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Full text of "The Wellesley cook book"

CA)E:t>£sLEy 



W" 



ERE 

TO BUY 



COOK ^ STOVES. 



The following letter is worthy the attention of every 
housekeeper, and I can fully indorse it: 

Office of the Boston c<K)KiN(i Soiioor,, 
Smith & Anthony Stove Co., Boston, Mass. Boston, Mass., December I'J, 1887. 

Dtar Sirs, —Three of the Hub Ranges, witn Wire Gauze Oven Doors, have been in constant 
use at the Boston Cooking School for the past two seasons, and they have proved to be very 
superior stoves. We can especially commend the Gauze Oven Door as being all you claim for it. 
Its ettect on meats is to render them tender and juicy, while the most delicate pastry is cooked 
evenly and uniformly on every side. The Range is economical in the use of fuel, and is ex- 
tremely simple in its management. We consider the Wire Gauze Oven Door an indispensable 
atUunct to a cooking range. 

From personal and public use, we can recommend the Hub Ranges as being the most reliable 
of any we have ever seen. Yours very truly, I. A. MAYNARD, Principal. 

M. A. HASTINGS, Asat. Principal. 

'"'"""wLefrr^a. W. D. PARL!N'S,25 Main St,, Natick. 



Established 1866. 



The Natiek Protective Union, 



THE 



li. 



LIBRARY OF CONGRESS. 



UNITED STATES OF AMERICA. 



/I8I0N8. 



Dffr and FANCY GOODS. 

Agent for DOMESTIC SEWING MACHINES and PATTERNS. 

« We manufacture our LADIES' AND CHILDREN'S COTTON 

UNDERWEAR, and can save you one profit. - 

Garments made to order. Good goods at reasonable prices. 

11 West Central Street, NATICK. 



ARLINGTON WHEAT MEAL! 

AN UNEQUALLED FOOD FOR ALL. 



Endorsed by all Physicians as an unequal- 
led food for Invalids and families. 

Pure Wheat Meal contains more hfe-sus- 
taining properties than any otlier food. 

It is a natural food for every Brain-Worker, 
containing the necessary Elements to 
strengthen the Brain. 

Flour is less gluten than wheat. Gluten is 
the alhuminoid principle corresponding to the 
albumen, tibrin, and gelatine in the human 
body. 

Dogs fed by Magendie (vide Kirks & Paget's 
Physiology) on flour, died in forty days; 
other dogs fed on wheat meal bread flourished 
and tlirove. The three-fourths impoverish- 
ment of the mineral ingredients proved fatal 
to the first. Why should mankind suffer 
from living on impoverished food as they do? 

The history of the Roman Empire in the 
time of Julius Cxsar shows tliat wlieat, as an 
article of food, combined with fresh out-door 
air life, is capable of producing and sustain- 
ing the highest type of physical manhood the 
world ever saw. This empire was built up and 
maintained by soldiers whose main article of 
food was wheat. See Boston Journal of Chem- 
istry, February, 1875. 

People who live mostly upon flour will, if 
they use the Arlington Wheat Meal, find their 
expenses in this department diminished three- 
fourths. The Wheat Meal will go further and 
give four times as much nutriment as an 
equal amount of flour. 

Laboring men can do their work with less 
exhaustion, because it contains more Sustain- 
ing Forces than any other food. 

Children who feed on this need never be 
troubled with Cholera Infantum, which de- 
stroys so many children. 

REASONS WHY IT IS PREFEBABLE TO 
FLOUR. 

PF..OUK is the only impoverished food 
used by mankind — impoverished by the 
wiindrawal of tlie tegumentary portion of the 
wheat, leaving the internal or starchy portion. 
See the facts ! 

• In chemistry we find that in 100 parts of 
substance — 
Wlieat has an ash of 17.7 parts; 
Flour an ash of 4.1 parts, — an impoverish- 
ment of over three-quarters. 
Wheat nas 8.2 parts of Phosphoric Acid ; 
Flour 2.1 parts Phosphoric Acid, — an im- 
poverishment of about three-quarters. 



Wheat has 0.0 Lime, and 0.6 Soda ; 

Flour has 0.1 Lime, and 0.1 Soda, — an 
impoverishment of five-sixths Lime and 
Suua each. 

Wheat has Sulphur 1..5; Flour has no Sul- 
phur. 

Wheat has Sulphuric Acid 0.5; Flour has 
no Sulphuric Acid. 

Wheat has Silica; Flour has no Silica. 



REGIMEN AND DIET. 

Every ettbrt of tli'e mind or movement of a 
muscle involves the expenditure, or waste, of 
nervous eiiergj' and vitality, in proportion to 
the magnitude of the effort ; these wasted prod- 
ucts pass off' with effete substances from tiie 
body, while recuperation is effected by nutri- 
tion. The loss of physical force by using 
Common Flour is immense, which analysis 
proves. 

FIRST, THEN, MAKE USE OP 

ARLINGTON WHEAT MEAL 

(MADE FROM ALL THE WHEAT). 

A perfect food for Children, making: 

them Strong and Vigorous — also 

imparts Strength to the Aged. 

This article contains ALL THE WHEAT. 
In tiie coverings of the wheat are the Phos- 
phates which go to constitute bone and muscle, 
and materially assist digestion l)y causing the 
rapid decomposit'ion of the food. It is in this 
way the Phosphates in A.rliiii>:toa 
Wheat Meal act, giving new power and 
strength to the system. 

EVERY BARREL GUARAXTEED TO 
GIVE SATISFACTION. 



It contains nil the NITROGEN- 
IZED SUBSTANCES which 
PRODUCE BLOOD and the 
LIVING ORGANISM. 



BEWARE OF IMITATIONS. 

For salehtj all Grocers. Send for 
Circular. 



MANUFACTURED BY 



SAMUEL A. FOWLE, 

ARLINGTON, MASS. 



IF ♦ YOU . WOULD • ENJOY 
REAL . DELICACIES 




Notice our motto on the curing of these superb meats. 

USE 

F. A. Ferris & Company's 




Our constant aitn is to make tliem the finest in the world. 

HAMS AND 

BONELESS BACON 



THE 



WELLESLEY COOK BOOK 



PREPARED BY THE 

LADIES OF THE CONGREGATIONAL SOCIETY 



r — 



BOSTO 
C. J. PETERS & 
1890 




^'. 

f-^^ 



/ 

/ 



Copyright, 1890, 
By I. A. Sanborn. 



PREFACE 



This book was prepared by the Parlor Fund Com- 
mittee, to aid in building the contemplated additions to 
the church, and has been made from a collection of 
receipts donated by the ladies of Wellesley. They 
are not original but favorite rules chosen by those 
whose names are given as guarantees of excellence. 
Advertisements have been solicited to pay the expenses 
of publication, but in no case have any been received 
from parties whose good^ our ladies have not themselves 
tested and can cordially recommend. 

Books may be ordered by mail from each of the 
committee. 

' Mrs. Benj. H. Sanborn, - 

• Mrs. Albert Jennings, 

Mrs. H. E. Currier, 

Elizabeth R. Horr, 

Mrs. T. B. Eollins, 

Parlor Fund Committee. 
Wellesley, Mass., June, 1890. 



NOTE. — Blank pages are left in this book for writing in other 
receipts or making changes. 



CONTENTS 



PAGE 

Bread 2-15 

Breakfast Cakes, Fbitters, and Doughnuts . 15-29 

Soup 29-35 

Fish 35-41 

Oysters 41-47 

Eggs 47-53 

Meat 53-65 

Vegetables 65-73 

Salads 73-81 

Pies 81-91 

Puddings 91-109 

Custards and Desserts 109-121 

Cake . . . 121-155 

Ice Cream and Sherbet 155-159 

Confectionery .?..,... 159-163 

Oriental Dishes 163-165 

Sauce and Pickles 165-177 

Fragments and Miscellaneous Hints . . . 177-182 

On the Feeding of Young Children . . . 182-184 



THE 



Hicks Brown Company 

MERCHANT MILLERS, 

MANSFIELD, OHIO, U.S.A. 



THE flour made by this Company, having been 
thoroughly tested in actual use by the authors of 
this Cook Book, has justly entitled them to the 
space given them for advertising. 

The celebrated brands of flour made by this 
Company are well known throughout New England for 
their purit}', uniformity, and the general good qualities of 
a strictly pure " Winter Wheat " flour, and are far superior 
to any " Spring " flour for domestic use. A trial of their 
brands will satisfy any one as to their superiority. 

THESE BRANDS ARE: 

'^HUNGARIAN, " fst Patent; 

"BROWN'S BEST," 2d Patent; 
"DAYLIGHT/' Straight; 

"WINTER KING," Clear. 

This Company also makes '* Graham " flour, which, 
like all of their other flour, stands pre-eminently in the 
front as an article of healthy nutrition. 

For further particulars, address 

THE HICKS BROWN COMPANY, Mansfield, Ohio. 



WELLESLEY COOK BOOK 



BREAD 

4s bread is the staff of life, be ye careful that it is sound and light. 

VTHEAT BREAD 

Pare three moderately large mealy potatoes, cut them 
into slices three-fourths of an inch thick, and boil them 
in a small covered dish with a little water and salt. 
When the potatoes are well cooked, pour off the water, 
sift them through a small strainer, stir in flour and water 
enough to make a quart or more of rather stiff batter, 
add a cake of compressed yeast, and set in a warm place. 
The batter will rise in one hour. Mix four quarts of 
flour, one-half cup of lard rubbed into the flour, one 
tablespoonful of sugar, salt, and the yeast so as to form 
a very stiff dough. 

The sponge will be ready to knead in three hours, and 

may be shaped into four loaves. Bread made in this 

way is always sweet and very light. The dough must 

not be allowed to stand over night, as it rises too 

quickly. 

Mrs E. A. Jennings. 

WHEAT BREAD 

Dry in the oven over night three quarts of flour. 
The secret of good bread depends upon having the flour 
very dry and the yeast fresh. 

Make a sponge early in the morning with one cup of 



4 WELLESLET COOK BOOK 

flour, one cup of warm milk and a cake of compressed 
yeast. Let it rise until it begins to fall. 

Mix the three quarts of dried flour with three pints of 
warm milk, or water, a tablespoonful each of sugar, 
lard, and salt. When well mixed, add the sponge and 
work the mixture ten minutes. Let it rise till half as 
high again as at first. 

Mould or knead it ten minutes more, and let it rise 
till twice its original height. Mould into loaves or bis- 
cuit, and when moderately light bake iu a slow oven. 

M. H. L. 

BREAD 

1 pint of milk 1 tablespoonful butter 

1-2 pint cold water 1 tablespoonful sugar 

1-2 cake of Pleischnaann's 1 teaspoonful salt, all dis- 

yeast dissolved in cold solved in 1-2 pint HOT 

water • water 

Add to the milk and cold water in the mixing-bowl 
the solution of the butter, sugar, and salt, and the solution 
of the yeast. Stir in flour enough to make a not very 
stiff batter. Do not knead it, but mix it with a knife, 
cutting it through, and working it over until all the dry 
flour is well mixed with the other materials. Scrape the 
dough from the sides of the mixing-dish, smooth the top 
with a knife. Cover with a thick cloth, and let the batter 
rise. Shape into loaves ; and when sponge has well risen, 
bake about forty minutes. Makes four good-sized loaves. 

The Eliot. 

BREAD WITH WHOLE WHEAT FLOUR 

1 quart tepid water 1 teaspoonful salt 

1 tablespoonful butter 1-2 yeast cake 

1 tablespoonful sugar Flour enoug-h to make a stiff 

batter 

Mix over night or in the morning. Keep at a temper- 
ate degree of heat. When light, stir down, remove to 



WELLESLEY COOK BOOK 5 

moulding-board. Work in only enough flour to allow 
the forming into loaves. Place in pans. Let it rise 
again, and bake in a quick but not too hot oven. 

In preparing the bread for the pans, mould as little 
as possible. The above rule makes two loaves. 

Mrs. Nathan Abbott. 

WHOLE WHEAT FLOUR BREAD 

Soak half a cake of Warner's Safe Yeast in one quart 
of lukewarm water, with salt. With the sifted whole 
wheat, use one coffee cup of sifted white flour. Use 
enough flour to make a batter that will drop thickly 
from the spoon. Set over night in warm room. In the 
morning, pour into bread pans, two-thirds full. Let it 
rise to top. Good oven. 

Mrs. Clements. 

GRAHAM BREAD 

One pint of warm milk, or milk and water, half of a 
yeast cake (compressed), and flour enough to make a 
thin batter. Let this rise over night, and in the morning 
stir in half a cup of sugar, a little salt, one teaspoonful 
of saleratus dissolved in water, and Graham (Arlington 
meal) enough to make a stiff batter. All the other 
ingredients should be thoroughly beaten into the sponge 
before adding the Graham, which should be stirred in a 
little at a time, and beaten ivell. Cut into biscuit, or 
shape into loaves, as preferred, and place in the baking- 
pans. Let it rise until very light, an hour and a half, or 
two hours, and bake. The oven should not be so hot as 
for white bread. 

Do not make it too stiff. 

M. Brown. 



b WELLESLET COOK BOOK 

GRAHAM BREAD 

1 pint Graham flour 2 teaspoonf uls Royal 

1 pint wheat flour ing Powder 

11-2 pints milk 1 egg 
1-2 cup sugar 

Sift flour, salt, powder ; add sugar, egg, and milk ; 

bake with good oven. 

A. M. a 

GRAHAM BREAD 
Three and three-quarters cups of warm water, one-third 
of a yeast cake, very little salt, a small cup molasses, one 
large quart Graham, one large quart St. Louis flour. If 
not quite stiff enough, always add flour rather than 
Graham. 

Mrs. Stoddard. 

GRAHAM BREAD 

1 quart warm water Scant half-pint molasses 

2 quarts flour A little salt 



1 3-4 quarts Graham flour 1-2 yeast cake 

Mrs. N. H. Dadmun. 



Let it rise over night, 



RYE BREAD 

2 cups rye meal Yeast powder, or 1 teaspoon- 

1 heaping cup flour f ul of soda and 2 of cream 

1 egg of tartar 

2 tablespoonfuls molasses 

Mix with milk, or milk and water, to pour easily from 
a spoon. Bake in gem pans or in a loaf. 

E. Marietta Dewing. 

BROWN BREAD 

1 pint rye meal 1 pint wheat flour 

1 pint bolted Indian meal 2-3 cup molasses 

2-3 cup yeast 

Scald the Indian meal, and when cool add the other 

ingredients. Moisten with sweet skimmed milk. Mix 

thoroughly and put into a tin pail with a close-fitting 

cover. Let it stand two hours ; then set it in the oven, 



WELLESLEY COOK BOOK 7 

on two bricks. Let the temperature of the oven for the 
first half-hour be of the degree required to bake apple 
pies ; then keep a very slow fire for five or six hours. 

Mrs. E. A. Jennings. 

BOSTON BROWN BREAD 

2 cups sour milk 1 1-2 teaspoonfuls of soda sifted 

2 cups Indian meal with 1-3 cup white flour 

1 cup molasses 1 teaspoonful salt 

1 cup rye or Graham flour 

Mix molasses and sour milk, then stir in the meal and 

flour. Pour into a buttered pail and steam three hours, 

then set in the oven and bake from twenty to thirty 

minutes. 

Winifred E. Badger, 

STEAMED BROWN BREAD 

1 cup Indian meal 1-2 teaspoonful soda 

2 cups rye meal 1-2 teaspoonful salt 
2-3 cup molasses 

Wet with milk or water. Stir well together. Steam 
three hours. ^ 

Mrs. Hohart. 

STEAMED BROWN BREAD 

Two cups Indian meal, two cups rye meal, one cup 
flour, one teaspoonful salt, mixed; one small cup 
molasses, one and one-half pints milk and water (half 
and half), or the same quantity sour milk, one heaping 
teaspoonful soda. Steam three hours. 

Mrs. Stoddard. 

BROWN BREAD 

1 cup Indian meal cup molasses 

1 cup flour 1-2 teaspoonfuls soda 

2 1-3 cups rye meal 1-2 pints milk 
2 teaspoonfuls salt 

Dissolve soda in a little boiling water and stir into 
the molasses. Steam six or seven hours. 

Miss Hall. 



WELLESLET COOK BOOK 



CORN BREAD 



1 pint of white Indian meal 2 1-2 teaspoonfuls of Royal 

(full) Baking- Powder 

1 teacup wheat flour Milk 

3 eg-g-s Butter the size of a walnut 
3 tablespoonfuls sugar (scant) 

Sift the meal, flour, sugar, and baking powder to- 
gether through a flour sieve ; work through the mixture 
the butter, add the eggs well beaten, and enough milk to 
cause the batter to just begin to pour from the spoon 
instead of dropping. Bake in gem pans. 



M. H. L. 



BROWN BREAD 



2 cupfuls Indian meal 3 cupf uls sour milk or water 

2 cupfuls coarse flour 1 teaspoonful soda 

1 cupful molasses 

Steam three hours and bake one-half hour. 

Mrs. Mary L. Whipple. 

STEAMED BROWN BREAD 

1 1-2 cups Indian meal 1-2 cup molasses 

1 1-2 cups rye meal 1 teaspoonful soda 

2-3 cup flour Salt 

Mix soft with cold water, and boil three hours. 

Lucy T. Winsor. 

POTATO YEAST 

12 potatoes 1 tablespoonful salt 

1 quart boiling water 1 tablespoonful sugar 

1 quart cold water 1 cup baker's yeast (or raise 

1 tablespoonful flour with cake yeast) 

Boil and mash the potatoes, and put them through a 

hair sieve, add the flour and then the cold water ; then the 

boiling water, salt, and sugar. When sufiiciently cool, 

put in the yeast, and set it to rise. Bottle the next 

day. 

H. E. C. 



WELLESLEY COOK BOOK 9 

SPANISH BUNNS 

1 lb. flour 3 eg-gs 

1-2 lb. sug-ar 1 cup fresh yeast 

1-4 lb. butter A little mace 

Milk to make it the consistency of pound cake ; 

beat well together, and put it in the tin you intend 

baking in. Set in a warm place, and bake like loaf 

bread, when light. 

Mrs. H. F. Durant. 

CINNAMON BUNNS 

One pint of risen white dough. Work into this two 
well-beaten eggs, one-half cup of brown sugar, and one- 
fourth of a cup of melted butter, and enough flour to roll 
it into a sheet fourteen inches in length by ten in width 
and about one-half inch in thickness. Sprinkle this 
sheet of dough generously with brown sugar and pow- 
dered cinnamon, and roll it into a tight roll as you do a 
sponge roll. Then slice it down with a sharp knife into 
rolls one-half inch thick and set these to rise in a greased 
pan till light, when they may be baked as biscuit. 

One-half cup of seedless raisins may be stirred into 

the dough if desired. 

Mrs. Cowan. 
BUNNS 

3 eg-g-s 3 cups milk 

2 cups sug'ar 2-3 cup yeast 

1-2 cup butter Teaspoonful soda 

Use the eggs, sugar and milk and flour to make a 

sponge. In the morning melt the butter and add with 

all the flour you can stir in with a spoon. In summer, 

when light, set the dough in a cool place till about two 

o'clock, then roll out, cut, fold over, and put in pans to 

rise. After baking rub over with sugar and water, or 

the white of an egg. 

Mrs. Bacon. 



10 WELLESLEY COOK BOOK 

BUNNS 

3 cups new milk 1 cup butter 

2 cups sugar 1 cup dried currants 

1 cup yeast 

Take three cups of milk, one cup of sugar, one cup of 
yeast, and flour enough to make a stiff batter. After it 
rises, add one cup of sugar, one cup of butter, and knead 
it and let it rise again ; cut it into cakes and let it rise 
again very light after putting into the pans. Add nut- 
meg if you like. Brush over the top with the white 
of egg and molasses when you take from oven. 

M. Brown. 

ROLLS 

Boil one pint milk, put in one large tablespoonful of 
butter while it cools; mix one large tablespoonful of 
sugar with three pints of flour, and a little salt, and one 
teacup of baker's yeast, or make a cup of yeast by 
taking two-thirds of a yeast cake dissolved in one-half 
cup of warm water, and flour enough for a thin batter. 
Let this rise for an hour before mixing the rolls. This 
should give the teacupful of yeast. 



Mrs. Stoddard. 



HUSK 



4 lbs. flour 3-4 lb. butter 

1 lb. sugar 1 pint milk 

4 eggs Cinnamon 
Yeast 

EuB flour and butter together; add sugar. Set a 
sponge with the milk and yeast. In the morning add 
the beaten eggs, make into three loaves and let it rise. 
Bake one hour in a slow oven — a little over-doing in- 
jures it greatly. 

Mrs. Bacon. 



WELLESLEY COOK BOOK. 11 

RUSK 

1 cup sugar 1-3 cup butter 

1 egg 1 teaspoonful soda 

1 cup sour milk 1-2 teaspoonful each cloves, 

2 cups flour cinnamon, and nutmeg 

Cream butter, add sugar, then the milk, into which 

has been stirred the soda., next the spices, flour and egg, 

well beaten. 

Mrs. Tucker. 

SOUTHERN BEATEN BISCUIT 

1 quart of flour 1 cup of rich milk 

Piece of lard the size of an egg- 1-4 teaspoonful of soda 
1 heaping teaspoonful of salt 

Chop the lard into the flour till thoroughly mixed 
through it, and add the other ingredients to make a stiff 
dough. Work this or beat it on a marble slab twenty- 
minutes, or until it blisters. Roll it one-fourth of an 
inch thick, and cut or make by hand into tiny biscuit. 
Stick them with a fork, and bake in a quick oven for 

thirty minutes. 

Mrs. Cowan. 

BUTTERED ROLL 

A PINT of flour, one heaping teaspoonful baking pow- 
der, a pinch of salt, and sweet milk enough to make a 
moderately stiff dough. Knead a little, roll out half an 
inch thick, and spread with a piece of butter the size of 
an egg. Sprinkle well with flour, roll up, and cut in 

slices an inch thick. Bake in a quick oven. 

A. L. W. 

EGG BISCUIT 

3 pints of flour 1 cup of milk 

2 eggs, the whites Pinch of salt 

1-2 cup of yeast 

Mix at eleven A. m. ; roll out at four p. m. Use two 

sizes of cutter, putting the smaller round of dough on top, 

then let it rise until supper-time. Bake twenty minutes. 

Mrs, Geo, U. Bobbins. 



ASK YOUR GROCER FOR 



yc|iji(d Stoue polisi; 

IT BLACKS BED COVERS, 

IS ABSOLUTELY FIBEPROOF^ 

AND FBEE FBOM SMELL, 

REX LIQUID STOVE POLISH Co. 

WHITMAN, MASS. 

PORTLAND 

^ Stat^ ^ 

MATCHES. 

WARRANTED THE 

Safest^ Surest J and Best 

FOR HOME USE OR EXPORT. 



MANUFACTURED ONLY BY 

Portland Star Match Co. 

PORTLAND, MAINE. 
13 



THE 



F. SCHUMACHER MILLING Co. 



AKRON, OHIO, 




Manufacturers of 

PAKCUED FARINOSE and ROLLED WHEAT; .• .• .• 
ROLLED AVENA, the best product Jtiade frotn White Oats, put 
up 171 Barrels, and Cases of j6 Packages, 2 lbs. each; OATMEAL ; 
CRACKED WHEAT; WHOLE WINTER WHEAT 
and W. W. GRAHAM FLOUR, Ahuays Pure, Ahvays Reliable; 
GRANULATED, and COARSE PEARL HOMINY; WHITE 
and YELLOW GRANULATED CORNMEAL. .» .♦ .• .• .• 



=; PARCHED FARINOSE. 



They have recently added to tlieir long list a new Cereal of inestimable 
value to those suffering from imp:iired digestion. RICH IN GLUTEN, 
GERM, GUM or DEXTRINE, it 
is favorably received everywhere, 
under the name and trade-mark of 

For INFANTS, it may well supersede all other foods (save milk, which cnn 
never find a perfect substitute during the first weeks of life), because its rendv 
and perfect digestion involves no strain upon feeble digestive power; it contiiins 
all the elements demanded by the growing life. And for like reasons it is equally 
adapted for INVALIDS. By FEVER PATIENTS it is used as a thin gruel, 
and is partaken of with some relish even when genuine appetite and all craving 
for food are suspended. 

For all REFINED, PROGRESSIVE HUMAN BEINGS, it will prove a 
perfect food, supplying all waste, and restoring every exhausted energy. 

Added to all its excellencies, its appetizing flavor will commend' it to the 
palates of man, woman, and child alike. 

To get the genuine, call for all these goods in original packages. 

H 



WELLESLEY COOK BOOK 15 



BREAKFAST CAKES, FRITTERS, AND 
DOUG-HNUTS 

"And now to breakfast with what appetite you have." 

A DELICIOUS BREAKFAST DISH 

Pour two cups of boiling water on one cup of Nuda- 
vene Flakes, add a scant teaspoonful of salt, and boil 
one hour in a double kettle. Serve with cream. 

RYE MUSH 

1 quart water 11-2 teaspoonfuls salt 

3 cups rye meal 

When the water is boiling hard — not before — salt it 

and stir in the rye meal, putting it in gradually, stirring 

constantly. Let it boil briskly for five minutes, stirring 

occasionally to prevent sticking. Then set it on the 

back of the range and let it cook slowly twenty minutes 

more. Serve hot with sugar and cream, or milk. Many 

will prefer it without sugar. 

Mrs. B. M. Manly. 

BREAKFAST CAKES 

1 1-2 cups Arling-ton wheat 1 large teaspoonful baking 

meal poTvder 

1 egg" 1 tablespoonf ul of sugar 

Mix with milk to a thin batter, add salt, and bake in 

muffin or gem pans. 

H. B. 



16 WELLESLEY COOK BOOK 

WHOLE WHEAT GEMS 

1 egg ^ 1 dessertspoonful sugar 

1 small tablespoonful melted A little salt 

butter 1 teaspoonf ul baking powder 
11-3 coffee cups of milk 

Mixed with enougli sifted whole wheat flour to make 

a batter the consistency of batter for fritters. Bake in 

hot gem pans in hot oven. 



Mrs. Clements. 



BREAKFAST GEMS 



1 cup sour milk 1-2 cup of white flour sifted 

1 teaspoonful salt with 1 even teaspoonful of 

1 cup of rye or graham flour soda 

1-4 cup molasses 

Before beginning to make the gems, place the gem 
pans in the oven to get very hot ; then mix the milk, 
molasses, and salt together. Add the flour, stir the 
whole thoroughly, and bake one-half hour. 

Winifred E. Badger. 

GRAHAM GEMS 

2 cups Graham 1 piece of butter size of an 

1 cup flour ess, melted 

1 ess 2 teaspoonfuls baking pow- 

1 pint of milk der, and salt 

1 tablespoonful of sugar 

Beat well together one-half hour before baking ; heat 

the gem pans hot^ butter well, bake in a quick oven. 

These cakes are very good baked as soon as mixed, but 

improved by standing a short time. 

Mrs. T. W. Willard. 

GRAHAM MUFFINS 

2 cups Graham 1 teaspoonful saleratus 

1 cup flour 2 teaspoonfuls cream tartar 

2 tablespoonfuls molasses or Salt 
1 tablespoonful sugar 

Mix with milk, or use one egg and mix with water. 

M7's. Lewis M. Grant. 



WELLESLET COOK BOOK 17 

RYE BREAKFAST CAKES 

2 cups of rye meal 1 1-2 cups of sweet milk to 

1-2 cup molasses mix it very soft 

A little salt 1 teaspoonful of saleratus 

Bake at once in a roll pan or muffin rings. 

3{rs. Caswell. 

RYE MUFFINS 

2 cups sour milk 2 eg-gs * 

'6 cups rye meal 1 teaspoonful soda 

1 cup flour A little salt. 

1 small cup molasses 

Mrs. Stoddard. 

RYE GEMS 

1 cup rye meal 2 larg-e spoonfuls of sugar 

1 cup Arlington flour 1 saltspoonful of salt 

1 teaspoonful Royal Baking 1 eg-g* thoroughly beaten 

Pow^der 1 cup of milk 

Mix in the order given, sift meal and flour twice and 
sift in the baking powder. Heat the gem pan hot and 
well buttered for a rich crust. 

A. M. Wilson. 
RYE GEMS 

1 egg 1 cup rye meal 

1-2 cup sugar 2-3 cup flour 

1 cup buttermilk 2 tablespoonfuls melted but- 

1 teaspoonful soda ter 

Mix in the order given, and bake in hot gem pans. 

Mrs. Benj. H. Sanborn. 

THIN JOHNNY CAKE 

2 eggs scant teaspoonful soda 

1 1-2 cups sw^eet milk scant teaspoonfuls cream 

Butter 1-2 size of an egg tartar or tw^o good tea- 

1 tablespoonful molasses spoonfuls of baking powder 

1 cup g-ranulated corn meal A pinch of salt 

Beat the eggs light ; add milk, salt, molasses, melted 
butter ; sift the soda and cream of tartar with the meal, 
and stir it in last. Bake about a half an hour in a hot 
oven, in a thin sheet. 

