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WHITE COLUMNS '81 
AUGUSTA COLLEGE 



REESE LIBRARY 

Augusta College 
Augusta, Georgia 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2010 with funding from 

LYRASIS Members, Sloan Foundation and ASU Foundation 



http://www.archive.org/details/whitecolumns1981augu 






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hite Columns '81 




Decade '80 





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Faced with crippling inflation, a difficult presidential 
election, and the Iranian hostage crisis, many Americans see 
the new decade as a new set of problems. Economists 
predicted recessions and have been proven correct. For 
months, the American people have been obsessed with the 
fate of fifty-two American hostages captured by an outraged 
group of Iranian students incited by the powerful religious 
and political leader, Ayatollah Khomeini. Reagan, Carter, and 
Anderson waged huge campaigns to convince the nation each 
was the right man to deliver the country from its 
predicament. Disturbed by these three choices and 
disillusioned by our political system, many Americans stayed 
home and refused to exercise their right to vote. 

Although these times appear bleak, the future looks much 
brighter . . . 




The Commitment to Excellence program 
at Augusta College last year is a prime 
example of working towards a brighter 
future. The goal of this program is to raise 
funds for library improvements, faculty 
development, and the acquisition of 
nationally known faculty members. This 
year the fund drive was opened with a 
barbeque held in the quandrangle behind 
Payne Hall, and once again, the program 
was a success. By working together, 
Augusta College and the surrounding 
community are investing in a better 
tomorrow. 







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A New Beginning 




One of the most exciting 
improvements on the Augusta College 
campus was the opening of Hardy 
Hall in the fall of 1980. The facilities 
in Hardy Hall include various 
learning aids, a media center, and 
space for WACG, the Augusta College 
radio station, and a television studio. 
Equipped with rooms for film 
production and editing, it is hoped 
that in the future the Hardy Hall 
facilities can broadcast some of its 
own programs. 

Hardy Hall has also become the 
new home for some of the 
departments formerly housed in 
Skinner Hall. The departments of 
Math and Computer Science, 
Psychology, Sociology, and Social 
Studies are now located in the new 
offices in Hardy Hall. 

The opening of Hardy Hall has 
opened up many new opportunities 
for faculty and students alike and 
should prove to be a great asset to 
the campus. 





Registration and orientation can often 
prove to be a nightmare for the entering 
freshmen; it can also prove to be chaotic 
for the upper classmen who never found 
time to pre-register. The orientation of 
entering students begins at 8:00 A.M. and 
can last well into the afternoon. Orientation 
usually consists of several speeches, a tour 
of the campus, and a mass of confusion. 
Despite the hassles of registration and 
orientation, students keep coming to 
college; Augusta College has an increased 
enrollment this year. 

Student involvement in intramural sports 
has increased along with enrollment. The 
fall quarter intramural football program 
was a definite success and a lot of fun for 
those who got involved. Intramural sports 
planned for winter and spring quarters 
include basketball, weightlifting. table 
tennis, recreational tennis and softball. 




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The sports scene at Augusta 
College definitely has a bright future. 
A soccer team was initiated this year 
and the team played a full schedule 
of games fall quarter. In addition, the 
more established sports are gaining in 
strength and popularity. In 1980, the 
Aqua Jags broke several records and 
became the winningest team on the 
campus. Although the students enjoy 
the great diversity of sports on 
campus, Augusta College is primarily 
a basketball college. The students are 
proud of the basketball team, and the 
team should be proud of representing 
a college with a great present and an 
even better future. 







The Augusta College Student 
Senate has worked very hard this 
year to better serve the student body. 
Frank Lee, the president of the 
Student Government Association, has 
taken several steps to improve the 
quality and effectiveness of the 
S.G.A. since he assumed office earlier 
in the year. One of Frank's pet 
projects was instituting a senate 
retreat program. Last September the 
senators went to Jekyll Island for a 
weekend. While attending lectures 
presented by Dr. Jane Cross and 
Dean J.W. Galloway, the senators 
were not only able to learn about 
"Time Management" and 
"Administration Processes", but also 
more about each other. 

Another advancement in the area of 
student organizations occurred when 
the Jazz Ensemble was honored by 
an invitation to perform for the 
Georgia State Assembly opening 
session. 








YOU CAN S T I L L MAKE 

APPOINTMENTS FOR 

CLASS PICTURES 

* FRIDAY & MONDAY * 





Augusta College students were treated to a new 
activity this year-a Halloween masquerade ball. The 
Halloween party gave students the opportunity to dress 
up in imaginative costumes. Awards were presented to 
the students who wore the scariest, the most original, 
and the most creative costumes. For those students 
who enjoy classic B-grade horror movies, the Student 
Union provided Christopher Lee starring in "Dracula" 
Pumpkins from the carving contest held earlier that 
day were displayed during the party. 

The more traditional events were also a big success 
this year. The Augusta College Oktoberfest provided 
students with a taste of the German culture. The 
hungry crowd was treated to sauerkraut, bratwurst, 
potato salad, soft pretzels, and beer. Some students 
who were really in the spirit of Oktoberfest danced to 
the joyful sounds of German records. Students who 
were too full to move preferred to sit around chatting 
with friends. 

The Christmas Ball is another of the long observed 
traditions of Augusta College. This year Miss Pamm 
Shands was crowned Christmas Belle and Mr. Reggie 
Forrest was crowned Christmas Beau. The semi-formal 
Christmas Ball gives students a chance to dress up and 
enjoy a little Christmas cheer with their friends. 





Commitment to Excellence. Hardy Hall. Registration 
and orientation. Sports. Student organizations. Student 
activities. The common denominator of all these words is 
you-the student. Whenever you're discouraged, remember 
that Augusta College exists for you. Your education is the 
primary goal of this campus. It exists for you, and you 
exist for the future. 






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Dedication 

The 1980-81 White Columns is 

dedicated to all those administrators, 
faculty members, and students who are 
dedicated to the students of Augusta 
College. By their continuing efforts and 
hard work, these dedicated individuals 
have contributed significantly to 
building and maintaining a well-rounded 
academic program for Augusta College 
students. 







Honors Convocation 

The purpose of the Augusta College Honors 
Convocation is to recognize students who 
have excelled in scholarship, service and lead- 
ership . during the past academic year. The 
keynote speaker was Dr. Fairfield Goodale, 
dean of the School of Medicine at the Medical 
College of Georgia. The Valedictorian Award 
was presented to Lyle K. Neff by Augusta 
College President George Christenberry. Neff 
achieved a near perfect grade point average of 
3.99 on a four point system. 

The Outstanding Faculty Member Award 
was presented to Dr. Jerry Sue Townsend, 
chairperson of the Department of Mathemat- 
ics and Computer Science. 

In addition to the presentation of various 
awards to students, a presentation was made 
to the AC Jazz Ensemble by local state legisla- 
tor David Swann. The Jazz Ensemble per- 
formed at the opening session of the Georgia 
Legislature in 1980. 




Dr. Jerry Sue Townsend 
Outstanding Faculty Member Award 





Annabel Tudor 
Chronicle-Herald Award 



William R. Scoggins 
Bell Ringer Award 





Beverly Meyers 
Senior Service-Leadership 



Frank Chow Lee 
Senior Service-Leadership 




Denise K. Seago 
Student National Education Award 



Donna K. Broshek 
White Columns Award 



Graduation 





Graduation '81 commenced at the William B. Bell 
auditorium. The exercises began at 3 P.M. on Sunday, 
June 14. Honor students were recognized while 292 
students received diplomas. A total of 300 degrees 
were awarded with 8 students each receiving two 
degrees. The benediction was presented by Dr. 
Thomas J. Henry, director of The Good Shepherd 
Church in Augusta. The key speaker was Dr. Henry 
L. Ashmore, president of Armstong State College. 




Students in American Universities and Colleges 




Beverly Myers and Denise McClure 



Gayla Spooner and Johnnie Poole 




(1 to r): Frank Lee, Donna K. Broshek, Roberta K. Allen, Erich Boerner 




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1980 was the first year for the Augusta college soccer team. 
They played a full schedule of games in the NCAA Division 
Two. Coached by Tom Taylor, the team posted a 4-8 record. 
After their first season, the team is expected to become stronger 
and the sport more popular with increased student participa- 
tion. 




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Front row (1 to r): Jon Arr.ngton. Tommy Tranum, Stuart Tranum, Bill Lilhs. V,ctor Mclvin. Middle row. Marvin 
Vanover-head coach, Delbert Haynes, Anthony Darnels, Brian Scott, Darren Mabins. James Richardson. David 
Brannen, Bobby Eskew-asst. coach. Back row: Rob Johnson-graduate asst. coach. Brad Usry, David Held, Glenn 
Glover, Rob Solomon, Jimmy Wright. 





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"I feci thai we had the most talent this year even 
though people didn't think we were going to do well this 
season. I think it's time for me to move on to better things 
in life, and I really don't feel bad about leaving the team." 

Brian Scott-Senior 




Marvin Vanover 
Head Coach 



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The Old-Timers teams 






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The 1980 yearbook was dedicated to Robbie Howard. 
Coach Childers presented the yearbook to Mrs. Howard at a 
home basketball game. The Robbie Howard Memorial Athle- 
tic Scholarship was developed in Mr. Howard's honor. 








Front row (1 to r): Bonita McNeal, Beth Real. Cindy Elliot, Diane Oglesby, Thelma Howard. Back row: Patricia 
Sullivan (mgr), Memore Hagen, Raponsa McNeal. Monica Sicard. Beth McKie, Pam Larsen, Emily Jones, Coach Tom 
Taylor. 



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"I feel we had an excellent season. Even though we fell 
short of our goal of a winning season, posting an 11-14 record. 
I am still pleased. We lost three games by one point each, and 
nine of our losses were against teams ranked in the nation's 
top ten teams (West Georgia. Berry. Lander. USC. Aiken). 

We tied for second with Shorter College in our division, 
and finished fourth in the conference tournament. The 
fourth place tournament finish was the highest place ever for 
an Augusta College women's basketball team. 

I'm confident that our third major goal of the season, to 
develop a winning attitude among our players, was accom- 
plished. That winning attitude was displayed continuously 
by our players. They practiced hard every day, including 
between-quarter holidays. They played with maximum ef- 
fort in every game with a never-give-up attitude. 

Please let me thank all our players for a rewarding year to 
me for their efforts and for the manner in which they repre- 
sented Augusta College throughout the season. As for next 
year, I am busy recruiting new players to add to our return- 
ing players. It's much easier to recruit and promote our pro- 
gram now because of the 'winning attitude' developed by 
this year's Lady Jaguar Basketball Team." 

Coach Tom Taylor 







Front row (1 to r): Sherry Walz. Kim Gauldin, Elaine Sola, Linda Black, Monica Sicard. Middle row: Shelby Boles, 
Jo Anna Mitchell, Angelia Wilcher, Tern Scheid, Susan Beck, Robin Thrailkill. Back row: Rob Johnson-coach. 





Front row (1 to r): Coach Richard Harrison, Mitch Ragland, Roger Bentley, Bill Stevens, Bartley Payne, David Johnson, Jon 
Stratton. Top row: Willis Biles, Mike Dennison, Lewis Biles, Karen Rubin, Ric Tutt, James Biles. 





"The Augusta College swimming 
team is unique in the fact that it is 
made up of local talent. I have 
trained these swimmers for ten 
years. Now they are in college, their 
community college. To me, this is 
what a community program is all 
about." 

Coach Harrison 




(1 to r): Wanda Jackson. Marty Hamilton, Delia Crews, Ann Mul- 
herin, Carol McNitt, Libba Anderson, Richard Justice, Paige 
Hodges, Renee Arazie. 





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"The baseball team had a great season. We 
placed seventh in the country for the NCAA sec- 
ond division. We only had one senior this year, 
so we're looking forward to many returni 
players and another winning season." 

Tim Crosby-sports information director 







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Front row(l to r): Mike Paul, Guy Piatt, Paul Tomberlin, Joe Rich, Bill Elliot, Brett Jenkins, Darryl Smith. Middle row: David 
French, Mark Hopkins, Jim Flanary, Mike Gailey, Tom Nash (asst. coach), Terry Childers (head coach), Ralph Herndon. Charles 
Carter, John Dickinson. Back row: David Brannen (manager), Walter Taylor. Greg Berzins. Tommy Hooker, Barry Arrington, Mike 
LaFontaine, Todd Mercer, Nat Dye. 





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Front row (1 to r): Tim Knowles, Jimmy Acord, Coach Harrison, Mitchell Pomerance. Back row: Mike Buck, Tony 
Akins, Mark Michels, Wayne Barton. 





(1 to r): Victoria Jackson. Diane Oglesby, Angie Edgar, Betty Hull. Lucy Mulherm, Frances Barrett. 



"The South Atlantic Conference has done more to insure top caliber compe- 
tition than anything else for the sports program at Augusta College." 

Coach Harrison 




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Jaguar Jaunt Attracts 373 Registrants 

by 
Martha Weatherly 

Two of the entries in the 1980 AC Jaguar Jaunt didn't run. And one of the runners 
wasn't officially entered in either race. 

