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Full text of "What we cook on Cape Cod"

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What We Cook 



On Cape Cod 



FOREWORD BY 
JOSEPH C. LINCOLN 



PUBLISHED BY THE 
VILLAGE IMPROVEMENT SOCIETY 
BARNSTABLE, MASS. 






Copyright, 1911 
By The Barnstable Village Improvement Society 






Printed by F. B. & F. P. Goss, Hyannis, Mass. 



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A Cape Cod cook book! you who stray 
Far from the old sand-bordered Bay, 
The cranberry bogs, the tossing pines, 
The wind-swept beaches frothing lines, 
"You city dwellers who, like me, 
Were children, playing by the sea, 
Whose fathers manned the vanished ships — 
Hark! do I hear you smack your lips? 

A Cape Cod cook book! My oh my! 
I know that twinkle on your eye, 
And why you're pricking up your ears, 
You've turned the clock back thirty years. 
I know that smile of yours; it tells 
Of chowder, luscious as it smells; 
And when you laugh aloud, you dream 
Of berry dumpling, bathed in cream. 

A Cape Cod cook book! Why, I'll bet 
The doughnut crock could tempt you yet! 
Those Cape Cod doughnuts! Yes you'll take 
A few of those, and then some cake — 
The frosted kinds — and — let me see — 
Some pie, of course, and — Mercy me! 
You can't go on; it wouldn't do! 
One takes on weight at forty-two. 

A Cape Cod cook book! Here they are! 
A breath from every cookie jar, 
A whiff from ovens spicy sweet, 
Two hundred secrets — good to eat! 
Thanksgiving, clambake, picnic grove, 
Each lends a taste, a treasure trove; 
And here they are for you to buy — 
What's that? You've bought one? So have I. 

Joseph C. Lincoln. 
Harwichport, Mass., August, 1911. 



■^g Sttitx g£- 



Foreword 3 

Bread 5 

Muffins 12 

Soups 13 

Fish 18 

bhellfish 21 

Meats 25 

Vegetables 32 

Salads and Salad Dressings 36 

Eggs, Cheese and Sandwiches 39 

For the Chafing Dish 42 

Puddings 46 

Cold Desserts and Ices 50 

Doughnuts, Cookies and Gingerbread 54 

Cake 60 

Pastry 72 

Pickles and Preserves 75 

Miscellaneous 80 



«*S ln>a& &- 



Polly's Nut Bread. — Two cups of graham and one cup of 
white flour, one-quarter cup of sugar, one teaspoonful of soda and 
one-half teaspoonful of salt. Sift together and add any bran 
that may remain in the sifter. Add one-half cup of molasses, 
one and one- half cups of sour milk and one cup of walnut meats. 
Bake in bread pan three-quarters of an hour. — [* * * * 

Maple Sugar Biscuit. — One pint of flour, two rounding tea- 
spoonfuls of baking powder, one-quarter teaspoonful of salt. Sift 
together and add one rounding tablespoonful of butter worked into 
the flour, add one-half cup of maple sugar broken in pieces the 
size of a pea. Add a half cup of milk and enough more to make 
a dough a little stiffer than for biscuits. "Work on the bread board 
till well mixed. Roll and cut with small biscuit cutter. Bake in a 
quick oven. If made and baked right this will be like baking pow- 
der biscuit with brown spots of melted sugar through them. — 
[Mrs. E. A. Handy. 

Virginia Batter Bread. — One quart of milk brought to the 
boiling point, one pint of corn meal, butter the size of an egg, 
one teaspoonful of salt. Cook and stir like mush. When cold 
add six eggs well beaten, one pint of cream or buttermilk in 
which a teaspoonful of soda has been dissolved. Put in a baking 
dish and cover till it rises. Bake. — [Mrs. J. D. Livingston. 

(2) [5] 



WHAT WE COOK 



Improved Popovers. — Two eggs beaten very light, one and 
one-half cups milk, one and one-half cups pastry flour, one-half 
teaspoonful salt. Beat together with an egg beater five minutes. 
Grease the cups and set on the stove to heat. Drop a piece of 
butter the size of a pea in each cup and let it melt. This gives 
a crisp crust to the popover. Bake in stone cups half an hour 
or until they are firm and will not fall when taken out. — [Mrs. 
E. A. Handy. 

Whole Wheat Bread. — Three cups of whole wheat flour, 
three teaspoonfuls of baking powder, one-half teaspoonful of salt, 
two teaspoonfuls of sugar, milk. Sift together thoroughly the 
flour, baking powder, salt and sugar, add enough milk to make a 
dough just stiff enough to handle conveniently. Shape into a 
loaf and place in a deep, buttered pan, handling as little as pos- 
sible. Allow it to stand five minutes before putting in the oven. 
Bake slowly and for a longer time than for white bread. Protect 
the loaf with a piece of buttered paper, putting the buttered side 
next the bread. — [Mrs. H. M. Hatchings. 

Brown Bread. — Three cups of rye meal, three cups of corn 
meal, one pint of molasses, one quart of sour milk, half cream if 
possible, one teaspoonful of soda, salt. Steam five hours. — [Mrs. 
Vaughan Bacon. 

Sally Lunn, for Tea. — Three eggs well beaten, one cup of 
warm milk, two tablespoonfuls of butter, two tablespoonfuls of 
sugar, one-half an yeast cake, three cups of flour. Set to rise 
about twelve o'clock and an hour before supper put in muffin pans 
to rise again for half an hour, then bake. — [Mrs. George Hussey. 

[6] 



ON CAPE COD 



Oat Meal Bread. — Pour one quart of boiling water over one 
pint of Quaker Rolled Oats. When hike warm add one small 
cup of molasses, one-half of a yeast cake dissolved in one cup of 
water, one teaspoonful of salt, two quarts of flour sifted or cut in. 
Let rise over night. Do not stir or knead in the morning. Let 
it rise a short time in pans before baking. This makes one dozen 
muffins or two loaves. — [Mrs. Ruth E. Chipman. 

*Toous Bread. — Two cups of Indian meal, one cup of Hour, 
two cups of sweet milk, one cup of sour milk, one-half cup of 
molasses, salt, one tablespoonful of soda. Boil four hours. Put 
in the oven if you like. — [Mrs. J. M. Day. 

♦Scotch Bread. — One pound of flour, scant half cup of sugar, 
half a pound of butter. Mix butter and sugar, then add the flour ; 
mix without liquid until it is a smooth paste. Roll out, not too 
thin ; nip round the edges. — [E. L. F. 

Something New in Corn Bread. — One and one-quarter cups 
Hour, three-quarters cup corn meal, two teaspoonfuls baking- 
powder, one-half teaspoonful salt. Sift together and work in 
two tablespoons butter. Add one well beaten egg and one-half 
cup milk. Beat all together and drop in spoonfuls on buttered 
tin. Bake in moderate oven. — [Mrs. E. A. Handy. 

Brown Bread. — Two cups of graham flour, one cup of corn 
meal, one cup of molasses, one teaspoon of soda, dissolved in 
the milk, one teaspoonful of salt, one cup of sour milk, one cup 
of sweet milk. Steam four hours. — [Mrs. F. H. Thayer. 

*Frotti Midsummer Cook Book . 

[7] 



WHAT WE COOK 



Breakfast Gems. — One cup of milk, one cup of water, one 
well beaten egg, one tablespoonful of melted butter, one table- 
spoonful of baking powder sifted with two cups of flour. Mix 
in the order given and pour into iron gem pans heated hot, first 
putting a piece of butter in each partition. Bake quickly in a 
very hot oven. — [Mrs. F. B. Goss. 

Water Gems. — Two cups of water, add one cup of milk, two 
and one-half cups of flour, beat about five minutes. Bake in very 
hot gem pans very freely buttered. Bake thirty-five minutes. — 
[Mrs. Davis. 

German Apple Cake. — One and one-half tablespoonfuls of 
butter and two and one-half tablespoonfuls of sugar beaten to a 
cream. Three cups of flour sifted with two teaspoonfuls of baking 
powder, add to butter and sugar. Add to this three well beaten 
eggs and enough rich milk to make a dough stiff enough to handle. 
Roll dough to fit pans. Slice apples very thin and lay them on the 
dough plentifully ; sprinkle with a little cinnamon and sugar. 
Bake in a medium oven. — [Mrs. M. A. Timken. 

Cream Biscuit. — One quart of flour, four teaspoonfuls of bak- 
ing powder, one teaspoonful of salt, sift twice, one-quarter cup 
of thick cream and enough milk to make a stiff dough. Work 
on the board a few minutes and cut with small round cutter. 
For picnics try cutting these or any baking powder biscuit the 
size and shape of half a slice of bread. Bake and when cool 
split and fill with any sandwich filling. Also try rolling the 
dough rather thin and spreading one-half with chopped ham, lay the 
other half on top and cut in squares and bake. — [Mrs. E. A. Handy 

[8] 



ON CAPE COD 



Parker. House Rolls. — Ingredients: One quart of flour, one 
yeast cake, one and one-half cups of milk, one-quarter of a cup of 
sugar, one-quarter of a cup of butter, a very little salt. Put salt 
and sugar into flour, then add the yeast cake after dissolving in 
one-quarter of a cup of luke warm water. Heat the milk and add 
the butter, use when nearly cool. Raise twice, then mould and 
raise again. Bake in a good oven. — [Mrs. E. D. Crocker. 

German Apple Cake. — Make a dough as given for Apple 
Short Cake. When it is in the pan ready for the oven, cover thick 
with apples peeled, cored and cut in eighths. Pour over a mixture 
made of one teaspoouful flour, three teaspooufuls brown sugar, 
one-half teaspoonful cinnamon, three tablespoonfuls milk. Bake 
iu hot oven about twenty minutes. Serve hot. — [Mrs. E. A. Handy. 

Huckleberry Griddle Cakes. — One well beateu egg, one pint 
of milk, one teaspoonful of baking powder, one tablespoonful of 
sugar, one pint of berries, flour. Bake on a griddle in thin cakes. 
— [Mrs. George Hussey. 

Fruit Rolls. — Two cups of flour, one-half cup of lard, one 
egg, one-half cup of milk and four scant teaspooufuls of baking 
powder. Roll out and spread with butter and sugar, one cup of 
chopped raisins and one-half cup of nuts. Roll up and cut across, 
then bake.— [Mrs. Job C. Cobb. 

Drop Biscuit. — One cup of cream, one cup of sour milk, one 
egg, one-half teaspoonful of soda and a little salt, flour for a 
stiff batter. Drop in spoonfuls on a battered tin and bake in 
a quick oven. — [Mrs. Mary Freeman Hinckley. 

[9] 



WHAT WE COOK 



Apple Short Cake. — Two cups sifted pastry flour, two tea- 
spoonfuls baking powder, one teaspoonful salt, one tablespoonful 
butter, one tablespoonful lard, one egg, one-half cup milk. Sift 
the dry ingredients together and work in the butter and lard. 
Beat the egg light and add the milk. Mix this with the flour, 
etc. Work till smooth and roll out to fit a round pan. Bake 
and split, fill with hot apple sauce. This can be made without 
the egg but is not nearly as good. — [Mrs. E. A. Handy. 

Potato Rolls. — Scald one cup of milk with one tablespoonful 
of butter and one of sugar. When cool add one teaspoonful of 
salt and one-quarter cake of yeast dissolved in a little water, add 
flour enough to make a sponge. Let it rise to double its bulk 
then add two beaten eggs and three small hot boiled potatoes 
rubbed through a sieve. Add flour enough to make it as stiff as 
bread dough, let it rise again. Roll out and cut with a biscuit 
cutter. Let them rise, and bake ten minutes. Very good. — [Mrs. 
F. H. Thayer. 

Coffee Cakes. — Cream one cup of butter with three cups of 
sugar, add three well beaten eggs, one cup of milk, three tea- 
spoonfuls of baking powder and flour enough to roll out. Roll 
half an inch thick, sprinkle with cinnamon and roll up. Cut 
half an inch across ; dip one end in sugar and bake sugar side 

Bkown Bread. — One cup of Indian meal, one cup of rye meal, 
one cup of bread flour, one cup of molasses, two level teaspoon- 
f ills of soda, a little salt, two cups of water. Steam four hours- 
One cup of raisins may be added. — [Mrs. Leslie Jones. 

[10] 



ON CAPE COD 



Corn Bread Omelet. — Sift together three-quarters of a cup of 
com meal, one-quarter of a cup of flour, one-half a teaspoon salt, 
oue tablespoon sugar. Beat one egg very light and add one-half 
a cup of sour milk, one-half a cup of sweet milk and one-fourth 
teaspoon soda dissolved in a little of the sweet milk. Beat this 
into the dry mixture and pour into a hot frying pan in which there 
is a large tablespoon melted butter. Let it heat for a minute on 
the stove and then pour gently over it one cup of sweet milk. 
Bake in a moderate oven half au hour. This should be creamy 
and yet firm enough to cut and serve. — [Mrs. E. A. Handy. 



Pone. — Pour one cup of boiling water over oue cup of white 
corn meal, let stand till hike warm. Separate the yolks of three 
eggs and beat them iuto the meal one at a time. Stir in one and 
one-half cups of luke warm milk, a pinch of salt, one small tea- 
spoonful of baking powder and butter the size of an egg. Bake 
one-half hour. — [Mrs. Davis. 

French Rusks. Two cups of scalded milk, one quarter of a 
cup of butter, one quarter of a cup of sugar, one teaspoonful of 
salt, one yeast cake dissolved in one-quarter of a cup of warm 
water and three cups of flour. Make a batter of all the ingred- 
ients and let it rise ; wheu risen add an egg and flour enough to 
knead. Let it rise and shape as rolls. When nearly done brush 
with vanilla and water and sprinkle with sugar. Bake in a mod- 
erate oven. — [Mrs. Leslie Jones. 

Crisped Crackers. — Split butter crackers and spread thinly 
with butter. Put in a pan and brown in the oven. Serve with 
soup. — [* * * * 

[11] 



WHAT WE COOK 



«*g mumitH §*- 



Fried Rye Muffins. — One and one-half cups rye meal, one and 
one-half cups white flour, one teaspoonful salt, three teaspoonfuls 
baking powder, one tablespoonful of sugar. Sift together and add 
two eggs beaten light and one cup of milk. Drop in spoonfuls in 
smoking hot fat and fry like doughnuts. — [Mrs. E. A. Handy. 

Muffins. — Two cups of flour, four teaspoonfuls of baking 
powder, half a teaspoonful of salt, one tablespoonful of sugar, 
sift together. Add one well beaten egg, one cup of milk and 
two tablespoonfuls of melted butter. — [Miss Annie Gorham 
Hinckley. 

Oatmeal Muffins. — One cup Quaker oats, pour over them 
one pint boiling water. Let stand three hours, then add one- 
half cup molasses, one teaspoonful (rounded) salt, one-half 
yeast cake dissolved in one-half cup warm water, 1 quart bread 
flour or enough to make a stiff batter. Beat well and rise over 
night. In the morning beat it hard and fill muffin pans. When 
it rises to double the size bake. Rub with butter while hot. 
This is good baked in a loaf. — [Mrs. E. A. Handy. 

