i uVvf fs 'Divisiurf^of »Ya t r r 
Pollution Control. 
Departmeni of Public Health 
fetid Resource Management 
Policy Council, is scheduled 
to select a prefeiTed system 
ft. D«c. 12. 

Although previous 
meetings have been held on 



the subject, the areas of the 
Upper Charles River and 
Upper Sudbury River involve 
some of the more complex 
decisions to be made: 
consequently, the 
subcommittee is looking for 
additional public reaction to 
the alternatives. 
Citizens and officials of the 



following communities are 
urgently requested to attend 
this meeting: Ashland, 
Bellingham, Dover, 
Framingham, Franklin, 
Hoilliston, Hopkinton, 
Medfield, Medway, Mil ford, 
Mill is, Natick. Norfolk. 
Sherborn, Southborough and 
Wrentham. 



15*+ 



News 

Milford, MA 
7 Dec 74 



^Area Town Official; 

Exchange Views 



MED WAY — A discussion andj 
exchange of views on alternative! 
approaches to wastewater treat- 1 

nent concepts were discussed by ; 
ibout 40 local and state officials. 
at a meeting in the Sanfordj 
Conference Room, sponsored by 

he Metropolitan Ajga Elanoiflg 
1 louncil : 

In general, MAPC stressed 
that "local input" regarding 
ijture wastewater treatment! 
t oncepts was a necessity for the j 
j urpose of long-range and effec- j 
tive planning. 

Sixteen area towns from i 
Tliddlesex and Norfolk counties 
were invited to the meeting at 
vhich five concepts for future j 
v wastewater treatment methods i 
v ere discussed. 

Each of the towns is expected i 
to forward its feelings regarding ; 
the concepts to the MAPC or; 
/ rmy Corp. of Engineers within i 
10 days; MAPC in turn 'will! 
forward the recommendations to I 
t te state legislature for its con- i 
s deration. 

"We are interested in your; 
p )int of view and what you would j 
1: ce to see in planning for future ! 
v astewater treatment con- 
cepts," David Kenyon, of the) 
; rmy Corps of Engineers said, j 
'are you interested in the least; 
costly method, which uses the) 
n inimum treatment of sewerage | 
and limits the uses of water, or , 
are you interested in paying! 
more for cleaner water which ] 
can be used in later years fori 
irrigation, industrial uses, and I 
supports aquatic life andj 
promotes aesthetic and en-j 
vironmental use," he added. ' ] 

In presenting the different con- j 
cepts of treatment available, Ke- j 
nyon said a decision on a 
preferred system has been 
scheduled for Dec. 12 and ad- 
ditional public reaction to the 
alternative concepts was bein^ 
sought by the technical subcom- 
mittee before making 
recommendations to the! 
legislature. j 

Officials pointed out that the \ 
Concepts presented would not | 
a: feet the current status of! 
IVedway-Franklin's application 
fcr federal funding for the dis- ( 
trcts proposed treatment facili- 1 
t> , which would be incorporated I 
in o the final proposal. 



Plan Of Future 

"The conecepts may take j 
years to implement fully" 
Jekabs Bittands of Metcalf &; 
Eddy said, "and your need is im- 
mediate." 

The conecpets proposed in the 
Crops of Engineers study in- 
clude: 

—Concept I, a minimal expan- - 
sion of the present Metropolitan 
Sewerage District of 43 com- 
munities and utilizing regional . 
and municipal systems to serve 
the remaining communities . 
within the study area. 

The approximate cost of 
building treatment facilities and : 
intermunicipal interceptor 
sewers is* $1 billion. The es- 
timated annual operation and ; 
maintenace cost is $38 million. • 

Concept 2, would expand the 
Metropolitan Sewerage District 
by creating 5 additional regional 
treatment systems within ■ the « 
present service area. * 

The approximate cost of 
building treatment facilities and ■ 
interceptor sewers is $1.04 

—Concept 3 would extend the 
Deer and Nut Island treatment 
plants service area by increasing 
ine present limits to include the 
Charles River Basin in its entire- 
ty and communities adjacent to | 
the present MDC water supplies ; 
in the Sudbury River Basin; 59 I 
Communities would be serviced 
by the two Metropolitan 
Sewerage District, treatment . 
plants. "':"—• 

MAPC said the estimated cost 
of building treatment -facilities . 
and intermunicipal interceptors 
is $1.1 billion. The estimated an- ' 
nual operation and. maintenance j 
1 cost $33 million. 

—Concept 4 is a decentralized 
system which would be achieved 
by developing six additional 
regional systems within the pre- 
sent Metropolitan Sewerage 
District" service area. 
. The estimated cost of building 
treatment facilities and inter- 
municipal interceptors is $1.12 
billion. The estimated annual 
operation and maintenance cost 
is $64 million. 

— Conecept 5 is a wastewater 
management plan utilizing land 
application, collecting the 
effluent of the five regional 
systems in concept 4 and .convey- 
ing it to southeastern 
Massachusetts for further treat- ' 
ment. 



- Estimated Cost • I 

The estimated cost for building 
treatment facilities and inter- 
municipal interceptions for the 
initial plan is $1.16 billion. The 
estimated annual operation and 
maintenance cost is $36 million. 

Twenty-three factors were con- 
sidered by the Crops in 
evaluating the concepts and were 
weighted for importance and as a 
guide by the technical subcom- 
mittee in recommending a con- 
cept. . . /: - --. :■■'■ 

. Concept 1 was rated first, con- 
cept 4 second, concept 2 third and 
concept 3 rated fourth. The last 
concept no 5. was rated last 
because the total amount of 
acreage needed for treatment 
purposes by the year 2000 would 
be 7500 acres of land using up all 
developable land in the area. 
. The reason for choosing con- 
cept 1 over concept 3 officials 
said was that in Concept 1 the 
wastewater would be treated by 
advance treatment facilities and 
would leave clean water in the 
basins, whereas in concept 3 
which is less expensive the treat- 
ment plant is centralized and 
uses minimum standards and the 
effluent is piped directly into 
Boston Harbor which according 
to officials can accept a 
reasonable amount of raw 
sewerage. 

This in turn, they pointed out 
drains out streams and leaves 
room for stagnant and un- 
desirable vegetation. 

Rita Barron from the Charles 
River Watershed Association 
commented that there is a great 
deal of flexibility built into the 
concepts and with the advances 
of technology, changes could be 
made and adapted to suit the 
needs of the area served. 

Citizens interested in further 
information on the concepts may 
read the- Corps of Engineers 
study at the local library. i 






Sun-Chronicle 
Attleboro, MA 

7 Dec 74 



<■■ 



Wastewater Treatment ] 
Systems Considered 



WRENTHAM - At a wastewater planning 
meeting in Medway Thursday night, 40 citizens 
from 16 area towns vented their concern about 
regional wastewater treatment. 

