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WBAI 99.5 FIN 



NOVEMBER 1985 



14th Annual WBAI Crafts Fair 



The holiday season is the time of 
\'ear when we try, against all odds, 
to fcK"us on the pleasure of giving. 
The pleasure is keenest when cir- 
cumstances (plus a fiill wallet or 
good credit) [X.Tmit \'ou to select a 
gift that \oii know will delight the 
recipient. Tlie pleasure, then, should 
be compounded by spreading your 
good cheer in several directions at 
once, right? Let's show you how to 
put this theon- to the test. 

B\' shopping at the 14th Annual 
WBAI Cratts Fair, vou can give Aunt 
Tillv and VC13AI lioth a gift the\'ll 
appreciate, WliAl's eas\-. We need 
money, and your $4 d(X)r tee ($3 
with the subscriber's coupon in this 
Folio) provides us with just that. 
And now for Aunt Tilly. 

During three weeks prior to 
Christmas, Frida\' through Sunda\- 
November 29-December 1; Dec 13- 
15; and December 20-22 .some 40() 
carefully selected professional 
cr:tftspeople from all over the 
country will be gathered together at 
Coluni*iia ', 'nive'-sit;,''.s Ferris Booth 
Hall, 115th Street arid Broadway. 

Presuming that Aunt Tilly is not 
partial to velvet paintings or Worlds 
Fair memorabilia you should find 
something to please her at the Fair's 
two full floors of crafts displays, 
Replace the heirlcx^m teapot you 
smashed as a toddler with one that 
will be cherished by generations to 
come. The Fair features the wares of 
potters who work with eventhing 
from earthenware to porcelain. Per- 
haps a piece of jewelry — a classic 
brooch or some kinky earrings to 
wear slumming to the Kamikaze 
Club, if she's a gentle soul, perhaps 
a handsome silk scarf or woven 
shawl to throw across her knees. 

Okay, Aunt Tilly's taken care of. 
How about Uncle Ned? A new belt, 
wallet or vest ma\- fill the bill. A 
beautiful, handcrafted wcjoden box 
for his collection of Alf Landon 
campaign buttons may appeal. A 
ceramic beer mug or cry.stal de- 
canter to be filled with his choice of 
spirits. Lambskin moccasins or a fun 
hat will do much to ward oft' winter's 
chill. 

While you're there, you may be 
able tf) find other answers to your 
shopping list from among the hand- 
crafted clothing or decorative ob- 
jea purveyors. The seleaion is vast 
and the quality is excellent. All 
participating craftspeople must be 
cleared by a jury of their peers from 
the crafts community before they 
find a place at the Fair. 

In case your loved one eschews 
all material gifts — except books 



(not as uncommon as you might 
think! ), the Authors Table returns to 
the Crafts Fair. You can subscribe, 
renew or give a gift subscription 
and receive a book free. Keep the 
book (you de.serve a gift), or else 
.send it along to place under the 
Christmas tree or menorah. It 
the time, six or eight weeks, til the 
Folio arrives for the first time. 

Authors represented at the Fair 
include regular WBAI contributors 
such as Bill Tabb, Gary Null and 
Paul Gorman. Also available are the 
works of Noam Chomsky, Ben 
Gross, Petra Kelly, Manning Mar- 
able and Abbie Hofftnan, to name 
just a few. 

Or, if you're a little .strapped this 
N-ear, give the Fair as a gift. Treat 
someone to the Fair admission and 
let them choo.se ( and pa>' for) a gift. 
It's sure to be just what they wanted. 




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Tliere i.s enough by way of social 
criticism of the media in this issue 
of the Folio (see James Aroason's 
piece on The New York Times) so 
that this Report both can be brief 
and al.so focus on WBAI. 

The September Marathon gen- 
erated $126,545 in support from 
you our sponsors. We did have a 
goal of $150,000 predicated, per- 
haps foolishly, on what we in faa 
needed, rather than what we knew 
was possible. Nonetheless, you de- 
livered yet another resounding vote 
of confidence for independent 
community radio and for that we 
thank you. 

As you know, Oaober marked 
the beginning of cxir fi.scal year. 
During the last fi.scal year WBAI 
received $580,000 in support from 



its listeners — more than we have 
received in the last ten years. How- 
ever, this growth in income, has not 
been accompanied by much growth 
in the number of subcribers nor, 
for that matter, in the overall size of 
our listening audience. 

While a minority of our li.steners 
are paying an ever larger amount to 
keep the .station on the air, it has 
simply has not been enough to 
provide anything more than below 
subsistance wages to a much-too- 
small .staff. Nor has it been adequate 
to handle pressing equipment 
maintenance needs. Indeed, our 
aging broadcast plant has had an 
increasingly negative effea on the 
quality of our air .sound. 

What we need to do, clearly, is to 
find a wav to build audience. This 



means finding the resources the 
promote and adverti.se the best of 
our programs. And it means having 
the money to prtxluce the kinds of 
dcKumentaries, concerts, and radio 
drama that have been the hallmark 
of WBAI's .service to its communir\-. 

The management .staff is looking 
for major funding to provide the 
grt)wth that is needed and I'll report 
on our efforts shortly. But mean- 
while, you can help as well. Talk up 
the station and the programs you 
like with friends. Give gift subscrip- 
tions to friends who don't sub- 
scribe. And when we cry 'wolf 
remember that, indeed, the wolf 
frequently is at our dcxir. 

So thanks once again for keeping 
us here — and for helping us get 
from here to there. 



