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Full text of "The Western comrade"

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Calif. 
Sec. 



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D 2DD7 D51D31S 4 

California State Library 



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Accession JVo /u (phrf. 

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'^ii--n 



IVIay, 191S 



Ten Cents 






:*■? Va? - Fictio t - Poetry : By ©r. Wm. J. Robinson, 
«?e -.e V. Debs, Car} Sandburg, G. E. Moray, and Others 





The Western Comrade 




Men's 


10-inch boots. $6.00 


Men's 


12-iach boots. 


7.00 


Men's 


15-inch boots. 


8.00 


Ladies 


lO-inch boots 5.00 


Ladies 


14-inch boots 


5.50 


Men's' 


Elk shoes .... 


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Ladies 


Elk shoes. . . 


3.50 


Infants 


' Elk shoes, 




1 to 
Child's 


5 


1.50 


Elk shoes, 5 


to 8 
Child's 




1.75 


Elk shoes, 


81/2 to 11 


2.25 


Misses 


and Youths, 




iiyg 


to 2 


2.50 




Place stocking foot on 
paper, drawing pencil 
around as per above Il- 
lustration. Pass tape 
around at lines with- 
out drawing tight. Give 
size usually worn. 



ELKSKIN 

BOOTS and SHOES 



Factory operated in connection 
with Llano Del Rio Colony 

IDEAL FOOTWEAR 

For Ranchers and Outdoor Men 



Tke famous Clifford Elkskin Snoes are ligktest and 
easiest for solid comfort and -w^ill out'wear tnree pairs 
of ordinary snoes. 

We cover all lines from ladies,' men's 
and children's button orj lace in light 
handsome patterns to the high boots for 
mountain, hunting, ranching or desert wear. 
Almost indestructible. 

Send in your orders iby mail. Take 



measurement according 

Out of town shoes made 

receipt of order. Send P. 0, 

whether we shall forward br mail or express. 



,0 instructions. 

immediately on 

order and state 



SALES DEPARTMENT 



Llano del Rio Company 

922 Higgins Building, Los Angeles, Cal. 



^^^^^.^^^^4M^^><.<■.^^^>^<■^^•^^>.J.^^♦>^JHJ^^4^^^;♦.J^.JHJ^^<.^^^^.>.^^ 



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CONTENTS 



Editorial Comment. By Frank E. Wolfe Page 5 

By-Product of the Fight. By Morgan Smith Page 9 

Business — Legal Stealing. By William Thurston 

Brown Page 10 

War and the Red Cross. By James P. Warbasse. .Page 11 

Must We Carry a Bundle of Hay? Page 13 

The People Are Soft. By Eugene V. Debs Page 14 

Sound Advice for Seetcers of Success. By G. E. 

Moray Page 14 

Colony Celebrates Anniversary Page 15 

Scenes at Llano del Rio Colony's Annual Cele- 
bration Page 16 

Fellowship in Work. By Harvey Armstrong Page 19 

Prevention of Conception. Bj' William J. Rob- 
inson, M. D Page 20 

Socialism Is Coming ....Page 21 

The Soldier Who Wouldn't. By A. Neil Lyons Page 22 

Woman (Poem). By Odell T. Fellows Page 23 

Murmurings in a Field Hospital (Poem). By 

Carl Sandburg Page 24 

To Our St. Anthony (Poem). By Chas. W. Wood. .Page 24 

Slams at Shams Page 25 

The Temple of Gold. By Rabindranath Tagore. . . .Page 26 

One Year's Achievement Page 28 

CARTOONS 

His Protecting Saint Page 4 

Made in America Page 7 

Modern Science and Prehistoric Savagery Page 9 

How Long? Page 12 

The Sultan "Over the Water" Page 22 



I 
♦ 




♦ 



♦ 






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The Western Comrade 



HIS PROTECTING SAINT 




-■ A 



:ii 





Wilhelm: "Are you, too, coming to congratulate me?" 

Death: "I do not come to congratulate you, but to prostrate myself before you 
and take your orders." 



— Sucesos, Valparaiso, CJtiJe 



The Western Comrade 



Political Action 



Devoted to the Cause of the Workers 



Co-operation 



Direct Action 



VOL. Ill 



LOS ANGELES, CAL., MAY, 1915 



NUMBER 1 




Llano del Rio Colonists Chopping Firewood by Use of a Gasoline Engine 



EDITORIAL COMMENT 



By Frank E. Wolfe 



THEODORE ROOSEVELT has denounced the 
peace movement of the American women, head- 
ed by Jane Addams, as "silly and base." He de- 
ch^red that the sympathizers with the movement are 
in many, if not all, instances, "physical cowards" 
and declares they advocate peace "without regard 
to righteoiisness. " In a letter written to a woman 
who had appealed to him this amazing sentence 
appears: "Above all it is base and evil to clamor 
for peace in the abstract, when silence is kept about 
concrete and hideous wrongs done to humanity at 
this very moment." 

Does Roosevelt refer to the hideous wrongs 
done to the millions of diseinployed and hungry 
workers in America ? Does he refer to our daily 
war ? Is it the daily hell of the capitalist system he 
has in mind ? Has he a thought for the wrongs done 



to the victims of Rockefeller in the Colorado mas- 
sacres ? Not at all ! That is why it is amazing. He 
is concerned about the outrages in Belgium — and so 
are we. But we see other outrages and other wrongs. 
Let us quote the Colonel again: 

"There is nothing easier, there is nothing on the 
whole less worth while entering into, than vague 
and hysterical demands for right in the abstract, 
coupled with the unworthy and timid refusal even 
to allude to frightful wrongs that are at the very 
moment committed in the concrete.". 

In this we most heartily concur. It reminds us 
that while he was Governor of New York, Roosevelt 
went about preaching abstract righteousness, while 
the contractors who were building the Croton aque- 
duct were committing "frightful wrongs" against 
their employes, refusing to comply with the State 



The Western Comrade 




Labor laws. "VVIien the conditions became unbear- 
able the men were forced to strike. Governor Roose- 
velt paused in his preaching about abstract righte- 
ousness long enough to send the militia out to shoot 
down a dozen or more of the workers. 
♦ ♦ *> 

AS for "phJ^sieal courage," it sounds well from 
a man who publicly boasted of shooting a flee- 
ing and unarmed man in the back ; one whose great 
achievements have been typified by shooting a 
mother monkey in the jungle. 

Physical courage 1 Let's see about that. Is there 
no courage shown by these women — by all women 
who are the mothers of the race? Let Mrs. Henry 
Villard, wJio tries to overlook the boaster's "bad 
•manners," while pointing them out, have a chance at 
him: 

"Colonel Roosevelt's denunciation of the Wo- 
man's Peace party comes with a bad grace from one 
who is the possessor of the Noble Prize. We all 
know that it is true that militarism — ^not peace — is 
now the aim of his ambition — a sorry one, indeed, in 
view of the present world-agony which stirs the souls 
of all those who love their fellow beings. 

"Mr. Roosevelt exalts physical bravery — such as 
the killing of enemies because of a difference of 
opinion — above the moral courage that scorns the 
use of means so base for any purpose whatever. 

"Has the world sunk so low that we can not 
hope to substitute for the 'doing of evil that good 
may come' and 'an eye for an eye and a tooth for 
a tooth' the touching doctrine that we must love our 
enemies and do good to those who persecute us? 

"The heroic effort now being made by the women 
of all countries to come together at The Hague, in 
order to express their horror of the brutality of war, 
is worthy of all praise. Women are far greater suf- 
ferers from war than men, and today they are voic- 
ing protest against it, a protest that will be heard." 

Mrs. Amos Pinchot, who is chairman of the New 
York branch of the Woman's Peace party, puts the 
finishing touch to the rebuke when she says: 

"That war is the natural inevitable result of cer- 
tain understandable factors, and that these factors 



can be influenced by the spread of healthy, con- 
structive, humane ideas, and especially by the reali- 
zation of a spirit of world-citizenship in politics and 
in commercial relations, seems not to have occurred 
to Colonel Roosevelt. In other words, war having 
up till now devastated humanity and shattered civ- 
ilization, let us make no effort toi understand its 
causes with the object of future prevention; let us 
simply get ready to fight, and let the women stand 
out of our way, because they can only bear children 
and not arms, and when they organize to protest 
against war they come under the head of 'physical 
cowards,' who 'fear death or pain or discomfort be- 
yond anything else.' 

"It is exactly here that women find their strong- 
est warrant for protest. No woman who has borne 
children can be called a physical coward, fearing 
death and pain beyond anything else. No, it is not 
for ourselves that we fear, but for the children of 
the Avhole world, for the future of the race. We 
of the Woman's Peace party are trying to help open 
the first tiny wedge in the thick walls of prejudice 
and precedent, to let humanity come into its prom- 
ised land of good faith and international brother- 
hood. 

"If we human beings once see that war is the 
consequence of false ideas instead of being a fatality 
like an earthquake, we shall set to work to root it 
out, like tuberculosis and other diseases, all of them 
consequences of human ignorance, misunderstanding 
and passion. 

"If this is futile, then all constructive efforts for 
the betterment of human living are also 'futile, silly 
and base.' " 

♦ ♦ ♦ 

HUNDREDS of unburied bodies of victims of the 
dread typhus fever lie in deserted houses in 
Servian cities. One town has had over 2000 deaths. 
In Valjevo, where Austrian soldiers held the town 
for a time, the people returned to their homes to 
find them infected. Substantially the entire com- 
munity is involved in the disease and the fatality is 
very high. Everywhere the grave diggers are ex- 
hausted in efforts to keep up with the ghastly 




The Western Comrade 




winrows thrown by the grim reaper. The armies 
spread the disease into the remotest districts. Non- 
eombatants, women and children are the most sus- 
eejitible and they succumb by the thousands. This 
news comes after weeks of suppression by the cen- 
sors. Now a corps of American physicians are going 
to Europe to use Dr. Plotz' new anti-typhus serum 
in the district ravaged by the disease. "With tlie new 
serum tliey hope to destroy the dread bacillus typhi- 
exanthematici. 

Plotz 's achievement is accepted by all the emi- 
nent bacteriologists of the country. He is an 
American born and educated. Under the old sys- 
tem the historian Avould have given Von Hindenburg 
two pages and Plotz not a line. The new system 
vnW immortPvlize the Plotzes and ignore or excoriate 
the murderers. 

♦ ♦ >:♦ 

SPEAKING of concrete wrongs, what of the 20,000 
unmarried women of England who will within 
the next few months become mothers of nameless 
babes? In Germany, Prance, Russia and other coun- 
tries a like condition doubtless exists. According 
to cable dispatches, women and girls follow the sol- 
diers on the march and are wrought up to a high 
pitch of emotionalism by the war. 

Army doctors and clergymen who are studying 
the situation closely, declare that vast numbers of 
girls are under the influence of a species of hysteria. 
They express the opinion that the women are at- 
tracted by the physical perfection and the trappings 
of the soldiers. 

War's aftermath will be most pleasant, but we 
should give thouglit to abstract (or is it concrete) 
righteousness and bow to God's will in these matters. 

♦ »j. .}. 

THE prosperity squawk in the daily newspapers 
takes on a semblance of truth when it comes 
down to facts about the opening of ammunition 
factories in America. Full crews are operating in 
all the institutions where man-killing implements 
are manufactured. Gambling in food stuffs goes 
merrily forward in New York and Chicago. In 
Europe the fields between the trenches, the earth 



and the timbers have been taking on a peculiar yel- 
lowish hue, due to the chemical effects of the shells 
charged with smokeless powder, the product of the 
American Powder Trust. There are thousands of 
these American-made shells being hurled across the 



\ 
\ 




MADE IN AlIERIGA 
"The devil! You Americans are surely sentimentalists." 

Inscription on shell reads, "Brave Germans, we pray for 

you! Jonathan's Gun Works, America." ^ .. „, ^, 

Lustige Blaetter 



space between the belligerent forces every hour. 
"The Americans make good shells. Our losses from 
them have been very heavy," said a German officer 
to an American correspondent, as he scraped the yel- 
low coating off a timber of a bombproof retreat. 
This was a delicate compliment and we should be 
duly appreciative. We should also be glad pros- 
perity has returned. 

♦ ♦ ♦> 

MACHINERY of the F-4, United States navy 
submarine, that so successfully sank that it 
never came to the surface, is said to be in excellent 
condition. That may be, but the fifteen men of the 
crew who perished miserably by slow asphyxiation or 
drowning are not in good condition to be of further 
service — as sailors. A letter from Lieutenant Ede, 
who was in command of the submarine, showed that 
it was known that the craft was leaky and unsafe. 
He is said to have declared his belief that he and 
his crew would meet their death if the craft was 
ordered to sea. These men were killed owing to 



The Western Comrade 




somebody's negligence. But let us not grow in- 
sistent. Punishment of a murderer will not help the 
ease. A better way has already been provided. A 
nation-wide memorial service, flowers, a hymn, a 
prayer and brief speeches by "our best citizens," 
"Solemn thought and devotional exercise." Five 
minutes to be devoted to solemn thought! Great! 
We're for that ! If we could get the workers of the 
world to devote five minutes to thought there would 
be no more F-4's or any other mankillers launched. 
■"3* "^ *$•■ 

WHAT are you reading? Are you wasting valu- 
able hours submerged in daily newspapers 
poring over the diurnal pabulum of scandals, "pros- 
perity" news and the Eiiropean war? Don't! If 
there is one subject above all others the Socialists 
of America should be studying it is the Mexican 
situation. The confusion that exists in the minds of 
the people of America arises out of the fact that 
the American press has for years, either stupidly 
or viciously, misrepresented the situation in Mexico. 
To get a correct foundation for i;nderstanding you 
should read "The Mexican People — Their Struggle 
for Freedom," by L. G. De Lara and Edgcumb Pin- 
chon. Then you should read every word written 
by John Kenneth Turner in his series of powerful 
articles now running in the Appeal to Reason. 

Read Lincoba Steffens' story in the May number 
of the Metropolitan Magazine. No living writer can 
convey to you in a few Avords what Steffens can of 
the real motives that iinderlie the action of the rev- 
olutionarj^ MesicaTis. Let us quote Carranza as re- 
ported by Steffens: "What you don't understand, 
I think, is that this is an economic, not a political 
revolution. You (Americans) keep asking us to 
establish, peace first, then set up constitutional gov- 
ernment, and then enact our reforms. # * * 
We established a good, strong government with a 
great constitution : a constitution much more ad- 
vanced than yours. But yoti foreigners — all of you, 
and our upper-class Mexicans — the enemies of the 
Mexican people and of libert.y and justice every- 
where — they corrupted our government. They took 
it away from the Mexican people and made it theirs. 



"We have had our political reforms: our law 
and order and we have prosperity — for the few. 
These are not the Mexican ideas * * * the Mex- 
ican aspiration, conscious and unconscious, is for a 
prosperous people : not a prosperous class, but a 
prosperous and happy life for all. OUR PEOPLE 
WANT THE LAND, the people, the peons, too: 
and they want leisure and a life of pleasure: not 
only a few, but all. And we can have that. Our 
country is very rich and very beautiful. But we 
know that we cannot get those things by mere po- 
litical reform or by setting up a representative con- 
gress. That's one big point where I differed Avith 
Villa. He wanted government first. But I said : 
'No, the buzzards that are sitting around watching 
and waiting in New York and El Paso, in London 
and Paris and Madrid and Havana : they are the 
modern doves of peace ; they will come with loans 
and — ' he flashed, 'witli bribes and they will get 
our government ! ' 

"We will fight on and on for all that we want; 
all. It is a people that is fighting. And we are all 
becoming poor, all ; all together. There are fewer 
and fewer that can afford to make loans and offer 
bribes. * * * All the while, we on our side are 
legislating. My cabinet are commissioners ; they join 
with others, experts and radicals, and very deliber- 
ately, very freely, they are drawing up laws, which 
I am uttering as decrees. By the time the revolution 
is over, those laws will be laws of the land, customs 
of the country, a real constitution." 
♦ ♦ ♦ 

IT now appears the thieves who looted the Rock 
Island Railway only got away with aboiit a third 
of a billion dollars. The lawyers for the manipula- 
tors (capitalist emphemism) carefully explained to 
the guileless investigators that there had been 
' ' merely a mistake of judgment. ' ' A strange feature 
developed in that the mistakes in judgment had only 
made other persons poorer. The prison doors yawn 
for the hungry lad that steals a banana. But then 
he should learn to manipulate and do it on a large 
scale. Steal a banana ship line and you are safe — 
but don't dallj^ with a fraction of fruit. 



The Western Comrade 



By-Product of the Fight 



By MORGAN SMITH 




HEN Calm Reason, the cop, finally has 
the combatants by the collars and they 
are shame-faeedly trying to explain why 
they did it and what they have gained 
by it, the real, magnificent issue is going 
to reveal itself quite unexpectedly, the 
real issue is, and then the combatants 
are going to point to it with the great 
self-righteousness, and the eop will let them go with 
the stern injunction that they never do it again until 
they get all ready and feel just like it. 

Way back in the Great Ice age this cop had these 
same little things to deal with and tSe unexpected 
justification is nothing new to him. Homo Priscus was 
troublesome in the v»ry same way on the very same 
grounds. Homo Priscus had some sharp pieces of flint 
and he used to cling to the flanks of the wild horses 
and stab them with the flint until they dropped. Some- 
times he would kill a dozen horses in a day and when 
he lay down at night Calm Reason would grab him. 

"Well, now that it's all over, how many of 'em did 
you eat !" the cop would inquire. 

Then Homo Priscus would hang his head, until the 
Great Issue popped out of the night. 

' ' There you are ! ' ' Homo Priscus would always 
say, sticking out bis chest, just as the powers are going 
to do. And the eop would have to slink away with 
the warning that Homo Priscus never do it again until 
he should be all ready and felt just like it. 

Brains! That's the cause. Evolution! That's the 
issue: 

There ^Y&^Q very few men in the age of the Great 
Ice and those that there were lived a roving, nomad's 
life. They fought with each other quite informally 
over flint pits and casual damsels. And the winner 
took the disputed thing and the loser went away or 
stayed there, as the case might be. And all the ani- 
mals and birds looked on and remarked that it was 
only a couple of men fighting. 

Then the men began hunting in packs and there 
were more fights. By that time they were using spears. 
When a fine yoiing doe would cross their path the 
l^^hole band of them would fire away. WTien the quarry 
fell each man claimed his spear had done the work and 
most always there was a fight to settle that. Archaeo- 
logical discoveries reveal that Homo Priscus adopted 
the novel scheme of putting a sign on his spear that 
would settle this question. The man whose spear had 
struck the mortal blow no longer had the fight twice or 



trice before he could eat. It was the first mutual 
benefit society and it was the first Rules of Order. 

The mutual benefit society worked wonders. Homo 
Priscus found that by co-operation he could dispute 
almost anything with the other animals and bring home 
the bacon that he couldn't bring home if he were work- 
ing independently. He found that the mutual benefit 




MODERN SCIENCE AND PREHISTORIC 

SAVAGERY 

The Professor: "Together, my dear Herr Caveman, 
we should be irresistible." 



society enabled him to stay in the same cave and still 
eat. It was no longer necessary to roam. By co- 
operation he could get the game even when the game 
was wary. So he colonized and co-operated success- 
fully to keep the wolves away from his stored meat. 
When Homo Priscus settled down conditions became 
more favorable to multiplication. 

"Why, bless my soul and honor, I'm multiplying," 
said Homo Priscus. And for years after that, if any- 



10 



The Western Comrade 



body inquired why he settled down and fought the 
wolves in place of traveling and eluding them he would 
assume a great deal of self-righteousness and say he 
did it so he could multiply and compete with the other 
animals in numbers. 

As Homo Priscus or Homo Primigenius multiplied 
there arose more and more impediment to the colonized 
existence, but he said that he could eat roots and fruits 
if the other animals could, so he acquired a taste for 
them rather than become a nomad again. He also con- 
cluded a truce with the wolves and the horses. They 
formed a triple alliance of strength, ferocity and brains. 

From that time on the animals watched man in- 
crease until he surpassed them all in numbers. They 
watched him acquire feet, wheels, and wings. They 
saw him destroy a forest by a magic spark from his 
flint. Soon after the Triple Alliance was formed the 
idea of "Fight for Fight's Sake" first came into vogue. 
Man had a fairly easy thing of it and all the faculties 
of his brain were not employed. Soi he went in for 
sports, and the first sport was "War. One colony would 
swoop over the hill or stream that divided it from the 
next colony and they would have one glorious time. 
When the game of War got to big league size several 
tribes would combine against other tribes, particularly 
if they had lived apart long enough! to acquire racial 
characteristics. 

One time one of the delerious victors grabbed a 
princess of the other side, in his excitement, and car- 
ried her back home. After that they would say, "Let's 
go over and get another princess or king or something, ' ' 
and the first thing they knew they got to thinking that 
the whole delightful thing was over the possession of 
the other man's princess or the reprisal following the 
capture of your princess. They would take away 
treasures and destroy crops. It is no new accomplish- 
ment to contrive a moral as the cause of a war. They 
used, way back in those times, to explain that the 
Gauls were retaining their art treasures contrary to 
justice and right. So they would go over into Gaul 
and take the treasures away. 

When they would come back with the spoils Calm 
Reason would grab them. Then they would point with 



great self-righteousness to the fact that they had 
learned some great things about art and civilization 
from the conquered people which nothing but war could 
have brought to them. So the cop would have to slink 
away. 

And thus it went with brains, war, and evolution. 
Man was born brainy; the war he achieved; and he 
had evolution thrust upon him. In the fight he de- 
veloped a finer brain and this expended itself in the 
development of the fight, just as it should do. Having 
come, willing or unwilling, to supremacy among the 
animals by means of his brain, man had, in the course 
of it, developed an uncanny thing that would not rest. 
Having developed at the behoof of supremacy the brain 
aiitomatically worked in that direction. 

When this war for supremacy is over and the cop, 
Calm Reason, has his defi, the kings and emperors will 
have somethiftg they did not aim at. They will have a 
beautifully organized government control. They will 
have demonstrated that the thing can be done. And, 
having evolved this 42-centimeter engine of supremacy, 
it will be pointed, after the war, in a direction that its 
new owners dictate. It vidll be pointed at the thick 
walls of caste, tradition, and punctilio that have forti- 
fied dynasties and oligarchies since the time that Nero 
burned Rome for fun. 

And when Society is supreme it will look around 
with amazement at the things it never aimed at. A 
good many people Who fought in order that they might 
own land may discover that the idea of owning land 
has gone completely out of style. Some whol fought 
that they might rear their children the way they 
wanted, may discover that they no longer have a word 
as to the way their children are reared. When So- 
ciety's restless, struggling brain has rendered it su- 
preme over arbitrary control, it will busy itself in the 
fight against everything that preys upon its well-being 
and it will discover that some of its bosomest acquaint- 
ances are its enemies. 

And Calm Reason, the cop, will ever be waiting at 
the end of the fight to nab somebody, but he will not 
nab. The unexpected justification will always be just 
behind him. Long live The Fight! 



Business — Legal Stealing 

By WILLIAM THURSTON BROWN 



THE light that is now rising above the horizon is 
revealing the fact that what we have been ac- 
customed to call business is only stealing made legal — 
that commerce is only piracy made respectable by law, 
that respectability is for the most part a thin veneer 
made necessary to maintain the immoral distinctions 
of class, that religion is very largely hypocrisy and 



statesmanship the art of proving the virtue and value' 
of a vicious system. 

There comes the same divine summons to freedom 
and fraternity now as of old. No diviner or authori- 
tative voice spoke in Palastine ages ago than speaks 
today in the hopes and faiths and longings of the com^. 
mon people. 



The Western Comrade 



11 



War and the Red Cross 



By JAMES P. WARBASSE 




HE forces which promote war often are 
found running x^arallel with the humane 
impulses which would relieve suffering. 
Tlie soldier has for his functions to 
destroy life, to maim or otherwise physi- 
cally incapacitate those of his fellow- 
beings who are called the "enemy," and 
to destroy property which might be of 
help to his opponents, and to appropriate from all 
sources whatever may be of aid in these operations. 
To such ends are enlisted all that science, art and skill 
can produce. 

Modern war continues until one side or the other 
has lost so many lives, has so many human beings in- 
capacitated, and so much property destroyed that the 
remaining people are no longer willing to venture the 
hazard of being called upon for further sacrifice of 
themselves. The remnant of the nation then stops 
the war: it ceases to fight, and the war' ends. 

Certain esternal agencies keep war going and post- 
pone the armistice which would bring peace. One of 
these factors is the profit which the noncombatant 
nations can make out of the bleeding people. Another 
factor is found in the Red Cross and the noncombatant 
activities allied with it. Though the first of these is 
purely economic, the Red Cross is no less its accomplice 
in keeping warfare alive. 

Thus we witness the spectacle of the United States, 
with sanctimonious hypocrisy, praying for the end of 
the war as a sort of Sunday performance, and during 
the week days lending its good offices to big business 
to send over to the soldiers grains, meats and other 
food-stuffs, guns, powder, shot and shell, to keep the 
slaughter going — all in the interest of profits. We 
lay upon our souls the tinetion of neutrality by sup- 
plying munitions of war to either side. 

Then comes the Red Cross and its allied neutrals, 
with sweet-voiced nurses and bandages and sheets and 
pillow-cases and goodies and soft beds, with the as- 
sumption that it is mitigating the horrors of war. 
However much it is mitigating the discomforts of indi- 
vidual warriors, one thing is certain: it is prolonging 
war; and war is nothing but horrors. Sentimentalism, 
combined with a confused ethical sense which calls for 
impartiality, results in a neutrality which promotes 
war. 

The fact can be grasped by a simple mind that, if 
it helps one side in warfare, it damages the other side. 
We need yet to push our mathematics one step farther 



and demonstrate that if we help both sides, we damage 
both sides. 

The commercial and sentimental neutrals if they 
were really interested in mitigating the horrors of war, 
would employ their energies to end the war. To end 
war is the best way to mitigate war. The last thing 
that one who really loves his fellow men, and who truly 
revolts at war, would think of would be to go into 
battle with a double-edged sword and fight against both 
sides. This is what our neutrals are doing ; and when 
we look upon the cost of one day of it we may cal- 
culate what will be the cost of the next day — the cost 
to both sides, for both are daily losing ; and in the end 
both are destined to be losers by the aggregate of their 
days of warfare. 

"Were the neutrals desirous of mitigating the hor- 
rors of war, instead of maintaining merely a commer- 
cial and sentimental interest in it, they would be act- 
ing more reasonably to throw all of their help upon one 
side and end it. War continues so long as the damages 
are fairly balanced. It ends when the balance is lost 
and an unbalance of damages takes its place. 

The soldier is a person who goes forth to kill his 
fellow man. The hope that he may kill but not be 
killed sejids him on his errand. He is not only a cold- 
blooded murderer; he also is a gambler. He hopes to 
do his unholy business, come off with his life, and be 
ever after proclaimed a "hero." Society with its na- 
tionalism, patriotism, race hatreds, militarism, per- 
verted histories which glorifj^ war, and the interna- 
tional quest for commercial profits, creates the soldier 
■ — the dupe of war. If he knew that he were to fare as 
badly as he hopes his "enemy" will, he would not go. 
The nearer to one hundred per cent the mortality of 
warfare approaches, the less will be the enthusiasm for 
its "glories." ' If the mortality could be brought up 
to one hundred per cent the problem would be solved, 
and war would cease. Do the activities of the Red 
Cross make for the abolition of war or for its perpetua- 
tion? 

If the man of fighting age refused to go to war, or 
if he was proclaimed the hero who had moral heroism 
enough to stay at home and do his work and refuse to 
participate in the miserable business, then the problem 
would be solved. Does the Red Cross, which rushes to 
the front to keep alive this "sport of kings," make for 
war or peace ? 

We may 'contemplate with amazement surgeons and 
nurses attempting to save lives, and at the same time 



12 



The Western Comrade 



working in co-operation with murderous men, equipped 
with the newest appliances of science, bent upon de- 
stroying lives — all zealously striving together. 

Perhaps society will some day look back with won- 
der upon the anachronism of surgical skill, with its in- 
finite possibilities for human service, occupied day and 




HOW LONG? 

Lucifer: "It seems to me, Eternal Father, this war 
should be settled before long. There have been so 
many trespassers against the Fifth Commandment 
{'Thou sUalt not kill') that I am running short of fuel." 

Sucesos, Valparaiso, Chile 



night in restoring to efficiency the butchers of men, 
that they may be returned to their cruel pursuit. 

Let the participating Red Cross doctors not beguile 
us with the claim that they are noncombatants, and 
inspired only by love of humanity. We shall not be 
deceived. They are a part of the program of war. 
When it is over, we shall find them parading among 



its "heroes" and accepting the recognition which is 
accorded to those who went forth to kill. 

Were the impelling motive behind the sentimental 
neutrals one of love for humanity and a burning zeal 
to sacrifice themselves for mankind, there are ample 
fields yet unoccupied in the struggle for life in every 
land. In our own country the preventable deaths in 
the economic warfare for livelihood and for profits are 
quite as appalling to the discerning eye as those of the 
European eharnel. Here are the unaided hurt crying 
for help — hurt by machines and dust and poisons and 
rotten railroad ties and insufficient food and crowded 
slums — hurt because somebody is making money by 
withholding rightful human protection from them and 
robbing others of the wealth that they create. 

These suffering and dying millions go down to their 
graves without the stain of their fellows' blood upon 
their hands. They are soldiers in the world's warfare 
against the forces of nature, enlisted to make the world 
more pleasant and life more livable. They stand for 
life, and not for death. They need all the surgeons, 
nurses, Red Cross stockings, and shirts that are now 
consumed by the blood-thirsty men who go forth to 
slay the husbands of innocent wives and the sons of 
guiltless mothers and the fathers of weeping babes. 

The answer to this social riddle is here: War is a 
ruling-class game. It is the affair of kings, ministers, 
imperialists, and the capitalistic seekers for markets 
and economic aggrandizement. The Red Cross execu- 
tive, doctor, and nurse prefer the approval and ap- 
plause of this so-called "upper class." To give them- 
selves to the cause of the lowly and of the exploited 
poor with the abandon with which they can give them- 
selves to the cause of war would mean also to court the 
disapproval of those who have the wealth and "hon- 
ors" to bestow. The money-giving public prefers to 
support the warfare which appeals most strongly to 
its dramatic sense. The exploited poor, on the other 
hand, in the industrial struggle have nothing to offer 
but a doubtful gratitude. 

Let us not be deceived. There is no neutrality in 
war. All parties to it are warriors — the Red Cross 
surgeon, the nurse, the sewing woman, and the priest. 

War is the consummate social crime. It is some- 
thing more than hell ; it is the crucible in which a social 
system is tested and found dross. 



AMOTION picture drama that was produced in Los Angeles several months ago is still enjoying an un- 
precedented popularity despite the fact that any thinking person could not but regret that the producer 
had shown such poor taste in the selection of his subject. The play is falsely called "The Birth of a Nation." 
It is based on Thomas Dixon's unspeakable book called "The Clansman." All the way through the picture 
story it is an unfair and outrageous attempt to bolster up a dying race prejudice. That the public should 
enthusiastically patronize this plea for hatred and contempt of the negro race forms a sad commentary upon 
the education, or lack thereof, of the rising generation. — G. B. B. 



The Western Comrade 



13 



Must We Carry a Bundle of Hay? 



The Western Comrade reprints this remarkable editorial from the Milwaukee Leader in the hope that the readers 
of this magazine may give it serious thought — thought that may some day ripen into action. California Socialists particu- 
larly should give themselves over to a few minutes introspection. We are proceeding with state and national constitu- 
tions which, from the face of election returns a vast percentage of the party membership do not believe in or approve. 
In view of this fact should we not make a start here and now to readjust our organic law to fit the needs and desires of 
the membership and of those who believe in the principles of Socialism, but who decline to be bound and restricted by 
our dogmatic and narrowed rules and laws? — [Editors.] 



JUVENAL, the famous Roman writer, tells us that 
the Hebrews of his day would not intermarry with 
other people. They did not eat with others, and when 
traveling they even carried a bundle of hay with them 
to sleep on. "Why? For fear that they might be pol- 
luted and lose the true faith of Judaism. Juvenal inti- 
mates that the Jews were very much despised and hated 
by other folks on that account. 

We know of similar customs of other Asiatic sects, 
particularly in India. 

Every sect, holding to a certain dogma, whether 
religious or political, is of necessity exclusive. A 
dogma is largely a matter of faith, not of fact. Ortho- 
doxy can not afford to let its faith come into contact 
with the faith of other people, lest it may become 
weakened or lose entirely. 

This holds good for orthodoxy within the Socialist 
Party. 

We have in our national constitution the follovring 
provision : 

Article X, Section 3. The platform of the Socialist 
Party shall be the supreme declaration of the party, 
and all state and municipal platforms shall conform 
thereto. No state or local organization shall under 
any circumstances fuse, combine or compromise with 
any other political party or organization, or refrain 
from making nominations, in order to favor the candi- 
date of such other organizations, nor shall any candi- 
date of the Socialist Party accept any nomination or 
Indorsement from any other party or political organi- 
zation. 

No member of the Socialist party shall, under any 
circumstances, vote in primary or regular elections 
for any candidate other than Socialists nominated, 
indorsed or recommended as candidates by the Social- 
ist Party. To do otherwise will constitute party trea- 
son, and result in expulsion from the party. 

We believe this orthodox provision is untenable. 
It is stupid because it helps the enemy, undemocratic 
because it disfranchises our members, and unsocialistie 
because it is anti-social in spirit and practice. 

The American Socialist Party is the only Socialist 
organization in the world that today holds this posi- 
tion. We have inherited it from the old Socialist Labor 
Party. 

And the experience of the various reform parties 
in America — the Greenbackers and the People's Party 
^which were fused and swallowed up by the Demo- 
crats — ^has a tendency to make such a provision popu- 
lar with former Populists, especially out West. 



Greenbackism and Populism had no economic basis 
to stand on, however, and would soon have gone out 
of existence anyway. A party which believed that a 
government can create values by printing money could 
not live long. And a party vdth the cardinal principle 
of unlimited coinage of silver at a ratio of 16 to 1, so 
that farmers could get a depreciated silver dollar for 
a bushel of wheat, would naturally cease to exist as 
soon' as a bushel of wheat would bring more than a 
dollar in gold. 

But there is absolutely no excuse for a movement 
which is based upon modern machine production and 
the concentration of wealth, and is, therefore, in ac- 
cord with the trend of economic evolution, to cling to 
any sectarian tactics. We need not be afraid that any- 
body will "steal our principles." 

We always must stay loyally with our organization 
and vote for all candidates when we have a ticket. We 
remain a part of this commonwealth, however, even 
after our candidates have been beaten at the primary. 

No class-conscious Socialist will ever advocate 
' ' fusion ' ' with any capitalist party. That is impossible. 
But why should Socialists be disfranchised, whenever 
it is impossible for them to have their own ticket? 

Our worst enemies profess to admire this "splendid 
isolation. ' ' They do so because by our silly tactics we 
paralyze our political action and voluntarily withdraw 
in their favor. 

There certainly is a great difference among non- 
Socialists. There are those who are fair to the working 
class and friendly to our aims, though they do not be- 
long to our party. 

There are those who are willing to go with us a 
great part of the way — the part still far before us — 
even though they are not willing to go the entire length 
of our "final aim." 

Now why in the name of common sense would we 
be forbidden to vote — after our o^vn candidate has heen 
eliminated at the primary — for those who are friendly 
to us? 

Why should we be forbidden to accept their en- 
dorsement before the primary? 

Or must every Socialist carry a bundle of hay to 
sleep on, lest he be contaminated and lose the true 
faith? 



14 



The Western Comrade 



The People Are Soft 



By EUGENE V. DEBS 



THE times are always more or less "hard" for the 
great majority of the people. There are alternat- 
ing periods of hard times and times still harder, but 
there is never prosperity for all the people. 

There is absolutely no excuse for hard times in 
the United States. We are at the very center of fabu- 
lous and inexhaustible riches, enough for all and a 
hundred times more, and in the very midst of these we 
are unable to feed and clothe and shelter ourselves. 
and we present a spectacle tragic enough to make stone 
images shed tears. 

At this very time, A. D. 1915, the times are harder 
than they have ever been in all the 139 years of our 
national existence. 

The National Congress, supposed to represent the 
people and provide measures for our security, comfort 
and happiness, adjourned in the very midst of the most 
paralyzing panic in the history of the country. When 
this Congress adjourned, one-fifth of all the productive 
workers of the nation were without employment, mil- 
lions of them and their dependent ones actually suffer- 
ing, but the political state of capitalism, decadent, ob- 
solete and worse than useless, could do absolutely noth- 
ing for them. All it could do was to vote hundreds of 
millions for pork barrel enterprises and spend the rest 



of the time filibustering and in other political palaver- 
ing which had no more relation to the actual industrial 
conditions of the country and the economic necessities 
of the masses than the croaking of frogs has to the 
failure of the potato crop. 

The fact is that capitalism has collapsed and that 
the political state of capitalism is paralyzed except in 
the function of creating bogus issues over which to 
humbug the people and keep them divided and fighting 
sham battles while they are being bled by the vampires 
that have seized upon the nation's industries and con- 
trol the government with no other object in view than 
to perpetuate their own plutocratic piracy and keep 
the people in poverty and subjection. - ^_^ 

The times are hard only because the people are^soft. 

Socialism makes it clear as the noon-day sun why 
the times are hard whether the Republican or Demo- 
cratic party is in power, and whether Roosevelt, Taft 
or Wilson occupies the executive seat at Washington. 

Socialism proposes that the industries of the nation 
shall be taken over by the nation and operated by the 
iiation for the benefit of the Avhole people, and when 
this revolutionary change has come to pass the people 
will never again know the blight and curse of hard 
times. 



Sound Advice For Seekers of Success 



By G. E. MORAY 



SIT STILL ! 
No matter who tells you to "keep moving." 
(This does not include the cop!) 

Everything comes to him who sits still and waits. 

Did you ever see a rich man who made a practice 
of going up and down the street, looking for profitable 
opportunities and chances to invest money? 

On the contrary, he gets an office, and sits down, 
like a spider inside its web, to wait for some genius, or 
inventor, or man with ideas, to come along and seek 
an interview. 

He sits still while the man with ideas gets down 
on his knees and wails and laments, and entreats the 
patient rich man to take nine-tenths of all the profits, 
and provide the funds — the good, glad golden funds— 
with which to develop the great idea and place it upon 
the market. 

Or our investor, while sitting still, loans his money 
to active men, who have plenty of ambition, energy 
and gumption, but who have been unable to accumulate 



money, and are willing to pay the sit-still, spiderlike 
individual a large part of the proceeds of their toil and 
effort just for the privilege of having possession of a 
portion of his money for a limited time. 

In this way fortunes are made for the man who sits 
still ; while the poor man of activity hustles like the 
Devil. 

If you have money to use, and want to make more, 
everybody, and everybody's brother will come your j 
way and tell you nice stories of dollar-ous opportuni- 
ties. 

You can reject all that are too visionary, too pro- 
gressive, or too intelligent, and choose those that are 
modeled after the old schemes Noah used to explain 
to the monkeys when he made his famous shipbuilding \ 
experiment. 

Then bank your money securely ; or keep it in your 
pocketbook; keep your pocketbook in your pocket; 
keep your hand upon your pocket, and 

SIT STILL! 



The Western Comrade 




Scene at Jackson's Lake Basin Where Llano del Rio Colonists Have Built a Conservation Dam 



Colony Celebrates Anniversary 





I 


^^^ 


^^ 



NTERNATIONAL :\Iay day will always 
have a double significance for the resi- 
dents at the Llano del Rio community. 
It will be observed in the future much 
the same as it was on May 1, 1915 — as 
the anniversary of the founding of the 
co-operative colony and as the World's 
labor day. 

The celebration for 1915 proved a great success 
and aroused enthusiasm in the colonists and visitors. 
Probably no community in America ever flew more 
crimson banners. In fact the only restriction as a col- 
onist expressed it was the lack of more textile fabrics 
of a crimson hue. 

The day's sports consisted of a series of races, 
basketball games and a baseball game between the 
single men and the married men's teams. The former 
won 5 to 7 and the young women took full credit on 
the ground that their rooting and singing inspired the 
boys to mighty deeds. 

The grand masquerade ball proved the high tide 
event in social life at the colony. The largest crowd 
that had ever assembled at the club house enjoyed 
several hours of the frolic. There were over fifty cou- 
ples in mask and their costumes were better and more 



varied than on former occasions. Prizes were awarde 
for best costumes and best sustained characters of th 
evening. 

Frank Farmer as Charlie Chaplin proved a sourc 
of delight to the children and continuous amusemer 
to all. iliss Aileen Ware gave an exhibition of fane 
toe dancing and followed it with folk dances that caj 
tivated tke hearts of all present. The child proved 
most charming and graceful performer and her daint 
but strong portrayal of parts in difficult dances wi 
long be a source of inspiration to the other childre 
of the colony. 

The other diversion in the evening's program c 
dances was a song, "It's a Short, Short Way to Llano, 
by Dan Rooke, rendered by the Llano quartette, an 
a violin solo by Frank H. Ware. 

Motion pictures were made under the direction c 
Frank E. Wolfe, with Chief Engineer Earle E. Glai 
as amateur operator of the motion picture earner! 
The pictures proved a success and will soon be put o 
the screen so that Socialists in other parts of the worl 
can see their comrades at the Llano community i 
action. 

The flag raising ceremonies were under the dire( 
tion of W. A. Engle, who made the speech of the daj 



The Western Comrade 




Llano Women's Study Club. These Colonists Are Taking an Active Part in the Educational 

Department of the Community 



Photon 



Scenes at Llano del Rio Colon 






Earl E. Glass, Chief Engineer, Operating Motion 
Picture Camera 



Girls' 50-yard dash. The members of the bai 
athletic events where they were entered. Baseljjis, 
times are popular with all ages in the communi 
will be taught to swim when the big open-air po(ft(, 
colony progresses other features will be added ajj 



The Western Comrade 



IT 




nner in the May 



mmuniiy 




Llano Community in Motion Picture Scene. Costumes, Setting and Action Show Wonderful 

Possibilities for the Future 



Annual May Day Celebration 





prizes 

a;( nis, basket ball and other sports and pas- 
m ording to plans, every child in the colony 
(( 1 course of construction is finished. As the 
' enjoyment of both young and old. 




I. Roland as "Queen of the May" Added Much to 
the Merriment of the Carnival 



18 



The Western Comrade 



He reviewed the history of all the flags and dwelt espe- 
cially on the one banner that stands for the real uni- 
versal brotherhood. At the end of the speeches the 
flag was run up to the masthead on the new pole and 
the orchestra played and the assembly sang "The Red 
Flag." 

A score of bright tongues of scarlet appeared over 




bungalows and tent houses and three cheers were given 
and the formal part of the program was concluded. 

The parade was of unique character in that nearly 
every resident of the community irrespective of age 
or occupation participated in the march. Only by 
counter marching were they able to see what was go- 
ing on. 

The parade was intended to show the growth and 
progress made by the colony since its inception. For 
this purpose the original colonists, composed of Job 
Harriman, Frank P. McMahon, William A. Engle, 
David J. Wilson, J. L. Stanley and Leo Dawson, were 
in the lead in the parade. They rode behind "Dolly" 
and "Dick," the two horses owned a year ago. Then 
followed the colonists of today, something over 300 in 
number, in wagons, trucks, automobiles and on other 
vehicles, farming machinery or marching four abreast 
on foot. Members of the Llano del Bio Women's Club 
filled three of the larger vehicles. The school children 
to the number of 75 rode in the autos in the parade. 
Leading the division was an immense tractor vdth a 
big red flag "at the foremast," as a former sailor ex- 
pressed it. It made an impressive sight as it carried 
a cargo of bright-eyed girls who surrounded Horace 
Farmer, the driver, and scarcely gave him elbow room 
to steer his cumbersome machine down the main street. 

Llano communists are opposed to war and especially 
do they oppose war taxes. Despite this fact they find 
themselves unwilling but extensive contributors. One 
week's donation for documentary revenue stamps ran 
over $100. Of this one deed alone took a $50 stamp. 



This marked a deal which is of the greatest importance 
to the colony. It means the acquisition of about 1000 
acres including lands that carry most valuable water 
rights. This ranch has about 120 acres of fine alfalfa 
and 20 acres of producing orchard besides livestock 
and implements. This acquisition is of the utmost im- 
portance to the colonists who are jubilant over the 
success of the long negotiations for this place. 

Steadily the colonists are gaining in the acquisition 
of land and water, in machinery, livestock and on 
other material and interests that is of great value to 
them. 

L. A. Zaehritz, who is foreman at the Big Rock 
fish hatchery, visited the Los Angeles office and re- 
ported excellent progress at the colony's trout fishery. 
He says the 60,000 fish hatched several weeks ago are 
in good condition and are rapidly assuming the form 
and semblance of the beautiful rainbow trout. They 
are about an inch and a half long. The salmo irredeus 
is indigenous to these mountain stream and the cousins 
of the colony's fingerlings are in the stream that flows 
in front of the hatchery. Comrade Zaehritz says it 
required great caution to care for the young trout and 
that the most danger comes from the possibilities of 
over-feeding. 

The new engine for the power plant has been placed 
in position and connected with the bench saw, band 
saw, the planer and sticker and with! a wood saw. 




Bill Schnitzer Teaching tlie Girls the Art of Buck 
and Wing Dancing 



There is more than sufficient power to operate this 
machinery. 

The 70 school children of the Llano school have 
been moved to most ideal housing in snow-white can- 
vas tent houses. This will be their home until the end 
of the summer term. At the beginning of the fall term 
it is expected the new school building will be ready 
for them. 



I 



The Western Comrade 



19 



Prudence Stokes Brown, who will take charge of 
one of the important departments of the educational 
division of the colony, is taking a course of training 
under the personal direction of Dr. Maria Montessori 




of Italy. Dr. ^Montessori will remain in Southern Cali- 
fornia about four months and during that time Com- 
rade Brown will continue the course under this famous 
teacher. 

Llano del Eio Colony ■\^'ill have the second Montes- 



sori school in California and great importance is at- 
tached to this department. 

The marriage of Horace Farmer and Miss Elinor 
Richards marked the second wedding of the young 
people in the colony within a month. Miss Richards 
went to visit her parents in Los Angeles and in about 
a week Horace Farmer obtained a leave of absence and 
the younger set of office force had an hour's outing at 
the court house. Herbert Stanley Calvert and Miss 
^lellie jMiller were the first to marry. 

Resident Llano del Rio Colonists are grateful to 
Comrade Adolf Lofton of Low-Gap, Washington, for 
a donation of 77 valuable books for the Llano Library. 
The selection of these volumes is a tribute to the intel- 
ligence of the donor. They include two valuable en- 
cyclopedias, the Library of Original Sources and other 
important reference works. Every book will prove of 
value. Many books have been donated, but this group 
is the most valuable that has been added to the few 
original books possessed by the co-operatives. There 
are several hundred books in the county library de- 
partment of the colony library. 



Fellowship in Work 



By HARVEY 

THIS article is written from a sense of appreciation, 
prompted by warm and grateful feelings to the 
strong men and sensible women who have not only 
established themselves upon a permanent basis, but 
through their vmselfish industrial effort, have made it 
possible for others who are not yet wage-slaves to add 
their labor to the earth and thus start to build at the 
very foundation of all wealth. 

If you want an ocular demonstration of industrial 
co-operation, in the actual workings, go at once to 
Llano del Rio Colony^ in the Antelope Valley. 

There you will find about 300 men and women who 
own their own jobs and the tools Avith which they 
Avork, getting the full product of their labor. Can you 
beat that? But that is not all. 

There they are, happy, healthy and hopeful; with 
no impudent bill-collectors to bother them; far re- 
moved from the hurly-burly of the artificial cities, in 
God's open country, right on the land. And they have 
found within one brief year, a vastness and freedom 
that makes them love it. 

Through their splendid efforts, this same "desert" 
is yet to become the dimple in California's smile. 

Just one year ago four men, with love for their fel- 
lowmen, selected that particular valley in which they 
and their subsequent co-partners could each plant a 
home and establish themselves in life. 

These workers all share in a high ideal, and have 



ARMSTRONG 

an economic interest in the success of the colony. Each 
individual there has a sense of communal duty toward 
the colony as a whole. There is the ideal of brother- 




hood, and a solidarity not to be found amongst any 
other group of workers on this earth. 

They have laid the foundation well. Success is 
assured. The experimental stage is safely passed. 
And now they can confidently push aside the curtains 
of the future, and look down the corridors of time far 
enough to see their life-long dreams come true. 



20 



The Western Comrade 



Prevention of Conception 

By WILLIAM J. ROBINSON, M. D. 




T is very easy to write on the subject of 
the voluntary limitation of offspring for 
an orthodox audience. For to an ortho- 
dox audience our line of reasoning is 
both new and novel, many of the argu- 
ments are shocking and therefore inter- 
esting, while the incontrovertible facts 
which we present and) which to us are 
so old, so very old, come to them as eye-openers, as 
inspired epoch-making truths. It is very difficult, 
however, to write on the subject for a radical audi- 
ence, especially if the radical audience is also an in- 
tellectual one. One feels like constantly apologizing. 
For it seems impossible to imagine that the arguments 
which you have to present in favor of the voluntary 
limitation of offspring, the proofs of the benefits which 
it would confer and of the evils which it would obviate 
should be unknovra to radical readers, or that they 
should not be in full agreement with them. Still there 
is a valid excuse for speaking on the subject of pre- 
A^ention to Socialists. The excuse is contained in the 
fact that the attitude of many Socialists to the subject 
under discussion is one of indifference, while many 
good comrades speak of it sneeringly or with ill-con- 
cealed if not open hostility. 

This indifference or hostility, when not due to 
thoughtlessness — people are not enthusiastic over any 
measure to which they have not given any considera- 
tion — is due to two causes, which, strange to say, are 
of a diametrically opposite character. Some good com- 
rades are indifferent or hostile to the small family 
propaganda because they do not believe that a one or 
two child system will in any way improve the condition 
of the working class. They are in general opposed to 
any measure which hasi not the Socialist imprimatur 
on it, and which has not for its immediate object the 
abolition of wage slavery and the bringing about of 
the co-operative commonwealth. Like the good ortho- 
dox brethren that they are, they bring down from the 
wall the old rusty weapon, the "iron law of wages," 
and tell us that as soon as the workingman has few 
or no children and is able to live on less, his wages 
will be cut in two and he will be just as badly off as 
before. Of course no sensible person has flow any use 
for the iron law of wages. A strong union, a high 
standard of living and a scarce labor market can con- 
vert the iron law of wages into one of papier mache 
and tear it asunder with the greatest ease. A single 
workman can demand and receive higher wages than 



a man with nine children. In fact, as he has only him- 
self or himself and wife to provide for, he can be more 
independent, he can aft'ord to wait; but when there 
are several hungry mouths at home crying for bread 
the man is apt to accept anything that is offered him, 
and it is a well known fact that fathers of big families, 
especially where the children are not yet earning a 
living, make very poor strikers. 

There are comrades of another class whose objec- 
tion to the prevention of conception propaganda is, 
as mentioned, of an entirely different, of an opposite 
character. Not being entirely devoid of common sense, 
they admit that a large family of little children is a 
curse to a workingman, and that his condition would 
be greatly improved if he could control the number of 
his children and the intervals of their appearance in 
this world. But that is just what they are afraid of. 
They are afraid that if the material condition of the 
working classes is materially improved, they may lose 
their revolutionary spirit (which spirit is a pure myth) 
and sink into the slough of self-contentment and obese 
satisfaction of the bourgeoisie. And what will then 
become of the revolution? Yes, and many comrades 
want a numerically large proletariat. For when that 
terrible bloody revolution breaks out, we want to be 
able to send a large proletarian army against the capi- 
talistic monster. These good comrades take it for 
granted that the proletariat will necessarily be on 
the side of the revolution. They forget that a large, 
hungry proletariat is often more anti-revolutionary 
than is the bourgeoisie itself; they forget that the slum 
proletariat, or what our German friends call Lumpen- 
proletariat, make very poor revolutionary material, 
and it is from this stratum that are recruited the hired 
thugs, gunmen, hoodlums and hooligans, black hun- 
dreds, strikebreakers and other enemies of revolution- 
ary or evolutionary progress. 

To enter into a detailed discussion of the pros and 
cons of the limitation of offspring propaganda within 
this brief space would be impossible. I can only re- 
iterate my conviction that if Socialism stands for the 
immediate imprOA^ement of the condition of the work- 
ing class, and not for manna and honey in the vague 
distant future, then the Socialist Party can engage in 
no more important, no more immediately beneficial, no 
nobler and saner propaganda, than the practical 
propaganda of teaching the people the means of limit- 
ing the number of their children. 

You see that young woman? She is pale, thin, ex- 



The Western Comrade 



21 



hausted. She has been married eight years and is 
the mother of five children. They take away evei^ 
minute of her time, exhaust every atom of her energy. 
What should we do with her? Teach her Socialism? 
Yes. But if you will at the same time teach her how 
she can guard herself against having any more chil- 
dren, you will have done more for her than Socialism 
ever has or ever will do, and she will be correspond- 
ingly more grateful. Socialism will improve the con- 
ditions of the people in time to come; the knowledge 
of the limitation of offspring helps today, tomorrow, 
and every other day. And that is the beauty of it. 
You need no committees, no organization, no conven- 
tions, no resolutions. It can be spread from mouth 
to mouth, without any concerted action ; all that is 
requisite is to become convinced of its great value, of 
its absolute necessity for the people in our present 
social-economic condition, both as a weapon of defense 
and offense. The Socialist Party, if it adopted the 
limitation of offspring propaganda as a part of its pro- 
gram, could, through its locals, spread this knowledge 
like wildfire, and no greater, no more effective ammu- 
nition could be put into the hands of the people. It 
would also swell the army of Socialist Party members 
enormously. This is rather an opportunistic point of 
view, and I do not urge the adoption of the propaganda 
on that score, for I do not believe that the Socialist 
Party should be a vote-hunting party, primarily. But 
where the increase in the membership is the result of 
real, practical, beneficial work, where the people em- 
brace Socialism because they see that membership means 
an immediate betterment in their condition, an acquisi- 
tion of knowledge, nobody has a right to object. 
I know a young man and a young woman, both en- 



gaged in literary work; they were delightfully suited 
to each other, and they loved each other in quite the 
old-fashioned way. They dearly wanted to get mar- 
ried, but their meager income was in the way. They 
two could live on it very Avell; but the spectre of 
numerous progeny stood before them. How could they 
aff'ord to have several children on their meager and un- 
certain income? They could not, and in the meantime 
their health suffered; hers even more than his. She 
was really becoming a pitiable sight. They learned 
how they could delay and control the appearance of 
children ; they got married ; her health became bloom- 
ing; and a happier eoiiple it is hard to find. And the 
woman, who is a Socialist, said recently in her woman's 
inconsequential manner, that the best thing Socialism 
did for her was that it gave her means — indirectly, but 
she might not have been able to learn it otherwise — 
to live happily with the man she loved. And she has 
adopted as hers the motto: There is no single measure 
that would so positivelj^, so immediately, contribute to 
the happiness and progress of the human race as teach- 
ing the people the proper means of the prevention of 
conception. 

This brief article deals with — or rather hints at — 
the benefits of the knowledge of the prevention of con- 
ception to the individual couple. The temptation is 
great to dilate upon the influence that such universal 
knowledge would have upon the race as a whole, the 
relationship of population to the food supply, the 
eugenic or dysgenic effects of such knowledge, etc. 
And the temptation is almost irresistible to enter upon 
a discussion of the effects of the rational control of 
the birth-rate upon the most important and most sin- 
ister event of the hour — "War. — New Review. 



Socialism is Coming 



nN his recent book on American syndicalism, John 
Graham Brooks has the following to say about So- 
cialism in the United States: 

"Socialism steadily wins its way underneath all 
differences. Language, religion, forms of government 
set no barrier to its growth, because the causes of So- 
cialism underlie all these. 

("The causes have their roots in the discovered ex- 
cesses of a competitive system that fails to meet the 
minimum of equality which powerful sections in these 
communities now demand. In no part of the world 
have these excesses been more riotous than in the United 
States. Nowhere have they been brought more widely 
or more directly home to the masses than in this coun- 
try. The magnitude of our area and of our economic 
resources have concealed and delayed the exposure. 



With the opening of the twentieth century the exposure 
has come. 

"After three decades of obscure and fitful struggle 
Socialism becomes part and parcel of our political andl 
social structure. It no longer stammers exclusively 
in a tongue half learned. It is at home in every Ameri- 
can dialect. It no longer apologizes, it defies. Almost 
suddenly it wins a Congressman, fifty Mayors, and. 
nearly a thousand elected officials. 

"One of our most commanding figures in the rail- 
road world says that the onlj^ practical issue now is tO' 
'stave Socialism off as long as possible.' He is con- 
vinced that the first chill of the shadow has fallen upom 
us. There is much reason to believe that Socialism in 
its more revolutionary character is from now on to 
have its most fruitful field in the United States."" 



22 



The Western Comrade 



The Soldier Who Wouldn't 



By A. NEIL LYONS 



NOAV, what they said exactly I did not perfectly 
hear nor can I perfectly state, because I was in 
drink (ammoniated quinine) at the time, and I am in 
drink (spirits of niter) now. May has arrived far 
sooner than I had been led to expect, and her allied 
forces have effectively bombarded the narrows of my 
respiratory Dardanelles. They have likewise closed 
both eyes. 

So I sat in the corner of the railway carriage as I 
sit now — my shoulders hunched, my throat and mouth 
invested, my eyes bottled up ; with no means of seeing, 
speaking, thinking, or eating, but not accustomed to 
playing the harp. 

Well, then, they all got into the carriage and I 
could hear that there were five of them, and that four 
out of the five were soldiers. One of the soldiers talked 
much and the other three agreed with him. The sol- 
dier who talked much was evidently of London origin. 
His speech was infected with the accent and intonation 
which is cultivated bj' the inhabitants of that city, and 
it reflected, also, a London turn of thought and philos- 
ophy. I could not see his face, but from what I could 
hear of it, it was one of those round and rather stolid 
faces, having a square blue chin and a small, aggres- 
sive nose, and a mouth much worn mth controversy. 
And very small eyes, which were lit with a bright 
flame — either of anger or joy. I don't know which. 
Nor does anybody else. It is the misfortune of these 
faces that nobody can ever make up his mind whether 
to treat them very seriously or scream with laughter 
at them. 

I can't tell you anything about this soldier's three 
companions. I couldn't hear their faces at all. I 
could only hear their names, which were Joe, Bill, and 
Sam, respectively. 

The fifth disturber of my fevered vigil in that 
jolty, smoky, stifling car was an individual of some 
civilian species. At first I thought he was a clergyman. 
Then I thought he was a layman, who had cultivated 
habits of order ; a schoolmaster, perhaps, or an actuary 
or an adjuster of sewing machines. I could hear that 
he had a bald head, was clean-shaven and wore pince- 
nez. I croiiched a little closer to my corner, and I 
decided to- make him a sewing machine expert and 
leave it at that. 

Then, with my throat and eyes tight closed, I willed 
myself to die. But the will wasn't good enough. I 
lived. I lived to hear the blue chinned soldier forswear 
fliimself. 



"i\Ie?" he said, in answer to a question from the 
bald-headed man. "Me orf to the front?" No, sport. 
I don't wanter go to no front. I'm orf to London, I 
am; to Casa Blanca, if ya know where that is?" 

"I do not," said the bald-headed man. 

"Then I see you ain't studied Spanish," rejoined 
the soldier. "That's a Spanish expression, meanin' 
AA''hitechapel in a common way o' speakin'. Well, 




Punch, London 

THE SULTAN "OVER THE WATER" 
Mehmed V. (to Constantinople) : "I don't want to 
leave you, but I think I ought to go." 



that's where I'm goin'. That's where my 'ome is and 
my missus, and a few little gawdfers. I'm goin' 'omi 
for 'oliday. I ain't gointer no front nor don't damn 
well want to." 

' ' Oh, don 't say that ! ' ' protested the bald-headed 
gentleman. 

"But I do say it, sport. If I go to the front, I shall 
be killed. I shall be killed at once. Before any o' my 
mates 'ere." 



The Western Comrade 



"Oh, don't say that," repeated the bald-headed 
gentleman. 

"But I do say it, sport; and my friends 'ere know 
it's right what I say. Ain't that right. Bill? Ain't 
that right, Sam? Ain't that right, Joe?" 

Bill— That's right! 

Sam— That's right! 

Joe— That's Right! 

"I'm goin' 'ome for a 'oliday," continued the sol- 
dier, "and I got a shillin' in me pocket to spend on it. 
That's what they leave me out o' me week's pay — a 
shillin' An' me a bloke as 'as always earned a pound 
a week!" 

"What do you belong to?" inquired the bald- 
headed gentleman. 

''Me?" replied the soldier. "I belongs to Kitch- 
ener's Splendid Army. That's what I belong to. Them 
what you see on the pictures. They overwork us. They 
underfeed us. And they pay us a bob a week!" 

"Oh, come !" murmured the bald-headed gentleman. 

"I'm comin' along quick enough," the soldier as- 
sured him. "What I'm tellin' you is the truth. What's 
more, I can say worse. Thej' don't look arter us when 
we 're ill. I tell you they don 't. A little mate o ' mine, 
in the transport, a fine little soldier be the name o' 
Freddy Chewitt, 'e fell orf 'is 'oss the other mornin' 
and 'e broke 'is leg, and they sends for the doctor and 
'e gives 'im two pills. What? You can't believe it? 
Then keep tryin' till ya can, sport. Don't interrupt 
my story. That same night another bloke, a person '1 
friend o' mine, a soldier in my platoon, 'e falls ill 



with earache. They sends for the doctor — the same 
doctor — and 'e comes, and 'e gives this chap two pills — 
the same two pills — well, two pills o' the same sort, 
then. This mornin' I'm a bit out o' sorts meself — 
sore froat an' that — so I goes to this same doctor, and 
'e does it again — two pills. Same two pills! Aiu't 
that right. Bill? Ain't that right, Joe? Ain't that 
right, Sam?" 

Bill— That's right! 

Joe— That's right! 

Sam— That's right! 

"Well, there's yar Kitchener's army, sport. 'Ow 
can two pills cure everythink? 'Ow can the same two 
pills cure an earache, a sore froat, and a broken leg? 
Well, it ain't common reason. Kitchener's Splendid 
Army! Wish I'd never joined it, nor me pals neether. 
Wish I'd never 'eerd of it. Treat a man like a dog. 
Overwork 'm. Underfeed 'im. Break 'is legs. Give 
'im two pills. Deduct 'is pay. Leave 'im a bob a week ! 
Coo ! It makes me go goosey to think of it. And then 
you arst me if I'm goin' to the front. Why, I wooden 
go to the front for a tho^^sand quid. Why wooden I? 
Because I got a brother at the front. Ain't that right. 
Bill? Ain't that right, Sam? Ain't that right, Joe?" 

Bill— That's right! 

Sam— That's right! 

Joe— That's right! 

"D'yeer that?" said the soldier. "D'yeer what 
my mates say? I got a brother in the army. I per- 
suaded 'im to join. 'E's at the front now. If I go 
to the front, 'e '11 bluggy well shoot me. ' ' — The Clarion. 



Wo 


man 


By ODELL 


T. FELLOWS 


Forth she steps in all her splendor, 


Yet within her, deathless ever, 


Beckoning toward the coming time ; 


Throbbed the love, divine and pure. 


the heart of her so tender! 


Wrong and grief could crush it never, — 


the faith and love sublime ! 


Born to conquer and endure. 


Ever 'neath the grievous burden 


Cleaving to her cruel master, , 


Have her fragile shoulders bent, — 


Aiding him the heights to climb ; 


Scant, indeed, has been the guerdon 


Triumphing o'er all disaster. 


That the waiting years have sent. 


She has stood the test of time. 


Once did love, a strange rare blossom, 


Now behold the vision glorious, — 


O'er her life its fragrance shed; 


Man and woman meet at last 


Once there lay within her bosom. 


Side by side, to stand victorious 


Sweet and fair, a childish head. 


O'er the errors of the past. 


But the love-dream quickly vanished ; 


Naught of mastery or slavery 


Childless sat she at her gate. 


Shall the future ages blight. 


All her short-lived joy was banished 


Woman's love and faith and bravery, — 


By the sternness of her fate. 


These have won the age-long fight. 



24 T he W e s t em C omrad e 

Murmurings in a Field Hospital 

By CARL SANDBURG 
(They picked him up in the grass where he had lain two days in the rain with a piece of shrapnel in his lungs.) 

C^OME to me only with playthings now . . . No more iron cold and real to handle, 

>' A picture of a singing- woman with blue eyes Shaped for a drive straight ahead. 

Standing at a fence of hollyhoekSj poppies and sun- Bring me only beautiful useless things. 

flowers . . . Only old home things touched at sunset. 

Or an old man I remember sitting with children tell- And at the window one day in summer 

ing stories Yellow of the new crock of butter 

Of days that never hai^pened anywhere in the Stood against the red of new climbing roses . . 

world . . . And the world was all playthings. 

To Our St. Anthony 

By CHARLES W. WOOD 

O ANTHONY, St. Anthony, we humbly bow to And dost thou not, dear saint, perceive a great con- 

thee, tamination 

To thy most holy ignorance and matchless purity. In books about the doings of the vegetable creation? 

Thou seizest our magazines, but even though we've Thy holy mind, undoubtedly, must view with eyes 

missed 'em, askance 

'Twas for our moral uplift that we built the postal Those dreadful, lewd directions how to fertilize the 

system. plants. 

Oh, speed the day, we pray thee, to that pure and Oh bless us, saint, with all the virtuous ignorance 

virtuous ending we need, 

When all shall be as dull as thee and Nature '11 quit To keep our minds protected from the secret of the 

offending. seed. 

Protect our brains, dear stupid saint, from every- We trust that thou wilt drape the curs that wander 

thing that's human, past our flat 

Especially from the loathsome thought that we were And put at least a fig leaf on our neighbor 's Thomas 

born of Avoman. eat. 

Oh, speed the darkness that shall spread from Maine Go out into our pastures, please, and civilize the 

clear down to Texas, herds; 

When no American shall know the secret of the And while thou'rt at it, Anthony, put pants upon 

sexes: . the birds. 

When all shall presuppose, with minds forever free From horrid sights of Nature we would be forever 

from sin, free; 

That woman's shape does not extend far down be- If need be, gouge our eyes out so we'll be as blind 

low her chin. as thee. 

'Unsex our drama, Anthony, by taking woman And when thou'rt finished, Anthony, with art and 

out; Nature, too, 

Destroy all art; for goodness sake, put literature to And all that's male or female has come under thy 

rout. taboo ; 

Burn all those a^vful books that tell how chickens And when at last all things in sight are stamped 

come from eggs; with thy approval, 

Burn all those awful pictures where the ladies all Or else with some anathema that calls for their 

have legs. removal; 

And may our postal laws, dear saint, drop heavily, We hope that thou wilt guide us where our sinful 

kerchug, nature fails, 

On every sexual reference to man or brute or By stamping every woman with : "Excluded From 

bug. the Males." — The Masses. 



The Western Comrade 



25 



Slams at Shams 

What '11 we do to the paragrapher 
who says Przemysl held out for quite 
a spell? 

m fii iii 
No, Hortense, we do not know who 
converted the Prinz Eitel Frederich 
— possibly Billy Sunday. 

k ih: ¥r: 
While the capture of Przemysl 
was without doubt a great achieve- 
ment, it can scarcely be called a pro- 
nounced victory. 

« « ^-C 
A poet philosopher said: "The 
world knows what two know." If 
this be true, what of all the secrets 
that just two know? 

^^ i)i iK 

yi\ M^ As, 

Since the Sultan's declaration of 
war, the Turkish daily newspaper, 
the Ikdam, has issued uxtras hourly 
vnXh red ink scarelieads. From the 
reckless appearance of the sheet the 
editors don't oare a ikdam for ex- 
penses. 

* ^ M( 

When the auxiliary cruiser Prinz 
Eitel Frederich entered the Norfolk 
harbor, Boy-Ed, naval attache, has- 
tened from Washington to consult 
with the commander. Dispatches do 
not state whether Doc-Yak went on 
board. 

^ ■ ?1^ ?K 

With Theodore Roosevelt tearing 
into Bryan's diplomacy, or lack 
thereof, in the Metropolitan, and Bill 
Taft getting in on the first page of 
the Saturday Evening Post with a 
terrific criticism of Wilson's spend- 
thrift policj% the administration must 
be boiling in its own grease. 

The British admirality announces 
that British picket boats have sunk 
the British submarine E-15. That 
may be a strong bid for first place in 
the world's champion boob class, but 
it wont win. The U. S. navy sunk 
the battleship Maine last mouth in 
the basin at the Brooklyn navy yard. 
We still hold the belt. 
^ * ^4 

Magazine writers are making much 
of Henry Ford's "horse-sense meth- 
ods of making men oiit of criminals." 
A force of eighty men are kept busy 
in the factory "sociological depart- 
ment" looking after the record of tlie 
employes. The space writers fail to 
mention the fact that Union men and 
Socialists are not worth experiment- 
ing upon. 



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Industrial Accidents 

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Tbe Old Parties 
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Concentration of ^[Vealtn 
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26 



The Western Comrade 



Here's One Magsizine 

You Want 




Charles Edward Russell 

" The reason why I advise all persons 
that believe in a free press to support 
Pearson's Magazine is because Pear- 
son's is the only great magazine that 
is free." 



Pearson's Magazine is the 
only magazine of its kind. 
Its form enables it to depend 
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advertisers not at all. It 
can and does, therefore, 
print facts which no maga- 
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advertising for a living can 
"afford" to print. It does 
print such facts every 
month. Every issue con- 
tains the truth about some 
condition which affects 
your daUy welfare, which 
you want to know and which 
you can find nowhere else. 
Besides, it prints as much 
fiction and other entertain- 
ment as any general maga- 
zine. If you want one 
radical magazine to live and 
grow, subscribe toPearson's. 



Pearson's is the only big 
magazine in America in 
which the Socialists get an 

equal opportunity with others to present their case, not occasionally 

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The case for Socialism is presented by the leading Socialist writers 
of America, including Allan L. Benson and Chas. Edward Russell. 
One copy will convince you that you want Pearson's. On the news- 
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Here's Another Magazine You Want 

The Western Comrade 

The only illustrated Socialist magazine west of Chicago. It is 
excelled by none in America. Hundreds of subscriptions are 
Jcoming in from Socialists who are anxious to keep in touch 
with news of the development of the Llano del Rio Colony. 
Our aim is to make the magazine better and brighter with each 
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Address Circulation Dept., 924 Higgins; Bldg., Los Angeles, Cal. 



The Temple of Gold 

By Rabindranath Tagore 

"CIRE," announced the servant to 

^ the King, "the St. Narottam 
never deigns to step into your royal 
temple. He is singing God's praise 
under the trees by the open road. The 
temple is empty of all worshipers. 
They flock round him like bees round 
the fragrant white lotus, leaving the 
golden jar of honey unheeded." 

The King, vexed at heart, went to 
the spot where Narottam sat on the 
grass. He asked him, "Father, why 
leave my temple of the golden dome 
and sit in the dust outside to preach 
God's love?" 

"Because God is not there in your 
temple," said Narottam. 

The King froA^Tied and said, "Do 
you know 20,000,000 of gold have 
been spent on that marvel of art, and 
the temple was duly consecrated to 
God with costly rites?" 

"Yes, I know," answered Narot- 
tam. "It was the dread year, when 
thousands of your people lost their 
homes in fire and stood at your door 
for help in vain. And God said, 
'The poor creature who can give 
no shelter to his brothers would 
aspire to build my house.' Thus he 
took his place with the shelterless 
under the trees by the road. And 
that golden bubble is empty of all 
but hot vapor of pride." 

The King cried in anger, "Leave 
my land!" 

Calmly said the saint, "Yes, ban- 
ish me where vou have banished my 
God." 

Dissappointment 

The car conductor was about to 
give the motorman two bells to go 
ahead. 

"Wait," shrilled an unmistakably 
feminine voice, "wait till I get my 
clothes on." 

Whereupon 73 men and 37 women 
turned to rubber. 

A fat woman lifted her basket of 
laundry aboard. The car went on. 

Going With Prince 

A very small boy was trying to 
lead a big- yellow dog up the road. 
"Where are you going to take the 
dog, my little man?" inquired a 
passerby. 

"I — I'm going to see where — 
where he wants to go, first," was 
the breathless reply. 



The Western Comrade 



21 



Poison For Profit 

"\7" OU fellows don't know how to 
cheat, and I hope you won't 
learn," said a grocer^ who had 
bought some butter from the Llano 
del Rio colonists. This grocer was 
willing to pay 5 cents a pound more 
than the market price if he could se- 
cure butter from the colony dairy. 

His customers liked the butter 
made by men and women as guileless 
as those who work in the colony 
dairy. They don't put in poison, pre- 
servatives or coloring matter. They 
make butter to eat and they keep it 
pure. The colonists do not poison 
themselves with the food they pro- 
duce. The lesson seems so obvious 
that one hesitates to point to it. 

When the people of the world get 
sense enough to co-operate and to 
produce food for use and not for 
profit they will not know how to 
cheat and poison each other — for 
profit; to lie and steal — for profit. 
The individuals, groups and nations 
will stop murdering each other — for 
profit. 

Gutter Gabbler 

Observing the success of the Billy 
Sunday methods in the matter of 
conversion. Puck rises to suggest that 
the attempt be made to apply the 
same methods to other church cere- 
monies and activities, proposing the 
following formulas : 

Pastor (christening infant) — 
' ' "What do you want to call this hunk 
of excess baggage. Bo?" 

Presiding Parson — "What miser- 
able mutt giveth this skirt to be mar- 
ried to this gink" The Bride's Fa- 
ther — "I'm the guy." 

Industrious Usher — "Slide, you 
icecarts ! Slide ! ' ' 

Passing the Plate — "Come across 
with the iron-men, you low-lived 
tight-wads!" 

Sunday School Superintendent — 
"All of you little flivvers that want 
to swat Satan, stand on one leg." 

Perils of Truth 

A friend and I, one summer's day, 
While in a truthful spell, 

Agreed on this, that come what may, 
Each other's fault's we'd tell. 

We pointed out the facts and fears, 
For less than half a week — 

And now it's quite a score of years 
Since we were known to speak ! 



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Gen. Otis says editorially in The Times, of 

EVERYMAN 

(By Luke North) 

"If law and order, respect for conventions and property rights 
are to be maintained in this land and its civilization continued, 
publications like Everyman must be suppressed . . ." 

And again Gen. Otis says: 

"Its lamentably brilliant pages pervert art to the cunning 
uses of social disturbers . . ." — and also, says the General, still 
speaking of Everyman : 

"It is disturbing to mental stability." 



Thank you kindly. General. I could ask no greater boon 
from the Los Angeles Times. — Luke. 



EVERYMAN (Monthly) 

Each Issue Has an Important Lecture or Essay by 

Clarence Darro\Y 



Year $1.50, Copy 25 Cents 
516 American Bank Bldg., Los Angeles 



28 



The Western Comrade 



THE WESTERN COMRADE 

Entered as second-class matter at the 
'Post office at Los Angeles, Cal. 



924 Higgins Building, Los Angeles, Cal. 

Subscription Price One Dollar a Year 
In Clubs of Four Fifty Cents 



Job Harriman, Managing Editor 
Frank E. Wolfe, Editor 



Vol. in May, 1915 No. 1 

One Year's Achievement 

'T^HIS number of the WESTERN 
COMRADE marks the begin- 
ning of the third year of its publi- 
cation. During the past two years 
the magazine has enjoyed a popular- 
ity that rarely comes to radical peri- 
odicals. It has had its ups and 
downs in a financial way, but has 
weathered all storms and now 
emerges, after a year's unparalleled 
financial depression in the business 
world, stronger and better equipped 
for the struggle than ever before. 

Since May, 1914, the WESTERN 
•COMRADE has been under the pres- 
ent management and during that pe- 
riod it has grown steadily in popu- 
larity and circulation. Considerable 
of this popularity is due to the fact 
that the Socialists of America are 
paying more attention to practical 
c-o-operative enterprises than ever 
before. The regular monthly story 
giving an outline of the progress of 
the Llano del Rio Co-operative Col- 
ony has proven a great attraction 
and has been one of the largest fac- 
tors in increasing the circulation of 
the magazine. 

In one year we have more than 
doubled the circulation and this has 
l)een done without any cries for help 
-or "ballyhoo" for support. The 
only attempt to secure subscribers 
lias been by the legitimate means of 
club offers and combinations with 
■other Socialist publications. On the 
other hand comrades at many points 
have voluntarily gone into the field 
and worked up clubs and sent in 
large lists of subscribers and sent 
them in with strong letters of praise 
for the magazine and encouragement 
for the editors. Two comrades be- 
came so interested that they quietly 
created an interest in a small but de- 
voted group of Socialists with the 
result that 400 public libraries in the 
middle and western states now get 
the WESTERN COMRADE on paid 
annual subscriptions. This is but 
one instance of the interest and en- 



thusiasm of the comrades of Cali- 
fornia. 

"I can sell a thousand a month 
if you keep the colony stories go- 
ing," writes a comrade who is ac- 
tively engaged in spreading Social- 
ist propaganda in the northern 
states. This speaker sold 115 
WESTERN COMRADES at one 
meeting. 

"It sells on sight," writes an- 
other prominent organizer. 

"The WESTERN COMRADE is 
now our best seller," declares a 
proprietor of a large bookstore 
dealing extensively in radical pub- 
lications in a large Pacific coast 
city. 

All of this is most gratifying and 
it tends to show that the magazine 
is coming as near as is possible to 
pleasing the vast majority of 
our readers. Cancellations have 



amounted to just two during 
twelve months both in the same 
mail — one because we were "pro- 
German" and the other because we 
"favor England." 

Renewals have been almost the 
unanimous rule of our subscribers. 
This is the surest stamp of ap- 
proval. 

The WESTERN COMRADE 
starts in the year stronger and more 
confident than ever before. We 
wish to take this opportunity to 
thank our thousands of friends for 
their encouragement and support. 
— [The Editors.] 

Or is It a Jabot? 

Father's meal is cooked 
In a steaming casserole 

While baby's meal is warmed 
'Neath a dainty camisole. 



1,000 Copies Sold on Pre-Publicatlon Orders! 

SOCIALIST 
WAR MANUAL 

A Revolutionary Interpretation of the European Armageddon and the 
Temporary Collapse of Internationalism 

Contains: 

IMMEDIATE CAUSES 

By Louis C. Fraina 

GENERAL CAUSES 

By Frank Bohn 

MILITARISM 

By Floyd Dell 

THE ATTITUDE OF ITALY 

By Prof. Arthur Living"ston 

ANTI-WAR MANIFESTOES 

By the European Socialist Parties 

SOCIALISM AND THE WAR 

By Isaac A. Hourwich, Ph. D. 

HOW GERMAN SOCIALISTS DIVIDED 

By William English Walling 

BRITISH AND AMERICAN SOCIALISTS ON THE WAR 

Summary and Criticism of articles by Bernard 
Shaw, H. G. Wells, H. M. Hyndman, Ramsay Mac- 
Donald, Robert Blatchford, Victor Berger, Eugene 
Debs and Charles Edward Russell. 

. •■ - This Socialist War Manual Will Probably Become Historic. 

Scholarly — Comprehensive — Indispensable 

Price, 15 Cents a Copy 

Special Low Rate, bundles of five or more 

New Review 

80 FIFTH AVENUE, NEW YORK 



The Western Comrade 



29 



College Town Democracy 

'T^HE question of the democracy of 
Yale and New Haven, as com- 
pared with the aristocracy of Har- 
vard and Boston, has been revived 
by the Rev. Dr. Samuel C. Bushnell, 
of Boston, a prominent Yale alumnus, 
and Dean Jones, of Yale. Dr. Bush- 
nell made it public at the banquet of 
the Waterbury Alumni Association, 
when he recited the following poem : 

I'm from good old Boston, 

The home of the bean and the cod, 
Wliere the Cabots speak only to 
Lowells, 
And the Lowells speak only to 
God. 

Dr. Bushnell sent the poem to Dean 
Jones, of the academic department of 
Yale, who, after consulting the 
muses, wrote back : 

Here's to the town of New Haven, 
The home of the Truth and the Light, 

"Where God talks to Jones 

In the very same tones 
That he uses with Hadley and 
Dwight. 

Wierd Combine 

A man, while wandering in tlie 
village cemetery, saw a monument 
and read with surprise the inscrip- 
tion on it: "A lawyer and an hon- 
est man." 

The man scratched his head and 
looked at the monument again. He 
read the inscription over and over. 
Then he walked all around the mon- 
ument and examined the grave 
I closely. Another man in the ceme- 
tery approached and asked him : 

"Have you found the grave of an 
old friend?" 

■' ' No, " replied the first man, ' ' but I 
was wondering how they came to 
bury those two fellows in one 
grave." 

Foiled Again! 

Score a scoop for Plutarch. 

Acting as war correspondent some 
years ago the stern chronicler 
of events wrote of Julius Caesar : 
"When he arrived at the banks of 
the Rubicon, which divides bisalpine 
Gaul from the rest of Italy, he 
stopped to deliberate. At last he 
cried out, 'The die is cast,' and im- 
mediately crossed the Rubicon." 

Curse the liick ! Here we have an 
upstart scribbler getting in ahead of 



us, and this, too, when everybody in 
California was convinced that it 
was Gen. Otis who not only crossed 
the Rubicon but cabled the fact 
back red hot right after he did it ! 

Colony Baby Arrives 

Miss Llano Schnitzer arrived at 
the colony a few days before 
this magazine went to press. 
Her parents, Mr. and Mrs. "Wm. 
Schnitzer, have been in the Llano 
del Rio Community about four 
months. This is the first baby born 
at Llano. The colony physician 
and trained nurses were in attend- 
ance. . 



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The American Socialist 

Official Organ of the 

Socialist Party of America. 

The American Socialist speaks 
with authority. It is a powerful 
news and propaganda weekly 
and is the only paper in the 
United States which gives an 
account of the official business 
of the Socialist Party. 

Every Socialist. Every Student of Socia- 
!isni sliould be a subscriber. 

Subscription Price 

50 cents a year. 

The American Socialist and The 
Western Comrade can be had in 
combination for one year by send- 
ing $1.25 to 

THE WESTERN COMRADE 

924 Higgins Building 
Los Angeles, Cal. 



Socialists Attention! 




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of union-made goods in the hands of 
every reader of The Western Comrade, 
we will send postage prepaid, on receipt 
of FIFTY CENTS, one of our genuine 
sheepskin-leather card cases BEARING 
THE UNION LABEL.. 

This card case contains four pockets, 
one large for bills and papers, one for 
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no longer necessary, for a class-conscious 
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Send fifty cents in stamps or money 
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MUTUAL UNION TRADING COMPANY 

(The only exclusive union label merchandisers) 
(Owned and managed by members of the working class) 

9 Board of Trade Court, CHICAGO, ILLS. 



30 



The Western Comrade 



First Aid to Serum 

TT seems that the anti-tetanus 
serum has not been a complete 
success, but the trouble is not so 
much with the serum as with the dis- 
ease. The disease progresses so fast 
that convulsions set in and the pa- 
tient is so worn out by them that he 
dies of asphyxiation before the anti- 
tetanus serum can become effective. 
So it is seen that the serum would 
gladly do all that is expected of it, 
if the disease would only be calm and 
give it half a chance. 

Dr. lleltszer, of the Rockefeller 
Institute, thinks, however, that he 
has found a way to overcome this 
drawback. He proposes to inject a 
solution of epsom salts into the 
spinal membrane. This is intended 
to relax the body completely and 
relieve the convulsions. The only 
weak point about Dr. Meltszer's 
treatment is that the patient will be 
relaxed so thoroughly that he can't 
breathe, and death will ensue. 

But let us not be discouraged. If 
we keep on trying, we are sure to 
find a way of keeping patients alive 
while they are being poisoned and 
mutilated.— E. 0. J. 

When a Man's Married 

The publicity manager for a cer- 
tain California co-operative colony 
was waxing a bit boastful when he 
said: 

"We got out 500 pieces of mail to- 
day. I mailed about a hundred dic- 
tated letters. We are poking them 
down that little old mail chute faster 
than Uncle Sam's hired men can cart 

them away. Next week we'll . " 

The speaker paused and paled, as if 
a chill had struck him. He turned to 
meet the steely glare of a woman, 
who said, icily: 

"Perhaps, while you are overload- 
ing the mail, you will remember to 
post those letters to mamma which 
I gave you a week ago Friday." 

Crossing the Wash? 

Motorist (blocked by load of hay) 
■ -I, say, there, pull out and let me by. 

Farmer — Oh, I dunno ez I'm in 
any hurry. 

Motorist (angrily) — You seemed 
in a hurry to let that other fellow's 
carriage get past. 

Farmer — That's cause his horse 
wuz eatin' my hay. There hain't no 
danger o' yew eatin' it, I reckon. 



REVOLT 
IN MEXICO 



Read the Correct Interpretation of Underlying Motives in the 
Most Remarkable and Valuable Book of the Year 

The Mexican People — 
Their Struggle for Freedom 

-By- 
L. Gutierrez de Lara and Edgcumb Pinchon 

¥ ¥ ¥ 

Eugene V. Debs says : 

" * * * It is written from the point 
of view of the working class, the tillers of 
the soil, the producers of the wealth, and 
shows that through all these centuries of toil 
and tears and blood and martyrdom they 
have been struggling for the one purpose of 
emancipating themselves from the tyranny 
of a heartless aristocracy, buttressed on the 
one hand by the Roman Church and on the 
other by the military power." 

¥ ¥ ¥ 

Georgia Kotsih says: 

"* * * It strips the glamor of 
benevolent motives from the dealings with 
Mexico of the United States and other coun- 
tries and presents the stark truth that 
American and world capitalism has been, 
and is, in league against the proletariat of 
Mexico for its OAvn sordid interest. And 
• while the Mexican master class is depicted 
as the most depraved and bloodthirsty in 
history, the Socialist will see that the story 
of the Mexican proletariat is in greater or 
less degree and in varying circumstances the 
story of the proletariat in every country." 

Published by DOUBLEDAy' PAGE & CO. 

IPrice Sl.SO 

We will send you this book and The Western Comrade for one 

year for $2.00 




The Western Comrade 



31 



Llano del Rio Co-operative Colony 



Llano, California 



THIS is the greatest Community Enterprise ever launched 
in America. 

The colony was founded by Job Harriman and is situated 
in the beautiful Antelope Valley, Los Angeles County, Cali- 
fornia, a few hours' ride from Los Angeles. The community 
is solving the problem. of disemployment and business failure, 
and offers a way to provide for the future welfare of the 
workers and their families. 

Here is an example of co-operation in action. Llano del 
Rio Colony is an enterprise unique in the history of com- 
munity groups. 

Some of the aims of the colony are: to solve the problem 
of unemployment by providing steady employment for the 
workers; to assure safety and comfort for the future and for 
old age; to guarantee education for the children in the best 
school under personal supervision, and to provide a social 
life amid surroundings better than can be found in the com- 
petitive world. 

Some of these aims have been carried out during the 
year since the colony began to work out the problems that 
confront pioneers. Tliere are about 350 persons living at 
the new town of Llano. There are now more than seventy 
pupils in the school, and several hundred are expected to be 
enrolled before a year shall have passed. Plans are under 
way for a school building, which will cost several thousand 
dollars. The bonds have been voted and there Is nothing to 
delay the building. 

Schools will open at the fall term with classes ranging 
from the Montessori and kindergarten grades through the 
intermediate which includes the first year in high school. 
This gives the pupils an opportunity to take advanced sub- 
jects, including languages in the colony schools. 

The colony owns a fine herd of about 100 head of Jersey 
and Holstein dairy cattle and is turning out a large amount 
of dairy products. 

There are about 150 hogs in the pens, and among them a 
large number of good brood sows. This department will be 
given special attention and ranks high in importance. 

The colony has about forty work horses, a large tractor, 
two trucks and a number of automobiles. The poultry de- 
partment has 800 egg-making birds,, some of them blue- 
ribbon prize winners. About 2000 additional chicks were . 
added in May. This department, as all others, is in the 
charge of an expert and it will expand rapidly. 

About 60,000 rainbow trout have been hatched in the col- 
ony's fish hatchery, and it is intended to add several hundred 
thousand each year. 

There are several hundred hares in the rabbitry and the 
manager of the department says the arrivals are in startling 
numbers. 

There are about 11,000 grape cuttings in the ground and 
thousands of deciduous fruit and shade trees in the colony 
nursery. This department Is being steadily extended. 

The community owns several hundred colonies of bees 
which are producing honey. This department will be in- 
creased to several thousands. 

Among other industries the colony owns a steam laundry, 
a planing mill, a printing plant, a machine shop, a soil an- 
alysis laboratory, and a number of other productive plants 
are contemplated, among them a cannery, a tannery, an ice 
plant, a shoe factory, knitting and weaving plant, a motion 
picture company and factory. 

The colonists are farming on a large scale with the use 
of modern machinery, using scientific system and tried 
methods. 



About 115 acres of garden is being planted this year. 

Social life in; the colony is most delightful. Entertain- 
ments and dances are regularly established functions. Base- 
ball, basket-ball, tennis, swimming, fishing, hunting and all 
other sports and pastimes are popula.r with all ages. 

Several hundred acres are now in alfalfa, which is ex- 
pected to run six cuttings of heavy hay this season. There 
are two producing orchards and about fifty-five acres of 
young pear trees. Several hundred acres will be planted in 
pears and apples next year. 

Six hundred and forty acres have been set aside for a 
site for a city. The building department is making bricks 
for the construction of hundreds of homes. The city will 
be the only one of its kind in the world. It will be built 
with the end of being beautiful and/ utilitarian. 

There are 1000 memberships in the colony and over 400 
of them are subscribed for. It is believed that the remainder 
will be taken within the next few months. 

The broadest democracy prevails In the management of 
the colony. There is a directorate of nine, elected by the 
stockholders, and a community commission of nine, elected 
by the General Assembly — all persons over 18 voting. Abso- 
lute equality prevails in every respect. The ultimate popu- 
lation of this colony will be between 5000 and 6000 persons. 

The colony is organized as a corporation under the laws 
of California. The capitalization is $2,000,000. One thousand 
members are provided for. Each shareholder agrees to sub- 
scribe for 20000 shares of stock. 

Each member agrees to pay $2500 and will receive 2000 
shares of capital stock and a deed to a lot 50x100 feet with 
a modern residence erected thereon. 

Each pays cash ($750) for 750 shares. 

Deferred payments on the remaining 1250 shares and house 
and lot are made by deducting one dollar per day (or more, 
if the member wishes to pay more rapidly) from the $4 
wages of the colonist. 

Out of the remaining $3 a day, the colonist gets the neces- 
sities and comforts of life. 

The balance remaining to the individual credit of the 
colonist may be drawn in cash out of the net proceeds of 
the enterprise. 

A per cent of the wages may be drawn in cash. 

Continuous employment is provided, and vacations ar- 
ranged as may be desired by the colonist. 

Each member holds an equal number of shares of stock 
as every other shareholder. 

Each member receives the same wage as every other 
member. 

In case anyone desires to leave the colony his shares 
and accumulated fund may be sold at any time. 

Are you tired of the competitive world? 

Do you want to get into a position where every hour's 
work will be for yourself and your family? Do you want 
assurance of employment and provisions for the future? Ask 
for the booklet entitled "The Gateway to Freedom." Sub- 
scribe for The Western Comrade ($1.00 per year), and keep 
posted on the progress of the colony. 

Address 
C. V. BGGLESTON CO. 

Fiscal Agents 
Llano del Rio Company 
924 Higgins Building Los Angeles, California 



Is Your Job Safe? 

Hundreds are safeguarding themselves by join- 
ing the Llano del Rio Co-operative Colony in 
the Antelope Valley, Los Angeles County, Cali- 
fornia, where climate and surroundings are ideal 
for an agricultural and industrial community 



This community is doing constructive and 
productive work in one of the most beautiful 
valleys in Southern California. The climate 
and surroundings are ideal. The Colony was 
founded and is conducted under the direct 
supervision of Job Harriman, who has been 
a leader in the 
Socialist move- 
ment in America 
for the past 25 
years. The Col- 
ony is solving for 
its members and 
their families the 
serious problems 
and disemploy- 
ment and insecur- 
ity for the future. 
Here is an example of COOPERATION IN 
ACTION. 

There were originally one thousand mem- 
berships. Nearly one-half of these are sold 
and the remainder are selling rapidly. Men 
and women of nearly every useful occupa- 
tion are needed in the community. These 
men are following the latest scientific meth- 
ods in farming, stock raising, dairying, poul- 
try production, bee keeping, trout hatching 




and "rearing, and other agriculturai and in- 
dustrial p.ursuits. Social life is most delight- 
ful. If you are willing to apply the princi- 
ples of co'-operation of which you have heard, 
talked and read so much, here is your oppor- 
tunity. Co-operation is a practical thing and 

must be worked 
out in a practical 
manner. By this 
method we can ac- 
celerate the great 
world movement 
toward the social- 
ization of all the 
sources of human 
life. 

Do you want to 
solve your own 
vexatious problems and assist in this great 
enterprise? We want Colonists and we want 
representatives who can speak and write the 
message of freedom. You can make good 
from this hour if you wiU take hold and se- 
cure members. You can make this organiza- 
tion work a permanent business. See the 
story of the Colony on page 15 of this maga- 
zine, take advantage of your opportunity 
and write for particulars. 



Address C. V. Eggleston, Fiscal Agent 

Llano del Rio Company 



924 Higgins Building 



Los Angeles, California 



u 



cJune, 1915 



Ten Cents 




Stories and Specials By 



A. W. Ricker 
J. Stitt Wilson 

Carl D. Thompson 
Mila T. Maynard 
Thos. W. Williams 



IMLorgan Smith 
A. F. Gannon 
Wiley H. Swift 
Owen R. Lovejoy 
Ruth Lee Stevens 



G. E. Bolton 

Frank E. Wolfe 
Marguerite Head 
Adelaide Maydwell 
Edmund Brumbaugh 




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Ladies 


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Ladies 


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ELKSKIN 

BOOTS and SHOES 



Factory operated in connection 
with Llano Del Rio Colony 

IDEAL FOOTWEAR 

For Ranchers and Outdoor Men 



Tke famous Clifford Elkskm Snoes are lightest and 
easiest for solid comfort and will outwear tnree pairs 
of ordinary snoes. 

We cover all lines from ladies,' men's 
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mountain, himting, ranching or desert wear. 
Almost indestructible. 

Send in your orders by mail. Take 
measurement according to instructions. 
Out of town shoes made immediately on 
receipt of order. Send P. 0. order and state 
whether we shall forward by mail or express. 



SALES DEPARTMENT 



Llano del Rio Company 

922 Higgins Building, Los Angeles, Cal. 







CONTENTS 









Current Review. By Frank E. Wolfe Page 5 

Child Labor in the Mines. By Thos. W. Williams. .Page 9 

Need of Co-Operation. By Edward N. Clopper. . . .Page 10 

Need Children for Profits. By Wiley H. Swift Page 11 

The Laws Are Ignored. By Owen R. Lovejoy Page 12 

Pharisees Rebuked Page 12 

"Unto the Third." By A. F. Gannon Page 13 

Children and Community Life. By Adelaide 

Maydwell Page 15 

Life with the Colony Children Page 16 

Filling the Dinner Pail. By A. W. Ricker Page 21 

The Dandy Funeral. By Morgan Smith Page 22 

Lawson — Labor — Liberty. By Edmund B. 

Brumbaugh Page 23 

Keep Up the Spade Page 23 

Is It Practical? By Carl D. Thompson Page 24 

Mother Earth (poem). By Ruth Lee Stevens Page 24 

Impeachment of Capitalism. By J. Stitt Wilson.. Page 25 

Is Your Conscience. Clear. By Mila Tupper 

Maynard Page 25 

The Fighter (poem). By Marguerite Head Page 25 

Hunter's New Book Page 28 

CARTOONS 

star Gazing Frontispiece 

Woodrow Wilson, Taxidermist Page 6 

The Star of Bethlehem (U. S. A.) Page 7 

The Party Wash Page 8 

Brave Work! Page 21 

The Path of Neutrality Page 28 




* 



* 
I 



»SH$H$»^»^|^h4i^H$H$»^»^»^H$H$»^»^h^jH^J^^^-H$H$»<^4- ^^^ 1$^ >2^ ij^ 



The Western Comrade 



STAR GAZING 




— Baltimore American 



How His Future Looks 



The Western Comrade 



Political Action 



Devoted to the Cause of the Workers 



Co-operation 



Direct Action 



VOL. Ill 



LOS ANGELES, CAL., JUNE, 1915 



NUMBER 2 




A Typical Louisiana Oyster Cannery Force. The Girl in the Foreground Is Eight Years Old and a Regular Worker. 



By Frank 

IF President "Wilson has surrendered to the war 
party of America, it seems extremely doubtful 
if Brj^an and the more sober of the Washington 
statesmen will be able to prevent intervention in 
ilexico and action toward Germany that will be 
tantamount to a declaration of war. Intervention 
means war with Mexico. Bryan's withdrawal from 
the cabinet is regarded by the war party as a tre- 
mendous victory. The gunmakers, the powder trust 
and all the forces that fatten on blood and carnage 



CURRENT REVIEW 

E. Wolfe 



are losing no opportunity to crowd their propaganda 
of war at any price. 

Wilson's note to Germany fell below the hopes 
of the jingoes, but it carries with it the implied 
threat of force that Bryan declined to support. 
With this foundation laid, all that is needed to pre- 
cipitate war will be a series| of incidents, the ex- 
change of "notes," the sinking of another ship, the 
severing of diplomatic relations and the uproar of the 
daily press — then the beginning of the cataclysm. 



The Western Comrade 




INTEKVENTION in Mexico looms as a greater 
danger to peace on this continent than since 
the revolution begun. Never was a more insidious 
plot floated than the Red Cross appeal for funds 
to "relieve suffering in the sister republics." The 
sudden cry of hunger in Mexico (City) touches the 
human heart. Vide any newspaper. "Food sent 
to starving Mexicans shipped abroad and sold!" 
screams the headlines. Can the American public 
be stupid enough to fail to see through this move 
on the part of capitalists who are for intervention? 
Will the Hearsts and Otises, the landgrabbers, the 
oil barons, and the mining kings succeed, after sev- 
eral years' effort, in stampeding the American peo- 
ple? The statement from Washington that 150,000 
armed men were starving 15,000,000 non-combat- 
tants is utterly absurd. If there is anybody starving 
ia Mexico it is the dealers and traders in the cities 
who have never produced anything or performed 
any useful service. The land is as rich and pro- 
ductive as ever and all the land that can be freed 
from the grasp of the exploiters is under cultivation. 
There is no time in history when the Americans 
have been so sorry a figure in the affairs of nations. 
The United States, with millions of disemployed and 
hungry workers, with 15,000,000 humans subsist- 
ing below the living line, with its hourly suicides, 
deaths from starvation, murders (legal and human) 
and its saturnalia of graft and corruption, will noiv 
go forth to force its particular brand of morality 
on a nation that, let alone, will shame us in a gen- 
eration. Intervention at this hour means war with 
a united Mexico. A prolonged, cruel war of in- 
vasion for conquest. A war which will make staiva- 
tion as great a reality in Mexico as it is in the 
United States. We may have to face, before the 
end, a United South America. Then we will have 
the spectacle of an immoral, vicious nation trying 
to force its ethics on an unmoral and happy people. 
If those who are short-sightedly seeking more profits 
at the bayonet point could but realize that this war 
of conquest will mean that Latin-America will close 
its doors to American commerce it might give capi- 
talism pause. It required no prophet to see the pos- 



sibility of war with A. B. C. powers and it may run 
down farther into the alphabet. Military experts 
have said it would require an army of 200,000 to 
subdue (enslave) Mexico. It will cost tens of thou- 
sands of lives. It will require years to accomplish. 
Fighting on their own grounds, armed, equipped 
arri c-picn-ipd veterans far outnumbering the callow 




— Sydney Bulletin 

WOODROW WILSON, TAXIDERMIST 
"Have I got to turn this durned bird into a war eagle?" 



clerks and school boys that make up a volunteer 
American army, we shall suffer a terrible loss of 
life. When our marines landed at Vera Cruz the 
indignation in South America was great. 

Militarism prays hourly for a war that will make 
350,000 American workers into potential murder- 
ers. President Wilson has held his head through 




The Western Comrade 




many trying situations, but the newspapers would 
make us believe he is about to lose it. 

Mexico is plagued with landlordism, clericalism 
and militarism. Now, American capitalism seeks to 
force the discomfiture of the nation and to enslave 
a race. Intervention means a prolonged, disastrous 
war. 

♦ ♦ ♦ 

4t/'~1ERTAINLY not, we can't discontinue our 
V> commerce with nations, peaceful and warring. 
That would be against precedent and tradition." 
This was the frank and sincere declaration of a 
"prominent business man" of the type so worshipped 
by the daily press. His personal name is of no im- 
portance. In numbers he is legion. He cogently 
voiced the sentiment of America. Why should we 
stop making powder and shrapnel for export and 
allow other nations to get the profits? Why should 
we? Now, honestly, isn't it sheer hypocrisy to say 
we care about the lives of men out there in the 
trenches ? What do we care for the lives of Ameri- 
cans in the trenches in the daily war. Should the 
Bethlehem gun works refuse to sell them to the kill- 
ers of Colorado? Should we of Los Angeles who 
buy sawed-off shotguns to shoot men, women and 
children in our streets, grow indignant about the 
sale of similar or less certain guns to shoot men, 
women and children in Belgium? Not unless we are 
a nation of hypocrites — and we are. 
■* ♦ 4* 

WE are a neutral nation. This is easily proved. 
Since the war began England has placed 
orders with the Bethlehem Steel Company of Penn- 
sylvania for over $100,000,000 worth of arms and 
ammunition. This company is now farming out a 
part of its contracts to the Allis Chalmers Company 
of AVisconsin where shrapnel shells are being partly 
finished and returned to Bethlehem. 

From America, England is getting shells that are 
the most deadly that have yet been devised. British 
gunners fire shells into the German trenches and 
some of these are reported to have such power that 
they kill everything that breathes within a radius of 
100 yards. The Germans retaliate by firing a simi- 
lar shell at the English — and both shells are made in 
America. 



Germany long ago complained that the Russians 
were using American shells. All belligerent coun- 
tries seem to be well supplied with these shells. The 
infidel Turks are using Christian shrapnel and 




— Kladderadatsch 

THE STAR OF BETHLEHEM (U. S. A.) 

"And when they saw the star, they went into the 
house and received guns, aircraft, and bombs in great 
number. And they gave of their treasure gold and 
great profits to the promised land," 



smokeless powder against the dogs of unbelievers 
on the invading ships. Christian gunners on allied 
dreadnaughts are killing moslems by the hundreds 
in the forts on the Dardanelles — ^using American 
projectiles. 

Mexicans have been killing each other for years 
and thej^ have been totally dependent upoii Ameri- 
can guns and ammunition. Now we are sending 



The Western Comrade 







food and cross red nurses into Mexico to demonstrate 
our neutrality there. 

Owing to o\ir neutrality we sold high-power, 
long-distance guns to Philippino pagans who 
promptly, and at safe distance, killed "our troops" 
who were armed with the archaic Springfields and 
black powder that made them splendid targets. We 
are neutral, so long as we get the profits. 
1 ♦ ♦ ♦> ■ 

WE note some of our editorial comrades are 
astonished at the revelations made at a 
hearing before the United States Commission on 
Industrial Relations at Washington where an agent 
:of the Boy Scout movement testified. Unhesitat- 
ingly and unblashingiy this man declared that John 
D. Rockefeller, Audrew Carnegie (of Ludlow and 
Homestead), and other plutocrats were heavy con- 
tributors to the fund for the youth-destroying in- 
stitution. 

The Boy Scout movement is a boy murder move- 
ment. In America it was spawned by the Powder 
itrust, but it is the legitimate offspring of militarism 
that has made shambles of the fields of Europe. 

■^ ♦$•■ ■•$•■ 

THIS number of the AVESTERN COMRADE is 
devoted to pictures and stories about children. 
It furnishes a contrast that is more startling than 
a casual glance would indicate. The pictures and 
stories of little ones in sweatshops, factories and 
mines clearly depict the dark side of child life in 
America. The views of the community children at 
Llano and Miss Maydwell's delightful article on the 
co-operative colony furnishes a ray of hope for the 

future. 

^ ♦$* ^ 

IF the world had not been busy with matters of 
greater import, the Barnes-Roosevelt backj'ard 
clothesline quarrel would have reached and held the 
honored position of p. 1 — col. 7. The best it did was 
to break in on page one, somewhere in the middle, 
usually on the fold, hidden under the big red line 
about some really important capture of 200 yards 
of trenches between Arras and Labasse. The result, 
it is believed, was that Mr. Roosevelt won the suit. 



The action was really based on the loose use of 
the words ""corruption" and "corrupt" when the 
former president mentioned his former counsellor 
guide mentor and friend. Then Barnes sued Roose- 
velt for $50,000. 

At the trial each said some horrible things about 




— New York World 

THE PARTY WASH 
Vindicating their "personal honor." 



the other and both proved their statements by docu- 
ments and witnesses. 

It wasn't what was said, it was the old Roose- 
veltian way of saying "Ice is cold! Water is wet! 
Fire is hot!" with a show of teeth and fierceness 
that has always astounded the rubes and boobs, that 
aroused the WTath of Barnes. Mr. Barnes sued to 
vindicate his personal honor — he lost. Mr. Roose- 
velt defended his personal honor — read the evidence. 



The Western Comrade 




Child Labor in the Mines 



By THOMAS W. WILLIAMS 




ATHER died when I was 11. There were 
4^ "F ^^^^' children. I was the only boy. We 

vfl had no resources. 

Some good, philanthropic, Christian 
people took an interest in the family. 
As a result I secured a "job" as "trap- 
per'" in a coal mine. I had a mania for 
books, an inborn desire to know. The 
school principal pleaded that I be permitted to piirsue 
my studies, but all to no purpose. What need would 
I, the only son of a widowed mother^ have for learn- 
j ing, anyway? My place was with the proletariat. 
I Mother and I were to be congratulated in securing 
isueh a windfall. 

I The experience of those first days alone at my 
; door, the "gob" literally alive with rats, the con- 
stant falling of loose pieces of rock and slate, the 



inky darkness and the impenetrable gloom, only oc- 
casionally broken when a driver passed with a chain 
of cars — all this is indelibly stamped on brain and 
heart. 

To add to my fears, older boys and men took 
especial delight in telling all sorts of weird, uncanny 
stories of impending harm. 

It was a veritable hell, and even now is an awful 
nightmare. 

I received the munificent sum of 60 cents a day, 
for ten Tiours' work^$3.60 a week — and furnished 
my own oil out of that. 

During those first years T saw dozens of men who 
were crushed out of all human semblance ; men and 
boys maimed and crippled. At one time the miners 
in one-half of the workings were prostrated by black 
damp, and only throvigh heroic effort were rescued 



1(1 



The Western Comrade 




at all. At another time the whole mouth of the mine 
caved in and we were rescued after many hours, our 
egress being through a small aperture improvised 
through loose dirt a distance of forty feet. 

It is an utter waste of time and money to send 
preachers to college to enable them to impress the 
people with the existence of hell. I know there is a 
hell. I have been there. Tens of thousands of boys 
are there now, and it is in the interests of these poor 
unfortunates that I pen these lines. 

By heroic effort and indomitable will I have been 
able to lift myself from these damning environments, 
but the lessons learned in those early years have been 
of invaluable service. The class struggle with all its 
gruesomeness and horror was brought home to me 
in clearer terms than could be portrayed by pen or 
tongue. 

The study of child slavery is fascinating to theor- 
ists, alluring to the economists and a diversion to the 
idealists, but to me it is all that the term implies. 

And what is the remedy? Maudlin sympathy and 



sporadic charity? Shall we tell these youngsters to 
"get their heart right" and "make their peace with 
God," because He in His inscrutable wisdom has so 
ordained? Well, hardly. 

Let us educate and organize the workers to revolt, 
to refuse to passively submit. So long as the means 
of life remain in the hands of the few, so long will the 
many suffer and toil and die. 

Child labor is a national calamity. It not only 
leaves its effect upon the child, but undermines the 
race. We must make the mines, the mills, the fac- 
tories and all the institutions of labor the property 
of all the people, and thereby remove the incentive 
for the substitution of the child for the man in the 
field of industry. 




Need of Co-Operation 

By EDWARD N. CLOPPER 



NEAKLY every state in the Union has on its statute 
books today a mass of legislation for the wel- 
fare of children. Some of it is archaic; some is ex- 
treme; and not a little is contradictory and unenforc- 
able. Fundamentally the difficulty lies in that old and 
vital defect of lack of vision, lack of the power of 
co-ordination. The relationship between the various 
branches of child welfare is remarkably intimate but 
quite often escapes observation and still oftener escapes 
realization by the very workers themselves. 

In their enthi^siasm for improving conditions they 



forget such elementary principles as, for instance, that 
the periods for compulsory attendance at school, for | 
prohibition of child labor and for public relief for chil- 
dren from want must be the same^ and if one is ex- 
tended, the other miist be changed to correspond. This 
applies to other branches of child welfare work with 
equal force and shows that co-operation is essential 
to effective reform. Because of the absence of this 
essential our laws are in confusion and our work is 
seriously hampered. 

Co-operation in this field can best be promoted 



The Western Comrade 



\\ 



through the medium of a general children's charter. 
At the National Conference in Memphis in 1914 the 
compilation of such a charter was urged to embody all 



the recognizable principles of child-caring, which could 
be used as a guide by the several states and individuals 
generally. 



Need Children for Profits 



By WILEY 

WHEN I consider what remains to be done for 
the protection of the childern in North and 
South Carolina I am forced to conclude that up to the 
present we have not progressed very far. North and 
South Carolina have a larger per cent of child workers 
in the manufacturing industry than any other state in 
the country. If the persons engaged in these industries 
should march by, every ninth person would be a child 
under 16. These children leave school forever at 12 — 
often younger in North Carolina, where there is prac- 
tically no enforcement — to work 11 hours a day in 
our factories. The opportunity for education is closed 
to them forever. 

Public opinion grows slowly and law halts behind 
public opinion. The people of tliese states as a whole 
deplore the conditions under which children are work- 



H. SWIFT 

ing, and yet it is my firm belief that neither North 
Carolina nor South Carolina, if left to herself, will 
enact any real child labor legislation within the next 
eight years. The cotton manufacturers as a class are 
actively opposed to all such legislation. They have 
dictated, can dictate and will dictate what our laws 
regulating the employment of children shall be. Every 
one of our four best governors has declared for legis- 
lation on this subject, but when the bill comes up the 
legislative halls are crowded with child employers, 
and they win. You need not be surprised that our 
Senator Overman blocked the Palmer-Owen bill. He 
knew that his re-election depended upon it. The Com- 
missioner of Labor is now making an. effort to enforce 
the law in North Carolina, and I look for him to be en- 
joined from further activity in this direction or to be 




12 



The Western Comrade 



defeated at the next election. He is playing with tire. 
One difficulty is the fact that the mills of the South 
are new and have brought prosperity for which, un- 
fortunately, people are often willing to pay any price. 



be successfully operated without children under 14, 
and they are certain no mill can be run if an eight- 
hour day for children under 16 prevails. There is only 
one way to get these children out of our mills and 



Men who build cotton mills believe that no mill can that is for the National Government to do it. 

The Laws Are Ignored 



By OWEN R 

THE up-to-date manufacturer wants efficient, re- 
sponsible, M^ell-trained workers — he does not want 
children at his machines. So we see a manufacturers' 
bill passed in Michigan raising the age limit from 14 
to 15; we see large employers endorsing the proposal 
of the Illinois Child Labor Committee to forbid all em- 
ployment of children under 16 during school hours; we 
see Pennsylvania limiting the working day of her 14 
and 15 year old children to less than 48 hours a week 
in order that they shall continue their education at a 
part-time day school (and incidentally, at last, elimin- 
ating them from her glass factories at night). Even 
backward Alabama has fixed a date after which no 
children under 14 shall be employed in her cotton mills. 
These are big advances, but they merely establish 
standards which enlightened people — employers and 
public — recognize as reasonable and necessary. The 
majority upholds them and yet there are other states 
in which similar measures have this year been defeated, 
because the reactionary minority, active and aggres- 
sive, has blocked the way to progress. In fact the 



. L O V E J O Y 

forces of reaction have never been so alert and well- 
organized as they are today. Possibly because they 
feel the ground slipping from under them, and well 
they may. The child labor bills defeated this year 
in West Virginia, Texas and the Carolinas are just so 
many new arguments for a federal law. Their chil- 
dren are our children and must be protected. We must 
extend to their factories and mills and canneries — to 
all establishments in the country that engage in inter- 
state comm.erce, the standards of ages and hours em- 
bodied in the laws of a majority of the states. Reac- 
tion will continue to use all the political power it pos- 
sesses that it may retain the privilege of legally em- 
ploying children of 12 or 13 — and violating without 
interference even that age limit (our agent found 84 
violations in 16 North Carolina mills in 15 days) ; re- 
action wants boys on the night shift; it will fight any 
proposal to shorten an 11-hour day. 

If all right-minded citizens would help, we should 
adopt a federal law and clear the way for constructive 
action. 



Pharisees Rebuked 



NEVER was self-righteousness, self-complacency 
and smuggery more quickly and sharply rebuked 
than at the first day's session of the Eleventh Annual 
Conference on Child Labor, which took place at the 
concourse at the San Francisco Exposition. 

The governor, the mayor and president of the ex- 
position were on the program and each sent a repre- 
sentative. The mayor's secretary made a good speech, 
but said nothing. The exposition man give a good ex- 
hibition of stereotyped phrases and self-laudation. The 
governor's representative was a politician — with ap- 
pearance and manners of the vintage 1873 — who read 
a "paper" which reeked with sophistries (polite word 
for lies) about the perfectly splendid laws governing 
child labor in California. His paper said California 
took ■ excellent care of its child workers ; that Cali- 
f ornija had no child workei's ; that working in the can- 
neries was good for the children, and that selling news- 
papers on the streets of the cities made the children 
better citizens; that there was no child labor worth 



mentioning (yet he continued to mention it and to 
apologize for it) and that the salubrious climate of 
this glorious state made it a joy for children to work; 
and besides they didn't have to work in California. 

