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Full text of "Who begot thee? Some genealogical and historical notes made in an effort to trace the American progenitors of one individual living in America in 1903"

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SOME GENEALOGICAL 
NOTES COMPILED 
BY GILBERT O. BENT. 



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K/ith the complitvenis cfihe compiler. 



Who Begot Thee? 



made in an effort to trace the 

American progenitors of 

one individual living 

in America in 



By gilbert O. ^ENT. 



Lattnce. * * Tell me this : Who begot thee ? 

Speed. Marry, the son of my grandfather. 

Launce. O illiterate loiterer ! It was the son of 
thy grandmother. 

— The Two Gentlemen of Verona, Act, in., Sc. i. 



t > J > 
1 J ■> 



BOSTON : 
PRINTED FOR PRIVATE DISTRIBUTION. 

1903. 






BOSTON. 

^ircss of IBaijtti OCIapp & &an. 



itilWv „_^ 



April 14, 1908 • 



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:• ; •.* 



INTRODUCTORY NOTE. 



Some time since tlie writer had occasion to look up certain lines 
of his American ancestors. The quest proved interesting and led 
to an attempt being made to trace them all. The following pages 
of family history and genealogical data — a sort of " reversed " gene- 
, alogy — are the result, up to the present, of this effort to trace the 
American progenitors of one American family, or individual, of the 
present day, throujO'h both fathers and mothers. A few historical 
notes have naturally been evolved. The information has been gath- 
ered from various genealogical and historical publications, as well 
as by original research. There are still numerous gaps to be filled 
before a complete chart can be printed. 

The compiler will be glad to be notified of errors or to receive 
further information regarding any of these lines of descent. 



Gilbert O. Bent, 



5 Oxford Terrace, Boston, Mass. 
March 1, 1903. 



CONTENTS. 



i. The Male Line ....... 7 

ii. The Progenitors or Elizabeth Brown . . 13 

ii. The Progenitors of Grace Rice . . . 17 

iv. The Progenitors of Mary Felch . . . 21 

V. The Progenitors of Anna Longley . . . 29 

vi. The Progenitors of Mary Eliza Bath . . 52 



Places mentioned are in the State of Massachusetts, U. S. A., when not otherwise 
specified or apparent. 
Dates are intended to conform to present sjstem of reckoning time. 



I. 



THE MALE LINE. 



John Bent. 1,596-1672. There is no confusion or doubt 
about the name of Bent among the emigrant founders of New Eng- 
land. The record is clear. Only one of this name appears in the 
ligts — John Bent, of Penton Grafton, Parish of Weyhill, County 
of Hants, England. He sailed for America, from Southampton, 
the latter part of April, 1638, in " the good shipp the Confidence 
of London of CC. tonnes, John Jobson, master," and became one 
of the founders of the town of Sudbury in the Massachusetts Bay 
colony. He brought with him his wife, Martha, and five children. 
He was son of Robert Bent* (1566-1631) and was born at 
Penton Grafton, about 70 miles southwest of London. Baptized 
Nov. 20, 1596. Married in England about 1621. Died at Sud- 
bury Sept. 27, 1672. His widow, Martha, died at Sudbury May 
15, 1679. 

Martha, the youngest child of John Bent, married in 1663 
Samuel Howe. Her son, David, was first proprietor of the Red 
Horse Tavern at Sudbury. David Howe's son, Ezekiel, grandson, 
Adam, and great-grandson, Lyman, (died 1861), were successive 
proprietors of this old tavern, which was made famous by Long- 
fellow under the name of "The Wayside Inn." It was Lyman 
Howe to whom Longfellow's poem refers as 

A man of ancient pedigree, 

A Justice of the Peace was be, 

Known in all Sudbury as " The Squire." 

* See article on " The English Ancestors of John Bent of Sudbury " by E. C. Felton 
of Steelton, Pa , iu the New-England Historical and Genealogical Register for Janu- 
ary, 189.n. 

For full Bent genealogy consult " The Bent family in America " by Allen H. Bent 
of Roxbury, Mass., from which excellent work this Bent line of descent is taken. 



8 GENEALOGICAL NOTES. 

Anne Bent, who, for nearly forty years, kept the well-known 
shop and ladies' exchange on Marlborough Street, later Washington 
Street, Boston, was sixth in descent from John, being the daughter 
of Rufus and Anne (Middleton-McKenzie) Bent. She opened the 
shop in 1795 by the advice of Judge R(f)bbins, with whom she lived 
at Milton, and retired from business in 1833. She died at Canton, 
Feb. 27, 1857, in the 89th year of her age and in possession of 
her maiden name. 



Peter Bent. 1629-1678. Son of John. Born at Penton 
Grafton, Eng., in April, 1629. Married, about 1651, Elizabeth. 
Settled at Marlborough. Died in England in May, 1678. His 
house was garrisoned, was burned by the Indians, and one of his 
sons scalped, during King Philip's war. 



Peter Bent, of Marlborough (1707-1798), who was a member 
of the first three Provincial Congresses, was a grandson of the 
above Peter and the great-grandfather of Peter Bent Brigham, who 
died in 1877. Peter Bent Brigham was for about forty years 
"mine host of Concert Hall," Boston (see S. A. Drake's "Old 
landmarks of Boston"). His bequest to found a hospital for the 
sick poor of Boston, which is now (1903) being applied, will 
amount to over $4,500,000. 

On Jan. 2, 1900, there died, in Boston, Robert Breck Brigham, a 
nephew of Peter Bent Brigham and fifth in descent from Peter 
Bent, the member of Congress. He was proprietor of that popular 
resort, Brigham's hotel and restaurant, on Washington Street. He 
owned the Hollis Street Theatre and other property in Boston. 
Under the terms of his will, besides various other charitable be- 
quests, a sum in the vicinity of $3,000,000 will be available to 
establish a hospital for incurables in Boston. 

Neither of these men left any family, Peter Bent Brigham never 
having married. Their gifts, for the purpose of alleviating human 
suffering, are among the most notable in the history of philanthropy. 



Hopestm Bent. 1672-1725. Son of Peter. Born at Marl- 
borough elan. 17, 1672. Married Nov. 27, 1700, Elizabeth, 
daughter of Major Thomas Brown. Died at Sudbury Aug. 18, 
1725. 

He served *'*«'^*i^*»^in the Colonial army in the campaign of 
1690 against the French and Indians. 



THE MALE LINE. 9 

HoPESTiLL Bent, through Elijah, was the progenitor of the Mis- 
souri branch of this family. Judge Silas Bent of St. Louis, Mo., 
died in 1827. The careers of his sons in Indian wars and in pio- 
neer work in the West furnish an interesting chapter in the history 
of the Bent family and in the annals of the doings of brave men 
anywhere (see Missouri Historical Soc. publications. No. II.). 
Charles (1799-1847) married a New Mexican lady, Maria Ignacia 
Jaramillo. When Gen. S. W. Kearney marched with "the army 
of the West " from Bent's Fort to Santa Fe, and conquered New 
Mexico, Charles Bent was appointed governor — the first English- 
speaking ruler of the old land of the Pueblos. He was assassinated 
Jan. 19, 1847, with several of those holding office under him. 
For this crime, Montoya, the leader of the insurrection, and several 
others, were hanged, after the United States soldiers had subdued 
the revolt. William (1809-1869), with his brothers, was of Bent's 
Fort, Colorado, the employer of Kit Carson for thirteen years. 
He married an Indian maiden, the daughter of a chief of the Chey- 
ennes. Robert and George died at Bent's Fort. 



Micah Bent. 1716-1760. Son of Hopestill. Born at Sud- 
bury April 29, 1716. Married in 1737, Grace, daughter of David 
Rice. Died at Sudbury in 1760. 



David Bent. 1739-1795. Son of Micah. Born at Sud- 
bury March 18, 1739. Married in 1761, Mary, daughter of Eben- 
ezer Felch. Died in Annapolis co.. Nova Scotia, in 1795. 

David Bent saw some military service in the Colonial army 
during the last French and Indian war. He served in Col. Joseph 
Buck minster's regiment in the expedition for the relief of Fort Wil- 
liam Henry in 1757. His name also appears in Massachusetts 
archives as a member of a military company at Sudbury in 1759. 

He was a member of a deputation appointed by citizens of the 
Massachusetts Bay province, in 1759, to visit the province of Nova 
Scotia and report upon the advisability of taking up land there for 
settlement, under the terms of the proclamation of Governor Law- 
rence, which followed the removal of the French Acadians. He 
was detained in Massachusetts, in 1760, when many of the others 
concerned in this emigration took their departure, by the death of 
his father and the settlement of his father's estate. He probably 
took up his residence in Nova Scotia in 1761. Some of his de- 



10 GENEALOGICAL NOTES. 

scendants are among the people from the Maritime Provinces of 
Canada, who, in Liter years, have returned to the land of their fore- 
fathers to hew out a living for themselves. These people, with 
comrades from the various New England states, furnish a large 
portion of the English population of the great provincial city of 
Boston. 

Among the names on the original grant of the tovA^nship of An- 
napolis, in 1759, were Elijah Bent, Hopestill Bent, Micah Bent, 
P. Bent* and Thomas Bent. Many of the original grantees did 
not settle there. 

The Bents have displayed their aptitude for pioneer work in Nova 
Scotia, as elsewhere. Calnek's History | thus refers to one member 
of the family — a descendant of Samuel^ — who settled at Lake 
Pleasant, a remote part of Annapolis county : 

'' The pioneer in the work of cultivation here was Mr. Charles Grandi- 
sou Bent, a son of the late Nedabiah Bent of Mount Hanley, in Wilmot, 
and was therefore the grandson of one of the stalwart immigrants from the 
old Massachusetts colony in 1760. The members of this family for three 
generations have been famed for the strength, activity and hardiness of 
their physical structure, and Grandison shared in a considerable degree this 
idiosyucracy of his family." 



Joseph Bent. 1771-1831. Son of David. Born in An- 
napolis CO., N. S., in 1771. Married in ll^)k, Anna, daughter of 
Israel Longley. Died in Annapolis co. in 1831. 

Mary, a daughter of Joseph Bent, married Aaron Eaton. Ai^^s- 
lia, another daughter, married Gilbert T. Bay. These two m^n 
formed the old shipping firm of Eaton & Bay of St. John, N. B. 

Lydia, a daughter of iVaron and INlary (Bent) Eaton, married 
the lion. George Edwin King (1839-1901), who was premier of 

* This was, doubtless, Peter Bent, son of Hopestill, and of the fourth generation 
from John, who nuiriied INIary, daughter of Kev. Samuel Panis, of Suleni witchcraft 
fame. lie is said to have died in Nova Scotia soon after his arrival there, and to have 
been the first of these emigrant founders of Nova Scotia to receive burial in the oldest 
burial ground in Canada, at Annapolis. 

t History of the County of Annapolis by W. A. Calnek. Edited and completed by 
Judge A. W. Savary, 1897. 

X Samuel Bent — who Avas one of the passengers by the " Charming Molly " in 1760 — 
and D:!vid Beat were both of the fifth generation from John. These two men were 
the progenitors of the people of this name in Annapolis Co., N. S. Samuel Bent, ac- 
cording to tradition, served under Wolfe at Quebec, in the company of Capt. John 
Wade. He is said to have made the staff and hoisted the Briti>h flag on the plains of 
Abraham when the French capitulated. He was a brother of Nedabiah Bent, royalist, 
of Braintree, Mass., and gave one of his sons this euphonious name of Nedabiah. 
His nephew, Josiah, Avas the original proprietor of "Bent's Crackers," Avhich have 
been manufactured in the United States for more than one hundred years. Capt. 
Wade also settled in Nova Scotia. John Chipman Wade (1817-1892) M.P., was his 
great-grandson. 



