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Full text of "White Columns"

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1992- 



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Opening 


1 




Student Life 


6 




Classes 


56 




Academics 


98 





Clubs % Organizations I I 8 

Sports 136 

Community 168 

Closing 188 



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Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2010 with funding from 

LYRASIS IVIembers, Sloan Foundation and ASU Foundation 



http://www.archive.org/details/whitecolumns1992augu 



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At Augusta College, many 
events took place that made 
this year different from the 
year before, but there will 
always be those little things, 
parking for instance, that 
never change. 




DIFFERED 








Augusta College is an institu- 
tion that is constantly in a changing 
mode. Being a commuter college, 
students come and go quarter after 
quarter. However, students were 
not the only difference this year. 
Augusta College inherited a new 
acting president. Dr. Martha Farmer, 
after the death of former president. 
Dr. Richard S. Wallace. 



Students and faculty had to 
work around new budget cuts. Fac- 
ulty had a "helping hand" when 
student government initiated an In- 
House volunteer service. 

Students and faculty took in- 
terest in improving our campus by 
campaigning for recycling aware- 
ness, alcohol awareness, and safe- 
sex promotion. Augusta College 



II 



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also remained an alcohol-free cam- 
pus prohibiting alcohol at any cam- 
pus functions. 

Students and faculty had to 
wait a few more weeks before head- 
ing out for spring break which was 
moved to Masters Week. With all 
these different changes through the 
year, Augusta College may look the 
samebutinitsown way... different. 




Crowded Parkins 
Registration Lines 
Uending Machines 
Computer Labs 
Brol^en Copy Machines 
Stress 

SGA Hand-Ballot Uoting 
Christmas Break 
Tutoring for Classes 
Epoxy-Painted Walls 
College Entrance Exams 
Seven A.M. Classes 
Inconsistent Clocks 
Parking Ticket Fees 
Library Hours 
AC Radio Station 
Closed Classes 
Financial Aid 




From the prices of books to the 
price of food, long registration 
lines to theater performances, 
every event at Augusta Col- 
lege made a difference to the 
students and faculty. 



Acting President 
Acting Registrar 
Academic Affairs UP 
Spring Break 
Athletics to Division (( 
Volunteer Office Aids 
Al E. Cat 
Budget Cuts 
Cat Trax 
Tuition Increase 
Recycling Awareness 
Student Deck Planned 
Safe Sex Promotion 




WH/VrS THE 



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According to the purists of the 
calendar, the new decade truly began 
in 1991. The year 1991 was full of the 
best and worst of times. These events 
are what made the difference from the 
year before and no other year can 
claim them. 

Just when the chimes of free- 
dom were ringing in the Soviet Union, 
the Kremlin and Gorbechov's empire 
crumbled to his feet; dividing the coun- 
try along with its people. 

On the homefront, Americans 
were finally shifting back to a more 
serene state after being caught in the 
middle of war halfway across the 
world. 

But it was one of America's 
most prestigious athlete's admittance 
to the HIV virus that can lead to AIDS, 
that woke up America. Magic John- 
son opened our eyes to the fact that 
this deadly virus can occur to anyone. 

Sexual harassment took a front- 
row seat in congress when Professor 
Anita 1 li 11 poured out charges against 
Clarence Thomas. 



As if to turn away from their 
troubles even for a mere glimpse, the 
world focused its attention on one of 
the most unforgettable World Series. 
For those of us at home, the toma- 
hawk-chopping Atlanta Braves be- 
came a household name as they sizzled 
their way to the top with a MIRACLE 
SEASON. 

Just as everything in the U.S. 
was improving, Americans watched 
a gruesome event that shook our na- 
tion. Los Angeles- an image etched 
forever in our minds. It was the first 
time in years that our country seemed 
unstable and out of control when the 
officers of the Rodney King beating 
were acquitted. Innocent lives were 
taken as people rioted in the streets 
after the verdict was read. 

Every event made a difference 
in our lives even if it didn't effect us 
directly. But through every event, we 
as a nation learned something so next 
year we can resolve to do better. 

-Nilam Patel 




Above: After graduation this woman reeeive congratulations from 
her family. Right: Students found it very useful to form study groups 
to help each other prepare for an upcoming exams. Far right: With 
the increase of students on campus, the registration lines became 
almost unbearable. Top right: Augusta Public Transit offered free 
service to AC students with valid IDs. What better time to review 
notes than while waiting for the bus. 



k 



^1 tudent life on campus had its differ- 



Oences this year. Enrollment increased 
by 100. making it harder to find a 
parking space in the already packed parking lot and 
made the registration lines almost unbearable. 

Students and faculty who smoke had difficult 
time finding a place to "light up". All buildings 
except for the lower level of the College Activity 
Center became smoke free. 

Recycling Week made students and faculty 
more "Earth Conscious." Campus offices recycled 
cans and paper and recycling bins were placed near 
the Chateau for students and faculty. 

Spring Break coincided with Masters Week 
this year which seemed to make Winter and Spring 
quarters go on forever. 

Student Life - What a difference! 





■■*s;. 




Fientation 



Do you remember Ori- 
entation? Were you nervous, 
excited, and frightened all at the 
same time? Were you unsure of 
what the day would bring, since 
all of your friends in college had 
already told you that ALL the 
classes were taken? Were you 
relieved to find out later that 
those people exaggerating? As 
you went around that day 
weren't you glad that you had 
those nice smiling people wear- 
ing those loud neon green 
nametags there to help you? I'm 
sure you were. Those smiling 
faces were the highly skilled and 
trained members of the Augusta 
College Orientation Advising 
Registration Special Programs 
staff, or OARS for short. 

The OARS staff is com- 
posed of students, who have 
volunteered their services for a 
period of one academic year. 
The staff was the brain child of 
Kathy Thompson, director of En- 
rollment Management. She 
wanted to "create a corps of 
trained student volunteers that 
would provide a continuity from 
program to program." Prior to 
the inception of the program. 
Orientation was staffed by 
whomever showed up to help 
that morning. Now, the staff is 
composed of people who put in 
as many hours as 65 hours in a 
year helping out with these pro- 
grams. 

Becoming an OARS 
staff member is relatively easy. 
One only needs to make an ap- 
plication with Ms. Thompson, 
who is located in the START UP 
center on the third floor of the 
CAC. Applications can be taken 
all year long. After the applica- 
tion is turned in, the prospective 
staff member is then handed an 
envelope with a check off sheet 
attached. The student has to go 
around and collect the neces- 
sary materials, find the right 
places, and speak to some im- 



portant people. Some of the things 
the staff learns are the number and 
position of all of the SGA free 
phones, where all of the adminis- 
trative offices are and what OPIDS 
is and where it is located. They 
also must obtain literature from 
such Student Services offices as 
Counseling and Testing, Financial 
Aid, and Student Activities. They 
must talk to Vice-Presidents 
Bompart and Barnabei, the Regis- 
trar, and the associate Dean of Stu- 
dents, Roscoe Williams, to name a 
few. Once this is turned in, the 
training with the current staff takes 
place and the new staff member is 
introduced to that most hectic of 
days: Orientation Day. 

Orientation Day is long 
and tiring for everyone. The pro- 
grams don't start until 10 a.m., but 
the OARS staff usually arrives in 
the PAT before 9 a.m. to set up. 
Usually there are already a few 
new students who are trying to get 
a jump on the system, but don't 
realize that they aren't able to reg- 
ister after a particular time, be- 
cause the computer won't allow it. 
Once the doors are open , the new 
students don't trickle in, they flood 
in. 

The first face a new stu- 
dent sees are those people who 
hand out the packets of useful in- 
formation. Also at the station are 
pencils, program schedules, infor- 
mation for Developmental Stud- 
ies students. Transfer information, 
and any other club or organization 
that manages to get their informa- 
tion to the OARS staff. From there 
the students go to the next station, 
where they pick up their schedule 
sheets. It is here that some prob- 
lems are addressed: Some people 
do not have schedule sheets, im- 
munization forms are not filed, 
there is some sort of admissions 
hold, etc... These problems are 
handled by the staff and represen- 
tative from Admissions, usually 
Patti Peabody. From there the stu- 
dents enter the Auditorium, where 



aze 



they are sat according to their ma- 
jor. There are OARS staff members 
inside to help them with any other 
questions. Usually the students are 
very restless. Many of them do not 
want to be there, they are worried 
about losing their classes. A few 
decide to leave the program and 
short circuit the process. They are 
found later in the day, wandering 
around campus confused and in 
need of help. Once the program 
starts, these new students are given 
an overdose of information con- 
cerning student services. Transfer 
credits. Developmental studies. 
Registration procedures and prob- 
lems with the "Registration Day 
from Hell" skit. After all of their 
questions have been answered, and 
perhaps a few more caused, the 
students are taken to their advi- 
sors. Here, it may take some time 
for the larger groups to see an 
advisor, but the OARS staff is there 
to help by answering what ques- 
tions they can, and telling the stu- 
dents what classes are actually 
closed. The OARS staff does not 
leave the station until the last stu- 
dent is gone, and then they go to 
see if another area needs help. This 
process can take as much as two 
hours. When this is finished the 
students and staff split their ways. 
The students go to register, buy 
their parking stickers, get their ID's 
madeand pay theirbills. The OARS 
staff reports back to the START UP 
center, where they relax for a few 
minutes and then fill out reports of 
the program and how the advising 
sessions with the students went. 

Orientation Day is a very 
busy day for all. It would be a little 
more difficult for everyone with- 
out the OARS staff there to help. 
New students have a chance to be 
greeted by fellow students who 
are willing to help. This helps to 
make the transition a little easier. 
That is the main mission of the 
OARS staff: To be there to just help 
when needed. 

James W. Hooper 




]; 




Below: Brenda and Dan - what 
would the Admissions Office be 
without these two! 




Bottom: Brent Erdman, a mem- 
ber of the OARS staff spends 
Orientation Day as one of the 
many volunteers wanting to 
help new students. 




Above: The Admissions Of- 
fice helps students with ar- 
ens ranging from registration 
questions to immunization 
requirements. Sam McNair 
helps a student move 
through! the process as 
quickly as possible. 



x'fl: The perfect schedule is 
often tough to find for in- 
coming students. So many 
classes are taken by enrolled 
students going Ihrougli pro- 
registration a quarter earlier 
that new students often start 
their school day in the morn- 
ing and finish up late In the 
day. 




Above: Sweets aren't one of 
the delicacies that vegetar- 
ians give up - Yi-Huey Yong, 
Secretary/Treasurer of the 
Higher Taste Club, 



Right: Vallartas Mexican 
restaurant offers vegetarian 
meals that Smita Pate 
Higher Taste Club President, 
takes advantage of. 



Vegetarians are not just "car- 
rot crunchers", they may 
choose from vegetables, 
fruits, grains, and legumes. 
Some types also enjoy dairy 
products and eggs. 



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ealmy 




The effect of diet on 
health has been a concern for 
mankind for thousands of 
years. In 1600 A.D., Thomas 
Moffett wrote in Heth (sic) Im- 
provement, "Men dig their 
Graves with their own Teeth, 
and die more by these fated 
Instruments than the Weapons 
of their Enemies." 

Today more and more 
scientific and medical studies 
DO Unk diet to a host of deadly 
diseases, including a variety of 
cancers and heart disease. As a 
result, people are altering their 
life-styles to include a healthier 
diet, and vegetarianism, once 
I looked upon as offbeat, is com- 
ing into its own. In fact, accord- 
ing to The Vegetarian Times 
magazine, about eight million 
\ Americans are now vegetar- 
I ians, including many celebri- 
ties like Candice Bergan, 
Christie Brinkly, George 
Harrison, Stevie Wonder, and 
Paul and Linda McCartney. 

Augusta College has its 
share of vegetarians too, and 
the Higher Taste Club was 
started this year to help veg- 
etarians and those interested in 
the life-style network and share 
information. Club members 
include students, faculty, and 
staff members-some who have 
sworn off meat for as many as 
16 years, as well as novices of 
several months. Non-vegetar- 
ians also frec|uent the meetings. 
Club president Smita 
I'atel, a vegetarian for eight 
years, said that one of the main 
functions of the group will be 
education. "We're not here to 
try to con vert anyone-we'll give 



them the facts, and they can 
decide for themselves. We can 
serve as a resource and support 
group for anyone who is inter- 
ested." 

Hema Patel, vice-presi- 
dent of the group, pointed out 
that while many people view 
vegetarians as "carrot 
crunchers," nothing could be 
further from the truth. "Veg- 
etarians choose from a wide 
variety of foods, including veg- 
etables, fruits, grains, and le- 
gumes (peas and beans). There 
are also varying degrees of veg- 
etarianism-lacto, which in- 
cludes use of dairy products; 
ovo, which includes eggs; lacto- 
ovo, which uses both eggs and 
dairy products; and vegan (pro- 
nounced vee-gun), which use 
no animal products at all. It 
gives people a lot of freedom to 
choose what they feel most com- 
fortable with, and what fits in 
best with their life-style." 

Faculty advisor Paul 
Sladky, assistant professor of 
English and a 16-year vegetar- 
ian, said, "In the 70's people 
became vegetarians for ethical, 
moral, pohtical, and spiritual 
reasons - health was not the 
prominent argument that it is 
today. Vegetarianism seems to 
follow closely the new direc- 
tion of holistic medicine, with 
its larger concern for a kind of 
'preventive' health mainte- 
nance. The low cholesterol na- 
ture of the vegetarian diet has 
strong appeal. On of our pur- 
poses is to make people aware 
of this option." 

Althougli lieiillh con- 
cerns are probably a major rea- 



son most Americans give up 
meat, Ms. Patel said some envi- 
ronmental problems caused by 
meat consumption are becom- 
ing more important. She said, 
"Growing one pound of wheat 
takes 60 gallons of water, while 
you will use 2500 to 6000 pounds 
of water to get the same amount 
of meat. Slaughterhouses and 
feedlots are also big users of 
fresh water, which is a precious 
resource we need to conserve." 
The students reasons 
for giving up on meat are di- 
verse, but club members feel 
good about their choices. Club 
secretary Yi-Huey Yong, a Pre- 
Med major, said, "All my hfe 
I've been conscious of what I 
was eating. As a biology major, 
seeing all the dead fish and 
animals made me realize what 
life actually meant and what 
meat really is." 

Ira Chase, a counseling 
psychologist at the Counseling 
and Testing Center, has been a 
vegetarian for nine years. He 
said, "I think vegetarianism con- 
tributes to wellness- it's part of 
a whole life-style. For me, not 
eating meat is a moral and 
health issue. I feel that it's 
healthier for me, and 1 know it's 
healthier for the animals." 

Ms. Patel encouraged 
by the student response to the 
group, said, "Now, we have 
about 15 members and that 
number is growing. We have 
as many members as a lot of 
college clubs, even though veg- 
etarians are a definite minor- 
ity." 

Karen Wiedmeier 
Public Relations Office 



SiAt^f // 



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"We're at war 

U.S. planes bomb Baghdad" 

The headhne in The Au- 
gusta Chronicle on the morning 
of Jan. 17, 1991, was the state- 
ment of what had taken place 
the night before. For the fifth 
time in this century, the United 
States had committed itself to a 
major war. 

There was a difference 
in this war and the ones that 
preceded it, however. This one 
was seen and heard around the 
world on live television. Cable 
Network News brought wave 
after wave of fighter-bombers 
battering Baghdad into our liv- 
ing rooms — homes where 
brothers, sisters, parents and 
friends of men and women in- 
volved in the fighting nervously 
watched and listened. 

The liberation of Ku- 
wait had begun. The mood was 
somber. At Augusta College, 
many students and staff mem- 
bers watched the war on televi- 
sion late into the night. Many 
missed classes or reported to 
their offices late. A television 
was brought into the Butler Hall 
Snack Bar. There was little con- 
versation. What conversation 
there was centered on the war. 

The picture was the 
same in the College Activities 
Center lounge where students 
gathered in front of the 52-inch 
television screen. 

The United States had 
been demanding for five-and- 



a-half months that Iraq with- 
draw from Kuwait. American 
warplanes and several thou- 
sand ground troops had been 
dispatched to Saudi Arabia in 
August. Military reserve units 
were put on stand-by for acti- 
vation. 

Before the war ended, 
it was brought very close to 
home at Augusta College. It hit 
closest to Theresa M. Bryant, 
director of the Division of Con- 
tinuing Education. Her brother 
was among the casualties. He 
was a gunner, one of 14 crew 
members flying on a support 
mission killed when their air- 
craft was shot down on Janu- 
ary 31 . She said that her brother, 
as well as the others who lost 
their lives were career military. 
"They were just doing their 
jobs." 

In the fall of 1990 when 
troops were being put on alert 
for possible duty in Saudi 
Arabia, enrollment at AC to- 
taled 5,205 which was 33 fewer 
students than had enrolled the 
previous fall. By winter quar- 
ter, registration was down to 
5,020. Spring enrollment was 
down by another seven stu- 
dents. Since the war's end, it 
has been on the upswing. 

There were no mecha- 
nisms in place to determine if 
the decline was Persian Gulf 
related, according to Jackie 
Stewart of the AC office of In- 
stitutional Research. "Wedidn't 



know where our students were 
working, how many were in 
the military or how many were 
military dependents," she said. 

For ROTC students at 
AC, the war made their mili- 
tary studies more serious. "We 
were no longer talking in ab- 
stracts," said LTC Patrick D. 
Rivette, professor of Military 
Science. 

"It definitely height- 
ened their interest," Rivette 
said. "Instead of just studying 
about logistical support and 
biological warfare, they saw it 
was something they could be 
called upon to know. These are 
skills you must learn before be- 
ing called to active duty. Once 
you're there, you don't have 
time to learn. You have to do." 
Sally Simkins 




V>v^ 



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12 





Above: When the United States committed itself to 
war in early January 1991, students of the ROTC 
program at AC realized how serious their military 
studies actually were. Students not only studied 
logistical support and biological warfare but tliey 
saw its effects first hand. 



I ar Left: Students anxiously awaited news of llu' 
warin theCAC l.oungeduringall hoursof theday. 
Most of the emotions seen were of anger and fear. 
The Coun,seling and Testing Center offered assis- 
tance to students having a difficult time dealing 
with Ihe effects of the w.ii 



l.rll: During the war in Iraq, Saddam Hussein's 
lorc( s ignited hundreds of oil wells in Kuwait, 
'iriioke bel( hed from the torched wells for many 
I Months, if lerwards.Salell lie photos showed a black- 
);n-y plume swept south from Kuwait as far soulh 
.1'. the Arabian Sea, which is eciiial lo the dislani c 
liom M.mh.illan lo the lijiof I'lorid.i, 



13 




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Above: Ccimpus politics were heated when a new 
policy banning alcohol on campus was passed. 
Here a news team interviews Kathryn Kimberly- 
SGA, Kay Phillips-Student Activities, JC 
Halvorson-SG A, John Groves-Student Activities, 
and Marion Cheek from Public Relations about 
the new policy. 



Right: Augusta had the opportunity to see Vice 
President Dan Quayle on one of his campaign 
stops for President George Bush. Quayle made 
his stop at Bush Field airport February 28th and 
stayed the afternoon to eat lunch with local city 
and county officials. 



Far Right: On a global view, the coup in the Soviet 
Union began on August 19, 1991. An eight-man 
committee led by Vice President Gennady 
Yanayev took power from President Mikhail S. 
Gorbachev. Yanayev said Gorbachev was ill. As 
Russian President Boris Yeltsin called on Rus- 
sians to resist the coup, tanks and other military 
gear moved into Moscow. 





DELTA 





Voters and non voters 
on campus have similar per- 
spective of political campaigns, 
whether it involves national, 
local or student government 
politics. "A joke: they start 
sweet and then the mud starts 
slinging," said Elizabeth 
Harper, as she worked in the 
campus book store. Freshman 
Charles Bell said, "I think about 
a lot of unkept promises and 
dishonesty." But for those who 
get involved in campus poli- 
tics, the rewards and accom- 
plishments are many. "Its such 
a wonderful experience once 
you get involved," said Patti 
Peabody, the first female Stu- 
dent Government Association 
President, serving in 1 986-1987. 

The lack of student in- 
volvement and delays in acting 
on issues sometimes spell a big 



negative for campus politics. 
"There are two groups of stu- 
dents, those who get involved 
and those who don't, and stu- 
dents are working harder leav- 
ing less time for politics," said 
Peabody. 

Also, there is some- 
times a delay in resolving some 
issues because leaders are not 
in a permanent position. Sev- 
eral of the colleges leadership 
positions are vacant, and it is 
easier for acting leaders to de- 
lay the decision making pro- 
cess. 

Sometimes the growth 
of the college sometimes causes 
issues that were handled ear- 
lier to reemerge, like parking. 
Many new spaces were made 
available three years ago, but 
the continuing enrollment in- 
crease has once again caused a 




problem with parking. 

Student involvement 
has increased some during the 
current tenure of Al Hamilton, 
outgoing SGA President. 
"We've got over 10 percent of 
the student body voting and 
the Senate size had doubled.... 
I want to see people involved. I 
am concerned about this cam- 
pus and the community," 
Hamilton said. He thinks the 
faculty has had a lot to do with 
the current involvement by 
speaking about upcoming 
events during class and vocally 
encouraging students to par- 
ticipate. 

"Hottest issues this 
past year have been dealing 
with the budget cuts, modifica- 
tion of the Student Activity Cen- 
ter and teacher evaluations." 
During the budget cuts stu- 
dents created a volunteer pro- 
gram and have been very help- 
ful contributing their time to 
ease the extra burden placed on 
the faculty. Modifications of 
the CAC building arose from a 
survey by the Judicial Cabinet. 
The new deck is in the planning 
process now. The teacher evalu- 
ation program, however, is one 
issue that seems never to get 
resolved. 

hi spiteof thenegatives 
there are big positives for those 
who get involved. Much can be 
gained from participating in tlie 
political structure. Students 
learn to be leaders and leaders 
learn humility. "Learning to 
di'.il with people is the greatest 
thing 1 learned," said Peabody. 
"Learning to deal with people, 
lo in.iki' unluirried decisions 
,HHi patience are the most im- 
portant things for me," said 
I lamilton. 

K, V.ni I iudson 





earcii 




Imagine going to a col- 
lege library and being sur- 
rounded by hoards of goofy 
teenagers with nothing but rag- 
ing hormones on their mind. 
Definitely not the ideal study 
location. 

Believe it or not, just a 
couple of years ago, this image 
was a horrifying dilemma that 
the Reese Library at Augusta 
College was facing. Assistant 
Head of Public Services for 
Reese Library, Roxann Bustos, 
remembers the invasion of the 
immature local teenagers all to 
well. 

"I can remember a 
couple of years ago finding 
teenagers on the upper floors 
of the library tossing M&M's 
around like they were still in 
their high school cafeterias," 
Bustos said. "They were acting 
like wild animals, and I felt like 
I was in a zoo instead of a col- 
lege library." 

"Ever since that inci- 
dent, high school students have 
been forbidden to enter the li- 
brary after 5:45 PM without 
adult supervision," Bustos said. 
"We started posting a guard at 
the front entrance, who checked 
student's IDs before allowing 
them to enter through the front 
gates." 

"After most of the im- 
mature trouble makers found 
out about the new regulations, 
they must have found other 
places to cause trouble because 
the noise and confusion at the 
library seemed to calm down," 
Bustos said. "The guard that 
stands at the front gate occa- 
sionally stops the younger look- 
ing people to make sure they 
are AC students." 

Augusta College has 
come a long way since the days 
of troubled teens invading col- 



lege students space. As a mat- 
ter of fact, 1992 brought many 
students into the library for sev- 
eral different reasons. Some stu- 
dents came to enrich their stud- 
ies with the vast research mate- 
rials, while others came to en- 
rich their social lives. 

"Younger students go 
to the library to socialize, but 
when they get into the higher 
level classes they tend to use 
the library to study a lot more," 
said Reed Coss, a Senior Com- 
munications major. 

"From my experience, 
more students come to the li- 
brary to study rather than to 
socialize," Assistant Librarian 
John O'Shea said. "However the 
library is a place for people to 
gather, so naturally socializing 
is also an integral part of the 
system." 

"I think as long as stu- 



dents aren't being disrespect- 
ful to others than they can do 
whatever they want," Bustos 
said. "I am really happy to see 
the students using the library 
regardless of their intentions." 

Whatever the initial 
reason might be for making a 
trip to the library, students will 
surely come away with some 
gained insight. Whether the 
knowledge has been academic 
or social, students will saunter 
away from Reese Library with 
valuable insights into the 
world. 

AC students should 
also feel privileged that they 
have the infinite right to use 
the library's resources without 
being subjected to prosecution. 
Just imagine how envious those 
uncontrollable hormone crea- 
tures must be! 

Tiffany Smith 







r- 













Above: The ATLAS computer system was 
installed in the library in 1989. This system 
allows students to look up publications by 
title of work, author of work, or by subject 
matter. It definately saves time and headache 
when completing homework projects. 










Left: The library may be the only place that 
some students can take advantage of the quiet 
to complete their work. Some corners of the 
library are isolated enough that small study 
groups can get away with talking -- quiet 
talking. 










Far Left: The third floor of the library houses 
a branch of computer services. The oflice 
vlays open during regular office hours and 
takes care of computer and software related 
problems shkiciits may I'Mcounti'r. 









Stiuia<ti.<k / g 




Some members of International 
Fantasy Gaming Society pictured 
here from left to right are: Tom 
Ricks, Tim Kennedy, Misty Nistler, 
James Hooper, Sean Hilland, and 
Gary Nistler (kneeling). The mem- 
bers traveled to Atlanta to play 
"Dark Lands Crossing". 



Gary Nistler, as the Druid, is ac- 
companied byanobserverdressed 
in white. Any member who wears 
white is considered invisible so they 
can get near the action without 
participating. 




ffs ■S&tixC^ 



^^ 



•h ' t 







ole 



D 




MembtTs playing the game- 
can b«.- injured or killed by 
weapxms or magic spell;.. 
SJunvn here. Misty Nistler 
as theCIeiic theCrimm has 
the pcjwer In heal (hose in- 
jured V) the K-im'' f<in 'on- 
tinix 



In November of 1991, a 
group of Augusta College stu- 
dents who were members of the 
Science Fiction and Fantasy club, 
received a unique opportunity to 
participate in an adventure of 
"sword and sorcery" that was dif- 
ferent from the more traditional 
dice and paper fantasy role-play- 
ing games that they were used to. 
This adventure was a live fan- 
tasy role-playing game spon- 
sored by the Atlanta provisional 
chapter of the International Fan- 
tasy Gaming Society (IFGS). Since 
that time, the members have par- 
ticipated in all of games in Geor- 
gia, which is well over a dozen, 
as well as two in Decatur, Ala- 
bama sponsored by the Decatur 
provisional chapter. 

The International Fantasy 
Gaming Society is a national or- 
ganization consisting of over 3000 
members with chapters in many 
states including California, Colo- 
rado, Texas, Oklahoma, Ohio, 
Alabama, and Georgia. The soci- 
ety is dedicated to producing fun, 
safe and imaginative games. 
There are rules to cover Fantasy, 
Undercover (spy), and Science 
Fiction games. At this point in 
time the Atlanta chapter has only 
run Fantasy games. 

A game has been likened to 
a play where the players, called 
PC's for the players characters, 
have no copy of the script and 
must improvise their way 
through the play. They must play 
off of each other and of the people 
who do possess a script, called 
NPC's for non-player characters. 
This is a considerable test of one's 
skills and imagination. During 
the game, the PC's must usually 
overcome some obstacle in order 
to "rescue the princess", of per- 
haps "find the ancient lost trea- 
sure of so and so. " These ob- 
stacles can range from some sort 
of puzzle similar in concept to 
the Sphinx's riddle of ancient 



layiii: 



Greek mythology, or a combat 
where the PC's "blood." While 
these encounters may be a major 
part of the game, some encoun- 
ters may consist of only meeting 
with an NPC and talking with 
them, trying to glean some infor- 
mation out of them about the 
game. 

These games can last any- 
where from four hours to forty- 
eight hours in length. Players are 
awarded points based on their 
performance called experience 
points. These points allow a char- 
acter to advance through levels. 
As the characters gain higher lev- 
els they become more powerful 
and gain new abilities. Along 
with these points is the possibil- 
ity of gaining treasure from each 
game for that character. 

At the core of all of these 
games are the characters that 
players develop using the rules 
system. There are eight character 
classes or professions and the few 
members from Augusta cover all 
of them. 

The club's secretary. Misty 
Nistler (Education major), has de- 
veloped two female Clerics, Glow 
Gilith and Emma, and a female 
Fighter, Blaze, who are based 
upon characters she developed 
for a Dungeons and Dragons 
campaign she plays in. Sean 
Hiland (Political Science) has de- 
veloped a Knight, Alistar, who 
comes from an island nation simi- 
lar to England and an Arabian 
merchant wizard named Akeer. 
Tom Ricks (English) developed 
a Priest, Redwin, and a nearly 
incompetent Mage named 
Vladamir, who was just recently 
cured of vamparism. Gary 
Nistler (Psychology) has a Thief 
named Jacks, a Druid named 
Jason l3owridge, and a Knight 
named Imbia. Rob Hay nie (Com- 
puter Science) has a college 
Kiingcr called Jordan Bowridge, 
and a bliin,. i^avid Caradine- like 



vJaine' 



Monk character called San-Do. 

Participating in the games 
provides many benefits. The 
games allow one to pit their act- 
ing talents against another indi- 
vidual or may just push them- 
selves to the limits of trying to 
stay in character for several 
hours. It helps to promote men- 
tal agility as a player tries to re- 
member what effect a spell may 
have or try to keep track of how 
many life points he may have in 
the middle of a big fight. The 
games also helps one to become 
physically fit. Hiking through 
the country side all day with a 
pack on your back, interspersed 
with mock combats is a physical 
challenge in itself. If one hap- 
pens to play the part of an NPC in 
a fighting encounter and three 
teams of PC's come through in 
one day at about twenty minute 
intervals, being physically fit is a 
plus. 

The pictures accompany- 
ing this article were taken at a 
game called Dark Lands Crossing 
written by P. Dennis Waltman, 
the current Atlanta Chapter presi- 
dent. The game was played on 
November 23, 1991. The party 
leader or Loremaster was James 
Hooper as the Ranger, Jordan 
Bowridge. Other party members 
include Tom Ricks as Vladamir 
the Mage, Sean Hiland as Alistar, 
Misty Nistler as the Cleric of 
Grimm Emma (that great "god" 
of fables and fairy tales), and Gary 
Nistler as the Druid, Jason 
Bowridge all from Augusta Col- 
lege. A visitor from Florida, Tim 
Kennedy, played the artisticThief 
and was thoroughly enjoyed by 
the group. The characters all 
came away from the game alive 
and with a modest amount of 
treasure and experience points. 
James W. Hooper 



f&aU^ /P 





nisicai 



nferprefafion 



Toscanini, Leonard 
Bernstein, Herbert von Karajan, 
Robert Shaw. The mere men- 
tion of the names of these great 
twentieth century conductors 
conjures up thoughts of great- 
ness, strength and power. The 
leader who stands before a sym- 
phony orchestra or concert 
choir possesses the utmost com- 
mand and abihty to emanate 
beautiful music. 

Music majors at Au- 
gusta College are given the rare 
opportunity to learn about and 
appreciate the complexity and 
savoir-faire of fine conducting 
through its study in three suc- 
cessive courses: Basic Conduct- 
ing, band and Orchestra Tech- 
niques, and Choral and Re- 
hearsal Techniques. Dr. Alan 
Drake, professor of Basic Con- 
ducting, teaches the students 
beat patterns and conducting 
with a batan held in the right 
hand. 

Eventually, they learn to use 
their left-hand independently 
from their right for cueing, con- 
trolling dynamics, and empha- 
sizing emotion. He tells the class 
to be as "straightforward as 
possible," and that "individual 
style will follow." 

Terms such as "impulse 
of will," a confident prepara- 
tion of the beat, the "ictus", or 
precision of each beat, and 
"takt," constancy or tempo, soon 
become familiar to the conduct- 
ing student. 

Each student has the 
chance to conduct a choir and 
instrumental ensemble formed 
by therest of the class. Senior 
Vicky Knowles, explains that 
"condvicting is harder than it 



looks and requires a lot olf prac- 
tice and a lot of thoughtl" 

Upon entering the 
class, each person must culmi- 
nate everything that he has 
studied in music. A conductor 
must be a fine musician, have 
an acute knowledge of music 
theory, comprehend music his- 
tory, posses technique aind be 
musicial. The most difficult el- 
ement of conducting is being 
able to convey to the musician 
what is intended in the music. 
A conductor suddenly becomes 
a leader, a teacher, and a por- 
trayer of musicial interpreta- 
tion with the expectation of 
pleasing the listeners. Conduct- 
ing "opens up a whole new 
world of interpretation," says 
Kevin Pollack. 

Ultimately what is im- 
portant in any class is the end 
result. Alice Milligan expresses 
her sentiments: "Taking this 



class really inakes me appreci- 
ate a good conductor. It in- 
creases my pleasure in going to 
a symphony because now not 
only do I hear the music, I can 
see the music." 

The priority of the 
music department at Augusta 
College is to make music. The 
highly qualified professors who 
are teachers as well as perform- 
ers make it their job to educate 
their students through the study 
of music theory, music history, 
ear training, private lessons, 
ensemble work, recital lab, or- 
chestration, and conduction, 
yielding a fine musician. 

Unlike other depart- 
ments, a freshman entering the 
music department has already 
become well-acquired with his 
field of study, his instrument or 
voice, through many years of 
practice and lessons. 

Robyn Macey 



k^ 



j^Q SkU^f 






Above: The music department at Augusta Col- 
lege is flowing to thebeat. Music classes such as 
Basic Conducting, Band and Orchestre Tech- 
niques, and Choral and Rehearsal Techniques 
are available in the Fine Arts building. 



Left: Dr. Alan Drake teaches the students beat 
patterns, conducting with a batan held in the 
right hand. Students eventually learn to use 
I heir left hand for cueing, controlling dynamics 
,ind emphasizing emotion. 