The second annual Jaguar Jaunt, held at the college September 27, attracted a 
total of 373 registrants, with 105 of them running the one-mile course. 

The one-mile run was the first event of a twin-contest competition. Some of the 
participants were entered in both races, the second race having a length of 5,000 
meters which repeated the short circuit for three laps. 

Sponsors of the race, which is rated third largest in the area, were the Alumni 
Association and the Student Government Association of Augusta College, and 
Southern Beer of Augusta, Inc. 

The two non-running entries, Robert Mingledolph and Ramona Jackson, covered 
the 5-kilometer circuit in wheel chairs. 

Mingledolph, with 3 races behind him, wants to enter the Turkey Trot in Novem- 
ber. Jackson began racing last year and has completed 5 races. She, too, is a 
candidate for the Turkey Trot. 

A trainee for the Fort Bragg Marathon, Jack McHenry, ran in the long race. His 
wife, Cathy, a beginning runner, competed tandem in the short race with her 3'/2- 
month-old Golden Retriever, Abraham, on a leash. Abe wasn't an official entrant 
although he wore a homemade entry tag and trotted the one-mile course at 10:18. 

A random scan of the entry roster turned up several names from the faculty and 
college offices. Dr. Charles Freeman and Dr. William Johnson (Languages and 
Literature), Dr. Edwin Flynn (Business Administration), John Groves (Student 
Activities), and information specialists Dee Davis and Marian Cheek were among 
the racers. 

One of the youngest entrants, Drew Hook, who is 8V2 years old, ran in the one- 
miler for his first race. He says he is not a prospect for the Olympics, however. "I'd 
rather play soccer." 

Robert Herron, who was last year's oldest Augusta College alumnus running, 
competed this year also. 

Mrs. Naomi Barnard, Co-ordinator of Alumni Affairs, said the event originated as 
a social activity, not a money-raiser, but if any profit were made, the Augusta 
College Foundation would benefit. The 1979 race registered 358, in spite of a rainy 
day, but the treasury netted an amount under $50. 

"We were told that it was good just to break even for a first race. At least, it didn't 
cost the college to have it." 

Mrs. Barnard said entry fees this year were increased to cover the cost of the T- 
shirts given to those who participated. 

"Southern Beer donated the trophies given to the winners," she explained. 
Southern Beer added to the intake by giving $.75 per entry to the alumni fund. Net 
proceeds amounted to figures between $300 and $400. 

Jurgen Cowling, AC student and member of the cross-country team, was the 
male winner of the one-mile event both years. He bettered his time two seconds 
over last year, clocking 4:47. 

Other trophies awarded went to Mark Koenig and Debbie Baber, winners in the 
5-kilometer competition. 

The Jaguar Jaunt seems to be established now, drawing contestants from not 
only students, faculty, and alumni, but from jogging and athletic buffs in the whole 
Augusta community. 



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Championship Softball Team 

"The Superstars" 




Second Place Team 

"Delta Tau Chi" 





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Championship Football Team 

"The Superstars" 




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"Intramurals was a great 
way to meet new people . . . 
especially people who aren't 
involved in other school re- 
lated activities." 

Erich Boerner 
(alias Ric Tutt) 

"It was mainly a lot of fun. 
It was a great way to spend 
the afternoon. I think there 
are a lot more people who 
would enjoy getting involved 
in intramural sports." 

Karl Boerner 




—PRESIDENT OF THE COLLEGE 




Dr. George A. Christenberry 
President of the College 




Front row (1 to r): Mr. Joseph Mele, Dr. Otha Gray, Mr. John McNeal, Dr. Christenberry, Dr. Geraldine Hargrove, Dr. Roy Nicely, 
Dr. Gray Dinwiddie Back row: Mr. Randall Thursby, Mr. Lee Wallace, Mr. Pete Galloway. 



DEANS 




Dr. W. Harold Moon 
Associate Dean of the College 



Dr. J. Gray Dinwiddie 
Dean of the College 





Dr. Otha L. Gray 

Dean of the School of Business Administration 



Dr. Geraldine W. Hargrove 
Dean of the School of Education 




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Dr. Roy E. Nicely 

Dean of Graduate Studies 



Mr. Joseph F. Mele 

Dean for Business and Finance, and 

Comptroller 



DEANS 




Mr. "J" "W" Galloway 
Dean of Students 



Mr. Roscoe Williams 
Associate Dean of Students 




Mr. John McNeal, Dean of College Relations, and Administrative Secretary Helga Waller 



ADMISSIONS 




Front row (1 to r): Mrs. Marsha Navarre, Mrs. Lee Wallace, Mrs. Barbara Lowe, Mrs. Catherine 
Shawver. Back row; Dr. Donald Smith-Director, Mr. Wade Gassman. 




*7§ Mrs. Carol Sheppard, Mrs. Mary 

Gardiner, Mrs. Naomi Barnard-Director 



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ALUMNI 



BUSINESS OFFICE 




Mrs. Janette Kelly 



Mrs. Angela Olson 



Mrs. Helen Story 



Pictured below (1 to r): Mrs. Leslie McCroan, Mrs. Betty Long, Mrs. Darlene Tochterman, 
Ms. June Pritchett, Mrs. Elease Morgan, Mrs. Mary Bailey-Director. 




CAFETERIA 




(1 to r): Ms. Gloria Amar, Mr. Tim Tyree-Director, Ms. Lydia Morin, Mr. Carlos Bracci, Ms. 
Melinda Lowery. 




Ms. Marcia Kuniansky, Mrs. Rita Rutsohn-Director, Mrs. Linda Thomson. 



CAREER PLANNING 



COMPUTER SERVICES 




Hanging in tree: Mr. Randall Thursby-Director. Standing (1 to r): The Unknown Operator (David Tardoff), Ms. Susan South, Mr. 
Robert Thies, Mrs. Nicolette Deloach. Mr. Larry Steele, Mr. Guy Bass, Ms. Hilary Horvath. Ms. Beverly Noble. Kneeling: Ms. 
Gayle Davidson, Mr. Victor Threatt. 



(1 to r): Ms. Sandra 

Barnes, Mrs. Maxine 

Allen, Miss Charlene 

Price, Dr. Sharon B. 

Covitz-Director. 




CONTINUING 
EDUCATION- 



COUNSELING CENTER 




Miss Anne Shepard, Ms. Deloris Wright, Dr. Barbara T. Speerstra-Director. 

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Standing (1 to r): Mrs. Sandra Fowler, Mrs. Alys Wilkes, Mrs. Evelyn Ellwanger. Seated: 
Mr. James Stallings-Director. 



FINANCIAL AID 



FINE ARTS ACTIVITIES 




Mrs. Sherice 

Hayden, Ms. Charlye 

Moore, Mr. Alex 

Mura-Director 



PERSONNEL 



PHYSICAL PLANT 




(1 to r): Mr. Willie Clay, Mr. James Bryant, Mr. Billy Mixon, Mr. Lamar Newsome, Dr. T. Dan McCrary- 
Director, Ms. Carol Johnson, Mr. Baxter Vinson, Mr. Chuck Lambert, Mr. Jake Wilson, Mr. Albert 
Montgomery, Mr. Jerry Morris, Mr. Philip Pridgen. 



Mrs. Dee Davis and Mrs. 
Marian Cheek 




PUBLIC INFORMATION 



STUDENT RECORDS — 



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(1 to r): Bart Snead, Jama Wood, Catherine Thibault, Amos Hurt 



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Mr. John Groves-Director, Miss Kathy 
Thompson 




TESTING CENTER 




Mr. Julian Heyman-Director, Mrs. Linda 
Hagerty, Mrs. Elizabeth Boyd 



Mr. Charles Adams, Mrs. Doris Bussey, Mr. 
Wade Gassman-Director 



VETERAN'S AFFAIRS' 




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Front row (1 to r): Mrs. Marguerite Fogleman, Miss Sheryl Moore, Mrs. Ellen Burroughs, Miss Blanche Garrard, 

Mrs. Margaret Roberts, Mrs. Jessie Morgan 

Back row: Mr. Ray Rowland, Miss Mary Goodspeed, Mrs. Virginia deTreville, Miss Ernestine Hill, Mrs. Elise 

Little 




Front row (1 to r): Mrs. Shirley Baker, Miss Marsha McCurley. Mrs. Oneida Gibson, Ms. Karen Williams, Mrs. LaBelle 
Fry, Mrs. Susan Coleman, Mrs. Meriam Smith 

Back row: Mrs. Kathleen Bone, Mrs. Hazel Outzs, Mrs. Johnnie Thomas, Mr. Carl Shurtleff, Mrs. Virginia Thomas, 
Mr. Charles Gibson, Jr. 



LIBRARY 



Lcxnooa^eS € Lr^nxtore. 





(1 to r): Dr. Adelheid Atkins, Dr. Samuel Duncan, Dr. Mary-Kathleen Blanchard, Mr. Keith 
Cowling, Mrs. Lillie Jugurtha, Dr. Charles Willig. 




(1 to r): Dr. John May, Dr. Elizabeth Panning, Dr. Margaret Yonce, Dr. Rosemary Depaolo, Dr. 
James Garvey, Mr. James Smith, Dr. Walter Evans, Mr. Lester Pollard, Ms. Bonnie Devet, Dr. 
William Johnson-Department Chairman. 




Dr. Duncan Smith and Dr. Norman Prinsky 



Dr. Walter Evans 



English Professor Adapts Alice in Wonderland 

by 
. Patti Hunt 

Even if his door was closed - which it seldom is - and there was no name on it, you would still have no problem 
finding Dr. Walter Evans' office. Just listen for a booming laugh or the endless clicking of a typewriter. 

Evans, a professor in the department of Languages and Literature, seems to be a quiet, easy-going, undemanding 
kind of teacher. However, after less than a week in any of his courses, it is obvious that Evans puts into his class 
what he expects from it - a positive attitude, attendance, participation, and a lot of hard work. 

Evans' attitude extends further than just his classes. He is a man who never talks about what he hasn't done, and 
does everything he can think of doing. He always has a project going. 

Dr. Evans' achievements can be separated into finished and unfinished business. His newest unfinished business is 
a book he is working on on the American short story, to follow a book he has recently finished writing. Evans 
refuses to comment on these books "for a couple of reasons. Number one, it's bad luck to talk about a book before it's 
published." And number two, Evans dislikes "blowing his own horn." 

Among Evans' finished accomplishments are several articles on short story writers and a 12,000 word history on 
the short story from 1800-1840 for the Short Story Encyclopedia which is to be published in 1981. 

In 1975, Evans was chosen as a Pulbright scholar to lecture on American literature at the University of Rouen, 
France. "It was terrific. One of the best years of my life." 

The Best of Cimarron Review, a collection of the "best", contains a short story written by Evans. 

In March of 1980, Evans finished adapting Alice in Wonderland for the stage. He had to write an introduction to 
set the physical setting and to supply information contained in footnotes throughout the book. He tried to be faithful 
to Lewis Carol, and ended up actually playing Carroll in the Fort Gordon Theater Guild production. Five out of six 
performances were sell-outs. 

Dr. Walter Evans has an impressive history of finished business, and there is lots more on the way. 




(1 to r): Dr. John W. Presley-Department Chairman, Mr. William Dodd, Dr. Ping-Tung Chang, 
Mrs. Betty D. Turner, Mrs. Barbara Stewart, Dr. Elizabeth A. House. 



Mrs. Judith Breckenridge, Mrs. Shirley 
King, Mr. Thomas Riley. 





Mr. William Dodd 



"Just Do It" 



by 
Edith Lewis 

"Just do it," is one way to begin writing according to Mr. William Dodd of the 
Special Studies Department. Dodd, along with Dr. John Presley, has written a 
book to aid students with their reading and writing skills. The book, Break- 
through, is the primary instruction manual for the special studies classes. 

Dodd has further aided his students by working on another manual, Essential 
Reading Skills, which, as the name implies, teaches fundamental reading skills. 
According to Dodd, the book was designed to meet the needs of those students 
who need help with their reading skills. The text included essays and papers on 
topics of interest to students. Some of these topics include: "Crabbing", "Black 
Newspapers", and "Purple Martins". 

Dodd is very dedicated to his work and his students. He feels that the Special 
Studies Department is a vital part of Augusta College because it provides many 
students with the necessary, basic skills to continue their education. Dodd feels 
that the students who receive the most benefits from special studies classes 
include night students and those students who have been away from school for a 
long time. Dodd feels that a positive attitude is encouraging to those students 
that take their education seriously. Dodd certainly has that positive attitude. 




(1 to r): Mr. William Whatley, Dr. Michael McLeod, Ms. Diana Sainte, Dr. Donald Law, Mr. 
Felton Moore, Dr. Otha Gray-Dean. 




Dr. Philip Rutsohn and Dr. Eugene Pierc 




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Coloring Sand Castles, and Economics 

by 
Martha Weatherly 

Kindergarten students studying economics? Really! Along with coloring and 
sand castles, economics may one day be introduced into the kindergarten, ac- 
cording to a program which Teresa Sherrouse is developing to improve and 
increase economic education in the public schools. 

