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Full text of "WBAI folio"

Another "Shining Black Prince"; 
Ossie Davis, iPresente! 



by Mimi Rosenberg 



Listen ... listen careftilly, can you hear it? 
Close your eyes, and if you were at Harlem's 
Riverside Church— or heard the live WBAI 
coverage— on February 12, 2005, rekindle 
those mournful sounds trumpeted for Ossie 
Davis by Wynton Marsalis. What, you 
weren't there or tuned in? No matter, you 
can conjure up that trumpet's wail, which 
pierced us and insisted that it was OK to 
release our individual pain with every note. 
And then that horn heralded us to soar from the depths of 
despair to the heights of a collective love. The bittersweet 
sounds of the trumpet linger, seeping deep into my soul to fix 
in my consciousness that a true griot always walks amongst the 
people. Presente, brother Ossie! 

Yes, Wynton spirited back our griot, so gracious, so warm 
and engaged in the human condition. For more than a millen- 
nium, griots— the passers-down of oral history— have provided 
the cultural glue for Afiican societies, offering the people coun- 
sel, news, praise-singing, and epic storytelling. Ossie Davis 
embodies the griot tradition and the great spirit of Mother 
Africa. As Mumia Abu-Jamal said of him: "He was a lion, and 
though he has passed, may his brilliant life inspire the lions 
and giants to come." 



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At the memorial, Hasna Muhammed, one of Ossie's 
daughters, generously explained how she had become accus- 
tomed to sharing her father with the great human family that 
her parents so easily became immersed in. In With Ossie and 
Ruby: In This Life Tbgether, their autobiography, the couple 
writes: "We survived— no, more than survived— we triumphed, 
thanks to a strategy that assured us the victory; simply, we 
learned how to belong to the people for whom we worked— 
mostly black people. They were, and still are, the audience that 
never made us rich, but never let us down." 

When labeled anti-American and denied work, Ossie Davis 
and Ruby Dee still triumphed, despite or perhaps because of 
the adversity. They believed in and worked with a deep love for 
the people— committed to values rather than personal aggran- 
dizement and material wealth. Their participation in the 
struggles of hurt and often despised people has placed them in 
the category of 20th-century heroes. 



Above: Wynton Marsalis performs at Ossie Davis memorial service: 
upper right: Mourners outside manorial; lower right: Ossie Davis and 
Ruby Dee at January 2005 Thbute to Rev. Herbert Daughtry at Brooklyn 
Academy of Music. Photo credit for all: William Famngton 




Griots are truth 
tellers who encompass 
in their mighty art the 
experiences of those 
battered by social struc- 
tures. Dreaming of 
egalitarianism with Rev, 
Dr Martin Luther King 
Jr, Ossie gazed out over 
the throngs at the 1963 
March on Washington, 
which he and Ruby 
helped organize. His 
powerful voice delivered 
the eulogy at the 1965 funeral of Malcolm X, calling him "our 
own Black shining prince— who didn't hesitate to die, because 
he loved us so." Three years later, following yet another assas- 
sination, his voice boomed forth like a drum in Central Park 
before a gathering crowd, exhorting us to head to Memphis and 
use our collective anger to seek economic justice for the strik- 
ing sanitation workers there and realize Martin King's last 
dream. And that basso profunda echoed again at Riverside 
Church on March 27, 2003, in a WBAl-organized event shortly 
after the U.S. invasion of Iraq and on the 36th anniversary of 
King's historic speech there opposing the Vietnam War Ossie 
admonished us, as Martin had, to become drum majors for 
peace and justice and to defy those masters of war. 

Growing up in Waycross, Georgia, his 87 eventfial years 
encompassed trailblazing decades of acting, writing, directing, 
and activism. For decades, our griot opened horizons for Black 
people on stage and screen. And from his work against 
McCarthyism in the 1950s to his recent activism against the 
Haitian coup, Ossie fought zealously for civil and human rights 
throughout the world. As an actor, he became most widely 
known for his roles in several Spike Lee films, including Do the 
Right Thing and Jungle Fever (both with Ruby), School Daze, Get 
on the Bus, She Hate Me, and Malcolm X, in which he re-enacted 
his original eulogy. (Last year, his final role— which again 
showed the breadth of his support for human rights— was as 
the loving but conflicted father of a lesbian in the Showtime 
cable TV program, 77ie L Word.) 
Continued on page 7 




INSIDE 


Indra Hardat Named Interim Mgr 


..2 


Farewell from Don Rojas 


..2 


Reports to the Listener 


..3 


Program Schedule 


4-5 


Summer Specials: 


. .5 


Lynne Stewart Speaks Out .... 


..6 


Local Station Board Report . . . 


..6 


Remembering John Hess 


..7 


i Remembering Joel Greenberg . 


..7 


Elributes to Fred Kuhn 


..7 


^ WBAI Youth At Conference . . . 


..8 


Support WBAI 


..8 


NEW WBAI STATION MANAGER 


Details on page 2 





"Stay Tuned" 

FRED KUHN (GEOBOLD) 
1944-2005 




The entire WBAI family mourns the pass- 
ing of our beloved colleague Fred Kuhn. 
Even while enduring the ravaging pain 
of cancer, he never lost his warm human- 
ity, sharp urit, and impeccable integrity. 
Fred ivas a pillar of this institution, and 
we will miss him dearly. May he rest in 
peace. Long live his legacy. 

—Don Rojas, former WBAI General Manager 
Fred Kuhn died April 29 after fighting 
prostate and bone cancer for almost two 
years. Born in 1944 in Shelbyville, 
Indiana, he started working in 1978 as 
WBAI's receptionist and switchboard 
operator, after first volunteering for a 
fund drive in 1967. 

He was known to many listeners as 
Fred Geobold, the host and producer of 
the Light Show, a late-night program for 
many years that has aired since 2002 on 
Wednesdays at 2 p.m. This arts program 
featured live bands, improv groups, 
actors, comedians, and professional 
wrestlers. He had a love of bluegrass 
music, collected banjos and guitars, and 
was fond of a little fipple of Jack. He was 
described as having an encyclopedic 
mind that could delight you with tales 
about everything from a 7-foot, 400- 
pound professional wrestler to the inner 
workings of the Vatican; he was also 
described as an intellectual with the avid 
curiosity of a child. His trademark sign- 
off to every interaction and phone call 
was "Stay tuned." 

—Rebecca Myles, WBAI News Reporter 

For tributes to Fred, see page 7. 



2 • WBAI Folio 



Summer 2005 



www.wbai.org 




The WBAI Folio is published periodically (as funds 
permit) and marled to all listener-members. Thanks to 
all staff and volunteers who contributed to this issue, 
with special appreciation to Liz Grove for extraordinary 
layout and design work. Permission granted to repnnt 
(with credit, including "www.wbaj.org") for nonprofit 
purposes only. 

We welcome comments, suggestions, letters, and 
volunteers. Write us at edltor@wbal.org or at the 
address below. 



Ed iters- in-Chief: Don Rojas and Indra Hardat 

Coordinating Editor: Bob Lederer 

Designer/Art Coordinator: Liz Grove 

Editors/Proofreaders: Chans Conn, Betsy Mickel, 
Mark Sanbome, Judy Seime 

Writers: Vick the Bruiser, Leigh Ann Caldwell, 

Janet Coleman, Dan Coughlin, Kathy Davis, 

Don DeBar, Evan Ginzburg, Simon Loekle, Mstndrake, 

Rebecca Myles, Ken Nash, Sally O'Brien, John Riley, 

Don Rojas, Cerene Roberts, Mimi Rosenberg, 

Andrea Sears, Evan Tobias, Bernard White 

Art Contributors: Mera Beckford, Herb Boyd, 

William Farrington, Joel Greenberg family, 

Ayo Harrington, Sue Kellogg, Fred Kuhn collection. 

