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Full text of "The White City magazine"

Digitized by tine Internet Arciiive 

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CARLI: Consortium of Academic and Researcii Libraries in Illinois 



http://www.archive.org/details/whitecitymagazin1905chic 



THE WHITE CITY MAGAZINE 




All Caps and Entire Exterior and Interior Ornamental 
Composition, Plaster and Cement Work for White City 



furnished by 



The Decorators Supply Co. 



\\ _\i. Wor.l'ARTH. President. 



OsCAK Si'lNDLHR, \'ice-Fl CbidelU. 



Manufacturers of 



\\'.\i. I". FosiKK. Secrctars. 



Interior and Exterior Ornaments of Every Description in 

Cement, Composition, Plaster and Wood. 

Columns, Capitals, Brackets, Cornices, Friezes, Mouldings, 

Panels, Wood Grilles, Fine Woodwork, Plastic Ceiling and Wall Decorations. 

Composition Ornaments for Woodwork. 



Designs and Estimates Furnished. 



209=219 South Clinton Street 



Chicago 



When writing to advertisers please mention the White City jMagazine, 



THE WHITE CITY MAGAZINE 



GEO. E. COLE & CO 



DESIGNERS 

Printers :: Binders 
Blank Book Makers 

STATIONERS 



(jjEO.ECbzE 




Our Service at Your Service 



86 and 88 Dearborn Street 
CHICAGO ILLINOIS 



Our STATIONERY and SUPPLIES are used in all the offices of the WHITE CITY 



When writing to advertiser-^ please mention the White City Magazine, 



THE WHITE CITY MAGAZINE 



True & True Co. 

Chicago 



Makers of 

The 

Good 

Doors 

and 

High=Qrade 

Millwork 




The True Door is a '^ivetl baUnced Door and is al^ojays in 
the center of the commercial stage. 



Millwork of our manufacture was used in the construction of the White City 
Band Stand, Scenic Railroad, Baby Incubators, Automatic Vaudeville, Garden 
Enclosure, Ball Room, Main Office, Canals of Venice and Colonnade and Tower. 



When writing to advertisers t'ease mention the White City Magazij 



THE WHITE CITY MAGAZINE 



Another Long Stride 

in the direction of making Chicago the greatest 
ELECTRIC CITY in the world, has been 
made by the adoption and hberal apphcation of 



Commonwealth 
Electric Light 

and Power 



in the new White City. 

Electricity is typical of the age in which 
we live. 

It is particularly adapted for illuminating 
purposes in modern residences and apartments. 

May we not send our representative to 
explain how YOU can use it to advantage, and 
why you SHOULD use it. 

Commonwealth Electric Company 

719 Garfield Boulevard 
General Offices: 139 Adams Street 



W'licn icritiiig to advertisers please mention the Wiini; t.iTV AIacazim;. 




Promoter of White City 




The JVhite Cirr Magazine 



Vol. I. 



FEBRUARY, 1905. 



No. I. 




iDCi 



^hQ .STORY 0/ 
WHITE CITY 



■DC! 




YPICAL of Chicago, 
with its bustle and 
quick action was the 
founding of White 
City. The conception 
of the plan, the im- 
mediate decision as to 
its merits, the launch- 
ing of the project and the work of con- 
struction : all have been appropriately en- 
ergetic and in accordance with the tradi- 
tions of Chicago. 

One afternoon during the sum.mer of 
1904 two Chicago men were engaged in 
earnest conversation. They were discuss- 
ing various features of the St. Louis Ex- 
position, the Amusement Parks in vari- 
ous eastern cities, until finally the subject 
of the entire lack of commensurate amuse- 
ment facilities for Chicago's millions was 
broached. 

These two men were A. J. Jones and 
Paul D. Howse ; both familiar with the 
subjects under discussion and as well ac- 
quainted with the details of summer 
amusement enterprises as any two men in 
the United States. 

"I know of the best location in the 
United States for an amusement park," 
finally said Howse. 

"If you have the location I know where 
we can get all the money we need to build 
it and operate it," said Jones. 

Then they commenced to figure. For 
the sum of $40,000 they could finance 
svch a venture as seemed desirable, This 




attraction and that attraction could be 
bought or leased or run on shares, etc. 
They could build this and that and so on. 
Yes, it would surely be a success. 

Mr. Howse called on J. Ogden Armour 
and asked him about a certain vacant 
tract of land which had produced an ex- 
cellent crop of corn that season and had 
netted Mr. Armour a rental of probably 
not less than $100. The property covered 
about 14 acres and extended from Sixty- 
third Street south to Sixt_v-fifth Street; 
from South Park Avenue to Calumet 
Avenue. 

As a result of that interview Mr. 
Howse went away with an option in his 
pocket. So far all went well and under 
the favorable auspices of their recent suc- 
cess the affair developed such possibili- 
ties that the question of using more than 
the allotted $40,000 became more and 
more pertinent. 

"The Wall Street game is not in my 
line," remarked HoAvse to his friend 
Jones, "but if it was I would raise $100,- 
000 to use in making this Park of ours the 
createst thing of the kind ever heard of in 
Chicago." 

"Same here," replied Jones. "We can 
take care of the work of putting it up and 
running it : we know all about that sort 
of thing, but what we need is a financier. 
"\A''e should have at least $100,000." 

"The next thing is to get the right 
man," replied Howse. 

"I know of a man," continued Tones, 



10 



THE WHITE CITY MAGAZINE 



after a moment's thought, "just the man 
to finance this affair. If we could get 
him to take charge of that end of it 
there would be no chance of a doubt as 
to its success. He's one of the most capa- 
ble men in Chicago. \Miy, he took the 
deadest hotel in Chicago and within a 
year he has made it the liveliest one and 
the best money-maker." 

"The verv man," replied Howse. 
"That's Joseph Beifeld of the Sherman 
House and College Inn. He's the talk 
of the town when people discuss success- 
ful business enterprises." 

The next dav as ^vlr. Beifeld was en- 



"Give mc $15,000 worth," said a third. 

"Hold on, gentlemen," said Mr. Bei- 
feld, "there won't be enough to go 
around at this rate. Wait until we see 
just how we will arrange this." 

But the venture was successfully 
launched and as }ilessrs. Jones and Howse 
went a\vay, a little bewildered with the 
rapidity of it all, they knew that White 
City had passed from an uncertainty into 
a tangible business enterprise. 

A few days later found the trio, Messrs. 
Beifeld. Howse and Jones, in New York 
City. They viewed the amusement parks 
of Conev Island and noted the successful 




"Green Fields and Pastures Aew" 



tertaining some business acquaintances at 
luncheon in the College Inn, he received 
a card from ]\Ir. Jones. Excusing him- 
self from his guests he was introduced by 
JNIr. Jones to ]Mr. Howse and a few mo- 
ments of conversation followed, during 
which A'olleys of questions and answers 
passed back and forth. 

^^'ith that remarkable intuition which 
has characterized all his business deal- 
ings, ^Ir. Beifeld realized the wonderful 
opportunities presented and made his de- 
cision quickly. He agreed to undertake 
the financing of White City. Then, 
turning to the table where his friends 
awaited him. among them being some of 
Chicago's best known capitalists, he ex- 
plained the project in a few words. 

'T'll take Sio.ooo stock in it.'' said one. 

'T'll take $20,000 in it myself," said an- 
other. 



features. They visited Luna Park, 
Dreamland, and the other leading places 
and witnessed the intense enjoyment of 
the thousands who congregated there day 
and evening. 

"I'm glad of one thing, boys," said Mr. 
Beifeld that evening at dinner, "we will 
give the people of Chicago an opportunity 
of enjoying themselves such as they have 
never yet dreamed of. When I think of 
the hot stufl:'y theatres in Chicago on sum- 
mer evenings; when I think of the abso- 
lute barrenness of the lives of so many 
thousands of men. women and children 
there, who have no place to go for clean, 
unobjectionable entertainment and pleas- 
ure, I'm glad that we are going to build 
White City, from humanitarian princi- 
ples if for no other reason." 

And the others declared that they felt 
exactly as he did about it. 



THE WHITE CITY MAGAZINE 



II 



Days of hard work and careful inspec- 
tion followed. They talked with men in- 



WHITE CITY 

H0O0.O0O.AMUSE^/Jir 

TO BE ERECTED HERE. 

THE WHITE CITY CONSTRUCTION CO. 
OFFICE. SCHILLER BUILDING. 




The First Official Xcjiice 

terestcd in the, various enterprises and 
discussed the reasons for this failure and 
that success until one evening "Six. Bei- 
feld said : 

"We must bear out the traditions of 
Chicago. Chicago has never yet taken 
second place in anything. Here, in New 
York, are a score or more of enterprises 
built at a cost of hundreds of thousands 
of dollars each. We are talking of build- 
ing something in Chicago at a cost of 
only $100,000. It is not the right thing. 
Why should not Chicago have something 
bigger and grander than anything we 
have seen here? \Miy should we think of 
taking second place?" 

"It's up to you," said JMr. Jones. 

"I'll not be ?n imitator," continued Mr. 
Beifeld, "I will lead but I won't follow. T 
will originate but not imitate. Boys, we'll 
make AViiite City bigger and grander 
than anything they have in New York and 
instead of spending a paltrv $100,000 to 
build it, we'll spend a million." 

Before leaving New York on their re- 
turn, arrangements were completed with 
the most skilled architect known in con- 
nection with the designing and construct- 
ing of similar enterprises ; Edward C. 



Boyce, who has designed and built more 
amusement parks than any other man in 
America and who has created some of the 
most successful devices for entertain- 
ment. Air. Boyce entered the White 
City Company and was made the vice- 
president when they elected officers. 

Mr. Joseph Beifeld was elected presi- 
dent, Mr. A. J. Jones, secretary and treas- 
urer, and Air. Paul D. Howse, general 
manager. 

Shortly after their return to home, an 
arm}' of workmen dro\e a peaceful flock 
of sheep out of the selected ground, loads 
of lumber were dumped at convenient 
places among the rustling cornstalks and 
soon a fence was constructed around the 
14 acres of gniund. 

In the meantime reports of the new en- 
terprise reached the ears of many Chicago 
business men and the projectors began to 
receive recjuests for stock. New York 
men came on to investigate and expressed 
a desire to participate in the venture but 
they were too late. Chicago had amply 
financed her remarkable new enterprise in 
the way characteristic of Chicago and 
capital went begging for the opportunity 
of investment. 




Uriving Filing for the Tower Foundntion 

All attractions and enterprises which 
,ere to be considered for the new Park 



12 



THE WHITE CITY MAGAZINE 



must be strictly high class and wholly 
free from questionable features. Every- 
thing to have a place must be of a char- 
acter which would pemiit a discussion of 
details in the home and at the fire-side of 
every Chicago famil)-. Every entertain- 
ing feature must be new and up-to-date. 



tie ones were to be amused ; not fright- 
ened or awed by weird and unpleasant 
things. 

From the best and most deserving of 
"clean'' amusement devices were finally 
selected the wonderful features which will 
make White City the trreatest and most 




Enormous Scene Pahice 



yet devoid of opportunities for criticism. 
Clean, healthful, mirth-provoking, care- 
dispelling amusements were to be chosen, 
and only such, in order to make every 
father and every mother feel assured that 
they could spend an afternoon or evening 
at "\\'hite City, accompanied by the little 
folks, and there would be nothing to re- 
gret afterwards. 

The management was besieged by an 
army of showmen, "fakirs," side-show 
men, museum freaks, etc., until word was 
passed down the line that there was 
"nothin' doing" at White City unless a 
clean bill could be shown. Frightful 
monstrosities, hideous dwarfs and all 
sorts of nature's pleasantries in the way 
of creating came to make application and 
as quickly went away again. The grown 
folks were to be entertained and the lit- 



charming amusement resort in the world. 
Nothing suggestive, nothing terrible, 
nothing disagreeable or nothing question- 
able. Yet everybody who visits White 
City will be so well entertained that the 
people of Chicago will wonder how they 
were able to get along at all without 
it. 

So, when the hospitable gates of this 
city of entertainment and amusement are 
thrown open to the public on the 27th of 
May, 1905, the citizens of Chicago and 
her suburbs will have occasion to thank 
Mr. Paul Howse for his idea, to thank 
Mr. Beifeld for his keen intuition and 
financing abilities, to thank Mr. Boyce 
for his architectural skill, and in fact, to 
thank everybody who has contributed to 
the work of constructing this wonderful, 
fairy-like place. 



THE WHITE CITY MAGAZINE 

A City of Flowers 

BIosso/i/s to be Scattered about White City Would Fill the Largest 
Greenhouses in the Country 



13 



C5N ADDITION to the 
dozen large flower beds 
White Citv will have 
one hundred and fifty 
large Urns filled with 
blossoms. On every 
alternate pedestal about 
the board walk an Art 

Urn of a special design will be placed. 

Each of these will be filled with flowers. 
These Urns are designed especially for 

White City by ]\Ir. Oscar Spindler of 




Sweden, will have charge of the garden- 
ing in White City. He promises some 
features in flowers and blossoms which 
will be as unique as beautiful. Half an 
acre of ground and a large hot house will 
be used in propagating the flowers and 
plants. 



Classes or Masses 

White City is designed for the pur- 
pose of supplying amusement and enter- 




A Scene 
the Decorator's Supply Company. Each 
Urn bears a monogram of White City 
and is cast out of imported Portland 
Cement. 

Three months' time is required in the 
manufacture of these Urns, and they are 
pronounced by Mr. Spindler to be the fin- 
est art goods the Decorator's Supply 
Company has ever turned out. When 
these Urns are placed and filled with flow- 
ers, White City will assume the appear- 
ance of a conservatory. 

Mr. John Bergstrom, well known in 
Chicago and formerly Royal Gardener of 



of Activity 
tainmcnt to the whole people of Chicago 
and vicinity. A few days ago as Joseph 
Beifeld, President of White City Com- 
I'AXY, was seated in his office in conversa- 
tion with a friend the latter questioned 
the advisability of charging an admission 
of only 10 cents at the entrance. 

"Are you not afraid that such a small 
admission fee will be criticized by the best 
people?'' asked the friend. 

"Well," replied Mr. Beifeld, "White 
City is not built alone for the four hund- 
red ; it is for the entertainment of the four 
million." 



14 



THE irHITE CITY MAGAZINE 



Fire Precautions at White City 

Xo/ flic Least of -chick -vill be Two Complete Fire Companies 



N THE building- of 
White City one of the 
first tilings considered 
was adequate protec- 
tion against fire. The 
area covered by the 
buildings, the i m- 
mense amount of val- 
uable material and the loss which would 
be sustained if a delay were permitted 
to occur in the time set for the opening 




of the best drilled firemen in the world, 
men who have been carefully selected for 
their experience, skdl, agility and gen- 
eral fitness, are on duty at the White 
City day and night. Their ecjuipment 
consists of two fire engines, one hook- 
and-ladder with a 6o-foot extension lad- 
der, two chemical engines and a coal 
wagon. Attached to the permanent hos- 
pital is an ambulance and attached to the 
White City police station is a patrol 




Scene from "F/i 

rendered it imperative that unusual pre- 
cautions be provided. 

White City has fire-fighting facilities 
such as are not possessed by thousands 
of cities which have a population of from 
10,000 to 15,000. The special ecju^pment 
owned by White City is the very best 
that money can buy and any fire which 
might break out anywhere in the grounds 
could be put out without delay even 
though no aid were given by the city 
force. 

Two complete fire companies, with 35 



htinsr the Flames ' 



wagon. This equipment participates in 
the great Fighting the Flames exhibition, 
but is expected at all times to attend to 
the duties which may arise at any part 
of White City. 

But, in case of a serious fire, all of 
the equipment of White City is of the 
regulation size and make, and the city 
department could dash into the grounds 
through the sixty-foot main entrance or 
through a number of other entrances and 
there would be no confusion because the 
fire-fighters of White City have been 



THE IVHITE CITY MAGAZINE 



15 



trained and drilled similarly and would 
act as a part of the city department. 

As an insurance risk White City is 
looked upon favorably by the insurance 
companies because every suggestion rela- 
tive to protection from fire has been fol- 
lowed. At stated intervals between the 
principal buildings are 16-inch blank 
brick walls, rising three feet above the 
roofs and completely segregating the 
various important structures. There are 
no open rafters in any of the buildings, 



feet of regulation hose with the same 
thread universally used on city hose. 

But the greatest of the fire fighting 
facilities at ^^' hite City is the enormous 
reservoir, the lake at the base of the 
Chutes. This lake holds 1,365,000 gal- 
lons of water and six fire engines can 
pump for several hours before exhaust- 
ing the supply. Two enormous electric 
pumps will be working day and night to 
keep the water at a high pressure in the 
mains and standpipes. 




One of the" Gangs;" Pay-day at White City 



and the roofs are covered with steel or 
composition. Several of the important 
structures, such as the College Inn, the 
Electrical Transforming Station, the 
Tower and the Chutes are built with steel 
frames and are fire-proof. 

The area of ground covered by the 
park is one-quarter of a mile long and 
375 feet wide. The buildings facing the 
wide Plaza with its brilliant flower beds 
are 100 feet in depth, leaving an open 
space of 175 feet across the Plaza. 

In front of these buildings is the 40- 
foot board walk, raised 4 feet from the 
ground and under which are placed the 
two 6-inch water mains. From these 
ma'ns run adequate connections to the 
various buildings and in each of the main 
structures is a standpipe with hose 
attached all readv for an emergency. 
Connected with these mains outside of 
the board walk and in positions where 
they w'll he readilv accessible, are fire 
plugs with double hvdrants : ten in all. 
Alternate ones have attached to them 50 



Xo fires of any kind will be permitted 
in the buildings with the exception of the 
fireproof College Inn. 

In the various buildings, placed at con- 
venient aild accessible locations, are 50 
Babcock fire extinguishers, 200 drv pow- 
der extinguishers, buckets, etc. The 
employes are subject to a regular fire 
drill at frequent intervals, under the 
supervision of a trained fireman familiar 
with drilling the employes of large con- 
cerns. Five regulation fire-alarm boxes 
are stationed about the grounds and an 
electric wh'stle calls the men to drill at 
any and all parts of the park, each sta- 
tion being numbered. .\n armv of 
trained watchmen patrol the park at 
nic'ht. 

Durino- the work of construction smok- 
m<Z h^s been prohil^ited in all parts of 
the 2'rnunds. 

So with everA- possible precaution 
against fire and with every known appli- 
ance for fio'htins: fire, the insurance risk 
is called a eood one. 



i6 



THE WHITE CITY MAGAZINE 



High-Class Attractions Only 

IVo Sho-vs of .-0/fcsf/o>n7hlc Character Will Be Found in While Cily 



V PERSONAL inspec- 
tion of all the large 
amusement enterprises 
of the East and all 
^^'estern Amusement 
Parks, the management 
of White City has 
been enabled to witness 
the operation and character of every 
entertainment offered the public. They 
have found a certain class of show or en- 




not been considered for obvious reasons. 
In these various Eastern and Western 
resorts a number of attractions were 
found which pleased everybody, and pa- 
trons were found coming from them with 
the feeling that they had received more 
than their money's worth. The very best 
of these attractions were selected for 
White City, and not only the manage- 
ment of White City but its patrons will 
benefit by the experience of others. 




The Midget CiU. 



tertainment which is of a questionable 
character; they have found that another 
class of show or entertainment which, 
while moral in character, is not worth the 
admission fees charged. 

In selecting attractions for White 
City, the questionable shows have been 
rejected, and the attractions which do 
not give people their money's worth have 



Selecting the best attractions. White 
City has improved upon them and will 
offer them at the very lowest possible 
rates of admission. 

A large number of these attractions 
have been selected as appealing especially 
to the patronage of women and children. 
It is the intention to make the daily mati- 
nee at White City a distinct feature. 



THE WHITE CITY MAGAZINE 



17 



A Few Questions Answered 

Verbatim Report of Answers to Inquiries 
JSIade by a Visitor at White City 



Q. Is that high structure in the South- 
west corner of the grounds a Loop the 
Loop? 

A. No; there will be no dangerous 
amusement devices in White City and 
none which the most sensitive need fear to 
patronize. The structure you speak of is 
the Scenic Railway. 

0. Is White City owned by Eastern 
capitalists ? 

A. No; White City is owned by 
about one hundred citizens of Chicago, 
and a very small amount of stock is owned 
by New York and St. Louis citizens. 

0. What admission will White City 
charge ? 

A. Ten cents. 

0. Will ten cents be the admission on 
Sundays and Holidays? 

A. Yes ; the admission will be ten 
cents at all times. 

O. Where is AA'hite City vaudeville 
Theatre located ? 

A. White City will have no Vaude- 
ville Theatre. 

Q. Why not? 

A. White City will give the best 
vaudeville and sensational acts in the open 
air without charging any extra admission 
to a theatre. The Vaudeville Theatres in 
the majority of the Parks have proven 
failures in the last few years, and White 
City believes that the theatre should be 
eliminated and the Vaudeville Entertain- 
ment given out of doors. 

0. What are the two large buildings 
on each side of the center of the grounds ? 

A. Thev are the public toilet rooms 
and a part of the perfect appointments in 
White City. 

0. Is the Fire and Flame show like 
Hale's Fire Fighters at the World's Fair ? 

A. The Fire and Flame show is abso- 
lutely different. Hale's Fire Fighters was 
an exhibition of skillful work on the part 
of firemen in making quick hydrant con- 
nections, etc. Fire and Flame will be a 
spectacular production' consisting of a 
tvpical street scene in which the burning 
of the buildincrs is incidental. 



0. Of what material are the build- 
ings ? 

A. All buildings in White City are 
as near fire proof as can be expeditiously 
built. All the large buildings are divided 
by 16 inch fire walls, and the exteriors are 
for the most part of metal lath and plas- 
ter, a recognized fire proofing material, 
and the insides are for the most part 
stamped steel, which is also fire proof. 

0. Where does the Water Supply of 
White City come from ? 

A. White City has one-half mile of 
six inch water pipe and a complete sew- 
erage svstem of its own. ^^'hen complete 
it will have about four miles of two inch 
water connections leading direct to Hose 
Reels which are located in all the build- 
ings. 

0. Is the depression at the North end 
of the grounds intended for a Lake ? 

A. No ; this depression will be a 
Sunken Garden, laid out with Cement 
\\'alks and beautiful Flower ?)eds. The 
onlv Lake in the grounds is in the center 
of the South end, and this will be used 
for the Chute boats. 

0. Will there be an elcv?tor in the 
Steel Tower in the middle of the grounds? 

A. No ; this Tower is entirely for 
lighting purposes. The Elevator Towers 
have proven unsatisfactory to the public. 

0. \\\\\ there be anv place in White 
City Park where patrons can sit down 
and listen to the music? 

A. Yes ; there will be seats around the 
band stand for several thousand people, 
and seats along the board walk for sev- 
eral thousand more. 

0. Will the attractions at ^^^^ITE 
City be changed ? 

A. Yes ; agents of the Companv are 
on the lookout continuallv for new attrac- 
tions both in the LTnited States and Eu- 
rope, and as new ones are found which 
are of good character and sati^^factors' to 
the public, they will be installed in White 
City. The attractions now being placed 
in White City will be changed from time 
to time. 



i8 



THE WHITE CITY MAGAZINE 



0. How many employees will \A^hite 
City have? 

A. There will be about one thousand 
persons employed in "\^'HITE Cnv. 

O. Are the big- attractions like the 
Scenic Railway and the Fire Show let out 
to concessionaires? 

A. No ; these attractions and all the 
principal attractions in ^A'ITITE City are 
built and owned by the Comixanv, and 
will be operated by the Company. 

0. \\\\\ "\A'iiiTE City be finished bv 
your opening- date. Mav 27? 

A. Yes : there is no question but that 
without extraordinary hurry White City 
will be completely finished before the 
opening da^^ 

0. Will AA'iiite City have a good 
Restaurant ? 

A. Yes ; it will have the best Restau- 
rant in the country, on the same order 
and operated bv the same people who now 
conduct the College Inn in the Sherman 
House. 

0. AA ill it have a popular price Res- 
taurant?" 

A. Yes ; the first floor of the Restau- 
rant building will be devoted to a popular 
orice Cafe. 



Few Accidents in Construction 

Sixteen large buildings have been 
erected in AA'hite City without anv 
workmen receiving serious injurv. No 
accidents of anv kind have occurred, but 
a it\Y have been verv sliehtlv injured. 
Fewr of the downtown buildinQ-s have been 
erected Avithout fatal accidents, but so 
much care has been used in constructing 
scafifolds and safetv appliances in White 
City that up until January 25th there has 
been practically no need of a physician's 
services. 



Mr. Berry Goes to Louisville 

?\Tr. Gerald Hcrrv. the expert Civil En- 
gineer, w^ho hid out and built AVtiite 
City Scenic Raihvay, has gone to Louis- 
ville, Ky.. where he will build a Scenic 
Railwav in a new park to be built in 
Louisville. ^Tr. Bovce is Architect of this 
Park. 

Mr. Eerrv made a host of friends in 
Chicag-o, who expect him to return for 
the opening of White City. 



Mr. Franc R. E. Woodward 
Now with White City 

Air. Franc R. E. Woodward, well 
known in newspaper and advertising cir- 
cles of New York, Chicago, St. Louies, St. 
Laul, and Alinneapolis, has been appoint- 
ed advertising manager for White City. 
To Mr. Woodward will fall the task of 
entertaining newspaper representatives 
from all over the country. He will have 
spacious offices and will personally meet 
and entertain not only Chicago newspaper 
representatives, but representatives of the 
country newspapers and journals pub- 
lished in other cities. 

Mr. Woodward is at present located at 
the down town offices of White City in 
the Schiller Building-, but after May ist 
he will be installed in his permanent quar- 
ters at WiiiTii City. 



TF THE Standard Oil Magnates create 
a corner in "silence" it will be a 
severe blow to Thomas W. Lawson. 
What would he do without his vocabu- 
lary? 

Ever See a Balloon Factory? 

X'isitors tO' White City next summer 
will be treated to the sight of a Balloon 
Factor}^ in full operation with Mr. John 
R. Gill as director of works. This factory 
will be located in the center of the board 
walk where everyone may see the process 
from the raw material to finished product. 



A Song Without Words 

^TTORNEY.— " And you will swear 
that you were in vour library, 
could not see the street, did not hear a 
sound, yet know that an automobile 
passed your door at eight o'clock." 
Prisoner. — " Sure, I smelt it." 



How Many Nails? 

More than 1,600 kegs of nails have been 
used up to January 26th in the construc- 
tion of White City. These nails range 
in size from brads one-half inch long 
to eighty penny spikes six inches long. 

If anyone is curious to figure out the 
number of nails used in White City, the 
Puzzle Editor of the White City Maga- 
zine will be pleased to hear from them. 



THE WHITE CITY MAGAZINE 



19 



An Installation 




HE FIRST public func- 
tion at Wi-iiTE City 
occurred on Wednes- 
day evening, Jan. i8th, 
when representatives 
of the various firms 
which have been doing 
contract work in build- 
ing White City gathered at the Park for 
the purpose of giving a rousing welcome 
to General ^Manager Paul D. Howse. 

The fact that j\Ir. Howse had just 
moved the executive offices from the 
Schiller Building to the Park created the 
occasion for this demonstration. 

It was to be a surprise and all the de- 
tails had been arranged to a nicety by 
the committee on arrangeiuents headed 
by Mark Salomon as Chairman. During 
the course of the day, a score or more 
of parcels of various dimensions were 
delivered bv messenger boys, trucks and 
wagons, each one containing some article 
appropriate for the furnishing of the 
private office of j\Ir. Howse. 

The invitations had been purely in- 
formal, the word having been passed 
from lip to lip among the employes and 
representatives of the contractors, but no 
one associated with the building of 
White City was omitted, and at 8 o'clock 
in the evening they began to g"ather in 
the new office building. 

A reception committee headed by 
Frank W. Williams, wdio acted as Chair- 
man, took care of the guests on their ar- 
rival while attendants relieved them of 
their wraps and arranged various accom- 
modations for their comfort. The bril- 
liantly lighted offices were quickly filled 
and the facilities of Caterer James Wy- 
man were soon taxed to their utmost. 
The arrangement committee had made 
such preparations for entertainment that 



hospitality was instituted from the time 
of the arrival of the first guest. 

Air. Howse was telephoned for and ar- 
rived on schedule time. Naturally he was 
surprised and wholly at a loss to under- 
stand the reason for the gathering until 
Alderman Snow, in whose ward White 
City is located, made an explanatory ad- 
dress. Air. Snow then led the way into 
the private office of Air. Howse who was 
invited to take a seat in his new office 
chair and familiarize himself with the ob- 
jects which had been presented. 

j\Ir. Howse was so utterly overcome 
by the unexpectedness of the entire af- 
fair that it was impossible for him to 
make an extended reply. He expressed 
his heartfelt thanks for the handsome and 
appropriate presentations and then re- 
lieved the embarrassment of the surprise 
by suggesting that everybody return to 
the. more commodious quarters in the ad- 
joining rooms where the matter could be 
more appropriately discussed. 

Then the Caterer and his forces worked 
overtime. Everybody present proved to 
be a good fellow in every sense of the 
word and a couple of hours of merry 
making, in which all participated, 
followed. 

The gifts comprised articles of all sorts 
appropriate for the furnishing of a private 
office and Air. Howse declared that if 
somebody had brought an oil stove, he 
could start housekeeping immediately at 
the Park. 

The Committee on Arrangement was 
composed of Messrs. Jacobs, Gill, An- 
derson, Gillespie, Sullivan, Saunders, 
Mather, Spindler, Lewis, LaAIarche, 
Donoghue, Wyman, Jacquist, Hawkins, 
Koll, Holland, Fairclough, Kenneah', 
Courtney, Harty and Mark Salomon, 
Chairman. 



20 



THE WHITE CITY MAGAZINE 



Advantage of a Board Walk 

The Rcsi/If of Experience Proves Plaiih to he 
Superior to eitJier Cement or Brick 



piE largest board walk 
in the world is located 
at Atlantic City, N. J. 
It is four miles long 
and forty feet wide. 
The next largest con- 
tinuous walk is in 
■^ AA'hite City. This 

walk is one-half mile long and thirty-eight 

feet wide. 




much better for pedestrians. The board 
walk was the first thing erected in 
White City, and as all buildings front 
on it, the)^ were built from the walk, 
and upon this walk all the trusses and 
mill work were framed. 

By its use the workmen avoided the 
mud which is ever present about new 
buildings and their work was much 
more expeditiously handled. 




On the Bunrrl Wnik at White Cltv 



2\Iany visitors have asked why cement 
walks have not been used in preference to 
plank walks. The reason is obvious to 
those who have practical knowledge of 
both materials. 

The board walk in White City is ele- 
vated four feet above the ground, the 
planks are laid with one-half inch crevice 
between them. All the dirt and dust sifts 
through this crevice and the plank walk is 
always clean. 

The water mains, sewer mains, electric 
wires, and gas mains are under this walk 
and can be altered or repaired without 
inconveniencing the public by tearing up 
the walk. 

The plank is much cooler than either 
cement or brick, it is never damp and is 



Propitious Weather 

During the work of building White 
City the weather has been so propitious 
in every way that much comment has 
been caused among the contractors and 
workmen. Between the dates of Sept. i 
and Jan. i only seven hours of time were 
lost by the contractors. Since January 
I the cold weather drove the men away 
from the work several times, but the 
total lost time resulting has been about 
six days altogether. 

Contractors state that the fine weather 
has been remarkable and that they do 
not remember a season when the same 
number of good working days has been 
embraced within the same period of time. 



THE WHITE CITY MAGAZINE 



21 



Large Electric Light Contract 




UlTE CITY will use 
more electric power 
than the combined cus- 
tomers of tlie Com- 
monwealth Electric Co. 
south of Thirty-ninth 
Street. The Fifty- 
tifth Street power 
house of the Commonwealth Company 
does not make enough current to supply 
White City, yet it supplies the entire 
district south of Thirty-ninth Street. 

In contracting" with the Chicago Edi- 
son Company for electric current the 
White City signed the largest contract 
ever made by the Chicago Edison Com- 
pany. Xot only will the Edison Com- 
pany provide power for tens of thousands 
of electric lights, but it also furnishes 
power for fifty or more motors ranging 
in size from i-horse power to 50-horse 
power. 

The Transforming Station will be 
located at Sixty-fourth and South Park 
Avenue and in it the verv large Trans- 
formers, which reduce the voltaee of the 



electric current, will be at once installed. 
The Edison Company will make this a 
model Transforming Station, and visitors 
to White City will be welcome to in- 
spect the giant machinery. 

In distributing the current more than 
one thousand miles of cables and wires 
will be used. These cables and wires are 
of all sizes made. The feed wires are 
controlled from the Transforming Station 
switch boards. The feed wires run direct 
to the various buildings, each building 
being on a separate cable. Just inside the 
building is the switch board controlling 
all the lines in that building. Nearly all 
the wiring in AA'hite City is in iron pipe 
and, as a whole, the wiring done under 
direction of inspectors from the City of 
Chicago Electrical Department, is as 
modern as any job in the country. 

The Chicago Electrical Department is 
acknowledged to be further advanced in 
the art of electric wiring than any other 
city in America, and all White' City's 
wiring has been done in accordance with 
the department's rules. 



Heavy Steel Structures 




ed by the 
Works, have 



BOUT two thousand 
tons of steel girders, 
beams, bolts, and struc- 
tural iron is now being 
erected in White 
City. The Steel Tower 
and Steel Chutes, 
which are being erect- 
Central Architectural Iron 
about one thousand two 



be a fire proof building, has about two 
hundred and fifty tons'of steel and the 
Transforming Station, wherein the big 
generators of the Edison Company wiH 
be located, has about eleven tons of steel. 

This latter is also a fire proof build- 
ing. 

The Filing Airships are built entirely 
of steel, about sixty tons being used in 
their construction. 




B 



Correct 

LINKS. — "Time is money, they say." 
Rinks. — "Yes, in a horse race." 



Scenic R nil way Track 
hundred and fifty tons of steel in them. 
The College Inn Restaurant, which will 



They Found It 

]V/[RS. Jenkins. — "Did you find that 
leak in the cellar?" 
Plumber. — "Yesh'm, it were in th-h-h 
(hie) wine bar'l." 

"\X/'ILD animals eat in their dens but 
poets don't. 



THE IVHITE CITY MAGAZINE 




WHITE CITY 



DESIGNED AND CONSTRUCTED ,W1TH THE INTENTION OF HAVING ABSOLUTELY THE : 
HOTEL COMPANY, OF CHICAGO. AN ARCHITECTURALLY BEAUTIFUL STRUCTURE WIT 
DEVICE AND IMPROVEMENT AND CAPABLE OF ACCOMMODATING 2,400 PERSONS. THE 
TOTAL EXPENDITURE REQUIRED IS NOT LESS THAN $60,C00. WHITE CITY COLLEGE IM 
POPULAR-PRICED TEMPERANCE CAFE, ALSO A MODEL GERMAN RESTAURANT WITH SPEC 




PP;: 
LLy 



I 




[ffilfeST RESTAURANT AND DINING HALL IN AMERICA, OWNED BY THE SHERMAN HOUSE 

IliPECIALLY DESIGNED FITTINGS AND FURNISHINGS, EQUIPPED WITH EVERY MODERN 

iNERAL SCHEME OF DECORATION WILL BE SIMILAR TO THE FAMOUS COLLEGE INN. 

PROPER WILL OCCUPY THE SECOND FLOOR; THE FIRST FLOOR TO CONTAIN A 

LY IMPORTED DELICACIES OF ALL KINDS. 



OLLEGE INN 




THE JJ'HITE CITY MAGAZINE 

The Desertion of 
Jinks 

idpti-dfrom The Strand for The White Ciff ALigaz 
B\ Franc R. E. \\'oodward 





pHE fact that Jinks be- 
haved in an infamous 
way towards his wife 
has been the cause of a 
great amount of com- 
ment among the neigh- 
bors during the past 
few weeks. All the 
other women had regarded him as a 
model husband, and certainly Mrs. Jinks 
was a most conscientious wife. She toiled 
and slaved for him, as any woman in her 
street would have maintained, far more 
than her husband had any right to ex- 
pect. 

Xow, this was the punishment for her, 
and the only solution to the problem is 
that Jinks suddenly went mad. Before 
she married Jinks, Mrs. Jinks had been 
the widowed i\Irs. Jones. Jones had ob- 
tained a berth as donkey-man on a 
steamer running between Chicago and 
Buffalo, and that steamer had gone down 
somewhere in Lake ]\Iichigan with all 
hands ; a judgment, the widow woman 
feared, for long years of contumacy which 
had culminated in the wickedness of trust- 
ing a soul to the waters of the lake and 
taking to it as a common donkey-man ; 
an immeasurable falling for a capable 
stationary engineer. 

Twelve years as ]\Irs. Jones had left 
her still childless and childless she re- 
mained as i\Irs. Jinks. As for Jinks, he, 
it was held, was fortunate in that capa- 
ble wife. He was a moderately good 
carpenter and joiner, and had steady 
work at White Citv, except during the 
bitter cold days. 

But he was not a man of the world 
and he needed someone to look after him. 
Nobody could tell what might have hap- 
pened to Horace Jinks if there had been 
no Mrs. Jinks to take care of him. He 
was a meek and quiet man, with a boyish 
face and sparse, limp whiskers. 



He had no vices ; even his pipe departed 
when he married, and ]\Irs. Jinks had 
engraved on him divers exotic virtues. 
It came about that he went solemnly to 
church every Sunday, under a stiff black 
derby, and put a nickel on the contribution 
plate ; one returned to him for the purpose 
out of his week's wages. Then, Mrs. Jinks 
overseeing him, he took off his best 
clothes and brushed them with solicitude 
and pains. 

On Saturday evenings he cleaned the 
knives, the forks, the kettles and washed 
the windows, patiently and conscientious- 
ly. On ^londay evenings, he took the 
clothes to the laundry and, on divers even- 
ings, he attended ]\Irs. Jinks in her mar- 
keting on Sixty-third Street to carry the 
purchases. 

]\Irs. Jinks' virtues were native and 
numerous. She was a wonderful man- 
ager. Every dime of Jinks' wages was 
bestowed to the greatest advantage and 
Jinks never ventured to guess how much 
of it she saved. Her cleanliness in house- 
wifery was distracting to behold. 

Whenever Jinks came home, she met 
him at the front door and then and there 
he changed his work shoes for a huge pair 
of carpet slippers, balancing himself pain- 
fully on alternate feet on the cold door- 
step. This was because she scrubbed 
the hall and doorstep, turn about with 
the wife of the downstairs family, and 
because the stair carpet was her own. 
She vigilantly supervised all through the 
process of "cleaning up" afterwork, so as 
to come between her walls and the possi- 
bilities of random splashes, and if in spite 
of her diligence, a spot remained to tell 
the tale, she was at pains to impress the 
fact on Jinks' memory, and to set forth 
at length on the circumstances of his un- 
grateful selfishness. 



THE WHITE CITY MAGAZINE 



25 



In the beginning she had always es- 
corted him to one of the downtown de- 
partment stores and had selected and paid 
for his clothes, for the reason that man is 
such a perfect fool and the salesmen do 
as they like with him. But she presently 
improved on that. 

One day a man called at her door and 
from the heavy pack which he carried on 
his shoulders, produced an assortment of 
cheap woolen remnants, with just enough 
cotton to make them look well, and 
straightway she conceived the idea of 
making Jinks' clothes herself. 



ing across from shoulder to shoulder. The 
main garment also bagged generously be- 
low his waist. 

Use made a habit of his discomfort, 
but it never reconciled him to the chaff 
of his fellow workmen and, as Mrs. Jinks 
elaborated successive suits, each one 
modeled on the last, the primeval acci- 
dents of her design developed into princi- 
ples, and grew even bolder and more 
hideously pronounced. Vain it was for 
Jinks to hint, as hint he did, that he 
should not like her to overwork herself, 
tailoring being bad for the eyes, and that 




Band Stand, Concert Hall and Main Entrance 



Decision w^as one of her virtues and 
a suit of dingy brown was begun that 
evening from the pattern furnished by an 
old one. More, it was finished by Sun- 
day, and when Jinks, overcome by aston- 
ishment at the sight, was forced into it 
and pushed off to church ere he could 
recover his senses, he continued to mar- 
vel at this wonderful thing. 

The garments were not altogether com- 
fortable, he found the trousers clung tight 
against his shins, but hung loose behind 
his heels ; when he sat down, it was on a 
wilderness of hard folds and seams. Also, 
his waistcoat collar peeped coyly up over 
his necktie and his coat collar went strain- 



there was a new store down on State 
Street, very cheap and reasonable. 

"You're very considerate, I dare say, 
settin' there acting a livin' lie before your 
own wife, Horace Jinks, as though I 
could not see through you like a book. A 
lot you care about overworking me, so 
long as your turn's served throwing away 
money like dirt in the street on a lot of 
Cheap John clothing tailors, while I'm 
workin' and slavin' here to save a nickel 
here and there and this is my return for 
it. Anybody'd think you could pick up 
money on the street car tracks and I be- 
lieve I'd be thought better of if I laid in 
bed all dav like some do." 



26 



THE WHITE CITY MAGAZINE 



Therefore, Horace Jinks avoided the 
subject in the future nor even murmured 
when she resolved to cut his hair. 

So his placid fortune endured for years. 
Then came a balmy evening- when i\lrs. 
Jinks betook herself with a basket to do 
some small shopping on Sixty-third 
Street and Jinks was left at home. He 
washed and put away the supper dishes 
and then, as Satan always finds mischief 
for die idle, he fell to meditating on a 
new pair of home-made trousers finished 
that day and hanging behind the parlor 
door. 

There tliey hung in all their decent in- 
nocence of shape. They were shorter of 
leg and longer of waist, and wilder in con- 
ception than any he had ever worn before, 
and as he looked on them, the small devil 
of original sin awoke and clamored in his 
breast. 

He was ashamed of it, of course, for well 
he knew the gratitude he owed his wife 
for those same trousers, among other 
blessings. 

Still, there the small devil was, and the 
small devil was fertile in base sugges- 
tions and could not be kept from hinting 
at the new crop of jibes that w^ould spring 
at Jinks' first public appearance in such 
things. 

"Pitch 'em in the ash bar*]," said the 
small devil at last. 

Jinks turned away in sheer horror of 
his wicked self and for a moment thought 
of washing the supper dishes all over 
again by way of discipline. 

Then he made for the back room, but 
saw from the hall landing that the front 
door was standing open, probably by the 
fault of the child downstairs. 

A man was loitering on the pavement 
and prying curiously about the door. His 
face was tanned, his hands w'ere thrust 
deep in the pockets of his un-suspendered 
blue trousers and well back on his head 
he wore a blue cloth cap with a peaked 
leather visor. It was a cap very much 
the same as lake sailors wear. 

He lurched a step nearer to the door 
and gazed at Jinks with a strange leer, 
saying : "^Irs. Jones ain't in, is she ?" 

Jinks stared at him for a matter of five 
seconds and then said "Eh !" 

"Mrs. Jones as w^as, then — Jinks, now, 
ain't it?" 



The stranger said this with a ghastly 
grin that Jinks neither liked nor under- 
stood. 

"No," said Jinks, "she ain't in now." 

"You ain't her husband, are vou ?" 

"Uh huh." 

The stranger took his pipe from his 
mouth and grinned silently and long. 

"Damme," he said at length, "you look 
the sort of swab she'd like," and with 
this free compliment he grinned again. 

Jinks made ready to shut the door, but 
the stranger thrust a foot against the sill 
and a hand against the panel. 

"Don't be in a hurry," he said, "Tve 
come here to have a little talk with }-ou, 
man to man. Do you understand?" Then 
he frowned fiercely. 

Horace Jinks felt uncomfortable, but 
his training of late had not been of a 
character to render him formidable. So 
he parleved. 

"What yer want?" he asked, 'T dunno 
you." 

"Then I'll take the liberty to introdooce 
myself, in a manner of speaking," said 
the stranger. He touched his cap with a 
gesture of mock humility. 

"I'm Bob Jones," he said, "come back 
from the bottom of the lake, so to speak. 
]Me as went down with the Sarah A, — 
safe dead five years gone. I come to 
see my wife." 

During the progress of this speech, the 
jaw of Horace Jinks was dropping lower 
and lower. At the end of it he poked his 
fingers up through his hair, looked down 
to the mat, then up to the transom, then 
out into the street, then hard at his vis- 
itor, but he found nothing to say. 

"Come to see my Avife," the man re- 
peated. "So now we can talk it over, 
man to man." 

Jinks slowlv shut his mouth and led the 
way upstairs mechanically, his fingers still 
in his hair. A sense of the state of af- 
fairs sank gradually into his brain and 
the small devil awoke again. 

Suppose this man was Jones ; suppose 
he did claim his wife. W'ould it be a 
knockdown blow ? Did it paralyze him or 
not? He thought of the trousers, the 
supper dishes, the laundry, the knives, 
the kettles, and the windows, and he 
thought of them in the way of a back- 
slider. 



THE WHITE CITY MAGAZINE 



27 



On the landing, Jones clutched his arm 
and asked in a hoarse whisper, "How 
long before she's back ?" 

" 'Bout an hour, I expect," Jinks re- 
plied, after first of all repeating the ques- 
tion in his own mind. Then he opened 
the parlor door. 

"Ah," said Jones, looking about him. 
")^ou've been pretty comfortable. Them 
chairs and things." — jerking his pipe 
towards the furniture, "was her's, — mine 



taking his pipe from his mouth and hold- 
ing it low in his hand. "I know Anner. 
How do }'ou find her ? Do she make you 
clean the windows?" 

"Well," Jinks admitted uneasily, "I do 
help her sometimes of course." 

"Ah, and the knives, too, I bet. and 
the cussed kittles, I know," and then 
rising and bending to look behind Jinks' 
head, he declared : "So help me, I b'lieve 
she cuts your hair. Well, I'm blow'd. 




Lntrniicc tu the Scenic Rnihvav 



that is to say, speaking straight and man 
to man." 

He sat down, puffing meditatively at 
his pipe and presently continued : 

"Well, here I am again ; old Bob Jones, 
dead and done for, gone down in the 
Sarah A; only I ain't done for, see!" 
and he pointed the stem of his pipe at 
Jinks' waistcoat. "I ain't done for, 'cause 
wh}^ ? On account of being picked up by 
a fishin' boat and took to Mackinack 
Island. I got took sick and, — but got a 
long rest there, and now," — looking hard 
at Jinks, — "V\t come back to see mv 
wife." 

"She don't like smoking in here," said 
Jinks, at length. 

"No, I bet she don't," Jones answered, 



just what she'd do, too." Then he pro- 
ceeded to inspect the blushing Jinks from 
divers points of vantage. 

He lifted a leg of the trousers hang- 
ing behind the parlor door. "I bet a dol- 
lar,"' he said, "that she made these here 
things. Nobodv else could do 'em like 
that. \Miy, they're wuss'n what you have 
on." 

The small devil began to have his argu- 
ment all his own way. If this man took 
his wife back, perhaps he would have to 
wear those trousers. 

"I'll bet," Jones said, "she ain't got 
anv milder. Jerusalem, what a jawer." 

Jinks began to feel that this was no 
longer his business. Plainly, Anner was 
this other man's wife, and he was bound 



28 



THE WHITE CITY MAGAZINE 



to acknowledge that this was a fact. The 
small devil put it to him as a matter of 
duty. 

"Well," said Jones, suddenly, "time's 
short and this ain't business. I won't be 
hard on you. mate. Of course I know I 
ought to stand on my rights, but seein' 
as you are a well meanin' young man, so 
to speak, and all settled and livin' here, 
quiet and matrimonial, I'll (this with a 
burst of sincerity) I'll compound the 
felony and duck." 

"Come, ril name a fig'ure. as man to 
man, first and last, no less and no more. 
Twenty dollars does it." 

Jinks had not twenty dollars. He had 
not even twenty cents, and he said so. And 
he would not think for to come between 
a man and his wife, he added, "not on no 
account. It may be rough on me, but it's 
me dooty. I will be the one to duck 
out." 

"No,'' said Jones, hastily clutching 
Jinks by the arm, "don't do that, I will 
make it a bit cheaper, say ten dollars. 
Come, that's reasonable, ain't it? Ten 
dollars ain't much compensation for me 
goin' away forever, where the stormy 
Avinds do blow, so to speak, and never 
as mtich as seein' my own wife ag'in, for 
better nor wuss. Between man and man, 
now, ten dollars and I'll skip. That's 
fair, ain't it?" 

"Of course it's fair." Jinks replied ef- 
fusively. "Tt's more'n fair. It's noble, 
downright noble, I call it. but I ain't goin' 
to take a mean advantage of your good- 
heartedness, ]\Ir. Jones. She's vour 
wife, and I oughtn't to come between 
you. I apologize. You stop and have 
your proper rights. It's me as ought to 
duck out, and I will," and he made a step 
towards the door. 

"Hold on," quoth Jones, and got be- 
tween Jinks and the door. "Don't do 
things rash. Look what a loss it will 
be to you with no home to go to, and 
nobody to look after you, and all that. 
It'll be dreadful. Say a couple, — and we 
won't quarrel. — jest a single dollar be- 
tween man and man and I'll stand a 
drink out of the money. You can easv 
raise a .dollar. The clock would pretty 
nigh do it. A dollar does it. and I'll" — 
there was a loud ringing of the bell over 
the door where thev stood. 



Somebody was ringing the bell at the 
front door and there was no doubt in 
the minds of either as to who it must 
be. 

"^^'ho's that ?" asked Bob Jones, appre- 
hensively. 

"I'll see," said Horace Jinks in reply. 
And he made a rush for the staircase. 
Bob Jones heard him open the front door. 
Then he went to the window and just 
below him he saw the crown of a bon- 
net. It vanished and, borne to him from 
within the door, there fell upon his ear 
the sound of a well remembered female 
voice. 

"Where you goin' now with no hat," 
asked the voice, sharply. 

"All right, Anner, there's — there's 
somebody upstairs to see you," Jinks an- 
swered, and, as Bob Jones could see, a 
man went scudding down the street in 
the gathering dust, and behold, it was 
Horace Jinks. 

Jones reached the landing in three 
strides. His wife was still at the front 
door staring after Jinks. He dashed into 
the back room, threw open the Avindow, 
dropped from the wash house roof into 
the back vard, scrambled desperatelv 
over the fence and disappeared into the 
gloom. He was seen by no living soul. 

And that is why Jinks' base desertion, 
under his wife's very eyes, too, is still an 
astonishment to the neighbors. 

He never returned to the house, nor 
did he ever call for his box of tools at 
\^^HITE City. 



N 



Not Necessary 

ORA. — "Plaze. mum, may I have 
ter-morrer off? " 
Mistress. — "Is it very necessary?" 
Nora. — "No mum, only me an' Pat 
wants ter git married, thot's all." 



T F YOU desire humorous reading, pick 
up the book of the fellow who takes 
himself seriousl}'. 



TF the Czar thinks his crown is too 
heavy he had better examine the 
head Perhaps it is too light for the 
burden. 



THE WHITE CITY MAGAZINE 



29 




Magnificent. Trolley Cars 
in Service 

■HITE CITY visitors, 
who come from the 
vast and populous ter- 
ritory South of 63d 
Street, will ride in the 
finest Trolley Cars ever 
conceived bv brains 
and ingenuity. 
Alanager John Sloan, of the Calumet 
Street Railway Company, has recently 
purchased and put in service a number of 
large trolle_v cars similar to these in use 
on the Wentworth line of the Chicago 
City Railway Co. These cars are pro- 
vided with a separate smoking compart- 
ment, and are perfect in appointment. 

The Calumet Electric's northern loop 
makes a circle opposite the entrance to 
^^'HITE City, so that residents of South 
Chicago, AVhiting, Hammond, Burnside, 
and other Southern suburbs will find the 
service to White City as good as that oi 
anv street car line in the countrv. 



Not n Beggar 

^ATTERED TOM (who looked like 
an animated rag-bag.") — "Ma'am, 
haxe you got an}' clothes dat'll — " 

Mrs. Subbub. — "No, go away, you're 
a tramp and Ell not give you any- 
thing." 

Tattered Tom (majestically). — "I 
don't want yer ter give me nothin', I 
wan' ter'trade mine off, Em no beggar." 

^ PARISIAN ''professor states that 

kissing is a healthful exercise. 

Apparently' sort of a Kissical-Culture. 

TETHE ships of the Baltic fleet are 
ordered back to Russia it will be 
"like finding 'em" for the Czar. 



^MERICAN dentists are popular 
abroad. Easy lies the tooth that 
wears a Yankee crown. 



E THE woman is the better half is 
the man onlv a \'ulgar fraction.^ 




Banda Rossa at White City 

When the 
gates of White 
City are thrown 
open on May 27 
for the admis- 
sion of the great 
amusement lov- 
ing populace of 
Chicago they 
will be greeted 
by a burst of 
music from one 
of the finest and 
most notable 
r. o ,^ musical organi- 

t-ugenio Csorrentmo, Maestro . . ■^ 

zations m the 
world : Banda Rossa, under the leader- 
ship of Signor Eugenio Sorrentino. 

Banda Rossa contains among its fifty 
clever members some of the most capa- 
ble soloists on the various instruments 
known to band musicians. During the 
first four weeks of the season Banda 
Rossa will give free concerts in the band 
stand, located in the center of the Plaza, 
every afternoon and evening. 

As a summer attraction Banda Rossa 
has proved one of the greatest successes 
in the history of amusement enterprises 
in America and abroad. A much larger 
admission fee than the 10 cents to "be 
charged to enter the gates of White City 
has generally been exacted from those 
who desired to hear this famous band 
alone, and it speaks Avell for the manag-e- 
ment of White City that such stellar 
attractions are to be the rule, and that 
they are merely incidents of the general 
scheme of pleasure-providing. 

Banda Rossa will remain at White 
City from Alay 27 to Tune 26. 



He Reiuemhered 



(C^HEM," began the portl\', com- 
placent man, who prided himself 
on having made his own wa}' through 
the world, "You perhaps do not remem- 
ber me, but twenty years ago I was a 
messenger boy and }'ou gave me a mes- 
sage to deliver." 

" Yes, yes," replied the banker, "where 
is the answer? " 



30 



THE WHITE CITY MAGAZINE 



Visitors at White City 

On SuiKlays, during" the hours of 2 and 
4 p. m. visitors are admitted to White 
City for the purpose of vieAving the 
work of construction and observing" the 
progress made from week tO' week. 

On pleasant Sunday afternoons the 
people have crowded to White City and 
the questions they have asked of the man 
at the gate and the other attendants 
would fill a ver_\- larg-e volume. Natur- 
ally there have been man}- details in con- 
nection with the various attractions antl 
amusement devices with which the attend- 
ants were not fam:liar and conjectures 
have been rife. 

At the present time sixteen buildings 
have been practically completed at White 
City and the work on nineteen others is 
progressing finely. The foundation for 
the 300 foot Electric Tower is now in 
and the iron work is arriv'ng in sections. 
The steel girders and beams for White 
City College Inn are now being placed 
in position and the excavating for the 
Electrical Transforming' Stat'on is prac- 
ticpllv finished. 

The neople of Chicago and vicinity are 
rordiallv invited bv the management of 
White City to visit the grounds at Sixty- 
third street and South Park avenue on 
Sundav afternoons during construction. 
Polite attendants will p-ive information 
and cheerfullv answer all questions. 



Fun Factory 

In the Eun 
Eactory visitors 
^k I j/ i to White City 

^'^ ^ ■ will find a 

source of end- 
less amusement 
and ha rmless 
mirth. Ridicu- 
lous and gro- 
tesque exagger- 
ations w h i c h 
cause roars of 
laughter, unex- 
pected incidents 
of a perfectly harmless character but very 
comical, and all sorts of unusual and 
mirth-provoking experiences will meet 
the callers at this temple of pure fun. 




Outdoor Shows 

Every after- 
noon and eve- 
ning outdoor 
shows will be 
given in the Cir- 
cus rings and on 
the Vaudeville 
stage. Com- 
fortable seats 
will be f u r- 
nished free in 
'plenty. Some of 
the attractions 
to be shown are 
the highest 
priced acts giv- 
en. There will be equestrian acts, acro- 
batic feats, aerial acts, Vaudeville num- 
bers, etc. 

It is the intention of the management 
of White City to give the most for the 
money given anywhere. When applica- 
tion is made for an engagement to Gen- 
eral Manager Howse he considers the 
quality alone, not the price. Those who 
attend White City will be given as much 
entertainment for the admiss'on fee of 
10 cents as they can get anywhere else 
for several times that amount. 




V\/'ATCH the man who loves to get 
close to nature when he slips 
down on the icy pavement. 

An Opportunity 

(^EORGE.— " To-night is the proper 
time to ask him." 

HoNORA. — "Oh no! Not to-night, 
he's awfully cross. He has lost, good- 
ness knows //07a much, on the Stock 
Exchange to-day." 

George. — "That's why this will be a 
good time to speak to. him. He'll for- 
get the lecture about saving and taking 
care of money. He knows I know all 
about it." 

A Counterfeit 

pHILOSOPHER.-"The gods vouch- 
safe their gifts to but few." 
Spriggs. — "That's true, but some fel- 
lows have so much conceit that they 
think they've got the real goods." 



THE WHITE CITY MAGAZINE 



31 



A Steamboat for Dry Land 

Luke Captain M'ho Learns That South Park 
jjvejiue is Not Located on the Lake Front 

Mr. Adolph Linick, one of White 
City's stockholders, was recently ap- 
proached by an acquaintance who is 
captain of a small lake steamer. "I want 
to arrange to run an excursion from 
Van Buren Street to White City next 
summer," the captain said. 

"You can't," ]\Ir. Linick started to re- 
ply, but the captain misunderstood his 
meaning and interrupted him saying : 

"But I want to. I have the finest steamer 
on the lake, and I do not intend to let 
the Tug Trust or anybody else beat me 
out of the excursion business. I can 
haul people from Randolph and Van 
l)uren Streets to 63d in three-fourths of 
an hour at twenty-five cents for the round 
trip, and I am already having my steamer 
fixed up for this business." 

''Could you cross a mile and a half of 
land with a steamboat?" ^Ir. I.inick 
asked, laughing. IMr. Linick led the cap- 
tain to a wall map and pointed out the 
location of South Park Avenue. "Well, 
this is on me,'' the captain said, "my 
steamer is the best on the lake, but it 
won't run a mile and a half on drv land." 




Flying Airships 

An enjoyment 
of the most ex- 
hilarating kind ; 
perfectly safe 
and secure yet 
of a novel char- 
acter, is expe- 
rienced by those 
who take a trip 
in the flying Air-Ships at White City. 
The Air-Ships are the complete realiza- 
tion of sane and safe aerial navigation 
ideas held by the famous inventor, Sir 
Hiram Alaxim. They are as nearly per- 
fect reproductions of the actual flight of 
birds as can be realized by human inven- 
tion. 

The best part of it all is that the plan 
is so simple and the method so safe that 
no one will hesitate to take a trip when 
the apparatus is exhibited. 




Performing Dogs 

Among the 
other interesting 
features to be 
shown at White 
City are the best 
t r a i n e d and 
most intelligent 
troups of per- 
''■i' forming Dogs 

^ _ ever shown in 

'--■M, M^ Chicago. Dogs 

^ jiiijPiU,. ■ — ' that act like 

men, stand up- 
right, d a n c e, 
turn somersaults, box, play policemen in 
uniform, act as coachmen and drive other 
little doggies hitched up as horses and 
do almost anything and everything 
except speak. 

Man has no friend like a faithful dog 
and he also has few better entertainers 
than the well trained animals which will 
lie exhiliited at White City. 



Exact Discrimination 

LJE. — "Did you ever notice how ex- 
act the deductions are of the twin 
Misses Smith ? " 

She. — "Yes, in the question of age." 



Prize Fire Horses for White City 

Eight of the finest trained thorough- 
bred fire horses in the United States 
will be used in the Fire and Flame 
production at White City. These 
horses were selcted two )-ears ago 
by the St. Louis World's Fair Corn- 
pan}- as being the finest they could pur- 
chase in the market. They were put 
through a course of training by the fire- 
men at the Fair grounds, and exhibited 
countless numbers of times before the 
millions of visitors during the past sum- 
mer. 

These horses have excited favorable 
comment from fire chiefs all over the 
United States and were bid for by a num- 
ber of municipalities. However, W^hite 
City succeeded in purchasing them, and 
they will be kept under the constant care 
of trainers until White City opens. 
They are probably the largest and strong- 
est educated horses in the country. 



THE WHITE CITY MAGAZINE 



Features of WHite City 

All L )i rivalled Assortiiieiit of Hio-h Class Aiiii/sc/i/eiifs 



An Electric Tower. Almost 300 feet 
high, illuminated by 20,000 incandes- 
cent lights. 

Fighting- the Flames. A thrilling spec- 
tacle exhibiting two complete Fire 
Companies in action while a six-story 
hotel burns; requires 250 people, 2 
trolley cars, 2 automobiles, 5 cabs, 6 
wagons, ambulance, patrol wagon, 14 
horses, etc. Greatest and most vivid 
outdoor spectacle ever produced. 

Canals of Venice. A romantic gondola 
ride through the moonlit water streets 
of Venice; viewing correct reproduc- 
tions of her famous buildings and 
statuary groups. 

Scenic Railway. A three-quarter mile 
ride up hill and down dale, through 
forest and glade, viewing the world's 
most marvelous scenery, actualK- re- 
produced in perspective. 

Baby Incubators. An exhibit of the 
greatest practical value to physicians 
and of the deepest interest to par- 
ents; showing scientific methods of 
saving the li\es of tiny babes. 

White City College Inn. Finest restau- 
rant in America, located in an enor- 
mous and architecturally beautiful 
building; a duplicate of Chicago's 
famous College Inn; also a popular 
priced temperance restaurant and a 
German restaurant. Will accommo- 
date 2,400 people. 

Music. Open air concerts day and eve- 
ning by the foremost bands and 
orchestras of America and Europe. 

Flying Airships. A revelation in bird- 
1 ike tran s portation. SirHiram 
Maxim's idea of safe and sane aerial 
navigation. 

Ball Room. Finest dancing floor in 
Chicago and capable of accommo- 
dating- 1,000 dancers at a time. 



Bumps. A harmless and hilarious 
method of enjoyment. "Have you 
bumped the bumps?" 

Midget City. A model miniature vil- 
lage of 25 tiny buildings peopled by a 
host of midgets of world-wide re- 
nown; midget theatre and circus with 
midget artistes. 

Shoot-the-Chutes. Duplex and longest 
in America. Has 500 foot escalator 
to carry people to the pavilion. All 
the newest improvements. 

Johnstown Flood. Most impressive and 
realistic of all scenic productions and 
constructed on a gigantic scale. A 
triumph of scenic art and startling 
realism. 

Simian City. A practical demonstra- 
tion of Darwin's theory; exemplified 
by forest bred monkeys, baboons and 
apes. 

Automatic Vaudeville. Containing all 
the latest mechanical novelties and 
furnishing entertainment for old and 
young. 

The Midway. A conglomeration of 
laughter inspiring features and clean 
amusements. 

Fun Factory. A merrymaking estab- 
lishment with laugh creating de\-ices 
on a large scale. 

The Producoscope. Electric pictorial 
reproductions of startling and thrill- 
ing events showing the animation and 
action of li\'ing objects. 

Observation Wheel. Fun for every- 
body. A ride you will not forget. 

Speed Toboggan. A mile ride in 45 
seconds. Absolutely the limit. 

Circus Rings. Continuous performances 
including equestrian acts, aerial 
flights and feats of strength and skill. 
Free exhibitions. 



y. 



^i= 



THE JVI-IITE CITY MAGAZINE 



33 




baboons, 
monkeys. 



apes, 

fnrrv 



Simian City 

Children, and 
the grown folks 
too, are always 
pleased at the 
antics of monk- 
eys. There will 
be monkeys of 
all kinds to be 
seen in the 
Simian City; 
chimpanzees, rat-tailed 
little fellows with their 
bright intelligent eyes and big ones with 
their aggressive looks and comically 
imitative ways. 

Arrangements have already been made 
by Mr. Howse for some of the very best 
troupes of monkeys which will enter- 
tain visitors to this unique pleasure place. 
Their acts are apparently as intelligent 
as though they were human beings and 
the remarkable way in which these mis- 
chievous creatures have been trained, 
their wonderful agility on the tight-rope, 
trapeze and swings and the grotesque 
manner in which thev perform will fur- 
nish an endless fund of amusement and 
entertainment for evervbodv. 



The Simple Life 



CiMPLE Simon went a fishing for to 

catch a whale. 
But all the water he could get was in 

his mother's pail. 
Said Simple Simon, after he, had fished 

the pail a minute: 
" I think I'll quit this simple life; there's 

really nothing in it." — -Pud'. 



"Y\7HEN a man is in his cups, it don't 
take him long to get into the jug. 



The Record 

JIGGS. — "What is the auto record?" 
Briggs. — "One hundred miles with 
only two arrests. 



Doesn't Require One. 



B 



ILL. — "Smith doesn't keep his auto 

in a garage at all." 
"Harry. — "No, he keeps it in the re- 
pair shop." 

>? 

npHE reason some women want a di- 
vorce is because they prefer a 
regular alimony to an irregular allow 
ance. 

'^ 

TT IS safe for a man, who desires to 
have a wife the direct opposite to 
himself, to marry any woman. 

UOW is it that when you come to talk 
to most handsome men you for- 
get all about the face? 
'^ 
A Feat 

TV/TR. Black. — "Dis nag hab made a 
record ob 2:l0." 

Mr. Brown.- — "Pacin", trottin' er run- 
nin'? " 

Mr. Black. — "Standin' still an' eatin' 
a peck ob corn." 

VV/'HEN money seems tight quietly 
investigate and see if the ice man 
is saving up to buy coal. 

»<» 

Apropos of Coming Events 

Instead of "meet me at the foun- 
tain," Chicagoans will get into the 
habit of saying: "Meet me at White 
City College Inn." 




34 



THE WHITE CITY MAGAZINE 





FIRE, BURGLARY, ACCIDENT, PLATE GLASS 



INSURANCE: 



MKERtWETM 



,1?! - -^g -, 



> 630 M ATI N A L L I FE B U I LO I N G^ V 
JUJ59 LASALLE ST. GHICAQO.T^ 



EMPLOYERS' LIABILITY, INCOME, BONDS 




For practical information regarding Insurance of any kind consult us 



White City Opens 

May 27 

Visitors Welcome During 

Construction 

Sundays, 2 to 4 p. m. 

Take Cars to 63d St. and South Park Ave, 



When -ixriting to advertisers plensa mention the White City Magazine. 



THE WHITE CITY MAGAZINE 



35 







Automatic 
Vaudeville 

1 ?8 State Street, 

Opposite Palmer House 

Admission Free 

One Cent Operates Any Machine 

Refined Amusement for Ladies 
Gentlemen and Children 



WILL HAVE THE LARGEST ARCADE 
IN THE WORLD 

WHITE CITY 

WITH THE LATEST AND BEST 
AMERICAN AND EUROPEAN NOVELTIES 



-'•^:^»- 



MIDLAND MACHINE CO., Chicago, 111. 



W 



:^. 



When v.riting to advertisers please mention the White City Magazine. 



36 



THE WHITE CITY MAGAZINE 




Harty Bros. & Harty Co. 




M. HARTY, JA8. P. HARTY, GEO. M. HARTY, 

President. Vice-Prest. Sec'y and Treas. 



Wholesale Manufacturers 

Sash, Doors 
Frames and 
Mouldings 

Fine Interior Finish 



ii? I" i^T^es' Twenty-First Street 

44«5 lO 4^ / ) NCAR THRnnP STREET 



NEAR THROOP STREET 



CHICAGO 



Telephones Canal 554 and 555 





When writing to advertisers please mention the White City Magazine, 



THE WHITE CITY MAGAZINE 



37 



Columns for White City Peristyle 




The above illustration shows three of the twenty columns, 

38 inches in diameter an-d 26 feet long, intended for 

the Peristyle at White City, ready to leave 

the factory of 

Henry Sanders Co. 

77-85 Weed Street, Chicago 

JVestern Manufacturers oj 

KOLL'S PATENT LOCK-JOINT COLUMNS 

Eastern Factory: Hartmann Bros. Mfg. Co., Mt. Vernon, N. Y 

We invite correspondence 

When writing to advertisers please mention the White City Magazine. 



v^ 



THE irHITE CITY MAGAZINE 



Albert Pick &■ Company, 199-201-203 Randolpli Street, Cliicago, 111. 






ft %^^ 




No. ;;ii3 

Hollow Stem 
Champagne Glass 



Rhine Wine 
Glass 




No. 310!) 

Cocktail 

Glass 



No. 3103 

Claret Wine 

Glass 



Our "Sunbeam Buffet Service comprises twenty-eignt different styles of Gotlets 
ana Xumblers; ana rourteen styles or Decanters ana SiaeDoard accessories 

^^unoeam Jr'attern 
Buffet 

Gi 




TJte 
Hanasomest 

m Design 

TAe Most 

Exquisitely Cut 



^ne Finest 
Quality 



^^iRT 



ass^v^are 

Design Patented by 

AlDert Pick Csf Company 

Practical in Shape (T¥iTl Exclusive in Desig 



No. 3117 
Hi-Ball 
Glass 




No 3146 

;-Pint Cordial 

Decanter 



No. 3140 
Essence 
Bottle 



No. 3148 
'/4-Pint Creme de 
Menthe Decanter 



Fine Hotel, Restaurant and Buffet Supplies of Every Description 



When -writing to advertisers please mention the White City Magazine. 



THE Jt'HITE CITY MAGAZINE 



39 



RAILWAY PARKS 





1 











,jU . >^ 




DREAMLAND, CONEY ISLAND, N. Y. 

EDWARD C. BOYCE, Vice-President 



Creates 

immense traffic 
and incidentally 
is enormously 
profitable. Why 
not build a 
modern amuse- 
ment resort in 
your city ? 
They pay well in 
cities of 25.000 
or more 
inhabitants. 

I am prepared 
to establish 
resorts of this 
character in 
good locations 
throughout the 
United States. 
I furnish com- 
plete plans for 
the entire park, 
including all 
successful 
amusement 
devices 

and superintend 
construction. 
In a limited 
numberofplaces 
I will furnish 
the necessary 
capital 

Estimates and 
complete in- 
formation will 
be furnished on 
application. 




WHITE CITY, NEW HAVEN, CONN. 

EDWARD C. BOYCE. President 



ED^VARD C. BOYCE, 302 Broadway, New York. 



When writing to advertisers please mention the White City Magazine. 



40 



THE JFHITE CITY MAGAZINE 





Illustrations suitable for 

appropriately printing 

Advertising Novelties, 

Stationery, Cards, 

Show Cards, Numbered Tickets 
or Blanks, etc. 

For Concessionaires or others. 

THE WALKER & WILLIAMS CO. (unhno 

334 Dearborn Street 670 Caxton Building 



TELEPHONES 



J HARRISON 1080 
I AUTOMATIC 6808 



AT THE WHITE CITY 




Be Sure and See 


Observation 
Wheel 


Electric 
Theatre 


See the Sights ! 


L^atest Electric Pictures 


A Ride You Will Long Remember 
Try It ! Take Tour Girl! 


Always Something New 
Go Once, Tou Will Go Again 


OWNERS 

American Vending Machine Co., 340 State St. 



When writing to advertisers please mention the White City Magazine. 



THE WHITE CITY MAGAZINE 



41 



White City 

Opens ^AevSeason May 27 



with Banda Rossa 



Y ACXO i 

j\ bill was"p^; 
>ved by 



ij 



tunity— 
of^very bottle of 

\ 



^ larch 3rd, 1897, 

^^J^enate and signed 
b^Pbe President) to 
"^^jt^tect the public 
^^i^ainst impure 
g^.ffi^5lcie^<Jhis 
tt^^.^SM^ us 

/»^olir^"Gprpor- 

us the purity and age 



TRA 



BOTTLED IN BOND ~ 

Is guaranteed by the highest authority on earth— the Goveriainerd 
of the U. S., and bears the Treasury Departments "Orecn Stamp"— 
proof th^t Sunny Brook is bottled in its pure natural state, under 
the direct supervision of Govt. Officials in U, S. Bonded Wart r.ouse. 
Avoid Whiskies Not Guaranteed by UncSe Sam. 

SUNNY BPOOK DISTILLERY CO., Jefferson County, Ky. 



When writing to advertuers please mention the White City Magazine. 



42 THE WHITE CITY MAGAZINE 



Schmidt Bros. Co. 

PAINTS. OILS y GLASS 

OUR MATERIALS ARE IN USE 
AT WHITE CITY 

7123-7125 Cottage Grove Avenue -:- CKicago, 111. 

Telephone Hyde Park 2^6 



I 



sr^ 



I A. E. BINGHAM, C. A. MARSH, G. M. WHITNEY, / 

I President. Vice-President. Sec'y and Treas. I 



Che IHarsb ^ Bingham €o. 



Pine, f \ \ • 1 Tellow 

„ f ; 1 imber ^ 

Hemlock rtr 

Ties and Pilinor 

c5 



Mill and Yard: Office: 

37th and Iron Streets H^S ^Id Colony Bldg. 

Chicago 



(> 



When writing to udvcrtiseys please inciitiun tlie Whitjl City Magazine. 



THE WHITE CITY MAGAZINE 





All Caps and Entire Exterior and Interior Ornamental 
Composition, Plaster and Cement Work for White City 

furnished by 

The Decorators Supply Co. 



Wm. Wolfarth, President. 



Oscar Spindler, Vice-President, 



Wm. T. Foster, Secretary. 



Manufacturers of 
Interior and Exterior Ornaments of Every Description in 

Cement, Composition, Plaster and Wood. 

Columns, Capitals, Brackets, Cornices, Friezes, Mouldings, 

Panels, Wood Grilles, Fine Woodwork, Plastic CcilinJ and Wall Decorations. 

Composition Ornaments for Woodwork. 



Designs and Estimates Furnished. 



209=219 South Clinton Street 



Chicago 




When writing to advertisers please mention The White City Magazine. 



THE WHITE CITY MAGAZINE 



True & True Co. 



Blue Island Ave. and Lincoln St. 
Phone Canal 944 



Chicago 




Makers of 

The 

Good 

Doors 

and Millwork 
that pleases 



"Ladies a.-' Genmen, ouah ent'a.inment dis ebenin' begins 
'TDtff a. piduah of de greates' tvondah of de century, 
namely, de True & True doah. You'll fine' dey's doah's 
an' doah's, but dey's dess on'y one best doah an' dats de 
True & True doah." 



In the Scenic Railroad, Canals of Venice, Garden Enclosure, Baby Incubators, 
Colonnade and Tower, Main Office, Ball Room, Automatic Vaudeville and White 
City Band Stand you will find Millwork of our manufacture. 



When writing to advertisers please mention The White City Magazine. 



THE WHITE CITY MAGAZINE 



Columns for White City Peristyle 




The above cut shows three of the twenty columns, 38 inches in diameter and 26 feet long, for 
the White City Peristyle about to leave our factory. 

Henry Sanders Co. 

Western Manufacturers of 

KOLL'S PATENT LOCK-JOINT 
COLUMNS 

77-85 Weed Street, Chicago, III. 

Eastern Factory: Hartmann Bros. Mfg. Co., Mt. Vernon, N. V. 



ijli J 



We are equipped for making Columns from 6 to 42 inches in diameter and proportionate lengths 
of all designs and woods; also Balustrades, Railings, Pedestals and Pilasters, and Turned Work 
of every description. Write for our Book of Designs. 



When writing to advertisers please mention The Whiie City Magazine. 



THE WHITE CITY MAGAZINE 



The "White City Magazine is printed and bound by 

P. F. Pettibone 
(&Co. 






STATIONERS 

PRINTERS 

BlankBookMakers 
Lithographe rs 

Edition Printing 
and Binding 



Main Store 

1 ?8 Monroe Street* 

Store, Factory and 
General Offices 

44-50 S. Desplaines 
Street* 

CHICAGO 




Telephone Monroe ^^g 

Prii'ate Exchanp-e 





When writing to advertisers please mention The White City Magazine. 




Paul D. Howse, General Manager Aaron J. Jones, Secretary and Treasurer 

OFFICIALS OF WHITE CITY 



The IVHirE Cirr Magazine 



Vol. I. 



MARCH, 1905. 



No. 2. 



The 

Necessity 




for 

White City 




INCE the days of the 
great Columbian Expo- 
sition, when Chicago 
showed the civilized 
u orld that wonderful 
"White City," which 
has never been equalled 
in splendor, grandeur or 
scope of comprehensive- 
ness, the great masses 
of Chicago have been 
without adequate 
amusement facilities. 

Having been given their fill of pleas- 
ure during the World's Fair, they have 
been clamoring for more with an unap- 
peased appetite ever since. 

Of course that portion of Chicago's 
population which can at any time take 
a train Southward if the weather gets 
cold, or take a train northward during 
the hot summer months, has not been 
particularly bothered by the lamentable 
lack of opportunities for clean, healthful 
amusements and innocent pleasures of an 
inexpensive kind which play so important 
a part in the lives of those who compose 
the great masses of less fortunate ones. 
At the same time thousands of dollars 
have been spent in other cities and at the 
Seashore which would have been kept in 
circulation in Qiicago had there existed 
such an Amusement Park as White 
City will be, because White City will 
amply supply the demand. 

So it was a genuine necessity which 
the founders of White City discovered. 



Statistics have proven time and again 
that the people make better citizens if 
they are afforded opportunities for inno- 
cent pleasure and enjoyment than if com- 
pelled to spend the hot evenings and sul- 
try afternoons in sulkiness, bewailing 
their lack of fortune and envying the 
wealthy, with their facilities for purchas- 
ing immunity from ennui. 

The Old World governments have rec- 
ognized this condition of cause for dis- 
content and have hberally provided pleas- 
ure resorts of various kinds, where the 
masses have carte blanche in the way of 
merry-making, this example being fol- 
lowed by many American cities. In Chi- 
cago strenuous eft'orts have been made 
along the same lines with the result that 
we now have one of the finest boulevard 
systems of any city in the world. 

But it is not the masses who can enjoy 
the boulevards to their fullest extent 
with their facilities for driving, cycling 
and automobiling. 

The class most in need of facilities 
for recreation and enjoyment at a mini- 
mum cost is composed of the hundreds 
of thousands of men, women and youths 
of both sexes who are employed in the 
citv at moderate salaries and who work 
liard for their money. They toil sev- 
eral hours each day and go to their 
homes or lodgings thoroughly tired. It 
is impossible for them to go away to 
some Summer resort whenever they feel 
so disposed because the expense is a mat- 
ter which must be considered, and then. 



10 



THE WHITE CITY MAGAZINE 



again, their positions would be jeopar- 
dized and their chances of earning a Hve- 
Hhood threatened if they should desert 
their posts. 

However, if they can jump on board 
a street car or an elevated train and ride, 
on the payment of a five-cent fare, to a 
spot dedicated as is White City to 
'"merriment and mirth," gain admission 
by the payment of one dime, and thus 



the possibilities of practically unlimited 
capital coupled with intellectual effort. 

An idea of the immensity of White 
City can be obtained by a consideration 
of the amount of ground covered. It is 
34-mile long and i-i2-mile wide, covers 
almost 14 acres and occupies two full 
sized city blocks. Sixty-third street 
bounds the North Side of White City, 
Sixty-fifth street the South Side, Calumet 




77^1? Main Ent)'ance, 6^d Street and South Park Ave. 



purchase the privilege of enjoying them- 
selves to the utmost in an orderly way, 
it serves to brighten up the gloom of an 
otherwise hopeless life of toil. 

It will be readily seen that the pro- 
moters of White City are engaged in 
raising the standard of citizenship in Chi- 
cago. 

The White City Construction Com- 
pany is now building at the corner of 63rd 
street and South Park avenue one of the 
finest Amusement Parks in the world. 
It's aim and object is to give to the peo- 
ple of Chicago an amusement "world's 
fair," — not in any sense in miniature — 
but on a scale of grandeur which will be 
in every way commensurate to the size 
of Chicago. It is building a White City 
devoted entirely to amusements and as 
perfect archite cturally as comes within 



avenue the West Side and South Park 
avenue the East Side. 

There are now in course of construc- 
tion a solid half-mile of magnificent 
buildings, each architecturally perfect 
and permanent in construction. Some of 
the buildings are fire-proof, while thick 
brick fire walls are placed between the 
more important ones. 

There is no suitable location in Chi- 
cago more accessible to the population 
on the North, West and South Sides. 
The South Side elevated road has a sta- 
tion at the main entrance and it is said 
that express trains will run from down- 
town to White City in the Spring in 
about ten minutes' time. The Sixty-third 
street cross-town line passes the subur- 
ban stations of all the South side rail- 
roads and brings the people from far 



THE WHITE CITY MAGAZINE 



II 



over on the West side for a 5 cent fare. 
The Calumet Electric line and the Chi- 
cago Electric Traction Company's line 
have their terminals at the main entrance 
to White City and both will have extra 
facilities for handling the crowds from 
their sections of the South Side by the 
time the Park is open, May 27. The 
Indiana avenue trolley, which now ends 
at Fifty-first street, has completed plans 
for building as far as White City in 
time for the opening. This will give 



pie. The management proposes to sup- 
ply amusement and entertainment for all 
of Chicago's citizens and provision is 
made for catering to the artistic and love 
of the beautiful as well as the hilarious 
and more boisterous sports of the more 
energetic seekers after fun and merri- 
ment. 

Once within the gates of White City 
everybody will be equally considered by 
the management. If a person chooses to 
spend the sum of 10 cents for a ticket 




Bridge across the Lagoon at ]\'hite City 



a direct surface line from the city and 
through one of the most thickly popu- 
lated residence sections of Chicago. The 
transportation facilities could not possi- 
bly be better. 

White City is without competition. 
There is no other first-class amusement 
park in Chicago and it is plain sailing 
for the management because all the peo- 
ple are desirous of taking advantage of 
the unusual and practically endless pos- 
sibilities for innocent and clean amuse- 
ments now being prepared for them. On 
every side are heard inquiries about 
White City and every bit of informa- 
tion given out officially is eagerly sought 
by the people of all classes. 

It must not be supposed that White 
City is being built for the special accom- 
modation of any particular class of peo- 



at the gate and does not wish to spend 
any more there will be no possible oppor- 
tunity for criticism. A complete free 
entertainment for the evening will be 
supplied by the management and various 
attractions, an admission to which will 
require the purchase of another ticket, 
can be patronized or ignored according 
to the desire of the patron. 

On entering the main gates at White 
City the seeker for pleasure will be 
greeted by strains of music from one 
of the very finest bands or orchestras in 
the world. The famous Banda Rossa has 
been engaged for the first four weeks of 
the season and will be found every after- 
noon and evening in the beautiful Band- 
stand located in the center of the Sunken 
Gardens. Along the cement walks which 
run throusfh the Gardens are located hun- 



12 



THE WHITE CITY MAGAZINE 



dreds of large roomy settees which can 
be occupied at will, free of charge, by 
those who desire to listen to the band con- 
certs or who wish to rest. Here also will 
be located the great Circus rings and the 
\"audeville stage, devoted to open-air en- 
tertainment within plain A'iew of the free 
seats. Regular programmes will be given 
ever}- afternoon and evening. 

In addition to these free exhibitions 
and entertainments mentioned there will 
be others, equally attractive, while there 



have been left entirely out of it so that 
any person who visits White City can 
feel assured that no harm can result from 
indulging in any of the methods offered 
for finding pleasure. 

One special feature noticeable in the 
building of White City will commend 
itself particularly to the public. It is the 
fact that the management owns every im- 
portant attraction in the grounds and 
therefore can dictate the policy under 
which it will be conducted. This permits 




After a Snow Storvi at White City 



will also be a constant succession of in- 
teresting events to amuse and dispel all 
thoughts of care. 

Never before were gathered together 
in any one amusement Park in the United 
States, or in Europe either, the wonder- 
ful attractions and amusement devices 
which are being constructed at White 
City. The management selected only 
those which would furnish entertainment 
for the people without endangering life 
or limb and the result is that every par- 
ticularly desirable and popular attraction 
seen at any of the Eastern or European 
resorts is being built at White City. All 
devices which have not given complete 
satisfaction as well as those which seemed 
to present any opportunity for accident 



intimate supervision of the conduct of 
employes and absolute assurance that no 
objectionable features will be permitted. 
The operation of these devices by the 
management insures that the class of all 
entertainments will be of the very highest 
standard. 

Yes, White City' has long been de- 
sired. The people did not know exactly 
what they did want but now that they 
have found out what White City is 
going to be they declare it is the very 
thing they have hoped for. It is going 
to fill the bill to the very letter and 
pleasant times can be looked forward to 
by the masses instead of a succession of 
cheerless, uninteresting days of toil fol- 
lowed by restless nights. 



THE WHITE CITY MAGAZINE 



13 



Johnstown Flood for White City 

Grandest and Most Spectacular Scenic Production Ever Shoivn 



4^ ^ 



HE Johnstown Flood, pro- 
nounced to be the greatest 
scenic production ever 
offered the pubHc, will be 
seen at Vv'hite City. 
It was first shown at the Pan-Ameri- 
can Exposition at Buft'alo, and it proved 
to be the greatest success of the many at- 
tractions of this great Fair. It is pro- 
nounced by experts to be far superior 
to the Galveston Flood shown at St. 
Louis. 

The Johnstown Flood which will be 
located in White City is a new one. with 
the scenic work by Sosman & Landis, 
and will be an improvement over the one 
at Buffalo. The entire city of Johnstown 
is shown, with the hills and the great 
reservoir in the distance. This is not a 
painting, but each of the buildings of the 
city of Johnstown is truthfully repro- 




Steel Structure of CoUci^e Fun 

duced in miniature. The production 
opens with the peaceful city of Johns- 
town with its citizens, commerce, and 
industry. Men and women are seen going 
about their pursuits, trains pass through 



the city, and teamsters are seen trans- 
ferring freight, while pleasure vehicles 
drive through the streets. Then comes 
a storm, and the flood. 

Small at first is the stream of water 
which trickles down the mountains in the 




Concrete Foii>idation for the ToiL'er 

distance ; the alarm is given, and those 
who are fortunate enough to apprehend 
their danger are seen rushing for the hill- 
tops. With a rumble that forebodes 
death for hundreds of souls, the walls of 
the great reservoir give way and down 
into the valley rushes the tremendous 
volume of water which submerges the 
city and crushes great buildings like egg 
shells. Hundreds of persons are caught 
in the tremendous torrent and within a 
few minutes the city is devastated. 

The production is correct in all details, 
the buildings being actual reproductions 
of those which crumbled beneath the 
great tidal wave. 

The scenic effects are excellent and 
may be said to be a triumph of stage 
craft. 

V\\~\\ does a genuine Vandyke pos- 
sess so much greater a value than a 
goatee ? 



THE WHITE CITY MAGAZINE 



Prosperity for Real Estate Owners 

H. C. Ross Mentions Some of the Benefits of the White City 




HE people of Chicago gener- 
ally speaking do not realize 
the great increase in prices 
of property in the territory 
surrounding the White 
City, although a few shrewd invest- 
ors have anticipated this advance and 
have secured several pieces. They are 
ready to pick up more if offered at rea- 
sonable figures. However, owners of 




H. C. Ross 

this property themselves recognize the 
bright future for all property within a 
mile or two of White City and have 
advanced prices from 25 to 200 per cent. 
This activity is not confined alone to 
property in the immediate vicinity of 
the Park, but extends as far north as 
39th street, south to 71st street and from 
the lake over into Englewood. 

Of course, the greatest advance and 
most inquiries apply to property near 
White City. For instance, immedi- 
ately across the street property has just 
been leased for ten years at double the 
rental paid formerly, and the same piece 
could not be bought for double the 
price. This the writer knows, as he per- 
sonally offered double the price it was 
quoted at last summer. In another case. 



a piece was ottered at $5,500 and no 
taKers and is now held at ^10,000 and 
IS to be improved with a fine store and 
apartment building. Other frontage of- 
fered at $24 per foot is now held at 
$75. Anotlier piece offered at $50 per 
foot is now to be improved and leased 
at a valuation of $200 per foot. Over 
600 feet in the two blocks north, on 
South Park avenue, has changed hands 
since the White City lease was written. 
Part of this has been leased for ten 
years and from fifty to sixty flats are 
building on the balance. 

The rental of apartments in the local- 
ity of the Park have stiffened materially 
and nearly ever flat in the district is oc- 
cupied. 

Another strong indication of the ad- 
vance in values is shown in the fact 
that where formerly mortgage bankers 
made Garfield boulevard or 6ist street 
the limit of their operation, they now 
have extended this restriction to all the 
property skirted by the Lake Shore and 
Pennsylvania railroad tracks. 

Acres, also, have shared in this pros- 
perity, as is shown by the sale of some- 
thing like sixteen acres south of Sixty- 
third street, between Calumet and Prai- 
rie avenues, at $5,000 an acre. This 
was offered to the writer last summer 




Tijue Keeper at IVkite City 

at $3,500, and probably could have been 
bought for $3,000 an acre. 

For the property lying north as far as 
Garfield boulevard there is more inquiry 
at the present time than for the last ten 
years. Quite a number of apartment 



THE WHITE CITY MAGAZINE 



15 



buildings have been built this winter 
and many more are to be built the com- 
ing summer. There is no locality in 
Chicago which offers such inducements 
to builders or investors as this part of 
the city does at the present time. 

Particularly gratifying is the fact that 
the character of improvements being 
made is the best showing that owners 
of the property fully appreciate the high 
class and the permanency of the enter- 
tainment to be offered bv White City 



Camp of Gypsies 

One of the unusual attractions at 
White City will be a genuine Gypsy 
Camp with black-eyed babies rolling 
and tumbling about, with olive com- 
plexioned maids attending to the duties 
of camp life, with sturdy young men, 
dressed in velveteens, silk neckerchiefs 
and wearing gold rings in their ears ; 
with a Gypsy queen, enthroned in all 
the splendor of barbaric affluence and 
ruling with a rod of iron, together with 




Grand Stand for Fire and Flames Exhibition 



and that the best people of Chicago will 
be attracted thereto. 

Ordinarily the only improvements 
made surrounding an amusement park 
are of the cheap clap-trap variety, but 
this feature is entirely lacking in all 
the buildings now or under considera- 
tion thus far. The reason for this is 
easily apparent. The investors in this 
property are proceeding in this wise 
after a careful investigation of the mag- 
nificent plans of White City and fully 
appreciating that Chicago people are to 
have the greatest amusement park in 
the world. They believe that these same 
people will patronize it in large numbers, 
thereby attracting many to this locality 
who do not at the present time know 
what a desirable residence section it is. 

It would be difficult to estimate the 
benefits to real estate caused by the 
building of White City, as it has start- 
ed a prosperity which will be lasting for 
several vears. H. C. Ross. 



It is said that the greatest test of 
friendship is to read the book of a 
rival. 



the other interesting things which are 
always to be seen in the camps of the 
real Gypsies. 

The Gypsies of White City must 
not be confounded with the graceless, 
ragged and dirty outlaws who make 
themselves nuisances in the suburbs of 
Chicago and who eke out a scanty 
existence by pettv pilferings. The 
White City Gypsies come direct from 
Sunny Spain and are persons of an 
entirely different class. They are 
descended from the ancient Egyptians, 
the name Gypsy being: a corruption of 
that historic word, ?nd their tribal laws 
and rituals have been handed down 
through their forefathers from time 
immemorial. 

Arrangements have Just been com- 
pleted by a special envov sent bv the 
management of White City to far-off 
Spain and these strange wanderers will 
soon begin the long and tiresome jour- 
ney across the Atlantic ocean. They 
prefer to travel in their caravans if pos- 
sible and will make a part of the jour- 
ney through the United States in this 
way. 



i6 



THE WHITE CITY MAGAZINE 



Ail Roads Lead to White City 

Uneqiialcd Transportation Facilities for an Amusement Park 




ONSER\\\TR'E estimates 
made by experts in handling 
immense crowds and having" 
a full knowledge of the trans- 
portation facilities which cen- 
ter at Sixty-third street and South Park 
avenue, the main entrance to White 
City, state without hesitation that 25,000 
persons can be landed at this corner per 



most thickly populated residence portion 
of Englewood and into Kenwood. The 
South Park station of this line is located 
at the main entrance to White City and 
the running time to the down-town dis- 
trict is now about 25 minutes. When the 
improvements are completed this time 
will be cut in half by the running of 
express trains which will be put into 




White City S en Ip tors' Workshop 



hour without extraordinary effort. In 
fact, it would seem as though the routes 
of the elevated and surface lines had 
been mapped out with the intention of 
giving to this particular location the best 
transportation facilities for bringing peo- 
ple direct from all parts of Chicago. 

In addition to the facilities which are 
at present installed, great improvements 
are projected and will be carried out in 
the immediate future so that they will 
be completed on or about the time that 
the gates of White City are thrown 
open to the public. 

The South Side Elevated Railroad 
Company will soon begin the work 
of building a four-track road with 
branches which penetrate through the 



service for the benefit of the patrons of 
White City. 

The South Side Elevated Railroad will 
be the principal feeding line to White 
City, as its connection with the other 
elevated lines on the loop down-town will 
materially assist in expediting travel, 
while, if the universal transfer system is 
inaugurated, it will mean that the resi- 
dents of any part of Chicago can visit 
White City upon the payment of a five- 
cent fare. The equipment of this Com- 
pany is equal to that of any elevated or 
surface road in the country. 

Running across the South Side, from 
the extreme western portion to Jackson 
Park, is the 6^rd street cross town trolley 
line, a part of the immense system of the 



THE WHITE CITY MAGAZINE 



17 



Chicago Street Railway Company. The 
cars on this line run past the main 
entrance of White City and transfers 
can be obtained to this line from any of 
the street car trunk lines running- north 
and south. 

For the convenience of those who find 
it to their advantage to use the suburban 
trains on the lines operated by the Illi- 
nois Central, IMichigan Central, Big Four, 
Lake Shore and Michigan Southern, 
Pennsylvania, Rock Island, Monon, 
Wabash or Chicago and Eastern Illinois 
Railwav Companies, or who arrive at the 
Sixty-third street station of anv of these 
lines on trains coming to Chica?-o, the 
Sixty-third street trollev lines oflfer the 
best facilities for reaching White City 
because these cars run past the stations 
owned by all the railroads enumerated 
above. 

The vast and populous territory lying 
south of Sixty-third street h?s an excep- 
tionallv good service supolied bv the Cal- 
umet Electric Street Railwav Companv, 
known as the "vellow line" : the Chicago 



Electric Traction Company, known as the 
Harvey and Blue Island line, and the 
South Chicago City Railway. The two 
first named have their terminals opposite 
the main entrance to White City and 
both are considering extensive improve- 
ments which will add materially to their 
facilities for bringing the people from the 
districts traversed by them and returning 
them to their homes with the greatest 
possible expedition. 

On or about May 27. White City^s 
opening day, it is expected that the Indi- 
ana avenue trolley line, which has Michi- 
gan and Wabash avenues on its down- 
town loop, will be extended from Fifty- 
first street, the present terminus, to Sixty- 
third street in front of White City^s 
gates. 

It will be obs:rved from the above 
description of transportation facilities 
that White City is especiallv favored 
and that Chicago's citizens from everv 
portion of the municipalitv and suburbs 
will find White City practically at their 
verv doors. 



Eugenio Sorrentino and His Banda Rossa 



The announcement of Sorrentino's 
Banda Rossa as one of the features for 
the opening week at the White City, 




T/ie Band Stand 

Chicago's new park, will attract thou- 
sands of people. Nothing else is more 
delightful during summer months than 
excellent band music out doors. No 



other band in America or any other 
country to-day is better suited to this 
purpose than Sorrentino's Banda Rossa. 
No other band pretends to play pro- 
grammes so widely diversified. Tlie 
usual quantitv of popular music in the 
wav of marches, intermezzos, overtures, 
etc., is there, and also what is more 
attractive, a long list of operatic selec- 
tions arranged bv Sorrentino himself. 
In this particubr field of music it is 
unrivaled ; but this is not strange, since 
all of the men, without a single excep- 
tion, are natives of Italy, the "mother 
of opera." The fifty men play as they 
would sing and in some numbers thev 
sing as they play — with a depth of feel- 
ing and beauty in phrasing not given to 
the German, the English or the Ameri- 
can musician. Herein lies the secret of 
the Banda Rossa's wonderful popularity. 
It takes music to the heart of its hear- 
ers. During a week's engagement, Sor- 
rentino always plays selections from at 
least fifteen operas, and an extended 
engagement means a list that often 
passes beyond fifty. 



i8 



THE WHITE CITY MAGAZINE 



Observation Wheel 

An Old Favorite with Neivest Improvements 




TXCE the days of the famous 
Ferris Wheel at the World's 
Columbian Exposition, there 
have been exhibited at the 
various Fairs held in differ- 
ent cities, observation wheels of all kinds 
and sizes within a circumscribed limit of 
height. 

Applications were received by the man- 
agement of White City from a score of 
proprietors of these observation wheels 
for the privilege of securing space at 
White City where they could install 
them. 

But. believing that if an attraction of 
this character was to be admitted, the 
management decided that it must be of a 
size and character which would befit 
White City, and finally made a contract 
with the American Vending Machine 
Company which provides for the finest 
observation wheel that has been built in 
the world since the Ferris Wheel was 
designed. In the making of the contract 
several things naturally were taken into 
consideration, among them being the fact 
that the original Ferris Wheel was of 
such enormous and cumbersome propor- 
tions that many persons feared to ride 
in it. In fact, it was too large and excited 
feelings of distrust in the hearts of the 
timid. The success which has character- 
ized wheels of a smaller size made it 
advisable to arrange for an observation 
wheel which would be without the 
unpleasant feature of the original Ferris 
Wheel and yet would carry the public 
in comfortable cars to a sufficient height 
to enable them to view the moving pano- 
rama always presented to the eye of the 
sight-seer at White City. 

This new observation wheel is now 
being constructed and will be equipped 
with safety appliances and all modern 
improvements. There will be accommo- 
dations for about 40 passengers at a time, 
each one finding plenty of room in a nicely 
upholstered and perfectly appointed car. 
White City's Observation Wheel is 
the perfection of mechanical and engi- 
neering skill, the mechanism being so per- 
fect that a child can run it. No percep- 
tible effort is descernible when the wheel 



is started or stopped, because the ball- 
bearings absolutely prevent any jar or 
noticeable friction. 

There is something particularly en- 
trancing about a ride on the observa- 
tion wheel. The visitor is slowly and 
irresistibly carried to a height which per- 




mits a view of all surrounding objects, 
and the sensation of being maintained in 
the air by invisible forces is felt. 

Various devices have been invented 
from time to time by promoters of amuse- 
ment enterprises, but none has ever yet 
been discovered which will take the place 
of the observation wheel with its pecu- 
liarly pleasant and indefinable sensations. 



John L. Sullivan is delivering a 
course of lectures on the fun he had 
spending a million dollars. He ought 
to send Hetty Green a pass. — Chicago 
Record-Herald. 

*** 

The size of a woman's foot has noth- 
ing to do with the ability she possesses 
for kicking. 



THE WHITE CITY MAGAZINE 



19 



The Builders of White City 

Assistants to General Manager Hoivse in the Construction Department 





John Crute 



T is unnecessary to state that 
the work of building White 
City requires the constant su- 
pervision of skilled engineers 
and architects. The construc- 
tion department is a very important one 
and it rests with the gentlemen who su- 
perintend it to have everything prepared 
in the most complete manner for the 
opening date, May 27. 

Everything must 
be done in a way 
which will meet 
with the approval 
of the city authori- 
ties, because they 
make severe in- 
spections of all 
buildings con- 
structed for amuse- 
m e n t purposes, 
where many people 
will congregate. In 
view of the fact that White City is the 
greatest Amusement Park in the United 
States and will undoubtedly have the 
biggest crowds ever gathered together 
since the World's Columbian Exposition, 
it can be readily understood that the 
strictest attention to those things which 
will insure safety is desirable. 

White City is called a model in every 
way and the architects have not only 
carefully observed every rule of the build- 
ing department, but made the plans in 
such a way that extraordinary precau- 
tions have been observed, although at a 
greatly increased 
expense. This was 
done so that any- 
^< body who visits 

White City can 
feel perfectly se- 
^^^ cure against the 

^1^ ^^^ possibility of an ac- 
cident of any kind. 
It is the object of 
the management of 
White City to 
have the people 
consider that they are the actual owners 
of this wonderful Amusement Park and 




G. H. French 



feel just as much at home and just as 
free from unpleasant occurrences as 
though spending the afternoon or even- 
ing at their own firesides. The whole 
idea in building White City is to have 
everything so arranged that the people 
will find it an ideal place for spending 
their leisure hours and will seek their 
amusements and pleasures there. 

Edward C. Boyce, the famous New 
York architect, who has designed and 
built more first-class Amusement devices, 
than all other architects and inventors, 
and who has super- 
vised the construc- 
tion of the most fa- 
mous Amusement 
resorts and parks, 
made the plans 
from which White 
City is being built, 
and the entire work 
is being done at his 
direction. John 
Crute is located at 
the park as the per- 
sonal representative of Mr. Boyc" and 
will remain until the work is completed. 

The electrical work at White City is 
being done under the supervision of G. 
H. French, an electrical engineer of con- 
siderable prominence, while the Scenic 
Railway, the finest ever built, was con- 
structed by Gerald Berry, a first-class 
civil engineer, who is now in Louisville, 
Ky., engaged in the work of construct- 
ing a similar device on a smaller scale. 




Gerald Berry 



The house that Jack built had just 
been finished. 

"It didn't cost any more than the 
architect's estimate," he proudly 
boasted. 

Herein we see the true fairy-tale ele- 
ment of the story. — Neiv York Sun. 

*** 

If other enterprises claim to be "just 
as good" as White City, it's equiva- 
lent to their donning the badge of infe- 
riority. 



20 



THE WHITE CITY MAGAZINE 



How Incubators Save Lives 

Raishig Infants Whose Existence Hangs by a Thread 



Next summer everybod}' will be ask- 
ing: "Have you seen the Incubator 
Babies ?'' 

They are a feature of White City. 
If you miss seeing them, miss seeing 
the tiny mites of humanity in their cas- 
tles, you miss one of the most instruc- 
tive and interesting sights of White 
City. 

They are in buildings specially con- 



into this cold, bustling world one, two 
or even three months before their time. 
"How did they come to be in incu- 
bators?" "Where do the doctors get 
them?" "Are they really alive, the 
same as other babies not reared in 
incubators?" are questions invariably 
asked of the lecturers, whose duty it is 
to deliver from time to time brief and 
comprehensive lecturettes on the appa- 




Ward in Infant Incubator with Attendants 



structed for the incubators, and every- 
thing pertaining thereto is admirably 
and scientifically arranged by the same 
physicians who had charge of the 
world-celebrated Victorian Era Exhibi- 
tion in Earl's Court, London ; the 
Trans-]\Iississippi Exposition in Omaha, 
and the Pan-American Exposition in 
Buffalo. There is nothing of the 
"fake," catchpenny idea about the infant 
incubators. On the contrary, they are 
founded on a purely scientific basis and 
are endorsed by the entire medical fra- 
ternity and are models. 

The babies there are all of premature 
birth. In other words, they have come 



ratus itself and the institution in gen- 
eral. 

The answers are as simple as the 
questions by the inquiring visitors are 
natural, albeit often very humorous. In 
the first place it should be said that the 
public has peculiar notions concerning 
this institution. The word incubators, 
to the uninformed, is apt to suggest 
something more than the mere rearing 
or preserving of life, and consequently 
is more or less confusing. 

Once you satisfy the average indi- 
vidual that the babies in the incubators 
are really alive, that they are weaklings, 
tiny, prematurely born infants and the 



THE WHITE CITY MAGAZINE 



21 




Scales in which Infants are Weighed 

next thing he will want to know if they 
are orphans or foundlings. 

The fact is they are neither and they 
may be of high or low degree. For 
example, milady resident of Prairie ave- 
nue gives birth to a baby girl so weak 
and fragile that its chances of life under 
ordinary conditions and the best condi- 
tions that medical science can supply in 
the aristocratic household, would be 
infinitesimal. What is to be done ? 
]\Iilady's physician suggests the incu- 
bators. 

Tf she is wise, she promptlv submits 



to his judgment. This implies of 
course, the immediate transfer of the 
infant aristocrat from the mansion to 
the incubator institution at White 
City. The same thing applies to 
babies born in every other station of 
life, high or low, rich or poor, black or 
white; the doctors who conduct this 
institution for the preservation of infant 
life make no distinction, have no prefer- 
ence. All they ask is that physicians 
and the public in general shall co-oper- 
ate with them in this truly noble and 
laudatory work. 

They make no charge whatsoever for 
the care of the infants and the only 
tax involved is the slight admission fee. 
which, while it bars the disinterested, 
undesirable class of visitors, is essential 
to the proper conduct and maintenance 
of the institution itself. 

The number of prematurely born 
infants, your physician will tell you, is 
much larger than you would think, 
from fifteen to thirty in a hundred 
births, according to the best authorities. 
The profession regards, scientifically 
speaking, all infants to be prematurely 
born who do not weigh over 5 pounds 
9 ounces at birth. The number of 
deaths until the introduction of this 
system, was steadily increasing in a 
progressive ratio that may be connected 
with the markedly increased employ- 
ment of wo;r:en in industrial occupa- 




liicubator Infant Receiving Bath 



THE WHITE CITY MAGAZINE 



tions. In any case, the time would 
appear to have now come to seriously 
consider ^ny proposition that offers to 
save these little lives to the world, espe- 
cially one that claims to save three- 
fourths of all that are placed in its care. 

To quote from the prospectus of this 
institution : ■ 

All infants weighing less than 2 
pounds 3 ounces die on the day of their 
birth. 

If the weight is from 2 pounds 3 
ounces to 3 pounds 5 ounces, nearly 
half of them are saved by the aid of 
this apparatus. 

If the weight is from 3 pounds 5 
ounces to 4 pounds 7 ounces, 72 per 
cent are saved. 

If the weight is from 4 pounds 7 
ounces to 5 pounds 9 ounces, go per 
cent are saved. 

>"\^'ith children weighing more than 
5 pounds 9 ounces, the percentage of 
mortality is so infinitesimal that practi- 
callv all are saved. 

The incubators and the ventilating 
tubes are silvered, giving them a bright 
and cheerful appearance. Inside, 



-^rf'-?*3W^| 




Smallest Indian Baby ; Weight at Birth i 
pound 8 oz., Raised in Infant Itmcbator 

through glass doors, may be seen the 
baby resting on a fine wire hammock, 
looking clean and comfortable, wrapped 
in a tiny spread and tied around with 




Scene m Model Nursery, Infant Incubatory 



THE WHITE CITY MAGAZINE 



23 




^^.,^ 




The Celebrated Incubator Triplets 



a pretty pink or blue ribbon, for all the 
world like a bonbon at the holidays. 
The temperature, which is usually set 
at 85 to 100 degrees, is regulated by a 
delicate thermostat. 

The apparatus is not the all important 
feature by any means. Apart from the 
trained nurses and wet nurses, the 
babies have the constant service of three 



physicians, and at night, as in the day 
time, they are fed from the breast every 
two hours. In the nursery there is a 
small pharmacy, contrivances for steril- 
izing milk, ingenious feeding bottles, 
and scales so delicateh' constructed that 
the infants may be weighed before and 
after feeding and their progress duly 
observed. 



White City Bonds and Shares 

A limited number of securities of 
The White City Construction Com- 
pany are offered at prices that will 
show a handsome profit to the investor. 

If interested make appointment by 
telephone. 

Telephone Main 4157. Joseph Bei- 
feld, Sherman House, Chicago. 



She — "And the reason you are so 

late getting home, you were struck by 

a trolley-car?" 

He — "Yes (hie) ; that's it, dear." 

She — "Were you frightened ?" 

He — "No (hie) ; didn't even (hie) 

take my breath away." 

She — "No; I notice that." — Yonkers 

Statesman. 



24 



THE WHITE CITY MAGAZINE 



Special Features of White City 

L /I rivaled Attractions for Chicago's $1^000^000 
Amusement Enterprise 



Electric Tower. Almost 300 feet high, 
illuminated by 20.000 incandescent 
lights. 

Fighting- the Flames. A thrilling spec- 
tacle exhibiting two complete Fire 
Companies in action while a six-story 
hotel burns; requires 250 people, 2 
trolley cars, 2 automobiles, 5 cabs, 6 
wagons, ambulance, patrol wagon, 14 
horses, etc. Greatest and most vivid 
outdoor spectacle ever produced. 

Venice. A romantic gondola ride 
through the moonlit water streets of 
\^enice; viewing correct reproduc- 
tions of her famous buildings and 
statuary groups. 

Scenic Railway. A three-quarter mile 
ride up hill and down dale, through 
forest and glade, viewing the world's 
most marvelous scenery, actually re- 
produced in perspective. 

Infant Incubators. An exhibit of the 
greatest practical value to physicians 
and of the deepest interest to par- 
ents; showing scientific methods of 
saving the lives of tiny babes. 

White City College Inn. Finest restau- 
rant in America, located in an enor- 
mous and architecturally beautiful 
building; a duplicate of Chicago's 
famous College Inn; also a popular 
priced temperance restaurant and a 
German restaurant. Will accommo- 
date 2.400 people. 

Music Open air concerts day and eve- 
ning by the foremost bands and 
orchestras of America and Europe. 

Flying Airships. A revelation in bird- 
1 ike tran sportation. SirHiram 
Maxim's idea of safe and sane aerial 
navigation. 

Ball Room. Finest dancing floor in 
Chicago and capable of accommo- 
dating 1,000 dancers at a time. 

Bumps. A harmless and hilarious 
method of enjoyment. "Have you 
bumped the bumps?" 



Midget City. A model miniature vil- 
lage of 25 tiny buildings peopled by a 
host of midgets of world-wide re- 
nown; midget theatre and circus with 
midget artistes. 

Shoot-the-Chutes. Duplex and longest 
in America. Has 500 foot escalator 
to carry people to the pavilion. All 
the newest improvements. 

Johnstown Flood. Most impressive and 
realistic of all scenic productions and 
constructed on a gigantic scale. A 
triumph of scenic art and startling 
realism. 

Automatic Vaudeville. Containing all 
the latest mechanical novelties and 
furnishing entertainment for old and 
young. 

Midway. A conglomeration of laughter 
inspiring features and clean amuse- 
ments. 

Fun Factory. A merrymaking estab- 
lishment with laugh creating devices 
on a large scale. 

Electric Theatre. Electric pictorial 
reproductions of startling and thrill- 
ing events showing the animation and 
action of living objects. 

Observation Wheel. Fun for every- 
body. A ride you will not forget. 

Circus Rings. Continuous performances 
including equestrian acts, aerial 
flights and feats of strength and skill. 
Free exhibitions. 

Mechanical Waxworks. Most remark- 
able collection of life-like figures, 
reproduced in wax and so supplied 
with intricate and cleverly contrived 
mechanisms that they appear to be 
possessed of the characteristics and 
abilities of living beings. 

Photograph Gallery. Where pictures 
of every kind known to lovers of 
photographic art will be made under 
the supervision of skilled photog- 
raphers. Conducted by one of the 
best known and largest photographic 
concerns in the world. 



THE WHITE CITY MAGAZINE 



25 



Gypsy Camp. With a host of genuine 
G}'psies from sunny Spain, secured 
by a special envoy sent across the 
water by the management of White 
City. 

Monkey, Dog: and Pony Circus. Other- 
wise called the Simian City. An 
aggregation of cleverly trained 
animals under the direction of Prof. 
Blake, one of the best known trainers 
in the world. A constantly changing 
program of special interest to chil- 
dren and pleasing to all. 

Double Circle. An absolutely harmless 
but exciting ride in perfectly con- 
structed gravity cars, whirling the 
rider at an exhilarating speed around 
a double circle. Lots of fun. 

Miniature Railway, A perfect model 
railroad system with tracks, switches, 
tiny cars, engines, etc. Almost a 
half-mile of trackage through tunnels 
and grottoes with beautiful scenic 
effects. Children or adults can ride. 



Beautiful Jim Key. The equine world 
wonder who earns annually the in- 
terest on Si, 000,000 and is the aristo- 
crat of the animal kingdom. Actually 
an educated horse which thinks, 
spells, counts, draws with chalk and 
writes his own name on a blackboard. 
Taught by kindness and a wonderful 
example of the power of love for 
dumb brutes. The children's friend. 

Temple of Music. Marvelous develop- 
ment of natural forces, applied by 
scientific methods for the performing 
of difficult airs on musical instru- 
ments of all kinds. Piano played by 
wireless telegraphy, the electricity 
passing through the body of a human 
being. Air, heat, steam, electricity, 
etc., used in these wonderful demon- 
strations. 

Palmistry Kiosk. Where the masteries 
of the future and occurrences of the 
past will be related by seers who can 
read the story of life as imprinted in 
the palm. 



Excursions to White City 

Railroad and Steamship Lines to Co-operate 




RRANGEMENTS with the 
various railroads centering in 
Chicago are being made with a 
view of conducting excursions 
from the cities, towns and vil- 
lages along the various lines and within a 
distance of 300 miles of Chicago. These 
excursions will be for the purpose of per- 
mitting the residents of other towns to 
visit White City at a minimum 
expense. All excursions will be con- 
ducted at reduced rates and will be found 
of special advantage to business men who 
desire to combine business with pleasure 
when they visit Chicago. 

The Publicity Department of White 
City will announce these railroad excur- 
sions from time to time so that the peo- 
ple in the territory affected by them will 
have full knowledge of them and of the 
exceptional opportunities for indulging 
in amusements when they visit wonderful 
White City. 

Anybody living within a distance of 



300 miles of Chicago will in this way be 
enabled to come to Chicago at reduced 
railroad fares. The Railroad Companies 
will combine with the Publicity Depart- 
ment of White City in advertising these 
excursions. 

In addition to the railroad excursions 
which will be arranged for, the Publicity 
Department of White City is perfecting 
plans for lake excursions, paying partic- 
ular attention to the towns on the shores 
of Lake Michigan which have steamship 
connections with Chicago. It is the inten- 
tion of the management to give every- 
body within riding distance of Chicago 
an opportunity to visit White City at 
the smallest possible expense. 




26 



THE WHITE CITY MAGAZINE 



White City Fire Department 

Under the tutorage of D. A. Hedglin 
the White City Fire Department is fast 
developing into a well equipped body of 
flame fighters. 

iMr. Hedglin who is always on duty in 
uniform on the grounds has ten picked 
men whom he puts tlirough a fire drill 
every afternoon. These men have be- 
come adepts at handling hose and various 
fire fighting apparatus. 



ent at White City is the Fire Chief and 
his men climbing over the buildings in 
their daily drill. 

The members of the department at 
present are : 



John Bergstrom 
F. W. Chamberlain 
James Chinn 
William Cooper 
Walter Gartrell 
William C. Hickev 



Alex Johnston 
John McDonald 
Tames Pifer 
jull Rhode 
Harrv E. Smith. 




White City Fire Depart7ne7it 



White City has ten regulation fire 
hydrants located within the grounds, each 
of which is supplied with icxD feet of 
Underwriter's Fire Hose. It has a num- 
ber of small chemicals and kill-fire adepts 
and has two 40-gallon Babcock's Chemi- 
cal Trucks. One is located on each side 
of the board walk and ready for instant 
use. 

A large gong has been placed in the 
center of the grounds, and a single tap 
brings the ten firemen to the spot with- 
out delay. Additional taps bring one 
hundred workmen and summons the City 
Fire Department. With this equipment 
there is very little risk from fire in 
White City. 

Within a short time a fire engine and 
hook and ladder truck will be installed, 

Under ^Mr. Hedglin's instructions the 
ten firemen have become adepts at climb- 
ing scafifolds and ladders, and one of the 
most interesting sights to be seen at pres- 



Sanitary Arrangements 

No expense has been spared to make 
White City as complete and up-to-date 
in all appointments and facilities as the 
most modern flat building or hotel. On 
either side of the Park, connected with 
the Colonnade which acts as the base 
for the great Electric Tower, will be 
located commodious and perfectly 
appointed toilet rooms. Trained attend- 
ants both male and female will be on 
duty constantly, and the most fastidious 
person will have no occasion to com- 
plain of the conveniences furnished. It 
is expected that thousands of Chica- 
goans and visitors to Chicago will go 
to White City during the summer 
afternoons and remain there for several 
hours, probably taking dinner, supper 
or lunch in the White City College 
Inn. 



THE WHITE CITY MAGAZINE 



27 



The Temple of Music 

Novel Electrical and Artistic Enter tain^nents 




HE talented and clever Wil- 
lard troupe of musical artists 
will appear at the Temple of 
Music in White City every 
afternoon and evening during 
the season, presenting the most remark- 
able and comprehensive program ever 
given by skilled musicians. Not alone 
do the Willards and their assistants per- 
form on every known instrument in duos, 
trios, quartettes and full bands or orches- 
tras but the audiences which visit the 
Temple of ]\Iusic at White City will be 
treated to a succession of wholl}^ new and 
sensational effects produced with the aid 
of complicated electrical devices. Mr. 
Willard has invented a great many 
entirely new and novel devices, the latest 
of which is the performing by him of 
intricate and difficult pieces on an elec- 
trically fitted piano, using a key board 
at a distance and transmitting the effort, 
by means of wireless telegraphy, the elec- 
tricity passing through the body of Kittie 



The decidedly novel and up-to-date 
performance given by the Willards is 
aptly termed "The Fashion Plate Music- 




C. D. Willard 

Inventor 

M. Willard. This is only one of many 
feats of unusual interest. The Willards 
have a collection of musical instruments, 
ancient and modern, which could not be 
duplicated except by an expenditure of 
not less than $50,000. Many of the instru- 
ments possessed by them were presented 
by prominent members of royalty and 
the nobility in Europe and Asia. 




Kiltie M. Willard 
Origuiator 

al Act Of The World" and is well deserv- 
ing of the title. 

Mr. Willard will not rest satisfied with 
the facilities which have so far proved 
him to be the leading creator of similar 
acts but is inventing several sensational 
and startling acts which will be first pro- 
duced in the Temple of Music at White 
City. 

The stage settings for the Temple of 
Music at White City will all be entirely 
new and elaborate as will befit the model 
structure now being built for their accom- 
modation at White City. 

To the lover of the artistic and the 
beautiful, the Temple of Music will prove 
a popular attraction. 



Now that election bribery has been 
claimed in a Philippine town, all 
doubts as to the fitness of these adapta- 
ble people for our form of government 
should be removed. 



2§ 



THE WHITE CITY MAGAZINE 



Bumps 

A New and Novel Pastime 



"HICAGOANS have never 
yet been given the opportu- 
nity of indul,8;inginthatexhil- 
arating and hilarious pas- 
time so popular at Coney 
Island and known as "Bumping the 
Bumps." During the summer amusement 
season at Coney Island the most frequent 




national, state, and municipal executives 
gravely ascended to the platform and 
took the greatest possible delight in slid- 
ing down the smooth incline ; caroming 
from one bump tO' another and landing 
at the foot against the air cushion with 
all the delight of school boys. It became 
a veritable craze before the season had 




method of salutation among people of all 
classes was : 

"Have you bumped the bumps" and 
the answer was almost invariably "You 
can bet your life I have." 

The Bumps first appeared at Dream- 
land and at once became the most pop- 
ular attraction in that resort. Dignified 



become far advanced and the manage-' 
ment of White City_, when visiting 
Dreamland last season determined that 
the Bumps should be introduced in Chi- 
cago. 

It is impossible to explain exactly what 
the Bumps are, or is, but the following 
brief description will give an excellent 



THE WHITE CITY MAGAZINE 



29 



idea of this attraction as it will be found 
at White City. 

In a handsomely built and specially 
designed structure : the first building seen 
by the visitor to White City on the west 
walk, will be found the Bumps. The 
front of the building is open and a flight 
of stairs leads the seeker for amusement 
to a platform at the rear of the building 
and about 20 feet from the ground. Lead- 
ing from this platform to the ground 
floor in front is a perfectly smooth and 
satin-finished incline, built of the finest 
maple lumber. The descent has an angle 
of about 30 degrees and here and there 
are cushioned protuberances which cause 
the person sliding down the incline to 
become diverted from a straight course 
and be directed in this way from one to 
another of the "Bumps" until the foot 
of the incline is finally reached. There 
will be found several precautionary appli- 
ances to prevent the possibility of injury 
or unpleasant sensation. 

In addition to the main slide there are 
three others, one a straight and narrow 
Chute constructed of slippery basket 
work and which gives the slider an excel- 
lent speed. Another gives the sensation 
of alternate falling and rising until the 
bottom is reached by a succession of gen- 
tle inclines. But the most exciting of all 
is what a base ball pitcher would call 
the in and out curve. It consists of a 
narrow Chute with sharp and sudden 
turns occurring at the most unexpected 



places and finally landing the bumper at 
the bottom without injury. 