I .ir left; I'he Augusta C ollege Music depart- 
iriiTit provides students the opportunity to 
iit\\.u (■ their learning abilily in rculiri); nuisic 
.iihI in.ikiri)'^ nofiilions 



JAfZ/g ^/ 




Above: One of the most anticiapted events of 
the Alumni Association is the annual golf 
tournament. Teams play their rounds at the 
Forest Hills Golf Course. 



Right: Neal's Barbeque of Thompson, Georgia 
catered the event this year. Over 600 guests 
enjoyed chicken and pork along with live mu- 
sic and a local art exhibit. 



Far right: President Martha Farmer and her 
husband Claude were guests at the barbeque 
Invited guests included the Augusta College 
Alumni and friends 




22 






ac 



K 1 



^ 



H 



or 




ore 



The Augusta College 
Alumni and friends gathered 
for the Annual Barbeque on 
Thursday, October 17. The 
Alumni Board changed the site 
of the Barbeque this year from 
the Quadrangle to the Alumni 
House. The change was made 
to help the Association with 
their fundraising efforts to reno- 
vate the Alumni house. 
$150,000 is needed for the reno- 
vations and the Board wanted 
Alumnists to see the needed 
repairs. 

The fundraising event was 
kicked off by a barbeque din- 
ner. The fundraiser, according 
to Hillis De Roller, was a brick- 
selling program. It was coordi- 
nated by De Roller and Helen 
Hendee and chaired by Carolyn 
Whitt, Alumni Association 
Coordinator. The bricks were 



sold for donations between 
$100- $5,000. Purchasers will 
have their names printed on 
the bricks which will then be 
used in the renovations. The 
bricks will be used to make a 
patio garden/fountain area in 
the backyard of the Maxwell 
House. 

Besides great food, the 
guests were treated to music 
and an Art exhibt featuring lo- 
cal artists from the Summerville 
area. Over six-hundred hun- 
gry people were served by 
Neal's Bar-B-Que and the des- 
serts were home-made by 
Alumni members and the AC 
Student Ambassador Board. 

The music was pro- 
vided by Toole And Company, 
The Sweet AdeUnes, The Loral 
Lady Barbershoppers and Mike 
Brown and his Brass Quintet. 



The weather was perfect 
for the fundraising event. 

Other events of the Asso- 
ciation throughout the year in- 
cluded a fundraising Phone- A- 
Thon, the Christmas Tree Light- 
ing Ceremony with Santa Claus 
and the Summerville area resi- 
dents, participating in the 
Homecoming events, the 
Spring Gala awards ceremony, 
and the Annual Golf Tourna- 
ment. A 50 year class reunion 
for the class of 1942 was held in 
May,1992. 

In 1992, AC had about 
11, 000 Alumni members. Some 
of the benefits the $50 dues in- 
clude for AC Alumnist include 
notification of and special dis- 
counts to AC events such as 
campus events, movies and the- 
ater performances. 

Beth Castleberry 






^3 


Los Amigos 
H i s p a n s ' 
candidate, 
JudyBrunson, 
is a sophomore 
majoring in 
Spanish. 








^^^H 


Student 






B^^^^HH 


Union's 






f^^^^^^l 


candidate, 


». 




^ICt2slR 


Jacqueline 


■••'• 




y^^ 


Babineaux, is 
a freshman in 


P 






Business 
Administration. 




"Augusta College Homecoming 
means fellowship, activities and re- 
unions," says Al Hamilton, Homecoming 
King for 1992. To Smita Patel, Homecom- 
ing means "a bunch of my friends and the 
Augusta College students getting together 
to have a great 'collegiate' time." 

On February 15, Smita Patel and 
Al Hamilton experienced Homecoming 
to its fullest when they were crowned 
king & queen during the Homecoming 
men's basketball game. Not only the new 
king and queen were presented to the 



Augusta College students, but also the new i| 
mascot for the Jaguars, Al E. Cat. I 

The cheering basketball crowd : 
showed their school spirit and enjoyed them- 
selves at the dance with the band Public Fax | 
afterwards. The Homeconring committee '{ 
did a superb job decorating the newly dedi- 
cated Athletic Complex in Mardi Gras style, 
and provided an excellent buffet with deli- 
cacies that Augusta College always will re- 
member as Homecoming 1992. 

Yi-Huey Yong 







Political 




E2" 


Science's 
candidate, 
Natasha 
Hendrix, is a 
freshman 
Political 
Science major. 





IE. 'to 


^1 


Zeta Tau 




PJ 


Alpha's 




mM 


wk 


candidate, 






1 


Elizabeth 
Wilkinson, is 
a senior 
majoring in 
Education. 









■^^" :^^^..^^- 




Political 
Science's 
candidate, 
D a r r e 1 1 
Griffis, is a 
sophomore in 
Business 
Administration 



GO 




mfimm 



Seven clubs and organi- 
zations participated in 
the banner contest. This 
banner was made by 
Student Ambassador 
Board, who placed first. 



Saturday, February 15, 
the Homecoming com- 
mittee worked hard to 
decorate the PE/Ath- 
letic Complex. 







Left: This year the \xiting 
for the Homecoming can- 
didates was done by 
penny vote. James Hooper 
of the Homecoming Com- 
mittee counted the votes. 











:•: 




Above: Not only the clubs 
and organizations partici- 
pated in the banner mak- 
ing festivities but the fac- 
ultv also joined in. 



Left: It looks like SG A Sen- 
ate had a hard time com- 
pleting their banner. 
Seems like Steve Cain had 
a hard time getting the 
paint on the banner. 




S(udei>Ci.^ 25 




"Kim 

Student 
Ambassador 
Board's candidate, 
Alfred Hamilton, 
is a senior 
majoring in 
Computer Science. 




QuEWi 

Higher Taste 
Club's candidate, 
Smita Patel, is a 
sophomore 
majoring in 
Biology. 



Ji 



MW 




1st 
^nner-wp 

Student Union's 
candidate, 
Tyrone Hardy, is 
a sophomore 
majoring in 
Psychology. 



-^^-^b. 



'^ 



^ 




1st 
^nner-up 

Student Ambassa- 
dor Board's candi- 
date, Beth Baker, 
is a senior major- 
ing in Math and 
Computer Science. 



Battle for control of 
the board: Jermaine 
Henegan (#21) and 
the Jags vs. Georgia 
College. 



The gym was 
packed to watch the 
AC Jags beat the 
Georgia College 
Colonials. 





All these years, 
the Augusta College basket- 
ball games have lacked one 
important fan- an active Au- 
gusta College mascot! Stu- 
dents, faculty and even the 
public fans have wondered 
why the Jaguar mascot has 
not existed. Well, since the 
homecoming game of Au- 
gusta College on February 
15, 1992 they did not have to 
wonder anymore. During 
the half-time of the home- 
coming game featuring Au- 
gusta College VS Georgia 
College, Al E. Cat was named 
the Augusta College mascot. 

A total of 258 dif- 
ferent mascot names were 
submitted. Jazzy, Paws, 
Jammin' Jac, A.C.'ey and Al 
E. Cat were the top five 
choices. 

Homecoming was 
a fun and exiting night for 
everyone, especially for 
Grady Leonard who received 
$50 for coming up with the 
mascot'sname,AlE.Cat! The 
mascot suit was generously 
paid for by an Augusta Col- 
lege Alumni. 

Smita Patel 



Augusta College 
cheerleaders are 
back. Eight females 
and five males made 
up the AC st|U.ul. 



I hethorus directed 
by Linda Banister 
sung the Star 
Spangled Banner. 



stujedii^-n ^y 



Homecoming Spirit: 
Good times, a good 
game, and good friends. 




jTff Sdii/eKt, 





Pictured Above: 
Martha Farmer - Au- 
gusta College Presi- 
dent, Clint Bryant - 
Athletic Director, Betty 
Wallace - wife of the 
late President Richard 
Wallace, George 
Christenberry - former 
President of Augusta 
College, Bill Kuhlke, 
William Wansley - 
I'rt'sident of the 
Alumni Association, 
Al I lamilton - Presi- 
i-k'nt of the Student 
( Government Associa- 
tion, and Richard 
I larrison -Chairman of 
I'l; Department, par- 
ticipated in signing the 
ili'ilii ,i(iiin basketb.ill. 



■ ■--■' -■■ 'i '; ' .:' '■ ' ' -r'-, 'I tf , p J J, J' 'jMciijic l',,thiiiiMii', |u(ly I'rini'.on, N.it-i'Ji.i I Icndrix, 
iMpatel,hllzabcth Wilkinson, Beth Baker, Al ll.irnillon, l;,irri-ll f .riffis, ,in<l lyrunc I N.r.ly. 



StJedt^Ti 2^ 




Above: Cedric Seward (Doug 
Joiner), Jonathan Harker (Greg 
Toomey), and Wilhelmina Murray 
(Patricia Ferguson) react to 
Renfield (Doug Wilson) as he ex- 
periences the effects of Dracula's 
power. 



Right: Shown here is Wilhelmina 
who has fainted from thealluring 
effect Dracula has upon her. Frus- 
trated, Jonathan Flarker plots his 
revenge of Dracula. 



Lord Godalming (Dale Thomas) 
and Helga Van Zandt (Charla 
Huck) had an overwhelming pas- 
sion for each other at every op- 
portunity. Thepairgavetheplay 
some of its most humorous mo- 
ments. 



^Q Sta/edC^ 






Where is the "Chateau"? 
That is the first obstacle to be 
met when an adventurous stu- 
dent decides to put his ego on 
the hne and audition for an AC 
theatre production. That yel- 
low storage house has intimi- 
dated many aspiring actors. Is 
it the building itself or the abuse 
that is rumored to take place 
within its four walls that fright- 
ens even the most self-actual- 
ized artist? The answer can only 
be revealed when one dares to 
darken the doorway. 

From that moment on, 
your soul, and any hopes of a 
dramatic career, are left to the 
mercy of your "dear uncle", as 
Dr. Gene Muto is known to 
Drama majors. (Beware to any 
Georgia native hopefuls, who 
will undoubtedly be berated for 
a southern accent; his bark is 
worse than his bite.) On one 
end of the room, we have the 



lion's den, or more specifically 
Gene's corner. 



"The whole process of au- 
ditioning, being cast, and 
acting in a play is to- 
gether terrifying and ex- 
citing. The terror 
dimishes, though, when 
the electricity on open- 
ing night surges within 
everyone. " 

Charla Huck 

In perfect view of the 
hunter, his prey anxiously 
awaits the call for the next vic- 
tim. It's fun to watch the line - 
up: The newcomers intimidated 
by the old hands; the old hands 





intimidated by the new blood 
that could be their replacement. 
What seemed like a game on 
one side of the room, stops in 
the long walk to the slaughter- 
house. How can I make him 
think I am the part? How can I 
get through this aUve? ' 'Sit down 
and read." That's the next ob- 
stacle. "Not interpret this line," 
"become this character" or "let 
me see you do this," it's just 
"READ." It takes a while to 
understand this concept, but 
the director must know above 
all else if this would-be thes- 
pian can hear inflections and 
follow instructions. That is his 
cue, as to the extent to which 
this lump of clay can be molded, 
and the difficulty of the task 
before him. "I learned how to 
actually move my lips, tongue 
and teeth when speaking. It was 
like some weird oral ballet. 
Sometimes though, the danc- 
ers would trip and there I was, 
back to saying 'git' instead of 
'get' and 'ah' instead of 'I-ee', 
but a few bellows from Dr. 
Muto, and constant fear of his 
diction stick, rather thick piece 
of do welling with a strip of red 
fabric at the top, and I soon 
began to monitor my diction 
much more carefully," said Dale 
Thomas, who has been in a num- 
ber of productions at AC. 

Read, stutter, fidget, 
squeak, but read—then look up 
and search hiseyesforapproval, 
only to hear, "Good, the cast list 

continued on pg. 32 



31 




(contmued from pg 31) 

will be up tomorrow, you can 
go now." It's over, and you 
know that you won't get any 
sleep until you see the cast list. 
Now comes the real acting- ly- 
ing to your comrades about 
how it wasn't as bad as you 
thought it would be. You then 
realize the hard part is yet to 
come- THE WAIT!! You leave 
and go home trying to keep 
busy, telling yourself you prob- 
ably wouldn't have time to be 
in a play anyway - you know 
the rumors of the hard work. 
Before you know it, you have 
lived the longest night of your 
life and morning is still three 
hours away! You don't have an 
eight o'clock class, but you come 
to school early - to study- and 
you decide to do it in Butler 



"An ego's greatest ex- 
ercise is the audition- 
ing process where it 
Hes in the hands of 
someone who has the 
power to decide what 
ones attitude will be 
throughout the quar- 
ter or possibly the rest 
of their lives." 

Greg Toomey 

Hall - even though your first 
class is in Markert. Now, this 
isn't a ploy to check the cast list, 
which you know you're not on 
anyway. Of course while you're 



there you might as well check 
the Theatre News bulletin 
board, just to see who did get 
on. Walk casually by - don't 
stop, and glance over your 
shoulder as you pass by. Wait! 
Was that my name? Still don't 
stop- keep going - put your 
stuff in the snack bar and come 
up with an excuse to walk by 
again. A pencil sharpener, must 
find a pencil sharpener. This 
time walk by slower and when 
you are sure your name is there 
and you haven't been rejected- 
you can stop and bask in the 
glory. Maybe someone will 
pass- of course you can't look 
too surprised. You must bal- 
ance your confidence with hu- 
mility- WOW! HE LIKES ME! 
Patricia Ferguson 




Through dress rehearsals, 
the actors receive advice 
from the director, Gene 
Muto, on the way the Hnes 
should be delivered and 
the blocking of the scene. 




32 ~^ 








r^ ~T" T^ 1 




""T 






^"'''^^■J'l 



Above: Cast members of The Pnsskvt ofDracula 
include left to right: Patricia Ferguson, Doug 
Wilson, Christopher Bailey, Dale Thomas, and 
Doug Joiner. Seated are: Greg Toomey, Charla 
Huck, Harvey Lynch and J. Rena Jankus. Pic- 
tured here, the actors listen attentively to the 
director after a dress rehearsal. Members prac- 
tice as long as six weeks for a production 



Left: Wilhelmina Murray (Patricia Ferguson) 
possessed by Dracula threa ten sCedric Seward 
(Doug Joiner), Lord Clodalming (Dale Tho- 
mas) and Johanlhan I larker(Greg Toomey) in 
the AC production of The Passion ofDraculii. 



|oli,,ll,,,M 1 l,.ll.'l K ,l,y, l,» 


IlirV'J !■ 


oven 1 iiiir 


by the powers of IJracula 


(Chrisl 


ipher liai- 


Icy). This scene shows som 


•of the 


n<iy props 


owned by the theater depc 


rlmenl 


,md some 


donated by local businesses 


Ihat.iri 


■necessary 


io);ivelheaudiencfthf 111! 


I'llci 1 1 


il 1 he play. 



Siu&d^f ^^ 



7 




^ 



-^^^--c 



/ 




I 

\ 



The Augusta College Theatre Depart- 
ment performed As Is Fall quarter. 
The play depicts the tragedy of the 
AIDS epidemic. Pictured above is stu- 
dent Tony Cooper and professor Jeff 
Herrmann. They perform a scene 
where Rich (Tony Cooper) is visited in 
the hospital by his brother (Jeff 
Herrmann). 



Pictured left are Doug Wilson, J. Rena 
Jankus, Tony Cooper, Gary Wasdin, 
and Donald Smith from the play As Is. 
They are performing a scene involving 
a PWA (Person With AIDS) group. 




^.^jeatf M 



^/f Stmuc^ 



_L 







.wareme 





Oh, those nasty little f our- 
letter words! Your mama 
warned you never to say them, 
but these days there is one little 
four-letter word that is uttered 
everyday on college campuses 
and is never far from people's 
minds -AIDS. 

Acquired Immune Defi- 
ciency Syndrome is what the 
AIDS acronym stands for, but 
fear and concern are what the 
acronym evokes. 

The saga of the AIDS vi- 
rus haunts the minds of college 
students as its mystery contin- 
ues. There are so many un- 
knowns about the disease and 
the mechanisms through which 
it is spread that the only cer- 
tainty that students do have 
about the disease is that they 
certainly are confused. 

Not only are there ques- 
tions regarding how virus is 
actually spread, though unsafe 
sex, intravenous drug use and 
blood transfusion have target 
as the primary means, there is 
also so much confusion about 
who does or who does not have 
AIDS because of the prolonged 
incubation period of the HIV 
virus which causes AIDS. A 
person infected with the HIV 
virus may not even acquire 
AIDS for up to ten years after 
being initially infected thus 
leaving a great many questions 
in the victim's mind and in the 
minds of all those whom he is in 
contact with. 

A survey oi blood 
samples from patients at tol- 
legf ( linics in the United States 
during the 88-89 academic year 
found that one in 500 tested 
positive fori II V with numbers 



steadily increasing as the days 
have gone by. 

These increasing numbers 
have provoked increasing cau- 
tion in terms of the dating and 
sexual activities of college stu- 
dents and Augusta College stu- 
dents are no exception. 

"It is the primary 
concern I have when 
even attempting or 
considering a long- 
term relationship and 
as far as routine dat- 
ing, a person's past 
can make or break their 
chance. " 

Michael Schepis 

An anonymous male 
sophomore said, "It doesn't re- 
ally affect me because I'm a 
Christian. I practice 100% absti- 
nence, and even for those who 
do use condoms, condoms are 
only 80% effective so you are 
still putting a 20%- gamble on 
your life. 1 think abstinence 
should be the primary consider- 
ation to protect yourself Uom 
AIDS, and if not, definitely use a 
condom." 

junior Jason Maples feels, 
"Ithinkithassignificantly trans- 
formed cultural attitudes to- 
ward casual sex. We are defi- 
nilily learning about the imme- 
di.ile consequences of our ac- 
tions, but we a re also now forced 



to consider the long-term/ 
long-reaching effects of what 
we do. I think we are realizing 
that we really haven't matured 
in our sexual attitudes, and 
AIDS is really causing an 
awakening. We have had to 
start redefining our principles 
and moral values. I think it has 
really thrown a monkey- 
wrench into the sexual revolu- 
tion what we truly value in 
our necessity and dependence 
on one another. This is just one 
major issue that causes us to 
think about human fragility; 
AIDS crosses racial boundaries 
and affects everyone equally. 
Instead of finger-pointing, 
there should be a great deal 
more banding together occur- 
ring." 

The awareness of AIDS 
has steadily increased over the 
years and amongst the colle- 
giate population as the dis- 
ease has spread. There still 
exists a great deal of confusion 
and fear in 1 992, but with AIDS 
Education Campaigns such as 
those embarked on by the Bell 
Ringer staff and the National 
Committee on AIDS aware- 
ness, the issue is becoming far 
more a matter of caution and 
precaution than fear and con- 
cern. People like Ryan White 
and Magic Johnson have 
helped us realize the implica- 
tions of AIDS and the strength 
and education needed to deal 
with the disease. They have 
shown us that we have to band 
together if we are to combat 
thediseaseandtheonly means 
of achieving this is through 
education and understanding. 
Anita I'atel 



SU-dl^c ^Q 










VyamiDims LoMiecfn 



ion; 



When people think 
back on their college careers, 
it is not their grade point aver- 
age that comes to mind, but 
rather the various clubs and 
organizations they took part 
in. 

This past year, Au- 
gusta College offered numer- 
ous activities (40 in all) rang- 
ing from fraternities and so- 
rorities to intramurals sports 
to student publications. 

Whether the student's 
interest lies in drama, music, 
writing or sports, AC offers 
something for everyone. 

While many students 
choose not to get involved, 
others actively participate. 

"In my opinion, you 
are not getting your money's 
worth if you come to school, 
go to classes, and then drive 
home as soon as they are 
over," states John Groves, Di- 
rector of Student Activities at 
AC. In Groves' opinion, stu- 
dents who have been involved 
in various organizations 
learned more than most text- 
books could ever teach them. 
"Most of the lessons of life are 
learned outside of school." 
Many active students agreed 
with this assessment. 

Alyson Creed, a re- 
cent graduate of AC, got in- 
volved in the Sociology Club 
and her fraternity to get to 
know people. "Time spent at 
AC was a lot less boring when 
there was more than just 



studying to do." 

Besides meeting new 
friends, campus activities 
hold other advantages as well. 

Presently working for 
Stout & Company, Creed 
hopes that her activities por- 
tray her as someone who 
wants to get involved and be 
active in her new job. 

Lisa Larger, a senior 
and former homecoming 
queen at AC, agreed that get- 
ting involved on campus 
greatly benefits her career. 
"Until you put your skills into 
practice, it is important to be 
in contact with people who 
may help in the future," states 
Larger. 

While clubs and orga- 
nizations are an exciting part 



JO Stu^li^ 



of college Hfe, grades should 
not be put in jeopardy. "Ac- 
tivities should not be done at 
the expense of your grades." 
adds Groves. While this is 
definitely true. Creed believes 
her participation made her a 
better student. "I had less 
time to procrastinate." 

At AC, the lack of 
participation could be attrib- 
uted, in part, to students not 
living on campus. In other 
colleges, there is more school 
spirit because students eat, 
sleep and study together. This 
fact should not discourage 
students but, "students who 
don't get involved at AC are 
missing out on a lot, "states 
Creed. 

Wendy Hohn 







_L 





Above: Besides being members of the Student 
Senate, Steven Stamps, Brent Erdman, and 
L.G.Freytakeadvantageof yearly leadership 
workshops sponsored by the Student Activi- 
ties Office. 



I A'lt: The AC Drama Department put on tlieir 
production of /Is /s Fall quarter. Theater has 
many positions for students to get involved 
with from stage managers and costume de- 
signers to lighting and sound assistants and 
the actors themselves. 



I .ir l.cU. Auf^Lr.l.iC oikgi' sM<'n's(JUiirlfl |)ul 
on .1 great show at the annual Alumni Barbe- 
( uc hi'ld at the Maxwell Alumni Mouse. I'he 
I ine Arts Department sponsors choirs, bands, 
ensembles, and chamber groups for students 
with musical and vocal skills. 



SdJedt^v, Jj f 




Jfi SiMladij^ 









Above; The Sociology Club supports numer- 
ous charitable organizations throughout the 
year. At Christmas, they collected boxes of 
toys for the Salvation Army to be distributed 
to needy children. The club also raised over 
$800 through a rummage sale Spring quarter. 
All proceeds from the sale went to the Kidney 
Foundation 










Right; Misty Nistler of the Homecoming Com- 
mittee collected penny votes during cam- 
paigning for the 1992 Homecoming King and 
Queen. All proceeds collected from voting 
were given to the Richmond County Humane 
Society. 










Far Right: Bleeding Hearts- Pi Kappa Phi does 
it again! Quarterly blood drives on campus 
account for about 400 pints of blood each year 
for the Shepeard Community Blood Center. 
Winter quarter totals set a new record for Pi 
Kappa Phi's efforts with 148 pints collected. 














ri 





Philanthropic endeav- 
ors seemed to ha\'e been popular 
extracurricular activities among 
the students at Augusta College. 
From working with children with 
Multiple Sclerosis to Adopting- 
a-highway, many students par- 
ticipated in their community and 
showed what big hearts they had. 

In the case of Pi Kappa 
Phi it was a big "bleeding" heart. 
They have sponsored blood 
drives for the Shepeard's Com- 
munity Blood Center for the past 
three quarters with their last one 
held in March. It collected a 
record-breaking 148 units of 
blood. Member Jeff Caubb said 
that being a part of this charity 
made him feel great, "But not 
only just because of a personal 
feeling you get knowing that you 
are helping others, but also it 
gives people (AC students and 



faculty) a chance to see their fra- 
ternities as more than just parties 
and kegs." 

Being big hearted was 
not the only reason for having 
participated in a charity. Many 
students had more practical pur- 
poses. Alysia Barja, a 23 year-old 
Communications major, chose to 
serve her internship with the 
March of Dimes to promote their 
Walk-a-Thon, because she said, 
"It really incorporated every- 
thing I studied as far as my major 
is concerned." One of her duties 
was enlisting the help of other 
students who she said were 
happy to volunteer. "They were 
very excited and very energetic 
about wanting to help out in any 
way they could," said Barja 

One of those volunteers 
was Venecia Chancey, a commu- 
nications major, who helped with 




the promotion of the Walk-a- 
Thon for the March of Dimes. "It 
makes me feel good that I'm do- 
ing something to help someone 
else and at the same time it will 
look good on my resume that I 
participated in this and also that 
it gives me a chance to use my 
classroom abilities in a practical 
situation. It also gives me a 
chance to use my leadership 
qualities and to further develop 
them." 

Some clubs and organi- 
zations require themselves to be 
involved in charities. For ex- 
ample, Zeta Tau Alpha, as a rule, 
must participate in some philan- 
thropic activity at least once a 
month. And there are many other 
groups with similar regulations, 
but most volunteer out of a sense 
of civic duty. Kay Phillips, the 
Assistant Director of Student 
Activities, said, "I think it re- 
flected really well on the school 
and I think it said something 
about our students too, that they 
are responsible citizens and com- 
munity-minded, that they are 
civic-oriented and want to do 
things for others." 

The list of charities that 
students got involved in seemed 
to be as endless as the Chinese 
population census. Students 
volunteered themselves in a cata- 
log of charities that could be 
ranged from Toys for Tots to dis- 
tributing condoms, or from build- 
ing playgrounds for handicapped 
kids to picking up trash on a 
highway. Whatever the cause, 
AC students proved their worth 
as valuable members of the com- 
munity. In so doing they have 
enlarged their hearts and made 
them beat stronger. 

Donnie I'etter 




iiii^li 




n 



1 





TT TT 




What do you want to 
do for the rest of your life? 

This question 

prompted the formation of the 
Start-Up Center at Augusta 
College. The Center is designed 
to help freshman and sopho- 
more students decide upon a 
major. 

"It is a statistical fact 
nationwide, that students who 
do not decide a major by their 
junior year are at risk for not 
staying in school," said Tim 
Bond, one of the Academic 
Advisors at the Center. 

"All Augusta College 
students must declare a major 
by the time they have 90 hours 
of course credits," Bond said. 
"After they reach junior status, 
they are not suppose to be at 
the center anymore." 

Most of the advised 



students are freshman. "There is 
approximately 500 that are cur- 
rently being advised," said Kathy 
Thompson, Director of the Start- 
up Center. 

The Center practices in- 
trusive advising. "Not just see- 
ing students for class schedules, 
but follow them and keep track 
of what they are doing," Thomp- 
son said. 

"During freshman pre- 
registration we make sure they 
have everything they need and 
the orientation staff wears badges 
so Start-Up students will know 
who to ask for information," 
Thompson said. 

The center has begun 
two new workshops that link stu- 
dents to the basics of deciding a 
major. Major Decisions 101 is the 
first step in planning a major. 
Gallery of Majors is a listing of 



all majors offered in each depart- 
ment and expected salary ranges. 

"The Center issues an 
advisory newsletter to the pro- 
fessors so they can call us if they 
need something," Bond said. 
"They have been really support- 
ive." 

"We didn't know what 
to expect, but the program has 
worked really well," Bond said. 

The Start-Up Center was 
organized by the Committee on 
Advising and Committee on Re- 
tention. It was not officially op- 
erating until Fall 1991. 

In the past, students 
were assigned a departmental 
counselor by their last name. The 
Start-Up Center gives them a 
place to go when they can't an- 
swer the big question. 

Nancy Murray 






r^"^ 













Above: Students wait in line to get the classes 
they want. Many find out the class they want 
is l^ull or they have an outstanding fine. With 
the help of the Start-Up Center, students who 
do not know their major can be advised on 
what classes to take. 



l-'ar Left: 46 KXK cnlerlained students register- 
ing for Spring quarter 1992. Prizes were given 
away, such as CD's and bumper stickers, along 
with free sandwiches and cokes from Subway. 



I.i-ll: Allcr w.iitnig )n Ihc hnrs Id rcgislr.ir, 
shidents wiilexperienceiincmiiri'cndk'sslinc- 
lhi' Kill' ,il Ihc hodkslori'. 



•jf/ 




The White Columns staff includes: Jennifer 
Sprague, Editor-in-Chief, Nilam Patel-Clubs 
Editor, Debi Deeder-Academics Editor, Terri 
Wood-Student Life Editor, Benjohnson-Sports 
Editor, Kevin Jiminez-Head Photographer, 
and John Groves- Yearbook Advisor. Special 
thanks to: Beth Castleberry who tabulated 
stats from our readers survey, Lisa Ackerman 
who designed student life layouts, Mark 
Ristroph who wrote sports copy, and Georgia 
Cunningham for a httle bit of everything. 
Public Safety for locking and unlocking build- 
ing doors at obscene times of the day and 
walking us to our car. Dominos Pizza, gave 
away free pizza when we passed out year- 
books. Student Activities Committee who gave 
us the funds needed for the yearbook, and the 
faculty and staff, classroom announcements, 
answering our surveys, and giving us advice. 



4^ A^4j(g 







Vyeniral 



It's 8 a.m. and the dead- 
line is only 24 hours away and 
we still have 70 pages to go. The 
staff is dashing around asking 
one another questions such as: 
Are the pictures in? Can you 
think of a caption? What club is 
this? Anyone have a story to fill 
these two pages? Will you proof 
this for me? 

What exactly goes into 
making the yearbook a success? 
EVERYTHING! Everything 
from picking out that awesome 
picture which sums up the year 
to filling those blank pages with 
exciting copy, pictures and cap- 
tions and ads. 

Being a part of the year- 
book staff is innovating and 
exciting and hard work all at 
the same time. Staff members 
must know a yearbook produc- 
tion inside out. Everything from 
cropping photos and produc- 



ing pages with desktop pub- 
lishing to time management to 
meet deadlines. 

The White Columns 
traditionally comes out in the 
fall, thus exposing activities 
such as Homecoming and June 
gradation and all the activities 
in between. We try to cover the 
different clubs and organiza- 
tions at Augusta College, the 
new classes or sports highlights 
and the general student life. 
The yearbook also includes a 
section entitled community/ 
mini-mag where subjects of the 
local community and the world 
are featured. 

Trying to identify the 
guy in the fourth row may not 
matter to just anyone but it does 
matter to the yearbook staff. 
While most people would say, 
"nobody will care if he has a 
name", the yearbook staff says, 



"We think he'd care." Because 
of this staff members will go 
out of their way to find his 
name and to make sure it is 
spelled correctly (usually). 

When asked how she 
joined the staff, Debi Deeder 
said, "I walked in wanting to 
take pictures for the yearbook 
last year and I ended up doing 
the academic section. I enjoy 
being on the staff and design- 
ing layouts and creating things 
on PageMaker." Nilam Patel 
added, "Working on the year- 
book, has given me the chance 
to use my creativity and hope- 
fully produce eye-catching lay- 
outs. " 

The staff shares one 
goal, making a difference for 
the Augusta College commu- 
nity. 

Terri Wood 




StuUli^e. df-^ 




Above: There is time tor work and 
there is time for play. In the boat- 
house after the races: Shea Seigler, 
Kim Kanavage, Sara Rubio, 
Stephanie Showman, Jennifer 
Bistrak, Mike Lambert, Rachel 
Harris, and two teammates. 



Right: Augusta College's 
Women's Novice Open 4 includes: 
Sara Rubio, Rachel Harris, Kim 
Kanavage, Jennifer Bistrack, and 
Stephanie Showman. 




dfif SmU^ 



-l 



jn]i 





eady 




jLALo o o 




Most people are just falling 
lut of bed bv the time their alarms 
;o off at seven but one group of 
tudents have already seen the 
unrise - pushing themselves be- 
ond reasonable limits in order 
3 achieve a goal. Chances are 
ou've probably seen them 
round campus - clad in their 
weatshirts and talking about 
nything from the intense morn- 
ng practice, the Red Hot Chili 
'eppers CD to Impressionism, 
he latest flicks or maybe an up- 
oming Regatta. Maybe vou'\'e 
aken notice of the unusually alert 
thlete Ln your earlv morning 
lass. Thev are members of the 
Augusta College Rowing Team, 
he largest club-sport on campus 
nd their goal is simple - to be 
he best. 

The AC. Rowing Team has 
ome a long way from the origi- 
al group of people rowing for 
un. Rebecca Dent, a member of 
ast years medal winning var- 
ity lightweight four and cox- 



swain of the novice lightweight 
four reminisces, "We all just 
started off this being a fun, dif- 
ferent thing to do." She added, 
"We didn't know what we were 
getting into." In the first year, the 
women's crew sent a lightweight 
four to Philadelphia to compete 
in the Dad Vail Regatta. The Dad 
Vail is the largest collegiate crew 
event in the U.S. attracting 
schools from across the country. 
The following year both the men's 
and women's crew raced a light- 
weight four and a heavyweight 
four. In 1991, the entire team 
raced on the Schuylkill River with 
the men's and women's light 
fours advancing to the semi-fi- 
nals. 

In October 1990, the light- 
weight men and women trav- 
eled to Boston for the prestigious 
Head of the Charles - the largest 
of the fall head races. 

Aside from the Dad Vail and 
the Charles, the team competes 
at the Head of the Chatahoochee 



during the fall season and in sev- 
eral 2000 meter races during the 
spring. Since 1990, the Crew has 
racked up medals at the Augusta 
invitational, Atlanta Rowing Fes- 
tival, and the Southern 
Intercollegiate Rowing Associa- 
tion (SIRA) Championship in 
Oakridge, Tennessee. 

The 1991-92 season saw the 
lossof many varsity oarsmen. In 
fact, Rebecca Dent and Kim 
Kanavage of last year's varsity 
lightweight four are now coxing 
the women's novice boats. The 
experiences paid off as both the 
novice lightweight four, known 
as the "pony-boat" and the nov- 
ice open four, called the "horse- 
boat" won medals early in the 
season at the Augusta Invita- 
tional Regatta. The men's novice 
lightweight four also kicked off a 
winning season by winning gold 
in Augusta beating larger schools 
like Florida Institute of Technol- 
ogy and Tulane University. Au- 
gusta also raced its first competi- 




tive pair, a novice heavyweight 
four and a varsity lightweight 
four. 