New York Blade, Matt Rogers, Dino Singh, 

Dolf Toussaing 



^Bfl 



'j^ 



99.5 FM • www.wbai.org 
120 Wall Street, 10th Floor 
New York, NY 10005 

Subways: 2, 3, 4. 5, J. M to Wall Si. 
Station IS wheelchair-accessible. 
Building requires picture I.D. for entry. 

Switchboard: (212) 209-2800 (M-F 9-5. closed 1-2) 

On-air line: (212) 209-2900 

Fax tine: (212) 747-1648 

(For complete list of WBAI paid staff, go to 

www.wbai.org under "About WBAI.") 

WBAI has been part of the Pacifica Radio Network 

since 1 960. Other Pacifica stations: 

WPFW (www.wpfw.org. Washington, DC), 

KPFT (www.kpft.org. Houston). 

KPFA (www.kpfa.org, Berkeley), and 

KPFK (www.kpfk.org, Los Angeles). 

There are also 75 Pacifica affiliate stations around 

the country. 

Pacifica Foundation (founded 1946): 
www.pacifica.org ■ (510) 849-2590 

Pacifica Radio Archives: 
www.PacificaRadioArchives.org • (800) 735-0230 



Indra Hardat Named WBAI Interim Manager 



WANTED: 

Volunteer Folio Ad 

Salesperson 



Responsibility: soliciting ads from 
nonprofits and small businesses 
to recoup some costs of producing 
this Folio. 

If interested, contact 
editor@wbai.org, 

or call (212) 209-2800. 



Folios Available 
Online 

The five preceding issues of the Folio 

are available online, 

and this edition will be soon, at 

www.wbai.org. 



Indra Hardat was named 
WBAl's Interim General 
Manager as of May 16 
by Pacifica Executive 
Director Dan Coughlin. 
Appointed with broad 
support from the staff and 
the Local Station Board, 
her term is expected to 
last 6 to 12 months, while 
a board committee con- 
ducts a search for a new 
manager 

Bom in Guyana, 
South America, around the time of its independence fi-om 
Britain, she is an accountant with more than 20 years of 
business experience and has served as WBAl's Business 
Manager for seven years. 

A longtime leftist and active member of several grass- 
roots organizations, including the Association of Concerned 
Guyanese, Ministry Among Guyanese, and Enterprise 




Photo credit Dt. 



Support Group, Indra is also a wife to a good husband, the 
proud mother of three, and indulgent grandmother of two. 

"I am humbled to serve as the manager of this great 
institution," Hardat said. "I look forward to working collabo- 
ratively with my colleagues to strengthen the core values of 
WBAI and to do my very best to deepen Pacifica's mission 
of peace and social justice." 

Outgoing General Manager Don Rojas welcomed the 
new appointment. "Indra brings a proven track record of 
strong financial management and will continue to ensure 
stability, transparency, and accountability during this tran- 
sition period," he said. 

During his two-and-a-half-year tenure, Rojas oversaw the 
launch of a completely revamped WBAI website, the roll-out 
of a Pacifica Internet Radio stream, the computerization of 
the station's fnncfions, and the re-initiation of this FoUo. The 
station's listenership continued to grow dramatically under 
Rojas's leadership, both in overall numbers and in racial 
diversity, now being comprised (according to a recent survey 
by the Arbitron firm) of about 50% people of color 



Farewell Message from 
General Manager Don Rojas 



After serving WBAI as General Manager for 
two years and four months, the time has 
come for me to move on. I wish the best of 
luck to the Interim General Manager, Indra 
Hardat. I am confident that under her lead- 
ership the station will continue to make strides in the 
months ahead. 

Being at the helm of this unique media institution 
has been e-xciting and challenging. I've had the privilege 
of working with the talented and passionate men and 
women who make up the staff and the corps of dedicated 
volunteers, all of whom are committed to strengthening 
independent cominunity radio in this age of corporate 
media consolidation. It's been especially painful, then, 
to witness the passing of several of those remarkable 
people, including staff members Safiya Bukhari, Lambert 
Marksman. Farouk Abdel-Muhti, John Hess, and Joel 
Greenberg, along with stalwart station supporter Ossie 
Davis. Most recently, we've suffered the terrible loss of 
Fred Kuhn, our wonderful receptionist and arts producer 

I've also had the honor to speak with hundreds of 
WBAJ listeners throughout the tri-state area, a truly 
remarkable and wonderfully diverse group of people who 
continue to support WBAI through thick and thin and 
who believe fervently in the principles of peace and social 
justice. I'm proud of the fact that during my tenure, our 
listenership has grown by some 25% and that thousands 
of members have participated in the first two democratic 
elections for the station's governing board. 

I urge all WBAI listeners to become more active in 
every aspect of the station's life, from spreading the word 
among friends, family, and colleagues who are not current 
listeners to attending regular board meetings, assisting in 
community forums, and working on fundraising ventures. 

In this multimedia era, WBAI is evolving into more 
than just a radio signal on the FM dial. Tbday, the station 
has a dynamic website (www.wbai.org) with not only a 
live audiostream, but a wealth of written news and com- 
mentaries, daily updates on shows, community 
events listings, interactive forums, links to 
archived audio programs, and lots more. 
Hundreds of people worldwide log onto 
the site every day. 

Furthermore, each week we 
send out an electronic newslef 
ter to 



thousands of subscribers alerting them to upcoming 
programs and station activities (subscribe for free at 
wbai.org). And we've been producing a weekly one-hour 
cable-TV public affairs program, aired over Manhattan 
Neighborhood Network. Plus we have this FoUo, which is 
a great offering for members and an effective tool for out- 
reach. 

Working together, the staff, the board, and the volun- 
teers have moved WBAI forward in recent years. Much 
has been achieved, but there's still much to be done. 
We've been able to computerize most of our administra- 
tive and program production processes in the past 24 
months, but we've not had the extra resources required to 
upgrade other key aspects of our technical infrastructure. 

More critically, the station is facing particularly diffi- 
cult economic times, with rising rent, utility, and labor 
costs forcing ever-higher fundraising goals in each drive. 
We recognize that many listeners are confronting»finan- 
cial crises of their own. So I'm making a special appeal to 
those of you who are able to give a bit more to be as gen- 
erous as possible in WBAl's time of special need. 

Help us keep our staff functioning at full capacity. 
Help us maintain this precious resource of fiercely inde- 
pendent journalism and culturally diverse programming 
that's especially important to working people, communi- 
ties of color, and the progressive community locally and 
nationally. 

You can pay by credit card on our website (click on 
"Contribute Online Here") or use the coupon on the back 
page to mail your checks (payable to WBAI-Pacifica, with 
"GM Appeal" on the memo line) or credit card informa- 
tion to the station. 

Finally, I want to express my heartfelt gratitude to 
the many listeners and member/ subscribers who've sent 
me messages of good wishes for the ftiture. Although I'm 
moving on to other pursuits, I'll leave a big piece of my 
heart with WBAI. While no longer occupying the GM's 
office, I intend, however, to remain an avid listener and 
an active supporter in the years ahead, and I hope you 
have the same intention. WBAI and Pacifica needs us 

all in these difficult times. Let's not disappoint them. 
Forward Ever, Backward Never! 



