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WBAI99.5 
FOLIO 



NOVEMBER 1991 




Report to the Listener 

Valerie van Isler, General Manager 

An Independent Voice in a Difficult Time 

Like all other forms of media, radio is a tool which can 
empower the community or isolate and undermine it. 
Perhaps no one understood this better than Lew Hill, who 
founded Pacifica Radio more than forty years ago. In 
today's world, we at WBAI are continually challenged to 
nurture and protect the freedom of the press, which is a 
cornerstone for the democratic empowerment of all 
people. 

One of the most important ways that we carry out this 
mandate is by brining our members and listening 
audience responsible, comprehensive, and insightful 
reporting on critical events from across the nation and 
around the world. WBAI featured the most extensive 
coverage in all the New York media of the nomination 
hearings to the Supreme Court of Judge Clarence Thomas. 

And what an event that turned out to be! Some 
optimists from the Washington beltway have said that it 
was more like a national teach-in on issues around sexual 
harassment than a sober examination for the highest court 
in the land. Unfortunately, it was neither, and it degraded 
the process along the way. One thing is certain, however: 
there was more heat than light throughout those days of 
opposing testimony and contested views. With this newest 
appointment, the court is now positioned to take an even 
more narrow, constructionist view of civil liberties and 
first amendment rights. And that means that alternative 
media and community radio stations like WBAI £U'e more 
important than ever to you and all our communities if we 
are to have an informed and democratic society. Your 
membership and continued support make a world of 
difference in the news, international and public affairs 
reports, and arts and cultural programming that you hear 
on this station. 

As the winter months approach and the holiday season 
nears, we will again bring the New York community one of 
the most beautiful events of the year. And this time, it will 
be even more exciting and special as we celebrate the 20th 
anniversary of the WBAI Holiday Crafts Fair. We are 
extending this early invitation to you — our members, 
listeners, and friends — to join us during the first three 
weekends in December — the 6th-8th, 13th-15th, and the 
20th-22th — for our silver celebration of the finest in 
American crafts by some of the nation's best artists. We 
are planning a special preview and a Founders Brunch to 
honor those who have organized and developed the Crafts 
Fair over the last two decades into one of the showcase 
events of the holiday season. 

Finally, a special note to all of our new members who 
joined WBAI radio during the past year: You are invited 
to an exciting evening of information and media viewpoints 
planned for early December. Your New Member invitation 
will tell you all about it, so look for it in the mail. 

Happy Thanksgiving and our thanks to you for giving to 
WBAI. 



The New York Marxist School 

presents: 

The First Vito Marcantonio Conference 
The Multicultural Curriculum: 
Recovering Progressive Traditions 

sponsored by the Vito Marcantonio Forum 
Saturday, November 9, 9am-4pm 

Boris Kagarlitsky 

founder, Russian Socialist Party; author, Farewell 

Perestroika 

Seminar: The Dynamics of Soviet Society Under 

Perestroika 

November 15, 16&17 

Public Lecture: Can Capitalism Prevail In the USSR? 

Thursday, November 14, 8pm 

Luciana Castellina 

founder, // Manifesto, Rome; member, European 

Parliament 

1992 and Left Politics in Europe 

Seminar, December 2, 3 & 4 

Public Lecture, Monday, December 2, 8pm 

Peter Kwong 

author, Chinatown, New York: Labor Movement and 

Politics 

Lecture: Race, Immigration, and the Municipal Budget 

Friday, December 6, 7pm 

Marilyn Clement 

coordinator, MADRE Women's Campaign for National 

Health Care 

Slide show & discussion: Organizing for a National 

Health Plan 

Tuesday, December 10, 8pm 

at: 

the Marxist School 

79 Leonard Street, NYC 

call for details and catalogue: (212) 941-0332 



EVE'S GARDEN... "The Miracle on 57th Street" 

Tucked away on the 4th floor of an office building on 57th Street in New York 
City Is an elegant boutique and bookshop devoted exclusively to women's 
sexual health, self-growth and happiness! 

Eve's Garden offers books on sexuality, relationships, Tantra, Goddess 
history, women-created erotica, and an exciting collection of romantic and 
sensual accessories to enhance self-love and shared love. 
Created by women for women. Eve's Garden is a comfortable space where 
women (and their partners) can shop in a feminist environment that nurtures 
the "intimate connection" And that's ttie miracle! 
Send $2.00 for our mail-order catalog, or visit Mon-Sat Noon-6:30 PM 
EVE'S GARDEN, 119 West 57th St. Suite 420 ( 6 7th Avei NY 10019 212-757-8651 



Come to the 20th Annual WBAI Holiday Crafts 
Fair! Jjj^ New York's oldest, largest and 

^ finest juried crafts event. Over 325 
of America's best professional craftspeople 
will be displaying and selling their own 
unique, handcrafted work. From clothing to 

household goods to 

stuff for the kids— 






if you're ■■■■■i^H looking for it, 
chances are you'll find it here. From $3 to 
$3,000 -we have something for everyone! So 
support your community radio station while 
you do your holiday shopping. ..and meet 
some of your favorite producers, too! 




Three weekends/Three major events 

(with different craftspeople exhibiting each week) 

December 6-8, 13-15 & 20-22 

Fridays: 5PM-9PM 

Saturdays & Sundays: 11AM-6PM 

Ferris Booth Hall 

Columbia University 

1 15th street & Broadway in NYC 

Admission: $6 per person (reduced-rate unlimited entry passes 
available at the door) 

For more information, call (212) 279-0707 during business hours. 



From Haiti to New Yorl<... 

Attorney Roy John Smith, author of Diary of an African 
American Attorney in Haiti specializes in human rights and 
immigration law. He has been a reporter for the WBAI 
Evening News, and his book was featured on Shelf Life, 
WBAI's literary series. Smith's work with Haitian immigrants 
in New York inspired him to travel to Haiti in the spring of 
1990. His visit came on the eve of what many believed to be the 
dawn of democracy, with elections scheduled for later in the 
year. In December, Jean-Bertrand Aristide became the 
country's first democratically elected president, a term which 
was abruptly ended when a military coup seized power this past 
September. 

WBAI News Editor Jennie Bourne spoke with Roy Smith 
shortly after the coup about his visit to Haiti and his work with 
the Haitian community here in New York. The following is an 
excerpt from that interview, which originally aired on WBAI's 
Evening News. 

RS: I wrote Diary of an 

African American Attorney 

in Haiti to share some of 

my love, honor, and 

respect for the Haitian 

people, particularly those 

in various stages of 

attaining legal status in 

New York....Despite all of 

the rhetoric of the U.S. 

government in support of 

democracy in Haiti, the 

Immigration and Natural- 
ization Service has 

constantly and consistently 

discriminated against 

Haitians applying for 

political asylum in the 

United States. While the 

laws have been very 

favorable for applications 

from Cuba, the Soviet 

Union, or Eastern European The grail gate at Father Jean-Bertrand Aristide 's St. John de Bosco Church. The church considered onerous by the 

countries, Haitians have was burned in 1987 by the Macoutes.fornnerDuvaiier bodyguards who remain armed, world. The cry for 

democracy is being lauded 
in Haiti, but the treatment by our government and its 
immigration services towards nationals of that country— right 
within our borders— is horrible. Haitians are systematically 
deported from this country, systematically captured in boats 
in the ocean and told they have no ri^t to apply to the 
United States for poHtical asylum and refuge. No other 
people are treated the way Haitians are treated. 

JB: Yet there are at least 400,000 Haitians in New York. 
RS: There are at least 400,000 to 500,000 known Haitians 
in the New York City area. The number of those missed by 
the U.S. census could easily be double or triple that. If our 
representatives were to speak up today, we would have the 
opportunity to offer these refugees the sanctuary our 
constitution and immigration laws seek to offer others but 
have yet fallen short of for the people of Haiti. 

JB: Can we talk a little bit about the conditions which have 
people fleeing their native country for the United States. 
Even before the coup, Haitians faced very difficult conditions. 




immigration visas for Haitians, as well as for other members 
of the Caribbean. It's unfortunate that the strongest lobby for 
inmiigrant rights in Congress did not include the 
impoverished and oppressed persons of the Caribbean, 
whether it is the En^h speakmg Caribbean with Trinidad 
and Jamaica or the French and Creole speaking Caribbean 
which includes Haiti. It's been called a racist lobby. I support 
immigration rights for everyone; I just feel that this is an 
opportunity, for Haitians and people of African ancestry in 
the Caribbean who are being oppressed, to demand inclusion 
JB: Margolie Rodriguez of the International Immigrants 
Foundation suggested there should be some change in our 
immigration policy, that the State Department could initiate a 
special status for Haitians which would enable them to get 
green cards or working papers here, but I understand that's a 
little more complicated than k might seem. 

RS: It's a political decision. The immigration service, 
under immigration law, has within its power the right to grant 
temporary protective status to persons that are fleeing 

calamities and disasters in 
their countries. Congress 
has determined that status 
will be granted to persons 
from Liberia, due to the 
disaster and oppression 
people of African ancestry 
are experiencing there, 
and it is perfectly within 
the power of the United 
States Congress and the 
administrative agency— the 
Immigration and Naturaliza- 
tion Service — to immediate^ 
issue temporary protective 
status for immigrants from 
Haiti. Haitians would then 
be allowed protection 
from deportation. In my 
opinion, there has been a 
real downplaying in the 
press of the status of 
people in this country who 
are fleeing a regime 



been systematically denied 
any fair hearings on their rights to political asylum in the 
U.S. Many refugees or families fear they would face 
persecution if they were returned to Haiti. It is my position, 
supported by a recent announcement by Amnesty 
International, that these people should apply today for 
political asylum and demand their rights. This is an 
opportunity for our government to practice what it preaches 
by granting people of African ancestry from Haiti the same 
rights that exist for refugees from throughout the world. 

JB: We have a lottery now inviting people from Germany, 
Poland, Eastern Europe, and other parts of the world to 
apply for legal status in the United States. Do you foresee 
any similar opportunity for Haitian people in this country? 

RS: It's a matter of politics on the part of Congress. If 
Congress wanted to have people from Haiti receive the same 
treatment as those refugees who are persecuted in Eastern 
Europe because of their reUgious or political beliefs, there 
would be a lottery and there would be allocated increased 



The per capita income is estimated to be around $300.00 per 
year. Can you tell me a little about the conditions people 
were living under when you visited there last year? 

RS: That is very important and something I sought to 
describe in my book. First, let me say I was inspired by my 
work here at WBAI to search out and understand what was 
causing people of African ancestry in Haiti to fight and stand 
up and challenge the oppression they faced. When I went 
there, I found not only the constantly referred to "specter of 
poverty" — Haiti is the poorest country in the Western 
Hemisphere— but I also learned about U.S. government 
policy. I went to the State Department and the United States 
Information Agency and asked them pointblank what they 
were doing with our tax dollars to improve the Uves of people 
of African ancestry in Haiti. They said they recognized their 
role and responsibility in promoting democracy and 
improving the education system, but expressed frustration at 
the inability of anyone to control the Haitian military. When 
I was there I saw soldiers robbing civilians, business people, 
and peasants in the street. 

JB: This was during peace time? There was no coup going 
on then? 

RS: There was no coup going on. In fact, it was a good 
time: there was relatively little street crime and the airports 
had been opened. This was in May of 1990. The U.S. 
information officer I spoke to said her biggest fear is that in 
Haiti there are leu'ge numbers of young men with guns and 
no food and no money. 

To order a copy of Diary of an African American Attorney 
in Haiti, write to Roy Smith at: 277 Broadway, Suite 1410, 
New York, N.Y. 10007. 



economics decoded 



You may have heard Doug Henwood's economic analysis on 
WBAI. You can read his analysis of the material world in Left 
Business Observer. LBO is a monthly newsletter that 
covers everything from Third World debt to the New York fiscal 
crisis; horn perestroika to the decline in U.S. living standards. 
With regular coverage of the world's financial markets and 
central banks (including our Federal Reserve). 

New subscribers get a free copy of issue #45, with its 
controversial article on Pentagonomics, a wide-ranging exami- 
nation of the military's role in the U.S. political economy — a 
historical look at the origin of the national security state, and an 
analysis of the Pentagon's effects on the civilian economy today. 



salutary antidote to the 
economic mush in main- 
stream periodicals 

— ^Alexander Cockburn 

factual, clear, stylish, and 
funny 

— Susan George, Transna- 
tional Institute 



the most delectable, insightful 
economics commentary 
being written in English 
today 
— James O'Connor, Univ. of 
California-Santa Cruz 

/ read you with pleasure 
— John Kenneth Galbraith 



Subscriptions Individuals, $20 a year (11 issues); $33, two years. 
Institutions, $50, one year; $80, two years. Sorry, we can't bill you. 



Left Business Observer 

250 W 85 St — Dept. B61 * New York NY 10024 




Is the thought of holiday shopping getting you down? 
Looking for a gift more substantial than a sweater? 

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A year's worth of information, in-depth analysis, 

and art rendered easy by 11 issues of the Folio. 

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Thanks for the Megawatts 

By Malcolm Howard 

Malcolm Howard reports for the WBAI Evening News. His 
documentary on James Bay will be part of our special 
Thanks^ving Day proff-amming beginning at 2:30PM on 
Thursday, November 2^h. 

Hydro-electric dcuns built on the LaGrande River in the 
'70s introduced a new phrase to the 14,000 Cree Indians 
living around James Bay in Northern Quebec: Nimass 
aksiwin, or "fish disease," became a household word to 
Crees in the mid '80s after they learned that pike, trout, and 
other fish they pulled from the LaGrande contained 
mercury. 

Below the placid surfaces of LaGrande's reservoirs, the 
invisible toxin formed when methane, released from rotting 
plants, combined with inorganic mercury, which leached 
from newly-submerged soil. The Cree's heavy fish diet 
brought the mercury into their bloodstream and many 
suffered neurological damage. About two-thirds of the 
people m Chisasibi (a town of 2,000 Crees who were 
relocated after the dams made their previous island home on 
the LaGrande unsafe) have higher than normal mercury 
levels. Some elders have 20 times normal levels. 

But the Quebec-owned power monopoly that built the 
LaGrande dams isn't done yet: It wants to build another 16 
dams m the Eeyou Astchee -the Cree word for their 
homeland. Although the utility, Hydro-Quebec, plans to 
spend $62 billion to dam almost every river flowing into the 
James and Hudson Bays, its immediate plans call for three 
huge dams on the Great Whale River, which feeds into 
Hudson Bay. 

The Cree and Inuit (the Cree's northerly neighbors) say 
another huge hydro-electric project would drive their 
centuries-old lifestyle of hunting, trapping, and fishing to 
extinction. Flooding would destroy calving areas for caribou, 
submerge nesting areas for geese, and put Indian hunting 
and trapping grounds under water. Dams on Great Whale 
would engulf 2,700 square miles -the equivalent of sinking 
southern Vermont or all of Long Island. 

Hydro-Quebec, meanwhile, boasts that it is flooding only 
one percent of the 440,000-square-niile James Bay region. 
What H-Q doesn't say is that the one percent they would 
flood is the only productive land for Crees and the only safe 
haven for wildlife. In that sense, Hydro-Quebec's dams are 
Uke smart bombs: They only target valleys where bears, 
beavers, fox, geese -and other animals the Cree rely 
on -find shelter on the wind-swept, subarctic tiaga. The 
natural infrastructure devastated by the dams, therefore, is 
far beyond what is actually covered by water. In fact, a 
watershed the size of Maine and New York combmed would 
be affected. But even the reservoirs are mind boggling: 
Because the Eeyou Astchee is mostly flat, water from 
dammed-up rivers spreads out over the land Uke spilt milk 
on a dinner table. Reservoirs on the LaGrande inundated 
almost 10,000 square miles. 