Rowing is a very unusual 
sport in several ways. The most 
noticeable is that oarsmen spend 
their time sitting down and mov- 
ing backwards. The team also 
carries its own oars and boat 
unlike baseball or football. There 
are no heroes in crew, no Most 
Valuable Player and no shot for 
individual glory. The oarsman 
is simply known by his or her 
seat number in the boat and ac- 
knowledged collectively as a 
pair, a four, or an eight, depend- 
ing on the number of people in 
the shell. 

Training is very strenuous- 
rising before the sunrise and row- 
ing into the sunset are not un- 
common. The team is expected 
to run, do weights, and pull erg 
pieces. Practices last around two 
hours a day, six-days a week. 
The actual race consists of 2000 
meters and last between 8 to 10 

(continued to pg. 46) 



Left: Stephanie Showman 
carries the boat along with 
her teammates. Rowers are 
required to carry all of their 
equipment to and from the 
river. 

W.:M 



A^//e ^^ 




eaciy 




(continued from pg. 45) 

minutes. That may not seem like a 
long time but it is what goes on in 
those eight minutes that is impor- 
tant. Rowers must move together 
with accuracy and good technique. 
In addition, the crew must fight 
both mental and physical fatigue. 
Many regattas require you to 
qualify for the finals - it is not 
uncommon to row two or three 
races on a Saturday - not to worry- 
the coxswain, the person who 
steers boats and calls commands 
keeps the team focused and moti- 
vated during the race. 

To a spectator, rowing may 
look easy but everyone had to work 
together to "set up" the boat. A 
boat leaning either port or star- 
board can slow a crew down and 
cause an oar to get stuck in the 
water making the oarsman "catch 
a crab". Possessing raw strength 
isn't enough- rowers must have 
coordination, balance, and a great 
deal of spirit to force their bodies 
to move correctly and finish the 
race. 

There are only two classifica- 
tions- lightweight and heavy- 
weight. Lightweight for women is 
under 130 pounds and under 160 
pounds for men. The Heavy- 
weight (Known as "Open" for 
women) category is anything 
above lightweight race. 

Making weight is an impor- 
tant aspect of rowing as a light- 
weight. When Rebecca Dent be- 
gan rowing she weighed 132 
pounds. Weighing in a 120 pounds 
she said, "I've learned to cut back 
on red meats, sugars, sweets, and 
to watch my fat intake in foods." 
She found out about weigh-ins the 
first day of the Dad Vail. "We 
wrapped ourselves in plastic gar- 
bage bags and went for a run. That 
removed our excess water weight," 
she said. All made weight. If a 
rower fails to make weight, the 



entire boat is disqualified un- 
less an alternate be substituted 
for the overweight offender. 
Rowers have two chances to 
make weight - the night before 
and the morning of race. Shan- 
non Shelton of the "ponies" lost 
eleven pounds. "The Rowing 
Team had given me the motiva- 
tion to eat right, to get in shape, 
and to stay in shape," she said. 
A sensible diet is crucial in 
crew. Rowers eat a lot of pasta. 
Bagels are also popular crew 
cuisine. It is not an uncommon 
sight to see the team huddled 
together around the trailer ba- 
gels and bananas the morning 
of a race. The team also likes to 
eat together at Vallarta's. 

There is more to the Au- 
gusta College Crew that just 
racing and having a good time. 
Because Crew is a club sport at 
AC, members are required to 
raise money through annual 
auctions, erg-a-thons, and ticket 
raffles. In addition to money 
from Student Activities fees, the 
money from these fund-raisers 
go toward buying new shells, 
oars, cox-boxes, and tools to 
keep the boat well-maintained. 
"The small investment that the 
Student Activities had made 
had reaped benefits at least ten- 
fold, " said John Groves, Direc- 
tor of Student Activities and 
rowing enthusiast. 

In addition to rowing and 
school, most of the team works. 
"Practice takes up a lot of my 
spare time but in the end, it's 
worth it," said Jeff Smith of the 
gold medal Novice Lightweight 
four. Tony Miller, president of 
the team is a busy guy. In addi- 
tion to school rowing, and 
work, he serves on the Student 
Ambassador Board. It's hard 
but it makes it worthwhile- it's 



a good break from school and 
work. Ifyou'rededicatedtocrew, 
then you'll find time," he said. 

The coaching staff is com- 
posed of volunteers committed 
to the goal of making AC the 
best. P.P. Meehan, a corporate 
insurance salesman for Insurance 
Services of Augusta and the head 
coach explains his involvement, 
"It's a good sport with good kids. 
They work hard, " adding "You 
tend to help those willing to help 
themselves." He coached the 
novice women's program at prac- 
tices starting at 5;45 a.m. and 
made sure that any boats need- 
ing repairs received them. Matt 
Evers, former rower at 
Worchestor Polytech Institute 
and Men's coach is another one 
making a sacrifice. In addition to 
weekday practices, Evers spent 
Saturday mornings and Sunday 
afternoons drilling technique into 
the minds of his men. John & 
Mary Patterson also help to make 
the team successful through ad- 
ditional coaching, encourage- 
ment, and handy-work in the 
boathouse. 

"It's been nice to see such a small 
program grow from 10 to 30 
members in less than 3 years with 
one of the strongest novice teams 
in the South," said Dan Dent, 
member of the original heavy- 
weight four and bow-seat of this 
year's pair. "The college students, 
high school students, and area 
businesses are in a highly suc- 
cessful venture. Everybody 
wins," said Groves. He goes on 
to say, "The beautiful thing is 
that you have a lot of people 
involved who aren't financially 
rewarded they're doing it be- 
cause they love it. It's obviously 
rewarding otherwise they 
wouldn't put all those hours into 
it. Michael Donehoo 








Pictured above some of the members of the 
Augusta College Rowing Team cheering on 
the racers: Darrell Hillman, Mike Donehoo, 
Tony Robinson, Mark Ristroph, Jennifer Bistrak, 
Kristi Murray, Mike McBroom, Tony Miller. 
Fun in the sun! 



AC Women's Novice Open 4 arc pictured on 
the Savannah River doing what they do best, 
and what lead them to victory-they are just 
rowing for the fun of it! 



StutUi:^ ^y 





iim 



bin 



il 



tie 



L^aclLclLeF 



Graduate school en- 
rollments at Augusta College 
over the past two years have 
not been so much a product of 
the sluggish economy, but as a 
result of other factors. Both 
professional trends and new 
programs caused most of the 
influx. Statistics point out that 
80% of AC graduates stay in the 
area after completing their 
course work. All of the gradu- 
ate departments agree that 
Augusta is a good job market; 
therefore, the school has had 
higher total enrollments. 

"There are some stu- 
dents that come back because 
of the poor economy," says Pro- 
fessor Holloman of the MBA 
program. "The notion that 
when the economy is bad, en- 
rollment is good, has some 
truth," said Holloman. How- 
ever, Miyoko Jackson in gradu- 
ate admissions of the MBA pro- 
grams cites two concrete rea- 
sons for more MBA students. 
"Nurses now want to pursue 
more administrative positions 
in part due to the possibility of 
contracting A.I.D.S. and also to 
have more responsible posi- 
tions in a hospital environment 
that is becoming increasingly 
more business oriented . In 1 989, 
enrollment rose 50% because of 
Westinghouse coming to the 
area. This year graduate en- 
rollment will be approximately 
70 students in the business 
school. In all, enrollment has 
been stable since 1983, includ- 
ing a male to female ratio of 
3:2." Jackson adds that grade 



point averages of admitted can- 
didates are slightly higher than 
last year. 

Professor of Psychol- 
ogy Harold Moon is very opti- 
mistic about AC'S Psychology 
Master degree. He too cites the 
poor economy as a possible in- 
fluence in increased enrollment. 
However, for his department 
graduate studies have been in- 
creasing over the past five 
years. "Today, if you want to 
make more money, you have to 
get a Ph.D. You can't hang out 
your shingle as a psychologist 
in most states, including Geor- 
gia, without a Ph.D. Augusta 
College gives local students a 
chance to work toward their 
Ph.D and stay in Augusta, while 
maintaining their jobs and fami- 
lies. Many students try to go 
from the undergraduate psy- 
chology degree to a doctoral 
program in the area to assure a 
higher paying job, especially in 
the government." Moon adds 
that the average age of stu- 
dents pursuing a Masters de- 
gree in psychology in the late 
twenties. Many are people who 
want a change in career. Nurs- 
ing and Business graduates 
don't seem to mind the drop in 
pay for the personal satisfac- 
tion they get from their new 
area of study. Helping others in 
counseling, mental hospitals 
and at VA hospitals, can be 
very rewarding. Another ma- 
jor reason many students en- 
roll in graduate programs is to 
boost their grade point aver- 
ages and GRE scores to help get 



into a good doctoral program. 
Professor Joseph 
Murphy, Dean of the School of 
Education, also cites the com- 
plexities affecting the number 
of graduate students in the edu- 
cation department. "NCATE 
accreditation loss hurt us ini- 
tially, but we are back up to 
previous enrollment figures. 
We have new programs such as 
counseling, special education 
and heath /physical education. 
These have helped to broaden 
our base for attracting poten- 
tial graduate students." 
Murphy says that regaining 
accreditation will surely be re- 
alized. For the past five years 
Murphy has seen steady in- 
creases in the number of stu- 
dents in the Master programs. 
People working that have an 



undergraduate degree come 
back to enhance their earning 
potential with a Master. In June, 
AC will award its first Master's 
degree in Heath and Physical 
Education. 

All graduate program 
spokespersons at Augusta Col- 
lege agree that a poor economy 
can increase enrollment, how 
ever more issues were respon 
sible for students deciding to 
enroll. 

One vision for increas- 
ing the number of students in 
all programs was expressed by 
president Richard S. Wallace 
during the fall of 1990. He said, 
"I would Uke to see Augusta 
College develop along the lines 
of William and Mary. It is a 
school of quality we can emu- 
late." 

Michael I. Rhoden 



¥S 






Above: Students in this nursing class realize 
that helping others, whether it is in counsel- 
ing, mental hospitals, or VA hospitals can be 
very rewarding. 



Left: Lisa Schubert, a student in the School ot 
Business, received a proclamation from Rich- 
mond County Commission for National Busi- 
ness Education. New degree options in the 
Education Department are now being offered 
such as Counseling, Special Education, and 
Health /Physical Education. These programs 
liclpcd to boost enrollment. 



I ,11 IcM (, I, iiliiales usually ciimplele Iheir 
M I H I ■ I ) ', I . u 1 11, 1 1 c ■ work a nd en ler the work world 
for ci few years before going on to grachialc 
school. 



SOitlcKtCile <^9 










Above: Students may take the opportunity to 
practice their interviewing skills through ser- 
vices on campus such as the Career Center, 
located in the Boykin Wright Hall at the cornor 
of Katherine Street and McDowell Road. The 
Counseling and Testing Center offers tests for 
students that directs them toward a career 
complementing their talents and interests. 










Right: Graduates are now finding it hard to 
get a job after graduation. Many students 
have chosen to go on to graduate school be- 
cause of the soft job market. 










Far Right: Tara Williams is employed at Trav- 
elers Insurance. Many AC students have jobs 
to help with the expense of college. It is also 
a great way to learn on-the-job skills that will 
be useful after graduation. 











QQ StJedl^ 





n 



n 



biere 



"You can't wear that!" said 
Diane Fennig, Director of the 
Career Center at Augusta Col- 
lege, to a female student who 
had come into the center to inter- 
view for an intern program. 
"Spandex pants and stiletto 
heels- 1 don't think so." The real 
key to finding success after col- 
lege comes largely through the 
students' own efforts. 

To start their job search, 
students take advantage of the 
career planning and placement 
activities available at AC. The 
Placement Office provides a wide 
range of services in which stu- 
dents are encouraged to partici- 
pate. Some of the services pro- 
vided include job placement for 
seniors, post-bacs, graduate stu- 
dents and alumni; career coun- 
seling, resume writing and cri- 
tiquing, interviewing techniques 
and job search strategies; resume 





f 



um 




T 



n 



liere 



referrals, part-time and full-time 
job postings. 

"We're a spring board to 
the real world," said Fennig. 
"Some people don't want to ask 
for help. They think it's beneath 
them." Fennig's advice is, "Get 
over it! Learn to network!" 

Cooperative education pro- 
grams are available for quahfied 
students (2.5 GPA or better). 
"There is a possibility of earning 
$15,000 for half a year at Savan- 
nah River Site," said Fennig. "SRS 
had 650 applicants for their sum- 
mer program. Eighty were se- 
lected, and eight to 10 of the 80 
were AC students." 

"Co-op is an invaluable 
learning process. Not only do 
you acquire actual experience 
doing what you only talk about 
in class, but you learn to trust in 
your own abilities," said Lynn 
Brown, Co-op Student - CSRA 
Planning Commission and Co- 
op Student of the Year. 

"I sent resumes every- 
where. I couldn't get a job," said 
Victoria Jarnagin after graduat- 
ing with a BA in History in June, 
1991. "1 had an internship with 
Historic Augusta my senior year. 
I was going to graduate school, 
but couldn't afford it without a 
job." 

Many graduates find il 
iiard to get a job after graduation, 
and also find it hard to get into 
graduate school since there is an 
influx of applicants due to the 
soft job market. "1 went to get my 
eyes examined," Jarnagin said, 
"and found they w\:.x^: looking 
for someone. I am now working 
for that optometrist. 1 have ap- 
plied at the Medical College ol 
f ;e()rgia,and will work on a BSin 
Occupalion.il rhiT,i|->y." 

Jarnagin, a l( )ng with other gr.ul 1 1 



ates, find themselves having to 
go into different fields of work 
and study. 

I'm looking forward to find- 
ing a job," said Elizabeth 
Wilkinson, a Senior Education 
major. "I've been calling princi- 
pals to set up interviews while 
doing my student teaching. 
Middle school teaching and spe- 
cial education are still good fields 
to get into." There are 68 people 
student teaching from the AC 
School of Education. 

The AC Career Library in- 
cludes literature pertaining to 
career information, job-hunting 
techniques and strategies, em- 
ployers and employment oppor- 
tunities, graduate schools, and 
current salary scales. 

According to the Placement 
Office, some of the employers 
interested in AC students include 
the State of Georgia, Charter Hos- 
pital, C&S Bank, Columbia 
County Schools, IBM, MCG, 
Richmond County Schools, 
Robinson-Humphrey, CSRA 
Planning Commission, 

Greenfield Industries, St. Joseph 
Hospital, U. S. Dept. of Energy, 
Westinghouse-SRS, University 
Hospital, Georgia Power, Fed- 
eral Paperboard, and Nutra 
Sweet. 

"With over three-fouths of 
our students working, our Ca- 
reer Planning and Placement 
Office plays a vital role on cam- 
pus. Students may obtain help in 
finding temporary, part-time, or 
full-time career opportunities 
that will allow them togain valu- 
able work experience. All stu- 
dents should definitely see what 
the Placement Office can do for 
them," said Mary K. Lisko, Pro- 
fessor, AC Scht)ol of Business 
Aiiministration. 

Mary Kay Moore 

51 




learral VJoodbye 



They say that there is 
one constant change. Au- 
gusta College is certainly no 
stranger to change, with an 
always-changing student 
body and faculty. 

But last year, AC 
graduation also underwent 
some changes. The August 
commencement ceremony 
was moved to December, 
while the June graduation re- 
mained intact, but both 
moved to the Augusta Col- 
lege Athletic Complex. 

"It made much more 
sense to do it every two quar- 
ters rather than have two 
close together," said John 
Schaeffer, Professor of Music 
and the commencement co- 
ordinator. "...For one thing 
we were running out of room 
at the June graduation." 

The new Athletic 
Complex was initiated into 
the ceremony in December. 
It seemed to many as an ideal 
place to hold the ceremony. 

People weren't disap- 
pointed. 

"It went remarkably 
well," said Schaeffer. "The 
biggest problem was park- 
ing, but Public Safety took 
care of that and did so admi- 
rably." 

Fred Wharton, Chair 
of the Languages and Litera- 
ture Department and also in- 
volved in the graduation cer- 
emony helped with the De- 
cember ceremony. 



"Things worked very 
smoothly in December," 
Wharton said with obvious 
excitement. "I was delighted 
because things actually went 
almost like clockwork. I 
thought it was a very good 
operation." 

But with good things 
come bad things. 

"There were some 
sound problems and I don't 
know who solved the prob- 
lems, but they've certainly 
been solved," said Wharton. 
"There was some reverb, but 
I don't think that's avoid- 
able." 

Future graduations 
will be held in the Athletic 
Complex or, if weather per- 
mits, outdoors. 

The Athletic Com- 
plex is a good location, not 
only for graduates and fac- 
ulty, but also for friends and 
family. 

"It will be able to ac- 
commodate people in some- 
what greater comfort," said 
Schaeffer. 

The overall feeling 
around Augusta College is 
that the gym is not only good 
for sporting events, but other 
activities as well. 

"Graduation at the 
gym in December went off 
with few hitches," stressed 
Schaeffer. 

So the December 
commencement was a big 
success, but how does the 



later graduation affect the 
graduates chance of employ- 
ment after their classes are 
completed? 

"The fact that you 
graduate in December does 
not affect your status as a 
graduate," said Schaeffer. 
"Graduation is a formal cer- 
emony. A lot of people, for 
one reason or another, aren't 
able to attend graduation, but 
we will certify that they have 
completed the graduation re- 
quirements as soon as they 
have. " 

Oh, one more thing 
about the gym; what are we 
going to call it? 

Reed Coss 















Above: Sherrie Barton, An- 
gela Jessen, and Shannon 
Martin are three of the out of 
the fifty-four students who 
received their Bachelor of 
Business Administration. 










1 jrLell; Many AugustaCol- 
Ifge nontraditional students 
work on their degree as well 
.IS raisinj^ a family. 










lifi iieth Baker, the Augusta 
( oiluge valedictorian, re- 
ceived her degree in Math- 
ematics. Mcr plans include 
((impleting a second major 
1 n C'( )m pu ter Science, then g( >- 
ing (»n to graduate school to 
nht.iin her Masters Degree in 
M.ilhi-malics, 



SPECIALIST IN EDUCATION 
Vicky Diane Addison Lori Ann Deeson 

Mary Grace Edmunds Calvin L. Holland, Sr. 

Richard J, Johnson, II Paul McNealy 

Florida Virginia Reed Kalhym Tuggly Paschal 

Krislina WilUams Walters 
MASTER OF EDUCATION 



Constance Murphy Beene 

Jennifer Hadden-Chocallo 

G. Buckingham Dollander 

Mary F. ElUs 

Rita McGahee HoUey 

Daniel Adam MacEachem 

EUie Ruth Rushin McGahee 

Ada Morgan 

David Livingston Robbins 

Pegg)- Ann Cranade Toole 

Michael Lee Wright 



Timothy M. Brunk 
Dianna Brickie Crislip 
Elizabeth Rose Edmonson 
Tern L. FuUord 
James H, Koan, II 
Geraldine Matthews 
Dorthy White Moore 
Addie Jefferson Pennamon 
Frances C. Szablewski 
Donna S. Turner 
Frances Vereen Young 



MASTERS OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 



Ralph Edwin Beene 
Michael Richard Brennan 
JuUie Lynn Craft 
Judith D. Gill 
William Mark Hinson 
Stephen N, Letoumeau 
Blaise M. Miller 
James Preston Newton 
William R. Skelton 



Melanie M. Benhart 
Russell S. Busch 
Lauren Elizabeth Evans 
Slephane Hennebert 
Chi L, Lee 
Werner Matson, 111 
Wendy Marie Clardy 
Thomas F. Ogle 
Donnna Lindsay Thomas 



MASTERS IN SCIENCE IN PSYCHOLOGY 
Andrew Gene Brucks Kimberly Hurst Clark 

Lakshmi Seenivasan-Decanay S. Alan Fann 
Elizabeth Jane Fenner Tina Fonlenot Dahl 

Barbara Rivers Hughes ]o Allison K.iltenbach Jncksor 

Christopher N. Larsen Belle Mead Ready 

Milla Sturdivant Reed Sandra Lynn Scheier 

lanine Marie Stocker Lois Chappell Winkler 

BACHELOR OF ARTS 



Angela D. Attaway 
Sean Patrick Basler 
Patricia Pullen Bell 
Darby Michelle Boles 
Michelle L. Bowen 
Bernard Chatman 
Alyson Anderson Creed 
Melanie Ann Edenfield 
David Michael Ellis 
Vickie Lynn Golden 
Gena Meads Grifhn 
Gerald Lee House 
Kyle David Josey 
Karen Louise King Hawk 
Susan L. Landis 
Jimmy Edward Law 
James Michael Leamard 
Frances G. Longsworth 
Robert P. McDowell, III 
Jacob Middleton 
Wanda Evelyn Moore 
Rhonwyn Allene Newsomc 
Terry Barbara Palmer 
Renee Michelle Prescott 
Ann Elizabeth Rhoades 
Wille Mendel Saunders 



Kimberly A. Babb 
Fredenck Michael Barnabei 
Claudus David Birdsong, Jr. 
Clayton Branch Bolton 
Patricia Lynn Cato 
Dacid Spencer Copenliaver 
Patrick jean Danser 
Keith Wilson Edmonds 
Steven David Gavin 
Sylvia Penelope Gregory 
Christine Kenny Hay 
Sonia Justice Ivey 
Charles Weigle Kellenher 
Julia Lyles Knox 
Alexis Marshall-Larry 
Olivia Michelle Lawrence 
Elwood M. Longencker 
Harriett Coleman Maguire 
Kathleen Everett McLendon 
Bertina Elaine Miller 
Judy Frances Moyer 
Ricky D. Oglesby 
Holley Lynnette Peterson 
Charles Andrew Reeves 
Robert D. Ringle 
Dawn Catherine Say lor 



Giovanni Rodriquez Shumake Dave W. Simmons 
Michelle Marie Sullivan Susan Marie Thomas 

Addrenna La Fran Thurman Rhonda Perkins True 
Veronica Walker Robert Duke Watkins 

David Bruce Willig Cheryl Galloway Wilso 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE 



George M, Allen 
Laura W. Barnelt 
Fredrick Roland Cox 
Patrick McKay Griffin 
Vicki McKeel Hatch 
Robert Eugene Htchinson, II 
Thomas Joseph Jackson, Jr, 
LynneS. Harris-Marion 
Julie Elizabeth Merilt 
Heather ). Oldnetllc 
Andrea Paige Richardson 
Barbara Twij^gs Thompson 



Beth C, Baker 
Sidney A. Brown 
Nilsa Gonzalez 
Marlene McDuffie Harris 
James W. Hooper 
Mildred H.Jackson 
Olivia Michelle Lawercnce 
Ronald Lee Martin, Jr. 
Thuy Hong Nguyen 
Romeo Recchia 
Teresa B. Spires 
Dena Elizabeth Watson 



BACHELOR OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 



Cynthia Mary Allen 
Curtis WI Ansley 
Sherrie Renee' Barton 
Gladys Lynelle Burke 
David Wayne Craft 
George William DaviH, Jr, 
David A, Dunagan 
Mnrgrel E, Elliott 
Terri Jean Harmon 
Trad Woods HigginH 
Koberl Shawn Horseman 
Wolney Tyrone Jackson 
Lorena Jernigan Oliver 
Diane L. lohntion 
D.ivki Wayne Knight 
Shannon MellHKa Mnrtin 
Mi'lttdye Anne McKelliir 
Rulh ThomiiH Mobley 
JoHephC, MllkTjr. 
Vklorin L, Oberzan 
l.lMii A.Srhul/ 
Micliellc VlclorlJi Slmw 
Jflmrri MIchni'l Synder 
Hrvln Denver Tnylor, Jr, 
n.-bhle I-orrnlni- Wnlker 
Sue lill.-n Wh.-eler 
Ancln-a Ki-Kina William 



Garnetl Mitchell Alton 
William Russell Ualch 
Krislen Michele Bowers 
Veronica P. Collins Bogan 
Penny Lynn Dalzelt 
Jerry Gregg Doulglns 
Warren Brad Duncan 
Angela L. Fowler 
Kathleen Marie I lurnlen 
Phan Bache Holland 
Nancy I'rlscllla Hudson 
J, Doyle Jenkins 
Angela C. Jesnen 
Roberl Joweph Johnnlon 
Franclne Lane Norrlw 
I'hyllh Joan McCoy 
Belinila Marie Mobley 
Denldi- l.iiurile MorriHon 
David Chrlalopher Myer 
MIchnel JnmeH Rlioden 
Piilrkla N, Shinn 
Gregory Allen Stavenu 
Brian Mark Sullivan 
Lillian I lulVahrenwnId 
K.-IIvy M, Weaver 
WendleCialf Wllhi'lm 
Michael W, YonermkI 



Hll/ab.-lh Mitcliel /Ippay 
IIACMIll.OH OI' SCIIINCI! IN l!DUCATION 

Drhbli- Aruie \inin Kalhyrii Su/.nnne Dixon 

John Jerome Walker William Klrkane Wheeler 

iiACHiu.oK or I'lNH Ain a 

Royre Day Savage 
ASSOCIATl! 01' SCIIiNCE 
Mnrlii Jcnnlru' Holland Cliira Mlllun Lytch 

ASSOCIATROI'ARTS 
Snndrlni' M. Cochnrd Vickie Conner HImini-r 

A8B0CIATI! OF APPLIED SClliNCIi 
Trncy lippu Slokeii 




rn 




ream Vyoniinue 



Augusta College 
held its June Graduation on 
the 13th at 10:00 a.m. in the 
college's Physical Education/ 
Athletic Complex. 

Carolynn Reid- 
Wallace, the Assistant Secre- 
tary of Education for Post- 
Secondary Education was the 
commencement speaker. Dr. 
Reid-Wallace is responsible 
for administering the federal 
government's higher educa- 
tion program. 

Approximately 360 
candidates graduated in the 
college's 67th commencement 
exercise, and had the oppor- 
tunity to be a part of one of 
the most stirring speeches. 

Dr. Reid- Wallace 
started off the commence- 



ment address with questions 
that hit home for many Ameri- 
cans who are concerned with 
the Education standard of the 
future: "How do we prepare 
the next generation of college 
students for the world that 
awaits them?" "How do we 
handle the ever increasing num- 
bers of students who enter col- 
lege ill-prepared for the courses 
they will be required to take?" 
Dr. Reid-Wallace summed 
these questions up with the 
answer of: standards, which are 
the key to preparing the next 
generation of students. Accord- 
ing to Dr. Reid-Wallace, the 
buck stops at higher education. 
She encouraged students to re- 
alize that education is vitally 
important to us. 















Above: Graduatesare pictured hereanxiously 
a waiting the commencement exercises to be- 
gin. As pictured here graduates do many 
things to keep themselves occupied during 
the exercise. 










i ..i l.tii. Kcilh llcigood .1 liathelor o( Science 
graduate proudly waves to family and friends 
in theaudience. Graduates work hard to finally 
see the day where it is all over. 










Ij.fl.Circilyiiii Kiid- Wallace the assisl.inl mi ■ 
rctary of education was the speaker for the 
67th commencement exercises for Augusta 
College. Dr. Reid-Wallace stressed the impor- 
tance of the value of education. 









June Class of 1992 



SPECIALISTS IN EDUCATION 

PEN>JY R. BARCLAY 
DORIASTINO CHEELY BROWN 
(ESSIE W CHAMBERS 
KATHLEEN FLITRELLE PURR 
MARY )ANE GARNER 
DONNA S. MARTIN 
ANITA LOUISE C. MURPHY 
PAMELA ARLENE PHILLIPS 
CAROL V, SWEARINCEN 
JOYCE P. WILLIAMS 
MASTER OF EDUCATION 
ANNIE GARDON ALBERTY 
LOUISE M. ASHGY 
CINDY LEE BEATTY 
JUILA ANNE BENNETT 
JANICE NEWSOME BRINKLEY 
ANNE WALKER BURKE 
MYRA CORCORAN 
JOY LYNN COX 
TRACY DEE EVANS DAVIS 
DOROTHY MARIE FLOYD 
GEBIE RENE FORREST 
MARY ST, DENIS FUTRELL 
CLAIRE M. lEFFCOAT 
DARREN THOMAS METRESS 
DAVID HAYES MORGAN 
JANET M, FAIN MORGAN 
DAWN MARGARET NEUKIRCH 
JONELLE F. ORD 
DEBORAH BROYLES PARDUE 
SUSAN DURDEN RICHEY 
HAROLD S, ROBV, SR. 
CAROL M. SOUTHER 
RITA RICHINS STANDACE 
SAMANTHA JOHNSON THRIFT 
WILLIAM KIKANE WHEELER 
MASTER OFBUSINESS ADMIN. 
SETH HAMMER ALALOF 
ANTONIA V, DUKES-CRAWFORD 
RICHELLE P, ECKLES 
ROBERT D. GILCRIST 
MATTHEW S. JUDD 
lAMES J. KENT 
JOHN SCHJRRA LAM 
LANCE C- LICI-ITENWALTER 
ROBIN ANNETTE OWENS 
SUSAN ANN WELCH 
RENEE M. WILKINSON 
MASTER OF SCIENCE 
IN PSYCHOLOGY 
MATTHEW K. BAHARLIAS 
DAPHNE ELAINE BAILEY 
MARGARET R. CHILDRESS 
JILL SUZANNE HAYES 
GWENCWLYN MILLER 
MARY CHRISTINE RHODES 
MARY KATHERINE WALKER 
MARGIE C WALLACE 
CANDI M. WILLIAMS 
BACHELOR OF ARTS 
SANDRA S. ANDERSON 
LURA ELLEN ARNOLD 
NATHANIEL B. BANKS 
AMY LOUISE BEAUDOIN 
SUSAN D. BLACKMON 
JUDITH A. BONADIO 
MARCLYNN E. BOWERS 
STEVEN ALBERT BREDA 
SANDRA CLACK DRICHAM 
LISA ADELE BRODIE 
LORA MARGERT BROYLES 
MARY B. BURNS 
TRACIE BROOKS BUSH 
DAVID HEATH CADDELL 
MICHELLE ANN CANCHOLA 
TONY R- COOPER 
FRANCOIS COUPON 
WENDY KAY CREEK 
CONNIE PAIGE CREWS 
liARDAHA CKOUT 
MARCIA GACNON DORIS 
JENETTE WASDEN FARROW 
JOHN PETER FILLOP 
ANGELA MICHOLE FINCH 
DORIS WELTCH FORCE 
MICHELLE MARIE FOSTER 
LAURIE WEIMAR FKAZIER 
KOHYN CiKAY CiAKMANY 
ANTHONY DALE GARREIT 
TRUDir MARIE GFORCi; 
ANNI-TII- t;i,INN 
AUTIIEK M.iGFNE GRANT, )R, 
TAMMY ( HRMlNIi (,HmN 
DEBOHAII S GKIIFIN 
in-l.lNI)A ANN (,I«K)MS 
LISA IIUTK) (■IIIIIFAU 
QUUEN E. HALL 
SHAWN PATRICK MAMMON 
MJiHCEDKJ. HARDIN 
ANDKA K HIGHSMirif 
TAMMY IJ(!NISIi HOHUS 
MARTHA ALICIA IKXiAN 
KIKJNIM LYNN HOWARD 
IXJNNII; l.hl' HU(KAHA 
DliHKA LYNN HULL 
IMVIDHl'.NI/ HUNTER 
JOHN MK HAFI. IIUK HUNS 
I.AVIIHNI' U)UI'. lOHNf-ON 
SU'l'HANIli I), JONI'S 
TONJUI.A KliNliE JONIIS 
I'A'IKICIA ANN lOHOAN 
CIlKlfi (', KllJr> 
OAVIDI.YNNKKIHGUL 
WIM.IAM K I.AMII 
FIOUN I.I' 

DlilllJHA l;(.l/.AIIir(H l.llWIf. 
fiUftAN )A( KI.Y I.INlJflK 
fXINAI.U (fOWAHlJ U)NG 
ANAS'IAWA M. MAUrXJX 
ffDlVflN PKANK MANI'MIIIX^NIA 



LISA K. MASELLI 
J ERE LIN MAXWELL 
CAROL UPSHAW MCDANIEL 
BRUCE DAVID MILLER 
LINDA SUSAN MOORE 
PETER LEWIS MORE 
MICHAEL PATRICK MULROY 
EVA CHRISTINE MUSGROVE 
VALERIE A. NEW 
LORRAINE CORLEY NEWMAN 
SHELIA D. O'ROURKE 
CATHY ANN OLSON 
JILL DEITZ OSBORN 
JAMES H, PARKER, |R. 
VICTORIA KAY DEITZ PARKER 
MELISSA KATHRYN PARR 
MARIE PENKUNAS 
ANNETTE LOUISE PKESCOTT 
CAROLE HOBBS PRESCOTT 
SCOTT MASON PRINCE 
DAWN WILSON RADFORD 
FRANK E. RAUNIKAR 
JOHN VINCENT REARDON 
DEBRA DENISE ROBINSON 
GINGER FA YE ROGERS 
LEANITA K. H. SAYE 
GIOVANNI R, SHUMAKE 
BENJAMIN WEBB SMITH 
RUSSELL PURVIS SMITH 
TIFFANY LYN SMITH 
SHARON ELIZABETH SPENCER 
CATHERINE PATRICIA SPIVEY 
PAULA ANN STANKAY 
TINA YVETTE STARKS 
JOHN THOMAS STATON, JR. 
GLENDA CAROL STUBBLEFIELD 
TONI L F TANKERSLEY 
JENNA CAREL THOMAS 
TINA L. THOMPSON 
PATRICL^ D, VAUGHN 
VANESSA VELEZ-CRU2 
NANCY P. WALLACE 
GENEVA R, WEBER 
CYNTHIA PETTY WELLS 
JULIE i-L WEST 

