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B A I 
OLIO 



99.5 FM 



FEBRUARY 1990 








On WBAI in February: 

Malcolm X (center) • Feb. 21si 
John Kani (lop left) - Feb. 9ih 
James Baldwin (lop righl) - Feb. 26lh 
Esther Hinds (bottom right) - Feb. 19th 
Sapphire (bottom left) - Feb. 28 



AFRICAN-AMERICAN HISTORY MONTH 



Page 2 



WBAI FM 99.5 



REPORT TO THE LISTENER 



Facilities Upgrade Campaign Goal is $1,000,000 in Listener Support for 1990 



Very soon, all our subscribers will be receiving a letter from 
me introducing our $1,000,000 campaign. This will be the 
first in a series of letters to our subscribers asking for addi- 
tional monetary assistance for our facilities upgrade. 

As I have stated before, WBAI needs to improve and 
upgrade all of its equipment, from the repair of the smal- 
lest portable tape recorder to the complete overhaul of our 
Master Control Room. We are producing and broadcasting 
with equipment which is, for the most part, between 20 and 
25 years old (almost as old as WBAI itself!). Needless to 
say, this equipment does not have much of a life span left, 
and we are mounting this campaign to raise the money 
before it all breaks down forever. 



fund, we need to put in $100,000 in 1990. In 1989, the sta- 
tion received $815,000 in listener dollars, and with normal 
growth 1990 will bring listener support up to $900,000. If 
we raise the 1990 goal to an even $1 million, the extra 
$1(X1,000 will be placed in a special account to be used ex- 
clusively for equipment improvement and upgrade. 

A prospectus will be available for viewing this month. If 
you are interested, please call me and I will send you a 
copy. In addition, if it is at all possible, please respond to 
the campaign letter with a donation. 

And of course, thank you for your response to our recent 
Marathon. Without you, we would not be. 



We need to raise a total of $550,000 over the next five years 
for this purpose. In order to get a proper start for this 



Rosemary Reed 
Station Maaag^ 



WBAI 



STAFF 



General Manager 

Rosemarie Reed 

Program Director 

Andrew Phillips 

Assistant Manager / Development 

Nydia Flores 

Operations Director 

Andy T. Wandzilak 

Assistant Manager / Operations 

Dan Finton 

Operations Assistants 

Max Schmid, Sidney Smith, Tom Whelan 

Public Affairs Director 

Mario Murillo 

Arts Director 

Bill Moore 

Finance Director 

Lisa North 

Subscriptions / Computing 

Allen Markman 

Receptionist 

Fred Kuhn 

Premium Coordinator 

Dorothy Altman 

Administrative Assistant 

Patrice Comninel 

Ctilef Engineer 

Bill Wells 

Maintenance Engineer 

Russ Landis 

Production Engineers 

Jennifer Bernet, Anthony Sloan 

Engineers 

Boris Cardenas, Tom Tortorella, S. Walden 

News Anchors 

Amy Goodman, Jennie Bourne 

Julie Cohen (Reporter) 

NEWS 

Praiap Chatterjee, Lauren Comiteau, Eric 

Corley, Evelyn Tully Costa, Paul DeRienzo, 

VIpul Desai, Arianne Genillard, Sam Green, 

Tom Hamilton, Michael G. Haskins, Sandra 



Hernandez, Lillian Huang, David Isay, Jesse 
Keyes , Robert Knight, Roger Kwame, Andy 
Lanset, Marika Martin, Sasha Nyary, Donald 
Rouse, David Sears, Nadine Shaw, Roy 
Smith, Ron Stetler, Laura Sydell, Richard Vec- 
chio, Eric Williams. 

AFTER THE NEWS 

Econonews: Maarten DeKadt, Richard 
Schrader. International Affairs: Samori 
Marksman. Labor and Community Issues: 
Ken Nash and Mimi Rosenberg. Psychology 
of Economics: Leo Cawley. Science/Peace: 
Michio Kaku. 

LIVE RADIO 

Margot Adier, Creative Unify Collective, Bob 
Fass, Mike Feder, Jim Freund, Paul Gorman, 
Fred Herschkowitz, Citizen Kafka, Robert 
Knight, Simon Loekle, R. Paul Martin, 
Rosemari Mealy, David Rothenberg. Habte 
Selassie, Sidney Smith, Carletta J. Walker, 
Bernard White, Will K. Wilkins, Peter Lam- 
born Wilson. 

PUBLIC AFFAIRS 

Gonzalo Aburto, Eva Yaa Asantewaa, Phyllis 
Bennis, Dennis Bernstein, Lydia Bragger, 
Elombe Brath, Jim Buck, Dave Burstein, 
Andrew Byard, Leo Cawley, Lloyd D'Aguilar, 
Martin DeKadt, Mick Dewan, Jerry Edwin, 
Anne Frost, Barbara Glickstein, Larry Guten- 
berg, Janet Hedman, Allen Herschkowitz, 
Susan Heske, Paul Hoeffel, Jeannie Hopper, 
Stuart Hutchison, Brandon Judell, Michio 
Kaku, Judith Kallas, Hank Kee, Jesse Keyes, 
Zenzile Kholsan, Joe King, Alice Krakauer, 
John McDonagh, Diane Mancino, Diana 
Mason, John Mason, David Mendelsohn, 
Mario Murillo, Santiago Nieves, Sally O'Brien, 
Kofi Pendergrass, Andrew Phillips, Valecia 
Phillips, Anibal Pozzo, Susan Radosh, Sheila 
Ryan, Richard Schrader, Scott Sommer, 
Paula Tedesco, Valerie Van Isler, Ralph Vega, 
Shelton Walden, Annette Walker, Carletta 
Walker, Tom Whelan, Tom V/isker, Robert 
Yuan. 



ARTS 

Jan Albert, Hernando Alvaricci, Al Angeloro, 
Roxanne Aubrey, Alina Avila, Jennifer Bernet, 
Sue Renee Bernstein, Rodney Black, Peter 
Bochan, Ted Bonnitt, Dolores Brandon, 
Susan Browne, Bill Canaday, Boris Car- 
denas, Doug Cheesman, Anthony Coggi, Bill 
Farrar, Phil Garfinkle, Frederick GeoBold, Ed- 
ward Haber, Joseph Hurley, Msihmoud 
Ibrahim, Chet Jackson, Kristen Johnson, 
Dave Kenney, Manya La Bruja, Yusef 
Lament, Julie Lyonn Lieberman, Simon 
Loekle, Lee Lowenfish, Harold Lucious, 
Michael Mabern, Darrell McNeill, Mickey 
Melendez, Edward Menje, Susan Menje, 
Lance Neal, Mike Nelson, David Nolan, 
Mildred Norman, Gary Olson, Kofi 
Pendergrass, Clare Pentecost, Valecia Phil- 
lips, Tom Pomposello, Pat Rich, Nancy 
Rodriguez, Lee Ryan, Michael Scarola, Don 
Scherdin, Max Schmid, Regina Roiito Sokol, 
Spyder, Victoria Starr, Dan Tepper, Tom Tor- 
torella, Jordyn Tyson, Tom Vitale, Joyce 
West, Christ Whent, Malika Lee Whitney. 

ENGINEERS 

Natalie Budells, Eric Corley, Ulysses T. Good, 
Claude Horvath, Bob Parrett, Kofi 
Pendergrass, David Smith, Peter Cedric 
Smith. Tom Tortorella, Willie Wilson, Jr., Paul 
Williams, Paul Wunder. 

WBAI Local Board 

Dorothy Altman (staff representative) Samuel 
Anderson, Rosalind Lubelsky Bressler, Leslie 
Cagan, Oymin Chin, Theodore Conani, 
Miriam Dinerman, Renee Farmer, Kalhy 
Goldman, Bray Healy, Anthony Mazzocchi, 
Cecelia McCall, Rosemari Mealy, Philip Tajit- 
su Nash, Steve Post, Charles Potter, Caryl 
Ftatner, Paul Robeson, Jr., Nan Rubin, 
Eugene Straus. Valerie Van Isler (staff repre- 
sentative), Marjorie Waxman, Milton Zisman. 
WBAI FOLIO 
Editor 
Sharon Griffiths 



WBAJ FM 99.5 



Page 3 



February Specials 



THURSDAY February 1 

2:3qpm SURVIVAL OF AN AES- 
THETIC: Black Ad In the 20th Century. 

Featuring excerpts from a November 
1989 synnposium of giants in Black litera- 
ture, held at City College of New York. 
7:30pm BUILDING BRIDGES. A Black 
Labor Special, with reports from around 
the country and the city on the history of 
and current developments In Black 
workers in the labor movement. 
9:00pm THE AFRIKAN POETRY 
THEATRE. Four poets from this Queens 
cultural center talk about poetry and 
recite from their works with host Bill 
Moore. 

MONDAY Februarys 

9:30am ALWAYS REMEMBERED: A 
Musical Tribute to Or. Martin Luther 
King. Featuring music dedicated to him 
and based on his speeches, including the 
broadcast premiere of David Baker's 
Through Th is Vale of Tears . 
1:00pm LOOKING BACK/TOWARDS 
THE FUTURE. Opening this series is an 
interview with Rosa Parks, who on 
December 1, 1955 quietly said "no" -thus 
beginning the modern civil rights move- 
ment. 

8:00pm LIVE FROM THE EMPIRE 
HOTEL A group of plays by David 
Mamet and Shel Silverstein, written for 
live radio presentation and performed by 
the Atlantic Theater Company from the 
Empire Hotel at Lincoln Center. 

TUESDAY February 6 

1:00pm LOOKING BACK/TOWARDS 
THE FUTURE. James Farmer, former 
rational Director of CORE, speaks about 
the development of CORE. 
2:30pm AMERICAN JAZZ RADIO FES- 
TIVAL Trumpeter V\/inton Marsalis per- 
forms the music of Duke Ellington with a 
full orchestra of Ellington alumni. 
7:30pm ARTHUR SCHOMBURG: 
AFRO-LATIN SCHOLAR. This program 
will explore the cultural dualism which 
shaped the life and thought of this Black 
Puerto Rican patriot who founded the 
world's largest collection of research 
materials on the African-American ex- 
perience. 

2:30pm AFRICAN HOLISTIC HEALTH. 
A discussion of African health and nutri- 
tion begins with Dr. Llaila O. Afrika, 
author of African Holistic Health. 
3:30pm HEALING AFRICAN 

AMERICA: OUR NUTRITION. 
Nutritionists offer a guide to issues cru- 
cial to the health of the Black community. 



MONDAY February 12 

1:00pm LOOKING BACK/TOWARDS 
THE FUTURE. Dr. Bernice Johnson 
Reagon tells us about the music which 
accompanied the civil rights movement 
ar>d analyses the role that music played. 



9:00pm THE CRIMINAL JUSTICE 
SYSTEM: Its Function and Effect on 
African-American*. The structure, 
process and media involved in arrests, 
releases and indictments: who gets ar- 
rested, who gets charged, and why? 

TUESDAY February 13 

1:00pm LOOKING BACK/TOWARDS 
THE FUTURE. The Rev. Ralph 
Abernathy's speech in Washington, DC 
at the Poor Peoples Campaign's 
Solidarity Day in 1968. 

SUNDAY February 18 

6:00am DER RING DES NIBELUN- 
GEN. Yes, its back! The long-standing 
WBAI tradition of broadcasting the entire 
Ring cycle. We will pre-empt all regularly 
scheduled programming (except for the 
evening news at 6pm) in order to bring 
you not only the music (this year, the 
Kraus recordings) but live and taped 
commentary and interviews as well. 

MONDAY February 19 

10:30pm ROOTS AND ALEX HALEY. 

Pulitzer prize-winning author Alex Haley 
and his books are discussed, including 
his work on The Autobiography of Mal- 
colm X and A Different K ind of Christmas. 
1:00pm LOOKING BACK/TOWARDS 
THE FUTURE. "The Ballot Or the Bullet" 
is one of Malcolm's X's most famous 
speeches, and sheds light on the vision 
which contributed greatly to the new 
militancy within Black organizations of 
that time. 

2:30pm THE YOUTH AND THE ELEC- 
TORAL PROCESS IN NICARAGUA. 
The legal age to vote in Nicaragua is 16. 
The youth today were about six years old 
when Somoza was overthrown. To whom 
do they owe their allegiances? 
4:00pm STORIES FROM HOME. This 
program brings you folktales from 
Africans and African-Americans with 
drums to set the feeling and mood. 

TUESDAY February 20 

7:30pm DR. W.E.B. DUBOIS: Father of 
Pan-Africanism, Peace Activist and 
Scholar. This program will examine the 
life and works of the late African- 
American freedom-fighter. 
10:00pm AIDSTALK IV. PWA Larry 
Gutenberg focuses on the issue of ser- 
vices available to persons of color who 
have AIDS. As has recently been acknow- 
ledged and reported in the media, this 
population is disproportionately affected 
with the disease. 

WEDNESDAY February 21 

1 :00pm MALCOLM X: A RetrospM- 
tive. This piece covers the life of Al-Hajj 
Malik Al-Shabazz from his first impact 
on the Black Power movement and the 
Black Muslim movement in 1960 to his 
assassination in 1965. 



2:00pm THE PRICE OF FREEDOM IS 
DEATH. On the 21st day of February, 
1965, at a meeting of the OAAU in the 
Audabon Ballroom in Harlem, shots rang 
out - and Malcolm X was dead. What 
impact does he carry today? How is he 
viewed by the Third VVorld? Also, hear the 
words from some of the most famous 
speeches of this great African-American 
hero, as well as music dedicated to and 
inspired by him. 

THURSDAY February 22 

2:30pm AMERICAN MUSIC IN 
CONFLICT. Anthony Davis is one of 
North America's most important contem- 
porary composers. His works include the 
opera X: The Life and Times of Malcolm 
X. He is the leader of the Anthony Davis 
Group and Epistemi. He will discuss his 
life as a classical composer. 

MONDAY February 26 

1:00pm LOOKING BACK/TOWARDS 
THE FUTURE. James Baldwin, perhaps 
one of the most important writers of the 
20th century, discusses the issue of living 
and growing in a White world. 
1 :30pm EMILE DeANTONIO: 
RADICAL ARTIST REMEMBERED. A 
celebration of this pioneer of the "New 
American Cinema" movement of the 
1950s, where artists mixed politics and a 
"liberation esthetic" into their work. 

TUESDAY February 27 

1:00pm LOOKING BACK/TOWARDS 
THE FUTURE. A two-part special on Har- 
riet Tubman. Born into slavery, she risked 
her life and freedom after escaping to the 
North by returning to the South 19 times, 
leading over 300 men, women and 
children to liberty by means of the Under- 
ground FUilway. Part Two will air tomor- 
row at this time. 