Perhaps the most sickening part of it all is that 60 percent 
of the power which would be created by the proposed dams 
on the Great Whale River will go to televisions, toasters, and 
air conditioners (radio stations, too) in New York State. The 
state's power authority has signed two contracts with 
Hydro-Quebec worth $19 billion. Unless those contracts are 



cancelled by November 1992, Quebec's debt-ridden utility will 
get the American capital it needs to build the dams. 

"Up until 20 years ago, we didn't use electricity even to 
cook," says Matthew Mukash, a Cree anti-dam activist. "So it's 
hard for us to hear how cities to the south, with used car lots lit 
all night Uke footbaU fields, need aU this power." 

The Cree and environmentaUsts argue that if the New York 
Power Authority (NYPA) put even a fraction of the money 
destined for Hydro-Quebec into conservation programs. New 
Yorkers won't need out-of-state power. Beyond that, money for 
installing better heating, lighting, and energy distribution systems 
would create 25 to 30 jobs per milUon dollars spent; 
Hydro-Quebec's dams would gamer only six jobs per milUon. 

In the process, H-Q would bulldoze the first roads to Great 
Whale, an isolated community of 1,000 Cree and Inuit 
("Eskimo") where the Great Whale River meets Hudson Bay. 
Hydro-Quebec would also build three airports (at least one of 
them big enough for 747s), slash a path through Cree hunting 
areas for 12,000 high-tension power poles, and erect a 
temporary factory town for 4,000 workers only 30 miles from the 
sleepy seaside village. 

Meanwhile, the town's namesake wiU be reduced to a trickle 
one-fifth its current size. "This river is a major calving area for 
the beluga [whale] herd," says Peter Papialuk, who runs a 
hunters' support program in Kuujjuaaraapik, the Inuit side of 
Great Whale. Changes in the salt water content near the river's 
mouth wiU change drastically and the belugas, which use the 
rivers to molt, wiU disappear. So wiU the age old Inuit tradition 
of launching canoes into Hudson Bay and hunting them. 

I began my (volunteer) career as a WBAI reporter after the 
Gulf War, and since then, most of my time has been spent 
covering the James Bay story. One thing I've learned: 
Hydro-dams are not the problem, they're a symptom. 

The United States, like other consumer- or industrial-based 
societies, has a habit of exporting the side effects of its energy 
addictions to far away, or "remote," areas populated by people 
of non-Europeans descent. The war against Iraq is only the most 
glaring example. Now, in the shadow of burning Kuwaiti oil 
fields, President Bush's national energy strategy ignores 
innovation and conservation and caUs for oU exploration in the 
Arctic National WildUfe Refuge, home of Athabascan Gwich'in 
people. 

But that's just another story with a similar plot. Among the 
resources being grabbed from native lands are uranium and coal 
for power plants, trees for paper pulp, and water to process this 
pulp. Meanwhile, rainforests are razed for hamburger meat 
How long can this go on? 

"The fact is, a culture based on conquest is not sustainable, 
and that's something we as indigenous people have come to 
understand very weU," says Winona LaDuke, an environmental 
activist and Anishinabeg (Chippewa) from Minnesota. That 
industrial society is encroaching on both of Earth's poles, and is 
muUing over greenhouse cities on Mars, shows that our leaders 
understand very Uttle about survival. 

I'm glad to teU the James Bay story during the month when 
many of us celebrate Thanksgiving because it's an example of 
Native Americans stiU showing European-based societies how to 
survive in the world we share. You see, if the Cree can help us 
change the wasteful ways of our state's power authority, we 
won't just save North America's last untouched wilderness. And 
we won't just be saving an indigenous culture that's lasted 
thousands of years. We'll save money on Con Ed bills. And 
that's something I'd be particularly grateful for. 



^^■■■••pppMi^r^ 



IMMMMlMlWMiMMIMIMMMilillil^^ 



I 





Top: Dale House, a Cree from Chisasibi, a town 1 ,000 miles north of NYC. Bottom: Nearby spillway on the LaGrande River. Photos by Kirk Condyles. 



If You Missed It, It's Because 
They Missed It 

by Ken Nash 

Ken Nash is co-Producer, with Mimi Rosenberg, of 
Building Bridges: Your Community-Labor Report, heard 
every Thursday from 7:30-8:30PM. 

On Saturday, August 31, 1991, between 250,000 and 
325,000 workers and their allies marched on the capital 
demanding a reversal of the failed policies of the '80s with 
regard to health care, anti-scab legislation, and aid to the 
cities. Solidarity Day II, which took its name from the first 
Solidarity Day 10 years ago when half a million people 
marched on Washington in protest of President Reagan's 
breaking of the PATCO strike, was a huge success— but you 
would never know it by watching the network news or by 
reading New York's Sunday newspapers. Of the media bigs, 
only Cable Network News (CNN) treated the march as a 
major news story, and the Daily News was the only paper to 
give out the AFL-CIO's crowd estimate of 325,000. 

ABC's early evening broadcast devoted less than one 
minute to shots of the march, excerpts from AFL-CIO 
President Lane Kirkland's speech, and a close-up of one of 
the march's many delegations. CBS's 11 o'clock news gave 
the shortest treatment, omitting even the marcher's 
demands. NBC's early evening broadcast did mention the 
demands, although it did so more as an afterthought. The 
network's 11 o'clock news added on a longer piece, but the 
emphasis was placed on the growing weakness of today's 
labor movement. NBC's parent company. General Electric, 
must surely have been pleased. 

CNN is hardly a pro-labor station— but it is a news 
station. They carried two major 2 and 1/2 minute stories, the 
first presenting good visuals of the march and scenes of 
numerous speakers and participants stating their demands. 
They also caught the tension between the march's domestic 
and foreign policy themes and devoted almost the entire last 
half of the broadcast to U.S. labor's role in Eastern 
European unions. The second piece focused on labor's 
demand for a national health care system. Numerous polls 
were examined showing that most Americans would pay 
higher taxes to achieve that goal. Other shorter pieces on 
CNN throughout the early evening showed U.S. workers 
marching in Washington, and many of these segments led off 
their broadcasts. 

The Sunday Times, Newsday, and the Sunday News all 
buried their coverage deep within the papers. The Times and 
News articles were short and accompanied by a march 
photo; Newsday chose to save the photo for a follow-up 
page. Only the Sunday News quoted the AFL-CIO and D.C. 
police estimate of 325,000 people zilong with the Federal 
Parks Service's "official" estimate of 250,000. The News and 
Newsday offered the clearest exposition of the major goals of 
the march, with Newsday quoting many New York City rank 
and file unionists, including our own Alberta Wright of 
Brooklyn. 

If tens of thousands of workers marched in Moscow, it 
would be front page news. When a few thousand Right to 
Lifers harass women seeking legal abortions in Wichita, 
Kansas, that too gets priority. But when the AFL-CIO, which 
represents millions of workers, brings 325,000 of them to 



Washington on a hot August day to vent their anger over the 
outrages of the past decade and demand changes for the 
future, they get diminished by the networks and news dailies 
of the Big Apple. Theodore Bikel, President of Artists and I 
Actors of America, pleaded at the march for the » 
Administration to consult with us— not to insult us. Well, it 
doesn't have to insult us. That's what the big three networks 
and New York City's newspapers are for. 




Photo of Solidarity Day II courtesy of the AFL-CIO. 



BEFORE YOU MOVE, 
PLEASE LET US KNOW 

Place label here 

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advance by using this form. Attach your 
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in your new address below. WBAI must pay 
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office. Send to: Address Change, WBAI, 505 
Eighth Avenue, New York, NY 10018. 



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Friday 1 



6:00 The Morning Show... 

8:00 Undercurrents with Fairness and 
Accuracy in Reporting. 

8:30 ...the Morning Show continues. 

!h30 Musical Expressions with host 
R.B, Isles, featuring Mike Longo. 

Noon Natural Living with Gary Null. 

1:00 Ruby III, A Journey into the 
Cosmic and Comic. Dancing for 
Mister Concertina. Mister Concertina, 
head (rf the mob — The Ccmcerto Grosso — 
hires Ruby to find where the rival 
gang — the Scuzzies — get their ultra hi- 
tech weaponry. A ZBS Production. 

1:30 Eastern Standard. A monthly talk 
show challenging Western stereotypes 
of Asian/Pacific Americans; featuring 
news and views from the Asian 
diaspora. Produced by Amy Chen, 
Devika Dayal, and Lawrence Chua. 

2^30 Altemativa Latina. The 

Altemativa Latina Collective brings 
you up-to-date news and information 
on the reality of Latin America and its 



people, both here and abroad. This 
bilingual program focusing on the 
politics, culture, and history of Latin 
America, features live reports from 
around the Americas, literary reviews, 
and a weekly report on the gay and les- 
bian Latino community. 

4:30 Friday Arts Magazine with host 
Joseph Hurley, featuring The Screening 
Room at 5:30 with Paul Wunder. 

6:00 The WBAI Evening News 

7:00 Stay tuned... 

8:00 Behind the Screens. Movie mat- 
ters with Jan Albert. 

8:30 A Moveable Feast. Contemporary 
American literature with host Tbm Vitale. 
Tonight Mark Helprin reads from his 
novel,y4 Soldier of the Great War, and 
talks about beauty in life and fiction. 

9:00 Home Fries. Live radio, comedy, 
music, and call-ins with Fred 
Herschkowitz. 

10:30 Unsung Heroes. Music with 
Jordyn Tyson. 

Midnight The Midnight Ravers. The 

thematic exploration of connections 
between African, American, Jamaican, 



The Midnight Ravers 

Alternating Fridays at Midnight 




^ Renascence ^ 

Psychotherapy 

Associates 

Fees on a sliding scale. 

Village 212-228-5426 

West Side 212-769-9127 

Nyack 914-359-3175 



The Midnight Ravers (clockwise from top): Dred-Scott Keyes, Dro, Terry Wilson, 
and Ben Mapp. 



and Caribbean music with Terry 
Wilson, Dro, Ben Mapp, and Dred- 
Scott Keyes. Every show is guaranteed 
to be a special. 

3:00 Lightshow. Spotlighting inde- 
pendence in and out of the performing 
arts, with hosts Frederick GeoBold 
and Sheila Hill. 

Saturday 2 

5:00 Hour of the Wolf. Science fiction, 
fantasy, enchantment, and the ima^a- 
tion with Jim Freund. 

7:00 As I Please with Simon Loekle. 

8:30 Any Saturday. Live radio with 
David Rothenberg. 

10:30 Lunchpail. Live radio with 
Paul Gorman. 

Noon Housing Notebook. Housing is- 
sues and news with Scott Sommer. 

1:00 Piper in the Meadow Straying. 
Folk music with Edward Haber. 

2:30 Our Time of the Month. The 

monthly magazine of women's issues 
with news and features, live discussion, 
readings, music, and more. Executive 
Producer, Lauren Comiteau. 

4:00 Hear and Now. Contemporary 
sounds with Cynthia Bell and Julie 
Lyoim Lieberman. 

5:00 Soundtrack with host Paul 
Wunder. All about the cinema with 
contributors Dr. Joy Browne, Marcia 
Pally, and Stuart Klawans. 

7:00 The Golden Age of Radio. Vintage 
radio with Max Schmid. By transcrip- 
tion. 

9:00 A Beauty and the Beat Jazz 
Special hosted by Lee Lowenfish. 

11:00 Radio Unnameable. Live radio 
with Bob Fass. 



Emperor Haile Selassie 




Photo by Bliott and Fry from Christine 
Sandfords book, Ethiopia Under Haile Selassie. 



1:00 Labbrish. Rastafari. On Novem- 
ber 2, 1930 in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia, 
in what may still be the ultimate spec- 
tacle on the African continent for the 
twentieth century, Haile Selassie I was 
crowned KING OF KINGS, LORD 
OF LORDS, CONQUERING LION 
OF THE TRIBE OF JUDAH 
ELECT OF GOD, LIGHT OF THE 
WORLD, KING OF ISRAEL, KING 
OF ZION, DEFENDER OF THE 
FAITH, and EMPEROR OF 
ETHIOPIA. This event did a little 
more than just capture the imagination 
of the world. 

In Jamaica, a group of people saw 
Haile Selassie not simply as the 
Emperor of Ethiopia, but as the 
returned JESUS CHRIST Haile Selas- 
sie was, for these people, GOD AL- 
MIGHTY incarnate. Our program will 
explore the phenomenon of Rastafari. 
Its doctrine and social and cultural un- 
pact on Jamaica and the world will be 
discussed with author Horace 
Campbell and one of the movement's 
central figures, Douglas Mack. 
Produced by Habte Selassie. 



Sunday 3 



honor of the composer's 190th 
birthday. 

9:30 Here ofa Sunday Morning. Early 
music with Chris Whent. 

11:30 Hard Work. Live radio with 
Mike Feder. 

1:00 Con Sabor Latino. Issues and 
music from the Latino community, 
with Mickey Melendez and Hernando 
Alvaricci. 

5:30 Latino Journal with Santiago 
Nieves. 

6:00 The WBAI News, including a 
review of the week's stories. 

6:30 Ryan's (Only in) NewYorlc Host 
Lee Ryan celebrates our favorite city 
with the Usual Suspects- Joyce West 
and Marie Becker. 

7:30 Outlooks. Alternative Healing for 
AIDS. Join Liz Gewirtz as she inter- 
views HIV antibody-positive minority 
women and men who are living with 
"AIDS," and the acupuncturist who 
has treated them. Liz will be entertain- 
ing phone calls!! 

8:30 Emanations. Live radio with the 
Emanations Collective -Michael G. 
Haskins, Ulysses T Good, and Theron 
Holmes-Clarke- focusing on the 
African American community. 

10^30 The Creative Unity Collective 
Show. This is ridiculous! We have to 
give in Folio copy way too early! It's 
only October 3rd! Who knows what's 
happening in the world! Has Clarence 
Thomas been confirmed? Who knows, 
I don't know! I can't think of anything' 
to write! You listeners will just have to 
take my word for it, it'll be an interest- 
ing show. Please listen. There'll be 
somethin' on it you'U like! Stereo, 2 hrs. 

12:30 News Rebroadcast 

1:00 Carrier Wave with Sidney Smith. 

3:00 Everything Old Is New Again. 

Music of the theater and more, with 
host David Kenney. 



5:00 Cosmik Debris. Words and music 
from the Void with Rocky and 
Pandora. 

7:00 Martin SokoPs Through the 
Opera Glass. Regina Fiorito-Sokol, 
Executive Producer. This morning we 
present a Bellini Birthday Bash in 



Monday 4 

6:00 The Morning Show with Rosemari 
Mealy... 

8:00 Undercurrents 

8:30 ...the Morning Show contmues. 



9:30 All Mixed Up with Peter Bochan. 

Noon Natural Living. Health and nutri- 
tion issues with Gary Null. 