BARBARA MYRICKS WILBURN 
SCOTT WILLARD WILKES 
ANTONIO WILKINSON 
ELIZABETH ANNE WILKINSON 
SUSAN FORD WILLIAMS 
ANTHONY PATRICK WOOD 
MARY K. WORSHAM 
DOROTHY BEALE WRIGHT 
HEATHER LEN YOUNG 
FELICIA ALEXANDRA ZAPATA 
GEORGE LIONEL ZUMBRO III 
BACHELOR OF SCIENCE 
MAUREEN JENETTE AKINS 
LEE MYONC-U ALFORD 
ANTHONY ULYSSES BARBER 
BRET ALLEN BRACKETT 
KAREN MICHELLE BRADLEY 
GEORGE JOSEPH BUCINA 
ANGELA J. COLEMAN 
PHILLIP LAWRENCE COULE 
MAHZAZ K, DASTI 
DONALD ALAN DENARD 
STEPHEN E. ELDRED 
WILLIAM GREGORY ELWELL 
ANTHONOY SCOTT FERGUSON 
HOLLY ANN GARDNER 
DEBRA RINKER GILLESPIE 
TIMOTHY J. GILLESPIE 
DANIEL COMER GOODWIN 
KENNETH PAUL GREMBOWICZ 
KEITH L. HAGOOD 
ALFRED A. HAMILTON 
DIANNA NEAL HAMRICK 
MICHAEL It. HANSON 
KERRY SUSAN HILL 
DARKYLS IIOLLEY 
LINDA KATHERINE HUDSON 
BONNIE PATRICE JENKINS 
PAY DIANE KING 
KELLE LYNN LANCHAM 
TRACY K. LYNCH 
CARLOS DANIEL MAKKYNA 
RICKY RAY NICHOLSON 
ANITA SUE NOC.A] 
JANICT' ANN PHILLIPS 
ROWLAND WHITNEY PITTS 
SHARON A, SCHMIT 
WESLEY ALAN SLONE 
CYNTHIA WILLIAMS SMITH 
VENNA R. SOLIPUKAM 
SHARON ELAINE SUMEItAU 
DENISE TIIREirr 
MONICA GAIL TOWNSEND 
KKYSTINA YVONNE VASCO 
Sriil'HI-N WAYNE WARRIOR 
MORGAN N WIIALEY. JR. 
AUDRIiV WIN( .FIELD 
( HUI'.KH'HPR M, WISNIESKI 
JOHN WEM.LY YEOMAN 
nACIILLOKOPHUHINIiSSADMI 
MI/.ANNI'. I'., ALEXANDER 
ini.IP ANN HAIl.py 
H(r.| ITA II. IHJA'I RIGHT HASS 
\UA( y AI.IMIA HI'.I.L 
MK HAI'L I'. ItLANCHAKn 
I ),I/AIU'III M/PMOKE ItOYLKS 
|M||N MAKVIN IIKYANT 
I'AIKK K Y. I1U( IIANAN 
DMUIRAII DI'.IMPK IIURKIN 
I'ADI. I., f IIANl l'y,IR, 
I AURA AN'.LLY ( LARK 
( ARLMEPIIIiNtOX 
(ONVA MARIE ( ((EASY 
SANDRA EMZAHEMI CHtJWIILL 
(,. CLAKK CUMMINS 

iJimim c. DANiiiL 



JOHN ALLEN DEMPSEY III 
THEREASA-ANNE M, DEWOODY 
GLENN EDWARD DRAWDY 
CHRISTIE JOSEY DURRENCE 
LARRY G, ENNIS 
RUSSELL EDWARD FOSTER 
NOELLE FRENCH 
KIMBERLY TOUCHE HAMPTON 
DEBRA JEAN HAWKES 
CRYSTAL A. HENDLEY 
lEFFERY NICHOLAS HUBERTY 
THOMAS R. JENKINS 
DOROTHY G. JOHNSON 
HOLLY R. JONES 
VANESSA DIANE HALL-JONES 
MONTIE HENDERSON 
JULIE A. KENTNER 
KEVIN KILCHENSTEIN 
LAURIE ALLISON MAY 
PARTICK T. MCCUE 
CHARLES E, MOYE 
NANCY J. NEWMAN 
BART COLTER O'QUINN 
VICTORIA B. PAPPAS 
CAROL LEE PONDER 
TINA CHRISTINE RABUN 
FRANK E. RAUNIKAR 
DEBORAH A. RHODES 
BEVERLY A. SANCHEZ 
TERESA A. SCHIER 
lERRY SCOTT 
CHRISTOPHER S SEIGLER 
TERRIE LOUISE SHELTON 
MARK DAVID STAHLER 
CURTIS R. SUMMERS 
SUSAN V, TAYLOR 
LESTER T. WALDEN III 
CHRISTOPHER T. WALLACE 
LAURIE SAMANTHA WHTTE 
PAYL RAYMOND WICKLINE 
TOM ALLEN D, WILLIAMS 
MARY HILLMAN WILLIAMS 
SONNETTA )OY WILLIAMS 
LORl ANN WREN 
VIRGINIA P, YORK 
BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN ED. 
TERESA RUTTl BELCHYK 
PAMELA EVANS CHILDS 
ALAN HUGH FAIRCLOTH 
ANNA VICTORIA S. MARTIN 
WANDA KAYE MCCORD 
DEBORAH GATES SMALLEY 
BACHELOR OF MUSIC 
MARGARET C. GOLDBERG 
VIRGINIA GLOVER JENKINS 
BACHELOR OF FINE ARTS 
ELIZABETH M, ROARK BARNES 
MICHAEL LEE BUDD 
DAN! LYN GRIFFIN 
VICTORIA WREN IIOLLEY 
ABBOT ANDREW SMITH 
ASSOCIATE OF SCIENCE 
CYNTHIA A. BROWN ANTHONY 
TERESA P. ANTONELLIS 
LINDA MARIE ARMSRTONG 
GWENDOLYN DENISE BARK 
KIMBERLY DAVIS BOROM 
KIMBERLY SUE BORRIS 
DEBOItAH KAY CARTRETT 
MADELINE L. CHRISTENSEN 
DORINDA ANSLEY CLARK 
BETTY H. COBSY 
JULIE CHAMBERS DELOACH 
iULIE YOUMANS DUNMIRE 
KATHLEEN ANN FISHER 
ANGELA DENISE FOX 
JACQUELINE WILLIAMS GIVENS 
LUANN GOOLSBY 
ROBIN L GRIFFIN 
WENDY HADDOCK 
DIANNE THORNTON HARPER 
JANICE C. HARRELL 
MELISSA LYNN HERLIHY 
BOBBY JOSEPH HICKOX 
MINDY CHARNELL HILLIS 
JACQUELYN F liCXIAN 
KIM M, HOWELL 
ELEANOR CASHIN JOIIANN 
JANICE L, KEY 
ROSEMARY RECTOR KING 
MARTHA ENGELKE LAPPE 
STERLING C, MARTINOVICH 
|OE ANN DOWNS MCGHEE 
AMY WALKER MCXJKE 
TRICIA MCCALI. MORRIS 
DEBRA OWIiNS MORTON 
SARAH ANN JOHNSON 
KATHERINE LYNN PI-TEKS 
ROSEMARY HARDY PILCIIER 
CYRINA LYNN RENTSCIILUR 
LESLIE A, ROBERTS 
MARIE N. SLIVKA 
PirTRA li.STANO 
ROBIN REDECCA STRICKLAND 
IN.JUDrni LOKIHTA WILKERSON 
ASSOCIATIU)!' ARTS 
JERRY WILIUIRN CI.AXTON 
VICKI I<) ItK Kl'Rl-xiN 
GRIiCOKY JOHN JONES 
SU/.ANNI( NEWMAN KNERCIi 
KATHI.HEN A, MACK 
RENAS. MOHLHY 
DAWN MARIE SI'liPHIiNR 
AHSOCIATHOI'AI'Pl.ltiDSCinNCn 
VKKI LAHIIAWN ItOSEMAN 
WILLIAM IIRYAN (■<H)I„|R, 
SAUA ), UELANIiY 
l)HIH)RAH S. (JKII'I'IN 
PAMELA ALIUCE HARTLRy 




-t i 



•'«^!-^' 



56 



Above: Doug Williams and Iain Drakeley take a breather 
between classes. Right: Members of the AC soccer 
team show their school spirit during a basketball game. 
Far right: Missy Sousa shows the guys how it's done. 
Top right: Students in the computer lab wait their turn 
for the English professor's advice. 







r 



|p .|P^j he\ are walking down halls, studying 
in the library, and eating in the cafete- 
ria. They drive here, bike here, and bus 

ere. They study business, education, and science. 

! 

"hey are all over the place. What are these things 
lat roam the campus? They're students. They are 
'vUgusta College. Each with the same goal-- a higher 
ducation. Even though these students may share 
3me similarities . it's hard to categorize them. They 
ave their own ideas, attitudes, views, backgrounds, 
id the\ span the age spectrum. 

Each of these students made a difference at 
•Ugusta College, w hether it was voting during SGA 
ections, recycling, participating in sports or in the 
ts, or just attending class. Each played their own 
ut in making a difference. 





Lisa Ackerman 

Jeremy Addy 

Andrag Agnihotri 

Annie Alberty 

John Alexander 



Larry Alexander ^J/^ 



Kimberly Allen 



Carolyn Alston 



Janel Andrews 

Leonard Andrews 

Holly Arnold 

Lura Arnold 

Michael Axton 



Tara Aycock 

Jacquelin Babineaux 

Mark Baggett 

Linda Baker 

Stephanie Baker 




SS 



September 16, 1991 brought in tl| 
first day of classes for Fall quart( 
Student Union sponsored a loci 
band and "First Class" refreshmenti 



SticK lour Neck OMt 



A group of 22 Augusta Col- 
■ge students and staff mem- 
> banded together Septem- 
er 13-14 and attacked the 
)pe course at Camp Gra\'itt, 
C. 

Their assault was success- 
il, and they returned to the 
impus from their Leadership 
etreat armed with impro\'ed 
adership skills and a 
■newed spirit of teamwork. 
"The retreat was for leader- 
lip," said Beth Castleberr\', a 
ember of Student Union and 
~L'Cond-year participant in 
c retreat. "It was to help 
.'.•. leaders establish leader- 
lip skills, and those who 
i\e established skills to 
larpen or better their 
.ills." 

During the retreat, partici- 
ints were required to tra- 
-Tse series of rope bridges 
ith, and at times without, the 
■Ip of their teammates. There 
L-re also some discussions 
,>out leadership and exercises 



to help the rope climbers get 
to know each other better. 

The program is sponsored 
by the Office of Student Activ- 
ities and is intended to give 
student leaders an opportuni- 
ty to build a sense of com- 
radery and confidence to 
bring back to AC. 

"What we were thinking 
about for the retreat was that 
it would he an energizer and a 
positi\'e experience for the stu- 
dent leaders so that they 
would come back ready to 
take on the world," said Kay 
Phillips, Assistant Director of 
Student Activities. "Hopefully 
it got them to know us better, 
for them to be comfortable 
with us, coming to us with 
problems or questions." 

According to Castleberry, 
the experience was rewarding 
and valuable lessons came 
back with most of those who 
attended. 

"We had to work as a team. 
We had to be dependent on 



each other and we had to sup- 
port each other. I think that is 
what we learned there to 
being back to school," she 
said. 

Brad Poole 



"Stick Your Neck Out" was the 
theme of the 1991 conference. 
Natasha Hendrix, Al Hamilton, 
Steve Cain, Mark Baggett, and L, G. 
Frey were a handful of students who 
worked on leadership skills. 





;S*gs'f:S?^ 



William Balch 
Jacqueline Barrett 
Rosetta Bass 
Stephanie Bell 
Justin Benfield 



Andrea Bennett 
Sonya Bcnning 
Maria Bernaldez 

Willie Berry 
Amber Biles 



59 



t>TlinClilTP 

or UULI1I0 



hUW bn^ER 



Beth C. Baker is a Post Bac- 
calaureate math major. She 
plans to complete a second 
major in Computer Science 
then enter graduate school to 
obtain a Masters Degree in 
Math. Her activities include 
Euclidean Society President 
and Student Ambassador 
Board member. Her honors 
include the Senior Mathemat- 
ics Award, Who's Who '90, 
and induction into the Phi 
Kappa Phi Honor Society. 



nOELEC 



nnchoir] 



Senior Michele A. Canchola 
is a Political Science and Soci- 
ology Major. Her plans are to 
obtain a law degree and Ph. d 
in Sociology, as well as to 
conduct research that under- 
stands and examines the 
operation of human social 
affairs. Her activities include 
Outstanding Judical Cabinet 
member. Nuclear Studies 
Honors Class, Dean's List 
and the Sunshine Founda- 
tion. 



MlhCflMLEbERRr 



Elizabeth Castleberry is a 
Junior Finance major. Her 
future plans are to pursue a 
Master's of International 
Business at USC with an 
emphasis in French and Ital- 
ian. Elizabeth's activities at 
AC include the Jerry Lewis 
Labor Day Telethon, Sunset 
Home Youth Center, NACA 
volunteer and she taught 
French at Warren Road Ele- 
mentary School. 




60 




Chris Black 
Rebecca Blocker 
Frank Block! 
Donna Bokesch . 
Michelle Bolyard 
James Bonitatibus 
Tony Bonner 
Allyson Booton 

Greg Bowen 
Lewis Boykin 
Tracee Brady 
Debbie Brewer 
Jsa Brittingham 
Benita Brown 
Cathy Brown 
Sid Brown 

Janene Browning 
Marci Bnmknian 

Lidy Brunson 
Israel Bryson 
C allierine Biiraii 
C lirisloplier Burke 

atrice Burke 
F.Jsa Bu/.hardt 



61 



Clarissa Byars 

Lisa Byrd 

Steve Campbell 

Kelly Cantrell 

Elizabeth Castleberry 



Martha Causby 
Helen Cech 
Scott Cheek 

Michelle Childs 
Jenna Chitty 



The Dominos Noid helped with 
the Pi Kappa Phi Blood Drive in 
the CAC. Along with the 
fraternity members, he made 
sure all donors were treated to 
all the hot pizza they could eat. 




JLVl 



Wait Disney Co-Op 



Mickey's calling. 

That's right, representatives 
from Walt Disney World in 
Orlando, Fla. visited Augusta 
College on Feb. 5 looking for 
recruits to work during the 
summer and Fall quarters in 
their College Program. 

Numerous work areas were 




62 



available to students: attrac- 
tions, tickets, merchandise 
and many more with a 2.5 
GPA to apply. 

Housing for workers dur- 
ing the program was provid- 
ed at Vista Way, with two and 
three bedroom apartments. 
Vista Way has racquet ball 
and tennis facilities, two 
pools, weight room, and hot 
tubs. Roomates were found 
from around the world. 

Tim Bond, a AC alumnus 
who took part in the program, 
shared an apartment with a 
Norwegian and a German. He 
worked at Disney from Jan- 
uary to May 1990 as a "mer- 
chandise host in the gift shop, 
stocking and working the 
cash register. 

Bond received a Ducktorate 
degree for "above average 
work and attending all the 
seminars." 

The training in the program 



included such as guest ser 
vices and problem solving 
All with great experience i) 
customer service, student 
earned $5.30 per hour am, 
were guaranteed thirty hour 
or more per week. Rent wa 
taken out of the student 
weekly paycheck. Disney pre 
vided all uniforms and laur 
dering services. : 

After students obtained 
position, professional semi 
nars were provided. Al 
employees were able to visi 
the Epcot Center, Disney am; 
Disney Studios MGM Them 
Park free with I. D. 

Interviewing with the Dis| 
ney representative also bene 
fited students who were look 
ing for employment afte; 
graduation. Disney was intei' 
ested in hiring prospectiv 
graduates to work in Orlandc 
so students came prepared t 
start a career. i 




Yona Choi 



Matthew Cleveland 



Lisa Cody 



Angela Coleman 



Ngima Coleman 
Christophe Connell 
Viriginia Connell 
Daniel Connor 
Rose Cooks 



Audrey Cooper 
Bill Cooper 
Dexter Cooper 
Susan Cax 
I. aura Craft 



63 



Ahcient Artifacts 

Black Creek Village is visited by AC Archaeology Minors 



\.^^^Ma '(^ 



Archaeological. This may 
conjure up images of Indiana 
Jones movies in the minds of 
many, but two AC students, 
Alison Hurst, a Junior Engi- 
neering major and Keith 
Rindt, a Senior History 
major, experienced the real 
thing this past summer. They 
spent four weeks discovering 
and digging up the past of St. 
Catherine's Island, Georgia. 
They both are minoring in 
Anthropology which is the 
field of study that includes 
Archaeology. The minor is 
offered by the Arts and Sci- 
ences Department. 

The American Museum of 
Natural History in New York 
is conducting the search that 
will continue off and on for 
the next three years. The pur- 
pose of the search is to dis- 
cover how the Indians lived 



before the contact with the 
Spanish and perhaps be able 
to reconstruct their lifestyle. 

"The five sites being exca- 
vated," Keith explained, 
"were representatives of con- 
tact and precontact." 

They issued nondestruc- 
tive techniques to excavate 
the site. This is very tedious 
work, according to Hurst, but 
it helps to preserve the envi- 
ronment and the site for fur- 
ther archaeological research. 
A magnetometer was used to 
detect the magnetic field at 
any given place. This enabled 
the crews to produce a dot 
sensing map that would help 
to generate artifacts and the 
best site to excavate. One site 
known as Black Creek Village 
was the principle site that 
Hurst and Rindt worked on. 

"They were not looking for 



anything particular," Hurst 
said, "just some structures, 
houses or where paths may 
have been." 

There were seven people 
on the site, including Hurst 
and Rindt. Because as Rindt 
said, "you cannot have too 
many people at once" or the 
very artifacts that were being 
searched for could be 
destroyed. 

Both students enjoyed their 
experience at St. Catherine's 
Island. Hurst "learned about 
new archaeological tech- 
niques," and why those sites 
are so important. However, 
for Rindt this was a taste of 
his career. He hopes to be an 
archaeologist someday. This 
project enabled him to meet 
"a lot of neat people and 
learn about remote sensing" 
using the magnetometer. 



Their four weeks were def 
nitely worth it to both of th 
students. 

Hurst and Rindt had a 
opportunity that is quickl 
vanishing because archaec 
logical sites are becomin 
extinct. The crude methods c 
excavation in the past and th 
uncertainty of public interei' 
has eroded the use of a larg 
number of sites for archaec 
logical study. There was nc 
any foresight to preserve th 
sites for future research. 

That is why the sites th;: 
remain are so importan 
They enable us to discovt 
the lives and lifestyles thii 
once existed. The answers \. 
many questions about peop 
of long ago are buried in tl 
soil. 

Nancy Murr? 
Bell Ringer Sta 



Wendy Creer 

Charles Cummings 

Jacqueline Cummings 

Deandre Currin 

Shirlee Dailey 

Christa Danbar 

Cassandra Davis 

Ingrid Davis 

Michael Davis 

Bo DeBruin 

Deborah Deeder 

Felitia De La Cruz 

Will Deloach 

Chi Dillashaw 

Diane Dinu 

Deborah Dixon 



64 






PTIinCUTP 
01 UULI1I0 



nLT30n CKEED 



Alyson A. Creed is a Senior 
Sociology major who plans to 
pursue a Masters in Speech 
Pathology at USC. She hopes 
to work with children or with 
the elderly. Alyson spends 
time involved in activities 
such as Zeta Tau Alpha, 
Alpha Kappa Delta, March of 
Dimes, and the Association 
for Retarded Citizens. 




LUEnDTCREER 



Wendy Kay Creer is a Senior 
Psychology niajor with future 
plans to attend graduate 
school. Activities she partici- 
pated in include Orientation 
Staff, the Who's Who Com- 
mittee, the Athletic Commit- 
tee, the Budget Advisory 
Committee and the Faculty/ 
Student Judiciary. 




o nnQtin tDLU 



Jo Angela Edwins is a Senior 
Communications and English 
major. I ier future plans are to 
pursue graduate school and 
ivcntually a career in writ- 
ing. Some of her activities 
Diclude staff writer for the 
I'xil Kinger and the Student 
Ambassador IJoard. She 
received the Augusta College 
I acuity Scholarship and I he 
I'.ilrit i,i Sniilh I .eslier Sehol 
.irsliip. 




65 



Stella Dorn 

Nancy Doyle 

Linda Dray 

Susan Dray 

Jamie Driver 



Will Duncan 



Katrina Latimer Dunn ».i-s. 



Teresa Dunn 



Shanta Dunnum 

Bill Dunwoody 

Ben Dusenbury 

Robert Ealy 

Monica Elam 



Marsha Emery 
Carol Emineth 
Terrie English 
Anna Ericsson 
Melanie Erwin 



66 





Dena Eskew 
Christiana Ezelhekaibee 
Sana Fadel 
Keshia Fielding 
Angela Fish 



Chanene Fitch 
Christina Fitzgerald 
Kevin Fleming 
Elizabeth Flournoy 
James Franklin 



A Look at CoM^ress 




L l->JBu=^ - j*^'w^.vu-i^ 



On Feb. 25 over 30 Augusta 
lillege students and faculty 
lumbers embarked on a trip 
I the State Capitol Building 
I Atlanta. 

I "Outstanding, very enlight- 

ling," said Bill Dunwoody, 

fnate Parliamentarian for 

Mgusta College SGA. "1 

ish we had more time in 

e Senate before they 

joumed." 

After a roll call of bills and 
e agenda was announced, 
iprescntati ve Donald 
leeks from the 89th district 
et the group. He and Ccor- 
Covemor Zell Miller took 
Tie out to pose with the 
oup for pictures. Miller was 
»t available for questions. 
Cheeks was cordial, sup- 
yjng copies of the agenda 



and booklets on parliamen- 
tary procedure and taking 
time out to answer questions. 

Cheeks said the state lot- 
tery "is a bad idea because 
the money will not go to edu- 
cation, and the crime rate will 
increase." 

Ted Turner, owner of tele- 
vision stations CNN, WTBS 
and TNT, addressed joint ses- 
sion of the State Congress. 
Governor Miller presented 
him with a proclamation stat- 
ing that Feb. 25 was officially 
"Ted Turner Day" in Georgia. 
Turner's wife, Jane Fonda- 
Turner, also appeared. 

"Ted and Jane made liie 
day," said Julie Dunmire, one 
student who attendcti 

The house had sixti'iii l)ills 
and five resolutions on their 



agenda the day of the trip. 
House Bill 124, which will 
ban toxic heavy metals in the 
packaging industry, House 
Bill 1170, which will require 
inmates to pay for medical 
services received while incar- 
cerated and House Bill 1400, 
which will allow excess state 
money to go into a savings 
account, were among them. 

According to members of 
the group, all had a good 
time. 

"It was interesting," said 
Steve Patch, an AC freshman 
who attended. 

Although they enjoyed vis- 
iting the Capitol, Li/.beth 
Wheeler and Abby Wood- 
ward expressed some doubts 
about their representatives. 
"We're distressed and dis- 



d v ^.- : _ 

mayed at the lack of female 
and minority representa- 
tives," said Wheeler. 

"How can they call them- 
selves representatives?" 
asked Woodward. 

Bonnie Rousch agreed 
when Kritie Germann 
assessed the trip. "We really 
enjoyed seeing what goes on 
behind the scenes," said Ger- 
mann. "The ushers gave us 
inside information on who 
everybody was and what was 
going on. Representative 
Charles W. Yeargin told us 
what it takes to be a politi- 
cian: 'Make your fortune first, 
and get involved in your 
community. Look tor solu- 
tions, not problems.' " 

Steve Cain 



67 



PTIinCMTP 

lAfHO'S M\fH& ^jyiONG 

I UULM 10 



mO[LLErOME 



Michelle M. Foster is a Senior 
Education major. Her plans 
are to obtain a Masters in 
Education and to join the 
Peace Corps. Some of her 
activities include the New- 
man Club, Augusta College 
Fun Fair, AC Elizabethian 
Fayre, and the Columbia 
County Special Olympics. 



fliRicin 



Senior Patricia H. Hall is a 
Mathematics major who 
plans to teach math and 
pursue her education. She is 
involved in the Euclidean 
Society. Awards include 
the Scholastic Achievement 
Award, Phi Kappa Phi Honor 
Society, and the Paul Douglas 
Teacher Scholarship. 



JChr]LV0R50 



John C. Halvorson is a Senior 
Political Science major. His 
future plans are to attend law 
school and then a career in 
politics. Some of his activities 
include the Political Science 
Club and the College Repub- 
licans. He volunteers for 
Habitat for Humanity, Red 
Cross, the United Way, and 
for area soup kitchens. 



6S 




Bavihg the F/amt 



I'll bet you're wondering 
ist exactly where to take 
3ur truckload of old beer 
ms, right? OK, maybe not. 
ut if you are, your pravers 
re answered. Recvcling 
'eek at Augusta College has 
■rived. 

"There's a big demand 
3W," said SGA President Al 
mailton. "Everybody is 
arth-conscious.' Sum- 
;erville is just starting it 
ecycling), so Augusta Col- 
ge should be a part of it." 

And a part of it we are. 
tiroughout the week of Sep. 
\-T7, e\'ents were scheduled 
1 kick off the fall quarter 
cycUng push initiated b\' the 
jA. Speakers came to the 
impus on Monday, Tuesday, 
liursday and Friday and a 
mtribution competition and 

"Can Castle Challenge" 



were held September 25. 

"You had to ha\'e a certain 
number of aluminum cans 
(for the Can Castle Challenge) 
and were given a certain 
amount of time in which to 
build your castle. The groups 
attempted to build the highest 
can castle, and there were 
prizes given for that," said 
Hamilton. 

Prizes included T-Shirts 
and plants. The contribution 
competition was open to any 
campus organization or indi- 
vidual who wanted to enter. 

In order to ease the difficul- 
ty of recycling on campus, 
SGA placed receptacles 
around the campus for recy- 
clable materials. 

"We distributed to the 
departments seven bins that 
we got from the City of 
Augusta," said Hamilton. 



"And we got Physical Plant to 
cut some 55 gallon bins in half 
for us and we painted those. 
The 55 gallon drums were 
placed down in the lobby of 
the CAC." 

Recycling is not a new idea 
at AC, however. 

"A couple of years ago 
there was an idea to start 
recycling, but for some reason 
it didn't go through," said 
Hamilton. "Then we brought 
it back through the Student 
Ambassador Board. We 
thought it would be a good 
opportunity to go ahead with 
it since Summerville was 
starting their recycling pro- 
ject. So far it's worked out real 
well, we've got so much sup- 
port from the community." 

"We're going to be collect- 
ing glass, clear glass, plastics, 
newspapers, office paper and 



aluminum," he said. "The 
City of Augusta is going to 
pick it up, and they're not 
charging us. They take part of 
it to Augusta Paper Stock and 
the other part to Dixie Recy- 
cling. They get the money in 
order to pay to operate the 
truck." 

Hamilton commented that 
the program was a service 
that the Student Government 
was able to provide for stu- 
dents. 

"We're just give them the 
opportunity to bring in their 
recycled goods to the campus. 
There are a lot of students 
who do recycle, and we made 
it a lot easier for them. Instead 
of going all the way down- 
town or saving up 100 pounds 
of cans." 

Brad Poole 
Bell Ringer 




Amy Freeman 
Noelle French 
L. G. Frey 
Chandra Fry 
Mary Futrell 
Jann Gapuzan 
Julianne Garrison 
Brian Germann 

Sherman Gills 
Kimberly Glass 
Daniel Goodwin 
Uzetta Gresham 
James Grissom Jr. 
Chandra Groomes 
Elizabeth Groves 
Gwendolyn Hailes 

Ben liamby 
Alfred Hamiilon 
Patricia Hamilton 
EJisha Hansen 
Michael I lanson 
Michael 1 lardy 
I 'am I lardy 
Tyrone I lardy 



69 



Angel Harlow 

Ross Harper 

Brian Harriss 

Claudia Hartwell 

Eugene Hatfield 




70 




Charles Hight 



Kerry Hill 



Yolanda Hill 



Tracy Hodges 



Ty Hoff 
Bengt Hogberg 
Dave Holmes 
larrett Holmes 
Jennifer Hollingsworth 



Tommy Holston 
Ernestine 1 looker 
James Hooper 
Riionda Howard 
Venita I loward 



71 



Hot, Bern i^ Safer 



:i ^:^3fe.l>" 



Augusta College students 
were treated to an entertaining 
and informative glance into 
the world of sexual freedom 
on October 9, 1991 in the CAC 
cafe. 

Educator and comedienne 
Suzi Landolphi inade AC the 
latest stop on her Hot, Sexy 
and Safer speaking tour. The 
program packages safer sex 
education in a style palatable 
to college students. 

"I thought it was informa- 
tive and she was very good, 
that she could talk that way to 
college students," said junior 
Education major Missy Hayes, 
"because some people need to 
know and be informed of 
important issues like AIDS, 
but some of the ways that she 
went about it were a little 
harsh. Augusta College is 
such a small school and we're 

Lene Hoybye 

Kenneth Hudson 

Paul Hudson 

T. Scott Hudson 

Kim Huffman 

Michael Hurling 

Robert Hutchinson 

Theresa Ivey 

Wolney Jackson 

Jay James 

Shelby James 

Tyya Jarrells 

Bonnie Jenkin 

Virginia Jenkins 

Harvey Johnson 

Keithaniel Johnson 



just kind of a community col- 
lege and we're not exposed to 
that much." 

Exposing college audiences 
to sexuality and sexual 
responsibility is what the Hot, 
Sexy and Safer program 
attempts to accomplish. 

"This is the year that this is 
going to happen," Landolphi 
said. "This is the year that the 
sexual revolution will start, 
because your generation 
won't stand for anything 
less." 

She has been touring college 
campuses for three years talk- 
ing about sexual freedom and 
responsibility, and according 
to her, times are changing. 

"When I first started to do 
this three years ago, they sort 
of would invite me there and 
then have no follow-up, but 
energy from the students after 



I left would stay alive for 
months." 

Now when I go somewhere, 
they are constantly saying 
'We're having a safer sex 
week, not just a day. We're 
starting to put condoms in our 
bookstores. We're putting con- 
doms in vending machines in 
the dorms.' So, I'm find- 
ing more now that people 
are starting to take responsi- 
bOity." 

Landolphi was hired by 
Student Union to speak at the 
college, an occurrence Landol- 
phi said is becoming more 
common. 

"It's the students that are 
hiring me now, not the admin- 
istration," she said. "Not 
because the administration 
doesn't want to, but because 
the students want to." 

Landolphi does not talk 



about morality in her safer sex 
program, instead she speaks 
of personal choices and deci- 
sions. 

"1 am tired of people like 
Jim Bakker and Jimmy Swag- 
gart," she said. "Think about 
their hypocritical behavior. 
I'm so tired of people who 
don't want us to talk about 
sex, and then going out and 
doing stuff on the sly." 

Landolphi's presentation 
marked the beginning of The 
Bell Ringer's safer sex pro-, 
gram at AC. Safer sex litera- 
ture was made available to 
students and over 200 con- 
doms were distributed. Con-i 
doms will remain available in' 
The Bell Ringer office, and a; 
table will be set up near The^ 
Bell Ringer office with more, 
safer sex literature. [ 

Brad Poolei 




72 




PTIinCMTP 
01 UULI1I0 



HL mmiLion 



Alfred A. Hamilton is a 
Senior Computer Science 
major. His plans are to 
attend a university in the 
country of Sweden. Some 
of his activities include work- 
ing with the United Way & 
Sunshine Foundation, Associ- 
ation for Computing Machin- 
ery, AFCEA Honor Student, 
and the Augusta Youth 
Center. 




mn^LEn[mRRi3 



Marlene Harris is a Senior 
Mathematics major. Her 
plans are to continue her 
education and to attend a 
graduate program in Mathe- 
matics. Some of her activities 
at Augusta College include 
being a Student Ambassador, 
and working with Student/ 
Factulty Committees such as 
the Athletic Committee, and 
Who's Who '91. 




nriDREn hiQh3 



Andrea \i. iiighsmith is a 
Senior History/ Psychology 
major. She plans to pursue a 
Master's degree in Counsel- 
ing Education. Her activities 
include being an Admissions 
Tour Guide, singing in the 
Augusta College Chamber 
Choir, and working with the 
Recycling Rally. Awards 
include AC Faculty Scholor- 
shiji, .iiul llic Willi, nil I. ester 
SchdlnisliM). 




73 



Andrew Jones 
Bobby Jones 

Justina Jones 
Michelle Jones 

Teresa Jones 



Wayne Jones 



Lawrence Karnowski 



William Kavanagh 

Benjamin Kay 

Buddy Keller 

Jack Kelle\- 

Brandi Kellv 



Kareem Kenney 

Jean Kidd 

Jannie King 

Alphonso Kirkland 

Brandon Knox 



Christina Koch 

Stephanie Kucklick 

Lucretia Lefavor 

Tammy Lane 

Kelle Langham 



74 




-\ 



I. 



T^^r — T 




/,-.; 




Mark Larisey 
Natasha Lawton 
James Learnarci 
Michele LePore 
Dinah Lewis 



Leslie Lewis 
Susan Linder 
Frances Longsworth 
Karen i.ott 
Tiu'resa Liiby 



7S 



t>TlinCMTti 
01 UULI1 10 



Rhonon L, houjnRD 



Rhonda L. Howard is a 
Senior History major. Her 
activities include Le Circle 
Francais and Alpha Mu 
Gamma. She served on the 
Student/Faculty Committe 
on Committees and the Stu- 
dent Welfare Committee. She 
is also a member of the Stu- 
dent Government Associa- 
tion Senate. 




om I hor 



Nora E. Hoyt is a Junior 
Vocal Performance/Music 
Education major who plans 
to earn a Master's Degree in 
musical theater. Her activities 
at Augusta College include 
the Choirand participating in 
the Opera workshop. She vol- 
unteered for the Soup kitchen 
and the Augusta Players 
Community Theatre. 





