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Full text of "WBAI folio"

NOVEMBER 1986 




15th annual WBAI Holiday Crafts Fair set 
for three weekends prior to Christmas 

The 15th Annual WBAI Holiday Crafts Fair, the oldest 
and largest Winter crafts market place in America, will 
be taking place during the three weekends immediately 
prior to Christmas, Friday through Sunday, December 
5-7, 12-14 and December 19-21. 

As always, the WBAI Crafts Fair will be taking place in 
Columbia University's Ferris Booth Hall (the home of this 
event for the last decade), which is located at 115th Street 
and Broadway in Manhattan. The Fair is open to the 
public on Fridays from 5:00 to 9:00 p.m., and from Noon 
to 7:00 p.m. each of the three Saturdays and Sundays. 




Over 300 carefully-selected professional craftspeople 
from over 30 states — selected from over 2,000 applicants 
— will be displaying and selling their own handmade 
work. The two full floors of crafts will feature shopping 
items and gift ideas to tempt everyone, including: ceram- 
ics, jewelry, handmade wearables, leather, blown glass, 
woodworking, homefurnishings and housewares, musi- 
cal instruments, basketry, quilts and tapestries, and much 
more. Fantasy or practical, there will be work for every 
age, taste and pocketbook (prices range from $1.50 up to 
the many thousands of dollars). There will be different 
craftspeople exhibiting each of the weeks of the show, so 
each Fair will be a different visual and shopping experi- 
ence! 

Many rare and diverse crafts will also be represented at 
this year's Fair, including pewter, handmade puppets and 
marionettes, bookbinding, scrimshaw (carving on bone 
and ivory), wood and metal kaleidoscopes, blown glass, 
fiber and paper jewelry, musical instruments (guitars, 
dulcimers, flutes, whistles, African melodic slit drums 
and ocarinas), handmade reproductions of 17th Century 
scientific instruments (telescopes, sun dials, barometers, 
and so on), paper masks and wall hangings, metal fire- 
place equipment, brooms and feather dusters, wooden 
miniature replicas of early model cars, and much more. 
In addition to the many thousands of handmade crafts 
for sale at the 15th Anual WBAI Holiday Crafts Fair, 
there will be assorted homemade foods, desserts, and re- 
freshments available. Live entertainment will be provided 
by the comedy/juggling duo known as 'Two Complete 
Fools," acappella singers, and others. 

The poster for this year's Crafts Fair was designed by 
noted theatrical graphic artist, Gilbert Lesser. 

Transportation to the WBAI Crafts Fair includes the 
IRT Seventh Avenue local train (the no. 1) to 116th Street 
and Broadway, as well as the M104, M4 and MS buses on 
Broadway. Good parking is also available in the Colum- 
bia University area. 

Admission to the 15th Annual WBAI Holiday Crafts 
Fair is $5.00 per person with all proceeds going to benefit 
non-commercial listener-supported radio station, WBAI- 
FM (99.5 in New York City). Additionally, for a $10 ad- 
mission charge, Fairgoers will gain unlimited entry to the 
show for any and all days of their choice. 

For more information, please call WBAI at (212) 
279-0707 or (212) 695-4465, weekdays between 10:00 
a.m. and 6:00 p.m. 



\X^AI-FM 
PACinCA RADIO 
505 HGHTH AVENUE 
NEW YORK, 

N.Y. 10018 

ADDRESS CORRECTION REQUESTED 





The Grand Dame 
of Yiddish Song 






Lin Yaldati was born in the Jewish Quarter of Amster- 
dam in 1912. At 12 she left school in order to take care of 
her parents' household. They were factory workers. Two 
years later she also went to work in a factory and at- 
tended dance classes after work. It was in a Layman's 
Yiddish Theater that she first sang Yiddish songs. 

During the Thirties she studied and worked with the 
Netherlands Ballet, and an Agit-Prop group. In 1938 she 
met and began to work with the German pianist-musicol- 
ogist Eberhard Rebling, who had gone to Holland and 
had begun to work in the underground. Their musical 
collaboration resulted in an evening of Yiddish songs and 
dances. By the end of April 1940 they were performing a 
program called "An Offer to a Foreign Land" with great 
success. Holland fell to the Nazis two weeks later, and 
they both began to work for the illegal resistance. They 
were not able to get married because of the Nuremberg 
Nazi laws. 

Two years later, in May 1942, the Reblings and their 
year-old daughter entered the underground, worked as 
couriers and gave illegal concerts featuring Yiddish 
songs. Yaldati was arrested in July 1944, underwent three 
days of interrogation, was imprisoned in Amsterdam and 
then transported to concentration camps: Westerbork, 
Auschwitz and Bergen-Belsen, where she sang for her fel- 
low prisoners and met Margot and Anne Frank. 

Yaldati was freed in 1945. Six weeks after her liberation 
she found her family. Rebling had been condemned to 
death, but managed to escape. Yaldati and her sister were 
the only survivors of their family. At the end of 1945 Lin 
appeared again in concerts, singing Yiddish resistance 
songs she had heard in the concentration camps. 

(continued next page) 



Postmaster 
Dated Material 



017376 CC 

MARIAN WALDMAN 
45 W 76 ST APT 2A 
NEW YORK NY 10023 



NON-PROFIT ORG. 

U.S. POSTAGE 

PAID 

NEW YORK, N.Y. 

PERMIT 5639 




Report to the Listeners 

Queries about money 



WBAI Holiday Crafts Fair 



WBAI's fiscal year ended on September 30. It is the 
time of year when we review the previous year's financial 
performance, the budget for the coming year, and try to 
develop a long-range focus (that is, a bit beyond our usu- 
al crisis management mentality) in evaluating the 
station's financial situation. For that reason, I thought I 
would use this column to address some of the monetary 
concerns we have and also answer some frequently asked 
questions about our funding policies and related matters. 

Will WBAI seek corporate sponsorship for pro- 
gramming? 

No. We will not. WBAI does not seek or accept corpo- 
rate sponsorship for any programming. Nor has Pacifica 
in its forty year history. 

There are many programs that have been produced by 
independent producers and broadcast over WBAI that 
'nave found corporate underwriting for their broadcast 
on other public radio stations. A good example is Liz 
Swados' "Jerusalem," produced by Rick Harris with 
funding from the National Endowment for the Arts and 
National Public Radio's Satellite Program Development 
Fund (both federally funded organizations) and the New 
York State Council for the Arts (a state funded organiza- 
tion.) The program was broadcast on WBAI without any 
funding from other sources. However, when it was aired 
on other stations around the country (WGBH-FM in Bos- 
ton is a good example), the broadcast was invariably sup- 
ported by some corporate funding — usually local and al- 
ways identified. This is just the kind of support that 
WBAI will not accept. 

In general, we will not accept support from large cor- 
porations and their associated foundations. As to small 
grants from local businesses, we usually do not accept 
them for programming. If a company wants to make a 
contribution in the same way that listeners do, we will 
probably take the money, and even acknowledge it. But 
the gift would have to be modest, certainly insufficient 
for us to become dependent on it. 

What is WBAI's budget for salaries? 

The station has budgeted $290,000 for salaries and re- 
lated expenses in fiscal year 87. In fiscal 1986, we budg- 
eted $289,000, but actually spent somewhat less than 
that. The salaries and related expenses lined in our budget 
include some consultancies (on-air engineering shifts, 
etc.) but not others (fees paid to people who work on 
community events and the crafts fair.) 

How big are the salaries and who gets them? 

Salaries are paid to administrative (management and 
programming) staff, recording engineers, and members 
of the news department. During marathons the payroll is 
increased through the addition of programming and vol- 
unteer coordinators. The salary range at the station is 
from a low of $11,500 to a high of $26,500. WBAI's mini- 
mum salary and its average salary are both below the 
comparable figures for Pacifica stations KPFK (Los Ange- 
les) and KPFA (Berkeley). The Pacifica Foundation na- 
tional board of directors has established as a three year 
goal (subject to appropriate increases in listener support) 
achieving 80; of the existing salary levels for public radio. 
Current WBAI salaries are less than half, on average, 
than the salaries paid in public radio and are also below 
prevailing wages in social change organizations. The sta- 
tion has as a goal that there be no more than a 2-1 differ- 
ential between the highest and the lowest paid person. 
We have taken some steps recently to accomplish this and 
we will take more in the near future. 

The Grand Dame of Yiddish Song 

The Reblings were married in 1946, and in December 
of that year she made her first foreign tour to the Scandi- 
navian countries; in 1947 she traveled to Warsaw and 
Lodz, and in Prague she appeared in a radio broadcast 
with Paul Robeson. She settled in the German Democrat- 
ic Republic in 1952 with her husband and daughters, the 
second of whom had been born in 1951. Since then she 
sees herself as a preserver of Yiddish songs. Her reper- 
toire includes songs of Hanns Eisler and Paul Dessau, as 
well as folk songs of many countries. 

Tours have taken her to Moscow, Brussels and Copen- 
hagen (1957); London and Paris (1959); the Scandinavian 
countries. South, South-East and East Asian countries 
(1965-1970); and Canada (1979). Her most recent appear- 
ances outside of the German Democratic Republic were 
Switzerland, Israel and in Holland— where she sang for 
the Queen at the Anne Frank birthday anniversary in 
June 1985, and again in Amsterdam and Paris this year. 

Eberhard Rebling was Director of the Hanns Eisler 
Conservatory in Berlin until his retirement in 1976. Since 
then he appears in concerts with his wife, as musical ar- 



Have there been changes in staff salaries over the last two 
years? 

There have been increases in many categories. And 
there will be more. The arts and information directors are 
now paid $15,000 each (by the way, a salary far too low 
for these positions). This is 50% higher than that paid to 
the former department heads. 

WBAI's lease expires in 1988. How much will it cost to 
move? 

The cost of moving, subject to the completion of the 
technical study, may run as high as $500,000. The final 
figure will be determined by factors like what the new 
space configuration is like, how much equipment we 
have to buy, etc. You should know that this figure does 
not include the cost of the space itself. Like other arts and 
social change organizations, WBAI will have to either 
buy or rent space at highly inflated market values. The 
situation is, in fact, quite serious. The amount of money 
needed is quite large and there is some question about the 
station's institutional ability to raise it. We would appre- 
ciate all the help we can get on this score. 

Is the WBAI station board responsible for fundraising? 

The WBAI board has considered itself a community 
advisory board, and until recently saw its role as repre- 
senting a diversity of community interests (its member- 
ship also includes some former station personnel). It has 
not considered itself a fundraising arm of the staton. 
However, the conventional wisdom in fundraising circles 
is that boards of directors are not only supposed to raise 
money, they should be the organization's best resource 
for fundraising — especially for capital needs like WBAI's 
need for a new home. The board is now addressing itself 
to the issue of fundraising and is looking for new mem- 
bers who will have to have, as a first requirement, the 
ability and willingness to raise significant amounts of 
money for the station's needs. If you have suggestions 
about this please let me know. And thanks. 

Two reminders: If you have not paid your Marathon 
Pledge, please do so now. Send your check to Pacifica- 
WBAI, P.O. Box 12345, Church Street Station, New 
York, NY 10249. 

Please remember that the new tax law reduces the ben- 
efits one derives from charitable contributions. However, 
you can still obtain the full deduction if you make a gift 
to WBAI now. So, even if you have supported WBAI this 
year, please consider doing it again. Mail your check to 
the P.O. Box listed above. 



ranger and pianist. Their two daughters, Kathinka (who , 
is the violinist of the Clara Schumann trio and a member 
of the faculty at the Conservatory), and Yalda (an actress 
who has appeared with the Dresden State Theater and 
sings programs of Yiddish and Sephardic songs), partici- 
pate in the concerts of Yiddish songs with their parents. 
The Reblings offer two programs: one entitled 
"Scholem sol Sain," and the second dedicated 'To the 
Memory of Anne Frank." 

Lin Yaldati and her family will arrive in New York on 
November 3 to tour here for three weeks; this is her first 
visit to the U.S. She and her family will appear in New 
York as follows: 

November 9: Bayview Avenue School, Freeport, L.I.; 
Concert, 3 p.m. 