A two million dollar study mandated by 
Congress is considering five concepts for future 
wastewater treatment. Affected are 109 cities and 
towns in the metropolitan Boston area, including 
Franklin and Wrentham. 

The subcommittee in charge is chaired by the 
Metropolitan District Commission and includes 
members of the Metropo litan Area Council, U.S. 
Environmental 



Protection Agency, U.S.* Army 
Corps, of Engineers, the Division of Water Pollution 
Control, Department of Public Health, Resource- 
Management Policy Council, and a citizen advisory 
committee. 

They will present their final recommendation at 
a Dec. 12 meeting in Boston. ..--.. 

Five different types of wastewater treatment 
systems are under consideration. They are minimal 
expansion of the present metropolitan sewage 
district of 43 communities, expansion of the M.S.D. 
to 59 communities, two alternatives for de- 



centralized systems with additional treatment 
facilities within the present area of the M.S.D., land 
application for 44 of the 109 communities, and 
sewage collection in five regional treatment 
facilities for further treatment in southeastern 
Massachusetts. 

Both Wrentham and Franklin would be in a 
regional system with Bellinghara, Medway and 
Holliston under three of the proposals. In another 
proposal, they would be included in the Boston 
sewage system. 

*i After the Dec. 12 hearing, the final proposal will 
be sent to state and federal agencies for review and 
further open hearings are planned for area towns. 

Wrentham member, David Stonefield, did not j 

attend the meeting but when telephoned com- ; 

mented that Wrentham is not ready for regional ' 

sewage treatment. He explained that projected j 
town population figures do not indicate sewage 
treatment planning is needed at this lime. 

' Town Selectmen have also told Wrentham town j 
officials they are not interested in sharing a J 
regional treatment facility. 



1% 



Globe 

Boston, lyLA 
1 1 Dec 74 



Panel to choose 
a sewer plan 



The shape of things to 
come in sewer manage- 
ment for metropolitan 
Boston may be defined to- 
morrow, "When a multi- 
agency subcommittee of 
\ he Boston Harbor-Eastern 
Massachusetts Wastewater 
Management Study is 
scheduled to recommend 
implemantation of one of 
five proposed plans. 

At stake are the role 
end scope of the Metropol- 
itan District Commission 
(MDC) in handling waste- 
water flows. 

Four alternatives are 
encompassed in the five 
plans developed by the 
MDC and the Army Corps 
of Engineers: expansion of 
the MDC district to 59 
communities; minimal ex- 
pansion of the present 43- 
community district; two 
proposals decentralizing the 
MDC and establishing re- 
gional wastewater treat- 
ment plants; conveyance 
of wastewater to south- 
eastern Massachusetts for 
treatment. 

"Whichever concept we 
choose will be just a rec- 
ommendation,'" Martin 
Weiss. MDC director of 
environmental planning, 
said. -- • 
Representatives of eight 
participating agencies will 
meet tomorrow at 1 p.m. 
at MDC headquarters in 
Beaton. The agencies are 
the MDC, the Army Corps 
c* Engineers, the US Envi- 
ronmental Protection 
Agency, the Massachusetts 
Division of Water Pollu- 
tion Control, the . Metro - 
polit an Area Planning 
Council) fne Department 
or'PuTJTic Health, the Re- 
: \xr.re Management Policy 
Co.T.cil ar.d a nir.e-mem- 
1 v.- Citizens Advisory 
C remittee. 

The propojil agreed 
■j::cn will be studied fur- 
ther, then resubmitted to 
•;e agencici before the 
... n is submitted to the 
I_:gis!atuie, Wj;jS3 said, 



The subcommittee ap- 
! pears to be leaning toward 
.'•.:. o first option, but MDC 
[Comr. John Sears has in- 
j -iteated he would be unli- 
j -;e ; y to approve it. 

Soars argues that that 
I option, which calls for . 
adding communities to the 
Existing 44-member sewer 
listrict and expanding the - 
Deer and Nut islands • 
reatment plants to accom- ; 

r~. ■ " 

modate them, would be 
next to impossible to ac- 
complish. 

It would require dou- 
bling the size of the Nut 
Island plant, Sears said, 
"by filling in Boston Har- 
bor or taking a chunk of 
Quincy." For that and 
other reasons, he said, "I 
don't think it will fly." 

The Citizens Advisory i 
Committee last week] 
\ voted to support the two 
proposals which shift the 
I handling of effluent to 
; suburban treatment 

plants. 

Plans 1 and 3 would ex- 
pand the MDC district by 
five and 16 communities 
respectively, retaining pri- \ 
mary wastewater treat- ! 
ment at MDC facilities at ! 
Nut and Deer islands for • 
release into Boston Har- ! 

bor. I 

i 

Plan 5, under which 
wastewater would be 
piped to Cape Cod and . 
southeastern Massachu- 
setts, has aroused opposi- 
tion from those regions j 
and is not expected to be 
considered seriously. 



157 



Globe 

Boston, MA 
13 Dec 74 



Satellite sewage-treatment plants 
proposed to cut harbor pollution 



By FJvelyn Keene 
Special to The Globe 

A plan to reduce Boston 
harbor pollution by . de- 
creasing the load . on the 
Deer Island and Nut Island 4 
j;ewage treatment plants 
and building , satellite' 
plants has been adopted 
by a special technical sub- 
committee on waste water 
management. 

The "subcommittee, 

whose chairman is the 
Metropolitan District 
Commission's chief engi- 
neer, Martin Cosgrove, in- 



_ eludes representatives of 
the US Army Corps of En- 
gineers, the US Environ- 
mental Protection Agency, 
the Metr opolitan Area 
Pl anning Council, a s well 
as several state agencies 
"including the division of 
■ Water Pollution Control, 
the Public Health Depart- 
ment, and the Resource 
Management Policy Coun- 
cil. 

Meeting at MDC offices 
yesterday, the group ap- 
proved a plan that would 
reduce from 43 to 32 the 
number of communities 
now served by the MDC at 
the Deer. Island and Nut 
Island treatment plants, 
and add one sewage treat- 
ment plant in Woburn, an- 
other in Canton, and pos- 
sibly a third in either Fra- 
mir.gham or Dedbam. 

The plan, which will re- 
quire public hearings and 
legislative approval, would 
cost about $753 million." " - 

The subcommittee elim- 
inated four other concepts 
presented in a Boston 
Harbor-Eastern Massachu- j 
setts waste water manage- j 
ment study. One called for -I 
land disposal of treated ! 
sewage from five regional | 



systems and" its" distribu- 
tion to various points in 
southeastern Massachu- 
setts. 