Linon k HUD30 



Senior Linda K. Hudson is a 
Chemistry major whose 
future plans are to attend 
medical school. Some of the 
activities she participated in 
at Augusta College include 
the Chemistry Club, volun- 
teering for the Children's 
Miracle Network Telethon 
and the Medical College of 
Georgia's Children's Center 
Camp Rainbow. 




/6 




Kj^de Dogs: No Mercif 



They get up at the crack of 
awn five days a week, 
ruise the empty streets of 

iigusta to the Lamar Build- 
)g and take the elevator to 
le 14th tloor. 

When they get there, they 
rack their knuckles and, 
rter a deep breath, begin to 
ing their arrows. 

They will attack anyone. 

They will spare no one. 

Thev will have no mercv. 

They are the Rude Dogs. 

f you want milk toast and 
lundane stuff, listen to the 
ther guys," said 96 RXR's 
ead Rude Dog Joe Mama, 
lilk toast and mundane stuff 

ill never come through 



your speakers if you tune to 
WRXR between 5 and 9 a. m. 
on the weekday. 

Joe is joined at the mic by 
Austin Rhodes, who is a tele- 
vision reporter for WRDW in 
his other life, and Doug "The 
Wolf Boy," whose crow fac- 
tor weather reports have 
made it possible for fuzzy - 
tongued, bleary - eyed rock- 
ers to know what to expect 
from the day. 

Joe Mama came to RXR in 
June 1991, Austin came about 
a year and a half ago, and 
they were joined by Doug in 
September 1991. The Rude 
Dogs were born. 

They get their material 



from a combination of net- 
works and local humor. 
Sonny, of Sonny is Always 
Right fame, was just an aver- 
age listener until they trans- 
formed him into a radio 
game show personality. They 
don't make excuses for what 
they do. 

What you hear is what you 
get," said Joe. 

They have a few words for 
those listeners who choose to 
tune to a more conventional 
morning show. 

"There's therapy available 
for them," said Doug. "Most 
of them are closet listeners, 
they just won't admit it." 

Joe said the show is often 



driven by the listeners. They 
get a lot of phone calls. One 
caller asked Joe to call her 
husband on their anniver- 
sary. Joe told the man that 
septic truck had dumped a 
load of raw sewage into his 
car. 

Another one hosed by the 
Rude Dogs. 

So, next time the phone 
rings, beware. 

You may be next. 

Brad Poole 
Bell Ringer 




Robyn Macey 
Stephanie Malick 
Andra Maples 
Carol Martin 
Lewis Mathis Jr. 
Raymand Mattlage 
Michael McBroom 
Kimberly McCumbers 

Joe McElmurray 
Lance McGahee 
Richard McGahee 
Christina McGee 
Tara McGowan 
Tina McGulfey 
Charlone McKenzie 
Scott McKie 

Agnes McMillan 
Michael Mew 
Sam Miller 
Tara Miller 
Victoria Mitchell 
Willi.im Mitchell 
M.i^.ili Monies 
Amy MontgomiTy 



cLsw yy 



Liwellyn Montrichard 

Crystal Moore 

Scharinell Moore 

Tasha Moore 

Pete More 




78 




Allison New 



Michelle Newnian 



Gary Nistler 



Misty Nistler 




Anita Nogai 
Rebecca Oberzan 
Mack Ou tier 
MJLldlcton Owens 
Graham Ownes 



Jacqueline Padgett 
Amitabh I'andcy 
Victoria i'appas 
I lema Pa (I'l 
Nilam I 'a lei 



79 




Smita Patel 

Robert Patten 

Jennifer Peacock 

Leon Peoples 

Tina Perry 

Dylan Peters 

Yun Hui Pi 

Emily Pike 

Jennifer Pitman 

Carol Ponder 

Brad Poolejunior 

Becky Postell 

Timothy Poulos 

Kristin Preetoius 

Annette Prescott 

Everett Procter 



Cohdoms 
OH Cam/^us, 



Where do sexually active 
and safe sex conscious 
Augusta College students get 
condoms? During the week 
of October 7, 1991 they got 
them from The Bell Ringer. 

The AC newspaper kicked 
off their safe sex campaign 
that week by distributing 
condoms on campus. 

The safe sex campaign, 
which was started jointly by 
The Bell Ringer and Student 
Union and continued indefi- 
nitely by The Bell Ringer, 
began on Wednesday, Oct- 
ober 9. To promote the cam- 
paign. The Bell Ringer had a 
table, which was set up in the 
CAC, where the condoms 
and safe sex literature was 
given to students at no cost. 

"There are over 5, 000 stu- 
dents here, a lot of whom are 
sexually active," said Brad 
Poole, Editor in Chief of the 
Bell Ringer. "The Bell Ringer 
wants to provide a service to 



the students, in addition tc 
the news, in order to address 
the situation." 

A three-part series of arti 
cles on safe sex was alsc 
planned, according to Poole. 

Also on Wednesday, a 
Noon, comedienne and edu 
cator Susan Landolphi visitec 
the campus and spoke in thi 
CAC as a part of her Safe Se: 
Tour. 

The East Central Georgi, 
AIDS Project Office providec, 
condoms. According to Lind. 
Thomas of that office, "Ii 
our 13-county district 
which includes Richmond 
Columbia, Burke, and Me 
Duffie counties, there hav 
been 233 reported cases o 
Aids. 5, 369 cases have bee 
reported in Georgia, and th 
number of cases reportei 
nationally is 186, 895." Thesi 
figures were as of Septembej 
1,1991. I 

Adrea Wood, Bellringer Sta J 




80 





0lHMHm 






I^Kl^^H 






UTTER CONTROL 






ZETA TAU ALPHA 
AUGUSTACOLLEGE 




M 


_ 




PTIinCUTP 
Jl UULIll J 



Senior Kelle Lynn Langham 
is a Mathennatics major. She 
plans to obtain a Doctorate 
in Mathematics and teach at 
the college level. Some of 
her activities include OARS 
Orientation, Baptist Student 
Union, and the Student 
Ambassador Board. Honors 
include Outstanding College 
Student of America and 
Phi Kappa Phi Scholastic 
Achievement Award. 



Alice Milligan, a Senior Vocal 
Performance major, plans to 
attend Graduate School upon 
graduation. Some of her 
activities at Augusta College 
include participating in the 
Augusta College Choir, a 
Musical Theatre workshop 
and Campus Outreach. 




mERpnoKE 



Peter L. More is a senior 
Political Science major whose 
future plans are to enroll in 
graduate studies in law. 
Some of the activities he 
belonged to include the Polit- 
ical Science Club and the 
Student/ Faculty Committee 
on Academics. 




Sf 



Douglas Puckett 

Michelle Rabun 

Tina Rabun 

Michael Raffield i 

Lewis Ramsey 



Mae Rauls 

Mary Raulerson 

Gwynn Reasor 

Brian Redd 

Joann Reeves 





Lethia Roberts 
Gregory Robinson 
Kay Roland 
Kenneth Roper 
Mark Rumph 




PTimCUTP 

WHO'S WHO AMONG 

JIUULI1IJ 

micmfLnuLROT 



Michael P. Mulroy is a Senior 
Psychology major. He plans 
to begin a doctoral program 
in Neurobiology or Behavior- 
ial Neuroscience. Some of his 
Augusta College activities 
include SROTC and the 
Ranger Club. Michael had 
one of his research published 
and volunteered for the Save 
the Dolphin Program and 
Green Peace. 



fOTKE^mniKn^ 



Frank E. Raunikar is a Senior 
English/Finance major who 
plans to get his A.J.D./M.BA 
and pursue an overseas 
career. Some of Frank's activ- 
ities include working as an 
English tutor, participating in 
the Sandhills Writers Confer- 
ence and the Summervill 
Grill Poetry Readings. He 
also worked as a Crisis Preg- 
nancy Center Volunteer. 



Elizabeth G. Schubert is a 
Senior Management major 
with plans to pursue her 
Masters in Business Adminis- 
tration in the future. Some of 
her activities at Augusta Col- 
lege include being President 
of Phi Beta Lambda, working 
as the Phi Beta Lambda Book 
Exchange Co-Manager, and 
volunteering for a Special 
Olympics Fundraiser. 





S^ 






Camp Pises Now 



The recent rise in crime in 
le Augusta area has Augus- 
i College Public Safety offi- 
;rs concerned about student 
id facult\- safety on campus, 
rcording to Public Safety 
"irector Kenneth Jones. 

"During times of class 
langes, we keep an officer 
arked in a patrol car 
atween the academic build- 
igs and the hbrar\-," he said. 

College campuses and 
Jier institutions that receive 
■deral money are required to 
jllect crime statistics and 
•port this information to the 
31 annually. This is required 
. the Campus Crime Aware- 
css and Campus Security 
ct of 1990. 

"We are in compliance with 



the act. In fact, we publish 
our statistics quarterly," said 
Jones. 

According to the report, 
AC crimes filed with the FBI 
were down 20 percent in the 
1990-91 fiscal year. Anyone 
may obtain copies of the 
report from any college in the 
nation. 

Colleges and Universities 
will have to expand the 
reporting of campus crimes if 
current legislation is passed 
and signed. 

HB 1296, which would 
change criminal reporting to 
include off-campus crimes 
against students, passed the 
state House of Representa- 
tives without opposition. It 
now heads to the Senate. 



The legislation is in 
response to a campaign by 
Safe Campuses Now, an 
Athens-based organization 
seeking to boost crime aware- 
ness among students. 

Federal law already 
requires the open reporting of 
campus crime, but critics con- 
tend that statistics are mis- 
leading because they fail to 
account for off-campus 
crimes. 

Before attending a college, 
especially one that is not in 
your hometown, it would be 
a good idea to ask the Regis- 
trar or the Public Safety office 
of that school to send you a 
copy of their report, accord- 
ing to Jones. 

In the spring of 1991, AC 




Public Safety began publish- 
ing "The Jaguar Jurisdiction." 

This newsletter is pub- 
lished four times a year to 
inform students and faculty 
about crime on the main and 
Forest Hills campuses. 

The Jaguar Jurisdiction and 
other crime prevention infor- 
mation can be found at vari- 
ous locations around campus. 

AC Public Safety is work- 
ing directly with the Augusta 
Police Department's Public 
Relations officer, Mark 
Cowan. 

"We are working on receiv- 
ing computerized crime 
statistics of the four block 
area surrounding the cam- 
pus," said Jones. 

Jim Sigg 

Brian Shellman 
Ronald Sherrod 
Giovanni Shumake 
Joyce Sikes 
Michael Simpson 
Brenda Sims 
David Singleton 
Ashley Skinner 

Jeff Slagle 
Wesley Slone 
Charlotte Smith 
Julia Smith 
Lawrence Smith II 
Maceo Smith 
Merita Smith 
Richard Solchenberger 

Robbin Smith 
Cioorge Souza 
Rebecca Spearman 
Sharon Spencer 
Michelle Spires 
Jennifer Sprague 
Annette Spurling 
Steven Stamps 



85 



1 



Jennifer Standefer 

Paula Stankay 

Duane Starrenburg 

John Stanton 

Amie Steed 



Joseph Steed 

Allen Stephens 

Darryl Stephens 

Robin Strickland 

Tonya Strowbridge 




Financial Aid Impro ves 



Lines in the Augusta Col- 
lege Financial Aid office could 
be shorter in the future, if new 
Financial Aid Director Kevin 
G. WeUwood has his way. 

Wellwood hopes to cut wait- 
ing time in his office during 
times other than registration. 

"I don't see why a student 
should have to wait 20 min- 
utes on a normal day," said the 
29-year-old director. During 
registration, he said, lines are 
expected. 

Wellwood took the helm of 
the AC Financial Aid office on 
December 9, 1991 after the for- 
mer Director, James R. 
Stallings, resigned from the 
position to accept a teaching 
job in the Department of 
Developmental Studies. 

He came to AC from Liberty 
University in Virginia, where 
he served as the Assistant 
Director of Financial Aid for 



tliree and one-half years. 

He is aware of some of the 
problems with the AC Finan- 
cial Aid office and wants to 
rebuild a good relationship 
with students. 

"There have been problems 
in the past with the reputa- 
tion," he said. "I'm certainly 
aware of that. We just want to 
start new and let the students 
know we're here as a service 
for them." 

He said improving efficien- 
cy and productivity in the 
office are among his main 
goals. He hopes to do that by 
shifting some of the workloads 
to allow staff members to bet- 
ter serve the needs of the stu- 
dents and by providing more 
professional development for 
the staff. He hopes to send 
staff members to two or three 
conferences this year, he said. 
He is also looking at the posi- 



tive aspects of the Financial 
Aid office. 

"The number-one strength 
we have is a great staff," he 
said. "They're willing to do 
whatever is necessary to get 
the job done." 

He said that he plans to 
increase the automation in the 
office by purchasing more 
computer equipment. This will 
allow staff members to look 
up information more quickly 
and drastically improve effi- 
ciency and productivity, he 
said. 

Wellwood served four years 
in the U. S. Air Force as an 
accounting specialist and 
earned his Master's degree in 
Business Administration from 
Liberty University in Virginia 
in 1989. 

During his college years he 
had some contact with finan- 
cial aid offices. He received 



Pell grants, scholarships, and ai 
school loan. 

Some difficulties he encoun 
tered when he appUed for thei 
loan gave him an understand- 
ing for his clients' problems 
he said. 

"As a former student, I car 
see where the student is com- 
ing from," he said. "When yoi. 
want something processed 
you want it processed today; 
not next month." 

The role of the AC Finanda 
Aid office is to connect stu ' 
dents with federal aid dollars, 
he said. ; 

In the future the office ma) 
be able to maintain data base: 
of available scholarships t(. 
help students gain access tc 
financial aid provided fron 
private sources, but that is no 
in the immediate future. Well 
wood said. 

Brad Pool 
BeU Ringer Staf 



86 




Jeffrey Sumner 



Arthur Tamkin 



I Marcus Tarikersley 



Casedric Tarver 



Paul Tatum 
Mack Taylor 
Erin Thomas 
lone Thompkins 
Michelle Thompson 



Coleman Tidwell 
Clarisse Tillery 
Janet Tindall 
Sterling Tolley 
Lorraine To to 



87 



I 

Ci^ /Plural AwaremsB 



Imagine living for five 
weeks in a foreign household 
where no one else under- 
stands English. 

To many foreign language 
students, such a scenario may 
sound like a nightmare, but a 
group of AC Spanish students 
wouldn't trade the experience 
for the world. 

Last summer, Spanish Pro- 
fessor Jana Sandarg shepherd- 
ed 33 students to Mexico for 
six weeks as part of the Inter- 
national Intercultural Studies 
Program to study the Spanish 
language and culture in a 
native setting. Program partic- 
ipants from AC were Kristin 
Askin, Susan Dray, Chris 
Roberts, Shannon Shelton, and 
Webb Smith. 

The trip is one which some 
of the students say they will 
never forget. 

"What I got from this trip 



Philip Tralies 

Jeaneen Tullis 

Theresa Usry 

Russell Van Horn 

Corey Veasey 

Helen Vella 

Edie Wall 

Terrilyn Wallace 

Diana Walker 

Merofier Walker 

Carly Ware 

Mary Washington 

Rhonda Watkins 

Wilson Watkins 

William Watson 

Vicki Watts 



you cannot buy with money," 
said Shelton, an English major 
who made the trip to complete 
foreign language require- 
ments. "It made me appreciate 
life here and admire others for 
their life." 

"The people were so laid 
back," Shelton said. "At the 
university, if you didn't get a 
paper in on time, you could 
turn it in later ... We did every- 
thing on Mexican time." The 
people down there would 
stop and take a break whenev- 
er they wanted. 

Shelton also said her Mexi- 
can family expressed concern 
for her throughout her stay 
with them. "They treated me 
like a guest would be treated. I 
didn't have to clean house, 
and the Mexican mother cared 
for me when 1 was sick. They 
were good-hearted people, 
people just like us." 



Smith believes he also 
learned not to take for granted 
the conveniences of life in 
America. "You have to con- 
stantly be careful in Mexico. 
You have to watch the water 
all the time. Even in the show- 
er I had to be careful not to 
drink it." 

The students also traveled 
across the country when they 
weren't attending class. They 
visited tourist attractions such 
as Puerto Vallarta and Cancun 
as well as museums and even 
a tequila factory. 

"I learned a lot you can't 
really get from books or slides 
or pictures," Shelton said. "It 
was really a great experience." 

Smith said he also learned 
an important lesson in Mexico. 
"Humans aren't that different. 
You learn when you're 
exposed to different cultures 
that discriminating against 



others because of their Ian-, 
guage is absurd." 

Professor Sandarg believes 
this new perspective is one of 
the most important lessons 
that student learn during their 
studies in foreign lands. 

"I think it gives them a new 
sense of what it means to be 
American," Professor Sandarg 
said. "Most people would be 
surprised to find out how 
wonderful and nice the Mexi' 
can people are. Unless we see 
how the rest of the world 
lives, we can't have a sense of 
identity to compare ourselves 
with other people." 

Professor Sandarg said AC 
students can study abroad 
through a variety of progranis 
in a variety of disciplines. Stu 
dents can choose to study in 
any of several countries 
around the world. 

Jo Angela Edwins 







88 




offlmtn'3 



QEQRQE n. 3QUZn 

George A. Souza is a Senior 
Biology major who plans to 
work for Walt Disney World 
after graduation. He eventu- 
ally plans to pursue a Ph.D. 
in Marine Biology. While at 
Augusta College, George was 
active in the Sci-Fi Fantasy 
Club, Tri-Beta, Los Amigos 
Hispanos, and the Student 
Government Recycling Com- 
mittee. 



jEnnira^rRHQu 



Jennifer J. Sprague, a Senior 
Marketing major, plans to pur- 
sue graduate studies in Mar- 
keting Research. Some of her 
activities at AC include Editor 
of the White Columns for four 
years. Student Government 
President, and Chair of the 
Communications Committee 
for the Student Advisory 
Council to the Board of 
Regents. She also received the 
AC Senior Service Leadership 
Award. 



3i[VEn 5innir3 



Steven G. Stamps is a Junior 
English major pursuing 
minors in French and Music. 
He plans to pursue a Ph.D. in 
Classical Studies. While at 
AC, some of his activities 
included serving as Chair of 
Ihf Student Senate, Staff 
Writer for the Bell Ringer 
Staff, participating with the 
AC Choir and Opera Work- 
shop. I le was al.so a member 
of the Delta Chi Fraternity. 






Eulala Weddle 

Marcia Weinreid 

Diane White 

Brandy Whitehurst 

Cindy Wilds 



Antonio Wilkinson 

Chelsea Williams 

Katina WiUiams 

Mary Williams 

Sonnetta Williams 



Vernon Williams Jr. 

Keith Williamson 

Kathie Wise 

Amie Woo 

Walter Worsham 



90 




/^/^////^ Champ io US 



The Augusta College Table 
nnis team has done it again. 
It s not a repeat. It's not e\'en 
hree-peat. 
It's a d\Tiasty. 

Pla\ing at Princeton Univer- 
y in N'ew Jersey, the team 
ckhanded and forehanded 



their way to their fourth con- 
secutive National Champi- 
onship. 

Player/Manager Ty Hoff 
spoke softly and modestly 
when asked about the latest 
title. 

'It's great, it's been our goal 



all year," he said. "We work 
hard all year." 

On their way to winning the 
last three championships, the 
team dropped only two match- 
es. Hoff hopes to build a table 
termis dynasty here at Augusta 
College. 








Dorothy Wright 
Chris Wurzinger 
Vernon Yeldell 



Yi-Hucy Yong 
Yo-Mong Yong 
Shonita Young 



Some think he already has. 

Augusta College was 
grouped with Columbia Uni- 
versity, Princeton University 
team 1, and Princeton Univer- 
sity team 2 in the first round of 
this year's tournament. The 
Jaguars easily won their group 
by posting 8-0 victories over all 
three teams. In the quarterfi- 
nals, AC squared off against 
Columbia again and recorded 
another 8-0 win. Yale Universi- 
ty faced the Jaguars in the 
semifinals and managed to 
take one match in an 8-1 loss. 
The men carried their momen- 
tum into the finals against 
Princeton 1 and brought home 
the 1992 Championship with 
an 8-1 victory. 

The AC team has three fresh- 
men: Anthony Cooper, Oscar 
Melvin, and Brian Pace. 
Upperclassmen are Anurag 
Agnihotri, Keith Hagood, and 
Ty Hoff. Hoff hopes to contin- 
ue the winning tradition by 
returning 5 players and bring- 
ing in two new international 
players. The No. 1 and No. 8 
players in Pakistan are expect- 
ed to join the squad in Septem- 
ber. 

"We just want to keep string- 
ing on as many (champi- 
onships) as possible and get 
bigger and better," Hoff said 
modestly. 

Kevin Kennedy 



^H Augusta College's Table Ten- 
nis Team Strikes Again! Team 
members are (L to R): Anurag Agni- 
hotri, Brian Pace, Oscar Melvin, 
Anthony Cooper, Keith Hagood, and 
player/manager Ty I loff. 



9/ 



PTimCUT^ 

WHO'S WHO AMONG 

JIUULMIJ 

DEni3EIhRE 



Denise Threet is a Senior 
Mathematics major who 
plans to earn a Master's 
degree in math and eventual- 
ly complete her Ph. D. in the 
same area. She hopes to teach 
at the college level. She was 
the Treasurer and Vice Presi- 
dent of the Euclidean Society 
and received the Jerry Sue 
Townsend Scholarship. 
Denise was also a Dean's List 
student. 




mi^mm-cm 



Vanessa Velez-Cruz is a 
Senior Communications and 
Spanish major with a minor 
in International Studies. She 
plans to pursue a law degree 
specializing in International 
and Immigration law. She 
was active with Los Amigos 
Hispanos, the Bell Ringer 
staff. Political Science Club, 
History Club, and the Inter- 
national Studies Association. 




hELEniVELLH 



Helen L. Vella is currently 
pursuing her Masters Degree 
in Education. She plans to 
teach Social Studies at the 
secondary level then plans to 
work toward a Ph.D. in His- 
tory. Some of her activities at 
AC include participating 
with the Augusta College 
Choir and the Augusta 
Choral Society. 




9^ 









^M Alpha Mu Gamma, the For- 
eign Language Honor Society, 
had its induction ceremonies on Fri- 
day, May 26 in the College Activities 
Center. Students who have excelled 
in French, Spanish, Latin, and Ger- 
man were inducted. Group photos 
shown here are for Latin (opposite 
page); French (top); and Spanish 
(bottom). Not pictured are inductees 
for German. 



1^1 Above: Another honor was 
bestowed upon two AC stu- 
dents Spring quarter. Sophomore 
Lori Foster (left) and Junior Jane 
Burks will travel to Sweden in 
August to attend the University Col- 
lege of Sundsvall/Harnosand. The 
students were awarded a scholarship 
to help with the costs of the trip. 



Maureen Akins 
Stacy Alexander 
Karen Aubrey 
Fred Barnabei 
Lowell Barnhart 
Joyce Billue 
Bill Bompart 
Tim Bond 

Dalton Brannen 
Clint Bryant 
Dave Calderon 
Fred Camarote 
Ed Cashin 
Marian Cheek 
Thomas Crute 
Georgia Cunningham 

Bill Dodd 
Martha Farmer 
Kay Ferguson 
Anna Filippo 
Skip Fite 
Joseph Greene 
John Groves 
Maria Harris 



93 



Richard Harrison 

Sonia Heifer 

Heather Andrews-Henry 

Steve Hobbs 

Michael Horton 



Robert Johnston 

Kenneth Jones 

Bill Juras 

Joe Mele 

Bill Messina 



Cynthia Miles 

Joe Murphy 

John O'Shea 

Ed Petit 

Kay Phillips 





94 




Patrick Rivette 



Rochelle Robinson 



Phillip Rogers 



John Schaefer 



Michael Schumacher 
Paul Sladky 
Cindy Smith 
Gary Stroebel 
I a nice Turner 



, Emil Urban 
Lillian Wan 
Fred Wharton 
Karen Wiedmeier 
Koscoi' Williams 



95 




Right: The teardrop is a great 
place to "people watch" be- 
tween classes. Below: Zeta 
and Pi Kappa Phi members 
volunteer to help acquaint 
students with the campus 
during Orientation. Bottom: 
A picture says a thousand 
words. 









96 




Left: LG Frey and Bengt 
Hogberg - exchange students 
from Sweden. Below: Al E. 
Cat and Simone Bizzard at a 
basketball game. Bottom: 
Members of the Rowing 
team with the infamous bro- 
ken seat. 




97 




98± 



Above; Dr. Drake offers more to AC students by teach- 
ing conducting to music majors. Right: Humanities 
classes require studying art slides for their exams. Far 
right: Chad Stephens prefers to study in the comforts of 
mother nature. Top right: Kevin Jiminez received the 
While Columns award for the outstanding staff mem- 
ber. 



For many freshman, the difference 
between high school and college is 
that students wonder if the profes- 
,ors realize that they have two other classes too. 
The syllabus shows a schedule packed so tightly 
\ ith readings, papers, and midterms that they 
\ onder when the "work" will give them a break 
"play". 

I Upperclassmen realize the extra hours at 
he lab or in front of the computer means a better 
rade and the trade-off is worth it. Students 
on't seem to mind reading six chapters for next 
vcek's lecture and doing the extra research that 
oes into group projects for a good grade. After 
II. this is what makes college life different. 






An English 101 writing group dis- 
cusses revision possibilities with 
Mr. Sladky. Students learn from 
talking with each other about their 
own writing in terms of strengths, 
weakness and revision strategies. 
Pictured here are, from left , An- 
drew FarlyJudithClarkeand Brett 
Roby. 



Patiently awaiting approval from 
the professor, students review their 
latest drafts. Students also critique 
each others papers for grammar & 
content. 



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With a liHic prtmipting from the pr<i- 
fcvifiT.studt'nlsget their idea") flowing. 
Mr Sladkypf»ints<rtJtthc'>trenght')ina 
siudcnlsargumentivc paper and gives 

-id'. !'<■ f'>r rhanK<"s 



ENGLISH 101 

If you ask students at Augusta 
College taking English 101 what they think 
about the class, you are likely to hear them 
say, "It is different." Unlike large general 
education lecture classes, English 101 is 
limited to twenty-five students, a size that 
contributes to the ease of interaction in the 
classroom and a greater opportunity for 
active participation. Since instructors 
emphasize multiple-draft revisions, stu- 
dents have a chance to discuss their drafts 
with their peers and instructor, edit the 
draft and learn from their mistakes. There 
is not just teacher-student talk, but a good 
deal of student-student talk about writing 
and writing problems. Students are able to 
read each other's work and receive feed- 
back from their classmates on what they 
have written. In an effort to motivate 
student writers, outstanding essays are 
entered in a publication contest called 
"Choice Voice" which publishes the best 
essays written by JTcshman linglish stu- 
dents each cjuartcr. Choice Voice essays 



appear in both hard copy and on the AC 
computer network. 

In essence, English 101 classes con- 
sist of computers, collaboration, and pub- 
lication. According to Professor Paul 
Sladky, Director of Freshman Composi- 
tion, "English 101 stresses writing as a way 
for students to get in touch with their own 
language and then use that language in 
their intellectual explorations. We try to 
stress writing as a means of learning as 
well as a means of communicating what's 
learned. In the process students become 
sharper in both thought and expression." 
Professor Sladky also notes that, "The pre- 
vailing wisdom is that writing is not taught; 
it's learned. And the best way for that to 
happen is for students to both write a lot 
and talk a lot about what they have writ- 
ten." Active participation in the classroom 
helps students write and think with greater 
clarity, which are the primary objectives of 
linglish 101. 

Scott Cheek 



101 



1X4/1/0^ 



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BIOLOGY 101 



"Do I really have to touch this 
frog?" is a question most frequently asked 
during a Biology 101 lab according to Dr. 
Judith Elaine Gordon. 

Dissecting the frog is one of the 
major events of the class. Although some 
students despise the cold frog, others can't 
wait to use their dissecting kit. "It's a half 
and half situation," says Dr. Gordon. "Stu- 
dents either love the frog or hate it." 

Biology 101 students should not 
be afraid of reading either. Dr. Gordon 
emphazises that the text book is a very 
important learning tool. "A lot of students 
give me a look of disbelief when I tell them 
to spend two hours of studying for each 
hour in class." To encourage the students 



to read their text books. Dr. Gordon has 
weekly "drill sessions" in which she ques- 
tions her "victims" about the covered ma- 
terial in the book. Although most of the 
students fear these "drill session" at the 
start of the quarter, the class evaluation 
sheets indicate that 65% of the student find 
them very helpful. 

Biology 101 is a general Biology 
course. Together with the sequel. Biology 
102, it touches all the fields in Biology 
lightly, from the complex chemistry in- 
volved in photosynthesis to the interesting 
topic of human anatomy and physiology. 
Biology 101 is a lesson in LIFE in every 
sense of the word. 

Yi-Huey Yong 




lQ7 Aau/eKCS 








(S) 





The Biology lab assistants have al- 
ready gone thought the Biology 101 
' lassand can assist with teaching the 
< lass. They also help those students 
'.vho might be having trouble with 

l|.. in.ih-ri-ll 



Besides dis- 
secting and 
learning about 
the the frog, 
students have 
the chance to 
study some 
anatomy and 
physiology 
which in- 
cludes study 
of the human 
skeleton. Most 
labs pair stu- 
dents with a 
classmate fora 
lab partner 




The Augusta College Choir 
and Concert Choir's strat- 
egy is to work as a team. 
The group feels it is an out- 
let for creative expression. 
Some of the events the 
Choirs participate in are the 
Christmas Tree Lighting 
Ceremony, half time at the 
basketball games, gradua- 
tion, and they also sing in 
the community. 



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MUSIC 171 

Is it possible to receive college credit, 
have fun, and learn all at the same time? 
Yes it is, and fifty students who are mem- 
bers of the Augusta College Concert Choir 
(MUS 171 A), under the direction of Dr. 
Linda Banister, do just that. 

Before the first song is sung Dr. 
Banister warms-up the group's voices 
through vocal exercises, the same way an 
athlete would stretch before attempting to 
run the 10k. Following this, the music, 
ranging from the Renaissance to that of the 
Twentieth Century, is ready to be rehearsed. 
According to Vicky Mitchell, a voice major, 
the variety of music makes choir interest- 
ing. "I've been exposed to music that I'd 
never been exposed to before." 

Even though voice majors are re- 
quired to be in choir, many non-music 
majors sign up for the pure enjoyment of 
singing, giving them an outlet for creative 



expression. One such student, Ron Sher- 
rod, has enjoyed the experience and ex- 
plains that he "believes that all students 
will have a greater admiration of Augusta 
College if they participate in the various 
social organizations and not just bury them- 
selves in books." 

So what's so special about a class 
that sings? "The esprit-de-corps is really 
important as is universal acceptance to 
personal development," said Dr. Banister. 
Unlike some subjects where each student 
performs individually, the choir's strategy 
is to work as a team giving no regard to 
one's race, sex, or color but instead striving 
to have the perfect blend of voices to create 
their common goal: beautiful music. Erin 
Thomas sums it up, "If students are look- 
ing for a place to 'belong' at Augusta Col- 
lege the choir is a great place to be." 

Robyn Victoria Macey 



/iWniair /05 



StUtUlc 




ART 431 



When people think of drawing 
class, some may only visualize a still life or 
a figure in the center of a room surrounded 
by students with a pencil and drawing pad 
in hand . Well, they would only be partially 
correct in their assumptions. 

Although the pencil is thought of 
as the most common drawing tool, there is 
a broader range of media that can be used. 
In our drawing class we used many tools 
for drawing including pencil, pen & ink, 
charcoal, pastel, conte crayon, collage and 
even the eraser. 

Through the instructor we learned 
to use all media with the manipulation of 
different techniques and ideas. Through 
experiment we learned about relationships 
between different types of paper and me- 
dia. This relationship is important to know 
before beginning a drawing project so that 
the artist may get his or her desired results. 
Learning to manipulate a chosen media to 
obtain the exact results that one wants is, in 
essence, learning to draw. If an artist can 
control his or her medium and get exactly 
what he or she wants from it, then their 
efforts in the learning process are success- 
ful. 

Unfortunately, it's not that easy to 
learn these things, but the mistakes made 



in the process are good lessons in them- 
selves (and can sometimes be nice sur- 
prises). 

As a Drawing IV art student, I am 
still learning how to successfully use dif- 
ferent types of media to achieve my de- 
sired results. Drawing has always been 
my first love among all other types of art. 
My favorite drawing medium is the pencil, 
although I do use other types of media. In 
drawing I do not think that the learning 
process ever ends - not with media, tech- 
niques or style. There is always something 
new to try... something new to discover. 

Daniel Finch - "India ink is my 
favorite medium in class, you can get the 
blackest black you can get and it's very 
powerful, but you are still able to get de- 
tail. Drawing is my favorite thing to do. 
This class pushes you to try new things. 
Things you would not do on your own. 

Amy Beaudoin - "I enjoy the cre- 
ative process and working with my hands. 
I appreciate all media because they each 
have something to contribute to my ideas 
and my ideas sometimes contribute to the 
media. I love it when a medium seems to 
have a life of its own... It's a nice surprise." 

Gail L. Heath 



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FINANCE 210 



How many of us carefully read all 
of the paperwork associated with our car 
loans? How many of us understand it if we 
do? Probably not many. 

Augusta College students taking 
FIN 210, a course in personal finance, how- 
ever, will have the opportunity to learn 
what they need to know to not only borrow 
wisely, but also to plan for retirement, buy 
a home, cope with taxes or invest in the 
stock market. 

"The course in designed to make 
sure that students will learn about all of the 
variety of financial needs that they are 
going to have," said Mary K. Lisko, Direc- 
tor of Student Advising and support for 
the School of Business Administration. "A 
lot of students have faced financial situa- 
tions before they come here, but a lot of the 
younger students have not bought a house 
or borrowed money, or thought about in- 
vesting in the stock market." 