1:00 Shelf Ufe. WBAI's Uterary series 
presents Ted Moone/s Trajfic and 
Laughter. What do southern Califor- 
nia, high-level diplomacy. Cape Town 
politics, sex, and an L.A. disc jockey 
have in common with the fate of the 
earth? Join us on the L.A. freeway of 
love for our radio adaptation of Ted 
Mooneyes latest comedic thriller. Per- 
formed with members of the Bad 
Neighbors Theatre Company and 
directed by Phillip Suraci. Produced 
and adapted by Piera Paine for the 
ArtsDepartment. Trajfic and Laughter 
will be heard on Shelf Life through 
November 27. 

1:30 Philippines in Focus. Politics, cul- 
ture, art, news, and music by and 
about Filipinos in the United States 
and in the Motherland. Produced by 
Wesley Macawili and Veena Cabreros- 
Sud. 

2:00 Haitian Plerspectives. T\me in as 
producer J. Raynald Louis takes a 
look at the current political situation 
in Haiti. Also: news, issues, and view- 
points from the city's Haitian com- 
munity. 

3:00 The Write Stuff. In this special ex- 
tended edition of The Write Stuff, 
Brandon Judell and Carletta Walker 
host a rousing roundtable discussion 
with John Preston and contributors to 
his two new books, Hometown: Gay 
Men Write About Hometown Where 
They Belong and The Big Gay Book. 
Guests include Arnie Kantrowitz, 
Michael Bronski, and other gay 
notables and some on the fringe of gay 
notability. 

4:30 Ihlkback! Live call-m radio with 
Malachy McCourt. 

6:00 The WBAI Evening News 

6:45 Undercurrents Highlights 

7:00 Behind the News with Samori 
Marksman. 

7:30 World View. Samori Marksman 
hosts this national satellite broadcast 
looking at international issues. 

8:30 Sequoyah. Native American news 
and issues from the Public Affairs 
Department. 



■■Ill- niwii !■ iimiihiiiimiii 



9K)0 Soundscapes: Explorations in 
Radio, Sound, and Music presents^ 
Celebration of Non-commercial Radio. 
On October 4, 1991, WBAI's sister sta- 
tion, KPFA in Berkeley, celebrated the 
dedication of its new $3 million build- 
ing and studio with a nationally broad- 
cast musical event featuring the work 
of composer Lou Harrison. 

"For the ceremonial opening of the 
new building..." says Harrison, "the 
Wallace Alexander Gerbode Founda- 
tion commissioned me to write a 
piece, and I was delighted that KPFAs 
music director, Charles Amirkanian, 
hoped that it might be based on 
Gamelan, perhaps the most beautiful 
kind of orchestra on our planet. 

"In the piece, I touch upon refer- 
ences to the European part of 
Asia...and since I wrote much of the 
work during President Bush's war in 
the Middle East, I set a text by Mark 
TVain about President McKinle/s war 
in the Philippines, a similar kind of 
thing....In the final section, I have 
made a valedictory setting of a section 
of the magnificent testimony of Chief 
Seattle to the Yankee power in 
Washington." That testimony follows: 

Where is a man without the beasts? 

If the beasts were gone, men would die 

from great loneliness of spirit. 

For whatever happens to the beasts 

soon happens to man. 

All things are connected. 

This we know. 

The earth does not belong to man; 

man belongs to the earth. 

This we know. 

All things are connected 

like the blood which unites one family. 

All things are connected. 

Whatever befalls the earth befalls 

the sons of the earth. 

Man did not weave the web of life, 

he is merely a strand in it. 

Whatever he does to the web 

he does to himself. 

A Celebration of Non-commercial 
Radio was produced by Charles 
Amirkhanian and engineered by Jim 
Bennett and Michael Yoshida. 

11:00 News Rebroadcast 

11:45 L'Chaim with Betsy Lenke. 

1:30 Walden's Fond. Animal rights, 
ecology, politics, spirituality and 
music. Hosted by Shelton Walden. 



3:30 Half Rist 3 with Michael G. Late 
night/early morning talk radio with 
Michael G. Haskins. 



Tuesday 5 

Election Day 

6:00 The Morning Show with Laura 

SydeU... 

8:00 Undercurrents 

8:30 The Morning Show continues with 
reports from the Middle East and 
Africa; produced by Sheila Ryan and 
2Lenzile Khoisan. 

9:30 Third World Gallery. Music with 
Chico Alvarez. 

Noon Natural Living with Gary Null. 

1:00 Shelf Life. WBAI's literary series 
presents Tbd Moone/s Traffic and 
Laughter. Produced and adapted by 
Piera Paine for the ArtsDepartment. 

1:30 Ikhrin Voices of the Arab World. 

Musician Mounir Bashir Speaks and 
Plays. Host Barbara Nimri Aziz talks 
with this leading Arab musician about 
Iraqi music and its regional influences; 
recorded in Baghdad. 

2:00 Frontlines Middle East with 
Phyllis Bennis. 

3:00 The Loose Groove. The Arts- 
Department magazine with views, 
reviews, news, muse, you(s), and ticket 
^ve-aways, too(s). 

4:30 Thlkback! Live call-in radio with 
Lynn Samuels. 

6:00 The WBAI Evening News 

6:45 Undercurrents Highlights 

7:00 Behind the News with Samori 
Marksman. 

7:30 Econonews with Maarten De Kadt 
and Marilyn Neimark. 

8^30 AIDS: P^ths to Self-Empower- 
ment and Living. Join Bob Lederer, 
Betsy Lenke, Nicholas Cimorelli, and 
Katrina Haslip for topical, provocative 
reports from the world of immune en- 
hancement. 

9:00 Jazz Sampler with Bill Farrar. 

10:00 That Old Time Religion. Bill 
Canaday presents a survey of African 



First Tuesday: 
Countdown '92 




Exactly one year before the next 
U.S. Presidential election, WBAI's 
Public Affairs Department will begin 
a monthly examination of the various 
candidates seeking the Presidency. 
This special series will be heard the 
first Tuesday of each month and In- 
crease in frequency as the election 
approaches. The producers of Be- 
hind the News, Where We Live, 
Econonews, and AIDS: Paths to Self- 
Empowerment and Living will com- 
bine their resources to make this a 
comprehensive and effective effort. 
Produced by Samori Marksman, 
Sally O'Brien, Zenzile Khoisan, Maar- 
ten De Kadt, Marilyn Neimark, Bob 
Lederer, Betsy Lenke, and Nicholas 
Cimorelli. 



WBAi and the Learning Alliance 
present a: 

COMEDY NIGHT 
BENEFIT 

An evening of comedy and satire 
with NYC's liottest, funniest sociaily 
relevant comics. Our benefit is sure 
to hieip you iaugfi througfi tfie eve- 
ning as you support tfie Learning 
Alliance and WBAI radio. 

WBAI Tafkback\ host 
Lynn Samuels presents: 

• Brett Butler 

• Jonathan Solomon 
• Scott Blakeman 

• Judith Sloan 
• Mindfields 

Friday November 15 
7:45PM 

RS.41 

West 11th St. 

(just west of 6th Ave.) 

$10 $15 $25* 
^$25 and up partially tax deductible 

For information call (212) 226-7171 



American and White Gospel music m 
the English language from the United 
States and the English-speaking 
Caribbean. 

11:00 News Rebroadcast 

11:45 Late Night Live Eclectic Radio 

with Carletta Joy Walker. 

1:30 Weaponry. Tonight's show marks 
the begiiming of a two-month special 
Weaponry series, East Wind Rain: The 
Road to Pearl Harbor. Producers Tom 
Wisker and Jim Dingeman will explore 
the issues and interpretations concern- 
injg the outbreak of the Pacific War 
with in-depth analysis of and commen- 
tary on the diplomatic, strategic, 
miUtary, and intelligence history of the 
period. Scholars, appropriate music, 
and authentic voices of the period will 
be a part of this series airing through 
December. 

3:30 Punk and Hardcore with Susan 
Brown. 



Wednesday 6 

6:00 The Morning Show with Shelton 
Walden... 



8:00 Undercurrents 

8:30 ...the Morning Show continues. 

9:30 Ghosts in the Machine: Women in 
Pop. The divas of pop, funk, punk, rap, 
reggae, and other good-for-your-soul 
styles in music, scene reports, and in- 
terviews. With host Victoria Starr. 

Noon Natural Living with Gary Null. 

1:00 Shelf Ufe. WBAI's literary series 
presents Ted Mooney*s Jhaffic and 
Laughter, 

1:30 A Positive Mind with Armand 
DiMele. 

2:30 Foodamour with Bernard Leroy. 
Tips on food and food-related sub- 
jects, with reviews and interviews. 




Illustration by Evelyn Dean 

3:00 Foraging with the ""Wildman" with 
naturalist "Wildman" Steve BrilL 
Beware the Batwoman! Naturalist and 
environmental activist Kathleen Ad- 
kins, a.k.a. the Batwoman, discusses 
her adventures studying our 
misunderstood flying m ammals , 

4:00 Pickney Place. The storytellmg 
program produced by Malika Lee 
Whitney. 

4:30 Ihlkback! Live call-in radio with 
Malika Lee Whitney. 

6:00 The WBAI Evening News 

6:45 Undercurrents Highlights 



7:00 Behind The News. An in-depth 
discussion of the da/s events. 

7:30 The Cutting Edge: Black News 
and Views. Produced by Dred-Scott 
Keyes. 

8:00 Explorations. Science and peace 
issues with Michio Kaku. 

9:00 Orr the Hook with Emanuel 
Goldstein, our resident techno-punk. 

10:00 The Personal Computer Show. 
Host, Joe King. Co-hosts, Hank Kec 
and David Burstein. Produced in 
cooperation with the New York 
Amateur Computer Club. 

11:00 News Rebroadcast 

11:45 Earthwatch with Robert Knight 
broadcasting from a point directly 
above the center of the earth. 

1:30 Stay tuned... 

3:30 Nightshirt Late night weirdness. 
Movies and America with Mike 
Sargent and Chris Taylor. 

Thursday 7 

6:00 The Morning Show with Santiago 
Nieves... 

8:00 Undercurrents 

8:30 ...the Morning Show continues. 

9:30 Shocking Blue. Music with 
Delphine Blue. 

Noon Natural Living with Gary Null. 

1:00 Shelf Life. WBAI's Uterary series 
presents Ted Moone/s Traffic and 
Laughter. 

1:30 This Way Out. The international 
magazine for and about the lesbian 
and gay community. 

2:00 An Afternoon Outing. Larry 
Gutenburg claims that the radio drive 
in gay broadcasters suggests a biologi- 
cal need to spread the words of gay 
pride year round. Proof will be 
provided on today's outing with Larry. 

2:30 Visit New Grimston, Anyway. A 

comedy series about how city govern- 
ment is run — really. Today's episode: 
The Gangs Are Both Here. Brian is 
chosen by Neil to speak to an assembly 
of two warring street gangs, the Plum 



Street Pings and the Warren Street 
Whizzes. A ZPPR Production. 

3H)0 Art Breaking. Charlie Finch on 
the issues, personalities, and deals of 
the art world. 

4H)0 Back to Basics with host Marcia 
McBroom. A talk show for and about 
youth and adults who care about our 
youth. Produced by the For Our 
Children's Sake Foundation. 

4^30 Tklkback! Live call-in radio with 
Playthell Benjamin. 

1 6:00 The WBAI Evening News 

6:45 Undercurrents Highlights 

7:00 Behind the News. An in-depth dis- 
cussion of the day's events with Samori 
Marksman. 

7:30 Building Bridges: Your Com- 
munity Labor Report Produced by 
Ken Nash and Mimi Rosenberg. 

8:30 Radio Free Eireann. A show on 
Ireland and the Irish Freedom strug- 
gle. Produced by Mick Dewan and 
John McDonagh. 

9:00 New York Collage with Nancy 

Rodriguez presenting the best in 
Caribbean and Latin music. 

10:00 Afrikaleidescope with Elombe 
Erath. 

IIHM) News Rebroadcast 

11:45 Late Night with Paul Mclsaac. 

1:30 Live Radio with Bob Fass. 

3:30 Live Air— or is it Dead Air? 
Anyway, music and live stuff with 
partners in crime David Nolan and 
Doug Cheesman. 



Friday 8 



6:00 The Morning Show with Mario 
Murillo... 

8:00 Undercurrents with Fairness and 
Accuracy in Reporting. 

8:30 ...the Morning Show continues. 

9:30 Musical Expressions with 
R.B. Isles. This morning's show fea- 
tures Fred Cole (Nat's brother). 

Noon Natural Living with Gary Null. 



l.-OO Ruby III, A Journey into the 
Cosmic and Comic. TTie Clay People. 
Mother Kapoor asks Ruby's help in 
tracking down her son, Rodant. A 
Boatman steers Inanna to the eerie 
city of the Clay People. A ZBS 
Production. 

1*30 Healthst}ies. Current issues in 
health care with WBAI's Nursing and 
Health Resources Network. 

2:30 Altemativa Latina. The 

Altemativa Latina Collective brings 
you a bilingual program focusing on 
the politics, culture, and history of 
Latin America. 

4:30 Friday Arts Magazine with host 
Joseph Hurley. Featuring 77z^ Screening 
Room at 5:30 with Paul Wunder. 

6:00 The WBAI Evening News 

7:00 Stay tuned... 

8:00 Working Title. Readings 
produced by Alina Avila. Tonight's 
show features New York poet Patricia 
Spears Jones, author of Key of 
Permanent Blue and Mythologidng 
Always: Seven Sonnets. 

8^30 A Moveable Feast. Contemporary 
American literature with host Tom 
Mtale. Tonight, Joy Harjo reads 
poems from Mad Love and War and 
talks about poetry, jazz, and the Native 
American experience. 

9:00 Home Fries, Live radio, comedy, 
music, and call-ins with Fred 
Herschkowitz. 

10:30 Strange Vibrations from the 
Hardcore with the Black Rock 
Coalition. 

Midnight Nightflyte. Music with Chet 
Jackson and Bob Bolder. Produced by 
Kim Jackson. 

3:00 Lightshow. Spotlighting inde- 
pendence in and out of the performing 
arts, with hosts Frederick GeoBold 
and Sheila Hill. 



Saturday 9 

5:00 Hour of the Wolf. Science fiction, 
fantasy, enchantment, and the imagina- 
tion. Live radio with Jim Freund. 

7:00 As I Please with Simon Loekle. 



8:30 Any Saturday. Live radio with 
David Rothenberg. 

10:30 Lunchpail. Live radio with Paul 
Gorman. 

Noon Housing Notebook. Housing is- 
sues and news with Scott Sommer of 
the Metropolitan Council on Housing. 

1:00 Piper in the Meadow Straying. 
Folk music with Edward Haber. 

2:30 Women's Programming. Execu- 
tive Producer, Valecia Phillips. 

4:00 Hear and Now. Contemporary 
sounds with Cynthia Bell and Julie 
Lyonn Lieberman. 

5:00 Soundtrack with host Paul 
Wunder. All about the cinema with 
contributors Dr. Joy Browne, Marcia 
Pally, and Stuart Klawans. 

7:00 The Golden Age of Radio. Vintage 
radio with Max Schmid. Electronically 
re-channeled to simulate stereo. 

The THal of the Catonsville Nine 




9:00 The Ti-ial of the Catonsville 
Nine. Tonight the players of New 
York City's Colony Theatre take part 
in this radio adaptation of Dzmiel 
Berrigan's play based on the 1960s 
trial in Catonsville, Maryland of nine 
war resisters who poured napalm on 
draft records and set them ablaze. The 
nine defendants used this action, their 
arrest, and their trial to call attention 
to the foreign and domestic policies of 
the U.S. government and military. 