Review of the Press 



The following interiiew hetiiven 
WBAI's News Director, Barbara 
Day. and James Arouson. jour- 
nalist and co-founder of the Na- 
tional Guardian, was broadcast 
on September 29th. 

James Aronson: I think the resig- 
nation had to come. 

Barbara Day: James Aron.son is 
the author of .several books about 
the media and has spent his work- 
ing life as a journalist. 

JA— No person with the integrity 
and principle which Sydney Schan- 
berg certainly demonstrates could 
remain on a newspaper which 
treated him as it did. 

BD — Pete Hamiil, in the lead 
article of the current i.ssue of the 
Village Voice, quotes an announce- 
ment made late in August by Sidney 
Gruson, deputy to Times publisher 
Arthur Sulzberger. It says, after ' <>,•- 
years of writing his twice-"" 
New York column on th j 

page of the New York Times, yd- 
ney Schanberg has been asked to 
accept another assignment which is 
now under discassion. Hamiil goes 
on to note that Schanberg, who has 
.spent his adult life working for the 
New Y(3rk Times, almo.st died for 
the in.stitution in the spring of 1975, 
when he .stayed behind in Cam- 
bodia to write the stor\- of the 
Khmer Rouge conquest of Phnom 
Penh. 

JA; — The publisher insisted that 
Schanberg was not living up to the 
original idea that he had about the 
column. He said he wanted a 
column on urban affairs generally. 
Then why for Gods .sake was the 
column called "New York"? 

BD — In recounting the tale, 
Hamiil said Schanberg wanted 
more and more coverage of the 
weak, the defenseless. Schanberg, 
interviewed by the Baston Citizen, 
says he looked at the city much the 
same way he'd looked at countries 
overseas. 

JA — He wrote about the real New 
York, the people in the inner cities, 
the people who are .so terribly 
deprived, and not about the people 
who have flown out to the suburbs. 

BD — Hamiil writes ekx]uently 
that Schanberg staked out his own 
beat — the homeless, the injured, 
the casualties of the indifference 
and greed of big builders, bankers, 
and other pillars of the establish- 
ment. 

JA — More and more the Times 
has publicly identified itself with 
those interests in the city — real 
estate people, the developers, and 
the big department store owners 
and s(5 on — whom Schanberg was 
obviously offending, and I think 
that is at the root of the problem. 
I'm not even so sure it was Abe 
Rosenthal, the terrible-tempered 
Mr. Bangs him.self, who was direaly 
responsible, but there's no ques- 
tion tliat Rosenthal is the perfea 



rep.esentative of the people who 
run the Times. 

BD— The New York Times, for 
generations of New Yorkers, was 
the paper of record. It was ordered 
in cit\' high schools, and .students in 
the Fifties and Sixties were told that 
reading the New York Times from 
cover to cover every day for four 
years was great preparation for 
college, if not indeed the equivalent 
of four years of college itself The 
paper has influenced the lives of 
many who praaice journalism in 
the cit\' today, and .so there is a note 
of .sadness when speaking about the 
paper's shift to the right. Aron.son 
says there's been a steady drift 
toward the neocon.servative ap- 
proach. 

JA — I think the New York con- 
.servatism manifests itself especiallv 
in the cultural coverage of the New 
York Times, the kind of people 
they've been hiring, but not alone 






,Cl^^^.i^^'..^' 










there. I think in its foreign coverage, 
with the acquisition of Shirley 
christian, who is probably the 
dream repwrter for the people whe 
are trying to overthrow the govern- 
ment of Nicaragua, the patent dis- 
mis.sal of Raymond Bonner, who.se 
coverage of Latin America was .so 
good. . . 

BD— Pete Hamiil mentions Wil- 
liam Buckley, Irving Kristol, and 
Norman Podhoretz as militants 
against Schanberg. 

JA — Neocoaservatism covers an 
awfiil lot of sins. There are a lot of 
people among the neoconserva- 
tives who once were in the left or 
regarded them.selves as of the left, 
and have departed from the left 
while pretending to do it with a 
measure of regret. It's not regret on 
their part, it's opportunism and 



greed and grasping, and that's what 
I think is the terrible spirit that Ls 
moving into the American cultural 
scene, which I think has to be 
resisted at all ca,sts. 

BD — ^And part of that resistance, 
according to Aron.son, is public 
support for progressive journalism. 
He also outlined the importance of 
the New York Times in the arena of 
government. 

JA — The Times has always been 
the leader, so to speak. I recall 
during the time of the Cuban crisis, 
the Bay of Pigs, when certain news- 
papers withheld information, as the 
Times did, and then finally the 
Times had to break the news, and 
other papers followed suit. And 
they did it becau.se the New York 
Times did it. And I recall President 
Kennedy's classic remark to Turner 
Catledge, the former executive edi- 
tor of the New York Times, whom 
he was chiding for disclosing cer- 
tain information about the Bay of 
Pigs plans, and Catledge said, "Well, 
other newspapers have printed this 
material, " and the President said, 
"Well, you know, Turner, it's not 
news until it appears in the New 
York Times." 

BD — Profes.sor James Aron.son 
has authored .several b(X)ks on the 
media. He resigned from the New 
York Times in 1948 to cofound the 
national weekly Guardian. I'm Bar- 
bara Da\-, Pacifica News, New York. 