Mrs. R. M. Manly. 



18 WELLESLEY COOK BOOK 

CORN MEAL BREAKFAST CAKES 

Scald 1 cup of corn meal 1-2 cup flour 

Add sufficient milk to make Heaping- teaspoonful baking" 

quite thin powder 
Pinch of salt 



Bake on a griddle. 



Mrs. Caswell. 



BREAKFAST CORN CAKE 

1 cupful corn meal 2 large spoonfuls of sug-ar 

1 cupful flour 1 saltspoonful of salt 

1 teaspoonful Royal Baking 1 egg- well beaten 
Powder Milk enough for a thick batter 

Sift the meal and flour twice, and sift in the baking 

powder ; mix in the order given. Melt a tablespoon- 

ful of butter in the spider ; pour about half of it into 

the mixture, and bake the cake in the spider, the melted 

butter forming a rich crust ; will bake in twenty minutes 

in a hot oven. 

Anna M. Wilson. 

CORN CAKE 

1 eg-g Salt 

1-2 cup sug-ar 1 tablespoonful butter 

1-2 cup flour 1 cup milk 

2 teaspoonfuls baking- powder 1 1-2 cups Indian meal. 

3Irs. A. Jennings. 
OENDORFF 

2 cups of hominy, after it is 1 tablespoonful of butter 

boiled 2 eggs 

1 cup of milk 

Bake in deep pie plates about twenty minutes to half 

an hour. Good breakfast dish. 

Mrs. C. P. Withington. 

RAISED MUFFINS 

1 pint milk 1 saltspoonful salt 

Piece of butter the size of an 1-2 cup yeast 
egg 

Flour for batter rather thicker than for griddle cakes. 

Mix in the morning, if for tea. When the batter is 



WELLESLEY COOK BOOK 19 

light, having been kept in a warm place, fill the rings 

half full, and let the muffins rise until the rings are full. 

Bake in a quick oven. Let them rise from one to two 

hours. 

Mrs. Edwin B. Webb. 

RAISED MUFFINS 

1-3 cup sug-ar 1 egg- 

1-4 cup butter Flour enoug-h to make a 

1-2 pint milk stiff batter 

1-4 cake yeast 

Dissolve the yeast cake in a little warm water, 

thicken it with flour, and let it rise half an hour. Cream 

the butter and sugar, warm the milk, and mix; let it 

rise over night. Stir it down in the morning. Add the 

egg well beaten; put into small tins when well risen, 

bake half an hour. 

Mrs. Benj. H. Sanborn. 

COFFEE ROLLS 

12 cups flour 1 yeast cake 

1 cup white sug-ar 3 eg-g-s 

1-2 cup butter or lard 3 larg-e cups warm milk 

Let rise over night. If well risen in the morning,. 
knead and set in cool place till 3 p. m. Shape in long- 
rolls, and let rise an hour and a half. Bake half an 

hour in a moderate oven. 

C. E. Cameron. 

MUFFINS 

1 pint milk 1-4 cup sug-ar 

2 eggs 

Beat the eggs and sugar together and add the milk. 
Stir into this one quart of flour, three teaspoonfuls yeast 
powder, salt, and a small piece of lard, melted. 

Mrs. N. H. Dadmiin. 



20 WELLESLEY COOK BOOK 

MUFFINS 

Three cups of flour, two teaspoonfuls of cream of 
tartar, one teaspoonful of soda. Mix with it one e^^, 
one tablespoonful of sugar, three of melted butter, a little 
salt, and two cups of sweet milk. Bake in gem pans. 

Mrs. J. Moulton. 

CREAM TARTAR MUFFINS 

1 quart flour 1 teaspoonful saleratus 

1 small pint rich milk 2 teaspoonfuls cream tartar 

2 egg-s Salt 

1 tablespoonful sugar 

Mix salt, sugar, cream tartar, dry in flour, add eggs 
without beating, then milk with saleratus dissolved in it, 
and beat thoroughly. Bake in gem pans in quick oven. 

Mrs. C. E. Shattuck. 

MUFFINS 

1 quart flour 2 teaspoonfuls cream tartar 

2 cups milk ' 1 teaspoonful soda 
1-2 cup sugar A little salt 

2 eg-gs Butter the size of an egg 

Melt the butter with four tablespoonfuls of boiling 
water. Beat thoroughly. Bake in muffin pans thirty 
minutes in a quick oven. 

Mrs. Mary L. Whipple. 

LEBANON MUFFINS 

2 egga 1 pint flour 

1 teacup cream, or sweet milk 1 teaspoonful baking pow- 
Butter 1-2 size of an egg der 

Beat the yolks, and add milk and melted butter. 

Mix the baking powder with the flour and add to the 

above, and stir in the beaten whites last. Will make 

one dozen in gem or muffin pan. 

Miss Kendall. 



WELLESLEY COOK BOOK 21 

POPOVERS 

1 pint sweet milk, 1 pint flour, 1 eg-g* 
Bake in iron gem pans. 



Mrs. Tucker. 



BLUEBERRY CAKE 



1 pint flour 2 teaspoonfuls cream tartar 

1 teaspoonful soda 2 eg-gs 

1-2 pint milk 

Mrs. Edwin B. Webb. 

BERRY CAKE 

Butter size of an eg-g- 1 eg-g* 

1-2 cup sug-ar 1-2 teaspoonful saleratus 

1 cup milk 1 teaspoonful cream tartar 

1 teaspoonful salt 2 cups flour (before sifted) 

1 cup berries 

Miss Hall. 

BLUEBERRY CAKE • 

2 eg-g-s 1 teaspoonful cream tartar 
1 cup sugar 1-2 teaspoonful soda 

1 cup milk Pint berries 



2 cups flour 



Miss Mary 3Iason. 



BLUEBERRY CAKE 



4 cupfuls flour 1 1-2 teaspoonfuls cream of 

1 cupful milk tartar 

1 cupful sug-ar 1 teaspoonful soda 

2 eggs 1 pint berries, rubbed in a dish 
1-2 cupful melted butter of flour 

Mrs. Mary L. Wliipple. 

ORANGE SHORTCAKE 

1 egg" 2-3 cup of sweet milk 
1-2 cup of sugar 1 1-4 cups of flour 

2 tablespoonfuls of melted 1 teaspoonful Royal Baking 
butter Powder 

Bake in a round pan. Split while hot. Fill with 

oranges that have been previously sliced, well sugared, 

and the seeds removed. 

Ellen Morris. 



22 WELLESLEY COOK BOOK 

HEALTHFUL SHORTCAKE 

1 pint rich, fresh buttermilk 1 quart nice ripe strawberries 
1 teaspoonful baking soda A little salt 

Graham flour 

To the milk add soda, salt, and sufficient Graham flour 
to make a tolerably stiff batter. Bake this in two pans 
(as for jelly cake) in a brisk oven. Have ready the 
strawberries, or any kind of fruit desired, mashed and 
sweetened to taste. 

When the cakes are baked, split and butter them, 
spread upon the halves the prepared fruit and put them 
together again. 

This may be eaten either hot or cold, and with cream. 

Elizabeth E. Horr. 

FOOL'S WONDERS 

One and one-half cups of sour milk, one egg, flour 
enough to roll thin about the size of a tea plate, a little 
salt, one-half teaspoonful of soda. Fry as doughnuts. 
Apples stewed and sweetened and spread between each 
layer. 

C. S. Flaqg. 
WAFFLES 

1 quart of flour 2 teaspoonfuls of cream of 
4 eg-gs tartar 

2 tablespoonfuls of butter 1 teaspoonful of soda 

A little salt 

Make a batter with milk, and bake in very hot waffle 

irons. 

Mrs. Pomeroy. 
WAFFLES 

2 eg-g-s 1 teaspoonful Royal Baking 

1 cup milk Powder 

1 pint flour 1-2 teaspoonful salt 

1 tablespoonful butter, melted 

Put a spoonful in each compartment of waffle iron, 

close the cover and cook one minute on one side, turn 

and cook a little longer on the other. Serve with syrup. 

Ellen Morris. 



WELLESLEY COOK BOOK 23 

RAISED DOUGHNUTS 

1 eg-g- 1-2 yeast cake 

1 cup sugar 1 pint milk (scalded) 

1-2 cup butter Little salt and nutmeg- 

Mix butter and sugar, then add the beaten egg, then 
the scalded milk and yeast, mix as stiff as bread, let rise 
over night. In the morning roll out about a quarter of 
an inch thick, cut in squares about three inches, let 
them stand an hour before raising. 

Mrs. J. E. Selfe. 

DOUGHNUTS 

1 cup sugar 2 cream tartar 

1 cup milk Spice 

2 eg-gs Wheat Meal sufficient to roll 
Piece of butter size of an egg out 

1 teaspoonful soda 

A. W. M. 

DOUGHNUTS 

2 cupfuls sugar 1 heaping teaspoonful baking 

2 eggs powder 

1 cupful milk A little salt 

2 tablespoonfuls butter 

Beat the sugar and eggs together. Mix soft. Have 

the lard very hot. 

Mrs. Mary L. Whipple. 

DOUGHNUTS 

2 eggs 1-2 teaspoonful saleratus, salt 

1 1-2 cups sugar and nutmeg 

1 1-2 cups sour milk Flour 

2 tablespoonfuls butter 

E. O. K. 

DOUGHNUTS 

1 cup sugar 1 teaspoonful soda 

1 ess A little salt and nutmeg 

1 large spoonful melted butter Flour to make a rather soft 

1 cup buttermilk dough 

Cut into rings with an open cutter. Fry in hot fat. 

Ellen Morris. 



24 WELLESLET COOK BOOK 

RYE PAN CAKES 

2 eg-g-s 1 tablespoonful molasses 

1 cup sug-ar 1-2 cup flour 

2 cups milk (s^weet or sour) Nutmeg and rose -water 

Thicken with rye meal so that the dough will pour 
easily from a spoon. If sour milk is used, add a rising 
teaspoonful of soda. If sweet milk, one of soda and 

two of cream tartar. 

E. Marietta Dewing. 
COCOA 

1 pint hot water 1 teacup brown sugar 

1 pint sweet milk 1 egg beaten thoroughly with 
4 teaspoonfuls cocoa, or 1-2 cup very hot, though not 

2 squares grated chocolate boiling water 
2 teaspoonfuls of corn starch 

dissolved in 1-2 cup milk 

Pour the Avater over the cocoa in a granite pot, then 
add the milk and sugar, beating thoroughly. When this 
boils up add the dissolved corn starch very slowly. Let 
all boil together well for some five or ten minutes, when 
the cocoa is ready. Break the eg% into a quart bowl 
and pour over it one-half cup very hot water, and beat it 
with a Dover e%^ beater till the bowl is nearly full of 
the froth. Pour some of this into the cocoa pot, then 
pour in the boiling cocoa, reserving some of the egg for 
the top, and serve. This makes eight cups of delightful 

cocoa. 

Mrs. Cowan. 
APPLE FRITTERS 

Yolks of two eggs beaten well ; add half a cup of 
milk or water, and one tablespoonful of olive oil, one 
teaspoonful of sugar, one saltspoonful of salt, and one 
cup of flour, or enough to make it almost a drop batter. 
When ready to use, add the whites of the eggs, beaten 
very stiff. Core and pare three or four apples, but do 
not break them. Cut them in. slices one-third of an inch 



WELLE SLEY COOK BOOK 25 

thick, leaving the opening in the centre. Dip each 
slice in the fritter batter and fry in hot fat. Drain and 
sprinkle with powdered sugar, lemon, and spice. If 
bananas are used, cut lengthwise and treat in same 
manner. 

Mrs. Albert Jennings. 

BANANA FRITTERS 

3 egg's 2 teaspoonfuls baking powder 

1 pint milk 1-2 teaspoonful salt 

2 teacups flour 2 bananas 

Beat the eggs thoroughly, add milk, and stir in flour, 
with which the powder has been well mixed while dry. 
Slice in the bananas, and drop by spoonful into hot lard. 

Mrs. Peabody. 

APPLE FRITTERS 

1 teacupful milk 2 teaspoonfuls baking powder 

1 beaten egg A pinch of salt 

Thicken with flour enough to prevent the batter from 

sticking to the spoon. Slice two or three sour apples 

very thin and mix them with the batter. Drop into hot 

lard, and fry like doughnuts. Eat with syrup, or cream 

and sugar. 

Mrs. Wilson. 

OATMEAL GRIDDLE CAKES 

1 pint cold boiled oatmeal 2 teaspoonfuls Royal Baking 

1 cup milk Powder 
. 1-2 teaspoonful salt 2 eggs 

2 cups flour 

Beat the milk into the oatmeal, add the salt, the 
yolks of the eggs, and a cup of boiling water, mixing all 
well together. Add the flour and beat again ; add the 
baking powder and continue beating. Beat the whites 
of the eggs to a stiff froth and add to the mixture, and 
mix well together. Bake on a hot buttered griddle. 



26 WELLESLET COOK BOOK 

FLOUR GRIDDLE CAKES 

1 pint sour milk 2 eggs 

A little butter 1 heaping- teaspoonful soda 

Salt Flour for a soft batter 

Mrs. Stoddard. 

FRENCH TOAST 

Beat two eggs and stir them into a pint of milk. 

Slice home-made bread ; dip the pieces into the eggs and 

milk, fry brown in hot butter. Sprinkle sugar on each 

piece and serve hot. 

Mrs. Wilson. 



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is for sale everywhere, and has for twenty years 
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BEST FAMILY SOAP in the WOJRLD. 

In order to bring its merits to the notice of a still larger constituency, we have 
recently reduced our price, keeping its quality unchanged, and offer the following 

BEAUTIFUL PRESENTS 

freeof all expense, to all who will preserve, and mail to us, with their full address, 

The Pictures of Mrs. Fogy cut from the Outside 
Wrappers tal<en from this Soap. 

For Fifteen Pictures we will mail a beautiful book, 56 pages, 

SHORT HINTS ON SOCIAL ETIQUETTE, 

the cash price of which is forty cents; or a new and beautiful set of seven 
Cabinet Portraits of 

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For Twenty-five Pictures we will mail the most beautiful Panel Picture 
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The original paintings are owned by us, and cannot be copied or duplicated 
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the land. For twenty-five Pictures we will mail, free of postage, the follow- 
ing six (6) unabridged popular novels : 
A. DaufferoHft WoiiKin, by Mrs. A. S. Stephens. 

From the EnrtJi to the Moon, by Jules Verne. 

The Story of a Wedding jRt»j/, by the author of " Dora Thome." 
I'hif I*eril of JHehard I'ardoii, by Fahjeon. 

C.ouds and Snnshhie, by Cuakles Reabe. 

Huthmi's Ward, by Flokence Marryat. 
Only one lot of these novels will be sent to one address. 

The housekeeper will find on a trial, accordincr to directions, thnt the washing 
does not require HALF THE QUANTITY OF DOBBINS' ELECTRIC 
SOAP that it does of any other; that there is a great saving of time and labor in 
its use; that it saves the\vear and tear of the clothes on tlie washboard, and does 
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I, L. CnAGIW & CO., 

Manufacturers Dobbins' Electric Sonp, 
No. 119 S. 4th St., PUILAVELPHIA, PA. 
28 



WELLESLEY COOK BOOK 



29 



SOUP 

"Every cook praises her own stew." 

POTATO SOUP 

1 Quart milk 1 onion 

6 large potatoes 1 tablespoonful butter 

1 stalk celery 
Put the milk to boil with onion and celery. Pare 
potatoes, and boil thirty minutes. Turn off the water, 
and mash fine and light. Add the boiling milk and the 
butter, and pepper and salt to taste. Eub through a 
strainer and serve immediately. A cup of whipped cream 

is an improvement. ^^ • -u ut j^u 

^ Mrs. Edwin B. Webb. 

CREAM SOUP 

1 +nV>lP^r»oonful flour Salt as needed , 

1 Ggg 

Bub the flour smooth in the butter, stir into the boiling 
water and bring to a quick boil. Set off from the fire 
for two or three minutes, stir in the egg beaten, then 
cover immediately in a hot tureen. ^^^^ ^ ^^^^^^_ 

CLAM SOUP 

Strain one quart clams and chop fine. Put piece of 
butter large as an egg into the kettle (or fry out several 
pieces of salt pork), then put in clams and the liquor. 
Add one quart cold water, two onions cut very fine, salt^ 



30 WELLE SLEY COOK BOOK 

pepper, and one teaspoonful sugar. Boil very slowly,- 
tightly covered, for two hours, then stir in pint milk, and 
at the last one tablespoonful flour mixed smoothly. 

Mrs. Watson. 

MOCK BISQUE SOUP 

Stew a can of tomatoes and strain, add a pinch of 
soda to remove acidity ; in another saucepan boil three 
pints of milk thickened with a tablespoonful of corn 
starch, previously mixed with a little cold milk ; add a 
lump of butter size of an egg, salt and pepper to taste ; 
mix with tomatoes ; let all come to a boil and serve. 

Mrs. Benj. H. Sanborn. 

TOMATO SOUP 

1 quart of canned tomatoes 1 pint milk 

3 teaspoonfuls of sugar 1-2 tablepoonful flour 

1 teaspoonful salt 

After boiling the tomatoes fifteen minutes, strain 
them and add water sufficient to increase the quantity, 
then stir in the sugar and salt. 

Put the milk into a vessel and set into hot water, stir in 
the flour slowly until the milk is thickened, then add this 
to the tomato, and let the whole boil five minutes. 

Winifred E. Badger. 

SPLIT PEA SOUP 

1-2 pint split peas 1 tablespoonful flour 

2 quarts cold water 1 teaspoonful sugar 
2 tablespoonfuls, butter 1 1-2 cups milk 

Soak the peas over night in cold water. Drain and 

put them on to boil in two quarts of cold water. When 

soft rub through a colander, then through a sieve, and put 

on to boil again. Add the milk, thicken with the flour 

rubbed smooth in the butter j season with salt and white 

pepper. 



WELLESLEY COOK BOOK 31 

BOUILLON 

5 lbs. juicy beef 4 pepper corns 

2 quarts cold water 1 small onion with 4 cloves 

Simmer six hours, strain and cool, skim, heat and 
season to taste. 

A. M. C. 

GREEN CORN SOUP 

7 large ears of corn 1 tablespoonful butter 

1 quart w^ater 1 teaspoonful flour 

1 pint milk 1 teaspoonful sugar 

Cut through each row of kernels with a sharp knife. 
With the back of the knife, scrape out the pulp. Boil 
the cobs thirty minutes in one quart of water ; strain, 
add the pulp, and boil ten minutes. Add the milk and 
sugar, thicken with the butter and flour cooked together. 
Boil up once, season with salt and white pepper, and 
serve. Corn a little hard is better for soup. 

Mrs. Benj. H. Sanborn. 

TOMATO SOUP WITH MILK 

Boil one quart milk, thicken with one tablespoonful 

of flour, one tablespoonful of butter, little pepper and 

salt, then one pint strained tomato with a pinch of soda 

added. Serve at once. 

Mrs. Stoddard. 



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FOIL sajjE by OROCEBS geneballt. 

34 



WELLESLET COOK BOOK 35 



nsH 

"Old Ocean's treasures." 

TO BROIL FISH 

Clean, wash, and wipe dry. Split, so that when laid 
flat, the backbone will be in the middle. Sprinkle with 
salt, and lay, inside down, upon a buttered gridiron over 
a clear fire until it is nicely colored, then turn. When 
done, put upon a hot dish, butter plentifully, and pepper- 
Put a hot cover over it and send to table. 

BAKED FISH 

A FISH weighing from four to six pounds is a good 
size to bake. It should be cooked whole to look well. 
Make dressing of bread crumbs, butter, salt, and a little 
salt pork chopped fine (parsley and onions, if you 
please) ; mix this with one egg. Fill the body, sew it 
up, lay in large dripper; put across it some strips of 
salt pork to flavor it. Put pint water and little salt in 
pan. Bake an hour and a half. Baste frequently. 
After taking up fish, thicken gravy and pour over it. 

Cream Gravy for Baked Fish. — Have ready in 
saucepan cup of cream, diluted with a few spoonfuls hot 
water ; stir in carefully two tablespoonfuls melted butter 
and a little chopped parsley ; heat this in vessel filled 
with hot water. Pour in gravy from dripping pan of 
fish. 



36 WELLE SLET cook BOOK 

FISH CHOWDER 

1 dozen potatoes sliced 1 pint rich milk 

coarsely 1 tablespoonful flour 

1 small haddock sliced 6 crackers toasted 
5 slices salt pork chopped Salt and pepper 

2 small onions sliced 

Place fish and potatoes in kettle and cover with water. 
Fry the pork, and skim out and place in the kettle ; fry 
the onions in the pork fat, add the whole to the fish and 
potatoes; boil until the potatoes are done, then, just 
before removing from fire, add the flour dissolved in 
milk, and seasoning. 

Place crackers in dish, pour over them the chowder. 

A. M. C. 

FISH BALLS 

1 cup ra^w salt fish 1 eg'g* well beaten 

2 cups raw potatoes Saltspoonful pepper 
1 teaspoonful butter 

Cook the fish and potatoes together till the potatoes 

are soft. Then mash well and add the butter and egg. 

Fry in hot fat. 

Pauline Smith. 



SCALLOPED CODFISH 

1 lb. salt codfish 3 tablespoonfuls butter 

1 cup of milk 1 cup bread crumbs 

3 eg-g-s 

Boil the fish and chop it fine. Hard-boil the eggs, 
and after chopping fine add to the fish. Put a part of 
the bread crumbs on the bottom of a dish, then a little 
of the milk heated with the butter, then fish and egg, 
and so on, leaving enough crumbs for a thick layer on 
top. Cover with bits of butter, and bake thirty minutes. 

New Lebanon, N. Y. 



WELLESLEY COOK BOOK 37 

SCALLOPED FISH 

One pound of fish boiled half an hour ; put one tea- 
spoonful salt and vinegar in the water. When done, 
break in small pieces and place it in the dish you are 
going to serve it in. Salt and pepper to taste ; take one 
and one-half cups of milk and let come to a boil, thicken 
with one-quarter cup melted butter, and flour to make a 
paste ; pour this over the fish. Half-dozen crackers 
rolled fine, mixed with a quarter cup butter ; spread over 
the top, and bake twenty or thirty minutes. 

Catherine S. Flagg. 

BROILED SALT MACKEREL 

Freshen by soaking it over night in water, taking 
care that the skin lies uppermost. In the morning dry it 
without breaking, cut off the head and tip of the tail, 
place it between the bars of a buttered fish-gridiron, and 
broil to a light brown, lay it on a hot dish, and dress 
with a little butter, pepper, and lemon juice, vinegar, or 
chopped pickle. 

SALMON CROQUETTES 

1 lb. salmon 1 eg'g- 

1 cup cream or milk 1 cup bread crumbs 

2 tablespoonfuls butter 1 tablespoonful flour 

Mix flour and butter together, and stir with the beaten 
egg into the milk when quite hot. Pour over the salmon 
and large cup of bread crumbs ; mix well, and when cold, 
shape and roll in egg and bread crumbs, and fry in deep 
fat, or make flat cakes and fry in frypan with less fat. 

New Lebanon, N. Y. 



S8 WELLESLEY COOK BOOK 

RICE CROQUETTES 

2 cups cold boiled rice 3 eg-g-s 

2 tablespoonfuls melted 1 teaspoonful sugar 
butter 

Work the butter in the rice, then add the beaten eggs 

and flour enough to mould. Eoll in Qg^ and powdered 

cracker. Pry in deep fat. 



VEAL CROQUETTES 

Chop cold veal and about one-fourth or one-third as 
much cold ham quite fine. Stir it into a milk sauce 
(milk thickened with flour and butter very thick). 

While hot, season highly and let it cool. Then shape 
into croquettes, roll in cracker crumbs, and fry as usual. 



TAILBY & SON, 

Opp. Railroad Station, 
WELLESLEY. 



plorists. 



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FLORAL DESIGNS for all occasions arranged at shortest notice. 
Orders by mail or otherwise promptly attended to. 

Flowers carefully packed, and forwarded to all parts of the United States 
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above in all other respects, at V^^v^V^" YARD. 



Roxbury Tapestries. 



II fE SHOW, without exception, the 



intire line of patterns produced 
by the ROXBURY CARPET CO., 

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JTohn If. Pray^ Sons & Co. 

CAMPETS and UPHOLSTERY, 

558 and 560 Washington Street , 
30 to 34 Harrison Avenue Extension. 

40 



WELLESLEY COOK BOOK 41 



OYSTERS 

" The man who first an Oyster ate, we read. 
Had made his will before the reckless deed. ' ' 

BISQUE OF OYSTERS 

Put two quarts of oysters in a saucepan with white 
pepper, two ounces of butter, nutmeg, two blades of 
mace, a bay leaf, a pinch of red pepper, and a pint of 
white broth. Cover and boil ten minutes. Drain in a 
colander and save the liquor. 

Chop the oysters very fine, and put on a plate. Knead 
five ounces of flour in a saucepan with four ounces of 
melted butter. Stir and cook a little, without allowing 
it to brown. Dilute with three pints of boiled milk and 
the oyster liquor. 

Add oysters, stir steadily, and boil ten minutes and 
rub thoroughly through a very fine sieve. Add more 
milk, if required, stir, and boil again. 

Finish with half a pint of raw cream and four ounces 

of butter in small bits. Taste, pour into a tureen and 

serve with small squares of bread fried in butter, and 

served separately. 

M. H. L. 

SCALLOPED OYSTERS 

1 quart oysters 1-2 cup butter 

1 lb. milk crackers Salt and pepper 

1 quart rich milk 

Roll the crackers and place a layer on bottom of dish, 

place next a layer of oysters, with bits of butter, salt 



42 WELLESLEY COOK BOOK 

and pepper; fill the dish with alternate layers of cracker 
and oysters, having cracker on the top. Pour over them 
the milk and oyster broth ; cover and bake briskly one 
hour, uncover and brown. 

This may be varied by adding a well-beaten egg and a 
trifle of nutmeg. 

Serve with slices of lemon. 

A. M. a 

OYSTERS EN COQUILLE 

Fill oyster or scallop shells with oysters ; season with 
salt, butter, pepper, and lemon juice, cover with sifted 
buttered bread crumbs. Bake till the crumbs are brown. 
Place the shells on small plates and serve. 



M. T. 



CREAMED OYSTERS 



1 pint oysters 1 tablespoonful of flour 

1 pint cream (rich milk is very Small piece of onion and of 
good) mace 

Let the cream with mace and onion come to a boil, 

mix the flour with a little cold milk and stir it into the 

cream. Let the oysters come to a boil in their own 

liquor, skim carefully, drain off all the liquor, turn the 

oysters into the cream, skim out the mace and onion, 

and serve. 

Mrs. T. W. Willard. 

OYSTER CAKES FOR BREAKFAST 

One pint oysters chopped into very small pieces and 
seasoned with pepper and salt. Add the liquor, one 
beaten egg, and rolled cracker enough to hold stiff so it 
can be fried, a spoonful at a time, on a hot griddle — 
browning both sides, and making very small cakes. 



WELLESLEY COOK BOOK 43 

PRIED OYSTERS 

Select largest and finest oysters. Drain and wipe 

them by spreading upon cloth, laying another over 

them, pressing lightly. Koll each in beaten egg, then in 

cracker crumbs with which has been mixed a very little 

pepper. Fry in mixture of equal parts of lard and 

butter. 

B. B. P. 

OYSTER SHORTCAKE 

2 1-2 cups flour 3 teaspoonf uls baking powder 

1 cup sweet milk Salt 

1 egg 

Bake as shortcake, split and fill with creamed oysters, 

viz., — 

1 quart oysters 1-2 cup butter 

1 cup cream 1 tablespoonful of corn starch 

M. H. L. 

OYSTER^ PIE 

One quart oysters drained; pepper, salt, and butter 
to taste. One quart of flour, two tablespoonfuls of lard, 
one teaspoonful baking powder, one-half teaspoonful 
salt. Mix with water for crust. Butter and line pie- 
plate with the crust ; fill with the oyster, seasoned ; cover 

with crust and bake. 

B. B. P. 

CLAM FRITTERS 

1 quart clams 2 egg-s 

1 pint flour Salt and pepper 

1-2 pint milk 

Make a batter of flour, eggs, and milk, and stir in 

clams. Drop in spoonfuls into hot fat, and fry brown 

on both sides. 

A. M. C. 



WELLESLEY COOK BOOK 47 



EGGS 

" The turnpike road to people's hearts, I find. 
Lies through their mouths, or / mistake mankind. " 

CREAMED EGGS 

Boil six eggs twenty minutes. Make one pint of 

cream sauce. Have six slices of toast in a hot dish; 

put a layer of sauce on each one, and then a part of the 

whites of the eggs, cut into thin strips. Eub a part of 

the yolks through a sieve upon the toast. Eepeat this 

and finish with a third layer of sauce. Place in the oven 

for about three minutes. Garnish with parsley, and 

serve hot. 