10:00pm A PROFILE OF THREE 
AFRICAN-AMERICAN AND CARIB- 
BEAN FILMMAKERS. A close look at 
Sinclair Bourne, US documentarian, who 
most recently directed The Making of "Do 
The Right Thing" , children's filmmaker 
Carmen Costeau, and Euzhan Paley, 
director of A Dry White Season . 

WEDNESDAY February 28 

4:00pm ARE YOU READY TO ROCK? 

A discussion with African-American writer 
and performance artist Sapphire about 
her new one-woman show Are You Ready 
To Rock? Her themes usually explore 
violence against women (including in- 
cest), racism, sexism and heterosexism. 
This program will explore each of these 
themes through readings of her poetry, 
music and interview. 




Page 4 



VV'BAI FM 99.5 



THURSDAY February 1 

6:00 THE MORNING MAGAZINE with 
Dred Scott. 

8:00 UNDERCURRENTS 

8:30 THE MORNING MAGAZINE con- 
tinues 

9:30 SHOCKING BLUE. Music with 
Delphine Blue. 

12:00 NATURAL LIVING. Health and 
nutrition with Gary Null. 

1 :00 THIS WAY OUT. The international 
magazine for and about the Lesbian 
and Gay community, now heard every 
Thursday. 

1:30 LISTENERS' ACTION ON 
HOMELESSNESS AND HOUSING. 

2:30 SURVIVAL OF AN AESTHETIC: 
Black Art In the 20th Century. 

Featuring excerpts from a November 
1989 symposium of giants in Black 
literature, held at City College of New 
York. Speakers include Toni Morrison, 
Alice Walker, Margaret Walker, Amiri 
Baraka and others. Produced by 
Rosemari Mealy and Deborah Edwards, 
professor of literature at Hunter College. 

3:30 THE BUSH ADMINISTRATION 
AND THE ENVIRONMENT: The 
Rhetoric and the Record. In his cam- 
paign for the Presidency, George Bush 
promised to be the "environmental 
President." One year after taking office, 
his appointments to environmental 
positions, reactions to disasters such as 
the Alaska oil spill and positions at the 
environmental conference earlier in the 
year raise questions about his 
promises. Join producer Jerry 0'- 
Connell for an interesting discussion. 

4:30 THE WBAI ARTS MAGAZINE. 

Lee Ryan, host. Featuring the Evening 
Sfilial at 4:30 and Frederick GeoBold's 
Ughtshow 

6:00 THE WBAI EVENING NEWS 

6:45 UNDERCURRENTS 
HIGHLIGHTS 

7:00 BEHIND THE NEWS. An in-depth 
discussion of the day's events, 
produced by Samori Marksman. 

7:30 BUILDING BRIDGES. The 

community labor report with Mimi 
Rosenberg and Ken Nash presents a 
Black Labor Special, with reports from 
around the country and the city on the 
history of and current developments in 
Black workers in the labor movement. 

8:30 RADIO FREE EIREANN. A show 

on Ireland and the Irish Freedom 
struggle. Produced by Mick Dewan and 
John McDonagh 

9:00 THE AFRIKAN POETRY 
THEATRE. Four poets from this 
Queens cultural center talk about 



poetry and recite from their works with 
host Bill Moore. Produced by Lila Steele. 

1 0:00 AFRIKALEIDOSCOPE with 
Elombe Brath. 

1 1 :00 NEWS REBROADCAST 

11:45 LATE NIGHT LIVE RADIO 

1:00 PRIMARY SOURCES. Uve radio 
with interim host. Bob Fass. 

3:30 LIVE AIR - or is it Dead Air? 
Anyway, music and live stuff with 
partners in crime David Nolan and 
Doug Cheesman. 

FRIDAY February! 

6:00 THE MORNING MAGAZINE with 
Will K. Wilkins. 

8:00 UNDERCURRENTS 

8:30 THE MORNING SHOW continues 

9:30 THIRD WORLD MUSIC 
MASTERS. Music with R.B. Isles. 

12:00 NATURAL LIVING. Health and 
nutrition issues with Gary Null. 

1:00 SOUTH AFRICA NOW: THE 
RADIO EDITION. A radio 
newsmagazine on the events in 
Southern Africa, delving into the story 
behind the reports coming from South 
Africa and the Frontline states. This pro- 
gram defies the media ban/censorship 
imposed by the Apartheid regime. 
Produced by Globalvision Television 
and adapted for radio by Sally O'Brien 
and Zenzile Khoisan. 

1 :30 HEALTHSTYLES. Current issues 
in health care, with WBAI's Nursing and 
■ Health Resources Network. 

2:30 ALTERNATIVA LATINA. The 

Alternativa Latina Collective brings you 
up-to-date news and information on the 
reality of Latin America and its people, 
both here and abroad. The only bi-lin- 
gual program focussing on the politics, 
culture and history of Latin America, 
this show includes the weekly feature, 
produced by Gonzalo Aburto, Romoien- 
do el Silencio (Breaking the Silence), 
dealing with the issues affecting the 
Gay and Lesbian Latino community. 

4:30 THE WBAI ARTS MAGAZINE 

with host Joseph Hurley, featuring the 
Evening Serial at 4:30, and The 
Screening Room at 5:30 with Paul 
Wunder and Joseph Hurley reviewing 
and discussing the latest films. 

6:00 THE WBAI EVENING NEWS 

6:45 DATELINE NICARAGUA. The 

story behind the headlines - news and 
features direct from Managua. 
Produced by Julie Light 

7:00 AIDS IN FOCUS, a weekly 
magazine on the politics and culture of 
the AIDS epidemic, produced by 
Michael Alcalay. 



7:1 5 FEARFUL SYMMETRY with Leo 
Cawley. 

8:00 WORKING TITLE. Readings 
produced by Alina Avila. 

8:30 A MOVEABLE FEAST. Authors 
read and discuss their latest works with 
Tom Vitale. Tonight, John Edgar 
V^deman reads from his collection of 
stories. Fever . 

9:00 HOME FRIES. Uve radio, 
comedy, music and call-ins with Fred 
Herschkowitz. 

10:30 BLACK ROCK COALITION 

12:00 NIGHTFLYTE. Music with Chet 
Jackson. 

3:00 MUSIC FROM THE CENTER OF 
THE EARTH with hosts Bill Wells and 
Gary Olson. 

SATURDAY Februarys 

5:00 HOUR OF THE WOLF. Science 

fiction, fantasy, enchantment, and the 
imagination. Live radio with Jim Freund. 

7:00 AS I PLEASE. "... for none of us 
can ever express the exact measure of 
his needs or thoughts or his sorrows; 
and human speech is like a cracked 
kettle on which we tap crude rhythms 
for bears to dance to, while we long to 
make music that will melt the stars." 

8:30 ANY SATURDAY. Live radio with 
David Rothenberg. 

10:30 LUNCHPAIL. Live radio with Paul 
Gorman. 

12:30 PIPER IN THE MEADOW 
STRAYING. Folk music with Edward 
Haber. 

2:00 COUNTRY MUSIC ALTERNA- 
TIVES. Bluegrass and traditional music 
with Tom Tortorella. On today's pro- 
gram, we celebrate African-American 
History Month with music of Charley 
Pride from a compact disc of his 
Greatest Hits. We'll hear such classics 
as You're Mv Jamaica . Honkv Tonk 
Blues and Burgers and Fries . Also on 
today's show is music of Hank Williams, 
from the CD I Ain't Got Nothin' But 
Time. December 1946 - April 1947 
Volume 1 . 

3:30 UNSUNG HEROES. Music with 

Jordyn Tyson. 

4:30 JAZZ SAMPLER with Bill Farrar. 

6:00 HEAR AND NOW. New music 
with Cynthia Bell and Julie Lyonn 
Lieberman. 

7:00 HOUSING NOTEBOOK with 

members of the Metropolitan Council 
on Housing. 

8:00 WORLD DANCE PARTY. African, 
Caribbean and Afro-Cuban music, 
produced by Al Angeloro. 



WBAl FM 99.5 



Page 5 



10:30 RADIO UNNAMEABLE. Live 
radio with Bob Pass. 

1:00 LABBRISH. Live radio with Habte 
Selassie. 

SUNDAY February 4 



5:00 SOUNDTRACK. All about the 

cinema with Paul Wunder. 

7:00 MARTIN SOKOL'S THROUGH 
THE OPERA GLASS Regina Fiorito 
Sokol and Anthony Coggi examine and 
comment on that most precious 
operatic commodity, the Black male 
singer. Interviews with Benjamin Mat- 
thews and Wayne Sanders of Opera 
Et)ony and the tenor, Vinson Cole will 
be heard. 

9.30 HERE OF A SUNDAY MORN- 
ING. Early music with Chris Whent. 

1 1 :30 HARD WORK. Live radio with 
Mike Feder. 

1:00 CON SABOR LATINO. Issues 
and music from the Latino community, 
with Mickey Melendez and Hernando 
Alvariccl. 

5:30 LATINO JOURNAL Producer 
Santiago Nieves focuses on the issues, 
concerns, and interests of the tri-state 
area's growing Latino community. 

6:00 THE WBAl EVENING NEWS 

6:30 BLACK! RED! THEN. NOW? 
This program will explore new and on- 
going developments between Blacks 
and Indians, and also those who have 
this unique dual heritage. Produced by 
Jim Buck. 

7:30 THE GAY SHOW. Join Urry 
Gutenberg, Bob Storm and Lee Ryan 
for the latest in Gay/Lesbian features 
and news including a report on the 
New York AIDS Coalition. 

8:30 EMANATIONS. Uve radio with 
Bernard White. 

10:30 THE GOLDEN AGE OF RADIO. 

Vintage radio with Max Schmid. 

12:30 NEWS REBROADCAST 

1:00 BACK OF THE BOOK. For the 

video portion of this morning's 
extravaganza we'll be showing Robert 
Mapplethorpe's nude photographs of 
Pussifica T. Catt. Caution: some of 
these photos are considered 
homoerotic by Senator Jesse Helms, 
who is not himself considered erotic, 
but who knows Tipper Gore whose 
name is. In the audio portion of our pro- 
gram we'll disclose plans for a portable 
reality dissolver that you can make out 
of chicken tenders. Also: how to break 
the id-ice at your Valentine's Day party. 
Free Form Live Radio by R. Paul Martin. 

3:00 EVERYTHING OLD IS NEW 
AGAIN. Music with Dave Kenney. 




Th» Atliinlic 1 heoler Company performs pliiys by David Mamel and Slid Silvcrslcin live 
from llie F.mpire Hotel on Monday, February Sih at 8pm. 

the Beat , a radio stew of jazz and clas- 
sics. Today's features include a preview 
of the Feb. 9th concert of the Sheila Jor- 
dan/Harvie Swartz Duo at the Cathedral 
of St. John the Divine. 



MONDAY Februarys 

6:00 THE MORNING MAGAZINE with 

Rosemari Mealy. 

8:00 UNDERCURRENTS 

8:30 THE MORNING SHOW continues 

9:30 ALWAYS REMEMBERED: A 
Musical Tribute to Dr. Martin Luther 
King. Featuring music dedicated to 
him and based on his speeches, 
including the broadcast premiere of 
David Baker's Through This Vale of 
Tears . Hosted by world-renowned 
pianist Andre Watts. (Satellite) 

12:00 NATURAL LIVING. Health and 
nutrition, with Gary Null. 

1:00 LOOKING BACK/TOWARDS 
THE FUTURE: African-American 
History. WBAl continues its 30th 
anniversary celebration with a series of 
archive programs commemorating 
African-American History Month and 
the struggle for civil rights. Opening 
this series is an interview with Rosa 
Parks, who on December 1, 1955 
quietly said "no" - thus beginning the 
modern civil rights movement. In the 
interview, she discusses why she 
refused to give up her seat to a White 
man and move to the back of the bus. 
(Archive) 

1:30 HUMAN RIGHTS IN AMERICA. 
Discussions, with Uoyd D'Aguilar and 
Joy James. 

2:30 IN SEARCH OF ROBERT 
JOHNSON. Producer Dred Scott and 
blues historian Peter Guralnick look at 
one of the most influential (and un- 
known) musicians of our time, Robert 
Johnson. His music has touched the 
Ftolling Stones, Muddy Waters, John 
Lee Hooker and many others. 

4:30 THE WBAl ARTS MAGAZINE 

with host, Lee Lowenfish - Beauty and 



6:00 THE WBAl EVENING NEWS 

6:45 UNDERCURRENTS 
HIGHLIGHTS 

7:00 BEHIND THE NEWS. An in-depth 

discussion of the day's events, 
produced by Samori Marksman. 

7:30 WORLD VIEW. International is- 
sues with Samori Marksman. 

8:00 LIVE FROM THE EMPIRE 
HOTEL. A group of plays by David 
Mamet and Shel Silverstein, written for 
live radio presentation and performed 
by the Atlantic Theater Company from 
the Empire Hotel at Lincoln Center. 
Produced by Patricia Wolff and 
directed byW.H. Macy; produced for 
WBAl by Charles Potter and Dan 
Finton; hosted by Treat W/illiams. 

10:00 LIVE RADIO DRAMA. Actors 
from the Atlantic Theater Company dis- 
cuss the fragile art of live radio drama 
and how it compares with working on 
the stage, TV and film, as they come 
directly from the performance of a 
group of plays written for live presenta- 
tion on radio (see above). 

11:00 NEWS REBROADCAST 

1 1 :45 UNSTUCK IN TIME. Live radio 
with Margot Adier. 

1:00 THE MOORISH ORTHODOX 
RADIO CRUSADE. Xerox-zines. 
Sufism, and other fun for brainiacs. 
Live radio with Peter Lamborn Wilson. 

3:30 ON THE ROCKS. Music with 
Roxanne. 



Page 6 



VVBAI FM 99.5 



An Interview With John Kani, South African Actor 



Last spring, when playwright Athoi Fugard first 
showed actor John Kani the script of Mv Children! 
My Africa, it was with considerable nervousness. 
"He told me I might well want to have nothing to do 
with this play," the 47-year-old star recalls. "He was 
nervous about the character of the teacher, Mr. M. 
He knows that my reputation as an actor in South 
Africa is intertwined with my reputation as part of 
the struggle for the liberation of the country. In the 
part of Mr. M., there were things he knew I might 
not agree with or want to project using my own 
image in South Africa." 