Public hearings on this, 
method - • demonstrated 
public distaste for the 
technology, one of the 
newest methods of dispos- 
ing of sewage from waste-* 
water treatment plants. j 



158 



SOUTH MIDDLESEX 

DAILY 




FRIDAY, DECEMBER 13, 1974 



New sewage plant 
or larger pipes? 



A decision on whether to build 
a new wastewater treatment 
plant for Framingham or a 
bigger trunk line leading 
ultimately to Boston Ilarbor Is 
eipected by the Metropolitan 
District Commission today. 

Either way, it is expected to 
solve sewer restriction 
problems for the South Mid- 
olesei area by about 1980, and 
in Framingham, Ashland, and 
Hopklnton particularly as they 
would be served by the new 
plant. 

Thursday a special sub- 
committee of state and federal 
agencies voted 3-3 on a modified 



concept of decentralization of 
MDC lines and building plants 
in at least two towns. 

The MDC voted for the 
wastewater treatment plant for 
Framingham and the other 
agencies agreed, according to 
Marty Weiss of the MDC, to let 
that organization vote again 
today, and abide by it. 

"What we wanted was a sense 
of priority for this area," Gerry 
Mimno of the South Middlesex 
Area Chamber of Commerce 
said today, "and we got it" 

The plant, if voted today, 
would be on the Wayland line in 
(Continued on Page 6A ) 

159 



what Rep. Barbara Gray, R- 
Framlngham, called the 
"Oxbow" area south of Potter 
and Little Farms Road In a 
mostly wooded area where 
there are sand pits. 

Even if the MDC votes for the 
plant it would be just a 
recommendation requiring 
publifi hearings aiui legislative 
approval 

Ho esthnjii o i ... I 

plant was mat i . | 

ttviiulu be til l 

I 
putting excess wutei or el 
into the Sudbury River at |hQ 
siL- 

According to Mimno, the 
original capital costs Wuuld bs 
borne by the federal govern- 
ment but subsequent operating 
costs of plants or new Unas i y 
have to come from local 
communities although then i3 a 
possl! Pity of all MDC towns 
1 

. • ' 

\ pdss bility of excess 

; a ho going into the river, 

; o led io it." 

.: other possibility uccoi 

1 to i lor an additional 

trunk line going to Dcciham 
where a plant could pos:ib!y be 
built instead of Framingham 

He said it would co r i 
million fcr the CG-irch line to 
V.'rllcsley and the 72 ir h line 
from there to Dedham, a total cf 

J more than 70,C"0 feet. 

But he said either way it 
would eventually increase the 
a~ca's aewer capacity end allow i 

1 for expansion of business end 

! home building 'here. 

: There are now rectrictions on 
sewer tie-ins on commup ; .'/s 
relying on MDC lines which po 
from hs're to Boston Harbor Nut 

: and Deer Island treatment 
p-.mts. 

The plan voted Thursday 
would cost abcut $750 million 
and reduce Boston Harbor 
pollution Ly treating it In plants 
In V/cburn and Canton, and 
po3£ibly reduce the number of 
coinrnimillrs on MDC lines 
from M to 32. 

Other plant sites are either 
Framingham or Dedham or 
WePesley. 

Mimno said the group gave 
Framingham top priority 
because "we're the area with 
restrictions now." 

• 'We get first priority either in 
building a new plant or 
enta . ii : 1 nea " re sal I. 

r il.j only que:: '"cJ 

Thursday he ^aid was v. . 

, this area "should have a local 

[ plant or a bigger p'po. " 

He said "We re going to have 



to rely on their recom- l 
men da t ions," on how a plant i 
would affect the Sudbury Nhrer. i 
A Citizens Advisory Com- > 
mittee which also vote* for the 
plant in Framingham wanted W 
per cent instead of the 
previously mention d i. 
cant of iolUvuen 

conox I I . - U,e 

i io u. 

wojid 

i 

■ 
. 

mor^y to maintain, it would be 
up to tiit community to cr. 
it i it bi 

But besuitj iiuu sue said 

"Almost eqril are the 

bioloi of 

•age 

into the River" 

M The main 
n - lent 

the low Bow," of the rn 
Ten. Gray i,; .i "if >cu 

The .. : i will 

corns alter an < . tudy 

Voting l and 

Citizens A 'Uoe 

for a Frr.T.^v' I was 

the U.S. Armv Corps of 
: .1 It 
were U>3 Environ il 
, Protection A( 
Derrabnc Health 

and Division cf \ ^tlon 

Control. 



EMMA Study Nears Final Recommendation Phi 
For Expansion of Regional Sewage District 1 



While the Council begins gearing up to conduct a 
comprehensive, areawide wastewater management 
study another sturt\ in which it has been involved 
begins to wind down 

Recommendations developed in the course of the 
Boston Harbor-Eastern Massachusetts Wastewater 
Management Study also referred to as EMMA, were 
presented at a se-ies of public meetings in January 
While the Council's new "208" study and plan (see 
Page 1 l will consider solutions to all sources of water 
pollution m the region EMMA is primarily concerned 
with future improvements to and expansion of the 
Metropolitan District Commission (MDC) Sewage 
District 

Council Participation 

Dur -q 'he study and recommendation process, the 
MAPC participated p'n a Technical Subcommittee 
chai'°d by ' h e MDC. the agency responsible for over- 
see nq the study Other aqenoes serving on the sub- 
Itei n~ii,de the U S Army Corps of Engineers. 
t) S Proteclioi Agent y iEPA). state 

D -. is ,i I ' .'. |i Pollution Control Department of 
' Slate Planning in addition 
a Citiz es in an advisory capacity to 

t r • st udy g i i 

A primary function performed by the Council was the 
organizing and publ cizinq of an initial series of public 
meetings desiq-ed tn encourage maximum citizen 
■ ise of the study and 
to ensure local representation in the state and federal 
decision-maKi-i < rope! i MAPC participation involved 
working with the region s news media as well as con- 
tacting interested citizen groups within the EMMA 
Study s 109 community area Local official and citizen 
: roposed alternatives for improving the 
. then evaluated by the technical 
subcommittee and incorporated into preliminary rec- 
ommendations 

More Meetings 

Beginning next month another series ot public 
meetings wu' be held to evaluate construction priori- 
ties including alternatives for treating combined sewer 
overflows and management arrangements for imple- 
menting the study s recommendations 

The estimated capital costs for treatment facilities, 
accompanying intercepted and pumping stations rec- 
ommended by the EMMA study is $735 million. Under 
the Federal Water Pollution Control Act Amendments 
of 1972 (Public Law 92-5001 the costs will be shared as 
follows: 75 percent federal, 15 percent state and 10 per- 
cent, or $73 5 million, local Annual operation and 
maintenance costs for which there are no federal or 
stale funds available, are expected to total $29 million 