Mrs. Edwin B. Webb. 

EGG BASKETS 

Boil eggs twenty minutes, shell, cut in halves, take 
out the yolks, and take slices from the points of each 
half white, that the baskets may stand. Put the yolks in 
a dish and mash fine, add equal quantity of finely chopped 
ham, chicken, or tongue ; season with salt, pepper, and 
mustard. Add and mix melted butter, and shape into 
round halls size of the yolk, putting one into each bas- 
ket. Set these on rounds of buttered toast a little larger 
than the baskets. 

A white sauce, as for cream toast, may be poured 
around, and sprigs of parsley placed on top of each ball 
make a pretty garnish. 



48 WELLESLEY COOK BOOK 

SCALLOPED EGGS 

6 eg-g-s 1-4 cup melted butter 

1 pint w^hite sauce 1 cup ham, veal, tong-ue, or 

1 cup cracker crumbs poultry 

Boil eggs twenty minutes, moisten the cracker 
crumbs with the melted butter, chop fine the meat, re- 
move the yolks of the eggs, and chop whites fine. 

Put a layer of buttered crumbs in a buttered scallop 

dish, then a layer of chopped whites, white sauce, meat, 

yolks rubbed through a strainer, and so on, till all the 

material is used, having buttered crumbs on the top. 

Bake till crumbs are brown. 

Mrs. Spear. 

BAKED EGGS 

Break each one in a cup, being careful not to break 
the yolk. Lay the eggs one by one in a hot buttered 
dish, put a little salt on each egg, and bake till firm ; 
add a little butter and serve at once. 

A Nicer Way 

Cover a buttered dish with fine cracker crumbs. Put 
each Qgg carefully into dish and cover it lightly with 
cracker,' butter, and seasoning, and &«/c6 until the crumbs 
brown. 

BEST "WAY OF BOILING EGGS 

Put the eggs into a saucepan and cover with boiling 
water and let stand where the water will keep hot, yet 
not boil, for ten minutes. 

If eggs are to be Aa?*c?-boiled, cook them in this way 
twenty minutes. The yolk will be dry and mealy, and 
easily rubbed smooth. 



WELLESLET COOK BOOK 49 

APPLE OMELETTE 

Beat apples, sugar, butter, and yellows well together. 
Lastly add the whites, beaten as for cake. Bake m a 
greased pudding dish. Serve cold with or without 

^^'^^^^- Mrs. Cowan. 

PLAIN OMELETTE 

3 eggs 3 table spoonfuls milk 

Beat whites and yolks of eggs separately, turn into 
bowl and add milk. Stir lightly together. 

Have a spider hot and pour mixture into it. As soon 
as it is a delicate brown on the bottom and is just set or 
cooked, but not stiff, put into the oven just to dry oif 
top — a very short time is sufftcient. Have a platter 
hot, and then fold together the omelette and turn on to it. 
Serve immediately. The omelette must be cooked as 

soon as prepared. Standing spoils it. 

Mrs. C. E. Shattuck. 

OMELETTE 

Lump of butter size of horse- 
1 tiblespoonful corn starch chestnut 

(small) Salt 

1-2 cup of milk: 

Beat the yolks, flour, and milk together, add the 
butter melted; beat the whites of the eggs to a stiff 
froth and add them the last thing. 

Grease a spider thoroughly with butter, and when hot 
put in the omelette and cook on top of stove. 

It takes about five minutes and needs very careful 
watching ; when done turn one half over on to the other 
and serve at once. ^^^^ ^^^^^^^^^^ 



50 WELLESLEY COOK BOOK 

BAKED OMELETTE 

1 pint milk 4 eg-g-s 1 table spoonful flour 

Scald the milk and thicken with the flour ; let it cool 
a little, then add the eggs, yolks and whites beaten sepa- 
rately, and a little salt. Pour into a buttered dish, and 
bake until it rises all over like a custard. 

Mrs. C. P. Withington. 

SIASCONSETT OMELETTE 

5 eggs Butter size of half an egg 

2-3 cup of milk Salt and. pepper 

Separate three whites, beat the five yolks and two 
whites ; add the milk, pepper, and salt, to taste. Put the 
butter into the frying-pan, heat and pour in the above 
mixture. If air bubbles rise, prick them. Have ready 
the three whites beaten stiff, and when the above is 
cooked through spread over the whites, with a sprinkle 
of salt, and place in the oven till the whites are a little 
stiffened. Loosen with a knife and roll out on a warm 
platter. 

OMELETTE 

1 1-2 cups hot, not boiled, milk 1 tablespoonful of flour 
5 eggs, yolks and whites 1 tablespoonful of butter 
beaten separately 1 teaspoonful of salt 

Bake twenty minutes in a hot oven and serve at once. 

Do not move it after once put into the oven till it is 

taken out. 

A. M. Wilson. 



WELLESLET COOK BOOK 63 



MEAT 

"Live not to eat, but eat to five. " 

ROAST BEEF 

Seven pounds of sirloin or the back of the rump. 
Wash, trim, tie or skewer into shape, and lay on a rack 
in the pan, and dredge all over with salt and flour. Put 
into a very hot oven at first, to sear the meat and keep 
in the juices. Put pieces of the fat beef into the pan. 
When well seared, baste (with the fat) and turn often, and 
reduce the heat. Bake one hour, if liked rare, an hour 
and a half well done. Add a little hot water to thje pan. 
if there is danger of the fat burning. 

YORKSHIRE PUDDING 

Serve as a Garnish to Boast Beef. 

Beat three eggs very light ; add one scant pmt" of 

milk and one-half teaspoonful of salt. Pour this mixture 

slowly over two-thirds of a cup of flour, beating all the 

time until smooth. Bake in hot gem pans three-qruar- 

ters of an hour. Baste twice with drippings fnom. the^ 

beef. 

GRAVY FOR ROAST BEEF 

When the meat is done, if more than a half-cup of 

fat, pour it out and mix two heaping tablespoonfuls of 

flour smooth with the fat in the pan and pour one and 

one-half pints of boiling water on, a little at a time ; boil 

a little, strain, and serve. 

Mrs. Benj. H. Sanborn. 



54 WELLESLEY COOK BOOK 

SCOTCH ROLL 

5 lbs. flank of beef 1-8 teaspoonful clove 

3 tablespoonfuls salt 1 teaspoonful summer savory 

1 tablespoonful sug-ar 3 tablespoonfuls vinegar 
1-2 teaspoonful pepper 

Kemove the tough skin from the beef. A portion 
of meat will be found thicker than the rest. With a 
sharp knife cut a thin layer from the thick part and lay 
upon the thin. Mix together the salt, sugar, pepper, 
clove, and summer savory and sprinkle over the meat, 
and then sprinkle with the vinegar. Eoll up and tie. 
Put away in a cold place for twelve hours ; then put in 
stewpan and cover with boiling water. Simmer gently 
for three and one-half hours. Mix four tablespoonfuls 
of flour with half a cup of cold water and stir into the 
gravy ; season to taste with salt and pepper ; simmer 
half .an hour longer. This may be used hot or cold. 

Mrs. Spear. 

BOILED LEG OF LAMB 

Wash the lamb, put it in the kettle with enough 
boiling water to cover. Let it cook until tender, then 
add salt ; the water should be boiled away to about three 
pints ; turn out a bowlful, let the remainder of the 
\Y2itev .sim7ner away until the lamb is nicely browned 
(turn it often), then remove to a hot platter. Add the 
bowl of liquor to tlie fat, and thicken with flour, strain 
and serve. 

Caper Sauce. — Add five tablespoonfuls of capers. 

Mint Sauce. — Add one-half cup of vinegar, a little 
sugar, and one-half cup of fresh chopped mint. 



WELLESLEY COOK BOOK 55 

POT ROAST 

Four to six pounds of the second or third cut from 
the rib of beef. Proceed same as above recipe for boiled 
lamb. Do not add more water at last if likely to burn, 
but remove to cooler part of the stove. 

Mrs. Benj. H. Sanborn. 

LAMB CHOPS (with green peas) 

Neatly trimmed, with bones scraped, they should 
then be rolled in a little melted butter and carefully 
broiled. When done, rub butter over them and season 
with pepper and salt. Slip little paper ruffles over the 
ends of the bones. They may be served with a centre of 
almost any kind of vegetable. 

TOAD IN THE HOLE 

1 lb. round steak 2 eg-g-s 

1 pint milk Salt and pepper 

1 cup flour 

Cut the steak into dice; beat eggs very light and add 

to them the milk and a little salt ; pour upon the flour, 

gradually beating till very light and smooth. Butter a 

two-quart dish, and in it put the meat. Season well 

with salt and pepper ; pour over it the batter, and bake 

one hour in a moderate oven. Serve hot. 

3frs. Spear. 

BOILED TURKEY 

Fill with a few bread crumbs and one pint of oysters. 

Boil the turkey in a cloth. 

Gravy. — One pint of oysters mixed with the chopped 

giblets. 

Mrs. Bacon. 



56 WELLE SLET COOK BOOK 

CHICKEN FRICASSEE 

1 chicken 1 eg-g- 

1 tablespoonful butter 1-2 teaspoonful celery salt 

2 tablespoonfuls flour 1 teaspoonful lemon juice 
1 cup cream or rich milk Salt and white pepper 

Cut the chicken in pieces for serving ; cover with 
boiling water, add one teaspoonful of salt, and one-half 
saltspoonful white pepper. Simmer one hour, or until 
tender, skimming well as it comes to the boiling-point. 
Kemove chicken and boil liquid down to one pint. 
Strain liquid, remove the fat, and add one cup of cream 
or good milk, and heat again. Melt one tablespoonful 
of butter in a saucepan, add two tablespoonfuls of flour; 
when well mixed, pour on slowly, a little at a time, the 
hot cream and liquid. Season to taste with salt and 
pepper, one-half teaspoonful of celery salt, one teaspoon- 
ful lemon juice. Beat well one Q;gg, add a little of the 
hot liquid, that you may mix it smoothly with the whole. 

If you wish a white fricassee, return the pieces of 
chicken to the liquid, just heat through, and serve. 

For a brown fricassee, brown the pieces in a little 

butter and pour over them the sauce. 

Sophia B. Horr. 

BROILED CHICKENS 

Select nice tender chickens ; split them down the 
breast ; wash very thoroughly and wipe dry ; rub both 
sides with salt, place in baking-pan (the skin side up)j 
cover with bits of butter, and sift over plenty of flour ; 
turn in a little water. When nearly done, remove 
from oven, and place on buttered broiler, over coals not 
too hot. Give them a nice brown on each side. Serve 
with thickened gravy. In broiling this way all danger of 
scorching the chickens before they are done is avoided. 

N. C. B. 



WELLESLEY COOK BOOK 57 

BAKED HAM 

Make a dough of rye meal and water, of sufficient thick- 
ness to spread well. Take a large pan and place the ham 
in it with the fat side down. Cover the meat with the 
dough about an inch thick, then turn over and completely 
cover it, leaving the fat side up. A twelve-pound ham 
will require seven hours to bake with a modesate fire. 
Half a ham from three to four hours. 

Mrs. C. E. Shattuck. 

BOILED HAM 

Wash and scrape the ham, put it in a kettle with 
boiling water, enough to cover, keep boiling slowly until 
tender all through (from five to six hours for a twelve- 
pound h.am), then remove from the fire and let stand 
in the kettle till cold. Remove the skin and part of the 
fat, put the ham on grate in a dripping-pan, stick cloves 
in the fat one inch apart. Sprinkle with cracker 
crumbs, bake in slow oven one hour, baste three times 
with sugar and water. 

Mrs. B. H. Sanborn. 

PRESSED CORN BEEF 

Take a fancy brisket piece weighing six or eight 
pounds, put into hot water and boil eight or nine hours. 
Take from water with a skimmer and put into a presser. 
Separate the meat with a knife and fork, putting any 
fat pieces which may be in it in small bits all through 
the meat, drain off any fat or liquid remaining, put on 
the weights and set away to cool. In summer it will be 
necessary to put it on ice. It should be one solid cake or 
block, from which delicate slices can be cut. 

Mrs. C. E. Shattuck. 



58 WELLE SLEY COOK BOOK 

MEAT PIE 

Take cold chicken, veal, or lamb, and cut into small 
pieces. Over this pour milk thickened with flour, and 
seasoned with butter, pepper, and salt, and cook five or 
ten minutes. 

Add rolled cracker and season with small pieces of 
butter. Just brown in the oven and serve hot. 

Mrs. C. E. Shattuck. 

SCALLOPED CHICKEN 
Take equal parts of cold chicken, boiled rice, or 
macaroni. Put in layers, and cover with buttered 
crumbs. Bake till brown. Cold roast turkey, using 
stuffing and gravy, may be prepared in the same way. 

Mrs. Spear. 

PRESSED CHICKEN 

Chop the meat fine, season with salt, pepper, and celery 

salt, moisten with some of the broth. Press in a square 

tin, and cut in slices when cold. 

Mrs. Stoddard. 

PRESSED LAMB 
Boil a quarter of lamb until tender. Eemove the 
bones. Chop a little and stir in one teaspoonful of pep- 
per and one heaping teaspoonful of sage. The meat 
should be salted while boiling. After stirring well, put 
into an ordinary bread tin, pressing down evenly with a 
spoon. If prepared while hot it will slice beautifully 
when cold. B. H. 

A NICE BREAKFAST DISH 

Cooked meat very finely chopped and nicely seasoned, 
warmed in the meat broth and served on hot slices of 
buttered toast. Send to table on a hot platter. 

P. W. Dana. 



WELLESLEY COOK BOOK 59 

A GOOD BREAKFAST DISH 

2 cupfuls cold meat chopped 1 tablespoonful butter 

very fine 2 teaspoonfuls flour 

2 cupfuls mashed potatoes Salt and pepper to taste 
1 cupful soup stock, or milk 

Put the butter into a saucepan over the lire ; when it 

has become hot add the flour and stir the mixture until 

it is smooth and frothy. Now add the stock, — or milk, 

— and season well with salt and pepper. Stir the liquid 

until it boils, then add the meat, and pour all into a 

shallow baker. Spread the mashed potatoes over the 

meat and cook fifteen minutes in a moderately hot oven. 

Do not cover the dish. Serve immediately on taking 

from the oven, 

3frs. R. M. Manly. 

DRIED BEEF IN CREAM 

Shave your beef very fine ; pour over it boiling 
water ; let it stand for a few minutes ; pour this off and 
pour on cream ; let it come to a boil ; if you have not 
cream, use milk and butter, and thicken with a little 
flour. Serve in covered dish. Good for breakfast with 
baked potatoes. 

PATES 

2 cups cold meat, chopped and seasoned 1 egg 

Boil the e^^ and mash fine, add to the meat made 
very fine. Put a little rich gravy in a small frypan. 
When very hot add the meat. Cut rounds, as for tarts, of 
good paste, and bake a delicate brown. Split and fill with 
the hot meat, or place it between two of the rounds of 
paste. Serve at once. Chicken, veal, or beef can be used. 

Mrs. Burr ill. 



60 WELLESLEY COOK BOOK 

VEAL LOAF 

3 1-2 lbs. veal, fat and lean 2 eg-g-s 

1 thick slice of fat pork 1-2 cup of butter 

Chop the whole raw 1 tablespoonf ul of pepper 

6 common crackers pounded A little clove and any herb to 
fine suit the taste 

Mix all together very thoroughly. Put it into a 

buttered bread tin and bake two hours. 

Mrs. C. E. Shattuck. 

VEAL PATTY 

3 lbs. fresh veal chopped 3 tablespoonfuls of milk 

1 heaping- tablespoonful salt A piece of butter size of an 
1 teaspoonful pepper eg-g- 

8 tablespoonfuls of powdered Nutmeg- or lemon 
crackers 

Bake in a loaf and slice cold. 



PRESSED MEAT 

Take about five pounds of the top of a shank of beef. 
Let it be fresh and clean-looking. Wash with a wet 
cloth. Boil until tender, usually three or four hours. 
Keep but little water in the kettle, watching carefully to 
see that it does not burn. When the meat is done, re- 
move it to a shallow pan. Pick out all bits of bone, 
gristle, and skin ; chop fine, season with salt, and stir 
into it a little of the water left in the kettle, enough to 
moisten it. Pack closely into a bowl or small pan, 
cover, placing a weight upon it, and set away in a cold 

place over night. 

Mrs. Tucker. 

RELISH FOR LUNCH OR TEA 

To one full cup of coarse bread crumbs add three cups 
milk, a good-sized piece butter, and one cup strong 
(grated) cheese. Put into a pudding dish, strew bread 



WELLESLEY COOK BOOK 61 

crumbs thickly over the top, and then bits of butter, and 
bake twenty minutes, or till a rich brown. Thinly 
spread on slices of bread and butter. This makes a nice 
sandwich for lunch or picnic. 

HORSERADISH SAUCE 

Cream one cup of butter till very light. Add two 
tablespoonfuls of grated horseradish, one tablespoonful 
thick cream. Serve on halibut steak. ^^ ^ 

TOMATO SAUCE (for Boiled Beef or Fish) 

1-2 can tomatoes 1 tablespoon chopped onion 

1 r>nr» watpr 1 tablespooniul butter 

2 cYov^s 1 tablespoonful corn starch 
9 allsoice berries 1-2 teaspoonful salt 

1 teaspoonfSr mixed herbs 1-2 saltspoonf ul pepper 

Put the tomatoes, water, and spices on to boil m a 
granite saucepan. Fry the onion in the butter, add the 
corn starch. When well mixed with the butter, stir 
into the tomato. Simmer ten minutes. Add salt and 
pepper. Strain the sauce over the boiled meat or tish. 

M, T. 

WHITE SAUCE 
(For Croquettes and Patties or Scalloped Potatoes) 

1 pint of hot milk 2 heaping tablespoonfuls flour 

2 tablespoonfuls butter 1-2 teaspoonful salt 

Put the butter in a saucepan, when it is melted add 
the dry flour and stir quickly till well mixed. Pour in 
the milk, a little at a time, mixing carefully. Stir till it 
boils and is smooth. Add salt ; some add a little white 
pepper, or cayenne, and celery salt. ^^^^ ^^ ^^ ^^^^^^^^^^ 



WELLESLEY COOK BOOK 65 



VEGETABLES 

" We now come to the root of the matter." 

POTATO PUFF 

Cold boiled potatoes put Milk, to make quite soft 

through a colander 1-2 teacupful butter (melted) 

Pepper and salt 2 egg-s (beat separately) 

Bake in buttered earthen dish. 

The Eliot. 

CREAMED POTATOES 

Cut cold potatoes into verij thin slices. Have ready 
hot milk thickened with a slight quantity of flour, and 
seasoned with pepper, butter, and salt. To this add 
potatoes, and cook five or ten minutes. 

Mrs. C. E. Shattuck. 

BAKED SWEET POTATOES 

Take medium-sized potatoes, wash, and lay them on 
the grating in a hot oven. When half done pierce them 
through with a fork to let the steam out. They are 
then dry and mealy. 

FRIED POTATOES 

Pare small potatoes, cut them in halves and each 
half into four pieces. Put in the frying basket and 
cook in boiling fat ten minutes. Drain on brown paper. 
Sprinkle with salt. Serve with chops or steak. 

Mrs. B. II. Sanborn. 



66 WELLESLEY COOK BOOK 

SCALLOPED POTATOES 

Pare and slice good potatoes. Butter a baking dish. 

Place a layer of the sliced potatoes in the bottom, 

sprinkle with salt, pepper, and flour, and strew with bits 

of butter. Eepeat the process until the dish is sufficiently 

full. Pour into the dish boiling milk until it comes up 

to the bottom of the top layer. Bake forty minutes, or 

until the potatoes are soft. Excellent for lunch with 

cold meat. 

Mrs. Tucker. 

CORN FRITTERS 

1 pint grated sweet corn 1 cup flour 

1 cup sweet milk A little salt 

Mix and fry the same as oyst'^rs. 

Mrs. Mary L. Whipple. 

ARTIFICIAL OYSTERS 

1 pint g-r'^en corn 1 cup flour 

1 pint milk 1-2 cup butter 

1 egg Salt and pepper to taste 

Beat the egg, add the milk and melted butter, salt, 
and pepper. Grate the corn from off the cob, stir it 
into the egg and butter, then add the flour. 

Drop a spoonful on to the hot gridiron and fry to a 
light brown. Serve hot, as you would griddle cakes. 

Winifred E. Badger. 

CREAMED TURNIPS 

Wash and pare the small white turnip, cut into half- 
inch dice pieces. Boil till tender in salted water. For 
the cream sauce, heat a pint of milk hot. Melt a large 
tablespoonful of butter into which a large spoonful of 
flour is carefully stirred with a saltspoonful of salt. Be 



WELLESLEY COOK BOOK 67 

sure there are no lumps. Pour over the hot milk, 
stirring all the time. When well cooked, remove from 
fire, drain the turnips through a colander into the dish 
in which they will be served, and pour the cream sauce 
over them. ^^"« ^^- ^^'^^^^^• 

VEGETABLE OYSTERS 
Scrape vegetable oysters and throw them into cold 
water to prevent discoloring. When you have sufficient, 
cut them in pieces half an inch long, and boil in just 
water enough to cover till tender. Drain off the water, 
and serve with 

"White Sauce 
A PINT of milk, butter the size of an egg, and a little 
salt. Thicken with a spoonful of flour made smooth in 
a little cold milk. 

CAULIFLOWER 
Choose those that are compact and of a good color. 
Strip off the outside leaves, wash them thoroughly, and 
lay them, head downwards, in a pan of cold water and 
salt, which will draw out all the insects. Boil them in 
plenty of boiling water, with a little salt, until tender. 
Drain and serve with white sauce. 

STEWED CARROTS 

Cut the carrots lengthwise, and boil till soft; then 
slice very thin and serve with white sauce. 

TOMATO MACARONI 

1 pint macaroni 1 pint canned tomato 

Cook the macaroni, pour the tomato over it. Put in a 

piece of butter and a little salt. 

^ Mrs. Mary L. Whipple. 



68 WELLESLEY COOK BOOK 

'WHITE SAUCE 

Boil one pint of milk or cream ; put two large table- 
spoonfuls of butter in a granite saucepan, stir over the 
fire until melted and bubbling. Add two heaping table- 
spoonfuls of dry flour, and stir until well mixed ; pour 
on the hot milk gradually, and stir rapidly until smooth. 
Season with half-teaspoonful of salt and pepper. 

BAKED MACARONI 

Beeak twelve sticks, cover with boiling water, cook 
twenty minutes ; while boiling, add one tablespoonful of 
salt. When done, pour in a colander and drain ; when 
the water has run off, put the macaroni in baking dish, 
pour over it the white sauce given above, and add the 
cracker crumbs, as in the rule for the scalloped fish. 
Slice cheese thin, or grate it on top before cooking. 
Bake until the crumbs are brown, about three-quarters 
of an hour ; this is enough for six, 

C. S. Flagg. 

PILAF 

1 cup rice 1 tablespoonful of butter 

2 cups tomato 1 slice of onion 
2 cups of broth, or water 

Bkow^x the onion in the butter, put the rice in dry and 
brown lightly. Stir often, in order to brown evenly. 
Add the tomato and broth ; if water is used, a little more 
butter is needed. Salt and pepper to taste. Let it 
simmer until the rice has taken up the liquor, then cover 
closely and steam for an hour in an oven not too hot. 
Do not stir after putting in the oven. 

E. Marietta Dewing. 



WELLESLEY COOK BOOK 69 

HOMINY SERVED AS A VEGETABLE 

1 cup hominy 11-2 cups milk 

1 cup white corn meal Butter size of an egg-, cut in 

2 teaspoonf uls baking powder bits over the top 
2 eggs 

Bake three-quarters of an hour in a pudding dish, 

buttered. 

Mrs. Burrill. 

CREAM PUFFING 

1 cup cold boiled hominy 2 eggs well beaten 

mashed fine 1-2 teacup brown sugar 

1 small teacup white corn 1 teaspoonful salt 

meal 1 large teaspoonful of Royal 

Lump of butter size of an egg, Baking Powder 

melted 1 very full teacup milk 

Bake in a greased pudding dish for one hour, or less 

in a hot oven. This is very nice for tea or for dinner,, 

served as a vegetable. 

Mrs. Coman,:, 



If you wish for 
Reliable Goods ^ 
patronize those 
who advertise 
in this Book 



70 



GEO. M. BOWMAN, secy, and supt. 



/^ OLDEN GATE 
^ PACKING CO. 



PACKERS OF 



EXTRA QUALITY 



?M^_ 



Canned praits 



rilHESE GOODS are excelled by 
-^ none, being the CHOICEST 
SELECTED FRUITS the season 
produces. Full Weight, In heavy 
Syrup, made from FUBE White 
Sugar. 



361 to 369 FOURTH STREET, 

Between JULIAN and EMPIRE, 

SAN JOSE, CALIFORNIA 

71 



Toy' Fair Dames of Wellesley. 

Y^ Shattuck, Grocer, 

offers y^ best ingredients for y^ recipes found in 

y^ excellent cook book. 

Flour— Best, Eggs — Fresh. 

Butter — Unequalled. Raisins — Finest. 

Canned Fruits — Choice. Spices — Oriental. 

Y*^ orders receive prompt attention. 
F. V7. SHATTUCK WABAN SQUARE. 

FANCY FLANNELS 

For Ladies' house dresses, sacques, 
wrappers, etc. 400 pieces imported ail-wool 
FLANNELS, in handsome 
plaids and stripes, always 



31c. 



PER 

sold at 37>2 cents, now at ^^0 MJ\^m yard 

SEND FOR SAMPLES, 

SHEPARD, NORWELL & CO., 

BOSTON, MASS. 

When I want a nice 

Roast of Beef or Lamb, 

or anything in fact usually kept in a first-class 
Market, I always go to MILTON E. SMLFH, who 
keeps that Market in Odd Fellows' Block. If you 
can't be suited there, you cannot anywhere. 

NATICK, MASS. 

72 



WELLESLEY COOK BOOK 73 



SALADS 

" We may live without poetry, music, and art, 
We may live without conscience, and live without heart. 
We may live without friends, we may live without books, 
But civilized man cannot live without cooks." 

CHICKEN SALAD 

The meat of two chickens chopped, three-quarters of 
the same bulk of celery, the yolk of five eggs, two tea- 
spoonfuls of mustard, one teaspoonful of pepper, one 
teaspoonful of salt, one-third cup of vinegar, one small 
bottle of olive oil, stirred gradually into the eggs, a few 
drops at a time. After it begins to thicken, add the 
other ingredients, well mixed in vinegar. 

Pour over chicken and celery, and serve. 

Mrs. Parritt. 

LOBSTER SALAD 

4 eg-g-s 1 tablespoonful of mustard 

1 tablespoonful of sugar 2 tablespoonfuls of butter 

1 tablespoonful of salt 2 tablespoonfuls of vineg-ar 

Beat the whites of the eggs separately, and add last. 

Cook in a bowl set in a kettle of water, stirring until it 

thickens. When cold, add cream enough to make as 

thin as boiled custard. Add salt and red pepper to the 

chopped lobster and lettuce. 

C. J. Hanks. 



74 WELLESLEY COOK BOOK 

LOBSTER SALAD 
(boiled fifteen minutes to a pound) 

Drain, take out the meat, discarding the "lady," or 
stomach, and removing the intestine. The liver, called 
also " Tom Alley," which turns green in boiling, should 
be used, and adds much to the richness of the dish. Cut 
up the meat and pour over it oil and vinegar, in pro- 
portion of one tablespoonful of oil to three of vinegar. 
Add pepper and salt. Let stand an hour or more in ice- 
chest. At serving time, arrange two or three leaves of 
lettuce together in form of a shell, put some of the 
lobster (drained of oil and vinegar) in each shell, allow- 
ing a shell for each person, and putting a little mayonnaise 
over each. 

BOILED SALAD DRESSING 

1 tablespoonful of sug-ar Yolks of 4 eg-g-s 

1 teaspoonful of mustard 5 tablespoonfuls salad oil 

1 teaspoonful of salt 1 cup of cold milk 

1 heaping teaspoonful of corn 1-4 cup of vineg-ar 
starch 

Mix in the order given. Cook in a double boiler 
until it thickens like soft custard. 

Mrs. B. H. Sanborn. 

SALAD DRESSING 

3 Gg'g'S 1 tablespoonful sw^eet oil 

1 tablespoonful salt 1 teacup milk 

1 tablespoonful white sugar 1 teacup vineg-ar 
1 tablespoonful mustard 

Beat the eggs, add salt, sugar, mustard, and oil, then 

add milk, and last of all the vinegar. Put in a double 

boiler and let it cook until it begins to thicken, stirring 

constantly. 

Mrs. Peahody. 