WBAI Program 
Publicity 

Imagine 110 million people tun- 
ing into WBAI to catch the latest 
word about the most current burn- 
ing issue. A bit farfetched, right? Yet 
it's less than 50% of the U.S. popula- 
tion. We would like to tell as many 
people as p<issible about WBAI 
programs of sp)ecial interest. By 
publicizing programs using means 
other than its own airwaves WBAI 
can reach a larger and broader 
audience. A larger audience means 
that not only will more people hear 
what we have to say, but more 
people will support our right to say 
it (and thus your right to hear it). 

We are trying to establish a net- 
work of volunteers to distribute 
handbills in their neighborhood, 
.schools and workplaces. In the 
weeks before a special program is 
aired, handbills would be .sent to 
the volunteers. The volunteers in 
turn would get the flyers up in their 
areas. This way we can alert large 
numbers of people, both listeners 
and non-listeners, to special pro- 
grams that might be of interest to 
them. Then we could sit back and 
wait for the multitudes to tune in. If 
you can help get flyers up and out 
please give Folio editor Marjorie 
Waxman a call at 279-0707. 

Greg Schmitz 



f 



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Orson Wells: An Appreciation 




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ByJ().seph Hurley 

George Orson Weiie.s, the Middle 
We,stern American genius for whom 
the term "enfant terrible" might 
almost seem to have heen coined, 
was found dead in his bed in Hol- 
ly-w(X)d in the early hours of the 
morning of Thursday, Oaober 10. 
Hollyw(X)d had neither undensttxxi 
him nor loved him. He was a few 
months into his 7ist year, and his 
300-pound frame, racked by dia- 
betes and an overtaxed hean, had 
simply thrown in the towel on a life 
charaaerizd by excess. His was an 
existence of t(X) much brandy, t(X) 
many cigars, too many lohsters, 
and, on a vastly more profound 
level, t(X) much talent, genuine and 
golden talent, in far t(X) many areas. 
Of tho.se talents, acting, writing, 
prixJucing, direaing, and all the 
rest, nowhere were more of them 
put to better, more original use than 
in radio, a medium with the power 
to unleash the human imagination, 
indeed, the human spirit itself, and 
let it soar beyond the limited 
capabilities of an\' stage designer 
wh(3 ever lived and even the most 
visionan' cinematographer imagin- 
able. 

Among Welles' earliest ventures 
into the world of radio was a seven- 
pan adaptation of Viaor Hugo's 
tragic novel, /.ev Misenih/es, which 
ran froin Jul\- 23 through .Septem- 
ber 3, 193'', when Orson Welles was 



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Here's Help 

for those breaking 
away from religion! 

Call the 
Freethought Hotline: 

Christians 
Anonymous 

608-256-8900 

Just as Alcoholics 
Anonymous helps 
recovering alcoholics, so 
Christians Anonymous 
helps those breaking 
away from religion. For 
free literature, reading 
lists, even q freethought 
pen pal call or write 
Freethought Today, P.O. 
Box 750, Madison, Wl 
53701 . 



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just rwent>'-tw() years of age. Welles, 
of course, played Jean Valjean, the 
luckless theif hounded for decades 
by the unrelenting and cruel In- 
spector Javen, a role undertaken for 
the (Kcasion by Martin Gabel. A 
glance at the list of aaors Welles 
had involved in his l.es Miserahles, 
offers a preview of the roster which 
would long continue to grace the 
Mercury Theatre On tlie Air, and 
eventually ever\- HolK-wfxjd en- 
deavor the flamboyant prodigy 
from Kenosha, Wi.sconsin, would 
ever achieve. In addition to Gabel, 
there were Riiy Collins, Alice Fro.st, 
Agnes Mcx)rehead, Hiram Sherman 
and Everette .Sloane. 

Welles' first radio appearance 
was as an aaor, in a 1934 NBC 
production entitled "Panic," and for 
the next two years he made fre- 
quent appearances, again as an ac- 
tor, in the NBC series "The March of 
Time." In ensuing seasons, he nar- 
rated a long-forgotten CBS series 
called "Musical Reveries, ' made ap- 
pearances in a CBS prcxiuaion of 
Shakespeare's "Hamlet, " and in the 
same network's .series, "The Ctjlum- 
bia Workshop. " For NBC, he guest- 
starred on 'The Edgar Bergen and 
Charlie McCarthy Show " in 1936. 

The ven- ne.xt year. Orson Welles 
took on the role of Lamont Cran- 
ston in the series, The Shadow, " 
and performed it while he adapted 
and planned his .se\'en-part Hugo 
adaptation, still .somehow finding 
time for several "Cavalcade of 
America" appearances, and .some 
work in something called ".Stream- 
lined Shakespeare. 

But it was the following \ear, in 
193H, when Orson Welles' greatest, 
and, without question, most notori- 
ous radio ad\'enure tcxik place. It 
was. of course, his produaion of 
Howard Koch s adaptation of H.G. 
Wells' "The War of the Worlds " 

It's well enough to know that the 
adaptation of >0('ells' 1898 novel. 
l">roadca.>it on the Eve ot HaJIcrwe en. 
Octoh)er 30, 1938, plunged much of 
the nation into a state of near panic. 
It was a CBS produaion b\ tlie 
newly formed Mercur\- Theatre. 
The name had been pinched from a 
then-popular magazine. The Ameri- 
can Mercury, a cop\- of which hap- 
pened to be present in the Snedens 
Landing hou.se where Welles and 
John Houseman, who would be- 
come the young genius' panner 
and principal producer, planned 
their fledgling company. 