The Bumps is an amusement device 
without any pretense of artistic eft'ort or 
dignity. It will be conducted for the 
sole use of those who are seeking pure 
fun and hilarity. 

The location of the Bumps will be 
readdy ascertained by the shouts of 
laughter and shrieks of hilarity which 
universally characterize this method of 
amusement. 

Any person who does not desire to 
laugh and who has a wish to preserve 
his dignity must surely refrain from 
approaching the Bumps, for once there, 
he will become so much affected by the 
spirit of noisy enjoyment that he must 
perforce join the happy throng and Bump 
the Bumps with the rest of them. 

No cars or boats are required to give 
the participant in this unique and excit- 
ing pleasure a rapid ride. The minute 
the visitor seats himself on the incline, 
the momentum created by the weight of 
the body causes an immediate and rapid 
descent, landing feet foremost upon the 
great air cushion at the foot. So when 
anyone asks you next season if you have 
"Bumped the Bumps," do not find your- 
self compelled to answer, "I have not," 
because you will certainly have missed 
one of the greatest enjoyments to be 
found. 

For a stubborn case of indigestion or 
the blues try the Bumps. 




Saw Mill at White City 



THE WHITE CITY MAGAZINE 

In Simian City 

A Theatre with Novel Artists 




ROBABLY one of the most 
popular attractions at White 
City will be the aggregation 
of trained animals which will 
appear in the Simian Cit}'. 
There will be 12 monkeys of various 
sizes and diti'erent families ; 16 dogs of 
all sizes, from the tiny terrier to the 
gigantic mastiff, and 8 little ponies, mini- 
ature horses, smaller even than some of 
the dogs which appear with them in the 
various per- 
formances. All 
these animals 
are under the 
charge of Pro 
fessor B lake, 
the famous ani- 
maltrainer.and 
a man who has 
done much to- 
ward popular- 
izing Darwin's 
theory of Sim- 
Prof. Blake -^^^ anccstry. 

Simian City, or the JMonkey, Dog and 
Pony Circus, as it will undoubtedly be 
more generally known, will have a large 
and commodious structure especially 
designed for this purpose and decorated 
in a suitable way with plastic reproduc- 
tions of famous performing animals. In- 
side there will be a comfortable audito- 
rium and a large stage behind which will 
be the living quarters of the clever four- 
footed performers. It is claimed that 






A Live Hobby Hotse 

these animals can do almost everything 
that a human being can do except talk, 
and Professor Blake declares that one of 
his monkey pets, the clever chimpanzee 
Dodo, makes an effort to speak at times 
and actually comes close to pronouncing 
a few simple words which he has heard 
used with frequency about him. 

Dodo stands at the head of trained ani- 




Caesar and His Master 



The Boxing Match 
mals for intelligence, and his actions are 
at times so similar to those of a human 
being that he has oft times been declared 
to be a dwarf by people in the audience 
before whom he was performing. He 
appears clothed like a very foppish indi- 
vidual and appears in evening dress on 
formal occasions. He takes the greatest 
of care to keep his white kid gloves from 
becoming soiled, and in eating, gravely 
tucks a napkin beneath his whiskered 



THE WHITE CITY MAGAZINE 



31 



chin so as not to soil his immaculate 
shirt bosom. 

Dodo has worn clothing so long that he 
absolutely refuses to appear before the 
public without being fully dressed, and 
although he remains in dishabille while 
in his quarters, at the sound of the per- 
forming bell he springs into his clothes 
like a fireman and requires but little aid 
from his attendants in dressing. He has 
his little bed similar in every appoint- 
ment to that of a spoiled child, and at 
night, after a hard 
day of performing 
before delighted 
thousands, he 
seems glad to don 
his befrilled night 
gown and creep 
into bed, where he 
falls asleep like a 
child. 

Although Dodo 
is the leading per 
former with this 
wonderful troupe 
of Monkeys, Dogs 
and Ponies, each 
individual member 
of the troupe has 
his work to do 
and does it well. 
There is no ques- 
tion but what this famous aggregation 
of trained animals is the leading one of 
its kind, and Professor Blake received 
flattering offers from all the large Sum- 
mer amusement parks in the United 



T/ie Maloncy 
Faiiiilv 




Doctor Alaloney 




States before he decided to come to 
White City with his interesting family. 
While the entertainment in the Simian 
City will appeal especially to the patron- 
age of women and children, everybody 
will find plenty to marvel at in the decid- 
edly interesting entertainment which will 
be offered. 



Electric Theater 

Otherwise called the Producoscope 

On various occasions those who will 
visit White City on the opening day. 
May 27, have seen reproductions of ex- 
citing incidents and thrilling events re- 
produced by what are commonly called 
moving picture machines. Some of these 
exhibitions have been of a remarkable 
proficiency and the exhibitions have been 
first-class reproductions, but the majoritv 
have failed to give the same satisfaction 
owing to incompetent operators, dam- 
aged films or inaccurate mechanical effects. 

White City is to have an Electric 
Theatre in which will be installed the 
most perfect machinery and other facili- 
ties for giving the best reproductions of 
moving pictures ever seen in Chicago. 
None of the hackneved and time-worn 
subjects will be used in White City's 
beautiful little Electric Theatre. 

The management has at the present 
time a special corps of expert photog- 
raphers and operators of moving picture 
machines at work securing accurate re- 
productions of thrilling scenes which will 
be reproduced in such a way in the Elec- 
tric Theatre as to fully repay visitors for 
their presence there. This oreanization 
is at the present time in Manchuria 
where views are being taken of scenes 
incident to the Japanese-Russian war. 
They have been in the company of the 
Japanese and Russians for about a year, 
were present at the naval battle of Port 
Arthur and were also present on the oc- 
casion of the capitulation of that fort- 
ress to the invincible arms of the Mikado's 
forces. 

Tlie scenes which will be reproduced 
in the Electric Theatre will be events 
which have contributed to the making of 
history and which will be shown to the 
people of Chicago at first hand. 

The expense incident to this method of 
securing the novelties for presentation 
in the Electric Theatre is naturally con- 
siderable but the management of White 
City is determined to give the people of 
Chicago such a high class of novel, 
unique and interesting entertainments 
that everybody who attends White City 
will declare it to be the grandest, great- 
est and most comprehensive aggregation 
of interesting" features ever witnessed in 
Chicago. 



32 THE WHITE CITY MAGAZINE 

Beautiful Jim K^y 

The Most Wonderful Horse in the World to be at White City 




XU^IBER of years 
ago amidst the 
Nesean pastures of 
Persia the great Sheik 
Ahemid. a powerful 
ruler, envied and ad- 
mired by all, ruled in 
love and firmness o'er 
his tribe, that stretched into far off 
Arabia's desert sands. For was there 
not in his dowar (tented home) the 
Queen of all Arabian horses, the Fair 
Lauretta, with a lineage carefully kept 
on tablets of ivory that reached back 
to the broods of Pharoah, comrades, 
friends of the tented tribes whom long 
association, love and kindness had 
nearlv brought up to their own plane, 
and when to their animal instincts have 
been added wits and a reasoning sense 
they feel all and know of ambition, love 
and hate. 

For in every black tent down to the 
Akaba and to the ocean, and across 
to the Euphrates and beyond to the 
sea of the Scythians the renown of 
Lauretta, the worshiped of all, was 




Writing His Name 

the daily talk, and for her health and 
safety they daily prayed. 

But the good Sheik's heart was 
heavy and anger knitted the furrow 
deeper in his brow. A trusted servant, 
a man long of his household betrayed 
him, and though a thousand wild 
horsemen rode madly o'er the desert 
sand, Lauretta was gone ; stolen by this 
base underling. Like the wind that 



whistles through the trees or the eagle's 
swift flight in the air, she skimmed o'er 
the sands as if disdaining to touch them 
with her polished hoofs, and thus into a 
foreign city and was sold to a great 
showman, who in time brought this 




At the Postoffice 

proud queen, once free as the air, now 
the slave of a circus man, to be exhib- 
ited to the tens of thousands of the 
curious. Through carelessness and 
unkind treatment she broke down and 
was again sold to a smaller circus that 
in time stranded in the South. She 
was bovight by a colored man, Dr. Wm. 
Key. She fell into- good hands, for 
Dr. Key was known throvighout Ten- 
nfssee as the kindest man of all to 
animals. 

Dr. Key had a patent medicine. Key- 
stone liniment, "good for man and 
beast," and he traveled around the 
South with a troupe of jubilee singers 
?nd Lauretta, whom he had taught to 
do a few acts. In this way he exhib- 
ited her to draw the crowds, to whom 
he sold his wonderful liniment. The 
doctor savs Lauretta was a very bright 
and intelligent horse, that^ seemed to 
understand every word he said. Joy 
came at last to this heartbroken queen, 
for one bright spring day in i8qo she 
foaled a colt, but such a spingled, 
shank-legged animal that no one but the 
mother's love could appreciate it. The 
sire was one of America's greatest 
horses, Tennessee Volunteer, the great 
Hambletonian. Thus beautiful Jim 



THE WHITE CITY MAGAZINE 



35 



Y~^MM^M^ 



m^^m 



^M 



m, 




An Old Tale Newly Told with a Veneer 



Adapted for The White City Magazine by Franc R. E. Woodward 



w 







INTRY blasts screeched 
and whistled about the 
snug little office building 
at White City. Little 
flurries of snow swirled 
and blew about the 
grounds, darting from 
the tops of the structures 
and flying in fleecy 
clouds through the skel- 
eton framework of in- 
completed buildings, 
then disappearing into the distance in 
vapor-like clouds. 

It was one of the few very cold days 
experienced during the building of 
White City when the weather was too 
inclement for the men to work outside 
and a little coterie had gathered in the 
cozy rooms of the engineering depart- 
ment. 

"Give us a story, John," said one of 
the New York engineers, addressing a 
familiar who had brought with him a 
reputation for relating tales remarkable 
for their picturesqueness. 

"Shure, Jawn, reel off one av thim 
sh-tories yer owld gran'father used to 
tell, usen't he, about th' hair-raisin' 
exploits av his ancisters in Noo York," 
exclaimed Little Pat, a good story teller 
himself and no mean judge, to boot. 

"Don't bother me," was the reply of 
Big John, as he removed his pipe from 
between his teeth and spat into the sand- 
box across the room with unerring aim, 
such as becomes a first-class engineer. 

At the same time there was a reminis- 
cent look in his eye as he cocked it 
reflectively at the sand-box. Little Pat 



nudged the man next to him and whis- 
pered that "th' trance was comin' on" 
and all waited in expectation while the 
big fellow gathered his thoughts. 

" 'Tis a story that one of my ancestors 
was fond of relating many, many years 
ago," he finally said by way of introduc- 
tion, "but the age of the story counts for 
but _little_ if it is well told. I'll try and 
tell it as it was told to me and, mind you, 
I don't say that it is my own story at 
all." 

Each man settled himself comfortably 
in his chair and assumed an attitude of 
interest and expectation because they 
could tell from tiie style of introduction 
that the story would be a good one. 

"A few miles from Boston in Massa- 
chusetts, there is a deep inlet, winding 
several miles into the interior of the 
country from Charles Bay, and terminat- 
ing in a thickly-wooded swamp or 
morass," said the story teller. "On one 
side of this inlet is a beautiful dark 
grove ; on the opposite side the land rises 
abruptly from the water's edge into a 
high ridge, on which grow a few scat- 
tered oaks of great age and immense size. 
Under one of these gigantic trees, 
according to old stories, there was a great 
amount of treasure buried by Kidd, the 
pirate. The inlet allowed a facility to 
bring the money in a boat secretly and at 
night to the very foot of the hill ; the ele- 
vation of the place permitted a good 
lookout to be kept that no one was at 
hand ; while the remarkable trees formed 
good landmarks by which the place might 
easily be found again. The old stories 
add, moreover, that the devil presided at 



36 



THE WHITE CITY MAGAZINE 



the hiding of the money, and took it 
under his guardianship ; but this, it is 
well known, he always does with buried 
treasure, particularly when it has been 
ill-gotten. Be that as it may, Kidd never 
returned to recover his wealth, being 
shortlv after seized at Boston, sent out to 
England, and there hanged for a pirate. 
''About the year 1727, just at the time 
that earthquakes were prevalent in New 
England, and shook many tall sinners 
down upon their knees, there lived near 
this place a meagre, miserly fellow, of 
the name of Bill Smith. He had a wife 
as miserly as himself; they were so 




A meagre, miserly fellow. 

miserly that they even endeavored to 
cheat each other. Whatever the woman 
could lay hands on, she hid away ; a hen 
could not cackle but she was on the alert 
to secure the new-laid tgg. Her husband 
was continually prying about to detect 
her secret hoards, and many and fierce 
were the conflicts that took place about 
what ought to have been common prop- 
erty. They lived in a forlorn-looking 
house that stood alone, and had an air 
of starvation within. A few straggling 
trees, emblems of sterility, grew near it ; 
no smoke ever curled from its chimney; 
no traveler stopped at its door. A miser- 
able horse, whose ribs were as articulate 
as the bars of a gridiron, stalked about a 
field, where a thin carpet of moss, 
scarcely covering the ragged beds of pud- 
ding-stone, tantalized and balked his 
hunger ; and sometimes he would lean his 
head over the fence, look piteously at the 



passer-by, and seem to petition deliver- 
ance from this land of famine. 

"The house and its inmates had alto- 
gether a bad name. Bill's wife was a 
tall termagant, fierce of temper, loud of 
tongue, and strong of arm. Her voice 
was often heard in wordy warfare with 
her husband; and his face sometimes 
showed signs that their conflicts were not 
confined to words. No one ventured, 
however, to interfere between them. The 
lonely wayfarer shrunk within himself at 
the horrid clamor and clapper-clawing; 
eyed the den of discord askance ; and hur- 
ried on his way, rejoicing, if a bachelor, 
in his celibacy. 

"One day that Bill Smith had been to 
a distant part of the neighborhood, he 
took what he considered a short cut 
homeward, through the swamp. Like 
most short cuts, it was an ill-chosen 
route. The swamp was ■■ thickly grown 
with great gloomy pines and hemlocks, 
some of them ninety feet high, which 
made it dark at noonday, and a retreat 
for all the owls of the neighborhood. It 
was full of pits and quagmires, partly 
covered with weeds and mosses, where 
the green surface often let the traveler 
into a gulf of black, smothering mud ; 
there were also dark and stagnant pools, 
the abodes of the tadpole, the bull-frog, 
and the water-snake; where the trunks 
of pines and hemlocks lay half-drowned, 
half-rotten, looking like alligators sleep- 
ing in the mire. 

"Bill had long been picking his way 
cautiously through this treacherous for- 
est ; stepping from tuft to tuft of rushes 
and roots, which aflforded precarious 
footholds among deep sloughs ; or pacing 
carefully, like a cat, along the prostrate 
trunks of trees ; startled now and then 
by the sudden screaming of the bittern, 
or the quacking of a wild duck rising on 
the wing from some solitary pool. At 
length he arrived at a firm piece of 
ground, which ran out like a peninsula 
into the deep bosom of the swamp. 

"It had been one of the strongholds of 
the Indians during their wars with the 
first colonists. Here they had thrown up 
a kind of fort, which they had looked 
upon as almost impregnable, and had 
used as a place of refuge for their 
squaws and children. Nothing remained 



THE WHITE CITY MAGAZINE 



17 



of the old Indian fort but a few embank- 
ments, gradually sinking to the level of 
the surrounding earth, and already over- 
grown in part by oaks and other forest 
trees, the foliage of which formed a con- 
trast to the dark pines and hemlocks of 
the swamp. 

"It was late in the dusk of evening 
when Bill Smith reached the old fort, 
and he paused there awhile to rest him- 
self. Any one but he would have felt 
unwilling to linger in this lonely, melan- 
choly place, for the common people had 
a bad opinion of it, from the stories 
handed down from the time of the 
Indian wars ; when, it was asserted, the 
savages held incantations here, and made 
sacrifices to the evil spirit. 

"Bill Smith, however, was not a man 
to be troubled with any fears of the kind. 
He rested himself for some time on the 
trunk of a fallen hemlock, listening to 
the boding cry of the tree-toad, and delv- 
ing with his walking-staff into a mound 
of black mould at his feet. As he turned 
up the soil unconsciously, his staff struck 
against something hard. He raked it out 
of the vegetable mould, and lo ! a cloven 
skull, with an Indian tomahawk very deep 
in it, lay before him. The rust on the 
weapon showed the time that had elapsed 
since this death-blow had been given. It 
was a dreary memento of the fierce strug- 
gle that had taken place in this last foot- 
hold of the Indian warriors. 

" 'Humph !' said Bill Smith, as he gave 
it a kick to shake the dirt from it. 

" 'Let that skull alone !' said a gruff 
voice. Bill lifted up his eyes, and beheld 
a great black man seated directly opposite 
him, on the stump of a tree. He was 
exceedingly surprised, having neither 
heard nor seen any one approach ; and 
he was still more perplexed on observing, 
as well as the gathering gloom would 
permit, that the stranger was neither 
negro nor Indian. It is true he was 
dressed in a rude half Indian garb, and 
had a red belt or sash swathed round his 
body ; but his face was neither black nor 
copper-color, but swarthy and dingy, and 
begrimed with soot, as if he had been 
accustomed to toil among fires and 
forges. He had a shock of coarse black 
hair, that stood out from his head in all 
directions, and bore an ax on his shoul- 
der. 



"He scowled for a moment at Bill 
with a pair of great red eyes. 

" 'What are you doing on my 
grounds?' said the black man, with a 
hoarse, growling voice. 

" 'Your grounds !' said Bill, with a 
sneer, 'no more your grounds than mine ; 
they belong to Deacon Arnold.' 

" 'Deacon Arnold be d — d,' said the 
stranger, 'as I flatter myself he will be, 
if he does not look more to his own sins 
and less to those of his neighbors. Look 
yonder, and see how Deacon Arnold is 
faring.' 

"Bill looked in the direction the 
stranger pointed, and beheld one of the 
great trees, fair and flourishing without, 
but rotten at the core, and saw that it 
had been nearly hewn through, so that 
the first high wind was likely to blow it 
down. On the bark of the tree was 
scored the name of Deacon Arnold, an 
eminent man, who had waxed wealthy 
by driving shrewd bargains with the 
Indians. Bill now looked around, and 
saw that most of the tall trees were 
marked with the name of some great 
man of the colony, and all more or less 
scored by the ax. The one on which he 
had been seated, and which had evi- 
dently just been hewn down, bore the 
name of Wilson; and he recollected a 
mighty rich man of that name who made 
a vulgar display of wealth, which it was 
whispered he had acquired by buccaneer- 
ing. 

"'He's just ready for burning!' said 
the black man, with a growl of triumph. 
'You see I am likely to have a good stock 
of firewood for winter.' 

" 'But what right have you,' said Bill, 
'to cut down Deacon Arnold's timber?' 

" 'The right of a prior claim,' said the 
other. 'This woodland belonged to me 
long before one of your white-faced race 
put foot upon the soil.' 

" 'And pray, who are you, if I may be 
so bold?' said Bill. 

" 'Oh, I go by various names. I am 
the wild huntsman in some countries ; the 
black miner in others. In this neighbor- 
hood I am known by the name of the 
black woodsman. I am he to whom the 
red men consecrated this spot, and in 
honor of whom they now and then 
roasted a white man, by way of sweet- 
smelling sacrifice. Since the red men 



38 



THE WHITE CITY MAGAZINE 



have been exterminated by you white 
savages, I amuse myself presiding at the 
persecutions of Quakers and Anabap- 
tists ; I am the great patron and prompter 
of slave-dealers, and the grand-master of 
the Salem witches.' 

" The upshot of all which is, that, if I 
mistake not/ said Bill, sturdily, 'you are 
he commonly called Old Scratch.' 

" 'The same, at your service !' replied 
the black man, with a half civil nod. 

"Such was the opening of this inter- 
view, according to the old story; though 
it had almost too farniliar an air to be 
credited. One would think that to meet 
with such a singular personage, in this 
wild, lonely place, would have shaken 
any man's nerves ; but Bill was a hard- 
minded fellow, not easily daunted, and 
he had lived so long with a termagant 
wife that he did not fear even the devil. 

"It is said that after this commence- 
ment they had a long and earnest conver- 
sation together, as Bill returned home- 
ward. The black man told him of great 
sums of money buried by Kidd the 
pirate under the oak trees on the high 
ridge, not far from the morass. All 
these were under his command and pro- 
tected by his power, so that none could 
find them but such as propitiated his 
favor. These he offered to place within 
Bill Smith's reach, having conceived an 
especial friendship for him ; but they 
were to be had only on certain conditions. 
What these conditions were may be 
easily surmised, though Bill never dis- 
closed them publicly. They must have 
been very hard, for he required time to 
think them over, and he was not a man 
to stick at trifles when money was in 
view. When they had reached the edge 
of the swamp, the stranger paused. 

" 'What proof have I that all you have 
been telling me is true?' said Bill. 

" 'There's my signature,' said the black 
man, pressing his finger on Bill's fore- 
head. 

"So saying, he turned off among the 
thickets of the swamp, and seemed, as 
Bill said, to go down, down, down'into 
the earth, until nothing but his head and 
shoulders could be seen, and so on, until 
he totally disappeared. 

"When Bill reached home, he found 
the black print of a finger burnt, as it 



were, into his forehead, which nothing 
could obliterate. 

"The first news his wife had to tell 
him was the sudden death of Abraham 
Wilson, the rich buccaneer. It was 
announced in the papers with the usual 
flourish, that 'a great man had fallen in 
Israel.' 

"Bill recollected the tree which his 
black friend had just hewn down, and 
which was ready for burning. 'Let the 
freebooter roast,' said Bill ; 'who cares ?' 

"He now felt convinced that all he had 
heard and seen was no illusion. 

"He was not prone to let his wife into 
his confidence ; but as this was an uneasy 
secret, he willingly shared it with her. 
All her avarice was awakened at the 
mention of hidden gold, and she urged 
her husband to comply with the black 
man's terms and secure what would 
make them wealthy for life. However 
Bill might have felt disposed to sell him- 
self to the devil, he was determined not 
to do so to oblige his wife; so he flatly 
refused, out of the mere spirit of con- 
tradiction. Many and bitter were the 
quarrels they had on the subject ; but the 
more she talked the more resolute was 
Bill not to be damned to please her. 

"At length she determined to drive the 
bargain on her own account, and, if she 
succeeded, to keep all the gain to herself. 
Being of the same fearless temper as her 
husband, she set off for the old Indian 
fort towards the close of a summer's day. 
She was many hours absent. When she 
came back, she was reserved and sullen 
in her replies. She spoke something of 
a black man about twilight hewing at 
the root of a tall tree. He was sulky, 
however, and would not come to terms ; 
she was to go again with a propitiatory 
offering, but what it was she forbore to 
say. 

"The next evening she set off again 
for the swamp, with her apron heavily 
laden. Bill waited and waited for her, 
but in vain ; midnight came, but she did 
not make her appearance ; morning, 
noon, night returned, but still she did 
not come. Bill now grew uneasy for her 
safety, especially as he found she had 
carried off in her apron the silver teapot 
and spoons and every portable article of 
value. Another night elapsed, another 



THE WHITE CITY MAGAZINE 



39 



morning came ; but no wife. In a word, 
she was never heard of more. 

"What was her real fate nobody 
knows, in consequence of so many pre- 
tending to know. It is one of those facts 
which have become confounded by a 
variety of historians. Some asserted that 
she had lost her way among the tangled 
mazes of the swamp, and sank into some 
pit or slough ; others, more uncharitable, 
hinted that she had eloped with the 
household booty and made off to some 
other province, while others surmised 
that the tempter had decoyed her into 
the dismal quagmire on the top of which 
her hat was found lying. In confirma- 
tion of this, it was said a great black 
man, with an ax on his shoulder, was 
seen late that very evening coming out of 
the swamp^ with an air of surly triumph, 
carrying a bundle tied in a check apron. 

"The most current and probable story, 
however, was to the effect that Bill 
Smith grew so anxious about the fate of 
his wife and his property that he set out 
at length to seek them both at the Indian 
fort. During a long summer's afternoon 
he searched about the gloomy place, but 
no wife was to be seen. He called her 
name repeatedly, but she was nowhere to 
be heard. The bittern alone responded 
to his voice, as it flew screaming by ; or 
the bull-frog croaked dolefully from a 
neighboring pool. At length, it is said, 
just in the brown hour of twilight, when 
the owl began to hoot and the bats to 
flit abbut, his attention was attracted by 
the clamor of carrion crows hovering 
about a cypress tree. He looked up, and 
beheld a bundle tied in a check apron, 
and hanging in the branches of the tree, 
while a great vulture perched hard by, 
as if keeping watch upon it. He leaped 
with joy; for he recognized his wife's 
apron and supposed it to contain the 
household valuables. 

" 'Let us get hold of the property,' 
said he, consoUngly to himself, 'and we 
will endeavor to do without the woman.' 

"As he scrambled up the tree, the 
vulture spread its wide wings, and sailed 
off screaming, into the deep shadows of 
the forest. Bill seized the check apron, 
but, woeful sight! found nothing but a 
heart and liver tied up in it. 

"Such, according to this most authentic 



old story, was all that was found of Bill's 
wife. She had probably attempted to 
deal with the black man as she had been 
accustomed to deal with her husband; 
but though a female scold is generally 
considered a match for the devil, yet in 
this instance she appears to have had the 
worst of it. She must have died game, 
however; for it is said Bill noticed many 
prints of cloven feet deeply stamped 
about the tree, and found handfuls of 
hair that looked as if they had been 
plucked from the coarse black shock of 
the woodman. Bill knew his wife's 
prowess by experience. He shrugged his 
shoulders as he looked at the signs of a 
fierce clapper-clawing. 'Egad,' said he 
to himself, 'Old Scratch must have had 
a tough time of it!' 

"Bill consoled himself for the loss of 
his property with the loss of his wife, 
for he was a man of fortitude. He even 
felt something like gratitude towards the 
black woodman, who, he considered, had 
done him a kindness. He sought, there- 
fore, to cultivate a further acquaintance 
with him, but for some time without suc- 
cess; the old blacklegs played shy, for, 
whatever people may think, he is not 
always to be had for calling; he knows 
how to play his cards when pretty sure 
of his game. 

"At lengtli, it is said, when delay had 
whetted Bill's eagerness to the quick, and 
prepared him to agree to anything rather 
than not gain the promised treasure, he 
met the black man one evening in his 
usual woodman's dress, with his ax on 
his shoulder, sauntering along the 
swamp and humming a tune. He affect- 
ed to receive Bill's advances with great 
indifference, made brief replies, and went 
on humming his tune. 

"By degrees, hov/ever, Bill brought 
him to business, and they began to hag- 
gle about the terms on which the former 
was to have the pirate's treasure. There 
was one condition which need not be 
mentioned, being generally understood in 
all cases where the devil grants favors ; 
but there were others about which, 
though of less importance, he was inflexi- 
bly obstinate. He insisted that the 
money found through his means should 
be employed in his service. He proposed, 
therefore, that Bill should employ it in 



40 



THE WHITE CITY MAGAZINE 



the black traffic; that is to sav, that he 
should fit out a slave-ship. This, how- 
ever, Bill resolutely refused : he was bad 
enough in all conscience but the devil 
himself could not tempt him to turn 
slave-trader. 

"Finding Bill so squeamish on this 
point, the devil did not insist upon it, but 
proposed instead that Bill should turn 
usurer, the devil being extremely anxious 
for the increase of usurers, looking upon 
them as his peculiar people. 

"To this no objections were made, for 
it was just to Bill's taste. 

" 'You shall open a broker's shop in 
Boston next month,' said the black man. 
" T'll do it to-morrow, if you wish,' 
said Bill Smith. 

" 'You shall lend money at two per 
cent a month.' 

"'Egad, I'll charge four!' replied Bill 
Smith. 

" 'You shall extort bonds, foreclose 
mortgages, drive the merchants to bank- 
ruptcy.' 

" 'I'll drive them to the d— 1,' cried 
Bill Smith. 

" 'You are the usurer for my money !' 
said black-legs with delight. "When 
will you want the rhino?' 
" 'This very night.' 
" 'Done !' said the devil. 
"'DONE!' said Bill Smith— so they 
shook hands and struck a bargain. 

"A few days' time saw Bill Smith 
seated behind his desk in a counting 
house in Boston. 

"His reputation for a ready-moneyed 
man who would lend money out for a 
good consideration soon spread abroad. 
Everybody remembers the time of Gov- 
ernor B , when money was particu- 
larly scarce. It was a time of paper 
credit. The country had been deluged 
with government bills, the famous Land 
Bank had been established; there had 
been a rage for speculating; the people 
had run mad with schemes for new set- 
tlements ; for building cities in the wilder- 
ness ; land-jobbers went about with maps 
of grants, and townships, and Eldorados, 
lying nobody knew where, but which 
ever}-body was ready to purchase. In a 
word, the great speculating fever, which 
breaks out every now and then in the 
country, had raged to an alarming 



degree, and everybody was dreaming of 
making sudden fortunes from nothing. 
As usual the fever had subsided; the 
dream had gone off and the imaginary 
fortunes with it ; the patients were left in 
doleful plight, and the whole country 
resounded with the consequent cry of 
'hard times.' 

"At this propitious time of public dis- 
tress did Bill Smith set up as usurer in 
Boston. His door was soon thronged by 
customers. The needy and adventurous ; 
the gambling speculator; the dreaming 
land-jobber ; the thriftless tradesman ; the 
merchant with cracked credit; in short, 
every one driven to raise money by des- 
perate means and desperate sacrifices, 
hurried to Bill Smith. 

"Thus Bill was the universal friend of 
the needy, and acted like a 'friend in 
need;' that is to say, he always exacted 
good pay and good security. In propor- 
tion to the distress of the applicant was 
the hardness of his terms. He accumu- 
lated bonds and mortgages; gradually 
squeezed his customers closer and closer, 
and sent them at length, dry as a sponge, 
from his door. 

"In this way he made money hand over 
hand ; became a rich and mighty man, 
and exalted his cocked hat upon 'Change. 
He built himself, as usual, a vast house, 
out of ostentation ; but left the greater 
part of it unfinished and unfurnished, out 
of parsimony. He even set up a carriage 
in the fulness of his vainglory, though he 
nearly starved the horses which drew it; 
and as the ungreased wheels groaned 
and screeched on the axle-trees you 
would have thought you heard the souls 
of the poor debtors he was squeezing. 

"As Bill waxed old, however, he grew 
thoughtful. Having secured the good 
things of this world he began to feel 
anxious about those of the next. He 
thought with regret on the bargain he 
had made with his black friend, and set 
his wits to work to cheat him out of the 
conditions. He became, therefore, of a 
sudden, a violent churchgoer. He 
prayed loudly and strenuously, as if 
heaven were to be taken by force of 
lungs. Indeed, one might always tell 
when he had sinned most during the 
week by the clamor of his Sunday devo- 
tion. The quiet Christians who had been 



THE WHITE CITY MAGAZINE 



41 



modestly and steadfastly traveling Zion- 
ward, were struck with self-reproach at 
seeing themselves so suddenly out- 
stripped in their career by this new-made 
convert. Bill was as rigid in religious as 
in money matters ; he was a stern super- 
visor and censurer of his neighbors, and 
seemed to think every sin entered up to 
their account became a credit on his own 
side of the page. He even talked of the 
expediency of reviving the persecution of 
Quakers and Anabaptists. In a word, 
Bill's zeal became as notorious as his 
riches. 

"Still, in spite of all this strenuous 
attention to forms. Bill had a lurking 
dread that the devil, after all, would have 
his due. That he might not be taken 
unawares, therefore, it is said he always 
carried a small Bible in his coat-pocket. 
He had also a great folio Bible on his 
counting-house desk, and would fre- 
quently be found reading it when people 
called on business ; on such occasions he 
would lay his green spectacles in the 
book, to mark the place, while he turned 
round to drive some usurious bargain. 

"Some say that Bill grew a little crack- 
brained in his old days, and that, fancy- 
ing his end approaching, he had his 
horse new shod, saddled and bridled, and 
buried with his feet uppermost ; because 
he supposed that at the last day the world 
would be turned upside down, in which 
case he should find his horse standing 
ready for mounting, and he was deter- 
mined at the worst to give his old friend 
a run for it. This, however, is probably 
a mere wives' fable. If he really did 



:^^^ 




He could but seize a trusty 
staff and anomt the back 
of the aggressor. 



take such a precaution it was entirely 
superfluous. 

"One hot summer afternoon in the 
dog-days, just as a terrible black thun- 
der-gust was coming up. Bill sat in his 
counting-house, in his white linen cap 
and India silk morning-gown. He was 
on the point of foreclosing a mortgage 
by which he would complete the ruin of 
an unlucky land-speculator for whom he 
had professed the greatest friendship. 
The poor land-jobber begged him to 
grant a few months' indulgence. Bill 
had grown testy and irritable, and 
refused another day. 

" 'My family will be ruined and 
brought upon the parish,' said the land- 
jobber. 

" 'Charity begins at home,' replied 
Bill ; 'I must take care of myself in these 
hard times.' 

" 'You have made so much money out 
of me,' said the speculator. 

"Bill lost his patience and his piety. 
'The devil take me,' said he, 'if I have 
made a farthing!' 

"Just then there were three loud 
knocks at the street-door. He stepped 
out to see who was there. A black man 
was holding a black horse, which 
neighed and stamped with impatience. 

" 'Bill, you're come for,' said the black 
fellow, gruffly. Bill shrank back, but too 
late. He had left his little Bible at the 
bottom of his coat pocket, and his big 
Bible on the desk buried under the mort- 
gage he was about to foreclose. Never 
was sinner taken more unawares. The 
black man whisked him like a child into 
the saddle, gave the horse the lash, and 
away he galloped with Bill on his back, 
in the midst of the thunder-storm. The 
clerks stuck their pens behind their ears, 
and stared after him from the windows. 
Away went Bill Smith, dashing down the 
street, his white cap bobbing up and 
down ; his morning-gown fluttering in 
the wind, and his steed striking fire out 
of the pavement at every bound. When 
the clerks turned to look for the black 
man he had disappeared. 

"Bill Smith never returned to fore- 
close the mortgage. A countryman who 
lived on the border of the swamp 
reported that in the height of the thun- 
der-gust he had heard a great clattering 



42 



THE WHITE CITY MAGAZINE 



of hoofs and a howling along the road, 
and running to the window caught sight 
of a figure, such as I have described, on 
a horse that galloped like mad across the 
fields, over the hills, and do^vn into the 
black hemlock swamp towards the old 
Indian fort; and that shortly after a 
thunder-bolt falling in that direction 
seemed to set the whole forest in a 
blaze. 

"The good people of Boston shook 
their heads and shrugged their shoulders. 
They had been so much accustomed to 
witches and goblins, and tricks of the 
devil, in all kinds of shapes, from the 
first settlement of the colony, that they 
were not so much horror-struck as might 
have been expected. Trustees were 
appointed to take charge of Bill's 
effects. There was nothing, how- 
ever, to administer upon. On search- 
ing his coffers, all his bonds and mort- 
gages were found reduced to cinders. In 
place of gold and silver, his iron chest 
was filled with chips and shavings; two 
skeletons lay in his stable instead of his 
half-star%'ed horses, and the very next 
day his great house took fire and was 
burned to the ground. 

"Such was the end of Bill Smith and 
his ill-gotten wealth. Let all griping 
money-brokers lay this story to heart. 
The truth of it is not to be doubted. 
The very hole under the oak-trees, 
whence he dug Kidd's money, is to be 
seen to this day ; and the neighboring 
swamp and old Indian fort are often 
haunted in stormy nights by a figure on 
horseback, in morning-gown and white 
cap, which is doubtless the troubled spirit 
of the usurer." 




Galloped like mad across the fields. 

"Shure, an' it's a great gift to be able 
to tell a sh-tory the loikes av thot", 
remarked Little Pat, after John had con- 
cluded and everybody had taken a 
change of position. 

John made no reply at the time but 
lighted his pipe anew. Then he arose 
and, walking over to the window, gazed 



at the cheerless view which presented 
itself. 

"Looks like an Arctic day," he said. 
"There'll be no work done outside and 
all we can do is to stay inside so as to 
not freeze ourselves. Suppose one of 
you other lads spins a yarn now, just 
for a change." 

"A story, Pat," cried several voices, 
"Give us one of your stories now." 

"Well," replied Little Pat, with a 
grin, "ye see me father was Oirish an' 
me mother was Dutch — not German, 
but the good old Dutch — an' I read a 
sh-tory wanst that was writ by a man 
all about the days when Noo York was 
ruled by the Dutch instead of by the 
Oirish, loike it is now. If that'll be 
sathsfacthry Oi'll tell it." 

"Shoot ahead, Pat," came from a half 
dozen voices at once. 

And this is the story as told by Lit- 
tle Pat, relieved of its various inter- 
polations and the native dialect of the 
speaker. 

* * * 

"It was on a blustering autumnal 
day that Wolfert Webber made his visit 
to the inn," began Little Pat. "The grove 
of elms and willows was stripped of 
leaves, which whirled in rustling eddies 
over the fields. The ninepin alley was 
deserted, for the premature chilliness 
of the day had driven the compay 
within doors. As it was Saturday after- 
noon, the habitual club was in session, 
composed principally of regular Dutch 
burghers, though including occasionally 
persons of various character and coun- 
try, as is natural in a place of such mot- 
ley population. 

"Beside the fireplace, in a huge leath- 
er-bottomed armchair, sat the dictator 
of this little world, the venerable Rem, 
or, as it was pronounced, Ramm Rap- 
elye. He was a man of Walloon race, 
and illustrious for the antiquity of his 
line, his great-grandmother having been 
the first white child born in the prov- 
ince. But he was still more illustrious 
for his wealth and dignity. He had 
long filled the noble office of alderman, 
and was a man to whom the Governor 
himself took off his hat. He had main- 
tained possession of the leather-bot- 
tomed chair from time immemorial and 



THE WHITE CITY MAGAZINE 



43 



had gradually waxed in bulk as he sat 
in his seat of government, until in the 
course of years he filled its whole mag- 
nitude. His word was decisive with his 
subjects; for he was so rich a man that 
he was never expected to support any 
opinion by argument. The landlord 
waited on him withpeculiar ofhciousness ; 
not that he paid better than his neigh- 
bors, but the coin of a rich man seems 
always to be so much more acceptable. 
The landlord had ever a pleasant word 
and a joke to insinuate in the ear of the 
august Ramm. It is true, Ramm never 
laughed, and, indeed, ever maintained a 
mastifif-like gravity and even surliness 
of aspect; yet he now and then regarded 
mine host with a token of approbation 
which, though nothing more nor less 
than a kind of grunt, still delighted the 
landlord more than a broad laugh from 
a poorer man. 

" 'This will be a rough night for the 
money-diggers,' said mine host, as a 
gust of wind howled round the house 
and rattled at the windows. 

"'What! are they at their works 
again?' said an English half-pay captain 
with one eye, who was a very frequent 
visitor at the 'inn. 

" 'Aye, are they,' said the landlord, 
'and well may they be. They've had 
luck of late. They say a great pot of 
money has been dug up in the fields, 
just behind Stuyvesant's orchard. Folks 
think it must have been buried there in 
old times by Peter Stuyvesant, the 
Dutch Governor.' 

"'Fudge!' said the one-eyed man of 
war, as he added q, small portion of 
water to a bottom of brandy. 

" 'Well you may believe it or not, as 
you please,' said mine host, somewhat 
nettled; 'but everybody knows that the 
old Governor buried a great deal of 
his money at the time of the Dutch 
troubles, when the English red-coats 
seized the province. They say, too, the 
old gentleman walks; aye, and in the 
very same dress that he wears in the 
picture that hangs up in the family 
house.' 

" 'Fudge!' said the half-pay officer. 

" 'Fudge, if you please. But didn't 
Corney Van Zandt see him at midnight, 
stalking about in the meadow, with his 



wooden leg, and a drawn sword in his 
hand that flashed like fire? And what 
can he be walking for, but because peo- 
ple have been troubling the place where 
he buried his money in old times?' 

"Here the landlord was interrupted 
by several guttural sounds from Ramm 
Rapelye, betokening that he was labor- 
ing with the unusual production of an 
idea. As he was too great a man to 
be slighted by a prudent publican, mine 
host respectfully paused until Ramm 
should deliver himself. The corpulent 
frame of this mighty burgher now gave 
all the symptoms of a volcanic moun- 
tain on the point of an eruption. First, 
there was a certain heaving of the 
abdomen, not unlike an earthquake; 
then was emitted a cloud of tobacco- 
smoke from that crater, his mouth; then 
there was a kind of rattle in the throat, 
as if the idea were working its way up 
through a region of phlegm; then there 
were several disjointed members of a 
sentence thrown out, ending in a cough; 
at length his voice forced its way into 
a slow, but absolute, tone of a man who 
feels the weight of his purse, if not of 
his ideas, every portion of his speech 
being marked by a testy puflf of tobac- 
co-smoke. 

" 'Who talks of old Peter Stuyves- 
ant's walking? — puff — Have people no 
respect for persons? — puff — puff — Peter 
Stuyvesant knew better what to do with 
his money than to bury it — puff — I 
know the Stuyvesant family — puff — 
every one of them — puff — not a more 
respectable family in the province — puff 
— old standards — puff — warm house- 
holders — puff — none of your upstarts — 
puff — puff — puff — Don't talk to me of 
Peter Stuyvesant's walking — puff — puff 
—puff— puff.' 

"Here the redoubtable Ramm con- 
tracted his brow, clasped up his mouth 
till it wrinkled at eac^h corner, and 
redoubled his smoking with such vehe- 
mence that the cloudy volume soon 
wreathed round his head as the smoke 
envelops the awful summit of Mount 
Aetna. 

"A general silence followed the sud- 
den rebuke of this very rich man. The 
subject, however, was too interesting to 
be readily abandoned. The conversa- 



44 



THE WHITE CITY MAGAZINE 



tion soon broke forth again from the 
Hps of Peechy Prauw Van Hook, the 
chronicler of the club, one of those 
prosing, narrative old men who, as they 
grow old, seem to be troubled with an 
incontinence of words. 

"Peechy could, at any time, tell as 
many stories in an evening as his 
hearers could digest in a month. He 
now resumed the conversation by 
affirming that, to his knowledge, money 
had, at different times, been digged up 
in various parts of the island. 

"The lucky persons who discovered 
them had always dreamt of them three 
times beforehand, and what was worthy 
of remark, those treasures had never 
been found but by some descendant of 
the good old Dutch families, which 
clearly proved that they had been buried 
by Dutchmen in the olden time. 

" 'Fiddlestick with your Dutchmen!' 
cried the half-pay officer. 'The Dutch 
had nothing to do with them. They 
were all buried by Kidd, the pirate, and 
his crew.' 

"Here a key-note was touched that 
roused the whole company. The name 
of Captain Kidd was like a taUsman in 
those times, and was associated with a 
thousand marvelous stories. 

"The half-pay officer took the lead, 
and in his narrations fathered upon 
Kidd all the plunderings and exploits 
of Morgan, Blackbeard, and the whole 
list of bloody buccaneers. 

"The officer was a man of great 
weight among the peaceable members 
of the club, by reason of his warlike 
character and gunpowder tales. All his 
golden stories of Kidd, however, and 
of the booty he had buried, were obsti- 
nately rivaled by the tales of Peechy 
Prauw, who, rather than suffer his 
Dutch progenitors to be ecJipsed by a 
foreign freebooter, enriched every field 
and shore in the neighborhood with the 
hidden wealth of Peter Stuyvesant and 
his contemporaries. 

"Not a word of this conversation was 
lost upon Wolfert Webber. He returned 
pensively home, full of magnificent 
ideas. The soil of his native island 
seemed to be turned into gold dust and 
every field to teem with treasure. 
His head almost reeled at the thought 



how often he must have heedlessly 
rambled over places where countless 
sums lay, scarcely covered by the turf 
beneath his feet. His mind was in an 
uproar with this whirl of new ideas. As 
he came in sight of the venerable man- 
sion of his forefathers, and the little 
realm where the Webbers had so long 
and so contently flourished, his gorge 
rose at the narrowness of his destiny. 

"'Unlucky Wolfert!' exclaimed he; 
'others can go to bed and dream them- 
selves into whole mines of wealth; they 
have but to seize a spade in the morn- 
ing, andturn up doubloons like potatoes ; 
but thou must dream of hardships and 
rise to poverty, — must dig the field from 
year's end to year's end, and yet raise 
nothing but cabbages!' 

"Wolfert Webber went to bed with a 
heavy heart; and it was long before the 
golden visions that disturbed his brain 
permitted hm to sink into repose. The 
same visions, however, extended 
into his sleeping thoughts, and 
assumed a more definite form. 
He dreamt that he had discovered 
an immense treasure in the cen- 
ter of his garden. At every stroke of 
the spade he laid bare a golden ingot; 
diamond crosses sparkled out of the 
dust; bags of money turned up their 
bellies, corpulent with pieces-of-eight, 
o,r venerable doubloons; and chests, 
wedged close with moidores, ducats and 
pistareens, yawned before his ravished 
eyes and vomited forth their glittering 
contents. 

"Wolfert awoke a poorer man than 
ever. He had no heart to go about his 
daily concerns, which appeared so pal- 
try and profitless; but sat all day long 
in the chimney-corner, picturing to 
himself ingots and heaps of gold in the 
fire. The next night his dream was 
repeated. He was again in his garden, 
digging, and laying open stores of hid- 
den wealth. There was something very 
singular in this repetition. He passed 
another day of reverie, and though it 
was cleaning-day, and the house, as 
usual in Dutch households, completely 
topsy-turvy, yet he sat unmoved amidst 
the general uproar. 

"The third night he went to bed with 
a palpitating heart. He put on his red 



THE WHITE CITY MAGAZINE 



45 



night-cap wrong side outward, for good 
luck. It was deep midnight before his 
anxious mind could settle itself into 
sleep. Again the golden dream was 
repeated and again he saw his garden 
teeming with ingots and money-bags. 

"Wolfert rose the next morning in 
complete bewilderment. A dream, three 
times repeated, was never known to lie; 
and if so, his fortune was made. 

"In his agitation he put on his waist- 
coat with the hind part before, and this 
was a corroboration of good luck. He 
no longer doubted that a huge store 
of money lay buried somewhere in 
his cabbage-field, coyly waiting to 
be sought for; and he repined at hav- 
ing so long been scratching about the 
surface of the soil instead of digging 
to the center. 

"He took his seat at the breakfast- 
table full of these speculations; asked 
his daughter to put a lump of gold into 
his tea, and on handing his wife a plate 
of slap-jacks, begged her to help her- 
self to a doubloon. 

"His grand care now was how to 
secure this immense treasure without 
its being known. Instead of his work- 
ing regularly in his grounds in the 
daytime, he now stole from his bed at 
night, and with spade and pickax went 
to work to rip up and dig about his 
paternal acres, from one end to the 
other. In a little time the whole gar- 
den, which had presented such a goodly 
and regular appearance, with its pha- 
lanx of cabbages, like a vegetable army 
in battle array, was reduced to a scene 
of devastation; while the relentless Wol- 
fert, with a night-cap on head and lan- 
tern and spade in hand, stalked 
through the slaughtered ranks, the 
destroying angel of his own vegetable 
world. 

"Every morning bore testimony to 
the ravages of the preceding night in 
cabbages of all ages and conditions, 
from the tender sprout to the full- 
grown head, piteously rooted from their 
quiet beds like worthless weeds, and 
left to wither in the sunshine. In vain 
Wolfert's wife remonstrated; in vain 
Amy, his darling daughter, wept over 
the destruction of some favorite mari- 
gold. 'Thou shalt have gold of 



another sort,' he would cry, chucking 
her under the chin. 'Thou shalt have 
a string of crooked ducats for thy wed- 
ding necklace, my child.' His family 
began really to fear that the poor man's 
wits were diseased. He muttered in his 
sleep at night about mines of wealth, 
about pearls and diamonds and bars of 
gold. In the daytime he was moody 
and abstracted, and walked about as if 
in a trance. Dame Webber held fre- 
quent councils with all the old women 
of the neighborhood; scarce an hour in 
the day but a knot of them might be 
seen wagging their white caps together 
round her door, while the poor woman 
made some piteous recital. The daugh- 
ter, too, was fain to seek for more fre- 
quent consolation from the stolen inter- 
views of her favored swain, Dirk Wald- 
ron. The delectable little Dutch songs, 
with which she used to dulcify the 
house, grew less and less frequent, and 
she would forget her sewing and look 
wistfully in her father's face as he sat 
pondering by the fireside. Wolfert 
caught her eye one day fixed on him 
thus anxiously, and for a moment was 
roused from his golden reveries. 

" 'Cheer up, my girl,' said he exult- 
ingly. 'Why dost thou droop? Thou 
shalt hold up thy head one day with the 
Brinckerhoffs and the Shermerhorns, 
the Van Homes and the Van Dams. 
By Saint Nicholas, but the patroon him- 
self shall beglad to get thee for his son!' 

"Amy shook her head at his vain- 
glorious boast, and was more than ever 
in doubt of the soundness of the good 
man's intellect. 

"In the meantime Wolfert went on 
digging and digging; but the field was 
extensive, and as his dream had indi- 
cated no precise spot, he had to dig at 
random. The winter set in before one- 
tenth of the scene of promise had been 
explored. The ground became frozen 
hard and the nights too cold for the 
labor of the spade. 

"No sooner, however, did the return- 
ing warmth of spring loosen the soil, 
and the small frogs begin to pipe in 
the meadows, than Wolfert resumed his 
labors with renovated zeal. Still, how- 
ever, the hours of industry were 
reversed. 



46 



THE WHITE CITY MAGAZINE 



"Instead of working cheerily all day, 
planting and setting out his vegetables, 
he remained thoughtfully idle until the 
shades of night summoned him to his 
secret labor. In this way he continued 
to dig from night to night, and week to 
week, and month to month, but not 
a stiver did he find. On the contrary, 
the more he digged, the poorer he 
grew. The rich soil of his garden was 
digged away, and the sand and gravel 
from beneath were thrown to the sur- 
face, until the whole field presented an 
aspect of sandy barrenness. 

"In the meantime, the seasons grad- 
ually rolled on. The little frogs which 
had piped in the meadows in early 
spring, croaked as bull-frogs during the 
summer heats, and then sank into 
silence. The peach-tree budded, blos- 
somed, and bore its fruit. The swal- 
lows and martins came, twitted about 
the roof, built their nests, reared their 
young, held their congress along the 
eaves, and then winged their flight in 
search of another spring. The cater- 
pillar spun its winding-sheet, dangled it^. 
from the great buttonwood tree before y 
the house; turned into a moth, fluttered 
with the last sunshine of 
summer, and disappeared; 
and finally the leaves of the 
buttonwood tree turned yel- 
low, then brown, then rustled 
one by one to the ground, 
and whirling about in little 



edidies of wind and dust, whispered 
that winter was at hand. 

"Wolfert gradually woke from his 
dream of wealth as the year declined. 
He had reared no crop for the supply 




Profoundly wrapt in 
meditation. 



THE WHITE CITY MAGAZINE 



47 



of his household during the sterility 
of winter. The season was long and 
severe, and for the first time the family 
was really straightened in its comfort. 
By degrees a revulsion of thought took 
place in Wolf ert's mind, common to those 
whose golden dreams have been dis- 
turbed by pinching realities. The idea 
gradually stole upon him that he should 
come to want. He already considered 
himself one of the most unfortunate 
men in the province having lost such an 
incalculable amount of undiscovered 
treasure, and now when thousands of 
pounds had eluded his search, to be 
perplexed for shillings and pence was 
cruel in the extreme. 

"Haggard care gathered about his 
brow; he went about with a money- 
seeking air, his eyes bent downwards 
into the dust, and carrying his hands in 
his pockets, as men are apt to do when 
they have nothing else to put into them. 
He could not even pass the city alms- 
house without giving it a rueful glance, 
as if it were destined to be his future 
abode. 

"The strangeness of his conduct and 
of his looks occasioned much specula- 
tion and remark. For a long time he 
was suspected of being crazy, and then 
everybody pitied him. At length it 
began to be suspected that he was poor, 
and then everybody avoided him. 

"The rich old burghers of his 
acquaintance met him outside of the 
door when he called, entertained him 
hospitably on the threshold, pressed 
him warmly by the hand at parting, 
shook their heads as he walked away, 
with the kind hearted expression of 
'poor Wolfert'; and turned a corner 
nimbly if by chance they saw him 
approaching as they walked the streets. 
Even the barber and the cobbler of the 
neighborhood, and a tattered tailor in 
an alley hard by, three of the poorest 
and merriest rogues in the world, eyed 
him with that abundant sympathy 
which usually attends a lack of means; 
and there is not a doubt but their 
pockets would have been at his com- 
mand, only that they happened to be 
empty. 

"Thus everybody deserted the Web- 
ber mansion, as if poverty were con- 
tagious, like the plague; everybody but 



honest Dirk Waldron, who still kept 
up his stolen visits to the daughter, and 
indeed seemed to wax more affection- 
ate as the fortunes of his mistress were 
on the wane. 

"Many months had elapsed since Wol- 
fert had frequented his old resort, the 
rural inn. He was taking a long lonely 
walk one Saturday afternoon, musing 
over his wants and disappointments, 
when his feet took instinctively their 
wonted direction, and on awakening out 
of a reverie he found himself before 
the door of the inn. For some moments 
he hesitated to enter, but his heart 
yearned for companionship and where 
can a ruined man find better compan- 
ionship than at a tavern where there is 
neither sober example nor sober advice 
to put him out of countenance? 

"Wolfert found several of the old 
frequenters of the inn at their usual 
posts and seated in their usual places; 
but one was missing, the great Ramm 
Rapelye, who for many years had filled 
the leather-bottomed chair of state. His 
place was supplied by a stranger, who 
seemed, however, completely at home in 
the chair and in the tavern. He was 
rather under size, but deep-chested, 
square and muscular. His broad shoul- 
ders, double joints, and bow knees, gave 
tokens of prodigious strength. His 
face was dark and weather-beaten; a 
deep scar, as if from the slash of a cut- 
glass, had almost divided his nose and 
made a gash in his upper lip, through 
which his teeth shone like a bulldog's. 
A mop of iron-gray hair gave a grisly 
finish to this hard-favored visage. His 
dress was of an amphibious character. 
He wore an old hat, edged with tar- 
nished lace and cocked in martial style, 
on one side of his head; a rusty blue 
military coat with brass buttons, and a 
wide pair of short petticoat trousers, or 
rather breeches, for they were gathered 
up at the knees. He ordered everybody 
about him with an authoritative air; 
talking in a voice that sounded like the 

crackling of thorns under a pot; d d 

the landlord and servants with perfect 
impunity, and was waited upon with 
greater obsequiousness than had ever 
been shown to the mighty Ramm him- 
self. 

"Wolfert's curiosity was awakened to 



48 



THE WHITE CITY MAGAZINE 



know who and what was this stranger, 
who had thus usurped sway in this 
ancient domain. Peechy Prauw took 
him aside, into a remote corner of the 
hall, and there, in an under voice and 
with great caution, imparted to him 
all that he knew on the subject. The 
inn had been aroused several months 
before, on a dark stormy night, by 
repeated long shouts that seemed like 
the howling of a wolf. They came from 
the water-side, and at length were dis- 
tinguished to be hailing the house in a 
seafearing manner — 'House-a-hoy !' The 
landlord turned out with his head 
waiter, tapster, hostler, and errand- 
boy — that is to say, with his old 
negro Cuff. On approaching the 
place whence the voice proceeded 
they found this amphibious-look- 
ing personage at the water's edge, quite 
alone, and seated on a great oaken sea- 
chest. How he came there, whether he 
had been set on shore from some boat, 
or had floated to land on his chest, 
nobody could tell, for he did not seem 
disposed to answer questions, and there 
was something in his looks and man- 
ners that put a stop to all questioning. 
Suffice it to say, he took possession of 
a corner-room of the inn, to which his 
chest was removed with great difficulty. 
Here he had remained ever since, keep- 
ing about the inn and its vicinity. Some- 
times, it is true, he disappeared for one, 
two or three days at a time, going and 
returning ^vithout giving any notice or 
account of his movements. He always 
appeared to have plenty of money, 
though often of very strange outland- 
ish coinage; and he regularly paid his 
bill every evening before turning in. 

"He had fitted up his room to his 
own fancy, having slung a hammock 
from the ceiling which he used instead 
of a bed, and decorated the walls with 
rusty pistols and cutlasses of foreign 
workmanship. A greater part of his time 
was passed in this room, seated by the 
window, which commanded a wide view 
of the Sound, a short old-fashioned 
pipe in his mouth, a glass of rum-toddy 
at his elbow, and a pocket-telescope in 
his hand with which he reconnoitred 
every boat that moved upon the water. 
Large square-rigged vessels seemed to 



excite but little attention but the 
moment he described anything with a 
shoulder-of-mutton sail or when a 
barge, yawl or jolly-boat hove in sight, 
up with the telescope, and he examined 
the craft with the most scrupulous atten- 
tion. 

"All this might have passed without 
much notice, for in those times the 
province was so much the resort of 
adventurers of all characters and cHmes 
that any oddity in dress or behavior 
attracted but small attention. In a lit- 
tle while, however, this strange sea- 
monster, thus strangely cast upon dry 
land, began to encroach upon the long- 
established customs and customers of 
the place, and to interfere in a dictatorial 
manner in the affairs of the ninepin 
alley and the bar-room, until in the end 
he usurped an absolute command over 
the whole inn. It was all in vain to 
attempt to withstand his authority. He 
was not exactly quarrelsome, but bois- 
terous and peremptory, like one accus- 
tomed to tyrannize on a quarter-deck; 
and there was a dare-devil air about 
everything he said and did that inspired 
wariness in all bystanders. Even the 
half-pay officer, so long the hero of the 
club, was soon silenced by him; and 
the quiet burghers stared with wonder 
at seeing their inflammable man of war 
so readily and quietly extinguished. 

"And then the tales that he would 
tell were enough to make a peaceful 
man's hair stand on end. There was 
not a sea-fight, nor marauding nor free- 
booting adventure that had happened 
within the last twenty years but he 
seemed perfectly versed in it. He 
delighted to talk of the exploits of the 
buccaneers in the West Indies and on 
the Spanish main. How his eyes would 
glisten as he described the waylaying 
of treasure-ships, the desperate fights, 
yard-arm and yard-arm — broadside and 
broadside — the boarding and capturing 
huge Spanish galleons! With what 
chuckling relish would he describe the 
descent upon some rich Spanish colony; 
the rifling of a church; the sacking of 
a convent! You would have thought 
you heard some gormandizer dilating 
upon the roasting of a savory goose at 
Michaelmas when he described the 



THE WHITE CITY MAGAZINE 



49 



roasting of some Spanish Don to make 
him discover his treasure — a detail 
given with a minuteness that made 
every rich old burgher present turn 
uncomfortably in his chair. All this 
would be told with infinite glee, as if he 
considered it an excellent joke ; and then 
he would give such a tyrannical leer in 
the face of his next neighbor that the 
poor man would be fain to laugh out of 
sheer faint-heartedness. If any one, how- 
,,ever, pretended to contradict him in any 
of his stories he was on fire in an in- 
stant. His very cocked hat assumed a 
momentary fierceness and seemed to re- 
sent the contradiction. 'How the devil 
should you know as well as I? I tell you 
it was as I say,' and he would at the 
same time let slip a broadside of thun- 
dering oaths and tremendous sea- 
phrases, such as had never been heard 
before within those peaceful walls. 

"Indeed, the worthy burghers began 
to surmise that he knew more of those 
stories than mere hearsay. Day after 
day their conjectures concerning him 
grew more and more wild and fearful. 
The strangeness of his arrival, the 
strangeness of his manners, the mystery 
that surrounded him, all made him 
something incomprehensible in their 
eyes. He was a kind of monster of the 
deep to them — he was a merman — ^he 
was a behemoth — he was a leviathan — 
in short, they knew not what he was, 

"The domineering spirit of this 
boisterous sea urchin at length grew 
quite intolerable. He was no respecter 
of persons; he contradicted the richest 
burghers without hesitation; he took 
possession of the sacred elbow-chair, 
which, time out of mind, had been the 
seat of sovereignty of the illustrious 
Ramm Rapelye. Nay, he even went so 
far, in one of his rough jocular moods, 
as to slap that mighty burgher on the 
back, drink his toddy and wink in his 
face, a thing scarcely to be believed. 
From this time Ramm Rapelye appeared 
no more at the inn; his example was 
followed by several of the most emi- 
nent customers who were too rich to 
tolerate being bullied out of their opin- 
ions, or being obliged to laugh at 
another man's jokes. The landlord was 
almost in despair; but he knew not how 



to get rid of this sea-monster and his 
sea-chest — they seemed both to have 
grown like fixtures or excrescences on 
his establishment. 

"Such was the account whispered 
cautiously in Wolfert's ear by the nar- 
rator, Peechy Prauw, as he held him 
by the button in a corner of the hall, 
casting a wary glance now and then 
towards the door of the bar-room, lest 
he should be overheard by the terrible 
hero of his tale. 

"Wolfert took his seat in a remote 
part of the room in silence; impressed 
with profound awe of this unknown, 
so versed in freebooting history. It 
was to him a wonderful instance of the 
revolutions of mighty empires, to find 
the venerable Ramm Rapelye thus 
ousted from the throne and a rugged 
tarpaulin dictating from his elbow- 
chair, hectoring the patriarchs, and fill- 
ing this tranquil little realm with brawl 
and bravado. 

"The stranger was on this evening in 
a more than usually communicative 
mood, and was narrating a number of 
astounding stories of plunderings and 
burnings on the high seas. He dwelt 
upon them with peculiar relish, height- 
ening the frightful particulars in pro- 
portion to their effect on his peaceful 
auditors. He gave a swaggering detail 
of the capture of a Spanish merchant- 
man. She was lying becalmed during 
a long summer's day, just off from 
the island which was one of the lurking 
places of the pirates. They had recon- 
noitred her with their spy-glasses from 
the shore, and ascertained her character 
and force. At night a picked crew of 
daring fellows set off for her in a whale- 
boat. They approached with muffled 
oars, as she lay rocking idly with the 
undulations of the sea, and her sails 
flapping against the masts. They were 
close under the stern before the guard 
on deck was aware of their approach. 
The alarm was given; the pirates threw 
hand-grenades on deck, and sprang up 
the main chains, sword in hand. 

"The crew flew to arms, but in great 
confusion; some were shot down, others 
took refuge in the tops; others were 
driven overboard and drowned, while 
others fought hand to hand from the 



50 



THE WHITE CITY MAGAZINE 



maindeck to the quarter-deck, disput- 
ing gallantly every inch of the ground. 
There were three Spanish gentlemen on 
board with their ladies, who made the 
most desperate resistance. They de- 
fended the companion-way, cut down 
several of their assailants, and fought 
like ver\' de\nls, for they were mad- 
dened by the shrieks of the ladies from 
the cabin. One of the Dons was old, 
and soon dispatched. The other two kept 
their ground vigorously, even though 
the captain of the pirates was among 
their assailants. Just then there was a 
shout of victory from the main-deck. 
'The ship is ours!' cried the pirates. 

"One of the Dons immediately 
dropped his sword and surrendered; the 
other, who was a hot-headed youngster 
and just married, gave the captain a 
slash in the face that laid all open. The 
captain just made out to articulate the 
words 'no quarter.' 

" 'And what did they do with their 
prisoners?' said Peechy Prauw, eagerly. 

" 'Threw them all overboard,' was the 
answer. A dead pause followed the 
reply. Peechy Prauw sunk quietly 
back, like a man who had unwarily 
stolen upon the lair of a sleeping lion. 
The honest burghers cast fearful glances 
at the deep scar slashed across the vis- 
age of the stranger, and moved their 
chairs a little farther off. The seaman, 
however, smoked on without moving a 
muscle, as though he either did not 
perceive or did not regard the unfavor- 
able eflFect he had produced upon his 
hearers. 

"The half-pay oflficer was the first to 
break the silence; for he was continually 
tempted to make ineffectual head 
against this tyrant of the seas and to 
regain his lost consequence in the eyes 
of his ancient companions. He now 
tried to match the gunpowder tales of 
the stranger by others equally tremen- 
dous. Kidd, as usual, was his hero, 
concerning whom he seemed to have 
picked up many of the floating tradi- 
tions of the province. The seaman had 
always evinced a settled pique against 
the one-eyed warrior. On this occasion 
he listened with peculiar impatience. He 
sat with one arm akimbo, the other 
elbow on the table, the hand holdinr on 



to the small pipe he was pettishly puff- 
ing; his legs crossed; drumming with 
one foot on the ground, and casting 
every now and then the side-glance of 
a basilisk at the prosing captain. At 
length the latter spoke of Kidd's having 
ascended the Hudson with some of 
his crew, to land his plunder in secrecy. 

"'Kidd up the Hudson!' burst forth 
the seaman, with a tremendous oath. 
'Kidd never was up the Hudson!' 

" 'I tell you he was,' said the otheF. 
'Aye, and they say he buried a quantity 
of treasure on the little flat that runs 
out into the river, called the Devil's 
Dans Kammer.' 

" 'The Devil's Dans Kammer in your 
teeth!' cried the seaman. 'I tell you 
Kidd was never up the Hudson. What 
a plague do you know of Kidd and his 
haunts?' 

" 'What do I know?' echoed the half- 
pay officer. 'Why, I was in London at 
the time of his trial; aye, and I had 
the pleasure of seeing him hanged at 
Execution Dock.' 

" 'Then, sir, let me tell you that you 
saw as pretty a fellow hanged as ever 
trod shoe-leather. Aye!' putting his 
face nearer to that of the officer, 'and 
there was many a land-lubber looked on 
that might much better have swung in 
his stead.' 

"The half-pay officer was silenced; 
but the indignation thus pent up in 
his bosom glowed with intense vehe- 
mence in his single eye, which kindled 
like a coal. 

"Peechy Prauw, who never could 
remain silent, observed that the gentle- 
man certainly was in the right. Kidd 
never did bury money up the Hudson, 
nor indeed in any of those parts, 
though many affirmed such to be the 
fact. It was Braddish and others of the 
buccaneers who had buried money; 
some said in Turtle bay, others on Long 
Island, others in the neighborhood of 
Hell-gate. 'Indeed,' added he, 'I recol- 
lect an adventure of Sam, the negro 
fisherman, many years ago, which some 
think had something to do with the 
buccaneers. As we are all friends here, 
and as it vrill go no further, I'll tell 
it to you. 

" 'Upon a dark night many years ago, 



THE WHITE CITY MAGAZINE 



51 



as Black Sam was returning from fish- 
ing in Hell-gate' — 

"Here the story was nipped in the 
bud by a sudden movement from the 
unknown, who, laying his iron fist on 
the table, knuckles downward, with a 
quiet force that indented the very 
boards, and looking grimly over his 
shoulder, with the grin of an angry 
bear; — 'Hark'ee, neighbor,' said he, with 
significant nodding of the head, 'you'd 
better let the buccaneers and their 
money alone — ^they're not for old men 
and old women to meddle with. They 
fought hard for their money ; they gave 
body and soul for it; and wherever it 
lies buried, depend upon it he must have 
a tug with the devil who gets it!' 

"This sudden explosion was succeeded 
by a blank silence throughout the room. 




In the wedding dress of CI^J 

her Grandmother. o_^^ - ^>i- 



Peechy Prauw shrunk within himself, 
and even the one-eyed officer turned 
pale. Wolfert, who from a dark corner 
of the room had listened with intense 
eagerness to all this talk about buried 
treasure, looked with mingled awe and 
reverence at this bold buccaneer; for 
such he really suspected him to be. 
There was a chinking of gold and a 
sparkling of jewels in all his stories 
about the Spanish main that gave a 
value to every period; and Wolfert 
would have given anything for the rum- 
maging of the ponderous sea-cheist, 
w'hich his imagination crammed full of 
golden chalices, crucifixes, and jolly 
round bags of doubloons. 

"The dead stillness that had fallen 
upon the company was at length inter- 
rupted by the stranger, who pulled out 
a prodigious watch of curious and 
ancient workmanship, and which in 
Wolfert's eyes had a decidedly Spanish 
look. On touching a spring it struck 
ten o'clock, upon which the sailor called 
for his reckoning, and having paid it 
out of a handful of outlandish coin, he 
drank off the remainder of his beverage, 
and without taking leave of any one, 
rolled out of the room, muttering to 
himself, as he stamped upstairs to his 
chamber. 

"It was some time before the com- 
pany could recover from the silence 
into which they had been thrown. The 
very footsteps of the stranger, which 
were heard now and then as he trav- 
ersed his chamber, inspired awe. 

"Still the conversation in which they 
had been engaged was too interesting 
not to be resumed. A heavy thunder- 
gust had gathered up unnoticed while 
they were lost in talk, and the torrents 
of rain that fell forbade all thoughts of 
setting off for home until the storm 
should subside. They drew nearer 
together, therefore, and entreated the 
worthy Peechy Prauw to continue the 
tale which had been so discourteously 
interrupted. He readily complied, whis- 
pering, however, in a tone scarcely 
above his breath, and drowned occa- 
sionally by the rolling of the thunder; 
and he would pause every now and then, 
and listen with evident awe, as he heard 
the heavy footsteps of the stranger 
pacing overhead. 



52 



THE WHITE CITY MAGAZINE 



The following is the purport of his 
storv: 



1 ADVENTURE OF THE BLACK r 
4 FISHERMAN. ^ 

Everybody knov/s Black Sam, the old 
negro fisherman, or, as he is commonly 
called, Mud Sam, who has fished about 
the Sound for the last half century. It 
is now many years since Sam who was 
then as active a young negro as any in 
•■^e province, and worked on the farm 
of Killian Suydam on Long Island, hav- 
ing finished his day's work at an early 
hour, was fishing, one still summer even- 
uig, just about the neighborhood of 
Hell-gate. 

He was in a light skiff; and being 
well acquainted with the currents and 
eddies, had shifted his station accord- 
ing to the shifting of the tide, from_ the 
Hen and Chickens to the Hog's Back, 
'rom the Hog's Back to the Pot; and 
from the Pot to the Frying Pan; but in 
the eagerness of his sport he did not 
see that the tide was rapidly ebbing, 
until the roaring of the whirlpools and 
eddies warned him of his danger; and 
he had some difficulty in shooting his 
skiflf from among the rocks and breakers 
and getting to the point of Blackwell's 
Island. Plere he cast anchor for some 
time, waiting the turn of the tide to 
enable him to return homewards. As 
the night set in, it grew blustering and 
gusty. Dark clouds came bundling up 
in the west; and now and then a growl 
of thunder or a flash of lightning told 
that a summer storm was at hand. Sam 
pulled over, therefore, under the lee of 
Manhattan Island, and coasting along, 
came to a snug nook, just under a steep 
beetling rock, where he fastened his skiff 
to the root of a tree that shot out from 
a cleft and spread its broad branches 
like a canopy over the water. The gust 
came scouring along; the wind threw up 
the river in white surges; the rain rat- 
tled among the leaves; the thunder bel- 
lowed worse than that which is now 
bellowing; the lightning seemed to lick 
up the surges of the stream; but Sam, 
snugly sheltered under rock and tree, 
lay crouching in his skiff, rocking upon 



the billows until he fell asleep. When 
he woke all was quiet. The gust had 
passed away, and only now and then a 
faint gleam of lightning in the east 
showed which way it had gone. The 
night was dark and moonless; and from 
the state of the tide Sam concluded it 
was near midnight. He was on the 
point of making loose his skiff to return 
homewards, when he saw a light gleam- 
ing along the water from a distance, > 
which seemed rapidly approaching. As 
it drew near he perceived it came from 
a lantern in the bow of a boat gliding 
under shadow of the land. It pulled up 
in a small cove, close to where he was. 
A man jumped on shore, and searching 
about with the lantern, exclaimed: 

"This is the place — here's the iron 
ring." 

The boat was then made fast, and the 
man returning on board, assisted his 
comrades in conveying something heavy 
on shore. As the light gleamed among 
them, Sam saw that they were five stout 
desperate - looking fellows, in red 
woolen caps, with a leader in a three- 
cornered hat, and that some of them 
were armed with dirks, or long knives, 
and pistols. They talked low to one 
another, and occasionally in some out- 
landish tongue he could not understand. 
On landing they made their way 
among the bushes, taking turns to 
relieve each other in lugging their bur- 
den up the rocky bank. Sam's curi- 
osity was now fully aroused; so leaving 
his skiff he clambered silently tip a 
ridge that overlooked their path. They 
had stopped to rest for a moment, and 
the leader was looking about among 
the bushes with his lantern. "Have you 
brought the spades?" said one. "They 
are here," replied another, who had 
them on his shoulder. "We must dig 
deep, where there will be no risk of dis- 
covery," said a third. 

A cold chill ran through Sam's veins. 
He fancied he saw before him a gang 
of murderers about to bury their vic- 
tim. His knees smote together. In his 
agitation he shook the branch of a 
tree with which he was supporting him- 
self as he lookedovertheedgeofthecliff. 
"What's that?" cried one of the gang. 
"Some one stirs among the bushes!" 



THE WHITE CITY MAGAZINE 



53 



The lantern was held up in the direc- 
tion of the noise. One of the red-caps 
cocked a pistol, and pointed it towards 
the very place where Sam was standing. 
He stood motionless — breathless; ex- 
pecting the next moment to be his last. 
Fortunately his dingy complexion was 
in his favor and made no glare among 
the leaves. 

" 'Tis no one," said the man with the 
lantern. "What a plague! you would 
not fire off your pistol and alarm the 
country." 

The pistol was uncocked; the burden 
was resumed, and the party slowly 
toiled along the bank. Sam watched 
them as they went; the light sending 
back fitful gleams through the dripping 
bushes, and it was not till they were 
fairly out of sight that he ventured to 
draw breath freely. He now thought of 
getting back to his boat and making 
his escape out of the reach of such dan- 
gerous neighbors ; but curiosity was all- 
powerful. He hesitated and lingered 
and listened. By and by he heard the 
strokes of spades. "They are digging 
the grave!" said he to himself; and the 
cold sweat started upon his forehead. 
Every stroke of a spade, as it sounded 
through the silent groves, went to his 
heart; it was evident there was as lit- 
tle noise made as possible; everything 
had an air of terrible mystery and 
secrecy. Sam had a great relish for 
the horrible — a tale of murder was a 
treat for him; and he was a constant 
attendant at executions. He could not 
resist an impulse, in spite of every dan- 
ger, to steal nearer to the scene of mys- 
tery and overlook the midnight fellows 
at their work. He crawled along cau- 
tiously, therefore, inch by inch; step- 
ping with the utmost care among the 
dry leaves lest their rustling should 
betray him. He came at length to where 
a steep rock intervened between him 
and the gang; for he saw the light of 
their lantern shining up against the 
branches of the trees on the other side. 
Sam slowly and silently clambered up 
the surface of the rock, and raising his 
head above its naked edge beheld the 
villains immediately below him, and so 
near, that though he dreaded discovery, 
he dared not withdraw lest the least 



movement should be heard. In this 
way he remained, with his round black 
face peering above the edge of the rock, 
like the sun just emerging above the 
edge of the horizon, or the round- 
cheeked moon on the dial of a clock. 

The red-caps had nearly finished 
their work; the grave was filled up, and 
they were carefully replacing the turf. 
This done, they scattered dry leaves 
over the place. "And now," said the 
leader, "I defy the devil himself to find 
it out." 

"The murderers!" exclaimed Sam in- 
voluntarily. 

The whole gang started, and looking 
up beheld the rotmd black head of Sam 
just above them — his white eyes strained 
half out of their orbits ; his white teeth 
chattering, and his whole visage shining 
with cold perspiration. 

"We're discovered!" cried one. 

"Down with him!" cried another. 

Sam heard the cocking of a pistol, 
but did not pause for the report. He 
scrambled over rock and stone, through 
brush and brier; rolled down banks like 
a hedge-hog; scrambled up others like 
a catamount. In every direction he 
heard some one or other of the gang 
hemming him in. At length he reached 
the rocky ridge along the river; one of 
the red-caps was hard behind him. A 
steep rock like a wall rose directly in his 
way; it seemed to cutoff all retreat, when 
fortunately he espied the strong cord- 
like branch of a grape-vine reaching 
half-way down it. He sprang at it with 
the force of a desperate man, seized it 
with both hands, and being young and 
agile, succeeded' in swinging himself 
to the summit of the clifT. Here he stood 
in full relief against the sky, when the 
red-cap cocked his pistol and fired. The 
ball whistled by Sam's head. With the 
lucky thought of a man in emergency, 
he uttered a yell, fell to the ground, and 
detached at the same time a fragment 
of the rocks which tumbled with a loud 
splash into the river. 

"I've done his business," said the red- 
cap to one or two of his comrades as 
they arrived panting. "He'll tell no 
tales, except to the fishes in the river." 

His pursuers now turned to meet 
their companions. Sam, sliding silently 



54 



THE WHITE CITY MAGAZINE 



down the surface of the rock, let him- 
self quietly into his skiff, cast loose the 
fastening, and abandoned himself to the 
rapid current, which in that place runs 
like a mill-stream, and soon swept him 
off from the neighborhood. It was not, 
however, until he had drifted a great 
distance that he ventured to ply his 
oars, when he made his skiff dart like 
an arrow through the strait of Hell- 
gate, never heeding the danger of Pot, 
Frying-Pan, nor Hog's Back itself; nor 
did he feel himself thoroughly secure 
until safely nestled in bed in the cock- 
loft of the ancient farm-house of the 
Suydams. 

Here the worthy Peechy Prauw 
paused to take breath, and to take a sip 
of the gossip tankard that stood at his 
elbow. His auditors remained with 
open mouths and outstretched necks, 
gaping like a nest of swallows for an 
additional mouthful. 

"And is that all?" exclaimed the half- 
pay officer. 

"That's all that belongs to the story," 
said Peechy Prauw. 

"And did Sam never find out what 
was buried by the red-caps?" said Wol- 
fert, eagerly, whose mind was haunted 
by nothing but ingots and doubloons. 

'"Not that I know of," said Peechy; 
"he had no time to spare from his work, 
and, to tell the truth, he did not like to 
run the risk of another race among the 
rocks. Besides, how should he recol- 
lect the spot Avhere the grave had been 
digged? Everything would look so dif- 
ferent by daylight. And then, where 
was the use of looking for a dead body 
when there was no chance of hanging 
the murderers?" 

"Aye, but are you sure it was a dead 
body they buried?" said Wolfert. 

"To be sure," cried Peechy Prauw, 
exultingly. "Does it not haunt the 
neighborhood to this very day?" 

"Haunts!" exclaimed several of the 
part\% opening their eyes still wider and 
edging their chairs still closer. 

"Aye, haunts," repeated Peechy; 
"have none of you heard of Father Red- 
cap, who haunts the old burnt farm- 
house in the woods, on the border of 
the Sound, near Hell-gate?" 



"Oh, to be sure, I've heard tell of 
something of the kind, but then I took 
it for some old wives' fable. 

"Old wives' fable or not," said Peechy 
Prauw, "that farm-house stands hard by 
the very spot. It's been unoccupied 
time out of mind, and stands in a lonely 
part of the coast; but those who fish 
in the neighborhood have often heard 
strange noises there; and lights have 
been seen about the wood at night; and 
an old fellow in a red cap has been seen 
at the windows more than once, which 
people might take to be the ghost of 
the body buried there. Once upon a 
time three soldiers took shelter in the 
building for the night, and rummaged it 
from top to bottom, when they found 
old Father Red-cap astride of a cider- 
barrel in the cellar with a jug in one 
hand and a goblet in the other. He 
offered them a drink out of his goblet, 
but just as one of the soldiers was put- 
ting it to his mouth — whew! — a flash of 
fire blazed through the cellar, blinded 
every mother's son of them for several 
minutes, and when they recovered their 
eye-sight, jug, goblet, and Red-cap had 
vanished, and nothing but the empty 
cider-barrel remained." 

Here the half-pay officer, who was 
growing very muzzy and sleepy, and 
nodding over his liquor, with half-ex- 
tinguished eye, suddenly gleamed up 
like an expiring rushlight. 

"That's all fudge!" said he, as Peechy 
Prauw finished his last story. 

"Well, I don't vouch for the truth of 
it myself," said Peechy Prauw, "though 
all the world knows that there's some- 
thing strange about that house and 
grounds; but as to the story of Mud 
Sam, I believe it just as well as if it had 
happened to myself." 

The deep interest taken in this conver- 
sation by the company had made them 
unconscious of the uproar abroad 
among the elements, when suddenly 
they were electrified by a tremendouis 
clap of thunder. A lumbering crash 
followed instantaneously, shaking the 
building to its very foundation. All 
started from their seats, imagining it 
the shock of an earthquake, or that old 
Father Red-cap was coming among 
them in all his terrors. They listened 



THE WHITE CITY MAGAZINE 



55 



for a moment, but only heard the rain 
pelting against the windows and the 
wind howling among the trees. The 
explosion was soon explained by the 
apparition of an old negro's bald head 
thrust in at the door, his white goggle 
eyes contrasting with his jetty poll, 
which was wet with rain and shone like 
a bottle. In a jargon but half intelli- 
gible he announced that the kitchen chim- 
ney had been struck by lightning. 

A sullen pause of the storm, which 
now rose and sank in gusts, produced 
a momentary stillness. In this interval 
the report of a musket was heard, and 
a long shout, almost like a yell, re- 
sounded from the shore. Every one 
crowded to the window; another mus- 
ket-shot was heard, and another long 
shout mingled wildly with a rising blast 
of wind. It seemed as if the cry came 
up from the bosom of the waters; for 
though incessant flashes of lightning 
spread a light about the shore, no one 
was to be seen. 

Suddenly the window of the room 
overhead was opened, and a loud halloo 
uttered by the mysterious stranger. 
Several bailings passed from one party 
to the other, but in a language which 
none of the company in the bar-room 
could understand; and presently they 
heard the windows closed and a great 
noise overhead, as if all the furniture 
was being pulled and hauled about the 
room. The negro servant was sum- 
moned, and shortly afterwards was seen 
assisting the veteran to lug the ponder- 
ous sea-chest downstairs. 

The landlord was in amazement, 
"What, you are not going on the water 
in such a storm?" 

"Storm!" said the other scornfully; 
"do you call such a sputter of weather a 
storm?" 

"You'll get drenched to the skin, — 
you'll catch your death!" said Peechy 
Prauw, affectionately. 

"Thunder and lightning!" exclaimed 
the veteran. "Don't preach about 
weather to a man that has cruised in 
whirlwinds and tornadoes." 

The obsequious Peechy was again 
struck dumb. The voice from the water 
was heard once more in a tone of im- 
patience; the bystand^ers stared with 



redoubled awe at this man of storms, 
who seemed to have come up out of the 
deep and to be summoned back to it 
again. As with the assistance of the 
negro he slowly bore his ponderous sea- 
chest towards the shore, they eyed it 
with a superstitious feeling, — half 
doubting whether he were not really 
about to embark upon it and launch 
forth upon the wild waves. They fol- 
lowed him at a distance with a lantern. 

"Dowse the light!" roared the hoarse 
voice from the water. "No one wants 
light here!" 

"Thunder and lightning!" exclaimed 
the veteran, turning short upon them; 
"back to the house with you!" 

Wolfert and his companions shrunk 
back in dismay. Still, their curiosity 
would not allow them entirely to with- 
draw. A long sheet of lightning now 
flickered across the waves and discov- 
ered a boat, filled with men, just under 
a rocky point, rising and sinking with 
the heavy surges, and swashing the 
waters at every heave. It was with diffi- 
culty held to the rocks by a boat-hook, 
for the current rushed furiously round 
the point. The veteran hoisted one end 
of the lumbering sea-chest on the gun- 
wale of the boat, and seized the handle 
at the other end to lift it in, when the 
motion propelled the boat from the 
shore; the chest slipped ofif from the 
gunwale, and, sinking into the waves, 
pulled the veteran headlong after it. 
A loud shriek was uttered by all on 
shore, and a volley of execrations by 
those on board; but boat and man were 
hurried away by the rushing swiftness 
of the tide. A pitchy darkness suc- 
ceeded. Wolfert Webber indeed fan- 
cied that he distinguished a cry for help 
and that he beheld the drowning man 
beckoning for assistance; but when the 
lightning again gleamed along the 
water all was void ; neither man nor 
boat was to be seen; nothing but the 
dashing and weltering of the waves as 
they hurried past. 

The company returned to the tavern 
to await the subsiding of the storm. 
They resumed their seats and gazed on 
each other with dismay. The whole 
transaction had not occupied five min- 
utes, and not a dozen words had been 



56 



THE WHITE CITY MAGAZINE 



spoken. When they looked at the 
oaken chair they could scarcely realize 
that the strange being who had so lately 
tenanted it, full of life and Herculean 
vigor, should already be a corpse. 
There was the very glass he had just 
drunk from; there lay the ashes from 
the pipe which he had smoked, as it 
Avere, with his last breath. As the 
worthy burghers pondered on these 
things, they felt a terrible conviction 
of the uncertainty of existence, and 
each felt as if the ground on which he 
stood was rendered less stable by the 
awful example. 

As, however, most of the company 
were possessed of that valuable philos- 
ophy wdiich enables a man to bear up 
with fortitude against the misfortunes 
of his neighbors, they soon managed to 
console themselves for the tragic end 
of the veteran. The landlord was par- 
ticularly happy that the poor dear man 
had paid his reckoning before he went; 
and made a kind of farewell speech on 
the occasion. 

"He came," said he, "in a storm, and 
he went in a storm; he came in the 
night, and he went in the night; he 
came nobody knows whence, and he 
has gone nobody knows where. For 
aught I know he has gone to sea once 
more on his chest, and may land to 
bother some people on the other side 
of the world. Though it's a thousand 
pities," added he, "that if he has eone 
to Davy Jones' locker he did not leave 
his own locker behind him." 

"His locker! St. Nicholas preserve 
us!" cried Peechy Prauw. "I'd not have 
had that sea-chest in the house for any 
money. I'll warrant he'd come racket- 
ing after it at nights, and making av 
haunted house of the inn. And as to 
his going to sea in his chest, I recollect 
what happened to Skipper ,^ --^ 

Onderdonk's ship on his ■-is:=r^^-,i^lfe^ 
voyage from Amsterdam. — ■ ■' 

"The boatswain died during a storm: 
so they wrapped him up in a sheet and 
put him in his own sea-chest, and threw 
him over-board; but they neglected in 
their hurry-skurry to say prayers over 
him — and the storm raged and roared 
louder than ever, and they saw the dead 
man seated in his chest, with his shroud 



for a sail, coming hard after the ship; 
and the sea breaking before him in 
great sprays like fire; and there they 
kept scudding day after day, and night 
after night, expecting every moment to 
go to wreck; and every night they saw 
the dead boatswain in his sea-chest try- 
ing to get up with them, and they heard 
his whistle above the blasts of the wind, 
and he seemed to send great seas 
mountain-high after them, that would 
have swamped the ship if they had not 
pulled up the dead-lights. And so it 
went on till they lost sight of him in the 
fogs off Newfoundland, and supposed 
he had veered ship and stood for Dead 
Man's Isle. So much for burying a 
man at sea without saying prayers over 
him." 

The thunder-gust which had hitherto 
detained the company was now at an 
end. The cuckoo clock in the hall told 
midnight; every one prepared to depart, 
for seldom was such a late hour of the 
night trespassed on by these quiet 
burghers. As they sallied forth, they 
found the heavens once more serene. 
The storm-clouds had rolled away and lay 
piled up in fleecy masses on the hori- 
zon, lighted up by the bright crescent of 
the moon, which looked like a little sil- 
ver lamp hung up in a palace of snow. 

The dismal occurrence of the night, 
and the dismal narrations they had 
heard, left a superstitious feeling in 
every mind. They cast a fearful glance 
at the spot where the buccaneer had 
disappeared, almost expecting to see 
him sailing on his chest in the cool 




A forlorn looking 
house. 



THE WHITE CITY MAGAZINE 



57 



moonshine. The trembUng- rays glit- 
tered along the waters, but all was placid 
and the current dimpled over the spot 
where he had g-one down. The party, 
as they went homewards, huddled to- 
gether in a little crowd, particularly 
when they passed a lonely field where 
a man had been murdered; and even the 
sexton, who had to complete his jour- 
ney alone, though accustomed, one 
would think, to ghosts and goblins, 
went a long way round rather than 
pass by his own church-yard. 

Wolfert Webber had now carried 
home a fresh stock of stories and no- 
tions to ruminate upon. These ac- 
counts of pots of money and Spanish 
treasures, buried here and there and 
everywhere about the rocks and bays of 
these wild shores, made him almost 
dizzy. "Blessed St. Nicholas!" ejacu- 
lated he, half aloud; "is it not possible 
to come upon one of these golden 
hoards and to make one's self rich in 
a twinkling? How hard that I must go 
on, delving and delving, day in and day 
out, merely to make a morsel of bread, 
when one lucky stroke of a spade might 
enable me to ride in my carriage for the 
rest of my life!" 

As he turned over in his mind all that 
had been told of the singular adventure 
of the negro fisherman, his imagination 
gave a totally different complexion to 
the tale. He saw in the gang of red- 
caps nothing but a crew of pirates 
burying their spoils, and his cupidity 
was once more awakened by the pos- 
sibility of at length getting on the 
traces of some of this lurking wealth. 
Indeed, his infected fancy tinged every- 
thing with gold. He felt like the greedy 
inhabitant of Bagdad when his eyes had 
been greased with the magic ointment 
of the dervish that gave him to see all 
the treasures of the earth. Caskets of 
buried jewels, chests of ingots, and bar- 
rels of outlandish coins, seemed to court 
him from their concealments and sup- 
plicate him to relieve them from their 
untimely graves. 

On making private inquiries about 
the grounds said to be haunted by 
Father Red-cap, he was more and more 
confirmed in his surmise. He learned 
that the place had several times been 



visited by experienced money-diggers, 
who had heard Black Sam's story, 
though none of them had met with suc- 
cess. On the contrary, they had always 
been dogged with ill-luck of some kind 
or other, in consequence, as Wolfert 
concluded, of not going to work at the 
proper time and with the proper cere- 
monials. The last attempt had been 
made by Cobus Quackenbos who dug 
for a whole night and met with incred- 
ible difSculty, for as fast as he threw 
one shovelful of earth out of the hole, 
two were thrown in by invisible hands. 
He succeeded so far, however, as to un- 
cover an iron chest, when there was a 
terrible roaring, ramping, and raging 
of uncouth figures about the hole, and 
at length a shower of blows, dealt by 
invisible cudgels, fairly belabored him 
off of the forbidden ground. This 
Cobus Quackenbos had declared on his 
death-bed, so that there could not be 
any doubt of it. He was a man that 
had devoted many years of his life to 
money-digging, and it was thought 
would have ultimately succeeded had he 
not died recently of a brain-fever in the 
almshouse. 

Wolfert Webber was now in a worry 
of trepidation and impatience, fearful 
lest some rival adventurer should get a 
scent of the buried gold. He deter- 
mined privately to seek out the black 
fisherman, and get him to serve as guide 
to the place where he had witnessed the 
mysterious scene of interment. Sam 
was easily found; for he was one of 
those old habitual beings that live about 
a neighborhood until they wear them- 
selves a place in the public mind, and 
become, in a manner, public characters. 
There was not an unlucky urchin about 
town that did not know Sam the fisher- 
man, and think that he had a right to 
play his tricks upon the old negro. Sam 
had led an amphibious life for more 
than half a century, about the shores of 
the bay and the fishing-grounds of the 
Sound. He passed the greater part of 
his time on and in the water, particu- 
larly about Hell-gate; and might have 
been taken, in bad weather, for one of 
the hobgoblins that used to haunt that 
strait. There would he be seen, at all 
times and in all weathers ; sometimes in 



58 



THE WHITE CITY MAGAZINE 



his skiff, anchored among- the eddies, or 
prowHng Hke a shark about some 
wreck, where tlie fish are supposed to 
be most abundant; sometimes seated on 
a rock from hour to hour, looking in 
the mist and drizzle like a solitary 
heron watching for its prey. He was 
well acquainted with every hole and cor- 
ner of the Sound; from the Wallabout 
to Hell-gate unto the Devil's Stepping- 
Stones ; and it was even affirmed that he 
knew all the fish in the river by their 
Christian names. 

Wolfert found him at his cabin, which 
was not much larger than a tolerable 
dog-house. It was rudely constructed 
of fragments of wrecks and drift-wood, 
and built on the rocky shore at the 
foot of the old fort, just about what at 
present forms the point of the Battery. 
A "most ancient and fishlike smell" per- 
vaded the place. Oars, paddles, and 
fishing-rods were leaning against the 
wall of the fort; a net was spread on the 
sand to dry; a skiff was drawn up on 
the beach; and at the door of his cabin 
was Mud Sam himself, indulging m the 
true negro luxury of sleeping in the 
sunshine. 

Many years had passed away since the 
time of Sam's youthful adventure, and 
the snows of many a winter had grizzled 
the knotty wool upon his head. He per- 
fectly recollected the circumstances, 
however, for he had often been called 
upon to relate them, though in his ver- 
sion of the story he differed in many 
points from Peechy Prauw; as is not 
unfrequently the case with authentic 
historians. As to the subsequent re- 
searches of money-diggers, Sam knew 
nothing about them; they were matters 
quite out of his line; neither did the 
cautious Wolfert care to disturb his 
thoughts on that point. His only wish 
was to secure the old fisherman as a 
pilot to the spot; and this was readily 
effected. The long time that had inter- 
vened since his nocturnal adventure had 
effaced all Sam's awe of the place, and 
the promise of a trifling reward roused 
him at once from his sleep and his sun- 
shine. 

The tide was adverse to making the 
expedition by water, and Wolfert was 
too impatient to get to the land of 
promise to wait for its turning; they set 



off, therefore, by land. A walk of four 
or five miles brought them to the edge 
of a wood, which at that time covered 
the greater part of the eastern side of 
the island. It was just beyond the 
pleasant region of Bloomen-dael. Here 
they struck into a long lane, straggHng 
among trees and bushes, very much 
overgrown with weeds and mullein- 
stalks, as if but seldom used, and so 
completely overshadowed as to enjoy 
but a kind of twilight. Wild vines en- 
tangled the trees and flaunted in their 
faces; brambles and briers caught their 
clothes as they passed; the garter-snake 
glided across their path; the spotted 
toad hopped and waddled before them, 
and the restless cat-bird mewed at them 
from every thicket. Had Wolfert Web- 
ber been deeply read in romantic legend 
he might have fancied himself entering 
upon forbidden, enchanted ground; or 
that these were some of the guardians 
set to keep watch upon buried treasure. 
As it was, the loneliness of the place 
and the wild stories connected with it 
had their effect upon his mind. 

On reaching the lower end of the lane 
they found themselves near the shore 
of the Sound in a kind of amphitheatre 
surrounded by forest trees. The area 
had once been a grass-plot, but was 
now shagged with briers and rank 
weeds. At one end, and just on the 
river bank, was a ruined building, little 
better than a heap of rubbish, with a 
chimney-stack rising like a solitary 
tower out of the center. The current 
of the Sound rushed along just below 
it, wildly grown trees drooping their 
branches into its waves. 

Wolfert had not a doubt that this 
was the haunted house of Father Red- 
cap, and called to mind the story of 
Peechy Prauw. The evening was ap- 
proaching, and the light falling dubi- 
ously among the woody places gave a 
melancholy tone to the scene, well cal- 
culated to foster any lurking feeling of 
awe or superstition. The night-hawk, 
wheeling about in the highest regions 
of the air, emitted his peevish boding 
cry. The woodpecker gave a lonely 
tap now and then on some hollow tree, 
and the fire-bird streamed by them with 
his deep-red plumage. 

They now came to an inclosure that 



THE WHITE CITY MAGAZINE 



59 



had once been a garden. It extended 
along the foot of a rocky ridge, but 
was Httle better than a wilderness of 
weeds, with here and there a matted 
rose-bush, or a peach or plum tree 
grown wild and ragged and covered 
with moss. At the lower end of the 
garden they passed a kind of vault in 
the side of a bank facing the water. It 
had the look of a root-house. The 
door, though decayed, was still strong 
and appeared to have been recently 
patched up. Wolfert pushed it open. 
It gave a harsh grating upon its hinges 
and striking against something Hke a 
box, a rattling sound ensued and a 
skull rolled on the floor. Wolfert drew 
back shuddering, but was reassured on 
being informed by the negro that this 
was a family vault belonging to one of 
the old Dutch families that owned this 
estate — an assertion corroborated by the 
sight of coffins of various sizes piled 
within. Sam had been familiar with all 
these scenes when a boy, and knew 
that he could not be far from the place 
of which they were in quest. 

They now made their way to the 
water's edge, scrambling along ledges 
of rocks that overhung the waves, and 
obliged often to hold by shrubs and 
grape-vines to avoid slipping into the 
deep and hurried stream. At length 
they came to a small cove, or rather 
indent of the shore. It was protected 
by steep rocks and overshadowed by a 
thick copse of oaks and chestnuts, so as 
to be sheltered and almost concealed. 
The beach shelved gradually within the 
cove, but the current swept deep, and 
black, and rapid, along its jutting 
points. The negro paused; raised his 
remnant of a hat and scratched his 
grizzled poll for a moment as he 
regarded this nook; then suddenly clap- 
ping his hands, he stepped exultingly 
forward, and pointed to a large iron 
ring, stapled firmly in the rock, just 
where a broad shelf of stone furnished 
a commodious landing-place. It was 
the very spot where the red-caps had 
landed. Years had changed the more 
perishable features of the scene, but 
rock and iron yield slowly to the influ- 
ence of time. On looking more closely 
Wolfert remarked three crosses cut in 



the rock just above the ring, which had 
no doubt some mysterious signification. 
Old Sam now readily recognized the 
overhanging rock under which his skiff 
had been sheltered during the thunder- 
gust. To follow up the course which 
the midnight gang had taken, however, 
was a hard task. His mind had been so 
much occupied on that eventful occasion 
by the persons of the drama as to pay 
but little attention to the scenes; and 
these places look so different by night 
and day. After wandering about for 
some time, however, they came to an 
opening among the trees which Sam 
thought resembled the place. There 
was a ledge of rock of moderate height 
like a wall on one side, which he thought 
might be the very ridge whence he had 
overlooked the diggers. Wolfert ex- 
amined it narrowly, and at length dis- 
covered three crosses similar to those 
on the ring, cut deeply into the face of 
the rock, but nearly obscured by moss 
that had grown over them. His heart 
leaped with joy, for he doubted not they 
were the private marks of the bucca- 
neers. All now that remained was to 
ascertain the precise spot where the 
treasure lay buried; for otherwise he 
might dig at random in the neighbor- 
hood of the crosses without coming 
upon the spoils, and he had already had 
enough of such profitless labor. Here, 
however, the old negro was perfectly at 
a loss, and indeed perplexed Wolfert by a 
variety of opinions, for his recollections 
were all confused. Sometimes Sam de- 
clared it must have been at the foot of 
a mulberry tree hard by; then beside a 
great white stone; then under a small 
green knoll a short distance from the 
ledge of rocks, until at length Wolfert 
became as bewildered as Sam. 

The shadows of evening were now 
spreading themselves over the woods, 
and rock and tree began to mingle to- 
gether. It was evidently too late to 
attempt anything further at present, and, 
indeed, Wolfert had not come provided 
with implements to prosecute his re- 
searches. Satisfied, therefore, with hav- 
ing ascertained the place, Wolfert took 
note of all its landmarks that he might 
recognize it again, and set out on his 
return homewards, resolved to prose- 



6o 



THE WHITE CITY MAGAZINE 



cute this s:oIden enterprise without de- 
lay. 

The leading anxiety which had hith- 
erto absorbed every feeHng being- now 
in some measure appeased, fancy began 
to wander and to conjure up a thousand 
shapes and chimeras as he returned 
through this haunted region. Pirates 
hanging in chains seemed to swing from 
every tree, and he ahiiost expected to 
see some Spanish Don, with his throat 
cut from ear to ear, rising slowly out 
of the ground and shaking the ghost 
of a money-bag. 

Their way back lay through the deso- 
late garden, and Wolfert's nerves had 
arrived at so sensitive a state that the 
flitting of a bird, the rustling of a leaf, 
or the falling of a nut, was enough to 
startle him. As they entered the con- 
fines of the garden, they caught sight of 
a figure at a distance advancing slowly 
up one of the walks, and bending under 
the weight of a burden. They paused 
and regarded him attentively. He wore 
what appeared to be a woolen cap, and, 
still more alarming, of a most sanguin- 
ar\' red. 

The figure moved slowly on, ascended 
the bank, and stopped at the very door 
of the sepulchral vault. Just before 
entering it he looked around. What 
was the affright of Wolfert when he 
recognized the grisly visage of the 
drowned buccaneer. He uttered an 
ejaculation of horror. The figure 
slowly raised his iron fist and shook it 
with a terrible menace. Wolfert did not 
pause to see any more, but hurried ofif 
as fast as his legs could carry him, nor 
was Sam slow in following at his heels, 
having all his ancient terrors revived. 
Away then did they scramble through 
bush and brake, horribly frightened at 
every bramble that tugged at their 
skirts, nor did they pause to breathe 
until they had blundered their way 
through this perilous wood and fairly 
reached the high road to the city. 

Several days elapsed before Wolfert 
could summon courage enough to 
prosecute the enterprise, so much had 
he been dismayed by the apparition, 
whether living or dead, of the grisly 
buccaneer. In the meantime, what a 
conflict of mind did he suffer! He neg- 



lected all his concerns, was moody and 
restless all day, lost his appetite, wan- 
dered in his thoughts and words, and 
committed a thousand blunders. His 
rest was broken; and when he fell 
asleep, the nightmare, in shape of a 
huge money-bag, sat squatted upon his 
breast. He babbled about incalculable 
sums; fancied himself engaged in 
money-digging; threw the bedclothes 
right and left in the idea that he was 
shoveling away the dirt; groped under 
the bed in quest of the treasure, and 
lugged forth, as he supposed, an ines- 
timable pot of gold. 

Dame Webber and her daughter 
were in despair at what they conceived 
a returning touch of insanity. There 
are two family oracles, one or other of 
which Dutch housewives consult in all 
cases of great doubt and perplexity — 
the dominie and the doctor. In the 
present instance, they repaired to the 
doctor. There was at that time a littk 
dark mouldy man of medicine, famous 
among the old wives of the Manhattoes 
for his skill, not only in the healing art 
but in all matters of strange and mys- 
terious nature. His name was Dr. 
Knipperhausen, but he was more com- 
monly known by the appellation of the 
High-German Doctor. To him did the 
poor women repair for counsel and 
assistance touching the mental vagaries 
of Wolfert Webber. 

They found the doctor seated in his 
little study, clad in the dark camlet robe 
of knowledge, with his black velvet cap, 
after the manner of Boorhaave, Van 
Helmont, and other medical sages; a 
pair of green spectacles set in black 
horn upon his clubbed nose, and poring 
over a German folio that reflected back 
the darkness of his physiognomy. The 
doctor listened to their statement of 
the symptoms of Wolfert's malady with 
profound attention; but when they 
came to mention his raving about buried 
money the little man pricked up his ears. 
Alas, poor women ; they little knew the 
aid they had called in. 

Dr. Knipperhausen had been half his 
life engaged in seeking the short cuts 
to fortune, in quest of which so many 
a long lifetime is wasted. He had 
passed some years of his youth among 



THE WHITE CITY MAGAZINE 



6i 



the Harz mountains of Germany, and 
had derived much valuable instruction 
from the miners touching the mode of 
seeking treasure buried in the earth. 
He had prosecuted his studies also 
under a traveling sage v^ho united the 



The doctor had often heard rumors 
of treasure being buried in various parts 
of the island, and had long been anxious 
to get on the traces of it. No sooner 
were Wolfert's waking and sleeping 
vagaries confided to him than he beheld 
in them the confirmed symptoms of a 
case of money-digging, and lost no time 
in probing it to the bottom. Wolfert 
had long been sorely oppressed in mind 
by the golden secret, and as a family 
physician is a kind of father confessor, 
he was glad of any opportunity of un- 
burdening himself. So far from curing, 
the doctor caught the malady from his 
patient. The circumstances unfolded to 
him awakened all his cupidity; he had 
not a doubt of money being buried 
somewhere in the neighborhood of the 
mysterious crosses, and offered to join 
Wolfert in his search. He informed 
him that much secrecy and caution must 
be observed in enterprises of the kind; 
that money is only to be digged for at 




mysteries of medicine Vv'ith magic and 
legerdemain. His mind, therefore, had 
become stored with all kinds of mystic 
lore; he had dabbled a little in astrol- 
ogy, alchemy, divination; knew how to 
detect stolen money and to tell where 
springs of water lay hidden; in a word, 
by the dark nature of his knowledge he 
had acquired the name of the High-Ger- 
man Doctor, which is pretty nearly 
equivalent to that of necromancer. 



Let that skull alone. ' ' czi^ 



62 



THE WHITE CITY MAGAZINE 



night; ^\dth certain forms and ceremo- 
nies; burning of drugs; repeating of 
mystic words, and, above all, that the 
seekers first must be provided with a 
divining rod, which had the wonder- 
ful property of pointing to the very spot 
on the surface of the earth under which 
treasure lay hidden. As the doctor had 
given much of his mind to these matters, 
he charged himself with all the neces- 
sary preparations, and, as the quarter 
of the moon was propitious, he under- 
took to have the divining rod ready by 
a certain night. 

Wolfert's heart leaped with joy at 
having met with so learned and able a 
coadjutor. Everything went on secretly 
but swimmingly. The doctor had many 
consultations with his patient, and the 
good women of the household lauded 
the comforting eflfect of his visits. In 
the meantime the wonderful divining 
rod, that great key to nature's secrets, 
was duly prepared. The doctor had 
thumbed over all his books of knowl- 
edge for the occasion; and the black 
fisherman was engaged to take them in 
his skiff to the scene of enterprise; to 
work with spade and pickax in unearth- 
ing the treasure; and to freight his 
bark with the weighty spoils they were 
certain of finding. 

At length the appointed night arrived 
for this perilous undertaking. Before 
Wolfert left his home he counseled his 
wife and daughter to go to bed, and 
feel no alarm if he should not return 
during the night. Like reasonable 
women, on being told not to feel alarm, 
they fell immediately into a panic. They 
saw at once by his manner that some- 
thing unusual was in agitation; all their 
fears about the unsettled state of his 
mind were revived with tenfold force; 
they hung about him, entreating him 
not to expose himself to the night air, 
but all in vain. When once Wolfert 
was mounted on his hobby, it was no 
easy matter to get him out of the saddle. 
It was a clear starlight night when he 
issued out of the portal of the Webber 
palace. He wore a large flapped hat 
tied under the chin with a handkerchief 
of his daughter's, to secure him from 
the night damp, while Dame Webber 
threw her long red cloak about his 



shoulders and fastened it around his 
neck. 

The doctor had been no less carefully 
armed and accoutered by his house- 
keeper, the vigilant Frau Ilsy, and sal- 
lied forth in his camlet robe by way of 
surcoat, his black velvet cap under his 
cocked hat, a thick clasped book under 
his arm, a basket of drugs and dried 
herbs in one hand, and in the other the 
miraculous rod of divination. 

The great church-clock struck ten as 
Wolfert and the doctor passed by the 
church-yard, and the watchmen bawled 
in hoarse voice a long and doleful "All's 
well!" A deep sleep had already fallen 
upon this primitive little burgh; nothing 
disturbed this awful silence, excepting 
now and then the bark of some profli- 
gate night-walking dog or the serenade 
of some romantic cat. It is true, Wol- 
fert fancied more than once that he 
heard the sound of a stealthy footfall at 
a distance behind them; but it might 
have been merely the echo of their own 
steps along the quiet streets. He 
thought also at one time that he saw a 
tall figure skulking after them — stop- 
ping when they stopped, and moving on 
as they proceeded; but the dim and 
uncertain lamp-light threw such vague 
gleams and shadows that this might all 
have been mere fancy. 

They found the old fisherman waiting 
for them, smoking his pipe in the stern 
of the skiff, which was moored just in 
front of his little cabin. A pickax and 
spade were lying in the bottom of the 
boat, with a dark lantern and a stone 
bottle of good Dutch courage, in which 
honest Sam no doubt put even more 
faith than did Dr. Knipperhausen in his 
drugs. 

Thus then did these three worthies 
embark in their cockleshell of a skiff 
upon this nocturnal expedition, with a 
wisdom and valor equaled only by the 
three wise men of Gotham who adven- 
tured to sea in a bowl. The tide was 
rising and running rapidly up the 
Sound. The current bore them along, 
almost without the aid of an oar. The 
profile of the town lay all in shadow. 
Here and there a light feebly glim- 
mered from sick-chamber or from 
cabin-window of some vessel at anchor 



THE WHITE CITY MAGAZINE 



63 



in the stream. Not a cloud obscured 
the deep starry firmament, the lights 
of which wavered on the surface of the 
placid river; and a shooting meteor, 
streaking its pale course in the very- 
direction they were taking, was inter- 
preted by the doctor into a most pro- 
pitious omen. 

In a little while they glided by the 
point of Corker's Hook and the rural 
inn which had been the scene of such 
night adventures. The family had re- 
tired to rest and the house was dark 
and still. Wolfert felt a chill pass over 
him as they passed the point where the 
buccaneer had disappeared. While re- 
garding it, they thought they saw a 
boat actually lurking at the very place; 
but the shore cast such a shadow over 
the border of the water that they could 
discern nothing distinctly. They had 
not proceeded far when they heard the 
low sounds of distant oars, as if cau- 
tiously pulled. Sam plied his oars with 
redoubled vigor, and knowing all the 
eddies and currents of the stream, soon 
left their followers, if such they were, 
far astern. In a little while they 
stretched across Turtle bay and Kip's 
bay, then shrouded themselves in the 
deep shadows of the Manhattan shore, 
and glided swiftly along, secure from 
observation. At length the negro shot 
his skiff into a little cove, darkly em- 
bowered by trees, and made it fast to 
the well-known iron ring. They now 
landed, and lighting the lantern, gath- 
ered their various implements and pro- 
ceeded slowly through the bushes. 
Every sound startled them, even that of 
their own footsteps among the dry 
leaves; and the hooting of a screech owl 
from the shattered chimney of the 
neighboring ruin made their blood run 
cold. 

In spite of all Wolfert's caution in 
taking note of the landmarks, it was 
some time before they could find the 
open place among the trees where the 
treasure was supposed to be buried. At 
length they came to the ledge of the 
rock; and on examining its surface by 
the aid of the lantern Wolfert recog- 
nized the three mystic crosses. Their 
hearts beat quick, for the momentous 
trial was at hand that was to determine 
their hopes. 



The lantern was now held by Wolfert 
Webber while the doctor produced the 
divining rod. It was a forked twig, one 
end of which was grasped firmly in each 
hand, while the center, forming the 
stem, pointed perpendicularly upwards. 
The doctor moved this wand about 
within a certain distance of the earth, 
from place to place, but for some time 
without any effect, while Wolfert kept 
the light of the lantern full upon it and 
watched it with the most breathless in- 
terest. At length the rod began slowly 
to turn. The doctor grasped it with 
greater earnestness, his hands trembling 
with the agitation of his mind. The 
wand continued to turn gradually, until 
at length the stem had reversed its posi- 
tion, and pointed perpendicularly down- 
ward, and remained pointing to one 
spot as fixedly as the needle to the pole. 

"This is the spot!" said the doctor, 
in an almost inaudible tone. 

Wolfert's heart was in his throat. 

"Shall I dig?" said the negro, grasp- 
ing the spade. 

"Pots tausend, no!" replied the little 
doctor, hastily. 

He now ordered his companions to 
keep close by him, and to maintain the 
most inflexible silence, as certain pre- 
cautions must be taken and ceremonies 
used to prevent the evil spirits which 
kept about buried treasure from doing 
them any harm. He then drew a circle 
about the place, large enough to in- 
clude the whole party. He next gath- 
ered dry twigs and leaves and made a 
fire, upon which he threw certain drugs 
and dried herbs which he had brought 
in his basket. A thick smoke rose, dif- 
fusing a potent odor, savoring mar- 
velously of brimstone and assafetida, 
which, however grateful it might be to 
the olfactory nerves of spirits, nearly 
strangled poor Wolfert and produced 
a fit of coughing and wheezing that 
made the whole grove resound. Dr. 
Knipperhausen then unclasped the vol- 
ume which he had brought under his 
arm, which was printed in red and 
black characters in German text. While 
Wolfert held the lantern, the doctor, 
by the aid of his spectacles, read off sev- 
eral forms of conjuration in Latin and 
German. He then ordered Sam to seize 
the pickax and proceed to work. The 



64 



THE WHITE CITY MAGAZINE 



close-bound soil gave obstinate signs of 
not having been disturbed for many a 
year. After having picked his way 
through the surface, Sam came to a bed 
of sand and gravel which he threw 
briskly to right and left with the spade. 

"Hark!" said ^^"olfert, who fancied 
he heard a trampling among the dry 
leaves and a rustling through the 
bushes. Sam paused for a moment, and 
they listened. No footsteps were 
near. The bat flitted by them in 
silence; a bird, roused from its roost by 
the light which glared up among the 
trees, flew circling about the flame. In 
the profound stillness of the woodland, 
they could hear the current rippling along 
the rocky shore and the distant murmur- 
ing and roaring of Hellgate. 

The negro continued his labors and 
had already digged a considerable hole. 
The doctor stood on the edge, reading 
formulae every now and then from his 
black-letter volume, or throwing more 
drugs and herbs upon the fire; while 
Wolfert bent anxiously over the pit, 
watching every stroke of the spade. 
Any one ^^'itnessing the scene thus 
lighted up by fire, lantern, and the re- 
flection of Wolfert's red mantle, might 
have mistaken the little doctor for some 
foul magician, busied in his incanta- 
tions, and the grizzly-headed negro for 
some swart goblin, obedient to his com- 
mands. 

At length the spade of the fisherman 
struck upon something that sounded 
hollow. The sound vibrated to Wol- 
fert's heart. He struck his spade again. 

'"Tis a chest," said Sam. 

"Full of gold, I'll warrant it!" cried 
Wolfert, clasping his hands with rap- 
ture. 

Scarcely had he uttered the words 
when a sound from above caught his 
ear. He cast up his eyes, and lo! by the 
expiring light of the fire he beheld, just 
over the disk of the rock, what ap- 
peared to be the grim visage of the 
drowned buccaneer, grinning hideously 
down upon him. 

Wolfert gave a loud cry and let fall 
the lantern. His panic communicated 
itself to his companions. The negro 
leaped out of the hole; the doctor 
dropped his book and basket, and be- 



gan to pray in German. All was horror 
and confusion. The fire was scattered 
about, the lantern extinguished. In 
their hurry-scurry they ran against and 
confounded one another. Tliey fancied 
a legion of hobgoblins let loose upon 
them, and that they saw, by the fitful 
gleams of the scattered embers, strange 
figures, in red caps, gibbering and 
ramping round them. The doctor ran 
one way, the negro another, and Wol- 
fert made for the water side. As he 
plunged strugghng onwards through 
bush and brake he heard the tread of 
some one in pursuit. He scrambled 
frantically fonvard. The footsteps 
gained upon him. He felt himself 
grasped by his cloak, when suddenly 
his pursuer was attacked in turn; a 
fierce fight and struggle ensued — a pis- 
tol was discharged that lit up rock and 
bush for a second and showed two 
figures grappling together — all was 
darker than ever. The contest con- 
tinued — the combatants clinched each 
other, and panted, and groaned, and 
rolled among the rocks. There was a 
snarling and growling as of a cur, min- 
gled with curses, in which Wolfert 
fancied he could recognize the voice of 
the buccaneer. He would fain have 
fled, but he was on the brink of a preci- 
pice and could go no further. 

Again the parties were on their feet; 
again there was a tugging and strug- 
gling, as if strength alone could decide 
the combat, until one was precipitated 
from the brow of the clifT and sent 
headlong into the deep stream that 
whirled below. Wolfert heard the 
plunge and a kind of strangling, bub- 
bling murmur, but the darkness of the 
night hid everything from him, and the 
swiftness of the current swept every- 
thing instantly out of hearing. One of 
the combatants was disposed of, but 
whether friend or foe Wolfert could 
not tell, nor whether they might not 
both be foes. He heard the survivor 
approach and his terror revived. He 
saw, where the profile of the rocks rose 
against the horizon, a human form ad- 
vancing. He could not be mistaken: 
it must be the buccaneer. Whither 
should he fly! — a precipice was on one 
side — a murderer on the other. The 



THE WHITE CITY MAGAZINE 



65 



enemy approached — he was close at 
hand. Wolfert attempted to let him- 
self down the face of the cliff. His coat 
caught in a thorn that grew on the edge. 
He was jerked from off his feet and 
held dangling in the air, half choked by 
the string with which his careful wife 
had fastened the garment around his 
neck. Wolfert thought his last moment 
was arrived; already had he committed 
his soul to St. Nicholas when the string 
broke, and he tumbled doAvn the bank, 
bumping from rock to rock, and bush 
to bush, and leaving the red cloak flut- 
tering like a bloody banner in the air. 

It was a long while before Wolfert 
came to himself. When he opened his 
eyes the ruddy streaks of morning were 
already shooting up the sky. He found 
himself grievously battered, and lying 
in the bottom of a boat. He attempted 
to sit up but was too sore and stiff to 
move. A voice requested him in 
friendly accents to lie still. He turned 
his eyes toward the speaker: it was Dirk 
Waldron. He had dogged the party, at 
the earnest request of Dame Webber 
and her daughter, who, with the laud- 
able curiosity of their sex, had pried 
into the secret consultations of Wolfert 
and the doctor. Dirk had been com- 
pletely distanced in following the light 




skiff of the fisherman, and had just come 
in to rescue the poor money-digger 
from his pursuer. 

Thus ended this perilous enterprise. 
The doctor and Black Sam severally 
found their way back to the Manhat- 
toes, each having some dreadful tale of 
peril to relate. As to poor Wolfert, 
instead of returning in triumph laden 
with bags of gold, he was borne home 
on a shutter, followed by a rabble-rout 
of curious urchins. His wife and daugh- 
ter saw the dismal pageant from a dis- 
tance and alarmed the neighborhood 
with their cries; they thought the poor 
man had suddenly settled the great debt 
of nature in one of his wayward moods. 
Finding him, however, still living, they 
had him speedily to bed, and a jury of 
old matrons of the neighborhood assem- 
bled to determine how he should be doc- 
tored. 

The whole town was in a buzz with 
the story of the money-diggers. Many 
repaired to the scene of the previous 
night's adventures; (but though they 
found the very place of the digging, 
they discovered nothing that compen- 
sated them for their trouble. Some say 
they found the fragments of an oaken 
chest, and an iron pot-lid which 
savored strongly of hidden money; and 
that in the old family vault there were 
traces of bales and boxes; but this is all 

very dubious. 

* * * 

During the relating of this remark- 
able tale Big John had blinked his eyes 
occasionally and once or twice had 
opened his mouth as though he were 
about to make some comment. But, 
thinking better of it, he reserved any- 
thing he had to say until Little Pat con- 
cluded. Finally he could stand it no 
longer and, breaking into the chorus of 
congratulations with which the story 
was received, he said with withering 
sarcasm: 

"You seem to have liked the stories 
of Washington Irving very much." 

"Shure," replied the unabashed Little 
Pat with a broad grin, "I have as much 
admiration for him as any man here, 
yerself for instance, because he tells as 
good a sh-tory as though he were an 
Oirishman himself." 



66 



THE WHITE CITY MAGAZINE 



The big fellow looked as though he 
was sorry he had spoken and made a 
pretense of getting ready to go home. 

"They were fine stories, just the 
same," remarked the map clerk. 

'Th' very best in American litera- 
toore." remarked Little Pat. "Th' 
sh-tory of 'Bill Smith an' Old Scratch' 
was very much loike th' sh-tory of 'Th' 
Divil an' Tom Walker' as related by 
Misther Irving." 

Big John laughed, Little Pat joining 



him and the others coming in in a cack- 
ling chorus. 

"You were too wise for me," said 
John. "I didn't know that you would 
recognize my story as being one of the 
most famous in American literature, 
the work of Washington Irving, but 
when Pat there, started to tell another 
by the same author, I knew it was all 
off with me. 

"Ye can't fool th' Oirish," said Lit- 
tle Pat. 




Pyrotechnic Expert 
at White City 



^ 



special Displays of Fireworks to be Given 




EORGE W. Porter, well 
known throughout the 
United States as an expert 
in the designing, manufac- 
ture and handling of fire- 
works, has joined the staflf of General 
Manager Howse at White City and will 
provide some decidedly novel and inter- 
esting features during the season. 

Mr. Porter will arrange displays of 
fireworks from time to time, and his pro- 
ductions will be of special interest to vis- 
itors at White City, in view of the fact 
that suitable designs appropriate to vari- 
ous occasions will be produced on a scale 
of magnificence and grandeur never 
before attempted in Chicago. 