In actuahty, Fugard need not have worried. In a 
sense, Kani's path crossed with that of Fugard's poig- 
nant schoolteacher before the playwright ever wrote 
the play. Speaking of Mr. Fugard, Mr. Kani said, 
"I've always felt like I had to pay back the man who 
was very important at a crucial time in my life when 
I didn't know what was going to happen, being 
young in South Africa with no future at hand and no 
dream, just wanting to be something. When I met 
him (Fugard), I knew exactly what I wanted to be. 
So I've always felt it, if I could do something for 
Athol, apart from working together for a better 
South Africa, I could repay some of that debt." 

Kani takes a pause, an actor's finely-honed, ironic 
pause, and continues. "I told him that if I could feel 
that I had done something for Lisa (Fugard's 
daughter, who also appears in the play), to give her 
a hand in this profession, I would feel I paid him 
back. Our lovely joke was that I would say to him 
that when the revolution comes and I have to kill 
you, I would kill you with a clean heart, because I 
don't owe you." 

As Associate Director of Johannesburg's Market 
Theater, Kani knows there is a future for My 
Children! My Africa! Kani's own goals for the play 
are clearly defined. "I wanted to be given the oppor- 
tunity to do the play in a small space, to share the 
experience with American people. I have no dreams 
of Broadway. I have dreams of a free South Africa, 
and it took a lot of persuasion to make me leave 
home even for this long. This is a very important 
time in the history of South Africa, and there is a 
feeling in me that I have to be there every minute of 
it. There is much work to be done." 

Some of that work involves what Kani calls the 
Market Theater's "laboratory." "Wc train young ac- 
tors, young writers, young directors and wc have 



what we call our township outreach. We go to the 
Black areas and introduce theater. Wc go to schools 
and demystify Shakespeare and the great texts, the 
books of the great English writers, because the 
educational system is so Victorian in its nature and 
so alien to the African culture. Even the medium of 
instruction is English, so you find the young Black 
students are having a very tough time being taught in 
a foreign language, learning a foreign culture, under- 
standing foreign literature. When we do the works 
as a group of actors, it helps them in their under- 
standing and in their writing of exams." 

It goes without saying that John Kani has known a 
considerable number of teachers like Mr. M - dedi- 
cated, caring individuals whose lives and values have 
been placed at risk in a changing Africa. "There was 
a time in the 80s when the slogan in the struggle 
among the youth was Liberation Now, Education 
Later," he says. "Many of them cracked up. Some of 
them gave up the profession they loved and lived for 
to go back to industry. Some took early retirement 
because they couldn't watch an uneducated nation. 
This was a complement, almost, to those teachers - a 
national suicide, which happened as a complement 
to the struggle itself. Eventually wc learned that we 
have to carry the spear on one side and knowledge 
on the other hand." 

A decade and a half ago, John Kani enjoyed a 
Broadway triumph with a pair of alternately per- 
formed plays: Si.swe Ban/i Is Dead and The Island , 
which he and his co-star Wmston Nlshona wrote in 
collaboration with Fugard. When Kani and Nlshona 
returned home, after having won Best Actor Tony 
awards for 1975, they were jailed and forced to en- 
dure 28 days of solitary confinement before being 
released. This time, nothing so humiliating is likely 
to happen to John Kani, but he will neverlhclcss still 
have to carry a pas.sbook and he may even have to 
tolerate harassment in the form of random searches 
and questioning. "The labor laws of South Africa do 
not recognize Black people as professional artists," 
he says. "Things, however, have relaxed," he admit.s, 
"and now they do not bother us under the vagrancy 
.statutes. There is .still no clear-cut regulation that 
says I can be an artist." 

Joseph Hurley 

Listen to Joseph Hurley's inlemew with John Kani on 
the Friday Arts Atancirine, Friday, February 9lh at 
4:30pm. 



WBAl FM 99.5 



Page 7 



TUESDAY February 6 

6:00 THE MORNING MAGAZINE with 

Otizen Kafka 

S:00 UNDERCURRENTS 

8:30 THE MORNING SHOW continues 

9:30 ALL MIXED UP. Radio collages 
with Peter Bochan. 

12:00 NATURAL LIVING. Health and 
nutrition with Gary Null 

1:00 LOOKING BACK/TOWARDS 
THE FUTURE: African-American 
History. In this second installment of 
WBAIs special archive series for 
African-A/nerican History l\4onth, 
James Farmer, former National Direc- 
tor of CORE, speaks about the 
development of CORE, which he says 
was accelerated by the Montgomery 
Bus Boycott and the student sit-in 
movement. He speaks about the im- 
pact of the Freedom Rides in forcing 
desegregation of interstate transport- 
ation systems in the South and the 
experiences and confrontations he and 
the riders face during this phase of the 
civil rights movement. Recorded in 
1960. (Archive) 

1:30 THE ALLIANCE REPORT 

produced in association with the 
rational Alliance of Third World 
Journalists. 

2:30 AMERICAN JAZZ RADIO 
FESTIVAL Trumpeter Winton Marsalis 
performs the music of Duke Ellington 
with a full orchestra of Ellington alumni, 
featuring the Ellington/Strayhorn or- 
chestration of Tchaikovsky's Nutcracker 
Suite. (Satellite) 

4:30 THE WBAl ARTS MAGAZINE 

with Eva Yaa Asantewaa and Jennifer 
Bernet. 

6:00 THE WBAl EVENING NEWS 

6:45 UNDERCURRENTS 
HIGHLIGHTS 

7:00 BEHIND THE NEWS. An in-depth 
discussion of the day's events, 
produced by Samori Marksman. 

7:30 ARTHUR SCHOMBURG: AFRO- 
LATIN SCHOLAR. In paying tribute to 
this great scholar and institution 
builder, this program will explore the 
cultural dualism which shaped the life 
and thought of this Black Puerto Rican 
patriot who founded the world's largest 
collection of research materials on the 
AJrican-American experience. Produced 
by Samori Marksman, Sam Anderson 
and Elombe Brath. 

8:30 CONVERSATIONS IN THE ARTS 

9:00 STOLEN MOMENTS. Jazz with 
Mahmoud Ibrahim. 

10:00 THE WRITE STUFF ■ a program 
about writers, produced in association 
with the Writers Union, hosted by 
Brandon Judell. 



1 1 :00 NEWS REBROADCAST 

1 1 :45 LATE NIGHT LIVE RADIO with 
Carletta J. Walker. 

1 :00 WEAPONRY. Military affairs and 
hardware with Tom Wisker. 

3:30 MONSTERS FROM THE ID. 

Punk rock from the dark side of your 
brain. A show not to be slept through, 
and we won't let you. VWth Ed Banger 
and Sue Real. 

WEDNESDAY February 7 

6:00 THE MORNING MAGAZINE with 
a guest host. 

8:00 UNDERCURRENTS 




John Kani. Tony award-winning South 
African actor, is inlen iewed by Jostph 
ll..rl.y »r. ih> frldilY ^'"''^ Miipayinf on 

Feb. 9th at 4:30pm. 
8:30 THE MORNING SHOW continues 

9:30 GHOSTS IN THE MACHINE: 
WOMEN IN POP. The divas of pop, 
funk, punk, rap, reggae, and other 
good-for-your-soul styles, in music, 
scene reports, and interviews. With 
host Victoria Starr. 

12:00 NATURAL LIVING. Health and 
nutrition with Gary Null. 

1 :00 LOOKING BACK/TOWARDS 
THE FUTURE: African-American His- 
tory. This WBAl archive special outlines 
the political, economic and social im- 
pact of the 1964 Mississippi Freedom 
Movement, and demonstrates the ef- 
fect that the movement had on the 
history of the United States and how it 
stimulated social change. (Archive) 

1 :30 CITY POLITICS. Discussions with 
David Mendelsohn. 

2:30 AFRICAN HOLISTIC HEALTH A 

discussion of African health and 
nutrition begins with Dr. Uaila O. Afrika, 
author of African Holistic Health . 



Producer and host Shelton Walden 
speaks with Dr. Afrika about how the 
African-American community can 
ideally improve its health. 

3:30 HEALING AFRICAN AMERICA: 
OUR NUTRITION. Nutritionists offer a 
guide to issues crucial to the health of 
the African-American community. How 
can nutrition combat heart disease, 
hypertension, obesity and stress? What 
are the special nutritional needs of 
children and pregnant women? What 
essential role does nutrition play in the 
recovery of persons addicted to alcohol 
and drugs? How can healthy eating be 
inexpensive, creative and fun? Explore 
these topics today with producer Eva 
Yaa Asantewaa. 

4:30 THE WBAl ARTS MAGAZINE 

with Malika Lee Whitney. Featuring the 
Fvenino Serial at 4:30, selected shorts 
at 4;45pm, Pickney Place , a program of 
storytelling at 5;00, and interviews at 
5:30. 

6:00 THE WBAl EVENING NEWS 

6:45 UNDERCURRENTS 
HIGHLIGHTS 

7:00 BEHIND THE NEWS. An in-depth 
discussion of the day's events, 
produced by Samori Marksman. 

7:30 EXPLORATIONS. Science and 
peace issues with Michio Kaku. 

8:30 THE CUTTING EDGE: BLACK 
NEWS AND VIEWS. Produced by Dred 
Scott. 

9:00 SOUNDS OF BRAZIL with 

Mildred Norman. Brazilian music - 
regional, folk, cult and popular, old and 
new. 

10:00 THE PERSONAL COMPUTER 
SHOW. Host, Joe King. Co-hosts. Hank 
Kee, and David Burstein. Produced in 
cooperation with the New York 
Amateur Computer Club. 

1 1 :00 NEWS REBROADCAST 

1 1 :45 EARTHWATCH. Live radio with 
Robert Knight. 

1 :30 CARRIER WAVE. Live radio with 

Sidney Smith. 

3:30 COSMIK DEBRIS. Music from 

the Void. 

THURSDAY Februarys 

6:00 THE MORNING MAGAZINE with 
Dred Scott. 



8:00 UNDERCURRENTS 

9:30 SHOCKING BLUE. Music with 
Oelphine Blue. 

12:00 NATURAL LIVING. Health and 

nutrition with Gary Null. 

1 :00 THIS WAY OUT. The internation- 
al magazine for and about the Lesbian 
and Gay community, now heard on 
Thursday. 



Pages 



WBAl FM 99.5 



ABOUT THE BLUES... 



When people hear "the blues" they immediately 
recall the image of an old Black man in the country, 
playing the guitar and singing a sad tune about hard 
times, a lost love or some other misfortune. Or they 
flash to Chicago, Memphis or Harlem in the 1920's 
and imagine a full-voiced Black woman, hands on 
hips, who sings a more upbeat song about com- 
parable concerns. Or they imagine no one in 
particular, but equate the music to an emotional 
state: part excitement, part depression, all heart and 
guts. 

I guess I think about all those things too, when I 
hear "the blues." But that's not all I think about. 

Embedded in the term, contained in these pictures 
of the old man and full-voiced woman and woven 
into the sounds, lyrics and sensations of the music, 
are certain suppositions about culture and history. 
We know who the players are in the story of the 
blues, and we know the scenarios that lead up to the 
creation of the blues. Notions of race, class, social 
status and politics loom over Muddy Waters* licks 
and Bessie Smith's moans. The history of the blues 



is part of the history of the United Stales, and that 
component is as old and settled as a rusty soda-pop 
sign in a traveler's consciousness. The blues whips 
up a panorama of extra-musical associations that, 
whether one chooses to acknowledge them or not, 
situates the music of the blues in African-American 
life of this century. 

In terms of the visual arts, the blues functions as one 
of several perspectives that artists encounter in our 
lime. It can either inspire an artist to create a par- 
ticular work or it can actually be the model upon 
which work is created. Of one is knowledgeable 
about Afro-America - its history, its traditions, its 
geography, its verbal and visual codes, its heroes, its 
demons, its ever-changing styles and its spiritual 
side - then one knows the blues. 

Richard J. Powell 
from the exhibition catalogue Tl\e Blues Aesthetic: 
Black Culture and Modernism, published by the 
Washington Project for the Arts. Mr. Powell is curator 
of the exhibition and professor of art history at Duke 
University. 



1:30 GRAY PANTHER REPORT with 
Lydia Bragger. 

2:30 THIS SPACE FOR RENT (open 
slot for new programming) 

3:30 YOU CANT FLUSH YOUR 
TROUBLES AWAY. Environmental 
hazards of conventional sewage 
systems and the alternative methods of 
disposing of human waste - the political 
dimensions of the problem and 
proposed solutions. Produced by Curtis 
Ellis. 

4:30 THE WBAl ARTS MAGAZINE. 

Lee Ryan, host. Featuring the Evening 
Sfilifll at 4:30 and Frederick GeoBold's 
Uohtshow. 

6:00 THE WBAl EVENING NEWS 

6:45 UNDERCURRENTS 
HIGHLIGHTS 

7:00 BEHIND THE NEWS. An in-depth 
discussion of the day's events, 
produced by Samori Marksman. 

7:30 BUILDING BRIDGES. A special 
report on health and safety in the 
workplace, with a representative of the 
New York Committee on Safety and 
Health (NYCOSH) speaking on the 
status of VDT legislation in NYC and the 
status of the Suffolk County law. Plus 
Bill Kane, New Jersey Area Director, 
Region 9, UAW, speaking about the 
New Jersey Right to Act Bill, which 
would empower workers to refuse to 
work on unsafe projects and give the 



communities the right to inspect environ- 
mentally unsafe workplaces. Produced 
by Mimi Rosenberg and Ken Nash. 

8:30 RADIO FREE EIREANN. A show 
on Ireland and the Irish Freedom 
struggle. Produced by Mick Dewan and 
John McDonagh. 

9:00 MARGARET WALKER AT THE 
SCHOMBURG. The author speaks 
about her realtionship with writer 
Richard Wright and her own career as 
an author and poet. 

10:00 CARIBBEAN AND LATIN 
AMERICAN REPORT produced by 
Annette Walker and others. 

1 1 :00 NEWS RE8ROADCAST 

1 1 :45 INVESTIGATIONS. Live radio 
and documentary with Andrew Phillips. 

1:00 PRIMARY SOURCES. Live radio 
with interim host. Bob Fass. 

3:30 MORNING DEW. A program 
devoted to the music of the Grateful 
Dead. Produced by Lance Neal. 

FRIDAY February 9 

6:00 THE MORNING MAGAZINE with 

Will K. Wilkins, 

8:00 UNDERCURRENTS 

8:30 THE MORNING SHOW continues 

9:30 THIRD WORLD MUSIC 
MASTERS. Music with R.B. Isles. 



12:00 NATURAL LIVING. Health and 
nutrition issues with Gary Null. 

1:00 SOUTH AFRICA NOW: THE 
RADIO EDITION. A radio 
newsmagazine on the events in 
Southern Africa, delving into the story 
behind the reports coming from South 
Africa and the Frontline states. This pro- 
gram defies the media ban/censorship 
imposed by the Apartheid regime. 
Produced by Globalvision Television 
and adapted for radio by Sally O'Brien 
and Zenzile Khoisan. 