WBAI staff at Feb 21 live bruadcost. produced 
by Ayo Hamtigton, from Harlem's Abyssinian 
Baptist Church commemorating the 40th 
anniversary of the assassination ofMalcohn X 
From left Don Rojas, Ayo Uanm^ton, Erwl 
Maitkmd Photo cre.dit Herb Boijil 




www.wbai.org 



Summer 2005 



WBAI Folio 



KHrwrnStHE 
ISTENER 



PROGRAMMING 

Bernard White, Program Director 

A ws Three of our beloved col- 
we start out this period ^^^^^^^^^^Z passmg of r,ews comt,.entator 
leagues have passed away. We mourn m p ^^^^ e^^enberg; and 

aoh^ Hess; er.gtneer, P«f ^^;S„^^o;erator, and arts producer Fred 
our lor,g-tir,ie ^---^^°'^f'^^^"oils at WBAI convey our condo- 
Kuhn. They will be sorely missed. All 
lences to their families. resigned as WBAI's 

Additional disturbing -^^^^''^^^^l, „le fhat he played in 
General Manager I want to *^-^ °°^^^J,^„,3 period. Don faced an 
stabilizing WBAI after an «treme y """^^^^3 ^^^^^^, Manager had to 
evolving set of circumstances thaOKipre ^^^^^^ ^^ ^^^^ ^^ ^^^^^^^.^ 

deal with in the ^r^'^^^ "^ f^^erstand and sympathize com- 
with aplomb and =°P^-';^^'^^°^ ,g" „d I wish him and his family well, 
pletely with his reasons for leavmg ^.^ resignation as 

Meanwhile, Dan Coughlm has anno ^^ ^^^^^^ ^^^ ^^^ ^^^ 

Pacifica's Executive D^^-^ctor 1 also wou ^^^ ^^^^^ ^^^^ 

skill and guidance m "^-§^ '"§ ™„d to the solid ground on which 
Ues that we faced i" *^ J^^X soo-to-be-xpanded famUy well, 
it now stands. I wish Dan and ^ so ^^ ^^^^^^^^^ 

The history of WBAI and ^-^^^l^^l As soon as one important 

day-to-day work and is Planning to imp^me ^^^^^^^ adjustments^ 

schedule after the Sp^S F"f °"™-^ J^^^ ,, i„'crease listenership and 
which will take effect "^. J""^,. ^J^^^f^.^ „„ mission. One major 
revenue while -aintaimng a^erence to ^^ ^^^^^^^ ^^^^^ ^ 

change will be in our r"o™"g ^^^"P' p, ^m Director responsibili- 
after 13 years as cohost to focus on "^ ' ^ rience, but the tune is 
fe! it has been a ^onderM and rewar<^^S e^Pe^ ^^^ ^^^^ ^,,^, o- 

[-er.r.^^rM2a=dpHarperw.^ 

n:ers—m^":Cellbem.olved in various ^^^^^^^^ 

rr^ty events. (See "S"-™- ^PeciaK P^ ^ ^^„,,,1 Manager 

I want to welcome . "^ra "a da^'^^ In ^^^^ ^^ ^^^ p,„fi „ 

indra brings to this position ^eaUedic ^^^ ^^^^ ^^^ ^^^^^ „f 

rrnSrrdtrrllVwithlndra to make WBAI an even 

^"Tnr;"rr^r your continued support. Arid until next 
time' Wtrong and pay close attention. 



ARTS 

Janet Coleman, Interim Arts Director 

^itar and banjo player ChrisHanf^H u'' ^"S'^-'/^^ng^ter, 

entlrusiast, ei^L ftor^em oflove -''h ''ff" ""''°''' '"^ "^^^"'"^ 
friends in a spedal elo« edition of thr-'r 1°" '™"^ "^ ^^ 
Ginzburg and Vicky HippleTa^ w^Wh r '^ ^^""^ ^°'"''^ ^^ ^^^" 
Haskins domg ma4 on^. . 1 ^ ""''">' ""* '^'chael G. 

Another sorely missed Arts producer is Rill F=,„, x, 
weekly Jazz Sampler after nnl,, 3 ^'^^ '^^° '■<="'''^d his 

jazz specials com£gt s rar n ^« ''''r" f ' "'" ™"''""'^ '° ^° 
Happily, in his TUesday ll p „ sC n ff':^"'!:*'? -^^ -'"§■ 
the music of Shocking Blue '' ' ^'"'^ ^"^ °"^ ^'^ ^"^ 

^eSn::: tludTnrrf "r"'° '""^'^ ^™'^^^' "-'"^^ °n 
Buddhist schorar i tL™" f """'"/''^^'^ ''^^°"«' 
analyst/historian CharresBS^' 7"'"' ^"''" °°^"''^'^' P^y^ho- 
and Suzzy Roche hterat t v'"' ' '^°°'''' ^^°"P'« Ka« ^alk 
and the /en Sn'^TcZmS IrS ch '^"' ^'"^'T """"- 
Prison Writing Program AwardT ^"""^'^ ""'^ *^ ^^ 

Ub^'S^lwI:!': 'r" °'".^^ ^-^'^ '--y ^eard on Radio 
Again. Cat ^Z Ca^ and tf^r ' ^^^^^^^^ Old Is New 
, ivauio i.ate, and the aforementioned Light Show 
In the words of a radio master, sf^y tuned. 



PUBL/C AFFAIRS 

good one. ^ *'^ ^« - team, and Sf ':^"°"^. ^"^^^^01/"^' ^^"<= 

'"<»yahoo.coai to 



Help WBAI Grow and Prosper! 

by Evan Tobias 

WBAI members have been hard at work spreading the word about the station. Outreach Coordinator Bok-keem 
Nyerere and volunteers %vith the Local Station Board's Membership, Outreach, and Fundraising (MOF) 
Committee have attended town hall meetings, worked tables at progressive events, visited colleges and higli 
schools, met with advocacy groups, and even talked with the Cub Scouts- each time soliciting suggestions for 
improving programming. A recent benefit concert, organized by Dante, a talented listener-member, helped with 
botli outreach and fundraising. 

In tlie montlis to come, the MOF will be sponsoring several ftmdraising events, so we'll need a lot of help. 
We're also holding a contest for a slogan (in any language) that sums up WBAI's mission/message for use in out- 
reach material. Get your creative juices flowing and submit an entry! 

You can make a difference: If our station is to stay vibrant, we need listeners to bring more people into our 
community. How many of your friends and coworkers aie WBAI members or even listeners? How many people 
do you encounter daily who have never heard of WBAI? What creative ideas do you have for helping raise 
money off-air? With spring in the air, consider sharing your talents, ideas, energy, and time to get tlie word out. 

Contact: Outreach Department, (212) 209-2869, outreach@wbai.org, or MOF Committee, (212) 209-2919, 
evbai(a)hotinail.com, with questions or ideas, 

Evan Tbbuis, a 2S-ye«r^oId musk tcacha; is chmr of the Local Stanon Board's Membership, Outreach, and Ftaulramng 
Committee. 



Monthly Report to the Listener 

On-air updates by management and department heads, with 
listener call-ins. For times, stay tuned or go to www.wbal.org. 




WBAI Program schedule 



Monday 



Tuesday 



Wednesday 



Thursday 



Friday 



6:00 AM 



7:00 AM 



8:00 AM 



WAKEUP CALL 

Deepa Fernandes (Mon.-Thurs.), Mario Murillo (Fri), and others 

In-depth coverage of local, national, and international news; social and cultural issues and events 

Focus on human rights, peace, and social, economic, and racial justice 

Check out the new website, www.wakeupcallradlo.org, with news, sound archives, blogs, a list of weekly segments, and much more! 