The faces of the men and women, who sat on che 
platform behind this Paleozoic apostle of what used to 
be, was a study. Dr. Felix Adler followed and with 
a voice as soft as the cooing of a dove, told of the 
dangers of the crime of self-complacency and excess 
satisfaction over achievement. The exposition 
"booster" (vile word) squirmed uneasily, though he 
but dimly understood, and the politician turned a deep 
crimson. 

Dr. Adler dismissed the boasts of the two speakers 
and made no direct reference, but he let it be known 
he had no confidence in their statements or patience 
with Pharisees of their type. Then Paul Scharrenberg 
spoke on "Organized Labor's Brief Against Child 
Labor." He expressed his amazement at the Iam6 
apology and specious denial of California's disgrace." 



The Western Comrade 



13 



He went after those responsible for the unprotected 
children in California's canneries and on the city 
streets. After tearing the mask of hypocrisy off the 
faces of the political pretenders^ the speaker declared 
"No dividends — no profits can compensate for these 
wrongs." 

Mrs. Florence Kelley of New York showed the close 
parallel of the claims of those who perpetuate child 
slavery in every state. In some states it is the cotton 
industry, and in California it was the canneries; and 
everywhere the exploiters claimed it didn't hurt the 
children — it was good for them. Hard labor is just 
what young children need. 

"Into every state we go these people say that their 
particular industry does not hurt the children. This 



holds in California — as we see here today with childern 
worked in your canneries — the same as it holds in 
Texas, where young children are worked in the cotton 
fields side by side with convicts wearing the ball and 
chain." 

Mrs. Kelley told of the horrors of those camps and 
one might have thought she was referring to the hop- 
picking camps of California. She declared none of us 
can say "My hands are clean so long as child labor 
exists anywhere in America." 

Edwin Markham read selections from "Children in 
Bondage" and brought the cannery child vividly be- 
fore his hearers. All the speakers agreed that a federal 
law is necessary and all showed keen zest in puncturing 
the Pharisaical preachment of plutocracy's protectors. 



"Unto the Third" 




By A. F. 

ASBY reached the foot of the ladder of 
success at 35 with "a pig and a peck of 
beans." This is not my figure of speech; 
it's Gasby's own — often uttered, in a 
properly deprecatory fashion, when 
I Gasby was mellowed by rare vintage in 
the presence of his peers about the ban- 
____^_____ quet board. Sometimes it was snarled 
by him, in a towering passion, to squelch o£fice-at- 
taehee or factoryhand who had the temerity to enter 
his presence with a plea for more generous remunera- 
tion. Like many other sayings of great men, it was 
not exactly true. Gasby possessed, in addition to tne 
porker and the peck of legumes, at the age mentioned, 
a homey wife and a curly headed kiddie of 5. How- 
ever, if these were purposely omitted by Gasby in 
coining the pithy, alliterative epitome of his dearth 
of earthly accumulations at the pivotal point of his 
career, they shall achieve a measure of justice, if some- 
what belated, at the hand of the present chronicler. 
If one who knew had dared to mention this discrepancy 
to Gasby in his phenomenally successful years Gasby 
would, no doubt, have witheringly replied: 

"Hell, yes! I also forgot to add a pair of cowhide 
boots and a hickory pants -with one gallus!" 

And there the matter would rest forever and two 
'.days — for Gasby, like Bimi, had "too much ego in his 
cosmos" to admit that anybody on earth had ever 
contributed an iota to Gasby's success, save Gasby. 
But to my tardy errantry of rescuing the lady and the 
laddie from the toils of oblivion. 

In the little country town which Gasby early hon- 
ored with his somewhat unproductive presence (and, 
long afterward, a massive, imposing library), Mrs. 



GANNON 

Gasby had an enviable reputation for her succulently 
superior preparation of the plebian viand, baked pork 
and beans. With hosewifely guile, precept to the con- 
trary notwithstanding, here was a woman who kept 
a secret. While the world had not as yet made a 
beaten path to her door, requests came from other 
communities for crockfuls of her special product. The 
shiftless Gasby, not being a generous provider, was 
content to do odd jobs — and deliver his wife's baked 
beans. 

ONE fateful day a commercial traveler domiciled 
at the single local caravansary asked the goddess 
who presided over the fly-specked dining tables for a 
serving of Gasby's beans, the virtues of which he had 
heard of at a neighboring town. None was at hand. 
Mine host, scenting profit and reputation for himself 
and hostelry, sent post-haste for a large portion, pip- 
ing hot from the Gasby oven. The drummer was de- 
lighted. Questions followed. Where could he see this 
man Gasby? The Gasby home was pointed out, a 
block down the straggling country street. Thither 
went the knight of the grip with a good cigar between 
his teeth and contentment in his heart — or, should one 
say, stomach? After the manner of his kind, Gasby 
sat on an upturned box, in a shady spot near the 
kitchen door, whittling. 

The stranger presented Gasby a cigar that was 
a revelation to the latter, once he had it "goin'." 

Pretty hot around an oven these days, eh?" 

"Recon 'tis," noncommittally opined Gasby. 

Mrs. Gasby, peering through a chink in the little 
curtained kitchen window, KNEW that it was. 

Half an hour later the caller departed, leaving a 



14 



The Western Comrade 



brace of cigars in his wake. Gasby arose and entered 
the house. There was the light of conquest in his 
eyes as he almost shouted: 

"Tillie, we're goin' into business — that feller an' 

us! We're goin' over t' S an' start a-cannin' 

beans," he ended, triumphantly. 

"No we aint, Cyrus," Tillie readily responded. "I 
heard his schemin'; were goin' t' work hard an' save 
till we get 'nough t' start a place o' our own. My 
mind 's made up ! " 

Gasby 's face lengthened as he parried: 
"But Teddie, he's got t' be edicated." 
"Never mind," consolingly replied his sweaty help- 
meet. "That man aint goin' to' get nothin' out o' 
my labor: you're welcome, but he aint," with finality. 

AFTER a desultory correspondence the promoter 
gave it up, sensing a far stronger will than 
Gasby 's. 

His suggestion that local newspaper advertising 
would largely increase sales was adopted, and in the 
course of a year we find Gasby at the head of a fast 

growing cannery in the city of S . As the volume 

of their trade grew other edibles, including shellfish 
from a nearby coast town, were entered in their list. 
For a few years Gasby always deferred and referred 
to his wife's sagacity. Then came flattering offers and 
inspiring suggestions from the advertising managers 
of various magazines of national scope. 

Tillie lost her fast diminishing grip on the business. 
Chefs were installed who gradually undermined the 
personal touch of her supervision. The name Gasby 
on food products had become a household word — built 
upon the rock of Tillie 's capability. Dishwater could 
sell if it were labeled " Gasby 's Soups." 

Teddie was now at boarding school. 

Tillie was inveigled into the automobile and social 
rut. Her heart was in the factories and Teddie 's fu- 
ture, rather than the round of functions where her 
prosperity gave entrance and her naivete half-concealed 
amusement. 

Gasby, hot on the -scent of the illusive dollar, had 
acquired farms from whence came vegetables for his 
factories, clam and oyster beds for his bivalves, and 
his importations of spices and condiments from foreign 
lands were large. 

Teddie, back from Yale and a whirl abroad, took 
charge of the publicity end of the business. His ad- 
vertising caught the public eye, and his catchphrase, 
"There's no gas to Gasby 's!" was incorporated (at 
so much per) in the songs and sayings of the variety 
stage. 

Surfeited with the supposed good things of life, 
Tillie died, but not before she had paired off Teddie 



with one of the reigning society belles, a late in life 
ambition realized. 

Appalled and brought halfway to his senses by 
the sudden loss of his comforter and guide, old Gasby 
stumbled aimlessly about in a business and social way 
for many long, lonesome months. 

Had not the momentum of money, with the guiding 
hand of his son, precluded failure during the year of 
Gasby 's readjustment to life without Tillie, such would 
have been his portion. 

The birth of his grandchild, Gladys, brought him 
from his semi-stupor and back into the harness again 
with much of his old vigor. 

EFFICIENCY was the middle name of Gasby 's 
farms, factories and fisheries. "While he had sac- 
rificed nothing to hygiene or equipment where science 
or invention pointed the way, the human factor of pro- 
duction went without champion. Wages only existed 
to be unceremoniously lopped off when new automatics 
were installed. In business acumen Gasby was three 
laps always ahead of his keenest competitors (for he 
had many by this time), but mutterings of discontent | 
among his employees were met by him with about as j 
much concern as were the first whispered dissents of I 
the villeins and serfs. Gasby was no Alexander II. In .' 
point of fact, Gasby considered himself a Napoleon in 
his particular field. 



ENTER James O'Hare, better known among the 
thousands of Gasby 's ' ' hands ' ' as Jimmie. James 
had read Karl Marx, a German. Gasby never had read 
the immortal Dutchman; Teddie, now known as Theo 
dore, had. Gasby senior took to swearing; Gasby 
junior took to sophistry. Both Gasbys were ineffective 
The strike came on. Gasby lost money — oodles. Thej 
strikers lost the strike — and many of them lost divers] 
meals in the interm. Gasby lost no meals, at leasl 
through any other cause than indigestion. Jimmie losi 
his job, and he and his good wife, Bridget, their partly 
paid-for home and, irreparable loss, little Micky, aged 
5, for want of medical treatment during a neighbor 
hood diphtheria scourge. Jimmie was for finishing 
Gasby. Bridget said: 

^L'ave 'im t' God!" 

Jimmie silently and fervently consigned him to 
the devil, and, though he would have liked to expedite 
matters, kept his hands off. 

Enter the villain, or villains. 

Gladys, aged 5, was to have a birthday fete on 

the Gasby lawn — not a party, mind you, but a fete. 

Among the many delicacies prepared to please the ' 

palates of blase childhood on the occasion was a sort 

(Continued on Page 27) 



I 



The Western Comrade 



in 




Children and Community Life 



By ADELAIDE MAYDWELL 



SINCE May 1, 1914, more than 100 children have 
gone into the Antelope Valley, California, to live. 
The change of scenes and of environment has meant 
to them a diversion in the trend of events that wiU 
leave its impress on them through life. 

Community life at Llano del Rio already has started 
these children into a new line of thought. The com- 
munity spirit grows upon them with rapidity. The 
knowledge that all public property is owned by the col- 
lectivity makes a change in them the same as it does in 
their parents. 

Many of these children came from the cities and had 
never knoAvn the joys of life in the country. Life at 
the Llano community is for children something more 
than living in the country. It is life in the big open 
with the great distances, the mountains, the plains, the 
wooded canyons, the forests, lakes and streams, and the 
great variations that are wrought in the seasons. 

It is true children quickly take these things as a 
matter of course from the marvellous breaking of the 
dawn, the sun rising over the distant buttes, the mirages 
with their miraculous changes woven with warp of pur- 
ple sky and woof of shadowy clouds to the sunset over 
the hazy-blue mountains far away toward the sea. 

It is not that they fail to see and unconsciously ap- 



preciate these things. A girl of 12, one afternoon, sat 
gazing dreamily at the Lovejoys, far down below in the 
broad valley. "I could look at them for hours," she 
said, simply. "The shadows change every minute and 
the colors are so wonderful. I don't want to go there 
when the others go. I want them forever to be a mys- 
tery." 

This is the ' ' stuff of dreams ' ' of the poets. The child 
is wise enough to avoid disillusionment, and she will not 
go behind the scenes and find tawdry tinsel and pru- 
nella. The Lovejoys will ever remain her land of mys- 
tery. For her there are cities and seas and mountains 
and marvellously wrought castles and ships. 

For the children of Llano there is little restraint. 
Out of school hours they have the minor tasks inci- 
dent to the household duties, but life is mostly free- 
dom and joy. 

A common scene is a dozen young boys, usually 
with older leaders, blankets and packs across their 
shoulders, off for a two days' hike in the mountain 
canyons, where they make camp beside the streams 
and live in their own way, unrestrained. 

Those boys have an opoprtunity that rarely or 
never falls to the lot of town boys or country lads in 
a scattered or isolated district. They ride, hunt, fish. 



The Western Comrade 





There Is No Enc li 



A Hiking Party at Llano. "Pliotograph this pie, it will soon disappear forever.' 



Fictwres by C^ 



Children Lead a Life of Joy and Frej 
Where a Part of Education is to Le 



^sit.*^.'jft(ft(»K^^j(sa 




Wading and Swimming Is a Source of Continuous Delight to the Youngsters of Llano Colony. 




Jackie Keou,^(< 



The, Western Comrade 



17 




tdoor Games. 



hotographer 




"Hi fellers! come on (shivers) the w-w-water's flne." (Temperature about 55°.) 



at the Llano del Rio Community 
o Give Happiness Full Expression 



r^t *.a, ■ 




!< sey Jones. 



Posing for Their Photos Is One of the Easiest Things Llano Community Childreu Do. 



18 



The Western Comrade 



swim, play baseball, basketball, tennis and other 
games that the more favored class of youth of the 
cities never enjoy. They have country life and city 
opportunity for education and amusement. The girls 
have equal opportunity for freedom and enjoyment of 
life.' 

"Everywhere I look, out of a window or door, here, 
I see a group of barefoot children wading in water 
and it is the most delightful thing about the place," 
said a woman visiting at the colony. 
i The difference between the life of these children 
'and that of the hundreds of thousands of children in 
'the mines, mills, factories, canneries and establish- 
ments for exploitation of the little ones, is the most 
striking to those who have had an insight into the 
curse of child labor. 

Next fall the colony will have the first of its new 
school houses and there will be vocational departmen'ts 
established. The schools will then range from the 
Montessori grade to the second year in high school. 
The community will have the second Montessori school 
in California. Prudence Stokes Brown, widely known 
as writer, speaker and educator, will have charge of 
this new school. She has had wide experience in the 
work and has a thorough knowledge of the Frobellian 
system. Her influence on the children of the Llano 
community will begin before their birth and will take 
them through their earlier childhood and up to the 
time she turns them over to her assistants in the regu- 
lar schoolroom. Comrade Brown is now taking a course 
under the personal direction of Dr. Montessori, and 
the colonists deem it an exceptional opportunity to 



should," said a woman who has made a deep study of 
child life. "You have the opportunity, and I believe 
the parents will see the possibilities. The first thing 
I would do would be to teach the mothers how to dress 






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Gentry P. McCorkle as the Pied Piper of Llano. 



start their children under the wonderful system estab- 
lished by the beloved "Dotoressa," whom the Italian 
children idolize. 

"You will breed a new race up here — or you 



the children — or rather how to undress them, for they 
all wear too much clothing. The clothing of these 
youngsters could be simplified, and made more brief 
and beautiful." 

The children seem to agree with this idea, for they 
wear the least possible when the opportunity comes. 

The appearance of the landscape at Llano shows a 
distinct change each month. The cleared fields and 
growing crops that replace the greesewood and cha- 
parral makes an inspiring sight. 

With the purchase of the Tighlman and the Elfline 
ranches the colony gets possession of a thousand ad- 
ditional acres of land, undisputed posession of the Big 
Rock dam site, the tunnel, about 150 additional acres 
of producing alfalfa fields, a large orchard with a 
heavy crop of fruit, range cattle and other live stock, 
and water rights worth a great deal to the com- 
munity. 

Nearly the entire acreage has been cleared on the 
Goodwin ranch. The garden and alfalfa on that place 
is in superb condition. The Dawson place, 160 acres, 
is all cleared and planted. This is one of the finest 
pieces of land in the colony. 

The apricots in several orchards are ripe and they 
are being canned and taken care of by the women of 
the colony. Miieh of the friiit will be put up in syrup, 
made of Llano honey. 

Four groups of 100 colonies of bees have been 
added to the colony apiary. This department is under 
the direction of B. G. Burdick. One of the apiaries 



The Western Comrade 



19 



will be used for the production of Italian queens. 

P. A. Knobbs has a score of men working with him 
in the garden. The vegetables are growing rapidly, 
and there are 80 acres in one garden, without, a weed, 
or an uncultivated inch of ground. There will be 
about 120 acres in the garden. Comrade Kjiobbs has 
one 17-aere piece in potatoes from which he expects 
to get 4000 sacks of potatoes. These potatoes will be 
dug early in July and the ground will again be planted. 

There are 80 "regulars" taking their meals at 
the Clubhouse dining-room. Saturdays and Sundays 
about 120 persons are served at each meal. 

Rapid progress is being made in the construction 
of the sunbaked clay brick houses. These houses are 
painted with a heavy coat of asphaltum and then 
whitewashed. They make a neat appearance, are cool 
and airy in the summer, and will be dry and warm in 
the winter. This construction is a remarkable achieve- 
ment for Comrade C. H. Scott, who will soon be com- 
pleting the houses at the rate of one a day. The cash 
outlay for each house, complete and ready for oc- 
cupancy, is actually less than the cost of a tent of the 
same size, laid do'mi at the colony. These houses are 
considered temporary, but they are so substantially 
built that they would last many years. A new pug 
mill, or power mixer, has just been completed for the 
brick yard. The new limekiln has been put into oper- 
ation. 

Members who have moved into the colony dur- 



dren, Fresno; Louis Ernst, Los Angeles; Oliver Lu- 
tan, San Pedro; Albert Cook, formerly a member of 
the Ruskin colony. 

Mr. Cook made the trip from Alaska to investi- 





ing the past two weeks to make their homes are as 
follows : 

.Mr. and Mrs. E. D. Brown and five children, Ker- 
man, Cal. ; Mr. and Mrs. William L. "Ward, three chil- 



gate — he stayed and took out a membership in the 
Llano colony. 

D. W. Rooke of Los Angeles has been making ar- 
rangements to bring his family to Llano to live. 

Among the prominent visitors were J. Stitt "Wilson, 
Mrs. "Wilson, their son Gladstone and daughter "Violet. 
The colonists were given a musical treat Tuesday 
evening when Gladstone "Wilson, by special request, 
gave some selections on the piano. Another well- 
known visitor in Llano recently was W. J. Yarrow of 
Dudley, Kern County, geologist and lecturer. Mr. 
Yarrow gave an extremely interesting forty-minute 
talk Sunday evening. 

Alterations are being made in the library to make 
it larger and more shelves are being put up to ac- 
commodate the 250 new books which have come in. 
This makes nearly 1000 books in the Llano library. 
Two consignments of books recently received have 
been the second shipment from Comrade Adolf Lof- 
ton of Low Gap, Wash., and from Dr. A. J. Stevens 
of Los Angeles. The colonists have extended their 
thanks to these two comrades. 

Fruit season has opened. Many women and chil- 
dren are busily engaged picking apricots. The gar- 
den is supplying vegetables. Another two-ton-to-the- 
acre alfalfa crop is being cut. 



20 



The Western Comrade 



Our Unctious Hookworm 



By G. E. BOLTON 



NOW ^¥e know what causes poverty and, armed 
with this knowledge, humanity has but to go 
aboiit it to destroy the cause and all will be well with 
the world. 

It is admitted poverty is responsible for a vast pre- 
ponderance of preventable sickness and of crime, but 
those are things caused by poverty, and now we are to 
deal with the cause of poverty. 

What is poverty? Let Carlyle say: "It is to live 
miserable we know not why ; to work sore and yet gain 
nothing; to be heart- worn, weary, yet isolated, unre- 
lated, girt in with a cold, universal laissez-faire." 

Greatest of all horrors bred by poverty is fear. Fear 
of hunger brings far greater suffering than hunger. 
Fear not for one's self, but for their loved ones. Fear 
and dread of want seizes the worker and renders him 
weak and hopeless. Enough of this — we know the hell 
of it all — the essence of poverty, the dread of want ! 

The Rockefeller Foundation experts have discov- 
ered the cause of poverty and to end suspense we has- 
ten to say it is the hookivorm. There you are : Get 
rid of your hookworm and — presto! You are in af- 
fluence. If you don't believe it go to the foundation's 
hookworm department at the Panama-Pacific Exposi- 
tion and see for yourself. The fact there are 15,000,000 
persons in the United States living in direst poverty 
would indicate that there is surely a great need for the 
Rockefeller Foundation and its corps of experts, which 
seem to have confined its efforts to giving a shot of 
thymol to a few himdred Georgia crackers and making 
the children sound and well enough to go down froni 
the hills to the cotton mills where there are no hook- 
worms, and, of course, no poverty. 

The exposition is a capital place to educate children 
of all ages. An excellent ararngement to soothe the 



feelings and the conscience of the bourgeoise and give 
the masters an opportunity to show their philanthropy. 
Benevolent feudalism is lavishly displayed. 

Every week thousands of school children pass 
through this Rockefeller booth in their tour of the 
educational building, and they stare morbidly at the 
wax figures of hookworm ^actims, then read the leg- 
ends: "Types of poverty caused by hookworm," and 
similar stupid or vicious inversions of the truth. 

I saw hookworms of five nationalities before I knew 
that they were the cause of poverty. These were in 
glass tubes at the Angel Island detention hospital. In 
an adjoining room were the former owners of the hook- 
worms. They were Japanese, Chinese,' Singalese, Hin- 
dus and Russians. Each had a different type of hook- 
worm, but the same brand of poverty — for all were 
poor. Their poverty was similar to that of the Georgia 
crackers. They were too poor — before the thymol op- 
eration — to be admitted to America. Presumably, the 
cause being removed, they now will be permitted to 
land. 

They used to tell us that booze was the cause of 
poverty, but Science marches on and on and makes new 
discoveries every day. 

The hookworm is a miserable parasite that fastens 
itself to the smaller intestines of proletarians, who are 
too poor to buy shoes — for the worm travels through 
open sores on the feet to the blood, through the heart, 
lungs, thence to the throat, thence by indigestion to the 
intestines. 

Here we leave the remainder of this article to you. 
The application is almost too obvious. The hookworm 
of capitalism is sapping the life of this nation and 
of nations of the world; and the greatest of them all 
is — ^the great unctuous Foundation Maker himself! 



Punctured Oratory 



How soft and soothing to the eiiltured ear comes the 
gentle pleadings of that refined evangel and apos- 
tle of sweetness, Reverend Sunday, when he reaches his 
loftiest flights ! The classicism of this scholarly man 
should lead all intellectuals along a broad, bright path 
to the pearly gates. Who could resist this description 
of an historic event in the life of a shepherd who became 
a king: 

When David got to the battlefield he saw Goliath. 
" Wlio 's that big lobster ? " he asked. His brothers said, 
"Why, he's the maia cheese of the Philistines." David 



said : "Are you guys going to let that stiff pull a bluff 
like that 1 Are you going to let him get away with it ? 
I'm going to it . . ." 

And he whirled his sling and soaked Goliath on 
the coco, between the lamps — bing I The giant went to 
the mat and took the count. And David took his sword 
and chopped his block off, and the gang beat it. 

Is it any mystery that thousands seek the throne 
of grace when they hear such sublime flights of oratory 
and such wonderful interpretations and compelling 
portrayal ? Truly the cultured East is the most favored 
section!— E. d'O. 



The Western Comrade 

Filling the Dinner Pail 

By A. W. RICKER 

\ RETURN of prosperity is to the capitalist and middle class as the light of the Grail in the swamp; their 
-^^ hope of salvation. To them the elusive goddess Gold seems to beckon and they assiduously court her and 
tirelessly wait upon her, fawning that thrift may follow. To the disemployed workers this so-called prosperity 
means a chance for a new master — and bread for their loved ones. To the propagandist it means shot and 
powder for his gun; sinews of war to destroy a false prosperity that fattens the favored few and starves the mul- 
titude. Comrade Ricker's interpretation will meet with many supporters. Our sowing time will soon be at 
hand. — P. E. W. 



21 



THE past twelve months from a business stand- 
point have been very bad ones. In the spring 
of 1914 hard times began to be felt on aU sides. It 
was apparent that we were in for one of those periods 
of depression which are inevitable under the present 
system of conducting the world's business. On top 
of this in July, 191-i. the great war broke out in Eu- 
rope, further depressing trade and reducing employ- 
ment. . As an inevitable result, the past winter has wit- 
nessed the eruelest poverty and misery among the 
wage-workers this country has experienced in half a 
century. • 

During such a period progressive ideas and con- 
structive economic measures have no chance for a 
hearing. Hungi-y men and women have no incentive 
to study and think — much less to act intelligently. 
War depresses the public mind and while nations are 
shedding each other's blood progress is at an end. 

At the general election of 1914 the inevitable hap- 
pened. In every .State of the Union, witt one or two 
exceptions, the old gang of political looters returned to 
power. A great many laws favoring big business have 
been put on the statute books. We were powerless 
to prevent it. 

This cloud, however, has a silver lining. 

With greater profits assured, capital is coming 
out of hiding. The railroads, assured of higher rates, 
will place big orders for equipment, so long and so 
badly needed. Europe has shot away her copper, her 
nickel and her steel. She has lost the markets, or 
cannot take care of them, in South America and the 
Orient. A revival of business in this country is ap- 
parent, and on a scale greater than we have ever wit- 
nessed. Mines are starting, shops are opening, and 
the big corporations are laying plans for extension 
of equipment. The dinner pail is going to be full 
again, and the working man will have more money 
Avith which to buy literature. He vrill liave time to 
think, to agitate and to organize. Not only time, but 
inclination as well. 

It is up to us who believe that industry should be 
o^mied by all the people instead of by a few barons 
of wealth, to make the utmost use of the good times 



ahead of us. Let us prepare to make hay while the 
sun shines. 

A few years of full employment and high prices 
are ahead of us. Then will come reaction and depres- 
sion once more. Radical and progressive ideas and 
organizations grow and develop in good times ; they 
decline and collapse in bad times. 

We should a'o ahead now with the idea -of so ex- 




— New York Evening Sun 

BRAVE WORK! 

Many Women and Babies Slain 



tending our propaganda and perfecting our organiza- 
tion during the full years, that we may be able to take 
over from capitalism the control of industry when 
the lean years come upon us once more. 



22 



The Western Comrade 

The Dandy Funeral 

A Gay Young Parable 



By MORGAN SMITH 



THERE was a little wretch of a pickaninny yel- 
low girl, and one day she died, and all the neigh- 
bors said it was too good to be true, and Auntie 
Thompson, little Lily 's mother, said that little Lily had 
lived too long as it was, and nobody seemed to care if 
little Lily did die. 

But the neighbors all said that they now would have 
a dandy funeral and they would take on as much as if 
little Lily hadn't been the curse of the whole place 
all her life. And Auntie Thompson said that she was 
now in the public eye, and something unusually line 
would naturally be expected of one in her position. 
She said all the neighbors would now expect some 
unusually fine mourning of her. And so she said that 
when the neighbors all came to the funeral she woatd 
then refuse to be separated from poor little Lily. She 
said that would be some unusually fine mourning, if 
she did say it herself. 

So, when the undertaker stepped forward to a.isist 
the pall-bearers to bear poor little Lily to the wagon. 
Auntie Thompson stepped forward, too. Auntie 
Thompson stepped forward just exactly as the under- 
taker did, excepting that she had a large knife and 
he didn't. 

And Auntie Thompson said that if anybody took 
little Lily out of that honse they would do it over her 
dead body. 

That, she said, was the way they were doing their 
mourning now. She said it was something unusually 
fine. 

So then the undertaker said that if he carried lit- 
tle Lily out over Auntie Thompson's dead body it 
would require quite a bit of extra climbing in addi- 
tion to the fact that he might be called to conduct the 
funeral of Auntie Thompson, too, without the bill be- 
ing paid either. 

So the undertaker then said that he would let it 
go at that and he then said that he would now go 
away from the house and not take Auntie Tliompson's 
child away from lur. And all the neighbors went 
quietly out through tiie door and let Auntie Thompson 
have little Lily. 

If it had been h few days previous Auntie Thompson 
would have told little Lily to go and get a big club 
and she would then see to it that the people didn't 
go away from the funeral before all the mourning was 
neatly attended to in the correct manner. And little 



Lily would then have stuck out her tongue at her 
mother, and she would have gone out and kicked all 
the neighbors' small children while they were not look- 
ing instead of getting a club to enable her mother toi 
make all the people come back to the funeral. 

But Auntie Thompson now had nobody upon whom 
she could depend to stick out their tongue at her and 
to kick all the neighbors' small children while they [ 
were not looking. Little Lily Avas dead, which was a 
Ihing that all the neighbors had said they hoped she 
would be some day. And so all that Auntie Thompson 
could do was to allow all the neighbors to leave the 
funeral quietly instead of hurriedly. 

So Auntie Thompson then went into another room 
and locked the door, and little Lily remained where 
they had left her. She had on her Sunday dress and 
the inside of the cofiin was clean. She knew that a 
suitable place for her Sunday dress would be down 
behind the mud bank where the small children of the 
neighbors sometimes strayed. But she decided to stay 
in the coffin where it was clean although none of the 
neighbors' small children ever strayed into the coffin. 

And Thompson came home drunk late that night 
and told Auntie Thompson that he had not been able 
to get away to attend the funeral of little Lily and 
then Auntie Thompson said that was all right because 
there had not yet been any funeral. She said she 
didn't know when the funeral of little Lily would be, 
she was siire. 

Then Thompson said that Auntie Thompson could 
do the sleeping alone for one night and perhaps two. 
He said he was going some place else. So Thompson 
then went out the back way which was the dark way, 
and as he was failing to get over the back fence owing 
to his hurry he said he would now sign a pledge never 
to celebrate the death of anybody again becaiase it 
made it hard for him to get over the back fence. 

But Aiuitie Thompson didn't do the sleeping alone 
for one night. She said that if Thompson woiildn't 
stop drinking and woiildn't stay at home where other 
correct men stayed, she would remain awake and move 
furniture from the position it had always occupied 
to a position more directly in front of the bedroom 
door. 

And after a while Auntie Thompson heard a noise 
and she said that if little Lily was going to get out of 
the coffin she would now get out of the window, as far 



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The Western Comrade 



23 



as she was concerned. And when she was outside 
she said that she guessed that if her husband could 
go some place else, she could go some place else too. 
And so Auntie Thompson went some place else, with- 
out another word. 

And when Auntie Thompson thought she had gone 
far enough she came suddenly upon a tree and she 
said she would now climb the tree. And when the 



moon came up she saw something moving in the next 
tree and when the sun came up she saw it was Thomp- 
son. And Thompson then asked her why she thought 
she had to do everything that he did. 

And the next day Auntie Thompson had to pay the 
health authorities two dollars apiece to come and 
separate her from poor little Lily, and she said that 
was more than the little brat was worth. 



Lawson — Labor — Liberty 



By EDMUND B, 

JOHN R. LAWSON has been found guilty of murder 
J in the first degree and sentenced to life imprison- 
ment. He killed no one, and he was not charged with 
ioing so ; he is simply said to have commanded a body 
9f strikers in a battle with strike-breaking sheriff's 
deputies in which a deputy was killed. When the 
Eoal miners of Colorado, struggling for a decent human 
existence, were beset by thugs in the form of mine 
»uards and state militia, he, as president of the Colo- 
rado State Federation of Labor and member of the 
executive board of the United Mine Workers, urged 

^ the miners to defend themselves and their families 
n every way possible. Since the forces of law and 
3rder were all on the other side, he was active in rais- 

te ing money to buy arms and ammunition for the de- 
fense that he advised. He may have been unwise. 
Certainly, in force alone is no power of permanent 
improvement. Perhaps he should not have lost his 
temper at the sight of men being driven into veritable 
slavery and women and children cursed and mal- 
treated and murdered in cold blood. But he did. He 
was human. In his wrath he reverted to primal in- 
tincts. Because he was like the great mass of man- 
kind, because his heart was not a heart of stone, be- 
eause he was true to his trust in an hour when fidelity 
was needed as never before, shall we say that his brow 
bears the brand of Cain? God forbid it! 

That brand belongs to another — one whom future, 
more enlightened generations v.'ill regard as infamous. 
John D. Rockefeller, Jr., should cower in infinite dread 



BRUM B AUGH 

from the righteous judgment of the God that he pro- 
fesses to serve. It was his greed that drove the miners 
to revolt, and on his soul is every life lost in the trou- 
bles that followed. Yet he has not been indicted, and 
he will not be. He may continue to teach his Sunday 
school and lecture on morals to the working class. 
"Equality before the law!" 

The striking miners of Colorado fought bravely, 
from Lawson down to the humblest man. But though 
they did, and though their cause was just, it must not 
be forgotten that they reaped in the strikei and the 
trial what they sowed at the ballot box. They voted 
for supporters of an industrial system based on the 
robbery and subjection of Labor, and their strike has 
been broken and Lawson must spend the rest of his 
days in prison unless his attorneys, in conjunction 
with public opinion, are powerful enough to set him at 
liberty. They "scabbed" on their class on election 
day, and their aspirations have been crushed. They 
refused to accept the emancipating message that So- 
cialists brought to them, and more firmly than ever is 
"the iron heel" fixed on their necks. Upon their 
stupidity rests the blame. 

But I am hopeful. Only through constant toil and 
prodigal expenditure of life and treasure, has progress 
ever come. The birth of the new social order cannot 
be a painless one. Some day Labor will learn. It will 
take the world and its wealth and the joy lying latent 
therein. 

Then will be Socialism. 



Keep Up the Spade 



WHEN the soldiers fighting in the trenches on 
the French frontier wish to establish a truce 
for sanitary purposes they hold aloft a spade and the 
enemy" readily responds in a similar manner, and 
soon the men may be seen climbing out of the trenches. 
At times they come close enough to exchange good- 
natured bantering with each other. By these exchanges 
of rude courtesy the fighting men of the Allies and 



the Germans learn that their "foes" are human and 
much like themselves. After that the firing is desultory 
and ineffective, though the officers, whose duty it is 
to keep alive the hatred they have fostered, rage and 
storm. 

American correspondents who report this situation 
declare it is necessary to change the men in their posi- 
tion and frequently shift them to other trenches in 



24 



The Western Comrade 



order to keep the brute uppermost in the fighters. So- 
cialists of Europe, on both sides of the struggle, are 
spreading a cry that may be far-reaching and most ef- 
fective. They shout : ' ' Keep up the spade ! ' ' and the 
slogan grows in strength and in meaning as it spreads. 



A truce between the toilers of all nations ! 
Will the workers of the world, either on war's gory 
field or in our daily hell of capitalism, ever learn to 
cease fighting each other and, keeping up the spade, 
turn on the common foe 1 — G. E. B. 



Is It Practical? 

By CARL D. THOMPSON 



HOW is Socialism to come? How are you going to 
bring it about? What is your program? 

These are questions constantly in the minds and 
on the lips of a great many very sincere people. The 
Socialist Movement has now reached a point of de- 
velopment where they may be answered with a con- 
siderable degree of exactness and detail. We propose 
to give them careful and candid consideration. 

And, besides, these questions often take the form 
of sincere and serious objections. It is often held that 
Socialism may oi?er a correct analysis of the present 
social order — that it may be a very beautiful ideal; 
but it is impractical ; it offers no constructive program. 

Furthermore, the person who prides himself upon 
being a practical reformer holds that he cannot afford 
to join the Socialist Party and vote the Socialist ticket, 
because the Socialists can do nothing to improve con- 
ditions now. And, as he thinks that certain "reform" 
parties, or perhaps some '"reform" wing of one of the 
old parties, is going to bring about certain improve- 



ments right away, he prefers to stay a non-SociausC. 

It is, therefore, of vital importance to make it clear 
and positive that the Socialist Movement does have 
a constructive program; that it does have a very defi- 
nite and detailed program of procedure, which its rep- 
resentatives follow consistently when elected to office. 
It is important to have it clearly understood that, 
while Socialism has a final goal, of which it never 
loses sight in the struggle for immediate and tempor- 
ary gains, it does not, therefore, fail to fight stubbornly, 
as we shall show, and at times very effectively, for 
every measure that would improve the immediate con- 
ditions of the common people. 

No one need be afraid of the bugaboo of "throwing 
away your vote." Every vote for Socialism has its 
effect for good at once. 

In more ways than one is it true that it is better 
to vote for what you really want and not get it just 
yet than to vote for what you don't want and get it 
immediately. 



m 



Mother Earth 



By RUTH LEE STEVENS 

Will you listen, oh, ye toilers ! to the message of the sod. 

For, when earth to thee hath spoken thou hast heard the voice of God ! 

Mother Earth is breathing, breathing. For 'tis only in the hill tops. 

Have you slumbered on her breast? By the rushing mountain stream. 

Have you known the peace and comfort. You can scale the wondrous ladder 

And the sense of perfect rest, Jacob saw in ancient dream. 

That is had by simply lying Leave your burdens all behind you, ■ 

With your pillow on the sod, Let there not be any strife. 

Snuggled down to Mother Nature, And by dint of patient climbing 

Your heart beating close to god? You shall reach the "Gate of Life." 



Mother Earth is resting, resting. 
Are you tired and weary, too? 
Would you like to have the blessing 
That is now in store for you? 
Leave the City's din of battle, 
Quit its noisome strife for prize, 
Wonderous wealth for you lies waiting, 
'Neath the azure of the skies ! 



Mother Earth is calling, calling. 
Will you hearken to her call? 
She but waits to give the blessing 
Held in store for one and all. 
God made land for all his children, 
Not for greedy landlords' gain! 
"Sell it not," he saith — forever! 
Oh ! his words are very plain. 



The Western Comrade 

Impeachment of Capitalism 



25 



By J . S T I T T WILSON 



PREACHERS of tlie gospel frequently urge indi- 
vidual salvation as an answer to the social prob- 
lem. Let me state with utmost emphasis that no indi- 
vidualistic spiritual experience can lift you out of the 
social and economic relations of the social system in 
which you live. There is no religious experience, no 
spiritual vision of God, as proposed by mystics, or 
Methodists, or Christian Scientists, or Salvationists, or 
any sort, which can release you from the grasp of 
economic relations. 

I impeach capitalism as the supreme anti-Christ of 
modern times. I take my stand on life and spirit and 



teaching of Jesus and declare that capitalism is a 
menace to every purpose and program of the Christ. 

Any man or church which professes to offer the 
word of God to the souls of men and yet leaves the 
American plutocracy in the saddle on the backs of the 
people is deluding the people. Any church in this city, 
or any city, which at this late date is still at peace 
with capitalism is a moral and spiritual tomb. The 
socialization of industry — democracy in fundamental 
equipment of society — in short, Socialism is the logic 
of Christianity. And here I took my stand long years 
ago. 



Is Your Conscience Clear? 

By MILA TUPPER M A.Y N A R D 



THE ghastly nightmare in Europe among our broth- 
ers and comi'ades should set us all searching our 
inmost hearts to see if each has done his part in efforts 
to malvc this kind of abomination forever impossible. 

Wliat can we do? The most sure and effective 
way is to strengthen the Socialist organization in your 
particular locality. 

Does this seem an anti-climaz? A prosey way to 
meet heroic issues? Perhaps; but it is the true way, 
none the less. Just so long as the people do not know 
better than to tolerate war in industry (competition), 
they will have to . en'dure or always be in danger of 
meeting that other murderous warfare with machine 
guns. "T ' 



Uo you want this deadly, nightmare, this unbeliev- 
able horror called Avar to vanish? Then work the 
harder to overthrow that more cruel, long-drawn-out 
torture, Capitalism. 

Going to business meetings when your back aches 
and you would prefer to go to bed; distributing bills, 
getting subs, talking tactfully and persistently for 
the making of new converts, paying dues promptly 
and meeting all- the expenses of the party as surely as 
you do the grocery bill— these are some of the prosey, 
but very real and sure, ways in which you can help 
make war forever impossible. 

You have the choice at this hour — a drone or an 
active worker in tlie hive 1 



The Fighter 

By MARGUERITE HEAD 



Just before the battle rages 

You may hear his wild huzzas; 
But through all the ancient story 
There is but a butcher's glory 
In the war each fighter wages 
For the bloody monarch. Mars. 

Shall the lure of printed pages 
In our youth vile lust instill? 
Shall the sanguinary hero 
With tlie instincts of a Nero, 
Who has plied his trade for ages, 
Teach our children how to kill? 



Still on battle-fields' bi-oad stages, 
With his brazen, villains' roles. 
He is dealing death and plunder, 
While behind machines of thunder 
Stands the gory fiend who gauges 
Guns to rend his brothers ' souls. 

Just before the battle rages. 
You may hear his wild huzzas ; 

But through all the ancient story 
There is but a butchers' glory 
In the war each fighter wages 
For the bloody monarch. Mars. 



26 



The Western Comrade 



REVOLT 
IN MEXICO 

Eead the Correct Interpretation of Underlying Motives in the 
Most Remarkable and Valuable Book of the Year 

The Mexican People — 
Their Struggle for Freedom 

~Bj- 

L. Gutierrez de Lara and Edgcumb Pinchon 

¥ ¥ ¥ 

Eugene V. Debs says : 

" * * * It is written from the point 
of view of the working class, the tillers of 
the soil, the producers of the wealth, and 
shows that through all these centuries of toil 
and tears and blood and martyrdom they 
have been struggling for the one purpose of 
emancipating themselves from the tyranny 
of a heartless aristocracy, buttressed on the 
one hand by the Roman Church and on the 
other by f.he military power." 

* ¥ ¥ 

Georgia Kotsfih says : 

"* * * It strips the glamor of 
l)eiievolent motives from the dealings with 
Mexico of the United States and other coun- 
tries and presents the stark truth that 
American and world capitalism has been, 
and is, in league against the proletariat of 
.Alexico for its OAvn sordid interest. And 
while the Mexican master class is depicted 
as the most depraved and bloodthirsty in 
history, the Socialist will see that the story 
if the Mexican proletariat is in greater or 
irss degree and in varying circumstances the 
-lory of the proletariat in every country." 
!• ■$• ■y 

Published by DOUBLEDAY, PAGE & CO. 

F»ricc Sl.SO 

We will send you this book and The "Western Comrade for one 

year for $2.00 




Death to Workers 

'T^HE hirelings of the master class in 
the Colorado state legislature are 
going to be asked to make it treason 
to induce men to go out on strike. 
Measures defining the organizing of 
concerted action by the workers as 
treason and punishable by impris- 
onment of from one to five years or 
a fine of from $1000 to $5000, or 
both, are to be submitted for pas- 
sage. One measure provides for the 
death penalty for treason. 

This plan follows close on the 
heels of the U. S. Supreme court de- 
cision upholding the right of a rail- 
way official to force an employe to 
withdraw from a union under the 
laws of Kansas. 

Will See the Start 

The Wall Street Journal tries to 
rebuke Jane Addams for saying 
"nothing can be settled by force." 
The brilliant editor asks about 
"slavery" and, American independ- 
ence." The facts are against him. 
Slavery was not settled by the war. 
It has not been abolished. As for 
independence — that is another myth. 

However, if the W. S. J. and its 
masters, who are such warm ex- 
ponents of force, want things settled 
by force, they are in a fair way to 
see the start of it. 

Modern Methods 

"How many head o' live stock you 
got on the place?" 

"Live stock?" echoed the some- 
what puzzled farmer. "What d' ye 
mean by live stock? I got four 
.steam tractors and seven automo- 
biles." 

Fak Hint 

"Kate!" , 

"Yes, mother." j 

"If the milkman should come 
while you and the young man are 
sitting out there, please tell him to 
leave an extra pint of milk in the 
morning. ' ' 

^^ ^ W. 

Today would be a good time to 
subscribe for the WESTERN COM- 
RADE. See half a dozen tempting 
combination offers in our advertising 
columns. 



"Unto the Third" 

(Continued from Page 14) 

of lobster pate covered with a delec- 
table dressing, the privy pride of 
Gasby's private chef, Jean Coret. 

Now comes the nub of the story. 
Gasby's butler got 10 per cent. 
Gasby's chef got nothing — outside 
his regular perquisites. Gasby's gro- 
eeryman got what he could make out 
of it. The latter gentleman did not 
have, to the full complement, the 
amount of imported lobster ordered, 
so he substituted some of Gasby's 
lobster — carefully removing the do- 
mestic labels and affixing the foreign. 

Now it may have been Gasby's 
lobster, prepared by "efficient" 
though brow-beaten "hands," that 
offered a fine free lunch for those 
ptomaine germs, and it may not have 
been. The fact remains, however, 
that innumerable of the deadly germs 
were found by a reputable chemist 
in the remains of the pate. 

Gladys died, as did one other child ; 
and several youngsters who partook 
of the tid-bit became violently ill. 

These question arise: Is Gasby's 
butler a villain? Is Gasby's chef a 



The Western Comrade 

villain? Is Gasby's groeeryman a 
villain? Is Jimmie O'Hara a vil- 
lain? Is J\Trs. Jimmie O'Hara a 
villainess ? 

Vale! Saint Anthony 

Saint Anthony Comstock who 
has had charge of the morals of 
the Universe, especially of New 
York (are or is there any?) has 
been canned from his soft place on 
the P. 0. D. payroll. Anthony 
monkeyed with the art societies 
and the artists proved him a com- 
mon nuisance. Sic semper toma- 
toes !— H. C. 



27 



THE JONES BOOK STORE 

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we will send postage prepaid, on receipt 
of FIFTY CENTS, one of our genuine 
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THE UNION LABEL. 

This card case contains four pockets, 
one large for bills and papers, one tor 
your dues-stamp book, and two with 
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CASE on the market made by Organized 
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no longer necessary for a class-conscious 
Socialist to be inconsistent. 

Send fifty cents in stamps or money 
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(The only exclusive union label merchandisers) 
(Owned and managed by members of the working class) 

9 Board of Trade Court, CHICAGO, ILLS. 



The American Socialist 

Official Organ of the 

Socialist Party ot America. 

The American Socialist speaks 
with authority. It is a powerful 
news and propaganda weekly 
and is the only paper in the 
United States which gives an 
account of the official business 
of the Socialist Party. 

Every Socialist. Every Student of Socia- 
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Subscription Price 

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The American Socialist and The 
Western Comrade can be had in 
combination for one year by send- 
ing $1.25 to 

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28 



The Western Comrade 



THE WESTERN COMRADE 



Entered as second-class matter at the 
post office at Los Angeles, Cal. 

924 Higgins Building, Los Angeles, Cal. 

Subscription Price One Dollar a Year 
In Clubs of Four Fifty Cents 



Job Harriman, Managing Editor 
Frank E. Wolfe, Editor 



Vol. Ill 



June, 1915 



No. 2 



Hunter's New Book 

O OBERT HUNTER has written an- 
■•• other valuable book. For years, 
the gulf which has separated the So- 
cialist and Labor Union Movements 
in the United States has been the 
despair of many members of the So- 
cialist Party. The Socialists have 
often criticised the attitude taken by 
the American Federation of Labor 
and its principal officers toward 
working-class political action. This 
criticism has sometimes been more 
bitter than it has been intelligent. 
Robert Hunter's criticism, however, 
is of a different nature. 

With masterly logic, he shows the 
untenableness of Mr. Gompers' posi- 
tion. He shows how the political 
policy of the American Federation 
of Labor has corrupted many of its 
leaders, has robbed Labor of some 
of its ablest men, and has made the 
Organized Labor Movement the 
laughing stock, the football and the 
tool of the Manufacturers' Associa- 
tion and its political henchmen. How 
absolutely fruitless of results this 
undignified begging policy has been, 
he proves by a comparison of the La- 
bor legislation of some of the coun- 
tries of Western Europe, where the 
workers enthusiastically support in- 
dependent workin-class political ac- 
tion with the Labor legislation of the 
United States. He quotes Gompers 
himself as saymg that the United 
States "is no less than two decades 
behind many of the European na- 
tions in the protection of the life, 
limb and health of the workers." 

So incisive is Hunter's logic that 
at times it turns the federation's 
policy into ridicule without really 
aiming to do so. Hunter sums up 
his case as follows : 

"There are, as it appears to me, 
certain main reasons for the failure 
of the political methods of the A. F. 
of L. First, no two persons in the 
federation agree as to what those 
methods are. Second, the m.ethods do 



not sticceed in electing to office effi- 
cient representatives of Labor who 
remain faithful to Labor. Even 
when 'card men' are elected to of- 
fice, they have not the political in- 
dependence necessary to enable 
them to fight vigorously the battles 
of Labor. They owe allegiance to 
capitalistic parties, political bosses 
and individual financial backers to 
such a degree that they are forced 
sooner or later, either to betray 
.Labor or to relinquish any ambi- 
tion they may have for a success- 
ful political carer. Third, the meth- 
ods do not develop self-reliance, in- 
dependence and integrity in the La- 
bor Movement. Instead of wean- 
ing the working-class from its 
bondage to the capitalist parties, 
they faster more and more securely 
the chains which bind it to those 
parties. They violate the spirit of 
Trades Unionism and, while Labor 
struggles for industrial freedom, 
these methods force it to remain 
in political slavery. In the cor- 



ruption of men, in the loss of lead- 
ers, in the betrayal of Labor, in the 
suspicion and distrust engendered 
araong the rank and file, in the 
weakening of the class spirit, and 
in the undermining of class soli- 
darity, the political methods of the 
American Federation of Labor are 
so demoralizing that in time they 
may actually ruin the Trade-Union 
Movement itself." 

No one at all interested in the 
Labor Movement can read this book 
without keen interest. It is filled 
with argument which is of the 
greatest value to the social teacher 
and agitator. One cannot but ex- 
press the hope that it will lead to 
a better understanding between, 
the political and economic wings of 
the Labor Movement in America. 
Every Socialist should study it. 

"Labor in Politics," by Robert 
Hunter, published by the Socialist 
Party National Office, 803 West 
]Madisou street, Chicago^ 111. Paper. 
Price 25 cents, prepaid. 




THE PATH OF NEUTRALITY 
Uncle Sam: "Well, Mr. Death, don't think that I am 
after the money. 1 sell you these things only because 
they will bring about peace sooner." 

A German shaft at Uncle Sam's "commercialism." 

Simplicissimus 



The Western Comrade 



To Our Gunmakers 

By Frank H. Ware 
TJNHALTERED, you prey upon the 
dead; 

Smilingly you feast 

On fast drying fields of blood. 

Countless numbers lie slain 

And bleached bones glisten in the 

sunlight ; 
Enrapt with delight you gnaw 
The flesh from precious bones. 

Keen Diplomacy 

Little Charlotte accompanied her 
mother to the home of an acquaint- 
ance, where a dinner-dance was be- 
ing given, says the New York Times. 
Wben the dessert-course was reached 
the little girl was brought down and 
given a place next to her mother at 
the table. 

The hostess was a woman much 
given to talking, and, in relating 
some interesting incidents, quite 
forgot to give little Charlotte any- 
thing to eat. 

After some time had elapsed, 
Charlotte could bear it no longer. 
"With the sobs rising in her throat, 
she held up her plate as high as she 
could and said: 

"Does anybody want a clean 
plate?" 

Millie Had "Bitten" 

She was a little girl and very po- 
lite. It was the first time she had 
been on a visit alone, and she had 
been carefully instructed how to be- 
have. 

"If they ask you to dine with 
them," papa had said, "you must 
sav 'No, thank vou, I have alreadv 
dined.' " ' 

It turned out just as papa had an- 
ticipated. 

"Come along, Mildred," said her 
little friend's father, "you must have 
a bite with us." 

"No, thank you," said the little 
girl -^vith dignity; "I have alreadv 
bitten." 

Our Amateur Players 

Llano Link — What was the row 
'out front during the first scene, 
Mike ? 

ileseal Mike — The understudy 
inursemaid got excited and carried 
in the heroine's baby when it wasn't 
idue to appear until three years later 
in the fourth act. 



Pictures for Propaganda 




Shoot Capitalism 

With a 

Stereopticon 



Anyone can lecture with the aid of pictures; they tell the 
story, you point out the moral. Pictures draw a crowd where 
other means fail. They make your work doubly effective. 

We tell you how to get the greatest results at the least 
expense. 

Send stamp for complete information. 

W. SCOTT LEWIS 



3493 Eagle Street. 



Los Angeles, California 



Gen. Otis says editorially in The Times, of 

EVERYMAN 

(By Luke North) 

"If law and order, respect for conventions and property rights 
are to be maintained in this land and its civilization continued, 
publications like Everyman must be suppressed . . ." 

And again Gen. Otis says : 

"Its lamentably brilliant pages pervert art to the cunning 
uses of social disturbers . . ." — and also, says the General, still 
speaking of Everyman : 

"It is disturbing to mental stability." 



Thank you kindly. General. I could ask no greater boon 
from the Los Angeles Times. — Luke. 

EVERYMAN (Monthly) 

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Clarence Darro^v 



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30 



The Western Comrade 



Question of the Pop 

A VISITOR at Llano was aeeom- 
panied by a wise, talkative and 
pedantic friend. When they reached 
a field of growing popcorn the visi- 
tor said : 

"I never quite understood about 
popcorn " 

"Why, that's simple enough," 
broke in the wise one. "The starch 
polygons are of such a nature as to 
facilitate expansion and render it 
explosive in character; there is a 
fracture of a particle along its two 
radii, the endosperm swelling very 
considerably, the peripheral portions 
cohering with the hull, but the frac- 
tured quarters turning back to meet 
below the embryo " 

"Yes, I reckon that's right," in- 
terrupted the first speaker, "but 
what I wanted to know is what 
makes the blamed stuff pop ! ' ' 

Our Own Atrocities 

A transcontinental railroad is 
boasting that none of its trains was 
ever submarined. This reminds us 
that on the day of the Lusitania 
tragedy a Santa Fe engine torpedoed 
an electric car in Los Angeles and 
killed half a dozen non-combatants 
and wounded a score of others. No 
warning was given and passengers 
and crew went crashing down to- 
gether. 

This grade crossing tragedy was 
one of the thousand similar annual 
incidents showing the barbarities of 
"peace" under a profit system that 
means a perpetual and a diurnal 
hell. 

The Torturer 

Doubt came a-begging; and I bade 
him wait ; 
Fed him. while sorry stories he'd 
repeat. 
He went, and left a cross upon my 
gate — 
The sign that brought his fellow 
tramp. Defeat. 

Love on the Llano 

"And do you really love me, 
George?" she asked. 

"Love you," repeated George fer- 
vently. "Why, while I was bidding 
you good-bpe last night, dear, the dog 
bit a large chunk out of my leg, and 
I never noticed it until I got home." 



THESOGIALIST CAMPAIGN BOOK FOR 1914 

Will give you up-to-date infonnatlon about 



The Socialist Movement 

TLe Lator Movement 

Co-operation 

Exploitation 

AA' ages ana rlours 

Unemploymenl 

Cnila LaDor 

>A' Oman and Lator 

Inaustrial A.cciaent8 

Poverty 



The Higt Cost of Living 

\Vnite Slavery 

Crime 

TLe Old Parties 

Tne Progressives 

Syndicalism 

Concentration or \Vealtn 

Tne Trusts 

Profits 

Socialists in Otrice 



and many otter tilings of interest to Socialists 
and students — too many to mention. 

It has been compiled by the INFORMATION 
DEPARTMENT OF THE SOCIALIST PARTY 
and is the most complete reference book of that 
character that has ever been published. 

Sound in ilexiole clotli, 350 pages* 

50 CENTS A COPY. 



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The Western Comrade 



31 



Llano del Rio Co-operative Colony 



Llano, California 



THIS is the greatest Community Enterprise ever launched 
In America. 

The colony was founded by Job Harriman and is situated 
in the beautiful Antelope Valley, Los Angeles County, Cali- 
fornia, a few hours' ride from Los Angeles. The community 
is solving the problem of disemployment and business failure, 
and offers a way to provide for the future welfare of the 
workers and their families. 

Here is an example of co-operation in action. Llano del 
Rio Colony is an enterprise unique in the history of com- 
munity groups. 

Some of the aims of the colony are: To solve the problem 
of unemployment by providing steady employment for the 
workers; to assure safety and comfort for the future and for 
old age; to guarantee education for the children in the best 
school under personal supervision, and to provide a social 
life amid surroundings better than can be found in the com- 
petitive world. 

Some of these aim^ have been carried out during the 
year since the colony began to work out the problems that 
confront pioneers. There are about 400 persons living at 
the new town of Llano. There are now more than seventy 
pupils in the schools, and several hundreds are expected to be 
enrolled before a year shall have passed. Plans are under 
way for a school building, which will cost several thousand 
dollars. The bonds have been voted and there is nothing to 
delay the building. 

Schools will open at the fall term with classes ranging 
from the Montessori and kindergarten grades through the 
llntermediate which includes the first year in high school. 
I This gives the pubils an opportunity to take advanced sub- 
;jects, including languages in the colony schools. 

■ The colony owns a fine herd of about 100 head of Jersey 
and Holstein dairy cattle and is turning out a large amount 
of dairy products. 

There are about 150 hogs in the pens, and among them a 
large number of good brood sows. This department will be 
given special attention and ranks high in importance. 

The colony has about forty work horses, a large tractor, 
two trucks and a number of automobiles. The poultry de- 
partment has 100 egg-making birds, some of them blue- 
ribbon prize winners. About 2000 additional chicks were 
added in May. This department, as all others, is in the 
charge of an expert and it will expand rapidly. 

About 60,000 rainbow trout have been hatched in the col- 
ony's fish hatchery, and it is intended to add several hundred 
thousand each year. 

There are several hundred hares in the rabbitry and the 
manager of the department says the arrivals are in startling 
numbers. 

There are about 11,000 grape cuttings in the ground and 
thousands of deciduous fruit and shade trees in the colony 
nursery. This department is being steadily extended. 

The community owns several hundred colonies of bees 
which are producing honey. This department will be in- 
creased to several thousands. 

Among other industries the colony owns a steam laundry, 
a planing mill, a printing plant, a machine shop, a soil an- 
alysis laboratory, and a number of other productive plants 
are contemplated, among them a cannery, a tannery, an ice 
plant, a shoe factory, knitting and weaving plant, a motion 
picture company and factory. 

The colonists are farming on a large scale with the use 
of modern machinery, using scientific system and tried 
methods. 



About 120 acres of garden has been planted this year. 

Social life in the colony is most delightful. Entertain- 
ments and dances are regularly established functions. Base- 
ball, basket-ball, tennis, swimming, fishing, hunting and all 
other sports and pastimes are popular with all ages. 

Several hundred acres are now in alfalfa, which is ex- 
pected to run six cuttings of heavy hay this season. There 
are two producing orchards and about fifty-five acres of 
young pear trees. Several hundred acres will be planted in 
pears and apples next year. 

Six hundred and forty acres have been set aside for a 
site for a city. The building department is making bricks 
for the construction of hundreds of homes. The city will 
be the only one of its kind in the world. It will be built 
with the end of being beautiful and utilitarian. 

There are 1000 memberships in the colony and nearly 600 
of them are subscribed for. It is believed that the remainder 
will be taken within the next few months. 

The broadest democracy prevails in the management of 
the colony. There is a directorate of nine, elected by the 
stockholders, and a community commission of nine, elected 
by the General Assembly — all persons over 18 voting. Abso- 
lute equality prevails in every respect. The ultimate popu- 
lation of this colony will be between 5000 and 6000 persons. 

The colony is organized as a corporation under the laws 
of California. The capitalization is $2,000,000. One thousand 
members are provided for. Each shareholder agrees to sub- 
scribe for 2000 shares of stock. 

Each member agrees to pay $2500 and will receive 2000 
shares of capital stock and a deed to a lot 50x100 feet with 
a modem residence erected thereon. 

Each pays cash ($750) for 750 shares. 

Deferred payments on the remaining 1250 shares and house 
and lot are made by deducting one dollar per day (or more, 
if the member wishes to pay more rapidly) from the $4 
wages of the colonist. 

Out of the remaining $3 a day, the colonist gets the neces- 
sities and comforts of life. 

The balance remaining to the individual credit of the 
colonist may be drawn in cash out of the net proceeds of 
the enterprise. 

A per cent of the wages rnay be drawn in cash. 

Continuous employment is provided, and vacations ar- 
ranged as may be desired by the colonist. 

Each member holds an equal number of shares of stock 
as every other shareholder. 

Each member receives the same wage as every other 
member. 

In case anyone desires to leave the colony his shares 
and accumulated fund may be sold at any time. 

Are you tired of the competitive world? 

Do you want to get into a position where every hour's 
work will be for yourself and your family? Do you want 
assurance of employment and provisions for the future? Ask 
for the booklet entitled: "The Gateway to Freedom." Sub- 
scribe for The Western Comrade ($1.00 per year), and keep 
!X)sted on the progress of the colony. 
Address 
C. V. EGGLESTON CO. 

Fiscal Agents 

Llano del Rio Company 

924 Higgins Building Los Angeles, California 



Is Your Job Safe? 

Hundreds are safeguarding themselves by join- 
ing the Llano del Rio Co-operative Colony in 
the Antelope Valley, Los Angeles County, Cali- 
fornia, where climate and surroundings are ideal 
for an agricultural and industrial community 



This community is doing constructive and 
productive work in one of the most beautiful 
valleys in Southern California. The climate 
and surroundings are ideal. The Colony was 
founded and is conducted under the direct 
supervision of Job Harriman, who has been 
a leader in the 
Socialist move- 
ment in America 
for the past 25 
years. The Col- 
ony is solving for 
its members and 
their families the 
serious problems 
and disemploy- 
ment and insecur- 
ity for the future. 
Here is an example of COOPERATION IN 
ACTION. 

There were originally one thousand mem- 
berships. Six hundred of these are sold 
and the remainder are selling rapidly. Men 
and women of nearly every useful occupa- 
tion are needed in the community. These 
men are following the latest scientific meth- 
ods in farming, stock raising, dairying, poul- 
try production, bee keeping, trout hatching 




and rearing, and other agricultural and in- 
dustrial pursuits. Social life is most delight- 
ful. If you are willing to apply the princi- 
ples of co-operation of which you have heard, 
talked and read so much, here is your oppor- 
tunity. Co-operation is a practical thing and 

must be worked 
out in a practical 
manner. By this 
method we can ac- 
celerate the great 
world movement 
toward the social- 
ization of all the 
sources of human 
life. 

Do you want to 
solve your own 
vexatious problems and assist in this great 
enterprise? We want Colonists and we want 
representatives who can speak and write the 
message of freedom. You can make good 
from this hour if you will take hold and se- 
cure members. You can make this organiza- 
tion work a permanent business. See the 
story of the Colony on page 15 of this maga- 
zine, take advantage of your opportunity 
and write for particulars. 



Address C. V. Eggleston, Fiscal Agent 

Llano del Rio Company 



924 Higgins Building 



Los Angeles, California 



tJul>-, 191S 



:^'f^S^('' 



Ten Cents 





Men's 


10-inch boots. $6.00 


Men's 


12-inch boots. 


7.00 


Men's 


15-inch boots. 


8.00 


Ladies 


10-inch boots 


5.00 


Ladies 


14-inch boots 5.50 | 


Men's 


Elk shoes 


4.00 


Ladies 


Elk shoes... 


3.50 


Infants 


' Elk shoes, 




1 to 
Child's 


5 


1.50 


Elk shoes, 5 


to 8 
Child's 




1.75 


Elk shoes. 


81/2 to 11 


2.25 


Misses 


and Youths, 




IIV2 


to 2 


2.50 






Place stocking foot on 
paper, drawing pencil 
around as per above Il- 
lustration. Pass tape 
around at lines with- 
out drawing tight. Give 
size usually worn. 



ELKSKIN 

BOOTS and SHOES 



Factory operated in connection 
with Llano Del Rio Colony 

IDEAL FOOTWEAR 

For Ranchers and Outdoor Men 



Xke famous Clifford Elkskin Shoes are lightest and 
easiest for solid comfort and -w^iU outwear tnree pairs 
of ordinary snoes. 

We cover all lines from ladies,' men's 
and children's button or lace in light 
handsome patterns to the high boots for 
mountain, hunting, ranching or desert wear. 
Almost indestructible. 

Send in your orders by mail. Take 
measurement according to instructions. 
Out of town shoes made immediately on 
receipt of order. Send P. O. order and state 
whether we shall forward by mail or express. 



SALES DEPARTMENT 



Llano del Rio Company 

922 Higgins Building, Los Angeles, Cal. 



CONTENTS 



Review of Events. By Frank Wolfe Page 5 

The Deeper Crime. By Morgan Smith Page 9 

Death Masks (Poem). By Gertrude Cornwall 

Hopkins Page 10 

Probating Sally. By Emanuel Julius Page 11 

Abolish Assassination. By Homer Constantine. . . .Page 11 

A Discontented Dog. By Oscar Ameringer Page 12 

Advice for Success Seekers. By G. E. Moray Page 12 

Our Devil's Delight. By G. B. Bolton Page 13 

Poverty (poem), by Alberta Leslie Page 14 

Hope, O Brother! (poem). By Marguerite Head.. Page 14 

Co-operatives and Education Page 15 

Blessings of Prayer Page 19 

1776 — Revolutionists — 1915. By Edmund R. 

Brumbaugh Page 20 

Original Sin. By John M. Work Page 20 

Rent, Interest and Profit. By Carl D. Thompson. .Page 21 

Garbage-Fed Babies. By Frank H. Ware Page 21 

Point Out the Error. By Dr. A. J. Stevens Page 22 

Molding a Man. By Gray Harriman Page 23 

CARTOONS 

A Son of the Metropolis. Drawn for Western 

Comrade by M. A. Kempf Frontispiece 

Rocking the Boat Page 7 

Wilson to Wilhelm Page 8 

The Elixir of Hate Page 13 

Next Execution Page 28 







^1 



,i5^ 



&( 





A SON OF THE METROPOLIS 



The Western Comrade 



Devoted to the Cause of the Workers 



Political Action 



Co-operation 



Direct Action 



VOL. Ill 



LOS ANGELES, CAL., JULY. 1915 



NUMBER 3 




The Picnic. Waiting f df tlie Barbecued Beef 



REVIEW OF EVENTS 

By Frank E. Wolfe 



SOCIALIZATION of the sources of production or 
wholesale industrial eonscrii^tion, or both, faces 
Labor in England. For the workers it means state 
capitalism with merciless and inexorable masters. 
Involuntary servitude in a newer form confronts the 
toilers in factory, mill and mine. The neeessitj^ of 
servile workers in ammunition factories is so great 
that Labor disputes, with possible acts of reprisal, 
at this hour are a menace to the life of England. 

The British cabinet realizes the imminent danger 
and is determined to organize the human resources 



on the same intense liasis as Germany. It will re- 
Cjuire this or England will go down to defeat at the 
hands of her Teutonic enemy. 

Labor has been discontent with long hours and 
Inadeciuate wages while ammunition manufacturers 
and brokers were rolling up immense fortunes. This 
lias caused strikes. Additional strikes at this hour 
would be fatal to the success of English arms — and 
profits. 

The govei'ument has taken up the case and dire 
things are threatened. Winston Churchill has put 



The Western Comrade 




forth a proposition that meets with much favor. He 
has advocated limited Socialism as a remedy for the 
evils of competition and industrial strife. He said: 

"The vi^hole nation must be socialized; the gov- 
ernment must organize so that every one of every 
rank and position, men and women, will do their 
fair share." 

Socialization with industrial conscription would 
bring a strange, anomolous condition — state capital- 
ism with a vengeance! 

England is hard pressed on all sides and from 
within. There is a strong realization among the ^ex- 
ploiters that Germany is after the life-blood of the 
nation. Frantically they appeal to those whom they 
have brutally driven. They call upon every worker 
to do his "allotted part" in the making of muni- 
tions of war and the production and handling of 
food. Too late the capitalists are raising the cry 
that "Western civilization is in danger. 

The cry falls on dull and unhearing ears of an 
over-worked and under-fer proletariat. England, 
with land enough in grouse moors and deer parks to 
furnish an abundance of food, is dependent upon 
importations. 

No serious move has been made in the centuries 
to free the land or to give Labor the product of its 
toil. Now payday has come. 

♦ ♦> *■ 

GERMANY'S abhorrent and murderous disregard 
for the lives of women and children, and other 
non-combatants, has been the subject of much war- 
ranted criticism. The world has long looked with 
equanimity on the murder of non-combatants dur- 
ing the barbarities of peace, but it has boiled with 
indignation at the concrete act of murder by sink- 
ing an unarmed defenseless passenger steamer at 
sea. 

"We kill babies by pestilence in the slums and 
poisonous warrens of the poor, but we shrink from 
the killing out under the open sky. 

Within a week after the Lusitania massacre, 
American exploiters of women and child slaves 
maimed and starved more than were sent to death 
when the liner plunged beneath the waves. 



It is, after all, a matter of when, where and how 
to kill. May we not call it the ethics of murder ? 



WAR has raged in Europe nearly a year. Six 
million human lives have been destroyed. 
Deaths in trenches, on the fields and in battle at sea 
have beeJi equaled by the victims of plague, pes- 
tilence and famine. Never in history of humanity 
has there been such blood letting. Seven of the 
world's greatest powers are in death grips, and a 
score of lesser nations are involved. In the grasp 
of capitalism other governments will become in- 
volved should the masters so decree. Hourly the 
path of neutrality grows more difficult. 

On one side. of the struggle are Great Britain, 
Prance, Russia, Servia, Belgium, Italy, Japan and 
Montenegro. Against them are arrayed Germany, 
Austria and Turkey. 

Aside from death and devastation of border 
territory the net results of the war are almost noth- 
ing. There has been no serious invasion of contend- 
ing armies. Germany has everywhere successfully 
defended her continental territory. Alsace and Lor- 
raine have at times been overrun by Frenchmen, but 
the occupation is not important and there is no 
serious danger to Germany from this direction. 
Teutonic tenure of Belgium does not mean perma- 
nency. The fighting on the western field is virtually 
a deadlock. A gain of one hundred yards is hailed 
as 'a great victory. 

Japan has scored a rather hollow victory over 
the Germans in China, and that aged and indurated 
empire (republic?) has yielded to virtually every 
demand of the Eastern dwarfs. 

Russia's invasion of Galicia has fizzled, and the 
glory of her conquest was transitory. The Czar's 
moujiks are stampeded and it will be fortunate for 
Russia if a stand can be made on her border. 

It is doubtful if the Kaiser's army will be so ill- 
advised as to attempt a serious invasion of Russian 
territory. 

Italy has made a bold dash across the first few 
provinces of Austria, but is meeting with more stub- 
born resistance every day and the invasion will not 



The Western Comrade 




seriously trouble the German-Austrian forces. 

The Allies have met terrific opposition in the 
Dardanelles, and it must be poor consolation for the 
British, when a half dozen warships are sunk by 
Turkish forts, to be told that the cost is no greater 
than had been counted. 

Germany's commerce has been driven from the 
seas and her outlying fighting ships destroyed. Yet 
she is in a powerful position with her splendid 




ROCKING THE BOAT 

Tut, Tut, Theodore 
— Pes Moines Register and Leader 



squadrons at Heligoland, and her wonderful fleet of 
submersibles. Germany is drawing heavily on her 
reserves of men, but her war machine is so uear per- 
fection there is no hitch in her program.. There is 
■A troublesome soot here and there where Socialists 



grow insistent in their clamor for an ending of the 
war. Quick, effective steps were taken in suppress- 
ing the Socialist publications when they bubuled 
over. 

» * * 

ENGLAND is rapidly approaching actual con- 
scription. The enrollment act, together with 
individual disemployment and public sentiment, is 
now tantamount to enforced enlistment of all but 
the upper and middle class. Short of ammunition, 
dissension among military leaders and far from 
unanimity in government affairs, England shows 
signs of being hard pressed. Harrassed by subma- 
rines, annoyed by Zeppelin raids, the stolid Briton is 
stung but impotent. 

France has almost every available man and boy 
in the field. If the Germans succeed in driving back 
and holding the Rxissians, an immense army of sea- 
soned victors may be s'svung from east to west and 
hurled at the tired and worn Allies in the trenches 
of France and Belgium. 

Constantinople remains under the green flag, and 
the unbelievers storm at the Dardanelles forts in 
vain. Wherever troops are ofQcered by the Germans, 
the Allies pay dearly for every foot gained. The 
Allies hope to open a channel to the Black Sea where 
at Odessa and other ports are vast stores of food. 
But the stubborn resistance of the Turks make it a 
long hard journey. 

♦ ♦ ♦ 

THE Republican or Democrat or Prohibitionist 
who fired two futile shots at J. P. Morgan was a 
very busy person, if the daily press can be believed — 
and it ean't. Among the other things he did just 
pervious to his grand splash was to indulge in some 
revolver target practice. According to the Hearst 
journals he fired 200,000 rounds at a "scarred tar- 
get painted on a rear fence, and at stalwart trees in 
the yard." 

The cost of ammunition would probably run $2000. 
With reloading and cleaning and other time out the 
man could not have fired over 100 shots an hour. 
This would have rqeuired 2000 hours. At a 10-hour 
day, continuous work, he would have had to shoot 
steadily 200 days, or nearly 7 months, without holi- 



The Western Comrade 




day or Sunday. Of course this would not be likely to 
attract any attention. 

No wonder the youthful product of our modern 
eolleg-es believe so thoroughlj^ in efficiency when the 
professors of such institutions show such persever- 
ance for efficiency. 



IF anyone thinks the J\lalthusian theory has been 
efi!eetually disposed of thej^ should see a copy of 
the London publication bearing that name. The 
editor of that solemn but amiising sheet bobs up 
with the declaration that the high cost of living is 
proof of the contention that the world is overpopu- 
lated. To quote from the editor : "In the first place, 
as our readers know, the world's food supply in ordi- 
nary times is only between two-thirds and three- 
fourths of the needs of its inhabitants. Hence the 
starvation of large numbers and the folly of talking 
about legal living wage." 

The editor of The Public, with an eye ever to the 
land question, quicklj' points out the fallacy of this 
stand : 

"As to the sanity of the Malthusian's proposi- 
tion that people having excessively large families 
would have been better off with a lesser number of 
children, nothing need be said at this point. But to 
say that one-third or one-fourth of the food-needs of 
the human race is unsupplied in times of peace is to 
set forth a state of affairs that has no likeness outside 
of Alice in Wonderland. 

"That one-third or one-fo\;rth more food would 
be used if every stomach in the world were filled may 
not be an extravagant claim ; but to conclude there- 
from that these stomachs are not filled because the 
food cannot be raised is a monstrous perversion of 
logic. It is needless to point to the vast areas of 
fertile land still unused, and to corresponding areas 
that are only partially used; it should be sufficient 
to show on the one had that nobody with means goes 
hungry, and on the other hand that food growers as 
a rule complain of lack of remuneration for their 
labor. * * * 

' ' The plight of the three-qiiarter fed families is not 
due to a shortage of food, any more than the fact of 



their having three-quarters house room, three-quar- 
ters clothing and three-quarters of the various com- 
forts of life are due to the fact that there is any 
shortage in houses, clothing or of the other products 
of labor. It is due solely to the fact that they lack 
the power to purchase these things. If, however, 
the wealth produced by Labor be divided between 
those who labor and those who idle, it may readily be 
seen how Labor may be short, not only in food, but in 
all other things made by Labor. The very land upon 
which these three-quarter fed people of London like 




Wilson to Wilhelm: "The next time you do that, 
mind, I shall be really angry." 

This cartoon, showing the popular British understanding 
of President Wilson, was commented upon widely in Amer- 
ica, where its bitter tone was criticised. 
— "London Daily Express 



pays a princely revenue to the owners, who give in 
return not one solitary penny. If this thought be 
applied throughout the world, and if it be realized 
that the labor throughout the world is contributing 
a heavy toll to the owners of the earth, who render no 
service in return, a stupendous fact will be ap- 
parent." 

Revolutionists the world over must unite and 
destroy creed and dogma. 

What quarrel have the Socialist and the Single 
Taxer ? Is it that the latter sees in the land the su- 
preme source of life? We agree that the world 
is underfed because of the monopoly of all sources 
of life. Would we Socialists lose anything if we 
joined in every effort to free the land? Would we 
not have the world to gain? 







The Western Comrade 



The Deeper Crime 

By MORGAN SMITH 



w 



11 ii 11 



HEN the North wind doesn't blow any 
more, and it never snows any more, and 
people don't have to sit in the barn and 
hide their heads under their wings any 
more : "When things are settled by the 
T«»T#«7 Hague Tribunal, and the markets of the 

^^ff-' world are organized, and everybody has 
S^iSSSSsI title to all the land, and nobody has 
need to demonstrate his superiority; When we do not 
maintain a standing army or soak all our money in 
armor-plate targets, or devote our brains to learning 
the goose-step — ^what will we do for War! What will 
we do then, poor things ! 

We'll take trips to the mountains — every brick- 
layer's son of us — and we'll travel in foreign coun- 
tries, and we'll sec the finest plays, and hear the finest 
music: and we'll take aviating trips and under-sea 
trips, and we'll have a general rotation of environment. 

For there is something iin deriving the spirit of war 
that is not included in hate, sport or loyalty ; and there 
is something to the levj'ing of armies that has nothing 
in common with hoodwinking. Be sure that when 
every conceivable excuse, pretext, and cause of war 
has been removed by a sane society, some worthy wight 
is going to arise from his bed, some morning, and say, 
"Gee whiz! I wish I could enlist!" He will say it, 
sure, unless we provide a psychological substitute for 
enlisting. 

Do we humans ruffle our feathers all up and peep 
plaintively when a cold, dark war-cloud stretches it- 
self over oi;r old mortgaged acres and upon the old 
familiar work-bench? No, we do not ruffle our little 
feathers and peep plaintively. We gird up our loins 
and sail out after that war-cloud with a glad cry of 
recognition. 

Why are the soldiers in the pictures always smiling 
and wherefore the complaint that a good pose of a 
peasant family driven from home can't be had owing 
to the omnipresent grins ! 

It's the Novelty — a thing that nothing but ruin and 
death could have brought for them. It's a crime 
greater than the crime of social strife. 

"Wliy! Do they like it, then?" says the war- 
cloud do'mi deep in the midst of its oppression and 
tyranny and error. 

"Do they like it. then?" says Billy Sunday as he 
lams his ten thousand men all over the auditorium and 
lams them back again. 

And if they do (and it does seem as if they did). 



why in the name of all torture and abuse do they like 
it, say Billy and the war-cloud. 

It is the Novelty, and the appalling emotions of 
fear and awe-things that nothing but torture and abuse 
could have bought for them. It is a crime, greater than 
the crime of making a fool of a man. 

We may grant that the foot-soldiers of society can 
relish a War, once they're into it. It is more conven- 
ient to grant it than to disregard all the pictures of 
mobs besieging consulates and falling over each other 
to enlist. And, since they have the appetite for War, 
we feed them War. They enjoy the taste and put up 
with the subsequent aches as philosophically as a 
youngster endures the green apple cramps in the 
stomach. But there is a wisdom at hand that can 
satisfy that craving without the results. Sane society 
will call it Constructive Emotionalism. 

It is not the War but the emotions of War that the 
foot -soldiers crave. It is a little novelty in their lives — 
a little change of scene, a glad wandering from the 
grind and scrape and worry. It is the novel emotion 
of Unity. Even while the astute recruiting office is 
flooding the streets with martial music and waving the 
flag the hurrying recruit holds most in mind the fact 
that he and all his neighbors are at one in something. 
They have all agreed with him and they have patted 
each other on the backs. 

That "one touch of nature" does not make the 
whole world kin because it is Nature, nor yet because 
it touches the whole world. It is the "one" part of 
the touch that does the business. It is Unity. When 
it is raining even the eat can tell the king that it's 
nasty. Wlien there is war there is a common hatred, 
which is Unity. It is not the hatred that is sublime. 
One day there will be the common peace of everyday 
life and that will satisfy the cravings without the 
cramps. 

We have learned that a youngster's cry for candy 
is really prompted by a craving for meat: Our mar- 
tyred militarists must not be swayed to war against 
their own will by the people who rise from their 
diiidgerj' to cry for a change of scene. People must 
not hurry to the recruiting office because War is the 
only semblance of Unity that their poor souls have 
experienced in a life-time. We have learned better 
than that. 

Wlien the North wind never blows any more, people 
will not go to War to see soul-stirring pyrotechnics and 
awful deeds of bravery ; they will go to the mountains 



10 



The Western Comrade 



and see great peaks that pierce the clouds and a sky- 
that is turquoise blue. When people never hide their 
heads under the wings any more, we will not make 
fools of ourselves for the sake of the beauty of Unity ; 
we will have the beauty of social precision from the 
dawn of life to its dusk. 

It is the emotions of our lives that make grow that 
part of us that grows independently of our body. That 
part must be fed or buried. 

War is the emotional Crown of Thorns. There is 
not a sublime emotion of the liuman soul that it does 
not gratify — and prostitute. It is the summit of wild 
ecstasy — the accumulated cravings of a lifetime. They 
have been growing and growing and unfed until they 
burst in the brothel of carnage, and the foot-soldiers 
die sated and content. At the end of the long starva- 
tion they are grateful for one draught of the potion of 
soul's life — even though it be hemlock. 

Oh, it is a crime — greater than the crime of making 
a fool of a man ! 

They go to war with wild hallelujahs. Even my 
lady of spurious social title who has seen the peaks 
piercing the clouds and the turquoise blue sky, and the 
chasm and the sea and the cascade; who has tasted of 
luxury and who had witnessed the random buds of 
man's emotional creatures — she goes. There she is — ■ 
in a great bustling hospital where people whisper and 
hurry along soundless corridors, and a huge motor darts 
up the country road in the night and halts at the en- 
trance — a lantern swinging from its doors. There is 
hurry and skurry and bated breath. There is Unity. 

And, back in the town the men are marching down 
the thronged street with the blare of the band and the 
throbbing of the driim. They are cheered and noticed 
for the first time in a lifetime, and they square their 
shoulders and new fire springs to their eyes. And the 



peopel, elbow to elbow, on the sidewalk, are all at one. 
They have clapped each other on the backs. And every 
man rushes for the taste of sweet ambrosia. He grasps 
feverishly for the pen, and signs. 

And all for what ! For War ! What's War to him 
or he to War! ' j 

Indeed it is the old lament of Hamlet over again. 
We have real aims for emotional ardor a-plenty, yet 
we cannot summon a sigh for them. j 

If that part of us that triumphs and carols and feeds 
in War is an immortal thing capable of surviving the 
body if its strength permits, then it is a thing that 
yearns, for its own element. Its own element, of what- 
ever else it may partake, is Liberty. The more it is re- 
stricted and starved the more it yearns, and that is the 
reason, perhaps, that War evokes a more spontaneous 
response among the poor foot-soldiers of society than 
among the spurious lords Avho have seen the cascade. 

What is a Broad man, and what is a Narrow man ? 
What is a fed man and what is a starved man ! 

The prisons of our souls can be made only of Time 
and of Space. What soul would not leap to a hemlock 
draught of War if it had been kept in a three-foot space 
at a workbench for a lifetime! What soul would not 
leap for the offer of War whose scope of thought had 
never been permitted to rise beyond the proportion of 
a week's salary and a week's expenses! What soul 
Avould not go to War that had never been to a nickel- 
show ! 

The North -^^'ind doth blow, but it is blowing do-\\Ti 
some old ideas that had worms in them, firmly rooted 
though they seemed. They served their turn but they 
have hung around too long after their usefulness was 
gone. The trend of the public mind is for seeking out 
the roots of things. We will not feed ourselves green 
apples, because we have learned better than that. 



You say that the white of his face in the darkness 
gleamed strangely, 
As touched by a light 
That is seen of the faces of those who die greatly, 
whose honor 
Gave all for the right; 
And you bring me his sword and his sash, and the 
message of comrades, 
All that they know 
Of the last of the hours that he spent on the earth. 

Me, his mother — ■ 
■ You comfort me so — 



Death Masks 

By GERTRUDE CORNWALL HOPKINS 

And I tell you you lie! 



I tell you the last that he knew of this earth was its 
hatred and anger ; 
Blood blinded his eyes; 
What gleamed white in the dark was the tightly 
clenched teeth of his raging, 
Cursing the skies, 
For his face was as blackened, awry, as the soul they 
tore from him — • 
Hurled to God's feet, 
A devil, the horrible madness of murder upon him — 
My son, who was sweet ! 



The Western Comrade 



Probating Sally 

By EMANUEL JULIUS 



II 



THREE women — Probation Officer Mrs. Tompkins, 
Sallie Williams, better known as Kitty, and her 
mother, Mrs. Mary S. Williams, of Santa Ana, were 
together in an effort to "fix things up." Mrs. Tomp- 
kins was the first "fixer"; the other two needed the 
"fixing," especially Kitty. 

"It's too late, I tell you," Kitty exclaimed, again 
and again. "It wont work, I say." 

"Yes it will," said Mrs. Tompkins, firmly. 

"I know it won't." Kitty seemed determined to 
have her way. 

"There," Mrs. Williams cried. "I offer to take 
her home again and she says 'no.' Oh, God, who'd 
a-thought my Sallie would fall so low." 

Mrs. Williams, a woman of 50, burst into tears. 

"Now, mother, please don't cry " 

■ ' ' You don 't love me or you wouldn 't make me suf- 
fer like this " 

"Yes, I do, mother. I'd do anything for you — but 
this can't be done — it's too late •" 

"It's never too late to mend," Avas Mrs. Tompkins' 
platitude. She looked at them as though she had 
given expression to a highly original thought. 

"Yes, it is," said Kitty; "some things get so broken 
you can't fix 'em — you have to throw 'em away. And 
I'm one of them. I can't be fixed." 

"Here you have a mother who is willing to take 
you home and give you a chance to start again," said 
the probation officer, kindly, but wearily, as if it was 
an old story to her. 

"I'll be miserable," Kitty said. A frown furrowed 



the girl's still pretty painted and made-up face. 

"I know what '11 happen," she added. "Every- 
body '11 look on me as a leper. The neighbors will 
point to me as a bad example. I tell you I won't be 
able to stand it." 

"You will," said the probation officer. 

"I wont. If mother would stay here I'd take care 
of her and give her a place to stay in " 

"How?" Mrs. Officer Tompkins asked. 

"You know. Five years of my kind of life has 
made me different. I can't change now, especially 
by going to my home town. There's nothing for me 
there." 

"Very well," Mrs. Tompkins frowned, ready to 
play her trump card; "if your mind is made up you 
can have the reformatory sentence the judge gave you. 
Go home or to the Whittier institution." 

"How '11 I live down Santa Ana?" 

"Work." 

"At what?" 

I don't know. Wash clothes — anything — to make 
a living. Jail or home — which will you take?" 

Kitty decided to go to Santa Ana. 

Ten minutes after they were gone, Kitty's mother 
rushed back into Probation Officer Tompkins' office. 

"We got to a corner," she panted, "when she 
grabbed me around the neck and kissed me. Then she 
ran off " 

Mrs. Tompkins said: "D — n it all!" — which was 
a rare thing for Mrs. Probation Officer Tompkins to 
sav — out loud. 



Abolish Assassination 

By HOMER CONSTANTINE 



A RABID Republican has made a dastardly attempt 
to assassinate an honored and respected citizen. 
This is the time to call a halt on the dangerous doctrine 
disseminated by these persons who fanatically follow 
this imported idea of republicanism. Every Repub- 
lican believe in violence. Every organ edited by these 
mad dogs of society advocates violence and expounds 
the fallacious theories that inevitably lead to such 
unspeakable atrocities as the attack on J. P. Morgan 
by a Republican fanatic. 

It is time for the people to organize the "Plain 
Citizens' Combine" so earnestly advocated by the Los 
Angeles Times, to the end that the followers of this 



abhorrent cult shall quietly and without a ripple on 
the surface be removed from human ken. No longer 
shall we tolerate these blatant soapboxers in our midst. 

Law and order mi^st be maintained (outside the 
combine). 

The police must stand as our bulwark. A citizens' 
police must be established in Los Angeles and these 
should be recruited as are some of our grand juries, 
from a list of names suggested by the secretary of the 
Merchants and Manufacturers' Association. 

This auxiliary police should contain none but those 
sworn to spifflicate these dangerous characters (Re- 
publicans) whenever and wherever found. They can 



12 



The Western Comrade 



immediately be armed with the sawed-off shotguns, our 
government already has so wisely provided. 

Back of the police stands firm and fast the county 
constabulary, the militia with its machine guns, the 
mighty enginery of our army and our great navy. 
Good citizens should boycott all the newspapers that 
dally with the theories of these wild dreamers and 
Utopians. 



Down with the advocates of a system that would 
break up the home, abolish religion, destroy the in- 
centive to work, and disrupt representative form of 
government. 

(Note: In ease it develops that Holt was a Demo- 
crat the reader will please strike out the word ' ' Repub- 
lican" and insert in lieu thereof the word "Demo- 
crat.") 



A Discontented Dog 



By OSCAR AMERINGER 



DID you ever see a dog without fleas? If yoii did 
you saw a happy, cheerful dog: a dog that lies 
in the shade of the old apple tree, dreaming of pork 
chops, jackrabbits and dog fights. 

Now, if you give this contented dog a handful of 
fleas, his dog nature will change immediately. Instead 
of dreaming about juicy pork chops, or how he would 
lick that brindle pup across the pike, or what he would 
do to the hind legs of that rabbit running through the 
underbrush, he sits up and notices things. 

Pointing a cold, melancholy "nose toward heaven, he 
stretches his neck and starts that peculiar up-and-down 
stroke characteristic to all flea-bitten dogs. He has 
found a job now; he has found useful emijloj'ment ; he 
has something to scratch for. 

Now, suppose the flea woiild sit up on the nose of 



that dog and say: "Lo and behold me, the benefactor. 
I have given work to this poor pup. Without me, this 
doggie Avould have no job. Withoiit me he would have 
no incentive to scratch." "Wouldn't it be funny if the 
flea would make such an argument? And suppose the 
dog would vote for the flea on the strength of it, 
wouldn 't that be still funnier ? 

Yet this is exactly what the working people have 
done for many, many years. They have voted into 
office those whose policies afflict them with parasites. 
And they do so because someone has told them that un- 
less we had the capitalist class we all would miserably 
perish. 

Socialists insist that society does not need the capi- 
talist class any more than a dog needs fleas. Let the 
nation be the capitalist. 



Advice For Success Seekers 



By G. E 

IMPEOVE your mind — it's a very small part of your 
being, but one that makes a lot of trouble unless 
you attend to its upkeep. 

First find out if you realty have a mind ; or whether 
you have mistaken ordinary instinct for mental equip- 
ment. 

If J0U discover that you possess a mind, investi- 
gate to find if it has become foolishly flattened or dirty 
with the dust of dollars. 

Not that it matters much, for fat-foolishness and 
dollar-dustiness are not antagonistic to success. You 
can win wealth with either, and winning wealth is the 
worthiest work' in life. 

But, nevertheless, a well-informed mind for display 
purposes is mighty useful. 

It will cause you to gain the respect of high-brows, 
a peculiar class of people who have improved their 
minds until their mental processes have become pecu- 
liarly involved. As your adherents and associates you 



M O R AY 

will find them very usefiil and immensely amusing; 
they will greatly relieve the tedium of your toil while 
you are amassing millions. 

Always read good books — books that build and 
books that better you. If you cannot select the right 
ones yourself, buy only those that are recommended 
by the elect ; and read them, either personally, or via 
your secretary. 

There are a few secretaries who are also inter- 
preters, and can successfully translate English into the 
language of the business world. Hire one ! 

Shun Shakespeare, until your mind has emerged 
from the dense darkness that surrounds war reports, 
sporting news, and the political pages of the daily de- 
liriums that sell on the news stands for a cent a copy. 

Leave advice for the loveless alone ; and forget the 
frenzies that afflict the writers of headlines; other- 
wise you will lose your invaluable mind before you 
have improved it. 









The Western Comrade 

Our Devil's Delight 

By G. E. BOLTON 



13 



AT the Panama-Pacific Exposition there are many 
exhibits that display the marvelous ingenuity of 
man in the development of machinery, but probably 
nothing shown there can compare with the wonderful 
instruments for the destruction of human life. The 
federal government makes this proud display. 

Nothing seems to have been left undone to dem- 
onstrate to the youth of the land what a noble and 
laudable thing is murder when done collectively and 
under legally prescribed methods. True there is an 
exhibit of the coast guard appliances for saving life, 
but it is at best an inferior display. The life-saving 
machinery is crude and obviously inadequate. The 
display is only enlivened by grotesque prints hung on 
the wall depicting some heroic acts of murder per- 
formed by revenue cutters in times of war. There is 
one gun for throwing a projectile with a life-line at- 
tached, but it is archaic arid illy constructed. It is 
merely an example of the weak and inefficient mechan- 
ism of peace. 

In looking at this poor showing as against the won- 
derously perfect rapid-firers I could not help thinking 
how Belzebub must enjoy a stroll through this depart- 
ment. 

Bernard Shaw put this over most vividly in Man 
and Superman, where he has the Devil say: "In the 
arts of life man invents nothing ; but in the arts of 
death he outdoes nature herself, and produces by chem- 
istry and machinery all of the slaughter of plague, 
pestilence and famine. In the arts of peace man is a 
bungler. I have seen his cotton factories and the like, 
with the maehinery that a greedy dog could have in- 
vented if it had wanted money instead of food. I 
know his clumsy typewriters and bungling locomotives 
and tedious bicycles ; they are toys compared to the 
Maxim gi;n, the submarine torpedo boat. There is 
nothing in man's industrial machinery but his greed 
and sloth : his heart is in' his weapons. This marvelous 
force of life of which you boast is a force of death: 
Man measures his strength by his destructiveness. 
What is his religion ? An excuse for hating me. What 
is law? An excuse for hanging you? What is moral- 
ity? Gentility! an excuse for consuming without pro- 
ducing. What is his art? An excuse for gloating over 
pictures of slaughter. What are his politics? Either 
the worship of a despot because a despot can kill, or 
parliamentary eoekfighting. ' ' 

This soliloquy rambles on and covers the foibles and 
idiosyncracief? of mankind, but none of its stabs is bet- 



ter thrust than the keen one at the perfection of the 
killing instruments. 

The exposition teem.s with this barbarism. Even 
the Educational building is disgraced by a Japanese 
exhibit where wax figures of soldiers are posed in the 




THE ELIXIR OF HATE 
Kaiser: "'Fair is foul and foul is fair; 

Hover through the fog and filthy air.' " 

— From Punch 



act of loading a rapid-fire cannon — presumably aimed 
at some inferior race : malay, mongol — or Caucasian. 

An American is credited with the invention of a 
poisonous gas for use in warfare. Every Christian na- 
tion is experimenting with or using his new, scientific 
method of destroying life. Nothing in the war dis- 
plays at the Pair gave a hint of this new discovery 
and we are not permitted to know how far our civil- 
ized government has progressed in this direction. We 
have every hope, however, that we shall not lag be- 
hind in our efforts toward benevolent asphyxiation 
when our time comes. 



14 



The Western Comrade 



Poverty 

By ALBERTA LESLIE 



I'D fain address thee, 
Could I words discover 
Charged with new terror, 

To voice man's hate and fear! 
But all, all have been sung or written over and over, 
And impotent, hurled at thee full many a year ! 

Long hath man 'neath thy foul rags been smothered. 
He hath aequaintanced thee too long, too well, 

Thee and the whelps tliou hast fathered, hast 
mothered, 
Hast spawned on earth, didst beget in Hell. 

These, thy jackals, wait to rend him limb from limb, 
Vice, ignorance, disease, thy very own, 

Thou hast no need of these to vanquish him, 
Thou wert enough ! Thou wert enough alone ! 

Too often must he gaze into thy cold cavernous eye, 
Unwelcome dost thou sit with him at many a 
scanty meal, 
With thy bony clutch around his heart perchance 
he yet must die. 
His sorrowful soul for ages hath withered beneath 
thy heel. 

Small wonders that man hath thee, oh ! though with- 
out a heart. 
To torture him thou camest from unknown depths 
of mire. 
Oh, monstrous, vile hermaphrodite, who art 
Of untold evils, both the dam and sire. 

Pale with a prison pallor, is thy hideous face, 
Thy garments reek with all the sins of eld. 

Like some foul vampire, thou shadowest the race, 
Man shrinks beneath the bitter scourge in thy lean 
fingers held! 



The rich? They shiver in their furs, the sleek, the 
dainty fed. 
If near them thou but cast thy shadow grim, 
They start and tremble in their silken beds, 

When dreaming, they think thou hast overtaken 
them. 

The poor? Alas! Men steal and women falter 
And turn from virtue's path to escape from thee. 

How often bringest them to the cell, the halter? 
AVhen from thy grasp the poor fools seek to flee. 

Thou stillest even the children's silvery laughter, 
Thou chainst them to vast, to swift machines; 

They may not play, for swift thou comest often: 
They know alas what thy grim presence means. 

Oh! Piteous shadows, thru the grey dawn stealing. 
To take their places in shop or mill or field. 

Heavy with sleep they stumble forth unwilling, 
To thee their playtime, nay, their very lives to 
yield. 

Under thy lash they toil, nor play, nor rest. 

Thy fangs are ready do they lag but once. 
Thou wolfish thing I Who stealest from the mother's 
breast 

The helpless hungry babe's sole sustenance. 

Men cry against thee, they weep, thou hast no pity ; 

They strive, they curse, they pray — all, all in vain. 
Still, vulture-like, thou hoverest the city, 

Still pestilent, thou showest the plain. 

While for deliverance men crying 

Fair cities perish and whole nations fall. 

All haste before thee to ruins ultimate. 

And thou, unclean thing, still broodest over all. 



Hope, O Brother! 

By MARGUERITE HEAD 



HOPE, Brother, though time be long. 
And turmoil and strife enshroud the earth ; 
For out of the chaos and woe and wrong, 
Freedom, Brother, shall come to birth. 

Night, Brother, is not so dark 

But the comforting light shines forth at morn; 
And a paean of joy, like the song of the lark. 

Shall rise to welcome the day, new-born. 



Work, Brother, for work shall yield 
A boon to the coming race of men; 

And the sceptres the tyrant rulers wield 
Shall never oppress the world again. 

Clasp, Brothers, your toil-worn hands; 

Union of hearts is a thing divine. 
And Brotherhood's service, uniting all lands, 

Is the noblest work in the world's design. 



The Western Comrade 



If) 





Sandbox on Ditch Irrigatrng Alfalfa and Orchards 



Co-operatives and Education 




IX pupils were graduated from the Llano 
Grammar school at the end of the term. 
They were Dona Spencer, Corrine Les- 
lie, Blanche Bannon, Helen Kaufman, 
Warren Miller and Clarence Cedarstrom. 
To Miss Helen Tyler, principal of the 
school, is due the credit of bringing this 
class through. There were about seventy- 
five pupils enrolled in the school before the end of the 
term. Miss Tyler and the school trustees say there 
will be about 115 pupils enrolled at the fall term. This 
does not include a Montessori school of about fifty 
pupils, which will be under the management of Pru- 
dence Stokes Brown, who is taking a special course 
under the distinguished educator. This department 
will begin with children at the age of 21/^ years and 
carry them through until they are 6 years old. 

Plans are being made for a new school house to 
be built with the money secured from the bonds re- 
cently voted by the districts. 

Graduation exercises were held in the assembly- 

oom at the Clubhouse. There were several hundred 

ersons present to enjoy an excellent program given 

entirely by the children of the school. Several 

sketches and a class play were given and the mem- 



bers of the community Avere surprised by the dra- 
matic ability and versatility displayed by the youthful 
actors and declaimers. There were several musical 
numbers and a Scotch dance by the charming little 
Misses Richardson and Scott made a hit with all 
present. 

The hall was prettily decorated and the stage was 
banked with flowers. Yellow and blue — the class 
colors — predominated in the flower and streamers. 
Diplomas were presented to the graduates by Prank 
E. Wolfe, who briefly outlined the history of the com- 
munity schools. The audience responded with great 
enthusiasm when the speaker mentioned the obliga- 
tion of the community to the children and the vision 
of the educational features of the future. 

The trustees of the Llano school district are John 
Leslie, Frank Harper and Mrs. David Cedarstrom. 
Greater interest is taken in the educational depart- 
ment each month. It is hoped that with the fall term 
there will be classes in sculpture, painting in oils, 
dancing, as well as the beginning of a system of voca- 
tional training. 

No celebration or gathering at the colony has 
equalled that of the Fourth of July picnic held on the 
colony newly acquired land, known as the Tighlman 



16 



The Western Comrade 




Community Life 
at Llano del Rio 



Beginning Work on New Swimming Plunge 






Chef I 



Making Clay Bricks. Note "Pug Mill" and Some Completed Houses 



Driving a Hand M 



The Western Comrade 



17 



6 


Industrial and 
Social Activity 


i 




18 



The Western Comrade 



ranch. Here several hundred members of the com- 
munity gathered beneath the broad trees beside the 
flowing waters where they enjoyed a day of perfect 
rest and relaxation. The Mauricio brothers had 




First graduation class of the Llano schools. Left 
to right: Miss Helen Tyler, principal; Corrine Leslie, 
Clarence Cederstrom, Helen Kauffman, Blanche Ban- 
non, Warren Miller and Dona Spencer. 



charge of the barbecue and the beef they brought up 
from the bed of hot rocks was cooked to a delicious 
turn. 

There were no speeches or other ceremonies save 
impromptu games on the part of the children. One or 
two groups of chess fans sought secluded spots beside 
the stream, and sat silent over the ivory pieces. 

A splendid spirit of comradeship was shown among 
the members of the commimity. "Old timers" greeted 
each other and compared this Fourth with that of a 
year ago, when the colonists were few in number but 
strong in hopefulness. There were many expressions 
of gratification over the great growth made by the 
colony. There were many visitors during the two 
days, but the greater portion of these came from the 
neighborhood. 

Burning lime in the new kilns is making steady 
progress under the management of R. E. Stevens. The 
grade of the product is excellent and an almost in- 
exhaustible supph^ is at hand. 

An invaluable department has been established at 
the community office, where F. H. Chamberlain has 
charge of the information bureau. Here wants of 
members of the commixoity are made known and sug- 
gestions for welfare are freely offered. 

The nightly meeting of managers has proven most 
important and has been conducive to a much smoother 
running machine. There is a better understanding 
between departments and there is more team work 
because of this understanding. This is a clearing house 



for reports and statements of progress. Managers 
make known their needs of men and teams or make 
releases so that there is never any idle teams or 
workers. 

Chief Architect L. A. Cooke has undertaken the 
work of statistician for the colony. He has prepared 
some interesting charts. Among them a diagram show- 
ing the growth of population of Llano and a chart 
of the temperature since the beginning of records. 

Leo. H. Dawson, who has charge of the nursery 
department, reports splendid growth of the vines and 
young trees in his department. Among other plants 
that are making^ good progress are 2500 blackberries 
and an equal number of strawberries that were donated 
by Comrade Hall from Chino. Eleven thousand grape 
vines will be bearing fruit next year. One hundred 
choice strawberry vines sent in by Comrade Post of 
Los Gatos are doing well. There are 100 Burbank 




Misses Scott and Richardson in Scotch Dance at 
Graduation Exercises 



The Western Comrade 



19 



Himalaya blackberries and an equal number of Lu- 
cretia dewberries, all making rapid growth. One 
thousand Concord grapes from Utah show vigorous 
growth. There are 1000 sturdy black locusts from 
Utah. These are to be used for ornamental trees, and 
for fence posts. The blossoms of these trees provide 
excellent nectar for the bees. 

One thousand California black walnut trees, do- 
nated by Comrade Al Gej'er, show remarkable growth. 
Seven acres have been planted in Russian sunflowers. 

The commissary department has been removed to 
larger quarters in the rear of the club building. 
Thomas H. Joims, who ha shad charge of this division, 
is being assisted by Allen Miller, who recently arrived 
at the colony. 

There have been small but steady additions to the 
live stock and poultry departments. The arrival of 
ten Swiss milch goats started the rumor that a Swiss 
cheese factory would be started, provided the war 
embargo would permit the importation of the holes. 

The dental office and house for Dr. Horneff have 
been completed and this neeedd department will soon 
be in operation. 

Plans are under way to construct two large silos 
to store ensilage for next winter. These probably will 
he constructed of cobble and concrete. They will be 
twenty feet in diameter. 

A numbe rof the boys who are now out of school 
have taken up work in the garden and other depart- 
ments where there is light, congenial employment. 

Among the later planting at the colony has been 



120 acres of milo maize, 10 acres of sweet potatoes, 20 
acres of beets, 17 acres of carrots and 20 acres in 
pumpkins. 

The first rush of caring for the fruit is over and 
the apricots and apples from the Tilghman ranch have 




been put up by the chef and by the families of the 
community. 

Four hundred new folding chairs, two billiard 
tables, a piano and a lot of heavy mission furniture is 
a part of the new possessions of the Colony Club. 

Visitors from all parts of America have registered 
at the club during the past month. Several Eastern 
States are represented by the new members. Cal- 
ifornia and Coast State comrades far outnumber 
all others. 



Blessings of Prayer 



WITH the soldiers on the fields, in forts and fleets 
of the struggling powers are many priests, 
preachers in frock and garmb of chaplain. These are 
the official prayer akers of the warring nations. In 
addition to the blessings in articleo mortis and praying 
for their holy dead they are praying to all the gods 
they know asking for some unholy dead. 

The British ask God (Jehovah) to send success to 
their arms (death to Germans and Turks). The Ger- 
mans invoke Gott (the same Jehovah) to punish (de- 
stroy) England. The French send up supplication to 
Dieu (also Jehovah") to send victories to their troops. 
The Rabbi of the Russians prays to Adanoi and the 
Jews in other armies implore the same god to aid them. 

In Southern Europe Asiatics of many nations are 
praying to all their Gods to punish the Christian dogs. 
There the Syrian sends up prayers to Adad : the 
.Arabian to Alia : the Persian to Syra ; the Tartarian 
to Idga ; the Egyptian to Aumn or Zent. 



In the British and French armies the natives of a 
score of lands are praying to Buddha, Mohammed, 
Doga, Rogt, Eher, Chur, Oese, Dios, Lian, Zeus, Con- 
fucius, Esgi, or Zenl. The Japanese are Shintos, 
Buddhists or worshippers of Zain. 

These fighters, be they Italians, Turks, Teutons, 
Austrians, Serbs, French, English, Ghurkas or Irish 
have had great faith in their gods, but their gods have 
permitted them to be starved, choked with poisonous 
gasses, evieerated, slain. Five millions of men have 
been destorycd and as many women and children are 
marked for death or worse. 

Priest and pagan alike will tell you his particular 
god is the best, most powerful and kind, of all the 
brands offered. Now and then they speak of the wrath 
of God, but mostly of his gentleness and mercy. Any-. 
way God is having a tough time of it, if he is making a 
serious attempt to adjust affairs, and the end is not 
vet.— A. M. 



2^ 



The Western Comrade 



1776 — Revolutionists — 1915 



By EDMUND R. BRUMBAUGH 



ONE hundred and thirty-nine years ago a group of 
men met and signed a declaration of principles. 
It was a defiant declaration. It slapped the face of 
smug conservatism. It enunciated doctrines regarded 
as rankest political heresy by every reactionary, non- 
progressive spirit, of the time. One passage from the 
declaration deserves particular attention, for it is as 
sound in logic, as right in principle, as applicable to 
present and future, as v^hen it was first penned. "We 
hold these truths to be self-evident," the passage 
reads, "that all men are created equal, that they are 
endowed by their Creator with certain inalienable 
rights, that among these are life, liberty and the pur- 
suit of happiness. That to secure these ends govern- 
ments are instituted among men, deriving their just 
powers from the consent of the governed. That when- 
ever any form of government becomes destructive of 
these ends it is the right of the people to alter or abolish 
it, and to institute new government, laying its founda- 
tion on such principles and organizing its powers in 
such form as to them shall seem most likely to effect 
their safety and happiness." 

The course of the Colonists from this declaration 
to the surrender of Cornwallis at Yorktown was de- 
termined largely by economic interests, as the course 
of men is determined in every age, but they fought for 
principle nevertheless, and they gave most liberally 
of life and treasure for its advancement. As the revo- 
lutionists of 1776 struggled for political liberty, so the 
revolutionists of 1915 are struggling for industrial lib- 
erty. As they were opposed by the rich and powerful 



and their papers and pulpits, so the revolutionists of 
today are opposed. As they were victorious, so the 
revolutionists of today will be victorious. Let us hope, 
however, that the revolutionists of today will be able 
to accomplish their aims through a process of peace- 
ful education, of conscious, rapid evolution. Let us 
hope that the new social order will not have to be 
baptized in the blood of the authors of its existence. It 
will not if the revolutionists have their way, if the 
enlightenment of the people be not postponed too long. 

But the new social order must be, though violence 
and bloodshed attend its coming. Labor will not sub- 
mit to subjection forever. The soul of man, though 
chained and cast down, will break its chains and rise 
to heights that now seem to some of us a most hopeless 
dream. 

This is the month of the nation's birth. Shall we 
be patriotic 1 Yes ! But our patriotism must not be 
narrow. It must not be degraded in defense and incite- 
ment of uniformed, glorified, military murder. The 
truer, broader patriotism finds expression in the hap- 
piness and prosperity of the people. It is not confined 
to boundary lines. Regard for every race, love for 
every land, consideration for the people of every 
clime — all this is embodied in it. 

Such is the patriotism of the true Socialist, the 
revolutionist of today, and he is striving to make it 
universal. The work is not easy, but he will succeed, 
and tjie descendants of those who denounce and deride 
him now will place flowers on his grave and pay trib- 
utes to his memory. 



Original Sin 

By JOHN M. WORK 



IT WAS a warm morning. I had been pulling the 
oars vigorously. I had stripped as much as civilized 
humanity — with its funny mental crotchet to the effect 
that the human body is disgraceful — will permit. Yet 
I was still overwarm. Casting about for shade, I spied 
a tiny island with trees overhanging the water. I bent 
to the oars and quickly pulled up under the grateful 
refreshing boughs. 

As I sat enjoying the coolness I became conscious 
of a noisy chattering in the branches above me. Look- 
ing up I found that I had attracted the angry attention 
of a score of mother blackbirds. Evidently their nests 
and little ones were hard by. I was an intruder. I 
might mean harm to their dear kiddies. So they made 



a furious assault upon me with their tongues. More 
than that. They tried to summon enough courage to 
assault me with their beaks and wings and claws. 

One of them, two dozen feet or so directly above my 
head, with claws in battle array, let herself descend 
rapidly right toward me. Maybe it was only a bluff 
to try to frighten me away. Or, maybe she really in- 
tended to attack me. If so, her courage failed when she 
was witlrin a few inches of my hand-protected face, and 
she flew away upbraiding me fiercely in her own lan- 
guage. 

If they had only known it, I would not have harmed 
their wee ones for the world. On the contrary, if I 
could have done anything to help to bring them up in 



The Western Comrade 



21 



the way little blackbirds should go, I would have done 
it with delight in my heart. 

But, no ; they could not know this. They could only 
judge me by other human beings. Their forefathers 
and foremothers had been despoiled and murdered and 
maltreated by the forebears of the human race. They 
had found many of the present generation of humans to 
be their enemies. For the sins of my kind, and for my 



own early sins, I had to endure the distrust and dislike 
of these glossy little mothers bent on protecting their 
young. 

There was no help for it. They would not trust me. 
I saw that I was only a nuisance to them. It is not 
agreeable to feel tliat one is a nuisance. So I backed 
my boat out and pulled off into the blistering sun again. 

Some day we shall gain the confidence of the birds. 



Rent, Interest and Profit 



By CARL D. THOMPSON 



SOCIAIilSTS believe that what one earns he should 
have. They also believe that what one does not 
earn he should not have. Yet millions upon millions 
of dollars are taken by the rich and leisured Classes 
for which they render no return whatever, and render 
no service to anyone. These millions the Socialists 
call unearned incomes. 

An unearned income may arise from any one of 
three different sources — interest, profit or rent. All 
three are perfectly legal and are therefore entirely 
justified by the i)resent world. But they are unearned, 
nevertheless. 

Socialists would abolish all unearned incomes. Un- 
der Socialism everyone would get all that he earned. 
No one would get what he did not earn. 

In order to do this, Socialism proposes that all pub- 
lic utilities and natural resources shall be taken over 



and publicly owned and operated by the city, state or 
nation. For it is clear now that it is by means of the 
private ownership and operation of the public utilities 
that the unearned incomes are secured. Therefore, it 
is clear that the public ownership and the proper op- 
eration of these utilities may be made to eliminate 
these unearned incomes. 

If landlords and speculators should find some 
entirely new scheme of getting rent, interest and 
profit. Socialism would then strike at the new 
scheme, whatever it might be, until it was defeated. 
Socialism ]ias this one end in view, viz., to stop ex- 
ploitation and plunder. Whatever means are neces- 
sary to that end. Socialism will use. 

The object of Socialism is to cut out unearned in- 
comes. Rent, interest and profit are three forms of 
unearned incomes. These Socialism will abolish. 



Garbage-Fed Babies 



By FRANK H. WARE 



IN Chicago, thirty children, ranging in years from 
seven to twelve, scantily clad, emaciated and starv- 
ing, found their way to their daily rendezvous on South 
Water Street Market where garbage cans were piled 
high with decaying fruit and vegetables. To their 
nostrils the smell must have been nauseating, but to 
their empty bellies, as they clawed the contents of the 
cans with eager hands, the food was welcome. Then 
the police swooped down on these children as they 
delved in the noisome mess and took them into custody. 

It was the first official act of the new health com- 
missioner, and he was going to prove to the city that 
"efficiency" was to be his motto from the start. In a 
Reverend-Billy-Sunday manner of "cleaning-the-city- 
from-hellhole-to-garret" this new commissioner de- 
clared he was going to cause a "healthy" revolution. 

He came very near succeeding as Kennedy and 
Rodriguez, Socialist aldermen in the city council, de- 
manded that these children be fed by the city. With 



a few pointed words they drew the attention of tlie 
city administration to a better plan of dealing with 
starving women and children. Thej^ shoAved the blind 
ones that lunches furnished free in the schools were 
more nourishing than the garbage scavenged in the 
streets and market places. 

Of course one shoidd not expect a "sane" capitalist 
administration to learn much from this as those in 
the seats of the mighty are not yet even in the Montes- 
sori grades of political economy. 

The daily garbage feast has long been a shocking 
public disgrace. Rodriguez and Kennedy have once 
more proven the advantage of political action that puts 
rebel.i with a punch into positions where they can 
make the most of their opportunity. Naturally there is 
no finality in supplying free lunches, even to starving 
children, but it was a good opportunity for effective 
propaganda, and these comrades seem to have made the 
most of it. 



22 



The Western Comrade 



Point Out the Error 

By DR. A. J. STEVENS 




URING more than twenty-six years of 
affiliation with and propaganda work for 
the Socialist movement, there has been 
formulating in my consciousness a pro- 
gram to be used by any and all who 
sincerely desire to better their own con- 
ditions and indirectly the conditions of 
all mankind. A plan or program for 
human action, that does not include principles which, 
when applied, will benefit all physically, mentally and 
spiritually, is not complete and not comprehensive 
enough to warrant a trial by the twentieth century 
people. 