1:30 MEDIUM HOT. International 
affairs with an emphasis on how the 
different media present the issues. With 
Adele Oilman and Sheila Ryan. 

2:30 ALTERNATIVA LATINA. The 

Alternativa Latina Collective brings you 
up-to-date news and information on the 
reality of Latin America and its people, 
both here and abroad. The only bi-lin- 
gual program focussing on the politics, 
culture and history of Latin America, this 
show includes the weekly feature, 
produced by Gonzalo Aburto, Romoien- 
do el Silencio (Breaking the Silence), 
dealing with the issues affecting the 
Gay and Lesbian Latino community. 

4:30 THE WBAl ARTS MAGAZINE 

with host Joseph Hurley, featuring the 
Evening Serial at 4:30, and The Screen- 
ing Room at 5:30 with Paul Wunder and 
Joseph Hurley reviewing and discussing 
the latest films. In a special feature 
today, an interview with John Kani, one 



WBAI FM 99.5 



Page 9 



of South Africa's leading actors. KanI 
has long been associated with 
playwright Athol Fugard, in whose most 
recent play MyAfrical MyChildrenI he 
recently appeared at the Perry Street 
Theater. Toward the end of the 
production's limited engagement, John 
Kani spoke to Joseph Hurley about his 
life since he first appeared in new York 
in 1974 and about the South Africa to 
which he has since returned. 

6:00 THE WBAI EVENING NEWS 

6:45 DATELINE NICARAGUA. The 
story behind the headlines - news and 
features direct from Managua. 
Produced by Julie Light. 

7:00 AIDS IN FOCUS, a weekly 
magazine on the politics and culture of 
the AIDS pandemic, produced by 
Michael Alcalay. 

7:15 FEARFUL SYMMETRY with Leo 

Cawiey. 

8:00 BEHIND THE SCREENS. Movie 
matters with Delores Hayes. 

8:30 A MOVEABLE FEAST. Authors 
read and discuss their latest works with 
Tom Vitale. Tonight, Terri McMillan read- 
ing from her second novel, 
Disappearina Acts. 

9:00 HOME FRIES. Uve radio, 
comedy, music and call-ins with Fred 
Herschkowitz. 

10:30 BLACK ROCK COALITION 

12:00 NIGHTFLYTE. Music with Kofi 
Pendergrass. 

3:00 MUSIC FROM THE CENTER OF 
THE EARTH with hosts Bill Wells and 
Gary Olson. 

SATURDAY February 10 

5:00 HOUR OF THE WOLF. Science 

fiction, fantasy, enchantment, and the 
Imagination. Live radio with Jim Freund. 

7:00 AS I PLEASE. "... for none of us 
can ever express the exact measure of 
his needs or thoughts or his sorrows; 
and human speech is like a cracked 
kettle on which we tap crude rhythms 
for bears to dance to, while we long to 
make music that will melt the stars." 

8:30 ANY SATURDAY. Uve radio with 
David Rothenberg. 

10:30 LUNCHPAIL Live radio with Paul 
Gorman. 

12:30 PIPER IN THE MEADOW STRAY- 
ING. Folk music with Edward Haber. 

2:00 COUNTRY MUSIC ALTERNA- 
TIVES. Bluegrass and traditional music 
with Tom Tortorella. We continue our 
celebration of Black History Month with 
more music of Charley Pride, today 
featuring the CD The Best of Charley 
Pride . We'll hear such classics as Jusl 
Between You and Me. Kaw Liga and Lei 
the Chios Fall . We'll also hear from the 



Hank V/illiams CD I nvesiek Blues. 
August 1947 - December 1946 . 

3:30 SLIPKNOT! Music with Spyder. 

4:30 JAZZ SAMPLER with Bill Farrar. 

6:00 HEAR AND NOW. New music 
with Cynthia Bell and Julie Lyonn 
Lieberman. 

7:00 HOUSING NOTEBOOK with 

members of the Metropolitan Council 
on Housing. 

8:00 WORLD DANCE PARTY. African, 
Caribbean and Afro-Cuban music, 
produced by Al Angeloro. 

10:30 RADIO UNNAMEABLE. Uve 
radio with Bob Pass. 

1 :00 LABBRISH. Uve radio with Habte 
Selassie. 

SUNDAY February 11 

5:00 SOUNDTRACK. All about the 

cinema with Paul Wunder. 

7:00 MARTIN SOKOL'S THROUGH 
THE OPERA GLASS. Regina Rorito 
Sokol, Executive Producer. Michael 
Scarola presents a retrospective of Leon- 
tyne Price, the first internationally 
known African-American prima donna. 

9:30 HERE OF A SUNDAY MORNING. 

Early music with Chris Whent. 

1 1 :30 HARD WORK. Live radio with 
Mike Feder. 

1:00 CON SABOR LATINO. Issues and 
music from the Latino community, with 
Mickey Melendez and Hernando 
Alvaricci. 

5:30 LATINO JOURNAL Producer 
Santiago Nieves focuses on the issues, 
concerns, and interests of the tri-state 
area's growing Latino community. 

6:00 THE WBAI EVENING NEWS 

6:30 

7:30 OUTLOOKS: THE GAY AND 
LESBIAN COMMUNITY ON THE AIR. 
Produced by the Gay and Lesbian Inde- 
pendent Broadcasters (G.L.I.B.). 
Tonight: perspectives on Black history. 

8:30 EMANATIONS. Live radio with 

Bernard White. 

10:30 THE GOLDEN AGE OF RADIO. 

Vintage radio with Max Schmid. 

12:30 NEWS REBROADCAST 

1:00 THE CREATIVE UNITY 
COLLECTIVE 

3:00 EVERYTHING OLD IS NEW 
AGAIN. Music with Dave Kenney. 

MONDAY" February 12 

6:00 THE MORNING MAGAZINE with 

Rosemari Mealy. 

8:00 UNDERCURRENTS 



8:30 THE MORNING SHOW continues 

9:30 MORNING MUSIC. Host Paul Mer- 
rill plays and reviews music of this 
season's forthcoming World Music In- 
stitute concerts. 

12:00 NATURAL LIVING. Health and 
nutrition, with Gary Null. 

1:00 LOOKING BACK/TOWARDS 
THE FUTURE: African-American 
History. In this Pacifica archive special, 
a musical history of the civil rights move- 
ment which was originally a part of 3M 
Civil Rights Series . Dr. Bernice Johnson 
Reagon tells us about the music which 
accompanied the civil rights movement 
and analyses the role that music played. 
(Archive) 

1:30 WHERE WE LIVE SPECIAL: 
Political Prisoners in the United 
States. An in-depth analysis of the ques- 
tion of political prisoners in the US. 
Includes interviews with Mutulu Shakur, 
Sylvio Baraldini, Susan Rosenberg, 
Unda Evans, Geronimo Pratt and 
others. Produced by Sally O'Brien with 
Zenzile Khoisan and Rosemari Mealy. 

4:30 THE WBAI ARTS MAGAZINE 

with host, Lee Lowenfish - Beauty and 
the Beat , a radio stew of jazz and clas- 
sics. Today's guest is Edward Jablonski, 
author of Happy With the Blues , who 
helps celebrate the 85th birthday of 
Harold Arlen. 

6:00 THE WBAI EVENING NEWS 

6:45 UNDERCURRENTS HIGHLIGHTS 

7:00 BEHIND THE NEWS. An in-depth 
discussion of the day's events, 
produced by Samori Marksman. 

7:30 WORLD VIEW. International 
issues with Samori Marksman. 

8:30 SEQUOYAH - NATIVE 
AMERICAN NEWS produced by Jim 

Buck. 

9:00 THE CRIMINAL JUSTICE 
SYSTEM: Its Function and Effect on 
African-Americans. The psychology, 
sociology and "media-ology ". A special 
three-part report examining the criminal 
justice system from initial arrest to con- 
clusion, its function in society and its 
effect on African-Americans as in- 
dividuals and as communities. Part One 
looks at the structure, process and 
media involved in arrests, releases and 
indictments: who gets arrested, who 
gets charged, and why? Guests include 
representatives from the Center for Con- 
stitutional Rights, the Legal Aid Society 
and the Center for Social Justice, as 
well as individuals formerly arrested, 
tried and/or incarcerated. Hosted and 
produced by Carletla Joy Walker and 
co-hosted by Safiya Bandele of the 
Center for Women's Development at 
Medgar Evers College. Parts Two and 
Three will be heard on Tuesday and 
Wednesday in this timeslot. 



Page 10 



WBAI FM 99.5 



From The Program Director 



When people ask me, "So... how do you like your 
new job?", I answer with one word: exhilarating. 

WBAI means many things to many people. Here, 
the laws of cause and effect are exaggerated and ac- 
celerated. I believe we all (staff and listeners) have 
grand plans for and fantasies about what WBAI is 
or could be - but ultimately, WBAI exerts its own 
irracible personality: its best side and its worst, its 
brilliance and disappointments, its fears and hopes. 
No single person is ever responsible - we all are. 

Since I've been in this chair a lot has changed in the 
world, and I've found that one thing a radio station 
like ours can do is respond quickly to change. It is 
truly an essential characteristic of this medium. I 
believe our Panama coverage is a good example - 1 
think our producers did outstanding and important 
work, and I want to officially thank them and to 
thank those of our listeners who supported us 
during those broadcasts, (sse page 16 - Ed.) 

Now on to program changes. You may already have 
noticed that the early morning line-up is changing, 
and we plan to continue shaping it over the coming 
months. We will be working with existing producers 
and inviting new talent into the slot to try out. Begin- 
ning this month, our News Department moves into 
the mornings with regular reports at 10 minutes 
before the hour. WBAI spends a large amount of its 
income on news, and we feel we will better serve 
our morning audience with news updates that in- 
clude both Pacifica national and international 
coverage with our own stories. The evening news 
remains as is. 

In the afternoons, we are opening up two hours 
each day (2:30-4:30pm, Monday through Thursday) 
for new programming. We receive many program 
proposals from new as well as current producers, 
and there are many good programs available to us 
from other national and international sources which 
I know many listeners would like to hear. This two 
hour timeslot will permit us greater programming 
flexibility and access for more producers - but of 
course it means changes in the current line-up. Al- 
ternativa I.atina moves to Fridays at 2:30pm. We 
lose Roscoc's free-form music show and NQMMO 
Eadia- The Undercurrents Friday show and Dennis 
Bernstein's Friday A ficrnnnn have been canceled 
and Medium Hot moves to 1:30pm on Fridays. This 



Way Out moves to 1:00pm on Thursdays (check list- 
ings for details). 

Following Natural Living on Monday, Tuesday and 
Wednesday, we are continuing our 30th anniversary 
archive documentary series, Looking Back/Towards 
the Future, as we try to understand what has hap- 
pened over these past 30 years and what impact it 
will all have on the new decade. Last month, we ran 
programs examining the East-West crisis and the 
Berhn Wall - this month, we review aspects of the 
civil rights movement and African-American history. 

With the current upheavals all over the globe, the 
big question facing us is: "Old Left, New Left, 
what's Left?" WBAI and its community of listeners 
must respond to this question if we are to continue 
to seriously value the ideals we have stood for over 
the past thirty years. With this in mind, I am propos- 
ing that WBAI arrange an event of some kind, 
perhaps with other appropriate institutions, to ex- 
amine these questions. We are currently looking for 
funding and partners to undertake such a venture 
and would like to do it as soon as possible. 

I am pleased that Wagner's Ring cycle is back with 
us again this year. I am also looking forward to hear- 
ing Anthony Davis do a special program 
investigating American Music in Conflict . I had the 
good fortune to meet Anthony at last year's Com- 
poser to Composer conference in Teluride, where 
he had an interesting and provocative exchange 
with John Cage on the nature and importance of im- 
provisation and the relevance of politics in music. 

We will also begin a series of programs looking at 
education and the African-American community. 
The series will commence with an oral history from 
a former school principal and the father of Mike 
Sargent, the producer of the series. Another new 
series on the environment starts this month as well. 
I intend for WBAI to play a leading role in inves- 
tigating the crises and expanding listeners' 
awareness on environmental issues in th future. 

Please write me with your comments. Your feed- 
back is considered and helps construct the future. 

Andrew Phillips 
Program Director 



WBAI 99.5 FM 



Page 11 



1 1 :00 NEWS REBROADCAST 

11:45 UNSTUCK IN TIME. Uve radio 

with Margot Adier. 

1:00 WALDEN'SPONO. Ashow 

discussing animal rights, ecology, and 
spirituality. Hosted by Shelton Walden. 

3:30 ON THE ROCKS. Music with 
Roxanne. 

TUESDAY February 13 

6:00 THE MORNING MAGAZINE with 

Citizen Kafka. 

8:00 UNDERCURRENTS 

8:30 THE MORNING SHOW continues 

9:30 THIRD WORLD GALLERY. Music 
with Chico Alvarez. 

12:00 NATURAL LIVING. Health and 
nutrition with Gary Null. 

1:00 LOOKING BACK/TOWARDS 
THE FUTURE: Atrlcan-American 
History. WBAI continues its special 
archive series with the Rev. Ralph 
Abernathy's speech in Washington, DC 
at the Poor Peoples Campaign's 
Solidarity Day in 1968. He gives a brief 
history of the civil rights movement and 
speaks of America's treatment of Blacks 
as emulative of Vietnam, which "almost 
succeeded in creating our own Black 
version of the Viet Cong in American 
cities." Pan Two will be heard tomorrow 
at 1pm. (Archive) 

1:30 FRONTLINE: MIDDLE EAST 

produced by Phyllis Bennis. 

2:30 AMERICAN JAZZ RADIO 
FESTIVAL Under the direction of 
clarinetist Dr. Michael White, the New 
Orleans Hot Seven play a wide variety of 
pieces by the early jazz composer Jelly 
Roll Morton. 

4:30 THE WBAI ARTS MAGAZINE 
with Eva Yaa Asantewaa and Jennifer 
Bernet. 

6:00 THE WBAI EVENING NEWS 

6:45 UNDERCURRENTS HIGHLIGHTS 

7:00 BEHIND THE NEWS. An in-depth 
discussion of the day's events, 
produced by Samori Marksman. 

7:30 ECONONEWS. 

8:30 THE SHAKESPEARE 
LIBERATION FRONT PRESENTS... 