The special designs made by Mr. Por- 
ter are principally of that class known 
as ground fireworks, because the display 
consists largely of set figures and comic 
subjects. A large number of them will 
be given on floats anchored in the lagoon 



connected with the Chutes, but there will 
be moving figures on land and water, 
birds and animals swimming or walking, 
flying machines on wires, etc. 

Any societies, clubs, civic organiza- 
tions or prominent individuals will be 
paid special attention to on the occasion 
of their visits to White City, and 
appropriate designs can be arranged for 
by sending notification in advance of pro- 
jected visits. 

Mr. Porter will have on hand reproduc- 
tions of emblems of the various promi- 
nent societies and will also make por- 
traits of leading officials or public men. 

A large and fully equipped factory to 
be located within a few blocks of White 
City is now being constructed, and 
within a few weeks Mr. Porter will be 
hard at work designing and manufactur- 
ing the fireworks, which will add materi- 
ally to the attractiveness of White City. 



THE WHITE CITY MAGAZINE 67 



Another Long Stride 

in the direction of making Chicago the greatest 
ELECTRIC CITY in the world, has been 
made by the adoption and Hberal apphcation of 



Commonwealth 
Electric Light 

and Power 



in the new White City. 

Electricity is typical of the age in which 
we live. 

It is particularly adapted for illuminating 
purposes in modern residences and apartments. 

May we not send our representative to 
explain how YOU can use it to advantage, and 
why you SHOULD use it. 

Commonwealth Electric Company 

719 Garfield Boulevard 
General Offices: 139 Adams Street 



When writing to advertisers please mention the White City Magazine. 



68 



THE WHITE CITY MAGAZINE 



What a Physician Says 

Lono-evii\ the Result of Indulgence in Amusements 




T IS not generally known, 
except among members of 
the medical profess on that 
amusements and entertain- 
ments which stimulate 
laughter, shouting, intense in- 
terest of an intermittent character or 
those thrills which are the result of 
swinging, riding in a rapidly moving 
elevator, coasting, or similar quick or 
unexpected movements act in very 
much the same way upon the human 
svstem and upon the circulation of the 
blood as though the person so affected 
were put through a course of physical 
culture by a thorough teacher." 

Thus spake one of the best known 
physicians in Chicago ; a man of 
national reputation and acknowledged 
superiority. He was discussing the 
benefits to be derived by the people of 
Chicago from White City and his 
point was that too few people realize 
the work done by nature. He contends 
that by permitting a relaxation of cer- 
tain pleasurable emotions, which are 
generally strangled under the guise of 
dignity, the human system derives 
material benefits, which add to the years 
of any mortal so participating in the 
enjoyments of life. 

"At the same time," he continued, "it 
makes life worth living to indulge in 
the harmless and innocent pleasures 
which are to be offered at White City. 
The stiff-necked business man, the dig- 
nified professor or pedagogue, the 
unbending attorney, the haughty society 
dame, and in fact all those who take 
life seriously, will find themselves bene- 
fited by afew hours of relaxation. 

"The amusements which will be 
found at White City are of such a 
character that no person in the world 
could possibly be injured or hurt, in 
morals, disposition or in a physical way. 
It will be impossible for anybody to 
visit White City and not to be bene- 
fited, if they will only act naturally. 

"There are entirely too many people 
in this world who think it necessary to 
go about with long faces and serious 



thoughts all of the time. They should 
not forget that in their nature exists the 
necessity for a certain amount of relax- 
ation, and if they do not profit by this 
knowledge they will find themselves 
very much in the same condition as the 
man who always chewed his food on one 
side of his mouth and wore his teeth 
all down on that side. 

"Nature requires an equalization of 
use of every faculty, it not necessarily 
following that all must be used to a 
similar extent, but each must be used 
enough to keep it in fit condition. Hin- 
doo fakirs hold a limb in one pose for 
years until the muscles grow fixed in 
that position. The man is then a crip- 
ple; his body is not normal. The 
Chinese women wrap their feet so 
tightly that the growth of these mem- 
bers is restricted and they cannot walk 
on them. They are then cripples. 

"When a man fails to keep alive the 
faculty of enjoying himself and spends 
all his time preserving a fancied dig- 
nity, or fails to see an3'thing in life but 
the serious things, how can he be 
happy and how can those with whom 
he is surrounded be happy — the mem- 
bers of his family or his business asso- 
ciates? He does not draw from the 
treasury of Nature his full allowance 
of the good things of life." 

When White City is open to the 
public there will be found sufficient 
entertainment for the great masses of 
Chicago. People of every class, age or 
condition in life will find things to 
amuse and entertain them such as have 
never been possible for them to enjoy 
in the past. 

It can truly be said of White City 
that it is "dedicated to Merriment and 
Mirth," also to Health, Happiness and 
Longevity. 



There isn't much difference between 
a trust and a monopoly. When a girl 
feels that she can trust a fellow she 
wants a monopoly on him. — Philadel- 
phia Record. 



THE WHITE CITY MAGAZINE 69 



If it's 



GOES 

it's Good 



Look for the Imprint 



Goes Lithographing Co. 

Main Office and Plant City Sales Dept. 

61st and Clark Sts. 160 Adams Street 

Chicago 



When writing to advertisers please mention the White City Magazine. 



THE WHITE CITY MAGAZINE 



GEORGE A. LEWIS 

HARDWARE 

407-409 £ast 63d Street. Chicago 

TelepKone Hyde ParK 493 



WHITE RIVER LUMBER CO. 


WHOLESALE AND RETAIL 


PINE AND HEMLOCK LUMBER 


Cedar Products and Mill Work 


Long Distance Telephones: 

Lake Shore 413 Main Office and Docks: 

South Chicago 44 NINETY-SECOND ST. BRIDGE, CHICAGO 



ANSEL COOK 

Office: Room 60 Grand Opera House Building, Chicago, 111. 

Scenic Artist, Designer, Originator 
and Constructor 

C Now engaged m preparing tne $60,000 reproduction or tne 
CITY OF VENICE, also tke $50,000 scenery for tKe 

SCENIC RAILWAY at WHITE CITY, CKicago. 

CL Designer and Constructor of tke famous COAL MINE 
IN MINIATURE for tKe Fairmount Coal Co. of West 
Virginia ( Highest Award), and tne -wonderful exniDit of tne 
Davis Colliery Co. of \Vest Virginia (Gold Medal), at tne 
Louisiana Purcnase Exposition; tne two principal features and 
most popular exhibits in the Mines and Metallurgy Suilding. 
CL Designer and Constructor of the Mural Decorations for 
the Dome of the State Capitol Building at Topeka, Kansas. 

Estimates Furnisned on Entire Productions or Separate Scenes 



When writing to advertisers please mention The White City Magazine. 



THE WHITE CITY MAGAZINE 



71 



BOSWORTH BROS. 

EXPRESS 

VAN AND STORAGE 



CO. 



Telephone .... Wentworth 876 and 857 

Expert Furniture and Piano 
Movers, Packers and Shippers 

MAIN OFFICE AND WAREHOUSE 
6103 - 6105 WENTWORTH AVENUE 



STRICTLY MODERN WAREHOUSE 
PRIVATE IRON ROOMS 



,300 



W. Krug & Son 

2829 La Salle Street 
CHICAGO, ILL. 

Excavating 

Wrecking ®> 

Filling 

Dealers in 

SAND and GRAVEL 

Phone South 976 

W. KRUG, JR., 

(>42g Vincennes Aver.ue 
Residence Phone Garfield 1753 




Do You Use Illustrations? il 

If you use drawings, photographs, engravings of any kind 
you appreciate the value of a concern that can uniformly 
giveyouthe required resultspromptly and at reasonable cost. 
Barnes-Crosby Company stands pre-eminent in its field, 
doing the largest engraving and illustrating business in the 
V70rld V7ith a clientele consisting of the most discriminating 
, M users of illustrations throughout the country. 

This unexcelled service costs you no more than that of mediocre quality 

Ask for booklets and estimates Address our nearest house 

Barnes-Crosby Company 

E. W. HOUSER, President 

Artists "RncrraTT-prQ Commercial 

M Electrotypers J--ii^ictv^:;io Photographers 
CHICAGO NEW YORK ST. LOUIS 

^^ Engraving Day and Night" 




When writing to advertisers please mention The White City Magazine. 



72 



THE WHITE CITY MAGAZINE 



Sykes Steel Roofing 
Company 

Sheet Metal Contractors 



MAKERS OF 



Fire-Proof Windows^ Constructed of Galvanized Iron on 

Copper Frames^ Equipped with Automatic Closing 

Devices and Glazed with Wire Glass 



112-122 West Nineteenth Place 



CHICAGO 



TELEPHONE CANAL 810 



II 



TelepHone Yards 142 



W. R. JACQUEST 

ILUMBING 



B 



GAS FITTING 



HOT WATER HEATING AND 
SEWERAGE 



w 



3528 SOUTH WOOD STREET, CHICAGO 




When writing to advertisers please mention The White City Magazine. 



THE WHITE CITY MAGAZINE 



n 



Dedicated to JV h i t e City 



JOSEPH E. HOWARD PRESENTS 
MISS DOROTHY RUSSELL'S LATEST EFFORT 



MEET ME AT 
WHITE CITY 




NEW CHORUS 

Meet me at White City, 

In old Chicago town; 
Where lovers spoon to music 

While strolling up and down ; 
No Coney Island dreamland 

Stands any chance at all ; 
There's only one White City — ■ 

It's the dearest place of all. 

Copyrighted 1905 by Dorothy Russell 




When writing to advertisers please mention The White City Magazine. 



74 



THE WHITE CITY MAGAZINE 



K Automatic gyol 



Chas. F. Donoghue 



PLUMBING 
STEAM AND 
GAS FITTING 



80 Van Buren Street :-: Chicago, 111 



WHEN YOU VI5IT WHITE CITY 



=5i 



DON'T FAIL TO TAKE IN 



(^ 



Ihe Monkey, Dog (Sh 
Pony Circus 

Otherwise called the Simian 

Citv An aggregation 

of cleverly trained animals 
under the direction of Prof. 
Blake, one of the best known 
trainers in the world. A con- 
stantly changing programme 
of special interest to children 
and pleasing to all. 

BLJtKE Sr HIMES . . Proprietors 



The Willard Temple 
of Music 

Marvelous development of 
natural forces, applied by 
scientific methods for the 
performing of difficult airs on 
musical instruments of all 
kinds. . . Piano played by 
wireless telegraphy, the elec- 
tricity passing through the 
body of a human being. 

IVILLJtRD dh MINES . . Proprietors 



GEORGE H. HIMES, Business Manager 

A 



When writing to advertisers please mention The White City Magazine. 



THE WHITE CITY MAGAZINE 



75 




{>^ 






Y ACX_PI CONGRESS 

A bill was -p^^^^arch 3rd, 1897, 

ved by tfie^senate and signed 

.M^^^ President) to 

l^i^tect the public 

Sfeainst impure 

jla^ gaxe us 

^_ '^^dlip^=^pp'or- 

lus the purity and age 
o^every bottle oi 

n^ Brook 



trAight 




BOTTLED IN BOND 



The Only 

Whiskey 

Awarded 

Grand Prize 

and 

Gold Medal 

at St. Louis 

World's 

Fair 



Is guaranteed by the highest authority on earth— the GovcppincRt 
of the U. S., and bears the. Treasury Departments "Orecn Stamp"— 
proof th^t Sunny Brook is bottled in its pure natural state, under 
the dirf^t supervision of Govt. Officials in U. S. Bonded Wsre^^ouse. 
Avoid Whiskies Not Guaranteed by Uncle Sam. 

SUNNY BPOOK DISTILLERY CO., Jefferson Cownty, Ky. 



J. B. Bates 

E. Simpson 

J. Perry Bates 



Telephone Canal 353 



J. B. BATES & CO. 

Ship Yard 

FLAG POLES, SPARS, YACHTS AND SMALL BOATS 



240 West Twenty-Second Street 



CHICAGO 



When writing to advertisers please mention The White City Magazine. 



76 



THE WHITE CITY MAGAZINE 



The South Side 

Elevated Railroad 

Company 

has a station 
at the gate of 

White City 





When writing to advertisers please mention The White City Magazine. 



THE WHITE CITY MAGAZINE 



77 




TELEPHONE HARRISON 424 



CLARK & HARRISON STS 



tl/(?i 



UTHO.CO. 

CHICAGO 



wL 



INDOOR AND OUTDOOR 

Lithographin 

High Grade and of Every Description, Let us try 
for your Business by Giving us a Chance to Estimate 



B 



MAYBE WE CAN GIVE YOU BETTER WORK OR 
BETTER PRICES :: :: :: :: TRY US AND SEE 



When -writing to advertisers please mention The White City Magazine. 



78 THE WHITE CITY MAGAZINE 

Central 

Printing & Engraving 

Company 

COMMERCIAL, RAILROAD, CIRCUS 
AND THEATRICAL PRINTING 



POSTERS 

FOR BILLBOARDS AND 
ELEVATED STATIONS 

CAR CARDS 

FOR SURFACE AND 
ELEVATED LINES 

See Our White City Work 



''&^ 






140-146 Monroe Street, Chicago 

Tel. Central 1 144 Automatic 6279 



When writing to advertisers please mention The White City Magazinb. 



THE WHITE CITY MAGAZINE 



79 



Jos. Deutsch, Pres't. 



ESTABLISHED 1896 Chas. Edwards, Sec'y and Treas. 



EDWARDS, DEUTSCH & 
HEITMANN 





Lithographers 

ig^-202 Clinton St., Chicago 



High Class Lithograph Work in all its Branches. Prompt, Reliable and 

Up-to-date. A complete establishment to which we give 

our personal supervision in the conception 

and execution of all orders 

entrusted to our 

Telephones Harrison care. We -ivill gladly submit samples 

^^2 and -//^ °f our recent productions. 



MEACHAM & WRIGHT 
COMPANY 

Improved Utica Hydraulic Cement 

AND 

Lehigh Portland Cement 

CHICAGO 



The above brands of cement were used exclusively in the con- 
struction of the White City. 



When writing to advertisers please mention The White City Magazine. 



80 



THE WHITE CITY MAGAZINE 



White City Printing 




Illustrations suitable for 

appropriately printing 

Advertising Novelties, 

Stationery, Cards, 

Show Cards, Numbered Tickets 
or Blanks, etc. 



For Concessionaires or others. 



THE WALKER & WILLIAMS CO. (un-no 

334 Dearborn Street 67O Caxton Building 

TFI EPHDNFq^ HARRISON 1080 
TELEPHONES | AUTOMATIC 6808 



Schmidt Bros, Co, 



J 



PAINTS, OILS y GLASS 

OUR MATERIALS ARE IN USE 
AT WHITE CITY. 



tv2i 






7123-7125 Cottage Grove Avenue -:- CKicago, III. 

Telephone Hyde Park 2^6 



X 



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THE WHITE CITY MAGAZINE 



8i 



]Vew 

Amsterdam 

Casualty Company 

C. J. PORTER 

Resident Ma 71 age r 

601 National Life Building 
Chicago 

W. M. GELDERMAN 

Manager Personal Accident Department 

LIABILITY . BURGLARY 
PLATE GLASS 
PERSONAL ACCIDENT 

INSURANCE 



CLARENCE BOYLE 
President 

Telephone Canal 1537 

Clarence Boyle 
Lumber Co. 

Wholesale Dealers in 

Hardwoods 
Yellow Pine 

and Cypress 

No. 319 W. 2 2d Street 
Chicago, 111. 



FIRE INSURANCE 

Write or Call us on the Telephone 
for Estimates 

Metropolitan Fire 
Insurance Co. 

OF CHICAGO 



JOHN NAGHTEN & CO., Gen. Mgrs. 



Established 1863 



/J9 LA SALLE STREET 

MORRIS GOODMAN, Agent 

Tel i Cent. 11 59 
'/ Auto. 4195 



WESTERN 

TRUSTS SAVINGS 

BANK 

157-159 La Salle Street 
Chicago 

Capital, $1,000,000 

j% Allowed for Savhigs 

Commercial Accounts 
Solicited 



OFFICERS 
Joseph E. Otis, . . President 
Walter H. Wilson, Vice-President 
Lawren'ce Nelson, Vice-President 
William C. Cook, . . Cashier 
H. Wollenberger, Ass't to Pres. 
W. G. Walling, . . Secretary 



When writing to advertisers please mention The White City Magazine. 



82 



THE WHITE CITY MAGAZINE 



WYM AN\S 
BUFFET 

Wines, Liquors Sp Cigars 

984 £• 63d street 
CHICi\GO 

Telephone 632 IVcntworth 



CALL AT 

WADDINGTON'S 

laiENTRAL 

U MARKET 

719 East 63d Street 

Corner Cottage Grove Ave. 

for Good Chops & Roasts 

LEADING BUTCHERS 



Cumber Company 

7i$t and Ulallacc Streets 




Pbona mentwortb 50i and sos 



Telephone Harrison 2633 

Q J. STEIN 

PLUMBING 

GAS 

STEAM FITTING 

AND 

SEWERAGE 
CONTRACTING 

No. 479 State St. CHICAGO 



Established before J. & A. MITCHELL 

the World's Fair Proprietors 

WASHINGTON PARK 
COAL & FEED CO. 

Wholesale and Retail Dealers in 

Coal, Coke and Wood 

Hay, Grain and Feed 
Main Office: 63o9 Cottage Grove Ave. 

Phone Hyde Park 1356 
Warehouse and Yards: 

71st Street and Madison Ave., on B.&O.Ry. 
Tel. Hyde Park 261 



If it's 



HARDWARE 

Go to 

Orr&Lockett's 

First and Save Time. 
71-73 RANDOLPH ST. 



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THE WHITE CITY MAGAZINE 





All Caps and Entire Exterior and Interior Ornamental 
Composition, Plaster and Cement Work for White City 

furnished by 

The Decorators Supply Co. 



Wm. Wolfarth, President. Oscar Spindler, Vice-President. 



Wm. T. Foster, Secretary. 



Manufacturers of 
Interior and Exterior Ornaments of Every Description in 

Cement, Composition, Plaster and Wood. 

Columns, Capitals, Brackets, Cornices, Friezes, Mouldings, 

Panels, Wood Grilles, Fine Woodwork, Plastic Ceiling and Wall Decorations. 

Composition Ornaments for Woodwork. 



Designs and Estimates Furnished. 



209=219 South Clinton Street 



Chicago 




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THE WHITE CITY MAGAZINE 



True & True Co 



Blue Island Ave. and Lincoln St. 
Phone Canal 944 



Chicago 



White City Garden Balustrade, Chilcoot Pass, Transforming Station, Fire Show, 
Ball Room, Main Office, Scenic Railroad, Automatic Vaudeville, Band Stand, 
Canals of Venice, Tower, Colonnade, Toilets and Baby Incubator Buildings, con= 
sisting of the main and auxiliary buildings, show Millwork furnished by us. 



The 

True 

Doors 

Are 

Qood 

Doors 




THE RETURNED EXPLORER-" This, your highness, is the 
greatest thing <we disco<vered in cAmerica.; itisa.True S^ "True 
Door. The na.ti'ves of cAmerica. use it to stop up the holes 
through -which they enter and lea-^ve their houses so they <wiU 
be safe at all times." 



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THE WHITE CITY MAGAZINE 



Patrons of White City 

will find the celebrated 

El Principe de Gales 

and 

La Preferencia 

CIGARS 

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pHOTO BY MATZENE 

UFIE READ, America s Most Distinctive Author, ivho has written 
his Ij?ipressions of White Citx for this issue. 



Chicago, 111. March 27, 1905. 

Franc 1{. e. Woodv/ard, 

Manager Publicity' Dept. ♦WHITE CITY. 
My Deal- ifi^oodward:- 

Kere are rcy Inpressions of White City. I an not afraid 
to say a few words in favor of such an enterprise. 

Yoxirs 



(^+VA*- UxCxd' 



The IVHirE Cirr Magazine 



Vol. I 



APRIL, 1905 



Nc 




Wkite City 




MUSEAIENT is eternal 
youth. 

Civilization is not more 
marked by the work per- 
formed than by the recrea- 
tion enjoyed by man. 

We are told that in or- 
der to achieve success, Ave 
must be earnest. But mere 
earnestness may be dull. 
The most stupid mind has been charac- 
terized by unvarving earnestness. 

The truth is that enthusiasm is the 
key to success. And the mind that is 
enthusiastic must have its by-play or 
after a time it droops and becomes 
weary of itself. 

Europeans have declared that Ameri- 
cans did not know how to enjoy their 
leisure. If in this charge there is truth, 
and we must acknowledge that it is not 
wholly devoid of verity, the cause of 
our backwardness in art, in music, in 
those graces which made the Greeks 
famous, is hereby explained. 

Out of recreation comes re-creation. 
Out of jollity comes progress, for fun 
is the perfume of fancy. Tragedies have 
set forth the troubles and the evils of 
the human family. But the great trage- 
dies were written by men who best ap- 
preciated humor — amusement. 

Lincoln was seen galloping about 
over the meadow with a boy sitting 
astride his neck. One of his friends, 



nJ 



JFritten for 

The White City 

Magazine 

by 

Opie Read 



knowing that he had a most important 
trial coming on, said to him: 'T should 
think that you would be preparing for 
that struggle." 

"And that is exactly what I am do- 
ing," the great man replied. He was 
looking for mirth to strengthen his 
seriousness, to "youth" his mind. 

Toward this youth of mind Chicago 
is making the most notable advance 
that has ever been made in America. On 
the twenty-seventh of May White City 
will be dedicated to mirth. In the con- 
struction of this Aladdin wonder more 
than a million dollars have been ex- 
pended. 

Within the past fifteen years our 
country has seen many World's fairs. 

White City is the gathered fun of 
them all. 

It is a city of youth. It is an exposi- 
tion of the spirit of levity. From all 
lands expert harvesters have garnered 
smiles and laughter. And with it all the 
highest, the most artistic form of 
beauty has been maintained. 

White City is a grouping of temples. 
It will be a delight to the eye and the 
ear. 

The music will be the finest that the 
world can offer. Every country will be 
represented. It will be the world's vivi- 
fied enjoyment. 

The future, or at least the year a 
century distant, will credit Chicago with 



12 



THE WHITE CITY MAGAZINE 



having conceived and executed the 
greatest of the world's fairs. Those that 
followed were excellent in so far as 
they imitated. Studied departure was a 
loss in merit. And it remained for Chi- 
cago to construct the greatest amuse- 
ment exposition that the world has seen. 
White City is larger, costlier in de- 
sign — in truth, a far-reaching improve- 



toms, without a single objectionable 
feature. It is character without gross- 
ness, fun without vulgarity. 

I had read of the progress of this 
town of wonders. I had heard people 
speak of it. Several days ago, upon in- 
vitation, I visited it. As a rule the ad- 
vertiser forestalls all astonishment. He 
is somewhat like the man who tells you 




Excavating for Foundations at White City 



ment on Coney Island or of any place 
of which the East may boast. 

That Chicago is America's natural 
summer resort was begvm as a para- 
grapher's joke. Then a great news- 
paper took up the question and dem- 
onstrated the truth of pleasantry. 

This truth, that nowhere is there such 
a summer resort, has made White City 
possible. 

People who go from Chicago to roast 
in the country, to put up with indiffer- 
ent fare and to "blunt the mind with 
dullness," realize the fad of it all; the 
sweltering nights, the travesty upon 
music by the neighborhood band. But 
it is the country — something different. 

But White City offers a taste of all 
countries. It gives a view^ of all cus- 



that he has a story that will tickle you 
almost to death, and who after laugh- 
ing in anticipation of your coming en- 
joyment, proceeds to relate a story 
which is already familiar. 

But it would be difficult for the 
shrewdest advertiser to exaggerate 
White City. It means nothing to ac- 
cent the beautiful. And yet we are 
frequently at a loss for a better word. 

High-sounding phrases are as a loud- 
horn, affording but little music, but any 
one, with emotion enough to feel a 
thrill, must, in viewing this new munici- 
pality of Comus, incline toward rhap- 
sody. It is a dream city materialized. 
The objectionable feature of the most 
of the international fairs is that they 
have been too scattered. The exhibi- 



TUn WHITE CITY MAGAZINE 



n 



tion of mere land was too pronounced; 
and going from one feature to another 
involved time and weariness. 

White City is confined within fif- 
teen acres. It is condensed. There is 
no waste land, no attempt to impress 
with useless distance. 

In our party was a Frenchman. His 
name is Babarez, and they call him 
count. He reminded me of the African 



strous. If you have a bit of art, show 
it to me. White City? Big without 
art. Let m.e think that I have seen it." 
But we insisted, and he went. It was 
amusing to watch him; and it was some 
time before he said anything, but we 
saw astonishment in his eye. 

"A dozen acres of Paris," he said. 
"You have brought the fun of the world 
and put it down into Chicago. And as 




Fire- Proofing Exterior of Bitilding at White City 



explorer, his countryman. When asked 
to go with us he shrugged and said: 

"But I have seen the stock yards. 
What else is there to show me? A 
place where amusements are to be held? 
Ah, you must remember that I am from 
the land of gaiety. When Americans 
build, they build for business. They 
say how many dollars can I get for this 
one? I have seen Chicago. The post 
ofifice! Ah, I have seen the post office. 
It is the only ancient building you have. 
It is not a place of amusement. Is it 
not a joke? Yes, I like America. I was 
at the St. Louis exposition — heard the 
guns at the Boer War. Yes, saw every- 
thing. Too big. Now you wish to 
show me something else that is mon- 



it is when all great things have been 
done, you wonder why it was so long 
deferred. Yes, you may put me on 
record, as you Americans say. I am 
not ashamed of my astonishment. It is 
a great picture, a painting made of 
building material. And it is all to be 
dedicated to merriment? Ah, Chicago 
has turned her business vigor to joyous 
account. Striding almost in advance of 
the present, you have ransacked the 
ancient world for artistic effect. And 
what a compliment to man it is to com- 
bine beauty and mirth. 

"After all it is the soul that laughs. 
The savage does not laugh. Laughter 
is the wordless expression of the senses. 
I saw the Dream City in New York. It 



14 



THE WHITE CITY MAGAZINE 



will not compare with this. It would 
seem that whatever this town under- 
takes, it improves upon. Hitherto, with 
the exception of the World's Fair, it has 
been in the direction of business. Now 
it is recreation. You will not have to 
appeal to the pride of the people. In- 
terest in this wonderful enterprise wiU 
not be stimulated by the fact that it is a 
home institution. The fact is that it is 
not merely a local project. It is of the 
world. To this city it will attract many 
thousands of visitors. It is a university, 
and to it the tovers of amusement will 
flock. 

"Laughter is a great democracy. It 
will be a boon for the poor, this univer- 
sity. Good humor will be a scholar- 
ship. Jollity will sit in the chair of hu- 
man nature. 

"Ah," he added, "but will not this 
leveling of troubles interfere with one 
of your important industries?" 

"Which industry is that?" some one 
inquired. 

"Ah, the divorce court. More than 
all legislation laughter does away with 
trouble. They say that the Ameri- 
can wafe is going insane on account of 
life in a flat. Let her come here to this 
beautiful place and forget the flat. Here 
she will live in a palace. And the man? 
He will forget his worries. To leave 
ofif work is not to rest. To laugh is 
to rest. As long as we find amusement 
the mind is kept sound. This will be a 
sanitarium. 

"In all of my land there is no such 
place as this, \^'e have many places 
dedicated to amusement, it is true, but 
nowhere else is there a fun city. The 
expenditure has been enormous, they 
say. Therefore I thought it must be 
somber, for Americans, though the 
founders of a new school of humor, are 
usually solemn when it comes to lay- 
ing out large sums of money. Ah, the 
different features! They make the head 
swim. It is as if every taste has been 
consulted. 

''This is a great town for summer 
shows. But all of the summer shows 
combined cannot compare with the 



White City. Yes, I am glad I came. 
I have had much to do with exposi- 
tions. And today you have shown me 
something new. It is as ^schylus said — 
'Age has ever youth enough to 
learn.' Now your pride will not be 
a packing house, but the White City." 
This enterprise means much to the 




Were will be^<^ 

NO FAKES 

lorQmtmUelittrBotiom 



6ach8c8vBryAttra&lw 
will be THE BEST 



i 




A Declaration 

West. It will be the pride of Chicago. 
Not since the World's Fair has such an 
investment been made here. It is a re- 
turn of the art, the beauty, the glowing 
days of ninety-three. 



THE WHITE CITY MAGAZINE 



15 




CONSTRUCTING WHITE CITY 

AN ARMY OF WORKMEN 
CONSTANTLY EMPLOYED 

Chutes 250x50 

Double Circle 262x85 

Scenic Railway: 

Scene Palace looxioo 

Railway Track 700x25 

Loading- Station 100x60 

Infant Incubators 90^75 

Beautiful Venice 250x100 

Electric Theater 20x75 

Fun Factory 20x75 

Band Room 20x50 

Jim Key 40x100 

Flying Airships 120x100 

Bumps 40x100 

Electric Tower (288 ft. high) 40x40 

Toilet Rooms (2) 40x40 

Band Stand 35 ft. in diameter 

Mechanical Wax Works.... 50x120 

The main entrance is 60 ft. wide and 
85 ft. deep, on each side being a large 
and commodious office building. These 
office buildings are each 85 ft. long by 
30 ft. wide. 

The Chutes Lake or Lagoon is 80 ft. 
wide by 325 ft. long and will hold 
1)365,000 gallons of water. 

At the present time over 1,000 men 
are working at White City and Gen- 
eral Manager Howse, who is acting as 
Director General of the work of con- 
struction, states positively that every- 
thing will be in readiness for the open- 
ing date, May 27th. 



ITH the beautiful weather 
which has prevailed during 
the past two weeks, work 
at White City has ad- 
vanced briskly and over 75 
per cent of the work of construction 
has now been completed. The principal 
buildings have been completed with the 
exception of the finishing work, and 
the smaller buildings are all well under 
way. 

A particularly noticeable fact in con- 
nection with the work of building the 
White City is that there are so many 
brick fire walls and that the appear- 
ance of all buildings show that they are 
put up as permanent structures. Those 
who witnessed the construction of the 
buildings for the World's Columbian 
Exposition and other expositions 
which have been held in recent years, 
commented on their flimsy character. 

White City is to be a permanent in- 
stitution and every building put up 
within the limits of the fourteen acres 
occupied as its site is of a better class 
of construction than 90 per cent of the 
buildings put up in any part of Chicago. 

An enormous quantity of material 
has been necessarily used in building 
White City, and since the work began 
hundreds of teams have hauled material 
almost without cessation. 

The following list of attractions and 
the space occupied by them, as given 
below, will give an adequate idea of the 
immensity of White City. The greater 
part of the space, as specified, are com- 
pletely occupied by the buildings used 
for exploiting various atractions. 

Ball Room 167x100 ft. 

College Inn 208x100 

Automatic Arcade 60x100 

Hereafter 40x60 

]\Ionkev, Dog & Pony Circus 40x100 

Temple of Music 35x100 

Johnstown Flood 40x100 

Transforming Station 60x80 

Photograph Galler}^ 20x50 

Palmistry Kiosk 20x50 

Midway 150x100 

Fire and Flames Show 225x180 







The Blimps Building 



i6 



THE WHITE CITY MAGAZINE 



BEAUTIFUL VENICE 

A REPRODUCTION OF THE WORLDS MOST 
SPLENDID ARCHITECTURAL EFFORTS 




EAUTIFUL Venice! What 
a poetic charm is invariably 
associated with this name, 
so resonant among the 
echoes of history. The 
queen of the Adriatic, the city of the 
Doges, the birth-place of romantic ad- 
venture, the home of Galileo and the 
stage upon which was produced the ter- 
rible tragedies of the dramatic Inquisi- 
tion. 

Approaching A enice from the Adri- 
atic Sea the irresistible impression is re- 
ceived by the observer of a city of pal- 
aces and towering spires floating tran- 
quilly on the surface of the blue water. 
It certainly has a unique appearance of 
fairy-like picturesqueness. 

In the enormous palace-like structure 
which has been especially designed and 
constructed at White City for the re- 
production of Beautiful Venice, there 
is gathered together what experts de- 
clare to be the most correct and com- 
plete representations of the principal 




views to be seen in Venice. This enor- 
mous building is 250 feet long and 100 
feet in depth. The front elevation gives 
a correct impression to the sightseer of 
one of the most famous palaces in 
Venice, the one chosen by Napoleon 
for his younger brother when he was 
sent to Venice as its ruler. At night 
the exterior is brilliantly illuminated 
with thousands of incandescent lights 
and outvies in brilliancy and splendor 
the original palace even as it was in all 
its original grandeur. 

Upon entering Beautiful Venice, the 
sightseer is conducted to a large and 
commodious gondola especially built 
for use at White City, and after being 
comfortably seated, floats away upon 
the surface of a running stream which 
carries the gondola into a broad canal 
upon either side of which stand repro- 
ductions of the structures made famous 
in the World's history as being a part 
of Venice. 

It is twilight in Venice and through 
the blue vault of Heaven twinkle count- 
less stars, the light from which serves 
to give that dreamy effect which no 
other portion of the day or night can 
impart. The magnificence of the sur- 
rounding structures, the rippling of the 
waters, the lights from the palace win- 
dows and the muffled sound of voices 
giving exclamations of wonder and 
admiration at the wonderful effect pro- 
duced, all serve to instill in the mind 
a feeling as though the Spirit of an- 
cient Venice had been again revived, 
and that a panorama of those wonder- 
ful scenes of trag'edy, comedy, adven- 
ture, war and strife, were about to be 
re-enacted then and there. Under a 
bridge glides the gondola, and to the 
right stands the famous arsenal at one 
time employing over 16,000 men, and 
where the World's greatest commercial 
transactions at one time took place. 
Then come quaint old houses with nar- 
row, poorly paved streets through 
which appear to float ghosts of those 
adventurous spirits whose valorous 



Venetian Palaces 



THE WHITE CITY MAGAZINE 



17 




Scefies Troni Beautiful Venice at White City 



i8 



THE WHITE CITY MAGAZINE 



deeds have been celebrated in poetry 
and prose. 

To the Northward can be seen the 
parish Church of Pope Pius X, while 
a glance to the left reveals a collection 
of old palaces, the former homes of the 
arrogant nobles of A'enice whose de- 
scent from the original twelve consuls 
who ruled the republic in its most thriv- 
ing period, gave them certain privileges 
and rights never before or since pos- 



The Lion's Mouth, or letter box of 
Old Venice is a receptacle for anony- 
mous denouncements, the unthinking 
medium of revenge. Into the greedy 
maw of this unconscious piece of stone 
were swallowed the reputations of thou- 
sands of innocent men and women. 
Any person desiring to denounce a foe, 
wrote the accusation on a piece of 
paper, dropped it into the Lion's Mouth 
and within a few hours the person so 




Electrical Workshop at WJiite City 



sessed by any except those of the blood 
royal. Under the Bridge of Sighs, the 
ponte dei Sospiri of History, floats the 
gondola, presenting to view on one 
hand the magnificent palace of the 
Doges, w'hile on the other side is a 
view of the carceri or public prison ; 
the graveyard of more hopes and fears; 
the birth-place of more sorrows and 
despairs than in any other similar place 
known in the World's history. Then 
come more ancient palaces, modest 
homes and thriving shops until that 
magnificent piece of sculptural work 
knoW'U as the Lion's Mouth comes into 



denounced had disappeared forever. 
Youths denounced age for testy words 
of correction, while age denounced 
youth for mere exuberance of spirits, 
lovers quarreled and denounced each 
other, unfilial children denounced their 
parents, ambitious and unprincipled 
business men eliminated competition by 
utilizing this popular method until the 
very atmosphere of Venice reeked with 
loathing and fear at the awful injustice 
of it all. The Lion's Mouth was the 
post-box for the Inquisition. Brilliant 
writers have pictured in poetry and 
prose the terror of the Lion's Mouth 
and several plays have been written; 



THE WHITE CITY MAGAZINE 



19 



some of them being especially popular 
in modern times. Through the mind 
of the passenger in the gondola, such 
recollections add a weirdness and in- 
tensity of interest while floating past 
this object with its fearsome recollec- 
tions. 

Next the gondola glides under the 
Campinile Bridge where is located the 
Campinile or Bell Tower of St. Mark's 



byzantine style of architecture in the 
form of a Greek cross with large and 
roomy porticos. Over the magnificent 
and imposing central portal stands the 
celebrated bronze horses of St. Mark, 
their gigantic wings outspread as 
though to shelter the pilgrims who pass 
the portals they guard. These horses 
were brought from the Hippodrome in 
Constantinople at the time of the sack- 




1 1 ' , 'V \ Vi i ! ^ * 



Sce)ie Pa/ace tIu-ous[/i which runs tJu Scenic Railivay 



from which Galileo made his astron- 
omical observation. Here the first 
view is obtained of the Canalazzo or 
Grand Canal which runs through the 
center of the city of Venice and divides 
it into two equal parts. Here the first 
view is obtained of the celebrated St. 
Mark's Church and the historic Plaza 
which fronts it. About this ponderous, 
yet architecturally beautiful structure, 
clings the romance of centuries. It is 
the most important Church in Venice: 
occupying a commanding position and 
being bordered by arcades and stately 
edifices. The foundations were laid in 
the year 977, A. D. It was built in the 



ing of that city by the crusaders. Na- 
poleon I removed them from Venice 
to Paris, but ))opular fueling ran so high 
among the Venetians at this outrage 
against their traditions that they were 
returned. 

It is stated that the bones of the 
Apostle St. Mark were removed to 
Venice in the year 829, A. D., from the 
city of Alexandria and he forthwith be- 
came the patron saint of the city of 
A^enice. In fact one of the numerous 
titles of the citv of Venice has been 
"The Republic of St. Mark." Imme- 
diately after the removal of these re- 
mains to Venice, pilgrims from all parts 



20 



THE WHITE CITY MAGAZINE 



of the surroundino- country visited the 
shrine of St. Mark, these pilgrimages 
adding materiahy to the prosperity and 
wealth of the city and its inhabitants. 

After passing this historic spot, the 
Ducal Palace or Palace of the Doges, 
is next sighted and the A'isitor is at 
once impressed with the two towering 
red columns which have a particular 
significance. During the crusade which 
occurred in the 14th century a large 



rate they made a fierce and final attack, 
throwing ladders from the masts of 
their galleys to the towers on the walls 
of Constantinople. The sailors ran gal- 
lanth^ over these ladders, fighting des- 
perately until the Turks were beaten 
back and the city taken. 

Among the other trophies carried off 
to celebrate this wonderful victory, 
were three columns, each being so large 
that a single galley was required for its 




Checking off the Crews 



tieet of war galleys sailed from the port 
of Venice and made an attack on the 
city of Constantinople. The siege was 
a protracted one and the treasury of 
Venice became practically empty, so that 
no money was left with which to pay 
the sailors and soldiers. In this ex- 
tremity, the admiral created a new 
coinage by using stamped letter discs, 
thus establishing a currency which 
would be redeemed in gold upon their 
return to Venice. Perhaps the frugal 
propensities of the Venetians were 
aroused to an exalted pitch by this ac- 
tion through fear of the instability of 
this currency in case of defeat. At any 



transportation. Un the return voyage 
one of these galleys was lost in a furious 
storm, but the other two made the port 
of Venice in safety and landed these 
enormous columns on the quay in 
front of the Plaza. The Venetian en- 
gineers were sorely perplexed by the 
size of these magnificent columns until 
the Doge offered as a reward to any 
person who would raise them into 
place, anything which he might desire. 
A clever engineer finally accomplished 
the work and to the consternation of 
the Doge claimed as his reward, the 
privilege of conducting a gambling 
place on the Plaza between the two 



THE WHITE CITY MAGAZINE 



21 



large columns which he had erected. 
The Doge kept his word and granted 
the request, but as a punishment for 
the indiscretion so exhibited, he issued 
a decree that all executions should take 
place on the same spot. History states 
that this decree made the gambling 
privilege of no value; perhaps because 
of the fact that in those days the execu- 
tions were so frequent that there was 
no opportunity for gambling at this par- 
ticular place. The antiquity of these 



ancient Doges in their splendor of 
bullion ornamentation and mysterious 
devices. From the palaces are heard 
sweet strains of languorous Italian 
music, and in the boatman's quarters 
can be heard the dashing strains of 
the Fandango. The residence portion 
is shown with trees luxuriant in foliage; 
balconies covered with creeping vines, 
beautiftd gardens with an abundance of 
flowers, and the people in holiday attire. 
The sfondola srlides alonsf throusrh 




Foundation Trench for Electrical Transforming Station 



two columns is lost in the mazes of 
ancient history and no one knows their 
origin. They were undoubtedly carried 
to Constantinople from some ancient 
city in the orient. 

The place of execution is seen sur- 
rounded by ancient buildings and a 
beautiful view is obtained of Old Venice. 
At this spot, the gondola leaves the 
Grand Canal and floats down the 
Rialto Canal, the derivation of this 
name being Rio del Alto or Deep River. 
At the Rialto bridge, several old man- 
sions are shown on the left hand and 
Pisona's Palace at the right. Here are 
displayed the Venetian masts in holi- 
day attire, together with banners of the 



other canals where the scenery is sim- 
ilar to that before described until the 
starting point is arrived at and the 
voyager disembarks. 

All the buildings, bridges, etc., are 
correct reproductions of the originals 
in Ancient Venice. The boat piles, 
with their weird many colored stripes 
like barber poles, were brought from 
A'enice for use at White City. Many 
unique electrical features have been 
designed for this production and serve 
to enhance the splendor and grandeur 
of the starlit scene. 

An expenditure of over $75,000.00 
was required to perfect beautiful Venice 
at White City. 



THE WHITE CITY MAGAZINE 



FAMOUS BANDA ROSSA 

ONE OF THE MOST CELEBRATED MUSICAL ORGANIZATIONS 
IN THE WORLD; HOW IT WAS STARTED 




H E BANDA 
ROSSA (the 
Red Band) is 
the outcome of 
the artistic am- 
bition of the cit- 
izens of the 
small city of 
San Sever o, 
Italy, who twen- 
ty years ago 
founded a so- 
ciety for the 
prom otion of 
m u s i c. The 
B a n d a Rossa, 
while enjoying an excellent local reputa- 
tion, did not achieve renown until the so- 
ciety, in 1889. called to the conductorship 
the young Eugenio Sorrentino, who had 
just graduated with the highest honors 
from the Royal Conservatory of .Naples. 
Sorrentino's genius made itself felt at 
once. The name and reputation of the 
Banda Rossa and its wonderful young 
conductor spread rapidly throughout the 
Italian Peninsula, and subsequently was 
crowned at the exposition in Genoa, in 



1892, commemorating the 400th anni- 
versary of the discovery of America by 
Columbus. The Banda Rossa won the 
first prize and gold medal, by the unani- 
mous decision of the judges, against six- 
ty-four of the finest bands in all Europe. 
In the same year Sorrentino and his 
Banda Rossa made a triumphal tour of 
Italy. The band was then summoned 
to Germany where it was enormously 
successful. It played in the principal 
cities of the Fatherland, and one of the 
most treasured of Sorrentino's medals is 
a decoration presented to him by the 
Kaiser. 

Surprising as it may be, Sorrentino 
is an enthusiastic Wagnerite, and the 
Banda Rossa is at its best in "The Ride 
of the Valkyries," the overture to 
"Tannhauser" and fantasies on "Lohen- 
grin," "Siegfried," "Parsifal," etc., 
although many people believe the band 
rises still higher in Sorrentino's unique 
and masterly arrangements (from 
"L'Africaine," "Carmen," "Aida," "II 
Trovatore," "Faust," Boito's "Mefisto- 
fele," Giordano's "Andrae Chenier" and 
Puccini's "La Boheme" and "La Tosca." 
These arrangements are superbly scored 




A Cold Day on the Board Walk at White City. 



THE WHITE CITY MAGAZINE 



and they must be heard to be appreci- 
ated. Puccini, after reading Sorren- 
tino's score for the great fantasie on 
"La Tosca," sent Sorrentino a letter 
complimenting him in warmest terms on 
the beauty and skill of the arrangement. 
Sorrentino is a positive genius. He 
has wonderful personal magnetism, and 
no one can see him lead his band with- 



Rossa, gave its first concert in America 
at the Metropolitan Opera House, in 
New York City. The great auditorium 
was packed with a delighted audience 
and the enthusiasm that attended that 
first concert in the New World was 
unprecedented. From New York the 
band went to Boston, and the same 
scenes of pleasureable excitement were 




Hoisting the first Truss into position for tJie College Inn 



out being convinced of his force and 
superlative capacity for leadership and 
his splendid musicianship. He stands at 
the head of his men with quiet, com- 
manding dignity. He is modest and 
perfectly free from all semblance of 
aft'ectation or pretense. 

In solo material, the Banda Rossa is 
the strongest organization of its kind 
traveling, either in the Old or New 
World to-day. Sorrentino has fourteen 
celebrated soloists, each worthy the 
name of artist. Their assistance col- 
lectively contributes largely to the won- 
derful sonority and tonal blend of the 
b:ind. 

Sorrentino's Banda Rossa, which, by 
the way, is the original and only Banda 



repeated. American cities have vied with 
each other in proclaiming their unquali- 
fied approval of the superb concerts by 
the "Red Men" from Italy. The band 
is dififerent from American bands in its 
instrumentation and it is unique in other 
ways ; but although unique it is always 
high class, scholarly and artistic in its 
playing. In operatic music it is without 
an equal, and its repertoire is practically 
unlimited. To all of its music, the Red 
Band brings a fervor, an abandon and a 
perfection of ensemble that are a perfect 
revelation. 

Banda Rossa will begin a season of 
four weeks at White Crrv on May 27, 
the date of opening. 



2? 



THE WHITE CITY MAGAZINE 



ORCHESTRIONS FOR WHITE CITY 



THE MUSICAL WORLD'S BEST 
PRODUCTIONS SELECTED 



X PREPARING for the en- 
tertainment of the hun- 
dreds of thousands of peo- 
ple from Chicago and vi- 
cinity who will find pleas- 
ure and enjoyment on summer after- 
noons and evenings at White City, no 
expense has been spared by the man- 




located in the enormous Ball Room and 
which will have a volume of tone equal 
to a complete and well trained orches- 
tra of over 50 distinct pieces. This 
beautiful Orchestrion was manufac- 
tured in Paris by Limonaire Bros, and 
was the principal feature in the French 
section of the Liberal Arts Building at 




Magnificent Parisian Oichcstrioti Jor the Ball Room at Wlntc City 



agement and nothing of an inferior 
character has been selected. 

Banda Rossa will naturally be the 
principal musical feature during the first 
four weeks, but in addition to this world 
renowned organization there will be 
other musical features, each one essen- 
tial in its way. Among the unusual 
musical features at White City will be 
a magnificent Orchestrion which will be 



the St. Louis Exposition. It was uni- 
versally pronounced by experts to be 
the most perfect specimen of intricate 
harmonic mechanism and its tone and 
volume such that it was impossible to 
believe that the music did not emanate 
from a brilliant orchestra until the in- 
strument was examined at close range. 
The accompanying illustration shows 
to a considerable extent the artistic de- 



THE WHITE CITY MAGAZINE 



25 



tail of construction and the elaborately 
executed decorations, each part of 
which is a beautiful example of carving. 
Accompanying this Orchestrion is a 
carefully selected series of classical and 
popular pieces embracing the latest 




Orxhestrio7ifor Scenic Rail-a.<a\ 



compositions. The management of 
White City secured this Orchestrion 
at the St. Louis Exposition and it is 
stated by the agent of the builders that 
it is the highest priced and most ex- 
pensive instrument of the kind ever sold 
in the United States. 

Another magnificent instrument which 
will be exhibited in the Loading Sta- 
tion of the Scenic Railway was pur- 
— hased by the management of White 
]iTT at the St. Louis Exposition at a 
)st of $10,000. It is an American- 
lade Band Orchestrion and with such 
magnificent tone volume that it is 
^qual in every way to a band of 32 
)ieces. This instrument was purchased 
from the firm of Rudolph Wurlitzer & 
Co., of Chicago, and is the very best 
American-made instrument ever ex- 
hibited. It was selected bv the man- 
agement of White City after a careful 
comparison with many competitive in- 
struments, and as a result, visitors to 
White City will be charmed by its ex- 
quisite music. This Orchestrion is 
completely devoid of the shrill and 
brassy tones which are so prominent in 
Orchestrions of a cheaper kind. 



Magnificent Scenery 

Robert J. Cutler, the veteran theatri- 
cal decorator and designer, together 
with Miss Kate Cutler, has been at 
work for several months preparing the 
varied scenic effects to be shown in 
some of the principal attractions at 
White City. Their work at Dream- 
land, Coney Island, was pronounced ab- 
solutely the finest ever designed for a 
similar enterprise, and they are beating 
all previous records in their work at 
White City. 

Mr. Cutler has staged and built many 
elaborate and grand productions in his 
time, but he states positively that his 
production of Beautiful Venice and his 
work in connection with the view ef- 
fects for the Scenic Railwav will cer- 
tainly be the finest he has ever accom- 
plished. Mr. Cutler and Miss Cutler 
spent several weeks abroad in the city 
of Venice preparing the sketches and 
obtaining photographs of the principal 
sights of interest so that their work at 
White City will be exact reproduc- 
tions. 

Naturally it will not be expected that 
the whole of the citv of A'enice will be 




/?odt'rf J. Cutler 

reproduced, but the most interesting 
and celebrated buildings, statuary and' 
national trophies will be shown in the 
most natural way. 



26 



THE WHITE CITY MAGAZINE 



HOW JIM KEY WAS TRAINED 

his venerable master tells 
abol;t this interesting work 




HE thousands who will visit 
White City and see Beau- 
tiful Jim Key in his mar- 
velous performance will 
come away wondering how 
it was possible to educate a horse to 
read, write, spell, count figures, change 
money, using a cash register, etc. In 
an interview with Dr. Key, his teacher, 
a venerable colored man who spent 
seven years in teaching him, he said: 
"I beean to teach him when he was 




Jun Key's Cash Register 

one year old. First, I taught him to 
lie down and roll. Next he learned how 
to make believe that he was lame and 
act as though he were suffering with 
different kinds of trouble, the general 
symptoms of which he would repro- 
duce. I had him learn to bring me dif- 
ferent things and then to learn different 
colors. The hardest thing I had to 



teach him was to learn how to eat 
sugar. I tried every way, and had it 
tied to the bridle, but Jim would always 
spit it out. One day I saw him eating 
an apple in the orchard and I believed 
that if I could place a piece of sugar 
in the apple he would eat it. I fixed an 
apple and then watched Jim. When he 
picked it up and munched it I thought 
he would go crazy with satisfaction and 
delight. I at once tried the sugar 
alone, but it was no use. He had taken 
a grudge against raw sugar, although 
he would take it with an apple coating. 
I worked with him for six months be- 
fore I succeeded. I had to cover the 
sugar with apple and he would eat both 
with great relish. I gradually reduced 
the quantity of apple over the sugar, 
and then would have a piece of apple 
laid over a piece of sugar in my hand, 
and when he would reach for the apple 
he would get the sugar. In this way he 
soon learned that sugar was sugar and 
apple was apple. 

"The learning of the alphabet was the 
work that required the most patience. 
I had to keep at it all the time for seven 
years. When I began I had in my mind 
only to teach Jim to pick out the letter 
A. I got some cards wath the letter A 
on them, and then put the sugar on the 
card. This was, of course, after Jim 
had grown to have a passion for sugar, 
which he has never lost. I would only 
say to him 'A, A, A,' and while I was 
doing this I would let nobody in the 
stable, and I would keep him away from 
other horses. He had a private school 
all to himself and a special tutor. I 
said 'A' a good many times, and Jim 
used up many cards, as he would lick 
the cards so much. Finally I got a tin 
with the letter painted on it. I took 
months and months, a half year, before 
I was satisfied that he would know the 
letter A when he would see it. When 
I had done this T thought that if Jim 
could onlv be made to bring the card to 
me I would have just what I wanted. I 
at once began to train him for this end. 
I began with a piece of apple in a hand- 



THE WHITE CITY MAGAZINE 



27 



kerchief. I would let him get the end 
in his jaw and then I would trv to draw 
it away from him. Finally I would 
have the piece of apple in my hand and 
hold out the handkerchief to him, and 
then give him the apple. He learned 
that he was being rewarded, and I soon 
had him tugging at the card and then 
bringing it to me. Then I thought that 
I had my fortune made, when one day 
I happened to think that if the horse 
knew A when he saw it he could be 



always reward him with apple or sugar 
— he likes one as well as the other — 
whenever he would do what she asked 
of him. The way Jim learned to open 
and close the desk drawers was this: I 
had put some apples in a drawer that 
had a string attached to it. Later on 
I returned and all the apples were gone. I 
suspected some boys that were about 
the place, and when I put some more 
apples in the drawer, they, too, disap- 
peared, and then I watched and soon 







Heating Material for Concrete Work 



taught the entire alphabet, and in this 
I was right. 

"My wife used to tell me to let the 
horse alone and come out of the stable, 
for she said she knew I would go crazy 
over Jim, but it came around so that 
she got very fond of Jim, and was soon 
very much attached to him. One day 
she happened to go into the stable 
while eating an apple, and she said, 
'Jim, do you want a piece of apple?' He 
shook his head up and down. The next 
thing I heard was my wife calling out, 
'Doctor, doctor, the horse can say yes.' 
I went in, but Jim would not say it for 
me. I went out, and watched, and saw 
him do it for my wife. From that day 
she fell in love with him, and would 



found that Jim was stealing my apples. 
He had been watching me and soon be- 
gan imitating me. From that time on 
my work was easy, and all from the 
effects of patience and kindness." 

'Tvindness, kindness and more kind- 
ness," is what the doctor says when 
asked how he succeeded in teaching so 
many things to a dumb animal. 

"I made him understand," said the 
trainer, "that by learning promptly he 
would earn a piece of sugar or some 
other dainty, while dullness meant no 
sugar, no apples, but a scolding. I 
never used a whip on him in my life. 
The whip makes horses stubborn, and 
then they obey through fear only and 
can't be trusted. Kindness, kindness 
and more kindness; that's the way." 



28 



THE WHITE CITY MAGAZINE 



THE POWER OF MYSTERY 

IT INFLUENCES THE ACTS OF 
COUNTLESS THOUSANDS EVERYWHERE 




ATURE has endowed iso- 
lated individuals with the 
apparently inexplainable 
power of peering into the 
future and of calling back 
to the memory of others the half for- 
gotten past. This power is called bv 
various cognomens and during the 
countless ages of the \\'orld's historv it 
has played an important part at times. 
x\s far back as the first indestructible 
records were carved on living stone by 
the hand of man will be found related 
tales of prophets and sooth-sayers. Xo 
nation has been without such. Without 
discussing the merits of their preten- 
sions there is no doubt but that the 
whole World has always been hugely 
interested in their sayings and prognos- 
tications. The ancient Persians, the 
undying Egyptians, the indefatigable 
Israelites, the mysterious Hindoos, the 
learned Chaldeans, and in fact everv 
people of consequence since the World 
began has been deeply interested and 
powerfully influenced by those who 
claim to review the past and foretell the 
future. 

In modern times the occupation of 
astrologer, fortune teller and prophet 
have been often held in disrepute owing 
to the fact that imprincipled persons re- 
sorted to trickery and irregular meth- 
ods for the impressing of those whom 
they desired to influence. Charlatan- 
ism took the place of scientific research 
and earnest study until those who dealt 
in such mysteries were not uncommonly 
called swindlers and impostors. But 
out of the shadows of well merited sus- 
picion and distrust, here and there a ray 
of sunshine has appeared in the person 
of a recognized exponent and student 
of this popular mystery. On frequent 
occasions items appear in the daily 
newspapers in all parts of the World 
telling of wonderful instances of fore- 
sight on the part of clairvoyants or for- 
tune tellers who have foretold impor- 
tant events in their most minute details. 
Their knowledge of the fact has been 
of inestimable value to countless thou- 



sands and perhaps for this reason manv 
impostors have been tolerated in the 
hope that among them would be occa- 
sionally found a person worthy of con- 
fidence and capable of correctly reading 
the future. 

Strange to say, no matter in what 
clime or country these students of mys- 
tery are to be found, they can be almost 
invariably traced back to the far East 
and thev claim without fear of contra- 




Cliilo, 
Child of the Orie?2i 

diction that those who wish to study 
these mysteries must learn either in the 
orient or from the orientals. 

Chilo, "Child of the Orient," the 
wonderful palmist whose engagement 
at the St. Louis Exposition proved one 
of the most interesting features to the 
millions of visitors, has secured the 
privilege of appearing before the crowds 
of sight-seers who will congregate at 
White City. Experts state that be- 
yond a doubt his work is the most thor- 
ough and his reading of the future the 
most interesting of any person making 
pretensions to the possession of such 
remarkable capabilities. 

His youth and his ancestry are never 
discussed by himself and even his inti- 
mates possess no knowledge of them or 
plead ignorance for reasons politic. 

Among his most precious possessions 
have been seen beautifully jeweled or- 



THE WHITE CITY MAGAZINE 



naments and insignia of oriental de- 
sign, their richness and uniqueness tes- 
tifying that they indicate a certain con- 
sequence on the part of the wearer. At 
infrequent intervals, Chilo has been vis- 
ited by strangely garbed, swarthy, fierce 
looking men who bear the stamp of 
orientalism and whose actions toward 
this mysterious dark-eyed young man 



sons of exalted rank and has felt free in 
almost every instance to tell them what 
the future held in store for them. 

But he refuses to discuss the future 
of Prince Henry, who visited this coun- 
try a few years ago, and was received 
with great acclaim by the residents of 
the United States. He read the palm of 
Prince Henry and left the curiosity of 




White cays 

Electric Tower 



indicate a certain reverence which can 
be attributed either to a recognition of 
superiority in him, because of great 
learning or exalted birth. 

But he declines to discuss such mat- 
ters and those who desire to retain his 
friendship find it unadvisable to press 
him for information in reference to his 
personal affairs. 

Chilo is equally at home in any of the 
large cities of Europe, Asia or America 
and he has appeared before many per- 



that high-born individual very much 
excited by declining to tell him the 
story which he read in the lines which 
fate had inscribed upon his palm. To 
this day he declines to refer to the sub- 
ject. 

At White City a specially designed 
building, to be known as the Palmistry 
Kiosk, is being constructed for Chilo 
and he will be found there on and after 
May 27. 



30 



THE WHITE CITY MAGAZINE 



PAINTING WHITE CITY 

ON'ER 2,000,000 SQUARE FEET 
OF SURFACE COVERED 





T TAKES a lot of paint to 
make White City white. 
About $12,000 invested in 
paints, oils, etc., sounds 
like a large sum of money, 
and that is what Schmidt Bros. Com- 
pany thought when the members of the 
firm had it all figured out. But they 
discovered that White Cit^ was a 
good sized job 
when they got 
into the details 
because there 
was over 2,- 
000,000 square 
feet of surface 
to be covered 
with two, and 
in some places 
three coats. 

They secured 
the contract 
after fig'uring 
it all out very 
F. C. Schmidt carefully and 

deciding that it would be better to make 
a very small profit per gallon on about 
100,000 pounds of paint rather than to 
make a large profit per gallon on a very 
small quantity. This decision on their 
part brought the firm into line with the 
large contractors and placed them in 
possession of the biggest contract given 
in Chicago since the days of the great 
World's Fair. 

Schmidt Bros, were pioneers on the 
South East side, locating at 71st street 
and Cottage Grove avenue fifteen years 
ago. F. C. Schmidt, manager of the 
firm, took ^Irs. Schmidt out into the 
comparative wilderness and the youth- 
ful Schmidts were herded on the prairies 
where there was abundant pasture land. 
They romped and played over the spot 
where now White City stands and 
snared gophers or played "Indian" with- 
out a thought that their father was to 
get the biggest contract for painting 
ever given to a single firm in Chicago 
on that self-same spot. 



General Manager Paul D. Howse 
gave Schmidt Bros. Company the con- 
tract upon receiving assurance that 
everything was to be delivered as re- 
quired and the firm has kept its word. 
Wagons have been busy every day since 
the first daub of paint was put on White 
City and F. C. Schmidt has been in 
the grounds so much of late that he de- 
clares his intention of taking a few 
shirts over to the Park to save going 
home on Sundays because he cannot 
well spare the time. Schmidt and Harry 
Meeks, the "boss painter" at White 
City, personally inspect every mark of 
the brushes to insure perfect satisfac- 
tion and so that Mr. Howse will have 
no reason to complain. 

There are about 100 painters now 
working at White City and they will 
be kept busy 
for several 
weeks to come. 
All the work 
is thoroughly 
done and only 
the very best 
materials are 
used. General 
Manager 
Howse made 
careful tests of 
many paints 
before letting 
the contract 
and the win- ^'''''y ^^''^' 

ners are careful to give no cause for 
criticism. 

Mr. Schmidt states that it will re- 
quire about 10,000 gallons of paint to 
properly dress White City and as the 
average weight of this material when 
mixed is about 1 1 pounds to the gallon 
it will be seen that 110,000 pounds of 
material will be used. This means that 
about 40 tons of white lead will be 
placed on the walls of White City. 
The army of painters will use up about 
2 tons of putty, filling in the depressions 
made by nail-heads and small cracks. 




THE WHITE CITY MAGAZINE 



31 



Over 25,000 pounds of Muresco, that 
delicately tinted product from the well- 
known factory of Benjamin Moore & 
Co., selected after the most scrutinizing 
tests and thorough examination, will be 



About 1,000 pounds of enamel will be 
used to cover the steel ceilings and a 
similar quantity of gilt bronze. Mr. 
Schmidt declares that if anybody dis- 
putes the amount of space to be cov- 




IVkite City Fire Department at Drill 



used for the interior decoration of the 
permanent buildings, including the ele- 
gant offices of the President, Secretary 
and Treasurer, General Manager; also 
the executive and administrative staffs. 



ered by paint at White Citt, viz., 2,- 
000,000 square feet, that he can con- 
vince them by showing the figures or 
giving them the opportunity of measur- 
ing it for themselves. 



32 



THE WHITE CITY MAGAZINE 



''HEREAFTER" 

A BEAUTIFUL AND NOVEL ENTERTAINMENT 
AT WHITE CITY 




HILE this title will perhaps 
have a gruesome impres- 
sion on some persons whose 
consciences trouble them, 
it will affect the majority 
in a pleasant way and offer an opportu- 
nity for unlimited speculation. 

"Hereafter" is an illusion, or rather a 
collection of illusions (referring to the 
exhibition and not to the theory), and 
the most beautiful and dramatic effects 
are produced by those clever arts and 
resourceful methods adopted by skilled 
illusionists. Audiences will be thrilled 
and amazed by the wonderful effects 
produced with the aid of appliances 
which are familiar only to the most 
skilled operatives. 

Prof. Burch, who has devoted almost 
a quarter of a century to the creating 
of unusual devices for the mystifying 
of scientists and arousing the wonder 
of countless thousands, will have the 
management of Hereafter at White 
City. A specially designed building is 
now being constructed for this attrac- 
tion, the location being on the East 
side of White City and between the 
Automatic A/'audeville and the Electric 
Towner. There will be a roomy stage, 
where the secrets of Prof. Burch will 
be carefully guarded and manipulated 
and the auditorium will accommodate 
several hundred persons. 

Ordinary illusions, such as have been 
exhibited in Chicago in years past, must 
not be confounded with the exhibitions 
which will be produced at White City. 
Prof. Burch has participated in the en- 
tertainment of hundreds of thousands 
of people at the five great expositions 
which have been given within the past 
dozen vears and will be present in Here- 
after the very best and most popular 
illusions wdiich have been introduced 
during that period of time. In addition 
to such as he has selected from his pre- 
vious efforts he has invented several 
wholly new ones, never yet shown in 
public. 

His work is similar to that produced 



by the world famous Maskelyne and 
Cook for the past fifty years in the re- 
nowned Egyptian Hall, London; al- 
most as celebrated as the Tower of 
London itself. Entertainment will be 




Prof. BtircJi, .Ifodcni Illusionist ' 



furnished for old and young and there 
will be absolutely nothing in any of his 
programmes to offend the most critical 
or fastidious. Beautiful girls will be 
transformed into flowers, familiar feat- 
ures will be changed to unfamiliar ones 
and back again and various uncanny 
transformations will occur. Persons of 
all ages will be fully entertained with 
just enough of the mysterious to give a 
delightfully creepy feeling now and then 
but there will be nothing of a startling 
or unpleasant nature in any of the ex- 
hibitions. There will bt; nothing to 
alarm the most nervous or hysterical 



THE WHITE CITY MAGAZINE 



33 



nor will there be anything to create un- 
pleasant sensations. 

Hereafter will be beautiful and sub- 
lime in many ways, laugh-provoking in 
others, but never disagreeable. It will 
be a strictly high-class entertainment 



Inspection Invited 

It is the desire of the Management of 
White City to inform the people of 
Chicago and vicinity of the fact that 
they are one and all invited to visit 
White City during construction on 
Sunday afternoons between two and five 
o'clock. In this way the people can 
form an idea of the immensity and scope 
of this magnificent amusement enter- 
prise and will tell their friends about it. 

Every visitor to White City will re- 
ceive courteous treatment and be given 
some information in connection with 
the various features there. 



Our Magnificent Entrance 

With the advent of Spring weather, 
additional forces of men have been put 
to work at White City and the con- 
struction is being conducted rapidly. 
Those who pass White City on board 
the Elevated cars can note from day to 




Mam Entrance 



day the progress made and it would 
seem as though a city were springing 
up almost by magic. 

White City is to have one of the 
grandest and most imposing entrances 
ever designed or constructed for any 
enterprise in this country or in Europe. 



all the way through and those who wit- 
ness the exhibitions will be supplied 
with an endless fund of conjecture and 
material for discussion. It will be one 
of the most pleasant and marvelous of 
the many attractions at White City. 



The arcade will be brilliantly illuminated 
by thousands of flashing incandescent 
lights and the exterior will be one blaze 
of electric glory. The executive and 




Main Entrance, Looking North 

administrative offices will be located in 
the structures on either side. 

It will be noticed from an observa- 
tion of the accompanying illustrations 
that the South Park Ave. Station of the 
South Side Elevated R. R. is located 
directly in front of the Main Entrance, 
the stairway being only a few feet away 
from the g-ate. 



Purpose of Publication 

The White City Magazine is pub- 
lished by the Advertising Department of 
the White City Construction Co., the 
reason for this publication being that 
the management desires to take this 
method of giving information to the 
public in reference to the progress of 
White City. At a later date full in- 
formation will be given in the news- 
papers, but the idea of a magazine ap- 
peals to the people, so that the Manage- 
ment desires to utilize such facilities as 
are originated by it and conducted in 
its own way. The White City Maga- 
zine is not a money making enterprise, 
nor is it in any way controlled or di- 
rected by any persons except the White 
City Construction Company and its 
officers. 



34 



THE WHITE CITY MAGAZINE 



BUILDERS' HARDWARE 

AN ENORMOUS QUANTITY USED 
IN CONSTRUCTING WHITE CITY 




T IS difficult for a mind, un- 
trained in the detail of con- 
struction work, to realize 
the enormoub quantities of 
material needed in the build- 
ing of White City. It would seem as 
though there were no limit to the little 
things required, particularly in the class 
technically known as builders' hard- 
ware. 

George A. Lewis has conducted a 
hardware business for several years at 
407-409 East 63rd street, and when the 
project of building White City came 
to his ears he presented himself 
promptly, all ready to take orders for 
the necessar}^ supplies of builders' hard- 
ware and prepared to deliver it at once 
with his wagon. His store was con- 
veniently near, he gave a good argu- 
ment by stating that he was ready to 
compete with any and all dealers, so 
General Manager Paul D. Howse 
handed him a list of materials required 
for immediate use. 

Lewis took the list and glanced over 
the figures. Then he scratched his 
head and looked again. 

The first item was for 225,000 feet of 
iron track and guard iron for the con- 
struction of Scenic Railway. The next 
item was for two carloads of nails and 
the next was for 5,000 gross of screws. 
Down the list he read, gasping for 
breath, and when he came to the end 
he said: 

"Do you want these today?" 

Mr. Howse laughed. "No, Mr. 
Lewis, I guess we can wait a few days 
for some of them." 

That night in the store at 407-9 East 
63rd street the incandescent lamps 
worked overtime. So did George. 

But when the materials were required 
they were promptly delivered. He had 
kept his word and had met the fierce 
competition of all the big dealers in 
Chicago. Since that time a wagon, 
bearing his name and the number of 
his store, has appeared every day at 
White City. His representative is 
constantly on the ground and the stock 



in his store has been turned so often 
during the past few months that hardly 
a bolt or a nail has had time to get ac- 
quainted. Mr. Lewis states that he sup- 
plied White City with the following, 
in addition to countless other items: 

Six carloads of nails weighing 180,- 
000 lbs. There were 1,800 kegs in all, 
containing 35,000,000 nails; 720,000 
screws used in the electric wiring, 2 
carloads of bolts ransfine in size from 




Geo. A. Lewis 

2 inches in length to 24 feet; 20 car- 
loads of iron, galvanized, rock-faced, 
pressed brick, corrugated, galvanized 
shingles, etc.; i carload of small build- 
ers' hardware, including locks, fasten- 
ings, hinges, etc. 

In addition to the above Mr. Lewis 
has supplied 2 carloads of paper for use 
in the making of papier mache orna- 
ments in the workshops at White City 
for decorating the Beautiful Venice 
building. 

Mr. Lewis' knowledge of the require- 
ments of the building laws and fire or- 
dinance has assisted materially in com- 
plying with all regulations in the con- 
struction work at White City. 



THE WHITE CITY MAGAZINE 



35 



Electric Theatre 

Among the multitude of interesting 
features to be contained in White City 
is the Electric Theatre, described by 
the promoters as being a decidedly new 
and up-to-date exhibition of moving 
pictures. Some time ago the manage- 
ment sent a commission to the scene of 
the war between Japan and Russia, fully 
equipped with machines for taking mov- 
ing pictures. The adventures and mis- 
haps experienced by the members of 
this commission would fill a large vol- 
ume in themselves, but notwithstanding 
the adverse circumstances under which 
they were working, they have succeeded 
in securing some very interesting 
views. On various occasions they have 
been on the firing line between the 
Japanese and Russian armies, keeping 
their machine practically intact, and as 



The attached illustrations will give a fair 
idea of some of the incidents which were 




One of the Scenes i?i the Electric Theatre 

personally witnessed by this commis- 
sion, as the scenes are actual reproduc- 
tions of events which have been de- 
scribed in press dispatches from the seat 




Scetie from the Japanese-Russian War Shoi 
in the Electric 1 heatre 



a result, there will be shown in the Elec- 
tric Theatre at White City, views 
which will give the observer the ir- 
resistible impression of being present 
when these exciting scenes occurred. 



of war. In addition to the views taken 
abroad in connection with the Japan- 
Russia war, will be shown other views 
almost equally as interesting and well 
worth seeing. 



36 



THE WHITE CITY MAGAZINE 



Special Features of White City 

L n rivaled Attractioiis for Chicago's $ipoo,ooo 
Aiirusefjient Enterprise 



Electric Tower. Almost 300 feet high, 
illuminated by 20,000 incandescent 
lights. 

Fire and Flames. A thrilling spec- 
lacic exniDiting two complete Fire 
Companies in action while a six-story 
hotel burns; requires 250 people, 2 
trolley cars, 2 automobiles, 5 cabs, 6 
wagons, ambulance, patrol wagon, 14 
horses, etc. Greatest and most vivid 
outdoor spectacle ever produced. 

Venice. A romantic gondola ride 
through the moonlit water streets of 
\"enice; viewing correct reproduc- 
tions of her famous buildings and 
statuary groups. 

Scenic Railway. A three-quarter mile 
ride up hill and down dale, through 
forest and glade, viewing the world's 
most marvelous scenery, actually re- 
produced in perspective. 

Infant Incubators. An exhibit of the 
greatest practical value to physicians 
and of the deepest interest to par- 
ents; showing scientific methods of 
saving the li\'es of tiny babes. 

White City College Inn. Finest restau- 
rant in America, located in an enor- 
mous and architecturally beautiful 
building; a duplicate of Chicago's 
famous College Inn; also a popular 
priced temperance restaurant and a 
German restaurant. Will accommo- 
date 2,400 people. 

Music. Open air concerts day and eve- 
ning by the foremost bands and 
orchestras of America and Europe. 

Flying Airships. A revelation in bird- 
like transportation. Sir Hiram 
Maxim's idea of safe and sane aerial 
navigation. 

Ball Room. Finest dancing floor in 
Chicago and capable of accommo- 
dating 1,000 dancers at a time. 

Bumps. A harmless and hilarious 
method' of enjoyment. "Have you 
bumped the bumps?" 



Hereafter. Beautiful, mystifying illu- 
sions, possessing in the highest degree 
the power of interesting and enter- 
taining. Conducted by Prof. Burch, 
the celebrated London illusionist. 

Shoot-the-Chutes. Duplex and longest 
in America. Has 500 foot escalator 
to carry people to the pavilion. All 
the newest improvements. 

Johnstown Flood. Most impressive and 
realistic of all scenic productions and 
constructed on a gigantic scale. A 
triumph of scenic art and startling 
realism. 

Automatic Vaudeville. Containing all 
the latest mechanical novelties and 
furnishing entertainment for old and 
young. 

Midway. A conglomeration of laughter 
inspiring features and clean amuse- 
ments. 

Fun Factory. A merrymaking estab- 
lishment with laugh creating devices 
on a large scale. 

Electric Theatre. Electric pictorial 
reproductions of startling and thrill- 
ing events showing the animation and 
action of living objects. 

Observation Wheel. Fun for every- 
body. A ride you will not forget. 

Circus Rings. Continuous performances 
including equestrian acts, aerial 
flights and feats of strength and skill. 
Free exhibitions. 

Mechanical Waxworks. Most remark- 
able collection of life-like figures, 
reproduced in wax and so supplied 
with intricate and cleverly contrived 
mechanisms that they appear to be 
possessed of the characteristics and 
abilities of living beings. 

Photograph Gallery. Where pictures 
of every kind known to lovers of 
photographic art will be made under 
the supervision of skilled photog- 
raphers. Conducted by one of the 
best known and largest photographic 
concerns in the world. 



THE WHITE CITY MAGAZINE 



37 



Gypsy Camp. With a host of genuine 
Gypsies from sunny Spain, secured 
by a special envoy sent across the 
water by the management of White 
City. 

Monkey, Dog and Pony Circus. Other- 
wise called the Simian City. An 
aggregation of cleverly trained 
animals under the direction of Prof. 
Blake, one of the best known trainers 
in the world. A constantly changing 
program of special interest to chil- 
dren and pleasing to all. 

Double Circle. An absolutely harmless 
but exciting ride in perfectly con- 
structed gravity cars, whirling the 
rider at an exhilarating speed around 
a double circle. Lots of fun. 

Miniature Railway. A perfect model 
railroad system with tracks, switches, 
tiny cars, engines, etc. Almost a 
half-mile of trackage through tunnels 
and grottoes with beautiful scenic 
effects. Children or adults can ride. 



Beautiful Jim Key. The equine world 
wonder who earns annually the in- 
terest on $1,000,000 and is the aristo- 
crat of the animal kingdom. Actually 
an educated horse which thinks, 
spells, counts, draws with ichalk and 
writes his own name on a blackboard. 
Taught by kindness and a wonderful 
example of the power ol love for 
dumb brutes. The children's friend. 

Temple of Music. Marvelous develop- 
ment of natural forces, applied by 
scientific methods for the performing 
of difficult airs on musical instru- 
ments of all kinds. Piano played by 
wireless telegraphy, the electricity 
passing through the body of a human 
being. Air, heat, steam, electricity, 
etc., used in these wonderful demon- 
strations. 

Palmistry Kiosk. Where the mysteries 
of the future and occurrences of the 
past will be related by seers who can 
read the story of life as imprinted in 
the palm. 



White City's Miniature 
Railroad 

Among the attractions which are being 
especially constructed for White City 
will be a decidedly novel Miniature Rail- 
road entirely different than any other 
Miniature Railway ever seen in Chicago. 
The cars and engine have been designed 
at the direction of Mr. Ashley J. Abel 
under whose management the railroad 
will be operated. The 12-inch track upon 
which the tiny trains will run will be 
about one-half mile long and will have 
two stations, one at either end of the 
Chutes lake. The track will encircle the 
lake passing through miniature tunnels 
underneath the bridge and through an 
elaborate grotto showing a perfect repro- 
duction of Niagara Falls with water ef- 
fects in a perfectly natural way. There 
will be" two trains running constantly 
over the Miniature Railway track and 
they will pass each other at the stations, 
side tracks and switches being built for 
this purpose. The miniature cars, of 
which there will be eight in number, will 
be of a special shape decorated with 
elaborate carving covered with gilt and 



white enamel, suitable in design for 
White City. Each car will carry six 
persons. 

The tiny engines used on this road 
are being built especially for White 
City at the works of one of the large 
watch factories and expert railroaders de- 
clare them to be perfect reproductions of 
the latest and most approved style of loco- 
motives. These engines will burn coal 
broken in small pieces, although a large 
portion of the fuel consumed in running 
them will consist of the broken ends of 
carbon sticks used in electric lis:hts. 

This concession at White City will 
undoubtedly be especially attractive to 
the children Avho will find much innocent 
amusement and enjoyment in riding 
around the miniature railroad track. 



RAPID TRANSIT. 
A flv and a flea in a flue 
Were imprisoned. Now, what could 
they do? 
Said the fly : "Let us flee !" 
"Let us fly," said the flea — 
So thev flew, through a flaw in the flue. 

Fuck. 



38 



THE WHITE CITY MAGAZINE 



WHITE CITY COLLEGE INN 



THE FINEST RESTAURANT 
IN AMERICA 




E^^ERAL score of work- 
men are employed in com- 
pleting- the work at White 
City College Inn restaur- 
ant, one of the largest and 
most imposing structures in the grounds 
and one which will undoubtedly be 
granted the palm for popularity by the 
people of Chicago. White City Col- 
lege Inn was designed specially for 



The College Inn proper will have ac- 
commodations for 2,400 people and 
plans are being perfected to make the 
cuisine and service the very best. Its 
magnificent appointments and perfect 
service will undoubtedly make White 
City College Inn particularly popular, 
owing to the fact that a business man 
can meet his family and friends there 
and enjoy a quiet lunch or an elaborate 




White City College Inn 



White City and when completed will 
undoubtedly be the most complete place 
of its kind. This magnificent structure 
will appear almost like a crystal palace, 
owing to the enormous area of plate 
glass, which will give visitors the im- 
pression of being practically in the 
open air, although comfortably seated 
inside the most magnificently appointed 
restaurant ever designed and con- 
structed. 



dinner and spend the evening in an en- 
joyable way. It will be a show place in 
which to entertain out of town friends. 
The building is absolutely fireproof and 
has a perfectly appointed kitchen on 
the main floor, its proximity to the din- 
ing room and accessible location insur- 
ing phenomenally quick service. 

White City College Inn will be 
headquarters for automobile parties and 
the management is making special ar- 



THE WHITE CITY MAGAZINE 



39 



rangements to care for such. Accom- 
modations will be furnished for 300 au- 
tomobiles in the Garage to be located 
on South Park avenue between 62d and 
63d streets, and it will be no more ef- 
fort for the autoist to be relieved of the 
care of his machine than it would be for 
him to check his hat or coat in any 
hotel. 

The entire upper portion of the mag- 
nificent structure shown in the accom- 
panying illustration will be occupied by 
the White City College Inn, elevated 
above the board walk to permit of suf- 
ficient accommodations below for a 
dairy lunch room and a German Raths- 



The White City College Inn is 
owned by the Sherman House Hotel 
Co., proprietor of the world renowned 
College Inn. Before the season is over, 
it will undoubtedly be one of the most 
popular dining places in all America. 



"Is it difficult to learn typewriting?" 
"Oh, no, I am getting along quite 

well, so that I can maintain a speed of 

about 80 mistakes a minute." 
*** 

It was indeed a wise youth who wrote 
home saying: "I am married now and 
all my troubles are over." 




White City Hook and Ladder 



keller. With these admirable accom- 
modations, visitors to White City will 
be given the opportunity of indulging 
in their appetites according to their de- 
sires or their purses. It will be possible 
to secure a cup of cofifee and a sand- 
wich in the Dairy Lunch Room, if a 
person desires to confine himself or her- 
self to such, or a visit can be made to 
the White City College Inn proper, 
where as good a dinner can be obtained 
as will be found anywhere in the United 
States. 



White City Fire Department 

In the accompanying illustration is 
shown a part of the volunteer fire crew 
assigned to the hook and ladder. The 
"Mascot" is one of the principal feat- 
ures of the picture. This Company is 
only one of several constantly on the 
grounds at White City during con- 
struction and they are well drilled and 
prepared for duty at any time. As soon 
as White City opens on May 27th all 
the firemen will be suitably uniformed. 



40 



THE WHITE CITY MAGAZINE 




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THE WHITE CITY MAGAZINE 



41 




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Compliments for the White City Magazine 



42 



THE WHITE CITY MAGAZINE 



BOATS AND GONDOLAS for WHITE CITY 



GRACEFUL WATER CRAFT BUILT 
IN CHICAGO FROM MODELS 



EOPLE living- in the vicin- 
ity of the ship yard of J. B. 
Bates & Co., 240 West 
Twenty-second street, found 
much food for contempla- 
tion and discussion in the watching of 
the building of the score of gondolas 
which will be seen tioatinsf alone the 




In truth they are strongly built and 
perfectly safe, so that those who desire 
to take a cruise along the canals of 
Beautiful Venice will feel assured that 
they will return in safety to the home 
port. They have been carefully built 
after models secured from Venice and 
are exactly the same as the originals, 




Gondolas for Beautiful I 'e7iice 



canals of Beautiful Venice at White 
City after the 27th of May. 

These strange looking crafts excited 
much comment on the part of the neigh- 
bors and they could not imagine what 
they were intended for, even after re- 
ferring to their supreme authority, an 
old lake captain, long since retired. 

"I 'low they must be for cruisin' 
among icebergs," he finally said, after a 
critical inspection. "But crack my bin- 
nacle if I see how they be a goin' ter 
sail 'em. Yes, them's fur cruisin' in th' 
ice, that's why they're so strong." 



except that they are not so long and 
are more strongly constructed. Each 
will accommodate 10 persons. 

Several of these gondolas are now 
to be seen on the board walk in front 
of Beautiful Venice and on Sunday 
afternoons, when visitors are admitted 
to the Park, they excite much atten- 
tion. The displacement of each gon- 
dola is about one ton; 10,000 feet of 
Cyprus and oak has so far been used in 
making the gondolas and 644 steel 
braces used to strengthen them and to 
support the seats. The cushioned seats 



THE WHITE CITY MAGAZINE 



43 



and high backs will make them very 
comfortable. The figure-heads are pat- 
terned after the regulation gondolas in 
Venice and are works of art. 

These boats are 17 feet in length, 4 
ft. 2 in. wide and 2 ft. 6 in. in depth. 

The boats for the Chutes have also 
been built by the above named firm and 
over 6,000 feet of the best grades of 
oak, poplar and white pine were used 
in their construction. Some of this ma- 
terial has cost as high as $78 per thou- 



sand feet. Over 15,000 screws were 
used in putting the boats together and 
400 feet of double strength piping was 
used in making the hand rails. The 
Chutes boats are 153/^ feet long, 4 ft. 
8 in. wide and 2 feet in depth. 

In connection with the above de- 
scribed work, J. B. Bates & Co. sup- 
plied White City with 256 flag poles 
from 20 feet to 40 feet in height. The 
flag staffs are of Washington fir and 
Georgia pine. 



CROWDS VIEW WHITE CITY 

MANY THOUSANDS VISIT THE 
GROUNDS ON SUNDAY AFTERNOONS 




N RESPONSE to the invi- 
tation of the management 
of White City for the 
public to visit the grounds 
on Sunday afternoons be- 
tween the hours of two and four o'clock, 
many thousands have accepted the invi- 
tation. So many people have arrived 
after four o'clock that it has been de- 
cided to extend the limit to five o'clock, 
thus giving three hours on Sunday 
afternoons for Chicagoans to view their 
new amusement headquarters. This 
plan has been in operation for several 
weeks without any particular effort be- 
ing made to acquaint the people with 
the fact that they had permission to 
visit White City on Sundays, but 
about a month ago, show cards were 
placed in the South Side Elevated 
trains, in the Calumet Electric cars and 
in the Blue Island line cars. These 
cards stated that White City would be 
open May 27th, and that visitors were 
invited to visit the Park during con- 
struction on Sundays between two and 
four P. M. In addition to these cards, 
the same facts were published in the 
White City Magazixe, and as a result, 
the following Sundays demonstrated 
that the people of Chicago had read the 
invitation. 

On Sunday, March 5th, there were 
about 3,500 visitors to White City. On 
March 12th, there were almost 5,000. 
On March 19th, a chilly rainy day, there 
were at least 2,000 people, but on Sun- 
day, March 26th, the first real Spring 
day with plenty of sunshine, almost 



15,000 people visited the grounds. This 
attendance under the conditions is un- 
precedented. Among the crowds were 
people from the extreme North and 
West sides, showing that the attractions 
offered at White City will appeal to 
the people in every part of Chicago and 
its suburbs, while the magnificent 
transportation facilities afforded by 
the South Side Elevated Road, the 
Sixty-third street cross town line, the 
Calumet Railway, the Blue Island line, 
and others, place White City within 
the reach of every resident of Chicago, 
and in every instance a five-cent fare 
only is required except for persons 
who live on the extreme North and 
Northwest sides. 

One of the accompanying illustra- 
tions, a view taken from within the 
grounds and looking through the mag- 
nificent Arcade Entrance, shows the 
South Side Elevated Station in front 
of the main entrance. On the after- 
noon of Sunday, March 26th, almost 
every elevated train was emptied of its 
passengers on arriving at the South 
Park avenue station. They trooped 
down the steps in crowds, finding them- 
selves right at the main entrance, made 
a tour of the grounds and returned by 
the same route. A number of persons 
who arrived at the Park via the South 
Side Elevated trains were questioned in 
reference to the time made by them and 
the invariable answer was that the time 
passed so quickly that they did not real- 
ize that any considerable distance had 
been traversed. 



44 



THE WHITE CITY MAGAZINE 



Automatic Vaudeville 

Visitors to White City will have the 
opportunity of spending their pennies in 
the largest Automatic machine estab- 
lishment in the world. For several 
months past the management has been 
investigating and examining variotis 
machines of every type and description 
for the purpose of selecting the very 



Vaudeville building, investigating the 
various opportunities for indulging 
curiosity, and no person, no matter how 
long they may stay there, or how many 
machines they may patronize, will have 
occasion to regret it or to think that 
his pennies have not been well spent. 
Those who are not familiar with this 
class of amusement, or those who have 




.■luto))iatic Wiiidc-i'ilU Structure 



best to be placed in the Automatic 
Vaudeville establishment. As a result, 
patrons will find a succession of wholly 
new and up-to-date machines, including 
those which furnish music, vocal and 
instrumental; machines for testing 
strength, skill, endurance, etc., and a 
practically endless assortment of comic, 
tragic and altogether interesting views. 
It will be possible to spend a whole 
afternoon and evening- in the Automatic 



merely seen individual machines here 
and there, can form no idea of the ex- 
tent and number of machines which will 
be shown at White City. There will 
be machines for delivering souvenirs, 
postal cards, picture cards of various 
kinds, confections, peanuts, mineral 
water, harmless drinks, perfumes, etc., 
etc. Do not fail to visit the Automatic 
Vaudeville when you go to the White 
City. Admission will be free. 




'tsf3SBms£i^miij^»m>i<iii 



Ti 



^ PpSSflgF 



Written for T/ie IMiiie City Alagazine 
by Franc R. E. Woodward 





Last night I sat in the tzvilight glozu 
While tlie c-c'eniiig breezes ran 
Scampering and tzvirling hither and yon, 
Tzi'isting and twining one by one, 
Chasing the last rays of the sun. 
As breezes only can. 

"Come, carry a message for me," I cried. 
To the zvhirling, dancing siglis, 
"Carry a message to my dear love, 
"Sz^'iftly and straight as a carrier dove ; 
"Tell her my heart is filled zuith love 
"A faith that ncz'er dies." 

Szciftly and straiglit as a carrier dove. 

On the back of the z^'ild north zvind. 

To the south he carried my message true. 

Carried my zvhispcr of love for you. 

The story that's old. yet ever nezv, 

In the hearts of human kind. 



I'm zi'aiting an _anszver zanth heart of faith 
From the zuarin breeze of the spring. 
And I knozv the zvaiting is not in vain. 
For fond affection can never zvane ; 
Q) ^ And zvhen my anszi'cr comes back again. 
Your love to me 'twill bring. 



46 



THE WHITE CITY MAGAZINE 



BALL ROOM 

OFFERING OPPORTUNITIES FOR 
HIGH CLASS RECREATION 




F THE thousands of visi- 
tors who have taken ad- 
vantage of the permission 
of the management of 
White City to inspect 
the grounds and buildings during the 
progress of construction, almost every 
one has made an inquiry in reference to 
the Ball Room. Nothing of the kind 
has ever before been projected in Chi- 
cas'o and the curiositv of the sightseers 



finest dancing floor ever constructed 
west of New York City, and those who 
possess tickets entitling them to appear 
on the floor will find comfortable seats 
in which to rest whenever they so 
desire. A magnificent Orchestrion, 
bought by the management for $20,000 
at the St. Louis Fair, will be located in 
the Ball Room, and in addition to this 
will be a high-class orchestra of not 
less than 20 pieces. A skilled and dip- 




IVhite City Ball Room 



has been aroused by speculation and 
discussion as to how it will be con- 
ducted. 

In this connection, it is perhaps best 
to state the precise conditions under 
which the Ball Room will be handled 
by the management of White City. 

The Ball Room is located in an enor- 
mous building, 167 feet long and 100 
feet wide, with suf^cient accommoda- 
tions for about 1,000 persons on the 
floor at a time. It will have the very 



lomatic master of ceremonies will be in 
full charge of the Ball Room, and it 
will be his duty and the duty of his 
numerous and well-trained assistants to 
see that there is no possibility for ob- 
jectionable occurrences or annoying 
features. 

There will be no opportunity for in- 
discriminate methods to be adopted by 
any persons whatever, and once in the 
Ball Room, the conduct of every per- 
son must be absolutely without re- 



THE WHITE CITY MAGAZINE 



47 



proach. Admission will not be free, as 
a small fixed charge will be made for 
defraying the large expenses which will 
be incident to its operation. Objec- 
tionable persons will be refused admit- 
tance, and indiscreet individuals will 
receive but scant courtesy from the 
master of ceremonies and his aides. At 
no time will any person present be sub- 
jected to humiliation or be compelled to 
appeal to the management. 

Such methods as will be adopted by 
the management of White City for the 
conducting of the popular Ball Room 
have been in vogue in Eastern seashore 
and mountain resorts for years, and as 
soon as the people of Chicago recog- 
nize the principles upon which the Ball 
Room is being conducted, it will be dis- 
covered that these methods are ade- 
quate and fully sufficient to preserve 
the dignity and keep inviolate the per- 
sonal privileges of every one in attend- 
ance. 



The Scenic Railway 

WILL FURNISH FUN FOR THE MULTITUDES 

Work on the Loading Station for the 
Scenic Railway has been practically 
completed with the exception of some 
papier mache ornamentation. The 
building utilized for this purpose is lOO 
feet by 60 feet, and from this Loading 
Station runs the quadruple track cov- 
ering ground 700 feet by 25 feet until 
the Scene Palace is reached. The 
Scene Palace is 100 feet square and is 
filled with pictorial representations cal- 
culated to interest and amuse. 

The Scenic Railway track is three- 
fourths of a mile long, the most ex- 
tensive ever constructed. Passengers 
will enter the cars on the ground floor 
of the Loading Station, and after rid- 
ing the full length of the track, which 
re-enters the Loading Station and the 
Scenic Palace several times, thev alight 
on the second floor and walk down a 
broad flight of easy steps to the ground. 
The cars are run on the gravity prin- 
ciple and traverse a series of raises and 
declines, dart around curves and give 
the sensation of rapid transit without 
unpleasant features. The cars are fitted 
with comfortable cushions and power- 
ful springs so that no jar is ever expe- 



rienced by the occupant, even when 
traveling at the most rapid rate of 
speed. 

There is absolutely no danger con- 
nected with a ride on the Scenic Rail- 
way, and the only result of such a 
trip is a feeling of exuberance and 
natural exhilaration. Tlie Scenic Rail- 
way has always been a popular form 
of amusement at summer parks, and the 
one at White City will undoubtedly 
have its full share of well desired patron- 
age. 

Ttie Prevailing Spirit 

Practically every resident of Chicago 
is thinking more or less about White 
City and the enjoyments to be obtained 
there on and after May 27th. New ideas 
are springing up at all times and bright 
wide-awake merchants are taking ad- 
vantage of the pubHcity which the name 
White City is obtaining, by naming 
something after it. 

Now it is the "White City Hat." 
Mr. Arthur Feilchenfeld, who conducts 
a well patronized hat store at 81-83 E. 
Van Buren St., is placing the White 
City hat on the market. According to 
the samples shown, the White City 
hat is going to be a very popular ar- 
ticle of wearing apparel for the summer 
season as it is light in weight as well 
as light in color. 

Mr. Eeilchenfeld has already received 
several advanced orders for the White 
City Hat and indications point to a big 
run for it. 

Our Circulation 

Beginning with the April issue of the 
White City Magazine, it will be placed 
on sale on all newsstands in Chicago 
and suburbs, so that any person desir- 
ing to obtain a copy of it can do so by 
placing the order with their newsdealer. 
This action has been taken by the man- 
agement of White City because of the 
fact that so many letters were sent in 
with stamps or money, requesting that 
copies be mailed them and that their 
name be placed on our subscription list. 
Those who enjoy reading the White 
City Magazine should notify their 
newsdealers that they would like to have 
it obtained for them regularly. 



48 



THE WHITE CITY MAGAZINE 



MONKEY, DOG AND PONY CIRCUS 



A WONDERFUL AGGREGATION 
OF TRAINED ANIMALS 




COLLECTION of trained 
monkeys, dogs and ponies 
will not only interest the 
children and attract their 
attention for hours at a 
time, but grown-up folks, while they 
may decline to admit it, will be equally 
eager to enjoy the entertainments given 
at White City. Prof. R. J. Blake, un- 
doubtedly the world's greatest domestic 
animal trainer, is. at the present time, 
preparing for exhibition the most intel- 
ligent and most highly educated collec- 
tion of domestic animals ever shown in 
Chicago. His exhibitions show the 
power of kindness in the education of 
members of the dumb brute kingdom. 
His influence has been attributed to 
mesmerism, hypnotism and like occult 
powers, but he answers all questions as 
to how he succeeded in training them 
by the one word "kindness." He never 
rules by fear, but by love and gentle- 
ness. During the performances con- 
ducted by him, there is never a cross 
word spoken. The entertainments given 
by these clever little dumb animals, 
prove conclusively that they have the 
power of understanding. Among the 
trained animals shown are wonder- 
ful Chimpanzees and Ourang-Outangs 
which conduct themselves in very much 
the same way as do some members of 
the human race. ''Dodo," whose por- 
trait is herewith given, and whose clev- 
erness was described in the March issue 
of the White City Magazine, has been 
taught to write his own name, a feat 
never before accomplished by any of the 
lower animals. A feature of the enter- 
tainments in the monkey, dog and pony 
circus will be the military drill given 
by a score of tiny ponies, the smallest, 
"Tiny mite" weighing only 60 lbs. and 
no larger than an ordinary sized dog. 
"Tiny Mite" is so small that he has been 
placed on an ordinary sized dining table 
and permitted to walk on it, gravely 
marching out of the way of the larger 
dishes and carefully avoiding any mis- 
haps to the china. 



Of dogs there will be all kinds and 
sizes, and each performance will be con- 
"luded with a grand leaping exhibition 
in which over a dozen will participate. 
Some of these dogs leap 15 feet high. 
Among the monkeys which will par- 
ticularly entertain the little ones at 
White City will be "Dodo," "Happy 
Hooligan," "Foxy Grandpa," "Gloomy 
Gus," "Mr. Dooley," "Buster Brown," 
"Mr. and Mrs. Bowser" and "Mr. and 
]\'Irs. Murphy." 

Special acts are being prepared for 
the season at White City, and it is 
promised that the entertainment to be 
given has never been equaled. 



Temple of Music 

AN UNEXAMPLED HIGH CLASS PRODUCTION 

Never before in America, was seen 
anything like the Temple of IN'Iusic pro- 
duced by the celebrated Willards and 
their assistants. The Temple of Music 
at White City, will be a dainty little 
theatre, charminglv hospitable, beauti- 
fully decorated and decidedly comfort- 
able. In front will be a stage literally 
filled with musical instruments and 
musical machinery especially designed 
for this production. The W. W. Kim- 
ball Co., working in conjunction with 
C. D. Willard, and carrying out original 
plans and patents owned by him, is 
building a monster pipe organ novelty, 
which, when completed, will carry the 
tone and volume of a full band of 26 
pieces. This instrument will be played 
by means of compressed air under 2,000 
lbs. pressure. One of the other novel- 
ties comes from the Flowery Kingdom, 
and is built of 3,000 pieces of spotted 
Bamboo, 500 blocks of Klyposerus 
wood and 375 hollow gourds or 
squashes which act as resonators. 

Another instrument, which was built 
by Willard himself in his own work- 
shop, was made of 146 Bogascheque 
cocoanuts, each one having a comic 
face carved on it. This will be a great 
laugh producer. 



KO 



THE WHITE CITY MAGAZINE 



There Are Many Ways of 
Getting There, 

But the quickest and easiest way is by 

Ti:Li:PHONE 




and 
up. 



RellSeTc/"" Sc Per Day 

Ask about our Auxiliary telephone 
for bus}- business men. 



Chicago Telephone 
Company, 




Contract Dept., 

203 
Washington St. 





Offo Schmidt IVine Comfy 



Telephones 
South 



/ 




:IMPORTERS: 



WHISKIES, WINES, CORDIALS 
LIBORS, MINERAL WATERS 



Sole J^gents for Mercier's Carte Blanche Chai)ipagne, 
made in Epernay, France. 
Haig & Haig's Scotch Whisky. 

Boshamer, Leon & Co.'s Ciareis,Sauternes diVid Bii?-gi/ndies. 
Moutet Brandies, Old Barrel Rye Whiskies, 1871. 



We furnish supplies 
for the very bestClubs, 
High Class Hotels and 
wealthy families. 



2616,2618,2620,2622 

Wabash Avenue 
CHICAGO, ILL. 




Aleet me at yy mte L%iy 



When ■writing to advertisers please mention the White City Magazine. 



THE WHITE CITY MAGAZINE 



51 



White City Hat 


What do you pt for 
what you spend? 

If you spend more than 
S2.00 for a hat you spend 
too much;if you spend less 
you don't spend enough. 
I can sell you the best hat 
in the world for 

$2.00 

All new styles and colors, 
Dunlop and Knox includ- 
ed, and only $2.00 to all. 

Arthur Fei chenfe d 

81-83 E. Van Buren St. 

Fisher Building 


Ffee Patent Hat Cleaner. Stop 
In and Get One. 



Twenty-five Thousand Pounds of 



MURESGO 




Vail ^.Tceiung 

Decorations. 

Kius Suction. 
Fob SALE ByAu Dealers. 



MURESGO 



used in White City 

» — • — ^ 

BENJAMIN MOORE & COMPANY 

SOLE MANUFACTURERS 

111-117 N. GREEN STREET, CHICAGO 

Write for Descriptive Matter 



Wlien writing to advertisers please mention the White City Magazine. 



52 



THE WHITE CITY MAGAZINE 



E. A. AARON 



Established 1885 



M. A. AARON 



E. A. AARON & BRO. 

GENERAL COMMISSION MERCHANTS 



: : : : : SPECIALTIES : : : : 

POULTRY, GAME 
and VEGETABLES 

Hotels, Clubs, Restaurants & 

Summer Resorts Supplied 

Special Attention to Shipping 

Orders 



134 South Water Street :: Chicago 



i Central 641 
Telephones \ Long Distance 661 
( Automatic 6641 



ILLINOIS ROOFING AND SUPPLY CO. 




All our ceilings are made up in classified designs. Each one in itself rep- 
resents a distinct class. There is no such thing as a conglomeration of design. 

We have Colonial, Romanesque, Greek, Empire, Rococo, etc. We not 
only select the correct design for your room but also apply it. 

Before buying, by all means give us a chance to submit you prices. 



Z»3-Z0 LaKC Jl, Central 514 Automatic 6171 ChlCa^O 

OUR METAIv CEILINCS were U.SED in CONSTRUCTING WHITE CITY 



When writing to advertisers please mention the White City Magazine. 



THE WHITE CITY MAGAZINE 



53 



John Sexton S^ Co. 

Importers of Teas and Coffees 

WHOLESALE GROCERS 



'# The 

Old Original 

Hotel and 

Itestaiirant 

Supply House 




16-18-20-22 STATE STREET 

CHICAGO 




Zeno Gum is 

in all choice 

flavors and 

is the best 

made 



will be found in 
these ZENO 
VENDING 
MACHINES 
placed at con- 
venient places 
in WHITE 
CITY PARK 



Zeno Mfg. Co., Chicago 



SCHMIDT BROS. CO. 


PAINTS, OILS 


AND GLASS 


7123-7125 Cottage Grove Ave. 


CHICAGO. ILL 


Telephone Hyde Park 256 


^^'^ 




We have 


I 


the contract 


1 .# -^ 


for painting 


r 


WHITE 


'^^^^Sff 


CITY 
and to 


,.«y 


furnish all 


d^k 


requisite 
materials 


F. C.SCHMIDT, Mgr. | 



When writing to advertisers please mention the White City Magazine. 



54 THE WHITE CITY MAGAZINE 



Good Lithographing 

GOES 

Everywhere 



THIS IS THE ONLY KIND OF WORK 

GOES 

TURNS OUT 



Look for the Imprint 



Goes Lithographing Co. 

Main Office and Plant City Sales Dept. 

61st and Clark Sts. 160 Adams Street 

Chicago 



When writing to advertisers please mention the White City Magazine. 

/ 



THE WHITE CITY MAGAZINE 55 



100,000 

ELECTRIC LIGHTS 

will turn night into day 

at, 

WHITE CITY 



Electricity for the entire lighting and 
power requirements in the White City will be 
supplied from the mains of the Common- 
wealth Electric Company. 

A spacious sub-station containing three 
1,000 Kilo-watt rotary transformers in oper- 
ation, and a display of electrical conveniences 
for household use will be located within the 
grounds, forming an interesting electrical 
exhibit which the general public is invited 
to inspect. 

If you have not made arrangements to 
have electric light installed in your home, do 
so before the Spring rush is on. 

Telephone Wentworth 465 



Commonwealth Electric Company 

719 Garfield Boulevard 
General Offices: 139 Adams Street. 



When writing to advertisers please mention the White City Magazine. 



THE WHITE CITY MAGAZINE 



A Paying Investment 

Even it a S200 National Cash Register adds to your profits during a 
year (300 working days) the sum of only 

5 cents a day, it will earn 71^ per cent For 
10 cents a day, it will earn 15 per cent 
15 cents a day, it will earn 22^/^ per cent 
20 cents a day, it will earn 30 per cent 
30 cents a day, it will earn 45 per cent 
50 cents a day, it will earn 75 per cent 



You 

Annually 
on Your 
Investment 





SUCH AN INVESTMENT IS WORTH 

INVESTIGATING, AT LEAST. 
Your inquiry will receive our best attention. 

National 
Cash Register Co. 

48-50 State Street, Chicago 



Sales of our Registers have passed the 
420,000 mark. During 1904 National 
Cash Registers were manufactured, 
sold and delivered at the rate of more 
than one Register every three minutes 
of each working day. 



Thousands of Dollars' 
"Worth of Protection 
Secured for Only 
a Few Cents a Day 



CASH REGISTERS 
SOLD ON 
EASY MONTHLY 
PAYMENTS 




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THE WHITE CITY MAGAZINE 



57 




ILLUSTRATE IT 

If you issue a catalog or booklet, use advertising space, publish a magazine — ILLUSTRATE IT. 

The illustration teUs the story the best. 
USE GOOD ILLUSTRATIONS. Your printing and advertising space costs you just as much with 
poor designs and engravings as the best but — the better the illustrations the better the results. 

BARNES-CROSBY QUALITY IS THE BEST. We can easily prove to you the superiority of 

"B-C Co." work. 
LARGEST IN THE WORLD. We employ the largest number of artists and engravers of any 

concern in the world. 
DAY AND NIGHT. Our engraving department is operated day and night. 

If you use engraving write on your letter head for a copy of our "B-C Co. Budget." Address our nearest house 

BARNES-CROSBY COMPANY 



E. W HOUSER. Pr< 



NEW YORK 



COMMERCIAL 



ST. LOUIS 



215 Madison Street 



CHICAGO 



•Phone Main 2487 



When writing to advertisers please mention the White City Magazine. 



58 



THE WHITE CITY MAGAZINE 



WHEN IN DOUBT 

CONSULT 




•EXAMINER'S" PALMIST AND ASTROLOGIST 

SHERMAN HOUSE, 135 RANDOLPH .STR.EET 

CHICAGO 

Office Hours, lO a. m. to 8 p. m. 



P. &. s 




Patented Dec. 23, 1902. 
No. 1161. 



30,000 

of these used in White City. 



Get our Prices on Receptacles for Permanent 
and Temporary Decorative Lighting. 

Pass & Seymour 

(Incorporated) 

130 West Jackson Boulevard 

CHICAGO, ILL. 




The High Grade Havana Cigar 
On Sale Everywhere 



When writing to advertisers please mention The White City Magazine. 



THE WHITE CITY MAGAZINE 59 




NotHin^ 
Down 



and One Hollar 
a week 



We will sell you a VICTOR 
TALKING MACHINE or 
EDISON PHONOGRAPH. 

We are headquarters for musical 
instruments of all varieties, and at 
prices our competitors cannot 
meet. 

Any user of a Victor Machine that will 
bring in a copy of this ad, we will give 
free of charge^ a sample package of our 
soft tone needles. 



The Rudolph Wurlitzer Co. 

298-300 Wabash Avenue 



When writing to advertisers please mention The White City Magazine. 



6o 



THE WHITE CITY MAGAZINE 




mm %imEi km mm\^ mmmE. mrnkm^ 



C h i c a g o' s 
$1,000,000 
Amusement 
Enterprise 



Opens 

May 27 







Admission 

10 Cents 



dedicated to 

Merriment and 

Mirth 



'ISITORS admitted during' constrticflion 
on Sunday Afternoons, 2 to 5 o'clocK 



When writing to advertisers please mention the White City Magazine. 



THE WHITE CITY MAGAZINE 



6i 



Warner ^^ 



CHICAGO, U. S. A. 



I/// 




Richelieu Ferndell Batavia 

Our Brands Pure Foods 

"Everylliing for thie table 
put up under these labels." 



"ly In order to a\oic] consuming 
poison in ones food, it is neces- 
sary to reject nearly everything 
that is colored, or contains a pre- 
s.-rvative. And if the consuming 
pjblic realized what is in store 
for it, unless the use of Aniline as 
a coloring matter in food products 
is stopped, it would pronounce the 
general practice of coloring foods 
as the greatest crime of the age. 
Aniline colors are declared to be 
rank poisons; and while the quantity consumed at any one 
time may be insignificant, who is there that wishes to take 
the risk of having any poison accumulate in his system ? 
^ There are goods such as those put up under the Richelieu, 
Ferndell and Batavia labels that are absolutely free from 
everything that is harmful, and foods such as these should be 
selected in every instance, and every food product containing 
Aniline coloring or other poisons, should be rejected. 



"Only selected goods packed under cur 
Rictielieu, Ferndell and Batavia labels, 
so prepared iljat the finished prcduot 
is of the highest quality and ABSO- 
LUTELY HEALTHFUL." 




When writing to advertisers please mention The White City Magazine. 



62 THE WHITE CITY MAGAZINE 



SAMUEL A. SPRY, President GEORGE E. SPRY, Treasurer 



JOHN SPRY LUMBER CO, 



AUNUFACTURERS AND DEALERS IN 



LUMBER, LATH, SHINGLES, 
SASH, DOORS, BLINDS, ETC. 

We will sell lumber to anyone in any quantity 
at wholesale prices and give wholesale grades. 

We also manufacture oak and maple flooring. 



JOHN SPRY LUMBER CO. 

Ashland Avenue and 22d Street, Chicago 



Sykes Steel Roofing 
Company 

Sheet Metal Contractors 



MAKERS OF 

Fire-Proof Windows, Constructed of Galvanized Iron on 

Copper Frames, Equipped with Automatic Closing 

Devices and Glazed n^ith Wire Glass 



112-122 West Nineteenth Place CHICAGO 

TELEPHONE CANAL 810 



When uriting to advertisers please mention the White City Magazine. 



THE WHITE CITY MAGAZINE 



63 



GEO.W.CHILDS CABINETS 5^ 




Littk (onlinentals S i 




-\ 



(ont mental 10 ^ 




M :4^^UiiiimfnS1 



BEARING «^^-™. ARE HIGHEST "^ QUALITY 



NAME 



FOR SALE EVERYWHERE 



When writing to advertisers please viention The White City Magazine. 



64 THE WHITE CITY MAGAZINE 



WHITE RIVER LUMBER CO. 

WHOLESALE AND RETAIL 

PINE AND HEMLOCK LUMBER 
Cedar Products and Mill Work 

Long Distance Telephones: 

Lake Shore 413 Main Office and Docks: 

South Chicago 44 NINETY-SECOND ST. BRIDGE, CHICAGO 



H. R. COXKLIX, President JOHN SEBA, Treasurer 

AUBREY PRO:?SER. \'ice-Pres. and My;r. G. E. BEERLY, Secretary 

Conklm Lumber Company 

EVERYTHING IN LUMBER AND 
MILL WORK 

General Office, Mam Yard and Mill, 38tli and Morgan Streets 
Telephone 204 and 1080 Yards 

Branch Y"ard and Office CHICAGO 

66th St. and Lowe Ave. Saw Mills 

Tele[.hone 726 Wentworth ASHLAND, WIS. 



M. HARTY, President JAS. P. HARTY, Vice-Prest. GEO. M. HAKTY, Sec'y and Treas. 

HARTY BROS. & HARTY CO. 

Wholesale Manufacturers 

Sash, Doors, Frames 
and Mouldings 

FINE INTERIOR FINISH 

442 to 458, 443 to 457 West Twenty- First Street, near Throop Street 

CHICAGO ^%%TZ,Mr' 

When writing to advertisers please mention the White City MAqAziwj, 



THE WHITE CITY MAGAZINE 



65 



BOSWORTH 
^ BROS. ^ 
EXPRESS, VAN 
& STORAGE CO. 

Telephone Wentworth 876 and 857 

Expert Furniture and Piano 
Movers, Packers and Shippers 



MAIN OFFICE AND WAREHOUSE 
6103-6105 WENTWORTH AVENUE 



STRICTLY MODERN WAREHOUSE. 300 

:: :: s: PRIVATE IRON ROOMS : 

General Teaming of All Kinds 



LaVenga 

AND 

College Inn 



Fine Havana 
Cigars 



A. Straus & Co. 



Makers 
CHICAGO 



jJie Botanical 
Decorating Co. 

C Carries a full stock 
or tne cnoicest, natural 
preservea plants, artmcial 
no^wers, trees and hanging 
Daskets for nouse, store 
ana tneatrical decoration. 
If you "want sometning 
nice, tnat will contribute 
to tne homelike appearance 
and attract attention, it is 
our ne"w electric lignt 
skades and globes m any 
color you Avisn; tney are 
winners. Get our catalogue 

The Botanical Decorating Co. 



271 Wabash Avenue 



Chicasio 



WESTERN 

TRUST ^ SAVINGS 

BANK 

157-159 La Salle Street 

Chicago 

•t 

Capital, $1,000,000 

J% Allowed for Savhigs 

Commercial Accounts 
Solicited 



OFFICERS 

Joseph E. Otis, . . President 
Walter H. Wilson, Vice-President 
Lawrence Nelson, Vice-President 
William C. Cook, . . Cashier 
H. Wollenberger, Ass't to Pres. 
W. G. Walling, . . Secretary 



When uriting to advertisers please mention the White City Magazine. 



66 



THE WHITE CITY MAGAZINE 



The Very Best Laxative 

Re-Leaf Splits 




On Sale 
Everywhere 



RE-LEAF CO., Pittsburgh 



PHOJSE HYDE pake: 493 



OEORaE A. liE^VIS 



BUILDERS' HARDWARE 



LARGE CONTRACT WORK 
A SPECIALTY 




40 7-109 E. SIXTY-THIRD ST. 
CHICAGO 



EVERYTHING IN "WHITE CITT IN THE HARDTV^AHE LINE 

"EROM NAILS TO RAILS" FURNISHED 

BY ME 



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THE WHITE CITY MAGAZINE 



67 



Look for the Sterling 
Label on the Lamp 





sterling Special and Sterling Regulars are 
used by all who appreciate incandescent 

lamps of true merit. 

The Sterling Regular is the equal of the 

best oval anchored type lamp made. Our 

output on this lamp insures a perfect 

selection on rigid specifications. 



The Sterling Electrical Mfg. Company 

Warren, Ohio. 
CHICAGO OFFICE: i6th Floor Masonic Temple 

Central 4754 A. M. RYCKOFF, Mgr. 



When writing to advertisers please mention the White City Magazine. 



68 



THE WHITE CITY MAGAZINE 



The White City Magazine is printed and bound by 

P. F. Pettibone 
(S^Co. 






STATIONERS 

PRINTERS 

BlankBookMakers 
Lithographers 

Edition Printing 
and Binding 



Main Store 

178 Monroe Street* 

Store, Factory and 
General Offices 

44-50 S. Desplaines 
Street* 

CHICAGO 



Telephone Monroe ^53 

Prii'ate Exchange 






When writing to advertisers please mention Tali WHITE CiyY Magazine, 



THE WHITE CITY MAGAZINE 





=kj^' 



y?' 




W^W^V^^on 



IS usednn the 

Pour/^Cornei^ "/«« Earth 





\n every-yclime/and 

S every nation it /is the 

^tanaard Typewritdr--^ ^ 



^^°^ 



(/ 



p 




Remingfton ^'^fi^^-L 

Typewriter Company S^pT^iTi 



^ *^'X. 



i54 Wabash Ave. 
Chicago, III. 



"Insurance that Insures 



)5 



FIRE, BURGLARY, ACCIDENT, PLATE GLASS 



INSURANCE 



MKER5WETZ1 



630 NATIONAL LIFE BUILDING 




I^ZT»7.1.1^i| 



^■^i»>^i>i.i^»r^^.i. 



EMPLOYERS' LIABILITY, INCOME, BONDS 



For practical information regarding Insurance of any kind consu 



When writing to advertisers please mention The White City Magazine. 




70 THE WHITE CITY MAGAZINE 




TELEPHONE HARRISON 424 



teni^ei 



0€f 



LITHO.CO. 

CLARK 5, HARRISON STS Crllf>/\OLf 

INDOOR AND OUTDOOR 
LITHOGRAPHING 

High Grade and of Every Description 
Let us try for your business by giving us a chance to estimate 

MAYBE WE CAN GIVE YOU BETTER WORK OR BETTER PRICES 
TRY US AND SEE 

We design, engrave and print the beautiful and artistic covers for The White City Magazine 



CENTRAL 

PRINTING & ENGRAVING 

COMPANY 

COMMERCIAL, RAILROAD, CIRCUS AND 
THEATRICAL PRINTING 

POSTERS CAR CARDS 

FOR BILLBOARD FOR SURFACE 

AND ELEVATED STATIONS AND ELEVATED LINES 

140-146 Monroe Street, Chicago 

Teh Central 1144 Automatic 6279 

WE PRINT THE CAR CARDS FOR WHITE CITY 
When writing to advertisers please mention The White City Maoazinb. 



THE WHITE CITY MAGAZINE 



71 



The South Side 

Elevated Railroad 

Company 

has a station 
at the gate of 

White City 




When writing to advertisers please mention The White City Magazine. 



72 



THE WHITE CITY MAGAZINE 




KANUFACTUREBS 
B>\KIN& POWDE 

--• SPICES 



lMJL-@niL©iiiS(a C®, 



IMPORTERS AND ROASTERS or 

50«52 MICHIGAN AVE. 
CHIC.A.GO. 




MPORTERS 



Lovers of Coffee 

should know that the blends of the HALL-GILBERG CO. are rapidly 
attracting the attention of those who serve and enjoy this 

King of Beverages 



WE ROAST, BLEND AND PACK 

ELECTA, NAPAMAX, ROYAL, BANQUET AND 
AMSTERDAM JAVA 



We wish to especially call the attention of Managers and Stewards to the fact that our 
Hotel and Restaurant Department supplies the COLLEGE INN and many of the lead- 
ing Hotels, Restaurants, Dining Car Systems and Clubs. 



Jos. Deutsch, Pres't. 



ESTABLISHED 1896 Ch.as. Edw.-^rds, Sec'y and Treas. 



EDWARDS, DEUTSCH & 




HEITMANN 

Lithographers 

ig4-202 Clinton St.^ Chicago 




High Class Lithograph Work in all its Branches. Prompt^ Reliable and 

Up-to-date. A complete establishment to which we give 

our personal supervision in the conception 

and execution of all orders 

entrusted to our 

Telephones Harrison care. We will gladly submit samples 

~f^2 and -172 of our recefit productions. 



Wlien writing to ndverti'iers piease mention the White City Magazine. 



THE WHITE CITY MAGAZINE 



73 





Illustrations suitable for 

appropriately printing 

Advertising Novelties, 

Stationery, Cards, 

Show Cards, Numbered Tickets 
or Blanks, etc. 

For Concessionaires or others. 

THE WALKER & WILLIAMS CO. m-mo 

334 Dearborn Street 67O Caxton Building 



TLLEFHONES 



t HARRISON 1080 
( AUTOMATIC 6808 



WYMAN'S BUFFET 

984 EAST SIXTY-THIRD STREET 

Just a Few Steps East of White City's Main Entrance 

Wines, Liquors and Cigars 



The best of refreshments provided for visitors to White 
City. :: :: Everything of the very finest quality. 



Telephone Wentworth 632 



Chicago, Illinois 



W?ien writing to advertisers please mention The White City Magazine. 



74 



THE WHITE CITY MAGAZINE 



If it's 



HARDWARE 

Go to 

Orr & LocKett's 

First and Save Time. 



71-73 RANDOLPH ST. 



B. Bates E. Simpsjn J. Perry Bate 

Telephone Canal 353 

J. B. Bates & Co. 

Ship Yard 

FLAG POLES, SPARS, YACHTS 
AND SMALL BOATS 



140 West i2d Street 



CHICAGO 



CLARENCE BOYLE 

President 

Telephone Canal 1537 

Clarence Boyle 
Lumber Co. 

Wholesale Dealers in 

Hardwoods 
Yellow Pine 

and Cypress 

No. 319 W. 2 2cl Street 
Chicago, 111. 



W. R. J ACQUEST 



PLUMBING 

GAS FITTING 

HOT WATER HEAT- 
ING & SEWERAGE 



Telephone Yards 142 



3528 S.WOOD ST. 

CHICAGO 



New 

Amsterdam 

Casualty Company 

C. J. PORTER 

Resident Manager 

601 National Life Building 
Chicago 

W. M. GELDERMAN 

Manager Personal Accident Department 



LIABILITY . BURGLARY 
PLATE GLASS 
PERSONAL ACCIDENT 

INSURANCE 



When writing to advertisers please mention The White City Magazine. 



THE WHITE CITY MAGAZINE 



Electricity 

for all 

Lighting 

and 

Power 

m White City 

supplied /rom the mains of th^ 

Commonwealth 
Electric Co. 

Southern District Office: 719 Garlield Boulevard 
General Offices: 139 Adams Street 

When writing to advertisers please mention The White City Magazine. 



THE WHITE CITY MAGAZINE 



True & True Co 



Blue Island Ave. and Lincoln St. 
Phone Canal 944 



Chicago 



White City Garden Balustrade, Chilcoot Pass, Transforming Station, Fire Show, 
Ball Room, Main Office, Scenic Railroad, Automatic Vaudeville, Band Stand, 
Canals of Venice, Tower, Colonnade, Toilets and Baby Incubator Buildings, con= 
sisting of the main and auxiliary buildings, show Millwork furnished by us. 



The 

True 

Doors 

Are 

Good 

Doors 




THE RETURNED EXPLORER—" This, your highness, is the 
greaiest thing 'vje disco'vered in cAmerica ; it is aT rue Sr True 

Door. The natives of cAmerica. use it to stop up the holes 
through Tvhich they enter and tea.'^ve their houses so they <witt 
be safe at all times." 



When writing to advertisers please mention The White City Magazine. 