From 6:25-6:30 daily, COMMUNITY BULLETIN BOARD (repeats at 10:55 a.m. and 4:55 p.m.); to submit items, go to www.wbai.org 

News headlines at 6:30, 7:00, and 8:00, with Leslie George (Mon.-Thurs.) 



9:00 AM 



DEMOCRACY NOW! Amy Goodman, Juan Gonzalez For archived programs and list of cable-TV broadcast times, go to www.democracynow.org 

Hard-hitting coverage of war and peace, government policies, and struggles for justice 



10:00 am 



1 1 :00 AM 



1 2:00 PM 



LAW & DISORD ER (isii 3d wKs .) 



WOMENSCDLLECTIVEmwk) 



OUT-FM 

Out-FM Collective Progressive lesbian, 
gay. bisexual, transgendered. two-spirit 
,. culture, and activism 



GLOBAL MOVEMENTS, 
URBAN STRUGGLES 

Deepa Fernandes and Biju Mathew 



CITY WATCH 

Deena Kolbert and Bill DiFazio 

Watchdog on NYC social, economic. 
political, cultural issues 



ECO-LOGIC 

David OcchJuto/ 
Ken Gale 

(alternating) 



CREATE YOUR 
HEALTHYHOME 

May Dooley 



PUBLIC AFFAIRS SPECIALS 



FIRST VOICES INDIGENOUS RADIO 

Tiokasin Ghosthorse and Mattie Harper 

Indigenous thinking 



C.C. COMEDY PLAYERS 
I REEL WORLD 



COUNTERSPIN Fairness and Accurac, 
in Reporting (FAIR) 



YOU AND YOUR MONEY Susan Lee 



SCIENCE, HEALTH AND HEALING Majid aii. m.d. 

Health preservation through science-based nutrition, 
exercise, and spirituality 



GLOBAL MEDICINE REVIEW Kamau Kokayl, M.D. 

Holistic health paradigms, global healing traditions, and 
cultural and community perspectives 



RISE UP RADIO 

Free Radio Youth Collective 

Youth-produced social justice radic 



TAKE CHARGE OF YOUR HEALTH! 

Corinne FurnarJ and Shari Lieberman 

Cutting-edge holistic/nutntional 
approaches to medical problems 



1:00 PM 



HEALTH ACTION 

Health Action Collective 

Corporate threats to health, activi 
acce ss issues, integrative healing 



POSITIVE MIND Armand DIMele 

Teaching strategies for fusing feelings and knowledge 



HEALTH STYLES 

Diana Mason and Barbara Glickstein 

Personal health and health policy 



2:00 PM 



CAT RADIO CAFE 

Janet Coleman and David Dozer 

Salon of politics and art 



ARTS MAGAZINE 

Prairie Miller, Peggy Dominique, Joe Hurley, 
Mary Ann Miller, R. Frasier, C. Korvath 

Film, culture currents, art gigs 



LIGHT SHOW 

Rotating hosts 

Folk songs, tales of struggle, poetry. 



PERSPECTIVE 

Louis Reyes Rivera 

Cultural workers with a message 



NONFICTtON (interim program) 
Harry Allen 

Books and interviews 



3:00 PM 



TALKBACK 

Hugh Hamilton 

Interactive new^s-talk program with interviews and listener call-ins 



CALDWELL CHRONICLE 

Earl Caldwell 

Reflections and call-ins on 
justice issues 



4:00 PM 



5:00 PM 



EXPERT 
WITNESS 



CUBA IN FOCUS 

Sally O'Brien and 
Gail Walker 



TAKING AIM 

Ralph Schoenman and Mya Shone 

Meticulous documentation and political 
analysis of war and repression 



EXPLORATIONS 

Michio Kaku 

An hour of information c 
technology, and politics 



BEHIND THE NEWS 

Doug Henwood 

Economics and politics, city to world 



THE JORDAN JOURNAL 

Howard Jordan 

Interviews, commentary and call-ins 
on Latino community issues 



6:00 PM 



WBAI EVENING NEWS 



(Editor), Eric Williams, Rebecca Myles, Sally O'Brien (Sunday Co-editor), and Barbara Day (Sunday Co-editor) 

jith in-depth progressive coverage of tri-state area. For recent archived programs, go to www.wbai.org 



FREE SPEECH RADIO NEWS 



7:00 PM 



BUILDING BRIDGES: 

YOUR COMMUNITY AND UBOR REPORT 
Mimi Rosenberg ant] Ken Nash 



8:00 PM 



HOUSING NOTEBOOK 

Scott Sommer 

Tenants" rights, call-ins 



9:00 PM 



HOME FRIES 

Fred Herschkowltz 

Music, comedy, call-ins 



10:00 pm 



i Monica Lopez {prod^^^,.,, 
" in the service of peace and s 



TAHRIR 

Barbara Nimri Aziz 

Voices of the Arab/Muslir 



Comn 



iity 



ASIA PACIFIC FORUM 

Asia Pacific Forum Collective 

Progressive Asian and Asian American 
politics and culture 



SHOCKING BLUE 

Delphine Blue 

(interim program) 



il JUStiC 



. For archived programs, go t 



OFF THE HOOK 

Emanuel Goldstein 

Hacker news 



PERSONAL COMPUTER SHOW 

loe King, Hank Kee, and Alfreil Poor 

Ask the experts 



GLOBAL BLACK 
EXPERIENCE 

Imhotep Gary Byrd 

Politics, music, and call-ins 



EDUCATION AT THE CROSSROADS 

Basir Mchawi 

Understanding "classes"... 

for the masses 



WHERE WE LIVE 

Sally O'Brien and Rosa Clemente 

Political prisoners, police repression 



AFRIKALEIDOSCOPE 

Etombe Brath 

African world politics and culture 



HEART OF MIND 

Kathy Davis and Malika Lee Whitney 

Self-evolution, spiritual activism 



1 1 :00 PM 



WBAI EVENING NEWS (Rebroadcast) 



FREE SPEECH RADIO NEWS (Rebroadcast) 



12:00 am 



NIGHTSHIFT 

Mike Sargent 



Ultra-free-form call-ins and 
music 



1 :00 AM 



2:00 AM 



PERSON TO PERSON 

Ton! Short 

Dialogues on tfie human 
condition 



3:00 AM 



4:00 AM 



5:00 AM 



MASS BACKWARDS 

Max Schmid 

Music, current radio drama, 
Jean Shepherd shows 



MOORISH ORTHODOX 
RADIO CRUSADE 

Bill Weinberg and 
Ann-Marie Hendrlckson 

Anarchism for the Global City 



WEAPONRY 

Tom WIsker 

Military technology, history 
and policy 



SPECIALS 



ROCK 'EM 
SOCK 'EM 
RADIO 

VIck 

the Bruiser 



PUNK AND 
HARDCORE 



UNDER THE 
LEARNING TREE 

Kamau KhallanI 

News/issues of concern 
to Jersey/the world 



BURN BABY BURN- 
CLAPPERS 

Lister Hewan-Lowe 



RADIO UNNAMEABLE 

Bob Fass 

The original free-form radio: 
musings and music, call-ins 
and conversation 



IN THE MOMENT 

Ibrahim Gonzalez 

Eclectic sounds, live 
performances, and interviews 



GLOBAL BEAT 
EXPERIENCE 

Imhotep Gary Byrd 

Message in the music: discs 
and discussions of African- 
American sounds and issues 



SISTER FROM 
ANOTHER PLANET 

Andrea Clarke 

Progressive soul music 



CREATIVE 
UNITY 
COLLECTIVE I 



LABBRISH 

Habte Selassie 

Reggae music 



HOUR OF THE WOLF 

Jim Freund 

Science fiction/fantasy 




Deepa Fernandes Named to Host Wakeup Call 

Deepa Kcmandes, former an(;hor of Froc Speech Radio News and cohost of Global Movements, Urban Struggles, will take over t!ie helm 
as the Monday-to-Thursday host of WBAI's morning program Wakeup Call on June 13. (Mario Murillo will continue hosting on FYidays.) 