9:00 THE CRIMINAL JUSTICE 
SYSTEM: Its Function and Effect on 
African-Americans. Part Two of a 
special three-part report examining the 
criminal justice system from initial arrest 
to conclusion, its function in society and 
its effect on African-Americans as in- 
dividuals and as communities. Today, 
we examine the possibilities, options 
and influences affecting trial, verdict 
and sentencing: who gets what type of 
sentence, and why? Special guests 




Richard Thompson, noted British folksinger, songwriter and guil;iri-sl, will he featured 
in concert on I'ipcr In The Meadow Siraving. Saturday, Feh. 1 7th at 1 2:.^0pm. 



include representatives from the Center 
for Constitutional Rights, the Legal Aid 
Society and the Center for Social 
Justice, as well as individuals formerly 
arrested, tried and/or incarcerated. 
Hosted and produced by Carletta Joy 
Walker and co-hosted by Safiya 
Bandele of the Center for Women's 
Development at Medgar Evers College. 
Part Three will be heard Wednesday 
night in this timeslot. 

11:00 NEWS REBROADCAST 

1 1 :45 LATE NIGHT LIVE RADIO with 
Carletta J. Walker. 

1 :00 WEAPONRY. Military affairs and 
hardware with Tom Wisker. 

3:30 PUNK AND HARDCORE. Music 
with Susan Browne. 

WEDNESDAY February 14 

6:00 THE MORNING MAGAZINE with 
a guest host. 

8:00 UNDERCURRENTS 

8:30 THE MORNING SHOW continues 

9:30 GHOSTS IN THE MACHINE: 
WOMEN IN POP. The divas of pop, 
funk, punk, rap, reggae, and other good- 
for-your-soul styles, in music, scene 
reports, and interviews. With host 
Victoria Starr. 

12:00 NATURAL LIVING. Health and 
nutrition with Gary Null. 

1:00 LOOKING BACK/TOWARDS 
THE FUTURE: African-American 
History. WBAI continues its special ar- 
chive series with Part Two of the Rev. 
Ralph Abernathy's speech in 
Washington, DC at the Poor Peoples 
Campaign's Solidarity Day in 1968. 



1:30 THE POSITIVE MIND with 

Armand DiMele. 

2:30 GANDHI IN THE PARK: On 
Freedom. An inquiry into the nature and 
real scope of freedom. What can we 
really do? How far can we change the 
world? How far can we change our- 
selves? If we see how difficult change is, 
how narrow our igal freedom, maybe we 
can be a little more tolerant of our 
neighbor. Produced by William Borman. 

4:30 THE WBAI ARTS MAGAZINE 

with Malika Lee Whitney. Featuring the 
Evening Serial at 4:30, selected shorts 
at 4:45pm, Pickney Place , a program of 
storytelling at 5;00, and interviews at 
5:30. 

6:00 THE WBAI EVENING NEWS 

6:45 UNDERCURRENTS HIGHLIGHTS 

7:00 BEHINDTHENEWS. An in-depth 
discussion of the day's events, 
produced by Samori Marksman. 

7:30 EXPLORATIONS. Science and 
peace issues with Michio Kaku. 

8:30 THE CUTTING EDGE: BLACK 
NEWS AND VIEWS. Produced by Dred 
Scott. 

9:00 THE CRIMINAL JUSTICE 
SYSTEM: Its Function and Effect on 
African-Americans. A special three-part 
report examining the criminal justice 
system from initial arrest to conclusion, 
its function in society and its effect on 
African-Americans as individuals and as 
communities. Today, Part Three looks at 
the levels and implications of release, 
imprisonment and parole: who goes to 
jail and what is the function of parole? 
Special guests include representatives 
from the Center for Constitutional 
Rights, the Legal Aid Society and the 
Center for Social Justice, as well as 



Page 12 



WBAI FM 99.5 



BLACK WOMEN: SOME REFLECTIONS 

Achievements Against The Odds 



During this Black/African History Month, as we 
enter into the decade of the 90s, we are reminded 
that the Black/ African woman's struggle remains a 
daily one. 

As we reflect upon the folk heroines like Harriet 
Tubman, Sojourner Truth, Ida B. Wells, Rosa Parks 
and Fannie Lou Hamer to name a few - those who 
refused to relinquish their African womanspirit to 
racist oppression and sexual inequality. Their 
stance, combined with that of African-American 
men, fostered movements that led to our own 
modern strides towards freedom in the United 
States. 

Black/African-American women have also worked 
apart in their own organizations, defining a "Black 
woman's ideology." For example. Black feminists 
have asserted their right to confront and challenge 
two main avenues of thought. They have resented 
the intense pressure from the Black/African com- 
munity to see sexism only in terms of the arena of 
heterosexual relationships and have summarily 
rejected the White women's movement's middle- 
class experience as the guide post to women's 
liberation. 

Black/African-American women have made con- 
tributions in all areas of society. For example, Lucy 
Parsons (1853-1942) was active in the radical labor 
movement for over sixty years. She published books, 
pamphlets and newspapers, and lead many 
demonstrations for free speech. The Chicago police 
considered her "more dangerous that a thousand 
rioters." "We arc the slaves of slaves," she once said. 
"We are exploited more ruthlessly than men." 



With a rich heritage predating the birth of many 
European civilizations, African-Americans continue 
to demonstrate their talents in the graphic and plas- 
tic arts. As slaves, we were locked into a system 
which thoroughly discouraged free expression, yet 
the Black/African craftspeople were able to use 
their gifts to fashion implements and articles for the 
plantation. Many of these were women, who made 
pots and wove intricate designs into textiles and 
straw in the African tradition. During the Harlem 
Renaissance, Augusta Savage emerged as one of the 
leading sculptors of the era. The National Archive 
Gift Collection holds her noted works Gamin' and 
Lift Every Voice and Sing . 

Finally, with a sense of independence and racial 
pride, African-American women writers have con- 
tinued to give expression to the frustrations and joys 
of their people. The tradition goes back to women 
like Phyllis Wheatley, who was the first slave and the 
second woman to publish a book of verse in the 
United States, to writers like Toni Morrison and 
Alice Walker, who have won acclaim in the modern- 
day mainstream publishing world. 

Our hope during this time of celebration and rcHcc- 
tion is that from this time forward, we will not 
hesitate to stand up for the Black community in 
general and the African/American woman in par- 
ticular, placing them on every present and future 
agenda of social and political development. As 
WBAI celebrates its 30th year of broadcasting as a 
listener-sponsored station, our programming this 
month reficcts our commitment to presenting a dif- 
ferent view of US history, one of "achievements 
against the odds." 

Rosemari Mealy 
WBAI Producer 



individuals formerly arrested, tried 
and/or incarcerated. Hosted and 
produced by Carletta Joy Walker and 
co-hosted by Safiya Bandele of the 
Center for Women's Development at 
Medgar Evers College. 

1 1 :00 NEWS REBROADCAST 

1 1 :45 EARTHWATCH. Uve radio with 
Robert Knight. 

1 :30 CARRIER WAVE. Uve radio with 
Sidney Smith. 

3:30 OUT OF THE SHADOWS. Music 
with Don Scherdin. 



THURSDAY February 15 

6:00 THE MORNING MAGAZINE with 

Dred Scott. 

8:00 UNDERCURRENTS 

9:30 SHOCKING BLUE, fuluslc with 
Delphine Blue 

12:00 NATURAL LIVING. Health and 
nutrition with Gary Null. 

1:00 THIS WAY OUT. The international 
magazine for and about the Lesbian 
and Gay community, now heard on 
Thursday. 

1:30 LISTENERS' ACTION ON 
HOMELESSNESS AND HOUSING. 



2:30 THIS SPACE FOR RENT (a time 
slot reserved for new programming) 

3:30 CYCLING AND RECYCLING. The 

first in a series of programs discussing 
ecological issues in the city. Today, we 
ponder an auto-free New York - the 
concept, its potential and the alternative 
vehicles which will get us there. Guests 
will include George Haikalis. Chairman 
of the Auto-Free New York Committee 
and George Blissm human-powered 
vehicle designer. Produced and hosted 
by Charles Komanoff and Carl 
Hultsberg. 

4:30 THE WBAI ARTS MAGAZINE. 
Lee Ryan, host. Featuring the Evening 



WBAI 99.5 FM 



Page 13 



Serial at 4:30 and Frederick GeoBold's 
Ughtshow 

6:00 THE WBAI EVENING NEWS 

6:45 UNDERCURRENTS HIGHLIGHTS 

7:00 BEHIND THE NEWS. An in-depth 
discussion of the day's events, 
produced by Samori Marksman. 

7:30 BUILDING BRIDGES. The 

community labor report with Mimi 
Rosenberg and Ken Nash. 

8:30 RADIO FREE EIREANN. A show 
on Ireland and the Irish Freedom 
struggle. Produced by Mick Dewan and 
John McDonagh. 

9:00 THIS SPACE FOR RENT (no 

scheduled program at press time) 

10:00 AFRIKALEIDOSCOPE with 
Bombe Brath. 

11:00 NEWS REBROADCAST 

11:45 LATE NIGHT LIVE RADIO 

1:00 PRIMARY SOURCES. Uve radio 

with interim host, Bob Fass. 

3:30 LIVE AIR - or is it Dead Air? 
Anyway, music and live stuff with 
partners in crime David Nolan and Doug 
Cheesman. 

FRIDAY Februan 16 

6:00 THE MORNING MAGAZINE with 
Will K. Wilkins. 

8:00 UNDERCURRENTS 

8:30 THE MORNING SHOW continues 

9:30 THIRD WORLD MUSIC 
MASTERS. Music with R.B. Isles. 

12:00 NATURAL LIVING. Health and 
nutrition issues with Gary Null. 

1:00 SOUTH AFRICA NOW: THE 
RADIO EDITION. A radio 
newsmagazine on the events in 
Southern Africa, delving into the story 
behind the reports coming from South 
Africa and the Frontline states. This 
program defies the media ban/censor- 
ship imposed by the Apartheid regime. 
Produced by Globalvision Television 
and adapted for radio by Sally O'Brien 
and Zenzile Khoisan. 

1:30 HEALTHSTYLES. Current issues 
in health care, with WBAI's Nursing and 
Health Resources Network. 

2:30 ALTERNATIVA LATINA. The 
Alternativa Latina Collective brings you 
up-to-date news and information on the 
reality of Latin America and its people, 
both here and abroad. The only bi-lin- 
gual program focussing on the politics, 
culture and history of Latin America, this 
show includes the weekly feature, 
produced by Gonzalo Aburto, Rompien- 
do el Silencio (Breaking the Silence), 
dealing with the issues affecting the 
Gay and Lesbian Latino community. 



4:30 THE WBAI ARTS MAGAZINE 

with host Joseph Hurley, featuring the 
Evening Serial at 4:30, and The 
Screening Room at 5:30 with Paul 
Wunder and Joseph Hurley reviewing 
and discussing the latest films. 

6:00 THE WBAI EVENING NEWS 

6:45 DATELINE NICARAGUA. The 
story behind the headlines - news and 
features direct from Managua. 
Produced by Julie Light. 

7:00 AIDS IN FOCUS, a weekly 
magazine on the politics and culture of 
the AIDS pandemic, produced by 
Michael Alcalay. 

7:1 5 FEARFUL SYMMETRY with Leo 
Cawley. 

8:00 WORKING TITLE. Readings 
produced by Alina Avila. 

8:30 A MOVEABLE FEAST. Authors 
read and discuss their latest works with 
Tom Vitale. Tonight, Los Angeles perfor- 
mance artist and poet La Loca recites 
Adventures on the Island of Adoles- 
cence. 




Noted African-Amcriciin soprano E.sthcr 

Minds conies to Qui There On Their Own on 

Mondiiy, Fcbniiiry 19lli .il 9:30ain. 

9:00 HOME FRIES. Uve radio, 
comedy, music and call-ins with Fred 
Herschkowitz. 

10:30 BLACK ROCK COALITION 

12:00 NIGHTFLYTE. Music with Chet 
Jackson. 

3:00 MUSIC FROM THE CENTER OF 
THE EARTH with hosts Bill Wells and 
Gary Olson. 

SATURDA^ February 17 

5:00 HOUR OF THE WOLF. Science 
fiction, fantasy, enchantment, and the 
imagination. Live radio with Jim Freund. 

7:00 AS I PLEASE. "... for none of us 
can ever express the exact measure of 



his needs or thoughts or his sorrows: 
and human speech is like a cracked 
kettle on which we tap crude rhythms 
for bears to dance to, while we long to 
make music that will melt the stars " 

8:30 ANY SATURDAY. Uve radio with 
David Rothenberg. 

10:30 LUNCHPAIL Uve radio with Paul 
Gorman. 

12:30 RICHARD THOMPSON IN 
CONCERT. Acclaimed English 
songwriter and virtuosic guitarist 
Richard Thompson recorded at the New 
Ritz in NYC on June 8, 1989. This 
program was produced by Natalie 
Budelis. Associate Producer, Edward 
Haber. Engineered by Natalie Budelis, 
Deidre Campbell and Edward Haber. 

2:00 COUNTRY MUSIC ALTERNA- 
TIVES. Bluegrass and traditional music 
with Tom Tortorella. Today we feature a 
new album from the Coon Creek Girls 
called Playing Our Respect . 

3:30 UNSUNG HEROES. Music with 
Jordyn Tyson. 

4:30 JAZZ SAMPLER with Bill Farrar. 

6:00 HEAR AND NOW. New music 
with Cynthia Bell and Julie Lyonn Ueber- 
man. 

7:00 HOUSING NOTEBOOK with 

members of the Metropolitan Council 
on Housing. 

8:00 WORLD DANCE PARTY. African, 
Caribbean and Afro-Cuban music, 
produced by Al Angeloro. 

10:30 RADIO UNNAMEABLE. Uve 

radio with Bob Fass. 

1 :00 LABBRISH. Uve radio with Habte 
Selassie. 

SUNDAY February 18 

5:00 SOUNDTRACK. All about the 
cinema with Paul Wunder. 

6:00 DERRINGDESNIBELUNGEN. 

Yes, its back! The long-standing WBAI 
tradition of broadcasting the entire Ring 
cycle on (or around) the traditional ob- 
servance of Washington's Birthday. We 
will pre-empt all regularly scheduled 
programming (except for the evening 
news at 6pm) in order to bring you not 
only the music (this year, the Kraus 
recordings) but live and taped commen- 
tary and interviews as well. On this day 
the word "marathon" (not a very popular 
one with our listeners, as the words 
'1und raiser " all too frequently follow it) 
has positive and even exciting connota- 
tions. Only a station like WBAI could 
dedicate almost twenty hours to a single 
work of art simply because it is a work 
of art. If you have never listened to the 
Ring before or have, perhaps, never 
dreamed of hearing the whole thing in 
one session, please tune in a give it a 
try. After all, Wagner took a quarter of a 



Page 14 



WBAI FM 99.5 



century to complete it - dedicating twen- 
ty hours of your own time to it seems 
more than fair. And you might even 
learn something - that's why we're here. 
Produced by (who else?) Manya. 