November 10: Village Gate, New York City; Benefit 
Concert for WBAI, 8 p.m. 

November 16: Hebrew Union College, 1 West 4th St.; 
Free Concert, 3 p.m. (reserved seats available; please call 
212-242-2280). 







MediaWatch 



Welcome to "MediaWatch, " an occasional column de- 
voted to media contradictions and curiosities. Having 
been volunteered for this task, the author casts a jaun- 
diced eye toward electronic and print media, and related 
topics proposed by WBAI listeners and the Folio's usually 
well-informed readers. 

Deeply distressed by the prospect of being required to 
dredge the Times on a regular basis, the author devotes 
the premier episode of "MediaWatch" to network cover- 
age of the Reykjavik Summit, in which President Fisher 
snatches defeat from the jaws of victory, scuttling Pre- 
mier Spassky's unprecedented arms reduction proposal in 
favor of fond dreams of his Strategic Defense Initiative, 
which stretches the bounds of computer science, if not 
reason. 

It must be noted here, since mainstream media often 
misses the point, that "Star Wars" is not a "defensive" 
system— its prime purpose being to protect missiles from 
nuclear attack, and only incidentally (and ineffectively) 
the American public. More to the point is the vision of 
SDI as a "bulletproof vest" from which to: (l)launch a 
nuclear first strike; (2) enforce a U.S. policy of global nu- 
clear domination; and/or (3) foment a military spending 
frenzy in hopes the Soviets will go broke before the 
Americans do. 

That said, "MediaWatch" gives its Adrenaline Award 
for best spot coverage of Sunday's summit session to 
ABC where Peter Jennings, standing outside the meeting 
hall, masterfully led a multi-correspondent discussion of 



NBC's spot coverage was the worst with Tom 
Brokaw's mealy-mouthed Amerigocentric catechism of 
the arms race, which carried few new or timely details. 
Of course, a deceleration of the arms race is a matter of 
no small concern to NBC's corporate overlords at Gener- 
al Electric, whose military weapons systems are some of 
its "most important products." 

Brokaw and Rather both signed off with the irritating 
"We'll see you later" (which they didn't, since I already 
had plans for the evening). This kind of false familiarity 
violates Knight's First Rule of news reporting: Never de- 
scend below the third person (i.e., avoid the presumptu- 
ously personal pronouns 'I/we' and 'you'). Sloppy gram- 
mar breeds sloppy thought (such as where "we" should 
place "our" missiles), and makes the supposedly indepen- 
dent press rhetorical members of the government's nego- 
tiating team. 

CBS did well with its supporting cast, retaining a pair 
of well-informed beards (one of them belonging to Co- 
lumbia's Johnathan Sanders) who pragmatically placed 
human rights and regional issues in their properly pessi- 
mistic context. While Soviet emigration and the occupa- 
tion of Afghanistan were frequently mentioned by the 
networks, there was less talk of U.S. violations of inter- 
national law and human rights, particulariy in Nicaragua 
and South Africa. 

NBC's Marvin Kalb intoned about "the Russians," in a 
linguistic and ideological refusal to acknowledge the 
proper name and contemporary reality of the Union of 
Soviet Socialist Republics. Kalb (who spearheaded a leg- 
endary effort to label right-wing crazy Nehmet Ali Agca's 
pope shooting as a Bulgarian communist plot) can be for- 
given for his neanderthal news instincts. But such under- 
standing does not extend to Secretary of State George 
Shultz, who later referred to "Russia" and "the Russians," 
repeatedly and without^ challenge on ABC's "Nightline'" 

building 



Stsff 



General Manager John J. Simon 

Program Director John Scagliolti 

Assistant Manager/Administrative Director Julie Brinckloe 

Bookkeeper Gloria George 

Subscriptions/Computing Allen Markman 

Receptionist Fred Kuhn 

WBAI LOCAL BOARD 

Margaret-Carmen Ashhurst, Mordecai Bauman, Marilyn Clement, 
Theodore Conant, Renee Farmer, Kathy Goldman, Steve Post 
(Chair), Caryl Ratner, Rosemarie Reed, Paul Robeson Jr., Milton 
Zisman 

DEVELOPMENT 

E.L. James, Frank Millspaugh, David Rothenberg, Jackie Shearer 

PROGRAMMING 

Executive Producer— Arts Gisele-Audrey Mills 

Executive Producer— Information IvyJ. Young 

ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANTS 

Bob Campbell, Dennis Coleman, Barbara Joumer, Greg Schmitz, 

Dorothy Altman 



NEWS 

News Assignment Reporters 

Deborah Begel, Bryn Friedman, Amy Goodman, Andy Lanset, Judy 

Shimel, Becky Thome 

Contributing Reporters 

Steven Bosh, Paul DeRienzo, Merle Jawitz, Dima Joseph, Jesse 

Keyes, Robert Knight, Maurice Rosen, Bob Sinclair 



NEWS ENGINEERS 

Jim Freund, Bill O'Neill, 

Williams, Lynn Samuels 



Tom Tortorella, Anthony Sloan, Paul 



agreement options. He outshone his colleagues, detailing ._^ ^ „„, ^■.„„^., ^ ^„ ^^^ , 

the potential arms reductions and proposed delay of Is "it any 'wonder the"Re"agan'ofds"a'rrro''busy 
Star Wars" deployment. In short, ABC "got there fastest - . - 

with the mostest." 

Runner-up CBS featured Dan Rather, seated in an out- 
door rooftop set overlooking beautiful downtown Reyk- 
javik. His comments were adequate (for what passes as 
network analysis), although delivered with more excite- 
ment than factuality. Example: "Star Wars is primarily a 
laser defense system, isn't it?" (Yes, Dan, but only if one 
ignores the atomic detonation which causes the X-ray de- 
vice to lase microseconds before it's destroyed by its own 
nuclear trigger!) 



weapons of the future to fight wars of the past? 

Freudian Slip of the Month 

"/ don't believe I have credibility." 



campaign 



Introducing: 

Vincent Smith dialosues 
with contemporary artists 




—National Security Advisor John M. Poindexter, com- 
menting on his anti-Libyan disinformation 
[NBC 'Today," 10/15/86]. 

Covering the summit for U.S. News & World Report 
was repatriated journalist Nicholas Daniloff, who surely 
must have mused about the role of the working press as 
political pawns when State Department spokesperson 
Bernard Kalb quit over his employer's planting of lies in 
news reports about Libya and Muammar Qadaffi. Per- 
haps conscience comes better late than never, but the 
least Kalb could have done to reaffirm his loyalty to the 
free press was identify when and where his government's 
disinformation feeds were planted. Otherwise, how can 
one believe anything one reads? 

It's unfortunate there was not a similar outcry over the 
Reagan administration's 1983 decision to include journal- 
ist cover in its foreign intelligence operations. Now, with 
the latest disinformation campaign, it is apparent that the 
government is using reporters as both "input and output 
devices," as they say in systems biz. 

Oh, well. Enough talk about disinformation and data. 
Until the next encounter, "MediaWatch" welcomes reader 
comments, suggestions and grip)es. 



"After the News" (Mon.-Fri. 7:30 p.m.) 

Michio Kaku (Science and Peace), Samori Marksman (International 
Affairs), Ruth Messinger (City Politics), Mimi Rosenberg (Commu- 
nity Issues), Bill Tabb (Economics), Maarten DeKadt, Richard 
Schrader, and Barbara Solow (Econonews). 

ON-AIR HOSTS 

Margot Adler, Ted Amory, James Brown and David Jackson, Fred 
Herschkowitz, Mary Houston, Robert Knight, Alfred Webre, Will K. 
Wilkins, Simon Loekle, Katy Keiffer, John Scagliotti, Marilyn Sokol, 
Rosko 

Weekend Producers 

Hernando Alverici and Mickey Melendez, Al Angeloro, Peter 
Bochan, Kate Borger, Bill Farrar, Bob Fass, Mike Feder, Paul Gor- 
man, Ed Haber, Mary Houston, James Irsay, David Rothenberg, 
Lynn Samuels, Habte Selassie, Sidney Smith, Marty Sokol, Max 
Schmid, Chris Whent, Jim Freund, Paul Wunder, Jack Shugg, R. Paul 
Martin, The Creative Unity Collective, Ted Bonitt 






tar W4 



in-t 



At:. 



RK 



Listen to a great WBAI half hour 

CONSIDER THE ALTERNATIVES 

FRIDAYS 1 P.M. 

A sparkling program o< intematkjnal, politkal and domestic intervie^g 
and comment, featuring among others Senators Ted Kennedy, Tom 
Harkin, Congressnwn Ted Weiss, Fton Dellums. Ed Markey and Jessie 
Jackson, Jane Fonda, Ben Spock, William Stoane Coffin and Marcus 
Raskin. Sponsored by Sane Education Fund. 

NY. SANE PEACE COUNCIL 

225 Lafayette St., Room 207, N.Y.C. 10012 (212) 219-9527 



Over the years WBAI has been a favorite listening post 
for artists of all disciplines. Painters, in particular, say the 
station keeps them company during long, sometimes 
lonely studio hours. In an effort to bring more artists to 
these air waves, Vincent Smith Dialogues With Contem- 
porary Artists will be introduced as a regular bi-weekly 
feature of the arts magazine. 

Smith, himself a painter (named to Who's Who In 
American Art 1978), promises to bring a refreshing, in- 
ternational, and multi-disciplinary perspective to his dia- 
logues. Among his first guests will be James Gwynne, 
writer, editor of Stepping Stones Press— A Literary An- 
thology Towards Liberation; Amiri Baraka— poet, play- 
wright, activist; and Ernest Crichlow— painter and edu- 
cator. Dolores Brandon will produce the Dialogues. 



Fall Strike Commemoration 1936/1986 

Monday, November 3, 8 p.m. 

Great Hall, Cooper Union (8th St. &. 4th Ave.) 

BE THERE WHEN THE LIGHTS GO OUT! 

'II Novembw 3, 19M: 

" Acton will recruu the ttrilu vol* 
fifty yean a^o thai uucbcd off tte 
Fiil-Wiuer 1936-37 ScAima's Soikc 
and |ave btith to the legeodary CUQ. 
National MwIUbm Ualtw . 

Vcleran scaaaea. 

BUIBjiUer, 

BebMciUroyft 

Joe Suck 

-will recall their fim-haod cxpcricacc* 

ibiriog the bnital 13-day strike thai 

captured the imafiBalioa of New Y«k CUy. 