"An experienced radio journalist, news reporter, and media trainer, Deepa will bring new energy and vision to this signature WBAI 
program," said Don Rj)|a.s, then WBAI General Manager, in announcing Fernandes' appointment. "She is an accomplished radio talent 
with a very bright future ahead other I am confident she will prove to be an invaluable asset to WBAI." 

Fernandes will join a Wakeup Call team consisting of executive producer Sharan Harper, producer/engineer Errol Maitland, and news 
editor Leslie George. If funds are available, a cohost will also be brought on. Fernandes will also work closely vrith WBAI Program Director 
Bernard White in restructuring the program and involving other WBAI producers. She vl^ll also help launch a new Wakeup Call website. 




5 



FM 

Details: 
uiuiui.uiDai.org 



BLACK BOXES: 
Programs air alternate 
weeks (except Cuba in 
Focus, last week); three- 
way split on Thurs. at 
11am represents 1st, 2d, 
& 3(1 weeks; 4tti week: 
Public Affairs Specials 



Saturday 



6:00 AM 



7:00 AM 



8:00 AM 



9:00 AM 



10:00 AM 



1 1 :00 AM 



12:00 pm 



1 :00 pm 



2:00 PM 



3:00 PM 



4:00 PM 



5:00 PM 



6:00 PM 



7:00 PM 



8:00 PM 



9:00 PM 



10:00 pm 



1 1 :00 PM 



12:00 am 



1 :00 AM 



2:00 AM 



3:00 AM 



4:00 AM 



HOUR OF THE WOLF 

Jim Freund 

Science fiction/fantasy 



AS I PLEASE 

Simon Loekle 

Literary commentary 
and readings 



ANY SATURDAY 

David Rothenberg 

Music, politics, arts, theater, 
sports, social commentary 
(plus special offers on theater 
tickets — call in!) 



ON THE COUNT 

Eddie Ellis and Ayo Harrington 

Criminal justice and prison 
policy, advocacy, and activism 



AL LEWIS LIVE 

"Grandpa" Al Lewis 
and Karen Lewis 

Outspoken political commentary 
— Get angry about something! 



RADIO FREE EIREANN 

John McDonagh and Sandy Boyer 

Irish and human rights issues 



HAITI: THE STRUGGLE CONTINUES 

Haiti Collective (interim time) 

News and progressive analysis 
about Haiti and Haitians in the U.S. 



LA VOZ LATINA (en espaiiol) 

Collectivo Latino (interim time) 

Issues affecting Latino community and 
Latin America 



ALL MIXED UP 

Peter Bochan 

A nonlinear sonic tapestry of 
music, art, and current events 



LIQUID SOUND LOUNGE 

Jeannie Hopper 

Soul-infused grooves of all 
persuasions representing 
independent artists 



MORNING DEW 

Mandrake 

Deadhead wakeup call 



UNDERGROUND RAILROAD 

Jay Smooth 

Hip-hop politics and culture 



SOUL CENTRAL STATION 

Tony Ryan 

R&B, soul, funk, and blues 



5:00 AM 



Sunday 



THROUGH THE 
OPERA GLASS 

Tony Coggi, 

Regina Fiorito Sokol, 

and Manya 

Recorded opera and 
interviews with artists 



HERE OF A 
SUNDAY MORNING 

Chris Whent 

Early music 



THE NEXT HOUR 

Special arts programming 



BEYOND THE PALE 

Esther Kaplan and 
Marilyn Kleinberg Neimark 

Progressive Jewish politics and culture 



WALDEN'S POND 

Shelton Walden 

Animals, health and 
environmental i 



RADIO LIBRE 

Ibrahim Gonzalez 

(interim program 
Many genres of 
Latmo music 



CON SABOR 
LATINO 

Mickey Melende; 



NEW WORLD GALLERY 

Chico Alvarez 

Latin jazz 



WBAI EVENING NEWS 



EQUAL TIME FOR FREETHOUGHT 

Barry Seidman. A. Dowret, and N. Murphy 



GOLDEN AGE OF RADIO 

Max Schmid 

Radio drama and 
old-time radio shows 



EVERYTHING OLD 
IS NEW AGAIN 

David Kenney 

Pop and jazz standards, show 
tunes, cabaret, and interviews 



LA NUEVA ALTERNATIVA 

Gonzalo Aburto and Ruben Lopez 

Rock and roll en espafiol 




CITIZEN K 

Kirk Grantham 

(interim program) 
Issue-oriented, caller-driven 
talk with an edge! 



COSMIK DEBRIS 

Rocky and Mark Laiosa 



Manhattan's Premier Left Cultural 6> Educational Center 

MUSIC • ART EXHIBITS • WORKSHOPS • CLASSES 

PUBLIC FORUMS • FILMS • PERFORMANCES 

451 West Street m Greenwich Villase • Phone: 212-242-4201 

www^brechtforum^ors 



BLOOMS DAY ON BROADWAY: I ^^lA 

LIVE FROM SYMPHONY SPACE ' '^ * 

(Thursday, June 1 6, 7:00 p.m. til after midnight) 

"Love, Language, Literature, Lust; Leopold's Women Bloom" is the theme of Symphony 
Space's 24th annual Bloomsday reading from James Joyce's modern masteipiece, Ulysses. 
WBAI presents exclusive live coverage of the marathon performance with a cast of over 60 
stars of stage and screen (including Malachy McCourt and Marian Seldes) and a chorus of 
34 Mollys (one for every year in her life). The Daily Show's Stephen Colbert stars as Bloom; 
Ttrry Donnelly plays Molly. 



CLEARWATER 

Festival 




CLEARWATER FESTIVAL 

(Saturday, June 1 8 & Sunday, June 1 9, all 
day both days) 

WBAL again partnering with the environmental 
group Clearwater, will broadcast live from the 
Festival including great music, storytelling, and 
speeches at Croton Point Park, Croton-on-Hudson, 
NY. Tline in or come out and stop by our portable studio. 



GAYS, GOD, AND EMPIRE: LESBIAN/GAY/ 
BISEXUAL/TRANSGENDER (LGBT) PRIDE DAY 

(Sunday, June 26, 1 1 :00 a.m.-9:00 p.m.) 
Join WBAI's OUT-FM collective and producers 
from Paciiica stations/ affiliates KPFA/Berkeley, 
WPFW/Washington, KPFK/Los Angeles, and 
KGNU/Boulder-Denver as we cover the LGBT 
movement and anti-gay attacks on it by religious 
and political leaders. We'll discuss gay marriage, 
transgender politics, commercialism in the move- 
ment, international affairs, Pride events, archived 
queer voices, and the latest in music, writing, 
and culture. Bring your radio to the Pride inarch. 
Details: www.outfitn.org. p^„,„ „^„ Ne„ yori, BUd, 

10th ANNUAL JERRY GARCIA BIRTHDAY SPECIAL 

(Saturday, July 30, 7:00 p.m.-midnight) 

Join Mandrake of Morning Dew for WBAI's annual salute to one of the most musically 
diverse icons, Jerry Garcia. We will present the usual and unusual aspects of Garcia's life 
represented in his own words, writings about him, and of course a huge dose of the best 
music he had to offer Tfen years after his death, Garcia's legacy lives on. 