6:00 THE WBAI EVENING NEWS 

6:30 DER RING DES NIBELUNGEN 
CONTINUES 

2:00 BACK OF THE BOOK. Valentine s 
day being over, your rejected host will 
scrub up with some Self surfactant 
preparatory to jettisoning his Wel- 
tanschauung and imploding. Featured: 
Hector and Anvil interview J. Danforth 
Quayle Ill's internal head lice. Nature 
abhors a vacuum. Bye Bye to f^^adame 
Expurgatrix Major. We predict som- 
nolence in her wake. Free Form Live 
Radio by R. Paul Martin. 

3:00 EVERYTHING OLD IS NEW 
AGAIN. Music with Dave Kenney. 

MONDAY February 19 

6:00 THE MORNING MAGAZINE with 
Rosemari Mealy. 

8:00 UNDERCURRENTS 

8:30 THE MORNING SHOW continues 

9:30 OUT THERE ON THEIR OWN: 
ESTHER HINDS. One of the most con- 
tinuously utilized Black sopranos on the 
concert and opera stages of the world, 
Esther Hinds was an alternate Bess in 
the Houston Opera's celebrated revival 
of George Gershwin's Porgy and Bess . 
She has also played Cleopatra in the 
recent full-length recording of the late 
Samuel Barber's Antonv and Cleopatra . 
Her concert repertoire ranges from Bach 
and Beethoven to Faure and Poulenc. In 
addition, she is Artistic Director of the 
Voices Saintpaulia and performs in a 
Gospel trio with her two sisters. She 
comes to talk about her life and music 
with host/producer Joseph Hurley. 

10:30 ROOTS AND ALEX HALEY. Pulit- 
zer prize-winning author Alex Haley and 
his books are discussed, including his 
work on The Autobiooraphv of Malcolm 
X and A Different Kind of Christmas . 
(Satellite) 

12:00 NATURAL LIVING. Health and 
nutrition, with Gary Null. 

1:00 LOOKING BACK/TOWARDS 
THE FUTURE: African-American 
History. Continuing our special archive 
series commemorating African- 
American History Month, this week we 
focus on the philosophy and life of 
Malcolm X, who was assassinated 25 
years ago February 21st. "The Ballot Or 
the Bullet" is one of Malcolm's most 
famous speeches, and sheds light on 
the vision which contributed greatly to 
the new militancy within Black organiza- 
tions of that time. Part Two will be heard 
tomorrow at this time. (Archive) 



1:30 HUMAN RIGHTS IN AMERICA. 

Discussions, with Uoyd D'Aguilar and 
Joy James. 

2:30 THE YOUTH AND THE ELEC- 
TORAL PROCESS IN NICARAGUA. 

The legal age to vote in Nicaragua is 16. 
The youth today were about six years 
old when Somoza was overthrown. 
Now, 10 years later, they will vote for the 
first time. How do they perceive the 
electoral process and the state of the 
nation? To whom do they owe their 
allegiances? Produced by Anibal Pozzo. 
with reporting by Jeannie Hopper. 

3:15 THIS SPACE FOR RENT (nothing 
scheduled at press time) 

4:00 STORIES FROM HOME. Hujam- 
bo! Akwaba! Kariba! Welcome to African 
folktales for the diaspora. This program 
brings you folktales from Africans and 
African-Americans with drums to set the 
feeling and mood. These tales have in- 
fluenced cultures all over the world. 
They reflect the magic, the wonder, the 
fantasy and the reality of life. In them, 
one is not surprised that animals talk, 
that trees have magic powers or that 
people turn into other things. Some 
stories are taken from truth, others are 
pure imagination - but they all make 
you think and feel. And in the tradition 
of our oneness with each other and na- 
ture, these stories help to convey 
lessons on how human beings should 
relate to everything around them. 
Stories read by Marcia Brown. Produced 
and engineered by Ulysses T. Good. 

4:30 THE WBAI ARTS MAGAZINE 

with host, Lee Lowenfish - Beauty and 
the Beat , a radio stew of jazz and clas- 
sics. Today is the legal version of 
Washington's birthday, and we'll 
celebrate by playing Dinah Washington, 
and have invited young jazz stars Kenny 
and Peter Washington (drummer and 
bassist, respectively). 

6:00 THE WBAI EVENING NEWS 

6:45 UNDERCURRENTS HIGHLIGHTS 

7:00 BEHIND THE NEWS. An in-depth 

discussion of the day's events, 
produced by Samori Marksman. 

7:30 WORLD VIEW. International 

issues with Samori Marksman. 

8:30 SEQUOYAH - NATIVE 
AMERICAN NEWS produced by Jim 
Buck. 

9:00 A TASTE OF THE BLUES with 
Tom Pomposello. 

10:00 JOURNEY INTO A CHANGING 
NIGERIA. A special report on Nigeria's 
sixth Military President Ibrahim 
Babangida's visit to the United States in 
January, accompanied by Major 
General Ike Nwachukwu, his Foreign 
Minister. Producer Amanda Peterson 
met up with the two African leaders to 
discuss the purpose of the visit, the 



Presidents plans to hand over power to 
a civilian government in 1992, US- 
Nigerian relations and many other 
critical issues affecting the people of 
Nigeria. 

1 1 :00 NEWS REBROADCAST 

11:45 UNSTUCK IN TIME. Uve radio 

with Margot Adier. 

1:00 THE MOORISH ORTHODOX 
RADIO CRUSADE. Xerox-zines, Sufism, 
and other fun for brainiacs. Uve radio 
with Peter Lamborn Wilson. 

3:30 ON THE ROCKS. Music with 
Ftoxanne. 

TUESDAY February 20 

6:00 THE MORNING MAGAZINE with 

Citizen Kafka. 

8:00 UNDERCURRENTS 

8:30 THE MORNING SHOW continues 

9:30 ALL MIXED UP. Radio collages 
with Peter Bochan. 

12:00 NATURAL LIVING. Health and 
nutrition with Gary Null. 

1:00 LOOKING BACK/TOWARDS 
THE FUTURE: African American 
History. Continuing our special archive 
series commemorating African- 
American History Month, this week we 
focus on the philosophy and life of 
Malcolm X, who was assassinated 25 
years ago February 21st. "The Ballot Of 
the Bullet" is one of Malcolm's most 
famous speeches, and sheds light on 
the vision which contributed greatly to 
the new militancy within Black organiza- 
tions of that time. Part II (Archive) 

1:30 THE ALLIANCE REPORT 

produced in association with the Nation- 
al Alliance of Third World Journalists. 

2:30 AMERICAN JAZZ RADIO FES- 
TIVAL Subtitled "Bouncin' With Bud", 
this program is also a tribute to bebop 
music and features such artists as Barry 
Harris, Slide Hampton, Jimmy Heath 
and Johnnie McLean. (Satellite) 

4:30 THE WBAI ARTS MAGAZINE 

with Eva Vaa Asantewaa and Jennifer 
Bernet. 

6:00 THE WBAI EVENING NEWS 

6:45 UNDERCURRENTS HIGHLIGHTS 

7:00 BEHIND THE NEWS. An in-depth 
discussion of the day's events, 
produced by Samori Marksman. 

7:30 DR. W.E.B. DUBOIS: Father of 
Pan-Africanism, Peace Activist and 
Scholar. This program will examine the 
life and works of the late African- 
American freedom-lighter. Produced by 
Samori Marksman and WBAI's Dr. 
Gerald Home, author of Black and Red: 
The Autobiography of DuBois . 

8:30 A ZPPR PRODUCTION. A special 
so;1 of radio drama. 



WBAI 99.5 FM 



Page 15 




We commcmorale (he 25lli anniversiiry of 

Ihc assassination of thr great Africnn- 

American leader Malcolm X with mnny 

special programs on February 21sL 

9:00 STOLEN MOMENTS. Jazz with 
Mahmoud Ibrahim. 

10:00 AIDSTALK IV. In the fourth of the 
AIDSTALK series, PWA Larry Gutenberg 
focuses on the issue of sen/ices avail- 
able to persons of color who have AIDS. 
As has recently been acknowledged and 
reported in the media, this population is 
disproportionately affected with the 
disease. 

1 1 :00 NEWS REBROADCAST 

1 1 :45 LATE NIGHT LIVE RADIO with 
Carletta J. Walker. 

1 :00 WEAPONRY. Military affairs and 
hardware with Tom Wisker. 

3:30 MONSTERS FROM THE ID. Punk 
rock from the dark side of your brain. A 
show not to be slept through, and we 
won't let you. With Ed Banger and Sue 
Real. 

WEDNESDAY February 21 

6:00 THE MORNING MAGAZINE with 
a guest host. 

8:00 UNDERCURRENTS 

8:30 THE MORNING SHOW continues 

9:30 GHOSTS IN THE MACHINE: 
WOMEN IN POP. The divas of pop, 
funk, punk, rap, reggae, and other good- 
for-your-soul styles, in music, scene 
reports, and interviews. With host 
Victoria Starr. 



12:00 NATURAL LIVING. Health and 

nutrition with Gary Null. 

1:00 MALCOLM X: A Retrospective. 

We begin our commemoration of the 
25lh anniversary of the assassination of 
Malcolm X with this award-winning 
Pacifica documentary produced by 
Chris Koch in 1965. The piece covers 
the life of Ai-Hajj Malik Al-Shabazz from 
his first impact on the Black Power 
movement and the Black Muslim 
movement in 1960 to his assassination 
in 1965. (Archive) 

2:00 THE PRICE OF FREEDOM IS 
DEATH. On the 21st day of February, 
1965, at a meeting of the OAAU in the 
Audabon Ballroom in Harlem, shots 
rang out - and Malcolm X was dead. 
Twenty-five years later we will be look- 
ing back at his life and his message. 
What impact does he carry today? How 
is he viewed by the Third World? These 
and other topics will be discussed with 
invited guests professor Bill Sales and 
Abdul Al Kalimat, both of whom are 
doing research into some aspect of 
Malcolm's life. Also hear the words from 
some of the most famous speeches of 
this great African-American hero, as well 
as music dedicated to and inspired by 
him. Produced by Bernard White and 
Ulysses T. Good with Dred Scott and 
Rosemari Mealy. 

6:00 THE WBAI EVENING NEWS 

6:45 UNDERCURRENTS HIGHLIGHTS 

7:00 BEHIND THE NEWS. An in-depth 
discussion of the day's events, 
produced by Samori Marksman. 

7:30 EXPLORATIONS. Science and 
peace issues with Michio Kaku. 

8:30 THE CUTTING EDGE: BLACK 
NEWS AND VIEWS. Produced by Dred 
Scott. 



9:00 NEW YORK COLLAGE. The 

common roots of all music originating 
in the Caribbean Islands, and all that it 
has grown into. Bring on the good 
sounds! Produced by Nancy Rodriguez. 

10:00 THE PERSONAL COMPUTER 
SHOW. Host, Joe King. Co-hosts, Hank 
Kee, and David Burstein. Produced in 
cooperation with the New York Amateur 
Computer Club. 

1 1 :00 NEWS REBROADCAST 

1 1 :45 EARTHWATCH. Live radio with 
Robert Knight. 

1 :30 CARRIER WAVE. Live radio with 
Sidney Smith. 

3:30 COSMIK DEBRIS. Music from the 
Void. 

THURSDAY February 22 

6:00 THE MORNING MAGAZINE with 

Dred Scott. 

8:00 UNDERCURRENTS 

9:30 SHOCKING BLUE. Music with 
Delphine Blue. 

12:00 NATURAL LIVING. Health and 

nutrition with Gary Null. 

1 :00 THIS WAY OUT. The international 
magazine for and about the Lesbian 
and Gay community, now heard on 
Thursday. 

1:30 GRAY PANTHER REPORT with 

Lydia Bragger. 

2:30 AMERICAN MUSIC IN 
CONFLICT. Anthony Davis is one of 
North America's most important contem- 
porary composers. His works include 
the opera X: The Life and Times of Mal- 
colm X . He is the leader of the Anthony 
Davis Group and Epistemi. He will dis- 
cuss his life as a classical composer. 




Celcbriitc llic lives of women of color with The Stations {'ojlcclite on 
Thursday, February 22nd at 9pni. 



Page 16 



\N BAI FM 99.5 



Panama: A Reporter's Diary 



December was an extraordinary monlh for Under- 
currents and WBAI. Coming on the heels of our 
special coverage of the FMLN's "maximum offen- 
sive" in San Salvador, we had the chance to provide 
the most thorough coverage of developments in 
Panama, culminating in the invasion and continuing 
occupation. 

I traveled in Panama during November and Decem- 
ber 1989, during which time the Undercurrents 
team accurately predicted: 1) the Bush 
administration's apparent violation of the Panama 
Canal treaties by failing to name as Chief Ad- 
ministrator the nominee of the Panamanian 
government; 2) the accession of General Manuel 
Noriega to chief of state (which made direct assas- 
sination of Noriega problematic even for the Bush 
administration); 3) the probability of a US invasion; 
4) the plans for serious resistance and continuous 
guerilla operations in such an event; and 5) the 
likelihood of a protracted occupation by US troops. 

While in Panama, I was also presented with the fate- 
ful opportunity to be the sole civilian observer at an 
armed military confrontation in which US troops 
falsely accused a Panamanian military patrol of 
planting a bomb at Miraflorcs Locks, in an eerie 
foreshadowing of one of the pretexts used for 
President Bush's invasion. 

Immediately after a weekend shootout with US 
troops at the Panama Defense Forces head- 
quarters, I secured an exclusive interview with 
Noriega on December 18th, two days before Presi- 
dent Bush's midnight invasion. Noriega claimed the 



US troops were armed and that they fired first, 
injuring several Panamanians before fire was 
returned, resulting in the death of an American. US 
officials had at first claimed the troops were un- 
armed, then that they had "gotten lost" in front of 
PDF headquarters. This interview was carried over 
wire services, radio and television, and in 
newspapers across the country. 

Then, on December 22nd, while the combined 
forces of the United States were seeking the 
whereabouts of the general. Undercurrents ob- 
tained a communique from Noriega, indicating that 
he was alive and at large, despite rumors carried 
throughout the day on CNN that he had been 
captured. The irony is that although this Undercur- 
rentsA VBAI exclusive was carried by national 
media, it was not reported over CNN, which is car- 
ried over SCN, the US military's Southern 
Command Network, meaning that the only news 
outlet available in Panama at that time was not 
reportingany of this. 