WELLESLEY COOK BOOK 75 

SALAD DRESSING 

1 tablespoonful butter 1-2 teaspoonful mustard 

1 dessertspoonful flour 1-2 teaspoonful salt 
2-3 cup boiling water 1 tablespoonful sugar 
Yolks of 3 eg-g-s 2 tablespoonfuls oil 

2 tablespoonfuls vinegar A little cayenne pepper 

Melt the butter in a small pan and stir in the flour 
until it begins to cook ; then pour on the boiling water, 
stirring until smooth. Add the eggs well beaten, a 
little at a time. Place the pan in a kettle of boiling 
water, stirring the mixture constantly until it has thick- 
ened. Add the heated vinegar, the mustard, salt, and 
sugar, well mixed together, and lastly the oil. 

Mrs. E. A. Jennings. 

BOILED DRESSING FOR COLD SLAW 

1-2 cup vinegar 1-2 saltspoonful pepper 

2 teaspoonfuls sugar 1-4 cup butter 

1-2 teaspoonful each of salt 1 teaspoonful of flour 
and mustard 

Mix the first four ingredients together and allow to 
come to a boil. Eub the butter and flour together, and 
pour on it the hot vinegar. Cook five minutes and pour 
it over the beaten yolk of an egg. 

Pauline Smith. 

BOILED SALAD DRESSING 

Yolks of 3 eggs 2 teaspoonfuls sugar 

"Whites of 3 eggs 2 teaspoonfuls melted butter 

1 teaspoonful mustard 1 cup cream, or milk 

2 teaspoonfuls salt 1-2 cup hot vinegar 

Stir all but the beaten whites of the eggs together 
and «ook in double boiler until like soft custard, then add 
the beaten whites of the eggs. Nice for lettuce, asparagus, 
string beans, or cauliflower, and especially so for raw 
chopped cabbage. 

Mrs. C. E. Shattuck. 



76 WELLESLEY COOK BOOK 

BOILED SALAD DRESSING 

Yolks 4 eg-g-s 1 tablespoonful mustard 

1 cup cold milk 1 tablespoonful sug-ar 

1 teaspoonful salt 5 tablespoonfuls salad oil 

Stir eggs, mustard, sugar, salt well together. Add 

oil and milk, and last one-half cup vinegar. Cook in 

a double boiler same as custard. 

Bana Hall. 

CREAM SALAD DRESSING 

4 eg-g-s 1 teaspoonful salt 

1 tablespoonful sug-ar 2 tablespoonfuls vineg-ar 

2 tablespoonfuls butter 1 teaspoonful mustard 

Put in everything except the whites of the eggs. 

Cook in a bowl set in a kettle of boiling water, stirring 

until it thickens. Beat the whites of the eggs and add 

last. When cold, add cream enough to make as thin as 

boiled custard. 

Mrs. H. H. Brown. 

POTATO SALAD 

Cut six large potatoes, cold boiled will do, into half- 
inch dice pieces, one hard-boiled egg chopped, one head 
of lettuce chopped with the Qgg. Mix well together 
and moisten well with home-made French dressing. 
Arrange in the centre of the dish and garnish with 
leaves of lettuce or parsley. Keep in a cool place till 
ready for serving, and add more of the dressing as it is 

brought to the table. 

A. M. Wilson. 

POTATO SALAD 
10 potatoes 6 hard-boiled eggs, chopped fine 

Use the dressing on this. 

Mrs. Mary L. Whipple. 



WELLESLEY COOK BOOK 77 

MAYONNAISE DRESSING 

TolUs Of 3 eggs iZZl^tnl ?Su*stard 

l"."?up Vinegar, or lemon 1 teas?oonful sugar 
^ -wi ^^"^e^-i. Cayenne pepper, If liked 

3U.1C© 

Mix the salt, mustard, and sugar in a soup plate. 

Add the yolks of eggs, and beat with a fork. A\hen 

these are blended, add the oil,, a little at a time. After 

the oil is taken up, add the vinegar or lemon ]uice^ 

This should be beaten half an hour, and will be a stitt 

paste. If it grows too stiff, a few drops of vinegar will 

bring it back. Set in a cool dark place. 

E. Marietta Dewing. 

CABBAGE SALAD 

1 •-> e-mail cabbage 2 table spoonfuls butter, or oil 

I'eS? caooage ^^^^ pepper, and mustard to 

1-2 pint vineg-ar taste 

1-2 cup sugar 

Beat egg, sugar, and spices together, and add to 
vinegar when boiling. Pour at once over the chopped 

cabbage. ^ j jj^^^^j.^^ 

COLD SLAW 

Boil one-half cup of vinegar with two teaspoonfuls of 
sugar, one-half teaspoonful salt, one-half teaspoonful 
mustard, one-half saltspoonful of pepper. 

Bub one-fourth cup of butter to a cream with one 
teaspoonful flour, and pour the boiling vinegar on it. 
Cook five minuteg. Then pour it over one well-beaten 
egg. Mix this dressing, while hot, with one pint of 
cabbage shaved, or chopped very fine. 

Cold slaw is delicious served with fried oysters or fish. 

C. E. Cameron. 



78 WELLESLEY COOK BOOK 

CABBAGE SALAD DRESSING 

3 egrg-s, -well beaten 1 teaspoonful each, corn 

Stablespoonfuls oil, ormelted starch, mustard, salt, and 

.butter pepper 

1 cup vinegar 6 tablespoonfuls STveet cream 

2 tablespoonfuls sugar 

Cook all together but the cream, which stir in lightly 
Avith a fork before using. 

Chop the solid part of a nice cabbage rather fine, then 
pour over it the dressing and stir thoroughly together. 

A Neighbor. 

CREAMED CABBAGE 

1 1-2 lbs. sliced cabbag-e 1 large spoonful butter 

1 cup milk Salt and pepper 

1 large spoonful flour 

Slice cabbage fine, and let it stand in cold water one 
liour, then put in boiling water and boil ten minutes ; 
change the water, and cook slowly one hour. 

Put butter in the spider, drain water from cabbage, 
and put in the spider. Add flour dissolved in milk, 
with salt and pepper to taste. Cover and simmer one- 
half hour. 

A. M. a 



FRANK H. PORTER, 



-• PLUMBER 

, Mass. I 



and m PinER 



Washington 
Wellesley, 

ALSO DEALER IN 

STOVES, RANGES and FURNACES, Plumbing 
Materials, and Hardware of all kinds. 

TIN, SHEET IRON and PLUMBING WORK done at short notice. 
Try our GOLDEN ROD BUA^D of BONELESS COD FISH, 

C. S. OLIVER, 

Wholesale, Retail, and Commission Dealer in all kinds of 

River, Lake and Ocean Fish, 

Cod Liver Oil, Cape Clams, Lobsters, etc. 
SOUTH AVEJ^UE, near Depot, XATICK, MASS, 

i^nsrcB-sinoiRnD's 

os\^^Ea•o 




Ot a rich pearly white and q-reat strength. It never smells like inferior starches, 

but is always sweet. It preserves from mildew fine laces and linens. 

KINGSFORD'S OSWEGO CORN STARCH, for food purposes, is in use all 

over the world. Pronounced to be equal to arrowroot in nutritious properties. 

79 



JoHj^g.lQUIRE&gs. 



Leaf Lard 



PUT UP EXPRESSLY 

FOR FAMILY USE 

in 3, 5, and 10 lb. pails and 10 lb. tubs; also 

PURE LARD 

by the tierce, barrel, half barrels and tubs ; is 
for sale by every first-class grocer and provi- 
sion dealer— all lard rendered by us is free 
from all Cotton Seed Oil, Tallow, Suet, and 
other adulterations so commonly used, and 
WAKRANTED STRICTLY PURE. None genu- 
ine without our name stamped upon the 
package. 

John P. Squire & Co., 

BOSTON, MASS. 



8o 



WELLESLEY COOK BOOK 81 



PIES 

"Man shall not live by bread alone. " 

PASTRY FOR ONE PIE 

1 heaping cup of pastry flour 1-4 teaspoonful salt 
1-4 teaspoonful Royal Baking 1 heaping tablespoonful lard 
Powder 

Mix baking powder and salt with the flour, and rub 
in the lard. Mix quite stiff with cold water. Eoll one 
half for under crust. Roll second half, spread with 
lard, cover thickly with flour, roll up like a jelly roll, 
stand on end and roll again. This secures flakiness. 

Mrs. B. H. Sanborn. 

TO MAKE A HEALTHFUL UNDER CRUST FOR 
SQUASH OR CUSTARD PIES 

Spread a cold pie plate thickly with sweet, fresh 
table butter, and when done, sift over it as much finely 
powdered cracker crumbs as will adhere to the butter ; 
fill and bake as usual. 

With a little more care, the pulverized cracker may be 
used as well for an upper crust on fruit or mince pies.— 
Proceeding with the under crust as above, add the fruit 
and seasoning, and sift the powdered cracker over the 
top until the fruit is well covered, putting on the butter 
lastly, in very thi^ily cut slices or shavings imtil the top is 
ivell covered with butter. —The heat of the oven will do 

the rest. „ „^ ^ 

P. W. Dana. 



82 WELLESLEY COOK BOOK 

PUFF PASTE FOR TARTS 

1 lb. flour White of 1 eg-g- 

1-4 lb. lard 3-4 lb. butter 

E-UB the lard thoroughly into the flour, and mix with 
cold water until stiff enough to roll. Eoll out quickly, 
put on in bits with a knife nice butter until the paste is 
covered. Sift on flour, roll again quickly, spread on 
more butter, and continue this until the butter is used. 

Cut out, and, just before putting in the oven, rub over 
them the white of the egg well beaten. 

A very hot oven is needed. 

SQUASH PIE 

One cup and a half of stewed and sifted squash, one 
cup of boiling milk, three-quarters of a cup of sugar, 
half a teaspoonful of salt, one saltspoonful of cinnamon, 
and one Qgg beaten slightly. 

Mrs. Albert Jennings. 

CRANBERRY PIE 

One quart of cranberries chopped fine, two cups of 
sugar, one-half cup of molasses, two cups of boiling 
water, two tablespoonfuls of corn starch. 

Enough for three pies. 

Mrs. J. Moulton. 

HOT CRANBERRY PIE 

Cover a deep pie plate with crust, fill with fresh 
cranberries, then put in as much molasses as the plate 
will hold, cover with a top crust well tucked under. 

Mrs. Stoddard. 



WELLESLEY COOK BOOK 83 

CRANBERRY PIES 

1 quart cranberries i 1-2 cups hot water 

2 cups sugar 1 tablespoonful corn starch 
1-2 cup molasses 

Dissolve the corn starch in a little cold water, to this 

add one and one-half cups of hot water ; put over the 

fire until it thickens, add one-half cup molasses, two 

cups sugar, pour over one quart of cranberries chopped 

fine. 

Perforate top crust with thimble holes. 

NeivhuryjJort. 

APPLE PIE WITH ONE CRUST 
Butter pie plates and fill with sliced apple. Sweeten 
and spice to taste. Cover and bake. When done, invert 
over another plate, removing the one in which it was 
baked. 



Mrs, Tucker. 



LEMON PIE 



1 lemon 3 eggs 

1 rnn suffar 1-2 cup milk 

4 ?ablespoonfuls powdered 1 tablespoonful flour, scant 
s^gar A little salt 

Grate the yellow rind; reject the thick white skin 
and the seeds, cut fine the remainder of the lemon and 
add to the rind with the juice. 

Eeserve the whites of two eggs for the frosting ; beat 
two yolks and one whole egg, then add one cup sugar, 
lemon, and flour, beat till very light, then add milk 
Bake forty minutes in a nice crust. 

Whip the whites of the two eggs till very light, then 
add four tablespoonfuls powdered sugar. Cover the top 

of the pie and brown delicately. . . r. rr 

^ Sophia B, Borr, 



84 WELLESLEY COOK BOOK. 



LEMON PIE 

- 2 cups sugar 2 lemons 

6 eggs 1 1-2 cups of water 

Beat the sugar and the yolks of the eggs until very 
light, add the rind and juice of lemons, and the water. 

After the crust is ready for the filling, beat the whites 

to a stiff froth and add to the above. 

This makes two pies. 

Mrs. Pomeroy. 

MINCE MEAT 

2 lbs. beef boiled in very little 1 tablespoonful cinnamon 
water 1 teaspoonful cloves and mace 

1 lb. suet 2 nutmegs 

4 lbs. apples chopped 1-2 lb. blanched almonds 

3 lbs. sugar pounded 

1 lb. currants 1-4 teaspoonful almond es- 
1 lb. seeded raisins sence 

1 lb. citron cut fine 1 cup grape or currant jelly 

2 oranges 1 quart of fruit juice (cider, 

3 lemons grape, or currant) 

Mix thoroughly, and add the beef liquor ; add salt, 
sugar, and molasses to taste. Dredge the suet with flour 
and chop fine. 

Bake one hour without previous cooking. 

Mrs. Burrill. 

RAISIN PIE 

1 cup sugar Butter the size of an egg 

3 eggs 1-2 teaspoonful soda 

1 1-2 cups flour 1 teaspoonful cream of tartar 
1-3 cup milk 

This will make three layers. 

For the Filling and Top. 

Whites of three eggs 1 cup stoned raisins chopped 

3-4 cup sugar fine 

A little lemon or vanilla 

Beat the whites of the eggs with the sugar, and stir 

in the raisins and lemon. 

Mrs. E. G. Fuller. 



WELLESLEY COOK BOOK S^ 



MOCK MINCE PIES 

1 cup chopped raisins 1-2 cup vineg-ar 

1 cup molasses G crackers rolled fine 

1 cup sugar 

All kinds of spice, if you like. 

Mrs. Hohart. 

BANBERRIES 

2 cups seeded and chopped 1 cup powdered sugar 
raisins 1 eg-g-, 1 lemon 

Grate outside of lemon, chop the rest fine. Make 

little cakes of puff paste, fill, and pinch down edges. 

Place on a tin, and bake a delicate brown. 



LEMON PIE 

For two pies, grated rind and juice of two lemons, one 
and one-half cups of cold water, one and one-half cups 
of sugar mixed with three heaping tablespoonfuls of 
flour, five eggs beaten, saving out the Avhites of three. 

Frosting. — To these three whites add three table- 
spoonfuls of powdered sugar. 

Mrs. Stoddard. 

LEMON PIE 

Into one pint of boiling milk stir two tablespoonfuls 
of corn starch, which is wet with cold milk, mix together 
yolks of six eggs, juice of three lemons, two cups of 
sugar, one tablespoonful of butter, stir all well together, 
cook in a double boiler, frost with the whites of eggs 
beaten to a stiff froth with one-half cup of sugar ; put 
in oven to brown. 

Bake the crusts separate while the filling is cooking, 

pricking little holes in the pastry to let the air out. 

This makes two large pies. 

Dana Hall. 



86 WELLESLEY COOK BOOK, 

LEMON PIE 

Grate the riud of one lemon and the juice of two or 

three, and add one cup sugar, the yolks of three eggs, 

and two whole eggs, two tablespoonfuls corn starch or 

flour scalded in one pint milk ; bake like a custard. 

The- frosting: whites of three eggs beaten to a froth 

with three tablespoonfuls sugar, brown lightly. This 

will make two pies. 

Mrs. Wilbur Hanks. 

CARAMEL PIE 

Three eggs, one cup each of sugar and flour, and one 
teaspoonful of Dwight's Cow Brand soda. Baked in a 
round pie tin. 

Cream. — Boil one pint of milk, two well-beaten eggs, 
two spoonfuls of corn starch, and two-thirds of a cup of 
sugar together. When nearly done add one-half a cup 
of butter. 

Caramel. — One-half a cup each of grated chocolate 

and water, and one cup of brown sugar. Boil till it will 

harden, then pour quickly over the pie in which the 

cream has been placed. 

Miss Lucy White. 

CHARLOTTE RUSSE PIE 

3 eggs 1-2 cup cold -water 

1 1-2 cups sugar 1-2 teaspoonful Dwight's Cow 

2 cups flour Brand soda 

1 teaspoonful cream tartar 

Beat the eggs thoroughly with the sugar, add one 
cup flour with ecen teaspoonful cream tartar, then water 
with one-half teaspoonful evened of soda, and one cup 
flour, no salt. Enough for two pies. 

Filling. — Pure sweet cream, beaten until stiff, 



WELLESLEY COOK BOOK. 87 

sweeten to taste, flavor with vanilla. Cut open pie, fill 
and pile some cream on top. Two cups of cream will 
till two pies. 

CREAM PIE 

3 eggs 1 heaping teaspoonf ul 

1 cup sugar baking po^wder 

2 cups flour 1-2 teaspoonf ul lemon 
1-2 cup water extract 

Beat the yolks and whites separately, adding one-half 

the sugar to each. Stir all together, and add one cup of 

flour. Beat five minutes. Then add the water, lemon, 

the other cup of flour, and the baking powder sifted 

with the flour. 

Filling 

2 eggs 3-4 cup sugar 

1 pint milk 2 tablespoonfuls flour 

When the milk boils, add the eggs, sugar, and flour 

beaten together, and stir. 



A. C. Withington. 



CREAM PIE 



3 eggs 1 cup flour 

1 cup sugar 1-4 teaspoonful salt 

3 tablespoonfuls water 2 teaspoonfuls yeast powder 

Beat eggs and sugar together twenty minutes, add 
other ingredients, beat five minutes, bake in two Wash- 
ington-pie tins. 

Filling 
1 cup sugar 2 eggs 

1-3 cup flour 1 pint milk 

Boil milk, stir in other ingredients beaten together, 
flavor with vanilla, and fill pies when cold. 

Mrs. W. L. Eussell. 



* pipe * 

f\r\: Embroideries 

A SPECIALTY. 

R.H.STEARNS &C0., 

139 & 140 Tremotit Street^ 
Our stamping Books 2-4-6-8-10-12-14-16 Temple Place, 

can be seen at SOSTON. 

U C CURRIER S ^^ ^**^ Martel, PARIS. 

Grove St., Wellesley. 

-DYEINGf^'^CLEnNSiNa* 

FINELY EXECUTED AT 

Barretts 
Boston • Dye • House, 

H. E. CURRIER, Agent, Grove St., WELLESLEY. 

Personal Attention given to 

Boston Shopping 

By F, H. CURRIER, 

GROVE STREET, WELLESLEY. 

ORDERS SOLICITEI). 

89 



lVTiniI7 QTADT? grant's block, 

IN Jj W 10 i UJtt Jjj Washington St., WELLESLEY. 

Choice (^ bocebies. 

FRUITS, JELLIES and CANNED GOODS IN VARIETY. 

GOOD ASSORTMENT OF KENNEDYS GOODS. 

NUTS AND CONFECTIONERY. 

BEST GRADES OF FLOUR CONSTANTLY ON HAND. 

FINE TEAS AND COFFEES A SPECIALTY. 



Goods delivered in k "Q i^X A "T) "17" 

Wellesleij and vicinity. jfi., Jj, L/JjAJiixj 



WELLESLEY, 

MASS. 



/ M U R R AY sTX ^^f^^ 



lfe^^\ LANIVIAN% / 

is the original *< FLORIDA XA/'ATER/' 
and must not be confounded with 
the numerous trashy perfunnes that 
usurp its name. Remember the 
name, and accept no substitute. 

MURRAY & LANMAN'S 

FLORIDA WATER 

HAS A 

DELICATE, SPRIGHTLY INDIVIDUALITY, 

immediately recognized by any one 
who has once used it. There is no 
perfume equally applicable for the 
Handkerchief, the Toilet, and the 
Bath that can compare with 



"^ 1V«i^S^ ^LAN MAN 'S^^ 



90 



WELLE SLEY COOK BOOK ^1 



PUDDINGS 

"Economy is a poor man's revenue. 
Extravagance a rich man 's ruin. 

HUNTER'S PUDDING 

3 brick loaves grated 1 lb. sugar 

1 lb. beef suet chopped very 1 quart milk 

gjjQ 1 glass rose water 

2 lbs raisins Large spoonful nutmeg 
'^ lbs currants . Large spoonful naace 

10 eggs Large spoonful cmnamon 

2 lemons, juice, grated rind 

Boil six hours. 

Sauce 

1-2 lb. white sugar A little flour 

1-2 lb. butter, creamed 1 pint boilmg water 

Cook a few minutes. Flavor with vanilla or almond. 

Jftss Mary Mason. 

PLUM PUDDING 

1 large loaf baker's bread 1 even teaspoonful mace 

2 lbs nlums 1-2 teaspoonful salt 
I lb currants 1-2 cup molasses 
1-4 lb citron 1 large cup sugar 

1 heaping teaspoonful cinna- 1 large cup chopped suet 

mon 3 pmts milk 

1 large nutmeg 3 eggs 
1-4 teaspoonful cloves 

Cut bread in cubes one inch square, put layers in a 
deep dish, alternately each ingredient. Make custard 
of milk and eggs ; pour over all. Stand one hour. Mix 
thoroughly and bake in slow oven three hours. 

Mrs. W. L. Russell. 



92 WELLE SLEY COOK BOOK, 



STEAMED SUET PUDDING 

1 cup molasses 1 cup citron 

1 cup cold water 2 to 3 cups flour 

1 cup chopped suet 1 teaspoonful soda 

1 cup chopped raisins Salt and spice to taste 

1 cup currants 

Steam three or four hours. Serve with hot or cold 

sauce, or both together. 



C. J. Hanks. 



BLACK PUDDING 



1 teacup molasses 1 teaspoonful Dwight's Cow 

1-2 teacup butter Brand soda 

1 teacup raisins 1 cup sour milk 

Steam three hours. Flour enough to make as stiff as 

gingerbread. 

Mrs. J. E. Selfe. 

BALTIMORE PUDDING 

1 cup of molasses 1 teaspoonful of saleratus 

1 cup of milk 1 teaspoonful cinnamon 

1 cup of chopped suet, or 1-2 1 teaspoonful of allspice and 

of butter 1 of mace 

1 cup of stoned and chopped 1-2 teaspoonful cloves and 1-2 

raisins grated nutmeg 
3 1-2 cups of flour • 

Beat the molasses, suet, raisins, and spice together ; 

then stir in the milk, in which dissolve the saleratus, 

then the flour. Steam five hours or more. 

A. Rollins. 

PLUM PUDDING 

1 pound raisins 1-4 pound brown sug*ar 

1 pound currants Rind of 1 lemon, grated 

1 pound suet, chopped fine 1-2 nutmeg 

3-4 pound stale bread crumbs 5 eggs 

1-4 pound flour 1-2 pound citron 

Mix well all dry ingredients. Beat eggs and pour over, 

mixing thoroughly. To be boiled in a mould, six hours 

at time of making, and six more when wanted for use. 

Mrs. Clements. 



WELLES LET COOK BOOK 93 

RAISIN PUDDING 

One cup molasses, one cup milk, one cup raisins, one- 
half cup butter, two and one-half cups flour, two tea- 
spoonfuls baking powder. Steam one hour in a tube 

pan. 

Mrs. T. W. Willard. 

ENGLISH CHRISTMAS PUDDING 

One pound raisins, one pound currants, one pound 
beef suet, one pound bread crumbs, one-half pound sugar, 
one-half pound flour, four eggs, one-half pint milk, one- 
fourth pound citron, one-fourth pound candied lemon peel. 
Mix the dry materials, add eggs, then milk. Boil four 
or five hours in moulds or floured cloths plunged into 
boiling water. 

Sauce 

One cup frosting sugar, whites of two eggs, juice of 
one lemon. 

Mrs. Stoddard. 

VIRGINIA RICE PUDDING 

4 tablespoonfuls rice 4 eggs 

1 quart milk 1 lemon 

Butter the size of an eg-g- 8 tablespoonfuls powdered 

Sugar to taste sugar 

Wash the rice and boil in the milk until quite soft ; 
take it from the fire and add the butter; sweeten to 
taste. When cold, add the beaten yolks of the eggs and 
the grated rind of the lemon. 

Mix into the whites the juice of the lemon and eight 
tablespoonfuls powdered sugar; beat till quite stiff. 
Put the rice in a pudding dish, with the whites smoothly 
over the top, place a piece of white paper over the dish, 
and bake a delicate brown, 

Mrs. II. F. Durant. 



94 WELLESLEY COOK BOOK 

PLAIN RICE PUDDING 

One-half cup rice, one quart of milk, four tablespoon- 
fuls sugar, and butter one-half the size of an ^g^, salt, 
and a very little nutmeg and cinnamon. 

Soak the rice in half the milk two hours, then add 
rent of the milk and the other things, and hake slowly 
for two hours. 

P. W. Dana. 

M. L. D.'S PUDDING SAUCE 

The beaten whites of one or two eggs. When very 
stiff, add the yolks and beat again — beating or cutting 
them in — then the sugar (say one or two tablespoon- 
fuls), and flavor to taste. This sauce should not stand 
long before serving. 

RICE PUDDING (without eggs) 

3 tablespoonfuls raw rice 1-2 teaspoonful salt 

2 cups milk Season with cinnamon and 

2 tablespoonfuls sugar allspice 

Soak the rice in cold water three hours ; pour off the 

water and dry the rice in a cloth. Heat the milk and 

pour on to the rice, boiling hot. Add the sugar, spice, 

and salt. Bake one hour, stirring three times. If you 

use raisins instead of spice, put them in at the last 

stirring. This . pudding may be served hot, and is 

recommended for the winter season, when eggs are 

scarce. 

Mrs. B. M. Manly, 

BREAD AND BUTTER PUDDING (good) 

Line a pudding dish with a layer of bread, sliced, 
buttered, and cut in small squares. Sprinkle a few 
dried currants over the bread, and grate a little nutmeg 



WELLESLEY COOK BOOK 95 

over them. Cover this with a second, and, if the dish is 

deep, with a third layer of bread squares, currants, and 

nutmeg. Pour over the whole a custard made of one 

quart of milk (or more, till it fills the dish), four eggs, 

three tablespoonfuls of sugar, and a teaspoonful of 

vanilla. Bake as custard, and serve hot with sauce. 

M. H. L. 

CURATE'S PUDDING 

3 egg's, weigh them in the shell 1 lemon 

Same weight each of butter, A little nutmeg (if you like) 
sugar, and flour 

Beat the butter to a cream with the sugar, add the 
eggs, then the flour by degrees, the peel and juice of a 
lemon, and a little nutmeg. 

Put the batter into five cups and bake three-quarters 
of an hour. To be mixed two hours before baking. 

Mrs. H. F. Durant. 

COTTAGE PUDDING 

2 eggs 11-2 cups flour 

1 cup sugar 1 teaspoonful cream tartar 

1-2 cup butter, good measure 1 teaspoonful saleratus, or 

1-2 cup sweet milk 2 teaspoonf uls baking powder 



Beat very light. 



Sauce 



1 cup sugar Add 2 tablespoonfuls of 

1 egg, beaten light cream, or milk 

Flavor to taste 



Beat very light. 



C. E. Cameron. 



BAKED INDIAN PUDDING 

1 quart boiling milk 1-2 cup molasses 

5 1-2 tablespoonfuls Indian Salt to suit the taste 
meal 

Pour the boiling milk over the meal. If you wish it 

jellied, stir in a little cold milk while it is baking. 

A. B. Hunting. 



96 WELLESLEY COOK BOOK 

DELICATE INDIAN PUDDING 

1 quart milk 1 tablespoonful butter 

2 heaping- tablespoonfuls of 3 eggs 

Indian meal 1 teaspoonful salt 

4 tablespoonfuls sug-ar 

Boil milk in double boiler. Sprinkle meal into it, 
stirring all the time. Cook twelve minutes. Beat to- 
gether eggs, salt, sugar, and half a teaspoonful ginger. 
Stir butter into the meal and milk. Pour this gradually 
on the egg mixture. Bake slowly one hour. 

Mrs. a E. Shattuck. 

INDIAN PUDDING 

3 quarts milk 1 teacup molasses 

2 teacups Indian meal Butter, g-inger, salt 

Scald two quarts of milk, and slowly stir in the 

meal, add molasses, small piece of butter, and small 

teaspoonful of ginger. Add the other quart of milk, 

and bake five or six hours. 

L. T. Wuisor. 

BAKED INDIAN PUDDING 

Boil one quart of milk; add six tablespoonfuls of 

Indian meal moistened with a little milk. When it 

thickens, pour it into a deep dish, adding one cupful 

of molasses, one-half cup sugar, one teaspoonful of salt, 

butter one tablespoonful, tablespoonful of ginger. Now 

add last one pint of cold milk. Do not stir it. Bake 

four hours. 

Dana Hall. 

APPLE PUDDING 

Eight large apples cored and filled with sugar. 

Put in a deep dish and cover with a batter of milk 

and eggs, the same as for custard. 

Mrs. Goodell. 



WELLE SLEY COOK BOOK 97 

SOFT GINGERBREAD WITH -WHIPPED CREAM 

One cup molasses, one teaspoon ful Dwight's Cow 
Brand soda, one teaspoonful ginger, one tablespoonful of 
butter or lard, salt ; stir all together, then pour on one- 
half cup of hoillng water, two cups of flour. 

Serve while hot with whipped cream, sweetened with 
powdered sugar, and flavored with vanilla. 

Mrs. Stoddard. 