THE MALE LINE. 11 

« 

the province of New Brunswick and, at the time of his death at 
Ottawa, a judge of the Supreme Court of Canada. Aaron Eaton 
was of New England descent, and Gilbert T. Ray was a son of 
Robert Ray, a Long Island, N. Y., loyalist, of Irish birth, who 
settled in Nova Scotia. Gilbert T. Ray's brother, Charles, fought 
under Nelson at Trafalgar. His brother, William Loutret, was the 
fiither of AVilliam Hallet Ray, M.P. (Canada), and another brother, 
Robert, was the fetlier of Charles R. Ray, who has been Colpnel of 
the 62d battahon Canadian militia and mayor of St. John, N. B. 

Susan Morse, a daughter of Joseph Bent, married George Troop 
Fellows. His nephew, the Hon. James I. Fellows (b. 1826), 
was agent-general in England for the province of New Brunswick 
and a member of the Legislative Council of the province. He was 
the originator of " Fellows' Hypophosphites " of world-wide repute. 
He died in London, Eng., in 1896. 



Gilbert Bent. 1813-1900.' Son of Joseph. Born in An- 
napolis CO., N. S., April 10, 1813. Married Nov. 22, 1838, 
Mary Eliza, daughter of John Bath. Married (2) Matilda Breeze. 
He built a number of vessels on the Annapolis river, including the 
first ship of Read & Wright's Black Ball Line. He removed to St. 
John, N. B., in 1843 and established the wholesale flour and pro- 
vision business which is still carried on there. Died at St. John, 
N. B., Oct. 19, 1900. 

Children : 

i. Annie Maria, b. Aug. 5, 1839. m. Oct. 16, 1858, Samuel Ed- 
ward Dawson,* Lit. D., F. R. S. C, King's Printer and Comp- 
troller of Stationery, Ottawa, Canada. 

ii. John Bath, b. July 24, 1841. d. Jan. 14, 1849. 

iii. Elizabeth Antoinette, b. May 4, 1844. 

iv. Amelia Ray, b. April 28, 1849. m. Dec. 14, 1886, Acahis 
Lockwood Palmer,t member of the Canadian Parliament and 
judge of the Supreme Court of New Brunswick. He d. Aug. 
10, 1899. 

V. Mary Eliza, b. Feb. 14, 1852. d. March 4, 1863. 

vi. Gilbert Oscar, b. July 24, 1854. 

vii. Frank Gordon, b. July 14, 1857. 

* Dr. Dawson is descended from the Dawsons of County Monoghan, Ireland. His 
grandfather, Thomas Dawson, was in the Royal Irish Artillery, served as a non-com- 
missioned officer in the army of Lord Cornwallis and was amongst those who surren- 
dered at Yorktown. 

t Judge Palmer was of Irish descent. His grandfather was a loyalist who left a large 
property in Westchester, N. Y., at the time of the American Revolution, and settled 
in New Brunswick. 



12 GENEALOGICAL NOTES. 




The family name of Elizabeth, who was probably born about 
1630 and married about 1651 Peter Bent, has not yet been discov- 
ered. Peter was born in England and came to America with his 
father, John, in 1638, when 9 years of age. He made more than 
one trip to England afterwards and died there. Elizabeth was 
probably born in England. She survived her husband many years. 
Was living at Sudbury as late as 1704 and, presumably, died there 
in old age. 



II. 



THE PROGENITORS OF ELIZABETH BROWN. 



BKOWN. 

William Brown, d. 1676. "Gentleman." Was one of the 

original grantees and settlers of Sudbury in 1639. Had a grant of 
200 acres of land there, in that part which is now the town of May- 
nard. He married Nov. 15, 1-641^ Mary, daughter of Thomas 
Besbedge. In 1643 he "was chosen and sworn surveyor of the 
armes of Sudbury." Was first deacon of the church at Sudbury, 
of which the Kev. Edmund Brown, who was also one of the origi- 
nal grantees of Sudbury, was first minister. Was Captain of mili- 
tia. He died in Boston Sept. 30, 1676, and was probably buried in 
the King's Chapel burial ground, Boston, where the remains of his 
son, Thomas, were laid 33 years later. He left a considerable es- 
tate, including interest in houses and lands in the parishes of Het- 
corne and Frittingden, Kent co., Kng., given to him by his father- 
in-law Besbedge, which he left to his wife Mary. 

The Browns and some others of the earliest Sudbury settlers prob- 
ably came from Sudbury, Eng., or adjacent parts, and gave the 
name to the new town in the Massachusetts Bay colony. The 
Brown family took an active part in the affairs of the Massachusetts 
Bay company both in England and America. 



Thomas Brown. 1645-1709. Son of William. Born May 
22, 1645. Was adopted as son by his maternal grandfather Thomas 
Besbedge. He married Sept. 29, 1667, Patience, daughter of 
Hopestill Foster. He married (2) March 1, 1704, Mary, daugh- 
ter of Deputy-Governor Thomas Danforth and widow of Solomon 
Phipps of Cambridge. He was representative from Sudbury for 
several successive terms. Commanded a company of horse in In- 
dian war. The " old Browne garrison " at Sudbury was probably 
built by him. He died May 7, 1709. Judge Sewall writes : " Mon- 



14 GENEALOGICAL NOTES. 

day May 9, 1709. Major Thomas Brown Esqre. of Sudbury was 
buried in the old burying place;* bearers, Cook, Sewall ; Eliakim 
Hutchinson, Townsend ; Jer. Dummer, Paul Dudley. Scarves and 
gloves." The will of Thomas Brown made his grandson, Jonathan 
Willard, his heir, and, among other bequests, gave his lands and 
tenements in England to be divided equally among his seven daugh- 
ters : Mary Willard, Thankful Hubbard, Patience Rice, Elizabeth 
Bent, Silence Herds, Hannah Brown and Eunice Brown. 

Elizabeth Brown. Born 1678. Daughter of Thomas. Born 
May 17, 1678. Married Nov. 27, 1700, Hopestill Bent. She sur- 
vived her husband and was living at Sudbury in 1728. 



BESBEDGE. 

This name has even a greater variety of spelling than usual in 
in the old names, ranging from Beesbeech down to Bisby. The 
matter of the spelling of a man's name, in old days, seems to have 
been left, as the estimable Mr. Samuel Weller left the spelling of 
his name, to "the taste and fancy of the speller." 



Thomas Besbedge. d. 1674. "Gentleman." Sailed from 
Sandwich, Eng., in the "Hercules" with his wife, six children (ac- 
cording to records, but there w^ere probably only three) and three 
servants, landing at Scituate harbor in the spring of 1634. He was 
one of the first deacons of Lothrop's church, the earliest gathered at 
Scituate. In 1638 he bouolit a house from William Palmer of 
Duxbury and moved there. He had real estate transactions in vari- 
ous parts of the colonies. In 1643 he was Deputy from Duxbury. 
He subsequently moved to Marshfield and thence to Sudbury, where 
he lived several years and where he died March 9, 1674. His will 
bequeathed all his houses and lands in Hetcorne and Frittingden, 
England, which constituted the principal part of his estate, to his 
grandchild and adopted son, Thomas Besbedge alias Brown, son of 
William and Mary (Besbedge) Brown, and made two other grand- 
sons, William and Edward Brown, executors. His daughter, Alice, 
married John Bourne-j- of Marshfield. Their daughter, Ehzabeth, 

* King's Chapel burial ground, Boston. 

t The second man-iagc recorded at Marshfield : " John Bourne and Alis Besbege was 
married ye is July 1645." 



PROGENITORS OF ELIZABETH BROWN. 15 

married in 1666 Joseph Bent,* son of the first John, and had a son 
Experience Bent (married in 1703 Abigail Sampson) who was be- 
queathed to in the will of Thomas Besbedge. 

Mary Besbedge. Daughter of Thomas. Born in England. 
Married Nov. 15, 1641, William Brown, whom she survived. Died 
after 1676. 



FOSTER. 

Among the passengers from London, Eng., to America by the 
good ship "Elizabeth," April 17, 1635, were Patience Foster, wid- 
ow, age about 40, Hopestill Foster, her son, and Rachel Bigg, 
mother of Patience Foster. Rachel Bisfo; died at Dorchester in 
1647. Patience (Bigg) Foster was the widow of Richard Foster 
of Biddenden, co. of Kent, Eng., who died in 1630. Richard 
was son of Rev. Thomas Foster of Biddenden and Ipswich, Eng. 



Hopestill Foster. 1616-1676. Son of Richard and Pa- 
tience (Biao") Foster. Born in Eno^land about 1616. Settled in 
Dorchester, Mass. Married, about 1639, Mary, daughter of James 
Bates. Hopestill Foster was an active man in the early Colonial 
days. His name for years is on nearly every page of Dorchester 
records. He was selectman in 1655 and many subsequent years. 
Was Deputy to the " General Court," annually, from 1659 to 1676, 
except in 1671 when he was commissioner to try small causes. He 
was Captain of militia. In " Good Old Dorchester," by William 
Dana Orcutt, there is given a copy of an interesting letter to Capt. 
Hopestill Foster from "King Philip, his Majesty P. P." in which 
His Majesty asked " that you would send me by this Indian five 
yards of white light collered serge to make me a coat and a good 
holland shirt redy made and a pr of good Indian briches all which 
I have present need of," etc. Hopestill Foster's occupation is said 
to have been that of a brewer. He died Oct. 15, 1676. His 
gravestone is standing in the old Dorchester burial place. 

Patience Foster. 1646-1703. Daughter of Hopestill. Bap- 
tized Aug. 16, 1646. Married at Sudbury Sept. 29, 1667, Thomas 
Brown. Died Aug. 15, 1703. Her gravestone is still standing in 
the old Sudbury burial ground, now in the town of Way land. 

* This Joseph Bent was killed in 1675, at the age of 34, by an accidental pistol shot 
from his brother Peter, 



16 GENEALOGICAL NOTES. 



BATES. 

James Bates. 1582-1655. Son of James Bate of Lydd, 
Kent, Eng., who died in England March 2, 1614. Baptized Dec. 
2, 1582. Came from England with the Fosters in the " Elizabeth" 
in 1635 and settled at Dorchester. He was a cousin of widow Pa- 
tience Foster. He married in 1603 Alice Glover of Saltwood, 
Eng. (b. 1583). "For centuries the family of Bate or Bates was 
seated at the old town of Lydd,* county of Kent, and for succes- 
sive generations held the offices of Chief Magistrate and Jurat." 
Thomas Bate was of the manor and estate of Jaques Court and also 
tenant of the manor of New Langport, both near Lydd. Master 
James Bates brought with him from England his wife, Alice, and 
four children. He was ruling elder of the church, selectman sev- 
eral years and Deputy in 1640. He died in 1655, leaving estate in 
England and in Massachusetts. His widoAv died Aug. 14, 1657. 
His son, Richard, lived at Lydd, Eng., and was the only one of his 
family left behind in the emigration to America. Richard was named 
trustee in his father's will, but died March 6, 1656. Another son, 
James, born 1626, lived in Dorchester and settled his father's es- 
tate there. 



Mary Bates. 1619-1703. Daughter of elames. Born in 
England. Baptized Nov. 21, 1619. Married, about 1639, Hope- 
still Foster. Died Jan. 5, 1703. 

*The old spelling was Lid, as Lynn was anciently spelled Lin. 



III. 



THE PROGENITORS OF GRACE RICE. 



EICE. 