O 



THE WHITE CITY MAGAZINE 



mm^^^mmAmm'mmmm»^^^mmmmm 



Bank 

CAPITAL : ONE MILLION DOLLARS 



Transacts a General Domestic ^ 

Foreign Banking, Savings, Trust Company & Bond Business 

J ^ Interest Paid on Savings 

Checking Accounts Received on Favorable Terms 

We Issue Travelers' Letters of Credit & Travelers' Checks 

Send for Our List of Safe Investmefits 



OFFICERS 

JOSEPH E. OTIS President 

"W^ ALTER H. "WILSOK Vice-President 

LAWRENCE NELSON Vice-President 

AVILLIAM C. COOK Cashier 

H. "WOLLENBERGER Asst. to Pres. 

AV. G. WALLING Secretary 



DIRECTORS 

JAMES TV STEVENS . . • President lUinois Life Insurance Co. 

ROBERT MATHER^ . . • • President The Rock Island Company 

W. A. GARDNER Gen'l Mgr. C. & N.-W. Ry. Co. 

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The fVHiTE Cirr Magazine 

MAY, 1905 No. 4 



Vol. I 



''(riet)er on (Ear^P'' ^^"^^^ ./-whitecity 



Written for The White City Magazine 

By STANLEY ^WATERLOO 






l/Vi 



HAVE you seen the Colorado 
honeysuckle growing at the 
foot of a ragged, rugged 
old boulder in a canyon of 
stone ? Such a flower of 
womanhood was Anne Sum- 
merville, and such a rock, 
stern and uncompromising, 
was her father, Amos Sum- 
merville, a prosperous man- 
ufacturer who vibrated be- 
tween his home at Brewster, a New 
England town of buzzing factories, and 
his office in New York. 

A new phase of existence and a new 
experience was about to come into the 
lives of these two, a change with a glit- 
ter to it. This change in the entire life 
and thought was brought about, as such 
things often are, by a change of en- 
vironment, first made by one and then, 
through her, carried to the other. And 
it was all in this wise : 

Anne, after much blandishment and 
some entreaty, had gained permiss'on 
to visit a Miss Kate Lennox, a former 
school friend, whose one fault in the 
eves of the autocrat of Anne's life was 
that she, with her mother and father, 
had been wild and indiscreet enough to 



move to Chicago. That a pupil, nay, a 
graduate, of the "Brewster Female Sem- 
inary" should hide her bright light 
under the dingy bushel of Chicago was, 
in the eyes of the whole population of 
the town, a thing to shake the head 
over. And as for the New York view 
of a visit to Chicago, it need only be 
said that Amos Summerville had it, and 
had it added to the natural Brewster 
view of such a departure from common 
sense. "Pigs ! mud ! a necessary west- 
ern trading point, but as for life there, 
bah !" 

"I've been west once, and that's 
enough for me !" the girl's father said, 
testily, and when Anne asked him when 
he had visited the west, he answered, 
after a period of retrospection, appar- 
ently remorsefully : "I went to Buffalo 
on an infringement patent case in 1870 
— before you were either born or 
thought of, young woman! And I re- 
peat, once was enough for me ! As for 
Chicago — what anyone wants to go there 
for I can't see. When anyone moves 
there, I forget them." 

But Kate Lennox was still a Brew- 
ster girl, albeit her glorious birthright 
was dimmed by the ill considered migra- 



12 



THE WHITE CITY MAGAZINE 



tion of her "folks," and old Amos Sum- 
men-ille could not withstand the plead- 
ings of his motherless daughter that she 
might visit her dearest and best friend 
and schoolmate in the place of her in- 
carceration in the collection of rude 
structures on the shore of Lake ]\Iich- 
igan. 

She came in ]\Iarch when all the 
world is astir, this fair daughter of 
the Puritans. And it was not more than 
six weeks before the ghastly, the ab- 



she alluded to him as "a Chicago man," 
and a young Chicago man, at that. 
There came back on the wings of the 
fast mail a letter which looked as if it 
had been carved in granite by a chisel 
of steel. 

"Never," it ended, "never on earth 
zmll I give my consent to your marriage 
to Archibald Fleming, or any other Chi- 
cago man." 

Mr. Summerville counted on the filial 
devotion and obedience of his daughter 




White City College Inti 



normal, the inconceivable occurred ! 
Such things will happen in this strange 
world. This cherished creature around 
whom clustered all the hopes of one 
stem old man wrote to him, fearingly but 
earnestly and pleadingly, asking his con- 
sent to her marriage with one Archibald 
Fleming, a young man who had not the 
shadow of an excuse to offer for the 
bald facts that he had been born, raised 
and educated in Chicago. Even more 
than that, he owned manfully to having 
gone into business in his native city and 
further declared himself to be deter- 
mined to remain there during a great 
many of the years of his natural life. 

It goes without saying that the full 
extent of Fleming's hardihood was not 
revealed to the old gentleman in Anne's 
appealing missive. It was enough that 



and he counted not in vain. Anne had 
grown to womanhood without a mother; 
she loved her stern but affectionate 
father, and she knew in her heart, and 
she told her lover bravely from the 
first, that she would not marry without 
the consent of the old man, in whose 
heart she reigned so absolutely. 

"Father has one trait," Anne told 
Fleming sadly; "It is a good and some- 
times it is a bad one ; he will not break 
his word. When once he has said a 
thing, that he will stick to as long- as 
he lives, even when he doesn't want 
to. 'My word,' he says, 'is my bond. 
With me it is sav and seal, everv 
time'." 

Anne's voice faltered as she repeated 
these frequent declarations of her father. 
Fleming, in whom there was stuff, re- 



THE WHITE CITY MAGAZINE 



13 



fused to be dismayed. "Don't be dis- 
couraged," he urged. "I'll go to New 
York and see him. Surely he won't 
spoil our whole lives out of mere — p — • 
perversity." 

He was on the verge of saying "pig- 
headedness," but the look in Anne's blue 
eyes had made him veer a little. 

Fleming went to New York, saw 
Amos Summerville, and came back a 



not be broken, either in letter or in 
spirit. 

"We must get your father out here," 
Fleming said to Anne one day, at the 
end of a long walk and a long talk ; 
"we must get him here somehow. 
We must make him know us better." 

"But how? He'll never come west!" 
exclaimed Anne. 

"You might be sick," said Fleming 




Construction IVork on the Electric Tower 



sadder, a wiser, but not a weakened 
man. As intimated, Fleming was not a 
"quitter." He had studied well the old 
gentleman of his hopes and had real- 
ized that there was a hard task before 
him. He had been well received, but he 
had recognized Mr. Summerville as one 
of those men who are not stubborn 
merely, but almost fanatical upon one 
subject. He had a pride in keeping his 
word to the literal letter, be that word 
wise or foolish. Such a man was Jephtha 
of the scriptural story. The assertion 
of one of his race once made, must 



desperately ; "not awfully sick, but — 
you might sprain your ankle or some- 
thing like that — and not hurry home !" 
He looked so pleadingly at her, this 
stalwart son of Illinois, that Anne 
could find no heart to reprove him. 
And, strange to say, so mysterious are 
the ways of Providence, Miss Anne 
Summerville really fell ill — it was but a 
slight cold — but she could not go home 
at the appointed time, and after the re- 
ceipt and sending of a telegram or two, 
Amos Summerville left New York in 
the so-called drawing-room of the lim- 



14 



THE WHITE CITY MAGAZINE 



ited train for Chicago. He passed 
through his early frontier town of Buf- 
falo in the night and arrived in Chicago 
anxious, appreh.ensive, but unhurt by 
Indians and untrodden by buffalo, and 
one look at Anne cheered him, while 
one embrace of her round arms and one 



-rf^Sk 




Hereafter 

kiss from her warm lips restored him to 
his usual complacence with himself and 
all the world — that is, the world east 
of the Alleghenies. 

But it was inevitable that it should 
come — consideration of the matter im- 
portant to the two — and, though the 
elder had hoped the problem solved by 
his mere say-so, he knew in his heart 
that there was something smouldering. 
Anne, lying convalescent, soon poured 
out her story to her father as he sat 
beside her sofa, and she was certainly 
a fetching and appealing picture in her 
soft, white house dress, her envelop- 
ing lace shawls, her little red slippers. 

"I don't object to Fleming, particu- 
larly," the old gentleman said at last. 
"He's well connected — his grandfather 
was a New Yorker. He's well to do 
and appears to be a man of parts. If 
he were an easterner the case might be 
different. But he isn't, and I'll keep 
my v;ord. You'll get over it, child. 
Never on earth, as I said before, will 
I consent to your marriage with him!" 



The girl could but submit, and later 
impart the situation to her lover. Some- 
how the news, distressful as it was, did 
not appal him. "We have plenty of 
time and I have faith," he said. "Are 
you certain about his exact words?" 

"Yes, indeed," was the sad reply. 
" 'Never on earth' will I consent to your 
marriage with Mr. Fleming!" 

"Never on earth," quoted the young 
man. "That's sad. I'm certain, dear, 
that our match has been made in 
heaven, but we can hardly go there 
with him to get your father's consent. 
Maybe he'd have a brush with Peter 
at the portals, anyhow. 'Never on 
earth'." And then a great thought came 
to him ! 

The days passed and Mr. Summer- 
ville was taken about and saw much of 
Chicago. It was all a surprise to him. 
He was taken among business men and 
to the clubs by Fleming — whom he had 
received pleasantly enough, knowing the 
hopelessness of the young man's case — 
and met half a hundred eastern friends 
and, almost to his own vexation, began 
to feel at home. Under the stimulus of 
the lake breeze his step became elastic 
and his spirits buoyant. Not the first 
fine old conservative eastern gentleman 
was he to have illusions dispelled in 
what was once the west. As for Flem- 
ing, he was patient, tactful and hopeful. 







Chinese Theatre 
trying to make himself a sort of neces- 
sity. He was a most resolute person. 
He had fallen in love swiftly and 
deeply, it is true, but it was no mere 
infatuation with him. It was "for 
keeps," and it may fairly be said of the 



THE WHITE CITY MAGAZINE 



15 



lady in the case that her mind was of 
the same steadfast quahty. 

The indisposition of Miss Summer- 
ville was not so grave that she was con- 
fined to the house for any length of 
time, but she somehow thought the 
climate suited her, and begged her 
father to remain until she was abso- 
lutely well, an arrangement to which he 
consented with surprising readiness. He 
had not seen half what there was to 



moment before he had been in Qiicago. 
He was now, to all intents and pur- 
poses, in another world — a splendid one. 
When the great Chicago World's Fair 
of 1893 was in existence, there were 
certain points of view within its area 
from which all seemed to be, in a way, 
unreal, so wonderful were the vistas, 
the snowy, graceful architecture and 
the general impression of the fabric of 
a dream. Upon the mind of ]\Ir. Sum- 




Beautiful Venice 



see, she said. Above all, must he visit 
White City, the realized Chicago 
dream. Of course the programme suit- 
ed Fleming. Who can say that he did 
not suggest it? 

"We must take great care of your 
father for the next few days," the 
lover said ; "Fve made some progress, 
I hope, but 1 want him to become fixed, 
absolutely, in the impression that, next 
to you, I am the finest person on this 
continent. I tell you what, dear, if I 
make as good a husband as Fm trying 
to be a good prospective son-in-law 
you'll have won a prize ! And Fm go- 
ing to try the former even harder," he 
concluded earnestly. 

The day for the visit to White City 
came, a day close to the last of June, 
clear and sunny and warm and with the 
smell of flowers from parks and gar- 
dens. It was an ideal day for such an 
outing. The drive was made, the city 
of marvels entered through the great 
archway and, with eyes wide open, Mr. 
Summerville gazed about him. A 



merville the same effect was produced 
by the great White City of today. 

There is no possibility of detail re- 
garding the experiences of a day of 
sight-seeing so varied in its features. 
Fleming laughingly played '"barker," as 
he indicated in a sing-song what might 
be visited and in what sequence. The 
programme seemed almost too extended 
for the limits of a single visit, but what 
of it? There was no occasion for haste. 
There were other days to come. The 
supply of days had never been exhausted 
in the past and why should it be in 
the future? Fleming was considerate. 
He wanted the western visit to be a 
genuine rest for his father-in-law to be. 
Nice young man ! 

They emerged into the great plaza 
and thence went into the garden be- 
tween the graceful white structures up- 
rearing on either side. There was a 
gush of music and the young woman of 
the party started toward the pavilion 
whence came the melody, but was 
checked by her father's voice. "Don't 



i6 



THE WHITE CITY MAGAZINE 



let her go, Fleming! If she gets seated 
near tliat music, we'll have difficulty in 
enticing her away." 

Fleming liked that call upon him. It 
sounded as if he were already one of 
the family. 

They wandered about together, ab- 
sorbed in the beauties about them, but, 




Fiat Factory 

as they walked, the strains followed 
them and seemed never far away. 

They saw many things in a leisurely 
w^ay. They first viewed the exposition 
from the outside and the wonder of Mr. 
Summerville grew as they strolled about. 
"You do things on a great scale in 
Chicago," he adm.itted at last, ungrudg- 
ingly. Some of the greater attractions 
were visited and a light luncheon taken, 
only a light one, because Fleming ex- 
plained they were to dine there. Then 
came a rest and afterward more atten- 
tion was paid to scenes in detail. They 
rode twice round the scenic railway, 
they shot the chutes, they became silent 
spectators at the electric theater, and 
later they went to the circus, attended 
by half a dozen small boys Fleming had 
picked up near the doors. They had 
their photographs taken, their fortunes 
w^ere told in the Spanish Gypsy camp, 
and here a brown old Gypsy saw in 
Anne's hand exactly how this story is 
coming out, much to the confusion of 
everyone in the trio except Fleming, 



who had predicted it long before the 
Gypsy had set eyes upon Anne. 

It was not the imposing and more 
pretentious exhibits alone which inter- 
ested Mr. Summerville ; he found among 
the lesser attractions many things 
which appealed to him particularly. 
Especially was he attracted by the mar- 
velous horse, the Arabian Jim Key, 
whose performances in his own white 
home have given to the world a new 
idea of what is possible to the equine 
brain. As fond of a horse from youth 
as David Harum himself, the old gen- 
tleman was as charmed as he was 
astonished. "I've always insisted," he 
declared, "that a horse is one of the 
most intelligent of animals, second only 
to the collie dog, and here's the proof. 
I wish some of the scientists who have 
been slandering the horse could see this 
marvel." And he stood there, fairly 
bubbling over with gratification. This 
was but a single little incident of the 
day, illustrative not only of the variety 
of experiences to be had upon the 
grounds, but of Mr. Summerville's 
hearty abandonment to the spirit of 
the thing. The young people looked 
at each other and smiled. 

"I do not know," said Mr. Summer- 
ville, thoughtfully, "if I've ever felt as 
I do today since I went to the circus 
as a boy. I'm young again. The coun- 




50 Cheviicals in Various Buildings for 
Fire Protection 

try fair had something of the effect on 
me once and so did my first view of 
the sights of a great city, but here are 
all the effects in one. I don't quite 



THE WHITE CITY MAGAZINE 



17 



understand it, but I'm getting younger. 
You'll have to keep an eye on me, my 
daughter." 

"You'll be sobered down by the Johns- 
town Flood, Mr. Summerville," Flem- 
ing assured him, as he led the way 
toward the great scenic production 
which gives a truthful moving picture 
of the world-known tragic occurrence. 
But there was such a rush and "go" 
to the representation, and as Anne said, 



as one who knows what is next to be 
done. 

"Where are we going now?" asked 
Anne, as Fleming led the way. 

"To the flying airships," answered 
Fleming. 

Had he been all the time leading up 
to a climax? To Anne it seemed that 
there was a look of peculiar determina- 
tion in his face as he took the next 
triumph of interest. Was there specu- 



^^SWS 







A Group of Painters at White City 



"We know it's only a picture!" the 
whole affair rather raised than depressed 
the visitors' spirits. And later in the 
day the same mental effect came after 
the huge realistic scene elsewhere of a 
burning city, with the fire companies in 
action and the daring rescues. 

And now began a round of jollity — 
led frequently rather than followed by 
Amos Summerville himself. 

And so the hours passed of a most 
enjoyable afternoon, hours spent amid 
a scene of striking revelations, of grat- 
ification of the delicate senses and of 
sane merriment everywhere. The per- 
fume of the flowers, the music, the 
brilliant attraction to the eye, the many 
strange and interesting things combined 
to an end which was complete. It was 
just as the sun was setting that Flem- 
ing began to seem a trifle thoughtful. 
After a rest Fleming started forth again 



lation in one eye, amusement only in 
the other? 

It may not have been the case at all. 
It may be that young Fleming was but 
acting upon the impulse of the moment 
as he directed the little party's course, 
but, giving him credit for possession of 
tact and taste and all acuteness, the 
doubt seems almost justified as to his 
ingenuousness. He could not have done 
better in leading his companions into 
primrose paths and keeping them therein 
until there prevailed a condition of men- 
tal, and it might be said very nearly 
emotional, receptiveness all round which 
made a blending fit for amiable hap- 
penings. It has been provided by gen- 
tle Nature that lovers are possessed of 
a sixth sense — and Fleming was a lover ; 
there could be no doubt of that ! 

As they ascended the platform about 
the base of the great steel column, the 



i8 



THE WHITE CITY MAGAZINE 



support of the flying machines, the gaze 
of Mr. Summerville was turned upon 
Fleming with an expression rather hard 
to define. It appeared to combine de- 
cided interest and kindly regard with 
something very like regret. To tell the 
truth, the young man had "grown upon" 
him. The day had shown a new phase 
of Fleming's character, the possession of 
a degree of buovancv, good nature and 



top from which depended far down- 
ward to the comfortable cages at the 
bottom of the long steel rods appearing 
like the dangling arms, at rest, of some 
tall, slender thing of life ; and such in- 
deed they soon seemed almost to be. The 
three stepped into one of the dependent 
cars and seated themselves and 
waited. It was only for a mo- 
ment ; slowly the tower began 




Steel Structural Work for the Chutes 



fine behavior which had not full op- 
portunity for expression, or at least to 
such an extent during their intercourse 
while meeting business men down town. 
He even sighed a little to himself. Had 
there arisen in the old gentleman's 
mind some slight regret that he had 
forever barred the way of this desirable 
youngster toward becoming his own son- 
in-law? But — the pledged word of a 
Summen-ille ! 

The flying airships ! "The only safe 
and sane form of aerial navigation," 
according to Sir Hiram Maxim, the in- 
ventor of world-wide fame, and one al- 
ways so conservative in his assertions. 
There it upreared itself, the great steel 
column, with the ring about it at the 



revolving, but there was no par- 
ticular sensation to the visitors. Then 
something began to happen. Swifter and 
swifter became the revolutions and the 
arms they tautened, quivered and 
reached outward and upward. Farther 
outward and upward, far away from the 
column, now they went, climbing to- 
ward the sky, and to those in the car at 
the end of one of them at least the 
effect was something as new as for a, 
moment startling. They were away in 
space, swimming swiftly and gently far 
aloft between heaven and earth, held 
safely as birds upon 'the wing by the 
strange power of centrifugal motion. 
Little did they care, though, what har- 
nessed force of nature had thus uplift- 



THE WHITE CITY MAGAZINE 



19 



ed them toward the zenith and thus bore 
them through the air in a mighty cir- 
cumference of a circle. The arm was 
extended to its utmost and farthest 
upward reach now and they were be- 
coming accustomed to the impalpable 
world to which they had been exalted. 
The gift of speech was returning to 
them, and they used it • 



cance in the ears of Fleming and there 
flashed an inspiration to his brain ! He 
leaned forward and spoke earnestly, al- 
most excitedly : 

"That is true, sir," he exclaimed. 
"We are no longer *on earth' ; we are 
where, without breaking your word, you 
can make two young people happy. Will 
vou do it, sir? Your daughter and I are 




{From left to ri^ht.) Buildings for Photo Gallery ; Dog, Pony and Monkey Circus : 
Teinple of Mtisic, and JoJmstoiun Flood 



'Tt is remarkable." said Mr. Sum- 
merville. 

"I like it," said Mr. Fleming. 

"It is lovely," exclaimed Miss Sum- 
merville. 

They laughed and talked in pure 
light-heartedness and stimulation of spir- 
its, the old gentleman perhaps the most 
exalted of the three. "It is inspiring," 
he exclaimed ; "I never experienced any- 
thing like it. Daughter, what do you 
think of it? Why, we're new creatures. 
We're birds or angels," he laughed, "or 
something of the sort. We're no longer 
on earth." 

"No longer 'on earth' !" The words 
rang with their full unintended signifi- 



in love as deeply as ever two human 
beings were, and, although I don't de- 
serve her, I'll try to make a mighty 
good husband and son-in-law, if you 
will but consent to it. Haven't the 
Fates afiforded justification?" he con- 
cluded, rather dolefully, but with an at- 
tempted smile. 

■ Mr. Summerville looked at his daugh- 
ter. She returned his gaze wistfully. 

He sat silent for a moment, and then 
there came about the corners of his 
mouth something very like a twitch- 
ing. He spoke at last: 

"I'll admit that I'm absolved. There 
doesn't seem to be anv question about 
that, and I'll go a little further" he 



20 



THE WHITE CITY MAGAZINE 



added, with a smile, but steadily; ''I'm 
glad that I interjected the words 'on 
earth' when I answered my daughter. It 
is all right ; I've had too many preju- 
dices. You shall have your own way." 
To say that the young people felt 
as if they were walking on air would 
not be quite correct. They were liter- 
ally up in air, but not altogether upon 
it, and thev were not walking. It 



pie at the big German Rathskeller, no 
moderate repast at the great dairy din- 
ing room, but a dinner, a Dinner with a 
large "D" in the main restaurant of 
all in the huge building, where cool 
breezes from the electric fans swayed 
gently the foliage of the green palms 
and where the best cooks the world 
could offer sent forth dishes to tempt 
the most critical of palates. 




Loading Station, Scenic Railway 



amounted to the same thing, though. 
They were nearer heaven in more ways 
than one than thev had ever thought to 
be. 

Not much more was said. There was 
no need for it. The dusk was deepen- 
ing, the revolutions of the mighty tower 
became less rapid, the long arms sank 
gently downward and the three people 
to whom the afternoon had brought so 
much were on earth amid all the pleas- 
ant glare and glitter of the night. "Is 
it not time for dinner?" suggested the 
eldest of them. 

It was a Dinner at the College Inn ! 
No hearty luncheon for these three peo- 



It was a dream, a most substantial 
dream, and the grim old gentleman, 
who knew a good dinner and could en- 
joy and understand it, from soup to 
imported cheese, leaned back at the end 
with a contented sigh and beaming coun- 
tenance. The feast of good things and 
knowing companionship was working 
within him and he was mellowing like 
an apple in warm autumn sunshine. 
They left the palace beatified. 

What better after a dinner of dinners 
than to recline idly in a gondola and 
float along the shining canals of Venice, 
the Wonderful, smoking a good cigar 
the while and studying the beauties of 



THE WHITE CITY MAGAZINE 



21 



the ancient palaces and dreaming and 
digesting liappily? Nothing, certainly, 
in the opinion of Mr. Summerville. As 
for his companions, they were neces- 
sarily not so much in Venice as in 
Paradise. 

Later, as they began their ride home- 
ward, all looked back toward where 
the great electric tower upreared toward 
the sky its three hundred feet of height, 
with all its effulgence of fifty thousand 
flames and with its mighty searchlight 



at the top blazing over the great city 
to the north, and the young man ex- 
pressed the thought of all as he ex- 
claimed: "It's the brightest night I 
ever saw or dreamed of." 

Of course it was ! 

So many things, all delightful, are 
happening and will happen at White 
City. 

One hour of joy dispels the cares 
And sufferings of a thousand years. 

— Baptiste. 




TRANSPORTATION FACILITIES 

HOW TO REACH WHITE CITY 



WHITE CITY is located at 63d 
street and South Park ave- 
nue, and may be easily 
reached from points in or out 
of Chicago by elevated roads, by table 
and electric street car lines, and by 
steam railroads. 

ELEVATED ROADS. 

At stations on the Union Loop you 
should observe the guiding signs which 
are located in conspicuous places on 
the stairs and platforms and by which 
you will be guided aright. 

The South Side "L" has a station im- 
mediately in front of White City at 
South Park avenue and 63d street. 
Time of trip from the Union Loop to 
White City is 30 minutes. 

Changing cars on other "L" lines, 
down-town, to South Side "L:" 

Erom Metropolitan "L," change at 
the LaSalle Street Station on Van 
Buren street. 

Returning home, change at Madison 
Street Station on Wabash avenue. 

From Chicago and Oak Park "L" 
and Northwestern ''L" change at the 
State Street Station on Van Buren 
street. 



Returning home, change at Adams 
Street Station or at Randolph Street 
Station on Eifth avenue. 

SUREACE LINES. 

In or near the down-town district 
take any surface line going south, pref- 
erably the State street cable or the Cot- 
tage Grove avenue cable (Chicago City 
Railway) then transfer to the 63d street 
electric line. 

Erom any point on the South Side 
the cars of the Chicago City Railway 
will carry you, for one fare only, right 
to the entrance of White City'. 

Under the present system of trans- 
fers on the Chicago City Railway, you 
may, upon the payment of one fare, 
ride in any one general direction as far 
as the cars of the company will carry 
you; but, should you reverse the gen- 
eral direction in which you have 
started, you may continue to ride only 
to the junction with the first cross line 
reached. 

Eor instance, if you are on a south- 
bound car, you will, upon the payment 
of a cash fare, receive a slip which will 
permit you to transfer to any inter- 



22 



THE WHITE CITY MAGAZINE 



secting east, west, or south line. If 
you take a west-bound car at a transfer 
point, you have established your gen- 
eral direction of south-west, and the 
conductor on the west-bound car will 
exchange your transfer-slip for one en- 
titling you to ride south or west, and 
you may thus exchange your transfer- 
slip indefinitely on south and west- 



again on 63d street to South Park 
avenue. 

Time from Madison street (down- 
town) to White City via Chicago City 
Railway Company's lines is 38 min- 
utes. 

The Calumet Electric lines from 
South Chicago, Cheltenham Beach, 
Hammond, Ind., etc., connect at Stony 




The Toboggan or Double Circle 



bound cars. If you reverse your direc- 
tion, however, and take a north or 
east-bound car at a transfer point, your 
transfer will entitle you to ride only as 
far as the intersection of the first cross 
line, and if you wish to ride farther 
than this point you must pay another 
cash fare. 

To avoid any misunderstanding, re- 
member that "Transfers will be issued 
ONLY at time fares are paid." 

Transfers are not issued from North 
or West-Side lines to Sou^h-Side lines. 
Exception: A passenger on the North 
Halsted street line may reach White 
City upon the payment of one fare and 
transferring at O'Neill street to the 
South Halsted street line and then 



Island avenue and 68th street with the 
cars from Pullman, Kensington, etc., 
which have their terminal at the en- 
trance to White City. 

The Chicago Electric Traction Com- 
pany's line runs clear through from 
Harvey and Blue Island direct to 63d 
street and South Park avenue. The 
fare from Harvey is 10 cents and from 
Blue Island 5 cents. 

SUBURBAN LINES. 

From points on the Aurora, Elgin 
& Chicago Electric line only two 
changes of cars need be made, as this 
line connects with the Metropolitan 
"L" at South 52d avenue and carries 
passengers d'irect to the Union "L" 
Loop, where the South Side "L" trains 



THE WHITE CITY MAGAZINE 



23 




24 



THE WHITE CITY MAGAZINE 



may be taken at LaSalle street, Dear- 
born street or State street stations. 

The Chicago and JoHet Electric 
Railway runnhig from Joliet to Chi- 
cago via Summit, Lemont, Lockport, 
etc., connects with the lines of the Chi- 
cago City Railway Company at Archer 
and South 48th avenues, it also con- 
nects with the lines of the Union Trac- 
tion Co. in the village of Lyons. 

STEAM RAILROADS 

All Illinois Central and Michigan 
Central trains, to and from all subur- 
ban stations, stop at Woodlawn Sta- 
tion on 63d street near Jackson Park. 
The 63d street electric cars, going west, 
carry passengers direct ,to the main 
entrance of White City on 63d street 
and South Park avenue. The South 
Side "L" trains may be taken at Madi- 
son Station, half a block west of Wood- 
lawn Station direct to White City. 

All trains of the Chicago, Rock Isl- 
and & Pacific, Lake Shore & Michigan 
Southern, and the Pittsburg, Et. 
Wayne & Chicago lines stop at Engle- 
wood Station on 63d street, where 
electric cars going east may be taken 
for White City, 1 nding passengers at 
the main entrance on South Park 
avenue. 

Those entering Chicago on the Chi- 
cago & Eastern Illinois, the Chicaeo & 
Western Indiana, the Pittsburg, Cin- 
cinnatai, Chicago, and St. Lou' , and 
the Wabash, can change at the 63d 
street station to the electric cars going- 
east direct to the main entrance of 
White City. 

Trains on the Grand Trunk stop at 
47th street. To transfer for White 
City, take the electric cars on 47th 
street going east, transfer to the Went- 
worth avenue electric (or to the State 
street cable) line and transfer again to 
the 63d street electric line, landing at 
the main entrance. 

Patrons of White City entering 
Chicago by other than the above-men- 
tioned roads will find convenient ele- 
vated stations near the respective rail- 
way stations —observe the guiding 
signs on elevated stairs and platforms, 
and refer to elevated railroads men- 
tioned above. The Kinzie Street Sta- 
tion of the Northwestern "L" is in 



front of the Wells Street Railroad Sta- 
tion. The Canal Street Station of the 
Metropolitan "L" is within half a block 
of the Union Station. 

STEAMSHIP DOCKS. 

The nearest and most convenient ele- 
vated train stations from the docks of 
all steamship lines are the Randolph 
Street Station on Wabash avenue, the 
State street, and Clark street stations 
on Lake street. These are within a 
few minutes' walk south from any one 
of the docks, and South Side elevated 
trains will carry passengers direct to 
White City. 

AUTOMOBILES. 

White City is within a short dis- 
tance of the boulevard system and ac 
commodations will be arranged for 300 
automobiles in the White City garage 
on South Park avenue between 62d 
and 63d streets. 

All who joy would win 

]\Iust share it — Happiness was born a 

twin. — Byron. 
*** 

"Where Care lodgeth, sleep will never 
lie." — Shakespeare. 

Flying Airships 

Among the various diversified enter- 
tainments which will be afforded visi- 
tors to White City will be the Flying 
Air Ships. These Air Ships are con- 
structed from the models designed by 
the great Hiram Maxim, and they ex- 
press in the fullest degree his ideas re- 
garding aerial navigation. Those who 
participate in this pleasure will be 
seated in large roomy Air Ships which, 
after loading, will be propelled through 
the air by centrifugal force, and the 
sensations experienced will be of the 
most pleasant and exhilarating char- 
acter. Absolutely no danger will be 
attached to this form of amusement, as 
the machine has been carefully con- 
structed with a special view to safety. 
It is impossible to give the reader a cor- 
rect idea of the Flying Air Ships and 
the enjoyment to be obtained by riding 
in them,' but as soon as White City is 
opened, the crowds of visitors will have 
ample opportunity to judge for them- 
selves. 



THE WHITE CITY MAGAZINE 



25 



INCUBATOR BABIES 

THEY WILL PROVE A SOURCE 
OF SCIENTIFIC ENTERTAINMENT 



LL THE world loves a 
baby" might be a new and 
trueparaphraseof the poet's 
notable saying concerning 
lovers. This is amply em- 
phasized in the "Infant Incubator" Ex- 
hibit at White City. It is safe to say 
that as large a percentage of interested 




pink. To avoid mixing or confusion of 
identity, each wears a medal on which 
is set down its initials and the date of 
its arrival, with such other information 
as bears on the treatment of the case. 
They are taken out and fed at regular 
intervals, bathed and dressed with great- 
est care, so that over eighty-five per 




Infant Incubators, Main Building 



visitors will pass through the doors of 
this exhibit, as any other on the 
grounds. It is something more than 
an exhibit — it is an educator. The tiny 
infants, only a few days old, and born 
into the world from one to three 
months ahead of the natural time are 
put into the glass ovens which are kept 
at an even temperature, and supplied 
constantly with fresh sterilized air by 
means of an automatic arrangement. 
The little mites seem thoroughly to en- 
joy their residence in the glass house, 
and in the sweet sleep of infancy create 
a fascinating picture. The boy infants 
have blue sashes and the girls have 



cent of the infants are saved for useful 
lives. This is a gain of nearly seventy 
per cent over the old methods, and an 
inestimable gain for the parents, who 
perhaps love them even more dearly be- 
cause of the misfortune that ushers 
them prematurely into individual exist- 
ence. 

The Infant Incubator system had its 
origin in Germany, the home of many 
of the most advanced methods of mod- 
ern medicine and surgery, and is con- 
ducted there under government aus- 
pices. It has proved a great success, 
and like results are being obtained in 
this country, where physicians welcome 



26 



THE WHITE CITY MAGAZINE 



it as an invaluable adjunct to their own 
skill. In Germany boys and girls, now 
eight years old, prove the efficacy of the 
system, and a careful record is kept of 
each child sent out. Thousands of 
precious lives have already been saved 
and it is only a question of time when 
the system will be universally adopted. 
Institutions will eventuallv be set up in 
all the large American cities. 

The nurses who have charge of the 
infants as they graduate from the ovens 
or incubators, certainly have their hands 
full, as with their wee charges on each 
arm they soothe them to rest and place 
them in the dainty cribs. It presents a 
picture of babyhood that is entrancing, 
and the only regret felt by the observer 
is that all infants cannot have such care 
to build up strong and healthy frames 
with which to fight the battles of life. 

The press has found the Incubators 
a never ending source of "human inter- 
est" stories, ^^'hat appeals to a right 
minded man or woman more strongly 
than the subject of infancy? What 
theme strikes tenderer chords, or ap- 
peals more strongly to all that is gen- 
tlest and best in mankind? 

The first attempt to substitute scien- 
tific treatment for the primitive methods 
that had for hundreds of years been em- 
ployed to save infants born prema- 
turely was made sixty years ago by Dr. 
Crede, of the University of Leipzig. He 
constructed a box with double metallic 
sides, and filled the space between the 
walls with water so as to regulate the 
temperature. Later experiments were 
made in Paris, but were only partially 
successful. It was eight years ago that 
the first institution was opened in Ber- 
lin. It was a private institution and 
won favor from the start, so quickly 
did the public become convinced that 
here at last a sensible and scientific 
method had been formulated. 

The public has been regarding the 
"Incubator Infant" with much sympa- 
thetic pity. They have looked upon the 
little fellow as a child of misfortune be- 
cause he did not get a fair start in the 
world. They have felt that he was al- 
ready handicapped in the race of life; 
destined to be a weakling and hence en- 
titled to more careful and tender solici- 



tude than is bestowed upon the average 
youngster. 

But look at infants grown up. Every 
year the number of children treated at 
the parent institute in Berlin has in- 
creased, and each year a reunion of the 
little ones who graduated there has been 
held. At these reunions all these chil- 
dren have been carefully examined — 
physically and mentally — by govern- 
mental authorities, and the medical pro- 
fession has been delighted with the pos- 
itive proof thus afforded that children 
so introduced to the world are fully 
equal in every respect to those born and 
nurtured under normal conditions. 

The first reunion of incubator gradu- 
ates reared by Dr. Couney and this sys- 
tem in this country occurred in New 
York July 31, 1904, at which time there 
were forty children present, ranging in 
age from three months to six years. 

After a visit to this institution one 
will feel amply repaid for having seen 
the quaint, delightful little fellows whose 
appeal to the sympathies is always 
stronger because of their utter helpless- 
ness. And mingled with this is a feeling 
of thankfulness for that genius that 
constantly broadens the scope of man's 
loving labor for his fellows. There is 
something in it all that makes you ask 
if times have not changed since the poet 
Burns, looking about him at the misery 
in the world, declared that "man was 
made to mourn." 



New boarder — "Don't you ever get 
tired of these nondescript salads the 
landlady furnishes us?" 

Philosophical boarder — "On the con- 
trary, I never cease to regard them with 
wonder and admiration for their extra- 
ordinarily cosmopolitan character." — 
Chicago Tribune. 

*** 
Today is ours: Why do we fear? 
Today is ours : we have it here. 
Let's banish Bus'ness, banish sorrow ; 
To the gods belongs tomorrow. 

— Cozvley. 
*** 

Recreation is intended to the mind as 
whetting is to the scythe. 

— Bishop Hall. 



THE WHITE CITY MAGAZINE 



27 




Ornamental Work at 
White City 

BEAUTIFUL DESIGNS FOR INTERIOR AND EXTERIOR 
IN COMPOSITION, PLASTER AND CEMENT WORK 

In beautifying 
White City, an 
important part of 
the work has been 
accompHshed b y 
the Decor ator's 
Supply Company, 
an organization de- 
voted exclusively 
to exterior and in- 
terior ornamental 

work in cement, composition, plaster, 
wood, etc. The 
odd and unique ef- 
fects presented to 
the eye when view- 
ing various struc- 
tures at White 
City, result princi- 
pally from this or- 
namental work na- 
turally coupled 
with the graceful 
architectural d e- 
signs and the gen- 
eral ensemble. 

Oscar Spindler, 
Vice-President of 
the Decorator's 
Supply Co., has 
during the past 
seven months, de- 
voted his time al- 
most exclusively to the work of de- 
signing and creat- 
ing these different 
effects, some few 
of which are re- 
produced in the ac- 
companying illus- 
trations. Hundreds 
of designs have 
been made for 
White City and 






visitors will ob- 
serve that no two 
buildings are dec- 
orated alike. 

The contract 
given for this work 
was second only to 



the World's Fair 
contracts because 
the solid half mile 
of structures at 
White City have 
all been treated 
with artistic skill 
and an enormous 
quantity of detail. 

M r. Spindler 
has designed col- 
umns, capitals, 
brackets, cornices, 
friezes, mouldings, 
panels, wood gril- 
les, plastic ceiling, 
\v a 1 1 decorations, 
composition orna- 
ments for wood- 
work and a host of 
others. 




He that will make a good use of any 
part of his life must allow a large por- 
tion of it to recreation. — Locke. 

I am sure Care's an enemy to life. 
— SJiakcspcarc. 




To Gum Ctiewers 

Following the policy of giving 
its visitors the highest quality 
of everything that can possibly 
be obtained, White City 
has arranged to install the Zeno 
Gum Vending machines exclu- 
sively at the grounds. The 
Zeno Gum machines were used 
exclusively at the St. Louis Exposition 
and the popularity they aroused there 
raised the Zeno machines to the first 
place among gum vending machines. 

The Zeno Manufacturing Company 
has completed a new machine, which is 
said to be the most perfect gum vending 
machine ever devised. The machine is 
most attractive in appearance and is espe- 
cially constructed to meet with the de- 
mands of White City visitors. The 
color scheme of the new machine is yel- 
low and black, which is worked together 
in a most pleasing combination. Hun- 
dreds of these machines will be scattered 
all through White City. 



28 



THE WHITE CITY MAGAZINE 



MILLWORK FOR WHITE CITY 

A RE.MARKABLE RECORD OF EFFICIENCY IN SECURING ABSOLUTE EXACTNESS 
WHILE FOLLOWING INTRICATE AND ORIGINAL DETAIL 




HE enormous task of supply- 
ing practically all of the mill 
work used at White City 
has been practically complet- 
ed by a Chicago concern and 
a record has been made in minute ex- 
actness. This concern is True & True 
Company, known all over the world as 
the makers of the "good doors." The 
magnitude of the order coupled with the 
intricate and original designs make the 
contract an unusually difficult one to 
execute, but it has been accomplished 



a factory which possessed perfect ma- 
chinery and could give faultless work- 
manship in order to turn out the minute 
detail required on each design. 

Fred Hawken, the estimator for True 
& True Company, proved a marvel in 
calculation. So perfectly did he com- 
pute and scale the work for the archi- 
tect's specifications and drawings that 
not one single alteration was necessary. 
When the various parts were delivered 
to Manager Paul D. Howse, it was dis- 
covered that they fitted to a nicety. 




A. IV. Trite, Treasurer 



C. J. True, President 



J. C. AJirens, Secretary 



almost without the necessity for criti- 
cism. 

White City of course would have 
nothing except the best that money and 
skill could secure. Every part of the 
work has been critically inspected, not 
alone by the Construction department 
at White City, but by rival firms. 

The order placed by White City 
with True & True Company is undoubt- 
edly the largest single order ever given 
for mill work in Chicago, if not in the 
United States, and it was enough to 
test the courage and capacity of any 
factory. 

Time was almost the first considera- 
tion although exactness of detail and 
excellence of material dominated all of 
the specifications. The work required 



Frank Adams, Superintendent of the 
factory, exerted every possible effort 
and saw that not a minute was wasted, 
because every hour counted. He kept 
his men and machinery in the various 
departments constantly at high pressure 
and as a result work was not only 
finished on time, but each piece was 
technically perfect. With such a test as 
was made of the facilities of the True 
& True Company, they now feel that 
they are capable of tackling any prob- 
lem in mill work which may be pre- 
sented. 

Visitors to White City when view- 
ing the Band Stand, Garden Balustrade, 
Scenic Railroad, Infant Incubators, Au- 
tomatic Vaudeville, Ballroom, Main Of- 
fice, Beautiful Venice, Bumps, Electric 



THE WHITE CITY MAGAZINE 



29 



Transforming Station, Fire Show, Elec- 
tric Tower, and the magnificent Colon- 
nade, will gaze not only upon the finest 




Frank Adams, Supt. of Factory 

specimens of architecture ever seen in 
Chicago, but they will be looking upon 
the results of one of the most extraor- 
dinary contracts ever given. 

Every style known in architecture was 
followed in the construction of the 



various decorations for the buildings at 
White City, including Old English, 
Renaissance and Gothic. For example, 
over one hundred and fory-five differ- 
ent designs in mouldings were used for 
Beautiful Venice. More than half of 
these designs were hand carved by the 
most expert wood carvers. If the 
mouldings used in the Colonnade and 
Electric Tower were placed end to end, 
they would reach from White City to 
the heart of Chicago, and if all the 
mouldings used throughout White City 
were placed end to end, thev would 
reach from Chicago almost to St. Paul, 
Minn. Not a piece of "set" moulding 
was used at White City, but each de- 
sign was carved and turned from origi- 
nal drawings. 

White City will have the most beau- 
tiful and most lavish structural work 
ever designed. The officers of True & 
True Company are C. J. True, Presi- 
dent; A. W. True, Treasurer; J. C. 
Ahrens. Secretary. Their offices and 
warehouses are located at Blue Island 
Avenue and Lincoln Street, with fac- 
tories on West 19th Street. 




True «5^ True Co. Workmen at White City 



30 



THE WHITE CITY MAGAZINE 



CUMMINS' INDIAN CONGRESS 

A REMARKABLY REALISTIC REPRODUCTION OF 
HISTORICAL EVENTS TO BE GIVEN AT WHITE CITY 




SUBTLE thrill goes throug-h 
almost every person when the 
word "Indian" is mentioned; 
it at once arouses the keenest 
interest in the most sluggish 
mind. Ever}' Indian story has an inde- 
scribable charm, filling the hearer with 
martial aspirations, causing him or her 
to idealize the old "Indian Fighters." 

Every Chicagoan has heard tales of 
early Chicago, as related by some pioneer 
whose father took an active part in those 
stirring events. How eagerly would 
they welcome a chance to see these histo- 
rical events reproduced — to witness the 
old familiar deeds, as told by living 
actors, re-enacted. This desired chance 
is to be given this Summer. Col. Cum- 
mins and his Indian Congress will be 
one of the features of White City when 
it opens on May 27. 

A spectacle which will stir the pulses 
of ever}' loyal Chicagoan will be the Fort 
Dearborn IMassacre, which will be pre- 
sented on a gigantic scale. The little los: 
fort and the cabins that surrounded it will 
form the scene in which the tragedy will 
be enacted. The little garrison of sol- 
diers parade the grounds ; the settlers 
trade and parley with the Indians and the 
children play about near the fort. General 
Hull, the commander of Fort Dearborn, 
meets a party of Indian braves in con- 
sultation and they hold a session of de- 
bate. Finally the treat\' is made. 

In accordance with its terms, the set- 
tlers distribute stores and provisions 
among the Indians and they depart, with 
their canoes heavily laden. The settlers 
resume their work ; — the children return 
to their play ; — and the scene is one of 
peace and quiet, such as has been de- 
picted in many stories of pioneer days. 

Suddenly, without a moment's warn- 
ing, the air is rent by the war-whoops of 
the Indians, and a horde of the redskins, 
hideous in their war paint, sweep into 
view. Immediately the scene changes, — 
peace gives way to war, — the dreaded In- 
dians have returned, — parents grab up 
their children and dash for the stock- 
ade, — the men grimly snatch up their 



weapons and prepare to fight fiercely for 
their new homes and their loved families. 
In the headlong rush for the shelter of 
the fort, some fall and are slain by the 
Indians before they can arise. The re- 
mainina: settlers srain the fort and the 




Col. Frederick T. Cwnt/iins 

Indians hem them in. Circling around 
the little stockade on their speedy prairie 
ponies, the redskins pour a continuous 
rifle fire into the garrison. The settlers, 
handicapped by the loss of the stores and 
provisions which they have just given to 
the Indians and infuriated by their 
treachery, return the fire fiercely. 

The struggle goes on. The Indians, 
conscious that the settlers must finally 
surrender, fight with fiendish anticipa- 
tion of the slaughter that is to come, — 
the settlers, heroic in their losing battle, 
struggle to the last with desperate valor. 

The end comes, — human energy can 
stand no more. The painted "red devils" 
swarm over the little stockade, and dash 
into the fort with fiendish exultation. 
Their war-whoops, filling the air, are 
mingled with the screams of the doomed 
women and children. The slaughter 



THE WHITE CITY MAGAZINE 



31 



soon ends ; the heroic little band is wiped 
out. 

Over one hundred and fifty people 
take part in this dramatic spectacle, of 
whom more than seventy are full blooded 
Indians. In brief, the history of Fort 
Dearborn is as follows : The little fort 
was built on a branch of the Chicago 
River during- 1803-4. A garrison of fifty 
soldiers under the command of General 
Hull was maintained, and about fifty 



tallest Indian that ever lived. He is a 
full blooded Yaqui Indian and stands 
nine feet high in his moccasins. An idea 
of his mammoth size can be gained from 
the fact that he is 50 inches across the 
shoulders and weighs more than four 
hundred pounds. One of his marvelous 
feats is his ability to leap over a full 
grown horse with but little apparent ef- 
fort. The history of this Indian is one of 
absorbing interest. He is a direct de- 




Chief Short Man, 
Sioux 



Chief Bear Foot, 

Cheyenne 



Chief Calico, 

Sioux 



settlers gathered about the fort. They 
traded with the Indians and lived the 
usual pioneer life. The Indians were 
apparently very friendly and had im- 
pressed General Hull with their good 
will. In 1812, General Hull called the 
Indians into conclave and drew up a 
treaty, which they ratified. Then Gen- 
eral Hull distributed a great quantity of 
stores and provisions among the red- 
skins. The Indians departed in peace, 
only to return a few hours later, rigged 
out in their war paint. The rest of the 
tragedy is well known. 

Another feature of Col. Cummins' 
Congress will be that of Montezuma, the 



scendant of the famous Montezuma, and 
his family are of the highest caste among 
the Yaqui Indians. In his native home, 
Montezuma was one of the chiefs, whose 
duty it is to tend the sacred fires kept 
constantly burning on the altars. At the 
time Cortez visited Mexico, the Yaqui 
Indians were of gigantic stature, but in 
the succeeding centuries they have be- 
come dwarfed by the influences of civili- 
zation. Montezuma, dwelling alone in 
the mountains, tending the sacred fires 
and free from the taint of mankind, grew 
to the stature of his ancestors. This 
noble specimen of the Indian race will be 
at White City during the entire summer. 



32 



THE WHITE CITY MAGAZINE 



In addition to many special features, 
there will be about twenty of the better 
class of Wild West acts. The show 
opens with a grand parade, introducing 
the most redoubtable and historically fa- 
mous ^^'ar Chiefs and representative 
braves of forty-two different Indian 
tribes, arrayed in all their picturesque 
and fearsome pomp and paint, chanting 
their strange songs. There will follow a 
series of stirring acts, embracing border 
bowie knife exhibitions, an illustration of 
the pony express in the days of '49, and 
the hold-up of the Overland Stage Coach. 

Like a page from an exciting book is 
the realistic reproduction of the chase, 
capture and lynching of a horse thief. 
The cow-boys, in their furious dash after 
the hated thief and the close race that 
ensues, arouse the audience to a high 
pitch of interest. Many other interest- 
ing acts follow in succession, until the 
grand finale is given. This is Custer's 
last stand, presented in three tableaux. 

The sad fate of brave General Custer 
and his little band of troopers is one 
which stirs the hearts of Americans 




Chief Lakota (Col. Cummins) 

every time it is told. June 25, 1876, will 
be long remembered in history as the day 
that witnessed the slaughter of the 
bravest band of men that ever repre- 
sented the United States in any l^attle, — 



a day that saw the last victory of the In- 
dians over white men. 

The scene opens with General Custer, 
at the head of his band of 200 troopers, 
hot upon the trail of Sitting Bull, chief 




Chief Red Cloud, Sioux 

of the Ogalalla Sioux, and his braves. 
Custer trusting his entire force to the 
discretion of Reynolds, the famous In- 
dian scout, presses on after Sitting Bull. 
That famous chieftain, by a series of the 
most clever maneuvers, inveigles Custer 
to follow him into the valley of the Little 
Big Horn. Custer divides his forces with 
Major Reno and attempts to hem in the 
Indians. Custer never knew or consid- 
ered the numbers of his foes. 

Custer's men followed Reynolds far 
into the valley and after long marches 
they finally came to a place where Sitting 
Bull had just camped. The ground was 
yet warm from his camp fires. Custer 
camped at this same spot. He then or- 
dered out the scouts. Reynolds and Cur- 
ley, to find where the Indians were lo- 
cated. Sitting Bull, anticipating this 
move of Custer's, had established a fake 
camp, which the scouts found, and hur- 
ried back to Custer to tell him of it. 

Custer, elated, believing that he has 
the Indians trapped, orders the bugle to 
sound "to arms" and dashes toward the 
fake encampment, hoping to take Sitting 



THE WHITE CITY MAGAZINE 



33 



Bull by surprise. But the Indians are 
prepared for him. Sitting Bull has with- 
drawn his men from the camp, and has 
surrounded it with his warriors, hiding 
them in the hills. 

Custer and his entire force dash into 
the trap and, in a moment, a furious 
battle is on. With Indians on all sides of 
him, Custer sees that it is almost hopeless 
to fight at all, yet he orders the "charge." 
The trap has been prepared too cleverly ; 
Custer soon finds that it is impossible to 
escape. Standing in the midst of his de- 
voted band of troopers, he directs the 



them off and fights his way to a high 
mound, where his men gather around 
him. 

The second tableau shows the battle, 
nearing the end. Custer's men have 
nearly all been killed, yet the remaining 
few are struggling valiantly and keeping 
the Indians at bay. One by one the 
troopers are slain and fall, until Custer 
stands alone on the mound. Swinging 
his heavy sabre aloft, his face lighted 
with determination and courage, his left 
hand clinching his smoking revolver, 
Custer fights on to the bitter end. An 




Indians who will Participate in Cummins' Productions 



losing battle. Chief Shot-in-the-eye, who 
participated at this battle, tells the fol- 
lowing story of the death of Custer: 

"Custer," says Shot-in-the-Eye, "stood 
in the center of his men and directed the 
battle. His face grew more desperate 
each minute as he saw the Indians clos- 
ing in from every side and realized that 
all escape was cut off. As his men were 
slain and he was left alone, he continued 
to fight desperately until he saw that the 
Indians were making no effort to kill 
him. Rather than fall into our hands 
alive, he turned his revolver on himself 
and FELL BY HIS OWN HAND." 

The conclusion of the great spectacle 
is given in three tableaux. The first 
tableau shows the battle raging furi- 
ously on all sides. The Indians, hanging 
from their ponies' necks and firing under 
their heads, circle swiftly around the 
troopers, shrilly yelling their war whoops. 
Custer, on whom the Indians have cen- 
tered all their efforts, is seen fighting 
desperately in the midst of the redskins. 
The Indians succeed in dragging him 
from his horse, but he quickly throws 



Indian is seen kneeling and pointing a 
rifle at Custer, when the tableau ends. 

Tableau three completes the tragedy. 
It shows the dreary mound, covered with 
the dead bodies of the faithful troopers 
and those of the Indians who have fallen 
in the battle. Custer is down, slain after 
a most brilliant exhibition of courage. 
His body is lying over the topmost part 
of the mound, and the American flag is 
lying close beside him. Presently Reno's 
scouts appear in the distance, — then dis- 
appear. Then Reno's entire band comes 
rushing to the rescue. The soldiers 
dash on to the mound. 

They seize the flag and hoist it up 
again to the staff. One of the men 
stumbles over a body. It is that of Gen- 
eral Custer. 

The soldiers gather al)out the body of 
the courageous General and remove their 
hats as they gaze at their beloved com- 
mander. They turn sadly, look fondly 
at the flag, and murmur, "Too late, too 
late." Then the curtain falls. 

Col. Cummins and his Indian Congress 
are well known throughout the entire 



34 



THE WHITE CITY MAGAZINE 



country and have given performances at 
every large Exposition held since 1S98. 
Col. Cummins' Congress was one of the 
most sensational and interesting features 
of the following expositions, — the Trans- 
j\Iississippi, the Greater America, the 
Pan-American and the St. Louis World's 
Fair. He has also given scores of per- 
formances in Aiadison Square Garden in 
Xew York. The show he will present at 
\\'hite City has been carefully im- 
proved and enlarged. I. will be the best 
and most spectacular Indian show ever 
presented. 

If all the year were playing holidays. 
To sport would be as tedious as to 
work. 

— Shakespeare. 



Commercial Association 
Interested 

WHITE CITY WILL ATTRACT VISITORS TO CHICAGO 

At one of the Wednesday noon meet- 
ings, which are a feature of the work of 
the Chicago Commercial Association, 
Air. Joseph Beifeld was requested to give 
a five minutes' talk on the subject of 
White City. This amount of time was 
assigned to each speaker and he was sup- 
posed to be limited strictly to it by the 
chairman. 

'T can best give you an idea of White 
City and its wonderful possibilities by 
reading a poem, written about White 
City by Opie Read," said Mr. Beifeld, 
rising and opening a copy of the White 
City Magazine. "It is not written in 
rhyme, but it is a poetic expression of 
Mr. Read's impressions of the remark- 
able enterprise which we are building for 
the people of Chicago." 

He then proceeded to read from the 
^Magazine, and the business men as- 
sembled listened with the most profound 
attention to his words. It required about 



five minutes' time to finish the reading 
and he was preparing to take his seat 
when there came an overwhelming re- 
quest from scores of throats for more 
uiformation about White City. 

The chairman graciously acceded to 
the demand for an extension of the five- 
minute limit and then Mr. Beifeld held 
their attention for a longer period of time 
than any speaker at the noon meetings 
of the association had ever before done. 
He eloquently described the beauty and 
grandeur of the miUion-dollar amuse- 
ment enterprise which is being con- 
structed at the corner of Sixty-third 
street and South Park avenue; — he 
painted a word picture in forceful colors, 
of the architecturally graceful structures, 
of the endless enjoyment to be found 
there, of the unlimited opportunities for 
healthful and clean amusement, of the 
exceptional facilities which would be 
afiforded the people of Chicago and vis- 
itors for indulging in harmless and mirth- 
provoking entertainments. 

Finally, after he had finished speak- 
ing, volleys of questions were directed 
at him and even after he had supplied all 
the desired information he was impor- 
tuned by a host of eager questioners to 
tell them over and over again about 
White City. They were unanimous in 
their decision that Mr. Beifeld had 
solved the problem of providing enter- 
tainment for visitors as well as for the 
people of Chicago and declared that his 
efforts would aid materially in attracting 
the business men to this city during the 
summer season. 

He was requested to provide suitable 
advertising matter to be put aboard the 
car SUNBEAM which started April 12, 
on its trip throughout the Northwest on 
a mission of advertising Chicago, in or- 
der to tell the people in the various cities 
visited about the wonders of White 
City. 



THE WHITE CITY MAGAZINE 



35 



MAGIC WHITE CITY 

UNPARALLELED DEVELOPMENT OF AN IDEA AND 
ITS DEFINITE FULFILLMENT INTO A GRAND REALITY 




IVERY great creation must 
have a beginning. 

This has been so 
since the world began, 
giant mountains were 



ever 
The 
con- 
structed only after the labor of cen- 
turies by nature forces ; great rivers 
have resulted from the combining of 
numerous small streams ; nations have 
been established by uniting the interests 
of smaller communities, themselves com- 
posed of individuals who banded to- 



ness of perception, business acumen, 
and financial genius. 

Great, big Chicago, with her popula- 
tion of 2,000,000 or more, has never 
vet been able to supply the demand for 
summer amusement facilities or to fur- 
nish entertainment for the people dur- 
ing the hot months. Never have the 
people been given the opportunity of 
enjoying themselves in a way befitting 
the residents of a metropolis, because 
the correct idea was not conceived bv 




The Site oj White City Eight Months Ago 



gether for mutual benelit ; the greatest 
fortunes have been accumulated from 
small beginnings and everything worth 
while must necessarily grow from some 
sort of commencement. 

So it has been with White City, the 
most magnificently conceived, perfectly 
designed, and handsomely constructed 
amusement enterprise in the world. 

At first White City was a vague 
dream, planned to compete with the so- 
called amusement parks in Chicago and 
modestly confident of taking a place 
with them ; a little better if possible, 
certainly as good as the rest. How the 
idea subsequently developed into the 
present marvelous realitv is a story of 
one man's indefatigable energy^ keen- 



those who claimed to pay particular at- 
tention to such matters. 

Chicagoans have been compelled to 
seek their summer amusements at the 
seashore, at the various resorts which 
lie on the shores of the numerous lakes 
or the banks of the rivers in Illinois, 
Wisconsin and Michigan, or by migrat- 
ing to New York citv, where direct 
communication could be obtained by 
trolley or steamboat with the greatest 
collection of Summer attractions to be 
found anyvvhere in the whole world — 
Coney Island. 

Of' course there were the theatres, 
some of which were kept open during 
the Summer months for the presentation 
of inferior productions ; generally with 



36 



THE WHITE CITY MAGAZINE 



second class performers. Again, there 
were a few scattered "parks" in which 
the principal attractions were bands, not 
always of the best, and the chief aim of 
the managements was to sell some par- 
ticular brand of beer. Some of the com- 
mon features, which are to b'e found in 
every ''park'" in the country and which 
furnish the entertainment at county 
fairs, were copied and exploited in an 
inexpensive way and it was astonishing 
to note the aviditv with which the 



In every case the manager had a 
string tied to him. This string was 
pulled at will by the officials of some 
transportation company or by some 
brewing concern. All the attempts to 
furnish Chicago with summer amuse- 
ments were made by capital with some 
"axe" to grind. Whether it happened 
to be a brewery with brand of beer to 
popularize or a railway company with a 
desire to increase its traffic ; never was 
an effectual effort made for the sole 




Binf s-eye view of IVhite City Jroni the Chutes 



pleasure-starved people of Chicago pat- 
ronized them. But they never experi- 
enced the pleasures of a first class 
amusement enterprise ; such as Chi- 
cago's reputation of being a good 
"show-town" entitled them to enjoy. 

The mistake of building a pleasure 
resort on the lake front, where the chill 
winds drive merriment to the dogs and 
the people to their homes, even on the 
hottest July and August evenings, was 
made and the promoters learned a les- 
son. They all tried to copy the success 
of some other cit}' where climate and 
other conditions were entirely different. 
No one seemed to hit the right idea ; 
to conceive a plan which would apply 
to Chicago and her topographical posi- 
tion. 



purpose of supplying the people with 
summer entertainment with the expecta- 
tion of realizing dividends on the merits 
of the enterprise alone. 

That Chicago possessed no place for 
summer entertainment sufficient to ac- 
commodate her pleasure-loving popula- 
tion and that none of the existing 
"parks" could be reached, except by a 
few people in the neighborhood, with- 
out devious transfers and by the pay- 
ment of more than one carfare, ■ re- 
mained a fact until the idea of building 
White City implanted itself in the 
mind of a clever man who had the en- 
ergy to push the project, and the abil- 
ity to bring it to fruition. 

Joseph Beifeld, the man who took 
the "deadest" hotel in Chicago and 



THE WHITE CITY MAGAZINE 



37 



made it the most popular one within a 
year, was never interested particularly 
in summer amusement enterprises until 
two clever Chicago promoters of amuse- 
ments, Paul D. Howse and A. J. Jones, 
called on him at the Sherman House 
and outlined a plan to build one. Howse, 
as one of the management of Sans 
Souci Park, had won a great success 
there as well as in other amusement 
enterprises, but his ambition demanded 
a wider scope. Jones, as the originator 
of the "Penny Vaudeville" and the pro- 



breaking entirely away from the plans 
and ideas held by those who controlled 
similar enterprises in Chicago. The new 
A¥hite City should be an individual 
enterprise, wholly free from the control 
of corporations which would gladly have 
accepted a liberal share in it as a method 
of drawing revenue into their coffers. It 
was to be an amusement resort which 
would be the only one of its kind in the 
great West. 

He agreed to see the plan through and 
to furnish all the funds required to build 




Ball Room {photo taken April 2j ) 



moter of various large amusement ven- 
tures, had an unbroken record of suc- 
cesses, so that a plan which they jointly 
presented was the result of expert judg- 
ment. 

Their idea was to expend $40,000 in 
constructing a Summer Park at the in- 
tersection of several surface lines and 
the South Side "L" ; the present loca- 
tion of White City, at the comer of 
63d street and South Park avenue. 
Other successful parks had been started 
with the expenditure of less money and 
they knew the intimate details in con- 
nection with their success. 

From a business standpoint Mr. Bei- 
feld was quickly convinced of the feasi- 
bility of the plan and agreed to join his 
efforts with theirs for the purpose of 



the park, which would not cost less than 
$ 1 00,000. 

A few days later found the trio in 
New York city. They viewed the nu- 
merous amusement places at Coney 
Island and took careful note of the suc- 
cessful features of each. At Dreamland, 
Luna Park, and other leading enterprises 
they witnessed the intense enjoyment of 
the thousands who congregated there 
day and evening. 

"We will give the people of Chicago 
an opportunity for enjoying themselves 
such as they have never yet dreamed 
of," remarked Mr. Beifeld to his com- 
panions while at dinner one evening after 
one of their trips of inspection. "When 
I think of the hot, stuffy theatres in Chi- 
cago on the torrid summer evenings ; 



38 



THE WHITE CITY MAGAZINE 



when I think of the absohite barrenness 
of the Hves of so many thousands of 
men, women and Httle children, who 
have no place to go for clean, unobjec- 
tionable entertainment and pleasure, I 
am glad we are going to build White 
CiTV from humanitarian principles, if 
for no other reason." 

And the others declared they felt ex- 
actly as he did about it. 

It was after a particularly hard day's 
work of inspection, when they had care- 



"I'll not be an imitator,'' continued Mr. 
Beifeld. "I will lead but I won't follow. 
I will originate but not copy. Boys, we 
will make White City bigger and 
grander than anything they have in New 
York or anywhere else, and instead of 
spending a paltry $100,000, we will spend 
a million." 

How well he has carried out his mag- 
nificent plans can best be judged by the 
people of Chicago after a visit to beauti- 
ful White City. Like magic creations 




View of IV kite City from the Tower 



fully investigated the leading features of 
Coney Island's leading attractions, that 
Mr. Beifeld declared himself dissatisfied 
with the plans which they had in view. 

"We must bear out the traditions of 
Chicago," he said, determinedly, "Chi- 
cago has never yet taken second place in 
anything. Here, in New York, are a 
score or more enterprises, each built at a 
cost of hundreds of thousands of dollars. 
We are talking of building something in 
Chicago at a cost of only $100,000. It is 
not the right thing. Why should not 
Chicago have something bigger and 
grander than anything we have seen 
here? Why should we think of taking 
second place?" 

Jones and Howse indicated their com- 
plete approval of his ideas. 



the towering white structures have 
sprung from the ground and, but for the 
presence of thousands of workmen, it 
would seem that the work had been ac- 
complished by more than human hands. 

Where less than eight months ago 
stood a field of waving corn now arises 
the spindling minarets, massive columns, 
graceful arches, and solid walls of the 
most architecturally perfect collection of 
enormous buildings ever constructed. 
Not even the famous World's Fair struct- 
ures, the work of the world's most fa- 
mous architects, were their equal in 
beauty of design and graceful outline. 

When the gates of White City are 
thrown open for the admission of the 
public May 27th, they will see the results 
of the expenditure of over $1,000,000. 



THE WHITE CITY MAGAZINE 



39 



The buildings are all of a permanent 
character and will outlive the present 
generation because it is the intention of 
the management to continue to supply 
the people of Chicago with high class, 
clean amusement for years to come. 

All attractions which have been ac- 
cepted by the management are strictly 
high class and wholly free from question- 
able features. Everything is of a char- 
acter which permits a discussion of de- 



pleasant things. Not a device or design 
which could in any way cause danger to 
life or limb has been even favorably 
thought of and anybody visiting White 
City has the assurance that their welfare 
is considered first of all. 

White City will be the grandest and 
most charming' amusement resort in the 




'^I^^CT** '■ 



Flying Airships 



tails in the home of every family. All 
are new and up-to-date, yet devoid of op- 
portunities for criticism. 

Clean, healthful, mirth-provoking, care- 
dispelling amusements have been selected 
so that every father and every mother 
can feel assured that they can spend an 
afternoon or evening at White City, ac- 
companied by their little ones, and there 
will be nothing to regret afterwards. 

Scores of show men have made appli- 
cation for permission to White City, 
and an army of "fakirs," freaks, etc., has 
besieged the gates of the new park, but 
they have been denied admission. It is 
the plan of the management to entertain 
and amuse the people, not to frighten 
them or awe thern by the sight of un- 



world, and every visitor will be so well 
entertained that each will wonder how 
Chicago ever got along without White 
City. 



"Oh, do you know, I met old Smith- 
son this morning, and he was very 
angry because young Trotter, who was 
courting his daughter, has gone away." 
"What, with his daughter?" 
"No ; without her." — Chicago Jour- 
nal. 

Alternate rest and labor long endure. 
*** 

White Citv — Dedicated to Merriment 
and Mirth. 



40 



THE WHITE CITY MAGAZINE 



UNCLE BILL AT WHITE CITY 

CHARACTER SKETCH WRITTEN FOR THE WHITE CITY MAGAZINE 

By OPIE READ 




CO ?i IE into town from 
A\'isconsin to visit my son 
that's here learnin' to 
write advertisements," said 
the old man. "He saw in 
a newspaper some time ago that adver- 
tisement writin' was what they call an 
art. and he 'lowed that as it looked like 
it was easy to learn it was the thing 
he wanted. So I let him go to the place 



Now there's an affair that a feller can 
tell the truth about and have no fear of 
exaggeratin'." 

"What is it, Uncle Bill?" some one 
inquired. 

"Why, it looks like a city made out 
of a whole lot of operas. In its beauty 
it's a song sung to the eye. Since I 
retired from hard work a number of 
years ago, I have seen all the world's 




Toboggan or Figure 8 



where they teached it. I don't know 
what he has learned, but I know what 
struck me after hearin' a lecture deliv- 
ered to the class. It's this : That the 
way to write a fetchin' advertisement is 
to have a truth to advertise. If a man 
learns how to set forth virtues that don't 
exist, why he has simply learned how to 
lie — and I don't take it that lyin' is an 
art; it is one of the underpinnin' princi- 
ples of old human nature, a little bet- 
ter developed in some men than in oth- 
ers. Yes, and wdiile I was in town, 
bovs. I went out to see the White City. 



fairs, and here they seem to have 
pinched the bud out of all of them and 
put it down." 

"Beautiful, is it?" 

"Why, it's like one of the dreams 
\ou have and grieve when you wake up 
and find that it ain't true. It's a vision 
turned into a fact." 

"A big place, is it?" 

"Well, it's like a dream, it can't b'e 
surveyed. You can't tell how big a 
dream is, you know. A charmin' decep- 
tion is put on the eye. And when 
you git ixi there you say to yourself, 



THE WHITE CITY MAGAZINE 



41 



'Hanged if I ain't in the world at last.' 
You've read about Venice, haven't you ? 
It's a town built about the edges of an 
eternal overflow. Well, they've got it 
here — just pulled it up by the roots 
away over yonder and set it out away 
over here. Made me think I was in 
Italy." 

"Were you ever in Italy, Uncle Bill?" 
"Well, not till I went into this town 
of Venice. And I tell you they put 
such a spell on my mind that I'll swear 
I thought I was there. There were the 
houses more than a thousand years old 
— the water streets where the boats had 
paddled about before America was dis- 
covered. Away off in the twilight of 
the city, amid the mysteries of the wind- 
in' ways, you could hear the bells a 
ringin', sweet an' low, callin' of the 
folks to prayer; an' down here at the 
broadenin' mouth of the canal, was 
where the ships started out to find new 
cotmtries and to conquer the old ones. 
I have heard a good deal about the 
dogs of Venice but I didn't see any. 
Might have heard one or two a-barkin" 
but didn't see any. Venice, I take it, 
wasn't much of a town for cats — not as 
much as for dogs. There was so much 
water that they could drown the kit- 
tens without any trouble, you know. 
Most wonderful place I ever saw. We 
wound in and around, mile after mile, 
ketchin' glimpses of old paintin's here 
and ancient statues there — with heart 
awakenin' mystery everywhere. And 
I says to my son that was with me, 
'Git such things to write about and you 
won't need no art.' Beauty is the medi- 
cine of the soul. Care makes the body 
old. In this place, there is so much 
beauty that there can't be any care. 
The mind is a-graspin' at first one thing 
and then another and forgets the body." 
"Well, what is there beside Venice, 
Uncle Bill?" 



"Everything. They've got more 
shows than twenty acres of circuses. 
Why, when Buffalo Bill sees it he'll 
take ofif his hat sure enough and make 
his bow. I tell you the old man goes 
out there and comes away believin' that 
the fairy books are true. Looks as if 
they might have been written to pre- 
pare a feller for this place, this White 
City." 

A White City Executive 

In giving credit to the builders of 
White City, it would be unfair to fail 
to acknowledge the work done by Her- 
man Gressman, who has exercised a su- 




Hermaii Gressman 
perintendence over all the carpenter work 
done in the grounds. Mr. Gressman took 
the original plans as delivered from the 
office of E. C. Boyce, the New York 
architect who designed White City, and 
from them has carried out the entire 
work of construction. The results of his 
work are apparent and require no explan- 
ation because White City complete is 
a lasting monument of his energy and 
faithful service. 



4^ 



THE WHITE CITY MAGAZINE 



SORRENTINO'S BANDA ROSSA 



FAMOUS "UNTAMED STEEDS OF 
A\ELODY" TO BE AT WHITE CITY 



Ycr new baud ma by beats if. but the 

old band's what I said — 
It alius 'pearcd to kind o' chord with 

soniepiii in my head: 
And, whilse I'm no iniisicianer, when my 

blame eyes is jes' 
A'lgJi drozciied out. a)id jMem'ry squares 

her jazi's and sort a' says 
She zvou't ncr never will fer git, I zvan' 

to jes' turn in 

And take and light right out o' here and 

git back J Vest ag'iii 
And stay there, wh.eu I git there, zuhere 

I never haf to say, 
I zcanf to hear the old band play. 

— James Whitcomb Riley. 




HE homely and full-hearted 
regard of "Jim" Riiey for 
"the old band" of his native 
town is no stronger than 
that held by the people of 
various large American cities for Sorren- 
tino's Banda Rossa, which has come to be 
an annual visitor. The Band today ranks 
as the greatest concert organization of its 
kind in America, and perhaps in all the 
world. Italy, the land of musicians, has 
none to compare with it, and White 
City is exceedingly fortunate in having 
secured the Banda Rossa for its opening 
day and four weeks thereafter. The band 
will play each afternoon and evening in 
the center of the Plaza. 

Sorrentino has fifty men with him this 
season; practically all of them are soio- 
ists. Herein lies the primary reason for 
that perfect tonal blend and ensemble 
which is so marked a characteristic of all 
that the band plays. Then, too, these 
sons of Italy are real singers. Melody 
always is dominant with them and no 
matter how great the climax, song still 
remains the heart of it all. "Untamed 
steeds of melody" they have been called, 
these red-coated musicians with Sorren- 
tino. 



The Banda Rossa had its origin in the 
little town of San Severo, Italy. After 
a brief and rather indiiTerent existence, 
the municipal musical society which was 
father to the band, called Eugenio Sor- 
rentino, then a young man, to the con- 
ductorship. A change for the better was 
in evidence at once. Many of the musi- 
cians who entered the young maestro's 
organization at the time are with him yet. 
These veterans were the foundation upon 
which Sorrentino builded toward success. 
But it was not until after the Banda 
Rossa had been under Sorrentino's direc- 
tion several years that it gained distinc- 
tion. In 1892, it was decided by Sorren- 
tino and his backers that it was high time 
for the Band of which they were so 
proud to sally forth for conquest. The 
Columbian Exposition at Genoa in cele- 
bration of the sailing of Christopher Co- 
lumbus for America had hung up some 
very rich and attractive prizes for mili- 
tary bands. Sixty-five from all parts of 
Europe entered the contest. Among them 
and practically unknown was the Banda 
Rossa. Sorrentino played Massenet's 
suite, "Scenes Pittoresques," and won the 
gold medal. 

When the Banda Rossa returned to 
San Severo, the town took a day ofif to 
celebrate the victory. The feature of the 
jubilee was the presentation of a medal 
to Sorrentino by the city officials and 
prominent citizens. The Banda Rossa 
was now in great demand, and Sorren- 
tino and his men began to travel. Every- 
where they were received with enthu- 
siasm. Finally they invaded Germany, 
the home of Wagner, where it was sup- 
posed Italian composers and Italian mu- 
sicians were not held in high opinion. 
Here their success was greater than ever. 

Kaiser Wilhelm was among those who 
fell victim to the witchery of the band's 
playing. The result was a handsome 
medal, presented to Sorrentino by the 
Kaiser. This was in 1896, while the 
band was in Berlin. Then came the first 
American tour, which was one long 



THE WHITE CITY MAGAZINE 



43 



triumph. Phillip Hale, the late Ben 
Wolff, W. F. Apthorp, and Louis Elson 
of Boston ; all of the critics in New York, 
Philadelphia, Buffalo and other big- east- 



White City. Popular music will 
have representation in sufficient quantity 
to satisfy everybody, but the ^8:reat feat- 
ures will be the errand fantasies on the 




ern cities wrote eulogies of the Band. 
The story each year since then has been 
much the same. Steadily but surely the 
Banda Rossa has climbed to a place pecu- 
liarly its own. 

Sorrentino is arranging- a special series 
of programmes for his engagement at the 



various operas arranged by Sorrentino 
himself. It is in its playing of operatic 
music that the band is absolutelv unsur- 
passed. Its repertoire in this direction 
has no equal. 

Jov is an import ; Jov is an exchange. 

^Ibid. 



44 



THE WHITE CITY MAGAZINE 



MUSICAL WONDERS 

DECIDEDLY UNIQUE FEATURES IN 
WILLARD'S TEMPLE OF MUSIC 



D. 



X THE history of entertain- 
ing the pubHc. there has been 
no more decided success than 
that which has rewarded 
the et^orts of Professor C. 
\Mllard and his clever assistants. 




Seven vears ago. Professor Willard ap- 
peared at San Francisco with a unique 
nuisical act. The paraphernalia intro- 
duced by him required so many trunks 
foi transportation that all his associates 
predicted a failure for him but he per- 




Ha7-77ionium for Temple of Music 

severed and since that time has con- 
stantly added new features until the 
wonderful Temple of Music, which will 
be shown at White City, is the cul- 
mination. Thousands of dollars have 
been expended by the Hines, Willard 
and Blake Syndicate in preparing for 
the opening of the Temple of Music 
at White City. 



After three months of work, the W. 
W. Kimball Co. has completed a mon- 
ster Swedish Harmoniumcosting $4,500. 
J. C. Deagan, one of the world's great- 
est musical authorities and a practical 
inventor of novelties, has constructed 
under special plans and patents owned 
by Professor Willard, a number of 
gigantic and novel instruments for the 
Temple of Music at an expense of al- 
most $7,000. 

Among the novel features are the 
Musical Air-ship, the Mysterious Fluke- 
mizer, the Great Roman Kaleidoscope, 
the Squeegee Gods of China, the Scan- 
dinavian Harpsichord, the Electric 
Lady, Marconi's Revolving Balls of 
Eire, A Bermuda Razzle-Dazzle, etc. etc. 

Up to date, the Temple of Music has 
cost its promotors about $50,000. Nine 
clever lady musical artists will appear 
at each performance to utilize the vari- 
ous inventions and instruments and 
there is no limit to the entertainment 
which will be furnished. 

The staiif for the Temple of Music 
is as follows : — 

C. D. Willard, Geo. H. Hines, R. J. 
Blake, associate owners ; W. X. Mac 
Collin, Managing Director ; H. L. Car- 
rier, Mechanical Engineer; L. C. Brodie, 
Electrician ; Kittle M. Willard, Origina- 
tor; Hazel L. Peters, Chief Soloist; 
Gertrude Woods, Prin. Novelties ; 
Harry Chalmers, Harpist. 



Enormous Columns 

Credit is due the Henry Sanders 
Company for assisting materially in the 
beautifying of White City. This con- 
cern manufactured the enormous col- 
umns which support the massive peri- 
style and add an uncommon beauty to 
the general architectural effect. It is 
not an every day occurrence for any fac- 
tory to receive an order for 20 columns, 
26 feet long and 38 inches in diameter. 
Such, however, were the proportions of 
this one particular job given to the 
Henry Sanders Company by General 
Manager Howse of White City. A 



THE WHITE CITY MAGAZINE 



45 



few years ago the completion of such a 
contract would have been so costly that 
perhaps the architectural beauty would 
have been compelled to suffer the substi- 
tution of something inferior in appear- 
ance because of its being cheaper in con- 
struction. With the method of manufac- 



Outdoor Circus Acts 

The management of White City has 
formulated plans which will permit any 
person to spend the entire afternoon and 
evening within the Park, be furnished 
with a delightful programme of music, 



::**fc 



'^n }'f 




Residence oj John A. McCaH, Long Branch, N^. J. {President of New York Life his. Co.) 



ture utilized in the making of the Koll 
patent lock joint columns, they are hol- 
low instead of being solid, although the 
staves are so thoroughly locked that 
they cannot come apart. Their strength 
is such that unless the superimposed load 
is unusually weighty, there is no neces- 
sity of placing an iron pillar inside the 
column. 

The accompanying illustration shows 
the residence of John A. McCall at Long 
Branch, N. J., wherein similar columns, 
although not so large as those required 
for White City, are in use. 

In addition to making the above 
described lock joint columns, the Henry 
Sanders Company fills orders for col- 
umns, pilasters, pedestals, balustrades 
and wood turnings of all kinds. 

In the advertising pages of this issue 
of the Magazine will be found an excel- 
lent illustration showing a wagon loaded 
with three of the enormous columns for 
White City. 



circus acts, etc., all for the price of the 
gate admission, only ten cents. Of 
course, there will be numerous other 
attractions, but sufficient entertainment 
will be found by thousands without the 
necessity for any additional expense. 

During the first week at White City, 
two of the most marvelous out-door acts 
ever shown in Chicago will be given 
free. Herr Granada and Alma Fedora, 
the celebrated high wire artistes, and the 
eight Flying Bicketts will give perform- 
ances at frequent intervals every after- 
noon and evening. These performances 
will be given in the open air and within 
plain view of thousands of comfortable 
settees which will be placed about the 
"Board Walk" and along the cement 
pavement within the Sunken Gardens. 

Other attractions are being booked by 
General Manager Paul D. Howse and 
those who visit White City can look 
for a decidedly entertaining programme. 



Begin — the 
power. 



present minute's in thy 
— Hughes. 



You will never hear the man who 
cries out against the number of people 
in the worfd offer to assist in correcting 
the mistake. 



46 



THE WHITE CITY MAGAZINE 



HAPPY HOOLIGAN 

THE WORLD'S MOST CONVINCING 
DEMONSTRATOR OF THE DARWINIAN THEORY 




niROFESSOR R. J. Blake has 
spared no expense and trou- 
ble to secure for the Dog, 
Pony and Monkey Circus, 
which will be one of the 



leading attractions at White City, the 
most up-to-date attractions of every 
kind. He will have over lOO dogs, 
ponies and monkeys, each one being 
admirably trained and capable of giving 
a most interesting performance. 

Happy Hooligan, undoubtedly the best 
known animal on the American Conti- 
nent today, is a gigantic specimen of 
monkeydom, at the present time being 
as tall as many full grown adults, while 
each birthday added to the eight which 
he has already witnessed, sees an in- 
crease in his height. History does not 
give the precise date nor the locality 
which witnessed the birth of Happy 



PaV 




Dodo, the Simian Marvel 
(Note his sigiiaiiire, ifrHicii by himsclj') 

Hooligan, but it was somewheres in the 
deep jungle along the banks of the 
Upper Congo River in Africa. 

Maurice Tobin, the famous African 
explorer, discovered Happy Hooligan 



gravely swinging on a creeping vine 
near his camp six years ago and was 
astonished at the size and peculiar ac- 
tions of this unique specimen of the 
Simian race. He 
has always supposed 
that some tribe of 
natives had captured 




The Bes^oar 



White City Simian ArtistS' 



the monkey when a baby and that he 
was accustomed to the society of hu- 
mans, because when Tobin advanced all 
ready to seize him, the monkey did not 
show any signs of fear but gravely met 
the advances of the white man with 
outstretched hand and gravely saluted 
him. Hand in hand, they returned to 
the camp fire and from that time on, 
Happy Hooligan never left the side of 
his new found friend. It was not 
necessary to tie him in any way because 
he delighted in the companionship of 
the explorers and gravely took his place 
among them on an equal footing. At 
the time he joined the explorer. Hooli- 
gan was about two years old, and a few 
weeks after joining the expedition, he 
acquitted himself so bravely under un- 
usual conditions that he not only saved 
the life of his master and friend, but 
won the admiration of every slave in the 
Company. 

Mr. Tobin, accompanied by J. B. 
Swartz, Col. vSmith of the British Army, 
and a score of Congo slaves, was mak- 
ing a forced march to reach Stanley 



THE WHITE CITY MAGAZINE 



47 



Falls, where he was to meet the mem- 
bers of another expedition. 

The party had run short of supplies 
owing to the fact that they had lost 
their way in an enormous swamp which 
delayed their progress for three days 
and took them out of their course a 
considerable distance. Mr. Tobin was 
attacked by a burning fever and when 
they encamped on the banks of a river 
after lieine without food for two davs, 



oring to distract the attention of the 
serpent from him. Finding that he was 
unsuccessful in these tactics, he sprang 
behind the serpent and seizing his tail 
jerked the venomous reptile away, mov- 
ing so rapidly that it was impossible for 
the serpent to strike him with its fangs. 
Tobin shouted lustily for help and the 
opportune return of some of the mem- 
bers of the party saved the life of the 
monkev, who was becomins: exhausted 




Dof^, Pony and Monkey Circus, Temple of Music and Johnstown Flood 



he fell exhausted. The other members 
of the expedition started on a search 
for game and food supplies, leaving 
Tobin alone in the camp with the ex- 
ception of his Simian companion. He 
fell asleep but was awakened by a sound 
of chattering made by Hooligan, and 
on opening his eyes, discovered to his 
horror an enormous serpent, one of the 
most poisonous known to naturalists, in 
close proximity with raised head and 
just about to sink his fangs into the 
face of the recumbent explorer. The 
monkey seemed to realize the desperate 
condition of his friend and was endeav- 



from his efforts, and killed the deadly 
serpent. The skin of the serpent was 
preserved and those who visited the 
exhibit of the Cliff Dwellers on the Pike 
at the St. Louis Fair, will remember 
the relation of its history as made by 
the exhibitors. 

Professor Blake succeeded in pur- 
chasing Happy Hooligan from Mr. 
Tobin, but he is the only man, with the 
exception of his first white master, to 
whom this intelligent Simian has ever 
given his friendship. Happy Hooligan 
is an accomplished acrobat and slack 
wire performer, one of his feats being 



THE WHITE CITY MAGAZINE 



to ride a bicycle upon a high wire. He 
is fond of bicycle riding- and in Boston 
in the year 1901, he rode a mile race in 
three minutes and 15 seconds. 

During the performances which will 
be given in the pretty little theater de- 
voted to the Dog, 
Ponv and Monkev 








Circus, Happy Hooligan participates in 
the programme at frequent intervals ; 
appearing as a policeman when he ar- 
rests a supposed "drunk" and lands him 
in the patrol wagon ; as a doctor visit- 
ing his patients, feeling their pulses and 
prescribing for them, and when occa- 
sion requires, can put on the gloves 
with any one of the twenty-five monkeys 
who appear with him. 

Professor Blake has had remarkable 




Home of Jiin Key 
success in the training of all his animals 
and he states that the only secret is 
kindness, perseverance and patience. 

Those who visit White City will have 
full opportunity to judge of the merits 
of his methods. 



Transportation Facilities 

NEW CARS TO BE PUT ON SURFACE LINES FOR 
WHITE CITY 

Over 250 a minute, — that is the rate 
at which the Chicago City Railway will 
be able to land people at the gates of 
White City. The Railway Company 
has secured 200 new cars and will run 
them for the accommodation of visitors 
to White City. The service to and 
from White City will not be excelled in 
any other city in the United States. The 
cars will run every fifty seconds, so that 
there will be no waiting for cars. 

The 200 new cars are the most beauti- 
ful and up-to-date vehicles ever con- 
structed. The otificials for the Railway 
Company visited New York, Boston and 
Philadelphia to secure the newest ideas 
in car construction. As a result of their 
efforts, Chicago will have two hundred 
of the most perfect electric cars ever 
made. It is planned to run these new 
cars entirely on the Indiana Avenue and 
Sixty-third Street lines, where the travel 
to White City is most likely to be the 
heaviest. Every possible device for the 
handling of enormous crowds has been 
secured, and comfort for the White City 
visitors has been the first consideration 
of the Railway officials. 

The new cars are complete in every 
detail. They are forty-eight feet long 
and are approximately nine feet wide. 
The aisles are the most spacious of those 
in any of the Chicago cars, and the cars 
will seat fifty people most comfortably. 
They will easily carry one hundred per- 
sons, so it is very easily seen that, with 
cars arriving at White City from three 
directions, it is comparatively easy to 
land 250 people at White City every 
minute. The cars are apparently built 
like the ordinary closed car but, by a 
clever device, they are readily converted 
into open cars. This device is in the 
arrangement of the windows. Each win- 
dow is in two sections, one of which 
slides up and the other drops down into, 
a socket, thus making an open car in a 
few seconds. 

One of the most attractive features of 
the new cars is the lighting facilities. 
Each car is to have twenty-seven electric 
lights, more than in any other cars made. 
There will be two strong headlights, one 



THE WHITE CITY MAGAZINE 



49 



at either end of the car. Each of these 
Hghts will be thirty-two candle power. 
Two lights will be on the platforms and 
twenty-three will be inside the cars. 
These lights will be sixteen candle power. 
It is claimed that the lighting of these 
new cars has been decided upon after 
long and careful experiments and that 
many new innovations have been in- 
stalled. 

The City Railway will construct a new 
line leading to the gates of White City. 
This line is a continuance of the Indiana 
Avenue line and will extend southward 
from Fifty-first Street, which is the pres- 
ent terminal of the line. The addition 
will be completed by May 27, the open- 
ing day of White City, and will prove 
to be a great convenience to thousands 
of people. 



Electric Theater 

otherwise called the Producoscope 

On various occasions those who will 
visit White City on the opening day. 
May 27, have seen reproductions of ex- 
citing incidents and thrilling events re- 
produced by what are commonly called 
moving picture machines. Some of these 
exhibitions have been of a remarkable 
proficiency and the exhibitions have been 
first-class reproductions, but the majority 
have failed to give the same satisfaction 
owing to incompetent operators, dam- 
agedfilms or inaccurate mechanical effects. 

White City is to have an Electric 
Theatre in which will be installed the 
most perfect machinery and other facili- 
ties for giving the best reproductions of 
moving pictures ever seen in Chicago. 
None of the hackneyed and time-worn 
subjects will be used in White City's 
beautiful little Electric Theatre. 

The management has at the present 
time a special corps of expert photog- 
raphers and operators of moving picture 
machines at work securing accurate re- 
productions of thrilling scenes which will 
be reproduced in such a way in the Elec- 
tric Theatre as to fully repay visitors for 
their presence there. This organization 
is at the present time in Manchuria 
where views are being taken of scenes 
incident to the Japanese-Russian war. 
They have been in the company of the 



Japanese and Russians for about a year, 
were present at the naval battle of Port 
Arthur and were also present on the oc- 
casion of the capitulation of that fort- 
ress to the invincible arms of the Mikado's 
forces. 

The scenes which will be reproduced 
in the Electric Theatre will be events 
which have contributed to the making of 
history and which will be shown to the 
people of Chicago at first hand. 

The expense incident to this method of 
securing the novelties for presentation 
in the Electric Theatre is naturally con- 
siderable but the management of White 
City is determined to give the people of 
Chicago such a high class of novel, 
unique and interesting entertainments 
that everybody who attends White City 
will declare it to be the grandest, great- 
est and most comprehensive aggregation 
of interesting features ever witnessed in 
Chicago. 

Amusements to virtue are like breezes 
of air to the flame — gentle ones will fan 
it, but strong ones will put it out. 
— Dctz'id Thomas. 



Sanitary Arrangements 

No expense has been spared to make 
White City as complete and up-to-date 
in all appointments and facilities as the 
most modern flat building or hotel. On 
either side of the Park, connected with 
the Colonnade which acts as the base 
for the great Electric Tower, will be 
located commodious and perfectly 
appointed toilet rooms. Trained attend- 
ants both male and female will be on 
duty constantly, and the most fastidious 
person will have no occasion to com- 
plain of the conveniences furnished. It 
is expected that thousands of Chica- 
goans and visitors to Chicago will go 
to White City during the summer 
afternoons and remain there for several 
hours, probably taking dinner, supper 
or lunch in the White City College 
Inn. 

Aunt Jane — "Is your husband all you 
thought he was?" 

Emma — "Well, yes, I think he is; but 
I am sorry to say that he is far from 
being what he thinks himself to be." — 
Boston Transcript. 



;o 



THE WHITE CTTY MAGAZINE 



SCENERY FOR BEAUTIFUL VENICE 

AN ENORMOUS QUANTITY OF IMPORTED CANVAS 
REQUIRED FOR MAKING THE PERSPECTIVE VIEWS 



fjiNSEL COOK, one of the 
most famous scenic artists in 
the United States and whose 
work is to be found in every 
first-class theatre, states that 
more canvas was required for construct- 
ing" the perspective views which adorn 
the interior of Beautiful 
X'onice, than was 





Ansel Cook 

ever before used for any scenic work un- 
der one roof. Almost 10,000 yards of 
Russia sheeting-, about 90,000 square feet, 
was imported direct from Russia because 
no dealer in this country could supply 
this enormous quantity. The canvas was 
used for the reproducing of scenes in 
\>nice which appear at a distance from 
the passenger in the gondola. That part 
of Venice through which the half mile 
of canals pass is actually built so that real 
palaces, groups of statuary, etc., are 
brought to view at every turn of the 
winding waterways, but the interior walls 
are hung with enormous panoramic paint- 
ings which carry out the efifect for a dis- 
tance of several miles. In painting these 
panoramic views, Ansel Cook required 
the services of six associate artists and a 
small army of assistants. Their work 
lasted for a period of four months, dur- 
ing which time the entire force was kept 



busy practically day and night. The ut- 
most care was exercised in order to give 
a perfect reproduction of Venice archi- 
tecturally and in the color scheme. 

During- a recent visit to the city of 
Venice, Mr. Cook carefully studied the 
details of ornaments, cornices and mould- 
ings used on the buildings which have 
been reproduced for White City and he 
has correctly carried out the original de- 
signs in his work. 

The wonderful perspective view of the 
Grand Canal, one of the most magnifi- 
cent paintings ever produced on canvas, 
is about 30 feet high by almost 200 feet 
long. The size of this for an individual 
painting has rarely been exceeded. Par- 
ticular care was taken to reproduce the 
animation and spirit of the busy scene 
presented to the sight-seer along the 
Grand Canal, with its host of gondolas, 
fishing boats with their bright colored 
sails, fruit barges, etc. 

Visitors to White City who experi- 
ence the delights of a gondola ride 
through Beautiful Venice, will marvel at 
the life-like reproductions of these his- 
toric scenes, while those who are familiar 
with artistic efforts, will not hesitate to 
make frank acknowledgment of the excel- 
lence of the reproduction. 




THE WHITE CITY MAGAZINE 



51 



FIRE SHOW 

A REALISTIC AND THRILLING OUTDOOR SPECTACLE 
AT WHITE CITY 




HILE White City is to have 
an unparalleled and un- 
equaled programme of en- 
tertainments of various kinds, 
there is no one particular 
feature which will appeal to the public 
like the Fire Show. Given within an 
■enormous area of ground almost 300 
feet long by 200 feet wide, the specta- 
tors are presented with a life-size street 



assigned to him or her for the purpose 
of giving the required perfection of de- 
tail. 

There will be three complete fire com- 
panies with the regulation equipment, 
including two engines a chemical, a 60- 
foot extension truck, chief's buggy, coal 
wagon, ambulance, patrol wagon, etc. 
Trolley cars wend their way along reg- 
ulation tracks, taking on and letting ofl' 




Photographic View of the Fire Show 



scene with buildings of the same dimen- 
sions as will be found in certain dis- 
tricts of any Metropolitan city. The 
sidewalks are constructed of concrete ; 
the streets are paved ; gas street lamps 
and fire hydrants are located according 
to regulations, while the buildings are 
equipped with fire escapes, etc., exactly 
as they are found in localities where the 
city ordinances are enforced. 

It is impossible to express in words 
the intense realism precipitated into the 
production by the addition of every con- 
ceivable feature which would be pres- 
ent at a real fire in a similar locality. 
Over 250 people will participate in this 
production and each will act a part 



passengers ; automobiles threaten the 
unwary pedestrian in the most natural 
way ; cabs, teams, delivery wagons and 
other vehicles stop at doors to deliver 
packages and go on their way again 
just as they would anywhere in the 
city ; newspaper delivery wagons dis- 
tribute the latest editions to clamorous 
newsboys who dart into the crowds cry- 
ing their papers ; street peddlers trans- 
act a thriving business ; gossips hang 
out of the tenement windows and dis- 
cuss matters with neighbors across the 
alley; business men enter their offices, 
stopping on the way at a cigar store or 
drug store, as their inclinations may 
direct. In fact, every participant in this 



THE WHITE CITY MAGAZINE 



production will be carefully drilled. 
The action of the spectacle begins 
after the enormous curtain, the longest 
in the world, has been rolled up from 
in front of the amphitheatre and afford- 
ing to the audience the first view. The 
acting is so perfect that it is impossible 
to realize at tirst that it is a play which 



street, the engines dash out and are 
directed to the scene of the fire by 
policemen. Around the corners come 
other fire apparatus ; a patrol wagon, 
ambulance, etc. Policemen establish fire 
lines and drive the crowds back out of 
the way. The fire hose is coupled to 
the hydrants the steaming engines are 




World Famous Fire Horses for Fire Show 



is being witnessed. Various humorous 
incidents occur ; a noisy fellow is 
hustled to the patrol box and when the 
wagon comes in response to the signal 
of the patrolmen is carried away amidst 
the hoots of the people. Various inci- 
dents add life and color to the scene, 
and finally an alarm of "fire" comes 
from a fireworks store, adjoining a 
five-story hotel which stands almost in 
the center of the square. A little clourl 
of smoke appears from one of the win- 
dows, a man dashes madly into the 
street and turns in an alarm at a regu- 
lation fire box. In response to this, and 
within plain view of the audience, the 
firemen spring from their beds, located 
in the second story of a double engine 
house, which stands just across the 
street from the grand stand, jump into 
their clothing and slide down the pole 
all ready to take their place on the ap- 
paratus. 

At the sounding of the gong in the 
engine house, well trained fire horses 
spring to their places, attendants deftlv 
snap the harness on, the driver springs 
to his seat and with a clanging of 
gongs and cries from the crowds in the 



quickly placed into position, enormous 
ladders are elevated to the windows, 
life nets are spread and held in posi- 
tion, while excited and terrorized occu- 
pants of the hotel spring from the top- 
most stories and roof to be caught 
without injury and taken to a place of 
safety. 

In the meantime the clouds of smoke 
have become thicker, flames dart through 
the roof and the scene is one of ab- 




Grand Stand for Fire Show 
sorbingly intense realism. Expert life 
savers, with their pompier ladders, per- 
form feats of astonishing valor, climb- 
ing from window to window, returning 
with rescued victims on their shoulders. 



THE WHITE CITY MAGAZINE 



53 



Some are taken away in the ambulance 
and others are received by hospitable 
neighbors who care for them in their 
well simulated distress. 

The fire fighters succeed in over- 
coming the flames and putting out the 
fire. When this has been accomplished 



cially for the St. Louis Exposition, to- 
gether with the remarkably well trained 
and intelligent horses, which were so 
popular with the visitors there last sum- 
mer. 

"Buck" and "Mac," the famous and 
remarkably trained fire horses which 




and they start on their return journey 
for the engine house, the curtain falls 
and the audience disperses. 

It is absolutely the most thrilling and 
intensely interesting exhibition, of skill 
and prowess ever given in public. Very 
few people in the audience remember 
that it is only an exhibition and there 
is no limit to the enthusiasm of the on- 
lookers, because they actually feel that 
the scene is real. The excellence of 
the performance causes them to applaud 
the participants as though at an actual 
fire. 

The buildings used in the fire show 
are constructed of various fireproofed 
materials and are protected against ac- 
cident in every way. Quantities of 
flimsy materials, which are intended to 
burn in order to give the proper effect, 
are placed at proper points so that as 
soon as the fire is over and the audience 
has been dispersed, the grounds are 
rapidly cleaned up and the structures 
prepared for the next exhibition. 

The management of White City 
bought the fire apparatus built espe- 



6o-foot Extensw?i 7> uck for Fire Show 

took first prizes in London, Paris and 
other European cities during the Inter- 
national Firemen's contest, will appear 




Claude L. Hagett 
at every performance at White City. 
Claude Hagen, the celebrated New 
York spectacle producer, designed the 



54 



THE WHITE CITY MAGAZINE 



tire show for White City and all the 
buildings were constructed under his 
personal supervision. lie has put on 




William West 

similar shows at Coney Island, but de- 
clares the one at White City to be the 
biggest, grandest and most realistic of 
any the ^^'orld has yet seen. W. A. 
Springer, working under the direction 
of Mr. Hagan, is drilling the 250 per- 
formers, and the spectacle will be pro- 
duced under his direction, while Wm. 




W. A. Springer 

West, who traveled abroad with the 
celebrated Kansas City Engine Co. No. 
I, and whose work contributed more 



largely than that of any other individual 
to the success of the tour, is the fire 
chief in charge of all apparatus. 

When Chief West dashes up to the 
fire, his face will be recognized by 
thousands of Chicagoans who have seen 
him in other American cities and abroad 
when he carried the stars and stripes to 
overwhelming victory as opposed to the 
chosen representatives of all other na- 
tions in fire fighting competition. 

Camp of Gypsies 

One of the unusual attractions at 
White City will be a genuine Gypsy 
Camp with black-eyed babies rolling 
and tumbling about, with olive com- 
plexioned maids attending to the duties 
of camp life, with sturdy young men, 
dressed in velveteens, silk neckerchiefs 
and wearing gold rings in their ears ; 
with a Gypsy queen, enthroned in all 
the splendor of barbaric affluence and 
ruling with a rod of iron, together with 
the other interesting things which are 
always to be seen in the camps of the 
real Gypsies. 

The Gypsies of White City must 
not be confounded with the graceless, 
ragged and dirty outlaws who make 
themselves nuisances in the suburbs of 
Chicago and who eke out a scanty 
existence by petty pilferings. The 
White City Gypsies come direct from 
Sunny Spain and are persons of an 
entirely different class. They are 
descended from the ancient Egyptians, 
the name Gypsy being a corruption of 
that historic word, and their tribal laws 
and rituals have been handed down 
through their forefathers from time 
immemorial. 

Arrangements have just been com- 
pleted by a special envoy sent by the 
management of White City to far-off 
Spain and these strange wanderers will 
soon begin the long and tiresome jour- 
ney across the Atlantic ocean. They 
prefer to travel in their caravans if pos- 
sible and will make a part of the jour- 
ney through the United States in this 
way. 

The impecunious dentist with a large 
family doubtless thinks it hard lines that 
the fewer teeth there are to fill the more 
mouths there are to fill. 



THE WHITE CITY MAGAZINE 



55 



Johnstown Flood 



fk 



HE Johnstown Flood, pro- 
nounced to be the greatest 
scenic production ever 
offered the pubHc, will be 
seen at White City. 

It was first shown at the Pan-Ameri- 
can Exposition at Buffalo, and it proved 
to be the greatest success of the many at- 
tractions of this great Fair. It is pro- 
nounced by experts to be far superior 
to the Galveston Flood shown at St. 
Louis. 

The Johnstown Flood which will be 
located in White City is a new one, with 
the scenic work by Sosman & Landis, 
and will be an improvement over the one 
at Buffalo. The entire city of Johnstown 
is shown, with the hills and the great 
reservoir in the distance. This is not a 
painting, but each of the buildings of the 
city of Johnstown is truthfully repro- 
duced in miniature. The production 
opens with the peaceful city of Johns- 
town with its citizens, commerce, and 
industry. iVIen and women are seen going 
about their pursuits, trains pass through 
the city, and teamsters are seen trans- 
ferring freight, while pleasure vehicles 
drive through the streets. Then comes 
a storm, and the flood. 

Small at first is the stream of water 
which trickles down the mountains in the 
distance ; the alarm is given, and those 
who are fortunate enough to apprehend 
their danger are seen rushing for the hill- 
tops. With a rumble that forebodes 
death for hundreds of souls, the walls of 
the great reservoir give way and down 
into the valley rushes the tremendous 
volume of water which submerges the 
city and crushes great buildings like egg 
shells. Hundreds of persons are caught 
in the tremendous torrent and within a 
few minutes the city is devastated. 

The production is correct in all details, 
the buildings being actual reproductions 
of those which crumbled beneath the 
great tidal wave. 

The scenic effects are excellent and 
may be said to be a triumph of stage 
craft. 




The Bumps 

HICAGOANS have never 
yet been given the opportu- 
nity of indulging inthatexhil- 
arating and hilarious pas- 
time so popular at Coney 
Island and known as "Bumping the 
Bumps." During the summer amusement 
season at Coney Island the most frequent 
method of salutation among people of all 
classes was : 

"Have you bumped the bumps" and 
the answer was almost invariably "You 
can bet your life I have." 

The Bumps first appeared at Dream- 
land and at once became the most pop- 
ular attraction in that resort. Dignified 




How is it that the teacher of memory 
lessons often forgets to pay the grocer? 



^?^^ 



IV/ierc the Biii/ips -,uill he " luujipcd" 

national, state, and municipal executives 
gravely ascended to the platform and 
took tlie greatest possible delight in slid- 
ing down the smooth incline ; caroming 
from one bump to another and landing 
at the foot against the air cushion with 
all the delight of school boys. It became 
a veritable craze before the season had 
become far advanced and the manage- 
ment of White City, when visiting 
Dreamland last season determined that 
the Bumps should be introduced in Qii- 
cago. 

It is impossible to explain exactly what 
the Bumps are, or is, but the following 
brief description will give an excellent 



56 



THE WHITE CITY MAGAZINE 



idea of this attraction as it will be found 
at White City. 

In a handsomely built and specially 
designed structure : the first building seen 
by the visitor to White City on the west 
walk, will be found the Bumps. The 
front of the building is open and a flight 
of stairs leads the seeker for amusement 
to a platform at the rear of the building 
and about 20 feet from the ground. Lead- 
ing from this platform to the ground 
floor in front is a perfectly smooth and 
satin-finished incline, built of the finest 
maple lumber. The descent has an angle 
of about 30 degrees and here and there 
are cushioned protuberances which cause 
the person sliding down the incline to 
become diverted from a straight course 
and be directed in this way from one to 
another of the "Bumps" until the foot 
of the incline is finally reached. There 
will be found several precautionary appli- 
ances to prevent the possibility of injury 
or unpleasant sensation. 

In addition to the main slide there are 
three others, one a straight and narrow 
Chute constructed of slippery basket 
work and which gives the slider an excel- 
lent speed. Another gives the sensation 
of alternate falling and rising until the 
bottom is reached by a succession of gen- 
tle inclines. But the most exciting of all 
is what a base ball pitcher would call 
the in and out curve. It consists of a 
narrow Chute with sharp and sudden 
turns occurring at the most unexpected 
places and finally landing the bumper at 
the bottom without injury. 

The Bumps is an amusement device 
without any pretense of artistic effort or 
dignity. It will be conducted for the 
sole use of those who are seeking pure 
fun and hilarity. 

The location of the Bumps will be 
readily ascertained by the shouts of 
laughter and shrieks of hilarity which 
universally characterize this method of 
amusement. 

Any person who does not desire to 
laugh and who has a wish to preserve 
his dignity must surely refrain from 
approaching the Bumps, for once there, 
he will become so much affected by the 
spirit of noisy enjoyment that he must 
perforce join the happy throng and Bump 
the Bumps with the rest of them. 

No cars or boats are required to give 
the participant in this unique and excit- 



ing pleasure a rapid ride. The minute 
the visitor seats himself on the incline, 
the momentum created by the weight of 
the body causes an immediate and rapid 
descent, landing feet foremost upon the 
great air cushion at the foot. So when 
anyone asks you next season if you have 
"Bumped the Bumps," do not find your- 
self compelled to answer, "I have not," 
because you will certainly have missed 
one of the greatest enjoyments to be 
found. 

For a stubborn case of indigestion or 
the blues try the Bumps. 



Observation Wheel 




INCE the days of the famous 
Ferris Wheel at the World's 
Columbian Exposition, there 
have been exhibited at the 
various Fairs held in differ- 
ent cities, observation wheels of all kinds 
and sizes within a circumscribed limit of 
height. 

Applications were received by the man- 
agement of White City from a score of 
proprietors of these observation wheels 
for the privilege of securing space at 
White City where they could install 
them. 

But, believing that if an attraction of 
this character was to be admitted, the 
management decided that it must be of a 
size and character which would befit 
White City, and finally made a contract 
with the American Vending Machine 
Company which provides for the finest 
observation wheel that has been built in 
the world since the Ferris Wheel was 
designed. In the making of the contract 
several things naturally were taken into 
consideration, among them being the fact 
that the original Ferris Wheel was of 
such enormous and cumbersome propor- 
tions that many persons feared to ride 
in it. In fact, it was too large and excited 
feelings of distrust in the hearts of the 
timid. The success which has character- 
ized wheels of a smaller size made it 
advisable to arrange for an observation 
wheel which would be without the 
unpleasant feature of the original Ferris 
Wheel and yet would carry the public 
in comfortable cars to a sufficient height 
to enable them to view the moving pano- 



THE WHITE CITY MAGAZINE 



57 



rama always presented to the eye of the 
sight-seer at White City. 

This new observation wheel is now 
being constructed and will be equipped 
with safety appliances and all modern 
improvements. There will be accommo- 
dations for about 40 passengers at a time, 
each one finding plenty of room in a nicely 
upholstered and perfectly appointed car. 

White City's Observation Wheel is 
the perfection of mechanical and engi- 
neering skill, the mechanism being so per- 
fect that a child can run it. No percep- 
tible effort is discernible when the wheel 



White City Fire Department 

In thebuilding of White City one of the 
first things considered was adequate pro- 
tection against fire. The area covered 
by the buildings, the immense amount of 
valuable material and the loss which would 
be sustained if a delay were permitted 
to occur in the time set for the opening 
rendered it imperative that unusual pre- 
cautions be provided. 

White City has fire-fighting facilities 
such as are not possessed by thousands 
of cities which have a population of from 




One of the Fire Engines for the Fire Show 



is Started or stopped, because the ball- 
bearings absolutely prevent any jar or 
noticeable friction. 

There is something particularly en- 
trancing about a ride on the observa- 
tion wheel. The visitor is slowly and 
irresistibly carried to a height which per- 
mits a view of all surrounding objects, 
and the sensation of being maintained in 
the air by invisible forces is felt. 

Various devices have been invented 
from time to time by promoters of amuse- 
ment enterprises, but none has ever yet 
been discovered which will take the place 
of the observation wheel with its pecu- 
liarly pleasant and indefinable sensations. 



Henderson — "Let's see ; they call the 
man who runs an automobile a chauf- 
feur, don't they?" 

Uncle Joseph — "Well, down our way 
they call him worse names than that." 
— Boston Transcript. 



10,000 to 15,000. The special equ'pment 
owned by White City is the very best 
that money can buy and any fire which 
might break out anywhere in the grounds 
could be ptit out without delay even 
though no aid were given by the city 
force. 

Two complete fire companies, with 35 
of the best drilled firemen in the world, 
men who have been carefully selected for 
their experience, skill, agility and gen- 
eral fitness, are on duty at the White 
City day and night. Their equipment 
consists of two fire engines, one hook- 
and-ladder with a 60-foot extension lad- 
der, two chemical engines and a coal 
wagon. Attached to the permanent hos- 
pital is an ambulance and attached to the 
White City police station is a patrol 
wagon. This equipment participates in 
the great Fighting the Flames exhibition, 
but is expected at all times to attend to 



58 



THE WHITE CITY MAGAZINE 



the duties which may arise at any part 
of White City. 

But. in case of a serious fire, all of 
the equipment of White City is of the 
regulation size and make, and the city 
department could dash into the grounds 
through tlie sixty-foot main entrance or 
through a number of other entrances and 
there "would be no confusion because the 
fire-fig-hters of White City have been 
trained and drilled similarly and would 
act as a part of the city department. 

As an insurance risk White City is 
looked upon favorably by the insurance 
companies because every suggestion rela- 
tive to protection from fire has been fol- 
lowed. At stated intervals between the 
principal buildings are 1 6-inch blank 
brick walls, rising three feet above the 
roofs and completely segreg:ating the 
various important structures. There are 
no open rafters in any of the buildings, 
and the roofs are covered with steel or 
composition. Several of the important 
structures, such as the College Inn, the 
Electrical Transforming Station, the 
Tower and the Chutes are built with steel 
frames and are fire-proof. 

Tlie area of ground covered by the 
park is one-quarter of a mile long and 
375 feet wide. The buildings facing the 
wide Plaza with its brilliant flower beds- 
are lOO feet in depth, leaving an open 
space of 1/5 feet across the Plaza. 

In front of these buildings is the 40- 
foot board walk, raised 4 feet from the 
ground and under which are placed the 
two 6-inch water mains. From these 
mains run adequate connections to the 
various buildings and in each of the main 
structures is a standpipe with hose 
attached all ready for an emergency. 
Connected with these mains outside of 
the board walk and in positions where 
they will be readily accessible, are fire 
plugs with double hydrants; ten in all. 
Alternate ones have attached to them 50 
feet of regulation hose with the same 
thread universally used on city hose. 

But the greatest of the fire fighting 
facilities at White City is the enormous 
reservoir, the lake at the base of the 
Chutes. This lake holds 1,365,000 gal- 
lons of water and six fire engines can 
pump for several hours before exhaust- 
ing the supply. Two enormous electric 
pumps will be working day and night to 



keep the water at a high pressure in tlie 
mains and standpipes. 

No fires of any kind will be permitted 
in the buildings with the exception of the 
fireproof College Inn. 

In the various buildings, placed at con- 
venient and accessible locations, are 50 
Babcock fire extinguishers, 200 dry pow- 
der extinguishers, buckets, etc. The 
employes are subject to a regular fire 
drill at frequent intervals, under the 
supervision of a trained fireman familiar 
with drilling the employes of large con- 
cerns. Five regulation fire-alarm boxes 
are stationed about the grounds and an 
electric whistle calls the men to drill at 
any and all parts of the park, each sta- 
tion being numbered. An army of 
trained watchmen patrol the park at 
night. 

During the work of construction smok- 
ing has been prohibited in all parts of 
the grounds. 

So with every possible precaution 
against fire and with every known appli- 
ance for fighting fire, the insurance risk 
is called a good one. 




Fire Works for White City 

EORGE W. Porter, well 
known throughout the 
United States as an expert 
in the designing, manufac- 
ture and handling of fire- 
works, has joined the staff of General 
Manager Howse at White City and will 
provide some decidedly novel and inter- 
esting features during the season. 

Mr. Porter will arrange displays of 
fireworks from time to time, and his pro- 
ductions will be of special interest to vis- 
itors at White City, in view of the fact 
that suitable designs appropriate to vari- 
ous occasions will be produced on a scale 
of magnificence and grandeur never 
before attempted in Chicago. 

The special designs made by Mr. Por- 
ter are principally of that class known 
as ground fireworks, because the display 
consists largely of set figures and comic 
subjects. A large number of them will 
be given on floats anchored in the lagoon 
connected with the Chutes, but there will 
be moving figures on land and water, 
birds and animals swimming or walking, 
flving machines on wires, etc. 



THE WHITE CITY MAGAZINE 



59 



BEAUTIFUL VENICE 

A REPRODUCTION OF THE WORLDS MOST 
SPLENDID ARCHITECTiURAL EFFORTS 




EAUTIFUL Venice! What 
a poetic charm is invariably 
associated with this name, 
so resonant among the 
echoes of history. The 
queen of the Adriatic, the city of the 
Doges, the birth-place of romantic ad- 
venture, the home of Galileo and the 
stage upon which was produced the ter- 
rible tragedies of the dramatic Inquisi- 
tion. 

Approaching Venice from the Adri- 
atic Sea the irresistible impression is re- 
ceived by the observer of a city of pal- 
aces and towering spires floating tran- 
quilly on the surface of the blue water. 
It certainly has a unique appearance of 
fairy-like picturesqueness. 

In the enormous palace-like structure 
which has been especially designed and 
constructed at White City for the re- 
production of Beautiful Venice, there 
is gathered together what experts de- 
clare to be the most correct and com- 
plete representations of the principal 







views to be seen in Venice. This enor- 
mous building is 250 feet long and 100 
feet in depth. The front elevation gives 
a correct impression to the sightseer of 
one of the most famous palaces in 
Venice, the one chosen by Napoleon 
for his younger brother when he was 
sent to Venice as its ruler. At night 
the exterior is brilliantly illuminated 
with thousands of incandescent lights 
and outvies in brilliancy and splendor 
the original palace even as it was in all 
its original grandeur. 

Upon entering Beautiful Venice, the 
sightseer is conducted to a large and 
commodious gondola especially built 
for use at White City, and after being 
comfortably seated, floats away upon 
the surface of a running stream which 
carries the gondola into a broad canal 
upon either side of which stand repro- 
ductions of the structures made famous 
in the World's history as being a part 
of Venice. 

It is twilight in Venice and through 
the blue vault of Heaven twinkle count- 
less stars, the light from which serves 
to give that dreamy effect which no 
other portion of the day or night can 
impart. The magnificence of the sur- 
rounding structures, the rippling of the 
waters, the lights from the palace win- 
dows and the muffled sound of voices 
giving exclamations of wonder and 
admiration at the wonderful effect pro- 
duced, all serve to instill in the mind 
a feeling as though the Spirit of an- 
cient Venice had been again revived, 
and that a panorama of those wonder- 
ful scenes of tragedy, comedy, adven- 
ture, war and strife, were about to be 
re-enacted then and there. Under a 
bridge glides the gondola, and to the 
right stands the famous arsenal at one 
time employing over 16,000 men, and 
where the World's greatest commercial 
transactions at one time took place. 
Then come quaint old houses with nar- 
row, poorly paved streets through 
which appear to float ghosts of those 
adventurous spirits whose valorous 



Venetian Palaces 



6o 



THE IVHITE CITY MAGAZINE 



deeds have been celebrated in poetry 
and prose. 

To the Northward can be seen the 
parish Church of Pope Pius X, while 
a o-lance to the left reveals a collection 




of old palaces, the former homes of the 
arrogant nobles of Venice whose de- 
scent from the original twelve consuls 
who ruled the republic in its most thriv- 
ing period, gave them certain privileges 
and rights never before or since pos- 
sessed by any except those of the blood 
royal. Under the Bridge of Sighs, the 
ponte dei Sospiri of History, floats the 
gondola, presenting to view on one 
hand the magnificent palace of the 
Doges, while on the other side is a 
view of the carceri or public prison; 
the graveyard of more hopes and fears; 
the birth-place of more sorrows and 
despairs than in any other similar place 
known in the World's history. Then 
come more ancient palaces, modest 
homes and thriving shops until that 
magnificent piece of sculptural work 
known as the Lion's Mouth comes into 
view. 

The Lion's Mouth, or letter box of 
Old Venice is a receptacle for anony- 
mous denouncements, the unthinking 
medium of revenge. Into the greedy 



maw of this unconscious piece of stone 
were swallowed the reputations of thou- 
sands of innocent men and women. 
Any person desiring to denounce a foe, 
wrote the accusation on a piece of 
paper, dropped it into the Lion's Mouth 
and within a few hours the person so 
denounced had disappeared forever. 
Youths denounced age for testy words 
of correction, while age denounced 
youth for mere exuberance of spirits, 
lovers quarreled and denounced each 
other, unfilial children denounced their 
parents, ambitious and unprincipled 
business men eliminated competition by 
utilizing this popular method until the 
very atmosphere of Venice reeked with 
loathing and fear at the awful injustice 
of it all. The Lion's Mouth was the 
post-box for the Inquisition. Brilliant 
writers have pictured in poetry and 
prose the terror of the Lion's Mouth 
and several plays have been written ; 




some of them being especially popular 
in modern times. Through the mind 
of the passenger in the gondola, such 
recollections add a weirdness and in- 



THE WHITE CITY MAGAZINE 



6i 



tensity of interest while floating past 
this object with its fearsome recollec- 
tions. 

Next the gondola glides under the 
Campinile Bridge where is located the 
Campinile or Bell Tower of St. Mark's 
from which Galileo made his astron- 
omical observation. Here the first 
view is obtained of the Canalazzo or 
Grand Canal which runs through the 
center of the city of Venice and divides 
it into two equal parts. Here the first 
view is obtained of the celebrated St. 
Mark's Church and the historic Plaza 
which fronts it. About this ponderous, 
yet architecturally beautiful structure, 
clings the romance of centuries. It is 
the most important Church in Venice ; 
occupying a commanding position and 
being bordered by arcades and stately 
edifices. The foundations were laid in 
the year 977, A. D. It was built in the 
byzantine style of architecture in the 
form of a Greek cross with large and 
roomy porticos. Over the magnificent 
and imposing central portal stands the 
celebrated bronze horses of St. Mark, 
their gigantic wings outspread as 
though to shelter the pilgrims who pass 
the portals they guard. These horses 
were brought from the Hippodrome in 
Constantinople at the time of the sack- 
ing of that city by the crusaders. Na- 
poleon I removed them from Venice 
to Paris, but popular feeling ran so high 
among the Venetians at this outrage 
against their traditions that they were 
returned. 

It is stated that the bones of the 
Apostle St. Mark were removed to 
Venice in the year 829, A. D., from the 
city of Alexandria and he forthwith be- 
came the patron saint of the city of 
\^enice. In fact one of the numerous 
titles of the city of Venice has been 
"The Republic of St. Mark." Imme- 
diately after the removal of these re- 
mains to Venice, pilgrims from all parts 
of the surrounding country visited the 
shrine of St. Mark, these pilgrimages 
adding materially to the prosperity and 
wealth of the city and its inhabitants. 

After passing this historic spot, the 
Ducal Palace or Palace of the Doges, 
is next sighted and the visitor is at 
once impressed with the two towering 



red columns which have a particular 
significance. During the crusade which 
occurred in the 14th century a large 
fleet of war galleys sailed from the port 
of Venice and made an attack on the 
city of Constantinople. The siege was 
a protracted one and the treasury of 
Venice became practically empty, so that 
no money was left with which to pay 




the sailors and soldiers. In this ex- 
tremity, the admiral created a new 
coinage by using stamped letter discs, 
thus establishing a currency which 
would be redeemed in gold upon their 
return to Venice. Perhaps the frugal 
propensities of the Venetians were 
aroused to an exalted pitch by this ac- 
tion through fear of the instability of 
this currency in case of defeat. At any 
rate they made a fierce and final attack, 
throwing ladders from the masts of 
their galleys to the towers on the walls 
of Constantinople. The sailors ran gal- 
lantly over these ladders, fighting des- 
perately until the Turks were beaten 
back and the city taken. 