[12] 



ON CAPE COD 



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Lettcce Sour. — Take a knuckle of veal, and boil gently on 
the back of the range 5 hours. Set away to cool, and skim off 
the fat when cold. Take two heads of lettuce, and boil in the 
stock till it is colored. Thicken with a little flour, add a cup of 
cream. — [Miss Julia G. Davis. 

*Clam Broth with Whipped Cream. — To a quart of clams, 
add a pint of water, and simmer on the back of the range an 
hour. Take off and strain. Have bouillon cups filled with hot 
water five minutes or more before serving. Heat broth, turn 
water from cups and fill with broth about two-thirds full. Cover 
with whipped cream. — [Miss Julia G. Davis. 

♦Lobster Soup. — Put the bones of the lobster on to boil in water 
enough to cover them. Boil one quart of milk. Fry one slice of 
onion cut fine in one tablespoouful of butter. When the onion 
is yellow skim it out and add to the butter two tablespoonfuls of 
flour. Add gradually the boiling milk. Season highly with salt 
and pepper. Boil fifteen or twenty minutes. Dry the coral and 
sift it into the soup. Add enough of the water in which the bones 
were boiled to make it the proper thickness. Put the fat of the 
lobster into the tureen. Pour the soup over it. Add one cup of 
lobster meat cut in small pieces. — [Miss II. L. Day. 

"From the Midsummer Cook Book. 

[13] 



WHAT WE COOK 



Asparagus Stew. — One quart of good beef stock, add one 
can of asparagus tips and boil till tender. Add the following 
meat balls : Take equal quantities of round of beef and fresh 
pork chopped very fine. Add two or three onions, chopped and 
fried in butter, a small quantity of soaked bread, five eggs, pep- 
per and salt. Mix well and make into small balls, roll in cracker 
dust or zwiback. Boil in the soup till tender. ■ Add a little 
thickening and a little parsley. Serve hot. — [Mrs. M. A. Tim- 
ken. 

St. Gemain Soup. — Put one can of peas (leaving out half a 
cup) into a stew pan, add one-half an onion, a bit of bay leaf, a 
sprig of parsley, a bit of mace, half a teaspoonful of sugar, one 
teaspoonful of salt, one saltspoonful of pepper. Simmer one-half 
hour, mash and add three cups of stock (or water). Let it come 
to the boiling point and rub through a sieve. Melt one table- 
spoonful of butter, add one tablespoonful of cornstarch and pour 
on slowly the hot stock. Cook ten minutes, add one cup of milk 
and the remainder of the peas. Heat and serve with croutons. 
— [Mrs. H. M. Hutchings. 

Tomato Soup for Canning. — One peck of ripe tomatoes, 
washed and cut in pieces. Wet six tablespoonfuls of cornstarch 
in enough water to make it smooth and add to the tomatoes. 
Fry four large onions in half a pound of butter until well browned 
but not burned. Put with the tomatoes and boil until thoroughly 
cooked, stirring all the time. Add one pound of white sugar, 
salt and pepper to taste and two quarts of boiling water. Strain 
through a colander and then through a cheese cloth. Put back on 
the stove and bring to a boil and can. — [Mrs. Peterson. 

[14] 



ON CAPE COD 



Clahkt Soup. — Pour one pint of boiling water into one pint 
of claret and add a little lemon juice and half a cup of sugar. 
Moisten one tablespoonful of arrowroot with cold water and add 
to the hot soup. Put in the double boiler for a few minutes and 
add a little cooked tapioca before serving. — [Mrs. J. D. Livings- 
ton. 

Baked Bean Soup. — Boil cold baked beans with a sliced 
onion and a little water and stewed tomato till soft, press through 
a sieve, add one tablespoonful of butter rubbed smooth with one 
tablespoonful of flour and boil up once. — [Mrs. E. A. Handy. 

Vegetable Soup Without Stock. — One-third cup of carrot, 
one and one-half cups of potato, one-third cup of turnip, one- 
half cup of celery, one-half an ouiou, one quart of water, one- 
half tablespoonful of finely chopped parsley, five tablespoonfuls 
of butter, salt and pepper. Wash and scrape carrot, wash and 
pare potatoes and turnip, cut in dice, peel onion and slice very 
thin. Prepare the vegetables before measuring. Cook all the 
vegetables except the potatoes in four tablespoonfuls of butter 
for ten minutes stirring all the time, add the potatoes and cook 
two minutes, add the water and boil one hour. Add the remain- 
ing butter and the parsley. Season with salt and pepper. — [Mrs. 
Maurice Hallett. 

Chicken Gumbo. — Take the necks, backs and wings of three 
broilers, one quart of okra, six large tomatoes skinned and sliced, 
one large onion chopped fine, two bell peppers sliced without 
seeds, two slices of bacon chopped fine. Fry all in butter, put- 
ting in the okra last. Put in a soup kettle with two quarts of 
water and simmer two hours. Add a little cooked rice and 
serve. — [Mrs. J. D. Livingston. 

[15] 



WHAT WE COOK 



Potato Soup. — Boil three good-sized potatoes in water. Boil 
one pint milk. Fry one slice onion, one carrot, one slice turnip, 
cut fine, in one heaping tablespoonful butter until yellow. Skim 
out, and add to the potato also one sprig of parsley. Rub the 
potato through a strainer and add to the milk. Stir one heaping 
tablespoonful flour into the butter in which the vegetables were 
cooked and add to the soup, with one teaspoonful salt, one salt- 
spoonful pepper. Strain and serve. — [Miss H. L. Day. 

Lobster Soup. — One good-sized or two small lobsters chopped 
not very fine, three hard crackers pounded very fine. Mix the 
cracker and tomalley with a piece of butter size of an egg. Add 
pepper and salt to taste and work all well together. Boil one 
quart of milk and pour gradually over the paste, stirring well. 
Then put in the chopped lobster and boil up once, stirring all the 
time. Grate the coral and add, if you have it. — [Miss H. L. Day. 

Black Bean Soup. — Soak one pint of black beans over night, 
the next morning drain them and boil in two quarts of fresh 
water. Slice and fry one small onion in a tablespoonful butter, 
add it to the beans, and celery root if you have it, with one- 
quarter of a pound of salt pork or a ham bone. Simmer four or 
five hours until the beans soften. Add cold water often to check 
boiling, leaving two quarts of water when done. Rub the beans 
through a colander, boil again and add a pinch of salt, a pinch 
of red pepper, a saltspoonful of mustard, a scant tablespoonful 
of flour, and a tablespoonful of butter rubbed together to prevent 
the beans from settling. Slice two hard boiled eggs and half a 
lemon thin and place in the tureen, add half a glass of sherry to 
the soup and pour over eggs and lemon. — [Grace B. Holway. 

[16] 



ON CAPE COD 



Lobsteh Soil*. — Put the bones of the lobster on to boil in 
water enough to cover them. Boil one quart of milk. Fry one 
onion cut fine in a tablespoonful of butter till yellow, skim out 
the onion and add to the butter two tablespoonfuls of flour. Add 
gradually to the boiling milk. Season highly with salt and 
pepper. Boil fifteen or twenty minutes. Dry the coral and sift 
it into the soup. Add enough of the water in which the bones 
were boiled to make it the proper thickness. Put the fat of the 
lobster into the tureen and pour the soup over it. Add one cup 
of lobster meat cut in small pieces. — [Miss H. L. Day. 

Sali's Polish Soup. — Go into the garden and gather all kinds 
of young vegetables, carrots, string and shell beans, small peas, 
pod and all, young onions, a bit of celery and a sprig of parsley. 
This makes a good combination. Cut a few potatoes into inch 
cubes, add to the other vegetables cut up, and boil till they are 
tender. Add a tablespoonful of butter rubbed smooth with a 
tablespoonful of flour, salt and pepper to taste. Serve with 
croutons made by buttering stale bread and cutting it in inch 
squares and browning in a slow oven. — [Amy L. Handy. 



[17] 



WHAT WE COOK 



«m mau m* 



Kedgeree. — Pat one cupful of boiled rice and one-half pound 
shredded codfish in a baking dish. Make a sauce by melting one 
tablespoonful of butter and one of flour in a saucepan, add one 
cup of milk, stir till thick, add the yolks of two hard boded eggs 
rubbed through a sieve and a little salt and pepper. Pour this 
over the fish and rice; stand in the oven till hot. — [* ***** 

Fish Souffle. — Cook one cup of bread crumbs in one-half 
cup of milk. Take from the fire and add the yolks of two eggs, 
a little salt and pepper and one cup of shredded codfish. When 
well mixed stir in carefully the whites of two eggs beaten to a 
dry froth. Put quickly into a baking dish and bake five minutes 
in a quick oven. Serve at once. — [* * * * * 

Scalloped Fish. — One and one-half cups cold flaked fish, 
three-quarters cup milk and a large piece of butter. Thicken 
with two tablespoonfuls of flour, add a pinch of salt and a little 
pepper, a little Worcestershire sauce, juice of onedialf a lemon 
and the yolk of one egg. Cover the fish with cracker crumbs and 
bits of butter and bake in ramkins. Serve very hot. — [Grace B. 
Holway. 

[18] 



ON CAPE COD 



Great-grandmother's Rkd Fish. — Equal parts of cold pota- 
toes, cold boiled beets and salt codfish that has been freshened. 
Chop altogether like fine hash. Heat in a spider with a generous 
lump of butter, a little pepper and a little milk, not enough to 
make it liquid. — [Miss Lucia Howard. 

A Salt Codfish Dinner. — Two pounds "Not a Bone" cod- 
fish, one dozen large potatoes, six onions, six beets, half a pound 
of salt pork. Soak the fish in cold water two hours then boil it 
half an hour. Roil the beets separately, boil the onions in a bag 
with the potatoes. Cut the pork in small squares and fry to 
extract the fat. Serve all hot. What is left can be minced and 
fried next day. — [Mrs. Job C. Cobb. 

Baked Fillet of Sole. — One dozen "Slivers." Dip each in 
corn meal and roll up and fasten with a small skewer or wooden 
toothpick, stand them in a baking pan and lay a small piece of 
salt pork on each one. Bake in a quick oven till done. Make 
a brown gravy in the pan to serve with them. — [Mrs. E. A. 
Handy. 

Torbot a la Creme. — Use either haddock or halibut. Boil 
about three pounds of fish until done. Remove the bones and 
skin and flake. Make the following sauce: Put one pint of 
milk in double boiler, half an onion, chopped, parsley, salt and 
pepper. When the milk boils add two tablespoonfuls of flour 
that has been stirred smooth with a little cold milk, butter the 
size of a large egg and the juice of a lemon. Cook until it 
thickens and strain through a gravy strainer over the fish. Put 
in buttered baking dish. Cover with crumbs and butter and 
bake.— [Mrs. S. L. Bartlett. 

[19] 



WHAT WE COOK 



Codfish Balls. — Two cups of codfish picked in small pieces, 
one quart of potatoes cut small. Boil together till the potatoes 
are just done; drain well and mash. Add half a tablespoonful 
of butter, one well beaten egg and a little pepper. Beat all 
together till light and creamy; if it seems dry add a little cream. 
Form into balls and roll in flour. Fry in smoking hot deep fat. 
These can be made into cakes and fried in pork fat. — [Mrs. E. 
A. Handy. 

Sauce Hollandaise. — Cream half a cup of butter, the yolks of 
two raw eggs beaten into the butter one at a time, a dash of 
cayenne pepper, a little salt, juice of one-half lemon and three- 
fourths cup of boiling water, added gradually stirring all the time. 
Cook in a double boiler till of the right consistency. Be careful it 
does not curdle. — [* * * * 

Codfish Chops. — Cook two tablespoonfuls of chopped onion 
in two tablespoonfuls of butter three minutes; add 
two tablespoonfuls of flour and stir till smooth, add 
two cups of boiling water and cook till thick. Add one cup of 
shredded codfish, half a teaspoonful of made mustard, and a little 
white pepper, one egg, and cook for a minute stirring all the time. 
When cold form into the shape of cutlets or croquettes ; roll in 
sifted bread crumbs, then in slightly beaten egg to which has been 
added a little salt and one tablespoonful of water, then again in 
crumbs. Fry and serve hot. — [* * * * 



[20] 



ON CAPE COD 



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Virginia Broiled Lokster. — Split live lobsters with a sharp 
knife. Remove the poison vein from the tail and crack the claws. 
Bake in a baking pan in a hot oven one-half hour. Serve with 
melted butter. — [Mrs. Peterson. 

Oyster Pie. — Line a deep dish with pie crust. Have one quart 
of oysters drained. Put a layer of oysters in the dish, a thin 
layer of cracker crumbs with some small pieces of butter dotted 
over. Then another layer of oysters, crackers, butter ; continue 
until the dish is nearly full. Mix the liquor from the oysters with 
a little salt and pepper and cream ; pour this over the pie and put 
on the top crust and bake in a moderate oven till brown. — [* * * * 

Macaroni and Clams. — One-half pound macaroni boiled tender ; 
one pint of clams, one slice of onion, one tablespoonful of butter, 
one tablespoonful of flour, one cup rich milk. Drain the clams 
and chop them. Scald the clam liquor and onion and skim it. 
Melt the butter and stir in the flour till smooth, then add milk and 
cook till it thickens, add clam liquor and cook a minute. Put lay- 
ers of macaroni and chopped clams in a baking dish, pour over the 
sauce and bake about twenty minutes. This is extremely good 
made with oysters instead of clams. — [Mrs. E. A. Handy. 

(3) [21] 



WHAT WE COOK 



Pickled Oysters. — Put a cup of cold water iuto a sauce pan 
with a cup of vinegar, let it boil up and skim. Cook oysters in it 
till plump, then take them out and add a little sugar and whole 
spices, cloves and alspice. Boil a few minutes and pour it over the 
oysters. Serve cold for tea. Use three pints of oysters for this 
quantity. — [Mrs. Ruth E. Chipman. 

Scalloped Scallops. — Melt butter the size of half an egg in 
the bottom of baking dish. Next put a layer of crumbs, a layer 
of scallops, pepper, salt and butter. Repeat this until the dish is 
full. Make a hole in the middle with spoon and pour milk in 
gradually until it covers the scallops. Have the top layer crumbs 
and dot with butter. Don't be afraid of the milk if you want 
them good. I never use cream.— [F. G. Phinney. 

Daniel Webster's Clam Chowder. — Two quarts of clams. 
Separate the bags from the shoulders. Strain off the liquor to 
settle. Chop the heads and shoulders quite fine. Pare and 
slice eight potatoes. Cut up a good-sized slice of pork and fry 
out. Eight hard crackers soaked. Throw into the kettle chopped 
clams, a little salt and pepper, then a layer of potatoes. Pour 
over the strained liquor, then add sufficient cold water to quite 
cover the whole. Cook until the potatoes are done, then add the 
soft part of the clams, crackers, one pint of milk. Boil eight 
minutes and serve hot. Onions if you like. — [Mrs. Barney Davis. 