Edmund Rice. 1594-1663. Born about 1594. Came, 
with wife and famil}'', from Berkhamstead, Hertfordshire, Eng., 
probably in 1638. Was one of the original proprietors and settlers 
of Sudbmy in 1639. Selectman from 1639 to 1644, deacon of the 
church, and Deputy to General Court for several terms. He bought 
various properties in Sudbury. His wife, Tamazine, died at Sud- 
bury June 13, 1654. He married (2) March 1, 1655, Mercie 
(Hurd), widow of Thomas Brigham of Cambridge. He was one 
of the petitioners for the town of Marlborough in 1656, and removed 
there about 1660. Among various appointments conferred upon 
" Goodman Rice " by the General Court was that of commissioner 
to solemnize marriag-es in Marlborouo^h. He died at Marlborouofh 
May 3, 1663, and was buried at Sudbury. His widow, Mercie, 
married in 1664 William Hunt of Marlborough, who died in 1667. 
She died Dec. 28, 1693. 

Henry Rice. 1617-1711. Son of Edmund. Born in Eng- 
land in 1617. Married at Sudbury, Feb. 1, 1644, Elizabeth, 
daughter of John Moore. In 1659 his father gave him deed of his 
grant of land in Framingham, whither he removed from Sudbury 
and built a house. He died at Framingham Feb. 10, 1711. Sev- 
eral rtiembers of the Rice family lived to great age. 

Jonathan Rice. 1654-1725. Son of Henry. Born at 
Sudbury July 3, 1654. Married (1) March 23, 1675, Martha 
Eames.* She died Feb. 2, 1676. Married (2) Nov. 1, 1677, 

* Probably daughter of Thomas Eames (1618-1680), whose wife and family were 
killed or taken captive by Indians Feb. 1, 1676. 



18 GENEALOGICAL NOTES. 

Rebecca, daughter of John Watson. She died Dec. 22, 1689. 
Married (3) Feb. 12, 1691, Elizabeth Wheeler, who survived 
him. At death of his mother, in 1705, he removed from Sud- 
bury to Framingham, and lived there with his father. He was 
selectman eleven years at Framingham, and Representative in 1711 
and 1720. Died at Framingham April 12, 1725. 

David Rice. 1680-1761. Son of Jonathan. Born March 
4, 1680. Married Nov. 7, 1707, Elizabeth, daughter of tJames 
Cutler. In 1730 David Rice was chosen constable of Sudbury, 
where he resided, but refused to serve, " and paid down five pounds 
money to said town, and so was discharged." He died in 1761. 
His will made his son, Israel, his executor, he to pay daughter, 
Grace Bent, £200, and son David £100. 

Grace Rice. b. 1716. Daughter of David. Born at Sud- 
bury about 1716. Married in 1737 Micah Bent, whom she sur- 
vived, and was living at Sudbury in 1764. 

(Second Rice line on p. 27.) 



In an Indian descent upon Marlborough, Aug. 8, 1704, Silas 
Rice ae. 9 and Timothy te. 7 were carried captive. They remained 
with the Indians, married Indian women, and became chiefs Tooka- 
nowras and Oughtsorangoughton of the Caughnawaga Indians in 
Canada. When old men they visited their native place in Massa- 
chusetts, bringing interpreters with them, as they had entirely for- 
gotten their mother tongue. 



MOOHE. 

John Moore, d. 1674. Probably from Essex co., England. 
Was an early settler at Sudbury, where he and his oldest son, 
John, who afterwards settled in Lancaster, were both proprietors. 
Made various purchases of property at Sudbury. Was town officer. 
One of his sons, Jacob, married Elizabeth, daughter of Henry and 
Hannah (Brewer) Loker. His wife, Elizabeth, was probably 
daughter of Philemon Whale. He died at Sudbury Jan. 6, 1674, 
leaving a lengthy and carefully-drawn will and a considerable 
estate. 



PROGENITORS OF GRACE RICE. 19 

Elizabeth Moore. d. 1705. Oldest daus^hter of John. 
Born in England. Married at Sudbury, Feb. 1, 1611, Henry 
Rice. Died at Framingham Aug. 3, 1705. 

Lydia 3Ioore. 1643-1723. Youngest daughter of eJohn. 
Born at Sudbury June 21, 1613. ^Married at Sudbury, May 3, 
1664, Samuel Wright, who died Aug. 21, 1664. She married (2) 
at Sudbury, June 15, 1665, James Cutler. She survived her sec- 
ond husband thirty-eight years and died, his widow, Nov. 23, 1723. 



WHALE. 

Philemon Whale. d. 1676. Probably came from Col- 
chester, Essex CO., Eng. Was an early settler at Sudbury, where 
he bought land in 1643. Ownedland in various parts of Sudbury. 
He was a weaver. His wife, Elizabeth, died June 20, 1647. He 
married (2) Nov. 7, 1649, Sarah, widow of Thomas Cakebread. 
She died in December, 1656, and he married (3) Nov. 9, 1657, 
Elizabeth, widow of Hugh Griffin, wlio died June 21, 1656. 
Philemon died Feb. 22, 1676. His widow, Elizabeth, died Nov. 8, 
1688. Whale's bridge is still known at Sudbury. 

Elizabeth Whale. Dausfhter of Philemon. Married John 
Moore. She was probably born and married in England. Died 
at Sudbury Dec. 14, 1690. 



WATSON. • 

John Watson. 1619-1711. Born in 1619. Became a resi- 
dent of Cambridge about 1650. His wife w^as Rebecca, daughter 
of Ann Errington. He was selectman in 1682 and 1684. Died 
May 20, 1711. 

Rebecca Watson. 1650-1689. Daughter of John. Born 
about 1650. Married at Sudbury, Nov. 1, 1677, Jonathan Rice. 
Died at Sudbury Dec. 22, 1689. 



20 GENEALOGICAL NOTES. 

EKKINGTON. 

Ann Erringtoii. 1576-1653. Widow. Born in 1576, near 
Newcastle-upon-Tyne, Eng. Lived at Cambridge. It is not known 
at what time she came there or whether she was at that time a 
widow. She died Dec. 25, 1653, ^. 77, according to the inscrip- 
tion on her gravestone, which is the oldest one now standing in the 
Cambridge burial ground. " The Lord gave her a good husband 
but he died." (Narrative upon joining the church at Cambridge.) 

Rebecca Errington. 1625-1690. Daughter of Ann. Born, 
probably, in England, about 1625. Married John Watson. ^ Died 
Nov. 11, 1690. 



CUTLER. 

James Cutler. 1606-1694. Was an original grantee of 
Watertown. Probably settled there as early as 1634. His first 
wife, Anna, was buried Sept. 30, 1644. She is said to have been 
a sister of the wife of John Grout. The tradition is that these two 
sisters were Puritans, and together sought their fortunes in America, 
coming from England "unattended by parents, husbands or lovers." 
James Cutler married (2) at Watertown, March 9, 1645, Mary, 
widow of Thomas King.* She died Dec. 7, 1654. He married 
(3) about 1662, Phosbe, daughter of John Page of Watertown. 
He removed, about 1651, to Cambridge Farms (Lexington). Died 
May 17, 1694. 

James Cutler. 1635-1685. Son of James. Born at Wa- 
tertown Nov. 6, 1635. Was of Cambridge and Lexington. He 
married, June 15, 1665, Lydia, daughter of John Moore and 
widow of Samuel Wright. Was a soldier in King Philip's war. 
Died at Lexington July 31, 1685, 

Elizabetli Cutler, b. 1681. Daughter of James. Born at 
Lexington March 14, 1681. Married, Nov. 7, 1707, David Rice. 
Died previous to 1739. 

* Thomas King was one of the purchasers of the Nashaway lands (Lancaster), in 
connection with John Prescott and others. He died in 1644, when hardly thirty years 
of age. James Cutler took his place as proprietor of Lancaster. 



IV. 



THE PROGENITORS OF MARY FELCH. 



FELCH. 

The name of Felch or Felt is probably of Flemish origin and 
was brought into England in the reign of Queen Elizabeth, when 
some 30,000 Flemish weavers went from the Netherlands to Eng- 
land in search of relio:ious freedom. This was a much laro;er num- 
ber of people than came to America in the whole so-called Puritan 
immigration of 1620-40. 

Henry Felch. d. 1670. Probably a native of Wales. Came 
to America about 1640. Was a settler and proprietor at Glouces- 
ter in 1641 and Watertown in 1642. His wife, Margarett, died 
June 23, 1655. He married (2), probably about 1657, Elizabeth, 
widow of Thomas Wyborne, who came from Tenterden, Kent, Eng., 
about 1638. Her son, John Wyborne, married Mary, daughter of 
Henry Felch. He is thought to have removed to Boston about 
1654 and to have lived there until his death. He died in Boston 
in August 1670. His widow, Elizabeth, was living in 1686 and 
probably died about 1695. 

Henry Feicli. d. 1699. Son of Henry. Was probably born 
in Wales and came to America with his father about 1640. He 
settled first at Watertown. Removed to Readins; about 1647. He 
married, in 1649, Hannah, daughter of William Sargent. He was 
selectman for several years. He appears to have been one of the 
people who did not appreciate Puritan customs and institutions. 
Sept. 10, 1653, he was convicted at Reading of the heinous crime of 
"departing the public assembly when the ordinance of baptism was 
about to be administered, was admonished by the court of his sin 
and ordered to pay costs to Jonas Eaton, two shillings." 

He died at Reading Nov. 11, 1699. His son John was appointed 
administrator of his estate. 



22 GENEALOGICAL NOTES. 

John Felcli. 1660-1746. Son of Henry. Born at Reading 
Feb. 26, 1660. Married May 25, 1685, Elizabeth, daughter of 
Robert Gowing. About 1709 he removed from Reading to AYes- 
ton and there died April 9, 1746. His wife, Elizabeth, died one 
day later, and a double headstone marks their graves at Weston. 
Under date of Sept. 12, 1730, he deeded all his lands in Natick to 
his son Ebenezer. 



Ebeiiezer Felcii. 1701-1779. Son of John. Born at Read- 
ing July 20, 1701. Married May 15, 1728, Mary, daughter of 
Stephen Bacon. He went to Katick in 1723, being the fourth 
white settler there. It is said that he went there as assistant super- 
intendent of Indians. Natick — the "place of hills" — was estab- 
lished by John Eliot, the "apostle to the Indians," in 1650. There 
he gathered his converts together and founded, in 1660, the first 
church of Christian Indians in America. Natick was an Indian vil- 
lage for nearly a century. The first records of the settlement were 
kept in tlie Indian language. Ebenezer Felch was the first white 
deacon of John Eliot's Indian church, being elected to that office by 
the Indians April 29, 1731. The John Eliot church is still at Na- 
tick, and there still stands the apostle's famous oak tree, but the red 
men are all gone. Civilization and Christianity did not agree with 
them. There were, it is said, five of the Natick Indians living in 
1792 and one last Indian as late as 1855. 

Ebenezer Felch was teacher of the public school at Natick and 
was also surveyor, assessor, the first selectman, moderator of town 
meetino's and the first town clerk. He held this latter office for fif- 
teen years or up to the time of his departure for Nova Scotia. His 
son, John, succeeded him as town clerk at Natick and in most of his 
other offices. Henry Evans, Ebenezer Felch and David Bent con- 
stituted a deputation sent in 1759, from the Massachusetts Bay 
province to the province of Nova Scotia, to confer with Governor 
Lawrence in reference to a grant of land. He became one of the 
grantees of the township of Annapolis, N. S., in 1759. This was 
known as the Eelch-Evans grant. He was one of the company 
which sailed from Boston for Annapolis May 17, 1760, by the 
"Charming Molly." There were 45 emigrant-passengers by this 
vessel and a considerable number of horses and cattle. Both be- 
fore and after his emigration to Nova Scotia he transferred various 
parcels of land in ISatick to his sons John and Daniel. Daniel 
Felch settled in Nova Scotia, with his fiither. Each settler had ap- 
portioned to him a lot of 500 acres of " forest primeval " in addi- 
tion to a portion of the cultivated marsh and upland which had been 
previously the property of the French inhabitants — the unfortunate 



PEOGENITOKS OF MARY FELCH. 23 

Acadians of the land of Longfellow's "Evangeline." In 1770 Eb- 
enezer Felch was entered in census returns of township of Annap- 
olis as holding 748 acres of land, and his son Daniel 642 acres. He 
died in Annapolis county in 1779. 
His children were : 

John. b. April 6, 1729. m. April 28, 1757, Mary Bacon. He 
was of Natick, imiholder. He was Captain in militia and was 
on the Crown Point and other Colonial military expeditions. 
He was a Revolutionary soldier and was killed at the battle of 
White Plains, Oct. 28, 1776. Left 6 children. His widow, 
Mary, died at Natick, Aug. 26, 1813, ae. 76. 