I hope you will not consider me an egotist or 
"smart-aleck" in making the following statements — 
for if you do, jow will be classing such men as Alfred 
Russell Wallace, Sir Oliver Lodge, Sir Wm. Thompson, 
Thos. A. Edison, Carl Marx, Abraham Lincoln, "T. K." 
et al., also as much — for I am repeating somewhat from 
these illustrious men: men who have spent many years 
of scientific research after the truth, concerning a 
Right Life's Program. 

Most people, now-a-days, believe in the evolutionary 
theory of life, as advanced by Darwin and Wallace. 
Wallace, after more than forty years of research, con- 
firmed their material evolutionary theory of life, but 
went Darwin one better, viz., he, A. R. Wallace, added 
to their material evolution a spiritual evolution. 

Darwin says, evolution is confined to the material 
only: Wallace, Lodge, Wm. Thompson, Edison and "T. 
K. " say that evolution includes not only the physical 
but also the spiritual or psychical. 

Abraham Lincoln believed in a spiritual realm and 
^renuously advocated the betterment of material con- 
ditions here on earth to facilitate man's moral, spiritual 
-,iid psychical development, which are necessary to 
evolutionary freedom here and hereafter. 

As a sort of a nerve tonic to the ultra materialist, 
let me say here that the existence of a future state or 
condition for man has already been scientifically dem- 
onstrated or proven by and through the material- 
science methods of investigation, as well as by psychical 
methods. 

My program or plan therefore includes principles 
and rules of life to be applied here and now^ but at the 
same time principles and rules which will — when lived 
rightly — fit \is for the next realm. The two seeming 
different realms or states of existence differ only in 
degree of fineness, vibration, consciousness, etc., and 



not in reality. The study of the X-ray phenomena, the 
mathematical relations of colors and musical tones, and 
the integration and disintegration of matter will help 
us to comprehend this correlation existing between the 
two conditions — the here and the hereafter. 

Science is "exact knowledge of the facts of nature, 
classified and systematized ; and youth is the established 
relation Avhich the facts of nature sustain to each 
other and to man." We cannot get outside of nature. 
Everything we think or do falls within nature. And 
in the degree that we scientifically adjust ourselves to 
nature and nature's laws, in that degree we free our- 
selves froni starvation, overwork, fear of want, fear of 
"hell," etc. 

No doubt but that we all wonder: why so much 
physical suffering exists in the midst of plenty? Why 
so much mental anguish and spiritual doubt are experi- 
enced by the majority of people in the midst of so 
many philosophies, religions and panaceas for happi- 
ness? And our wonder increases — until our Program 
of Life shall be constructed along lines which include 
both phases of life, viz., the physical and spiritual. 
When we leave out either the phj^sical or spiritual we 
have but half a truth or program, and we all know that 
we can't do this in mathematics, music, or any of the 
sciences and expect accurate results. 

Life is either destructive or constructive, temporal 
or permanent ; and as life has been proven to be con- 
tinuous and scientific it therefore follows that a pro- 
gram to be consistent must include all phases of life. 

Our Socialist program is like Darwin's evolution — 
it is good as far as it goes. It considers but a part of 
life — the physical. To be sure it (the Socialists' pro- 
gram) is par excellence compared -with our aged com- 
mercialized material program. 

We are seeing tlie fruition of this latter program in 
the war of Europe. There property and material things 
are more highly prized than human life. It is the same 
here in the United States, except we are not using the 
"up-to-date" and modern methods of killing. We are 
using the slow, crafty and cunning processes of killing, 
viz.. starving^ overwork, fear-of-want, fear-of-hell, etc. 

Nature gives us abundant opportunities for investi- 
gation, appropriation and assimilation. The Socialists 
have investigated the material conditions and have ar- 
rived at a general agreement, but are divided as to the 
appropriation method. 

This division tends to neutralize or destroy our 
power, and whatever destroys our power is unwise. If 



The Western Comrade 



23 



this be true in the political field, it is true in the eco- 
nomic and every other phase of human activity. Our 
experience has taught us that co-operation is a law of 
nature. The atoms co-operate to form the molecule 
and the molecules unite to form the cell and the cells 
join to form the organism, whether mineral, vegetable, 
animal or man. If any part of an organism — a wagon, 
a watch, a flower, or man — fails to perform its function 
then the efficiency of the whole is curtailed. 

Man is a physical, spiritual and psychical organism. 
If his material leg or eye is destroyed, we at once decide 
that the whole organism is affected. We also say if a 
man has "wheels in his head" or is not of sound mind, 
he is deficient in his usefulness. Tf he gets drunk, an- 
gry, or is not truthful and is immoral, we at once class 
him as not the best. 

Science has demonstrated that lief is continuous and 
that we take with us on leaving this realm certain 
things accumulated while in this physical body — in a 
word, character, wliether good or bad. We say a bad 
character is not desirable here, and neither is it "over 
there." Material things we leave behind. They are 



Only useful during our short stay on earth, but are 
very necessary while here. We cannot build character 
which we take with us, without the material things at 
the same time. 

Now our program must include character building 
as the goal and material things for use while here, in 
order to conform to nature's intent or laws. Without 
character we are non compos mentis, but with good 
character we are good lovers, brothers, sisters, parents 
and citizens. Good character establishes unity, co- 
operation and power. Teach from the Progressive 
Life how to acquire good character. The Land Colony 
is pushing ahead. Every modern appliance within 
reach for lightening the "load" of life is being utilized 
by these Socialists. They are proceeding with deter- 
mination that means success. 

I note with heartfelt gratitude, in the last AVestern 
Comrade, that the children will be initiated under the 
Montessori method of education and that every oppor- 
tunity is being given them for recreation and education. 

Our program then must include the spiritual wel- 
fare as well as the phyiseal. 



Molding a Man 

By GRAY HARRIMAN 



JOHN and Raj^mond were brothers. They lived on a 
homestead, in the middle west, right on the very 
edge of a groat rolling prairie. 

John was the first born and therefore the favorite. 
It was John who had the mittens with the double lin- 
ing. It was John who sat upon the horsehair uphol- 
stered couch, that was reserved for guests only. It was 
John that could harness up the old gray and go to the 
husking bee. It was John this and John that. 

At last the mother of these boys decided that John 
must be given an education. John went to college. 
John went to the mountains during his vacation. For 
there it was, that he would meet educated people, peo- 
ple that could help his career. Thus it was that John 
lived soft. 

As for Raymond, he got up and made the fire in the 
old drum stove, fed the stock and went down the old 
icy path to the spring. Raymond was told that he did 
not need an education, one in the family was enough. 
His mother and father had never had an education. 

John finished his education and married a society 
girl in the east. He had a good position as a corpora- 
tion attorney, but he needed his salary to live as an 
attorney should in his position, and just could not spare 
any to his folks. 

The mother was tired of life's grim struggle and at 
the age of sixty succumbed. Raymond was now left 



with the mortgaged farm upon his shoulders. John had 
of late forgotten to write. The farm was run down, so 
Raymond left and Avent into the bigger world. 

Some years after Ra3'mond was one of mj^riad cogs 
in a great industrial machine and lived in one of those 
boxes, which is one of an endless row. His wife was 
sick, sick with the great white plague ; his son was a 
weak boy, his health undermined by the insanitary con- 
ditions of the eoal mines. Raymond worked twelve 
hours each day in the damp coal mines. He dared not 
stop, or the rent and doctor bills would come due and 
the company did not tolerate laxness in the paying of 
debts. 

■John, what had become of him? He was elected 
governor of the state in which Raymond worked. 
John's friends had pulled political wires and elected 
him. He owed much to them. His wife had satisfied 
her social ambitions. Yes it is true the owners of the 
coal mines had compelled their employes to vote for 
John as governor, but that was politics. 

The conditions in the coal mines were terrible. 
There were none of the new safety appliances, for they 
detracted from the dividends, and large dividends 
meant general business prosperity. 

The miners struck. The mine owners went to John 
and said: "Our emploj^es are damaging our business; 
we supported you for governor, now send us troops 



24' 



The Western Comrade 



The Conscript 

By MARY E. GARBUTT 

THE Conscript goes Avith sullen mien and downcast eyes 
To face the cannon's mouth. 
He may return again to hoine and wife, 
Once more take up his humble life — 
Or he may fall a victim in the strife. 

He has no foe that urges to the fight ; 

He is not called some cruel wrong to right. 

He goes because he's caught within the net 

Of some strong, cruel power that takes away his will 

To act a freeman's part. 

The Conscript feels no savage lust for blood; 

No military glory fires his soul : 

But rather in his humble breast is found 

A spirit friendly to all litiman kind 

Of every race and clime. 

And yet the word goes forth he must obey, 

And march into the thickest of the fray 

To do the very things his soul revolts against. 

If he could only nerve himself, a man of strength, 
To voice the slumbering instinct of his heart; 
He would resist this age-long tyranny of crowns 
That forces him to do this cruel wrong 
To his own soul. 

Upon the battlefield in trenches grim 
Beside his brothers slain — 
Amid the shrieks and groans of dying men 
At last his soul is stirred — his mind awakes : 
His heart burns with a flame that cannot die. 

He breaks the age-long chains that bind him fast; 

In courage strong he stands at last. 

He calls aloud with shouts of joy 

Across the lines to those in trenches there — 

"Are we not friends and comrades, oh ye men? 

Have we a grievance that we wound and slay? 

I send across to you, my brothers. 

Love 's way to settle every wrong. 

No more like cattle dumb will we obey — 

Like freemen strong we will arise 

And, joining hands, build us a world 

Radiant with joy — with freedom, and good will!" 



to protect our business and property. 

The troops were sent. A riot re- 
sulted owing to the white heat of 
both factious. A woman was struck 
by a soldier in the melee. Raymond 
had had no education, therefore his 
moral code was crude, but this was 
too much. He struck the soldier in 
return, he struck harder than he in- 
tended, and killed him. Raymond 
was court-martialed and deported to 
a military prison under a "life" sen- 
tence, which meant death. 

John had a son, who was educated 
much the same as his father. The son 
was now in the real estate business 
and owned a tract of land in Florida, 
which was absolutely worthless. 
Nevertheless, he sold many lots and 
cleared something like $80,000. It 
was not his fault that his victims had 
not investigated. 

Late one night a thin, weak and 
shoulder-bent creature succeeded in 
breaking into the parlor of John's 
son's house. The son of John heard 
the noise and, grasping his revolver, 
crept in upon the intruder and cap- 
tured him. The police were sum- 
moned and the thief quickly taken 
away. The law condemned him. 
Thus he became a criminal. The law 
did not ask why his mother died in 
the little unfurnished one-room com- 
pany house ? It did not ask why his 
father had been given "life" im- 
prisonment ? It did not ask about the 
advantages which both father and 
son had never been able to gain. It 
weighed only the fact that he had 
been caught with the goods. 

The son of John was elected a 
judge and accredited by all a good 
fellow. The law did not ask where 
he made his wealth or whether his 
father was an honest man. It cared 
not, he was a business success. Yet 
some say environment molds not the 
man. 

But Why Crow? 

The wife of a Sacramento Social- 
ist has been married three times. 
Her maiden name was Partridge, her 
first husband was named Robins, her 
second Sparrow, the present Quale. 
There are now two young robins, one 
sparrow and three quales in the fam- 
ily. One grandfather was a Swan 
and another a Jay, but he's dead 
now and a bird of Paradise. They 
live on Hawk avenue, Eagleville, 
Canary Island, and the fellow who 
wrote this is a Lyre and a relative 
of the family. 



The Western Comrade 



25 



Fate 

By Jack Wolf 
'T^HE sky is leaden, the air bodes 
^ iU, ■ 

All nature broods in a threat to kill. 
The lion roars in the forest deep 
But I, in my house secure, shall sleep. 

The storm passed weakly, the skj' is 

blue. 
The ship is safe and the Irautors 

too, — 
But the man in Iiis house upon the 

rock. 
Has disappeared in an earthquake 

shock ! 

How to Tell a Democrat 

By ^^^ W. Pannell 

IVyfY friend, the Socialist, was one 
day leading a rather diminutive 
Jersey cow down the main street of 
his little home town, by means of a 
rope tied to a ring in the animal's 
nose, when he was challenged hj a 
young Democrat of the place, as 
follows : 

■'Say, Uncle, that's a Socialist cow, 
isn't it?" 

•'No," replied my friend with 
emphasis. "This is a Democrat 
cow. ' ' 

"How do vou make that out. 
Uncle?" 

"How!" exploded our friend. 
"You dummy, can't you see that I 
am leading it by the nose?" 

Wanted— Two Million Votes 

Socialist vote in 1900 96,991 

Socialist vote in 1904 407,227 

Socialist vote in 190S 424,488 

Socialist vote in 1912 901,012 

SOCIALIST VOTE IN 1916. .2,000,000 

"X^E now have about 475 elected 
' * officials of all kinds, including 
state legislators, mayors, sheriffs, 
councilmen, judges, constables, mem- 
bers of school boards, etc. 

If the SoeiaUst Party polls 2,000,- 
000 votes in 1916, the Socialists 
elected to office in the United States 
will be counted by the thousands. 
Niimerous cities and counties, AND 
POSSIBLY ONE OR TWO STATES 
\dll fall into our hands. 

It is plain, therefore, that the re- 
sults will be achieved by the doubling 
of oxir vote in 1916 are far greater 
than the results ever before achieved 
by a similar increase. 

Never before was the doubling of 
our votes so profoundly to be wished 
for as at this time. 



REVOLT 
IN MEXICO 



Read the Correct Interpretation of Underlying Motives in the 
Most Remarkable and Valuable Book of the Year 

The Mexican People — 
Their Struggle for Freedom 

-By- 
L. Gutierrez de Lara and Edgcumb Pinchon 

¥ ¥ ¥ 

Eugene V. Debs says : 

" * * * It is written from the point 
of view of the working class, the tillers of 
the soil, the producers of the wealth, and 
shows that through all these centuries of toil 
and tears and blood and martyrdom they 
have been struggling for the one purpose of 
emancipating themselves from the tyranny 
of a heartless aristocracy, buttressed on the 
one hand by the Roman Church and on the 
other by the military power." 
¥ ¥ ¥ 

Georgia Kotsr-h says: 

"* * * It strips the glamor of 
benevolent motives from the dealings with 
Mexico of the United States and other coun- 
tries and presents the stark truth that 
American and »7orld capitalism has been, 
and is, in league against the proletariat of 
Mexico for its own sordid interest. And 
while the Mexican master class is depicted 
as the most depraved and bloodthirsty in 
history, the Socialist will see that the story 
of the Mexican proletariat is in greater or 
less degree and in varying circumstances the 
story of the proletariat in every country." 

Published by DOUBLEDAY, PAGE & CO. 

F»rice §l.SO 

We will send you this book and The Western Comrade for one 

year for $2.00 




2f5 



The Western Comrade 



Be Natural and You Will Be 
Damned 

By Stuart Taber 
pR-R-rrr-e-eet ! Tu WEET-T-T ! 

Whc-e-eet ! tu WHOO-oooooooo ! 
Wild— shrill— loud— soft, 
And purple-shadow smooth ; 
Trills of love, good songs of food; 
Twitters at cloudlets; 
Bold warbles to breezes, 
Mad joy-screams at NOTHING ! 
NOT CARING A DAMN ! 

So burbles unhampered, 
All healthy with freedom — 
Erratic as wind. 
The wonderful. 
Clean-bodied 
BIRD ! 

No purity fiends to infect him. 

No life-searing legends of Christ ; 

No laws save the dictums of NA- 
TURE, 

No fools to bray at his antics ! 

He comes and goes at his leisure, 

No master in his, save Desire ! 

His pranks lead him not to a mad- 
house ; 

Without shame he may love in the 
sunlight ; 

His food he may choose from ALL 
food. 

And no joint-swelling labor is his. 

He is free ! Free ! FREE ! 

As free as the clean white cloud ! 

And am I not as great as a bird? 
Must I cripple my body with toil 
That some fat fool and his greasy 

woman 
May swathe their filth in silks? 
Must I mute my good clean songs of 

flesh, 
And steal my love in the glooms of 

night? 
Must the yellow teeth of the PACK 
Grind the will that NATURE gave 

to ME? 

Watch the Bird! 
WATCH ME! 

THE JONES BOOK STORE 

226 West First St., Los Angels, Cal. 
Headquarters for the best Socialist 
books and literature. 







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other means fail. They make your work doubly effective. 

We tell you how to get the greatest results at the least 
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Send stamp for complete information. 

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Gen. Otis says editorially in The Times, of 

EVERYMAN 

(By Luke North) 

"If law and order, respect for conventions and property rights 
are to be maintained in this land and its civilization continued, 
publications like Everyman must be suppressed . . ." 

And again Gen. Otis says: 

"Its lamentably brilliant pages pervert art to the cunning 
uses of social disturbers . . ." — and also, says the General, still 
speaking of Everyman : 

"It is disturbing to mental stability." 



Thank you kindly. General. I could ask no greater boon 
from the Los Angeles Times. — Luke. 



EVERYMAN (Monthly) 

Each Issue Has an Important Lecture or Essay by 

Clarence Darro^v 



Year $1.50, Copy 25 Cents 
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T he W e s tern C omr ade 27 



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28 



The Western Comrade 



THE WESTERN COMRADE 



Entered as second-class matter at the 
post office at Los Angeles, Cal. 

924 Higgins Building, Los Angeles, Cal. 

Subscription Price One Dollar a Year 
In Clubs of Four Fifty Cents 

Job Harriman, Managing Editor 
Frank E. Wolfe, Editor 



vo. in 



June, 1915 



No. 3 



Inspiration or Gloom? 

By Edouard d'Ormand 

T INGERING a moment in tlie de- 
lig'htful atmosphere of insoui- 
sanre that thinly covers the splendid 
spirit of comradeship in the editorial 
office of this magazine I once over- 
heard a criticism based solely upon 
cover-page appearance of one number 
— that the publication was "too 
gloomy." 

I have since wondered if any of the 
readers of the inside pages shared in 
the opinion of the all too superficial 
critic. If there be siicli may I be per- 
mitted to dispel their false conclu- 
sions. The editor is so hopeful, so 
earnest and compelling in his en- 
thiisiasm that all who surround him 
are at times carried away with his 
fervor and I have seen half a dozen 
persons, sometimes casual visitors, 
suddenly plunged into a state of 
febrile energy while all turned in 
with a will and worked at various 
tasks incident to getting out cir- 
culars and publicity matter for the 
mail or pushing forward the propa- 
ganda of co-operative action. 

If this pnsses the censorship I ask 
you to believe this editor is the most 
hopeful and optimistic man I know. 
Beside him at work I am led to join 
in his belief in the aphorism of Saint 
Simon: "L'age d'or, qu'une aveugel 
tradition a place jusqu ici dans le 
passe, est devant nous" (The golden 
age which blind tradition has hith- 
erto placed in the past, is just be- 
fore us). Not that there is a belief 
of flowery beds of ease without first 
the suffering of Gehenna— that is 
already here — but we are going 
through it, perhaps with a fight more 
sharp than most dare face. That is 
a part of the game. 

I find here no shrinking from the 
future. Here rather the spirit of 
boldly facing the straight pathway 
no matter how "charged with pun- 
ishment the scroll." Here is the 
fearless wish that the fight, if it 



must come, will come while we have 
a "clear sighting eye and a steady 
trigger finger." 

"If you are looking for philo- 
sophical fatalism you won't find it 
in the office of the Western Com- 
rade. If you want the inspiration 
of boiling, seething activity and 



confident hopefulness borne along 
with the impelling buoyancy of 
confidence, strength and vuiiity 
drop in a minute, as I like to do, 
and get a "shot of hope." Don't 
linger too long or you will either 
be brushed aside as a chip on the 
eddy — or put to work. 



War and Alcohol 



"\A7^AR has hit the alcohol business 
a terrific jolt. Plunged into 
the war, the great nations found 
that social cognizance of the alco- 
hol menace had to be taken. 

Some workers in this country are 
predicting that the use of alcohol 
will decline in this country, because 
the lesson being learned in war- 
torn Europe will not be lost on 
America. "We workingmen need 
to be Avide-awake and at our best 
every minute, for our fight is seri- 
ous and never-ending," said a 



Trade Union leader. "The sooner 
we cut out the booze, the better it 
will be for us. We are up against 
the shrewdest men in the country. 
We can't afford to poison our 
brains. I would like to see the 
whole Labor Movement put the ban 
on alcohol. It poisons and kills. It 
never has won any battle for us and 
never will. Cut it out ! ' ' 

And he was no prude. He was 
just a good, hard fighter who has 
been through a lot of fights and 
knows what is needed to win. 




The Western Comrade 



29 



Will Henry Think? 



By NARGI YINGA 



A PHYSICIAN on his morning 
■^^ walk found a five dollar bill. As 
a keen diagnostician he detected 
some congenital discrepancy in the 
greenback, — but he also observed it 
bore such a convincing likeness to 
the ones printed on the legalized 
press that he decided it would well 
serve in paying a bill he owed his 
genial but insistent butcher. 

As the butcher started to put what 
he thought was a legal satisfaction 
of an honest debt in his till, a farmer 
entered and called his attention to a 
long overdue account. Without de- 
lay the butcher handed over the doc- 
tor's recent find to the farmer — and 
the farmer beamed with satisfaction. 

Then the farmer went to the black- 
smith and, using the same five, paid 
for the repairs on his wagon. But 
the blacksmith, who gloried in his 
promptness in paying his debts, ran 
over to the doctor's and settled for 
services rendered during the black- 
smith's wife's illness. 

The doctor on finding himself in 



possession of his early morning find 
concluded it was best to retire his 
emergency currency from circula- 
tion, as it had not been legalized by 
the "millionaire club" at head- 
quarters. This he quickly ac- 
complished by laying the spurious 
bill on the fire of his open grate. 

One of the chief differences be- 
tween the physician and the bank- 
ers was that the physician had to 
go with his honest debt unpaid (as 
did the butcher, the farmer and 
the blacksmith) until the piece of 
paper was found by the roadside: 
while the famous emergency cur- 
rency promoters have the advan- 
tage of printers' ink and paper. 

Now, who thinks that the doctor, 
the butcher, the farmer and the 
blacksmith were swindled in the 
above transaction? "Were they not 
all satisfied that their debts were 
paid ? 

The moral to this tale is admit- 
tedly obvious, but — think it over, 
Henry, give it a thought! 



Socialists Attention! 




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of union-made goods in the hands of 
every reader of The Western Comrade, 
we will send postage prepaid, on receipt 
of FIFTY CENTS, one of our genuine 
sheepskin-leather card cases BEARING 
THE UNION LABEL. 

This card case contains four pockets, 
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80 



The Western Comrade 



More Fun at Llano 



A SUNDAY; school teaeher one day 
caught "sanctification" and a 
' ' glimpse of heaven. ' ' The following 
Sunday she told her class of little 
boys of the joys and pleasures they 
would derive when once they get in- 
side the pearly gates. 

"Now, boys," said the teacher, 
when she thought she had them hyp- 
notized, "how many of you want to 
go to heaven?" 

All stood save little Jimmy. 

"Stand up with the rest of us, 
Jimmy, ' ' came persuasively from the 
teacher. "Tou want to go to heaven, 
don't you?" 

' ' Nope ! ' ' was Jimmy 's firm re- 
sponse. 

"Why, Jimmie!" fairly screamed 
the astounded teacher, "of course 
you do ! We all do ! Why, heaven 
is wonderful ; it is sublime ; it is——" 

"Aw " broke in Jimmie, "I 

don't want to go there. My old 
man's .joined the Llano del Rio 
Colony." 

Historical Accuracy 

Comrade Theodore Roosevelt is 
peevish because a cartoonist has pic- 
tured him with the wrong foot in 
the stirrup while mounting a horse. 
Accuracy — historical accuracy is in- 
dispensable. Perhaps that's why the 
colonel placed his 0. K. on a statuette 
of himself, mounted on a broncho 
charging up San Juan Hill when 
there were no mounted American 
troops in Cuba. 



Statement of ownership, management 
and circulation, etc., required by thie act 
of August 24, 1912, of 

THE WESTERN COMRADE 
publislied montlily at Los Angeles, Cali- 
fornia, for April 1, 1915 : 

Managing editor, Job Harriman, 923 
Higgins building. 

Editor, Frank E. Wolfe, 923 Higgins 
building. 

Business manager. Prank E. Wolfe, 923 
Higgins building. 

Publisher, Job Harriman, 923 Higgins 
building. 

Owner, Job Harriman, 923 Higgins 
building. 

Known bondholders, mortgagees and 
other security holders holding one per 
cent or more of total amounts of bonds, 
mortgages, or other securities: None. 
JOB HARRIMAN. 

Sworn to and subscribed before me 
this 24th day of March, 1915. 

C. V. EGGLESTON, 
Notary Public in and for the County of 

Los Angeles, State of California. 

(My commission expires Nov. 19, 191S.) 



THESOGIALIST CAMPAIGN BOOK FOR 1914 

Will give you up-to-date intormatlon about 



Tlie Socialist Movement 

Tke Labor Movement 

Co-operation 

Exploitation 

\Vages ana Hours 

Unemploymenl 

Child Labor 

^A' Oman ana Labor 

Industrial A.ccidents 

Poverty 



Tbe Higb Cost of Living 

nV nite Slavery 

Crime 

Tbe Old Parties 

Xbe Progressives 

Syndicalism 

Concentration or NV ealtn 

Tbe Trusts 

Profits 

Socialists m Office 



and many otlier things of interest to Socialists 
and students — too many to mention. 

It has been compiled by the INFORMATION 
DEPARTMENT OF THE SOCIALIST PARTY 
and is the most complete reference book of that 
character that has ever been published. 

Bound m flexible cloth, 350 pages. 

50 CENTS A COPY. 



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Telephone Home A-4533 

HARRIMAN & RYCKMAN 

Attorneys at Law 

921 Higgins Building 

Los Angeles, Cal. 



Home A-2003 Main 61£ 

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Room 514 Los Angeles, Cal. 



The Western Comrade 



31 



Llano del Rio Co-operative Colony 



Llano, California 



THIS is the greatest Commimity Enterprise ever launched 
in America. 

The colony was founded by Job Harriman and is situated 
in the beautiful Antelope Valley, Los Angeles County, Cali- 
fornia, a few hours' ride from Los Angeles. The community 
is solving the problem of disemployment and business failure, 
and offers a way to provide for the future welfare of the 
workers and their families. 

Here is an example of co-operation in action. Llano del 
Rio Colony is an enterprise unique in the history of com- 
munity groups. 

Some of the aims of the colony are: To solve the problem 
of unemployment by providing steady employment for the 
workers; to assure safety and comfort for the future and for 
old age; to guarantee education for the children in the best 
school under personal supervision, and to provide a social 
life amid surroundings better than can be found in the com- 
petitive world. 

Some of these aims have been carried out during the 
year since the colony began to work out the problems that 
confront pioneers. There are about 400 persons living at 
the new town of Llano. There are now more than seventy 
pupils in the schools, and several hundreds are expected to be 
enrolled before a year shall have passed. Plans are under 
way for a school building, which will cost several thousand 
dollars. The bonds have been voted and there is nothing to 
delay the building. 

Schools will open at the fall term with classes ranging 
from the Montessori and kindergarten grades through the 
intermediate which includes the first year in high school. 
This gives the pubils an opportunity to take advanced sub- 
jects, including languages in the colony schools. 

The colony owns a fine herd of about 100 head of Jersey 
md Holstein dairy cattle and is turning out a large amount 
:3f dairy products. 

There are about 150 hogs in the pens, and among them a 
large niimber of good brood sows. This department will be 
;iven special attention and ranks high in importance. 

The colony has about forty work horses, a large tractor, 
two trucks and a number of automobiles. The poultry de- 
partment has 100 egg-making birds, some of them blue- 
ribbon prize winners. About 2000 additional chicks were 
idded in May. This department, as all others, Is In the 
3harge of an expert and it will expand rapidly. 

About 60,000 rainbow trout have been hatched in the col- 
pny's fish hatchery, and it is intended to add several hundred 
housand each year. 

There are several hundred hares in the rabbitry and the 
manager of the department says the arrivals are in startling 
lumbers. 

There are about 11,000 grape cuttings in the ground and 
housands of deciduous fruit and shade trees in the colony 
nursery. This department is being steadily extended. 

The community owns several hundred colonies of bees 
_ which are prodncing honey. This department will be in- 
preased to several thousands. 

I Among other industries the colony owns a steam laundry, 
I planing mill, a printing plant, a machine shop, a soil an- 
ilysis laboratory, and a number of other productive plants 
Are contemplated, among them a cannery, a tannery, an ice 
plant, a shoe factory, knitting and weaving plant, a motion 
bicture company and factory. 



About 120 acres of garden has been planted this year. 

The colonists are farming on a large scale with the use 
of modern machinery, using scientific system and tried 
methods. 

Social life in the colony is most delightful. Entertain- 
ments and dances are regularly established functions. Base- 
ball, basket-ball, tennis, swimming, fishing, hunting and all 
other sports and pastimes are popular with all ages. 

Several hundred acres are now in alfalfa, which is ex- 
pected to run six cuttings of heavy hay this season. There 
are two producing orchards and about fifty-five acres of i 
young pear trees. Several hundred acres will be planted in 
pears and apples next year. 

Six hundred and forty acres have been set aside for a 
site for a city. The building department is making bricks 
for the construction of hundreds of homes. The city will 
be the only one of its kind in the world. It will be built 
with the end of being beautiful and utilitarian. 

There are 1000 memberships in the colony and nearly 600 
of them are subscribed for. It is believed that the remainder 
will be taken within the next few months. 

The broadest democracy prevails in the management of 
the colony. There is a directorate of nine, elected by the 
stockholders, and a community commission of nine, elected 
by the General Assembly — all persons over 18 voting. Abso- 
lute equality prevails in every respect. The ultimate popu- 
lation of this colony will be between 5000 and 6000 persons. 

The colony is organized as a corporation under the laws 
of California. The capitalization is $2,000,000. One thousand 
members are provided for. Each shareholder agrees to sub- 
scribe for 2000 shares of stock. 

Each pays cash ($750) for 750 shares. 

Deferred payments on the remaining 1250 shares are made 
by deducting one dollar per day (or more, if the member ■ 
wishes to pay more rapidly) from the $4 wage of the colonist. 

Out of the remaining $3 a day, the colonist gets the neces- 
sities and comforts of life. 

The balance remaining to the individual credit of the 
colonist may be drawn in cash out of the net proceeds of 
the enterprise. 

A per cent of the wages may be drawn in cash. 

Continuous employment is provided, and vacations ar- 
ranged as may be desired by the colonist. 

Each member holds an equal number of shares of stock 
as every other shareholder. 

Each member receives the same wage as every other 
member. 

In case anyone desires to leave the colony his shares 
and accumulated fund may be sold at any time. 

Are you tired of the competitive world? 

Do you want to get into a position where every hour's 
work will be for yourself and your family? Do you want 
assurance of employment and provisions for the future? Ask 
for the booklet entitled: "The Gateway to Freedom." Sub- 
scribe for The Western Comrade ($1.00 per year), and keep 
posted on the progress of the colony. 

Address LLANO DEL RIO COMPANY, 924 Higgins build- 
ing, Los Angeles, California. 



Is Your Job Safe? 

Hundreds are safeguarding themselves by join- 
ing the Llano del Rio Co-operative Colony in 
the Antelope Valley, Los Angeles County, Cali- 
fornia, where climate and surroundings are ideal 
for an agricultural and industrial community 



This community is doing constructive and 
productive work in one of the most beautiful 
valleys in Southern CaJifomia. The climate 
and surroundings are ideal. The Colony was 
founded and is conducted under the direct 
supervision of Job Harriman, who has been 
a leader in the 
Socialist move- 
ment in America 
for the past 25 
years. The Col- 
ony is solving for 
its members and 
their families the 
serious problems 
and disemploy- 
ment and insecur- 
ity for the future. 
Here is an example of COOPERATION IN 
ACTION. 

There were originally one thousand mem- 
berships. Six hundred of these are sold 
and the remainder are selling rapidly. Men 
and women of nearly every useful occupa- 
tion are needed in the community. These 
men are following the latest scientific meth- 
ods in farming, stock raising, dairying, poul- 
try production, bee keeping, trout hatching 




and rearing, and other agricultural and in- 
dustrial pursuits. Social life is most delight- 
ful. If you are willing to apply the princi- 
ples of co-operation of which you have heard, 
talked and read so much, here is your oppor- 
tunity. Co-operation is a practical thing and 

must be worked 
out in a practical 
manner. By this 
method we can ac- 
celerate the great 
world movement 
toward the social- 
ization of all the 
sources of human 
life. 

Do you want to 
solve your own 
vexatious problems and assist in this great 
enterprise? We want Colonists and we want 
representatives who can speak and write the 
message of freedom. You can make good 
from this hour if you will take hold and se- 
cure members. You can make this organiza- 
tion work a permanent business. See the 
story of the Colony on page 15 of this maga- 
zine, take advantage of your opportunity 
and write for particulars. 



Llano del Rio Company 



924 Higgins Building 



Los Angeles, California 



|\ugust, 1915 



Pen Cents 




The 

Western 
Comrade 






'/ 








Men's 


10-inch boots. $6.00 


Men's 


12-iach boots. 


7.00 


Men's 


15-inch boots. 


8.00 


Ladies 


10-inch boots 5.00 


Ladies 


14-inch boots 5.50 


Men's 


Elk shoes 


4.00 


Ladies 


Elk shoes. . . 


3.50 


Infants 


' Elk shoes, 




1 to 
Child's 


5 


1.50 


Elk shoes, 5 


to 8 
Child's 




1.75 


Elk shoes. 


81/2 to 11 


2.25 


Misses 


and Youths, 




IW2 


to 2... 


2.50, 






ELKSKIN 

BOOTS and SHOES 



Factory operated in connection 
with Llano Del Rio Colony 

IDEAL FOOTWEAR 

For Ranchers and Outdoor Men 



Tke famous Clifford Elkskin Snoes are lightest and 
easiest for solid comfort and will outwear tnree pairs 
of ordinary snoes. 

We cover all lines from ladies,' men's 
and children's button or lace in light 
handsome patterns to the high boots for 
mountain, hunting, ranching or desert wear. 
Almost indestructible. 

Send in your orders by mail. Take 
measurement according to instructions. 
Out of town shoes made immediately on 
receipt of order. Send P. 0. order and state 
whether we shall forward by mail or express. 



Place stocking foot on 
paper, drawing pencil 
around as per above Il- 
lustration. Pass tape 
around at lines witli- 
out drawing tight. Give 
size usually worn. 



SALES DEPARTMENT 

Llano del Rio Company 

922 Higgins Building, Los Angeles, Cal. 



CONTENTS 



Current Topics. By Frank E. Wolfe Page 5 

Southern Chivalry Vindicated Page 8 

That Heavenly Mississippi. By Frank E. Wolfe... Page 9 

Out of the Night! By George F. Hibner Page 10 

Llano Colony's Progress Rapid Page 11 

Aid to Our Kings. By Frank H. Ware Page 15 

Robert Minor — Cartoonist of the Revolt Page 16 

Billy's Buffoonery Page 18 

The Muddling Worker. By Homer Constantlne. . . .Page 19 
Do You Really Want Socialism? By John M. Work. Page 19 

Truth Will Conquer. By Albert A. James Page 20 

Recall This Judge! Page 21 

Christian Balzac Hoffman Page 22 

Let Men Live! By Edmund R. Brumbaugh Page 23 

The Latest from Llano. By M. A. Kempf Page 24 

Business is "Good" Page 26 



CARTOONS 

The "Secret Enemy" Frontispiece 

Over Warsaw Page 6 

Brightening Business Skies , Page 7 

In Georgia Page 8 

The Responsibility for the War Page 15 

Labor Cartoons by Robert Minor Page 16 

An Impertinent Uncle Page 23 

Fertilizing the American Beauty Rose Page 28 




The "Secret Enemy" 




Labour "Leader": "Vot does de Var matter? ! — Vy, you vould be cliust as veil off under the 
Chermans! plenty monny, plenty time for drink, Eh?" — The Bystander. 

British newspapers overlook no opportunity to brand as traitor every worker who has the spirit to 
revolt. Labor leaders are denounced as German spies. This has had its effect on every class but the 
workers. They are coming to know tne capitalist prostitute press too well. 



The Western Comrade 



Political Action 



VOL. Ill 



Devoted to the Cause of the Workers 



Co-operation 



Direct Action 



LOS ANGELES, CAL., AUGUST, 1915 



NUMBER 4 




Scene in Big Rock Canyon 



CURRENT TOPICS 

By Frank E. Wolfe 



WAR in Europe closed the "fiscal year" on 
August 1 and each party in the business 
balanced books and added and subtracted figures 
showing losses and gains. 

The first total shows a loss in dead, wounded and 
missing of 10,716.210 men. Fighting during August 
will run this total far above 10,800,000. 

The next total shows a loss in money of $16,500,- 
000,000. To this total add $-45,000,000 each day since 
August 1. 

These figures do not include naval losses or ships 
of commerce that are destroyed hourly. German 
submarines have sunk nearly 300 ships since their 
under-sea campaign began several months ago. 

These figures only cover the direct losses and do 
not take anv account of non-combatants who are 



doomed to die miserable lingering deaths, nor do 
they cover the untold losses of villages destroyed, 
cities pillaged, crops ruined and the general ravish- 
ment of entire districts. The figures do not cover 
the- greater loss through destruction of productive 
industry nor the killing of strong workers or the 
creation of nations of cripples and madmen. 

The expense indicated in these fig-ures is entailed 
by putting 22,000,000 men on the battle line. 

With 9,000,000 fighting men in field, fort and fleet, 
Germany has held 13,000,000 at bay. The mad Kaiser 
has forced the fighting and preserved the Vaterland 
from the heel of the enemy. Germany has produced 
her own food and munitions and her allies find them- 
selves, at the end of the year, scouring the countries 
of the earth for food and munitions. 



The Western Comrade 




THE cost of the war in everything but money will 
have to be paid. The debt incurred by the awful 
toll of human life will have to be paid. The ruined 
cities may be rebuilt in half a century. Restoration 
of industries will be the work of the people for the 
nest generation^ but there is one debt that will never 
be paid. 

War bonds universally will be repudiated. War 
debts will not be liquidated. This must be obvious 
when one considers the si/e of the debt at this hour. 
The ever mounting total reaches $66,000,000,000 and 
the increase is more rapid every day. Sixty-six bil- 
lions of dollars ! We cannot begin to comprehend the 
magnitude of these figures. We do not know if the 
concrete wealth of the world reaches to this colossal 
total. 

Not enough gold has ever been mined to pay 
the interest on the debt this world-war will have 
rolled up. 

If any nation involved should survive the crash, 
repudiation would be inevitable. There is no other 
way. To refund such a debt would be to mortgage 
the future and enslave races for a thousand years. 
This would mean a revolt that would sweep the 
nations out of existence. Repudiation of war debt — 
and all other debt is inevitable. The revolution is 
at hand ! The ending of the war will mean that none 
of the nations now involved can stop. No two nor 
no group can conclude a peace that will mean any- 
thing but the beginning of a still fiercer struggle 
from within. To fight on and on is the only way. 
Exhaustion of the monetary resources of the world 
is at hand. Next will come exhaustion of the supply 
of men and munitions. Then will come another peace 
of Warsaw — the peace of death ! Then the real fight, 
the revolt of the people ! The survivors, the so-called 
"unfit"! 

Gloomy outlook? Yes, it is gruesome enoligh. 
It is not more dismal than the situation. Our critics 
who dislike to think, prefer more cheerful scenes. 
Would that there was a more hopeful outlook for 
the world. The writer of today cannot keep away 
from contemperaneous history and these are the 
most momentous days since the dawn of this era of 
the human race. 



WHEN the passengers sailed on the Titanic 's 
first and la.st voyage they took the ordinary 
risks of steamship travel under a system of profits 
first and safety last. They knew an attempt would 
be made to break records. Plunging through the 
fog under full forced pressure the ship was driven 
to its doom. Speed meant mail contracts and fame. 




OVER WARSAW 

— Philadelphia Public Ledger. 



that meant profits ! Hundreds were murdered there 
but they had at least the chance to die in the open. 
When the Lusitania sailed from New York the 
passengers on board took the hazard of booking on 
a ship carrying contraband of war if not actually an 
armed auxiliary cruiser. For the owners a success- 
ful voyage through the undersea blockade there was 
gold and glory — profits! Those on board risked 



The Western Comrade 




their lives aud many died, but they went down 
heroically in the open seas. 

The 1500 victims of greed who perished in the 
Chicago horror died miserably — crushed, suffocated 
in the crowded cabins or in the unspeakable filth 
of the slimy miasmatic ooze of the rivers. 

There is small chance of the Eastland disaster 
causing a diplomatic rupture with any one or even 
division in the President's cabinet. There will be 
investigations, coroner's verdicts, probably indict- 
ments, trials, more trials, convictions, appeals and 
all the weary and bootless details of the course of 
the law. At the end nothing will be done to remove 
the cause of these murders. We shall continue to 
kill as long as there are profits in taking risks of 
wholesale murder. 

* * * 

WHEN hundreds of Canadian Henry Dubbs 
reached for their pay envelopes the other 
day they found a little slip which read: 

"Your King and Country need you; we don't." 

That means: "You're fired. You now have the 
alternative of starving or enlisting." 

Of course Great Britain has never resorted to 
actual conscription, and never expects to. 

In England every measure short of forcible con- 
scription of the workers has been adopted. Every 
class but the workers is deeply interested in the 
war. Koyalty, nobility and the loyal sons of capital- 
ism have unhesitatingly plunged into the war. They 
see the necessity of preserving the existing order 
and of saving England — for themselves. 

In Canada the same spirit seems to hold. There 
are thousands of unemployed, and there seems no 
likelihood of a dearth of workers. To discharge 
a few thousand will mean lower wages and more 
profits. Truly these be parlous days for Henry and 
Henrietta. 

4" * * 

LOS ANGELES firemen appealed to the voters 
of the working class and on an initiative act 
they were given the two-platoon system. The work- 
ing class voted solidly for the measure which gave 
the firemen an opportunity to go home to their 
family for a period out of every twenty-four hours. 



This was voted at an election of city officials on 
an "economy and efficiency" platform. "Vote for 
us and reduce your taxes," was the slogan, and a 
majority of the council was elected on that Avar 
cry. There was much rejoicing at the achievement. 

AVhen the initiative law went into effect the coun- 
cil closed ten firehouses, some of them near the 
school houses. Then the "civic" organizations got 
busy and the infamous Municipal League led a move- 




BRIGHTENING BUSINESS SKIES 
Running Up an Awful Big Bill 

— Des Moines Register and Leader 



ment to bring about the repeal of the two-platoon 
law. 

Twenty organizations joined in the action, prom- 
inent in which was the notorious Merchants and 
Manufacturers' Association and other Labor-hating 




A 



The Western Comrade 







institutions. A majority of the City Council will 
join in the action. The power of the prostitute press 
will be thrown against the law and the initiative 
made a mockery. Political action will win for tlie 
workers? Does it pay to dally with this? 
* * * 

BULLETINS from the office of information of the 
United States Department of Agriculture dis- 
close a pleasant little deception on the part of certain 



worthy gentlemen who buy smutty barley from the 
farmers at a low price, then proceed to mix it with 
lime and sell it for "choice brewing barley." In- 
spectors say it is difficult to discover the fraud by 
a casual examination, but a chemical analysis shows 
the lime and the smut. 

This adulteration and befouled barley finds its 
way to your dining table in some guise. There is no 
escape. You are poisoned for profit. 



Southern Chivalry Vindicated 



THE world holds Georgia in contempt. The 
cowardly murder of Leo Frank is a crowTiing 
act of infamy of all the long list of atrocities perpe- 
trated in the southern states in the past few years. 

"With the guilt or innocence of Frank we are not 
concerned. With Hearst and Burns and a part of 
the capitalist press in search of advertising con- 
tracts arrayed on one side and another wing of the 
same press on the other side there is no getting at 
the truth. As to the blood guilt of the people of 
Georgia there is no shadow of doubt. 

Leo Frank is dead. Georgia chivalry is vindi- 
cated and the manifest superiority of the southern 
gentleman once more has been satisfactorily demon- 
strated. There will follow a series of arrests, trials, 
demonstrations for and against the defendants. Pos- 
sibly there may be some convictions and some 
' ' legal ' ' murders. Georgia will thus have an opportu- 
nity to adopt the Mississippi plan of ■\'icarious atone- 
ment by following a series of lynchings with a couple 
of legal hangings. If a way can be found to take 
someone who has killed someone out and kill them 
"legally" the fair name and fame of the state is 
saved. 

This Georgia mob is the worst one of modern 
times. Its act was as studiedly cruel and cold 
blooded as, say, the Mississippi mob that "legally" 
combined a watermelon feast and a double hanging. 
The deed Avas as dastardly as that of the state of 
Georgia a year ago when, under the regime of Gov. 
Stanton, a boy was "legally" hanged on the accusa 
tion of being an accessory to an illegal murder. This 



mob acted after months of "cooling time." There 
was no sudden pitch of passion, no hot lieaded de- 
mand for vengence. It was as deliberate, bestial and 





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IN GEORGIA 

The Southern Gentleman Demonstrates 


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revolting as, for instance, the "legal" hanging by 
the California mob which assembled vicariously at 
San Quentin aod strangled Ealph Parris a few 
months ago. 




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The Western Comrade 



That Heavenly Mississippi 



By FRANK E. WOLFE 




HERE is a land of pure delight — Missis- 
sippi ! They hanged two negroes there re- 
cently — legally ! So rare and unusual was 
this legal phase that the occasion was 
made a gala day. Five thousand persons 
were in attendance and there was a great 
diversity of features in the entertain- 
ment preceding the main event. 

Dependent ever on the daily press we lose some of 
the finer points of the day's delightful diversion, but 
enough comes through to show that in the populace 
of this southern state we have still a lot of the true 
spirit of Americanism. 

Starkville, formerly a tank town, jumped into 
everlasting fame when the sheriff, with true southern 
nobility of character, sprung the trap. Eemoving his 
hat he vraved it gallantly and shouted, "Goodbye, 
boys, and good luck!" (What element of luck or 
"chance entered where men swung off to glory filled 
with watermelon, soda pop and fried chicken?) 

These men were "legally" tried and the sentence 
of the judge was "legally" executed. They had 
arisen in wrath and slain a Pullman porter. In our 
less civilized and semi-barbaric state we would have 
been prone to declare 

■ the act merited reward 
rather than deserved 
punishment. 

Features of the day 
were free lemonade, 

■ scriptural reading, free 
sandwiches, political 
speeches by county can- 
didates, c h u f ;c h' and 
Sabbath school an- 
nouncements, sale of souvenirs of rope and scaffold, 
psalms of Moses and the lamb, watermelon and fried 
chicken (served exclusively to the condemned) and a 
score of other delightful, grand and petit divertisse- 
ments. 

■ One newspaper account of the affair gives a keen 
flash of insight when it naively states: "Back of and 
through it all was a sensed realization that Mississippi 
has been lax in the enforcement of the law and that 
this legal execution would go far to restore the fair 
name of the state." 

Great! Simply wonderful! Here we have a vicar- 
ious atonement so simple and concrete that the most 
bone-headed of us can understand. When this point 




was touched upon delicately by one of the candidates 
both the condemned, who sat on the gallows back of 
the speakers, applauded vigorously, and they were 
joined by the thousands who sat on the grass in the 
natural amphitheater where the great scene was staged. 
Thus the vicarious atonement scheme met with ap- 
proval bj' both sides — the saviors and the saved. 

The press agent who handled the publicity end of 
the entertainment advertised it extensively and the re- 
sults were most satisfactory. Concessionaires reported 
a most profitable day's business. 

During the progress of one speech a candidate for 
sheriff perpetrated an amusing lapsus linguea when he 
said : "I sure hopes you all will vote for me. ' ' Then, 
with an apologetic smile at the manacled men, he said: 
' ' I mean all of yo ' all that can get to the polls ! " 

At this contretemps the multitude roared with de- 
light and the condemned joined in a gale of laughter. 
The crowning act of the day's performance was, of 
course, the hanging. This was preceded by much 
fervid singing and some religious shoiiting. The grand 
old song, "The Pleavenly Caanan," ran through the 
whole day's ceremonj- and at the climax, when all 
stood and sang, the scene was most inspiring, the two 

shackled men hobbling 
forward beside the Rev- 
erend Mr. Winbush and 
singing at the tops of 
their voices the closing 
lines : • 
"Not Jordans stream nor 

death's cold flood 
Should fright us from that 
'■ "gliore." ' 

Thus far we have 
taken the daily news- 
papers. May we not, with fairness, listen to voces 
Slississippiensis as our imagination is stimulated and 
inspired : 

(The Sheriff:) "Now ladies and gentlemen, don't 
crowd down so close to this er, ah, — platform. You 
all will be given every op'tunity " 

"Cose they does. They repents they-all's sins " 

"Ladies and gentlemen: In this campaign we come 
before you " 

"De good Lawd don't hold nothin' agin no- 
buddy " 



"Honesty and efficiency will ever be " 

"Here y'are, soovnir, same piece of rope they're 
usin'^ only two bits ". 



10 



The Western Comrade 



Chorus of voices rising above the babble and rever- 
berating along the grassy hill side : 

"There is a land of pure delight 
Where Saints immortal reign; 
Infinite day excludes the night. 
And pleasures banish pain." 

(As singing dies down:) 

"No, dey don't pay nothin' fo' dat watermellyon. 

De jailor he done furnish " 

"Our chief aim will be to reduce you-all's taxes 



and " 

"Ice cole sody pop, only five a bot!" 
"Fo'giveness ob sins an' salvation; dat's what we 

all lookin' fo' an " 

"Wbar dey evah get fried chicken befo'? Dat's 

what " 



"Hush, he's gwine invoke de devine blessin' " 

"No he ain't " 

"We pledge our unwavering fealty to the old flag 

and the glorious principles " 

"Dere ain't no dam use you acting up " 



(Singing wells forth from a thousand throats and 

others of the multitude join M'ith hysteric fervor.) 

"There everlasting spring abides, 
And never-withering flowers; 
Death, like a narrow sea, divides 
This heavenly land from ours." 

"Stand firm for the old party of Lincoln, Grant and 
Roose— er— oh, Taft " 

"Huccumb you-all ain't out in de cotton fiel wid 
dat " 



'Cose dey kaint go to hell " 

'Red hot, all hot! Weiners and tomoUys, get 'em 



while- 



(The sheriff) "You-all will have to stop crowding 

up to this platform. "We're treating you right an " 

"When will dey come aroun' wif de free lemonade 

an' dem " 

"Sweet fields beyond the swelling flood 
Stand dressed in living green — " 

"Peanuts! Five a bag! Hey Dit Seals; how you 
like it up dere wid dat iron on yo ' laig ? ' ' 



(Minister comes forward, raises hands.) 
"Time's up." (The sheriff.) 

"Our Father, who art in Heaven " ] 

Crowd mumbling, sounds like low slumbrous 

thunder of lazy sea on long beach. As prayer ends, 

noises resume. Singing^ vending, cursing and swaying 

forward. Sheriff and assistants adjust nooses and pull 

down black caps. 

"Wonder who' gwine send 'em to glory ?" 

"He's gwine do it hisself — dat's kind sheriff' we 

got." 

"Don't crowd, now ladies an— — " 

"Popcorn, peanuts, all hot " 

"By virtue of the authority vested in me by the 

commonwealth of Mississippi " 

"Watch his knees wobble " 

"I now execute " i 

"Looky, now " ' 

"And may God in his infinite pity " 'I 

"Dit's weakenin' " ' 

"Have mercy on your soul. Goodbye, boys, and 

good luck ! " 

Silence. The low murmur of hundreds of crooning 

mammies swelling into loud song which is joined byi 

the two men on the scaffold, whose muffled voices come! 

from the folds of the hideous black bags : ^ 

"Could we but climb where Moses stood, 
And view the landscape o'er — " 

Crash of trap sprung and bodies shooting down- 
Avard. Figures bound upward from impact at end of 
ropes. Convulsively draw up knees then relax as shud- 
der runs through frame. 

Unintelligible shouts and wild cheering from crowd. 

Bodies sway and twist 'round and 'round at end of 

ropes. Doctors bare heads in burning glare of sun and 

hold watches in « their hands as they draw near. 

Preacher bows head, his white lips moving. 

"Not Jordans stream nor death's cold flood 
Should fright me from that shore." 

"Peanuts, five a bag!" 






: 



! 



Out of the Night 

By GEORGE F. HIBNER 



COME, toilers, out of the night! Know that the 
sun is shining for you. That you, wonder-beings, 
should toil ever for profit of others is like robbing you 
of sunlight that is abundant for all ; like robbing you of 
shelter that is within reach of all. It isi like locking 
you from music, art, joy, life, — all — all within easy 
reach, did you but cease letting others order your lives. 
Come, toilers, out of the night. 

Come, toilers, out of the night ! Sun and wind and 
wave hold peace and rest for you — hold silent great 



lessons for you. And for you, Color is touching with 
infinite hands millions of miles today. Beauty is send- 
ing her hosts to the hills, the valleys, the rocks, the 
woods, the waters, the clouds, and in infinite voices of 
music — for you! For you! Did you know! Did you 
know! Come, toilers, out of the night! 

Did you know that these days passed down to you 
out of the universe are for you — for you — and you have 
no right under the stars to sell them to others ! joy, 
joy, did you but know ! Come, toilers, out of the night !" 






The Western Comrade 



u 




Everybody in the Community Enjoys the Swimming Pool 



Llano Colony's Progress Rapid 




ISITORS at Llano del Rio Community 
are always surprised at the size of the 
town of Llano, the large amount of land 
cleared and under cultivation, and the 
abundance of water. In its growth with- 
in a few months from a few clustered 
tents to a town of 466 people in which 
substantial adobes are"replacing tempor- 
ary tents, first necessary to house the people, Llano has 
duplicated the performance of early-day mining towns, 
and ere the year of 1915 is passed will have become the 
metropolis of Antelope Valley. This progress is taken 
.'as a demonstration of the ripeness of the times and 
how ready the people are to practice co-operation. 

The reports of the various managers of the dififerent 
departments show most eloquently the material 
progress that has been made. 

Even the people at Llano had no clear idea of the 
tremendous advancement, the record of achievement 
carried by the reports of the different departments 
aroused their enthusiasm to a new and higher pitch, 
ilore than 200 visitors shared the enthusiasm of the 
colonists last month, many of whom have signed up to 
join the progressive community, and all of them evinced 
a desire to become members eventually. The number of 
visitors is increasing all the time, some hailing from 



such distant places as England, Canada and the New 
England states. In truth, the eyes of the Socialist 
world are on Llano. Jim Larkin, the famous Irish- 
English labor leader, after his visit, said: "I am too 
filled with enthusiasm to give expression to my feel- 
ings, but one thing certain is that you have the land 
and the water. I am also very much pleased with the 
class of people that I find here." 

Thomas "W. Williams, state secretary of the Socialist 
party of California, was recently a visitor and he care- 
fully looked over the possibilities of the Llano Colony. 
In a brief address in the Assembly hall he waxed quite 
enthusiastic over the potentialities of the land and 
water and called attention to the fact that the success 
of this colony would have a great effect on the So- 
cialist movement at large, as he declared that we were 
inseparably connected with the movement whether or 
not we wanted such to be a fact. Comrade "Williams 
pointed out that while the colonists are busy within 
the community they should not lose sight of the neces- 
sity of carrying their allegiance completely to the po- 
litical end of the fight for furtherance of Socialism. 

Visitors remark on the delightful climate of Llano. 
The lack of humidity, coupled with the cool breeze 
which blows nearly all day, renders working in the sun 
no hardship. Frequently the hottest part of the day 



12 



The Western Comrade 




is between 8 and 9 o'clock in the morning. The nights 
are refreshingly cool and plenty of bedding is essential 
to comfort. 

There is a good prospect that Llano will have a 
bra-ss band before another month. The Saturday night 
dances are being continued with increasing attendance. 
If their popularity increases an addition will haveto be 
put onto the Assembly hall. The visitors have a keen 
delight in the dances, which are free. 

Dr. Robert K. Williams, who has been 
looking after the health of the colonists 
since his arrival, reports that an unusually 
good state of health is prevalent amongst the 
residents here. He has found but trivial 
disorders so far. The good water and the 
even and salubrious climate is largely ac- 
countable for this. At a recent meeting of 
the joint board he was duly recommended 
to be appointed health of&cer. 

Dr. S. C. Hornef, the Llano dentist, will 
soon be a permanent resident of the Colony. 
His office equipment is nearly completed. 
Part of the furniture was made in the car- 
penter shop and is a credit to the institution. 
Aided by the capable Mrs. Hornef, he ex- 
pects to have an office that will be a credit 
to any city. Twenty-five years of experience 
in dental work and travels that have taken 
him to every part of the world have won a 
reputation that is well established. It might 
well be added that Socialism has been one of 
the first thoughts with Dr. Hornef always. 
It is the opportunity to live in a Socialist 
community that has brought Llano this valuable citizen. 

S. W. Coffren, recently elected manager of the 
finance department and appointed assistant postmaster, 
has initiated many innovations in the office. Distribu- 
tion sheets will show the amount of labor in each de- 



jjartment, giving iiiformation 
ii.at will be valuable in comput- 
nig costs. 

liarl Glass, head of the en- 
gineering department, has been 
making measurements and ob- 
taining other data regarding the 
tunnel, the source of the domes- 
tic water supply. This water is 
to be used to supply the new 
school house and the townsite. 
The latter is now being surveyed. 
The new townsite, nestling close 
to the Sierra Madres, overlooks 
the broad reaches of the great 
Antelope Valley. The distance 
from the present residence cen- 
ter is about two miles. The elevation is considerably 
greater than the present, which is 3188 feet. 

Under the direction of- Comrade John Harriman, 
the new swimming pool was completed recently and 
filled for the first time. The Colonists will be able 
to now enjoy another luxiary. The dimension of the 
pool is 65 by 150 feet. Near it stands the newly fin- 
ished Solarium in which sun baths can be taken. 

The reports by the 
heads of departments 
give most clearly and 
concisely what has 
been accomplished 
and is under con- 
templation. 

The extent of the 
agricultural opera- 
tions are given as 
follows- by Assistant 
Superintendent F. "W. 
Carr : 

One hundred and 
seventy-five acres of 
corn, 65 acres of 
which are heading 
out. The third cut- 
ting of hay has been 
taken from the 250 
acres of alfalfa and 
the fourth cutting is 
now under way. At 
the Mescal tract 30 
acres of corn and 50 
acres of alfalfa add to the wealth of Llano. The total 
amount of land under cultivation, including garden, 
orchard, narsery, alfalfa, etc., is 1200 acres. 

A report from the building department shows that 
the community hna 64 tent-houses (part boards and 




>!(• 



If. 



The Western Comrade 



18 




llpart canvas) and twelve tents for visitors. There are 
'twelve wooden houses and four ranch houses. Twelve 
clay brick (adobe) iiouses have lieen completed and 
occupied, five others are ready for roofs, and thirteen 
stone foundations have been completed upon which 
houses soon will be 
started. In addition to 
this the foundation for 
an addition to the office 
building has been fin- 
ished. This calls for 
'four additional office 
rooms, and a room 18 
by 24 feet for the man- 
ag-ers' meetings, which 
are held every night. 
The following is taken 
from a report to the 
community commission 
liy Comrade George 
Hcffner, manager of the construction department: 

"The foundation and floor of a silo 25 feet in 
diameter and 30 feet high is now ready for the walls 
and a crew is busy making the concrete blocks to lay 
them up. 

"A good portion of the mason work for a sanitary 
dairy barn, 42 feet by 150 feet, has been completed and 
the joist and roofing will soon be in place. 

"A start has also been made in getting out materials 
for the construction of shelter for our work-stock, and 

if present plans are carried out a 

buildirig will be erected 36 feet 
wide and 140 feet long, with a hay 
rack down the center that will hold 
from 20 to 25 tons of hay, so that 
we can remove an entire stack 
when we break in on it. 

"We liave two poultry houses, 
'18 feet by 60 feet, of an approved 
type. Also a brooder house, 14 
feet by 24 feet, divided into three 
apartments. There are completed 
two rabbit hotises, one 68 feet long 
and one 72 feet long, the combined 
capacity being 210 breeders. Be- 
side the house there is a yard 
for the young stock, 58 feet by 
64 feet, enclosed on four sides 
with chicken wire four feet high. 
The club house contains be- 
tween 10,000 and 11,000 square feet of floor space. 

"The bakeoven now in course of construction will 
Ihave a capacity of 125 loaves at one batch and two or 
jthree batches per day can be baked. The plan is to 
lay a coil of pipe over the arch and cover it with eight 



to ten inches of sand, which will furnish constant hot 
water for the bakexy and the hotel kitchen. It is 
possible also to establish a temporary laundry at the 
rear of the bakery in a separate building where the 
hot water would oe available to take care of that de- 
partment until we can erect the industrial 
building and establish the permanent 
laundrjr. We can then turn the tempor- 
ary laundry into shower baths. 

"The carpenter shop has done good 
service. The amormt of sizing and re-saw- 
ing has been too great for the machines 
that are now in use, as they were not in- 
tended for that kind of work. In this 
division are made the door and window 
frames, screens, tables and other cabinet 
work. Recently tliey made 50 bee hives 
and 1500 fillers for bee hives. The cabi- 
net ^■^■ork for the dentist's office is practi- 
cally completed, and a large batch of sash 
for the colony house is ready to run." 

Llano Local Socialist Party has 51 members and a 
steady and good attendance at every meeting. Frank 
Ijimpach is the secretary. It seems to some persons 
strange that "propaganda" meetings should be held in 
this community, but these gatherings are very popular 
and frequently visiting "nons" and "nears" get some- 
thing to make them think. About 250 persons attend 
these meetings. Comrade J. Stitt Wilson commented 
on this, saying he knew no other place in Califoimia 




Swiss Milch Goats Thrive on the Llano. 



Avhere several hundred Socialists can be gathered to- 
gether within an hour's notice. The local grows stead- 
ily and some day will be the largest and most solidly 
knit organization in California. 

The .sanitary commission, of which B. R. Brainard is 



14 



The Western Comrade 



superintendent, is proud of its record made in standing 
two inspections by state ofSeials and getting a clean 
bill. The county health department says we have the 
cleanest, most sanitary village in California. 

D. C. Copley, who is in charge of the poultry de- 
partment, reports 2000 stock. Of these there will soon 
be 1200 laying hens, culled closely, as this manager 
does not believe in keeping boarders. This department 
is now supplying fat young fryers and broilers and 
some ducks for roasting. This department was without 
a head and without proper organization and supplies 
until too late in the season to plan extensive incubating. 

Comrade Copley has the department so well con- 
ducted that every member of the community is proud 
of it. He has plans for the future. He will plan large 
extensions for next season, when an attempt will be 
made to raise an immense flock of turkeys. During 
the winter there will be constructed additional brooder 
houses and new incubator buildings. "With this done 
and the rancho on an extensive grain-producing basis, 
the birds will be increased to several thousand. 

We will take the soil from beneath our feet and 
build houses and from the same soil take the grain and 
this will enable us to run a poultry department that 
will produce eggs and meat not only for this commun- 
ity, but will be a big revenue producer in the future. 
This was, in effect, the report of Department Manager 
Copley. 

Leo A. Dawson, department of horticulture, has 
made a report showing excellent progress in his divi- 
sion. With his assistants he is preparing 7000 seedlings 
for budding to stone fruits such as Satsuma and 
Tragedy plums, French and Silver prunes and Salway, 
Elberta and cling peaches. The honey locust trees 
have made an average growth of three feet from seed- 
lings as large as lead pencils last spring. Two thou- 
sand strawberry plants are making a fine showing and 
many thousand plants will be raised from these for 
next season. Twenty-five hundred blackberry and 
loganberry plants have made an average growth of 
three feet. The row of 100 rhubarb plants look promis- 
ing and large quantities of this can be produced. 

Many thousands grape cuttings have made a good 
growth of ten inches. About thirty acres will be 
planted in grapes. These are Concords, Sultanas, Mus- 
cats, Tokay, Thompson seedless and Black Conichon. 
One hundred acres will be planted in apples next win- 
ter. The Bartlett pear acreage will be increased by 
at least 160 acres at the next planting season. The 
young pear orchards on the colony have made an aver- 
age growth of four feet. There is a large number of 
flourishing trees on hand and a "family orchard" will 
be planted for the community. This will contain among 
other fruits, seven varieties of plums, prunes and sum- 
mer apples. 



Several acres in experimental sunflowers have 
turned out fine and this will form a part of the poultry 
food for the future. 

Experimental cotton plants are flourishing. The 
peanuts planted late are showing up well and will be a 
part of the crops of the future. 

There are 137 head of cattle in the colony herd. This 
division is under the able hand of Oliver Luton. There 
is a large number of particularly promising young 
heifers. There are 175 head of hogs in the pork divi- 
sion. Fifty of these are good brood sows. The grade 
of this stock is improving and a change will be made to 
all Poland Chinas. 

From the garden the colony is getting a large 
amount of vegetables. Two wagon loads of luscious 
watermelons are distributed each day. There are five 
acres in Muskmelons just ripening. Seventeen acres of' i 
potatoes have been dug and these are running from 30 
to 50 sacks to the acre. Three acres of onions are ready 
for digging and two acres will be put in the same prod- 
uct at the fall planting. 

A large supply of a great variety of vegetables is 
being turned over to the commissary department. P. Ai 
Knobbs, who is in charge of this department has made 
a wonderful showing considering the fact that he has 
been working with recently cleared vsdld lands. 

It has taken considerable figuring to get the depart- 
ment of social service running smoothly on the eight- 
hour basis. The workers in the elubouse, kitchen and 
dining room have the regulation hours and one day off 
each week. 

The hand laundry has been organized under the di- 
rection of William B. Hunter, who has completed his 
arrangements for taking the work of the colony pre- 
paratory to opening the new steam laundry. 

Plans are virtually completed for the irrigation 
system for the entire community. This department is 
now in the hands of H. M. Wood, who has had wide 
experience in the business. 

The system as planned will take a large quantity 
of pipe as well as several miles of large cobble-stone 
ditches. Each of these ditches will be capable of carry- 
ing at least 2500 inches of water. The initial system 
as planned would include five cobble-stone ditches from 
one to three miles in length. 

The first installation of pipe as laterals from these 
ditches will be fourteen miles. Some of these laterals 
will be the head pipe lines for orchards having turnouts 
at each tree row. Others will be larger pipe with turn- 
outs at each 100 feet for alfalfa irrigation. There will 
be stands every 660 feet with gates to control the water 
into the different pipe lines. This is only the initial 
system, which will be duplicated all over the ranch, 
which probably sooner or later will cover 20,000 acres 
or more. 



The Western Comrade 



Aid to Our Kings 

By FRANK H. WARE 



MAES walked beside the parapet and laughed. Tbe 
hoarse echoes grated through the hollow corri- 
dors of his fortress-palace. In silence he leaned for- 
ward and looked below, to Earth, where grappled mil- 
lions of men midst the screams of heavy shells that 
hurtled through the air and fell, ploughing in their 
journey of death through villages, homes and factories. 
Here and there captured towns lay pillaged and 
burned, while in others soldiers were killing the un- 
armed and looting. 

In one little village in Poland, jagged walls stood 
as mute evidence of a raking cannon fire. The main 




THE KESPONSIBILITY FOR THE WAE 

God: "I've read the green, yellow, and blue books, 
and know less than ever who is in the wrong." 

St. Peter: "Suppose we settle it with the dice." 

— Pasquino, Turin 



street of the town was strewn with vrreckage, and 
here and there lay bodies of women and children — the 
ravished and the more mercifully slain. 

A young girl, hair flowing across her shoulders 
and clothing half town from her body, screamed and 
dashed from the ruins of her little home. Close be- 



hind came a young officer, blood oozing and dripping 
from a nasty wound in his cheek. Still clutching the 
neck of a broken bottle the girl sped up the street, 
fear lending wings to her feet. The officer, hoarsely 
commanding her to halt, quickly closed the distance 
between them, and drawing his sword raised it above 
his head 

The pallid face of a girl stared with glazed and 
unseeing eyes from the dust. The din of battle went 
on as before and again the laughter of Mars rang 
through the corridors. 

Night came and the toll-keeper counted his dead. 

"How many?" growled Mars. 

"Twenty-five thousand," came the reply in slow 
monotone. 

"And the total?" 

"10,716,210 to date." 

Narrowing his bloodshot eyes to puffy slits, the 
great god turned to momentary thought. From be- 
hind a pillar in the corridor crept a gaunt, skeleton- 
like creature, who rushed forward and prostrated her- 
self with a clatter before Mars. The war god stirred 
and, opening his eyes, started in surprise. 

"Famine!" he cried, "Arise — waste no time. To 
Earth — Famine — tonight! Let thy hungry belly feast 
on women, babes and men. Haste — begone ! ' ' 

The creature arose, a hideous grin playing across 
her fleshless face. Turning she strode into the corridor. 
A hollow clattering followed her. 

Long after the echoes had died. Mars stood silent 
and stared into vacancy. 

"I wonder," he mused slowly, "I wonder — if — " 

Wheeling suddenly on his heel he strode to an- 
other part of the palace and stopped before a massive 
door. Groaning and creaking on rusty hinges the door 
swung slowly open. In the center of a little room sat 
another creature much dirtier and more bedraggled 
than Famine. 

"Pestilence!" greeted Mars through his teeth, "stir 
thy foul rags and follow in the footsteps of thy sister 
Famine. Go blow thy breath on stricken villages of 
starving men and women. To the hospitals, tonight, 
and seize those sore wounded and aid them to their 
graves. Hasten — spare none ! ' ' 

A stench arose and followed her as she passed 
along the hallways, and the black plants and flowers 
of the corridors withered and died as she neared. 

"Famine ! Pestilence !" Mars walked to his throne- 
room chuckling grimly. 

(Continued on Page 30) 



16 



The Western Comrade 



Robert Minor, Ca 




"HELLO, WILSON! THIS IS THE AMERICAN 
PEOPLE TALKING: WE WANT WAR!" %'. 








'MEAT AHEAD!" 



Workers' Ne 
Champion 

T ABOR in America should 

congratulated on the fact thit 
the greatest cartoonist of a gen- 
eration has joined the staff of the 
world's leading Socialist publica- 
tion. The New York Call has 
listed Robert jMinor and the d: 
cartoon of that publication hi 
proven not only one of its gre 
est attractions, but one of the nn 
powerful propaganda features. 
JMinor's cartoons are rep: 
duced everywhere. So conipell: 
are his masterly drawings, 
keen his ideas and so snappy 
captions that editors find them 
resistible. Wherever there is 
man with red blood, a radical 
trend and a spirit of daring back 
of the scissors, you will find Minor 
cartoons reprinted. 

In presenting this page to 
readers, the editors of The Wi 
. ern Comrade feel it has offered! 
tret^t. The cartoons were taken 
.rarfdom and no selection was made 
otlier than to obtain a variety to 
j"kTghow the wonderful power of this 
I'.^rtist .of the revolt. _ 

!^ Probably no keener thrust 

o'rer b6en made 'at the prostitul 
"press than that where the 
painted lady is sho'wn tele- 
phoning President Wilson, 
jising the voice of the peo- 
ple in a demand for war. 




The WesternComrade 



17 



list of the Revolt 




^i^^^^!^ 




SING SING PRISON REVERTS TO OLD SYSTEM 
SUITABLE TO "CHRISTIAN CIVILIZATION" 




THE DYNAMITE SOWER 



18 



The Western Comrade 

Billy's Buffoonery 

■Pi R. CHARLES P. AKED, pastor of the First Congregational Church of San Francisco, resigned from a committee 
■'-'^ of one hundred because the organization booked Billy Sunday to "preach" in its Tabernacle. Then the Sunday 
press agents made their worst fumble by stirring up the affair. It might have healed, but these enterprising dope- 
sters don't know such things never get well if you pick them. Dr. Aked made a statement in which he character- 
ized Billy's pulpit mannerisms and buffoonery and blasphemy. Then the p. a. picked it and Dr. Aked came 
through with a bill of particulars that seems sufficient. Here it is: 



IWITjIDEEW from the Commattee of One Hundred 
quietly, without fuss or publicity. I gave my rea- 
sons to the committee and supposed the matter was 
closed. I did not send to the secular press a copy of 
my letter. I do not know, and can not learn, what 
member of the committee made my resignation public. 

It all comes to this : I do not know of any consid- 
eration in the world which would induce me to be- 
come a party to the buffoonery and blasphemy of a 
''Billy Sunday" mission. 

The justification of this language is to be found in 
the reports of the San Francisco press. 
I "Cleopatra was a flat nosed wench who sailed up 
ihe Nile clothed only in sunshine and climate." Let 
it be admitted that I have not secured from Dr. Sunday 
pr from Bishop Hughes or from Dr. H. H. Bell a guar- 
antee that Dr. Sunday said this in precisely these 
{JTords. But nobody has denied it — ^neither Dr. Sunday 
iior the person described by the newspapers as his "of- 
ficial press agent, ' ' nor Dr. Bell, nor anybody else. The 
report stands. 

Let us use plain and honest speech. I do not know 
whether Cleopatra ever sat naked in a boat and caused 
herself to be rowed up the River Nile. Yet I take my 
stand here: that nothing on God's earth can justify in 
a sermon the leering suggestiveness of Dr. Sunday's 
phrases. 

There can be only one object in stating the fact — 
if it is a fact — in that way. And the object is — dirt. 

And parents may very well ponder this quotation: 

' ' Pilate was a lick-spittle, low-down, free-lunch, hog- 
pouched, pitiable, plastic, ward-heeling, whisky-soaked 
graft politician of his day." 

If their boys bring this language into the home 
they — fathers and mothers — will understand that the 
youngsters have not been to a prizefight nor to a saloon 
nor to a house of infamous resort. Parents will under- 
stand that the boys have been to a religious service, 
and have listened to a preacher who by the grace of 
an American college is a Doctor of Divinity, and 
who is supported by the leading clergy of San Fran- 
cisco. 

My opposition to the proposal to invite Dr. Sunday 
could not, of course, be grounded in these utterances, 
because the meeting at which I voiced my objections 
was held many months ago, and my letter withdraw- 



IK 



it 

3 



}' 



ing from the committee was written nearly two weeks 
ago. I had before me at that time such evidence 
this : 

Princeton University refused to invite Dr. Sun- 
day, and gave its reasons. The d«an of the graduate 
school, over his own signature, printed quotations 
from Dr. Sunday's "sermons." 

And these are specimens : 

"If a minister believes and teaches evolution he 
is a stinking skunk, a hypocrite and a liar." 

"If I were the wife of some of you men, I'd re^ 
fuse to clean their old spittoons. I say let every hog 
clean his own trough." 

"Your wife has as good a right to line up before 
a bar and fill up her skin with the hog-gut you do, 
as you have." 

"Then Herodias came in and danced with her foot 
stuck out to a quarter to twelve, and old Herod 
said, 'Sis, you're a peach. You can have anything 
you want even to the half of my kingdom. ' She hiked 
off to her licentious mother." 

"Why, a man with red blood in his veins can't 

look at half the women in the streets now and not have 

impure thoughts." i; 

"Little girl, you look so small, i J 

Don't you wear no clothes at all? 
Don't you wear no chemise shirt? 
Don't you wear no petty skirt? 
Don't you wear no underclothes 
But your corset and your hose?" 

They call this a revival of religion. 

But it will be observed that in my letter to the 
committee I took another ground. I did so because 
I had read the apologies made for Dr. Sunday by 
clergymen and heard in committee the arguments in 
support of the invitation. 

If the pulpit and the new substitute for the re-i 

ligion of Jesus Christ are the gospel according to 

"Billy Sunday," then Protestant Christianity is 

doomed and man's indignant heart will turn away to 

find the symbols of its faith elsewhere. 
# * « 

The Twin City Reporter of Minneapolis throws a 
glimmer of light on the Rev. Billy's madness and indi- 
cates he is as foolish as a fox. He is quoted as saying: 
"Why do people — especially the Avorking people^fall^ 
for this religious game? I can't understand it. It's 
funny the way they go crazy and give up the money." 



The Western Comrade 

The Muddling Worker 



19 



By HOMER CONSTANTINE 



A CRITICAL analysis of a widely printed photo- 
graph of a scene at Bayonne, New Jersey, strike 
riot would show that it was rather poorly faked. "Why 
have only one man in the attitude of drawing a re- 
volver ? Why not several with drawn guns ? In my ex- 
perience as a newspaper photographer I faked them 
worse than that and knew of it being done dozens of 
times. 

But why should editors of Labor and Socialist pub- 
lications be surprised or indignant about a cheating 
photograph. Is a lie by the camera worse than the 
myriad lies in the story written about the scene? As 
for the picture, I would rather believe it genuine and 
that the youth well down stage, in- convenient range 
of the camera for "close-up stuff," is really drawing 
an honest-to-god gun, and that he is about to get some 
action. 

The disheartening feature of the photo is the lack 
of cohesion and team work on the part of the rioters. 
There are enough men present, tramping over most 
convenient paving stones, to have carried the trenches 
of the Rockefeller gunmen. It seems like the old, hap- 



hazard style of the workers, muddling along with lit- 
tle or no team work, while the other fellow depends on 
standing together in concerted action — and wins. 
A couple of years ago I spent considerable time in 















^^l^^^mfT^mBLiJ^mtyiS'^' 


%i 








K^^.T , ^ 




The Wrong Ways 









Bayonne, and the scene here sho^vn was on my route 
between the railway station and my work. Looking 
at it now I almost regret I could not have been present. 
Those smaller paving stones look so alluringly easy 
to dislodge. 



Do You Really Want Socialism? 



By JOHN M. WORK 



IT has been said that Socialism will not be introduced 
on Wednesday afternoon at half past two. In other 
words, it will not be a sudden process so that we can 
point to any specific date as the time when the new 
order was born. 

I agree with that statement. But, it is also true that 
there will come a time when we will win a general 
election and capture the powers of the National Gov- 
ernment. 

That day will be the beginning of the end of the 
great struggle for Socialism. That day will be the 
beginning of the end of exploitation, poverty, and all 
the social ills that blight the lives of the great host 
whose hearts are weary "longing for the strife to 
cease." 

When will that day come ? 

It will come whenever the Socialists want it to 
come. We can have Socialism whenever the Socialists 
really want Socialism. 

A minority of the Socialists are exceedingly active. 
Their work for the cause is all that could be desired 
or expected. But there are thousands upon thousands 
of people who vote the Socialist ticket, and yet who 



never turn a hand over to . get Socialism except by 
one act. That act is very commendable in itself, but, 
instead of being the sole act performed for the cause, 
it should be the culmination of many activities. Maybe 
these people want Socialism, but they certainly do not 
act like it. 

In order to get Socialism, it is necessary to convince 
a majority of the people that we ought to have it — 
so that they, too, will vote the ticket. 

There is no way to do this except through close, 
compact, thorough, efScient organization. 

We must fight systematically, not chaotically. We 
must fire broadsides, not popguns. We must meet the 
powerful organization of the enemy with an organiza- 
tion still more powerful. 

Ten million unorganized Socialists would have no 
terrors for the capitalist class. But half a million or- 
ganized Socialists, carrying on a systematic, persistent, 
courageous, methodical propaganda, can turn the 
United States, not upside down, but right side up, 
scare the plutes into spasms, carry the election, and 
introduce Socialism. 

You are not a good Socialist unless vou are a mem- 



2n 



T % e W es te f ii '€ h inr ade 



ber of the Socialist Party organization. You are not a ,. 
good Socialist unless you hustle for Socialism. ' ' ' 

A Socialist who is not a member of the party or- 
ganization is exploiting his own brother Socialists, be- 
catise he is -making them perform the duties he ought 
to perform. 

We are already beginning to be called upon to step 
in and take charge of the immediate work of making the 
transition from capitalism to Socialism. In many lo- 
calities, this responsibility has already been placed 
upon us. 

Yet, many alleged Socialists still neglect the™ duty, 
though these successes make it vastly easier thaii hith- 
erto to build a powerful organization and to reach the 
minds of the people. 

Joining the party organization and paying dues 
promptly is the first duty of every Socialist. No other 
work you can do for the caiise will have such a telling 
and far-reaching effect. 

Having joined, be a member — a real member — not 
a dead one. Every member of the Socialist Party is an 



integral part of the movement.' Every member should 
be active. Every member should be thoroughly posted, 
not only on the principles, but also on the tactics and 
current events of the movement, so that the organiza- 
tion will at all times be able to act with both wisdom 
and expedition on every question that arises. 

This insures tlie maintenance of a rank and tile 
movement. Both a thorough and efficient organization 
and a rank and file movement are indispensable in the 
Socialist Party. 

What it requires to accomplish these results is 
thorough organization, co-ordinate effort, persistent ag- 
gressiveness, wise foresight and indomitable courage. 

The time for scattering shot is gone. 

The time for rainbow-chasing is gone. 

We must be practical. We must use common sense. 

We must advance upon the enemy in perfect order 
and in battle array. 

By so doing, we shall win this political battle and 
emancipate ourselves from the galling chains of capi- 
talism. 



I 



Truth Will Conquer 



By ALBERT A. JAMES 



IS the religion of Christ a myth? Is it a power in 
the world today? Mind you, I do not refer to the 
visible organized church, but to the simple words and 
teachings of Jesus as recorded in the Bible. 

Is it a fact that any considerable number of the 
individiials of the so-called Christian nations of the 
world believe that that Christ ever lived in the world 
as a man? And do they believe that His spirit is in 
the hearts of men today? 

Every date line on every war order which sends the 
millions of Avorking men of one nation at the throats 
of the workers of another nation, the date line, mind 
you, points to the birth of a baby in a manger, while 
the body of the order proves that the promoters of 
war have forgotten that the baby grew to manhood 
and taught and gave his life to prove that the world of 
the future should be ruled by love and brotherhood 
and not by brute force. 

The date line on every promissary note points to 
the birth of the savior of mankind, but the interest 
clause proves that the so-called Christians of today do 
not take him seriously when, he condemns the practice 
of taking interest. 

The date lines on every piece of money points to 
the greatest day in the world's history, the day on 
which the world's creator took on the form of man 
and came to live among the people as an example of 
how evil might be banished from among men. Yet 
it is a common saying that money is the root of all evil. 



In the early centuries after Christ, the ruling class! 
of the world tried to destroy his work by killing' 
those who were his followers. Later they discovered' 
a more effective plan, that was to pretend to accept 
his teachings and by hiding his words from the massj}. 
they gave out their saying as the. gospel and thus- 
enslaved believers and unbelievers alike. 

Too manj' of the world's dispossessed today hear' 
only the call of the fat parasite when he adminishes 
the "servants to obey your masters." You are in-) 
vited to turn to the words of Jesus and read there ai 
radicalism that will make your Socialism look con-' 
servative. 

Read the words of the Carpenter of Galilee and 
you will find there truths that will turn your hate to 
love. You will find there a social justice proposed that 
will make the Co-operative Commonwealth appear as 
only the next step up the long stairway of human 
emancipation. 

Turn the pages of any New Testament and read 
there the words of the world's greatest man-lover. 
You will find triiths which if properly used will drive 
the mental prostitutes out of the pulpit and force them 
from the social and religious leadership of the nation. ■• 

I answer my questions in the affirmative. Thed 
world 's greatest teacher, who was murdered by the r 
ruling class nearly two thousand years ago, still lives 1 
in the hearts of men today. His truths will bring free- 
dom to the wage slaves of America today. 



The Western Comrade 



21 



Recall this Judge! 



•'S' 



- political coffin of Judge "Willis." 
I Los Angeles ^vas the first city in the United States 
■' to recall an official who opposed the will of the people, 
but this latest appeal is a bit startling to the average 
citizen who is stopped on the street by circulators of 
[M.'titious and asked to sentence a superior judge to re- 
rirement for life. 

"WE APPEAL TO THE PEOPLE WHO ARE 
ABOVE ALL JUDGES." So proclaims hand bills 
printed by the Anti-Grand Jury League, which goes on 
to state that the Central Labor Council, the Building 




Trades Council and the Socialist Assembly of Los An- 
geles have all passed resolutions similar in intent, the 
one passed by the Central Labor Council reading as 
follows : 

WHEREAS, the fate of John Lawson today may be 
the fate of any man tomorrow whose power to organize 
the workers the masterclass fears, and 

WH13REAS, Grand Juries in Colorado have indicted 
hundreds of Union ^liners but not one mine-owner, 
and in New York scores of Garment Workers but not 
one clothing trades employer, and 

WHEREAS, Grand Juries in California have just 
been given an added length of rope with which to 
noose those that they have indicted, by the decision of 



Judge F. R. Willis, given in open court, in which he 
declared that the indictment of Caplan and Schmidt 
was legal "Regardless of whether or not there was 
prejudice on the part of certain Grand Jurors who re- 
turned the indictment," therefore be it 

RESOLVED that it is the duty of good citizenship 
to (1) recall Judge F. R. Willis from the bench; (2) to 
initiate constiti^tiojial amendment abolishing Grand 
Jury Process in California; (3) to form an ANTL 
GRAND JURY LEAGUE in Los Angeles, California, 
and throughout the United States, and be it also 

RESOLVED that we constitute ourselves a com- 
mittee of one hundred to obtain the signatures of 
friends and members of Organized Labor in Los An- 
geles to the aforementioned recall and initiative pe- 
tition. 

Something new, this recall move in the defense of 
prisoners who are being tried in capitalist's courts by 
capitalist's judges and capitalist's juries wth ihe prob- 
able capitalist's verdict; something new — yes, and a 
most unpleasant novelty to these judges who see ap 
peals taken from the courts to the people ! 

The resolution passed by the Socialist Assembly 
sets forth in part that 

"The grand jury which indicted Schmidt and Cap- 
Ian was an illegal grand jury in this, to-wit, tliat it 
contained in its membership F. S. Hughes and H. S. 
Mayberry, personal friends of F. J. Zeehandelaar, the 
secretary of the Merchants and Manufacturers Asso- 
ciation of Los Angeles ; E. H. Greppin, a former director 
of said Association ; L. J. G. Spruanee and H. J. Whit- 
ley, who had the 0. K. of said Association and its said 
secretary: J. E. Carr, a former partner of W. D. 
Stevens, a representative in Congress, and believed by 
the said Zeehandlaar to be on the side of the Associa- 
tion ; John Blesser, believed by the said Zeehandelaar to 
be also on the side of the said Association; E. J. Vaw- 
ter, also believed by the said Zeehandlaar to be on the 
side of the said Association; E. A. Forester, a strong 
anti-union man, and Charles A. Wier, one of the 
strongest admirers of the said Association and its said 
secretary." 

Some prejudice in such a jury list as that — is there 
not? 

And the judge who would ignore such prejudice — ■ 
what should be done to him? 

If you had a chance to sign a petition for his recall 
— what would you do ? 

Here is an opportunity for lovers of freedom to 
strike a blow at oppression and tyranny by the courts 
of capitalism. 



22 



The Western Comrade 



Christian Balzac Hoffman 



COJIRADE CHRISTIAN BALZAC HOFFMAN has 
left lis and we lose one of the bravest, gentlest 
souls that has devoted a valuable life to the noblest 
cause. His loss will be keenly felt not only by those 
who were more closely associated with him, but by 
thousands of absent comrades who have known him 
and loved him. 

They knew his writing and his work on the plat- 
form. Comrade Hoffman's successes in the business 
world early in life did not lessen this profound love for 
his fellow-man. The grim sordidness of commercial life 
made no impress on his lovable personality. As a pro- 
pagandist he was untiring, patient and withal forceful 
and convincing. 

The end came for him as he had wished. He passed 
quietly after an active day's work for the cause he 
loved so well. To Comrade Anna, the beloved wife 
who survives him, we extend our sincerest, deepest 
sympathy. A note from her breathes a loyalty and de- 
votion to his memory, and a brave support of her be- 
reavement that is inspirational to still greater efforts 
in the cause to which this great soul was so devoted. — 
(The Editors.) 

V V V 

(This powerful arraignment of war and the makers 
of war was written shortly before the death of Comrade 
Hoffman.) 

Do You Want War? 

I MEAN you — the mother — the father — the brother — 
the sister — the woman — the man. I am asking you : 
DO YOU WANT WAR? I am not asking the money 
lender, the bond broker, the manufacturer of ammuni- 
tion, of guns, shot and shell nor the exporter of food- 
stuffs and mules. I am asking YOU. Not the politi- 
cian, the statesmen, the patriot, the American, the Eng- 
lishman, the German, the Frenchman, the Russian, the 
Turk. I GO BEYOND THESE— TO THE REAL YOU. 
I appeal to your heart, your soul, to your manhood, 
your womanhood, TO YOU AS A MEMBER OF THE 
GREAT BROTHERHOOD— MANKIND. 

Do you want war? Do you want to drench the 
whole world in blood? Is it not enough that Europe 
is blood-mad, frenzied with fire, rape, murder? Is 
America to be drawn into the orgy — into the death- 
dance of civilization? 

Are you forgetting that this is a war of the rich? 
This is not a revolution of the people against their op- 
pressors — of the workers against their exploiters — of 
slaves against masters — of poor against rich. This is 
a war of the ARISTOCRACY— OF KINGS AND 
PRINCES. 



It is a great blood-letting of the PEOPLE, planned 
and ordered by the rulers to quiet the spirit of revolu- 
tion — democracy — Socialism; to weaken and exhaust 
the people ; to blind them with hatred ; to divide them 
into nations and countries; to reduce them into tribes 
and clans; to set them to fighting and killing each 







other; to forget that they are brothers, common men 
and women who own nothing except their strength to 
toil and have nothing to lose but their chains. 

Beware, you sticklers for national honor — you 
prodders of patriots ! 

Should you succeed in involving America in war 
you may be unable to control the universal frenzy. 

The exploited of the world, the homeless, jobless 
vagabonds, the tramps and loafers, the degenerates who 
rot in your jails and asylums — ^who fester in your slums 
and swarm in your cities, may take you at your word, 
may follow your preachings and example and burn, rape 
and kill on their own account. 

You are playing with fire — hell's fire — when you 
push this game to the limit. 



The Western Comrade 



Let Men Live! 



By EDMUND R. BRUMBAUGH 



23 



PRESS reports inform us that Thomas A. Edison, 
the greatest living inventive genius, has been en- 
gaged by the Navy Department to devise new and 
more deadly instruments of destruction. Following 
close upon this is another and even graver announce- 
ment — that substantial increases are to be made in 
the army and all military equipment. No doubt a great 
many know nothing of either event. Probably few 
who know, see anything therein to cause concern. Cer- 
tain it is, however, that scarcely a protest has been 
made, and from many quarters has come most hearty 
applause. It all goes to show that, while making a 
great pretense of being for peace, and though we have 
scored severely the nations of Europe for indulging 
in war, we, the American people, are not free from 
their error, but are blindly, boastfully, treading the 
very same path over which the warring countries have 
rushed to their present fearful sacrifice of life and 
treasure. 

Who can dispute it? And if there be those who 
can, how can they profess to possess regard for truth 
or to be intelligent 1 When genius is prostituted to the 
purposes of war, than which no baser purposes exist; 
when tens of thousands of strong young men are to 
be taken from home and friends and the pursuits of 
peace and led to die on the battlefield or herded into 
barracks, prepared to meet such death; when an in- 
sidious, widespread propaganda of war-making pa- 
triotism is well under way, with editors and teachers 
and preachers giving it strong support — when this is 
the case, is not some foreboding justified? Is it the 
part of prudence to sit with folded hands and ascribe 
an eternity to peace while "those who have caught 
the rabies from the dogs of war" persist in trying to 
produce an epidemic of the same disease ? 

The death of my father not long ago has made me 
feel more deeply than ever the preeiousness and sacred- 
ness of human life. In spite of its sorrow and trials, 
words are too weak to express its wondrous charm, and 
the wealth of worlds were inadequate return for the 
gloom and the heartache that attends its passing. "Let 
^len Live!" Let this be our slogan. Let men live — 
and live as men should live. Life must be preserved 
as long as possible, be lifted up, made joyous and free. 
It will be. ilerey and justice demand it, and an en- 
lightened, useful manhood and womanhood will bring 
it to pass. Life is worth living now with all of its 
needless woes. What will it be when a just social 
system has come to bless mankind? 



It is hard to say and indeed it is a question if one 
should try. Prophecy is a thankless, hopeless task. It 
only iavites the jeers and sneers of little, visionless 
souls, and even we who are looking far foi-ward can 
catch but a glimpse of the glory that is to be. The 
rational, socially righteous man not only dreams, but 
he strives to make his dreams come true. He cannot 
be content with a counterfeit civilization. His wrath 
is aroused by a system that produces war or shackles 




AN BIPERTINENT UNCLE 

She: "You always follow me, and even count my 
footsteps. To know what you want of me is of no 
account to me." — Claridades, San Antonio, Texas 

A "Mexican-American" view of the situation. 



life to a needless struggle for animal necessities. The 
man of today who is making history, promoting prog- 
ress, advancing the world, is a walking protest against 
anything or anybody that, suddenly or by degrees, 
destroys kuman life, defeating its purpose and denying 
its value. 



24 



The Western Comrade 







The Latest jFrom Llano 

; Dear Western Cc^^ade: ' '"' . ■ ' 

I' am writing to let yoxi know it ain't all apricot jam and honey 
; and- never ending/ggpd climate-iont here in Llano. 
\'i. Yesterday I; st^j^ed in tkalVeach orchard at the Tilghman 
Iplaee aftel-'the ^ther kids had'gone. I was laying iinder a tree 
Jand%e,Engle'§|)ApSmarty was' there too. Then it got kinder 
»late and. a y-Jiid came up and we, started for home. I was eat- 
jfing- a'dandy juicy peach and si^^ing A' I 'm glad my mother didn't 
"taise ine to be' a soldier,"" betttFe'ii "bites and not minding the 
wind until it began to blow the alfalfa so that you would have 
thought you were walking on the ocean. 

Smarty was walking along side of me, feeling friendly like 
with everything till the wind, phoof, upended Smarty and blew 
him away over- the green and made him real mad so he barked 
while he Avas a going. It would have taken me too but I was 
ballasted with peaches so I just laughed tho' I couldn't see 
where I was going — till I saw stars — when a peach hit me on 
the nose and I woke up. 

Gee, I'm glad now I dont live where there's cyclones or bliz- 

^*"-^'^®-- - Yours fraternally, ■ 



-Drawing and Text by M, A. Kempf 



Fatty Smith. 



Llano Dramatic Club 

npHE Live Wire Dramatic Club of 
-'- the Llano del Rio Community has 
scored another success in the produc- 
tion of a farce comedy that proved a 
riot of fun from the minute the cur- 
tain rang up to the tag, — a new song 
of the community. 

The company played to a capacity 
house — meaning everybody in Llnao. 
Standing room only and overflows 
are the rules of Llano amusements 
for two reasons — the attractions are 
good and no admission is charged. 

The east of the Si Slocumb play in- 
eluded : W. A. Engle in the title role, 
ilrs. B. R. Brainerd, Ray Keough, 
Mrs. Keough, the Wallace brothersl 
and their wives. Dr. R. K. Williams^ 
Earle E. Glass, F. P. McMahon, Geo, 
T. Pickett, Wm. Schnitzer, B. R, 
Brainerd, Mrs. McMahon, David 
Cedarstrom. 

Local hits and songs were liberally 
interspersed. Dr. Williams and Mrs, 
AYallace sang a duet that brought 
half a dozen encores. Dr. Williams 
by a clever piece of "business"; 
brought Comrade Wiley of Fresno od 
the stage and the community mem-; 
bers heard their new master of song 
for the first time. He not only sang; 
but within a few minutes he had 
everybody present singing, and sing- 
ing well. It was inspiring to many 
visitors to see and hear the pioneers 
lustily joining in the chorus. With 
an all-star cast it would not be fail 
to make selections. The success oi 
the play is most encouraging to the 
club and another play is on the way. 

Two dramatic companies and a 
minstrel troupe henceforth will forn 
a large part of the amusements of -the 
community. AVhen better facilities 
are provided for theatrical produc- 
tions a greater impetus will be giveDJ 
to dramatics in the community. At! 
present the assembly hall at the clutl 
house has a capacity of only abour 
i50 and the seats are always filledj 
and the standing room occupied be- 
fore the curtain rings up. 

The arts and crafts club has joined 
with the Llano local Socialist Party 
and the combination vdll contribute 
the next entertainment. 

When the big silo, 20 feet in diam- 
eter and 40 feet high, is completed 
it will be visible for hundreds oi 
miles across the valley. Ultimatelj 
a searchlight vrill be placed on the 
top of this, silo and its rays wU 
startle the people within a radius oi 
several hundred miles. 






L 



hI 



T h e W e s tern C m r ad e 25 



Knit UnderAvear 



Cheapest Because It Wears Best 



Women's Men's 

Union Suits, low neck, knee length, sizes 32 Undershirts, light weight, cream, sizes 34 to 44. .$ .75 

to 44 $1.25 Undershirts, light weight, black, sizes 34 to 44. . 1.00 

Union Suits, half low neck, elbow sleeves, ankle Drawers, light weight, cream, sizes 30 to 44 75 

length, sizes 32 to 44 1.25 Drawers, light weight, cream, sizes 30 to 44. . . . 1.00 

Under Vests, sleeveless, sizes 30 to 44 3? Shirts and Drawers, double fleeced, grey, sizes 

Xight Robes, sizes 32 to 46 1.50 30 to 44 1.25 

Hose, extra wearing, black, sizes 8 to 10% 30 Shirts and Drawers, Egyptian cotton, ecru, 

Hose, light weight, all colors, sizes 8 to 10%. . . .50 sizes 30 to 44. . . .'. 1.50 

Girls' ChUdren's Boys' 

Union Suits, sizes 20 to 30...$ .50 Taped unions, answering Union Suits, sizes 20 to 32....$ .60 

Union Suits, better grade, purpose of a waist, sizes Union Suits, b^.ter grade, 

sizes 20 to 30 1.00 20 to 28 $ .65 sizes 20 to 32 90 

Hose, black, tan or white, Same as above, only bet- Sportsman's hose for boys, 

sizes 6 to 10% 25 ter grade, sizes 20 to 28. . . 1.05 sizes 6 to 10% 25 to .40 

Pure Wool Goods 

Made by "Wool Growers' Co-operative ^Mills. 
Direct From Sheep's Back to Your Back. 

Black and Grey Mackinaw Coat, length 35 Trousers, Grey and Navy Blue, usual sizes $4.00 

inches, sizes 36 to 44 $8.00 Shirts, Grey and Navy Blue, usual sizes 3.00 

Blankets Men's Hose 

White or grey. 70x82 in., weight 5 lbs $7 85 Extra wearing value, black, sizes 9 to 11% $ .25 

Grey, 70x82 in., weight 7% lbs 9.90 Heavy weight, black, sizes 9 to 11%, 3 pairs 1.00 

Llano del Rio Community 

(Mail Order Department) 

923 Higgins Bldg. Los Angeles, Cal. 

(Make all checks or money orders payable to Llano del Rio Company) 



26 



The Western Comrade 



REVOLT 
IN MEXICO 



Read the Correct Interpretation of Underlying Motives in the 
]\Iost Remarkable and Valuable Book of the Year 

The Mexican People — 
Their Struggle for Freedom 

-By- 
L. Gutierrez de Lara and Edgcumb Pinchon 

¥ 1^ r 

Eugene V. Debs says : 

" * * * It is written from the point 
of view of the working class, the tillers of 
the soil, the producers of the wealth, and 
shows that through all these centuries of toil 
and tears and blood and martyrdom they 
have been struggling for the one purpose of 
emancipating themselves from the tyranny 
of a heartless aristocracy, buttressed on the 
one hand by the Roman Church and on the 
other by };he military power." 

1^ ¥ ¥ 

Georgia Kotsch says : 

"* * * It strips the glamor of 
benevolent motives from the dealings with 
iMexico of the United States and other coun- 
tries and presents the stark truth that 
American and i^orld capitalism has been, 
and is, in league against the proletariat of 
IMexico for its own sordid interest. And 
while the Mexican master class is depicted 
as the most depraved and bloodthirsty in 
history, the Socialist will see that the story 
of the Mexican proletariat is in greater or 
less degree and in varying circumstances the 
story of the proletariat in every country." 

Published by DOUBLEDAY, PAGE & CO. 

F»pice $1.^0 

We will send you this book and The Western Comrade for one 

year for $2.00 



Business is "Good" 




"DUSINESS is "good." 

If you have any doubts, con- 
sult the daily newspapers, which 
have a way, all their own, of jug- 
gling bank clearances and making 
them appear to be on the increase. 

Business in Los Angeles, espe- 
cially, is "good." 

If you don't believe it, consult the 
employment agencies, where one may 
find a hundred men for every job. 
Business in our to-wn is ' ' Good. ' ' 

If you are from Missouri, take a 
look at the 3600 empty storerooms, 
which, if rented, would net about 
$5,000,000 a year. 

And then if you are still in doubt, 
try and locate a real estate man who 
has made a deal in a month. Ask 
each one about the 6000 empty houses 
in Los Angeles, and top it off by try- 
ing to borrow some money at a bank 
at the same rate of interest, and on 
the same security, at which muuey 
could have been secured two years 
ago. 

Business is "good" in Los An- 
geles and in your town. 

There can be no doubt about it. 
Every firm, almost, has discharged a 
portion of its employes, and trimmed 
the wages of the others. 

Also, and furthermore, the sheriff ji 
is busy closing up the small fellows 
who can't pay their bills, and col 
lection agents are seekiog, in vain, to 
run the unemployed into a corner 
and compel them to settle. 

Yet. verily, business is "good. 
And it 's getting better rapidly, with 
reverse English. 

But — if you think this applies to 
Los Angeles alone, you don't know 
your own home town. The "depres- 
sion" is country -wide — it is world 
wide. 

The fact that expropriation has! 
overtaken hundreds of thousands oil 
our bourgeoise friends is carefullji 
concealed by the daily newspapers, 

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The Western Comrade 



27 



The same old prosperity yawp greets 
you wherever you read the newspa- 
pers. Many of them refuse to print 
any more accounts of suicide and all 
sidestep the reason for the appalling 
number who give up in the unequal 
struggle. 

One deep mystery is : What has 
become of the vast horde of small 
salaried counter salesmen, and book- 
keepers who have been thrown 'out 
liy the closing out of small business? 
This is the most hopeless and helpless 
■lass on earth. Efforts to organize 
them have proven almost futile 
everywhere. Servile and smug they 
have led all battalions of the Henry 
Dubb cadet corps. 

From this class is recruited the 
National Guard and the Naval Mi- 
litia. Their sons later on join the 
Boy Scouts, the Boys' Brigade, the 
^niitia of Christ and other regiments 
r^ady to battle for the gods of their 
masters. 

The highways are strewn with 
blanket stiffs even this early in the 
year, despite the fact workers in sea- 
sonal occupations are not yet sup- 
posed to be disemployed. Therefore 
liiisiness is "good" for the rube con- 
stable with a mileage graft. 

Business is "good" — for the mak- 
'■I'S of guns and ammunition, and the 
bickers who deal in war supplies, 
and the grafting officials who handle 
tlie war loans. 

Make a Big Grab 

Assailed by a ravenous hunger an 
old man steals a loaf of bread. 

"Ten years," yawns a fat judge, 
. .and the old man goes to prison for 
. Jife. 

Another man steals an entire 
wheat crop and a railroad and gets 
a coat of federal court whitewash. 

The moral lies before your eyes. 
It's a matter of proportion. Be a 
,big thief and make a bold grab for 
Ithe whole cheese. 

Radiant Toad 

j Katheryn, blonde, beautiful and 6, 
; jwhose parents recently entered the 
:■ (Christian Science fold, started on an 

jevening stroll with a favored uncle. 

A toad rustled in the undergrowth 

beside the path. 
"It's only a friendly toad," said 

the uncle. 
"I know," said the child in a voice 

calculated to convince herself. "He 

wont hurt us. He'll just reflect 

ove!" 



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Telephone Home A-4533 

HARRIMAN & RYCKMAN 

Attorneys at Law 

921 Higgins Building 

Los Angeles, Cal. 



Home A-2003 Main 619 

A. J. STEVENS 

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28 



THE WESTERN COMRADE 



Entered as second-class matter at the 
post office at Los Angeles, Cal. 

924 Higgins Building, Los Angeles, Cal. 

Subscription Price One Dollar a Year 
In Clubs of Four Fifty Cents 

Job Harriman, Managing Editor 
Frank E. Wolfe. Editor 

Vol. m August 1915 No. 4 

Rambling Thoughts 

The editor of a Los Angeles news- 
paper declares the war in Europe 
mnst stop because the world is going 
bankrupt, not because the blood, 
bones and flesh of millions of men 
are being used to fertilize the soil 
of the nations. The same editor sees 
trouble ahead because of the destruc- 
tion of property and the piling up 
of a war debt that will require 500 
years to erase, but fails to see any- 
thing to get excited about in the de- 
struction of ten million laborers and 
the sorrow which fills the homes of 
the dead soldiers. Real property, 
owned by the rich, is one thing, and 
a few million lives is another, and 
of considerably less importance, ac- 
cording to this editor's line of rea- 
soning. 

rK «t H^ 

The whole world is stark mad, 
and of course tliis includes the United 
States. The church people are pray- 
ing for peace, and the ammunition 
manufacturers are working nights, 
days and Sundays to turn out more 
material, to take more lives. The 
United States is neutral, bhit the 
prosperity columns of its newspapers 
gloat over the big orders from Eu- 
rope. Everybody wants peace, but 
most of them grab all the money they 
can get hold of, whether it repre- 
sents an order for beans or bullets. 
^ ^ ^i 

Catholics are killing Catholics, 
Protestants are killing Protestants, 
Mfisons are killing Masons, Social- 
ists are killing Socialists, and hus- 
bands are killing their wives' fami- 
lies when they fire on homes in 
neighboring countries. Sure! Why 
not! It's a great little war, over 
in Europe. Surely its great to be 
crazy ! 

.^ m ^i 

The Pontiff, posing as the one and 
only true representative of God, and 
supposed (by millions and millions), 
to have the power of bringing nations 
to their knees, has tried several times 



The Western C omrade 

to tell Kaiser Bill where his ter- 
minus is located. In fact. Bill told 
the Pope to go to and attend 
strictly to his own business, which 
everyone will admit is no nice way 
to talk to the vicar of Christ. 
'^ ^ ^ 

As further proof that everyone 
has gone crazy, it might be said 
that newspapers in the United 
States this winter will be gloating 
over the big European orders for 
food produced in the United States, 
while millions are going hungry in 
the country where the food was 
produced. Sure! Let's all go 
crazy I Ship the food to Europe to 
feed the soldiers, so they can kill a 
few more million innocent people, 
and at the same time allow other 
millions to starve to death here at 
home. That's a great little idea. 
In fact it would be considered a 
ten strike in any squirrel house in 
the world, if thought out in detail 
by one of the inmates. 
rK ?K t!^ 

Two foolhardy Americans lost 
their lives when they persisted in 
taking hazards of war and sailed 
from England on the Arabic. They 



knew the ship was a floating am- 
munition magazine engaged in the 
most dangerous occupation of run- 
ning guns through a submersible 
blockade. They gambled and lost 
and now their kind want you, 
Henry, to go to war and get killed. 
The world is mad, but there are a 
few million workers who still have 
possession of their senses and 
through this is the hope of the sur- 
vival of the race. 

* « ?i^ 

A prize-fighter goes into training 
several weeks before the hour set 
for him to go into the ring. If he 
didn't intend to fight he wouldn't 
train. A girl learns dancing so she 
can show others just how they do 
the Los Angeles wiggle. If she 
didn't intend to dance she wouldn't 
take lessons. A printer learns to 
set type because he intends to set 
type for a living. A baker learns 
the baker's trade because he in- 
ti-nds to bake bread for a living. 
But of course a nation doesn't buy 
battleships and rifles, and ammuni- 
tion, with the expectation of en- 
aaging in war. Oh no! Also, oh 
slush !— H. W. 




m 



id 



FERTILIZING THE AMERICAN BEAUTY ROSE 



Drawing by M. A. Kempf 



The Western Comrade 



29 



Retort Cautious 

A FRENCHMAN and a German 
lived in the same apartment 
house just across the court from each 
other, and evenings after reading 
their papers they would sit in their 
Avindows and banter each other over 
the victories and defeats of their 
j-espective countries. 

One night after nearly a week of 
French reverses, the German's gibes 
aTid quips seemed to cut very se- 
verely. One word led to another un- 
til the Frenchman could stand it no 
longer. Leaving his window in hot 
liaste he returned a few moments 
later playing the "Marsellaise" on 
a violin. The German grunted his 
disgust and picked up his paper to 
read, but the soul-stirring music was 
too much. Throwing down his paper 
he disappeared into his darkened 
room and soon hoarse, throbbing 
tones of a loud trombone were blar- 
ing away at "Der "Waclit am 
Rhine." 

Other windows of the court began 
to fill ^vith heads and shouts and 
pleadings for the entertainers to 
cease proved in vain. A hurry call 
||for the police by the quaking land- 
"lord. aided by several protesting ten- 
ants, brought in the police reserve 
squad. It did not take long to place 
tlie musicians under arrest and they 
were taken to a nearby station house 
and locked up for the night in widely 
divided cells. 

The next morning they were haled 
before a very sober and severe justice 
of the peace who meted out to them 
an e-Kceedingly warm lecture on 
"Neiitrality in America" with a fine 
of $2-5 for disturbing the peace as a 
httle side dish. Then they were 
made to shake hands as if they were 
.forming a bond of everlasting 
ifriendship, and told to go home to- 
gether. 

Passing down the street they 
talked to each other in guarded 
'language, both fighting shy of the 
Svar. Wlien they reached their apart- 
.ments a j'oung newsboy was heard 
jto cry out a great Russian victory 
lover the Germans. The Frenchman's 
jheart leaped for joy and on reaching 
that part of the hall where they 
parted he could hold himself no 
longer. 

"I see," he said with a broad 
imile, "zat ze Russians have been 
imusing zemselves again." 

Although hot under the collar from 



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923 Higgins Bldg. 
Los Angeles 



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Official Organ of the 

Socialist Party of America. 

The American Socialist speaks 
with authority. It is a powerful 
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and is the only paper in the 
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Every Socialist. Every Student of Socia- 
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Socialists Attention! 




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of union-made goods In the hands of 
every reader of The Western Comrade, 
we will send postage prepaid, on receipt 
of FIFTY CENTS, one of our genuine 
sheepskin-leather card cases BEARING 
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80 



The Western Comrade 



this remark, the German tried his 
best to control himself. 
." ,"Yell," he said, with a faint smile, 
"dot vos noddings. In der summer 
most of us Chermans take der vaca- 
tions an enchoy demselves by der 
mountains, or by der seashore, or — " 
hesitating before slamming shut the 
door of his room, "or capturing der 
French!" Slam! 



Aid to Our Kings 

(Continued from Page 15) 

"Famine, Pestilence," he mut- 
tered again, this time almost ten- 
derly; his eyes gleaming wistfully 
like a lover's. "A pretty pair," he 
murmured softly, "and faithful.". 

On Earth the two dread sisters al- 
ready had begun their deadly work. 
Women and babies shriveled like 
thirsting flowers as Famine clutched 
them in her bony fingers. In the 
trenches and field hospitals the 
shadow of Pestilence crept. 

Awakening from his reverie the 
war god called to his tollkeeper: 

"Tell me," he gruffly ordered, 
"when there are thirty million." 



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MAGAZINE 

at all, you will 

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Gen. Otis says editorially in The Times, of 

EVERYMAN 

(By Luke North) 

"If law and order, respect for conventions and property rights 
are to be maintained in this land and its civilization continued, 
publications like Everyman must be suppressed . . ." 

And again Gen. Otis says: 

"Its lamentably brilliant pages pervert art to the cunning 
uses of social disturbers . . ." — and also, says the General, still 
speaking of Everyman : 

"It is disturbing to mental stability." 



Thank you kindly. General. I could ask no greater boon 
from the Los Angeles Times. — Luke. 



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The Western Comrade 



31 



Llano del Rio Co-operative Colony 



Llano, California 



THIS is the greatest Community Enterprise ever launched 
in America. 

The colony was founded by Job Harriman and is situated 
in the beautiful Antelope Valley, Los Angeles County, Cali- 
fornia, a few heurs' ride from Los Angeles. The community 
is solving the problem of disemployment and business failure, 
and offers a way to provide for the future welfare of the 
workers and their families. 

Here is an example of co-operation in action. Llano del 
Rio Colony is an enterprise unique in the history of com- 
munity groups. 

Some of the aims of the colony are: To solve the problem 
of unemploynaent by providing steady employment for the 
workers; to assure safety and comfort for the future and for 
old age; to guarantee education for the children in the best 
school under personal supervision, and to provide a social 
life amid surroundings better than can be found in the com- 
petitive world. 

Some of these aims have been carried out during the 
year since the colony began to work out the problems that 
confront pioneers. There are about 475 persons living at 
the new town of Llano. There are now more than seventy 
pupils in the schools, and several hundreds are expected to be 
enrolled before a year shall have passed. Plans are under 
way for a school building, which will cost several thousand 
dollars. The bonds have been voted and sold and there is 
nothing to delay the building. 

Schools will open at the fall term with classes ranging 
from the Montessori and kindergarten grades through the 
intermediate which includes the first year in high school. 
This gives the pupils an opportunity to take advanced sub- 
jects, including languages in the colony schools. 

The colony owns a fine herd of about 100 head of Jersey 
md Holstein dairy cattle and Is turning out a large amount 
3f dairy products. 

There are about 175 hogs in the pens, and among them a 
arge number of good brood sows. This department will be 
;iven special attention and ranks high in importance. 

The colony has about forty work horses, a large tractor, 
wo trucks and a number of automobiles. The poultry de- 
'artment has 1000 egg-making birds, some of them blue- 
ibbon prize winners. About 2000 additional chicks were 
idded recently. This department, as all others, Is in the 
;harge of an expert and it will expand rapidly. 

There are several hundred hares in the rabbitry and the 
aanager of the department says the arrivals are in startling 
lumbers. 

There are about 11,000 grape cuttings in the ground and 
liousands of deciduous fruit and shade trees in the colony 
lursery. This department is being steadily extended. 

The community owns several hundred colonies of bees 
■vhich are producing honey. This department will be in- 
reased to several thousands. 

Among other industries the colony owns a steam laundry, 
I planing mill, a printing plant, a machine shop, a soil an- 
ilysis laboratory, and a number of other productive plants 
ire contemplated, among them a cannery, a tannery, an ice 
ijant, a shoe factory, knitting and weaving plant, a motion 
licture company and factory. 