Mrs. Sherrouse, a 1967 graduate of Florida State University, with a triple 
major (Government, International Affairs, and History) and a double minor 
(Spanish and Economics), taught in public schools for five years, then went to 
graduate school at Augusta College and earned an M.B.A. 

According to Sherrouse, the first step in bringing Americans to a better under- 
standing of economics has been to teach it to high school students. In addition to 
the regular course on economics, another one is available in some schools on 
Personal Finance. Mrs. Sherrouse said, "It teaches careful shopping, money 
management, insurance, consumers' rights, saving money, borrowing money, 
buying a car or a house." 

But educators are now realizing that the values of free enterprise should be 
taught in the lower grades as well, and some middle schools are offering courses 
based on economic concepts. 

Mrs. Sherrouse has worked on the development of a program to bring econom- 
ic education into elementary and middle schools, beginning at the kindergarten 
level. Two years ago, she began conducting workshops for teachers, principals, 
and curriculum coordinators to introduce "Trade Offs," a series of films for 
grades 5 through 7. 

"The content of the film is on the level of children in these grades. The films 
show the necessity of making choices when people have unlimited wants and a 
scarcity of resources. Prices and quantities, supply and demand, are also empha- 
sized," Mrs. Sherrouse said. 

She said the first grader's concept of economics would be "attuned to the 
family, including the father's and mother's occupations, family buying, uses of 
money, forms of money, etc." 

Kindergarten children would be introduced to similar subjects but their pro- 
gram would be limited to "pictures, activities, or play-acting," she said. 

The third grader could envision economics on a community level, and include 
a study on taxes. "They would study what communities can do, and why they 
cannot do everything," she said. 

Economics on the elementary and middle school levels would not have to be as 
formal or as concentrated as the high school courses. They might include short 
units in the social studies courses, and use pamphlets, films or film strips, pro- 
jects, and simulations. 

Mrs. Sherrouse said, "Our goal is to try to encourage people to become better 
citizens of their own world, and to help them understand their part in that 
world." 



CHeMl5TftV k PHYSiCS y 





Front row (1 to r): Dr. Roy Nicely, Mrs. Jean Godin, Dr. Harry Kuniansky. 
Back row: Dr. William Marsh, Mr. William Monge. 







(1 to r): Ms. Mary Lisko, Mr. Emmett Arnold. Mrs. Teresa Sherrouse, Dr. Edwin Flynn, Dr. Donald Markwalder. 




Front row (1 to r): Dr. Silvia Richart, Dr. Ronnie Ezell. 
Middle row: Dr. Janice Turner-Department Chair- 
man, Mrs. Barbara Stewart, Mr. Harry Dolynuik. 
Back row: Dr. Harry Bowsher, Dr. Floyd O'Neal, Dr. 
Gary Stroebel. 



Dr. Harry F. Bowsher 



Bowsher Takes Place in Computer-Heart-Flow Project 

by 
Chris Bodie 

An interest in the advantages of the micro-computer has led physics professor Dr. Harry Bowsher to develop several 
medical programs specifically designed for its use. 

Falling prices of computers are enabling teaching and medical institutions to purchase more units for the use of students 
and doctors, says Bowsher. The small individual units can be used for study or diagnostic purposes without tying up main 
computer systems. 

Bowsher's most recent project involves examining the heart's left ventricle. First, ultrasound machines record left- 
ventricle thickness and the pressure of blood flow. Then Bowsher's program makes it possible for a micro-computer to 
record and store the resulting data. 

"My part in the computer-heart flow project," Bowsher says, "is to write programs to convert this ultrasonic data into 
numerical codes so the computer can evaluate the work done by the left ventricle." 

The advantage of this system over others is that nothing needs to be inserted into the body. Without pain or unpleasant- 
ness for patients, doctors will be able to obtain information to evaluate the effects of cardiac drugs. 

Bowsher says he has also found the micro-computer helpful in his study of "metrology", the student of ancient units of 
measurement. Funded by a local foundation, he has traveled three times to Europe to study and speak on measurements 
used in building Stonehenge and the Great Pyramids. 

As chairman this year of the philosophy and history of science section of the Georgia Academy of Science, Bowsher read 
a paper on ancient Hebrew documents and use of metrological units, and he plans to give another this spring on the 
metrological units used in the building of Stonehenge. 

Bowsher says his plans include using "a little gadget AC just bought to allow me to teach the computer to talk to the 
students." This summer he plans to work with nuclear medicine students at MCG. 

Having worked for five summers with the Electro Nuclear Group at Oakridge National Lab, Bowsher looks forward to 
taking fourteen chemistry and physics students there to do research this spring. 

Although he has been active in outside research projects throughout his twenty-year teaching career, Bowsher has 
never succumbed to the temptation of leaving the academic world. 

Bowsher loves being a teacher. "I never seriously considered anything else," he says. 



-ROTC; 
N0R5lNGj 




Maj. Frederick S. Travis and 
Cpt. Richard T. Brazzeal 




Travis Reveals Army Pride 

by 
Sheron Smith 

Major Fred Travis claims that he does no recruiting for the army. 

So why has the number of Augusta College ROTC cadets more than doubled in his two years as 
head of Military Science? 

"I'm not a recruiter, I'm an educator," says Travis. "My job is to make good lieutenants, not get 
them." 

And make them he has. Out of the 144 students who participated in ROTC last year, 50 of them 
are under contract with the army. That means that they will enter active duty as second 
lieutenants upon graduation, earning a starting salary of $14,300. "That's more than 90% of this 
year's A.C. graduates will make as starting salaries,", brags Travis. 

If that statement doesn't reveal Travis' "army pride", his record will. He has made a career of 
the military, and he was last stationed in Alaska as company commander of an aviation company. 
He requested duty in Augusta two years ago and he has been with the Military Science depart- 
ment ever since. "It was time to help develop officers," he said, "and it was time to get to the 
source." 

Travis says that the army "is like a religion to me." If the army really was a religion, Major 
Travis would probably be its pope. He demonstrates his dedication by often putting in 12 hour 
days. His duties include teaching all of the upper-level military science courses and organizing 
trips the ROTC cadets take every quarter. Survival exercises in the Appalachian Mountains are 
planned every fall, and tours of Ft. Gordon are usually taken in the winter and spring. Other 
activities include rapelling, a mountain scaling technique that the cadets can sometimes be seen 
practicing on the CAC tower. 

Travis feels that the ROTC program has a bright future at Augusta College. "The army doesn't 
hinder upward mobility," he said. "You're only limited by your talents but we can help develop 
those talents. I want to teach what the army has taught me." 



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(1 to r): Miss Louise Bryant-Department Chairman, Mrs. Prances Harley, Mrs. Bertee Gaylard 




Mrs. Carolyn Wheale, Mrs. Grace Busbee, Mrs. Connie Skalak, Mrs. Mary Anderson. Mrs. Joyce Billue, Mrs. 
Emily Capers 



Intramural Program Looks Encouraging 

by 

Donna K. Broshek 

"The intramural sports program looks encouraging," ac- 
cording to Dennis W. Burau, assistant professor of physical 
education. 

Burau has devoted his full attention to the intramural pro- 
gram here at AC since he quit coaching baseball two years 
ago. Although the turnouts for the Softball and flag football 
intramural programs were disappointing this year, fourteen 
teams entered the basketball league — twice the number of 
teams in that league in the past. 

According to Burau, the lack of facilities, especially during 
winter quarter, has caused problems for the intramural 
leagues. Hopefully, however, funds for a new gym will be 
available in the near future. 

Another problem, Burau feels, is that since AC is a non- 
dorm campus, many students leave campus immediately 
after class and head for home or work. "That doesn't stop 
everyone, however," said Burau. "Some guys miss work to 
play in their intramural games." 

Burau is hoping to start an intramural water polo league 
next year. He's observed the water polo P.E. classes. "Every- 
one seems to have a good time. I hope we can attract enough 
people to start a league." 

Occasionally, the intramural league sponsors weightlifting 
tournaments. Because of complaints he's received about the 
weight room, Burau stressed that plans are under way to 
improve the appearance of the weight room, and add new 
equipment and a new floor. 

"Women can also get involved in weight training," accord- 
ing to Burau. "Women can follow the same weight training 
program that men do. They just need to work with less 
weight." 

Burau emphasized that the intramural program at AC is for 
everyone. "If students can find the time, I can find a place for 
everyone within the intramural program." 




Coach Burau 




Tim Crosby, Richard Harrison 




(1 to r): Mr. Marvin Vanover-Department Chairman, Mrs. Phyllis Wilson, Mr. Dennis Burau, Mr. Robert Eskew, 
Mr. Thomas Taylor 




(I to r)- Mrs. Vola Jacobs, Mr. Barry Jacobs, Mrs. Artemisia Thevaos, Dr. James Russey, Mr. John Scott-Department 
Chairman, Mr. Richard Prank, Miss Eugenia Comer, Mr. Steven Greenquist, Mr. Jack King, Mr. Seymour Kesten, 
Dr. Eloy Fominaya, Mr. Michael McClary. __________^ 




Augusta Symphony Orchestra Provides Showcase for AC Faculty and Students 

by 
Martha Weatherly 

The pleasant smile behind the goatee of Harry Jacobs is well known to music 
and humanities students at the Pine Arts Center. But community music lovers 
are more familiar with his back, as they see him conducting the Augusta 
Symphony Orchestra. 

Jacobs has directed the orchestra for 26 years, and he says the 85 members of 
the organization "are as fine as any in urban or metropolitan orchestras of 
much larger cities." 

The orchestra is partly composed of faculty members from AC and several 
nearby colleges, and has recently gained "a marvelous infusion" of music 
teachers from area public schools. 

The symphony orchestra enjoys a special relationship with the college, even 
though they are not officially connected. Concerts are held at the Performing 
Arts Theater, and Jacobs said, "The orchestra provides a 'showcase' for the 
musical performance of faculty members and students." 

The orchestra gives music students the advantage of a fine outlet for their 
talents, and "conversely, the college provides the orchestra with highly trained 
musicians." AC faculty members perform, often as soloists, with the orchestra 
In 1954 Jacobs was asked to organize a civic orchestra. It played for a local performance of the Boardway play "South Pacific" 
on tour. This event encouraged the musicians to believe they should continue as an orchestra. 

Initially, Jacobs said, the group was only as competent as a good high school orchestra. Recruiting and training musicians 
developed the ensemble into the Augusta Symphony Orchestra. Pour members of the original seventeen still play with the 
orchestra. , .. 

Jacobs said the treasury suffered a deficit the first year, but concert attendance has grown steadily. About five years ago, 
concerts were inadvertently oversold, and some ticketholders were turned away. This "embarassing situation ' led to adding a 
second concert series. This year, the orchestra has also added a "pops" series. 

Music for the concerts is chosen in several ways, he said. "Requests from the audience and the orchestra are important. I select 
some music to balance the programming, including various styles and periods. And, of course, I consider the music in relation to 
the ability of the orchestra." TT . , 

College officials recognized Jacobs' ability, and foresaw a faculty affiliation with him as an asset to the college. He was asked to 
join the AC faculty in 1963 as Chairman of the Pine Arts Department. 

He served in this capacity until 1966, when he became director of Fine Arts activities. This allowed him more time to develop 
arts in the community. 
Jacobs teaches music theory had instrumental performance courses, and the music and art sections in humanities courses. 
Whether he hums a recitative, or beats the time of Beethoven's Fifth in the classroom, students, too, are aware of his 
enthusiasm for music, and of his ability to communicate that enthusiasm to others. 




(1 to r): Dr. William Wellnitz, Dr. Emil Urban-Department Chairman, Dr. James Bickert. Dr. Judith Gordon, 
Dr. Harvey Stirewalt 




Gordon Finds Foreign Ferns 

by 

Sheron Smith 



If Dr. Judith Gordon had not diverted her interests from home economics to 
botany in her college days, a botanical rarity along the banks of the Savannah 
would probably have remained undiscovered. 

And the biology department of Augusta College would have missed having the 
fern specialist as a faculty member. 

Dr. Gordon, assistant professor of biology, received an undergraduate degree 
from Penn state in home economics. But because of an interest in ecology and 
plants, she pursued a masters in botany at Virginia Tech and a Ph.D. at Indiana 
University. She has been teaching at Augusta College for five years. 

Dr. Gordon's main interest lies in fern taxonomy "which means that you study 
ferns to determine what they are related to," she said, "and where they fit in a 
classification system. To do this you have to look at all different aspects of their 
development, and how they reproduce." 

But Dr. Gordon's study of ferns goes beyond the greenhouse. 

Two years ago, whil hiking along a stream that flows into the Savannah River 
on the South Carolina side, she discovered about 100 plants of a certain fern that 
she recognized as being non-native to the area. "I know most of the ferns of this 
area," she said, "and have keyed and identified them. I knew this fern was not 
native and in order to identify it, I had to get a key to the genus (category of related 
organisms) after I had figured out the family it belonged to." From the master key 
of the world's species of ferns. Dr. Gordon picked out an Asian key which had a 
genus she thought the fern may belong to. She then sent a sample of the fern to the 
National Herbarium of the Smithsonian Institution, where plants are classified, 
and the species of Dr. Gordon's discovery was confirmed: arachniodes simplicion. 