There is a brief passage in House- 
man's book. RiinTbrotigb," which 



perhaps entifies as succinaly as any 
writer ever will the preci.se qualities 
Orson Welles brought to radio, the 
traits which made him great and at 
the same time rendered him vul 
nerable in the extreme. "For Welles, 
as I have .said," writes Houseman, 
"was first and foremost, a magician 
whose panicular talent lay in his 
ability to stretch the familiar ele- 
ments of theatrical effea far beytjnd 
their normal point of tension. For 
this rea on, his prcxiuctioas required 
more areftil preparation and more 
perfea e ecution than most; like all 
complicated magic tricks, they re- 
mained, till the last moment, in a 
state of precarious balance." 

Even ater he turned to the movies, 
Welles' talent was still very much 
gift for great s(jund, a point made b\ 
Francois Truffaut, another great and 
humane talent lost to the world 
within the last dozen months. In his 
foreword to Andre Bazin's book 
Orson Welles. A Critical Vieiv, Truf- 
faut wrote: 'His radio experience 
taught him ne\'er to leave a film in 
repo,se, to set up aural bridges from 
one .scene to the next, making u.se 
of music as no one had before him, 
to capture or .stimulate awareness, 
to play with the volume of voices at 
least as much as the words. Which is 
why — independenth- of the great 
visual pleasures they afford us — 
Orson Welles' films also make mar- 
velous radio broadcasts: 1 ha\e ver- 
ified this be recording all of them 
on cas.settes, which I listen to in m\- 
bathrcx)m with ever renewed de- 
light.' 

Truffaut s wn- linle fcxjtnote must 
sureh- have pleased the lumbering 
giant from Wisconsin, the man who 
signed off on all of his radio broad- 
casts as "Your obedient servant. 
Orson Welles." 



FRIED 
HERSHKOWITZ 

Host of "Home Fries" 
will DJ any events: 
Party, Wedding, Bar 
Mitzvah, etc. 
Great Dancing Music, 
Intelligent Selections 



oOpi^^ 



Beau 
you 

can be 

and 

do 
away 

with 
ROTC 

Is there an ROTC unit on 
your high school or college 
campus? Or is one on its 
way? If so, contact the War 
Resisters League's ROTC 
Clearinghouse for organiz- 
ing information. 

Dl am interested in getting rid of the 
Army/Navy/Marine Corps/Air Force 

ROTC at 

college/high school. 

DEnclosed is $5 for your 'ROTC 
Dismantling Kit." 



Name . 



Organization . 
Address 



City_ 
State. 



.Zip. 



Phone(s) 

Mail to: WAR 



RESISTERS 
LEAGUE 

339 Lafayette St.. NYC, NY 10012 



Announcing the WBAI 
25th Anniversary Dances 

GUEST DJs-FOOD-DRINKS 

THE FIRST SATURDAY OF EVERY MONTH IN 1985 



O 



^ 



Nov. 2, 9pm 
Kate Borger, deejay 

at 

Taller Latino Americano 
19 W. 21st Street 
Admission: $7 at door 
For nnore information call 
(212) 279-0707 weekdays 







% 




it 



Join Us at The Conference 
On Socialism and Activism 

New York City Dec. 6, 7, 8 

Teachers College, Columbia University, 120th St. and Broadway 

Co-sponsored by The Guardian, 
The Nation, The Progressive, WBAI-FM 

KEYNOTE SPEAKERS 

Sidney Lens, Senior Editor, Progressive Magazine 
Rev. William Sloan Coffin, Jr., Riverside Church 
Prof. George Wald, Nobel Laureate 
Barbara Ehrenreich, Co-Chairperson, DSA 
Dr Michio Kaku, Nuclear Physicist 
Representative from African National Congress 

Our Movement Is At A Critical Juncture 
Where Do We Go From Here? 

* Network with Socialists and Activists 

* Strategize to Build the Movement 

* Develop Organizing Skills 

STEERING COMMITTEE 

Sidney Lens Carolyn Kazdin 

Barbara Koeppel Michio Kaku 

Joe Miller 





ENDORSERS 




Salvador Luria 


David McReynolds 


Frank Collins 


Sidney Peck 


John Gerassi 


John Trinkl 


Barbara Ehrenreich 


Norma Becker 


Peter Dawidowicz 


Maggie Feigin 


Mel Beinenfeld 


Bogdan Denitch 


William Shakalis 


Richard Falk 


Conrad Lynn 


Stanley Aronowitz 


George Wald 


Dan LaBotz 


Richard Fernandez 


Jack O'Dell 


Erwin Knoll 


Diane Feeley 


William Sloan Coffin, Jr. 


Sidney Gluck 


Kim Moody 


Don Doumakes 


Loren Shumway 


Irving Beinin 


Anthony Mazzocchi 


Saul Mendlovitz 


R.L. Norman 


Carolyn Toll 


Z. F. Lane 


Norman Soloman 


Leslie Cagin 
Studs Terkel 


Connie Hogart 


For More Information Call (2 1 2) 408-3394 




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Zip 


Enclosed find: D $7 


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Mail to 


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STAFF 



DEPTS 

ADMINISTRATIVE STAFF 
John J. Simon (general manager), Mar- 
jorie Waxman (assistant general man- 
ager), Rick Harris (aaing interim pro- 
gram direaor), Gloria George (txx)k- 
keeper) Kofi Pendergras,s (volunteer 
ccxjrdinator), Fred Kuhn (receptionist), 
Passifica (meowLst), Allen Markman (sub- 
scripdonVoomputing). Dennis Coleman. 