TkkdaitS 




COPsTTRIBUTING PRODUCERS 

Information and Services 

Lotsu Amenuvor, Max Anloine. jim Aronson, John Atlas, Richard 
Barr, Mary Boger, Jennie Bourne, Elmobe Brath, Dave Burstein, Den- 
nis Coleman, Blanche Weisen Cook, Andrew Cooper, Lloyd 
D'Aguilar, Diane Decorah, Maarten DeKadt, Vernon Douglas, Bob 
Eng, Geoffrey Fox, Angela Gilliam, Fred Goldhaber, David Gordon, 
Mark Green, Joan Greenbaum, Ken Grossinger, Larry Gutenbergy, 
Ron Habin, Lorraine Hale, Craig Harris, Allen Hershkowitz, Susan 
Heske, Lex Hixon, Paul Hoeffel, Gerald Home, Gladys Horton, Lin- 
da Johnson, Rose Jordan, Carolyn Jung, Barbara Juppe, Michio 
Kaku, Judith Kallas, Kamado, Harris Kimball, Joe King, Hank Kee, 
Lisa Knauer, Utrice Lieds, Marvin Lynch, Diane Mancino, Allen 
Markman, R. Paul Martin, John Mason, Bob McDonald, John 
McDonough, David Mendelson, Ruth Messinger, David Metzger, 
Jim Montavalli, Blossom Neuschatz, Sam Neuschatz, Santiago 
Nieves, Bertell Oilman, Bob O'Sullivan, Judie Pasternak, Alex Paul, 
Victor Perlo, Andrew Phillips, Jane Pipik, Liston Pope, Sheldon 
Ranz, Rosemarie Reed, Al Rivera, Lee Ryan, Sheila Ryan, Kirkpat- 
rick Sale, Stuart Schaar, Oliver Schoen, Richard Schrader, Richard 
Siegal, Jim Sleeper, Sidney Smith, Barbara Solow, David Sprintzen, 
William Tabb, Rod Taylor, Paula Tedesco, Edith Tiger, Jordyn 
Tyson, Valerie Van Isler, Ralph Vega Jr., Gloria Waldman, Annette 
Walker, Abe Weisburg, Richard Wheeler, Tom Whelan, Tom Wisker, 
Robert Yuen, Kalhy Ann Kersey 

Arts 

Jan Albert, Hernando Alvaricci, Al Angeloro, Alina Avila, Cynthia 
Bell, Rachel Berghash, Joe Bevilacqua, Dolores Brandon, Susan 
Browne, Bill Cannaday, Ted Cohen, Ceal Coleman, Dennis Cole- 
man, David D'Arcy, Ken Davis, Marjorie DeFazio, Barbara 
DeMauro, Vernon Douglas, Suzie Drews, Stephen Erickson, Yale 
Evelev, Regina Fiorito, jim Freund, Phil Garfinkel, Charlie Gilbert, 
Patricia Hankoop, Rick Harris, Joseph Hurley, Mahmoud Ibrahim, 
Chet Jackson, Manya Lu Bruja, Cid Kafka, Katy Keiffer, Dave Ken- 
ney, Oleg Kerensky, Lauren Krenzel, Simon Loekle, Sharon Mattlin, 
Mickey Melendez, Courtney Monroe, Bill Moore, Diane Morris, 
Charlie Morrow, Mike Nelson, Joanna Ney, David Nolan, Mildren 
Norman, Kofi Pendergrass, Tom Pniewski, Tom Pompasello, Sue 
Radacovsky, Spencer Richards, Don Scherdin, Peter Seeger, Cliff 
Seidman, Habte Selassie, Laura Simms, Anthony Sloan, Sidriey 
Smith, Martin Sokol, Susan Stone, Jim Theobald, Jordyn Tyson, 
Tom Vitale, Joyce West, Malika Lee Whitney, Anne Sergeant 
Wooster, Paul Wunder, Elizabeth Zimmer, Sharon Griffiths, Pat 
Rich, Jack Shugg, Max Schmid, R. Paul 



ENGINEERING 

Adam Brand, Natalie Budelis, Dennis Coleman, Ken Davis, Stephen 
Erickson, Daniel Finton (recording engineer). Dean Gallea, Edward 
Haber, Dana B. Hanford Jr., R. Paul Martin, Bill O'Neill (Production 
Director), Bob Parrett, Jane Pipik, Sue Radacovsky (recording engi- 
neer), Peter Shuler (recording engineer). Miles Smith (studio techni- 
cian), Peter Cedric Smith, Bill Wells (chief engineer), Paul Wunder, 
Anthony Sloan, Sharon Mattlin, Rocco Lovascio, Faith Day, Bran- 
don Whitney 



Produceil by die Mahoe Workers Hiitorkal Asiocialioo Rctervatiou: (3U) 242-5IM 



FOLIO STAFF 

Julie Brinckloe Editor 

Sharon Griffiths Listings Editor 

Composition / Layout 

Violet Chen, Vanessa Johnson, Jennifer Loeb, Brian Sanet. 



Listenings 



Saturday/ 1 

5:00 HOUR OF THE WOLF. 

Fantasy, for a spell. Im- 
agination and en- 
chantment with) Jim 
Freund. 

7:00 CHILDSPLAY. For ttie 
ctiild in oil of us, with 
Sidney Smith. 

8:30 ANY SATURDAY. With 

David Rothenberg. 
10:30 BRUNCH. With Paul 

Gorman. 
12:30 THE GOLDEN AGE OF 
RADIO. Old time radio 
with Max Schmid and 
Jack Shugg. 

2:00 PART OF THE ACT. 
Radio with Lynn 
Samuels. 

3:30 JAZZ SAMPLER. With 
Bill Farrar. 

5:00 ALL MIXED UP. Just as 
the title implies, with 
Peter Bochon. 

7:00 THE WBAI EVENING 
NEWS. 

7:30 HOUSING NOTEBOOK. 
With members of the 
Metropolitan Council 
on Housing. 

8:30 UVE FROM STUDIO A. 
World Dance Music, 
produced by Al 
Angeloro. 
10:30 RADIO UNNAMEABLE. 
With Bob Pass. 

1:00 LABBRISH. With Habte 
Selassie. 

Sunday/2 

5:00 SOUNDTRACK. All 

about the cinema. 
With Paul Wunder. 

7:00 PIPER IN THE 

MEADOW STRAYING. 
Folk music with Ed 
Haber. 

9:00 HERE OF A SUNDAY 

MORNING. Early music 
with Chris Whent. 
11:00 HARD WORK. Radio 

with Mike Feder. 
12:30 WORKING TITLE. A 
holf-hour series de- 
voted to readings. This 
is the final installment 
of Samuel R. Delany's 
"The Tales of Plagues 
and Carnivals," read 
by the author and Bar- 
bara Wise. Produced 
by Alina Avila. 

1:00 CON SABOR LATINO. 
Issues and music from 
the Latin community. 
With Mickey Melendez 
and Hernando 
Alvaricci. 

4:30 THROUGH THE OPERA 
GLASS. Rare opera 
recordings with Martin 
Sokol. 

7:00 THE WBAI EVENING 
NEWS. 

7:30 THE PERSONAL 

COMPUTER SHOW. 
With Joe King. 

8:30 EMANATIONS. With 

Bernard White. 
10:30 RADIO. With James 

Irsay, 
12:30 NEWS REBROADCAST. 

1:00 BACK OF THE BOOK. 
"Per omnia saecula 
saeculorum"— myth or 
physical fact? Live 
radio with R. Paul 
Martin. 

3:00 EVERYTHING OLD IS 
NEW AGAIN. With 
Dave Kenney. 



Monday/3 

6:00 THE MORNING SHOW. 

The morning 
magazine of the air. 
With Will K. Wilkins. 
9:00 MORNING MUSIC. A 3 

hour music special on 
the Latin American 
New Song Movement, 
featuring music from 
Chile, Brazil Puerto 



Rico, Cuba, El 
Salvador, Mexico, and 
Nicaragua. 

10:00 Program 

Announcements. 

11:00 Program 

Announcements. 

12:00 NATURAL LIVING. With 
Gary Null. 
1:00 PUBLIC AFFAIRS 

FEATURE: "Common 
Ground." The Roots of 
World Hunger. Author 
and food expert 
Frances Moore Lappe 
(the author of the con- 
troversial and popular 
book of the early 70's, 
"Diet for a Small 
Planet") discusses the 
political roots of world 
hunger and offers 
solutions to help starv- 
ing people feed them- 

30|y03 

1:30 PUBLIC AFFAIRS 

FEATURE: "National 
Alliance of Third 
World Journalists." 

The Alliance reports 
on domestic and inter- 
national struggles. 

2:30 A WBAI Arts feature. 

3:00 Free Form Radio with 
Rosko. 

5:00 TIte WBAI Arts 

Magazine. Hosted by 
Lee Lowenfish. 

5:30 Seventh Inning 
Stretch: Sports 
features & news. 

6:30 THE WBAI EVENING 
NEWS. 

7:30 AFTER-THE-NEWS. Inter 
national issues with 
Samori Marksman. 

8:30 PUBLIC AFFAIRS 
FEATURE: "Latino 
Journal." New York's 
English language 
radio magazine for 
Latinos. Hosted by 
Santiago Nieves and 
Lydio Corfez, 

9:00 EVENING MUSIC. 
10:00 WORLDWATCH. 

"High Tech Poetry for 
HIgh-Risk Students." 
Keeping inner-city kids 
in school and moti- 
vated is one of the 
biggest challenges in 
teaching. The Poetry 
Video Learning Project 
is the new Drop-Out 
Prevention Program's 
attempt to tap 
frustrated teen-age 
energies. 
11:00 NEWS REBROADCAST. 
1 1 :30 Late Night Live Radio. 
With Margot Adier. 

1:00 Even Later Night Live 
Radio. 

3:30 OUT OF THE 

SHADOWS. With Don 
Scherdin. 

Tuesday/4 

6:00 THE MORNING SHOW. 

We'll think up a title 
someday. With John 
Scagliofti and Sharon 
Griffiths. Featuring the 
UN women's report at 
6:30. 
9:00 MORNING MUSIC: 

"Hear and Now," with 
Cynthia Bell. Today, 
composer/performer 
Judith (Martin) St. Croix 
will give a live demon- 
stration of the Voyetra 
8 synthesizer and 
discuss her composi- 
tional techniques, as 
well as her latest work, 
"Burning in the 
Center." Marilyn Bliss, 
a composer and 
flutist, will also be fea- 
tured in the first part of 
a 4 part series dealing 
with "An Exploration of 
the Creative Mind," 
and is produced by 
New York Women 
Composers. 



10:00 

11:00 

12:00 

1:00 



1:15 



1:30 

2:30 

2:45 

3:00 
5:00 
6:30 
7:30 

8:30 



9:00 
10:00 



11:00 
11:30 

1:00 

1:30 



3:30 



Program 

Announcements. 
Program 

Announcements. 
NATURAL LIVING. With 
Gary Null. 
PUBLIC AFFAIRS 
FEATURE: "Transcend- 
ing Space and Time." 
This science fiction 
story describes health 
care in the year 2500 
and beyond. Pro- 
duced and read by 
Delores Brandon and 
introduced by Diane 
Mancino. 
PUBLIC AFFAIRS 
FEATURE: "Emergen- 
cy." Health care spe- 
cialists working in the 
Emergency Room de- 
scribe when and how 
to best utilize 
Emergency Room ser- 
vices in NYC's large 
metropolitan hospitals. 
Produced by Barbara 
Glickstein. 
PUBLIC AFFAIRS 
FEATURE: "Grey Pan- 
thers Report." With 
Lydia Bragger. 
PUBLIC AFFAIRS 
FEATURES: "Indian 
Diaspora." 
PUBLIC AFFAIRS 
FEATURE: "This Week 
In Nicaragua." 
Free Form Radio with 
Marilyn Sokol. 
The WBAI Arts 
Magazine. 
THE WBAI EVENING 
NEWS. 

AFTER-THE-NEWS. 
Economic issues with 
Bill Tabb. 
ARTS FEATURE: 
"Darllnghissima." An 
interview with Natalie 
Danes! Murray. She 
has compiled a 
superb collection of 
letters written by her 
friend, Janet Planner, 
who wrote the "Paris 
Letters" column for the 
New Yorker magazine 
for about 50 years 
under the pen name 
of "Genet." Their close 
friendship began in 
1940 and continued 
for nearly 40 years. 
Produced by Patty 
Ross. 




EVENING MUSIC. 
WORLD WATCH. "A 
Report Back from 
MADRE on the Artist's 
Contingent to 
Nicaragua." 
NEWS REBROADCAST. 
Late Night Live Radio. 
With Rosemary Mealy. 
Even Later Night 
Radio. 

WEAPONRY. Military 
affairs and hardware. 
With Tom Wisker. 
THE MUSIC GOES 
ROUND AND ROUND. 
With Jack Shugg 



1:00 PUBLIC AFFAIRS 
FEATURE: "Ara- 
besque." This series, 
broadcast in this time- 
slot through January, 
will draw upon the rich 
experience of Arabic 
literature, poetry, 
religion, intellectual 
heritage, and popular 
culture to bring fresh 
perspectives to events 
in the Middle East. 



1:30 
2:30 



3:00 
5:00 
6:30 
7:30 

8:30 



9:00 



10:00 



11:00 
11:30 

1:00 

1:30 

3:30 



Uve Public Affairs 
programming with 
listener phone calls. 
ARTS FEATURE: "The 
Disappearance of 
Flight 19." In 1945, a 
squadron of planes 
disappeared in the 
Bermuda Triangle. This 
drama follows various 
crewmembers' pre- 
flight lives and their 
terrifying final voyage 
into the Unknown. Pro- 
duced by Suzanne 
Hall. 