CARIBBEAN DAY CARNIVAL/PARADE 

(Monday, September 5, 6:00 a.m.-6:00 p.m.) 

As Grenada recovers from Hurricane Ivan, Jamaica struggles with increased deportations, 
and Haitians with an illegal government, the long-awaited Caribbean Court of Justice opens 
in Trinidad. Join us on the air, on the 'net, or on the scene in Brooklyn to celebrate the 
indomitable spirit of Caribbean people. We'll bring you music, culture, news, and views. 
Carnival info: www.wiadca.com 

LABOR DAY SPECIAL 

(Monday, September 5, 7:00 p.m.-midnight) 

Another Labor Day, another parade, more political campaigning, and sales galore. But what 
about the condition of the workers— those organized into unions as well as those (the major- 
ity) left to their own devices to deal with their bosses' attacks? What of those who can't find 
work or are displaced? That's our focus on this Labor Day: the working class in New York 
City, the nation, and the world. So to hell with Bush and his class; we'll focus on health care, 
keeping pensions and Social Security, jobs vrith good pay and benefits, and we haven't forgot- 
ten a redistribution of wealth from the "haves and have more"— and solidarity. Produced by 
Mimi Rosenberg and Ken Nash of Building Bridges: Your Community and Labor Report. 



WBAI and Paclfica Producers Again Win 
Community Radio Awards 

Congratulations to the Pacifica producers who received awards from the National Federation of 
Community Broadcasters (NFCB), which provides support services to non-commercial stations. 

Silver Reels: 

• National Documentary: Leslie George of WBAI's Wakeup Call-"The Emma Clark Story: 
A Struggle for Freedom and Reparations" 

• Local Music/Entertainment Program or Special: Peter Bochan of WBAI's All Mixed Up- 
"A Shortcut Through 2003" 

Special Merit Awards: 

• National News and Public Affairs Features: Free Speech Radio News (FSRN) 

Collective-Newscast on 1 st anniversary of Iraq invasion 

• National Documentary: FSRN's Aaron Glantz-'lraq: One Year of Occupation and Resistance" 

• Radio Drama: Otis Maclay, Sarah Crowder, and the KPFT (Houston) Radio Theatre 
Workshop-'ln the City" 

• Local Music/Entertainment Program or Special: KPFA (Berkeley)'s Labor Collective 
(Natasha Moss, Jon Frommer, Ann Worth, and Susan Chacin)-''2O04 Western Workers 
Labor Heritage Festival"; KPFT's JD Doyle-"Queer Music Before Stonewall" 

• Promo: Pacifica Radio Archives' Brian DeShazor-'A Passel of Pomp and a Circus of 
Circumstance" Promo. -Cerene Roberts 

For the complete list of awardees, go to www.nfcb.org. 



WBAI Folio 



Summer 2005 



www.wbai.org 



Lynne Stewart Speaks Out on WBAI 



by Sally O'Brien 



One of the most important functions of alternative media like WBAI is to 
cover stories that affect the health and well-being of "the community"— 
in this instance, the WBAI listening community, which, by and large, is 
involved in the world around them. In this time of Homeland Security— 
a time in which, as the late WBAI Program Director Samori Marksman 
used to say, we are living in a "National Security State"— the legal paradigms are shift- 
ing so far to the right that assumed civil liberties are no longer the standard that we 
can hold the courts to. 

Nowhere is this so aptly demonstrated as in the case of defense attorney Lynne 
Stewart. She was arrested in 2002 on conspiracy charges that she materially aided a 
"terrorist" organization associated with her client, blind Sheik Omar Abdul Rahman, 
when she helped him release a press statement that prosecutors claimed contained a 
message for his followers in Egypt. Key to the case were video surveillance tapes of 
attorney/client meetings, which Stewart maintained showed no evidence of her guilt. 
But after a trial that invoked the specter of Osama Bin Laden, Stewart and her two 
Muslim co-defendants were convicted on all counts this past February. 

Admittedly, WBAI was not the only outlet to cover this story— in fact it received 
quite a lot of media attention. But what made our coverage different was our 
approach: First, following the spirit of the long-held tenet that in our legal system a 
person is shielded by the presumption of innocence "until proven guilty," we omitted 
government bias and antiterrorism hysteria, opting instead to let the subject tell her 
story. Second, realizing the current precarious moment for civil liberties, we encour- 
aged listeners to attend the trial and decide for themselves whether this lifelong 
champion of civil and political rights was really guilty of terrorism and deserved to 
spend the final phase of this grandmother's well-lived life in prison. 

"During the trial, I think WBAI was the main vehicle for getting people to court," 
Stewart says. "Our end of politics never got much or good coverage, but at least during 
the '80s, there were straight news stories and columnists like [Ncwsday's] Murray 
Kempton and [The Daily News's] Jimmy Breslin, who looked more in depth at the 
political issues" behind sensationalized court cases. 

It is exactly these political issues that WBAI holds up to the public for examina- 
tion. We knew that the outcome of the Lynne Stewart case holds serious implications 
for all people in this country and for the sanctity of the attorney/client privilege. As 
more immigrants and U.S. citizens— particularly Arabs and Muslims— become targets 
of McCarthy-era-type witch-hunts, imprisoning a progressive attorney on "terrorism" 
charges sets a dangerous precedent for us all. We felt it was our responsibility to give 
full coverage to the trial. 




center), husband Ralph Poyntcr, and 
n, February 200S Photo credit Sue Kellogg 



after Stewart's 



"I think I've been on just about every major show on WBAI," Stewart notes. "Jose 
Santiago would come to court at least once a week and at lunch do interviews for the 
Evening News.... I've been interviewed from many different perspectives." Besides the 
Evening News, Stewart has appeared— sometimes repeatedly— on such programs as 
Wakeup Call, Democracy Now!, Free Speech Radio News, The Caldwell Chronicle, 
Building Bridges, 'Qhrir, Education at the Crossroads, Aiiikaleidoscope, Where We 
Live, and the Sunday News. 

Lynne Stewart is curtently appealing her conviction. Facing up to 30 years in prison, 
she is scheduled to be sentenced in September. For more information or to get involved 
in a letter-writing campaign, call (21 2) 625-9696 or log onto www.lynnestewart.oiTg. 
Sally O'Brien is the host and executive producer of Where We Live (TImrsdays, 8-9 pm), 
executive producer of Cuba in Focus (last Mondays of month, 5-6 pm), and co-anchor/editor 
of the Sunday News (6-6 30 pm) 



Meet Your Local Station Board 

(listed in descending order of vote totals; internally elected positions— each for one-year terms — 
noted as applicable; next membership election for LSB members October-November 2006) 



LISTENER-SPONSOR MEMBERS 

Elected February 2004 for terms expiring December 2006: 



Father LauTcnce Lucas 

Michael T^rif Warren 

(Pacifica National Board mernber) 

Steve Brown 

Paul DeRienzo 

Paul Surovell 



Ray Laforest 

(Pacifica National Board member) 
Carolyn Birden 
Mariana Gaston (Vice Chair) 
Miguel Maldonado 



Elected December 2004 for terms expiring December 2007: 



Omowale Clay 

Evan Tbbias (Assistant Secretary) 

Sara Flounders 

Berthold Reimers 

Lisa Davis 



Marian Borenstein 

Patty Heffley 

(Pacifica National Board member) 

Cheryl Ife Griffin* 

Mitchel Cohen*" 



*Rutiner-up seated upon restgtiat^on of Alice Shields 
**Runner-up seated upon resignation of Luanne Pennesn 



STAFF MEMBERS 

Elected February 2004 for terms expiring December 2006: 
Bob Lcderer Tiokasin Ghosthorse 

(Pacifica National Board member) Shawn Rhodes 

Elected December 2004 for terms expiring December 2007: 
Ccrene Roberts R. Paul Martin 

Vajra Kilgour (Chair) 



ADDITIONAL OFFICERS 

Non-board members elected December 2004 as officers by the Local 

Station Board (as permitted by Pacifica bylaws): 

Baruti Bediako (TYeasurer) Berta Silva (Secretary) 



Local Station Board Committees 

The WBAI Local Station Board (LSB) has several advisory committees aimed at assisting 
the board in pertbrming particular duties under the Pacifica Bylaws. Listener-members 
and staff receive voting rights in these committees (with some exceptionsj upon attend- 
ing three consecutive meetings. 