The Vietnam conflict is behind us— 
as are Grenada, Panama, Iraq....The 
location changes, but the genocidal 
policies remain the same. Produced by 
Dred-Scott Keyes and Edward 
McMuUan for WBAI radio. 



THE ORIGINAL POLITICAL COMIC BOOK OF THE '80s AND '908 



SAMPLE COPY 
$4 post paid: 



World War 3 

P.O. Box 20271 

Tompkins Square 

N.Y. N.Y. 10009 




11:00 Radio Unnameable. Live radio 
with Bob Fass. 

1;00 Labbrish. Live radio with Habte 
Selassie. 

Sunday 10 

5:00 Heresy, where radio sings, cries, 
whispers, shouts, and laughs— with a 
woman's voice. Fiction, poetry, music, 
and current events through a woman's 
eyes, hands and mind. With Sharon 
Griffiths. 

7:00 Martin Sokol's Through the 
Opera Glass. Regina Fiorito-Sokol, 
Executive Producer. This morning we 
salute Isabella Colbran, the 
phenomenal soprano for whom Ros- 
sini wrote 10 operas. 

9130 Here ofa Sunday Morning. Early 
music with Chris Whent. 

11:30 Hard Work. Live radio with 
Mike Feder, 

1:00 Con Sabor Latino. Issues and 
music from the Latino community, 
with Mickey Melendez and Hernando 
Alvaricci. 

5:30 Latino Journal with Santiago 
Nieves. 

6:00 The WBAI News, mcluding a 
review of the week's stories. 



6:30 Ryan's (Only in) New York. Host 
Lee Ryan celebrates our favorite city 
with the Usual Suspects- Joyce West 
and Marie Becker. 

7^30 The Gay Show. Join the queerest 
show on the radio. Larry Gutenburg, 
Bob Storm, Allan Ross, Marie Becker, 
and others offer the latest in news, 
reviews, and interviews of and with the 
gay/lesbian community. 

8:30 Emanations. Live radio with the 
Emanations Collective -Michael G. 
Haskins, Ulysses T. Good, and Theron 
Holmes-Clarke— focusing on the 
Afric£m American community. 

10:30 J Smooth's Underground Rail- 
road. J Smooth: HIP HOP Radioac- 
tivist/Aural Graffiti Artist/Language 
Vandal/Cultural Terrorist... The 
Underground Railroad: HIP HOP 
Music/HIP HOP Culture/The 
NOWSTEP to the '90s. 

12:30 News Rebroadcast 

1:00 Back of the Book. Pussifica T. Catt 
interviews a U.S. Senator who makes 
money on the side by selling canned 
flatulence. Pope Weaselpenis XVI ex- 
plains why he has nominated Porky Pig 
for sainthood. In an Op-Ed piece, 
Elmer Fudd reveals that Porky is ac- 
tually the Anti-Christ. If there's time. 
Space Aliens will deliver the people of 
earth an ultimatum, otherwise your 
host will prattle on about what a mess 



his life is. Free Form Live Radio by R. 
Paul Martin. 

3:00 Everything Old is New Again. 

Music of the theater and more, with 
host David Kenney. 

Monday 11 

Veterans Day 

6:00 The Morning Show with Rosemari 
Mealy... 

8:00 Undercurrents 

8:30 ...The Morning Show continues. 

9'3Q The Bemie Fleshkin Show. Rock 
n' roll and comedy adventure. 

Noon Natural Living. Health and nutri- 
tion issues with Gary Null. 

1:00 Shelf Life. WBAI's literary series 
presents Ted Moone/s Trajfic and 
Laughter. Performed with members of 
the Bad Neighbors Theatre Company 
and directed by Phillip Suraci. 
Produced and adapted by Piera Paine 
for the ArtsDepartment. 

1:30 Philippines in Focus. Politics, cul- 
ture, art, news, and music by and 
about Filipinos in the United States 
and in the Motherland. Produced by 
Wesley Macawili and Veena Cabreros- 
Sud. 




BE HAxftR.>DU5. -s YOOB- HEINLTK. 



2:00 Veterans Day Special. Join 
Weaponry producers Tom Wisker and 
Jim Dingeman as they explore the 
status of veterans in America today. 
There will be readings of fiction, criti- 
cal commentary, guests from several 
veterans organizations, including 
Vietnam Veterans Against the War 
( WAW), and of course, all the ap- 



immmfm 



m i mwfjfjixnmi - 



propriate music you've come to expect 
from Jim and Tom. 

4:30 Ihlkback! Live call-in radio with 
Malachy McCourt. 

6.*00 The WBAI Evening News 

6:45 Undercurrents Highlights 

7:00 Behind the News with Samori 
Marksman. 

7:30 World View. Samori Marksman 
hosts this national satellite broadcast 
looking at international issues. 

8:30 Sequoyah. Native American news 
and issues from the Public Affairs 
Department. 

9:00 Soundscapes: Explorations in 
Radio, Sound, and Music. Country 
Blues Reconsidered. Spend two hours 
with host Tom Pomposello and the 
great bluesmen of yesteryear— Blind 
Lemon Jefferson, Charley Patton, 
Bukka White, Robert Johnson, Missis- 
sippi John Hurt, Skip James, Lightnin' 
Hopkins, Reverend Gary Davis, and 
more — in this extravaganza of vintage 
78RPMs, field recordings, rare inter- 
views, and commentary.... The roots of 
it all! 

11:00 News Rebroadcast 

11:45 The Moorish Orthodox Radio 
Crusade. Xerox-zines, Sufism, and 
other fun for brainiacs with Peter 
Lamborn Wilson. 

1:30 Late Night Live Radio. Host 
Danah Geffen speaks with Chris Griscom 
of the Light Institute of Galisteo. 

3:30 Mass Backwards. The word of 
Satan revealed via host Mad Max. 
Tonight, two tales of Eastern Bloc Dys- 
topia (in honor of Veterans Day?): 
Renaissance Radio's adaptation of 
Yevgeny Zamyetin's 1920 Russian 
novel WE, which has been called the 
handbook of the subjugation of man; 
and a WPA Theatre radio version of 
R.U.R. (Rossum's Universal Robots) 
by Czech playwright Karel Capek. 
MADA M'l MADAM! 



T\iesday 12 

6:00 The Morning Show >^ith Laura 
SydeU... 

8:00 Undercurrents 



8:30 ...the Morning Show continues 
with reports firom the Middle East and 
Africa; produced by Sheila Ryan and 
Zenzile Khoisan. 

9*30 Third World Gallery. Music with 
Chico Alvarez. 

Noon Natural Living with Gary Null. 

1:00 Shelf Life. WBAI's literary series 
presents Tbd Moone/s Traffic and 
Laughter. 

130 Tkhrin Voices of the Arab World. 

A Children's Arabic School in Brook- 
lyn: A Visit. Host Barbara Nimri Aziz 
is joined by teachers and children in 
this exploration of how Arabic 
children are being taught and what 
facilities are available in New York to 
encourage their Arabic heritage. 

2:00 The Alliance Report. Produced in 
association with the National Alliance 
of Third World Journalists. 



3:00 The Loose Groove. The Arts- 
Department magazine with views, 
reviews, news, muse, you(s), and ticket 
give-aways, too(s). 

430 Ihlkback! with Lynn Samuels. 

6:00 The WBAI Evening News 

6:45 Undercurrents Highlights 

7:00 Behind the News with Samori 
Marksman. 

730 Where We Live. Producers Sally 
O'Brien and 21enzile Khoisan present 
the voices of the disenfranchised and 
U.S. political and social issues generally 
ignored by the mainstream media. 

830 AIDS: VaXhs to Self-Empower- 
ment and Living. Join Bob Lederer, 
Betsy Lenke, Nicholas Cimorelli, and 
Katrina Haslip for topical, provocative 
reports from the world of immune en- 
hancement. 




Mississippi Fred McDowell electrified Delta rhytlims: "I do not play no rock 'n 
roll, y'all. Jus' the straight 'n natch'l blue." Featured on Soundscapes with Tom 
Pomposello on Monday, November 1 1 at 9:00PM. Photo by Chris Strachwitz. 



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-mmoNC DEW- 

GUIDE TO A REAL GOOD TIME 




99.; 
Ncv^VorkCity 



Mornings 
3^50AH-6AM 











PUFF. . 

Si Hudson St-fcomer Hamsort St J 
lower Manho«o« 766-9^59 



Ihe Ultimate Oral 
Experience 

Gum Disease Treatments 
That Work! 




Luz M. Zelaya, R.D.H. 

office of: Dr. Bruce Milner 

120 East 62nd Street 
New York, NY 10021 
212-751-6428 



SMM) Stolen Moments. Jazz^th 
M ahmoud Ibrahim. 

lOHM) Accent on Percussion. Montego 
Joe brings you all kinds of music con- 
taining percussion; with interviews and 
analysis. 

IIHH) News Rebroadcast 

11:45 Late Night Live Eclectic Radio 

with Carletta Joy Walker. 

1:30 Weaponry. East Wind Rain: The 
Road to Pearl Harbor. Producers Tom 
Wisker and Jim Dingeman continue 
their exploration of the issues and in- 
terpretations concerning the outbreak 
of die Pacific War. (see listing on 11/5) 

3:30 Monsters from the Id. Punk rock 
from the dark side of your brain, with 
Ed Banger and Sue Real. 



Wednesday 13 

6:00 The Morning Show with Shelton 
Walden... 



8:00 Undercurrents 

8:30 .^the Morning Show continues. 

9:30 Ghosts in the Machine: Women in 
Pop with host Victoria Starr. 

Noon Natural Living with Gary Null. 

1:00 Shelf Life. WBAI's literary series 
presents Ted Moone/s Thaffic and 
Laughter. 

1:30 Gray Panther Report with Lydia 
Bragger. 

2:30 Foodamour with Bernard Leroy. 

3:00 Foraging with the '*Wildman" with 
naturalist "Wildman" Steve Brill. 
Today's episode: Surviving in the 
Wilderness. Naturalist Tom Squier 
draws on his experiences as a military 
survival instructor and his Native 
American heritage to explain how 
people can use readily available 
natural resources intelligently in emer- 
gency situations. 

4:00 Pickney Place. The storytelling pro- 
gram for children and the child in all 
of us. Produced by Malika Lee Whitney. 

4:30 Ihlkback! with Malika Lee 
Whitney. 

6:00 The WBAI Evening News 

6:45 Undercurrents Highlights 



7:00 Behind the News with Samori 

Marksman. 

7:30 The Cutting Edge: Black News 
and Views. Produced by Dred-Scott 
Keyes. 

8:00 Explorations. Science and peace 
issues with Michio Kaku. 

9:00 Off the Hook with Emanuel 
Goldstein, our resident techno-punk. 

10:00 The Personal Computer Show. 

Host, Joe King. Co-hosts, Hank Kee 
and David Burstein. 

11:00 News Rebroadcast 

11:45 Earthvi^tch with Robert Knight 
broadcasting from a point directly 
above the center of the earth. 

1:30 Stay tuned... 

3:30 Nightshirt. Late night weirdness. 
Movies and America with Mike 
Sargent and Chris Taylor. 



Thursday 14 

6:00 The Morning Show with Santiago 
Nieves... 



8:00 Undercurrents 

8:30 ...the Morning Show continues. 

9^30 Shocldng Blue. Music with 
Delphine Blue. 

Noon Natural Living with Gary Null. 

1:00 Shelf Life. WBAI's literary series 
presents Ted Moone/s Traffic and 
Laughter. 

1-30 This Way Out. The international 
magazine for and about the lesbian 
and gay community. 

2:00 An Afternoon Outing. WBAI's 

weekly news magazine for and about 
the gay and lesbian community, with 
host Gon2^o Aburto. 

2:30 Guess Who*s Stopping *BAI? 

Community radio maven Andrew 
Bailey drops in with his manic 
monologues and more. 

3:00 Art Breaking. Charlie Finch on 
the issues, personalities, and deals of 
the art world. 

4:00 Back to Basics with host Marcia 
McBroom. A talk show for and about 
youth and adults who care about our 



■• I i > Tira inar i M 



youth. Produced by the For Our 
Children's Sake Foundation. 

4:30 l^Ikback! with Playthell Benjamin. 

6:00 The WBAI Evening News 

6:45 Undercurrents Highlights 

7:00 Behind the News with Samori 
Marksman. 

7:30 Building Bridges: Your 
Community Labor Report Produced 
by Ken Nash and Mimi Rosenberg. 

S:30 Radio Free Eireann with Mick 
Dewan and John McDonagh. 

9:00 New York Collage with Nancy 
Rodriguez presenting the best in 
Caribbean and Latin music. 

10:00 Latin America and Caribbean 
Report News and views from the 
hemisphere. Produced by Annette 
Walker. 

11:00 News Rebroadcast 

11:45 Late Night with Paul Mclsaac. 

1:30 Live Radio with Bob Fass. 

3:30 Morning Dew. A program 
devoted to the music of the Grateful 
Dead. Produced by Lance Neal; sound 
by Deyan Ivanovic. 

Friday 15 

6:00 The Morning Show with Msirio 
Murillo... 

8:00 Undercurrents with Fairness and 
Accuracy in Reporting. 

8:30 ...the Morning Show continues. 

9*30 Musical Expressions. Live from 
WBAFs Studio A! Host R.B. Isles 
presents The Rob Silverman Trio. 

Noon Natural Living with Gary Null. 

1:00 Ruby III, A Journey into the 
Cosmic and Comic. The Punishing 
Stones. Professor TJ Teru excavates a 
sunken city of the Nullians, The Big 
Ooze, in sejirch of the "Ultimate 
Game." Meanwhile, a paleontologist 
escorts Inanna to some talking stones 
who make unforgivable puns. A ZBS 
Production. 

1'30 Stay tuned... 



2:30 Alternatlva Latina. The 

Alternativa Latina Collective brings 
you a bilingual progrzun focusing on 
the politics, culture, and history of 
Latin America. 

4:30 Friday Arts Magazine with host 
Joseph Hurley, featuring The Screening 
Room at 5:30 with Paul Wunder. 

6:00 The WBAI Evening News 

7:00 Stay tuned... 

8:00 Behind the Screens. Movie mat- 
ters with Jan Albert. 

8:30 A Moveable Feast Contemporary 
American literature widi host Tom Vitale. 
Tonight, David Gates reads from his first 
novel, Jemigan, and talks about mad 
protagcmists and Beckett. 

9:00 Home Fries. Live radio, comedy, 
music, and call-ins with Fred 
Herschkowitz. 

10:30 Unsung Heroes. Music with 
Jordyn Tyson. 

Midnight The Midnight Ravers. The 
thematic exploration of connections 
between African, American, Jamaican, 
and Caribbean music with Terry 
Wilson, Dro, Ben Mapp, and Dred- 
Scott Keyes. Every show is guziranteed 
to be a special. 

3:00 Lightshow. Spotlighting inde- 
pendence in and out of the performing 
arts, with hosts Frederick GeoBold 
and Sheila Hill. 



Saturday 16 

5:00 Hour of the Wolf. Science fiction, 
fantasy, enchantment, and the imagina- 
tion with Jim Freund. 

7:00 As I Please with Simon Loekle. 

8:30 Any Saturday. Live radio with 
David Rothenberg. 