The fern is native to China and the surrounding countries. How it became 
naturalized in this area is purely a matter of speculation, according to Dr. Gordon. 
"Most probably," she said, "soneone in this area had a fern of that type and the 
wind picked up some of the spores." Spores can be carried for hundreds of miles, 
she said, and the fact that the fern naturalized itself in this area is not all that 
surprising since the weather of the southern U.S. is similar to that of China. 

Still, the discovery of the arachniodes simplicion growing along the Savannah 
is significant, and a report on the find is forthcoming in the American Fern 
Journal. Dr. Gordon doubts that the fern grows anywhere else in the country, and 
she feels lucky to have found it. 

"It's growing in a really isolated area," she said, "There's a lot of water mocca- 
sins and ticks so naturally not too many people go there. It was a matter of luck 
that I was at the right place at the right time." 




Local History Affects the Nation 

by 

Tom Dworschak 

"It's unfortunate that so many people think that 'where I am can't be important.' 
Local history is too significant to be ignored this way." 

So says Professor Edward J. Cashin, Chairman of Augusta College's History De- 
partment and author of four books on the history of Augusta. 

A strong believer that "case studies of local history form the foundation of national 
history," Cashin explained one local event from out of the past that had national 
implications. The case of Cummings vs. Richmond County Board of Education in 1899 
upheld the doctrine of "separate but equal" education that stood until 1954. 

"To residents of this area, this case is local history," Cashin says, "but in reality it 
affected the entire nation. In fact, a scholar from Cal Tech traveled at great expense 
all the way from the West Coach to Augusta just to study this one case. For him it was 
not local history." 

Another idea Cashin stressed is that "old historical generalities, which exist be- 
cause of the lack of anything better, are usually oversimplifications of fact and are 
usually wrong." Cashin cites the institution of slavery in the antebellum South. 

"People look at the old slave codes which prohibited slaves from owning property, 
smoking, learning how to read or write, or being on the streets after dark, and 
therefore assume that 'Gone With the Wind' accurately portrayed slavery. 

"Actually, these codes are designed to control agrarian slaves, not urban slaves, 
and in the cities the codes were disregarded. In Augusta, slaves owned property and 
moved about freely." 

Cashin also cleared up some false assumptions about General Sherman's march 
through Georgia during the Civil War. The professor said that Sherman's motives for 
bypassing Augusta were purely military, not humanitarian. 

"Sherman was marching from Atlanta to Savannah, and a glance at the map shows 
that Augusta does not lie along that path. The closest Sherman got to Augusta was 
Waynesboro, where some Union and Confederate cavalry clashed." 

Cashin added that the period fires that ravage large sections of Augusta have 
destroyed more of the city's heritage than any of the America's wars ever did. 

The future of Augusta looks bright, Cashin believes. "We will probably find that 
the things that have provided us with a reason for being in the past will do so also in 
the future. Our location on the Savannah River is a source of strength. But we do need 
to use the river to our advantage — the Waterfront project is a step in the right 
direction. 

"New tax laws are an advantage in remodeling old houses," Cashin said, "and 
renovated houses will attract tourists. We're moving in the right direction in preserv- 
ing Augusta's heritage." 






(1 to r): Dr. David Speak, Dr. Thomas Chadwick, 
Dr. Ralph Walker, Dr. George Chen 



(I to r): Dr. Calvin Billman, Dr. 

Edward Cashin-Department 

Chairmen, Dr. Charles Saggus 




(1 r): Dr. David Foley, Miss Jeanne Jensen, Dr. 
Thomas Ramage, Dr. Paul Taylor 




(1 to r): Dr. Delwin Cahoon, Dr. Joanne Zimmerman, Dr. Harold Moon, Dr. Ed Edmonds-Department Chairman 
Dr. John Sappington 




"If we don't get some positive reinforcement 
for our work on modeling stimulus responses, 
I'm considering shaping my fixed ratio to 
commit extinction!" 



Dr. Jane Cross, Dr. Steve Hobbs. Dr. David Proefrock 




Inducing Hypnosis with the Alpha Disk Synchronizer 

by 

Donna K. Broshek 

"For many years, psychologists have been aware of a phenomenon labeled 
subjective color preception," according to Dr. Delwin Cahoon, a psychology 
professor at Augusta College. Subjective color preception is the sensation of 
color which results from viewing a rotating black and white pattern. 

Dr. Cahoon's interest in this phenomenon led him to create the Alpha Disk 
Synchronizer which, basically, is a black and white disk attached to a power ' 
source. Dr. Cahoon's Synchronizer was awarded the grand prize in a contest 
sponsored by Hypnosis Quarterly. 

While experimenting with the Synchronizer, Dr. Cahoon discovered that the 
most effective rate of pulsation for subjective color preception to occur is 8-12 
cycles per second; this rate coincides with the Alpha range of brain wave activ- 
ity. Since Alpha activity is correlated with relaxation and suggestibility, Dr. 
Cahoon foresaw applications of this phenomena in his clinical use of hypnosis. 
He discovered that the Alpha Disk Synchronizer was indeed effective in induc- 
ing hypnosis. 

In practice, Dr. Cahoon seats the subject 12-18 inches in front of the disk and 
explains the procedure as follows: 

"As you can see, the disk in front of you has a black and' white design. 

However, when it is rotating at a speed corresponding to your Alpha brain 

wave frequency, a color effect will appear. The point at which you see these 

colors most clearly indicates maximum readiness for hypnosis. Now gaze 

steadily at the disk but without straining in any way ..." 

Theoretically, Alpha should be enchanced by the rotation rate of 8-12 cps. "In 

any event," according to Dr. Cahoon, "the dramatic appearance of color where 

color previously did not exist convinces the subject that something is happening. 

Since that something has been defined as indicating the approach of hypnosis, 

the subject quite readily accepts the role of hypnotized subject." 




(1 to r): Dr. John Smith, Jr., Mrs. Ernestine Thompson, Dr. R. Frickey-Department Chairman, Dr. Phillip Reiehel, 
Dr. Dexter Burley 



Sluts, Nuts and Perverts 

by 

Diane McGrath 

Have you ever wondered what it's like to be a pervert, juvenile delinquent, or 
a murderer? Well, sociology professor Phillip Reiehel gives students the oppor- 
tunity to explore these lifestyles and many others as well. 

Reiehel, 34, has lived in Augusta since 1972 and has taught at Augusta 
College for eight years. He received a Baccalaureate degree from Nebraska 
Wesleyan and a Masters and Ph. D. from Kansas State. 

Being a student during the troublesome, rebellious 1960's, Reiehel developed 
an interest in social affairs, society, war, and the role of students on campus at 
that time; he thus chose to enter the field of sociology. 

In the spring, Dr. Reiehel taught "Introduction to Criminal Justice", "Social 
Problems", and a "Selected Topics" course that he called "Sluts, Nuts, and 
Perverts" (a title from a classic journal article). He likes "Selected Topics" 
courses because they allow him to deal with interesting, informative subjects 
not covered in the regular curriculum. Reiehel would eventually like to cover 
Cultism or the Jonestown incident. 

Last year he conducted a course about murder, discussing the "Act of Mur- 
der", "Murder in Literature", and "Theories about Murder". Students found the 
"Murder in Literature" session especially exciting. Reiehel invited English 
professor Norm Prinsky to speak and show films concerning the topic. In the 
middle of class Prinsky was "shot" and "killed" by a blank fired through the 
classroom door by Dr. Duncan Smith, leaving the students aghast. 

Dr. Reiehel doesn't deal with the ordinary. He prefers "non-traditional learn- 
ing techniques" to give students a sense of non-traditional lifestyles. 




Dr. Reiehel 



The Effects of Television 

by 

Betty Hull 

Television did not become a major factor in everyday lives of Americans until 1946. Then T.V. came into its own. Now 
millions of children automatically turn on the T.V. daily without thinking. What are the consequences? Dr. Anne 
Christenberry is one person who can let you know. 

Dr. Christenberry, along with Dr. Linda Clary, both education professors at Augusta College, has written four research 
papers on the effects of T.V. on young children. In March the most recent paper will be presented for the International 
Reading Association in New Orleans. At the conference there will be programs, lectures, and workshops offered on the 
topic. 

The main objective of their research is to "raise people's awareness". T.V. is both a permanent and pre-eminent fixture 
in American homes today. Dr. Christenberry says, "We know it has a tremendous influence, but we don't know how 
much." 

Dr. Christenberry brings out the fact that maybe teachers need to reexamine their teaching methods. "They should be 
aware of how children are conditioned by T.V." Viewers, especially children, watch a television program for about 7 
minutes, and then there are the ads . . . Therefore, children's attention spans are conditioned for short periods of time. 
Perhaps elementary schooling methods should be altered to shorter working periods. 

Many of the television programs are not directed at and are inapproprate for kids. Most heroes in T.V. shows today do 
not exemplify traits most parents would want their children to emulate. Sometimes a young child can become confused by 
traits that his parents teach him to value and those which T.V. characters exhibit. With stable characters such as The 
Lone Ranger and John Wayne it was clear who was the goody guy. 

Many times a child who watches T.V. by himself becomes mesmerized. Studies have proved that the whole presentation 
of television (the color, sound, and lighting) can cause a person to become somewhat fixated. 

Dr. Christenberry believes that it is unnatural for children to watch T.V. for long hours. "Little children learn through 
activity." T. V. violence also can impose rather adverse effects on children's lives. Bandura and Walters, psychologists, did 
a study on agression in children. Research revealed that children tend to imitate what they see on T.V. "We still do not 
know how extensive the effect is," says Dr. Christenberry. 

Dr. Christenberry says that it is wise for parents to view shows with their children, "If a parent can react with the child, 
he can keep the child on the right road." 

Remember, "help your child select as you select." 




(1 to r): Dr. Frank McMillan, Dr. Elige Hickman, Dr. Frank Chou, Mrs. Karen Sheppo, Dr. Linda Clary, Dr. Lyle 
Smith. Mrs. Paulette Harris, Dr. Robert Hilliard, Dr. Sharon Crawley, Dr. Mary Anne Christenberry, Dr. Geraldine 
Hargrove-Dean, Back row: Dr. John Flowers, Dr. Joseph Murphy 




(1 to r): Dr. Freddy Maynard, Dr. Margaret Dexter, Dr. Bill Bompart. Dr. James Benedict, Mr. Allen Baker 




/ill W-J 



(1 to r): Mrs. Elizabeth Bryan, Mrs. Anna Turner, Dr. M. Edward Petitt. Mr. Allen Baker. Dr. Gerald Thompson. Dr. 
Anna Hamrick, Mr. A. Marlin Brown 




Baker & Hamrick at computer 



Publishers Express Interest in CSC 235 Lecture Notes 

by 

Donna G. Sylvester 

Allen Baker and Kathy Hamrick, Professors in the Department 
of Mathematics and Computer Science, have conducted research 
on techniques used to teach computer programming. The intent of 
their research was to find a more effective approach for introduc- 
ing students to programming languages. 

The approach they developed evolved over a two year period 
and separates the programming process into problem solving and 
language translation. When the approach was introduced into 
CSC 235, a suitable text could not be found. Therefore, they decid- 
ed to compose lecture notes for student use. These lecture notes 
are currently used in all CSC 235 courses as one of the primary 
texts. 

Several publishing firms have indicated interest in the lecture 
notes and are currently reviewing the material as a possible com- 
puter science textbook. Regardless of the outcome of the text 
publication, both professors feel the method is sound and have 
plans for further research into the teaching of computer program- 
ming. 

Allen Baker is a graduate of the Georgia Instute of Technology 
and Bowling Green State University. He came to Augusta College 
in 1978 from the University of Georgia where he was manager, 
Data Base Administration. Kathy Hamrick is a graduate of the 
University of Georgia. She has been at Augusta College since 
1976. 