RECOMMENDATIONS (See map- 

There are 109 communities in the study area, includ- 
ing d3 members of the MDC-admimstered Metropolitan 
Sewage District (MSDl Treatment systems have been 
considered for all study area communities, and those 
recommended encompass 60 cities and towns 

The subcommittee has endorsed moderate, decen- 
tralized treatment systems for the MSD This would be 
accomplished by maintaining the present service area 
of the Deer Island sewage treatment plant, reducing the 
service area of the Nut Island sewage treatment plant 
and serving the outer area of the MSD with inland treat- 
ment facilities 

Recommendations are based upon providing secon 
dary treatment at the Boston Harbor facilities and ad 
vanced treatment, which includes secondary treatmen 
plus nutrient removal, at the inland facilities discharg- 
ing into rivers Toxic substances in industrial wastes 
would be subject to EPA pre-treatment regulations 
prior to discharge into sewer systems and alternative 
strategies for controlling combined sewer overflows 
will be proposed 

Boston Harbor: Upgrading the present primary treat- 
ment plant at Deer Island to a secondary treatment 
facility handling anticipated flows of 380 million gal- 
lons per day (mgd) in the year 2000 The Nut Island 
primary treatment plant would also be expanded and 
upgraded to secondary treatment to handle an antici- 
pated flow of 120 mgd in the year 2000 The two plants 
are currently designed for 343 mgd and 112 mgd. 
Sludge produced at these facilities would be incinerat- 
ed rather than discharged into the harbor These im- 
provements would benefit overall water guality and 
help safeguard public health, especially at recreational 
areas It should be noted that the restoration of Boston 
Harbor water quality will depend mostly upon abating 
several other causes of pollution, notably the com- 
bined sewer overflows. 

Neponsel River: An advanced treatment facility would 
be located in the Canton area It would treat approxi- 
mately 30 mgd in the year 2000 from the towns of Can- 
ton, Norwood. Walpole, Sharon and Stoughton This 
facility would reduce the service area of the Nut Island 
plant and keep reclaimed wastewater as far upstream in 
the Neponset River Basin as possible The highly treat- 
ed effluent should help the Neponset River by improv- 
ing flows in dry summer months. 

Charles River: The Wellesley area would be the location 
for an advanced treatment facility to serve the towns of 
Wellesley. Framingham, Ashland, Hopkinton, Natick 
and Southborough, as well as parts of Dover and Sher- 
born when sewerage is provided there This 30 mgd 



facility would reduce flows to the Nut Island plant by 
the year 2000 and help retain reclaimed wastewater in 
its basin of origin. Adding these flows of clean water to 
the Charles River will be helpful to water guality in dry 
seasons The treatment facilities which are in various 
stages of implementation in the Medfield. Medway and 
Milford areas should also benefit the river 

Aberjona River: An advanced treatment facility of about 
two mgd in the Woburn area is under consideration as 
an alternative to serve the special purpose of augment- 
ing flows in the Aberjona River during summer months 
when additional water is needed in the river. Other 
means of providing low flow augmentation will be eval- 
uated to determine which is the most cost-effective. 







EASTERN MASSACHUSETTS METROPOLITAN AREA 

WASTEWATER MANAGEMENT STUDY 



m ^ m Study Area Boundary 

— Recommended Service Areas 

120 Approximate Capacity of the Facility in MGD 

a Secondary Treatment Facility 

■ Recommended Advanced Treatment Facility 

D Flow Augmentation Facility 
Source of data: U.S. Army Corps of Engineers 



161 



SOUTH MIDDLESEX 

DAILY 





Sewage plant isn't 



coming 

A »ew wastewater treatment 
ptait will not be built in 
Fnuningham. Instead, step. 1 
will be taken to "provide relief " 
for the existing trunk lin<\ 
according to Richard Noss, 
environmental engineer with 
the Metropolitan District 
Commission. 

The ultimate plan for solving 
sewer restriction prohlems m 
the South Middlesex area wilJ 
center around construction of a 
satellite plant to handle 
sewerage flow or the Charle , 
possibly in Welleslev No*ss.Mrl 

Gerry Muniio of the Sourh 
Middlesex Are;: «"hnn»h«»r of 
Commerce applauded In 
decision saying it will solve the 
immediate t apacity prnblen 
and also provide "a long ran; <■ 
opportunity to re:ise the w«ter 
at some time in the future 

Framingha.ii. Ashland, 
Natick and Hcpkmtun would 
benefit from use of another 
trunk line Mimno said. 

The proposal to buiM n 
treatment plant in 

Franungham wa-> probably 
defeated Mirnno said, becau.se 
the Sudbury u a low-flow rive; 
and the technology does not 
exist that could forecast the 
effect more nutrients won In 
have on it 

Noss would not detail 
specifics of why the 
Frammgham plant proposal 
was defeated, but said there 
were "a number of reasons " 

"There were problems with 
both directions " he said 

The MDC's decision wai, not 
the last word on the matter 
hnwvcr, '''"' public hearings wi'l 
be l.'dd in January to presonl 
plrif. lor the entire area a, :.■■ 



to Framingham 



study, Noss said "Response of 
those hearings will be taken into 
consideration." 

Noss would not say how the 
different agencies voted on the 
plan, but said it evoked "eon 
siderable discussion." 

The decision will be subject to 
review "by the policy-making 
people in state government," 
Noss added, including 
primarily the Regional 
Metropolitan Planning Corn 
mission 

For all practical purpf ;<•- 
'hough, the plan foi i plan! in 
!• ramini'Jiarn was killed i- hen 



the MIX! voted to siiirt its 
fieu," toward m.-kiiig .1 bigger 
trunk line 

Under cither pl;.n, the 
original capital costs vvouid I* 
bornt b> the federal govern- 
ment but subsequent operating 
costs of plants or new \u\e> 
would have tu ccme from io hI 
communities, according to 
Mimno. 

He ha- -aid that in additional 
trunk line to Weill .ley wool I 
cost $'$(> mill, on, but 'hat eitnei 
way, the ai ea's sewi r .ip ■:' * 
W1111M be in. n ise ! a:i.l .ill v 
toi l/isiin s mil horiie mn !i ,, 
growth 



INpw sewage pi; 
or larger pipes? 



SATURDAY, DfCEMBER 14, 1974 






SOUTH MIDDLESEX 

DAILY 




Another vote asked 
on area sewage plan 



Although a »tate agency last 
week recommended another 
trunk line to solve South Mid- 
dlesex area sewage problem*, a 
citizens advisory committee 
may ask reconsideration, 
favoring a new wastewater 
treatment plant. 

The committee was one of six 
voting on the proposal last week 
which came after an extensive 
study. 