10:30 Lunchpail. Live radio with 
Paul Gorman. 

Noon Housing Notebook. Housing is- 
sues and news with Scott Sommer. 

1:00 Piper in the Meadow Straying. 

Folk music with Edward Haber. 

2:30 Women's Programming with 
Safiya Bandele. 



4:00 Hear and Now. Contemporary 
sounds with Cynthia Bell and Julie 
Lyonn Lieberman. 

5:00 Soundtrack with host Paul 
Wunder. All about the cinema with 
contributors Dr. Joy Browne, Marcia 
Pally, and Stuart Klawans. 

7:00 The Golden Age of Radio. Vintage 
radio with Max Schmid. Colorized. 

9:00 World Music Special 

11:00 Radio Unnameable. Liye radio 
with Bob Fass. 

1:00 Labbrish. Live radio with Habte 
Selassie. 

Sunday 17 

5:00 Heresy, where radio sings, cries, 
whispers, shouts, and laughs— with a 
woman's voice. Fiction, poetry, music, 
and current events through a woman's 
eyes, hands and mind. With Sharon 
Griffiths. 

7:00 Martin SokoPs Through the 
Opera Glass. Regina Fiorito-Sokol, 
Executive Producer. Manya's favorites. 

9:30 Here ofa Sunday Morning. Early 
music with Chris Whent. 

11:30 Hard Work. Live radio with 
Mike Feder. 

1:00 Con Sabor Latino. Issues and 
music from the Latino community, 
with Mickey Melendez and Hernando 
Alv£U"icci. 

5:30 Latino Journal with Santiago 

Nieves. 

6:00 The WBAI News, including a 
review of the week's stories. 

6-30 Ryan's (Only in) New York. Host 
Lee Ryan celebrates our favorite city 
with the Usual Suspects— Joyce West 
and Marie Becker. 

7-30 Outlooks. "Dish Radio" Magazine 
Special. Join Gary Lacinski and Liz 
Gewirtz as they host the "Dish Radio" 
magazine special— live! Segments in- 
clude a debut of a lesbian soap opera, 
the director of GMHC talking about 
the upcoming Dance-A-Thon, gay 
holiday shopping, and more! 

8*30 Emanations. Live radio with the 
Emanations Collective — Michael G. 
Haskins, Ulysses T. Good, and Theron 




Patrick O'ConneJI and Elizabeth McGovem in a SoundPiay production of In- 
geborg Bachmann's radio drama, The Good God of Manhattan. Monday October 
1 8th at 9:00PM on Soundscapes. 



Holmes-Clarke — focusing on the 
African American community. 

10:30 The Creative Unitj' Collective 
Show. We must apologize for the out- 
burst in the Folio copy of November 
3rcL We've been under a lot of pres- 
sure lately, and, well, /know, some- 
times you say things you don't really 
mean. We apologize to all parties 
concerned for our unprofessional be- 
havior. The Creative Unity Collective 
recognizes the need for prompt receiv- 
ing oi Folio copy. Sorry. Oh yeah, lis- 
ten. Stereo, 2 hrs, 

12:30 News Rebroadcast 



Noon Natural Lining. Health and nutri- 
tion issues with Gary Null 

1H)0 Shelf Life. W^AI's literary series 
presents Ted Moone/s Traffic and 
LMU^ter. Performed with members of 
the Bad Neighbors Theatre Company 
and directed by Phillip Suraci. 
Produced and adapted by Piera Paine 
for the ArtsDepartmenL 

1:30 Philippines in Focus. Produced by 
Weslev Macawili £ind Veena Cabreros- 
Sud ' 

2:00 Haitian Perspectives with J. 
Raynald Louis. 



IHW Carrier Wave with Sidney Smith. 3:00 Stav tuned.. 



3H)0 Everything Old Is New Again. 
Music of the theater and more, with 
host David Kenney. 

Monday 18 

fen IW Moming Show with Rosemari 
Mealy... 

8K)0 Undercurrents 

8:30 ..Jhe Moming Show continues. 

9J0 All Mixed Up with Peter Bochan. 



4K)0 Conversation in the Arts. 

Producer Lee Lowenfish presents 
mo\ie score composer and jazz great 
Johnny MandeL 

4:30 Talkback! Live call-in radio with 
Malachy McCourt. 

feOO The WBAI Evening News 

6:45 Undercurrents Highlights 

7:00 Behind the News with Samori 
Marksman. 

7*30 World View. Samori Marksman 
hosts this national satellite broadcast 
looking at international issues. 



SJO Sequoyah. Native American news 
and issues from the PubUc Affairs 
Department. 

9:00 Soundscapes: Explorations in 
Radio, Sound, and Music with 
Andrew Phillips. The Sound- 
Play/Horspiel Series of radio drama 
continues with Ingeborg Bachmann's 
The Good God of Manhattan. At first, 
the accidental meeting of Jan and 
Jennifer in Grand Central station 
seems banal. But after a one-night 
stand in a cheap hotel, their love affair 
becomes more passionate and all-con- 
suming. They move to higher and 
higher floors in the hotel trying to find 
a language and resfxjnse to the inten- 
sity of their love. Bachmann's play is a 
painful examination of the relationship 
between women and men and challen- 
ges the audience to ask whether ideals 
still make sense in a "practical" world, 
whether they are still possible in a 
world that sanctifies war, exploitation 
and murder. 

Directed by Carey Perloff and trans- 
lated and produced by Faith Wilding, 
this play features Elizabeth McGovem 
and Patrick O'Connell, with music by 
Elizabeth Swados. 

IIHX) News Rebroadcast 

11:45 L'Chaim with Betsy Lenke. 

1:30 Wal den's Pond. Animal rights, 
ecology, politics, spirituality and 
music. Hosted by Shelton Walden. 

3:30 Half Past 3 with Michael a Late 
night'early morning talk radio with 
Michael G. Haskins. 



Tbesday 19 

6KX) The Moming Show with Laura 
SydeU... 

8:00 Undercurrents 

8:30 .~tbe Moming Show continues 
with reports from the Middle East and 
Africa; produced by SheUa Ryan and 
Zenzile Khoisan. 

9-JO Third Worid Caller); Music with 
Chico AK'arez. 

Noon Natural Living with Gary Null. 

1:00 Shelf Life. WBAI's literary series 
presents Ted Moone/s Traffic and 
LMughter. 



1:30 Tkhrir. Voices of the Arab Worid. 

Jerusalem. This afteraoon's show 
begins a series of programs focusing 
on cities of the Arab world. Host 
Barbara Nimri Aziz presents songs 
and poetry which capture the city's his- 
tory and culture, and residents talk 
about the intimacies of living and 
growing up in Jerusalem's neighbor- 
hoods. 

2HX) Frontlines Middle East with 
Phyllis Bennis. 

3KX) Live from The Public Theater 
Feeling Good Forever. Arthur T. 
Wilson's play, Feeling Good Forever, 
is designed to promote communica- 
tion on AIDS prevention. It addres- 
ses issues concerning abstinence, 
condoms, risky sexual behavior, and 
drug abuse, while highlighting peer 
pressure, self-esteem, and the open 
dialogue necessary between parent 
and child through humor and a 
devil's advocacy point of view. 
General health information will be 
presented in thought-provoking seg- 
ments that reveal the three faces of 
AIDS: HIV, ARC, and full blown 
AIDS. To reserve a seat at the Public 
Theater (no admission charge), call 
(212) 598-7185. But if you can't be 
there, tune in! 

4:30 Tklkback! with Lynn Samuels. 

6.-00 The WBAI Evening News 

6:45 Undercurrents Highlights 

7HN) Behind the News with Samori 
Marksman. 

7:30 Ex:ononews with Maarten De Kadt 
and Marilyn Neimark. 

8:30 AIDS: Paths to Self-Empower- 
ment and Living. Join Bob Lederer, 
Betsy Lenke, Nicholas Cimorelli, and 
Katrina Haslip for topical, provocative 
reports from the world of immune 
enhancement. 

9:00 Jazz Sampler Special with Bill 
Farrar. 

ll.-OO News Rebroadcast 

11:45 Late Night Live Eclectic Radio 

with Carletta Joy Walker. 

1:30 Weaponry. East Wind Rain: The 
Road to Pearl Harbor. Produced by 
Tom Wisker and Jim Dingeman. 

3^30 Punk and Hardcore with Susan 
Brown. 



Wednesday 20 Thursday 21 



6:00 The Morning Show with Shelton 
Walden... 

8,-00 Undercurrents 

8:30 «.the Morning Show continues. 

9--30 Ghosts in the Machine: Women in 
Pop with host Victoria Starr. 

Noon Natural Living with Gary NulL 

1:00 Shelf Life, WBAI's literary series 
presents Ted Moone/s Traffic and 
Lmi^ter. 

1:30 A Positive Mind with Armand 
DiMele. 

2:30 Foodamour with Bernard Leroy. 

3:00 Cycling and Recycling. A 
forum on New York City 
grassroots ecological activism 
with Carl Hultberg of the Village 
Green Recycling Team and 
Charlie Komanoff of 
Transportation Alternatives. 

4H)0 Pickney Place. The storytelling 
program produced by Malika Lee 
Whitney. 

4i30 lalkback! with Malika Lee Whimey. 

6,-00 The WBAI Evening News 

6:45 Undercurrents Highlights 

7HX) Behind The News with Samori 
Marksman. 

I'M The Cutting Edge: Black News 
and Views with Dred-Scott Keyes, 

8:00 Explorations, Science and peace 
issues with Michio Kaku, 

9:D0 Off the Hook with Emanuel 
Goldstein, our resident techno-punk. 

10:00 The Personal Computer Show. 
Host, Joe King. Co-hosts, Hank Kec 
and Da\id Burstein. 

11:00 News Rebroadcast 

11:45 Earthw^tch with Robert KnighL 

1-30 Staytuned.„ 

3:30 NightshifL Late night weirdness. 
Movies and America with Mike 
Sargent and Chris Taylor. 



6HX) The Morning Show with Santiago 

Nieves... 

8K)0 Undercurrents 

8:30 .„the Morning Show contiflnes. 

9-30 Shocking Bloc. Mnsicwidi 
Delphine Blue. 



Media Network 

and th€ Hunter College 

Department of 

Communications Present: 

Repackaging 

Paradise: 

Media Strategies For 

A New Worid 

November 23 and 24 
at Hunter College 

RePadcaging Paradise will view the 

upoNning quincentennial celebration 

as the latest in a long series of media 

miarepresefitations of "America." It 

wil emphasize the multiplicity of 

voices that are redefining America by 

creating thdr own medu images. The 

CDTifererKewilf fieature panels; 

workshops and saeenings. 

bell hooks 

Keynote address 

Other speakers will include 

producers Richard Fung, Jackie 

Shearer, Elia Suleiman and Ela 

Troyano; Peggy Berryhill (Radio 

Smithsonian); Tomas 

Ybarra-Frausto (The Rockefeller 

Foundation); actress Danitra 

Vance; and journalist Robert Allen 

Warrior. 




/bf regsl^afian mformalNn conCact 



39 W. 14th St., #403 

New York. NY 10011 
(212)929-2663 



The Guns of November 

Midnight on Thursday November 21st 




WBAI marks the occasion of the 28th anniversary of the assassination of John F. 
Kennedy with our Thursday late night and Friday early morning producers 
examining the question, "Who killed JFK?" Were George Bush and Richard Nixon 
in Dallas on that fateful day? Tune in as we try to answer these and other questions. 
Produced by the Public Affairs Department; with Paul Mclsaac, Bob Pass, David 
Nolan, Doug Cheesman, Samori Marksman, and Mario Murillo. 



Noon Natural Living with Gary Null. 

1:00 Shelf Life. WBAI's literary series 
presents Ted Mooney's Traffic and 
Laughter. 

1:30 This Way Out The international 
lesbian and gay magazine. 

2:00 An Afternoon Outing. Larry 
Gutenburg claims that the radio drive 
in gay bro£idcasters suggests a biologi- 
cal need to spread the words of gay 



pride year round. Proof will be 
provided on today's outing with Larry. 

2:30 Conversation in the Arts. Kathleen 
Mock is a folk musician who has per- 
formed at CBGB's, Beowolf, and Sine. 
Her music expresses daring themes; 
her voice is beautiful both in timbre 
and resonance of truth. T\ine in for 
your heart, mind, and soul. Produced 
by Floraine Kay. 

3:00 Art Breaking with Charlie Finch. 



4:00 Back to Basics with host Marda 
McBroom. Produced by the For Our 
Children's Sake Foundation. 

4*30 Tklkback! with PlaythcU Benjamin. 

6:00 The WBAI Evening News 

6:45 Undercurrents Highlights 

7:00 Behind The News with Samori 
Marksman. 

7:30 Building Bridges: Your 
Community Labor Report Produced 
by Mimi Rosenberg and Ken Nash. 

8:30 Radio Free Eireann with Mick 
Dewan and John McDonagh. 

9:00 New York Collage. The best 
Caribbean and Latin music with host 

Nancy Rodriguez. 

10:00 Afrikaleidescope with Elombe 
Brath. 

11:00 News Rebroadcast 

12:00 The Guns of November (see box) 

Friday 22 

6:00 The Morning Show. Host Mario 
Murillo continues our look at "Who 
kiUed JFK?" 

8:00 Undercurrents with Fairness and 
Accuracy in Reporting. 

8:30 ...the Morning Show continues. 

9:30 Musical Expressions. HostR.B. 

Isles features Kenny Barron. 

Noon Natural Living with Gary Null. 

1:00 Ruby III, A Journey into the 
Cosmic and Comic. The Gate of 
Temptation. Professor Tbru and Ruby 
enter the Nullians' Grand Chamber 
only to find the "Ultimate Game" 
stolen. And defying a terrifying war- 
rior, Inanna miraculously passes 
through the Gate of Temptation. A 
ZBS Production. 

1:30 Healthstyles. Ciu-rent issues in 
health care with WBAI's Nursing and 
Health Resources Network. 

2:30 Altemativa Latina. The bilingual 
program focusing on the politics, cul- 
ture, and history of Latin America. 

4:30 Friday Arts Magazine with host 
Joseph Hurley. Featuring The Screening 
Room at 5:30 with Paul Wunder. 



6.-00 The WBAI Evening News 

7K)0 Staytuned^ 

i8.*00 Working Title. Readings 
produced by Alina Avila. This 
evening's show features an excerpt 
from Geoffrey Fox's novel about two 
women revolutionaries in Latin 
America, Welcome to My Contri. 

8:30 A Moveable Feast. Contemporary 
American literature with host Tom 
Vitale. Tonight, Mary McGarry Morris 
reads fromyl Dangerous Woman and 
talks about creating emotionally dis- 
turbed heroes. 

9H)0 Home Fries. Live radio, comedy, 
music, and call-ins with Fred 
Herschkowitz. 

10:30 Strange Vibrations from the 
Hardcore with the Black Rode Coalition. 

Midnight Nightflyte. Music with Chet 
Jackson and Bob Bolder. Produced by 
Kim Jackson. 

3H)0 Lightshow with hosts Frederick 
GeoBold and Sheila Hill. 



Saturday 23 

5:00 Hour of the Wolf. Science fiction 
and fantasy with Jim Freund. 

7:00 As I Please with Simon Loekle. 

8:30 Any Saturday. Live radio with 
David Rothenberg. 

10:30 Lunchpail. Live radio with 
Paul Gorman. 