Dr. Jerry Townsend, Chairman, and other members of the department share their thoughts after a 
faculty meeting. 



faculty crn:di:d5 




FACULTY CA-a*<Dȣ>S 



\<* 




Graduates 



Bridges-Thompson 



'•3* 



Bruce Bridges 
Psychology 



Kathie Hammond 
Psychology 



Dale Reddick 
Psychology 



Maxwell Taylor 
Business 



David Crooke 
Psychology 



Patricia McKee 
Accounting 



Sandi Rogers 
Education 



Linda Thompson 
Accounting 




Amerson-Cleek 



Seniors 



Sharon Amerson 
Nursing 

Ellen Anderson 
English 

Leroy Arnette. Jr. 
Sociology, Crim. Justice 



Doug Barnard III 
Business 

Albert Bennett, Jr. 
Business Education 

Huery Bentley III 
Management 



Joel Biles, Jr. 
Biology 



Willis Biles 
Biology 



Walter Brooks 
Accounting 



Ben Bynum. Jr. 
Management 

Phyllis Cantley 
Accounting 

Christene Cleek 
Sociology 




Seniors 



Culpepper-Gray 




Gail Culpepper 
Psychology 

Brian Deringer 
Biology 

Mary Diveley 
History 



Mark Espitallier 
Psychology 

Arleen Evans 

Public Administration 

Lynn Flanagan 
Biology 



Steve Fogle 
Accounting 

Alan Fowler 
Computer Science 

Wayne Fowler 
Management 



John Gable 
Psychology 

Glenn Glover 
Accounting 

Terri Gray 
English 



Green-Lancaster 



Seniors 



Steven Green 
Psychology 

Cordy Hobbs, Jr. 
Psychology 

Arthur Holliday 
History 



Jeff Hoover 
Biology 

Lynda Houston 
Nursing 

Sandra Johnson 
Sociology 



Shirley Johnson 
Psychology 

Starr Johnson 
Accounting 

Kim Keats 
Art 



D. Kay Kirkman 
English 

Gary Kirkman 
Business 

Kay Lancaster 
Music Education 




Seniors 



Leach-Muller 




Lazaleus Leach 
Accounting 

Frank Lee 
Biology, Psychology 

Elyssa Levere 
Biology 



Lynda Ann Lovingood 
Special Education 

Barbara Ludwikowski 
Finance 

Collins Lyons 
Biology 



John MacDonald 
Biology 

Billy Masters 
Marketing 

Denise McClure 
Elementary Education 



Kathleen McLain 
Sociology 

Kathryn McNitt 
Elementary Education 

Catherine Muller 
Sociology 



Meyers-Seago 



Seniors 




Seniors 



Seaman- Weaver 




John Seaman, Jr. 
Political Science 



Roy Smith 
History 



Teresa Smith 
Accounting 



Libby Steed 
Biology 

Milton Steinberg 
Management 

Edward Tarver 
Political Science 



Mary Terrell 
Nursing 

Bob Turner 
Accounting 

Charles Valder 

Political Science-Sociology 



Sherry Walz 
Biology 

Charles Warren III 
History 

Jill Reed Weaver 
Marketing 



Weston-Wright 



Seniors 




Seniors 




Adams-DeVaney 



Juniors 



Adams, John 
Alfano, Scott 
Ardrey, Brett 
Atkins, Amy 



Barnwell, Valerie 
Bell, Maxine 
Berry, Donald Jr. 
Biles, James 



Biles, Louis 
Boerner, Karl 
Branch, Steven 
Broshek. Donna 



Brown Eric 
Buggs, Keith 
Canada, Karen 
Chavous, Marvin 



Cooper, Laurie 
Cooper, Mary Ellen 
Crawford, Priscilla 
DeVaney, Robin 




Juniors 



Dudley- Jones 




Dudley, Delia 
Emmil, Daphne 
Eubanks, Gerry 
Parrar, Mark 



Galloway, Rick 
Grubbs, Sharrell 
Harbin, Lee 
Harpe, Karen 



Hartfield, Clinton 
Hicks, Charles 
Hoffman, Jon 
Home, Marsha 



Home, Stanford 
Houston, Reginald 
Hunt, Lease 
Jackson, Wanda 



Jenkins, Phyllis 
Johnson, Kenneth Lee 
Jones, David 
Jones, Dorothy 



Jones-Newman 



Juniors 



Jones, Martin 
Jones, Theresa 
Langston, Vann 
Lawlor, Joanne 



Lenz, Carol 
Lewis, Edith 
Lillis, BUI 
Little, Elise 



Ludwick, Tim 
Manning, Leonard 
Marlin, Brenda 
Marshall. Alan 



Marshall, Joyce 
McCawley, John 
McDonald, Eric 
Molock, Anthony 



Mortensen, Stephanie 
Myers, Cindy 
Neal, Eddie 
Newman, Sandra 




Juniors 



Nohe-Vaughan 




Nohe, Kathleen 
Olds, Shellie 
Prelesmk, Don 
Regan, James 



RiUer. Sandra 
Romelotti. David 
Sacco, Carole 
Scherer, Patricia 



Scott. Patrick 
Setty, Lata 
Smith, Rita 
Smith, Sandy 



Spooner. Gena 
Sullivan, Ardena 
Toole, Marie 
Tranum. Tommy 



Tudor. Annabel 
Tutt, Ric 
Vakoc, Connie 
Vaughan, Porter 



Vick-Williams 



Juniors 



Vick, David 
Warne. Susan 
Weis. Audrey 
Whaley. Don 



Williams, Bruce 
Williams. Kim 




Sophomores 



Adams-Forrest 




Adams, Julian 
Annast, Sharon 
Banning. Debra 
Boatman, John 



Boland, Del 
Boles, Shelby 
Brooks, Jacquelyn 
Buchanon, Steve 



Butler, Ida 
Carte, Teddi 
Cisneros, Ralph 
Crozier, Joseph 



Daniel, Barry 
Dean, George 
Duggan, Sonya 
Edgar, Angle 



Evans, Stephanie 
Everett, Theodore 
Earthing, Robert 
Eorrest, Reginald 



Garthwaite-McGahee 



Sophomores 



Garthwaite, Lisa 
Harris, Susan 
Harrison, Robert Jr. 
Hattman. Barbara 



Heath, Suzanne 
Herrington, Anita 
Holmes, Dennis 
Howard. Mary 



Howard, Thelma 
Hunt, Patti 
Ingram, Barbara 
Jones, Gloria 



Lam, Patricia 
Lane, Jayne 
Larmon, Kimberley 
Lightfoot. Leven 



Main, Linda 
Martin, Marianne 
Mathis, LaVerne 
MeGahee, Dwayne 




Sophomores 



McGlotha-Sims 




McGlotha, Beverly 
Miles, Susan 
Miller, Audrey 
Miller, Gail 



Mize, Darlene 
Mosley, Mary 
Palmer, Melvina 
Pippin, Ed 



Popplewell, Doug 
Price, Donald 
Price, Edna 
Reber, Elizabeth 



Reddick, Kathleen 
Reichel, Patricia 
Richardson, Karl 
Rogers, Donna 



Sanders, Susan 
Sanders, Vicki 
Sherman, James 
Sims, Marcelle 



Smith-Yun 



Sophomores 



Smith, Christine 
Smith. Laura 
Spurlock. Rhonda 
Tankersley, Roxanne 



Taylor. Walter 
Thaxton, Jeter 
Thomas. Gwendolyn 
Thrailkill. Mark 



Tomberhn, Teresa 
Tranum, Stuart 
Turner, Brett 
Walker. Randy- 



Walker. Samm 
Walsh. Crystal 
Ward. Frank Jr. 
Wardlaw, Sam 



Williams. Alfonso 
Wolfert, Peter 
Yun, Chun Sue 
Space. Phillip 




Freshmen 



Adams-Columbro 




Adams, Janice 
Adams, Stephanie 
Anderson, Libba 
Andress, Charlene 



Armstrong, Tina 
Arthur, Tommy 
Avery, Gertrude 
Bell, Edwina 



Bennett, Leslie 
Bennett, Ramona 
Boerner, Margot 
Brumberg, Cindy 



Byrd, Michael 
Carroll, Sarah 
Chambers. Mike 
Chappel, Lois 



Ciccarello, Melanie 
Clark, Tammy 
Cofer, Amy 
Columbro, Norene 



Conrad-Dye 



Freshmen 



Conrad, Terrie 
Cooper, Valerie 
Costello, Teresa 
Crews, Delia 



Cummings. Janice 
Davis, Donna 
Davis, Karen 
Dean. Pamela 



Denmson, Michael 
Diggs, Sharon 
Dixon. Chris 
Dixon, Jim 



Dobbs, Lanora 
Dodd, Bill 
Donathan, Gloria 
Dorsey, Freda 



Duncan, Rhonda 
Duncan, Teresa 
Dunn, Robert 
Dye, Angela 




Freshmen 



Fleisch- Jacobs 




Fleisch, Martha 
Fowler, Alandra 
Gallahar, Vicki 
Gantt, Joe 



Garner, Edward 
Garner, Frank 
Gavin, Dawn Daniels 
Gay, Beth 



Gearhart, Cathy 
Giles, Darryl 
Goodis, Mary 
Hanison, Daisey 



Hensley, Lelia 
Herrod. Lynda 
Hogan, Lynn 
Holmes, Pamela 



Horath, Anita 
Howell, Helen 
Hutcheson, George 
Jacobs, Betty 



Jalandoni-Lightfoot 



Freshmen 



Jalandoni. Mary 
Jar vis, Peggy 
Jason, Jerry 
Jenkins. Wayne 



Johnson, Cathy 
Jones, Jeffrey 
Jones, Mark 
Jones, Pamela 



Jones, Sandra 
Kelleher. Maria 
Kelsey, Bill 
Kemper, John 



Key, Jeff 
King, Purvis 
Landers, Timothy 
Lanham. Paulinda 



Lanning. Julia 
Lawrence, Queen 
Lewis, Willie Jr. 
Lightfoot. Cassandra 




Freshmen 



Long-Nelson 




Long, Donna 
Lyons, Faye 
Lyons. Janice 
Mack, Bonita 



Manley. Donna 
Masters, Kessler 
McCombs. Donna 
McElveen, Montine 



McPherson, Paula 
Milford, Sue 
Miller, Susan 
Mitchell. JoAnna 



Mitchell, Sythena 
Mock, Kimberlyn 
Moore, Debby 
Morns, Janet 



Muliins, Colin 
Murray, Ginny 
Myer, Carol 
Nelson, Tammy 



Newman-Scott 



Freshmen 



Newman, Skip 
Noble, Deborah 
Oates. Jon 
O'Neil. Alison 



Orsborn, Cynthia 
Owens, Angel 
Pizarro, Vilma 
Poss. Mary 



Prather, Mike 
Queen, Max Jr. 
Rawls. Irene 
Read, Jon 



Readdy, Gina 
Reeves, Tracy 
Richardson, Rita 
Riley, Natalie 



Ruff, Kimberly 
Sanderlin. Alicia 
Schieberl. Laurie 
Scott, Gerald 




Freshmen 



Sellers-Wacker 




Sellers, James Jr. 
Smith. Adrienne 
Smith, Deborah 
Smith, Jennifer 



Smith, Pam 
Sparks, Geraldine 
Spooner, Jacqui 
Stanford, Dennis 



Stephens. Bridget 
Sullivan. Patricia 
Tankersley. Helen 
Taylor, Alyscia 



Taylor, Janelle 
Thomas, Melody 
Thrailkill. Robbin 
Tolbert, Glenn 



Traynham, Deborah 
Ulm, Julie 
Varela, Johanna 
Wacker. Lorena 



Walker-Wynn 



Freshmen 




Makeups 



Acord-Battle 




Acord, William J. 
Adams. Vermta 
Agee, John 
Alexander, Anthony 
Allen, Diana Crane 



Anderson, George 
Anderson, Hope 
Anderson, Linda 
Annis, B.J. 
Ansley, David 



Anthony, Bernadette 
Armstrong, Sylvia 
Arnold, Carl - 
Arnngton. Marie 
Austin, Perry 



Avery, Louise 
Avery, Mark 
Avrett. Clifford A. Ill 
Baker, Chris 
Banning, Debra 



Barger, Stanley 
Barkley, Mark 
Barnaby, Faye Otts 
Barron, Debbie 
Barton, Donna Marie 



Bass, Cindy 
Bass, Guy 
Baston, Allen 
Bates. Ruth 
Battle, Diane 



Beard-Capers 



Makeups 



Beard. Deborah 
Becerra. Vivian 
Beck, Henry S. Ill 
Beckham, Tracy 
Benitez, Carlos 



Bishop, Quinton 
Black, Linda 
Bledsoe, Raymond C. 
Blodgett, Frances 
Boshell. Jean 



Boyd, Mark 
Bovd. Richard W. Jr. 
Bradford. Carl 
Brassell, Debra 
Bnttain, Gregg 



Bntton, Aurora 
Brodenck, Pamela 
Brooks. Cheryl 
Broughton, Richard 
Bruce, Marie 



Bruno, Glenda 
Bryant, Tammy 
Burris, Jane 
Butler, Marion 
Bynes, Janice 



Cail, Pierre 
Calhoun. Catherine 
Campbell, Diane 
Canuette, Shelby 
Capers, Carolyn 




(\YM ■ I 



Makeups 



Capers-Daniel 




Capers, Kim 
Carder, Naomi 
Carroll. James 
Carroll. Thomas 
Carter, Charles 



Castro, Belinda 
Cave, Leslie 
Centers, Lori 
Chappelle. Tommy 
Chavous, Sheila 



Cheeseborough, Deborah 
Chesser, William 
Chestnut, Prasert 
Ciarlone. Mark 
Clement. Cheryl 



Coffen, Francis 
Colon, Odette 
Connor. Marcia 
Cook, Cheryl 
Cornehson, David 



Coulter, John 
Covington. Sarah 
Cox, B. K. 
Crawford, Kathy 
Crockett, William 



Cruey, G. Kendall 
Cummings, Moses 
Daitch, David 
Daniel, Deborah 
Daniel, Nianne 



Danner-Gabe 



Makeups 



Danner, John 
Dasher, Samuel 
Davis, Phyllis 
Dean, Chris 
Delgado, Stella 



Dent, Douglas 
Dickey, Ann Howard 
Diggs. Andrea 
Diggs. Sharon 
Donehoo. David 



Dorns, Suzanne 
Dowey. William 
Driggers, Valarie 
Dudley, Larry 
Dumas, Donna 



Erbland, Mark 
Ertter, John 
Ethndge, Cheryl 
Fatteh, Hasanah 
Fee. Gene Boyer Jr. 