Stephen, b. Sept. 10, 1731. m. 1754, Hannah Fisher. Set- 
tled at Walpole. d. June 12, 1823. Left 5 daughters. He 
served for 8 months, as sergeant in Col. Ebenezer Nichols' reg- 
iment in the campaign of 1758 against the French. 

Daniel, b. Dec. 8, 1734. m. April 9, 1763, Anne Bent. 'Set- 
tled in Nova Scotia. Had 8 children, d. about 1783. Widow 
m. Anthony Van Blarcom in 1785 and died the same year. 

Mary. 

Mary Felch. 1740-1792. Daughter of Ebenezer. Born at 
Natick Feb. 9, 1740. Married in 1761 David Bent. Died in An- 
napolis CO., N. S., about 1792. 



SAEGENT. 

William Sargent. 1602-1682. Son of Roger Sargent, who 
was son of Hugh, the mayor of Northampton, Eng., in 1626. 
Huofh Sarsfent married Maro^aret, daus^hter of Nicholas GifFord of 
the ancient and distinguished family of Gifford, seated at Honfleur, 
Normandy, in the eighth century. William Sargent was baptized 
June 20, 1602. Married (1) Hannah, who died in Sept. 1632. 
Married (2) Marie, who died about 1637. Married (3) in 1638 
Sarah, widow of William Minshull of Whitchurch, co. of Salop, 
gentleman, and formerly of Bunbury in Cheshire.* William Sar- 
gent came to America from Northampton, Eng., in 1638 with his 
newly-married wife, Sarah, and two daughters by his first wife. 
He settled at Charlestown, in that part which afterwards became 
the town of Maiden, where he was lay preacher in 1648-50. He 

* A member of this old Cheshire family, Elizabeth Minshull, was the third wife of 
John Milton. They were married Feb. 24, 1663, when she was in her 25th j^ear and 
Milton in his 55th. She died in 1727- Another member of the family, Thomas Min- 
shull, was one of William Penn's emigrants to Pennsylvania. He and wife, Margaret, 
settled there in 1682. They were Quakers. 



24 GENEALOGICAL NOTES. 

was also deacon and an active citizen. He removed to Barnstable, 
about 1656, where he was again lay preacher. Died at Barnstable 
Dec. 16, 1682. His widow died Jan. 12, 1689. 

HaiiM all Sargent. 1629-1717. Daughter of William. Born 
in England. Baptized July 13, 1629. Married in 1649 Henry 
Felch. Died Dec. 15, 1717. Her sister, Ruth, married (1) Jon- 
athan Winslow, (2) Richard Bourne, (3) John Chipman, whose 
first wife was Hope Howland, daughter of John Howland who came 
in the "Mayflower." John Chipman died April 7, 1708. Ruth 
Chipman died at Sandwich in 1713. In her will she left bequest to 
"the daughters of my sister Felch at Reading." 



GOWING. 

Robert Gowing. 1618-1698. Born in Scotland in 1618. 
Was at Dedham in 1636. Married Oct. 31, 1644, Elizabeth, 
daughter of Henry Brock. He lived at Wenham for ten years and 
finally settled at Lynn. Died at Lynn, June 7, 1698. 

Elizabeth Growing. 1660-1746. Daughter of Robert. Born 
in 1660. Married May 25, 1685, John Felch. Died at Weston 
April 10, 1746. 



BROCK. 

Henry Brock, d. 1652. Came from Stradbroke, Suffolk 
CO., Eng., with wife, Elizabeth, who was daughter of Richard 
Barber. Proprietor at Dedham in 1638. Lived in Boston in 1639. 
Admitted to church at Dedham Dec. 24, 1641. Died at Dedham in 
1652. His son, the Rev. John Brock, married Sarah, widow of the 
Rev. Samuel Haugh, whom he succeeded as minister at Reading in 
1662. 

Elizabeth Brock, b. 1620. Daughter of Henry. Born at 
Stradbroke, Eng., about 1620. Admitted to church at Dedham 
Oct. 27, 1643. Married at Dedham Oct. 31, 1644, Robert Gow- 
ing. Probably died at Lynn. 



PKOGENITORS OF MARY FELCH. 25 

BAEBER. 

Richard Barber, d. 1644. Born in England, probably 
about 1575. Proprietor at Dedham in 1638. His wife, Elizabeth, 
died at Dedham Feb. 20, 1643. He died at Dedham June 18, 1644. 

The first bequest in his will is that of a cow, which he had received 
as a free gift from London, to the deacons of the church at Dedham 
for " the use and benefit of the poor in Dedham." He left his house, 
lands, etc., in Dedham to his executors, Henry Brock and John 
Brock, son of Henry. 

Elizabeth Barber, d, 1652. Daughter of Kichard. Born 
in England. Married in Eng. Henry Brock. "The wife of good- 
man Brocke " was received into the church at Dedham March 29, 
1640. She died at Dedham in 1652 — the same year as her husband. 



BACON. 

Michael Bacon, d. 1648. Was one of the veiy small num- 
ber of the early settlers who came from Ireland. The Irish immi- 
gration increased at a later date. He is said to have been born in 
England and to have gone to the north of Ireland about seven years 
before his emigration to America. He brought wife and children with 
him and settled at Dedham in 1640. He signed the church covenant 
at Dedham. His wife, Alice, was admitted to the church Sept. 17, 
1641, and died April 2, 1648. Michael died April 18, 1648. He 
had children: Michael, Daniel, John, Sarah and Alice, who mar- 
ried at Dedham March 31, 1647, Lieut. Thomas Bancroft.* She 
died at Dedham March 29, 1648. f 

John Bacon, d. 1683. Son of Michael. Came to America 
with his father and settled at Dedham. Made a " freeman " in 1647. 
Married at Dedham Feb. 17, 1652, Rebecca Hall. He was select- 
man, etc., at Dedham, and one of the largest ratepayers. A fac- 
simile of his autograph, with those of many others of the early Ded- 
ham settlers, may be found in Vol. HI. of the published records of 
Dedham. John Bacon was a member of Capt. Timothy Dwight's 
company in King Philip's war. He died at Dedham June 17, 
1683. His widow, Rebecca, died at Dedham Oct. 27, 1694. 

*The ancestor by second wife, Elizabeth Metcalfe, of George Bancroft the historian, 
tit is recorded that in 1647-48 there was a "mild winter" in this section of the 
country and that "a great sicknesse epidemical did the Lord lay upon us." 



fi. 



26 GENEALOGICAL NOTES. 

Stephen Bacon. 1677-1766. Son of John. Born at Ded- 
ham Aug. 21, 1677. Married Jan. 6, 1704, at Sudbury, where his 
first child was born, Mary, daughter of John Loker. He built a 
house in Needham in 1705 and there settled. This house is now, or 
was recently, standing. In 1719 he was one of a committee of three 
appointed to run the boundary line between Needham and Natick. 
His name appears upon Needham records in 1740 in connection with 
a highway through his lands. He died at Needham in 1766. His 
son, Stephen, died in Digby, Nova Scotia, in 1804, ae. 91. He had 
two other sons who lived to over 90. His older brother, Samuel, 
also settled in Needham and died there Nov. '^^, 1743. 

Mary Bacon, b. 1708. Daughter of Stephen. Born at 
Orr^ NtLdham March 20, 1708. Married at Needham May 15, 1728, 
Ebenezer Felch. Probably died in Annapolis co., N. S., after 
1770. She was a sister of Lieut. John Bacon who married Abigail 
Sawin, granddaughter of Thomas Sawin, the first white settler at 
Natick. Lieut. Bacon was one of the Natick men who went to 
Annapolis, N. S., in the campaign against the French of 1745-48. 
He went forth with the patriots on the momentous day of Lexington 
and was killed in the fighting of April 19, 1775. A monument in 
memory of him and four others who fell on that day, on the Colonial 
side, was erected in the burial ground at Needham in 1851. He had 
as many as six sons who served in the Revolutionary war. In the 
official lists of Massachusetts soldiers and sailors of the Revolution 
are 271 Bacon names. 



The good old names of Mary and John occur frequently among 
the early Bacons. The two principal New England lines of this his- 
toric name appear to come from Michael of Dedham and Nathaniel 
of Barnstable, who is an ancestor of a very large proportion of the 
eminent people of Cape Cod. 

John Bacon, lawyer and judge, who died at Barnstable Aug. 20, 
1731, was descended from Nathaniel.* This John Bacon provided 
in his will that his "negro slave, Dinah, shall be sold and the pro- 
ceeds improved by my executors in buying bibles and they shall give 
them equally and alike to each of my said wife's and my grand- 
children." There seems to be something like a touch of grim humor 
about this provision in the will of John Bacon. Our Puritan fore- 
fathers were slaveholders, and slavery was an established institution 
in New England up to the close of the 18th century. In those 
" good old days " they also hanged people or " pressed " them to 

* It is not known what relationship, if any, this Nathaniel Bacon bore to his name- 
sake and contemporary of Virginia fame. 



PROGENITORS OF MARY FELCH. 27 

death, not only for " witchcraft " but for what we would consider 
now the most petty offences, such as the theft of some small article. 



LOKER. 

John liOker. d. 1653. Was one of the orio-inal orrantees of 
Sudbury in 1639. Made a freeman May 6, 1646. Died at Sud- 
bury June 18, 1653. 

His widow, Mary (Draper), survived many years. She bought 
a house and lot from the executor of the estate of Robert Best in 
1654, and appears to have been living in Sudbury as late as 1697. 
A widow, Elizabeth Loker, who died at Sudbury May 18, 1648, 
may have been the mother of John, Henry, Bridget, who married 
(1) Robert Davies, (2) Thomas King, and another sister (Anne?) 
who probably married Richard Newton. 

John LiOker. 1650-1719. Son of John. Born at Sudburv 
about 1650. Was one of the settlers in the " outlands " of Sudbury. 
He married about 1673, Sarah, daughter of Matthew Rice. Mar- 
ried (2) Jan. 6, 1705, Rachel, daughter of John Haynes, who sur- 
vived him. He died at Sudbury Nov. 10, 1719. His oldest son, 
John, settled in Needham. To him and to his son-in-law, Stephen 
Bacon, he bequeathed lands in Natick and Needham. 

Mary Loker. b. 1680. Daughter of John. Born at Sud- 
bury Aug. 3, 1680. Married at Sudbury Jan. 6, 1704, Stephen 
Bacon. Probably died at Needham. 

(Second Loker line on p. 38.) 



xllCE. 

Edmund Rice. See page 17. 

Matthew Rice. 1629-1717. Son of Edmund. Born in 
England in 1629. Was an early settler outside of Sudbury proper. 
Married July 7, 1654, Martha, daughter of Barnabas Lamson and 
ward of John Stone. In 1683 he bought the Indian Head farm, 
300 acres, in Framingham, but did not settle there. The property 
went to his children and grandchildren. Died in 1717. 

Sarah Rice. 1655-1702. Daughter of Matthew. Born at 
Sudbury, Sept. 9, 1655. Married, about 1673, John Loker. Died 
at Sudbury, March 7, 1702. 



28 GENEALOGICAL NOTES. 



LAMSON. 