The course evolved out of a 400- 
levcl course intend not just for business 
majors. No prerequisites are required for 
the class, and non-business majors are en- 



couraged enroll. 

"There's not a lot of theory behind 
it. I think it's a very practical course de- 
signed to give a little taste of all the differ- 
ent things," said Professor Lisko. "It's 
designed to be an all-purpose course to 
teach the students a little bit about a lot of 
different things that they need to know in 
terms of finance and financial planning." 

Although two sections of the class 
were to be offered for fall quarter, enroll- 
ment was not what the School of Business 
Administration would have liked. 

"We did not have a lot of response. 
We have not had heavy enrollment in the 
class, but we're pleased that we have had 
faculty available to teach it despite rather 
limited enrollment, and we think it will 
build as word gets around that it is a very 
practical and useful elective that students 
can take," said Professor Lisko. 

"It think it would be nice if it were 
required of everyone. Any student would 
find very useful and practical information 
in Ihe class." 

Brad Poole 



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NURSING 203 



Although nursing students 
have different opinions on their pro- 
spective career, they all agree that a 
career in nursing is certainly not bor- 
ing. There are many different job set- 
tings a nurse can choose to work in. A 
few of these are community heath cen- 
ters, occupational heath, and hospi- 
tals. Judy Wilkerson, a student in Nurs- 
ing 203, will never forget taking 7:00 
a.m. vital signs on a patient that did not 
have any — the patient was deceased. 

The students are glad they can 
practice on dummies first. For patients 
would definitely not want to undergo, 
what some students do to these poor 
dummies. One of the most memorable 
experiences for students in the skills 



lab, according to Annie Chaffee, is "to 
discover the dummies have inter- 
changeable sexual parts." 

Nursing students choose the 
nursing field for various reasons. Nurs- 
ing is a major that enjoys the personal 
satisfaction one receives from helping 
others. Another reason for choosing 
the nursing profession could be job 
security. Petra Strako can not even 
remember the reason for choosing this 
field of hard work. She even states, "1 
must have been suffering from tempo- 
rary insanity." The best advice for an 
upcoming nursing student given by 
the experts, nursing students them- 
selves, is to STUDY! STUDY! STUDY! 

Yi-Huey Yong 



r\ 




1 





^ 



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112 ~± 





T^ W^ It \^M 




HISTORY 212 

The "haunted pillar" and "Fanning 
Hall" of Augusta are just two examples of 
the many unknown details that Dr. Cashin's 
students learn in History 211 and 212. 

Dr. Cashin not only brings the 
facts to class, but also the attitude that the 
news of yesterday affects the decisions of 
today. The whole principle behind it is that 
history repeats itself. So a successful way 
in making decisions for our generation is 
to study our past. Donnie Fetter stated, "1 
am a firm believer that history repeats 
itself just thought different circumstances 
and different people. By studying history, 
we can learn from our past mistakes & try 
not to repeat the same error. 



Dr. Cashin also brings enthusiasm 
and excitement to HIS 211 and HIS 212, 
allowing the students who were dreading 
this part of the core, to actually find the 
class exciting and eye-opening. Students 
who have completed the class left with a 
different feeling toward the study of His- 
tory. Dr. Cashin brings it alive to our world 
and today. "And he certainly did for this 
student. So much, that I changed my ma- 
jor," stated Kathryn Kimberly. 

And well, as far as the meaning of 
the "haunted pillar"-take the class. It is a 
class about the past and the present. 

Kathryn Kimberly 




\) tiA^cvst/t HU^\J-f 




Computer Science is one of the 
more diverse majors offered at Au- 
gusta College. Not only does it require 
competence in mathematics logic and 
computing systems in general, a suc- 
cessful student will also possess ana- 
lytical skills and be somewhat creative. 

The diversity of the program is 
also reflected in its students who come 
from all walks of life. Many are tradi- 
tional students, but just as many are 
not. Dr. Petit, Chairman of the Depart- 
ment of Mathematics and Computer 
Science, explains that half are full-time 
students, one fourth are part-time, and 
that one fourth attend evening classes 
only. 

Regardless of a student's sta- 
tus, most agree that the computer sci- 
ence curriculum, which is based in 
theory and mathematics, is rigorous. 
Departmental statistics support the stu- 
dents opinions; Dr. Petit further ex- 
plained that while 180 AC students are 
declared Computer Science majors, 
only 20 or so graduate each year. He is 



excited though because total enroll- 
ment in the program is increasing and 
this year's graduating class is slightly 
larger than usual. 

The curriculum, which empha- 
sizes computer programming, archi- 
tecture and software development, is 
designed to prepare students for ca- 
reers in the computer industry or 
graduate studies. Most agree that their 
work will pay off in the end. "I'm glad 
I chose computer science," reports 
Morgan Whaley, a graduating Senior. 
"I'm looking forward to a challenging 
and rewarding career!" 

Data structures and symbolic 
logic are consistently the most difficult 
courses and students quickly adjust to 
pulling all-nighters in Hardy Hall. The 
rigors of the program and the 
department's relatively small size com- 
bine to foster a bonding which bridges 
most any gap — age, race, or gender — 
and yields a true sense of camaraderie 
among computer science students. This 
is what they will miss most. 

Rowland W. Pitts 



ff'fi 




IMXl 

KinW 





Left: Julie Livingston is work- 
ing on Pascal, a programing lan- 
guage, to complete her program. 



Below: One fourth of the Com- 
puter Science majors attend 
evening classes only. 



Bottom: Ms. Medley, a faculty 
member for six year, helps a stu- 
dent with his program. 



175 



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GEOLOGY 212 



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(iIjIWI^m™ «rt ifjm TO" y ^ 




"A sill, a flow, a laccolith, have 
no significance to the majority of col- 
lege students unless of course you are 
in Professor Joe Breur's Geology 101 
class. 

Despite the field trips to Hagges 
Rock and the cemetery lots, "most stu- 
dents do not enjoy the rock identifying 
porfion of the class," says Professor 
Breur. Most find the fossil section is 
more to their liking. 

Although most students feel 
they are well rounded, Mr. Breur points 
out "the broad knowledge of the sci- 
ences and the history of the earth which 




this class offers is beneficial. 

Larry Alexander, Jr, a junior at 
August College, remarked, "due to the 
knowledge learned in Mr. Breur's class, 
I no longer take my environment for 
granted. I view my surroundings with 
an intelligent eye appreciating the earth 
for more than just it's aesthetic value." 

Geology 101 and 102 can sat- 
isfy ten hours of credit under area II of 
the core curriculum. The majority of 
students who take geology are weak in 
math and science. However the ben- 
efits this class offers is great for all 
students. 

Chris Connell 



AcaJemcs /ff 



1 




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Above: The Women's Lightweight Four of the Rowir 
team after their win at the Augusta Invitational Regatt 
Right Top: Student leaders from various AC clubs ar 
organizations attended a leadership retreat Fall quat£ 
Here, the group attempts to conquer the Ropes Cours 
Bottom Right: Members from the Political Science Ch 
man their booth at the annual Community Party ar 
members of Zeta Tau Alpha take time out to pose f 
Shoot Yourself! at the CAC. Nice ZTA girls!! 




f^'f he clubs and organizations at Augusta 
I College made differences throughout 
f .-. the community. Activities such as col- 
lecting toys for the Salvation Army during the 
holidays and quarterly Blood Drives for the 
Shepard Community Blood Center allowed the 
area to see the philinthropic nature of the cam- 
pus and its students. 

New clubs hit the AC scene this year; 
clubs such as Black Student Union, Campus 
Outreach and Higher Taste gave students more 
opportunities to get involved. With the wide 
variety of groups offered, everyone should be 
able to find an activity to suit their individual 
tastes. But it's the club members that were 
making the difference this year. Their dedica- 
:ion to a club is what makes the campus a 
success. It's their work and caring that makes 
a difference. 

I I I I I I I I I I* 

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Mark Glenn, Deborah Smiley, Susan Taylor, Paul R. William, 
Beth Williams, Willie E. Berry, Martha P. Chan, Georgia Stever, 
Andra Maples, Diane Crews, Tracy Bellotti, Pete Thorvig, April 
Colburn 



Gail Heath, Felicia Jones, Debra Robinson, Sonnetta Williar 
Karen Bowseman 



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Eric Carlin, Steve Sousa, Sean Norman, Meredith Shead, Ken 
Grembowicz, Leigh McCorkle, Susan Hill,George Souza, Bonnie 
Jenkins Dr. Robin Richardson, Rick Oster 



Donald Smith, N'gima Coleman, Charlotte Smith, Jennift 
Stallings, Sharotina Hill, Kenya Waltower, F'tima Colemai 
Norman Senior, Marcus Tankersley, Macco Smith, Tyror 
Hardy, Jerry Hempfield III, Wayne Brooks, Dorian Law, Joh 
Baker, Jay James 



/20 ^^ ^ Def!J<aiiti>i!S 





Donald Denard-President (Not Pictured), Morgan Whaley-Vice 
^resident, Ron Liddle-Secretan,', Pat Caughman-Treasurer, Beth 
3aker, Mike Hanson, Jan Gupuzan, Kathryn Speering, Gail 
A illiams. Randy Pitts, Richard Goodis, Dee Medley-Sponsor 



Jeannie Butler, Victoria Knowles, Lisa E. Cody, Lisa Jerrett, Karey 
Pearson, Susie Wong, Robyn Macey, Jeff Thomas, Perry Bertolone, 
Mike Whitley, Amy Walker, Charla Phoenix, Amy Matlock, Cindy 
Hicks, Erin S. Thomas, Troy Rodgers, Tracy Thurmond, Brian 
Waldrop, Hal Perdue, Daniel E. Ferland, Patrick Dukes, Tracy 
Martin, Jay Maddox, Jean Christian, Al Ludwick. 




nbers of the newly formed homecoming committee choose Mardi Gras for the 
ritme of this year's gala. 



'is & OlVUUil'tillM 



w 




Ahe Sociology Club sponsored a Salvation Army Toy Collection for the 
poor during December as one of their many community activities for the 
year. Many clubs were moving in a different direction by volunteering 
their time, and making contributions to different organizations and buisnesses 
around the Augusta area. 




fjTjr &i^S & OlfmiiaiaKS 



One bright Saturday 
morning, I woke up early (8:00 
A.M.- yes, that's early, for a 
Saturday). I gulped down my 
usual eye-opening cup of cof- 
fee, telephoned one of my fel- 
low Newman Club members to 
make sure she was awake 
(which she wasn't), and threw 
myself in the shower for my 
morning absolutions. By 8:45, 1 
was on the road in my '74 Ply- 
mouth wagon, the wind blow- 
ing at me through the open win- 
dow, singing in-tune on my way 
to make the world a little better 
place for a family I'd never be- 
fore set eyes on in my life. 

I arrived at the Habitat 
for Humanity site in Augusta 
around 9:00, ready to begin any 
task they set before me. Con- 
sidering my total lack of expe- 
rience and knowledge of the 
construction business, I was 
sure this would be as simple 
and menial as loading some 
wood, fetching a hammer, or 
handing someone the right- 
sized nails, a preconcieved no- 
tion which was quickly and 
swiftly disposed of, never again 
to return. 1 met up with Lori, 
Wendy, Andrew, and Jesse, 
other Newman Club members 
who were helping out that 
morning, and we all went 
searching for someone in need 
of some extra hands. 

What we found was 
work, hard work, and plenty of 
it. We also, to our delight and 
suprise, found the lady who 
would be living in the house 



after it was finished. She wa^ 
putting the base coat of paint 
on one of the window sills andi 
looking as pleased and proud, 
as if she were already living inj 
her soon-to-be new house. We; 
introduced ourselves to her and 
she returned the gesture, in 
forming us that her name was 
Lilly, and that she and her chil- 
dren were scheduled to move 
in within a few months. Since 
she couldn't, on her income,! 
afford to buy a regularly priced 
house and support her children,; 
too, she was reviewed for this; 
house, met the criteria, and now 
is able to buy the house for only 
as much as the materials cost 
(as all of the labor is volun- 
teered). She invited us to help; 
her with the windows, which 
we were happy to do, though! 
shghtly skeptical of our abili-l 
ties. That turned out to be the 
first of many jobs the Newmar! 
Club members did that day. 
Before we left, we had climbed 
up onto a roof to nail in shingles 
cut and nailed up styrofoarr 
insulation, measured, cut, and 
installed siding, and met nu- 
merous people, ages 6 to 70, al 
of whom were very nice and 
seemed happy for the opportu- 
nity to be doing their part tc 
reduce homelessness in the cit) 
of Augusta. Knowing that ir 
some small way, we had made 
a difference to Lilly, to her famil 
and in a sense, to all of human- 
ity. 

Michelle Fostei 



I 



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dill 




Victoria Mitchell, Mark Meyers, Nicole Jatho, Tracy Meehan, 
Z\nthia McXeill, Don Feezor, Russell Smith, Patricia Myers, 
^on Sherrod, Marsha Jones, Amy Walker, Teresa Hicks. 



Hope Hammond, Andrea Bennett, Kristina Kalantar, Cynthia McNeill, Kelly 
O'Neal, Jennifer Zapatka, Charla Phoenix, Mary Im, Marsha Emery, Tracy Meehan, 
Holly, Alice Milligan, Jane Powell, Marsha Jones, Jane Merves, Nora Hoyt, Lisa 
Cody, Virginia Mitchell, Betty Boyd, Christy Johnson, Jack Herrington, Tony 
Cooper, Gary Wasdin, Britt Cooper, Don Feezor, Scott Moore, Brian Moore, 
Russell Smith, Randy Pitts, Ron Sherrod, Ryan Dukes, Andy Reid, Elaine Lewis, 
Lithia Wallace, Amy Montgomery, Nicole Jatho, Amy Walker, Ervin Thomas, 
Victoria Mitchell, Dory Compton, Teresa Hicks. 




.ina Williams, ,\ancy Leeking, Rohm [dlmson, J<in<i Ix'fl lo Right: Willie Saunders, Brent Erdman, Donald 

I ohnston, (,eigh Ann Cisler, Dr lie Ann ( <ildwcll, |i)lin Gray,JasonRaif()rd, Vernon Yeldell, Eddie Hickman, James 

iVhitesell, Antoncila Delaurcntys, Janice IJurkell, D.ivid Creer, Bo [>'Bniin. 
i, Berhart, Gena Padgett, Mr. William Mc's.sina. 



•is & u/yaata/H/u' fjrjf 




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Gene Muto, Jeff Herrmann, Nelda Dubovsky, Tony Cooper, 
Chris Bailey, Mary Hopper, Donald Smith, Gary Wasdin, Ty 
Edell, Charla Huck, Amy Dorrill, Raphael Classe, Rena Jankus, 
Rhonda Morris, Amy Finlin, Caprice Loper, Ron Martin, Terri 
Wood, Doug Joiner, Julie Kentner,Pat Ferguson 




tn 



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Photo identification not available 



I 7^ G&tS^ & OifmzaCoKe 




mn 



l%Jn 




Pierre Sutton, Dan Goodwin, Morgan Whaley, Brian Harriss'%to 
Roger Templeton, Andy Hatfield, Denise Threet, Mark Baggetti 
Steve Galvin, Kelle Langham, Trin Beaudry, Mrs. Benedict, Dr; 
Benedict, Holly Rankin, Dr. Thompson, Buddy Keller, Dr| 
Maynard 




(//mf Oa^//(e( 



\ 




Wendy Creer, Michele Canchola, Llewellyn Montrichard, 
Allison Kertnar, and Willie Berry 




ft # ft 







• identification not available 





Dr. Paul Sladkey, Smita Patel, Yi-Huey Yong, Hema Patel 





Student Union sponsored several events for Augusta College students to 
participate in throughout the year. Some of these events were: top- Student 
Unions Wild Video Dance Party and above- the Student Union Pool tourna- 
ment which brought in a heavy crowd of competitors, especially when the 
winner takes home one hundred dollars. John Fiske took home the cash, while 
Brad Poole came in second and Kevin Jiminez placed third. 




(ultm f 




126 



The regular bi- 
monthly meeting has come 
to order and many activities 
are planned for the upcom- 
ing school year. Today is 
Halloween and we have re- 
freshments and members 
dressed for the occasion. 

The Dean of the 
School of Business Admin- 
istration, Dr. Dalton 
Brannen, is the speaker for 
today and he is summariz- 
ing the School's state of af- 
fairs. He has also extended 
an open invitation to any- 
one who wants to stop by 
his office and talk to him. 

Activities for the up- 
coming weeks include proc- 
lamations from the City of 
Augusta and the County 
Commissioners in recogni- 
tion of National Education 
for Business Week (Novem- 
ber 10-16) and a seminar in 
recognition of the event. 

Numerous confer- 
ences are available for mem- 
bers to participate in and in- 
clude trips to Knoxville, Ten- 
nessee and Savannah, Geor- 
gia. These conferences are 
designed to help PBL. State 
and leadership conferences 
are designed to let members 
interact socially with busi- 



ness leaders and listen to pre " 
sentations. Members are 
able to participate in comi 
petitive events while enjo)! 
the sights of the host city. !ili 

Projects in the local io 
community that are plannec 
are assisting the Goldeij 
Harvest Food Bank and be{ 
ing servers for the Mentaj 
Health Christmas Party 
Projects such as these helj 
our local community and let; 
them see that August 
College's Phi Beta Lambd; 
is concerned with our city. 

Committees hel{li 
members get involved in th 
Chapter and help them prac 
tice their leadership ability 
The committees also help: 
to enhance the awareness o 
PBL are planning, member 
are able to interact on a so 
cial scale with the upcominj 
Christmas Party and the an 
nual banquet held in thi 
spring. 

With these activitie 
planned, and future goals ti 
be set and achieved, the Zet 
Psi Chapter of Phi Bet, 
Lambda is helping member 
help themselves to becom' 
Future Business Leaders o 
America! 

Diane L. Johnson 



I 



I 



atl 



;.F 









Jionda Howard, Jack Evans, Mary Kathleen Blanchard, J. Duncan Julie Armstrong, George Souza, Cheryl Lide, Lisa Larger, Deborah 
.obertson, Venessa Velez-Cruz, and Lisa Larger Day, Chuck Hardman, Sonia Heifer, Jennifer Hollingsworth, 

Lethia Roberts, Scott Nichols, Judy Brunson, Seth Alalof, Jana 

Sandarg 




f 



Kh(Xi, Julie Kentner, Kosetta Bass, Victoria Pappas, Crystal Michelle Foster, Eric Asserson, Lori Foster, Elizabeth Gledhill, 
dley, Anna Ericssf)n, Tom Smiley, Mary Mobley-Sponsor, Lynn Larson, Maricar Umayan, Jess. D. Jones 
, Frey (photo identification incomplete; 



ds & Oiymia&iiie g^f 





Bob Heineman, Steve Ertter, Dan Bower, Brian Woo, Derryl 
White, Dave Simas, Danny Lack, Larry Jenkins, Peter Swain, 
Tim Milton, Darren Woo, David Driver, Shawn P. Vincent, 
Rusty Thornhill, Dave Holmes 




^^ Xi ^psiio^ 




Michelle Newman, Lisa Willis, Linda Bowling, Shannon Bur- 
?! ton, Cindy Cocks, Patrice Willis, Kathryn Kimberly, Allison 

'mt Kertnar, Kathie Wise, Karin Schulz, Kimberly McCumbers 



fof/t/caf Sofi 



c/e/(Ci 




Ron Hall, Dr. Bourdouvalis, Steve Cain, John Filop, Mark 
Larisy, Will Fadel, Jonny Kavenough, Leicia Whittemore, J.C. 
Halvorson, Sandy Emerson, Michelle Canchola 



jjTn (mJ:S &: Ol-^aKZa&IKS 





eorge Leverett, Barbara Coleman, Percell Garvin, Laurent 
eBar, Lisa Schubert, Dorma Hathway, Al Bennett, Ayanna 
urns, Vanessa Bise, Diane Johnson, Brenda Parrish, Rosa 
obinson, Natasha Hendrix, Elizabeth Castleberry, Willie Berry, 
r. Martha Farmer 



Tim Gillespie, Chris Wisnieski, Bill Johnson, Dr. H. F. Bowsher, 
Brett Brackett, Mike Ling, Joey Spires Steve Mervin 




&ds & OimtuajlwKs 




T 



he Ranger Club has many activities for members to participate in 
throughout the academic year. Top; members are able to experience 
the feeling of rappelling, which is frequently opened to any student 
interested in trying out the "sport." Above: Student Union brought in 
the Lichtenstein Circus, billed as the smallest in the world, to give 
Augusta College students a break between classes. 




UllltPMlff 



130 (^'^ 



SGA: What does it re- 
ally mean? 

Voicing your opinion. 
You, the student have the 
right to express how you 
feel about Academic Af- 
fairs and Student Life here 
at Augusta College. 

Involvement. Each 
student here at Augusta 
College pays a student ac- 
tivities fee and throughout 
the school year, SGA will 
sponsor activities, comedi- 
ans, and much more. Par- 
ticipation in these events 
will guarantee you receiv- 
ing your money's worth. 

Problem solving. 
There have been several 
standing committees to 
handle all problems, big or 
small. 

Finally, representa- 
tion. SGA is representa- 
tive of the student body. 
We do what the student 
body wants us to do, we do 
our best to answer the stu- 



dentbody'squestions,anc 
we try to make the Au 
gusta College experiencd 
as rewarding as possible.! 

Whether your con 
cems are academically re! 
lated, student life related 
or you just want to find ou 
what is going on, the SGi^ 
is at your disposal. SG/ 
may not have an immedi' v- 
ate answer, but we will di 
the best job to finding i \ 
solution. j I 

The SGA office is Ic' 
cated in the College Activ; 
ity Center (CAC) on th! 
second floor. You may als 
caUthe office at 737-160^1 
If no one is available whe 
you call, leave you 
messege on the answerin 
machine. 

The Student Goven 
ment Association lool 
forward to hearing yoi 
comments and assistin 
you. 

Alfred Hamilto 





Cpt. Baker, Cdt. Merofier Walker, Cdt. Steve McQueen, Cdt. 
Kirk Calloway, Cdt. Don Lackman, Cdt. Anthony Leab, Cdt. 
John Price, Cdt. Angela Story 




*^^^=^J 






\iny Weatherford, Vickie Johnson, Amy Woo, Stephanie Showman, 
-auri Ann Huff, .Mike Donehoo, Mike Ristroph, Jeff Smith, Kristio 
wlurray, Ashley Cox, Rebecca Dent,TonyKobinson, I Javjd McDanicl, 
jcolt Stewart, Darrell Hillman, Tony Miller, Mike Lammer, Christa 
jray, Steve Dilworth, Rachel Harris, Sandra Teany, Ben Hillman, 
>an Dent, Mat Evers, Jon Patterson, Mary Patterson, )■. P. Meehan, 
essica Williams, Mike McBroom, Kim Kanavage, Shannon Shelton, 
ra Rubio, Shea Seigler, Joey Thompson, Jennifer Bistnu k, Alysia 
brja, Chris Roberts, Chris Keating, Lane BradfonJ 




Merofier Walker, Jason Raiford, Beth Castleberry, Susan Linder, 
Kathryn Kimberly, Rebecca Blocker, Debi Deeder, Kay Phillips, 
Steven Stamp.s, N'gima Coleman, Fatima Coleman, Larissa Badie, 
JenniferSprague, Pete Moore, Julie Kcntnar, Missy Nistler, Allison 
Kertner, John CJroves, Steve Cain, Peggy Florence, Jodi Wallace, 
Dexter Cooper, Tyrone Hardy, Dwayne I looks, James Hooper 



u^' ri Fantam 





endte 




Ronald Martin, Gary Nistler, Misty Nistler, James W. Hooper, 
Robert S. Haynie Jr., Mark Laricy, Tom Ricks, George Souza, 
James Smith, Sean Hiland, Rhonda Tarver Drummond, Brian 
Hirjkle Chris Warzinger, Pete Warren 



Rebecca Blocker, Rhonda Howard, Elizabeth Wilkinson,, 
Stephanie Bell, Lisa Ackerman, Teresa Hicks, Steven Cain, 
Merofier Walker, Beth Castleberry, Bill Dunwoody, James 
Hooper, Steven Stamps, Brent Erdman, Andy Pilson, Debbie 
Hull, Mark Baggot, Brooke Brandon 



up/0^^f-6M \btmt Ak 





Elsa Buzhardt, Alyson Creed, Susan Linder, Susan Cox, Sharon 
Holmes, Elizabeth Morrow, Mercedes J. Hardin, Dr. Charles Case, 
Jeann Meeks, Annette Glenn, Tammy Hobbs, Michele Canchola, 
Teresa Jo Dunn, Jessica Oliver, David Singleton, Robert Carswell, 
Reginald Murphy, Sara Rubio, Charlene McKenzie, Llewellyn 
Montrichard, Carol McDaniels, Michele Childs, Larissa Badie, Beatrice 
Kalako, James Jackson, Timothy Jennings, Lewis Ramsey, Mae Rauls, 
Mark Lariscy, Merofier Walker, Tracy Bush, Vernon Yedell, Linda 
Moore, George Zumbro 



Robyn Macey, Tony Miller, Smita Patel, Frank Raunikar, Jarroc 
Dubose-Schmitt, Shannon Shelton, Ron Sherrod, George Souza 
Steven Stamps, Joy Staulcup, Beth Williams, Beth Baker, Bethan) 
Byrd, Jo Angela Edwins, Sandy Emerson, Brian Epps, Jear 
Frederick, Al Hamilton, Teresa Hicks, Andrea Highsmith 
Rhonda Howard, Charla Huck, Kelle Langham 




x^ecaiM 




j Dwayne Hooks, Steven Stamps, Kathryn Kimberly, J.C. 
I Halvorson, Michele Canchola, Al Hamilton 




Pattie Jordan-Treasurer,Lauri Hiland-President and 1st V.P. 
State, Tori Rowland-Secretary, Alan Faircloth-lst. V.P., Matt 
Lowrey-2nd V.P., Karen Saye- Recording Sec, Cindy Wells- 
Historian, Cindy Glaze- State President. 





Lop, Harvey Lynch, Gary Wasdin, and Charla Huck work on set 
design. Augusta College Drama Guild performed several plays 
throughout the year for students and the surrounding community. 
Above; Phi Beta Lambda opens their booth at the beginning of every 
quarter for students to exchange and buy books. 




/^^ (Ms & Orgmkaiw. 



•citilK£ 



In the early part of 1990, 
the AC Euclidean Society was in 
the process of re-establishing its 
presence on campus. The mem- 
bership was small but devoted and 
anxious to make the organization 
a success once again. A year later 
the club had achieved many of its 
goals and was looking ahead to 
another year of activities and learn- 
ing. The members were proud of 
their accompUshments and wanted 
to come up with something that 
would make others stand up and 
take notice of the Euclidean Soci- 
ety. And we have; participating in 
Homecoming, volunteering our 
skills and time, sponsoring guest 
lectures, and just plain having fun. 

One of our most success- 
ful projects was the club t-shirt. It 
has served to bring the members 
closer together and has been a 
source of profit. The idea of a club 
t-shirt came up at one of the meet- 
ings and that idea was quickly 
voted in as a project for the Euclid- 
ean Society to undertake. Sugges- 
tions for themes and slogans came 
from members and faculty alike 
and many a meeting was spent 
brainstorming and voting on ideas. 
It seemed as though once the club 
had decided on a concept, a better 
one would come along; the deci- 
sion process was indeed a long 
one. Then THE slogan rolled off 
someone's tongue and immedi- 
ately the group responded. After 
months of thought, decision mak- 
ing, and fund raising the Euchd- 
ean Society was finally going to 
have a t-shirt! The t-shirt has given 
us great publicity on and off cam- 
pus. Oh yea, the slogan... MATH- 
EMATICIANS DON'T JUST DO 
IT... THEY PROVE IT! 



We prove it in everything 
we undertake. The Euclidean So- 
ciety believes in working hard, and 
playing hard, not to over quote 
shoe commercials, but "life is toe 
short, play hard." Every year we 
sponsor guest lectures, and dur- 
ing this past year we featured Deda 
Xeng, a graduate student at 
Clemson University, and Dr. Rob 
ert Jamerson, professor of Math 
ematics at Clemson University. The 
purpose of the lectures is to expos 
students to recent research in mathi 
ematics. We also try to expose stU' 
dents to the different fields of math 
ematics available. 

Teaching is the goal o 
most of our members, and they ar 
given the chance to experienc( 
teaching first hand and get to know 
what teaching is really hke Iron 
the professors themselves. Everj 
quarter the Euchdean Society holds 
MAT 107 help sessions, which ar 
normally scheduled a few dayi 
prior to the final exam. Many stu 
dents bring their old tests and note 
and take this great opportunity tc 
put the pieces together. Also, foi 
the past two years the Euclidear 
Society has helped with the math 
contest sponsored by AC for thf 
area high schools. Last year we 
submitted questions for the vari- 
ous stages of the competition anc 
helped to keep score. But this i; 
only one side of teaching, we havf 
a wonderful relationship with thi 
faculty of the mathematics depart 
ment. 

We are a wild, caring, in 
tellectual bunch who enjoy meet 
ing others interested in mathemat 
ics. The Euclidean society is defi 
nitely a club to be noticed! 

Kelle Langhan 



^tade^nt i/lnfon 




^ I entity 




Jacque Babineaux, Elizabeth Castleberry, Yi-Huey Yong, Teresa 
Jones, Tyrone Hardy, Saritha Vaz, Smita Patel, Dwayne Hooks, 
Natasha Hendrix, Deborah Deeder, Merofier Walker, Larissa 
Badie, Dexter Cooper, Darrell Griffis, Shonta Young. 



Ty Hoff, Derek May, Keith Hagood, Magali Monies, Maury 
Saggus, Yair Nathin, Anthony Cooper, Brain Pace, Oscar Melvin, 
Scott Bulter. 



j^ite Coimne I \^ta /aa A^pka 




■t in order: Jennifer Sprague-Editor, Classes; Nilam Palcl- 
jbs. Opening and Closing; Debi Deeder- Academics, Commu- 
.;Terri WfK)d-Studcnl Life; [5cn Johnson-Sports; Kfvin Jim int'/- 
itography; Cindy Hif ks-I'hotography; Michclie Ncwm.in- 
• erti.sing. 



Diane IJiiiu, Aiyson Creed, Lisa Ackerman, Stephanie Shaw, 
Missy Hayes, Lisa Walters, Elizabeth Wilkinson, Kim Leopard, 
Yi-I lucy Yong, Kclli Monro, Rebecca Ridl('li()ovc'r,T<immy Creen, 
J.mc I5urks, Susan i-'inley, Sony,! Porter, Stepiianie Barger, Debbie 
Irulson, Missy MarshbLiin, Milli Jackson, Brandi Kelly, Lori 
lostcr, Angela I'isli, N.it,isli,i I It'ndrix, Lynn Larson, Elizabeth 
Cledhill. 



135 




^''^wt 



f^Q ^oi<^ 



Above: Joey Spires finds time before a game to help a 
youngster with his soccer. Right: An intramural foot- 
ball player unloads the ball under pressure. Far right: 
Jaguars Mascot Al E. Cat gels the team prepared for a 
big game. Top Right: A womens's Volleyball player 
practices the fundamentals of the sport. 



ht 




ususta College Athletics had 
to make many adjustments 
from last year. From switch- 
ing to Division I from Division II to the 
switching from the "Old Gym" to the 
new Athletic Complex. There was also 
a new addition to Augusta College sports 
this past year. On February 15, AC 
unveiled their new mascot AL E. CAT. 
E\ en though most teams had rocky sea- 
sons, there were two teams that took the 
adjustments in stride. Both the Women's 
Basketball team and the Women's Ten- 
lis team celebrated the end of their sea- 
sons with a Conference Championship. 












^^^K^ 

w^H 












PRgk'5^ 






1 SCORFBOARD 


H Piedmont 


w 


m Allen 


w 


n Elon 


L 


H Benedict 


L 


H Lenoir-Rhyne 


L 


ri Catawba 


L 


■jj Florida Southern 


W 


H Florida Memorial 


W 


jB Fayetteville State 


W 


^1 North Alabama 


L 


H Lander 


W 


^B GA College 


W 


H use Spartanburg 
^r Armstrong State 
jL Francis Marion 


L 

W 

W 


■ USC-Alken 


L 


M Columbus 


W 


T Morehouse 


W 


h^ Lander 


W 


J Columbus 


L 


■Jj North Alabama 


W 


ij use Spartanburg 
m USC-Aiken 


w 
w 


H Armstrong State 
H Georgia College 
H Francis Marion 


L 

W 

L 


H Paine 


W 


H Georgia College 


L 


ibm 






n^ 







EMOTIONAL 

Jags fall short in finals, but had a great season. 



The Augusta College 
men's basketball team went 
into the 91-92 season with 
high expectations, from both 
the coaches, the players, and 
the media. This Jaguar team 
was only losing one player 
and was returning the 
school's all-time points 
leader, Keenan Mann, and 
the school's all-time block 
leader, Derek Stewart. This 
Jaguar team had competed 
on the Division I level against 
the likes of Florida, South 
Carolina, Georgia Tech, Min- 
nesota, and several others, 
not to mention the tough Big 
South Conference competi- 
tion. The 91-92 season was 
the first season for the Jag- 
uar athletic program back 
down on the Division II level, 
in the newly formed Peach 
Belt Conference. One basket- 
ball magazine ranked the 
Jags 16th in a preseason poll 
for Division II schools. The 



Jags were expected to domi- 
nate their new found com- 
petition, but this was not the 
case. 

Although the Jags 
dicin't run out to an 
undefeated season like many 
had hoped for, they did fin- 
ish the season for the first 
time since 1981 with a win- 
ning record, at 17-11. The 
Jags posted some impressive 
wins throughout the season 
including three wins over na- 
tionally ranked teams. The 
first came against 
Fayetteville St., #2 in the na- 
tion, with a 86-83 victory. 
Later in the season, the Jags 
toppled the defending na- 
tional champions. North Ala- 
bama, #10 in the country, 
with a 77-64 victory. Two 
days later the Jags upset the 
#14 ranked team in the na- 
tion with 66-64 win. The Jags 
also posted a two-point vic- 
tory over Paine College, 61- 



59, in the Augusta City Clas 
sic, in front of nearly 4,00( 
fans. The Jags wrapped uf 
their season with a disap 
pointing first round loss ii 
the Peach Belt Conference 
Tournament to Georgia Col 
lege, 79-87. 