Clam Fritters. — One quart of clams drained and chopped fine, 
half a cup of clam water, half a cup of cream, two well beaten 
eggs (three are better), two cups of flour and a little pepper. Fry 
like pan cakes in half an inch of pork fat. — [Mrs. E. A. Handy. 

[22] 



ON CAPE COD 



Oyster Chowder. — Two slices of fat salt pork, cut in dice, 
one onion sliced thin, one pint oysters, one pint potatoes cut as 
for French fried, one quart very rich milk, one-half cup fine 
cracker crumbs, salt and pepper. Fry the pork and onions to- 
gether but do not let them brown. Cook the oysters in their own 
liquor until just plump and add the pork, onion and potatoes that 
have been boiled till tender. Mix in the cracker crumbs and hot 
milk. Let the chowder stand where it will not cook for half an 
hour. This "ripens" it and brings out the flavor. — [Mrs. E. A. 
Handy. 

Yacht Oyster Sour. — Two quarts of milk, one head of celery, 
one-half pound of butter, one cup of rolled crackers, salt, a pinch 
of red pepper. Boil the milk with the celery, strain off the celery, 
set the milk back on the stove, add the butter and the seasoning, 
one hundred small oysters. Let it simmer a little till the edges 
of the oysters curl. Thicken with the cracker and serve at once. 
Old-fashioned receipt. — [Grace B. Holway. 

Broiled Oysters. — One egg, cracker crumbs, and one pint of 
oysters. Dip the oysters in the egg and then in the cracker 
crumbs and broil over a clear fire. Make a dressing of one pint 
of milk and one teaspoonful of flour, salt and pepper and butter 
the size of an egg. Boil up once and pour over the oysters. — 
[Grace B. Holway. 

Stuffed Oysters, a Southern Dish. — Fry one small onion 
chopped fine and a little parsley in one tablespoonful of butter. 
Wash and drain one quart of oysters and chop with two slices of 
toast, season with salt and red pepper, mix with the onion and 
cook until it does not taste raw. Fill shells with a mixture, cover 
with cracker crumbs and butter. Bake till brown. 



[23] 



WHAT WE COOK 



Oyster Shortcake. — Make a good biscuit crust, roll out iu two 
rounds. Put one in the pan and spread with soft butter, put the 
other one on top and bake. Cook one quart of oysters in their own 
liquor, drain and keep the oysters hot. Make a sauce of one 
tablespoonful of butter and two of flour melted together, add the 
oyster liquor and one cup of cream, cook till thick, stirring all the 
time. Add the oysters. Split the shortcake and put the creamed 
oysters between the layers and on top. — [Mrs. E. A. Handy. 

Cape Cod Clam Chowder. — One quart of clams thoroughly 
cleaned, one quart of milk, one good sized onion, six potatoes, 
four slices of pork, one tablespoonful of butter, three crackers 
broken, pepper. Fry out the pork and then put in the sliced 
onion and cook a few minutes ; put them into a large kettle and add 
the sliced potatoes ; boil them till soft in water to cover them ; add 
the clam water (after straining), then the clams. Cook five min- 
utes, then add the quart of milk, and when it comes to a boil add 
butter, cracker and pepper. Enough for six or eight persons. — 
[Mrs. E. D. Crocker. 



[24] 



ON CAPE COD 



-18 MmU 8*- 



Plankkd Steak. — Rub a two-inch plank with olive oil to prevent 
its burning and heat it in the oven for half an hour. Put the steak 
on the plank and put in a hot oven for ten minutes, turn steak, 
butter well and cook ten minutes more, add more butter and a lit- 
tle salt and serve on the plank. This is for steak one inch thick. 
— [Mrs. E. A. Handy. 

Chicken Terrapin. — Chop a cold roast chicken and one par- 
boiled sweetbread moderately fine. Make a rich cream sauce 
with one cup hot cream and one-quarter cup of butter and two 
tablespoon fuls of Hour. Add the chicken and sweetbread, pepper 
and salt to taste. Heat it over hot water fifteen minutes and 
just before serving add the yolks of two well beaten eggs and one 
wine glass of sherry. Serve at once. — [Grace B. Holway. 

Begorra. — One pint of cold lamb, minced ; six or seven sticks 
of macaroni cooked tender. Put in a buttered baking dish with 
one cup of stewed tomato, a little pepper and salt and three table- 
spoonfuls of gravy. Cover with crumbs and bits of butter and 
bake.— [Mrs. S. L. Bartlett. 

[25] 



WHAT WE COOK 



Mrs. Trowbridge's Breakfast Bacon. — Slice fat bacon and 
lay it in milk for ten minutes; dip it in flour and fry it in its own 
fat. Take out when crisp and fry cold potatoes iu the fat. Serve 
on platter with potatoes iu the middle and bacon on outer circle. — 
[Mrs. L. Mortimer. 

Roast Ham. — Wash and trim a small ham, soak over night. Iu 
the morning cover the entire ham thickly with a flour and water 
paste, put it in a dripping pan and bake four hours. Do not 
baste it and do not be frightened if it looks as if it were burning to 
a cinder. This will cut in thin slices and be perfectly tender and 
much more digestible than boiled ham. — [Mrs. E. A. Handy. 

Sausage Crisps. — Make a batter of three well beaten eggs, 
level teaspoonful of salt, two cups of milk and two-thirds of a cup 
of flour. Mix the flour with a little of the milk before stirring into 
the batter to prevent its lumping. Spread a thin layer of sausage 
meat on the bottom of a baking pan and pour the well beaten bat- 
ter over it. Bake in a hot oven till brown. Serve hot. This is 
very rich and very good on a cold day. — [Mrs. E. A. Handy. 

*Frizzled Beef. — Half a pound of smoked beef cut in thin shav- 
ings. Pour boiling water over it and let it stand ten minutes. 
Drain, and heat it in one tablespoonful of hot butter, to curl or 
frizzle it. Add one cup of hot cream ; or make a sauce with one 
cup of milk, one tablespoonful of butter aud oue tablespoonful of 
flour; pour it over one well beaten egg, add the beef aud a litlie 
pepper, and serve at once. Or, frizzle it aud mix with two or 
three poached eggs. — [Mrs. E. S. Phinney. 

"From Midsummer Cook Book. 

[26] 



ON CAPE COD 



Lamb Souffle. — Melt half :i tablespoonful of butter and add 
one-half tablespoonful of Hour, one-half teaspoonful of salt, one- 
half teaspoouful of celery salt, a few drops of onion juice and a 
few grains of pepper. Then add gradually one cup of scalded 
milk and one-quarter cup of stale bread crumbs. Remove from 
the fire and add one cup of finely chopped cold lamb. Add the 
well beaten yolks of two eggs and last fold in the whites of two 
eggs beaten stitlly. Bake in a moderate oven and serve with 
tomato sauce. — [Mrs. Tripp. 

*Veal Birds. — Take slices of veal from the loin cut very thin. 
Wipe them, remove the bone, skin and fat, aud pound until they 
are one-quarter of an inch thick. Trim into pieces two and one- 
half inches by four. Chop the trimmings fine with one square inch 
of fat salt pork for each bird. Add one-half as much fine cracker 
crumbs as there is meat; season highly with salt, pepper, thyme, 
lemon, cayenne and onion to taste. Moisten with a raw egg and a 
little hot water. Spread the mixture on each slice and roll tightly, 
tie or fasten with a skewer. Dredge with salt, pepper and flour. 
Fry slowly in hot butter until the birds are a golden brown ; then 
half cover with cream and simmer till they are tender. Remove 
the strings or skewers and serve on toast. Garnish with parsley 
and lemon. If the veal used seems tough dip the slices in olive oil 
before spreading with the stuffing. — [Miss E. Munroe. 

♦Beef Loaf. — Chop one and one-half pounds beefsteak very fine ; 
add two cups rolled crackers, one cup cold water, one-half cup 
butter, with salt and pepper. Shape into a loaf, place in pan, and 
bake slowly two hours. To be sliced when cold. — [Miss D. E. 
Hinckley. 
♦From Midsummer Cook Book 

[27] 



WHAT WE COOK 



*A la mode Mutton. — Make a dressing as for turkey. Fill two 
large or four small onions with whole cloves. Take a leg of mut- 
ton ; take out the bone : put in the stuffing ; place it in pot on a 
grate; put in the onions; dredge with flour; add two tablespoon- 
fuls allspice, two cloves, two peppers and quite a lot of salt. Add 
enough water to allow the meat to rest on it, keeping the same 
quantity through the cooking. Steam, for a large leg, seven 
hours. Keep the pot covered tight all the time. Gravy : take 
some of the liquor from the pot; add currant jelly and a little wine 
and serve. — [Miss Julia G. Davis. 

*Delicious Stuffing for Fowl. — Two dozen oysters chopped 
very fine, mixed with two cups of fine bread or cracker crumbs, a 
full ounce of butter, a tablespoouful of chopped parsley, a little 
grated lemon peel, plenty of salt and black pepper, a little red 
pepper, and one tablespoouful of chopped celery. Moisten with a 
little oyster liquor, a little cream and the well beaten yolk of an 
egg. — [Miss M. L. Bacon. 

*Queen's Mouthfuls. — Mince very fine one pound veal, poul- 
try or game, cooked or raw, with a little fat salt pork. Add salt, 
pepper, nutmeg, parsley, a little onion, a few bread crumbs and 
two eggs. Put all in a saucepan with two tablespoonfuls of cream 
and two ounces butter. Stir over the fire for five minutes. Let 
the mixture get cold. Roll out some light paste the thickness of 
a dollar. Cut out some rounds three inches in diameter. Lay 
in a little of the meat, cover with another round and press th« 
edges together. Bake in a rather hot oven. — [E. J. H. 

"•From Midsummer Cook Book. 

[28] 



ON CAPE COD 



*Chicken Pilaf. — Boil a fowl until tender ; when cold cut in 
not too small pieces. Pilaf : One cup of rice, one can of to- 
matoes, a large piece of butter ; cook in a farina kettle for an 
hour and a half. Ten minutes before serving add the chicken. 
— [Mrs. Ellen Davis. 

Baked Sausages. — Prick sausages and cover with boiling 
water for ten minutes ; remove and put into cold water for two 
minutes. Roll in beaten egg and then in bread crumbs; put in 
a pan in a hot oven ten minutes. This rule is for sausages in 
cases. — [* * * * 

*Veal Loaf. — Three pounds of raw veal and one-half pound of 
salt pork chopped together very line, six or eight crackers rolled 
fine, three well beaten eggs, one-half cup of thick cream, one- 
quarter of a pound of butter, one glass of sherry and one of 
brandy or port wine, one onion chopped fine and the juice and 
grated rind of one lemon, one teaspoonfnl each of pepper, 
cloves, sweet marjoram, sage and salt. Mix these all together 
with the meat and mould into a loaf ; place in a dripping pan, 
cover the top with more cracker crumbs and bits of butter ; add 
a little water to the pan. While baking baste often with melted 
butter. — [Miss M. L. Bacon. 

Sake for Game. — Six tablespoon fula of currant jelly, two 
tablespoonfuls of butter melted together, add two tablespoonfuls 
of lemon juice ; just before taking from the fire add one table- 
spoonful of grated orange peel and one glass of port wine. Cool 
a little and serve with venison or any kind of game. — [Mrs. E. A. 
Handy. 

♦From Mldftummer Cook Book. 

[29] 



WHAT WE COOK 



Smothered Fowl and Oysters. — Dress a good plump fowl as 
for roasting. Drain one pint of oysters and fill the fowl ; sew 
up and set in a kettle to steam, put a rack under it to keep it out 
of the water. Put salt, pepper and some pieces of celery in the 
water. Boil hard until the fowl is tender but not broken. Serve 
with a sauce made from the water in the kettle and one cup of 
cream thickened with flour. Add one piut of oysters and cook 
till they curl. Pour this over the fowl. An Old-fashioned Rule. 

*Ciiicken Terrapin. — Boil a fowl with the giblets until teuder. 
When cold, cut fowl and giblets into small pieces. Put in a 
saucepan piece of butter, not quite quarter of a pound, with a 
tablespoonful of flour; thoroughly mix. Add three hard boiled 
eggs chopped very fine, a cup of broth, a cup of cream, salt aud 
pepper. Simmer for ten minutes, add chicken, thoroughly heat, 
when ready to serve, a cup of wine. Truffles improve the terra- 
pin. — [Mrs. Ellen Davis. 

Savory Beek. — Four or five pounds of round of beef or any 
inexpensive cut. Fry till very brown all over; this will take 
about half an hour. Put the beef in a covered dish not much 
larger than the beef. Mix two tablespoons of flour with the fat in 
the pan the meat was fried in. If there is not fat enough add a 
little butter. When the flour browns pour in a quart of water and 
boil till thick. Add salt and one teaspoon of kitchen bouquet. 
Have an onion and carrot sliced over the meat. Add some pars- 
ley and celery salt; pour the gravy over it and bake in the oven 
four hours, adding water if it cooks away. This is easily adapted 
to the tireless cooker.— [Mrs. E. A. Handy. 

*Fron\ Midsummer Cook Book. 



[30] 



ON CAPE COD 



♦Pressed Chicken. — Boil two chickens tender, take out the 
bones and chop the meat fine. Add a small cup of bread crumbs ; 
season to taste with butter, pepper, salt, and a little sage ; pour in 
enough of the liquor to make it moist ; mould in any shape you 
choose, and when cold cut in slices. — [Mrs. Dauforth Parker. 

Home-made Corned Beef. — Put five or six pounds of fresh 
beef into a kettle, the brisket is the best piece to use. Add one 
cup of salt, one tablespoon sugar and a few whole spices, about 
half a teaspoonful. Pour over this two quarts or more of boil- 
ing water and boil slowly until very tender. If the water boils 
away add more to keep two quarts in the kettle. This is es- 
pecially good done in the tireless cooker. — [Mrs. E. A. Handy. 

Plain Southern Okra. — Take a chicken and cut in pieces to 
fry. Have your spider hot with lard in it to cook the chicken. 
Flour each piece and cook to a good brown. Put your chicken in 
a soup pot. Cut up one large onion in slices and one pint of okra ; 
fry brown in the fat in which the chicken was cooked. When 
done pour all the contents of the spider into the soup pot with the 
chicken and add five tomatoes cut up, three ears of corn cut from 
the cob, one cup of lima beans and two quarts of water. Boil 
all together for three or four hours. Season with salt and pepper. 
Serve without straining. — [Miss Mary K. Cobb. 

Veal Fricassee. — Cut the veal in pieces and roll in cracker 
crumbs. Melt a small piece of butter or lard in a frying pan and 
cook veal in it. When the veal is done make a gravy in the pan 
with a little flour and milk to pour over it. — [Mrs. Ruth E. Chip- 
man. 

Baked Liver. — Take a whole calf's liver, make stuffing as for 
turkey, tie in the liver, bake an hour and a half, cook strips of 
bacon on the liver. Serve with broiled tomatoes. — [Mrs. Ellen M. 
Davis. 