The colonists are farming on a large scale with the use 
t modern machinery, using scientific system and tried 
lethods. 



No more commissions will be paid for the sale of mem- 
berships or stock in the Llano del Rio Community. Every 
installment member should be a worker to secure new 
members. 

About 120 acres of garden has been planted this year. 

Social life in the colony is most delightful. Entertain- 
ments and dances are regularly established functions. Base- 
ball, basket-ball, tennis, swimming, fishing, hunting and all 
other sports and pastimes are popular with all ages. 

Several hundred acres are now in alfalfa, which is ex- 
pected to run six cuttings of heavy hay this season. There 
are two producing orchards and about fifty-five acres of 
young pear trees. Several hundred acres will be planted In 
pears and apples next year. 

Six hundred and forty acres have been set aside for a 
site for a city. The building department Is making bricks 
for the construction of hundreds of homes. The city will 
be the only one of its kind in the world. It will be built 
with the end of being beautiful and utilitarian. 

There are 1000 memberships in the colony and nearly 700 
of them are subscribed for. It is believed that the remainder 
will be taken within the next few months. 

The broadest democracy prevails in the management of 
the colony. There is a directorate of nine, elected by the 
stockholders, and a community commission of nine, elected 
by the General Assembly — all persons over IS voting. Abso- 
lute equality prevails in every respect. The ultimate popu- 
lation of this colony will be between 5000 and 6000 persons. 

The colony is organized as a corporation under the laws 
of California. The capitalization is $2,000,000. One thousand 
members are provided for. Each shareholder agrees to sub- 
scribe for 2000 shares of stock. 

Each pays cash ($750) for 750 shares. 

Deferred payments on the remaining 1250 shares are made 
by deducting one dollar per day (or more, if the member 
wishes to pay more rapidly) from the $4 wage of the colonist. 

Out of the remaining $3 a day, the colonist gets the neces- 
sities and comforts of life. 

The balance remaining to the individual credit of the 
colonist may be drawn in cash out of the net proceeds of 
the enterprise. 

A per cent of the wages may be drawn in cash. 

Continuous employment is provided, and vacations ar- 
ranged as may be desired by the colonist. 

Each member holds an equal number of shares of stock 
as every other shareholder. 

Each member receives the same wage as every other 
member. 

In case anyone desires to leave the colony his shares 
and accumulated fund may be sold at any time. 

Are you tired of the competitive world? 

Do you want to get into a position where every hour's 
work will be for yourself and your family? Do you want 
assurance of employment and provisions for the future? Ask 
for the booklet entitled: "The Gateway to Freedom." Sub- 
scribe for The Western Comrade ($1.00 per year), and keep 
posted on the progress of the colony. 

Address LLANO DEL RIO COMPANY, 924 Higgins build- 
ing, Los Angeles, California. 



"That which is not for the interest of the 
whole swarm is not for the interest of a singie 
bee." — IVlarcus Aurelius. 



Tired of the Struggle? 



ARE you a victim of the "back to the 
land movement"? If so, on your ar- 
rival, didn't you find that you must 
sell at wholesale and buy at retail? Com- 
pelled to submit to the 
other fellow 's prices 
in both cases? Join 
the Llano Del Rio Co- 
operative Colony, where 
we buy at wholesale 
and wUl sell our surplus 
to the outside world at 
retail, through our own 
store. 

Do you see your life sav- 
ings being wiped out in 
the purchase of necessities 
because you can not use 
your time productively? 
Join our community where 
your job is your own and 
where you take your or- 
ders from a boss you and 
your comrades have se- 
lected. 

Are you tired of creat- 
ing by your labor or- 
chards, houses, factories 
and machinery, only to see them owned and 
used by others to enslave those who do 




ALBERT 
iVIanager iVIembe 



create these things under collective own- 
ership and democratic control. 

Are you tired of a sixteen-hour day and 
isolation for yourself and family? Join our 
Colony and get an eight- 
hour day, and in our 
social life you will find 
congenial friends whose 
every desire is for your 
success. 

Are you tired for the 
heartbreaking struggle to 
keep your children clothed 
and in school. Come to 
Llano where we consider 
our children our greatest 
asset and where our edu- 
cators take the children 
at two years and carry 
them through from the 
Montessori (kindergarten) 
to the high school. 

Are you tired of specu- 
lation, wherein the wealth 
of the workers passes as 
unearned increment into 
the coffers of those who 
speculate in land and 
tools of production? Join our Colony where 
no real estate is for sale and no "business 



A. JAIVIES 

rship Department 



useful work? Join our Colony and help opportunities" are available. 

"Talent and intelligence are gifts which should rightly be used in 
the servic* of others. The development of these by education is the 
gift of the community to the individual, and the exercise of greater 
ability entitles none to the false rew/ards of greater possessions, but 
only to the joy ®f greater service to others." — From the Community 
Constitution. 

Llano del Rio Company 

Membership Department 

924 Higgins Building Los Angeles, California 



September 

Nineteen fifteen 
Ten Cents 



!omrad^ 




Third 
Circle 

of Might 
By 

Morgan 
Smith 




Men's 


10-inch boots. $6.00 


Men's 


12-inch boots. 


7.00 


Men's 


15-inch boots. 


8.00 


Ladies 


10-inch boots 5.00 


Ladies 


14-inch boots 5.50 


Men's 


Elk shoes 


4.00 


Ladies 


Elk shoes. . . 


3.50 


Infants 


' Elk shoes, 




1 to 
Child's 


5 


1.50 


Elk shoes, 5 


to 8 
Child's 




1.75 


Elk shoes. 


81/2 to 11 


2.25 


Misses 


and Youths, 




iiy2 


to 2 


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Place stocking foot on 
paper, drawing pencil 
around as per above Il- 
lustration. Pass tape 
around at lines with- 
out drawing tight. Give 
size usually worn. 



ELKSKIN 

BOOTS and SHOES 



Factory operated in connection 
with Llano Del Rio Colony 

IDEAL FOOTWEAR 

For Ranchers and Outdoor Men 



The famous Clifford Elkskin Snoes are lightest and 
easiest for solid comfort and will out"wear tnree pairs 
of ordinary snoes. 

We cover all lines from ladies,' men's 
and children's button or lace in light 
handsome patterns to the high boots for 
moimtain, hunting, ranching or desert wear. 
Almost indestructible. 

Send in your orders by mail. Take 
measurement according to instructions. 
Out of towTi shoes made immediately on 
receipt of order. Send P. 0. order and state 
whether we shall forward by mail or express. 



SALES DEPARTMENT 



Llano del Rio Company 

922 Higgins Building, Los Angeles, Cal. 



CONTENTS 



Leo Tolstoy. Drawn by Wm. R. Walker Cover 

Facts and Comment. By Frank E. Wolfe Page 5 

Third Circle of IVIight By Morgan Smith Page 9 

Hell For Its Makers. By Frank H. Ware Page 11 

Busting the Iron Law. By George Cantrell Page 13 

Where Is the Home? By Irwin Tucker Page 14 

Mary Phagan Passes Judgment. By Mary White 

Ovington Page 14 

Community Grows in Power. By R. K. Williams. .Page 15 

Industrial Activity at Llano del Rio Community .. .Page 16 

Earth Is Enough (Poem). By Edwin Markham. . .Page 20 

Our Wonderful School Page 21 

A Remarkable Prediction. By Count Leo Tolstoy. .Page 22 

Peace or War? By A. E. Briggs Page 22 

Speak, What Think Ye of the War? (Poem).. By 

Ernest Desland Page 23 

Picturing Our Hero. Page 23 

Rights vs. Power Page 26 

Should Sanity Strike? By Albert A. James Page 29 

CARTOONS 

War's Stupendous Cost Frontispiece 

Jum-Jum, the Wild Man Page 6 

A Year of War Page 7 

"Blood! Blood! Gimme Blood!" Page 9 

Kreuzland, Kreuzland Ueber Alles! Page 11 

At One Gulp Page 13 

When the Welsh Miners Came Up Out of the 

Ground Page 28 



War's Stupendous Cost 




To the Last Farthing 



<##^ , 



—Cleveland Plain Dealer 



The Western Comrade 



Political Action 



VOL. Ill 



Devoted to the Cause of the Workers 



Co-operation 



Direct Action 



LOS ANGELES, CAL., SEPTEMBER, 1915 



NUMBER 5 




FACTS AND COMMENT 

By Frank E. Wolfe 



A YEAR and a half ago a woman, who had at- 
tended some of the first sessions of the In- 
dustrial Relations Commission, made a prediction 
that has heen most wonderfully fulfilled: 

"Out of this inveistigation will come some far- 
reaehing results. The personnel of the commission 
is poor. From Jim Connell to Harris Weinstock, 
labor may view the makeup with suspicion. But 
there is Frank P. Walsh and Basil Manley, and these 
men will prevent the commission from proving a 
farce. 

"Walsh has the potentiality and fearlessness; he 
will learn much, and will broaden as he learns and 
in the final he will emerge as a champion of the 
workers." 



Walsh has made good and Manley has made good. 
As for Connell — well, he is "Buttonhole Jim," sec- 
ond vice-president of the A. F. of L. Bored to 
distraction, interested in only a few things — the 
militia of Christ and the welfare of the pantiff. 

AYeinstock, (Mrs.) Harriman and Commons may 
make all the side reports they can write, but the 
real report of Walsh and Manley must be printed 
and given the widest circulation. 

Walsh has done a great work in bringing out with 
vivid clearness the class war in America. With the 
workers now lies the responsibility of seeing that 
the report is made a strong weapon for the revo- 
lution. 

Now write to vour Congressman and urge him 



T h e Western Comrade 




^1~ 




to use his efforts to get the Walsh report printed 
and distributed. 

i!i y^ iK 

TEXAS citizens recently burned a negro alive in & 
public sqiiare and on the same day an Illinois 
sheriff succeeded, only after great difficulty, in sav- 
ing a prisoner from lynching. The spirit of mob 
murder is not confined to the Southern States. On 
the contrary, there are many instances to show that 
this disease is not localized or geographical. 

Lynchings in the United States are decreasing 
and the more atrocious tortures are fewer than in 
former years. There are evidences that we are let- 
ting the ape and the tiger die and that there are 
more humane instincts than of yore. In comment- 
ing on this, our moralists are always sure to bring 
in the horrors of complacent disregard for the laAV. 
To them murder under the law is at worst a "de- 
plorable necessity." They do not see that cold blood 
legalized strangling is more reprehensible than the 
mob murders committed in sudden heat following 
some maddening crime against a woman. 

At this hour, when thousands of men and women 
are exerting every effort to bring, through the in- 
itiative, the abolition of legal killings, our cold 
blooded vicarious prison lynchings are wholly un- 
pardonable. 

•« ^ m 

WE have been called to account by a gentleman 
from Georgia who resented the statement 
printed in this column that "as to the blood guilt 
of the people of that state there is no shadow of 
doubt." He pleaded extenuating circumstances. In 
a voice so rich and mellifluous that one sensed in 
back of it the Aoap of a black mammy's milk, the 
young man said : 

"We are much misjudged. In Georgia our 
women have, I reckon, less political rights than in 
any other state. She can't (kaint) vote; she has no 
legal right to make a will ; she may not dispose of 
property; she has no control over her children — in 
fact no legal standing at all. 1 think that's why we 
believe in gi-^dng them a square deal." 

The square deal is, apparently, given to some 



after death by deliberately planning a cold-blooded 
murder. Could there be a more absurd anachronism? 
Deprived of every right Georgia women are brutally 
exploited, but are given- a ' ' square deal ' ' — if they 
happen to be white women — after they have been 
assaulted by their exploiter. 

Are the Georgia women who work in the fac- 
tories and fields given a square deal? AVas there 
ever a protest from our ehivalric friends when the 
girls in the pencil factory where Mary Phagan 
worked were forced to toil bodyracking hours on 
miserable pay ? Was there any talk of fair play for 
]\Iary Phagan, alive, underpaid and overworked? Is 
there any "square deal" for the young girls whose 
lives are ground out in the cotton mills of Georgia? 
Is there a square deal for the black women of 







JUjM-JUM, the wild MAN 

— New York Call 



The Western Comrade 




Georgia ? Do the tens of thousands of mulatto chil- 
dren of that and other southern states bespeak a 
square deal for the white wives and sweethearts of 
the eliivalric gentlemen of Ja.wjy? 

AYe do not mean to be harsli and unjust. Neither 
have we any grudge against Georgia. We plainly 
and frankly plead guilty to equally eold-blooded 
lynehings in California as those of Georgia and Mis- 
sissippi. Since we printed the former article on this 
subject we strangled a man at Folsom penitentiary. 
Our murder was as studied and cold as that of the 
other mob that strung up a weak, wounded and 
shackled man near Atlanta. The difference is in 
the degree of our hypocrisy. 

In California we try, at least, to give women 
political and legal equality. In her proud possession 
of her vote the California woman follows her Chris- 
tian pastor to the polls and votes to continue legal 
lynching in California. 

AVe are, however, in a measure, getting away 
from the cobwebby maze of sophistries of our Georgia 
brothers who prate about chivalry and a square deal. 

. t\ . ». .!•. 

44/^~^ ARDS are out " nice, smug, society talk. 

V^ Cards are out for a function at the Folsom 
penitentiary. California is about to perform an- 
other murder and this time we shall try to break 
into ^Mississippi's class by making an "occasion." 
Newspapers describe the official invitatons for the 
execution of the court's sentence on the person of 
David Fountain as "neatly engraved cards with 
black borders." We are not told whether there will 
be any fried chicken, watermelon or any of the frilly 
things that made the Starkville function such a pro- 
nounced success. 

^K 5K $M 

SOCIALISTS who are given to debating ques- 
tions of the day have been seeking a foil for the 
subject, "Does Labor want an eight-hoiir day?" 

We would like the negative side if we could 
get an intellectual Henry of the craft union type to 
act as a foil. 

Not yet ! If labor wants an eight-hour day or 
anything else in the way of shorter hours, or better 



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A YEAR OF WAR 


Uncle Sam; "HuUy gee! I could make swell 


canned meat out of that!" 


— L'l'^snuella de la Torratxa, Barcelona 



conditions it would get it without hesitation or 
delay. 

Labor in California did not want an eight-hour 
day when it voted against — or failed to vote for the 
initiative measure at the last state election. The 
act was initiated by the Socialists of the state. 
Shamed into action and goaded on by the activity 
of Socialists who are also trade unionists, organized 
labor passed resolutions and gave half-hearted 
"moral" support. The brunt of the fight was car- 
ried by Thomas W. Williams, state secretary of the 
Socialist Party, and he made every dime that came 
in look like a double eagle to the plutocratic power 
that fought liim. It was an opportunity of a gen- 



The Western Comrade 







eration. The measure was called revolutionary. It 
was not, but it was a tremendous step ahead. Noth- 
ing could have clearer demonstrated the muddy 
brain of the toiler than the result of that election. 
The more barefaced the lies of the press agents of 
the labor-hating organization the greater the eager- 
ness of the small farmer and the farm hand and the 
stupid city mechanics to defeat the eight-hour 
initiative. ■' ■ 

AN enterprising imbecile of "Watts, California — 
a suburb of Los Angeles that is made the butt 
of many coarse jokes — created a tremendous sensa- 
tion in daily newspaper circles by springing an "edi- 
tion" of 2000 war extras one bright Sunday morn- 
ing. The scarehead in high black wood type an- 
nounced the "English Navy Sunk!" The fake was 
cheap, silly and obvious, but the public has been 
educated to high blackface type and shrieking an- 
nouncements so it bought and read and believed a 
.story so fearfully and wonderfully wrought that it 
plainly was of squirrel-house production. The 
funny feature was the squawk of indignation from 
the regular daily press. It demanded arrest and im- 
prisonment of the faker. The Watts genius had only 
overplayed their game. They have been faking in 
every edition but their frauds are neatly covered 
with credit lines of news agencies. It is the same old 
story of the legality and morality of organized 
cheating and the utter outlawry of the individual 
who takes a plunge into the nasty game. 

^. m m 

THE State Railway Commission has issued an 
order suspending the new law prohibiting 
others than regularly authorized telegraphers and 
station agents from receiving and delivering train 
orders. The measure was calculated to safeguard 
the lives of passengers and trainmen. As a "Labor 
measure" it was valuable in that it prevented the 
possibility of trainmen with a smattering of knowl- 
edge of the telegraph code and a craft union idea 
from handling orders and scabbing on the operators 
in case of strikes. The railroad magnates found a 
direct route to nullify an obnoxious law. Again for 



l^stf^mp 



the thousandth time are achievements by political 
action snatched from the workers before any benefit 
is derived. Are our masters mad, that they take 
those long chances of destroying our hope of libera- 
tion by peaceful means? 

7\i 7K ?K 

EVEN as the Italian Socialists held down the lid 
for a year, so are our comrades in Sweden 
struggling with that part of capitalism that profits 
most by war. Every effort is being exerted by Ger- 
many to get the northern country involved. 

The military part in Sweden is composed of ambi- 
tious officers and representatives of the big finan- 
cial interests. All the militarists of Sweden are 
of the German school; they are trained along Ger- 
man lines and they are in full sympathy with the 
Kaiser in the struggle. 

If the Socialists of Sweden can prevent war it 
will be a big victory for democracy and a long step 
toward Socialist success. 

WHAT are you reading? Are you getting mis- 
information from the daily organs of plutoc- 
racy and trying vainly to discount the editorial lies 
and distorted "news" items? You can't do it. It 
takes years of training to enable one to pick oi;t the 
thin thread of truth that is interwoven in the fabric 
made of the warp of stock sophistries and woof of 
barefaced falsehoods wherever the interests of the 
ruling class are at stake. Do you read the American 
Socialist? If j^ou do not you are losing much. If 
you miss a copy of Pearson's Magazine you cannot 
keep abreast of the national news from the stand- 
point of rebels who are unafraid. There are scores 
of live Socialist weeklies that are devoted to con- 
structive propaganda. They carry news of the day 
in such form that the workers may read and not be 
deceived. Do you read the New York Daily Call? 
One Sunday edition is worth a year's subscription. 
The Milwaukee Daily Leader is keen and snappy and 
carries a splendid editorial page. In order that the 
readers of the Western Comrade may have at least 
two of the best publications in America we have 
made most advantageous combination offers. 










The Western Comrade 

Third Circle of Might 



By MORGAN SMITH 





M 



IGHT is a railroad train — with so many 
stops and such and such turn-outs and 
a certain course to be run in a certain 
time. "We must not be playing blocks 
with Might, and Might must not be pliiy- 
ing dolls with us. This is no playing 
matter. Science has fixed a day when 
we are going to be waiting for Might 
at the last station on the line; Might must be on 
time or humanity will suffer the fate of the mastodons. 
That Might is capable of being entrusted with any 
such jobs as saving the Human Race without the as- 
sistance of its old side-partner, Right, has occurred 
only to a few, and these few kept it and their standing 
in the community to themselves. When it comes to 
saving things the popular conception of the savers 
has been a team of two descendants of Pegasus scam- 
pering along the obstacle race of life — Might on one 
side and Right on the other. They have been made 
yoke-mates in every important undertaking. 

And when Might and Right got started anywhere 
one- would perpetually be just out of sight around the 
corner ahead and the other jogging back along the 
road to find him. Yet the people kept patiently on 
repairing breaks in the impossible harness and hunt- 
ing up Right so that he and Might would be sure to 
stick in the same road. "Leave 'em alone," they said, 
"and they'll get somewhere or other, raising a cloud 
of dust behind them." But they didn't. 

That there is such a thing somewhere as positive 
and unvarying Right, nobody doubts. But when we 
seize it and hold it down and sit on it long enough 
to make drawings of it, we will find that it, above all 
others things, is a thing that will work. It will be 
efficient. It will be Mighty, and, between you and 
me, we will recognize in it a strange resemblance to our 
old friend ]\Iight. 

The long dynasty of Right, though possessing al- 
ways marked family resemblances, has had multifari- 
ous dignified vagaries. It could appear to be almost 
anything at all, according to the light it stood in. It 
has never been close enough to permit a real good look. 
Now, Might, whatever else its shortcomings might 
be, has at least always been of tangible stuff. Might 
is not always just out of sight around the corner. It 
is there all the time, and may be measured, photo- 
graphed, consulted or spat upon. 

So they have scampered — Right and Might; one 
just around the corner and the other hunting back 



along the way. Obviously one should, long ago, have 
been rid of the other. Present signs indicate that one 
of them has actually dropped out. One of them has 
been stink-potted. 

If the futility of accomplishing purposes through 
the agency of the chimera. Right is established, we 
must divest. the other. Might, of all the age-long har- 
ness of its whilom running mate. Might has always 
been countenanced only so far as it was warranted 




'BLOOD! BLOOD! GIMME BLOOD!" 

— New York Call 



by the prevailing conception of Right. Let us, now, 
in our intelligent development of Slight, retain only 
at all times that part that works and let us throw the 
other parts away some place. Since science has fur- 
nished us A^ith an objective, let i;s set ourselves to 
discover what parts of Might are calculated to arrive 
on time at that last station on the line. 

The first thing must be a treaty of some sort with 
Might. Might has had its shortcomings, surely, but 
humanity has never been really on the exact level 
either. Just because it was a tangible thing and under 
our control, we have bandied poor Might around from 
pillar to post everlastingly since the days when Might 
used to dictate the position of our thumbs. Might is 
just now having the one hearty laugh of its career 
and seems thoroughly imbued with our idea of true 
sport. We may have stuffed Might into crowded quar- 
ters in a bottle ; we may have torn it limb from limb 
and put it together so oddly that it couldn't recognize 
itself: we may have set two forces of Might to fight- 



10 



The Western Comrade 



ing each other while we went behind something and 
snickered; but, just now, the laugh is on us, 'tis true. 

Through the first two stages of the evolution of 
Might we have turned that original dictator of thumbs 
from our enemy to our friend and then into our plaj'- 
mate. It cannot be our enemy during the next stage, 
even if it would. It must not be our playmate, be- 
cause the third circle of Might is no playing matter. 

Eailroads have divisional points where a train may 
pause, hook up to a different engine, take on a different 
kind of fuel, perhaps, and generally hitch up its trous- 
ers and take a look around. These divisional points 
are located where conditions of travel change. 

As I say. Might is a railroad train. Along the 
course we humans have run there have been changes 
in conditions of travel. Just because one kind of 
might could be relied on to get us to one place we 
did not rely on it to get us to another. 

The physical engine was for Existence. 

Once gained, we changed engines. 

The mental engine was for Supremacy. 

Having attained which we must have another en- 

The other engine will get us to that last station. 
It will not have done it independently of the other en- 
gine, but through their efficiency. Could the Mental 
engine have been relied upon to get us all the way 
to the place called Security? Let us hitch up our 
trousers and take a look around. Did we rely on the 
Physical engine to get us all the way to Supremacy? 

Eeally, now, are Ave on the last lap to Security with 
that good old mental engine ? Why, no ! That old men- 
tal engine is running up all the side streets of the Su- 
premacy stop, and down by the old apple tree and back 
to the brook. It is shooting sparks and fire just as. if 
it were really a choo-train, but it is really nothing but 
the little tooting stationary to a merry-go- 'round. The 
grade to Security is a little too level and smooth for 
the snorting old hog-back. 

We are like the mastadon. We are big enoiigh, 
goodness knows, and when the fallacy of social suicide 
has disappeared we will be bigger. When it gets down 
to a plain matter of comparing "what's on your plate" 
with ' ' what 's your need, ' ' we will realize that our size 
is no great strength. The mastadon, according to re- 
ports, did not dismiss the matter lightly by saying 
that just whichever part of him survived would be all 
right with him. The mastadon, light brained though 
he is reported to have been, said that he would get 
enough for the whole twentj'- tons of him or bust. He 
busted, 'tis true, hut we are not going to. We're go- 
ing to get our bulky frame down to the point where 
every muscle that we feed must be just so much power 
to combat the thing ahead. Science has given us a 
big advantage by telling us what's ahead. 



So just here is where the first new, faint images of • 
Right begin to strangely resemble our old friend Might. : J 
Bight is a thing that works ; Right is efficiency. If we 
are going to be here when the world grows cold it 
must be through the co-ordination of all our forces. If 
we are going to get away from the Supremacy stop on 
time it must be with a new type of engine. Efficiency 
is Right and Efficiency is Might. Algebraically that 
makes Right, Might. 

Physically, Might and Mental Might have come 
plunk up against nice new conditions and they may as 
well sit down and talk about old times to an appreci- 
ative new form of povs^er. Physical Might worked un- 
der conditions of blind, ceaseless action. Every form 
of life foiight and struggled because it seemed to be 
proper to fight rather than die. We all struggled our 
best because there was usually a struggling elbow in 
our rib. When we discovered that there was better 
scenery and less striiggle on top of the seething mass 
of heads, we began to make diagrams and surveys of 
the most effective means of placing the toe on the eye- 
ball. That was the "What-a-man-wants" stage of the 
journey. Now we have come to the "What-a-man- 
needs" division. It is a new kind of country. Let us 
look over that mysterious little engine, the Soul, and 
see what it is good for. 

On the planet Mars they are neariug the last sta- 
tion in the third division of i\Iight. The survival of 
the conscious beings depends upon bringing, all the 
way to the equatorial regions, the snows that accumu- 
late at the poles. Through the telescope we see irrigat- 
ing ditches that niake that monster globe appear like 
baby's ball. What force has put those ditches there 
and, more important, bj^ what force is the immense con- 
scious population living in amity and happiness. Do 
you think the laws of society on Mars are based on 
the "What-a-man-wants" idea? Why, no. They need 
more than they want. To desire and to require are 
synonymous there, now, as are Might and Right. 

But it takes time to get to a certain place. If, 
when ]\Iars had its last ruinous war, the people had not 
substituted Social Force for Material Force, they would 
not now be supph-ing their dry land with moisture 
and living in amity and happiness. They would be a 
frozen offering to the fool God of Desire. 

Many have been the intellectual seers who have 
attempted to proA'ide a uniform conscious purpose in 
life. We have had as many aims of existence as we 
have had seers. Why not give the telescope a chance 
along with the others! Suppose we live with the 
prosaic sole purpose of defeating that cooling of the 
earth's crust, and see what, along the way, we will 
attain of Right .Security and Unity ! 

Might is a railroad train. ^ 

f 



T h e W e s t er7i Comrade 



11 



Hell For Its Makers 



By FRANK H. WARE 




CENE : The receiving parlor of Hades 
Red velvet curtains hang about room, 
in one corner are piles of coffins, empty, 
yet faded flowers and wreathes show evi- 
dence of recent occupancy. There is a 
never ending clank of chains and dis- 
cordant sounds and groans, faint but yet 
perceptible. In center, down stage, is 
a iiedestal AA'ith a huge book en top. Many devils are 
working clearing away coffins. Merl, chief of receiv- 
ing devils, is sitting on a small tlirone beside the 
pedestal. Large gong rings s.rd curtain parts in back. 
Six devils enter carrying coffin, and place it before 
^lerl. One of them snatches a tag fastened to the coffin 
and presents it to !Merl. Six 
devils then exit. 

MERL (reading tag^ — 
Capt. George Perkins, Fifth 
Battalion King's Own Rifle- 
men; shot leading charge of 
land forces, Dardenelles. 

(Three devils with ham- 
mers and chisels enter.) 

MERL — Let's see him. 

(Devils burst open coffin 
and Captain Perkins sits up, 
pallid from his wounds and 
death sickness. 'i 

CAPT. PERKINS (look- 
ing about amazed and awed. 
a bit perplexed) — "Where 
am I? 

MERI^In hell. Arise and 
register (indicating book on 
pedestaD . 

CAPT. PERKINS (aris- 
ing) — I beg pardon, but 
jaren't you a trifle mistaken? 

:\]ERL— We don't make 
mistakes here. We punish 
them. 

CAPT. PERKINS (re- 
monstrating"! — But I have 

been a good man 1 I am still a good man — and a 
Christian ! 

:\rERL— H'm— lefs see. (Turns tag over.) It 

I says here that you ordered your men to slaughter 3000 

Turks and Gei-maus who were out of ammunition and 

beggiiig for food. You — yes, you. Captain Perkins, 

were responsible for this massacre. 




KREUZLAND,KREUZLAND UEBER ALLES ! 
"Father, where is your grave?" 

— Drawn by Louis Raemakers 



CAPT, PERKINS (hotly)— But they were not 
Christians; they were dogs, i^nbelievers. 

MERL — That gave you the right to massacre them, 
then'? 

CAPT. PERIQNS (a trifle nervous)— But this 
was war! They Avould have done the same to us! 
Don't you understand "war'? 

]MERL (yawning) — ^T-e-s, I think I know a little 
about it, having handled hundreds of thousands of 
officers during the past four thousand years. 

CAPT. PERKINS (stepping back)— Are you Satan? 
MERL — N-o-o-o. I am but the head of the receiv- 
ing department. 

CAPT. PERKINS (looking aroundl— So this is 

Avhere everyone comes when 

they land in hell, eh? 
Pretty nice place to live — 
MERL— No ; this is the en- 
trance for notables only. The 
rest, you will find, are herded 
through a gate without even 
registering, and put to work 
at their everlasting tasks. 

CAPT. PERKINS — Do 
many of them go in that 
way ? 

MERL— Oh, yes. Only 
about one-tenth of one per 
cent ever go to heaven. 

CAPT. PERKINS— Then 
you might say that everyone, 
figuratively speaking, of 
course, finally ends in hell? 
MERL— Practically that. 
CAPT. PERKINS— What 
do you do with us officers 
and notables? We were 
thought to be good people 
on Earth, therefore our pun- 
ishments could not be so very 
severe. 

MERL — That depends 
iipon j^our record as it stands 
here — not what the people of Earth credit you with. 
Now, Captain Perkins, you will step to the book and 
register. 

CAPT. PERKINS (goes to register, picks up 
pen) — I can't see the sense in registering here. When 
yoii once get here, you're here for good. 

IMERL — I'm afraid you won't see the sense in lots 



12 



The Western Comrade 



of things for a while yet — especially when it comes to 
punishment. 

CAPT. PERKINS (laying down pen after sign- 
ing) — But you don't mete out severe punishment to 
good people — er — that is persons who think — or rather 
know — you understand, those who have been good ! 

MERL (laughing) — As the American says, "There 
ain't no such animal." 

CAPT. PERKINS— But— there are the preach- 
ers and priests, undoubtedly they are good ; you must 
admit that. 

MERL — I admit nothing. Come here. (They go 
to side stage and Merl draws back curtain. A flare 
of red light greets them and the howls of hundreds 
of thousands in torture causes Captain Perkins to 
draw back in fear. Merl lowers curtain and laughs.) 
Those are your Hellroaring preachers — your GOOD 
preachers. (Turns fiercely and glares at Captain 
Perkins.) It is you that makes hell possible! 

CAPT. PERKINS (shrinking back)— Me? 

MERL — Yes, you! You and the rest of your ac- 
cursed group of humanity. You officers and notables ! 
(Laughs sarcastically.) Who orders the priests to 
pray for the success of arms? Do the common peo- 
ple? Who orders the making of ammunitions and war 
materials ? Who orders the subscription to a war loan ? 
Who orders the soldiers on the field of battle? Who 
orders the making of war babies? And again, who 
makes the laws of the land and tells the people they 
will be punished if one of them is broken? DO THE 
PEOPLE? (Wipes perspiration from his brow.) 
Well, here is the result : Here is the hell you have 
created. It has been created a long time, but each 
generation sends in its new sets of laws and new 
subdivisions have to be added to handle the 
crowd — for everyone, no matter who he is, 
breaks some law at some time in his life. Why man, 
it keeps us going like hell, making new inventions of 
torture to keep apace of the ones you are making for 
this Earthly cataclysm brought about by you nobles. 

CAPT. PERKINS (quaking)— Then the nobles 
are punished for making the laws? 

MERL — Hell, no ! We punish no one for making 
laws. It's breaking them. 

CAPT. PERKINS— Then I can't see why the 
nobles should be punished — that is most of them — for 
they never break the laws they make. 

MERL — Oh, yes they do, only they do it in what 
they call a "legal" manner. It's all the same to us. 
Because that word "legal" does not mean anything 
here. 

CAPT. PERKINS— But "legal" means within 
the law; therefore why should they be punished for 
something they did not do? 



MERL — Do you think there ever was such a thing 
as justice? Don't you realize that when a law is 
broken by the common people they are punished? 
Don't you understand that when one of the lawmak- 
ers should be forced through necessity for more riches 
to break the same law in exactly the same manner, 
that he is never brought before the courts? 

CAPT. PERKINS- But the people have a right 
to have him brought to the bar of justice, no matter 
who he is. 

MERL — ^Yes, that's what you tell them and they 
are chloroformed by that kind of dope. Then when 
the time comes and they land a lawmaker for law- 
breaking, what happens ? Why, a nice, neat intelligent 
jury is selected — oh, no, not by the people — and 
"justice" is taken for a nice little walk around the 
block while a coat of whitewash is plastered over the 
case. 

CAPT. PERKINS— But I never made any laws. 
I have done nothing but obey laws ever since I can 
remember. I can truthfully say that 1 have never 
broken one. 

]\IBRL— How about the slaughtering of those 3000 
"unbelievers"? 

CAPTAIN PERKINS— Ho! I broke no law— in 
fact, that was but the execution of orders from my 
superior officers. Those orders were laws, because in 
times of war they are given authority, and having 
executed their orders or laws I should not be punished. 
To have fallen down on one order would have meant 
an everlasting disgrace and, as they would also have 
been broken laws, I should rightfully expect punish- 
ment here. 

MERL — The carrying out of those orders did not 
prevent you from breaking other laws. 

CAPT. PERKINS— No other laws were broken. 

MERL— How about the law "Thou Shalt Not 
Kill"? 

CAPT. T'ERKINS- Why, man, this is a war. That 
law is repealed in times of hostilities. It would have 
been impossible for me to carry out the laws of my 
superiors and this latter law. They are conflicting. 
They are opposite. To carry out one is to break the 
other. l\Iust I be punished for ; 

MERL — Yes, that is the reason why practically 
everyone comes here. No law, no matter how long 
ago it was made, is ever repealed in hell. Now you 
can see : you HAVE to break one law to make or keep 
another. Then comes punishment everlasting when 
you die. 

CAPT. PERKINS— But, you said that one-tenth 
of one per cent escaped hell. How can they do that? 
MERL — They were lucky enough to be born with- 
(Continued on page 26) 



"T^ HE great European upheaval ; the great buteher- 
X ing contest has shattered many of the hopes of 
lumanity. The long standing laws of international 
ourtesies and customs have been ruthlessly discarded, 
ind innocent noncombatants on land and sea have been 
nurdered in cold blood. Things of priceless beauty 
ind historical value and grandeur have been shattered. 
In Germany the cherished ideals of Socialist vpork- 
ng class solidarity, the bubble of international class 



The Western Comrade 

Busting the Iron Law 

By GEORGE E. CANTRELL 



13 




AT ONE GULP 

How Much Longer Can She Feed Him? 

— Des Moines Register and Leader 



var, has been blown up, accompanied by the bitter lash- 
ngs of their ' ' Comrades ' ' across the borders. In all the 
)elligerent countries the call to arms has found So- 
lialist comrades lined up against each other with mur- 
lerous intent, each believing in his own way that "his" 
iountry is in danger. The splendid theory of inter- 
lational class interests has proved too weak to resist 
he bugle's startling note, and too young to stem the 
ushing torrent of inflamed race hatred. 

In England the workers are face to face with hu- 
ailiation or conscription. Indeed, in these times of 



highly scientific combat, voluntary enlistment is of 
little avail. England has always fought against con- 
scription as against a plague. A few years ago, when 
the late Lord Roberts came out strong for national 
military service, he aroused a great storm of unpopu- 
lar criticism that sent him reeling back to private life. 
Like the working class of this country the Britishers 
like to think they are free. 

Another cherished institution which has been shat 
tered is the "Iron Law" of supply and demand. In 
times of peace, schools of economic thought have tried 
to impress the worker with the theory of supply and 
demand. With thousands of unemployed at the factory 
gates wages have often been kept to the low-water 
mark — because supply was greater than demand. 

But the war has called many of Britain's skilled 
workers to fight, and the pendulum of supply and de- 
mand has swung over with a bang. Employers and 
munition factory owners are rcf-ping huge profits. 
Their workers patriotically toil long hours to produce 
munitions of war to help "their" country. But they 
have suddenly seen the light. The long hours are im- 
pairing their working ability and they "lay off" one 
day in seven for rest. Because of this they are accused 
of ' ' slacking ' ' and of drunkenness, and the busy British 
government is actually so anxious about them that 
they appoint investigators to provide means of pre- 
venting them from striking — or even taking rest. 

Every day lost, every hour wasted, means less profits 
for the employers. The speed with which the govern- 
ment has taken up the settlement of strikes is a revela- 
tion to the world. 

The investigators for the government related how 
several dock workers were shipped to a French post 
to relieve congestion in shipping, and on pay day, after 
a big week with ten hours a day seven days a week, 
many of these fellows got too drunk to work next day. 
They were sent back to England and a new batch sent 
to continue the work. These were men from the army. 
On pay day one man only imbibed too freely. He got 
twelve months hard labor. Therefore: 

Put the workers under military control ! ilake 
them a part of the army, when to refuse to work is to 
mutiny. Isn't that easy, eh? 

The theory of supply and demand has been exposed. 
The British workers are being tricked and the Ameri- 
can workers will he tricked the same way. Heavy de- 
mand and scanty supply of labor will be met by the 
incontrovertible argument of the bayonet point and 
the iron law will he repealed by the bullet. 



14 



The Western Comrade 

Where Is the Home? 



By IRWIN TUCKER 



"W 



OMAN'S Place Is the Home" runs the ancient 
slogan. True. And woman, seeking to take 
her place, looks around her and cries: "Where Is the 
Home?" 

To most of the working women of the world, the 
word is a mockery. They have no homes. But such as 
have them, must be in full possession. If a woman's 
realm is the home, it follows that she must reign in 
her own realm. 

What is the home ? To begin with there is the struc- 
ture of the building in which the nest is made. If 
woman is to rule her own realm, she must control the 
house, and the land on which it stands. The propor- 
tion of women of any class who now actually own the 
buildings in which they live is infinitesimal. But be- 
fore woman can rule in her own realm, she must have 
the say-so regarding both the building and the land. 

Woman is the provider, the "loaf-giver," as the 
Saxons said ; the nourisher. To rule in her own realm 
she must control the food supply. No longer is the 
food supply a thing of her own manufacture. It comes 
from markets, groceries, dairies ; it comes in cans, bot- 
tles and boxes. To control her realm she must be able 
to control sources of supply. She must be able to de- 
tect and to punish adulteration of food; she must be 
able to regulate quantity and price ; else she is not ruler 
in her own sphere. 

Here is the place where lives are produced. All 
our business and industry find their sole justification in 



their service to the home. No matter how extensi 
the mill or how intricate the enterprise, if it cannof 
show that ultimately it will enrich the living-room or 
replenish the larder, it must dissolve and fade away., 
Service to life is the only plea on which any existing: 
institution can endure. 

All of these. things enter into the texture of the 
home. Hence woman, if she is to rule in her own 
sphere, must control them all. Her children must have 
clothes ; it is part of her rale to see that they are good 
clothes. The hom.e must be lit, warmed and cleaned. 
Hence control of the light supply, fuel supply and 
sanitary provisions are part of her kingdom. 

It is the mother's duty to educate. The school is 
therefore a part of the home. She must be empowered 
to say what shall be taught her children, and undei 
what conditions they shall learn. 

If any of these powers are lacking, woman is nol| 
mistress of her own kingdom — the home. 

By no means except control of the municipalj 
county, and state governments, insofar as they affecl| 
her sphere, can woman be secure in her own place. 
order that woman, who is held responsible for thi 
■well-being of the home, may live up to her responsi-' 
bility, she must wield these powers. For our civiliza- 
tion is so complex that at every point the home con- 
nects with the whole structure of society about it. In 
order to be mistress in one point, she must be a co'- 
ruler of all. 



Mary Phagan Passes Judgment 

MARY WHITE OVINGTON in the New Republic 



YOU care a lot about me, you men of Georgia, now 
that I am dead. 
You have spent thousands of dollars trying to learn 

who mutilated my body. 
You have filled the columns of your newspapers with 

the story of my wrong. 
You have broken into a prison and murdered a man 

that I might be avenged. 
But why did you not care for me when I was alive? 
I was but a child, but you shut me out of the daylight. 
You held me within four walls watching a machine 

that crashed through the air, 
Endlessly watching a whirring knife as it cut a piece 

of wood. ' 

Noise fills the place — noise, dust, 'and the sickening 

smell of oil. 



I msh some of the thousands of dollars that you spent 

on the trial might have kept me in school, 
A real school, the kind you build for the rich. 
I worked through the hot August days 
When you were bossing the girls, or shooting birds, 
Or lounging in doorways cursing the nigger ; 
And you never paid me enough to buy a pretty dress. 
You sometimes spoke coarsely to me when I went to 

and from my work ; 
Yes, you did, and I had to pretend I liked it. 
Why did you despise me living and yet love me so now? 
I think I know. It is like what the preacher told me 

about Christ: 
People hated Him when He was alive, • 
But when He was dead they killed man after- man for 

His sake. 



The Western Comrade 



l& 




Part of Llano Community Dairy Herd at Milking Time 



Community Grows in Power 



By R. K. WILLIAMS 



1 


A 


^ 


^ 




^ 


^ 


# J 



S the Llano del Rio Community grows in 
population its power and influences in- 
creases in all directions. Hundreds of 
visitors floek to Llano every month and 
are given the fullest and freest oppor- 
tunity to investigate everj^ phase of the 
great enterprise. 

Of those who visit the colony a good 
percentage are persons who are (earnestly seeking an 
opportiinity to get away from the competitive struggle, 
^lore than 47 permanent residents took up their 
abode in Llano during the period of Aug^lst 15 to 
September 15. The hotel is a busy place at 
the three important occasions of the day and 
more than 100 regular patrons seat them- 
selves at each meal now. A month ago the 
daily average was about 75 colony workers. 

The schools have been opened 
with 137 pupils of which 97 are in , /^ __ 
the elementary grade, 25 kinder- --^ " '^" 



garten pupils and 15 high school 
students are 
now enrolled. 

The schools 
will be under 
the efficient 
management of 
Miss Helen R. 
Tyler, principal. 



.it 




who was •with us last j^ear ; Miss Ramona Parsons will 
have charge of the youngsters up to the fourth grade 
and iliss Grace M. Powell will take the scholars from 
the fourth grade up to high, as well as administer over 
the domestic science department and Sloyds. Miss 
Parsons is an accomplished gymnast and teacher of 
swimming and if the weather continues pleasant and 
warm she ■will doubtless have an ardent following of 
water devotees as this sport can be indulged in freely 
in the large swimming pool, which is an attraction of 
the colony. 

]\rrs. Prudence Stokes Brown, the well known edu- 
cator, who has been taking a course of personal in- 
struction under the far-famed Dr. ilontessori for the 
purpose of installing a Montessori school here, has ar- 
rived. She is accompanied by Mrs. A. L. Horn 
of Pasadena and will begin work at once 
in this special department of 
teaching. An immense 
truck from Pasadena, 
loaded to the guards with 
household 



goods and other 
'lelongings fol- 
lowed theni in. 
The colony 
community un- 
doubtedlv h a s 
been enriched 




Community Bake Oven During Construction 



16 



The Western Comrade 



[ 



£'iiii!iiiiiiiiiiini::Niun:iiiiiUii 



iiniiiiiiiiiiijiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiuniiiipiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiffi 

Industrial Activity at L 

iiiiiiiiiiiiiuiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiMiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiyiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiw 




Phq 



Pho] ilii 



Scene at the Colony Brick Yard 




Immense Silo Under Construction 




The Western Comrade 



17 



iiiiimiiiiiiimniiiiiiiiiiigiii 



lllillillll!|!|!!llllllllllllllllll!llllllll 



no del Rio Community | 

lllillMllUIMIIIIillllUllilllillllillllllllilUllliilllllliiillillllllllillllllM^ Illlllllll iiiiiiiii lllllliililiiiiiiiiiiiiiHiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiMiiiiB 



phs 



)her 




Ranch Office at Llano Community 



1. 








3^- .■;'■'' ,"_'*^ 




^^R 




F- V ■*" 






' .ime Kiln 



Benching Broom Corn at Llano 



18 



The Western Comrade 




by this galaxy of teachers. Very few communities of 
this size are blessed with four such capable instructors. 
The Montessori pupils are not included in the fore- 
going. No figures are at present aA^ailable on the num- 
ber of little tots that will attend the Montessori system. 

From September 1 to September 15, 103 visitors 
looked us over and many of them were so well satisfied 
that they joined and will later come in to stay, when 
they can make arrangements on the outside to do so. 

Improvements are noted all along the line. The 
ranch work is progressing wonderfully well and the 
building and arts departments are catching up with 
the procession. The pug mills and other brick ma- 
chinery have been moved to the permanent townsite, 
which lies about a mile above the present site dud 
far overlooks the far reaches of the shimmering vallej'. 
The work is under the charge of Chester Page and his 
crew is ready to turn out brick for the new school 
which will be one of the first buildings to be erected 
upon the new and permanent townsite. Substantial 
work will be shown on this structure and a greater feel- 
ing of permanency will have been implanted in the 
hearts of the sturdy ones who have stayed through the 
vicissitudes of the past 18 months. 

The Board of Survey, which is nothing less than an 

inventory or effi- 

ciency board, has 
made a careful 
and painstaking 
survey and pre- 
sents an elaborate 
report that is con- 
structive and reas- 
suring in every 
way. It may be 
well to quote some 
of the things that 
they have found, 




which to many colonists, will be indeed surprising. 
Speaking of possessions, the Board found that con- 
ditions at Jackson Lake and at the Trout Hatchery 
are such that with very little labor and expense both 
can be turned into attractive summer and winter re- 
sorts and ought therefore to become good revenue pro- 
ducers on aceoiint of their easy accessibility from the 
south where many tourists spend considerable time. 
At both these places the scenery is inspiring and the 
air extremely exhilerating. 

In this connection the coi;nty supervisors have in- 
cluded in the proposed budget for next month's elec- 
tion an appropriation to build the scenic highway 
through the San Gabriel canyons to the summit of the 
big range, thence down to a point a mile below the 
colonj''s lands at the Luckel camp. From this point 
the roadway to the Llano community will be put in 
first-class condition. This would shorten the distance 
between Los Angeles and Llano by thirty-five miles. 

Another item in the county budget is $75,000 to 
build a road from Little Rock to Llano. This will be 
a great boon to the community and will go far to solve 
the transportation problem. The boulevard through 
Mint Canyon is assured and the survey is under way. 
Thus the community is assured of splendid roads to 

all its important 
connecting points. 
At present, good 
meals are being 
served at the 
Hatchery Inn, un- 
der the manage- 
ment of Chef 
Mandel. The chef 



Water Sports on the Llano 



attends 


to 


the 


wants 


of 


ills 


guests 


in 


true 



C h e s t e rfieldian 



The Western Comrade 



19 



.style and the jnenu is more than ordinary. Rugged 
mountains surround this place so that tramps over 
them will add zest to the seeker after pleasure and 
liealth. The colony owns 160 acres there. This place 
is the soilrce of the Big Rock Creek. Pellucid water 
boils and bubbles up in various places out of black 
earth eienagas and runs in all directions till it meets 
in one common current and drops down a sturdy fall 
at the root of a giant tree. Paths have been cut 
through the tangled mass of vegetation and trees, 
benches and rustic seats have been placed in charming 
nooks, so that at every turn the visitor is surprised at 
some new beauty. jNIany days can be spent here with- 
out tiring ; the air, sky and mountain spelling a Avon- 
drous charm. 

The Board finds that the ilescal waters, which is a 

part of the estate, 

can be increased 



There are three compartments in a brooder house 14 
by 24 feet, each compartment holding 500 chicks ; two 
chicken houses, 18 by 60 feet, with a capacity of 500 
each. There are now 1800 chickens enrolled on Com- 
rade Copley's data book. He is "Hoganizing" his 
flock and the residents of the colony are pleased, in- 
deed. The lazy birds are given short shrift and a;s a 
conseqttence the non-producers are roasted to a tiirn 
and consumed with gusto by gratified colonists'. ■ ■ 
Comrade Kilmer has so efliciently handled the rab- 
bit end of the farm that he is now in a position to 
satisfy all demands. He has regular times of doling 
out the little fellows and from now on rabbit delicacies 
will be a feature of the hotel tables as well as at the 
homes. 

An addition was recently made to the dairy herd, 

which is under the 

management of Corn- 




very much by tunnel- 
ling into the hills 
and into the floor of 
Jackson Lake. To 
many this will be a 
pleasing surprise as 
it opens avenues for 
future development. 

Here are some 
very interesting data 
of the possessions of 
the colony at the 
present time : Twen- 
ty-six adobe houses 
are completed; nine 
nearly completed, 

that is, awaiting roof; fourteen frame houses, occupied 
by families ; eight ranch houses ; 78 tent houses : twelve 
municipal tents, or transient quarters containing from 
one to five beds each ; one large warehouse tent ; two 
hotels ; five barns ; three blacksmith shops ; one horse 
barn under construction; one cow barn under construc- 
tion ; one office building under construction on the tem- 
porary site; one bakery, nearing completion, capable 
of holding 170 loaves at one time. One silo, 25 by 31 
feet; 300-ton capacity, almost completed, but now ready 
to be filled. This silo is of permanent construction and 
made of cement blocks : one solarium, or bath house ; 
two rabbitries, 7 by 72 feet and 7 by 68 feet. The 
Board has recommended additional buildings for the 
rabbits as follows: One building, 7 by 84 feet, con- 
taining 118 hutches and for the young stock, which are 
now on hand, an adobe building 25 by 70 feet. An 
earnest attempt will be made to start these extra 
buildings at an early date. 

Development is shown in the poultry department. 



Llano Girls' Tennis and Basketball Club 



rade Luton. He now 
has 101 cows, three 
prize bulls, nine 
Swiss goats, all 
blooded stock, and 
51 calves. Through 
tlie constant care 
and hard work of 
Comrade Luton and 
his earnest helpers, 
the supply of milk 
and butter does not 
fail the colony. Long 
liours, patient, hard 
work are requisites 
of a successful dairy 
herd. Few people realize how things are done until 
they actually behold the process. Dairymen as a rule 
are seldom thought of except when the supply of milk 
or butter runs low. A surprise will be in store for 
any visitor or colonist not familiar with this work to 
go through the motions of being a dairyman for a 
week or so. 

The ranch has 68 good strong horses. Comrade B.- 
G. Burdiek, head apiarist, is now handling over 500 
stands of bees in the colony, so that honey is an every- 
day delicacy upon the tables of the colonists and the 
hotel. Several tons of honey are on hand. A portion 
of the honey is being Tised for preserving purposes. 

Comrade Knobbs, who has the garden in charge, 
with a large corps of assistants, is delivering fresh 
vegetables to the homes and hotel daily. All sorts of 
melons are delivered in abundance and enjoyed thor- 
oiighly by ever3'-one. A tcm of tomatoes are being 
taken care of daily and soon canning will start in 
earnest, as well as drying in order to make a new 



20 



The Western Comrade 



2iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii»iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiimiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii 
I Earth is 

i By Edwin 



soup delicacy. In tlie Survey's report, farm imple- 
ments galore were inventoried, such as vs^agons, plows, 
stackers, wheel cultivators, listers, buggies, harrows, 
mowing rakes, scrapers, seeders, wheelbarrows, hand 
tools etc. 

Another sub-head notes road scrapers, bean sepa- 
rator, sawmill, ditching plows, cream separator, hay 
balers, harnesses of all sorts and sizes. Three auto 
trucks and four automobiles are noted. 

Among the miscellaneous property mentioned for 
the iise of the colony is the following : Swimming pool, 
temporary hand laundry, 17 boats, two pool tables, 
five barber chairs, two pianos, creamery and full 
equipment, up-to-date library and reading room, cir- 
cular wood saw, planer, band saw, two power concrete 
mixers, block molds and 200 pallets, bath tubs, lava- 
tories, sinks, big supply of plumbers' supplies and 
tools, fully equipped tin shop and supplies, harness 
shop, shoe shop, cabinet shop and big drill press. 

There is about 250 tons or more of alfalfa in stacks 
and approximately 250 to 300 
tons of alfalfa and corn still iin- 
cut^ which is to be used to fill 
the silo for ensilage. 

The following is data for 
those interested in things horti- 
cultural. On the Young place 
there are twenty acres in pears 
and on the Bixby ranch twenty 
acres ; 15 acres of assorted 
fruits on the Henneburg place, 
the present site of the club 
house and twenty acres of as- 
sorted fruits on the Tighlman 
ranch, grapes, etc. The above 
assures plenty of fruit, when 
fully matured, for quite a popu- 
lation. The nursery has ready 
for planting in the spring 21,000 
apple and pear trees; 2500 
strawberry plants; 2500 black- 
berry ; 800 black walnut ; 1000 black locust for the 
townsite ; 100 rhubarb plants ; and 7000 grape cuttings, 
all for spring transplanting. One-quarter acre of pea- 
nuts are showing up finely. 

Many thousands of feet of all sorts of lumber, di- 
mension and otherwise, ready for transportation to the 
colony, lies at Palmdale. "When this arrives intense 
activity will begin and an early complete housing pro- 
gram will be started. Conditions are favorable, in- 
deed, that all will be comfortably housed, or living 
comfortably at the hotel and club house before much 
cold or inclement weather arrives. 

Recently the colony was favored with a visit of 
Lancaster fair boosters. There were five in the party 



and each gave a nice little talk, complimenting the 
colonists upon their solidarity, oneness of purpose and 
upon the immense showing made upon these lands dur- 
ing the past year and a half. All gave a cordial invi- 
tation to attend the Lancaster fair to be held some time 
in October. It has been determined to accept the invi- 
tation and in consequence the ladies of the colony are 
getting their wits together to make a good showing 
of the arts and crafts of that element. From the agri- 
cultural end of the ranch will go exhibits of fruits, 
vegetables, and from the dairy some of the herd. 
Other exhibits will include pigs, chickens and rabbits. 
Without doubt this will be made an occasion of some 
moment as a real fine display can be made from this- 
place. When it is considered that but less than IS 
months have elapsed since the present managers of 
the colony have taken hold of this project, the de- 
velopment is truly wonderful. It is complimentary, to- 
say the least, that Llano community should be invited 
to show its products, for it is a tacit recognition that 
cooperatiA^e efforts are superior 
II to individual competition, for 



Enough 

Mar k ham 



The men of Earth have here the stuff 
Of Paradise. We have enough ! 
We need no other stones to build 
The Temple of the Unfulfilled- 
No other ivory for the doors — 
No other marble for the floors — 
No other cedar for the beam 
And dome of man's immortal dream. 

Here on the paths of every day — 
Here on the common human way 
Is all the stuff' the gods would take 
To build a heaven, to mold and make 
New Edens. Ours the stuff sublime 
To build Eternity in time ! 



^illlllll 



what farmer, unaided, could be- 
gin to make an agricultural or 
stock showing in less than five 
years ? 

There is no abatement in. 
interest or the attendance at 
the Saturday evening dances. 
The music being good, the floor 
is kept constantly full and 
when Comrade Stewart, the 
floor manager, gets busy with 
his quaint language architec- 
ture and his good humorea 
manhandling, things get lively 
indeed. The folks that danced 
the old-fashioned things years 
ago are strong friends of Stew- 
liiiililp art for he carries them back to 
"of Missouri ' ' with his singing 
calling, and the tintinabulation of the music's rhythm 
gives reluctant feet the terpsichorean urge. 

Luther Burbank says: "Every child should have 
m\id-pies, grasshoppers, waterbugs, tadpoles, mud- 
turtles, elderberries, vrild strawberries, acorns, chest- 
nuts, trees to climb, brooks to wade in, water-lilies, 
woodchucks, bats, butterflies, various animals to pet,, 
hay fields, pine cones, rocks to roll, sand snakes, huckle- 
berries and hornets ; and any child whO' has been de- 
prived of these has been deprived of the best pare of 
his education." So they should. The Llano Com- 
munity kids have all this and in addition they have 
the advantage of a new order of social life and assur- 
ance for the future. 



The Western Comrade 

Our Wonderful School 



21 



THE seeoud ilontessori School in the State of Cali- 
fornia, under public school management, has been 
opened at Llano del Eio Colony. 

This ;Montessori School did not spring up in a day 
or a week ; it has been five months developing, and this 
is its story up to date. 

Llano del Rio Colony wants the best education pos- 
sible for its children, and to this end they are looking 
for public school teachers that crave an opportunity 
to work upon the most progressive lines. Last April, 
Llano del Rio secured the interest and co-operation 
of Prudence Stokes Brown and engaged her services 
for the kindergarten department. 

Mrs. Brown has for twenty-five years been a most 
progressive and enthusiastic kindergartener. She bears 
the distinction of having initiated and taught the first 
public school kindergarten in the State of Calfornia. 
Llano del Rio people thought they were most fortunate 
in securing ilrs. Brown's services and 
Mrs. Brown considered Llano del Rio 
an ideal place in which to establish the 
kindergarten that would prove that the 
education of the head, heart and hand 
Tvas no vague dream of Froebel's. 
Every step possible was being taken to 
facilitate the organization of a summer 
kindergarten in Llano, when Dr. Mon- 
tessori arrived in Los Angeles and of- 
fered a four months' course in her 
method of scientific pedagogy. ^Irs. 
Brown was eager to take the course of 
this great doctor and the Llano del Rio 
community, true to the spirit of prog- 
ress, responded to her request for a 
leave of absence for the purpose of 
studying with Dr. ]\[ontessori. The four months have 
passed and with them all of Mrs. Brown's old enthusi- 
asm for the Froebelian Kindergarten. A Montessori 
School, pure and simple, now takes the place of the 
kindergarten with ^Irs. Brown, and the Llano del Rio 
people accept the change with the enthusiasm of ]Mrs. 
Brown and will have the second ^Montessori School in 
the State of California. Mrs. Brown states her views 
of this new system in the following words : 

"After nearly four months' close observation of 
the daily exercises of a demonstration class in the ilon- 
tessori method as well as four months of regular lec- 
ture work on the technique, science and psyeholog^^ of 
this method under Dr. Montessori, I am under a most 
ievout and ardent conviction that the ^Montessori 
method of education is in absolute accord with Froe- 




bel's philosophy of education. I further believe that 
Froebel, in his sincere search for means and measures 
for developing the whole child — body, mind and soul — 
would, were he here today, be the first to recognize his 
great ideal for childhood embodied in Dr. ]Montessori's 
method of scientific pedagogy. 

Froebel was pre-eminently a philosopher, a prophet 
and a seer — he saw in the soul of man potential per- 
fection and prophesied that the destiny of man is to 
become conscious of his divinity and to reveal this in- 
ner completeness in self-determination and freedom. 
"Froebel yearned and labored to evolve and de- 
velop a method and a logical sequence of materials that 
would give the child free, spontaneous self-expression, 
iluch of the method and many of the materials have 
long been abandoned by even his most devout follow- 
ers, but the spirit and purpose of Froebel's life and 
work will abide forever. Educators and would-be 
educators have tirelessly labored to dis- 
cover and create materials that would 
harmonize with the wonderful insight 
of Froebel: that the child is a self- 
active, self-determining being, and 
therefore must educate himself. 

■'I, for one, have grown gray follow- 
ing Froebel's spirit with radiant en- 
thusiasm, sure at every step that his 
philosophy was absolutely correct, and 
that the carrying out of Froebel's phi- 
losophy was the only salvation of the 
fhild. At last I sit at the feet of Dr. 
Montessori serenely confident that she 
has found the method of self-education 
for the child. 

"jMy only pang of sorrow now is that 
all kindergarteners inspired by the spirit of Froebel 
are not here to see what I see and hear what I hear. 

"There is much that is like Froebel's plan in garden 
and plastic play and work as well as in the games of 
sense, the beauty and order of the surroundings is ihe 
same in the ilontessori method as in Froebel's. The 
care of pets is considered essential by both, but the 
house of childhood is a much closer connection with 
the home life of the child than the kindergarten de- 
signed by Froebel. The materials have been reduced 
to the minimum of simplicity and necessity by scientific 
experiment. They have been quantitatively and quali- 
tatively determined to suit the age and stage of de- 
velopment of children from two and one-half years to 
six. No confusion exists here for the child — no weary- 
(Continued on Page 30) 



22 TheWestern Comrade 

A Remarkable Prediction 

By COUNT LEO TOLSTOY 

T EG TOLSTOY made a remarkable prediction shortly before his death. This was written at the request of the 

Russian Czar and is said to have made a deep impression on Nicholas, who sent it to the Kaiser. Aside from the 

discrepancy in dates the propehcy thus far seems to have been wonderfully fulfilled. The cover page of this issue is 

engraved from a painting made several years ago by William R. Walker and is here reproduced for the first time. 



THE events wliicli I here reveal are of a universal 
character and must shortly come to pass. I see 
the form of a woman floating upon the sea of human 
fate. Nations rush madly after her, but she only toys 
with each. Her diamonds and rubies write her name 
"Commercialism." Alluring and bewitching she 
seems, but destruction and agony follow in her wake. 
Her breath reeks of sordid transactions; her voice is 
metallic in character and her look of greed is as so 
much poison to the nations who fall victim to her 
charms. She carries aloft three torches of universal 
corruption : one representing war, one bigotry and 
hypocrisy, and the third law, that dangerous founda- 
tion of all unauthentic traditions. The great conflagra- 
tion will start about 1912, set by the first torch, in 
the countries of southeastern Europe (Turkey, Italy, 
Bulgaria, Servia, etc.). It will develop into' a destruc- 
tive calamity in 1913. I see Europe in flames and bleed- 
ing, and hear the lamentations of huge battlefi'flds. But 
aboiit the year 1915 a strange figure enters the stage 



11 

!( 



ill 



[ 



of the bloody drama. He is a man of little militarist:' 
training, but he will hold most of Europe in his gri 
till 1925. He is already walking the earth, a man ( 
affairs. A mission is assigned him by a superior powe 

There is marked a new political era for the 01 
World; no empires and kingdoms, but the whol 
world will form a Federation of the Unite 
States of Nations. 

After 1925 I see a change in religious sentiment 
the fall of the Church and the decline of the ethici 
idea. Then a great reform begins. It will lay the eo: 
ner-stone of the Temple of Patheism. God, Soul, Spir 
and immortality will be molten in a new furnace an! 
will prepare the way for the peaceful beginning of 
new ethical era. Political and religious distui'banc< 
have shaken the spiritual foundations of all nation 
biit I see each growing wiser. I see the passing she 
of the world-drama fade like the glowing of evenin 
upon the mountains, and with one motion of the han 
of "Commercialism" a new history begins. 



Peace or War? 



By A. E. BRIGGS 



rs 



SHALL it be peace or war? We are in the balance. 
Roosevelt says we must fight to "preserve our 
honor." He does not compute the "cost." He says 
"war at any price." The price is the lives of the 
working class of the nations to the conflict. Some- 
one has "insulted" us; send out a million innocent 
workers to kill a million innocent workers of another 
nation or be killed. Vidicate "our honor," in the coin 
of the blood of the workers. 

All Europe has gone insane arid in its insanity it 
has not even "respected the rights of Americans." 
Bring on the gims. Bring on the working men. Bring 
on the machinery of death. Go to it, you workers. Go 
into the mouths of the cannons you have made for your 
industrial masters. It is your "duty." You are 
"patriots." 

Your patriotism that leads you to slaughter was 
made by the owners of munition factories where the 
guns were made that will kill you. Your "patriotism" 
consists of flag-worship and Rooseveltian screams. It 
is "firecracker patriotism." It is "my country, right 



p 
t 



i 



or wrong. " It is the ' ' patriotism ' ' that has bathed tl 
past in blood and destroyed that for which it is su; 
posed to stand. It is the "patriotism" that, if m 
civilized and christianized and modernized and ed; 
cated, will leave the world, once more, one vast wi 
derness. 

What is the remedy" Do you want a remedy? 1 
remove the cause of war is the remedy. The cause 
all war is gain or profit. 

So long as we have individualism will we have wa 
So long as we live under a system that makes every i 
dividual under it an industrial enemy of every othe 
■will we have war. 

The alternative of war is collectivism. The alte 
native of war is industrial democracy. The alternatr 
of war is the economies of Christ. The alternative 
war is Socialism. 

Is the price too high? There is but one price tWkn] 
peace. The Avriter is "for peace at any price." ■■lidi 

Let those who would not pay the price go to t'Bft, 
front. Let them forget every ideal that aceidentalBlfl 



The Western Comrade 



23 



Dund way to their brains. Let them attend the flag 
xercise and worship the symbol, the emblem, the idol, 
s does the pagan. 

The price you will pay for peace will be the sur- 
ndor of the privilege to kill. The price you will pay 
)r peace will be the surrender of military taxes. The 
rice you will pay for peace will be the surrender of 
urder and of carnage and of waste and of hatred 
id of a black heart and of death. Do you want to pay 
le price? Are you not convinced there is no price 



I' 



too high to pay for peace and for universal brotherhood? 

Never kill? No, never, except in defense of our 
lives. If men come to our land to rob and kill us, we 
have no choice and we must defend ourselves. Against 
murderous man we must defend ourselves, as against 
murderous beasts. 

The time-worn bell of war now heads its funeral 
march. It is silent, let us hope, forever. The twentieth 
century bell is ringing for peace, for brotherhood, for 
solidarity, for co-operation, for the economics of Christ. 



Speak, What Think Ye of the War? 



By ERNEST DESLAND 



ULERS of nations, from thy throne cast down 
Thy stately robe, thy scepter and thy crown, 
umblings of discontent cause thee to frown. 
hy citizens, wilt thou dare ignore? 
peak, what think ye of the war ! 

re thy edicts, the heritage of kingly dower? 
ffer not thy royal birth as token of thy power, 
or hail thy divine right from yon palace tower, 
he dignity of thine office cannot overawe, 
peak, what think ye of the war ! 

tand up, ye statesmen at our command; 

the mandate held within thy hand 
bring despair throughout the land? 
Tiy sanction this reign of man-made law? — 
peak, what think ye of the war ! 

6 priests and preachers of earthly realm ordained, 
Tio with Cross and Book bless battlefield, now stained 

SI ''ith blood of the dead, the dying and maimed — 

f' . this the God ye would adore? 
Deak, what think ye of the war! 

e mystic and devotee, who kneel daily at thy shrine — 
^e sluggard of vile estate who in luxury repine ; 
he increase of thy wealth betrays a marked decline : 
irophets, seers, and dreamers galore, 
leak, what think ve of the war ! 



Ye soldiers, vnth guns and swords arrayed. 
Ready to kill thy victim, undismayed ; 
Flinch not, lest authority upbraid. 
Art thou exalted to shed this gore? 
Speak, what think ye of the war ! 

Ye mothers and babes, who are ever dear, 
Bid them strength of heart, kiss 'way all fear; 
Dost thou consider some bereft woman's tear? 
Arouse thy tenderness, we now implore. 
Speak, what think ye of the war! 

Ye populace — know ye not ye have the might 

To cry halt upon this bloody sight? 

Why look on undisturbed, as if to show delight? 

Does a stupor permeate thy core? 

Speak, what think ye of the war! 

What loving God would e'er proclaim 
Chaos in his own domain 
Till perfected souls can hui remain? 
Is this the rule of Christian lore? 
Speak, what wills this cosmic war! 

Ye stars, which reflect to earth each night — 
Ye sun, a symbol of a greater Light — 
God, thou dost reveal to us thy might. 
In supplication, we wait at heaven's door. 
Speak, what think' ye of the war ! 



Picturing Our Hero 



jstuN this issue we gladly present to our readers the 
H!» latest true-to-life portrait of America's foremost 
bhting man. Jum-Jum is shown, on page six, in a 
;i.f*tural and easy pose, tliewed like an Aiirock bull and 
sked like the great cave bear. Here we see, thanks 
t(it|j) the skill of that eminent artist and society favorite, 
jiijobert Minor, the most eminent troglodyte in his lair. 



gnawing with gusto and gutteral growl the green skull 
of a mollycoddle just slain on the plains of Plattsburg. 
AVitness his joy as ho mumbles the bones and gristles 
and joints of the fresh slain pacifist from Passaic or 
Podunk. See in the open countenance pictured here 
the cunning and craft of one who will ever stand fast 
against Chinafying of our glorious republic. — A. M. 



24 



The Western Comrade 



Hope— And a Car! 

T KNOW there 's; a ear for me some- 

where 
Which is coming to make me as free 

as air, 
To swing and swoop from place to 

place 
And take a turn at setting the pace. 
No longer to climb with draging feet 
The long long pull to Outlook street. 
But throw in the clutch and soar 

aloft 
Like a bird balanced on pinions soft. 

I rise with the dawn to try my car 

Which will dash away with its 
rhythmic jar 

To fill my soul with space and light 

"Ere I shut myself in for the daily 
fight 

For dollars — or cents; the right to 
live 

Will have some meaning when mus- 
cles give 

To the curves and jolts of the moun- 
tain pass 

Quite bej^ond reach to me now, alas ! 

And then at night, when work is 

done 
A¥itli someone, the right one, full of 

fun 
And tender sweetness we'll glide 

along 
Wooed by the ocean's age-long song. 
And plan ^or a house and lot? Oh, 

no! 
For a bigger car in which to stow 
The strictly needfnil, a kitchenette, 
And then — the kev of the fields, you 

bet ! ' —A. C. A. 

The Hellishness of War 

In a protest against the alleged 
mistreatment of Japanese in Ger- 
many, Baron Chinda says the Nip- 
ponese were thrown into prison and 
kept there without regard to class. 
This is terrible ! Awful ! It empha- 
sizes the hellishness of war. Why 
not merely imprison the working 
class ? The members of the working 
class are inured to hardships, and 
jails wouldn't hurt them — ^but the 
other class should be shown some 
consideration. 



"That which a man makes or pro- 
duces is his own, as against all the 
world — to enjoy or to destroy, to use, 
to exchange, or to give. No one else 
can rightfully claim it, and his ex- 
clusive right to it involves no wrong 
to anyone else." — Henry George. 



Pictures for Propaganda 




Shoot Capitalism 

With a 

Stereopticon 



Anyone can lecture with the aid of pictures; they tell the 
story, you point out the moral. Pictures draw a crowd where 
other means fail. They make your work doubly effective. 

We tell you how to get the greatest results at the least 
expense. 

Send stamp for complete information. 

W. SCOTT LEWIS 



3493 Eagle Street. 



Los Angeles, California 





In order to place a copy of our catalogui 
of union-made goods in the hands o{ 
every reader of The Western Comradi 
we will send postage prepaid, on recelp| 
of FIFTY CENTS, one of our genuin> 
sheepskin-leather card cases BEARINi 
THE UNION LABEL. 

This card case contains four pockets 
one large for bills and papers, one fo| 
your dues-stamp book, and two wit^ 
transparent windows for union member 
ship cards. This is the ONLY CAR]| 
CASE on the market made by Organize 
Labor and bearing the union label. It i' 
no longer necessary for a class-consciou^ 
Socialist to be inconsistent. 

Send fifty cents in stamps or mone| 
order. 



MUTUAL UNION TRADING COMPANY 

(The only exclusive union label merchandisers) 
(Owned and managed by members of the working class) 

9 Board of Trade Court, CHICAGO, ILLS. 



Teasing Tad 

r NEVER see a pollywog, 
*■ Aqiiiver in a creek, 
Subaqueous potential frog, 
But unto him I squeak : 

'0 protoplasmic tadpole, why 

Your pessimistic air ? 
^ surreptitious glance at I 

Should wean you from despair." 

1 slyly poke him in the rib, 

And say: "We twain, we might 
Be quasi-cousins, eh, Amphib — 



The Western Comrade 



25 



lous Pre-Adamite?' 



— E. d'O. 



Offense of a Fence! 

'JOHN SERGEN came to his death 
J as the result of a bullet fired 
Tom behind the fence of the Tide- 
water Oil plant in Bayonne, in the 
land or hands of persons unknown." 
—Coroner's verdict in the case of a mur- 
dered striker. 

This statement that the fence was 
in the hand or hands of persons un- 
known is not reprinted to show a 
sample of the purity of English as 
she is spoke and writ in New Jersey. 
The meaning of the jury is clear. It 
neant to say the fence was in the 
land or hands of persons unidenti- 
ied by them. 

At our age it requires little to re- 
mind us of a story : 

Some Indiana patriots erected a 

lagstaff, rove halliards and hoist Old 

3k ry to the peak. A vandal awaited 

!Over of the night and stole the tex- 

ile fabric. An indignation meeting 

a*, "ollowed. The town patriarch made 

f he great speech and his peroration 

as : 

"I say if any man or men shall 
aul down the flag or flags he shall 
ne shot to death on the .spot or 
rtl spots !"—G. E. B. 

It* 
wit 

blij 



'laai 



1^ Wait, But Don't Stop! 



When you get a prospective sub- 
scriber for The Western Comrade 
•caching for his weaselskin pocket- 
)ook, keep after him and get him 
m one of our combination offers, 
le needs the American Socialist, 
i*earson's Magazine, the Milwaukee 
)aily Leader, the Mexican Revolt, 
ifet him on one or all combinations, 
ifake the deal and send the post- 
ffice money order. We will back 
'ou up. This is an opportunity to do 
ome good propaganda work and to 
;ive impetus to the movement which 
•ou have so near to vour heart. 



REVOLT 
IN MEXICO 

Read the Correct Interpretation of Underlying Motives in the 
Most Remarkable and Valuable Book of the Year 

The Mexican People — 
Their Struggle for Freedom 

-By- 
L. Gutierrez de Laxa and Edgcumb Pinchon 

1^ » ¥ 
Eugene V. Debs says : 

" * * * It is written from the point 
of view of the working class, the tillers of 
the soil, the producers of the wealth, and 
shows that through all these centuries of toil 
and tears and blood and martyrdom they 
have been struggling for the one purpose of 
emancipating themselves from the tyranny 
of a heartless aristocracy, buttressed on the 
one hand by the Roman Church and on the 
other by t.he military power." 
1^ ¥ v 

Georgia Kotsch says : 

"* * * It strips the glamor of 
benevolent motives from the dealings with 
Mexico of the United States and other coun- 
tries and presents the stark truth that 
American and t^orld capitalism has been, 
and is, in league against the proletariat of 
Mexico for its own sordid interest. And 
while the Mexican master class is depicted 
as the most depraved and bloodthirsty in 
history, the Socialist will see that the story 
of the Mexican proletariat is in greater or 
less degree and in varying circumstances the 
story of the proletariat in every country. ' ' 
¥ %- ¥ 

Published by DOUBLEDAY, PAGE & CO. 

F»rice Sl.SO 

We will send you this book and The Western Comrade for one 

year for $2.00 




26 



PEARSONS 

is the only Magazine 
of its kind 

This is why: — 

Three years ago Pearson's decided to 
be a free magazine. 

This is what it did:— 

ABANDONED FANCY COVERS 
CUT OUT COLORED PICTURES 
ADOPTED PLAIN PAPER 

This was the purpose: — 

A plain form would enable the mag- 
azine to live on its income from sub- 
scriptions and monthly sales. It 
would not have to consider the effect 
on advertisers when it wanted to print 
the truth about any public question. 

This was the result: — 



The Western Comrade 

Hell For Its Makers 



I 



Pearson's now prints the truth about 
some question which affects your wel- 
fare in every issue. It prints facts 
which no magazine that de- 
pends on advertising could 
"afford ' ' to print. 

And, with all this, Pearsons still prints 
as much fiction and entertainment 
articles as other magazines. If you 
want plain facts instead of pretty 
pictures buy a copy on the news 
stand for 15 cents, or subscribe by 
the year for $1.50. 

By special arrangement with Pear- 
son's we are able to make you the 
following clubbing offer. 

You can get both PEAR- 
SON'S MAGAZINE and 
THE WESTERN COM- 
RADE for one year by 
sending $1.50 (the price of 
Pearson's alone) to 

The Western Comrade 

923 HIGGINS BLDG. 
LOS ANGELES, CALIF. 



THE JONES BOOK STORE 

226 West First St., Los Angeles, Cal. 
Headquarters for the best Socialist 
books and literature. 







INSURANCE 


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be glad to caii on you 



(Continued from Page 12) 



out life and no law has been broken. 

CAPT. PERKINS— Then is my 
punishment to be very severe 

MERL — I think there are one or 
two others liere in hell Avhose pun- 
ishment is a trifle worse ; but for 
the most part it is a terrible ordeal. 

CAPT. PERKINS (frightened) 
— Can't I do something to get out 
of it? 

IMERL— There is nothing to do. 

CAPT. PERKINS (going to his 
knees) — I will give you a thousand 
pounds sterling 

JIERL (wa^dng him aside) — 
"Monev can't buy salvation from 
hell ! ■ 

CAPT. PERKINS (clutching 
tight the coat of Merl) — God, yes! 
It must ! Take everything I have ! 
'S\j home in England ! My fortune ! 

(Merl laughs sarcasticallv.) 

CAPT. PERKINS— Take my 
family! My wife and daughters! 

Spare me! I — ^I (breaks down 

and sobs). 

IMERL (pulls him roughly to his 
feet^ — Get up ! Your punishment 
awaits. 

CAPT. PERKINS— God! (Sobs.) 
AVhat is it? What am I to do? 

MERL — Follow! (Leads way to 
side stage. Capt. Perkins follows, 
deiected and broken in spirit.) 

CAPT. PERKINS (drawing back, 
again frightened) — No! Not with 
the clergy — I don't get their pun- 
ishment ? 



MERL— No. It shall be worse 

CAPT. PERKINS (awed) 
Worse ! (Again throws himself i 
the feet of Merl.) Tell me ! I— I- 
must know — now ! God ' Is the; 
no way out! 

MERL (laughs)— You did ng 
hesitate to punish those Turks 

CAPT. PERKINS— Yes— yes^ 
yes, I know — biit I did not knoif 
then — I did not understand — but 
now — cannot God help? 

]\IERL — Not now ; it is too late^ 

CAPT. PERKINS (echoing) 
Too late ! 

MERL (pulls him again rough! 
to his feet) — Come! (Merl stam| 
twice. The six devile enter.) Shffi 
Capt. Perkins to his punishmen' 

CAPT. PERKINS— Tell me, fin 
what it is ! (The devils seize hi 
and he struggles to free himse' 

IMERL— You— shall— (Capt. R 
kins listens dejectedly) face yo; 
murdered three thousand and et 
nally and forever ■\vrite on a w; 
in letters of blood these wor' 
"I MURDERED YOU! I M 
DERED YOU!" (Capt. Per 
swoons and is carried out, and 
crackling laughter of the six de 
is drowned amidst the groans ai 
shrieks of the victims who gre] 
them with their prey off stage, 
noise dies do-mi. Merl stand: 
■with arms folded smiles in sarcai 
and nods his head in delight 
(CURTAIN) 



Rights vs. Power 



"X^T'HAT does a right get j^ou 
when you have not the power 
to back it up ? 

Power brings the rights and en- 
forces them. Abstract "sacred" 
rights of citizens are nullified by 
the meanest lowbrow clubs'W'inger 
that walks a beat. If you don't be- 
lieve it go out dressed like a work- 
ing man and try to exercise your 
sacred inalienable rights of free 
speech at any point that is made 
taboo by plutocratic power. 

Elizabeth Gurley Flynn recently 
had excellent proof of the way 
power overrides right whenever the 
masters so decree. Denied the 
right to speak in Paterson, N. J., 



Miss Flynn announces she 
bring suit against the city. C 
of Police Bimson put it straight ai 
without a Ciuibble when he said: ^ 
"You may have the right to sflel 
hut we have the power to prevent yi 

Well put and true. 

Elizabeth puts in many tell 
licks for the workers. She has do: 
a world of good and we admi 
her— BUT— 

IMiss Flynn believes in direct ai 
tion — so do we, all of us. She b^ 
lieves in it so strongly that 
overlooks, neglects if not scorns tW 
very thing that puts the club O' 
power in the hands of plutocrati 
police authority — political action. , 



The Western Comrade 27 



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to 44 $1 .25 Undershirts, light weight, black, sizes 34 to 44 . . 1 .00 

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length, sizes 32 to 44 1.25 Drawers, light weight, cream, sizes 30 to 44. . . . 1.00 

Under Vests, sleeveless, sizes 30 to 44 3f Shirts and Drawers, double fleeced, grey, sizes 

Night Robes, sizes 32 to 46 1.50 30 to 44 1.25 

Hose, extra wearing, black, sizes 8 to 10% 30 Shirts and Drawers, Egyptian cotton, ecru. 

Hose, light weight, all colors, sizes S to 10% ... .50 sizes 30 to 44 1.50 

Men's Hose 

Extra wearing value, black, sizes 9 to 11% $ .25 

Heavy weight, black, sizes 9 to 11%, 3 pairs. . . . 1.00 

Girls' Children's Boys' 

Union Suits, sizes 20 to 30...$ .50 Taped unions, answering Union Suits, sizes 20 to 32 $ .60 

Union Suits, better grade, purpose of a waist, sizes Union Suits, bt.,ter grade, 

sizes 20 to 30 1.00 20 to 28 $ .65 sizes 20 to 32 90 

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sizes 6 to 10% 25 ter grade, sizes 20 to 28. .. 1.05 sizes 6 to 10% 25 to .40 

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inches, sizes 36 to 44 $8.00 Shirts, Grey and Navy Blue, usual sizes 3.00 

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(Mail Order Department) 

923 Higgins Bldg. Los Angeles, Cal. 

(Make all checks or money orders payable to Llano del Rio Company) 



28 



The Western Comrade 



THE WESTERN COMRADE 



Entered as second-class matter at the 
post office at Los Angeles, Cal. 

924 Higgins Building, Los Angeles, Cal. 

Subscription Price One Dollar a Year 
In Clubs of Four Fifty Cents 

Job Harriman, Managing Editor 
Frank E. Wolfe, Editor 

Vol. ni September, 1915 No.5 
Random Shots 

"Britons never, never, never shall be 
Slavs. — Howard Briibaker, in The Masses. 

Congratulations and greetings ! 
How did yon ever get that Slav thing 
past the printer? 

^ ^ ^ 

Dumba has added a bit to the 
gaiety of a ghastly season. His in- 
nocence and naivette is most droll — 
or was he Dumba 'nuff to think he 
could affront the steel trust and not 
get his passports? (Thirty days on 
the rockpile !) 

* ^ i\i 

How German diplomats must have 
laughed — secretly and diplomatically 
behind closed doors — when the 
American note was received. Those 
astute Tutons, who know that so- 
called international law is always 
changing — always follows the needs 
of international capitalism — must 
have burst into a gale of wild laugh- 
ter when they read the words "the 
principles of international law are 
immutable." Har! har! har! 
» ^i ^i 

People of some American cities 
pay twenty-five kinds of taxes. These 
are the afterbites the workers suffer. 
The toilers are robbed at the point of 
production and exploited when they 
seek to buy what they have produced. 
They pay interest, rent and twenty- 
five kinds of taxes. 

In Cleveland they run to varied 
taxes, while in Los Angeles there is 
a mad trend toward licenses and as- 
sessments. Under the cloak of so- 
called improvements a horde of graft- 
ing contractors have brought about 
sales of street and sewer bonds that 
have amounted to confiscation of the 
homes of many of the workers and 
imposed a staggering burden on 
others. 

Conditions doubtless will be 
worse before they are better, but 
there are most encouraging signs 
of a great awakening. Hungry 
Henry listens eagerly these days and 




! 



WHEN THE WELSH JIINERS CAME UP OUT OP 
THE GROUND 



I 



I: 



i 



-Drawn for Western Comrade by M. A. Kempf' 



the times were never so ripe for 
propaganda. 

* tK rK 

The report of the Federal Re- 
serve Board to the effect that 
American banks were Shylocking 
even to the point of charging 120 
per cent interest aroused a snort of 
shortlived indignation. The finger 
of scorn was pointed at somebody 
in some other state for a minute 
then the story was forgotten. No 
city or state is free from the out- 
rage of usury. In Los Angeles 24 
per cent is charged on trust deeds 
and the excuse is given that they 
are "short time loans." People are 
being dispossessed of their homes. 
A prominent public official of Los 
Angeles is connected with a Shy- 
locking firm that charges 24 per 
cent. Anyone want to start some- 
thing? Ask for names and facts. 

iji i|i ^;i 

"Fighting is drawing near to 
Dubgorod," says the dispatches 
from the front. Gorod means "the 
place of the." Thus we locate the 
home of Henrivitch Dubbkowski 
of Russia who is forced to shoul- 



f(i 



der a rifle and march to Poland c 
Galicia and shoot at Heinrieh vo 
Dubbheimer of Germany. DuW 
kowski doesn 't know it, but he W 
for an ally 'Enry Dubb of Hen 
land, Michael McDubb of Irelaii 
'Arry MacDubb of Scotland, Hen' 
Le Duboux of France and Hash 
mura Duboki of Japan. 

As Dooley said about Dewey 
"We are a gr-r-eat family." 
^ * ^ 

Eastern newspapers are worri( 
about the American breadwinne 
who were droMmed when the Lui 
tania was torpedoed. It is amazii 
that they get away with this bun 
Henry Dubb comes back from 1 
pleasant little job (when he h 
one) of 14 hours' toil in the rollil 
mill, where they kill a "breadwi' 
ner" every few hours, and reads 
his penny sheet that some bre 
■\vinners are killed in the war zo 
on a floating arsenal. Henry 
then expected to make an ass 
himself by sobbing himself to sle 
or wildly demanding vengear 
against the murderer. Henry is ( 
pected to do this — and he does, l"!! 



m 



The Western Comrade 



29 



Should Sanity Strike 



By ALBERT A. JAMES 



A S we attempt to explain our 
I plan of operation at the Llano 

ilel Rio Colony, we are often struck 
\itli the seeming impossibility for 
he average man who does useful 
abor to throw ofE the idea that the 
wnership of the means of produc- 
ion must rest in some individual or 
orporation whose sole purpose is 
hi' exploitation of the worker. 

The Socialist writers and speak- 
rs have been pounding away at 
his point for years, but it seems im- 
■ossible for many of the workers to 
hrow off the old psychology, and 
ee that they themselves, under 
ome plan of organization, must as- 
ume the responsibility of owner- 
hip of the means of production. 

It requires infinite patience when 
,e find so many willing, so many 
etermined to enter into numerous 
etails that have no bearing on the 
reat object in view. 
A man who can conscientiously 
Qd religiously sell an honest work- 
ig man a suit of clothes for $21.50 
Dd represent it as an extra value, 
hen the labor cost is $3.22, cannot 
nderstand how men can, by co- 
peration, produce their necessities 

eight hours, and in the evening 
ance to the music made by their 
)mrades. 

This is especially hard for a man 

understand if his boss has hired 

perfectly good preacher to tell 
im and his fellow slaves that the 
ance is an awful sin and that the 
rofit of $18.28 belongs to the own- 
'S of the means of production, by 
divine right." 

A man who would sell to his fel- 
iw man a town lot for $1500.00 
ith a building erected thereon at 
X additional cost of $2000.00 wnen 

knows that the wage of a labor- 
Lg man will not permit him to oc- 
ipy a place that actually cosl in 
ipreciation, taxes, insurance and 
iterest $41.00 per month — such a 
.an cannot understand how labor- 
Lg men, by co-operative effort can 
2t values equivalent to $4.00 per 
ay when they are living on town 
'ts that cost $1.67 each, and live in 
rases proportionately cheap be- 
luse exploitation has been omitted. 

A man who is aware of the fact 
lat 90 per cent of the world's 



workers are in abject poverty in 
this age of the world's greatest la- 
bor-saving machinery, and yet can 
religiously support an industrial 
system that drives women to prosti- 
tution and men to the life of a hope- 
less vagabond or to open rebellion 
against society — such a man would 
be unhappy without a boss to absorb 
the product of his labor. 

Should sanity suddenly strike the 
great mass of working men, such in- 
dividuals would have to be herded 
into a stockade and there provided 
with a great stone god whom they 
could fall down and worship as boss 
and as the author of their salva- 
tion from hunger. 

In order to make the simple ones 
perfectly contented it might be 
necessary to provide a stone image 
of a prostitute press on the one side 
and on the other side might be 
placed an image representing a 
prostitute pulpit. The oracle of 
such a press would continually cry 
out for the workers to arm them- 
selves and go forth as valiant sol- 
diers to defend the wealth created 
by labor but possessed by the 
bosses. The oracle of such a pul- 
pit would continually cry out 
"Servants, obey your master," 
and representing the jingoes of all 
nations, would bless the armies 
and pray loudly that each of the 
contending nations should be vic- 
torious. 

Under siich an environment the 
dear ones who dare not think 
could ooze out into the great un- 
known, knowing throughout their 
declining years that all was well 
with their masters. 

Seriously, the writer does not 
wish to cast the slightest reflection 
on the religious belief of any in- 
dividual. We who see the crimes 
committed in the name of Him who 
died for the poor and dispossessed 
must of necessity hide our faces 
in shame. Those who are so indi- 
vidualistic that they refuse to see 
any social crime find themselves 
helpless when they attempt to in- 
vestigate a co-operative movement. 

It would be as impossible for 
such people to understand our 
colonization scheme as it was for 
the hangers-on at the Court of King 



The American Socialist 

Official Organ of the 

Socialist Party of America. 

The American Socialist speaks 
with authority. It is a powerful 
news and propaganda weekly 
and is the only paper in the 
United States which gives an 
account of the official business 
of the Socialist Party. 

Every Socialist. Every Student of Socia- 
lism should be a subscriber. 

Subscription Price 

50 cents a year. 

The American Socialist and The 
Western Comrade can be had in 
combination for one year by send- 
ing $1.25 to 

THE WESTERN COMRADE 

924 Higgins Building 
Los Angeles, Cal. 



"The Great Working Class Daily" 

MILWAUKEE 
LEADER 

"Unawed by Influence 
and Unbribed by Gain" 

Editor — Victor I^. Berjjer. 
Assistants— Jamas Howe, A. M. Sim- 
ors, Osmore Smith, Thomas S. An- 
drews. 



The Leader is published in Americas 
stronghold of Socialism. It is the 
greatest English Socialist Daily in the 
vol Id. It is a Modern Metropolitan 
Daily, containing the latest news. 

Among its distinctive features are: 

SOCIALIST NEWS PAGE, LA- 
BOR NEWS PAGE, SPORTING 
PAGE, MAGAZINE SECTION, 
WOMAN'S PAGE, EDITORIAL 
PAGE. 

The price of The Deader is 25c per 
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Combination offer -with 

The WESTERN COMRADE 

Both for one year for $3.00 (the 
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Address: 

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Los Angeles, Calif. 



30 



The Western Comrade 



George III to understand why our 
Colonial forefathers left the "beau- 
tiful civilization"' under their mon- 
arch and traveled the dangerous 
seas to establisli homes in the wil- 
derness of America, for Ave have 
people today who as thoroug-hly 
believe in the divine right of capi- 
tal to rule the wOrld as people be- 
lieved in that day that kings ruled 
by "divine right." 

For those who wish to establish 
an industrial democracy there is no 
new continent. We must build 
within the capitalistic system commu- 
nities founded on industrial justice. 

Our Wonderful School 

(Continued from Page 21) 
ing sequences of work and play are 
planned here by the teacher. Here 
in Dr. i\Iontessori's house and garden 
of childhood the kindergartener finds 
her ideal kindergarten, where the 
children blossom into maturity of 
feeling and thought as naturally as 
flowers bloom in a well-kept garden. " 

First Aid 

Scene on the promenade deck of 
a San Francisco steamer. Pretty 
tourist, battling- with the wind, 
finally succeeds in turning half hitch 
with veil over her flying hair and 
neatly tying a bowline beneath a 
dimpled chin. 

Approach Bert Engle with Pan- 
ama clutched in one hand and toupee 
in another: 

"I beg your pardon, madam, if 
you have another veil and will lend 
it to me, I will tie MY hair on." 

Hope for White Hope 

A city prospect accompanied by a 
pretty young woman approached op- 
erations of some Llano bricklayers 
and showed deep interest. Gibbon, 
thewed like a Thor, and bearded like 
a pard, ceased singing as he sent the 
mixing hoe surging through the 
plastic mass. The city man saw ad- 
miration in the girl's eyes, and said 
to Gibbon: 

"That looks easy enough. Do jou 
suppose I could learn to do it?" " 

"Well," said Gibbon slowly, after 
giving the rather robust prospect a 
quick once-over, "I think you 
could." Then he spat meditatively 
and added: "You see, this here is a 
job for a fellow with a No. 4 hat and 
a 44 shirt." 



Ignorance is the Great 
Curse! 

Do you know, for instance, the scientific difference between love and 
passion? 

Human life is full of hideous exhibits of wretchedness due to ignor- 
ance of sexual normality. 

Stupid, pernicious prudery long has blinded us to sexual truth. Science 
was slow in entering this vital field. In recent years ccmmercialists 
eyeing profits have unloaded many unscientific and dangerous sex books. 
Now, the world's great scientific minds are dealing with this subject upon 
which human happiness often depends. No longer is the subject taboo 
among intelligent people. 

We take pleasure in offering to the American public 
the work of one of the world's greatest authorities upon 
the question of sexual life. He is August Forel, M. D., 
Ph, D., LL. D., of Zurich, Switzerland. His book will 
open your eyes to yourself and explain many mysteries. 
You will be better for this knowledge. 

Every professional man and woman, those dealing with social, medical, 
criminal, legal, religious and educational matters will find this book of 
immediate value. Nurses, police officials, heads of public institutions, 
writers, judges, clergymen and teachers are urged to get this book at once. 

The subject is treated from every point of view. The chapter on "love 
and other irradiations of the sexual appetite" is a profound exposition 
of sex emotions — Contraceptive means discussed — Degeneracy exposed — 
A guide to all in domestic relations — A great book by a great man. 

^*The Sexual Question^ ^ 

Heretofore sold by subscription, only to physicians. Now offered to 
the public. Written in plain terms. Former price $5.50. Now sent pre- 
paid for $1,60. This is the revised and enlarged Marshall English transla- 
tion. Send check, money order or stamps. 

Gotham Book Society, Dept. 387 

General Dealers in Books, Sent on Mail Order 

142 West 23rd St., New York, N. Y. 



The British Columbia Federationist 



Room 217 
Labor Temple 
Vancouver, B. C. 
$1.25 Per Year 
Issued Weekly 



R. Parm Pettlpiece, Managing Editor 
A labor paper unparalleled by any labor paper of Canada. 
Endorsed by the Victoria Trades and Labor Council and 
New Westminster Trades and Labor Council. Official 
orj^an of the Vancouver Trades and Labor Council and 
British Columbia Federation of Labor. The paper for 
Industrial Unity. Political LTnitj-, Strength and Victory! 
If you do not take this paper you should subscribe today! 



Telephone Home A-4533 

HARRIMAN & RYCKMAN 

Attorneys at Law 

921 Higgins Building 

Los Angeles, Cal, 



Home A-2003 Main 61' 

A. J. STEVENS ' 

Dentist 

306 South Broadway 

Room 514 Los Angeles, CaJj 



The Western Comrade 



31 



Llano del Rio Co-operative Colony 



Llano, California 



^HIS is the greatest Community Enterprise ever launched 
. in America. 

The colony was founded by Job Harriman and is situated 
the beautiful Antelope Valley, Los Angeles County, Cali- 
rnia, a few hours' ride from Los Angeles. The community 
solving the problem of disemployment and business failure, 
d offers a way to provide for the future welfare of the 
Jikers and their families. 

Here is an example of co-operation in action. Llano del 
Colony is an enterprise unique in the history of com- 
-uiity groups. 

Some of the aims of the colony are: To solve the problem 
unemployment by providing steady employment for the 
)rkers; to assure safety and comfort for the future and for 
■i age; to guarantee education for the children in the best 
iliool under personal supervision, and to provide a social 
e amid surroundings better than can be found in the com- 
titive world. 

Some of these aims have been carried out during the 
ar since the colony began to work out the problems that 
afront pioneers. There are about 475 persons living at 
5 new town of Llano. There are now more than seventy 
pils in the schools, and several hundreds Eire expected to be 
rolled before a year shall have passed. Plans are under 
ly for a school building, which will cost several thousand 
Uars. The bonds have been voted and sold and there is 
thing to delay the building. 

Schools have opened for the fall term with classes ranging 
im the Montessori and kindergarten grades through the 
;ermediate which includes the first year in high school, 
lis gives the pupils an opportunity to take advanced sub- 
its, including languages in the colony school. About fifty 
pils have been enrolled. 

The colony owns a fine herd of about 100 head of Jersey 
d Holstein dairy cattle and is turning out a large amount 

dairy products. There is steady demand for our out- 
t. 

There are about 175 hogs in the pens, and among them a 
■ge number of good brood sows. This department will be 
ren special attention and ranks high in importance. 

The colony has sixty-eight work horses, a large tractor, 
o trucks and a number of automobiles. The poultry de- 
rtment has 2000 egg-making birds, some of them blue 
ibon prize winners. This department, as all others, is in the 
arge of an expert and it will expand rapidly. 

There are several hundred hares in the rabbitry and the 
inager of the department says the arrivals are in startling 
mbers. 

There are about 11,000 grape cuttings in the ground and 
susands of deciduous fruit and shade trees in the colony 
rsery. This department is being steadily extended. 

The community owns several hundred colonies of bees 
lich are producing honey. This department will be in- 

ased to several thousands. Several tons of honey are on 
nd. 



Among other industries the colony owns a steam laundry. 



^uplaning mill, a printing plant, a machine shop, a soil an- 
■'sis laboratory, and a number of other productive plants 

^ le contemplated, among them a cannery, a tannery, an ice 
,int, a shoe factory, knitting and weaving plant, a motion 
?ture company and factory. All of this machinery is not 
t set up owing to the stress of handling crops. 

The colonists are farming on a large scale with the use 
modern machinery, using scientific system and tried 
?thods. 



No more commissions will be paid for the sale of mem- 
berships or stock in the Llano del Rio Community. Every 
installment member should be a worker to secure new 
members. 

About 120 acres of garden was planted this year. The re- 
sults have been most gratifying. 

Social life in the colony is most delightful. Entertain- 
ments and dances are regularly established functions. Base- 
ball, basket-ball, tennis, swimming, fishing, hunting and all 
other sports and pastimes are popular with all ages. 

Several hundred acres are now in alfalfa, which is ex- 
pected to run six cuttings of heavy hay this season. There 
are two producing orchards and about fifty-five acres of 
young pear trees. Several hundred acres will be planted in 
pears and apples next year. 

Six hundred and forty acres have been set aside for a 
site for a city. The building department is making bricks 
for the construction of hundreds of homes. The city will 
be the only one of its kind in the world. It will be built 
with the end of being beautiful and utilitarian. 

There are 1000 memberships in the colony and over 700 
of them are subscribed for. It is believed that the remainder 
will be taken within the next few months. 

The broadest democracy prevails in the management of 
the colony. There is a directorate of nine, elected by the 
stockholders, and a community commission of nine, elected 
by the General Assembly — all persons over 18 voting. Abso- 
lute equality prevails in every respect. The ultimate popu- 
lation of this colony will be between 5000 and 6000 persons. 

The colony is organized as a corporation under the laws 
of California. The capitalization is $2,000,000. One thousand 
members are provided for. Each shareholder agrees to sub- 
scribe for 2000 shares of stock. 

Each pays cash ($750) for 750 shares. This will be in- 
creased to $1000 within a few months. 

Deferred payments on the remaining 1250 shares are made 
by deducting one dollar per day (or more, if the member 
wishes to pay more rapidly) from the $4 wage of the colonist. 

Out of the remaining $3 a day, the colonist gets the neces- 
sities and comforts of life. 

The balance remaining to the individual credit of the 
colonist may be drawn in cash out of the net proceeds of 
the enterprise. 

A per cent of the wages may be drawn in cash. 

Continuous employment is provided, and vacations ar- 
ranged as may be desired by the colonist. 

Each member holds an equal number of shares of stock 
as every other shareholder. 

Each member receives the same wage as every other 
member. 

In case anyone desires to leave the colony his shares 
and accumulated fund may be sold at any time. 

Are you tired of the competitive world? 

Do you want to get into a position where every hour's 
work will be for yourself and your family? Do you want 
assurance of employment and provisions for the future? Ask 
for the booklet entitled: "The Gateway to Freedom." Sub- 
scribe for The Western Comrade ($1.00 per year), and keep 
posted on the progress of the colony. Ask about our monthly 
payment installment membership. 

Address LLANO DEL RIO COMPANY, 924 Higgins build- 
ing, Los Angeles, California. 



Are You An Undesirable? 



HAVE you been an agitator in your vi- 
cinity ! Have you struggled and 
worked to make things better for humanity ? 
Have you developed a spirit of altruism, 
and thus become a rebel 
against the oppression of 
the capitalist autocracy? 
Have you been honestly 
and earnestly spreading 
the doctrine of discon- 
tent with the system of 
the despoilers 1 Have 
you talked and agitated 
for the coming co-opera- 
tive system? If so, you 
have friends and com- 
rades and loved ones, 
but you are undesirable 
so far as the capitalists 
and parasites are con- 
cerned. If you have 
achieved this much we 
want you to go a step 
farther. We want you- 
to come to the Llano del 
Rio Community where 
we are making a great 
demonstration of the co-operation for which 
you have worked. 

You see the future alike of farmers and 
city mechanic. You see the centralization 







\| 




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v^-a»-4j^ J 


A^'^i ^IsIHSk 


fi 


m^ 


»"r?to»<« 


f " "^flfe"^ 


l«^ 


w 


' ^"^ 


j^^^ 


|L». 


-*^. -i 


j00^^^ 


^IHI 


W. 


^.^''■: 


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■'iHfiitiir'--' 




' 



Sandbox and Irrigation Gates 



of wealth and the crushing down of the 
middle classes. You see expropriation and 
disemployment. You see your comrades go 
down and under in the fierceness of the 
struggle. Surely you are 
tired of the struggle in 
the competitive system, 
where remains the inex- 
orable the law of tooth 
and claw. 

AVhy not cast your lot 
with your comrades who 
for eighteen months 
have borne the brunt of 
the hardships in pioneer- 
ing at the Llano del Rio 
Co-operative Community 
in Los Angeles County, 
California. 

If you are tired of be- 
ing exploited and robbed 
and want to get the field 
social product of your 
efforts, turn to pages 15, 
16, 17, 18, 19 and 31 of 
this magazine and read 
the story of the wonder- 
ful progress that has been made by the Co- 
operative Community founded by Job Har- 
riman. If you are interested write for our 
booklet, "The Gateway to Freedom." 



"Modern society conducts its affairs under circumstances which 
create and maintain an ever increasing burden on all humanity. Man 
sustained in youth by the illusion that ability or good fortune will 
ultimately reward him with happiness through material success, learns 
sooner or later, that no peace can be his until the unmoral conditions 
of commercialism and industrial competition are removed." — From 
the Community Constitution. 

LLANO DEL RIO COMPANY 



Membership Department 



924 Higgins Building 



Los Angeles, California 



)ctober, 1915 



Ten Cents 





"anaticism in the Socialist Party— Job Harriman 




Men's 10-inch boots. $6.00 

Men's 12-inch boots. 7.00 

Men's 15-inch boots. 8.00 

Ladies' 12-in. boots.. 6.00 

Ladies' 15-in. boots.. 7.00 

Men's Elk -work shoes 4.00 
Men's Elk dress shoes 5.00 

Ladies' Elk shoes. . . 4.00 
Infants ' Elk shoes, 

1 to 5 1.50 

Child's Elk shoes, 

51/2 to 8 2.00 

Child's Elk shoes, 

8V2 to 11 2.50 

Misses' and Youths, 

111/2 to 2 3.00 




Place stocking foot on 
paper, drawing pencil 
around as per above Il- 
lustration. Pass tape 
around at lines with- 
out drawing tight. Give 
size usually worn. 



ELKSKIN 

BOOTS and SHOES 



Factory operated in connection 
with Llano Del Rio Colony 

IDEAL FOOTWEAR 

For Ranchers and Outdoor Men 



Tke famous Clifford Elkskin Snoes are ligktest and 
easiest for solid comfort and will outwear tnree pairs 
of ordinary snoes. 

We cover all lines from ladies,' men's 
and children's button or lace in light 
handsome patterns to the high boots for 
mountain, hunting, ranching or desert wear. 
Almost indestructible. 

Send in your orders by mail. Take 
measurement according to instructions. 
Out of town shoes made immediately on 
receipt of order. Send P. 0. order and state 
whether we shall forward by mail or express. 



SALES DEPARTMENT 



Llano del Rio Company 

922 Higgins Building, Los Angeles, Cal. 



CONTENTS 



Current Topics. By Frank E. Wolfe Page 5 

Fanaticism iVIeans Failure. By Job Harriman Page 9 

War's Pentecost. By Frank H. Ware Page 10 

Enemy's Child. By Charlotte Holmes Crawford ... Page 12 

Daughters of Joy. By Rose Sharland Page 14 

The Fable of the "Nut" By A. P. Gannon Page 14 

Industrial Activity Inspiring. By R. K. Williams. .Page 15 

Glimpse of the Diverse Activities of the Llano 

Community Page 16 

How We Live at Llano Page 21 

Learn Living and Loving. By Prudence Stokes 

Brown Page 22 

Success (Poem). By Ernest Wooster Page 23 

Capitalism's Justice — 1915 Page 24 

The Goal in Sight. By John M. Work Page 26 

State and Church Page 29 

CARTOONS 

The Czar's Doll Frontispiece 

In His Name? Page 6 

On the Gallipoli Peninsula Page 7 

Triumph of Man! Page S 

". . . . the Artillery Did Splendid Work" Page 10 

The Stay-at- Homes Page 11 

Aerial Craft Beware! Page 28 



The Czar's Doll 




"Oh, Dodd! Oh, Dodd! How my doUie has changed!" 



— Lustigc BJaetter 



The Western Comrade 



Political Action 



Devoted to the Cause of the Workers 



Co-operation 



Direct Action 



VOL. Ill 



LOS ANGELES, CAL., OCTOBER, 1915 



NUMBER 6 




The Community Dairy Herd Is Pastured on Alfalfa Fields Amid Ideal Surroundings 



CURRENT TOPICS 

By Frank E. Wolfe 



FAILURE to embroil the United States in war 
with Germany over the sinking of ships bearing 
American treasure and citizens has brought British 
capitalism to its senses. A more insidious and more 
effective way has been discovered. War loans will 
do the trick. One-half billion dollars was but half a 
bite at the cherry. More and more billions will fol- 
low. Nothing short of a run on every American bank 
can stop war loans. No one dare advocate these 
runs and depositors seem too stupid and too indif- 
ferent to understand their danger. 

A run on American banks would bankrupt the 
country and disclose the universal insolvency. Under 
the new conspiracy of British-American capitalism 
the country will be drained by a succession of these 
loans. Then they will want men ! AVe must be in- 
volved in the war and the masters are shrewd 



enough to know they can achieve it only by indirec- 
tion. 

The statement that the money does not leave the 
country is disingenuous. The gold certainly leaves 
the banks where the working class has deposited out 
of their meager earnings. The fact that these sav- 
ings find their way to the pockets of the steel kings 
and munition makers will prove of small consolation 
to the small depositor when he sees the sign hung on 
the barred door of the bank that has failed. The in- 
difference of the sodden and muddy-brained masses 
does not meau that there is not great latent poten- 
tiality to stampede. Indeed, it is the most stupid 
cattle that wildly burst through all barriers. 

In America we have long wrought for revolt and 
when the flame bursts forth in Eiurope who shall say 
it will not spread here ? 



The Western Comrade 




UNDER a reconstruction on a "saner basis Ameri- 
cans will be forced to throw off the yoke of 
capitalism and fall in line with the great adA^ance 
step of United Europe. 

For the ten thousandth time we will say the only 
thing that can prevent a bloody revoliition in Ameri- 




IN HIS NAME ? 
"Onward, Christian Soldiers." 



-Syclnej' Bulletin 



ca will be that a peaceful revolution comes swiftly 
through a great political, economic and industrial re- 
organization. 

If the sources of life be not Cjuickly taken from 
the hands of the exploiters, then nothing can pre- 
vent the cataclysm here. Reformers and revampers 
may well ponder these facts. 

Some day the Socialist will meet his former capi- 
talistie-bourgeoise-minded neighbor — if they both 



survive the struggle — and say, "Didn't I tell you it 
was coming? Now you see, Henry, it's here." 

* * * 

PRACTICALLY all Europe is now involved in the 
world's pentecost of war. Only the remoteness, 
or rather the fact that the Scandinavian countries are 
not in the pathway of the destroyers, has thus far 
saved them. Spain and Portugal are not yet in- 
volved, but both countries are only smouldering over 
volcanoes of revolt that will burst forth when the 
hour strikes. 

The upheaval in Europe will leave no throne, no 
royalty, no nobility and no shred of capitalism. The 
revolt will come at an hour when resistence will be 
swept aside. Trained, seasoned murderers on both 
sides of the contest may claim victims by countless 
thousands, but the struggle will be short and the re- 
constructive spirit will amaze the world with its 
speed and accomplishment. 

* * * 

BOILING and seething beneath the surface the 
revolt in Russia is taking form from day to day. 
Despite rigid censorship news leaks out from Moscow 
showing that the revolution is breeding there. 

On September 27 barricades were built in the 
streets and the students from the university led the 
battles. Eight high officials and twenty-five police 
officers were killed, while three students were killed 
and a dozen wounded. The body of one student lay 
all night in the street. 

A great demonstration took place at the funeral 
of the dead revolutionists, and the university men 
held the police back everywhere. In Petrograd, Ros- 
tov, Khai'kov and Odessa serious riots and disorders 
are reported though the censors have sought to sup- 
press the news. 

These fights are the forerunner of those certain to 
sweep over Russia a little later. In the coming re- 
volt every country in Europe will be involved, but 
each one will have its own revolution and they will 
probably only converge where large cities are near 
border lines. National boundaries will then disap- 
pear and the folk upheaval will take on a stronger 
international aspect than has ever been dreamed by 
even the most ardent theorists. 




The Western Comrade 




THE European War is about half over. Aiiother 
year may see its end. Tlie war debt will grow 
in greater ratio each month the struggle continues. 
The war has gone so far that every war bond will 
be repudiated. The struggling workers of Europe 
were already bearing a burden far beyond their en- 
durance. They cannot pay the debt or even the 
interest on the debt. The wealth prodiicers lie in 




ON THE GALLIPOLI PENINSULA 
"Did .vou ever see such a nut?" 

— Cleveland Plain Dealer 



the muddy trenches or hang in ghastly festoons on 
the barbed-wire entanglements. Repudiation is in- 
evitable and in the crash will come the revolution 
that will repudiate all debts and destroy all paper 
upon which is written the enslavement of one by 
another. 



CANADA has revived her hymn of hate and goije 
as fiercely into the Gott strafing business as 
any British-loathing German junker. 

The second verse of the National anthem, once 
stricken out, has been authorized by the Angelican 
Bishops at the general synod. The proclamation of 
the saintly gents state that in the time of war and 
tumult the verse may be sung with perfect pro- 
priety. All right here goes: 

O Lord, our God, arise! 
Scatter his armies, 

And make them fall. 
Confound their politics, 
Frustrate their knavish tricks. 
On Thee our hopes vfe fix. 

God save us all. 

Aside from the banality, crudity, and the fact that 
it is quaint to the point of grotesqueness, this seems 
fair enough. In fact, viewing the submarines and 
the Zeppelins, we would stand for even stronger 
dope thaii merely confounding politics or beshrew- 
ing the Kaiser for his knavish tricks. 

If men of God can stand in the pulpit and implore 
Jehova to destroy the armies of their enemy, why 
may not the congregation arise and sing, or even 
stand on chairs as did the Bishops, and roar out the 
words of this stodgy anthem ? Anyway, we like th'e 
omnibus ending, ' ' God save us all. ' ' 

But, of course, that means only us Britains — 
" Save us " — For what ? 

♦ * ♦ 

SOCIALISTS who have long known of the fright- 
ful maladjustment under capitalism may well 
draw much amusement from the antics of the 
bourgeoise iinder the process of expropriation now 
so apparent everywhere. The fact is that 96 per 
cent of the American people are desperately poor 
and that the remaining four per cent control all the 
vast wealth of the nation. 

In Los Angeles where the pinch comes the most 
severe on the middle class, it is am^ising to watch 
the squirm and to hear the squawk of the erstwhile 
proud possessor of sundry parcels of real estate — 
vacant lots or small houses for rent. Upper Spring 
street is a graveyard and vivid signs are there show- 



The Western Comrade 




ing the wreckage left by small merchants who have 
gone under. 

Few storekeepers are paying rent, and the ' ' help ' ' 
is frequently on half pay. Big department stores 
are giving "paper" for their advertising bills and 
thousands of disemployed flock the streets. Hun- 
dreds of homes are broken up and several families 
are found in one house. The seasonal workers are 
flocking into the cities, but they have not their old- 
time grub stake. 

On the highways the blanket stiff is joined by a 
new species. This is not the old-timer with a bindle 




TRIUMPH OF MAN! 
The Monk: "Yes, Darwin was right!" 

— Milwaukee Leader 



stick, but the disemployed city worker — clerks, 
salesmen, bookkeepers and other soft-handed capi- 
talist-minded paupers. On their faces one sees the 
first flush of eagerness of the adventure. Later 
these faces will be less pleasant to look upon. The 
youths are learning a lesson from the old timers 
and strange scenes are enacted after the mulligan 
is downed and the groups are gathered around 
flickering camp flres. These things are of California, 



but the tragedy of it is of every state. There is a 
terrific under current of thought in the world today. 
There will either be a swift, peaceful overturning of 
the economic and industrial world or there will be 
a tremendous revolution. These statements have 
been made a thousand times, but the hour is almost 
here. The crash is impending — but the masters, the 
96, are deaf and blind. "Will they wait too long? 

♦ ♦ ♦ 

JOHN SPABGO contributed much to the interest 
in the great Labor Day conference in New 
York. In speaking of the need for understanding 
and steadfastness, he declared that the ideal of So- 
cialism was to establish a great industrial democ- 
racy, wliere equality of opportunity pertained. He 
believed that society was now making tremendous 
strides toward collective ownership and that the 
war was hastening these strides. Capitalism was 
more and more leaving such great projects as the 
construction of the Panama Canal, the development 
of hygiene, etc., to the collectivity. He asserted, 
however, that that sort of collectivism was not So- 
cialism; that Socialists desire a collectivism shot 
through and through with the passion of democracy. 
"Out of the hell of Mars, out of the bloody mist 
of war will come the Socialist Movement chastened, 
less arrogant, less dogmatic than before, disciplined 
and awakened. It must face many practical prob- 
lems, and I hope that it will have the courage not 
to temporize." 