Chairman Rita Barron of 
Newton said Monday she will 
meet with the committee 
sometime this week to review 
the decision which she said 

wasn't expected." 

When the committee met with 
several other state and federal 
agencies last week she said they 
didn't expect to make a final 
recommendation. 

The Metropolitan District 
Commission's vote Friday 
recommending an additional 
trunk line loading ultimately to 
Boston Harhor came a day after 
a !i-3 tie vote on whether to favor 
a new treatment plant in 
Framingham instead. 

The additional line would be 
fi6 inches to Wellesley where a 
treatment plant may be built 
instead and 72-inches from 
there to Dedham where it would 
tie into the MDC system leading 



la Boston Harbor. 

The proposal was to solve the 
area's sewer restriction 
problems because ot MDC lines 
having reached capacity, 
limiting tie-ins. 

The MDC recommendation is 
not final however as there will 
be public hearings in January 
for the entire Eastern 
Massachusetts area studied. 

The proposal was a modified 
concept >f decentraliaation of 
MDC lint : and building satellite 
plants ir. at least Woburn and 
Canton. 

Mrs. Barron however said, 
"We had not gone to the 
meeting expecting to vote on 
specific satellite plants, but 
agreed to the concept of 
reducing the load on the Boston 
Harbor Islam plants." 

The committee voted for a 
new wastewater treatment 
plant in Framingham although 
she said Monday "Framingham 
has a serious problem that has 
to be dealt with but which way I 
don't know." 

A. Richard Miller of the lake 
Cochitunte Watershed 
Assoc, and the advisory com- 
mittee said however he would 
ask for a reconsideration. 

"We were faced with a nasty 
11th hour dilemma to vote for 



TUESDAY, DECEMBER 17. 1974 



163 



one or the ether based en 
inadequate information," ha 
said of the trunk line-treatment 
plant vote. 

Miller said there is a problem 
with the Charles River possibly 
drying up far a week eaert year 
by 1990 if an additional trunk 
line is used. 

He said a U.S. Geological 
Survey citing that possibility 
was not admitted Into testimony 
until the meeting last week. 

"The river is going to dry tap if 
we take water out and use it and 
send it somewhere else," he 
said. 

Miller said he favored 
"continued planning for a 
facility on the Sudbury River," 
at the Framingham site 
although there is not yet enough 
information he felt to vote on 
either proposal. 

He said the vote last week and 
subsequent MDC vote swinging 
the recommendation came 

because they felt they wanted 
to make a dedstoej that day." 

Miller felt there is not enough 
information on how ground 
water around rivers or how 
their flow would be affected. 

' Priorities are upside down 
and topsy turvy." he said, 
adding the vote was "really 
flying blind in some ways" and 
"uncomfortably close to closing 
your eyes and throwing a dart ." 

Gerry Mimno of the South 
Middlesex Area Chamber of 
iVmmerce he*ever said the 
additional tnmk line would 
enable more growth for the 
area, allowing hujuiess and 
residential tic ins to sewers 




Neo? QriGland 

*m • VOLUME 6 

Sierzrzan n g .j A n 75 

SIERRA CLUB • NEW ENGLAND CHAPTER BULLETIN 



Waste Water Disposal 

The next Greater Boston Group General 
Membership meeting will be Wednesday, 
January 15, 7:30 p.m. at the MIT. Student 
Center, Mezzanine Lounge. There will be a 
discussion of sewage disposal problems and a 
report on the study by the Army Corps of 
Engineers and the M.D.C. on wastewater 
disposal in Eastern Massachusetts. 

As required by the 1972 Water Pollution 
Control Act, the Corps and the M.D.C. with fnput 
from a Citizens' Advisory Group, have drawn up 
a basic wastewater treatment plan for the 109 
M.D.C. communities, with particular focus on 
the 50-odd cities and towns in the Greater Boston 
area. 

The plan will have profound impact not only on 
regional water quality, but also on land use, 
future population growth, and the flow of four 
major rivers. 

The plan would decentralize the M.D.C. 
wastewater disposal system by establishing a 
number of satellite sewage treatment plants. 

Discharges from these plants would raise 
water levels in the Charles, Neponset. Mystic 
and Sudbury Rivers. Area communities are now 
withdrawing more water than they release from 
these rivers. 

An especially controversial issue is the 
construction ^of a secondary treatment plant on 
Deer Island in Boston Harbor. At present, 
sewage from Boston area communities receives 
only primary treatment; i.e., solids are removed 
from the water. The 1972 Water Pollution Control 
Act requires that all municipal waste receive 
secondary treatment, which removes up to 90 
per cent of the organic matter in sewage, by 1977 
(the M.D.C. cannot meet this deadline). If a 
secondary treatment plant is built on Deer 
Island, this could destroy the island's recreation- 
al potential. 

The M.D.C. and the Corps are required by law 
to solicit public comment on their plan. This is 
your chance to be heard — you don't have to be 
an expert to have a say in the future of Greater 
Boston's water supply. For further information 
call Madeleine Kolb at 547-1223. 



16U 



£ Patriot Ledger 
Quincy, MA 

30 May 75 



/ 



'Nut Island Filling 
Sewerage Opposed 



QUINCY - Houghs Neck resi- 
dents and City Councilor Loo Kel- 
ly strongly voiced their opposition 
last night to the filling of the Nut 
Island bay area, which the Metro- 
politan District Commission 
(MDC) is considering to expand 
the sewage treatment plant lo- 
cated there. 

' The crowd of 400 applauded and 
cheered Mr. Kelly at the waste- 
water management public meet- 
ing at the Lincoln-Hancock School 
when he explained that his feeling 
was the same as that of his consti- 
tuents. 

Mr. Kelly warned of the sludge 
deposit and flooding which may 
occur in the area if the 23-acre bay 
area adjacent to Nut Island is 
filled in. 

Martin Weiss, MDC Environ- 
mental Planning Office director, 
later countered this remark by 
saying that facilities would be 
built to incinerate the sludge rath- 
er than discharge it into the har- 
bor. 

Numerous residents asked why 
the MDC would prefer not to util- 
ize Peddocks Island to upgrade 
the Nut Island plant. Mr. Weiss' 
answer was that it would cost 
moro money, even though the 
MDC owns the island. 

Mr. Weiss said that running 
pipes underwater from Nut Island 
to Peddocks Island would outrun 
the cost of extending Nut Island 
by filling the bay by several mil- 
lion dollars. 

, Aside from (lie cost involved, 
Mr. Kelly said even though Ped- 
docks Island was originally ob- 
tained by the MDC for recreation 
and conservation purposes, the 
use of 25 of its 1.10 acres could be 
transformed, according to law. 