This type of vital information about Panama, El Sal- 
vador, Colombia and other Latin American crisis 
points would not be available without the Undercur- 
rents crew, the WBAI staff and, equally importantly, 
you listeners who have voted for the free flow of 
information with your consistent spiritual and finan- 
cial support. We thank all of you and look forward 
to your continued support in the dangerous times to 
come. 

Robert Knight 
Senior Protkiccr, L'ndcrcurrcnts 



4:30 THE WBAI ARTS MAGAZINE. 
Lee Ryan, host. Featuring the Evening 
Serial at 4:30 and Frederick GeoBolds 
LiQhtshow. 

6:00 THE WBAI EVENING NEWS 

6:45 UNDERCURRENTS HIGHLIGHTS 

7:00 BEHIND THE NEWS. An in-depth 
discussion of the day's events, 
produced by Samori Marl<sman, 

7:30 BUILDING BRIDGES. Labor news 
of the month in review, including a 
roundtable discussion by labor jour- 
nalists on the month's developments. 
Produced by Ken Nash and Mimi 
Rosenberg. 

8:30 RADIO FREE EIREANN. A show 
on Ireland and the Irish Freedom 
struggle. Produced by Mick Dewan and 
John McDonagh. 

9:00 THE STATIONS COLLECTIVE. A 

discussion with [)orothy Randall Gray, 
Storme Webber and Cheryl Boyce 
Taylor about this women's theater 
ensemble which exists to celebrate ihe 



diversity and common experiences of 
women of color through poetry, music 
and dance. Produced by Valecia Phillips. 

10:00 CARIBBEAN AND LATIN 
AMERICAN REPORT produced by 
Annette Walker and others. 

1 1 :00 NEWS REBROADCAST 

1 1 :45 INVESTIGATIONS. Live radio 
and documentary with Andrew Phillips. 

1 :00 PRIMARY SOURCES. Live radio 

with interim host, Bob Fass. 

3:30 MORNING DEW. A program 
devoted to the music of the Grateful 
Dead. Produced by Lance Neal. 

FRIDAY Ktbniiiry 2.^ 

6:00 THE MORNING MAGAZINE with 
Will K. Wilkins. 

8:00 UNDERCURRENTS 

8:30 THE MORNING SHOW continues 

9:30 THIRD WORLD MUSIC 
MASTERS. Music with R.B. Isles. 



12:00 NATURAL LIVING. Health and 
nutrition issues with Gary Null. 

1 :00 SOUTH AFRICA NOW: THE 
RADIO EDITION. A radio 
newsmagazine on the events in 
Southern Africa, delving into the story 
behind the reports coming from South 
Africa and the Frontline states. This 
program defies the media ban/censor- 
ship imposed by the Apartheid regime. 
Produced by Globalvision Television 
and adapted for radio by Sally O'Brien 
and Zenziie Khoisan. 

1:30 MEDIUM HOT. International 
affairs with an emphasis on how the 
different media present the issues. With 
Adele Oitman and Sheila Ftyan. 

2:30 ALTERNATIVA UTINA. The 

Alternativa Latina Collective brings you 
up-to-date news and information on the 
reality of Latin America and its people, 
both here and abroad. The only bi-lln- 
gual program focussing on the politics, 
culture and history of Latin America. 



WBAI 99.5 FM 



Page 17 




James Baldwin discusses living and 

growing In a While world on Monday, Feb. 

26lh al Ipm. 

4:30 THE WBAI ARTS MAGAZINE 

with host Joseph Hurley, featuring the 
Evening Serial at 4:30, and The Screen- 
ing Room at 5:30 with Paul Wunder and 
Joseph Hurley reviewing and discussing 
the latest films. 

6:00 THE WBAI EVENING NEWS 

6:45 DATELINE NICARAGUA. The 

story behind the headlines - news and 
features direct from Managua. 
Produced by Julie Light. 

7:00 AIDS IN FOCUS, a weekly 
magazine on the politics and culture of 
the AIDS epidemic, produced by 
Michael Alcalay. 

7:15 FEARFUL SYMMETRY with Leo 
Cawley. 

8:00 BEHIND THE SCREENS. Movie 

matters with Delores Hayes. 

8:30 A MOVEABLE FEAST. Authors 
read and discuss their latest works with 
Tom Vitale. Tonight, Julian Barnes 
reads from his novel, A History of the 
World in 10 1/2 Chapters . 

9:00 THE BERNIE STARR SHOW. 
Rock 'n roll and comedy adventure. 

12:00 NIGHTFLYTE. Music with Kofi 
Pendergrass. 

3:00 MUSIC FROM THE CENTER OF 
THE EARTH with hosts Bill Wells and 
Gary Olson. 

SATURDAY Febriian, 24 

5:00 HOUR OF THE WOLF. Science 
fiction, fantasy, enchantment, and the 
imagination. Live radio with Jim Freund. 

7:00 AS I PLEASE. ". . for none of us 
can ever express the exact measure of 
his needs or thoughts or his sorrows: 
and human speech is like a cracked 
kettle on which we tap crude rhythms 
for bears to dance to, while we long to 



make music that will melt the stars." 

8:30 ANY SATURDAY. Uve radio with 
David Rothenberg 

10:30 LUNCHPAIL Live radio with Paul 
Gorman. 

12:30 PIPER IN THE MEADOW 
STRAYING. Folk music with Edward 
Haber, 

2:00 COUNTRY MUSIC ALTERNA- 
TIVES. Bluegrass and traditional music 
with Tom Tortorella. Today we pay 
tribute to Bluegrass greats Lester Ran 
and Earl Scruggs by playing such clas- 
sics as Rint Hill Special and Foogv 
Mountain Breakdown. 

3:30 SLIPKNOT! Music with Spyder. 

4:30 JAZZ SAMPLER with Bill Farrar. 

6:00 HEAR AND NOW. New music 
with Cynthia Bell and Julie Lyonn 
Lieberman. 

7:00 HOUSING NOTEBOOK with 

members of the Metropolitan Council 
on Housing. 

8:00 WORLD DANCE PARTY. African, 
Caribbean and Afro-Cuban music, 
produced by Al Angeloro. 

10:30 RADIO UNNAMEABLE. Uve 

radio with Bob Fass. 

1 :00 LABBRISH. Live radio with Habte 

Selassie. 

SUNDAY February 25 

5:00 SOUNDTRACK. Ail about the 

cinema with Paul Wunder. 

7:00 MARTIN SOKOL'S THROUGH 
THE OPERA GLASS. Regina Rorito 
Sokol, Executive Producer. From the 
archives, Martin Sokol features a double 
bill of Scott Joplin's ragtime opera 
Treemonisha and the superlative 
American bass-baritone Paul Robeson 
in recital. 

9:30 HERE OF A SUNDAY MORNING. 

Early music with Chris Whent. 

1 1 :30 HARD WORK. Live radio with 
Mike Feder. 

1 :00 CON SABOR LATINO. Issues and 
music from the Latino community, with 
Mickey Melendez and Hernando 
Alvaricci. 

5:30 LATINO JOURNAL Producer 
Santiago Nieves focuses on the issues, 
concerns, and interests of the tri-state 
area's growing Latino community. 

6:00 THE WBAI EVENING NEWS 

6:30 THAT OLD TIME RELIGION. 

Documents of the Civil Rights struggles. 
Recordings of speeches and songs 
from the 60s Blacks and Whites. 
Produced by Bill Canaday. 



7:30 OUTLOOKS: THE GAY AND 
LESBIAN COMMUNITY ON THE AIR. 

Produced by the Gay and Lesbian 
Independent Broadcasters (G.L.I.B.). 
Tonight - Lesbians who love porn: 
reclaiming our own sexuality. 

8:30 EMANATIONS. Uve radio with 
Bernard White. 

10:30 THE GOLDEN AGE OF RADIO. 

Vintage radio with Max Schmid. 

12:30 NEWS REBROADCAST 

1.00 THE CREATIVE UNITY 
COLLECTIVE 

3:00 EVERYTHING OLD IS NEW 
AGAIN. Music with Dave Kenney. 

MONDAY February 26 

6:00 THE MORNING MAGAZINE with 

Rosemari Mealy. 

8:00 UNDERCURRENTS 

8:30 THE MORNING SHOW continues 

9:30 MORNING MUSIC. 

12:00 NATURAL LIVING. Health and 
nutrition, with Gary Null. 

1:00 LOOKING BACK/TOWARDS 
THE FUTURE: African-American 
History. James Baldwin, perhaps one of 
the most important writers of the 20ih 
century, is remembered in this 
WBAI/Pacifica archive special. In a talk 
to students at a predominantly African- 
American high school in Oakland, CA, 
Mr. Baldwin discusses the issue of living 
and growing in a White world. (Archive) 

1:30 EMILE DeANTONIO: RADICAL 
ARTIST REMEMBERED. A celebration 
of this pioneer of the "New American 
Cinema" movement of the 1950s, where 
artists mixed politics and a "liberation 
esthetic" into their work. DeAntonio 
broke new ground in form and content 
in radical filmmaking. His career reflects 




Provocative African-Anicriciin poet 

Sapphire, Wednc>dn)', Fcbrunr) 28lh 

al 4pm. 



Page 18 



VVBAI FM 99.5 



the turbulence of modern North 
American history, from the McCarthy 
era to the Ploughshares movement. 
This program will include discussions of 
his works with colleagues and friends, 
and will include Andrew Phillips' radio 
documentary of the filmmaker. 
Produced by Stuart Hutchison and 
Andrew Phillips. 

6:00 THE WBAI EVENING NEWS 

6:45 UNDERCURRENTS HIGHLIGHTS 

7:00 BEHIND THE NEWS. An in-depth 
discussion of the day's events, 
produced by Samori Marksman. 

7:30 WORLD VIEW. International 
issues with Samori Marksman. 

8:30 SEQUOYAH - NATIVE 
AMERICAN NEWS produced by Jim 
Buck. 

«:00 GET RHYTHM! Music with Pat 
Rich. 

10:00 ASIAN/AMERICAN FOCUS. 

Issues, events and analysis of the New 
York Asian-American community. 
Produced by Michael Matsumoto. 

11:00 NEWS REBROADCAST 

11:45 UNSTUCK IN TIME. Live radio 
with Margot Adier. 

1:00 WALDEN'SPOND. Ashow 

discussing animal rights, ecology, and 
spirituality. Hosted by Shelton Walden. 

3:30 ON THE ROCKS. Music with 
Roxanne. 

TUESDAY February 27 

6:00 THE MORNING MAGAZINE with 
Citizen Kafka. 

8:00 UNDERCURRENTS 

8:30 THE MORNING SHOW continues 

»:30 THIRD WORLD GALLERY. Music 
with Chico Alvarez. 

12:00 NATURAL LIVING. Health and 
nutrition with Gary Null. 

1:00 LOOKING BACK/TOWARDS 
THE FUTURE: African-American 
History. We conclude our 30th 
anniversary archive special series with a 
two-part special on Harriet Tubman. 
Born into slavery, she risked her life and 
freedom after escaping to the North by 
returning to the South 19 times, leading 
over 300 men, women and children to 
liberty by means of the Underground 
Railway. Produced by Darcel King (Part 
Two will air tomorrow at this time.) 
(Archive) 

1:30 FRONTLINE: MIDDLE EAST 

produced by Phyllis Bennis. 

2:30 AMERICAN JAZZ RADIO 
FESTIVAL 82 year old 
saxophonist/composer Benny Carter is 
saluted with a birthday concert that 
includes performers such as Hank 



Jones, Ray Brown, Dizzy Gillespie and 
Sylvia Syms. All of the music played is 
composed by Carter. (Satellite) 

4:30 THE WBAI ARTS MAGAZINE 

with Eva Yaa Asantewaa and Jennifer 
Bernet. 

6:00 THE WBAI EVENING NEWS 

6:45 UNDERCURRENTS HIGHLIGHTS 

7:00 BEHIND THE NEWS. An in-depth 

discussion of the day's events, 
produced by Samori Marksman. 

7:30 ECONONEWS. With Martin de 
Kadt and Rick Schrader. 

8:30 A SOLDIER'S PLAY: Charles 
Fuller. Award-winning playwright 
Charles Fuller's life and work Is ex- 
amined. His Obie-winning Soldier's 
Play , upon which the movie A Soldier's 
Story is based is included in the discus- 
sion. (Satellite) 

9:00 STOLEN MOMENTS. Jazz with 
Mahmoud Ibrahim. 

10:00 A PROFILE OF THREE 
AFRICAN-AMERICAN AND 
CARIBBEAN FILMMAKERS. A close 
look at Sinclair Bourne, US documen- 
tarian, who most recently directed The 
Making of "Do The Right Thing" , 
children's filmmaker Carmen Costeau, 
and Euzhan Paley, director of A Dry 
White Season . Produced by Rosemari 
Mealy. 

11:00 NEWS REBROADCAST 

1 1 :45 LATE NIGHT LIVE RADIO with 
Carletta J. Walker. 

1 :00 WEAPONRY. Military affairs and 
hardware with Tom Wisker. 

3:30 PUNK AND HARDCORE. Music 
with Susan Browne. 

WEDNESDAV February 28 

6:00 THE MORNING MAGAZINE with 
a guest host. 

8:00 UNDERCURRENTS 

8:30 THE MORNING SHOW continues 

9:30 GHOSTS IN THE MACHINE: 
WOMEN IN POP. The divas of pop, 
funk, punk, rap, reggae, and other good- 
for-your-soul styles, in music, scene 
reports, and interviews. With host 
Victoria Starr. 

12:00 NATURAL LIVING. Health and 
nutrition with Gary Null. 

1:00 LOOKING BACK/TOWARDS 
THE FUTURE: African-American 
History. We conclude our 30th anniver- 
sary archive special series with a special 
on Harriet Tubman. Born into slavery, 
she risked her life and freedom after 
escaping to the North by returning to 
the South 19 times, leading over 300 



men, women and children to liberty by 
means of the Underground Railway. 
Produced by Darcel King. Part Two. 

1:30 THE POSITIVE MIND with 

Armand DiMele. 

2:30 BLACKS AND EDUCATION IN 
AMERICA. A glimpse of the past, a 
study of the present, and ideas for the 
future - featuring interviews with Black 
teachers and administrators ranging 
from pre-school to college, along with 
discussions with Blacks who have trium- 
phed in various fields of endeavor and 
the difficulties they overcame. Produced 
by Mike Sargent, Albert Sargent and Bill 
Lee. 

4:00 ARE YOU READY TO ROCK? A 

discussion with African-American writer 
and performance artist Sapphire about 
her new one-woman show Are You 
Ready To Rock ? Her themes usually 
explore violence against women (includ- 
ing incest), racism, sexism and 
heterosexism. This program will explore 
each of these themes through readings 
of her poetry, music and interview. 
Produced by Valecia Phillips. 