Among the other trophies carried ofif 
to celebrate this wonderful victory, 



62 



THE WHITE CITY MAGAZINE 



were tliree columns, each being' so large 
that a single galley was required for it? 
transportation. On the return vovage 
one of these galleys was lost in a furious 
storm, but the other two made the port 
of A'enice in safety and landed theso 
enormous columns on the quav i'l 
front of the Plaza. The Venetian en- 
gineers were sorelv perplexed bv the 
size of these magnificent columns tmtil 
the Doge offered as a reward to any 
person who would raise them into 
place, anything which he might desire. 
A clever engineer finally accomplished 
the work and to the consternation of 
the Doge claimed as his reward, the 
privilege of conducting a gambling 
place on the Plaza between the two 
large columns which he had erected. 

The Doge kept his word and granted 
the request, but as a punishment for 
the indiscretion so exhibited, he issued 
a decree that all executions should take 
place on the same spot. History states 
that this decree made the gambling 
privilege of no value; perhaps because 
of the fact that in those days the execu- 
tions were so frequent that there was 
no opportunity for gambling at this par- 
ticular place. The antiquity of these 
two colmnns is lost in the mazes of 
ancient history and no one knows their 
origin. They were undoubtedly carried 
to Constantinople from some ancient 
city in the orient. 

The place of execution is seen sur- 
rounded by ancient buildings and a 
beautiful view is obtained of Old Venice 



At this spot, the gondola leaves the 
Grand Canal and floats down the 
Rialto Canal, the derivation of this 
name being Rio del Alto or Deep River. 
At the Rialto bridge, several old man- 
sions are shown on the left hand and 
Pisona's Palace at the right. Here are 
displayed the Venetian masts in holi- 
day attire, together with banners of the 
ancient Doges in their splendor of 
bullion ornamentation and mysterious 
devices. From the palaces are heard 
sweet strains of languorous Italian 
music, and in the boatman's quarters 
can be heard the dashing strains of 
the Fandango. The residence portion 
is shown with trees luxuriant in foliage : 
balconies covered with creeping vines, 
beautiful gardens with an abundance of 
flowers, and the people in holiday attire. 

The gondola glides along through 
other canals where the scenery is sim- 
ilar to that before described until the 
starting point is arrived at and the 
voyager disembarks. 

All the buildings, bridges, etc., are 
correct reproductions of the originals 
in Ancient A'^enice. The boat piles, 
with their weird many colored stripes 
like barber poles, were brought from 
\^enice for use at White City. Many 
unique electrical features have been 
designed for this production and serve 
to enhance the splendor and grandeur 
of the starlit scene. 

An expenditure of over $75,000.00 
was required to perfect beautiful Venice 
at White City. 



THE WHITE CITY MAGAZINE 



63 



Special Features of White City 

Unrivaled Attractions for Chicago's $1^000^000 
Ajiiusenient Enterprise 



Electric Tower. Almost 300 feet high, 
illuminated by 20,000 incandescent 
lights. 

Fire Show. A thrilling spectacle ex- 
hibiting three complete Fire Com- 
panies in action while a five-story 
hotel burns; requires 250 people, 2 
trolley cars, 2 automobiles, 5 cabs, 6 
wagons, ambulance, patrol wagon, 14 
horses, etc. Greatest and most vivid 
outdoor spectacle ever produced. 

Venice. A romantic gondola ride 
through the moonlit water streets of 
Venice; viewing correct reproduc- 
tions of her famous buildings and 
statuary groups. 

Scenic Railway. A three-quarter mile 
ride up hill and down dale, through 
forest and glade, viewing the world's 
most marvelous scenery, actually re- 
produced in per.<^.pective. 

Infant Incubators. An exhibit of the 
greatest practical value to physicians 
and of the deepest interest to par- 
ents; showing scientific methods of 
saving the lives of tiny babes. 

White City College Inn. Finest restau- 
rant in America, located in an enor- 
mous and architecturally beautiful 
building; a duplicate of Chicago's 
famous College Inn; also a popular 
priced temperance restaurant and a 
German restaurant. Will accommo- 
date 2,400 people. 

Music. Open air concerts day and eve- 
ning by the foremost bands and 
orchestras of America and Europe. 

Flying; Airships. A revelation in bird- 
1 ike tran s portat ion. SirHiram 
Maxim's idea of safe and sane aerial 
navigation. 

Ball Room. Finest dancing floor in 
Chicago and capable of accommo- 
dating 1,000 dancers at a time. 

Bumps. A harmless and hilarious 
method of enjoyment. "Have you 
bumped the bumps? " 



Hereafter. Beautiful, mystifying illu- 
sions, possessing in the highest degree 
the power of interesting and enter- 
taining. Conducted by Prof. Burch, 
the celebrated London illusionist. 

Shoot- the-Chutes. Duplex and longest 
in America. Has 500 foot escalator 
to carry people to the pavilion. All 
the newest improvements. 

Johnstown Flood. Most impressive and 
realistic of all scenic productions and 
constructed on a gigantic scale. A 
triumph of scenic art and startling 
realism. 

Automatic Vaudeville. Containing all 
the latest mechanical novelties and 
furnishing entertainment for old and 
young. 

Midway. A conglomeration of laughter 
inspiring features and clean amuse- 
ments. 

Fun Factory, A merrymaking estab- 
lishment with laugh creating devices 
on a large scale. 

Electric Theatre. Electric pictorial 
reproductions of startling and thrill- 
ing events showing the animation and 
action of living objects. 

Observation Wheel. Fun for every- 
body, A ride you will not forget. 

Circus Ringfs. Continuous performances 
including equestrian acts, aerial 
flights and feats of strength and skill. 
Free exhibitions. 

Mechanical Waxworks. Most remark- 
able collection of life-like figures, 
reproduced in wax and so supplied 
with intricate and cleverly contrived 
mechanisms that they appear to be 
possessed of the characteristics and 
abilities of living beings. 

Photograph Gallery. Where pictures 
of every kind known to lovers of 
photographic art will be made under 
the supervision of skilled photog- 
raphers. Conducted by one of the 
best known and largest photographic 
concerns in the world. 



64 



THE WHITE CITY MAGAZINE 



Gypsy Camp. With a host of genuine 
Gipsies from sunny Spain, secured 
by a special envoy sent across the 
water bv the management of White 
Gty. 

Dog:, Pony and Monkey Circus. Other- 
wise called the Simian City. An 
aggregation of cleverly trained 
animals under the direction of Prof. 
Blake, one of the best known trainers 
in the world. A constantly changing 
program of special interest to chil- 
dren and pleasing to all. 

Toboggan. An absolutely harmless 
but exciting ride in perfectly con- 
structed gravity cars, whirling the 
rider at an e.xhilarating speed around 
a double circle. Lots of fun. 

Beautiful Jim Key. The equine world 
wonder who earns annually the in- 
terest on Si, 000,000 and is the aristo- 
crat of the animal kingdom. Actually 
an educated horse which thinks, 
spells, counts, draws with chalk and 
writes his own name on a blackboard. 
Taught by kindness and a wonderful 
example of the power of love for 
dumb brutes. The children's friend. 

Palmistry Kiosk. Where the mysteries 
of the future and occurrences of the 
past will be related by seers who can 
read the story of life as imprinted in 
the palm. 

Utopia. A beautiful and brilliant 
series of unexpected scenes, under 
and over the sea; also during a tour of 
the surface of the moon the spectator 
is charmed and delighted with the 
novelty and splendor of the phe- 
nomena witnessed. 



Miniature Railway. A perfect model 
railroad system with tracks, switches, 
tiny cars, engines, etc. Almost a 
half-mile of trackage through tunnels 
and grottoes with beautiful scenic 
effects Children or adults can ride. 

Temple of Music. Marvelous develop- 
ment of natural forces, applied by 
scientific methods for the performing 
of difficult airs on musical instru- 
ments of all kinds. Piano played by 
wireless telegraphy, the electricity 
passing through the body of a human 
being. Air, heat, steam, electricity, 
etc., used in these wonderful demon- 
strations. 

Chinese Theatre. With jugglers, actors, 
acrobats, etc., direct from the flowery 
kingdom. This troupe of oriental 
entertainers contains several high- 
caste Chinese women with tiny feet. 

Cummins^ Indian Congress. Includes 
150 Indians from all the principal 
tribes, cowboys, sharpshooters, sol- 
diers, trappers, etc. Western scenes 
and pioneer days vividly recalled by 
a thrilling spectacle showing the 
massacre of Fort Dearborn and a 
realistic representation of Custer's 
last stand; reproduced in three life- 
like tableaux. 

Terrace Tavern. A high-class refectory 
where ice cream, soda water, soft 
drinks and light lunches can be 
obtained. 

Double Whirl. Participants in the de- 
lights of this novel pastime are given 
a pleasant circular ride during which 
they have a view of the park from a 
considerable elevation. 




ENTRANCE 63''^«i^J &so.PARKAvr 

OPEN 



Lmay*!- 







^ 



Oq 



to 

I- 



:^ 






^ 




66 



THE WHITE CITY MAGAZINE 



Rothschild 

& Company 

State and Van Buren Streets 




The White City 

of State Street 



Substantial Saving and "S & H'' Green 
Trading Stamps Free on Every Purchase 



When writing to advertisers please mention The White City Magazine. 



THE WHITE CITY MAGAZINE 



67 




C h i c a g o* s 
$1,000,000 
Amusement 
Enterprise 



Opens 

May 27 




Admission 

10 Cents 



dedicated to 

Merriment and 

Mirth 



'ISITORS admitted during' constrtidlion 
on Sunday Afternoons, 2 to 5 o*clocK 



When writing to advertisers please mention The White City Magazine. 



68 



THE WHITE CITY MAGAZINE 



Columns for White City Peristyle 




The above cut shows three of the twenty columns, 38 inches in diameter and 26 feet long, for 
the White City Peristyle about to leave our factory. 



Henry Sanders Co. 

litest em Manufacturers of 

KOLL'S PATENT LOCK-JOINT 



Iff 



COLUMNS 



77-85 Weed Street, Chicago, III. 

Eastern Factory: Hartmann Bros. Mfg. Co., Mt. Vernon, N. Y. 



We are equipped for making C(jlumns from 6 to 42 inches in diameter and proportionate lengths 
of all designs and woods; also Balustrades, Railings, Pedestals and Pilasters, and Turned Work 
of every description. Writk for our Book of Designs. 



When writing to advertisers please mention The White City Magazine. 



THE WHITE CITY MAGAZINE 



69 




SJLnr(SniL©Il[S® C®. 



IMPORTERS AND ROASTERS or 

50*52 MICHIGAN AVE. 
CHIO^VGO. 




Lovers of Coffee 

should know that the blends of the HALL-GILBERG CO. are rapidly 
attracting the attention of those who serve and enjoy this 

King of Beverages 



WE ROAST, BLEND AND PACK 

ELECTA, NAPAMAX, ROYAL, BANQUET AND 
AMSTERDAM JAVA 



■We wish to especially call the attention of Managers and Stewards to the fact that our 
Hotel and Restaurant Department supplies the COLLEGE INN and many of the lead- 
ing Hotels, Restaurants, Dining Car Systems and Clubs. 



A 

L 
L 

H 
A 
V 
A 
N 
A 



SMOKE 




ON SALE EVERYWHERE 



S 
W 

E 
E 
T 

cSc 

M 
I 

L 
D 



When writing to advertisers please mention The White City Magazine. 



THE WHITE CITY MAGAZINE 



The Very Best Laxative 

Re-Leaf Splits 




piLinrs 



On Sale 

Everywhere RE-LEAF CO., Pittsburgh 



WYMAN'S BUFFET 

984 EAST SIXTY-THIRD STREET 

Just a Few Steps East of White City's Main Entrance 

Wines, Liquors and Cigars 



The best of refreshments provided for visitors to White 
City. :: :: Everything of the very finest quality. 

Telephone Wentworth 632 Chicago, Illinois 



When wiriting to advertisert please mention The White Citt Magazine. 



THE WHITE CITY MAGAZINE 



71 




First-class Service 

From CHICAOO TO 

-H^ ST. LOUIS "^ 
DETRO IT 
NIAGARA FALLS 
BUFFALO 
NEW YORK 
BOSTON 
(Q, CANADA 



CITY TICKET OFFICE 
97 Jidams St. 



When writing to advertisers please mention The White Cjty Magazine. 



72 



THE JVHITE CITY MAGAZINE 



..uwiiiiii;;;/, 
,xxN\\\\\\\nilii;;/////// 



'>//^/ 
'^///. 







a 1 



i':Q^ 



Pillsbury's Best Flour can't make 
poor bread — It's you or the stove — 
Pillsbury's Best Flour can't make 
poor bread. Ordinary Flour makes 
very ordinary bread. Pillsbury's 
Best — makes the best bread. 

Capacity Pillsbury Minneapolis Mills— 35,000 Barrels Daily. 



A DOZEN DON'T»S 



DON'T 

Neglect the surest protection to life and property 
— a telephone in the home. 

DON'T 

Delay availing yourself of the surest factor of 
increased business, the telephone. 

DON'T 

Be the only resident of your block -without this 
luxurious necessity. 

DON'T 

Spend money and energy on unnecessary jour- 
neys, -when the telephone will do most of it 
for you. 

DON'T 

Leave your family in anxiety at your delayed 
return, when a telephone in your home would 
be the medium of their relief. 

DON'T 

Make your Tvife or other members of your 
family go up or down stairs to answer the 
telephone ; have an extension station on second 
or third floor, or both. 



DON'T 

Fail to insure your property against loss by 
fire — the telephone calls the Fire Depart- 
ment. 

DON'T 

Allow another day to pass -without having 
in your home the means of reaching your 

doctor instantly. 
DON'T 

Delude yourself with the belief that you 
can get along -without the telephone. 

DON'T 

Forget that -with a telephone in your home 
and another in your office, your t-wo vital 
interests are al-ways in touch. 

DON'T 

Live any longer -without this faithful friend 
and ready servant ; al-w^ays available night 
and day. 

DON'T 

\Vait to contract for telephone service. 
Do it no\v. 



CHICAGO TELEPHONE COMPANY 



Main 294 



Contract Department 



203 'Washing'ton .Street 



Wlien writing to advertisers please mention The White City Magazine. 



THE WHITE CITY MAGAZINE 



•73 



A Paying Investment 

Even if a $200 National Cash Register adds to your profits during a 
year (300 working days) the sum of only 

5 cents a day, it will earn 714 per cent For 
10 cents a day, it will earn 15 per cent 
15 cents a day, it will earn 221^ per cent 
20 cents a day, it will earn 30 per cent 
30 cents a day, it will earn 45 per cent 
50 cents a day, it will earn 75 per cent Investment 



You 

Annually 
on Your 





SUCH AN INVESTMENT IS WORTH 
INVESTIGATING, AT LEAST. 

Your inquiry will receive our best attention. 

National 
Cash Register Co. 



48-50 State Street, Chicago 



Sales of our Registers have passed the 
420,000 mark. During 1904 National 
Cash Registers were manufactured, 
sold and delivered at the rate of more 
than one Register every three minutes 
of each working day. 



Thousands of Dollars' 
Worth of Protection 
Secured for Only 
a Few Cents a Day 



CASH REGISTERS 
SOLD ON 
EASY MONTHLY 
PAYMENTS 




When icriting to advertisers please iiie)itiun 



The White City Magazine. 



74 



THE WHITE CITY MAGAZINE 



Otto Schmidt IVine Comfy 




rIMPORTERS: 



WHISKIES, WINES, CORDIALS 
LIQUORS, MINERAL WATERS 



Sole Jigents for Mercier's Carte Blanche Champagne, 
made in Epernay, France. 
Haig & Haig's Scotch IVhisky. 

Boshamer.Leon & Co.'s Clarets,Saiiter7tes2iV\A Burgundies. 
M.o\\\.et Braftdies, Old Barrel Rye Whiskies, iSyi. 



We furnish supplies 
for the very bestClubs, 
High Class Hotels and 
best families. 



2616,2618,2620,2622 

Wabash Avenue 
CHICAGO, ILL. 



/' 



„^">^ 




D/leet me ai w kite City 



J r YOU are inter- 
I T ested in artistic 
^^ Metal Ceilings 
NOTICE the Ceiling 
in the entrance to 
White City :: :: :: 
WE PUT IT UP 



WHEELING 
CORRUGATING COMPANY 

Manufacturers of Steel Ceilings 
45-47 LAKE STREET 



Chas F. Dono^hue 



Plumbing 
Steam and 
Gas Fitting 



Natural Gas Fitting 
a Specialty 



80 Van Burcn St., Chicago 



W?ien writing to advertisers please menHon The White Citt Magazinb. 



THE WHITE CITY. MAGAZINE 



75 




ILLUSTRATE IT 

K you issue a catalog or booklet, use advertising space, publish a magazine — ILLUSTRATE IT. 

The illustration tells the story the best. 

USE GOOD ILLUSTRATIONS. Your printing and advertising space costs you just as much with 
poor designs and engravings as the best but — the better the illustrations the better the results. 

BARNES-CROSBY QUALITY IS THE BEST. We can easily prove to you the superiority of 
"B-C Co." work. 

LARGEST IN THE WORLD. We employ the largest number of artists and engravers of any 
concern in the world. 

DAY AND NIGHT. Our engraving department is operated day and night. 

If you use engraving write on your letter head for a copy of our "B-C Co. Budget." Address our nearest house 

BARNES-CROSBY COMPANY 



ELECTROTYPERS 

CHICAGO 



E- W. HOUSER, Pr< 



NEW YORK 



PHOTOGRAPHERS 

ST. LOUIS 



215 Madison Street 



CHICAGO 



'Phone Main 2487 



When luriting to adreitiscrs phase mention The White City Magazine- 



76 



THE WHITE CITY MAGAZINE 



John Sexton ^ Co. 

Importers of Teas and Coffees 

WHOLESALE GROCERS 



W The 

p Old Original 
f Hotel and 
j liesfaiiraiit 
yO Supply House 




16-18-20-22 STATE STREET 

CHICAGO 



Twenty-five Thousand Pounds of 



MURESCO 




Kills Suction. 
Fob Sale By All Dealers. 



MURESGO 



used in White City 

BENJAMIN MOORE & COMPANY 

SOLE MANUFACTURERS 

111-117 N. GREEN STREET, CHICAGO 

Write for Descriptive Matter 



When writing to advertisers please jitenliuii Tui- Wjuij: City Magazine. 



THE WHITE CITY MAGAZINE 



77 



The White City Magazine is printed and bound by 

P. F. Pettibone 
(S^Co. 





STATIONERS 

PRINTERS 

BlankBookMakers 
Lithographers 

Edition Printing 
and Binding 



Main Store 

1 78 Monroe Street* 

Store, Factory and 
General Offices 

44-50 S. Desplaines 
Street. 

CHICAGO 



Telephone Monroe ^53 



Prii'iite F.Xi/idnQ 






When writing to advertisers please mention The White City Ma(jAzinb. 



78 



THE WHITE CITY MAGAZINE 



GEO. S. SLOAN & SON 



Vl^ H O L. ES A L. E 



POULTRY, GAME, FISH and VEGETABLES 

HOTEL, RESTAURANT AND CLUB TRADE SOLICITED 



5 Central 1511 
I Automatic 6616 



124 SOUTH WATER STREET 

CHICAGO, ILL. 



ESTABLISHED 1896 



EDWARDS,DEUT5CH & Heitmnih 
lithographers 

"prompt-pliable -Up to Date 
High class lithograph workinallits branches 



194-202 S.GLINTON ST. 



xci cnumuE'c HARRISON ^3£ 
ItLLPHUINLb HARRISON 472 



CHICAGO. 



TFT FPHONFsi MAIN 2240 




J. G. NEUMEISTER 




IMPORTER OF 




CHEESE AND DELICACIES 




(90) 


154 S. Water St., 


CHICAGO 



When writing to advertisers please mention The White City Magazine 



THE WHITE CITY MAGAZINE 79 

CHicago, ^prif2^, XQOd. 
(do iRe Chicago ^tnusement- Moving ^adCic: 

Just a Moment, Please ! 

Tnside of seventy-idvo Routs after tRe ^Riie Qiy opening, DKay 21[iR 

Prof. [5fa{es 

S)og, Pony and jtjion^ey Circus and tHe 

^orfd's Greaiest Q joZuskaf ^iffards in tfieir 

temple of jvLnsic 

Wiff Se iRe fafl^ and rage of CRicago 

^aii and See 

^. S- — ^Re price of admission to tRese tivo incomparaSfe attractions 
onfi) /O cents eacR, incfuding reserved seat. ^Re pu6fic Zi>iff do tRe rest. 

"^^ours to entertain, 3£ines, ^fat^e ^ ^iffard. 



TRY 



Best & Russell Company's 

NEW SIZE 



Qolden Crown lOc. Cigar 



] ON SALE EVERYWHERE 



When liriting to advertisers please mention The White City Magazine. 



So THE WHITE CITY MAGAZINE 

E. A. AARON PHONES M. A. AARON 

Central 64 1 Long Distance 66 1 Automatic 664 I 

E. A. AARON 6c BRO. 

GENERAL PRODUCE MERCHANTS 

Dealers in Fancy Poultry, Game, Fruit and Vegetables 
HOTELS, CLUBS, RESTAURANTS AND SUMMER GARDENS SUPPLIED 

\re deliver goods to all parts of city. 134-136 SoUth WatCr StrCCt, CHICAGO 




TELEPHONE HARRISON 424 



Pt/ 



UTHOXO. 

CLARK S HARRISON STS CHIOrVOvl 

INDOOR AND OUTDOOR 
LITHOGRAPHING 

High Grade and of Every Description 
Let us try for your business by giving us a chance to estimate 

MAYBE WE CAN GIVE YOU BETTER WORK OR BETTER PRICES 
TRY US AND SEE 

We design, engrave and print the beautiful and artistic covers for The White City Magazine 



THE 



Chicago & Wcllston Coal Co. 

OFFICE, TRACKS AND STORAGE SHEDS 

CLARK AND TWELFTH STREETS, CHICAGO 

Telephone South 737 



PRODUCERS OF 



Pocahontas Smokeless Coal 



When iiiitiiig to advertisers f'lease mention Tui; \\'iiit£ City Magazine. 



THE WHITE CITY MAGAZINE 



The South Side 

Elevated Railroad 

Company 

has a station 
at the gate of 

White City 





When writing to advertisers please mention The White City Magazine. 



THE WHITE CITY MAGAZINE 



UP-TO-DATE FIRE PROTECTION IS THE BEST INSURANCE 

Ihe ''Babcock" Hand Fire Extinguisher 

Is perfection in Fire F*igfHtii\^ Applicix\ces ^ for MillSs. Factories 
Public Building's, >StoreHouses, Lumber Yards, Residei^ces, E.tc. 



W e manuiracture a complete 
line or Fire Exting'uisners suit- 
able ior every risk. iTeaa- 
quarters lor Axes, Pike Poles 
Fire Buckets. Play Pipes 
Nozzles ana miscellaneous 
supplies ror private ana mu- 
nicipal Fire Departments 
ine largest manufacturers oi 
Fire Apparatus in tne United 
States. 




Cnemical Extinguisners on 
Wneels for Mill and Factory 
use. Cnemical Engines ror 
Village, Town & City Fire 
Departments, Hook CJ* Ladder 
Trucks, Steam Fire Engines 
Combination Cnemical En- 
gines and Hose Wagons 
Ihe Fire Apparatus used in tKe Fire 
Sho-w and the Fire Protection for 
the buildings of ^Vhite City, man- 
ufactured by us. 



f!o, 1 — 6=GaUon Babcock Fire Extinguisher 

The Standard of the World. Has Stood the Test for Over Half a Century 




MIACHAH & WRIGHT 
COMPANY 



SALES AGENTS 
AND DEALERS IN 

LEHIGH PORTi_AND CEMENT 
138 WASHINGTON STREET 

©I 



F. D. MEACHAM, Pres. 

F. S. WRIGHT. Vice-Pre = 

S. P. BLOUNT. Theas. 

C. M. FOSTER. Secw. 



TELEPHONE MAIN 59 



When uriting to advertisers please mention The White City Magazine. 



THE WHITE CITY MAGAZINE 83 

ATTENTION ! 

Advertisers 



Commencing witn the JUNE issue of 

'Uie White City 

M, * and throughout 

a,ga.ZlIlC the entire season 
June, July, August, September and 
October, we will combine our regular 

PROGRAM WITH 

THE MAGAZINE 

making T \ 71 ' j_ (^ ' j_ 

it The White L^ity 
Magazine ana 
bouvenir Program 

rligh grade advertisers can quickly 
realize its value. A limited amount 
or space open for the season. For 
rates and full information apply to 

FRANC R. E. ^VOODWARD 

Manager Publicity Department 
Sixty-third St. ^ South Park Ave. 

Phone Wentworth 996 Private Exchange 



When writing to advertisers please mention The White City Magazine. 



84 



THE WHITE CITY MAGAZINE 



CUMMINS' WILD WEST 

ENDORSED by AMERICA'S GREATEST MEN and WOMEN, the PULPIT and the PRESS 



AND INDIAN 
CONGRESS 



}Jk 






/r^''"X7^^K ^'H-''^\ 



^i-d "70i> -^^: 



■1 



Late the Greatest Feature at 

Trans. Miss. Exposition Omaha, 1898 

Greater American Exposition. . .Omaha, 1899 

Pan-American Exposition Buffalo, 1901 

Madison Square Garden, New York City, 1903 
World's Fair St. Louis, 1904 



AT WHITE CITY 

CHICAGO, SEASON 1905 

PRODUCING COLONEL CUMMINS' OWN 
CREATION 

The Siege or Massacre of Fort Dearborn 

also the Custer Massacre 

or the Battle of the Little Big Horn 



51 Different Tribes of North American INDIANS 



Telephones: Office, Central 4495 
Studio, Ogden 3491 



ANSEL COOK 



cenic 3lrtieit 



Scenery^ Drop Curtains &" Stage Productions 




All the Scenery in Beautiful 

Canals of Venice at White City 

Painted by me 



Office, 6o Grand Opera House Block 
Scenic Studio, 267 South Kedzie Ave. 

CHICAGO 



When writing to advertisers please mention The White City Magazine. 



THE WHITE CITY MAGAZINE 



8S 



ALL OUR LINES 

WITH FREE TRANSFERS 

LEAD DIRECT TO 



r — ^r 



Wkite City 



V ) \ ) 



7^ 



Coftage Grove, State Street 

W' ent^vortn Avenue 

Halstea Street 

Asnlana 

Etc. 



200 

rianasome, Ne-w Cars ■will be 
put into Service June 1st 




When writing to advertisers please mention The White City Magazine. 



86 



THE WHITE CITY MAGAZINE 



Estahiiihcd iS^J 




PHONE 2272 MAIN 


Henry H. Shufeldt & Co. 

H. S. AUSTRIAN. Manager 
CHICAGO 

Distillers of\hc 
Famous 




W. M. WALKER 

156=158 S. WATER ST. 


WHOLESALE 


RYE MALT 




FISH AND 


IMPERIAL 

AND 




OYSTERS 


OLD TOM 

GINS 






Hotel and Restaurant Supply 






CHICAGO 








R. C. Radtke A. W. Grotfeld 




JULIUS 


R. C. Radtke & Co. 




TOEFFNER 


Wholesale 

Apples 
Onions, Potatoes 

Vegetables M 
Fruits 




MANUFACTURER OF 

THuring'er 
Bratwurst 


Headquarters for Mushrooms 
l^g South Water St. 




CERVELAT, SALAMIE 

AND 


Chicago, Hi. 




WESTPHALIEN HAMS 


<^ 




RESTAURANT AND HOTEL 




SUPPLIES 


Phones 

Long Distance Main 4688 

Automatic 8660 




770 "W. Van Buren St. 

Telephone West 26 



When writing to advertisers please mention The White City Magazine. 



THE WHITE CITY MAGAZINE 



87 



Chicago &? Oak Park 
Elevated Railroad 



Direct Route for 

River Forest 

Oak Park, Austin ana 

>A^est Side 

Residents V isitmg 

W^kite City 



Cnange Cars at State \sf v an Buren 

( Union Loop ) 



When writing to advertisers please mention The \\'hite City Magazine. 



THE WHITE CITY MAGAZINE 



^W^ 

\S\MM 






Hi 






wmm 



\smm\smm 






IB 



m 

1 



& 






I 

m 






Ideal Sites for riomes 

ALONG THE 

NE\V 

RAVENS^VOOD 
EXTENSION 

of tke 

NortnA\^estern 
Elevatea 
Railroaa 



PURE AIR 



PLENTY^/ ROOM 



QUICK 

TRANSPORTATION 

DO^VN-TOWN 

D-cent Fare 



m 



^!i^< 



y 
























fer-^7^ 
M^^^ 






When writing to advertisers please mention The White City Magazine. 



THE WHITE CITY MAGAZINE 



n i i n 



Take the 



Metropolitan 

West Side 

Elevated 

r. White 

City 




change Cars at La Salle Street Station 

(Union Loop) 

Cars direct to gate 



PI ID 

When writing to advertisers please mention The White City Magazine. 



90 



THE WHITE CITY MAGAZINE 



"^^'hy, yes, 
I saw the 
announcement 
of their 
engagement 
in last night's 
Evening 
Post." 




"Indeed, well 
I'vealwaysfound 
the Evening 
Post to be a 
reliable news- 
paper so I'll 
send my 
congratulations 
at once." 



Knickerbocker Ice Co. 



City Distributing Depots 




LOCATIONS 

420 22d St, . 
448 W. 42d Place 
3808 Western Ave. . 
3973 Vincennes Ave. . 
6105 Lexington Ave. . 
1211 7Sth St. 
6152 La Salle St. . 
9326 Anthony Ave. 
459 Kensington Ave. . 
206 Johnson St. . 
69 N. Curtis St. . 
Van Buren and Rockwell 
1420 Milwaukee Ave. . 
705 S. Ashland Ave. . 
14th St. and Western A 
395 Illinois St. 
Putnam St. and Chicago 
401 Southport Ave. 
1713 Maple Ave. . 
539 Montrose Blvd. . 
Mayfair .... 



TELEPHONES 

South 403 

. Yards 660 

. Yards 494 

. Drexel 6891 

Hyde Park 564 

Hyde Park 487 

Wentworth 526 

So. Chicago 99 

W. Pullman 132 

. Canal 486 

Monroe 978 

. West 1350 

. West 1299 

. Canal 195 

. Canal 93 

, North 191 

Monroe 1931 

. North 1477 

. Evanston 445 

. Lake View 402 

Jefferson Park 38 



Sts. 



ve. 



Ave. 



General Offices: 



Phone: 
Central 1006 



0m gorfe Life l3uilDing 

171 La Salle Street 
CHICAGO 



Suite: 717-724 



J. L. PENTECOST 



L. J. PENTECOST 



WM. H. PENTECOST 



PENTECOST BROS. 



■W^HOLESALE 



FISH AND OYSTERS 



266 and 268 South Water St., Chicago 

Telephone Main 1953 



When writing to advertisers please mention The White City Magazine. 



THE WHITE CITY MAGAZINE 



91 



C. W. FOSTER CO. 

Retailers of 

CHOICE CUTS ^/ MEATS 

OF ALL KINDS 

Wholesalers ^Hotel, Restaurant and Vessel Supplies 

WE INVITE INSPECTION 
AND SOLICIT AN ORDER 

209-211 S. Water Street 

CornerFi ft hA venue 

Chicago 




Andrews Steel Rod 
Furniture i^^ 

Is not an IMITATION 
It Is the Real Thing 



It is the original metal furniture made under tlie original 
patents, and is the style that 

Has made Metal Furniture Famous 

Beware of imitations— they are not "just as good" and 
never have demonstrated their value as Andrews Metal 
Furniture has. 

The metal work of Andrews Metal Furniture is closely 
interivoven — (not riveted or soldered like the imita- 
tions). The wood work of Andrews Metal Furniture is 
carelullv selected, thoroughly kiln dried - perfectly fin- 
ished. The Andrews make of Metal Furniture is the only 
kind that lias demonstrated its value and is the only 
kind to buy. Always attractive, cleanly, arti.stic, 
indestructible and inexpensive. Manufacturers also 
of Bank and Ofhce Fittings, School and Church Furni- 
ture, Opera Chairs, Hall Seating, etc. Send for Catalogs 
either department. 



The A. H. Andrews Co. 

174-176 Wabash Avenue, Chicago 



Andrews Office Desks 

have a name to their credit 
and are a credit to their 
name, for they are made 
by specialists who know how 




When writing to advertisers please mention The White City Magazine. 



92 THE WHITE CITY MAGAZINE 

Fire, Burglary, Accident, Plate Glass 

fCENTRAU 



INSURANCE: 



MKERiWETM 



Employers' Liability, Income, Bonds 



A. J. OLSON 

ELGIN DAIRIES' 

MILK AND CREAM 

261-263 N. Franklin St., Chicago 

Telephone North 7 1 3 



WHOLESALE ONLY 



FOX BRAND The Butter that has made our name popular is served 
Xc client on College Inn tables. If you like it, ask 

your grocer to get it for you. 
g^**^j^ "Fox's Best Eggs" 

Acquires in cartons are making a great 

National hit. Eat them at the White City and insist 

Demand upon your grocer getting them—they are incomparably good 

THE PETER FOX SONS COMPANY 

COMMISSION MERCHANTS 

192 SOUTH WATER STREET 

PHONES MAIN 2 17— AUTO. 9792 CHICAGO 

When writing to advertisers please mention The White City Magazine. 



THE WHITE CITY MAGAZINE 



93 



The Calumet Cars 

( 1 ellow Line) 

RUN DIRECT TO 

THE ^VHITE CITY 



FROM 

Soutn Cnicago, Robey, Man- 
Kattan Beacn, Pullman, AiVest 
Pullman, Kensington, Rose- 
land, Burnside, Grand Cross- 
ing, Auburn Park, J3ryn 
Ma-wr and Parkside : : : : 







W. R. JACQUEST 



PLUMBING 

GAS FITTING 

HOT WATER HEAT- 
ING & SEWERAGE 

Telephone Yards 142 



3528 S. WOOD ST. 

CHICAGO 



BOSWORTH 
^ BROS. ^ 
EXPRESS, VAN 
& STORAGE CO. 

Telephone Wentworth 876 and 857 

Expert Furniture and Piano 
Movers, Paci^ers and Shippers 



MAIN OFFICE AND WAREHOUSE 
6103-6105 WENTWORTH AVENUE 



STRICTLY MODERN WAREHOUSE, 300 

:: :: :: PRIVATE IRON ROOMS :: :: :: 

General Teaming of All Kinds 



When writing to advertisers please mention The White City Magazine. 



94 



THE WHITE CITY MAGAZINE 



yi Chance for yi I I 



to see the greatest piece of architectural work ever constructed 
in this country— WHITE CITY. 

The Chicago Electric Traction Company 

will assist in swelling the crowds by conveying people from the 
Citv of Harvey, III., the Village of Posen, the City of Blue Island, 
Mt. Greenwood, Purington, Morgan Park, Washington Heights, 
South Englewood, Auburn Park and Park Manor. C, All cars 
from the aforesaid points will run direct to the main entrance of 
WHITE CITY, 63d Street and South Park Avenue. C Cars 
will be run at short intervals for the accommodation of the traveling 
public. Also special attention will be given to pleasure seekers. 

W. H. Conrad 

General Manager 
Chicago Electric Traction Co. 



BUTTON MAKERS 
TO WHITE CITY 



Bastian Bros* 

Successors to F. F. Pulver Co. 
Rochester, N.Y. 



cAdvertising Novelties 

Pulveroid Signs 

Celluloid Nol?elties 

College, Club & 

Society Tins 



CHICAGO OFFICE : MASONIC TEMPLE 
L. A. HALL, Manager 



SYKES 

STEEL ROOFING 

COMPANY 



Sheet Metal 
Contractors 



Makers of Fire-Proof Windows, Constructed of 

Galvanized Iron or Copper Frames, Equipped with 

Automatic Closing Devices and 

Glazed with Wire Glass 

112-122 WEST NINETEENTH PLACE- 
CHICAGO 

Telephone Canal 810 



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THE WHITE CITY MAGAZINE 



95 



The exterior and interior millworii on the beautiful 
General Office Buildings and Main Entrance to 
=^ White City is entirely the product of =. 

HARTY BROS. ®> HARTY CO. 

MANUFACTURERS 

SASH, DOORS, FRAMES 
AND MOULDINGS 



442 to 458 W. Twenty-First St., - Chicago 

Lumber District 



Telephones: Canal 554 and 555 



CLARENCE BOYLE 

President 

Telephone Canal 1537 

Clarence Boyle 
Lumber Co. 

Wholesale Dealers in 

Hardwoods 
Yellow Pine 

and Cypress 

No. 319 W. 2 2d Street 
Chicago, 111. 



LaVenga 
College Inn 



Fine Havana 
Cigars 



A.Straus & Co. 



Makers 
CHICAGO 



W?ien teriting to advertisers please mention The White Citt Magazine. 



96 



THE WHITE CITY MAGAZINE 



P. & S. 




Patented Dec. 23, 1902, 

No. 1161. 



30,000 

of these used in White City. 



Qet our Prices on Receptacles for Permanent 
and Temporary Decorative Lighting. 

Pass & Seymour 

(Incorporated) 

130 West Jackson Boulevard 
CHICAGO, ILL. 



WHITE RIVER LUMBER CO. 

WHOLESALE AND RETAIL 

PINE AND HEMLOCK LUMBER 



Cedar Products and Mill Work 



Long Distance Telephones: 
Lake Shore 413 
South Chicago 44 



Main Office and Docks; 

NINETY-SECOND ST. BRIDGE, CHICAGO 



PHOIN'E HAnmsoN 1080 

Thi Walkir & 

ILLIAMS Co. 

(UN-INC.) 



yssr 



709 — 3.08 DEARBORN ST. 

PONTIj^C BUILTDING- 

COR. HCAIiKISON SXUKET 

CHICAGO 



Don*t> Forget* 

Our Opening Day 

May 27 



J.B.Bates K. bimpson J. Perry Bates 

Telephone Canal 353 

J. B. Bates & Co. 

Ship Yard 

FLAG POLES, SPARS, YACHTS 
AND SMALL BOATS 



240 West 22d Street 



CHICAGO 



When writing to advertisers please mention The White City Magazinb, 



THE WHITE CITY MAGAZINE 97 



PHONE CENTRAL 3481 

GEO. BEUZEVILLE & CO. 

138 SOUTH WATER ST., CHICAGO 

POULTRY, GAME, FRUITS AND 
PRODUCE 

HOTEL AND RESTAURANT reference 

SUPPLY HOUSE FIRST national bank, Chicago 



CENTRAL 

PRINTING & ENGRAVING 

COMPANY 

COMMERCIAL, RAILROAD, CIRCUS AND 
THEATRICAL PRINTING 

POSTERS CAR CARDS 

FOR BILLBOARD FOR SURFACE 

AND ELEVATED STATIONS AND ELEVATED LINES 

140-146 Monroe Street, Chicago 

Tel. Central 1144 Automatic 6279 

WE PRINT THE CAR CARDS FOR WHITE CITY 



The Nearest Drug Store to '^TVhite City'''' 

C. B. SEALES 

PHARMACIST 

N. W. Corner 

64th St. and Rhodes Ave. 

Telephone Wentworth 744 CHICAGO, ILL. 

TF/ien writing to advertisers please mention The White City Magazine. 



98 



THE WHITE CITY MAGAZINE 





PHONE HVDE park; 493 






aEOROE 


A. 


liE^VIS 






BUILDERS' 


HARDWARE 




LARGE 


COXTRACT WORK ^^ 


\'yi 


107-409 E. SIXTY-THIRD 


ST. 


A 


SPECIALTT ^ 


9 


CHICAGO 






EVERYTHING IN WHITE CITY IN 


THE HARDWARE LINE 






"FROM NAILS TO 


RAILS 


" FURNISHED 






BY ME 







ROBERT A. GILLESPIE, President 

BENJ. L. ANDERSON, Secretary 

THE 

JOHN GILLESPIE 

LUMBER CO. 

Dealers in 

Fine Hardwood Dressed 
Lumber of all kinds 

A Specialty 

CORNER LUMBER 6- 
SEWARD STREETS 

Phone Canal 1006 



Branch Yards: 
4JJ-441 Fifth Avenue 
Phone Harrison JJl<p 



SCHMIDT BROS. CO. 

PAINTS. OILS 
AND GLASS 

7123-7125 Cottage Grove Ave. 

CHICAGO. ILL. 

Telephone Hyde Park 256 



We have 
the contract 
for painting 
WHITE 
CITY 
and to 
furnish all 
requisite 
materials 




F. C. SCHMIDT, Mgr. 



When vyriting to advertisers please mention The Whits City Magazine. 



THE WHITE CITY MAGAZINE AND SOUVENIR PROGRAM 



f \ 



ALL OUR LINES 

WITH FREE TRANSFERS 

LEAD DIRECT TO 



f \ f — ^ 



W^kite City 



O 

iz; 
I— I 



U 
O 

iz: 



o 

>-^ 
h 

< 



O 
2 



Co^iage Grove, State Street 

W' entwortn Avenue 

Halstea Street 

Asnlana 

Etc. 




200 

rlanasome. New Cars will be 
put into Service June 1st 



w 

H 
> 

0) 



2: 

o 



> 
r 

o 



Chicago City Rail^^i^ay Co. 



T. E. MITTEN, First Vice-President 



M. B. STARRING, General Manager 



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THE IVIIITE CITY MAGAZINE AND SOUJ'ENIR PROGRAM 




^/>e WORLD\S FAVORITE 



Triple 

Reversible-Six Finished 

Surfaces 



REX-E.Z.E. 

TRADE MASK HKGISTERED 



Tliree 

strops Combined 

in One 



Easily preserve and impart a keen edge to razors, surgical instruments and all other fine steel 
blades without expert knowledge and experience. 



DIRECTION AND GUARANTEE TAG ATTACHED 



No. 1. 

No. 2. 
No. 2y2 
No. 3. 
No. 4. 



Safety. 



Junior Size, 2 x 22. 

Medium Size, 254: x 28. 

Regular Size, 2 j4^ x 25 . 

Large Size, 2% x 25 . 



.Size, 1% x20 Price, Sl.OO 

" 1.50 

" 2.00 

" 2.50 

" 3.00 



Mpply to Dealers Jinytvhere, or 



Johhing Catalogue 
mailed on api'liration 



WEIFFENBACH MFG. CO. 

Sole Proprietors 620 North Humboldt St., CHICAGO 

M. J. JANECEK, Gen'L Sales Manager 

Jobbing Manufacturers of Finest Shell Horse Hide, Imported <f? Domestic 
Russia, Staple & High Grade Razor Strops of every kind. 

RAZOR STROPS 



Royal's Special Chase Leather Couch 




This Coucli is upholstered in Chase leather, all hair-filled. It is built on a full guaranteed 
steel construction; has 82 oil-tempered springs, all bound to a steel support 
that prevents sagging. Frame is of quarter-sawed oak and is beautifully 
flaked and higliiy polished; has heavy claw feet. Special during this 
Sale at 

Terms on this Couch 50c Weekly 



$141^ 



$1.00 Weekly 
Furnishes Your 
Home Complete 

GREDITtoALL 




^^^ ^ FUMTURL 

AND CAj^p^j- QQ^ 



6308=6310 
So. Halstcd St. 



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THE WHITE CITY MAGAZINE AND SOUVENIR PROGRAM 



FOREMAN 




uality 



92-96 \VASHINGTON STREET 
If —»■ 



A NEW MEN'S CLOTHING 
STORE of QUALITY 



Perfect Fitting Garments 
of Latest Fasnion. Prices 
from T^velve to Forty Dol- 
lars. A pleasure to snow you 
tne store ana clotnes. 






Agent for 

NORTHERN 

The most silent 

American Car 

2 cy. 

Bevel Gear Drive 




fW» 



Agfent for 

DARRACQ 

Famous 

French Touring 

Cars —Immediate 

Delivery 



The great 4=Cylinder Air=CooIed Car. Runabout, Light Tonneau and 20=30 H. P. 
lOuring Car. Light and speedy, always under perfect control. 



-^ 



-^ 






309=310=311 MICHIGAN AVENUE 



OPPOSITE LOQAN MONUMENT 



When writing to advertisers please mention The White City Magazine. 



THE WHITE CITY MAGAZINE AND SOUVENIR PROGRAM 




Cngra\)cr 



WE ENGRAVE on precious metals, 
your monogram, initials, inscriptions, etc. 



IF YOU WILL SEND 
IOC in stamps or silver 
we will design for vou your 

JVI o n o g r a m 

beautituUy illumined 

on heavy paper, suitable tor 
passe-partout or framing. 

We have designed over l,ooo mono- 
grams in this way, the usual price 
being 25 and 50 cents. 
THIS is to get acquainted with 

JOHN R. BROPHY 

8O6 Columbus Memorial Bldg. 
State and Washington Sts. 




DR. E. Alfred Kohler 

DENTIST 

1206 E.GARFIELD BLVD. ( 55th St.) 3 E COR. STATE ST. 

Telephones: Wentworth 371. 610, 131. 



EVERY LADY 

SHOULD VISIT BURNHAM'S 



OUR sa'a^^si^^'HS is the best 

II AIR IIYEIMfa Ourexpertsrestorethe hairtoits 
nilin UlklllU natural colorbyasimpleprocess 

HAIR DnCSSINu by expert frenchmen 

Rare Shades of Hair Perfe ctly Matched 

OUR 

SPECIAL 

HAIR TONIC 

used with 
wonderful results 
for years in our 
scientific scalp 
treatment. 
Price, Sl.OO. 

FACIAL MASSAGE 




Manicuring 
Hand Massage 

Every lady can 
have beautiful, 
smooth, 
white hands. 

J Foot Massage 

OUR NEW VIBRATORY 

METHODisnottlieordi- 
nary massa^'e as it is 
usually given, but a treatment which will build up new 
tissue, remove lines, tone up the muscles and give to 
the face a fresh, healthy, glowing appearance sug- 
gestive of youth 

Removes wrinkles, 
fine lines and re- 
stores wasted 
tissues. It is a skin 
beautifier in every sense of the word. Price, Sl.OO. 



E.BURNHAM'S Hygienic 

SKIN FOOD 



LADIES' TURKISH BATHS 



E. BURNHAM 

70 AND 72 STATE STREET, CHICAGO 



DR E. A. KOHLER PROF. G. D. LYNCH 

THERAPEUTIC 

LIGHT 

TREATMENT 



The Only Modem X reat- 
ment known to Science for 
Treating all kinds or Ail- 
ments and Diseases without 
the Use or Medicine or the 
K.niie. Consultation Free. 
Lady Aftendant. 

1206 GARFIELD BOULEVARD 

55th ST.. S. E. COR. STATE 

CHICAGO 

OFFICE HOURS : 9 TO 12, 1 TO 3130 
EVENINGS BY APPOINTMENT 



Telephones: Wentwohth 



I 371 
I 610 



When writing to advertisers please mention The White City Magazine. 



THE WHITE CITY MAGAZINE AND SOU F EN I R PROGRAM 



New Sources o/Power 

CTliis company is prepared to furnish detailed erec- 
tion plans, specifications and complete machinery 
equipment for peat fuel manufacturing plants having 
a daily output of from 100 to 1,000 tons. 
CThe result of our system and machinery gives a fuel 
product of the same specific gravity, or weight, as hard 
coal, and as dense and tough as cement, containing all 
the heat value of the finest coal ever mined. It is 

In Reality Peat Coal 

Cit is the only process and the only machinery in the 
world that actually turns common or swamp-mud-peat 
into a hard,weather-proof, high-grade fuel upon a large 
commercial basis, at a cost so ridiculously low as to 
be out of all proportion to its market value. 
CThe company will issue exclusive and monopolistic 
manufacturing licenses protected by its patents, and 
will build, equip and install plants of any capacity 
under a guaranteed contract. 

Cit is desirous of negotiating with responsible parties 
for the organization of subsidiary local companies in 
any part of the United States or the world. 
€LA limited amount of the company's capital stock is 
now being placed at par. As an investment it has no 
equal for either the quick takers of profits or the 
permanent holders. 

United States Peat Fuel Co. 

1007 Fort Dearborn Building, Chicago 



When writing to advertisers please mention The White City Magazine. 



THE WHITE CITY MAGAZINE AND SOUVENIR PROGRAM 



^ 



Fred'k H. Bartlett &Co. 

100 \Vaskington Street 

Second Floor Chicago Title fej' Trust Annex 



5^SSES^SS^S^ffiS^H^ffi^^^S^ESefflBEfflfflBBSffl;^5ra^ 




Buy fe^SellCkicago Real Estate/g^Cash 

IF YOU WANT TO REALIZE ON YOUR CHICAGO PROPERTY, WE 
WILL BUY IT. SEND DESCRIPTION OF PROPERTY WITH PRICE; 
WE WILL REPORT IN 24 HOURS. NO DELAY IN CLOSING DEALS. 
IF YOU U'lSH TO PURCHASE CHICAGO PROPERTY, WE ARE HEAD- 
QUARTERS FOR BARGAINS IN HOUSES, FLATS, STORES and VACANT. 

Send for illustrated booklet ]ust issued. Mailed free to any address. 



Cb 



FRED'K H. BARTLETT ^ CO., 100 Washington St 



When writing to advertisers please mention The White City Magazine. 



O 




'■'■ Dedicated to Afcrri?7icnt a?id il/ndh. 



The JVhite Cirr Magazine 



Vol. I 



AND SOUVENIR PROGRAM 

JUNE, 1905 



No. 5 





ISITORS to Chicago, ar- 
riving after twilight, will 
be greeted when still 
many miles from the city 
by the brilliant scintil- 
lating rays of light ema- 
nating from the tall elec- 
tric tower which arises to an altitude of 
300 feet from the peristyle in the center 
of White City. To the residents of 
Chicago this marvelous electric tower 
will act as a constant beacon light and 
guide, suggesting the fun and jollity to 
be found within the hospitable gates of 
this beautiful annisement resort and that 
sordid surroundings in crowded locali- 
ties can be quickly exchanged for the 
beauty and limitless pleasures to be 
found at White City. 

On arriving within view of the en- 
trance the eye is dazzled by myriads of 
incandescent lights, with which the 
buildings are studded. At the main gate, 
located at the corner of 63d street and 
South Park avenue, the entire structure 
is outlined and the gigantic archway is 
dotted with thousands of lights. The 
massive snow white entrance to White 
City is one of the most beautiful struc- 
tures of its kind. 

On entering the main archway the vis- 
itor will find, to the left, the executive 
offices of the President and the General 
Manager, also the Department of Pub- 
licity. These offices are splendidly fur- 
nished and completely equipped. In the 
rear of the offices of the Department of 



Publicity are public telephone booths, 
telegraph offices, etc., for the accommo- 
dation of visitors. To the right of the 
main entrance are located the adminis- 
trative offices of the Secretary and Treas- 
urer and corps of busy assistants. 

Passing through the turnstiles, after 
paying the nominal admission fee of 10 
cents, the visitor becomes a guest of 
White City, with the implied promise 
that he or she shall not want for enter- 
tainment and amusement so long as the 
visit is continued. The first impression 
received is one of dazzling brilliancv, be- 
cause of the thousands of flashing iri- 
descent glcamings radiating from the 
countless incandescent lights which out- 
line all the buildings and create day out 
of night. 

As the magnificence of the scene dawns 
upon the visitor, after the first burst of 
splendor, and the sounds of laughter and 
merriment come to the ear, a feeling of 
undefinable pleasure and gratification 
takes the place of startled wonder. 
There are the crowds on the half-mile 
"Board Walk," the alluring strains of 
music, the sweet and delicate fragrance 
of beautiful flowers in the Sunken Gar- 
dens and art urns, all of which combine 
to produce a sense of keen enjoyment 
and delightful anticipation which cannot 
be analyzed. 

Passing toward the Plaza, with its 
thousands of beautiful and rare flowers, 
the visitor may descend a half-dozen 
broad steps and find himself on the 



12 



THE WHITE CITY MAGAZINE AND SOUVENIR PROGRAM 



Plaza, which surrounds the beautifully 
designed and elaborately carved Band 
Stand. Located about the Band Stand 
are hundreds of long and commodious 
settees, which furnish a resting place for 
tired sight-seers or those who wish to 
enjoy the musical programme and the 
free outdoor circus without having their 
thoughts distracted by the passing 
throngs of laughter lovers. Musical pro- 
grammes will be rendered every after- 



of White City^ be entertained with a 
first-class musical programme and a 
series of eventful performances by clever 
acrobats — finding in this way complete 
and unequaled entertainment without the 
necessity for expending another penny. 
Of course there are other and more dom- 
inating features in White City^ to each 
of which a small admission fee is 
charged, but it is not required or even 
suffsfested of the visitor that these should 




Chutes Lagoon, Peristyle and Base of Tozver 



noon and evening from the Band Stand 
by organizations having a world-wide 
reputation. On the large open stage, 
which will be seen a short distance south 
of the Band Stand, performances will 
be regularly given by clever acrobats and 
other performers. 

With a liberality which has never been 
equaled in the history of amusements in 
this or any other country, the manage- 
ment has arranged to give the people of 
Chicago and visitors more for their 
money than has ever before been offered 
under any circumstances. Upon paying 
the admission fee of 10 cents at the main 
entrance, the visitor can spend an entire 
afternoon and evening within the walls 



necessarily be patronized. Of course, 
knowing the amusement loving tenden- 
cies of the people of Chicago, the man- 
agement constructed these features with 
the expectation that they would be lib- 
erally patronized, but this is left wholly 
to the impulse of the visitor. 

An expenditure of about $1,250,000 
was required before the gates of White 
City were thrown open to the public. 
The progress of construction has not 
only excited the admiration of builders 
all over the country, but has in itself 
established a new record. 

Eight months previous to the opening 
date the site at present covered by the 
world's greatest amusement resort pre- 



THE WHITE CITY MAGAZINE AND SOUVENIR PROGRAM 



13 



sented a scene of bucolic rest and pas- 
toral simplicity. A gang of workmen 
drove a peaceful flock of sheep out of 
the corn field, which had flourished there 
during the season, put up the fence, and 
White City began to grow like magic. 
White City has broken more records 
than any previous enterprise of the kind. 
It covers more ground than any similar 
enterprise and contains more features. 



street. White City is lighted with 
125,000 incandescent lights. 

Aside from the brilliancy and beauty 
of the night illumination at White City, 
a view by day presents a delightful 
charm to the artistic eye. The buildings 
are all architecturally beautiful and the 
master hand which designed them has 
outclassed those men whose efforts made 
the World's Columbian Exposition (the 




Beautiful Venice ; Also the Band Stand 



It has cost more, owing to the perma- 
nency of the construction and the first- 
class material which was required in 
every instance. It has the highest tower, 
illuminated with 25,000 incandescent 
lights. It has the greatest capacity for 
utilizing electrical energy of any single 
enterprise, it being a statistical fact that 
the electrical energy required for fur- 
nishing the power and light for White 
City is greater in quantity than the total 
electrical energy required for heating, 
lighting and purposes of power in all of 
that part of Chicago lying south of 39th 



original White City) the wonder of the 
world. 

At various points about the "Board 
Walk" are located artistic booths filled 
with curios from all parts of the globe, 
and every opportunity is furnished at 
frequent intervals to supply any craving 
for sweets or such popular products as 
popped corn, roasted peanuts, etc., etc. 
Soda fountains, with their glittering 
array of multi-colored syrups and foam- 
ing jets, are to be found at convenient 
intervals, so that the crowds, when warm 
and dusty because of the laughing and 



14 



THE WHITE CITY MAGAZINE AND SOUVENIR PROGRAM 



shouting which is always incident to a 
trip to White City, can indulge in in- 
nocent refreshment. 

Enormous electric signs present them- 
selves in an unmistakable way to tell the 
visitor what form of attraction is con- 
tained beneath their supervision. Each 
attraction is housed in a separate build- 
ing, and all are amply provided with 
comfortable opera chairs. No attraction 
is permitted to be overcrowded at any 
performance, the number of admissions 
to each show being limited to the num- 
ber of seats in the auditorium. Every 
possible means for administering to the 
comfort of visitors has been furnished 



FIRE 



by the management, and strenuous ef- 
forts have been successfully made for 
providing entertainment and features of 
a high order. Only such attractions as 
those which combine amusement in a 
high degree, together with unimpeach- 
able character, were chosen, and any- 
thing which might possibly give offense 
to the most sensitive or supercritical 
person has been carefully eliminated. 

Now, the acme of enterprise, the su- 
perlative of amusement, and on the pin- 
nacle of prosperity stands beautiful, 
magnificent White City, with its select 
features for the innocent amusement of 
the people of all classes. 



SHOW 



A MARVELOUS AND THRILLING SPECTACLE 



HE greatest and most elab- 
orate attraction at White 
City is undoubtedly the Fire 
Show. This mammoth spec- 
tacle of burning buildings and 
dashing fire departments in action is one 




which will stir the pulses of even the 
most sluggish. This great feature is 
located in the extreme southern part of 
the grounds, and the entrance is on the 
southeast corner of the oblong formed 
bv the "Board W^alk." This show is 







«Pi_^/ /^ 



.^:. ■••. 




fl*#f 



Front of Fire Shozv Grand Stand 



THE WHITE CITY MAGAZINE AND SOUVENIR PROGRAM 



15 



given on a scale of grandeur that is mar- 
velous. The grandstand for the audi- 
ence alone seats more than fifteen hun- 
dred persons. 

From the grandstand the audience is 
given a view of three blocks of business 
houses such as may be seen in any part 
of a metropolitan city. There are dry 
goods stores, department stores and all 
other kinds of stores in the scene. Many 



fight and spectators crowd about them 
to witness the conflict, when a patrol 
wagon dashes up and the offenders are 
arrested. 

Suddenly, without a moment's warn- 
ing, the cry of "Fire!" comes from the 
hotel which stands on the corner of the 
street. The scene quickly changes. The 
terrified occupants of the hotel crowd to 
the windows and scream for help. The 




Scene in the Fire Shoiv 



of the spectators will quickly recognize 
many of the names displayed on the 
sign boards in front of the various busi- 
ness places. 

The scene is one typical of any city on 
a busy day. Wagons and cabs trot 
through the streets, automobiles dash in 
and out among the teams, trolley cars 
speed along regulation tracks, and hun- 
dreds of pedestrians crowd on the side- 
walks in the pursuit of their business. 
Women stop in at the stores to purchase 
goods, the men stop at cigar stands and 
purchase tobacco, and the view is one 
of life and action. Two boys get into a 



crowds on the streets run to watch the 
structure burn, and are driven back by 
the police just as the engines arrive. 
Fire lines are stretched, the hose is 
coupled to the hydrants, and the life-nets 
are spread barely in time to catch the 
apparently frenzied men and women as 
they leap from the topmost stories of 
the structure. The firemen perform 
wonderful feats of agility as they scale 
up the walls with their pompier ladders 
and slide down ropes with fainting 
women in their arms. 

After a hard battle all the occupants 
of the hotel are rescued, and then the 



i6 



THE WHITE CITY MAGAZINE AND SOUVENIR PROGRAM 



work of fighting the fire is begun. The 
hose shoots strong streams of water into 
the blazing building and the long ex- 
tension ladder creeps slowly into place. 
The flames seem for a time as if they 
would defeat the brave eft'orts of the 



plete, and is one of the finest shows of 
its kind in the world, even exceeding the 
Hale's Fire Fighters, which attained so 
much popularity at St. Louis last year. 
Chief West, who was one of the famous 
Kansas City firemen who went to Eu- 



V 




\ 








open Air Circus Acts 



firemen to extinguish them. But finally, 
after a furious battle with the flames, the 
firemen are victorious and the blaze is 
subdued. And the audience disperses. 

That this spectacle is presented on a 
mammoth scale is readily understood 
when it is known that it requires three 
complete fire companies to produce this 
show, including an extension ladder and 
chief's wagon ; over two hundred and 
fifty people are used to give the street 
scene the proper life and bustle ; five 
cabs and two automobiles dash through 
the streets, and fourteen horses are used. 
The exhibition is most lifelike and in- 
tensely realistic ; the audience f requentl}- 
forgets that it is only a spectacle that 
they are watching, and not a real con- 
flagration, and are aroused to a high 
pitch of excitement. This show cost 
more than $20,000 to install and com- 



rope and taught the foreigners how to 
handle engines, is the leader of the Fire 
Department at White City. 



LONESOME. 
"What a fool Smith is." 
"Why?" 

"He got a divorce only the other 
day and now he's just bought a new 
talking machine." 

*** 

AN ETYMOLOGIST. 

Dusty : "A beautiful young miss who 
was attendin' the Northwestern Univer- 
sity once took a deep interest in me." 

Tired Tom : "Wot kind of insecks was 
she studyin'." 

Rest is the sweet sauce of labor. 

— Plutarch. 



THE WHITE CITY MAGAZINE AND SOUVENIR PROGRAM 



17 



BEAUTIFUL VENICE 

CANALS AND GONDOLAS 
FACILITATE A DELIGHTFUL VISIT 




LL the romantic beauty of 
the cool and dcHghtful gon- 
dola ride through the moon- 
lit waterways of the ancient 
Italian city is greatly en- 
hanced when a spectator realizes the his- 
toric scenes and structures which are re- 
produced before him. All the gorgeous 
scenes are actually represented in per- 



beautifuUy embellished with fine wood 
carvings. 

Floating gently forward to the strains 
of the music furnished by the gondoliers, 
the journey begins at the Arsenal in 
Venice. Proceeding northward through 
the canals, the spectator sees the homes 
of the gondoliers to the right, and next 
to them is the historic parish church of 




Interior View of Beautiful Venice 



spective and are identical copies, on a 
smaller scale, of the beautiful and medi- 
aeval edifices of the old Venetian city. 

This feature of White City is one of 
the largest on the grounds, and is located 
in a magnificent building on the west 
side of the "White City Board Walk." 
This structure is typical of the architec- 
ture to be seen in the ancient city of 
the Doges, and is entirely white, being 



Pope Leo the Tenth, near which is the 
Eglise Sainte Marie-du-Salute. The 
Royal Palace of Venice next comes into 
view as the gondola floats on through 
the Grand Canal toward the Ducal Pal- 
ace. Passing this, the boat sweeps by 
the old Campanile to the Hall of Justice. 
Here is shown the historic Lion's Mouth, 
into which any person might throw a 
written accusation against another. In 



THE WHITE CITY MAGAZINE AND SOUVENIR PROGRAM 



the mediaeval days the Lion's Mouth was 
an institution feared by every citizen of 
Venice, for the name of the accuser was 
kept secret. Just across the canal from 
the Lion's INIouth is tlie Prison, and con- 
necting the two is the world-famous 
Bridge of Sighs, over which condemned 
prisoners walked and saw the daylight 
for the last time. Still carried north- 
ward, the gondola next floats onward to 



the Campanile, the spectator next sees 
the St. Marc Church, which is also 
marked by a red column. On the right, 
next to the St. Marc Church, is the 
Campanile Tower as it appeared before 
it fell. On the left is an old wine house 
and the poorer quarters of the city. 

To the right is the famous Rialto 
Bridge, which has been the favorite sub- 
ject for art pictures for many vears. 




Night Scene in the Lagoon 



the Courtyard of Persano Palace, next 
to which is the entrance to the prison 
and an ancient palace. In the palace 
courtyard is a well, typical of Venice. 

Rounding the police box, the gondola 
goes eastward to the Palace Guinahi, 
passing the Campanile and the Grand 
Canal on the left. On the same side is 
the Palace Pisani Moretta and a hotel. 
Across the canal to the right is noted 
Palazzo Contarini Delia Figure and the 
Palace Da Dula a Murano. This struc- 
ture is distinguished easily by the red 
column in front of it. Sweeping past 
an old well on the right and passing by 



Coming back to the starting place, the 
gondola passes another large palace on 
the southeast. During the entire trip the 
flags seen on the many Venetian masts 
are the emblems of the various Doges. 
This trip is more than three-quarters of 
a mile in length and is one of the most 
interesting as well as most beautiful fea- 
tures of White City. 

Some women are utterly false. Even 
their minds are made up. 

The mind ought sometimes to be 
amused. — Phaedrus. 



THE IVHITE CITY MAGAZINE AND SOUVENIR PROGRAM 



19 



SCENIC RAILWAY 

AN ENCHANTING RIDE 
IN SWIFT MOVING CARS 




ITH the exception of the Fire 
Show, the Scenic Railway is 
the most elaborate and pre- 
tentious attraction at White 
City. This feature of the 
park is located on the west side of the 
"Board Walk," near the Electric Tower. 
The front of the building is wide open 
and inside is a spiral railway represent- 
ing the ascent up a steep hill or moun- 



After the cars are loaded at the sta- 
tion bordering on the "Board Walk," 
they are drawn up a steep incline. Here 
they are started down a precipitous in- 
cline without any motive power. Mak- 
ing a long sweep downward, the car 
speeds at a terrific rate up a hill, then 
down another, and then dashes upward 
into the Palace of Views. 

This is a most sumptuously fitted 




Loading Station for Scenic Railway 



tain. This, however, is merely the load- 
ing station. This attraction has been in- 
stalled at a great expense and is most 
complete in every detail. This attrac- 
tion appeals strongly to those who are 
seeking excitement, combined with a 
high degree of entertainment. Every 
moment of the long and swift trip up 
hill and down dale through the castle 
of views is one of the keenest enjoy- 
ment. 



place, showing many of the most beau- 
tiful scenes in the country actually re- 
produced in detail. The car ghdes 
swiftly past a delightful little waterfall, 
sweeps onward around the pond, a fleet- 
ing view of a party of bathers is had 
and then the car plunges into a dark tun- 
nel. On dashing out from the darkness 
a huge and grotesque figure of a man 
brandishing a club is seen. The color- 
ing of the figure and the effect of the 



THE WHITE CITY MAGAZINE AND SOUVENIR PROGRAM 



various colored electric lights thrown on 
him, give the fig'ure a most startling ap- 
pearance. Onward dashes the car into 
darkness again, only to emerge a mo- 
ment later into another beautiful scene. 
Thus come a succession of changes from 
darkness to light, and then the car 
sweeps out into daylight again and gen- 
tly drifts on over an undulating track to 
the starting place and the ride is over. 

But all this takes up a good amount 
of time, as the trackage for this attrac- 
tion covers more than three-quarters of 
a mile and is so scattered with different 
views and figures that the spectator be- 
lieves that he has traveled much farther 
than he really has. There is a keen 
sense of exhilaration as the car starts on 
its initial downward course, the occupant 
grasps his seat and hangs on for dear 



life, though he is securely strapped in. 
Soon, however, this fear wears oflf, and 
after a second or so the visitor is laugh- 
ing and shouting and urging the car to 
a faster speed. This feature of White 
City has already attained a great amount 
of popularity, and it is safe to predict 
that the Scenic Railway will draw as 
great crowds as any other attraction at 
the grounds. This feature is especially 
delightful on a warm day or night, and 
is sure to draw enormous crowds of visi- 
tors every afternoon and evening. The 
tracks are inspected several times daily, 
so that the Scenic Railway is kept con- 
stantly in a state of repair and precludes 
all possibility of any mishap. This is 
true of all the amusements at White 
City — the safety of the public is the 
first consideration of the manaarement. 



SHOOTING THE CHUTES 

LATEST STYLE AND BEST EQUIPPED 
STRUCTURE IN AMERICA 



HUE Chutes is easily picked 
out from the many attrac- 
tions at White City by the 
great crowds which are con- 
stantly about it. This attrac- 
tion has been extremely popular at every 
amusement resort for many years, and 
every manager has come to believe that 
his park is not complete unless he has 
one. White City, following its policy 
of having only the best of everything, 
has a Chutes that is the best ever con- 
structed up to date. It has all the latest 
improvements and will bear comparison 
with any other Chutes in the country. 

This form of amusement is one which 
appeals directly to all classes and to all 
ages, until it has become so well known 
that the phrase "Shoot the Chutes" is 
understood by every person. There is 
a strange exhilaration and fascinating 
sensation about the dash at incredible 
speed down the swift incline and the 
darting out upon the water on the flat- 
bottomed boats, which seem every mo- 
ment as if they would dive under, which 
attracts every visitor. The Chutes at 
White City is located at the extreme 
south end of the "Board Walk" and is 
at the south end of the Lagoon. 



A feature of the Chutes is the escala- 
tor. This machine carries the people to 
the top of the pavilion, where they take 
the boats for the descent, saves them the 
effort of walking up the steep incline 
and greatly facilitates the quick move- 
ment of the crowds. The Escalator is 
very similar to a moving sidewalk and 
is provided with a moving handrail, so 
that a person may steady himself while 
making the ascent. This machine is the 
longest one ever constructed, being more 
than 500 feet in length, and it is en- 
tirely safe. This same form of machine 
in a less improved state has been used 
in various stores and parks for a num- 
ber of years, and there has never yet 
been any accident with one of them. 

The lagoons into which the boats dash 
with their merry crowds has been built 
especially for the Chutes. It is very 
large for the purpose for which it. is 
used and contains more than 1,350,000 
gallons of water. The sides of the la- 
goon are heavily cemented and water 
rains off of them very quickly. There 
are several entrances to the "Board 
Walk" from the lagoon, so that there 
is no chance for too great crowds to 
gather about the sides of the pond. 



THE WHITE CITY MAGAZINE AND SOUVENIR PROGRAM 



The Chutes at White City are the 
longest which have ever been constructed 
and are complete in every detail. The 
entire framework of the Chutes is built 
from steel and has been solidly rein- 
forced in many places. The tracks down 
which the boats slide at their swift speed 
is also made of steel, as is the roadbed 
for the cars. A large corps of guards 



repair man is constantly maintained at 
the Garage to care for all machines left 
there. There is also a huge tank, hold- 
ing over six hundred gallons of gasoline, 
at which the visiting machines may be 
replenished. 

When a machine drives up to the 
gates at White City there is a uni- 
formed attendant to assist the occupants 




3a3^J 




^J^^ 




Chutes Lagoon; Also Viezv of Fire Shozv Front 



are constantly about the attraction and 
every precaution is taken for the han- 
dling of visitors quickly. 



WhiteCityAutomobileGarage 

Just across the street from the en- 
trance to White City, on the northwest 
corner of Sixty-third street and South 
Park avenue, is the White City Auto- 
mobile Garage. Here a party may check 
a machine with the same facility with 
which he would ordinarily check an um- 
brella, and he may feel absolutely certain 
that his car will be given the best of care 
while there. A skillful and well-trained 



to alight and direct the chauffeur to the 
Garage. In this way a party may come 
to White City in an automobile with as 
little trouble and responsibility as a pe- 
destrian. 

The capacity of this Garage is three 
hundred machines. Its great popularity 
is attested by the fact that on the two 
days following the opening of White 
City the Garage accommodated more 
than two hundred machines daily. In 
addition to the large number of automo- 
biles cared for. many horses and car- 
riages are provided with suitable quar- 
ters while their owners enjoy the hospi- 
tality of White City. 



22 



THE WHITE CITY MAGAZINE AND SOUJ'ENIR PROGRAM 



BUMPING THE BUMPS 

A LAUGHTER - PROVOKING AND 
HILARIOUS METHOD OF ENJOYMENT 



^ 


1 



X A BEAUTIFUL building 
on the west side of the "Board 
Walk," the first structure 
that attracts the eye after 
passing through the turn- 
stiles at the gates, will be found the 
Bumps. Chicagoans have never yet been 
introduced to this sport, but at White 
City they will find this new and novel 
pastime. During the Summer the com- 
mon salutation around Chicago will be, 
"Have you Bumped the Bumps?" And 
the answer will invariably be, "You can 
bet that I have." 

The Bumps first appeared at Coney 
Island in the amusement resort called 
Dreamland, and at once attained a great 
degree of popularity. Every person was 
eager to try this new and exhilarating 
novelty — even state and municipal exec- 
utives gravely ascended to the high plat- 
form and shrieked with delight as they 
shot down the smooth incline, carroming 
from one bump to another, and finally 
bringing up against the padded cushion 
at the bottom with all the abandon of 
schoolboys. Tlie Bumps became a veri- 
table craze before the season was over, 
and the management of White City was 
so impressed with the great degree of 
entertainment to be derived from them 
that Bumps was one of the first attrac- 
tions to be installed at White City. 
This building is larger than the one at 
Coney Island and is better supplied with 
bumps. 

It is impossible to explain what the 
Bumps are, or is, but the following brief 
description will give an excellent idea of 
this attraction as it will be found at 
White City. 

The front of the building containing 
the Bumps is open and a flight of stairs 
leads the seeker for amusement to a 
platform at the rear of the structure and 
about thirty feet from the ground. Lead- 
ing from this platform to the ground 
floor is a perfectly smooth incline, built 
of the finest of maple lumber. The de- 
scent has an angle of about thirty de- 
grees, and here and there are large 
padded cushions which cause the person 



sliding down the incline to become di- 
verted from a straight course and be 
bounced from one to another of the 
bumps until the foot of the incline is 
finally reached. There will be found 
several precautionary measures to pre- 
vent all possibility of injury or unpleas- 
ant sensation. 

In addition to the main slide there will 
be three others, one a straight and iiar- 




"Have You Bumped the Bumps?" 

row shoot constructed of slippery basket 
work, which gives the slider an excellent 
speed. Another gives the sensation of 
alternate falling and rising until the bot- 
tom is reached by a succession of gentle 
inclines. But the most exciting of the 
three is what a baseball pitcher would 
call an in and out curve. It consists of 
a narrow chute, with sharp and sudden 
turns occurring at the most unexpected 
places, and finally landing the bumper at 
the bottom without injury. 

The Bumps is an amusement device 
without any pretense of artistic effort or 
dignity. It is conducted for the sole use 
of those who are seeking unalloyed fun 
and hilarity. The location of the Bumps 
is readily ascertained by the shouts of 
laughter and shrieks of hilarity which 



THE WHITE CITY MAGAZINE AND SOUVENIR PROGRAM 



uni\^ersally characterize this form of 
amusement. 

Any person who does not desire to 
lose all dignity and indulge in a great 
amount of healthful laughter must re- 
frain from visiting the Bumps — for, once 
there, he will surely join in the great 
throngs of jostling, laughing people, and 
before he knows it he will be bumping 
the Bumps with the rest of the crowd. 

No cars or boats are required to give 
the participant in this unique and excit- 



ing pleasure a rapid ride. The minute 
the visitor seats himself on the incline 
the momentum created by the weight of 
the body causes an immediate and rapid 
descent, landing him feet foremost on 
the air-cushion at the bottom. 

A person cannot fail to find the Bumps 
if he is willing to be amused, for all he 
need do is to follow the largest crowd 
and stop where the laughter and mirth 
are most boisterous. For a stubborn 
case of indigestion or the blues, try the 
Bumps. 



BALL ROOM 

FINEST DANCING FLOOR IN AMERICA 




N GREAT big Chicago, with 
its endless de m a n d for 
amusements and recreation, 
there has never before been 
constructed a ball room or 
dancing floor with the capacity of the 
celebrated ball room at White City. 
The Ball Room is located in an enormous 
building, 170 feet long and 100 feet wide, 
having sufficient accommodations for 
1,000 persons on the floor. The floor 



itself is the finest ever constructed west 
of New York City, having been built of 
the finest quality hard white maple, with 
a finish which rivals the polish on a 
piano. All about the dancing floor are 
located cafe tables and chairs, each with 
its menu card containing a list of tem- 
perance drinks. No liquor is sold in the 
Ball Room. A large and roomy balcony 
is similarly arranged, although in the 
scores of beautifully decorated boxes arc 




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^•sraw-^T'-^^. .-- i;:^--s= . 




Ball Room 



24 



THE WHITE CITY MAGAZINE AND SOUVENIR PROGRAM 



to be found comfortable seats in which 
tired sight-seers may find rest and com- 
fort. JNIusic is supplied by a high-class 
orchestra, which is supplemented by a 
magnificent Orchestrion. This instru- 
ment was purchased by the White City 
management in St. Louis. It was orig- 
inally constructed for exhibition in the 
French section of the Liberal Arts Build- 
ing- at the Louisiana Purchase Exposi- 
tion. 

A skilled and diplomatic Master of 
Ceremonies has full charge of the Ball 
Room, and it is his duty and the duty 
of his numerous well-trained assistants 
to see that patrons are not subjected to 
any objectionable features or annoying- 
occurrences. No opportunity exists for 
indiscriminate methods to be adopted by 
any of the participants in the enjoyment 
of dancing on the Ball Room floor. The 
conduct of every person present must 
be absolutely without reproach. A small 
charge is made for the privilege of dan- 
cing. 

It is the policy of the management to 
refuse admittance to persons of an ob- 
jectionable character or appearance and 
indiscreet individuals who may success- 
fully elude the vigilance of the Master 
of Ceremonies and secure admission will 
receive but scant courtesy. 

At no time will any person present 
find it necessary to appeal to the man- 
agement for protection from unwelcome 
advances by strangers. 

Such methods have been in vogue in 
seashore and mountain resorts for years, 
and the}" are meeting with universal 
favor among the people who visit White 
City. They are adopted for the purpose 
of preserving the dignity and keeping 
inviolate the personal privileges of any- 
one who may patronize this form of 
amusement. 



of hard labor to fit up and connect these 
lights. 

An almost inestimable amount of wire 
was used in wiring White City. In all 
3,575,430 feet of wire were used on the 



Electrical Construction 

The installing of the electrical work 
at \\'hite City was a mammoth under- 
taking, but it has been most efficiently 
accomplished by a large force of elec- 
tricians w^hich numbered over two hun- 
dred and eighty men. That this task 
was of great magnitude is evidenced by 
the fact that there is exactly 124,575 
incandescent lights on the grounds at 
White City. It was the work of weeks 




H. B. Wild 

grounds, which is more than seven hun- 
dred miles of wire. Every inch of wire 
was incased in iron tubing — in this way 
enough iron was used to build a railroad 
track from Chicago almost to St. Paul. 

A feature of the lighting system used 
at White City is that it is a "by-pass" 
system. By this 
arrangement there 
are two distinct 
systems, one for 
the exterior lights 
and one for the in- 
terior. In case of 
an a c ci d e n t to 
either of these sys- 
tems, the lights 
from the other 
s y s t e m can be 
switched on to both 
at a second's no- 
tice, so that there /■ M. Wild 
is no possibility of the lights failing at 
White City. 

White City has its own transforming 
station, which is most complete and 
equipped with all modern improved de- 
vices. 

The accompanying illustrations show 
the Wild Brothers, whose services have 
been of material value in the construc- 
tion work at White City. 




THE WHITE CITY MAGAZINE AND SOUVENIR PROGRAM 



25 



FLYING AIRSHIPS 

AN UP-TO-DATE METHOD OF AERIAL NAVIGATION 




IIRECTLY across the Sunken 
Gardens from the entrance, 
being the first structure 
which a spectator sees as he 
enters the grounds — is the 
Flying Airships. This is the ideal place 
for the seeker for a new sensation. Here 
a person may enjoy all the novelty and 
exhilaration of a real airship ride with- 



hundred feet in height. Across the top 
of the pyramid there are several steel 
beams, from which the airships hang 
pendant by strong steel cables. Each 
car seats over a dozen persons, and there 
are about eight cars — thus many per- 
sons can take the ride at the same time. 
When all the occupants of the airships 
are seated, the cars begin to revolve 




Flying Airships 



out undergoing any of the dangers com- 
monly associated with that form of 
sport. The attraction was installed in 
White City after a long and careful 
study. It represents Sir Hiram Maxim's 
idea of safe and sane aerial navigation, 
and has been completed after a great 
amount of labor. 

A giant framework of steel composes 
the base, around which the airships glide 
at a high rate of speed. This frame is 
similar to a pyramid in shape and is a 



slowly around the steel frame. The mo- 
tion becomes faster and faster, and as 
the speed increases the cars mount 
higher and higher into the air. After 
revolving a few moments the cars at- 
tain a great speed and rise to a height 
of about thirty feet. The occupants of 
the cars are securely tied in, so as to 
prevent all possibility of accidents, and 
they shout with delight as they experi- 
ence for the first time the novelty of 
aerial navigation. 



26 



THE WHITE CITY MAGAZINE AND SOUVENIR PROGRAM 



COLLEGE INN 

POPULAR AND ATTRACTIVE RESTAURANT 
BEST IN AMERICA 




HE finest restaurant in Amer- 
ica. How often has this 
phrase been apphed to even 
mediocre eating places ? 
Nearly every chop house or 
lunchroom makes claim to this title, until 
it has become trite and meaningless. But 
when applied to the White City College 
Inn the phrase again is filled with mean- 
ing and is the literal truth, for this res- 



eated in the Sherman House in the 
downtown district, but it is reproduced 
on a much larger scale and is equally 
complete in its appointments. To those 
who have visited the noted eating place 
in the Sherman House it is useless to 
try to expand upon the beauty of the 
place, for they already know all about it. 
But to those who have never been so 
fortunate as to visit the former place. 




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II pji ill li fiJJi 




-^r^ 



m 




^■S3i,-^ 




White Cit\ College Inn 



taurant is the finest in the country, bar- 
ring none. However great the crowds 
that throng to White City during this 
Summer, every facility for catering to 
them has been supplied. In this struc- 
ture can be found every delicacy desired 
by the rich, and also a full meal for 
those whose purses are limited. After 
walking about the grounds and indulging 
in the sports to be found there, hunger 
asserts itself and the crowds naturally 
turn to College Inn. 

The White City College Inn is a 
duplicate of the famous College Inn lo- 



the chance to visit even a finer restau- 
rant will be granted. It occupies one of 
the most pretentious and beautiful build- 
ings on the grounds. It is architectur- 
ally perfect, being constructed of ce- 
ment, covering a framework of steel. It 
was especially designed for White City 
and is probably the largest building in 
the country devoted exclusively to a 
restaurant. 

The College Inn proper occupies the 
entire upper part of the structure, the 
whole front of the building consisting of 
enormous plate-glass windows, which af- 



THE WHITE CITY MAGAZINE AND SOUVENIR PROGRAM 



27 



ford the diners an excellent opportunity 
of watching the merry throngs on the 
grounds. The location of the College 
Inn, being in the middle of the Sunken 
Gardens, gives a view from the windows 
that is not excelled anywhere at White 
City. Thousands of incandescent lights 
stud the ceilings and the walls are done 



Adjoining the dairy lunchroom is a 
German Rathskeller, which is typical of 
the many similar places in every Ger- 
man town. Here a person may sit and 
drink his beer and be surrounded with 
many accommodations afforded visitors. 
The cement floors, the typical bar, and 
the decorations of the room, all tend to 




^>-2^^^ 



Tlie Terrace, a Popular Resort for Ladies and Children 



in green and white, the effect being most 
harmonious and pleasing. 

The great dining hall is reached by 
steps at either end of the structure. In- 
side there are balconies and alcoves 
where parties may dine in semi-privacy. 
Hundreds of skilled waiters are ready to 
obey the slightest motion of the diner, 
and a full orchestra is constantly retained 
to furnish music. In this beautiful place 
eating is robbed of its material side and 
at once becomes a psychic pleasure. In 
all this building will accommodate 2,400 
diners at a time. 

Downstairs, and fronting on the 
''Hoard Walk," is the dairy lunchroom. 
Here a person may obtain a meal at 
whatever price he may wish. The prices 
in this dairy lunchroom are the same as 
at any of the lunchrooms in the down- 
town district, and the best of service is 
given. 



lend a distinctly German atmosphere to 
the place. This Rathskeller has already 
proved very popular, and doubtless will 
continue to grow in popularity as the 
Summer advances. 



Oscar Spindler 



Mr. Oscar Spindler, 
\ice-president of the 
Decorators Supply 
Co., has been men- 
tioned several times 
in past issues of the 
White City Maga- 
zine. A liberal por- 
tion of the beautiful 
effects, so pleasing in the general con- 
struction work at White City, is the 
result of his clever designing. 



Jf^ 

^ 



28 



THE WHITE CITY MAGAZINE AND SOUVENIR PROGRAM 



AUTOMATIC VAUDEVILLE 

CONTAINING 1,100 ATTRACTIONS 



IHE ^Mechanical Theater — here 
the spectator may obtain a 
full evening's entertainment 
for a few pennies. There 
are more than eleven hun- 
dred devices for the entertainment of 
young- and old housed in this most beau- 
tiful structure, which is located on the 
east side of the g^rounds on the "Board 




them. In the Automatic Vaudeville they 
can be seen, and for one cent the sight- 
seer can almost literally take a trip to 
New York and view the well-known 
places there, see the great crowds mov- 
ing about and the hustle and bustle. 

Also, for the infinitesimal sum of one 
cent, they may hear popular music from 
the latest comic opera or musical com- 




Infciior J'iczv of flic Automatic Vaudeville 



Walk," just south of the White City 
College Inn. For a few pennies the 
visitor can see some of the world's best 
scenes as viewed from a swiftly moving 
train, or see hundreds of humorous 
stories told by moving pictures. Several 
hours can easily be spent in this attrac- 
tion, and then the spectator will not have 
exhausted the many forms of amuse- 
ment to be seen there. 

One of the strongest features of the 
Automatic Vaudeville is the fact that it 
is educational in a great degree. Every 
person has read of the famous Flatiron 
building in New York and the various 
historic places in Europe, but very few 
have been fortunate enough to have seen 



edy. The songs which every one is 
whistling on the streets can be learned 
at no cost. Moreover, these songs and 
ballads, as reproduced, are sung by the 
best artists. Imagine being able to hear 
Patti or Melba for one cent. The ma- 
chines used in the Automatic Vaudeville 
are the best that have yet been invented 
and nothing of the true value of the 
music is lost through the transmission. 

Again the visitor may have some fa- 
vorite recitation which he would like to 
hear again. He can find it at the Auto- 
matic Vaudeville. Operas, musical com- 
edies, speeches by well-known orators, 
recitations, and in fact every variety of 



THE WHITE CITY MAGAZINE AND SOUVENIR PROGRAM 



29 



entertainment is included within the 
scope of this attraction. 

Would you know if your lungs are 
weak? You can find out in the Auto- 
matic Vaudeville. There are scores of 
machines which are carefully and mi- 
nutely tabulated to show the exact con- 
dition of the visitor. The use of this 
machine will be as comprehensive and 
complete as an examination by an ex- 




Aiitomatic I 'audcville 

pert physician. In exchange for other 
pennies the spectator can test his lift- 
ing capacity, his hitting ability and the 
strength of his grip. Not only may he 
find out his strength and his weakness, 
but he can find a cure for them. It is 
a well known fact that electricity is a 
cure for many weaknesses, and in the 
Automatic Vaudeville he will find many 
devices for receiving electric and mag- 
netic treatments which are of great ben- 
efit. 

There is no limit to the fun and en- 
tertainment which any oerson may ob- 
tain from this attraction. That it is 
pleasing and interesting is well evi- 
denced by the great crowds which have 
swarmed into it since the opening of 
White City. A great deal of its popu- 
larity has been due to the great scope 
of the amusements provided for visitors. 
There is hardly a form of amusement 
which cannot be obtained for one cent. 
The machines are of the latest patterns 



and contain all of the recent improve- 
ments. 

The Automatic Vaudeville continues 
to draw great throngs of visitors, and 
its popularity is increasing each day. 



Photograph Gallery 

Where the Best Work in Chicago is Done 

Just to the south of the peristyle on 
the east side of the "Board Walk" is 
located the White City Photograph 
Gallery. As an attraction to visitors who 
cannot always command facilities for 
having their pictures taken it will sup- 
ply all deficiencies. Only first-class op- 
erators are employed and a high grade 
of work can be turned out with the 
ample facilities at hand. All kinds of 
pictures are taken, including tintypes or 
cards of any size or description. In ad- 
dition to the work of making pictures to 
order, the managers of this concession 
always have on hand an assortment of 




Photo Gallery ~ 

White City photographs and views 
which can be purchased at moderate 
prices. 

Those who are interested in a high- 
class photograph gallery will find par- 
ticular interest by visiting this establish- 
ment at White City. 



30 



THE WHITE CITY MAGAZINE AND SOUVENIR PROGRAM 



THE 



MIDWAY 



CONTAINING ENTER 
FOR EVE 

>0 AMUSEMENT resort is 
complete without a Midway, 
where jollity and mirth run 
riot unrestrained and un- 
hampered by conventionality. 
Here may be found every form of 
amusement and all kinds of games and 
pastimes into which the elements of 
chance and probability enter. The Mid- 




TAINING FEATURES 
RY B O DY 

ble device and all kinds of unique exhi- 
bitions crowd the Midway, so that a trip 
through is well worth while. 

The first booth is occupied by a candy 
store, where the new confection, "Fluflf- 
Fluff," may be found. The next booth 
is the Stein Rack. Here the visitor en- 
deavors to completely cover a painted 
circle with a metal disk by tossing it on 




Observation Wheel; Also Viezv of Part of the Midivay 



way occupies three sides of the plaza in 
front of the Fire Show and encircles the 
Observation Wheel on three sides, being 
located at the southeastern part of the 
grounds where the "Board Walk" turns 
onto the bridge. 

Popular prices are the rule at the Mid- 
way, and for very small sums the visitor 
may have unlimited enjoyment and prob- 
ably carry home with him a valuable 
souvenir of White City. Every possi- 



a smooth board. The prizes are souvenir 
steins. Next comes the Knife Rack. 
This is very similar to the familiar cane 
rack. The participant tries to throw a 
wooden ring around a knife, and the 
motto of the place is "The knife you 
ring is the knife you get." 

The air rifle booth is the next in order. 
This attraction is especially interesting 
to small children. The next booth con- 
tains the Cane Rack, which has proved 



THE WHITE CITY MAGAZINE AND SOUVENIR PROGRAM 



31 



its great popularity for many years, and 
a description of this deservedly well pat- 
ronized feature would be superfluous. 

The White City Stream is the next 
attraction which meets the view of the 
spectator. This is a stream of water, 
along the banks of which are many 
miniature houses. In the swiftly run- 
ning stream are hundreds of wooden 
fishes, which the visitor endeavors to 
catch with a hook and line. Each one 
of the fish contains a prize. Next comes 
the Gypsy Camp, where there are a corps 
of fortune tellers. Hotel Sleepyville is 
the next booth. The participants in this 
sport try to hurl a ball through the win- 
dows of the hotel and awaken the occu- 
pants. If he is successful in bursting a 
glass window a strange thing happens 
which interests everyone. 

In adjoining booths are the old and 
tried Rifle Gallery and Baby Rack. 
These attractions are too well known to 
need any comment. The next attraction 
is one which is somewhat new to Chi- 
cagoans. It is the baseball game. The 
participant in this sport takes a regula- 
tion bat and knocks a baseball. The 
scoring is counted according to the hit 
he makes. In the southeast corner of 
the Midway is the penny arcade. Here 
are all kinds of slot machines. 

The next feature is the Japan ball 
game. This must be seen to be appre- 
ciated, as it is almost impossible to de- 
scribe it. The game is most interesting 
and attracts a great number of specta- 
tors. The Glass-blowers occupy the re- 
maining booth, Avhere all kinds of glass 
work is made for visitors while they 
wait. 



Toboggan 

A Laughter-Provoking Method of Enjoyment 

One of the most popular and best pat- 
ronized attractions at White City is 
the Toboggan. It is impossible to give 
a detailed description which would be 
of interest of this unique and hilarious 
method of enjoyment, because there is 
no elaborate apparatus, no grand scenic 
effects, and no regulated program, but 
there is always music during the op- 
eration of this feature ; the music of 



happy laughter and joyous voices tune- 
ful with accents of merriment. 

The participant in this sport takes a 
seat in a comfortable cushioned vehicle 
and sturdy attendants roll it down the 
track to a point where it is seized by a 
wire rope and is elevated up a steep 
incline, where the rapid and mirth-pro- 
voking journey begins. Upon reaching 




Structure of Toboggan 

the top the cars seem imbued with life 
and dart down a gentle declivity as 
though fitted with powerful wings. 

Darting around unexpected curves, up 
slopes and down into valleys, the car is 
whirled at a rapid rate of speed upon a 
journey lasting almost two minutes. It 
finally returns to the original point of 
departure, where the merry passengers 
disembark and make way for others, 
who eagerly fill their places. 

All afternoon and evening crowds 
happily make their way to the Tobog- 
gan, and it is universally voted to be 
one of the jolliest forms of entertain- 
ment at White City. 



W. R. Jacquest 

The accompanying 
illustration portrays 
W. R. Jacquest, one 
of the men who has 
assisted materially in 
building White City. 
He contracted for an 
enormous quantity of 
plumbing and suc- 
cessfully carried out his work. 




THE WHITE CITY MAGAZINE AND SOUl'ENIR PROGRAM 



CUMMINS' INDIAN CONGRESS 

A THRILLING AND EXCITING WILD WEST SHOW 
WITH RECKLESS PARTICIPANTS 



HE first attraction which the 
visitor sees after he enters 
tlie grounds is Colonel Cum- 
niins' Indian Congress. This 
feature is located at the ex- 
treme north end of the park ; the en- 
trance is to the right of the "Board 
\\'alk," and is within a hundred feet of 




pees smoking ; the women busying them- 
selves about their work, and the little 
redskins playing among the wigwams. 
These Indians live here exactly as they 
do on their native prairie, cooking their 
own food and living close to nature. The 
spectator then passes the arena and goes 
on to the end of the grounds, where the 




Location of Cummins' Indian Congress 



the gates of White City. The entrance 
to the attraction is shaped like a huge 
wigwam, covered with all manner of 
hieroglyphics and Indian symbols, illus- 
trating the manner in which the redskins 
used to keep records of their victories in 
war. In the upper part of this tepee 
there is the famous cowboy band, which 
will furnish the music for the produc- 
tion. 

As the spectator enters the enclosure 
he first sees an Indian encampment — the 
braves sitting lazily in front of their te- 



grandstand is located. Here before him 
are enacted the great and absorbing fea- 
tures which compose the show. The pro- 
gramme of events follows : 

1. Reception by the famous Indian 
Chiefs of fifty-one different tribes, in- 
cluding many of the best known Indian 
leaders. 

2. Grand entry ; parade of all the In- 
dians, including squaws and pappooses. 
Aboriginal savage equestrian review. 

3. Introduction of Indians, cowboys 
and band of lady riders. 



THE WHITE CITY MAGAZINE AND SOUVENIR PROGRAM 



33 



4. Introduction of Colonel Cummins. 

5. Maze. 

6. Miss Hartzell, champion rifle shot 
of the world. 

7. Pony Express, as seen in the days 
of '49 ; George Esler. 

8. Race of Nations, Indian lady and 
cowboy. 



22. Champion Zouave drill team of 
the world. 

23. Custer's last stand, "The Custer 
Massacre," or the battle of the Little Big 
Horn. A vivid reproduction of the trag- 
edy that occurred on June 25, 1876. 

The story of the death of General Cus- 
ter and the death and annihilation of 




Tobozs.an 



9. Riding wild cattle. 

10. Jim Hopkins and band of fancy 
ropers in feats never seen before. 

11. Attack on trappers' cabin by In- 
dians. 

Lacrosse — international game. 

12. Stage coach hold-up. 

13. Tournament. 

14. Hanging a horse thief. 

15. Relay race, one mile. 

16. Educated cow horse. 

17. Chase for a bride. 

18. Attack on an emigrant train cross- 
ing the mountains, by Indians. 

19. Cowboy quadrille 

20. Sports and pastimes on the plains. 

21. Roping contest. 



his little band is one which stirs the 
hearts of Americans every time it is 
told. June 26, 1876, will long be re- 
membered as the day in history that 
marked the slaughter of the bravest men 
who ever represented the United States 
— a day that saw the last victory of In- 
dians over white men 

The scene opens with General Custer 
at the head of his little band of men, hot 
upon the trail of Sitting Bull, chief of 
the Ogalalla Sioux, and his braves. Cus- 
ter, trusting his entire force to the dis- 
cretion of Reynolds, the noted Indian 
scout, presses on after' Sitting Bull. 
That famous chieftain, by a series of 
the most clever maneuvers, inveigles 



34 



THE WHITE CITY MAGAZINE AND SOUVENIR PROGRAM 



Custer into the valley of the Little Bit; 
Horn. Custer's men followed Reynolds 
far into the valley and finally came tj a 
place where Sitting Bull had just 
camped. The ground was }'et warm from 
the camp fires. Custer halted and sent 
out his scouts. Sitting Bull, anticipating 
this move, had established a fake camp, 
which the scouts found and hurried back 
to Custer. 

Custer, elated and believing he has the 
Indians trapped, orders the bugle to 
sound and dashes into the fake encamp- 
ment, hoping to take Sitting BuF. by 
surprise. But the Indians are prepare-'l 
for him. Sitting Bull has withdrawn his 
men and has surrounded the camp. 

Custer and his men dash into the trap 
and in a moment a furious battle is on. 
With Indians on all sides of him, Custer 
sees that it is hopeless to fight, but still 
he orders the charge, and in the midst 
of the losing fight he directs his men 
calmly. As his men were slain and fell 
on all sides of him, he continued the bat- 
tle. Chief Shot-in-the-Eyes, who was 
present at the fight, declares that when 
Custer was left alone on the field he 
turned his gun on himself and died 
rather than fall into the hands of the 
Indians. 

The conclusion of this great spectacle 
is shown in three tableaux. The first 
tableau shows the battle raging furi- 
ously on all sides. The Indians, hang- 
ing from their ponies' necks, circle 
swiftly about the troopers, shrilly shriek- 
ing their war cries. Custer is seen fight- 
ing desperately in the midst of the red- 
skins, and is finally dragged from his 
horse, but he quickly throws off his as- 
sailants and fights his way to a high 
mound, where the remnants of his force 
gather about him. 

The second tableau shows the battle 
nearing the end. Custer's men have 
nearly all been killed, yet the remaining 
few are struggling valiantly and keeping 
the Indians at bay. One by one the 
troopers are slain until Custer stands 
alone on the mound. Swinging his heavy 
saber aloft, his face lighted with deter- 
mination and courage, his left hand 
clinching his smoking revolver, he fights 
on to the bitter end. An Indian is seen 
kneeling and pointing a gun at Custer 
when the tableaux ends. 



Tableau three completes the tragedy. 
It shows the dreary mound, covered with 
the dead bodies of the troopers and those 
of the Indians who have fallen in the 
fierce battle. Custer is down — slain after 
a most brilliant exhibition of sublime 
courage and determination. His body is 
lying over the topmost part of the mound 
and the American flag is lying close be- 
side him. Presently some scouts appear 
in the distance, look carefully at the 
mound, and then disappear. Then 
Reno's entire band comes rushing to the 
rescue. The soldiers dash on to the 
mound. 

They seize the flag and hoist it up to 
the staff again amid cheers. One of the 
men stumbles over a body. It is that of 
General Custer. 

The soldiers gather about the body of 
the courageous General and remove their 
hats as they gaze at their beloved leader. 
They turn sadly, look fondly at the flag 
and murmur, "Too late! Too late!" The 
curtain falls. 

Miniature Railway 

A Perfect Model System with Track, Switches, etc. 

Surrounding the lagoon into which 
dart the boats from the Chutes, with 
their loads of laughing and shouting 
pleasure-seekers, is the track upon which 
run the trains of the Miniature Railway 
system of White City. The rolling- 
stock for the Miniature Railway con- 
sists of several perfectly equipped cars, 
each of which are pulled by a tiny loco- 
motive, every detail of which has been 
as accurately constructed in miniature as 
though the parts were intended for one 
of the gigantic monsters which haul 
heavy-laden trains across the western 
mountain ranges. 

The signal of the tiny whistle almost 
universally excites merriment, but when 
the onlookers observe the sturdy strength 
of the tiny locomotive as it pulls its cars 
loaded with passengers, their interest is 
excited and they desire to participate in 
the enjoyment of those who have already 
secured tickets for a ride. 

The railway track is almost a half- mile 
in length, passing entirely around the 
lagoon and underneath the enormous 
grandstand which is a part of the Fire 
Show. 



THE WHITE CITY MAGAZINE AND SOUVENIR PROGRAM 



35 



OBSERVATION WHEEL 

A UNIQUE AND DELIGHTFUL METHOD 
OF SEEING WHITE CITY 



i 


1 



N THE plaza in front of the 
M i d w a y at the extreme 
southeast corner of the park 
is the Observation Wheel. 
For many years this device, 
in a less improved form, has enjoyed 
great popularity among all classes, and 
this year is proving no exception. The 
cause of this is due probably to the fact 
that there is no keen excitement or 
nerve testing chances about it. It is a 
form of entertainment which even the 
youngest child or the oldest person may 
enjoy without the slightest foreboding — 
hence its popularity. 

Owing to the position given the Ob- 
servation Wheel it was necessarily lim- 
ited as to size, but there was no limit 
put upon the completeness and stability 
of the structure. This wheel is the finest 
ever constructed since the Ferris Wheel 
at the World's Fair in 1893. It is smaller 
than the Ferris Wheel because the man- 
agement realized that a great number of 
persons feared to ride in the former be- 
cause of its great and cumbersome bulk. 
It was too large and excited feelings of 
distrust in even the most brave. The 
success which has characterized other 
smaller wheels made it advisable to make 
the White City Wheel of a size which 
would be without the objectionable fea- 
tures of the Ferris Wheel, and yet would 
carry the people to a sufficient height 
so that they might view the stirring 
panorama which is always presented to 
the sight-seer at White City. 

White City's Observation Wheel is 
the perfection of mechanical and engi- 
neering skill, the mechanism being so 
perfect and yet so simple that a child 
could easily run it. No perceptible effort 
is discernible when the wheel is started 
or stopped, because the ingenious plac- 
ing of the ball bearings absolutely pre- 
vents all jar or friction. 

There is something particularly en- 
trancing about a ride on this Observa- 
tion Wheel. The visitor is slowly and 
irresistibly carried to a height which 
permits a clear view of all the surround- 
ing houses and attractions, and in fact 



gives the spectator a complete bird's-eye 
view of the whole in all its pristine 
beauty. Probably the chief attraction 
of this wheel is the fact that the rider 
feels the sensation of being maintained 
in the air by invisible forces. 

Various devices have been invented 
from time to time by promoters of 
amusement parks, but none has ever yet 
been found which will take the place of 
the Observation Wheel and its peculiarly 
pleasant and indefinable sensations. 

A White City Executive 

In giving credit to the builders of 
White City, it would be unfair to fail 
to acknowledge the work done by Her- 
man Gressman, who has exercised a su- 
perintendence over all the carpenter work 




done in the grounds. Mr. Gressman took 
the original plans as delivered from the 
office of E. C. Boyce, the New York 
architect who designed White City, and 
from them has carried out the entire 
work of construction. The results of his 
work are apparent and require no ex- 
planation because White City complete 
is a lasting monument of his energy and 
faithful service. 

Mr. Gressman is located at 3641-43 
South Hermitage avenue, where he con- 
ducts a large and lucrative business as 
general carpenter and builder. 



36 



THE WHITE CITY MAGAZINE AND SOUVENIR PROGRAM 



DOG, PONY & MONKEY CIRCUS 

CLEVER EXHIBITION BY DOMESTIC ANIMALS 




?IIS is the attraction for the 
children. Since the opening 
of White City thonsands of 
httle ones have attended Pro- 
fessor F. Blake's Dog, Pony 
and Monkey Circus to see the wonderful 
exhibitions of the power of human be- 
ings over animals and to witness their 
entertaining and amusing acts. There 
are over fifty animals in this show and 
each one is the best that can be procured 
by money or energy. The show occupies 
an entire building just south of the Elec- 
tric Tower on the east side of the "Board 
Walk." 

The great power Professor Blake pos- 
sesses over the animals in his show has 
been attributed to hypnotism and like 




Aiii)iial Circus 

occult sciences, but it is nothing more 
unusual than kindness. He rules his 
animals by love and gentleness, never 
speaking a harsh word to any of them. 
The performance given by these dumb 
creatures is a crucial test of their pow- 
ers of understanding and goes far to 
establish what an eminent American 
scientist has sought through the wilds 
of all countries and the jungles to prove 



— that the lower order of animals really, 
communicate with each other through 
an almost human faculty. This troupe 
of trained animals includes, among other 
features, a family of chimpanzees and 
orang-outangs, who stand as high as a 
man. "Tiny Mite," the smallest horse 
in the world, is also included among the 
interesting features of the show. A 
glance at the programme will convince 
an}'one that the exhibition will prove en- 
tertaining : 

1. Pony Drill; playing soldiers and 
executing National Guard tactics. 

2. Trick Pony, with Happy Hooligan 
as Dr. Jones. 

3. The Rope-Walking Dogs ; a tri- 
umph in animal training. 

4. Rocking Pony (the Hobby Horse) ; 
a difficult feat well executed. 

5. Waltzing Ponies. 

6. Rope Jumping ; an extremely dif- 
ficult accomplishment for dumb animals. 

7. Serpentine Dancing Dogs. 

8. Boxing Dogs (Fitzsimmons and 
Corbett), with Happy Hooligan as a 
policeman. 

9. Riding Dogs and Monkeys. 

10. Gloomy Gus, the wonderful wire- 
walking monkey. 

11. Wire-Balancing Dogs. 
Happy Hooligan. 
Perch and Globe, juggling mon- 



12. 
13. 
kevs. 
'14. 
15. 
16. 



Roller-Skating Baboons. 
Trick Pony. 
Monkev on crutches. 

17. High Wire Bicycle Act. 

18. Wrestling Pony. 

19. Monkey Supper Scene. 

20. Bucking Dogs. 

21. Bar Monkeys. 

22. Have You Seen Maud? 

23. High Diving Dog. 

24. Bag Punching. 

25. High Leaping Dogs. 
Altogether this exhibition is the best 

that can possibly be procured, as each 
animal has been carefully selected and 
is the best of its kind in the act chosen 
for it. The spectator is repaid many 
times in enjoyment for the very nominal 
admission fee. 



THE WHITE CITY MAGAZINE AND SOUVENIR PROGRAM 



37 



CHINESE THEATRE 

WITH ORIENTAL ACROBATS AND ACTORS 




YPICAL of the flowery king- 
dom is the Httle Chinese The- 
ater, located just south of 
the Peristyle on the west side 
of the "Board Walk." This 
is imported direct from China 
entertainments are exactly the 
same as the shows given there by their 
own theatrical companies. Each mem- 
ber of the cast has been brought to this 



theater 
and its 



m 







Chinese Theater 

country direct from the Flowery King- 
dom, and has appeared in his native land 
as an actor. The scenery has been used 
in one of the theaters in Pekin, and is 
most beautiful, being a good example of 
the scenic work of Chinese artists. 

The little-footed women who appear 
in the plays presented are some of the 
very few Chinese women in this coun- 
try, and visitors to White City should 
not fail to see this most interesting and 
educating show. The principal play 
which this Oriental company presents is 
typical of their country, and is of the 
regulation length. Many of these Chi- 
nese people are seeing the first view of 
America, coming directly to Chicago 
after they landed in New York. The 



company will remain at White City 
during the Summer and will probably 
delight thousands of Chicagoans with 
their performances. 

Electric Theatre 

A Delightful and Amusing Program Furnished 

Although located in a rather unpre- 
tentious structure adjoining the Scenic 
Railway Loading Station on the South, 
there is no form of entertainment at 
White City which will appeal more to 
the pleasure-loving propensities of the 
people than the programs given in the 
Electric Theater. There are no actors 
or actresses in this theater, but the 
scenes presented show at times scores 
and even hundreds in action. 

The Electric Theater reproduces the 
actions and movements of living persons 
in a most realistic way and presents 
scenes which it would be impossible to 
portray in any other manner than with 
the aid of rapidly moving films contain- 
ing actual photographs. The manage- 
ment of the Electric Theater sent a spe- 
cial commission to the scene of the war 
between Russia and Japan for the pur- 
pose of taking moving pictures of the 
historical events occurrinsf there. 





EU\tiu J heat^i 



38 



THE WHITE CITY MAGAZINE AND SOUVENIR PROGRAM 



THE TEMPLE OF MUSIC 

A DECIDEDLY ENJOYABLE ENTERTAINMENT 



HIS is tlie most marvelous 
; and comprehensive musical 
! performance ever attempted. 
The Temple of JMusic is lo- 
cated on the east side of the 
"Board ^^'alk" and just south of the 
Electric Tower. None of the time-wom 
and hackneyed freak instruments are to 




ica, England, Japan, China and Rou- 
mania. 

Among" the many various instruments 
played by Professor Willard's musicians 
perhaps one of the queerest is the 
"Squeegee Gods of China." This instru- 
ment consists of a row of twelve life- 
size heads of Chinamen with their lonsf 




Interior View of Temple of Music 



be found in this house of symphony — 
each instrument being of a special kind, 
and many of them costing thousands of 
dollars to construct. The forces of na- 
ture are harnessed and made to dispense 
beautiful music — light, heat, steam and 
electricity being used by Professor Wil- 
lard's corps of skillful musicians. 

A visit to this home of music is al- 
most education in music, and is equal 
in scope to a trip through all the foreign 
countries where various histruments are 
supposed to have originated. Several 
nations are represented by typical musi- 
cal instruments. There are strange in- 
struments from Sweden, Erance, Amer- 



pigtails hanging. By pulling the queues 
of the Chinamen the men are made to 
sing their weird songs and strange 
chants. The effect of seeing and hear- 
ing these figures perform is one of star- 
tling realism. 

The various instruments for this show 
fill an entire stage and are banked high 
up the sides. An idea of the magnitude 
of some of the instruments may be ob- 
tained from the fact that the combined 
weight of all of them is 3,720 pounds, or 
very nearly two tons. They are con- 
structed from all ftinds of material — 
wood, aluminum, steel, zinc, copper and 
lead having been used in their construe- 



THE WHITE CITY MAGAZINE AND SOUVENIR PROGRAM 



39 



tion. Some are shaken, some are pulled, 
some are played by hand, and others by 
compressed air. 

The most strange and fanciful of all 
the many devices in the Temple of Music 
is the musical airship. This is a pon- 
derous machine and is constructed of 
196 tubes of silver. It is operated bv 
electricity, the current passing through 
the body of a girl. This sensational de- 
vice is a triumph of invention, requiring 



Double Whirl 

A Novel and Amusing Pastime 

The Double Whirl combines the pleas- 
ures of a ride on a miniature Ferris 
Wheel and the old-fashioned carousel, 
both of which are familiar to almost 
every visitor at White City, although 
none such are to be found within its 
gates. Six miniature Ferris wheels, each 




The Ever-Popular Double JVIiin 



thousands of wires, coils and other de- 
vices to operate it. This instrument is 
so complicated that Professor Willard 
has been questioned very closely by the 
Underwriters regarding it. At one time 
the Chicago authorities forbade him to 
exhibit it. Professor Willard met the 
objections of the Underwriters by en- 
casing all the thousands of wires in steel 
tubes. 

Those who visit the Temple of Music 
cannot fail to be extremely interested in 
this strange and unique instrument, 
which certainly surpasses every other 
musical device in originality and clev- 
erness. 



attached to an enormous revolving shaft 
centered in a revolving drum, roll slow- 
ly round and round with their loads of 
passengers. No elaborate description 
can be given of the Double Whirl, but 
it would take an endless amount of writ- 
ing to describe the fun and pleasure of 
participation in its regular operation. 



Mahomet's coffin had just been sus- 
pended in the air. 

"It was his own idea," they said ; 
"you see he used to live in a Harlem 
flat." 

Thus did the prophet save space. — 
New York Sun. 



40 



THE WHITE CITY MAGAZINE AND SOLU'ENIR PROGRAM 



INFANT INCUBATORS 

SCIENTIFIC AND HUMANITARIAN METHODS 
AT WORK TOGETHER 



HIS attraction is a great deal 
more than an exhibit — it is 
an educator. The Incubators 
are located in a beautiful 
structure at the southeast 
comer of the "Board Walk." This build- 
ing- is the only one on the grounds which 
has anv color in it, being a dark red with 




the sweet sleep of infancy they create a 
fascinating picture. The boy infants 
have blue sashes and the girls have pink. 
To avoid confusion as to their identity 
each child wears a medal on which is 
stamped its initials and the date of its 
arrival, and such other information as 
bears on the treatment of the case. Thev 




Infant Incubator Building 



white trimmings. It is built after the 
old colonial style and is most pretentious 
in its appointments. 

It is safe to say that as large a per- 
centage of interested visitors pass into 
this attraction as any other on the 
grounds. The tiny infants only a few 
days old, and born into the world from 
one to three months ahead of the natural 
time, are put into the glass ovens, which 
are kept at an even temperature, and 
supplied constantly with sterilized air by 
means of an automatic arrangement. 
The little ones seem thoroughly to enjoy 
their homes in the glass houses, and in 



are taken and fed at regular intervals, 
bathed and dressed with the greatest 
care, so that eighty-five per cent of the 
infants are saved for useful lives. There 
is a gain of nearly seventy per cent over 
the old methods, and an inestimable gain 
for the parents, who perhaps love them 
more dearly for their misfortunes. 

The Infant Incubator system had its- 
origin in Germany, the home of many of 
the most advanced methods of modern 
medicine and surgery, and is conducted 
there under government auspices. It 
has proved a great success, and like re- 
sults are being obtained in this country, 



THE WHITE CITY MAGAZINE AND SOUVENIR PROGRAM 



41 



where physicians welcome it as an in- 
valuable adjunct to their own skill. 
Thousands of precious lives have already 
been saved and it is only a question of 
time when the system will be universally 
adopted. Institutions similar to these 
will soon be set up in all the large Amer- 
ican cities. 

The nurses who ha-^'c charge of the 
infants as they graduate from the ovens 
of the incubators certainly have their 
hands full, as, with their wee charges 
on their hands, they have to soothe them 
to rest and place them in the dainty 
cribs. 

The first attempt to substitute scien- 
tific treatment for the primitive methods 
that had for hundreds of years been used 
to save babies born prematurely was 
made by Dr. Crede, of the University 
of Leipzig. He constructed a box with 
double metallic sides and filled the space 
within with water, so as to regulate the 
temperature. This was sixty years ago, 
and it was not until eight years ago that 
the first institution was opened in Ber- 
lin, which won favor from the start be- 
cause of the great success it made in 
saving the lives of the little ones. 

The first reunion of incubator gradu- 
ates reared by Dr. Couney, who has the 
incubators at White City, was held in 
New York July 31, 1904, at which time 
forty children were present, ranging in 
age from 3 to 6 years. 

After a visit to this institution one 
feels amply repaid for having seen the 
quaint, delightful little fellows whose ap- 
peal to the s}'mpathies is always stronger 
because of their utter helplessness. 
Every visitor to the incubator cannot fail 
to come away praising the great system 
that can accomplish such great wonders, 
where for centuries the precious lives 
were permitted to flicker out. 



Fun Factory 



Laughter-Creating Devices for Old and Young 

Abandon all dignity ye who enter 
here. No person, however sedate and 
cynical, can go into this attraction with- 
out laughing and being well pleased with 
the world in general. Go where the 
laughter is loudest and there you will 
find the Fun Factory. This attraction is 
located on the east side of the "Board 



Walk," and is situated just north of the 
Electric Tower. 

Mirrors are the cause of it all. By a 
most ingenious and skillful arrangement 
of the various glasses many humorous 
and amusing illusions are given. There 
is the convex mirror, the concave mir- 
ror, the double mirror, and in fact every 
kind of a mirror that human ingenuity 
has devised. 

The spectator steps before one glass 
to look at himself and finds that he has 
apparently flattened out until he is only 
about one foot tall and five or six feet 
broad. The enormous change in the 
appearance of a person when he stands 
before this mirror is most ludicrous. 
The next moment he steps before an- 
other glass and sees himself many feet 
tall and extremely slender. From the 
first mirror to the last the spectator is 
convulsed with laughter. 

It has been observed that each spec- 
tator tries to put the laugh on some 
other person. He will stand way out 
from the mirrors and endeavor to be- 
guile his friends to step nearer, and 
when they do so he will laugh at their 
discomfiture, only a moment later to find 
that he, himself, has wandered too near 
one of the mirrors and that he is the 
center of the laughter of his friends, who 
are thoroughh' enjoying his awkward 
position. 




Fun Factory 



THE WHITE CITY MAGAZINE AND SOUJ'ENIR PROGRAM 




JOHNSTOWN FLOOD 

ONE OF THE WORLD'S GREATEST 
AND MOST AWE-INSPIRING TRAGEDIES 

and bright on this fatal night. The citi- 
zens of the town had celebrated Decora- 
tion Day, and the entire business section 
of the city was gayly decorated in bunt- 
ing and flags. Night falls, and now the 
mountains which rise on all sides of the 
town throw the long blue shadows over 
the valley and the lights glitter from the 
casements and windows. In strong con- 
trast to the lurid glare of the factories, 



HAA'E seen the Johnstown 
Flood." Wherever you see 
a person at White City 
wearing a circular card with 
the preceding inscription on 
it. vou see a person who is entirely 
pleased and gratified with the return of 
liis small investment, and one who is 
willing to inform others that they are 
missins: something- educatiuii" and enter- 




Intcrior Vieiv, lohnstozvn Flood Building 



taining if they fail to see this great ex- 
hibiton. 

The Johnstown Flood is the most im- 
pressive and realistic of all scenic pro- 
ductions, and is produced on a mammoth 
scale. The entire show is a triumph of 
scenic art and startling realism. On a 
large staging the entire city of Johns- 
town, Pa., is reproduced in perspective, 
with the streets and houses being exact 
patterns of the actual structures in that 
town. 

Business is being carried on in the 
city, people walk the streets, the trains 
arrive at the stations, and the entire 
scene is one of activity. After several 
days of rainfall, the sun had shone clear 



the moon bathes the city in a mantle of 
silver. 

Suddenly the skies cloud over, and in 
a moment a fierce storm bursts over the 
city, the thunder crashes and re-echoes 
in the mountains. Then quiet comes 
again and the stars twinkle in the heav- 
ens and the little valley is wrapt in slum- 
ber. 

The reservoir breaks and the torrent 
comes sweeping down the narrow defile, 
washing away several villages, and 
dashes on with a sullen roar toward 
Johnstown. On comes the wall of water, 
carrying with it men, women, children 
and all kinds of trees, houses and ani- 
mals. The roar of the coming cataract 



THE WHITE CITY MAGAZINE AND SOUVENIR PROGRAM 



43 



has been heard by some, who flee to 
safety, but the next instant the city is 
swept away. Where 2,000 houses had 
stood there is nothing but a sea of water. 
The entire city of Johnstown has been 
wiped out. 

The story of the flood is the story of 
one of the greatest tragedies of the 
world. On Friday, May 31, 1889, in 
the State of Penns}lvania, the entire 




JoJinstoivn Flood 

beautiful valley of the Conemaugh was 
devastated, 10,000 lives were wiped out 
and millions of dollars' worth of prop- 
erty was destroyed. 

Johnstown, Pa., was one of the most 
prosperous manufacturing towns in the 
state. Including its suburbs, it had a 
population of 35,000 persons, and was 
situated at the junction of the Cone- 
maugh River and Stony Creek. One of 
the largest steel works in the country, 
the Cambria Iron Company, had its plant 
there. 

About fifteen or eighteen miles north- 
east from Johnstown was the great res- 
ervoir, which was 500 feet above the 
city. The great basin held more than 
sixty million gallons of water, which 
was held in check by a dam 700 feet in 
length, 90 feet thick at the base and 110 
feet high. This reservoir was the prop- 
erty of a number of wealthy gentlemen 



of Pittsburg, who formed the "South 
Fork Fishing Club." 

When the dam burst, after many days 
of heavy rains, the great wall of water 
swept down over the little city and it 
was completely annihilated. This trag- 
edy is so faithfully reproduced and is 
given on so great a scale that the audi- 
ence forgets that it is only a spectacle 
which they are watching and sits spell- 
bound, intentl}- gazing at the unfolding 
of the story. 



Pcrcival — "Are you going to take up 
your fawther's business ?" 

Archibald — "Naw, it's enough to 
have one tradesman in the family, 
doncher know." 

If politeness were marked down to 
$1.98 perhaps more people would have 



If any Christmas dinner was pre- 
pared for General Kuropatkin in Tokio 
he'd better hurry up or it will spoil. 

"Sh — h, don't disturb the chauffeur." 

"What's the matter?" 

"He's writing an auto-biography." 

Mrs. Brozvuc — -"Yes ; they're in 
Eg}-pt now, and will spend the winter 
on the Nile." \ 

Mrs. Malaprop — "How nice ! They'll 
get a chance to see all them Pyrenees 
and the Phoenix, won't they?" — Phila- 
delphia Press. 

*** 

"I hear you lost a million on the 
Street?" 

"Yes ; but my wife's mother got run 
over by an auto." 

"And your house burned ?" 

"Yes ; but my wife's lap-dog was in 
it. What'll you take?"- — Houston Post. 



"A blizzard is a big nuisance," said 
Uncle Eben ; "but it's a sort o' comfort 
to fin' sumpin disagree'ble dat can't be 
blamed on a trust." — Washiiio-fon Star. 