Noon Disabled in Action Speaks. Deirf 
Issues, Deaf Rights. Novelist/disability 
rights activist Jean Stewart, whose hus- 
band is Deaf, will host the second of 
this two-part series. Her guests 
include writer Judith Treesberg and 
South African Deaf activist Lindsay 
Dunn. TVeesberg, whose powerful jour- 
nalism has appeared in TTie Nation 
and elsewhere, edits The Bicultural 
Center News and is the mother of a 
Deaf daughter, Dunn is President of 
Black Deaf Advocates. Join three out- 
spoken Deaf rights champions in a 
freewheeling discussion of cultural 
oppression of Deaf people by the 
dominant hearing culture, police 
brutality against Deaf people, racism, 
and other pressing concerns to the 
Deaf community. 



IKM) Piper in the Meadow Straying. 

Folk music with Edward Haber. 

2:30 Women's Programming. Executive 
Producer, Susan Heske. 

4:00 Hear and Now. Contemporary 
sounds with Cynthia Bell and Julie 
Lyonn Lieberman. 

5:00 Soundtrack with host Paul 
Wunder. All about the cinema with 
contributors Dr. Joy Browne, Marcia 
Pally, and Stuart Klawans. 

7:00 The Golden Age of Radio. Vintage 
radio with Max Schmid. DigitzJly trans- 
ferred from original wire recordings. 




Evangelline playwright Sarah Miller. 

9:00 Evangeline. "He had a wild look 
in his eye, like a fire fl/d got caught 
in his head or something..." Evan- 
geline is an evocative play by Sarah 
Miller, directed by Robert Brush, 
with music by Gary Helm, and 

, produced by Vision Quest Produc- 
tions. Tonight's program was 
recorded in performance at CB's 
Gallery on the Bowery and includes 
an interview with the playwright and 
director by WBAI host. Sue Renee 
Bernstein. 

11:00 Radio Unnameable. Live radio 
with Bob Fass. 

1:00 Labbrish. Live radio with Habte 
Selassie. 

Please -pay your 
pledge! 



Sunday 24 

5:00 Maya Motion. With the elements 
of music, conversation, speeches, and 
street sound, this early morning am- 
biance will set the tone for listeners to 
meditate on a few of the ideas holding 
concern in today's world. Produced by 
Paul Ruest/Argot Network. 

7:00 Martin Sokol's Through the 
Opera Glass. Regina Fiorito-Sokol, 
Executive Producer. Michael Scarola 
samples some of the Met's more 
recent complete recordings of works 
by Wagner, Donizetti, and Verdi. 

9^30 Here of a Sunday Morning. Early 
music with Chris Whent. 

11:30 Hard Work. Live radio with 
Mike Feder. 

1:00 Con Sabor Latino. Issues and 
music from the Latino community, 
with Mickey Melendez and Hernando 
Alvaricci. 

5:30 Latino Journal with Santiago 

Nieves. 

6:00 The WBAI News, including a 
review of the week's stories. 

6:30 Ryan's (Only in) New York. Host 
Lee Ryan celebrates om favorite city 
with the Usual Suspects— Joyce West 
and Marie Becker. 

7i30 The Gay Show. Join the queerest 
show on the radio. Larry Gutenburg, 
Bob Storm, Allan Ross, Marie Becker, 
and others offer the latest in news, 
reviews, and interviews of and with the 
gay/lesbian community. 

8:30 Emanations. Live radio with the 
Emanations Collective— Michael G. 
Haskins, Ulysses T. Good, and Theron 
Holmes-Clarke- focusing on the 
African American community. 

10:30 J Smooth's Underground 
Railroad. TWo hours of HIP HOP 
music and culture from J Smooth, the 
original HIP HOP radio activist and 
critically acclaimed aural graffiti artist. 

12:30 News Rebroadcast 

1:00 Back of the Book. He's short, he's 
fat, he's ugly, he's consistently im- 
pecunious, he lacks ambition, he's a 
slob, he's horny, he's your host. From a 
distance he sees her: the butch woman 
on the subway. Six feet tall, bicycle 




Composer Burton Lane Is featured on Out There on Their Own with Joseph 
Hurley. Tuesday, November 26th at 10:00PM. 



shorts, short hair, hairy armpits and a 
down of hair on her legs, unshaven for 
who knows how long. She wore a 
scowl. Can this crush be saved? In a 
culinary segment. Hector and Anvil 
find that this year's turkey crop is miss- 
ing the part where the pinfeathers 
were supposed to go. Itchy T. Echidna 
covers the promotion of the new 
"McBirdButt" sandwich. Free Form 
Live Radio by R. Paul Martin. 

3:00 Everything Old is New Again. 

Music of the theater and more, with 
host David Kenney. 

Monday 25 

6:00 The Morning Show with Rosemari 
Mealy... 

8:00 Undercurrents 

8:30 ...The Morning Show continues. 

9-30 All Mixed Up with Peter Bochan. 

Noon Natural Living. Health and nutri- 
tion issues with Gary Null. 

1:00 Shelf Life. WBAI's literary series 
presents Ted Mooney's Traffic and 
Laughter. Performed with members of 
the Bad Neighbors Theatre Company 
and directed by Phillip Suraci. 
Produced and adapted by Piera Paine 
for the ArtsDepartment. 

1^30 Philippines in Focus. Produced by 
Wesley Macawili and Veena Cabreros- 
Sud. 



2:00 Human Rights in America. Dis- 
cussions with Lloyd D'Aguilar and Joy 
James. 

3:00 City in Crisis: An Environmental 
Roundtable. Producer Evelyn 1\illy 
Costa and guests examine the city's 
many environmental problems and dis- 
cuss £dternatives to our current course. 

4:00 Conversations in the Arts. Dardne 
Thomas talks with African 
Griot/musician Abdou Rahman 
Mangary. 

4^30 Ihlkback! Live call-in radio with 
Malachy McCourt. 

6:00 The WBAI Evening News 

6:45 Undercurrents Highlights 

7:00 Behind the News with Samori 
Marksman. 

7:30 World View. Samori Marksman 
hosts this national satellite broadcast 
looking at international issues. 

8*J0 Sequoyah. Native American news 
and issues from the PubUc Affairs 
Department. 

9:00 Soundscapes: Explorations in 
Radio, Sound, and Music presents 
Distal Audio Broadcasting, Part I. 
Tonight's show is an investigation of 
digital audio broadcasting (DAB) — 
it's already here and soon it will 
change the way you hear the world. 
DAB, audio distributed by satellite, 
means you could tune to WBAI on 
your car radio in New York and drive 



to California listening to BAI all the 
way (if you actually wanted to do 
that!). But will this actually happen? 
Probably not. How will digital radio 
alter what we hear? Radio sound will 
be "CD sound" for a start. And the an- 
noying reception loss we experience 
because of "shadowing" and "multi- 
pathing" will be eliminated. What will 
it do to FM and AM radio? What will 
happen to non-commercial radio? 
Produced by Jake Glanz. 

11:00 News Rebroadcast 

11:45 The Moorish Orthodox Radio 
Crusade. Xerox-zines, Sufism, and 
other fun for brainiacs with Peter 
Lamborn Wdson. 

1:30 Late Night Live Radio with Danah 
Geffen. 

3:30 Mass Backwards. The word of 
Satan revealed via host Mad Max. 
AMANAP, LANAC A, NALP A, 

NAM A! 

T\iesday 26 

6:00 The Morning Show with Laura 
Sydell... 

8:00 Undercurrents 

8:30 ...The Morning Show continues. 

9:30 Third World Gallery. Music with 
Chico Alvarez. 

Noon Natural Living with Gary Null. 

1:00 Shelf Life. WBAI's literary series 
presents Ted Mooney's Trcj^^c and 
Laughter. 

1'3Q Thhrin Voices of the Arab World. 

Water Use and Drainage from the West 
Bank. Water expert Dr. Kamal Abdul 
Fattah, a professor at Bir 2Leit Univer- 
sity, speaks with host Barbara Nimri 
Aziz about water needs and the politi- 
cal implications of the region's 
developing water crisis. 

2:00 The Alliance Report. Produced in 
association with the National AUiance 
of Third World Journalists. 

3:00 The Loose Groove. The Arts- 
Department magazine with views, 
reviews, news, muse, you(s), and ticket 
^ve-aways, too(s). 

4:30 l^lkback! with Lynn Samuels. 

6:00 The WBAI Evening News 



6:45 Undercurrents Highlights 

7:00 Behind the News with Samori 
Marksman. 

7:30 Where We Uve. Producers Sally 
O'Brien and Zenzile Khoisan present 
the voices of the disenfranchised and 
U.S. political and social issues generally 
ignored by the mainstream media. 

8:30 AIDS: Plaths to Self-Empower- 
ment and Living. Join Bob Lederer, 
Betsy Lenke, Nicholas Cimorelli, and 
Katrina Haslip for topical, provocative 
reports from the world of immune en- 
hancement. 

9:00 Stolen Moments. Jazz with 
Mahmoud Ibrahim. 

10:00 Out There on Their Own: Burton 
Lane. Composer Burton Lane has 
had one of the longest and most il- 
lustrious careers in the history of 
Broadway and Hollywood. In his over 
five decades in the business, he has wit- 
nessed the rise and fall of the movie 
musical and significant changes on 
Broadway. Lane has worked with 
great collaborators ranging from Alan 
Jay Lerner to E.Y. "Yip" Harburg to 
Fred Astaire, and he has composed 
the music for Broadway shows includ- 
ing Fm/an'j Rainbow and On a Clear 
Day You Can See Forever, and movies 
such as Royal Wedding. Tbne in tonight 
as the comj)oser comes to Out There 
on Their Own to talk about his life and 
his music. WBAJ's long-running series 
of theatrical profiles is produced and 
hosted by Joseph Hurley, with en- 
gineermg by Paul Ruest and George 
Wellington. 

11:00 News Rebroadcast 

11:45 Late Night live Eclectic Radio 

>^ith Carletta Joy Walker. 

1:30 Weaponry. East Wind Rain: The 
Road to Pearl Harbor. Produced by 
Tom Wisker and Jim Dingeman. 

3:30 Monsters from the Id. Pimk rock 
from the dark side of your brain, with 
Ed Banger and Sue Real. 



Wednesday 27 

6:00 The Morning Show with Shelton 
Walden... 



8:00 Undercurrents 

8:30 ...The Morning Show continues. 



9:30 Ghosts in the Machine: Women in 

Pop with host Victoria Starr. 

Noon Natural Living with Gary Null. 

im Shelf Life. WBAI's literary series 
presents Ted Moone/s Traffic and 
Laughter. 

1'30 Gray I^nther Report with Lydia 

Bragger. 

2:30 Foodamour with Bernard Leroy. 

3.*00 Seventh Inning Stretch. Today's 
sports hour highlights baseball's Hot 
Stove League; with Lee Lowenfish. 

4:00 Pickney Place. The storytelling pro- 
gram for children and the child in all 
of us. Produced by Malika Lee Whitney. 

4:30 Iklkback! with Malika Lee 
Whitney. 

6:00 The WBAI Evening News 

6:45 Undercurrents Highlights 

7:00 Behind the News with Samori 
Marksman. 

7:30 Voodoo Dread: IWelve Hours of 
Jimi Hendrix (see box) 



Thursday 28 

Thanksgiving Day 

6:00 Hie Morning Show with Santiago 
Nieves... 

8:00 Undercurrents 

8:30 ...The Morning Show continues. 

9:30 Shocking Blue. Music with 
Delphine Blue. 

Noon Natural Living with Gary Null. 

1:00 Arts Department Thanksgiving 
Day Special 

1:30 This Way Out. The international 
magazine for and about the lesbian 
and gay community. 

2:00 An Afternoon Outing. WBAI's 
weekly news magazine for and about 
the gay and lesbian community, with 
host Gonzalo Aburto. 

2:30 A Thanksgiving Day Special. As 
most "Americans" sit down to turkey 
and stuffing dinners in celebration of 
Thanksgiving, this country's in- 



November 27-28 
7:30PM - 6;00AM 
The awesome talent that 
traversed our earth to our 
eternal pleasure and benefit, 
Jimi Hendrix, will be the 
object of our attention on 
the 49th anniversary of his 
advent. Join Lance Neal, 
Roxanne Whitaker, and 
Habte Selassie for an ex- 
ploration with author David 

Henderson and others. 
Naturally, Hendrix will be 
there. l\ine in and enjoy 
with us for twelve uninter- 
rupted hours, Jimi Hendrix— 
^^Voodoo Dread, 

Jimi 




NOVEMBER 27, 1942 - SEPTEMBER 18, 1970 



HENDRIX 



The Great National Debate on 
^Multiculturalism' 

Saturday November 30th 8:30AM-6:00PM 




Against the backdrop of a variety of studies showing that the U.S.' non-European 
population will outnumber its European — or white — one by the early 21st century, a 
heated debate is ra^g across the United States of America over what is to be 
taught — and who should teach it — in our institutions of learning. Words and phrases 
such as "multiculturalism," "Afrocentricity," "people of color," and "curriculum of 
inclusion" have all become household concepts in the daily discourse. 

T\me in as WBAI presents a 9-hour special on this all-important issue which brings 
together leading scholars and education activists for discussion, debate, and analysis 
of the relevant issues. 

Among the guests will be historians Howard Zinn, PhiUp Foner, Gerald Home, Dr. 
Molefe Asante, Leonard Jeffries, Josef Ben Jochannan, Jan Carew, Francis 
Fitzgerald, Blanche Wiesen Cook, and others. The program will also feature Native 
American and Asian spokespersons on a variety of issues relevant to the topic, along 
with WBAI producers Rosalba Rolan, Sandra Rodriguez, Annette Walker and Ed 
Haber. Produced by Samori Marksman. (Illustration by Renee Curran.) 



digenous cultures have little to 
celebrate, seemg the holiday as an in- 
sult to their culture and identities. 
Time in this afternoon as Native 
American, and other, activists and 
scholars share their views of the 
hoUday, along with discussions of is- 
sues of concern to Native Americans. 



Featured will be Ingrid Washinanook 
of the American Indian Movement 
(AIM), Ward Churchill, author of 
Agents of Repression, WBAI news 
reporter Mdcolm Howard on the 
James Bay dispute, and others. 
Produced by the Public Affairs 
Department. 



6:00 The WBAI Evening News 

6:45 Undercurrents Highlights 

7:00 Behind the News with Samori 
Marksman. 

7:30 Building Bridges: Your 
Community Labor Report Produced 
by Ken Nash and Mimi Rosenberg, 

8:30 Radio Free Eireann with Mick 
Dewan and John McDonagh. 

9:00 Revolutionary Rhythms with 
WBAI's resident ethnomusicologist, 
Neva Wartell. 

10:00 Latin America and Caribbean 
Report with Annette Walker. 

11:00 News Rebroadcast 

11:45 Late Night with Paul Mclsaac. 

1^30 Live Radio with Bob Fass. 

3:30 Morning Dew. A program 
devoted to the music of the Grateful 
Dead. Produced by Lance Neal; sound 
by Deyan Ivanovic. 

Friday 29 

6:00 The Morning Show with Mario 
Murillo... 

8:00 Undercurrents with Fairness and 
Accuracy in Reporting. 

8:30 Report to the Listener 

9^30 Musical Expressions with R.B. 
Isles. 

Noota Natural Living with Gary Null. 