FRUIT PUFFS . 

1 pint flour 1 pinch salt 

3 teaspoonfuls baking" powder 1 pint milk 

Put in buttered cups one tablespoonful of mixture, 

then a layer of fruit, another spoonful of the mixture. 

Put cups in steamer, cover tight, cook twenty minutes. 

Serve with cream and sugar. 

Mrs. E. W. Stevens. 

PAN DOWDY 

1 pint flour 1 cup milk 

1-4 cup sug-ar 1 eg-g- 

1-2 teaspoonful salt 2 teaspoonfuls butter melted 

1 large teaspoonful baking in t^vo tablespoonfuls boil- 

poTvder ing^ water 

Fill baking dish half full of sliced apples, pour over 
them the batter made as above, and bake. 
Serve with hot sauce. 

Mrs. Peabody. 

DUTCH APPLE PUDDING 

1 pint pastry flour 1 teaspoonful cream of tartar 

1-2 teaspoonful salt Butter size of an egg 

1-2 teaspoonful Dwight's Cow 
Brand soda 

Mix well. Beat one egg light, add two-thirds of a 

cup of milk. Pour it into the dry mixture. Stir and 

spread half an inch thick in a baking pan. Pare and 



98 WELLESLEY COOK BOOK 

cut into eighths four apples, stick them into the dough 
in rows. 

Sprinkle over them two teaspoonfuls of sugar. Bake 
twenty minutes in a hot oven. 

Pudding Sauce 

1 eg-g 2 tablespoonfuls milk 

1 cup sugar 

Beat the Qgg and sugar to a froth. 

Mrs. N. C. Dadmun. 

APPLE DUMPLINGS 

1 quart of flour 2 egg-s 

3 teaspoonfuls of baking 1-2 cup sugar 

powder 2 quarts of apples 
1 pint of milk 

Mix baking powder with the flour, beat eggs and 
sugar, and add to the milk, then mix thoroughly with 
the flour. 

Cut the apples in small bits. Steam in cups. Put a 

little batter in the bottom of a cup well buttered, then 

half fill with apple, then a little more batter, till the 

cup is two-thirds full. Steam thirty minutes and serve 

with sweet rich sauce. The above recipe makes twelve 

common coffee-cups. 

Mrs. Biirrill. 

ROLLED APPLE DUMPLING 

Make a nice soda biscuit crust, roll less than a half- 
inch thick, spread with chopped apple, then roll and cut 
into pieces about two or three inches long, stand on the 
ends in a deep pan, putting a small piece of butter on 
each, and bake about one half-hour. Serve while hot, 

with a hard sauce. 

Mrs. Stoddard. 



WELLESLEY COOK BOOK 99 

APPLE PUDDING 

Two cups of fine bread crumbs, two cups chopped 
apple, one cup of sugar, a little butter, and water enough 
to moisten it. 

Put a layer of bread crumbs, then a layer of apple. 

Bake until apple is done. 

Serve with a sweet sauce. 

Mrs. James Moulton. 

APPLE PUDDING 

1 cup of new milk 1 teaspoonful cream tartar 

2 cups of flour 1-2 teaspoonful soda 
1-2 cup of butter 

Put the apples sliced in the dish, pour over the 

batter, and steam two hours. Put a plate over it. 

Miss Lucretia Fuller. 

BROWN BETTY 

1 cup bread crumbs . 1 teaspoonful cinnamon 

2 cups chopped apples 2 tablespoonfuls butter 
1-2 cup sug-ar 

Put in a layer of apples, then bread crumbs, sugar^ 

butter in small pieces. Bake half an hour. Eat hoty 

with sugar and cream. 

Mrs. Mary L. Whipple. 

STEAMED DUMPLING 

Fill a four-quart granite saucepan half full of sour 
apples pared and cut into quarters ; add a cup of water, 
when thoroughly heated and nearly cooked set on a 
trivet to prevent burning, then add dumplings. 

Take one pint of flour, two teaspoonfuls of baking 
powder, and half a teaspoonful of salt ; wet with milk 
until it is a soft dough, not stiff enough to roll out. 



100 WELLESLET COOK BOOK 

Take a large spoon wet in water, and drop dough by 
spoonfuls on apple, making seven dumplings. Put cover 
on and steam twenty minutes. Serve with molasses, 
sauce, or maple syrup. These are excellent made of 
blueberries, adding water and sugar to berries before 
jiiitting in dumplings. 

Mrs. Spear. 

CRANBERRY PUDDING 

1-2 cup milk Butter the size of a walnut 

1-2 cup flour 1-2 teaspoonful soda 

1-2 pint cranberries 1 teaspoonful cream of tartar 

1-2 cup sug-ar 1 egg- 

Steam three-quarters of an hour. 

Stir the cranberries into the batter, as if they were 

raisins, for a plum pudding. 

Mrs. Edwin B. Wehh. 

PRUNE PUDDING 

Cook half a pound of prunes in a thin syrup, and 
when tender remove the stones, being careful not to 
break the fruit. Keturn the stones to the syrup, and 
boil until it is quite thick, then strain over the fruit. 
When cold, beat a pint of cream to a stiff froth, and pile 
high over the fruit. Serve with cake or wafers. 

A. L. W. 

PRUNE PUDDING 

One pound French prunes boiled and strained, to 
which add two-thirds cup powdered sugar, and the beaten 
whites of three eggs. Bake twenty minutes. Make a 
soft custard of one pint milk, yolks of three eggs, one- 
half cup sugar, flavor with vanilla. 

When ready to serve use custard for a sauce for 

pudding. 

Mrs. C. E. Shattuck. 



WELLESLEY COOK BOOK 101 



STEAMED PEACH DUMPLINGS 



Fill a deep pudding dish part full of sliced peaches, 
sprinkle with sugar, and add a little water. Then take 
one pint of flour, one heaping teaspoonful of baking 
powder, and a little salt. Sift four times, and mix with 
milk until the batter is soft enough to spread over the 
peaches. Steam forty minutes. 

Blackberries may be used instead of peaches. 

Sauce 

1-2 cup butter 1 egg- 

1 cup powdered sug-ar 1-4 teaspoonful vanilla 

Beat butter and sugar to a cream, then add the e^g^ 
well beaten. 

Mrs. C. P. Withington. 

APRICOT-TAPIOCA PUDDING 

1 1-2 cups apricot marmalade 2-3 cup of sug-ar 

3 tablespoonfuls pearl tapioca 1-2 teaspoonful salt 

To prepare the marmalade: — First soak good evapo- 
rated apricots over night in cold water ; then cook very 
slowly on the back of the range for several hours, until 
the fruit can easily be beaten into a smooth marmalade. 

Soak the tapioca over night also ; then add the salt 
and cook in a double boiler fifteen or twenty minutes, or 
until it becomes transparent. Now stir in the sugar and 
the marmalade, and let it simmer about ten minutes. 
Pour into a mould, and when cold serve with sugar and 
cream. This will make dessert for five. 

Any kind of preserved fruit " left over " from the 
supper supply may take the place of apricots, but no 
flavor is quite so fine. 

Mrs. R. M. Manly. 



102 WELLESLEY COOK BOOK 

SPONGE PUDDING 

One pint of milk put into double boiler. Mix one- 
half cup flour, one-quarter cup of sugar, with enough 
cold milk to make a thin paste. Then add the boiling 
milk, turning on slowly, and return to boiler, and cook 
until it thickens, stirring all the time. Add one-quarter 
cup of butter, and the well-beaten yolks of five eggs, 
then the well-beaten whites of the eggs. Bake in an 
earthen pudding dish, set in pan of boiling water. 
Bake one-half hour exactly. 

Make a sauce to eat with it, and you will find it very 

nice. 

Mrs. S. C. Evans. 

SPONGE PUDDING 

1 cup of milk 3 eg-g-s 

3-4 cup of flour 1-2 teaspoonful vanilla 

2 tablespoonfuls sug-ar Salt 
Butter half size of an eg-g' 

Put part of the milk in a double boiler, and while it 
is scalding wet the flour with the remainder and add to 
the hot milk, cooking until thick. 

Take from the fire, and when a little cool add sugar, 
butter, salt, and yolks well beaten, then, the whites 
whipped dry, and bake three-quarters of an hour in 
water. 

To be eaten hot with a creamy sauce. 

3frs. Clough. 

COCOANUT PUDDING 

Three eggs, one grated cocoanut, one and one-half 
cups of sugar, three and one-half cups of milk, and one- 
half a cup of butter. Line a deep dish with pastry, 
pour in the above mixture. Serve cold. 

Miss Lucy Wiite. 



WELLE SLET COOK BOOK 103 

BAKED CHOCOLATE PUDDING 

1 pint of bread crumbs 1-2 cup sugar 

1 quart milk (scalded) 6 tablespoonfuls of chocolate 

2 eggs 

Scald bread and milk together, add sugar and choco- 
ate, one tablespoonful of melted butter; when cool, 
add eggs. To be eaten hot with cold sauce, or cold with 
hot or cold sauce. 

Cold Sauce. 

One cup of sugar, one tablespoonful of butter beaten 

to a cream. Beat one egg very light, and stir together. 

Flavor with vanilla. 

M. Brown. 

ORANGE-TAPIOCA PUDDING 

1-2 cup pearl tapioca fi oranges 

1 1-2 cups sugar 1 saltspoonful salt 

1 quart boiling water 

Wash the tapioca, put in a double boiler with the 
boiling water, salt, grated rind of three oranges, and two- 
thirds of a cup of sugar. Cook until soft and trans- 
parent. Stir often while cooking. Have the oranges 
sliced in a deep glass dish, spi'inkle over them one cup 
of sugar. When the tapioca is cooked and cold, pour it 
over the oranges, and serve. Whipped cream is an 
addition. 

TAPIOCA CREAM 

Soak 3 tablespoonfuls tapioca Yolks 4 eggs 

till soft 6 tablespoonfuls sugar 

Scald 1 quart milk 

Add to tapioca, then to the milk, boil a few minutes. 
Flavor, pour into a dish and cool. Beat the whites to 
a stiff froth with two tablespoonfuls of sugar, and add. 

E. 0. K. 



104 WELLESLET COOK BOOK 



COCOANUT PUDDING 

1 larg-e cup bread crumbs 1-2 cup sugar 

1 pint scalding- milk Butter size of butternut 

1-2 cup cocoanut Yolks of two eggs 

Frosting 

1-4 cup sugar Whites of two eggs 

1-2 cup cocoanut 

Spread on the pudding when baked, replace in the 

oven and brown lightly. 

Mrs. N. H. Dadmiin. 



LIQUID SAUCE FOR PUDDING 

Beat the white and 3^ oik of one egg separately and 

stiff. Mix them, and stir in a scant teacup of sugar. 

Set the bowl over the steam of boiling tea-kettle. Stir 

constantly, but slowly, until it begins to thicken. Take 

it off, and add the grated rind and juice of two lemons. 

or other flavor, and serve. 

M. II. L. 

PUDDING SAUCE 
1 cup sugar 1-2 cup butter 1 egg 

Cream together butter and sugar, add the yolk and 

white of the e^g beaten separately. Flavor with lemon 

or vanilla. 

Ilrs. Morrill. 

PUDDING SAUCE 

1 ess 1-2 cup sugar 4 tablespoonfuls milk 

Beat the white of the egg to a froth ; beat the yolk 
and sugar together, after which add the beaten white. 
Heat the milk to boiling point, and pour over just before 

sending to the table. Flavor. 

J. Peabody. 



WELLESLEY COOK BOOK 105 



PUDDING SAUCE 

1 cup sug-ar 1 eg-g- 

1 heaping- teaspoonful flour 1 teaspoonful vanilla, or a 

1-4 cup butter little nutmeg 

1 cup boiling water 

Mix sugar, flour, and butter together. Just before 

serving, pour on the water and let it boil up once. Beat 

the eg^ and pour the liquid slowly over it, stirring all 

the time, and flavor. Good on any hot pudding, and on 

apple or peach fritters. 

Mrs. Bcnj. H. Sanborn. 

PUDDING SAUCE 

1 cup sugar 1-2 cup butter 

Scald one-half pint milk, and thicken with a little 

flour. 

Beat butter and sugar to a cream. Add to the milk, 

and let it come to a boil. 

Miss Lucy White. 

PUDDING SAUCE 

1-2 cup of butter 1 egg 

1 cup of po^vdered sugar 1-4 teaspoonful of vanilla 

Beat butter and sugar to a cream, then add the egg 
well beaten. 

H. M. W. 
COLD SAUCE 

1 large cup powdered sugar Vanilla 

1-2 cup butter Coloring 

Cream butter and sugar, color one-third red, one-third 
with a little melted chocolate ; pile on small glass dish 
like a harlequin ice cream. 

Mrs. W. L. Bussell. 

COLD SAUCE 

Stir four large spoonfuls of sugar, two of butter, and 
the white of one egg to a cream. Flavor and serve. 

Lucy White. 



106 ^ WELLESLEY COOK BOOK 

SYRUP FOR WAFFLES AND GRIDDLE-CAKES 

2 lbs. best brown sugar 1 tablespoonful of vanilla 

1 pint of water 

Boil sugar aud water until it will drop thick drops 
from the spoon. Flavor when cool. 

Mrs. Benj. H. Sanborn. 



EliASTIC 

STARCH 

The Original and Only Genuine Article 
of this N^ature . 

SINCE introducing this CELEBRATED 
ARTICLE, v/e have had a good 
' many imitators. Like other imita- 
tors, they lack the essential qualities that 
make the genuine successful. 

If you want to get satisfaction, use only 
the Original - ELASTIC." It is the only 
Reliable and Genuine Article. 



See that our Flat-Iron Trade Mark is 
on Every Trackage. 

J. C. HUBINGER BROS'. CO., 

Inventors and Manufacturers, 
NEW HAVEN, CONN., and KEOKUK, IOWA. 

107 



LADIES, IF YOU WOULD HAVE 
THE BEST, 

ASK YOUR GROCER FOR 

The Boston 
Crystal Gelatine. 



MM^W 



ii^^\THEMaSTJELi:r ^ ■ 
\FORTHElEASTMONEY g 

^ ^BsaLUTEa?:puRE, m 



BOSTON CRYSTAL GELATINE makes the 
most transparent jelly, and, being abso- 
' lately odorless and tasteless, requires less 
flavoring than any other, and is, on this 
account, more economical to use. It takes 
only about half as much of the Boston Crystal 
as of other kinds for any given recipe, and, the 
quantity being less, it will dissolve more readily. 
It contains no acid, and is therefore as well 
adapted for creams and custards as for Jellies. 

SMALL, OR REGULAR SIZE, 15 cents, 
Making 3 pints of Jelly. 

LARGE, OR DOUBLE SIZE, 20 cents, 

Making 3 quarts of Jelly. Equal to 2 packages of the 

English Gelatine, 

I08 



WELLESLEY COOK BOOK 109 



CUSTARDS AND DESSERTS 

"The end crowns all." 

BAKED CUSTARDS 

1 pint of milk 1-2 teaspoonful salt 

3 dessertspoonfuls sugar Nutmeg- or lemon flavoring 

4 eggs 1-2 cup cold milk (extra) 

Scald, but not boil, tbe pint of milk. Beat eggs and 
sugar very thoroughly. • To them add salt and spice (or 
lemon), and the half-cup of cold milk, and to this mixture 
the scalding milk. 

Put into a pan in which is hot water sixr custard 
cups, and bake. Done when they are well browned, but 
not to be baked till the custard rises and falls.. 

m E. c. 

COFFEE CUSTARDS 

1-2 pint strong coffee 4 tablespoonfUls sugar- 

1 pint rich milk 4 eggs, yolks 

Beat the eggs and sugar until very light. Add the- 

boiling milk, then the coffee. Cook in the double boiler 

until it thickens. Serve cold with whipped_cream which 

has been colored a pale brown with coffee.. 

M. T. 

CARAMEL CUSTARD 

1-2 cup sugar 6 eggs 

3 tablespoonfuls water 1-2 teaspoonful salt 

1 quart milk 1 teaspoonful vanilla 

Melt the sugar, add the water, and stir into the warm 

milk. Beat the eggs slightly, add the salt, vanilla, and 



110 WELLESLEY COOK BOOK 

part of the milk. Strain this into the remainder of the 
milk, and pour into a buttered mould. Set mould in a 
pan of warm water, and bake thirty or forty minutes, 
or until firm. Serve cold with caramel sauce. 

Miss Hall. 

LEMON CREAM 

1 lomon 4 egg's 

2 tablospoonfuls water 4 tablespoonfuls sugar 

Beat yolks of eggs, add sugar, juice and rind of lemon, 
and water, and set on the stove. When the mixture be- 
gins to thicken, stir in the whites of the eggs, beaten to 
a froth, with two tablespoonfuls of sugar. Cook one or 

two minutes. 

Mrs. Edwin B. Webb. 

LEMON CREAM 

Dissolve two tablespoonfuls of corn starch in a little 
water. Add the juice and grated rind of one large 
lemon, and one cup of sugar. On this pour two and 
one-half cups of boiling water. Add the yolks of three 
eggs. Set on the stove and cook slowly, stirring it until 
it thickens like custard. Kemove from the fire and stir 
in the whites of eggs, beaten stiff, and set away to cool. 
It can be made the day before using. 

Mrs. J. Moulton. 

ORANGE FLOAT 

1 pint -water 2 oranges 

1 cup sugar 2 eggs, whites 

2 lemons 

Let sugar and water come to a boil, then stir in the 

nice of the lemong. Cut the oranges in slices and lay 

tliem in a glass dish, and when the lemon syrup is cold, 

pour it over the oranges. Beat the whites of the eggs 

to a stiff froth, with a little sugar, and cover the top. 

Mrs. Morrill. 



WELLESLEY COOK BOOK 111 



FLOATING ISLAND 

1 quart milk 2 teaspoonfuls corn starch 

4 egg's Pinch of salt 

6 tablespoonfuls sug'ar Flavor -with vanilla 

Boil the milk, stir in yolks of eggs, beaten with 

the corn starch, three tablespoonfuls sugar, and the salt. 

Take out a tablespoonful or two of the hot milk into your 

bowl before pouring out the egg mixture. Let it stand 

on the stove until it thickens. Pour it into baking dish. 

Beat the whites of the eggs to a stitf froth, and put in 

the rest of the sugar, and the vanilla. Pour in drops 

upon the pudding, and brown in the oven. 

Mrs. Tucker. 

SNOTV PUDDING 

To one small package of Boston Crystal Gelatine 
add one-half cup cold water, soak half an hour, then 
add one cup of boiling water to dissolve the gelatine, 
juice of three lemons, and one cup of sugar. Beat the 
whites of four eggs stiff, and when the gelatine is cold, 
but not stiff, pour it into the Qgg, and beat all until it 
will just drop from a spoon, then put in a mould. Serve 
with custard made from yolks of eggs. 

VELVET CREAM 

1-2 box g-elatine 6 tablespoonfuls white sugar 

1 quart milk 1 tablespoonful flavoring 

3 eg-gs 

Put the gelatine and milk on the stove, add the yolks 

of the eggs, beaten; stir until the mixture comes to a 

soft custard. Beat the whites of the eggs to a froth, 

add the sugar and flavoring, and stir the mixture into 

the custard when it begins to cool. Pour into moulds. 

To be eaten cold, with or without sugar and cream. 

Mrs. Geo. H. Bobbins. 



112 WELLESLET COOK BOOK 

COFFEE CREAM 

One tablespoonful of gelatine to one cup of hot water, 
one-fourth cup sugar. Flavor with strong coffee. When 
solid, serve with whipped cream, sweetened with pow- 
dered sugar, flavored with vanilla. 

Mrs. Stoddard. 

LEMON MERINGUE PUDDING 

1 quart milk 1 cup sug-ar 

1 pint bread crumbs 4 tablespoonfuls powdered 

4 eg-g-s sug-ar 

1-2 cup butter 1-2 teaspoonful salt 

1 lemon 

Soak the bread in just milk enough to cover it. 
Beat the yolks of the eggs and one cup of sugar to- 
gether, add the juice and grated rind of the lemon. Melt 
the butter and stir in with the soaked bread, then put 
all together, stirring it well. Add the rest of the milk 
just before placing in the oven. Bake in a buttered 
dish till Arm. 

When done, cover with a frosting made with the 

whites of four eggs and four tablespoonfuls powdered 

sugar; return to the oven and brown slightly. 

To be eaten cold. 

SopJiia B. Horr. 

APPLE FLOAT 

3 apples 4 tablespoonfuls sugar 

2 eg-gs 1 pint milk 

Stew the apples and drain till quite dry. Beat the 

whites of the eggs stiff, add two tablespoonfuls of sugar, 

and beat into the drained apple. Make a soft custard of 

the yolks and the milk, add two tablespoonfuls of sugar 

and a bit of salt. Pour the custard into a dish and lay 

the float on the top. 

3frs. Burrill. 



WELLESLEY COOK BOOK 113 

CREAMED APPLES 

1 Quart apple sauce 1 cup cream 

1 cup sugar Whites of 2 eggs beaten stiff 

Mix cream, sugar, and whites of eggs together, and 
pour over the cold apple sauce. Time, six minutes, if 

the sauce is previously prepared. , ^ . ^ 

^ A Friend. 

PAINTED LADIES 

Choose firm, sound apples, remove the eyes, but leave 

the stems on, steam in a steamer till soft. Dissolve one 

cup of sugar in a pint of water, add three cloves and 

bits of lemon peel. Boil down one-half. When the 

apples are done lift carefully into a dish and cover the 

sides with jelly. Then turn the syrup into the dish, but 

not over the apples. Serve cold. 

Pauline Smith. 

ANGEL FOOD 

1 lb. figs carefully prepared 2 cups cold water 

1 cup sugar J^iice of 2 lemons 

Let cook slowly two or three hours. When cold, 

serve with cream. 



C. J. Hanks. 



CURRANT PUDDING 



1 Quart of currants fresh 1 cup of corn starch or 
1-2 lb. of sugar ground rice 

Stem the currants and put them over to boil with one 
pint of cold water until they are soft. Strain through a 
coarse cloth and boil the liquid. Dissolve the corn 
starch in a little cold water, and add to the liquid when 
boiling; boil twenty minutes, stirring constantly. 

Miss White. 



114 WELLE SLEY COOK BOOK 

FRUIT SALAD 

Slice alternately in a glass dish layers of oranges, 
pineapple, bananas, grated cocoanut or the prepared 
cocoanut, the juice of a lemon, sprinkling each layer 
with sugar. If in strawberry or raspberry time a few 
can be used. This is best prepared the day before. 

Mr&. Stoddard. 

FRUIT JELLY 

To one ounce package of Boston- Crystal Gelatine 
add one pint of cold water^ place over the tea-kettle or 
any warm place. 

To one teacup of dried apricots or other fruit, put 
one quart of cold water and place on back of the stove 
to slowly swell. When the fruit is quite soft, let it boil 
slowly a few minutes (never stir it and the jelly will be 
clear), add two cups of sugar; boil two minutes, and 
carefully skim the fruit into a mould. 

Put the gelatine into the syrup, and just let it boil 
up, and pour over the fruit. When cold serve with 
cream and sugar. 

JUDGE PETER'S PUDDING 

3-4 box of Crystal Gelatine 6 figs 

2 oranges 2 lemons 

2 bananas 10 English walnuts 

Dissolve the gelatine in one-half pint of cold water, 
then add one-half pint of boiling water, the juice of 
two lemons, two cups of powdered sugar. 

Strain and let it stand until it begins to thicken. Stir 
in the fruit cut in small pieces, and turn into a mould 
and let it harden. Serve with whipped cream. 

Mrs. Lewis M, Grant. 



WELLESLEY COOK BOOK. 115 

ORANGE TRIPLE 

1 pint whipped cream Yolks 3 eggs 

1 cup poTvdered sugar 1-2 box gelatine 

Juice 2 sweet oranges 1 cup boiling water 
Grated rind of one 

Mix juice, rind, and sugar, pour the hot liquid over. 

Heat within a vessel of boiling water, stirring constantly 

to prevent curdling. 

Mrs. Bacon. 

ORANGE SPONGE 

1-4 box of gelatine 3 oranges 

1 teacup cold water 4 eggs, 1-2 pint sugar 

Put the gelatine in the water and place in a pan of 
hot water to dissolve, then add the juice of the oranges, 
the whites of the eggs beaten to a stiff froth, and the 
sugar. Beat about fifteen minutes and put in mould to 
harden. Serve with whipped cream or soft custard of 
the yolks beaten with two tablespoonfuls of sugar and 
one pint of milk. 



A. C. W. 



PRUNE WHIPS 



1 lb. prunes 1-4 teaspoonful salt 

1 small teacup sugar 1-4 teaspoonful soda 

4 whites of eggs 

Soak prunes over night in just water enough to cover 
them. In the morning, stone, and boil in the water in 
which they were soaked, until they form a thick paste, 
adding the sugar. When cool mix thoroughly with the 
whites of eggs beaten to a stiff froth, adding soda and 
salt. 

Put in pudding dish and bake fifteen minutes, or until 
brown, in slow oven. 

Serve cold, with cream or boiled custard. 

F. E. Lord. 



116 WELLESLEY COOK BOOK 

SNOW PUDDING 

1-4 box g-elatine Yolks of 3 eg-g-s 

1-4 cup of cold water 3 tablespoonfuls sugar 

1 cup boiling- water 1-2 saltspoonful salt 

1 cup sug-ar 1 pint hot milk 

1-4 cup of lemon juice 1-2 teaspoonful vanilla 

Whites of 3 eggs 

Soak the gelatine in the cold water lifteen minutes, 
or until soft. Then dissolve it in the boiling water, add 
the sugar and lemon juice. Stir until the sugar is dis- 
solved. Strain into a large bowl and set away to cool. 
Stir occasionally. Beat the whites of the eggs to a stiff 
froth, and when the gelatine begins to thicken add the 
beaten whites, and beat all together until very light. 
When nearly stiff enough to drop, pour into a mould. 
Make a boiled custard of the yolks of the eggs, the 
sugar, salt, and milk, and when cool flavor with vanilla. 
When needed, turn the snow out on to a dish, and pour 

the custard around it. 

The Eliot. 



SNOW PUDDING 

1-2 box Boston Crystal Gela- 1 coffee-cup cold water 

tine 1 pint boiling w^ater 

2 cups sugar, 4 eggs Juice of 1 lemon 

Soak the gelatine in the cold water for ten minutes, 
then pour on the boiling water, add the sugar and lemon, 
let stand till cool. Beat the whites of eggs to a stiff 
froth, add the other mixture by spoonfuls, and beat one 
hour ; this makes the snow. 

Make a soft custard of the yolks of the eggs and one 
quart of milk, flavor to taste. When ready to serve, 
pour into the dish around the snow. 

Mrs. T. W. Willard. 



WELLESLEY COOK BOOK 117 

SNOW PUDDING 

One-third package Crystal Gelatine, pour upon it 
one pint of boiling water, place it over hot steam and 
stir occasionally until dissolved, which will take perhaps 
fifteen minutes. Add the juice of one lemon and one 
cup of sugar, stir well and stand away to cool ; when 
the consistency of a soup jelly, beat two eggs to a stiff 
froth, then beat the jelly and froth together^ and mould 
in any shape. Serve with soft custard. 

Mrs. Albert Jennings. 

RASPBERRY FLOAT 

Whip the whites of four eggs stiff, add three-fourths 
cup powdered sugar, beat well, then add one cup rasp- 
berry jam, and beat with a spoon or fork for twenty 
minutes. Pile on a glass dish and serve with cream. 

Mrs. Stoddard. 

FOR DESSERT 

One glass of currant jelly well beaten, whites of two 

eggs beaten separately, then mix and beat together. 

Set away in the ice chest till wanted, then serve with 

soft-boiled custard. 

Harriet Guardenier. 




120 



WELLESLEY COOK BOOK 121 



CAKE 

" With weights and measures just and true, 
Oven of even heat, 
Well-buttered tins and quiet nerves, 
Success will be complete. 

"OLD TIMES " SPONGE CAKE 

10 large eggs (11 if small) 1 good-sized lemon, rind 
1 lb. powdered sugar and juice 

1-2 lb. flour well sifted 

Beat the whites of the eggs very light, then the 
yolks. Mix together, beating the while. Then add 
the pound of sugar, very gradually, beating as you lightly 
sprinkle it in. To this add the grated yellow rind of 
the lemon, then the juice. Lastly, stir in the flour. 
This is all-important, and must be done very gently and 
lightly. If stirred hard or fast while the flour is add- 
ing, or after, the cake will be dry and tough. Put 
immediately into a moderately brisk oven, and take 
out the moment it is done, which may be determined by 
piercing with a clean broom straw, or by the loosening of 
the cake from the edge of the pan. This quantity will 
make one small cake of four layers, or, larger, of two 
layers. Jelly, or an orange meringue, may be spread 
between the layers. rr rr ^ 



122 WELLESLET COOK BOOK. 

B VERY-DAY SPONGE CAKE 

3 egga 2 teaspoonfuls Royal Baking 

1 1-2 cups sugar Powder 

2 cups flour 1 teaspoonf ul extract of lemon 

1-2 cup cold water 1 pinch of salt 

Beat the eggs three minutes, add the sugar, beat 
three minutes, then one cup of flour, and beat three 
minutes. 