Free Form Radio with 
Rosko. 

The WBAI Arts 
Magazine. 
THE WBAI EVENING 
NEWS. 

AFTER-THE-NEWS. 
Science and peace 
issues with Michio 
Kaku. 

PUBLIC AFFAIRS 
FEATURE: "Politics 
and Black Ameri- 
cans." A tape of a 
meeting sponsored by 
the Johnson Founda- 
tion, celebrating their 
100th anniversary, this 
program examines the 
current role of Black 
Americans in the 
political process, in- 
cluding the Black 
voting experience, the 
impact of the 1984 
candidacy of Jesse 
Jackson, and the 
declining emphasis of 
Civil Rights issues. 
Moderated by Alan 
Bickley. 

EVENING MUSIC: 
"Live Muse." Live jazz 
from the New Muse, 
an Brooklyn-based 
community museum 
and cultural center. 
Produced by Roland 
Alexander, Reggie 
Workman, and Samori 
Marksman. 

WORLD WATCH. 

Members of the United 
Church of Christ's fact- 
finding tour to the Mid- 
dle East report on their 
trip to the West Bank, 
East Jerusalem, and 
Jordan. 

NEWS REBROADCAST. 
EARTHWATCH. With 
Robert Knight. 
Even Later Night 
Radio. 

BEIN' KRAZEE. With 
Dennis Coleman. 
RUDE AWAKENING 
with John Bello and 
Ed Banger. Music to 
microwave your cat 
by. 




WednesdayVS Thursday/6 



6:00 THE MORNING SHOW. 

With Will K. Wilkins. 

Featuring "Naming 

Names" at 8;20. 
9:00 MORNING MUSIC: 

"Shocking Blue." With 

Delphine Blue. 
10:00 Program 

Announcements. 
11:00 Program 

Announcements. 
12:00 NATURAL LIVING. With 

Gory Null. 



6KM THE MORNING SHOW: 
"Homefries." With 
Fred Herschkowitz. 

9:00 MORNING MUSIC: 
"World Jazz." With 
Chipo Wakatama. 
12:00 NATURAL LIVING. With 
Gary Null. 

1:00 A Public Affairs 
feature. 

1:30 Live Public Affairs 
programming with 
listener phone calls. 



2:30 PUBUC AFFAIRS 

FEATURES: "The ANC 
Frontline Report." A 

weekly update on im- 
portant events in South 
Africa. 

2:45 PUBLIC AFFAIRS 
FEATURE: "USSR In 
Change." 

3:00 Free Form Radio with 
Marilyn Sokol. 

5:00 The WBAI Arts 
Magazine. 

6:30 THE WBAI EVENING 
NEWS. 

7:30 AFTER-THE-NEWS. City 
Politics with Ruth Mess- 
inger. 

8:30 ARTS FEATURE: "Hlgh- 
Heeied Women." The 
nearly-famous gals will 
be funny (fer shure). 
Produced by Joyce 
West. 

9:00 EVENING MUSIC. 
10:00 WORLDWATCH: 

"Afrlkaleldoscope." 
A program of political 
and historical analysis 
of world and cultural 
events. With Elombe 
Broth. 
11:00 NEWS REBROADCAST. 
1 1:30 Late Night Live Radio. 

1:00 Even Later Night 
Radio. 

1:30 METEOR WATCH. 
Radio with James 
Irsay. 

3:30 MORNING DEW. A 
program devoted to 
the Grateful Dead. 



Friday/7 



6:00 

9:00 

10:00 

11:00 

12:00 

1:00 



1:30 



2:30 
3:00 
5:00 

6:30 



THE MORNING SHOW. 

AM on FM. With Simon 
Loekle and Katy 
Keiffer. 

MORNING MUSIC: 
"Stormy Monday." 
With James Browne 
and David Jackson. 
Program 

Announcements. 
Program 

Announcements. 
NATURAL LIVING. With 
Gary Null. 
PUBLIC AFFAIRS 
FEATURE: "Caldlcott's 
Farewell." Dr. Helen 
Caldicott, fiery 
Australian physician 
who helped ignite the 
contemporary nuclear 
disarmament move- 
ment, is leaving her 
activism behind and 
returning home this 
year. This is the first of 
two programs with ex- 
clusive highlights of 
her final address in the 
US Part 2 will be 
broadcast in this time- 
slot on Nov. 14th. 
Uve Public Affairs 
programming with 
listener phone calls. 
A WBAI Arts feature. 
Free Form Live Radio. 
The WBAI Arts 
Magazine. 
THE WBAI EVENING 
NEWS. 



7:15 ARER-THE-NEWS. 

Coalitions and Unions. 

With Mimi Rosenberg 

and Ken Nasti, 
8:00 BERNIE FLESHKIN'S 

ROCK & ROLL DANCE 

PARTY. Eat and dance 

along with Bernie and 

friends at Dixie's Hell's 

Kitchen Diner, 
10:00 EVOLUTION ROCK. 

With Kate Borger. 
12:00 Live Radio. 
2:00 IN REAL TIME. New 

age radio with Mary 

Houston and Alfred 

Webre. 
3:00 SPIRIT MOVES. A show 

with consciousness. 

With Dr. Rashon Root- 

womyn. 

Saturday/8 

5:00 HOUR OF THE WOLF/- 
CHILDSPLAY. Mm 

Freund and Sidney 
Smith present a com- 
plete broadcast of 
"The Tales of Plagues 
and Carnivals," by 
Samuel R. Delany. This 
adaptation for radio is 
performed by the 
author and Barbara 
Wise, and will include 
an interview with 
Delany. Produced by 
Alina Avila. Technical 
direction by Dan Fin- 
ton. Production consul- 
tant: Jim Freund. 




II 



I 

m 

t 

Ht 



self-contained drama 
in the series "Prince 
and Warlord: Tales of 
Vlad Tepes Drakul" 
(oka Count Dracula), 
involving the extraor- 
dinary denizens of 
Hell's Kitchen— "Doc" 
Miranda, o passionate 
and dedicated street 
physician. Dancer, a 
canny Black who rules 
a motley collection of 
pimps, hookers, and 
derelicts who are her 
"people," the vicious 
pimp Sweet Gene, 
and the unknown ar- 
sonist who may obliter- 
ate their entire world. 
A ZPPR production. 
9:30 LIVE FROM STUDIO A. 
World Dance Music, 
produced by Al 
Angeloro. 
10:30 RADIO UNNAMEABLE. 
With Bob Fass. 
1:00 LABBRISH. With Habte 
Selassie. 

Sunday/9 

5:00 SOUNDTRACK. All 

about the Cinema. 

With Paul Wunder. 
7:00 PIPER IN THE 

MEADOW STRAYING. 

Folk music with Ed 

Haber. 
9:00 HERE OF A SUNDAY 

MORNING. Early music 

with Chris Whent. 



11:00 


HARD WORK. Radio 

with Mike Feder. 


Tu 


12:30 


To be announced. 




1:00 


CON SABOR LATINO. 

Issues and music from 
the Latin community. 
With Mickey Melendez 
and Hernando 

Alvaricci. 


6:00 


4:30 


THROUGH THE OPERA 
GLASS. Rare opera 
recordings with Martin 
Sokol. 


9.00 


7:00 


THE WBAI EVENING 
NEWS. 




7:30 


THE PERSONAL 
COMPUTER SHOW. 






With Joe King. 


10:00 


8:30 


EMANATIONS. With 






Bernard White. 


11:00 


10:30 


RADIO. With James 






Irsay. 


12:00 


12:30 


NEWS REBROADCAST. 




1:00 


RADIO. With the 
Creative Unity 


1:00 




Collective. 


1:30 


3:00 


EVERYTHING OLD IS 
NEW AGAIN. With 






Dave Kenney. 


2:30 



Monday/10 



6:00 
9:00 



10:00 

11:00 

12:00 

1:00 



8:30 


ANY SATURDAY. With 

David Rothenberg. 




10:30 


BRUNCH. With Paul 
Gorman. 




12:30 


THE GOLDEN AGE OF 
RADIO. Old time radio 
with Max Schmid and 
Jack Shugg. 




2:00 


PART OF THE ACT. 

Radio with Lynn 
Samuels. 




3:30 


JAZZ SAMPLER. With 
Bill Forrar. 


1:30 


5:00 


ALL MIXED UP. Just as 






the title implies, with 


2:30 




Peter Bochan. 


3-00 


7:00 


THE WBAI EVENING 






NEWS. 


5:00 


7:30 


HOUSING NOTEBOOK. 

With members of the 
Metropolitan Council 


5:30 




on Housing. 


6:30 


8:30 


ARTS FEATURE: "Hell's 






Kitchen." The first. 


7:30 



8:30 



9:00 
10:00 



11:00 
11:30 

1:00 



3:30 



THE MORNING SHOW 

With Will K. Wilkins. 
MORNING MUSIC. 
African music special 
with Sikhulu Shange. 
Music and information 
from the continent, 
with a focus on South 
Africa. 
Program 

Announcements. 
Program 

Announcements. 
NATURAL LIVING. With 
Gary Null. 
PUBLIC AFFAIRS 
FEATURE: "Cam- 
bridge Forum." John 
Pastore, secretary of 
the 1985 Nobel Peace 
prize-winning 
organization. Interna- 
tional Physicians For 
the Prevention of 
Nuclear War, speaks 
on the IPPNW's rapid 
growth, and the 
organization's 
prescription for an 
end to the arms race. 
Live Public Affairs 
programming with 
listener phone calls. 
A WBAI Arts feature. 
Free Form Radio with 
Rosko. 

Ttte WBAI Arts 
Magazine. Hosted by 
Lee Lowenfish. 
Seventh Inning 
Stretch: Sports 
features & news. 
THE WBAI EVENING 
NEWS. 

AFTER-THE-NEWS. Inter 
national issues with 
Samori Marksman. 
PUBLIC AFFAIRS 
FEATURE: "Doin' It For 
Ourselves." A monthly 
women's news show, 
featuring news by, for 
and about women. 
Produced by the 
Women's Radio Col- 
lective of WBAI. 
EVENING MUSIC. 
WORLD WATCH. "I'm 
Not Hungry, I'll Just 
Pick." The guest. Dr. 
Alice O'Flynn, resear- 
cher and clinician, 
whose work deals with 
eating habits and 
disorders as well as 
healthful approaches 
to weight loss, 
discusses some of the 
changing demo- 
graphics related to 
eating problems with 
co-host, Diana Mason 
Produced in collabo- 
ration with the New 
York Counties 
Registered Nurses 
Association. 

NEWS REBROADCAST. 
Late Night Live Radio 

With Margot Adier. 

Even Later Night Live 

Radio. With Sydney 

Smith. 

COSMIK DEBRIS. With 

Sharon Griffiths. Kill 

Ugly Radiol! 



Tuesday/11 



THE MORNING SHOW. 

With John Scagliotti 
and Sharon Griffiths 
(proving that we get 
ya coming and 
going). 

MORNING MUSIC: 
"Hear and Now," with 
Cynthia Bell. A live in- 
terview and samples 
of the music of Ken 
Werner. Also, Part 2 of 
"An Exploration of the 
Creative Mind." 
Program 

Announcements. 
Program 

Announcements. 
NATURAL LIVING. With 
Gary Null. 
A Public Affairs 
feature. 

Live Public Affairs 
programming with 
listener phone calls. 
PUBLIC AFFAIRS 
FEATURE: "Indian 
Diaspora." 
PUBLIC AFFAIRS 
FEATURE: "This Week 
In Nicaragua." 
Free Form Radio with 
Marilyn Sokol. 
The WBAI Arts 
Magazine. 
THE WBAI EVENING 
NEWS. 

AFTER-THE-NEWS. 
Economic and cultural 
issues with Econonews 
— Maarten de Kadt, 
Richard Schroder and 
Barbara Solow. 
A WBAI Arts feature. 
EVENING MUSIC. 
WORLD WATCH. 
NEWS REBROADCAST. 
Late Night Live Radio. 
Even Later Night 
Radio. 

WEAPONRY. Military 
affairs and hardware. 
With Tom Wisker. 