WBAI LOCAL BOARD 
Margaret-Carmen Ashhurst, Mordecai 
Bauman, Roben Bloom. Zala Chandler, 
Marilyn Clement, Theodore Conant, 
Renee Farmer, Kathy Goldman, Oscar 
Hanigsberg, Maria De Lourdes Hinoj- 
hasa, Kenneth Jenkins, Richard Perez, 
Steve Post, Canl Ramer, Rosemarie 
Reed, Milton Zisman. 

NEWS 

Deborah Beagle, Christopher J, Bille, 
Jenny Bourne, Boukan Collins, Bar- 
bra Day (Director), Tra\ is T. Hipp 
(commentary), Robert Knight, Andy 
Lanset, Danny Lehreckc, Julie Light, 
David Merron (overseas correspond- 
ent), Sally O'Brien, Gene Palumbo (Ei 
Salvador), Judy Shimmel, Ingrid Stur- 
gis, Becky Thorne, Freddy Washing- 
ton. 

PUBLIC AFFAIRS 

Jim Aronson, John Atlas, Richard Barr, 
Dave Burstein, Dennis Coleman, An- 
drew Cooperjoe Cuomo, Diane De- 
corah, Maarten DeKadt, Vernon Doug- 
las, Bob Eng, Fred Goldhaber, Amy 
Goodman, Davis Gordon, Mark Green, 
Joan Greenbaum, Ken Grossinger, Ron 
Habin, Lorraine Hale, Allen Hershko- 
witz, Lex Hixdn, Paul Hoeffel, Gerald 
Home, Linda Johnson, Carolvn Jung, 
Michio Kaku, Judith Kallas, Kathy Ann 
Kersey, Joe King, Hank Kee, Utrice 
Lieds, Marvin Lynch, Allan Markman, R 
Paul Martin, Bob McDonald, Paul Mc- 
Isaac, David Mendelson, Ruth Messin- 
ger, Dave Metzger (direaor), Jim Mon- 
tavalli, Santiago Nieves, Benell Oilman, 
Bob O'Sullivan, Alex Paul, Andrew Phil- 
lips, Rosemarie Reed, Al Rivera, Maurice 
Rosen, Mimi Rosenberg, David Rothen- 
berg, Kirkpatrick Sale, Richard Schrader, 
Ruth Shereff, Fred Siegal, Jim SLeeper, 
Sidney Smith, Barbara Solow, David 
Sprintzen, William Tabb, Rod Taylor, 
Edith Tiger, Tqm Wisker. 

INTERNATIONAL AFFAIRS 
Lotsu Amenuvor, Max Antoine, Mary 
Boger, Elombe Brath, Lloyd D'Agui- 
lar Daniel del Solar. Geoffrey Fox, 
Gerald Home, Angela Gilliam. Bar- 
bara Juppe, Lisa Knaucr Kathy Ann 
Ker.sey, Samori Marksman, John Ma- 
son, John McDonough, Blossom Ncu- 
.schatz, Sam Neu.schat^. Victor Pcrlo. 
Liston Pope, Sheldon. Ranz, Mimi 
Rosenberg, Sheila Ryan. Stuart 
-Schaar. Valerie Van Isler. Ralph Vega. 
Jr.. Gloria Waldman, Annette 
Walker (director), Abe Weisburg, 
Tom Whelan. 



Seidman, Jack Shugg, Laura Simms, 
Anthony Sloan, Sidney Smith, Susan 
Stone, Jord\n T\son. Tom Vitale, Joyce 
West, Anne Sergeant W<X).ster, Elizabeth 
Zimmer. 

MUSIC 

John Bello, Hernando Alvaricci, Al An- 
geloro, Richard Barr, Cynthia Bell, Peter 
B<Khan, Kate Borger, Susan Browne, 
Bill Canaday, The Laughing Cavalier, 
Ted Cohen, Kenny Davis, Barbara De- 
Mauro, Vernon LXiuglas, YALE Evelev, 
Bill Farrar, Regina Fiorito, Sharon Grif- 
fiths, Edward Haber, Mahmoud Ibrahim, 
James Irsay, Chet Jackson, Dave Kenne\', 
Fred Kleinke, Paul Laz^arus, Man\'a (aa- 
ing music direaor), Mickey Meiendez, 
Courtne\' Monroe, Bill Moore, David 
Nolan, Mildred Norman, Kofi Pender- 
grass, Tom Pompasello, Tom Pniew.ski, 
Sue Radacovsky, Pat Rich, Spencer 
Richards, Don Scherdin, Max Schmid, 
Peter Seeger, Habte Selassie, Jack Shugg, 
Sidney Smith, Martin Sokol, Jim Th«> 
bald, Jordyn Tyson, Chris Whent, Paul 
Wunder. 

LIVE RADIO 

Margot Adler, Richard Barr, Dennis 
Coleman, Joe Cuomo, Bob Pass, Mike 
Feder, John Fisk, Jim Freund, Paul 
Gorman, Fred Herschkowitz, Marv Hous- 
ton, Isaac Jackson, Citizen Kafka, Robert 
Knight, Fred Kuhn, Alan Levanthal, 
Diane Lacey, Simon Loekle, Leonard 
Lopate, Sharon Manlin, Kathy O'Con- 
nell, David Rothenberg, Lynn Samuels, 
Habte Selassie, Sidnev Smith, Bemard 
White, Paul Wunder. 