Put the lemon extract into the water; the baking 
powder and salt into the rest of the flour. Stir into the 
mixture the water, then the flour. 

This will make two thin loaves, baked in the bread 

pans twenty minutes. 

Sophia B. Horr. 

FALMOUTH SPONGE CAKE 

6 eggs A little salt 

1 3-4 cups sug-ar 2 large spoonfuls cold water 

2 cups flour 1 teaspoonful essence lemon 

Separate the eggs, beat yolks a little, add cold water 

and sugar, and beat well. Then beat the whites stiff, 

mix in, put in lemon, salt ; beat up well, then stir in 

flour. Bake in quick oven. 

Mrs. Hobart. 

HOT-WATER SPONGE CAKE 

6 eggs The grated rind of half a 

2 cups sugar lemon 

2 coffee-cups pastry flour One teaspoonful of the juice 
1-2 cup boiling water 

Beat the yolks and sugar to a froth; also beat the 
whites to a stiff froth. Add the lemon to the yolks 
and sugar, then add the boiling water ; next the whites, 
and last of all the flour. Mix quickly, and bake in two 
sheets for half an hour in a moderate oven. 

H. E. a 



WELLESLEY COOK BOOK 123 

HOT-WATER SPONGE CAKE 

4 eggs 1 heaping- teaspoonful baking 

2 cups sugar powder 

2 1-2 cups pastry flour 1-2 teaspoonful salt 

1-2 cup hot water 

Beat the eggs well, mix the sugar with them, put in 
half of the water, flour, and powder, and beat a few- 
minutes. Then put in the rest and beat five minutes. 
This makes two sheets. Bake twenty minutes. 

Mrs. Mary L. Whipple. 

BERWICK SPONGE CAKE 

3 eggs 1-2 cup cold water 

1 1-2 cups sugar 1-2 teaspoonful lemon extract 

2 cups flour Pinch of salt 
1 teaspoonful baking powder 

Beat the eggs five minutes ; add the sugar and beat 

five minutes longer, add the water, lemon extract, and 

the flour sifted three times with the salt and baking 

powder. Bake in a shallow pan, in a quick, steady oven, 

thirty-five minutes. 

Mrs. R. M. Manly. 

SPONGE CAKE 

Three eggs, beat two minutes, add one and one-half 

cups white sugar, and beat five minutes ; one cup flour, 

beat two minutes, another cup of flour with one tear 

spoonful cream tartar stirred in, one-half cup cold water 

with one-half teaspoonful Dwight's Cow Brand soda, 

little salt and flavor. Makes two loaves. 

A. B. C. 

CREAM SPONGE CAKE 

One cup sugar. Drop two eggs in a cup and fill up 
with cream, then beat this with the sugar. One and 
one-half cups flour, one and one-half teaspoonfuls Royal 
Baking Powder, or, if sour cream is used, a little soda. 

Mrs. Wilson. 



124 WELLESLEY COOK BOOK 

SPONGE CAKE 

3 egrgrs 1 teaspoonful cream tartar 
1 cup sug-ar 1 cup flour 

1-2 teaspoonful soda 

Beat the yolks and whites separately, then beat in 

sugar, dissolve soda in a little water, add to the eggs 

and sugar, then add cream tartar to the flour, then mix 

all together and bake. 

Mrs. J. E. Selfe. 

SPONGE CAKE 

Beat the yolks of six eggs and two cups of sugar 

together thoroughly, add the whites of the eggs beaten 

to a stiff froth, beat this mixture for fifteen minutes, 

flavor with lemon juice or extract, stir in two cups of 

flour as quickly as possible, and bake immediately. 

Half quantity for a small loaf. 

Miss Lucy White. 

LADY FINGERS 

4 eggs 1-2 cup powdered sugar 1 cup flour 

Beat yolks and sugar together, add whites well 

beaten, then the flour. Stir as little as possible. Bake 

in a slow oven. 

Mrs. Mary L. Whipple. 

LADT FINGERS 

1 cup sugar 1 pint flour 

1-2 cup butter 1 teaspoonful cream of tartar 

1-4 cup milk 1-2 teaspoonful soda 

legg 

Cut into little strips, roll with your hands in sugar, 

and bake in a quick oven. 

Mrs. N. U. Dadmun. 



WELLE SLEY COOK BOOK 125 

BOSTON MADELINES 

Three-fourths cup of sugar, the same of flour, one- 
fourth cup of corn starch, one teaspoonful baking 
powder, one-third cup milk, and yolks of four eggs, 
flavor to taste. Bake in gem pans, one teaspoonful in 
each gem ; use white frosting. They are very nice 
without any frosting, and can be baked in any shape 

desired. 

Mrs. T. W. Willard. 

JELLY ROLL 

3 eggs 1-2 teaspoonful Dwig-ht's Cow 

1 cup sugar Brand soda 

1 cup flour 1-2 teaspoonful lemon 

1 teaspoonful cream tartar 

Sift cream tartar with the flour. Dissolve the soda 
in a very little water. Bake in dripping pan, spread 
with jelly while hot, and roll. 

Wolcott, Verrmotit. 

DELICIOUS CAKE 

1 cup butter 3 cups St. Louis flour 

2 cups sug-ar, flne granulated 2 teaspoonfuls Royal Baking: 
1 cup milk Powder 

5 eg'gs, leaving out tw^o whites 

Cream the butter. Add sugar and mix thoroughly. 
Add beaten yolks. Sift the baking powder into the 
flour. Add flour and milk to the mixture, alternately^ 
little at a time. Beat, not stir, very thoroughly. Add 
beaten whites last. 

Frosting 

White of one egg. Scant cup of powdered sugar, 
added gradually, and beaten, not stirred. Five table- 
spoonfuls grated chocolate. 

C. E. Cameron. 



126 WELLESLEY COOK BOOK 

SNOW FLAKE CAKE 

1-2 cup butter 1 teaspoonful cream tartar 

1 1-2 cups sug-ar 1-2 teaspoonful Dwight's 

2 cups pastry flour Cow Brand soda 
1-4 cup milk Juice of 1-2 lemon 
5 egg-s (whites only) 

Beat the butter to a cream. Gradually add the 
sugar, then the lemon, and when very light the milk ; 
next the whites of the eggs, beaten to a stiff froth, then 
the flour, in which the soda and cream of tartar are 
well mixed. Bake in sheets in a moderate oven ; when 
nearly cool, frost. 

Frosting 

3 egg-s (whites) 1-2 g-rated cocoanut 

2 larg-e cups powdered sug'ar Juice of 1-2 lemon 

Add the sugar gradually to the whites, already beaten 
to a stiff froth, then the lemon and cocoanut. Frost the 
top of each loaf, or make layer cake of it by putting the 
sheets together. 



H. E. C. 



SUNSHINE CAKE 



Yolks of 11 egga 2 cups sug-ar 

1 cup butter 1 cup milk 

2 1-2 cups flour 1 teaspoonful cream tartar 
1-2 teaspoonful soda Flavor with vanilla 

3Irs. S. C. Evans. 

WHITE CAKE 

Whites of 8 eggs 3 cups flour 

2 cups sugar 1 teaspoonful cream tartar 

1-2 cup butter 1-2 teaspoonful Dwight's 
:M cup milk Cow Brand soda 

Bake in layers ; spread each layer with icing and 

grated cocoanut, and, when put together, cover the 

whole with the icing and cocoanut. 

Mrs. Parritt. 



WELLESLEY COOK BOOK 127 

RICE FLOUR CAKE 

1 lb. rice flour 6 eg-g-s 

1 lb. sugar 1-4 teaspoonful Dwig'ht's 

2 o-i cups butter Cow Brand soda 
2 3-4 cups milk Flavor with lemon 

M. M. Clark. 

MOUNTAIN CAKE 

1 lb. sug'ar 1-2 teaspoonful Dwig'ht's 

1 lb. flour Cow^ Brand soda 

1-2 lb. butter 1 teaspoonful cream tartar 

6 eg-gs 

Icing to be between the layers. The cake must be 

baked in separate tins, same as Washington pie ; when 

about cold, spread on the icing quite thick, and so on, 

making as many layers as you please. 

Icing 

One pound powdered sugar ; pour over it just enough 

cold water to dissolve it, then take the whites of three 

eggs, beat them a little, but not to a froth. Add the 

sugar and water, put it in a bowl, place it in a vessel of 

boiling water, and beat the mixture. First it is thin and 

clear, then it begins to thicken. When quite thick, take 

from the fire, and beat until cold and thick enough to 

put on with a knife. 

M. M. Clark. 

BRIDE'S CAKE 

1-2 cup butter 1 teaspoonful Royal Baking 

1 cup sug-ar Powder 

"Whites of 4 eg-g-s 1 teaspoonful almond, or rose 

2 tablespoonf uls milk water 
1 1-2 cups flour 

Warm the dish the cake is to be mixed in ; put the 

butter in cold, and beat to a cream. Add the sugar 

slowly, and mix in the order given. Frost with white 

or golden frosting. 

Mrs. Betij. H. Sanborn. 



128 WEL LESLEY COOK BOOK 



DELICATE CAKE 

1 cup butter 1-2 cup sweet milk 

2 cups sug-ar 4 cups flour sifted with 

6 whites of eggs 2 teaspoonfuls baking powder 

Beat the butter to a cream. Whip the whites of 
eggs and sugar together, and add to the butter; then 
add the milk, and beat all together five minutes. Stir 
in the flour thoroughly, and bake in a quick oven one- 
half hour. 

Winifred E. Badger. 

LILY CAKE 

2 cups sug-ar 1 cup corn starch 

1 cup butter 2 cups flour 

1 cup sw^eet milk 1 teaspoonful cream tartar 

1-2 teaspoonful soda 5 egg's 

Cream together butter and sugar. Add the ingre- 
dients in the order given, and lastly the whites of the 
eggs, beaten to a stiff froth. Flavor with almond or 

vanilla, and frost with chocolate frosting. 

3Irs. Morrill. 

"WHITE MOUNTAIN CAKE 

1-2 cup butter 1-2 teaspoonful soda 

1 1-2 cups sugar 2 cups flour 

2 eggs 1 teaspoonful cream of tartar 
1-2 cup milk Flavor with lemon 

Bake slowly. Mrs. Hohart. 

ONE-EGG CAKE 

1-2 cup of butter 2 cups flour 

1 cup sugar 1-2 teaspoonful of soda 

1 egg 1 teaspoonful cream tartar 

1 cup of milk 1 teaspoonful vanilla 

Beat the sugar and butter to a cream ; add the beaten 

e^g and the milk, in which is dissolved the soda, then 

the flour and cream tartar mixed together. Flavor. 

Beat all together thoroughly. 

Bake in a moderate oven. 

J. Peahody. 



WELLESLEY COOK BOOK 129 



GOLD CAKE 

1-2 cup of butter 2 cups of flour 

1 cup of sug-ar 1-2 teaspoonful cream tartar 

Yolks 8 eggs 1-4 teaspoonful Dwig-ht's Cow 

1-2 cup of milk Brand soda 

Mrs. Goodell. 



SILVER CAKE 

2 cups sugar 3 cups flour 

1-2 cup butter 1-2 teaspoonful cream tartar 

Whites 8 eg-gs 1-4 teaspoonful soda 



1-2 cup milk 



Mrs. Goodell. 



FEATHER CAKE 



2 cups of sug'ar 3 eg-g-s 

3 cups of flour 2 teaspoonfuls cream tartar 
1-2 cup of butter 1 teaspoonful soda 

1 small cup of milk 

A CUP of dried currants is a great addition. 

Mrs. Pomeroy. 

"WELLESLEY CAKE 

Stir together one cup white sugar, and one-half cup 

melted butter. Add one egg well beaten, and stir together. 

Into one-half cup sweet milk put one teaspoonful cream 

tartar and one-half teaspoonful soda, and beat to a foam. 

After stirring all together, add two cups flour, and flavor 

to taste. Bake in quick oven. 

A. B. C. 

COFFEE CAKE 

1 cup coffee 1 teaspoonful cinnamon 

1 cup molasses 1-5 teaspoonful clove 

1 cup brow^n sugar 1-4 to 1-3 of a nutmeg 

1-2 cup butter 2 teaspoonfuls baking 
3 1-2 cups flour powder 

1 egg Fruit to taste 

Mary E. Horton. 



130 WELLESLEY COOK BOOK 



COFFEE CAKE 

1 cup coffee 1 teaspoonful clove 

1-2 cup butter 1 teaspoonful cinnamon 

1 cup sugar 1 nutmeg- 

1 cup molasses 1-2 lb. raisins 
1 teaspoonful Dwight's Cow 4 1-2 cups flour 
Brand soda 



Mrs. J. E. Selfe. 



QUEEN'S CAKE 



3 eggs, whites 1-2 cup milk 

1 cup sugar 1 teaspoonful cream tartar 
2-3 cup butter 2 cups of flour 

1-2 scant teaspoonful soda 

Frost with caramel frosting. 

A. M. F. 

FRENCH CAKE 

3 cups sugar 5 eggs 

1 cup butter 1 teaspoonful cream tartar 

1 cup milk 2-3 teaspoonful saleratus 

4 cups flour Flavor with lemon 

This is sufficient for two loaves. 

E. Marietta Dewing. 

LADY'S CAKE 

2 cups sugar 1 even teaspoonful soda 
2-3 cup butter Whites of 5 eggs 

1-2 cup milk 3 cups flour 

1 heaping teaspoonful cream Flavor with almond 
of tartar 

Mrs. E. G. Fuller. 

DOLLY VARDEN CAKE 

2 cups of sugar 1 1-2 teaspoonfuls baking 
2-3 cup of butter powder sifted three times 
1 cup of milk with 2 1-2 cups of flour 

3 eggs 

Beat the eggs thoroughly. Rub the butter and sugar 
to a cream, ^ncl beat well with the eggs. Add the milk 
and flour, and bake thirty-live minutes in a moderate 
oven. 

Winifred E. Badger. 



WELLESLEY COOK BOOK 131 



LEMON CAKE 

1 cupful butter Whites of 2 eggs 

2 cupfuls sugar 1 1-2 teaspoonfuls baking 

3 cupfuls pastry flour powder 

1 small cupful milk Juice of 1 lemon 

Yolks of 4 eggs 

Beat the butter and sugar to a cream. Add the eggs, 

well beaten, next the milk, then the flour, with which 

the baking powder is mixed. Mix quickly, and bake in 

two sheets, in a moderate oven, thirty minutes. Cover 

with a frosting flavored with lemon. 

Mrs. Mary L. Whipple. 

GREEN MOUNTAIN CAKE 

1 cup sugar 1-2 cup butter 

Whites of 4 eggs 2 teaspoonfuls baking powder 

2-0 cup sweet milk 2 1-2 cups flour 

Bake in a loaf and frost ; beat the butter and sugar 

well together, add the flavoring, then the milk, then the 

flour, eggs last, beaten to a stiff froth. 

Mrs. T. W. Willard. 

MAGIC CAKE 

1-2 cup of butter 3 tablespoonfuls milk 

1 cup sugar 1 teaspoonful cream of tartar 

3 eggs 1-2 teaspoonful soda 

1 1-2 cups flour Flavor with almond 

31iss Lucy White. 

MEASURE POUND CAKE 

1 cup eggs 1 cup butter 

1 1-2 cups sugar 11-2 cups flour 

Cream the butter, add the flour, beat thoroughly 

together. Beat sugar and yolks of eggs together, and 

the beaten whites. The more beating the better. Bake 

in shallow pans. 

Mrs. Bacon. 



132 WELLESLEY COOK BOOK 



ORANGE CAKE 

1 1-2 cups sugar Juice of 1 orange 
Yolks 5 egg-s 2 cups flour 

Whites of 2 1 teaspoonful Royal Baking 

1-2 cup cold water Powder 

Frosting 

Grated rind 1-2 orange Sugar enough to spread 

"Whites 3 eggs well beaten nicely 

EuB the grated rind into part of the sugar before 
adding the eggs. 

Bake in three layers, and spread frosting between. 

Harriet Guardenier. 

ORANGE CAKE 

3 cups flour 2 cups sugar 

2 eggs 1 tablespoonful butter 

1 cup milk Baking powder 

Bake in jelly cake pans. 

Filling 
Juice and grated rind of two oranges and one lemon, 
cup sugar, tablespoonful corn starch. Boil till liquid 
thickens, and when cold spread on cakes. 

Mrs. Bacon. 

ORANGE CAKE 

2 cups sugar Whites of 3 eggs 

1 cup butter 1 teaspoonful cream of tartar 

1 cup milk 1-2 teaspoonful soda 

3 1-2 cups flour Juice and peel of 2 oranges 
Yolks of 5 eggs 

Beat the butter and sugar to a cream. 

Filling and Frosting 
Whites of two eggs, grated rind of two oranges and 
juice of one. Confectioner's sugar to make thick. 

. Mrs. N. H. Dadmun. 



WELLESLEY COOK BOOK 133 

ORANGE CAKE 

cuus suffar Whites 3 eggs 
2 cSpl flo5? 1-2 cup water 

1 tpasnoonful cream of tartar A little salt ^ ^ . , - 
1 teSpoonful Dwight's Cow Juice and grated rind of 

Brand saleratus 1 orange 

Yolks 5 eggs 

Beat the whites to a stiff froth, add the sugar, when 
thoroughly mixed add the yolks, previously beaten for 
five minutes ; bake in five tins. 

Frosting between Layers 
Whites of two eggs, juice and grated rind of one 
orange, sugar enough to make quite stiff. 

3Irs. Albert Jennings. 

CHOCOLATE CAKE 

1 «-nr» Vkn+tfir 5 eggs, 2 whites left out 

2 cuSs ?ugar 1 tiaspoonful cream tartar 

1 ?-7cups flour 1-2 teaspoonf ul Dwight's Cow 

1 cup milk Brand soda 

Beat the butter to a cream. Add the sugar gradually, 
then the eg^s well beaten, the milk, next the flour, in 
which the cream of tartar has been well mixed. Dis- 
solve soda in a teaspoonf ul of the milk, add, stir quickly, 
and bake in two sheets for thirty minutes, in a moderate 

oven. Ice. 

Icing 

Whites of 2 eggs 6 tablespoonf uls grated choc- 

' suga"^' "' powdered ^ ojate^^^,^, ^^ ^^^.^^^ 

Put the chocolate and six tablespoonfuls of the sugar 
in a saucepan with two spoonfuls of hot water. Stir 
over a hot fire until smooth and glossy. Beat the whites 
to a froth and add the sugar and chocolate. 

//. E. C. 



134 WELLESLEY COOK BOOK 

CHOCOLATE CAKE 

i cup of sugar 1-2 cup butter 

"Whites of 2 egg's 11-2 cups flour 

1 teaspoonful cream of tartar 1-2 cup sweet milk 

1-2 teaspoonful Dwig-ht's Cow Flavor with vanilla 
Brand soda 

iixiB sugar and butter to a cream, add whites of eggs 
beaten stiff, then flour with creain of tartar, dissolve 
the soda in milk and stir into cake well. Bake in three 
or four layers. 

Frosting 

Whites of 2 eg-g-s 1 cake German sweet choco- 

Pow^dered sugar late 

Beat eggs stiff, stir in chocolate grated, add sugar, not 
enough to make the mixture. too stiff. It should not be 
so soft as to run. Spread the frosting between the 
layers and over the top. 

Mrs. Albert Jennings. 



CHOCOLATE CARAMEL CAKE 

1 cup of butter 1 cup of corn starch 

2 cups of sugar Whites of 7 eggs 

1 cup of sweet milk 3 teaspoonfuls of baking 

1 1-2 cups of flour powder in flour 

Cream butter and sugar, add the milk and flour, then 
the corn starch, last the eggs whipped. Bake in a 
dripping pan. 

Caramel 

One pound brown sugar, one-fourth pound of German 
chocolate, one-half cup of sweet milk, butter size of an 
Qgg, tablespoonful of vanilla. 

Boil until it thickens like jelly, then spread. 

Mrs, H. H. Brown. 



WELLESLEY COOK BOOK 135 

CHOCOLATE CAKE 

1 square of chocolate 2 even cups of flour 

1-4 cup butter 1-2 cup milk 

1 cup sugar 1-2 teaspoonful soda 

2 eg-g-s 1 teaspoonful cream of tartar 

Melt the chocolate in four tablespoonfuls of water. 

Beat the yolks and Avhites of the eggs separately. 

Cream the Butter, and add the sugar, chocolate, and 
yolks of the eggs, a little at a time. 

Mix the cream of tartar and soda with the flour and 
add, then the milk and whites of the eggs. Frost with 
chocolate frosting. 

3frs. E. A. Jennings. 

CHOCOLATE CAKE 

4 eggs 2 cups flour 

1 1-2 cups sugar '^1 teaspoonful cream tartar 

1 small cup cold water 1-2 teaspoonful Dwight's soda 

Sift cream of tartar and soda with flour. Bake in 

round tins. 

Filling 

1-4 cake of Baker's chocolate Whites of 2 eggs 
1 cup sugar 1 teaspoonful vanilla 

Beat the sugar, chocolate, and eggs together, and stir 
to tht 
vanilla. 



into the boiling milk. Boil until thick, then add the 



Abbie A. Moulton. 

CHOCOLATE CAKE 

1 cup butter 1 cup of milk 

2 cups sugar 1-2 teaspoonful soda 
5 eggs, reserving the whites 3 1-2 cups flour 

of two 1 teaspoonful cream of tartar 

Frosting for this Cake 

One cup sugar, six large spoonfuls grated chocolate, 

whites of two eggs. 

Mrs. II. II. Brown, 



136 WELLESLEY COOK BOOK 

CHOCOLATE CAKE 

1 cup sug-ar 1-2 cup milk 

2 eg-g-s 3 1-2 cups flour 

3 tablespoonfuls melted 1 heaping- teaspoonful Royal 

butter Baking Powder 

Bake in three round tins, and put together with the 
frosting. 

Boiled Frosting 

2 cups sugar 1-2 teaspoonful vanilla 

1-2 cup water 6 tablespoonfuls grated 

Whites of 2 eggs, beaten stiff chocolate 

Boil the sugar and water, without stirring, until the 
syrup, taken up on a skewer, will "thread," and pour 
over the eggs in a fine stream, beating well. Add choco- 
late and vanilla, and beat until thick enough to spread. 

Mrs. Benj. H. Sanborn. 

COCOANUT CAKE 

1 1-2 cups of sugar 1 teaspoonful cream tartar 

1-2 cup of butter 1-2 teaspoonful soda 

1-2 cup of milk 2 cups of freshly grated 

2 1-2 cups of flour cocoanut 



Whites of 4 eggs 



Miss H. H. Rollins. 



COCOANUT CAKE 

1 cup sugar 3 tablespoonfuls butter 
Yolks of 3 eggs 1 cup sweet milk 

2 cups flour 2 even teaspoonfuls cream 
1 even teaspoonful soda tartar 

Bake in four round tins. Beat the whites of eggs 
very light, add about one-half as much sugar as for ordi- 
nary frosting. Then Schepp's desiccated cocoanut, to 
thicken enough to spread nicely ; put between and on 
top. Sprinkle on some dry cocoanut, and set away to 

cool. 

Mrs. J. Moulton. 



WELLESLEY COOK BOOK 137 

PUFF CAKE 

3 eggs 1 1-2 cups milk 

2 cups sugar 3 teaspoonfuls Royal Baking 
1-2 cup butter, small cup Powder 

3 cups flour 

Cream the butter, add sugar, then cream again ; add 
milk, then the flour, in which the baking powder has 
been thoroughly stirred. Flavor with extract of almond. 

Mrs. Burrill. . 

NUT CAKE 

1 cup sugar 2 teaspoonfuls Royal Baking 
1-2 cup butter Powder 

2 eggs 1 large cup walnut meat, 
1-2 cup sweet milk chopped 

1 1-2 cups flour 

Cream butter and sugar ; sift baking powder with the 
flour ; mix in the order given. Bake in one loaf ; frost 
with white frosting, and in the frosting lay halves of 

walnuts. . ^^ c r. 

3frs. Benj. TL Sanborn. 

MINNEHAHA CAKE 

2 cugs of sugar 3 eggs 

1-2 cup of butter 2 teaspoonfuls cream tartar 

1 cup of milk 1 teaspoonful soda 

Bake in three jelly cake tins. 

Filling 

1 cup sugar 1-2 cup chopped raisins 

1 egg, white only 1-2 cup currant jelly 

Boil the sugar, first adding a very little water, and 
pour hot upon the egg, beaten stiff, then add the other 
ingredients, and spread between the layers while warm. 
A little orange or lemon juice will improve it. 

Mrs. Burrill. 



138 WELLESLEY COOK BOOK 

ALMOND CAKE 

1 cup sugar 1 teaspoonful cream tartar 
1-2 cup butter 1-2 teaspoonful Dwight's soda 
"Whites of 2 eggs dissolved in 1-2 cup milk 

2 cups flour Flavor with almond 

Mrs. Albert Jennings. 

PLAIN CAKE 

1 cup sugar. 1 eg^ Powder 

Piece of butter size of an egg 1 cup water, or milk —water 

2 teaspoonfuls Royal Baking makes tenderer cake. 

Cream together the butter and sugar, add the Qgg and 
beat thoroughly, add the water (or milk), and mix the 
baking powder with flour enough to make moderately 
stiff. The amount of flour used depends largelj' on the 
kind used. You need less of patent-process than of 
pastry. Beat all thoroughly once more, and bake in a 
loaf, or in three layers. 

Essence of any kind, or raisins, or currants, or nuts, 
added, makes a variety. 

CHOCOLATE CREAM 

The Cream 

2 cups granulated (or any white) sugar 3-4 cup milk 

Boil for fifteen or twenty minutes, taking care to 

stir often enough to keep from burning. Remove from 

the fire, and flavor to taste. Cool a few minutes, and 

stir until it thickens and begins to look like candy. 

Spread on cake quickly. This is enough for three 

layers. 

The Chocolate 

Cut up one-half cake Baker's chocolate. Melt by 
placing dish in mouth of tea-kettle. Over each layer of 
cream spread layer of chocolate. 

Charlotte E. Miller. 



WELLESLEY COOK BOOK 139 

VARIETY OF FRO STINGS 

With the cream part of the above, a variety of frost- 
ings may be made, if to the boiling milk and sugar 
chopped raisins, or figs, or dates, or currants, or nuts, or 
cocoanut be added. Nuts or fruit should not be added 
until the frosting is about to be removed from the fire, 
but cocoanut may be boiled. If you wish to frost but 
one loaf, only half the quantity need be used. 

Charlotte E. Miller. 

MAPLE SUGAR FROSTING 
Three cups maple syrup boiled to a wax, and stirred 
until it begins to sugar, then spread quickly. Will put 
three layers together. charlotte E. Miller. 

CARAMEL CAKE 

2 es-e-s 2 cups flour 

1 cur> suffar 1-2 teaspoonful soda 

1-2 cup butter 1 teaspoonful cream tartar 

1-2 cup milk 

Beat whites of eggs separately ; cream the yolks and 
butter, then beat in sugar ; dissolve soda in the milk and 
add, also flour and cream tartar. Bake in two sheets. 

Filling 

2 coffee-cups of powdered 2-3 cup milk 
sugar Butter size of walnut 

Boil all ten minutes, then beat till cold and creamy, 
and add one teaspoonful vanilla. Spread between sheets 

and on top. ^ t^ i. ^ 

^ J. Peabody. 



140 WELLESLET COOK BOOK 

CORNUCOPIAS FOR LUNCH 

3 eg-g-s Salt 

1 cup sugar 1 cup flour 
Stablespoonfulswater 2 teaspoonfuls yeast powder 

Beat eggs and sugar twenty minutes ; add other 

ingredients : beat five minutes. Bake in small round 

tins size of teacup saucer. When taken from the oven 

tie each one in form of cornucopia ; just before serving, 

remove strings and fill with whipped cream, and a square 

of currant jelly in centre. 

Mrs. W. L. Russell. 

CHARLOTTE RUSSE 

1-2 pint thick cream Sug-ar to taste 

2 eggs (the whites) Lemon or vanilla, to flavor 
2 teaspoonfuls gelatine 1 loaf sponge cake 

Whip the cream to a froth, also the whites of the 
eggs; add one cup water with the gelatine dissolved 
in it ; sweeten to taste, and flavor. 

Take a deep dish and line with small strips of sponge 
cake on the sides. Put a piece of white paper on the 
bottom of the dish, then pour in the cream. Let it 
remain till hardened. Turn out on a flat dish to serve. 

Mrs. Morrill. 