*>'roin Midsummer Cook Book . 

[31] 



WHAT WE COOK 



-*S H^dabbs gfc* 



*Corn Pudding. — Eight good-sized ears of corn, scored and 
scraped, two eggs well beaten with a bowl of milk, a little salt 
and a good-sized piece of butter. Bake an hour in a good oven. 
—[Mrs. Ruth E. Chipman. 

*Carrots. — Scrape young carrots and boil half an hour ; slice 
and stew in one cup of hot water and one tablespoon fill of butter, 
a little pepper and salt. When soft add four tablespoon fu Is of 
cream, one tablespoonful of butter cut in bits and rolled in Hour. 
—Miss M. L. Bacon. 

Hominy Puff. — Two cups hot boiled hominy, one-quarter cup 
of butter, one-half cup of milk, four eggs. Stir the butter, milk 
and the yolks of the eggs into the hot hominy, last of all add the 
whites of the eggs beaten stiff. Bake half an hour. — [Mrs. E. A. 
Handy. 

*Baked Sweet Potatoes. — Twelve sweet potatoes boiled soft, 
one-half cup of butter, one-half cup of sugar. Slice the potatoes 
and arrange in layers in bread pan. Have the top layer sugar. 
Add a little water to keep moist. Bake till done. — [J. B. G. 

♦From Midsummer Cook Book. 

[32] 



ON CAPE COD 



Corn Fritters. — Oue well beaten egg, three ears of corn grated 
from the cob, two tablespoonfnls of flour, one tablespoonful of 
milk, more or less according to the juiciness of the corn, a pinch 
of salt. Drop mixture by teaspoonfuls into boiling fat about an 
inch deep. 

Italian Macaroni. — Cook one-half pound of macaroni in one 
quart of soup stock or beef extract and water until tender. Put 
two tablespoonfnls of butter and one chopped onion in a filing 
pan and fry till a golden brown. Add one cup of chopped ham 
and the same of chicken, some mushrooms if you have them ; when 
hot season with salt, pepper, one tablespoonful of Worcestershire 
sauce and two of tomato sauce. Pour it into a shallow dish and 
sprinkle grated cheese over the top. Set into the oven till it 
begins to brown. This is a good luncheon dish and no other meat 
is needed. — [* * * * 

Sauce for Spaghetti. — Cook one medium sized onion, minced, 
in two tablespoonfuls of butter till soft, then rub in two table- 
spoonfuls of flour gradually. Add two cups of tomatoes slowly, 
stirring constantly. When smooth and thick remove from the fire 
and strain. Reheat and add one-half a teaspoonful each of 
allspice, clove and cinnamon; pour over cooked spaghetti. Serve 
with grated cheese. — [Mrs. Vaughan Bacon. 

German Puffers. — Peel and grate several raw potatoes and 
drain. To each cupful of potato add one well beaten egg, and 
salt and pepper and one tablespoonful of cream. Fry like pan- 
cakes in plenty of fat. — [Mrs. E. A. Handy. 

[33] 



WHAT WE COOK 



Escalloped Potatoes. — Put in a deep pudding dish a layer of 
raw potatoes peeled and sliced very thin, season with salt and 
pepper and bits of butter ; continue these layers till the dish is full. 
Cover with milk and bake until done. If cheese is liked, sprinkle 
over the top before baking. — [* * * * 

Candied Sweet Potatoes. — Peel and slice raw sweet potatoes. 
Melt two tablespoonfuls of butter and two of sugar in a frying pan 
and add the potatoes with a little water ; cover and cook till they 
begin to be tender, then put them in the oven uncovered to brown. 
—[Mis. E. A. Handy. 

Stuffed Potatoes. — Bake good-sized potatoes until just done. 
Cut off one end and scoop out the potato ; do not break the skins. 
Mash well and season with salt and pepper, add a little cream 
and whip light ; put back into the shells and brown in the oven. 

r* * * * 

*Spaghetti. Au Italian receipt brought from Palermo. — Take 
a quart of rich beef soup ; mix it with half a can of tomato or 
an equal amount of fresh tomatoes. Boil them together and then 
strain so as to rid the soup of pulp and seed ; season with pepper 
and salt. Put a roll of spaghetti into the soup. Do not break 
the sticks ; by putting in one end of the sticks to the boiling 
soup, it will gradually all bend in. Boil until all of the soup is 
absorbed by the spaghetti. Just before serving it, sprinkle 
thoroughly with grated Parmesan cheese. To have a perfect dish, 
buy your spaghetti from the Italian dealers. Also do not use the 
bottled cheese. It can be obtained from the Italian dealers ; 
grate it as it is needed. It keeps a long time. — [Mrs. W. R. 
Ellis. 

-From Midsummer Cook Book. 



[34] 



ON CAPE COD 



German Noodles. — One egg, as much water as the egg shell 
will hold. Mix the egg and water, add a little salt. Stir in as 
orach Hour as possible and work smooth on the bread board; 
break otY small pieces and roll as thin as paper. Lay them on 
cloths to dry for an hour, roll up and cut in quarter inch ribbons. 
Dry and use like maccaroni. It is much better. — [Mrs. E. A. 
Handy. 

Spaghetti, Italian Style. — Boil one-half of a package of 
spaghetti till tender; put in a buttered dish and pour over the fol- 
lowing sauce: Fry one tablespoonful of onion in one tablespoonful 
of butter; when well browned add one large tablespoonful of flour. 
Add gradually one and a half cups of tomato, salt. Grate cheese 
over the top and cover with crumbs and bake. — [Mrs. S. L. 
Bartlett. 

Potato Turnovers. — One pint of freshly mashed potato ; add 
one well beaten egg, one tablespoonful of flour, and salt and 
popper to taste. Koll out on a well floured board and cut in 
squares. Put a spoonful of chopped meat on each square and fold 
over like a turnover. Bake long enough to heat the meat and 
brown the potato. Serve with tomato sauce or brown gravy. — 
[Mrs. E. A. Handy. 

Smothered Potatoes. — Six potatoes and one onion peeled and 
sliced thin. Put two slices of fat salt pork cut in dice in a fry- 
ing pan, when it begins to fry add the potatoes and onion with a 
very little water. Cover tight and cook, turning gently once in a 
while. When the potatoes are soft take off the cover and cook 
away the water and brown. Turn out on a platter and serve. It 
will take about one hour to cook and brown. — [Mrs. E. A. Handy. 

[35] 



WHAT WE COOK 



-^8 ^ala^B nnb Btxlnh BresBtngB 8^ 



Cream Salad Dressing, German. — Whip one-half cup of 
cream, either sweet or sour, add one-half teaspoonful of salt, a 
little black pepper. Mix two teaspoonfuls of grated onion to 
two tablespoonfuls of vinegar and beat into the cream. This 
is good with all kinds of vegetable salad. — [Mrs. E. A. Handy. 

Quick Tomato Jelly. — Heat two cups of any good chili sauce 
with half a cup of water and strain over one tablespoonful of 
gelatine softened in one-quarter of a cup of cold water. Stir till 
dissolved and pour into moulds. When hard serve with mayon- 
naise on lettuce. — [Mrs. B. D. Peterson, Jr. 

Boiled Salad Dressing. — Mix the yolks of three eggs, three 
tablespoonfuls of vinegar, half a teaspoonful of salt and the same 
of mustard and a little red pepper ; cook in double boiler till 
thick and creamy, stir all the time to prevent curdling. Add one 
tablespoonful of butter as soon as it is thick and while it is hot. 
When ready to serve add the whites of the eggs beaten to a dry 
froth. 

Potato Salad. — Cut cold boiled potatoes in small pieces, add 
celery cut small. Put a la} 7 er of potatoes and one of celeiy in the 
salad bowl in a little chopped onion and parsle} 7 . Pour over a 
boiled dressing. — [* * * * 

[36] 



ON CAPE COD 



Quick Mayonnaise. — One teaspoouful of dry mustard, one- 
half teaspoonful of salt, one cup of olive oil, juice of half a 
lemon, one egg. Mix the mustard, salt and lemon juice, add the 
slightly beaten yolk of egg and stir well. Add the oil drop by 
drop until you have used one teaspoouful, then beat with an egg- 
beater adding the oil a teaspoonful at a time and as it mixes add 
the oil by tablespoonfuls. When all the oil is used add the white 
of the egg beaten stiff. The ingredients should be cold. — [Mrs. 
E. A. Handy. 

Russian Salad. — One can of French peas, twice as much cel- 
ery, cut in dice; same quantity of carrot; one tablespoonful of 
chopped parsley. Serve with mayonnaise dressing. — [Mrs. Charles 
Knowles. 

Crackers to Serve with Salad. — Split Boston crackers and 
soak in cold water for ten minutes, remove carefully into a tin 
plate, put a lump of butter on each one. Place in a hot oven for 
twenty minutes. Add a little cheese if liked. — [Mrs. B. Davis. 

German Potato Salad, Hot. — Cut potatoes in inch cubes 
and boil till tender, drain and add one thinly sliced onion, salt 
and pepper. Make the dressing while the potatoes are cooking. 
Fry four thick slices of bacon cut in dice till crisp, add one- 
quarter cup of vinegar and let it get hot, pour over the potatoes 
and onions and serve at once. — [Mrs. E. A. Handy. 

Sweet Potato Salad. — Cut boiled sweet potatoes in en lies, 
one-third as much raw apple cut line and a little celery, nuts if 
liked. Serve with mayonnaise dressing. — [Mrs. F. H. Thayer. 

(4) [37] 



WHAT WE COOK 



Halibut Salad. — Equal parts of cold boiled halibut and cold 
hard boiled eggs or potatoes diced. Arrange on lettuce leaves 
and cover with a good salad dressing. Chopped olives can be 
added. — [Mrs. Leslie Jones. 

Salad Dressing. — Put two-thirds of a cup of vinegar, a piece 
of butter the size of an egg, a saltspoonful of salt and a speck of 
pepper into a saucepan and set on the stove to boil. Mix two 
tablespoonfuls of sugar, a quarter of a teaspoonful of mustard and 
a heaping teaspoonful of cornstarch together thoroughly, add a 
half cup of cream, and when free from lumps pour slowly into the 
boiling vinegar. Stir till smooth and thick, remove from the fire 
and pour the mixture over the well beateu yolks of three eggs and 
beat for five minutes. Strain the juice of a large lemon, add it to 
the dressing and beat well again. — [Mrs. Lottie C. Holmes. 



"To be a good cook means the knowledge of all herbs, 
balms and spices; and of all that is healing and sweet in 
fields and groves, savory in meats. It means carefulness, 
inventiveness, watchfulness, intelligence and readiness of 
appliances. It means the economy of your great-grand- 
mothers and the science of modern chemists; it means 
English thoroughness, French art and Arabian hospitality; 
it means, in fine, that you are to be perfectly and always 
ladies (loaf givers), and you are to see that everybody has 
something nice to eat." — [Ruskin. 



[38] 



ON CAPE COD 



■^f £090, Glljrm anb £>atti>uitrif?a g&- 



Egg Timbale. — Break six eggs into a bowl, add one cup of milk 
and a little salt and pepper, beat until creamy, and pour into but- 
tered cups. Stand the cups in a pan of hot water and bake till 
set. Turu out on a platter and serve with a cream sauce poured 
round them. — [* * * * 

Good Omelet. — Six eggs beaten separately, one-half cup of 
milk, a pinch of salt added to the yolks. Stir the whites in lightly 
and bake in a moderate oven. — [Mrs. F. H. Thayer. 

Cheese Souffle. — Make a cream sauce of two tablespoonfuls 
of butter, one of flour and one-half cup of milk, season with salt 
and cayenne, add the beaten yolks of three eggs and one cupful of 
grated cheese. When cool add the whites of four eggs beaten 
very light. Bake in a buttered dish one-half hour; do not have 
the oven too hot. — [* * * * 

Breakfast Eggs. — Break two eggs in an egg cup for each per- 
son. Add a teaspoonful of cream, a little salt and pepper. Set 
cups in a saucepan of hot water, cover and cook till the whites are 
set. Serve in the cups at once. — [Mrs. E. A. Handy. 

[39] 



WHAT WE COOK 



Omelet. — Melt one tablespoonful of batter, stir in one table- 
spoonful of flour, add one cup of milk, stir and cook until thick, 
cool for a few minutes and add to the beaten yolks of five eggs. 
Beat the whites until so dry that you can turn the bowl over with- 
out spilling ; mix lightly with the yolks and cream sauce. Melt 
one tablespoonful of butter in a frying pan and when hot turn in 
the omelet. Cook a few minutes and then set the pan in the oven 
to finish. Be careful not to cook too long. This will serve five 
people. — [Mrs. E. A. Handy. 

Oyster Sandwiches. — One quart of oysters, chopped fine, add 
one-half cup of butter, one beaten egg, one-half cup of cracker 
crumbs, salt, pepper and a dash of cayenne. Cook very lightty, 
stirring with a fork. Use to fill sandwiches when cold. — [* * * 

Cheese Fondue. — Mix one cup of scalded milk, one cup of soft 
bread crumbs, one-quarter of a pound of mild cheese cut in small 
pieces, one tablespoonful of butter and a half teaspoonful of salt. 
Add the well beaten yolks of three eggs, and last the whites of the 
eggs beaten stiff. Bake in buttered dish twenty or thirty minutes 
in a moderate oven. — [Miss Mary Cobb. 

Cheese Filling for Timhals. — Melt half a pound of Ameri- 
can cheese with one tablespoon butter. When smooth add two 
well-beaten eggs and half a cup of thin cream, salt and pepper. 
Cook until smooth and thick. Fill timbal cases or serve on 
crackers. This is very good made in the chafing dish and served 
on toast. It will not get string}' and tough. If some is left over 
it makes a good cold cheese filling for sandwiches. — [Mrs. E. A. 
Handy. 

[40] 



ON CAPE COD 



Fried Cheese Sandwiches. — Put a slice of cheese between 
two slices of bread and soak in a batter made of one slightly 
beaten egg and one-half cup of milk and a little salt. Fry in 
butter. — [Mrs. E. A. Handy. 

Mock Cheese Souffle. — Butter slices of stale bread and put a 
layer in a bakiug dish. Cover with thin slices of cheese or grated 
cheese, repeat the bread and butter and cheese until the dish is 
full. Beat two eggs light and add two cups of milk, a level tea- 
spoon salt and a dash of red pepper. Pour this over the bread and 
cheese ; let it stand half an hour. Hake half an hour and serve at 
once. — L^ rs - E. A. Handy. 



[41] 



WHAT WE COOK 



-hS ifar % QUjafutg Stall 9^ 



Al Crocker's Welsh Rarebit. — Put a piece of butter the size 
of an egg in the chafing dish. Cut one pound of soft cheese in 
small pieces and add to the butter ; when all begins to melt pour 
in mixture containing two well beaten eggs, half a teaspoonful of 
mustard, dry, saltspoonful of salt, half a saltspoonful of cayenne. 
When thoroughly melted and mixed add one-third of a bottle of 
beer. This must be stirred constantly till done, when it will 
be smooth and creamy. Serve on crackers. 