1:00 Ruby III, A Journey into the 
Cosmic and Comic. The Rise and Fall 
of Rodant Kapoor. While Kapoor and 
his family are shopping in Magnifico, 
he hears the voice of Zumzammim, the 
Dark Force, which promises him the 
Secret Knowledge. A ZBS Production. 

1'3Q Crafts Fair Goes Silver. Starting 
next week, the WBAI Holiday Crafts 
Fair marks its 20th anniversary. This 
small community event has grown into 
the oldest and largest wmter crafts 
show in the United States. To begin 
our celebrations, WBAI producer 
Peter Schmideg presents a special half- 
hour documentary tracing the fair's 
history, featuring Crafts Fair Director 
Matt Alperin, past and present artists, 
and surprise guests. 



2H)0 Stay tuned... 

2:30 Altemativa Latina. The 

Alteraativa Latina Collective brings 
you a bilingual program focusing on 
the politics, culture, and history of 
Latin America. 

4:30 Friday Arts Magazine with host 
Joseph Hurley, featuring TTie Screening 
Room at 5:30 with Paul Wunder. 

6.-00 The WBAI Evening News 

7K)0 Stoytuned^ 

8.-00 Behind the Screens. Movie mat- 
ters with Jan Albert. 

8:30 A Moveable Feast with host Tom 
Vitale. Tonight, Michael Chabon reads 
from his collection of stories, A Model 
World, and talks about models in fictim 
and in life. 

9:00 Home Fries. Live radio, comedy, 
music, and call-ins with Fred 
Herschkowitz. 

10:30 Unsung Heroes. Music with 
Jordyn Tyson. 

Midnight The Midnight Ravers. The 

thematic exploration of connections 
between African, American, Jamaican, 
and Caribbean music with Terry 
Wilson, Dro, Ben Mapp, and Dred- 
Scott Keyes. 

3K)0 Lightshow. Spotlighting inde- 
pendence in and out of the performing 
arts, with hosts Frederick GeoBold 
and Sheila Hill. 



Saturday 30 

5:00 Hour of the Wolf. Science fiction 
and fantasy with Jim Freund. 

7:00 As I Please with Simon Loekle. 

8:30 The Great National Debate on 
"Multiculturalism" (see box) 

6:00 Soundtrack with host Paul 
Wunder. All about the cinema with 
contributors Dr. Joy Browne, Marda 
Pally, and Stuart Klawans. 

7:00 The Golden Age of Radio. Vintage 
radio with Max Schmid. World AIDS 
Day covercige begins. 

9:00 Live from the Nuyorican Poets* 
Cafe! "A Day Without Art" special 
program from New York's Loisaida. 



11:00 Radio Unnameable. Live radio 
with Bob Fass. 

1:00 Labbrish. Live radio with Habte 
Selassie. 



World AIDS Day 

November 30th at 
7:00PM 

through 




Mmmm; 



WBAI radio will join the Worid Health 
Organization, Visual AIDS, Red Hot 
and Blue, ACT UR and others in the 
worldwide effort dedicated to increas- 
ing awareness of the issues and ques- 
tions related to prevention, education, 
and governmental and individual 
responses to AIDS. 

The United Nations' Worid Health 
Organization chose one day for re- 
searchers and activists to air and 
share information. The arts 
community's Visual AIDS developed 
"A Day Without Art" to remember and 
respond. 

Here on WBAI, we will participate by 
presenting art and information not 
available in other media -from old- 
time radio to storytelling to opera - 
and by adding unique perspectives to 
what information is already out there. 
We'll also feature, from 9:00-1 1 :00PM, 
a live broadcast from the Nuyorican 
Poets' Cafe. We will continue our AIDS 
awareness programming with our 
regular Sunday producers throughout 
December 1 st. 

Mark your calendars -and listen for 
more information. Coordinated by 
Betsy Lenke. 



Reflexology 
Shiatsu 



neck 

toes 

arms 

hands 

fingers 

shoulders 

Bob Brand 
(212) 292-9181 



Macintosh 


D e s i 


g n 


Co nsul 


ting 


Train 


\ n g 


System I nstallation 

Design & Typesetting 

Hardware & Software 

Telecommunications 


718-875- 


8949 



WBAI Local Board Meeting 

November 21 8t 
6:30PM at: 

WBAI 
505 Eighth Ave. (at 35th St.) 

Open meeting -all welcome! 



Cover credits: 

Photo by 
Marie Masciovecchio. 

Typesetting by 
219 Type. 



In the Real World... 

Phyllis Bennis {Frontlines Middle East on alternate 
Tuesday afternoons) is a regular contributor to The 
Amsterdam News. She is also editor of a new anthology, 
A Gulf Crisis Reader (Interlink Publishing, Brooklyn), in 
which she has a chapter, "False Consensus: George 
Bush's United Nations." Laura Flanders also has a 
chapter in the book, "Media Mind Games and The War," 
which analyzes U.S. press coverage of the Gulf crisis. In 
September, Laura said a sad goodbye to Undercurrents y 
where she was Senior Producer. She then went off to 
Washington, D.C. to co-host the Robert Gates 
Confirmation Hearings. This month she will attend the 
Journalists for Peace Conference in Helsinki^ where she'll 
represent Pacifica Radio and Fairness and Accuracy in 
Reporting (FAIR) .... Sandra Rodriguez manages and 
sings with Mario Bauza's Afro-Cuban Jazz Orchestra. 
Rosalba Rolon is Executive Director of PREGONES 
Theater in the Bronx. They are co-producers of the 
Women: Love, Song, and Struggle editions of the 
Saturday afternoon women's programming slot .... On 
Tuesday, November 12, during National Children's Book 



Week, Malika Lee Whitney and the Pickney Players will 
perform in a program entitled "Songololo!" which features 
African, Caribbean, and African American stories with 
music. Catch it at the Countee Cullen Library, 103rd St. 
and Lenox Avenue in Harlem. Malika will also participate 
in the annual gathering of the National Association of 
Black Storytellers in Myrtle Beach, South Carolina . . . . 
Scott Sommer {Housing Notebook) is the new president of 
the Legal Services Staff Association, District 65AJAW. 
That's the local that was on strike for 16 weeks from April 
to July. Scott was the strike coordinator. They won! . . . . 
Shelton Walden (Walden's Pond and the Wednesday 
Morning Show) was a participant 
People of Color Environmental 
Washington, D.C. in late October . . , 
luck to Patrice Comninel, the 
Coordinator since May 1989, and 



in the First Annual 

Conference held in 

. Good-bye and good 

station's Volunteer 

to Jennifer Bernet, 



Operations Director and long-time producer, who is 
expecting a child in November. 



Compiled by Annette Walker 

Producer 




WBAI traveled to Jersey Qty in September to play softball with the Renegades, a team sponsored by ACT-UP/NY, From left to right: Jose Santiago, 
Tom Vitale, Anthony Sloan, Michael Laing (a friend of Creative Unity's Yusuf Lamont), Betsy Lenke, and Monica DeFeo. The next game will be in New 

York in the spring -all are welcome, so stay tuned for details. 



To the Editors representing the WBAI 
community: 

A vitriolic letter against me was publtshecl 
in the October Foiio. It is curious that the one 
letter you chose to print is so out of syrx: with 
the overwhelmingly favorable resporwe to my 
16 August 1991 1-hour broadcast 'Bush's Boy 
in the Kremlin -Mikhail Gorbachev's Sys- 
ten^tic Sabotage and Destruction of the Union 
of Soviet Socialist Republics." 

Of the 74 letters that have reached me from 
WBAI listeners, I opened 46, every one of the 
46 compliment nrty presentation.... 

The WBAI top management is apparently 
embarrassed by my event-proven correctness 
and its own irresponsibility during the political 
cataclysm of the past years. Its prior official 
analyst on the Soviet realm is so acceptable to 
the New World Order as to be inviteUe onto 
MacNeil/Lehrer. Its meager attention to the 
Bush/Gorbachev/Yeltsin coup has tieen almoet 
exclusively reactive to, not anticipatory of same, 
generally in step with ttie media herd. Too often 
...when Ted Koppel has not been interested, 
WBAI has not been interested. And connections 
have not been explained.... 

Very ti^uly yours, Stephen Wohl 

Mechanical engineer 

Inventor 

Ardent anti-fascist 

Rockaway Beach, NY 

Dear WBAI, 
Enck>sed is a check in response to your 
current marathon and the inaeditsle volume of 
information, induding the Thomas hearings. 
Gates hearings, and the link between Inslaw, 
lrar>-Contra, October Surprise, eto. 

I had to use VCR tepes, recorcSng in simul- 
cast nrxxle, to record your broadcasts, because 
120-minute audio cassettes arent bng enough. 
Also, I hope to be around (alive) tong 
erwugh to see the Inslaw case made fully public 
and fully exposed. That may only be possible if 
reporters don't keep notes, but send diaries, 
eto. to a distant connputer, probably by modem. 
Please, stay safe while you investigate this 
story. 

Bruce R. 
Bayside, NY 



Dear WBAI, 
This is all I can afford. I was thrilled when 
the new transmitter went on Saturday night 
You're coming in loud and clear -hooray! 



Again, thanks for providing a forum for urv 
signed artists like myself to be heardi 



Sincerely, 



SandaA. 
New York City 



W 



BAI: 



am subsaibing because your alternative 
perspective news and feature coverage should 
continue. 

The Thomas hearings and report on the 
Trench" abortion drug, which I listened to in my 
car from work, are excellent examples. 

But please, some of your people should 
tone down their overpolarized generalizations 
about groups. 

By resorting to extrenne and stereotypical 
remarks, they promote the very kind of behavior 
they purport to be against. ..Biut- 



Good Luck 



A listener 



Dear Fred GeoBold, 
Just a note to say thank you!" very much 
for inviting me to be a guest on Lightshow on 
September 20th — I enjoyed the experience and 
kx)k forward to future broadcasts and possible 
'Lightshow Live" gigs shoukj you start those up 
again. 



Sincerely, 



Jan Corliss 
New Jersey 



Dear Chet: 
We tiie brottiers at C-95, 17 Lower, on 
Rikers Island are avid listeners to your Nightflyte 
program and are very glad that you are keeping 
a very special part of the past alive. However, I 
wish very much that your show could be ex- 
tended. Perhaps support from your lister)ers is 
very important in keeping the linnited time tiiat 
you do have, and I hope and truly believe tiiat 
you get the donations that are needed in keep- 
ing WBAI's Nightflyte alive and all other broad- 
casts that are instrumental to the Black 
Awareness Conscience and community in 
keeping our heritage alive in Black news. 

So keep up the good work Chet and to the 
people - support and keep all segments of 
WBAI-FM alive, please! That you very nrxjch. 
Yours truly in tiie sti-uggle. 

Buteh K.C. & tiie 17 Lower Posse 

Big Low- Down 

Big Dukey Skip 

Gus-Mo 

Razz-A-Dazz 



Dear Malika Lee Whitney, 
Basically I have enjoyed working at the 
radk) statkxi. I have learned a fot about inrv 
provisation and spontaneity. I think one of tiie 
hardest things for me is cold reading, but I am 
glad I was forced into it I think that once tiiis is 
mastered, you can do anything. One of the 
things I wouki like to see happen is more 
audience participation and feedback on Pick- 
ney Place.. .we could hear and talk atiout a tot 
of tiie listener's interests.... 

Anotiier thing that is great about the racfio 
station is there is the power to present certain 
social political views that aren't represented too 
often in media. 

Maya Jones 

WBAI Intern 

Pickney Place/Talk Back 



Dear Friends, 
The staff and Board of the Center for Con- 
stitutional Rights wish to thank the staff and 
Board of WBAI for nanning CCR as one of your 
community organizations of the year and for tiie 
award given on October 6, 1991 at the WBAI 
Festival '91. 

Just as you take pride in your work whk:h 
gives a voice to communities and social change 
movements which don't have the kind of media 
access available to those with power and 
wealth, the Center takes great pride in being a 
fighting voice for these movements t»efore tiie 
courts. Our respect for how well you do your 
work makes us especially proud that you have 
tiiought to recognize us with tiie award. 

It also gave us great pride when you asked 
us to represent you in defending WBAI's view 
of its professional responsibilities. In tiie 1970s, 
when the Manhattan District Attorney issued a 
grand jury subpoena for tapes of broadcasts 
and imprisoned station manager Ed Goodman, 
the Center was proud to have been your voice 
in court as you defended the important profes- 
sional issues involved in broadcast freedom. 
Likewise, during tiie Gulf War, we were proud 
to represent Pacifica News when other media 
would not teke a stand against press censor- 
ship. 



BACKTALK! 



Thanks again for the honor you have be- 
stowed on us. We sleep better because we 
know you're on tiie air. 



Sincerely, 



Jinsoo Kim 

Sara Rios 

Co-Interim Coordinators 



Dear Charlie Rnch, 
I want to express my appreciation to you for 
inviting me and Jeffrey Keough to talk witii you 
last month on Art Breaking about The Drawing 
Center's most recent exhibition, "Seeing 
Through 'Paradise': Artists and the Terezin Con- 
centiation Canp." 

The response to the show has been ex- 
ti'aordinary, tiianks to tiie attention you and 
others in the media gave tiiis exceptional work. 

You will be pleased to know that the show 
is indeed going on to Houston before it is 
returned to Czechoslovakia. 



Best regards. 



Ann Philbin 



W 



BAI: 



'Thank you for the amazing progrannming!! 
I recentiy graduated from Oberlin College, and 
when I got back to Suburban New Jersey, pjfelt 
so isolated and cut off from the progressive 
community I was a part of at Oberlin. Now BAI 
is part of my salvation! Looking at the 
mainstream media makes me sick to my 
stomach— all tiie lies! So thank you BAI for 
letting me have a ray of tiuth during my time at 
home. 

How 'bout a program on anti-racist educa- 
tion? How do we do it? What is it? Is it different 
from multicultural education? How do we do it 
in schools, out of schools? Suggestions: June 
Jordan, Chandra Mohanty....lf I think of others, 
I'll let you know. 

Thanks. (If I had more money, I'd give it!) 



Love. 



Elana 
New Jersey 



Bequest 
Notice 

Please remember 

WBAI 

in your will and estate 

planning. 

For information, contact 

the WBAI Manager 

at 21 2-279-0707. 

Thank you. 