The team's overal 
performance for the seasoi 
was highlighted by two, first 
team All-Conference selec 
tions, and one, second-tean 
All-Conference selection 
The first two were to no one' 
surprise, Keenan Mann (16.: 
points per game, 7.6 re 
bounds per game) and De 
rek Stewart (15.5 points pe 
game, 6.6 rebounds pe 
game). This year was the las 
season for Keenan Manr 
who has been the center o 
AC basketball for four year | 
and will leave behind hir^ i 
an era of excellence, as we! 
as the school's all-time scoi 
ing record. 

Mark Ristrop 



Mrts 






Left: The men's basketball 
team had a season of 
mixed emotions, but over- 
all the Jags finished 17-11 
for the season. 






Bottom Left: AC Jags held 
up a strong fight against 
all of their opponents. 
The Jaguars went to all 
extremes to keep posses- 
sion of the ball and keep 
defense strong. 



Below: The Jags started 
their regular season in the 
new Athletic Complex on 
the Wrightsboro Road 
campus. The building 
was dedicated this year. 




"The major difference between 
this year's team and the previ- 
ous two teams is that with only 
losing two guys off of last year's 
roster, we returned nine guys 
who started at least three games 
for us during the course of last 
year." 

(",/,/, // ( 7/11/ lin/iiiil 



sm^ 139 



Right: Lady Jags used 
their skills and team spirit 
effectively for a success- 
ful season. They team 
captured the title in the 
in the Peach Belt finals. 






^M^^ 



Below: Workingasa team 
made the difference for 
the Lady Jags as they ral- 
lied their way to the top. 



Bottom Right: The Ladv 
Jags took the Georgia Col- 
lege Colonials 64-46 in the 
finals to clench the Peach 
Belt tournament title. 
Tracey Strange was the 
Peach Belt Conference 
MVP. 



1^ 



-m-- . - 


—1 




J%^ 


mL^^k: 


mxm^^p 


m^ 




"We've played 
quite well as a 
team. We don't 
have any indi- 
vidual stars." 



Conch Lou'i'll Bnrnhnrl 



7^0 




UNFORGETTABLE 

Lady Jags Clench Title In An Outstanding Season 



The Augusta College 

.adv Jaguars basketball 

earn jumped from medioc- 

::•. in the Big South Confer- 

■ :e la'it year to being a 

A'er iiouse this season in 

- Peach Belt Conference. 

-t vear the Ladv Jags fin- 
- -d with a 11-18 record, 

i won the first ever Peach 
Jelt Conference. This sea- 
on the Lady Jags finished 
ied for first in the Peach Belt, 
vith a 23-6 record, and won 
he first ever Peach Belt Con- 
erence championship. No- 
>ody was expecting the tre- 
nendous success that the 
ady Jags experienced this 
eason especially after los- 
ig several key players. The 
2Cond leading scorer in Big 
outh history, Debbie Born, 
nd the conference leader in 
ebounding, Gladys Burke 
'ould both be missing from 
(he 92 team, but the team 

me together as a whole 



and rose to the occasion to 
led the team to one of its best 
seasons. 

The Lady Jag's sea- 
son was filled with excite- 
ment and surprise, with the 
team racking up a thirteen 
game win streak covering 
most of the conference 
games. They finished 14-2 in 
the conference, striking a 
fearful note in women's bas- 
ketball in the Peach Belt for 
the upcoming season. The 
Lady Jags also had three 
overtime games this season, 
one of which was an emo- 
tional loss to Paine College 
in the Augusta City Classic. 
The Lady Jags blew-out 
Georgia College in the con- 
ference tournament finals, 
64-46, to get revenge from 
an earlier regular season loss 
to the Lady Colonials. Tracy 
Strange won the Tourna- 
ment MVP, and Kay Sand- 
ers and Angle Long made 



the All-Tournament team. 
Strange (15.3 points per 
game, 5.4 rebounds per 
game) and Sanders (12.1 
points per game, 11.6 re- 
bounds per game) were also 
named to the second team 
All-Conference along with 
Robin Edwards (10.3 points 
per game, 6.8 assists per 
game). 

Coach Lowell 

Barnhart was named the 
Peach Belt Conference coach 
of the year for his outstand- 
ing accomplishments with 
the Lady Jags in coaching 
them to his best season at 
Augusta College, the Dick 
Wallace award, named after 
the former president Dr. Ri- 
chard Wallace. Of the sea- 
son Barnhart noted, "Its one 
of the highlights of my ca- 
reer." Coach Barnhart also 
coached the soccer team this 
past season. 

Mark Ristroph 



SCOKhKOARD 


Ft. Valley State 
Paine 


W 
W 


West Georgia 


L 


Benedict 


W 


Benedict 


W 


Ft. Valley State 

Spelman 

MD Eastern Shore 


W 
W 
L 


Lander 


W 


Georgia College 
use Spartanburg 
Armstrong State 


W 
W 
W 


Francis Marion 


W 


Morris Brown 


W 


USC-Aiken 


W 


Columbus 


W 


Spelman 
Lander 


W 
W 


Columbus 


W 


use Spartanburg 
USC-Aiken 


W 
W 


Armstrong State 


L 


Georgia College 
Morris Brown 


L 

W 


West Georgia 
Francis Marion 


L 
W 


Paine 


L 


Armstrong State 
Georgia College 


W 
W 




fi 



'^W 



1992 
Lady Jaguars 

Tracey Strange 
Kay Sanders 
Angle Long 
Robin Edwards 
Julie Yeargin 
Kerrie Marshall 
Candy Black 
Teresa Smith 
Kim Lewis 
Melissa 

Detchemendy 
Karen Tranum 
Susie McKeown 



'r- 




y^f^ <^ 






All Conference Performers 

Kay Sanders - 

2nd team All-Conference 
Peach Belt All-Tournament 

Robin Edwards - 

2nd team All-Conference 

Tracey Strange - 

2nd team All-Conference 
Peach Belt Tournament MVP 

Angie Long - Peach Belt All Tournament 



j^:V^i 






The Lady Jags worked to- 
gether and supported each 
other through the season. 
They used aggressive me- 
chanics to dominate their 
games and have an excep- 
tional first season in the 
I'each BeltConl^erence.. They 
never lost their confidence. 



M? 




"It is very disappoint- ^ 

ing when you don't ^ 

win, but I saw some PI 
encouraging things." 

Coach Unodl Baniliart 



M4 



Mds 




J Kr-y-tr*!^-..,^^^::^^. 



MOTIVATION 

The soccer team pushed for the Big South title 



The Augusta College 
soccer team had a rough time 
getting out of the gates this 
season, starting off with only 
one win in their first ten games 
of the season. The Jaguars 
then realized the season had 
tarted and rebounded to win 
iix games and a tie against 
anly two losers, finishing out 
the season with a 7-11-1 
ecord. The Jaguars finished 
Peach Belt Conference play 
Aith a 4-3 record. 

The Jaguars season 
opening 1-9 record did not 
eflect the wealth of talented 
Diayers on the Jaguar squad, 
nstead the opening record 
ihows the result of a lot of 
lard luck, some injuries, and 
1 lack of unity. Of those first 



nine losses, two of them were 
in overtime and two of them 
were decided by just one goals 
difference. After the Jaguars 
started playing up to their 
potential, they really poured 
it on a few teams. The Jag- 
uars ended their losing streak 
with a 6-0 demolition of Peach 
Belt rival USC-Aiken. Au- 
gusta College scoring leader, 
Ken Dawson, had two goals 
in the game. The Jaguars 
continued their scoring binge 
a few games later with a de- 
cisive 4-1 victory over St. 
Leo. After a 2-0 shutout of 
conference foe Francis 
Marion, the Jaguars throttled 
Columbus College, 9-1, in 
their final regular season 
matchup. With the end of the 



season outburst, the Jaguars 
finished the season in third 
place in the Peach Belt. After 
advancing through the first 
of the playoffs, the Jags lost 
in the second round, 3-0, to 
USC-Spartanburg . 

The Jaguars placed 
three players on the All-Con- 
ference team and two of them 
also made the all-tournament 
team. Ken Dawson, all-time 
leading scorer (48) and points 
leader (128) was named to 
his third all-conference team. 
Danny Kight was also named 
to both the all-conference and 
all-tournament teams and fin- 
ishing off the awards was 
Philip Dembure who made 
the all-conference team as 
well. 

Mark Ristroph 





SCOREBOARD 


W.VA.Wesleyan 


L 


Gardner-Webb 


W 


Erskine 


L 


Tusculum 


L 


William Carey 


L 


Lar\der 


L 


Spartanburg 


L 


W.VA.Wesleyan 


L 


W. Florida 


L 


USC-Aiken 


W 


Catawba 


L 


St, Leo 


W 


Winthrop 


T 


Francis Marion 


W 


Mercer 


L 


Columbus 


W 


Clark-Atlanta 


W 


Columbus 


w 


Spartanburg 


L 



6pork 



SCOKhKOARD 


Emory University 


L 


Converse 


L 


Charleston Southern 


L 


Winthrop 


L 


Mercer 


L 


Paine 


L 


Emory University 


L 


USC-Aiken 


L 


Newberry 


L 


Paine 


L 


Armstrong State 


L 


use Spartanburg 


L 


Eckerd 


L 


SCAD 


L 


use Spartanburg 


L 


Armstrong State 


L 


Wesleyan 


W 


USC-Aiken 


L 


Francis Marion 


L 


Newberry 


L 


SCAD 


L 


Erskine 


W 


Armstrong State 


L 


Francis Marion 


L 



DETERMINATION 

Lady Jags fought hard to improve their recorc 



The Augusta College 
volleyball team did not have 
much in the way of success 
for this past year, but the team 
did learn everything from 
their experiences. They say 
that winning isn't everything 
and the volleyball team 
showed that their is some- 
thingotherthanwinning. The 
team never gave up despite a 
schedule that seemed to over- 
power them and it is hard to 
ask for much more. The Jag- 
uars finished the season with 
a 2-22 record. One of the 
losses came as the result of a 
forfeit. One of the victories 
that the Jaguars did manage 
to achieve broke an unfortu- 
nate 32 game losing streak. 
That streak started last sea- 
son and carried over for the 
first sixteen games of this 
season. Even with such a 



negative season opening, the 
team moved on. The victory 
that broke the streak was a 
three match shutout against 
Wesleyan College. The three 
game match there ended with 
Augusta College clearly the 
dominant team. The final 
scores ofthe match were 15- 
3, 15-4, and 15-9. Unfortu- 
nately the winning streak 
never came into being and 
the next four games were 
disappointing losses. One of 
the highlight games of the 
season for the Jaguars came 
in the contest against Savan- 
nah College of Arts and De- 
sign, but AC couldn't keep 
control and fell to SCAD, 
losing both matches in the 
fifth and final match. 

The athletes playing 
for the Jaguars the past few 
seasons have been learning 



and growing from their ex 
periences. The team is be 
coming seasoned and mor 
cohesive. The tough sched 
ule they face puts them u 
against some of the bettei 
skilled teams in the region s 
they surely learn from thei 
losses. The falls that the tear 
takes now are building a four 
dation for next seasons vo 
leyball athletes to come i 
and improve upon. While 
may be easier for the Jaguai 
to hope that next year's sched 
ule matches them with moB 
teams the Jags can dominat 

j 

like the Wesleyan team froij 
this year, it will ultimately h 
the challenge of tough rivaj 
that make them more pre! 
pared to take the champior 
ship next year. I 

Mark Ristrop 



J/f^ ^ 





1 

i^ 19.' ',..j^\.i' 


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Volleyball Award Winners 

Krysti Boeck-Vasko - MVP 
Brooke Lovett -- Best Attitude 
Angle I-ong — Most Improved 



jfffff / 1, mn ^ 



^ f^/ 




"We've got a talented 
team. We're young, but 
we should get better with 
match experience." 








f^fgSjc^ 




WORK PAY6 OFF 

Men's team gets experience in tough conference 



Augusta College's 
Mens Tennis Team moved 
to Division II in the Peach 
Belt Conference this season 
which insured a difficult 
schedule and possibly dis- 
appointing records. Their 
impending season seemed 
to be ominous because the 
Peach Belt contained some 
of the toughest competition 
in the nation. The men fin- 
ished their season with an 
impressive 18-9 record 
while facing some stiff com- 
petition. Four of the top ten 
nationally ranked teams 
were on the Jaguars sched- 
ule. The men were coming 
off a 10-19 record in 1991, 



and were returning with- 
out two of the team's lead- 
ers: Allen VanCampen and 
Steve Platte. The team came 
together when it counted 
and finished with the first 
winning season for the men 
in as long a time as anyone 
can remember. 

Teamwork was a 
crucial key to the men's suc- 
cess, but individual achieve- 
ment also played a major 
role. The Jaguars were led 
by Mike Hayes who fin- 
ished with a 10-8 singles 
record and was named Most 
Valuable Player. Danny 
Uschiner finished at 15-9 
and was given the recogni- 



tion of Best Attitude. The 
Most Improved player on 
the team was Will Segraves. 
Only a few names were 
mentioned here, but every- 
one on the team should be 
congratulated on their won- 
derful performances this 
season. 

The men's teams 
success was due partially to 
readjusted and attainable 
goals. The Augusta College 
Jaguars will be as competi- 
tive, if not more, in the fol- 
lowing years, because of the 
addition of several young 
athletes. 

Melissa Delafchell 





HpPRSKr-^^pl^V 


1 

i 


SCORRROARD 


1 


Newberry 


■ 


Ft. Valley State 


H 


SC State 


H 


Lander 


1 


Mercer 


w H 


Presbyterian 


Q 


Oglethorpe 


Hj 


Morehouse 


w R 


Wabash 


w H 


GA College 


L [^ 


Coker 


w B 


use Spartanburg L HP 


Newberry 


w mt 


Wright State 


w M 


Francis Marion 


w H 


Columbus 


w Wi 


Armstrong State 


> L III 


Erskine 


H 


Chas. Southern 


w 9| 


Oglethorpe 


B 


The Citadel 


H 


SC state 


w m{ 


Pfeiffer 


w C^ 


Belmont Abbey 


Hj 


Wingate 


w 


■ 


Queens College 


L 


w 


UNC Charlotte 


L 


1 




1 



r¥9 



UNBELIEVABLE 

Women's Tennis Brings Home Conference Title 





SCORRROARD 


Mars Hill 


W 


Fort Valley State 


W 


S.C. State 


w 


Columbia College 


w 


Lander 


w 


Mercer 


w 


Radford 


L 


Tennessee Tech 


W 


Georgia State 


L 


Georgia College 


W 


Coker 


W 


use Spartanburg 


L 


m Francis Marion 


L 


S Armstrong State 


W 


R Columbus 


W 


1 Chas. Southern 


W 


1 Erskine 


W 


1 Oglethrope 


W 


Savannah State 


W 


Florida Jr. College 


L 




Jacksonville Univ. 


W 




Gardner-Webb 


W 



The Augusta Col- 
lege Women's Tennis Team 
along with the men's team 
were moved to Division 11 
in the Peach Belt Confer- 
ence. The women practiced 
long and hard in anticipa- 
tion of their rigorous sched- 
ule to come. Although the 
team had previously ailing 
records, they began the sea- 
son putting their best foot 
forward. 

The women's team 
surprised everyone by 
bringing home the confer- 
ence championship this 
season after finishing their 
regular season with an im- 
pressive 17-5 mark. This 
best ever season came on 
the heels of a 10-12 record 



in 1991 with no conference 
victories and a sixth place 
finish in the conference. 
Overall the team proved 
that they had more than 
potential to win, they could 
accomplish their goals. 

Everyone on the Jag- 
uars Women's Tennis Team 
deserved a pat on the back, 
but some earned their right 
to be specially recognized. 
Cheri Cathey finished the 
season with a 14-5 record, 
was the number two Singles 
Conference Champion, and 
was named Most Valuable 
Player and Most Improved 
Player. Sandra Journell was 
also named to the All-Con- 
ference team finishing the 
season with a 13-5 record 



and was also half of thd 
third ranked Doubles Con 
ference Champion. Thtj 
other half of the thirc 
ranked doubles team wa:i 
the third Jaguar All-Con i 
ference selection, Lorr; 
Randolph, who finisheo 
with a 11-4 mark and wa; 
the number six Single 
Championship. Amie Woe 
was honored with Best Ati 
titude and finished the sea 
son with a 10-2 record. Tht 
future is looking bright fo 
women's tennis at Augusts 
College thanks to the hare 
work and tremendous ef 
fort exhibited by this teami 

Melissa Delafchel; 






"Teamwork. That was 
the key element that 
enabled the Lady Jags 
to capture the Peach 
Belt Conference Cham- 



Coiiih Ihtk lliilfirld 



^ pionship." 



■^ 



'1^^ -"*J^.^^Jv 



^ /S/ 



UN^ELIEVA3LE 



Right: Cooling off on the 
court -- Courtley Winter 
and Andrea Barnes at a 
home match at the 
Newman Tennis Center. 



y -^^ 



Below: At the Peach Belt 
Conference in Savannah, 
Georgia, team members 
Cheri Cathey, Lorri 
Randolph, Julie 

Dickerson-Kersey, Kim 
Kile, and Sandra Journell 



Bottom Right: All work 
and no play... .Andrea 
Barnes, Courtley Winter, 
Randy Kersey, Julie 
Dickerson-Kersey, Cheri 
Cathey, Kim Kile, Sandra 
Journell, Amie Woo, Lorri 
Randolph, and Coach 
Dick Hatfield. 




All-Conference Performers 

Cheri Cathey 

All-Conference 

#2 Singles Winner 
Lorri Randolph 

All-Conference 

#6 Singles Winner 

#3 Doubles Winner 
Sandra Journell 

All-Conference 

#3 Doubles Winner 



^52 s^ 




-^^ 




r 

1992 Women's 
Tennis Team 

Andrea Barnes 

Cheri Cathey 

Julie Dickerson-Kersey 

Sandra Journell 

Courtley Winter 

Lorri Randolph 

Amie Woo 

Kim Kile 

Coach Dick Hatfield 



.'1 

V 



I 




i:2/4 



153 




"We're 

basically just 

looking 

forward to 

swimming 

best times, 

going to 

class, 

pulling good 

grades, and 

having a fun 

time." 

Coach Jeff Rout 



5EA50N FINALE 

Aqua Jags complete their last season with a splash 



The first real victim 
of the move from Division I 
to Division II was the Au- 
gusta College Swim Team. 
At the end of the swim sea- 
son, the Athletic Director, 
Clint Bryant, announced that 
the Athletic Department 
would be dropping the 
swimming program at Au- 
gusta College. Before the 
season started this year, 
there were rumors in the air 
as to which sports might or 
might not get cut from the 
AC Athletic line-up. Instead 
of carrying all the sports for 
another year of Division II 
play, the athletic program 



has its first casualty against 
the huge athletic budget 
which there seems to never 
be enough of. Bryant 
pointed out several reasons 
for the cancellation of the 
swimming program. "Due 
to the lack of participation 
we find ourselves not meet- 
ing sports sponsorship cri- 
teria in women's swimming. 
In addition, with the lack of 
women's swimming teams 
in the Southeastern United 
States and the fact that swim- 
ming is not a sport of partici- 
pation in the Peach Belt Ath- 
letic Conference, the Au- 
gusta College Athletic Com- 



i 



mittee recommended tha 
the program be dropped 
The motion was approvec 
by the Augusta College Ath 
letic Association and th( 
President." 

With suspicions o; 
the swimming program be: 
ing dropped at the end of th( 
season, the Lady Jaguars no 
only competed for them: 
selves, but for the school 
especially when the suppor 
needed was not given 
Nonetheless, the Aqua Jag. 
made a difference at August. 
College. 

Mark Ristropt 



d 



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"We hope to improve 
upon last year's fifth- 
place finish in the 
Southern States 
Championships." 

Ciificli Jeff Rdiil 



155 



LEAD THE PACK 

New coach continues strong leadership for team 



Georgia's rich tradi- 
tion of golf was upheld by 
another inspired season of Au- 
gusta College Golf. Alto- 
gether, they ha\-e shown tre- 
mendous effort by practicing 
many tedious hours and im- 
pro\ing on personal goals and 
a\erages. Another encourag- 
ing aspect was finishing ninth 
in the strong District 111 Xorth, 
just missing an NCAA East- 
em Regional playoff spot by 
one team. Ranking fifty sixth 
in the nation of Division 1 was 
e\idence alone of how much 
thev ha\'e achieved. 

Starting off the season 
on the right foot, the Jaguars 
placed second out of seven- 
teen teams at Old Dominion 
in .N'orth Carolina. The Jag- 
uars were sure not to disap- 
point their excellent record by 
placing first out of fifteen 



teams at the Jaguar Classic 
held at Forest Hills Golf Club 
and first out of seventeen 
teams at C&S Intercollegiate 
played at Cedar Creek Golf 
Club in Aiken. The Jaguars 
had a strong fourth place fin- 
ish in the Cleveland Classics/ 
Augusta College Invitational 
against a field that included 
thirteen teams ranked in the 
district or ranked nationally. 
The team maintained a distin- 
guished record by finishing 
in the top ten in five of the six 
tournaments. 

Golf is a sport made to 
support a drive for personal 
excellence. Individual scores 
reflect more about the quality 
of a team than the consoli- 
dated scores. Richard John- 
son with an average of 73.4 
proved to be vital asset for the 
91-92 season. Coming in at a 



close follow was Neil MacRae 
with a 74.5. Chris Kuhlke and 
Craig Hislop improved their 
averages with a 74.8. 

Jim Kelson, the new 
head coach of the Augusta 
College Jaguars, made an im- 
mediate impact in his first sea- 
son. Coach Kelson also seems 
to have a keen interest in golf 
and a deep appreciation for 
the players and their roles as 
student athletes. "I'm ex- 
tremely excited about the up- 
coming season," Kelson said. 
"Although we have a very 
young team, we also have sev- 
eral players that have a great 
deal of competitive experi- 
ence." 

The Jags had a very 
difficult schedule and proved 
that they could stand up to the 
challenges presented to them. 

Nikki Suarez 





"I'm really 
excited 
about this 
team. 

We have a 
pretty good 
team; there 
are a lot of 
talented 
players. I'm 
just looking 
to see how 
far we can 

go." 

Conch jiiii Kelson 



sjw^fST 



The team started 
practicing as a 
group in early 
September un- 
der heavy fisted 
Coach Dip 
Metress who 
whipped the 
team into com- 
petition form. 



KEEPING PACE 



Men's & Women's teams ran against the best 



The Augusta College 
Cross Country teams, both 
men and wom.en, were never 
in the spotlight that some of 
the other sports received 
throughout the year, and 
understandably so—cross 
country is simply not a spec- 
tator sport. 

The team consisted 
of usually about seven 
women and six men, but 
sometimes less, due to in- 
jury or some other intan- 
gible. In order to compete, 
however, both the men and 
women's teams needed five 
runners to qualify. The team 
started practicing as a gf6up 
in early September under 
heavy fisted Coach Dip 



Metress who whipped the 
team into competition form. 
Unfortunately, the Jaguar's 
competition was a bit 
tougher than expected. 

The season started 
with a meet at USC- Aiken 
with both the women and 
the men finishing fourth. 
The team then traveled up to 
a meet in Spartanburg, S.C. 
where foggy conditions and 
an unmarked course led to 
several runners becoming 
lost (final results could not 
be obtained, but all AC run- 
ners did finish). Next up 
was a trip to Atlanta where 
the Jags fell prey to the likes 
of Georgia, Georgia Tech, 
Georgia State and some 



other powerhouses from al 
over the state of Georgia. An 
other race in Aiken resulted 
in a second place finish fol 
the women and anothe 
fourth place finish for thi 
men. The Jags then travelec 
to Charlotte, NC to compet( 
in the Belmont Abbey Home 
coming meet, where agaii 
both men and women scorec 
fourth place finishes. Th 
season ended with the Bij 
South Conference Meet ii 
Spartanburg, and althoug 
the team didn't come homi 
with first place, we do knov; 
that no one got lost this time 
Mark Ristropl 





JUlJL. 



« 




i 








All-Conference Performers 

Women 

Jennifer Bistrak - MVP 

Sara Gordon - Best Attitude 

Julie Yeargin - Most Improved 

Men 

Greg Elvvell - MVP 

Ken Gampbell - Best Attitude 

Mark Ristroph - Most Improved 



■ii"^-->^ J 



fS9 




All-Conference Performers 




Chris Hodge 


1st team All-Conference 


s 


Ronnie Barnes 


J 


1st team All-Conference 


JM 


Jamie Miller 




1st team All-Conference 


i 


■B.^'b^C^,^ 


R? 




/QQ Spar<s 



CHALLENGING 

Year was challenging despite 25-26 record 



The Augusta College 
Baseball team entered the 
1992 season coming off the 
toughest schedule in the 
team's history. Unfortu- 
nately the mo\'e down to Di- 
\ision n did not make things 
anv easier for the Jags. In 
1^91 the Jaguars played 
against Georgia, Kentucky, 
South Carolina, Georgia 
Tech, Clemson, Georgia 
■Southern and several other 
national powerhouses. The 
schedule for the 1992 season 
was not any better as the 
Jaguars played in the tough- 
est Division II conference in 
the nation. Six of the confer- 
ences teams were in the na- 
tif >nal top 25 during the sea- 
and three of the teams 
re in the top 10 at the end 
he season . AC finished 



the season with a 25-26 
mark and finished confer- 
ence play at 5-12. 

The Jags never could 
get a solid winning streak 
started throughout the sea- 
son but did suffer some close 
loses including three loses 
in extra innings. The Jags 
fell on hard luck again in the 
Peach Belt Conference Tour- 
nament when the Jags had 
to face USC-Aiken, ranked 
5th nationally, in the open- 
ing round. The Jaguars al- 
lowed only two hits in the 
game, but lost 2-0 to send 
them into the loser's bracket. 
There, the Jaguars found 
themselves facing topseeded 
Armstrong State only to 
come away with a 7-5 loss. 

The tough competi- 
tion brought out some of the 



star talent that has filled the 
Jaguar roster for many years. 
This year, the Jaguars placed 
three players on the All-Con- 
ference team. Chris Hodge 
finished his impressive ca- 
reer at Augusta College with 
a .325 average and 16 hom- 
ers, earning All-Conference 
honors and first-team South 
Atlantic Region honors. 
Ronnie Barnes also finished 
his career at Augusta Col- 
lege in grand style, leading 
the team in hitting at .345 
and stolen bases. Barnes was 
also named to the All-Con- 
ference team and to the sec- 
ond team South Atlantic 
Region. Junior Jamie Miller 
also earned All-Conference 
honors as well as second 
team South Atlantic Region. 
Mark Ristroph 





SCOREBOARD 



Erskine 

Valdosta State 

Valdosta State 

Valdosta State 

Georgia 

Gannon 

Presbyterian 

Georgia College 

Mount Olive 

Pfeiffer 

Pfeiffer 

Pfeiffer 

S. Indiana 

S. Indiana 

Francis Marion 

Shepherd 

Shepherd 

USC-Aiken 

USC-Aiken 

USC-Aiken 

S. Carliona St. 

Columbus W 

use Spartanburg 

use Spartanburg 

use Spartanburg 

Tuskeegee W 

Tuskeegee W 

Brevvton-Parker 

Brewton-Parker 

S. Carliona St. 

Armstrong State 

ArmstrongStatc 

Armstrong Stale 

Columbus L 

Columbus L 

Columbus L 

Newberry 

Newberry 

Georgia College 

Georgia College 

Georgia College 

USC-Aiken 

Francis Marion 

Newberry 

Newberry 

Frskine 

Brewlon-Parker 

Brewton-I'arker 

Wiiilhrop 

USC-Aiken 

Armstrong Stale 



L 

W 

L 

L 

L 

W 

L 

L 

L 

W 

W 

L 

W 

W 

L 

W 

W 

W 

L 

L 

L 

L 

W 

L 



W 
W 
W 
W 

L 
L 



W 

L 

W 

W 

1, 

L 

W 

W 

W 

L 

W 

I. 

W 

I. 

I, 



rei 



BATTER UP 

Softball team ends year with record of 13-21-1 



SCOHhHOARD 


Erskine 


L 


Erskine 


L 


Kennesaw State 


L 


Kennesaw State 


L 


Erskine 


W 


Erskine 


T 


use Spartanburg 
use Spartanburg 
Columbus 


L 
L 
L 


Columbus 


L 


Lander 


L 


Lander 


L 


Francis Marion 


W 


Francis Marion 


L 


USC-Aiken 


L 


Georgia College 
Georgia College 
Paine 


W 

L 

W 


Paine 


W 


North Florida 


L 


North Florida 


L 


Kennesaw State 


L 


Kennesaw State 


L 


USC-Aiken 


W 


USC-Aiken 


W 


USC-Aiken 


L 


Newberry 
Newberry 
Georgia College 
Georgia College 
USC-Aiken 


W 

W 

W 

L 

W 


USC- Spartanburg 
USC-Aiken 


L 
L 


Paine 


W 


Paine 


W 



The Augusta College 
Softball team showed a solid 
improvement over last 
years 8-26 record in the Big 
South. The Jaguars went 
13-21-1 in their first season 
of competition on the Divi- 
sion II level and held out 
for a 5- 1 2 conference record . 
The team started off the sea- 
son with only one win in 
eleven games but then re- 
bounded to slowly bring up 
the numbers in the win col- 
umn. The Jags finished the 
season by winning eight out 
of their last twelve games. 
The Jags went into the 
Peach Belt Conference tour- 
nament on a confident note 
and defeated local rival 



USC-Aiken 7-2 in the open- 
ing round. In the second 
round the Jaguars met USC- 
Spartanburg only to be 
shutout 5-0. The loss sent 
the team into the loser's 
bracket to face the Pacers 
from USC-Aiken again, this 
time the outcome was in 
the opponents favor, 5-16. 
The team did not have the 
success that it was aiming 
for but did support some 
stand-out performances 
throughout the season and 
tournament. The Jags main 
pitcher, Rebecca 

Ridlehoover, earned All- 
Conference as well as All- 
Tournament honors. 
Ridlehoover not only led 



the team in pitching with 
2.91 ERA but also led th 
team in hitting with a .34 
average. Shortstop, Robii 
Edwards, also made the Allj 
Conference team, by lead! 
ing the team in homerun 
with eight , and RBIs witl 
24. The Jags thirdbas 
player, Nancy Woolwine 
was selected wit 
Ridlehoover to the All 
Tournament team. Athleti 
award honors on the tear? 
went to Rebecci 
Ridlehoover for Most Valu 
able Player, Becky Pirtle fo 
Best Attitude, and to Nanc; 
Woolwine as the Most Im, 
proved Player. 

Mark Ristropl 





Softball Award Winners 

Rebecca Ridlehoover - MVP 
Becky Pirtle - Best Attitude 
Nancy Woolwine - Most Improved 




^1^763 




"We know it's diffi- 
cult to win in the 
Olympics but it's not 
just for us, it's for our 
country." 






^v:5iii' 



76^^11 



v/^ 




OLYMPIC 60UND 

AC players make Olympic table tennis team 



In tn'outs held this 
past December in Cuba, two 
Augusta College students, 
Yair Nathan and Magali 
Montes, earned slots on the 
Olvmpic table tennis team 
from their native Peru. They 
1 were among only eight play- 
«ers chosen for the team. 

Both players, who 
are currently playing on the 
AC table tennis team, will 
travel to Barcelona, Spain to 
plav in the summer Olym- 
pic Games on July 25 - Au- 
gust 8, 1992. 

Both players are ex- 
cited about the opportunity. 
I "We know it's diffi- 

cult to win in the Olympics," 
said Montes, "But it's not just 
for us, it's for our country." 
I While both players 

prepared mentally and 
physically for the Olympic 
trials, they also had to keep 
I up in school. The AC team 



has a strenuous practice 
schedule to add to the play- 
ers' schoolwork. 

"It's difficult to be a 
player and a student," said 
Nathan. 

He has decided to 
take this quarter off and re- 
turn to Peru to train for one 
month, then begin a full-time 
practice routine for the 
Olympics. Montes, a gradu- 
ate student, will remain at 
AC until June. 

Montes said it was 
her father who introduced 
her to the sport. He played 
on the Argentina national 
team. He enrolled her in 
lessons, and by age 10 she 
was on her way to the South 
American National tourna- 
ment for juniors. 

That was the begin- 
ning of the 13-year amateur 
career. 

"I was going to re- 



tire," she said, "But then I 
thought of the Olympics as 
the last goal." 

She didn't retire. In- 
stead she went on to win five 
titles at the South American 
Championships. 

Nathan has been 
playing table tennis since 
1982. His brother plays also 
and will accompany the two 
AC players to Barcelona in 
July. 

"I thought I would 
play soccer," said Nathan. "I 
never thought I would be 
playing table tennis." 

Nathan's titles in- 
clude second place in the 
doubles event at the Latin- 
American Championship 
(with his brother), and the 
South American Doubles 
Championship, also with his 
brother. 

Laura De Young 




"I thought I 
would play 
soccer. I 
never 
thought I 
would be 
playing 
table ten- 



nis. 



Yair Nathan 



^ 




165 



i 



"You 

could 
really go 

crazy 
with this 

stuff 

if you got 

enough 

student 

interest." 



jolui Groves 



INTRAMURAL6 

Seminoles Football Dominate Campus League 



766^ 



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Whether they met as 
gladiators on the football field 
or as warriors on the volleyball 
court or golf course, amateur 
athletes from Augusta College 
formed teams and lasting 
friendships while participating 
in the intramural sports offered 
through the Student Activities 
Office. 