DRAMA, LITERATURE AND ART 
Jan Alben, Alina Avila, Rachel Berghash, 
Joe Bev, Peter Bochan, Dolores Bran- 
don, Doreen Canto, Ceal Coleman, Den- 
nis Coleman, Joe Cuomo, David D'Arcy, 
Marjorie DeFazio, Martha Dodge, Ver- 
non Douglas, Suzie Drews, Stephen 
Erickson, Mike Feder, John Fisk, Sela 
Francis, Jim Freund, Phil Garfinkel, 
Charlie Gilbert, Sharon Griffiths, Ed- 
ward Haber, Rick HarrLs (direaor), Jo- 
seph Hurlev, Isaac ladtson. EL. lames, 
Lauren Krenzel, Manya La Bmja, Cid 
Kafka. Katy Keiffer, Oleg Kerensky, Si- 
mon Loekle, Sharon Mattlin, Diane Mor- 
ris, Charlie Morrow, Mike Nelson,Joanna 
Ney, Kathy O'Connell, Max Schmid, Cliff 



WOMEN S DEPT 

Cynthia Bell, Jennie Bourne, Loretta 
Campbell, Doreen Canto, Blanche 
Cook, Katherine Davenport, Amy 
Goodman, Maxine Gowcr, Sharon 
Grifflths (Director), Susan Hcskc, 
Gladys Horton, Rose Jordan, Kama- 
do. Kathy Ker.sey. Lauren Krenzel, 
Diane Mancino, Maryannc Napoli, 
Judic Pasternak, Jane Pipj|<. Rosemary 
Reed. Pai Rich, Viv Sulherlanci, Paula 
Tedesco. Jordyn T\-son. 

ANNOUNCERS 

Doreen Canto, Michael Cokkinos, Den- 
nis Coleman, Boukan Collins, Ken 
Davis, Daniel Finton, Jime Freund, John 
Fisk, Sharon Griffiths, Edward Haber, 
Judy Harrow, Chet Jackson, Fred Kuhn, 
RtKCO Lovascio, R. Paul Manin, Sharon 
Mattlin, Ptrickl McGuire, David Nolan, 
Kathy O'Connell, Bill O'Neill (chief an- 
nouncer), Jos.seph Oliva, Bob Parrett, 
Alex Paul, Kofi Pendergrass, Sue Rada- 
covsky, Don Scherdin, Sidney Smith, 
Tom Tortorella, Anthony Sloan, Paul 
Williams, Tom Wisker. 

ENGINEERING 

Adam Brand, Natalie Budelis, Dennis 
Coleman, Ken Davis, Stephen Erickson, 
Daniel Finton (recording engineer). 
John Fisk, Dean Gallea, Edward Haber. 
Dana B. Hanford.Jr., R. Paul Manin, Bill 
O'Neill (produaion direaor). Bob Par 
rett, Jane Pipik, Sue Radacov.sk\' ( record- 
ing engineer), Peter Shuler ( recording 
engineer). Miles Smith (studio techni- 
cian), Viv Sutherland, Bill Wells (chief 
engineer), Paul Wunder. 



FOLIO 

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Adler, Bob Campbell, Fine/Design 
Typesetting, RCI Graphics, Roberts & 
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Listen to a great WBAI half hour 

CONSIDER THE ALTERNATIVES 

A sparkling program of international, pd'rtk^al smd domestic interviews 
and comment, featuring among others Senators Ted Kennedy, Tom 
Harkin, Congressmen Ted Weiss, Ron Dellums, Ed Martey and Jessie 
Jackson, Jane Fonda, Ben Spock, William Sloane Coffin anA Marcus 
Raskin. Sponsored by Sane Education Fund. 

NY. SANE PEACE COUNCIL 

225 Ufayette St., Room 207, N.Y.C. 1(X)12 (212) 219-9527 



Personal Thanks From the 
Personal Computer Show 



The Personal Computer Show 
would like to thank the many 
people who made the marathon a 
success, with particular gratitude to 
Misino, Fox and (teller Inc., Life- 
boat Associates, Software Toolworks, 
Microsystems Journal, Lotus Devel- 
opment Corporation and Marc 
Schnapp. And of course the New 
York Amateur Computer Club and 



the many volunteers who came by 
to help. 

And we still have available a 
phenomenal offer for a small to 
medium-sized business — the IBM 
Business Management Series pro- 
gram which includes: a full account- 
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counts receivable, general ledger, 
payroll, order entry, inventory, as 



well as interaaive training mod- 
ules. This package normally sells for 
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and True compatibles. We're asking 
for a $1,(XX) tax-deductible dona- 
tion to WBAI. For further informa- 
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FOLIO UNCLASSIFIFDS Send tvped 
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BAREFOOT BOOGIE -freestyle danc- 
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MOVED! But we didn't know our new 
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THE GOOD MEDICINE WAY, a Nu- 
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and "Natural People." Sample copy 
$1.00 to: Najiiwea Disogonihi, 77 
Park Terrace East, D38, New York, 
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NICE GUY, 30; has had limited dance 
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Debuts 

BAD HABITS 

Saturday, Novemlaer 9 & 23 at 4 PM 
Peter Jon Schuler and Joseph 
Hurley present a free-form collage 
drawn from their lives, their loves, 
their work and their experiences 
growing up. in the Middle West, 
leaving home in search of a larger 
world, and finding careers in 
Europe and New York, all of it set 
against the music of their times, the 
songs and the melodies that pro 
vided the sound tracks for the.se 
similar journeys made along related 
pathways, but traveled a generation 
apart. 