Fields, Sharen 
Finley, Gloria 
Fitch, Larry 
Flemming, Gerri 
Finchum, Richard 




Frails, Larry 
Frails, Pamela 
Freeman. Angela 
Fultz. Andrea 
Gabe, Tammie 




/V k 



•i* 



l<l L 




r* f» 



Makeups 



Galloway-Heland 




Galloway, Michele 
Galloway, Rick 
Gavin, Joseph 
Gibbs, Pic 
Giles, Darryl 



Gilman, Cindy 
Givens, Roy 
Godbee, Ann 
Goodis, Mary 
Goodis, Richard II 



Gosdin, Richard 
Gracey, Betty 
Graham, Flaciea 
Graham, Mary 
Grant, Arthur 



Graves, Maggie 
Gray, Terri 
Green, Terrel Lynn 
Gregg, John 
Gregory, Junell 



Greubel, Frederick 
Grimes, Michael 
Haire, Kathy 
Hall, Vivanne 
Halman, Chuck 



Hardin, Evelyn 
Harmon, Paul 
Harrison, Shellene 
Hawkins, Kenny 
Heland, James 



Held-Ingram 



Makeups 



Held, David 
Hemann, Gregg 
Henderson, Mike 
Hendley, Deborah 
Henley, Lynette 



Hickman, Pam 
Hill, Jerry 
Hill, Johnny 
Hill, Juanita 
Hill, Louise 



Hill. Tara 
Hobbs, Dolly 
Hodges, Bonnie 
Hodges, Krista 
Holland, Tyrone 



Holley, Terry 
Holloway, Leigh 
Holz-Meister, Kay 
Honston, Philippa 
Hope, Annette 



Hopper, George 
Horton, John 
Horvath, Hilary 
Houston, Lynda Jane 
Howard, Greg 



Howard, Paul 
Hughes, Angela 
Hughes, Glen 
Hutchinson, Norman 
Ingram, Lona 




Makeups 



Irwin-Lanier 




Irwin, Jennie 
Isom, Brooklyn 
Jackson, Edward 
Jackson, Frances 
Jackson, Jane 



Jackson, Josephine 
Johnson, Michael 
Johnson, Rob 
Johnston, Linda 
Jones, Anthony 



Jones, David 
Jones, Diana 
Jones, Joanne 
Jones, Lois 
Jongma, Henry 



Jordan, Louise 
Juras, David 
Kalcos, Maria 
Karmichael, Steve 
Keber, Faith 



Kelley, George W. Jr. 
Kelley, Mary 
King, Meta 
Klementowski, Mary 
Kuglar, Everett 



Kuglar, Nancy 
Lamers, Christopher 
Lamkin, Sandra 
Lane, W. Edwin Jr. 
Lanier, Wayne 



Lattimore-Mercer 



Makeups 



Lattimore. Brenda 
Leatherwood, Susan 
Lee, Barrie 
Lee. Richard 
Lemke, Jimmy 



Lenz, Carol 
Lenz, Laura 
Lindsey. Olivia 
Lindser, B.P. 
Lory, Brant 



Lovelace, Ginny 
Luke, Cicero Sr. 
Luke, Hazel 
Luke, William 
Maes, Dodi 



Manning, Leonard 
Marshall, Daniel 
Matson, Chip 
McCants, Tina 
McCarthy, William 



McCauley, John 
McClellan, Jonathan 
McDaniel, Angela 
McElmurray, Ben 
McGrath, Dennis 



McKie, Beth 
McKine. Clyde 
Medina, Maria 
Melvin, Victor 
Mercer, Shern 




132 



Makeups 



Merritt-Palmer 




Merritt, Sandra 
Miles, Jenine 
Milford, Lynda 
Miller, Janice 
Miller, Kurt 



Mobley, Nancy 
Molskow, Tom 
Monroe, Gary 
Montgomery, Al 
Moon, Martha 



Moore, Sara 
Morris, Sara 
Moses, Carlene 
Mulherin, Ann 
Mulherin, Barbara 



Mulherin, Tom 
Murray, Robert 
Myers, Beverly 
Myhand, Solomon 
Nabntt, Cheryl 



Nash, Thomas 
Navarro, Louis III 
Nixon, Francena 
Nobles, Debra 
Nobles, Jeanette 



Nohe, Kathleen 
Norman, Douglas 
O'Connor, Martin 
O'Connor, Sharon 
Palmer, Diane 



Partain-Roebuck 



Makeups 



Partain, Russell 
Pate, Janet 
Payne, Bartley 
Pedraza, Vince 
Perkins, Frankie 



Perry, Dixie B. 
Perry, Lisa 
Phillips, Joann 
Pierce, Voncille 
Polk, Robert 



Powell, W. Floyd Jr. 
Prather, Mike 
Price, Edna 
Quaye, N. Gordon 
Quick, Charles 



Rabb, Sharion 
Rainey, Carolyn 
Ramsey, Douglas 
Read, Jon 
Read, Vera 



Reeder, Stephen 
Reichard, Jon 
Reynolds, Twila 
Rhodes, Michael 
Riley, Karen 



Roberts, V. Miles 
Roberts, William H. Jr. 
Robinson, Roy 
Rodman, Alice 
Roebuck, Fay Ellen 




Makeups 



Rogers-Smith 




Rogers, Nancy 
Rowe, Kenneth 
Rucker, John T. Jr. 
Ruff, Kimberly 
Ruler, John 



Ryan, Paul 
Sanders. Paul 
Sanford, Charles 
Sargent, Jeff 
Saunders, Phyllis 



Schmidt, Tracey 
Scoggins, Vernon 
Scott, Aline 
Searles, Michael 
Sears, Janet 



Seniuk, Susan 
Setty, Lata 
Sharma, Aparajita 
Sharma, Rakesh 
Sharpe, Joseph 



Shelton, Karen 
Shuford, Lisa 
Shuman, Jennifer 
Sieber, Tim 
Smith, Chris 



Smith, Delores 
Smith, Don 
Smith, Jennie 
Smith, Sandra 
Smith, Steve 



Sogge-Vick 



Makeups 



Sogge, Debbie 
South, Susan 
Sparks, Geraldine 
Spooner, Gayla 
Spurgeon, Carol 



Steverson, Carolyn 
Stiles, Dora Mae 
Story, Randy 
Striker, Gene 
Stroud, Connie 



Sullivan, Martha 
Sweat, John 
Sylvester, Donna 
Tate, Claude Jr. 
Tatro, Jack 



Taylor, Lisa 
Tayler, Tracy 
Taylor, Walter 
Teach, Joseph 
Thomas, Beverly 



Thompson, Frank 
Tomberlin, Paul 
Tomlinson, William 
Totka, Eva 
Totka, Jacqueline 



Turner, Bob 
Ulm, Julie 
Usry, Deloris 
Vasquez, Dolores 
Vick, Brenda 




136 



Makeups 



Vinson-Zeit 




Vinson, Larry 
Vinson, Martha 
Walker, Cynthia 
Walters, Andrea 
Walters, Pamela 



Wan, Lillian 
Watkins, Kirk 
Watkins, Patricia 
Watts, Peggy 
Weatherly, Martha 



Welcher, Portia 
Weldon, Bill 
Wells, Kevin 
Westbrook, M. Craig 
White, Dee 



Wichman, Carolyn 
Williams, Jimmy 
Wilson, James 
Wilson, Jeanie 
Wilson, Wilhelmina 



Wisnieski, Christopher 
Wolfe, Brent 
Worthington, Jo Ann 
Wright, Erika 
Wynn, Bob 



Zeit, Evelyn 



Imnts 



LYCEUM SERIES 




The Tempest 



This year Atlanta's Academy Theatre presented a superb 
performance of Eugene O'Neil's A Moon for the Misbegotten. 

In addition to the performance, the Academy actors 
conducted a series of workshops for students, teachers, and 
community theatre people. 

Another exciting production was Shakespeare s The 
Tempest which was presented by the National Players. The 
play was a skillful blend of romance and realism, high poetry 
and low comedy. 




A Moon for the Misbegotten 





The Tartini Trio 



One of the first presentations of the Lyceum Series 
this year was a lecture by Jeffrey Klein entitled 
"MOTHER JONES on Politics". Since its inception, 
Klein has been a principal editor of Mother Jones. 
Klein has written seven cover stories for the magazine 
including "The Unbooked Tour of Russia", "Born Again 
Porn", and "Semi-Tough: The Politics Behind 60 
Minutes". 

The Lyceum Series also sponsored a discussion by 
Frederick Allen, chief political writer for the Atlanta 
Constitution, and Dr. Bruce Campbell, associate 
professor of political science at the University of 
Georgia. The two political experts discussed the 1980 
presidential election. 

Another political expert brought to the campus by 
the Lyceum Series was Congressman Parren Mitchell 
from Maryland. Mitchell, Chairman of the House Sub- 
Committee on Small Business, spoke on "American 
Politics in the 80's". 

The Piedmont Chamber Orchestra with guest 
conductor Peter Perret, and featured artists Elaine 
Richey and Sally Peck, performed in April as part of 
the Lyceum Series. The 22-member orchestra, created 
in 1968, consists of strings and solo winds, and is 
augmented by brass and percussion as the program 
requires. 

The Lyceum Series continued its tradition of 
sponsoring fine musical performances with the 
appearance of the Tartini Trio. 




Congressman Mitchell talks with Dr. Tom Chadwick and students Kenneth Johnson anr' 
Beverly Meyers 



Cullum Program 




Dr. Barbara Stowasser 



Dr. Bruce Lawrence 



The Cullum Third World Culture Program 
focused on "The World of Islam" this year. The 
program looked at the unifying values and major 
issues of Islam in light of its geographic and 
cultural diversity. The program also studied the 
impact of modernization on traditional societies, 
and the resulting rise in cultural and religious 
nationalism. 

Lecture topics included "Islam and Politics: 
Examples from Recent History", "Islam, Sister 
Religion to Judaism and Christianity", Islamic 
Mysticism", and "American Policy in the Middle 
East". 

The Cullum Program won the G. Theodore 
Mitau Award in 1979 for innovation and change 
in a state college. 



V 




Dr. L. Carl Brown 



Ernie Barnes 



Ernie Barnes, the artist whose works were fea- 
tured on TV's "Good Times" comedy show, had an 
exhibit and sale of his works in our Fine Arts Cen- 
ter on May 1 and 2. 

The exhibit was sponsored by the Student Union 
and opened with a reception. 

Barnes has achieved national recognition for his 
diverse talents. After graduating from high school 
in Durham, N.C., with 26 full athletic scholarships, 
he attended North Carolina Central University. He 
received his degree in art, and was then drafted to 
play professional football by the then world cham- 
pion Baltimore Colts. Over the next six years, he 
played offensive guard for the San Diego Chargers, 
and later for the Denver Broncos. Though he no 
longer plays football, Barnes has translated much 
of the beauty and spirit of athletic grace into his 
art. 

His works have received much popular attention, 
and have been featured in over a dozen one man 
shows throughout the nation. 






"The Glass Menagerie" 




DrQaitizations 



Reserve Officers Training Corps 





Student Government Association 





Frank Chow Lee 
President 



George Scott Alfano 
Vice President 



Phyllis Cantley 
Treasurer 



Sheila Ryan 
Secretary 




Se/ia/e-Front row (1 to r): Carolyn Jackson, Huery Bentley III, Kristi Shaw, William Wansley. Susan Pearson, Patt Scherer, 
Gayla Spooner, Middle row: Dale Reddick, Glenda Bruno. Back row: Charles DeVaney, Cheryl Ethridge, Alfonso Williams, 
Beverly Meyers-Chairman, Ed Tarver, Pat McKee, Leonard Manning, Laurie Cooper. 



The SGA administration accomplished many projects under the leadership of Frank Chow Lee. Re-paving of the parking lot 
behind the Reese Library, better lighting on campus, the CAC opened for additional hours, additional typewriters in the library, and 
coffee breaks for night students are just a few examples. In addition, Frank was responsible for instituting the senate retreat at 
Jekyll Island, and for hosting a meeting of the Students Advisory Council of the University System at AC. Congratulations Frank, 
Scott, Phyllis, and Sheila for a job well done! 




Student Union-(\ to r): Krisi Shaw, Beverly Meyers, Ed Tarver-Chairman, Edith Lewis, Henry Kelly, Annabel Tudor, 
Ranzy Weston, Paul Ryan, Jacqui Spooner. Kathy Thompson-Advisor, Frank Lee. 