Basketball and softball 
were also offered as intramural 
sports. The sports were open to 
any Augusta College student 
who was not a varsity athlete. 
All intramural sports are 
funded by the Student Activi- 
ties Committee (SAC), accord- 
ing to John Groves, Director of 
Student Activities. 

"We pay for all the sup- 
plies, the balls, and referees," 
he said, adding that most of the 
SAC money comes from the 
$25 fee paid by students. 

The SAC has only been 
involved in the funding of in- 
tramural sports for three or four 
years, according to Groves. 
"But we've had intramurals for- 
ever, " he added. 

Mr. Groves said more 
students became involved in 
intramural sports last year than 
in any year in the past 10 years. 

"We were even able to 
have a golf tournament during 
winter quarter," he said with a 
laugh. "We had it on probably 
the worst day of winter quar- 
ter, but it was fun." 

Mr. Groves added that 
he thought intramural sports 
are very important to the col- 
lege career of a student. "It 
helps get them involved in 
things that are going on around 
campus, " he said. 

One of the key factors 
of the success of an intramural 
program is tapping the interest 



of students. "You could really 
go crazy with this stuff, if you 
got enough student interest." 

Mr. Groves said that 
one day there could even be an 
intramural table tennis team, 
an intramural billiard team or 
possibly an intramural rowing 
team. "It could be endless, but 
again the key is whether or not 
you can get the students inter- 
ested." 

One of the many suc- 
cess stories that grew out of the 
intramural sports was the Semi- 
noles touch-football team. The 
team dominated the campus 
league, losing only one game. 

After becoming cam- 
pus champions, the team trav- 
eled to the state intramural foot- 
ball tournament in Statesboro, 
where they lost two games. But 
one of those games was a 42-0 
loss to state champion and na- 
tional runner-up Mercer Uni- 
versity. 

"I think we did okay 
(at the state games)," said J.C. 
Halvorson, who was a member 



of the Seminoles and vice-presi 
dent of the Student Govern 
ment Association. "We wen 
just glad to be there." 

He said he became in 
volved with the intramura 
sports — he also played volley 
ball, basketball and softball 
to take advantage of the SAC 
fee. "I payed the money tc 
play, so I took advantage o 
that. I also enjoyed it," he said 

Halvorson also said b 
sees the benefits offered by par 
ticipating in a competitive at 
mosphere," he said. "Plus it'; 
an enjoyable experience for ev 
eryone, win or lose." 

Student Jody Wilson 
who played on the Delta Ch 
football team, echoec 
Halvorson's feelings. "The] 
(the sports) help you meet nev 
people," he said. "I met a lot o 
new people playing footbal 
those few days. 

"It really helps you fi 
in," he added. 

Jason Smitl 





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Above: Right: Anti-US protestors bum American flag in 
protest of US Military bases stationed in the Philippines. 
Far Right: The coup may have ended communist rule but 
it began a series of changes that will continue for years to 
come.Top Right: Destruction in Iraq was estimated to be 
in the hundreds of millions of dollars. 



here were several e\ ents in the news this past 

T\ ear that made people take interest. The fall of 
communism in Russia and the withdrawl of 
American troops from subic Bay Naval Station 
and Clark Air Force Base in the Philippines made the head 
lines. There was man\ events that took place closer to home. 
From the William Kennedy Smith trial to the Mike Tyson ip ;V^ 
trial, from Clarence Thomas hearings to the riots in Los | 
Angeles, everyone was interested in what was taking place j 
in the news. 

In sports the Atlanta Braves were National League 
Champions, which had almost everybody doing the "Toma- 
lawk Chop." There was no doubt that Fred Couples would 
win the Masters. This years was the first year the professional 
jaskeiball players were allowed to participate in Olympics. 
What a difference this year has made! 







A Reader Survey urns conducted at AC in 
the fall of 1991. The following results are 
the student opinions gathered from that 
survey. 



Best IVIusic Group 

1. U2 B 

2. Boyz II Men | 

3. The Judds 

4. Color Me Badd 

5. Dire Straits 



1. 

2. 
3. 
4. 
5. 



Best Vocalist 

Luther Vandross 
Mariah Carey 
James Brown 
Reba McEntire 
Michael Bolton 

Films 

The Silence of the Lambs 
City Slickers 
Boyz in the Hood 
Terminator II 
Robin Hood 

Best Actress 

Julia Roberts 
Jodie Foster 
Demi Moore 
Angelica Houston 
Barbra Streisand 

Best Actor 

Wesley Snipes 
Robert DeNiro 
Kevin Costner 
Billy Crystal 
Robin Williams 



"i 







What Was What In September, 1991 


Monday 


Fridaj 




8:00 


MacGyver 


8:00 


Family Matters 




Evening Shade 




Princesses 




Fresh Prince of Bel-Air 




Real Life with Jane Pauley 


8:30 


Major Dad 


8:30 


Step by Step 




Blossom 




Brooklyn Bride 


9:00 


Monday Night Football 


9:00 


Perfect Strangers 




Murphy Brown 




Carol Burnett Show 




Monday Night Movie 




Dear John 


10:00 


Northern Exposure 


9:30 


Baby Talk 


Wednesday 

8:00 Dinosaurs 

Royal Family 
Unsolved Mysteries 


10:00 


Flesh 'n' Blood ! 
20/20 

Palace Guard 
Reasonable Doubts 


8:30 


Wonder Years 


Sunday 


9:00 


Doogie Howser 


7:00 


Life Goes On 




Jake and the Fatman 




60 Minutes 




Night Court 




Adventures of Mark and 


9:30 


Sibs 




Brian 




Seinfeld 


7:30 


Eerie Indiana 


10:00 


Anything but Love 


8:00 


Funniest Home Videos 




48 Hours 




Murder, She Wrote 




Quantum Leap 


8:30 


America's Funniest People 


10:30 


Good & Evil 


9:00 


Sunday Night Movie 

RiM Pholo Service, Inc 






* Rod Stewart and Rachael Hunter tied the knot. 

* Quincy Jones took home 6 Oscar wins includ- 

ing Album of the Year. 

* James Brown was freed after serving two 

years of a six year term. 

* Eddie Van Halen and Valerie Bertinelli had 

their first baby - Wolfgang. 

* Michael Jackson and Madonna arrived at the 

Oscars together. 

* Paula Abdul refutes allegations that another 

sang on Forever Your Girl . 

* Billy Joel received an honorary doctorate 

from Fairfield University - he did not 
graduate high school. 

* Natalie Cole sang with her father Nat King 

Cole thanks to post-mortem Memorex. 
*$200,000 in dainages, 60 injuries, and 16 
arrests were made at a Guns N' Roses 
concert due to lack of security. 

* Robin Hood's theme song "Everything I Do I 

Do It For You" by Bryan Adams hit 
triple platinum. 

* Garth Brooks' record Ropin' the Wind became 

the first country album to debut ut 
number one. 



\. 

2, 
3. 

4. 
5. 
6. 
7, 
8. 
9. 
10 



TOP RENTALS 



"JFK" 

"The Last Boy Scout" 

"Highlander 2: The 

Quickening" 

"The Butcher's Wife" 

"Frankie & Johnny" 

"The Fisher King" 

"Freejack" 

"The Commitments" 

"Boyz in the Hood" 

"Curly Sue" 




NalalieC 




Guns N' Roses 




'^. 



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-> 


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M.CoolJ 


Top Five 


Soap Operas 


1 . The Younj; and the Restless 


2. All My Children 


General Hospital 


; As the World Turns 


Guiding Light 

ii 



D 


id you know that in 




Septemberl991... 


--98 


percent of the homes in the 




United States had color 




televisions. 


-64 


percent had two or more 




sets. 


-73 


percent had a VCR. 


-60 


percent bought basic cable. 


-56 


percent received 30 or 




more channels. 




RM Pholo Service, INC. 






>U992/ 




Prime-Time Series 


iBPT" 


^■^ -:3^r--<„Jffi«iaHiiatt.^ai^ 


1. 


60 Minutes 


2. 


Roseanne 


3. 


Murphy Brown 


4. 


Cheers 


5. 


Home Improvements 


6. 


Designing Women 


7. 


Coacli 


8. 


Full House 


9. 


Unsolved Mysteries 


10. 


Murder, She Wrote 


12. 


Monday Night Football 


14. 


Northern Exposure 


20. 


20/20 


25. 


L.A. Law 


30. 


Young Indiana Jones 


37. 


Married... with Children 


42. 


In Living Color 


48. 


Beverly Hills, 90210 


53. 


Quantum Leap 


57. 


Sisters 


63. 


Anything but Love 


64. 


MacGyver 


70. 


Brooklyn Bridge 


71. 


The Commish 


75. 


Life Goes On 




The Trials of Rosie O'Neill 


86. 


Dear John 


91. 


The Young Riders 


92. 


America's Most Wanted 


96. 


Adventures of Mark & Brian 


97. 


Eerie, Indiana 


100. 


Hidden Video 




Syndicated Series 


ezaip 


i., -.■■^. r -^r-^rsatt. 2 ^.'ft. .i^jm. 


1^ 


Wheel of Fortune 


2. 


Jeopardy! 


3. 


Star Trek: The Next 




Generation 


4. 


Oprah Winfrey 


5. 


Entertainment Tonight 


6. 


A Current Affair 


7. 


Married. ..with Children 


8. 


Thi' Cosby Show 


'■). 


Donahue 


10. 


hiside Edition 




Copywrilc, TV ( liiidf Jlmk' 1992 



1(1 Si Ii w.if/rrMy,(/,(T 



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I 



eader S 




flu A Reader Survey was conducted at AC in 
the fall of 1991. The following results are 
the student opinions gathered from that 
survey. 

Do you believe that US 
troops should be sent back 
to Iraq? 



YES: 
NO: 



37% 
67% 



I 



I Do you approve of pre- 
marital sex? 



YES: 
NO: 



74% 
26% 



How many partners have 
you had in the past six 
months? 



NONE: 


25% 


ONE: 


66% 


TWO: 


7% 



Have you ever had unpro- 3 
tected sex? 



s 



YES: 
NO: 



63% 
37% 



Do you approve of interra- 
cial relationships? 



YES: 
NO: 



68% 

32% 



Have you ever found your- 
self intoxicated and driven ^ 
anyway? 






YES: 
NO: 



46% 

54% 



s 



If you saw someone in your 
class cheating on a test, 
would you report it? 



YES: 
NO: 



24% 
71% 



How many hours per week 
do you exercise? 

None: 9% 

1-5: 71% 

6-10: 15% 

10+: 5% 



■BffiL.^^Hk 



^eet & Worst of Television 



Most Poignant Moment on TV: Sports 
immortal Magic Johnson's announce- 
ment that he has the AIDS virus. 

The Video That Shook the Country, 
Part 1: The Rodney King beating. 

The Video That Shook the Country, 
Part II: Scenes of truck driver Reginald 
Denny being beaten during the L.A. 
riots. 

Newsman We Miss The Most: The 

late Harry Reasoner. 

Most Riveting Viewing: The Clarence 
Thomas- Anita Hill hearings. 

The Head in the Sand Award: To the 

three major networks for refusing to 
run condon ads — still. 



Biggest Labor Pain: To Diaper Dan 
Quayle, who put a damper on Murphy 
Brown's big event by sparking a 
national debate on single mothers. 

The Shoot from the Hip ~ and into 
the Lip Award: To Geraldo Rivera, 

who, before a national TV audience, 
had his face injected with fat that had 
been suctioned from his fanny. 

Workout of the Year: Jack Palance's 
one-armed push-ups on Oscar night. 

Sportscaster of the Year: Oscar host 
Billy Crystal, for his commentary on 
Jack Palance. 

Clutch Performance: Magic Johnson, 
playing in the All-Star Game, sinking 
that unbelievable three-pointer in the 
final moments and copping the game's 
MVP Award. 



^7?»3SI&'5 




Magic Johns 




Barbara Bush 




'( erry Anderson 



Vice President Dan Quaylc 




Stretch Your 


Dollars & Cents 


McDonald's Quarter Pounder 


$1.49 


Burger King Sm.Onion Rings 


$0.99 


Levi's SOl's 


$35.00 


Keds Tennis Slioes 


$19.99 


Ticket to evening movie 


$5.50 


Double scoop Baskin Robbins 


$2.40 


Hershey's Candy Bar 


$0.45 


1 gallon unleaded gas 


$0.99 


Tuition for 1 quarter at AC 


$514 


New Release Compact Disk 


$14.99 


Fee for Avail Machine use 


$0.75 


Political Science book 


$41.25 



People Magazine $1.99 

1 month of HBO & Cinemax $18.99 

Roll of Kodak 35mm/24exp. $4.19 

12-packofCoke $2.99 

New Release Video Rental $3.00 

Gen. admission - Braves Came $8.00 
Gen. admission - Augusta Pirates $5.00 

Ticket to a concert $20.00 

Minimum Wage $4.25 
Large 2 topping pizza (Domino's)$13.70 

Pack of Cigarettes $1.90 

Arby's Curly Fries $0.99 

Cassette Tape $7.99 

Ticket to Six Flags $22.00 

Pack of Chewing Gum $0.89 

A Dozen Roses $25.00 

Happy Meal from McDonalds $1.99 

Postage Stamp $0.29 

One Paperback Book $5.99 

One can of Coke $0.53 

Six-pack of Miller Lite beer $4.75 

SilkHanesPanty-Hose $4.95 

I .hiK) Ride for three hours $200 

( u'orgia State Tax 6% 

I'.Kkofpaper $0.59 

Three pack of Condoms $3.00 



Qiimmta T/ly 



yiB',ii\eTi\ f.P'iti^r Bu*h 






I:.M 



V-i 



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to the 



Class of 1992 



. ' ^V- 



^ BOBBY TONES 

AUGUSTA^ 



IliK-x 




re .<!L^r 







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<:^l\/[aQnoLia 
JOook^noti 

2611 Central Avenue 

Augusta, GA 30904 

(404)738-5184 

Wide Selection Of: 
•Fiction 
•Classics 
•Gardening 
•Cook Books 
•Travel Books 
•Regional Books 
•Reference Books 
•Children's Books 
•Nature Guide Books 

n/v£.LcomE 

Hours 
Monday thru Saturday 
10:00 A.M. - 6:00 P.M. 




GREENFIELD INDUSTRIES, INC 

470 Old Evans Road 
Augusta, GA 30809 
706-863-7708 



AM€}CO 
I 

GO JAGUARS ! ! 



Amoco Performance Products, Inc. 



j ItO CrniMmi^ 



Augusta 



^ 



: 



5^* 




COKE & AUGUSTA COLLEGE 
THE REAL THING 




^B 



mgm 





1901 North Le3 Road • P.O. Box 15029 • Aususta, Georgia 30919-5029 




[f-^- " 






GREENRELD INDUSTRIES, INC. 



470 Old Evans Road 
Augusta, GA 30809 
1 -706-863-7708 





1^ 



cAususta 



Congratulations to the 

Graduating Classes of 

December 1991 & June 1992 



1 -404-863-7708 



1^ ^Vfe^x 



Office Supply 

P.O. Box 6515 

634 E. Buena Vista Avenue 

North Augusta, South Carolina 29841 



"Complete Office Outfitters" 



(803) 278-4036 
(803) 2782082 



Amoco Performance 

Products, Inc. 

Augusta 



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•HUtnKrki ol Th« Coca- 



Augusta Coca-Cola Bottling Company 

1901 North Leg * P.O. Box 15029 * Augusta, Ga 30919-5029 



i«:s 






V^w is your favorite 
professor and why? 



^ ^ T~\ r. Walker, because 
■L-^ he is very in- 
formed and aware 
of state, local and 
federal govern- 
ment." 

John C. Halvorson 



^M ^ r. Arthur (sociol- 
^ — ' ogy) because he's 
legit, down to 
earth. He also can 
get one on one 
with the student." 

Dexter Cooper 



■^ 



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} 



^< 



V,«? 



rofessor Steven 
Greenquist be- 
cause he opened f 
up the beautiful 
world of photog- 
raphy to me in my 
Senior year(lst 
time around)." 

I.illi.iii I,. W.in 






*M A r. Si ad ky, he broke 
J — ' everything down 






straight." 



Corey Veascy 



Vi 




SACK 

Talk 



This Reader Survey was 


conducted 


in the FaU of 1991. 




How many times have 


you changed 


your 


major? 




One Time 


47% 


Two Times 


18% 


Three Times 


18% 


Four Times 


9% 


More Than Four 


8% 


How many hours per 


week do you study? 


1-5 Times 


24% 


6-10 Times 


37% 


11-15 Times 


20% 


16-20 Times 


12% 


21-25 Times 


4% 


26-30 Times 


4% 


More than 31 


9% 


Are you: 




Democrat 


23% 


Republican 


43% 


Independent 


34% 


Do you vote: 




Regularly 


52% 


Occasionally 


17% 


Rarely 


14% 


Never 


17% 


Do you vote in. 




NatL Elections 


30% 


State Elections 


26% 


Local Elections 


24% 


Campus Elections 20% 


Do uou think Gone With 


Tlte Wind should have 


had a sequel? 




Yes 20% 




No 80% 


^^^ 





Give Us A Break 



Flags waved at half mast 
throughout vacation spots, spas, and 
beaches of the western world in poi- 
gnant soUdarity with those hundreds 
of Augusta College students who 
were denied the traditional spring 
break after winter quarter finals. AC 
administration had finally given in 
to popular demand to postpone 
spring break until Masters Week; 
but time being of the essence, the 
administration was unwilling to 
deny the student body the full allot- 
ment of time spent in the classroom. 

As a result of this change, 
there was virtually no break between 
the winter and spring quarters. Stu- 
dents missed the post winter finals 
break, which generally allowed them 
to unwind built up tensions in prepa- 
ration for the new quarter. 

The radical departure from 
custom was met with a variety of 
reactions at AC. While Public Safety 
has not reported any significant ter- 
rorist activity relating to this change, 
some students have been observed 
reacting with frowns, sneers and 
outright complaining. In fairness, it 
must be stated that there was much 
evidence of placid acceptance of the 
change; but that might simply indi- 
cate that some students were slow 
reactors. 

Communications major 
Mark Ristroph was both pragmatic 
and philosophic in outlook. "I know 
of AC students who wait tables dur- 
ing Masters who earn over $1500 in 
that week. It solves their money 
problems for the rest of the school 
year," he said. There will always be 



people who react unfavorably to- 
ward change." 

History major Walter Schutt 
liked the chance to get out of town 
for Masters Week." The money situ- 
ation decides if I leave town. If I do 
leave, the books stay here and if I 
stay here I hope Hardy Hall is open." 

Kimberly Hudgeon, a part- 
time night student working on her 
Masters in Middle Grades Educa- 
tion, felt compelled to keep current 
or ahead in her assignments once 
the spring quarter had started even 
if AC was closed for Masters. "If 
there's no break between quarters 
then I'll have no break at all. I 
couldn't just put the books aside 
knowing there was work to catch up 
on." 

Sophomore Vivian Vaiden, 
majoring in Biology, demonstrated 
an admirable reverence for tradi- 
tion. "My boyfriend and I went to 
Daytona right after finals. It was 
great, but it was only a three-day 
break and we had to get back for 
registration. Masters Week? I need 
that break too. I don't like golf and 
I don't plan to study." 

Michael Donehoo, a junior 
majoring in Communications, was 
not happy about the merged breaks. 
Seeing the benefit of a real break 
subsequent to finals, he offered, 
"Start the fall quarter early enough 
to a How for a two- week break around 
the Regatta and Masters. Sudents 
could get their break, golf fans could 
enjoy the Masters and everyone 
would be happy." 

Gene Rickaby 



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Up 






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WeVe the one! 

Local decisions made by local people 
to meet local needs. 




u 



FIRST 

COLUMBIA 

BANK 



"Columbia County's Community Bank' 



Main Office 

4109 Columbia Road 

Martinez, GA 

863-2583 



Grovetown Office 

101 W. Robinson Ave. 

Grovetown, GA 

855-1340 



MEMBER FDIC 






::^ 



^: 



bankehs 



Your Hometown Bank 
For 65 Years! 



MEMBER 
FDIC 



1=} 



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OoiriK around a (("if cnurM.- ha« never been easier. E-Z-GO's new gas 
Kolf car is suKstanlially quieter, smoother and more powerful than ever 
before. It's the p<-rfecl complement to the world's leading electric (jolf tar. 

F,-Z-rrO*Nob<Klv liuiMs ill. ,„ l„ti<-r 



ZGatHsum 




ti^i^nt 




I 



^ 



What is your advice to the 
freshmen? 

^^T^ ake it seriously; if you 

^ are not ready to go for 
the dean's list, do not 
waste your money - 
stay home." 

Grady Leonard 



f?T7 njoy yourself now be- ^ 
-i— ' cause after gradua- fit 
tion it is time to '' 
work." 



't^- 



Kevin Jiminez 



M/^^et ahead in your 

^^ classes early so when 

you slow down at the 

end of the quarter, you 

will be caught up." 

GaryR. Nisller.Jr. 



? f T^ xpose yourself to all 
i— ' aspects of college life 
to become a well 
rounded person." 

Ty HolT 



1 



^ 



"G 



ct U) know your pro- 
fessors." 

Sinila Piilcl 



' 4 •». 



^ 







L 




This Reader Survey was conducted 
in the Fal! of 1991. 



Hoiv many times dur- 
ing a week do you go 
out (date, parties, 
movies,etc.)? 
None 9% 

One Time 25% 

Two Times 34% 

Three Times 17% 
Four Times 7% 

More Than Four 8% 

Do you drink alcoholic 
beverages? 
Yes 81% 
No 19% 

Do you smoke? 
Yes 16% 

No 84% 

Do you go to the dollar 
movie theatre or the 
standardmovie theatre? 
Dollar theatre 49% 
Standard theatre 51% 

Do you eat concessions 
at movie? 
Yes 68% 

No 32% 

From which restaurant 
do you most frequently 
order your pizza? 



Pizza Hut 

Little Ceasars 

Dominos 

Wedgy's 

Athens 

Antony's 

Chucky Cheese 



58% 
17% 
12% 

7% 
3% 
2% 
1% 




Above: Student Union recognizes 
that Augusta College students are 
not over 2 1 , so many of the activities 
they sponsor are aimed toward that 
age group. Lisa Walters, Angela Fish, 
Natasha Hendrix, and Diane Dinu, 
are enjoying the Movie Night at 
Master Cinema. 

FarLeft: Two of the Student Union 
members, Beth Castleberry and 
Saritha Vaz, go to preview new 
comedians at the Great Escape. 



Left: The Northern Pikes at the 
Riverwalk Amphitheater. Band mem- 
bers are Bryan Potvin-Guitar, Jay 
Semko-Bass, and Merl Bryck-Guitar. 








NiMife in AuM 





Let's face it. Augusta isn't Athens 
or Atlanta, or New York. As Sterling Tolley, 
a Senior majoring in History puts it, "It is a 
limited nightlife. There is no real variety. 
There are either really nice bars or pool hall 
kind of bars—nothing in between." 

Despite the lack of a college town 
feel, Augusta manages to do well as a town. 
Many Augusta College students can be seen 
having a few suds at the Red Lion or 
Squeaky's Tip Top. "The Red Lion attracts 
mostly an AC and MCG crowd," offered 
Laura DeYoung, adding, "Everyone knows 
everyone else." 

Local talent like Sylvia 's Advice can 
usually be heard on the weekends. The 
band, playing a blend of folk and alternative, 
attracts a great deal of people. Bill Peacock, 
manager of the Red Lion, thinks it's the 
service and uniqueness of the bar. "People 
want to be taken care of at a low price," said 
Peacock. He added, "It's about being seen." 

The Tip Top is the other place 
around town to be seen. When a newcomer 
walks into the bar, that person is greeted by 
hand painted walls, a juke-box packed with 
great music like R.E.M. and Talking Heads, 
as well as by Stan. Stan is a regular and if you 
have ever hung out there, then your have 
seen him. He speaks with an impediment 
but everyone knows he loves baseball and 
the country tunes in the juke-box. When 
Patsy Cline's "He Called Me Baby" plays, he 
just smiles and breaks into a jig. "Stan is a 
very accepted part of the crowd, " said Alycia 
Barja, a Senior majoring in Communica- 
tions. 

One thing which attracts a lot of 
people to the Tip Top is the juke-box. "I like 
the music in the juke-box," said Stephanie 
Showman, a Freshman whose major is un- 
decided. Barja added, "If you want cheese, 
they've got it. jazz, country— they've got it. 
The juke-box has music to suit each persons 
ndividual tastes." 

Squeaky's also did a number of 
Disco Hell nights. Emcee Coco Rubio plays 
the best dance mix of old and new dance 
favorites. "He plays old Seventies tunes to 
New Age rap and theKed I lotC hili Peppers. 
I le skips the cheesy pop music," said Barja. 

During Disco I fell, (he pl.irc ciin 



iJ - 



get so packed that dancing becomes highly 
restrictive. 

The extremely cool head out to the 
Partridge Inn, the place to be seen on the 
weekends. The jazz is real cool and the 
atmosphere extremely classy. Sit back and 
have a nice glass of Red Wine and talk about 
the week with friends. 

The music scene is alive and well at 
such places as the Cotton Row Cafe where 
you can listen to an obscure folk-singer 
strum his acoustic guitar. The Post Office is 
a place to go to see the well known bands. 
This past March, the Smithereens made a 
stop here for their tour. 

Augusta has a couple of good bars. 
You'll always meet somebody interesting at 
the Tip Top— whether it be a psychologist or 
someone in need of one. 

For those under 21, Augusta can 
seem a bit boring. "If you've been here more 
than six months, you'll find that there is 
nothing to do in Augusta," said Robert 
Kriegel, a 19 year old Chemistry Junior. 
Natasha Hendrix, an 18 year old Freshman 
majoring in Political Science disagrees. 
"There are a lot of things you can do— it just 
requires a little creativity. For instance, 
watching a movie with your friends or get- 
ting a whole bunch of people to go out to 
eat," she said. 

One place that was considered a 
really popular restaurant to take a lot of 
people out to eat was Vallartas. Barja says it 
best, "Vallartas has good food, jumbo 
margaritas, and service with a smile." Luigi's 
was a second restaurant known for it's "amaz- 
ing baklava". The Summerville Grill, across 
from the Tip Top gets rave reviews from it 
loyal clientele. "They have a Mediterranean 
sandwich that could satisfy any appetite." 

The cultural scene provides stu- 
dents with a wonderful opportunity to ex- 
perience the arts first hand. Steven Stamps, 
a Senior majoring in English lists a few, 
"You've got the Augusta Opera, Symphony, 
Ballet, Augusta Players, and the Fort Gor- 
don Dinner Theater," adding, "There is some- 
thing going on two or three days a week to 
give people a great variety whether it's pop 
or classical or country." 

Michael Donehoo 



r 



S ^ S Engraving Jnc. 

TROPHY SHOP 

Computerized Engraving 
Custom Awards ■ Logos - Plastic Signage 

BOB WALDERA 

3733 Washington Road • Martinez, GA 30917 • (404)863-7501 
FAX (404) 860-5927 PAGER 442-2301 



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2^^ 



Augusta (404) 737-4120 Aiken (803) 641-0144 

"SAFETY COMES FIRST" 

SERVICES S^ 

FOR f£ST CONTflOL. INC sKK^^^W 



Jeff C. Annis 

Home (404) 736-5601 



P.O. Box 2879 
Augusta, GA 30904 



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Augusla. Ciciirgia V)9W 

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.1114 Wrighlbhoro Road 

Augusta. Georgia .XWOQ 

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Vallarta's Congratulates the Augusta College 1992 Graduates 



N.^ 



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MAKE A 
NIGHT OF IT! 

We're always playing your tune! 

Come Experience (he DilTerence Down Under! 

UhDERGROUhD CaFE 

Live Entertainment 
Every Night 

Now Open Sundays! 

ALSO FEATURING: 

Daily Specials Food Orders to Go 
Food Served Daily from 11 AM-Midnight 

Happy Hour 4 PM-7PM S » 

LOCATED AT 81h & BROAD 

724-9457 




Congratulations to the Class of 1992 

GO JAGS!! 





\N>> 




'Beautiful Weddings in the ^mantic StyCe. 
By Odudson Tempteton. 



(Bridat Registry, Invitations, 
Qifts. The ptace for zuonderfuC 
weddings to begin. 



Ic^mpleton 
G)llcction, 



2606 Wrightsboro Road 

^/Aii;.Mist:i,r;;i.f/lfM) 73X .Sf)'>2 



Wljat is the most important 
thing you have learned dur- 
ing your college years? 



TTT t's all in how you 
J- play the game." 

Bill Henshall 

* T T have learned that I 
J- should have put 
more into my stud- 
ies instead of par- 
tying. 1 did not 
apply myself 
where 1 should 
have." 

Katie Nelson 

f? A college education 
Jl\. is easily the most 
valuable acquisi- 
tion a person can 
make." 

Anonymous 



* * T) eople are the same t 



all over." fT 

Rebecca J. Blocker 



i..-*S 



f f T"* hat one has many 

1 friends but TRUE ' 

friends are rare." "*^ 

Smita I'alcl ^~^, 




Whether it's lounging 
around in the CAC lounge 
and watching TV or par- 
ticipating in clubs or Stu- 
dent Government, the stu- 
dents at Augusta College 
make a difference. 





WHAT'S THE 

Dimd 




SUirimGr. The number of students decreased tremen- 
dously due to the fact that most students wanted a break before 
taking on another year of classes. For freshman coming in, students 
could not enroll unless they were immunized. Discussions on what 
to do with the old gym brought up debates with students and faculty. 
Augusta College President Dr. Richard S. Wallace died of colon 
cancer on July 21. 

FSlII. Dr. Martha Farmer was named acting president of 
Augusta College. To the students' relief, the bookstore lowered 
textbook prices. National Collegiate Alcohol Week was the focus on 
campus the week of September 13. Safe sex programs began at 
Augusta College. Budget cuts caused a hiring freeze on campus. 
Students that kept putting off the Regents exam were forbidden to 
register for the following quarter. September 23 - 27. was named 
Recycling Week. Students were given the chance to find a job at the 
Ca reer Center Employer Expo. Thanksgiving break was extended to 
seven days instead of the usual three. Graduation was held for the 
first time in December. Ti" 73Q 



WintGr. AC mourned the death of Registrar Greg Witcher. 
Jim Kelson was named Golf Coach. Bill Bompart was named as the 
new Vice President of Academic Affairs. Presidential candidate Pat 
Buchanan stopped in Augusta, so did Dan Quayle. The long- 
awaited Physical Education/Athletic Complex on Wrightsboro 
Road was dedicated and the Jaguar mascot was introduced. The 
Lady Jaguars clenched their first ever Peach Belt Conference titles 
in basketball and in tennis. The Augusta Invitational Regatta on the 
Savannah gave the Women's Novice Four a gold medal. 

Dprin^. Student Government elections stirred up de- 
bates on campus and questioned the SGA By-laws. A tuition hike 
of 4 percent was approved for next year. Pi Kappa Phi sponsored a 
record-setting blood drive with the help of faculty and students. 
Once again, the Table Tennis dynasty continued as they clenched 
their FOURTH consecutive National Championship. Honors Night 
bestowed honors on some of AC's best and brightest students. June 
graduation was held for the first time in the new Athletic Complex 
with Dr. Reid-Wallace giving the commencement address. 

What a quarter. What a year. What a 

DIFFERMCE 




The campus was full of many 
events that set this year apart from 
any other. Performances of bands 
and the Drama Department and 
events such as In-House Volun- 
teering all helped to make a differ- 
ence to the students and faculty. 





Don't ever believe that one single 
person can not make a difference 
in this world. It is the determina- 
tion and spirit of one individual 
that can motivate others. It takes 
one person to pass along ideas 
and dreams so the world can be- 
come a better place. Change starts 
with one person. Don't wait for 
change to find you. Take your 
education and your desire to make 
the world a better place and find a 
miracle waiting to happen. It only 
takes one to make a difference. 
Jennifer Sprague 
Editor-in-Chief 




AUGUSTA COLLEGE 
WHITE COLUMNS 



192 



I PUBLISHING COMPANY/ MABCELINE, MISSOUHl MOIB 




pB? 



(hiop^fo 



The 1992 \Uh\te Columns. Volume 36, was printed and bound by 
Walsworth Publishing in Marceline, Missouri with a total press run 
of 800 books. Our Walsworth representative was Susan Goddard. 

The cover of the book is a four-color litho laminated. Silver foil is 
applied with a purple trapped color. The cover is also black, lexotone 
quarter bound with a corduroy grain. 

Lee Ann O'Keefe of Bethalto, Illinois designed the endsheets and 
division pages. 

Spot colors used throughout the book are 877 Silver and 273 
Royal Purple. Palatino was the typestyle used as body copy and cap- 
tions throughout the book. Folio typestyles are printed in Freestyle. 
Casper Open Face was used in Student Life, Mistral was used in 
Academics, Paragon and Freeport were used in the Clubs sections. 
Technical was used in the Sports section. Surf and Fina Font were 
used in classes. 

Student portraits were taken by Olan Mills School Division. Kevin 
Jiminez was head photographer for the staff. Thanks to the Augusta 
Chronicle-Herald and the Bell Ringer for help with stories and pho- 
tographs. 

All sections except Classes were produced on Aldus PageMaker 
with a Zenith Z-386/25 system. The Classes section was produced 
with Comtran. Corel Draw was also utilized for many graphics and 
headlines. 

Ideas for the Mini-Mag were taken from student polls, TV Guide, 
Glamour Magazine, local and national newspapers, Rolling Stone, 
People, and the Associated Press. 

Dr. James Garvey's Spring quarter Feature Writing Class con- 
tributed most of the stories in the Student Life Section. 

Mr. John Groves, Director of Student Activities, is faculty advisor 
for the book. All rights reserved. 

Opinions expressed in the White Columns are not necessarily the 
opinions of Augusta College. 

All comments and inquiries should be made to: 

Editor-in-Chief 

White Columns 

Augusta College 

2500 Walton Way 

Augusta, Georgia 30910 



A 



U'G-U'S-T 



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