4:30 THE WBAI ARTS MAGAZINE 

with Malika Lee Whitney. Featuring the 
Evenino Serial at 4:30, selected shorts 
at 4:45pm, Pickney Place , a program of 
storytelling at 5:00, and interviews at 
5:30. 

6:00 THE WBAI EVENING NEWS 

6:45 UNDERCURRENTS HIGHLIGHTS 

7:00 BEHIND THE NEWS. An in-depth 
discussion of the day's events, 
produced by Samori Marksman. 

7:30 EXPLORATIONS. Science and 
peace issues with Michio Kaku. 

8:30 THE CUTTING EDGE SPECIAL: 
Blacks and the West. Historian William 
Katz and producer Dred Scott look at 
the impact of African-Americans on the 
development of the US west of the Mis- 
sissippi. 

9:00 NEW YORK COLLAGE. The com- 
mon roots of all music originating in the 
Caribbean Islands, and all that it has 
grown into. Bring on the good sounds! 
Produced by Nancy Rodriguez. 

10:00 THE PERSONAL COMPUTER 
SHOW. Host, Joe King. Co-hosts, Hank 
Kee, and David Burstein. Produced in 
cooperation with the New York Amateur 
Computer Club. 

11:00 NEWS REBROADCAST 

1 1 :45 EARTHWATCH. Uve radio with 
Robert Knight. 

1 :30 CARRIER WAVE. Live radio with 
Sidney Smith. 

3:30 OUT OF THE SHADOWS. Music 
with Don Scherdin. 



WBAI 99.5 FM 



Page 19 



WHAT'S INDECENT? 



The first serious test of the Federal Communications 
Commission's authority to regulate something called 
"indecent" speech began at 2:00pm October 30, 1973, 
when WBAI broadcast a comic routine by George 
Carlin. The Supreme Court wasn't laughing when it 
heard the case five years later. Instead, it held that 
the FCC could regulate language that was not 
obscene but was "patently offensive". The form of 
regulation approved was the "channeling" of such 
material to hours when unsupervised children were 
unlikely to be exposed. For almost a decade, the 
Facifica decision was interpreted simply as a require- 
ment that the seven words featured in the Carlin 
routine (shit, fuck, piss, cunt, cocksuckcr, motherfuck- 
er and tits) could not be broadcast until after 
10:00pm. 

That standard changed abruptly on April 16, 1987, 
the next to last day in office of outgoing FCC Chair- 
man Mark Fowler. As an apparent payoff to the 
conservative groups who had called off a picket 
against his appointment, the Chairman announced 
that the Commission would no longer limit regulation 
of "indecent" speech to the post-10:00pm broadcast 
of the "seven deadly words." Instead, it would apply a 
"generic" concept of indecency at any hour when 
there was a "reasonable risk" that "children" would 
be in the audience. Indecency was now broadly 
defined as "any language or material that, in context, 
depicts or describes, in terms patently offensive as 
measured by contemporary community standards for 
the broadcast medium, sexual or excretory 
activities or organs." None of the key terms - 
children, reasonable risk, context, contemporary com- 
munity standards for the broadcast medium, patently 
offensive - were defined. Instead of explanations, the 
Commission offered three examples which violated 
its retrospectively applied new policy. Broadcasts by 
Pacifica's Los Angeles station of a play about AIDS, 
a sexually explicit song on a student-run station at the 
University of California at Santa Barbara and sexual 
innuendo in the talk-show of Philadelphia "shock- 
jock" Howard Stern were singled out as violations of 
the new policy. 

The f>olicy has been in turmoil ever since. In response 
to an appeal by Facifica, Action for Children's 
Tfelevision and other public interest groups and broad- 
cast industry representatives, a federal court of 
appeals affirmed the expanded definition of indecen- 
cy, but struck down the enforcement of that 
definition at any time except "daytime" hours. Con- 
gress responded by ordering the FCC to ban indecent 
material at any time of the day or night. The court 
stayed the ban. At present, the FCC is trying to ap- 
pease Congress by aggressively 



enforcing its indecency policy during "daytime" hours 
(6:00am to 8:00pm), while gathering information 
which will show that the broadcast media are so ac- 
cessible at all times that only a complete ban of 
indecent material can protect children from ex- 
posure. Comments in response to the Commission's 
inquiry arc due by January 19,1990. Topics on which 
comments are invited include: data on children's 
viewing and listening habits; the effectiveness of 
parental supervision; the effectiveness of technologi- 
cal barriers; and the availability of indecent materials 
from non-broadcast sources. The Commission has in- 
dicated its skepticism that any form of restriction will 
be effective and its preference for a complete ban of 
all indecent material. 

Over the past two years, "indecency," like "abortion," 
has become a code word in a heated political con- 
troversy. Congressmen have been as reluctant to 
support "indecency" as they have been to support 
"the murder of the unborn." Although the indecency 
controversy raises a host of complex legal and social 
issues, three issues are central: (1) Should the choice 
of whether or not to listen to an "offensive" but con- 
stitutionally protected form of speech be made by 
individuals and families or by the federal govern- 
ment?; (2) Is the indecency policy clear enough to 
allow a broadcast station to predict what will and will 
not be considered indecent?; and (3) Is it possible to 
justify a ban against all sexual or excretory references 
which might offend the "average broadcast listener"? 

The answer to the last question is of special impor- 
tance to stations like WBAI and other 
non-commercial stations, which try to address mem- 
bers of the population who are not "average" 
listeners. Minority groups. Gays and Lesbians and 
those interested in literature and the arts are not like- 
ly to be content with the sort of "decent" 
while-bread-and-mayonnaise programming to which 
Jesse Helms and the present FCC Commissioners 
wish to limit broadcast stations. Under the standard 
which it has proposed, the Commission maybe per- 
fectly willing to punish the late-evening broadcaster 
of a Gay play in Los Angeles, a Bessie Smith tune in 
Houston, or readings from Joyce, Burroughs or 
Ginsburg in New York in order to eliminate the pos- 
sibility that a teenager, randomly thumbing his radio 
dial in Nebraska won't be able to hear a steamy song 
by Prince. Are the voices of those who are not 
"average" that offensive? Do we really need to be 
quite so completely saved from art? 

John Crigler 

Haley, Baden & Potts 



Page 20 



\VBAI FM 99.5 



WBAI's first general manager, Mel Most, 
passed away on Saturday, January 6th. 
While I never met him, I enjoyed our 
numerous conversations on the phone 
while he was preparing his article for our 
30th anniversary issue of the Folio 
(January, 1990). He was clear-headed, 
even feisty, as he demanded that I find out 
the name of a certain volunteer (buried 
somewhere in the annals of WBAI his- 
tory) who was the driving force behind the 
early WBAI, working out of the musty 
basement of the townhouse on East 39lh 
Street. He would call to remind me that 
what he wrote could not be altered: it was 
what he believed in. Well, we believe in it 
too, and we'll go on believing in what he 
stood for - peace and justice and love and 
human dignity. It is no wonder he was our 
first manager, for he set the standards for 
all of us who follow in his giant footsteps. 

Rosemarie Reed 



llic nncclings of Ihc I^ocal Board of Dircclon 
of WRAI arc held on Ihc last lliursday of 
every month at District Council 1199, 310 W 
43rd Street, NYC at 6:30pm. If there arc any 
change in meeting time or l<x:ation, it will be 
announced frequently on the air. 

WBAI is a 50,000 watt listener-sponsored 
community radio station broadcasting to most 
of the metropolitan area of New York and 
New Jersey. Our address is: 505 8lh Avenue, 
New York, NY, 10018 (212) 279-0707. 'ITie 
station is licensed to the Pacifica Foundation 
and broadcasts at a frequency of 99.5MHz. 
SulKcriplions are available at $45yyr ($25^ 
student/senior), $2 of which underwrites the 
cost of one year's Folio subscription. The 
WBAI Folio is published 1 1 limes a year and is 
distributed to all subscribers. 

When drafting your will, plca.se consider 
making a bequest to WBAl-l'aciflca. For 
information, write or call Ro.scmarie Reed, 
Station Manager, WHAI-I'M, 505 Fighth 
Avenue, New York, NY, 10018 (212) 
279-0707 



SUBSCRIBE! 

YES. I'll support listener-sponsored WBAI! Sign me up as a subscriber and send me the 
Folio every month. My tax-deductible donation is enclosed. 

( ) Regular rate - $45/year 

( ) Student/Senior citizen rate - $25/year 

( ) Additional Donation - $ 



Name: 
Address: 
City: 
Phone: 



State: 



Zip: 



Mail to: WBAI, Box 1 2345, Church Street Station, New York, N Y 1 0249 

Make checks payable to PaciticaAVBAI 



WBAI 99.5 FM 



Page 21 








Page 22 



WBAI FM 99.5 



Report From the Listeners: 

Our Listeners' Letters 



Gentlemen of Econonews: 

tt's been a couple of days since I 
listened to the across-the-board attack 
on presumably all New York cab drivers 
broadcast over your air. 

As a cabbie, I'm sure I've heard and 
lived as many cabbie horror stories as 
anyone has over the past five years. I'm 
not vifriting to deny the bullying, crude 
conduct many cabbies display towards 
folks they deem weaker, vulnerable and 
inconvenient, such as women schlep- 
ping children. Is their conduct truly 
abnormal? I've come to expect thought- 
ful analysis on your program - is the 
deterioration of cab service a subject 
you'd like to explore? If so, I respectfully 
suggest a few avenues of exploration 
(no pun intended): 
Cabbing is no longer a job for actors 
and college students. It's mainly done 
by immigrants from oppressed 
countries - agreed? Really, look around - 
no more cafeterias with hackstands in 
midtown. These things are signs of 
deteriorating - may I say barbarous - 
working conditions. 

Murders, armed robberies and fare beat- 
ing - dozens, thousands, beyond count. 
The NY Tirnes reports dead NY cabbies 
as a footnote to a Page 1 story dateline 
Paris. 

Cabbie school - 14,000 annual 
graduates and no failures (?) 

Traffic, air quality, 12-hour-plus work 
days and stress - bad for cabbies - bad 
for carriage horses, too. 

I hope this helps you answer the rhetori- 
cal question "What's wrong with these 
cabbies?" 

Sincerely, 
Eugene J. Weixel 



Dear Slaff of WBAI... 

Thank you, thank you, thank you for 
retaining your quality attitude towards 
broadcasting. I have been a listener for 
about 20 years; not always daily or 
weekly, but I knew you were there, hold- 
ing down that 99.5 FM spot of integrity, 
The in-depth coverage of news, music. 



health etc; the superb use of the English 
language (or any other) some of you 
who have spoken from your heart of 
hearts, has made me proud to be called 
a human being. With that connecting 
thread of our unselfish selves, maybe 
we have a chance to keep our voices 
against the power-crazed leaders. 

Whether it was Habte Selassie playing 
Fela Anikulapo-Kuti's "Unknown Sol- 
dier" in the middle of the night (while 
driving over the Triboro Bridge); or 
Carletta J. Walker speaking to us of a 
personal tragedy, making me feel the 
poetry of her soul; or Delphine Blue 
playing the Gypsy Kings; or Michio 
Kaku speaking of the unspeakable, un- 
publicized events in the atmosphere; or 
Gary Null's health and nutrition class; or 
any one of you during any 24 hour 
period, you have uplifted my Being. 

So once again, thank you for keeping 
your souls alive and sharing them with 
us! 

Very Sincerely, 
Joan Grishman 



Dear Folks - 

I'm glad to hear of your improvements 
in working quarters! I worked as an FCC 
licensed radio engineer in transmitters 
of radio stations for years until the FCC 
revoked my license because they didn't 
like my union organizing, etc. 

I have been aware of the more profes- 
sional working of WBAI although I am 
still aware of your limitations, but still 
prefer you to the "smoothies." 

Very Best Wishes for 1990 
Philip Boothroyd 

ex: WJZ (AM & TV), WWRL, WPEN, 
WNAR, WHLM (I'm 91 years old) 



Dear WBAI - 

Enclosed is a check for $55.00, honor- 
ing pledge #35513. This is a duplicate 
pledge - my husband and I each made 
a pledge unbeknownst to each other • 
and we had decided to ignore the 



second, having already sent/paid the 
first. 

But, your coverage of the invasion of 
Panama over the last few days has 
reminded us just how significant and 
what a good job vou do . so we're send- 
ing in the second pledge. 

Thank you for your good work. Happy 

New Year. 

Barbara Arnn/Nick Hill 



Dear Mr. Phillips - 

Hours away from the New Year, I want 
to take this opportunity to express my 
thanks for the remarkable contribution 
WBAI makes to my work and my hope 
that WBAI continues its unique role In 
the progressive community. 

No other media outlet. Including Nation- 
al Public Radio, came close to the 
extraordinary reporting and analysis the 
station offered on the Panamanian in- 
vasion. More important, this kind of 
reporting was what we have come to 
expect and look forward to. 

As important to community and labor 
activists is WBAI's role in informing us of 
what is going on in the activist com- 
munity and particularly what is 
happening in the third world com- 
munities of this city. WBAI has become 
a truly multi-racial and multi-cultural 
advocacy station. 

Obviously, with a change in staff, wor- 
ries mount that WBAI will soften its 
advocacy and muckraking role in the 
progressive community. As a con- 
tributor both personally and through my 
union - 1 deeply hope WBAI not only 
continues BUT STRENGTHENS ITS 
COMMITMENT AND CONTRIBUTION 
TO THE PROGRESSIVE CAUSE. 

Sincerely yours, 

Miriam Thompson 
Director of Community Action 
Programs/Editor of Unity News 
Local 259. UAW 



WBAI 99.5 FM 



Page 23 




Photo Credits: 






The Atlantic Theater page 5 


Brigitte Lacombe 


John Kani 


page? 


Gerry Goodstein 


Richard Thompson 


page 11 


Hugh Brown 


Malcolm X 


page 15 


Lawrence Henry 


Stations Collective 


page 15 


Maria Perez 


James Baldwin 


page 17 


Yves Coatsilou 



Page 24 



VN'BAI 99.5 FM 



LIVE FROM THE 

EMPIRE HOTEL 



AN EVENING OF ORIGINAL RADIO DRAMA 



DAVID 



SHEL 



MAMET & SIIVERSTEIN 



DIRECTED BY 

WH. MACY 



PRODUCED BY 

PATRICIA WOLFF 




broadcast live from the Empire Hotel in New Vbrk City on WBAI-FM 99 5 

this (lerfrKftiiince was made possiblti by a Qfn»(ous granl ic The Atlantic Ihcatet Coinpanv bv TTw iwqut HoM and Mumni Ch«fnpi)qnc 









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