Judicial Cabinet-{\ to r): Theresa Jones, Joyce Dozier, Jerry Bedingfield-Chairman, Donna Broshek, Gary Kirkman 



Pi Kappa 




Front row (1 to rt): Chris Powell, Ken Stacy, Paul Ryan. Second row: John Boatman, Bill Rutledge, Paul Sanders, John Sweat. Third 
row: James White, Rudi Wilmouth, Bob Turner, Vann Langston. Back row: Tracy Reeves, Chris Wisnieski, Jeff Sargeant Andy 
Cheek, Roy Givens, Tony Perrotto. 








This page paid for by Pi Kappa Phi. 




Mu Rho Sigma 
Epsilon 



MU RHO SIGMA, EPSILON chapter, was formed at Augusta College 
in March 1980 to help bridge the gap between the married or formerly 
married woman student and the college community. 

MU RHO SIGMA offers friendship, scholastic encouragement and an 
opportunity to participate in college activities as part of a peer group. 
Membership is open to those women who are or have been married, are 
part-time or full-time students, may or may not have children, and may 
or may not work part-time or full-time. Meetings are held at alternating 
times (days, nights and weekends) so that everyone will have a chance 
to attend. Programs are planned which will be both informative and fun 
and which will at times include the entire family. 

MU RHO SIGMA was originally founded at Georgia State in the 1950s. 
It is fast adding colonies to its already dynamic organization. Its alumnae 
are very active and supportive of the new colonies. 

EPSILON COLONY at Augusta College encourages any married or 
formerly married woman student to attend a meeting to find out more 
about us. Not a sorority in the traditional sense, we are a sisterhood in 
our desire to help each other through what can sometimes be hectic 
college years. Those who are attending Augusta College for the first 
time or who are considering attending or returning to school are also 
welcome to contact us for more information. 




Patt Scherer receiving the Mu Rho Sigma Scholarship. 



* %■ 



i'lSS 



■ 



1980-81 Officers. 



1980-81 Officers 



1981-82 Officers 



Organizational President 
President 
Vice President 
Recording Secretary 
Corresponding Secretary 
Treasurer 



Linda Thomson 
Denise Mc Clure 
Joyce Dozier 
Patt Scherer 
Linda Wise 
Carolyn Lineberry 



President 

Vice President 

Recording Secretary 

Corresponding Secretary 

Treasurer 

Advisor 



Patt Scherer 
Marsha Home 
Linda Carter 
Suzanne Heath 
Faye Otts 
Mary Lisko 




Mu Rho Sigma members at the Hoedown. 



Members at a Mu Rho Sigma convention in Atlanta. 




Members: 



Gayle Atwater 
Sandi Foster 
Betty Goetz 

* Rosemary Grimm 

* Theresa Jones 
Julie Pender 
Linda Wise 
Dee Vasquez 

Linda Ellen Thompson 
*Denise McClure 
*Joyce Dozier 
*Patt Scherer 

* Carolyn Lineberry 
Marsha Home 
Linda Carter 
Suzanne Heath 
Faye Otts 

*= Charter Members 

Pledges: 
Mary Terry 
Michelle Atkins 
Iris Dillard 
Pat McKee 
Sandi Rogers 

Honorary Members: 
Rita Rutsohn 
Linda Thompson 



Delta Sigma Theta 




(1 to r): Norma Williams-Secretary, Deidre John- 
son-President, Beverly Myers-Vice President 




Francine Wynn and Linda "B.J." Anderson 



Zeta Tau Alpha 













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Front row: Jean Crosby, Lisa Perry, Stephanie Mortenson, Linda Meehan, Mary Wright. Standing: 
Gayla Spooner, Tracy Jones. 



Alpha Kappa Alpha 




(1 to r): Karen Canada, Dora Stiles, and Valerie Barnwell 



Delta Chi 




Newly initiated brothers 



Perry Austin 
Jeff Boyd 
Carlo Bracci Jr. 
Carlo Bracci Sr. 
Steve Bracci 
Howard Bryan 
Don Ferrell 
Michael Lirette 
Lee Manning 
Brooke Martin 
Ron McCoy 

Tom Nash 

Mark Overstreet 

Don Prelesnik 

Ray Reynolds 

Thomas Rhodes 

James Sellers 

Roy Smith 

Charlie Valder 

Pete Wolfert 

Steve Safford-Pledge 

Robert Thurmond-Pledge 



Psychology Organization 




(1 to r): Jacqueline Glenn, Carolyn Wishman, Jeanette Luc, Susan Pearson, Dale Reddick- 
Treasurer, Steve Green, Lisa Bishop, Bruce Bridges, Donna Broshek-Secretary. Not pic- 
tured: Bill Scoggins-President. 



NAAAE 




In tree: David Donehoo. Standing (1 to r): Tracy Hawkins, 
Mike Jeffers, Ms. Eugenia Comer-Advisor, Angelika Selman, 
Delia Dudley. 



Phi Beta Lambda 



Shellene Harrison-President 
Walter Brooks-Vice President 
Lucie Dixon-Secretary 
Carey Jones-Treasurer 
Lynda Lovingood-Reporter 
Albert Bennett-Parliamentarian 



Roberta Allen 
Lewis Avery 
Debra Ann Barnes 
Wayne Bartel 
Audrey Bergeron 
Debra Cartledge 
Leslie Cave 
Carolyn Hamilton 
Joe Harris 
Starr Johnson 
Carol Jones 
Elaine Jones 



Henry Kelly 
Patricia Lemon 
John McCauley 
Sally Mclver 
Pat McKee 
Beth Mortensen 
Stephanie Mortensen 
Patty Niece 
Debra Nobles 
Peggy Paradise 
Bob Parken 
Marcia Perry 



Greg Posten 
Robyn Rowe 
Deloris Smith 
Brian Urbanek 
Tamra Vanderloop 
Cynthia Walker 
William Wansley 
David Wardlaw 
Dee White 
Bruce Williams 
Mildred Wright 



Euclidean Society 



Michael Binic 

Michael Carries 

George Hutchenson 

Brenda Locke 

Dr. Freddy Maynard 

Leslie Rosas 

Dr. Gerald Thompson 

Mary Ann Whitener 

Alfonso Williams 



Pep Club 




Front row (1 to r): Pamm Shands, Faye Lyons, Maxine Raimer. Row 2: Dawn Daniels, 
Bridget Stephens, Tina Armstrong, Annette Williams, Sharon Diggs, Joyce Shands. Row 
3: Gertrude Avery, Kimberly Ruff, Janice Lyons, Vilma Pizarro. Back row: Anthony 
Jones, Ranzy Weston, John Arrington, Reginald Forrest, Glenn Hughes. 



Bell Ringer 




Annabel Tudor 
Editor-in-Chief 



(1 to r): Patricia Swearingen, Bill Scoggins, Pat McKee, Elianne 
Halbersberg, Sheron Smith. 



Staff Box 

Annabel Tudor, Editor-in-Chief 

Pat McKee, News Editor 

Lizbeth A. Wheeler, Copy Editor 

Vann Langston, Sports Editor 

Sheron Smith, Feature Editor 

Bill Scoggins, Business Manager 

Al Griffin, Ass't. Business Mgr. 

Elianne Halsberg, Entertainment Editor 

Patricia Swearingen, Ass't. Entertainment Editor 

James Garvey, Advisor 

Bell Ringer Award-Bill Scoggins 

Chronicle-Herald Award-Annabel Tudor 

The Bell Ringer does not try to verify the claims made by its advertisers, nor does it 
endorse products advertised. 

Opinions expressed in signed editorials and in letters to the editor do not necessarily 
reflect the opinion of the Bell Ringer or Augusta College. 



165 



White Columns 




(1 to r): Rakesh Sharma, Photographer; Donna K. Broshek, Editor-in-Chief; Donna 
G. Sylvester, Asst. Editor; Sonya Duggan, Co-Business Manager. 



Anita Herrington, Co-Business Manager; Gerald Steele, 
Layout Staff. 



Staff 1980-81 



Editor-in-Chief: Donna K. Broshek 
Assistant Editor: Kathleen Reddick, Fall 

Donna G. Sylvester, Winter, Spring 
Copy Editor: Shelby Boles, Fall 
Layout Editor: Donna G. Sylvester, Fall, Winter 
Assistant Layout Editor: Ardena Sullivan, Winter, Spring 
Business Manager: Alison O'Neil, Fall 
Co-Business Managers: Sonya Duggan, Winter, Spring 

Anita Herrington, Winter, Spring 
Staff: Janice Adams, Mike Dennison, Edith Lewis, Gerald Steele 
Photo Editors: James White, Fall 

James Sherman, Fall 

Rakesh Sharma, Winter, Spring 
Staff Photographers: Jon Read, Porter Vaughan 

Contributing Photographers: Donna K. Broshek, Dee Davis, John Groves, Pat Scherer, Anna- 
bel Tudor, Mike Webb, Roscoe Williams. 

White Columns 1980-81 cover and divider pages drawn and designed by Dixie Perry. 
Student pictures taken by Sudlow Photography. 
Makeup pictures taken by Jim King Photographer. 

Special thanks to: Dee Davis, Mary Dickson, John Groves. Frank Lee, Pat McKee, Gayla Spooner, Kathy Thompson, 
Annabel Tudor, and the Bell Ringer Staff. 



i^ 
w* 



























fldittftising 



New Car Sales 
New Truck Sales 
Used Car Sales 




• Auto Body Repairs 
and Painting 

• Service Repair on 
Any Kind of Vehicle 



FORD 



• On-The-Spot Financing 

• Leasing on New Cars 
and Trucks 

• Rental Cars and Trucks 
By the Day or Month 

• Complete Line of Parts 
and Accessories 

• "EARLY BIRD SERVICE" — 
leave your car with us anytime 
during the 24 hours. 

M04J736-335/ 



J?066 Yfoidon tffig/iuiai/. Cy^^M/h.^x>i^/a 30909 



Trade-mark® I J 

"late" school nights 



to 



V" 




The Citizens and Southern National Bank 

We're here 



I would like to express my appreciation to the 
yearbook staff, especially my editor Donna Bro- 
shek and the business managers Anita Herring- 
ton and Sonya Duggan. Thanks for a job well 
done. 

Donna Sylvester 

Asst. Editor 




Paid for by Andrew Jackson 



Augusta College 
Jazz Ensemble 



MICHAEL McCLARY 

Director 

828-3211 




1455 WALTON WAY 

AUGUSTA, GEORGIA 30902 

(404) 722 -2224 



Tiem Huong Tin 



!M 



m 



ORiental Boutique 

Oriental Foods - Gifts - Jewelry 



Michel Huong Sanchez 



US(T) & Bobby Jones Expwy 
3128 Deans Bridge Road 



Telephone (404) 790-4303 
Augusta, Georgia 30906 



"A Touch Of The Orient In August 



?? 



#*,-& 



mm 

WIA 






mfvfm 




| ITALIAN - GERMAN* 
AMERICAN FOOD 



M 12 Vt'righlsboro Rd. - Lunch and Dinner 

Salad Har- -JH-5-WJ .-'.{ 

Corner D Rridgv Rd Lyman SI Dinner Only 

Cocktail Lounge -"Jti-OOOS ~'JH <>J 1 1 




SOUTMSfDE 
DATSUN 

DRIVEN TO EXCELLENCE 




PEACH ORCHARD EXXON 

Service Center 



E*ON 



Specializing In All Mechanical Work 



Auto and Trucks 
Road Service 



Barney Glover 



2822 Peach Orchard Rd 

Augusta. Ga 30906 

( 404 ) 793-3165 



FfRD 



When America Needs A Better Idea 
Ford Puts It On Wheels 



WILLIE COLQUITT 

SALES REPRESENTATIVE 



WALKER FORD. INC 



1223 WALTON WAY 
AUGUSTA OA 30901 



722 3371 
Res 788 8213 




Symbol of l c Jj§|jr Quality 

MEMBER 

BUY FROM THE PROFESSIONALS 

M&M MOTORS 

738-6638 

Top Value New and Used Cars & Trucks 



BILLMcGAHEE 



RAY SIGERS 



MAC McGAHEE 



LEWIS JONES 



JOHN FOSTER 



"Guaranteed Titles 

- OUR MOTTO - 

"CUSTOMER SATISFACTION' 

MEMBER OF GIADA 
A name you can TRUST 



congratulations seniors! welcome to the alumni world ! 




Maxwell Alumni House 

The Augusta College Alumni Association is a growing 
organization which supports every phase of the college. The 
association hosts activities throughout the year such as 
reunions and other events designed to maintain a close 
relationship with classmates and the college. Each graduated 
class receives a complimentary membership in the association 
tor the first year following graduation. The Office of the 
Director of Alumni Affairs is located in the Maxwell House. 

ASSOCIATION VICE PRESIDENTS 

OFFICERS 

H Gradv Smith. III. '75 

Presideni (( JJ .. Ruth McAuliffe. 28 

^S&ifcsr David Renter. Jr., '76 

Robert M Herron. '79 Joyce K Wa!sh -75 

Secretary James M Menger. '55 

C Pearl Bailie, '76 



Where 

Opportunities 

Grow! 



Compliments of Brynwood Pharmacy 

3527 Walton Way 
Augusta, GA 




First National 
Bank 



MEMBER FDIC 






SCONYERS. INC 


211 

Old Fasf 
Caier 


Windsor Spring Road 
gusta, Georgia 30906 
ioned P't Cooked Bar-B-Q 
ng Division 404*790-5411 


LARRY E 


SCONYERS Preside 



WILLIAMS AUTO ELECTRIC CO. 