2:45 

3:00 
5:00 
6:30 
7:30 



8:30 

9:00 

10:00 

11:00 

11:30 

1:00 

1:30 




3:30 THE MUSIC GOES 

ROUND AND ROUND. 

With Jack Shugg. 

Wednesday/12 



6:00 



9:00 



10:00 



11:00 



12:00 



THE MORNING SHOW. 

With Will K. Wilkins. 
Featuring "What's Left 
to Read," a series of 
commentary from left- 
wing publications, with 
regular reports from 
Alex Cockburn and 
Chris Hutchings of The 
Nation magazine, at 
8:20. 

MORNING MUSIC: 
"World Jazz." With 
Chip Wakatama. 
Program 

Announcements. 
Program 

Announcements. 
NATURAL LIVING. With 
Gary Null. 




1:00 PUBUC AFFAIRS 
FEATURE: "Arabes- 
que." A timely, and 
revealing exploration 
of the culture and 
society of the Middle 
East, broadcast in this 
timeslot through 
January. 

1:30 Live Public Affairs 
programming with 
listener phone calls. 

2:30 ARTS FEATURE: "The 
Ghost of the AdelphI 
Theater." A radio 
drama about the 
haunting of the 
Adelphi theater in Lon- 
don by a deceased 
actor. He is contacted 
at a seance and 
death becomes an 
unwelcome guest for 
one of the partici- 
pants. Produced by 
Suzanne Hall. 

3:00 Free Form Radio with 
Rosko. 

5:00 The WBAI Arts 
Magazine. 

6:30 THE WBAI EVENING 
NEWS. 

7:30 AFTER-THE-NEWS. 
Science and peace 
issues with Michio 
Kaku. 

8:30 PUBLIC AFFAIRS 

FEATURE: "Irish Family 
Planning." Kathy Ann 
Kersey speaks with 
Christine Donaher of 
the Irish Family Plan- 
ning Association 
based in Dublin. 

9:00 EVENING MUSIC: 

"Live Muse." Live jazz 
returns to our airwaves 
when WBAI joins the 
New Muse, a Brooklyn- 
based community 
museum and cultural 
center, for a series of 
weekly concerts pro- 
duced by Jazz greats 
Roland Alexander and 
Reggie Workman (a 
£_-, former BAl Jazz Pro- 

«~- ducer) and Samori 

Marksman. The series 
will be heard in this 
timeslot on a regular 
basis, and will feature 
the Muse's 13 piece 
band, "Jazz Masters," 
and a range of up 
and coming local 
talent. 

10:00 WORLD WATCH. The 
Partnership for the 
Homeless discusses 
"Help tor the Homeless 
Week" (Nov. 17-26), a 
concerted effort to en- 
courage more New 
Yorkers to become in- 
volved in the homeless 
issue 

11:00 NEWS REBROADCAST. 

11:30 EARTHWATCH. With 
Robert Knight. 

1:00 Even Later Night 

Radio. 
1:30 BEIN' KRAZEE. With 

Dennis Coleman. 
3:30 Punk and Hardcore 
with Susan Browne. 

Thursday/13 

THE MORNING SHOW. 
"Homefries." With 
Fred Herschkowitz. 
MORNING MUSIC: 
"Shocking Blue." With 
Delphine Blue. 
NATURAL LIVING. With 
Gory Null. 
A Public Affairs 
Feature 

Uve Public Affairs 
programming with 
listener phone calls. 
PUBUC AFFAIRS 
FEATURE: "The ANC 
Frontline Report." A 
weekly update on im- 
portant events in South 
Africa. 

PUBUC AFFAIRS 
FEATURE: "USSR In 
Change." 

Free Form Radio with 
Marilyn Sokol. 
The WBAI Arts 
Magazine. 
THE WBAI EVENING 
NEWS. 



7:30 AFTER-iTrif r:;WS. City 

Politic- "'i'" .'liih 
Messii igt.. 
8:30 ARTS FEATURE: 
"Suzuki Bean." A 

young (10 year old) 
beatnik girl learns 
about love and life 
and Tells All. Produced 
by the Shakespeare 
Liberation Front. 



9:00 



10:00 



11:00 

11:30 

1:00 

1:30 



3:30 



EVENING MUSIC: 
"Women Gospel 
Singers." A survey of 
women Gospel singers 
from the 20's to the 
present, featuring the 
works of Arizona 
Drones, Aretha 
Franklin, the Davis 
sisters, Clara Ward, 
and others. Produced 
by Bill Canoday. 
WORLD WATCH. 
"Home Sweet Nurs- 
ing Home: The Myths 
and the Realities." 
Guest speaker Jeanne 
Dewe-Matthews, direc- 
tor of Nursing at a New 
Rochelle nursing 
home, will explain the 
kind of clients served 
and what con realis- 
tically be expected of 
nursing homes. Tips 
will also be given to 
avoid the disaster of 
selecting the wrong 
home. 

NEWS REBROADCAST. 
Late Night Live Radio. 
Even Later Night 
Radio. 

METEOR WATCH. 
Radio with James 
Irsay. 

DEAD AIR. With David 
Nolan. 



Friday/14 



6:00 THE MORNING SHOW. 

With Simon Loekle and 
Katy Keiffer. 
9:00 MORNING MUSIC: 
"Stormy Monday." 

With James Browne 
and David Jackson. 
10:00 Program 

Announcements. 
11:00 Program 

Announcements. 
12:00 NATURAL LIVING. With 

Gary Null. 

1:00 PUBLIC AFFAIRS 

FEATURE: "Caldicott's 
Farewell." Part 2 of Dr. 
Helen Caldicott's 
farewell address in the 
US. See Nov. 7th for 
details. 

1:30 PUBUC AFFAIRS 
FEATURE: 
"Healthstyles." 
Health professionals 
examine current 
trends and issues in 
health core. 

2:30 A WBAI Arts feature. 

3:00 Free Form Live Radio. 

5:00 The WBAI Arts 
Magazine. 

6:30 THE WBAI EVENING 
NEWS. 

7:15 AFTER-THE-NEWS. 

Coalitions and Unions. 
With Mimi Rosenberg 
and Ken Nash. 

8:00 BERNIE FLESHKIN'S 

ROCK ft ROLL DANCE 
PARTY. Eat and dance 
along with Bernie and 
friends at Dixie's Hell's 
Kitchen Diner. 

10:00 EVOLUTION ROCK. 
With Kate Borger. 

12:00 Live Radio. 

2:00 IN REAL TIME. New 
age radio with Mary 
Houston and Alfred 
Webre. 

3:00 SPIRIT MOVES. A show 
with consciousness. 
With Dr. Rashon Root- 
womyn. 

Saturday /1 5 

5:00 HOUR OF THE WOLF. 

Fantasy for a spell. 
Imagination and en- 
chantment with Jim 
Freund. 

7:00 CHILDSPLAY. For the 
child in all of us, with 
Sidney Smith. 

8:30 ANY SATURDAY. With 
David Rothenberg. 



10:30 


BRUNCH. With Paul 
Gorman. 




12:30 


THE GOLDEN AGE OF 
RADIO. Old time radio 
with Max Schmid and 
Jack Shugg. 




2:00 


PART OF THE ACT. 

Radio with Lynn 
Samuels. 




3:30 


JAZZ SAMPLER. With 

Bill Farrar. 




5:00 


ALL MIXED UP. Just as 






the title implies, with 


1:30 




Peter Bochan. 




7:00 


THE WBAI EVENING 
NEWS. 




7:30 


HOUSING NOTCBOOK. 

With members of the 
Metropolitan Council 






on Housing. 


2:30 


8:30 


LIVE FROM STUDIO A. 

World Dance Music, 


3:00 




produced by Al 


5:00 




Angeloro. 




10:30 


RADIO UNNAMEABLE. 






With Bob Pass. 


5:30 


1:00 


LABBRISH. With Habte 
Selassie. 




Sunday/16 


6:30 
7:30 


5:00 


SOUNDTRACK. All 

about the cinema. 






With Paul Wunder. 


8:30 


7:00 


PIPER IN THE 





MEADOW STRAYING. 

Folk music with Ed 
Haber. 

9:00 HERE OF A SUNDAY 

MORNING. Early music 
with Chris Whent. 
11:00 HARD WORK. Radio 

with Mike Feder. 
12:30 WORKING TITLE. 
"Tante Lemon." A 
sound collage based 
on the writings of per- 
formance artist 
Beatrice Roth. 

1:00 CON SABOR LATINO. 
Issues and music from 
the Latin community. 
With Mickey Melendez 
and Hernando 
Alvaricci. 

4:30 THROUGH THE OPERA 
GLASS. Rare opera 
recordings with Martin 
Sokol. 

7:00 THE WBAI EVENING 
NEWS. 

7:30 THE PERSONAL 

COMPUTER SHOW. 
With Joe King. 

8:30 EMANATIONS. With 

Bernard White. 
10:30 RADIO. With James 

Irsay. 
12:30 NEWS REBROADCAST. 

1:00 BACK OF THE BOOK. 
Ranting, raving and 
generally negative 
vibrations; live radio 
with R. Paul Martin. 

3:00 EVERYTHING OLD IS 
NEW AGAIN. With 
Dave Kenney. 

Monday/17 

6:00 THE MORNING SHOW. 

With Will K. Wiikins. 
Featuring "Naming 
Names" the report 
from the Gay and Les- 
bian Alliance Against 
Defamation, at 8:20. 

9:00 MORNING MUSIC: 
"Transplanted 
Africa." A trip through 
the music/religions 
that have flowered in 
the New World, in such 
places as Caribbean 
nations, Brazil, Peru, 
Venezuela, and Cen- 
tral American coun- 
tries. Interestingly 
enough, the nature of 
the music reflects the 
area of Africa that the 
transplanted peoples 
were from, making 
ethnic research an ex- 
citing and musical 
proposition. Pfoduced 
by Bill Moore. 

10:00 Program 

Announcements. 

11:00 Program 

Announcements. 

12:00 NATURAL LIVING. With 
Gary Null. 
1:00 PUBLIC AFFAIRS 

FEATURE: "May Sar- 
ton-The Values We 
Have To Keep." Poet 
May Sarton reads 
selections from her 



9:00 
10:00 



11:00 
11:30 

1:00 



3:30 



work. Including two 
sonnets written after 
the death of Martin 
Luther King Jr.'s death. 
Her collections of 
poetry include "A 
Durable Fire." Her 
other works include 
the novel "Kinds of 
Love" and her journal 
"The House by the 
Sea." 

PUBLIC AFFAIRS 
FEATURE: "National 
Alliance of Third 
Worid Journalists." 
The Alliance reports 
on domestic and inter- 
national struggles. 
A WBAI Arts feature. 
Free Form Radio with 
Rosko. 

The WBAI Arts 
Magazine. Hosted by 
Lee Lowenfish. 
Seventh Inning 
Stretch. Sports 
features & news. 
THE WBAI EVENING 
NEWS. 

AFTER-THE-NEWS. Inter 
national issues with 
Samori Marksman. 
PUBLIC AFFAIRS 
FEATURE: "Latino 
Journal." New York's 
English language 
radio magazine for 
Latinos. Hosted by 
Santiago Nieves and 
Lydia Cortez. 
EVENING MUSIC. 
WORLD WATCH. The 
Madness Network: 
Psychiatry, Human 
Rights and the Men- 
tal Health System. 
Host Allen Markman 
and ex-patients 
discuss their ex- 
periences inside and 
outside of the institu- 
tion. 

NEWS REBROADCAST. 
Late Night Live Radio. 
With Margot Adier, 
Even Later Night Live 
Radio. With Sidney 
Smith. 

OUT OF THE 
SHADOWS. With Don 
Scherdin. 

Tuesday /1 8 

6:00 THE MORNING SHOW. 

With John Scagliotti 
and Sharon Griffiths. 
Featuring the UN 
Women's Report at 
6:30. 
9:00 MORNING MUSIC: 
"Hear and Now." 
Katheleen St. John is 
today's guest com- 
poser, featuring her 
music and a live inter- 
view. Also, part 3 of 
"An Exploration of the 
Creative Mind" 
features Elizabeth Bell. 
Produced by Cynthia 
Bell. 
10:00 Program 

Announcements. 
11:00 Program 

Announcements. 
12:00 NATURAL LIVING. With 
Gary Null. 