Highlights 

CONTINl!ED TOMORROW 
Weekdays at 11 :30 AM 
Beginning November 3, a serialized 
reading of Mark Twain's Life on the 
Mississippi." 

VOICES FROM THE HEART ... 

MUSIC FROM THE MEN S MOVE 

MENT 

Tuesday, November 5 at 2 PM 

La.stjune, the National Organization 



of Changing Men sponsored their 
10th Annual Conference on Men 
and Masculinity in St. Louis, and this 
this included four days of speeches, 
workshops, organizing, coascious- 
ness-raising . . . and music! Two 
major conceas during the confer- 
ence featured men and women 
performers whose songs celebrate 
the changes going on in men's lives 
as they redefine masculinity and 
their relationships with women, 
children, and other men. Presented 
by Lou Giansante. 

OUT THERE ON THERE OWN: 
ROBERT CAZIMERO. 

Thursday-, November ^^ at 2:30 PM 
A galaxy of musical .stars shines over 
Hawaii but is relatively little know 
in the Continental US. In this in- 
terview, Robert Cazimero describes 
the ways in which his life informs 
his performance art, and what limits 
are at work when a Hawaiian star 
attempts to find a broader audi- 
ence. This program includes a wide 
variety of contemporan,' Hawaiian 
music, including the Beamer 
Brothers, Loyal Garner, Carole Kai 
and the late Kui Lee. Produced by 
Jo.seph Hurle\ and Peter John 
Schuler. 

THE PIPER IN THE MEADOW 



Details 



STRAYING 

Thursdav, November 7 & 14 at 8:30 
PM 

Concert night at Hunter College in 
July 1984 was one to remember 
with two French musical acts, and 
both are heard on WBAI this month. 
On Nov. 7 — the French rt)ck group 
Malicorne, one of the more interest- 
ing and innovative French groups 
to have merged traditional music 
with contemporary' influences. 
Then, on Nov. 14 — Dan Ar Bras, 
who once was a member of Fairport 
convention, and who has recorded 
several discs of his own .songs in 
recent years. Both programs were 
recorded (digitally) by Miles Smith 
with Sue Radacovsky and produced 
for radio by Edward Haber. 

AN INFORMAI. HOUR WITH 
JEANNE MOREAL; 
Wednesday, November 13 at 9 PM 
With Jeanne Moreau about to open 
c^n Broadway in a revival of Tennes- 
see W'illiams' "The Night of the 
Iguana," WBAI re-runs its exclusixe 
study of the famed French actress, 
first broadcast in June of this year. 
Mile. Moreau speaks of life, love 
and the death of her friend and 
colleague, Francois Truffaut. Selec- 



tions of her music is also featured. 

MEDIA RE^VIEW 

Monday, November 18 & 25 at 1 PM 
Politics were conspicuous at this 
year's New Music .Seminar, the 6th 
■ Annual gathering of the pop, rock 
and new age music industry. On 
1 1/18 hear about apartheid and the 
music industry. On 11/25 hear 
excerpts from the seminar featuring 
Frank Zappa, commenting on put- 
ting rating .stickers on albums — is it 
censorship? Produced by Dennis 
Bernstein. 

AMBIGUOUS LEGACY: JOHN KEN- 
NEDY AND THE AMERICAN 
CONDITION. 

Friday, November 22, 8 pm. 
Twenty-rwo years have pas.sed since 
the death of President John F. 
Kennedy. The Kennedy years are 
remembered, rightly or wrongly, as 
a special time — an era of unparal- 
leled optimism, idealism, trust in 
government and national self-con- 
fidence. Many ob.servers view the 
sudden, violent terminatitjn of the 
Kennedy' presidency as a watershed 
e\ent, signaling die end of Ameri- 
can innocence and the beginniiig of 
a new and turbulent decade. A 
ct)ntentious debate has ari.sen over 
President Kennedy's true political 



characier and direaion, and 
whether his deatli should be .seen 
as a 'sen.seless " tragic act of fate, or 
as an event with political signifi- 
cance which altered the course of 
American history. This documen- 
tary examines in a comprehensive 
and dispassionate way what his 
brief presidency and its shcxrking 
end really means. The be.st way to 
understand many of the most criti- 
cal issues and problems of today, 
such as the arms race and U.S. 
intervention in Latin America, is by 
tracing their roots in the Kennedy 
era. 

Produced by Rosemarie Reetl and 
Larry Schlossman. 
(This show was originally broadcast 
on WBAI in November, 1983). 

RELIGIOUS FUNDAMENTALISM IN 
THE MIDDLE FAST 
Wednesday, November 27 at 9 PM 
Religious fundamentali.sm — Islam- 
ic, Jewish, and Christian — has be- 
come a significant taaor in Mideast 
politics. This program explores 
what tensions in the various scxie- 
ties have given rise to this phe- 
nomenon, and what effect funda- 
mentalist movements are having on 
that volatile region. Produced by 
Sheila Ryan, Nubar Housepian, and 
Stuart Scharr. 




Roland and Robert Cazimero, Hawaiian Superstars 



Amos Oz 



Ruins 



Rachel Berghash is a poet and tran.s- 
lator who produces a monthly 
poetry program entitled A World 
Elsewhere on 'WBAI. Her guest this 
month is the distinguished Israeli 
author Amos Oz. In preparation for 
this program she came across the 
following pro.se piece she had writ- 
ten several years ago. 