STARTERS — GENERATORS AND ALTERNATORS REPAIRED 
AND EXCHANGED — ALL WORK GUARANTEED 90 DAYS 



Don and Phil 

PHONE 733-0333 



301 EVE STREET 
AUGUSTA, GEORGIA 30904 



DANIEL VILLAGE 
BARBER SHOP 

2803 Wrightsboro 
Augusta, GA. 



AUGUSTA PARTY SHOP 

1629 Walton Way 

Augusta, Ga. 



0LASS 

TJervice 

LflENTER 



Tl 1 



JODIE H IVEY III (BUDDY) 



PAPER PRODUCTS 

1431 Marvin Griffin Rd. 

Augusta, Ga. 30906 



Bus Phone 722-7395 



1230 Reynolds Street 
Augusta. Ga 30903 



Of li-^ Cuswm Gunsmiihmg 3 JS* Accessories 

■'<i/^2rf i Sanders Custom Gun Shop 
vwi/kjrc^-t,;,^.. 



120 NINTH STREET • PHONE 722-8164 
AUGUSTA, GEORGIA 30902 



FURNITURE RENTALS 

INC. 

559 Walton Way 
Augusta, Ga. 30901 



ED &JEANN1NE SANDERS 



KOCH FUELS INC. 
Prep Phillips Drive 
Augusta, Ga. 



GIBSON'S FLOWERS 
2131 Walton Way 
Augusta, Ga. 



MACUCH STEEL PRODUCTS 

1527 Augusta Ave. 

Augusta, GA. 30904 




Monday through Saturday 



Located in Surrey Center near the 

Augusta National Golf Course 

475 Highland Avenue 

Augusta, Ceorgia 30909 




ROGER W. DAVIS & ASSOCIATES 



Site Planners-Lanscape Architects 
4 Fifth St. Augusta, Georgia 30901 
(404) 724-4666 



JACK GROGAN INSURANCE AGENCY 



COMMERCIAL - AUTO - HOME 
ESTATE PLANNING 



PHILLY STYLE 
SUBS & STEAKS 

1889 Gordon Hvvy. - 736-2224 

Gordon Hwy. & Wheeless Rd. Across from Augusta Tire 

Augusta, Georgia 30904 



OVER 30 YEARS EXPERIENCE ON FOREIGN CARS 



Sams Foreign Car Service 

Specializing in VW, Toyota, Datsun 



SAM CARPENTER, Owner 7th & Greene St. 

722-7 1 62 Across from Trailways 



"for all your sign needs" 



7JJM 



&IJ :Ji 



JOHNNIES AUTO PARTS 



1480 REYNOLDS STREET • AUGUSTA, GEORGIA 30901 



(404) 724-6407 



LARRY FINUF 

Owner 



■ ■ , . V 




FLOWERS ft GIFTS 



827 seventh Street 
Augusta GA 30902 



STEWART 
SHEET METAL WORKS, INC. 

*LL TYPE SHEET METAL WORK INCLUDING STAINLESS. 
ALUMINUM WELDING AND FINISHING 



Debokah c p»bt 



Phone 7241 391 
HOME 863-2925 



EL STEWART 



Augusta 
_ Scale 
Company 



Tom Lemon 

Sales Manager 



1914 Lumpkin Road 

P.O. Box 5641 

Augusta, Georgia 30906 

(404)793-2190 



PET 

INCORPORATED 



DAIRY GROUP 



XJU. 



•' 447 HIGHLAND AVENUE 
SURREYfcCENTEH 
AUGUSTA, OgORGIA 30909 



KlKGS 



3LUR) m 



(fi«> 



Phone (H4) 736-3037 



3309 WASHINGTON ROAD 

AUGUSTA MALL - AUGUSTA, GA , 
COLUMBIA MALL - COLUMBIA, S.C. 




GREAT FOOD 
GENEROUS LIBATIONS 
LIVE ENTERTAINMENT 
GAMES & POOL TABLES 

lim;b 11:00-2:30 

2740 Washington Rd. 

Augusta, GA 

736-4087 




Restaurant & Lounge 

NOW OPEN SATURDAYS 



SATURDAY S LUNCH MENU 

LAMB w ROAST POTATOES & STRING BEANS 

ALSO ANOTHER ENTREE 

AS WELL AS AVGOLEMONO SOUP 

GREEK SALAD AND BAKLAVA 

349 TELFAIR ST „__ „„„ = 

TELFAIR INN 722 4805 



WHEATLEY 

Grading Contractors, Inc. 



Residential 
Commercial 
Industrial 




Licensed Throughout 

Georgia and 

South Carolina 



P Box 4391 
Settlement Rd 



Martinez, Ga. 30907 
863 2164 or 863-2165 



P & T ELECTRIC 

Electrical Contractors 

24 HOUR SERVICE 

Craig Peoples - 793-0174 Rt. 6, Box 439 Winn Dr. 

Ronnie Thomas - 863-1843 AUGUSTA, GA. 30906 




A B BEVERAGE 
537 Gwinnett St. Ext. 
Augusta, Ga. 



STROTHER'S 

PRINTING, INC. 

305 EIGHTH STREET 

AUGUSTA, GEORGIA 30902 

PHONE 722-4813 



Sbudii' i 



KING OF BEERS 



tjjinnefs 



A PLACE WORTH 
SEARCHING FOR 

733-0574 



modern welding company 

jfTlodern) box ioo67 . augusta. Georgia 30903 

FABRICATORS OF METAL PRODUCTS 




Uube 



Ft E S T\A.T_J R..A.ISJ" T 




JUST GOOD FOOD 



1920 

WALTON WAY 

AUGUSTA 



PHONE 
73*4179 
GEORGIA 



Electric Cowboy 's 
Drink of the Month 




COWBOY 
COOLAIO 
M 00 



INGREDIENTS 

Rum. Pcaih Brandy. Orange Juice. Sour Mil 



DfLIGHTfUUr DEUCIOUS 




PH: (404) 738-0741 



AL WALL MOTORS 

1879 GORDON HWY. 
AUGUSTA, GA. 30904 

AL WALL OWNER BUY, SELL & 

TRADE 



Since 1866 
Agents, Brokers and Consultants 

DAWSON, TAYLOR & SHERMAN, 
Inc. 



404-722-8883 
943 Reynolds St. 
Augusta, 30913 




JENNINGS MANOR 



3235 Deans Bridge Road (U.S. Highway 1 
South) 

Greetings and Good Luck to the Class Of '81! 



RYDER. THE BEST TRUCK MONEY CAN RENT. 



re. 



RYDER 



Six Convenient Neighborhood Dealers 



BEAR 

EUBANKS AUTO 
& TRUCK ALIGNMENT, INC. 



B G EUBANKS 



®ff* ^Uea ^otor ,3lmt 



JOHN O. COUGHEh 



JGUBTA GEC 



24 HOUR WRECKER SERVICE 
CALL THOMAS KENDRICK AT 722-5346-7 

Open Sat. 9 to 1 for Free Estimates 

Georgia Paint & Body Works 

RADIATOR REPAIR WORK 

ALL WORK GUARANTEED 90 DAYS 

TRANSPORTATION ASSISTANCE 



Colonial 



g/aAcKO/^/MKjb 



asty 



p. o. box zeee • augusta. oeorgia 50003 



MARION KREPPS 



■ I IIMII 

WRECKED 
CARS 



DIXIE PAINT & BODY SHOP, INC. 

3331 Ol-O SAVAfsJIsjAH ROAD 

AUGUSTA GEORGIA 30900 

FREE ESTIMATES - WORK GUARANTEED 



Shop ■ 79a4066 



RES 592-410O 



Compliments of 



PHONE: 790-0697 WRECKER SERVICE 

John's Auto Service 

SPECIALIZING IN REBUILDING ENGINES 



CUSTOM JEWELRY * JEWELRY REPAIR * WATCHES 
* GOLD JEWELRY 



#^ .% 



<^»^' 



JOHN McCORD 
OWNER 



1802 THOMPSON DRIVE 
AUGUSTA, GEORGIA 30906 



ROBERT J HOLTZCLAW 
OWNER JEWELER 



3830 Washincton Rom 
Martinez GA 30S07 

Ph 860 5388 



BRYNWOOD PHARMACY INC 
3527 Walton Way 
Augusta, Ga. 



24 Hour Wrecker Service Phone 863-9551 

E & G GARAGE 

Complete Auto Repair 
Ed & Glen 

105-B Robinson Ave. 
Grovetown, GA 30813 




JERRY D. HOOKS 

Representative 

2343 Lumpkin Road 
Augusta, GA 30906 
Phone:793-1255 Res: 798-3922 



(Die QWn (Taocnt 

SINCE 1937 

Fine Foods and Beverages 



■ll 



NATIONWIDE 
INSURANCE 




7th and Reynolds Augusta, Georg 



MASTER 
FABRICATORS 



404-724-9426 
Or 724-2144 



AUGUSTA, GA 




We'll give you 
the Shaft . . . 
any length! 




HOAGIE HUT 

2101 CENTRAL AVE. 

7330432 



HOAGIE HUT 

2101 Central Ave. 

Augusta, Ga. 

733-0432 

PIZZA - BEER 

OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK 
MEET YOUR FRIENDS 

EST HOAGIES THIS SIDE OF THE 
H AS N-DI XO N LINE 




CURTIS 

BAPTIST 

SCHOOL 

"WE OFFER A COMPLETE EDUCATlOH 
WITH A CHRISTIAN ATMOSPHERE" 

• Established in 1964 • 

• DAY CARE • DEDICATED TEACHERS 

• KINDERGARTEN • MODERN FACILITIES 

• ELEMENTARY • OUTSTANDING PROGRAMS 

• HIGH SCHOOL • BUS TRANSPORTATION 



For Complete Information Call... 

OAY CARE 
THRU ELEMENTARY 



7TH thru 1ZTH GRADE 



.- > «» " i - "*4 

w 

You're the nurse who wants to make the 
most of your career — 

to constantly improve your skills — 
to become the best you can be. 

We want that for you, too. 

Call us for an interview to discover what's 
"special" about St. Joseph nursing. 

We feel sure you will want to 

MAKE US A PART OF YOUR DAY! 



738-0196 



722-2437 




2230 BROAD ST. 



1326 BROAD ST. 




A MINISTRY OF CURTIS BAPTIST CHURCH 
LAWRENCE V. BRADLEY JR^ — PASTOR 



ST. JOSEPH 
HOSPITAL 

404-737-7454 AUGUSTA, GEORGIA 



DUKE RESTAURANT 



1920 Walton Way 

Augusta, Ga. 

736-6879 



738-7604 
738-7812 



<&w 



sg*£ 



l*"** 



1853 Gordon Highway. Augusta. Georgia 



1 



jftrst Sapiist CJiurrli 

3500 WALTON WAY 

AnqiiBtn, A?>enrqia 



Dr George L Balentine 



TELEPHONE 722-0O88 . 722-6321 



c^atch-EX i crfuto <^3 



TRUCK WHEEL ALIGNMENT * BALANCING 

BEAK WHEEL ALIGNMENT . . . FRAME STRAIGHTENING 

WHEEL BALANCING . . . GENERAL REPAIR WORK 

TIRE SKIMMING 



1215-17-19 REYNOLDS ST. 
AUGUSTA. GA. 



ONE HOUR MARTINIZING 



'nifmnit 



ONE HOUR MARTINIZING 

2356 Washington 

Augusta, Ga . 

738-0993 



THE PICTURE FRAME PLACE 

CUSTOM FRAMING * PRINTS * STOCK 
FRAMES 

1960 KISSINGBOWER ROAD 

AUGUSTA. GEORGIA 30906 

TELE. 738-4925 

KELLY ROBERTSON 

SANDRA KREPPS 

PAT MARCUS 



Compliments of 

COLUMBIA NITROGEN CORP. 



"Compliments Of A Friend" 



FAST SERVICE 

MIGHTY MUFFLER 

15th At Walton Way 
722-4429 




Continental 

Charcoal 

Room 



at Bush Field 

Fine Dining Consisting Of: 
Steak, Lobster, Crab, Prime Rib 

Dinner 6:00-1 1 :00 Mon.-Thur. 
6:00-11:30 Fri. & Sot. 

Bush Field -798-5501 

Now Serving Lunch 1 1 -2 Monday-Friday 



$&& 







II 



CONSULTING SINCE 1959 



ANTHONY 

ADVERTISING 



SPECIALISTS IN UNIVERSITY & 
COLLEGE YEARBOOK & HANDBOOK 
ADVERTISING 

A few pages of selected advertising will help defray soaring 
printing costs. Student Publication Advisors and Publishers' 
Representatives are welcome to call us for further information. 
Our staff of professionals will work closely with you and your 
publisher. 



1600 TULLY CIRCLE SUITE 105 ATLANTA. GEORGIA 30329 

(404) 329-0016 



"SUP** 
coNR«y 





■I i i ii K-nmm