FINANCE COMMITTEE 

Helps with LSB mandate to approve the station's annual budget (subject to final 
approval by the Pacifica National Board) and to make quarterly reports on finances to 
the National Board. 

MANAGEMENT EVALUATION COMMITTEE 

Helps with LSB mandate to prepare an annual written evaluation of WBAI's general 
manager (GM) and program director (PD); when warranted, to initiate the process of 
firing the GM, which must be approved by Pacifica Executive Director; if not, it is 
decided by Pacifica National Board. 

MEMBERSHIP, OUTREACH, & FUNDRAISING COMMITTEE 

Helps with LSB mandate to actively reach out to underrepresented communities so as 
to achieve station diversity; to build collaborations with like-minded organizations; and 
to assist the station with fundraising. 

PROGRAMMING COMMITTEE 

Helps with LSB mandate to work with management to ensure that WBAI programming 
fulfills Pacifica's mission (including increasing understanding between peoples and 
offering alternative news and information and artistic expression) and responds to the 
diverse needs of listeners and communities and to ensure that procedures for program- 
ming decisions and evaluation are working fairly to provide quality programming. 

COMMITTEE OF INCLUSION (COI) 

Carries out bylaws mandate to monitor, issue quarterly reports on, and if necessary 
make recommendations to the LSB, Pacifica National Board, and station management 
to remedy underrepresentation of signal-area communities in programming and 
staffing and among LSB election candidates. (The COI is a committee of the Pacifica 
National Board, unlike the LSB advisory committees.) 

AD HOC BYLAWS REVIEW COMMITTEE 

•|"h(- Pacifica National Board will hold a Bylaws c:onvcntion between Sept. 30, 2005 and 
March 30, 2006 to review the Pacifica bylaws and consider possible amendments. 
Each Local Station Board has formed an ad hoc committee to collect and organize rec- 
ommendations for refinement of the bylaws, to be reviewed and approved by the LSB 
and tiK'ii forwarded to the Pacifica National Board Governance C^ommittec. 



Get Involved! 

PROVIDE YOUR INPUT 



We urge you to get involved! All LSB and committee meetings (except under narrowly defined circumstiinces) are 
open to the public and include fime for public comment. We also welcome your emails, letters, and phone messages. 
Phone:212-209-2919 • Email: lsb@wbai.org • Mail: LSB, c/o WBAI, 120 Wall St, 10th Fl., New York, NY 10005 

Por more info, including meetini,; dates ,ind minutes, go to www.wbai.orR/lttb or call the number above. Time into 
the monthly Local Station Board Report, with listener call-ins at 2I2-209-2H00. Check H-ww.wbai.org for dates. 



www.wbai.org 



Summer 2005 



WBAI Folio 



JOHN HESS 

1917-2005 

by Andrea Sears, WBAI News Editor 



John Hess, the former New York Times reporter, food 
critic, author, and ascerbic commentator for the WBAI 
Evening News, died on January 25. He was 87. 

About 10 years ago, I was working on a story about 
some new pohcy unveiled at City Hall that day. I needed 
someone to critique what Rudy Giuliani was up to when 




cmiit Dolf Tbussatgii 

I heard a familiar voice on the newsroom monitor John Hess, who had been a regular 
on WNYC, was being interviewed in our studios. After the show, he was more than 
happy to give his analysis for my story. 

John also mentioned that he'd like to do weekly commentaries for our newscast. 
A few days later he was back, recording the first of hundreds of commentaries that 
soon made him a staple on the WBAI Evening News. 

John had spent 24 years at The New York Times. He covered the Paris Peace TSlks 
in 1 968, but in speaking about those years he got more excited recounting his efforts 
to convince 77ie Titries to report on the International War Crimes Tribunal that had 
first brought media attention to the My Lai massacre. He was nominated for a Pulitzer 
Prize for his articles exposing a nursing home scandal in New York, but couldn't con- 
vince the paper's management to set up a team of investigative reporters. He lefl The 
Times in 1978, but never stopped being a journalist. He continued filing WBAI com- 
mentaries until a month before his death. 

John Hess's book on his New York Times experience, My Times: A Memoir of Dissent, 
IS available as a premium for a pledge to WBAI. For details, and for text of some of John's 
WBAI commentaries, go to www.wbai.org. See also www.johnlhess.blogspot.com. 



JOELGREENBERG 

1947-2005 

by Simon Loekle 




Joel chose to listen to WBAI and starting in '87 volun- 
teered to answer phones when listeners were plentifijl 
but answerers were not. In the late '90s, he agreed to 
take on production duties for Through the Opera Glass, 
hosted by Regina Sokol and Anthony Coggi. Last year he 
produced a special broadcast on Opera and James Joyce "'""' ""'" ""' <^''^'*erg farmly 
for the Bloomsday Centenary. Three kinds of play balanced his work (scientific 
research in another field of air time, the potentials of breath analysis): theatrical 
(Wagner), sporting (Go Yanks!), and words {Finnegans Wake). 

Threnody 

"...myth is what we believe in..." — WB. Yeats 

The "Golden Age" of 'BAI is not 

an irretrievable past 

but a graspable, glorious goal 

should we dare admit 

our community is buUt on air 

Joel, generous, kind, cooperative, 

was one embodying the genuine aim, 

the myths that hold us together, 

bonds of freedom lift us 

as easy as song. 

Simon Loekle is host of As I Please (Saturdays, 7 00-8 30 am). 



IV-ibuteS to Fred Kuhn Ossie Davis, IPresentel 




Fred Kuhn anil Light's 1980 album, 'A Song of Gods 
Cone Mad' (Datfstar Records) Light was composed of 
Fred Kuhn (I2-stnng, vocals, bass), Maryann Arrien, 
Roberta Sappington and Freff AH words & music 
(except 'TYiad' and 'Bells of Rhymney') by Fred Kuhn 
(Scanned ttnage, courtesy of Robert Knight ) 



from Evan Ginzburg, Cohost of Light Show 

It was like a Fellini movie. 

3 a.m. at the old studio at 505 Eighth 
Avenue. Ascending in an ancient, creaky 
elevator reminiscent of something out of 
a silent movie, I'd stagger into the station 
bleary-eyed. Inevitably, however, I'd be 
jolted by an adrenaline rush caused by the 
alternate reality I had just been dropped 
into— a waiting room full of musicians, 
performance artists, and even larger-than- 
life professional wrestlers. 

And in the middle of this happy 
chaos would be a calm, smiling Fred 
Geobold. 

Carrying too many CDs for his hands 
to hold, he'd rush into the studio at 2:59 
and change. Somehow he'd squeeze into 
every nook and cranny a multitude of 
instruments as well as the excited musi- 
cians that lugged them in. For many of 
them it was their first time on the air. 

"Let's make some radio," he'd say, contentment written on his face. 