WBAI Staff 



station Manager 

Valerie van Isler 

Development Director 

Daria Kashian 

Program Director 

Andrew Phillips 

Interim Operations Director 

David Nolan 

Operations Assistants 

Max Schmid, Sidney Snnith, Shelton 

Walden.Tom Whelan 

News Editors 

Amy Goodman, Jennie Bourne 

News Reporter 

Jose Santiago 

Public Affairs Director 

Mario Murillo 

Arts Director 

Anthony J. Sloan 

Business Officer/Bookkeeper 

Osorio Potter/Gloria George 

Subscriptions/Computing 

Allen Markman, April Greene 

Receptionist 

Fred Kuhn 

Premium Coordinator/Fulfiilment 

Dorothy Altman/Sharon Thomas 

Chief Engineer 

Bill Wells 

Interim Maintenance Engineer 

Gracen Challenger 

Production Engineers 

Paul Ruest, George Wellington 

Chief Announcer 

Shelton Walden 

Foiio Editor 

Lauren Comiteau 

Foiio Production 

Cherise Barri, Bob Brand, Mary Brand, The 

Creative Unity Collective, Ftenee Curran, 

Betsy Lenke, Marie Masciovecchio, Tom 

Whelan , 

News 

Julia Qark, Julie Cohen, Lauren Comiteau, 
Evelyn Tully Costa, Suzie Coue, Davika 
Deyal, Paul DeRienzo, Jan Ellis, Tom Hamilton, 
Michael G. Haskins, William Hollister, Malcolm 
Howard, David Isay, Dred-Scott Keyes, Robert 
Knight, Andy Lanset, George Lawson, Donald 
Rouse, David Sears, Nadine Shaw, James 
Sherman, Laura Sydell, Richard Vecchio, 
Annette Walker, Eric Williams 

Live Radio 

Margot Adier, Playthell Benjamin, Pusslfica T. 
Catt, Creative Unity Collective (Michael 
Mabem, Yusuf Lament, Darrell McNeill, and 
Rodney Black), Curtis Blis, Emanations 
Collective (Ulysses T. Good, Michael Haskins, 
Theron Holmes-Clarke), Bob Pass, Mike 
Feder, Jim Freund, Danah Geffen, Paul Gorman, 
Michael G. Haskins, Fred Herschkowitz, 
Citizen Kafka, Robert Knight, Betsy Lenke, 
Simon Loekle, Malachy Md3ourt, R Paul Martin, 
Rosemari Mealy, Pandora, ArKlrew Phillips, 
Clu Ramsey, Rocky, David Rothenberg, Lynn 
Samuels, Mike Sargent, Habte Selassie, 
Sidney Smith, Chris Taylor, Shelton WaWen, 
Carletta J. Walker, Bernard White, Malika Lee 
Whitney, Peter LambornWilson 

Public Affairs 

Gonzalo Aburto, Lynn Albin, Eva Yaa 
Asantewaa, Marilyn AdIer, Barbara Nimrl Aziz, 
Marie Becker, Phyllis Bennis, Dennis Bernstein, 
William Borman, Lydia Bragger, Elombe 
Brath, "Wildman" Steve Brill, Dave Burstein, 



Veena Cabreros-Sud, Leo Cawley (1944-1991), 
Nteholas Cimorelli, Lauren Comiteau, Blanche 
Wiesen Cook, Eugenic Cossio, Evelyn Tully 
Costa, Uoyd D'Aguilar, Maarten de Kadt, Mick 
Dewan, Jerry Edwin, Laura Renders, Anne 
Frost, Danah Geffen, Barbara Giickstein, Larry 
Gutenburg, Michael G. hlaskins, Katrine Haslip, 
Susan Heske, Brandon Judell, Kamado, 
Michio Kaku, Judith Kallas, Hank Kee, Dred 
Scott Keyes, Zenzile Khoisan, Joe King, Lisa 
Maya Knauer, Alice Krakauer, Troy Lang, 
Francisco Latorre, Bob Lederer, Betsy Lenke, 
Wesley Macawili, John McDonagh, Ed 
McMullan, Samori Marksman, Diana Mason, 
Ken Nash, Marilyn Neimark, Santiago Nieves, 
Sally O'Brien, Kofi Pendergrass, Valecia Phillips, 
Judith Powell, Anibal Pozzo, Olga Charlotte 
Rahn, Don Rojas, Mimi Rosenberg, Allan 
Ross, Paul Ruest, Sheila Ryan, Mike Sargent, 
Scott Sommer, Paula Tedesco, Valerie van Isler, 
Shelton Walden, Annette Walker, Carletta Joy 
Walker, Tom Whelan, Tom Wisker, Paul 
Zulkowitz 

Arts 

Jan Albert, Chico Alvarez, Hernando Aivaricci, 
Alina Avila, Cherise Barri, Jennifer Bemet, 
Cynthia Bell, Sue Renee Bernstein, Brenda 
Black, Rodney Black, Delphine Blue (Music Coor- 
dinator), Peter Bochan, Bill Boler, Ted Bonnitt, 
Douglas Bost, Susan Brown, Bill Canaday, Tom 
Carrozza, Doug Cheesman, Amy Chen, 
Anthony Coggi, Richard Dieguez, Bill Farrar, 
Qiarles Rnch, Matthew Rnch, John Rsk, Chiri 
Rtzpatrick, Jim Freund, Phil Garfinkel, Kyle 
Caspar, Frederick GeoBold, Liz Gewirtz, brahim 
Gonzalez, Edward Haber, Rick Harris, Joseph 
Hurley, Mahmoud Ibrahim, F^chard B. Isles, 
Deyan Ivanovic, Chet Jackson (Music Coor- 
dinator), Kim Jackson, Brandon Judell, Citizen 
Kafka, Roralne Kay, David Kenney, George 
Konetsky, Manya La Bruja, Yusuf Lamont, 
Bernard Leroy, Julie Lyonn Ueberman, Lee 
Lowenfish, Andrea Lucas (Uterary Coor- 
dinator), Harold Lucious, Michael Mabern, 
Darrell McNeill, Margueritte, Stephen Marshall, 
Joseph Mauceri, Mickey Melendez, Edward 
Menje, Susan Menje, Susan Micari, The 
Midnight Ravers (Terry Wilson, Dro, Ben 
Mapp, and Dred- Scott Keyes), Montego Joe, 
Lance Neal, David Nolan (Poetry Coordinator), 
Nuyorican Poets' Cafe, Rera Paine, Valecia 
Phillips, Charles Potter, Paula Pow, John 
Randolph, Pat Rich, Dana Richardson, Nancy 
Rodriguez, Sue Roseen, Hank Rosenfeld, 
Lee Ryan, Mike Sargent, Don Scherdin, Max 
Schmid, Peter Schmideg, James Sherman, 
Peter Cedric Smith, Regina Rorito- Sokol, 
Karen Spenser, Victoria Starr, Jordyn Tyson, 
Tom Vitale, Carletta Joy Walker, Jeffrey Ward, 
Neva Wartell (Recordings Librarian), Joyce 
West, Chris Whent, Malika Lee Whitney, Paul 
Wunder 

Engineers 

Natalie Budelis, Eliza Butler, Eric Cortey, Ulysses 
T. Good, Michael G. Haskins, Qaude Horvath, 
Dred Scott- Keyes, Betsy Lenke, Bob Parrett, John 
Randolph, Andrew Richter, Peter Schmideg, 
David Smith, Peter Cedric Smith, Spyder, 
Carietta Joy Walker, George Wellinton, Willie 
Wilson, Jr., Paul Wunder. (Sound gatherers: 
Yusef Aziz, Kamau Davis, Crispin Nedd, Melvin 
Simmons) 

WBAI Local Board 

David Addams, Dorothy Altman (staff repre- 
sentative) Samuel Anderson, Leslie Cagan, 
Oymin Chin, Diana Correa, Richard Demenus, 
Miriam Dinerman, Renee Farmer, Bray Healy, 
William Henning, Michio Kaku, Stephen Kass, 



Marjorie Lipsyte, Cecelia McCall, Frank 
Millspaugh, Philip Tajitsu Nash, Steve Post, 
Charies Potter, Nan l^ubin, Lila Steele, Eugene 
Straus, Milton Zisnnan 

Pacifica National Board 

Roberta Brooks, Phil Nash, Jack O'Oell, Kay 
Pierson, Jennie Rhine, Eugene Straus, Dennis 
Sucec, Catherine Thomas, James Yes 



Whole Foods 

in Soho 

New York's Largest Selection 

of Certified Organic Produce 

& Gary Null's products 

Catering available 

212-673-5388 

Open 7 days 

9:00AM-9:30PM 

117 Prince St. NYC 

We ship UPS anywhere 



ADS 



You can't advertise on WBAI, but you 

can take ads in the Folio. Fourteen 

thousand subscribers receive each issue. 

and we often have bonus distribution at 

events. 

Display ad rates are: 

1 inch by 2 inch ( 1 column wide by 1 inch 
high) $ 45 

2 inch by 2 inch ( 1 column wide by 2 inch 
high) $ 95 

2 inch by 4 inch (1/6 page)$135 
l/3page$185 l/2page$250 
FuU page$450 

15% discount for three issue insertion, 
paid in advance, 20% discount for full 
year, eleven issue contract. Agency conv 
misions respected. Simple typesetting 
included.Call the Folio ad coordinator at 
212-279-0707 for more details. 



WBAI is a 50,000 watt, listener-sponsored 
community radio station broadcasting to 
nfx)st of the metropolitan area of New York 
and New Jersey. The station is licensed to 
the Pacifica Foundation and broadcasts at 
a frequency of 99.5 MHz. Subscriptions 
are available at $50/year ($25/year stu- 
dent/senior), $2 of which undenwrites the 
cost of one year's Folio subscription. 
The WBAI Folio is published 11 times a 
year by Pacifica-WBAI Radio and is dis- 
tributed to all subscribers. Second class 
postage paid in NY, NY. ISSN ilO005-272. 
Postmaster: please send address changes 
to: WBAI Radio, 505 8th Ave., NY, NY 
10018. 

When drafting your will, please consider 
making a bequest to WBAI-Pacifica. For 
more information, write or call Valerie van 
Isler, Station Manager, WBAI-FM, 505 
Eighth Ave., New York, NY 10018, (212) 
279-0707. 



Classifled ads... 

may be placed by mail (WBAI, 505 
Eighth Avenue, New York, N.Y. 10018), by 
fax, by dropping them during business hours 
at the station, or by phone. Use the form on 
the back. You must attach a check (payable 
to WBAI) in the full amount, or your VISA 
or Mastercharge number; we cannot bill or 
accept other credit cards, such as American 
Express. The deadline for us to receive ads is 
always the tenth of the previous month: Nov. 
10 for December, etc.... No exceptions can be 
made. We cannot guarantee placement of any 
ad at any time and retain the right to refuse 
any ad (refunding your money, of course) for 
any reason. The cost is $15 (the minimum) 
for the first 35 words and $ .50 for each addi- 
tional word. 

Your ad may be for any legal purpose. You 
may offer your services, sell your product, 
seek a lover, promote your organization or 
whatever. We strongly recommend personal 
ads use a P.O. box or similar (which we can- 
not provide. All ads will be formatted as 
below. The first few words are bold, and no 
other style is available. 

Events 

SPECIAL SOCIAL ISSUES SEMI- 
NARS at the LEARNING ALLIANCE 
in November include: ROBERT BLY; 
Multiculturalism: International Arms 
Trade; MARGOT ADLBR; Tibet; 
BARBARA EHRENRHCH political 
COTrectness; and more. FOR FREE 
CATALOG caU: 212-226-7171. 

LFV^E FROM THE PUBLIC 
THEATER: Feeling Good Forever, 
Arthur T. Wilson's AIDS educati(Mi play. 
Tuesday, November 19th from 3:00- 
4:30PM at the PubUc Theater, 425 
Lafayette SL, Manhattan. Admission is 
free, but please call for reservation: 
(212) 598-7185. Be part of this Uve 
radio drama brought to you by the 
Playwriting in the Schools Program and 
WBAI. 

Exhibitions 

"24 GOOD PAINTINGS, 3 GOOD 
DRAWINGS, AND 5 GOOD PRINTS 
BY ONE GOOD ARTIST" is an ex- 
hibition by Doug Lindsay upstairs at the 
Cedar Tavern, 82 University Place, Oct. 
1 thru Nov. 5. Info: 243-9355. 

Housing Desired 

PLEASE, PLEASE (AND ANOTHER 
JAMES BROWN) PLEEEASE! Help 
the WBAI /\rts Director find a humble 
abode in a multi-racial neighborhood in 
Manhattan or the South Bronx. Clod 



lYxxnmate, coc4. Anthony ain't never 
home anyway. Call Anthony Sloan, the 
head hcxicho of the Gixxive Office, at 
(212) 279-0707, exLl26. 

Products 

PEACE THROUGH PLAY. Non- 
violent, educational toys, easily 
modified for special needs. Teachers, 
grandparents, parents, and aunts and 
uncles: earn toys and money for the 
holidays. To buy or sell DISCOVERY 
Toys, call Marianne (516) 737-8154. 

Health 

NATURAL HEALING FOR ALL 
AGES. Sunrider Herb Foods taken in 
cambnnation with whole foods naturally 
heal the human bocfy for a wonderful 
feeling evoy day! Free Consultaticm. 
Call Wayne (212) 777-3667. 

WHAT IS HEALTH? WHAT IS 
DISEASE? Harmony, Peace, & The 
Power of Healing Lie Within Each of 
Lfe. Learn to create the condtions for 
health! We offer books, video/aucfio 
tapes, research, weekly radio show 
reaching areas of CT, LX, NX MA, bi- 
monthly JOURNAL Send $2.50 for 
sample journal: Natural Ifygiene, Inc. 
RO. Box 2132W, Huntington, CT. 
06484. 

Therapy/Growth 

THE PYRAMID CLUB 2000. Help 
form a world wide celebration for all the 
people of the Earth. If s time. For (fetalis 
call (800) 829-3611 (24 hours). 

BODY-CENTERED PSYCHO- 
THERAPY FOR WOMEN. Gestalt 
dialogs, gentle touch and movement, 
and inner child work help access and 
release emotional blocks. Experienced 
with incest survivors. Abby Turner, 
Certified Rubenfeld Synergist, (212) 
427-2881. 

INSPIRATION FOR PERSONAL 
AND PLANETARY CARE. Con- 
scious guided breathing, reflexolc^ 
foot massage, despair and empower- 
ment, burnout prevention, deep ecol- 
ogy. $30 per 1/2 hour. (212) 
772-3855. Monica Whelan-Marshal. 

Services 

MEL WRIGHT PHOTOGRAPHY. 

Ffcad shots * Public Relations * 
Editorial * Weddngs * Portraits * 



Fashion & Beauty * Model Portfdios. 
Superb creative {Aotograpiiy. Available 
for studio or locations assignments. 
Studio: (212) 243-8732. 

NEED AN EDITOR (written word 
or audio tape), media consultant, or 
organizer with a broad knowledge 
base for your thesis? If so, give Dred- 
Scott Keyes a call: (718) 237-0380. 
Reasonable rates. 

Business Opportunities 

MONEY MAKING OPPORTUNITIES. 

Home woricers needed by 150 firms. 
Tq) Pay, start immediately. Send $1.(X) 
and ^0 self -addressed stamped ea- 
vdope to: Jackson, Box 281, Montclair, 
NJ 07042. 

Audio Cassettes 

CHOMSKY, COCKBURN, 
CALDICOTT, Ehrenreich, Marable, 
Parenti, Said et al. Alternative radio 
programs as heard on WBAI. Write 
for free cassette catalogue. Send 
SASE to David Barsamian, 1814 
Spruce, Boulder, CO 80302. 

Miscellaneous 

COLLECTOR- WILL PAY up to 

$10,000 for Political or Cause buttons. 
Call Mort: 212-764-6330. 



Advertise in Folio! 
Reach over 40,000 readers 
and support WBAI! 
CaU (212) 279-0707. 



WBAI is hiring a: 

• Business Director 

• Operations Director 

• Maintenance Engineer 



By union contract and Pacifica 
policy, permanent hires are made 
through an Applicant Review com- 
mittee, with an affirmative action of- 
ficer. Women and people of color 
encouraged to apply. Send resumes 
promptly to: 

WBAI/Pacifica Radio 

505 Eighth Avenue 

New York, NY 10018 

Attn: Valerie van isier 



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Pacifica Radio 

505 8th Avenue 

New York, N.Y. 10018 



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