Barnabas Lamson. d. 1640. Probably from Essex co., 
Eng. Was proprietor and town officer at Cambridge in 1635. Se- 
lectman in 1636. A member of the Cambridge church. He died 
in 1640. His wife died before him.* He left his five young chil- 
dren to the care, during their minority, of five different friends. 

Martha Lanasoii. 1635-1717, Daughter of Barnabas. Prob- 
ably born at Cambridge about 1635. Left by her father to care of 
John Stone, who became a pioneer settler in the " outlands " of Sud- 
bury. Married, at Sudbury, July 7, 1654, Matthew Rice, whom 
she survived. Died in old age — after 1717. 

* Peter Lidgett, merchant, of Boston, who died in 1676, leaving a Avidow Elizabeth 
(Scammon), who became the second wife of John Saffin, was a nephew of the wife of 
Barnabas Lamson. Peter Lidgett's will bequeathed to the three daughters of Barna- 
bas Lamson. 



V. 



THE PROGENITORS OF ANNA LONGLEY. 



LONGLEY. 

The name of Longley or Langley is a distinguished one, both by 
pedigree and by talents. 

The visit of the Duke and Duchess of Cornwall and York to 
Canada, in 1901, recalled the interesting fact that the first Duke of 
York was a Langley — Edmund de Langley, 5th son of Edward 
III. and great grandfather of Edward IV., was created Duke of 
York in 1385. Between the houses of York and Lancaster were 
fought the long wars of the roses — the great " genealogical " wars. 
Early Langleys were of the manors of Penulbury and Agecroft in 
Lancashire, the former acquired by marriage with the Prestwich 
family. Three William Langleys were rectors of the church at 
Prestwich.* William Langley, who married Lucy At Lese, and 
his descendants, were of the manor of Well Court, Kent, in the 
15th century. To one branch of this family belonged Thomas 
Langley (1370-1437), who was Bishop of Durham, Cardinal and 
Lord Chancellor of England. 

William Longley or Langley wrote the famous " Piers Plough- 
man's Visions," two hundred years before Shakespeare, inaugurating 
the first great epoch in English literature. He held orders in the 
church and was an ardent reformer. 

William Longley. 1614-1680. Son of John Longley of 
Firsby, Lincolnshire, Eng. Born about 1614. He married Joanna 
GofFe.f He was one of the grantees of Lynn, where he was ad- 

*A list of the rectors of Prestvpich and much other interesting matter regarding 
some branches of early English Longleys and Langleys may be found in the publica- 
tions of the Chetham Society, of England. 

t She was a sister of Thomas Goflfe, a merchant and ship-owner of London and a 
member of the company which " floated " the Pilgrims. He was probably the owner 
of the " Mayflower " on her memorable voyage of 1620 as well as on her later voj'^ages 
to America of 1629 and '30. He was also the first Deputy-Governor of the Massacliu- 
setts company. He died when on a voyage to America to look after his commercial 
interests in New England. He lost heavily by his "adventures" with the Pilgrims. 



30 GENEALOGICAL NOTES. 

mitted a freeman (under name of Langley) March 14, 1639. 
Bought house and land at Lynn about 1638. He made a letter of 
attorney Aug. 8, 1639, as "son and heir of John Longley, late of 
Firsby in co. of Lincoln, clerk," to Thomas Meeke of Waynflete 
St. Mary,* gentleman, to sell lands etc. descended to him from his 
said father. William Longley held various offices at Lynn. He 
was a selectman, clerk of the writs, magistrate, etc. He appears 
to have been possessed of an excellently-developed bump of com- 
bativeness. The annalist of Lynn relates that the Longleys were 
often at odds with their neighbors on account of land claims. In 
the court records of March 30, 1641, there is a suit entered : "The 
Worshipful Emanuell Downing and Edmund Batter v. William 
Langley de Lynn." 

In 1662 William Longley prosecuted the town of Lynn for not 
laying out to him 40 acres of land, according to the division of 1638, 
when this grant had been erroneously put down to " Richard " Long- 
ley. This land appears to have been withheld from W^illiam Longley 
during the Cromwellian regime. The court decided, after hearing 
evidence, that he should have the 40 acres or £40 in money. In 1 663 
John Hathorne complained to the church at Lynn that Andrew Mans- 
field and William Longley had given false testimony in the recent land 
case, for which they were censured. They appealed to the county 
court, accusing Hathorne of slander, of which he was found guilty 
and sentenced to pay a fine of £10 and make a public acknowledg- 
ment in the meeting-house at Lynn, or else to pay £20 and costs. 
This direct clash between the powers of Church and State appears to 
have caused considerable commotion at Lynn. 

In 1663 Thomas Newhall, the first white person born at Lynn, 
was prosecuted by William Longley for assault and battery com- 
mitted on the wife of said William Longley while she was assisting 
in running a land line. 

In 1663 William Longley removed from Lynn to Groton. 
Under date of June 17, 1663, Thomas Browne of Groton gave 
deed to "William Longley of Lin, in the county of Essex, yeo- 

The government of Massachusetts granted, April 16, 1734, 1000 acres of land to Rob- 
ert "Rand, whose father married a daughter of William and Joanna (Goffe) Longley, on 
account of the services to the colony of his granduncle Thomas GofFe. That Thomas 
poffe must have rendered great services to the Plymouth and Massachusetts colonies, 
in their early days, is evident from this remarkable expression of gratitude, in the shape 
of a large grant of land, more than a century after the first settlements, to so remote a 
connection as a grandson of his sister. 

The early emigrations to America, from England, were commercial ventures organ- 
ized by English merchants. The religious element Avas made very prominent by some 
ovei'-zealous Puritans, who attempted to establish, and did establish for a time, an ec- 
clesiastical despotism in New England. 

* The village of Firsby is about 4 miles northwest of Wainfleet St. Mary (there is 
also a Wainfleet All Saints) in Lincolnshire. Not far away is Somersby, where the 
poet Tennyson Avas born, and by Firsby runs the little river Steeping — the original of 
Tennyson's "Brook." Upon its gi'assy banks the first American William Longley, 
as a lad, doubtless disported himself, nigh three centuries agone. 



PROGENITORS OF ANNA LONGLEY. 31 

man," of his house, orchard, lands, etc. in Groton, for £80. 
sterling. Under same date William Longley of Lynn and Jo- 
anna, his wife, conveyed to Thomas Browne, of " Grawton," his 
house, orchard and lands in Lynn for £125. sterling. Richard 
Blood, Capt. James Parker and William Longley were the three 
largest original proprietors of the extensive territory which originally 
bore the name of Groton. Probably some of William Longley's 
lands took in a portion of what later formed the town of Shirley, 
where some of his descendants settled. His large tracts of native 
forest were eventually divided into farms and occupied by his de- 
scendants. His son, John, was also an original proprietor of Gro- 
ton. 

William Longley first appears upon the records of Groton June 
21, 1663, when with Capt. eJames Parker and others, he voted 
against the proposal to give Rev. Samuel Willard the use of the 
house and lands devoted by the town to the purposes of the ministry. 
There are numerous indications that the first William Longley was 
not in accord with the attempted ecclesiastical despotism of the day. 
He was selectman at Groton in 1665, and town clerk in 1666 and 
'67. 

Groton was destroyed by Indians in the spring of 1676 and its 
inhabitants dispersed. William Longley and his family went to 
Charlestown, where they remained for a year or two and where he 
had a grant of land. Some members of the family were also in 
Lynn during this period. He returned to Groton with a large pro- 
portion of the old inhabitants, and rebuilt his house there. At Gro- 
ton this dauntless pioneer man died Nov. 29, 1680. His widow, 
Joanna, married, about 1683, Benjamin Crispe, survived him, and 
died at Charlestown, probably at the home of one of her children, 
April 18, 1698, te. 79. Her gravestone is still standing in the old 
Phipps street bm-ial ground, Charlestown, where the remains of 
many of her descendants also lie. In her will she remembered her 
three grandchildren who had been carried captive by Indians in 1694. 
It contains the following clause : 

Item. I give and bequeath unto my three grandchildren y* 
are in captivity, if they return, Yizdt, three books, one of 
y"^ a bible, another a sermon book, treating of faith, and the 
other a psalm book. 

William Longley. d. 1694. Son of William. Probably 
born at Lynn and removed with his father to Groton in 1663. He 
married (1) at Groton, May 15, 1672, Lydia. He married (2) 
previous to 1686, Deliverance Crispe, probably the widow of Jona- 
than Crispe, who died at Groton in 1680. Was a large owner of 
lands in Groton. He was town clerk of Groton in 1687 and from 



32 . GENEALOGICAL NOTES. 

1692 until his death, July 27, 1694, when he and his family, with 
the exception of three of the children, were slain by Indians. On 
Feb. 20, 1880, a monument at the place in Groton where stood 
William Longley's house, and where the first William Longley had 
also lived, was dedicated. The inscription reads : 

Here Dwelt 
WILLIAM AND DELIVERANCE LONGLEY 

WITH THEIR EIGHT CHILDREN. 

On THE 27th of July, 1694, 

The Indians Killed the Father and Mother 

and five of the children 

and carried into captivity 

the other three. 

Of the three children, Betty, Lydia and John, who were taken 
captive by the Indians, Betty died of starvation and Lydia was sold 
to the French in Canada. She became a Roman Catholic and a 
sister of the Congregation de Notre Dame in Montreal. In that 
institution is preserved the French record of the baptism of Lydia 
Longley. A copy of it was procured by Dr. Samuel A. Green, a 
native of Groton and an ex-mayor of Boston, who gives the follow- 
ing' translation in his historical sketch of Groton : 

On Tuesday, April 24, 1696, the ceremony of baptism was performed on 
an English girl, named Lydia Longley, who was born April 14, 1674, at 
Groton, a few miles from Boston in New England, She was the daughter 
of William Longley and Deliverance Crisj),* both Protestants. She was 
captured in the month of July, 1694, by the Abdnaqui Indians, and has 
lived for the past month in the house of the Sisters of the Congregation de 
Notre Dame. The godfather was M. Jacques Leber, merchant ; the god- 
mother was Madame Marie Madeleine Dupont, wife of M. de Maricort, 
Ecuyer, Captain of a company of Marines : she named this English girl 
Lydia Madeleine. Signed 

" Lydia Madeleine Longley 

" Madeleine Dupont 

" Leber 

*'M. Caille, acting curate." 

Sister Madeleine died at the house of the Sisters of the Congrega- 
tion de Notre Dame, July 20, 1758, at the age of 84 years. Her 
remains and those of Sister Marguerite (who was her relative, Sarah 
Tarbell, of Groton) lie buried in the little cemetery connected with 
the con vent, f 

* Deliverance Crispe was probably her stepmother. 

t In a Dictionnaire G^nealogique, by the Abbe Tanguay, published in the Province of 
Quebec, in 1871, there is a list of" Anglais " who were taken " in the wars of the seven- 
teenth century between New-France and New-England," including the name of 
" Lydia Madeleine Longly." 



PEOGENITORS OF ANNA LONGLEY. 33 

The Longleys and their relatives and connections at Groton suffered 
severely in the various Indian raids — in killed, wounded and missing. 
Among those captured by the Indians were three Tarbell boys, who 
were taken June 20, 1707. They married Indian women, became 
chiefs and founded the Indian settlement of St. Regis in Canada, 
which is said not to contain a pure-blooded Indian. A part of the 
village of St. Regis comes within the limits of Franklin county in 
the state of New York. More than once treaties have been made 
between the governor of that state and the chiefs of the Indians, 
among whom were the descendants of these Tarbell lads. On Sept. 
23, 1825, a treaty was signed by eleven chiefs and trustees of the 
tribe, including Peter Tarbell, Thomas Tarbell, Mitchell Tarbell, 
Louis Tarbell and Battice* Tarbell. These were all descendants of 
the Tarbells of Groton, Mass.f Several efforts were made by the 
Massachusetts government to induce these wandering Tarbells and 
others to return to the New England fold, but without avail. They 
remained with the red men, and their children forgot the tongue 
which the fathers spoke. Among others taken captive from Groton 
was Matthias Farnsworth (born 1690). He was taken in August 
1704. He remained in Canada, took a French wife, and the name 
is now found in French Canada written Farnet, Phaneuf, etc. 
Matthias Farnsworth was long supposed to be dead. He was bap- 
tized into the Roman Catholic Church at Montreal as Matthias 
Claude Farnet, his godfather being Claude de Ramezay. 