1:00 A Public Affairs 
feature. 

1:30 PUBLIC AFFAIRS 

FEATURE: "Grey Pan- 
thers." Today, the 
topic is "The Healthy 
Elderly." With Lydia 
Bragger 

2:30 PUBLIC AFFAIRS 
FEATURE: "Indian 
Diaspora." 

2:45 PUBLIC AFFAIRS 

FEATURE: "This Week 
in Nicaragua." 

3:00 Free Form Radio with 
Marilyn Sokol. 

5:00 The WBAI Arts 
Magazine. 

6:30 THE WBAI EVENING 
NEWS. 

7:30 AFTER-THE-NEWS. 

Economic issues with 
Bill Tabb. 

8:30 ARTS FEATURE: "You 
Knew Them When." 
Get a head start on 
the 1995 Academy 
Awards by getting ac- 
quainted with the 
young filmmakers 
working in the NYC 



area right now. Pro- 
duced by Larry Kay 
and student film- 
makers, this is your 
ticket to the movies of 
tomorrow. Produced 
by Ellen Kolba. 

9:00 EVENING MUSIC. 
10:00 WORLDWATCH. 
11:00 NEWS REBROADCAST. 
1 1 :30 Late Night Live Radio. 

1:00 Even Later Night 
Radio. 

1:30 WEAPONRY. Military 
affairs and hardware. 
With Tom Wisker. 

3:30 THE MUSIC GOES 

ROUND AND ROUND. 
With Jack Shugg. 

Wednesday/19 

6:00 THE MORNING SHOW. 

Tune in and find out 
what's what. With Will 
K. Wiikins. Featuring 
the segment "What's 
Left to Read?" at 8:20. 

9:00 MORNING MUSIC. 
10:00 Program 

Announcements. 
11:00 Program 

Announcements. 
12:00 NATURAL LIVING. With 
Gary Null. 

1:00 A Public Affairs 
feature. 

1:30 Live Public Affairs 
programming with 
listener phone calls. 

2:30 ARTS FEATURE: "Invisi- 
ble Influence." A 
dramatization of the 
true story of a woman 
who claims to have 
been abducted by 
aliens at the age of 
three. Produced by 
Suzanne Hall. 

3:00 Free Form Radio with 
Rosko, 

5:00 The WBAI Arts 
Magazine. 

6:30 THE WBAI EVENING 
NEWS. 

7:30 AFTER-THE-NEWS. 
Science and peace 
issues with Michio 
Kaku. 

8:30 A Public Affairs 

feature. 



9:00 MORNING MUSIC: 

"Shocking Blue." With 
Delphine Blue. 
12:00 NATURAL LIVING. With 
Gary Null. 

IKK) PUBLIC AFFAIRS 

FEATURE: "Consider 
the Alternatives." An 

exclusive interview 
with CTA Executive Pro- 
ducer and host Bob 
Musil and Randall 
Robinson, Executive 
Director of TransAfrica, 
the Washington-based 
citizens lobby con- 
cerned with ending 
South African apar- 
theid policy. In his in- 
terview witti Musil, 
Robinson talks about 
the failures of the 
Reagan administra- 
tion, what strategies 
US activists must follow 
now, the role of 
Africa's frontline states, 
and the current situa- 
tion inside South 
Africa. 

1:30 PUBLIC AFFAIRS 
FEATURE: "The 
Mozambique Na- 
tional Resistance 
(MNR)-The Contras 
of Mozambique." This 
program will examine 
the undeclared war 
on Mozambique by 
the South African- 
backed MNR. Foreign 
aid workers and 
Mozambicans will 
speak of their ex- 
periences with the 
MNR and a picture of 
social and economic 
chaos will emerge— 
one that is rarely 
glimpsed in the 
American mass 
media. Produced by 
Tom Wheian. 

2:30 PUBLIC AFFAIRS 

FEATURE: "The ANC 
Frontline Report." A 
weekly update on im- 
portant events in South 
Africa . 

SPIKE JONES 



When Spike Jones found Rock and Roll too insipid to 
parody, it was fortunate that Stan Freberg was there to 
take up the challenge with such classics as "Cry" and 
"The Old Payola Roll Blues." He also had a good time 
lampooning television with such notables as "Xmas 
Dragnet" and 'The Honeyearthers." In the late '60s he 
tackled a much broader topic: American History, in his 
album "Stan Freberg presents The United States of Amer- 
ica." In this, the first hour of a three-part retrospective of 
his career, Mr. Freberg discusses his days on the live 
"Beany & Cecil Show," his years spent in advertising, his 
radio show and records. Also interviewed are his cohorts 
Daws Butler, better known as the voice of Huckleberry 
Hound, and June Foray, the voice of Rocky the Squirrel 
and Natasha Fatale. 



9:00 EVENING MUSIC: 
"Live Muse." A live 
jazz concert from the 
New Muse. Featuring 
Jazz Masters, the 
Muse's 13 piece 
band, as well as up 
and coming local 
talent. Produced by 
Roland Alexander, 
Reggie Workman, and 
Samori Marksman. 

10:00 WORLD WATCH. Only 
in New York. Single 
mother cabaret singer 
reviews Breslin and 
Brady; Ryan's 
Madness. Co-host: Lee 
Ryan. 

11:00 NEWS REBROADCAST. 

11:30 EARTHWATCH. With 
Robert Knight. 
1:00 Even Later Night 

Radio. 
1:30 BEIN' KRAZEE. With 

Dennis Coleman. 
3:30 RUDE AWAKENING. 
The breakfast club of 
the deeply disturbed. 
With John Bello and 
Ed Banger. 

Thursday/20 

6:00 THE MORNING SHOW. 

"Homefries." With 
Fred Herschkowitz. 



2:45 PUBLIC AFFAIRS 

FEATURE: "USSR in 
Change." 

3:00 Free Form Radio with 
Marilyn Sokol. 



5:00 The WBAI Arts 

Magazine. "Out There 
on Their Own," with 
featured guest. Josh 
White, Jr. 



6:30 THE WBAI EVENING 

NEWS. 
7:30 AFTER-THE-NEWS. City 

Politics with Ruth Mess- 
inger. 
8:30 ARTS FEATURE: "High- 
Heeled Women." 

Another in a series 
from those femme 
fatales of the air- 
waves. 
9:00 ARTS FEATURE: 

"Urban Minstrels." 
One of the "girl 
groups" who set an 
example in pop music 
was "The Exciters." This 
version of "Urban 
Minstrels" will play host 
to Brenda Reed, lead 
singer of The Exciters. 
Produced by Kofi 
Pendergrass. 

10:00 WORLDWATCH: 

"Afrikaieldoscope." 

A program of political 
and historical analysis 
of world and cultural 
events from an African 
perspective. With 
Elombe Brath. 




11:00 NEWS REBROADCAST. 
11:35 Late Night Live Radio. 
1:00 Even Later Night 

Radio. 
1:30 METEOR WATCH. 
Radio with James 
Irsay. 
3:30 MORNING DEW. A 
program devoted to 
the Grateful Dead. 

Friday/21 

6:00 THE MORNING SHOW. 

With Simon Loekie and 
Katy Keiffer. 
9:00 MORNING MUSIC: 
"Stormy Monday." 

With James Browne 
and David Jackson. 




JC»HWHiTE,JR 

Josh White, Jr. began his professional career at the age 
of four, as part of his famous father's club act. In his ado- 
lescence. Josh, Jr., appeared on the Broadway stage, and 
later developed a folk-blues repertoire to become a suc- 
cessful recording artist. He has played and sung on the 
stages of concert halls on four continents and has ap- 
peared at most of the world's major folk and jazz festi- 
vals. Among his current endeavors is a one-man show 
called "Josh," on the life and times of his father, who, 
among many other achievements in a long and distin- 
guished career, wrote 'The House of the Rising Sun." 
Josh White, Jr. comes to WBAI's "Out There On Their 
Own" to discuss his own life and career, as well as those 
of his distinguished father. Producer: Joseph Hurley. En- 
gineer: Peter Jon Shuler. 



10:00 Program 

Announcements. 
11:00 Program 

Announcements. 
12:00 NATURAL LIVING. With 
Gary Null. 
1:00 A Public Affairs 

feature. 
1:30 Live Public Affairs 
programming with 
listener phone calls. 
2:30 A WBAI Arts feature. 

3:00 PUBLIC AFFAIRS 

FEATURE: "Who Killed 
JFK?" A special with 
experts on the possi- 
ble government con- 
spiracy which 
assassinated President 
Kennedy on 11/23/63. 

5:00 The WBAI Arts 
Magazine. 

6:30 THE WBAI EVENING 
NEWS. 

7:15 AFTER-THE-NEWS. 

Coalitions and Unions. 
With Mimi Rosenberg 
and Ken Nash. 

8:00 BERNIE FLESHKIN'S 

ROCK & ROU DANCE 
PARTY. Eat and dance 
along with Bernie and 
triends at Dixie's Hell's 
Kitchen Diner. 
10:00 EVOLUTION ROCK. 

With Kate Borger. 
12:00 Live Radio. 

2:00 IN REAL TIME. New 
age radio with Mary 
Houston and Alfred 
Webre. 

3:00 SPIRIT MOVES. A show 
with consciousness. 
With Dr. Rashon Root- 
womyn. 

Saturday/22 

5:00 HOUR OF THE WOLF. 

Fantasy, for a spell. 

Imagination and 

enchantment Jim 

Freund. 
7:00 CHILDSPLAY. For the 

child in all of us, with 

Sidney Smith. 
8:30 ANY SATURDAY. With 

David Rothenberg. 
10:30 BRUNCH. With Paul 

Gorman. 
12:30 THE GOLDEN AGE OF 

RADIO. Old time radio 

with Max Schmid and 

Jack Shugg, 
2:00 PART OF THE ACT. 

Radio with Lynn 

Samuels. 
3:30 JAZZ SAMPLER. With 

Bill Farrar. 
5:00 ALL MIXED UP. Just as 

the title implies, with 

Peter Bochan. 
7:00 THE WBAI EVENING 

NEWS. 
7:30 HOUSING NOTEBOOK. 

With members of the 

Metropolitan Council 

on Housing, 
8:30 LIVE FROM STUDIO A. 

World Dance Music, 

produced by Al 

Angeloro. 
10:30 RADIO UNNAMEABLE. 

With Bob Foss. 
1:00 LABBRISH. With Habte 

Selassie, 

Sunday/23 

5:00 SOUNDTRACK. All 

about the cinema. 

With Paul Wunder, 
7:00 PIPER IN THE 

MEADOW STRAYING. 

Folk music with Ed 

Haber. 
9:00 HERE OF A SUNDAY 

MORNING. Early music 

with Chris Whent. 
11:00 HARD WORK. Radio 

with Mike Feder, 
12:30 BEHIND THE SCREENS. 

With Dolores Hayes. 
1:00 CON SABOR LATINO. 

Issues and music from 

the Latin community. 

With Mickey Melendez 

and Hernando 

Alvaricci. 
4:30 THROUGH THE OPERA 

GLASS. Rare opera 

recordings with Martin 

Sokol. 
5:00 The WBAI Arts 

Magazine. Hosted by 

Lee Lowenfish. 
5:30 Seventh Inning 

Stretch. Sports 

features & news. 



7:00 THE WBAI EVENING 

NEWS. 
7:30 THE PERSONAL 

COMPUTER SHOW. 

With Joe King. 
8:30 EMANATIONS. With 

Bernard White. 
10:30 RADIO. With James 

Irsay. 
12:30 NEWS REBROADCAST. 
1:00 RADIO. With the 

Creative Unity Collec- 
tive. 
3:00 EVERYTHING OLD IS 

NEW AGAIN. With 

Dave Kenney. 



Monday/24 

6:00 THE MORNING SHOW. 