Mr. Weiss stated that MDC 
primary sewage treatment plants 
on Deer Island apd Nut Island 
have reached their capacities. Ad- 
ditional plants are needed, he 



said, and upgrading to secondary 
status is necessary at the primary 
plants. 

The MDC has endorsed a plan 
to decentralize the present sew- 
age system. Proposed are two 
advanced treatment plants; one 
along the Neponset River in the 
Canton area, and another alone 
the Charles River in the Wcllesley 
area. Also, a small flow augmen- 
tation facility for the Aberjona 
River in the Woburn area is being 
considered. 

Mr. Kelly assured irate resi- 
dents that no proposal to take over 
homes was being considered in 
bay fill plan. Residents pointed 
out that views of downtown Bos- 
ton and Dorchester Bay would be 
blocked by a treatment plant ex- 
tension on an enlarged Nut Island. 

A representative from Mctcalf 
and Eddy, consultants to ihe 
study, said that up to 10-years ago 
rainfall diluted much of the pollut 
ant material in wastewater 
Jekab Vitlands, the Eastern Mas 
sachusetts Metropolitan Area pro 
ject manager for the study, said 
that today, rainwater is already 
polluted, lessening the diluting 
effect to the wastewater. 

Mr. Kelly praised the use of 
chlorine in the bay to improve the 
quality of the water. Partially 
treated sewerage has been over- 
flowing from the Nut Island plant, 
he said, and chlorination has 
helped improve the situation. 

Including water pollution con- 
trols, the entire project is e\- 
pected in cost approximately $900 
million. The study was started in 
March 197.1. 

The metropolitan area popu- 
lation in 1970 was 3,129.200.' In 
2000, the population is expected to 
be 3,806,fi()0. The 30year projected 
plan is for construction of treat- 
ment plants that will sufficiently 
handle this increase. 



165 



The Patriet Ledger, Friday, Octeber 3, W7S ^ 



400 Oppose MDC Bay Fill Plan 



QUINCY - The city is 
"doomed to destruction," accord- 
ing to City Councillor Leo J. Kelly, 
if a proposal to fill in 26 acres of 
Quincy Bay is approved. 

Mr. Kelly led some 400 oppo- 
nents of the plan at a hearing last 
night sponsored by the Eastern 
Massachusetts Metropolitan Area 
(EMMA) wastewater man- 
agement study. 

Participants in the study in- 
clude the Metropolitan District 
Commission (MDC) and the 
Army Corps of Engineers and the 
proposal includes expansion of 
Nut Island to include secondary 
sewerage treatment facilities. 

The group proposes to fill in 26 
acres of the bay adjacent to Nut 
Island but Mr. Kelly said the 
filling would have disastrous ef- 
fects on the bay's tidal flow. 

As it is, the bay is not fully 
flushed out by the tide, and with 
the filling, Mr. Kelly predicted 
tidal flushing would be reduced to 
a trickle, resulting in a waterfront 
' that is nothing but acres of 
smelling, stinking mud flats." 

An accountant, an MDC official, 
and an engineer all made presen- 
tations but the audience was.reore 
interested in finding out what had 
been done about demands made 
at a meeting in April. 

Mr. Kelly said the bay is 
already in terrible condition 
without destroying tidal flow, with 
the level of dissolved oxygen dan- 
gerously low and the level of toxic 
metals such as lead, mercury, 
chrome, zinc and nickle very 



low oxygen level and the 




metals as well as gases from the 
treatment plant have also re- 
sulted in verv little marine life, 
said Mr. Kelly. 

Both Mr. Kelly and Councillor 
Dennis Harrington asked why 
there is no Quincy representative 
on the EMMA study group or its 
citizen advisory committee with 
Mr. Harrington suggesting 
EMMA couldn't stand the heated 
opposition from the area. 

"Concentrate on primary treat- 
ment on Nut Island and prove you 
can do that and forget any plans at 
all to fill in any part of Quincy 
Bay," said Mr. Harrington. 

Councillor Warren Powers re- 
iterated the environmental haz- 
ards of the project and added, 
"Why does Quincy have to be the 
dumping ground for everywhere 
else? — Let's have some of the 
other towns share these prob- 
lems," a sentiment voiced by nu- 
merous other persons at the hear- 
ing. 

Martin Weiss of the MDC said 
Mr. Kelly had taken many of his 
facts and figures out of context 
but Mr. Kelly countered "the 
facts are not taken out of context 
— you already know there's little 
flushing there now." ■ 

Harold Davis, the school 
committee's representative on 
the park and recreation com- 
mission, said that with the MDC's 
previous track record, any project 



it puts forth "strains the imagina- 
tion." 

Mr. Davis joined in the call for 
a Quincy representative on the 
EMMA committee. 

Pasquale DiStefano, president 
of the Quincy Citizen's Associa- 
tion, said no filling of Quincy Bay 
can be contemplated — "too 
much of our precious bay has 
already been desecrated," he 
said. 

Questioning the validity of the 
hearing, Mr. DiStefano said, "If 
Quincy says 'no' is it going to be 
'no' or are you just putting us on 
— I think you are." 

Mr. Weiss said he could not 
believe anyone from the MDC had 
ever said the water coming out of 
the present Nut Island plaint 
would be "crystal clear." 

However, several persons, in- 
cluding Joseph Brophy of the 
park and recreation commission, 
said they had been told by the 
MDC "you can practically drink 
.the water," when the plant was 
constructed in 1950. 

The plant at Nut Island serves 
22 communities "and Westwood 
and Needham and ail of that can 
damn well go and build their own 
plants," said Mr. Brophy. 

"We've lived here too long to 
believe anything you (the MDC) 
or the Army Corps of Engf\eers 
has to say. We don't war' ^is 
here." 

One woman suggeslr 



mdTi 



the whole works, primary and 
secondary treatment plani 
Peddock's Island but Mr. 
reply that Peddock's Island 
reserved for open space and rec- 
reational use" brought boos freer. 
many of the audience. 

Councillor Kelly, however, ^jd 
the MDC can use the island for 
waste treatment facilities. 

The hearing had originally been 
scheduled for the auditorium lr 
the Kennedy Health Center on 
Hancock Street which has \T. 
seats. 

Earlier yesterday Mr. .jw 
questioned whether the MDC ana 
Army Engineers were attempt*? 
to discourage discussion of the: 
study by choosing such a small 
hall. 

In any case, the meeting ires 
adjourned to the library at the 
Vocational-Technical School and 
later to the school's gymnasium to 
accomodate the large crowd. 

Mayor Walter J. Hannon aari 
his- opponent in the November 
mayoral race, Joseph J. LaRaia 
both said they would like to s« 
the present Nut Island plant run- 
ning at its optimum level. 