44 



THE WHITE CITY MAGAZINE AND SOUVENIR PROGRAM 



i i 



HEREAFTER" 



THE FUTURE STATE VIVIDLY AND IMPRESSIVELY SHOWN 



HIS unique attraction is sit- 
uated in a large building just 
north of the colonnade and 
on the east side of the White 
City "Board Walk," and is 
one of the most cleverly conceived en- 
tertainments in the park. While the 
title of this feature may make a grew- 
some impression on some persons, to 




der of countless thousands, has the man- 
agement of this attraction. He spent 
over two months at AVhite City during 
its construction personally supervising 
the work of installing the show, for he 
could not trust the delicate and wonder- 
ful mechanism to common workmen. 
On a large and roomy stage in his own 
special building. Professor Burch has 




Interior Viczv of Hereafter 



the majority it will furnish an unlimited 
field for speculation. 

"Hereafter" is an illusion, or rather 
a series of illusions, and the most beau- 
tiful and dramatic effects are produced 
by those clever arts and resourceful 
methods adopted by skilled illusionists. 
The audience sits spellbound, seeking in 
vain to gain even the slightest percep- 
tion of how the wonderful effects are 
produced. 

Professor Burch, who has devoted al- 
most a quarter of a century to the cre- 
ating of unusual devices for the mysti- 
fving of scientists and arousinsr the won- 



arranged his carefully guarded secrets 
and will exhibit them several times daily 
to the public. 

Ordinary illusions, such as have been 
exhibited in Chicago in years past, must 
not be confounded with the exhibitions 
which will be produced at White City. 
Professor Burch has participated in the 
entertainment of hundreds of thousands 
of people at the five great expositions 
which have been given within the past 
dozen years, and he will present in the 
Hereafter the very best and most popu- 
lar illusions which have been introduced 
durinsr that time. In addition to the 



THE WHITE CITY MAGAZINE AND SOUVENIR PROGRAM 



45 



/" % 




Hereafter 

great efifects which he has selected from 
his previous efforts, he has invented sev- 
eral wholly new devices, which are being 
shown at White City for the first time 
ever presented to the public. 

His work is similar to that produced 
by the world-famous Maskelyne and 



Cook for the past fifty }ears in the re- 
nowned Egyptian Hall in London, almost 
as celebrated as the Tower of London 
itself. Entertainment will be furnished 
for old and young, and there will be 
absolutely nothing in any of the pro- 
grammes to oft'end even the most criti- 
cal and fastidious. Beautiful girls are 
transformed into flowers, familiar fea- 
tures being transformed into unfamiliar 
ones and back again. Other various un- 
canny transformations will also occur. 
Persons of all ages will be fully enter- 
tained, with just enough of the myste- 
rious to give a delightfully creepy feeling 
now and then, but there will be nothing 
of a startling or vuipleasant nature in 
any of the shows. There is nothing to 
alarm the most nervous or hysterical, 
nor will there be anything to create un- 
pleasant sensations. 

"Hereafter" is beautiful and sublime 
in many ways, but never disagreeable. 
It is a strictly high-class and up-to-date 
entertainment all the way through, and 
those who witness the exhibitions are 
supplied with an endless fund of con- 
jecture and material for discussion. It 
is one of the most pleasant attractions 
at White City. 



MECHANICAL EXPOSITION 

AUTOMATIC NOVELTIES WHICH ENTERTAIN 




XTO the Lion's IMouth and 
Out of It. The yawning 
mouth of a gigantic cast of 
a mammoth African Lion 
marks the entrance to this 
most interesting exhibit, which is located 
under the ballroom and which has its 
entrance on the east side of the "Roard 
Walk." Hemer's Mechanical Exposi- 
tion, as this unique show is named, con- 
tains a most remarkable collection of 
lifelike figures reproduced in wax, and 
so supplied with intricate and cleverly 
contrived mechanisms that they appear 
to have all the characteristics and abili- 
ties of living human beings. This ex- 
hibition of ingenuity is absolutely new to 
Chicagoans, and is the most comprehen- 
sive exhibit of the kind ever attempted. 
The spectator descends a dark pas- 
sage and steps out into a broad room, 
which is only semi-lighted. Here the 



various wax figures are constantly going 
through their performances and even 
walking about. The person who does 
not endeavor to try to talk to one of 
these lifelike figures before he gets 
through is an exception, for the models 
are so true to life that any person is 
liable to be taken in. Nearly every per- 
son believes for a moment at least that 
some of the figures must be alive, so 
realistically and intelligently do they per- 
form their various evolutions. 

One of the first views which meets the 
spectator is the reproduction of nurses 
attending wounded soldiers. A nurse 
kneels b}^ a wounded man, carefully 
bathing his wounds, while the man 
struggles on the ground in anguish. In 
another part of the field the captain of 
the soldiers, waving his sword aloft, 
beckons his men onward. 

Then follow scores of other exhibits. 



46 



THE ]VHITE CITY MAGAZINE AND SOUVENIR PROGRAM 



J I M 



KEY 



THE MARVELOUS EDUCATED HORSE 




X TliE west side of the 
grounds is the Jini Key build- 
ing. It is located next to 
the Flying Airships, and the 
front of the structure is dec- 
orated with a mammoth horseshoe 
studded with electric lights. This place 
was designed especially for Jim Key, and 
is so constructed that every person who 



visits the show has an excellent view of 
the famous animal. 

In speaking of his horse, Mr. Rogers, 
the owner of Jim Key, said : "It is only 
a 'one horse show,' but amid all the at- 
tractions at the Pike in the St. Louis 
Exposition last year, this marvelous edu- 
cated horse made the most money." 

Many of the managers of the great 




Home of Beautiful Jim Key 



THE WHITE CITY MAGAZINE AND SOUVENIR PROGRAM 



47 



amusement parks in the East tried to 
get Jim Key as their drawing card for 
this season, but Mr. Rogers reahzed that 
White City was the ideal location for 
this wonderful horse, and as a result the 
noted animal will be seen in Chicago all 
during the Summer. Jim Key has made 



been a revelation to other trainers, who 
could never hope to approach this per- 
fection. Jim Key is not a trick horse in 
any sense of the word. Too frequently, 
for example, trainers ask the horse a 
question in figures and then give him 
some apparent signal when the number 




Mechanical Exposition 



an enviable record wherever he has been 
exhibited, and he will undoubtedly con- 
tinue to be a great attraction. 

In all the history of the training of 
animals there have been only two horses 
who might truly be said to have been 
educated. These two animals are Hans, 
the famous German horse, and the 
world-famed Jim Key, the Arabian edu- 
cated horse. Though seemingly impos- 
sible, this equine king can actually read, 
write, spell, think, count, figure, change 
money, and use a national cash register. 
Jim can also give many Bible quotations, 
of which he knows a great number. 

It is especially interesting to note that 
the entire training of Jim Key was ac- 
complished by kindness. Dr. William 
Key, the former owner of Jim Key, has 
had entire charge of the animal since it 
was a colt. Dr. Key is a typical Uncle 
Tom of the Southland, and the wonders 
he has accomplished with this animal has 



is correct. With Jim it is different. 
When Jim is asked to figure, he goes to 
a board and selects the proper number 
to represent the result, entirely without 
aid of any kind. 

Jim Key is also a member of many 
societies. He is the equine honorary 
member of the American Humane Asso- 
ciation, which numbers over three mil- 
lion children. He has over six hundred 
thousand signed members of the Jim 
Key Band of Mercy, who have pledged 
themselves to the statement, "I promise 
always to be kind to animals." All of 
Jim Key's performances are given under 
the auspices of the American Humane 
Society of Boston. 

Jim Key gives performances continu- 
ally during the day and evening, and 
each show lasts through half an hour. 
The audience asks the horse all the ques- 
tions, to which he is always ready with 
an intelligent answer. 



48 THE WHITE CITY MAGAZINE AND SOUVENIR PROGRAM 



Shut down your desk- 
Co to Colorado 



Two weeks of rest and recreation in 
Colorado is what you need. 

The mountain air beats medicine. The 
outdoor Hfe and the freedom from care 
will make a new man of you. 

Climb a peak or two and see what a 
beautiful world you live in; get a new view 
of life with your head above the clouds ! 

You'll come back with a tranquil mind 
and strength in reserve sufficient for a year. 

Do this, or not, YOU are the one to 
decide. 

Our Colorado booklet " Under the 
Turquoise Sky " may help. Details of 
Rock Island rates and services will come 
with it, just for your information. Write 
to-day. 



1 



RoGklsiand 
System 



w 



A. B. SCHMIDT, 
Gen'l Agent, Pass. Dept., 
Rock Island System, 91 Adams St. 
Chicago. 



"^ 



l^'hen writing to advertisers please mention The VN'hite City Magazine. 



THE WHITE CITY MAGAZINE AND SOUVENIR PROGRAM 



49 



Hemmer's 

Mechanical E^xposition 








$75,000 

Pro- 
duction 


Don't 

Miss 

It 


ONE OF THE CARDINAL FEATURES 
SHOWN AT WHITE CITY 




AH Caps and Entire Exterior and Interior 
Ornamental Composition, Plaster and Cement Work for White City 

furnished by 

The Decorators Supply Co. 

Manufacturers of Interior and Exterior Ornaments of Every 
Description in Cement, Composition, Plaster and Wood. 
Columns, Capitals, Brackets, Cornices, Friezes, Mouldings, 
Panels, Wood Grilles, Fine Woodwork, Plastic Ceiling and 
Wall Decorations. Composition Ornaments for Woodwork. 



Designs and Estimates Furnished 



209-2 1 9 S. Clinton St., Chicago 



When writing to advertisers please mention The White City Magazine. 



THE WHITE CITY MAGAZINE AND SOUVENIR PROGRAM 




Annoixnc 



emen 




C An attraction of real value to you, if you are an 
advertiser, is the product of Barnes-Crosby Company. 
The strength and originality of B-C Designs and the 
superiority of B-C Engravings hold the patronage of a 
large number of successful advertisers and other users 
of engraving throughout the country. COur work is shown regularly 
in "The White City Magazine" and the high grade periodicals. 

If you are a user of eiiijraving, write on your letterhead for a copy of our "B-C Co. Budget." 

Barnes-Crosby Company 

E. W. HOUSER, President ^ . , 

Artists CMr^DAX/UDC Commercial 

Electrotypers iliM OK/\V E-Ko Photographers ^f) 

Chicago New York St. Louis /\ 

215 Madison St., Chicago. 'Phones: Main 2487, Auto. 6208 




When writing to advertisers please mention The White City Magazine. 



THE WHITE CITY MAGAZINE AND SOUVENIR PROGRAM 



51 



A.L.SINGER&CO. 

173=175 E. Adams St. 

Chicago 



Makers of 



Fine Uniforms 



All Employes 

of White City 

Uniformed 

by Us 

Write for samples and prices 

All the Season's Latest Novelties can be found in our 
CUSTOM TAILORING DEPT. 











CLAY MODELING 

ELECTROTYPING 



'^ms^h t^. 



pHoncM/nnJSSC 



[7"AVENUL *-, 

»-' COR.QUINCYSr ^._ 



II.G;^iiO. 



Columns 
for White 
City 
Peristyle 




WE are equipped 
for making Col- 
umns from 6 to 
42 inches in diameter 
and proportionate 
lengths of all designs 
and woods ;also Balus- 
trades, Railings, Ped- 
estals and Pilasters, 
and Turned %Vork of 
every description. 



Write for our 
Book of Designs. 



HENRY SANDERS CO. 

Western Manufacturers of 

KOLL^S PATENT 
LOCK-JOINT COLUMNS 

77-85 Weed Street, Chicago, 111. 

EASTERN FACTORY: HARTMANN BROS. MFG. CO., MT. VERNON, N. Y. 



When writing to advertisers please mention The White City Magazine. 



52 



THE WHITE CITY MAGAZINE AND SOUl'ENIR PROGRAM 



A Paying Investment 

Even it" a S200 National Cash Register adds to your profits during a 
year (300 working days) the sum of only 

5 cents a day, it will earn yi/^ per cent For 
10 cents a day, it will earn 15 per cent 
15 cents a day, it will earn 22^^ per cent 
20 cents a day, it will earn 30 per cent 
30 cents a day, it will earn 45 per cent 
50 cents a day, it will earn 75 per cent 



You 

Annually 
on Your 
Investment 




SUCH AN INVESTMENT IS WORTH 
INVESTIGATING, AT LEAST, 

Your inquiry will receive our best attention. 

National 
Cash Register Co. 

48-50 State Street, Chicago 



Sales of our Registers have passed the 
420,000 mark. During 1904 National 
Cash Registers were manufactured, 
sold and delivered at the rate of more 
than one Register every three minutes 
of each working day. 



Thousands of Dollars' 
Worth of Protection 
Secured for Only 
a Few Cents a Day 



CASH REGISTERS 
SOLD ON 
EASY MONTHLY 
PAYMENTS 




When writing to advertisers please mention The White City Magazine. 



THE WHITE CITY MAGAZINE AND SOUVENIR PROGRAM 



The Very Best Laxative 

Re-Leaf Splits 




On Sale 
Everywhere 



[PILDTS" 

RE-LEAF CO., Pittsburgh 



Knickerbocker Ice Co. 



City Distributing Depots 




LOCATIONS 

420 22dSt. . 
448 W. 42d Place 
3808 Western Ave. 
3973 Vincennes Ave. 
6105 Lexington Ave. 
1211 75th St. 
6152 La Salle St. . 
9326 Anthony Ave. 
459 Kensington \\ 



TELEPHONES 

South 403 

. Yards 660 

. Yards 494 

. Drexel 6891 

Hyde Park 564 

Hyde Park 487 

Wentworth 526 

So. Chicago 99 

W. Pullman 132 



206 Johnson St Canal 486 

69 N. Curtis St. . . . Monroe 978 
Van Buren and Rockyv-ell Sts. . West 1350 
1420 Milwaukee Ave. . . . West 1299 
70S S. Ashland Ave. . . . Canal 195 
14th St. and Western Ave. . Canal 93 

395 Illinois St North 191 

Putnam St. and Chicago Ave. Monroe 1931 



401 Southport Ave. 
1713 Maple Ave. . 
539 Montrose Blvd. 
Mayfair . 



General Offices: 



Phone: 
Central 1006 



Bz'm gorfe Life Ql3uilDing 

171 La Salle Street 
CHICAGO 



North 1477 

. Evanston 445 

. Lake View 402 

Jefferson Park 38 



Suite: 717-724 



When writing to advertisers please mention The White City Magazine. 



54 



THE WHITE CITY MAGAZINE AND SOUJ'ENIR PROGRAM 



BUTTON MAKERS 
TO WHITE CITY 



Bastian Bros. 

Successors to F. F. Pulver Co. 
Rochester, N.Y. 

I 

cAdvertising Novelties 

Pulveroid Signs 

Celluloid Novelties 

College. Club & 

Society 'Pins 



CHICAGO OFFICE: MASONIC TEMPLE 
L. A. HALL, Western Manager 

Telephone Central 5375 



SCHMIDT BROS. CO. 

PAINTS, OILS 
AND GLASS 

7123-7125 Cottage Grove Ave. 

CHICAGO, ILL 

Telephone Hyde Park 256 



We have 
the contract 
for painting 
WHITE 
CITY 
and to 
furnish all 
requisite 
materials 




F. C. SCHMIDT, Mgr. 



A DOZEN DON'TS 



DON'T 

Neglect the surest protection to life and property 
— a telephone in the home. 

DON'T 

Delay availing yourself of the surest factor of 
increased business, the telephone. 

DON'T 

Be the only resident of your block without this 
luxurious necessity. 

DON'T 

Spend money and energy on unnecessary jour- 
neys, -when the telephone will do most of it 
for you. 

DON'T 

Leave your family in anxiety at your delayed 
return, -when a telephone in your home would 
he the medium of their relief. 

DON'T 

Make your -wife or other members of your 
family go up or do^vn stairs to answ^er the 
telephone ; have an extension station on second 
or third floor, or both. 



DON'T 

Fail to insure your property against loss by 
fire — the telephone calls the Fire Depart- 
ment. 

DON'T 

Allow another day to pass without having 
in your home the means of reaching your 

doctor instantly. 
DON'T 

Delude yourself -with the belief that you 
can get along without the telephone. 

DON'T 

Forget that -with a telephone in your home 
and another in your office, your two vital 
interests are aWays in touch. 

DON'T 

Live any longer without this faithful friend 
and ready servant ; always available night 
and day. 

DON'T 

Wait to contract for telephone service. 
Do it now. 



CHICAGO TELEPHONE COMPANY 

Main 294 Contract Department 203 AVasHine'ton Street 



J 



fVhen writing to advertisers please mention The Whitb City Magazine. 



THE WHITE CITY MAGAZINE AND SOUVENIR PROGRAM 55 



PI \u 



Take the 



Metropolitan 

West Side 

Elevated 

ro 

AUSTIN 

OAK PARK, HARLEM 

AND THE CEMETERIES 

CONCORDIA 

FOREST HOME 

W ALDHEIM 



FIVE 

CENTS TO THE COUNTRY 

Garfield Park Branch 



PI ^ D 

When writing to advertisers please mention The White City Magazine. 



56 



THE WHITE CITY MAGAZINE AND SOUVENIR PROGRAM 



The Nearest Drug Store to "-White City'*'' 

C. B. SEALES 



Telephone Wentworth 744 



PHARMACIST 

N. W. Corner 

64th St. and Rhodes Ave. 
CHICAGO, ILL. 



ESTABLISHED 1896 



EDWARDS,DEUT5CH & Heitmann 
■**®^ mthographers 

J^rompt-J^ha ble -Up to Date 
High class litAograph worltinallits branches 



194-202 S.CLINTON ST. 



TELEPHONES JJ^SSIISJl fA 



CHICAGO. 



COVER OF THIS MAGAZINE LITHOGRAPHED BY US. 



P. &s 




Patented Dec. 23, 1902. 
No. 1161. 



40,000 

of these used in White City. 



Qet our Prices on Receptacles for Permanent 
and Temporary Decorative Lighting. 

Pass & Seymour 

(Incorporated) 

130 West Jackson Boulevard 
CHICAGO, ILL. 



When writing to advertisers please mention The White Citv Magazine. 



THE WHITE CITY MAGAZINE AND SOUVENIR PROGRAM 









wmm 



SKIS] 



SIMlSl'SlMlS 

siwalsiSfm 









\Ek 



I 



Ideal Sites for Homes 

ALONG THE 

NEW 

RAVENS^VOOD 
EXTENSION 

of tne 

Nortn^vestern 
Elevatea 
Railroaa 



PURE AIR 



PLENTY^/ ROOM 



QUICK 

TRANSPORTATION 

DOWN-TOWN 

5-cent Fare 



^ 



SI 



it 






SIMS 






siwmJisiSfs 



SIMS 



siMisJlsiMis 



When writing to advertisers please mention The White City Magazine. 



^8 



THE WHITE CITY MAGAZINE AXD SOUVENIR PROGRAM 



Tiic White City Magazine is printed and bound by 

P. F. Pettibone 
(S^Co. 




i^ 




STATIONERS 

PRINTERS 

BlankBookMakers 
Lithographers 

Edition Printing 
and Binding 



Main Store 

178 Monroe Streets 

Store, Factory and 
General Offices 

44-50 S. Desplaines 
Street* 

CHICAGO 



Telephone Monroe 453 

Pri-vate Exchange 






When writing to advertisers please mention The White City Magazine. 



THU WHITE CITY MAGAZINE AND SOUVENIR PROGRAM 



59 




Tke Wkite City 
Magazine 

tnrougnout tne entire season, 
July, August, SepteniDer and 
October, will combine its 
regular 

PROGRAM WITH 

THE MAGAZINE 

making it 

^. WHITE CITY 
MAGAZINE y 
SOUVENIR 
PROGRAM 



Hign grade advertisers can 
quickly realize its value. A 
limited amount or space open 
for tbe season. For rates and 
rull iniormation apply to 

Franc R.E.Woodward 

Manager Publicity Department 

Sixty-third St. 6^ South Park Ave. 

"Phone Wentworth 996 

Private Exchange 



American 
Posting 
Service 

Morgan Street : Comer Lake 
'Ptone 1963 Monroe 

Billposting 

Distributing 

Poster Printing 



Special a^iention 
given to all kinds 
or aavertismg toy 
Balls, Picnics, 
Excursions, etc. 

House-to- nouse 
distributing or 
circulars, book- 
lets, samples, etc., 
IS done by well- 
organized crews 
or competent men 
at very lowest 
possible rates. 

No cbarge ir work 
IS not satisfactory. 



When writing to advertisers please mention The White City Magazine. 



[6o 



THE WHITE CITV MAGAZINE AND SOUVENIR PROGRAM 



Cnicago GT* Oak Park 
Elevated. Railroad. 



U 



Direct Route for 

River Forest 

Oak Park, Austin ana 

NV^est Side 

Residents V isitmg 

W^kite City 



Change Cars at State &^ v an Buren 
( Uinon Loop ) 



When writing to advertisers please mention The White City Magazinb. 



THE WHITE CITY MAGAZINE AND SOUl'ENIR PROGRAM 6l 



The exterior and interior millwork on the beautiful 
General Office Buildings and Main Entrance to 
= White City is entirely the product of = 

HARTY BROS. (Si> HARTY CO. 

MANUFACTURERS 

SASH, DOORS, FRAMES 
AND MOULDINGS 



442 to 458 W. Twenty-First St., - Chicago 

Lumber District 
Telephones: Canal 554 and 555 



AT THE WHITE CITY 



Be Sure and Visit the 

ELECTRIC THEATRE 

Electric pictorial reproductions of startling and 

thrilling events showing the animation 

and action of living objects 

LATEST ELECTRIC PICTURES 

Always Something New Go Once, l^oull Go Again 



OWNERS 

American Vending Machine Co.^ 340 State St, 



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62 



THE WHITE CITY MAGAZINE AND SOUVENIR PROGRAM 





W€€{/ 



LTTHO.CO. 

CHICAGO 



^ CLARK AND HARRISON STREETS 
' Telephone Harrison 424 



INDOOR AND OUTDOOR 

LITHOGRAPHING 

Higk Grade and or Every Description 

LET US TRY FOR YOUR BUSINESS BY GIVING US A CHANCE TO ESTIMATE 

Maybe we can give you tetter Avork or tetter prices 

TRY US AND SEE 



PHONE HYDE PAKK 493 



GEORaE A. liEW^IS 

BUILDERS' HARDWARE 



LARGE CONTRACT WORK 
A SPECIALTY 




407-409 E. SIXTY-THIRD ST. 
CHICAGO 



EVERYTHING IN WHITE CITY IN THE HARDW^ARE 1,INE 

"FROM NAILS TO RAILS" FURNISHED 

BY ME 



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THE WHITE CITY MAGAZINE AND SOUVENIR PROGRAM 



63 



The Club-Room Car 

(no extra charge) 

IS FOUND ONLY ON THE 




Chicago & Eastern Illinois Railroad 




BETWEEN 



CHICAGO 



AND 



ST. LOUIS 

This is but one of the many new 
features in our equipment which 
agreeably surprises our patrons. 
In Chicago, trains arrive and leave 
from the 

La Salle Street Station 
on the Elevated Loop 

and in St. Louis, the Union Station. 



F. J. DEICKE, 

Gen. Agt. Pass. Dept., 

900 Olive Street, St. Louis. 



A. B. SCHMIDT, 

Gen. Agt. Pass. Dept., 

91 Adams Street, Cliicago. 



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64 



THE WHITE CITY MAGAZIXE AND SOUJ'EXIR PROGRAM 



^ Chance for ^11 



to see the greatest piece of architectural work ever constructed 
in this country— WHITE CITY. 

The Chicago Electric Traction Company 

will assist in swelling the crowds by conveying people from the 
City of Harvey, 111., the Village of Posen, the City of Blue Island, 
Alt. Greenwood, Purington, Morgan Park, Washington Heights, 
South Englewood, Auburn Park and Park Manor. ^ All cars 
from the aforesaid points will run direct to the main entrance of 
WHITE CITY, 63d Street and South Park Avenue. C, Cars 
will be run at short intervals for the accommodationof the traveling 
public. Also special attention will be given to pleasure seekers. 

W. H. Conrad 

General Manager 
Chicago Electric Traction Co. 



W. R. JAGQUEST 



PLUMBING 

GAS FITTING 

HOT WATER HEAT- 
ING & SEWERAGE 



Telephone Yards 142 



3528 S. WOOD ST. 

CHICAGO 



ILLINOIS 
ROOFING & SUPPLY CO. 

When you 
want a 

Metal 

Ceiling 

S sec us 

» , , - M' We can save 

i.ilR,Mli!t£:ifc you money 

WE HAVE ALL KINDS OF DESIGNS 




OUR METAL CEILINGS WERE USED IN 
CONSTRUCTING WHITE CITY 



23-25 Lake Street - Chicago 

Telephones: 
Central 514 Automatic 6(71 



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THE WHITE CITY MAGAZINE AND SOUVENIR PROGRAM 



65 



The South Side 

Elevated Railroad 

Company 

has a station 
at the gate of 

White City 





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66 



THE WHITE CITY MAGAZINE AND SOUVENIR PROGRAM 



i lie Calumet Cars 

(Yellow Line) 

RUN DIRECT TO 

THE WHITE CITY 



FROM 

South Chicago, Rohey, Man- 
hattan Beach, Pullman, ^iVest 
Pullman, Kensington, Rose- 
land, Burnsiae, Grand Cross- 
ing, Auhurn Park, Bryn 
Ma-wr and Parkside : : : : 







CENTRAL 

PRINTING & ENGRAVING 

COMPANY 



COMMERCIAL, RAILROAD, CIRCUS AND 
THEATRICAL PRINTING 



POSTERS 

FOR BILLBOARD 
AND ELEVATED STATIONS 



CAR CARDS 

FOR SURFACE 
AND ELEVATED LINES 



140-146 Monroe Street, Chicago 

Tel. Central 1 144 Automatic 6279 



WE PRINT THE CAR CARDS FOR WHITE CITY 



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THE WHITE CITY MAGAZINE AND SOUVENIR PROGRAM 



f — ^ f — ^ 



o 

I— ( 



U 
O 



ALL OUR LINES 

WITH FREE TRANSFERS 

LEAD DIRECT TO 



( — \( ^ 



VV^hite City 



o 
2 



o 

2 



J \ J 



Cofiage Grove, State Street 

N\'ent\vortn Avenue 

Halstea Street 

Asnland 

Etc. 




55 Additional Trips 

no-win regular daily operation on tKe 

SIXTY-THIRD STREET LINE 

One-minute intervals between 
cars on Sundays and rlolidays 
with increased service as needed 

1%-niinute intervals during 
the rush hours on week-days 



m 

H 
> 

in 



Z 

o 

> 
r 

t— < 
z 

o 



h 



Cnicago City Rail^vay Co. 



T. E. MITTEN, First Vice-President 



M. B. STARRING, General Manager 



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THE WHITE CITY MAGAZINE AND SOUVENIR PROGRAM 




^AcWORLD\S FAVORITE 



Triple 

Reversible-Six Finished 

Surfaces 



REX-E.Z.E. 

TRADE mark; REGISTERED 



Three 

Strops Combined 

in One 



Easily preserve and impart a keen edge to razors, surgical instruments 

and other fine steel blades witliout expert knowledge and experience. 

DIRECTION AND GUARANTEE TAG ATTACHED 

No. 1. Safety Size, l%x20 Price, §1.00 

No. 2. junior " 2 x22 " 1.50 

No.2'<.l\Iedium " 2%y.2?, " 2.00 

No. 8. Regular " 2;4:x25 " 2.50 

No.4. Large " 2'4x25 " 3.00 

SEE REGISTERED TRADE MARK. TAKE NO IMITATIONS. 
Jipply to Dealers Jinywhere, or 



Send 2c stamp for 

free booklet 

of Shaving and 

Stropping 

Instructions 



WEIFFENBACH MFG. CO. 

Sole Proprietors 620 North Humboldt St., CHICAGO 

M. J. JANECEK, Gen'L Salens Manager 

Jobbing Manufacturers of Finest Shell Horse Hide, Imported & Domestic 
Russia., Staple & High Grade Razor Strops of every Hind. 

RAZOR STROPS 






Agent for 

NORTHERN 

Ttie most silent 

American Car 

2 cy. 

Bevel Gear Drive 




fW> 



Agent for 

DARRACQ 

Famous 

French Touring 

Cars —Immediate 

Delivery 



The great 4=CyIinder Air=Cooled Car. Runabout, Light Tonneau and 20=30 H. P. 
lOuring Car. Light and speedy, always under perfect control. 




:<@i> 



309=310=311 MICHIGAN AVENUE 



OPPOSITE LOGAN MONUMENT 



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THE WHITE CITY MAGAZINE AND SOW EN I R PROGRAM 



FOREMAN 




92-96 WASHINGTON STREET 

if 3C 



uality 



A NEW MEN'S CLOTHING 
STORE of QUALITY 



Perfect Fitting Garments 
of Latest Fashion. Prices 
irom T-welve to Forty Dol- 
lars. A pleasure to sno^v you 
tne store ana clothes. 



CENTRAL 

PRINTING & ENGRAVING 

COMPANY 



COMMERCIAL, RAILROAD, CIRCUS AND 
THEATRICAL PRINTING 



POSTERS 

FOR BILLBOARD 
AND ELEVATED STATIONS 



CAR CARDS 

FOR SURFACE 
AND ELEVATED LINES 



140-146 Monroe Street, Chicago 

Tel. Central 1 144 Automatic 6279 

WHAT BETTER METHOD OF ADVERTISING THAN OUR WORK 
FOR WHITE CITY? 



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THE WHITE CITY MAGAZINE AND SOUVENIR PROGRAM 




DR. E. Alfred Kohler 



DENTIST 

1206 E.GARFIELD BLVD. (55TH St.) S.E. COR. STATE ST. 

Telephones; Wentworth 371. 610, 131. 



EVERY LADY 

SHOULD VISIT BURNHAM'S 



Ourexperts restore the hairtoits 
natural color by a simple process 

MARCEL WAVING 

BY EXPERT FRENCHMEN 



OUR SA'A^'^^'o^o^'Rg IS THE BEST 
HAIR DYEING 

HAIR DRESSING 

Rare Shades of Hair Perfe ctly Matched 

OUR n^^^~l Manicuring 
Hand Massage 

Every lady can 
have beautiful, 
smooth, 
white hands. 

J Foot Massage 



SPECIAL 
HAIR TOMIC 

used with 
wonderful result! 
for years in our 
scientific scalp 
treatment. 
Price, gl.OO. 



FACIAL MASSAGE I 




OUR NEW VIBRATORY 

lETHODisnottheordi- 
nary massatie as it is 
usually given, but a treatment which will build up new 
tissue, remove lines, tone up the muscles and give to 
the face a fresh, healthy, glowing appearance sug- 
gestive of youth. 

Removes wrinkles, 
fine lines and re- 
stores wasted 
tissues. It is a slcin 
beautifier in every sense of the word. Price, Sl.OO. 



E.BURNHAM'S Hygienic 

SKIN FOOD 



LADIES' TURKISH BATHS 



E. BURNHAM 

70 AND 72 STATE STREET, CHICAGO 



Knickerbocker Ice Co. 




City Distributing Depots 



LOCATIONS 

420 22d St. . 
448 W. 42d Place 
3808 Western Ave. . 
3973 Vincennes Ave. . 
6105 Lexington Ave. . 
1211 75th St. 
6152 La Salle St. . 
9326 Anthony Ave. 
459 Kensington Ave. . 
206 Johnson St. . 
69 N. Curtis St. . 
Van Buren and Rockwell 
1420 Milwaukee Ave. . 
705 S. Ashland Ave. . 
14th St. and Western A 
395 Illinois St. 
Putnam St. and Chicago 
401 Southport Ave. 
1713 Maple Ave. . 
539 Montrose Blvd 
Mayfair . 



TELEPHONES 

South 403 

. Yards 660 

. Yards 494 

. Drexel 6891 

Hyde Park 564 

Hyde Park 487 

Wentworth 526 

So. Chicago 99 

W. Pullman 132 

. Canal 486 

Monroe 978 

West 1350 

. West 1299 

. Canal 195 

ve. . Canal 93 

. North 191 

Ave. Monroe 1931 

. North 1477 

. Evanston 445 

. Lake View 402 

Jefferson Park 38 



Sts. 



General Offices: 



Phone: 
Central 1006 



171 La Salle Street 
CHICAGO 



Suite: 717-724 



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THE WHITE CITY MAGAZINE AND SOUVENIR PROGRAM 




Annoixnc 




emen 




C An attraction of real value to you, if you are an 
advertiser, is the product of Barnes-Crosby Company. 
The strength and originality of B-C Designs and the 
superiority of B-C Engravings hold the patronage of a 
large number of successful advertisers and other users 
of engraving throughout the country. COur work is shown regularly 
in "The White City Magazine" and the high grade periodicals. 

If you are a user of engraving, write on your letterhead for a copy of our "B-C Co. Budget.'' 

Barnes-Crosby Company 

. . E. W. HOUSER, President _ 

Artists CMr^o A\7TrE>c Commercial 

g> Electrotypers Ili\ OKAV tKo Photographers f) 

Chicago New York St. Louis /\ 

M 215 Madison St., Chicago. 'Phones: Main 2487, Auto. 6208 ^"^ 




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THE WHITE CITY MAGAZINE AND SOUVENIR PROGRAM 



The South Side 

Elevated Railroad 

Company 

has a station 
at the gate of 

White City 





When writing to advertisers please mention The White City Magazine. 




'■'■Dedicated to Alerrimcnt and Alirih. 



The IVhite Cirr Magazine 

AND SOUVENIR PROGRAM 



Vol. I 



JULY, 1905 



No. 6 





ISITORS to Chicago, ar- 
riving after twilight, will 
be greeted when still 
many miles from the city 
by the brilliant scintil- 
lating rays of light ema- 
nating from the tall elec- 
tric tower which arises to an altitude of 
300 feet from the peristyle in the center 
of White City. To the residents of 
Chicago this marvelous electric tower 
will act as a constant beacon light and 
guide, suggesting the fun and jollity to 
be found within the hospitable gates of 
this beautiful amusement resort and that 
sordid surroundings in crowded locali- 
ties can be quickly exchanged for the 
beauty and limitless pleasures to be 
found at White City. 

On arriving within view of the en- 
trance the eye is dazzled by myriads of 
incandescent lights, with which the 
buildings are studded. At the main gate, 
located at the corner of 63d street and 
South Park avenue, the entire structure 
is outlined and the gigantic archway is 
dotted with thousands of lights. The 
massive snow white entrance to White 
City is one of the most beautiful struc- 
ture" of its kind. 

On entering the main archway the vis- 
itor will find, to the left, the executive 
ofifices of the President and the General 
Manager, also the Department of Pub- 
licity. These offices are splendidly fur- 
nished and completely equipped. In the 
rear of the offices of the Department of 



Publicity are public telephone booths, 
telegraph offices, etc., for the accommo- 
dation of visitors. To the right of the 
main entrance are located the adminis- 
trative offices of the Secretary and Treas- 
urer and corps of busy assistants. 

Passing through the turnstiles, after 
paying the nominal admission fee of 10 
cents, the visitor becomes a guest of 
White City, with the implied promise 
that he or she shall not want for enter- 
tainment and amusement so long as the 
visit is continued. The first impression 
received is one of dazzling brilliancy, be- 
cause of the thousands of flashing iri- 
descent gleamings radiating from the 
countless incandescent lights which out- 
line all the buildings and create day out 
of night. 

As the magnificence of the scene dawns 
upon the visitor, after the first burst of 
splendor, and the sounds of laughter and 
merriment come to the ear, a feeling of 
undefinable pleasure and gratification 
takes the place of startled wonder. 
There are the crowds on the half-mile 
"Board Walk," the alluring strains of 
music, the sweet and delicate fragrance 
of beautiful flowers in the Sunken Gar- 
dens and art urns, all of which combine 
to produce a sense of keen enjoyment 
and delightful anticipation which cannot 
be analyzed. 

Passing toward the Plaza, with its 
thousands of beautiful and rare flowers, 
the visitor may descend a half-dozen 
broad steps and find himself on the 



12 



THE WHITE CITY MAGAZINE AND SOUl'ENIR PROGRAM 



Plaza, which surrounds the beautifully 
designed and elaborately carved Band 
Stand. Located about the Band Stand 
are hundreds of long and commodious 
settees, which furnish a resting place for 
tired sight-seers or those who wish to 
enjoy the musical programme and the 
free outdoor circus without having their 
thoughts distracted by the passing 
throngs of laughter lovers. Musical pro- 
srrammes will be rendered everv after- 



of White City, be entertained with a 
first-class musical programme and a 
series of eventful performances by clever 
acrobats — finding in this way complete 
and unequaled entertainment without the 
necessity for expending another penny. 
Of course there are other and more dom- 
inating features in White City, to each 
of which a small admission fee is 
charged, but it is not required or even 
suGfCfcsted of the visitor that these should 







CJiutes Lagoon, Peristyle and Base of Tui 



noon and evening from the Band Stand 
by organizations having a world-wide 
reputation. On the large open stage, 
which wall be seen a short distance south 
of the Band Stand, performances will 
be regularly given by clever acrobats and 
other performers. 

With a liberality which has never been 
equaled in the history of amusements in 
this or any other country, the manage- 
ment has arranged to give the people of 
Chicago and visitors more for their 
money than has ever before been offered 
under any circumstances. Upon paying 
the admission fee of 10 cents at the main 
entrance, the visitor can spend an entire 
afternoon and evening within the walls 



necessarily be patronized. Of course, 
knowing the amusement loving tenden- 
cies of the people of Chicago, the man- 
agement constructed these features with 
the expectation that they would, be lib- 
erally patronized, but this is left wholly 
to the impulse of the visitor. 

An expenditure of about $1,250,000 
was required before the gates of White 
City were thrown open to the public. 
The progress of construction has not 
only excited the admiration of builders 
all over the country, but has in itself 
established a new record. 

Eight months previous to the opening 
date the site at present covered by the 
world's greatest amusement resort pre- 



THE WHITE CITY MAGAZINE AND SOUVENIR PROGRAM 



13 



sented a scene of bucolic rest and pas- 
toral simplicity. A gang of workmen 
drove a peaceful flock of sheep out of 
the corn field, which had flourished there 
during the season, put up the fence, and 
White City began to grow like magic. 
White City has broken more records 
than any previous enterprise of the kind. 
It covers more ground than any similar 
enterprise and contains more features. 



street. White City is lighted with 
125,000 incandescent lights. 

Aside from the brilliancy and beauty 
of the night illumination at White City, 
a view by day presents a delightful 
charm to the artistic eye. The buildings 
are all architecturally beautiful and the 
master hand which designed them has 
outclassed those men whose efforts made 
the World's Columbian Exposition (the 




Beautiful Venice; Also the Band Stand 



It has cost more, owing to the perma- 
nency of the construction and the first- 
class material which was required in 
every instance. It has the highest tower, 
illuminated with 25,000 incandescent 
lights. It has the greatest capacity for 
utilizing electrical energy of any single 
enterprise, it being a statistical fact that 
the electrical energy required for fur- 
nishing the power and light for White 
City is greater in quantity than the total 
electrical energy required for heating, 
lighting and purposes of power in all of 
that part of Chicago lying south of 39th 



original White City) the wonder of the 
world. 

At various points about the "Board 
Walk" are located artistic booths filled 
with curios from all parts of the globe, 
and every opportunity is furnished at 
frequent intervals to supply any craving 
for sweets or such popular products as 
popped corn, roasted peanuts, etc., etc. 
Soda fountains, with their glittering 
array of multi-colored syrups and foam- 
ing jets, are to be found at convenient 
intervals, so that the crowds, when warm 
and dusty because of the laughing and 



14 



THE WHITE CITY MAGAZINE AND SOUVENIR PROGRAM 



shouting which is always incident to a 
trip to \\'hite City, can indulge in in- 
nocent refreshment. 

Enormous electric signs present them- 
selves in an unmistakable way to tell the 
\'isitor what form of attraction is con- 
tained beneath their supervision. Each 
attraction is housed in a separate build- 
ing, and all are amply provided with 
comfortable opera chairs. No attraction 
is permitted to be overcrowded at any 
performance, the number of admissions 
to each show being limited to the num- 
ber of seats in the auditorium. Every 
possible means for administering to the 
comfort of visitors has been furnished 



by the management, and strenuous ef- 
forts have been successfully made for 
providing entertainment and features of 
a high order. Only such attractions as 
those which combine amusement in a 
high degree, together with unimpeach- 
able character, were chosen, and any- 
thing which might possibly give offense 
to the most sensitive or supercritical 
person has been carefully eliminated. 

Now, the acme of enterprise, the su- 
perlative of amusement, and on the pin- 
nacle of prosperity stands beautiful, 
magnificent White City, with its select 
features for the innocent amusement of 
the people of all classes. 



FIRE 



SHOW 



A MARVELOUS AND THRILLING SPECTACLE 




HE greatest and most elab- 
orate attraction at White 
City is undoubtedly the Fire 
Show. This mammoth spec- 
tacle of burning buildings and 
dashing fire departments in action is one 



SR.-T 



which will stir the pulses of even the 
most sluggish. This great feature is 
located in the extreme southern part of 
the grounds, and the entrance is on the 
southeast corner of the oblong formed 
by the "Board Walk." This show is 




r^ 




Front of Fire Show Grand Stand 



THE WHITE CITY MAGAZINE AND SOUVENIR PROGRAM 



15 



given on a scale of grandeur that is mar- 
velous. The grandstand for the audi- 
ence alone seats more than fifteen hun- 
dred persons. 

From the grandstand the audience is 
given a view of three blocks of business 
houses such as may be seen in any part 
of a metropolitan city. There are dry 
goods stores, department stores and all 
other kinds of stores in the scene. Manv 



fight and s^ ectators crowd about them 
to witness the conflict, when a patrol 
wagon dashes up and the offenders are 
arrested. 

Suddenly, without a moment's warn- 
ing, the cry of "Fire!" comes from the 
hotel which stands on the corner of the 
street. The scene quickly changes. The 
terrified occupants of the hotel crowd to 
the windows and scream for help. The 




Scene in the Fire Show 



of the spectators will quickly recognize 
many of the names displayed on the 
sign boards in front of the various busi- 
ness places. 

The scene is one typical of any city on 
a busy day. Wagons and cabs trot 
through the streets, automobiles dash in 
and out among the teams, trolley cars 
speed along regulation tracks, and hun- 
dreds of pedestrians crowd on the side- 
walks in the pursuit of their business. 
Women stop in at the stores to purchase 
goods, the men stop at cigar stands and 
purchase tobacco, and the view is one 
of life and action. Two boys get into a 



crowds on the streets run to watch the 
structure burn, and are driven back by 
the police just as the engines arrive. 
Fire lines are stretched, the hose is 
coupled to the hydrants, and the life-nets 
are spread barely in time to catch the 
apparently frenzied men and women as 
they leap from the topmost stories of 
the structure. The firemen perform 
wonderful feats of agility as they scale 
up the walls with their pompier ladders 
and slide down ropes with fainting 
women in their arms. 

After a hard battle all the occupants 
of the hotel are rescued, and then the 



i6 



THE WHITE CITY MAGAZINE AND SOUVENIR PROGRAM 



work of fighting the fire is begun. The 
hose shoots strong streams of water into 
the blazing building and the long ex- 
tension ladder creeps slowly into place. 
The flames seem for a time as if they 
would defeat the brave efforts of the 



plete, and is one of the finest shows of 
its kind in the world, even exceeding the 
Hale's Fire Fighters, which attained so 
much popularity at St. Louis last year. 
Chief West, who was one of the famous 
Kansas City firemen who went to Eu- 




Ol>en Air Circus Acts 



firemen to extinguish them. But finally, 
after a furious battle with the flames, the 
firemen are victorious and the blaze is 
subdued. And the audience disperses. 

That this spectacle is presented on a 
mammoth scale is readily understood 
when it is known that it requires three 
complete fire companies to produce this 
show, including an extension ladder and 
chief's wagon ; over two hundred and 
fifty people are used to give the street 
scene the proper life and bustle ; five 
cabs and two atitomobiles dash through 
the streets, and fovirteen horses are used. 
The exhibition is most lifelike and in- 
tensely realistic ; the audience frequently 
forgets that it is only a spectacle that 
they are watching, and not a real con- 
flagration, and are aroused to a high 
pitch of excitement. This show cost 
more than $20,000 to install and com- 



rope and taught the foreigners how to 
handle engines, is the leader of the Fire 
Department at White City. 



"Most magnificent and comprehensive 
amusement resort the world has ever 
seen."- — Warren A. Patrick in the Bill- 
hoard. 



"Beautiful White City is exactly 
what the people of Chicago have long 
needed, and they certainly appreciate the 
efforts of the liberal management." — 
Nezv York Clipper. 



"Cost a million, but it's yours for a 
dime." — Amy Leslie in the Daily Nc-ivs. 



THE WHITE CITY MAGAZINE AND SOUVENIR PROGRAM 



17 



BEAUTIFUL VENICE 

CANALS AND GONDOLAS 
FACILITATE A DELIGHTFUL VISIT 




LL the romantic beauty of 
the cool and dehghtful gon- 
dola ride through the moon- 
lit waterways of the ancient 
Italian city is greatly en- 
hanced when a spectator realizes the his- 
toric scenes and structures which are re- 
produced before him. All the gorgeous 
scenes are actually represented in per- 



beautifully embellished with fine wood 
carvings. 

Floating gently forward to the strains 
of the music furnished by the gondoliers, 
the journey begins at the Arsenal in 
Venice. Proceeding northward through 
the canals, the spectator sees the homes 
of the gondoliers to the right, and next 
to them is the historic parish church of 




Interior View of Beautiful Venice 



spective and are identical copies, on a 
smaller scale, of the beautiful and medi- 
seval edifices of the old Venetian city. 

This feature of White City is one of 
the largest on the grounds, and is located 
in a magnificent building on the west 
side of the "White City Board Walk." 
This structure is typical of the architec- 
ture to be seen in the ancient city of 
the Doges, and is entirely white, being 



Pope Leo the Tenth, near which is the 
Eglise Sainte Marie-du-Salute. The 
Royal Palace of Venice next comes into 
view as the gondola floats on through 
the Grand Canal toward the Ducal Pal- 
ace. Passing this, the boat sweeps by 
the old Campanile to the Hall of Justice. 
Here is shown the historic Lion's Mouth, 
into which any person might throw a 
written accusation acrainst another. In 



i8 



THE ]VH1TE CITY MAGAZINE AND SOUVENIR PROGRAM 



the mediaeval days the Lion's Mouth was 
an institution feared by every citizen of 
\^enice, for the name of the accuser was 
kept secret. Just across the canal from 
the Lion's Mouth is the Prison, and con- 
necting the two is the world-famous 
Bridge of Sighs, over which condemned 
prisoners walked and saw the daylight 
for the last time. Still carried north- 
ward, the gondola next floats onward to 



the Campanile, the spectator next sees 
the St. Marc Church, which is also 
marked by a red column. On the right, 
next to the St. Marc Church, is the 
Campanile Tower as it appeared before 
it fell. On the left is an old wine house 
and the poorer quarters of the city. 

To the right is the famous Rialto 
Bridge, which has been the favorite sub- 
ject for art pictures for many years. 




Nighl Scene in the Lagoon 



the Courtyard of Persano Palace, next 
to which is the entrance to the prison 
and an ancient palace. In the palace 
courtyard is a well, typical of Venice. 

Rounding the police box, the gondola 
goes eastward to the Palace Guinahi, 
passing the Campanile and the Grand 
Canal on the left. On the same side is 
the Palace Pisani Moretta and a hotel. 
Across the canal to the right is noted 
Palazzo Contarini Delia Figure and the 
Palace Da Dula a Murano. This struc- 
ture is distinguished easily by the red 
column in front of it. Sweeping past 
an old well on the right and passing by 



Coming back to the starting place, the 
gondola passes another large palace on 
the southeast. During the entire trip the 
flags seen on the many Venetian masts 
are the emblems of the various Doges. 
This trip is more than three-quarters of 
a mile in length and is one of the most 
interesting as well as most beautiful fea- 
tures of White City. 



"A pleasure resort combining the at- 
tractive features seen on the Midway 
during the World's Fair at Chicago and 
on the Pike at St. Louis." — Sail Fran- 
CISCO Post. 



THE WHITE CITY MAGAZINE AND SOUVENIR PROGRAM 



19 



SCENIC R A I LW A Y 

AN ENCHANTING RIDE 
IN SWIFT MOVING CARS 




ITH the exception of the Fire 
Show, the Scenic Railway is 
the most elaborate and pre- 
tentious attraction at White 
City. This feature of the 
park is located on the west side of the 
"Board Walk," near the Electric Tower. 
The front of the building is wide open 
and inside is a spiral railway represent- 
ing the ascent up a steep hill or moun- 



After the cars are loaded at the sta- 
tion bordering on the "Board Walk," 
they are drawn up a steep incline. Here 
they are started down a precipitous in- 
cline without any motive power. Mak- 
ing a long sweep downward, the car 
speeds at a terrific rate up a hill, then 
down another, and then dashes upward 
into tlie Palace of Views. 

This is a most sumptuously fitted 




Loading Station for Scenic Raihvay 



tain. This, however, is merely the load- 
ing station. This attraction has been in- 
stalled at a great expense and is most 
complete in every detail. This attrac- 
tion appeals strongly to those who are 
seeking excitement, combined with a 
high degree of entertainment. Every 
moment of the long and swift trip up 
hill and down dale through the castle 
of views is one of the keenest enjoy- 
ment. 



place, showing many of the most beau- 
tiful scenes in the country actually re- 
produced in detail. The car glides 
swiftly past a delightful little waterfall, 
sweeps onward around the pond, a fleet- 
ing view of a party of bathers is had 
and then the car plunges into a dark tun- 
nel. On dashing out from the darkness 
a huge and grotesque figure of a man 
brandishing a club is seen. The color- 
ing of the figure and the effect of the 



20 



THE WHITE CITY MAGAZINE AND SOUVENIR PROGRAM 



various colored electric lights thrown on 
him, give the figure a most startling ap- 
pearance. Onward dashes the car into 
darkness again, only to emerge a mo- 
ment later into another beautiful scene. 
Thus come a succession of changes from 
darkness to light, and then the car 
sweeps out into daylight again and gen- 
tly drifts on over an undulating track to 
the starting place and the ride is over. 

But all this takes up a good amount 
of time, as the trackage for this attrac- 
tion covers more than three-quarters of 
a mile and is so scattered with different 
views and figures that the spectator be- 
lieves that he has traveled much farther 
than he really has. There is a keen 
sense of exhilaration as the car starts on 
its initial downward course, the occupant 
grasps his seat and hangs on for dear 



life, though he is securely strapped in. 
Soon, however, this fear wears off, and 
after a second or so the visitor is laugh- 
ing and shouting and urging the car to 
a faster speed. This feature of White 
City has already attained a great amount 
of popularity, and it is safe to predict 
that the Scenic Railway will draw as 
great crowds as any other attraction at 
the grounds. This feature is especially 
delightful on a warm day or night, and 
is sure to draw enormous crowds of visi- 
tors every afternoon and evening. The 
tracks are inspected several times daily, 
so that the Scenic Railway is kept con- 
stantly in a state of repair and precludes 
all possibility of any mishap. This is 
true of all the amusements at White 
City — the safety of the public is the 
first consideration of the management. 



SHOOTING THE CHUTES 

LATEST STYLE AND BEST EQUIPPED 
STRUCTURE IN AMERICA 



HHE Chutes is easily picked 
out from the many attrac- 
tions at White City by the 
great crowds which are con- 
stantly about it. This attrac- 
tion has been extremely popular at every 
amusement resort for many years, and 
every manager has come to believe that 
his park is not complete unless he has 
one. White City, following its policy 
of having only the best of everything, 
has a Chutes that is the best ever con- 
structed up to date. It has all the latest 
improvements and will bear comparison 
with any other Chutes in the country. 

This form of amusement is one which 
appeals directly to all classes and to all 
ages, until it has become so well known 
that the phrase "Shoot the Chutes" is 
understood by every person. There is 
a strange exhilaration and fascinating 
sensation about the dash at incredible 
speed down the swift incline and the 
darting out upon the water on the flat- 
bottomed boats, which seem every mo- 
ment as if they would dive under, which 
attracts every visitor. The Chutes at 
White City is located at the extreme 
south end of the "Board Walk" and is 
at the south end of the Lagoon. 



A feature of the Chutes is the escala- 
tor. This machine carries the people to 
the top of the pavilion, where they take 
the boats for the descent, saves them the 
effort of walking up the steep incline 
and greatly facilitates the quick move- 
ment of the crowds. The Escalator is 
very similar to a moving sidewalk and 
is provided with a moving handrail, so 
that a person may steady himself while 
making the ascent. This machine is the 
longest one ever constructed, being more 
than 500 feet in length, and it is en- 
tirely safe. This same form of machine 
in a less improved state has been used 
in various stores and parks for a num- 
ber of years, and there has never yet 
been any accident with one of them. 

The lagoons into which the boats dash 
with their merry crowds has been built 
especially for the Chutes. It is very 
large for the purpose for which it is 
used and contains more than 1,350,000 
gallons of water. The sides of the la- 
goon are heavily cemented and water 
rains off of them very quickly. There 
are several entrances to the "Board 
Walk" from the lagoon, so that there 
is no chance for too great crowds to 
gather about the sides of the pond. 



THE WHITE CITY MAGAZINE AND SOUVENIR PROGRAM 



21 



The Chutes at White City are the 
longest which have ever been constructed 
and are complete in every detail. The 
entire framework of the Chutes is built 
from steel and has been solidly rein- 
forced in many places. The tracks down 
which the boats slide at their swift speed 
is also made of steel, as is the roadbed 
for the cars. A large corps of guards 



repair man is constantly maintained at 
the Garage to care for all machines left 
there. There is also a huge tank, hold- 
ing over six hundred gallons of gasoline, 
at which the visiting machines may be 
replenished. 

When a machine drives up to the 
gates at White City there is a uni- 
formed attendant to assist the occupants 




Chutes Lagoon; Also Vieiv of Fire Shoiv Front 



are constantly about the attraction and 
every precaution is taken for the han- 
dling of visitors quickly . 



WhiteCityAutomobileGarage 

Just across the street from the en- 
trance to White City, on the northwest 
corner of Sixty-third street and South 
Park avenue, is the White City Auto- 
mobile Garage. Here a party may check 
a machine with the same facility with 
which he would ordinarily check an um- 
brella, and he may feel absolutely certain 
that his car will be given the best of care 
while there. A skillful and well-trained 



to alight and direct the chauffeur to the 
Garage. In this way a party may come 
to White City in an automobile with as 
little trouble and responsibility as a pe- 
destrian. 

The capacity of this Garage is three 
hundred machines. Its great popularity 
is attested by the fact that on the two 
days following the opening of White 
City the Garage accommodated more 
than two hundred machines daily. In 
addition to the large number of automo- 
biles cared for, many horses and car- 
riages are provided with suitable quar- 
ters while their owners enjoy the hospi- 
tality of White City. 



22 



THE WHITE CITY MAGAZINE AND SOUVENIR PROGRAM 



BUMPING THE BUMPS 

A LAUGHTER - PROVOKING AND 
HILARIOUS METHOD OF ENJOYMENT 




stiles 



N A BEAUTIFUL building 
on the west side of the "Board 
^^'alk," the first structure 
that attracts the eye after 
passing through the turn- 
at the gates, will be found the 



Bumps. Chicagoans have never yet been 
introduced to this sport, but at White 
City they will find this new and novel 
pastime. During the Summer the com- 
mon salutation around Chicago will be, 
"Have you Bumped the Bumps?" And 
the answer will invariably be, "You can 
bet that I have." 

The Bumps first appeared at Coney 
Island in the amusement resort called 
Dreamland, and at once attained a great 
degree of popularity. Every person was 
eager to try this new and exhilarating 
novelt}- — even state and municipal exec- 
utives gravely ascended to the high plat- 
form and shrieked with delight as they 
shot down the smooth incline, carroming 
from one bump to another, and finally 
bringing up against the padded cushion 
at the bottom with all the abandon of 
schoolboys. The Bumps became a veri- 
table craze before the season was over, 
and the management of White City was 
so impressed with the great degree of 
entertainment to be derived from them 
that Bumps was one of the first attrac- 
tions to be installed at White City. 
This building is larger than the one at 
Coney Island and is better supplied with 
bumps. 

It is impossible to explain what the 
Bumps are, or is, but the following brief 
description will give an excellent idea of 
this attraction as it will be found at 
White City. 

The front of the building containing 
the Bumps is open and a flight of stairs 
leads the seeker for amusement to a 
platform at the rear of the structure and 
about thirty feet from the ground. Lead- 
ing from this platform to the ground 
floor is a perfectly smooth incline, built 
of the finest of maple lumber. The de- 
scent has an angle of about thirty de- 
grees, and here and there are large 
padded cushions which cause the person 



sliding down the incline to become di- 
verted from a straight course and be 
bounced from one to another of the 
bumps until the foot of the incline is 
finally reached. There will be found 
several precautionary measures to pre- 
vent all possibility of injury or unpleas- 
ant sensation. 

In addition to the main slide there will 
be three others, one a straight and nar- 




"Have You Bumped tlie Buuips?" 

row shoot constructed of slippery basket 
work, which gives the slider an excellent 
speed. Another gives the sensation of 
alternate falling and rising until the bot- 
tom is reached by a succession of gentle 
inclines. But the most exciting of the 
three is what a baseball pitcher would 
call an in and out curve. It consists of 
a narrow chute, with sharp and sudden 
turns occurring at the most unexpected 
places, and finally landing the bumper at 
the bottom without injury. 

The Bumps is an amusement device' 
without any pretense of artistic effort or 
dignity. It is conducted for the sole use 
of those who are seeking unalloyed fun 
and hilarity. The location of the Bumps 
is readily ascertained by the shouts of 
laughter and shrieks of hilarity which 



THE WHITE CITY MAGAZINE AND SOUVENIR PROGRAM 



universally characterize this form of 
amtisement. 

Any person who does not desire to 
lose all dignity and indulge in a great 
amount of healthful laughter must re- 
frain from visiting the Bumps — for, once 
there, he will surely join in the great 
throngs of jostling, laughing people, and 
before he knows it he will be bumping 
the Bumps with the rest of the crowd. 

No cars or boats are required to give 
the participant in this unique and excit- 



ing pleasure a rapid ride. The minute 
the visitor seats himself on the incline 
the momentum created by the weight of 
the body causes an immediate and rapid 
descent, landing him feet foremost on 
the air-cushion at the bottom. 

A person cannot fail to find the Bumps 
if he is willing to be amused, for all he 
need do is to follow the largest crowd 
and stop where the laughter and mirth 
are most boisterous. For a stubborn 
case of indigestion or the blues, try the 
Bumps. 



BALL ROOM 

FINEST DANCING FLOOR IN AMERICA 




N GREAT big Chicago, with 
its endless de m a n d for 
amusements and recreation, 
there has never before been 
constructed a ball room or 
dancing floor with the capacity of the 
celebrated ball room at White City. 
The Ball Room is located in an enormous 
building, 170 feet long and 100 feet wide, 
having sufficient accommodations for 
1.000 persons on the floor. The floor 



itself is the finest ever constructed west 
of New York City, having been built of 
the finest quality hard white maple, with 
a finish which rivals the polish on a 
piano. All about the dancing floor are 
located cafe tables and chairs, each with 
its menu card containing a list of tem- 
perance drinks. No liquor is sold in the 
Ball Room. A large and roomy balcony 
is similarly arranged, although in the 
scores of beautifully decorated boxes are 




Ball Room 



24 



THE WHITE CITY MAGAZINE AND SOUVENIR PROGRAM 



to be found comfortable seats in which 
tired sight-seers may find rest and com- 
fort. Music is supplied by a high-class 
orchestra, which is supplemented by a 
magnificent Orchestrion. This instru- 
ment was purchased by the White City 
management in St. Louis. It was orig- 
inally constructed for exhibition in the 
French section of the Liberal Arts Build- 
ing at the Louisiana Purchase Exposi- 
tion. 

A skilled and diplomatic Master of 
Ceremonies has full charge of the Ball 
Room, and it is his duty and the duty 
of his numerous well-trained assistants 
to see that patrons are not subjected to 
any objectionable features or annoying 
occurrences. No opportunity exists for 
indiscriminate methods to be adopted by 
any of the participants in the enjoyment 
of dancing on the Ball Room floor. The 
conduct of every person present must 
be absolutely without reproach. A small 
charge is made for the privilege of dan- 
cing. 

It is the policy of the management to 
refuse admittance to persons of an ob- 
jectionable character or appearance and 
indiscreet individuals who may success- 
fully elude the vigilance of the Master 
of Ceremonies and secure admission will 
receive but scant courtesy. 

At no time will any person present 
find it necessary to appeal to the man- 
agement for protection from unwelcome 
advances by strangers. 

Such methods have been in vogue in 
seashore and mountain resorts for years, 
and they are meeting with universal 
favor among the people who visit White 
City. They are adopted for the purpose 
of preserving the dignity and keeping 
inviolate the personal privileges of any- 
one who may patronize this form of 
amusement. 



Emergency Hospital 

A COMPLETELY EQUIPPED AND UP- 
TO-DATE INSTITUTION AT WHITE CITY 

Visitors to White City who may find 
themselves in need of services of a phy- 
sician and surgeon will find Dr. R. A. 
Smith installed in what is undoubtedly 
the most completely equipped emergency 
hospital ever constructed in Chicago. 
The Emergency Hospital is located on 
the east side of the "Board Walk," near 
the 64th street entrance, and just east 
of the Toilet Rooms. 

The Emergency Hospital is completely 
equipped with ever}' modern device and 
appliance and no charge is made for 
treatment. 

The management of White City is 
enabled to offer these facilities through 
the aid and courtesy of Truax, Greene 
& Co.. the well known manufacturers of 
surgical instruments and appliances. 



"The tremendous jam, both within and 
without the gates, vividly recalled the 
days of the Columbian Exposition, while 
the scenes presented within brought back 
still another recollection of the vanished 
White City." — Chicas:o Record Herald. 



"White City is exactly that which it 
brands itself — the whitest, finest example 
of cleanliness possible to imagine so near 
a smoke belt. No rain-dabbed grass, no 
dripping trees, no dusty measure of 
landscape interferes with White City in 
its whiteness." — Chicago Dai/v A^ezvs. 



"White City has become the mecca 
of thousands of Chicagoans and visit- 
ors." — Hearst's Chicago Examiner. 



THE WHITE CITY MAGAZINE AND SOUVENIR PROGRAM 



FLYING AIRSHIPS 

AN UP-TO-DATE METHOD OF AERIAL NAVIGATION 




IRECTLY across the Sunken 
Gardens from the entrance, 
being the first structure 
which a spectator sees as he 
enters tlie grounds — is the 
Flying Airships. This is the ideal place 
for the seeker for a new sensation. Here 
a person may enjoy all the novelty and 
exhilaration of a real airship ride with- 



hundred feet in height. Across the top 
of the pyramid there are several steel 
beams, from which the airships hang 
pendant by strong steel cables. Each 
car seats over a dozen persons, and there 
are about eight cars — thus many per- 
sons can take the ride at the same time. 
When all the occupants of the airships 
are seated, the cars begin to revolve 




Flying Airships 



out undergoing any of the dangers com- 
monly associated with that form of 
sport. The attraction was installed in 
White City after a long and careful 
study. It represents Sir Hiram Maxim's 
idea of safe and sane aerial navigation, 
and has been completed after a great 
amount of labor. 

A giant framework of steel composes 
the base, around which the airships glide 
at a high rate of speed. This frame is 
similar to a pyramid in shape and is a 



slowly around the steel frame. The mo- 
tion becomes faster and faster, and as 
the speed increases the cars mount 
higher and higher into the air. After 
revolving a few moments the cars at- 
tain a great speed and rise to a height 
of about thirty feet. The occupants of 
the cars are securely tied in, so as to 
prevent all possibility of accidents, and 
they shout with delight as they experi- 
ence for the first time the novelty of 
aerial navigation. 



26 



THE WHITE CITY MAGAZINE AND SOUVENIR PROGRAM 




COLLEGE INN 

POPULAR AND ATTRACTIVE RESTAURANT 
BEST IN AMERICA 

HE finest restaurant in Amer- 
ica. How often has this 
phrase been apphed to even 
mediocre eating places ? 
Xearly every chop house or 



kmchroom makes claim to this title, until 
it has become trite and meaningless. But 
when applied to the White City College 
Inn the phrase again is filled with mean- 
ing and is the literal truth, for this res- 



eated in the Sherman House in the 
downtown district, but it is reproduced 
on a much larger scale and is equally 
complete in its appointments. To those 
who have visited the noted eating place 
in the Sherman House it is useless to 
try to expand upon the beauty of the 
place, for they already know all about it. 
But to those who have never been so 
fortunate as to visit the former place, 




IVhite City College Inn 



taurant is the finest in the country, bar- 
ring none. However great the crowds 
that throng to White City during this 
Summer, every facility for catering to 
them has been supplied. In this struc- 
ture can be found every delicacy desired 
by the rich, and also a full meal for 
those whose purses are limited. After 
walking about the grounds and indulging 
in the sports to be found there, hunger 
asserts itself and the crowds naturally 
turn to College Inn. 

The White City College Inn is a 
duplicate of the famous College Inn lo- 



the chance to visit even a finer restau- 
rant will be granted. It occupies one of 
the most pretentious and beautiful build- 
ings on the grounds. It is architectur- 
ally perfect, being constructed of ce- 
ment, covering a framework of steel. It 
was especially designed for White City 
and is probably the largest building in 
the country devoted exclusively to a 
restaurant. 

Tlie College Inn proper occupies the 
entire upper part of the structure, the 
whole front of the building consisting of 
enormous plate-glass windows, which af- 



THE WHITE CITY MAGAZINE AND SOUVENIR PROGRAM 



27 



ford the diners an excellent opportunity 
of watching the merr}' throngs on the 
grounds. The location of the College 
Inn, being in the middle of the Sunken 
Gardens, gives a view from the windows 
that is not excelled anywhere at White 
City. Thousands of incandescent lights 
stud the ceilinsfs and the walls are done 



Adjoining the dairy lunchroom is a 
German Rathskeller, which is typical of 
the many similar places in every Ger- 
man town. Here a person may sit and 
drink his beer and be surrounded with 
many accommodations afforded visitors. 
The cement floors, the typical bar, and 
the decorations of the room, all tend to 




Tlic Terrace, a Popular Resort for Ladies and Children 



in green and white, the eft'ect being most 
harmonious and pleasing. 

The great dining hall is reached by 
steps at either end of the structure. In- 
side there are balconies and alcoves 
where parties may dine in semi-privacy. 
Hundreds of skilled waiters are ready to 
obey the slightest motion of the diner, 
and a full orchestra is constantly retained 
to furnish music. In this beautiful place 
eating is robbed of its material side and 
at once becomes a psychic pleasure. In 
all this building will accommodate 2,400 
diners at a time. 

Downstairs, and fronting on the 
'"Board Walk," is the dairy lunchroom. 
Here a person may obtain a meal at 
whatever price he may wish. The prices 
in this dairy lunchroom are the same as 
at any of the lunchrooms in the down- 
town district, and the best of service is 



lend a distinctly German atmosphere to 
the place. This Rathskeller has already 
proved very popular, and doubtless will 
continue to grow in popularity as the 
Summer advances. 



''White City, with its myriads of 
electric lights and its numerous attrac- 
tions, is entertaining thousands of peo- 
ple, and it may be said safely that it is 
a conspicuous success." — Chicago Even- 
ing Post. 



"It looks as if the "Board Walk" at 
White City would be the most popular 
thing in Chicago this Summer." — Chi- 
cago Journal. 

"The greatest amusement enterprise 
on earth." — Colfax, la., Tribune. 



28 



THE WHITE CITY MAGAZINE AND SOUVENIR PROGRAM 



AUTOMATIC VAUDEVILLE 

CONTAINING 1,100 ATTRACTIONS 



HE ^Mechanical Theater — here 
the spectator may obtain a 
full evening's entertainment 
for a few pennies. There 
are more than eleven hun- 
dred devices for the entertainment of 
young" and old housed in this most beau- 
tiful structure, which is located on the 
east side of the o-rounds on the "Board 




them. In the Automatic Vaudeville they 
can be seen, and for one cent the sight- 
seer can almost literally take a trip to 
New York and view the well-known 
places there, see the great crowds mov- 
ing about and the hustle and bustle. 

Also, for the infinitesimal sum of one 
cent, they may hear popular music from 
the latest comic opera or musical com- 




Inferior Viezv of the Automatic Vaudeville 



Walk," just south of the White City 
College Inn. For a few pennies the 
visitor can see some of the world's best 
scenes as viewed from a swiftly moving 
train, or see hundreds of humorous 
stories told by moving pictures. Several 
hours can easily be spent in this attrac- 
tion, and then the spectator will not have 
exhausted the many forms of amuse- 
ment to be seen there. 

One of the strongest features of the 
Automatic Vaudeville is the fact that it 
is educational in a great degree.' Every 
person has read of the famous Flatiron 
building in New York and the various 
historic places in Europe, but very few 
have been fortunate enougfh to have seen 



edy. The songs which every one is 
whistling on the streets can be learned 
at no cost. Moreover, these songs and 
ballads, as reproduced, are sung by the 
best artists. Imagine being able to hear 
Patti or Melba for one cent. The ma- 
chines used in the Automatic Vaudeville 
are the best that have yet been invented 
and nothing of the true value of the 
music is lost through the transmission. ■ 
Again the visitor may have some fa- 
vorite recitation which he would like to 
hear again. He can find it at the Auto- 
matic Vaudeville. Operas, musical com- 
edies, speeches by well-known orators, 
recitations, and in fact every variety of 



THE WHITE CITY MAGAZINE AND SOUVENIR PROGRAM 



29 



entertainment is included within the 
scope of this attraction. 

Would you know if your lungs are 
weak? You can find out in the Auto- 
matic Vaudeville. There are scores of 
machines which are carefully and mi- 
nutely tabulated to show the exact con- 
dition of the visitor. The use of this 
machine will be as comprehensive and 
complete as an examination by an ex- 




Autoinatic Vaudeville 

pert physician. In exchange for other 
pennies the spectator can test his lift- 
ing capacity, his hitting ability and the 
strength of his grip. Not only may he 
find out his strength and his weakness, 
but he can find a cure for them. It is 
a well known fact that electricity is a 
cure for many weaknesses, and in the 
Automatic Vaudeville he will find many 
devices for receiving electric and mag- 
netic treatments which are of great ben- 
efit. 

There is no limit to the fun and en- 
tertainment which any person may ob- 
tain from this attraction. That it is 
pleasing and interesting is well evi- 
denced by the great crowds which have 
swarmed into it since the opening of 
White City. A great deal of its popu- 
larity has been due to the great scope 
of the amusements provided for visitors. 
There is hardly a form of amusement 
which cannot be obtained for one cent. 
The machines are of the latest patterns 



and contain all of the recent improve- 
ments. 

The Automatic Vaudeville continues 
to draw great throngs of visitors, and 
its popularity is increasing each day. 



Photograph Gallery 

Where the Best Work in Chicago is Done 

Just to the south of the peristyle on 
the east side of the "Board Walk" is 
located the White City Photograph 
Gallery. As an attraction to visitors who 
cannot always command facilities for 
having their pictures taken it will sup- 
ply all deficiencies. Only first-class op- 
erators are employed and a high grade 
of work can be turned out with the 
ample facilities at hand. All kinds of 
pictures are taken, including tintypes or 
cards of any size or description. In ad- 
dition to the work of making pictures to 
order, the managers of this concession 
always have on hand an assortment of 



f=*Si»" 



^j#w«,- 



::^, 



White Gi-iy Photo Go;J 




Photo Gallery 

White City photographs and views 
which can be purchased at moderate 
prices. 

Those who are interested in a high- 
class photograph gallery will find par- 
ticular interest by visiting this establish- 
ment at White City. 



30 



THE WHITE CITY MAGAZINE AND SOUVENIR PROGRAM 



THE 



MIDWAY 



CONTAINING ENTER 
FOR EVE 

>0 AJ^IUSEMENT resort is 
complete without a Midway, 
where joUity and mirth run 
riot unrestrained and un- 
hampered by conventionality. 
Here may be found every form of 
amusement and all kinds of games and 
pastimes into which the elements of 
chance and probability enter. The Mid- 




TAINING FEATURES 
RY BO DY 

ble device and all kinds of unique exhi- 
bitions crowd the Midway, so that a trip 
through is well worth while. 

The first booth is occupied by a candy 
store, where the new confection, "Fluff- 
Fluff," may be found. The next booth 
is the Stein Rack. Here the visitor en- 
deavors to completely cover a painted 
circle with a metal disk by tossing it on 




Observation Wheel; Also View of Pari of the Midway 



way occupies three sides of the plaza in 
front of the Fire Show and encircles the 
Observation Wheel on three sides, being 
located at the southeastern part of the 
grounds where the "Board Walk" turns 
onto the bridge. 

Popular prices are the rule at the Mid- 
way, and for very small sums the visitor 
may have unlimited enjoyment and prob- 
ably carry home with him a valuable 
souvenir of White City. Every possi- 



a smooth board. The prizes are souvenir 
steins. Next comes the Knife Rack. 
This is very similar to the familiar cane 
rack. The participant tries to throw a. 
wooden ring around a knife, and the 
motto of the place is "The knife you 
ring is the knife you get." 

The air rifle booth is the next in order. 
This attraction is especially interesting 
to small children. The next booth con- 
tains the Cane Rack, which has proved 



THE WHITE CITY MAGAZINE AND SOUVENIR PROGRAM 



its great popularity for many years, and 
a description of this deservedly well pat- 
ronized feature would be superfluous. 

The White City Stream is the next 
attraction which meets the view of the 
spectator. This is a stream of water, 
along the banks of which are many 
miniature houses. In the swiftly run- 
ning stream are hundreds of wooden 
fishes, which the visitor endeavors to 
catch with a hook and line. Each one 
of the fish contains a prize. Next comes 
the Gypsy Camp, where there are a corps 
of fortune tellers. Hotel Sleepyville is 
the next booth. The participants in this 
sport try to hurl a ball through the win- 
dows of the hotel and awaken the occu- 
pants. If he is successful in bursting a 
glass window a strange thing happens 
which interests everyone. 

In adjoining booths are the old and 
tried Rifle Gallery and Baby Rack. 
These attractions are too well known to 
need any comment. The next attraction 
is one which is somewhat new to Chi- 
cagoans. It is the baseball game. The 
participant in this sport takes a regula- 
tion bat and knocks a baseball. The 
scoring is counted according to the hit 
he makes. In the southeast corner of 
the Midway is the penny arcade. Here 
are all kinds of slot machines. 

The next feature is the Japan ball 
game. This must be seen to be appre- 
ciated, as it is almost impossible to de- 
scribe it. The game is most interesting 
and attracts a great number of specta- 
tors. The Glass-blowers occupy the re- 
maining booth, where all kinds of glass 
work is made for visitors while they 
wait. 



Toboggan 

A Laughter-Provoking Method of Enjoyment 

One of the most popular and best pat- 
ronized attractions at White City is 
the Toboggan. It is impossible to give 
a detailed description which would be 
of interest of this unique and hilarious 
method of enjoyment, because there is 
no elaborate apparatus, no grand scenic 
effects, and no regulated program, but 
there is always music during the op- 
eration of this feature ; the music of 



happy laughter and joyous voices tune- 
ful with accents of merriment. 

The participant in this sport takes a 
seat in a comfortable cushioned vehicle 
and sturdy attendants roll it down the 
track to a point where it Is seized by a 
wire rope and is elevated up a steep 
incline, where the rapid and mirth-pro- 
voking journey begins. Upon reaching 




Structure of Toboggan ■ ^ 

the top the cars seem imbued with life 
and dart down a gentle declivity as 
though fitted with powerful wings. 

Darting around unexpected curves, up 
slopes and down into valleys, the car is 
whirled at a rapid rate of speed upon a 
journey lasting almost two minutes. It 
finally returns to the original point of 
departure, where the merry passengers 
disembark and make way for others, 
who eagerly fill their places. 

All afternoon and evening crowds 
happily make their way to the Tobog- 
gan, and it is universally voted to be 
one of the jolliest forms of entertain- 
ment at White City. 



"Tens upon tens of thousands of peo- 
ple threw dull cares aside, left the wor- 
ries of the business world behind them 
and sought rest at White City last 
niarht." — Chicago Chronicle. 



"Crowds of people fill the streets for 
blocks in every direction from the en- 
trance to enter White City.'" — Balti- 
more, Md., Nezvs. 



32 



THE WHITE CITY MAGAZINE AND SOUVENIR PROGRAM 



CUMMINS' INDIAN CONGRESS 



TH RILLING 
WITH 



AND EXCITING WILD WEST SHOW 
RECKLESS PARTICIPANTS 



HE first attraction which the 
visitor sees after he enters 
the grounds is Colonel Cum- 
mins' Indian Congress. This 
feature is located at the ex- 
treme north end of the park ; the en- 
trance is to the right of the "Board 
Walk." and is within a hundred feet of 




pees smoking ; the women busying them- 
selves about their work, and the little 
redskins placing among the wigwams. 
These Indians live here exactly as they 
do on their native prairie, cooking their 
own food and living close to nature. The 
spectator then passes the arena and goes 
on to the end of the grounds, where the 




Location of Cummins' Indian Congress 



the gates of White City. The entrance 
to the attraction is shaped like a huge 
wigwam, covered with all manner of 
hieroglyphics and Indian symbols, illus- 
trating the manner in which the redskins 
used to keep records of their victories in 
war. In the upper part of this tepee 
there is the famous cowboy band, which 
will furnish the music for the produc- 
tion. 

As the spectator enters the enclosure 
he first sees an Indian encampment — the 
braves sitting lazily in front of their te- 



grandstand is located. Here before him 
are enacted the great and absorbing fea- 
tures which compose the show. The pro- 
gramme of events follows : 

1. Reception by the famous Indian 
Chiefs of fifty-one different tribes, in-' 
eluding many of the best known Indian 
leaders. 

2. Grand entry ; parade of all the In- 
dians, including squaws and pappooses. 
Aboriginal savage equestrian review. 

3. Introduction of Indians, cowboys 
and band of lady riders. 



THE WHITE CITY MAGAZINE AND SOUVENIR PROGRAM 



33 



4. Introduction of Colonel Cummins. 

5. Maze. 

6. Miss Hartzell, champion rifle shot 
of the world. 

7. Pony Express, as seen in the days 
of '49 ; George Esler. 

8. Race of Nations, Indian lady and 
cowboy. 



22. Champion Zouave drill team of 
the world. 

23. Custer's last stand, "The Custer 
Massacre," or the battle of the Little Big 
Horn. A vivid reproduction of the trag- 
edy that occurred on June 25, 1876. 

The story of the death of General Cus- 
ter and the death and annihilation of 




Toboggan 



9. Riding wild cattle. 

10. Jim Hopkins and band of fancy 
ropers in feats never seen before. 

11. Attack on trappers' cabin by In- 
dians. 

Lacrosse — international game. 

12. Stage coach hold-up. 

13. Tournament. 

14. Hanging a horse thief. 

15. Relay race, one mile. 

16. Educated cow horse. 

17. Chase for a bride. 

18. Attack on an emigrant train cross- 
ing the mountains, by Indians. 

19. Cowboy quadrille 

20. Sports and pastimes on the plains. 

21. Roping contest. 



his little band is one which stirs the 
hearts of Americans every time it is 
told. June 26, 1876, will long be re- 
membered as the day in history that 
marked the slaughter of the bravest men 
who ever represented the United States 
— a day that saw the last victory of In- 
dians over white men 

The scene opens with General Custer 
at the head of his little band of men, hot 
upon the trail of Sitting Bull, chief of 
the Ogalalla Sioux, and his braves. Cus- 
ter, trusting his entire force to the dis- 
cretion of Reynolds, the noted Indian 
scout, presses on after Sitting Bull. 
That famous chieftain, by a series of 
the most clever maneuvers, inveigles 



34 



THE WHITE CITY MAGAZINE AND SOUVENIR PROGRAM 



Custer into the valley of the Little Big 
Horn. Custer's men followed Reynolds 
far into the valley and finally came tj a 
place where Sitting Bull had just 
camped. The ground was yet warm from 
the camp fires. Custer halted and sent 
out his scouts. Sitting Bull, anticipating 
this move, had established a fake camp, 
which the scouts found and hurried back 
to Custer. 

Custer, elated and believing he has the 
Indians trapped, orders the bugle to 
sound and dashes into the fake encamp- 
ment, hoping to take Sitting BuP. by 
surprise. But the Indians are prepare I 
for him. Sitting Bull has withdrawn his 
men and has surrounded the camp. 

Custer and his men dash into the trap 
and in a moment a furious battle is on. 
\Mth Indians on all sides of him, Custer 
sees that it is hopeless to fight, but still 
he orders the charge, and in the midst 
of the losing fight he directs his men 
calmly. As his men were slain and feli 
on all sides of him, he continued the bat- 
tle. Chief Shot-in-the-Eyes, who was 
present at the fight, declares that when 
Custer was left alone on the field he 
turned his gun on himself and died 
rather than fall into the hands of the 
Indians. 

The conclusion of this great spectacle 
is shown in three tableaux. The first 
tableau shows the battle raging furi- 
ously on all sides. The Indians, hang- 
ing from their ponies' necks, circle 
swiftly about the troopers, shrilly shriek- 
ing their war cries. Custer is seen fight- 
ing desperately in the midst of the red- 
skins, and is finally dragged from his 
horse, but he quickly throws off his as- 
sailants and fights his way to a high 
mound, where the remnants of his force 
gather about him. 

The second tableau shows the battle 
nearing the end. Custer's men have 
nearly all been killed, yet the remaining 
few are struggling valiantly and keeping 
the Indians at bay. One by one the 
troopers are slain until Custer stands 
alone on the mound. Swinging his heavy 
saber aloft, his face lighted with deter- 
mination and courage, his left hand 
clinching his smoking revolver, he fights 
on to the bitter end. An Indian is seen 
kneeling and pointing a gun at Custer 
when the tableaux ends. 



Tableau three completes the tragedy. 
It shows the dreary mound, covered with 
the dead bodies of the troopers and those 
of the Indians who have fallen in the 
fierce battle. Custer is down — slain after 
a most brilliant exhibition of sublime 
courage and determination. His body is 
lying over the topmost part of the mound 
and the x^merican flag is lying close be- 
side him. Presently some scouts appear 
in the distance, look carefully at the 
mound, and then disappear. Then 
Reno's entire band comes rushing to the 
rescue. The soldiers dash on to the 
mound. 

They seize the flag and hoist it up to 
the staff again amid cheers. One of the 
men stumbles over a body. It is that of 
General Custer. 

The soldiers gather about the body of 
the courageous General and remove their 
hats as they gaze at their beloved leader. 
They turn sadly, look fondly at the flag 
and murmur, ''Too late ! Too late !" The 
curtain falls. 



Miniature Railway 

A Perfect Model System withTrack, Switches, etc. 

Surrounding the lagoon into which 
dart the boats from the Chutes, with 
their loads of laughing and shouting 
pleasure-seekers, is the track upon which 
run the trains of the Miniature Railway 
system of White City. The rolling 
stock for the Miniature Railway con- 
sists of several perfectly equipped cars, 
each of which are pulled by a tiny loco- 
motive, every detail of which has been 
as accurately constructed in miniature as 
though the parts were intended for one 
of the gigantic monsters which haul 
heavy-laden trains across the western 
mountain ranges. 

The signal of the tiny whistle almost 
universally excites merriment, but when 
the onlookers observe the sturdy strength 
of the tiny locomotive as it pulls its cars 
loaded with passengers, their interest is 
excited and they desire to participate in 
the enjoyment of those who have already 
secured tickets for a ride. 

The railway track is almost a half- mile 
in length, passing entirely around the 
lagoon and underneath the enormous 
grandstand which is a part of the Fire 
Show. 



THE WHITE CITY MAGAZINE AND SOUVENIR PROGRAM 



35 



OBSERVATION WHEEL 

A UNIQUE AND DELIGHTFUL METHOD 
OF SEEING WHITE CITY 




N THE plaza in front of the 
Midway at the extreme 
southeast corner of the park 
is the Observation WheeL 
For many years this device, 
in a less improved form, has enjoyed 
great popularity among all classes, and 
this year is proving no exception. The 
cause of this is due probably to the fact 
that there is no keen excitement or 
nerve testing chances about it. It is a 
form of entertainment which even the 
youngest child or the oldest person may 
enjoy without the slightest foreboding — 
hence its popularity. 

Owing to the position given the Ob- 
servation Wheel it was necessarily lim- 
ited as to size, but there was no limit 
put upon the completeness and stability 
of the structure. This wheel is the finest 
ever constructed since the Ferris Wheel 
at the World's Fair in 1893. It is smaller 
than the Ferris Wheel because the man- 
agement realized that a great number of 
persons feared to ride in the former be- 
cause of its great and cumbersome bulk. 
It was too large and excited feelings of 
distrust in even the most brave. The 
success which has characterized other 
smaller wheels made it advisable to make 
the White City Wheel of a size which 
would be without the objectionable fea- 
tures of the Ferris Wheel, and yet would 
carry the people to a sufficient height 
so that they might view the stirring 
panorama which is always presented to 
the sight-seer at White City. 

White City's Observation Wheel is 
the perfection of mechanical and engi- 
neering skill, the mechanism being so 



perfect and yet so simple that a child 
could easily run it. No perceptible effort 
is discernible when the wheel is started 
or stopped, because the ingenious plac- 
ing of the ball bearings absolutely pre- 
vents all jar or friction. 

There is something particularly en- 
trancing about a ride on this Observa- 
tion Wheel. The visitor is slowly and 
irresistibly carried to a height which 
permits a clear view of all the surround- 
ing houses and attractions, and in fact 
gives the spectator a complete bird's-eye 
view of the whole in all its pristine 
beauty. Probably the chief attraction 
of this wheel is the fact that the rider 
feels the sensation of being maintained 
in the air by invisible forces. 

Various devices have been invented 
from time to time by promoters of 
amusement parks, but none has ever yet 
been found which will take the place of 
the Observation Wheel and its peculiarly 
pleasant and indefinable sensations. 



"The general design of the structures 
and landscape features revive in the 
minds of the citizens of Chicago and 
\'isitors the Columbian Exposition in 
1893."— 07»a//a Herald. 

"The crowds which surge through the 
grounds enjoyed every minute and lib- 
erally patronized all the amusement fea- 
tures at White City. — Chicago Inter 
Ocean. 

"White City will equal the St. Louis 
Pike or even Midway Plaisance of 1893." 
■ — Chicago Tribune. 



36 



THE WHITE CITY MAGAZINE AND SOUVENIR PROGRAM 



DOG, PONY & MONKEY CIRCUS 

CLEVER EXHIBITION BY DOMESTIC ANIMALS 




HIS is the attraction for the 
cliildren. Since the opening 
of White City thousands of 
httle ones have attended Pro- 
fessor F. Blake's Dog, Pony 
and ]\Ionkey Circus to see the wonderful 
exhibitions of the power of human be- 
ings over animals and to witness their 
entertaining and amusing acts. There 
are over fifty animals in this show and 
each one is the best that can be procured 
by money or energy. The show occupies 
an entire building just south of the Elec- 
tric Tower on the east side of the "Board 
\\'alk." 

The great power Professor Blake pos- 
sesses over the animals in his show has 
been attributed to hypnotism and like 




Animal Circus 

occult sciences, but it is nothing more 
unusual than kindness. He rules his 
animals by love and gentleness, never 
speaking a harsh word to any of them. 
The performance given by these dumb 
creatures is a crucial test of their pow- 
ers of understanding and goes far to 
establish what an eminent American 
scientist has sought through the wilds 
of all countries and the jungles to prove 



— that the lower order of animals really 
communicate with each other through 
an almost human faculty. This troupe 
of trained animals includes, among other 
features, a family of chimpanzees and 
orang-outangs, who stand as high as a 
man. "Tiny Mite," the smallest horse 
in the world, is also included among the 
interesting features of the show. A 
glance at the programme will convince 
anyone that the exhibition will prove en- 
tertaining : 

1. Pony Drill; playing soldiers and 
executing National Guard tactics. 

2. Trick Pony, with Happy Hooligan 
as Dr. Jones. 

3. The Rope-Walking Dogs ; a tri- 
umph in animal training. 

4. Rocking Pony (the Hobby Horse) ; 
a difficult feat well executed. 

5. Waltzing Ponies. 

6. Rope Jumping ; an extremely dif- 
ficult accomplishment for dumb animals. 

7. Serpentine Dancing Dogs. 

8. Boxing Dogs (Fitzsimmons and 
Corbett), with Happy Hooligan as a 
policeman. 

9. Riding Dogs and Monkeys. 

10. Gloomy Gus, the wonderful wire- 
walking monkey. 

11. Wire-Balancing Dogs. 

12. Happy Flooligan. 

13. Perch and Globe, juggling mon- 
keys. 

14. RoUer-Skating Baboons. 

15. Trick Pony. 

16. Monkey on crutches. 

17. High Wire Bicycle Act. 

18. Wrestling Pony. 

19. Monkey Supper Scene. 

20. Bucking Dogs. 

21. Bar Monkeys. 

22. Have You Seen Maud? 

23. High Diving Dog. 

24. Bag Punching. 

25. High Leaping Dogs. 
Altogether this exhibition is the best 

that can possibly be procured, as each 
animal has been carefully selected and 
is the best of its kind in the act chosen 
for it. The spectator is repaid many 
times in enjoyment for the very nominal 
admission fee. 



THE WHITE CITY MAGAZINE AND SOUVENIR PROGRAM 



37 



CHINESE THEATRE 

WITH ORIENTAL ACROBATS AND ACTORS 




theater 
and its 



YPICAL of the flowery king- 
dom is the little Chinese The- 
ater, located just south of 
the Peristyle on the west side 
of the "Board Walk." This 
is imported direct from China 
entertainments are exactly the 



same as the shows given there by their 
own theatrical companies. Each mem- 
ber of the cast has been brought to this 



^-^ 




Chinese Theater 

country direct from the Flowery King- 
dom, and has appeared in his native land 
as an actor. The scenery has been used 
in one of the theaters in Pekin, and is 
most beautiful, being a good example of 
the scenic work of Chinese artists. 

The little-footed women who appear 
in the plays presented are some of the 
very few Chinese women in this coun- 
try, and visitors to White City should 
not fail to see this most interesting and 
educating show. The principal play 
which this Oriental company presents is 
typical of their country, and is of the 
regulation length. Many of these Chi- 
nese people are seeing the first view of 
America, coming directly to Chicago 
after they landed in New York. The 



company will remain at White City 
during the Summer and will probably 
delight thousands of Chicagoans with 
their performances. 

Electric Theatre 

A Delightful and Amusing Program Furnished 

Although located in a rather unpre- 
tentious structure adjoining the Scenic 
Railway Loading Station on the South, 
there is no form of entertainment at 
White City which will appeal more to 
the pleasure-loving propensities of the 
people than the programs given in the 
Electric Theater. There are no actors 
or actresses in this theater, but the 
scenes presented show at times scores 
and even hundreds in action. 

The Electric Theater reproduces the 
actions and movements of living persons 
in a most realistic way and presents 
scenes which it would be impossible to 
portray in any other manner than with 
the aid of rapidly moving films contain- 
ing actual photographs. The manage- 
ment of the Electric Theater sent a spe- 
cial commission to the scene of the war 
between Russia and Japan for the pur- 
pose of taking moving pictures of the 
historical events occurrinsf there. 




Electric Theater 



38 



THE WHITE CITY MAGAZINE AND SOUVENIR PROGRAM 



THE TEMPLE OF MUSIC 

A DECIDEDLY ENJOYABLE ENTERTAINMENT 



HIS is the most marvelous 
and comprehensive musical 
performance ever attempted. 
The Temple of jNIusic is lo- 
cated on the east side of the 
"Board ^^'alk" and just south of the 
Electric Tower. None of the time-worn 
and hackneved freak instruments are to 




ica, England, Japan, China and Rou- 
mania. 

Among the many various instruments 
played by Professor Willard's musicians 
perhaps one of the queerest is the 
"Squeegee Gods of China." This instru- 
ment consists of a row of twelve life- 
size heads of Chinamen with their lonsr 



i»<MBifci>. mi-iO^iJ^fcfe 



UR Mot 




Interior View of Temple of Music 



be found in this house of symphony — 
each instrument being of a special kind, 
and many of them costing thousands of 
dollars to construct. The forces of na- 
ture are harnessed and made to dispense 
beautiful music — light, heat, steam and 
electricity being used by Professor Wil- 
lard's corps of skillful musicians. 

A visit to this home of music is al- 
most education in music, and is equal 
in scope to a trip through all the foreign 
countries where various instruments are 
supposed to have originated. Several 
nations are represented by typical musi- 
cal instruments. There are strange in- 
struments from Sweden, France, Amer- 



pigtails hanging. By pulling the queues 
of the Chinamen the men are made to 
sing their weird songs and strange 
chants. The effect of seeing and hear- 
ing these figures perform is one of star- 
tling realism. 

The various instruments for this show 
fill an entire stage and are banked high 
up the sides. An idea of the magnitude 
of some of the instruments may be ob- 
tained from the fact that the combined 
weight of all of them is 3,720 pounds, or 
very nearly two tons. They are con- 
structed from all kinds of material — 
wood, aluminum, steel, zinc, copper and 
lead having- been used in their construe- 



THE WHITE CITY MAGAZINE AND SOUVENIR PROGRAM 



39 



tion. Some are shaken, some are pulled, 
some are played by hand, and others by 
compressed air. 

The most strange and fanciful of all 
the many devices in the Temple of Music 
is the musical airship. This is a pon- 
derous machine and is constructed of 
196 tubes of silver. It is operated by 
electricity, the ctirrent passing through 
the body of a girl. This sensational de- 
vice is a triumph of invention, requiring 



Double Whirl 

A Novel and Amusing Pastime 

The Double Whirl combines the pleas- 
ures of a ride on a miniature Ferris 
Wheel and the old-fashioned carousel, 
both of v^hich are familiar to almost 
every visitor at White City^ although 
none such are to be found within its 
gates. Six miniature Ferris wheels, each 
attached to an enormous revolving shaft 




The Ever-Popular Double Whirl 



thousands of wires, coils and other de- 
vices to operate it. This instrument is 
so complicated that Professor Willard 
has been questioned very closely by the 
Underwriters regarding it. At one time 
the Chicago authorities forbade him to 
exhibit it. Professor Willard met the 
objections of the Underwriters by en- 
casing all the thousands of wires in steel 
tubes. 

Those who visit the Temple of Music 
cannot fail to be extremely interested in 
this strange and unique instrument, 
which certainly surpasses every other 
musical device in originality and clev- 
erness. 



centered in a revolving drum, roll slow- 
ly round and round with their loads of 
passengers. No elaborate description 
can be given of the Double Whirl, but 
it would take an endless amount of writ- 
ing to describe the fun and pleasure of 
participation in its regular operation. 

Some women are utterly false. Even 
their minds are made up. 
*** 

The mind ought sometimes to be 
amused. — Phaedrns. 

*** 

Rest is the sweet sauce of labor. 

— Plutarch, 



40 



THE WHITE CITY MAGAZINE AND SOUVENIR PROGRAM 



INFANT INCUBATORS 

SCIENTIFIC AND HUMANITARIAN METHODS 
AT WORK TOGETHER 



. HIS attraction is a great deal 
^ ^^ more than an exhibit — it is 
an educator. The Incubators 
are located in a beautiful 
structure at the southeast 
comer of the "Board Walk." This build- 
ing is the only one on the grounds which 
has anv color in it. beinsr a dark red with 




the sweet sleep of infancy they create a 
fascinating picture. The boy infants 
have blue sashes and the girls have pink. 
To avoid confusion as to their identity 
each child wears a medal on which is 
stamped its initials and the date of its 
arrival, and such other information as 
bears on the treatment of the case. Thev 




Infant Incubator Building 



white trimmings. It is built after the 
old colonial style and is most pretentious 
in its appointments. 

It is safe to say that as large a per- 
centage of interested visitors pass into 
this attraction as any other on the 
grounds. The tiny infants only a few 
days old, and born into the world from 
one to three months ahead of the natural 
time, are put into the glass ovens, which 
are kept at an even temperature, and 
supplied constantly wdth sterilized air by 
means of an automatic arrangement. 
The little ones seem thoroughly to enjoy 
their homes in the glass houses, and in 



are taken and fed at regular intervals, 
bathed and dressed with the greatest 
care, so that eighty-five per cent of the 
infants are saved for useful lives. There 
is a gain of nearly seventy per cent over 
the old methods, and an inestimable gain 
for the parents, who perhaps love them 
more dearly for their misfortunes. 

The Infant Incubator system had its 
origin in Germany, the home of many of 
the most advanced methods of modern 
medicine and surgery, and is conducted 
there under government auspices. It 
has proved a great success, and like re- 
sults are being obtained in this countrv, 



THE WHITE CITY MAGAZINE AND SOUVENIR PROGRAM 



41 



where physicians welcome it as an in- 
valuable adjunct to their own skill. 
Thousands of precious lives have already 
been saved and it is only a question of 
time when the system will be universally 
adopted. Institutions similar to these 
will soon be set up in all the large Amer- 
ican cities. 

The nurses who have charge of the 
infants as they graduate from the ovens 
of the incubators certainly have their 
hands full, as, with their wee charges 
on their hands, they have to soothe them 
to rest and place them in the dainty 
cribs. 

The first attempt to substitute scien- 
tific treatment for the primitive methods 
that had for hundreds of years been used 
to save babies born prematurely was 



made by Dr. Crede, of the University 
of Leipzig. He constructed a box with 
double metallic sides and filled the space 
within with water, so as to regulate the 
temperature. This was sixty years ago, 
and it was not until eight years ago that 
the first institution was opened in Ber- 
lin, which won favor from the start be- 
cause of the great success it made in 
saving the lives of the little ones. 

After a visit to this institution one 
feels amply repaid for having seen the 
quaint, delightful little fellows whose ap- 
peal to the sympathies is always stronger 
because of their utter helplessness. 
Every visitor to the incubator cannot fail 
to come away praising the great system 
that can accomplish such great wonders, 
where for centuries the precious lives 
were permitted to flicker out. 



OVER AND UNDER THE SEA 



A 
AND 



TRIP TO PARIS IN AN AIRSHIP 

A VOYAGE IN A SUBMARINE BOAT 




NE of the most imposing and 
prominent structures within 
the walls of White City is 
j that building which contains 
' "Over and Under the Sea," 
a delightful and especially enjoyable pan- 
oramic invention. After entering the 
brilliantly lighted entrance, with its wide 
hall beautifully decorated with statuary, 
etc., the visitor steps upon deck of an 
enormous airship, all ready for a vo3'age. 
The airship quivers, the wind whistles 
through the rigging and mechanical de- 
vices enable the aerial voyager to view 
the scenery incident to a trip from 
White City across the mountains and 
valleys to the Atlantic Ocean, through 
clouds and a violent hurricane at sea 
until Paris is reached. 

On arriving in Paris the party is con- 
ducted into a series of undergrotmd grot- 
toes and through the enormous sewers, 
which have been admirably reconstructed 
for public inspection. After sufficient 
time has been taken to view the various 
beauties of Paris, the guide shows the 
way to an underground dock, where a 
submarine vessel awaits them. The boat 
passes down the River Seine and out 
into the Atlantic, where curious and in- 
teresting submarine views are given. 
Fish of all kinds swim throusfh the 



waters, wrecks are observed and the gen- 
eral topography of the ocean bed is 
plainly perceived. The submarine boat 
lands the party, after devious submarine 
wanderings through the great lakes and 
through specially constructed canals, 
back to White City. 

The trip is a remarkably interesting 
and particularly enjoyable one. 




Entrance to Over and Under the Sea 



42 



THE WHITE CITY MAGAZINE AND SOUVENIR PROGRAM 



JOHNSTOWN FLOOD 

ONE OF THE WORLD'S GREATEST 
AND MOST AWE-INSPIRING TRAGEDIES 




HAA'E seen the Johnstown 
Flood." Wherever you see 
a person at White City 
wearing" a circular card with 
the preceding- inscription on 
it, you see a person who is entirely 
pleased and gratified with the return of 
his small investment, and one who is 
willing to inform others that they are 
missine somethins: educatinsr and enter- 



and bright on this fatal night. The citi- 
zens of the town had celebrated Decora- 
tion Day, and the entire business section 
of the city was gayly decorated in bunt- 
ing and flags. Night falls, and now the 
mountains which rise on all sides of the 
town throw the long blue shadows over 
the valley and the lights glitter from the 
casements and windows. In strong con- 
trast to the lurid glare of the factories, 




Lderior View, Johnstown Flood Building 



taining if they fail to see this great ex- 
hibiton. 

The Johnstown Flood is the most im- 
pressive and realistic of all scenic pro- 
ductions, and is produced on a mammoth 
scale. The entire show is a triumph of 
scenic art and startling realism. On a 
large staging the entire city of Johns- 
town, Pa., is reproduced in perspective, 
with the streets and houses being exact 
patterns of the actual structures in that 
town. 

Business is being carried on in the 
city, people walk the streets, the trains 
arrive at the stations, and the entire 
scene is one of activity. After several 
days of rainfall, the sun had shone clear 



the moon bathes the city in a mantle of 
silver. 

Suddenly the skies cloud over, and in 
a moment a fierce storm bursts over the 
city, the thunder crashes and re-echoes 
in the mountains. Then quiet comes 
again and the stars twinkle in the heav- 
ens and the little valley is wrapt in slum- 
ber. 

The reservoir breaks and the torrent 
comes sweeping down the narrow defile, 
washing away several villages, and 
dashes on with a sullen roar toward 
Johnstown. On comes the wall of water, 
carrying with it men, women, children 
and all kinds of trees, houses and ani- 
mals. The roar of the coming cataract 



THE WHITE CITY MAGAZINE AND SOUVENIR PROGRAM 



43 



has been heard by some, who flee to 
safety, but the next instant the city is 
swept away. Where 2,000 houses had 
stood there is nothing but a sea of water. 
The entire city of Johnstown has been 
wiped out. 

The story of the flood is the story of 
one of the greatest tragedies of the 
world. On Friday, May 31, 1889, in 
the State of Pennsylvania, the entire 




Johnstoivn Flood 

beautiful valley of the Conemaugh was 
devastated, 10,000 lives were wiped out 
and millions of dollars' worth of prop- 
erty was destroyed. 

Johnstown, Pa., was one of the most 
prosperous manufacturing towns in the 
state. Including its suburbs, it had a 
population of 35,000 persons, and was 
situated at the junction of the Cone- 
maugh River and Stony Creek. One of 
the largest steel works in the country, 
the Cambria Iron Company, had its plant 
there. 

About fifteen or eighteen miles north- 
east from Johnstown was the great res- 
ervoir, which was 500 feet above the 
cit3^ The great basin held more than 
sixty million gallons of water, which 
was held in check by a dam 700 feet in 
length. 90 feet thick at the base and 110 
feet high. This reservoir was the prop- 
erty of a number of wealthy gentlemen 



of Pittsburg, who formed the "South 
Fork Fishing Club." 

When the dam burst, after many days 
of heavy rains, the great wall of water 
swept down over the little city and it 
was completely annihilated. This trag- 
edy is so faithfully reproduced and is 
given on so great a scale that the audi- 
ence forgets that it is only a spectacle 
which they are watching and sits spell- 
bound, intently gazing at the unfolding 
of the story. 



"The opening of White City marked 
an epoch in the history of amusements." 
— JVarren A. Patrick in the Billboard. 

"Beautiful White City, the Coney Is- 
land of the West." — Nezv Orleans States. 

"White City is not unlike the World's 
Fair at Chicago." — Salt Lake City Tri- 
bune. 

"White City cost over a million dol- 
lars and is the leading attraction in Chi- 
cago." — Humboldt, Kan., Herald. 

"White City has an attendance of 
over 25,000 to 40,000 every day."— L'ay- 
ton, Ohio, Nezvs. 

*^* 

Percival — "Are you going to take up 
your fawther's business ?" 

Archibald — "Naw, it's enough to 
have one tradesman in the family, 
doncher know." 

If politeness were marked down to 
$1.98 perhaps more people would have 



"Sh — h, don't disturb the chauffeur." 
"What's the matter?" 
"He's writing an auto-biography." 
*** 

Mrs. Brozvne — "Yes ; they're in 
Egypt now, and will spend the winter 
on the Nile." ; 

Mrs. Malaprop — -"How nice ! They'll 
get a chance to see all them Pyrenees 
and the Phcenix, won't they?" — Phila- 
delphia Press. 



44 



THE WHITE CITY MAGAZINE AND SOUVENIR PROGRAM 



i i 



HEREAFTER 



5 J 



THE FUTURE STATE VIVIDLY AND IMPRESSIVELY SHOWN 



HIS unique attraction is sit- 
uated in a large building just 
north of the colonnade and 
on the east side of the White 
City "Board Walk," and is 
one of the most cleverly conceived en- 
tertainments in the park. While the 
title of this feature may make a grew- 
some impression on some persons, to 




der of countless thousands, has the man- 
agement of this attraction. He spent 
over two months at White City during 
its construction personally supervising 
the work of installing the show, for he 
could not trust the delicate and wonder- 
ful mechanism to common workmen. 
On a large and roomy stage in his own 
special building, Professor Burch has 




Interior Viczv of hereafter 



the majority it will furnish an unlimited 
field for speculation. 

"Hereafter" is an illusion, or rather 
a series of illusions, and the most beau- 
tiful and dramatic effects are produced 
by those clever arts and resourceful 
methods adopted by skilled illusionists. 
The audience sits spellbound, seeking in 
vain to gain even the slightest percep- 
tion of how the wonderful effects are 
produced. 

Professor Burch, who has devoted al- 
most a quarter of a century to the cre- 
ating of unusual devices for the mysti- 
fying of scientists and arousing the won- 



arranged his carefully guarded secrets 
and will exhibit them several times daily 
to the public. 

Ordinary illusions, such as have been 
exhibited in Chicago in years past, must 
not be confounded with the exhibitions 
which will be produced at White City. 
Professor Burch has participated in the 
entertainment of hundreds of thousands 
of people at the five great expositions 
which have been given within the past 
dozen years, and he will present in the 
Hereafter the very best and most popu- 
lar illusions which have been introduced 
during that time. In addition to the 



THE WHITE CITY MAGAZINE AND SOUVENIR PROGRAM 



45 



n^^ 




Hereafter 

great effects which he has selected from 
his previous eft'orts, he has invented sev- 
eral wholly new devices, which are being 
shown at White City for the first time 
ever presented to the public. 

His work is similar to that produced 
by the world-famous Maskelyne and 



Cook for the past fifty years in the re- 
nowned Egyptian Hall in London, almost 
as celebrated as the Tower of London 
itself. Entertainment will be furnished 
for old and young, and there will be 
absolutely nothing in any of the pro- 
grammes to oft'end even the most criti- 
cal and fastidious. Beautiful girls are 
transformed into flowers, familiar fea- 
tures being transformed into unfamiliar 
ones and back again. Other various un- 
canny transformations will also occur. 
Persons of all ages will be fully enter- 
tained, with just enough of the myste- 
rious to give a delightfully creepy feeling 
now and then, but there will be nothing 
of a startling or unpleasant nature in 
any of the shows. There is nothing to 
alarm the most nervous or hysterical, 
nor will there be anything to create un- 
pleasant sensations. 

"Hereafter" is beautiful and sublime 
in many ways, but never disagreeable. 
It is a strictly high-class and up-to-date 
entertainment all the way through, and 
those who witness the exhibitions are 
supplied with an endless fund of con- 
jecture and material for discussion. It 
is one of the most pleasant attractions 
at White City. 



MECHANICAL EXPOSITION 

AUTOMATIC NOVELTIES WHICH ENTERTAIN 




NTO the Lion's Mouth and 
Out of It. The yawning 
mouth of a gigantic cast of 
a mammoth African Lion 
marks the entrance to this 
most interesting exhibit, which is located 
under the ballroom and which has its 
entrance on the east side of the "Board 
Walk." Hemer's ^Mechanical Exposi- 
tion, as this unique show is named, con- 
tains a most remarkable collection of 
lifelike figures reproduced in wax, and 
so supplied with intricate and cleverly 
contrived mechanisms that they appear 
to have all the characteristics and abili- 
ties of living human beings. This ex- 
hibition of ingenuity is absolutely new to 
Chicagoans, and is the most comprehen- 
sive exhibit of the kind ever attempted. 
The spectator descends a dark pas- 
sage and steps out into a broad room, 
which is only semi-lighted. Here the 



various wax figures are constantly going 
through their performances and even 
walking about. The person who does 
not endeavor to try to talk to one of 
these lifelike figures before he gets 
through is an exception, for the models 
are so true to life that any person is 
liable to be taken in. Nearly every per- 
son believes for a moment at least that 
some of the figures must be alive, so 
realistically and intelligently do they per- 
form their various evolutions. 

One of the first views which meets the 
spectator is the reproduction of nurses 
attending wounded soldiers. A nurse 
kneels by a wovmded man, carefully 
bathing his wounds, while the man 
struggles on the ground in anguish. In 
another part of the field the captain of 
the soldiers, waving his sword aloft, 
beckons his men onward. 

Then follow scores of other exhibits. 



46 



THE WHITE CITY MAGAZINE AND SOUVENIR PROGRAM 



J 1 M 



KEY 



THE MARVELOUS EDUCATED HORSE 




N THE west side of the 
grounds is the Jim Key build- 
ing". It is located next to 
the Flying Airships, and the 
front of the structure is dec- 
orated with a mammoth horseshoe 
studded with electric lights. This place 
was designed especially for Jim Key, and 
is so constructed that every person who 



visits the show has an excellent view of 
the famous animal. 

In speaking of his horse, Mr. Rogers, 
the owner of Jim Key, said : "It is only 
a 'one horse show,' but amid all the at- 
tractions at the Pike in the St. Louis 
Exposition last 3'ear, this marvelous edu- 
cated horse made the most money." 

Many of the managers of the great 



\ 







Home of Beautiful Jim Key 



THE WHITE CITY MAGAZINE AND SOUVENIR PROGRAM 



47 



amusement parks in the East tried to 
get Jim Key as their drawing card for 
this season, but Mr. Rogers reahzed that 
White City was the ideal location for 
this wonderful horse, and as a result the 
noted animal will be seen in Chicago all 
during the Summer. Jim Key has made 



been a revelation to other trainers, who 
could never hope to approach this per- 
fection. Jim Key is not a trick horse in 
any sense of the word. Too frequently, 
for example, trainers ask the horse a 
question in figures and then give him 
some apparent signal when the number 




Mechanical Exposition 



an enviable record wherever he has been 
exhibited, and he will undoubtedly con- 
tinue to be a great attraction. 

In all the history of the training of 
animals there have been only two horses 
who might truly be said to have been 
educated. These two animals are Hans, 
the famous German horse, and the 
world-famed Jim Key, the Arabian edu- 
cated horse. Though seemingly impos- 
sible, this equine king can actually read, 
write, spell, think, count, figure, change 
money, and use a national cash register. 
Jim can also give many Bible quotations, 
of which he knows a great number. 

It is especially interesting to note that 
the entire training of Jim Key was ac- 
complished by kindness. Dr. William 
Key, the former owner of Jim Key, has 
had entire charge of the animal since it 
was a colt. Dr. Key is a typical Uncle 
Tom of the Southland, and the wonders 
he has accomplished with this animal has 



is correct. With Jim it is different. 
When Jim is asked to figure, he goes to 
a board and selects the proper number 
to represent the result, entirely without 
aid of any kind. 

Jim Key is also a member of many 
societies. He is the equine honorary 
member of the American Humane Asso- 
ciation, which numbers over three mil- 
lion children. He has over six hundred 
thousand signed members of the Jim 
Key Band of Mercy, who have pledged 
themselves to the statement, 'T promise 
always to be kind to animals." All of 
Jim Key's performances are given under 
the auspices of the American Humane 
Society of Boston. 

Jim Key gives performances continu- 
ally during the day and evening, and 
each show lasts through half an hour. 
The audience asks the horse all the ques- 
tions, to which he is always ready with 
an intelligent answer. 



48 



THE WHITE CITY MAGAZINE AND SOUVENIR PROGRAM 



ULRICH'S CHICAGO CONCERT BAND 

NOW ENGAGED AT WHITE CITY FOR AN EXTENDED SEASON 
FOUR PROGRAMS EVERY DAY 




TRICK'S Chicago Con- 
cert Band, which is as- 
sembled irom tlic fa- 
mous Theo. Thomas 
Orchestra, was organ- 
ized in 1904 by Messrs. 
Albert Ulrich, conduc- 
tor, and JNI. A. Wintrich. business man- 
ager, who conceived the idea that Chi- 
cago, the foremost musical city of the 
United States, was lacking a strictly 
high-class Concert Band. 

The organization is principally assenir 
bled from the brass and wood wind play- 
ers of this great orchestra, and this 
choir, which is in itself a complete band, 
forms the most finished and artistic 
group of any musical organization in 
the world. 

The late Theo. Thomas, the world's 
greatest conductor, spared no expense in 
collecting these artists from all parts of 
the globe, and under his masterly baton 





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Albert Ulrich, Leader 

drilling them day after day for the past 
fifteen years, this organization received 
a worldly reputation for its wonderful 
ensemble playing, rich quality of tone 
and great technique. Mr. Albert Ulrich, 
conductor of this fine band, and one of 
Chicago's most noted musicians, has won 



fame far and wide for his wonderful 
magnetism and splendid musicianship. 
Not alone does he excel as a conductor, 




Albert Wasshausen, Cornet Soloist 

but ranks as one of the finest trumpeters 
in the United States. His excellent solo 
performances while in Germany caused 
considerable astonishment and received 
many enticing offers from the various 
Royal Opera Houses to assist in the well 
known operas, such as "The Trumpeter 
Von Seckingen," which opera requires 
a most extraordinary performer and 
musician. 

However, Mr. Ulrich's desire to come 
to this glorious country, "the land of 
much promise," cast aside all these mag- 
nificent offers, and he sailed for New 
York City, where he joined the famous 
Theo. Thomas Orchestra and has since 
then been a member, as well as the con- 
fidential companion of the late master. 

He is modest and perfectly free from 
any semblance of affectation or pretense. 
His magnetism is in his eyes, each and 
every look having a peculiar meaning, 
whereby he is capable of producing the 
most delicate shades and tone coloring. 

The Band's library is considered the 
largest in existence, comprising over 
3,000 standard numbers, including work§ 



THE WHITE CITY MAGAZINE AND SOUVENIR PROGRAM 



49 



from Wagner, Tschaikowsky, Berlioz, rank highest of any organization yet 

Rich, Strauss, Glazonouw, Dvorak, heard. 

Saint Saens, Moszkowski, Elgar, Mas- Its soloists number eight of the great- 




M. C. Smith, Trombone Soloist 

cagni, Puccini and many other great 
composers. 

Its rendition of various overtures, such 
as 1812 (the great French Revolution 




G. Staiige, Euphonium Soloist. 

number), Tannhauser, Phedre, Eine 
Faust Overture, and Fantasie's on II 
Pagliaci, Lohengrin, Parsifal, L'Afri- 
caine, etc., etc., are most artistic and 




Jos. Schrcurs, Clarinet Soloist 
est artists ever in America: "Sir. 



Jos. 



Schreurs, Belgium's foremost clarinetist ; 
Mr. Alfred Ouensel, Germany's flute vir- 
tuoso ; Mr. Leopold De Mare, Holland's 




Leopold De Mare , French Horn Soloist 

eminent French hornist : Alfred Barthel, 
professor from Paris' celebrated Con- 
servatory of Music ; Mr. G. Strange, 
euphonium soloist from Hamburg ; Mr. 



50 



THE WHITE CITY MAGAZINE AND SOUVENIR PROGRAM 



Albert Wasshausen, New York City's 
favorite cornetist, and last, but not least, 
Mr. M. C. Smith, the wizard of the slide- 
trombone, a young" man of g"reat talent 
and technique who attracted ]\Ir. \\'int- 




Alfrcd Oucnscl Flute Soloist 

rich's attention on one of his extensive 
tours with the Thomas Orchestra. He 
forthwith negotiated with Mr. Smith ex- 
pressly for the season at White City. 

The instrumentation of Ulrich's Con- 
cert Band differs widely from other or- 
ganizations, with its army of Albert Bb 
clarinets, Boehm flutes, French oboes, 
English horns. German wald horner, 
monster tubas and bombardons, German 
trumpets and quartet of kettle drums. 
They enable the Band to play the most 
difficult works published. 

The programs will be at all times mis- 
cellaneous, from the highest standard to 
the most popular works of the day. The 
large librar}' is practically unlimited, and 
any requests, if properly made, will be 
complied with. 



Fun Factory 



Laughter-Creating Devices for Old and Young 

Abandon all dignity ye who enter 
here. No person, however sedate and 
cynical, can go into this attraction with- 
the world in general. Go where the 
laughter is loudest and there you will 
out laughing and being well pleased with 
find the Fun Factorv. This attraction is 



located on the east side of the "Board 
Walk," and is situated just north of the 
Electric Tower. 

Mirrors are the cause of it all. By a 
most ingenious and skillful arrangement 
of the various glasses many humorous 
and amusing illusions are given. There 
is the convex mirror, the concave mir- 
ror, the double mirror, and in fact every 
kind of a mirror that human ingenuity 
has devised. 

The spectator steps before one glass 
to look at himself and finds that he has 
apparently flattened out until he is only 
about one foot tall and five or six feet 
broad. The enormous change in the 
appearance of a person when he stands 
before this mirror is most ludicrous. 
The next moment he steps before an- 
other glass and sees himself many feet 
tall and extremely slender. From the 
first mirror to the last the spectator is 
convulsed with laughter. 

It has been observed that each spec- 
tator tries to put the laugh on some 
other person. He will stand way out 
from the mirrors and endeavor to be- 
guile his friends to step nearer, and 
when they do so he will laugh at their 
discomfiture, only a moment later to find 
that he, himself, has wandered too near 
one of the mirrors and that he is the 
center of the laughter of his friends, who 
are thoroughly enjoying his awkward 
position. 




52 



THE WHITE CITY MAGAZINE AND SOUVENIR PROGRAM 



TRANSPORTATION FACILITIES 

HOW TO REACH WHITE CITY 



WHITE CITY is located at 63d 
street and South Park ave- 
nue, and may be easily 
reached from points in or out 
of Chicago by elevated roads, by cable 
and electric street car lines, and by 
steam railroads. 

ELE\'ATED ROADS. 

At stations on the Union Loop you 
should observ'e the guiding signs which 
are located in conspicuous places on 
the stairs and platforms and by which 
you will be guided aright. 

The South Side "L" has a station im- 
mediately in front of White City at 
South Park avenue and 63d street. 
Time of trip from the Union Loop to 
White City is 30 minutes. 

Changing cars on other "L" lines, 
down-town, to South Side "L :" 

From Metropolitan "L," change at 
the LaSalle Street Station on Van 
Buren street. 

Returning home, change at Madison 
Street Station on Wabash avenue. 

From Chicago and Oak Park "L" 
and Northwestern "L" change at the 
State Street Station on Van Buren 
street. 

Returning home, change at Adams 
"Street Station or at Randolph Street 
Station on Fifth avenue. 

- SURFACE LINES. 

In or near the down-town district 
take any surface line going south, pref- 
erably the State street cable or the Cot- 
tage Grove avenue cable (Chicago City 
Railway) then transfer to the 63d street 
electric line. 

From any point on the South Side 
the cars of the Chicago City Railway 
will carry you, for one fare only, right 
to the entrance of White City. 

Under the present system of trans- 
fers on the Chicago City Railway, you 
may, upon the payment of one fare, 
ride in any one general direction as far 
as the cars of the company will carry 
you; but, should you reverse the gen- 
eral direction in which you have 



started, you may continue to ride only 
to the junction with the first cross line 
reached. 

For instance, if you are on a south- 
bound car, you will, upon the payment 
of a cash fare, receive a slip which will 
permit you to transfer to any inter- 
secting east, west, or south line. If 
you take a west-bound car at a transfer 
point, you have established your gen- 
eral direction of south-west, and the 
conductor on the west-bound car will 
exchange your transfer-slip for one en- 
titling you to ride south or west, and 
you may thus exchange your transfer- 
slip indefinitely on south and west- 
bound cars. If you reverse your direc- 
tion, however, and take a north or 
east-bound car at a transfer point, your 
transfer will entitle you to ride only as 
far as the intersection of the first cross 
line, and if you wish to ride farther 
than this point you must pay another 
cash fare. 

To avoid anv misunderstanding-, re- 
member that "Transfers will be issued 
ONLY at time fares are paid." 

Transfers are not issued from North 
or West-Side lines to Sou'-h-Side lines. 
Exception: A passenger on the North 
Halsted street line may reach White 
City upon the payment of one fare and 
transferring at O'Neill street to the 
South Halsted street line and then 
again on 63d street to South Park 
avenue. 