News, interviews, talk, 
music, and informa- 
tion to get you armed 
and ready for the day. 
With Will K. Wilkins. 
9:00 MORNING MUSIC. 
10:00 Program 

Announcements. 
11:00 Program 

Announcements. 
12:00 NATURAL LIVING. With 
Gary Null. 
1:00 PUBLIC AFFAIRS 

FEATURE: "Nuclear 
Free New Zealand." 
Sir Wallace Rowling, 
former Prime Minister 
of New Zealand and 
currently serving as 
ambassador to 
Washington, discusses 
his country's ban on 
nuclear weapons and 
its effects on New 
Zealand's relationship 
with her allies. 
1:30 Live Public Affairs 
programming with 
listener phone calls. 
2:30 A WBAI Arts feature. 
3:00 Free Form Radio with 

Rosko. 
6:30 THE WBAI EVENING 

NEWS. 
7:30 AFTER-THE-NEWS. Inter 
national issues with 
Samori Marksman. 
8:30 A Public Affairs 

feature. 
9:00 EVENING MUSIC: 
"JImi Hendrix 
Documentary." Part 1 
of a four part 
documentary on the 
life and music of the 
innovative electric 
guitarist. This show 
features many rare or 
previously unreleased 
live and studio perfor- 
mances, as well as in- 
terviews with Hendrix 
himself. Comments 
and insights are also 
provided by people 
associated with and 
influenced by Hendrix, 
including Ornette Col- 
eman and Rahsaan 
Roland Kirk, John 
McLaughlin, John Lee 
Hooker, John Ham- 
mond, Eric Burdon, 
James Hendrix, Sr., 
and others. Parts 2-4 
will be broadcast at 
this time through Thurs- 
day, 
10:00 WORLDWATCH: 
"Ireland In 
Transition." As we 
continue to be denied 
access to news com- 
ing from Ireland, WBAI 
will explore the on- 
going British "shoot-to- 
kill" policy, the failure 
of the recent Anglo- 
Irish Agreement, and 
special live reports 
from Ireland on the 
annual Sinn Fein con- 
ference. With Mike 
Dewan. This discussion 
will continue on 
November 26th in this 
timeslot. 
11:00 NEWS REBROADCAST. 
11:30 Late Night Live Radio. 
With Margot Adier. 

1:00 Even Later Night Uve 
Radio. With Sidney 
Smith. 

3:30 COSMIK DEBRIS. With 

Sharon Griffiths. Radio 
is as radio does. 



Tuesday/25 



6:00 


THE MORNING SHOW. 

A breakfast stew, with 




9:00 


John Scagliotti and 
Sharon Griffiths (who is 
really ready for dinner 
and sleepy-bye). 
MORNING MUSIC. 


10:00 


10:00 


Program 
Announcements. 


11:00 
11 '30 


11:00 


Program 
Announcements. 


1-00 


12:00 


NATURAL LIVING. With 




1:00 


Gary Null. 

A Public Affairs 


1:30 


1:30 


feature. 

Live Public Affairs 


3:30 


2:30 


programming with 
listener phone calls. 
PUBLIC AFFAIRS 
FEATURE: "Indian 


Thi 


2:45 


Diaspora." 
PUBLIC AFFAIRS 
FEATURE: "This Weel< 


6:00 




in Nicaragua." 


9:00 


3:00 


Free Form Radio with 




5:00 


Marilyn Sokol. 
The WBAI Arts 


12:00 


6:30 


Magazine. 

THE WBAI EVENING 


1:00 


7:30 


NEWS. 
AFTER-THE-NEWS. 


1:30 



Economic and cultural 
issues with Econonews 
— Maarten de Kadt, 
Richard Schroder and 
Barbara Solow. 

8:30 A WBAI Arts feature. 

9:00 EVENING MUSIC. Part 
2 of "Jimi Hendrix," an 
in-depth documentary 
on the great guitarist. 
10:00 WORLD WATCH. "The 
Impact of Aids on the 
Family." With 
Rosemary Mealy and 
guests. 
11:00 NEWS REBROADCAST. 
1 1 :30 Late Night Live Radio. 
With Rosemary Mealy. 

1:00 Even Later Night 
Radio. 

1:30 WEAPONRY. Military 
affairs and hardware. 
With Tom Wisker. 

3:30 THE MUSIC GOES 

ROUND AND ROUND. 
With Jock Shugg. 

Wednesday/26 

6:00 THE MORNING SHOW. 

What? Tune in and find 
out. With Will K. Wilkins. 

9:00 MORNING MUSIC. 
10:00 Program 

Announcements. 
11:00 Program 

Announcements. 
12:00 NATURAL LIVING. With 
Gary Null. 

1:00 PUBLIC AFFAIRS 
FEATURE: "Ara- 
besque." The Middle 
East cannot be ig- 
nored. Scarcely a day 
passes that does not 
in some way draw our 
attention to this part of 
the world. Each week 
at this time through 
January, Arabesque 
draws upon the rich 
experience of Arab 
literature, poetry, 
religion, intellectual 
heritage, and popular 
culture to bring fresh 
perspectives to events 
in the Middle East, 

1:30 Live Public Affairs 
programming with 
listener phone calls. 

2:30 ARTS FEATURE: "Maior 
Dome's Stories for 
Boys and Girls— Send 
Me a Dream." It's 
2016 AD, and the US 
has turned into an 
Orwellian madhouse 
that makes Oceania 
look like Knott's Berry 
Farm. (Kind of like this 
place.l^ioduced by 
Charlie Morrow. 

3:00 Free Form Radio with 
Rosko. 

5:00 The WBAI Arts 
Magazine. 

6:30 THE WBAI EVENING 
NEWS. 

7:30 AFTER-THE-NEWS. 

Science and peace 
issues with Michio 
Kaku. 
8:30 A Public Affairs 
feature. 



9:00 EVENING MUSIC. ;Part 

3 of the documentary 
"JImi Hendrix." Pro- 
duced by Burt Scott, 
Craig West, and Don 
West. 

WORLD WATCH. Part 2 
of "Ireland in Transi- 
tion." See listing of 
Nov. 24th for details. 
NEWS REBROADCAST. 
EARTHWATCH. With 
Robert Knight. 
Even Later Night 
Radio. 

BEIN' KRAZEE. With 
Dennis Coleman. 
Punk and Hardcore 
with Susan Browne. 

Thursday/27 

THE MORNING SHOW. 
"Homefries." With 
Fred Herschkowitz, 
MORNING MUSIC: 
"Shoclcing Blue." With 
Delphine Blue. 
NATURAL LIVING. With 
Gary Null. 
A Public Affairs 
feature. 

Live Public Affairs 
programming with 
listener phone calls. 

2:30 PUBLIC AFFAIRS 

FEATURE: "The ANC 
Frontline Report." A 
weekly update on im- 
portant events in South 
Africa. 

2:45 PUBLIC AFFAIRS 
FEATURE: "USSR In 
Change." 

3:00 ARTS FEATURE: "The 3 
Hour and Fifteen 
Minute Turkey." Hold 
the cranberry sauce! 
Music, comedy and 
stuff(ing), produced by 
Jim Freund. 

6:30 THE WBAI EVENING 
NEWS. 

7:30 AFTER-THE-NEWS. City 
Politics with Ruth 
Messinger. 

8:30 ARTS FEATURE: "Jean 
Binta Breeze." A con- 
tinuation of the series 
on Dub poetry. Jean 
Biota Breeze, one of 
the few recorded 
women Dub poets, 
talks about her devel- 
opment as an artist, 
the significance of 
Dub poetry, and gives 
a female perspective 
on the social realities 
of Jamaica and the 
Caribbean, 

9:00 EVENING MUSIC. Part 

4 of the documentary 
"Jimi Hendrix," 

10:00 WORLD WATCH. "Gay 
Porno Today." Explor- 
ing the print and elec- 
tronic media's current 
style of gay pornog- 
raphy on the stages of 
midtown, the books 
and magazines, and 
the gay-porn video 
market. AIDS is a 
reality. . .what is it do- 
ing to the gay porn 
scene? With Larry 
Gutenberg, 

11:00 NEWS REBROADCAST. 

1 1 :35 Late Night Live Radio. 
1:00 Even Later Night 

Radio. 
1:30 METEOR WATCH. 
Radio with James 
irsay. 
3:30 DEAD AIR. With David 
Nolan. 

Friday/28 

6:00 THE MORNING SHOW. 

A veritable chatfest, 
with Simon Loekle and 
Katy Keiffer. 
9:00 MORNING MUSIC: 
"Stormy Monday." 
With James Browne 
and David Jackson. 

10:00 Program 

Announcements. 

11:00 Program 

Announcements. 

12:00 NATURAL LIVING. With 

Gary Null. 
1:00 A Public Affairs 

feature. 
1:30 PUBLIC AFFAIRS 
FEATURE: "Health- 
styles." Health profes- 
sionals examine cur- 



rent trends and is-sues 
In he<7ith care. Produc- 
ed by Thr •^•ur jng and 
HeoiW i- to _. -a Net- 
work. 

2:30 ARTS FEATURE: "Jack 
London Speaks to- 
day!!" It's 1905, and 
times are hard as 
ever. The union has 
brought Jack London 
in to help the struggle. 
Original play by Stuart 
Hutchinson. A Ram's 
Horn production. 

3:00 Free Form Live Radio. 

5:00 The WBAI Arts 
Magazine. 

6:30 THE WBAI EVENING 
NEWS. 

7:15 AFTER-THE-NEWS. 

Coalitions and Unions. 
With Mimi Rosenberg 
and Ken Nash. 

8:00 BERNIE FLESHKIN'S 

ROCK & ROLL DANCE 
PARTY. Eat and dance 
along with Bernie and 
friends at Dixie's Hell's 
Kitchen Diner, 
10:00 BLACK ROCK COALI- 
TION. 

12:00 Live Radio. 
2:00 IN REAL TIME. New 

age radio with Mary 
Houston and Alfred 
Webre, 
3:00 SPIRIT MOVES. A show 

with consciousness. 
With Dr, Rashon Root- 
womyn, 

Saturday/29 

5:00 HOUR OF THE WOLF. 



7:00 


CHILDSPLAY. For the 




child in all of us, with 




Sidney Smith, 


8:30 


ANY SATURDAY. With 




David Rothenberg. 


10:30 


BRUNCH. With Paul 




Gorman, 


12:30 


THE GOLDEN AGE OF 




RADIO. Old time radio 




with Max Schmid and 




Jack Shugg, 


2:00 


PART OF THE ACT. 




Radio with Lynn 




Samuels, 


3:30 


JAZZ SAMPLER. With 




Bill Farrar. 


5:00 


ALL MIXED UP. Just as 




the title implies, with 




Peter Bochan. 


7:00 


THE WBAI EVENING 




NEWS. 


7:30 


HOUSING NOTEBOOK. 



8:30 LIVE FROM STUDIO A. 

World Dance Music, 
produced by Al 
Angeloro. 
10:30 RADIO UNNAMEABLE. 

With Bob Fass. 
1:00 LABBRISH. With Habte 
Selassie. 

Sunday/30 

5:00 SOUNDTRACK. All 

about the cinema. 

With Paul Wunder. 
7:00 PIPER IN THE 

MEADOW STRAYING. 

Folk music with Ed 

Haber. 
9:00 HERE OF A SUNDAY 

MORNING. Early music 

with Chris Whent. 
11:00 HARD WORK. Radio 

with Mike Feder, 
12:30 BEHIND THE SCREENS. 

Delores Hayes goes to 

the movies. 
1:00 CON SABOR LATINO. 

Issues and music from 

the Latin community. 

With Mickey Melendez 

and Hernando 

Alvaricci. 
4:30 THROUGH THE OPERA 

GLASS. Rare opera 

recordings with Martin 

Sokol. 
7:00 THE WBAI EVENING 

NEWS. 
7:30 THE PERSONAL 

COMPUTER SHOW. 

With Joe King. 
8:30 EMANATIONS. With 

Bernard White. 
10:30 RADIO. With James 

Irsay. 
12:30 NEWS REBROADCAST. 
1:00 BACK OF THE BOOK. 

With R. Paul Martin. 
3:00 EVERYTHING OLD IS 

NEW AGAIN. With 

Dave Kenney. 