Among: the Canadian branches of Farnsworths — descendants of 
Matthias Farnsworth of Lynn and Groton, who was born in 1612 in 
Lancaster, Eng. — are those of Annapolis co., N. S. Several of his 
descendants went to Nova Scotia in the emigration of 1760 and 
settled in Granville. 

JohnLongley. 1683-1750. "The Captive." Son of Wil- 
liam. Born at Groton in 1683. Taken captive by Indians July 
27, 1694, when the massacre of his family took place. He remained 
with the Indians over four years and was known among them as John 
Angary. He narrowly escaped death from starvation. He took 
kindly to hfe among the Indians, notwithstanding hardships, and, 
had it not been for determined efforts on the part of his relatives and 
the Massachusetts government, he would probably have become an 
Indian chief. He was ransomed by the government and, with great 
difficulty, induced to return to civilization. He became, instead of 
a great Indian Sachem, a respectable deacon of the church and lead- 
ing citizen of Groton, Mass. Among papers in possession of the 

* Saint Jean Baptiste. 

t Some interesting reading in this connection is to be found in " A history of St. 
Lawrence and Franklin counties, New York," by Dr. Franklin B. Hough (Albany, 
1853). 



34 GENEALOGICAL NOTES. 

New-England Historic Genealogical Society, Boston (Knox manu- 
scripts), is a deposition made by John Longley, giving a brief state- 
ment concerning his captivity among the Indians. 

John Longley married (1) in 1705 Sarah, daughter of Jonas 
Prescott, by whom he had five children. He married (2) at Lan- 
caster Nov. 30, 1720, Deborah, daughter of John Wilder and 
widow of Robert Houghton, junior, by whom he had seven children. 
He had nine sons. Like his father and grandfather before him, he 
was clerk of the town of Groton. He filled that office from 1723 to 
1726 and again in 1728 and 1729. He was town treasurer for some 
twelve years and had three elections as Representative to the Gene- 
ral Court. He was deacon of the church 28 years. He died at 
Groton May 25, 1750. His widow, Deborah, died Nov. 7, 1763, 
in her 7 2d year. 

William Longley. 1708-1788. Second child and oldest son 
of John. Born at Groton Feb. 7, 1708. Among the records of 
hajotismata by the Rev. Dudley Bradstreet, 4th minister of Groton, 
is the following : Feb. 15. 1707* Guilielmus Longly Filius 
Joannis & Sarace Longly. 

He married Jan. 4, 1733, Mary, daughter of Joseph Parker. He 
appears to have been concerned in the settlement of the new town of 
Lunenburg, adjoining Groton, and may have lived there for a time. 
In 1751, in company with his two brothers, John and Jonas, he re- 
moved from Groton to Shirley — a very serious journey through the 
wilderness, at that time, though only ten miles distance. In con- 
nection with Samuel Hazen, he built the first grist-mill at Shirley, to 
which a saw-mill was added later. He was the miller of Shirley and 
was succeeded by his son, William, in the same occupation. 

William Longley saw military service in the French war. He 
served in Col. Jonathan Bagley's regiment during the campaign of 
1758. Several of his brothers also served in this war. His brother, 
Joseph, who was in the same company as William, was mortally 
wounded at Fort William Henry and died at Greenbush, N. Y., 
Oct. 12, 1758. Under date of May 9, 1758, William Longley 
appointed his brother, "John Longley, of Shirley, gentleman," his 
lawful attorney to sell real estate and transact all business for him. 
Under this power of attorney, Dec. 5, 1763, John Longley, on 
behalf of his brother, William, " now residing in the Province of 
Nova Scotia, yeoman," deeded William's interest in the estate of his 
father's widow, Deborah, to their brother, Zachariah of Groton. 
William Longley removed to Nova Scotia in 1760 and settled in the 
Belleisle district, Granville, Annapolis co. He took with him his 
son, Israel, then about 15 years of age. About the time that Israel 

* 1708 present style. 



PROGENITORS OF ANNA LONGLEY. 35 

became of age he appears to have returned to Shirley, leaving the 
Nova Scotia property to Israel. 
He died at Shirley May 15, 1788. 

Israel Longley. 1745-1824. Son of William. Born at 
Groton, Oct. 12, 1745. Removed to Granville, N. S., with his 
father in 1760. Married in 1770 Anna, daughter of Isaac Kent. 
He was one of the grantees of the township of Wilmot, when that 
section of Annapolis county was opened up in 1777. He settled 
at a place in the new township which was given the name of Para- 
dise — famed for its fruits and flowers. He died in Annapolis co., 
N. S., Sept. 16, 1824. 

Anna Longley. 1773-1860. Daughter of Israel. Born in 
Annapolis co., N. S., Feb. 23, 1773. Married in 1792 Joseph 
Bent. Died in Annapolis co. Sept. 12, 1860. 

The Canadian branches of the Longleys have been very success- 
ful in maintaining life and liberty and in the pursuit of happiness 
under the British flag. 

Among the more prominent members of the family in Annapolis 
CO., Nova Scotia, may be mentioned Avard Longley (1824-1884), 
who represented Annapolis county, both in provincial and national 
parliaments, for many years. He was a grandson of the first 
Israel. In two of his successful elections his brother, Israel, was 
a candidate on the opposing ticket. 

Hon. James Wilberforce Longley (born 1849), F.R.S.C., 
etc., attorney-general of Nova Scotia, is a great-grandson of the first 
Israel. His eloquent voice has been heard in Boston on diflferent 
occasions. 



PRESCOTT. 

John Prescott. 1605-1681. James Prescott, who married 
a Standish, was of Standish in Lancashire, Eng., in the time of 
good Queen Elizabeth. An order of Her Majesty, dated August, 
1564, directs him ''to keep in readiness horsemen and armor." He 
had six sons, the oldest of whom was Sir James Prescott, of the 
manor of Dryby in Lincolnshire, who married Alice Molineaux. 
The second son, Roger, married (1) Elizabeth and (2) Ellen 
Shaw of Standish. Ralph, youngest son of Roger and Ellen, born 



36 GENEALOGICAL NOTES. 

in 1572, had a wife, Ellen, and a youngest child, eTohn Prescott, 
the emigrant, who was born at Standish in 1605. He married 
Jan. 21, 1629, at Wygan, in Lancaslnre, Mary Platts, "a York- 
shire girl," and removed to Sowerby in Yorkshire, where he lived 
for some seven years. In 1638 he emigrated to Barbados, W. I., 
where he became a landowner. There does not appear to be any 
evidence that religious matters had anything to do with his emigra- 
tion. In 1640 he migrated from the island of Barbados to the 
Massachusetts Bay colony in North America. He landed at Bos- 
ton, and took up his residence at Watertown, which was a sort of 
"clearing-house" for early emigrants. He had grants of land at 
Watertown. In 1643 he associated himself with Thomas King 
(see p. 20) and others in the purchase from Sholan, the Indian 
Sachem of the Nashaway tribe, of a large tract of land, where he 
became one of the pioneer settlers. He was probably settled on 
these lands by June, 1645. In 1652 this settlement at Nashaway, 
of which for forty years John Prescott was the leading spirit, was 
incorporated and, " at the request of the inhabitants," was given 
the name of " Prescott " by the House of Deputies. Some of the 
Puritan Deputies discovered, however, after this graceful act had 
been performed, that, from their point of view, John Prescott was 
not all that he ought to be. He had maintained his liberty of 
conscience, which was something that they could not tolerate — es- 
pecially under the sway of a John Endecott. The awful fact 
transpired that John Prescott had " never given public adhesion to 
the established church covenant ;" in short, he was not a " freeman," 
and, therefore, not eligible for any kind of an office, and not even a 
voter, so to name a whole township, and especially one where there 
was a good deal of "heresy," after such a man, could not be thought 
of. In 1653 the name of the town was changed by the House of 
Deputies to West Town, and, finally, as a sort of compromise, to 
Lancaster. Thus this town bears, at the present day, instead of 
one of the greatest of American family names, the name of the 
native county in England of the founder of that family. 

John Prescott is surely deserving of high honor, if for no other 
reason, for the stand which he took in favor of intellectual and re- 
ligious liberty. He was a supporter of Dr. Robert Child, who 
truthftdly set forth in his petition to the Massachusetts government, 
in 1646, that there were " many thousands in these plantations" 
who were most unjustly detained from voting and from all part in 
the government because " they will not take these church covenants." 
Gov. John Winthrop, in his history of New England (II. 306), 
relates, with pious superstition, the ills which "a special providence 
of God" brought upon those who favored Child's petition. He tells 



PROGENITORS OF ANNA LONGLEY. 37 

how the pioneer Prescott " lost a horse and his lading in Sudbury 
river, and a week after, his wife and children, being upon another 
horse, were hardly saved from drowning." All this befell Prescott 
on account of his refusal to promptly bend the knee to the Puritan 
theocracy ! Governor Winthrop failed to note the wonderful inter- 
position of providence which saved Prescott's wife and children from 
a watery grave, which he would have been quick to do had it suited 
his purpose. 

John Prescott finally found it advisable to become a " freeman " 
in 1669, when he was about sixty-four years of age, and after the 
religious restrictions had been altered by instructions from the gov- 
ernment of Charles II. 

In 1654 John Prescott built the first grist-mill in Lancaster, and 
also, later, a saw-mill. In 1667, by contract with Capt. James 
Parker and others, a committee of citizens of Groton, he built a 
grist-mill in Groton, to which a saw-mill was afterwards added, re- 
ceiving, in consideration, 520 acres of land in Groton and various 
privileges. He and his family escaped the Indian massacre of 
1676, when Lancaster was destroyed, and remained uninhabited for 
three years. He returned to Lancaster about 1679, and rebuilt his 
mills and houses. 

He brouofht with him to America a suit of armor which had 
probably been worn by him, or some of his ancestors, in the British 
army. This he used sometimes to don, greatly to the terror of the 
Indians. 

He died at Lancaster in December, 1681. His wife died a short 
time before him. In the old burial field at Lpoucaster the remains 
of this ideal pioneer man were laid. There, upon a rude fragment 
of slate-stone, may be deciphered the words, faintly traced, " John 
Prescott deceased." 

Jonas Prescott. 1648-1723. Youngest child of John. Born 
at Lancaster in June, 1648. Married Dec. 14, 1672, Mary, 
daughter of John Loker. He settled in Groton, where he was the 
first miller — succeeding to the mill and lands of his father there. 
Both Jonas Prescott and his father followed the calling of black- 
smith, as well as miller and millwright. 

He was town clerk of Groton for several years, selectman, Rep- 
resentative, and Captain of niilitia. i 

He died, generally lamented, Dec. 31, 1723. p 

Sarah Prescott. 1686-1718. Daughter of Jonas. Born 
at Groton May 3, 1686. Married in 1705 John Longley. Died 
at Groton March, 8, 1718. 