Time from Madison street (down- 
town) to White City via Chicago City 
Railway Company's lines is 38 min- 
utes. 

The Calumet Electric lines from 
South Chicago, Cheltenham Beach, 
Hammond, Ind.. etc., connect at Stony 
Island avenue and 68th street with the 
cars from Pullman. Kensington, etc.. 
which have their terminal at the en- 
trance to White Citv. 

The Chicago Electric Traction Com- 
Harvey and Bine Island direct to 63d 
street and South Park avenue. The 
fare from Harvey is 10 cents and from 
Blue Island 5 cents. 



THE WHITE CITY MAGAZINE AND SOUVENIR PROGRAM 



53 



SUBURBAN LINES. 
From points on the Aurora, Elgin 
& Chicago Electric line only two 
changes of cars need be made, as this 
line connects with the Metropolitan 
''L" at South 52d avenue and carries 
passengers direct to the Union "L" 
Loop, where the South Side "L" trains 
may be taken at LaSalle street. Dear- 
born street or State street stations. 

The Chicago and Joliet Electric 
Railway running from Joliet to Chi- 
cago via Summit, Lemont, Lockport, 
etc., connects with the lines of the Chi- 
cago City Railway Company at Archer 
and South 48th avenues. It also con- 
nects with the lines of the Union Trac- 
tion Co. in the village of Lyons. 

STEAM RAILROADS 

All Illinois Central and Michigan 
Central trains, to and from all subur- 
ban stations, stop at Woodlawn Sta- 
tion on 63d street near Jackson Park. 
The 63d street electric cars, going west, 
carry passengers direct ,to the main 
entrance of White City on 63d street 
and South Park avenue. The South 
Side "L" trains may be taken at Madi- 
son Station, half a block west of Wood- 
lawn Station direct to White Citt. 

All trains of the Chicago, Rock Isl- 
and & Pacific, Lake Shore & Michigan 
Southern, and the Pittsburg, Ft. 
Wayne & Chicago lines stop at Engle- 
wood Station on 63d street, where 
electric cars going east may be taken 
for White Citt, landing passengers at 
the main entrance on South Park 
avenue. 

Those entering Chicago on the Chi- 
cago & Eastern Illinois, the Chicaeo & 
Western Indiana, the Pittsburg, Cin- 
cinnati, Chicago, and St. Lo- is, and 
the Wabash, can change at the 63d 
street station to the electric cars going 



east direct to the main entrance of 
White City. 

Trains on the Grand Trunk stop at 
47th street. To transfer for White 
City, take the electric cars on 47th 
street going east, transfer to the Went- 
worth avenue electric (or to the State 
street cable) line and transfer again to 
the 63d street electric line, landing at 
the main entrance. 

Patrons of White City entering 
Chicago by other than the above-men- 
tioned roads will find convenient ele- 
vated stations near' the respective rail- 
way stations — observe the guiding 
signs on elevated stairs and platforms, 
and refer to elevated railroads men- 
tioned above. The Kinzie Street Sta- 
tion of the Northwestern "L" is in 
front of the Wells Street Railroad Sta- 
tion. The Canal Street Station of the 
Metropolitan "L" is within half a block 
of the Union Station. 

STEAMSHIP DOCKS. 

The nearest and most convenient ele- 
vated train stations from the docks of 
all steamship lines are the Randolph 
Street Station on Wabash avenue, the 
State street, and Clark street stations 
on Lake street. These are within a 
few minutes' walk south from any one 
of the docks, and South Side elevated 
trains will carry passengers direct to 
White City. 

AUTOMOBILES. 

White City is within a short dis- 
tance of the boulevard system and ac' 
commodations will be arranged for 300 
automobiles in the White City garage 
on South Park avenue between 62d 
and 63d streets. 



All who joy would win 
Must share it — Happiness was born a 
twin. — Byron. 



THE ]VHITE CITY MAGAZINE AND SOUVENIR PROGRAM 



iSpecial Features of WHite City 



Unrivaled Attractions for Chicaoo's 
A iniiseDienf Enterprise 



^1^000,000 



Electric Tower. Almost 300 feet high, 
illuminated by 20,000 incandescent 
lights. 

Fire Show. A thrilling spectacle ex- 
hibiting three complete Fire Com- 
panies in action while a five-story 
hotel burns; requires 250 people, 2 
trolley cars, 2 automobiles, 5 cabs, 6 
wagons, ambulance, patrol wagon, 14 
horses, etc. Greatest and most vivid 
outdoor spectacle ever produced. 

Venice. A romantic gondola ride 
through the moonlit water streets of 
Venice; viewing correct reproduc- 
tions of her famous buildings and 
statuary groups. 

Scenic Railway. A three-quarter mile 
ride up hill and down dale, through 
forest and glade, viewing the world's 
most marvelous scenery, actually re- 
produced in per.'.pective. 

Infant Incubators. An exhibit of the 
greatest practical value to physicians 
and of the deepest interest to par- 
ents; showing scientific methods of 
saving the lives of tiny babes. 

White City College Inn. Finest restau- 
rant in America, located in an enor- 
mous and architecturally beautiful 
building; a duplicate of Chicago's 
famous College Inn; also a popular 
priced temperance restaurant and a 
German restaurant. Will accommo- 
date 2,400 people. 

Music. Open air concerts day and eve- 
ning by the foremost bands and 
orchestras of America and Europe. 

Flyingf Airships. A revelation in bird- 
1 ike tran s portation. SirHiram 
Maxim's idea of safe and sane aerial 
navigation. 

Ball Room. Finest dancing floor in 
Chicago and capable of accommo- 
dating 1,000 dancers at a time. 

Bumps. A harmless and hilarious 
method of enjoyment. "Have you 
bumped the bumps?" 



Hereafter. Beautiful, mystifying illu- 
sions, possessing in the highest degree 
the power of interesting and enter- 
taining. Conducted by Prof. Burch, 
the celebrated London illusionist. 

Shoot-the-Chutes. Duplex and longest 
in America. Has 500 foot escalator 
to carry people to the pavilion. All 
the newest improvements. 

Johnstown Flood. Most impressive and 
realistic of all scenic productions and 
constructed on a gigantic scale. A 
triumph of scenic art and startling 
realism. 

Automatic Vaudeville. Containing all 
the latest mechanical novelties and 
furnishing entertainment for old and 
young. 

Midway. A conglomeration of laughter 
inspiring features and clean amuse- 
ments. 

Fun Factory. A merrymaking estab- 
lishment with laugh creating devices 
on a large scale. 

Electric Theatre. Electric pictorial 
reproductions of startling and thrill- 
ing events showing the animation and 
action of living objects. 

Observation Wheel. Fun for every- 
body. A ride you will not forget. 

Circus Ring;s. Continuous performances 
including equestrian acts, aerial 
flights and feats of strength and skill. 
Free exhibitions. 

Mechanical Waxworks. Most remark- 
able collection of life-like figures, 
reproduced in wax and so supplied 
with intricate and cleverly contrived 
mechanisms that they appear to be 
possessed of the characteristics and 
abilities of living beings. 

Photograph Gallery. Where pictures 
of every kind known to lovers of 
photographic art will be made under 
the supervision of skilled photog- 
raphers. Conducted by one of the 
best known and largest photographic 
concerns in the world. 



THE WHITE CITY MAGAZINE AND SOUVENIR PROGRAM 



55 



Gypsy Camp. With a host of genuine 
Gypsies from sunny Spain, secured 
by a special envoy sent across the 
water by the management of White 
City. 

Dog', Pony and Monkey Circus. Other- 
wise called the Simian City. An 
aggregation of cleverly trained 
animals under the direction of Prof. 
Blake, one of the best known trainers 
in the world. A constantly changing 
program of special interest to chil- 
dren and pleasing to all. 

Toboggan. An absolutely harmless 
but exciting ride in perfectly con- 
structed gravity cars, whirling the 
rider at an exhilarating speed around 
a double circle. Lots of fun. 

Beautiful Jim Key. The equine world 
wonder who earns annually the in- 
terest on Si, 000,000 and is the aristo- 
crat of the animal kingdom. Actually 
an educated horse which thinks, 
spells, counts, draws with chalk and 
writes his own name on a blackboard. 
Taught by kindness and a wonderful 
example of the power of love for 
dumb brutes. The children's friend. 

Palmistry Kiosk. Where the mysteries 
of the future and occurrences of the 
past will be related by seers who can 
read the story of life as imprinted in 
the palm. 

Utopia. A beautiful and brilliant 
series of unexpected scenes, under 
and over the sea; also during a tour of 
the surface of the moon the spectator 
is charmed and delighted with the 
novelty and splendor of the phe- 
nomena witnessed. 



Miniature Railway. A perfect model 
railroad system with tracks, switches, 
tiny cars, engines, etc. Almost a 
half-mile of trackage through tunnels 
and grottoes with beautiful scenic 
effects Children or adults can ride. 

Temple of Music. Marvelous develop- 
ment of natural forces, applied by 
scientific methods for the performing 
of difficult airs on musical instru- 
ments of all kinds. Piano played by 
wireless telegraphy, the electricity 
passing through the body of a human 
being. Air, heat, steam, electricity, 
etc., used in these wonderful demon- 
strations. 

Chinese Theatre. With jugglers, actors, 
acrobats, etc., direct from the flowery 
kingdom. This troupe of oriental 
entertainers contains several high- 
caste Chinese women with tiny feet. 

Cummins* Indian Congress. Includes 
150 Indians from all the principal 
tribes, cowboys, sharpshooters, sol- 
diers, trappers, etc. Western scenes 
and pioneer days vividly recalled by 
a thrilling spectacle showing the 
massacre of Fort Dearborn and a 
realistic representation of Custer's 
last stand; reproduced in three life- 
like tableaux. 

Terrace Tavern. A high-class refectory 
where ice cream, soda water, soft 
drinks and light lunches can be 
obtained. 

Double Whirl. Participants in the de- 
lights of this novel pastime are given 
a pleasant circular ride during which 
they have a view of the park from a 
considerable elevation. 



P. &.S 




Patented Dec. 23, 1902. 
No. 1161. 



40,000 

of these used in White City. 

Get our Prices on Receptacles for Permanent 
and Temporary Decorative Lighting, 

Pass & Seymour 

(Incorporated) 

130 West Jackson Boulevard 
CHICAGO, ILL. 



When writing to advertisers please mention The White City Magazine. 



56 



THE WHITE CITY MAGAZINE AND SOUVENIR PROGRAM 



WM\^ 






i^iMf^ 



fsiv^isi 



\smM 



\smM{ 






i 



^ 
^ 



I 

1! 



J IS 

I 



Ideal Sites for rlomes 

ALONG THE 

NE\V 

RAVENS^VOOD 
EXTENSION 

of tne 

NortliAv^estern 
Elevatea 
Railroaa 



PURE AIR 



PLENTY^/" ROOM 



QUICK 

TRANSPORTATION 

DOWN-TOWN 

O-cent Fare 



pi 





















When writing to advertisers please mention The White City Magazine. 



THE WHITE CITY MAGAZINE AND SOUVENIR PROGRAM 



57 






BastianBros. 

Successors to F. F. Pulver Co. 

ROCHESTER, N.Y. 

Celluloia 
Advertising Novelties 

Pulveroia Signs 
College, CluD G?" Society Pins 

Button Makers to White City 



CHICAGO OFFICE : MASONIC TEMPLE 

L. A. HALL, Western Manager 
Telephone Central 5375 




CLAY MODELING 

^^^ ^^ ELECTROTYPING 

22,1 "^*^ 

SZND 4C. IN STAMPS FOR A BEAUTIFUL 
CLAY MODEL BOOKLET 



A.L.SINQER&CO. 

173=175 E. Adams St. 

Chicago 



Makers of 



Fine Uniforms 



All Employes 

of White City 

Uniformed 

by Us 

Write for samples and prices 

All the Season's Latest Novelties can be found in our 
CUSTOM TAILORING DEPT. 



SCHMIDT BROS. CO. 

PAINTS, OILS 
AND GLASS 

7123-7125 Cottage Grove Ave. 

CHICAGO, ILL. 

Telephone Hyde Park 256 



We have 
the contract 
for painting 
WHITE 
CITY 
and to 
furnish all 
requisite 
materials 




F.C.SCHMIDT, Mgr. 



When writing to advertisers please mention The White City Magazine. 



58 THE WHITE CITY MAGAZINE AND SOUVENIR PROGRAM 

n i I D 

'Take the 

Metropolitan 

West Side 

Elevated 

To 

AUSTIN 

OAK PARK, HARLEM 

AND THE CEMETERIES 

CONCORDIA 

FOREST HOME 

WALDHEIM 



FIVE 

CENTS TO THE COUNTRY 

Garfield Park Branch 



PI I D 

When writing to advertisers please mention The White City Magazine. 



THE WHITE CITY MAGAZINE AND SOUVENIR PROGRAM 59 



With Rod and Reel 
in the Rockies 



Great sport is in store for the angler \Yho goes to 
Colorado. 

Altogether, there are 6,000 miles of trout streams 
in the State. 

Six million young trout were distributed from the 
State hatcheries in 1904. 

New varieties were introduced: The Eastern brook 
trout; red and yellow speckled; European brook; 
yellow salmon; the Mackinaw; Loch Leven (from 
Scotland), and the famous Lake Tahoe trout from 
Nevada. 

A total of 33,000,000 fish have been put into 
Colorado's streams since 1901. 

About time to pull a few out, don't you think ? 

Every true disciple of Ike Walton should get his 
share ! 

Better go, it's a grand country, aside from the 
fishing. Clear, crisp air; golden sunshine; bluest of 
skies; magnificent scenery. 

Quick, convenient service via Rock Island System 
from Chicago, St. Louis and Kansas City to Denver, 
Colorado Springs and Pueblo. Low rates all summer. 

Send for our 80-page Colorado booklet and lay 
your plans to go. 



1 



Rocklsiand 
System 



^ ^ 



JOHN SEBASTIAN 

Passenger Traffic Manager 

CHICAGO 



When writing to advertisers please mention The White City Magazine. 



6o 



THE WHITE CITY MAGAZINE AND SOUVENIR PROGRAM 



Tbc White City Magazine is printed and bound by 

P. F. Pettibone 
(&Co. 






STATIONERS 

PRINTERS 

BlankBookMakers 
Lithographers 

Edition Printing 
and Binding 



Main Store 

1 78 Monroe Street. 

Store, Factory and 
General Offices 

44-50 S. Desplaines 
Street* 

CHICAGO 



Telephone Monroe ^5g 

Pri-vate Exchange 






When writing to advertisers please mention The White City Magazini 



THE WHITE CITY MAGAZINE AND SOUVENIR PROGRAM 



6l 




Tke Wkite City 
Magazine 

tnrougnout tne entire season, 
July, August, September and 
October, ■will combine its 
regular 

PROGRAM WITH 

THE MAGAZINE 

making it 

^e WHITE CITY 
MAGAZINE y 
SOUVENIR 
PROGRAM 



Hign grade advertisers can 
quickly realize its value. A 
limited amount or space open 
tor tne season. For rates and 
full information apply to 

Franc R.E.Woodward 

Manager Publicity Department 

Sixty-third St. &? South Park Ave. 

'Phone Wentworth 996 

Private Exchange 



American 
Posting 
Service 

Morgan Street : Corner Lake 
'Plione 1963 Monroe 

Billposting 

Distributing 

Poster Printing 



Special a{iention 
given to all kmas 
or advertising for 
Balls, Picnics, 
Excursions, etc. 

House-to- house 
distributing or 
circulars, book- 
lets, samples, etc., 
IS done by well- 
organized cre^vs 
or competent men 
at very lowest 
possible rates. 

No ckarge if w^ork 
IS not satisfactory. 



When writing to advertisers please mention The White City Magazine. 



62 



THE WHITE CITY MAGAZINE AND SOUVENIR PROGRAM 



The Club-Room Car 

(no extra charge) 
IS FOUND ONLY ON THE 




CHICAGO & EASTERN ILLINOIS RAILROAD 

BETWEEN 

CHICACO - ST. LOUIS 

This is but one of the many new features in our equipment 

which agreeably surprises our patrons. 

In Chicago, trains arrive and leave from the 

La Salle Street Station on the Elevated Loop 

and in St. Louis, the Union Station. 



F. J. DEICKE, 

Gen. Agt. Pass. Dept., 

900 Olive Street, St. Louis. 



A. B. SCHIHIDT, 

Gen. /^gt. Pass. Dept. 

91 Adams Street, Chicago. 



ESTABLISHED 1896 



EDWARDS,DEUT5CH & HEi mANIH 

LITHOGRAPHERS 

"prompt-^liable-Vp to Date 
High class lithograpfi work in all its branches 



194-202 S.CLINTON ST. 



TELFPHONFS "ARRISON 452 
ltLbFtlU[NL!> HARRISON 472 



CHICAGO. 



COVER OF THIS MAGAZINE LITHOGRAPHED BY US. 



Whtn xuriting to advertistrs please mention Th« Whitb City Magazini. 



THE WHITE CITY MAGAZINE AND SOUVENIR PROGRAM 63 



U 



Cnicago ^ Oak Park 
Elevatea Railroad 



f^ 



Direct Route for 

River Forest 

Oak Park, Austin and 

West Side 

Residents Visiting 

W^kite City 



Ckange Cars at State 6r* Van B 

( Union Loop ) 



u 



uren 



When writing to advertisers please mention The White City Magazine. 



64 THE WHITE CITY MAGAZINE AND SOUVENIR PROGRAM 



A Chance for ^11 

to see the greatest piece of architectural work ever constructed 
in this country— WHITE CITY. 

The Chicago Electric Traction Company 

will assist in swelling the crowds by conveying people from the 
City of Harvey, 111., the Village of Posen, the City of Blue Island, 
Alt. Greenwood, Purington, Morgan Park, Washington Heights, 
South Englewood, Auburn Park and Park Manor. C. AH cars 
from the aforesaid points will run direct to the main entrance of 
WHITE CITY, 63d Street and South Park Avenue. C Cars 
will be run at short intervals for the accommodation of the traveling 
public. Also special attention will be given to pleasure seekers. 

W. H. Conrad 

General Manager 
Chicago Electric Traction Co. 



PHONE UTDE PARK 493 



GEORGE A. liEW^IS 

BUILDERS' HARDWARE 

LARGE CONTRACT WORK \YYI ^^'^^^^ ^- SI^TTTHIRD ST. 

A SPECIALTY SM$ CHICAGO 



EVERYTHING IN WHITE CITY IN THE HARDWARE I.INE 

"FROM NAILS TO RAILS" FURNISHED 

BY ME 



Whtn writing to advertisers please mention The White City Magazine. 



THE WHITE CITY MAGAZINE AND SOUVENIR PROGRAM 



65 



CHICAGO ^"NEWYORKl 

"TNE BEAUTIFUL WAY? V 

EVERY MILE A PICTURE o-£ 

~~ AMD NO SMOKE TO SPOIL THE VIEW \ 



Lackawanna 
Railroad 




THE ROAD 

of 

ANTHRACITE 












^^.,, 



DEIAWAKE WATER CAP PA \ ' jj^1» ' *^^ (jl l« 

C ON LACKAWAHNA R R 'imMZ-^" ^^.^ 

3 TRAINS ^ ^T'*:?^t#^^ 
THROUGH DAILY 

OBSERVATION CAR5 
DINING CARS 

NEW PULLMANS j^-^j^-^ ^-~^^Jif ^?Ch'* /-^ y^^ 
UICH BACK SEAT COACHES 1 CrS^^r^:^ ^^SS^ tfy^i^ 

y^ GEO.A.CULLEN 

NEW TICKET OFFICE /^ ClHtKALVHiTlRNPA^SEHCERACEHT 

lOI ADAMS STREET ("Ai^QUEnEBiDc) chicaoo. 

"A PLEASURE TO ANSWER QUESTIONS" -v.m.e 






Take a trip on the Miniature Railway 
at White City and see the beautiful 
reproductions of the famous scenery 
which has given the Lackawanna 
Route its world-wide reputation as the 
favorite route of tourists. 



When writing to advertisers please mention Th« White City Magazini. 



66 



THE WHITE CITY MAGAZINE AND SOUVENIR PROGRAM 



The Very Best Laxative 

Re-Leaf Splits 




On Sale 
Everywhere 



RE-LEAF CO., Pittsburgh 



The Calumet Cars 

( Y ellow Line) 

RUN DIRECT TO 

THE ^VHITE CITY 



FROM 

South Cnicago, Robey, Man- 
hattan Beacli, Pullman, West 
Pullman, ICensington, Rose- 
land, Burnside, Grand Cross- 
ing, Auburn Park, Bryn 
Ma-wr and Parkside : : : : 







When writing to advertisers please mention The White City Magazine. 



THE WHITE CITY MAGAZINE AND SOUVENIR PROGRAM 



o 

I— I 

CQ 



U 

o 
2 



ALL OUR LINES 

WITH FREE TRANSFERS 

LEAD DIRECT TO 



r \ 



Wkite City 



O 

I— I 
h 

l-H 



o 
iz; 



V J \. 



A Ne^\^ Terminal 

has been constructed at 

Vernon Ave. ®, Sixty-Third St. 

for tne accommoaation or 
patrons or \A' nite City 




33 Additional Trips 

no^v m regular daily operation on tne 

SIXTY-THIRD STREET LINE 

One-mmute intervals Det\veen 
cars on Sundays and Holidays 
witn increased service as needed 

1%-niinute intervals during 
tne rusn nours on week-days 



> 

w 

tfl 



o 



> 
r 

I— I 
o 



J K 



Chicago City Rail^way Co. 



T. E. MITTEN, First Vice-President 



M. B. STARRING, General Manager 



When ufriting to advertisers please mention The White City Magazine. 



THE WHITE CITY MAGAZINE AND SOUVENIR PROGRAM 




^Ae WORLD\S FAVORITE 



Triple 

Reversible-Six Finished 

Surfaces 



REX-E.Z.E. 

xsADB mask: REQISTSKBL) 



Three 

strops Combined 

in One 



Send 2c stamp for 

free booklet 

of Shaving and 

Stropping 

Instructions 



Easily preserve and impart a keen edge to razors, surgical instruments 

and otlier fine steel blades without expert knowledge and experience. 

DIRECTION AND GUARANTEE TAG ATTACHED 

No. 1. Safety Size, 1^x20 Price, $1.00 

No. 2. Junior " 2 x22 " 1.50 

No. 2'4. Medium " 2% ^2^ " 2.00 

No. a Regular " 2i<x25 " 2.50 

No.4. Large " 2^-^x25 " 3.00 

SEE REGISTERED TRADE MARK. TAKE NO IMITATIONS. 
Mpply to Dealers Mnyivhere, or 

WEIFFENBACH MFG. CO. 

Sole Proprietors 620 North Humboldt St., CHICAGO 

M. J. JANECEK, Gen-l Sales Manager 

Jobbing Ma.nufa.cturers of Finest Shell Horse Hide, Imported & Domestic 
\ Russia, Staple & High Grade Razor Strops of every kind. 



Jobbing Catalogue 
mailed on aptJlication 



RAZOR STROPS 



S. F. BOWSER & CO 

iLong BistancE (gasoline 
Storage Canfes 



^ 



FORT WAYNE 
IND. 



CHICAGO KEPRESENTATIVB 

K. F. HESSENMUKLLER 

1303 MICHIGAN AVE. 

PHONE SOUTH 1301 



(X^ 



When writing to advertisers please mention Thb Whitb Citt Magazinb. 



THE WHITE CITY MAGAZINE AND SOUVENIR PROGRAM 



jJte Most Popular Drink <7/^the Season 



Ck 



erioia 



1 



Healtliful and Refreshing At all tke Soft Drink Stands in White City 

C. LANGE &■ CO., Originators, 671-675 W. Lake St., Chicago 



P. & s, 




Patented Dec. 23, 1902. 

No. 1161. 



40,000 

of these used in White City. 



Get our Prices on Receptacles for Permanent 
and Temporary Decorative Lighting. 

Pass & Seymour 

(Incorporated) 

130 West Jackson Boulevard 
CHICAGO, ILL. 



SCHMIDT BROS. CO. 

PAINTS. OILS 
AND GLASS 

7123-7125 Cottage Grove Ave. 

CHICAGO, ILL. 

Telephone Hyde Park 256 



We have 
the contract 
for painting 
WHITE 
CITY 
and to 
furnish all 
requisite 
materials 




F. C. SCHMIDT, Mgr. 







BastianBros. 

Successors to F. F. Pulver Co. 
ROCHESTER, N.Y. 

Celluloia 
Advertising Novelties 

Pulveroid Signs 
College, Club 6?' Society Pins 

Button Makers to White City 

CHICAGO OFFICE : MASONIC TEMPLE 

L. A. HALL, Western Manager 
Telephone Central 5375 



When writing to advertisers please mention The White City Magazine. 



THE WHITE CITY MAGAZINE AND SOUVENIR PROGRAM 




DR. E. Alfred Kohler 



DENTIST 

1206 E.GARFIELD BLVD. (55TH St.) S.E. COR. STATE 3T. 

Telephones: Wentworth 371. 610, 131. 



EVERY LADY 

SHOULD VISIT BURNHAM'S 



OUR S&'A"i8?l1f.'Ri IS THE BEST 

UAID nVCIMA Ourexpertsrestorethehairloits 
imill UICIRU natural colorbyasimpleprocess 

II AID nDCCCIlin MARCEL WAVING 
nAllf UnCOOlllU BY EXPERT FRENCHMEN 

Rare Shades of Hair Perf ectly Matched 

'Manicuring 



OUR 

SPECIAL 
HAIR TONIC 

used with 
wonderful results 
for years in our 
scientific scalp 
treatment. 
Price, $1.00. 



FACIAL MASSAGE 




Hand Massage 

Every lady can 
have beautiful, 
smooth, 
white hands. 

Foot Massage 

OUR NEW VIBRATORY 

METHOOisnottheordi- 
nary massajfe as it is 
usually given, but a treatment which will build up new 
tissue, remove lines, tone up the muscles and give to 
the face a fresh, healthy, glowing appearance sug- 
gestive of vouth. 

E. BURNHAM'S Hygienic ^„71in%tnd"?:: 

CKIIM FnOr^ stores wasted 
OrXII^ rVJKJU tissues. It is a skin 
beautifier in every sense of the word. Price, 81.00. 

LADIES' TURKISH BATHS 



E. BURNHAM 

70 AND 72 STATE STREET, CHICAGO 



Knickerbocker Ice Co. 




City Distributing Depots 

LOCATIONS TELEPHONES 

420 22d St South 403 

448 W. 42d Place . . . Yards 660 

3808 Western Ave. . . . Yards 494 
3973 Vincennes Ave. . . . Drexel 6891 
6105 Lexington Ave. . . Hyde Park 564 
1211 75th St. ... Hyde Park 487 

6152 La Salle St. . . Wentworth 526 
9326 Anthony Ave. . So. Chicago 99 
459 Kensington Ave. . W. Pullman 132 

206 Johnson St Canal 486 

69 N. Curtis St. . . . Monroe 978 
Van Buren and Rockwell Sts. . West 1350 
1420 Milwaukee Ave. . . . West 1299 
705 S. Ashland Ave. . . . Canal 195 
14th St. and Western Ave. . Canal 93 

395 Illinois St North 191 

Putnam St. and Chicago Ave. Monroe 1931 



General Offices: 



401 Southport Ave. 
1713 Maple Ave. . 
539 Montrose Blvd. 
Mayfair . . . 



Phone: 
Central 1006 



Bm gorfe Life OBuilDing 

171 La Salle Street 
CHICAGO 



. North 1477 

. Evanston 445 

. Lake View 402 

Jefferson Park 38 



Suite: 717-724 



When writing to advertisers please mention The Whitb City Magazine. 



THE WHITE CITY MAGAZINE AND SOUVENIR PROGRAM 



The South Side 

Elevated Railroad 

Company 

has a station 
at the gate of 

White City 





When writing to advertisers please mention The White City Magazine. 



THE WHITE CITY MAGAZINE AND SOUVENIR PROGRAM 



NEAREST NATIONAL BANK TO ^V^HITE CITY 

J. J. XICHOLS, PREST, V. E. NICHOLS, viOE-PRES. <t OASHIEH. E. r. OLSONi ASST. cashiek 

:ST NATIONAL BANK 
OP INQLIWOOD 

63rd Street and Stewart Avenue established issq 

CAPITAL AND SURPLUS, S200,000.00 

We Invite Your Attention to the Following Comparative Statement 

Deposits January 1, 1897, 8 261,268.64 

Deposits January 1, 1898, 296,628.57 

Deposits January 1, 1899, 401,650.11 

Deposits January 1, 1900 589,987.45 

Deposits January 1, 1901 632,782.98 

Deposits January 1, 1902, 922,148.09 

Deposits January 1, 1903 1,078,743.81 

Deposits January 1, 1904 1,262,789.34 

Deposits January 1, 1905, 1,445,238.15 

Deposits May 29, 1905, 1,598,090.09 

Notwithstanding^ this favorable condition, we are not disposed to let this growth stop. To all 

those desiring banking relations on the South Side, we extend a cordial invitation to our 

COMMERCIAL DEPARTMENT, FOREIGN EXCHANGE, TRAVKLER'S CHEQUES 

SAVINGS DEPARTMENT, 3 Per Cent Interest Allowed 

Assuring the most liberal treatment consistent with sound banking principles, 

Savings Departtnent Open Saturday Evenings from 6 to 8. 



"THE SPARKLING" 
"SODA WATER" 

onDranght throughout 
WHITE CITY is made with 

AUTOMATIC AND 
00 NTINUOUS 
OARBONATING 
APPARATUS 
PUEOHASED PEOM 

THE BISHOP k 
BABCOCK CO. 

192-194 E. Washington St. 

Telephone Main 3590 
MAKEES OF 

Original CLEVELAND 
BEER PUMPS 
AND SUPPLIES 
"NEW PEOOESS" 
I LIQUID GAS, Etc I 




fresh:': 




CORNUCOPIAS 

= FOR = 



TRANSPARENT 

= BAGS == 



FLOSS CANDY WAXED PAPER 

We furnish all WAX PAPER and BAGS to White City 

Confectioners' Paper Specialties 
Chocolate Dipping Paper 

W. J. Bradford & Company 

PAPER DEALERS 
26-28 MARKET STREET, CHICAGO 



When writing to advertisers please mention The White City Magazine. 




'■'■Dedicated to Merriment and Mirth. 



The IVhite Cirr Magazine 

AND SOUVENIR PROGRAM 



Vol. 1 



AUGUST, 1905 



No. 7 




FIRE 



SHOW 



A MARVELOUS AND THRILLING SPECTACLE 




HE greatest and most elab- 
orate attraction at White 
City is undoubtedly the Fire 
Show. This mammoth spec- 
tacle of burning buildings and 
dashing fire departments in action is one 
which will stir the pulses of even the 
most sluggish. This great feature is 
located in the extreme southern part of 
the grounds, and the entrance is on the 
southeast corner of the oblong formed 
by the "Board Walk." This show is 
given on a scale of grandeur that is mar- 
velous. The grandstand for the audi- 
ence alone seats more than fifteen hun- 
dred persons. 

From the grandstand the audience is 
given a view of three blocks of business 
houses such as may be seen in any part 
of a metropolitan city. There are dry 
goods stores, department stores and all 
other kinds of stores in the scene. Many 
of the spectators will quickly recognize 
many of the names displayed on the 
sign boards in front of the various busi- 
ness places. 

The scene is one typical of any city on 
a busy day. Wagons and cabs trot 
through the streets, automobiles dash in 
and out among the teams, trolley cars 
speed along regulation tracks, and hun- 



dreds of pedestrians crowd on the side- 
walks in the pursuit of their business. 
Women stop in at the stores to purchase 
goods, the men stop at cigar stands and 
purchase tobacco, and the view is one 
of life and action. Two boys get into a 
fight and spectators crowd about them 
to witness the conflict, when a patrol 
wagon dashes up and the offenders are 
arrested. 

Suddenly, without a moment's warn- 
ing, the cry of "Fire !" comes from the 
hotel which stands on the corner of the 
street. The scene quickly changes. The 
terrified occupants of the hotel crowd to 
the windows and scream for help. The 
crowds on the streets run to watch the 
structure burn, and are driven back by 
the police just as the engines arrive. 
Fire lines are stretched, the hose is 
coupled to the hydrants, and the life-nets 
are spread barely in time to catch the 
apparently frenzied men and women as 
they leap from the topmost stories of 
the structure. The firemen perform 
wonderful feats of agility as they scale 
up the walls with their pompier ladders 
and slide down ropes with fainting 
women in their arms. 

After a hard battle all the occupants 
of the hotel are rescued, and then the 



THE WHITE CITY MAGAZINE AND SOUVENIR PROGRAM 



work of fighting the fire is begun. The 
hose shoots strong streams of water into 
the blazing building and the long ex- 
tension ladder creeps slowly into place. 
The flames seem for a time as if they 



pitch of excitement. This show cost 
more than $20,000 to install and com- 
plete, and is one of the finest shows of 
its kind in the world, even exceeding the 
Hale's Fire Fighters, which attained so 




Scene in the Fire Show 



would defeat the brave efforts of the 
firemen to extinguish them. But finally, 
after a furious battle with the flames, the 
firemen are victorious and the blaze is 
subdued. And the audience disperses. 

That this spectacle is presented on a 
mammoth scale is readily understood 
when it is known that it requires three 
complete fire companies to produce this 
show, including an extension ladder and 
chief's wagon ; over two hundred and 
fifty people are used to give the street 
scene the proper life and bustle ; five 
cabs and two automobiles dash through 
the streets, and fourteen horses are used. 
The exhibition is most lifelike and in- 
tensely realistic ; the audience frequently 
forgets that it is only a spectacle that 
they are watching, and not a real con- 
flagration, and are aroused to a high 



much popularity at St. Louis last year. 
Chief West, who was one of the famous 
Kansas City firemen who went to Eu- 
rope and taught the foreigners how to 
handle engines, is the leader of the Fire 
Department at White City. 



"Beautiful White City is exactly 
what the people of Chicago have long 
needed, and they certainly appreciate the 
efiforts of the liberal management." — 
New York Clipper. 



"Most magnificent and comprehensive 
amusement resoi"t the world has ever 
seen." — Warren A. Patrick in the Bill- 
hoard. 



THE WHITE CITY MAGAZINE AND SOUVENIR PROGRAM 



13 



COLLEGE INN 

POPULAR AND ATTRACTIVE RESTAURANT 
BEST IN AMERICA 




HE finest restaurant in Amer- 
ica. How often has this 
phrase been applied to even 
mediocre eating places ? 
Nearly every chop house or 
lunchroom makes claim to this title, until 
it has become trite and meaningless. But 
when applied to the White City College 
Inn the phrase again is filled with mean- 
ing and is the literal truth, for this re<=-- 
taurant is the finest in the country, bar- 
ring none. However great the crowds 
that throng to White City during this 
Summer, every facility for catering to 



cated in the Sherman House in the 
downtown district, but it is reproduced 
on a much larger scale and is equally 
complete in its appointments. To those 
who have visited the noted eating place 
in the Sherman House it is useless to 
try to expand upon the beauty of the 
place, for they already know all about it. 
But to those who have never been so 
fortunate as to visit the former place, 
the chance to visit even a finer restau- 
rant will be granted. It occupies one of 
the most pretentious and beautiful build- 
ings on the grounds. It is architectur- 




White City College Inn 



them has been supplied. In this struc- 
ture can be found every delicacy desired 
by the rich, and also a full meal for 
those whose purses are limited. After 
walking about the grounds and indulging 
in the sports to be found there, hunger 
asserts itself and the crowds naturally 
turn to College Inn. 

The White City College Inn is a 
duplicate of the famous College Inn lo- 



ally perfect, being constructed of ce- 
ment, covering a framework of steel. It 
was especially designed for White City 
and is probably the largest building in 
the country devoted exclusively to a 
restaurant. 

The College Inn proper occupies the 
entire upper part of the structure, the 
whole front of the building consisting of 
enormous plate-glass windows, which af- 



M 



THE WHITE CITY MAGAZINE AND SOUVENIR PROGRAM 



ford the diners an excellent opportunity 
of watching the merry throngs on the 
grounds. The location of the College 
Inn. being in the middle of the Sunken 
Gardens, gives a ^'ie^v from the windows 
that is not excelled anywhere at White 
City. Thousands of incandescent lights 
stud the ceilinsfs and the walls are done 



Downstairs, and fronting on the 
'"Board Walk," is the dairy lunchroom. 
Here a person may obtain a meal at 
whatever price he may wish. The prices 
in this dairy lunchroom are the same as 
at any of the lunchrooms in the down- 
town district, and the best of service is 
given. 




The Terrace, a Popular Resort for Ladies and Children 



in green and white, the effect being most 
harmonious and pleasing. 

The great dining hall is reached by 
steps at either end of the structure. In- 
side there are balconies and alcoves 
where parties may dine in semi-privacy. 
Hundreds of skilled waiters are ready to 
obey the slightest motion of the diner, 
and a full orchestra is constantly retained 
to furnish music. In this beautiful place 
eating is robbed of its material side and 
at once becomes a psychic pleasure. In 
all this building will accommodate 2,400 
diners at a time. 



Adjoining the dairy lunchroom is a 
German Rathskeller, which is typical of 
the many similar places in every Ger- 
man town. Here a person may sit and 
drink his beer and be surrounded with 
many accommodations aft"orded visitors. 
The cement floors, the typical bar, and 
the decorations of the room, all tend to 
lend a distinctly German atmosphere to 
the place. This Rathskeller has already 
proved very popular, and doubtless will 
continue to grow in popularity as the 
Summer advances. 



>^r\i5SM^ 







THE WHITE CITY MAGAZINE AND SOUVENIR PROGRAM 



15 



BEAUTIFUL VENICE 

CANALS AND GONDOLAS 
FACILITATE A DELIGHTFUL VISIT 




LL the romantic beauty of 
the cool and deUghtful gon- 
dola ride through the moon- 
lit waterways of the ancient 
Italian city is greatly en- 
hanced when a spectator realizes the his- 
toric scenes and structures which are re- 
produced before him. All the gorgeous 
scenes are actually represented in per- 
spective and are identical copies, on a 
smaller scale, of the beautiful and medi- 
aeval edifices of the old Venetian city. 



beautifully embellished with fine wood 
carvings. 

Floating gently forward to the strains 
of the music furnished by the gondoliers, 
the journey begins at the Arsenal in 
Venice. Proceeding northward through 
the canals, the spectator sees the homes 
of the gondoliers to the right, and next 
to them is the historic parish church of 
Pope Leo the Tenth, near which is the 
Eglise Sainte Marie-du-Salute. The 
Royal Palace of Venice next comes into 




Interior View of Beautiful Venice 



This feature of White City is one of 
the largest on the grounds, and is located 
in a magnificent building on the west 
side of the "White City Board Walk." 
This structure is typical of the architec- 
ture to be seen in the ancient city of 
the Doges, and is entirely white, being 



view as the gondola floats on through 
the Grand Canal toward the Ducal Pal- 
ace. Passing this, the boat sweeps by 
the old Campanile to the Hall of Justice. 
Here is shown the historic Lion's Mouth, 
into which any person might throw a 
written accusation against another. In 



i6 



THE WHITE CITY MAGAZINE AND SOUVENIR PROGRAM 



the piedi^eval da}'S the Lion's Mouth was 
an institution feared by every citizen of 
A^enice, for the name of the accuser was 
kept secret. Just across the canal from 
the Lion's Mouth is the Prison, and con- 
necting the two is the world-famous 
Bridge of Sighs, over which condemned 
prisoners walked and saw the daylight 
for the last time. Still carried north- 



the St. Marc Church, which is also 
marked by a red column. On the right, 
next to the St. Marc Church, is the 
Campanile Tower as it appeared before 
it fell. On the left is an old wine house 
and the poorer quarters of the city. 

To the right is the famous Rialto 
Bridge, which has been the favorite sub- 
ject for art pictures for many years. 




Beautiful Venice; Also the Band Stand 



ward, the gondola next floats onward to 
the Courtyard of Persano Palace, next 
to which is the entrance to the prison 
and an ancient palace. In the palace 
courtyard is a well, typical of Venice. 

Rounding the police box, the gondola 
goes eastward to the Palace Guinahi, 
passing the Campanile and the Grand 
Canal on the left. On the same side is 
the Palace Pisani Moretta and a hotel. 
Across the canal to the right is noted 
Palazzo Contarini Delia Figure and the 
Palace Da Dula a Murano. This struc- 
ture is distinguished easily by the red 
column in front of it. Sweeping past 
an old well on the right and passing by 
the Campanile, the spectator next sees 



Coming back to the starting place, the 
gondola passes another large palace on 
the southeast. During the entire trip the 
flags seen on the many Venetian masts 
are the emblems of the various Doges. 
This trip is more than three-quarters of 
a mile in length and is one of the most 
interesting as well as most beautiful fea- 
tures of White City. 



"It looks as if the "Board Walk" at 
White City would be the most popular 
thing in Chicago this Summer." — Chi- 
cago Journal. 

*** 

"Cost a million, but it's yours for a 
dime." — Amy Leslie in the Daily Nezvs, 



THE WHITE CITY MAGAZINE AND SOUVENIR PROGRAM 



17 



SHOOTING THE CHUTES 

LATEST STYLE AND BEST EQUIPPED 
STRUCTURE IN AMERICA 




|HE Chutes is easily picked 
out from the many attrac- 
tions at White City by the 
great crowds which are con- 
stantly about it. This attrac- 
tion has been extremely popular at every 
amusement resort for many years, and 
every manager has come to believe that 
his park is not complete unless he has 
one. White City, following its policy 



darting out upon the water on the flat- 
bottomed boats, which seem every mo- 
ment as if they would dive under, which 
attracts every visitor. The Chutes at 
White City is located at the extreme 
south end of the "Board Walk" and is 
at the south end of the Lagoon. 

A feature of the Chutes is the escala- 
tor. This machine carries the people to 
the top of the pavilion, where they take 




Chutes Lagoon, Peristyle and Base of Tower 



of having only the best of everything, 
has a Chutes that is the best ever con- 
structed up to date. It has all the latest 
improvements and will bear comparison 
with any other Chutes in the country. 

This form of amusement is one which 
appeals directly to all classes and to all 
ages, until it has become so well known 
that the phrase "Shoot the Chutes" is 
understood by every person. There is 
a strange exhilaration and fascinating 
sensation about the dash at incredible 
speed down the swift incline and the 



the boats for the descent, saves them the 
effort of walking up the steep incline 
and greatly facilitates the quick move- 
ment of the crowds. The Escalator is 
very similar to a moving sidewalk and 
is provided with a moving handrail, so 
that a person may steady himself while 
making the ascent. This machine is the 
longest one ever constructed, being more 
than 500 feet in length, and it is en- 
tirely safe. This same form of machine 
in a less improved state has been used 
in various stores and parks for a num- 



i8 



THE WHITE CITY MAGAZINE AND SOUVENIR PROGRAM 



ber of years, and there has never yet 
been any accident with one of them. 

The lagoons into which the boats dash 
with their merry crowds has been built 
especially for the Chutes. It is very 
large for the purpose for which it is 



are constantly about the attraction and 
every precaution is taken for the han- 
dling of visitors quickly. 



"The greatest amusement enterprise 
on earth." — Colfax, la., Tribune. 




Chutes Lagoon; Also View of Fire Show Front 



used and contains more than 1,350,000 
gallons of water. The sides of the la- 
goon are heavily cemented and water 
rains oflf of them very quickly. There 
are several entrances to the "Board 
Walk" from the lagoon, so that there 
is no chance for too great crowds to 
gather about the sides of the pond. 

The Chutes at White City are the 
longest which have ever been constructed 
and are complete in every detail. The 
entire framework of the Chutes is built 
from steel and has been solidly rein- 
forced in many places. The tracks down 
which the boats slide at their swift speed 
is also made of steel, as is the roadbed 
for the cars. A large corps of guards 



"White City, with its myriads of 
electric lights and its numerous attrac- 
tions, is entertaining thousands of peo- 
ple, and it may be said safely that it is 
a conspicuous success." — Chicago Even- 
ing Post. 

*** 

"A pleasure resort combining the at- 
tractive features seen on the Midway 
during the World's Fair at Chicago and 
on the Pike at St. Louis."- — San Fran- 
cisco Post. 



"White City has become the mecca 
of thousands of Chicagoans and visit- 
ors." — Hearst's ChicaQ-o Examiner. 



THE WHITE CITY MAGAZINE AND SOUVENIR PROGRAM 



19 




BALL ROOM 

FINEST DANCING FLOOR IN AMERICA 

N GREAT big Chicago, with 

its endless de m a n d for 

amusements and recreation, 

there has never before been 

constructed a ball room or 
dancing floor with the capacity of the 
celebrated ball room at White City. 
The Ball Room is located in an enormous 
building, 170 feet long and 100 feet wide, 
having sufficient accommodations for 
1,000 persons on the floor. The floor 
itself is the finest ever constructed west 
of New York City, having been built of 
the finest quality hard white maple, with 
a finish which rivals the polish on a 
piano. All about the dancing floor are 
located cafe tables and chairs, each with 
its menu card containing a list of tem- 
perance drinks. No liquor is sold in the 
Ball Room. A larsre and roomv balconv 




Interior of Ball Roojn 
orchestra, which is supplemented by a 
magnificent Orchestrion. This instru- 
ment was purchased by the White City 
management in St. Louis. It was orig- 
inally constructed for exhibition in the 
French section of the Liberal Arts Build- 





■«s#-1 



Igj ili Hi Lg» tli Igj m !IJ ib Lsr — isi !1IJI11S( sm iii iw - iTnlnft ^*~T^ 

1^ 




gl J III III III 







Ball Room 



is similarly arranged, although in the 
scores of beautifully decorated boxes are 
to be found comfortable seats in which 
tired sight-seers may find rest and com- 
fort. Music is supplied by a high-class 



ing at theLouisianaPurchaseExposition. 
A skilled and diplomatic Master of 
Ceremonies has full charge of the Ball 
Room, and it is his duty and the duty 
of his numerous well-trained assistants 



20 



THE WHITE CITY MAGAZINE AND SOUVENIR PROGRAM 



to see that patrons are not subjected to 
any objectionable features or annoying- 
occurrences. No opportunity exists for 
indiscriminate methods to be adopted bv 
any of the participants in the enjoyment 
of dancing- on the Ball Room floor. The 
conduct of every person present must 
be absolutely without reproach. A small 
charge is made for the privilege of dan- 
cing:. 



Toboggan 



A Laughter-Provoking Method of Enjoyment 

One of the most popular and best pat- 
ronized attractions at White City is 
the Toboggan. It is impossible to give 
a detailed description which would be 
of interest of this unique and hilarious 
method of enjoyment, because there is 




Toboggan 



It is the policy of the management to 
refuse admittance to persons of an ob- 
jectionable character or appearance and 
indiscreet individuals who may success- 
fully elude the vigilance of the Master 
of Ceremonies and secure admission will 
receive but scant courtesy. 

Such methods have been in vogue in 
seashore and mountain resorts for years, 
and they are meeting with universal 
favor among the people who visit White 
City. They are adopted for the purpose 
of preserving the dignity and keeping 
inviolate the personal privileges of any- 
one who may patronize this form of 
amusement. 



no elaborate apparatus, no grand scenic 
eflfects, and no regulated program, but 
there is always music during the op- 
eration of this feature; the music of 
happy laughter and joyous voices tune- 
ful with accents of merriment. 

The participant in this sport takes a 
seat in a comfortable cushioned vehicle 
and sturdy attendants roll it down the 
track to a point where it Is seized by a 
wire rope and is elevated up a steep 
incline, where the rapid and mirth-pro- 
voking journey begins. Upon reaching 
the top the cars seem imbued with life 



THE WHITE CITY MAGAZINE AND SOUVENIR PROGRAM 



21 



and dart down a gentle declivity as 
though fitted with powerful wings. 

Darting around unexpected curves, up 
slopes and down into valleys, the car is 
whirled at a rapid rate of speed upon a 
journey lasting almost two minutes. It 
finally returns to the original point of 
departure, where the merry passengers 
disembark and make way for others, 
who eagerly fill their places. 

All afternoon and evening crowds 
happily make their way to the Tobog- 
gan, and it is universally voted to be 
one of the jolliest forms of entertain- 
ment at White City. 













Structure of Toboggan 



OVER AND UNDER THE SEA 



A 
AN D 



TRIP TO PARIS IN AN AIRSHIP 

A VOYAGE IN A SUBMARINE BOAT 




NE of the most imposing and 
prominent structures within 
the walls of White City is 
that building which contains 
"Over and Under the Sea," 
a delightful and especially enjoyable pan- 
oramic invention. After entering the 
brilliantly lighted entrance, with its wide 
hall beautifullv decorated with statuary, 



^ J^ 




Entrance to Over and Under the Sea 



etc., the visitor steps upon deck of an 
enormous airship, all ready for a voyage. 
The airship quivers, the wind whistles 
through the rigging and mechanical de- 
vices enable the aerial voyager to view 
the scenery incident to a trip from 
White City across the mountains and 
valleys to the Atlantic Ocean, through 
clouds and a violent hurricane at sea 
until Paris is reached. 

On arriving in Paris the party is con- 
ducted into a series of underground grot- 
toes and through the enormous sewers. 
which have been admirably reconstructed 
for public inspection. After sufficient 
time has been taken to view the various 
beauties of Paris, the guide shows the 
way to an underground dock, where a 
submarine vessel awaits them. The boat 
passes down the River Seine and out 
into the Atlantic, where curious and in- 
teresting submarine views are given. 
Fish of all kinds swim through the 
waters, wrecks are observed and the gen- 
eral topography of the ocean bed is 
plainly perceived. The submarine boat 
lands the party, after devious submarine 
wanderings through the great lakes and 
through specially constructed canals, 
back to White City. 

The trip is a remarkably interesting 
and particularly enjoyable one. 



22 



THE WHITE CITY MAGAZINE AND SOUVENIR PROGRAM 



SCENIC R A I LW A Y 

AN ENCHANTING RIDE 
IN SWIFT MOVING CARS 




ITH the exception of the Fire 
Show, the Scenic Railway is 
the most elaborate and pre- 
tentious attraction at White 
City. This feature of the 
park is located on the west side of the 
"Board Walk," near the Electric Tower. 
The front of the building is wide open 
and inside is a spiral railway represent- 
ing the ascent up a steep hill or moun- 



After the cars are loaded at the sta- 
tion bordering on the "Board Walk," 
they are drawn up a steep incline. Here 
they are started down a precipitous in- 
cline without any motive power. Mak- 
ing a long sweep downward, the car 
speeds at a terrific rate up a hill, then 
down another, and then dashes upward 
into the Palace of Views. 

This is a most sumptuously fitted 




Loading Station for Scenic Railway 



tain. This, however, is merely the load- 
ing station. This attraction has been in- 
stalled at a great expense and is most 
complete in every detail. This attrac- 
tion appeals strongly to those who are 
seeking excitement, combined with a 
high degree of entertainment. Every 
moment of the long and swift trip up 
hill and down dale through the castle 
of views is one of the keenest enjoy- 
ment. 



place, showing many of the most beau- 
tiful scenes in the country actually re- 
produced in detail. The car glides 
swiftly past a delightful little waterfall, 
sweeps onward around the pond, a fleet- 
ing view of a party of bathers is had 
and then the car plunges into a dark tun- 
nel. On dashing out from the darkness 
a huge and grotesque figure of a man 
brandishing a club is seen. The color- 
ing of the figure and the effect of the 



THE WHITE CITY MAGAZINE AND SOUVENIR PROGRAM 



23 



various colored electric lights thrown on 
him, give the figure a most startling ap- 
pearance. Onward dashe' tne car into 
darkness again, only to emerge a mo- 
ment later into another beautiful scene. 
Thus come a succession of changes from 
darkness to light, and then the car 
sweeps out into daylight again and gen- 
tly drifts on over an undulating track to 



City has already attained a great amount 
of popularity, and it is safe to predict 
that the Scenic Railway will draw as 
great crowds as any other attraction at 
the grounds. This feature is especially 
delightful on a warm day or night, and 
is sure to draw enormous crowds of visi- 
tors every afternoon and evening. The 
tracks are inspected several times daily. 




Night Scene in the Lagoon 



the starting place and the ride is over. 

But all this takes up a good amount 
of time, as the trackage for this attrac- 
tion covers more than three-quarters of 
a mile and is so scattered with different 
views and figures that the spectator be- 
lieves that he has traveled much farther 
than he really has. There is a keen 
sense of exhilaration as the car starts on 
its initial downward course, the occupant 
grasps his seat and hangs on for dear 
life, though he is securely strapped in. 
Soon, however, this fear wears ofif, and 
after a second or so the visitor is laugh- 
ing and shouting and urging the car to 
a faster speed. This feature of White 



so that the Scenic Railway is kept con- 
stantly in a state of repair and precludes 
all possibility of any mishap. This is 
true of all the amusements at White 
City — the safety of the public is the 
first consideration of the management. 



"White City is exactly that which it 
brands itself — the whitest, finest example 
of cleanliness possible to imagine so near 
a smoke belt. No rain-dabbed grass, no 
dripping trees, no dusty measure of 
landscape interferes with White City in 
its whiteness." — Chicago Daily Nezvs. 



24 



THE WHITE CITY MAGAZINE AND SOUVENIR PROGRAM 



WHITE CITY 

THE LARGEST, THE SAFEST, THE MOST BEAUTIFUL 
AMUSEMENT RESORT IN AMERICA 



ISITORS to Chicago, ar- 
riving after twilight, wilh" 
be greeted when still 
many miles from the city 
by the brilliant scintil- 
lating rays of light ema- 
nating' from the tall elec- 
tric tower which arises to an altitude of 
300 feet from the peristyle in the center 
of White City. To the residents of 
Chicago this marvelous electric tower 




~ incandescent lights, with which the 
""buildings are studded. At the main gate, 
located at the corner of 63d street and 
South Park avenue, the entire structure 
is outlined and the gigantic archway is 
dotted with thousands of lights. The 
massive snow white entrance to White 
City is one of the most beautiful struc- 
tures of its kind. 

On entering the main archway the vis- 
itor will find, to the left, the executive 




Open Air Circus Acts 



will act as a constant beacon light and 
guide, suggesting the fun and jollity to 
be found within the hospitable gates of 
this beautiful amusement resort and that 
sordid surroundings in crowded locali- 
ties can be quickly exchanged for the 
beauty and limitless pleasures to be 
found at White City. 

On arriving within view of the en- 
trance the eye is dazzled by myriads of 



offices of the President and the General 
Manager, also the Department of Pub- 
licity. These offices are splendidly fur- 
nished and completely equipped. In the 
rear of the offices of the Department of 
Publicity are public telephone booths, 
telegraph offices, etc., for the accommo- 
dation of visitors. To the right of the 
main entrance are located the adminis- 
trative offices of the Secretary and Treas- 
urer and corps of busy assistants. 



THE WHITE CITY MAGAZINE AND SOUVENIR PROGRAM 



25 



Passing through the turnstiles, after 
paying the nominal admission fee of 10 
cents, the visitor becomes a guest of 
White City, with the implied promise 
that he or she shall not want for enter- 
tainment and amusement so long as the 
visit is continued. The first impression 
received is one of dazzling brilliancy, be- 
cause of the thousands of flashing iri- 



and delightful anticipation which cannot 
be analyzed. 

Passing toward the Plaza, with its 
thousands of beautiful and rare flowers, 
the visitor may descend a half-dozen 
broad steps and find himself on the 
Plaza, which surrounds the beautifully 
designed and elaborately carved Band 
Stand. Located about the Band Stand 




Front of Fire Show Grand Stand 



descent gleamings radiating from the 
countless incandescent lights which out- 
line all the buildings and create day out 
of night. 

As the magnificence of the scene dawns 
upon the visitor, after the first burst of 
splendor, and the sounds of laughter and 
merriment come to the ear, a feeling of 
undefinable pleasure and gratification 
takes the place of startled wonder. 
There are the crowds on the half-mile 
"Board Walk," the alluring strains of 
music, the sweet and delicate fragrance 
of beautiful flowers in the Sunken Gar- 
dens and art urns, all of which combine 
to produce a sense of keen enjoyment 



are hundreds of long and commodious 
settees, which furnish a resting place for 
tired sight-seers or those who wish to 
enjoy the musical programme and the 
free outdoor circus without having their 
thoughts distracted by the passing 
throngs of laughter lovers. Musical pro- 
grammes will be rendered every after- 
noon and evening from the Band Stand 
by organizations having a world-wide 
reputation. On the large open stage, 
which will be seen a short distance south 
of the Band Stand, performances will 
be regularly given by clever acrobats and 
other performers. 



26 



THE WHITE CITY MAGAZINE AND SOUVENIR PROGRAM 



With a liberality which has never been 
equaled in the history of amusements in 
this or any other country, the manage- 
ment has arranged to give the people of 
Chicago and visitors more for their 
money than has ever before been offered 
under any circumstances. Upon paying 
the admission fee of 10 cents at the main 
entrance, the visitor can spend an entire 
afternoon and evening within the walls 
of White City, be entertained with a 
first-class musical programme and a 
series of eventful performances by clever 
acrobats — finding in this way complete 
and uncqualed entertainment without the 
necessity for expending another penny. 
Of course there are other and more dom- 
inating features in White City, to each 
of which a small admission fee is 
charged, but it is not required or even 
suggested of the visitor that these should 
necessarily be patronized. Of course, 
knowing the amusement loving tenden- 
cies of the people of Chicago, the man- 
agement constructed these features with 
the expectation that they would be lib- 
erally patronized, but this is left wholl}' 
to the impulse of the visitor. 

An expenditure of about $1,250,000 
was required before the gates of White 
City were thrown open to the public. 
The progress of construction has not 
only excited the admiration of builders 
all over the country, but has in itself 
established a new record. 

Eight months previous to the opening 
date the site at present covered by the 
world's greatest amusement resort pre- 
sented a scene of bucolic rest and pas- 
toral simplicity. A gang of workmen 
drove a peaceful flock of sheep out of 
the corn field, which had flourished there 
during the season, put up the fence, and 
White City began to grow like magic. 

White City has broken more records 
than any previous enterprise of the kind. 
It covers more ground than any similar 
enterprise and contains more features. 
It has cost more, owing to the perma- 
nency of the construction and the first- 
class material which was required in 
ever)' instance. It has the highest tower, 
illuminated with 25,000 incandescent 
lights. It has the greatest capacity for 
utilizing electrical energy of any single 
enterprise, it being a statistical fact that 



the electrical energy required for fur- 
nishing the power and light for White 
City is greater in quantity than the total 
electrical energy required for heating, 
lighting and purposes of power in all of 
that part of Chicago lying south of 39th 
street. White City is lighted with 
125,000 incandescent lights. 

Aside from the brilliancy and beauty 
of the night illumination at White City, 
a view by day presents a delightful 
charm to the artistic eye. The buildings 
are all architecturally beautiful and the 
master hand which designed them has 
outclassed those men whose efiforts made 
the World's Columbian Exposition (the 
original White City) the wonder of the 
world. 

At various points about the "Coard 
Walk" are located artistic booths filled 
with curios from all parts of the globe, 
and every opportunity is furnished at 
frequent intervals to supply any craving 
for sweets or such popular products as 
popped corn, roasted peanuts, etc., etc. 
Soda fountains, with their glittering 
array of multi-colored syrups and foam- 
ing jets, are to be found at convenient 
intervals, so that the crowds, wlicn warm 
and dusty because of the laughing and 
shouting which is always incident to a 
trip to White City, can indulge in in- 
nocent refreshment. 

Enormous electric signs present them- 
selves in an unmistakable way to tell the 
visitor what form of attraction is con- 
tained beneath their supervision. Each 
attraction is housed in a separate build- 
ing, and all are amply provided with 
comfortable opera chairs. No attraction 
is permitted to be overcrowded at any 
performance, the number of admissions 
to each show being limited to the num- 
ber of seats in the auditorium. Every 
possible means for administering to the 
comfort of visitors has been furnished 
by the management, and strenuous ef- 
forts have been successfully made for 
providing entertainment and features of 
a high order. Only such attractions as 
those which combine amusement in a 
high degree, together with unimpeach- 
able character, were chosen, and any- 
thing which might possibly give offense 
to the most sensitive or supercritical 
person has been carefully eliminated, 



THE WHITE CITY MAGAZINE AND SOUVENIR PROGRAM 



27 



Ulrich's 
Chicago Concert Band 

The center of attraction at White 
City is always Ulrich's Chicago Concert 
Band, assembled from the members of 
the Theodore Thomas Orchestra. Under 
the capable leadership of .\ll)ert Ulrich, 
they offer the patrons of White City a 
pleasing program of classical, sacred. 




Albert Ulrich, Leader 

popular and operatic music, twice each 
day, and the public appreciation of their 
eft'orts fills the seats arranged in the 
sunken gardens around the band stand 
during ever}' program. The cornet solos 
of Albert Wasshausen attract especial 
attention and are invariably encored 
again and again, and the leader, Albert 
Ulrich, has a world-wide reputation as 
a trumpet soloist. The other members 
of the band, like Mr. Ulrich, spent years 
with the late Theodore Thomas, and have 
imbibed his spirit to such an extent that 
their rendition of Chicago favorites 
are given in the true spirit of Chicago's 
beloved master. The attractions which 
surround the band stand on every hand 
appeal to the various classes of visitors, 
but the band appeals to everybody, and 
no one thinks of visiting White City 
without stopping awhile within earshot 
of the band. Among the soloists in the 
aggregation are eight of the greatest 



artists ever in America : Mr. Joseph 
Schreurs, Mr. Alfred Ouensel, Mr. Leo- 
pold De Mare, Mr. Alfred Barthel, Mr. 
G. Stange, Mr. Albert Wasshausen and 
Mr. M. C. Smith, the latter being New 
York City's famous trombone soloist, 
who attracted the attention of M. A. 
Wintirich, business manager of the or- 
ganization, on one of the orchestra tours, 
and was especially engaged for the sea- 
son at White City. The instrumenta- 
tion of the band covers as broad a range 
as any musical organization in the world. 
There are Albert Bb clarinets, Boehm 
flutes, French oboes, English horns. Ger- 
man waldhorner, tubas, bombardons, 
German trumpets and kettle drums. 



Merry-Go-Round 

No resort for the amusement of the 
masses, adults and children alike, would 
be complete without a carousel, or 
Merry-Go-Round, and so the children 
and many of the grown folks gravitate 
to the new structure in the center of the 
Midway. The Merry-Go-Round, fur- 
nished with rocking horses and double 
seats, brightl}' painted woodwork, and a 
band orchestrion, which adds the latest 
popular music to the delightful whirling 
motion, is located squarely in front of 
the Fire Show, with the booths of the 
Midway on three sides, and the Chutes 
Lagoon on the other. It is built near 
the ground and runs on strong wheels 
upon a circular track, making it abso- 
lutely safe, and any kind of a breakdown 
impossible. Here the children come and 
spend the afternoon and evening, with 
never a thought of leaving the cute lit- 
tle horses and the music for any of the 
other attractions which surround them. 
As they sweep around the big circle they 
catch glimpses of the variegated IMidway 
booths, the Fire Show facade and the 
splash of boats dashing down the Chutes 
into the lagoon. A crowd surrounds the 
carousel every afternoon and evening 
and the conductor is kept busy collecting 
the tickets from the boys and girls, men 
and women who love the rocking motion 
of the lifelike horses. 



"Crowds of people fill the streets for 
blocks in every direction from the en- 
trance to enter White City." — Balti- 
more, Md.j Nezvs. 



28 



THE WHITE CITY MAGAZINE AND SOUVENIR PROGRAM 



BUMPING THE BUMPS 

A LAUGHTER - PROVOKING AND 
HILARIOUS METHOD OF ENJOYMENT 




N A BEAUTIFUL building 
on the west side of the "Board 
Walk," the first structure 
that attracts the eye after 
passing through the turn- 
stiles at the gates, will be found the 
Bumps. Chicagoans have never yet been 
introduced to this sport, but at White 
City they will find this new and novel 
pastime. During the Summer the com- 




"Have You Bumped the Bumps/" 

mon salutation around Chicago will be, 
"Have you Bumped the Bumps?" And 
the answer will invariably be, "You can 
bet that I have." 

The Bumps first appeared at Coney 
Island in the amusement resort called 
Dreamland, and at once attained a great 
degree of popularity. Every person was 
eager to try this new and exhilarating 
novelty- — even state and municipal exec- 
utives gravely ascended to the high plat- 
form and shrieked with delight as they 
shot down the smooth incline, carroming 
from one bump to another, and finally 
bringing up against the padded cushion 
at the bottom with all the abandon of 
schoolboys. The Bumps became a veri- 
table craze before the season was over, 
and the management of White City was 



so impressed with the great degree of 
entertainment to be derived from them 
that Bumps was one of the first attrac- 
tions to be installed at White City. 
This building is larger than the one at 
Coney Island and is better supplied with 
bumps. 

It is impossible to explain what the 
Bumps are, or is, but the following brief 
description will give an excellent idea of 
this attraction as it will be found at 
White City. 

The front of the building containing 
the Bumps is open and a flight of stairs 
leads the seeker for amusement to a 
platform at the rear of the structure and 
about thirty feet from the ground. Lead- 
ing from this platform to the ground 
floor is a perfectly smooth incline, built 
of the finest of maple lumber. The de- 
scent has an angle of about thirty de- 
grees, and here and there are large 
padded cushions which cause the person 
sliding down the incline to become di- 
verted from a straight course and be 
bounced from one to another of the 
bumps until the foot of the incline is 
finally reached. There will be found 
several precautionary measures to pre- 
vent all possibility of injury or unpleas- 
ant sensation. 

In addition to the main slide there will 
be three others, one a straight and nar- 
row shoot constructed of slippery basket 
work, which gives the slider an excellent 
speed. Another gives the sensation of 
alternate falling and rising vmtil the bot- 
tom is reached by a succession of gentle 
inclines. But the most exciting of the 
three is what a baseball pitcher would 
call an in and out curve. It consists of 
a narrow chute, with sharp and sudden 
turns occurring at the most unexpected 
places, and finally landing the bumper at 
the bottom without injury. 

The Bumps is an amusement device 
without any pretense of artistic efl^ort or 
dignity. It is conducted for the sole use 
of those who are seeking unalloyed fun 
and hilarity. The location of the Bumps 
is readily ascertained by the shouts of 
laughter and shrieks of hilarity which 



THE WHITE CITY MAGAZINE AND SOUVENIR PROGRAM 



29 



universally characterize this form of 
amusement. 

Any person who does not desire to 
lose all dignity and indulge in a great 
amount of healthful laughter must re- 
frain from visiting the Bumps — for, once 
there, he will surely join in the great 
throngs of jostling, laughing people, and 
before he knows it he will be bumping 
the Bumps with the rest of the crowd. 

No cars or boats are required to give 
the participant in this unique and excit- 
ing pleasure a rapid ride. The minute 
the visitor seats himself on the incline 



Double Whirl 

A Novel and Amusing Pastime 

The Double Whirl combines the pleas- 
ures of a ride on a miniature Ferris 
Wheel and the old-fashioned carousel, 
both of which are familiar to almost 
every visitor at White City, although 
none such are to be found within its 
gates. Six miniature Ferris wheels, each 
attached to an enormous revolving shaft 
centered in a revolving drum, roll slow- 
ly round and round with their loads of 
passengers. No elaborate description 




The Ever-Popular Double Whirl 



the momentum created by the weight of 
the body causes an immediate and rapid 
descent, landing him feet foremost on 
the air-cushion at the bottom. 

A person cannot fail to find the Bumps 
if he is willing to be amused, for all he 
need do is to follow the largest crowd 
and stop where the laughter and mirth 
are most boisterous. For a stubborn 
case of indigestion or the blues, try the 
Bumps. 



can be given of the Double Whirl, but 
it would take an endless amount of writ- 
ing to describe the fun and pleasure of 
participation in its regular operation. 



"The tremendous jam, both within and 
without the gates, vividly recalled the 
days of the Columbian Exposition, while 
the scenes presented within brought back 
still another recollection of the vanished 
White City." — Chicas.o Record Herald. 



30 



THE WHITE CITY MAGAZINE AND SOUVENIR PROGRAM 



THE TEMPLE OF MUSIC 

A DECIDEDLY ENJOYABLE ENTERTAINMENT 



HIS is the most marvelous 
and comprehensive musical 
performance ever attempted. 
The Temple of J\Iusic is lo- 
cated on the east side of the 
"Board Walk" and just south of the 
Electric Tower. None of the time-worn 
and hackneved freak instruments are to 




ica, England, Japan, China and Rou- 
mania. 

Among the many various instruments 
played by Professor Willard's musicians 
perhaps one of the queerest is the 
"Squeegee Gods of China." This instru- 
ment consists of a row of twelve life- 
size heads of Chinamen with their lone 




Interior View of Temple of Music 



be found in this house of symphony — 
each instrument being of a special kind, 
and many of them costing thousands of 
dollars to construct. The forces of na- 
ture are harnessed and made to dispense 
beautiful music — light, heat, steam and 
electricity being used by Professor Wil- 
lard's corps of skillful musicians. 

A visit to this home of music is al- 
most education in music, and is equal 
in scope to a trip through all the foreign 
countries where various instruments are 
supposed to have originated. Several 
nations are represented by typical musi- 
cal instruments. There are strange in- 
struments from Sweden, France, Amer- 



pigtails hanging. By pulling the queues 
of the Chinamen the men are made to 
sing their weird songs and strange 
chants. The effect of seeing and hear- 
ing these figures perform is one of star- 
tling realism. 

The various instruments for this show 
fill an entire stage and are banked high 
up the sides. An idea of the magnitude 
of some of the instruments may be ob- 
tained from the fact that the combined 
weight of all of them is 3,720 pounds, or 
very nearly two tons. They are con- 
structed from all kinds of material — 
wood, aluminum, steel, zinc, copper and 
lead having been used in their construe- 



THE WHITE CITY MAGAZINE AND SOUVENIR PROGRAM 



31 



tion. Some are shaken, some are pulled, 
some are played by hand, and others by 
compressed air. 

The most strange and fanciful of all 
the many devices in the Temple of Music 
is the musical airship. This is a pon- 
derous machine and is constructed of 
196 tubes of silver. It is operated by 
electricity, the current passing through 
the body of a girl. This sensational de- 
vice is a triumph of invention, requiring 
thousands of wires, coils and other de- 
vices to operate it. This instrument is 



which certainly surpasses every other 
musical device in originality and clev- 
erness. 

Miniature Railway 

This month it is possible for White 
City patrons to take a flying trip along 
the beautiful route of the famous Lacka- 
wanna Railroad, viewing the scenery 
which has made the railway famous all 
over the country — all for five cents. Al- 
thousfh ever^•thin8:, from the arausre of 




Miniature Railway at White City 



so complicated that Professor Willard 
has been questioned very closely by the 
Underwriters regarding it. At one time 
the Chicago authorities forbade him to 
exhibit it. Professor Willard met the 
objections of the Underwriters by en- 
casing all the thousands of wires in steel 
tubes. 

Those who visit the Temple of Music 
cannot fail to be extremely interested in 
this strange and unique instrument. 



the track to the Pennsylvania mountains, 
is in miniature, the illusion is complete, 
and the choicest scenery along the Dela- 
ware River has been selected and re- 
produced for the benefit of the patrons 
of the miniature Lackawanna Railroad. 
Passengers purchase their tickets and 
board the upholstered miniature cars at 
the northwest corner of the Chutes La- 
goon. There are five cars in the train, 
drawn by a perfect model locomotive less 



32 



THE WHITE CITY MAGAZINE AND SOUVENIR PROGRAM 



than four feet long and weighing about 
450 pounds. It was constructed wholly 
by Mr. Harry N. Stephens, who, with 
i\shley J. Abell. owns and manages the 
road, and is a perfect copy of a modern 
railway locomotive. 

With a shrill toot of the tiny whistle 
the train moves off down the side of the 
lagoon, the boats splashing into the water 
at the left, and the high balustrade of 
the Board Walk on the right. Suddenly 
the train plunges into a short tunnel, to 
emerge upon a rural scene, with grassy 
banks, miniature fences, signal towers 
and water tanks. Then another short 
tunnel, and a perfect copy of the fa- 
mous Delaware ^^"ater Gap opens on the 
view. The train sweeps around the bank 
of a river, with a real waterfall cascadins: 



down the side of a mountain. The moun- 
tains, faithfully reproduced in natural 
colors, rise high on every side, and are 
reflected in the mirror-like bosom of the 
river. The train then dashes into an- 
other short tunnel, beyond which is a 
representation of the Hudson River, with 
the skyscrapers and public buildings of 
New York City on the other bank. There 
is time for a short glimpse of the model 
ferries and steamboats in the river, and 
then all is left behind as the train passes 
into a long, winding tunnel. At the 
other end is the Chutes Lagoon again, 
around which the train passes to the sta- 
tion from where it started. The ride is 
a succession of changes, and is one of 
the most pleasing attractions at White 
City. 



JOHNSTOWN FLOOD 

ONE OF THE WORLD'S GREATEST 
AND MOST AWE-INSPIRING TRAGEDIES 




HA\^E seen the Johnstown 
Flood." Wherever you see 
a person at White City 
wearing a circular card with 
the preceding inscription on 
it, you see a person who is entirely 
pleased and gratified with the return of 
his small investment, and one who is 
willing to inform others that they are 
missing something educating and enter- 
taining if they fail to see this great ex- 
hibiton. 

The Johnstown Flood is the most im- 
pressive and realistic of all scenic pro- 
ductions, and is produced on a mammoth 
scale. The entire show is a triumph of 
scenic art and startling realism. On a 
large staging the entire city of Johns- 
town, Pa., is reproduced in perspective, 
with the streets and houses being exact 
patterns of the actual structures in that 
town. 

Business is being carried on in the 
city, people walk the streets, the trains 
arrive at the stations, and the entire 
scene is one of activity. After several 
days of rainfall, the sun had shone clear 
and bright on this fatal night. The citi- 
zens of the town had celebrated Decora- 
tion Day, and the entire business section 
of the city was gayly decorated in bunt- 
ing and flags. Night falls, and now the 



mountains which rise on all sides of the 
town throw the long blue shadows over 
the vallev and the lights glitter from the 




Johnstown Flood 

casements and windows. In strong con- 
trast to the lurid glare of the factories, 
the moon bathes the city in a mantle of 
silver. 



THE WHITE CITY MAGAZINE AND SOUVENIR PROGRAM 



33 



Suddenly the skies cloud over, and in 
a moment a fierce storm bursts over the 
city, the thunder crashes and re-echoes 
in the mountains. Then quiet comes 
again and the stars twinkle in the heav- 
ens and the little valley is wrapt in slum- 
ber. 

The reservoir breaks and the torrent 
comes sweeping down the narrow defile, 
washing away several villages, and 



state. Including its suburbs, it had a 
population of 35,000 persons, and was 
situated at the junction of the Cone- 
maugh River and Stony Creek. One of 
the largest steel works in the country, 
the Cambria Iron Company, had its plant 
there. 

About fifteen or eighteen miles north- 
east from Johnstown was the great res- 
ervoir, which was 500 feet above the 




Interior View, Johnstown Flood Building 



dashes on with a sullen roar toward 
Johnstown. On comes the wall of water, 
carrying with it men, women, children 
and all kinds of trees, houses and ani- 
mals. The roar of the coming cataract 
has been heard by some, who flee to 
safety, but the next instant the city is 
swept away. Where 2,000 houses had 
stood there is nothing but a sea of water. 
The entire city of Johnstown has been 
wiped out. 

The story of the flood is the story of 
one of the greatest tragedies of the 
world. On Friday, May 31, 1889, in 
the State of Pennsylvania, the entire 
beautiful valley of the Conemaugh was 
devastated, 10,000 lives were wiped out 
and millions of dollars' worth of prop- 
erty was destroyed. 

Johnstown, Pa., was one of the most 
prosperous manufacturing towns in the 



city. The great basin held more than 
sixty million gallons of water, which 
was held in check by a dam 700 feet in 
length, 90 feet thick at the base and 110 
feet high. This reservoir was the prop- 
erty of a number of wealthy gentlemen 
of Pittsburg, who formed the "South 
Fork Fishing Club." 

When the dam burst, after many days 
of heavy rains, the great wall of water 
swept down over the little city and it 
was completely annihilated. This trag- 
edy is so faithfully reproduced and is 
given on so great a scale that the audi- 
ence forgets that it is only a spectacle 
which they are watching and sits spell- 
bound, intently gazing at the unfolding 
of the story. 

Rest is the sweet sauce of labor. 

— Plutarch. 



34 



THE WHITE CITY MAGAZINE AND SOUVENIR PROGRAM 



OBSERVATION WHEEL 

A UNIQUE AND DELIGHTFUL METHOD 
OF SEEING WHITE CITY 




y THE plaza in front of the 
?\I i d w a y at the extreme 
southeast corner of the park 
is the Observation Wheeh 
For many years this device, 
in a less improved form, has enjoyed 
great popularity among all classes, and 
this year is proving no exception. The 
cause of this is due probably to the fact 
that there is no keen excitement or 
nerve testing chances about it. It is a 
form of entertainment which even the 
youngest child or the oldest person may 
enjoy without the slightest foreboding — 
hence its popularity. 

Owing to the position given the Ob- 
servation Wheel it was necessarily lim- 
ited as to size, but there was no limit 
put upon the completeness and stability 
of the structure. This wheel is the finest 
ever constructed since the Ferris Wheel 
at the World's Fair in 1893. It is smaller 
than the Ferris Wheel because the man- 
agement realized that a great number of 
persons feared to ride in the former be- 
cause of its great and cumbersome bulk. 
It was too large and excited feelings of 
distrust in even the most brave. The 
success which has characterized other 
smaller wheels made it advisable to make 
the White City Wheel of a size which 
would be without the objectionable fea- 
tures of the Ferris Wheel, and yet would 
carry the people to a sufficient height 
so that they might view the stirring 
panorama which is always presented to 
the sight-seer at White City. 

White Citv's Observation Wheel is 
the perfection of mechanical and engi- 
neering skill, the mechanism being so 
perfect and yet so simple that a child 
could easily run it. No perceptible effort 
is discernible when the wheel is started 
or stopped, because the ingenious plac- 
ing of the ball bearings absolutely pre- 
vents all jar or friction. 

There is something particularly en- 
trancing about a ride on this Observa- 
tion Wheel. The visitor is slowly and 
irresistibly carried to a height which 
permits a clear view of all the surround- 



ing houses and attractions, and in fact 
gives the spectator a complete bird's-eye 
view of the whole in all its pristine 
beauty. Probably the chief attraction 
of this wheel is the fact that the rider 
feels the sensation of being maintained 
in the air by invisible forces. 

Various devices have been invented 
from time to time by promoters of 
amusement parks, but none has ever yet 
been found which will take the place of 
the Observation Wheel and its peculiarly 
pleasant and indefinable sensations. 



WhiteCityAutomobileGarage 

Just across the street from the en- 
trance to White City, on the northwest 
corner of Sixty-third street and South 
Park avenue, is the White City Auto- 
mobile Garage. Here a party may check 
a machine with the same facility with 
which he would ordinarily check an um- 
brella, and he may feel absolutely certain 
that his car will be given the best of care 
while there. A skillful and well-trained 
repair man is constantly maintained at 
the Garage to care for all machines left 
there. There is also a huge tank, hold- 
ing over six hundred gallons of gasoline, 
at which the visiting machines may be 
replenished. 

When a machine drives up to the 
gates at White City there is a uni- 
formed attendant to assist the occupants 
to alight and direct the chauffeur to the 
Garage. In this way a party may come 
to White City in an automobile with as 
little trouble and responsibility as a pe- 
destrian. 

The capacity of this Garage is three 
hundred machines. Its great popularity 
is attested by the fact that on the two 
days following the opening of White 
City the Garage accommodated more 
than two hundred machines daily. In 
addition to the large number of automo- 
biles cared for, many horses and car- 
riages are provided with suitable quar- 
ters while their owners enjoy the hospi- 
tality of White City. 



THE WHITE CITY MAGAZINE AND SOUVENIR PROGRAM 



35 



FLYING AIRSHIPS 

AN UP-TO-DATE METHOD OF AERIAL NAVIGATION 




TRECTLY across the Sunken 
Gardens from the entrance, 
being the first structure 
which a spectator sees as he 
enters the grounds — is the 
Flying Airships. This is the ideal place 
for the seeker for a new sensation. Here 
a person may enjoy all the novelty and 
exhilaration of a real airship ride with- 



hundred feet in height. Across the top 
of the pyramid there are several steel 
beams, from which the airships hang 
pendant by strong steel cables. Each 
car seats over a dozen persons, and there 
are about eight cars — thus many per- 
sons can take the ride at the same time. 
When all the occupants of the airships 
are seated, the cars begin to revolve 




Flying Airshif's 



out undergoing any of the dangers com- 
monly associated with that form of 
sport. The attraction was installed in 
White City after a long and careful 
study. It represents Sir Hiram Maxim's 
idea of safe and sane aerial navigation, 
and has been completed after a great 
amount of labor. 

A giant framework of steel composes 
the base, around which the airships glide 
at a high rate of speed. This frame is 
similar to a pyramid in shape and is a 



slowly around the steel frame. The mo- 
tion becomes faster and faster, and as 
the speed increases the cars mount 
higher and higher into the air. After 
revolving a few moments the cars at- 
tain a great speed and rise to a height 
of about thirty feet. The occupants of 
the cars are securely tied in, so as to 
prevent all possibility of accidents, and 
they shout with delight as they experi- 
ence for the first time the novelty of 
aerial navigation. 



THE JVHITE CITY MAGAZINE AND SOUVENIR PROGRAM 



J I M 



KEY 



THE MARVELOUS EDUCATED HORSE 




:N the west side of the 
gTonnds is the Jim Key build 
ing. It is located next to 
the Flying Airships, and the 
front of the structure is dec- 
orated with a mammoth horseshoe 
studded with electric lights. This place 
was desig-ned especially for Jim Key, and 
is so constructed that every person who 



l^^visits the show has an excellent view of 
the famous animal. 

In speaking of his horse, Mr. Rogers, 
the owner of Jim Key, said : "It is only 
a 'one horse show,' but amid all the at- 
tractions at the Pike in the St. Louis 
Exposition last year, this marvelous edu- 
cated horse made the most money." 

Many of the manasfers of the great 




Home of Beautiful Jim Key 



THE WHITE CITY MAGAZINE AND SOUVENIR PROGRAM 



37 



amusement parks in the East tried to 
get Jim Key as their drawing card for 
this season, but Mr. Rogers reahzed that 
White City was the ideal location for 
this wonderful horse, and as a result the 
noted animal will be seen in Chicago all 
during the Summer. Jim Key has made 
an enviable record wherever he has been 
exhibited, and he will undoubtedly con- 
tinue to be a great attraction. 

In all the history of the training of 
animals there have been only two horses 
who might truly be said to have been 
educated. These two animals are Hans, 
the famous German horse, and the 
world-famed Jim Key, the Arabian edu- 
cated horse. Though seemingly impos- 
sible, this equine king can actually read, 
write, spell, think, count, figure, change 
money, and use a national cash register. 
Jim can also give many Bible quotations, 
of which he knows a great number. 

It is especially interesting to note that 
the entire training of Jim Key was ac- 
complished by kindness. Dr. William 
Key, the former owner of Jim Key, has 
had entire charge of the animal since it 
was a colt. Dr. Key is a typical Uncle 
Tom of the Southland, and the wonders 
he has accomplished with this animal has 
been a revelation to other trainers, who 
could never hope to approach this per- 
fection. Jim Key is not a trick horse in 
any sense of the word. Too frequently, 
for example, trainers ask the horse a 
question in figures and then give him 
some apparent signal when the number 
is correct. With Jim it is different. 
When Jim is asked to figure, he goes to 
a board and selects the proper number 
to represent the result, entirely without 
aid of any kind. 

Jim Key is also a member of many 
societies. He is the equine honorary 
member of the American Humane Asso- 
ciation, which numbers over three mil- 
lion children. He has over six hundred 
thousand signed members of the Jim 
Key Band of Mercy, who have pledged 
themselves to the statement, "I promise 
always to be kind to animals." All of 
Jim Key's performances are given under 
the auspices of the American Humane 
Society of Boston. 

Jim Key gives performances continu- 
ally during the day and evening, and 



each show lasts through half an hour. 
The audience asks the horse all the ques- 
tions, to which he is always ready with 
an intelligent answer. 



Electric Theatre 

A Delightful and Amusing Program Furnished 

Although located in a rather unpre- 
tentious structure adjoining the Scenic 
Railway Loading Station on the South, 
there is no form of entertainment at 
White City which will appeal more to 
the pleasure-loving propensities of the 
people than the programs given in the 




• Electric Theater 

Electric Theater. There are no actors 
or actresses in this theater, but the 
scenes presented show at times scores 
and even hundreds in action. 

The Electric Theater reproduces the 
actions and movements of living persons 
in a most realistic way and presents 
scenes which it would be impossible to 
portray in any other manner than with 
the aid of rapidly moving films contain- 
ing actual photographs. The manage- 
ment of the Electric Theater sent a spe- 
cial commission to the scene of the war 
between Russia and Japan for the pur- 
pose of taking moving pictures of the 
historical events occurring there. 



38 



THE WHITE CITY MAGAZINE AND SOUVENIR PROGRAM 



MECHANICAL EXPOSITION 

AUTOMATIC NOVELTIES WHICH ENTERTAIN 



XTO the Lion's Mouth and 
Out of It. The yawning- 
mouth of a gigantic cast of 
a mammoth African Lion 
marks the entrance to this 
most interesting exhibit, which is located 
under the ballroom and which has its 
entrance on the east side of the "Board 




are so true to life that any person is 
liable to be taken in. Nearly every per- 
some of the figures must be alive, so 
realistically and intelligently do they per- 
son believes for a moment at least that 
form their various evolutions. 

One of the first views which meets the 
spectator is the reproduction of nurses 







Mechanical Exposition 



Walk." Hemer's Mechanical Exposi- 
tion, as this unique show is named, con- 
tains a most remarkable collection of 
lifelike figures reproduced in wax, and 
so supplied with intricate and cleverly 
contrived mechanisms that they appear 
to have all the characteristics and abili- 
ties of living human beings. This ex- 
hibition of ingenuity is absolutely new to 
Chicagoans, and is the most comprehen- 
sive exhibit of the kind ever attempted. 
The spectator descends a dark pas- 
sage and steps out into a broad room, 
which is only semi-lighted. Here the 
various wax figures are constantly going 
through their performances and even 
walking about. The person who does 
not endeavor to try to talk to one of 
these lifelike figures before he gets 
through is an exception, for the models 



attending wounded soldiers. A nurse 
kneels by a wounded man, carefully 
bathing his wounds, while the man 
struggles on the ground in anguish. In 
another part of the field the captain of 
the soldiers, waving his sword aloft, 
beckons his men onward. 

Then follow scores of other exhibits. 



"The crowds which surge through the 
grounds enjoyed every minute and lib- 
erally patronized all the amusement fea- 
tures at White City. — Chicago Inter 
Ocean. 



"The opening of White City marked 
an epoch in the history of amusements." 
— Warren A. Patrick in the Billboard. 



THE WHITE CITY MAGAZINE AND SOUVENIR PROGRAM 



39 



DOG, PONY & MONKEY CIRCUS 

CLEVER EXHIBITION BY DOMESTIC ANIMALS 




HIS is the attraction for the 
children. Since the opening 
of White City thousands of 
httle ones have attended Pro- 
fessor F. Blake's Dog, Pony 
and Monkey Circus to see the wonderful 
exhibitions of the power of human be- 
ings over animals and to witness their 
entertaining and amusing acts. There 
are over fifty animals in this show and 
each one is the best that can be procured 
by money or energy. The show occupies 
an entire building just south of the Elec- 
tric Tower on the east side of the "Board 
Walk." 

The great power Professor Blake pos- 
sesses over the animals in his show has 
been attributed to hypnotism and like 
occult sciences, but it is nothing more 
unusual than kindness. He rules his 
animals by love and gentleness, never 
speaking a harsh word to any of them. 
The performance given by these dumb 
creatures is a crucial test of their pow- 
ers of imderstanding and goes far to 
establish what an eminent American 
scientist has sought through the wilds 
of all countries and the jungle'; to prove 
— that the lower order of animals really 
communicate with each other through 
an almost human faculty. This troupe 
of trained animals includes, among other 
features, a family of chimpanzees and 
orang-outangs, who stand as high as a 
man. "Tiny Mite," the smallest horse 
in the world, is also included among the 
interesting features of the show. A 
glance at the programme will convince 
anyone that the exhibition will prove en- 
tertaining : 

1. Pony Drill ; playing soldiers and 
executing National Guard tactics. 

2. Trick Pony, with Happy Hooligan 
as Dr. Jones. 

3. The Rope-Walking Dogs ; a tri- 
umph in animal training. 

4. Rocking Pony (the Hobby Horse) ; 
a difficult feat well executed. 

5. Waltzing Ponies. 

6. Rope Jumping ; an extremely dif- 
ficult accomplishment for dumb animals. 

7. Serpentine Dancing Dogs. 



8. Boxing Dogs (Fitzsimmons and 
Corbett), with Happy Hooligan as a 
policeman. 

9. Riding Dogs and Monkeys. 

10. Gloomy Gus, the wonderful wire- 
walking monkey. 

11. Wire-Balancing Dogs. 

12. Happy Hooligan. 

13. Perch and Globe, juggling mon- 
keys. 

14. Roller-Skating Baboons. 

15. Trick Pony. 

16. Monkey on crutches. 

17. High Wire Bicycle Act. 

18. Wrestling Pony. 

19. Monkey Supper Scene. 

20. Bucking Dogs. 

21. Bar Monkevs. 

22. Have You Seen Maud? 

23. High Diving Dog. 

24. Bag Punching. 

25. High Leaping Dogs. 
Altogether this exhibition is the best 

that can possibly be procured, as each 
animal has been carefully selected and 
is the best of its kind in the act chosen 
for it. The spectator is repaid many 
times in enjoyment for the very nominal 
admission fee. 





~^^^^ 



^I^^fe ^ I 



^0 



THE WHITE CITY MAGAZINE AND SOUVENIR PROGRAM 



CUMMINS' INDIAN CONGRESS 

A THRILLING AND EXCITING WILD WEST SHOW 
WITH RECKLESS PARTICIPANTS 



m 



HE first attraction which the 
visitor sees after he enters 
the grounds is Colonel Cum- 
mins' Indian Congress. This 
feature is located at the ex- 
treme north end of the park ; the en- 
trance is to the right of the "Board 
Walk." and is within a hundred feet of 



pees smoking ; the women busying them- 
selves about their work, and the little 
redskins playing among the wigwams. 
These Indians live here exactly as they 
do on their native prairie, cooking their 
own food and living close to nature. The 
spectator then passes the arena and goes 
on to the end of the grounds, where the 




Location of Cummins' Indian Congress 



the gates of White City. The entrance 
to the attraction is shaped like a huge 
wigwam, covered with all manner of 
hieroglyphics and Indian symbols, illus- 
trating the manner in which the redskins 
used to keep records of their victories in 
war. In the upper part of this tepee 
there is the famous cowboy band, which 
will furnish the music for the produc- 
tion. 

As the spectator enters the enclosure 
he first sees an Indian encampment — the 
braves sitting lazily in front of their te- 



grandstand is located. Here before him 
are enacted the great and absorbing fea- 
tures which compose the show. The pro- 
gramme of events follows : 

1. Reception by the famous Indian 
Chiefs of fifty-one dififerent tribes, in- 
cluding many of the best known Indian 
leaders. 

2. Grand entry ; parade of all the In- 
dians, including squaws and pappooses. 
Aboriginal savage equestrian review. 

3. Introduction of Indians, cowboys 
and band of lady riders. 



THE WHITE CITY MAGAZINE AND SOUVENIR PROGRAM 



41 



4. Introduction of Colonel Cummins. 

5. Maze. 

6. Miss Hartzell, champion rifle shot 
of the world. 

7. Pony Express, as seen in the days 
of '49 ; George Esler. 

8. Race of Nations, Indian lady and 
cowboy. 

9. Riding wild cattle. 

10. Jim Hopkins and band of fancy 
ropers in feats never seen before. 

11. Attack on trappers' cabin by In- 
dians. 

Lacrosse — international game. 

12. Stage coach hold-up. 

13. Tournament. 

14. Hanging a horse thief. 

15. Relay race, one mile. 

16. Educated cow horse. 

17. Chase for a bride. 

18. Attack on an emigrant train cross- 
ing the mountains, by Indians. 

19. Cowboy quadrille 

20. Sports and pastimes on the plains. 

21. Roping contest. 

22. Champion Zouave drill team of 
the world. 

23. Custer's last stand, "The Custer 
Massacre," or the battle of the Little Big 
Horn. A vivid reproduction of the trag- 
edy that occurred on June 25, 1876. 

The story of the death of General Cus- 
ter and the death and annihilation of 
his little band is one which stirs the 
hearts of Americans every time it is 
told. June 26, 1876, will long be re- 
membered as the day in history that 
marked the slaughter of the bravest men 
who ever represented the United States 
— a day that saw the last victory of In- 
dians over white men 

The scene opens with General Custer 
at the head of his little band of men, hot 
upon the trail of Sitting Bull, chief of 
the Ogalalla Sioux, and his braves. Cus- 
ter, trusting his entire force to the dis- 
cretion of Reynolds, the noted Indian 
scout, presses on after Sitting Bull. 
That famous chieftain, by a series of 
the most clever maneuvers, inveigles 
Custer into the valley of the Little Big 
Horn. Custer's men followed Reynolds 
far into the valley and finally came ti a 
place where Sitting Bull had just 
camped. The ground was yet warm from 
the camp fires. Custer halted and sent 
out his scouts. Sitting Bull, anticipating 



this move, had established a fake camp, 
which the scouts found and hurried back 
to Custer. 

Custer, elated and believing he has the 
Indians trapped, orders the bugle to 
sound and dashes into the fake encamp- 
ment, hoping to take Sitting BuP. by 
surprise. But the Indians are prepare'l 
for him. Sitting Bull has withdrawn his 
men and has surrounded the camp. 

Custer and his men dash into the trap 
and in a moment a furious battle is on. 
With Indians on all sides of him, Custer 
sees that it is hopeless to fight, but still 
he orders the charge, and in the midst 
of the losing fight he directs his men 
calmly. As his men were slain and fell 
on all sides of him, he continued the bat- 
tle. Chief Shot-in-the-Eyes, who was 
present at the fight, declares that when 
Custer was left alone on the field he 
turned his gun on himself and died 
rather than fall into the hands of the 
Indians. 

The conclusion of this great spectacle 
is shown in three tableaux. The first 
tableau shows the battle raging furi- 
ously on all sides. The Indians, hang- 
ing from their ponies' necks, circle 
swiftly about the troopers, shrilly shriek- 
ing their war cries. Custer is seen fight- 
ing desperately in the midst of the red- 
skins, and is finally dragged from his 
horse, but he quickly throws off his as- 
sailants and fights his way to a high 
mound, where the remnants of his force 
gather about him. 

The second tableau shows the battle 
nearing the end. Custer's men have 
nearly all been killed, yet the remaining 
few are struggling valiantly and keeping 
the Indians at bay. One by one the 
troopers are slain until Custer stands 
alone on the mound. Swinging his heavy 
saber aloft, his face lighted with deter- 
mination and courage, his left hand 
clinching his smoking revolver, he fights 
on to the bitter end. An Indian is seen 
kneeling and pointing a gun at Custer 
when the tableaux ends. 

Tableau three completes the tragedy. 
It shows the dreary mound, covered with 
the dead bodies of the troopers and those 
of the Indians who have fallen in the 
fierce battle. Custer is down — slain after 
a most brilliant exhibition of sublime 
courage and determination. His body is 



42 



THE WHITE CITY MAGAZINE AND SOUVENIR PROGRAM 



lying over the topmost part of the mound 
and the American flag is lying close be- 
side him. Presently some scouts appear 
in the distance, look carefully at the 
mound, and then disappear. Then 
Reno's entire band comes rushing to the 
rescue. The soldiers dash on to the 
mound. 

They seize the flag and hoist it up to 



the stafif again amid cheers. One of the 
men stumbles over a body. It is that of 
General Custer. 

The soldiers gather about the body of 
the courageous General and remove their 
hats as they gaze at their beloved leader. 
They turn sadly, look fondly at the flag 
and murmur, "Too late ! Too late !" The 
curtain falls. 



THE 



MIDWAY 



CONTAINING ENTERTAINING 
FOR EVERYBODY 



FEATURES 




.O AMUSEMENT resort is 
complete without a Midw^ay, 
where jollity and mirth run 
riot unrestrained and un- 
hampered by conventionality. 
Here may be found every form of 
amusement and all kinds of games and 
pastimes into which the elements of 
chance and probability enter. The Mid- 
way occupies three sides of the plaza in 



front of the Fire Show and encircles the 
Observation Wheel on three sides, being 
located at the southeastern part of the 
grounds where the "Board Walk" turns 
onto the bridge. 

Popular prices are the rule at the Mid- 
way, and for very small sums the visitor 
may have unlimited enjoyment and prob- 
ably carry home with him a valuable 
souvenir of White City. Every possi- 




Observation Wheel; Also View of Part of the Midway 



THE WHITE CITY MAGAZINE AND SOUVENIR PROGRAM 



43 



ble device and all kinds of unique exhi- 
bitions crowd the Midway, so that a trip 
through is well worth while. 

The first booth is occupied by a candy 
store, where the new confection, "Fluff- 
Fluff," may be found. The next booth 
is the Stein Rack. Here the visitor en- 
deavors to completely cover a painted 
circle with a metal disk by tossing it on 
a smooth board. The prizes are souvenir 
steins. Next comes the Knife Rack. 
This is very similar to the familiar cane 
rack. The participant tries to throw a 
wooden ring around a knife, and the 
motto of the place is "The knife you 
ring is the knife you get." 

The air rifle booth is the next in order. 
This attraction is especially interesting 
to small children. The next booth con- 
tains the Cane Rack, which has proved 
its great popularity for many years, and 
a description of this deservedly well pat- 
ronized feature would be superfluous. 

The White City Stream is the next 
attraction which meets the view of the 
spectator. This is a stream of water, 
along the banks of which are many 
miniature houses. In the swiftly run- 
ning stream are hundreds of wooden 
fishes, which the visitor endeavors to 
catch with a hook and line. Each one 
of the fish contains a prize. Next comes 
the Gypsy Camp, where there are a corps 
of fortune tellers. Hotel Sleepyville is 
the next booth. The participants in this 
sport try to hurl a ball through the win- 
dows of the hotel and awaken the occu- 
pants. If he is successful in bursting a 
glass window a strange thing happens 
which interests everyone. 

In adjoining booths are the old and 
tried Rifle Gallery and Baby Rack. 
These attractions are too well known to 
need any comment. The next attraction 
is one which is somewhat new to Chi- 
cagoans. It is the baseball game. The 
participant in this sport takes a regula- 
tion bat and knocks a baseball. The 
scoring is counted according to the hit 
he makes. In the southeast corner of 
the Midway is the penny arcade. Here 
are all kinds of slot machines. 

The next feature is the Japan ball 
game. This must be seen to be appre- 
ciated, as it is almost impossible to de- 
scribe it. The game is most interesting 
and attracts a great number of specta- 



tors. The Glass-blowers occupy the re- 
maining booth, where all kinds of glass 
work is made for visitors while they 
wait. 



Photograph Gallery 

Where the Best Work in Chicago is Done 

Just to the south of the peristyle on 
the east side of the "Board Walk" is 
located the White City Photograph 
Gallery. As an attraction to visitors who 
cannot always command facilities for 
having their pictures taken it will sup- 
ply all deficiencies. Only first-class op- 
erators are employed and a high grade 
of work can be turned out with the 




Flioto LroUery 

ample facilities at hand. All kinds of 
pictures are taken, including tintypes or 
cards of any size or description. In ad- 
dition to the work of making pictures to 
order, the managers of this concession 
always have on hand an assortment of 
White City photographs and views 
which can be purchased at moderate 
prices. 

Those who are interested in a high- 
class photograph gallery will find par- 
ticular interest by visiting this establish- 
ment at White City. 



44 



THE WHITE CITY MAGAZINE AND SOUVENIR PROGRAM 



INFANT INCUBATORS 

SCIENTIFIC AND HUMANITARIAN METHODS 
AT WO RK TOGETHER 



'HIS attraction is a great deal 
more than an exhibit — it is 
an educator. The Incubators 
are located in a beautiful 
structure at the southeast 
corner of the "Board Walk." This build- 
ing is the only one on the grounds which 
has anv color in it, beinsr a dark red with 



1 


1 


1 



the sweet sleep of infancy they create a 
fascinating picture. The boy infants 
have blue sashes and the girls have pink. 
To avoid confusion as to their identity 
each child wears a medal on which is 
stamped its initials and the date of its 
arrival, and such other information as 
bears on the treatment of the case. They 




Infant Incubator Building 



white trimmings. It is built after the 
old colonial style and is most pretentious 
in its appointments. 

It is safe to say that as large a per- 
centage of interested visitors pass into 
this attraction as any other on the 
grounds. The tiny infants only a few 
days old, and born into the world from 
one to three months ahead of the natural 
time, are put into the glass ovens, which 
are kept at an even temperature, and 
supplied constantly with sterilized air by 
means of an automatic arrangement. 
The little ones seem thoroughly to enjoy 
their homes in the glass houses, and in 



are taken and fed at regular intervals, 
bathed and dressed with the greatest 
care, so that eighty-five per cent of the 
infants are saved for useful lives. There 
is a gain of nearly seventy per cent over 
the old methods, and an inestimable gain 
for the parents, who perhaps love them 
more dearly for their misfortunes. 

The Infant Incubator system had its 
origin in Germany, the home of many of 
the most advanced methods of modern 
medicine and surgery, and is conducted 
there under government auspices. It 
has proved a great success, and like re- 
sults are being obtained in this country, 



THE WHITE CITY MAGAZINE AND SOUVENIR PROGRAM 



45 



where physicians welcome it as an in- 
valuable adjunct to their own skill. 
Thousands of precious lives have already 
been saved and it is only a question of 
time when the system will be universally 
adopted. Institutions similar to these 
will soon be set up in all the large Amer- 
ican cities. 

The nurses who have charge of the 
infants as they graduate from the ovens 
of the incubators certainly have their 
hands full, as, with their wee charges 
on their hands, they have to soothe them 
to rest and place them in the dainty 
cribs. 

The first attempt to substitute scien- 
tific treatment for the primitive methods 
that had for hundreds of years been used 
to save babies born prematurely was 



made by Dr. Crede, of the University 
of Leipzig. He constructed a box with 
double metallic sides and filled the space 
within with water, so as to regulate the 
temperature. This was sixty years ago, 
and it was not until eight years ago that 
the first institution was opened in Ber- 
lin, which won favor from the start be- 
cause of the great success it made in 
saving the lives of the little ones. 

After a visit to this institution one 
feels amply repaid for having seen the 
quaint, delightful little fellows whose ap- 
peal to the sympathies is always stronger 
because of their utter helplessness. 
Every visitor to the incubator cannot fail 
to come away praising the great system 
that can accomplish such great wonders, 
where for centuries the precious lives 
were permitted to flicker out. 



AUTOMATIC VAUDEVILLE 

CONTAINING 1,100 ATTRACTIONS 



HE Mechanical Theater — here 
the spectator may obtain a 
full evening's entertainment 
for a few pennies. There 
are more than eleven hun- 
dred devices for the entertainment of 
young and old housed in this most beau- 





Automatic Vaudeville 

tiful structure, which is located on the 
east side of the grounds on the "Board 
Walk," just south of the White City 
College Inn. For a few pennies the 



visitor can see some of the world's best 
scenes as viewed from a swiftly moving 
train, or see hundreds of humorous 
stories told by moving pictures. Several 
hours can easily be spent in this attrac- 
tion, and then the spectator will not have 
exhausted the many forms of amuse- 
ment to be seen there. 

One of the strongest features of the 
Automatic Vaudeville is the fact that it 
is educational in a great degree. Every 
person has read of the famous Flatiron 
building in New York and the various 
historic places in Europe, but very few 
have been fortunate enough to have seen 
them. In the Automatic Vaudeville they 
can be seen, and for one cent the sight- 
seer can almost literally take a trip to 
New York and view the well-known 
places there, see the great crowds mov- 
ing about and the hustle and bustle. 

Also, for the infinitesimal sum of one 
cent, they may hear popular music from 
the latest comic opera or musical com- 
edy. The songs which every one is 
whistling on the streets can be learned 
at no cost. Moreover, these songs and 
ballads, as reproduced, are sung by the 
best artists. Imagine being able to hear 
Patti or Melba for one cent. The ma- 
chines used in the Automatic Vaudeville 
are the best that have vet been invented 



46 



THE WHITE CITY MAGAZINE AND SOUVENIR PROGRAM 



and nothing of the true vahie of the 
music is lost through the transmission. 

Again the visitor may have some fa- 
vorite recitation which he would like to 
hear again. He can find it at the Auto- 
matic Vaudeville. Operas, musical corn- 



There is no limit to the fun and en- 
tertainment which any person may ob- 
tain from this attraction. That it is 
pleasing and interesting is well evi- 
denced by the great crowds which have 
swarmed into it since the opening of 




Interior View of the Automatic Vaudeville 



edies, speeches by well-known orators, 
recitations, and in fact every variety of 
entertainment is included within the 
scope of this attraction. 

Would you know if your lungs are 
weak? You can find out in the Auto- 
matic Vaudeville. There are scores of 
machines which are carefully and mi- 
nutely tabulated to show the exact con- 
dition of the visitor. The use of this 
machine will be as comprehensive and 
complete as an examination by an ex- 
pert physician. In exchange for other 
pennies the spectator can test his lift- 
ing capacity, his hitting ability and the 
strength of his grip. Not only may he 
find out his strength and his weakness, 
but he can find a cure for them. It is 
a well known fact that electricity is a 
cure for many weaknesses, and in the 
Automatic Vaudeville he will find many 
devices for receiving electric and mag- 
netic treatments which are of great ben- 
efit. 



White City. A great deal of its popu- 
larity has been due to the great scope 
of the amusements provided for visitors. 
There is hardly a form of amusement 
which cannot be obtained for one cent. 
The machines are of the latest patterns 
and contain all of the recent improve- 
ments. 

The Automatic Vaudeville continues 
to draw great throngs of visitors, and 
its popularity is increasing each day. 




THE WHITE CITY MAGAZINE AND SOUVENIR PROGRAM 



47 



CHINESE THEATRE 

WITH ORIENTAL ACROBATS AND ACTORS 




|YPICAL of the flowery king- 
dom is the httle Chinese The- 
ater, located just south of 
the Peristyle on the west side 
of the "Board Walk." This 
theater is imported direct from China 
and its entertainments are exactly the 
same as the shows given there by their 
own theatrical companies. Each mem- 
ber of the cast has been brought to this 




Chinese Theater 

country direct from the Flowery King- 
dom, and has appeared in his native land 
as an actor. The scenery has been used 
in one of the theaters in Pekin, and is 
most beautiful, being a good example of 
the scenic work of Chinese artists. 

The little-footed women who appear 
in the plays presented are some of the 
very few Chinese women in this coun- 
try, and visitors to White City should 
not fail to see this most interesting and 
educating show. The principal play 
which this Oriental company presents is 
typical of their country, and is of the 
regulation length. Many of these Chi- 
nese people are seeing the first view of 
America, coming directly to Chicago 
after they landed in New York. The 



company will remain at White City 
during the Summer and will probably 
delight thousands of Chicagoans with 
their performances. 



Puzzle Garden 

Of all the aggravating things calcu- 
lated to worry Chicagoans, the Puzzle 
Garden at White City is the most in- 
explicable. It looks innocent and un- 
pretentious in its white home between 
the Infant Incubators and Over and 
Under the Sea, but that is your mistake. 
You enter the embellished corridor and 
pass out into a labyrinth of narrow pas- 
sages, wdiere you walk, retrace your 
steps, twist and turn for blocks without 
getting anywhere in particular. There 
are doors which lead nowhere, and walls 
which looked like a way out at first, but 
on closer approach bear onl}- a neatly 
painted sentence to the effect that you 
are "wrong again." Then you do the 
twist and turn all over again, and, finally 
giving up all hope of reaching the cen- 
tral parlor, wish you could get out. But 
you can't, and there you are. When 
your predicament seems to be hopeless, 
a polite guide appears on the top of the 
wall above your head and guides 3'ou to 
an exit, from where you can climb a 
stairway and watch the confusion of 
others who are going through the same 
labyrinth. 

The Puzzle Garden is something new, 
and was not opened until White City 
was in full swing. It is the latest thing 
in Chicago, and the crowds are exploring 
it every da}', resolving they will learn 
the windings until they can walk straight 
to the center. But they don't, and even 
the guides who direct the visitors from 
the top of the structure are at sea when 
they are put down into the narrow cor- 
ridors. 



"The general design of the structures 
and landscape features revive in the 
minds of the citizens of Chicago and 
visitors the Columbian Exposition in 
\?>9Zr— Omaha Herald. 



48 



THE WHITE CITY MAGAZINE AND SOUVENIR PROGRAM 



i i 



HEREAFTER" 



THE FUTURE STATE VIVIDLY AND IMPRESSIVELY SHOWN 




|HIS unique attraction is sit- 
uated in a large'building just 
north of the colonnade and 
on the east side of the White 
City "Board Walk," and is 
one of the most cleverly conceived en- 
tertainments in the park. While the 
title of this feature may make a grew- 
some impression on some persons, to 



der of countless thousands, has the man- 
agement of this attraction. He spent 
over two months at White City during 
its construction personally supervising 
the work of installing the show, for he 
could not trust the delicate and wonder- 
ful mechanism to common workmen. 
On a large and roomy stage in his own 
special building, Professor Burch has 




Interior View of hereafter 



the majority it will furnish an unlimited 
field for speculation. 

"Hereafter" is an illusion, or rather 
a series of illusions, and the most beau- 
tiful and dramatic effects are produced 
by those clever arts and resourceful 
methods adopted by skilled illusionists. 
The audience sits spellbound, seeking in 
vain to gain even the slightest percep- 
tion of how the wonderful effects are 
produced. 

Professor Burch, who has devoted al- 
most a quarter of a century to the cre- 
ating of unusual devices for the mysti- 
fvinsr of scientists and arousins: the won- 



arranged his carefully guarded secrets 
and will exhibit them several times daily 
to the public. 

Ordinary illusions, such as have been 
exhibited in Chicago in years past, must 
not be confounded with the exhibitions 
which will be produced at White City. 
Professor Burch has participated in the 
entertainment of hundreds of thousands 
of people at the five great expositions 
which have been given within the past 
dozen years, and he will present in the 
Hereafter the very best and most popu- 
lar illusions which have been introduced 
during that time. In addition to the 



THE WHITE CITY MAGAZINE AND SOUVENIR PROGRAM 



49 



great effects which he has selected from 
his previous efforts, he has invented sev- 
eral wholly new devices, which are being 
shown at White City for the first time 
ever presented to the public. 

His work is similar to that produced 
by the world-famous Maskelyne and 
Cook for the past fifty }'ears in the re- 
nowned Eg3'ptian Hall in London, almost 
as celebrated as the Tower of London 
itself. Entertainment will be furnished 
for old and young, and there will be 
absolutely nothing in any of the pro- 
grammes to offend even the most criti- 
cal and fastidious. Beautiful girls are 
transformed into flowers, familiar fea- 
tures being transformed into unfamiliar 
ones and back again. Other various un- 
canny transformations will also occur. 
Persons of all ages will be fully enter- 
tained, with just enough of the myste- 
rious to give a delightfully creepy feeling 
now and then, but there will be nothing 
of a startling or unpleasant nature in 
any of the shows. There is nothing to 
alarm the most nervous or hvsterical, 
nor will there be anything to create un- 
pleasant sensations. 

"Hereafter" is beautiful and sublime 
in many ways, but never disagreeable. 
It is a strictly high-class and up-to-date 
entertainment all the way through, and 
those who witness the exhibitions are 
supplied with an endless fund of con- 
jecture and material for discussion. 




White City's Hospital 

BEST EQUIPPED AND MOST COMPLETE 
EMERGENCY HOSPITAL IN CHICAGO 

No feature of a place where the peo- 
ple congregate could be more useful than 
a well-equipped and properly conducted 
Emergency Hospital, and no amusement 
resort in the United States, or the world, 
in fact, is better equipped in this respect 
than White City. The care and fore- 
thought that has been exerfcised through- 
out the construction of the grounds, from 
the selection of the site to the installa- 
tion of the lighting system. Has found 
its highest expression in the establish- 
ment and fitting out of the Emergency 
Llospital, which is provided for the aid 
and convenience of the thousands of vis- 
itors to White City. 

Among such crowds as flock into this 
brilliant resort there are ofttimes calls for 
the prompt services of a competent physi- 
cian, a bandage or two, or some restora- 
tive. A woman or child is overcome bv 
the heat, a fainting spell or a sudden 
illness, and then the prompt intervention 
of a doctor prevents what might have 
been a serious injury or illness. Some- 
times a doctor even is not necessary, but 
the presence of medicines, restoratives 
and bandages, with someone who knows 
how to apply them, will save a life. It 
w^as with this in mind that the Emer- 
gency Hospital at White City was es- 
tablished and fitted with everything that 
the most modern medical and surgical 
research can suggest. 

It is located at the eastern end of the 
Peristyle, just off the Board Walk, ad- 
joining one of the exits upon South Park 
avenue. Like all the structures at White 
City, the building is white, and the in- 
side fittings are such as to produce a 
maximum amount of light and air. There 
are sanitary cots, screens, invalid chairs, 
a case of the most improved surgical in- 
struments, and everything which can be 
found in the most elaborate and up-to- 
date hospital in the country, only on a 
smaller scale. The fittings were fiu-- 
nished by Truax, Greene & Co. of Chi- 
cago, who superintended the furnishing 
of the hospital throughout and have 
pronounced it complete. 

An ambulance is kept in readiness to 
answer anv call dav or night, greatly 



50 



THE WHITE CITY MAGAZINE AND SOUVENIR PROGRAM 



aiding the efficiency of the establishment 
and rendering- invah;able service to the 
special police which constantly patrol the 
grounds, ready to offer aid in case of 
sudden indisposition. 

It is characteristic of the typical Chi- 
cago spirit which has planned and built 
White City, that such an institution as 
this should be provided, and further char- 
acteristic that no charge whatever is 
made for its services. It is at the dis- 
position of any ^^^HITE City visitor, and 
the public generally will always find it 
prompt in answering any demand upon 
its resources. 



Fun Factory 

Laughter-Creating Devices for Old and Young 

Abandon all dignity ye who enter 
here. No person, however sedate and 
cynical,, can go into this attraction with- 
out laughing and being well pleased with 
the world in sreneral. Go where the 




laughter is loudest and there you will 
find the Fun Factory. This attraction is 
located on the east side of the "Board 
Walk," and is situated just north of the 
Electric Tower. 

Mirrors are the cause of it all. By a 
most ingenious and skillful arrangement 
of the various glasses many humorous 
and amusing illusions are given. There 
is the convex mirror, the concave mir- 



ror, the double mirror, and in fact every 
kind of a mirror that human ingenuity 
has devised. 

The spectator steps before one glass 
to look at himself and finds that he has 
apparently flattened out until he is only 
about one foot tall and five or six feet 
broad. The enormous change in the 
appearance of a person when he stands 
before this mirror is most ludicrous. 
The next moment he steps before an- 
other glass and sees himself many feet 
tall and extremely slender. From the 
first mirror to the last the spectator is 
convulsed with laughter. 

It has been observed that each spec- 
tator tries to put the laugh on some 
other person. He will stand way out 
from the mirrors and endeavor to be- 
guile his friends to step nearer, and 
when they do so he will laugh at their 
discomfiture, only a moment later to find 
that he, himself, has wandered too near 
one of the mirrors and that he is the 
center of the laughter of his friends, who 
are thoroughly enjoying his awkward 
position. 



"Tens upon tens of thousands of peo- 
ple threw dull cares aside, left the wor- 
ries of the business world behind them 
and. sought rest at White City last 
nieht." — Chicago Chronicle. 



"Beautiful White City, the Coney Is- 
land of the West." — Neiv Orleans States. 
*** 

"White City is not unlike the World's 
Fair at Chicago." — Salt Lake City Tri- 
bune. 



"White City cost over a million dol- 
lars and is the leading attraction in Chi- 
cago." — Humboldt, Kan., Herald. 
*** 

"White City has an attendance of 
over 25,000 to 40,000 every day."— Day- 
ton, Ohio, Nezi's. 




52 



THE WHITE CITY MAGAZINE AND SOUVENIR PROGRAM 



^Special Features of WHite City 

Unrivaled Attractions for Chicago's $1^000^000 
Aiiiiisciiient Enterprise 



Electric Tower. Almost 300 feet high, 
illuminated b>' 20,000 incandescent 
lights. 

Fire Show. A thrilling spectacle ex- 
hibiting three complete Fire Com- 
panies in action while a five-story 
hotel burns; requires 250 people, 2 
trolley cars, 2 automobiles, 5 cabs, 6 
wagons, ambulance, patrol wagon, 14 
.horses, etc. Greatest and most vivid 
outdoor spectacle ever produced. 

Venice. A romantic gondola ride 
through the moonlit water streets of 
Venice; viewing correct reproduc- 
tions of her famous buildings and 
statuary groups. 

Scenic Railway. A three-quarter mile 
ride up hill and down dale, through 
forest and glade, viewing the world's 
most marvelous scenery, actually re- 
produced in per5.pective. 

Infant Incubators. An exhibit of the 
greatest practical value to physicians 
and of the deepest interest to par- 
ents; showing scientific methods of 
saving the lives of tiny babes. 

White City College Inn. Finest restau- 
rant in America, located in an enor- 
mous and architecturally beautiful 
building; a duplicate of Chicago's 
famous College Inn; also a popular 
priced temperance restaurant and a 
German restaurant. Will accommo- 
date 2,400 people. 

Music. Open air concerts day and eve- 
ning by the foremost bands and 
orchestras of America and Europe. 

Flying Airships. A revelation in bird- 
1 ike transportation. SirHiram 
Maxim's idea of safe and sane aerial 
navigation. 

Ball Room. Finest dancing floor in 
Chicago and capable of accommo- 
dating 1,000 dancers at a time. 

Bumps. A harmless and hilarious 
method of enjoyment. "Have you 
bumped the bumps? " 



Hereafter. Beautiful, mystifying illu- 
sions, possessing in the highest degree 
the power of interesting and enter- 
taining. Conducted by Prof. Burch, 
the celebrated London illusionist. 

Shoot-the-Chutes. Duplex and longest 
in America. Has 500 foot escalator 
to carry people to the pavilion. All 
the newest improvements. 

Johnstown Flood. Most impressive and 
realistic of all scenic productions and 
constructed on a gigantic scale. A 
triumph of scenic art and startling 
realism. 

Automatic Vaudeville. Containing all 
the latest mechanical novelties and 
furnishing entertainment for old and 
young. 

Midway. A conglomeration of laughter 
inspiring features and clean amuse- 
ments. 

Fun Factory. A merrymaking estab- 
lishment with laugh creating devices 
on a large scale. 

Electric Theatre. Electric pictorial 
reproductions of startling and thrill- 
ing events showing the animation and 
action of living objects. 

Observation Wheel. Fun for every- 
body. A ride you will not forget. 

Circus Rings. Continuous performances 
including equestrian acts, aerial 
flights and feats of strength and skill. 
Free exhibitions. 

Mechanical Waxworks. Most remark- 
able collection of life-like figures, 
reproduced in wax and so supplied 
with intricate and cleverly contrived 
mechanisms that they appear to be 
possessed of the characteristics and 
abilities of living beings. 

Photograph Gallery. Where pictures 
of every kind known to lovers of 
photographic art will be made under 
the supervision of skilled photog- 
raphers. Conducted by one of the 
best known and largest photographic 
concerns in the world. 



THE WHITE CITY MAGAZINE AND SOUVENIR PROGRAM 



53 



Gypsy Camp. With a host of genuine 
Gypsies from sunny Spain, secured 
by a special envoy sent across the 
water by the management of White 
City. 

Dog;, Pony and Monkey Circus. Other- 
wise called the Simian City. An 
aggregation of cleverly trained 
animals under the direction of Prof. 
Blake, one of the best known trainers 
in the world. A constantly changing 
program of special interest to chil- 
dren and pleasing to all. 

Toboggfan. An absolutely harmless 
but exciting ride in perfectly con- 
structed gravity cars, whirling the 
rider at an e.xhilarating speed around 
a double circle. Lots of fun. 

Beautiful Jim Key. The equine world 
wonder who earns annually the in- 
terest on $1,000,000 and is the aristo- 
crat of the animal kingdom. Actually 
an educated horse which thinks, 
spells, counts, draws with chalk and 
writes his own name on a blackboard. 
Taught by kindness and a wonderful 
example of the power of love for 
dumb brutes. The children's friend. 