DRIED APPLE CAKE 

2 cupfuls apples 5 cupfuls flour 

2 cupfuls molasses 3 eggs 

1 cupful sugar 2 teaspoonfuls soda 

1 cupful sour milk Cloves and cinnamon 

1 cupful butter 

Soak the apples over night. Chop, and simmer in the 

molasses two hours. Stir the soda into the milk, beat 

the eggs, butter, and sugar together, and mix all together. 

Bake one hour. 

Mrs. Mary L. Whipple. 



WELLESLET COOK BOOK 141 

APPLE CAKE 

1 cup butter 1 teaspoonful cinnamon 

1 cup sug-ar 1-2 teaspoonful cloves and 
1 egg- allspice 

1 cup dried apple A little salt 

1 cup molasses 1-2 cup raisins, stoned, 
1-2 cup sour milk chopped, and made per- 

2 cups flour fectly dry 
1 teaspoonful soda 

Soak the dried apple over night. Chop it quite fine 

and simmer two hours in the molasses. Let it cool. 

Cream the butter and add to it the sugar, beating them 

together thoroughly. Beat the egg till very light, and 

add to the butter and sugar. Then put in the apple, 

molasses, and milk. Sift in lightly the flour, soda, and 

spices. Scatter the raisins into the mixture, beat 

thoroughly, and bake in a moderately hot oven about 

three-quarters of an hour. This may be frosted or not, 

as is liked. This receipt will make two thin or one^^ 

thick loaf. 

Mrs. Johrh Amiersoru. 



MARBLE CAKE 
White Part 

1^2 cup butter Whites oT 4 eg-g-s 

1 1-2 cups sugar 1-2 teaspoonful soda 

1-2 cup milk 1 teaspoonful cream tartar' 

2 1-2 cups flour Flavor -with lemon 

Dark Part 

1-2 cup butter Yolks of 4 eg-g-s 

1 cup brown sugar 1-2 teaspoonful soda 

1-2 cup molasses 1 teaspoonful cream tartar 

1-2 cup milk All kinds of spice 

2 cups flour 

Mrs. Albert Jennings. 



142 WELLE SLEY COOK BOOK. 



MARBLED CHOCOLATE CAKE 

1 cup butter 1 cup sw^eet milk 

3 cups flour 1-2 teaspoonful soda 

4 eg-gs 1 teaspoonful cream tartar 

2 cups powdered sugar 

Mix ingredients well, then take out one and one-half 

cups of the mixture, and mix with it enough chocolate, 

previously melted in a few drops of hot water, to give a 

dark color, then put in pans in separate layers and bake 

half an hour. 

Mrs. Parritt 

LEOPARD CAKE 

Whites of 6 egg's 6 tablespoonfuls milk 

2 cups sug-ar 1 teaspoonful soda 

4 cups pastry flour 2 teaspoonfuls cream tartar 

1 cup butter 

Sift the flour, cream of tartar, and soda together; 
cream the butter, add the sugar, and then add gradually 
the eggs, flour, and milk. 

The Dark Batter 

1 cup butter 1 pound raisins chopped 

1 cup sug-ar 1 pound currants 

1-2 teaspoonful cloves 1 cup molasses 

1 teaspoonful cinnamon Yolks of (i egg-s 

1 nutmeg- 4 cups pastry flour 

1 cup citron 1 teafepoonful soda 

Cream the butter, and mix the other ingredients in 
the order given above, adding the flour and eggs in small 
quantities at a time. Let the currants be well dried, 
and mixed with a little of the flour. Put the dark batter 
into two pans, and mix the light batter with it in spots. 
Bake two hours in a moderate oven. The flavor of this 
cake is improved by keeping it a few weeks. 

Mrs. E. A. Jennings. 



WELLESLEY COOK BOOK 143 

MARBLE CAKE 

1-2 cup of butter 1-2 cup of milk 

1 cup of sugar 1 3-4 cups pastry flour 

2 eggs, yolks and whites 1 teaspoonf ul Royal Baking 
beaten separately Powder 

Divide the mixture into halves ; to one half add 

1-2 cup raisins, stoned and 6 English walnuts, chopped 

chopped 2 tablespoonfuls molasses 

1-2 cup of currants 1 teaspoonful mixed mace 
Small piece citron, chopped and cassia 

Put the dark in the centre of the pan, and the light 

on either side. One loaf. 

Mrs. B. H. Sanborn. 

NED'S CAKE 

1 cup butter 1 teaspoonful soda mixed with 

2 cups sugar flour 

5 eggs 1 c^P each walnuts, raisms, 

1 cup milk and citron 

3 1-2 cups flour Extract of lemon, rose, and 

2 teaspoonfuls cream tartar bitter almond 

Cream butter and sugar, add beaten yolks of five 
eggs and whites of three, reserving the whites of two 
for frosting. Add the other ingredients, and lastly the 
nuts, raisins, and citron chopped. Bake in two deep 

pans. 

Frosting 

Whites of two eggs beaten stiff, one cup of confec- 
tioner's sugar ; beat smooth. 

Canterbury, Conn. 

VERMONT CURRANT CAKE 

1-2 cup butter 1-2 cup currants 

1 1-4 cups sugar 1-2 teaspoonful cream tartar 
1-2 cup milk 1-4 teaspoonful Dwight's Cow 

2 eggs Brand soda 

2 cups flour ^ . ^ . 

Mrs. A. Jennings. 



144 WELLESLEY COOK BOOK 



MARSHALL CAKE 

2 1-2 cups of sugar 4 eg-g-s 

1 cup of butter 1 teaspoonful soda 

1 cup of milk 1 teaspoonful cream tartar 

4 cups of flour 

Bake in three shallow tins, two cakes plain ; to the 
third add 

2 tablespoonfuls of molasses 1-4 lb. citron 

1 cup of raisins, stoned and Cloves, cinnamon, nutmeg, 

chopped etc., to suit the taste 
1 cup currants 

Wet this after it is baked with the white of an egg, 
and place between the light ones. Frost. 

Miss A. Rollins. 

COLD WATER CAKE 

1 cup of sugar 1 egg 

1-2 cup of molasses 1-2 teaspoonful of soda 

1-4 cup of butter A little spice of all kinds to 

1-2 cup of cold water suit taste 

1-2 cup of raisins 1 pint of flour 

Mary C. Seagrave. 

TUMBLER CAKE 

3 tumblers sugar 1 teaspoonful cream tartar 
1 tumbler butter 1-2 teaspoonful soda 

1 tumbler sweet milk 1 tumbler citron 

4 eggs Flavor with lemon 

5 tumblers flour 



C. J. Hanks. 



AUSTIN CAKE 



3 cups sugar 5 cups flour 

1 cup butter 1 1-2 cups chopped raisins 

2 eggs 1 teaspoonful Royal Baking 
2 tablespoonfuls molasses Powder 

1 1-2 cups milk 1 teaspoonful mixed spices 

Cream butter and sugar, sift baking powder and spice 
with the flour. Mix in the order given, and bake in two 
bread pans. 

Mrs. B. H. Sanborn. 



WELLES LEY COOK BOOK 146 

EMMARY CAKE 

1 cup of butter 1 tablespoonful cinnamon 

2 cups of sugar, and rub both 1 teaspoonful vanilla 
together until creamed 2 teaspoonfuls cloves 

6 eggs, beating the two parts 1 teaspoonful soda 
separately 2 teaspoonfuls cream tartar 

3 pints of sifted flour 1 lb. currants 

1-2 cup of molasses 1-2 lb. chopped raisins 

2 cups milk 1-2 lb. citron 

This will make three loaves of cake. 

N. L. 

ELECTION CAKE 

1 lb. raised bread dough 1-3 cup warm water, or milk 

(2 cups) 1-2 teaspoonful soda 

1 cup butter 1 1-2 cups flour 

1 1-2 cups sugar 1 cup raisins, stoned 

4 eggs 

Take from your bread dough which has been raised ; 
that which you wish to use, cut in small pieces and pour 
over it the milk in which the soda has been dissolved ; 
add the sugar, and the butter, melted, but ?iot inade hot. 
Mix these well together. 

Beat thoroughly the eggs and add to the mixture, also 
the flavoring you choose, the flour, and lastly the raisins. 

I use for this cake one teaspoonful extract of lemon 
and half a nutmeg. 

Put it in a bread pan, set it in a warm place, and let 

rise one and a half hours. Bake in a moderate oven the 

same length of time. 

Sophia B. Horr. 

RAISED CAKE 

Set a sponge, as for bread, and to a teacupful of 

sponge add 

1 teacupful butter 2 eggs 

1 teacupful sugar Spice, raisins, and currants 

Mrs. Edwin B. }Vebb. 



146 



WELLESLEY COOK BOOK 



RAISED CAKE 



1 ess 

1 1-2 cups sugar 
1-2 cup butter 
1-2 cup milk 
1-2 cup yeast 



2 1-2 cups flour 

1 cup chopped raisins 

1-2 teaspoonful Dwight's soda 

1 teaspoonful cream tartar 

Spices of all kinds 

Mrs. A. Jennings. 



FRUIT CAKE 



1 cup chopped pork 

1 cup molasses 

1 cup sugar 

1-2 cup water 

1-2 cup milk 

1 teaspoonful saleratus 



1-2 lb. raisins 
1 lb. currants 
1-4 lb. citron 
1 egg 

Flour enough, so the spoon 
will stand erect 



Mrs. Albert Jennings. 



FRUIT CAKE 



3 cups butter 

3 cups brown sugar 

3 cups molasses 

12 eggs 

8 cups flour 



2 lbs. currants 

2 lbs. citron 

All kinds of spices 

1 tablespoonful soda 

1 tablespoonful cream tartar 



Sift cream of tartar in flour, and mix soda in water, 

Bake three hours. 

Mrs. H. H. Brown. 



FRUIT CAKE 



1 cup butter 

2 cups sugar 

3 cups flour 
3 eggs 



Scant cup of milk 
1 cup of chopped raisins 
Citron, nutmeg, cloves, and 
spice 



The juice of an orange improves the flavor. 

Mrs. Caswell. 



PLAIN FRUIT CAKE 



2 cups sugar 

2 cups molasses 

2 eggs 

1 cup butter 

1 cup milk 

1 teaspoonful soda 

This makes two loaves. 



1 cup stoned raisins chopped 

1 cup currants 

1-4 lb. citron 

Spice, 1 teaspoonful each 

4 cups flour 



F. M. F. 



WELLESLEY COOK BOOK 147 



BLACK CAKE 

1 cup butter 1 cup currants 

1 cup sug-ar 1 cup citron 

1 cup molasses 2 teaspoonfuls cloves 

4 eggs 2 teaspoonfuls nutmeg 

4 cups flour 2 teaspoonfuls soda 

1 cup raisins . Frosting- or not 

Cream the butter, add the sugar ; beat the eggs to a 
stiff froth, add to butter and sugar ; then add the 
molasses, then the flour, saving enough to flour fruit. 
Stone and chop raisins, wash and dry currants, chop 
citron, or, if you like, cut in fine pieces. Add spices and 
soda. Bake three hours in moderate oven. 

H. E. C. 

HARRISON CAKE 

3 eg-g-s 5 cups flour 

2 cups molasses 1 teaspoonful soda *" 
1 cup sugar 1 lb. stoned raisins 

1 cup butter Nutmeg- and cinnamon 

1 cup milk 

Bake in a slow oven in two iron bread pans. 

Harriet Guardenier. 

HARRISON CAKE 

1 1-2 cups butter 1 lb. currants 

2 cups sug-ar 1-2 lb. citron 

1 cup molasses 5 cups flour 

6 eg-g-s 1 teaspoonful soda 

2 lbs. raisins Spice 

Miss Mary Mason. 

QUEEN'S CAKE 

1 lb. flour 1 g-ill of cream 

1 lb. sugar 5 egg-s • 

1-2 lb. butter Citron 

1 lb. raisins All kinds of spice 



1 lb, currants 

Bake slowly a long time. 



Mrs. a E. Shattuck. 



148 WELLESLET COOK BOOK 

FRUIT CAKE 

1-2 cup molasses 2 eg-g-s 

1 cup sugar 1 teaspoonful soda 
1-2 cup butter Fruit and spices 

2 cups flour 

E. O. K. 

FROSTING FOR ONE LARGE SHEET OF CAKE 

1 eg-g", the white 1 tablespoonful lemon juice 

1 teacupful powdered sugar 

The egg must not be beaten till the sugar is added. 
Put the white of the egg in a shallow dish and add the 
sugar by degrees, beating with a spoon; v/hen all the 
sugar has been used, add the lemon juice. 

If the white of the egg is large, it will require a very 
full cup of sugar ; if small, a scant cup. 

This will give a smooth, clear icing that will easily 
harcfen. 

Sophia B. Horr, 

FROSTING FOR CAKE 

White of one egg beaten to a stiff froth, one cup of 
powdered sugar. To this add one large apple grated, 
and beat twenty-five minutes. Flavor with vanilla. 

Mrs. S. C. Evans. 

CHOCOLATE FROSTING 

Three tablespoonfuls of grated chocolate, three table- 
spoonfuls boiling water, one-half teaspoonful vanilla, 
and powdered sugar to thicken. 

Mrs. Bcnj. H. Sanborn. 

CHOCOLATE FROSTING 

Beat the whites of two eggs to a stiff froth, add one 
and a half cups sugar and four tablespoonfuls of melted 
chocolate. 

Mrs. Parritt. 



WELLESLEY COOK BOOK 149 



BOSTON CREAM CAKES 

1-2 pint boiling- water 5 egg-s 

1 cup butter 1-4 teaspoonful soda 

2 cups flour 

Pour the boiling water over the butter, and while hot 
stir in the flour. When the whole is smooth and well 
scalded, set away to cool. When cold, break in the 
eggs. Stir until perfectly mixed, then add the soda. 

Drop mixture in buttered pan, tablespoonful in a 
place, and bake in quick oven. When done, fill the 
hollow cakes with cream. For cream use : 

1 pint milk 1 cup sug'ar 

1-2 cup flour 2 eg-g-s 

Stir together and heat until of the consistency of 

cream. Flavor with lemon. 

Mrs. Clements. 

CREAM CAKES 

1 cup water, 1-2 cup butter 1-4 teaspoonful Dwig-ht's 
1 cup flour Cow Brand soda 

3 eggs, yolks and whites 
beaten separately 

Put the water and butter in a saucepan and let it 
come to a boil, add the flour dry, beat until smooth, and 
remove from the fire. When cool, add the yolks and 
mix well, then stir in whites. Drop in tablespoonfuls, 
on buttered tins, about three inches apart. 

Bake from twenty to thirty minutes. Split when 
cool and fill with cream. 

Cream for Cream Cakes 

1-2 pint milk 1 tablespoonful flour 

2 tablespoonfuls sugar 1 e^s, a little salt 

Wet the flour in a little cold milk and cook in the 

boiling milk five minutes, add q^^ and sugar, and cook 

one minute. When cool flavor. 



160 WELLESLEY COOK BOOK 

ECLAIRS 

Bake the cream cake paste in oblong pieces. When 
cool split and fill with same cream. Ice with chocolate 
or vanilla frosting. 

Mrs. B. H. Sanborn. 

CARAMEL FROSTING 

1 cup sugar 1 square Baker's chocolate 

1 tablespoonful water scraped fine 

Simmer gently twenty minutes, being careful not to 
let it burn. Spread on the cake while hot. 

A. Rollins. 

CARAMEL FROSTING 

Two cups of sugar, two-thirds cup of milk, piece of 
butter half the size of an egg ; boil together ten min- 
utes. Flavor and beat till cool. Melt two squares of 
chocolate and spread on top. 

A. a W. 

GOOD GINGERBREAD 

2-3 cup molasses 1 teaspoonful soda 

2-3 cup sugar 1 teaspoonful cinnamon 

2-3 cup butter 2 teaspoonfuls ginger 

1 egg 2 1-2 cups flour 
1 cup sour milk 

Put on the back of the range where it will warm, but 
not get hot, a dish containing the molasses, sugar, butter, 
spice, and a little salt, which you can stir now and then. 

When you are ready to bake your gingerbread, add 
one Qgg well beaten, the milk in which the soda has 
been dissolved, and then the flour. 

This will make one good loaf, baked in the bread pan. 

Time for baking, one hour, 

Sophia B. Horr. 



WELLESLEY COOK BOOK. 151 

BOSTON HARD GINGERBREAD 

1 lb. butter 2 lbs. flour , 

1 1-2 lbs. sugar 2 tablespoonfuls ginger 

5 eggs 
Cream together the butter and sugar, beat the eggs, 
and then add; also ginger to taste, and flour to roll very 

thin. . 

This is the very old-fashioned recipe called Gore (gin- 
gerbread. If put in an air-tight tin box it will keep 

good for several months. ^ , . „ rr 

^ Sophia B. Horr. 

PATENT GINGERBREAD 

3 cups flour 1 cup milk 

1 r»nT^ <5ne-ar 1 cup molasses 

i ?easpSSnf ul soda 1-2 tablespoonful cloves 



1 tablespoonful cinnamon 
Fruit if you choose. 



Mrs. Bacon. 



FAIRY GINGERBREAD 

1 cup molasses 1 teaspoonful Dwight's Cow 

1 r.nT^ csnp-flr Brand soda 

i-2 cup butter, filled with Ginger to taste ; pinch of salt 

boiling water Flour to mix stiff 

Stir molasses, sugar, ginger, and salt together, then 
add soda, and while foaming add hot water and butter. 
The dough should be rolled out verij thin. 

K. L. Burrill. 

HARD GINGERBREAD 

1 cur> of sugar 1 teaspoonful of saleratus 

1 cSp of buUer 1 tablespoonful of ginger 

1-3 cup of molasses Flour enough to roll 

1-2 cup of sour milk 

KOLL thill, and bake quickly. Cut in oblong pieces 
while warm. Misa A. BolUm. 



152 WELLESLEY COOK BOOK 



MOLASSES GINGERBREAD 

2 cups molasses 1 teaspoonful cinnamon 

1 cup butter 1 cup boiling' -water -with two 

Nutmeg- teaspoonf uls soda dissolved 

3 1-2 cups flour in it 



1 teaspoonful cloves 



Mrs. Parritt. 



HARD GINGERBREAD 



1 cup of butter 1-2 teaspoonful Dwight's Cow 

2 cups of sugar Brand soda 

1 ess^ 3-4 cup of milk Flour to make rather a stiff 

1 teaspoonful ginger or nut- dough 
meg 

Beat the butter to a cream. Add the sugar, then the 
well-beaten Q^g. Dissolve soda in the milk. Add the 
spice, and roll very thin. 

H. E. C. 

MOLASSES COOKIES 

1 cup molasses 1 teaspoonful Dwight's Cow 

1-2 cup sugar Brand soda 

1-2 cup lard 1 teaspoonful salt 

2-3 cup cold water 1 teaspoonful ginger 

Beat together sugar and lard, add molasses, water, 
soda dissolved, ginger, and salt. Koll with as little flour 
as possible, cut out, and bake in rather a hot oven. 

H. E. C. 

COOKIES 

1 cup sugar 1 teaspoonful cream of tartar 

1-2 cup butter 1 scant teaspoonful soda 

1 egg Flour to roll 
1-2 cup milk 

Cream the butter and sugar, add the egg well beaten, 
then one cup or more of flour with one teaspoonful of 
cream of tartar sifted with it, then add the milk in 
which has been dissolved the soda. Flavor, and add 
flour to roll, 

Mrs. H. W. F. T. 



WELLESLEY COOK BOOK 153 

CHOCOLATE COOKIES 

2 eg-g-s 1-2 cake chocolate 

2-3 cup butter 1 teaspoonful Dwig-ht's soda 

2 teaspoonfuls cream tartar Flour enoug-h to roll 

1 1-2 cups sugar 

Mrs. Albert Jennings. 

SUGAR SNAPS 

1 cup sugar 1-2 teaspoonful Dwight's Cow 

2-3 cup butter Brand soda 

1 ess 1 teaspoonful cream tartar 

4 tablespoonfuls milk Lemon or vanilla 

Flour to roll stiff 

Mrs. L. M. Grant. 
HAMLETS 

Two eggs, one and one-half cnps of sugar, one-half 
cup each of raisins and currants, two-thirds cup of but- 
ter, one teaspoonful each of cinnamon, clove, and nut- 
meg, one teaspoonful soda dissolved in two tablespoon- 
fuls milk, make very stiff with flour. Take pieces of 
dough a little larger than English walnuts and roll into 
balls, placing them three inches apart in buttered pans. 
The hands must be well floured. These are best to 
stand several weeks, till moist like fruit cake. 

Mrs. Stoddard. 
HERMIT CAKES 

1 1-2 cups sugar 1 tablespoonful cinnamon 

1 cup butter 1 tablespoonful cloves 

2 eggs 1 tablespoonful nutmeg' 
1 tablespoonful milk 1 cup currants 

1 teaspoonful Dwight's Cow Flour to roll th^ 
Brand soda Sprinkle with sugar 

Mrs. N. H. Dadmun. 

SPICE COOKIES 

1 coffee-cup lard and butter 1 teaspoonful cloves 

1 coffee-cup sugar 1-2 teaspoonful Dwight's Cow 

1 coffee-cup molasses Brand soda dissolved in the 

1-2 cup boiling hot w^ater w^ater 

1 tablespoonful ging-er Flour to roll stiff 

Mrs. Lewis M. Grant. 



154 V/ELLESLEY COOK BOOK 

GINGER SNAPS (without butter) 

2 egg's well beaten 1 teaspoonful Dwight's 

1 cup of brown sugar Cow Brand soda 

1 teaspoonful of ginger Flour to roll out 
1 cup of molasses boiled 

Mix in the order given, bake in a quick oven. 

Mrs. B. H. Sanborn. 

GINGER SNAPS 

1 1-2 cups molasses 1 tablespoonful ginger 

1-2 cup sugar 1 tablespoonful vinegar 

1 cup butter 1 teaspoonful Dwight's Cow 
1-2 teaspoonful salt Brand soda 

As much flour as can be worked in. Roll thin, bake 

on buttered tins. 

Mrs. W. L. Russell. 

VANILLA WAFERS 

1 cup sugar 1 teaspoonful vanilla 

2-3 cup butter 1-4 teaspoonful soda 

1 egg 1-2 teaspoonful cream tartar 

4 tablespoonfuls milk Flour to roll thin 

3/rs. iV. H. Badmun. 

BROOKLYN FLORENTINES 

Make a thin, rich paste, and line a tin. Over this 

spread a layer of jelly, and bake. Then beat up the 

whites of two eggs, and pour over the top. Over this 

sprinkle cocoanut or minced almonds, and powdered 

sugar. Put into oven and brown. When done, cut in 

diamonds. 

Mrs. B. H. Sanborn. 

GRUMMETS 

1 cup sugar 1-2 teaspoonful saleratus 
3-4 cup butter 1 cup chopped raisins 

2 eggs Spices of all kinds 

Beat butter and sugar together, add eggs, ^v^ll beaten, 

then spice and raisins. Mix saleratus in flour. Flour 

enough to roll thin like cookies. 

M. Brown. 



WELLESLEY COOK BOOK 155 



ICE CREAM AND SHERBET 

"To be good be useful ; to be useful always be making 
something good." 

ICE CREAM 

2 quarts milk 1 small cup flour 

1 quart cream 3 cups sugar 

Boil the milk and stir in the flour wet in a little cold 

milk. Boil ten minutes ; when cold, add cream and 

sugar, and flavor to taste. Strain through a fine strainer 

and freeze. 

Mrs. Burrill. 

BROOKLYN PEACH ICE CREAM 

To one quart of peaches take one quart of milk, 
sweeten the milk ver]/ sweet and freeze. When frozen, 
stir in the peaches, which have previously been sliced 
and sweetened, then pack. 

Mrs. Benj. H. Sanborn. 

VANILLA ICE CREAM 

For two quarts of vanilla ice cream, boil two teacupfuls 
of milk in a milk boiler, or in a basin set inside of a pan of 
water. Beat the yolks of two eggs, stir them in the boil- 
ing milk, and continue stirring until it thickens like cus- 
tard. When cool, add the whites of four eggs, previously 
beaten to a stiff froth, and one coffee-cupful of pulverized 



156 WELLESLEY COOK BOOK 

sugar. Put on the ice. When ready for freezing, add 
one quart of rich cream, three teaspoonfuls extract of 
vanilla, and freeze. 

CHOCOLATE ICE CREAM 

Use the recipe given above, adding to the milk, be- 
fore boiling, from two to four ounces grated chocolate. 

ALMOND ICE CREAM 

Use the same recipe as for vanilla ice cream, except 
use extract of bitter almond for flavoring. 

TUTTI FRUTTI ICE CREAM 

Make same as ordinary ice cream, and as soon as it 
begins to thicken in the freezer, add candied cherries to 
the proportion of about six ounces of cherries to two 
quarts of cream. Then cover the freezer can and turn 
the crank so as to mix the cherries in, and beat the cream 
up light, until it is frozen. Mrs. Benj. H. Sanborn. 



FROZEN APRICOTS 

1 can apricots 1 quart water 

1 large pint sugar 1 pint whipped cream 

Cut the apricots into small pieces, add the sugar and 

water, and freeze. When nearly frozen, add the cream. 

Mrs. Mary L. Whipple. 

CAFE PARFAIT 

1 pint of cream 1 cup of coffee 2-3 cup sugar 

Dissolve sugar in the coffee. Whip the cream 
thoroughly with an egg-beater, and pour in the coffee 
and sugar. Turn into a mould, pack in ice and salt. 
Let it stand two hours. This makes a pretty dish when 
the juice of strawberries is used instead of the coffee. 
More time will be required for freezing the strawberry. 

Miss Hall. 



WELLESLEY COOK BOOK 157 

FROZEN PEACHES 

1 can peaches 1 quart hot water 

1 heaping pint sugar 2 cups whipped cream 

Boil the sugar and water together twelve minutes; 

then add the peaches, and cook twenty minutes longer. 

Then rub through a sieve and cool. Freeze. When 

nearly frozen, remove the cover and add the cream. Let 

stand one hour before serving. Apricots may be used 

instead of peaches. 

Pauline Smith. 

FRUIT CREAM 

1-2 can apricots 3 lemons 

3 bananas 3 cups sugar 

3 orang-es 3 cups water 

Put a puree strainer or sieve over a granite pan or 

bowl, and turn in the apricots and rub all but skins 

through. Peel bananas and sift pulp. Squeeze oranges 

and lemons and strain into fruit pulp, add sugar, and, 

when dissolved, freeze as usual. 

Mrs, Spear. 

MILK SHERBET 

1 quart milk 2 cupfuls sugar 

Freeze. Then mix in the juice of three lemons. 

Mrs. Mary L. Whipple.. 

STRAWBERRY or BLACKBERRY SHERBET 

1 quart berries, or enough to 1 pint water 

make 1 pint juice 1 lemon 

1 pint sugar 
Mash berries, add sugar, and, after the sugar is dis- 
solved, add water and lemon juice. Press through fine 
cheese-cloth and freeze. Vary sugar as fruit requires. 
All fresh fruits are improved by the addition of a lemon. 

Mrs. Spear. 



158 WELLESLET COOK BOOK. 

POMEGRANATE SHERBET 

Dissolve as much gelatine as you can heap on a large 

tablespoon in boiling water. To one quart of water add 

one and one-half cups of sugar, and the juice of eight 

blood-oranges. Strain and freeze. 

A. M. Wilson. 

GRAPE SHERBET 

2 lbs. Concord grapes 1 quart water 

2 lemons 1 lb. sugar 

Lay a square of cheese-cloth over a large bowl ; put 

in washed grapes and mash with wooden masher. 

Squeeze out all juice and add equal amount of cold 

water, the lemon juice, and sugar. Use sugar enough 

to make quite sweet. Freeze as usual. 

Mrs. Spear. 

RASPBERRY SHERBET 

1 tablespoonful Boston Crys- 2 cups raspberry jam 

tal Gelatine 1 cup sugar 

1 quart boiling -water 1-4 cup cold -water 
1 lemon 

Soak the gelatine in the cold water ten minutes. Add 

half the boiling water and the sugar. Soak the jam in 

half the boiling water. Mix all together, add the lemon 

juice. Strain and freeze. 

Mrs. Benj. H. Sanborn. 

LEMON SHERBET 

1 tablespoonful Crystal Gela- 1 pint sugar 

tine Juice of 6 lemons 

1 quart -water 

Soak the gelatine in a little of the cold water for ten 
minutes, and when softened add remainder of the water, 
the sugar and lemon juice. Strain when all is dissolved, 
and then freeze. 

If lemons are very juicy, five will be sufficient. 

J. Peabody. 



WELLESLEY COOK BOOK 159 



CONFECTIONERY 

"Prove all; hold fast that which is good." 

CREAM CANDY 

2 cups sugar 1 small teaspoonful cream 

1 cup -water tartar 

1 teaspoonful butter 1 teaspoonful vanilla 

Boil, without stirring in the least, until it will harden 
in cold water. After it is taken off the stove, stir in the 
vanilla, and turn out on a greased platter. Begin to pull 

as soon as you can handle it. 

Mrs. Pomeroy. 