Lobster Newburg. — One and a half cups of lobster meat, one- 
quarter of a cup of sherry, one-quarter of a cup of butter, three 
tablespoonfuls of flour, one and three-quarters cups of cream, one- 
half tablespoonful of brandy, pinch of salt. Let lobster stand in 
sherry fifteen minutes, add the butter and cook five minutes, add 
the other ingredients, cook and serve hot. — [Mrs. B. Davis. 

Pigs in Blankets. — Season large oysters with salt and pepper, 
roll in very thin slices of fat bacon and fasten with a toothpick. 
Fry in a hot pan until the bacon is done, or run six on a silver 
skewer and broil till the bacon is crisp. — [Mrs. E. A. Handy. 

[42] 



ON CAPE COD 



Tomato Rarebit. — One cup of stewed and strained tomato, two 
well beaten eggs, one tablespoonful of butter, one cup of cheese 
cut in small pieces, salt and a dash of cayenne. Melt butter and 
cheese together, add tomato and seasouing, cook till it is smooth, 
add the eggs and cook until like thick custard. Serve at once on 
hot buttered toast. — [Mrs. E. A. Handy. 

Sherry Roast. — Melt one tablespoonful of butter in the 
chafing dish, add one saltspoonful of salt and a dash of pap- 
rika, half a cup of finely cut celery and twenty-five oysters. 
Cook until the oysters curl, then add a wine glass of sherry, heat 
and serve on toast. — [Mrs. E. A. Handy. 

Cirried Oysters. — Put one tablespoonful of butter, one tea- 
spoonful of grated onion, one-half teaspoonful of curry powder 
and one tablespoonful of flour in a hot chafing dish. When 
blended add the oyster liquor and cook a minute, stirring. Add 
the oysters and when they curl serve on toast. — [Mrs. E. A. 
Handy. 

Oysters and Tomatoes. — Two tablespoonfuls of butter, one 
tablespoonful of Hour, one slice of onion, one cup of stewed and 
strained tomatoes, one pint of oysters, salt and pepper. Cook 
the onion in the butter till light brown, add the flour and brown 
again. Add the tomatoes and cook and stir until thick. Add 
the oysters, drained, and cook until they plump up. Serve on 
toast. — [Mrs. E. A. Handy. 

Beef Steak with Oysters. — Broil the steak, cover the top with 
raw oysters and set it on the grate of the oven till the oysters curl. 
Serve at once. — [Mrs. E. A. Handy. 

[43] 



WHAT WE COOK 



Meat Warmed in Gravy. — Cut any cold meat in small 
pieces ; for three cups of meat take one cup of gravy or stock ; 
failing that, one teaspoonful of beef extract and one cup of hot 
water. Season highly with salt, pepper and a little onion juice if 
liked. When this gravy is hot stir in one teaspoonful of corn- 
starch, wet with a little cold water; when it boils add the meat 
and heat thoroughly but do not let it boil as that will toughen the 
meat. — [Mrs. E. A. Handy. 



Chicken and Oysters. — Melt two tablespoonfuls of butter, 
add two tablespoonfuls of flour ; cook and stir till smooth, add 
two cups of cream and cook till thick and smooth. Add one pint 
of oysters that have been cooked in their own liquor and drained ; 
one pint of cold chicken cut in small pieces, salt and pepper, and 
a wine glass of sherry. Heat and serve on hot buttered toast. — 
[Mrs. E. A. Handy. 



Loisster a la Newburg. — For six or eight persons use the 
meat of a lobster weighing four pounds. One-half pint of cream, 
four tablespoonfuls of butter, two tablespoonfuls of brandy, two 
of sherry, half teaspoonful of salt, a little cayenne, a little nut- 
meg, yolks of two eggs. Cut lobster into small pieces, put butter 
in pan ; when hot put in lobster, cook slowly five minutes. Then 
add brandy, sherry, salt and pepper and simmer three minutes. 
Beat yolks well, add the cream, pour over and stir constantly a 
minute and a half or until the cream thickens. Serve at once. — 
[Mra. T. C. Day. 

[44] 



ON CAPE COD 



Eggs Poached in Bkotii. — One pint of chicken or beef broth 
well seasoned. Bring to a boil, move the saucepan where it will 
be hot but not boil. Break in six eggs, be careful not to break 
the yolks. When the whites are set take them out of the broth 
and put them on hot buttered toast. Thicken the broth with 
two small teaspoonfuls of cornstarch wet with a little cold water. 
Boil up and pour over the eggs and toast. — [Mrs. E. A. Handy. 

Poached Eggs in Milk. — Have plenty of milk scalding hot 
but not boiling, a little salt. Drop eggs in, being careful not to 
break the yolks. Keep the milk hut and as soon as the whites 
are set serve on toast. A good variation is tu use thin cream 
aud pour it over the toast carefully before taking out the eggs. 
The eggs should not be over twenty-four hours old. — [Mrs. E. A. 
Handy. 

Tomato Eggs. — Cut three or four good-sized tomatoes into 
halves ; take out a little of the inside, lay them in a pan contain- 
ing two ounces of melted butter and fry them lightly. When 
nearly done, drop into each piece of tomato a raw egg. Watch 
carefully until egg has set, then remove from the pan and lay 
upon a slice of buttered toast. Cut the toast neatly around the 
tomatoes. Dust each with a little salt and pepper. — [Mrs. W. R. 
Ellis. 



[45] 



WHAT WE COOK 



<4g Patoutga f&r 



Indian Pudding. — One cup of corn meal, one-half cup of 
molasses, one quart of milk and a small piece of butter. Scald a 
little more than half the milk, stir in the meal, add the butter and 
the molasses and a little salt. Let it cool in a bakiug dish. Pour 
on the cold milk as you set it in the oven. Bake four hours. — 
[Mrs. Mary Freeman Hinckley. 

Sweet Potato Pudding. — One cup of boiled and mashed 
sweet potato, two cups of hot milk, two well beaten eggs, three 
tablespooufuls of sugar, one teaspoonful of cinnamon and nut- 
meg mixed, half a teaspoonful of salt. Bake in a buttered bak- 
ing dish in a slow oven. Serve with cream. — [Mrs. E. A. Handy. 

Cracker Pudding. — Add one well beaten egg to three table- 
spoonfuls of sugar. Two cups of milk, pinch of salt, three 
crackers rolled fine, nutmeg, and some seeded raisins. Bake 
about an hour and serve with butter and sugar. — [Mrs. F. H. 
Thayer. 

Custard Baked Pudding. — Three tablespooufuls of flour, one 
pint of scalding milk, four eggs, yolks and whites beaten sep- 
arately. Wet the flour in a little cold milk and add the hot milk, 
add the yolks and then the whites of the eggs. Bake twenty 
minutes and serve with sauce. 

[46] 



ON CAPE COD 



PEAcn Cobbler. — Butter the outside of a cup and insert it 
in the center of a buttered baking dish. Fill the dish with sliced 
peaches and one-half cup of sugar. Make a good biscuit crust, 
using two cups sifted flour, two teaspoonfuls of baking powder, a 
pinch of salt, four tablespoonfuls of butter rubbed into the flour, 
two eggs well beaten, add one and one-half cups of milk and stir 
all together. Roll out and cover the peaches. Bake one-half an 
hour in a moderate oven. Turn out the pudding on a deep plat- 
ter and serve at once. The cup will be full of delicious syrup. 
Serve with whipped cream. — [Miss Grace B. Holway. 

Graham Fruit Pudding. — One and one-half cups sifted gra- 
ham flour, one-half cup of molasses, one-quarter cup of melted 
butter, one-half cup of milk, one egg, one teaspoon ful of soda, 
salt, a little spice, one-half cup of raisins and one-quarter citron. 
Steam in a buttered dish three hours. — [Mrs. F. H. Thayer. 

Pudding Sauce. — Two cups of milk, one-half cup of sugar, 
two eggs and one teaspoouful of vanilla. Beat the eggs to a froth 
with the sugar, add slowly to the milk which should be boiling 
hot. Cook for a minute and serve. — [* * * * 

Blueberry Dumplings. — Sift one quart of flour with four level 
teaspoonfuls of baking powder ; mix with milk until it is as stiff 
as soft biscuit. Boil the berries first with a little water then add 
one-half cup each of sugar and molasses. Put the berries on to 
cook one hour before the dumplings are to be used. Cook forty 
minutes then drop in the dumplings, cook twenty minutes. Split 
and butter, pour the stewed berries over them. — [Mrs. Peterson. 

[47] 



WHAT WE COOK 



Plum Pudding. — Half a pound of bread crumbs, one-quarter 
of a pound of beef suet or butter, one-half a pound of currants, 
one-half a pound of raisins, chopped, one-quarter of a pound of 
citron sliced thin, one-half teaspoonful of salt, four eggs, well 
beaten, one-half cup of milk, one-half cup of brandy or one cup 
of sherry, one-half cup of sugar. Cinnamon, mace and nutmeg. 
Boil four and a half hours. Serve with wine sauce. — [Miss 
Grace B. Holway. 

Steamed Chocolate Pudding. — One-half cup of sugar, one 
teaspoonful of butter, one egg, one cup of tlour sifted with one 
teaspoonful of baking powder, one square of chocolate, and half 
a cup of milk stirred in slowly. Steam one and one-quarter 
hours. — [Mrs. Leslie Jones. 

Apple Pudding. — Six apples, two slices of bread, one cup of 
suet all chopped fine ; juice of one lemon, a little salt, one tea- 
spoonful of soda dissolved in a little water. Steam three hours. 
Serve with sauce. — [Mrs. Job C. Cobb. 

Steamed Chocolate Pudding. — Cream three tablespoonfuls 
of butter, add three-quarters of a cup of sugar gradually and one 
well beaten egg. Mix and sift two and one-quarter cups of 
flour, four and one-half teaspoonfuls of baking powder and one- 
quarter teaspoonful of salt, add alternately with one cup of milk 
to first mixture, then add two and one-half squares of Baker's 
chocolate, melted. Turn into a buttered mould and steam two 
hours. Serve with cream sauce. Cream sauce : Cream one- 
quarter of a cup of butter, add one cup of powdered sugar grad- 
ually. Add drop by drop one-quarter cup of rich milk or cream, 
flavor with vanilla. — [Mrs. Maurice Hallett; - 

[48J 



ON CAPE COD 



Black Podding. — One cup of molasses, one- half cup of melted 
butter, one-half cup of sour milk, two cups of Hour, one-half tea- 
spoonful of soda, a little nutmeg and cinnamon. Steam one hour 
and serve with sauce. Sauce : One-half cup of butter creamed 
with one cup of sugar, one egg and one tablespoonful of vinegar. 
Steam over a teakettle. — [Mrs. F. H. Thayer. 

Cold Sauce for Pudding. — One large tablespoonful of flour 
mixed with cold water till smooth, thicken with boiling water till 
the consistency of thick cream. When cold add half a cup of 
butter and one cup of sugar well creamed and a little vanilla. It 
should look curdled when served. — [Mrs. Leslie Jones. 



[49] 



WHAT WE COOK 



-*$ (Eoto Ifcsatfrtfi nnh Jr?a 



Pineapple Sherbet. — One can of sliced pineapple, chopped 
fine, one pint of water, one pint of sugar, one tablespoonful of 
minute gelatine, juice of one lemon. — [Mrs. Thomas P. Lewis. 

Lemon Cream. — Beat the yolks of four eggs with four table- 
spoonfuls of sugar, add the juice and grated rind of one large 
lemon and two tablespoonfuls of hot water. Simmer till it 
thickens then remove from the fire. Beat the whites of the eggs 
to a stiff froth with two tablespoonfuls of sugar and stir into the 
yolks previously cooked. To be eaten cold. — [Mrs. Job C. 
Cobb. 

Raspberry or Strawberry Sherbet. — One pint of berry 
juice, one pint of sugar, one pint of water, one tablespoonful of 
gelatine, or one pint of preserved fruit, one cup of sugar, one 
quart of water, two lemons, one tablespoonful of gelatine. Soak 
the gelatine in a little of the water, cold, add the rest of the 
water hot to dissolve the gelatine. Add the other ingredients, 
cool and freeze. — [Mrs. F. H. Thayer. 

Union Club Ice Cream. — One half a pound of sugar and 
three eggs beaten together to a cream. Boil a pint of cream and 
when cool add to the sugar and egg and cook in a double boiler 
till it is the consistency of thick custard. — [Miss Lucia Howard. 

[50] 



ON CAPE COD 



Mrs. M.'s Chocolate Ice Ckeam. — Four squares of choco- 
late put in a double boiler and entirely melted. Add one quart 
of milk, stir until dissolved. Beat three eggs, a pinch of salt and 
one and one-half cups of sugar together, cook with milk until it is 
thick. When cold add a pint of cream and one tablespoonful of 
vanilla. Freeze. — [Mrs. Lawrence Mortimer. 

Lemon Ckeam. — Three lemons, four eggs, pint of boiling water, 
sugar to taste, about one cup full. Orate the lemons and pour 
the boiling water on the peel, let it stand a few minutes, add the 
sugar while hot and strain. Add the eggs well beaten. Stir well 
together and cook in a double boiler till it thickens. — [Miss II. L. 
Day. 

Chocolate Sauce eor Ice Ckeam. — Two tablespoonfuls of 
butter, one level tablespoonful of flour, four teaspoonfuls of 
cocoa, one cup of cold water, four tablespoonfuls of sugar, one 
teaspoonful of vanilla and a pinch of salt. Melt the butter, mix 
the flour and cocoa and stir into the butter, add the water grad- 
ually, stirring and beating all the time. Cook till it thickens and 
before serving add the sugar and vanilla. — [Mrs. Alfred Crocker, 
Jr. 

Velvet Ckeam. — One-half box of gelatine, one and one-half 
cups of sherry, one lemon, grated rind and juice, one and one- 
half cups of sugar, one and one-half pints of cream. Soak the 
gelatine in the wine, add the lemon and sugar. Heat all together 
until dissolved. Strain and cool, when nearly cold enough to 
stiffen add the cream whipped. Pour into moulds. — [Mrs. F. II. 
Thayer. 

[51] 



WHAT WE COOK 



Frozen Pudding. — Make a good custard, using either whole 
eggs or the yolks alone. Three yolks or two whole eggs to a pint 
of milk and one-half cup of sugar. One cup of mixed fruits, one 
cup of wine, or less wine and one tablespoonful each of brandy 
and rum. Add cream as you wish and freeze. — [Miss H. L. Day. 

Apricot Custard. — One cup of dried apricots, stewed and 
mashed fine. One-half cup of butter creamed with three- fourths 
cup of sugar, two eggs, one teaspoonful of cornstarch, one-half 
cup of sweet milk. Bake in one crust and frost. — [Mrs. P. S. 
Lehnert. 