♦ * * 

IN the death of Kier Hardie, Socialism loses one 
of its greatest figures. Eighteen months has 
seen the taking away of some of the greatest figures 
in the world's movement: Bebel, Jaures, DeLeon, 
Hardie — leaders of radical thought of four coun- 
tries. Hardie 's loss at this time is a great blow to 
the radical movement. In the hour of the approach- 
ing world-wide upheaval, such men as these will 
be sorely missed. To the British Socialist the death 
of Kier Hardie comes as a personal bereavement. 
In the Socialist Movement at large, there is a keen 
sense of an irreparable loss. 







The Western Comrade 



Fanaticism Means Failure 



By JOB HARRIMAN 



WHAT is the trouble with the Socialist Party 
membership ? 

Why are there fewer members by cue hall" today 
than in 1912 ? 

Is there a shortage of propaganda material? No, 
the fields are white with harvest. 

Are we not in the midst of a world war ? 

Is not this fiendish struggle the ripe fruit of Capi- 
talism ? Are not the best men of the world being mur- 
dered in cold blood, by the powers, only for com- 
mercial supremacy? Is not the commissary of the 
world being impoverished? Is not starvation grip- 
ping the vitals of all Europe today? 

A shortage in Propaganda material! Have we not 
a panic in our own country? Has nature not blessed 
us with the largest crops in the history of our nation ? 
Is not the price of wheat low and the price of flour 
high ? Have we not millions of idle men willing and 
anxious to work? Are their farms and homes not 
good security for money if they could borrow? Are 
thej' not told by the money powers that there is no 
money to lend ? Are not the same bankers now lending 
$500,000,000 to the Allies for war purposes while they 
foreclose the mortgages on the farms and homes of 
our country because there is no money to led? 

A shortage in Propaganda material? 

Are we not now in the act of entering into a war 
with ^Mexico? 

Is our action not being forced by the land, mine 
and oil field proprietors of that country? Has not the 
Commission on Industrial Relations uncovered an in- 
ternal condition that is shaking our institutions to 
their very foundations? Are we not shipping millions 
of tons of food to feed the European war while our 
children starve at home? "Would it not be wiser to 
starve the war and feed our children? 

Surely our membership in the Socialist Party is 
not in a state of lethargy because there is no new prop- 
aganda matei'ial. Then what is the trouble? 

The trouble is with our methods. 

We are not practical. We are doctrinaries. We 
are traveling the road of the old S. L. P. We are mak- 
ing a fetish of our movement, a religion of our theories. 
We are Puritans. We are "absolutely right." "All 
others are wrong." We are the guardians of a "sa- 
cred" organization. We are weeding out the heretics. 
Only those who are "clear" may remain. We are 
sincere, honest and devoted. We are suspicious of 
others. "Those who are not with us are against us," 
are wrong — are dangerous. We are developing a fana- 



ticism that will be our downfall unless our course is 
changed. 

We believe we are right, but that does not make 
us right nor does it say we are wrong. It only says 
we believe. 

Believing a truth tliat we do not practice is as 
dangerous to the mind as believing a falsehood that we 
cannot practice. Belief alone leads to fanaticism. Ad- 
stract principles must be tested and sustained by prac- 
tical, concrete experiences. These experiences are the 
ballast ; without them the mind will flounder and sink. 

Truth and honesty alone will not sustain the mind. 
Mental, like bodily development, depends on action. 

Honest ? Of course our people are honest, but that 
will not save them. Every fanatic is honest. If he 
were not honest he eould not be a fanatic. An honest 
profound conviction is the essential element of fanatic- 
ism. Couple that conviction with sufficient experi- 
ence to convert the energy to some practical purpose 
and your fanatic will be resolved into a man of judg- 
ment and power. 

While our movement was small, practical opera- 
tions were impossible, and hence fanatics developed, 
but now that the movement is powerful it will demand 
practical men and practical operations or it will dis- 
solve and reorganize in some practical form. 

Nor must we deceive ourselves and insist that our 
course is right because we are happy in our belief. All 
people are happy in their belief else they could not 
believe. When one becomes unhappy in his belief his 
belief changes. After all belief is a sort of resting 
place for the mind. Stimulate it and it becomes a con- 
viction, put it to some practical purpose and it becomes 
a social passion, rob it of practicability and it leads 
to fanaticism. 

Mob psychology is made up of the psychology of 
its members and will be sober, well poised and de- 
termined if its work deals largely with practical af- 
fairs, but it will tend to fanaticism if it spends its 
energy in propaganda alone. 

I submit that the Socialist party spends the vast 
majority of its effort in propaganda and for this rea- 
son is moving toward fanaticism, as did the S. L. P. 
It will change its course. It will become more active 
in the labor movement and in co-operative enterprises 
or it will dissolve. Capitalism Avill be overthrown by 
an organization that can deliver more comforts to the 
people than Capitalism can deliver, or it will not be 
overthrown at all, talk, teach, preach, and argue as 
we mav. 



10 



The Western Comrade 

War's Pentecost 

By FRANK H. WARE 



1. r ANY thousands from the districts devastated by the cataclysm of war make their way to America. Most of them 
iVL have stories to tell. All disavow ability or intent to write them. This is one of the tales of an American who 
lived through some of the most momentous days at the front during the recent fighting in the Champagne district. 




N the swirl of the vortex I foimd myself 
beside a stretcher on which a white-faced 
boy lay staring upward. His lips were 
moving, but no sound came from them. 
In the grime and tilth of wounds and 
war his uniform was indistinguishable. 
Were the lips forming the words "Unser 
Vater, " " Notre Pere " or " Our Father ' ' ? 
I seized the stretcher and we followed the ghastly pro- 
cession into the dark, low, vault-like "hospital" ward. 
The sight of wounded and dying men caused a 
queer sensation to pass over me. A sensation that was 
half pity and half hatred. Pity for those in pain, 
hatred for those who caused it. But with the towns- 
people the sight of hundreds of wounded arriving 
every hour had steeled their hearts to the suffering, 

long ago. On the cots 

lay many who had lost 
arm or leg. Others, who 
had been blinded by hand 
grenades in close trench 
fighting, were being led 
around by nurses and doe- 
tors. But what surprised 
me most was the great 
number of grey-haired 
men, men past middle age, 
among the wounded. I 
expected to find for the 
most part young men — the 
flower of the nation, as 
they were called — but it 
was the reverse that 
greeted me. 

Why is it?" I asked a 
surgeon. He turned and 
walked away without 
answering 

"Why is it?" I asked 
of a nurse. She looked 
at me for u moment, then 
lowerd her head and 
passed on. 

It was because the 

flower of the nation 

were now either rotting in 




their graves or maimed and disfigured — the latter a 
menace to society for the remainder of their days. 
In but little more than a year twelve millions had been 
killed and wounded. 

I wandered over to where one of the wounded was 
sitting in a wheel chair. His face was pallid, but the 
deep furroughs that lined it and the drooping eyelids 
that would close for moments at a time bespoke of an 
intense siiffering. I noticed also that his right arm 
had been amputated above the elbow. 

"You must have been in a pretty tough battle?" 
I queried so as to open a conversation. 

He merely nodded his head in assent. I M'aited a 
few moments for him to say something and finally he 
raised the stump of his right arm so as to flaunt the 
empty sleeve in the air and said: "They're all tough." 

"If you don't mind, I'll 

tell you about the battle 
I was shot in," he added. 
I had come a long way 
to see this hospital and I 
anticipated hearing many 
recounts of battles, so I 
told him to go ahead. 

"It was in the Cham- 
paign district," he started 
out, "and our battalion 
was .joined by three oth- 
ers. We had orders to 
charge the enemy's 
trenches on the following 
day. Our artillery had 
done splendid work the 
day before and our ma- 
chine guns had raked 
down hundreds. 

"The day of the charge 
broke warm and sunny. 
Under cover of their own 
guns the enemy were 
mending their barbed- 
wire entanglements. All 
morning we kept up a 
desultory fire and it was 
nearly noon before the 
order came for the charge. 



the artillery did splendid work." 

— By .J. Gabrielse 



The Western Comrade 



11 



When it came we poured 
over our trenches and 
started for them. In a 
moment, machine guns 
were raiding us down by 
hundreds, but we were 
thousands. Then I seemed 
to go mad. My comrades 
were mad. Our lioarse 
cries echoed above us in 
the screaming shrapnel. 

"The first trench was 
filled with dead and dy- 
ing. Some of the enemy 
were fleeing. Others met 
us in desperation. The 
rest stood stupified with 
fear. Bayonets jabbed 
and thrust, each one drip- 
ping red. Blood was 
everywhere. 

"I remember stumbling 
and falling across the 
bodies of several of the 
enemy. On rising I no- 
ticed the attitudes of some 
of the dead. Many were 
in such life-like poses. 
One man looked as if he 
was just lying down rest- 
ing; his eyes were wide open and a faint smile played 
across his face. Another one was leaning against the 
side of the trench, one hand raised to his hip. While 
another still grasped the handles of a machine gun, 
his eyes peering through the sights, his body tense and 
rigid. Behind us, caught in the enemy's barbed wire, 
were many of our own comrades, their mouths wide 
open, their eyes staring at us, yet they were all dead. 
We, who live, envy those who die. 

. "It took but a glance to take this in and after run- 
ning on for ten j'ards or so I was in the thick of 
it again. I was mad again and I slashed and stabbed 
at this man and that ; trampling over the fallen, com- 
rades or enemy. Then came inky blackness. 

"When I awoke the stars were shining and dead 
were lying all around me. I tried to raise myself to 
look around, but everything swam before my eyes and 
I sank back again. The blood on my hands and face 
had dried and felt itchy. My head was burning and 
my hands and feet felt numb and cold. 

"It was cjuite some time before I tried to move 
again, but when I did a sharp pain on my right arm 
made me stop suddenly. With my left hand I reached 
over and slowly felt up and down to find the hurt. The 




The Stay-at-Homes 



arm had been slashed to 
the bone in several places. 
The ciits all over my 
body began to bxirn. Then 
I swooned. 

"In the hospital the 
doctors told me gangrene 
had set in and that they 
would have to amputate. 
At first I refused to sub- 
mit. I wanted thar avm 
and had to have it. With- 
out it I could not earn a 
living for the stay-at- 
homes — my wife and chil- 
dren. I fought them off 
time and again, but finally 
when tlie pain got so in- 
tense I submitted to the 
operation. 

"I now wear a metal 
cross. For it I show an 
empty sleeve. But in that 
battle nearly thirty thou- 
sand now wear a wooden 
cross. ' ' 

For a moment neither 
one of us spoke. Finally 
I broke the silence by 
asking: "When will 
these Caesers stop fighting?" He looked at me sharply 
for a moment before he answered: "When the fight- 
ers stop the Caesers." 

"When the fighters stop the Caesers?" I queried. 
Looking around cautiously before replying he 
leaned toward me and said in a low voice : "Yes. The 
time is near at hand when the masters will have had 
enough. They will try to call their men off the battle- 
fields to operate again the mills, mines, factories and 
farms. But the soldier of today is fast awakening. 
This war is teaching him a lesson. Whisperings in the 
trenches with his comrades during lulls in the fighting 
finds him eager to learn more. He sees why he is 
fighting. 

"Try him out now with some of the patriotic talk 
that roused him to such fervor when the master class 
was urging the workers to enlist!" The wounded man 
laughed a ghastly chuckle that at first seemed natural 
but ended in a horrible grimace of pain. Then he con- 
tinued : 

"At first the propagandists were few in numbers 
and when thej' were caught it went hard with them. 
Now — " I think his eyes twinkled as he said this, "now 
it is different!" 



-By J. Gabrielse 



12 



The Western Comrade 



Enemy's Child 

By CHARLOTTE HOLMES CRAWFORD in The Forum 




[ AIS, Madame, do not let them write it 
dowTi "de pere inconnu." "Father un- 
known" is mother dishonored. Say 
rather "enemy's child." 

How, Madame? If I am willing for 
le Gouvernement to take this Thing 
when it comes? What should I do with 
it, this Enemy's Brat? It is not mine. 
A woman bears her children a son homme a elle. This 
child is not mine. 

Oui, Madame, last night they brought me here on 
the road of iron with the wounded. I worked in the 
fields, I helped with the sick and buried the dead until 
my time was drawing near. 

A little while more and I shall bring forth a mon- 
ster, half French and half Enemy. Two heads it will 
have and two hearts, for never those two can make 
one. 

Quel age, Madame? Ten months ago I was nine- 
teen — nineteen, and betrothed to Mathieu. Now I 
am old, old and Mathieu — do you see this, here on the 
cord around my neck? That 'is what they gave me 
when I went for news of Mathieu. A great basketful 
of them and another and another. A harvest from 
the Marme. They searched in one and gave me this, 
Mathieu 's number. Mathieu, un numero ! Voila tout ! 
The river has taken him away. 

Oui, Madame, notre village. It has no need now 
to be — how do they say? — deleted by M'sieu le 
Censeur. Shall a heap of rubbish bear a name ? There 
is nothing more. Only ashes and debris and stupid, 
gaping walls. All, all gone. And of Mathieu, — rien 
que ca. 

Que voulez-vous? It is for France. 

Dost thou hear that, thou Enemy's Brat? 

The church — ah, Madame, you should see. The 
Holy Virgin in her niche was untouched. They say she 
hid her face when the first shell struck. She was 
good to our village. For so many years the crops 
were good. This year even — but this crop was 
not in. 

Combien, Madame? My father, my mother, I and 
Chariot. There were two between, but le bon Dieu 
was kind to them. They died before. 

Chariot was twelve, Madame. He was a good 
boy. M'sieu le Cure said he was a good boy. But 
hold, Madame. We spoiled him, we others. We 
thought there was no boy like Chariot. 

Chariot ! Chariot ! 



jMy mother laid him in my arms when he was but 
an hour old. "Via ton affaire," she said. 

Ah, Madame, to have a little brother to care for, it 
is almost better than to have a son. It was only yes- 
terday that I taught him to walk. Yesterday — a thou- 
sand years — it is the same. 

They came to our village as to the others. They 
took M'sieu le Maire, and said they Avould kill him 
if anyone in the village did not instantly obey. 

We were frightened. Had we not seen the poor ' 
people ? Oh, les pauv, gens ! Had we not heard the 
cries and the shooting in the dark? For every shot, 
a life. We were still. 

We kept in our house. The hours went by until 
we thought we should go mad with the tramping. 
Was the whole world come to France? At last. Chariot 
ran out. My father shouted to him, but he leaped 
through the door and was gone. 

"An instant, to see," he called back. 

He did not come and he did not come. All three, 
we went to find him. 

And then — 

"Melie! Melie!" 

It was Chariot's voice, calling me. I saw himi 
running toward me, and — he had no hands. Chariot 
had no hands. 

At last we stopped the bleeding. Then Thej' came, 
demanding to eat. One stood by the bed where 
Chariot was lying. 

"If the Prussians had done this in 1870," he said 
in French, "there would not be so many saere French- 
men left to fight now." 

They went through our hours. They found the 
gun, old and rusty, which mon grandpere had carried 
in 1870. We had hidden it, but they found it. 

One said, looking at Chariot: 

"At least, thou wilt not use it, thou." 

And Chariot — ah, Madame — he was but a child, 
and we had spoiled him — looked at his bloody bandages 
and smiled. 

"Ma foi, M'sieu I'Ennemi, I can learn to shooii 
with the feet." 

Madame, they took him out. They held us bounci 
to watch. They stood him up against the house — s(' 
little, ah, he looked so little standing there. . . 
Once he cried out: "Melie!" Shall I ever forget 
Melie; It was like when he was tout petit and afrai( 
in the dark. Then he sobbed: 

"C'est pour la patrie." 



i 



a 



The Western Comrade 



13 



Yes, Madame. They shot him. 

Chariot ! Chariot ! 

The nest day — was it? — I do not know. The days 
ill ran together after that. Someone had fired, they 
said, fired a shot for France. They overran the vil- 
lage, shooting, burning, and 

Ah, mon pere! 

"When they seized me, he hurled a stone. 

That time, they used the bayonet. 

I did not know any more for a long time. The 
good sisters found me and kept me ia the cellar of the 
:onvent till I was well again. 

Then first of all I thought of my mother. 

I went back to the village, — non, Madame, I will be 
kind. Tou shall not hear. Such things are not to 
liear. iloi, j'ai vu. I found my mother. "With a 
little stick, she was poking in the ashes where our 
liome had been. She did not know me. 

Day by day, I brought her food, the little that I 
could find. Then, one day, the wall — there was one 
left standing — fell down and crushed her. I pulled 
awaj' the stones from her, but she was dead. I set a 
stone at her head and another at her feet. They came 
from our fireplace. My little crucifix I laid upon her 
breast and I made the sign of the cross over her and 
said my prayers. I pray the Savior will forgive her 
the last sacrament. If not, Seigneur, I swear, those 
last days, I would take for them a thousand years of 
purgatory. Jesus, let them pass her hers. 

Ah, Madame, when I found that I had conceived! 

I ran to the Holy Mother where she stood un- 
liarmed in her niche. I knelt down among the stones 
and broken 'glass. Before I had never seen her so 
clearly. Always in the dim light of candles 
and the colored windows. Now she was all light, 
sunlight. 

Madame, I prayed to her to let me do the forbidden 
thing. I told her all why, so many reasons why. 

"A sign, give me a sign, Holy One," I prayed. 

A long time, I waited. The clouds were passing, 

one by one, away from the sun. It was one clear day 

in the long wet. Sometimes she was in shadow, 

ometimes bright. At last, I swear it, she shook 

her head 

"It is for France," I cried, and waited again. 

There was no answer, though I waited long. But 
she had shaken her head. The Holy Mother had 
;-Bshaken her head. 

The Medical Corps found me wandering and starv- 
ing. 

"Thou art strong. Thou canst help." 

So I did, Madame. Sometimes I helped with the 
wounded, sometimes I buried the dead. 



Always among the enemy dead and wounded, I 
kept looking, for I thought: 

"If I find him, the ravisher, maybe they will not 
need to write it down 'de pare inconnu.' " 

But I did not know him, Madame. How should I? 
There was not only one. 

So I said to the Hate-Thing within me: 

"When I look on him, leap Thou, that I may 
know. ' ' 

One day, I saw Them sliding by in the distance, 
except for their moving, like a piece of the plain be- 
hind Them. Only here and there the sun on their 
helmets. 

Then a red hate sprang up between me and 
Them. I spat toward Them. They marched like 
one creature. They were one creature — one Devil, 
the Enemy. 

And the Hate-Thing within me gave a great leap ! 
• Then I knew it was not the child of one, but of all — 
Enemy's Child. 

And I made up a song of rejoicing over their dead 
which I buried. When I was alone I sang it aloud. 
When I was not alone, it sang itself in me. 

"Blood pooling our furrows today — 
Enemy's blood: 
Fair green crops in our fields tomorrow! 
Lie there, little Enemy, fatten our fields'." 

Was I mad? I do not know. It sang itself in me. 

And often I laughed how they thought to conquer. 
Can French fields bear alien crops? Not though they 
are sown thick with enemy slain ! 

And the Hate-Thing within me grew and grew, and 
■n-ith it my hate. But the Holy Mother had shaken her 
head. Mary, forgive me that I murdered it many a 
day in my heart ! 

Mon Dieu, to have travail for an Enemy 's Brat ! 

Mon Dieu, how the night is long till the morrow! 

Oui, Madame, the paper. Bring it and I will sign 
it. Enemy's Child shall be Gouvernement's Child. 

An revoir, Madame. Priez pour moi ! 
***** 

Mais non, Madame, I cannot. He has the eyes of 
Chariot. On my arm they laid him, and I look at him 
for the first time, and his eyes, they are Chariot's. 
How can I give him up? 

Tell Gouvernement I will be French for two. 

Can a French field bear an alien crop? 
Ah, Madame, love is stronger than hate. My 
love has conquered my hate. And something soft 
and small in the crook of my arm, that sweetest 
sound, a soli of content and the tug of little lips 
at my breast. . . . 

All, see, he opens them, the eyes of Chariot. Mon 
fils a moi ! 



14 



The Western Comrade 

Daughters of Joy 

By ROSE SHARLAND in The Clarion 



WALKING arm-in-arm with soldiers or sailors, 
chucking this one imder the chin, patting that 
one on the cheek, laughing over the shoulder at the 
others, with a glad eye for all, what happy girls they 
seemed when the sea was all a-glitter and the sun 
scorching the hot sands ! 

Some of them would lie basking in the surf for hours, 
laughing shrilly when the waves dashed over their 
sunburnt arms and legs; and the sun, shining alike 
on the good and evil, rained his warm kisses on their 
faces — pretty faces, too, when the dimples came and 
went in the joy of the passing hour. And the saucy 
badinage of words with all and sundry, the ready wit, 
the quick jest, the careless freedom. 

Then one thought: '"Surely this a better life than 
long hours in a sweater's den, the paltry pence for 
long mechanical labor, and the pale, anaemic faces of 
the city by-ways ! ' ' Here at least was the free air and 
sunlight and sea. plenty to eat and drink, lots of pretty 
clothes, -and kisses by the score. 

The one with the innocent, wide, blue eyes was wear- 
ing a blue Madonna hood over her gold hair, and her 
flower face smiled childishly on all as she passed; and 
if a hard steely look came into those eyes at times, what 
wonder' She had her price and would not be beaten 
doAvn so long- as she had youth and beauty for the 
bargaining. Then the pretty dark one, so much sought 
after, M^hose pink dress brought out the rose bloom 
of her cheeks — of Nature's painting, too, as yet. Like 



a gay bird she hopped from one to the other, takiai 
where she would, and sparing of her kisses. Her voi 
and laugh were silvery, like a skylark at dawn in tl 
woods. She,' too, was a bird escaped from some nest 
but at what a price had she bought freedom! 
. At last the hot days went, the heavy rains fell, tU 
whole aspect of the outside world changed. Cold wind! 
whistled around the huts on the fore-shore — whistlei 
and shrieked and wailed : ' ' Lost, lost, all lost ! " til 
people indoors drew close to fires they had lighted am 
shuddered, for there, out in the rain, were the ga; 
girls, out to earn their bread. How pitiful the scant 
frocks looked then! The thin, white shoes soakei 
through, and the taM^dry chiffon clinging dank to th 
slim forms. 

Luck was against them, too, as they shivered am 
passed through the lashing gale. Night fell, am 
passed, and something impelled the woman with til 
sweet eyes who lived in the house by the sea to loo! 
out at dawn — the grey, chill, early da^^Ti of a eheei 
less summer day. There, huddled in a shelter, immoh 
PS death, sat two of the daughters of joy. 

They had spent the long cold night there. The birt 

of the air have nests, but girls who make a playthin 

of love have not where to lay their heads. U 

And the sweet woman with the mother soul shinin 

in her beautiful, pure eyes, said: 

"I cannot sleep now for thinking of those poor girli 
outside — alwavs outside. T have a daughter mvself. 



i^ 



The Fable of the "Nut" 



i 



By A. F. G^lNNON 



ONCE upon a time there was a Nut with a handful 
of hobnails jingling about in his Single-cylinder 
mentality until the latter developed a Knock. He de- 
cided that Malthus must have been off his feed Good 
and Proper when the poor boob pulled that "moral 
self-control" stuff, so, on the principle that it's bet- 
ter late than Never, the Nut set himself assiduously 
to remedy the Malthusian Miff. 

He had five notches' on the Healthy End of his 
Gat when the John Law Squad interrupted his Socio- 
logical Labors and landed him in Casa Queer, safe 
from the Infuriated Mob who resented his recent at- 
tempt to perforate their Rotund and respected fellow- 
citizen and Industrial Mogul, Jeremiah Coldcash. 

While the Nut was ruminating in the Dippy. Den, 



with his steering gear jammed at an angle of fort] 
five Degrees, on the cruelty of a cold and unappn 
eiative community, the citizens were heaving sighs ( 
relief and rushing into cold Print and Public Uttej 
ance with statements about the Hand of ProvidenJE 
being descernable in the delivery from death of 
esteemed townsman and benefactor, Jeremiah Cow 
cash." 

Jeremiah, being Jake, wrote out two fat chad 
one for the Police Relief and another for a wori 
Local Charity — then ordered his Agents to go dow 
to Kelly's Patch, where his tenements were loca^ei 
and jimmy into the Underfed Infant's Milk Fund wit 
a ten-percent increase of rentals all around. 

MORAL: Who's Loony Now? 



i 



h 



The Western Comrade 



15 




Section of Llano Showing Construction in Progress. Building in Foreground in Course ot Construction Is 

an Addition to the Ranch Office 



Industrial Activity Inspiring 



By R. K. WILLIAMS 




NE of our new members, a woman of 
lovely character and sweet personality, 
made the remark the other day that in 
all her travels she has at last found a 
place where one hears all the sounds of 
industrial activity and none of the ac- 
companying sounds of discontent. She 
is particularly charmed with the melo- 
dious ring of the anvil, the explosive exhaust of en- 
liines and the buzz of the saw as it ploughs its way 
through the wood. Afar over the fields and orchards 
the sounds travel, and mingling therewith is the song 
of men, content and strong, in the knowledge of abso- 
lute possession of the job. 

These little signs were significant things to her. 
Where else in the United States can the same be said? 
Coming directly, as she did, from the competitive 
struggle and the grind of life, these tokens of industry 
with harmony and peace made a deep impression upon 
her. 

The arching heavens continue to pour down an 
effulgence of light. Never a shadow darkens the broad 



reaches of the valley. Distances come and go, the 
mountains move and quicken under the rays of a soft 
October sun. The climate is superbly ideal. The 
mornings, as the sun is sending shafts of opalescent 
colors athwart the sky, has the zest of coming winter, 
but as it rises higher over the distant ranges of the 
Sierras, a gentle warmth permeates all things and 
Nature seems, indeed, at peace with herself. The 
evenings, brilliant and cool, lure one to the comfort of 
the bed and there are few here that spend wakeful or 
restless nights. 

It may sound like a sanitorium advertisement, but 
the truth is that generally, members of this colony 
sleep sounder than in places of the same size anywhere 
in the country. Doubtless this is due to the fact that 
we are over 3100 feet elev.ation and there is no fog or 
dew to encumber the atmosphere. Then, too, there is 
something else. That something else is simply a feel- 
ing — a feeling of security. 

We are growing as fast as it is safe to grow. In 
fact the problem of housing the incomers keep the 
building department working up to the limit. More 



Comrade 



17 



ies at the Llano Community 



laning 

Mill 

and 

Wood 

orking 

chinery 




)ne of 

the 

icksmith 
»hops 

at 
dustrial 
Center 




18 



The Western Comrade 




Type of the Temporary Clay Brick Houses at Llano 



than 77 new residents took up their abode in the col- 
ony during the past thirty days. This represents 27 
actual stockholders with working contracts. 

Visitors and prospects continue to come. Three hun- 
dred and twenty earnest people were the guests of the 
colony in the last month. One cannot help but be im- 
pressed with the earnestness displayed. The hotel is 
proving too small for the accommodation of the lium- 
bers that want to eat with us. So the building depart- 
ment is beginning the work of enlarging the assembly 
hall and when completed will add one-third more space, 
making a large room approximately 65 by 75 feet. 
"Whether this will be the limit of expansion is hard to 
say at this time. 

At one end of the hall will be the stage from which 
will be given dramatics and other entertainments. Its 
location will not interfere with the regular Saturday 
night dances. As time goes by these hops are becom- 
ing more popular for the reason that a dancing class 
under the direction of Mrs. Williams and Comrade A. 
A. Stewart has been started. The initial number sign- 
ing was 77. The ages 
ranged from 6 to 60. On 
Thursday evenings good 
feeling and enthusiasm 
runs high, for this is the 
night of the class. At 
present the class numbers 
about 100. Many of the 
timid ones have screwed 
up enough courage to 
learn to dance, so that it 
is safe to predict that 
within sixty days there 
will be but few people in 
the colony that will not be 
able to shake the "light 
fantastic toe." 

Owing to the distance 




Johanna, the Colony's Cliampioii Holstein 



from the hotel to the 
dairy and the number 
of men working there, 
arrange ments have 
been made to build a 
substantial bunk house 
for their accommoda- 
tion. The building will 
contain five rooms — 
three bedrooms 12x12, 
kitchen 12x16 and din- 
ing-room of 16x16 feet. 
In addition to the 
building, there will be 
placed two tents 12x12. 
Assurances are thus given that a great deal of incon- 
venience will be done away with and much comfort 
added to these hard working men. 

The library, which is a branch of the Los Angeles 
County Library, is growing. 

Several hundred volumes of books will be added 
to the library within a week. This is a donation of 
the Los Angeles Liberal Club and thanks is due AValter 
Collins, secretary of that organization. 

Other donations have been through Comrade 
Adolph Lofton of Lowgap, Washington, who is add- 
ing to the several hundred books he has already sent 
by making another shipment. Comrade Dr. A. J. 
Stevens of Los Angeles, Harry Thomas of Llano and 
others have also made donations to the library. 

The books give a wide choice of reading and they 
are much appreciated by the residents of Llano. The 
library is well patronized and much matter of the 
so-called heavier nature is in demand. Books on 
psychology and ethics are really popular. Fiction, 
however, continues to have a heavy call and at all 

hours readers will be 
, found pouring over maga- 
zines, books and newspa- 
pers. In the evening the 
library is completely 
filled w i t h interested 
readers. 

The high school, after 
so many vexatious delays 
will surely be started 
within a few days at 
most. Between 19 and 25 
pupils will be enrolled 
and probably by the time 
the school is in active op- 
eration the number will 
be increased as newcom- 
ers are arriving with sons 



The Western Comrade 



and daughters of high 
school degree. This work 
will be under C. AY. Hun- 
ton, who has had exten- 
sive experience in teach- 
ing and is a Socialist from 
the days of Edward Bel- 
lamy. Mr. Huntou has 
been active in the great 
social movement for many 
years and for the last sev- 
eral years had a substan- 
tial business in Grants 
Pass, Oregon. Comrade 
Hunton feels that history 
showing the different so- 
cial systems can be better taught here than at any other it from another angle it is most encouraging. It 
place in the country. There will he no hindrance to shows a spirit nothing short of marvelous to see peo- 
the giving of the true interpretation of histoiy. pie willing to come and help build this place and live 

The Montessori school introduced by the capable in cramped quarters and do without many of the old- 
Prudence Stokes Brown is a success, and she is simplj^ time comforts. Ever.yone realizes that we have a prin- 




19 

the permanent townsite. 
There are thirty-six 
foundations for the tem- 
porary brick houses laid 
and work is progressing 
rapidly. When houses are 
completed and ready for 
occupancy by the older 
residents, new members 
come and occupy the old 
quarters whether in tents 
or the hotel. So that a 
continual demand is made 
on the building depart- 
ment. In a way this is 
discouraging, but viewing 



overwhelmed with little folks who are enthusiastic 
over their learning new things and being so happily 
entertained. While conditions at the Goodwin place 
are not ideal, everything possible is being done to of- 
fer every facility to Mrs. Brown to forward her very 
important work. 

The elementary school will soon be completed and 
great satisfaction will prevail. The present quarters 
are very cramped and the teachers are laboring under 
a big handicap and will doubtless make the move with 
delight. Additional pupils are entering weekly so 
that all available space will be utilized. Considering 
the difficulties attendant upon the advent of school 
this year, great progress has been made and the genu- 
ine hard work gone through is appreciated by every- 
one. 

Incomers are amazed at the wr-.~\ accomplished in 
the brief time— eighteen months of the existence of 
the colony. It is un- 
necessary now to talk 
about the prospects and 
things we hope to do. 
So many things have 
been already done the 
premises of the future 
are perfectly patent. 
People now can realize 
that we intend to build 
a city. A model city 
in every way. Pressure 
in housing the people 
has kept back the 
work of building on 



cipality in the building and the fact that men and 
women used to luxuries are willing to submit to the 
discomforts of camp life is an evidence that it will 
come to fruition. 

It must not be inferred that everyone is suffering 
discomforts for such a statement would not be true. 
There are 600 people in this community and 90 per 
cent of them are very comfortably housed, indeed. 

Another building of interest to be erected will be 
one 70 by 24 feet. In this will be the laundry, sewing- 
room, drying-room, engine and power room and the 
creamery. This is to be located east of the bakery, 
which is just finished. Fires have been lighted under 
the oven and the colonists are enjoying the usual bake- 
shop delicacies. The fact that breads, pastries, etc., 
are baked in the bakery relieves tension in the kitchen 
materially and reflect itself largely in the increased 
variety on the menu of the dining-room. 



i ■ • 


A 
. LKI. 


W^' ■ - •' ■ fl^i^^^^k. ithn 







A Portion of One of the "Hoganized" Poultry Yards 



20 



The Western Comrade 



The fact that a charge of 25 cents per meal is now 
made, an innovation, does not deter visitors from com- 
ing. The money thus received is used to further im- 
prove the cuisine and table necessities. We are now 
charging $2 per round trip from Palmdale to the 
colony. This money goes a considerable way in keep- 
ing up repairs on the automobiles. As soon as we 
feel that adequate accommodation can be offered to 
the sojourners, a nightly charge will be made for beds. 
"We feel that in the above two items, people are get- 
ting more than their money's worth and we have no 
conscientious scruples about taking the money. A let- 
ter received a few days 
ago asks: "How do you 
run your Socialistic col- 
ony?" 

For the benefit of that 
inquirer, who doubtless 
will see this in The Com- 
rade, we would like to 
say that this is not a 
"Socialist colony" in the 
true acceptation of that 
word, as understood gen- 
erally by Socialists. This 
is a business concern, a 
live, solvent business in- 
stitution. If one wanted 
to actually define condi- 
tions here it might be 
termed communism, or 
closely allied thereto, and 
not Socialism, broadly 
speaking. Socialism 
means each according to 
his deeds, while commun- 
ism is interpreted to 

mean each according to 

his needs. The Llano del 

Eio Company is organized and existing under the laws 
of the State of California. A board of directors stands 
between the stockholders and the State. They are 
responsible for the company. The difference between 
this company and the Southern Pacific or any other 
company, is that the working members, who must be 
stockholders, receive the profits of the concern. The 
profits will not go to non-resident stockholders, but to 
the working members only. 

The question "being shorn of one's liberty" and 
"household goods being confiscated" ought to be 
cleared up. Fullest liberty exists within the colony. 
Every man, who has an idea, is invited to give it. The 
test of an idea or theory isTits workability. If two 
theories oppose in some particular occasion, as has 



occurred, an experiment settled the question. One i 
not compelled to wear any particular brand of clothin 
and none need lose his indentity, as has been suggestec 
Service is the only thing that counts in this colonj 
This has been frequently said, but for the benefit of th 
friendly inquiry, it must be reiterated. 

Household goods and personal property certain! 
belong to the individual. This is one of the cardin£i 
tenets of Socialism. Private property to be privatel 
owned and public property privately owned to be put 
licly used. Such a statement about goods being coi 
fiscated is preposterous. It is amusing to note the idea 

that some people have c 




Billy Young Riding Herd on tlie Llano 



the colony. They cannc 
believe that this is not a 
Utopia, Icaria, a City c 
the Sun, or some equa' 
ly phantastic propositioiPii 
No, we are grounded o 
economics and believ 
that when we shall havi 
solved the three eL 
mentals — food, clothinj 
and shelter, our ethici 
morals and intellectu; 
slants will follow. It :| 
true that we are the r 
suit of our digestion anj 
the people as a who' 
represent one vast dige; 
center. The Chinesi 
10,000 years ago, worke- 
this theory out prettj 
clearly. It still hoL 
good. We travel "on 
stomachs," and if t' 
man is fed, clothed an 
sheltered, he's a prett; 
amiable sort of thind 
As to the method of running the ranch, it can be briefl| 
stated that a board of managers, composed of the supeil 
intendent, managers and foremen of the various deparl 
ments, are cognizant of all the details of the place. t| 
the number of twenty-five or thirty, they seat then] 
selves each night at 7 o'clock around the long tabll 
and talk of the things done and the things to be donl 
on the morrow. Teams are received and placed, mi 
chinery of various sorts is shifted from place to placi 
and men as needed at various places are assigned s 
that the big book has a detailed account of the lay-ou 
for the next day's business. 

The meeting is not a parliamentary body, by an; 
means. No motions are made and no disputes arise a 
(Continued on Page 25) 



:k 



lei 



The Western Comrade 

How We Live at Llano 



21 



A WOMAN correspondent located in the northern 
part of the State writes asking what to bring to 
the colony in order to be comfortable in the house 
and the kind and quality of clothing, the method of 
* marketing, etc. 

It may be interesting to those contemplating join- 
ing us ultimately, to elaborate on this phase a little so 
*'i|that the women will have a more comprehensive idea 
of what women do and how they live. The men that 
come to the colony are well informed as to what they 
do and how they will pass their time, but the women 
folks are simply left to shift for themselves. 

In the first place, bring with you everything that 
you have been accustomed to using about the house. 
Don't give away washboards, tubs, oil stoves, cots, 
griddles, stove pipe and the like. . Many women make 
the mistake, when about to embark on the unknown 
sea of Llano, which to some is a tragedy of apprehen- 
sion, of leaving behind with some good friend, or actu- 
ally giving away some household necessity that would 
^be highly prized here. 

Don't forget the cookstove. Wood is used almost 
exclusively. If your stove is a coal burner it will burn 
wood satisfactorily. A gas stove will not be of much 
service at present. The present is what we are living in. 
Most families want to get settled as soon as possible 
and nothing takes the place of the old family stove. 
Its presence in the corner of a tent or house brings feel- 
ings of hominess. 

One woman brought with her several sacks of carpet 
rags, not knowing what else to do with them. Upon 
^ arrival here she found that they could be made into a 
substantial rug. She sent them to Los Angeles and 
in a short time she had in return a lovely carpet rug 
which now covers a floor, greatly enhancing the com- 
fort and looks of an otherwise plain tent. 

While we make cabinet stuff in the colony all the 
time, the work is pressing and local orders cannot 
always be kept up. So it is advisable to bring your 
cupboards, kitchen cabinets and kitchen tables and 
everything that appertains to the kitchen. 

The commissary is usually well supplied with the 
necessities and much of the time carrying so-called 
luxuries, yet it is expedient and advisable to bring with 
you as much food stuffs as you conveniently can. By 
so doing, you will not be compelled to go without your 
particular favorite thing that you have been accustomed 
to. Some families come to us so well supplied with 
canned goods and other table foods that for months 
they make but few demands on the commissary except 
for butter and milk. 



It often is hard for intending members to lay in a 
large supply of things accustomed to, yet if due thought 
is given this subject a good deal of deprivation will 
be averted. Incidentally this method will save the 
colony as a whole considerable money. 

Shoes are a prime necessity. The character of earth 
here is said to be hard on shoes. About this there is 
some doubt. Any place where sidewalks are not in 
evidence shoe leather goes very rapidly. It is sug- 
gested that the housewife supply herself and children 
well with sufficient good, substantial footgear, to last 
a reasonable length of time. While it is all right for 
a person to get and demand commissary supplies the 
moment of arrival, after having a working contract 
and entrance fee paid, yet it seems like an imposition 
upon those who are already here for a long time. This 
matter is rather delicate to explain, so consider it best 
to do the best you can for yourself, and by so doing 
you will protect others. 

The question as to how the women folks dress in 
Llano can be siinply answered by saying practically in 
the same manner that one lives at home. Fancy 
clothes, to be sure, are not needed to any great extent, 
although on many occasions good and expensive cloth- 
ing is and can be worn. Middle blouses and skirts are 
popular and other simple things of that sort. The 
writer is not up on clothes parlance, hence he cannot 
give the proper names. Khaki is not worn as much as 
you would imagine. Whipcord skirts are occasionally 
seen, but good serviceable house dresses can be always 
used. Come with a good supply of these things on 
hand. 

It is requested that patrons of the store arrange to 
get supplies but once a day. This is made to keep 
down extra and unnecessary bookkeeping. The family 
sends the children to the store as in any place, and the 
goods ordered are carried home and a charge made 
against the credit of the colonist. In this connection it 
is well to suggest that you come with market baskets. 
Occasionally we run out of them and the distance from 
the source of supply precludes the possibility of a 
qi;ick replenishment. As to charging, the colony does 
not make a profit from goods sold to colonists. The 
prices are figured as nearly to cost as possible and the 
amount of the things supplied is charged to the account 
of the working member, thus obviating the necessity 
of using money. Every working member who has a 
contract gets $4 per day so there is usually ample 
credit to take care of all purchases. 

What is your social life? We live just the same 
(Continued on Page 25) 



22 



The Western Comrade 



Learn Living and Loving 

By PRUDENCE STOKES BROWN 



THE Montessori School at Llano is established. 
Forty-five children ranging from 3 to 6 gather 
at the hotel five mornings in the week and are taken 
in autos to the Goodwin ranch. The beautiful old 
place with its cottonwood trees, its flowing brook and 
old ranch house, now serves as the "children's house," 
the "Casa Di Bambini," the "kindergarten" or child 
garden — either of these names will do. The facts are 
what iiiterest the children, and the fathers and moth- 
ers of Llano. 

Here the children practice "living and loving" 
from nine o'clock in the morning until fcur o'clock in 
the afternoon. Here they find a home that invites 
orderly, active and rational thinking. Here is a yard, 
swings and trapeze ; a large, well filled sand table of 
convenient height, and sand box on the ground; water- 
ing pots and garden tools, and the delight of water in 
abundance flowing over stones and pebbles ; a beauti- 
ful, good natured Spitz dog ; a kindly old mother cat 
with a well behaved kitten; a few good old mother 
hens and birds that come and go as they choose, 
drinking from the stream and eating the crumbs the 
children sweep from the tables and floor after the noon- 
day meal. 

The house is not the permanent Montessori school 
building, but a comfortable old ranch house with floor 
space for fifty children; a dining room that has been 
fitted with tables to seat them; cupboards suitable to 
the size of the children, and the number of dishes they 
require; low sinks for washing these dishes — and I 
must not forget to say that our tables and cupboards 
are made in Llano's own carpenter shop by men who 
know just how to plan and construct in the most con- 
venient and efficient manner. I mention this because I 
feel that the very presence of furniture made at home 
serves to draw out from those using it a feeling of 
respect and admiration. 

There are couches on which the children rest and 
sleep ; a kitchen with all necessary appointments — and 
here in this house of childhood, after only one month, 
the children are adapting themselves as naturally to 
these home conditions, and the liberty of using them, 
as we could expect. That is saying a great deal, but 
we expect wonders — we who study Dr. Montessori 's 
scientific pedagogy. 

A word for co-operation. 

In Llano everybody co-operates to make conditions 
for children. When we wanted sand only a word went 
forth and we had a half dozen boys and girls with 



horse and wagon ott' to the wash for sand. They siftej 
and sacked sand as heartily as they played basketball 
We wanted swings; and the young man herding cotaI H'I"' 
in a nearby pasture left the cattle grazing in the a 
falfa and in a few moments had constructed bars an 
put up swings. When time for two little tots to g 
home, who live in an opposite direction from the res 
the gallant "cowboy" takes them home on his horsi 
When cleaning up, not only the sanitary commission 
at hand, but women of culture and refinement ; wome 
who know just exactly how to clean house- — eve 
t.hoi;gh they have been known in England as militar 
suft'ragists and have gone to jail upholding the:- 
principles. 

For the noon lunch the call goes forth for mill? 
and gallons, not quarts, are delivered at our door. "W 
{)refer to make the sandwiches and salads at the schoc 
instead of having each child bring his oAvn, and a eon 
mittee of women take this matter in hand and bot 
fruit and salads come from the hotel and store. 

Co-operation spells success, and Llano's Montessoi 
School is heading straight for that point. I doubt 
there is in the state of California a Montessori Scho( 
promising as much life and liberty to childhood as th, 
one now established at Llano. 

The interest that is being shown by parents aniBijIii 
others who were at first doubtful about the practicabi 
ity of the Montessori school is most encouragini 
Nearly every member of the community is ready t 
contribute his or her effort to assist in our worl 
It is inspiring to receive this assistance. 

Doctor Maria Montessori is giving a course of tweh 
lectures in San Francisco. The object is to give tli 
public an opportunity to hear from the founder of th 
tiew science of pedagogy the fundamental principlt, i 
of the method, and also to give the parents a bettel] 
understanding of the child and his needs. 

The subjects are as follows: "Discipline in Litt.jl 
Children"; "Exercises of Practical Life"; "Tli 
Foundation of Auto Education"; "Intellectual Wor ' 
and Mental Hygiene"; "The Intelligence"; "Tl.j 
Imagination of the Child"; "The Foundation of tl;| 
Imagination"; "The Education of the Will"; "Mor; 
Education," and "The Social Responsibility of tl i 
Mother." The last two lectures will be a presentatio |' 
of the material used in the Montessori schools. 

J. Stitt Wilson, his wife and daughter, took thj 
Third International Training Course for teachers, anl 
graduated from San Francisco last August. 



The Western Comrade 



23 



Success 



By ERNEST WOOSTER 



IS 



acher 



pitalist 



This old world of ours is so fuimy the 
Powers that made it must ehortle 
with glee 

"From the day we are boru to the toot 
of the horn, everything is but 
God's just decree. 

There's a reason obscure, but a good 
one, be sure, for poverty, suff 'ring 
and sin; 

And it's sacred — don't doiibt, or at- 
tempt to find out how M'e got in 
the fix we are in.'" 

All blandly we're told that it's no 
use to scold — but give thanks to 
the Lord in the sky — ■ 

Trust to him our aii'airs, faithfully 
kneel at our prayers — we will get 
our reward when we die. 

Though industrially robbed and judi- 
cially jobbed from the cradle clear 
through to the grave. 

And with brain and with brawn we 
nuist toil till life's gone iu an un- 
fruitful eil'ort to save — 

Yet we musn't complain (that's the 
preacher's refrain) but all meekly 
be lowly and good! 

"Be frugal! Don't spend!" financiers 
recommend (what would happen 
to us if we should?) 

There's a world of advice to be had 
without price, and it claims we can 
all get ahead; 

Says there's no reason wh.y we should 
fail if we try and give heed to 
the things that are said: 

There are ways, be assured, that the 
coin can be lured, proven ways 
that we must not despise — 

And the first one, though old (to be- 
lieve as we're told) is to care- 
fully economize. 

If we'd do without phones, eat no 
more ice cream cones, and forget 
all about union r\iles; 

Were content with oiir lot, glad to 
get what we've got, and would sell 
all our diamonds and jewels; 

If we didn't drink booze, and we wore 
cheaper shoes, and chewed no to- 
bacco or gum; 

Drove no automobiles, and consumed 
cheaper meals — we surely could 
save quite a s\im. 

These optimists state it's not hard to 
beat Fate; there's a way if there's 
only a will ; 



So it wouldn't be hard, if we plowed 
the back yard, tO' cut down the 
vegetable bill. 

We could sell what we grow, pay the 

bills that we owe, and live better 

than we can live now: 
More, the fund will increase if we buy 

lis some geese, and a pig and some 

hens and a cow. 
Then the bank account grows when we 

buy no new clothes, but wear out 

the old ones instead ; 
Wear the pants of last year Avitli a 

patch in the rear, and spend all our 

evenings in bed ; 
Don't incur the expense that the 

"movie" presents, but go to the 

preaeking, that's free — 
(But you bet we won't wait till they 

pass round the plate — we'll save 

some more money, you see) 
Yes, we're told there's a chance, for all 

who wear pants, to in time become 

president, 
Or a smug millionaire if with thrift- 

iness rare we cling like a leech to 

each cent, 
And but wisely invest in the manner 

that's best — our fortunes will soon 

be secure : 
Y'et it seems passing strange that poor 

folks never change, but always 

continue so poor. 

Yes, we played at your game, but the 

wealth never came, so we think 

your advice is a sell — 
Though in church you may pray, yet 

we'll all stay away, take chances 

on going to Hell. 
We have a new plan, and we'll get 

every man, each believer in jiis- 

tiee and right. 
For the Socialist scheme is now more 

than a dream — it has grown to be 

real over night. 
You may lie, steal and shirk, you may 

live without work, where Profit is 

still to be beat, 
But though it seems queer, you cannot 

do it here — you must work here or 

else you don't eat. 
Yet if you do your share, and you do 

what is fair, you'll prosper along 

with the rest. 
So keep your advice, we've all paid the 

price, and we know that our way 

is the best. 



And 

Be 

Rich 



But 

We 

Went 

to 

Llano 



24 



The Western Comrade 

Capitalism's Justice — 1915 



T 



HE following is an extract from the court records in the trial of M. A. Schmidt, charged with murder in connec 
tion with the destruction of the Los Angeles Times in 1910. The prosecution Is proceeding on the theory ths 
the building was destroyed by dynamite. The defense contends that it was gas. Behold the decision of Judge Will: 
in the selection of the jury. 



k 



Capitalism's Juror 
JUROR Charles Hughes, A RETIRED CAPITALIST, 
J being examined, testified in part as follows: 
- Question : And the defendant would have to prove 
it to you? 

Answer: I think he would, yes sir. 

Question: And do you start in the trial with 

the firm, positive conviction that this building was 

destroyed by dynamite with intent to take human 

life? 

Answer : Yes sir. 

******* 

Question: Yes, and if the defendant wanted to 
establish to your satisfaction that it was done with 
gas accidentally, he would have to introduce some 
proof, wouldn't he? 

Answer : If that is a necessary element in the case, 
he would have to do that. 

Question: Then if the District Attorney, in the 
presentation of his case against the defendant, did not 
remove from your mind the belief, which is now there, 
that it was done by means of dynamite, you would not 
require any proof on that question from the people, 
would you? 

Answer: I would be inclined to believe that the 
building was destroyed by dynamite. 

Question: Now, you understand that is the posi- 
tion of the District Attorney? 

Answer : Yes sir. 

Question : And upon that point you would not re- 
quire any proof from the District Attorney, would you ? 

Answer : No. 

* ^i: * * * * * 

Question : Then you go into the trial of this case 
with your mind made up upon that question? 

Answer: Yes sir. 

******* 

Question: "Well, you say you would give Uiiu a 

fair and impartial trial. That statement is also coupled 

with the mental reservation that you have this opinion 

which would affect your judgment? 

Answer : To a certain extent, yes sir. 

******* 

Question: You wouldn't be satisfied, would you, 
Mr. Hughes, to take that as a fact, that the Times 
building was destroyed by dynamite, from what you 
read in the newspapers in regard to the guilt or in- 
nocence of this defendant? 

Answer: Well, connecting the defendant with it, 
if the prosecution did that, I should take that part of 
it as settled. 

THE ABOVE .JUROR, A RETIRED CAPITALIST, 
WAS CHALLENGED BY THE DEFENSE FOR HAV- 
ING A FIXED OPINION THAT IT WAS DYNAMITE 
THE COURT DENIED THE CHALLENGE. 



I 



l5 



ill 



i 



11 



(I 



Labor's Juror 
T UROR John A. Horton, A DAY LABORER, b^ 
J examined, testified as follows : 

Question: Have you ever formed any opinioi 
to the cause of the disaster? 

Answer: Well, what I know about it and "w 
I heard about it I thought at the time it was caij 
by gas explosion. 

Question : That is the way your mind is now ? 

Answer: That is the way I had it. 

Question: You think the source of your infor| 
tion on that convinces you that it was gas? 

Answer: I thought so all the time, and I li 
always contended that that was what it was. 

Question: All you have read and heard confil 
you in that view? 

Answer: Yes sir. 

Question: You still believe it? 

Answer: I still believe it, to a certain extent 
couldn't believe anything else; wasn't anything 
proven to me. I couldn't believe anything else. 

Mr. Keyes: What is that answer? (Answer re< 

Mr. Harriman: You think that opinion is so fir 
fixed in your mind that you Avould be unable to 
it aside? 

Answer : Well, it would have to be proven other'\i 

Question : From what you have known — from v,i\' 
you have heard — before you came to this courtron, 
what you have read in the papers, you say you feel 1at 
your opinion that the building was blown up by gaiiK^ 
so firmly fixed that it would require evidence to 
lodge that opinion? 

Answer : Yes sir. 

Question: So you feel now that this defenda 
innocent ? 

Answer: Yes sir. 

Question: And could not possibly be guilty! 
that offense until the opinion in your mind that it a? 
blown up by gas, is dislodged and another establish!' 

Answer: Yes sir. 

Question: They would have to prove his guilt I| 
beyond a reasonable doubt? 

Answer: Yes sir. 

Question : By establishing the fact that that bt)| 
ing was blown up by dynamite, and that he had sole- 
thing to do with it, before you could find him guiy? 

Answer: Yes sir. 

Question: This opinion that you have, that it ,as 
blown up by gas, would go with you into the jury 1 x, 
if you were chosen, would it? 

Answer: Yes sir. 

THE ABOVE JUROR, A DAY LABORER, ^i.S 
CHAJjLENGED by THE STATE FOR HAVING [A 
FIXED OPINION THAT IT WAS GAS. THE COUT. 
SUSTAINED THE CHALLENGE. 



I 



The Western Comrade 



25 



[ndustrial Activity Inspiring 



(Continued from Page 20) 



!y are contemplating things and 
iVili ilJug with facts. There is no 
mce for a difference of opinion to 
se, as some man around that table 
II be found who is thoroughly 
niliar with every question that 
ses, and can explain it. 
This body makes no rules, for 
les will not run a ranch. Con- 
;ions govern, and efforts toward 
seting conditions are soon de- 
•mined upon. 

There is no semblance between 

is body and the Socialist local, as 

IS suggested. The difference is 

I! it the one is dealing with ma- 

:ial, concrete things and the other 

handling abstractions. 

Real knowledge can be gleaned 

infljin close attendance on these 

;etings. Visitors are requested to 

tend meetings of this board and 

■ so doing a clearer idea of how 

a successful business is run. A mil- 

B inaire recently sat in the session 

;d afterward remarked that he 

n d not see how a business of this 

6 ,ture could not succeed when so 



many men knew how to run it. 

Halloween was a gala night in 
Llano and a masquerade was held. 
Good times are always in happy 
anticipation, not only for local 
celebrations but for the greater and 
more permanent happiness in the 
not distant future. 

The annual meeting of the Llano 
del Rio Company proved most in- 
teresting and the financial report 
of Secretary Gentry P. McCorkle 
was received with profound satis- 
faction. Aside from the incidental 
excitement of the election the meet- 
ing was devoid of important inci- 
dents. The following were elected 
directors : Job Harriman, D. J. 
Wilson, W. A. Bngle, Frank E. 
Wolfe, G. P. McCorkle, A. F. Snell, 
0. W. Luton, G. E. Etherton and 
J. J. Leslie. Of these the first seven 
were re-elected. In the organiza- 
tion meeting that followed, Job 
Harriman was elected President ; D. 
J. Wilson, Vice-President, G. P. ilc- 
Corkle, Secretary, . and Frank E. 
Wolfe, Treasurer. 



How We Live at Llano 



(Continued from Page 21) 



:re as you do in your own places. 

e have groups of friends visit 

we visit them. AVe have lately 

rmed a card club and go to a 

j.fferent home each week ; play 

- Jirds for an hour and a half and 
len have some refreshments, con- 
iSting of two things — for instance, 
bflfee and cake, pie and coffee, nuts 
nd raisins, candy and nuts and 

- ny other combinations that can be 
iTved that will number two. Be- 
bre the club was arranged this 
natter was agreed upon. 

' Then we have dances on Satur- 
|ay evenings. At this function we 
■ jress up in our best and somehow 
ir other we don't feel a bit em- 
barrassed. A general good time 
'. always had. We renew our ac- 
jaaintanceship with one another 
;Qd altogether we are exceedingly 
■iendly and go home with a feel- 
ig that an evening has been well 
pent. At the dance, usually, we 
ave a good orchestra, composed 
f violin, cornet and piano. 



Many women worry over the 
question whether they will be able 
to have their laundry done as in the 
cities. This can be answered by 
saying that our laundry facilities 
are not strictly up to date, but we 
have a regular laundry outfit, but 
it is not as yet set up, but will soon 
be installed and all kinds of work 
will be done and done promptly. 
At the present time a very efficient 
laundry service is in vogue and 
regular family washing is done on 
stated days. The hotel laundry is 
a regular thing and the single men 
have to be looked after in this re- 
gard. So far there has been very 
little complaint on this score and 
no newcomer need worry particu- 
larly about this phase of colony 
life. 

However, it is well to bring your 
own washtubs, boilers, washboards 
and such, so that you can do your 
own laundry. There have been 
many who left these necessary 
things behind, but on arriving here 



PEARSONS 

is the only Magazine 
of its kind 

This is why: — 

Three years ago Pearson's decided to 
be a free magazine. 

This is what it did: — 



ABANDONED FANCY COVERS 
CUT OUT COLORED PICTURES 
ADOPTED PLAIN PAPER 

This was the purpose: — 

A plain form would enable the mag- 
azine to live on its income from sub- 
scriptions and monthly sales. It 
would not have to consider the effect 
on advertisers when it wanted to print 
the truth about any public question. 

This was the result: — 

Pearson's nou> prints the truth about 
some question which affects your wel- 
fare in every issue. It prints facts 
which no magazine that de- 
pends on advertising could 
'•afford ' ' to print. 

And, with all this, Pearsons still prints 
as much fiction and entertainment 
articles as other magazines. If you 
want plain facts instead of pretty 
pictures buy a copy on the news 
stand for 15 cents, or subscribe by 
the year for $1.50. 

By special arrangement with Pear- 
son's we are able to make you the 
following clubbing offer. 

You can get both PEAR- 
SON'S MAGAZINE and 
THE WESTERN COM- 
RADE for one year by ; 
sending $1.50 (the price of 
Pearson's alone) to 

The Western Comrade 

923 HIGGINS BLDG. 
LOS ANGELES, CALIF. 



WILL TRADE 

Equity in ia acres (or your Llano 
Co-operative shares. First come first 
served. My land is choice Thompson 
seedless soil, first water right, church 
ditch, 62 V4 cents per acre. Small 
house, barn. well, fenced, and ten 
acres in Thompson seedless grapes. 

H. T, CLARK, Mail Carrier 
Kerman, California 



26 



The American Socialist 

Official Organ of the 

Socialist Party of America. 

The American Socialist speaks 
with authority. It is a powerful 
news and propaganda weekly 
and is the only paper in the 
United States which gives an 
account of the official business 
of the Socialist Party. 

Every Socialist. Every Student of Socia- 
lism should be a subscriber. 

Subscription Price 

50 cents a year. 



The American Socialist and The 
Western Comrade can be had in 
combination for one year by send- 
ing $1.25 to 

THE WESTERN COMRADE 

924 Higgins Building 
Los Angeles, Cal. 



The Western Comrade 

found their mistake. Many times 
one wishes to wash some article 
that would be troublesome to have 
done in the laundry. 

The homes have been so arranged 
that domestic ditches run close to 
them, so that the water question 
never bothers anyone. Many resi- 
dents have water barrels, which 
they fill occasionally, and others 
use bags and buckets. This matter 
is simply a question of choice. For 
hot water at home on wash days, 
a few minutes will suffice to con- 
struct a temporary outdoor . wash 
fire which can be made between 
walls of brick, and water heated 
there. This can be done when the 
stove is not in Avorking order. 

Families on arriving here, that 
are not accompanied by their 
household goods, usually go to the 
hotel, where meals are served at 
6 :30 a. m., 12 noon and at 5 :30 p. m. 



"The Great Working Class Daily" 

MILWAUKEE 
LEADER 

"Unawed by Influence 
and Unbribed by Gain" 

Editor — Victor L,. Berger. 
assistants— James Howe, A. M. Sim- 
ons, Osmore Smith, Thomas S. An- 
drews. 



Tlie T^eader is published in America's 
stronghold of Socialism. It is the 
greatest English Socialist Daily in the 
vol 111. It is a Modern Metropolitan 
Daily, containing the latest news. 

Among its distinctive features are: 

SOCIALIST NEWS PAGE, LA- 
BOR NEWS PAGE, SPORTING 
PAGE. MAGAZINE SECTION, 
WOMAN'S PAGE, EDITORIAL 
PAGE. 

The price of The Leader is 25c per 
month; ifS.OO per year. 

Combination offer with 

The WESTERN COMRADE 

Eodi for one year for $3.00 (the 
price of the Milwaukee Leader alone). 

Address: 

Circulation Department 

923 Higgins BIdg., 

Los Angeles, Calif. 




'01 

d 

d 
(oi 



These meals are indeed substan 
and good and there is very li 
complaint on this score. 

"We hope that these dome 
things are somewhat cleared 
Avould be glad to place ourselvei 
the service of anyone wish 
further information overlooked' 
forgotten. 

Upon your arrival here much 
depend on your former experie 
and your own strength of cl 
acter. Sometimes the tender! 
from the East bears the incom 
iences incidental to the pioneei 
better than those who think t 
have roughed it in the West. _, 

To some small mishaps are e2 [ 
gerated into misfortunes and a 
dents of minor character beci 
calamities. Many who were inc 
venienced by lack of housing a 
weeks ago are now snugly es' 
lished for the winter. — R. K. W 



The Goal in Sight 



By JOHN M. WORK 



T N a previous article I pointed 
out that it is one of our great 
tasks to break down and destroy 
the economic conservatism in the 
minds of the people, so that their 
minds will become ripe for So- 
cialism. 

We are doing it very fast. 

In the past ten years we have 
been able to see this conservatism, 
this prejudice against Socialism, 
gradually disappear before our 
eyes. 

We have destroyed at least half 
of it in these ten years. I do not 
mean that half the people have 
come to the point where they vote 
the Socialist ticket. I mean that 
at least half the prejudice has dis- 
appeared. 

In other words, the people of the 
United States have swung at least 
half way over to Socialism in the 
past ten years. 

In a few more years the rest of 
the prejudice will disappear and 
they will swing the rest of the way. 

Then their minds will be ripe for 
Socialism. 

And we will then have Socialism. 

But, do not think the task of 
battering down the remainder of 
this prejudice is going to be easy. 
Do not allow yourself to be fooled 



It 



Is 



m 

lii' 



«( 



fell, 



into believing that our troubles 
over. Do not get the idea that^ lilial 
path from here to the co-opera 
commonwealth is a smooth 
gentle incline. 

If you do, you will find youi 
terribly mistaken. 

On the contrary, there are mi 
tains to climb, cliffs to scale, 
gles to penetrate, rivers to f 
and wild beasts to overcome, be: 
the goal can be reached. 

We shall see plenty of reve 
before our final victory. 

And when the reverses come, 
faint-hearted will sneak to c< 
as usual and leave the old guar™ 
fight the battles. 

But the old guard constantly] 
creases in numbers. The bat 
will be fought. All obstacles ill 
be overcome. The goal will 
reached. 

The ranks of the old guard re 
always open for recruits. 

Don't be a fair-weather Sociast. 
Don't be a faint-heart. Don't be 
a craven. 

Join the old guard and makejljp 
your mind that you will be on 
firing line in the thick of the fi it. 
at the times that try men's sols, 
as well as when the enemy is in 
retreat. 



'I 



The Western Comrade 



27 



''^ Kidding Aii Engine 

^HE kidders' club was having 
some fun at the expense of a 
lonist who has the wisdom of 
■lomon. One told a story about 
sol's" recent journey to Los An- 
les where he purchased for $50 a 
jtoreycle of the vintage of '09, and 
irted back to Llano overland, 
iter toiling along with repairs and 
st aid applications, "Sol," aceord- 
g to the recital, made the top of a 
I, ig grade. With a sigh of relief 
e pilgrim raised his feet to a 
sition of ease while the ancient 
d asthmatic engine gave a sigh of 
, jlief and lapsed into soothing 
ence. 

Two miles and the coast was at an 
d. "Sol" turned on the gas, but 
his amazement there was no 
nds of the phthisical cough of the 
kety engine. Then the wayfarer 
de the startling discovery that 
3 engine had gone adrift and fallen 
t of its moorings. "Sol" toiled 
ek over the grade pushing the ma- 
ine before him. 

During the telling "Sol" wore a 
lile that bespoke the fact he had 
e better of the argument. 

What did you do?" queried a 
dder. 

'Well," said "Sol" with a satis- 
d chuckle, "I go back up the hill 
etty mad. I find the engine and I 
id some baling wire. I tie him 
ck on and she run all right. Run 
16 down hill, so I convince a bindle 
fif it's better to ride than walk so 
sell him for $65 and bum a ride to 
Bwhall and catch a colony machine 
one. I only make fifteen dollars 
' pushing back up that hill. But 
sure did feel foolish when that en- 
ue fell out." 

And "Sol's" words carried con- 
etion as he smoked up on a new 
iarwood pipe and fingered a roll 
ten-dollar bills. 



No Cliance 



"I see when a man runs for oiSce 
■ has to put himself in the hands of 
5 friends." 

Yes, my dear." 
"If a woman ran would she have 

put lierself in the hands of her 
nnen friends?" 
"I suppose so." 

'Well, I don't imagine many 
)meu will run. Think of taking 
eh chances!" 



REVOLT 
IN MEXICO 



Read the Correct Interpretation of Underlying Motives in the 
Most Remarkable and Valuable Book of the Tear 

The Mexican People — 
Their Struggle for Freedom 

-By- 
L. Gutierrez de Lara and Edgcumb Pinchon 

1^ ¥ ¥ 

Eugene V. Debs says : 

" * * * It is written from the point 
of view of the working class, the tillers of 
the soil, the producers of the wealth, and 
shows that through all these centuries of toil 
and tears and blood and martyrdom they 
have been struggling for the one purpose of 
emancipating themselves from the tyranny 
of a heartless aristocracy, buttressed on the 
one hand by the Roman Church and on the 
other by Jhe military power." 

* * ¥ 

Georgia Kotsch says : 

"* * * It strips the glamor of 
benevolent motives from the dealings with 
jMesico of the United States and other coun- 
tries and presents the stark truth that 
American and world capitalism has been, 
and is, in league against the proletariat of 
Mexico for its own sordid interest. And 
while the Mexican master class is depicted 
as the most depraved and bloodthirsty in 
history, the Socialist will see that the story 
of the Mexican proletariat is in greater or 
less degree and in varying circumstances the 
story of the proletariat in every country." 
¥ ¥ ¥ 

Published by DOUBLEDAY, PAGE & CO. 

F»rice Sl.SO 

We will send you this book and The Western Comrade for one 

year for $1.75 




28 



THE WESTERN COMRADE 



Entered as second-class matter at the 
. post office at Los Angeles, Cal. 

924 Higgins Building, Los Angeles, Cal. 

Subscription Price One Dollar a Year 
In Clubs of Four Fifty Cents 

Job Harriman, Managing Editor 
Frank E. Wolfe, Editor 



Vol. Ill 



October, 1915 



No. 6 



Better have failed in the high aim as I, 
Than vulgarly in the low aim succeed 
As, God be thanked, I do not. 

— Browning. 

m Hi ^ 

"CHOOT to kill!" was the order 
of the Chief of Police of Los 
Angeles when a man had killed a 
police officer who had invaded his 
home. The hue and cry of a man- 
hunt was on. The air reeked with 
the shrieks for Tengeance. A coun- 
try constable captured the man and 
dashed the hopes of the city police- 
men who sought the dead-or-alive 
reward and the honor of the killing. 
The capture did not answer the de- 
mand for action and blood. 

Two boys, apparently imbued with 
the spirit of adventure, charged with 
no misdeeds, fled from two police 
officers. Eight shots were fired by 
the officers. One bullet pierced both 
lads, instantly killing one and fatally 
wounding the other. 

' ' Shoot to kill ! ' ' This is a danger- 
ous order to give to the police. It 
means murderous assaults upon the 
public. 

The police of Los Angeles are plan- 
ning a vigorous campaign against 
the unemployed army that flocks to 
the city every fall and we soon shall 
have more of the shooting "to kill." 

^^ pK * 
Q PEAKING of war debt. The Wall 
Street Journal says "England 
provides for debt. Germany leaves 
it to God." 

"We know a very talented, deserv- 
ing but impoverished editor who 
would like to negotiate a reasonable 
loan on the German basis. 



Prance is sitting on the lid, but 
M'ith indifferent success. The truth 
boils and bubbles from beneath and 
truth is barred in the war zone. 
The Paris "Guerre Sociale," the 
Loeuvre, the Rappel and the Radi- 
cal are all under suspension. It 
must be great to be an editor in the 
war zone. 



The Western Comrade 

A talesman with a very laudable 
hope of getting on the jury in a fa- 
mous trial now in progress in Los 
Angeles said he "would not believe 
any man was an anarchist until it 
was absolutely proven." Pair 
enough ! AVe know many mild and 
harmless philosophers who claim to 
be anarchists or Christians, but a 
lot of them would find it difficult 
to prove it even to this talesman of 
the early eocene. 

* ^ « 

A seedy looking individual ap- 
proached the captain of a freight 
steamer and doffing his cap asked 




AERIAL CRAFT BEWARE! 

Frenchman to the Pope: "Bet- 
ter get out of my way, dear 
Benedict. The captain has given 
me strict orders to jfire on all 
hostile flying machines." 

— L'Aslno 



for a job. The captain scrutinized 
the applicant before speaking. 

"What experience have you had 
as a sailor," he grated. 

"Lor' bless yuh, mate," came the 
steady response, "my father ran 
one of the fastest swan boats in 
Central Park." 

^!^ ^ Hi 

An Illinois woman has been sen- 
tenced to 20,000 days in prison for 
manufacturing "dope." If this con- 
tinues about a thousand Illinois 
journalists are liable to a term of 
two thousands years each for a sim- 
ilar offense. 

l'^ iji ^K 

"He is a perfect disciplinarian." 

' ' Yep ; never gives an order unless 

he is dead sure it will be obeyed." 



lil! 



Now and then a Ford joke come 
out so clear and convincing thi 
one can see upon the surface thj 
it is founded on facts. The latei 
one of these comes from the Mi 
waukee Leader: 

A man applied for a job as a m 
clianic and the owner of the gara§ 
asked him if he had had any e: 
perience. "Sure thing," said tl 
applicant. "Why, I'm the guy wl 
used to put part No. 453 on all tl; 
cars in the Ford factory." 

"How did you lose your job''| 
he was asked. 

' ' Jiist a little hard luck, ' ' repli 
the applicant. "I dropped n 
monkey-wrench one day and by tl^ 
time I stopped to pick it up I wj 
16 cars behind. This made the forjj 
man mad. He fired me and then 
got mad and quit the works. 
^ ^ ^ 

Hail to Comrade Henri Bourasi 
editor of LeDevoir of Montre; 
The activity of this one live w: 
has kept the French-Canadians 
the maritime provinces from rui 
ing madly into the war. His p^ 
sistent campaign has resulted 
some anti-recruiting riots. T| 
growth of Socialism in East 
Canada has alarmed the Brit: 
Government, but the movement 
powerful and attempts at suppri 
sion would be most ill-advised. 
^ ^ ^ 

An indignant capitalist of Pas^ 
dena writes us to remove his naii 
from our circulation list. This if-; 
tion brought an apology to us frcj 
the hopeful man who had stjj 
scribed for the magazine in the ]k 
lief we might get a glimmer of liw 
into his foggy brain. The apolof 
is misplaced. We were consoli 
by the memory of Diogenes La 
tins: "The sun, too, shines i: 
cesspools and is not polluted!" 

yi it; yj; ,, 

^is ?K ^i^ a 

Here's a suggestion for the I 
Angeles boosters who have pass] 
the hat to keep the San Diego si. 
show from prematurely closing JS 
gates : Let 's get up a little se:|r 
annual fair to commemorate the i^ 
quent openings of the Celebra (j 
in the Panama Canal. 



Sunfish Sam — Taking anytl^| 
for your hay fever? 

Wallie Whale— Yes; I'm takjg 
boxing lessons to wallop the fi'jt 
one who gives me free advice. 



The Western Comrade 



29 



u 



State and Church 

°,.i pHE people of California arose in 

more or less intelligent wrath at 

lie recent election and overwlielm- 

nglr defeated a proposition to ex- 

mpt church property from taxation. 

'he proposed amendment was ribbed 

,p with the full intent of evading 

axation on millions of dollars worth 

f income property and land held 

ut of use. Not only did the Catholic 

hureh seek this but the other de- 

tominations were equally eager to 

;et out from under the "burden" 

, if paying taxes on their property 

aioldings. 

Of course not much dependence 
:an be placed on the theory that the 
.Woters were all acting intelligently. 
I'lrhe vote was among a dozen other 
egative votes on proposed amend- 
ents. iluch of the majority 
gainst this proposition was a part 
f the general, blind protest against 
onditions that exist in California 
;oday. Overtaxation and staggering 
,ssessments have maddened the peo- 
ile and their vote was largely a re- 
It of that condition. The deaden- 
g depression of the financial situa- 
ion, the widespread disemployment 
,nd consequent failure of thousands 
if small merchants has caused a wail 
f despair from the middle class. 
riiis group voted solidly against all 
:iinendments and among them the 
xemption of church taxation. 
On the other hand there were 
any Avho realized that exemption 
rom taxation of church property is 
antamount to state appropriation 
rom the public funds. There is lit- 
|tle inclination on the part of the 
eople of California to revert to the 
icious system of state contributions 
religious denominations and pri- 
ate institutions. It will not be 
done. Despite their seeming som- 
jnolence on many matters the people 
(are educated beyond the point of a 
r Jreversion to such an inconsistency in 
what they think is a democratic com- 
monwealth. — H. C. 



The Soul of You 

How many loved your moment of 
glad grace 
And loved your beauty with love 

false or true 
But one man loved the pilgrim soul 
in .vou 
And loved tlie sorrows in your chang- 
ing face. ' —Yeats. ^ 



Ignorance is the Great 
Curse ! 

Do you know, for instance, the scientific difference between love and 
passion? 

Human life is full of hideous exhibits of wretchedness due to ignor- 
ance of sexual normality. 

Stupid, pernicious prudery long has blinded us to sexual truth. Science 
was slow in entering this vital field. In recent years commercialists 
eyeing profits have unloaded many unscientific and dangerous sex books. 
Now, the world's great scientific minds are dealing with this subject upon 
which human happiness often depends. No longer is the subject taboo 
among intelligent people. 

We take pleasure in offering to the American public 
the work of one of the world's greatest authorities upon 
the question of sexual life. He is August Forel, M. D., 
Ph. D., LL. D., of Zurich, Switzerland. His book will 
open your eyes to yourself and explain many mysteries. 
You will be better for this knowledge. 

Every professional man and woman, those dealing with social, medical, 
criminal, legal, religious and educational matters will find this book of 
immediate value. Nurses, police officials, heads of public institutions, 
writers, judges, clergymen and teachers are urged to get this book at once. 

The subject is treated from every point of view. The chapter on "love 
and other irradiations of the sexual appetite" is a profound exposition 
of sex emotions — Contraceptive means discussed — Degeneracy exposed — 
A guide to all in domestic relations — A great book by a great man. 



(( 



The Sexual Question" 



Heretofore sold by subscription, only to physicians. Now offered to 
the public. Written in plain terms. Former price $5.50. Now sent pre- 
paid for $1,60. This is the revised and enlarged Marshall English transla- 
tion. Send check, money order or stamps. 

Gotham Book Society, Dept. 387 

General Dealers in Books. Sent on Mail Order 

142 West 23rd St., New York, N. Y. 



Da^vson's Dermal Cream 

Prevents wrinkles, softens and beautifies skin. Kemoves freckles, 
tan, moth patches and all discolorations. Greatest beautifier of 
the age. 

One Ounce Jar 60c Postpaid 

Prepared By DR. ELIZABETH DAWSON Llano, Calif. 



Telephone Home A-4533 

HARRIMAN & RYCKMAN 

Attorneys at Law 

921 Higgins Building 

Los Angeies, Cal, 



Home 


A-2003 


Main 


619 




A. 


J. STEVENS 

Dentist 




Room 


306 South Broadway 
514 Los Angeles, 


Cal. 



30 



The Western Comrade 



Pictures for Propaganda 




Shoot Capitalism 

With a 

Stereopticon 



Anyone can lecture with the aid of pictures; they tell the 
story, you point out the moral. Pictures draw a crowd where 
other means fail. They make your work doubly efEeetive. 

We tell you how to get the greatest results at the least 
expense. 

Send stamp for complete information. 

W. SCOTT LEWIS 



3493 Eagle Street. 



Los Angeles, California 



Cut Your Fuel Bill 
and Get More Heat 

By burning air and oil in j^our cook stove, heater, range, boiler 
or furnace. 

Who would think of running an automobile on coal or wood'? 
Yet hundreds of thousands of people today are using coal and 
wood to cook with. 

If the railroads of today should take off their oil-burning 
locomotives and replace them with the old style soft coal engines, 
the inefficiency of the old engines would cause a great deal of 
dissatisfaction. 

Why do you continue to use the old inefficient methods for 
heating and cooking? 

Burn Air and Oil 

The I. N. L. oil burner forms a gas that burns with an extreme 
heat. The cost of fuel is extremely low, ranging from three cents 
per gallon and up. 

The installation is also simple, and the principle of operation 
is understood at sight. 

For further particulars and price list of burners address 

Llano del Rio Company 

Mail Order Department 

923 HIGGINS BLDG. LOS ANGELES. GAL. 

Territory open for live agents 



Scripture For It 

TN talking practical applicatio; 

of Socialist or co-operative prin- 
ciples one frequently finds most 
strenuous opposition from the 
theoretic and argumentative So- 
cialists. The following illustrates: 

A group of colonists were talk- 
ing to a rather dogmatic Socialisfej 
comrade who was visiting thf! 
community and who seemed mueP 
more inclined to deal in abstract 
theories than to see the value of 
applications. After an extremely 
pedantic and doctrinaire utterance 
on the part of the visitor David 
Evans, the quietest man at Llano, 
said, in a delightful Scotch brogue: 

"AVe have to show them. They 
want the Scriptures for it. If it 
isn't in the first chapter of Karl 
]Marx some of them reject it. 
They remind me of an old Scotch- 
man who had been a home body. 
He was talking to a lad just re- 
turned from a long voyage. 

" 'Tell me, noo, Jamie, what was 
the most wonderful thing you saw 
when at sea?' 

" 'I think the strangest thing I 
saw was the flying-fish.' 

" 'Noo, laddie, dinna mak' a fule 
o' yersel. Wha ever heard o' a 
fush a fleein?' 

" 'Another strange thing I saw 
when crossing the Red Sea. We 
dropped anchor and when we 
raised it again there was one of 
Pharaoh's chariot entangled on it.' 

" 'Ay, laddie, I'll believe that. 
We've Scripture for that.' " 

Murder For Profit 

IVTINETEEN girls were murdered 
■'-^ in Pittsburg (home of the steel 
trust), when rotting fire escapes, 
barred windows and locked doors 
brought death to the workers in a 
factory there. The steel trust was 
so overcome with horror over one 
holocaust where twenty-one men 
lost their lives that it has spent 
hundreds of thousands of dollars 
prosecuting and persecuting mem- 
bers of a certain labor organiza- 
tion. Will there be similar activi- 
ties in the ease of the button fac- 
tory girls? No, Henrietta, there 
will not. This crime is one of 
capitalism. The other was one 
that could be fastened onto Labor. 
The steel trust is not playing that 
sort of game. 



wt 



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Si 
dm 
Fork 
•11 a 

litil 



ttiii 
llie 
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m 

Mi 

Bib' 



The Western Comrade 



31 



Llano del Rio Co-operative Colony 

Llano, California 



rHIS is the greatest Community Enterprise ever launched 
in America. 

The colony was founded by Job Harriman and is situated 
the beautiful Antelope Valley, Los Angeles County, Cali- 
tornia, a few hours' ride from Los Angeles. The community 
's solving the problem of disemployment and business failure, 
md offers a way to provide for the future welfare of the 
(vorkers and their families. 

Here is an example of co-operation in action. Llano del 
Rio Colony is an enterprise unique in the history of com- 
munity groups. 

Some of the aims of the colony are: To solve the problem 
Df unemployment by providing steady employment for the 
workers; to assure safety and comfort for the future and for 
old age; to guarantee education for the children in the best 
school under personal supervision, and to provide a social 
life amid surroundings better than can be found in the com- 
petitive world. 

Some of these aims have been carried out during the 
year since the colony began to work out the problems that 
confront pioneers. There are about 600 persons living at 
the new town of Llano. There are now more than 170 
pupils in the schools, and several hundreds are expected to be 
enrolled before a year shall have passed. Plans are under 
way for a school building, which will cost several thousand 
dollars. The bonds have been voted and sold and there is 
nothing to delay the building. 

Schools have opened for the fall term with classes ranging 
from the Montessori and kindergarten grades through the 
intermediate which includes the first year in high school. 
This gives the pupils an opportunity to take advanced sub- 
jects, including languages in the colony school. 

The colony owns a fine herd of about 100 head of Jersey 
and Holstein dairy cattle and Is turning out a large amount 
of dairy products. There Is steady demand for our out- 
put. 

There are over 200 hogs in the pens, and among them a 
large number of good brood sows. This department will be 
given special attention and ranks high in importance. 

The colony has seventy-five work horses, a large tractor, 
two trucks and a number of automobiles. The poultry de- 
partment has 2000 egg-making birds, some of them blue 
libbon prize winners. This department, as all others, is in the 
charge of an expert and it will expand rapidly. 

There are several hundred hares in the rabbitry and the 
manager of the department says the arrivals are in startling 
numbers. 

There are about 11,000 grape cuttings in the ground and 
thousands of deciduous fruit and shade trees in the colony 
nursery. This department is being steadily extended. 

The community owns several hundred colonies of bees 
which are producing honey. This department will be In- 
creased to several thousands. Several tons of honey are on 

liand. 

Among other industries the colony owns a steam laundry, 
a planing mill, a printing plant, a machine shop, a soil an- 
alysis laboratory, and a number of other productive plants 
are contemplated, among them a cannery, a tannery, an ice 
plant, a shoe factory, knitting and weaving plant, a motion 
picture company and factory. All of this machinery is not 
yet set up owing to the stress of handling crops. 

The colonists are farming on a large scale with the use 
of modern machinery, using scientific system and tried 
methods. 



No more commissions will be paid for the sale of mem- 
berships or stock in the Llano del Rio Community. Every 
installment member should be a worker to secure new 
members. 

About 120 acres of garden was planted this year. The re- 
sults have been most gratifying. 

Social life in the colony is most delightful. Entertain- 
ments and dances are regularly established functions. Base- 
ball, basket-ball, tennis, swimming, fishing, hunting and all 
other sports and pastimes are popular with all ages. 

Several hundred acres are now in alfalfa, which is ex- 
pected to run six cuttings of heavy hay this season. There 
are two producing orchards and about fifty-five acres of 
young pear trees. Several hundred acres will be planted in 
pears and apples next year. 

Six hundred and forty acres have been set aside for a 
site for a city. The building department is making bricks 
for the construction of hundreds of homes. The city will 
be the only one of its kind in the world. It will be built 
with the end of being beautiful and utilitarian. 

There are 1000 memberships in the colony and over 800 
of them are subscribed for. It is believed that the remainder 
will be taken within the next few months. 

The broadest democracy prevails in the management of 
the colony. There is a directorate of nine, elected by the 
stockholders, and a community commission of nine, elected 
by the General Assembly — all persons over 18 voting. Abso- 
lute equality prevails in every respect. The ultimate popu- 
lation of this colony will be between 5000 and 6000 persons. 

The colony is organized as a corporation under the laws 
of California. The capitalization is $2,000,000. One thousand 
members are provided for. Each shareholder agrees to sub- 
scribe for 2000 shares of stock. 

Each pays cash ($750) for 750 shares. This will be in- 
creased to $1000 within a few months. 

Deferred payments on the remaining 1250 shares are made 
by deducting one dollar per day (or more, if the member 
■wishes to pay more rapidly) from the $4 wage of the colonist. 

Out of the remaining $3 a day, the colonist gets the neces- 
sities and comforts of life. 

The balance remaining to the individual credit of the 
colonist may be drawn in cash out of the net proceeds of 
the enterprise. 

A per cent of the wages may be drawn in cash. 

Continuous employment is provided, and vacations ar- 
ranged as may be desired by the colonist. 

Each member holds an equal number of shares of stock 
as every other shareholder. 

Each member receives the same wage as every other 
member. 

In case anyone desires to leave the colony his shares 
and accumulated fund may be sold at any time. 

Are you tired of the competitive world? 

Do you want to get into a position where every hour's 
work will be for yourself and your family? Do you want 
assurance of employment and provisions for the future? Ask 
for the booklet entitled: "The Gateway to Freedom." Sub- 
scribe for The Western Comrade ($1.00 per 3'ear), and keep 
posted on the progress of the colony. Ask about our monthly 
payment installment membership. 

Address LLANO DEL RIO COMPANY, 924 Higgins build- 
ing, Los Angeles, California. 



Victory For Toilers 

Co-operation Proves Success 



T LANO DEL RIO Colonists have made a 
wonderful demonstration of success in 
their effort to put a great theory into prac- 
tise. Here a group of theorists with practi- 
cal ideas back of them have established a 
community founded on equality and jus- 
tice and have 
made greater pro- 
gress in a year 
and a half than 
their most cheer- 
ful optimist had 
hoped to achieve 
in several years. 
They have nearly 
8000 acres of land, 
an abundance of 
pure mountain wa- 
ter and hundreds 
of heads of live 
stock and a large 
amount of indus- 
trial machinery. They have established a 
town of 600 inhabitants and are growing 
rapidly. Their plans contemplate a beau- 
tiful city with homes for all their members. 
There are less than 200 memberships remain- 
ing unsold and these are being subscribed for 
every day. The price of memberships will 
remain at $750 for a short time, then it will 
go to .$1000. 




A Jersey of the Dairy Herd 



Great care is being taken in the selection 
of the colonists. If you are tired of the 
uphill fight in the cut-throat competitive 
system you should investigate the Llano del 
Rio enterprise. You will find that a great 
opportunity awaits you there. This com- 
munity is not com- 
posed of failures, 
but rather from 
those Avho have 
achieved a great 
measure of suc- 
cess. Many of 
them scorned the 
idea of success 
when it meant the 
crushing down of 
their fellow man. 
Here is gathered a 
group of earnest, 
enthusiastic men 
and women who 
who are going ahead with earnestness 
and determination that insures a suc- 
cess that means a great demonstration of the 
value of co-operative action. You are urged 
to read the stories about the colony printed 
in this magazine. Read announcement on 
page 31, and take immediate steps to se- 
cure a membership. Ask about our monthly 
payment plan. 



"Modern society conducts its affairs under circumstances ivhich 
create and maintain an ever increasing burden on all humanity. Man 
sustained in youth by the illusion that ability or good fortune will 
ultimately reward him with happiness through material success, learns 
sooner or later, that no peace can be his until the unmoral conditions 
of commercialism and industrial competition are removed." — From 
the Community Constitution. 

LLANO DEL RIO COMPANY 



Membership Department 



924 Higgins Building 



Los Angeles, California 



|.he Wi-01 £K1,\ VynK.'MJIL 




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vvSJ 



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Llano del Rio Co-operative Colony 

;^■ '' 

Llano, California 1^ 



THIS is the greatest Community Enterprise ever launched 
In America. 

The colony was founded by Job Harriman and is situated 
in the beautiful Antelope Valley, Los Angeles County, Cali- 
fornia, a few hours' ride from Los Angeles. The community 
is solving the problem of disemployment and business failure, 
and offers a way to provide for the future welfare of the 
workers and their families. 

Here is an example of co-operation in action. Llano del 
Rio Colony is an enterprise unique in the history of com- 
munity groups. 

Some of the aims of the colony are: To solve the problem 
of unemployment by providing steady employment for the 
workers; to assure safety and comfort for the future and for 
old age; to guarantee education for the children in the best 
school under personal supervision, and to provide a social 
life amid surroundings better than can be found in the com- 
petitive world. 

Some of these aims have been carried out during the 
year since the colony began to work out the problems that 
confront pioneers. There are about 700 persons living at 
the new town of Llano. There are now more than 200 
pupils in the schools, and several hundreds are expected to be 
enrolled before a year shall have passed. Plans are under 
way for a school building, which will cost several thousand 
dollars. The bonds have been voted and sold and there is 
nothing to delay the building. 

Schools have opened for the fall term with classes ranging 
from the Montessori and kindergarten grades through the 
intermediate which includes the first year in high school. 
This gives the pupils an opportunity to take advanced sub- 
jects, including languages in the colony school. 

The colony owns a fine herd of 105 head of Jersey 
and Holstein dairy cattle and is turning out a large amount 
of dairy products. There is steady demand for our out- 
put. 

There are over 200 hogs in the pens, and among them a 
large number of good brood sows. This department will be 
given special attention and ranks high in importance. 

The colony has seventy-five work horses, a large tractor, 
two trucks and a number of automobiles. The poultry de- 
partment has 2000 egg-making birds, some of them blue 
ribbon prize winners. This department, as all others, is in the 
charge of an expert and it will expand rapidly. 

There are several hundred hares in the rabbitry and the 
manager of the department says the arrivals are in startling 
numbers. 

There are about 11,000 grape cuttings in the ground and 
thousands of deciduous fruit and shade trees in the colony 
nursery. This department is being steadily extended. 

The community owns several hundred colonies of bees 
which are producing honey. This department will be in- 
creased to several thousands. Several tons of honey are on 
hand. 

Among other industries the colony owns a steam laundry, 
a planing mill, large modern sawmill, a printing plant, a 
machine shop, a soil analysis laboratory, and a number of 
other productive plants are contemplated, among them a 
cannery, a tannery, an ice plant, a shoe factory, knitting and 
weaving plant, a motion picture company and factory. All 
of this machinery is not yet set up owing to the stress of 
handling crops. 

The colonists are farming on a large scale with the use 
of modern machinery, using scientific system and tried 
methods. 



No more commissions will be paid for the sale of mem- 
berships or stock in the Llano del Rio Community. Every 
installment member should be a worker to secure new j 
members. 

About 120 acres of garden was planted this year. The re- 
sults have been most gratifying. 

Social life in the colony is most delightful. Entertain- 
ments and dances are regularly established functions. Base- 
ball, basket-ball, tennis, swimming, fishing, hunting and all 
other sports and pastimes are popular with all ages. 

Several hundred acres are now in alfalfa, which is ex- 
pected to run six cuttings of heavy hay this season. Thera 
are two producing orchards and about flfty-five acres of 
young pear trees. Several hundred acres will be planted in 
pears and apples next year. 

Six hundred and forty acres have been set aside for a 
site for a city. The building department is making bricks 
for the construction of hundreds of homes. The city will 
be the only one of its kind in the world. It will be builti 
with the end of being beautiful and utilitarian. 

There are 1000 memberships in the colony and over 900 
of them are subscribed for. It is believed that the remainder; 
will be taken within the next few months. 

The broadest democracy prevails in the management of 
the colony. There is a directorate of nine, elected by the 
stockholders, and a community commission of nine, elected 
by the General Assembly — all persons over 18 voting. Abso- 
lute equality prevails in every respect. The ultimate popu- 
lation of this colony will be between 5000 and 6000 persons. 

The colony is organized as a corporation under the laws 
of California. The capitalization is $2,000,000. One thousand 
members are provided for. Each shareholder agrees to sub- 
scribe for 2000 shares of stock. 

Each pays cash ($750) for 750 shares. This will be in- 
creased to $1000 on December 15. 

Deferred payments on the remaining 1250 shares are made 
by deducting one dollar per day (or more, if the member 
wishes to pay more rapidly) from the $4 wage of the colonist. 

Out of the remaining $3 a day, the colonist gets the neces- 
sities and comforts of life. 

The balance remaining to the individual credit of the 
colonist may be drawn in cash out of the net proceeds ot 

the enterprise. 

A per cent of the wages may be drawn in cash. 

Continuous employment is provided, and vacations ar- 
ranged as may be desired by the colonist. 

Each member holds an equal number of shares of stocki 
as every other shareholder. 

Each member receives the same wage as every other 
member. 

In case anyone desires to leave the colony his shares 
and accumulated fund may be sold at any time. 

Are you tired of the competitive world? 

Do you want to get into a position where every hour's 
work will be for yourself and your family? Do you want 
assurance of employment and provisions for the future? Ask 
for the booklet entitled: "The Gateway to Freedom." Sub- 
scribe for The Western Comrade ($1.00 per year), and keep 
posted on the progress of the colony. Ask about our monthly 
payment installment membership. 

Address LLANO DEL RIO COMPANY, 924 Higgins build- 
ing, Los Angeles, California. 



CONTENTS 



Page 

Editorial Review 5 

By Frank E. Wolfe. 

Murderers — You and 1 9 

By G. E. Bolton. 

Strangiers (Poem) 9 

By Frank H. Ware. 

Sophy 10 

By Clara R. Cushman. 

The Job 11 

By Frank H. Ware. 

Socialism and Farmers 12 

By J. E. Beum. 

Sunday and Socialism 13 

By Edmund R. Brumbaugh. 

Age Limit a Tragedy U 

By Frank E. Wolfe". 

Snow Caps Greet Colonists 15 

By R. K. Williams. 

Llano del Rio As It Is Today 16 

Life on the Llano 20 

By R. K. Williams. 

The Church and the Llano 22 

By Albert A. James. 

Ballots Will Educate 29 

By William E. Bohn. 

CARTOONS 

Competition in Legal Horrors Frontispiece 

Borrowing a Half Billion 6 

That Bill 7 

"Lay Up Ti-easures for Yourselves — " 8 





-[]<Sit-F 






-Drawn for The Western Comrade hy M. A. Kem^f 



The Western Comrade 



Political Action 



Devoted to the Cause of the Workers 



Co-operation 



Direct Action 



VOL. Ill 



LOS ANGELES, CAL., NOVEMBER, 1915 



NUMBER 7 




EDITORIAL REVIEW 

By Frank E. Wolfe 



OP all tlie comments, critical and encouraging, 
that hare come in since the printing of Job 
Harriman's article on fanaticism in the Socialist 
Party, no one has so cogently put the case as a com- 
rade of northern California, who says: 

"The article in Western Comrade on 'Fanaticism 
Means Failure,' is most timely. Just as the church 
has said, 'Let us get together and believe something 
about .Jesus,' instead of saying, 'Let us get together 
and put the principle of Jesus at work.' So the 
Socialist Party has said, 'Let us get together and 
believe some economic doctrine!' instead of saying, 
'Let us get together on a simple program of co- 



operation and public ownership.' The American 
people will never get together on doctrine, economic 
or religious. But they are well nigh ready for a 
simple program. I think the time is ripe for a 
movement that will parallel to some extent the 
English 'I. L. P.' A movement that will have the 
ultimate goal in view, but will be wise enough to 
begin with a program that will unite all forward- 
moving people. A 'National Public Ownership 
League' is a good suggestion. * * * 

"Hundreds of thousands of people are ready to 
move thus who will never become 'doctrinaires!' 
The American mind is not interested in photoplays, 



The Western Comrade 




it wants action, not a preacliment, but a program, 
and a program that does not reach too far beyond 
the horizon of the average mind. "We want a move- 




..^i^ 



BOEEOWING A HALF BILLION 
Just a Minute, Please 

— Des Moines Register and Leader 



ment that will get the people, the state to begin to 
move in the right direction. ' ' 

He is right. Our way has been faith but no 
works. We have advocated theories until the wel- 
kin rang, but whenever anyone has attempted a 
practical application of those theories he has been 
the object of the bitterest attacks from his fellow 
theorists. In California, as in other states, the party 
membership is at a low ebb. Here we have thou- 
sands of splendid spirited comrades who have lapsed 
their cards and are outside the organization. Asked 
a reason many will say because there is no action ; 
that the various locals, city organizations and cer- 



tain of the higher subdivisions are in the hands of 
heresy-hunting doctrines who will not brook any 
progressive action. 

They will tell you the party is drifting into the 
position of the old S. L. P. and that its political 
power is gone. 

♦ ♦ ♦ 

ONE might get the idea that the dogmatic So- 
cialist of the "headquarters" type might at 
least remain "neutral." This is not the case. He 
is more likely to abandon his assaults on the ram- 
parts of capitalism and train the mighty enginery 
of his fighting guns on the advancing columns of 
his O'svn comrades who are trying to put his preach- 
ment into practice. 

"I want to see the Llano colony fail," said a 
secretary of the executive committee in a large 
California city. "When they (the men and women at 
Llano) lose out they will be better Socialists." 

This amazing statement has been duplicated in 
other sections. Socialists of California have been 
driven into a panic of fear over statements printed 
in an infamous labor-hating newspaper. From their 
actions one might well believe the statement that 
this notorious journal is to the "Eed R-r-evolution- 
ist" what the Bible is to an orthodox Presbyterian — 
sacred, and to be believed "from kiver to kiver. " 

♦ ♦ ♦ 

IN the vast correspondence that flows into these 
offices there comes from nearly every state in the 
union expressions of profound gratitude that some- 
where a group of Socialists has been brave enough 
and energetic enough to do something. 

"Thank God for some action ! I am tired of this 
platform theorizing. I shall join you, if I am per- 
mitted, and help work out the problem of feeding, 
clothing, and making happy humans. I know it is 
individual deliverance for a few thousands, but it 
will make a wonderfully impressive demonstration 
for the world," writes another prospect. 

He, too, is right. To solve the problems he men- 
tions means a thousand more colonies ; it means a 
move toward the seizure of the sources of life that 
will be revolutionary. 



The Western Comrade 




E 



ARL LOREBORN startled England when he de- 
clared in the House of Lords, that revolution 
was certain to follow in Europe if the conflict were 
continued indefinitely. This is most encouraging. 
The conflict will continue indefinitely and it will be 
followed by revolution in every European country. 

Fifteen millions of men have been killed or dis- 
abled for life and countless thousands of non-eom- 
batants' lives have been destroyed bj^ this hucksters' 
war. England alone is spending $21,000,000 a day, 
principally for munitions. Billions more will be 
spent. Germany is probably spending as much, and 
the other allied powers are pouring out untold treas- 
ure of gold. And the end is not in sight. Englana 
is making desperate appeals for the people to turn 
their sovereigns into shells and their shillings into 
shrapnel. The cry is "Crush Germany with English 
gold!" 

The struggle has settled into dogged determina- 
tion to hold out to the end. In England, France, 
Germany and all other countries the censorship is 
more rigid than ever before. In London the Daily 
Globe was suppressed for asking the government em- 
barrassing questions, and a few days later a similar 
fate overtook the powerful Yoerwartz of Berlin. 
The British sheet was merely radical. The German 
journal was the leading Socialist daily in the coun- 
try. The questions asked by our German comrades 
were couched in the politest terms and the demand 
was for more knowledge about the war and more 
truthfulness in statements that were ofSeially pub- 
lished. 

Suppression is what the Socialists of Germany 
have thrived upon. Lender Bismark's iron laws the 
party grew at a rate that appalled the Emperor. 
Suppression at this hour will do miich to fan the 
smouldering revolt into consuming flames. 

"When the hour strikes Europe will be swept as 
with a cyclone. Read.justment there will mean an 
overturning here. Socialists in America have the 
greatest opportunity for propaganda that has ever 
been presented in the history of the movement. Lore- 
born foresees revolt, and British workers will do 
their part to make the prediction come true. 



WATCH the unfolding and growth of the con- 
spiracy of the armament makers. The sub- 
sidy slides over the face of the purchased press and 
the agitation for large war appropriations grows 
amain. Never was the American press so beautifully 
oiled with the smooth lubricant of capitalist gold. 
From the large dailies to the smallest pornographic 
sheets, there is a cry for warships, fortification and 
a great army. 

Preparedness is the cry. Well, preparedness will 




THAT BILL 
Now Who Do You Suppose Will Have to Pay It? 
— Des Moines Register and Leader 



prevent war. Witness Germany — the best prepared 
country in tlie world. There peace, plenty and pros- 
perity reign. Let us prepare for war and have the 
peace of Germany. 




The Western Comrade 



1 




THE LaFollette alien seaman's law did not go 
into effect on November 4, as per the provision 
of the acts. The law is indefinitely suspended on or- 
der of the Secretary of Commerce. The enactment 
of this measure was hailed as a great victory for the 
workers. Vessels are being given clearance at the 
"discretion of collectors of ports." Pretty soft for 
the collectors ! 

Nullification of the seaman's protective law finds 
a hundred parallels in similar acts for the better- 
ment of the working class. In California an act pro- 
tecting the public from the danger of moving trains 
by telegraph by inexperienced operators was set 
aside by the state railroad commissioners. 

In Los Angeles every effort possible is being put 
forth by every labor-hating journal and organiza- 
tion to repeal the two-platoon ordinance for city fire- 
men. This ''working class measure" was adopted 
by an overwhelming vote on an initiative election. 
Everywhere a ' ' higher power ' ' is invoked to nullify 
labor legislations. These acts crept through while 
the exploiters were not looking. Now they are to be 
arbitrarily nullified. Such instances make it difiicult 
for the political aetionist to keep a straight face 
while arguing for the use of the ballot as a means of 
righting the wrongs of the workers. 

♦ •♦ ♦ 

THERE are more revolutionary Socialists in 
California and in the United States now than 
ever before, yet the party membership is about one- 
third what it Avas a few years ago. There is a dis- 
tinct demand for action — political, direct, and 
through co-operative movements. 

♦ ♦ ♦ 

THAT agents provacateur should be sent into the 
colony for the purpose of sowing the seeds of 
dissension was a foregone conclusion. That these 
persons should be keen, tactful and of the type that, 
for a time at least, could deceive and lead the mem- 
bers of the community was also to be expected. i\Iost 
of the residents at Llano are convinced that at least 
two of these efforts have been made. The fact that 
the chief labor-hating newspaper of California has 
so vigorously championed the cause of a disturber 
is taken as an indication that the operation of this 



traitor is not a mere accident. A determined effort 
will be made to arouse alarm and distrust. Our com- 
rades are forewarned of these attempts. Nothing 
will be left undone to discredit the great enterprise. 




"Lay Up Treasurer for Yourselves — " 

— The Masses 



Meanwhile we grow apace. Each day sees us more 
strongly entrenched than before. There is no out- 
side influence that can harnl us. Loyalty, faithful- 
ness and confidence of our comrades will make us 
invulnerable. Everywhere our friends should view 
with distrust the efforts that may be made by these 
agents of capitalism. We are out to win unbounded 
success and each day sees us nearer our goal. 
^ ♦ ^* 

The cover page of this issue is from a photograph 
of a remarkable bronze engraving by Adolph Feil, a 
member of the Llano del Rio Community. 










The Western Comrade 

Murderers — You and I! 

Bv G. E. BOLTON 




I am not 



I 



E have just killed a boy — you and I. He 
■was a youth, in the day of his adolesence. 
He had but ^vandered from a mother's 
L-are. But we have killed him in our 
blood lust, you and I. We strangled him 
and he died slowly, horribly. 

Have you ever before seen anyone die 

_ by the rope? Is it not horrible to see 

rhem, to look at the writhing bodies, the distorted 
taee, the staring eyes, the protruding tongue — for no 
Mack hood of death could conceal that. 

What did you see when we killed him? 
morbid but I am deep in the 
SL-ene and I want you, who 
Helped me kill him, to dwell 
u it with me. 

"^Tiat impressed you 
most? Was it the screams, 
the swooning of the sister 
or the dry sobs of the mother 
or the boy's own manner? 

Do you know what im- 
pressed me most? I think it 
was the silence — and the 
quick sounds. I looked to 
see who it was making a 
dry, choking sound, not sobs 
but the retching of a body 
trying to keep from crying 
aloud. Then the clanging 
doors! How it startled us 
after the silence and the 
waiting ! 

Did you hear the droning 
voice of the priest? He 
mumbled his words horribly, 
but I know he was not say- 
ing "Thou shalt not kill." He does not say that be- 
cause he, too, believes in the killing, and he helped 
us — ^you and I — in the killing. 

Did you hear the groans — not of the dying, but of 
those who were doing the killing? Did you feel the 
stab in your soul when the boy's body shot downward? 
I did, and I felt him tremble when we placed the black 
cap over his face. I felt the thrill of horror when we 
put the noose — the noose we had so cleverly and so 
brutishly wrought, over his head. Did you see how 
smooth and soft was the skin on the lad's neck? Yet 
it was cold — so cold. 



Stranglers 

By Frank H. Ware 

SHUDDER as I watch him— 

My victim! 
His upturned face is white as chalk — 
Drawn cheeks and burning eyes — 
His parted lips and glistening teeth — 

I watch it all ! 

I tremble lest he take his life — 

My victim! 
The scaffold in the prison yard — 
The priest with cowl and iDook — 
The shadows dancing on the wall — 

I watch it all! 

I hear him utter his futile prayer — 

My victim! 
He leans upon the padre's arm — 
A crash ! His soul has flown ! 
I am the State — avenged am I — 

But lo ! My hands are stained ! 



Did you think, as I, that this was some mother's 
boy; that she should be there with him so that she 
could take his body when we lowered it and said: 
"Woman, behold thy son!" Then it seemed to me that 
she was there and that she took him, her boy, her 
baby — for he was that to her even after we killea 
him — and sat beside him as mothers have always sat, 
and with her hair she wiped the dew of death from 
his brow and the bloody froth from his lips — from 
the lips of the boy you and I had just strangled to 
death ; she held his head on her lap and moaned as 
only stricken mothers can. 

"Give him to me, now 
you have done with him. He 
was my baby only a little 
while ago. He was so sweet 
to me, so gentle. I never 
knew him to be harsh or 
cruel. My boy, my baby 
boy! What have they done 
to you? . You were such a 
beautiful boy and we loved 
you so. You used to sit with 
me there at home and we 
watched the sunsets, your 
head on my shoulder — and 
now they have strangled 
you." 

Then there seemed a 
long silence, broken only by 
low moans, and then again 
her voice : 

"Your neck was so soft 
and sweet and now it's so 
bruised and mangled. They 
say it was but justice. I 
prayed to the Mother whose 
son was slain as you have been, but the priests said it 
was God's will. Now you are gone from us forever. 
My boy, my baby boy!" 

Did you hear it, you who have strangled this 
child ? 

You say you did not kill him? 
You were not there ! 
I SAY YOU LIE ! 

You and I and all of us murdered this boy. Come, 
admit your guilt. Your hands are red with blood! 
You are as guilty as hell ! 

(Continued on Page 24) 



.10 



The Western Comrade 



Sophy 



By CLARA R. CUSHMAN 




T was a story straight from life, the set- 
ting in our own enlightened Southern 
California. Here it is as I caught it 
from the lips of the woman sitting be- 
hind me, not long ago on the Los Angeles 
Interurban : 

"* * * if I was a sinner nobody 
could bring me to the Lord quicker 'n he 
could. He's certainly the preacher to save souls. He 
took our little Annie by the arm the other day, and he 
hadn't talked to her five minutes before she began to 
cry and knelt right down on the floor and said she 
wanted to be baptized right away. And her only 
seven, too, and so little and delicate! Ain't it won- 
derful the ones the Lord chooses? Well, as the Bible 
says, 'A little child shall lead them.' All our children 
come to Christ early, all but Sophy, 'n Samuel told 
her she was no child of our'n and need never come 
back. I-I thought a heap of that girl too. LI could 
hardly bear to give her up, but it was the will of the 
Lord, 'u Samuel knows best. She had the good Chris- 
tian home the others did, but she always chose the 
ways of Satan." 

"What! Sophy isn't gone!" 

"Ain't you heard? Oh dear! Oh dear! Seems 
like it's a terrible cross the Lord's give us to bear. 
How me and Samuel worked all these years to make 
that girl meek and humble in the sight of the Lord! 
But she was that vain and proud ! Always complainin ' 
about the way I made her dresses and the kind of 
shoes I made her wear, 'n wantin' to wear her hair in 
curls, instead of thinkin' of her soul and the life ever- 
lasting. Many's the time Samuel's stood over her and 
made her kneel down and pray for the Lord to for- 
give her for her sinful vanity, and she was that de- 
ceitful that he had to make her pray out loud to be 
sure she was doin' it." 

"What a pity that " 

"Yes, to think me and Samiiel who was saved by 
grace thirty years ago should have a child like that. 
But it was the Lord's will and I ain't complainin'. 
We done our duty and tried to put the fear of God 
in her heart. I ain't complainin', but it's an awful 
thing to know your own girl is goin' straight to hell. 
LI thought a heap of that girl. Many's the time I've 
had to pray for strength to do my duty by her, or 
she'd been a win din' me around her finger, she had 
that cute, tantalizin' way with her. I rec'lect one 
day when she was still a baby sittin' in my lap — 



^tjl 



111 



k 



Samuel 'n I had only been married a couple of year* 
an' she was laughin' an' crowin' 'n takin' on aboul 
nothin' like she always did, 'n I grabbed her up be 
fore Ithought 'n said, 'Oh, ain't she the prettiest 
thing you ever laid eyes on?' 'N Samuel looked upj 
from the Quarterly he was readin' n' said, 'Emma, 
you're makin' an idol of that child. The Lord will' 
punish you.' 'N I knew Samuel was right. He's been 
a good husband to me. I prayed over night for 
month for the strength to marry him. I knew it Avas 
my duty for he was a worker in the field of Christ' 
and he had forty acres of land, 'n I knew I mightn't: 
have as good a chance. He's always been a good pro- 
vider 'n a good husband 'n I knew he was right in the 
sight of the Lord, so I made up my mind I'd always 
try to do right by my children 'n not let my sinful 
feelin's get the best of me. So when Samuel was sayin' 
the blessin' and Sophy would begin to laugh audi 
pound the high chair I'd spat her hands, 'n she was 
that full of laugh, she thought I was playin' with her. 
so she's look kind of sacred a minnit, then she'd begini 
to laugh 'n holler more 'n ever. So I had to hit her 
real hard before she'd know I meant she was bein' 
wicked. Then she'd set there 'n tremble all over, for 
she knew if she cried her father would take her in 
hand; for as Samuel often says, as all children are 
born in sin, whose goin' to take it out of them unless 
their parents does it. So he always started in early 
to make the children honor their father and mother." 

"Wouldn't—" 

"No, she wouldn't." 

"I wasn't goin' to say — " 

"Oh that's all right. As I was sayin', Sophy found 
out pretty early that she mustn't let her feelin's lead 
fier in sin. She never was much of a hand to cry 
though. It was her laffin' when she shouldn't that we 
had to stop, 'n her thinkin' so much about her looks, 
'n always wantin' what was pretty, not what was good 
in the sight of the Lord. She said once that she didn't 
want to go to that ugly church, that it smelled bad, 'n 
the people all looked ugly and sang such ugly songs.j 
She only said it once. Samuel said he was goin to' 
teach her to be a good Christian woman if it broke 
our hearts and took all the hide off her back. So she 
did just what we said after that without talkin', but 
she never stopped her laughin'. 'N when she'd go 
to church instead of keepin' her eyes on the preacher 
or down at her book like a modest girl should 'n be-, 
(Continued on Page 23) 



The Western Comrade 



11 



The Job 



By FRANK H. WARE 




AY, May, ' ' said a young girl to her work- 
ing companion as they sat dipping 
chocolates on the fourth floor of a large 
candy factory, "who was the guy you 
were out with last night ? ' ' 

"Aw," returned May carelessly, 
"■just a 'pick' what come along at 
quittin' time last night. Calls himself 

■ c-rald Warner, son of a Wall Street broker. Like as 
lot, though, his name's Smith an' his old man's a 
'lumber. " And her blue eyes sparkled as she tossed 
ler blonde curls. 

Didn't he show you a good time?" queried the 
irst girl. 

"No kick there, Rose. Went down to a show — 
Charlie Chaplin, he's great this week — then to a 
jabaray. The kid was flush with his coin all right." 

"Gee, I wish I was a man," reflected Rose, 
thoughtfully, "then I wouldn't have to work in a 
eandy factory at six per." 

"Jiggers!" warned May, "here's Gibbons." 

A glowering individual approached, hovered over 
them for a moment and passed on. His face was hard 
and stern, and his severe scrutiny caused the girls to 
tremble. 

What's he so blame sore about here lately," 
whispered Rose when the foreman was out of earshot. 

"Sadie." 

"What's she done?" 

"Nothin'— only " 

"Only what?" 

May glanced around cautiously, then bending for- 
ward over her work turned her head toward Rose. 

"She listened to the bunch upstairs kiekin' about 
protection. Tou know, only one fire escape and nar- 
row wooden stairs at the back. Somebody ran to 
Gibbons and 'peached.' " 

"What'd Gibbons say?" 

"Gave her hell. Told her she was hired to work 
and not kick — then he canned her." 

"An' the bunch upstairs?" 

"Got the same dose. There must of been twenty- 
five of them." 

Again the foreman bore down upon them, like a 
hawk after its prey, paused over the industrious girls, 
then went on. 

■ "Gosh!" whispered Rose in relief, "tin cans were 
ringin' in my ears for a moment." 

"I thought he had us, too!" returned May 



For several moments they worked on speedily, 
silently. Finally when Gibbons was agaiu over at the 
far end of the room May whispered. 

"He," she said, indicating the foreman with a 
slight nod, "he's got orders to cut down expenses and 
get out more work. Fat chance to get protection with 
them kind of orders from the boss." 

"Hm," returned Rose thoughtfully, "maybe if 
somebody would go up to the fire commission with a 
big kick — maybe they might " 

"No chance. Rose. That's been tried before. 
Listen here, the old man's a millionaire — rides in a 
limousine and all that. Last week he gave a swell 
private dinner to some city officials and of course a 
bunch of them fire commissioners was there an helped 
lick up the champagne. Now what's your chance for 
protection." 

' ' I guess there ain 't none, ' ' Rose sighed resignedly. 

"You bet there ain't," and May's words carried 
conviction with them. "Listen, Rose," and May spoke 
very slowly, yet cautiously, "me and you and every- 
body else in this building — and there must be a thou- 
sand — ^needs their job. The boss knows it — so does 
the fire commission." 

Saturday afternoon came, and instead of the usual 
half holiday the toilers in the candy factory were 
made to work all day. 

Late in the afternoon Rose turned to May. "May," 
she whispered, "Do you smell anything?" 

May raised her head and sniffed the reeking air of 
their close and uncomfortable room. 

"Smells like smoke," she commented. 

"That's what I " 

"Fire!" screamed someone. In a moment was wild 
disorder. 

"Fire! Fire!" echoed others. Then came the mad 
scramble for the narrow stairway. 

Smoke by this time was pouring through cracks in 
the floor, and, as the factory was of cheap wooden 
material, the flames quickly spread to other floors. 