38 GENEALOGICAL NOTES. 

The Hon. Benjamin Peescott (1696-1738), justice of Superior 
Court, etc., was a brother of Sarah and father of Col. WilUam 
Prescott, who served as lieutenant in the expedition of 1755 to 
Nova Scotia, which expelled the French Acadians, and w^ho led the 
Colonial forces at the battle of Bunker Hill. A monument marks 
the place of his birth at Groton. Col. William Prescott was the 
father of the Hon. William Prescott (1762-1844), who married 
Catharine Green Hickling and whose son was William Hickling 
Prescott, the historian (1796-1859). 

Col. William Prescott's sister, Elizabeth, married Col. Abijah 
Willard, loyalist. He went with the Royal army to Halifax, 
N. S., in 1776. In 1778 he was proscribed and banished by the 
revolted colonies. He settled in St. John county. Province of New 
Brunswick, and named the locality Lancaster (now the parish of 
Lancaster) after his native place in Massachusetts. He died at 
Lancaster, N. B., in 1789. 



LOKEE. 

John Loker. See page 27. 

Mary Loker. 1653-1735. Daughter of John — a posthu- 
mous child. Born at Sudbury Sept. 28, 1653. Married at Lan- 
caster Dec. 14, 1672, Jonas Prescott, by whom she had twelve 
children. Died Oct. 28, 1735. It is said that she lived to see one 
hundred and seventy-six of her descendants. 



PARKER. 

Joseph Parker, d. 1690. Was one of the original proprie- 
tors of Groton, and also a petitioner for Chelmsford in 1653 and 
Dunstable in 1673. Was a large landowner in these places. He 
was a brother of James Parker of Groton, Chelmsford and Dun- 
stable, and they had three ether brothers, Abraham, John and 
Jacob, among the early settlers of New England. He was a select- 
man, etc., at Dunstable. The official seal or " town's brand marke " 
of Groton was adopted by the government on his petition. 

His first wife, Margaret, died about 1654. He married (2) June 
24, 1655, Rebecca Read. He died in 1690, leaving an only son, 
Joseph. 



PROGENITORS OF ANNA LONGLEY. 30 

Joseph Parker. 1653-1725. Son of Joseph. Born at 
Chelmsford March 30, 1653. Said to have been the first child born 
there. He and his father both served in King Philip's war. Feb. 
15, 1676, while going after reinforcements from Major Willard's 
forces, they were ambushed and " had ye Indian bullets thick about 
them." The son was wounded in the shoulder and had his clothes 
torn by pistol bullets. One of the two was at Charlestown, for a 
time, after the destruction of the frontier towns, and was admitted 
as a citizen there April 3, 1676. He settled, later, in Groton. His 
first wife, Elizabeth, was probably the daughter of Richard and 
Isabel Blood of Groton. He married (2) Nov. 19, 1684, Hannah. 
He died at Groton in 1725, and his widow, Hannah, was appointed 
to administer his estate. She sold the homestead in Groton to 
Thomas Tarbell in 1729. 

Joseph Parker. 1689-1753. Son of Joseph. Born March 
1, 1689. Married Jan. 24, 1716, Abigail, daughter of Obadiah 
Sawtell. He died at Groton Nov. 26, 1753, leaving nine or ten 
children and a large estate. 

Mary Parker. 1716-1758. Oldest child of Joseph. Born 
at Groton Oct. 12, 1716. Married at Groton Jan. 4, 1733, Wil- 
liam Longley. Died at Shirley Aug. 7, 1758. 

The many early Parkers in New England begot many early Mary 
Parkers, and there is, naturally, some confusion about them. In 
1692, during the Salem witchcraft frenzy, a Mary Parker was 
hano;ed as a witch. At her examination she was asked, " How lonof 
have ye been in the snare of the devil ? " She answered : " I know 
nothing of it. There is another woman of the same name in An-, 
dover." Nevertheless she was hanged. In 1710 an act was pa?sed 
by the General Court of Massachusetts reversing the witchcraft 
convictions and declaring them to be null and void. The represen- 
tatives of the witch, Mary Parker, received from the government of 
Massachusetts the munificent sum of £8. as compensation for her 
illegal execution. 

Among Parker descendants of note is Samuel Parker, the Ha- 
waiian. He is descended from Samuel Parker of Dedham, through 
John P. Parker of Newton, who settled in Hawaii about 1816 and 
whose son, the father of Samuel, owned half of the island. Samuel 
Parker, millionaire, nobleman at King Kalakaua's court and Prime 
Minister under Queen Liliuokalani, is said to have been offered the 
governorship of Hawaii by President Roosevelt. 



40 GENEALOGICAL NOTES. 

SAWTELL. 

Richard Sawtell. d. 1694. Was a proprietor at Water- 
town in 1636. He was one of the early settlers of Groton, where 
he was the first town clerk, filling that office in 1662—4. Richard 
Sawtell served in Major Appleton's company during King Philip's 
war. He appears to have returned to W^atertown after the de- 
struction of Groton by the Indians in 1676. Was selectman, etc. 
He died at Watertown Aug. 21, 1694. His widow, Elizabeth, 
died at Watertown Oct. 18, 1694. He left his lands in Groton to 
his son Obadiah. 

On May 23, 1665, " goodwife Sawtell" was among those who 
were " warned " by the selectmen of Watertown for " not attending 
their seats in the meeting-house, appointed them by the town." 

Obadiah SawtelL 1649-1740. Son of Richard. Probably 
born at Watertown about 1649. Married, about 1682, Hannah, 
daughter of George Lawrence. Died at Groton March 20, 1740, 
"in 92^ year of his age," according to the inscription on his grave- 
stone at Groton. Obadiah Sawtell was a soldier in King Philip's 
war. His son, Obadiah, was killed by Indians at Charlestown, 
N. H., June 17, 1749. 

Abigail Sawtell. 1698-1787. Daughter of Obadiah. Born 
at Groton March 13, 1698. Married at Groton eJan. 24, 1716, 
Joseph Parker. Died at Pepperrell Feb. 9, 1787. The inscription 
on her tombstone at Groton reads : 

She left two hundred or upwards 
of children and grand-children. 
The sweet remembrance of Y® Just 
Shall flourish when she sleeps in dust. 

Upon her death, her grandson, Joshua Longley of Shirley, ad- 
ministered her estate.* 



LAWRENCE. 

George Liawrence. 1637-1709. An early settler at Wa- 
tertown. Married (1) Sept. 29, 1657, Elizabeth, daughter of 
Benjamin Cris[)e. She died May 28, 1691. He married (2) 
Aug. 16, 1691, Elizabeth Holland, who survived him. 

He died at Watertown March 21, 1709. 

* Joshna was sou of William Longley, the progenitor of the Nova Scotia branch of 
this famil3^ and was a man of note in the business and politics of Shirley. He mar- 
ried Bridget Melvin of Concord. Of him Chandler's History of Shirley remarks: 
" Of all who have borne the name of Longley in Shirley, Joshua (the tenth-born of 
William, the eldest sou of the redeemed captive) was the most illustrious." 



PROGENITORS OF ANNA LONGLEY. 41 

Hannah LaTrrence. b. 1662. Daughter of George. Born 
May 24, 1662. Married, about 1682, Obadiah Sawtell. Prob- 
ably died at Groton — after 1726. 



CRISPE. 

Benjamin Crispe. b. 1611. Born in England about 1611. 
Came to America in 1629 with Major Edward Gibbons. Was 
proprietor at AYatertown in 16r56. Made a freeman May 6, 1646. 
He sold his property at Watertown Sept. 25, 1666, to Thomas 
Boydon, and removed to Groton. Was selectman at Groton in 
1668. He returned to Watertown after the destruction of Groton 
by the Indians in 1676, and was living there in 1681. 

His wife, Bridget, dying, he married (2) about 1683, Joanna, 
widow of William Longley, who survived him. 

Elizabeth Crispe. 1637-1691. Daughter of Benjamin. 
Born Jan. 8, 1637. Married Sept. 29, 1657, George Lawrence. 
Died at Watertown May 28, 1691. 



KENT. 

The Kcnts were seated at Sherbeck, England, as far back as the 
thirteenth century. Several of this name came to America in the 
early immigrations. One of the most distinguished of Kent de- 
scendants in America was the " ChanceUor," James Kent of Xew 
York, who died Nov. 12, 1847, te. 84. He was of the sixth gen- 
eration from the immigrant Thomas Kent. 

Edward Augustus, Duke of Kent, the fourth son of King George 
ni., and the father of Queen Victoria, was governor of Xova Scotia 
in 1796. At his death in 1820 this title became extinct. 

John Kent. Born in England. Came to Dedham in 1645. 
He was made a freeman ^lay 3, 1654. He had two brothers, 
Joseph and ^Foshua, who came to Dedham about the same time.* 
He married May 21, 1662, Hannah, daughter of Erancis Griswold. 

* If anv religions or political reason influenced the emigration of these three broth- 
ers, at this conipanitively late period, it must have been the desire to escape Puritan 
domination in Englaiid. 

One genealogical writer makes the statement that large numbers of people came to 
America because they were •' disgusted with the rule of Cromwell and his fanatics." 



42 GENEALOGICAL NOTES. 

He removed from Dedham to Charlestown in 1673. In 1678 and 
'79 was one of the "tythingmen." He bought land of William 
Bullard's heirs in 1695. In old age — July 16, 1707 — he deeded 
his dwelling-house and lands in Charlestown to his son John of 
Scituate. 

Ebenezer Kent. 1680-1752. Son of John. Born at 
Charlestown Aug. 18, 1680. Removed to Hingham about 1700 
and built the first dwelling-house on the west side of the Conah asset 
river. He married Sept. 8, 1703, Hannah, daughter of Joseph 
Gannett. Was a landowner in several Massachusetts towns. He 
died Feb. 16, 1752. His will is at Suffolk Probate records, 
Boston. The administrators were his widow, Hannah, and sons 
Isaac and Ebenezer. 

Isaac Kent. b. 1712. Son of Ebenezer. Born at Hingham 
Sept. 27, 1712 (or, perhaps, a few years later). Married Oct. 25, 
1739, Rachel, daughter of Andrew Beal. Removed in 1745 to 
Milford. From 1750 to 1760 his name is on the executive com- 
mittee of that town. On May 17, 1760, he was a passenger by the 
sloop " Charming Molly " from Boston to Annapolis, Nova Scotia. 
He took his live stock with him in the vessel, and settled near Round 
Hill, Annapolis co. In 1770 he was one of the largest land own- 
ers in the township of Annapolis, being returned in census as hold- 
ing one thousand four hundred and ninety-eight acres. Died in 
Annapolis co.. Nova Scotia. 

Anna Kent. b. 1750. Daughter of Isaac. Born at Milford, 
Mass., July 25, 1750. Married in 1770 Israel Longley. Had 
fourteen children. Died in Annapolis Co., N. S. 



GRISWOLD. 

Francis Griswolcl. d. 1652. A resident of Cambrido:e in 
1636. Had grant of land there at that date. He was a drummer. 
A member of the Cambridge church. Bought various properties at 
Cambridge. Proprietor also of Charlestown, whither he removed 
about 1650. Bought at Charlestown March 16, 1650, house, 
orchard and lands from Richard Wilson of Boston, the witness to 
the transaction being Increase No well. He died at Charlestown 
Oct. 2, 1652, leaving two children : Elizabeth, who married Jonas 
Palmer of Rehoboth, and Hannah. His widow, Mary, married 



PKOGENITORS OF ANNA LONGLEY. 43 

about January, 1654, William Bullard of Charlestown, formerly 
of Dedham. They were members of the church at Cambridge in 
1658. She died at Charlestown May 17, 1685. William Bullard 
died at Dedham Dec. 24, 1686, ae. about 92. 

Hannah Oriswolcl. 1645-1691. Daughter of Francis. 
Born at Cambridge March 4, 1645. Married at Dedham May 21, 
1662, John Kent. The " wife of brother John Kent " was received 
into the church at Dedham Feb. 5, 1665. She died Jan. 9, 1691. 



GANNETT. 