Palmistry Kiosk. Where the m\'steries 
of the future and occurrences of the 
past will be related by seers who can 
read the story of life as imprinted in 
the palm. 

Cummins* Indian Congress. Includes 
150 Indians from all the principal 
tribes, cowboys, sharpshooters, sol- 
diers, trappers, etc. Western scenes 
and pioneer days vividly recalled by 
a thrilling spectacle showing the 
massacre of Fort Dearborn and a 
realistic representation of Custer's 
last stand; reproduced in three life- 
like tableaux. 



Miniature Railway. A perfect model 
railroad system with tracks, switches, 
tiny cars, engines, etc. Almost a 
half-mile of trackage through tunnels 
and grottoes with beautiful scenic 
effects. Children or adults can ride. 

Temple of Music. Marvelous develop- 
ment of natural forces, applied by 
scientific methods for the performing 
of difficult airs on musical instru- 
ments of all kinds. Piano played by 
wireless telegraphy, the electricity 
passing through the body of a human 
being. Air, heat, steam, electricity, 
etc., used in these wonderful demon- 
strations. 

Chinese Theatre. With jugglers, actors, 
acrobats, etc., direct from the flowery 
kingdom. This troupe of oriental 
entertainers contains se\'eral high- 
caste Chinese women with tiny feet. 

Over and Under the Sea. A beautiful 
and brilliant series of unexpected 
scenes under and over the sea; also 
during a tour of the surface of the 
moon the spectator is charmed and 
delighted with the novelty and splen- 
dor of the phenomena witnessed. 

Double Whirl. Participants in the de- 
lights of this novel pastime are given 
a pleasant circular ride during which 
they have a view of the park from a 
considerable elevation. 

Puzzle Garden. A mystifying labyrinth 
of misleading hallways, leading you 
nowhere in particular unless you 
know your way about, and taking you 
everywhere as soon as you " get on." 

Carousel. The merry-go-round which 
always delights the children, and fur- 
nishes exhilarating and innocent 
pleasure for men, women, boys and 
girls alike. 



54 



THE WHITE CITY MAGAZINE AND SOUVENIR PROGRAM 



TRANSPORTATION FACILITIES 

HOW TO REACH WHITE CITY 



WHITE CITY is located at 63d 
street and South Park ave- 
nue, and may be easily 
reached from points in or out 
of Chicago by elevated roads, by able 
and electric street car lines, and by 
steam railroads. 

ELEVATED ROADS. 

At stations on the Union Loop you 
should obser\'e the guiding signs which 
are located in conspicuous places on 
the stairs and platforms and by which 
you will be guided aright. 

The South Side "L" has a station im- 
mediately in front of White City at 
South Park avenue and 63d street. 
Time of trip from the Union Loop to 
White Citt is 30 minutes. 

Changing cars on other "L" lines, 
down-town, to South Side "L :" 

From Metropolitan "L," change at 
the LaSalle Street Station on Van 
Buren street. 

Returning home, change at Madison 
Street Station on Wabash avenue. 

From Chicago and Oak Park "L" 
and Northwestern "L" change at the 
State Street Station on Van Buren 
street. 

Returning home, change at Adams 
Street Station or at Randolph Street 
Station on Fifth avenue. 

SURFACE LINES. 

In or near the down-town district 
take any surface line going south, pref- 
erably the State street cable or the Cot- 
tage Grove avenue cable (Chicago City 
Railway) then transfer to the 63d street 
electric line. 

From any point on the South Side 
the cars of the Chicago City Railway 
will carry you, for one fare only, right 
to the entrance of White City. 

Under the present system of trans- 
fers on the Chicago City Railway, you 
may, upon the payment of one fare, 
ride in any one general direction as far 
as the cars of the company will carry 
you; but, should you reverse the gen- 
eral direction in which you have 



started, you may continue to ride only 
to the junction with the first cross line 
reached. 

For instance, if you are on a south- 
bound car, you will, upon the payment 
of a cash fare, receive a slip which will 
permit you to transfer to any inter- 
secting east, west, or south line. If 
you take a west-bound car at a transfer 
point, you have established your gen- 
eral direction of south-west, and the 
conductor on the west-bound car will 
exchange your transfer-slip for one en- 
titling you to ride south or west, and 
you may thus exchange your transfer- 
slip indefinitely on south and west- 
bound cars. If you reverse your direc- 
tion, however, and take a north or 
east-bound car at a transfer point, your 
transfer will entitle you to ride only as 
far as the intersection of the first cross 
line, and if you wish to ride farther 
than this point you must pay another 
cash fare. 

To avoid any misunderstanding, re- 
member that "Transfers will be issued 
ONLY at time fares are paid." 

Transfers are not issued from North 
or West-Side lines to Sou"h-Side lines. 
Exception: A passenger on the North 
Halsted street line may reach White 
City upon the payment of one fare and 
transferring at O'Neill street to the 
South Halsted street line and then 
again on 63d street to South Park 
avenue. 

Time from Madison street (down- 
town) to White City via Chicago City 
Railway Company's lines is 38 min- 
utes. 

The Calumet Electric lines from 
South Chicago, Cheltenham Beach, 
Hammond, Ind., etc., connect at Stony 
Island avenue and 68th street with the 
cars from Pullman, Kensington, etc., 
which have their terminal at the en- 
trance to White City. 

The Chicago Electric Traction Com- 
Harvey and Blue Island direct to 63d 
street and South Park avenue. The 
fare from Harvey is 10 cents and from 
Blue Island 5 cents. 



THE WHITE CITY MAGAZINE AND SOUVENIR PROGRAM 



55 



SUBURBAN LINES. 

From points on the Aurora, Elgin 
& Chicago Electric Hne only two 
changes of cars need be made, as this 
line connects with the Metropolitan 
"L" at South 52d avenue and carries 
passengers direct to the Union "L" 
Loop, where the South Side "L" trains 
may be taken at LaSalle street, Dear- 
born street or State street stations. 

The Chicago and Joliet Electric 
Railway running from Joliet to Chi- 
cago via Summit, Lemont, Lockport, 
etc., connects with the lines of the Chi- 
cago City Railway Company at Archer 
and South 48th avenues. It also con- 
nects with the lines of the Union Trac- 
tion Co. in the village of Lyons. 

STEAM RAILROADS 
All Illinois Central and Michigan 
Central trains, to and from all subur- 
ban stations, stop at Woodlawn Sta- 
tion on 63d street near Jackson Park. 
The 63d street electric cars, going west, 
carry passengers direct ,to the main 
entrance of White City on 63d street 
and South Park avenue. The South 
Side "L" trains may be taken at Madi- 
son Station, half a block west of Wood- 
lawn Station direct to White City. 

All trains of the Chicago, Rock Isl- 
and & Pacific, Lake Shore & Michigan 
Southern, and the Pittsburg, Ft. 
Wayne & Chicago lines stop at Engle- 
wood Station on 63d street, where 
electric cars going east may be taken 
for White City, landing passengers at 
the main entrance on South Park 
avenue. 

Those entering Chicago on the Chi- 
cago & Eastern Illinois, the Chicagfo & 
Western Indiana, the Pittsburg, Cin- 
cinnati, Chicago, and St. Louis, and 



the Wabash, can change at the 63d 
street station to the electric cars going 
east direct to the main entrance of 
White City. 

Trains on the Grand Trunk stop at 
47th street. To transfer for White 
City, take the electric cars on 47th 
street going east, transfer to the Went- 
worth avenue electric (or to the State 
street cable) line and transfer again to 
the 63d street electric line, landing at 
the main entrance. 

Patrons of White City entering 
Chicago by other than the above-men- 
tioned roads will find convenient ele- 
vated stations near the respective rail- 
way stations — observe the guiding 
signs on elevated stairs and platforms, 
and refer to elevated railroads men- 
tioned above. The Kinzie Street Sta- 
tion of the Northwestern "L" is in 
front of the Wells Street Railroad Sta- 
tion. The Canal Street Station of the 
Metropolitan "L" is within half a block 
of the Union Station. 

STEAMSHIP DOCKS. 

The nearest and most convenient ele- 
vated train stations from the docks of 
all steamship lines are the Randolph 
Street Station on Wabash avenue, the 
State street, and Clark street stations 
on Lake street. These are within a 
few minutes' walk south from any one 
of the docks, and South Side elevated 
trains will carry passengers direct to 
White City. 

AUTOMOBILES. 
White City is within a short dis- 
tance of the boulevard system and ac' 
commodations will be arranged for 300 
automobiles in the White City garage 
on South Park avenue between 62d 
and 63d streets. 



THE WHITE CITY MAGAZINE AND SOUVENIR PROGRAM 









SKIS 
SIMS 



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Ideal Sites for riomes 

ALONG THE 

NE^V 

RAVENSWOOD 
EXTENSION 

of tke 

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PURE AIR 



PLENTY^/" ROOM 



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TRANSPORTATION 

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THE WHITE CITY MAGAZINE AND SOUVENIR PROGRAM 



57 



W. R. JACQUEST 



PLUMBING 

GAS FITTING 

HOT WATER HEAT- 
ING & SEWERAGE 

Telephone Yards 142 



3528 S. WOOD ST. 

CHICAGO 




ifEHISIiill. 



^MrM) 







#^^/ 



CLAY MODELING 

^ '^^ ELECTROTYPING 




PmonlMain JSSO. 



^ ' COR , au 1 NCY ST, ^iiiiti^^feAJ 



^^SK.^'e::^ '^i£>site£si£f ^' ~hi£^ 




U^Ct?i/ 



UTHO.CO. 

CHICAGO 



,; '} CLARK AND HARRISON STREETS 

A^^-^ Telephone Harrison 424 



INDOOR AND OUTDOOR 

LITHOGRAPHING 

Hign Grade and or Every Description 

LET US TRY FOR YOUR BUSINESS BY GIVING US A CHANCE TO ESTIMATE 

Maybe we can give you tetter work or tetter prices 

TRY US AND SEE 



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eg THE WHITE CITY MAGAZINE AND SOUVENIR PROGRAM 

PI ■ ^D 



T^ake the 



Metropolitan 

West Side 

Elevated 

AUSTIN 

OAK PARK, HARLEM 

AND THE CEMETERIES 

CONCORDIA 

FOREST HOME 

W ALDHEIM 



FIVE 

CENTS TO THE COUNTRY 

Garfield Park Branch 



p i ^ n 

When writing to advertisers please mention The White City Magazine. 



THE WHITE CITY MAGAZINE AND SOUVENIR PROGRAM 59 



Ciool 
Coloraao 



vA/ny spend your vacation m the numid 
atmospnere or low altitudes ? 

Colorado air is dry and cool, ijreezes xrom 
sno"wy mountains play over resorts tnat are 
5,000 to 10,000 feet atove sea-level. 

Rock Island tnrougn trains take you to 
Colorado m comfort. 

t/lectric lignted cnair cars and sleepers 
cooled Dy electric fans. 

Iveserve Dertns well in advance. 



A. B. SCHMIDT 

General Agent Passenger Dept. 
91 Adams St. 



When writing to advertisers please mention The White City Magazine. 



6o 



THE WHITE CITY MAGAZINE AND SOUVENIR PROGRAM 



Tlic White City Magazine is printed and bound by 

P. F. Pettibone 
(&Co. 






STATIONERS 

PRINTERS 

BlankBookMakers 
Lithographers 

Edition Printing 
and Binding 



Main Store 

178 Monroe Street* 

Store, Factory and 
General Offices 

44-50 S. Desplaines 
Street* 

CHICAGO 



Telephone Monroe <!J58 

Pri-vate Exchange 




y^ 




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THE WHITE CITY MAGAZINE AND SOUVENIR PROGRAM 



6l 



CENTRAL 

PRINTING & ENGRAVING 

COMPANY 



COMMERCIAL, RAILROAD, CIRCUS AND 
THEATRICAL PRINTING 



POSTERS 

FOR BILLBOARD 
AND ELEVATED STATIONS 



CAR CARDS 

FOR SURFACE 
AND ELEVATED LINES 



140-146 Monroe Street, Chicago 



Tel. Central 1144 



Automatic 6279 



WHAT BETTER METHOD OF ADVERTISING THAN OUR WORK 
FOR WHITE CITY? 




ADWIRTISIRSi 

THE WHITE CITY MAGAZINE 

THROUGHOUT THE KNTIRE SEASON 
^VII.L C03IBINE ITS REGULAR 

PROGRAM WITH THE MAGAZI>rE 

MAKING IT 

Tto# Wilis ©11^ M^;ga:i!m® ami 
8@MW#Mir Program 

HIGH GRADE ADVERTISERS CAN QUICKLY RE4LIZE 

ITS VALUE. A LIJIITED AMOUNT OF SPACE 

OPEN FOR THE SEASON. 

KOK HATES AKD FUI,I, I KFOBMATION APPLY TO 

FRANC R. E. WOODWARD, Mawager publicity Depahtment 
Sixtt-Thikd St. and South Pahk Ave. 
'Phonb "WEwrvroRXH 996 private exoeanqe 




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62 



THE WHITE CITY MAGAZINE AND SOUVENIR PROGRAM 



The Club-Room Car 

(no extra charge) 
IS FOUND ONLY ON THE 




CHICAGO & EASTERN ILLINOIS RAILROAD 

BETWEEN 

CHICAGO -ST. LOUIS 

This is but one of the many new features in our equipment 

which agreeably surprises our patrons. 

In Chicago, trains arrive and leave from the 

La Salle Street Station on the Elevated Loop 

and in St. Louis, the Union Station. 



F. J. DEICKE, 

Gen. Agt. Pass. Dept., 
900 Olive Street, St. Louis. 



A. B. SCHMIDT, 

Gen. Agt. Pass. Dept. 

91 Adams Street, Chicago. 



ESTABLISHED 1896 



EDWARDS,DEUT5CH & Heitmann 
lithographers 

"prompt-^lia ble -Up to Date 
High class lithogmph work inall its branches 



194-202 S.CLINTON ST. 



TE-liTDUAiurc HARRISON 452 

TELEPHONES harrison 472 



CHICAGO. 



COVER OF THIS MAGAZINE LITHOGRAPHED BY US. 



Whtn writing to advertistrs please mention Thi Whits City Magazine. 



THE WHITE CITY MAGAZINE AND SOUVENIR PROGRAM 



63 



Cliicago fe^OakPark 
Elevatedl Railroad 



'^ 



Direct Route for 

River Forest 

Oak Park, Austin and 

^Vest Side 

Residents Visiting 

Wkite City 



Ckange Cars at State ^ Van Buren 

( Union Loop ) 



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64 THE WHITE CITY MAGAZINE AND SOUVENIR PROGRAM 



yi Chance for ^U 

to see the greatest piece of architectural work ever constructed 
in this country— WHITE CITY. 

The Chicago Electric Traction Company 

will assist in swelling the crowds by conveying people from the 
City of Harvey, 111., the Village of Posen, the City of Blue Island, 
Alt. Greenwood, Purington, Morgan Park, Washington Heights, 
South Englewood, Auburn Park and Park Manor. C All cars 
from the aforesaid points will run direct to the main entrance of 
WHITE CITY, 63d Street and South Park Avenue. C, Cars 
will he run at short intervals for the accommodation of the traveling 
public. Also special attention will be given to pleasure seekers. 

W. H. Conrad 

General Manager 
Chicago Electric Traction Co. 



PHONE HYDE I'ARK: 493 



GEORGE A. LE\VIS 

BUILDERS' HARDWARE 

LARGE CONTRACT WORK VVV^ 407-109 E. SIXTY-THIRD ST. 

A SPECIALTY SS=^ CHICAGO 



EVERTTHING IN AVHITE CITY IN THE HAHDAVARE LINE 

"FROM NAILS TO RAILS" FURNISHED 

BY ME 



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THE WHITE CITY MAGAZINE AND SOUVENIR PROGRAM 



65 



CHICAGO ^0 NEW YOKK 



TNE BEAUTIFUL WAY 

EVERY MILE A PICTURE 

--- AHD NO SMOKE TO SPOIL THE VIEW 



7 ^ 



Lackawanna 
Railroad 



THE ROAD 

oi 

ANTHRACITE 



^j^s^^:t ,,Hi I III ,|| 




DELAWARE WATER CAP PA. 
'- ONUCKAWANNA R.R 



3 TRAINS 
THROUGH DAILY 

OBSERVATION CARS 
DINING CARS 
NEW PULLMANS 
niOH BACK SEAT COACHES 



NEW TICKET OFFICE 

lOI ADAMS STREET ("^'^QUETTEBLDo) 



^^1^-^ ^^ GEO.A.CULLEN 

CCHCHAL WCiTERN PAS5EHCER ACEfiT 

CHICAGO. 



'A PLEASURE TO ANSWER QUESTIONS 



Take a trip on the Miniature Railway 
at White City and see the beautiful 
reproductions of the famous scenery 
which has given the Lackawanna 
Route its world-wide reputation as the 
favorite route of tourists. 



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66 



THE WHITE CITY MAGAZINE AND SOUVENIR PROGRAM 



The Very Best Laxative 

Re-Leaf Splits 




IPILDirS 



On Sale 
Everywhere 



RE-LEAF CO., Pittsburgh 



The Calumet Cars 

(Yellow Line) 

RUN DIRECT TO 

THE \VHITE CITY 



FROM 

Soutk CKicago, RoDey, Man- 
Kattan Beacli, Pullman, West 
Pullman, Kensington, Rose- 
land, Burnsiae, Grand Cross- 
ing, Auturn Park, Bryn 
Ma-wr and Parkside : : : : 



^U 






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THE WHITE CITY MAGAZINE AND SOUVENIR PROGRAM 



O 
I— I 

m 



u 

o 
2 



ALL OUR LINES 

WITH FREE TRANSFERS 

LEAD DIRECT TO 



r — N r 



W^kite City 



o 
2: 



o 

2 



J \. 



A New^ Terminal 

has been constructed at 

Vernon Ave. ®j Sixty-Third St. 

for tne accommodation or 
patrons or White City 




DO Additional Trips 

no^v in regular daily operation on tlie 

SIXTY-THIRD STREET LINE 

One-mmute intervals between 
cars on Sundays and Holidays 
witn increased service as needed 

l^-mmute intervals during 
the rush hours on week-days 



w 

H 

> 

w 

m 
JO 



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o 



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o 



Chicago City Rail^^v^ay Co. 



T. E. MITTEN, First Vice-President 



M. B. STARRING, General Manager 



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THE WHITE CITY MAGAZINE AND SOUVENIR PROGRAM 




^Ae WORLD\S FAVORITE 



Triple 

Reversible-Six Finished 

Surfaces 



REX-E.Z.E. 

THADa MARK SEOISTERED 



Three 

Strops Combined 

in One 



Send 2c stamp for 

free booklet 

of Shaving; and 

Stropping 

Instructions 



Jobbing Catalogue 
mailed on application 



Easily preterve and Impart a keen edge to razors, surgical instruments 

and other fine steel blades without expert knowledge and experience 

DIRECTION AND GUARANTEE TAG ATTACHED 

No. 1. Safety Size, l?^x20 Price. $1.00 

No. 2. Junior " 2 x22 " 1.50 

No. 2 '4. Medium " 2!4:x23 " 2.00 

No. 3. Regular " 2%y.2^ " 2.50 

No. 4. Large " 2!-^x25 " 3.00 

SEE REGISTERED TRADE IVIARK. TAKE NO IMITATIONS. 
Mppty to Dealers Anywhere, or 

WEIFFENBACH MFG. CO. 

Sole Proprietors 620 North Humboldt St., CHICAGO 

M. J. JANECEK, Genl Sales Manager 

Jobbing Manufacturers of Finest Shell Horse Hide, Imported & Domestic 
Russia, Staple & High Grade Razor Strops of every kind. 

RAZOR STROPS 



ESTABLISHED 1896 



EDWARDSDEUTSCH & HEITMANIH 

LITHOGRAPHERS 

"prompt-pliable -Up to Date 

High class lithograph workinallits branches 



194-202 S.CLINTON ST. 



TFIFDHniurc HARRISON 452 

TELEPHONES harrison 4r2 



CHICAGO. 



COVER OF THIS MAGAZINE LITHOGRAPHED BY US. 



When writing to advertisers please mention the White City Magazine. 



THE WHITE CITY MAGAZINE AND SOUVENIR PROGRAM 



The Very Best Laxative 

Re-Leaf Splits 




On Sale 
Everywhere 



RE-LEAF CO., Pittsburgh 



SCHMIDT BROS. CO. 


PAINTS. OILS 


AND GLASS 


7123-7125 Cottage Grove Ave. 


CHICAGO. ILL 


Telephone Hyde Park 256 


^#^»\ 


We have 


1 M'0k 


the contract 


for painting 




WHITE 


M^M 


CITY 


mMKff 


and to 


1 ^"""^m 


furnish all 


>' 'HiPw 


requisite 


A'^k 


materials 


f. C. SCHMIDT, Mgr. 





e^M^ 




ly^ 



BastianBros. 

Successors to F. F. Pulver Co. 

ROCHESTER, N.Y. 

Celluloid. 
Advertising Novelties 

Pulveroia Signs 
College, Club ^ Society Pins 



Button Makers to White City 



CHICAGO OFFICE : MASONIC TEMPLE 

L. A. HALL. Western Manager 
Telephone Central 5375 



When writing to advertisers please mention The White City Magazine. 



THE WHITE CITY MAGAZINE AND SOUVENIR PROGRAM 




DR. E. Alfred Kohler 

DENTIST 

1206 E.GARFIELD BLVD. (55TH St.) S.E.COR. STATE 3T. 

Telephones: Wentwortm 371. 610, 131. 



EVERY LADY 

SHOULD VISIT BURNHAM'S 



OURS&'i'iS^'o^o^'RglSTHEBEST 

II AIR nVEIlin Ourexpertsrestore the hairtoits 
nHlll UICIRU natural colorbyasimpleprocess 

HAIR DRESSING by expert frenchmen 

Rare Shades of Hair Perfe ctly Matched 

OUR 

SPECIAL 

HAIR TONIC 



used with 
wonderful result; 
for years in our 
scientific scalp 
treatment. 
Price, sl.OO. 




Every lady can 
have beautiful, 
smooth, 
white hands. 



Foot Massage 



FACIAL MASSAGE ^m 



lEW VIBRATORY 

is not the ordi- 
nary massage as it is 
usually given, but a treatment which will build up new 
tissue, remove lines, tone up the muscles and give to 
the face a fresh, healthy, glowing appearance sug- 
gestive of vouth. 

E. BURNHAM;S Hygienic l^^^:'^^ 

SKIN FOOD fLuel Itlsas"^ 
beautifier in every sense of the word. Price, 81.00. 

LADIES' TURKISH BATHS 



E. BURNHAM 

70 AND 72 STATE STREET, CHICAGO 



PHOXE HYDE PARK 403 



GEORGE A. liEAVIS 

BUILDERS' HARDWARE 



LARGE CONTRACT W^ORK 
A SPECIALTY 




407109 E. SIXTT-THIRD ST. 
CHICAGO 



EVERYTHING IN WHITE CITY IN THE HARDWARE I.INE 

"FROM NAILS TO HAILS" FURNISHED 

BY ME 



W7i«n writing to advertiaera pleaae mtntion Thb Whitb Cut Maoazimb. 



THE WHITE CITY MAGAZINE AND SOUVENIR PROGRAM 



The South Side 

Elevated Railroad 

Company 

has a station 
at the gate of 

White City 





Wh«n loriting to advertisers please mention Thh White Citt Maqazinb. 



THE WHITE CITY MAGAZINE AND SOUVENIR PROGRAM 



The Club-Room Car 

(no extra charge) 
IS FOUND ONLY ON THE 




CHICAGO & EASTERN ILLINOIS RAILROAD 

BETWEEN 

CHICACO - ST. LOUIS 

This is but one of the many new features in our equipment 

which agreeably surprises our patrons. 

In Chicago, trains arrive and leave from the 

La Salle Street Station on the Elevated Loop 

and in St. Louis, the Union Station. 



F. J. DEICKE, 

Gen. Agt. Pass. Dept., 

900 Olive Street, St. Louis. 



A. B. SCHMIDT, 

Gen. Agt. Pass. Dept. 

91 Adams Street, Chicago. 



"THE SPARKLING" 
"SODA WATER" 

onDranght throughout 
WHITE CITY is made with 
AUTOMATIC AND 
00 NTINUOUS 
CARBONATING 
APPARATUS 
PUEOHASED PKOM 

THE BISHOP & 
BABCOCK CO. 

192-194 E. Washington St. 

Telephone Main 3590 
MAKEES OF 

Original CLEVELAND 
BEER PUMPS 
AND SUPPLIES 
"NEW PBOOESS" 
I LIQUID GAS,Etc._ 




FRESH ^.' I 
54LltOPfaNUTS' ■ 




CORNUCOPIAS TRANSPARENT 
^= FOR =^ = BAGS = 
FLOSS CANDY WAXED PAPER 

Wc furnish all WAX PAPER and BAGS to White City 

Confectioners' Paper Specialties 
Chocolate Dipping Paper 

W. J. Bradford & Company 

PAPER DEALERS 

26-28 MARKET STREET. CHICAGO 



When writing to advertisers please mention Thi White City Magazine. 



■^■■fiW^- 




'■'■Dedicated to Mei-rimetit and Mirth.'" 



The PThite Cirr Magazine 

AND SOUVENIR PROGRAM 

Vol. 1 SEPTEMBER, 1905 No. 8 




A Visit to Wkite City 

Written for The White City Magazine by T. E. F. 




RE you fond of travel ? 
Ave }'ou fond of sight- 
seeing? Are you fond 
of being amused? I am 
sure you all are. 

Well, come with me 
on one of my excursions 
which will extend over the space of a 
few hours, and you can go from our 
country into the wilds of Africa ; from 
the beginning of the world to the end 
thereof. You may converse with the 
aborigines of our land as well as with 
the elite thereof, and to do all this you 
need not suffer the pangs of seasickness 
nor the distress of long railroad travel. 
You need only come with me, even with- 
out a letter of credit or passport, to the 
White City, to this wonderful minia- 
ture World's Fair, the ruling spirit and 
king of which is a man of fertile brain, 
keen understanding and wonderful ex- 
ecutive ability, to whom Chicago cer- 
tainly owes much and who can well be 
the envy of other cities. He has erected 
a place where the poor man can, with 
little expense, regale his family and the 
four hundred lavishly entertain their 
friends. 



I said I would take you from our 
country into the wilds of Africa ; yes, you 
may even see the remnants of those noble 
fellows whose love of finery and lack of 
civilization and education led them to 
barter their lands for a few gay feathers 
and glittering beads. They are noble- 
looking fellows and picturesque indeed, 
these Indians of the Cummins Wild 
West Show ; these true Americans, fath- 
ers of our land, who still go through 
their war dances and let forth their shrill 
war-whoops. They are an uncommuni- 
cative band, but seem to revel in their 
gaudy attire. 

Then go with me to Africa. You, I 
suppose, think you may not talk with the 
inhabitants of that country, but I think 
they would well understand you even in 
your own language, for they show won- 
derful intelligence. You ask what they 
resemble, and are they black or white? 
They are neither black nor white and 
weigh about 3.000 pounds, but they ride 
bicycles, dance, enjoy our American 
sugar product and seem delighted with 
the approval of the American public ; in- 
deed, even look with favor on the frail 
hvimanity which comes to gaze on them, 



12 



THE WHITE CITY MAGAZINE AND SOUVENIR PROGRAM 



]\Iy friends, these elephants from the 
wiids of Africa are seen every afternoon 
and evening on the stage of this Fairy 
City. 

Then you will still follow me and enter 
a place where the frailest mites, who 
have just about entered this world, are, 
through the wonders of science, given a 
hold on life. I saw one little bundle of 
humanity, weighing just tw-o pounds, 
evidently serenely happy, starting on its 



After seeing these interesting sights, it 
is wise to relax a bit and be amused 
before starting on a "Trip Through 
Venice." I shall take you to the "Figure 
Eight" and the "Scenic Railway," and 
make the delightfully novel ascent and 
descent on these cars amid roars of 
laughter and cries of "Hold on to your 
hats and your girls." You will then 
climb, at least be propelled, up a steep 
incline and enter a boat. Down you 




Electrical Illumination at White City 



journey through life, which perhaps will 
lead it Over or Under the Sea, as its 
destiny may be. 

Then suddenly in the midst of these 
travels you hear the fire alarm, the roar- 
ing and hissing of flames, the tramp of 
horses' hoofs, the piercing shrieks of 
human beings, and you see some of our 
brave heroes dash through fire and 
smoke to rescue women and children 
from a blazing structure. These valiant 
creatures do their work nobly, restoring 
children to their crazed parents and hus- 
bands and wives to one another. They 
are enthusiastically and deservedly 
cheered by the awed populace. 



shoot into the water, the spray dashes 
and gives you the sensation of being on 
a large steamer in a storm. 

Then we will go to Venice, enter a 
gondola and travel around listening to 
the song of the gondolier warbling, gaz- 
ing on the balconies from which the 
sweet-faced signorita listens to the love 
strains of her inamorata, breathing' the 
sweet Italian air and living through the 
romances of the divine poets. 

Then vou enter a train and the first 
disaster of the evening occurs. You are 
just about to start for other parts when 
a band of masked men enter and, after 
telling you to hold up your hands, dis- 



THE WHITE CITY MAGAZINE AND SOUVENIR PROGRAM 



13 



possess you of all your belongings ; but 
_you will be in such a rush to continue 
with me your journey to distant climes 
in the airship that even this incident only 
adds to the pleasures and novelty of the 
trip. We proceed to the vast infinite, to 
parts unknown, where the atmosphere is 
rare. We pay a visit to the Pleiades 
and Saturn and return to Mother Earth 



better nature study could not be found 
the world over. 

After this we proceed to satisfy our 
inner man with food and nectar fit for 
the gods, and end these delightfully 
spent hours by paying a visit to the man 
who, through his untiring energy, has 
given to us an entertainment such as can 
be equaled no place and which has kept 




Night Scene at White City 



so delighted with our trip that we de- 
termine ere long to renew the same. 

By this time night has folded its man- 
tle over our planet and myriads of little 
lights glimmer from rooftops and win- 
dows. The sight that greets us is su- 
perb, and to add to the glory thereof 
sweet strains of music are wafted to us. 
We are spellbound and determine to rest 
for awhile and imbibe the full glory of 
the scene and watch the thousands of 
human beings of all classes and nation- 
alities who throng the Board Walk. A 



our City and its surroundings in the pub- 
lic mind and eye this Summer. To him 
we extend our thanks. 

Do you think you will be repaid for 
your trip ? I hear a chorus of ayes, ayes, 
ayes. T. E. F. 



White City's beautiful Electric Tower 
is almost 300 feet high and carries 25,000 
electric lights. It can be seen for 30 
miles. 

* :■: :•: 

If you wish to see all of White City 
and visit every attraction it will require 
two or three visits. 



14 



THE WHITE CITY MAGAZINE AND SOUVENIR PROGRAM 



FIRE 



SHOW 



A MARVELOUS AND THRILLING SPECTACLE 



HE greatest and most elab- 
orate attraction at White 
City is undoubtedly the Fire 
Show. This mammoth spec- 
tacle of burning buildings and 
dashing fire departments in action is one 
which will stir the pulses of even the 
most slusrsfish. This great feature is 




of the spectators will quickly recognize 
many of the names displayed on the 
sign boards in front of the various busi- 
ness places. 

The scene is one typical of any city on 
a busy day. Wagons and cabs trot 
through the streets, automobiles dash in 
and out among the teams, trolley cars 




•-rSIf?^ > 



Scene in the Fire Show 



located in the extreme southern part of 
the grounds, and the entrance is on the 
southeast comer of the oblong formed 
by the "Board Walk." This show is 
given on a scale of grandeur that is mar- 
velous. The grandstand for the audi- 
ence alone seats more than fifteen hun- 
dred persons. 

From the grandstand the audience is 
given a view of three blocks of business 
houses such as may be seen in any part 
of a metropolitan city. There are dry 
goods stores, department stores and all 
other kinds of stores in the scene. Many 



speed along regulation tracks, and hun- 
dreds of pedestrians crowd on the side- 
walks in the pursuit of their business. 
Women stop in at the stores to purchase 
goods, the men stop at cigar stands and 
purchase tobacco, and the view is one 
of life and action. Two boys get into a 
fight and spectators crowd about them 
to witness the conflict, when a patrol 
wagon dashes up and the ofifenders are 
arrested. 

Suddenly, without a moment's warn- 
ing, the cry of "Fire!" comes from the 
hotel which stands on the corner of the 



THE WHITE CITY MAGAZINE AND SOUVENIR PROGRAM 



15 



street. The scene quickly changes. The 
terrified occupants of the hotel crowd to 
the windows and scream for help. The 
crowds on the streets run to watch the 
structure burn, and are driven back by 
the police just as the engines arrive. 
Fire lines are stretched, the hose is 
coupled to the hydrants, and the life-nets 
are spread barely in time to catch the 
apparently frenzied men and women as 
they leap from the topmost stories of 
the structure. The firemen perform 



after a furious battle with the flames, the 
firemen are victorious and the blaze is 
subdued. And the audience disperses. 

That this spectacle is presented on a 
mammoth scale is readily understood 
when it is known that it requires three 
complete fire companies to produce this 
show, including an extension ladder and 
chief's wagon ; over two hundred and 
fifty people are used to give the street 
scene the proper life and bustle ; five 
cabs and two automobiles dash through 









Front of Fire Show Grand Stand 



wonderful feats of agility as they scale 
up the walls with their pompier ladders 
and slide down ropes with fainting 
women in their arms. 

After a hard battle all the occupants 
of the hotel are rescued, and then the 
work of fighting the fire is begun. The 
hose shoots strong streams of water into 
the blazing building and the long ex- 
tension ladder creeps slowly into place. 
The flames seem for a time as if they 
would defeat the brave efforts of the 
firemen to extinguish them. But finally, 



the streets, and fourteen horses are used. 
The exhibition is most lifelike and in- 
tensely realistic ; the audience frequently 
forgets that it is only a spectacle that 
they are watching, and not a real con- 
flagration, and are aroused to a high 
pitch of excitement. This show cost 
more than $200,000 to install and com- 
plete, and is one of the finest shows of 
its kind in the world, even exceeding the 
Hale's Fire Fighters, which attained so 
much popularity at St. Louis last year. 



i6 



THE WHITE CITY MAGAZINE AND SOUVENIR PROGRAM 




COLLEGE INN 

POPULAR AND ATTRACTIVE RESTAURANT 
BEST IN AMERICA 

HE finest restaurant in Amer- 
ica. How often has this 
phrase been apphed to even 
mediocre eating places ? 
Nearly every chop house or 



lunchroom makes claim to this title, until 
it has become trite and meaningless. But 
when applied to the White City College 
Inn the phrase again is filled with mean- 
ing and is the literal truth, for this re"?- 
taurant is the finest in the country, bar- 
ring none. However great the crowds 
that throng to White City during this 
Summer, every facility for catering to 



cated in the Sherman House in the 
downtown district, but it is reproduced 
on a much larger scale and is equally 
complete in its appointments. To those 
who have visited the noted eating place 
in the Sherman House it is useless to 
try to expand upon the beauty of the 
place, for they already know all about it. 
But to those who have never been so 
fortunate as to visit the former place, 
the chance to visit even a finer restau- 
rant will be granted. It occupies one of 
the most pretentious and beautiful build- 
ings on the grounds. It is architectur- 







WIS. iS aiiSiR-nsi^s? 

i|i ^{1! Ill 411 Jii 111 ji 
Hi ill ". ill 111 II ^11 % 



I 




White City College Inn 



them has been supplied. In this struc- 
ture can be found every delicacy desired 
by the rich, and also a full meal for 
those whose purses are limited. After 
walking about the grounds and indulging 
in the sports to be found there, htmger 
asserts itself and the crowds naturally 
turn to College Inn. 

The White City College Inn is a 
duplicate of the famous College Inn lo- 



ally perfect, being constructed of ce- 
ment, covering a framework of steel. It 
was especially designed for White City 
and is probably the largest building in 
the country devoted exclusively to a 
restaurant. 

The College Inn proper occupies the 
entire upper part of the structure, the 
whole front of the building consisting of 
enormous plate-glass windows, which af- 



THE WHITE CITY MAGAZINE AND SOUVENIR PROGRAM 



'7 



ford the diners an excellent opportunity 
of watching the merry throngs on the 
grounds. The location of the College 
Inn, being in the middle of the Sunken 
Gardens, gives a view from the windows 
that is not excelled anywhere at White 
City. Thousands of incandescent lights 
stud the ceilings and the walls are done 
in green and white, the effect being most 
harmonious and pleasing. 

The great dining hall is reached by 
steps at either end of the structure. In- 



town district, and the best of service is 
given. 

Adjoining the dairy lunchroom is a 
German Rathskeller, which is typical of 
the many similar places in every Ger- 
man town. Here a person may sit and 
drink his beer and be surrounded with 
many accommodations afforded visitors. 
The cement floors, the typical bar, and 
the decorations of the room, all tend to 
lend a distinctly German atmosphere to 




Interior View College Inn 



side there are balconies and alcoves 
where parties may dine in semi-privacy. 
Hundreds of skilled waiters are ready to 
obey the slightest motion of the diner, 
and a full orchestra is constantly retained 
to furnish music. In this beautiful place 
eating is robbed of its material side and 
at once becomes a psychic pleasure. In 
all this building will accommodate 2,400 
diners at a time. 

Downstairs, and fronting on the 
''Board Walk," is the dairy lunchroom. 
Here a person may obtain a meal at 
whatever price he may wish. The prices 
in this dairy lunchroom are the same as 
at any of the lunchrooms in the down- 



the place. In the White City College 
Inn a table d'hote dinner at $1.00 is 
served every day from 5 to 8 o'clock. 
In the lunchroom downstairs a 25-cent 
luncheon is served to excursionists. 



It requires about eight hours' actual 
time to witness all of the paid attrac- 
tions at White City. This period does 
not allow any time for observation, see- 
ing the circus, listening to the Band, or 
lunch. 

W kite City was built for the 
"masses," not the "classes." 



\S 



THE WHITE CITY MAGAZINE AND SOUVENIR PROGRAM 



WHITE CITY 

THE LARGEST, THE SAFEST, THE MOST BEAUTIFUL 
AMUSEMENT RESORT IN AMERICA 



ISITORS to Chicago, ar- 
riving after twilight, will 
be greeted when still 
many miles from the city 
by the brilliant scintil- 
lating rays of light ema- 
nating from the tall elec- 
tric tower which arises to an altitude of 
300 feet from the peristyle in the center 
of White City. To the residents of 
Chicas:o this marvelous electric tower 




incandescent lights, with which the 
buildings are studded. At the main gate, 
located at the corner of 63d street and 
South Park avenue, the entire structure 
is outlined and the gigantic archway is 
dotted with thousands of lights. The 
massive snow white entrance to White 
City is one of the most beautiful struc- 
tures of its kind. 

On entering the main archway the vis- 
itor will find, to the left, the executive 




Chutes Lagoon, Peristyle and Base of Tower 



will act as a constant beacon light and 
guide, suggesting the fun and jollity to 
be found within the hospitable gates of 
this beautiful amusement resort and that 
sordid surroundings in crowded locali- 
ties can be quickly exchanged for the 
beauty and limitless pleasures to be 
found at White City. 

On arriving within view of the en- 
trance the eye is dazzled by myriads of 



offices of the President and the General 
Manager, also the Department of Pub- 
licity. These offices are splendidly fur- 
nished and completely equipped. In the 
rear of the offices of the Department of 
Publicity are public telephone booths, 
telegraph offices, etc., for the accommo- 
dation of visitors. To the right of the 
main entrance are located the adminis- 
trative offices of the Secretary and Treas- 
urer and corps of busy assistants. 



20 



THE WHITE CITY MAGAZINE AND SOUVENIR PROGRAM 



Passing through the turnstiles, after 
paying the nominal admission fee of 10 
cents, the visitor becomes a guest of 
White City, with the implied promise 
that he or she shall not want for enter- 
tainment and amusement so long as the 
visit is continued. The first impression 
received is one of dazzling brilliancy, be- 
cause of the thousands of flashing iri- 
descent gleamings radiating from the 
countless incandescent lights which out- 
line all the buildings and create day out 
of night. 
As the magnificence of the scene dawns 



broad steps and find himself on the 
Plaza, which surrounds the beautifully 
designed and elaborately carved Band 
Stand. Located about the Band Stand 
are hundreds of long and commodious 
settees, which furnish a resting place for 
tired sight-seers or those who wish to 
enjoy the musical programme and the 
free outdoor circus without having their 
thoughts distracted by the passing 
throngs of laughter lovers. Musical pro- 
grammes will be rendered every after- 
noon and evening from the Band Stand 
by organizations having a world-wide 




Executive Staff College Inn 



upon the visitor, after the first burst of 
splendor, and the sounds of laughter and 
merriment come to the ear, a feeling of 
undefinable pleasure and gratification 
takes the place of startled wonder. 
There are the crowds on the half-mile 
"Board Walk," the alluring strains of 
music, the sweet and delicate fragrance 
of beautiful flowers in the Sunken Gar- 
dens and art urns, all of which combine 
to produce a sense of keen enjoyment 
and delightful anticipation which cannot 
be analyzed. 

Passing toward the Plaza, with its 
thousands of beautiful and rare flowers, 
the visitor may descend a half-dozen 



reputation. On the large open stage, 
which will be seen a short distance south 
of the Band Stand, performances will 
be regularly given by clever acrobats and 
other performers. 

With a liberality which has never been 
equaled in the history of amusements in 
this or any other country, the manage- 
ment has arranged to give the people of 
Chicago and visitors more for their 
money than has ever before been offered 
under any circumstances. Upon paying 
the admission fee of 10 cents at the main 
entrance, the visitor can spend an entire 
afternoon and evening within the walls 
of White City, be entertained with a 



THE WHITE CITY MAGAZINE AND SOUVENIR PROGRAM 



21 



first-class musical programme and a 
series of eventful performances by clever 
acrobats — finding in this way complete 
and unequaled entertainment without the 
necessity for expending another penny. 
Of course there are other and more dom- 
inating features in White City, to each 
of which a small admission fee is 
charged, but it is not required or even 
suggested of the visitor that these should 
necessarily be patronized. Of course, 
knowing the amusement loving tenden- 



toral simplicity. A gang of workmen 
drove a peaceful flock of sheep out of 
the corn field, which had flourished there 
during the season, put up the fence, and 
White City began to grow like magic. 
White City has broken more records 
than any previous enterprise of the kind. 
It covers more ground than any similar 
enterprise and contains more features. 
It has cost more, owing to the perma- 
nency of the construction and the first- 
class material which was required in 




Open Air Circus Acts 



cies of the people of Chicago, the man- 
agement constructed these features with 
the expectation that they would be lib- 
erally patronized, but this is left wholly 
to the impulse of the visitor. 

An expenditure of about $1,250,000 
was required before the gates of White 
City were thrown open to the public. 
The progress of construction has not 
only excited the admiration of builders 
all over the country, but has in itself 
established a new record. 

Eight months previous to the opening 
date the site at present covered by the 
world's greatest amusement resort pre- 
sented a scene of bucolic rest and pas- 



every instance. It has the highest tower, 
illuminated with 25,000 incandescent 
lights. It has the greatest capacity for 
utilizing electrical energy of any single 
enterprise, it being a statistical fact that 
the electrical energy required for fur- 
nishing the power and light for White 
City is greater in quantity than the total 
electrical energy required for heating, 
lighting and purposes of power in all of 
that part of Chicago lying south of 39th 
street. White City is lighted with 
125,000 incandescent lights. 

Aside from the brilliancy and beauty 
of the night illumination at White City. 
a view by day presents a delightful 



22 



THE WHITE CITY MAGAZINE AND SOUVENIR PROGRAM 



charm to the artistic eye. The buildings 
are all architecturally beautiful and the 
master hand which designed them has 
outclassed those men whose efforts made 
the World's Columbian Exposition (the 
original \\'hite City) the wonder of the 
world. 

At various points about the "Board 
Walk" are located artistic booths filled 
with curios from all parts of the globe, 
and every opportunity is furnished at 
frequent intervals to supply any craving 



attraction is housed in a separate build- 
ing, and all are amply provided with 
comfortable opera chairs. No attraction 
is permitted to be overcrowded at any 
performance, the number of admissions 
to each show being limited to the num- 
ber of seats in the auditorium. Every 
possible means for administering to the 
comfort of visitors has been furnished 
by the management, and strenuous ef- 
forts have been successfully made for 
providing entertainment and features of 




Beautiful Venice; Also the Band Stand 



for sweets or such popular products as 
popped corn, roasted peanuts, etc., etc. 
Soda fountains, with their glittering 
array of multi-colored syrups and foam- 
ing jets, are to be found at convenient 
intervals, so that the crowds, when warm 
and dusty because of the laughing and 
shouting which is always incident to a 
trip to White City, can indulge in in- 
nocent refreshment. 

Enormous electric signs present them- 
selves in an unmistakable way to tell the 
visitor what form of attraction is con- 
tained beneath their supervision. Each 



a high order. Only such attractions as 
those which combine amusement in a 
high degree, together with unimpeach- 
able character, were chosen, and any- 
thing which might possibly give offense 
to the most sensitive or supercritical 
person has been carefully eliminated. 



Have you seen the great Fire Show 
at White City? Don't miss it. 



Table d'Hote dinner in the White 
City College Inn, 5 to 8 p. in., for $1.00. 



THE WHITE CITY MAGAZINE AND SOUVENIR PROGRAM 



23 



BEAUTIFUL VENICE 

CANALS AND GONDOLAS 
FACILITATE A DELIGHTFUL VISIT 




LL the romantic beauty of 
the cool and deHghtful gon- 
dola ride through the moon- 
lit waterways of the ancient 
Italian city is greatly en- 
hanced when a spectator realizes the his- 
toric scenes and structures which are re- 
produced before him. All the gorgeous 
scenes are actually represented in per- 
spective and are identical copies, on a 
smaller scale, of the beautiful and medi- 
aeval edifices of the old Venetian citv. 



beautifully embellished with fine wood 
carvings. 

Floating gently forward to the strains 
of the music furnished by the gondoliers, 
the journey begins at the Arsenal in 
Venice. Proceeding northward through 
the canals, the spectator sees the homes 
of the gondoliers to the right, and next 
to them is the historic parish church of 
Pope Leo the Tenth, near which is the 
Eglise Sainte Marie-du-Salute. The 
Roval Palace of Venice next comes into 




Interior View of Beautiful Venice 



This feature of White City is one of 
the largest on the grounds, and is located 
in a magnificent building on the west 
side of the "White City Board Walk." 
This structure is typical of the architec- 
ture to be seen in the ancient city of 
the Doges, and is entirely white, being 



view as the gondola floats on through 
the Grand Canal toward the Ducal Pal- 
ace. Passing this, the boat sweeps by 
the old Campanile to the Hall of Justice. 
Here is shown the historic Lion's Mouth, 
into which any person might throw a 
written accusation against another. In 



24 



THE WHITE CITY MAGAZINE AND SOUVENIR PROGRAM 



the medic-eval days the Lion's Mouth was 
an institution feared by every citizen of 
\"enice, for the name of the accuser was 
kept secret. Just across the canal from 
the Lion's Mouth is the Prison, and con- 
necting the two is the world-famous 
Bridge of Sighs, over which condemned 
prisoners walked and saw the daylight 
for the last time. Still carried north- 
ward, the gondola next floats onward to 



and the poorer quarters of the city. 
To the right is the famous Rialto 
Bridge, which has been the favorite sub- 
ject for art pictures for many years. 
Coming back to the starting place, the 
gondola passes another large palace on 
the southeast. During the entire trip the 
flags seen on the many Venetian masts 
are the emblems of the various Doges. 
This trip is more than three-quarters of 




7 he Terrace, a Popular Resort for Ladies and Children 



the Courtyard of Persano Palace, next 
to which is the entrance to the prison 
and an ancient palace. In the palace 
courtyard is a well, typical of Venice. 

Rounding the police box, the gondola 
goes eastward to the Palace Guinahi, 
passing the Campanile and the Grand 
Canal on the left. On the same side is 
the Palace Pisani Moretta and a hotel. 
Across the canal to the right is noted 
Palazzo Contarini Delia Figure and the 
Palace Da Dula a Murano. This struc- 
ture is distinguished easily by the red 
column in front of it. Sweeping past 
an old well on the right and passing by 
the Campanile, the spectator next sees 
the St. Marc Church, which is also 
marked by a red column. On the right, 
next to the St. Marc Church, is the 
Campanile Tower as it appeared before 
it fell. On the left is an old wine house 



a mile in length and is one of the niubi 
interesting as well as most beautiful fea- 
tures of White Cttv. 



White City has given the people of 
Western America their first opportunity 
for indulging in wholesome, innocent 
amusements at a very small expense. 



It would seem that White City is to 
have many imitators next season. Imi- 
tation is the most sincere flattery. 



Have you listened to the "Barkers" at 
Wpiite City? It's as good as a show to 
hear them. 



\\^iiite City cost a million to build, 
but it's yours for a dime. 



THE WHITE CITY MAGAZINE AND SOUVENIR PROGRAM 



25 



SHOOTING THE CHUTES 

LATEST STYLE AND BEST EQUIPPED 
STRUCTURE IN AMERICA 



|HE Chutes is easily picked 
out from the many attrac- 
tions at White City by the 
great crowds which are con- 
stantly about it. This attrac- 
tion has been extremely popular at every 
amusement resort for many years, and 
every manager has come to bcHeve that 




a strange exhilaration and fascinating 
sensation about the dash at incredible 
speed down the swift incline and the 
darting out upon the water on the flat- 
bottomed boats, which seem every mo- 
ment as if they would dive under, which 
attracts every visitor. The Chutes at 
White City is located at the extreme 




Chutes Lagoon; Also View of Fire Show Front 



his park is not complete unless he has 
one. White City, following its policy 
of having only the best of everything, 
has a Chutes that is the best ever con- 
structed up to date. It has all the latest 
improvements and will bear comparison 
with any other Chutes in the country. 

This form of amusement is one which 
appeals directly to all classes and to all 
ages, until it has become so well known 
that the phrase "Shoot the Chutes" is 
understood by every person. There is 



south end of the "Board Walk" and is 
at the south end of the Lagoon. 

A feature of the Chutes is the escala- 
tor. This machine carries the people to 
the top of the pavilion, where they take 
the boats for the descent, saves them the 
effort of walking up the steep incline 
and greatly facilitates the quick move- 
ment of the crowds. The Escalator is 
very similar to a moving sidewalk and 
is provided with a moving handrail, so 
that a person may steady himself while 



26 



THE WHITE CITY MAGAZINE AND SOUVENIR PROGRAM 



making the ascent. This machine is the 
longest one ever constructed, being more 
than 500 feet in length, and it is en- 
tirely safe. This same form of machine 
in a less improved state has been used 
in various stores and parks for a num- 
ber of years, and there has never yet 
been any accident with one of them. 

The lagoons into which the boats dash 
with their merry crowds has been built 
especially for the Chutes. It is very 
large for the purpose for which it is 
used and contains more than 1,350,000 
gallons of water. The sides of the la- 
goon are heavily cemented and water 
rains off of them very quickly. There 



are several entrances to the "Board 
Walk" from the lagoon, so that there 
is no chance for too great crowds to 
gather about the sides of the pond. 

The Chutes at White City are the 
longest which have ever been constructed 
and are complete in every detail. The 
entire framework of the Chutes is built 
from steel and has been solidly rein- 
forced in many places. The tracks down 
which the boats slide at their swift speed 
is also made of steel, as is the roadbed 
for the cars. A large corps of guards 
are constantly about the attraction and 
every precaution is taken for the han- 
dling of visitors quickly. 



OVER AND UNDER THE SEA 



A 
AND 



TRIP TO PARIS IN AN AIRSHIP 

A VOYAGE IN A SUBMARINE BOAT 



NE of the most imposing and 
prominent structures within 
the walls of White City is 
that building which contains 
"Over and Under the Sea," 
a delightful and especially enjoyable pan- 
oramiic invention. After entering the 
brilliantly lighted entrance, with its wide 
hall beautifully decorated with statuary. 





Entrance to Over and Under the Sea 



etc., the visitor steps upon deck of an 
enormous airship, all ready for a voyage. 
The airship quivers, the wind whistles 
through the rigging and mechanical de- 
vices enable the aerial voyager to view 
the scenery incident to a trip from 
White City across the mountains and 
valleys to the Atlantic Ocean, through 
clouds and a violent hurricane at sea 
until Paris is reached. 

On arriving in Paris the party is con- 
ducted into a series of underground grot- 
toes and through the enormous sewers, 
which have been admirably reconstructed 
for public inspection. After sufficient 
time has been taken to view the various 
beauties of Paris, the guide shows the 
way to an underground dock, where a 
submarine vessel awaits them. The boat 
passes down the River Seine and out 
into the Atlantic, where curious and in- 
teresting submarine views are given. 
Fish of all kinds swim through the 
waters, wrecks are observed and the gen- 
eral topography of the ocean bed is 
plainly perceived. The submarine boat 
lands the party, after devious submarine 
wanderings through the great lakes and 
through specially constructed canals, 
back to White City. 

The trip is a remarkably interesting 
and particularly enjoyable one. 



THE WHITE CITY MAGAZINE AND SOUVENIR PROGRAM 

BALL ROOM 

FINEST DANCING FLOOR IN AMERICA 



27 




N GREAT big Chicago, with 
its endless de m a n d for 
amusements and recreation, 
there has never before been 
constructed a ball room or 
dancing floor with the capacity of the 
celebrated ball room at White City. 
The Ball Room is located in an enormous 
building, 170 feet long and 100 feet wide, 
having sufficient accommodations for 
1,000 persons on the floor. The floor 
itself is the finest ever constructed west 
of New York City, having been built of 
the finest quality hard white maple, with 
a finish which rivals the polish on a 
piano. All about the dancing floor are 
located cafe tables and chairs, each with 
its menu card containing a list of tem- 
perance drinks. No liquor is sold in the 
Ball Room. A large and roomy balcony 




Interior of Ball Room 
orchestra, which is supplemented by a 
magnificent Orchestrion. This instru- 
ment was purchased by the White City 
management in St. Louis. It was orig- 
inally constructed for exhibition in the 
French section of the Liberal Arts Build- 




^||p|i||y|ii| jy||| '"'^"' "■'"'■^-.i^ii^^-^ii^ '- 



'Hf _ 

V I ill ill ill 




III III III I 




Ball Room 



is similarly arranged, although in the 
scores of beautifully decorated boxes are 
to be found comfortable seats in which 
tired sight-seers may find rest and com- 
fort. Music is supplied by a high-class 



ing at theLouisianaPurchascExposition 
A skilled and diplomatic Master of 
Ceremonies has full charge of the Ball 
Room, and it is his duty and the duty 
of his numerous well-trained assistants 



28 



THE WHITE CITY MAGAZINE AND SOUVENIR PROGRAM 



to see that patrons are not subjected to 
any objectionable features or annoying 
occurrences. No opportunity exists for 
indiscriminate methods to be adopted by 
any of the participants in the enjoyment 
of dancing on the Ball Room floor. The 
conduct of every person present must 
be absolutely without reproach. A small 
charge is made for the privilege of dan- 
cing. 

It is the policy of the management to 
refuse admittance to persons of an ob- 
jectionable character or appearance and 
indiscreet individuals who may success- 
fully elude the vigilance of the Master 
of Ceremonies and secure admission will 
receive but scant courtesy. 

Such methods have been in vogue in 
seashore and mountain resorts for years, 
and they are meeting with universal 
favor among the people who visit White 
City. They are adopted for the purpose 
of preserving the dignity and keeping 
inviolate the personal privileges of any- 
one v;ho may patronize this form of 
amusement. 



"Crowds of people fill the streets for 
blocks in every direction from the en- 
trance to enter White City.'' — Balti- 
more, Md.. News. 

It costs just $2.90 to visit each and 
every one of the numerous paid attrac- 
tions at White City. 



Merry-Go-Round 

No resort for the amusement of the 
masses, adults and children alike, would 
be complete without a carousel, or 
Merry-Go-Round, and so the children 
and many of the grown folks gravitate 
to the new structure in the center of the 
Midway. The Merry-Go-Round, fur- 
nished with rocking horses and double 
seats, brightly painted woodwork, and a 
band orchestrion, which adds the latest 
popular music to the delightful whirling 
motion, is located squarely in front of 
the Fire Show, with the booths of the 
^Midway on three sides, and the Chutes 
Lagoon on the other. It is built near 
the ground and runs on strong wheels 
upon a circular track, making it abso- 
lutely safe, and any kind of a breakdown 
impossible. Here the children come and 
spend the afternoon and evening, with 
never a thought of leaving the cute lit- 
tle horses and the music for any of the 
other attractions which surround them. 
As they sweep around the big circle they 
catch glimpses of the variegated Midway 
booths, the Fire Show facade and the 
splash of boats dashing down the Chutes 
into the lagoon. A crowd surrounds the 
carousel every afternoon and evening 
and the conductor is kept busy collecting 
the tickets from the boys and girls, men 
and women who love the rocking motion 
of the lifelike horses. 



THE TEMPLE OF MUSIC 

A DECIDEDLY ENJOYABLE ENTERTAINMENT 




HIS is the most marvelous 
and comprehensive musical 
performance ever attempted. 
The Temple of Music is lo- 
cated on the east side of the 
"Board W^alk" and just south of the 
Electric Tower. None of the time-worn 
and hackneyed freak instruments are to 
be found in this house of symphony — 
each instrument being of a special kind, 
and many of them costing thousands of 
dollars to construct. The forces of na- 
ture are harnessed and made to dispense 
beautiful music — light, heat, steam and 
electricity being used by Professor Wil- 
lard's corps of skillful musicians. 



A visit to this home of music is al- 
most education in music, and is equal 
in scope to a trip through all the foreign 
countries where various instruments are 
supposed to have originated. Several 
nations are represented by typical musi- 
cal instruments. There are strange in- 
struments from Sweden. France, Amer- 
ica, England, Japan, China and Rou- 
mania. 

Among the many various instruments 
played by Professor Willard's musicians 
perhaps one of the queerest is the 
"Squeegee Gods of China." This instru- 
ment consists of a row of twelve life- 
size heads of Chinamen with their long 



THE WHITE CITY MAGAZINE AND SOUVENIR PROGRAM 



29 



pigtails hanging. By pulling the queues 
of the Chinamen the men are made to 
sing their weird songs and strange 
chants. The effect of seeing and hear- 



You enter the embellished corridor and 
pass out into a labyrinth of narrow pas- 
sages, where you walk, retrace your 
steps, twist and turn for blocks without 




Interior View of Temple of Music 



ing these figures perform is one of star- 
tling realism. 

The various instruments for this show 
fill an entire stage and are banked high 
up the sides. An idea of the magnitude 
of some of the instruments may be ob- 
tained from the fact that the combined 
weight of all of them is 3,720 pounds, or 
very nearly two tons. They are con- 
structed from all kinds of material — 
wood, aluminum, steel, zinc, copper and 
lead having been used in their construc- 
tion. Some are shaken, some are pulled, 
some are played by hand, and others by 
compressed air. 

Puzzle Garden 

Of all the aggravating things calcu- 
lated to worry Chicagoans, the Puzzle 
Garden at White City is the most in- 
explicable. It looks innocent and un- 
pretentious in its white home between 
the Infant Incubators and Over and 
Under the Sea, but that is vour mistake. 



getting anywhere in particular. There 
are doors which lead nowhere, and walls 
which looked like a way out at first, but 
on closer approach bear only a neatly 
painted sentence to the effect that you 
are "wrong again." Then you do the 
twist and turn all over again, and, finally 
giving up all hope of reaching the cen- 
tral parlor, wish you could get out. But 
you can't, and there you are. When 
vour predicament seems to be hopeless, 
a polite guide appears on the top of the 
wall above your head and guides you to 
an exit, from where you can climb a 
stairway and watch the confusion of 
others who are going through the same 
labyrinth. 

The Puzzle Garden is something new, 
and was not opened until White City 
was in full swing. It is the latest thing 
in Chicago, and the crowds are exploring 
it every day, resolving they will learn 
the windings until they can walk straight 
to the center. 



30 



THE WHITE CITY MAGAZINE AND SOUVENIR PROGRAM 



BUMPING THE BUMPS 

A LAUGHTER - PROVOKING AND 
HILARIOUS METHOD OF ENJOYMENT 




N A BEAUTIFUL building 
on the west side of the "Board 
Walk," the first structure 
that attracts the eye after 
passing through the turn- 
stiles at the gates, will be found the 
Bumps. Chicagoans have never yet been 
introduced to this sport, but at White 
City thev will find this new and novel 
pastime. During the Summer the com- 




"Have You Bumped the Bunipsf" 

men salutation around Chicago will be, 
"Have you Bumped the Bumps?" And 
the answer will invariably be, "You can 
bet that I have." 

The Bumps first appeared at Coney 
Island in the amusement resort called 
Dreamland, and at once attained a great 
degree of popularity. Every person was 
eager to try this new and exhilarating 
novelty — even state and municipal exec- 
utives gravely ascended to the high plat- 
form and shrieked with delight as they 
shot down the smooth incline, carroming 
from one bump to another, and finally 
bringing up against the padded cushion 
at the bottom with all the abandon of 
schoolboys. The Bumps became a veri- 
table craze before the season was over, 
and the management of White City was 



so impressed with the great degree of 
entertainment to be derived from them 
that Bumps was one of the first attrac- 
tions to be installed at White City. 
This building is larger than the one at 
Coney Island and is better supplied with 
bumps. 

It is impossible to explain what the 
Bumps are, or is, but the following brief 
description will give an excellent idea of 
this attraction as it will be found at 
White City. 

The front of the building containing 
the Bumps is open and a flight of stairs 
leads the seeker for amusement to a 
platform at the rear of the structure and 
about thirty feet from the ground. Lead- 
ing from this platform to the ground 
floor is a perfectly smooth incline, built 
of the finest of maple lumber. The de- 
scent has an angle of about thirty de- 
grees, and here and there are large 
padded cushions which cause the person 
sliding down the incline to become di- 
verted from a straight course and be 
bounced from one to another of the 
bumps until the foot of the incline is 
finally reached. There will be found 
several precautionary measures to pre- 
vent all possibility of injury or unpleas- 
ant sensation. 

In addition to the main slide there will 
be three others, one a straight and nar- 
row shoot constructed of slippery basket 
work, which gives the slider an excellent 
speed. Another gives the sensation of 
alternate falling and rising until the bot- 
tom is reached by a succession of gentle 
inclines. But the most exciting of the 
three is what a baseball pitcher would 
call an in and out curve. It consists of 
a narrow chute, with sharp and sudden 
turns occurring at the most unexpected 
places, and finally landing the bumper at 
the bottom without injury. 

The Bumps is an amusement device 
without any pretense of artistic effort or 
dignity. It is conducted for the sole use 
of those who are seeking unalloyed fun 
and hilarity. The location of the Bumps 
is readily ascertained by the shouts of 
laughter and shrieks of hilarity which 



THE WHITE CITY MAGAZINE AND SOUVENIR PROGRAM 



31 



universally characterize this form of 
amusement. 

Any person who does not desire to 
lose all dignity and indulge in a great 
amount of healthful laughter must re- 
frain from visiting the Bumps — for, once 
there, he will surely join in the great 
throngs of jostling, laughing people, and 
before he knows it he will be bumping 
the Bumps with the rest of the crowd. 

No cars or boats are required to give 
the participant in this unique and excit- 
ing pleasure a rapid ride. The minute 
the visitor seats himself on the incline 



Double Whirl 

A Novel and Amusing Pastime 

The Double Whirl combines the pleas- 
ures of a ride on a miiiiature Ferris 
Wheel and the old-fashioned carousel, 
both of which are familiar to almost 
every visitor at White City, although 
none such are to be found within its 
gates. Six miniature Ferris wheels, each 
attached to an enormous revolving shaft 
centered in a revolving drum, roll slow- 
ly round and round with their loads of 
passengers. No elaborate description 




The Ever-Popular Double Whirl 



the momentum created by the weight of 
the body causes an immediate and rapid 
descent, landing him feet foremost on 
the air-cushion at the bottom. 

A person cannot fail to find the Bumps 
if he is willing to be amused, for all he 
need do is to follow the largest crowd 
and stop where the laughter and mirth 
are most boisterous. For a stubborn 
case of indigestion or the blues, try the 
Bumps. 



can be given of the Double Whirl, but 
it would take an endless amount of writ- 
ing to describe the fun and pleasure of 
participation in its regular operation. 



Band concerts at 2:30, 4:00, 7:15 and 
9 :45 o'clock every day. 

White City is open to the public from 
1 p. m. until midnight. 



THE WHITE CITY MAGAZINE AND SOUVENIR PROGRAM 




JOHNSTOWN FLOOD 

ONE OF THE WORLD'S GREATEST 
AND MOST AWE-INSPIRING TRAGEDIES 

and all kinds of trees, houses and ani- 
mals. The roar of the coming- cataract 
has been heard by some, who flee to 
safety, but the next instant the city is 
swept away. Where 2,000 houses had 
stood there is nothing but a sea of water. 
The entire city of Johnstown has been 
wiped out. 

The story of the flood is the story of 
one of the greatest tragedies of the 
world. On Friday, May 31, 1889, in 
the State of Pennsylvania, the entire 



HAA'E seen the Johnstown 
Flood." Wherever you see 
a person at White City 
wearing a circular card with 
the preceding inscription on 
it. you see a person who is entirely 
pleased and gratified with the return of 
his small investment, and one who is 
willing to inform others that they are 
missing something educating and enter- 
taining if they fail to see this great ex- 
hibiton. 

The Johnstown Flood is the most im- 
pressive and realistic of all scenic pro- 
ductions, and is produced on a mammoth 
scale. The entire show is a triumph of 
scenic art and startling realism. On a 
large staging the entire city of Johns- 
town, Pa., is reproduced in perspective, 
with the streets and houses being exact 
patterns of the actual structures in that 
town. 

Business is being carried on in the 
city, people walk the streets, the trains 
arrive at the stations, and the entire 
scene is one of activity. After several 
davs of rainfall, the sun had shone clear 
and bright on this fatal night. The citi- 
zens of the town had celebrated Decora- 
tion Day, and the entire business section 
of the city was gayly decorated in bunt- 
ing and flags. Night falls, and now the 
mountains which rise on all sides of the 
town throw the long blue shadows over 
the valley and the lights glitter from the 
casements and windows. In strong con- 
trast to the lurid glare of the factories, 
the moon bathes the city in a mantle of 
silver. 

Suddenlv the skies cloud over, and in 
a moment a fierce storm bursts over the 
city, the thunder crashes and re-echoes 
in the mountains. Then quiet comes 
again and the stars twinkle in the heav- 
ens and the little valley is wrapt in slum- 
ber. 

The reservoir breaks and the torrent 
comes sweeping down the narrow defile, 
washing away several villages, and 
dashes on with a sullen roar toward 
Johnstown. On comes the wall of water, 
carrying with it men, women, children 




Johnstown Flood 

beautiful valley of the Conemaugh was 
devastated, 10,000 lives were wiped out 
and millions of dollars' worth of prop- 
erty was destroyed. 

Johnstown, Pa., was one of the most 
prosperous manufacturing towns in the 
state. Including its suburbs, it had a 
population of 35,000 persons, and was 
situated at the junction of the Cone- 
maugh River and Stony Creek. One of 
the largest steel works in the country, 
the Cambria Iron Company, had its plant 
there. 

About fifteen or eighteen miles north- 
east from Johnstown was the great res- 



THE WHITE CITY MAGAZINE AND SOUVENIR PROGRAM 



33 



ervoir, which was 500 feet above the 
city. The great basin held more than 
sixty miUion gallons of water, which 
was held in check by a dam 700 feet in 



Walk," and is situated just north of the 
Electric Tower. 

Mirrors are the cause of it all. By a 
most ingfenious and skillful arrangement 




Interior View, Johnstown Flood Building 



length, 90 feet thick at the base and 110 
feet high. This reservoir was the prop- 
erty of a number of wealthy gentlemen 
of Pittsburg, who formed the "South 
Fork Fishing Club." 

When the dam burst, after many days 
of heavy rains, the great wall of water 
swept down over the little city and it 
was completely annihilated. This trag- 
edy is so faithfully reproduced and is 
given on so great a scale that the audi- 
ence forgets that it is only a spectacle 
which they are watching and sits spell- 
bound, intently gazing at the unfolding 
of the story. 



Fun Factory 



Laughter-Creating Devices for Old and Young 

Abandon all dignity ye who enter 
here. No person, however sedate and 
cynical, can go into this attraction with- 
out laughing and being well pleased with 
the world in general. Go where the 
laughter is loudest and there you will 
find the Fun Factory. This attraction is 
located on the east side of the "Board 



of the various glasses many humorous 
and amusing illusions are given. There 




is the convex mirror, the concave mir- 
ror, the double mirror, and in fact every 



34 



THE WHITE CITY MAGAZINE AND SOUVENIR PROGRAM 



kind of a mirror that human ingenuity 
has devised. 

The spectator steps before one glass 
to look at himself and finds that he has 
apparentl}' flattened out until he is only 
about one foot tall and five or six feet 
broad. The enormous change in the 
appearance of a person when he stands 
before this mirror is most ludicrous. 
The next moment he steps before an- 
other glass and sees himself many feet 
tall and extremelv slender. From the 



first mirror to the last the spectator is 
convulsed with laughter. 

It has been observed that each spec- 
tator tries to put the laugh on some 
other person. He will stand way out 
from the mirrors and endeavor to be- 
guile his friends to step nearer, and 
when they do so he will laugh at their 
discomfiture, only a moment later to find 
that he, himself, has wandered too near 
one of the mirrors and that he is the 
center of the laughter of his friends, who 
are thoroughly enjoying his awkward 
position. 



OBSERVATION WHEEL 

A UNIQUE AND DELIGHTFUL METHOD 
OF SEEING WHITE CITY 




N THE plaza in front of the 
M i d w a y at the extreme 
southeast corner of the park 
is the Observation Wheel. 
For many years this device, 
in a less improved form, has enjoyed 
great popularity among all classes, and 
this year is proving no exception. The 
cause of this is due probably to the fact 
that there is no keen excitement or 
nerve testing chances about it. It is a 
form of entertainment which even the 
youngest child or the oldest person may 
enjoy without the slightest foreboding — 
hence its popularitv. 

Owing to the position given the Ob- 
servation Wheel it was necessarily lim- 
ited as to size, but there was no limit 
put upon the completeness and stability 
of the structure. This wheel is the finest 
ever constructed since the Ferris Wheel 
at the World's Fair in 1893. It is smaller 
than the Ferris Wheel because the man- 
agement realized that a great number of 
persons feared to ride in the former be- 
cause of its great and cumbersome bulk. 
It was too large and excited feelings of 
distrust in even the most brave. The 
success which has characterized other 
smaller wheels made it advisable to make 
the White City Wheel of a size which 
would be without the objectionable fea- 



tures of the Ferris Wheel, and yet would 
carry the people to a sufficient height 
so that they might view the stirring 
panorama which is always presented to 
the sight-seer at White City. 

White City^s Observation Wheel is 
the perfection of mechanical and engi- 
neering skill, the mechanism being so 
perfect and yet so simple that a child 
could easily run it. No perceptible effort 
is discernible when the wheel is started 
or stopped, because the ingenious plac- 
ing of the ball bearings absolutely pre- 
vents all jar or friction. 

There is something particularly en- 
trancing about a ride on this Observa- 
tion Wheel. The visitor is slowly and 
irresistibly carried to a height which 
permits a clear view of all the surround- 
ing houses and attractions, and in fact 
gives the spectator a complete bird's-e3^e 
view of the whole in all its pristine 
beauty. Probably the chief attraction 
of this wheel is the fact that the rider 
feels the sensation of being maintained 
in the air by invisible forces. 

Various devices have been invented 
from time to time by promoters of 
amusement parks, but none has ever yet 
been found which will take the place of 
the Observation Wheel and its peculiarly 
pleasant and indefinable sensations. 



THE WHITE CITY MAGAZINE AND SOUVENIR PROGRAM 



35 



SCENIC RAILWAY 

AN ENCHANTING RIDE 
IN SWIYT MOVING CARS 




ITH the exception of the Fire 
Show, the Scenic Railway is 
the most elaborate and pre- 
tentious attraction at White 
City. This feature of the 
park is located on the west side of the 
"Board Walk," near the Electric Tower. 
The front of the building is wide open 
and inside is a spiral railway represent- 
ing the ascent up a steep hill or moun- 



After the cars are loaded at the sta- 
tion bordering on the "Board Walk," 
they are drawn up a steep incline. Here 
they are started down a precipitous in- 
cline without any motive power. Mak- 
ing a long sweep downward, the car 
speeds at a terrific rate up a hill, then 
down another, and then dashes upward 
into the Palace of Views. 

This is a most sumptuously fitted 




Loading Station for Scenic Railway 



tain. This, however, is merely the load- 
ing station. This attraction has been in- 
stalled at a great expense and is most 
complete in every detail. This attrac- 
tion appeals strongly to those who are 
seeking excitement, combined with a 
high degree of entertainment. Every 
moment of the long and swift trip up 
hill and down dale through the castle 
of views is one of the keenest enjoy- 
ment. 



place, showing many of the most beau- 
tiful scenes in the country actually re- 
produced in detail. The car glides 
swiftly past a delightful little waterfall, 
sweeps onward around the pond, a fleet- 
ing view of a party of bathers is had 
and then the car plunges into a dark tun- 
nel. On dashing out from the darkness 
a huge and grotesque figure of a man 
brandishing a club is seen. The color- 
ing of the figure and the effect of the 



36 



THE WHITE CITY MAGAZINE AND SOUVENIR PROGRAM 



various colored electric lights thrown on 
him, give the figure a most startling ap- 
pearance. Onward dashe' tne car into 
darkness again, only to emerge a mo- 
ment later into another beautiful scene 
Thus come a succession of changes from 
darkness to light, and then the car 
sweeps out into daylight again and gen- 
tlv drifts on over an undulating track to 



City has already attained a great amount 
of popularity, and it is safe to predict 
that the Scenic Railway will draw as 
great crowds as any other attraction at 
the grounds. This feature is especially 
delightful on a warm day or night, and 
is sure to draw enormous crowds of visi- 
tors every afternoon and evening. The 
tracks are inspected several times daily, 




Night Scene in the Lagoon 



the starting place and the ride is over. 

But all this takes up a good amount 
of time, as the trackage for this attrac- 
tion covers more than three-quarters of 
a mile and is so scattered with different 
views and figures that the spectator be- 
lieves that he has traveled much farther 
than he really has. There is a keen 
sense of exhilaration as the car starts on 
its initial downward course, the occupa'nt 
grasps his seat and hangs on for dear 
life, though he is securely strapped in. 
Soon, however, this fear wears off, and 
after a second or so the visitor is laugh- 
ing and shouting and urging the car to 
a faster speed. This feature of White 



so that the Scenic Railway is kept con- 
stantly in a state of repair and precludes 
all possibility of any mishap. This is 
true of all the amusements at White 
City — the safety of the public is the 
first consideration of the management. 



The attendance at White City for the 
season is greater than the attendance at 
the Pan-American Exposition in Buf- 
falo. 



White City is the largest individual 
anuisement resort in the world. 



THE WHITE CITY MAGAZINE AND SOUVENIR PROGRAM 



}7 



Toboggan 



A Laughter-Provoking Method of Enjoyment 

One of the most popular and best pat- 
ronized attractions at White City is 
the Toboggan. It is impossible to give 
a detailed description which would be 
of interest of this unique and hilarious 
method of enjoyment, because there is 
no elaborate apparatus, no grand scenic 
effects, and no regulated program, but 
there is always music during the op- 
eration of this feature ; the music of 



.i»«SA>tStttijH%^ 








Structure of Toboggan 

happy laughter and joyous voices tune- 
ful with accents of merriment. 

The participant in this sport takes a 
seat in a comfortable cushioned vehicle 
and sturdy attendants roll it down the 
track to a point where it Is seized by a 
wire rope and is elevated up a steep 
incline, where the rapid and mirth-pro- 
voking journey begins. Upon reaching 
the top the cars seem imbued with life 
and dart down a gentle declivity as 
though fitted with powerful wings. 

Darting around unexpected curves, up 
slopes and down into valleys, the car is 
whirled at a rapid rate of speed upon a 
journey lasting almost two minutes. It 
finally returns to the original point of 
departure, where the merry passengers 
disembark and make way for others, 
who eagerly fill their places. 

All afternoon and evening crowds 
happily make their way to the Tobog- 
gan, and it is universally voted to be 
one of the jolliest forms of entertain- 
ment at White City. 



Music at White City 

CONCERTS EVERY AFTERNOON AND 

EVENING BY THE WORLD'S MOST 

POPULAR ORGANIZATIONS 

With the liberality which has character- 
ized all of the dealings of the manage- 
ment of White City with the public, no 
expense has been spared to secure the 
leading musical organizations of the 
world for concert work in the beautiful 
Band Stand, located in the center of the 
Plaza at White City. 

Organizations which have never be- 
fore played open-air concerts, and which 
have always charged an admission fee 
of not less than 25 cents (generally 
double that amount), have been engaged 
at enormous salaries to appear at White 
City and give FREE concerts to the 
visitors. 

As a result the thousands of seats 
along the Board Walk, in the Plaza and 
Sunken Gardens have been filled every 
pleasant afternoon and evening by the 
music-lovers of Chicago and vicinity. 
These open-air concerts have been the 
talk of the city and have been eagerly 
patronized. 

Sorrentino and his famous Banda 
Rossa, Ulrich and his celebrated Concert 
Band, assembled from the members of 
the Theodore Thomas Orchestra ; Carl 
Bunge and his popular Metropolitan 
Band — each have appeared at White 
City for extended engagements, to the 
great delight of the people. Other bands, 
announcements of whose engagements 
will be made at a later date, will keep 
up the standard of excellence so admir- 
ably established. 

The Royal Hussar Band of Hungary 
has come all the way from Europe for 
an engagement of two weeks at White 
City, beginning Monday, September 4, 
and the brilliancy and dash of their ex- 
ecution of the most difficult pieces serves 
to make their concerts very popular. 

To be given the opportunity of visit- 
ing beautiful Whtte City^ with its 
myriads of attractions, witness an out- 
door circus and listen to an extended 
concert by a celebrated musical organi- 
zation, all for the sum of 10 cents, is 
an event in the lives of Chicagoans, and 
they have hastened to take advantage of 
it in a liberal manner. 



38 



THE WHITE CITY MAGAZINE AND SOUVENIR PROGRAM 



MECHANICAL EXPOSITION 

AUTOMATIC NOVELTIES WHICH ENTERTAIN 



NTO the Lion's Mouth and 
Out of It. The yawning 
mouth of a gigantic cast of 
a mammoth African Lion 
marks the entrance to this 
most interesting exhibit, which is located 
under the ballroom and which has its 
entrance on the east side of the "Board 




are so true to life that any person is 
liable to be taken in. Nearly every per- 
son believes for a moment at least that 
some of the figures must be alive, so 
realistically and intelligently do they per- 
form their various evolutions. 

One of the first views which meets the 
spectator is the reproduction of nurses 




Mechanical Exposition 



Walk." Hemer's Mechanical Exposi- 
tion, as this unique show is named, con- 
tains a most remarkable collection of 
lifelike figures reproduced in wax, and 
so supplied with intricate and cleverly 
contrived mechanisms that they appear 
to have all the characteristics and abili- 
ties of living human beings. This ex- 
hibition of ingenuity is absolutely new to 
Chicagoans, and is the most comprehen- 
sive exhibit of the kind ever attempted. 
The spectator descends a dark pas- 
sage and steps out into a broad room, 
which is only semi-lighted. Here the 
various wax figures are constantly going 
through their performances and even 
walking about. The person who does 
not endeavor to try to talk to one of 
these lifelike figures before he gets 
through is an exception, for the models 



attending wounded soldiers. A nurse 
kneels by a wounded man, carefully 
bathing his wounds, while the man 
struggles on the ground in anguish. In 
another part of the field the captain of 
the soldiers, waving his sword aloft, 
beckons his men onward. 

Then follow scores of other exhibits. 



"White City is exactly that which it 
brands itself — the whitest, finest example 
of cleanliness possible to imagine so near 
a smoke belt. No rain-dabbed grass, no 
dripping trees, no dusty measure of 
landscape interferes with White City in 
its whiteness." — Chicago Daily Nezvs. 
* * * 

Beautiful Venice possesses a charm 
which appeals to the artistic mind. 



THE WHITE CITY MAGAZINE AND SOUVENIR PROGRAM 



39 



DOG, PONY & MONKEY CIRCUS 

CLEVER EXHIBITION BY DOMESTIC ANIMALS 




HIS is the attraction for tlie 
children. Since the opening 
of White City thousands of 
Httle ones have attended Pro- 
fessor F. Blake's Dog, Pony 
and Monkey Circus to see the wonderful 
exhibitions of the power of human be- 
ings over animals and to witness their 
entertaining and amusing acts. There 
are over fifty animals in this show and 
each one is the best that can be procured 
by money or energy. The show occupies 
an entire building just south of the Elec- 
tric Tower on the east side of the "Board 
Walk." 

The great power Professor Blake pos- 
sesses over the animals in his show has 
been attributed to hypnotism and like 
occult sciences, but it is nothing more 
unusual than kindness. He rules his 
animals by love and gentleness, never 
speaking a harsh word to any of them. 
The performance given by these dumb 
creatures is a crucial test of their pow- 
ers of understanding and goes far to 
establish what an eminent American 
scientist has sought through the wilds 
of all countries and the jungles to prove 
— that the lower order of animals really 
communicate with each other through 
an almost human faculty. This troupe 
of trained animals includes, among other 
features, a family of chimpanzees anrl 
orang-outangs, who stand as high as a 
man. "Tiny Mite," the smallest horse 
in the world, is also included among the 
interesting features of the show. A 
glance at the programme will convince 
anyone that the exhibition will prove en- 
tertaining : 

1. Pony Drill; playing soldiers and 
executing National Guard tactics. 

2. Trick Pony, with Happy Hooligan 
as Dr. Jones. 

3. The Rope-Walking Dogs ; a tri- 
umph in animal training. 

4. Rocking Pony (the Hobby Horse) ; 
a difficult feat well executed. 

5. Waltzing Ponies. 

6. Rope Jumping; an extremely dif- 
ficult accomplishment for dumb animals. 

7. Serpentine Dancing Dogs. 



8. Boxing Dogs (Fitzsimmons and 
Corbett), with Happy Hooligan as a 
policeman. 

9. Riding Dogs and Monkeys. 

10. Gloomy Gus, the wonderful wire- 
walking monkey. 

11. Wire-Balancing Dogs. 

12. Happy Hooligan. 

13. Perch and Globe, juggling mon- 
keys. 

14. Roller-Skating Baboons. 

15. Trick Pony. 

16. Monkey on crutches. 

17. High Wire Bicycle Act. 

18. Wrestling Pony. 

19. Monkey Supper Scene. 

20. Bucking Dogs. 

21. Bar Monkevs. 

22. Have You Seen Maud? 

23. High Diving Dog. 

24. Bag Punching. 

25. High Leaping Dogs. 
Altogether this exhibition is the best 

that can possibly be procured, as each 
animal has been carefully selected and 
is the best of its kind in the act chosen 
for it. The spectator is repaid many 
times in enjoyment for the very nominal 
admission fee. 




40 



THE WHITE CITY MAGAZINE AND SOUVENIR PROGRAM 



INFANT INCUBATORS 

SCIENTIFIC AND HUMANITARIAN METHODS 
AT WORK TOGETHER 



HIS attraction is a great deal 
more than an exhibit — it is 
an educator. The Incubators 
are located in a beautiful 
structure at the southeast 
corner of the "Board Walk." This build- 
ing is the only one on the grounds which 
has anv color in it, being- a dark red with 




the sweet sleep of infancy they create a 
fascinating picture. The boy infants 
have blue sashes and the girls have pink. 
To avoid confusion as to their identity 
each child wears a medal on which is 
stamped its initials and the date of its 
arrival, and such other information as 
bears on the treatment of the case. They 




Infant Incubator Building 



white trimmings. It is built after the 
old colonial style and is most pretentious 
in its appointments. 

It is safe to say that as large a per- 
centage of interested visitors pass into 
this attraction as any other on the 
grounds. The tiny infants only a few 
days old, and born into the world from 
one to three months ahead of the natural 
time, are put into the glass ovens, which 
are kept at an even temperature, and 
supplied constantly with sterilized air by 
means of an automatic arrangement. 
The little ones seem thoroughly to enjoy 
their homes in the glass houses, and in 



are taken and fed at regular intervals, 
bathed and dressed with the greatest 
care, so that eighty-five per cent of the 
infants are saved for useful lives. There 
is a gain of nearly seventy per cent over 
the old methods, and an inestimable gain 
for the parents, who perhaps love them 
more dearly for their misfortunes. 

The Infant Incubator system had its 
origin in Germany, the home of many of 
the most advanced methods of modern 
medicine and surgery, and is conducted 
there under government auspices. It 
has proved a great success, and like re- 
sults are being obtained in this country. 



THE WHITE CITY MAGAZINE AND SOUVENIR PROGRAM 



41 



where physicians welcome it as an in- 
valuable adjunct to their own skill. 
Thousands of precious lives have already 
been saved and it is only a question of 
time when the system will be universally 
adopted. Institutions similar to these 
will soon be set up in all the large Amer- 
ican cities. 

The nurses who have charge of the 
infants as they graduate from the ovens 
of the incubators certainly have their 
hands full, as, with their wee charges 
on their hands, they have to soothe them 
to rest and place them in the dainty 
cribs. 

The first attempt to substitute scien- 
tific treatment for the primitive methods 
that had for hundreds of years been used 
to save babies born prematurely was 



made by Dr. Crede, of the University 
of Leipzig. He constructed a box with 
double metallic sides and filled the space 
within with water, so as to regulate the 
temperature. This was sixty years ago, 
and it was not until eight years ago that 
the first institution was opened in Ber- 
lin, which won favor from the start be- 
cause of the great success it made in 
saving the lives of the little ones. 

After a visit to this institution one 
feels amply repaid for having seen the 
quaint, delightful little fellows whose ap- 
peal to the sympathies is always stronger 
because of their utter helplessness. 
Every visitor to the incubator cannot fail 
to come away praising the great system 
that can accomplish such great wonders, 
where for centuries the precious lives 
were permitted to flicker out. 



AUTOMATIC VAUDEVILLE 

CONTAINING 1,100 ATTRACTIONS 



HE Mechanical Theater — here 
the spectator may obtain a 
full evening's entertainment 
for a few pennies. There 
are more than eleven hun- 
dred devices for the entertainment of 
young and old housed in this most beau- 







Automatic Vaudeville 

tiful structure, which is located on the 
east side of the grounds on the "Board 
Walk," just south of the White City 
College Inn. For a few pennies the 



visitor can see some of the world's best 
scenes as viewed from a swiftly moving 
train, or see hundreds of humorous 
stories told by moving pictures. Several 
hours can easily be spent in this attrac- 
tion, and then the spectator will not have 
exhausted the many forms of amuse- 
ment to be seen there. 

One of the strongest features of the 
Automatic Vaudeville is the fact that it 
is educational in a great degree. Every 
person has read of the famous Flatiron 
building in New York and the various 
historic places in Europe, but very few 
have been fortunate enough to have seen 
them. In the Automatic Vaudeville they 
can be seen, and for one cent the sight- 
seer can almost literally take a trip to 
New York and view the well-known 
places there, see the great crowds mov- 
ing about and the hustle and bustle. 

Also, for the infinitesimal sum of one 
cent, they may hear popular music from 
the latest comic opera or musical com- 
edy. The songs which every one is 
whistling on the streets can be learned 
at no cost. Moreover, these songs and 
ballads, as reproduced, are sung by the 
best artists. Imagine being able to hear 
Patti or Melba for one cent. The ma- 
chines used in the Automatic Vaudeville 
are the best that have yet been invented 



42 



THE WHITE CITY MAGAZINE AND SOUVENIR PROGRAM 



and nothing of the true vahie of the 
music is lost through the transmission. 

Again the visitor may have some fa- 
vorite recitation which he would like to 
hear again. He can find it at the Auto- 
matic A'^audeville. Operas, musical com- 
edies, speeches by well-known orators, 



but he can find a cure for them. It is 
a well known fact that electricity is a 
cure for many weaknesses, and in the 
Automatic Vaudeville he will find many 
devices for receiving electric and mag- 
netic treatments whicli are of great ben- 
efit. 




Interior View of the Automatic Vaudeville 



recitations, and in fact every variety of 
entertainment is included within the 
scope of this attraction. 

Would you know if your lungs are 
weak? You can find out in the Auto- 
matic Vaudeville. There are scores of 
machines which are carefully and mi- 
nutely tabulated to show the exact con- 
dition of the visitor. The use of this 
machine will be as comprehensive and 
complete as an examination by an ex- 
pert physician. In exchange for other 
pennies the spectator can test his lift- 
ing capacity, his hitting ability and the 
strength of his grip. Not only may he 
find out his strength and his weakness. 



There is no limit to the fun and en- 
tertainment which any person may ob- 
tain from this attraction. That it is 
pleasing and interesting is well evi- 
denced by the great crowds which have 
swarmed into it since the opening of 
White City. A great deal of its popu- 
larity has been due to the great scope 
of the amusements provided for visitors. 
There is hardly a form of amusement 
which cannot be obtained for one cent. 
The machines are of the latest patterns 
and contain all of the recent improve- 
ments; 

The Automatic Vaudeville continues 
to draw great throngs of visitors, and 
its popularity is increasing each day. 



THE WHITE CITV MAGAZINE AND SOUVENIR PROGRAM 



43 



J 1 M 



KEY 



THE MARVELOUS EDUCATED HORSE 




N THE west side of the 
grounds is the Jim Key build- 
ing. It is located next to 
the Flying Airships, and the 
front of the structure is dec- 
orated with a mammoth horseshoe 
studded with electric lights. This place 
was designed especially for Jim Key, and 
is so constructed that every person who 



visits the show has an excellent view of 
the famous animal. 

In speaking of his horse, Mr. Rogers, 
the owner of Jim Key, said : "It is only 
a 'one horse show,' but amid all the at- 
tractions at the Pike in the St. Louis 
Exposition last year, this marvelous edu- 
cated horse made the most money." 

Many of the managers of the great 



\ 




r^^Um _S 




Home of Beautiful Jim Key 



44 



THE WHITE CITY MAGAZINE AND SOUVENIR PROGRAM 



amusement parks in the East tried to 
get Jim Key as their drawing card for 
this season, but ]\Ir. Rogers reahzed that 
White City was the ideal location for 
this wonderful horse, and as a result the 
noted animal will be seen in Chicago all 
during the Summer. Jim Key has made 
an enviable record wherever he has been 
exhibited, and he will undoubtedly con- 
tinue to be a great attraction. 

In all the history of the training of 
animals there have been only two horses 
who might truly be said to have been 
educated. These two animals are Hans, 
the famous German horse, and the 
world-famed Jim Key, the Arabian edu- 
cated horse. Though seemingly impos- 
sible, this equine king can actually read, 
write, spell, think, count, figure, change 
money, and use a national cash register. 
Jim can also give many Bible quotations, 
of which he knows a great number. 

It is especially interesting to note that 
the entire training of Jim Key was ac- 
complished by kindness. Dr. William 
Key, the former owner of Jim Key, has 
had entire charge of the animal since it 
was a colt. Dr. Key is a typical Uncle 
Tom of the Southland, and the wonders 
he has accomplished with this animal has 
been a revelation to other trainers, who 
could never hope to approach this per- 
fection. Jim Key is not a trick horse in 
any sense of the word. Too frequently, 
for example, trainers ask the horse a 
question in figures and then give him 
some apparent signal when the number 
is correct. With Jim it is different. 
When Jim is asked to figure, he goes to 
a board and selects the proper number 
to represent the result, entirely without 
aid of any kind. 

Jim Key is also a member of many 
societies. He is the equine honorary 
member of the American Humane Asso- 
ciation, which numbers over three mil- 
lion children. He has over six hundred 
thousand signed members of the Jim 
Key Band of Mercy, who have pledged 
themselves to the statement, "I promise 
always to be kind to animals." All of 
Jim Key's performances are given under 
the auspices of the American Humane 
Society of Boston. 

Jim Key gives performances continu- 
ally during the day and evening, and 



each show lasts through half an hour. 
The audience asks the horse all the ques- 
tions, to which he is always ready with 
an intelligent answer. 



Electric Theatre 

A Delightful and Amusing Program Furnished 

Although located in a rather unpre- 
tentious structure adjoining the Scenic 
Railway Loading Station on the South, 
there is no form of entertainment at 
White City which will appeal more to 
the pleasure-loving propensities of the 
people than the programs given in the 




Electric Theater 

Electric Theater. There are no actors 
or actresses in this theater, but the 
scenes presented show at times scores 
and even hundreds in action. 

The Electric Theater reproduces the 
actions and movements of living persons 
in a most realistic way and presents 
scenes which it would be impossible to 
portray in any other manner than with 
the aid of rapidly moving films contain- 
ing actual photographs. The manage- 
ment of the Electric Theater sent a spe- 
cial commission to the scene of the war 
between Russia and Japan for the pur- 
pose of taking moving pictures of the 
historical events occurring there. 



THE WHITE CITY MAGAZINE AND SOUVENIR PROGRAM 



45 



FLYING AIRSHIPS 

AN UP-TO-DATE METHOD OF AERIAL NAVIGATION 




IIRECTLY across the Sunken 
Gardens from the entrance, 
being the first structure 
which a spectator sees as he 
enters the grounds — is the 
Flying Airships. This is the ideal place 
for the seeker for a new sensation. Here 
a person may enjoy all the novelty and 
exhilaration of a real airship ride with- 



hundred feet in height. Across the top 
of the pyramid there are several steel 
beams, from which the airships hang 
pendant by strong steel cables. Each 
car seats over a dozen persons, and there 
are about eight cars — thus many per- 
sons can take the ride at the same time. 
When all the occupants of the airships 
are seated, the cars begin to revolve 




Flying Airships 



out undergoing any of the dangers com- 
monly associated with that form of 
sport. The attraction was installed in 
White City after a long and careful 
study. It represents Sir Hiram Maxim's 
idea of safe and sane aerial navigation, 
and has been completed after a great 
amount of labor. 

A giant framework of steel composes 
the base, around which the airships glide 
at a high rate of speed. This frame is 
similar to a pyramid in shape and is a 



slowly around the steel frame. The mo- 
tion becomes faster and faster, and as 
the speed increases the cars mount 
higher and higher into the air. After 
revolving a few moments the cars at- 
tain a great speed and rise to a height 
of about thirty feet. The occupants of 
the cars are securely tied in, so as to 
prevent all possibility of accidents, and 
they shout with delight as they experi- 
ence for the first time the novelty of 
aerial navigation. 



46 



THE WHITE CITY MAGAZINE AND SOUVENIR PROGRAM 



Miniature Railway 

This month it is possible for White 
City patrons to take a flying trip along 
the beautiful route of the famous Lacka- 
wanna Railroad, viewing the scenery 
which has made the railway famous all 
over the country — all for five cents. Al- 
though ever}thing, from the gauge of 
the track to the Pennsylvania mountains, 
is in miniature, the illusion is complete, 
and the choicest scenery along the Dela- 



lagoon, the boats splashing into the water 
at the left, and the high balustrade of 
the Board Walk on the right. Suddenly 
the train plunges into a short tunnel, to 
emerge upon a rural scene, with grassy 
banks, miniature fences, signal towers 
and water tanks. Then another short 
tunnel, and a perfect copy of the fa- 
mous Delaware Water Gap opens on the 
view. The train sweeps around the bank 
of a river, with a real waterfall cascading 
down the side of a mountain. The moun- 




ware River has been selected and re- 
produced for the benefit of the patrons 
of the miniature Lackawanna Railroad. 
Passengers purchase their tickets and 
board the upholstered miniature cars at 
the northwest corner of the Chutes La- 
goon. There are five cars in the train, 
drawn by a perfect model locomotive less 
than four feet long and weighing about 
450 pounds. It was constructed by the 
International Miniature Railway Com- 
pany of Chicago, and is a perfect copy 
of a modern railway locomotive. 

With a shrill toot of the tiny whistle 
the train moves ofif down the side of the 



tains, faithfully reproduced in natural 
colors, rise high on every side, and are 
reflected in the mirror-like bosom of the 
river. The train then dashes into an- 
other short tunnel, beyond which is a 
representation of the Hudson River, with 
the skyscrapers and public buildings of 
New York City on the other bank. There 
is time for a short glimpse of the model 
ferries and steamboats in the river, and 
then all is left behind as the train passes 
into a long, winding tunnel. At the 
other end is the Chutes Lagoon again, 
around which the train passes to the sta- 
tion from where it started. The ride is 



THE WHITE CITY MAGAZINE AND SOUVENIR PROGRAM 



47 



a succession of changes, and is one of 
the most pleasing attractions at White 
City. 

The reproduction of the Delaware 
Water Gap at White City gives some 
idea of the impressiveness of that scene, 
but no picture can possibly do justice to 
this masterpiece of nature. A feature 
which the Lackawanna Railroad empha- 
sizes with equal force with these scenic 
attractions is that of absolute cleanliness 
and freedom from smoke, which is as- 



WhiteCity AutomobileGarage 

Just across the street from the en- 
trance to White City, on the northwest 
corner of Sixty-third street and South 
Park avenue, is the White City Auto- 
mobile Garage. Here a party may check 
a machine with the same facility with 
which he would ordinarily check an um- 
brella, and he may feel absolutely certain 
that his car will be given the best of care 
while there. A skillful and well-trained 
repair man is constantly maintained at 




sured by the use of anthracite coal ex- 
clusively; hence the term, the Road of 
Anthracite. What a pleasure it is to take 
a trip hundreds of miles without the 
slightest danger of getting a cinder in 
your eye or of soiling your linen with 
black refuse belched forth from the orig- 
inal engine. It may be said that the 
Lackawanna Railroad is unique in its 
exclusive use of anthracite coal. These 
features, together with the beautitul, 
commodious and artistic equipment of 
its through trains and the superiority of 
its dining car service, are combining to 
make the Lackawanna pre-eminently the 
choice of careful travelers between Chi- 
cago and New York. 



the Garage to care for all machines left 
there. There is also a huge tank, hold- 
ing over six hundred gallons of gasoline, 
at which the visiting machines may be 
replenished. 

When a machine drives up to the 
gates at White City there is a uni- 
formed attendant to assist the occupants 
to alight and direct the chauffeur to the 
Garage. In this way a party may come 
to White City in an automobile with as 
little trouble and responsibility as a pe- 
destrian. 

The capacity of this Garage is three 
hundred machines. Its great popularity 
is attested by the fact that on the two 
days following the opening of White 



THE WHITE CITY MAGAZINE AND SOUVENIR PROGRAM 



City the Garage accommodated more 
than two hundred machines daily. In 
addition to the large number of automo- 
biles cared for, many horses and car- 
riages are provided with suitable quar- 
ters while their owners enjoy the hospi- 
tality of White City. 



White City's Hospital 

BEST EQUIPPED AND MOST COMPLETE 
EMERGENCY HOSPITAL IN CHICAGO 

No feature of a place where the peo- 
ple congregate could be more useful than 
a well-equipped and properly conducted 
Emergency Hospital, and no amusement 
resort in the United States, or the world, 
in fact, is better equipped in this respect 
than White City. The care and fore- 
thought that has been exercised through- 



of a doctor prevents what might have 
been a serious injury or illness. Some- 
times a doctor even is not necessary, but 
the presence of medicines, restoratives 
and bandages, with someone who knows 
how to apply them, will save a life. It 
was with this in mind that the Emer- 
gency Hospital at White City was es- 
tablished and fitted with everything that 
the most modern medical and surgical 
research can suggest. 

It is located at the eastern end of the 
Peristyle, just off the Board Walk, ad- 
joining one of the exits upon South Park 
avenue. Like all the structures at White 
City, the building is white, and the in- 
side fittings are such as to produce a 
maximum amount of light and air. There 
are sanitary cots, screens, invalid chairs, 
a case of the most improved surgical in- 




niiiiiiilid 




'^~"'??« » ^iS 1 1 



jfifiiiri&iii^lfiJtt^'ii 






Eiuergency Hospital at White City 



out the construction of the grounds, from 
the selection of the site to the installa- 
tion of the lighting system, has found 
its highest expression in the establish- 
ment and fitting out of the Emergency 
Hospital, which is provided for the aid 
and convenience of the thousands of vis- 
itors to White City. 

Among such crowds as flock into this 
brilliant resort there are ofttimes calls for 
the prompt services of a competent physi- 
cian, a bandage or two, or some restora- 
tive. A woman or child is overcome by 
the heat, a fainting spell or a sudden 
illness, and then the prompt intervention 



struments, and everything which can be 
found in the most elaborate and up-to- 
date hospital in the country, only on a 
smaller scale. The fittings were fur- 
nished by Truax, Greene & Co. of Chi- 
cago, who superintended the furnishing 
of the hospital throughout and have 
pronounced it complete. 

.' n ambulance is kept in readiness to 
answer any call day or night, greatly 
aiding the efficiency of the establishment 
and rendering invaluable service to the 
special police which constantly patrol the 
grounds, ready to ofifer aid in case of 
sudden indisposition. 



THE WHITE CITY MAGAZINE AND SOUVENIR PROGRAM 



49 



CUMMINS' INDIAN CONGRESS 

A THRILLING AND EXCITING WILD WEST SHOW 
WITH RECKLESS PARTICIPANTS 



1 


1 



HE first attraction which the 
visitor sees after he enters 
the grounds is Colonel Cum- 
mins' Indian Congress. This 
feature is located at the ex- 
treme north end of the park ; the en- 
trance is to the right of the "Board 
Walk," and is within a hundred feet of 
the gates of White City. The entrance 
to the attraction is shaped like a huge 
wigwam, covered with all manner of 



pees smoking ; the women busying them- 
selves about their work, and the little 
redskins pla3'ing among the wigwams. 
These Indians live here exactly as they 
do on their native prairie, cooking their 
own food and living close to nature. The 
spectator then passes the arena and goes 
on to the end of the grounds, where the 
grandstand is located. 

The story of the death of General Cus- 
ter and the death and annihilation of 




Location of Cummins' Indian Congress 



hieroglyphics and Indian symbols, illus- 
trating the manner in which the redskins 
used to keep records of their victories in 
war. In the upper part of this tepee 
there is the famous cowboy band, which 
will furnish the music for the produc- 
tion. 

As the spectator enters the enclosure 
he first sees an Indian encampment — the 
braves sitting lazily in front of their te- 



his little band, which is reproduced in 
three tableaux by Colonel Cummins 
and his forces, is one which stirs the 
hearts of Americans every time it is 
told. June 26, 1876, will long be re- 
membered as the day in history that 
marked the slaughter of the bravest men 
who ever represented the United States 
— a day that saw the last victory of In- 
dians over white men. 



50 THE WHITE CITY MAGAZINE AND SOUVENIR PROGRAM 

THEATRE DU PARIS 

A CHARMING COLLECTION OF CLEVER 



I LL U S 
I HIS unique attraction is sit- 
uated in a large building just 
north of the colonnade and 
on the east side of the White 
City "Board Walk," and is 
one of the most cleverly conceived en- 
tertainments in the park. While the 
title of this feature may make a grew- 
some impression on some persons, to 




IONS 

over two months at White City during 
its construction personally supervising 
the work of installing the show, for he 
could not trust the delicate and wonder- 
ful mechanism to common workmen. 
On a large and roomy stage in his own 
special building, Professor Burch has 
arranged his carefully guarded secrets 
and will exhibit them several times dailv. 




j7iterior I'le-d.' of I'heatre du Paris 

the majority it will furnish an unlimited 
field for speculation. 

The show is an illusion, or rather 
a series of illusions, and the most beau- 
tiful and dramatic effects are produced 
by those clever arts and resourceful 
methods adopted by skilled illusionists. 
The audience sits spellbound, seeking in 
vain to gain even the slightest percep- 
tion of how the wonderful effects are 
produced. 

Professor Burch, who has devoted al- 
most a quarter of a century to the cre- 
ating of unusual devices for the mysti- 
fying of scientists and arousing the won- 
der of countless thousands, has the man- 
agement of this attraction. He spent 



Ordinary illusions, such as have been 
exhibited in Chicago in years past, must 
not be confounded with the exhibitions 
which will be produced at White City. 
Professor Burch has participated in the 
entertainment of hundreds of thousands 
of people at the five great expositions 
which have been given within the past 
dozen years, and he will present 
the very best and most popular 
illusions which have been introduced 
during that time. In addition to the 
great effects which he has selected from 
his previous efforts, he has invented sev- 
eral wholly new devices, which are being 
shown at White City for the first time 
ever presented to the public. 



nl 







52 



THE WHITE CITY MAGAZINE AND SOUVENIR PROGRAM 



Special Features of White City 

Unrivaled Attractio7is for Chicago's $1^000^000 
Amusement Enterf>rise 



Electric Tower. Almost 300 feet high, 
illuminated by 20,000 incandescent 
lights. 

Fire Show. A thrilling spectacle ex- 
hibiting three complete Fire Com- 
panies in action while a five-story 
hotel burns; requires 250 people, 2 
trolley cars, 2 automobiles, 5 cabs, 6 
wagons, ambulance, patrol wagon, 14 
horses, etc. Greatest and most vivid 
outdoor spectacle ever produced. 

Venice. A romantic gondola ride 
through the moonlit water streets of 
\'enice; viewing correct reproduc- 
tions of her famous buildings and 
statuary groups. 

Scenic Railway. A three-quarter mile 
I ide up hill and down dale, through 
forest and glade, viewing the world's 
most marvelous scenery, actually re- 
produced in per.spective. 

Infant Incubators. An exhibit of the 
greatest practical value to physicians 
and of the deepest interest to par- 
ents; showing scientific methods of 
saving the lives of tiny babes. 

White City CoUegfe Inn. Finest restau- 
rant in America, located in an enor- 
mous and architecturally beautiful 
building; a duplicate of Chicago's 
famous College Inn; also a popular 
priced temperance restaurant and a 
German restaurant. Will accommo- 
date 2,400 people. 

Music Open air concerts day and eve- 
ning by the foremost bands and 
orchestras of America and Europe. 

Flying Airships. A revelation in bird- 
like tran s portat ion. SirHiram 
Maxim's idea of safe and sane aerial 
navigation. 

Ball Room. Finest dancing floor in 
Chicago and capable of accommo- 
dating 1,000 dancers at a time. 

Bumps. A harmless and hilarious 
method of enjoyment. "Have you 
bumped the bumps? " 



Theatre du Paris. Beautiful, mystifying 
illusions, possessing in the highest de 
gree the power of interesting and en- 
tertaining. Conducted by Prof. Burch, 
the celebrated London illusionist. 

Shoot-the-Chutes. Duplex and longest 
in America. Has 500 foot escalator 
to carry people to the pavilion. All 
the newest improvements. 

Johnstown Flood. Most impressive and 
realistic of all scenic productions and 
constructed on a gigantic scale. A 
triumph of scenic art and startling 
realism. 

Automatic Vaudeville. Containing all 
the latest mechanical novelties and 
furnishing entertainment for old and 
young. 

Midway. A conglomeration of laughter 
inspiring features and clean amuse- 
ments. 

Fun Factory. A merrymaking estab- 
lishment with laugh creating devices 
on a large scale. 

Electric Theatre. Electric pictorial 
reproductions of startling and thrill- 
ing events showing the animation and 
action of living objects. 

Observation Wheel. Fun for every- 
body. A ride you will not forget. 

Circus Rings. Continuous performances 
including equestrian acts, aerial 
flights and feats of strength and skill. 
Free exhibitions. 

Mechanical Waxworks. Most remark- 
able collection of life-like figures, 
reproduced in wax and so supplied 
with intricate and cleverly contrived 
mechanisms that they appear to be 
possessed of the characteristics and 
abilities of living beings. 

Photograph Gallery. Where pictures 
of every kind known to lovers of 
photographic art will be made under 
the supervision of skilled photog- 
raphers. Conducted by one of the 
best known and largest photographic 
concerns in the world. 



THE WHITE CITY MAGAZINE AND SOUVENIR PROGRAM 



53 



Gypsy Camp. With a host of genuine 
Gypsies from sunn}^ Spain, secured 
by a special envoy sent across the 
water by the management of White 
City. 

Dog:, Pony and Monkey Circus. Other- 
wise called the Simian City. An 
aggregation of cleverly trained 
animals under the direction of Prof. 
Blake, one of the best known trainers 
in the world. A constantly changing 
program of special interest to chil- 
dren and pleasing to all. 

Toboggan. An absolutely harmless 
but exciting ride in perfectly con- 
structed gravity cars, whirling the 
rider at an exhilarating speed around 
a double circle. Lots of fun. 

Beautiful Jim Key. The equine world 
wonder who earns annually the in- 
terest on $1,000,000 and is the aristo- 
crat of the animal kingdom. Actually 
an educated horse which thinks, 
spells, counts, draws with chalk and 
writes his own name on a blackboard. 
Taught by kindness and a wonderful 
example of the power of love for 
dumb brutes. The children's friend. 

Palmistry Kiosk. Where the mysteries 
of the future and occurrences of the 
past will be related by seers who can 
read the story of life as imprinted in 
the palm. 

Cummins' Indian Congress. Includes 
150 Indians from all the principal 
tribes, cowboys, sharpshooters, sol- 
diers, trappers, etc. Western scenes 
and pioneer days vividly recalled by 
a thrilling spectacle showing Custer's 
last stand; reproduced in three life- 
like tableaux. 



Miniature Railway. A perfect model 
railroad system with tracks, switches, 
tiny cars, engines, etc. Almost a 
half-mile of trackage through tunnels 
and grottoes with beautiful scenic 
effects. Children or adults can ride. 

Temple of Music. Marvelous develop- 
ment of natural forces, applied by 
scientific methods for the performing 
of difficult airs on musical instru- 
ments of all kinds. Piano played by 
wireless telegraphy, the electricity 
passing through the body of a human 
being. Air, heat, steam, electricity, 
etc., used in these wonderful demon- 
strations. 

The Alps. A beautiful and realistic 
scenic production, accompanied by 
the natural phenomena incident to a 
night in Switzerland in view of the 
towering mountains. 

Over and Under the Sea. A beautiful 
and brilliant series of unexpected 
scenes under and over the sea; also 
during a tour- of the surface of the 
moon the spectator is charmed and 
delighted with the novelty and splen- 
dor of the phenomena witnessed. 

Double Whirl. Participants in the de- 
lights of this novel pastime are given 
a pleasant circular ride during which 
they have a view of the park from a 
considerable elevation. 

Puzzle Garden. A mystifying labyrinth 
of misleading hallways, leading you 
nowhere in particular unless you 
know your way about, and taking you 
everywhere as soon as 3'ou " get on." 

Carousel. The merry-go-round which 
always delights the children, and fur- 
nishes exhilarating and innocent 
pleasure for men, women, boys and 
girls alike. 



54 



THE WHITE CITY MAGAZINE AND SOUVENIR PROGRAM 



TRANSPORTATION FACILITIES 

HOW TO REACH WHITE CITY 



WHITE CITY is located at 63d 
street and South Park ave- 
nue, and may be easily 
reached from points in or out 
of Chicago by elevated roads, by able 
and electric street car Hues, and by 
steam railroajo. 

ELEVATED ROADS. 

At stations on the Union Loop you 
should observe the guiding signs which 
are located in conspicuous places on 
the stairs and platforms and by which 
you will be guided aright. 

The South Side "L" has a station im- 
mediately in front of White City at 
South Park avenue and 63d street. 
Time of trip from the Union Loop to 
White City is 30 minutes. 

Changing cars on other "L" lines, 
down-town, to South Side "L:" 

From Metropolitan "L," change at 
the LaSalle Street Station on Van 
Buren street. 

Returning home, change at Madison 
Street Station on Wabash avenue. 

From Chicago and Oak Park "L" 
and Northwestern "L" change at the 
State Street Station on Van Buren 
street. 

Returning home, change at Adams 
Street Station or at Randolph Street 
Station on Fifth avenue. 

SURFACE LINES. 

In or near the down-town district 
take any surface line going south, pref- 
erably the State street cable or the Cot- 
tage Grove avenue cable (Chicago City 
Railway) then transfer to the 63d street 
electric line. 

From any point on the South Side 
the cars of the Chicago City Railway 
will carry you, for one fare only, right 
to the entrance of White City. 

Under the present system of trans- 
fers on the Chicago City Railway, you 
may, upon the payment of one fare, 
ride in any one general direction as far 
as the cars of the company will carry 
you; but, should you reverse the gen- 
eral direction in which you have 



started, you may continue to ride only 
to the junction with the first cross line 
reached. 

For instance, if you are on a south- 
bound car, you will, upon the payment 
of a cash fare, receive a slip which will 
permit you to transfer to any inter- 
secting east, west, or south line. If 
you take a west-bound car at a transfer 
point, you have established your gen- 
eral direction of south-west, and the 
conductor on the west-bound car will 
exchange your transfer-slip for one en- 
titling you to ride south or west, and 
you may thus exchange your transfer- 
slip indefinitely on south and west- 
bound cars. If you reverse your direc- 
tion, however, and take a north or 
east-bound car at a transfer point, your 
transfer will entitle you to ride only as 
far as the intersection of the first cross 
line, and if you wish to ride farther 
than this point you must pay another 
cash fare. 

To avoid any misunderstanding, re- 
member that "Transfers will be issued 
ONLY at time fares are paid." 

Transfers are not issued from North 
or West-Side lines to Sou"h-Side lines. 
Exception: A passenger on the North 
Halsted street line may reach White 
City upon the payment of one fare and 
transferring at O'Neill street to the 
South Halsted street line and then 
again on 63d street to South Park 
avenue. 

Time from Madison street (down- 
town) to White City via Chicago City 
Railway Company's lines is 38 min- 
utes. 

The Calumet Electric lines from 
South Chicago, Cheltenham Beach, 
Hammond, Ind., etc., connect at Stony 
Island avenue and 68th street with the 
cars from Pullman, Kensington, etc., 
which have their terminal at the en- 
trance to White City. 

The Chicago Electric Traction Com- 
Harvey and Blue Island direct to 63d 
street and South Park avenue. The 
fare from Harvey is 10 cents and from 
Blue Island 5 cents. 



THE WHITE CITY MAGAZINE AND SOUVENIR PROGRAM 



55 



SUBURBAN LINES. 

From points on the Aurora, Elgin 
& Chicago Electric line only two 
changes of cars need be made, as this 
line connects with the Metropolitan 
"L" at South 52d avenue and carries 
passengers direct to the Union "L" 
Loop, where the South Side "L" trains 
may be taken at LaSalle street. Dear- 
born street or State street stations. 

The Chicago and Joliet Electric 
Railway running from Joliet to Chi- 
cago via Summit, Lemont, Lockport, 
etc., connects with the lines of the Chi- 
cago City Railway Company at Archer 
and South 48th avenues. It also con- 
nects with the lines of the Union Trac- 
tion Co. in the village of Lyons. 
STEAM RAILROADS 

All Illinois Central and Michigan 
Central trains, to and from all subur- 
ban stations, stop at Woodlawn Sta- 
tion on 63d street near Jackson Park. 
The 63d street electric cars, going west, 
carry passengers direct ,to the main 
entrance of White City on 63d street 
and South Park avenue. The South 
Side "L" trains may be taken at Madi- 
son Station, half a block west of Wood- 
lawn Station direct to White City. 

All trains of the Chicago, Rock Isl- 
and & Pacific, Lake Shore & Michigan 
Southern, and the Pitt..burg, Ft. 
Wayne & Chicago lines stop at Engle- 
wood Station on 63d street, where 
electric cars going east may be taken 
for White City, landing passengers at 
the main entrance on South Park 
avenue. 

Those entering Chicago on the Chi- 
cago & Eastern Illinois, the Chicasfo & 
Western Indiana, the Pittsburg, Cin- 
cinnati, Chicago, and St. Lr uis, and 



the Wabash, can change at the 63d 
street station to the electric cars going 
east direct to the main entrance of 
White City. 

Trains on the Grand Trunk stop at 
47th street. To transfer for White 
City, take the electric cars on 47th 
street going east, transfer to the Went- 
worth avenue electric (or to the State 
street cable) line and transfer again to 
the 63d street electric line, landing at 
the main entrance. 

Patrons of White City entering 
Chicago by other than the above-men- 
tioned roads will find convenient ele- 
vated stations near the respective rail- 
way stations — observe the guiding 
signs on elevated stairs and platforms, 
and refer to elevated railroads men- 
tioned above. The Kinzie Street Sta- 
tion of the Northwestern "L" is in 
front of the Wells Street Railroad Sta- 
tion. The Canal Street Station of the 
Metropolitan "L" is within half a block 
of the Union Station. 

STEAMSHIP DOCKS. 

The nearest and most convenient ele- 
vated train stations from the docks of 
all steamsli'p lines are the Randolph 
Street Station on Wabash avenue, the 
State street, and Clark street stations 
on Lake street. These are within a 
few minutes' walk south from any one 
of the docks, and South Side elevated 
trains will carry passengers direct to 
White City. 

AUTOMOBILES. 

White City is within a short dis- 
tance of the boulevard system and ac- 
commodations will be arranged for 300 
automobiles in the White City garage 
on South Park avenue between 62d 
and 63d streets. 



56 



THE WHITE CITY MAGAZINE AND SOUVENIR PROGRAM 



THE 



MIDWAY 



CONTAINING ENTERTAINING FEATURES 
FOR EVERYBODY 




)0 AMUSEMENT resort is 
complete without a Midway, 
where joHity and mirth run 
riot unrestrained and un- 
hampered by conventionality. 
Here may be found every form of 
amusement and all kinds of games and 
pastimes into which the elements of 
chance and probability enter. The Mid- 
way occupies three sides of the plaza in 



ble device and all kinds of unique exhi- 
bitions crowd the Midway, so that a trip 
through is well worth while. 

The first booth is occupied by a candy 
store, where the new confection, "Eluflf- 
Fluff," may be found. The next booth 
is the Stein Rack. Here the visitor en- 
deavors to completely cover a painted 
circle with a metal disk by tossing it on 
a smooth board. The prizes are souvenir 




Observation Wheel; Also View of Part of the Midway 



front of the Fire Show and encircles the 
Observation Wheel on three sides, being 
located at the southeastern part of the 
grounds where the "Board Walk" turns 
onto the bridge. 

Popular prices are the rule at the Mid- 
way, and for very small sums the visitor 
may have unlimited enjoyment and prob- 
ably carry home with him a valuable 
souvenir of White City. Every possi- 



steins. Next comes the Knife Rack. 
This is very similar to the familiar cane 
rack. The participant tries to throw a 
wooden ring around a knife, and the 
motto of the place is "The knife you 
ring is the knife you get." 

The air rifle booth is the next in order. 
This attraction is especially interesting 
to small children. The next booth con- 
tains the Cane Rack, which has proved 



THE WHITE CITY MAGAZINE AND SOUVENIR PROGRAM 



57 



its great popularity for many years, and 
a description of this deservedly well pat- 
ronized feature would be superfluous. 

The White City Stream is the next 
attraction which meets the view of the 
spectator. This is a stream of water, 
along the banks of which are many 
miniature houses. In the swiftly run- 
ning stream are hundreds of wooden 
fishes, which the visitor endeavors to 
catch with a hook and line. Each one 
of the fish contains a prize. Next comes 
the Gypsy Camp, where there are a corps 
of fortune tellers. Hotel Sleepyville is 
the next booth. The participants in this 
sport try to hurl a ball through the win- 
dows of the hotel and awaken the occu- 
pants. If he is successful in bursting a 
glass window a strange thing happens 
which interests everyone. 

In adjoining booths are the old and 
tried Rifle Gallery and Baby Rack. 
These attractions are too well known to 
need any comment. The next attraction 
is one which is somewhat new to Chi- 
cagoans. It is the baseball game. The 
participant in this sport takes a regula- 
tion bat and knocks a baseball. The 
scoring is counted according to the hit 
he makes. In the southeast corner of 
the Midway is the penny arcade. Here 
are all kinds of slot machines. 

The next feature is the Japan ball 
game. This must be seen to be appre- 
ciated, as it is almost impossible to de- 
scribe it. The game is most interesting 
and attracts a great number of specta- 
tors. The Glass-blowers occupy the re- 
maining booth, where all kinds of glass 
work is made for visitors while they 
wait. 



"The crowds which surge through the 
grounds enjoyed every minute and lib- 
erally patronized all the amusement fea- 
tures at White City. — Chicago Inter 
Ocean. 



"The opening of White City marked 
an epoch in the history of amusements." 
— Warren A. Patrick in the Billboard. 



"The greatest amusement enterprise 
on earth." — Colfax,