"I don't know that the plant b* 
ever run right.' said Mr. Haiuor 
adding the trucking of thousand 
of tons of fill through Hou# ; 
Neck would create an unbearable 
hardship on residents of the am 
The federal Environment 
Protection Agency is scheduled to 
prepare an environmental lmpac' 
statement on the project "and I 
just hope it will show a better 
solution to this problem than ill- 
ig," said Mr. LaRaiau 



V 



166 



D. h a Written Statements Received at the Final Meetings 



167 



Further statement of the Charles River Watershed Association 
to the public meeting held by the Boston Harbor Eastern 
Massachusetts Metropolitan Area Wastewater Management 
Study. September 30, 1975, Junior High School, Wellesley, 
Massachusetts. 

I am Lydia R. Goodhue, 90 Dover Road in Wellesley, speaking for the 
Board of The Charles River Watershed Association. We submitted a 
statement at the June 5 meeting in Needham (a copy of which is 
attached). This statement: 

1. Approved the principle of a decentralized system with 
improvements of Deer and Nut Island treatment. 

2. Opposed a plant on the banks of the river. Good planning - 
and indeed all the recent Charles River plans - calls for recrea- 
tional and scenic uses of the river banks. Only water-related 
structures such as boat houses should be encouraged on the river's 
edge. 

3. Called for a great deal of input from citizens and local 
officials before a site or even site alternatives are chosen. 

4. Applauded the high priority given to the problem of urban 
run -off . 

Since then we have seen little if anything happen which would 
lessen our concerns. 

Unless a citizen group has some immediate and real input in the 
over-all decisions, we fear that citizen activity will be reactive 
and defensive rather than creative and positive. We believe that 
citizen input should go not only to the matter of the site, but 
also to the matter of design and operation. We are worried about: 

1. Sludge disposal 

2. - Smell 

3. Noise 

4. Nutrient removal 

5. Record of experience of an existing plant of similar design 

We feel the need of more water quality data upon which to base these 
decisions. For instance, what is the data information on the effect 
on the river of the effluent under the worst possible conditions? 
What of emergency conditions? In case of failure of the operation, 
would the raw sewage go into the river? 

And, finally, we are concerned about the problem of operation - 
whether the plant will be operated by trained and high-quality 
staff and supervised by an alert staff at the agency level. 



168 






Statement of the Charles River Watershed Association 
to the Public Meeting held by the Boston Harbor- 
Eastern Massachusetts Metropolitan Area Wastewater 
Management Study. June 5> 1975 Pollard School Needham 

I am Mary H. Pyffe of Pond Rd., Wellesley, representing the Board 
of the Charles River Watershed Association, We are an association 
of concerned citizens from all parts of the Charles River's Water- 
shed who care about the river, its banks, and the condition of the 
entire watershed as it affects the river and citizens 1 enjoyment 
of it. 

We approve the principle of a decentralized system for the 
Metropolitan Sewerage District with improvement of Deer Island and 
Nut Island treatment and with an advanced treatment plant in the 
mid-Charles watershed. We realize that the M.D.C. system is often 
surcharged here and that the river would benefit from added flow 
if it is clean. 

However, we object to the phrase "along the Charles River in the 
Wellesley area" because: 

1. The treatment plant should not be on the banks of the 
river. The river is a great recreational and environmental asset 
to the region, and only those structures which are water-linked 
(such as a boat house) should occupy land adjacent to the river, 
especially in the Wellesley-Dover area, one of the most scenic 
locations. 

2. We have long supported planning which promotes the 
recreational and scenic uses of the river banks, notably the 
Department of Natural Resources' input into the Corps of Engineers 
5 -year study of the Charles and the most recent SENE proposal of 
the New England River Basins Commission. 

3. We do not think that a site or even site alternatives 
should be chosen without a great deal of formal input from local 
citizens, citizens' associations, and town and city officials. 

We are glad that storm water regulation has been assigned a high 
priority because urban run-off is a serious pollutant of the 
Charles River. 



169 



9/30/75 
STATEMENT OF WELLESLEY BOARD OF SELECTMEN TO THE M.D.C. 
ME. CHAIRMAN: 

My name is Richard L. Gardner, Chairman of the Board of Select- 
men of the Town of Wellesley. I am attending this public information 
meeting to indicate the opposition of the Town of Wellesley to the 
alternative recommended by the Boston Harbor-Eastern Massachusetts 
Metropolitan Area ("E.M.M.A.") Wastewater Management Study for the 
provision of sewage treatment facilities in the Greater Boston area. 
This recommended plan includes a system of supplementary satellite 
treatment plants, a management structure for the wastewater treatment 
system and a financing mechanism for assessing its capital, operating 
and maintenance costs. 

We oppose the satellite plan because it creates unacceptable 
health hazards, degrades the environment in which it is located, is 
more expensive, does not conform to the recommendations of the Tech- 
nical Advisory Committee, did not consider adequately technical alter- 
natives, and there was inadequate involvement of the municipalities 
within the study area. 

UNACCEPTABLE HEALTH HAZARDS: There is a certainty that viruses 
will pass through the primary, secondary and tertiary treatment and 
into the discharge effluent. At this time, there are no federal or 
state regulations concerning limits for viruses in water or wastewater 
However, because very low numbers ( <10) of viruses are sufficient to 
cause disease in man, viruses in water supplies or surface waters 



170 



represent a significant health hazard. A major source of virus in 
surface waters is effluent from municipal waste treatment plants. It 
is estimated that advanced waste treatment plants discharge 150 in- 
fectious units of virus per liter (EMMA wastewater management study: 
Hygienic Impacts). The capacity of the proposed treatment facility on 
the middle Charles River is 30 million gallons per day, thus the plant 
would be discharging approximately 18 billion viruses per day. In the 
event of plant malfunction, the number could be several times higher. 
Viruses have been recovered in water up to 10 miles from the point of 
effluent discharge; it can be assumed that the Charles would be virus- 
contaminated for several miles from the proposed plant site. This 
contamination could endanger those populations exposed. These viruses, 
which include poliomyelitis and infectious hepatitis strains, would 
endanger the people of Wellesley, Needham, Dover, Westwood, the West 
Roxbury Section of Boston, Dedham, Newton, Waltham, Watertown, the 
Brighton section of Boston, Cambridge, Brookline, and the Back Bay/ 
Beacon Hill sections of Boston* A total of 500,000 people live within 
the above-mentioned localities. 

The above described hazard exists under the best conditions. We 
are not talking about a situation where something goes wrong at the 
treatment plant — a malfunction -- a strike -- equipment failure — 
human error — or some other failing of man or nature. 