Acple Compote. — Core, pare and steam eight apples until 
tender and arrange on an ice-cream platter. Chop some candied 
pineapple and cherries and cook them in a syrup made with one 
cup of sugar and one of water. Fill the cores full of the fruit 
drained from the syrup. Boil the syrup till thick as honey, flavor 
with lemon juice and pour over the apples. Serve with whipped 
cream if possible. — [* * * * 

Pineapple Pudding. — Quarter of a box of gelatine, half a cup 
of sugar, and half a pint of boiling water. Soak the gelatine in 
the juice from the pineapple and add the boiling water and sugar. 
When cold whip in the well beaten whites of two eggs. Mould 
and serve with whipped cream. — [Mrs. Charles Knowles. 

Bird's Nest Jelly. — Peel and core six apples, put close to- 
gether in a baking dish and fill the cores with sugar. Bake until 
they are soft. Soak half a box of gelatine in one cup of water, 
add two cups of boiling water to dissolve it. Sweeten to taste, 
add flavoring, wine or lemon juice, and when it begins to thicken 
pour over the apples. Serve with whipped cream. — [* * * * 

[52] 



ON CAPE COD 



Coffee Custard. — One pint of coffee, one cup of cream, heat 
together and pour onto the yolks of four eggs beaten with one 
teaspoonful of cornstarch and four tablespoon fole of sugar. 
Cook in double boiler until it thickens and the foam is gone. 
Cool and serve with whipped cream. — [Mrs. E. A. Hand}'. 

Coffee Mousse. — Yolks of four eggs, five ounces of sugar, one 
cup of strong coffee. Beat the yolks and add the sugar and beat 
well. Add the coffee hot. When cold add one pint of whipped 
cream. Pack in salt and ice for four hours. — [Mrs. Charles 
Knowles. 

Savory Apples. — Core apples and set in a pan to bake. Fill 
holes with mince meat and bake till tender. — [Mrs. E. A. Handy. 

Apple Surprise. — Cut apples in halves across the core. Scoop 
out the core without breaking the skin. Fill the cavities with 
sugar and a little cinnamon and fasten the halves together with 
toothpicks. Bake till tender. — [Mrs. E. A. Handy. 

Frozen Orange Whip. — Boil together one cup of sugar and 
two-thirds of a cup of water until thick, add grated rind of two 
oranges with One-quarter of a cup of orange juice, cover ami keep 
warm one hour, then cool. Beat one pint of cream until stiff and 
add gradually the orange syrup. Remove the pulp of two oranges, 
separate into small pieces, drain off the juice, pour it into a 
mould, then put in alternate layers of whipped cream and orange 
pulp until mould is full. Pack in salt and ice and let stand two 
hours (no more). This is delicious. — [Marion M. Copland. 



(5) [53] 



WHAT WE COOK 



+*§ Sfliujljmrta, (taktefi attb (gtttgrrbmtfi S&- 



Molasses Cookies. — One cup of molasses, one cup of butter 
melted, one-half cup of sugar, one egg dropped in whole and 
beaten with the other ingredients. One teaspoonful each of soda 
and ginger, flour to roll out thin. — [Mrs. F. H. Thayer. 

Doughndts. — Butter the size of a walnut creamed with two 
cups of sugar, three eggs well beaten with the butter and sugar, 
one cup of milk, one teaspoonful of soda, one teaspoonful of 
cream of tartar, pinch of salt, nutmeg, five cups of flour, heap- 
ing.— [Mrs. F. H. Thayer. 

Oat Meal Drop Cakes. — One-half cup of butter creamed 
with one cup of sugar, two well beaten eggs, one-half cup sour 
milk, one-quarter teaspoonful of soda, one teaspoonful of cinnamon, 
one cup of raisins, two cups of flour and two cups of Quaker oats. 
Drop in cakes and hake thirty minutes. Good. — [Mrs. F. H. 
Thayer. 

Brown Sugar Cookies. — One cup of shortening, two cups of 
brown sugar, one egg, one-half cup of milk, salt and vanilla, two 
teaspoonfuls of cream of tartar and one teaspoonful of soda, flour 
to roll soft. Bake in a quick oven. — [Mrs. Leslie Jones. 

[54] 



ON CAPE COD 



Hermits. — Cream together one cup of butter and one and one- 
half cups of sugar, add two well beaten eggs, one cup of milk, 
salt, vanilla and one cup of Hour which has been sifted with three 
teaspoonfuls of baking powder, one teaspoonful of cinnamon, 
one-half teaspoonful of allspice and the same of nutmeg. Add 
one cup of chopped raisins well floured, one cup of chopped 
walnuts and flour enough so the dough can be handled. Roll 
thin and bake in a hot oven. — [Miss Annie Gorham Hinckley. 

Good Doughnuts. — Two well beaten eggs, one cup of sugar, 
one cup of new milk, this will contain about the right amount 
of shortening ; two even teaspoonfuls of cream of tartar, one 
even teaspoonful of soda, a little salt and nutmeg and flour 
enough to roll out. Have the fat very hot. — [Mrs. A. G. White. 

Brownies. — One cup of sugar, one-half cup of melted butter, 
two eggs beaten lightly, two squares of chocolate, melted. Flour 
to make quite stiff, vanilla and nuts. Spread about the thick- 
ness of fudge and bake. Cut in squares as soon as taken from 
the oven. In order to have; them moist be careful not to bake- 
too long. — [Miss Annie Gorham Hinckley. 

Blitz-kuciien. — One heaping cup of butter creamed with one 
heaping cup of sugar, add four well beaten eggs and one table- 
spoonful of vanilla. Sift in two scant cups of Hour and one tea- 
spoonful of baking powder. Spread on shallow pan and cover 
with sugar, cinnamon and blanched almonds. Hake in a moderate 
oven and cut into squares when done. 

[55] 



WHAT WE COOK 



Cream Puke Shells. — Two cups of boiling water, two table- 
spoonfuls of cottolene, a little salt. While boiling add one and 
a half cups (large) of pastry flour, a little at a time, stir and 
cook until smooth. When a little cool add four well beaten eggs. 
Drop on greased tin and bake thirty-five minutes. — [Mrs. Leslie 
Jones. 

Buown Sugar Cookies. — One cup of brown sugar, three- 
quarters of a cup of melted butter, two well beaten eggs, one 
teaspoon ful of soda, two teaspoon f ids of cream of tartar, one 
quart of flour and a little vanilla. Very good with chopped pea- 
nuts added. A fig filling is also good. — [Miss Annie Gorham 
Hinckley. 

Fairy Gingerbread. — One cup of butter, two cups of sugar, 
one cup of milk, four cups of flour, three-quarters of a teaspoon- 
ful of soda, one tablespoonful of ginger. Beat the butter to a 
cream, add the sugar gradually, when very light add the ginger, 
then the milk in which the soda has been dissolved, then the 
flour. Butter a tin sheet and spread the mixture very thin with 
a knife. Takes only a short time to bake. When still hot cut 
into squares. — [Mrs. Peterson. 

Doughnuts. — Sift together five cups of pastry flour, one level 
teaspoonful of soda, two slightly rounding teaspoonfuls of cream 
of tartar, one teaspoonful of salt, one-half teaspoonful of cinna- 
mon. Beat three eggs very light, add one large cup of sugar 
and three-quarters of a cup of milk and three tablespoonfuls of 
thin cream. Roll and cut and let stand on the board one-half 
hour before frying. They will not soak fat. — [Mrs. E. A. 
Handy. 

[56] 



ON CAPE COD 



Gingerbbkad. — Three-quarters of a cup of molasses, one tea- 
spoonful of soda dissolved in the molasses, one-third of a cup of 
sugar, one egg, one-half cup of butter, melted. One teaspoonful 
of ginger, two cups of flour. — [Mrs. F. H. Thayer. 

Doughnuts. — One and one-half cups of sugar, saltspoonful of 
nutmeg, two eggs, beaten together thoroughly. One cup of top 
milk, flour enough to mix very soft. Mix one heaping teaspoon- 
ful of baking powder with the flour. Toss together lightly on the 
board, roll and cut out as soft as possible to handle. — [Mrs. 
Alfred Crocker, Jr. 

Hakd Gin<;ekbkead. — One-half cup of shortening, one-half cup 
of sugar, one cup of molasses, two- thirds of a cup of milk, one 
rounded teaspoonful of soda, ginger and a little salt. Pastry 
flour to pat out. Bake in moderate oven in a large pan. Cut in 
squares to take from the pan. — [Mrs. Leslie Jones. 

Delicious Cookies. — One-third of a cup of butter creamed 
with two-thirds of a cup of sugar, two tablespoonfuls of milk, 
two cups of flour, two teaspoonfuls of baking powder, one tea- 
spoonful of vanilla and a pinch of salt. Roll very thin and 
sprinkle with sugar before baking. — [Mrs. Tripp. 

Soft Molasses Cookies. — One cup of sugar, one-half cup of 
melted lard, two-thirds of a cup of boiling water, two teaspoon- 
fuls of soda, one-half teaspoonful of ginger, one-half teaspoonful 
of cinnamon, a little salt. Use just enough flour to handle. Do 
not roll too thin. Hake in a quick oven. — [Mis. James Holmes* 

[57] 



WHAT WE COOK 



Soft Molasses Gingerbread. — Two cups of molasses, two- 
thirds cup of butter, two eggs, one cup of sour milk, one level 
tablespoonful of soda, same of ginger, a little clove, and one 
teaspoonful of salt, four cups of pastry flour. Beat the eggs well 
and add the milk. Heat the molasses and butter together, when 
hot stir in the soda, spice and salt, as it foams add it to the 
eggs and milk, beat well and add the flour. Bake in a moderate 
oven. — [Mrs. E. A. Handy. 



Gingerbread Cookies. — Cream one cup of butter, add two 
cups of sugar and beat well, add two well beaten eggs and half 
cup of cream, one tahlespoonful of ginger and one of cinnamon, 
one teaspoonful of soda and two of cream of tartar sifted with 
flour, salt. Flour to roll thin. Cut and sprinkle sugar on top 
before baking. — fPersis Hay ward. 

Sugar Cookies. — One cup of butter creamed with two cups of 
sugar, four eggs beaten separately, one-quarter cup of milk, two 
teaspoonfuls of baking powder, one teaspoonful of vanilla or a 
little nutmeg, flour to roll out. — [Mrs. F. H. Thayer. 

Swedish Cookies. — One-half cup of butter, one-third cup of 
sugar, one well beaten egg, three-quarters of a cup of flour, one- 
half teaspoonful of vanilla. Citron or almonds. Cream the 
butter, add the sugar gradually, egg, flour and vanilla. Drop in 
small portions on buttered sheet two inches apart. Spread with 
a knife dipped in cold water. Put four almonds or four bits of 
citron on each. — [Mrs. Tripp. 

[58] 



ON CAPE COD 



Filled Cookies. — One-half cup of shortening, une cup of 
sugar, one egg, one-half cup of milk, two teaspoonfuls of cream 
of tartar, one teaspoon ful of soda, one teaspoonful of vanilla, 
three and a half cups of Hour. Filling : One cup of raisins, 
chopped, one-half cup of sugar, one-half cup of water, one tea- 
spoonful of flour. Cook till thick. Roll dough thin, cut in 
small rounds, put a little filling on a round and cover with 
another round, pinch the edges together. Bake in rather a quick 
oven. — [Mrs. Leslie Jones. 

Brownies. — One-third of a cup of butter, one-third of a cup 
of molasses, one-third of a cup of sugar, one well beaten egg. 
one cup of flour and one cup of nut meats. Drop by spoonful 
about an inch apart and bake quickly. — [Mrs. Vaughan Bacon. 

Gingerbread. — Three-quarters of a cup of molasses, fill the 
cup up with sugar, one-half cup of shortening, fill the cup up with 
hot water, add salt and ginger, three cups of flour and one tea- 
spoonful of soda. Mix well then add one well beaten egg. Bake 
in a moderate oven. — [Mrs. Leslie Jones. 



[59] 



WHAT WE COOK 



«43 Glak* g*» 



In regard to the making of cake, Kate Douglass 
Wiggin says, "Be sure and have fresh eggs, sweet 
butter, and good flour and sugar and then remember 
that all depends upon the woman who puts them to- 
gether." Aurelia Buck can take good flour and sugar, 
sweet butter and fresh eggs, and in ten strokes of 
hand she can make 'em into something the very 
hogs'll turn away from." — [In "A Village Stradivarius." 



Coffee Cake. — One cup of butter, one cup of sugar, one cup 
of molasses, one egg, one cup of cold coffee, one cup of raisius, 
one cup of chopped walnuts, one tablespoonful of cinnamon, one- 
half tablespoon ful of cloves, one heaping teaspoonful of soda, 
four and a half cups of flour. — [Miss Annie Gorham Hinckley. 

Lazy Dazy Cake. — Sift together three times, one and one- 
half cups of flour, one cup of sugar and two teaspoonfuls of bak- 
ing powder. Put the unbeaten whites of three eggs in a meas- 
uring cup and add soft (not melted) butter to half fill the cup, 
add sweet milk till the cup is full ; pour this into the flour mix- 
ture and beat seven minutes. This makes a small pan of cake.- 
—[Mrs. E. A. Handy. 

[60] 



ON CAPE COD 



Quick Sponge Cakes. — Separate four eggs, putting the yolks 
in the mixing bowl and beating till a light yellow. Add grad- 
ually one cup of sugar. Beat the whites, adding a pinch of salt, 
to a stiff froth. Add to the yolks. Sift one teaspoonful of bak- 
ing powder with one cup of flour and add to the first mixture. 
Flavor with vanilla or lemon. Pour into muffin pans and bake 
from twenty minutes to half an hour, according to the heat of the 
oven. This makes twelve. Very good to take to picnics or to 
eat with ice cream. — [Mrs. Sprague. 

Maple Suoar Frosting. — One cup of maple syrup and a 
pinch of cream of tartar. Boil till it hairs from the spoon ; pour 
on to the white of one egg beaten stiff. Heat till cool and spread 
on cake. — [* * * * 

Spice Cake. — Three-quarters cup of butter creamed with two 
cups of sugar, two eggs added whole and beaten well with the 
butter and sugar, one cup of milk, three cups of flour, one and 
one-half teaspoonfuls of baking powder, one and one-half cups of 
raisins, one-half teaspoonful of cinnamon, one-quarter teaspoon- 
ful of clove, one-quarter teaspoonful of alspice and a little nutmeg. 
Sour milk can be used in place of sweet but use soda instead of 
baking powder. — [Mrs. F. H. Thayer. 

Five Egg Sponge Cake. — Yolks of five eggs beaten very 
light, cut in one cup of sugar, add the juice of one-half of a 
lemon. Beat the whites of five eggs stiff and cut in slowly, one 
cup of sifted pastry Hour cut in with a knife, one teaspoonful 
each of vanilla and lemon extract. Bake slowly three-quarters of 
an hour. — [Miss Elizabeth C. Nye. 

[61] 



WHAT WE COOK 



Grandma Hayward's Blueberry Cake. — Oue well beaten 
egg, add oue cup of sugar aud one tablespoonful of butter, 
melted, beat well and add one cup of milk and four cups of 
pastry flour sifted with three teaspoonfuls of baking powder. 
Two cups of floured berries. Just before putting in the oven 
sprinkle with sugar. — [Persis Hay ward. 