This rainy aftern(»n in New York 
is conducive to memories and sad 
thoughts. I leaf through a magazine 
and a color photograph attracts my 
attention. Israeli soldiers are hold- 
ing Palestinian prisoners near a 
coastal village in .south Lebanon. 
The .soldiers' faces are bewildered, 
their movements hesitant, not 
forceful or triumphant as one might 
expea. 

Until the age of eighteen the.se 
young Israelis spend their time 
hiking in the mountains, playing 
musical instruments, .studying and 
having ideological discussions. 
Suddenly this changes. They are 
sent to army camps for training, 
where they yield to sweat and du,st, 
and an incessant thought of death. 

Mothers of these .soldiers, in spite 
of unthinkable anxiety, guide them 
to be courageous. Some of these 
mothers were classmates of mine. I 
see them on my frequent visits to 
Israel. We talk about education, and 
psychoanalysis, and philo-sophize 
about relationships and marriage. 
Chaya, who teaches mathematics, 
was the prettie.st and the mo.st 
studious. She minded being .short, 
but I envied her, small .stature and 
all, Dina, who rjns a school of 7(X), 
wore such large ribbons in her hair 



that if you sat behind her you 
couldn't .see the blackboard. There 
was Sara, a daredevil, who is raising 
a family of four. I once called her for 
help, when a fish my mother had 
put in the bathtub jumped out, and I 
was too squeamish to pick it up. 
And Zehava, who at the age of 
fourteen could di.scu.ss b(X)ks with 
the sophistication of a worldly 
critic; every day after school we 
would stand at the corner of our 
street and talk with deep convic- 
tion. The.se women who played 
games endlessly, who giggled at 
boys, who felt empathy for each 
other, who were affeaionate and 
frivolous, now have innumerable 
dialogues with God — about death. 

I look at the magazine photo 
again. The Palestinians are blind- 
folded. The movements of their 
bodies and heads indicate fear. 
Might they be children of an Arab 
family I once visited? 

My family lived in Jerusalem 
where my father owned a stationery 
store. He had a cu.stomer who lived 
in Ramallah, an Arab town nearby. 
When I was about eleven, this man 
invited us to come and visit his 
family. The bus we went on be- 
longed to an Arab company, and 
only commuted between Arab vil- 
lages and towns. When my parents 
and I .sat on the bus I felt a strange 
excitement, like when I read a novel 
about French coal miners, or when 
1 .saw a movie about life in New 
Orleans. 

I felt privileged. None of my 
friends ever visited people in an 
Arab town, and none of their pa- 
rents could relate to Arabs with the 



ease that my father did. My father, 
who was born in the old city of 
Jerusalem, was fond of the Arabs 
and liked to do business with them. 
He never tired of telling me how, at 
the beginning of the Arab-Israeli 
war in 1948, an Arab cu.stomer who 
lived in Jordan and cjwed him 
money managed to return the debt 
through opposing lines. 

On the way to Ramallah we 
pas.sed a number of Arab villages. 
Except for some scattered olive 
trees and small squarish houses, the 
land was bare. But there was a 
unique beauty to these villages. A 
beauty you might expect in a place 
where hermits communicate with 
heavenly spirits. Not the beauty of a 
Jewish farm, green and produaive, 
of the beauty of a European village 
where custom and religion prevail. 
This was a beauty of a land lying in a 
soft, warm and carefree slumber. A 
strong light was unfolding as the 
bus went by: a light, like a Sufi 
dance, transcending rites and laws 
and moral precepts. At each stop my 
heart leaped. How I craved to leave 
the bus and run in tho.se thorny, 
yellow and strange fields! To enter 
these Arab homes, perhaps .stay 
there for a while. I was sitting next 
to my mother wh(j was wearing a 
green summer dre.ss to match her 
reddish hair and fair skin. My father 
was chatting with some Arabs. He 
spoke Arabic fluently, and was al- 
ways pleased to demonstrate it. He 
would then tell me of the Arab's flair 
for flattery, and how they would 
praise the beauty of my mother. 

When we finally arrived in Ramal- 
lah, the hills and hou.ses were 



tinged with a deep blue. I thought 
of Abraham and Sara and how they 
greeted the travelers who turned 
out to be angels. In this case, we 
were like Abraham and Sara, and 
the Arab family were the angels, 
who upon meeting us showered us 
with blessings. My parents spent the 
afternoon chatting with them on tlie 
terrace, while I kept running around 
in circles with their children. And 1 
remember that all that time their 



faces were lit with friendliness. 

It is .still raining here. Riverside 
Park is empty. Soon the trees will 
bud and the park will fill with young 
people, who will play and stroll by 
the river. I look at the photo again: 
the earth is laden with ruins; the sun 
is beating at the faces of the soldiers 
and prisoners; and there are no 
olive trees, nor blue hills, nor musi- 
cal instruments. 



BROADSIDE 



TrZ'^^:, 



THE NATIONAL TOPICAL |^?M\j^^^1 
SONG MAGAZINE ^»5^' ^^^ 

^ .<^'' Victor Jara .^/>^ . --- 




i Voed 



• 15-20 songs each month, lyrics & music 

• poems, articles, reviews, Tuli Kupierberg 

• special issues: Lee Hays Tribute, Phil Ochs, Latin America, 
Third World, Native Americans. Children's Songs, etc. 



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