"May!" 

"Rose!" 

"Where are you?" 

"Here— I'm " 

"Hurt?" 

"I don't know — Gibbons knocked me " 



'Quick, May, give me your hand, the fire- 
'I know — but the smoke is so thick." 
(Continued on Page 26) 



12 



The Western Comrade 

Socialism and Farmers 

By J. E. BEUM 



1 


I 


^ 



S Socialism beneficial to the farmers? 
Let us see. Under Socialism all com- 
petition in all vocations and walks of life 
will be eliminated. Instead of competi- 
tion we will have co-operation in all the 
departments effecting the production 
and distribution of commodities. Every 
industry will be centralized under one 
head and under its own management. This will ob- 
viously eliminate many needless vocations. 

Nor will there be several institutions carrying on 
the same line of business in the community necessitat- 
ing the marshaling of enormous useless capital for their 
construction, nor their corresponding waste of energy 
in time and wages. This will mean a tremendous sav- 
ing to the farmers of the community who now bear 
the brunt of the burden in the support of these needless 
concerns. Let me give you a concrete illustration of 
what is meant by this limitation of economic worth. 
Manchester is a little coun- 
try town surrounded by a ..-■■■'"....;■ 

farming community. It has 
four elevators and one mill 
buying grain, making in all five 
places that buy grain of the 
community. Under our modern 
system of handling grain one 
elevator could handle this grain 
and under collective ownership 
we would unquestionably have 
but one market place for gain 



". . . Instead of the dismem- 
bered, disjointed and cut-throat sys- 
tem which is in vogue today, agricul- 
ture will be organized along the line 
of scientifie principles ; and all those 
who engage in the industry, instead 
of the selfish and insane method, will 
aid to make it more efficient and 
thereby contribute his share to the 
>>ettprment of the human rac*^." 



in Manchester. This would be a ■"■•::::::::::::::::::::::::::::;: • rent 

direct saving of the capital used 

in building and maintaining the other four places that 

are not needed. 

Again there are three lumber yards at the present 
where only one yard would be necessary under col- 
lective ownership since all the yards carry practically 
the same stock. Here again we would have a saving 
of the capital and energy now in building and equip- 
ping the other two extra and needless yards. 

Then we have seven dry goods and grocery stores 
where one store could effectively handle all the busi- 
ness under collective ownership. Again a considerable 
gain of the saving of capital and labor. And thus it 
would be in all other lines now followed by several 
competitors in the same town. This would mean an 
incalculable gain to the farmers who are the patrons 
of this town and who represent the large percentage of 



its consumers. For there can be no argument but that 
the patrons of Manchester pay for the extra capital 
invested — the extra labor spent and the extra profits 
exploited by all these needless concerns. 

Every communitj^ operating under the economic 
system pays for and supports the unnecessary shop- 
keepers in its midst. For if the community does not 
pay for them who does? 

And now about Socialism and the little farm. So- 
cialism does not propose to deprive the farmer of his 
little farm. On the other hand, capitalism is eliminat-, 
ing the little farm. 

The census in 1880 shows that 25% of all the farm- 
ers in the United States were renters ; in 1890, 28% ; 
1900, 35% ; Avhile the 1910 census shows 37%. 

But that is not all. A large percentage of the farm-' 
ers who hold paper title to their lands o^vn but an 
equity in the land itself. In other words the farms 
are mortgaged. And that the increase in the number 
of mortgaged farms from year 
;; to year is in the same propor- 
tion as the increase in the num- 
ber of renters, is the opinion of 
men who are best qualified to 
give us information on the 
subject. 

A mortgaged farmer is only 

a little better situated than a 

renter. The only difference 

between the two is that one 

pays interest and the other 

One is exploited as 

surely as is the other. And 

as the land advances in value the mortgages and 

amount of interest increase in proportion. 

"While I was practicing law in a town in Northern! 
Minnesota some years past, I had occasion to pass om 
abstracts for a Massachusetts loaning company that 
was operating in the vicinity of the town where I was 
located. All the mortgages that were taken by this 
company with very few exceptions were either re- 
newals or the taking up of old loans of other com- 
panies. Invariably these loans were for a larger 
amount than the amount of the old mortgages. While 
the rate of interest in some instances might have been 
less than the rate for which the old mortgages pro- 
vided, yet the amount of interest to be paid was more 
than replaced by reason of the increased principal. 
And what was true in Northern Minnesota is true 



ip 



(ji 
v, 

Ml 



!" 



The Western Comrade 



13 



everywhere where similar conditions exist. And sim- 
ilar conditions exist almost everywhere. 

There is but one practical solution for you and 
that is Socialism. The first rule of Socialism is co- 
operation. Instead of the dismembered, disjointed and 
cut-throat system which is in vogue today, agriculture 
will be organized along the line of scientific principles; 
and all those who engage in the industry, instead of 
the selfish and insane method, will aid to make it more 



efficient and thereby contribute his share to the better- 
ment of the human race. 

These are some of the general principles demon- 
strating the practicability of Socialism as effecting the 
farmer. The large capitalist has long since seen the 
inherent folly of competition. Why not you farmers 
also join in the triumphant march toward which the 
civilized world is quickly passing — the universal broth- 
erhood of man. 



Sunday and Socialism 

By EDMUND R. BRUMBAUGH 



WT AM no Socialist," shouted Billy Sunday at one of 
-L his meetings in Omaha, and fully five thousand 
people applauded. It was a pitiful spectacle, a heart- 
rending exhibition of hypocrisy and ignorance ; let us 
be kind and say it was mostly the latter. Hypocrisy 
is too serious a charge to be hurled lightly. 

Mr. Sunday may consign to fire and brimstone 
those who disagree with him; probably he would re- 
serve for me the hottest place in the bottomless pit ; 
but I shall not retort in kind. Reason and policy for- 
bid it. The dogma of eternal torture seems indescrib- 
ably hideous to me and to deny those attributes of 
justice and mercy ascribed to God and without which 
He is not God at all. Besides it is better to be known 
as a friend than an enemy of religion, religion having 

vital a bearing on human life and conduct, and to 
express one's self too bluntly is apt to lead some to 
misunderstand. 

Mr. Sunday speaks much truth. No one can 
doubt it who is fair enough to give him a hearing. He 
also says what is not true, and this it is that calls for 
reply. Being but a man, he is open to criticism. Lips 
that speak truth one moment are not given leave to 
lie the next, and only cowardice could ask that false- 
hood go unchallenged. 

"I am not a Socialist." Mr. Sunday uttered the 
words as if denying an accusation of something ex- 
tremely reprehensible. "Why?" we may ask. Has 
he ever given a moment to fair, unbiased study of 
economic problems? WTiat does he know of conditions 
confronting the lives of the poor of today? Is he con- 
versant with the works of Thompson, Wilson, White, 
Car, Tucker and Eauschenbusch — all Socialists and 
all Christians? If not, why not? Is it because he 
thinks that souls can be saved from sin and prepared 
for life eternal and sinless while the bodies of work- 
ers are maimed and broken through toil and need and 
sent to early graves ? Why is Mr. Sunday not a Social- 
ist ? It is up to him to give a satisfactory answer or be 
convicted of trying to serve both God and Mammon. 



"Crime breeds poverty," said Billy Sunday. He 
picked a high proportion — ninety-five per cent. We 
may well question the statement with such a percent- 
age in view. Think what it means! That the poor 
are poor because of their sin, that the extent of their 
poverty exposes the extent of their shortcomings! 
Were it so, Mr. Sunday would have to work harder 
than he does, and it would take him a thousand years 
to make even a dent in the devil's armour. Two-thirds 
of the people would be beyond redemption and half of 
the remainder criminals at heart. The washer-woman, 
slaving over her tub, would be a fiend incarnate, and 
the perfumed female in her limousine an angel of light. 
Surely, Mr. Sunday does not always realize the im- 
port of his words. 

"You cannot produce good conduct by mere legis- 
lation," claimed Sunday as a clincher to his attack 
on Socialism. It sounded like a sentence from a speech 
at a liquor dealers' convention. But who ever said 
that you could make men good in this way? Certainly 
not a Socialist. That statutes are not the source of 
morality is a big, basic element of the Socialist phil- 
osophy. There is hardly a limit, however, to the ef- 
ficacy of law when backed by widespread, intelli- 
gent public opinion. To contend otherwise is to take 
up the cry of anarchy, to plead for a state ra which 
greed-inspired fraud and brutal force occupy jointly 
the seat of power. 

Mr. Sunday gets much notoriety. Millions will hear 
and read his sermons who will never see these lines. 
The truth is hampered. A thousand forces combine 
to keep it down. We have reason to rejoice, however; 
the truth cannot be killed; it proceeds from God and 
partakes of His immortality. It must and it will be 
triumphant. 

The Golden Age is before us. Showers of material 
and spiritual blessings are in store for mankind. Chris- 
tian and Jew, Protestant and Catholic, believer and 
non-believer — workers of the world, let us reach out 
and take hold of our heritage. 



14 



The Western Comrade 



Age Limit a Tragedy 



By FRANK E. WOLFE 



"W 



"HAT is your age limit?" is a question fre- 
quently asked by those making their first 
inquiry about the Llano del Kio Community. The ques- 
tion has a tragic significance for thousands of workers 
still in their prime days of usefulness. 

"I am strong and vigorous, and can do the best 
day's work of my life; yet I was among the first to be 
laid off in my shop, and my gray hair has prevented 
me from getting a job, though I am but forty-seven, 
and in good health," writes a man from one of the 
big railroad centers. 

The fear of the loss of the job is ever present with 
the American worker. As the centralization of 
wealth goes forward,, the seizure of the sources 

of life closes other avenues to 

the younger men, and the older 
ones are replaced. Modern la- 
bor saving machinery and the 
"speeding up" process has 
crowded the middle-aged man 
out of industries. 

In the Llano del Rio Com- 
munity the tragedy of the aging 
finds no place. There, no one is 
pushed aside. Willingness to 
do one's best, to make the ef- 
fort, is the only requisite. The 
young, city-bred clerk, who 
could carry but four bricks 
from the mill and who worked 
beside a grizzled man twice his 
age carrying a full mould of 
six, found there a reversal of 
the rule in the outside world. 

How, bitter the hour when one full of life, active 
and eager to go on doing a man's work finds himself 
gently but persistently thrust aside because of his age ! 
Enforced idleness, involuntary physical stagnation, dis- 
couragement, and loss of confidence in one's self, is 
quickly followed by mental failure and a life destroyed 
at a time of its fullness when ripe experience should 
make service more valuable. 

What horror overcomes the worker when he reaches 
the understanding at last that nowhere is he wanted; 
that youth that can be speeded is preferred because 
profits must flow; that the master will be served — no 
matter what hopelessness! What more dismal, soul- 
depressing thought could come to the worker than that 
soon he will be brushed aside — scrapped and ruthlessly 



The Declaration of Principles in 
the Constitution of the Llano del 
Rio Community contains the follow- 
ing paragraph : 

The duty of the community to the 
individual is to administer justice, 
to eliminate greed and selfishness, to 
educate all, and to aid any in time 
o£ age or misfortune- 

The General Assembly of the 
community has passed resolutions 
pledging the people of Llano to 
render aid and support to their com- 
rades who may be overtaken by 
accident, ill health or inability to 
work. This sentiment is shared alike 
by young and old in the colony. 



a de luxe t. 

the future | i 
realization v ' 



discarded like the obsolete machinery of yesterday a 
Beaten and bludgeoned in the fierceness of the strugH 
gle, men and women come to us with bruised heads andl 
sore hearts. Almost from birth they have been robbedj 
cheated and exploited by merciless masters, and thej 
iron is in many souls. Suspicion and distrust has be-| 
come a part of their nature. Slow and difficult is the 
process of disarming and reassuring them. "It look^ 
too good" is an expression we have heard a thousandl 
times. But, my comrades, it is coming ! We get al 
better understanding as the vision grows. The pro-j 
noun "we" takes on a sweeter sound than "they. 
' ' Our ' ' possessions in land, Avater, stock and machinery,] 
is more valuable than "mine." Hope renewed, confi-j 
dence in humanity restored! 
brotherly feeling and comrade-^ 
ship grows. 

We are pioneering, but som^ 
of our experienced men laugh at'^ 
that and declare if there is 
pioneering, it is 
method. 

Our vision of 
comes nearer to 
every day. Interest in this 
effort to put the co-operative 
theory into practice grows in 
almost every English-speaking 
country. 

We are making a demonstra- 
tion of wonderful success. We i 
are not groping ; Ave have found i 
our way. "Insurmountable" ob- 
stacles have proven easy when ' 
approached with determination and confidence — and in , 
this some of our strongest and most indomitable spirits 
were those whom capitalism had pushed aside. 

In the fullness of their years we shall tenderly care 
for our comrades, Avho have wrought in our mutual serv- 
ice, and their declining days shall be filled Avith sunshine 
and joy of life among their own people. 

At Llano we have planned to provide for the future 
by making the soil with its boundless fecundity produce 
enough to cover all our needs of food, clothing, shelter, 
education, amusement and social life ; there, I say, we 
hope to so lift the burden that the workers, free from 
haunting fear, shall stand erect as free men and women 
dauntless and happy in the assurance of safety in the 
days to come. 



The Western Comrade 



15 



Snow Caps Greet Colonists 



By R. K. WILLIAMS 




SNOW-COVERED range glistening in 
the bright sunshine forms a most en- 
trancing morning background for the 
white tenthouses and the more subdued 
coloring of stone and brick buildings on 
the llano. While the high mountains 
are snow covered well down into the 
timber line, the bright sun warms the 

valley and the alfalfa fields have taken on a more vivid 

green. We had a quarter of an inch of rain on the 

mesa but much more than that must have fallen on 

the mountains back of us. 

The snow in the mountains means a bountiful sup- 
ply of water for the next year. 

Some of it will reach the colony 

two or three years hence. 

The action of Nature at work 

in the hills could be seen from 

the plain below and proved a 

beautiful and magnificent sight. 

Two days' snowfall sufficed to 

fill the canyons, cuts and draws 

of the mountain sides. Since 

then sunshine has beamed down 

in the same pleasant way of mid- 
summer. 

With the exceptions that the 

evenings and mornings are 

chilly, some ice forming on 

standing water, the climate is 

very much the same as that of a 

month ago. Warmer clothes 

are being brought from trunks 

and other places and worn, much 

to the comfort of the people. 

Old residents of these parts tell 

us that snow in the mountains 

at this time, is a month earlier 

and assures an abundance of water for nest season's 

irrigation. 

This fact is very welcome as the colony has been 

steadily clearing land and many more acres will have 

been leveled and planted by spring so that added wa- 

>ters will find a profitable outlet. 

Chilly weather has not deterred members from 

joining us. Nearly every day one to two new resi- 
dents settle down and begin to make themselves at 

home. The colony now has nearly 700 residents. This 



becomes stale very quickly Things are continuously 
moving forward. Every day sees something new in 
the shape of houses, tents, new land prepared for va- 
rious things. The commissary carries on its books 157 
traders, nearly all heads of families. The hotel takes 
care of from 125 to 140 daily. 

The assembly hall in the club house, which is also 
used for the dining room, has been enlarged and even 
now is inadequate to meet the requirements of the 
colony. The first demonstration of its inadequateness 
was on last Saturday night, when the usual dance was 
held. So many people gathered about the fioor that 
the actual dancing place seemed smaller than usual. 
This fact is extremely gratify- 
ing. We would regret to think 
that we had more room than we 
needed. It helps a lot to know 
that there is a greater demand 
for space, for houses and other 
things than we are able to sup- 
ply fully, though it is rather 
rough on the ones not comfort- 
ably fixed. 

As a matter of fact the time 
may never come when we really 
will be ahead of the demand for 
homes and space. This is the 
way to grow and gives assurance 
that people everywhere are wak- 
ing up to the fact that we have 
here a demonstration worthy of 
the participation of everyone 
and that by such participation a 
great cooperative enterprise, 
stronger, more substantial than 
any ever launched and main- 
tained, will be a concrete entity. 
Word from all parts of the 
United States reaches us that the "eyes of the Socialist 
world" are upon us. Visitors and travelers tell us that 
everywhere questions are being asked about the col- 
ony. They also tell us that the only deterrent to many 
more joining us is the initial price required before the 
member can secure a working contract. This, of course, 
has to be done, as we are still living under capitalism 
and we yet have to work on capitalistic lines, especially 
with the outside world. Inside the colony group itself 
very little need of money is experienced, but this does 
is a considerable increase over last month. History not mean that the member could not use money here 




I 



16 



The We 



Llano del Rio Co-operati\ 




•■'^sr'^r^.ya^TM^Sw 




General Panoramic View of tlie Llano del Rio Community. The Foreground Is a Vividly Green Field of Alfalfa. Thfe 




Montessori Class. Teachers, Right to Left: Prudence Stokes Brown, Director; Mildred G. Buxton, and Adeline S. Hor 






Comrade 



17 



ommunity As It Is Today 



.***»*?'•«*=.. 




Ihown Here are Temporary and tlie Land Will Be Turned Into Alfalfa and Orchards When the Permanent City Is Built 









,;:?4A'*'> 



rt: 



V V- w .4 ' Vi] -v. : ' » 



. . !*)>?*, ■■'■ • 




kittle Montessorians Enjoy Their Play-Work in the Sunshine. The Cottonwoods Furnish Shade for the Alfresco Room 



18 



The Western Comrade 



with which to procure things we do not carry, in case 
such things are wanted. 

However, money is not needed in tlie colony for 
exchange purposes, for all of our barter and trade is 
carried on in a credit way. 

The even tenor of colony life and the effects of 
mutual assistance is fast showing results in the younger 
generation. A new psychology is being created in the 
boys in the schools and in the general colony life, and 
the example of work being done cooperatively. For 
instance, upon George Pickett's return from the north, 
where he had been on an expedition of explaining the 
colony and other business, he formed a group of boys, 
ranging in age from 7 to 14 years, and started to work 
on a bad piece of road, just west of town. The first 
day, thirteen boys formed themselves around him, and 
during the day they worked like Trojans. It took all 
of Pickett's persuasive powers in keeping them from 
overdoing their tender muscles. So anxious were the 
little fellows to show results the first day, that they 
swallowed their midday lunch in ten minutes, and 
while Pickett was up the road a short ways exploring, 
he returned and found them hard at work. 

Nearly two miles of excellent road work was done 
the first day. When the trucks came in after dark, 
the drivers said that the moment they struck the re- 
paired piece of road the difference could be noticed. 

The second day's lineup showed twenty -three 
ardent youngsters ready and they trudged off under 
the leadership of Pickett with their picks, shovels and 
rakes. Pickett facetiously called them his "Coxey 
Army" and the boys fell into the humor of the joke. 

More work was done the second day than the first 
and the third day sufficed to complete, in good shape, 
five miles of once very bad road. 

The workers were rewarded with a taffy pull in 
the bakery under the auspices of Mrs. Pickett. None 
but the workers 
was allowed to in- 
dulge in the good 
things passed 
around and many 
were the longing 
looks and much 
mouth watering oc- 
casioned in boys 
unable to get into 
the gang. 

The next big job 
for the boys will be 
to brush up the 
horse barn and help 
make the faithful 
animals warm and 













1 








^ 


^^^^^^^ 




Result of Two Hours' Rabbit Hunt at Llano 



cozy and protected from the cutting winds. The boys' 
slogan, worthy of all emulation, is "No work, no eats." 
Here's a list of the little stalwarts that helped to 
show the resiilts of cooperation in action : David Wal- 
lace, Eugene Fredericks, Merril Wallace, Kaymoud 
Ward, Warran Powers, Harry Pike, Clarence Fremont, 
John Price, Iver Iverson, Lee Fread, Maurice Eldridge, 
Leonard Zimmerman, Spencer Brown, Ross Brown, 
Harold Millar, Orvil Millar, Carl Miller, Warren Fread, 
Everett Morrison, Chester Morrison, Bebel Alonzo, 
Irvin Barlow, Richard Rawlins, Merle Bowman and 
William Carr. 

The transportation department, working under dif- 
ficulties, indeed, is improving vastly and on Sunday 
last seven truck loads were pulled into the colony. This 
depleted the immense pile of stuff at Palmdale quite 
a lot. For the past four days nearly forty tons of 
materials, foodstuffs and household goods were drawn 
into Llano. Three trucks I'unning almost steadily are 
now doing good work and real results can be seen at 
this and at the Palmdale end. With a clearing up 
of the freight situation many of the colony's difficul- 
ties will have been solved. As the freight arriving and 
departing is sure to grow more and more, this phase 
of colony efficiency will require eternal vigilance and 
work. However, there is a sanguine hope that troubles 
in this direction will be solved in the natural course 
of the colony's unfoldment. 

The colony has been exceedingly enriched by the 
receipt of a complete sawmill, shipped from near Oak- 
land. The capacity of this mill is in the neighborhood 
of 30,000 feet daily. Doubtless it will be set up here 
at the colony and the logs hauled from the nearby 
mountains and turned into the sort of lumber required. 
By having the mill here, it is figured that great saving 
of lumber will be made and in addition have the slabs 
and ends of firewood, which will mean labor saved. 

Wheat planting 
is well under way 
and by the time this 
magazine reaches 
the public more 
than 120 acres will 
have been put in. 
Land has been 
prepared for oats 
and barley and 
fruit trees and the 
tractor is busy at 
work with a crew 
clearing more land 
for the spring plant- 
ing of pears, ap- 
ples, cereals and al- 



The Western Comrade 



19 







>^^^ f.W^ 




falfa. By spring there 
will be a large area de- 
voted to alfalfa, how 
much at this time it is 
difficult to say. 

Twenty-sis teams are 
busy at work leveling 
land. "Weather conditions 
probably will permit this 
sort of labor for a consid- 
erable time. 

The building depart- 
ment is working hard to 
prepare places for the in- 
coming people and are 
still behind. However, 
there is but little actual 

suffering, though some discomfort, from this phase of 
colony life. People generally coming in have brought 
their own equipment, so that a few hours' labor suf- 
fices to put up a substantial and comfortable place to 
live. 

The schools in Llano are progressing. In the high 
school there are twenty-three pupils in some studies 
and nineteen in all the studies. C. "W. Hunton, the 
teacher, is greatly pleased with the fine showing and 
is enthusiastic over the interest shown by pupils and 
parents in his particular branch. 

At the present time there are more than 260 pupils 
attending the various schools and this number is rap- 
idly being recruited. In addition to the regular schools 
now in progress, there will be added more studies along 
industrial and agricultural lines. The latter will be 
included in a night course. 

A wireless telegraph club has been organized and 
work begun on the construction of a station that will 
be fully up to the standard and of commercial capacity. 
Much interest was evinced and it is the intention to 
teach those desiring to learn this fascinating method of 
communication both in the electrical and telegraphic 
work. Plans are being considered of aerials, whether 
to make a temporary set or to go for the permanent 
thing at once. A wide field will be opened when the 
wireless is in actual operation. 

Some of the difficulties besetting the formation of 
Llano schools, and detailing the present condition of 
them, is fully set forth in the following article from 
the pen of Miss Grace M. Powell, one of the teachers 
in Llano. 

ALTHOUGH there were neither doors nor windows 
in the new building, it was very pleasant during 
the warmer weather and before the cold weather came 
the windows were put in. Besides the doors and 



*-#t^' 



B:i 









Mining Limestone for the Kiln 



windows new individual 
desks were put in, the pu- 
pils formerly being seated 
at tables. 

The work of the 
grades is very similar to 
that of the city. As yet 
domestic science has not 
been started, but within 
the nest month a building 
will be erected for that 
purpose. 

The Montessori Kin- 
dergarten, which is the 
pride of the colony, is in 

charge of Mrs. Prudence 

Stokes Brown and her as- 
sistants. There are fifty-four children enrolled. This 
work is carried on at the Goodwin Ranch. They have 
a seven-room building, which is well equipped for such 
work. The children are taken to and from the kinder- 
garten by automobile. These daily rides are a source 
of great joy to the wee ones. 

The high school department holds session in a large 
room at the hotel. They are in charge of Mr. C. "W. 
Hunton and work is carried on in the same manner as 
other high schools. 

A new addition to the school system is the night 
school, which is a popular place for the men and 
women as for the boys and girls. Almost any subject 
desired can be taken up, but the class that has the 
most students is the Public Speaking and English, 
which is in charge of Mr. Etherton. Another well at- 
tended class is the music class under the supervision of 
Mr. Page. 

Night school is in session sis nights a week and a 
great deal of interest is being shown by the well at- 
tended classes. 

Taken as a whole the school of Llano will stand in 
the lead with any of the county schools. 

Up to the present time there are 130 pupils in the 
grades, fifty-four in the Kindergarten, twenty-five in 
the high school and about fifty in the night school, or 
about 260 people of all ages attending some branch 
of the Llano school. 

In connection with the school work, a Parent and 
Teachers' Association has been formed, so that the 
parents can be in touch with the work of the school 
and see and help the school in its many problems. 
These meetings are held twice a month. They are well 
attended and much interest is being Shown in theui by 
the parents and teachers. 

"Work on our new $5000 schoolhouse will soon be 
begun. 



20 



The Western Comrade 



Life On the Llano 



By R. K. WILLIAMS 





OW We Live at Llano" has stirred up 
some enthusiasm and this department 
has received several communications in 
the last few days pouring in all sorts 
of questions. It is very gratifying, in- 
deed, to note the interest taken, and to 
read the words of commendation, say- 
ing that these hints are very helpful, 
and that they can rely upon the information thus 
purveyed. 

When one is filled with enthusiasm for a thing, 
it is hard to hew close to the line, but this we have de- 
termined to do. We have grown so large and have 
so much development work done to show the prospects 
and other visitors that we do not find it necessary to 
expatiate in rhapsodies or attempt to juggle at all 
with the cerulean. All that is needed is to give a clear 
exposition of facts and if the facts prove unpalatable 
or act as a deterrent upon the intending member, then 
we conclude that that person is not very determined 
of heart and is looking for something that we haven't 
got here. We have no apologies for the colony. We 
have but kindly feeling toward everyone who is help- 



ing build this great project, a 
project that means absolute 
freedom from worry and con- 
tented old age. Job Harriman's 
enthusiastic optimism is shared 
and echoed by all the friends 
of this wonderful effort at co- 
operation. He says that we 
have a principality in the mak- 
ing and the way that it is to 
be made is for the individuals 
themselves to work and pull to- 
gether for that one great end. 
Anyone who is willing to come 
here, brave some hardships, put 
up with some discomforts, go a 
little short now and then on 
the table and wear a few less 
handsome clothes, will be wel- 
come here. This will be, we 
feel, a temporary condition. 
We invite the world to come 
and visit us. But to the ques- 
tions : 

A lady from Kerman writes 
and asks six questions. One 
of the questions is difficult to answer and I doubt the 
wisdom of attempting to answer it. The query is : 
"What provision have you made for bringing up the 
children with a religious training? I feel that I want 
my children to have Sunday school and to be brought 
up with a feeling of reverence for God." 

As yet we have no regular provision for "religious 
training" in the popular acceptation of the phrase. 
We feel that parents who have arrived at the age of 
discretion should be able to bring up their children 
along these lines pretty much as they ought to go. As 
there are so many sects and creeds it would be hard to 
install the Sunday school that would be satisfactory 
to all. We have people of all sorts of religious beliefs 
in the colony, and we have some with no belief at all. 
To establish a colony religion, so to speak, doubtless 
would be very distasteful to a large majority of resi- 
dents here who feel they have sufficient intelligence to 
individually work out these problems for themselves. 
The feeling is that if colonists want to hold "divine 
worship" it .'should be held within the sanctity of the 
home, and that none of the present public buildings 
iised for the purpose, and also there is a rule that if 



The Western Comrade 



21 



aiiyoue wants to propagate any particular religious 
creed, that individual must submit to the open forum 
and answer anj^ questions put. 

Socialists the world over do this, as well as most 
other lines of human uplift invite interrogations. As 
a rule, the expounder of the gospel does not do this. 
""Yhenever the proper person comes along qualified to 
teach the Bible in the proper way, that is as generally 
wanted, then that person will have an opportujiity to 
display his profundity and skill. Until then, probably, 
the Sunday school, as regularly known, will have to be 
a small group affair. 

We believe that reverence to God is shoM^n by rever- 
encing and helping one 's brothers and sisters and that 
God can be seen in the faces of all, if deeply sought and 
that God can l)e seen in these giant hills and valleys and 
that Nature's god smiles up from the carpet of flowers 
adorning the wide plains. 

The same lady asks how goods from the commissary 
are distributed. 

The answer to this will be repeated. There is no 
regular delivery wagon to convey groceries from the 
commissary to the homes. There is an attempt to have 
all the colonists do their shopping in the morning. It 
is urged that they bring their own receptacles for carry- 
ing away provisions, etc. As remarked before, baskets 
soon run out and the distance to the source of supply 
is so great, that intending 
residents are requested to 
bring with them baskets and 
especially jars, buckets or 
bottles to convey liquid ma- 
terials, such as vinegar, honey, 
syrups, oils and the like. Let 
it be emphasized that the 
more completely, one provides 
themselves with the accus- 
tomed things at home, the bet- 
ter and more satisfied will 
they be, and incidentally save 
us all considerable outlay in 
cash. 

The nest four questions 
can be grouped. They are: 
"Have you a medical doctor? 
Dentist? (and my husband 
wants to know about the bar- 
ber) and telephone?" 

Unfortunately we have no 
medical man with us. The op- 
portunities for a broad-mind- 
ed and first-class doctor are 
unlimited. "We have an ideal 
climate here for the curing of 



chronic troubles, and a sanitorium run in the interests 
of the colony would be the means of bringing in a big 
revenue. It would permit the working out any par- 
ticular ideas of the doctor that were for the betterment 
of humanity. While the doctor would receive $4 per 
day, which seems pitiable in comparison to some in- 
comes of surgeons and doctors, yet the security and 
freedom experienced by that individual and the knowl- 
edge that some time he would be beyond all possible 
want, in addition to the satisfaction that he would 
be doing a noble work, would more than compensate 
between the sure $4 and the large income that he hopes 
to receive. 

AVe have no dentist at the present time. We have 
had our hopes dashed several times, but do not despair 
of getting one soon. This is no promise that we will 
have a good dentist soon, but it can be said that we are 
in communication with a good man, who may come in. 

Yes, we have a barber, and he is a good one. He 
has a neat shop, and practically all the usual things 
obtainable in a city shop can be obtained from his de- 
partment. Charges are 15 cents for a shave and 25 
cents for a haircut. He sells tickets which reduce the 
above figures somewhat and the cost is charged against 
the individual having the work done and credited to 
his department. We could have a telephone here con- 
(Continued on Page 24) 




Corner in the Tent House Occupied by Dr. R. K. Williams 



22 



The Western Comrade 



The Church and Llano 



By ALBERT A. JAMES 




EEQUENTLY we are asked if we have a 
church at the Llano del Rio Colony. 
The various forms in which this question 
is asked emphasizes the fact that in- 
numerable religions and sects have 
sprung up, as a result of the competitive 
system. 

It seems that a new sect or "moral 
standard" has developed, as a result of each foi-m of 
exploitation. For instance, we have the captains of 
industry of the Thaw- White type, employing a "Billy 
Sunday" to tell their wage slaves that they will go to 
hell if they drink booze. We hear these same captains 
of industry say that they could well afford to pay 
Sunday $50,000 a week, because of the profits they 
make because of the increased efficiency of their men, 
caused by Sunday's work. 

Unfortunately, Billy Sunday has to put a few extra 
touches on the hell of a generation ago, in order to 
get a contrast with the hell the steel workers are forced 
to live and work in at Pittsburg. 

This extra touch which Mr. Sunday gives to his 
picture of hell offends the aesthetic tastes of the Rev. 
Aked, who would warn an office boy to be loyal to his 
master and not trade office secrets for a ticket to the 
ball game. But he would hold in reverence the $10,000 
a year Bishop, who would trade his ability to draw a 
cirowd to the faithful Epworth League workers of his 
dhureh, for $100 per night. 

We are sometimes condemned because we do not 
build a church at the colony. Please tell us, you who 
think you are followers of the lowly Nazarene, who 
we Avouid accept in that church? Would you ex- 
clude from it the Jew, or would you accept the Jew 
and exclude the Mormon, or would you condemn to 
everlasting punishment both the Jew and the Mormon 
and accept only the Methodist? 

It may be you would have us build a church for 
each of the various sects which the competitive system 
has developed. If so, we would need more churches 
than cow stanchions. 

Would you have us eontiniTe the practice of build- 
ing hundred thousand dollar edifices in the name of 
the Carpenter, and mortgage the soul, the conscience 
and the honor of those who "worship" there to the 
money lender of the community? Would you have us 
build these great palaces and dedicate them to the wor- 
ship of the Carpenter who had no place where he could 
lay his head? 



Those who have blindly followed formalities have, 
at times, shown evidences of having realized there is a 
second commandment, as well as a first, and have at- 
tempted to show the South Sea Islander that it is not 
in harmony with the teachings of the Nazarene for him 
to slay his brother, put him in a pot, cook him and eat 
him; but these same formality worshipers will boldly 
defend our present industrial system whereby the 
strong devour the weak, by absorbing daily the greater 
part of the production of the workers, through a sys- 
tem of profits, rents and interest. They fail to see that 
to consume a man's time is to consume his life. They 
do not stop at consuming a man's time, but consume 
the time and life of the women and babies, grinding 
into profits the lives and souls of the most helpless 
members of our race. 

We are not at all disturbed when the defenders of 
the present industrial system use every means to retard 
the work of those who would establish a community 
where the god of profit is not worshipped and where 
the rights of the individual are conserved through co- 
operative ownership of the means of production. 

Those who preach submission to the present condi- 
tions and forget that justice should be done, are quick 
to condemn. Those who would teach the wage slave 
of today to be patient and bye and bye everything will 
be lovely, are careful to see that there is pie in the 
cupboard today at their own home. Is it any wonder 
that the workers are tired of such preaching and are 
seeking an asylum from those who would coin the most 
sacred belief of man into money and self-aggrandize- 
ment? 

We have frequently asked correspondents who 
clamor for churches to send us the plans of the clrarch 
where the Carpenter of Nazareth worshipped, but 
none has been forthcoming. 

Have we a place of worship? Yes, we have God's 
great, unlimited creation of mountain and plain. We 
breathe the pure air, unpolluted by the breath of him 
who shouts the praise of a murderous army or shrugs 
his shoulders indifferently when the state literally 
tears the head from the body of its victim at a legal 
hanging. 

No, we have no visible church; but we have a de- 
termination to erase from our hearts that cannibalistic 
spirit (our heritage for generations) and establish in 
its stead that spirit of real brotherhood which not only 
revolts at making a pot roast of our brother, but also 
refuses to eat his time or consume his wife and babies. 



The Western Comrade 



23 



Sophy 

(Continued from Page 10) 



havin' proper in the chosen house 
of God, she'd look around and 
around with them big black eyes, 
then all of a sudden they'd crinkle 
up, 'n she'd begin to bite them full 
red lips o' her'n — I guess Satan 
made her mouth — 'n like as not 
she'd disgrace us by snickerin' out 
loud. 'N when we got home 'u had 
to face Sam'l she'd begin to trim- 
ble, 'n maybe all she'd say was that 
Brother Barker was tryin' to get a 
chew of tobaeker out o' his pocket 
without Sister Barker seein' him. 
As if Tom Barker's godlessness 
wasn't a thing to cry about instead 
of laugh about ! 

■'Well, what with Samuel's and 
my Christian training Sophy got 
quieter as she got older, 'n Samuel 
says, 'With the help of God we'll 
save Sophy's soul yet.' He kept 
thinkin' every Sunday that she'd 
get converted 'n want to be bap- 
tized, but I could see that Satan 
was still lurkin' in her, behind 
them big smoulderin' eyes. I got 
so's I couldn't understand her 
at all. 

"When Samuel would get the 
whip, she looked so tall and slim, 
'n stood so queer and still, not 
shakin' a mite like she used to 
when he hit her, she gave me a 
queer sort of feelin' that there was 
something about her he couldn't 
hurt no matter how hard he hit. 
'N I suppose the Lord will punish 
me, but when I found she'd sneaked 
out 'n learned to dance I never told 
her father, for I knew he'd turn 
her out, 'n sinful as she was I 
thought a heap of that girl. 'N 
things went on like that for awhile, 
me standin' between her and her 
father, 'n then one day he said he 'd 
waited till she was seventeen, he'd 
given her good Christian trainin' 
'n nlenty of time, now she'd got to 
make up her mind to be baptized or 
go, he couldn't have her evil influ- 
ence leadin' her little brothers and 
sisters astrav. 

" 'N then* Sophy got mad. She 
was never much of a hand to get 
mad, except at her father. With 
me, she'd .iust give me a queer, 
■Dityin' kind of look, but when her 
father said anything to her. her 
eyes got just like red hot coals, but 



she never dared to say much. But 
now she broke right out and told 
him she hated him and his hideous 
religion, 'n all she'd stayed this 
long for was because she couldn't 
bear to leave her little sisters and 
because she pitied me. She said 
she never blamed poor ila — she 
was always tormeutin' herself 
more'n anybody else tryin' to live 
up to her ugly belief. 'N she said 
that from now on if she starved to 
death doin' it she was goin' to look 
'n look till she found a place where 
all the laughter 'n fun that was 
always seethin' 'n bubblin' way 
down in her would be wanted. 
'Somebody must want it.' she 
said, thro win' out her arms with 
one of them gestures she was al- 
ways enticin' me away from my 
duty with, 'I've got so much, 'n 
maybe the devil will like my bein' 
pretty if your hideous old God 
don't!' 

"She never got any farther, for 
Samuel got right up 'n pointed to 
the door, his hand ashakin', 'n said, 
'Out of this house, you devil's 
woman! You ain't no child of 
ours ! ' 

" 'N she went and I got up to 
follow her out and tell her to be 
sure to take her winter underwear 
that was on the top shelf in the 
children's room, 'n I wanted to 
give her the egg money I'd saved 
up. for Samuel always lets me have 
that for my own, as he says he 
knows I won't squander it, but 
Samuel said, 'Sit down, Emma,' so 
I set down. 

"Samuel's hand was still 
shakin', but he picked up the 
Quarterly 'n went right on readin'. 
Samuel's lots stronger 'n me. But 
Sophy came back and kissed me 
good-bye 'n I whispered to her 
about the underwear, 'n then she 
begun to cry, 'n oh it was terrible ! 
Terrible! Sophy goin' straight to 
hell like that ! My own girl on the 
road to hell!" 

"You don't mean to tell me 
Sophy has " 

"Oh not like you think. She's 
married and got a baby, but her 
soul's lost just the same. She's 
one of them movie actresses!" 

The speaker lapsed into sobs. 



The Mexican 
People 

Their Struggle 
for Freedom 

By 

L. Gutierrez de Lara 

and 

Edgcumb Pinchon 




Each new battle of the bloody revo- 
lution in Mexico makes this book the 
more valuable. It is the most remark- 
able as well as the most intelligent in- 
terpretation of underlying motives. 

Every one should have this book in 
his library. 

We are fast closing out our remain- 
ing copies of "The Mexican People." 
If you hurry you can get in on the 
combination offer of The Western 
Comrade and this book for only $1.75. 

Address The Western Comrade, Cir- 
culation Manager, 923 Higgins BIdg., 
Los Angeles, Gal. 



24 



Your Combings 

made into switches for 
one dollar, postpaid. 

Work guaranteed. 

MRS. E. TURNWALL 

Llano, Cal. 



PEARSONS 

is the only Magazine 
of its kind 

This is why: — 

Three years ago Pearson's decided to 
be a free magazine. 

This is what it did:^ 

ABANDONED FANCY COVERS 
CUT OUT COLORED PICTURES 
ADOPTED PLAIN PAPER 

This was the purpose: — 

A plain form would enable the mag- 
azine to live on its income from sub- 
scriptions and monthly sales. It 
would not have to consider the effect 
on advertisers when it wanted to print 
the truth about any public question. 

This was the result: — 

Pearson's notv prints the truth about 
some question which affects your wel- 
fare in every issue. It prints facts 

which no magazine that de- 
pends on advertising could 
"afford ' ' to print. 

And, with all this, Pearsons still prints 
as much fiction and entertainment 
articles as other magazines. If you 
want plain facts instead of pretty 
pictures buy a copy on the news 
stand for 15 cents, or subscribe by 
the year for $1.50. 

By special arrangement with Pear- 
son's we are able to make you the 
following clubbing offer. 

You can get both PEAR- 
SON'S MAGAZINE and 
THE WESTERN COM- 
RADE for one year by 
sending $1.50 (the price of 
Pearson's alone) to 

The Western Comrade 

923 HIGGINS BLDG. 
LOS ANGELES, CALIF. 



The Western Comrade 

Murderers — You and I 



(Continued from Page 9) 



You priest, you preacher, you 
lying, sniveling psalm-singing hyp- 
ocrites. You are the murderers ! 

You judge ! You miserable, cow- 
ardly assassin! You draw your 
cloak of sanctity about you, but 
you smell of the musty tomb ! 
You and your damned laws and 
courts and dungeons and gibbet's: 
You reek with the stench of the 
rotting ages. You murdered this 
boy! 

You banker, gambler, petty 
hucksterers — you of the tribe of 
business — ^you slew this youth! 



You of white soft hands, large oi 
girth and small of brain, you are 
the murderers ! 

You, reader of this, you helped 
me strangle this boy, but there is 
a difference. 

You wanted it done; I was un- 
willing. You believe in capital 
killing : I abhor murder. You call 
it punishment; I say you do it for 
brutal, cruel, barbaric revenge. 
You, people of California, make me 
a party to your crime of murder 
and for that I hate you with all the 
hate of hell! 



Life On the Llano 



(Continued from Page 20) 



necting us to all parts of the coun- 
try, with a day or two of labor. 
We have the wire to connect it up 
and the loose ends are just a mile 
and a half away. This matter is 
simply one of doing the work and 
as we are so pressed for other 
things have not thought it neces- 
sary to take the time to do it. 

Vegetables are daily carted 
around and all desiring may give 
their orders to the vegetable man. 
The garbage is removed daily. The 
families place it in cans on the back 
of the lots as in the city, and the 
garbage man does the rest. Fami- 
lies contemplating coming in would 
make no mistake in bringing along 
this recepticle. However, this is 
not insisted on. 

An Idaho man asks how the 
adobes are constructed. "While the 
writer is not able to build one, or 
tell exactly how it is done, yet the 
following is a rough sketcL. Bricks 
are made in the usual way and sun- 
dried. These are laid on stone 
foundations, asphalted over to pre- 
vent capillary attraction, and the 
walls run up in the usual way. The 
roof is then laid and dirt mixed 
with water, collected usually in the 
yard of the building, and is then 
carried to the roof and artistically 
laid. The roof is then painted with 
asphaltum and the sides covered 
with a waterproof material. These 
homes are plastered with adobe, 
which gives them a nice brown 



color. The effect is soothing and. 
the interiors are warm and dry. 
The building is 16x24, two rooms.: 
Some few are slightly larger. These 
adobes are temporary and Avill be 
torn down when we move to the 
permanent townsite. 

The cafeteria is in vogue in the 
dining-room. That is, everyone 
waits on himself, practically.' 
Knives, forks, etc., are in boxes and; 
plenty of trays constitute the equip-i 
ment necessary for the attack oni 
the food supply. Then you go ini 
front of a long counter, where youi 
are handed the various edibles.' 
This method has been found very 
satisfactory, as it does away withi 
much labor in the carrying dishes 
to and fro, filled and empty, and 
causing considerable waiting on the 
part of the diners. 

Mrs. A. F. Zachaery of Bridge- 
port, Conn., asks what to bring to 
Llano in the way of clothing. 

Everything that you are in the 
habit of wearing, with the excep- 
tion of extreme evening gowns, or 
of a very dressy nature. One nice 
dress for our evening affairs would 
not come amiss. However, would 
advise you to bring the substantials' 
and lots of them, such as middle 
blouses, middle pinafores, one-piece 
gingham dresses, plenty of aprons 
and one-piece woolen dresses, serge 
or something warm. The winter 
season throws a considerable chiU 
around and everyone should take 







lislli 



ktsi 
I at 

.Is 
pr 
ttitl; 
ittrr 



|iir( 



The Western Comrade 



25 



[bare to provide themselves with 
lialenty of warm clothing. 

Provide yourself and children 
\vith warm sweaters and, of course, 
v'our regular winter coats, warm 
itockings and good, strong walking 
ihoes. Don't forget the knitted 
•aps and snug hats. These are gen- 
rally useful. 
As remarked in a previous issue 
regard to household furnishings, 
Ting the cookstove, built for wood- 
lurning, at least five links of pipe 
nd two elbows. The colony makes 
his material, but it is not always 
jossible to obtain it on request and 
p-QU might as well be comfortable 
IS quickly as possible. 

There is a mistake that should be 
ectified now that appeared in last 
nonth's .'Western Comrade. The 
statement was made that family 
ivashing could be done at the laun- 
iry. This statement has been in- 
lignantly refuted more than fifteen 
imes, so it is advisable to bring 
fOVLV own washtubs — galvanized, 
)referably — boilers, buckets, etc., in 
)rder to do this work at home. 
Jowever, at the time of last -writ- 
ng, there seems to have been set 
iside a day to do family washing, 
rat since the rule has been changed 
m account of the inadequate quar- 
;ers and hand work. 

As has been said before, bring all 
S^our kitchen utensils. A man re- 
!ently arrived after giving away 
iverything in his home kitchen. He 
was much put out and suffered not 
little in not having these neces- 
sary things when he arrived here. 
[t is hardly necessary to dictate to 
the housewife what to bring along 
these lines, as her good sense will 
figure it out. 

In making yourself comfortable 
in Llano, do not forget a good sup- 
ply of warm bedding. As a matter 
of fact, figure this way: Assume 
that there is nothing to be had along 
these lines for a long time and that 
you must depend wholly upon your- 
self. This policy will win most any- 
where and will make you comfort- 
able here. 

Recently a family arrived and 
began drawing heavily on the com- 
missary. "While this is in a sense 
all right, yet it is not fair to the 
colonists already here. People on 
the outside must not forget that 
this is a living proposition and 
when you come here to join us, you 






We do with Talking Machines what Ford did with Autos 

YOU ASK^HY THIS 

BEAUTIFUL, LARGE^IZE; 

TALKING MACHINE 

SELLS FOR ONLY 



$10 




Size 1 5 J inches at haze: CJ-a high. Ask for 
oak of mahogany finish. Nickel plated, 
r-vcraible, tonearm and reproducer, playing 
Edison. Vi(ftor, Columbia and other disc 
records, 10 and 12 inches. Worm gear 
motor. Threaded winding shaft. Plays 2 
ten-inch records with one winding — Tone 
controlling door. Neat and solidly made. 



If you have never been wiilin^j to spend 
$25 for a talking machine this is your chance. 
The MUSIGRAPH is as large, good-Ioohing, 
right-sounding as machines selling for $25. 

How do we do it ? Here's the answer; Giganlic 
profits have been made from $25 machines because of 
patent right monopoly. Millions have gone for ad- 
vertising $25 machines, and these millions came back 
from the public. The attempt is to make $25 the standard price. It's loo much. 

The trust price game is broken. Here is a machine which gives perfect satisfaction 
(guaranteed) for only $ 1 0. It will fill your home wilh dancing, good music, fun and happi- 
ness. Money back if it isn't as represented. MUSIGRAPHS are selling by the 
thousands. People who can afford it buy showy autcs, but common-sense people gladly ride 
Fords — both get over the ground. Same way with talking machines, only the MUSIGRAPH 
looks and works like the high-priced instruments. 

WHAT BETTER CHRISTMAS GIFT CAN YOU THINK OF? Musi- 
graphs play any standard disc record, hi;^h-priced or even the little five and 
ten cent records. Hurry your order to make sure of Christmas delivery. 

We are advertising these big bargain machines through our customers — one MUSIGRAPH 
in use sells a dozen more. 

One cash payment is our plan. So to-day. to insure Christmas delivery, send $10, 
by P. O. money order, check, draft, express order or postage stamps. All we ask is that you 
tell your neighbors how to get a MUSIGRAPH for only $10. 



GUARANTEE. 

This machine is as represented, both as to 
materials and workmanship, for a period of 
one year. If the MUSIGRAPH is not as 
iepre«ented send it back immediately and 

Get your money back. 



Address MUSIGRAPH, Dept. 224 

Distributors Advertising Service (Inc.) 

142 West 23rd Street, New York City 



Christmas Shopping? 

Undoubtedly you have friends who have a literary bent and whom you 
would like to remember with a Christmas present. There is nothing 
more suitable than a year's subscription to The Western Comrade. 

Send in a check or money order for one dollar ($1) now so that the 
subscription will commence with the Christmas edition. 

To make four people happy just send in two dollars ($2) with their 
names and addresses. Address: 

Circulation IVlanager 

THE WESTERN COMRADE 



923 Higgins Building 



Los Angeles, Cal. 



26 



Our 
Greatest Offer! 

Here is a combination offer of The 
American Socialist, oiiicial organ of 
tlie National Socialist Party, the 
famous "1914 National Campaign 
Book" and The Western Comrade 
that not one reader of The Western 
Comrade can afford to let slip by. 

The American Socialist 

for one year is $ .50 

The 1914 Campaign Book. .oO 
The Western Comrade for 
one year is 1.00 

Total $2.00 

We will make you a 
combination of the 
above for just $1.35 

Take advantage of this offer now! 

Address: Circulation Manager 
THE WESTERN COIVIRADE 

923 Higgins Bldg., Los Angeles, Cal. 



"The Great Working Class Daily" 

MILWAUKEE 
LEADER 

"Unawed by Influence 
and Unbribed by Gain" 

Editor — Victor Ij. Eerger. 
!.ssistants— Jamas Howe. A. M. Sim- 
ors, O.sjnore Snnith, Thomas S. An- 
drews. 



Tlie T>eader is published in America's 
stronghold of Socialism. It is the 
greatest English Socialist Daily in the 
vol Id. It is a Modern Metropolitan 
Daily, containing the latest news. 

Among its distinctive features are: 
SOCIALIST NEWS PAGE, LA- 
BOR NEWS PAGE, SPORTING 
PAGE, MAGAZINE SECTION, 
WOMAN'S PAGE, EDITORIAL 
PAGE. 

The pvicp of The Leader is 25c per 
month; $3.00 per year. 

Combination offer with 

The WESTERN COMRADE 

Both for one year for $3.00 (the 
price of the Milwaukee Leader alone). 

Address: 

Circulation Department 

923 Higgins Bldg., 

Los Angeles, Calif. 



The Western Comrade 

are joining a lot of humans just 
lilje yourselves and have the same 
vrants and filled with the same de- 
sires. We have all made sacrifices 
to get into this colony and novF 
that we are here, we want others 
to respect this sacrifice and help as 
much as possible by helping them- 
selves. 

Come so equipped with flannel 
shirts, heavy boots and shoes, hats 
and gloves, rubber boots — in fact 
so supplied that you will not need 



to go to the comissary for several 
months. 

There are many more questions to 
be answered and we hope that we 
have helped a little, and before clos- 
ing will say to the Ch,ittanooga cor- 
respondent that we eat pork, salt 
pork, bacon, hams and other prod- 
ucts of the noble animal, but we 
don't always have him. So bring 
all the dried meats j^ou can pay for 
and receive the blessings of the 
eomissarv man. 



The Job 



(Continued from. Page 11) 



"Hurry, May, the heat- 
"Over this way " 

"Yes^the stairway is — 



"It's all on fire!" 

"Let's try a window?'" 

"I don't know " 

"The smoke — it's so thick I — 
hold tighter! Mav — we'll soon 
be " 

"Yes," feebly, "I'll try " 

' ' Here 's a window — May ! ' ' 

"May! Look up here! No! 
No ! Don 't faint ! For God 's sake, 
i\Iay ! We must get out of here ! 
JMay ! May ! Please, wake up ! 
See ! The people below — they hold 
out their arms to us ! The flames 
are closer ! God, May ! Jump ! 
The heat — May ! You must jump ! 
You will die — look out ! Our 
clothes are afire ! Oh ! May ! May ! 
I must leap ! Good-bye dear — 
good " 

Through the air, elotlies aflame, 
the girl leaped four stories, strik- 
ing the ground with a sickening- 
crash. 

"P\0"WN the long ward of a hos- 
pital were rows of cots filled 
with burned and injured victims. 
Here and there nurses and doctors 
busied themselves ^vith their pa- 
tients m the attempt to alleviate 
pain. 

"IMay!" screamed a girl in a 
cot. 

A rurse hurried over to quiet her. 

"There, there, dear, you'll be all 
rip-lit soon." 

"Ts May here?" she asked plain- 
tivelv. 

"Rose!" came in a muffled but 
alad erv from the next cot. 

":\ray! I'm so glad " 

In a week the nurse obtained 



permission of the doctors to place 
the girls' cots closer together. 

"May!" whispered Rose, after 
the nurse had gone, "do you 
know?" 

"About you? Yes." 

"And I know about you." 

There was a silence. 

"Will vdu tell me— if I tell you. 
May?" 

"You don't have to tell me, 
Rose — I know." 

"I know, too. May, about me. 
I-I can't walk any more. My-my 
feet are gone!" 

There was another silence. Both 
were stifling the sobs of pity for 
the other. 

"Rose," said May finally, "they 
lied to me at first — but I knew. 
They didn 't have to tell me. Please, 
Rose," she pleaded, "if mother 
comes don't tell her — not yet, any- 
way — I am blind ! ' ' 

"I won't," promised Rose. 

"Is there a window — near?" 

"One at my . left," Rose an- 
swered. 

"What can vou see — ^vou know 
I " 

"There is a court wall," she 
began slowly — then apologetically, 
"I can't see much, but there's a 
vine there with a few leaves on it — 
and one leaf that's red — and — 
flutters. Oh May, dear— I-I can't!" 

Another long silence, then : 

"Rose, do you think I can learn 
all over — in the dark. I've got to 
work — or starve " 

"We will both try, May. We 
ffot to live." Then she sighed 
heavily as she said: 
• "I wonder if we can get our old 
jobs back when they rebuild the 
factory?" 



The Western Comrade 



27 



Militaristic A. F. of L. 

"LJERE is a word of greeting to 
Comrades Joe Cannon and 
Adolph Germer. They failed to get 
an anti-militarj'- resolution through 
the A. F. of L. convention, biit they 
put up a fight that attracted wide- 
spread attention. Joe's speech was 
carried out by the press associates 
and given widespread publicity. 

"As soon as we are prepared," 
said Comrade Camion, "we shall be 
plunged into a war whenever it may 
mean profits for the financial inter- 
ests." 

The truth of this undoubtedly 

Avas borne in upon the hearers, but 

Gompers rushed to the rescue of the 

armament makers and profit 

U pickers. 

A sad feature of the situation was 
that Andrew Furuseth, the grand 
old stalwart, took the side of the 
militarists. It is unfortunate that 
one so keen in almost all matters 
concerning the workers should be 
groping and blind on such a 
matter. 

Interrupted Joy 

"Young man," said the magis- 
trate severely, "the assault you 
have committed on your poor wife 
was most brutal. Do you know of 
any reason why I should not send 
you to prison?" 

"If you do, your honor," replied 
the prisoner at the bar, hopefully, 
"it will break up our honeymoon." 

Fittest to the Front 

In Servia the aged and the in- 
firm, the invalids and crippled, are 
fighting in the war. This is an in- 
version that should be stopped. 
These are the fittest, and usually 
they are allowed to live while the 
young and strong perish. Let us 
cling to our old claim of the sur- 
vival of the fittest. 

On the Free List 

The Ripsaw heads an article "I 
Hope God Will Read This." 

We hope so, too. Wliy not con- 
sult your subscription list? 

At the Class 

"The new colonist would be a 
good dancer if it wasn't for two 
things." "What's that?" "His 
feet." 



Ignorance is the Great 
Curse! 

Do you know, for instance, the scientific difference between love and 
passion? 

Human life is full of hideous exhibits of wretchedness due to ignor- 
ance of sexual normality. 

Stupid, pernicious prudery long has blinded us to sexual truth. Science 
was slow in entering this vital field. In recent years commercialists 
eyeing profits have unloaded many unscientific and dangerous sex books. 
Now, the world's great scientific minds are dealing with this subject upon 
which human happiness often depends. No longer is the subject taboo 
among intelligent people. 

We take pleasure in offering to the American public 
the work of one of the world's greatest authorities upon 
the question of sexual life. He is August Forel, M. D., 
Ph. D., LL. D., of Zurich, Switzerland. His book will 
open your eyes to yourself and explain many mysteries. 
You will be better for this knowledge. 

Every professional man and woman, those dealing with social, medical, 
criminal, legal, religious and educational matters will find this book of 
immediate value. Nurses, police officials, heads of public institutions, 
writers, judges, clergymen and teachers are urged to get this book at once. 

The subject is treated from every point of view. The chapter on "love 
and other irradiations of the sexual appetite" is a profound exposition 
of sex emotions — Contraceptive means discussed — Degeneracy exposed — 
A guide to all in domestic relations — A great book by a great man. 

^^The Sexual Question'^ 

Heretofore sold by subscription, only to physicians. Now offered to 
the public. Written in plain terms. Former price $5.50. Now sent pre- 
paid for $1 60. This is the revised and enlarged Marshall English transla- 
tion. Send check, money order or stamps. 

Gotham Book Society, Dept. 387 

General Dealers in Boohs, Sent on Mail Order 

142 West 23rd St., New York, N. Y. 



DaAvson*s Dermal Cream 

Prevents wrinkles, softens and beautifies skin. Kemoves freckles, 

tan, moth patches and all discolorations. Greatest beautifier of 

the age. cWi 

One Ounce Jar 60c Postpaid 

Prepared By DR. ELIZABETH DAWSON Llano, Calif. 



Telephone Home A-4533 

HARRIMAN & EYCKMAN 

Attorneys at Law 

921 Higgins Building 

Los Angeles. Cal. 



Home A-2003 Main 619 

A. J. STEVENS 

Dentist 

306 South Broadway 

Room 514 Los Angeles, Cal. 



28 



The Western Comrade 



THE WESTERN COMRADE 



Entered as second-class matter at the 
post office at Los Angeles, Cal. 

924 Higgins Building, Los Angeles, Cal. 

Subscription Price One Dollar a Year 
In Clubs of Four Fifty Cents 

Job Harriman, Managing Editor 
Frank E. Wolfe, Editor 

Vol. Ill November, 1915 No. 7 

Random Shots 

Q.EOBGE R. LUNN, direct action- 
ist who once chopped down a 
sacred tree in the streets of 
Schenectady and narrowly escaped 
a jail sentence for chopping at the 
same time sacred tradition and a 
court injunction, has been for the 
second time elected mayor of that 
lively New York city. Lunn really 
succeeded in getting arrested and 
jailed in another New York town 
where he insisted on speaking on 
the streets. 

Lunn believes in action and is ut- 
terly unafraid alike of the sneer of 
the direct actionist and the snarl of 
the pure and simple political action- 
ist. With Lunn was elected Stein- 
metz and half a dozen other Social- 
ists. Lunn will appoint heads for a 
score of the most important offices 
in the city. Here again is power in 
the hands of men who know how to 
use it in the interest of the workers. 
Here is a city where will no longer 
be heard the echo of the resounding 
whack of the policeman's club on the 
skull of Henry Dubb. 
^. ?K ^ 

"We're all going to be blown 
up — we are." So cries the powder 
trust— also "Help!— U. S. A.— the 
American people — Help ! ' ' 

Well — what if they are? 

It would be but a case of getting 
a taste of their own patent medi- 
cines, which they so cleverly com- 
pound for their Christian Allies to 
doctor their comrades of Germany. 
^ rK JK 

The poor Mexicans are starving. 
I know, because the Standard Oil 
thorugh its well-lubricated newspa- 
pers says so. We must send an army 
over the border and stop their riot- 
ing. We must protect our (the 
Standard Oil's) property. We must 
feed them — (bullets) — but (secretly) 
we must starve them back into the 
servility and slavery from which 
they are now revolting. 



Watch capitalism with its gen- 
erous benevolence step forward this 
coming yuletide and spread its 
share of Christmas giving. As a 
forerunner they have already given 
Great Britain a half billion dollar 
war loan. They have sent hun- 
dreds of tons of ammunition to the 
Allies. Even the starving Belgians 
have received their share — and an- 
other share is promised right away. 

Oh! We here at home? No, 
they haven't forgotten us, either. 
Just the other day they gave us a 
nice little factory fire and burnea 
a number of the "inmates" with it. 
That will give some of us unem- 
ployed a job when they build a ncv, 
factory. 

And then again, on account of 
the war they have given us a nice 
assortment of high prices. (Some- 
body's got to pay for all this food 
they send abroad.) 

Now what are they going to do 
Christmas? Maybe, if we're good, 
they might send a few regiments 
or so of us over to help the Allies. 
(Maybe, they might give us a nice 
war of our own.) 

Capitalism is such a beautiful 
blessing. It makes the whole year 
a continual "merry" Christmas. 
3^ *; 5K 

Spanked, figuratively, by the 
Llano General Assembly, a group 
of the younger and more ebullient 
set was not utterly crushed — not 
utterly. Four of the irrepressibles 
gathered where the moonlight flood- 
ed the broad front porch : with arms 
over each other's shovilders, eyes 
turned upward and with a beautiful 
barbershop chord sang : 

"In Heaven above. 
Where all is love. 
There'll be no 'sembly there!" 
JK a^ ^ 

If you think the French Social- 
ists have followed the renegade 
Briand you have been deceived. In 
a speech recently made by 
Benaudel, a Socialist deputy, the 
declaration was openly made that 
France should annex no part of the 
enemy country. This utterance was 
met by cheers from the Socialists 
and howls of protest from others. 
Just what territory the French 
hope to annex would be difficult to 
imagine inasmuch as the red 
breeches have scarcely disfigured 
any landscape beyond the borders 
of their own patrie. 



At the recruiting stand: "La- 
dies and Gentlemen, Martha, the 
celebrated Salome dancer, will fa- 
vor us with some of her favorite — " 

"Those volunteering for the 
front kindly step this way — " 

"Men, I am sacrificing every- 
thing for the cause — I have allowed 
women to Avork in my factory in 
order to let the men go to the 
front." 

"God on High is with us. Last 
night seventy souls were wiped out 
in a brutal and murderous assault 
by a Zeppelin. Step up, boys, and 
sign for the front. Let us pray !" 

' ' Are you married, my good man ? 
No 1 You will find a war bride over 
there on the right. The priest will 
marry you." 

"The Celtic sisters will now fa- 
vor us with a song and dance. You 
men, back there — step up closer!" 
5}$ * ^ 
Zeppelin Heinle — "What's doing' 
today. Sub?" 

Submarine Semival — "Nothin' 
much. One liner with 350 women 
and children is all. How's it with 
you?" 

Zeppelin Heini — "Pretty rot- 
ten. One little college, one glue fac- 
tory — oh, yes — and a hospital — 
only two thousand in it, though." 

Vi. iK i}' 

Sizzling and hot comes the war 
news from the "front" these days. 
Wonderful skill and tireless zeal is 
shown by the war correspondent, 
who never sleeps and never aban- 
dons his post. How the world 
thrilled over its morning postum 
and sausage when it read in Los 
Angeles Tribune under caption 
"Zeppelin Inspection" the follow- 
ing amazing item : 

LONDON. Nov. 17.— Stately but- 
ler to aristocratic master in Lon- 
don's west end: "A Zeppelin's 
passing hover, sir — if you wish to 
hinspect it, sir." The Zep was 
hurriedly "hinspected." 

Then on the turn over page we 
find more startling news that should 
have been headed "Important If 
True!" 

PARIS, Nov. 17. — A wounded sol- 
dier fell from a tramcar at the Quai 
des Tuileries and the wheels passed 
over one leg, producing splinters, 
but no blood. He had lost his real 
leg in the battle of the Marne. 

You will surely get your penny's 
worth any morning you invest. 
— E. d'O. 



The Western Comrade 



29 



Ballots Will Educate 

William E. Bohn 

j TN the public schools we are 
spending more money on the 

, education of girls than on that of 

j boys. One of two things is true. 

I Either the educated female is a 
good product partly wasted, or she 
is a poor product and our money is 
wasted. 

As a matter of fact, she is a good 
[iroduct. But she is not as good as 
slie might be. Give the girls the 
prospect of active participation in 
oiu- political life and a wide range 
of studies will gain new meaning 
for more than half our pupils. 
Tliey will learn more without the 
expenditure of an additional dol- 
lar. And what they learn will gain 
in meaning. The girl graduate will 
leave school a fitter person because 
she has seen from the start a rea- 
son for intelligent citizenship. 
?^ ^ ^ 

Oily Junior 

The continuous, unwarranted as- 
saults on young Mr. Rockefeller 
liring to mind the brutality of the 
public a few years ago, at the time 
of the Tarbell articles. To para- 
plirase an utterance of that day : 

"John D. 
Jr. he 

Is catching it 
Prom A to Z, 
'Till he must think, 
In this turmoil 
That hell is heated 
With Standard Oil." 

Sta'^ement of ownership, manage- 
ment and circulation, etc., required by 
the Act of August 24, 1912, of 

THE WESTERN COMRADE, 
published monthly at Los Angeles, Cali- 
fornia, for October 1, 1915: 

Managing editor. Job Harriman, 923 
Higgins building. 

Editor, Frank E. Wolfe, 923 Higgins 
building. 

Business manager, Frank E. Wolfe, 
923 Higgins building. 

Publisher, Job Harriman, 923 Higgins 
: building. 

Owner, Job Harriman, 923 Higgins 
building. 

Known bondholders, mortgagees and 

' other security holders holding one per 

cent or more of total amounts of bonds, 

mortgages, or other securities; None. 

JOB HARRIMAN. 

Sworn to and subscribed before me 
this 27th day of September, 1915. 

A. A. JAMES. 
Notary Public in and for the County of 

Los Angeles, State of California. 
(My commission expires July 20, 1916.) 



Pictures for Propaganda 




Shoot Capitalism 

With a 

Stereopticon 



Anyone can lecture with the aid of pictures; they tell the 
story, you point out the moral. Pictures draw a crowd where 
other means fail. They make your work doubly effective. 

We tell you how to get the greatest results at the least 
expense. 

Send stamp for complete information. 

W. SCOTT LEWIS 



3493 Eagle Street. 



Los Angeles, California, 



Cut Your Fuel Bill 
and Get More Heat 

By burning air and oil in your cook stove, heater, range, boiler 
or furnace. 

Who would think of running an automobile on coal or wood? 
Yet hundreds of thousands of people today are using coal and 
wood to cook with. 

If the railroads of today should take off their oil-burning 
locomotives and replace them with the old style soft coal engines, 
the ineifiiciency of the old engines would cause a great deal of 
dissatisfaction. 

AVhy do you continue to use the old inefficient methods for 
heating and cooking? 

Burn Air and Oil 

The I. N. L. oil burner forms a gas that burns with an extreme 
heat. The cost of fuel is extremely low, ranging from three cents 
per gallon and up. 

The installation is also simple, and the principle of operation 
is understood at sight. 

For further particulars and price list of burners address 

Llano del Rio Company 



923 HIGGINS BLDG. 



Mail Order Department 



LOS ANGELES, CAL. 



Territory open for live agents 



30 



The Western Comrade 



Knit UnderAvear 

Cheapest Because It Wears Best 



Women's 

Union Suits, low neck, knee length, sizes 32 

to 44 $1.25 

Union Suits, half low neck, elbow sleeves, ankle 

length, sizes 32 to 44 1.25 

Under Vests, sleeveless, sizes 30 to 44 35 

Night Robes, sizes 32 to 46 1.50 

Hose, extra wearing, black, sizes 8 to 10% 30 

Hose, light weight, all colors, sizes 8 to 10% ... .50 



Men's 

Undershirts, light weight, cream, sizes 34 to 44. .$ -75 
Undershirts, light weight, black, sizes 34 to 44.. 1.00 

Drawers, light weight, cream, sizes 30 to 44 75 

Drawers, light weight, cream, sizes 30 to 44 1.00 

Shirts and Drawers, double fleeced, grey, sizes 

30 to 44 1.25 

Shirts and Drawers, Egyptian cotton, ecru, 

sizes 30 to 44 1.50 



Men's Hose 

Extra wearing value, black, sizes 9 to 11% $ '25 

Heavy weight, black, sizes 9 to 11%, 3 pairs 1.00 



Girls' 



Children's 



Boys' 



Union Suits, sizes 20 to 30...$ .50 Taped unions, answering 
Union Suits, better grade, purpose of a waist, 

sizes 20 to 30 1.00 sizes 20 to 28 $ .65 

Hose, black, tan or white. Same as above, only bet- 
sizes 6 to 10% 25 ter grade, sizes 20 to 28 1.05 



Union Suits, sizes 20 to 32...$ .60 
Union Suits, better grade, 

sizes 20 to 32 90 

Sportsman's hose for boys, 

sizes 6 to 10% 25 to .40 



Pure Wool Goods 

Made by Wool Growers' Co-operative Mills 
Direct From Sheep's Back to Your Back 

Black and Grey Mackinaw Coat, length 25 Trousers, Grey and Navy Blue, usual sizes. .. .$4.00 
inches, sizes 36 to 44 $8.00 Shirts, Grey and Navy Blue, usual sizes 3.00 

Blankets 

White or grey, 70x82 in., weight 5 lbs $7.85 

Grey, 70x82 in., weight 7% lbs 9.90 

Llano del Rio Community 

(Mail Order Department) 

923 Higgins Bldg. Los Angeles, Cal. 

(Make all checks or money orders payable to Llano del Rio Company) 




Men's 10-inch boots. $6.00 
Men's 12-mch boots. 7.00 
Men's 15-inch boots. 8.00 
Ladies' 12-in. boots.. 6.00 
Ladies' 15-in. boots.. 7.00 
Men's Elk work shoes 4.00 
Men's Elk dress shoes 5.00 
Ladies' Elk shoes. . . 4.00 
Infants ' Elk shoes, 

1 to 5 1.50 

Child's Elk shoes, 

51 2 to 8 2.00 

Child's Elk shoes, 

81/2 to 11 2.50 

Misses' and Youths, 

llVo to 2 3.00 




ELKSKIN 

BOOTS and SHOES 



Factory operated in connection 
with Llano Del Rio Colony 

IDEAL FOOTWEAR 

For Ranchers and Outdoor Men 



Xke famous Clifford Elkskm Snoes are lightest and 
easiest for solid comfort and will out-wear three pairs 
of ordinary shoes. 

We cover all lines from ladies,' men's 

and children's button or lace in light 

handsome patterns to the high boots for 

■ mountain, hunting, ranching or desert wear. 

Almost indestructible. 

Send in your orders by mail. Take 
measurement according to instructions. 
Out of town shoes made immediately on 
receipt of order. Send P. 0. order and state 
whether we shall forward by mail or express. 



Place stocking foot on 
paper, drawing pencil 
around as per above Il- 
lustration. Pass tape 
around at lines with- 
out drawing tight. Give 
size usually worn. 



SALES DEPARTMENT 

Llano del Rio Company 

922 Higgins Building, Los Angeles, Cal. 



Wanted: 100 Men! 

Steady Employment for Life 



A FEW months ago the advertisement in 
this space called for 1000 men. Nine 
hundred have responded. Not all of them 
have arrived at Llano, but there are several 
hundred there and all the absent members 
are eager to come and they are flocking 
there by the score 
every month. The 
remaining mem- 
berships are being 
rapidly subscribed 
and in a short 
time they vsrill all 
be taken. Are you 
going to be among 
the fortunate thou- 
sand members and 
join the several 
thousands of com- 
rades who are 
working out the 
problem that has vexed humanity for ages? 
Are you not tired of the struggle under the 
murderous competitive system? Thousands 
are going down every month under fore- 
closures and other capitalist methods of 
expropriation. Are you not ready to join 
a group of workers and be one of the 
pioneers in working out this great problem 
that has confronted humanity throughout 
the ages. 




Members of Llano Colony on an Outing 



The community is extending its holdings 
of land and water, live stock, farm imple- 
ments and machinery. It grows in numbers 
and in financial strength. It grows in pother 
because of solidarity and comradeship. 
A complete new, modern sawmill plant 

has been added to 
the colony prop- 
erty. This comes 
in, as does our 
other machinery, 
free and clear of 
debt. Our great- 
est task now is to 
clear more and 
more land and 
get in crops. 

Only about 100 
memberships re- 
main. The initial 
fee will be raised 
to $1000 in a few weeks. If you want to 
join this great cooperative community you 
will have to act promptly. Don't delay an 
hour. Send us information about yourself 
and ask for an application blank. Read the 
stories about the colony in this magazine. 
Prompt and decisive action at this hour may 
mean a turning point in your life that will 
lead to happiness and safety during your 
old age. 



"Modern .society conducts its affairs under circumstances which create 
and niaintain an ever increasing burden on all humanity. Man sustained 
in youth by the illusion that ability or good fortune will ultimately reward 
hirh with happiness through material success, learns sooner or later, that 
no peace can be his until the unmoral conditions of commercialism and 
industrial competition are removed." — From the Community Constitution. 

LLANO DEL RIO COMPANY 

Membership Department 

924 Higgins Building Los Angeles, California 



)ecember, 1915 



Ten Cents 




mM' 





In This Issue— Clara Cushman, A. F. Gannon, Frank E. Wolfe, G. E. Bolton, Frank H. Ware^ 
Edmund Brumbaugh, J. L. Engdahl, John Dequer, R. K. Williams, Joseph D. Cannon 



Llano del Rio Co-operative Colony 



Llano, California 



f 



THIS is the greatest Community Enterprise ever launched 
in America. 

The colony was founded by Job Harriman and is situated 
in the beautiful Antelope Valley, Los Angeles County, Cali- 
fornia, a few hours' ride from Los Angeles. The community 
is solving the problem of disemployment and business failure, 
and offers a way to provide for the future welfare of the 
workers and their families. 

Here is an example of co-operation in action. Llano del 
Rio Colony is an enterprise unique in the history of com- 
munity groups. 

It was established by Job Harriman to solve the problem 
of unemployment by providing steady employment for the 
workers; to assure safety and comfort for the future and for 
old age; to guarantee education for the children In the best 
school under personal supervision, and to provide a social 
life amid surroundings better than can be found in the com- 
petitive world. 

Some of the aims of the colony are: To solve the problem 
year since the colony began to work out the problems that 
confront pioneers- There are about 700 persons living at 
the new town of Llano. There are now more than 200 
pupils in the schools, and several hundred are expected to be 
enrolled before a year shall have passed. Plans are under 
way for a school building, which will cost several thousand 
dollars. The bonds have been voted and sold and there is 
nothing to delay the building. 

Schools have opened with classes ranging from the 
Montessori and kindergarten grades through the intermediate, 
which includes the first year in high school. This gives the 
pupils an opportunity to take advanced subjects, including 
languages in the colony school. 

The colony owns a fine herd of 105 head of Jersey 
and Holstein dairy cattle and is turning out a large amount 
of dairy products. There is steady demand for our out- 
put. 

There are over 200 hogs in the pens, and among them a 
large number of good brood sows. This department will be 
given special attention and ranks high in importance. 

The colony has seventy-flve work horses, two large trac- 
tors, three trucks and a number of automobiles. The poultry 
department has 2000 egg-making birds, some of them blue 
ribbon prize winners. This department, as all others, is in the 
charge of an expert and it will expand rapidly. 

There are several hundred hares in the rabbitry and the 
manager of tlie department says the arrivals are in startling 
numbers. 

There are about 11,000 grape cuttings in the ground and 
thousands of deciduous fruit and shade trees in the colony 
nursery. This department is being steadily extended. 

The community owns several hundred colonies of bees 
which are producing honey. This department will be in- 
creased to several thousands. Several tons of honey are on 
hand. 

Among other industries the colony owns a steam laundry, 
a planing mill, large modern sawmill, a printing plant, a 
machine shop, a soil analysis laboratory, and a number of 
other productive plants are contemplated, among them a 
cannery, a tannery, an ice plant, a shoe factory, knitting and 
weaving plant, a motion picture company and factory. All 
of this machinery is not yet set up owing to the stress of 
handling crops. 

The colonists are farming on a large scale with the use 
of modern machinery, using scientific system and tried 
methods. 



No more commissions will be paid for the sale of mem- 
berships or stock in the Llano del Rio Community. EJvery 
installment member should be a worker to secure new| 
members. 

About 120 acres of garden was planted this year. The re; 
suits have been most gratifying. v 

Social life in the colony Is most delightful. Entertain- 
ments and dances are regularly established functions. Base- 
ball, basket-ball, tennis, swimming, fishing, hunting and all 
other sports and pastimes are popular with all ages. 

Several hundred acres are now in alfalfa, which is ex- 
pected to run six cuttings of heavy hay this season. There 
are two producing orchards and about fifty-five acres of 
young pear trees. Several hundred acres will be planted in 
pears and apples next year. 

Six hundred and forty acres have been set aside for a 
site for a city. The building department is making bricks 
for the construction of hundreds of homes. The city will 
be the only one of its kind in the world. It will be built 
with the end of being beautiful and utilitarian. 

There are 1000 memberships in the colony and over 900 
of them are subscribed for. It is believed that the remainder 
will be taken within the next few months. 

The broadest democracy prevails In the management of 
the colony. There is a directorate of nine, elected by the 
stockholders, and a community commission of nine, elected 
by the General Assembly — all persons over 18 voting. Abso- 
lute equality prevails in every respect. The ultimate popu- 
lation of this colony will be between 5000 and 6000 persons. 

The colony is organized as a corporation under the laws 
of California. The capitalization is $2,000,000. One thousand 1 
members are provided for. Each shareholder agrees to sub 
scribe for 2000 shares of stock. Each pays cash $1000 for i 
1000 shares. 

Deferred payments on the remaining 1000 shares are made 
by deducting one dollar per day from the $4 wage of the 
colonist. 

Out of the remaining $3 a day, the colonist gets the neces- 
sities and comforts of life. 

The balance remaining to the individual credit of the i 
colonist may be drawn in cash out of the net proceeds of 
the enterprise. 

A per cent of the wages may be drawn in cash. 

Continuous employment is provided, and vacations ar- 
ranged as may be desired by the colonist. 

Each member holds an equal number of shares of stock 
as every other shareholder. 

Each member receives the same wage as every other 
member. 

In case anyone desires to leave the colony his shares 
and accumulated credits may be sold at any time. 

Are you tired of the competitive world? 

Do you want to get into a position where every hour's 
work will be for yourself and your family? Do you want 
assurance of employment and provisions for the future? Ask 
for the booklet entitled: "The Gateway to Freedom." Sub- 
scribe for The Western Comrade ($1.00 per year), and keep 
posted on the progress of the colony. Ask about our monthly 
payment installment membership. 

Address LLANO DEL RIO COMPANY, 924 Higgins build- 
ing, Los Angeles, California. 



.C:i 



r'N/ 



^^. 



4 -* 



% 



fe 



7/1. 



V 



A 



CONTENTS 



Page 

Trend of the Hour 5 

By Frank E. Wolfe. 

Socialism Strikes Millville 9 

By Clara Cushman. 

In the Name of Christ — Amen ! 11 

By Prank H. Ware. 

Solid Ivory 12 

By A. F. Gannon. 

Eescue the Desorientes 13 

By G. E. Bolton. 

Among the Immortals 14 

By Edmund Brumbaugh. 

One Big Union 14 

By J. L. Engdahl. 

Llano del Rio 15 

By John Dequer. 

Llano Colonists Are Undaunted by Storm 18 

By R. K. Williams. 

The Wonders of Llano 22 

By Joseph D. Cannon. 

Cartoonist Joins Community 26 

Random Shots 28 

CARTOONS 

The Cross of Honor Frontispiece 

' ' Liquid Fire " " 6 

Christmas Eve 7 

The Malthusian MifE 8 

An Afterthought 16 

Ivan 's Christmas Wish 28 



p^^ 



b, 



mj 



A> 



\lf^ 



X 





Their Christmas Present 




THE CROSS OF HONOR 

Patriotism, fathered by bourgeoise greed and hypocrisy, mothered by proletarian ignorance and 
guUabilitj', brings nothing but poverty and miserj- to the working class. 



-Drawn for Xhe Western Comrade hy Af. A. Kempf 



The Western Comrade 



'olltlcal Action 



Devoted to the Cause of the Workers 
Co-operation 



Direct Action 



^OL. Ill 



LOS ANGELES, CAL., DECEMBER, 1915 



NUMBER 8 




TREND OF THE HOUR 



HERE comes the ''Lanclsturm" for American 
cities. The ■" citizen police'' will soon be in 
our midst. There is a widespread movement to 
establish a force that can qnickly be armed and set 
to the task of cj[uelling riots ''in time of great dis- 
aster" — presumably such as the Standard Oil strike 
in Bavonne, and other labor disturbances. Fine idea. 
Chicago plans a force of 20,000 of these volun- 
teer police "reservists." Here is a suggestion: If 
they organize the laudstrum in your village, be 
among the first to volunteer. Get on the inside. Get 
your instnietions — and a gun. Show that you are 
on the side of law and order. Eemember "West Vir- 
ginia. Calumet, Ludlow, Lawrence, Patterson and 
Bavonne. Get on the inside! 
* * * 

THE Landsturm will shine in Chicago. The regu- 
lar force sometimes is inadequate. A great 
strain falls upon the iiniformed body. 

I once caused much disturbance and a call for 
reinforcements when I objected to the fine artistic 
touch of patrolmen Jerry O'Connor and Dan Cal- 



By Frank E. Wolfe 

laghan, who shattered sequence, continuity and 
sense when thej' cut five connecting scenes and six 
iudispensible titles from a motion picture I exhibited 
there. "Nothing but the blood of the lamb" was 
deleted because the worti "blood" cannot go on the 
screen in Chicago motion picture theaters. 

A citizen reservist phalanx was called and Dan 
and Jerry were reversed by a vote of 39 to — one 
noble Roman refrained from voting because "while 
the story clearly was within the bounds of free 
speech, it was calculated to arouse class feeling be- 
tween capital and labor." Here was vindication 
and encouragement from a high source. 
* * * 

THEY say the Landsturm will make for a 
"cleaner, safer and better Chicago." Here's 
hoping it will be cleaner than when the uniformed 
police — ^the river district harness bulls — clubbed my 
camera man away when we tried to get one motion 
picture of scores of Chicago citizenry scrabbling in 
garbage barrels and eating refuse from back doors 
of fish, fruit and meat stalls. 



The Western Comrade 




NEVER has there been 
more concerted team- 
work than that of the 
American press, under the 
persuasive powers of the 
shipping trust, in its as- 
saults on the LaFollette 
Seamen's Law. This 
measure was calculated 
to give to seamen on ships 
flying the American flag 
the same rights of per- 
sonal liberty and the same 
recognition of their citi- 
zen's rights as are granted 
to other working men. It 
was adopted by Congress 
and before it went into 
effect it was nullified by 
the interpretations and 
special suspensions and 
dispensations of various 
officials — all without war- 
rant of .law or justice. 

The fact that the meas- 
ure improves the safety of 
life at sea has made no 
impression on those edi- 
tors who have followed 
their line of inspired prop- 

aganda against the measure. If you want to know 
the real cause of the opposition to the measure, ap- 
ply your own interpretation through the law of 
economic determination. The shipping trust wants 
to destroy a law that says it must have American 
officers and crews that speak the same language 
of the officers. In the Pacific, Japanese ships pay 
their Orientals about one-sixth the wages neces- 
sary for subsistence of American workers. 

A thousand sophistries are sprung by the porno- 
graphic press. It were futile to review them. 

Secretary of Labor Wilson calls the campaign 
against the measiire a conspiracy and he has abun- 
dant proof. Gerald Henderson, editor of the Har- 
vard Law Review sums up the case most cogently: 




"LIQUID FIRE" 

"Hello! Potsdam? Thanked your dear 
God yet for your newest success?" 



"It is many a year since 
this country has seen a 
propaganda as skillful, as 
extensive, and seemingly 
as irresistible as that 
which has been conducted 
against the LaFollette 
Seamen's law. 

The average citizen 
who reads the newspa- 
pers glances at the car- 
toons, hears political 
speeches, and discusses 
the affairs of the nation 
with his neighbor has 
come to associate the law 
subconsciously with every 
form of political stupidity 
and moral obliquity." 

The law will be repealed 
or so amended that profits 
will not be unpaired. 
Protection of the workers 
will be annulled and, 
while there may be some 
semblance of safety pro- 
visions permitted to re- 
main, the measure, after 
Congress gets through 
with it, will be innocuous 
and labor will have an empty husk. There will be 
no such fluke in the present Congress. Conservatism 
and reactionaryism mil rule. Labor measures will 
find short shrift. Labor will get what it merits 
from the imbecile system which it supports. 
* * * 

JOE HILL was murdered in cold blood by the peo- 
ple of Utah. Joe Hill alive was as harmless as 
the average preacher of the doctrine of discontent 
with the system of wage slavery. Joe Hill shot to 
death becomes a martyr and his power grows a 
thousand fold. Utah is, for the hour, the victor. La- 
martine summed this case most clearly: 

"THE MURDERER HAS BUT ONE HOUR; 
THE VICTIM HAS ETERNITY." 



old 



-Drawn by Louis Raemaekers 



The Western Comrade 




HENRY FOBD and a strange crew strangely re- 
cruited have gone to sea sailing for nowhere 
to do something, no man knows what. Some say 
he is going to stop Christians from murdering each 
other and that he hopes to achieve this marvel on 
or about the birthday of Christ. If Henry hopes to 
civilize the modern disciple of Christ he will have 
to get closer than the average distance of the radio 
wave. He will have to get right up to the firing line, 
and there will find chaplain and priest in frock and 
skirt, praying to God, on his natal day, to guide and 
direct the shrapnel "that is now before us and about 
to be thrown" so that it may strew death and de- 
struction in the village where the agents of the 
( 'hristian king or czar may direct. Henry will find 
sounds and sights and smells, the horror of which 

he could not have found 

even in the warrens of the 
])0or of Detroit. He will 
lind the agents of the vari- 
ous dieties invoking bless- 
ings from the sky on the 
poisonous gasses about to 
be poured into the 
trenches where they pray 
there may be most stran- 
irulation, suffering and 
death. 

Henry is hastening from 
ovir shores to bring about 
a "general strike" on the 
battlefields of Europe. 
May we interrupt our 
thought a moment to ob- 
serve that it would be "a 
norful joke" if someone 
should start a general 
strike in Henry''s factory? 
Not that he doesn't pay 
miraculously high wages. 
Not that. Suppose some- 
one should agitate for 
freedom to belong to a 
labor union or freedom to 
be a member of the So- 




CHRISTMAS EVE 

"Ah, Santa Claus; no fooling now! For us 
tobacco; for the Germans, cholera." 



cialist Party ! Suppose the poor fish that make and as- 
semble the tin flivvers should decide to be men? But 
what's the use! General strikes don't bi'eed among 
catfish. Back to Henry and his fellow pacificators : 
They sail at an inopportune hour. Why not stay 
here and paeificate the preparationists (Christian 
crew) and the anti-preparationists (pagans and So- 
cialists) ? Presently our patriotic preparationist will 
be manufacturing shells for home consumption. The 
next year will mark an era of high tarifi; legisla- 
tion and the manufacture of every impelment of mur- 
der from the bayonet to the latest pattern of riot 
guns for street and strike use. We shall spend hun- 
dreds of millions to satisfy the needs of "prepared- 
ness. ' ' Then we shall select an enemy. This will be 
a peacefully inclined nation, but Ave can soon goad 

them into action. The 
poison press is already at 
that. Next we will go into 
the business of breeding 
an international hatred 
and suspicion. This will 
make our selected enemy 
start on a career of prep- 
aration. Then we will 
have greater reason to 
manufacture more guns 
and more munitions, more 
fortifications and more 
killers. Our "foe" will 
be spurred on to greater 
effort and we shall be 
forced to build more ships. 
Simple little merry-go- 
round, isn't it? Where 
will it end? That's easy. 
Every Frankenstein mon- 
ster destroys its creator. 
Preparedness will lead us 
where it has led the na- 
tions of Europe. 

Ford will get no official 
recognition. He will re- 
turn disappointed. The 



imm' 



-Le Rire. Paris 



fighting will continue. 




The Western Comrade 







THIS mythical or actual foreign foe will prove a 
most admirable stalking horse for those who 
believe with Taft that we need many guns and a 
large standing army to keep down possible riots dur- 
ing wide-spread labor troubles. 
To quote the fat one: 

In a nation of 100,000,000 there are liable to be 
riots, mobs and insurrections wliicli cannot be regu- 
lated except by the presence of an army. 

Regulated is good ! The regulation at Ludlow 

was most effective and satisfactory to preparationist 

Rockefeller. If you want to get to the real meat 

of the matter, read Wil- ^ 

liam Jennings Bryan's 

utterances : 

Now, a new power has 
arisen in the land and 
demands control of the 
taxing power. It is the 
preparers of prepared- 
ness — the battleship 
builders and the manu- 
facturers of munitions. 
They have been making 
enormous profits sup- 
plying the belligerent 
nations with fighting 
material, but the Euro- 
pean war must end 
some time . . . and 
what will these con- 
cerns do for water- 
melon-like dividends? 
There is only one way 
to insure their con- 
tinued prosperity — they 
must lash this country 
into a state of chronic 
fear, and then coin the 
fear into dollars. They 
already have their sub- 
sidized organs setting 
up a false standard of 
national honor — the duelist's standard; they are glori- 
fying brute force. They are transplanting upon Ameri- 
can soil the European tree of hatred which is bearing 
its bloody fruit across the Atlantic. 
* * * 

ARISE, Malthus, and come from your burial 
cave. Vindication and confirmation are toward 
Prof. Joseph F. Jolmson of the New York Uni- 
versity, who has turned the trick. Johnson declares 




The Malthusian Miff 



that oppressive taxes, wars, poverty and numerous 
other ills are due to an excessive number of babies 
in the world. He wants matrimony discouraged 
and courtship abolished. Reason: The humans of 
the world are reproducing their kind faster than 
they can supply raiment and food. 

He wants the stork's wings cropped, and would 
make midwifery a crime. Every prospective parent 
or candidate for parenthood should be forced to 
prove in advance, to the "authorities," that he is 
capable of supporting a child. The professor at- 
tributes the Eitropean war to the free and unre- 

strained course of Eros 

in Germany. Babes bred 
in love must go for 
' ' kannonenfutter. ' ' 
To quote Johnson : 

The birth rate in 
Germany, for instance, 
grew so rapidly that 
the nation could not 
support its population. 
Colonies were formed 
and they grew. The 
products of these col- 
onies had to have an 
outlet. Hence, con- 
quest. 

Babies born to the poor 
mean more taxes on the 
rich, says this most 
erudite one ! 

' ' Regulate childbirth 
and you will have bared 
one of the principal 
causes of taxation trou- 
ble." 

Is the N. Y. U. a hook- 
worm college? Johnson should not be allowed to 
evaporate and die of dry rot in New York. Here is 
a great interpreter. His equal probably has not 
been heard since John went forth crying in the 
wilderness. He should crawl from his cavern and 
join his neighbors, old Ezry Skinclothes and Samuel 
Stonehatehet, in a dinosaur hunt on the palezoic 
plains of Plattsburg. 



-Drawn by M. A. Kempf 










The Western Comrade 



Socialism Strikes Millville 



By CLARA R. CUSHMAN 




HEN Martha Simpson, the wife of the 
hardware merchant, said we ought to in- 
vite the wife of the bricklayer, who is 
worliing on the new Odd Fellow's Build- 
ing, to join the Millville Ladies' Improve- 
ment Society, I knew that in the name 
of the morals of our fair city it was time 
for me to speak. 
"Ladies," I says, "I'm a Christian woman, my 
husband paying fifty dollars a year out of his oavu 
' jpocket to keep up the minister, so I don't like to knock 
lanybody, but it's my duty to tell you that woman is — 
iii," I choked on the word — "a Socialist." 

Widow Steele, who was sitting next to Mrs. Dr. 
iBromley, said: "What's Socialist?" 

Mrs. Dr. Bromley shuddered. She's a perfect lady 
if there ever was one. "Don't ask me," she says, "I'm 
a respectable married woman." 

"So am I," I says, "but it's our duty to know a lit- . 
tie about them, just like we know about the devil, so 's 
we can keep out of his path. I've investigated So- 
cialists in the Los Angeles Sunday Times, and they're 
a menace to the country. They haven't any money 

and they go around dynamiting rich people " 

"Something like Black Handers " Mrs. Hodkin- 

son whose husband runs a dairy, says. 

"I guess so. And they're Atheists " 

Mrs. Hawkins, the wife of the Methodist minister 

(our minister isn't married or I wouldn't have said 

that about fifty dollars), dropped the dress she was 

making for her fifth baby, and says in her soft voice : 

"Dear, dear, what's this world coming to?" 

"Socialists " I whispered the rest. 

"Well, well," Widow Steel says, "Ain't that tur- 
rible? You wouldn't think it, and her with them in- 
nocent brown eyes." 

"A woman of your age, Lucy Steele," I says, 
"ought to know it's the innocent looking ones that 
sometimes do the wickedest things." Lucy's a good- 
hearted woman, but she doesn't know much. I am a 
graduate of the Immanuel Baptist Institute of Brown 
County, Indiana, and taught school in Texas two years. 
Then Martha Simpson spoke up. "Well, I don't be- 
lieve that little mite of a woman would dynamite a flea, 
and I don't believe the rest, either." 

Martha's that way. You can't argue with her. I 
I opened my mouth to speak and just then Fannie Mar- 
tin, who thinks she knows it all just because her hus- 
band owns the Beetgrowers' Bank, and because she 



has a sister she visits in the city, began to talk. She 
said it didn't make any difference if Mrs. Bricklayer 
(as that is her husband's trade, and it's my duty to 
be charitable), if Mrs. Bricklayer was a Socialist; that 
nowadays it was the style in ladies ' clubs to take mem- 
bers in, no matter Avhat thej'- believed or Avhat their 
husbands did, just so they had tlie price, and we didn't 
want to be countrified and old-fashioned. 

"When you find a bomb under your husband's bank 
some fine morning," I says, "you may feel different." 

"My sister never said anything about them using 
dynamite," she says, "but I'll write and ask her to 
make sure. My sister says that George Bernard Shaw 
is all the rage now in the ladies' clubs, and she says 
he's a Socialist. She never said he was a dynamiter." 

Now when Fannie Martin says a thing is the style 
the other ladies are going to do it if they have to 
risk tons of dynamite or even their immortal souls. 
My soul comes first with me, and safety next, instead 
of "Safety First." I'll never risk either for the sake 
of being in style, although I 'm just as stylish as Fannie, 
for that matter, only not so flashy. And I'm strong 
against anarchy, being the wife of Justice of the Peace 
T. M. Parker, who is also our city undertaker, stationer 
and furniture dealer. I knew it wouldn 't do any good 
to say anything more, but I wanted to feel that I had 
done my Christian duty. 

"Yes," I says, I know about this man Shaw. He 
wrote that awful play. I wouldn't name it for a mil- 
lion, but the initials are 'Mrs. W. P.' " 

Fannie giggled and says, "How do you know so 
much about it?" 

"Well," I says, "as I'm censor for the Main Street 
nickelodeon, I always read the dramatic page of our 
metropolitan paper and there was a synopsis of the 
play in that., I read it before I knew what it was. There 
ought to be a law against alloAving such things in the 
paper to make ladies blush and corrupt our innocent 
young. And, ' ' I says, looking straight at Fannie, ' ' any- 
way, I never sent for the book and don't keep it hid on 
the top shelf of the pantry behind the raspberry jam'." 

You should have seen Fannie 's face ! Her hired girl 
told Mrs. Brown, the postmistress, and she told me. 
I guess you know Fannie by this time ! 

Mrs. Attorney Peterson, who is very intellectual, 
then said that because oue Socialist used dynamite and 
wrote wicked books, it didn't follow that all Socialists 
were wicked any more than that all the French race 
were bad just because Zola and Dumas wrote wicked 



10 



The Western Comrade 



French novels. "I believe in being broadminded, " she 
says. 

Mrs. Druggist Perkins, meaning her husband is a 
druggist, who always takes the opposite side to every- 
thing I say because we don't agree about predestina- 
tion, said she was in favor of being broadminded, too, 
and inviting Mrs. Bricklayer to join our society. She 
said we could make sure of her morals by asking her 
to show us her marriage certificate. "As our town is 
growing so cosmopolitan, two brick buildings now un- 
der course of erection, and undesirable citizens liable 
to become residencers at any time, I believe we might 
be broadminded and still protect the fair name of our 
society by requesting every new member to show her 
marriage certificate. If Mrs. Bricklayer knows it is 
our custom, her feelings will not be hurt." 

Well, everybody thought that would be a fine idea, 
excepting three ladies ; first, myself, who said after all 
marriage certificates didn't tell everything, you had 
to notice the size of the first child, and anyway they 
better remember "Safety Next" and think of the dyna- 
mite ; second, Fannie, who said she didn 't think they 
ever did that up at Los Angeles ; and third, Mrs. Dr. 
Hendley, who said even married ladies Avere unrefined 
sometimes, and that ought to go in the motion as an 
amendment. 

Well, when the society was called to order and the 
motion put, of course it carried, thanks to Fannie and 
her style. And as luck would have it I'm on the in- 
vitation committee with Widow Steele, of all people 
in the world. It was our duty to call on Mrs. Brick- 
layer and ask her to join. 

Her little girl came to the door, a very respectable 
looking child, I'll admit. I believe in giving the devil 
his due. While she went to find her mother I had a 
minute to investigate. I could see that Widow Steele 
wasn't going to be any help. I peeked under the sofa, 
but it had been swept clean, then I glanced tiround the 
room. The carpets and chairs were too expensive for 
a bricklayer's wife. I understand that's the way So- 
cialists are, they squander their own money, and then 
expect thrifty people like me and the Judge to divide 
up with them. But there wasn't a sign of a lace cur- 
tain at the windows and not a single piece of fancy 
work in the room, just a lot of books and some ugly 
wild sunflowers in a bowl, and a picture of a man with 
whiskers all over his face and another of a statue with- 
out any clothes on, but quite respectable, as he was a 
man, all doubled up with his chin in his hands. I was 
about to say to myself, "Awfully poor taste, but re- 
spectable," when my eye caught the row of books. The 
titles were mostly outlandish foreign ones, mostly Rus- 
sian looking and French and Dago, and you know what 
awful morals those foreigners have ! Suddenly I gasped. 



I caught the name of Gorky, and I guess you know 
about him; then of Shaw, and there in plain view- 
not even hidden on the pantry shelf, mind you — was 
"Mrs. W. P." I was still red from the shock of that 
when I looked at the table and there, face down and 
open so that the title fairly glared at you, was thattl 
unspeakable book that they've been playing at a Los! 
Angeles theater ! " D. G. ! " . " D. G. " right in the samel 
room with that innocent child! 

I heard Mrs. Bricklayer coming and tried to pull: 
myself together. She had on gloves and said she 's been 
digging in the garden. Digging in the garden ! Wasn't 
that the way they buried dynamite? I made up my 
mind it was policy to keep on the good side of her. 

She came to us with both hands out. "I'm so glad 
to see you! I've been so lonely since I came to the 
country." 

"Country indeed!" I thought. "And with two 
brick buildings going up, and five hundred iniiab- 
itants ! ' ' But I didn 't say it. I musn 't take chances. 
I gave her the invitation and she said she'd love to join, 
that she was the president of their club in Berkeley. 
I asked what club, and she said the Woman's Socialist 
League. The way she said it you'd have thought she 
was talking about the Foreign Missionary Society ! ^ 

Just then we heard a step on the porch and she 
said her husband had come home from work and she 
went out to meet him and brought him in and intro- 
duced him. He walked up to us and shook hands as 
coolly as if he had been the Justice of the Peace instead 
of a common workingman. Then he excused himself to 
take off his working clothes. I told Mrs. Bricklayer 
as delicately as I could about our rule for new mem- 
bers. I even smiled, but I was trembling inside and 
saying "Safety Next." She looked kind of surprised 
for a minute, then her eyes began to shine and she gave 
a kind of gasp, and said very softly: "Yes. I see. I 
see. I'll try to find it." 

She'd "try to find it!" I thought of that little 
brown frame over the head of the bed in the spare 
room where my own certificate shed its sacred light 
over our home for so many years, and I shuddered. 

Mrs. Bricklayer went to the desk and -began rum- 
maging through the drawers. Finally she called to 
her husband, her voice kind of trembly : "John! John! 
Do you know where our marriage certificate is?" 

"What?" he roared in the rudest way. 

She went into the bedroom to explain. When she 
came back her eyes were shining more than ever, and 
I heard a queer splutter in the bedroom. I hoped 
he wasn't lighting a fuse. I had a notion to run, but 
thought it would be poor policy. 

"He doesn't know where he put it," she began to 
(Continued on Page 23) 



The Western Comrade 



11 



In the Name of Christ — Amen! 



By FRANK H. WARE 




IS dusk in a little village. The birds 
in the tree tops twitter their soft, 
happy notes and the calm of night 
echoes the noise of droning in- 
sects — soon the peaceful noises of 
the night are drowned by the steady "tramp, tramp" 
of multitudinous feet marching and the ceaseless 
creaking of heavy wheels. 

Away on the far horizon lights flare redly and are 
followed later by the dull but distinct booming of can- 
non. Back of a near-by hill artillery breaks forth with 
a deafening roar. The shouts of drivers come louder 
arid more frequent in their fevered haste and the even 
tramping sounds double-time as sharp orders rang out. 
Then comes a "whee-ee-ee," and overhead with 
flash and shriek a blinding greenish-white shower 
shell bursts, lighting up the village and countryside — 
the marching columns of soldiers, the horse-drawn 
cannon with their cursing drivers, and the upturned 
pallid faces of helpless humans. 

More shells follow and the townspeople flee in panic. 



Here and there in the dust lie the forms of men, women 
and children — many writhing in agony of wounds — 
others silent and motionless. 

In the center of the village a little group of women 
and children huddle on the steps of a church. Trem- 
bling in fear, but with bowed heads, they listen to the 
prayers of a priest. 

"Our Father!" 

A bursting shell lights his upraised face and closed 
eyes. 

"Hear our prayer and protect us " 

A woman screams and crumples to the roadway. 

"On this, the dawn of the day of Thy blessed na- 
tivity " 

The little white hospital with its red cross flag 
blown by the storm of battle bursts into flames. 

"Deliver unto the enemy a crushing defeat " 

The steeple splinters and falls. 



"And punish them with an everlasting hell- 
A shell bursts among them, killing many. 
"In the name of Christ — ^Amen!" 



12 



The Western Comrade 



Solid Ivory 

By A. F. GANNON 




D LYNCH was a ribbon raveler, at twelve 
per, in Bunk's Big Bazar on Broadway. 
0. Henry was not within his ken, and 
the only Stevenson of note in his mental 
card-index was the guy who put the first 
locomotive over. He could tell you all 
about Ty Cobb and "Confession" Jack 
O'Brien, but the worth-while subtilties 
were beyond him. That summarizes Ed. 

Myrtle was nineteen, and Corpulent Cortez (or 
whoever it was on a peak in Darien) had nothing on 
her insofar as a large and romantic outlook was con- 
cerned. 

She worked in the Macerator Laundry on Los 
Angeles street and, thanks to a pickle-and-pie-proof 
liver, penny dances and Robert Chambers' novels, 
lived mostly in the rosy region of romance. 

They met on the top of a beach-bound bus one Sun- 
day evening, whither Myrtle hied after finishing the 
latest emotion-raker from the dictaphone of her fa- 
vorite fictioner. 

She liked Ed's concave shoulders, the aroma of his 
"dago" cigarettes and the cut of his jib. In Ed's 
estimation, Myrtle was all to the mustard. Myrtle 
felt sure that Christy never got by with anything 
niftier. 

Picture shows, Burbank matinees and Chiua-cafe 
feeds followed with dizzying rapidity, Ed. proposed. 
Myrtle disposed. No one opposed. 

Myrtle dreamed at her mangle for a few secret, 
saccharine months before the first tilt. 

Ed had two tickets for a show. Myrtle was to 
work late in the week-end rush. They were to meet 
at a down-town corner and go from there to the thea- 
tre. No Ed awaited when Myrtle arrived. She saun- 
tered with the throng to the nest block, wondering 
what had detained him and already reveling in the 
delights of music, song and laughter that were to be 
hers that evening at the widely touted comedy they 
were to attend. 

She stopped for a moment on the curb near 
the corner. Suddenly she felt like screaming. 
Ed, chatting gaily with the blond girl on his arm, was 
crossing toward her through the traffic. She clinched 
her fists and controlled herself as she distinctly heard 
him say to the girl as they parted just behind her in 
the crowd: 

"Good night, kid. See y' later." 

Ed hurried toward their rendezvous. Myrtle was 



a bit late. Ed jokingly chaffed her, saying that lie 
had waited half an hour. 

Ed was in high glee at the slap-stick work of ti 
low comedian. Myrtle was glum. 

"Work hard t' day, kid?" solicitously inquired Ed 

"Yes," admitted Myrtle, dangerously close to tears. 

"Too bad y' didn't like the show, Myrt. We'll go 
home after this act," said Ed in a tone of kindliness 
personified. 

Myrtle gritted her teeth. 

At home the storm burst. Ed, a badly abused and 
misunderstood man, went out and got drunk. 

Followed many drab months of bickering. Ed didn't 
measure up to Myrtle's Chamberesque ideal. 

"A rag and a bone and a hank of hair" was Ed's un- 
expressed opinion after some months of connubial 
juxtaposition. 

A moist, sticky baby could not heal the breach. 
Aiken tried to bridge it at its largest end and form the 
usual triangle. 

Aiken was the manager of the Macerator 
Laundry, the possessor of a poly-lunged gasoline 
guzzler, a harveyized conscience and a penchant for 
sympathy with pretty married women whose home 
life was not all that it should be. 

Robert Chambers and "Confession" Jack O'Brien 
were too much for Ed junior, so he just naturally faded, 
and in a fit of colic, shuffled off. Ed senior openly 
sought solace in his slender blond co-worker. Myrtle 
was divorced. 

By the simple process of continually rebuffing Aiken 
and his advances. Myrtle lost her job. 

Coming out of a Broadway cabaret late one night, 
she met Ed and his affinity, face to face : 

"My, what a mush!" said Myrtle to her compan- 
ion — meaning the affinity, of course. The blond winced. 
Mj'rtle was instantly suffused with happiness. Her 
escort, well dressed gentleman that he was, made no 
comment, but Chamberesquely ushered her to a wait- 
ing taxi. 

"Here," if we were in on the E. P. Roe, we would i 
say "the author lays down his pen." As it is we will 
hurry to the mark that makes the printer seek the end 
rule. If you are disappointed we can but offer re- 
grets. If you Bought a real story-writer's story we 
are sorry, but you share the blame. 

You see, this is not a regular story — just a little 
cross-section of that delectable or dispieable thing 
called life. 



The Western Comrade 



13 



Rescue the Desorientes 



Bv G. E. BOLTON 




ILLIA:\r C. OWEN, who thinks so far 
ahead of aud writes so far above his 
readers that he gets and holds (and 
possibly wants) but a limited audience, 
has summarized the situation of the vari- 
ous labor and so-called radical move- 
ments in America. 

In the English section of the Mexi- 
can (Spanish") anarchist semanal revolucionario "Ee- 
gi-neraeion'" this keen writer points out the political 
jdo-\mfall of trade unionists in San Francisco, aud de- 
iclares that in Los Angeles, Socialism has been ab- 
sorbed by "progressivism" and that the National 
Socialist Party is harping on the efficiency shown by 
militarism in Germany. (This to bolster up the theory 
of the desirability of state ownership and manage- 
ment.) 

The writer declares the I. "W. W. a busted balloon. 
As for the American Federation of Labor, he says it 
is "worsted invariably in its half-hearted conflicts 
with capital, and sinks more deeply into the mud of 
a despairing conservatism." 

This, too, before Gompers saved the day for the 
munition makers, militarists and martinets at the San 
iFranciseo convention, where two Socialist delegates 
attempted to work through a resolution against the 
reparedness conspiracy and the attempt to add col- 
eetive murder to the high school curriculum. 

Those who know Gompers and those who surround 
him should, however, have as little difficulty in pre- 
idicting. 

Next, this brilliant Anarchist takes a sharp rap at 
Anarchists. He apparently agrees with Jean Grave, 
Vhom he accredits with being the leading spokesman 
of the European group, when he writes that "at this 
factual hour they are disorganized and more and more 
'desorientes'." (Lacking in plan — drifting without 
destination or knowledge of direction.) 

Let us Cjuote Owen here: "Yes, indeed. A move- 
ment that does not understand that its basis is the 
free individual ; that does not understand that free- 
idoom implies abstention from invasion and battle to 
death against the invader — such a movement has ex- 
actly the strength and consistency of a rope of sand." 
Owen became a Nationalist at the outbreak of the 
European war. English birth and breeding came to 
tlie surface and he shows the greatest bitterness against 
all things Teutonic — hates the "invader." 

The writer declares that the future belongs to 



I 



Anarchism, for "man unquestionably is destined to 
be free. But it will be an Anarchism founded on 
principle and not the sensational hodge-podge that has 
of late, under the driving of greedy notoriety hunters, 
usurped the name." (Is this a slap at Emma and her 
phalanx of worshipping, volunteer publicity agents?) 

"The clouds are breaking and the great contest 
of the future, that between freedom and authority, is 
taking visible shape." 

This is most encouraging and I, for one, am in- 
clined to agree that the clouds are breaking. A time 
of world-wide upheaval is nearing, but we have too 
many times seized the rope only to find it sand. 

"William C. Owen has spent an active life. For 
years he has been a rebel against all that restrains the 
liberty of man. His stern, uncompromising character 
many times has forced him outside the fold. A pro- 
found student, a clear thinker, a masterly writer, we 
see no reason why he should not make a serious at- 
tempt to orient American radicalism. 

He knows Stirner, Godwin and Tolstoi (the spon- 
tanistics). He has made deep study of Proudhon. 
Bakunine, Kropotkin and Tucker (federalistics). 

Wliy not try it. Yokefellow Owen? Here we are, 
desoriente — drifting. Where is there a concrete plan? 
Will you give us an affirmation? Can you not make 
clear to some of the more dense of us — many of whom 
are groping but honestly want to know? We are not 
seeking a royal road to knowledge, but there is a 
short cut that will keep the neophyte out of the morass 
of confusion. 

Why not a book that will do this for us? 

Permit us a classification: Owen would decline to 
be labelled or tagged, but here is a hazard — he is in- 
doministic, spontanistic and revolutionary insurgent. 
Negative to every doctrine of the state. 

There has been nothing in common as to the basis 
of most of the teachers of anarchism. Most of them 
recognize as the supreme law of human procedure 
merely a natural law. They do not tell us what 
takes place, and how to accelerate its movement, but 
merely follow the genetic procedure of telling us what 
will take place. Shall we follow the altruistic Godwin 
or the egoistic Stirner? 

Many who have known Owen and followed his 
writings will join this serious suggestion. Will he 
abandon his plan of "je ne propose rien, je ne sup- 
pose rien. j 'expose" and provide a compass and a rud- 
der to the American desorientes? 



14 



The Western Comrade 

Among the Immortals 

By EDMUND R. BRUMBAUGH 



JOSEPH HILLSTROM— or Joe Hill, as he was called 
by his comrades — sleeps under the sod, his body 
pierced by the bullets of an enraged plutocracy. The 
heart that throbbed with love for his fellows is still. 
The brain that grew great with the wisdom of social 
protest is at rest. The hands that guided the pencil or 
brush, placing on paper or canvas their owner's visions 
of truth and beauty are folded forever. Yesterday, 
Joe Hill was but one of us, struggling like us, as best 
he knew how, for justice, for liberty, for civilization. 
Today he has left us behind, has attained an eminence 
for which few have the strength. He is among the im- 
mortals. Socrates, Spartacus, Jesus, Bruno, Savona- 
rola, Wat Tyler, Elijah Lovejoy, John Brown and a 
host of other dauntless ones whom this same hard path 
have trod and who have died for the truth, are keep- 
ing him company. 

We, who are trying to build a better social order, 
mourn for our martyred comrade. We know he was 
no murderer. We know he was no robber. We know 
that he abhorred both murder and robbery with all 
the stength of his artist's soul. His was a holy ideal, 
and idealists are not criminals. 



Murder has been done, but Joe Hill is the victim 
and not the culprit. His murderers may rejoice, sus- 
tained as they are by the heartfelt approval of the 
enemies and robbers of the working class, but theif 
rejoicing will be turned to chagrin and last- 
ing defeat be the sequel to their temporary triumph. I 
Longing for Liberty cannot be confined by iron baii 
or shot to death even in the name of "law and order '^ 
and the sacrad constitution ! It is bound to break forth 
again and again, and to grow stronger and strongeifj; 
until tyranny is made to flee before it. Force cannot 
restrain it long ; fraud cannot deceive it ; all the money i 
in the world cannot corrupt it ; and half-way measure^! 
will fail to satisfy. ':! 

The martyrdom of November 19 was a shamefifl,'' 
thing. We wish from the bottom of our hearts thalil 
it had not been. But it could not be prevented. Capi- 
talism controlled. This martyrdom, therefore, is no 
discouragement; rather is it the reverse. It is even atti 
inspiration, a call to greater devotion. Thinking of 
it, we are lifted aloft; a determination springs up with- 
in us to drive from the earth the system that made 
it possible. ''j 



One Big Union 

By J. L. ENGDAHL 



w 



E are told in a seven-line cablegram that a 
combination of 1,500,000 workingmen has been 
effected in Great Britain by the adoption of a draft 
constitution linking together the National Union of 
Railway Men, the Transport Workers' Federation and 
the Miners' Federation. 

This amalgamation plan got under way before the 
war started and the fact that action has now been 
taken shows that the British workers have not been 
entirely submerged by the European conflagration. 

Germany has demonstrated to the world the value 
of organization and the socialization of industry, both 
in peace and in war. It required the war to drive home 
this lesson to other nations, especially England. It doca 
not look as if this lesson had as yet been learned by 
the peoples of the United States. The sessions of the 
next Congress will tell the story. 

But we submit that the industrial solidarity being 
shown by the workers of Great Britain, in uniting into 
one solid phalanx the railway men, the miners and the 
transport workers, should be immediately copied by the 



I 



organized workers of the United States. 