Viruses are the most important items that would escape the treat- 
ment that is proposed at such a plant, but not the only items, however;. 
Organic chemicals, salts (which are extremely critical for people 
suffering from hypertension or cardiac conditions), urine compounds, 

171 



pesticides, heavy metals and dissolved metallic chromium would be in- 
cluded. Furthermore, the plant proposes phosphate elimination but 
actually adds nitrates in the treatment process. These nitrogen com- 
pounds can be extremely harmful to drinking water. Finally, there is 
a substantial algae growth problem in the lower Charles River, and this 
problem may be exacerbated by the effluent discharge of the Middle 
Charles Treatment Plant. 

ENVIRONMENTAL DEGRADATION : The proposed satellite plant will 
dump sewage effluent into the Charles River at a location where no 
sewage - treated or untreated - is being dumped presently. This plant 
would have severe noise problems associated with its operation. A 
sludge incinerator on the same site may create additional air pollu- 
tion problems . 

The satellite plant would be incompatible with the designation of 
this stretch of the Charles River for improvement to Class n B" water 
quality by the State's Division of Water Pollution Control. 

The location of a satellite plant in an area that is otherwise 
devoted to residential, recreational, educational, conservation, office 
or research, and park land uses is not acceptable. The size and bulk 
of such a plant is out of scale; the noise and odor is objectionable; 
and it is impossible to screen such a plant from its surroundings, 
particularly the 250' high smoke stack that would be needed for the 
sludge incinerator. 

MORE EXPENSIVE : Operating and maintenance costs of sewage treat- 
ment under the satellite plant alternative could be at least $*+.7 
million per year more than the same items for the expansion of central 

172 



plants alternative. Main components of the operation and maintenance 
costs are labor, chemicals and power, thus these costs may be greatly- 
underestimated, particularly when considered over the UO-year lifetime 
of the plant. 

HON -CONFORMING TO THE TECHNICAL ADVISORY COMMITTEE RECOMMENDATIONS : 
The committee evaluated 23 different items, both engineering and 
environmental considerations. This review favored the expansion of 
central plants alternative, not the development, of satellites. 

INADEQUATE INVOLVEMENT OF THE MUNICIPALITIES : Until the elected 
officials of the Town of Wellesley began to question directly members 
of the E.M.M.A. Technical Advisory Committee, very little detail and 
substantive information had been provided. The information tended to 
be very general and innocuous in nature and did not do justice to a 
study which may lead to the expenditure of over $800,000,000 in public 
funds. Actually, this problem of the municipalities getting adequate 
information still remains unresolved. On July 29th representatives 
from the Towns of Wellesley, Dover and Sherborn held a joint study 
meeting. This July 29th meeting reviewed the technical work done by 
the E.M.M.A. study and the way in which potential health and environ- 
mental hazards would be handled by the sewage treatment plants. Several 
questions remained unanswered after this July 29th meeting. A formal 
letter was transmitted to M.D.C. Director of Environmental Planning, 
Martin Weiss on August 8, 1975 » with the expectation that answers 
would be received before Labor Day. Mr. Weiss personally assured 
both Mr. Colby and Mr. Murphy in separate telephone conversations that 
answers would be dispatched no later than the end of the week of 

173 



September 1st. This promised response has not been received to date. 

The only advantage cited for the implementation of a supplementary 
satellite treatment plant alternative is the augmentation of low water 
level in the Charles and Neponset Rivers during times of drought or 
other low river flow instances. We feel that there are better ways of 
handling this problem. Impoundment of water upstream for release 
during these low flow periods and diversion of water from another 
source are two such alternatives. ' 

There is one point that is important to make in conclusion. 
Since the Town of Wellesley is greatly affected by the proposed loca- 
tion of the satellite plant, it might be thought that our opposition 
would be automatic. On the contrary, we are well aware that wastewater 
problems must and will be solved. Consequently, we have made a great 
effort to be objective and factual in our evaluation. 

The Town of Wellesley has been assisted in this study of the 
wastewater management proposals by a special committee appointed by 
the Board of Selectmen. This committee has included planners, biochem- 
ists, virologists, microbiologists, air pollution and water pollution 
control- experts , environmental attorneys, financial and management 
consultants, and interested citizens. We are proud of the work this 
committee has done, the long hours of careful study and review of 
material made available to them, and the openness of the process de- 
veloped to undertake this study. There has been wide publicity in the 
newspapers and on radio stations of the activities of this committee 
and good attendance by the general public at its various meetings. We 
are very much indebted to their efforts and assistance. 



The results of the evaluation which ray statement tonight has sum- 
marized leads inescapably to the conclusion that the proposed satellite 
treatment plant would be a multi-million dollar mistake which would 
endanger the health, quality of life and welfare of the citizens of the 
Commonwealth. It would achieve a result exactly opposite from its 
initial objective. 

(RETYPED FOR PURPOSES OF PUBLICATION) 



175 



CITY OF QUJNCY 

IN COUNCIL 



RESOLVE NO. 469 



September 22, 1975 

BE IT RESOLVED that the Quincy City Council record 
itself in opposition to the filling in of any portion of 
Quincy Bay and adjacent to Nut Island. Copy referred to 
Army Corps of Engineers and Metropolitan District Commission 

and EMMA. 



Adopted in Council September 22, 1975 
/ / 




APPROVED 



-X"SEF2 3 i975„ 



V. / 






i-1 



A TrneCoitf* Attest 



Assistant City Clerk , 



<0->$fi n 



MAYOR 



YEAS Harrington. Kelly LaRaia, Lydon. Marshall, Powers, Quinn Sheets, Tobin 



NAYS Harrington, Kelly, LaRaia Lydon, Marshall, Powers, Quinn, Sheets, Tob 

176 



in 



TO: MD6 and Army Corps of Engineers 

FROM: Paul D. Harold 

RE: Nut Island Sewage Treatment Plant 

City Council Candidate Paul D. Harold has voiced his opposition to 
an MDC plan that calls for filling 26 acres of Cuincy Bay to upgrade the 
Nut Island Sewage Treatment Plant. 

"Such a filling would have a disastrous effect on the ecology of 
Quincy Bay and would turn much of the shore area into swampy mudflats 
because of the change in tidal currents," Mr. Harold told a gathering 
at the home of Mr. and Mrs. Robert Kamb, #0 Bay View Ave., Foughes Neck. 

Mr. Harold said it seems that the MDC "is saying that in order to 
save Quincy Bay, we must destroy it. An upgrading of the treatment plant 
is certainly overdue, but this plan is completely unacceptable." 

Mr. Harold said the MDC should involve community residents in working 
up an acceptable plan, and urged Quincy residents to attend ^Thursday ■ s 
Wastewater Management Study meeting at 7 p.m. at the Kennedy Health Center 
to hear what a lternative plans are being considered. 



Paul D. Harold 

31 Riverside Avenue 

Quincy, I 'A 02169 



177 



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