Aunt Anstis' Cake. — Cream one-half cup of butter, add one 
cup of sugar gradually and beat till creamy. Add four well 
beaten eggs, one cup of flour aud one teaspoonful of baking 
powder. This calls for an all round flour. — [Mrs. Mary F. 
Hinckley. 

Cream Sponge Layer Cake. — Beat the yolks of four eggs 
until thick and lemon colored, add one cup of sugar gradually 
and beat a couple of minutes then add three tablespoon fill a of 
cold water. Put one and one-half tablespoonfuls of cornstarch in 
a cup and fill with flour. Mix and sift flour and cornstarch with 
one and one-quarter teaspoonfuls of baking powder and one- 
quarter teaspoonful of salt, add to first mixture. When thor- 
oughly mixed add the whites of four eggs beaten till stiff, and one 
teaspoonful of lemon extract. Bake thirty minutes in a moderate 
oven. When cool split cake and spread with currant jelly. 
Frost with chocolate frosting. — [Mrs. Maurice Hallett. 

Chocolate Frosting. — Whip the whites of two eggs stiff, add 
confectioner's sugar, two squares of Baker's chocolate and oue 
teaspoonful of butter, melted. Flavor with vanilla. — [Mrs. 
Maurice Hallett. 

[62] 



ON CAPE COD 



Luncheon Cahaway Cakk. — Cream one-quarter of a cup of 
butter and three-quarters of a cup of sugar, add oue well beaten 
egg. Sift together oue tablespoonful of baking powder and oue 
and oue-third cups of flour, add this alternately with three-quarters 
of a cup of milk. One tablespoonful of caraway seeds, three- 
quarters of a teaspoonful of vanilla and one-quarter of a teaspoon- 
ful of salt. Turn in buttered and floured cake pan, sprinkle with 
sugar and bake. Serve hot. 

Potato Cake. — One-half cup of butter creamed with two cups 
of sugar, yolks of rive eggs well beaten, one teaspoonful of soda 
dissolved in one cup of sour milk, one cup of grated chocolate, 
one-half cup of chopped almonds, one teaspoonful of cinnamon, 
one-half teaspoonful of allspice, one-quarter of a teaspoonful of 
cloves, one grated nutmeg, two cups of flour, whites of five eggs, 
well beaten, one cup of potato well mashed and cold. Mix in the 
order given and bake in two tins lined with paper. — [Mrs. F. H. 
Thayer. 

Hazelnut Tokte. German. — Two pounds of nuts weighed in 
the shell, shell them and griud all but about two dozen. Seven 
yolks of eggs well beaten, one and one-half cups of sugar, one 
spoonful of cold water. Beat well, add all but one cup of the 
grated nuts. One teaspoonful of flour, one teaspoonful of baking 
powder, whites of four eggs beaten stiff. Hake in two layers. 
Make a frosting of the three whites of eggs and decorate with 
the whole nuts candied. Tut whipped cream with the re- 
maining grated nuts between the layers. Delicious. — [Mrs. F. II. 
Thayer. 

[63] 



WHAT WE COOK 



Chocolate Cake. — One-half cup of butter creamed with one 
cup of sugar. Put in a small saucepan four squares of Baker's 
chocolate, five tablespooufuls of sugar and two of hot water ; melt 
until smooth and then pour into butter and sugar. Add three well 
beaten eggs, half a cup of milk, one aud three-quarters cups of 
flour, one-half teaspoonful of soda, and one teaspoonful of cream 
of tartar. Do not get too stiff. Bake in a moderate oven as the 
bottom is apt to burn. — [* * * * 

Pound Cake. — Cream one pound of butter, add one pound of 
sugar and cream together, add ten eggs beaten separately, one 
pound of flour, one pound of currants, two pounds of raisins, one 
pound of citron, half a bottle of essence of lemon, half a bottle of 
essence of vanilla, two tablespoonfuls of all kinds of spices. This 
will make three large loaves. — [Mrs. F. B. Goss. 

Walnut Cream Pie. — Three eggs beaten two minutes, add one 
aud one-half cups of sugar and beat five minutes, one-half cup of 
cold water, two cups of flour and two teaspoonfuls of baking 
powder, one pound of walnuts, weighed shells and all. — [Mrs. F. 
H. Thayer. 

Frosting for Cake. — Two cups of sugar, two-thirds of a 
cup of milk, half of a teaspoonful of butter. Boil five minutes 
and beat till cool, not cold. — [* * * * 

Buttercup Cake. — One-half cup of butter creamed with one 
and one-half cups of sugar, yolks of six eggs and one whole egg, 
one-half cup of milk, two cups of flour, two teaspoonfuls of 
baking powder, flavoring. Frost with yellow frosting. — [Mrs. F. 
H. Thayer. 

[64] 



ON CAPE COD 



Pldnkets. Good with ice cream. — Cream one scant cup <>f 
butter and one cup of sugar. Beat the yolks and whites of six 
eggs separately, each until very light then add yolks to whites, 
fold them together. Add the eggs to the butter and sugar a 
little at a time. Sift together twice one-half cup of flour, three- 
quarters cup of cornstarch and two level teaspoonfuls of baking 
powder, add to the other ingredients and flavor with vanilla. 
Bake in individual pans. After baking dust with confectioner's 
sugar. Two scant cups of Hour are equal to the cornstarch and 
flour.— [Mrs. F. H. Thayer. 

Mks. Madison's Old-Fashioned Wine Cake. — One pound 
butter, one pound sugar beaten to a cream, add the yolks of six 
eggs well beaten, one wineglass of brandy, one wineglass of 
sherry, mace and one whole nutmeg grated, one teaspoonful of 
soda dissolved in a little hot water, one pound sifted Hour, one- 
half pound currants, washed, dried and floured, one pound raisins 
chopped, one-half pound citron, sliced thin, cut off all the green 
rind. Flour all the fruit. Bake in two pans in a moderate oven 
one and one-quarter hours. — [Grace B. Holway. 

Marzipan. — Eight eggs, two pounds of flour, two pounds of 
sugar, one lemon, anise seed. Beat the whites of the eggs to a 
stiff froth, add the yolks well beaten, sift in the sugar gradually 
and beat for half an hour, add the grated lemon rind and then the 
flour, if not, firm enough to roll out add more flour, roll rather thin 
and cut into small cakes, sprinkle with anise seed and stand over 
night to dry. In the morning bake in a moderate oven. — A 
German Christmas Cake. 

[65] 



WHAT WE COOK 



Cape Cod Cake. — One-half cup of butter, one cup of sugar, 
one egg, one-half cup of molasses, one cup of sour milk, one tea- 
spoonful of soda, five cups of flour, one cup of raisins, spice. 
— [Miss Annie Gorham Hinckley. 

Angel Cake. — One heaping cup of flour measured after sift- 
ing, add one teaspoonful of cream of tartar and sift seven times- 
Beat the whites of eleven eggs very light, add one cup of sugar 
gradually, one teaspoonful of vanilla and add the flour gradually. 
Bake one hour. — [Mrs. F. H. Thayer. 

Every Day Cake. — Two cups of flour, one cup of sugar, two 
teaspoonfuls of baking powder sifted together. One-third of a 
cup of melted butter, add two unbeaten eggs and fill the cup with 
milk, add this with a little vanilla to the flour mixture and beat 
well. — [Miss Annie Gorham Hinckley. 

Fruit Cake. — Half a pound of butter, half a pound of sugar, 
five eggs, one-quarter of a teaspoonful of soda dissolved in one- 
quarter of a cup of molasses, one teaspoonful of all kinds of 
spices, one-quarter of a bottle of lemon, one-half a tumbler of 
brandy, three-quarters of a pound of citron, one and a half-pounds 
of raisins, half a pound of flour. Put fruit in last and bake in a 
slow oven. — [Mrs. D. M. Seabury. 

White Mountain Cake. — One cup of butter creamed with 
three cups of sugar, one-half cup sweet milk, three and oue-half 
cups of flour sifted with two teaspoonfuls of baking powder, 
whites of ten eggs. Flavor to taste. — [P. S. Lehnert. 

[66] 



ON CAPE COD 



Bridget Powers' Fancy Cakk. Old fashioned. — One-half 
cup of butter, one cup of sugar creamed together, the whites of 
three eggs beaten stiff, one and one-half cups of sifted flour, one- 
half small teaspoonful of cream of tartar, one-quarter of a tea- 
spoonful of soda dissolved in one-half cup of milk, almond 
flavoring. Yellow part : One-half cup of butter, one cup of 
sugar creamed, one whole egg and the yolks of the three eggs, 
one-half cup of milk, one-half teaspoonful of cream of tartar, one- 
quarter of a teaspoonful of soda, one and one-half cups of flour. 
Flavor with vanilla. Mix the batter in the pans as for marble 
cake. — [Miss Grace B. Holway. 

Shrewsbury Cakes. — One cup of butter creamed with one 
and one-half cups of sugar, add four well beaten eggs. Beat 
this mixture until it is light and creamy, then add a little shredded 
citron and four cups of flour. It should be a thick batter. Drop 
in small cakes from a spoon on a buttered tin and bake in a 
good oven. An Old Receipt. 

Marlborough Cake. — Four eggs, whites and yolks beaten 
separately, two cups of sugar, one cup of sweet cream, one-half 
teaspoonful of soda and one teaspoonful of cream of tartar sifted 
with two cups of flour. — [Miss Annie Gorham Hinckley. 

Marshmallow Frosting. — Boil three-quarters of a cup of 

sugar and one-quarter of a cup of milk until the syrup threads ; 
do not stir after boiling begins. Cook one-quarter of a pound of 
marshmallows and two tablespoonfuls of water over boiling 
water until smooth. Combine the two mixtures and heat until 
stiff enough to spread. Flavor with vanilla. 

[67J 



WHAT WE COOK 



Maushmallow Filling. — One-half pound of marshmallows 
set in the oven until they run together, be careful not to scorch. 
Boil one cup of sugar with four tahlespoonfuls of water until it 
threads, then pour it over the well beaten white of an egg. Add 
the melted marshrnallows and a little vanilla and beat until stiff 
enough to spread. 

Butter Scotch. — One cup of white sugar, one cup of brown 
sugar, two tablespoonfuls of vinegar, one-half cup of water and a 
good piece of butter. Boil until it threads or hardens in cold 
water. — [Miss Annie Gorhara Hinckley. 

Angel Cake. — Whites of ten eggs, one and one-half cups of 
sugar, one teaspoonful of cream of tartar, pinch of salt, one cup 
of flour, one tablespoonful of water and a little vanilla. Beat the 
whites of eggs very thoroughly and then beat in the sugar grad- 
ually. Sift the flour, salt and cream of tartar together twice and 
fold lightly into the eggs and sugar. Add vanilla and cold water. 
Bake in a moderate oven. — [Miss Annie Gorham Hinckley. 

Avon Snow Cake. — Cream one cup of butter with two cups of 
sugar, add one cup of milk, three and a half cups of flour, one- 
half teaspoonful of soda, one teaspoonful of cream of tartar and 
the well beaten whites of five eggs. Bake in layers, spread with 
frosting and grated cocoanut. — [Mrs. D. M. Seabury. 

Panlchek. — Two cups of brown sugar, one-half cup of cream, 
pinch of salt, vanilla, good piece of butter. Chopped nuts, 
dates, and maraschino cherries. Good with nuts alone. — [Miss 
Annie Gorham Hinckley. 

[68] 



ON CAPE COD 



Marguerites. — Two eggs well beaten, one enp of brown sugar, 
one-third of a teaspoonful of salt, one-quarter of a teaspoonful of 
baking powder, mix well and one-half cup of flour and one cup of 
pecan meats. Hake fifteeu or twenty minutes in small tins with a 
nut meat on each one. Bake in a quick oven. — [Mrs. Charles 
Knowles. 

Makguekitks. — One cup of sugar, one-half cup of water, five 
marshmallows, the whites of two eggs, two tablespoonfuls of 
shredded cocoanut, one-half teaspoonful of vanilla, one cup of 
English walnuts, cut, saltines. Boil the sugar and water till the 
syrup will thread, remove to back of range and add marshmallows 
cut in pieces, pour this over the whites of eggs beaten stiff, then 
add the cocoanut, vanilla and nut meats. Spread the mixture on 
saltines and bake till delicately brown. — [Mrs. Thomas Lewis. 

Hot Mils Cakk. — Two eggs well beaten, one cup of sugar, 
sift together one cup of flour and one tablespoonful of baking 
powder twice and add to the eggs and sugar. Scald one-half cup 
of milk (generous) with a piece of butter the size of a large Eng- 
lish walnut and add this hot just before putting in the pan to 
bake. — [Mrs. Job C. Cobb. 

Quick Cake. — This is all mixed with an eggbeuter in the order 
given : Two eggs beaten light, one cup sugar, beat well, one 
tablespoonful melted butter, beat again, one-half cup milk, one 
and one-half cups flour. Add these, a little of each at a time, and 
beat till it is full of bubbles. Last of all add one teaspoonful of 
baking powder. This makes a very light layer cake. — [Mrs. E. 
A. Handy. 

(6) [69] 



WHAT WE COOK 



Mocha Tart. — One cup of granulated sugar sifted four times, 
yolks of four eggs beaten with sugar until light, one and one-half 
tablespoonfuls of coffee extract, one cup of flour sifted four times 
with one teaspoonful of baking powder. Beat the whites of five 
eggs to a froth and add last. Bake in two round tins. Filling : 
One- half pint of cream whipped, sugar to taste, one and one-half 
tablespoonfuls of coffee extract. Icing : One and one-half 
tablespoonfuls of coffee extract stirred well with one cup of con- 
fectioner's sugar. Add one teaspoonful of cold water at a time 
until thin enough to spread. — [Miss Elizabeth C. Nye. 

Delicate Cake. — One-half cup of butter creamed with one 
and one-half cups of sugar, one-half cup of milk, two and one- 
half cups of flour, two teaspoonfuls of baking powder, whites of 
five eggs beaten stiff. — [Mrs. F. H. Thayer. 

Spanish Bun. — Cream one cup of butter with two cups of 
light brown sugar, add the yolks of two eggs and two whole ones 
well beaten. One small teaspoonful of cinnamon and the same 
of cloves, one cup of milk and two of flour, two teaspoonfuls of 
baking powder. Bake in a good sized dripping pan ; when cool 
turn out and cut in squares. Make a boiled frosting using the 
two whites of eggs and frost the top and sides of each square. 

^^^ _ V $fc ¥fc •Jjt -Jk 

Delicate Cake. — Cream one cup of butter with two cups of 
sugar. Sift three cups of flour, four tablespoonfuls of cornstarch 
and three teaspoonfuls of baking powder together and add 
alternately with one cup of milk. Last of all add the whites of 
four eggs beaten to a stiff froth. — [* * * * 

[70] 



ON CAPE COD 



Mother's Sponge Cake. — Six eggs, one and one-half cups of 
sugar, one and one-half cups of flour, juice and grated rind of 
one lemon, half a teaspoonful of salt. Separate the yolks and 
whites of the eggs ; add the lemon to the yolks and beat, add 
half the sugar and beat again, add the remaining sugar and beat 
light. Beat the whites and the salt to a dry froth and add to 
the yolks and sugar and beat hard for five minutes or until the 
bubbles rise and break. Cut the flour in lightly. Bake in a 
slow oven about an hour. — [Mrs. E. A. Handy. 