The United Mine Workers of America and the 
Western Federation of Miners have been endeavoring 
to amalgamate for years. Of course, they are now 
united in the Mining Department of the American Fed- 
eration of Labor, but this is a loose organization. There 
are half a dozen brotherhoods claiming jurisdiction' 
over the workers in the operating departments of the 
nation's railroads. Nearly a dozen more organizations 
claim jurisdiction over the men in the railroad shop 
trades, these being loosely organized into the Railwayi 
Department of the A. P. of L. The International Sea-; 
men's Union, with the Lake Seamen's Union, sees no 
reason for amalgamating with the Longshoremen's 
Union. This goes to show how far the American 
worker is behind his British brother in unity of effort, 
Perhaps we shall need another Harriman strike, an-; 
other Colorado, another struggle on the Great Lakes, 
the Atlantic or the Pacific, before the value of soli- 
darity has been taught the workers. In the meantime 
watch the big labor combine in Great Britain. 



The Western Comrade 



15 



Llano del Rio 



By JOHN DEOUER 



THIS will be a short and sweet description of the 
Llano del Rio Colony, just as I found it. It is 
not Socialism — you cannot build heaven ia 
hell. It is a business enterprise, conducted on business 
principles, for practical results. The colony is not con- 
cerned with individual ideals, but with ways and means 
to get food, clothing and shelter. When these are se- 
cure, then, if j^ou are idealistic, your ideals can grow. 

The colony is not a full and perfect democracy. There 
is only one place in which democracy is complete — 
that is in the choice of directors. These directors have 
to do with the business of the corporation and appoint 
superintendents, managers, etc. They take your ap- 
plication, admit you to a 

working contract, and if 
your influence is detri- 
mental to the good of the 
enterprise, they discharge 
you. This may sound un- 
idealistic, but it is in ac- 
cord with the law of the 
state, and we must be in ac- 
cord with it if we wish to 
succeed. The recall of the 
directors, held in the hands 
of the stockholders, safe- 
guards the abuse o" this 
power. 

The law of the state fa- 
vors corporations organized 
on business lines. That is: 
governed by directors 
elected by stockholders. 
AVhen you pay in your in- 
itial payment you take out 

stock. This makes you a stockholder and the direc- 
tors are responsible, under the law, for the investment. 
They are legally bound to work for your interest as a 
stockholder. This is your relation to the company. 
Ton can hold stock and not go to the colony at all. 
And I dare say that is a safe iavestment — far safer 
than anything I know of. 

Bradstreet shows that when a man goes into busi- 
ness there are ninety-five out of a hundred chances 
against him. Llano has at least ninety-five out of every 
hundred chances to win. To become a stockholder in 
itself is desirable. When you have paid in your $1000 
initial payment fee, you get a working contract, and 
you take up your residence at the colony and become 




Workers returning from the fields at the end of a 
sunny December day. Community pliotographs take 
on a new, artistic touch under the hands of Com- 
rade Kempf. 



an employe in the companj^ in which you are a stock- 
holder. You have then first right as a stockholder — ■ 
that is, a part owner of the corporation — and next you 
are a worker for the corporation of which you are an 
employe. The law therefore covers you twice as an 
owner and a worker. A little thought will make it 
plain; the state law deals with corporations who hire 
help. The stockholders work not — they are interested 
through the investment. Laborers are supposed to be 
hired and fired by the directors or the "agents." Thus 
it is that the Llano del Rio Colony is organized to 
comply with the law; but the work is done by the 
owners (stockholders), under a working contract. 

The worker-owner is under 

a board of directors. And 
the board of directors is re- 
sponsible under the law and 
subject to recall by the 
stockholders. 

The colony does not aim 
to set up a new form of gov- 
ernment over its working 
members ; where there is no 
law there is no transgres- 
sion, from which we take 
it that where laws are mul- 
tiplied transgression fol- 
lows. Now, the State of 
California has five thous- 
and laws which we are 
bound to obey, in the col- 
ony or out. That is quite 
enough — it is not the aim of 
the community to add to 
this burden. The best we 
can do is to build an industrial village where the con 
ditions of employment shall be just, the products 
equitably shared; where sanitary anki hygienic factors 
get due consideration, and where socially created 
wealth will ultimately redound to the benefit of all. 
Therefore, when you come to Llano, come to go to 
work with your comrades, and not to make riiles and 
regulations. He who goes to Llano goes to raise alfalfa, 
chickens, wheat, rabbits, potatoes, beef, garden truck, 
for the common weal of all. If you have legislative 
ambitions, go into politics and get elected to the state 
house. Llano is a corporation under the laws of capi- 
talism, where the owners are the workers, and receive 
(Continued on Page 25) 



An After-Thought 



-.■ •-3*^a-.- 



I 






Child Labor Exploiter as Santa Claus — "Sure kid, 
we didn't forget you! Here's a nice new factory whis- 
tle we've been putting up for you. You'll hear this one. 
so you needn't be late to work and get docked next yet 



V.J.- 



-Drawn for The 'Western C 








.4, KemPf 



18 



The Western Comrade 



"N 



OT since the big 
wind, " is an 
expression that 
henceforth will have some 
meaning at the Llano del 
Rio Community. Friday, 
night, December 3, was 
an eventful one ia the his- 
tory of the colony. The 
gale that swept the entire 
Pacific coast and wrought 
such havoc everywhere did 
not spare Llano and the 
southwest. The storm 
swept down on us with a 
fury never before experi- 
enced in this valley. Our- 
adobe houses stood like 
granite and not one of the 
completed structures was 
damaged by wind or rain. 
Two dozen of the tent 
houses were blown down 
and a few of them were 
whipped to ribbons. 

At about 10:30 o'clock 
at night a great black cloud formed iu a boot- 
shape which hovered for a long time over the city. 
The toe lost particles of clouds from time to time and 
swirled off into the mountain range behind. For 
more than half an hour before the wind storm broke 
a roar could be heard in the foothills resembling the 
sound of a giant cataract. 

The wind was almost continuous until after 2 o 'clock 
Saturday morning, viciously wiping out tents and 
tearing off the heavy porch of the hotel. The noise 
of the wind and the sounds of household goods careen- 
ing drunkenly about the streets lent a sort of terror 
hard to describe. 

As tent after tent collapsed or was swept from its 
moorings the people gathered in the hotel or in the 
adobe homes of friends and waited for a cessation 
of the tempest. 

Tent houses were twisted and torn and blo'^vn from 
foundations, but fortunately not a person was in- 
jured, although many had narrow escapes from flying 
debris. The adobe homes stood up with rock solidity, 
showing that even a four-inch wall, as these adobes 
are, can withstand very vigorous wind and rain 
storms. It is understood that the adobes so far built 
are of a temporary nature and should permanent 
buildings be erected of this material, thicker walls 
would obtain. 

There was little confusion and but slight appro- 



Llano Colonists Are 



By R. K. 




storming in the Mountains; Sunshine on the Llano. Picture Shows the 



hension among the inhabitants. Mutual assistance was 
given in the darkness and it was not long before the 
homeless families were made partially comfortable for 
the balance of the night. 

"When daylight dawned a scene of wreckage was 
everywhere visible. Furniture, washpans, beds, bed- 
ding and wearing apparel were blown about indis- 
criminately and lodged here and there against the 
fences. Bedding in the municipal or transient tents 
was thoroughly drenched, but thanks to a hot sun, 
quickly dried on the fence. Men and women turned 
out without waiting for suggestions and helped one 
another in a triily harmonious way. More than 100 
men, women and children were homeless, but were 
more or less comfortably housed within two or three 
hours after daylight and the work of rebuilding tents 
and fallen frames began. A roof was quickly placed 
on the unfinished office building and beds placed 
within which was quickly filled by people. "Work 
of repairing the hotel was started soon after break- 
fast and before noon all the damage to the roof proper 
was repaired, although the porch itself was not re- 
placed. Probably the porch would have stood up 
against the blast had the beams been anchored to the 
big stone supports. 

Only necessary work on the ranch was done during 
the two succeeding days as the housing force devoted 
all energies to reinstating a normal condition. Work 



The Western Comrade 



19 



Undaunted by Storm 



WILLIAMS 




New Dairy Barns, Silo, Rabbltry, and a Portion of the Poultry Department. 



of repair is still going on and will continue until 
complete and the repair work on the tents and the 
new tents will be of a more substantial nature. More 
braces will be placed and the frames strengthened in 
every way. 

However, there is consolation in the fact that the 
wind and rain was general up and down the mountain- 
ous coast region. Much harder winds blew to the 
north and more copious rains fell to the south. The 
trouble is, we were not prepared for such a shaking 
up of the elements and gives a salutory lesson that 
more substantial buildings are necessary. As a mat- 
ter of fact, had we been sheltered within solid wooden 
buildings or adobe none of the disagreeable features 
attendant upon this incident would be ours. As it is, 
considerable time has been lost and some setback in 
the field work will be evidenced. 

Notwithstanding the general disruption of the even 
tenor of our way, the calamitous weather did not affect 
or dampen the spirit of the colonists to have fun. The 
usual Saturday night dance was held and nearly all 
of the homeless people esconced in temporary quarters 
danced about the spacious dance hall with the usual 
vim. After all, depression and happiness is a state of 
mind. 

It would require more than a windstorm to daunt 
the bold hearts of the Llano colonists who bore the 
hardships with true pioneer spirit. 



Snow covers the moun- 
tains south of Llano and 
gladdens the eye and 
feelings, as we are warm 
and comfortable down 
here, while we know it is 
cold up there. Much of 
the snow that fell Friday 
night and Saturday morn- 
ing on the low foothills 
has vanished under the 
sun and even now a dif- 
ference in the vegetation 
can be seen and some 
change in the water sup- 
ply is slightly visible. The 
snow in the Sierra Madres 
south of us supplies very 
largely and regulates the 
Big Rock flow. More 
snow will fall in the 
mighty gashes during the 
winter and when the 
warm sun of spring gets 
around to us, the con- 
densed waters will eon- 
tribute toward making these lands among the most 
productive to be found anywhere in all great, fertile 
California. 

The garden season is practically over and work is 
now under way clearing and preparing lands for next 
spring's planting near the Tighlman place, although 
the number of acres may be increased. 

Near the first of the year planting of fruit trees will 
begin on a little more than two hundred acres. The 
orchard will contain nearly all varieties of fruit trees, 
such as pear, apple, peach, olive, etc. 

Clearing is going on at the present time on sections 
34 and 35. It will not be long until clearing work on 
these 1280 acres will have been finished. 

Two hundred acres of alfalfa will be planted in the 
spring close to the soiirce of water supply. A good deal 
of the land is now cleared and the remainder will be 
cleared, plowed and worked in time for spring plant- 
ing. 

It is planned to move the hennery up to the west end 
of Tighlman 's and build substantial adobe chicken, 
brooder and incubator houses and fix the place up in a 
thoroughly up-to-date manner. The chickens will have 
as much alfalfa to run on as thought desirable and will 
be sheltered from the west winds by the foothills and 
the tall row of trees that extend to the north of the 
place. 

The boiler for the steam laundry is now being placed 



20 



The Western Comrade 




Llano Lads, Imbued With Cooperative Spirit, Building Their Adobe "Clubhouse. 



and soon the machinery to do washing for the colony 
will be established and our troubles in this direction 
will be at an end. A new industrial field opens with 
the opening of the doors of the wash house. Doubdess 
a bid will be made for business in the surrounding towns 
of the valley. 

The bakery has introduced an oil burning system 
displacing the cumbersome and costly wood fire, so that 
now two bakings of 135 loaves can be had at a cost of 40 
cents outlay. At present the bread consumption 
averages 250 loaves daily. Of course, there are many 
colonists who bake bread in their own homes. 

The orchestra has been requested and acceded to the 
request that music be furnished at evening meals at 
least three times a week. The work of the orchestra 
has been much improved and enlarged by the addition 
of several artists. Mr. Copley is always looking for 
talent and a hearty invitation is extended to anyone 
who can play. 

While music at meals does not take the place of food 
substantials it adds materially to the zest of eating and 
takes one away from the meaner things of the physical 
world. This sort of thing should receive all possible 
encouragement. 

W. H. Peterson has opened a studio in which he 
teaches many different kinds of instruments, specializ- 
ing on the violin. Comrade Peterson has had consider- 
able experience along these lines and is eminently qual- 
ified to teach orchestral instruments. He is busy with 
pupils most of the time and puts in considerably more 
than eight hours per day. The colony is enriched by the 
presence of Mr. Peterson. In addition to the above ac- 
complishments he is an expert rabbit breeder and 
spends a part of the day helping Manager Kilmer at 
the rabbitry. 



We are working to- 
ward a better organiza- 
tion all the time. Things 
generally are taking on 
a more substantial char- 
acter of solidarity. As 
time goes on a new 
knowledge of identity of 
interest manifests itself. 
A new and stronger un- 
derstanding of our mis- 
sion out here on this pro- 
lific plain becomes visi- 
ble. The cobwebs of mys- 
tery are disappearing 
and impractical ideals 
are being left behind. 
Soon the knowledge will 
become common that our 
interests here are identical and when that is thorough- 
ly understood life will broaden for us all. 

The reason for the existence of the Llano del Rio 
Corporation is so plain and apparent that it is mysti- 
fying, for as a rule we are always looking for some- 
thing that does not exist. 

People come to us filled with vagaries. Where they 
get them it is hard to determine. Newcomers arrived 
here filled with idealism and notions of a weird form 
of democracy that are utterly out of place in an insti- 
tution dealing with things and practicalities. It 
must be insisted that if this colony is to exist we must 
follow the well tried and wrought out formulas of cor- 
porations organized under capitalism. We cannot hope 
to win in the desperate fight for competence if we 
deviate from the plans that have proven success in 
the outside world. Those who imagine, as some of 
our newcomers do, that a complete revolution of the 
methods of getting must immediately obtain upon 
arrival here, are due for a shock. We are not attempt- 
ing an Utopian phantasmagoria, but are constantly 
dealing with things of life, nature and harness and 
horses, plows, wood cutting and the building of homes. 
In order to succeed, and we are succeeding beyond 
what the founders of this institution had hoped for, as 
the present city and development that is to be found 
here can show, we must follow out the lines laid down 
by organized capitalism and use the same tools that it 
is fighting and struggling Avith. 

Will it ever be believed that most of our benefits 
arise from the method of getting a living? This ques- 
tion becomes more real when we are on the ground 
working out this problem. It is an aphorism that our 
ethics and morals flow from our economic condition. 
Feed the inner man and bring to him machinery of pro- 



The Western Comrade 



21 



duction suited to his use 
and lie will by natural pro- 
cess evolve into a society 
suited to his needs. We 
are, first of all, trying to 
solve the question of food 
supply. Last year we 
raised almost seventy per 
cent of what we consumed. 
Nest year we will do very 
much better than that. We 
have within our grasp op- 
portunities never hoped 
for by the working class of 
any country. We have a 
principality in the making, 
but to assure many doubt- 
ing ones, the first duty 
here is not to set up a gov- 
ernment with which to guide ourselves. The laws of 
California have taken care of that. The reason for 
saying this is that arguments have taken place on this 
very point. Many people living in and around Marietta 
have asked this question. Some of our Washington and 
Idaho friends do not yet seem to understand that we 
are a business concern, incorporated under the laws of 
this state ; that a board of managers stands between 
the body politic and the state ; that the board of direc- 
tors is responsible for the actions of the individual in 
the colony and should defalcation of mismanagement 
arise, they and not the colonists would be stripped to 
make good the debts of the corporation ; that power of 
hiring and discharging lies with the board and should 
a change be desired in this respect the only course to 
follow would be to repeal a state law and recall the 
board. To take the power of discharge from the 
board's hands would be a bid for anarchy and chaos. 

An organized, central control is absolutely neces- 
sary in the present stage of evolution toward Socialism. 
The scintillating rays of national or world Socialism 
are but dimly seen over the eastern horizon. As long 
as the grind of the wheels of the juggernaught causes 
tears and groans and robs infants of their true heri- 
tage no institution surrounded by the competitive sys- 
tem will long succeed in its fight if other than capital- 
istic means be used. 

Once more, this corporation differs from the Western 
Union, Standard Oil or the Southern Pacific in this 
respect only : that the profits of this concern goes to the 
stockholders with working contracts actually working, 
and that their food, shelter and clothing are assured. 
We might make apologies for some of our food, tlie 
lack of more comfortable shelter and the paucity of 
our clothing, yet when one considers that when the end 




Looking Across Swimming Pool Toward Solarium and Colony Tent Houses 



of the month rolls by there are no bills to meet, no 
worries over the landlord bothering you, there are com- 
pensations. And, anyway, we all came here, or should 
have, with the understanding that there is a certain 
amount of pioneering to do, and should it become naus- 
eous or irksome the same old blighted world of strug- 
gling competition is open and the soft handed and faint 
hearted should seek its kindness. 

This is a very human place. We are composed of 
men and women of radical thought along every line of 
human endeavor. To amalgamate these is the disidera- 
tum. One of the most difficult things for a person to 
do is to stand in the other fellow's place and see how 
he would feel had a certain thing been done. Those 
that attempt to always give more than they expect to 
receive come closest to the proper way of thinking. 

Before closing permit us to revert a moment to the 
necessity of having an organized control, the power of 
discharge to protect the collectivity against the indi- 
viduals. When an organization of men band together 
to accomplish something for their own benefit, or to 
more strongly build a labor craft into a more formid- 
able rival of the entrenched interests, hirelings come 
among them. This can certainly be looked for. The 
ancient fights against tyranny for hundreds and thous- 
ands of years lost the fight because of the spy. Sparta- 
cus, Dreimakos, and others of the elder world, and 
Jesus lost the fight and life because of the treachery of 
the hired spy. Labor organizations the world over to- 
day are filled with them. Why should we be exempt 
from this form of disruption 1 We are doing something. 
We are freeing those who .join us from the terrors of 
the struggle and pointing a lesson to the world. Hence, 
we look for the disrupter and spy. History warrants 
it, experience and safety demand it. 



22 



The Western Comrade 



The Wonders of Llano 

By JOSEPH D. CANNON 

THE writer of the following article has spent a lifetime in the Labor and Socialist Movements. He is known in 
every state in the Union and loved by his comrades everywhere, and admired by the industrial overlords from 
whom he has wrested many victories for the workers. As he was a delegate to the Western Federation of Miners to 
the recent A. P. of L. convention at San Francisco, Comrade Cannon decided to visit the Llano del Rio Co-operative 
Community. This story was written shortly after several days' sojourn at Llano. — Editor's note. 



PICTURE if you can a scene of bustling activity 
where the mere onlooker seems so certainly out 
of place, and where the motive is not one of 
profit making or wealth accumulation for a few fa- 
vored individuals — where greed is not the master, at 
the crack of whose whip the toilers, in fear for their 
food, clothing and shelter, spring to new and over- 
taxing efforts — and what you will see in Llano, Llano 
del Rio, in the sunny Antelope Valley of Southern Cali- 
fornia. 

It ig the colony of which you have probably heard 
more or less, a!iid where c6-operation is the motive of 
the workers — and all are owners as well as workers. 

Here a marvel is being wrought, while the scoffer, 
unaware of the project's assured success, continues to 
direct his now stingless darts. 

A desert is being turned into a garden, and a soil 
which bore naught but cactus, sage and chaparral is 
resounding to the call of the husbandmen with teem- 
ing crops of great variety. 

Pour men and a horse, on a then desert waste, 
eighteen inonths ago, with nothing but a vision 
to urge them on, have already shown how well founded 
was their faith; for now there are more than sis hun- 
dred souls, men, women and children, in the colony at 
Llano. Sixty to seventy horses are there instead of 
one — and these are not sufficient for the work that is 
there for them to do. 

Over one hundred head of Jersey and Holstein cows 
make up the dairy herd, and this number is increasing 
rapidly. 

Of chickens there seemed many hundreds, all of fancy 
stock, from which great returns will be sure to accrue. 

The rabbitry is far from being the least interesting 
merit in the colony's growing prospects. 

Right now, in December, eighty per cent of the 
workers are employed in clearing ground and planting 
crops, mostly grain, which will be followed by alfalfa. 
Next spring one hundred and twenty-five acres will be 
put into garden truck, all for home consumption. 

Already the colony has its own nursery; and great 
orckards are being set out. Pears do wonderfully well ; 
and soon "Llano Pears" shall be one of the fancy 
staples in the grocery world. But peaches, apples, 
grapes and some other fruits are giving great promise. 



and as rapidly as it can be done new ground is being 
broken and new and varied orchards, as well as other 
crops, being put in. ,' 

There is water sufficient to irrigate not less than 
twenty thousand acres, with probabilities of enough 
more being conserved to increase that acreage by fifty 
per cent. The colony at present has not that much 
land, but its holdings are steadily being increased and 
it will ultimately have all for which it can develop 
water. There are two sources for the supply. One is 
a tunnel a mile or so in length, from which runs a con- 
stant stream of nearly ice cold, pure water, enough to 
supply the domestic requirements of the colony for 
all time. 

The other is the flow from the ever-melting snows of 
the mountains. This will not only irrigate their lands, 
but it will light and heat their homes and shops, turn 
the wheels of their power machines and eventually 
transport them and their goods to and from market. 

For conservation they have a splendid dam site, and 
for power plants they have many advantageous loca- 
tions where the mountain stream will generate their 
electricity. 

With but little difference in labor cost the colonists 
have the choice of granite, gray sandstone, concrete or 
brick, all on their own ground, from which to select 
their building material. Ground is about to be broken 
for a $5000 school, which will be the first building on 
the permanent town site of Llano. 

But speaking of schools : the children from two years 
and up are in school. The Montessori method is in 
most successful operation and the graded schools are 
doing splendid work. Last but not least is the night 
schools at which the workers are given the advantage 
of lecture courses not usually heard outside of colleges, 
and at which there are always many students. In ad- 
dition to this there is a public library which is growing 
in size and worth, and in which there are always large 
numbers of readers. 

There are many more interesting features. The ma- 
chine shop, the cabinet shop, the building department, 
and many others too numerous to list, but all of which 
are so worth while. 

It is not the intent of the colony to sell milk from 
its great dairy herdte, but butter and cheese. Pelts 



The Western Comrade 



23 



will not be sold merely as hides, but 
as shoes, gloves, belts or other fin- 
ished products. The hares will 
produce not only meat for the col- 
onists, but the most attractive furs. 
No article as far as it can be ar- 
ranged •R-ill be produced to sell 
just as arw material, but as fin- 
ished product. 

Already more has been achieved 
in eighteen months than the four 
wise men with the horse thought 
possible in ten years — and as yet 
I the colony is in swaddling clothes. 
AVatch it when it really begins to 
move ; when its orchards are bear- 
ing in full and its herds doing more 
than merely increasing. 



Llano will be modern. It has its 
struggles to win, and opposition to 
overcome, but it is in a position to 
do these. It is increasing in value 
and it can speak right now in dol- 
lars and cents most convincingly. 
Its lands and waters are easily 
worth $150,000. Its herds and ma- 
chinery just as much. And this — 
all of this — belongs to the men 
who are doing the work. Every 
toiler is working for the benefit of 
the colony, and the colony is thp 
reward of every toiler. 

Llano will demonstrate that co- 
operation is a greater success than 
even the advocates of co-operation 
heretofore claimed. 



Socialism Strikes Millville 



(Continued from Page 10) 



I'xplain, and I says to myself, "Just 
as I thought!" when the man 
sliouted at her again: 

''Oh, I remember now, honey. 
Look in that book on Rhode Island 
Red Hens!" 

I almost fainted. 

She got the book out of a drawer 
and run through the leaves till she 
found the paper. It didn't even 
have a ribbon tied around it, with 
pretty verses, like is the style now- 
a days — just a plain slip. I looked 
at the date carefully and it seemed 
all right, but the little girl might 
be small for her age. Mrs. Brick- 
layer had her hand on her face 
and her back turned, and the 
"Widow Steele says to her, "Don't 
cry. We don't aim to hurt your 
feelin's. It's just the rules of the 
club, and I'm ashamed of myself." 
The widow's good hearted, but as 
I said, she hasn't much sense. She 
didn't realize the very sofa she was 
sitting on might be stuffed with 
some deadly powder. '^ 
Mrs. Bricklayer says, no indeed, she 
wasn't crying, and she'd be de- 
lighted to come to the club. I 
grabbed the widow's arm and hur- 
ried out as fast as I could "^ 

I didn't speak until we had 
turned the corner. 

"Safe!" I savs, then. "Safe, 
thank God!" 

"Safe? "says the widow. ""Wha' 
da va mean? Quit pinchin' my 
arm"!" 

"Didn't you notice?" 
Ij "Notice what?" 



"The books!" She just stared. 

"Her digging in the garden?" 

"What of it? Don't we all dig 
in the garden?" 

"But the gloves! Aren't gloves 
non-conductors or something?" 

The widow stared in her stupid 
way. "What yu talkin' about?" 

"Aud the sputter in the bed- 
room? Those people are menaces! 
And did you notice how her eyes 
shone when she heard that man 
coming up the steps?" 

"Huh?" 

"And the way he looked at her? 
And called her 'honey?' and did — 
you — see — what — he — did ? ' ' 

"What?" 

I whispered it. "Kissed her!" 

At last even Martha, stupid and 
uneducated as she is, saw. 

"And they been married seven 
years! For the land sakes!" 

"Seven years!" I says, "Mark 
my words, Lucy Steele, certificate 
or no certificate, there's something 
irregular about that family! And 
heaven help me ! I've just thought 
of something else!" 

"I sat right down on a dusty 
stump in my best dress, I was so 
weak. My husband, the Judge, has 
always been attractive to ladies. 
What if that woman should set her 
cap for him? I rocked and sobbed. 

"What's the matter with yu? 
Ge ut)!" the widow kept saving. 

"Oh, Lucy Steele ! Lucy Steele ! ' ' 
was all I could say. "You ought 
to be glad your husband's safe 
buried!" 



The Mexican 
People 

Their Struggle 
for Freedom 

By 

L. Gutierrez de Lara 

and 

Edgcumb Pinchon 




Each new battle of the bloody revo- 
lution in Sfexico makes this book the 
more valuable. It is the most remark- 
able as well as the most intelligent in- 
terpretation of underlying motives. 

Every one should have this book in 
his library. 

We are fast closing out our remain- 
ing copies of "The Mexican People." 
If you hurry you can get in on the 
combination offer of The Western 
Comrade and this book for only $1.75. 

Address The Western Comrade, Cir- 
culation Manager, 923 HIggins BIdg., 
Los Angeles, Cal. 



24 



The Western Comrade 



Ignorance is the Great 
Curse ! 

Do you know, for instance, the scientific difference between love and 
passion? 

Human life is full of hideous exhibits of wretchedness due to ignor- 
ance of sexual normality. 

Stupid, pernicious prudery long has blinded us to sexual truth. Science 
was slow in entering this vital field. In recent years commercialists 
eyeing profits have unloaded many unscientific and dangerous sex books. 
Now, the world's great scientific minds are dealing with this subject upon 
which human happiness often depends. No longer Is the subject taboo 
among intelligent people. 

We take pleasure in offering to the American public 
the work of one of the world's greatest authorities upop 
the question of sexual life. He is August Forel, M. D., 
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You will be better for this knowledge. 

Every professional man and woman, those dealing with social, medical, 
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The subject is treated from every point of view. The chapter on "love 
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General Dealers in Books, Sent on Mail Order 

142 West 23rd St., New York, N. Y. 



DaAvson's Dermal Cream 

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tan, motli patches and all diseolorations. Greatest beautifier of 
the age. 

One Ounce Jar 60c Postpaid 

Prepared By DR. ELIZABETH DAWSON Llano, Calif. 



Telephone Home A-4533 

HARRIMAN & RYCKMAN 

Attorneys at Law 

921 Higgins Building 

Los Angeies, Cal. 



Home A-2003 Main 619 

A. J. STEVENS 

Dentist 

306 South Broadway 

Room 514 Los Angeles, Cal. 



News From the Front 

"D E prepared for a thriller. Here 's 
the latent from the front and is 
good for "top right, with eight-col. 
scarehead, (blood-red ink please, 
Mr. Pressman) ' ' for any high- 
minded, yellow-fevered newspaper : 
The Kaiser has a (or the) zellegewe- 
bentziiendung. Is this a form of 
bacteria? If it is, beware! 

Now everyone knows that most 
maladies are caused from over- 
indulgence in microbes. But even 
then, the microbes could all be 
placed on the point of a needle and 
not one microbe wotild get stuck. 
Now take a needle-point full of 
these germ distributors into your 
sylstem and within a few weeks' 
time wake up some morning with 
a zellegewebentzuendung inside of 
you. Shades of a dinosaur ! 

Take a trip back into the eocene 
age when microbes were the size of 
your employer's home and went 
around at regular periods distrib- 
uting their Palezoic germs. Sup- 
pose you were located on a high 
cliff and one fine day received a 
visit from a few of these nice big 
germs. Then after a few hundred 
years went by you woke up one day 
with a coryphodonia inside of you? 

AVhile your shuddering get down 
on your knees and fervently thank 
your employer's god that you are 
dog-gone glad you're living in the 
enlightened age of Christianity and 
that no matter what happens you 
can never wake up with anything 
worse inside you than a zellegewe- 
bentzuendung. — F. H. W. 

Prosperous 1915 

TJ AS the 1915 prosperity bubble 
broken? Thousands of busi- 
ness houses in the United States, 
many long established, barkened to 
the prosperity call, only to find it 
a teiren blowing their death knell. 
This song of prosperity sounds 
like a cheap piano without a sound- 
ing-board. It gives forth an uu- 
harmonious, grating, tin-like noise 
that shows up its falsity when the 
first note is struck. Now that 1916 
is upon us, will capitalism still de- 
lude the people with its falseness? 
Will we go through another year of 
bunko without waking? 

So far as we can see, the only 
ones who are "blessed" with pros- 
perity are munition manufacturers. 



*' 



The Western Comrade 



25 



Llano del Rio 



(Continued from Page 15) 



their owu as tliey produce it. The 
wage basis is set for a figuring 
base, as well as to comply with 
legal requirements. 

The company figures itself in 
debt to you at the rate of four dol- 
lars a day and when it begins to 
pay out you will have yours forth- 
coming — and it will pay out, as we 
liave the climate, soil and water to 
do it. 

The land is easily cleared and 
leveled, and the water is available. 
l!y putting in a dam in a nearby 
stream a lake will be formed of 
7000 acres area, holding more than 
ten feet of water over the greater 
part of its area. This lake will en- 
iiance the value of the property 
millions of dollars and will cause 
the desert to look like the map of 
Ireland. The only danger is that 
too many cooks will spoil the broth. 
Discipline is essential to success. 
Still the colony is not undemocratic. 
They have their assembly where the 
rank and file discuss the problems. 
The managers' meetings every 
evening are open to the member- 
ship. Good ideas are at all times 
welcome. 

The social life, even now, is a 
treat. The short work day gives 
opportunity for recreation. Music 
and song are heard even in these 
pioneering days. There are no re- 
strictions in the colony that are not 
found in the rest of the world. It 
is the aim of the board to give as 
large a measure of freedom to the 
individual as possible and still be 
consistant to the welfare of the 
community. 

The colony is a work proposi- 
tion in a workaday world, and aims 
at turning the product socially 
created to the social enjoyment of 
the community, according to the 
rule "each according to his deeds." 

When you come, comrades (and 
you will come sooner or later), do 
not expect to enter another world, 
for, if you do, you will be disap- 
pointed; but come to co-operate in 
the struggle against capitalism ex- 
ploitation of the individual, by 
bending together for mutual good, 
in such a way that the law cannot 
destroy us — and we cannot destroy 
each other. 



Read the Gateway to Freedom 
carefully, in the light of what I 
have written you. Remember it 
was written by men large in tne 
faith, and is, in minor points, 
strong — yes, perhaps overdrawn — 
but not in the possibilities — they 
are not overdrawn in any of the 
literature. 

If you intend to join, comrades, 
now is the time to take out an in- 
stallment membership, at least. Get 
in, I advise you; for if you can 
only pay part of the money, it is 
my conviction that the time is near 
when men will give the premium 
to get Llano stock and a chance to 
enter the colony. 

Do not think I have been swept 
off my feet. No, not I ! After calm 
investigation I drew my own con- 
elusions; saw it all, and am now 
telling you, comrades, realizing that 
should I lie or misrepresent I would 
justly lose my place as an efficient 
agitator in the cause we love. I, 
therefore, say again that I am con- 
vinced from a business standpoint, 
Llano is safe. Safe as anything un- 
der capitalism can be. 

Let us review the possibilities: 

Here is the Antelope Valley, in 
fact a part of the great Mojave 
desert, stretching away as far as 
the eyes can see — land that has 
lain dormant for ages, because it 
was not watered. The colony has 
means at its disposal to put water 
on the land. 

Once this rich plain — which in 
its dry state is valueless — is 
touched by water and the plow, 
a veritable gold mine of virgin 
strength is tapped. This land will 
yield its wealth of fruit and grain, 
of beef, wool. A glance at the trees 
already grown, and at the growing 
alflalf a ; multiply that by the ex- 
tent of the desert, and the possi- 
bilities of the water anld there opens 
before your eyes a vision of plenty 
and growth that baffles the im- 
agination. 

I realize we are easily baffled. 
We look at everything from the 
individualistic standpoint. But 
when yoit multiply the individual's 
power by 1000 and equip them witn 
machinery of production, such as 
science has placed at our command, 



Your Combings 

made into switches for 
one dollar, postpaid. 

Worlc guaranteed. 

MRS. E. TURNWALL 

Llano, Cat. 



PEARSONS 

is the only Magazine 
of its kind 

This is why: — 

Three years ago Pearson's decided to 
be a free magazine. 

This is what it did: — 



ABANDONED FANCY COVERS 
CUT OUT COLORED PICTURES 
ADOPTED PLAIN PAPER 

This was the purpose: — 

A plain form would enable the mag- 
azine to live on its income from sub- 
scriptions and monthly sales. It 
would not have to consider the effect 
on advertisers when it wanted to print , 
the truth about any public question. 

This was the result: — 

Pearson's now prints the truth about 
some question which affects your wel- 
fare in every issue. It pr ints facts 

which no magazine that de- 
pends on advertising could 
"afford ' ' to print. 

And, with all this, Pearsons still prints 
as much fiction and entertainment 
articles as other magazines. If you 
want plain facts instead of pretty 
pictures buy a copy on the news 
stand for 15 cents, or subscribe by 
the year for $1.50. 

By special arrangement with Pear- 
son's we are able to make you the 
following clubbing offer. 

You can get both PEAR- 
SON'S MAGAZINE and 
THE WESTERN COM- 
RADE for one year by 
sending $1.50 (the price of 
Pearson's alone) to 

The Western Comrade 

923 HIGGINS BLDG. 
LOS ANGELES, CALIF. 



26 



The Western Comrade 



Our 
Greatest Offer! 

Here is a combination offer of The 
American Socialist, official organ of 
the National Socialist Party, the 
famous "1914 National Campaign 
Book" and The Western Comrade 
that not one reader of The Western 
Comrade can afford to let slip by. 

The American Socialist 

for one year is $ .50 

The 1914 Campaign BooPc. .30 
The Western Comrade for 
one year is 1.00 

Total $2.00 

We will make you a 
combination of the 
above for just $1.35 

Take advantage of this offer now! 

Address: Circulation Manager 

THE WESTERN COMRADE 

923 Higgins Bldg., Los Angeles, Cal. 



"The Great Working Class Daily" 

MILWAUKEE 
LEADER 

"Unawed by Influence 
and Unbrlbed by Gain" 

Editor — Victor L. Eerger. 
Assistants — Jamss Howe. A. M. Sira- 
ors, Osmore Smith, Thomas S. An- 
drews. 



The Leader is published in America's 
stronghold of Socialism. It is the 
greatest English Socialist Daily in the 
wnild. It is a Modern Metropolitan 
Daily, containing the latest news. 

Among' its distinctive features are: 

SOCIALIST NEWS PAGE, LA- 
BOR NEWS PAGE, SPORTING 
PAGE. MAGAZINE SECTION, 
WOMAN'S PAGE, EDITORIAL 
PAGE. 

The price of The Deader is 25c per 
month; $3.00 per year. 

Combination offer with 

The WESTERN COMRADE 

Both for one year for ?3.00 (the 
price of the Milw.aukee Leader alone). 

Address: 

Circulation Department 

923 Higgins Bldg., 

Los Angeles, Calif. 



the horizon of possibilities widens 
and widens. 

Aside from the soil, the water 
and the co-operation of many men 
and women, there is the factor of 
climate. A week before Christ- 
mas and the eottonwood still 
has its foliage. The grass is 
still green and summer birds are 
singing in the meadow. The long 
season is another advantage. The 
comparatively small cost of shelter 
and the natural advantages of a 
high and dry climate on health and 
well being, are further considera- 
tions. 

I have spoken much of Llano 
while on the platform of the Social- 
ist Party. I then had a few mis- 
conceptions, but these soon passed 
away when I saw the colony in 
reality. I found that to construct 
a world after our hearts' desire 
may not be the world of our com- 
rades' dreams; and to put our no- 
tions into vogue will not work here. 
Llano is no dream world. It is a 



job. It is employment. It de- 
pends upon the strong in heart and 
the steadfast in faith for victory. 
It has its hardships now, but we 
will love it for the price we paid. 
We are here on the frontier bat- 
tling with the god of the desert on 
one hand, and with the monster 
Mammon on the other. 

The influx of new members is 
great. They devour what was pro- 
duced last year. Last year the older 
members were new and had to be 
accustomed to their tasks. This 
year they start in a full acquaint- 
ance with the problem and each 
other. 

They have wrought wonders in a 
year. What they will yet do I can- 
not say and make my meaning 
clear. You should see for your- 
selves, comrades, all of you to whom 
I have spoken of this great work in 
the field of co-operation. You 
should come and investigate — not 
a Utopia — but a business proposi- 
tion for collective benefit. 



Cartoonist Joins Colony 



n^HE large and steadily growing 
Western Comrade family has 
cause for congratulation on the fact 
that Matthew A. Kempf of New 
York has joined the Llano del Rio 
Colony and the staff of the maga- 
zine. Comrade Kempf is an artist 
and a cartoonist whose work has 
won him fame in the East where he 
has been known through his master- 
ful drawings published in various 
magazines. Some of the Western 
Comrade readers are familiar with 
M. A. Kempf 's drawings published 
in the Masses. 

Several months ago one of his 
drawings occupied the two center 
pages of that magazine and the pic- 
ture created a vast amount of favor- 
able comment in all manner of pub- 
lications in the East. New York 
daily newspapers as well as scores 
of other publications reprinted the 
cartoon. The drawing depicted 
grisly death on horseback beckon- 
ing the United States to join the 
carnage. The treatment of the 
ghastly winrows of the slain, the 
grim darkling of the night sky 
made doubly gruesome by the burn- 
ing homes formed a composition 
that was most compelling. The pic- 
ture alone was enough to have 



brought any artist into the fore- 
front of successful cartoonists. 
Since that time a number of Com- 
rade Kempf 's drawings have ap- 
peared in the Western Comrade. 
Now the artist and his wife have 
journeyed from New York to Cali- 
fornia to become members of the 
Llano del Rio Community. 

Comrade Kempf will take up as 
much outdoor work as he will be 
permitted to do. He will illustrate 
articles for the Western Comrade 
and will teach art classes in the 
Llano schools, where he expects to 
develop a large amount of latent 
talent. 

The colony is steadily gathering 
persons of great ability and in this 
latest recruit to the community the 
present and absent members are 
alike to be felicitated. 

With more enrollments in the 
new art classes at Llano the educa-. 
tional average "will be increased. 
When the population of the com- 
munity was slightly over 600 there 
were 260 personis enrolled in the 
various schools and educational de- 
partments. This included all ages 
from the 2-year-olds in the Montes- 
sori school up to some of the 50- 
year-olds in the night schools. 



The Western Comrade 



27 



Marked for Death 

By Hortense Flexner 

"LJE had a woodland look — half- 
■*■■'- startled, gay — 
As if his eyes, light-thirsty, had 
not learned 
To wake accustomed on earth's 
joyous day. 
A child, whose merriment and 
wonder burned 
In harmless flame, even his uniform 
Was but a lie to hide his wind- 
wild grace, 
Whose limbs were rounded youth, 
too supple, warm, 
To hold the measure of the 
street-made pace, 
Music and marching — colors in the 
sky — 
The crowded station, then the 
train — farewell ! 
For all he had the glance, exultant, 

shy. 
That seemed to marvel, "More to 

see— to tell!" 
Yet with his breathing moved, hid 

by his coat, 
A NUMBERED, METAL DISK, 

STRAPPED ROUND HIS 

THROAT ! 

Watch Congress! 

^"LJERE comes the good little Pub- 
lie at this late day accusing the 
German Socialist deputies with fail- 
ing of steadfast adherence to prin- 
ciple such as has recently been 
slic^vn by one Democrat congress- 
man who has opposed militarist 
plans, and laying at the door of 
tliose members the fratricidal war 
in Europe. All right, let's watch 
this Democratic congress. Let's 
also keep an eye on the lonely So- 
cialist congressman. Here we will 
get a lot of "steadfast adherence to 
principle," the principle of capi- 
talist greed and grab. It will not 
he rivers and harbors pork — but it 
will be pork. 

Into Our Pocketbook 

"PXPENDITURES of the National 
Government were high enough 
last year, but this year there will be 
a call for about" $160,000,000 in- 
crease. If Myer London asks for 
' that peace appropriation he is 
likely to make himself heard even if 
all the millions finally go for de- 
struction of life. A Socialist con- 
, gressman wont be smothered even 
I during preparationist madness. 



Pictures for Propaganda 



Shoot Capitalism 

With a 

Stereopticon 



Anyone ean lecture with the aid of pictures; they tell the 
story, you point out the moral. Pictures draw a crowd where 
other means fail. They make your work doubly effective. 

We tell you how to get the greatest results at the least 
expense. 

Send stamp for complete information. 

W. SCOTT LEWIS 




3493 Eag-le Street. 



Los Angeles, California 



Cut Your Fuel Bill 
and Get More Heat 

By burning air and oil in your cook stove, heater, range, boiler 
or furnace. 

Who would think of running an automobile on coal or wood? 
Yet hundreds of thousands of people today are using coal and 
wood to cook with. 

If the railroads of today should take off their oil-burning 
locomotives and replace them with the old style soft coal engines, 
the inefficiency of the old engines would cause a great deal of 
dissatisfaction. 

Why do you continue to use the old inefficient methods for 
heating and cooking? 

Burn Air and Oil 

The I. N. L. oil burner forms a gas that burns with an extreme 
heat. The cost of fuel is extremely low, ranging from three cents 
per gallon and up. 

The installation is also simple, and the principle of operation 
is understood at sight. 

For further particulars and price list of burners address 

Llano del Rio Company 



923 HIGGINS BLDG. 



Mail Order Department 



LOS ANGELES, GAL. 



Territory open for live agents 



28 



The Western Comrade 



THE WESTERN COMRADE 



Bntered as second-class matter at the 
post office at Los Angeles, Cal. 

924 Higgins Building, Los Angeles, Cal. 

Subscription Price One Dollar a Year 
In Clubs of Pour Fifty Cents 

Job Harriman, Managing Editor 
Frank E. Wolfe, Editor 



Vol. Ill December, 1915 



No. 8 



Random Shots 

"T^O you believe Joe Hill was 
guilty ? ' ' asked an argumentist 
who squeezed a dozen books on Sci- 
entific Socialism beneath his elbow 
and braced himself for wordy com- 
bat. 

The question and the bracing was 
characteristic of the type. 

The answer: 

"Guilty of what? I don't even 
know with what he was charged but 
I do know the people of the State of 
Utah are guilty of a brutal and cold- 
blooded murder. Their deed of blood 
and horror was studied, premeditat- 
ed, and was committed after long, 
cooling time. No more bestial or 
sickening scene has been enacted in 
a so-called civilized state in a cen- 
tury. This studied barbarity is in- 
finitely worse than the burning of 
negroes in Texas or lynchings in 
bloody Georgia. The people of Utah 
are as murderous in their instincts 
as the people of California, and both 
are guilty as hell!" 

Ki ^ ?H 

lyTANY letters have reached this of- 
fice during the past month 
wherein readers have expressed opin- 
ions regarding the article by G. E. 
Bolton entitled ' ' Murderers, You and 
I," in our November issi^e. Only a 
few have disagreed with the writer, 
and those by way of disavowing that 
they are murderers and decrying the 
writer's final declaration of hate. The 
article seems to have had the effect 
of arousing California readers to the 
realization that we are all made mur- 
derers, willingly or unwillingly, by 
laws that cause "the people of the 
state" to strangle human beings. 
i^ ■¥. ^ 

IVTAY we be permitted to suggest 
to some of our dogmatic and 
hypercritical brethren, who mistake 
motion for progress, that a dead fish 
can float down stream, biit it takes 
a live one to swim up. 




IVAN'S CHRISTMAS WISH 

"You may share your heart with others, dearest, — but not your gold." 

The characters represent Russia and France 

— Kladderadatsch. Berlin 



'T^HE ignominious defeat of the 
Allies in the Dardanelles is 
Germany's greatest victory. Ger- 
man guns, in German designed 
fortresses, German officers and 
doubtless many German fighting- 
merit are responsible for the great 
victory. 

Britain has paid a heavy toll 
in life and treasure and her 
Egyptian holdings are in danger. 
Starving Germany seems to be a 
costly procedure. 

ijii iI4 ^K 

rK ^ ?*- 

A SSASINATION on the scaffold 
■^ ^ is the worst form of assassina- 
tion because there it is invested 
with the approval of society. — 
Revolutionists' Handbook. 



TN the stampede brought about 
by the preparationist conspira- 
tors we seem about to be presented 
the indubitable proof that we 
are under what Burke called "the 
hoofs of the s'winish multitude." 
Shaw says "what the people are 
in the pit and gallery, they also are 
in the polling booth." What the 
people read, so do they think. To- 
day in this great "democracy" the 
people are reading — the daily 
press. Burke's statement will vary 
with the square — the ratio being 
the per cent of people reading and 
believing the capitalist daily news- 
papers of America. We are in a 
position to know the number is dis- 
hearteningly large. 



The Western Comrade 



29 



"DEFOKE you read the following 
lines be warned that they were 
taken from a speech by one of Eng- 
land's ablest statesmen, a profound 
thinker with a clearness of vision 
that lifts him far above his asso- 
ciates. Lord Eoseberry, a Liberal 
in the broad sense, who has in this 
case no motive other than that of 
the good of humanity, said in a re- 
'i-nt public gathering: 

■'I know nothing more disheart- 
ening than the announcement re- 
iM'utly made that the United 
States — the one great eoiantry left 
in the world free from the hideous. 
Moody burden of war — is about to 
rniliark upon the building of a huge 
nrmada destined to be equal or sec- 
iiiid to our own. It raeans that the 
Inirden will continue upon the other 
nations, and be increased exactly in 
pi'oportion to the fleet of the United 
States. I confess that it is a dis- 
lioartening prospect that the United 
States, so remote from the Euro- 
]>r-an conflict, should voluntarily in 
tlipse days take up the burden, 
Avliieh, after this war, will be found 
to have broken, or almost broken, 
our backs." 

The conspiracy of the American 
ai-mament trust will not only prove 
a terrific burden on the workers of 
our country, but will place a still 
Si-eater burden upon the people of 
other nations. 

^. * ^« 

"Q\TER there the dollar alone 
rules, and all diplomacy is a 
pestilential swamp ; decency is an 
infrequent guest, with scorn grin- 
ning ever over its shoulder; the 
entrepreneur is a rogue, the ofScial 
a -purchasable puppet, the lady a 
cold-cream-covered lady-peacock." 
A foreign writer has .just said this 
aliout the United States. "We won't 
toll you who it was because we must 
all remain neutral. It's simply aw- 
fnl the impression some of these 
presumptions and envious outsiders 
sot of us ! 

5K « ^ 

"M'OTHING can stop reactionary 
protectionists from forcing a 

revision to the high tariff of the 

good old days. No longer will the 
' need to trot out that tatterdemalion 

"pauper labor of Europe." They 

have a better scarecrow in the war. 
i and as a result it will be an easy 

year at Washington — and there will 

be miich pork. 



We do with Talking Machines what Ford did with Autos 

BEAUTIFUL. LARGE/ilZE 

TALKING MACHINE 

SELLS FOR ONLY 




Size I 5 i inches at base: 63^ high. Ask for 
oak or mahogany finish. Nickel plated, 
reversible, toneann and reproducer, playing 
Edison, Vi(5lor, Columbia and other disc 
records, 10 and ]2 inches. Worm gear 
motor. Threaded winding shaft. Plays 2 
ten-inch records wilh one winding — Tone 
controlling door. Neat and solidly made. 



If you have never been willing to spend 
$25 for a talking machine this is your chance. 
The MUSIGRAPH is as large, good-looking, 
right-sounding as machines selling for $25. 

How do we do it ? Here's the answer : Giganiic 
profits have been made from $25 machines because of 
patent right monopoly. Millions have gone for ad- 
vertising ^25 machines, and these millions came back 
from the public. The attempt is to make $25 the standard price. It's too much. 

The trust price game is broken. Here is a machine which gives perfect satisfaction 
(guareinteed) for only $ 1 0- It will fill your home with dancing, good music, fun and happi- 
ness. Money back if it isn't as represented. MUSIGRAPHS are selling by the 
thousands. People who can afford it buy showy autos, but common-sense people gladly ride 
Fords — both get over the ground. Same way with talking machines, only the MUSIGRAPH 
looks and works like the high-priced instruments. 

WHAT BETTER CHRISTMAS GIFT CAN YOU THINK OF? Musi- 
graphs play any standard disc record, high-priced or even the little five and 
ten cent records. Hurry your order to make sure of Christmas delivery. 

We are advertising these big bargain machines through our customers — one MUSIGRAPH 
in use sells a dozen more. 

One cash payment is our plan. So to-day, to insure Christmas delivery, send $10, 
by P. O. money order, check, draft, express order or postage stamps- All we ask is that you 
tell your neighbors how to get a MUSIGRAPH for only $10. 



GUARANTEE. 

This machine is as represented, both as to 
materials and workmanship, for a period of 
one year. If the MUSIGRAPH is not as 
represented send it back immediately and 

Get your money back. 



Address MUSIGRAPH, Dept. 224 

Distributors Advertising Service (Inc.) 

142 West 23rd Street, New, York City 



The Social-Democrat 

State paper of the Socialist Party of California, 75 
cents a year. 

For $1.35 T\'e will send you the Social-Democrat 
and the Western Comrade both for one year. This 
is a combination you can hardly overlook. 

Address : 

The Western Comrade 

923 Higgins Bldg. Los Angeles, Cal. 



Knit Under^vear 

Cheapest Because It Wears Best 

Women's Men's 

Union Suits, low neck, knee length, sizes 32 Undershirts, light weight, cream, sizes 34 to 44. .$ .75 

to 44 $1.25 Undershirts, light weight, black, sizes 34 to 44. . 1.00 

Union Suits, half low neck, elbow sleeves, ankle Drawers, light weight, cream, sizes 30 to 44 75 

length, sizes 32 to 44 1.25 Drawers, light weight, cream, sizes 30 to 44 1.00 

Under Vests, sleeveless, sizes 30 to 44 35 Shirts and Drawers, double fleeced, grey, sizes 

Night Robes, sizes 32 to 46 1.50 30 to 44 ." 1.25 

Hose, extra, wearing, black, sizes 8 to 10% 30 Shirts and Drawers, Egyptian cotton, ecru. 

Hose, light weight, all colors, sizes 8 to 10% ... .50 sizes 30 to 44 1.50 

Men's Hose 

Extra wearing value, black, sizes 9 to 11% $ -25 

Heavy weight, black, sizes 9 to 11%, 3 pairs. . . . 1.00 

Girls' Children's Boys' 

Union Suits, sizes 20 to 30...$ .50 Taped unions, answering Union Suits, sizes 20 to 32...$ .60 

Union Suits, better grade, purpose of a waist, Union Suits, better grade, 

sizes 20 to 30 1.00 sizes 20 to 28 $ .65 sizes 20 to 32 90 

Hose, black, tan or white. Same as above, only bet- Sportsman's hose for boys, 

sizes 6 to 10% 25 ter grade, sizes 20 to 28 1.05 sizes 6 to 10% 25 to .40 

Pure Wool Goods 

Made by Wool Growers' Co-operative Mills 
Direct From Sheep's Back to Your Back 

Black and Grey Mackinaw Coat, length 25 Trousers, Grey and Navy Blue, usual sizes. .. .$4.00 
inches, sizes 36 to 44 $8.00 Shirts, Grey and Navy Blue, usual sizes 3.00 

Blankets 

White or grey, 70x82 in., weight 5 lbs $7.85 

Grey, 70x82 in., weight 7% lbs 9.90 

Llano del Rio Community 

(Mail Order Department) 

923 Higgins Bldg. Los Angeles, Cal. 

(Make all checks or money orders payable to Llano del Rio Company) 




Men's lO-inch boots. $6. 00 
Men's 12-inch boots. 7.00 
Men's 15-inch boots. 8.00 
Ladies' 12-in. boots.. 6.00 
Ladies' 15-in. boots.. 7.00 
Men's Elk 'work shoes 4.00 
Men's Elk dress shoes 5.00 
Ladies' Elk shoes. . . 4.00 
Infants ' Elk shoes, 

1 to 5 1.50 

Child's Elk shoes, 

51/2 to 8 2.00 

Child's Elk shoes, 

81/2 to 11 2.50 

Misses' and Youths, 

111/2 to 2 3.00 




ELKSKIN 

BOOTS and SHOES 



Factory operated in connection 
with Llano Del Rio Colony 

IDEAL FOOTWEAR 

For Ranchers and Outdoor Men 



Tke famous Clifford Elkskin Shoes are lightest and 
easiest for solid comfort and will outwear three pairs 
of ordinary shoes. 

We cover all lines from ladies,' men's 
and children's button or lace in light 
handsome patterns to the high boots for 
mountain, himting, ranching or desert wear. 
Almost indestructible. 

Send in your orders by mail. Take 
measurement according to instructions. 
Out of to'^\Ti shoes made immediately on 
receipt of order. Send P. O. order and state 
whether we shall forward by mail or express. 



Place stocking foot on 
paper, drawing pencil 
around as per above Il- 
lustration. Pass tape 
around at lines with- 
out drawing tight. Give 
•ize usually worn. 



SALES DEPARTMENT 

Llano del Rio Company 

922 Higgins Building, Los Angeles, Cal. 



Colony Memberships For Sale 

Llano del Rio Community 



ANNOUNCEMENT is hereloy made that 
about seventy-five vacancies will be 
made in installment memberships 
when that many cancellations are forced by 
failure to make payments. This is caused in 
nearly every instance by illness, death or dis- 
employment of ab- j 
sent comrades or 
members of their 
family. This is 
not a large num- 
ber considering 
the thousand 
memberships. 1 1 
leaves the colony 
Avith about x50 
memberships for 
sale. Many of our 
absent members 
have taken the 
short cut, closed 
out their business 
affairs, shipped 
their goods and 
joined the col- 
onists. This has 
caused a rather 
unexpected rush 
and again con- 
gested the trans- 
portation depart- 
ment and put the builders behind, but it all 
clears rapidly. We want workers. Need an 
additional civil engineer, a photo engraver, 
a physician, a dentist and about one hvindred 
farmers of experience. The Northwest holds 
this hundred and we hope to recruit them 
there. Men and women who have experi- 




enced pioneering in the Northwest make ex- 
cellent colonists. They are always welcome 
at Llano. We are adding to our land hold- 
ings, our machinery, our livestock and 
implements. We are clearing land and pre- 
paring hundreds of acres for planting. Con- 
tinuous employ- 
ment is assured to 
all who join us. 
If you are tired of 
the fight in the 
competitive world 
come to Llano 
and help work out 
this great prob- 
lem of coopera- 
tion. Read the 
statements on 
page two of this 
magazine ; read 
the stories about 
the colony. Write 
for the free book- 
let entitled "The 
Gateway to Free- 
dom," ask for an 
application blank 
and you will be in 
a fair way to take 
the step that may 
be the turning 
point in your life. If you have the pioneer 
spirit and are a co-operator at heart and you 
can qualify by showing a clean record for 
sobriety, industry and honesty you will be 
welcomed by hundreds of your comrades 
who are living happily at the Llano del Rio 
community, Los Angeles County, California. 



"Billy" Young Riding Herd at Llano 



LLANO DEL RIO COMPANY 

Membership Department 

924 Higgins Building Los Angeles, California 



WESTERN I 



cJtxiau.tx.r'^ " V^Ko 




Preparedness Number 



I 



V'/.'^/: 




/...c.yy 



I 



^///A/////- n V/AlmLl 



Llano del Rio Co-operative Colony 



Llano, California 



THIS is the greatest Conununity Enterprise ever launched 
in America. 

The colony was founded by Job Harriman and is sitifated 
in the beautiful Antelope Valley, Los Angeles County, Cali- 
fornia, a few hffurs' ride from Los Angeles. The community 
is solving the problem of disemployment and business failure, 
and offers a way to provide for the future welfare of the 
workers and their families. 

Here is an example of co-operation in action. Llano del 
Rio Colony is an enterprise unique in the history of com- 
munity groups. 

It was established by Job Harriman to solve the problem 
of unemployment by providing steady employment for the 
workers; to assure safety and comfort for the future and for 
old age; to guarantee education for the children in the best 
school under personal supervision, and to provide a social 
life amid surroundings better than can be found in the com- 
petitive world. 

Some of the aims of the colony are : To solve the problem 
year since the colony began to work out the problems that 
confront pioneers- There are about 700 persons living at 
the new town of Llano. There are now more than 200 
pupils in the schools, and several hundred are expected to be 
enrolled before a year shall have passed. Plans are under 
way for a school building, which will cost several thousand 
dollars. The bonds have been voted and sold and there is 
nothing to delay the building. 

Schools have opened with classes ranging from the 
Montessori and kindergarten grades through the intermediate, 
which includes the first year in high school. This gives the 
pupils an opportunity to take advanced subjects, including 
languages in the colony school. 

The colony owns a fine herd of 105 head of Jersey 
and Holstein dairy cattle and is turning out a large amount 
of dairy products. There is steady demand for our out- 
put. 

There are over 200 hogs in the pens, and among them a 
large number of good brood sows. This department will be 
given special attention and ranks high in im.portance. 

The colony has seventy-five work horses, two large trac- 
tors, three trucks and a number of automobiles. The poultry 
department has 2000 egg-making birds, some of them blue 
ribbon prize winners. This department, as all others, is in the 
charge of an expert and it will expand rapidly. 

There are several hundred hares in the rabbitry and the 
manager of the department says the arrivals are in startling 
numbers. 

There are about 11,000 grape cuttings in the ground and 
thousands of deciduous fruit and shade trees in the colony 
nursery. This department is being steadily extended. 

The community owns several hundred colonies of bees 
which are producing honey. This department will be in- 
creased to several thousands. Several tons of honey are on 
hand. 

Among other industries the colony owns a steam laundry, 
a planing mill, large modern sawmill, a printing plant, a 
machine shop, a soil analysis laboratory, and a number of 
other productive plants are contemplated, among them a 
cannery, a tannery, an ice plant, a shoe factory, knitting and 
weaving plant, a motion picture company and factory. All 
of this machinery is not yet set up owing to the stress of 
handling crops. 

The colonists are farming on a large scale with the use 
of modem machinery, using scientific system and tried 
methods. 



About 120 acres of garden was planted this year. The re- 
sults have been most gratifying. 

Social life in the colony is most delightful. Entertain- 
ments and dances are regularly established functions. Base- 
ball, basket-ball, tennis, swimming, fishing, hunting and all ! 
other sports and pastimes are popular with all ages. 

Several hundred acres are now in alfalfa, which is ex- 
pected to run six cuttings of heavy hay this season. There 
are two producing orchards and about fifty-five acres of 
young pear trees. Several hundred acres will be planted in 
pears and apples next year. 

Six hundred and forty acres have been set aside for a 
site for a city. The building department is making bricks 
for the construction of hundreds of homes. The city will 
be the only one of its kind in the world. It will be built 
with the end of being beautiful and utilitarian. 

There are 1000 memberships in the colony and moat 
of them are subscribed for. It is believed that the remainder 
will be taken within the next few months. 

The broadest democracy prevails in the management of 
the colony. There is a directorate of nine, elected by the 
stockholders, and a community commission of nine, elected 
by the General Assembly— all persons over 18 voting. Abso- 
lute equality prevails in every respect. The ultimate popu- 
lation of this colony will be between 5000 and 6000 persons. 

The colony is organized as a corporation under the laws 
of California. The capitalization is $2,000,000. One thousand 
members are provided for. Each shareholder agrees to sub- 
scribe for 2000 shares of stock. Each pays cash $1000 for 
1000 shares. I' 

Deferred payments on the remaining 1000 shares are made 
by deducting one dollar per day from the $4 wage of the 
colonist. 

Out of the remaining $3 a day, the colonist gets the neces- 
sities and comforts of life. 

The balance remaining to the individual credit of the 
colonist may be drawn in cash out of the net proceeds of 
the enterprise. 

A per cent of the wages may be drawn in cash. 

Continuous employment is provided, and vacations ar- 
ranged as may be desired by the colonist. 

Each member holds an equal number of shares of stock 
as every other shareholder. 

Each member receives the same wage as every other 
member. 

In case anyone desires to leave the colony his sharet i 
and accumulated credits may be sold at any time. 

Are you tired of the competitive world? 

Do you want to get into a position where every hour's 
work will be for yourself and your family? Do you want I 
assurance of employment and provisions for the future? Ask 
for the booklet entitled: "The Gateway to Freedom." Sub- 
scribe for The Western Comrade ($ .50 per year), and keep 
posted on the progress of the colony. Ask about our monthly 
payment installment membership. 

Address LLANO DEL RIO COMPANY, 526 California 
Building, Los Angeles, California. ' 



CONTENTS 



Editorial Comment 
By Frank E. Wolfe. 

When Slavery Will End 
By Adelaide Maydwell. 

Socialists and Preparedness 

Preparedness at Llano 
By R. K. Williams. 

Theory and Socialism 
By John Dequer. 

Humpety Dumpety (Poem) 
By Ernest R. Wooster. 

Do Unto Others . 

Safety Next . 

By Clara R. Cushman. 

Look, You Kings ! (Poem) . 
By Harvey B. Westgate. 



Page 
. 5 



10 
13 



19 

22 

23 
24 

29 



i:f, 



W 



^ 



A 



ILLUSTRATIONS 

Preparing the Worker . . . . Frontispiece 

Out of the Basket 6 

The Triumphant Gladiator ..... 7 

Hulling Strawberries in a Louisiana Cannery . . 9 

Preparedness Takes Men from Constructive Labor . 10 

Deprivation and Exposure for Patriots ; Joy for 

Capitalists ....... 11 

JIaking Brick at Llano . . . . . .14 

Turning Brick . . •. . . . . 15 

Preparedness . . . . . . . .16 

The New and Old ilethods of Scraping Land at Llano IS 

Proposed School for Llano . . . . . .19 

Calves Feeding .20 

Dairy Herd on Way to Be Milked . . . .21 



•^^ 






A^ 



^^ 



Preparing the Worker 




"Prepare yourselves to shoot yourselves, you damned fools; there's profit and safety in it 
for us." — That is what the capitalists would say to the working class if they, the capitalists, said 
what they really think and want. 



-Drawn for Western Comrade by M. A. Kempf. 



HE Western Comrade 



Devoted to the Cause of the Workers 



iPolltlcal Action 



Co-operation 



Direct Action 



LOS ANGELES, CAL., JANUARY, 1916 



NUMBER 9 




EDITORIAL 



COMMENT 



By Frank E. Wolfe 



SAFETY first was a great idea, a great catch 
word aud almost a war cry. It was almost as 
good as "swat the fly,'" "back to the laud" aud 
other nifty little sayings invented by clever press 
agents. Out of it has gro^\Ti what bids fair to be 
a great institution, "the safety expert." 

The American Landsturm is commanded by a safe- 
ty expert, in fact he already is here. We have the 
daily papers for it. The safety expert was in com- 
mand of the gunmen of Bast Youngstown, when a 
lot of misguided strikers sought to picket at the 
gates of a steel mill. The safety experts ordered 
the gunmen to fire, and at the first volley twenty 
victims fell. Among them were some women who 
were so far away they could not hear the war cry 
"Safety First" and seek cover. In fact they did 
not even know there was a safety expert with his 
platoon of assistants in that vicinity. 

Of course it was announced as a battle, and the 



proof lies in the fact that twenty persons were shot. 
That makes it a battle for the daily press. The fact 
that there were no safety experts or gunmen in- 
jured would lead some of the more critical to label 
it a massacre. 

V T T 

THERE is something encouraging in the speed 
with which the strikers at East Youngstown 
learned a lesson. Once they had faced a storm of 
bullets, while they were closely massed in the 
streets, they had had enough. Instead of throwing 
bricks at the gunmen, and inviting more slaughter, 
they dispersed and within a brief time went at it 
in a different manner. 

One is almost persuaded to believe that some 
genius in their midst made a discovery and whis- 
pered to them of the potentiality of a box of matches 
and a bottle of benzine. At any rate they no longer 
faced the armed thugs or endangered their lives. 



The Western Comrade 




This was a group of "ignorant foreigners," but 
their action in Youngstown has made a profound 
impression on the working class. We are for po- 
litical action. We are opposed to all acts of vio- 
lence, and snug as it may sound, we deeply deplore 
the action at Youngstown. It was bad to destroy 
property and regrettable that the mill owners saw 
fit to shoot down twenty human beings. In spite 
of this we can't help thinking it was well for the 
workers abandon mass action in the vicinity of 
the mills. 

* * * 

THE Youngstown steel mill workers were men 
imported from Europe and mercilessly ex- 
ploited from the hour of their landing. They were 
beaten, cheated and swindled at every turn. They 
were brutally fleeced and worked to a point of beas- 
tiality in the mills. At 
their first sign of protest 
their masters unhesitating- 
ly shot them down like 
dogs. 

Blindly, possibly stu- 
pidly, they met direct ac- 
tion with direct action — 
they of a character that 
could not make but the 
masters pause. 

* * * 

DESPITE the silence 
and suppression of 
the British Government in 
all affairs in India. There 
is a growing belief of an 
imminent danger of a tre- 
mendous revolt of the Hin- 
dus. This is not entirely 
based upon reports of such 
incidents as the deposition 
of Nawab, Sultan Ul Mul- 
ki, the Nizam of Hyder- 
bad, or other influential 
Indian princes, but is 
rather based on continuous 
stories coming through 




T 



Out of the Basket 



other channels of sporadic mutinies and wide- 
spread unrest. 

Germany with her world-wide spy system pre- 
tends to have information which indicates that 
British rule in India is doomed; and, with or with- 
out foundation, claims the disaffection spreads, to 
other British holdings. They hint darkly at a pos- 
sible uprising that will lead to complete revolution 
in Egypt; and they point with considerable justi- 
fication to colonial misrule in that country where 
industrial and economic conditions have long been 
a disgrace to Great Britain. 

According to the plans of the Anglo-Japanese 
treaty the Nipponese are pledged to come to the 
rescue should Great Britain's possessions become 
imperiled. The indications are the central powers 
will supply the peril and involve the Far Bast in 

the struggle. 

* * * 
HE most amusing in- 
terview with Henry 
Ford immediately follow- 
ing his return was that in 
which he disclosed the 
fact that he had discov- 
ered the economic waste 
of war in that it daily de- 
stroyed a large number of 
productive workers. Henry 
knows of but one yard- 
stick by which to measure 
working men — the num- 
ber of automobiles they 
could make and assemble 
in one day. He says they 
are destroying human life 
that could turn out 5000 
Fords a day of say — ten 
hours. This is a fact 
known to millions of ' ' fail- 
ures" but it cost a great 
"success" hundreds of 
thousands of dollars and 
an opera bouffe trip to 
Scandahoovia to find out. 



-New York Sun. 




The Western Comrade 




AS a spifflicator of 
straw men, T. E. has 
no living equal. His 
chief occupation today is 
to quote extensively from 
■what nobody has said, 
and to proceed in his ovrn 
fearful and -n'onderful 
■way to utterly demolish 
the illogical utterances 
that never have been ut- 
tered. 

The paeifiets — if there 
really is sueh a creature- 
gets "his" as regularly 
as Teddy gets his modi- 
cum of hot blood and ra'w 
bones for breakfast. If 
his press agents can get 
enough of his dope iato 
the daily ne'wspapers he 
hopes to cro'wd do'wn 
stage enough to get the 
Kepubliean nomination at 
the coming Chicago con- 
vention. 

* * * 

IT is estimated that Tur- 
key has 100,000 Chris-' 
tions (Armenians) held 
in involuntary servitude. 

Their method of enslaving these men ■was direct and 
■with at least a measure of candor. They ■were osten- 
sibly recruited in large numbers to serve in the Turk- 
ish army — gathered iu large camps but never ■were 
given guns. That would have been unwise. "With- 
out any unnecessary delay these recruits were put 
to work on military details and so cruel has been 
their treatment that they are perishing by thou- 
sands. Barbarous ! 

* * * 

IT is not estimated how many are prepared for in- 
voluntary servitude in England — the number is 
kno^wn. The official figures are 761,875. Of these 
49,808 are married and 312,067 are single. These 



The Triumphant Gladiator 



men enlisted under the 
Derby plan, and all hoped 
for active service in the 
field. Workers in British 
mills and mines, and 
dwellers of the London 
slums were, in thousands 
of instances, williag to go 
out to the camps and the 
fields to fight and, if need 
be, die like men in the 
open. 

Now the disclosure is 
made. Conscription will 
come quickly and there 
will be no more subter- 
fuge. These men ■were 
"starred" as "unfit" for 
"active service as soldiers 
under arms, but will be 
used as munition workers 
OR IN OTHER FIELDS. ' ' 
* * * 

THE officials admit that 
428,853 men of mili- 
tary age were rejected for 
"medical" reasons. Po- 
litely put. Lack of proper 
nutrition before birth and 
during their life would 
come nearer the truth. 
Now that there are several hundred thousand able- 
bodied workers available for service under military 
orders British labor ■will face a quick sharp cam- 
paign of conscription and under this other hundreds 
of thousands of workers will be drafted for the fac- 
tories, fields, coal mines, trams, docks and railways. 
Simple and direct as the Osmanlis. The only dif- 
ference is, in Turkey it is Mohammedan enslaving 
Christian; in England it is Christian enslaving 
Christian. 

In France the employers broke up a general rail- 
way strike by directing their government to eaU 
the army to the colors, then ordered the soldier en- 
gineers, firemen, s^witchmen, trainmen and other 




-New Tork World. 




The Western Comrade 




soldier-railway workers to their tasks under mar 
tial law. 

"In England under the "defense of the realm," 
with a few hundred thousand more soldier-dockers, 
carters, tram men, railway men and miners under 
conscription, Organized Labor will be at the mercy 
of rapacious capitalism. 

In America we of the working class do things 
better — or do we? 

One large body of Organized Labor already is 
shouting for preparedness. Nowhere do we hear 
the voice of indignant protest against these war 
measures advocated by the munitions makers and 
their legislative puppets at Washington. 

California has the distinction of having two 
strong advocates of military servitude. The plan 
is to build national highways with soldiery. 

At first blush the plan looks alluring in that it 
proposes to put soldiers to work. (The only in- 
stance I know where professional killers did actual 
valuable work was when the Hessians paved Duke 
street, Alexandria, Va., with cobble stones which 
remain there to this hour, a hubblety, jolty reminder 
of this solitary instance.) 

But the highway soldiery plan would not so 
work out. Rather it would transform decent work- 
ingmen into vicious loafers that live unnatural lives 
in military camps. This would mean aiitomobile 
roads for the rich tourists, and a conscript army that 
would preclude any possibility of a successful strike 
in any large industry in America. Labor is 
relying on leaders who are at this hour hobnobbing 
with the militarists and munitionists at Washington. 
* * * 

LOS ANGELES is a highly moral city, truly a 
city of angels and saints — a city with the lid 
on. There is no segregated district, no red lights 
blink cheerily in any chosen section of the city, 
and from every pulpit you can get fulsome and 
gratuitous accounts of our purity. Envious out- 
siders speak shmngly of "whited sepulchers." 
The difilerenee between Los Angeles and other cities 
is simply that we do things differently. 

Before me lies the class-ad section of an even- 



ing paper, and in one column I count printed solici- 
tations from twenty-seven houses of prostitution. 
In this highly moral and educational daily I learn 
that "Lucy" has moved from the old stand on 
Spring street to a better location on Hill; and that 
"Vivian" is with her. I see that "LaBelle" is at 
the same old stand where the French method is 
still in use. I am able to locate "Maude," "Mar- 
garite" and "Ina," and I learn that "Victoria Bal- 
Jou, formerly of Louisville, Ky.," is an operator 
giving massage and sweats in our midst. This il- 
luminating page also conveys the gratifying in- 
telligence that a respectable dentist establishment 
has been opened on premises where, until recently, 
a notorious house of assignation and prostitution 
has been operated by the knowledge and consent 
of its owner — a merchant prince, who has led a 
"most exemplary life." 

The municipality has for a long time rented 
its property in Temple Block where at least one 
saloon has flourished. This by consent of the City 
Council. With this shining example before them 
the Board of .Education doubtless has few qualms 
of conscience when it reads the class-ad section 
and sees that its own "Avaffle alley," sometimes 
known as Mercantile Place, is becoming a popular 
resort for the "bath and massage parlor." 

The annual rental of "waffle alley" is $25,000 
a year. Critical persons have said it was worth 
four times that amount, but the Board of Educa- 
tion goes calmly on in its superior way. The casual 
stroller through Mercantile Place is assailed by the 
delectable odors of hot waffles, and less pleasant 
odors from the dog-and-monkey stores that line 
the way. Here the cry of the cockatoo and the 
shriek of the chimpanzee are mingled with the tin- 
tinabulation of tuneless pianos in the song shops. 
Upstairs over this municipal menagerie "Maud" 
and "Clara" and others of "formerly of's" and 
"new operators," await the unwarj^, unwashed and 
unsweated males, who for a great part arrive from 
Milpetas, Sheboygan and Skowhegan. Alas, for 
the erstwhile glories of "WafOe Alley;" It is 
awful — too waffle. 



The Western Comrade 



hen Slavery Will End 




THE National Child La- 
bor Committee has just 
managed extensive 
observancft of Child 
Labor day. This 
committee an- 
nounces that 9000 
organizations, in- 
cluding churches 
;i u d synagogues, 
reeognized the day. 
But why? Why 
have a Child Labor 
Day 1 Surely Amer- 
ica is agreed that 
child labor is not 
consistent with her 
ideals. The Na- 
tional Child Labor 
Committee, realiz- 
ing that these ques- 
tions will be asked, 
has issued the fol- 
lowing explanatory 
statement: "Child Labor Day is a reminder. "We 
have a strong sentiment in this country against the 
exploitation of children, but, perhaps for the very 
reason that our sentiment is strong — so strong as to 
make it hard to believe child labor can exist in Amer- 
ica — we have never taken the decisive steps to end 
once for all the labor of children. 

■'If a 14-year age limit in factories and 16-year 
limit in mines were enforced throughout the country 
more than 50.000 children would immediately be elim- 
inated from industry. That is, more than 50,000 chil- 
dren are at work in the United States contrary to the 
primary standards of child labor legislation. If the 
eight-hour day and no night work in factories were 
the law for children under 16, another 100,000 chil- 
dren would be affected. There are still states in the 
Union where children 9 or 10 years old may be found 
at work in the mills. There are still states where the 
child of 12 may work eleven hours a day. There are 
still states where the education of a child under 14 is 
not compulsory. The census of 1910 found 1,990,225 
children between 10 and 16 at work in this country. 
■'It is because these things are so and we in Amer- 
ica are apt to forget them, that we ask our friends to 
observe Child Labor Day and remind the country that 
child labor in the Lilted States is a live, pressing is- 
sue. Each vear a new lot of children go to work. 



By ADELAIDE MAYDWELL 



Each year a new lot leave 
school too soon, go to work 
too blindly, work 
too long hours. Will 
the citizens of the 
United States never 
take concerted ac- 
tion against this 
waste of children?" 
The committee is 
made up of good 
men and women 
who are actuated 
by the highest pos- 
sible motives. They 
are doing excellent 
work. They are 
making exhaustive 
investigations and 
continuously are 
bringing to light 
the terrible condi- 
tions that exist in 
the industrial dis- 
tricts. They are pressing issues for the amelioration 
of these conditions, and so urgent has been the demand 
that in many states there have been laws passed for 
the protection of the child slaves in factories, mills and 
mines. With this the Socialists have no quarrel. The 
achievement is in every way valuable. The effort is 
worthj^. 

We do say that we have little patience with simple 
palliatives. We always wish our friends were pro- 
ceeding with a little more understanding of the real, 
underlying cause of child slavery. Of course there are 
many in the work who are true Socialists and who 
understand thoroughly. 

The committee does well to point out the fact that 
the economic interests of capitalism demand the child- 
hood of 1,990,225 of the coming generation. It does 
well to show that 100,000 Ajnerican children have no 
protection against the avarice of the captains of indus- 
try who work them long hours and violate the rules of 
humanity by working them during the night. 

Child slavery will continue in some form as long 
as wage slavery continues. It is true that shortening 
the hours of toil and improving safety and sanitary con- 
ditions are all in the nature of the working class eon- 
c^uests. But it is also true there will be no victory un- 
til all who toil are liberated from the galling chains of 
the capitalist system. 



|0 



The Western Comrade 




Preparedness takes men from useful, productive labor and puts them to do useless, wasteful and destructive tasks. 




HE Socialist Party must soon take a posi- 
tive stand on its position as to prepared- 
ness. This is admitted by all who have 
given this problem any thought. Among 
the leading Socialist writers, opinion is 
divided. Charles Edward Russell is out 
flat-footed for preparedness. This has 
shocked many of the revolutionary fol- 
lowers of that highly popular leader. Joshua Wan- 
hope, editorial head writer for the New York Call, 
admits he is at sea and asks helplessly for the answer. 
L. B. Boudin, whom "Wanhope invites to supply the 
answer, takes up the challenge and writes for the New 
Review critical analysis of the position of Socialists 
of America. Boudin, in his article, says he tries to 
throw some light on the subject and find a position that 
is at least consistent without leading straight into the 
preparedness camp. In taking up the position of Rus- 
sell he says: ' 

"What is the argument that Russell advanced in 
favor of preparedness that has so discomfited us? If 
we examine the Russell argument closely we shall find 
that it consists of two basic positions: (1) That war 
is inevitable ; that it is of the very essence of capital- 
ism to breed wars, — it is the nature of the beast. 
(2) That in the event of war it is the duty of Social- 
ists to stick to their nation, or at least defend it when 
it is attacked. Both doctrines are supposed to be 'ac- 
cepted Socialist theory,' and the first one particularly 
revolutionary. When the two are put together, there 
is no escape except in preparedness, — or in the clouds. 
Btlt if either one of them should prove incorrect, the 
force of the Russell argument is broken, and we may 
perhaps find the solution of which Wanhope despaired. 
How about them, then? Can either of them be safely 
attacked by a Socialist? And if so, which? 

"My answer to this question is: neither of these 
two doctrines is true, at least not in the current or ' ac- 
cepted' sense, in the sense in which it is used in the dis- 
cussion on war and preparedness. This may sound 



Socialists and 



startling, particularly so as to the alleged revolutionary 
doctrine that capitalism — competition — of necessity 
breeds war. And authority may be quoted against me, 
as well as the fact that they are 'universally accepted' 
among Socialists. I will concede that they are gen- 
erally 'accepted,' but I categorically deny that either 
of them is either true or revolutionary. 

"The fact is that capitalism as such is neither war- 
like nor pacific, or, rather, sometimes warlike and 
sometimes pacific, depending entirely on the stage of 
development and surrounding circumstances. The 
salient point which is important for us here is that 
there is no inevitability about war, such as is sup- 
posed to flow from the very existence of the competi- 
tive system. History proves conclusively that a highly 
developed competitive society can get along very 
nicely — and very profitably to the capitalists — without 
war. I have discussed this matter at some length in 
my book, 'Socialism and War,' where I have attempted 
to back up my assertion with some proof by a reference 
to historical events, and I shall refer the reader to that , 
book for the proof. 

"According to Wanhope — and he evidently ex- 
presses the 'accepted' view of the subject — the pur- 
pose of war is plunder; and the danger to any nation 
therefore naturally increases with its wealth — with 
the increase of the amount of plunder which it offers 
to a conqueror. 'If,' says he, 'a nation weak in arma- 
ments happens to be wealthy, it is a fair mark for 
more powerfully armed neighbors.' As we are ai 
wealthy nation, and expect to be even wealthier after' 
the European conflict is over, some other nation, prob- 
ably the winner of the present war, '-will fasten a quar- 
rel upon us so that it may plunder us through force,' 
if we should remain unprepared to meet it in a pas- 
sage at arms. 



The West &rn Comrade 



il 




Preparedness means deprivation, exposure, hunger, disease for the patriots — profits, comfort, joy for the capitalists. 



Preparedness 



. "If the major premises of this syllogism be correct, 
the situation would be indeed hopeless. It is evident 
that nothing that the working class of this country- 
could do, no 'policy' it could adopt, could in any way 
prevent our well-armed and plunder-hungry 'neigh- 
bors' from looting us. 

"Fortunately, for these blessed United States of 
ours, and for the working class of this country, Wan- 
hope's pivotal assumption is utterly untrue. Modern 
wars are not undertaken for the purpose of plunder- 
ing the conquered territories, but for the purpose of 
developing them capitalistically. It is therefore not 
the 'wealthy' — capitalistically highly developed — coun- 
tries that are the 'fair mark' of the rapacious imper- 
ialists, but the 'poor' — capitalistically undeveloped — 
countries. China is a much more desirable object of 
attack for the prospective imperialistic conqueror than 
the United States. If we are ever attacked, it will not 
be due to the allurements which our wealth will offer 
to the greediness of some modern conquistadore, but 
to the uses to which we shall be putting our surplus- 

I wealth — to our own 'developing' and 'civilizing' en- 
terprises, which may come into conflict with the 'en- 

I terprising genius ' and ' civilizing mission ' of some good 

■ 'neighbor ' of ours, far away from our own shores. * * * 

' ' Our interest in war is not limited to the desire to 

prevent or terminate it as speedily as possible — it goes 

beyond that. We must see to it that the temporary 

struggle between two nations should not be turned 

I into a permanent national struggle by the conquest by 
one of the combatants of any territory wholly or pre- 
dominantly inhabited by the 'nationals' of the other 
combatants. If, therefore, 'our' nation should be 
threatened with conquest it is our duty to defend it. 
But it is our duty as Socialists, not as national patriots. 
It is our duty not because our nation is threatened 



with such fate, but because a nation is threatened. And 
in so far as it lies in our power we must do likewise 
by any other nation. 

"The consideration of 'our duty to our nation' in 
connection with the real dangers threatening it, must, 
therefore, lead us to the following conclusion: What 
we are really interested in defending is not threatened, 
and what is threatened we are not interested in de- 
fending. The only difficulty that remains is that 
our ruling class may pursue such a policy with respect 
to the matters fraught with dangers of war, as to in- 
cidentally endanger what we are interested in defend- 
ing. This difficulty can be met by the working class 
of this country formulating, and consistently adhering 
to, a foreign policy of its own. An outline of such a 
policy will be presented in 'our next'." 

Joshua Wanhope, in the New York Call, tries to 
show the contrast in handling the subject of war ap- 
propriations between the United States and Germany. 
He makes an admission, however, that "perhaps they 
'do not do these things better in Germany,' but at 
least they do them differently." His article follows 
in part: 

"The Executive Committee of the German Socialist 
Party has severely censured Vorwaerts for supporting 
the position of the twenty Socialist Party members of 
the Eeichstag who voted against the war credits in such 
positive language that Vorwaerts declares it will create 
' embitterments and party dissensions.' That paper 
also protests against 'being read out of the party' and 
claims the Executive Committee has no right to do it; 
that the question at issue must be settled by a party 
convention. 

' ' This, then, is how the matter stands : The Execu- 
tive Committee of the German Socialist Party, accord- 
ing to Vorwaerts, aims to read out of the party any 
member who votes against war credits and appropria- 
tions and any newspaper that supports them, declar- 
ing such conduct 'un-Socialistic' 

"And over here the membership of the Socialist 



12 



The Western Comrade 



Party has declared by referendum that it will expel any 
Socialist representative member who votes for war 
credits and appropriations. 

"Where are we at, anyhow? Is it good Socialism 
to vote for war credits in Germany and utterly opposed 
to Socialism to vote for them here, or vice versa? 

" If it is permissible in Germany and not permissable 
here ; if circumstances alter eases, then, assuredly it is 
a policy. If the German Socialists are to be allowed 
to plead necessity, then shall we be allowed to plead it, 
if, in the opinion of the majority, the time ever comes 
when it is necessary to do so, as it has come to the ma- 
jority of German Socialists? 

"Editorially, the Call supports the policy, or prin- 
ciple — call it either name you will — of the party mem- 
bership here. There are good and sufficient reasons 
for its support, regardless of the question of policy or 
principle. It is a position that is amply justified by 
existing conditions. But, nevertheless, upon those who 
insist upon its being an immutable, essential principle 
of Socialism rests the responsibility for any future ' em- 
bitterment and party dissension,' as Vorwarts calls it, 
that may arise from such insistence. The fact, too, that 
the ' embitterment and party dissension' in Germany 
that the Vorwaerts foresees is based on exactly the re- 
verse position that we have here should determine us 
to go slow and carefully consider. We cannot logically 
commend or excuse the action of the party majority 
in Germany and at the same time logically condemn and 
denounce the views of such Socialists as Ghent and Rus- 
sell and those who agree with them, unless we admit 
that the whole controversy is over a policy and not a 
principle. And let no one suppose that those comrades 
are too dense to perceive the contradiction and press it 
upon us. They will assuredly point out that 'reading 
outofl the party' is a double-edged sWord that cuts 
both ways — one way in Germany and the opposite way 
here. And trouble lies in the fact that they cannot 
be refused; that matters are actually shaping them- 
selves as they say. Vorwaerts declares that a party 
convention dealing with this 
crucial question is needed in 
Germany, and the suggestion 
that it is also needed here may 
not be altogether out of place. 



It will be very difficult, if not impossible, to hold one 
in Germany now, but no such difficulty exists 
here. * * *" 

In contradiction to the German policy, Eugene V. 
Debs says: 

"As a Socialist I can very sincerely regret that 
any Socialist in Europe should have voted one dollar 
toward a war appropriation. Of course even at this 
distance we can appreciate that these men, our broth- 
ers in the warring countries, stood in the midst of 
tremendous pressure. But it would have been bet- 
ter if they had chosen to stand like a stone wall in i 
the midst of just such pressure and told their coun- 
trymen that not one dollar would they vote for war 
purposes. To my mind they should have maintained 
their international standing." 

With the slogan of "Refuse to Be Confused," 
George R. Kirkpatrick writes a stinging article in the 
New York Call: 

"As long as the working class can be confused 
and tricked into the pitiful attitude and condition of 
political infant and intellectual suckling, it will be 
flattered, crushed and robbed in times of peace, and 
will be flattered, bled and robbed in times of war. In 
the present war, and in the 'next war,' and in the 
class war, the only thing the capitalist class sincerely 
fears is a working class too cunning to fight for a 
civilization which the workers are shrewdly kept too ' 
ignorant and busy to keenly, deeply and comfortably 
enjoy — a working class too cunning to bleed itself 
into pale-faced stupidity, licking the boot that kicks 
it, while it yawps patriotism and wallows in its own 
ignorance and poverty, from which ignorance and 
poverty the working class can never escape while the 
ruling class is 'prepared.' * * * 

"Look at Europe and learn what 'preparedness' 
prepares for. Look at Colorado and Calumet and 
West Virginia and learn what 'preparedness' prepares 
for. Look, also, with very special care, at the unholy 
brutality and cunning of the assassins of the sacred 

rights of freedom discussion, 
and you will surely realize 
that the 'preparedness' of 
militarism leads straight on 
to the lynching of 'liberty." 




The Western Comrade 



13 



Preparedness at Llano 




REPAEEDNESS a t 
'\ifi "P Llano is taking on a 
VyV substantial form. The recent heavy fall 

of show wet the ground to a considerable 
depth, thus helping to prepare the land 
for spring planting. Nature herself is 
conspiring to prepare proper conditions 
here for ideal living. Practically since the 
~i jfirst of the year, in common with other portions of 
"! California, Llano has been subjected to a variety of 
I weather. Beginning on New Year's Day more than 
■ ten inches of snow fell and filled the mighty gashes 
the mountains many feet deep. Following the 
gnow came a three days' rain, thoroughly soaking the 
iground to a depth of several feet. At the tail end 
lof the rain snow again came and the foothills were 
;eovered with flakes, which was refreshing and en- 
couraging to the colonists 
located in the plain below. 
The tent city sturdily 
stood the heavy snow and 
rainfall and not a great deal 
of inconvenience was oc- 
casioned. There was some 
I wetting of bedding and the 
like, but on the whole the 
tents and adobes stood the 
unusual soaking, very well, 
indeed. 

Two or three of the un- 
finished adobes, that were 
wholly exposed to the inces- 
sant snow and the following 
drenching rain, melted down 
in part. On account of the 
uncertainty of the weather, 
probably these will not be 
erected. The laundry building, quite a commodious 
structure, was partly wrecked, but no damage done 
- to the machinery or the boiler that was already in- 
stalled. The building was ready for the roof, and 
had the roofing arrived ten hours sooner the loss 
;0f the walls would have been avoided. Immediately 
-!work will begin on fixing up the place and shortly 

the laundry will be in actual operation. 
1 1 Pruning in the orchards has been completed. The 
trees now present a shapely look and will bear accord- 
ing to orders, so to speak. Stones in the Bixby orch- 
ard have been raked up in piles and are being hauled 
to the various low places in the fields, in the roads and 
along the ditches, where many of them have been 



By R. K. WILLIAMS 




used for the cobbling of the irrigat- 
ing ditches. Water from the Big 
Rock is allowed to run over the land at the present 
time in order to store moisture in the soil. 

On January 10 and 11, the University of Califor- 
nia held an institute at Llano. Three well-known 
speakers from the college extension course delivered 
lectures to a big and interested audience — for nearly 
all of the audience were farmers or near farmers. 

In the afternoon of the tenth. Dr. Bryant spoke 
on the raising of hogs. He covered the ground thor- 
oughly and gave some very valuable suggestions. As 
soon as practicable, they will be put into effect. He 
judged several of the stock and reported favorably 
on the breed and their condition. 

Following Dr. Bryant, Dr. Cady spoke at consid- 
erable length on hog cholera, its origin, symptoms and 

treatment. The doctor de- 
scribed the system of immu- 
nization and told how virus 
was produced that would in a 
large measure prevent hog 
cholera. Dr. Cady said that 
hogs suffering from this 
dread scourge must be seg- 
regated, as the excreta from 
the diseased animal carried 
the infection. 

In the evening Dr. Bry- 
ant again spoke on the rela- 
tion of the university to the 
people and described at in- 
teresting length the methods 
employed in its agricultural 
experiment stations. His 
talk brought the people 
closer to this great, helpful 
organization. Dr. Bryant left the next day for the 
north. 

On January 11, Prof. Thomas Forsythe Hunt, dean 
of the College of Agriculture at Berkeley, came and 
after going over the ranch gave a most instructive 
and interesting lecture on horticulture and its allied 
parts. 

Mr. Hunt was much impressed, indeed, with the 
growth of Llano and assured the colonists that the 
help of the university was always available. He said 
that under the conditions ruling here, he did not feel 
that there could be much more done than there had, 
and that the method used was practically in accord- 
ance with the best judgment received from experi- 



14 



The West efn Comrade 




m 



Crew Making Adobe Brick at Llano del Rio Community 



mentation at the various stations throughout the 
State. Assuring us of a desire for further intimacy 
with us and our project, he departed the next day for 
the north. 

The colony has been much enriched by the presence 
of these practical men, who are in constant close touch 
with the various experiments going on throughout the 
western part of the United States. The Llanoites ap- 
preciated the efiforts made in coming here. H. L. Daw- 
son of the horticultural department was instrumental 
in bringing the institute to fruition. A more diversified 
and larger institute is promised for next year. 

"W. E. Poore, who came more than 600 miles to 
demonstrate his ability as a tanner of hides, by using 
his own process, has more than made good. His work 
is little less than wonderful. The manner in which 
it was done, the shortness of time required and the 
quality of leather turned out cannot be excelled. The 
results of his work are on exhibition and afford a most 
pleasing sight. Rabbit hides were tanned to the soft- 
ness, almost, of a handkerchief; calf, cow, bull and 
horse hides also were tanned. It now remains to de- 
velop an industry worthy of attention in this depart- 
ment. 

Comrade "Wright of Fresno arrived in the colony 
and following him come his looms. "Wright is a car- 
pet rug weaver. He makes rugs of all descriptions and 
soon the click of his loom will be heard in the 
colony. 

"Work on the ranch has been somewhat retarded, 
owing to the inclemency of the weather. However, 
when weather conditions permitted, the thirty horse- 



power caterpillar was put to work hauling three Fresno 
scrapers of unusual size, leveling land. Its work was 
most efficient and did a fine job on the Hubbard place. 
It takes four men to handle the caterpillar and at- 
tendant scrapers which are attached. The work done 
is highly efficient and does away with a great deal of 
horse power, and the use of a whip is not necessary. 
Feed the thing plenty of distillate and it is an ever- 
ready slave. 

In addition to the farming requirements the cater- 
pillar is being used to haul freight from Palmdale. 
It easily hauls fifteen tons, loaded on trailers. The 
roads between here and Palmdale are well packed, ex- 
cept in the wash of the Big Rock, and good time can 
be made. 

The Hart-Parr tractor has been brought in from 
clearing operations and is being carefully overhauled. 
It soon will be put to other work in the fields and in 
its stead a donkey engine will be placed. 

New arrivals at the rabbitry keep the census taker 
busy with pencil and tablet. Quite a number of tanned 
hides repose in the rabbit playroom, and many uses 
can be found for these. Muffs, coats, gloves and 
finishings for ladies' clothes can be made from these 
hides. 

About eighty-five cows are being milked daily. The 
young stock and dry cows are now on the Hubbard 
place, grazing. The milk has fallen off somewhat 
and the butter has declined about fifty pounds per 
week. The creamery is making 360 pounds of butter 
weekly. 

"Visitors and regular paid-up members continue to 



i 



The Western Comrade 



15 



■arrive so that the hotel and housing conditions gen- 
'^rally are constantly overtaxed. Great efforts are be- 
ing made to arrange tent homes for incoming regular 
members. Transportation has held this phase back 
somewhat. Since the last appearance of this maga- 
zine over 275 visitors registered at the hotel. The 
dining-room seats between 130 and 150 regular diners, 
now. As fast as possible, families are being shifted to 
their own places from the hotel, thus relieving to a 
large extent the onus of food preparation in the 
kitchen. 

The sanitary condition of the colony is good. The 
sanitary department is working out some excellent 
ideas that in a large measure obviates the necessity of 
piping the place for water. Drops are being made in 
the domestic ditches so that boxes to store the water 
are not necessary. The running water falling into a 
drop is always fresh. Toilets of an improved nature, 
and sanitary in every feature, are rapidly being in- 
stalled. 

A new girl arrived at the Gherling home on Janu- 
ary 8 and made happy the hearts of father and mother. 
Dr. Dequer, with nurses, officiated at the momentous 
event. 

AYork rapidly is progressing at the lime kiln. The 
kiln is to be tip to date and btiilt most solidly. A 
cable stretched across the canyon carries the basket 
to the top of the kiln and an automatic lock dumps 
the contents straight into the fiery pit beneath. A 
mountain of quicklime rock and hydraulic lime is close 
by. Enough lime is in sight to last fifty years. In fact, 
this colony could blast and dig for ages at the lime 



formation without sounding its depths or exhausting 
its supply. Quite a camp is to be established at Bobs 
Gap, where the kiln is located, and a regular force of 
men will be kept there. 

A weekly newspaper has been started in Llano. It 
is read from the platform on Sunday nights and af- 
fords instruction, entertainment and amusement to 
the colonists. A big audience always assembles for 
its reading. This method of purveying the news will 
be continued until the presses and printing parapher- 
nalia, now in Los Angeles, are brought here and power 
is furnished. A big field is presented at Llano and 
contributions are requested from everyone and consid- 
ered before being read. The starters of the enterprise 
are proud of their efforts, and confidently predict the 
growth of the Llano Weekly until it reaches all the 
installment members of the colony and receives a circu- 
lation among radicals throughout the State. To A. A. 
Stew.irt belongs the honor, or dishonor, as the case 
may be, of actually starting the newspaper. With him 
as colaborers are J. -J. Leslie and Eobert K. Williams. 
The present staff will be greatly augmented in the 
near future, and especially when the printing outfit 
arrives. Artist Kempf is doing Trojan service for the 
paper and has hopes, indeed, for its future. 

Despite adverse criticism, most of which has been 
based upon misinformation and a lack of understand- 
ing of the things we are trying to do here, the colon- 
ists are going on serenely with their work. There is 
little nervousness over the outcome of the co-oper- 
ative proposition. Paretical farmers — men who have 
(Continued on Page 26) 




Men in Foreground "Turning" Brick in Sun Drying Process. 




EDNESS 



Drawn for The Western Comrade by M, A. Kempf 



18 



The Western Comrade 




The New Method vs the Old. Formerly four Kors s and ono man were used in leveTIng and scraping the 
land at Llano. Today four men with three unusuall ■ large scrapers attached to a caterpillar, scrape and 
level the land with incredible speed Instead of the whip is used a throttle. This tractor is i;apahle of haul- 
ing fifteen tons of freight loaded on trailers, n is also a true co-operator, in that it does net eat except 
when working. The above scenes were taken within a stones throw of the community's new townsite. 



The W ester n Comrade 



19^ 




toi 



Architects' Drawing of Proposed School to Be Erected on New Townsite at Llano. 



Theory and Socialism 




HE artistic skill needed 
to copy fruits and flow- 
ers is surely of a different degree from 
that required for human portraiture. The 
artist is no less aJi artist if he exeells 
in one or the other. It is simply a ques- 
tion of -which subject his mind and hand 
lend themselves with greater facility. It 
is evident that the painter of fruits must be familiar 
with the shades and colors and conditions of his sub- 
jects, as much so as the artist of portraits must know 
how to transcribe human emotion into light and shade. 
What is true of the artist is true of mankind in 
general, especially when we consider them as organ- 
ized for the furtherance of their ideals. In this as- 
pect humanity teaches us new and wonderful lessons. 
It becomes clearly apparent that intellectual convic- 
tion and the understanding of economic theories 
learned from books, does not make a man an adapta- 
ble unit in a collective effort. No more so than the 
acquisition of artists' technique makes one an artist. 
A person may paint fruit so that birds may want 
to eat it but that does not prove him a master. It 
only shows that birds are not good judges of art. Nor 
does the ability to pass an examination in Marx's eco- 
nomies mean that that person will co-operate or can 
co-operate with his fellows in the solution of present- 
day problems in a present-day world under present- 
day laws with present-day tools used for collective 



By JOHN DEQUER 



benefit. He may find himself hope- 
lessly out of place were he to at- 
tempt it. As the painter of flowers may fail to por- 
tray faces with accuracy, so the teacher of Socialism 
often fails in his attempt to co-operate. Again let 
me emphasize that theoretical knowledge is some- 
times difficultly applied to actual practice. 

On the other hand, we find the man who knows 
but little of the theory of scientific Socialism who 
cares not about the forces that move the scroll of his- 
tory, and he also has the vision, he only sees it in a 
different way. Our theorist sees a commonwealth 
brought about by economic forces necessitating the 
downfall of capitalism and the triumph of the revolu- 
tionary proletariat over the capitalist state in a final 
all-powerful industrial awakening of the wage-worker. 
It is his vision, his flower picture. It is artistic, it 
contains much truth. Uultimately he may be right; 
Socialism may come that way, but it is not in sight. 
The problem of life begins with breakfast and ends 
with death. Our theorists oftentimes secretly or openly 
rejoice at the poverty rampant in the world, for is 
that not a sure sign of the coming day of the god eco- 
nomic coercion ? I have no quarrel with him on account 
of his views. It is his picture of life. But I wish to 
consider other comrades, such as we have at Llano, 
many of whom know nothing about the scientific con- 
cept of society in a scientific way. No more so than 
the flower painter adequately understands the por- 



20 



The Western Comrade 



trayal of human emotion. To those who have a vision 
and see it and labor to make it real, they see the vast 
reaches of the drab grey desert stretched before their 
eyes ; they see the silver threads of streamlets gushing 
from the distant mountain sides and they know from 
past experience that by uniting their forces they can 
turn the drab grey of the desert into wide reaches of 
emerald fields. 

"With the eye of their Socialist faith they see the 
future grain ripen to a golden glory and meadow 
dotted with perfumed hay. They know by their col- 
lective labor they can cause their poverty to grow less 
and their wealth to increase. They hear the music of 
the bees amongst the clover. They see the lambkins 
play in distant meadows, fruit trees laden with blos- 
soms ; the promise of a harvest to be. They see them- 
selves build houses and 
tenant them ; their chil- 
dren happy, free, edu- 
cated along broad and 
liberal lines. 

Their vision is not in 
distant times to come, 
but now ; not for their 
grandchildren, but for 
their own — the children 
that are, as well as those 
that are to be. They 
take their comrades by 
the hand and say: 
"Come, let us pluck 
down 'the vision hung 
in air,' and cause it to 
dwell amongst us a 
glorious reality. Today, 
as far as in us lies, let 
us enjoy the vision con- 
cretely ourselves." Are they less seers of the final 
truth than the others? No, they co-operate now for 
present material well being and let others speculate 
while they do it. They may repudiate the materialism 
of the economist, but they apply themselves materially. 

The economically sound comrade will deride them 
as idealistic dreamers, but he only applies himself ideal- 
istically. We should not smile, life is full of such con- 
tradictions. In the case of the true co-operator his 
metaphysics is a delusion. "With a socalled scientific 
Socialist his materialism is a sham and no sincere mind 
finds pleasure in shams. Herein lies the weakness of 
our social propaganda. 

Oftentimes our scitntificos, our industrial comrades, 
would say, "But you have to starve them to it; hunger 
will drive them — hit them in the tummy." But these 
are destructive ideas. You can form a mob in that 




way, but not a new social order. "We have enough of; 
vicious and hungry faces now; enough spiritual dross,; 
stupidity and intellectual degeneracy in the human 
world in which we move ; more than enough insipidity 
from lack of soul culture in both men and women upon 
whom sloth and ignorance, twin daughters of that old 
hag poverty, have laid their heavy hands. 

""We must not continue to breed them. "We must 
rear a noble race," says the co-operator. Give our 
children an education and environment that shall 
recognize the siibduing power of love, the tenderness 
of sympathy, the fullness of joy, the wideness of hope, 
the strength of self-reliance, the heroism of devotion,^ 
the power of the intellect: the lessons of self-restraint 
with poise that comes from a constant purpose in life 
and we shall behold a generation dedicated and devoted 

to the social ideal. Not 
' ' after thrones have 
crumbled and kings are 
dust,"" but now, justice 
the portion of their 
children and mine. 
Children fed, clothed,, 
sheltered and taught 
under social action and 
social discipline and 
the discipline demo- 
cratically controlled. 

Not all artists are 
geniuses, so not all co- 
operators are perfect. 
To succeed we must 
have plan and purpose 
to our system and a true 
co-operator recognizes 
these facts. There is no- 
place for violent or mad 
men in co-operation. Their logical place is in the in- 
dividualistic world. 

As mankind look upon sculptor for form alone, 
so many of my comrades look upon Socialism for 
speech alone. They form a kind of a mutual criticism 
association which has a tendency to become narrow, 
bigoted, parading forms of broadmindedness but lack- 
ing the substance. "We have in our locals too often 
become economic puritans. We have given a sectar- 
ian character to our propaganda that reminds one of 
our puritan forefathers who whitewashed everything^ 
about their churches until it seemed that whitewash 
was an article of their faith. 

The austere sameness got on the nerves of the 
younger generations and they reacted against puritan- 
ism in religion. Today we have the same spirit de- 
veloping in the Socialist Movement. I meet many good. 



I 



The Western Comrade 



21 








Herd of Holsteins and Jerseys on Way to Dairy Barn to Be Milked. 



comrades who are irreligious puritanical. Mankind in 
mass cares but little for abstract doctrines. They do 
not delight in over-doses of intellectualism. They 
would rather hoe a desert into bloom. That is why I 
find it easier to get a thousand dollars from a comrade, 
who has it, for practical purposes, than twenty-five 
cents as dues for a debating society, oftentimes mis- 
called a local. He would rather help build an indus- 
trial enterprise than to intellectually understand why 
the worker does not pay taxes or whether he is robbed 
as a producer or a consumer. 

To build his own house or till his own field and tend 
his own flock with his comrades — that to him is reli- 
gion, worship and love. If the actual sight of co-opera- 
tion does not inspire you with zest for its extension, 
do not join it; it is not for you. For Llano is located 
in the desert and to him who can see her possibilities 
she holds out great rewards, but it is knowledge of 
agriculture and business that gives one the grasp of 
the possibilities. Her strength is hidden in the unde- 
veloped character of her re- 
sources. Her faults are ap- 
parent to all. That in itself 
is a blessing, for it causes a 
man with a weak heart for 
the battle to retire and en- 
lists chiefly the willing, 
the understanding and the 
strong. 

They who do not come for 
the Four Dollar wages alone, 
nor the eight-hour day, nor 
the freedom from bill collec- 




Construction Work on Laundry 



tors, but they who come to realize the ideal as they 
see it and are willing not only to talk but to work 
for its realization in bringing the vision down to earth, 
come because realization is not lost but is enlivened 
and beautified in the material creation. 

Each achievement in our co-operative community 
is an ideal realized in part or in full as the achieve- 
ment is perfect or imperfect. Of course there are a 
few human imperfections. That is natural. Even 
Raphael's great masterpiece, "The Transfiguration," 
is marred in its matchless beauty by the introduction 
of a monk, but at Llano, as in the picture, the eye 
quickly leaves the discordant features for the lovelier 
vision. "We forget the flaws in detail as we behold 
the masterpiece of mountains, plains and sky — the 
work of that artist, Nature. 

We overlook human bickerings as we stand en- 
raptured before human achievement. The desert, the 
terror of the individual, becomes the co-operators' 
promised land. But there is no use for me to try to 

describe it ; all I can do is to 

paraphrase a famous writer. 
Were I to paint a picture of 
Llano's possibilities I should 
require the grace of a Ra- 
phael, the color of a Titian 
and the variety of a Turner. 
I would need an audience 
of true co-operators, then I 
might harmonize them all 
into a vision of a movement 
that presages the coming of 
a better age. 



i^ 



Th e W este rn Comrade 



Humpety Dumpety 




eyes 



the 



UMPETY 

DUMPETY 

Sat on tlie wall, 

This Hmnpety 
Dumpety fat, 

Guileless and 
smirking he sat — 

He blinked both his 
greatest surprise 
The iirst time he heard of the Half Billion prize; 
Then took on a patriot's look as disguise 
As he waked the whole country with clarion call. 
^'It's time we prepared for the nation's defense; 
Our position such a number of dangers presents; 
Look at Europe and learn. 
You'll a lesson discern — 

You see Uncle Sam has just put some deep dents 
In the world's foreign trade — 
My Lord what a raid! 
On their business we made, 
But I'm sorely afraid 

That we've gone just a little, just a wee bit too far; 
Let's prepare for defense — but of course not for war. 
Thus Humpety Dumpety patriot true 
Said "Come, rally boys to the red, white and blue. 
An army and navy far greater we need — 
'PEEPAREDNESS' now let that be our creed." 
(And you never would guess 'twas inordinate greed 
But just listen close and you'll pick up a clue.) 

Then Humpety Dumpety smole his fat face — 

This Humpety Dumpety did — 

As off from the wall he slid. 

He called to his crew, to his tried men and true. 

And whispered his orders — they knew what to do — 

For he'd had them in training for quite a long 

while : 
"Army League! Navy League; On, 

my men, onward ! 
"Here's a fat prize just ripe to be 

squandered. 
"Hypnotize our preaching men, 
"Compromise each author's pen, 
"Subsidize the papers then 
Have reputations laundered." 

Nobly they did their work, and well — 
Money they spent and the editors fell — 
Then Humpety tolled the Liberty Bell — 
And it told the land as 'twas tolled to tell : 
^'Prepare for war! Prepare quick and well!" 



By ERNEST WOOSTER 

P) ONE into ragtime verse by a 
^-^ scab member of the Irra- 
tional Union of "near potes." 
All rules of the union regarding 
meter, rhyme, etc., disregarded. 



Old Humpety Dumpety demands 
some return. 
(He's as suave and as crafty as ever 

you'll meet — 
Humpety lives on a wall, but that 
wall is Wall Street.) 
"My land, boys, you're slow; I should think you 

would know 
It is time you produced^I have paid you the dough, 
Though I don't mind expense you have sure got to earn. 
Now frame a good lie 
Of a cursed foreign spy — 
Make it clever and sly, 
But be sure it gets by." 

One editor worried and puzzled and frowned, ft 

Then reported the Japanese hanging around. ' 

But this was old stuff — his read- 
ers, he found, I 

"Wouldn't look, wouldn't read, 
aad wouldn't believe 

And showed they saw through the 
intent to deceive. 

"But ha!" quoth the scribe, "I'll 
-^- show how the Jap 

Is just getting ready to change our whole map. 
If we do not wake up from our 'dream of peace' nap 
He will take our fair land and our girls, understand; 
Great sums he'll demand — 
Oh, yes, it 's all planned. ' ' 
And the editor spread on full many a page 
The lie with intent to create such a rage 
That the whole West would say: 
"Let us arm right away" — 
Thus did the editor earn his fair wage. 





But Humpety Dumpety cried for some more. 
"Where's the paper I leased 
Back here in the East? 

Now lookee here. Bob, get this thru your knob: 
You have got to produce or you lose your fat job. 
^ That Jap Story won't do — it is too far 

^^xr«^. away, 

But you've got to come through — Mexico, 
did you say ? 
You've used that old bluff 
Till you've worn it threadbare 
And the South needs that stuff 
So just leave it right there. 
But I've told you enough — 
Now invent a good scare." 






The Western Comrade 



m 




The editor pondered, chagrined 
and perplexed. 

"Will Canada do?" he haz- 
arded next. 

But Humpety snorted contempt 
for his pains 
■And mumbled something about "sawdust for brains." 

Old Humpety Dumpety croaked from the wall : 

'■;\Iust you always be shown? 

Is your head just pure bone? 

Now I've been well impressed with that story out 

West. 
You must do just as well, so now do your best." 
And the editor squirmed and gave heed to the call. 
"A fiction I'll tell now, while Europe's embroiled, 
Of how it was planned we'd be easily despoiled." 
So he told in dispatches 
Of another fell plot. 
And it really outmatches 
Tlie Jap yarn a whole lot. 
So he told (for the gold) of Europe's 

plot bold — 
xV preposterous lie, but a story that 

sold. 
The consummate liar 
Sent his story by wire 
How the Powers conspire 
To chisel and carve our weak nation to bits; 





Calculated, it was, to scare 

us to fits. 
The lie was the same, he had 

just changed the name. 
'Twas a gory old story he 

managed to frame. 
Though the inventor obscure 

is unknown to fame, 
Old Humpety paid well 

when he put in a claim. 



Now Old Humpety Dumpety can drop his fat grin. 
He has won his desires. 
He has started the fires. 

He has opened the door to this new god of war. 
Soon thirsting and bursting we'll be to shed gore. 
And we're puffed up with pride till we're sure we 
can win. 
Prince Profit's the king- 
He rules the whole thing. 
And a war he will bring 
Just so long as we cling 
To the imbecile notion, as they do 'cross the ocean. 
That preparing for war means insuring for peace. 
(You'd expect you'd find better sense among geese.) 
Though Europe prepared and got into a fuss 
They say it will work just the opposite with us. 
Old Humpety has told us — he knows what is good, 
So we '11 vote the Half Billion as good children should. 



,D o 



Unto 



O t h 



TELL Lincoln Steffense that the Golden Rule is 
dead 

Sympathy, helpfulness, patience, hope, the Golden 
|Rule — the formula for brotherhood — are dead; as 
.'many years ago befell the great god Pan — the Lord of 
'Life — before that man, conscious of his reason and 
his will, took hold and meed. 

If brotherhood is dead, how shall we guide our 
lives? By greed and violence alone? Or did he mean 
to confine the hope of the ages to the few — his little 
circle of the elect — who should take refuge from the 
evils of the day in a strong unity and purpose to stand 
together for a higher plane of living. 

For the few — how familiar the situation. How in- 
evitable for every active group to stand for itself 
asainst all comers. Whether it be a group bound by 
some creed, or by some bond of common occupation, 
the refrain is always the same. "Damn the sinner; 
damn the public; damn the capitalist." 

The Frenchman with his gift of words expressed 
it many years ago in a brief sentence: "To under- 



stand everything is to forgive everything. ' ' The count- 
less theories and exclusive organizations which have 
divided and still divide men are all various forms oi. 
misunderstanding. The sectarian is trained to believe 
that the man who does not accept his teaching is 
wicked. The environment of the aristocrat reeks with 
the idea that the "proletariat" is a misguided and ig- 
norant mass which must be controlled for its own good, 
and is just as honestly convinced in this judgment as 
our comrade who brushes aside the capitalist as heart- 
less, soulless, blind destroyer of his brethren. 

Until every human being recognizes the brother in 
every other human being, whether degraded and blind- 
ed by money, or by ignorance ; by too much indulgence, 
or by too little opportunity, no abiding constructive 
work can be done. Hate is a poison which destroys all 
life. Nothing permanent can be established until it is 
eliminated. All forms of hate are forms of blindness. 
When you let in the light — when you establish the 
Golden Rule — you establish the joy of life. — ^A Constant 
Associate. 



24 



The Western Comrade 



S a f 



t y 



N 



X t 




HEN Mrs. Hampson 
Elder, the Presi- 

dentress of the Millville Ladies American 
Literary Society, says: "Is there any 
new business to come before our society 
today?" I got up. 

"Mrs. President," I says, and Ladies, 
•'I want to make a motion to change the 
name of our society." 
Everybody gasped. 

Mrs. Hodgkinsou says: "I think it's a beautiful 
name. ' ' 

"It's so genteel," Mrs. Dr. Bromley murmured. 
" 'S too long. Always thought so," says the Widow 
Steele. 