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Mbulsd Itw loit w«<k ol oocn month *ic*pl tot Urn JulyiAueusI K- 
UM wMch 11 a douOl* luu* ond no folic oppoott ot ttio otid ol July. 
All od< UxHiid a» submiitod by itw Htm (smj day ol llw monlh prioi 
to pubUcoDon S»» imotmooon bokmr lot oddMonol doodHnM. 

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Out of the mouths of volunteers * 



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DItcounto: 10X on lot ony non-profit group. 10-20% off for f«p«at 
iTMMrlkxu of ttM tatTf od. Con wbsmut* anoth«r conn*fo^*o<)y 
oa for uM tn ttM tarn* wrtM. tS.OO ryp«Mfflr>g orxi past*-up 
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10% dOcount for ptopayrTwnt. Pr«paym«nta or* du« by ttio first 
FrMoy o* ttw month prior to publtcoHon In ord«r to rocorv* ttw dl»- 
count 

(212)279-0707 



FRED 
HERSHKOWTTZ 

Host of "Home Fries" 
will DJ any events: 
Party, Wedding, Bar 
Mitzvah, etc. 
Gteat Dancing Mu^ic, 
Intelligent SelectionSL- 
(212) 279^0707 




S 




e 



I 



I had been to WBAI once before, to see the faces be- 
hind the sound. That was when the affliction became an 
addiction. 

Waiting patiently in the lobby to see Katy Kieffer and 
Simon Loekle, I met Max Schmid, and in direct contra- 
diction to what is commonly true, the face went with the 
name. I told him why I was there, and he said I would 
have to wait in the lobby until their show was over, be- 
cause I wasn't allowed in "the back." That was it. The 
forbidden zone, where IT happened. The labyrinth where 
all the faceless voices came from. There had to be a way 
to get back there. Enter Max! We talked a little while, and 
I made him a balloon hat (which is what I do). He sug- 
gested that I work at the next Marathon (only two weeks 
away), and I said, "sure, no problem." I was in! 

A few days later, 1 'called the station and got a time 
slot. Friday morning, six-thirty a.m. Needless to say, I 
could not sleep the night before, but I was so geared-up, 
it didn't matter. 

The next morning I found myself passing through the 
forbidden doors to the back. Worn carpeting, walls lined 
with old lockers, and boxes on boxes stacked to the ceil- 
ing gave the place a quality of ragged bleakness. Perhaps 
the hour of the morning had something to do with it. 
Then a bright, smiling face peered out of a doorway at 
me. It was Pat Rich, the Volunteer Coordinator. She held 
out her hand. "Oh, you must be Brian," she said. "Glad 
to see you." And suddenly the place got a little brighter. 

Since I had donated in earlier marathons, I had a pretty 
good idea of what was involved. But now I was working 
at the other end. I looked at the volunteer table with its 
eight phones, wondering what I would do if they all rang 
at once. At six-thirty in the morning, I guess it's hard to 
get volunteers, and I was the only one there. With Pat as 
my mentor, however, I eased into my official capacity 
and sat down. And waited for the phone to ring. And 
waited... and waited. This was going to be easier than I 
thought! 



WORLD MUSIC INSTrraTC 



15^ 



FOLIO UNCLASSIFIEDS are the 
inexpensive way to advertise. 
Rates are S.40 per word, S5.00 
minimum, and ads must arrive 
at WBAi one fuil month before 
issue date. Personal ads can 
be given a Folio Box Number; 
add $3.50 to have re-sponses 
forwarded for two months. 

Send typed copy with your 
check to: WBAI FOLIO, 505 8th 
Avenue, New York. NY 10018. 



155 West 72IKI Street, Suile 706. Mew Vbrk, NY 10023 



NOVEMBER 

too P» MUSIC OF SCOnAMD t, DtELAND: SOy Wlivd 



Fn aw PM CREOLE e CAJ<ln MUSIC: Aiphonsc 'Boiwc' A>*ita 
& Cuu«y FentanoC; B a ii a o U 

S« a 00 m CREOLE S CAJUn MUSIC: Al|>hef»c VolMC' Af4ot> 
& Canny FonUnot: B< .» u »okJ 

&« 3:00 pn CREOLE e CAJUn MUSIC: AphonM VotMc' Af4ata 
EC 



Tel. (212) 362-3366. (212) 362-0290 



^Umtmffut^ SquE-rrOutl) 



14 FK 

15 s« 

15 s« 

16 s^ 
20 nu, 
22 s« 



a;0OPm 

a 00 PM 



LE JEU DE ROBm ET MARION. A ISth Ctabmy 
Miwkal CttOM^ir: AAOtijmMM 
LE JEU DE ROBIN ET MARION. A 13Ui Ccnba; 
Musical Cotnady: Anonymuc 

MUSIC OF PERSIA: Bahtam SadegMan C Shahla Mkfal 

MUSIC OF CAMBODIA: Attlato U> be anxxincad 

NEW CURRETfTS DOWNTOWN: Zettsalal 

FOLK t l>OPULAR MUSIC OF AFGHANtSlAH: «W 
'branaaai t> Chetzam Sahnl. Mujadeddl 



27 Bama St. 



27 Barrov St. 

WMf*,glon Squ«* OuTti 



Oi* *uatontMr\' 



Ci«<T*MCh HouM * 



Wv^vigtan Square Oi«cl> 



•n 

• 10 



The first call came around 7:15. Someone was pledging 
money, and I was there to take it from him. If the rest of 
the morning went like this, it would be a piece of cake. 
The station would make money, and my part in it would 
make my day. 

But nothing is ever that easy. Even less so, I found, at 
WBAI. Suddenly the pledge line became a format for 
complaints and information. One listener had not re- 
ceived a Folio on time in six months. Another wanted the 
name of a song Rosco had played last Friday afternoon at 
2:10. Still another wondered who in the world we were, 
and why we were asking for money.... And so it went. 
The next time I looked up, it was after nine. Pat had to go 
to her "other job." "How would you like to learn 'Tally?" 
she said. 'Tally" is the senior position in the volunteer 
room: the person who adds up the money pledged and 
provides a running total to the on-air announcer. If pre- 
mium offers came in, I was to make sure they were prop- 
erly distributed. I said I thought I could handle it, and 
moved over to the Tally chair. I had already moved up a 
notch — although there was no one else in the room to 
note my rapid rise. 

Then Fred Hershkowitz (himself!) walked in. I had 
called his show once, and talked on the air with him 
about experiments that kids do in elementary school sci- 
ence class with potatoes and onions. But he was a star 
then, and I, a mere listener on the line. Now here he 
stood before me in a Mets t-shirt and socks, saying he 
had some jazz records to give as premiums. I would stay 
on top of it somehow. I wasn't about to let Fred Her- 
shkowitz down. 

A few minutes later I heard Fred on the air, offering his 
premiums and asking for listener support. And the 
phones started to ring. I grabbed for one, and another 
rang. Then a third one. 1 held more calls on the line while 
I tallied up the pledges. I wanted Fred to know he was 
having an effect. And more calls came, and more. I 
prayed for a volunteer. And Sam Somebody walked 
through the door. A miracle. 

Sam and I became a team, answering and tallying 
through Fred's show. By the time he signed off we had 
raised over one-thousand dollars. 

But it was time for me to sign off, too (remember, I do 
balloons). And more volunteers were beginning to wan- 
der in, about the way I had once, several days ago. 

As I walked back through the lobby — past the thread- 
bare carpeting and the old lockers and the boxes on boxes 
ready to fall at the first tremor — I felt, I don't know, bet- 
ter. Better for having volunteered. Better for having met 
Max, and Pat, and Fred Hershkowitz himself, and the 
volunteers who came after me. Better for the people who 
still give money even when the station runs as efficiently 
as a steam-powered typewriter. Better. 

— Brian Sanet 




CONING IN DECEMBER 

A n*w Folio £*«t.ur*ii 

METROPOLITAN CALENDAR 



lnt.ttr*«t. 
»ubscrlb*r« 




DECEMBER 5, 6, 7 - 1986 

In These Unprecedented Times — Join Us At The 2nd Aniiiial 

CONFERENCE ON 
SOCIAUSM AND ACTIVISM 

CO-SPONSORED B^ Ttie Guardian, The Progressive, Socialist Review, WBAi-FM 

Keynote speakers include: 

Rep. John Conyers, Barbara CXxJIey, Benjamin Spock, 

Mayor Bernie Sanders, Bertell Oilman, Michio Kaku, Digna Sanchez 

The Reagan Administration's attacks on the minimal gains made over the last 50 years have sent 
movements for social and economic equality in this country reeling. The struggle for such familiar 
demands as decent housing, tmioniiation, disarmament and nonintervention in the Third World is 
difficult. In addition, activists are encumbered with the psychological and social impact of a society 
whose economic base is eroding. 

Never since the Depression has our society witnessed such polarization between rich and poor. 
After having fostered major social catastrophes, Reagan will be leaving office sooil It b at iust such a 
time of political shifts in Ifie wake of economic uncerlainty that social activism can make a difference 
in moving the people and shaping the policies of this country^ 

Bringing together people involved in the most significant struggles o/ our decade is a crucial step 
as we try to solve the problems facing our country and the world. The Conference on Socialism and 
Activism will do iust that. It is only through combining our skills, experietKes and knowledge that we 
will be prepared to face the challenges of the post-Reagan era. 

Special panels on: 

• Challenging the Right-Wing's Manipulation of the Media 

• Politics and Religion In the Black Community 

• Defining ttie Family 

Endofsefs: 

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lUMtyAranoMU Mgoo 0* L* ruffW >Mn HMgKon iMiAv bflM M NoMMn i 

NonulKkif OenOwOTMM Jo«iNoidtn Arm^ UMnun JKft DIM N 

OMuraofmyi 

iBlrwyrKA 



1 fun* 



tar Mora latonaHioa CJI 12111 M}-M» 



UCUIIAIION fOlM 



CWv riljla f zlpL_ 



fiKkM^Fiad: a M Sniw. ilaitm, I |ila|i< 

D (12 Icflubr AdvMCtd kgitlralilM 

((It IcfMlratkM «l Ihc Doorl 

Q (_ OwlribiiiMm 



Mail check or M.O. to: 

Conferen> I', Bon 0716, 

Brookl)ii, NY 11240 



HUNTER COLLEGE NEW YORK CITY 



PARENTS: BEFORE having your in- 
fant/child "routinely" vac- 
cinated, EDUCATE yourself 
about VACCINE DAMAGE. Your 
child's Immune System can toe 
HEALTHY WITHOUT VACCINES. In- 
formation on legal exemptions 
for school. Call or send SASE: 
ANTI-VAC, Box 1777, 2109 
Broadway, NY NY 10023, Attn: 
Sharon Kimmelman, (212) 
870-5117. 

EXOTIC ADVENTURE-TRAVEL- 
ING COMPANION with a taste 
for EXCITEMENT and ADVENTURE 
sought to circle the world on a 
lengthy trek through Australia, 
the Far East, Tibet, Nepal, 
and/or just about anywhere 
else. Budget no problem. Jack, 
Main PO, Box 7289, NY, NY 
10116. 




BANNED & REJECTED Art Show. 
November 8th Opening, 7:30 
p.m. ABC NO RIO, 156 Rivington 
Street. (212) 254-3697, (718) 
388-9549. Performances: Mis Fit 
and others. 

WANTED: "AZNAVOUR SINGS," 
"AZNAVOUR Volumes 1, 2." 
Please respond to FOLIO, Box 
51. 

RUSSIAN! Intensive tutoring in the 
language from zero up (and 
upper and upper— yup!) by a 
native teacher who is over-edu- 
cated, over-experienced, over- 
weight— over-everything, who is 
atX5ut to fall off the celibacy 
wagon— again— hey, how did 
that slip in here? Not another 
Sieg for Sig, Freunde?l For if it is, 
it sure brings me no Freud. EX- 
TRA: There will be no clowning 
around — ever— during the 
lessons, for a mere 50% in the 
honorarium; Scout's honor! (718) 
854-4604. 




!:«i^tkh:i^rm 

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