And for so many, many years he did just that. "You're listening to a Light Show," 
Fred would announce in that sweet voice so perfect for the airwaves. 

Fred was more than my radio mentor He was also a dear friend. We'd go to clubs 
and listen to the music he loved so much and even hit some wrestling shows. 

For a warm, sensitive guy, he sure loved his steel-cage matches. 

I spent some of the best nights of my life with Fred Geobold at WBAI. Exhilarated 
after a broadcast, we'd sit and just talk. And with the incredibly well-rounded Fred, you 
could discuss literally anything. And with those conversations always came laughter 

I loved Fred Geobold. And always will. 

And although I can never hope to be the radio man he was, on every broadcast I 
do he'll be in my heart. 

So stay tuned, Fred. Stay tuned. 

from Vick the Bruiser, Host of Rock 'Em Sock 'Em Radio 

Fred Geobold was to me a mentor and friend. Though initially meeting him in the 
Eighth Avenue reception area, we became friends while on the MIS bus en route to 
the Wall Street station. We spoke of music and the times, and he soon invited me to 
become a cohost of the Light Show. With much excitement I joined the ranks of the 
Light Show crew, meeting and conversing with some of wrestling's finest, not to 
mention myriads of local musicians, poets, etc. 

Some of my fondest memories of that time were actually off the air, when Fred, 
Max Schmid, Jim Freund, Simon Loekle, and I would sit around and banter and wise- 
crack about life and times. That continues to be the essence of WBAI, at least to me, 
as one who was witness to these amazing fellas who had such a long, deep friendship 
and respect for each other I always felt blessed to have been a part of that. 

It was also Fred who dubbed me Vick the Bruiser in those days as a tribute to one 
of his old favorites, Dick the Bruiser, a wrestler short in stature but not in presence. 
That name has not only become my on-air moniker, but my identity with friends and 
family. 

Fred and I also saw eye to eye on the "ole banjer," both of us playing and loving 
the sound. I saw Fred in the hospital the night before his passing and, as I happened 
to have my banjo with me, was able to play a couple of ditties for him, which I will 
never forget. I am so glad to have had the opportunity to know such a man, of whom 
not an unkind word could be mumbled, always with the quickest of wits, who kept 
you on your toes, with laughter close behind. 

With so much love, Fred, your light will never fade. 
For more tributes from Fred's colleagues, go to www.wbai.org. 



Continued from front cover 

I had the good fortune to share experiences with Ossie such as linking hands 
during the waves of arrests of those protesting the police shooting of Amadou Diallo, 
celebrating the anniversary of the first Labor Day in Union Square, and reading "Just 
Be Simple" with children at union II99/SEIU. And Ossie and Ruby graced WBAI 
repeatedly with their appearances on numerous programs, always reaching out to 
educate and inspire listeners about the vital issues of the day. 

It wasn't surprising that Ossie's family asked that contributions in his memory be 
made to Oxfam America's Sudan Crisis Relief Fund, EXCEL (automotive training) 
Institute, Tbday's Students/Tbmorrow's Tfeachers ...and to WBAI. Each organization 
typified a particular vocational sensitivity and interest of Ossie's. And, while Ossie's 
and Ruby's affection for WBAI is clear, years before our station's debut, they had 
already joined in the struggles for workers, human and civil rights, civil liberties, and 
economic fairness, and against imperialist wars. We honor Ossie Davis and in so doing 
hold on to his teachings, his artistic creations, his wonderful, encompassing humanity. 

Ossie Davis, another shining Black prince, Presente! 
An Ossie Dams "Dtbute 2-CD set is available as a WBAI premium. It includes Ossie's eulogies 
to Malcolm X arid Dr Martin Luther King, Jr, a 1998 interview by Mimi Rosenberg and Ken 
Nash with Ossie and Ruby, Ossie's recitation of labor poetry at 1199, and his 2003 speech at 
the WBAI forum opposing the war against Iraq. Tb order, go to www.wbai.org (right column) 
or call (212) 209-2848. At the request of the Davis/Dee family, we are not able to offer a record- 
ing of the memorial service. More photos ofinemonal at www.wbai.org/gallery. 
Mimi Rosenberg is the cohost, along with Ken Nash, of Building Bridges: Your 
Community and Labor Report (Mondays, 7.00-8:00 ptn ) 



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UNION PRINTED IN THE U.S. 



8 • WBAI Folio 



Summer 2005 



www.wbai.org 



WBAI Youth at Media Conference: 
Each One Teach One 



by Leigh Ann Caldwell 



This spring, WBAI youth played an important role in the Grassroots Media 
Conference aimed at supporting and enhancing independent media in New 
York City. In its second year, the conference, held at New School University 
on April 9-10, stressed partnerships among independent media at a time 
when government propaganda is increasing and corporate media are mini- 
mizing voices of dissent. The event brought together independent print, radio, Internet, 
and video organizations, as well as community organizers, teachers, and media 
activists. The weekend was filled with panels, discussions, workshops, and films on 
such topics as media freelancing, the art of graffiti, making video documentaries, and 
getting your community involved. 

Youth projects at WBAI were an integral part of the conference. Members of Radio 
Rootz, a radio and media education project in NYC public schools (founded by WBAI's 
Deepa Femandes), led a workshop called "Get Involved! Get Heard!" The youth dis- 
cussed and dissected topics such as media representations and stereotypes and 
making youth-produced pieces. The students from Radio Rootz also presented their 
pre-produced radio pieces. Harlem sixth grader Azania Al-Shabazz played "Perceptions 
of War," which aired on Free Speech Radio News on March 18 (archived at 
www.fsm.org), near the second anniversary of the war in Iraq. Azania's radio piece 
discussed the war in Iraq and the possibility of a draft. Azania spoke to the partici- 
pants about why she chose this topic to report: "The war is very scary because by the 
time we are old enough to go to war, there might be a draft. I also know someone who 
has a family member in the war" Ireece Underwood, a 17-year-old Brooklynite who 
attends high school at Manhattan Comprehensive Day and Night, presented her inter- 
view with her great-grandmother— a Black woman active in the 1960s civil rights 
movement— which will be part of a documentary called "African Americans Through 
the Generations," expected to air on WBAI in June. 

WBAI's weekly youth program, Rise Up Radio, coordinated a workshop and con- 
ducted outreach throughout the weekend for WBAI . Kat Aaron, a Rise Up Radio 
producer, led a panel discussion on radio technology that included members of 
Freel03Point9, an Internet radio station, and Neuro TVansmitter, a low power radio sta- 
tion. Panelists analyzed the growing number of Internet radio stations, the ease of 
launching one, and the fact that the Web is not yet monopolized by large media 
owners. "That's what makes the Internet so cool— you can listen to so many different 
people's voices," Kat said. She compared the current situation to the early days of FM 
radio, before media consolidation choked off many independent outlets. Kat urged 
people to learn that history and watch for warning signs of consolidated ownership of 
the Internet. "It's not inconceivable that in the future, Internet content will become 
more regulated," Kat said. 









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Overall, participants pronounced the conference a success. "It's definitely benefi- 
cial," said Ireece Underwood. "The people who come and participate get to learn how 
to do new things and how to get involved." 

Leigh Ann Caldwell is a teacher with Radio Rootz and a reporter for the WBAI 
Evening News and Free Speech Radio News For more on Radio Rootz, go to 
w^^^v.radiorootz.org or sec WBAI Folio, Fall 2004, p. 8 (online at www.wbai.org). 
Rise Up Radio (ivww.riseupradio.org), currently heard Fridays from 11:00 a.m. -noon, 
will soon move to a more youth-friendly time. 



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