Wedding Cake. — One and one-half cups of butter creamed 
with one and one-half cups of sugar, one cup of molasses, four 
eggs, one teaspoonful of soda in four and one-half cups of flour. 
One pound raisins, one pound currants, one-half pound citron, 
one teaspoonful of cloves, cinnamon, and nutmeg. Mix and let 
it stand over night. Bake four hours. — [P. S. Lehnert. 



[71] 



WHAT WE COOK 



*$J Paatnj &- 



Sour Milk Pie. — One cup of sour milk, one cup of chopped 
raisins, one teaspoonful each of cloves, cinnamon and nutmeg, a 
little salt, two eggs and one cup of sugar. This makes two pies. 
— [Mrs. A. G. White. 

Lemon Pie. — Beat to a froth one and one-half cups of sugar, 
the rind and juice of one and one-half lemons and the yolks of 
three eggs. Then beat the whites of three eggs and stir in with 
one and one-half tablespoons of milk. Turn into a plate already 
prepared and bake in a moderate oven forty-five minutes. — 
[Josephine Farrington. 

Chocolate Pie. — Two cups of milk, four eggs, four table- 
spoonfuls of sugar, two and one-half tablespoonfuls of grated 
chocolate, pinch of salt and a little vanilla. Melt chocolate and 
stir in a little milk and when well mixed add the rest of the milk 
with the yolks of three eggs and one whole egg well beaten, 
sugar, salt and vanilla. Stir well and bake in a plate lined with 
pie crust. Have the oven moderate and be careful not to burn. 
Cool and frost with the whites of three eggs and three teaspoon- 
fuls of sugar. — [Mrs. Mary Freeman Hinckley. 

[72] 



ON CAPE COD 



Delicious Filling for Turnovers. — Mix well one egg, one 
cup of sugar, juice and grated rind of one lemon, one tablespoon 
cornstarch, two tablespoons milk, one-half tablespoon butter and 
one cup boiling water. Cook till thick and add one-half cup of 
seeded raisins. When cold use for turnovers or for filling for pie 
with two crusts. — [Mrs. E. A. Handy. 

Apple Pot Pie. — Peel and quarter apples. Stew with a little 
water and when soft add sugar and cinnamon to taste. Make 
dumplings of one cup pastry flour, one rounding teaspoon baking 
powder and one-quarter teaspoon salt. Mix with milk just stiff 
enough to roll out. Cut in rounds and drop in the boiling apple 
sauce. Cover tight and keep boiling for ten or more minutes. 
Try with a straw and serve as soon as cooked or they will be 
soggy. These dumplings can be dropped from a spoon into the 
hot apple sauce to save time. — [Mrs. E. A. Handy. 

Delaps. — Four apples, remove skins and cores, put through 
a meat chopper or chop in bowl. Measure and add an equal 
amount of sugar and the grated rind and juice of a lemon. Line 
patty pans with pie paste and fill with the mixture. Hake in s 
moderate oven until the apple is red. Serve with whipped cream 
Variations: Bake in pie plate and cover with meringue as for 
lemon pie. If apples are not acid use less sugar. — [Mrs. E. A. 
Handy. 

Wholesome Apple Pie. — Slice apples thin to fill a pie plate 
heaping full. Add one cup sugar and half a level teaspoon each 
of cinnamon and nutmeg. Cover with a good pie paste and bake 
oue hour in a moderate oven. Just before putting in the oven 
dash some cold water over the crust. It will make it flaky and 
crisp. — [Mrs. E. A. Handy. 



[73] 



WHAT WE COOK 



Eccles. — One large cup of seeded and chopped raisins, one 
cup of sugar, one teaspoonful of cinnamon, one-quarter teaspoon- 
ful of nutmeg, and the same of cloves, two tablespoonfuls of 
strong coffee and one tablespoonful of brandy or rum. Make a 
rich piecrust. Roll and cut with medium sized cookie cutter, two 
rounds for each eccle. Put one teaspoonful of the mixture on 
the bottom round, wet the edge as for a pie, gash the top round 
and put in place, pressing together around the edge with a fork 
dipped in flour. The filling will make three dozen "Eccles." — 
[Mrs. Alfred Crocker, Jr. 



[74] 



ON CAPE COD 



-*§{ Ptrkba ntib ijlrf arnica §*- 



Club Sauce. — Six large tomatoes, one green pepper, (without 
the seeds), one onion, one cup of sugar, two cups of vinegar and 
two tablespoonfuls of salt. Chop all fine and boil to the con- 
sistency of catsup. — [Mrs. Leslie Jones. 

Spiced Apple Jelly. — One-half peck of apples, one pint of 
vinegar, three pints of water, one ounce of stick cinnamon, one- 
half ounce of whole cloves. Cook the apples with the vinegar 
and water and spices. Strain and use a pint of fruit juice to a 
pint of sugar as in any jelly. — [Mrs. Peterson. 

Cranberry Sauce. — Boil one quart of water and three cups of 
sugar ten minutes, add three pints of cranberries and let it boil 
up once. Cover and set on the back of the stove to simmer but 
not boil, twenty minutes. Cool and serve the next day when it is 
at its best. — [Mrs. B. D. Peterson, Jr. 

Spiced Currants. — Seven pounds of currants, five pounds of 
brown sugar, three tablespoonfuls of cinnamon, three tablespoon- 
fuls of cloves, one pint of vinegar. Wash the currants and re- 
move the stems ; put in kettle with the sugar and vinegar, add 
the spices tied in a muslin bag. Cook slowly an hour and a half. 
— [Mrs. Peterson. 

[75] 



WHAT WE COOK 



iSpiCE Jelly. — One peck of apples, five cups of vinegar, three 
cups of water, half ounce of whole cloves, half ounce of allspice, 
one ounce of cinnamon bark. Cut apples, without paring or cor- 
ing ; put in kettle with spices, vinegar and water and boil until 
soft. Suspend the compound in a bag to extract the juice. 
Measure the juice and allow one pound of sugar to each pint. 
Put the juice back on the fire and heat the sugar in the oven. 
When the juice boils add the sugar and simmer three-quarters of 
an hour. — [Mrs. H. M. Hutchings. 

Spiced Grapes. — Eight pounds of grapes and eight pounds of 
sugar, one pint of vinegar, one tablespoonful each of cloves, 
cinnamon, allspice and mace. Press the pulp of the grapes from 
the skins one at a time, boil the pulp a few minutes and strain 
out the seeds. Add the skins and boil slowly half an hour, add 
the other ingredients and boil till thick. Be careful it does not 
burn. — [Mrs. E. A. Handy. 

Pear Relish. — Three-fourths of a pound of sugar to each 
pound of pear sliced thin. Let stand over night, in the morning 
add one-quarter pound of ginger root tied in a thin cloth. Cook 
several hours. — [Mrs. F. H. Thayer. 

Grape Fruit Marmalade. — One grape fruit, one orange, one 
lemon. Three quarts of cold water, three quarts of sugar. Peel 
and cut the rind in slivers with scissors. Put the pulp through a 
meat chopper, add three quarts of water, let it stand over night, 
the next day boil half an hour, let stand twenty- four hours, boil 
one hour and add three quarts of sugar, boil till it jellies. This- 
makes eight glasses. — [Mrs. E. A. Handy. 

[76] 



ON CAPE COD 



Tomato Marmalade. — Four pounds of ripe tomatoes, peeled, 
four pounds of sugar, six lemons and one cup of raisins. He- 
move the seeds from raisins and lemons and chop with tomatoes. 
Add the sugar and boil slowly together two hours. Put hot into 
glass. — [Mrs. Howard. 

Sugared Gkape Fruit Rind. — Cut rind in strips and soak 
forty-eight hours in salt and water, one tablespoonful of salt to 
one quart of water. Drain and cook eight hours in fresh water, 
changing water two or three times. Cook one hour in a syrup 
made of one pound of sugar to one half cup of water for each 
pound of rind. Boil until the syrup is nearly boiled away. 
Drain, cool and roll in powdered sugar. — [Mrs. Ruth E. Chip- 
man. 

Quince Honey. — To one large quince grated, add one cup of 
sugar and a little water. Boil till clear. — [* * * * 

Orange Marmalade. A Cuban Receipt. — Messina or Valen- 
cia oranges. Peel off the yellow rind very thin, soak twenty- four 
hours in salt and water. Next day boil the peels three hours in 
fresh water, changing the water two or three times. Peel off all 
the white skin on the oranges and throw it away. Cut up the 
fruit in very small pieces, taking out all the seeds. Cut the 
yellow peel in narrow strips. Weigh peel, oranges and juice, 
and to every pound or pint add a little less than a pound of 
granulated sugar. Boil until thick and clear ; from an hour to 
an hour and a half. Some prefer three-quarters of a pound of 
sugar to a pound of fruit. — [Miss H. L. Day. 

[77] 



WHAT WE COOK 



Sweet Corn Pickle. — One dozen ears corn cut from the cob, 
one large head of cabbage, chopped, six green peppers, chopped, 
eight onions, chopped, three stalks of celery, chopped, three cups 
of brown sugar, three small tablespoons salt, three pints vinegar, 
four tablespoons dry mustard, one tablespoon tumeric, two 
tablespoons celery seed. Boil forty-five minutes and can. — [Mrs. 
E. A. Handy. 

Sliced Pickles. — Pare and slice very thin one dozen cucum- 
bers. Sprinkle with salt and let stand three or four hours, then 
drain. Take one quart of cold vinegar, half a cup each of black 
and white mustard seed, six onions cut small, three-quarters of a 
cup of salad oil and one tablespoonful of celery seed. Mix all 
well together and pour over the cucumbers. — [Mrs. Walter Tufts. 

Uncooked Chili Sauce. — One peck of ripe tomatoes, cut fine, 
sprinkle with one cup of salt and drain, eight stalks of celery cut 
in small pieces, four green peppers chopped, do not use seeds, one 
cup of chopped onion, one cup of horse radish, one cup of mustard 
seed, two cups of sugar, two teaspoonfuls of black pepper, same 
of cloves and cinnamon, one quart of vinegar. Mix well and seal 
in jars. — [Mrs. E. A. Handy. 

Lemon Marmala.de. — One lemon, one cup of water, one cup of 
sugar. Peel the yellow rind from the lemon and cut it in thin 
strips, boil it in a pint of water for one hour, drain and throw 
away the water. Chop the lemon pulp, free it from seeds, add 
one cup of water and the rind, boil one hour, add the sugar and 
boil about fifteen minutes, or until it jellies. — [Mrs. E. A. Handy. 

[78] 



ON CAPE COD 



Chow Chow. — One large cauliflower and two quarts of small 
string beans broken in pieces and parboiled. One quart of onions, 
peeled, one quart of ripe cucumbers peeled and cut in inch pieces, 
one quart of small cucumbers, one quart of green tomatoes, add 
six green peppers cut small, do not use the seeds of the peppers. 
Stand in weak brine for twenty-four hours, scald in the same brine, 
drain and while still hot pour over the following mixture : One 
cup of flour, six tablespoonfuls of dry mustard, one tablespoonful 
of tumeric, one and one-half cups of brown sugar sifted together 
and mixed to a paste with a little cold vinegar, stir this carefully 
into two quarts of hot cider vinegar, cook slowly until it thickens, 
stirring all the time, seal in jars while hot. — [* * * * 



[70] 



WHAT WE COOK 



-3g MiBa Uattnma g^ 



"Now may good digestion wait on appetite, 
And health on both!" 

— [Shakespeare. 

Cream Sauce. — One tablespoonful of butter, one tablespoon- 
ful of flour, one cup of milk. Melt the butter, add the flour and 
stir till smooth, add the milk slightly warm and cook till thick, 
stirring all the time. This will never be lumpy. — [Mrs. E. A. 
Handy. 

Stuffed Prunes. — Four dozen prunes boiled until tender iu 
unsweetened water. Drain until thoroughly dry and remove the 
stones. Make a paste of cream cheese with chopped walnuts for 
filling. Serve with salad. — [Miss Marvin. 

•Chile con Carne. Mexican receipt. — One and one-half 
pounds tender raw beef, one onion, one-half can tomatoes, one- 
half pod red pepper. Hash the beef tine ; put it to cook with 
sufficient cold water ; with this mix the chopped onion and pep- 
per. Stew until well done and almost dry. Then add tomato 
and scald. — [Miss D. E. Hinckley. 

"From Midsummer Cook Book. 

[80] 



ON CAPE COD 



"They have in Turkey a drink called Coffee. This 
drink comforteth the brain and heart and helpeth the 
digestion." — [Bacon. 

Boiled Coffee. — The coffee must be freshly ground, failing 
that warm it in the oven stirring often, be careful it does not 
brown any more than when you put it in. For six cups take six 
tablespoonfuls of coffee, one yolk of egg and cold water enough 
to make a thin paste. Let this stand for five minutes or an hour 
if more convenient, add six cups of cold water. Put over a hot 
tire and the minute it begins to boil stir it down and then let 
it boil up once more. Set it where it will keep hot but not boil, 
until it settles. — [Mrs. E. A. Handy. 

Chocolate Fudge. — One quart of sugar, one-quarter of a 
pound of Baker's chocolate, one-half cup of milk, butter the size 
of an egg. Cook till it hardens in water, flavor and beat a few 
minutes. — [Mrs. Lottie C. Holmes. 

Sea Foam. — Three cups of brown sugar, one cup of water, one 
tablespoonful of vinegar. Boil until it threads. Then beat into 
it the whites of two eggs which have been beaten light, add vanilla 
and nuts. Beat fifteen minutes or so and drop on buttered paper. 
— [Miss Annie Gorham Hinckley. 

Baked Beans. — Soak one quart of beans over night, in the 
morning rinse well. Put in the bean pot with three-quarters of a 
pound of pork, one tablespoonful of molasses and one teaspoonful 
of salt. Bake all day.— [Mrs. Job C. Cobb 

[81] 



WHAT WE COOK 



D. A. R. Punch. — One dozen oranges, one dozen lemons, one 
can of grated pineapple, one quart bottle of rasp"berry juice, one 
glass of grape jelly, six cups of sugar, one quart of water, one 
quart of apollinaris added at intervals while being served. Suffi- 
cient for fifty people. — [Miss Marvin. 



In the name of the Village Improvement Society I wish to 
thank all those Cape Cod housekeepers who have so kindly contrib- 
uted their favorite receipts and so made this book of real use as well 
as of interest. 

We are indebted to Miss Irene Loring for the design for the 
cover. 

AMY L. HANDY, Compiler. 



[82] 



OCT 21 <q ' J 



One copy del. to Cat. Div. 



21 ii»i