NUT CANDY 

2 cups molasses, " New 3-4 cup sugar 
Orleans " Coffee-cup of walnut meats 

Boil sugar and molasses until it will harden quickly 

in water. Add a piece of butter and the walnut meats 

just before removing from the fire. Pour in shallow pans 

and check with knife. 

Mrs. C. E. Shattuck. 

VINEGAR CANDY 

Boil together for twenty minutes two cups of white 
sugar and one of vinegar. When done, pour into shallow 
pan's, cool, and mark into half-inch squares, or when 
half cool pull, making very white candy. 

Miss Lucy White. 



160 WELLE SLEY COOK BOOK 

HOREHOUND CANDY 

Boil two ounces of dried horehound in a pint and a 
half of water for about half an hour. Strain, and add 
three and a half pounds brown sugar. Boil over a hot 
fire until it is sufficiently hard. Pour out in flat, well- 
buttered tin trays, and mark into small squares with a 
knife as soon as it is cool enough to retain its shape. 

Miss Lucy White. 

MAPLE SUGAR CANDY 

This may be made of the syrup or the sugar. In 
either case the best and clearest should be used. If the 
syrup is used, put it to boil just as you would molasses. 
Boil it fast until it begins to get thick. Take a little 
on a sauce-plate and stir ; if it gi^ains quickly it is 
done. Remove from the fire, and stir until it commences 
to grain, and pour into buttered pans or small muffin 
tins. English walnuts or hutternuts are an addition. 

Wolcott, Vermont. 

BUTTER SCOTCH 

1 cupful sugar 1 tablespoonful vinegar 

1 cupful molasses A pinch of soda 

1-2 cupful butter, nearly 

Boil until done. When cold, cut into squares. Wrap 

in paraffine paper. 

Mrs. Mary L. Whipple. 

ALMOND CAKE 

Whites of five eggs, stir in sugar enough to make it 

stiff, with just a little pinch of flour, half a pound of 

almonds scalded and pounded ; drop on buttered tins, 

and bake in a quick oven. 

Mrs. Parrltt. 



WELLESLEY COOK BOOK 161 

CREAM WALNUTS 

White of one egg, tablesijoonful of cream, confec- 
tioner's sugar enough to make a stiff batter, then roll 
into fairly good-sized balls. Flavor according to taste, 
then take one pound English walnuts, halve them, and 
put one half on each side of the cream, put in a cool 
place to harden. May Selfe. 

NUT CAKES 

One pound powdered sugar, whites of six eggs beaten 
to a stiff froth. One and one-fourth pounds almonds 
pounded fine in a mortar or linen cloth. Drop on but- 
tered tins and bake, in a quick oven. 

NUTS AND FRUIT GLACE 

2 cup sug-ar 1 cup water 

Boil slowly, without stirring, half an hour. Dip the 
end of a skewer into the syrup and then into cold water. 
If the thread formed is brittle, the syrup is done. Set 
the saucepan into boiling water to keep the syrup from 
candying. Take the prepared nuts or fruit on the point 
of a large needle, dip them into the syrup, and lay on 
buttered plates to cool. English walnuts are very nice 
prepared in this way. Oranges should be divided into 
sections without breaking the skin. 

Mrs. Benj. H. Sanborn. 

CHOCOLATE CAKES 
Whites of eight eggs, one pound powdered sugar, 
six ounces of flour. One-half pound of sweet chocolate, 
grated. Beat the whites stiff, add the sugar little at a 
time, then chocolate, then flour. Grease the tins with 
lard. Drop the mixture in small round balls, and bake 
in a very quick oven, otherwise they become thin and 
hard. 



162 WELLESLEY COOK BOOK 

CHOCOLATE PUFFS 

Beat well the whites of two eggs, then add half a 

pound of sugar. Scrape fine one pound and a half of 

chocolate, dredge with flour, mixing well. Add this to 

the eggs and sugar. Place upon buttered tins thin spots 

of powdered sugar about the size of half a dollar, pile 

a part of the mixture upon each spot, and sift over 

them fine white sugar. Bake a few minutes in a quick 

oven. 

Mrs. Clements. 

CARAMELS 

1 cup Bakers chocolate 1 teaspoonful flour 

2 cups molasses Good-sized piece of butter 
2 cups sugar 1 teaspoonful soda 

1 cup milk 

G-KATE chocolate fine. When nearly done stir in 
soda. 

When partly cool cut in checks. 

CARAMELS 

1-2 cup butter 1 cup grated chocolate 

2 cups milk 3 cups white sugar 

Put butter and milk on together ; when they boil 
briskly, add the sugar ; when that boils, add chocolate, 
and boil, stirring frequently, until it is stiff and slightly 
granulated, which will take half an hour or more. 

F. E. Lord. 

COCOANUT CARAMELS 

One pint milk, butter size of egg, one cocoanut grated 
fine (or desiccated cocoanut may be used), three pounds 
of white sugar, two teaspoonfuls lemon, boil slowly 
until stiff, beat to a cream, pour in shallow pans, and 
when partly cold cat in squares. 

Miss Lucy White. 



WELLESLEY COOK LOOK 163 



ORIENTAL DISHES 

SARMAS 

1-2 cup of rice 2 lbs. beef chopped very fine 

Boil the rice, mix with the chopped beef. Add a 
little butter, salt and pepper to taste. Take fresh grape 
leaves and put them in boiling water until tender. In 
each leaf roll a little of the beef and rice, making small 
oval balls, with the ends closed. Stew them in water 
sufficient to cover. Put a plate on them while stewing, 
to keep them from floating. If made with lamb instead 
of beef, no butter is needed. 

CHESTNUT STEW 

2 quarts chestnuts 3 lbs. beef 

Slit the chestnut shells, and roast until soft. Re- 
move the shells. Cut the beef in inch squares, and 
brown in butter as for hash. Add a little water, flour, 
butter, and salt to make a gravy. Put in the roasted 
chestnuts and stew for about half an hour. 

QUINCE AND MEAT 

Take two good-sized quinces to two pounds beef. 

Pare the quinces and cut them in slices. 

Cut the beef in squares about an inch in size, and 
brown it in butter as for hash. Add a little water, flour, 
butter, and salt to make a gravy. Put the quinces in, 
and stew until soft. 



164 WELLESLEY COOK BOOK 

SUMMER-SQUASH DOLMAS 

Take one-half cup rice to two pounds beef. Chop 
the beef fine; boil the rice and mix with the beef. 
Salt and pepper to taste. 

Take out the inside of the squashes and fill with the 
rice and meat, putting a little butter in each. 

Stew till the squashes are soft. If made with lamb, 
no butter is needed. 

These may be eaten alone or with lemon sauce. 

Take the yolks of five eggs to the juice of three 
lemons. Beat the yolks well and stir in the lemon juice. 
Pour over the squash dolmas. 

PILAF 

Two cups broth to one cup rice. When the broth 
comes to boiling point put in the rice. Salt to taste. 

Boil the rice soft, without stirring, until all the broth 
is absorbed and leaves the rice only. Eat with stewed 
tomatoes. 

DROP CAKES 

1 cup sug-ar 1 teaspoonful baking powder 

1 cup cream Flour enoug-h to drop from 

1 eg-g- spoon 

Take one-half cup pulverized sugar and one even 

tablespoonful cinnamon, and mix them together. Drop 

the cakes into the cinnamon and sugar, and put them 

carefully into a greased pan. Bake as long as cookies. 

Agnes M. Lord, Smyrna. 



WELLESLEY COOK BOOK 165 



SAUCE AND PICKLES 

"Mingle, mingle, mingle. 
You that mingle may. ' ' 

RHUBARB SAUCE 

4 lbs rhubarb (wine) 2 cups sugar 

Cut up the rhubarb (leave the skin ou), and put into 

an earthen dish with the sugar. Cover tightl}^ and cook 

in a moderately hot oven until soft, testing with a straw. 

The sauce needs to be watched, as it may become too 

brown, and that would spoil the flavor, which is delicious 

when the red rhubarb is used. 

Mrs. E. P. Anderson. 

CRANBERRY SAUCE 

1 quart cranberries 1 pint water 1 pint sugar 

Boil cranberries in water six minutes, add sugar, boil 

six minutes longer. 

Mrs. W. L. Russell, 

CRANBERRY SAUCE 

3 pints of cranberries 1 1-2 pints of sugar 1 pint water 
Boll eight minutes, cool in the kettle. 

Miss Lucy White. 

CURRANT JELLY (Never-failing) 

Pick the fruit as soon as ripe (not dead-ripe). Look 
over carefully, but do not remove the stems ; crush a 
little of the fruit that it may not stick to the kettle. 



166 WELLESLEY COOK BOOK 

Cook slowly at first, then bring to a boil and cook until 
soft, strain through fine cheese-cloth and boil ten min- 
utes, and measure the juice ; add an equal measure of 
sugar which has been thoroughly heated in the oven ; 
boil ten minutes, skimming as it boils. 

Mrs. Benj. H. Sanborn. 

CURRANT JELLY 

One pint of juice, one pound of sugar, put the cur- 
rants into the oven to warm, then press out the juice. 
Stir the sugar and juice together until the sugar is 
thoroughly dissolved, then put on the stove and stir 
about fifteen minutes, not letting it boil. 

Miss Lucy White. 

ORANGE MARMALADE 

2 1-2 dozen oranges 12 lbs. coffee-crush sugar 

Pare oranges very thin, cover the parings with water 
and boil until tender, skim them out and cut into fine 
shreds, and put them back in the water with the juice 
and pulp of the oranges, add the sugar, and boil three- 
quarters of an hour; do not put in seeds or skins or 
white part of peel. Two and one-half dozen should 
weigh a little over eight pounds. 

A. M. C. 
PRESERVED CURRANTS 
5 lbs. currants 1 lb. seeded raisins 1 teacup water 

To each pound of fruit allow three-fourths of a pound 
of sugar. 

Pick currants from the stem, put currants, sugar, and 
raisins all in kettle together, with one cup of water to 
prevent burning until sugar is dissolved, and cook ten 
or fifteen minutes. 

L. T. Winsor. 



WELLESLEY COOK BOOK 167 



ONE, TWO, THREE JAM 

2 lbs. ripe currants 4 lbs. sug-ar 

3 lbs. raisins 6 oranges 
1 pint currant juice 

Seed the raisins and chop them. Chop rather fine 

the peel of four of the oranges. Cook all together till 

soft. 

M7'S. Burrill. 

SPICED TOMATO 

7 lbs peeled and sliced tomato 2 1-2 tablespoonfuls ground 
5 lbs. sugar (crushed) cloves 

2 1-2 tablespoonfuls ground 1 pint good vinegar 
cinnamon 

Boil slowly from two to three hours. Keeps well 

without being sealed. 

P. W. Dana. 

SPICED CURRANTS 

8 quarts currants (stemmed) 3 teaspoonfuls ground cinna- 
4 quarts brown sugar mon 

1 1-2 pints cider vinegar 2 nutmegs grated 

2 teaspoonfuls ground clove 

Let the pickle come to boiling, put in the currants, 

and boil slowly, stirring enough to prevent burning, for 

two hours, or until thickened as desired. Recipe fills 

about eight quart cans. 

Mary E. Eorton. 

SPICED CURRANTS 

5 quarts currants 1 teaspoonful ground cloves 

3 lbs. bro-wn sugar 1 teaspoonful ground cinna- 

1 pint vinegar mon 

Pick currants from the stems, and boil all together 
three-quarters of an hour. Take out the currants, and 
boil the syrup a quarter of an hour longer. 

L. T. Winsor. 



168 WELLE SLEY COOK BOOK 



SPICED CURRANTS 

7 lbs. fruit 1 tablespoonful cinnamon, 

4 lbs. sug-ar cloves, allspice 

1 pint vineg-ar 

Boil slowly two hours or more. 

Mrs. C. E. Shattuck. 



BLACKBERRY SYRUP 

2 qts. blackberry juice 1-2 oz. each of nutmeg-, cinna- 

1 lb. loaf sug-ar mon, and allspice 

1-4 oz. cloves 1 cup water 

Pulverize the spice and boil fifteen minutes. 
An excellent corrective for the stomach and bowels. 

Mrs. GoodelL 

PICKLED QUINCES 

For 2 lbs. fruit allow 1-3 a broken, not grated, 

1 1-2 lbs. sug-ar nutmeg- 

1 quart vineg-ar A handful stick cinnamon 
A little whole clove 

Let the spices and sugar boil, covered, a short time in 

the vinegar, then lay in the fruit — not too much at a 

time, lest some pieces get overdone and broken — cover, 

watch, and as fast as tender take out each piece with 

spoon and lay in jar, draining carefully from pickle. 

When all are done, let the pickle become as thick as 

desired, then pour over the fruit until that is well 

covered. 

Mary E. Horton. 

RASPBERRY SHRUB 

Place red raspberries in a stone jar, cover them with 
good vinegar, let them stand over night. Next morn- 
ing strain, and to one pint of juice add onC' pint of 
sugar. Boil ten minutes, and bottle while hot. 

Mrs. H, H. Brown. 



WELLESLEY COOK BOOK 169 

RASPBERRY SHRUB 

To six quarts of berries add one quart of vinegar. 
Let them stand twenty-four hours, then strain through 
cheese-cloth. To one pint juice add one pound sugar. 
Heat slowly, allowing it to boil five or ten minutes. 
When cold, bottle for use. This makes a very cooling 
drink by adding tv»^o tablespoonfuls of the shrub and one 
teaspoonful of sugar to a glass of water. 

Mrs. Benj. H. Sanborn. 

PEAR CHIPS 

8 lbs. pears, pared and quar- 1-4 lb. preserved ginger 

tered 1-2 dozen lemons 

6 lbs. sugar 

Let the pears, sugar, and ginger stand over night. In 
the morning add sliced lemons. Cook one-half hour. 

A. M. a 

SWEET PICKLE PEARS 

Boil ten pounds pears until soft ; make a syrup of two 

pounds sugar, one quart vinegar. 

Miss Mary Mason. 

SWEET PICKLE PEARS 

7 lbs. pears 1-2 oz whole cloves 

1 qt. vinegar 1-2 oz. -whole allspice 

3 1-2 lbs. brown sugar 1-2 oz. stick cinnamon 

Remove the skins from the pears and steam until 
tender. Put the vinegar and sugar into a saucepan, add 
the spices and heat. When boiling hot, pour over the 
pears. Let them stand twenty-four hours. Then drain 
off the syrup, scald, and return to jar. Repeat this once 
more, the last time scalding both fruit and syrup. 

Mrs. C. E. S/tattuck. 



170 WELLESLEY COOK BOOK. 

GRAPE KETCHUP 

5 pints grapes 2 tablespoonfuls cinnamon 

1 pint vinegar 1 tablespoonful cloves 

2 pints brown sugar 1 teaspoonful salt 

1-2 tablespoonful allspice A little cayenne pepper 

Cook the grapes until soft, and sift through a colan- 
der. Add the other ingredients, and boil until the ketch- 
up is thick. 

Mrs. E. A. Jennings. 

GRAPE KETCHUP 

5 lbs. grapes 1-2 teaspoonful cloves 

2 1-2 lbs. sugar 1-2 teaspoonful allspice 

1 teaspoonful ground cinna- 1-4 teaspoonful pepper 

mon 1-4 teaspoonful salt 

Boil the grapes with a little more water than enough 
to cover them, until quite soft. Strain or rub through a 
sieve to get out seeds. Add sugar and spices, and boil 
until sufficiently thick. Bottle and seal. 

Mrs. E. P. Anderson. 



SWEET CUCUMBER PICKLE 

Slice cucumbers about one-fourth inch thick. The 
cucumbers should be gathered when about an inch and a 
half in diameter. After slicing them crosswise, put 
them in a strong brine, where they will keep, if the brine 
is strong enough to hold up an egg, for several months, 
or until cold weather makes preserving a pleasant occu- 
pation. 

Soak the sliced cucumbers in cold water till the salt is 
out, changing the water several times. Then boil one 
hour in strong alum water. Then soak out the alum 
taste in cold water, which will require several days 
changing the water two or three times a day. Make a 



WELLESLEY COOK BOOK 171 

syrup, one quart good vinegar, one pint water, three 

pounds sugar to four pounds cucumber, cinnamon, cloves, 

and mace to taste. Boil the cucumbers in this syrup till 

it is rich, clear, and thick. Some sliced ginger preserved 

with it is an improvement. 

Knoxville, Tenn. 

^ TOMATO KETCHUP 

Wash and slice the tomatoes, and when well cooked, 
sift them, and to every gallon of juice add two table- 
spoonfuls of table salt, two tablespoonfuls of cassia, two 
tablespoonfuls of ground mace, one teaspoonful of 
cayenne pepper, one teacup of white sugar, and boil 
down one-third. When nearly done, add one pint of 
vinegar to every gallon of tomatoes. 

CHILI SAUCE 

Take thirty ripe tomatoes, peel them, three onions, 
three peppers, ripe ones, chop the onions and peppers 
very fine. Add to the partially cooked tomatoes a table- 
spoonful each of allspice, cloves, cinnamon, two table- 
spoonfuls of salt, one cup sugar, and a quart of vinegar. 
Cook thoroughly. Bottle, cork, and seal. 

3Iiss Mary Mason. 

TOMATO CHOW CHOW 

One peck tomatoes, green, sliced, six green peppers, 
four onions, one cup salt, stirred together, and stand over 
night; pour off the water, put them in a kettle with 
vinegar enough to cover them, one cup grated horse- 
radish, one cup sugar, one tablespoonful clove, cinnamon, 

allspice. Cook until soft. 

Miss Mary Mason. 



172 WELLESLET COOK BOOK. 

CHOW CHOW 

To one bushel green tomatoes chopped fine, use one 
teacupful salt. Let them stand over night. In the 
morning strain off the brine. To one gallon of tomatoes 
allow two quarts vinegar, two peppers, one-third tea- 
spoonful red pepper, one-half teaspoonful black pepper, 
and two green peppers chopped fine, one teaspoonful 
each of cinnamon, cloves, and allspice, one ounce celery 
seed, one ounce white mustard seed, and one teacupful 
brown sugar. Boil till tender, and can. 

Harriet Guardenier. 

TO PREPARE BELL PEPPERS 

Take out the stem and seeds, and put the peppers in a 

brine made from two quarts salt to about eight quarts 

water. Let them remain nine days in the brine, then 

take them out, and into each pepper put a few cloves, a 

little allspice and mustard seed, and some horseradish. 

Last of all an onion. Scald your vinegar and pour on 

them boiling hot. 

Mrs. Martha Clark. 

SPANISH PICKLE 

Eight quarts green tomatoes, chopped and salted. Let 

them stand twenty-four hours, then strain off the water. 

Add three pints each of onions and green peppers chopped, 

one cup of black mustard seed, two tablespoonfuls each 

ground allspice, cloves, three tablespoonfuls ginger, one 

of mace, two of celery seed, one coffee-cup brown sugar. 

Just cover with vinegar. Some prefer to boil it ten or 

fifteen minutes. 

Mrs. C. E. Shattuck. 



WELLESLEY COOK BOOK 173 

CUCUMBER PICKLES 

2 gallons vinegar, cold 2 oz. whole black pepper 

1-4 lb. ground mustard 1 oz. whole allspice 

1-4 lb. fine salt 1 oz. whole cloves 

2 oz. white mustard seed Onions, if you like 

Wash the cucumbers and wipe them and throw into 
the mixture. Stir them occasionally. They work in a 
few daySj and will keep a long time. 

M. Brown, 



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WELLESLEY and SO. NATICK. 

176 



WELLESLEY COOK BOOK 177 



FRAGMENTS AND MISCELLANEOUS 
HINTS 

" Therefore, in everything, 'gather up the fragments that nothing 
be lost. ' " 

Save all broken pieces and crusts of bread that can- 
not be used for toast, and dry them in a moderate oven. 
When well dried pound in a mortar and sift, and put 
away in a glass jar to be used in scallops, croquettes, 
dressings, or steamed puddings. 

Cold mashed potatoes, moistened with cream, and 
made in cakes and browned in the spider, are a good 
breakfast or lunch dish. 

Cold boiled potatoes made into salad, or cooked Lyon- 
naise, are also good for lunches. 

Save celery tops for use in salads, in soups or stews. 

Fragments of mashed turnips, not enough for another 
meal, are just the thing for vegetable soups ; lima beans 
and canned peas may be pressed through the colander 
and added to the soup stock. 

Every bone should be guarded with jealous care, and 
is the foundation for numberless delicious soups. The 
ends of a rib roast, the tough end of a steak and of a 



178 WELLESLEY COOK BOOK. 

mutton chop are so much addition to the wealth of your 
soup-kettle. 

Skim carefully the surface of your soup, trim your 
chops and steaks, and save every fragment of fat, which 
should be clarified and strained and used in place of 
lard. 

Fragments of cold roast chicken, turkey, veal, or 
lamb, are appetizing if made into croquettes, scallops, 
or finely minced and seasoned and served on toast gar- 
nished by parsley or celery tops. 

When rice is used as a vegetable and left over, eggs 
may be added with a little sprinkling of flour, and light, 
tender, delicate griddles may be made. 

Cold boiled, baked, or even fried fish may be used 
for croquettes, or in cream sauce, or for scallops, and 
prove as attractive as in the first serving. 

Iron Rust. — This may be removed by salt mixed 
with a little lemon juice ; put in the sun ; if necessary, 
use two applications. 

How TO Clean a Tea or Coffee Pot. — If the inside 
o£ your tea or coffee pot is black from long use, fill it 
with water, throw in a piece of hard soap, set it on the 
stove, and let it boil from half an hour to an hour. 

For a Cough. — Mix equal parts of lemon juice, 
glycerine, and pure honey. Dose : One teaspoonful 
three times a day. 

To remove the tops of fruit jars that cannot be started 
by hand, dip a cloth in very hot water and apply to the 
outside of the cap ; this will cause it to expand. 



WELLESLEY COOK BOOK. 179" 

Salt water, as a lotion for weak eyes, is highly 
recommended by many physicians, and gives much relief 
where eyes have been strained by overwork. 

A GARGLE of salt and vinegar, with a little cayenne 
pepper, will do more to disperse soreness of the throat 
than any other remedy of which we have heard ; it will 
sometimes cure in a few hours. 

Place over the tight spot of a boot a cloth wrung 
out of hot water. The moisture causes the leather to 
stretch enough to make the boot fit easily. 

The best plant for a hanging basket, or the most 
cheerful for winter blooming, is the common morning- 
glory. As a window plant for winter it is a success, as 
it grows freely and produces graceful flowers in abun- 
dance. Besides, the morning-glory in the house has the 
advantage of those grown outside, as the flowers remain 
open nearly the whole day. 

When a room is to have new paper, the old ought to 
be removed first. A boiler of hot water set in a room, 
and the doors closed for a while, will cause the paper to 
loosen, so that it may be taken off without difficulty. 

The woodwork may then be cleaned easily while the 
dirt is softened by the steam. 

Always boil macaroni, tapioca, etc., before putting 
them into the soup. 

A LiTTLL lemon juice stewed with prunes adds flavor. 

Soak gelatine in cold water. Dissolve it in boiling 
water. 



180 WELLESLET COOK BOOK. 

Drain everything which is fried in deep lard on light 
brown paper before serving. 



Scalloped oysters taste and look better when the 
cracker crumbs are moistened in melted butter. 

A WET strip of cotton cloth put round an apple pie 
before baking keeps in the juices. 

To test a baked custard, put a knife blade in it ; it 
should come out clean. 

Serve melons always ice-cold. 

To PREPARE Salt for Table. — Dry the salt. To 
one-half teacupful salt, add one teaspoonful flour, roll 
out and mix thoroughly. This prevents the salt from 
sticking in the bottles. 

To REMOVE White Spots from Furniture. — Take 
equal parts of spirits of turpentine and spirits of cam- 
phor. Shake till clear, and brush over the spots with a 
soft sponge. If necessary, rub with a little sweet oil, 
or any furniture polish. 

To whiten laces, place them in sour milk and let 
them stand in the sun. 

BEEP JUICE 

Choose a thick cut of fine, fresh, juicy "round" 
steak, without fat. Broil or sear it over the coals for 
only a ]ninute, or long enough to merely heat it through- 
out. Cut it in many places, then put it in press, which 
should be first warmed, and squeeze the juice out into a 
warm bowl or pan. Salt juice slightly. It should be 
served immediately, free from all fat. 



WELLESLET COOK BOOK, 181 

VANILLA 

1-8 lb. vanilla beans 1 pint alcohol 

1 tonka bean 1 pint vrater 

Cut the vanilla beans up very tine, and put them and 
the tonka bean in the alcohol. 

Leave them for one week, shaking every day. Then 
add the pint of water and leave another week then, if 
it is settled and clear, it is ready for use. 



182 WELLESLEY COOK BOOK. 



ON THE FEEDING OF YOUNG 
CHILDREN 

When planning the meals for the family table, it will 
well repay every mother with young children to give 
special thought to the demands of their rapidly growing 
bodies. A mother should seek to meet her child's early 
physical needs with as much thoughtfulness and enthu- 
siasm as she seeks later its moral and intellectual 
advancement. Indeed, a mother may well feel that in 
properly nourishing her child's body she is directly con- 
tributing to its higher development. Yet, nothwith- 
standing the interest and importance that attach to 
this subject, in how few families are children rightly 
fed ! Their diet is either meagre, or they are allowed to 
eat like their elders. What children are to eat for break- 
fast, dinner, and supper should never be left to chance. 

The dinner should be planned with reference to the 
breakfast, and the meals for to-day varied from those of 
yesterday. In order that children may have simple and 
nourishing food, it is often necessary to prepare for 
them special dishes. This should not be thought too 
much trouble or too large an expense. Even a mother 
who keeps no maid in the kitchen may, if she choose to 
make herself intelligent in these matters, easily provide 
a suitable diet for her children. Eating between meals 
should not be allowed. The eating of candy is most 
destructive to good digestion. If sweets are craved, a 



WELLESLET COOK BOOK. 183 

block of pure sugar may be given at dessert. This is 
not too severe a rule. Trial proves that children are 
satisfied with right living when not led astray by the 
weak and ignorant indulgence of their parents. 

When a child first comes to the family table, a little 
firmness on the mother's part will be required to dis- 
courage it from Asking for dishes not its own. This firm- 
ness should be exercised without hesitation. As has 
been said above, it is easy, with a little painstaking, to 
interest a young child in its own well-being. What it 
at first accepts in obedience to its mother becomes later 
the child's choice and a habit of self-control. It is most 
important, too, that the child be taught hoiv to eat. To 
do this will require no small amount of supervision and 
patience. It must be taught first by example, and the 
example should be supplemented by the social and 
physiological reasons for eating properly. Thorough 
mastication of solid food must be insisted on, and milk 
and broths should be sipped from a spoon. Milk, when 
taken rapidly into the stomach, forms a hard curd diffi- 
cult for the stomach to break up and digest. 

Baker's crackers and baker's bread, on which so many 
children are largely fed, are almost the worst of foods 
for them, as, in addition to being deficient in nourish- 
ment, they often contain ammonia or alum, on which 
their lightness depends. Home-made white-flour bread 
is also deficient in nourishment, and should be allowed 
only as a change from coarse bread. Bread and crackers 
made from whole-Avheat flour, and cornmeal bread are 
suitable breadstuffs for children. 

Starchy foods, as rice and potato, should be given 
sparingly. 



184 WELLESLEY COOK BOOK. 

Thoroughly cooked crushed oats, wheat and barley, 
gluten and wheatena, are the best of breakfast dishes 
for children. A saucerful of one of the above-mentioned 
cereals, with coarse bread, milk, and a baked apple, 
makes a simple, nourishing breakfast. Plain soiip, 
lamb, beef, or chicken, roasted or broiled, with potato 
and one other vegetable, such as either spinach, aspara- 
gus, squash, peas, beans, cauliflower, green corn grated, 
and stewed celery, may form the dinner. Fresh fish, as 
cod, haddock, or halibut, is nourishing and useful for 
variety. An e^g lightly boiled, or a plain omelette, 
may also be used as an alternate with cereals at break- 
fast. The supper should consist of milk and coarse 
bread and butter, or the bread may be made into milk- 
toast. Ripe fruit may be given at breakfast and dessert. 
If pudding or cake is given at dessert, it must be of the 
most simple character. The writer believes neither 
puddings nor cake to be necessary for a child's present 
happiness or future welfare. No condiment but salt 
should be used. Water, if possible either filtered or 
spring water, should be the only drink. 

The diet laid down here applies only to children of 
from three to four years of age and upward.^ The 
mother who desires a sound physical development in her 
children keeps them to a plain, nourishing diet until at 
least maturity is reached. 

Frances Field Abbott. 

1 This is much too generous a diet for younger children. Milk, coarse bread, 
cereals, brotlis, and eggs should form the staples of a child's diet from 
infancy up to three and a half years. Some fruit may also be given. In most 
cases underdone roast lamb, beef, and chicken, minced tine, and baked 
potato may be used sparingly after the age of two years has been reached. 



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