She's a good-hearted woman, but such a cross 
to our society. She's so unliterary. On "Favorite 

Author" day she read _ ^__^ ______ 

recipe ' = = = =- - 



By CLARA R. CUSHMAN 



r e 



Profits for plethoric knaves; 
Rifles for revolting slaves; 
Ease for apopletic plutes; 
Pittance for their sweaty brutes. 
Arms to quell them if they rise ; 
Rot to promise (in the skies) ; 
Egress to a toilless sphere 
Death will grant — if they're "good 
Noxious nonsense ? Jot and tit — 
Every single bit of it ! 
Sophists spout the stinking mess ; 
Such is real "preparedness." 



Mrs. Borer's recipe on h-'" 
how to make mince meat, ji 
and at our last meeting i-i 
she brought a sack of j-j 
string beans and strung |;i 
them all the time Mrs. 11 
Attorney Peterson was ji 
reading her paper on "Is V\ 
American Literature Dec- j-j 
adencing?" |;i 

"I'm against it," Mrs. || 
Druggist Perkins says. |;;! 
She is always against 
everything I say, just be- |I| 
cause we don't agree on [:;! 
predestination. A narrow- til 

minded woman, I call her, '.' .^. .^..^. ^ .,j„._. ■ 

to believe everybody that 

doesn't belong to her church is going to hell! Now I 
think you're on the safe side no matter what church 
you belong to, unless, of course, it's the Catholic 
or Unitarian. 

"Mrs. President," I says, "have I got the floor, 
or have I not?" 

ilrs. Elder (I forgot to mention that her husband 
runs the Palace Hotel) rapped for order with the 
sawed-off croquet mallet that the Ladies' Home Jour- 
nal sent her a prize of a dollar for, when she wrote 
about using the mallet for a gavel, and Mr. Bok sent 
her a letter congratulating her. He said it proved 
that lack of money made geniuses. 

' ' Order, ladies ; ' ' she says, rapping on the photo- 
graph album so's she wouldn't scratch Mrs. Hidg- 



kinson's red cherry table. "Mrs. 
Judge Parker has the floor ! ' ' 

"Ladies," I says, "we must not only change the 
name of oui- society, but we must drop the study of 

American literchoor " Up popped Fannie Martin, 

the pert thing, before I could finish. 

"That's just what I been telling you. My sister in 
Los Angeles says that name sounds awfully countrified. 
She says literary societies are back numbers, especially 
if you don't study anything but American litertoor. If 
we want to do the really swell thing we ought to study 
the problems of our community. ' ' 

"What problems?" says the widow Steele. "We 
ain't got no problems." 

' ' Why, ' ' Fannie says, ' ' like— like ' ' 

You should have seen those women fall over them- 
selves to help Fannie out. Just because her husband 

owns the Beet Growers' 

;=:=::::, :: , :::,::; ,: ::=::;;!:i;:=::::=;:;;i:;;;=;:;;=:=::;;i;:;:i:;;rj::j -^^^-^ , 

"How to make our 
husbands go to church," 
says Mrs. Dinwiddle, 
whose husband raises cel- 
ery. 

"And quit using to- 
bacco " 

"And thro win' horse- 



paredness 

By A. F. GANNON 



shoes on the Lord's day." 
And Mrs. Attorney 
here ! j,| Peterson, who is very in- 

jl tellectual, says: "While 
11 it is indeed deplorable to 
j;;| see our husbands so lax in 
iiij those qualities of — of — so 

:ri, :,rlirl.:,:sr:i: :-;-L,r-:-r-K ■"'• ^^^' ^^ have even deeper 

problems than those to 
gi apple. Have you forgotten the wave of crime that 
recently swept our fair city?" 

"Shucks!" says the widow Steele. 

Shucks nothing!" snapped Martha Simpson. 
"Didn't I have two custard pies took right out of the 
pantry window where I set them to cool?" 

"And a ham out of my smokehouse," says Mrs. 
Hodgkinson. 

"And a bucket of milk off my back porch," says 
Mrs. Dr. Bromley. 

"Not to mention," says Mrs. At. Peterson, "the 
pair — a piece of my husband's most intimate wearing 
apparel from my clothes line evidently with criminal 
intent. And the criminal still at large preying upon 
society!" 



"We need stricter laws," says 
Mrs. Constable McCoy. 

Mrs. Mayberry Crump began to 
get excited. Her husband ran for 
constable against Milt. McCoy, 
who beat him on account of being 
a Progressive. 

"It's Johnson's crazy reform 

laws that's ruining the country," 

Mrs. Crump says. "My husband 

says so. Why I just read in the 

paper about a man being arrested 

I for selling watered stock ! I call 

' that cruelty to animals, to make 

j the poor things go without water 

' just because it makes them weigh 

n little heavier." 

"Cruelty or not," says Mrs. Mc- 
Coy, "we got to uphold the ma- 
jesty of the law. ' ' 

"Mrs. President," I says, "I been 
waitin' a long time. Have I the 
floor or have I not?" 

Mrs. Elder rapped with the mal- 
let. "Order, ladies! Mrs. Judge 
Parker has the floor." 

"What I want to say is, that it 
ain't because it's stylish that I'm 
making this motion. If I'm a back 
number for studying American 
literchoor instead of dangerous, 
immoral, foreign stuff, all right, 
I'm willing to be a back number. 
The Stars and Stripes are good 
enough for me ! " 

Here I got the Chataqua salute, 
like we'd read about, from nearly 
all the ladies. 

"No, it ain't because I want to 
be stylish that I make this motion, 
but it's on account of my immortal 
soul and Safety Next, which you 
know is my motto. (Applause.) 

"Ladies, that noble champion of 
purity, Mr. Anthony Comstoek, is 
gone. Vice may now rampant 
freely through the pages of Ameri- 
can literchoor, just like it rampants 
across the great Atlantic in those 
wicked foreign countries. How 
then, ladies, how can we protect 
ourselves from the icy hand of vice 
which will now sieze in its burning 
grip our literchoor? (Applause.) 

"Ladies, there is just one way. 
Just one." 

"What? What?" they all asked 
at once. 

"Ladies," I says, "we must drop 
the study of literchoor, until the 
Lord in his infinite mercy sends us 
another Comstoek." 

"It's the only ladylike thing to 
do," mi;rmured Mrs. Dr. Bromley. 
.."Ladies," I went on, "when we 



The Western Comrade 

recollect that sinful books crept 
into our community unbeknownst 
to us, even while Mr. Comstoek 
was working night and day to keep 
our nation pure, what will it be 
now that he is gone ? And our art ! 
All our art will now be without — ' ' 

"Don't!" says Mrs. Dr. Brom- 
ley, faintly. She can't stand any- 
thing indelicate. 

"No, I won't," I says. "But I 
make a motion that we drop the 
study of literchoor and study some- 
thing that isn't so dangerous." 

The motion carried unanimously 
because for once Fannie and I 
agreed, Fannie because she wanted 
to be stylish and myself because I 
am a captainess in the Army of 
the Lord. 

'"But I'd like to ask," Fanny 
says, "what sinful books Mrs. 
Judge Parker is talking about? I 
don't know of any sinful books 
creeping in. " 

"Then I'll tell you," I says, 
"that poetry book you recom- 
mended as being so stylish." 

"Oh," Fannie says, tossing her 
head, "you mean 'Leaves of Grass.' 
I don't care. My sister says lots 
of nice ladies read it." But she got 
red as a beet just the same. She 
remembered how Mrs. Dr. Bromley 
read one line and screamed. 

"Grass ain't got no leaves any- 
way," says the widow Steele. 
"Shucks!" 

' ' And you haven 't forgotten ' The 
Jungle, ' " I says in a whisper. They 
all looked like they wanted to craAvl 
under their chairs. The way it was. 
Tommy Elder's school teacher told 
Mrs. "Elder that "The Jungle 
Book" would be a nice book for 
Tommy's Christmas present, but 
she got mixed up and got another 
book called "The Jungle" and 
hung it on the Methodist Christmas 
tree for Tommy. She started to 
read it to him and had a nervous 
chill. But the devil was lurking in 
that book, she just couldn't stop 
reading till she'd finished. Then 
she gave it to Mrs. Hodgkinson and 
she gave it to Mrs. Peterson, and so 
on till every lady in town had read 
it, except Mrs. Hawkins, the wife 
of the Methodist minister — even 
Mrs. Dr. Bromley, sensitive as she 
is. And we all promised we 'd never 
tell anybody, and I g^^ess that will 
be held against us on the great 
Judgement day. 

Mrs. Attorney Peterson got up. 



25 



PEARSONS 

is the only Magazine 
of its kind 

This is why: — 

Three years ago Pearson's decided to 
be a free magazine. 

This is what it did: — 

ABANDONED FANCY COVERS 
CUT OUT COLORED PICTURES 
ADOPTED PLAIN PAPER 

This was the purpose: — 

A plain form would enable the mag- 
azine to live on its income from sub- 
scriptions and monthly sales. It 
would not have to consider the effect 
on advertisers when it wanted to print 
the truth about any public question. 

This was the result: — 

Pearson's now prints the truth about 
some question which affectsyourwel- 
fare in every issue. It prints facts 

which no magazine that de- 
pends on advertising could 
"afford ' ' to print. 

And, with all this, Pearsons still prints 
as much fiction and entertainment 
articles as other magazines. If you 
want plain facts instead of pretty 
pictures buy a copy on the news 
stand for 15 cents, or subscribe by 
the year for $1.50. 

By special arrangement with Pear- 
son's we are able to make you the 
following clubbing offer. 

You can get both PEAR- 
SON'S MAGAZINE and 
THE WESTERN COM- 
RADE for one year by 
sending $1.00 to 

The Western Comrade 

526 CALIFORNIA BLDG. 
LOS ANGELES, CALIF. 



Your Combings 

made into switches for 
one dollar, postpaid. 

Work guaranteed. 

MRS. E. TURNWALL 

Llano, Cal. 



26 



Our 
Greatest Offer! 

Here is a combination offer of The 
American Socialist, official organ of 
the National Socialist Party, the 
famous "1914 National Campaign 
Book" and The Western Comrade 
that not one reader of The Western 
Comrade can afford to let slip by. 

The American Socialist 

for one year is $ .50 

Tlie 1914 Campaign Book. .bO 
The Western Comrade for 
one year is 50 

Total $1.50 

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combination of the 
above for just $1.00 

Take advantage of this offer now! 

Address : Circulation Manager 

THE WESTERN COMRADE 

526 California BIdg. 

Los Angeles. Cal. 



"The Great Working Class Dally" 

MILWAUKEE 
LEADER 

"Unawed by Influence 
and Unbribed by Gain" 

Editor — Victor L. Berger. 
Assistants— James Howe. A. M. Sim- 
ors, Osinore Smith, Thomas S. An- 
drews. 



The Leader is published in Araer'ca's 
stronshold of Socialism. It is the 
greatest English Socialist Daily in the 
voild. It is a Modern Metropolitan 
Daily, containing the latest news. 

Among its distinctive features are: 
SOCIALIST NEWS PAGE, LA- 
BOR NEWS PAGE, SPORTING 
PAGE, MAGAZINE SECTION, 
WOMAN'S PAGE, EDITORIAL 
PAGE. 

The price of The Leader is 25c per 
month; $3.00 per year. 

Combination offer with 

The WESTERN COMRADE 

Both for one year for $2.25. 

Address: 

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526 California BIdg. 

Los Angeles, Calif. 



The Western Comrade 

"Madame President," — she says 
it's more culture to say "madame," 
but I won't say it because it's 
what those wicked Frenchmen say 
— "Madame President, I make a 
motion that we call our society the 
'Millville Ladies' Improvement So- 
ciety,' that being inclusive enough 
to embrace whatever the name in- 
cludes." 

"What's that you say?" asked 
the widow. ; 

Mrs. Peterson scorned to reply. 



"But," says Martha Simpson, 
"people might think from that 
name that it was us that needed 
the improving instead of us doing 
the improving." 

"Maybe we do," I says, looking 
straight at Fannie, and would you 
believe it? That chit was looking 
straight back at me ! 

"Yes, maybe we do," she says in 
her nastiest way. 

Then I glanced around and every- 
body was looking at everybody 
else, thinking that the other lady 
needed the improving. 

All except Mrs. Hawkins, the wife 
of the Methodist minister. She is 
going to have — I mean to say, a lit- 
tle stranger is coming to bless her 
home, the fifth. The Reverend Mr. 
Hawkins says every new baby — I 
mean stranger — brings him one 
step nearer to the Great Throne. 
Mrs. Reverend Hawkins says in her 
soft, husky voice — she always has 
a cold — she says : 

"Dear sisters, I want to confess 
that I need improving. I am a 
wicked sinner." 

"You!" everybody says. 

"Yes," she says, her eyes filling 
with tears. " This morning I sinned 
against my husband and God." 

iShe always has a bright pink 
spot on each cheek bone, but now 
her face got pink all over. 



' ' I was getting breakfast and the 
smell of the fried potatoes madei 
me kind of sick, and Lucy had hold 
of my apron pulling it, and little 
Andrew kept calling 'Ma! Ma!' 
And just then my husband says: 
'Mary, can't you keep those chil- 
dren quiet? I am trying to com- 
mune with God.' Well the Evil 
Spirit seemed to walk right into my 
heart and put words of evil into my 
mouth, and I said, "You let Godi 
wait, Andrew Hawkins, and go fas- 
ten the back of little Andrew's sus- 
penders!' " 

Her lips trembled and she began 
to cough like she always does when 
she's excited. 

"Andrew hasn't spoken to me 
since. And I ask you, dear sisters, 
tonight when you say your prayers, 
to ask God to forgive me and make 
Andrew forgive me, and make me 
a better wife and mother." 

We all said we would, all but 
the widow Steele. She said: "Huh! 
Huh! Huh!" just like a cross old 
dog. She has no polish. 

"I rise to a point of order," I 
says, "Mrs. Attorney Peterson's 
motion hasn't been seconded." 

"I second the motion," says 
Fannie." 

We voted and the motion carried. 
Then we adjourned to meet the next 
week at Mrs. Mayberry Crump's. 
I am chairman of the program com- 
mittee for next time. Mrs. Attor- 
ney Peterson and myself will have a 
debate, "Resolved, That Anthony 
Comstock Has Done More Good for 
the World Than Billy Sunday." I 
have the affirmative. We will open 
with the song, "Where Is My Wan- 
dering Boy Tonight? Down in the 
Licensed Saloon." Mrs. Dinwiddle 
sings the soprano and Mrs. Sampson 
Elder the alto. All ladies are in- 
vited. 



Preparedness at Llano 



(Continued from Page 15) 



made their living from the soil — 
are still strongly of the opinion 
that the future is brighter here 
than elsewhere in the country. Of 
course, to men who have been re- 
ceiving cash payments for their la- 
bor each week, or monthly, find it 
a hardship to not receive the en- 
velope regularly. However, they 
are coming to understand the mo- 



tives actuating us here and adapt- 
ing themselves to the conditions. 
In fact, that is all that is required 
here. Conditions control and the 
man and woman who can adapt 
themselves find little difficulty in 
getting along. It is unfortunate 
that it is beyond the pen possibility 
of a word painter to exactly tell 
the truth. What is rhyme to one is 



The Western Comrade 



27 



blank verse to another. It takes 
a vision to see this thing, as it re- 
quires vision of any farmer that 
, goes into the wilderness or the arid 
i plains and hopes to build a farm. 
The picture is there before he starts 
for his home. It may take a long 
time to realize that ambition and 
many circumlocutions twist out of 
form the ideals and hopes, but if 
the mind remains adaptable, backed 
up with energetic work and en- 
thusiasm, it's pretty hard to beat 
that man. 

Misconceptions often arise over 
the inattentive reading of an arti- 
cle. Somewhere, somehow, some- 
one said that when the silo was fin- 
ished a searchlight would be placed 
thereon that could sweep the great 
Antelope Valley and the ranging 
mountains for a hundred miles. A 
prospect complained bitterly that 
misinformation was being purveyed 
because he did not find the search- 
light. He had misread the story. 

It might be boresome to reiterate 
that the Llano del Rio is an agri- 
cultural proposition primarily. It 
is from that that we expect to get 
our living. From the success along 
agricultural lines will come our in- 
dustries. They will come as soon as 
conditions, remember, permit. We 
will have a clothes factory, a tan- 
;ning establishment, a shoemaking 
i establishment of magnitude and a 
big printing plant. These will 
come all right, but they are not here 
now. Anyone can see that it is but 
a question of men and material un- 
til these things are realized. There 
jis no discouragement in this fact. 
I Often men think they can do things 
'jWhen they cannot. Experimenta- 
ition often proves a reasonable 
theory wrong. 

The writer of this remembers 
that when the truth about Llano 
was told to him he felt disappoint- 
ed. He had pictures of something 
.entirely different. Not that he was 
'told wrongly, but long mulling 
over dreams had builded a city and 
peopled it with phantasm. He was 
(almost mad to have that dream 
I shattered and be brought back to 
I earth by a friend who had carefully 
I gone over the lands here and re- 
I ported that with hard work and 
j attention to details the people here 
.would live in good homes, would 
I have leisure and could travel from 
;the excess products. He found 
(Continued on Page 29) 



Pictures for Propaganda 




Shoot Capitalism 

With a 

Stereopticon 



Anyone can lecture with the aid of pictures; they tell the 
story, you point out the moral. Pictures draw a crowd where 
other means fail. They make your work doubly effective. 

"We tell you how to get the greatest results at the least 
expense. 

Send stamp for complete information. 

W. SCOTT LEWIS 



3493 Eagle Street. 



Los Angeles, California 



Comrades, 

Get Back to the Land! 

Splendid opportunities for homeseekers in former Uintah 
Indian Reservation, Northeastern Utah. Cheap land, fertile 
soil, good climate, Socialist community. Government offering 
unusual chance to settlers. Learn all about it by sending for 
sample copy of The Dawn, Socialist magazine. Write 

Dawn Land & Colony Company 

Myton, Utah 



Announcement ! 

The Western Comrade takes pleasure in announcing to its readers the 
reduction in price on its yearly subscription rate from one dollar to fifty 
cents. Clubs of four or more will be accepted at twenty-five cents for each 
subscription. Single copies five cents each. 

For a short time only we will furnish the following combination of 
Pearson's Magazine, the National Rip-Saw and The Western Comrade one 
year for $1.25. 

Send your remittance today to 

THE WESTERN COMRADE 

526 California Building Los Angeles, California 



28 



THE WESTERN COMRADE 



Entered as second-class matter at the 
post office at Los Angeles, Cal. 

526 California Bldg., Los Angeles, Cal. 

Subscription Price Fifty Cents a Year 
In Clubs of Four Twenty-five Cents 

Job Harriman, Managing Editor 
Frank E. Wolfe, Editor 



Vol. Ill January, 1916 



No. 9 



"T^ O Arms! Capitalists, Par- 
-*• sons, Politicians, Land- 
lords, Editors, and Other Stay-at- 
Home Patriots. Your Country 
Needs You in the Trenches! 
Workers, Follow Your Masters!" 



"POR printing and distributing post- 
"'• ers with this startling call to 
arms, the courts of Aukland, N. Z., 
fined Tom Barker $250. The start- 
ling thing about this is that Tom 
escaped the "squirrel house." Any- 
one who would get the impression 
that this bunch would go to war 
would be a fair subject for the 
"booby hatch." 

It was a victory for the laborite. 
While his little poster did not get 
much circulation, every newspaper 
in Australia played it up big — and 
Tom's bright idea got across every- 
where with a terrific wallop. 

* )i^ ^ 

TT seems a pity that the powder 
towns are placed in such isolated 
spots. It might be great if they 
could be operated in close proximity 
to some of the resorts of millionaire 
munition makers. A recent explo- 
sion in one of these humanitarian in- 
stitutions sent up a cloud of chlorine 
gas which quickly spread and de- 
scended and nearly asphyxiated the 
entire population of the settlement. 

* ^C r!^ 

T OHN D. ROCKEFELLER has 
J placed his stamp of approval on 
Billy Sunday and says he wishes all 
of the working people could hear 
the evangelist preach. That's easy. 
The foundation is rich enough to 
finance Billy and send him on a 
tour of the Rockefeller interests. We 
would suggest that he get first ac- 
tion at Ludlow. 

?K S^ W. 
'T^ HE recruiting department of the 
•^ Seventy-first Infantry, N. G. N. 
Y., is advertising for young men 
with red blood in their veins. They 
have used about 70,000,000 gallons 
of this product for fertilizer in 
Europe. 



The Western Comrade 

'T^HE press agents of capitalism 
-*- are now informing their be- 
fuddled readers that "unknown 
persons in Berlin are quietly ad- 
vising Americans to leave for 
home, stating that the crisis be- 
tween Germany and the United 
States is growing acute and that a 
diplomatic break, with resumption 
of submarine activities is certain, 
according to advices received here 
today." 

This is only one of their little 
wrath arousing scares which will 
become an every day occurrence 
in the near future. The patriotic 
public will read — and believe — 
and then our masters' dream, 
"preparedness," quickly will be 
realized. 



« H^ ^ 

"D IBBON counter Johnnies who 
^ compose the Illinois navy are 
proud possessors of the hulk of the 
Eastland, erstwhile profit-making 
excursion boat. This "battleship," 
as the militiamen already are call- 
ing it, starts in with a grand rec- 
ord as a killer. In the noble work 
of destroying human life the East- 
land has a handicap of 800 to its 
credit. 

?^ rK ^ 

A LOS ANGELES chicken picked 
a hundred dollar diamond from 
the cravat of a poultry show judge 
and swallowed it. We have known 
chickens with a fondness for dia- 
monds, and judges with fondness 
for chicken, but the judges didn't 
eat the chickens, nor the chickens 
swallow the diamonds. 
^ » JK 

A BOILER maker of Wood River, 
^^ 111., by dint of thrift and fru- 
gality, saved enough tobacco tags to 
furnish a four room house. The 
piano cost him 750,000 tags, but the 
tireless one made the grade. Oh, 
that we had the words and the 
space to drive this lesson of persis- 
tence and providence home to our 
young readers. 

M^ ^K ^i 

T ITTLE DOROTHY had to stay 
after school again and when 
she reached home her mother asked 
her why the teacher kept her in. 

"Just because I talked in sew- 
ing, ' ' answered Dorothy, carelessly, 
"but," and her eyes flashed as she 
said, "I didn't talk half as much 
as teacher did!" 



O OCIALISTS have always argued 
^ that the Government is unable 
now and always will be unable to 
bust the Standard Oil trust or any 
other trust. The trusts are the 
natural result of industrial evolu- 
tion. Socialism demands that the 
oil industry be socialized and de- 
mocratized; that is, that this huge 
flood of profits be wiped out, that 
the products of the Standard Oil 
Company be produced for the ben- 
efit of those using these products 
and not as a means of building 
huge fortunes for tyrannical money 
czars. When the people get con- 
trol of the Government at Wash- 
ington they will also get control of 
the oil trust. It will be interesting 
to note how the old parties will 
again solve this trust problem in 
this year's presidential campaign. 

7K * ■¥. 
"PVERY true poet is inspired. 
Prophesy? No — just under- 
standing, interpretation. Two 
verses from Whittier, half a cen- 
titry ago : 

"Love is lost and faith is dying; 
With the brute the man is sold ; 
And the dropping blood of Labor 
Hardens into gold. 

"Here the dying wail of Famine, 
There the battle's groan of 
pain; 
And in silence, smooth-faced 
Mammon 
Reaping men like grain." 
* ^ * 
n^HE MASSES has a prize press 
pearl each month. May we of- 
fer them one from Los Angeles Tri- 
bune and highly commend it for the 
blue ribbon. Undoubtedly it was 
written by one of the little brothers 
of Saint Swithin: 

Let us get right down to the 
bottom of that Youngstown riot- 
ing, and if any "undesirable 
aliens" are found to be concerned ' 
in it send them back to their 
native land without delay. 
^ -ii iH 
" A FTER a long and earnest dis- 
eussion," this from Indian- 
apolis, "the United Mine Workers 
of America, in convention here to- 
day, defeated a resolution to 
amend the constitution of the or- 
ganization so as to exclude from 
its membership National Guards- 
men and the state constabulary." 
Just a plain case of being duped 
into a suicide pact. ^ 



The Western Comrade 



29 



Preparedness at Llano 

(Continued from Page 27) 

more freedom from financial worry 
could be secured here than else- 
where, but (and the but was big) 
tirst it had to be gotten out of the 
uround. Though the sandstone 
hospital, with its greenrooms, red- 
tiled floor and hurrying doctors 
and nurses flitting to and fro, and 
millionaire patients handing us 
^l^lOO weekly for our good water, 
food and attention, failed to mater- 
ialize when he arrived, yet lilie the 
Jirst protozoa washed out of the 
ocean's ooze and adapted himself 
to his environment, the writer re- 
membered his humble brother of 
the Cambrian fens and tried to 
adapt himself to conditions. 

A splendid opportunity is offered 
here for the man that is tired of 
the struggle in the competitive 
^\orld, providing that he under- 
stands that capitalism is still the 
dominant thing, and that he has to 
adapt himself to the conditions im- 
l)osed by that iron-heeled monster. 
We are going ahead and have ab- 
solutely no fears of the future. 

Look, Yo u Kings! 

By Harvey E. West gate 

T OOK, you kings, from your 

scarlet thrones, 
Ijook, you kings, at the bleaching 

bones ; 
See the graves of the men who 

have died, 
Hundreds of thousands placed side 

by side. 
Yea, look, and listen, and majk 

the date. 
Behold the love that is turning to 

hate. 
And know full well what will be 

your fate. 

Look, you kings ! 

•Look, you kings, at the crimson 

flood, 
Look, you kings, at the rivers of 

blood ; 
Hear the cries of millions of men. 
Think of what is, and what might 

have been. 
Yea, look; and ponder, and mark 

you well. 
That from the trenches of shot and 

shell. 
Guns will soon turn and blow you 
ta hell. 

Look, you kings ' 



Ignorance is the Great 
Curse ! 

Do you know, for instance, the scientific difference between love and 
passion? 

Human life is full of hideous exhibits of wretchedness due to ignor- 
ance of sexual normality. 

Stupid, pernicious prudery long has blinded us to sexual truth. Science 
was slow in entering this vital field. In recent years commercialists 
eyeing profits have unloaded many unscientific and dangerous sex books. 
Now, the world's great scientific minds are dealing with this subject upon 
which human happiness often depends. No longer is the subject taboo 
among intelligent people. 

We take pleasure in offering to the American public 
the work of one of the world's greatest authorities upon 
the question of sexual life. He is August Forel, M. D., 
Ph. D., LL. D., of Zurich, Switzerland. His book will 
open your eyes to yourself and explain many mysteries. 
You will be better for this knowledge. 

Every professional man and woman, those dealing with social, medical, 
criminal, legal, religious and educational matters will find this book of 
immediate value. Nurses, police officials, heads of public institutions, 
writers, judges, clergymen and teachers are urged to get this book at once. 

The subject is treated from every point of view. The chapter on "love 
and other irradiations of the sexual appetite" is a profound exposition 
of sex emotions — Contraceptive means discussed — Degeneracy exposed — 
A guide to all in domestic relations — A great book by a great man. 

^*The Sexual Question^* 

Heretofore sold by subscription, only to physicians. Now offered to 
the public. Written in plain terms. Former price $5.50. Now sent pre- 
paid for $1.60. This is the revised and enlarged Marshall English transla- 
tion. Send check, money order or stamps. 

Gotham Book Society, Dept. 387 

General Dealers in Books, Sent on Mail Order 

142 West 23rd St., New York, N. Y. 



Dawson's Dermal Cream 

Prevents wrinkles, softens and beautifies skin. Removes freckles, 
tan, moth patches and all discolorations. Greatest beautifier of 
the age. 

One Ounce Jar 60c Postpaid 

Prepared By DR. ELIZABETH DAWSON Llano, Calif. 



Telephone Home A-4533 

HARRIMAN & RYCKMAN 

Attorneys at Law 

921 Higgins Building 

Los Angeles, Cal. 



Home A-2003 Main 619 

A. J. STEVENS 

Dentist 

306 South Broadway 

Room 514 Los Angeles, Cal. 



Knit UnderAvear 



Cheapest Because It Wears Best 



Women's Men's 

Union Suits, low neck, knee length, sizes 32 Undershirts, light weight, cream, sizes 34 to 44. .$ -75 

to 44 $1.25 Undershirts, light weight, hlack, sizes 34 to 44. . 1.00 

Union Suits, half low neck, elbow sleeves, ankle Drawers, light weight, cream, sizes 30 to 44 75 

length, sizes 32 to 44 1.25 Drawers, light weight, cream, sizes 30 to 44 1.00 

Under Vests, sleeveless, sizes 30 to 44 35 Shirts and Drawers, double fleeced, grey, sizes 

Night Robes, sizes 32 to 46 1.50 30 to 44 1.25 

Hose, extra wearing, black, sizes 8 to 10% 30 Shirts and Drawers, Egyptian cotton, ecru, 

Hose, light weight, all colors, sizes 8 to 10% ... .50 sizes 30 to 44 1.50 

Men's Hose 

Extra wearing value, black, sizes 9 to 11% $ -25 

Heavy weight, black, sizes 9 to 11%, 3 pairs. . . . 1.00 

Girls' Children's Boys' 

Union Suits, sizes 20 to 30...$ .50 Taped unions, answering Union Suits, sizes 20 to 32...$ .60 

Union Suits, better grade, purpose of a waist, Union Suits, better grade, 

sizes 20 to 30 1.00 sizes 20 to 28 $ .65 sizes 20 to 32 90 

Hose, black, tan or white, Same as above, only bet- Sportsman's hose for boys, 

sizes 6 to 10% .25 ter grade, sizes 20 to 28 1.05 sizes 6 to 10% 25 to .40 

Pure Wool Goods 

Made by Wool Growers' Co-operative Mills 
Direct From Sheep's Back to Your Back 

Black and Grey Mackinaw Coat, length 25 Trousers, Grey and Navy Blue, usual sizes. .. .$4.00 
inches, sizes 36 to 44 $8.00 Shirts, Grey and Navy Blue, usual sizes 3.00 

Blankets 

White or grey, 70x82 in., weight 5 lbs $7.85 

Grey, 70x82 in., weight 7% lbs 9.90 

Llano del Rio Community 

(Mail Order Department) 

526 California Bldg. Los Angeles, Cal. 

(Make all checks or money orders payable to Llano del Rio Company) 




Men's lO-inch boots. $6.00 
Men's 12-inch boots. 7.00 
Men's 15-inch boots. 8.00 
Ladies' 12-in. boots.. 6.00 
Ladies' 15-in. boots.. 7.00 
Men's Elk work shoes 4.00 
Men's Elk dress shoes 5.00 
Ladies' Elk shoes. . . 4.00 
Infants ' Elk shoes, 

1 to 5 1.50 

Child's Elk shoes, 

51/2 to 8 2.00 

Child's Elk shoes, 

81/2 to 11 2.50 

Misses' and Youths, 

111/2 to 2 3.00 



-i / 
— ^-^ / 






ELKSKIN 

BOOTS and SHOES 



Factory operated in connection 
with Llano Del Rio Colony 

IDEAL FOOTWEAR 

For Ranchers and Outdoor Men 



Xne famous Clifford Elkskin Shoes are ligntest and 
easiest for solid comfort and -will outwear three pairs 
of ordinary shoes. 

We cover all lines from ladies,' men's 
and children's button or lace in light 
handsome patterns to the high boots for 
mountain, hunting, ranching or desert wear. 
Almost indestructible. 

Send in your orders by mail. Take 
measurement according to instructions. 
Out of to"v\Ti shoes made immediately on 
receipt of order. Send P. 0. order and state 
whether we shall forward by mail or express. 



Place stocking foot on 
paper, drawing pencil 
around as per above Il- 
lustration. Pass tape 
around at lines with- 
out drawing tight. Give 
size usually worn. 



SALES DEPARTMENT 



Llano del Rio Company 

526 California Bldg., Los Angeles, Cal. 



Gateway to Freedom 



LLANO DEL RIO Colonists have made a 
wonderful demonstration of success in 
their effort to put a great theory into prac- 
tise.. Here a group of theorists with practi- 
cal ideas back of them have established a 
community founded on equality and justice 
and have made 
greater progress 
in a year and a 
half than their 
most cheerful op- 
timist could have 
hoped to achieve 
in several years. 
They have nearly 
8000 acres of land, 
an abundance of 
pure mountain wa- 
ter and hundreds 
of head of live 
stock and a large 
amount of indus- 
trial machinery. 
They have established a town of 700 inhab- 
itants and are growing rapidly. Their plans 
contemplate a beautiful city with homes for 
all their members. There are few member- 
ships remaining unsold and these are being 
subscribed for every day. The price of 
memberships is $1000. 

Are you tired of the struggle in the cut- 
throat competitive system? Have you 
fought long enough in the uneven and all 
but hopeless battle? 

Are you not ready now to join forces with 
these comrades, the men and women who 




have gone into this co-operative movement 
with the determination of making a collec- 
tive effort to reach the goal of freedom 
and happiness and to show the world the 
possibilities and desirability of co-operative 
action? Nearly all the desirable land in 

America has been 
seized. Almost all 
the water rights 
are held by the 
greedy corpora- 
tions. 

Here is almost 
the last remaining 
chance for an op- 
portunity where 
the land is cheap 
and the water plen- 
tiful. 

The colonists 
have secured an 
abundance of water 
and land, and can 
secure more land, as their control of the 
water gives them a commanding position in 
their district. 

This land and water need but the appli- 
cation of human energy to develop a prin- 
cipality in the beautiful Antelope Valley. It 
may be the last opportunity of the sort ever 
given to the workers of America. 

Write today and tell us your age and oc- 
cupation and number of persons in your 
family. Ask for an application blank. Don't 
delay. The step you take today may be the 
opening to the gateway to your freedom. 



Address your coTnmunication to 



LLANO DEL RIO COMPANY 

526 California Building Los Angeles, California 



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Information About the 



Llano del Rio Co-operative Colony 



Llano, California 



T 



HIS is the greatest Community Enterprise 
ever launched in America. 



The colony was founded by Job Harriman and 
is situated in the beautiful Antelope Valley, Los 
Angeles County, California, a few hours' ride 
from Los Angeles. The community is solving the 
problem of disemployment and business failure, 
and offers a way to provide for the future wel- 
fare of the workers and their families. 

Here is an example of co-operation in action. 
Llano del Rio Colony is an enterprise unique in 
the history of community groups. 

It was established in an attempt to solve the 
problem of unemployment by providing steady 
employment for the workers ; to assure safety and 
comfort for the future and for old age ; to guar- 
antee education for the children in the best school 
under personal supervision, and to provide a so- 
cial life amid surroundings better than can be 
found in the competitive world. 

There are about 700 persons living at the new 
tow!n of Llano. There are now more than 200 
pupils in the schools, and several hundred are 
expected to be enrolled before a year shall have 
passed. Plans are under way for a school build- 
ing, which will cost several thousand dollars. The 
bonds have been voted and sold and there is 
nothing to delay the building. 

Schools have opened with classes ranging from 
the Jlontessori and kindergarten grades through 
the intermediate, which includes the first year in 
high school. This gives the pupils an opportu- 
nity to take advanced subjects, including lan- 
guages in the colony school. 

The colony owns a fine herd of 105 head of 
Jersey and Holstein dairy cattle and is turning 
out a large amount of dairy products. There is 
steady demand for our output. 

There are over 200 hogs in the pens, and among 
them a large number of good brood sows. This 
department will be given special attention and 
ranks high in importance. 

The colony has seventy-five work horses, two 
large tractors, three trucks and a number of au- 
tomobiles. The poultry department has 2000 egg- 
making birds, some of them blue ribbon prize 
winners. This department, as all others, is in the 
charge of an expert and it will expand rapidly. 



There are several hundred hares in the rabbitry 
and the manager of the department says the ar- 
rivals are in startling numbers. 

There are about 11,000 grape cuttings in the 
ground and thousands of deciduous fruit and 
shade trees in the colony nursery.. This depart- 
ment is being steadily extended. 

The community owns several hundred colonies 
of bees which are producing honey. This depart- 
ment will be increased to several thousands. 
Several tons of honey are on hand. 

Among other industries the colony owns a 
steam laundry, a planing mill, large modern saw- 
mill, a printing plant, a machine shop, a tannery, 
a rug and carpet weaving plant, and a number of 
other productive plants are contemplated, among 
them a cannery, an ice plant, a shoe factory, knit- 
ting and weaving plant, a motion picture com- 
pany and factory. All of this machinery is not 
yet set up owing to the stress of handling the 
crops. 

The colonists are farming on a large scale with 
the use of modern machinery, using scientific sys- 
tem and tried methods. 

About 120 acres of garden was planted last 
year. The results have been most gratifying. 

Social life in the colony is most delightful. 
Entertainments and dances are regularly estab- 
lished functions. Baseball, basket-ball, tennis, 
swimming, fishing, hunting and all other sportS' 
and pastimes are popular with all ages. 

Several hundred acres are now in alfalfa, which 
is expected to run six cuttings of heavy hay this 
season. There are two producing- orchards and 
about one hundred acres of young pear trees. 
Several hundred acres will be planted in pears 
and apples next year. 

Six hundred and forty acres have been set aside 
for a site for a city. The building department is 
making bricks for the construction of hundreds 
of homes. The city will be the only one of its 
kind in the world. It will be built witli the end of 
being beautiful and utilitarian. 

There are 1000 memberships in the colony and 
most of them are subscribed for. It is believed 
that the remainder will be taken within the next 
few months. 



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CONTENTS 



Page 
Editorials ........ 5 

By Frank E. Wolfe. 

Blessings of Ignorance ..... 9 

By Emanuel Julius. 

A ^Millionaire's Vision (Poem) . . . . .11 

By Wilby Heard. 

Jolting the Jingoes ..... .12 

By Edmund R. Brumbaugh. 

The Man Without a Country 12 

By A. F. Gannon. 

Through Eyes of Tomorrow ..... 13 
By Ernest S. Wooster. 

Enthusiasm Rules Llano . . . . . .18 

By R. K. Williams. 

Montessorians ....... 22 

By A. C. A. 

On Big Rock Creek ...... 23 

Llano Musings . . . . . . . -24 

By John Dequer. 

Wedding Bells 25 

By Clara R. Cushman. 

The Preparers (Poem) . ., . . . -26 

By A. F. Gannon. 

ILLUSTRATIONS 

Peeping Into Paradise .... Frontispiece 

L^ncle Samuels .....••• ^ 
Buying Labor . . . . . • • ^ 

Some Day ......•• 8 

The New "Sick Man" 11 

Out of the Trenches . . . . • • -16 



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Peeping 

Into 
Paradise 



-Drawn tor the Western Comrade by M. A. Kempt 



The Western Comrade 



Political Action 



Devoted to the Cause of the Workers 
Co-operation 



Direct Action 



VOL. Ill 



LOS ANGELES, CAL., FEBRUARY. 1916 



NUMBER 10 




Big Rock Basin Looking South From the Dam Site 



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A 



RAISING the price of gasoline 
\ras the greatest blunder ever 
made by the oil trust. It ran squarely against the 
great middle class — that strong buhvark of capital- 
ism which has steadfastly withstood the arguments 
of the Socialists. 

In California action has been started that indi- 
cates that an arousement would be easy if a leader 
would but spring up in the midst of the outraged 
mass of automobile owners who have seen the price 
of their motive fluid nearly doubled within a few 
weeks. 

First a little municipal board of public utilities 
was appealed to. Then the mayor of Los Angeles. 
Then committees were appointed. An appeal was 
made to the State Eailwaj' Commission (state board 
of public utilities'). In order to carry out the farce 



By Frank E. Wolfe 



of regulation it will first be neces- 
sary to prove gasoline is a public 
utility. That should be easy, but it isn't. If gaso- 
line is a public utility, so is lubricating oil; so is 
hard grease and spark plugs. Gasoline regulation is 
a ghastly joke. In the East the price is much higher. 
■\\"hile AVashington is paying twenty-three cents or 
more a gallon, the United States has not paid more 
than eleven cents. At eleven cents there are sev- 
eral cents a gallon profit. 

In California there is greater production of crude 
oil than ever before in the history of the industry. 
By the new process, low gravity oil can be refined 
and gasoline produced at a lo^Ver rate than before. 
There has always been several hundred percent 
profit in gasoline. The oil lands of California were 
almost all stolen from the people. The Standard 



The Western Comrade 




Oil is brazenly drilling wells on lands that are in 
litigation and again they are showing their contempt 
for the "sovereign people." 

To the Socialist reader the solution is obvious. 
But in hope that we catch the eye of the unawak- 
ened, we give the solution : RESTORATION TO THE 
PEOPLE OF THAT WHICH HAS BEEN CONFIS- 
CATED. THE COLLECTIVE OWNERSHIP OF 
THIS AND ALL OTHER SOURCES OF LIFE. 

T T T 

UXTRA! Uxtra! Hor- 
rors of war and an 
invasion of a peaceful la- 
boring republic ! The I. 
W. W. agitators are going 
to descend from the nail 
keg and do something. 
We have the assurance of 
the capitalist press that 
this is the case. 

The industrial workers 
are to invade Lower Cali- 
fornia, a land populated 
by fierce banditti, helo- 
dermas and horned toads. 
The plan was for the I. W. 
W. to marshal a great 
army of blanket stiffs and 
scizzorbills, armed with 
the deadly bindlestick, 
marching with flat-wheel 
goosestep, into a seething 
maelstrom of de facto and 
other kinds of jefe po- 
liticos of Tijuana Baja. 

Federal officers have been ransacking the rooms 
of these embryonic invaders in Los Angeles and 
among the other deadly and damning evidence has 
been found a red-backed songbook containing these 
fateful words : 

"To arms! To arms! Ye brave! 
The avenging sword unsheath. 
March on, march on, all hearts resolve 
On victory or death." 

These turrible words once more officially alarm 




the state. The previous occasion was when a special 
commissioner of the Governor discovered them dur- 
ing the San Diego free-speech fight. That this is 
the chorus of the French National anthem has not 
soaked through the brain of any policeman or spe- 
cial investigator. This situation almost parallels 
the discovery made by the brightest cub re- 
porter on a Sacramento newspaper who discovered 
a plot on the part of five desperate characters 

who were about to march 
on Rock Island and seize 
the arsenal, if there be one 
there ; thence march tri- 
umphantly to the capture 
of Chicago ; thence on 
and on, all five of them, to 
the overthrow of the Gov- 
ernment at Washington. 

God bless the daily 
press. Tis not only the 
palladium and bulwark of 
our freedom, but it adds 
greatly to the gaiety of 
nations in the dull-drab 
depths of a dismal season. 
<• * <• 

HE Socialist Party as 
organized in Califor- 
nia is a wonderful institu- 
tion. It has a state execu- 
tive board, a state office, a 
state secretary and a state 
mimeograph. Combined, 
this is a mighty piece of 
enginerj' and presently, 
when it gets ready to move, it will spiflieate the cap- 
italist system and send the decentralized fragments 
scattering through space. 

Just at present, however, its mimeograph-seere- 
tary is busy in much weightier matters. Having 
cleared the decks, if not the atmosphere, by conduct- 
ing opera boutfe heresy trials, the inky-blinky in- 
stitution reels out monthly if not weekly circular 
letters "to the Locals and Branches." Most of these 
are prefaced by the stereotyped phrases, "we are 



Uncle Samuels 

— The Passing Show, London 



T 



The Western Comrade 




c-oustaiitly receiving inquiries concerning tlie Llano 
colony." This is the straw-man method and smacks 
of the system of writing letters to oneself and ans- 
wering them in the weekly organ. 

To quote one line: "The Socialist Party lias not 
now nor never has had the remotest connection, either 
directly or indirectly, with this colony." To this 
we always say heartily, "Amen and amenl" 

The Socialist Party of California under the guid- 
ance of the S. E. B. and 
its mimeographer has 
wrought in so masterly a 
manner that the dwindling 
membership is at the van- 
ishing point. The largest, 
most thriving and wide- 
awake local in the state is 
located at t he colony. 
There are a number of 
locals where our comrades, 
with splendid spirit, are 
striving to be constructive 
in building up membership 
and spreading propa- 
ganda. In this their suc- 
cess is measured by their 
independence of assistance 
from the state headquar- 
ters. There are more So- 
cialists in California at 
this hour than ever before 
in the history of the move- 
ment, "^'e have on the 
platform now more great 
speakers than we have 

ever had before. Greater interest is taken state 
wide than at any time since the movement began 
To grow on the Pacific Coast. This is not by aid 
of the state management, but in spite of its piffling 
and childish methods. 

The Llano del Rio Colony, with its 700 members, 
is proud of the fact that its founder is a man who 
has spent a long life in the service of the Socialist 
Movement. The commimity is glad that its mem- 
bership is solidly Socialists. It is proud of the won- 







derful success that it is achieving and re.joices that 

it has not "the remotest connection either directly 

or indirectly" with a morbund group centered 

around a mimeograph. 

4> ^ 41 

THIS magazine recently published an appeal for 
one of the leading anarchist writers of America 
to write a book which would orient students who seek 
knowledge on .just what the philosophy of anarchy 

may be. One is reminded 
of the necessity of some 
such work where they con- 
sider the diverse attitudes 
of William C. Owen and 
Alex. Berkman. Owen has 
been raging about the in- 
vasion of Belgium and de- 
claring that workers of all 
nations should ever stand 
ready to repel invaders. 
Berkman. in his new mag- 
azine, the Blast, bitterly 
assails Congressman Meyer 
London because he said 
that Socialists would de- 
fend the country if it were 
invaded. 

Whatever the criticism 
may be, London unciues- 
tionably spoke the truth. 
No matter how high-flown 
our sentiments or declara- 
tions may be, history and 
the facts are with London. 
We maj' say to capitalism. 
"Why should we defend your country?" But in 
the stress of invasion, where the homes of the work- 
ers, their wives and children in jeopardy. Socialists 
of America would find themselves in the same at- 
titude as Socialists of Belgium and Prance. 

Capitalism pi-oduces the burglar; but does not 
prevent the worker from defending his family and 
his possessions. Our much criticised, scientific 
analysis, and our interpretation of motives do not 
prevent us from being human. It may be true that 



Lloyd George: "Haven't you any patriotism?" 
Britisli Labor: "Aye, I sells it." 

New York E\-ening Pun 



The Western Comrade 




Ob S^&c^f r~y^ 



m 



the so-called danger of invasion is a nightmare of 
jingo imagination, "but that is beside the question. 
London's answer was correct. What the Social- 
ists aim to do and what they must do is to so educate 
the workers of all countries to the point Avhere there 
can be no invasion; and where there is no invasion 
there can be no war. 

* ♦ * 

CLEVELAND MofEett in writing a senseless serial 
for McClure's, illuminates a dull-drab page by 
a happy selection of a Socialist pledge. The article 
purports to describe a war in 1922 during which 
America is invaded. No credit is given to Kirk- 
patrick, but the writer indicates his belief that 
American. Socialists will not all be reconciled to the 
suppositious war. See what the readers of McClure 's 
Magazine get : 

"It's some big coup they are planning for to- 
night," she said. "We must wait here." 

So we waited and, presently, along Wabash 
avenue, with crashing bands and a roar of angry 
voices, came an anti-militarist Socialist parade with 
floats and banners presenting firebrand sentiments 
that called forth jeers and hisses from crowds along 
the sidewalks or again enthusiastic cheers from other 
crowds of contrary mind. 

"You see there's going to be trouble," trembled 
the girl, clutching my arm. "Read that!" 

A huge float was rolling past bearing this pledge 
in great red letters: 

"I refuse to kill your father. I refuse to slay 
your mother's son. I refuse to plunge a bayonet into 
the breast of your sweetheart's brother. I refuse to 
assassinate you and then hide my stained fists in the 
folds of any fiag. I refuse to be flattered into hell's 
nightmare by a class of well-fed snobs, crooks and 
cowards who despise our 
class socially, rob our 
class economically and be- 
tray our class politically." 
At this the hostile 
crowds roared their ap- 
proval and disapproval. 
Also at another float that 
paraded these words: 

"What is war? For 
working-class wive s — 
heartache. For working- 
class mothers — loneliness. 
For working-class chil- 
dren — orphanage. For 
peace — defeat. For death 
— a harvest. For nations 
— debts. For bankers — 
bonds, interest. For 
preachers on both sides — ■ 



ferocious prayers for victory. For big manu- 
facturers — business profits. For 'Thou Shalt Not 
Kill' — boisterous laughter. For Christ — contempt." 

I saw that my companion was deeply moved. 

"It's all true — what they say, isn't it?" she mur- 
mured. 

"Yes, it's true, but — we can't change the world, 
we can't give up our country, our independence." 

This is splendid propaganda, and it will reach 
myriad of the desirable ones, as not all McClure's 
readers are of the Bourgeoise. 

* * * 

PORK — and more pork! Los Angeles wants her 
hams and bacon^from the National barrel. The 
method is througli the old gag of establishing a 
navy, away back up in the mud fiats. There is no 
reason in the world why Los Angeles, which has 
no harbor, should not have a navy yard at its 
harbor. 

We respectfully submit that our bottom soil, 
and the bottom is near the top, in the inner harbor 
is just as suitable for a navy yard as the slimy 
ooze that surrounds the Mare Island institution 
where no battleship can ever wend its way. 

Our city council is reported as having voted 
unanimously in favor of a resolution for the estab- 
lishment of this navy yard. We are for pork, whether 
it is for a Nigger Slough naval base, or for dredging 
a navigable channel in Mescal Creek. 

* * * 

THEY are setting the stage again. Newspapers 
are preparing the public for their daily thrill 
between oats and eggs 
when they detail horrible 
acts and deeds of Dave 
Caplan. The deputy dis- 
trict attorney, who attends 
to the building of barriers 
and setting the guards, has 
let it leak to the court 
house reporters that he ex- 
pects dangerous characters 
to crowd the courtroom. 
Of course there will be no 
effort to create an atmos- 
phere. 




Some Day — When They Beat Their Spears 
Into Pruning Hooks 

— Chicago Daily News 




^mM^, 






The Western Comrade 



Blessings of Ignorance 




ERSOXS who read 
what goes by the 

name of criticism in the ne'^vspapers aud 
magazines will certainly agree with 
Goldsmith that '"error is ever talkative." 
AVhile it is true that a little knowledge 
is a risky thing, it also is true that much 
knowledge Ls still more dangerous. 
I have in mind a young man who got a job as dra- 
matic editor on one of the afternoon papers. He was a 
nice chap, with all the ignorance that one could gather 
iu a small Pennsylvania city. He was not a thinker, 
but he was a delightful dancer. He was not a high- 
brow, but he was an expert on high-brow drinks. 

After six months of cub reporting in New York, 
he suddenly found himself in charge of the dramatic 
column. It happened that he knew nothing of the 
stage, of plays, of acting. Little did he dream that it 
was because of his ignorance that he was given what 
many people consider an important position. 

He was a hard worker, however, and could write 
columns a day. when necessary. This young man had 
a few vague impressions. One was that Shaw was in- 
sincere. Another was that Shaw is not a creator of 
plays, but a clever writer of conversation. He often 
remarkable that ' ' Shaw mistakes talk for drama. ' ' Fre- 
quently, he referred to Shaw as "the inimitable." 

In other words, he had all the requisites of a writer 
of dramatic reviews. Aud he made good. By con- 
sistently ridiculing the good and praising the bad, he 
got himself a reputation. Ibsen was pessimistic. 
Strindberg was misanthropic. Hauptmann was de- 
pressing. Maeterlinck was not a clear thinker. Brieux 
was a propagandist. Gorki lacked humor. Andreyev 
was sardonic. And so on, with many eteetras. On the 
other hand, Charles Klein was a thinker who possessed 
the dramatic instinct. George Cohan would someday 
write the great American play. Margaret Mayo was 
a great humorist who could hand Eabelais cards and 
spades. Charles Rann Kennedy was a profound philo- 
sopher. Belasco was a siiperman. And so on, ^^-\\\\ 
many eteetras. 

This fascinating youth had a genius for being 
wrong. Being very busy and always hopping about — 
now at the theater, now at the office — he had no time 
to think — which was a fortunate thing. But, youth is 
erratic and will always do strange things — and this 
youth was no exception. Shelley, somewhere in his 
Letters, says "that all of us, who are worth anything, 
spend our manhood in unlearning the follies, or ex- 
piating the mistakes of our youth." 



By EMANUEL JULIUS 



This boy started to unlearn 
too soon. This dramatic critic 
did something quite unprofessional. He began 
to study the drama, its history, its philosophy, its 
technique. He read many plays and much good critic- 
ism. Instead of slamming Shaw, he began to discuss 
Shaw's philosophy. "Androcles and the Lion," when 
produced by Granville Barker last winter, was reviewed 
with something that approximated intelligence. Eman- 
uel Reicher's interpretation of Ibsen's "John Gabriel 
Borknian" received sincere commendation. Lord 
Dusany's one-act "The Glittering Gate" was given 
high praise. And he held his job, too, which was con- 
sidered quite remarkable. 

Then he went up to Forty-second street to see a 
foolish war play — and he wrote a review that must 
have embarrassed its author. "The White Feather," 
"The Fallen Idol," "Experience," "It Pays to Ad- 
vertise," and other typical Broadway productions were 
treated with passionate scorn. "Wliat was the result? 
I could put it gently by saying he was "requested to 
resign," or he was "let out." I won't. He was fired. 
He was bounced. He was canned. This boy had made 
a great mistake. He had tried to be intelligent, to show 
some knowledge while working on an afternoon paper. 
Not that he was fired for praising the good. No ; even 
that can be endured. The trouble with young men is 
that when they enthuse over the meritorious there is 
danger that they will frowin on the meritricious. The 
managers, the press agents, the advertising men — all 
poured down one fine afternoon and demanded the 
young man's discharge. He was told that he wasn't 
constructive. ' ' Destructive critisicm has had its day ! ' ' 
he was informed. 

The moral, of course, is obvious— ^knowledge is a 
dangerous thing. Had that yoiith remained ignorant 
and continued to look on mediocre persons as the great 
artists of the drama, he would not have been separated 
from a good-paying position. Knowledge is a dis- 
tressing thing. It is not easy for an intelligent person 
to write; but ignorance, as already mentioned, is talk- 
ative — and gets the bacon. 

When a man has a desire for facts, he is hampered, 
thus making it difficult for him to keep the pace. "He 
that increaseth loiowledge increaseth sorrow," We. 
learn from the Book of Ecclesiastes. This takes on a 
new meaning when applied by my young friend who 
made good as a dramatic critic because he was delight- 
fully ignorant and lost out when he became interested 
in that tnith which, as Berkeley exclaimed, is the cry 
of all. but the game of few. Truth is a torch, but I must 



10 



The Western Comrade 



not fail to add that a torch can burn one's fingers. 
Men write best who know least. 

"A man," Schopenhauer tells us in his Counsels 
and Maxims, "must be still a greenhorn in the ways of 
the world, if he imagines that he can make himself 
popular in society by exhibiting intelligence and dis- 
cernment. With the immense majority of people-, such 
qualities excite hatred and resentment, which are 
rendered all the harder to bear by the fact that people 
are obliged to suppress — even to themselves — the real 
reason of their anger.'' 

It is very easy for the master minds of the news- 
papers — dramatic, literary and art writers — to give 
the impression that there is profound knowledge be- 
hind their vaporings. One of the best tricks is to re- 
sort to names and titles — piling them on thick. For 
instance, let lis suppose a reviewpr is speaking of a 
novel. Let me show, somewhat extravagantly, how he 
strings things out : 

"Mr. Humpetty Klinketty's novel, which is after 
the manner of August Stringberg's 'Confession of a 
Pool,' at times suggests George Moore's 'Memoirs of 
My Dead Life' and Max Stirner's 'The Ego and His 
Own. ' For psychological insight, he ranks with Fyodor 
Dostoevsky. The characterization is equal to that of 
Gustave Flaubert in his justly famed 'Madame Bov- 
ary. ' And yet, the simplicity of Turgenef's 'Smoke' is 
there. He has the humor (minus the vulgarisms) of 
an 0. Henry. In all, Mr. Humpetty Klinketty seems 
to be a composite of Lafcadio Hearn, Mark Twain, 
Benjamin De Casseres, Maxim Gorki, Victor Hugo, 
James Huneker, Maurice Maeterlinck, George Gissing, 
Walt Whitman, Frederick Nietzsche, Henry George, 
Richard Wagner, Karl Marx, Peter Kropotkin, Elisee 
Reclus, Remy de Gourmont, Emma Goldman and 
Anthony Comstock. ' ' 

This trick never fails. Resort to it three or four 
times and you get a reputation for being a critic of 
profound knowledge and wide reading. 

So much for the dramatic and literary critics. Now 
a moment with the art critics. Readers will, of course, 
remember the awful how-do-you-do when the Mona 
Lisa was discovered. AVe patient sufferers had to en- 
dure an awful amount of senseless piffle about Leonardo 
da Vinci's picture. Really, Mona Lisa just bores me. 
Her face, to me, is plainly stupid. To think of all the 
years the painter spent in "getting" that smile! And 
Avhen he got it, lo and behold, what a smirk ! And yet, 
this woman has caused art critics to rid themselves of 
heaps of bunk. I sincerely believe the following by 
Kane S. Smith, of the University of London, takes the 
bacon: "The painting is one of the most actively evil 
pictures ever painted, the embodiment of all evil the 
painter could imagine put into the most attractive form 



he could devise. It is an exquisite piece of painting, 
but if you look at it long enough to get into its atmos- 
phere I think you will be glad to escape from its in- 
fluence." Is that not a feast of piffle? 

Reporters are not supposed to be interested in 
news. They must search for "features." A dog may 
bite a man — possibly it will get two lines. A wise re- 
porter takes that story, gives it a twist and has the 
man retaliate by biting the dog — and it gets a column. 
The noted lover of animals. Miss Lind-af Hageby, was 
interviewed by a number of New York reporters. She 
answered their questions to the best of her ability, but 
later claimed that the reporters paid little attention to 
her answers. "Have dogs souls?" she was asked. The 
woman said she believed they have souls ; and here is 
what the papers printed: "Miss Lind-af Hageby says 
kippered herrings have souls and warns the American 
people not to eat them in case the herrings' souls come 
back to haunt people." All of which makes an un- 
happy combination of poor English and a weak and 
wobbly lie. 

Only the other day, I m,et a woman who writes 
"feature" articles six times a week. She supplies a 
daily interview with the great and the near great. If 
she works hard for about 20 years more, she may be- 
come as famous as Dorothy Dix. She is always on the 
alert for copy and greets everyone with ' ' What 's startl- 
ing?" 

" 'Others,' " I averred, "ought to make a good 
article. Here is a magazine of interesting freaks — they 
write the new verse — imagist stuff." 

"I don't know a thing about it — > — " 

"Tut!" I interrupted; "all the more reason why 
you will write a readable story." 

"I will need to know something about it in order 
to get through the introductory paragraphs." 

"Very little. Don't overtax yourself by studying 
the subject." 

She agreed. 

"Facts do hamper me," said the woman. 

She spent a long time studying her subject — oh, at 
least two hours, and wrote her story. 

When I met her again, she said: 

"I didn't like my story. All the interesting things 
I had planned to say I found out, afterwards, to be 
untrue, so I had to stick to facts. If I hadn't spent so 
much time on that story I'd have done better work, 
even though a few would have thought it foolish. I 
shall certainly profit by that mistake. In the future 
I shall place more reliance on mj^ own ability." 

And there you are. We'll close the services with 
this little hymn: 

"From ignorance our comfort flows; 
The only wretched are the wise." 



The Western Comrade 



11 




Lg^ 



The New '*Sick Man" Soon "V\'ill Follow His Victims 



-Drawn for the ~U"estern Comrade by M. A. Kempf 



A Millionaire 



V 



1 s 1 o n 



MY God I "tis false, yes, every 
thing I see ; 
"Tis false, my God, it dare, it cannot be — 
And still, alas, I know too well 'tis true, 
These are but part of all the souls I slew. 
These arms, these legs, these skulls about me here, 
These crippled forms and faces pale and sere. 
These babies with little mouths agape for air; 
These girls who stroll the streets a public ware. 
These all are but the fritits of my demands, 
These ruins all are the blightiugs of my hands. 
For me and mine have each of these been slain. 
That I might LIVE these all have died in pain. 
The blood and marrow of each nerve and bone, 
Each heart throb, sorrow, agony and groan; 
Thev all have gone to form mv mighty throne. 



By W I L B Y HEARD 



But bosh — All this is nothing but 
a dream, 
I, too, am part of Life's e'er gushing stream. 
'Twas ever thus, and thus 'twill ever be, 
A thousand slaves that one at least be free. 
If these must die then so it was decreed. 
God's will be done — be it to sport or bleed. 
'Tis not for me to mourn or mope their lot. 
No more than they to envy what I've got. 
Good God, be this all false, or be it true, 
I leave it all, I leave it all to you. 
I know but this, be things as e 'er they may. 
If one but robs enough he need not pay. 
Away — such scenes I will henceforth decline ; 
Thank God for what he does for me and mine — 
Waiter — bring here another flask of wine. 



12 



The Western Comrade I 

Jolting the Jingoes 




N editor 's brain 
is an amazing 

organ. It may be the source of mucli 
wisdom, a teacher of truth unparalleled, 
and again it may be a queer, distorted, 
helpless thing, performing antics enough 
to make men and angels weep and laugh 
by turns. The latter sad state is illus- 
trated by a recent editorial in Senator Hitchcock's 
Omaha World-Herald. 

According to the editorial in question, ideas and not 
armaments are the cause of war. The trouble is in the 
minds of the people. Therefore, the pernicious propa- 
ganda of the "pacifists" must cease, and every man 
throw up his hat for "prepared- 
ness," AVliile the ladies wave their 
handkerchiefs. 

Of course, I have taken consid- 
erable liberty with the language of 
the editorial, but in no particular has 
its meaning been misrepresented. 
The editorial was evidently intended 
as an answer to arguments of the 
"pacifists," yet it was no answer. 
Ideas are all-important as makers of 
good or evil; the most ardent "paci- 
fist" will admit that; and, in fact, 
the entire peace propaganda is con- 
ducted with a view to counteracting 
the subtile, ingenious, extremely 
false ideas with which professed 
peace-loving militarists are poisoning 
the minds of the people. 

It were a waste of time to argue 
whether ideas or armaments were the 
cause of war. If A puts strychnine 
in B's soup, and B dies, what causes 
B's death ? Is it the strychnine in the soup or the mur- 
derous intent in the mind of A? Obviously, neither is 
the sole cause. Both are contributing factors. In the 
same way, if universal miseducation leads to increased 
armaments, and increased armaments lead to war, as 
they always do, what is the cause of the war? It is 
miseducation or increased armaments? Obviously, 
neither is the sole cause. Both are contributing fac- 
tors. 

This is no time for jingoes to smile and sneer at the 
opposition. They had better be preparing to sur- 
render gracefully. Their position is as hideous as the 
hell it would make, and earnest, enlightened public 
opinion will never tolerate it. Whether dubbed "paci- 



By EDMUND R. BRUMBAUGH 



The Man Without 
a Country 

By A. F. GANNON 

TTB holds all equal; 
-*- -*- Truth, raw mate- 
rial; 
Reason, a tool ; 
War, insanity; 
Crime, an effect ; 
Ignorance, eradicable; 
Hunger, unnecessary; 
Wealth, an exeresenee; 
Health, natural; 
Art, expression ; 
Culture, fruition; 
Labor, requisite; 
Co-operation, the way ; 
Love, paramount. 



=5111 



fists," "mollycoddles," or 
any other name that reae-' 
tionary malice may devise, the active, real peace-loving' 
people of the nation propose to persist in their propa- 
ganda until men Avho dare to speak for war or the 
means of war will be universally regarded as the 
mental prostitutes that they are, and those who don 
military uniforms and offer themselves for murder 
in the name of patriotism will be considered the scum 
of the earth, undeserving of association with decent, 
intelligent people. 

The working, producing- masses have no real in- 
terest in war except to keep out of it, and no interest 
in preparation for war except to oppose it and pre- 
vent it if possible. In the first place, 
this country is no more in danger of 
invasion than it is of a collision with 
Halley's comet. Furthermore, the 
large part of the people would lose 
very little if some other nation 
would come over and swallow us up. 
It makes no difference to them what 
piece of bunting floats over their 
heads or what the band plays on the 
Fourth of July. Flags fire no substi- 
tute for food, and patriotic songs fail 
to remove for a fraction of a second 
the sting and blight of the poverty 
to which the masses are doomed 
every day of their lives. In this 
stage of the world's development a 
country that cannot keep out of war 
is unfit to save. 

The triumph of peace is sure, but 
it may be postponed, and war pre- 
cede it, even in our own land. If it 
does, and the workers are forced to 
fight, those who are wise will turn their guns against 
the corrupters of public sentiment instead of against 
their brother workers who have accidently been born 
across an imaginary boundary line. 

The .jingoes will squirm if they chance to read this. 
Some I know would be jolted into hysterics. But jolt- 
ing the jingoes these days is a very pleasant occupa- 
tion. It is only a small part of what is coming to 
them. 

In this day of awakening no sane person would 
dream of trying to incite war and to pursuade work- 
ers of one land to join in collective, wholesale murder 
of other workers. These truths are finding greater 
acceptance among the workers each day. 



The Western Comrade 



13 




Large Tractor "Railing" Land. This Crew of Two Clear Fifteen Acres a Day by This Method 



Through Eyes of Tomorrow 




HE mid-forenoon ]\Iay 
sun shone with an 
ardor that make even native Californians 
seek the shadows, and it glistened from 
the solid sandstone and granite sides of 
the great cluster of buildings of the 
Universal University with dazzling 
brightness. It was the year 1965. 
The U. U. (commonly called the "Double You") oc- 
cupied a low promontory in a little sheltered cove that 
cuddled up against the gaunt reaches of the snow- 
capped Sierra Madres in the extreme southern part of 
the Antelope Valley. Stretching in three directions are 
fertile fields and fruitful orchards, but there are many 
who tell of days when it was all a yucca-studded waste. 
In its inception the U. U. was just an advanced 
high school, teaching as best it could the "higher educa- 
tion." In 1917 it occupied one tiny room with just 
one instructor and less than half a dozen students. 
How it grew till it became the greatest university of 
the west is a story as unique and refreshing as any 
that ever waited for historian to narrate. As much by 
accident as design its course was shaped. When it 
had not yet outgrown its first single room, there came 



By ERNEST S. WOOSTER 



one day a lusty young man, trudg- 
ing on foot as he had done for 
many days. He came demanding that he be permitted 
to work for his education. And he would accept no 
refusal as final nor did any rebuff dampen his ardor 
or thwart his determination. 

His success inspired others; within a year twenty 
young men and women had applied and been accepted, 
with scores of applications on file. It became a prob- 
lem requiring immediate solution. The problem was 
solved by establishing industries which employed the 
students at useful work and paid their expenses with 
something to spare. It was the only school of this kind 
in the world. 

It must be mentioned here that the U. U. was first 
established as an educational institution solely for the 
youth of the Llano del Rio Colony, the pioneer of those 
co-operative enterprises that were the phenomenon of 
the decade from 1920 to 1930 and which allied them- 
selves under the name of The Associated Colonies dur- 
ing the thirties and became a power in the political 
and industrial movements of this country for many 
years. Of course the U. U. became the source of edu- 
cation for the ambitious persons of all the colonies, but 



14 



The Western Comrade 



this was not to happen for ten years after the system 
of admitting industrial students was introduced, and 
after student-industries had become a part of the U. U. 
providing work for all. 

But on this particular invigorating morning the 
history classes were in session. This was a morning 
study; in the afternoon these students would be seen 
in the various industries, though but a few hours amply 
sufficed to satisfy all needs. In the lecture room of 
Prof. Warren, instructor in Economic History, a class 
of young men and women listened with absorbed in- 
terest. Nor was it the forced attention simulated by 
classes of a generation previous in schools throughout 
the world. And neither were the attentive stu- 
dents of that type formerly associated with stu- 
diousness — the pale, spectacled anemic speci- 
mens who shut themselves off from all but 
study. Prof. "Warren had the physique of an 
athletic director, while the young men and women 
might have been chosen for physical perfection. This 
physical perfection was due to the system of the U. U. 
first established wiith the Slontessori school in 1915. 
The instructor was speaking. 

"We now take up the most interesting develop- 
ments of the Commercial period. You remember how 
the wage system superseded the slave and self system. 
Now it, too, began to present acute problems, and 
early in the present century they began to be more 
or less generally recognized, though but few persons 
were able to trace them from cause to effect. Clearly 
Capitalism was breaking down and radical measures 
were necessary to save it. You recall that we have al- 
ready learned how this became one of the ever-menac- 
ing problems and how it 
reached its first generally 
critical stage in 1914 when 
the first world war broke 
out. Possibly many of you 
can remember when the 
Peace Pact was signed." 

"Mi ne scias la jaron," 
spoke a youthful student. 

She used the universal 
tongue, Esperanto. This 
had been a feature of the 
Colony Schools everywhere 
from the very first, and 
was usually preferred by 
the younger people be- 
cause of the greater lucid- 
ity with which ideas were 
expressed; it was a sort of 
shorthand of language to 
them. Frequently ques- 




A Colony Surveying Crew at Work 



tions propounded by the instructors in English brought 
answers in Esperanto ; its use came as naturally to these 
young men and women as English. Her remark was, 
"I know not the year." 

"The date is immaterial," resumed Prof. Warren. 
"We need not definitely say which year it was. This 
point is not so important — history is concerned by 
epochs and events, not bounded by precise years. 

"It will be difficult for you to conceive of the ap- 
palling chaos of those times, even before the war be- 
gan. While your motion picture history course has 
shown you the people of the times, their way of living, 
etc., yet you can not get the psychology of it all by 
means of films. Imagine each little independent nation 
with its army, its president or potentates, its law-mak- 
ing bodies, its functionaries of all kinds, but most of 
them useless. Each country was a world unto itself; 
it cared nothing for the rest of the Earth except to 
profit from it in some manner. Nationalism was taught 
instead of patriotism as you know it. Of course, you 
can look back now and say, 'How absurd not to have 
a world senate,' but it must be remembered that indi- 
vidualism was the trait that ruled the actions and 
thoughts of our grandfathers. Co-operation was the 
dream food of cranks; practical men dominated. 

"So enamored of this theory were they, so ego- 
tistical, so cocksure, that the most significant incidents 
made not the slightest dent in their self-esteem. This 
is best illustrated by the awakening of China. After 
lying dormant for centuries, outstripped by the up- 
start nations of the west, it had, almost at a bound, 
leaped from a despotic government to that of a repub- 
lic. China seemed to have gathered strength from this 

thousand-year nap and the 
stored-up energy of her 
people transformed her 
from a slumberland to a 
land teeming with activity 
and industry. It's half -bil- 
lion people made the chry- 
salis emerge a great giant 
whose resourcefulness 
amazed the world. 

"But this happened 
mostly while the European 
nations were slaughtering 
their best men, and when 
they had adjusted their 
quarrels after twenty mil- 
lion men were killed, China 
was a new menace. Fol- 
lowing in the path of com- 
mercial enterprise hewed 
by tire western world, for- 



The Western Comrade 



15 



eign trade became the 
Chinese ambition and 
Chinese - marked goods 
^vere to be seen in every 
market; the Chinese flag 
was in every port. 

■'Now this was one of 
the most potent factors in 
healing the hates engender- 
ed by the war. The spectre 
of the Yellow man haunted 
them all. German tolerated 
Briton, Frenchman planned 
with Austria, Russian con- 
versed with Bulgar. The 
common danger was a 
bludgeon forcing them to- 
gether. The Chinese flag 
followed Chinese goods ; 
the Chinese army was 
drilled to protect the Chin- 
ese flag. Though at first dominated by the Japanese, 
the Chinese soon shook loose and took the initiative. 
The idea of an Oriental Confederacy grew — India, Siam, 
Japan, the Philippines — with China the whip hand. 
This was the first form of the new Asiatic association. 
Soon envious eyes were cast on Siberia, and it became 
Russia's constant dread that a new "scourge of God" 
should lead a Yellow Horde from the East. 

"All Europe felt this fear of the newi-born East. 
Russia, Germany, France, England, Italy, Austria, the 
Balkans — impotent alone, mutually jealous, each hiding 
her weakness — forgot their grievances in the face of 
this hideous wraith and hurried to form the Union of 
Europe. No nation could long remain neutral. Turkey 
and Egypt joined with Persia in the short-lived Asiatic 
Entente, but it soon broke up, with Egypt a member 
of the Union of Europe and the others aligning them- 
selves with the East. 

"Even before this, fear had begun to gnaw at the 
Americas. Brazil had become a competitor of the 
United States. During the war Canada had entered 
largely into the world's trade, and the Dominion was 
being exploited as a commercial nation. Mexico had 
become an export country. But their jealousy of one 
another was overshadowed by fear of the Orient. Out 
of this timorousness grew the Pan-American Union, 
taking in the AVestern Hemisphere. 

"Australia and New Zealand, with Africa, joined 
the Union of Europe. The latter became the joint 
property of all the nations of this combination. 

"Now the growth of the Oriental Confederation 
must necessarily lead to certain sequences. Applying 
the law of evolution, which you know so well, it meant 




An Irrigation Ditch Near the Townsite 



that an aggressive move 
would be made to capture 
the world's markets,backing 
this up with army and navy. 
It means that Europe must 
arm again, and this time 
on a vaster scale ; as teach- 
er for the East she had but 
herself to blame that the 
lesson had been so well 
learned. 

"In the United States 
whether to arm or not to 
arm became the all-absorb- 
ing question. The Paci- 
fists had grown in 
strength, drawing lessons 
from the European con- 
flict. But, on the otlier 
h a n d the Preparedists 
pointed out that it was an 
age when war was almost iinavoidable, and must, there- 
fore, be prepared for. 

"Now again I must direct your attention to the 
Profiteers who ruled every nation. Many were kind- 
hearted men who abhorred war, yet they were fore- 
most in competing for foreign trade; they stole the 
markets of the fighting nations of Europe, thus tread- 
ing the road that led directly to trouble. In the election 
of 1916 the question was fought along the lines of 
Shall We Prepare? Being better organized and with 
a greater incentive — here again you will note the work- 
ing of the law of Economic Determinism — the Pre- 
Preparedists were able to win, and the neueleus of the 
Pan-American Armada was established. 

"Note that the seeds of war were sown side by side 
with the seeds of peace. The worn-out nations of Eu- 
rope had learned their bitter lesson. They were ready 
for lasting peace. But with the tliree great World As- 
sociations formed to compete for trade it meant that 
war must eventually ensue ; such gigantic preparations 
coidd not be left idle long. The world lay divided into 
three armed camps, and the best energies of all were 
turned to the building of newer and more hideous 
death-dealing devices. Huge fortunes were constantly 
offered as prizes to stimulate inventive genius. The 
ingenuity of the greatest constructive minds were, 
grimly enoitgh, turned to building destructive engines. 
But before dismissing you I want to pmnhasize this 
point : While it was an age of individualism, the co- 
operative spirit was already infiltrating everywhere. 
Yet the people of those days failed to see it; it 
was another significant phase of the Evolution they so 
little understood, and refused to heed." 




—Drawn for the Western Comrade by M. A. Kempf 



The next tren 




be abandoned 



18 



The Western Comrade 




Plowing Lines for Tree Planting 




TALWART workers at the Llano del Rio 
Colony are showing greater activity, en- 
thusiasm and hope than ever before 
since the inception of the enterprise. At- 
tacks on us by capitalist newspapers and 
disturbers have drawn, the comrades 
closer together and their solidarity 
makes for still better co-operation. 
Everj'body has a shoulder to the wheel of progress. 
The colonists laugh through assembly meetings and 
there has been no bickerings of late. Men and women 
are singing at their work. With the spirit that prevails 
there is nothing that can prevent the colony making 
unbounded success. 

The splcLiid showing in the annual financial re- 
port has put. heart into the weakest. Letters of en- 
couragement and appreciation come from absent mem- 
bers all over iije country. The progress of the enter- 
prise in all depiirtments is at the highest mark. 

The spring-rplanting season is here. Preparations 
are being madft? and work is being done to take ad- 
vantage of the season's call. Every one here realizes 
that in order to make Llano grow and the desert to 
bloom as the rose, a vast amount of labor must be ex- 
pended. 

The weather has been unusually M|ild for the past 
three weeks, or practically since the first of February. 
Indeed, it is hard to realize that it is winter. The days 



Enthusiasm 

have been warm and the nights gy r_ ^ 

pleasantly cool and so propitious 

has been the weather that vegetation has begun to 
bud and carpet the hills and valleys hereabout. The 
big tractor is stea<3ily clearing land. 

The caterpiller engine has been doing yeoman ser- 
vice almost twenty-four hours of the day. During the 
day leveling and clearing the land has been going on 
and when the night falls plows are put behind it and 
work is continued throughout the night with three 
shifts of men. It is surprising what enormous amount 
of Avork this little thing will do, M'hich, by the way, is 
a 30-horsepow;er affair. It does the work of at least 
twelve horses and has the advantage of consuming 
nothing when standing still. Its diet consists mainly 
of distillate and oil. 

The plowing and leveling on the Hubbard place, 
which is south of the ditch, is almost completed. But 
little remains to be done to make it ready for seeding. 
Seeding has been going on for some time and that 
work will be continued until the whole of the laud 
lying between the upper and lower ditches is one solid 
mass of alfalfa and barley. 

One hundred and sixty acres is now being prepared 
under direction of 0. W. Luton, of the agricultural de- 



The Western Comrade 



19 




Digging Holes lor Pear Orcliard 



Rules Llano 

WILLIAMS partment, just back of the Tighl- 

man ranch and north of the lower 
diteh. This will be put into barley and alfalfa. This 
piece of land is very near the intake and irrigation, 
therefore, vaW be very easy. 

To the north of the land in question, P. A. Knobbs, 
of the garden department, is plowing and preparuig 
for a big garden. It is not quite certain just how many 
acres at this time, but the land being worked on now 
is fully forty acres. The location of the garden tract 
is in a most favored locality. 

The high line ditch, meaning that a new survey 
has been made in order to see how far up the hillside, 
back of the permanent townsite the water can be car- 
ried, is being widened at the bottom to five feet. The 
upper and lower ditches will prove quite an advantage 
as can be seen at a glance. 

Organization is better than ever before. There is 
less confusion and the managers' meetings, which are 
held nightly, are being solidly attended and much in- 
terest is manifested. Twenty-five managers and fore- 
men take seats about the long table in the new office 
building, and the room is already grown too small. At 
least 75 to 100 interested onlookers attend the meet- 
ings to see how things are being done and what is in 



prospect. Complete order prevails and the session is 
over in an hour or less and the notes made by the 
stenographer graphically tell the story of the doings 
day by day on the ranch. 

It may be interesting to know that the managers' 
meeting of the Llano farm is unique in a way. Every 
successful organization in the country has adopted and 
is using some such method of keeping its men in touch 
with the affairs of the ranch, work is arranged, teams 
apportioned, men assigned and maehinerj^ disposed of 
for the next da.y"s work. All matters pertaining to the 
ranch is brought up at these meetings and usually set- 
tled very quickly. The thing that is unusual is the 
fact that it is not a parliamentary body, no motions 
being made, hence nothing to reconsider and no red 
tape to dispense with. Every day sees the utility of 
the managers' meeting and as the days go jy its effec- 
tiveness will grow. 

Llano is now connected -with the outf le world by 
telephone. F. 0. Harper is completing ar ingements to 
connect by phones the dairy, horse co ral and the 
Tighlman ranch. Much travel about the r .nch has been 
eliminated and Los Angeles is but a mimite away now. 

For the week ending February 19, Copley's poultry 
department turned into the commissary 128 dozen 
eggs. The work of enlarging the chicken ranch is 
under way. 

Five thousand holes have been dug under Horti- 



2(hi 



The Western Comrade 



CTilteFist Dawson on the east quarter section. The 
wbrk of hole digging will soon be over, and the work 
o:^ inserting the trees started. 

i Joseph Bowers of the dairy department reports for 
thfe week ending Feb. 19, that he is receiving 135 gal- 
lons of milk daily and that there is no sickness in the 
herd. 

C. H. Scott of the building department reports that 
work has started on the industrial building at the 
new town site. Materials are being hauled there now. 
The roof on the laundry building is completed. Much 
repair work has been done by this department during 
the past three weeks. AVork has been caught up and 
from now on efforts will be directed on the new town- 
site, which is located about two miles from the present 
site of Llano. 

The hog department has grown somewhat and now 
more than twenty pens are available for the little and 
big porkers. 

Tanning is regularly going forward and the leather 
turned out is of exceptional quality. All rabbit hides 
are being tanned now and the finished product is as 
pliable as cloth. A good quality of razor strops are 
being made at the tannery. One hundred and seventy- 
sis rabbit hides were turned into the tannery last 
week. The' tannery is providing all the leather used 
at the new shoe shop and the harness shop. 

Hay Proebstel, the surveyor, is continuing work on 
the townsite and has two blocks wholly completed, as 
well as the new industrial site. It won't be long now 
until a substantial building will command a view of 
the great valley to the north. Architect "William Braun 
is busily engaged in making drawings for the city 
and he has completed dozens of different designs for 
the interiors of the new homes. The lines he has so 
far drawn are very beautiful. 

A drying house has been constructed at the brick- 
yard and only the roof is lacking to have the brick- 
making machines busy at work. "When the covering is 
made weather will have no effect on the brick in- 
dustry. 

Ending February 19, the rabbitry turned in some 
interesting figures. There were weaned 168 rabbits; 
64 litters were born; 255 pounds of rabbits killed and 
176 hides turned to the tannery. Summer shades are 
being made for the corral and the land about the rab- 
bitry is being fenced preparatory to planting vege- 
tables for the rabbits. 

The lime kiln at Bobs Gap is progressing well. 
March 1 will see the kiln in active operation and prob- 
ably will be second to none as a burner of lime rock. 
Lime is badly needed and as a matter of fact is the only 
thing required to make work on the new townsite rush. 
J. J. Leslie with a crew of two men and a tractor. 



cleared 73 acres of land last week and burned the 
brush. This acreage has been railed twice. 

F. J. Wright, the expert rug maker from Fresno, 
has completed up to Feb. 19, seven rag rugs and one!. 
burlap rug. He is using but one of his looms, as he!) 
has not sufficient space. Much interest is being mani- 
fested by all the colonists as immediate returns from 
rags can be seen. As soon as the laundry building is 
enlarged this manufactory will be placed therein and 
greater efficiency will be shown. 

The managers of the various departments hand 
weekly a report to be read Sunday evenings, which 
proves of great interest. This innovation has proved 
a success and now everyone that cares to hear and 
know what has been done has this opportunity. These ji 
reports have opened the eyes of many people, as it is '!' 
impossible for one person to keep fully informed on 
what is taking place at all times over such a vast ' 
acreage. It takes quite a number of men to run the 
ranch at Llano. 

,. One of the most delightful and instructive visits 
tlhit the writer had in a long time was to the Monte- 
SQrri school, conducted by Mrs. Prudence Stokes 
Brown, with able assistants, recently. He happened in 
just as dinner Avas being served and watched with 
great interest the little tots line up in Cafeteria style 
for their portions. It was amusing and pleasing to 
see with what care they tiptoed to their seats at the 
little low tables and then sat back waiting for all to 
be served. Thirty-three children of tender age ranged ; 
themselves about the tables with as much or more 
decorum than grown people. The way they helped 
each other was truly a delight. "With all possible 
courtesy little boys helped little girls to this thing or 
that and the solicitude shown was truly affecting. 
Not a loud or boisterous word was spoken, and the 
table manners displayed by the little guests were amaz- 
ing. The table was set and the chairs were arranged 
by the children, and, too, without a word of instruc- 
tion. Everything was in perfect order. Each plate 
had the cutlery neatly laid beside it, with not the 
slightest variation in distance. The spoons in a box 
were all laid one within the other. The knives and 
forks were arranged in the same manner by the child- 
ren assigned to this work. Mrs. Brown said that child- 
ren loved order and that given proper incentive they 
were as dainty and as particular as the most fastidious 
housewife. 

The mothers and fathers of these children are proud 
of this Montessori school. Children are being taught 
manners, relationship and social ethics that will be a, 
living standard and by the time they graduate from 
this delightful home they will be ready to take their 
place in new environments with perfect aplomb. 



The Western Comrade 



21 




Part of the Colony's Garden Ready for Planting 



EVERY big movement to emancipate suffering man- 
kind has had to bear with persecutions, villifica- 
tions and misrepresentations. This can be explained 
on two grounds: ignorance, which begets intolerance, 
and on the patent thing called Economic Determinism. 

A few weeks ago the State Corporation Commis- 
sioner made a report, if not taken from a disgruntled 
member, at least echoed the sentiments once heard on 
the floor of the Assembly hall. The report caused 
some consternation in the heai'ts of people who are 
friendly to the cooperative idea and of this greatest 
of all cooperative efforts. Persons who were not able 
to discriminate were stampeded. 

There was a great deal in the report that was lit- 
erally true and that, of course, will not hurt anyone. 
There was more than a generous amount of innuendo 
of things gone wrong that indeed does put in an im- 
proper light the true situation at Llano. There is no 
objection to the financial situation of the colony being 
made public. There is no mystery and never has been 
about this phase of the company. If a person did not 
understand, it was because he did not go to the proper 
place in which to tind out. 

The principal difficulty with most people is that 



they think a thing and learn to believe it. It does not 
matter what the truth is. They will act as quickly on 
an untruth and be as earnest about it as if they were 
truly following on the paths of rectitude. One will 
find people that take a man's word and then act as 
though the man should not be investigated. Many 
persons do not think for themselves. They are wait- 
ing for a leader and when that leader comes they listen 
attentively for awhile and thinking they have absorbed 
all of the leader's thought, begin to form a new cult, a 
new religion or a new colony, as the ease may be. 

There is one essential difference between Llano and 
the rest of the world. In Llano a new psychology is 
in the making. People as a rule change twice and 
later a third time — sometimes wrong, mostly to the 
right way of thinking. To make this clear, an example 
will be cited of a man, a seemingly sensible, capable, 
money-making man and a Socialist. 

For weeks and months this man dreamed of the 
colony at Llano del Bio. He was living in the northern 
part of the state of California. His business was good, 
but he had no heart in it. He wanted to get to 
that "dream city" and help lay the marble slabs and 
(Continued on Page 27) 



22 



The Western Comrade 



Montessorian 






\sfe7 



VISIT to the Montessori 
school at Llano, California. 

It had been raining for a week or 
more, and the roads were as bad as 
desert roads can be, though that is not 
bad at all from the point of view of a 
dweller in a elay district; still as I 
looked around the immaculate school 
and watched the crowd of children trooping towards 
the door, I sighed with a housekeeper's prevision of 
disaster. 

But the crowd was intercepted and diverted ; some- 
thing happened at the back door, and when they filed 
in from that direction the "real estate" had been 
eliminated, and each showed, as they passed, a clean 
handkerchief. When school opened some of these 
children had not made acquaintance with that import- 
ant article. In those cases the handkerchiefs were lent 
them, but they must be brought to school clean each 
morning. Ultimately they all acquired both the hand- 
kerchiefs and the habit of using them. 

On this day the usual routine had been altered. 
The Guide to Wisdom had been absent at story telling 
time, so the more energetic kiddies attacked the piled 
tables and benches and unpacking them according to 
some law which had previously been impressed upon 
them, set them carefully in their places. It was de- 
lightful to see very little tots studying the angle be- 
tween the bench and the tal)le A^ath an eye to correct 
alignment and an inner conviction to its importance; 
just the expression that I had seen on the face of an 
artist stepping back from his easel to get the effect 
of the whole. 

Then some of them began taking off the chintz cov- 
ers which had been wrapped around the stands of 
shelves on which their toys were stored. These cov- 
ers had been adjusted carefully by them the night be- 
fore, the angles laid smooth and pinned tight, and now 
they were to be taken off in just the right way. It 
took two children to handle the cloth, possibly 10x6, 
and one boy of six found himself alone and called a 
companion to his aid. Billie's attention, however, was 
attracted elsewhere, and seeing the child's dilemma 
an assistant Guide took a hand. But Billie, looking 
around suddenly, observed what was going on, and 
took the end of the cloth from the assistant with digni- 
fied and repressed indignation. Was not this the 
children's house? Were not they alone responsible for 
its management? What business had the assistant 
Guide with his shelf cover ? In so many movements the 
reason for which they had been trained to understand. 



By A. C. A 



that dragging inconvenience had been re- 
duced to accurates compactness, and put 
in its place — like the Guide, who stood back smiling. 

By this time most of the children had provided 
themselves with a toy. Sometimes half a dozen would 
occupy themselves with one engaging problem. They 
would even let a Guide play it with them, discovering 
thus many strange things. I sat down by a boy who 
had a box of cylinders he was pondering over. He 
took one up solemnly and demonstrated to me that 
it had something which might have been sand inside. 
"Soft,"' he said. Then he shook another cylinder: it 
sounded like small stones. "Loud," he said. It was 
a test of hearing. He was going to try to put them 
in the box in the order of their gradation of sound. The ! 
variation I soon discovered was quite minute. 

But the Guide to Wisdom was beckoning me, "Just 
see how beautifully Cecil plays this game," she said. 
I sat down by Cecil. He had a frame with two pieces 
of cloth tacked to it, each of which had six strings at- 
tached to its edge ; the game being to tie six bows, 
right. Ah ! there was the rub. Can you tell me out of 
hand howi many motions are involved in tying a bow? 
Cecil kuows. 

Bu there was a more interesting feature to this 
ease. No child in this, his own house, is obliged to do 
anything. He just falls naturally into doing something 
because there are so many interesting things to do. 
But Cecil had stood around idle and aimless for three 
months. With all the others busy around him he alone 
had stood aloof, until this toy had claimed him for its 
own. The day before he had tied those bows steadily 
for two houi's. Today he appeared inclined to repeat 
the feat. He had learned to do one thing perfectly; 
how entrancing! Soon he would make new concpiests. 

I had to go away for a little while. When I came 
back the table had been set, still by the children. One 
little tot was filling all the glasses with water. The 
pitcher was small, but still he had to hold it with both 
hands, and he was filling each glass just full enough, 
not too full, and not a drop fell on the table. In the 
kitchen four babies were standing on a bench by the 
table (their heads would have been about on a level 
with it if they had been on the floor), buttering toast, 
which other tots were toasting on the stove. It took 
a great deal of toast for twenty or thirty children, but 
they did it all themselves. 

There are great things planned for the Llano 
schools, but it is not difficult to have faith in their 
realization after even a brief investigation of this 
Great Beginning. 



The Western Comrade 



23 



On B 



Rock Creek 




This stream, which is the 
main source of supply for the 
Llano del Rio Community, 
reaches torrential proportions 
during the winter months. It 
is the plan to conserve all 
this immense run off and use 
it to irrigate additional vast 
tracts of the colony lands. 



Big Rock Canyon is ever 
popular with the colonists 
and many impormptu pic- 
nics are enjoyed by them. 




24 



The Western Comrade 



Llano Musings 




HEER up, brave hearts 
of the Llano, and fear 
not though the storms of the desert shake 
your tents, or the ignorance of the men- 
tally misnourished cause you discomfort, 
or if petty tyranny by a more petty offi- 
cial endeavors to destroy you — for you 
shall Tvin ! 

Persecutions, calumnies, criticisms and opposition 
are powerless in the face of loyal co-operative effort. 
The sneer and the criticism of the vicious, and the 
ignorant without and within your ranks will strength- 
en your resolve to succeed. It will act as fuel for the 
fire of your ideal. 

If co-operation is wrong in principle, you will fail; 
and the better you co-operate the quicker you will fall. 
But if it is right, then the storms ^^'ill only cull oiit the 
chaff and reveal the real and golden grain. This is 
true in every walk of life ; in art, in politics, in science. 
Every new idea will rouse against itself an inevitable 
storm of opposition by those who are unaccustomed or 
unadapted to such a new idea. Bruno, Voltaire, Galileo, 
Paine, Ingersoll and Marx, all great minds in science 
and philosophy, have had the venomous arrows of ig- 
norance and bigotry driven at their hearts by those who 
in logic ought to have been their friends. We must 
expect to get it from within as well as from without. 
But that which comes from Avithin is the more pain- 
ful and bitter. Still we must eject it from our system 
if we would be well. Against that which assails us 
from without we can be on our guard. The collectivity 
must defend itself against all foes. 

The problem of the Llano is and will be primarily 
a problem of collective production for collective use. 
To do that we need collective, harmonious action be- 
cause upon the harmonious action of the individuals i^i 
the organization depends the efficiency of the work;, 
and upon the efficiency with which the work is- done 
depends the results. All that is needed is men and 
women who are interested in- causing their enterprise 
to grow and develop, as a source of communal wealth. 
And those who want to make, it anything else than a 
source of wealth and comfort are seeing spooks. 

Llano is run by the living and for the living, and 
when the dead arrive We will find them a resting 
place. We care not whether, a man worships the 
ghosts of the past or of the future. We are neither a 
church or a seance room. We only band together to 
produce and enjoy material things in a material world, 
in a material way, and you can have your spirits in a 
bottle, in the skv or in a cabinet, so long as thev do 



By JOHN DEQUER 



not interfere with your efficient co- 
operation while you are on the job. 

We are organized for useful deeds — not to advance 
certain creeds. There are people whose minds are so 
metaphysical that they will live on faith six hours 
between each meal, but at meal time they are on earth 
four square. Now I have no quarrel with their met- 
aphysics, because "meta" means "beyond," "physic," 
we all understand, and when we are beyond that, gen- 
erally speaking, we are ciuite useless to ourselves and 
everyone else. 

Llano is not a dream world of fairy rose gardens and 
Arcadian ideals. It is a job of reclaiming the Mojave 
desert and making it a fit habitation. The Mojave is 
real. The job is real, and requires loyal red blooded 
co-operators to raise it to its highest possibilities, and 
we have them; great, noble, wholehearted souls A^ath 
faith in the land and each other. These are the bearers 
of the new ideal and idea to combine their small re- 
sources into a corporation for mutual benefit. They 
will succeed though they have to fight all the forces of 
ignorant scepticism from without and all the chimerical 
idealism from within. The realists face reality in a 
real way, meeting conditions in a practical way, and 
sticking with determined energy to tlie course they 
have chosen. They will reap a reward of plenty and 
peace, and that at no distant day. -"' 

To plow and to sow, to reap and to mow, to quary 
and to build, to eat and to dress, to laugh and to sing, 
to learn and to love ; all this is being done more fully 
as the days go by. 

Does not the Socialist party aim at all these things ? 
Yes, on a greater and grander scale. Socialism is 
building the great temple of humanity in which some 
day the race shall dwell. But while the temple is being 
builded why should we sit naked under the stars when 
we can organize with our comrades and build a house 
and have our needs supplied ? Llano cares for the now ; 
Socialism builds for the morrow. 

The, fact is that many people are not adaptable to 
anything new. They stray upon th,e stage of life suf- 
fering mental photophobia. They fear the light, hence 
they endeavor to stay in darkness. These cannot be 
saved and, like an inflamed vermiform appendix, must 
be eliminated or they destroy the body. This is cruel 
as Jaweh, but needful as bread. 

These people are not bad ; they are often very sin- 
cere. - But sincerity means little. No one ever dis- 
putes the sincerity of a rattle snake — only do not get 
friendly with him on that account. Sincerity is fine 
(Continued on Page 31) 



The Western Comrade 



25 



Wedding Bells 



1 


1— 1 11 


^^^ 





By CLARA 



T is the custom in 
Millville to prefix 
the names of the married ladies with the 
oeenpations of their respective husbands, 
ilrs. Judge T. M. Parker, whose husband 
is Justice of the Peace, city undertaker, 
stationer and furniture dealer, once ex- 
plained it in this way : 

"Wlien you say Mrs. Martin, or ilrs. Perkijis, or 
Mrs. Hawkins, or Mrs. Barnes, you don"t tell much; 
but when you say ilrs. Banker Martin or Mrs. Drug- 
gist Perkins or Reverend ilrs. Hawkins, or Mrs. Brick- 
layer Barnes, you tell a lot." Then she added: 

"And if I had my way we'd all say Mrs. Episcopal 
Banker Martin and Mrs. Presbyterian Druggist Perk- 
ins, and Mrs. Reverend Methodist Hawkins, and Mrs. 
Socialist Bricklayer Barnes. In that way we'd tell 
everything right away and save our breaths." Mrs. 
Baptist Judge Parker prided herself on being prac- 
tical. 

But this isn't a story of ilrs. Baptist Judge Parker. 
It's a story of her eighteen-year-old daughter Nellie, 
who with great pomp and rejoicing had just become 
Mrs. Beetgrower Preston and was living in her brand 
new cottage just at the edge of town, adjoining the 
old Thornton place upon which the Bricklaj^er So- 
cialist Barneses had recently moved. Mrs. Bricklayer 
Socialist Barnes also figures in the story as villainness 
or good fairy, depending upon your point of view. 

Mrs. Bricklayer Socialist Barnes was running a lit- 
tle one-wheeled hand plow over the east section of her 
back yard. Her face was very red and upon it was 
an expression of mingled joy and despair. It was her 
first experience at backyard, intensified ranching, or 
any other kind for that matter. But not for a moment 
did she falter. 

"Five feet one in her stockings and every inch a 
fighter," her husband often said of her proudly. 

She thought of that, and gripped the plow handle 
anew. She hated a coward or a quitter! Then she 
dropped the handle, turned quite pale, screamed and 
tried to climb a peach tree. "Oh, I almost stepped 
on it." 

"It" was a very large, very horny, horned toad. It 
scuttled across the plowed ground and disappeared in 
a friendly bush. 

Five-Feet-One returned to her plow, giggling sheep- 
ishly. "I guess it's because the nasty thing's big, 
fierce ancestors used to chase mine," she mused. "How 
some instincts do stick." 

"When the plowing was at length accomplished and 



R. CUSHMAN she had gone over the bed with a 
rake, she sat down in the spring 
sunshine on the warm, moist sod to read the directions 
on the paper packets of vegetable seeds. Mrs. Socialist 
Bricklayer Barnes might know how the little reptile 
of her recent experience happened to be her steenth 
cousin ; she might know something of how world bodies 
met, united and propagated ; and why, when a laborer 
has worked four hours he ought to begin looking for 
his hat and coat; but she distinctly did not know 
whether you planted lettuce and radish seeds a half 
inch in the ground or two feet. But she meant to find 
out. 

' ' Cover with one-fourth inch fine soil firmly pressed 
down," she read, and rose to obey directions. 

Her hand touched the dark, moist clods. It gave 
her a delicious sensation. Never in all her life before 
had she felt new turned sod. Suddenly she sat up 
alertly, her eyes blazing. Almost, almost she felt the 
warm earth throb ! 

"I belive it's true!" she whispered. "True! It's 
alive. All matter lives and breathes ! There's no such 
a thing as dead matter ! " 

She got down on her knees and laid her ear close 
to the sod. Breathless, she listened. Did she only 
imagine it, that soft stirring, like her sleeping baby's 
breath, or did she really hear it! It was spring! 

She forgot where she was, forgot her nearness to the 
road until a figure came between the horizon and her 
rapt eyes. It was Mrs. Baptist Judge Parker on her 
way to visit her newly married daughter. 

Mrs. Socialist Bricklayer Barnes again had cause 
to giggle sheepishly, as she assumed a position in keep- 
ing with the scheme of the universe and the usages 
of polite society. 

"Good morning, Mrs. Parker," she called cheer- 
fully. 

"Good morning," Mrs. Parker replied, not paus- 
ing for a moment, but even hastening her steps. 

u\Irs. S. B. looked after her thoughtfully. "I don't 
seem to get acquainted very fast. I suppose she thinks 
I'm crazy, standing on my head like that." 

Mrs. B. J. hurried pantingly on, not being built on 
hurrying lines. She was musing, too, or cogitating, 
let us say, as the word seemed to suit better her pro- 
portions. 

"I must write to the Los Angeles Times and find 
what it means when Socialists stand on their ears. 
Some free love ceremony, I'll be bound. I'm seared 
to have Nellie live down here by such people." 

Not realizing that she was a menace, J\Irs. Brick- 



26 



The Western Comrade 



layer Barnes M'ent on with her planting. She was 
commencing with the radishes when she heard the soft 
thud of running steps behind her, and turning saw Nel- 
lie, the new bride. She had on a little blue cap and 
kimona, daintily embroidered wStli a thousand careful 
stitches and who knows how many thousand girlish 
dreams. Her eyes were red and swollen and she spoke 
in short gasps. She must have run all the way across 
the beet field. 

' ' Oh hide me, hide me ! Don 't let mamma find me ! " 

Mrs. Socialist Bricklayer Barnes cast aside her 
seeds. 

"Of course I will. I'd like to rescue a good many 
young girls from their mammas. Come in quick." 

She seized the girl's hand and led her into the 
house. "Now," she said, sitting down in front of the 
little bride, quite like a doctor in consultation, "tell 
me all about it." 

"Oh I knew you'd help me. ]\Iamma says j^ou 
don't believe in marriage, and I don't either. Oh, how 
I hate it." 

Mrs. S. B. 's eyes grew big. "I not believe in mar- 
riage ! ' " 

"Yes, she says it's true because you keep your 
certificate in a book on chickens. She found out tlie 
day she came to see you." 

"Oh," said Mrs. S. B., smiling at some recollection, 
' ' The scrap of paper — Let 's not talk about me, let 's talk 
about you. You don't want to be married. Tell me 
why. ' ' 

Crimson floods swept the girl's face. "I can't,'' 
she whispered. 

"Oh yes you can. Come! Don't you love your 
husband? I'm sure you did before you married him. 
I used to watch you go by together." 

Nellie stole a look at her face. She did not seem in 
the least horrified. She had the same kind of a smile 



T h 



that she had when she was talking about the weather, 
"^^ery low the little bride began. 

"I thought I loved him, but I don't now. I hate 
him." 

"Why?" 

"I know the secret."' 

"'\Yhat secret?" 

"The married woman's secret." Lower and lower. 

"Yes? What's that?" 

"You know,'' she whispered. "It's that men are 
beasts." 

Mrs. S. B. frowned and clinched her hands. Five 
feet one she was, and every inch a fighter. "Has your 
liusband abused you?'' 

Nellie shook her head. "No, biit I know." 

"Yes? How do you know, my dear?" 

"After mamma and every one had left, he said: 
'Thank God they've gone at last! Now you're all 
mine!' Then he kissed me and — and — oh, I can't tell 
the rest ! He never kissed me like that before. And 
then I knew. And whenever he comes near me I begin 
to shake. I can't help it. He has moved out into 
the tank house. 

"Why, the poor boy!'' 

The girl rose, wringing her hands. "Oh, what 
shall I do? I can't go back! I can't! And I can't tell 
mamma. She'd say, '"WHiom God hath joined together 
let no man put asunder.' And she'd make me go back. 
And she knew, too ! Knew and wouldn't tell me! Just 
let me walk right into a trap. That's the Avay they 
treat girls — they set traps for girls — the men do — and 
the women sit back and let us walk right into them! 
Even your own mother." 

She poured out all her disillusion, her pent-\ip grief 
and fear. 

"And I know why they do it, too. Oli, I figured 
fContimied on Page 30) 



par 



THEY grace the velvet depths of 
Profit's pulpits 
And bid the burdened meekly bear their yoke ; 
Denouncing those brave spirits as "low culprits" 
Who tiount the masters and the slaves provoke. 

They plj' perfervid pens in prostitution 

(Without the spur that speeds the strumpet's shame). 
Whose genius could enkindle revolution 

In souls yet stranger to the sacred flame. 

They prate of "peace'' and, in the guise of playing. 
Inculcate murder in tlie mind of yoiith ; 



By A. F. GANNON 



And slyly gild the gory art of slay- 
ing 
Till each child spurns the native gold of ruth. 

They glibly dwell upon tiu-' nation's "mission." 
And cry: "To arms!'' on the pretext of peace. 

Until the stupid mass, swayed by attrition, 
Conceives the thouglit bred in it's brain obese. 

And ye who sit supine amid the splendor 

Of high ideals or a love of self. 
Betimes shall waken or be forced to render 

Your blood and manhood to these pimps of pelf! 



The Western Comrade 



27 



jEnthusiasm Rules Llano 



(Continued from Page 21) 



bring to fruitiou the hope of tlie 
lages. Plato sa-\v it aud described it 
[well ; St. Simou sa^v it also aud 
ried it ; Robert Owen lived it for 
|ai time ; Oneida was the mecca for 
ears; Ruskin saw devotees pour 
; East Aurora builded great and 
lolid; Ziou City contained zealots 
|of an idea. These and other great 
Jemancipatory efforts tilled the mind 
of the man in question. Nothing 
Ibut auroras, tinted and alluring, 
held his attention. He would talk 
to none that were not in sympathy 
with him and his ideas. He con- 
structed homes, cities, palaces, es- 
tates — in fact air castles, and 
strange to say, for these dreams he 
ever got ready and receptive audi- 
ences too. 

At last fortune favored him and 
he got away from business long 
enough to run to the colony and 
look it over," as the saying goes. 
The only thing that charmed him 
was the homes of next year, the 
views of the towering, sky-piercing 
crests, snow covered and bewilder- 
ing in sun and moonshine, the fast 
automobile ride, the redolent odors 
of exhaling spring, the drizzle of 
the night, all of which were invig- 
orating. He did not see a thing 
that he came to see. The great 
plain to the north and east with 
its long undulations dissolving in 
the distance; changing colors, lights 
and shadows. These were the 
things he saw and appreciated. 

The things the man did not see, 
nor could he see if he had tried, 
was the land, water, adobe houses, 
little, not palaces ; tents, ungainly 
barns, long and short horn cattle; 
plebeian rabbits ; fluft'y chickens 
[ and the season's dependability. He 
i joined. 

The man in question later re- 
' turned bag and baggage. He was 
filled with enthusiasm at first. He 
was going to have that city whether 
or no. The electric lights must 
bloom on each yucca tree and a 
long line of lights would adorn the 
^Madre hills from the Big Rock to 
the ifeseal, a distance of twelve 
miles. The Santa Fe, thirty-five 
miles away, winding its way 
through the jagged hills to the 
south, must run into a shaft of 



light from a giant searchlight 
placed upon the dream tower hun- 
dreds of feet in height. Los An- 
geles ninety miles away must be 
startled and entertained nightly by 
the weird reflections in the heavens 
of the wonders of Llano. These 
simple things were to be but a few 
of the achievements that he had 
come to the colony to perform. 

For a couple of Weeks he 
"lazed" around awaiting some 
sort of move in this direction and 
was immeasurably pained to see 
none. He, however, noticed men 
being taken in autos to work at the 
lime kiln, to the Hubbard place, to 
the Tighlman ranch and to the land 
at Mescal. He observed men with 
picks and shovels and hoes going 
into the fields and orchards. He 
saw men driving wagons filled with 
lumber, bags, and hay. He noticed 
the dairj' cows turned into this 
field and into that and later saw 
them driven to the long barn and 
he saw the ugly sight of milkers 
milking the cows and yet later, he 
saw the butter on the tables and 
milk there too, and he saw the 
churn at work and wrappers busy 
putting it up in pound packages. 
He went to the comissary and saw 
men and women buying things and 
taking them home, ilost astonish- 
ing of all, he heard preparations 
for work here and there. ^York ! 
Work! What a shock. This city 
of his was not to be built by work 
but by genii hands. 

This man wandered about in a 
daze for a month and finally made 
the discovery that work is the basis 
of everything; that if a dream city 
is to be built the masons must be 
there ; big wagons must haul the 
brick and stone and sand and lime. 
The carpenters must saw and ham- I 
mer and the landscape man must '- 
bend his back and sweat over every 
flower or bush ; that aching muscles 
must be the reward of this thing to 
be. Astonishing discovery ! 

With the discovery came a new 
incentive to work at something 
worth while. The dreams, like a 
shimmering drapery, dropped off 
and lay in the distant land of fox 
fire. A new psychology had l)een 
(Continued on Page 29) 



I( you think the war -in Europe 
has shattered Socialism, read L. B. 
Boudin's famous book, 

"Socialism 
and War" 



and let this eminent author, who is 
one of the foremost in the Socialist 
ranks, put you right. Socialism is 
NOT shattered. It is NOT even 
dented. 

As a matter of fact, it is only upon 
applying the magic touch of Socialist 
interpretation that the war reveals its 
fundamental causes, meaning and con- 
sequences. Instead of destroying So- 
cialist theory, the war has vindicat- 
ed it. 

In the course of a very suggestive 
historical analysis, Boudin divides the 
life history of capitalist society into 
three epochs — two of them warlike and 
one peaceful. In the era when capital- 
ism is just emerging out of feudalism it 
wages a series of bloody wars for the 
extension of territory. The second 
epoch is the pacific period of capitalist 
internal development. Having secured 
access to the sea, having formed the 
nation and secured its own dominance 
within the nation, the capitalist class 
enters upon an era of peace in order to 
develop its resources and power at 
home. 

The third epoch, the present one in 
which imperialism plays a dominant 
part, is essentially warlike; and its 
essential economic characteristic is the 
exportation of capital, principally in 
the form of iron and steel. The lead- 
ing industrial nations of the world, no 
longer having a market at home which 
can be industrialized by the purchase 
and introduction of industrial means of 
production, the nations strive to se- 
cure control of undeveloped countries 
which can be "developed" in the sense 
of being industrially revolutionized. 

After the general consideration of 
the economics and ideology of the war. 
Boudin, in the chapter on the "Imme- 
diate Causes of the War and the 
Stakes Involved," goes deep into the 
complicated mass of international re- 
lations that brought about the war. 

After thisi very interesting analysis 
of the war. Boudin takes up the at- 
titude of the Socialists. 

He also applies the class struggle 
theory to the race problem, and show^s 
how truly reactionary are the race 
theories of imperialism, and how pro- 
gressive the Socialist theory of the 
same subject is. Boudin develops a 
theory of nationalism, internationalism, 
war and peace, which is truly Marxian 
in conception and Socialistic in outlook. 

Send $1.10 to The Western Comrade. 
S20 California Building, Los Angeles. 
Cal., and we will promptly have the 
book forwarded to you, postpaid. 



Llano Rug Works 

Rugs from old carpets. Rag rugs 
a specialty. Room size rugs as 
well as small sizes at Los Angeles 
prices. We pay freight both ways. 
Write for information or ship di- 
rect to Rug Department, Llano del 
Rio Colony, Llano, Calif. 



28 



The Western Comrade 



THE WESTERN COMRADE 



Entered as second-class matter at the 
post ofBce at Los Angeles, Cal. 

526 California Bldg., Los Angeles, Cal. 

Subscription Price Fifty Cents a Year 
In Clubs of Four Twenty-five Cents 

Job Harriman, Managing Editor 

Frank E. Wolfe, Editor 
Frank H. Ware, Associate Editor 

Vol. Ill February, 1916 No. 10 

TyASHINGTON sends out a 
telegram that Germany has 
offered Nicaragua more money 
than the United States for the 
Nicaraguan canal route, which, ac- 
cording- to some senators, is an ar- 
gument in favor of an immediate 
ratification of the pending treaty, 
and to others believe there is an 
ulterior purpose behind it. "Watch 
for the wave of preparedness talk 
now. 

# # * 

A USTRALIA is in a state of un- 
rest. The Socialist party there 
has taken a position against the war 
and has vigorously fought enlist- 
ment. Miss Pankhurst, who recent- 
ly spoke at Melbourne on "Shall 
Men Enlist?" was interrupted by 
soldiers who were sent to the meet- 
ing for the purpose of breaking it 
up. They almost succeeded in pre- 
cipitating a riot, but finally Miss 
Pankhurst concluded her speech. 

* # # 

INDUSTRIAL affairs in Australia 
are in turmoil. At Broken Hill 
in New South Wales thousands of 
miners are on strike. In the same 
state coke workers are also on strike 
for higher wages. The effect of the 
strike will probably be far-reaching 
as New Castle steel works in Eng- 
land depend on this supply. Re- 
ports say that other industries are 
affected and great signs of general 
uneasiness. Conscription may be re- 
sorted to. 

4- ^^ ^ 

"GANGLAND has called again for 
her single men to join the 
army. This proclamation will have 
the effect of enrolling all single men 
of military age who have not been 
exempted. This really means con- 
scription. Eighteen-year-old boys 
are now being pressed into the ser- 
vice. The value of murder train- 
ing of the Boy Scouts will now be 
demonstrated. 



t 



a 



t 1 



Sorrow ripens the soul- — AU- 
GUST RODIN. 

All that eats think is evil. — 
HILLAIRE BELLOC. 

My reputation will take care of 
itself.— WOODROW WILSON. 

Our navy is too weak to be a 
bully.— REAR ADMIRAL STAN- 
FORD. 

The greatest bonehead T ever 
saw accused me of being one. — 
GEORGE PICKETT. 

I promise the House at some fu- 
ture time to be a great deal better. 
—MEYER LONDON. 

Firm refusal unavailing, I have 
been forced to submit to the peo- 
ple's will.— YUAN SHIH-KAI. 

I don't believe in Woman Suf- 
frage and I haven't any respect for 
women who dabble in such trash. — 
HETTY GREEN. 

Be not dumb driven slaves in the 
army of destruction, be heroes in 
the army of reconstruction. — 
HELEN KELLER. 

Any man who will sabotage when 
he's working for himself hasn't got 
sense enough to be an I. W. W. — 
GEORGE GIBBONS. 

In marriage man finds not his 
mate but his housemate. It is for- 
tunate for the system that the mar- 
ried man soOn loses all desire for 
his mate in captivity. — MARION 
COX. 

We know that hundreds of com- 
rades have joined the Llano Colony 
and we would not knowingly do 
aught to in any sense jeopardize 
their interests.' — THOMAS W. 
WILLIAMS. 

The mind will not develop unless 
the brain is rested with enjoyment 
and relief from all care, and enjoys 
an intense excitement when such 
excitement results only in pleasure. 
—JOB HARRIMAN. 

I have no country to fight for ; 
my country is the earth ; I am a 
citizen of the world. I would not 
violate my principles for God, much 
less for a crazy kaiser, a savage 
czar, a degenerate king, or a gang 
of pot-bellied parasites^— EUGENE 
V. DEBS. 



Oh, our women, they are sublime ! 
—GEN. JOFFRE. 

Call me anything but Colonel. — 
WM. HOWARD TAPT. 

I know positively that a food 
trust is being organized. — GIP- 
PORD PINCHOT. 

Ignorance is the only soil in 
which tyranny can fatt