Matthew Gannett. 1618-1694. Was born in England, 
probably Dorsetshire, in 1618. Settled at Hingham about 1638. 
Married, about 1650, Hannah, daughter of Joseph Andrews. In 
1651 he removed to Scituate where he purchased an interest in the 
Conahasset lands from Anna Yinal. He died at Scituate in Octo- 
ber, 1694. 

Joseph Gannett. 1660-1693. Son of Matthew. Born at 
Scituate about 1660. He married Aug. 15, 1682, Deborah, daugh- 
ter of Henry Coombs. Died of yellow fever at Scituate, Aug. 14, 
1693. 

Hannah Gannett. 1684-1767. Daughter of Joseph. Born 
in 1684 at Scituate. Married at Scituate, Sept. 8, 1703, Ebenezer 
Kent. Died at Hingham March 27, 1767. 

A member of this family, Benjamin, married in 1783 Deborah 
Sampson* (1760-1827), who was a soldier in the revolutionary 
war. Having spun and wove the cloth, she had made for herself a 
suit of male attire and enlisted in the 4th Massachusetts regiment of 
the Colonial army, in April 1781, under the name of Robert Shurt- 
liffe. She served two and one-half years with the army and took 
part in several engagements, without her sex being discovered until 
after the close of the war, though she was wounded. She was dis- 
charged Oct. 23, 1783, with a pension, the same as other soldiers. 
Soon afterw^ards she married Benjamin Gannett and became the 
exemplary mother of a respectable family of children. After her 
death her pension was continued to her husband during his lifetime. 

* A member of an earlier generation of her family, Abigail Sampson, married in 
1703 Experience Bent, grandson of the first John Bent (see Besbedge). 



44 GENEALOGICAL NOTES. 



ANDREWS. 

Thomas Andrews, d. 1643. Came from Devonshire, Eng., 
when, probably, well up in years, with his son, Joseph. Settled 
at Hingham previous to 1635, his grant of land there being adjacent 
to that of his son. Died at Hingham. Rev. P. Hobart records 
Aug. 21, 1643, "Old Thomas Andrews dyed." 

Joseph Andrews. 1597-1680. Son of Thomas. Born in 
Devonshire, Eng., about 1597. Probably married in England and 
brought his wife, Elizabeth, with him to America. Settled early 
at Hingham where he was one of the grantees of 1635. Was the 
first town clerk of Hingham. Deputy for three years. He removed 
to Duxbury, where he lived some time and held various offices. He 
returned, later, to Hingham and there died Jan. 1, 1680. His 
widow, Elizabeth, died Aug. 12, 1688. 

He erected the Andrews garrison house, probably the oldest 
building in Hingham, which passed, in 1665, into , the possession 
of his son, Thomas. Thomas was Deputy from Hingham and 
Captain of militia. He perished, with most of his command, when 
on the ill-managed and disastrous expedition against the French in 
Canada, under Sir William Phipps, in 1690. 

The will of Joseph Andrews provided carefully for his widow and 
family and remembered many of his descendants. Among the items 
in the bequests were : to " daughter Hannah Gannett 1 pewter 
platter," "daughter Mary Beard 1 pewter platter and 1 candlestick," 
to son Joseph " my sword and my gold ring and a bible " and 
"unto all my grandsons that bear my name, Joseph, each of them 
and every one of them a pewter platter." His son Ephraim got the 
estate in New Jersey. His son Thomas was made sole executor. 

Hannah Andrews. 1622-1700. Daughter of Joseph. Born 
in England about 1622. Married about 1650, Matthew Gannett. 
Died July 21, 1700. 

The Andrews family of England furnished most important sup- 
port to both the Plymouth and the Massachusetts colonies in their 
early struggles for existence. 

Richard Andrews, who contributed so liberally to the Puritan 
funds, was an alderman of London. Thomas Andrews, who was 
probably a brother of Pichard, was Puritan Lord Mayor of Lon- 
don, and appointed as his chaplain Samuel Mather — brother of In- 
crease and uncle of Cotton Mather. Thomas and Richard An- 



PROGENITORS OF ANNA LONGLEY. 45 

drews were both of the London Adventurers' company of merchants 
which organized the early emigrations. 

Sir Edmund Andros (Andrews) was a royalist, an officer of the 
British army and a favorite at Court. He was governor successively 
of New York, New England, Virginia and Guernsey, where his 
family had been long established. His official reputation has suf- 
fered from " the caustic pens of the Mathers and the bitter spite of 
the early New England historians." (Henry Ferguson.) What 
relationship the above bore to the Hingham branch of the family has 
not been established. 



COOMBS. 

Henry Coombs, d. 1669. Was a proprietor at Salem in 
1635. Bought property at Marblehead in 1648 and removed there. 
"Way-warden" at Marblehead in 1656. In 1667 there was a com- 
plaint* against him for saying that Mr. Walton, who was school- 
master and acted as minister at Marblehead, " preached nothing but 
lies and he could prove him to be a knave." It does not appear 
that he was hanged for this offence but died in 1669. His widow, 
Elizabeth, died in 1709. 

Deborah Coombs, d. 1728. Daughter of Henry. Born at 
Marblehead. Married at Marblehead, Aug. 15, 1682, Joseph Gan- 
nett. Married (2) at Scituate, June 17, 1703, Joseph House. 
Died at Scituate, Sept. 19, 1728. 



BEAL. 

John Beal. 1588-1688. Came to America in the " Diligent," 
from London, and landed at Boston, Aug. 10, 1638. He brought 
with him his wife, five sons, three daughters and two servants. He 
was of the parish of Hingham, in the Forehoe Hundred, Norfolk 
CO., England. He settled at Hingham, Mass. Was Deputy in 
1649 and '59. His wife, Nazareth, was daughter of Edmund Ho- 
bart. She died in 1658. He married (2) March 10, 1659, Mary, 
widow of his old friend Nicholas Jacob, of Hingham, Eng., who 

* Prosecutions and decisive punishments for various forms of the crime of Use ma- 

jeste were frequent under the Puritan despotism. As an instance, from Salem court 

records Feb. 27, 1650 : " Apphia, wife of John Clemence of Marblehead, to be set by 

the heels in the stocks at Marblehead half an hour for saying that the governor was 

the death of her father." 



46 GENEALOGICAL NOTES. 

was one of the pioneers at Hingham, Mass., in 1633. She died at 
Hingham, June 15, 1681. John Beal was found dead in his yard 
April 1, 1688. Judge Sewall writes on that date : " Father Beal 
of Hingham dies set. 100 years." His lengthy will, proved before 
Sir Edmund Andros, is on record at Suffolk Probate, Boston. 

Jeremiah Beal. 1631-1716. Son of John. Born in Eng- 
land in 1631. Married Nov. 18, 1652, Sarah, daughter of William 
Ripley. He was Lieutenant in militia, selectman and Representa- 
tive from Hingham for several years. Died Aug. 10, 1716. 

Jeremiah Beal. 1655-1703. Son of Jeremiah. Born at 
Hingham, May 13, 1655. Married May 22, 1677, Hannah, daugh- 
ter of Andrew Lane. Was selectman for several years. Died 
April 21, 1703. 

Andrei;v Beal. 1686-1762. Son of Jeremiah. Born at 
Hingham, Jan. 27, 1686. Married Dec. 14, 1715, Rachel, daugh- 
ter of Joshua Bates. Died Jan. 10, 1762. 

Bachel Beal. b. 1719. Daughter of Andrew. Born at 
Hingham, Aug. 25, 1719. Married at Hingham by the Rev. Ne- 
hemiah Hobart, Oct. 25, 1739, Isaac Kent. Died in Annapolis 
county, Nova Scotia. 



HOBART. 

The author of " One thousand years of Hubbard history " claims 
that the Hubbards and Hobarts are descended from the Norse Sea- 
King Hubba, who ravaged portions of France and England in the 
latter half of the ninth century. According to Miss Yonge and 
Bardsley's new dictionary these names are derived from St. Hubert, 
patron of hunters. 



Edmund Hobart. 1574-1646. Born about 1574. Came 
to America from Hingham, Norfolk co., Eng., in 1633, with wife, 
three children and one servant. His wife was Margaret Dewey.* 

* In the Dewey family history and life of George Dewey, Rear Admiral TJ. S. N., 
who destroyed the Spanish ileet at Manila Bay in 1898, it is stated that Margaret Dew- 
ey was born about 1575 and there is given the following copy from parish records of 
Hingham, Eng. : " Edmund Hubberte and Margaret Dewe were married the vij daie 
of September 1600." 



PROGENITORS OF ANNA LONGLEY. 47 

He settled first at Charlestown, where he was one of ten citizens 
who agreed that only certain desirable persons should be allowed to 
"sit down and dwell in the town." He was admitted to the church 
in Boston in 1634. His wife, Margaret, died soon after arrival in 
America. He married (2) at Charlestown, Oct. 10, 1634, Sarah, 
widow of the Rev. John Lyford.* 

Edmund Hobart became one of the settlers of Hingham in 1635. 
He was Deputy for several years. He died at Hingham March 8, 
1646. His widow died at Charlestown June 23, 1649. 

' Nazareth Hobart. 1601-1658. Daughter of Edmund. 
Born in England about 1601. Married in England John Beal. 
Died at Hingham, Sept. 23, 1658. 



Rev. Peter Hobart, the first minister of Hingham, was a brother 
of Nazareth. He came out about two years later than his father, 
arriving at Charlestown, June 8, 1635, with wife and four children, 
in one of a fleet of seven vessels. He was one of the founders of 
Hingham, Sept. 18, 1635. He was the keeper of the famous 
" diary," which for forty-four years chronicled the births, deaths, 
marriages, etc., which came under his notice. 

Peter Hobart appears to have been a staunch royalist and other- 
wise entirely out of sympathy with the Puritan str anglers of religious 
freedom. He had many clashes with the Puritans. In 1646 he was 
fined £20. for "seditious practices and derogation of and contempt 
for authority." According to Gov. Winthrop he was prevented from 
preaching in Boston " for that his spirit had been discovered to be 
averse to our ecclesiastical and civil government and he was a bold 
man and would speak his mind." Peter Hobart was born in 1604 
and died Jan. 20, 1679. The names of eighteen of his children 
are recorded. 



Garret A. Hobart (1844-1899), who was elected vice-President 
of the United States in 1896, when William McKinley was first 
elected President, was of the 10th generation from Edmund Hobart 
and Margaret Dewey. 

*Rev. John Lyford was sent out, in Maixh, 1624, by the Company in England, from 
his charge at Lebeleglish, Ireland, to administer to the spiritual needs of the Plymouth 
settlement. Whether the Company neglected to inform itself as to his ecclesiastical 
and other leanings, or sent him with malice prepense, is not clear, but certain it is that 
he proved so very unacceptable to the brethren at Plymouth, and so stern an adherent 
to the faith of his forefathers, that he was banished from Plymouth colony a few months 
after his arrival. 



48 GENEALOGICAL NOTES. 

RIPLEY. 

William Ripley, d. 1656. Was of Wymondham, Norfolk 
CO., England. Came to America in the "Diligent," in 1638, 
bringing with him his wife, two sons and two daughters. He was 
a weaver. Settled at Hingham in 1638. His wife died at Hing- 
ham. He married (2) Sept. 29, 1654, Elizabeth, widow of Thomas 
Thaxter. William Ripley was buried at Hingham July 11, 1656. 
His widow married (3) Jan. 20, 1658, John D wight.* She died 
July 18, 1660.1 

Sarah Ripley, d. 1715. Daughter of William. Born in Eng- 
land. Married at Boston, Nov. 18, 1652, Jeremiah Beal. Died at 
Hingham, June 29, 1715. 



LANE. 

William Lane. d. 1654. Came from England with adult 
family, including two sons and four daughters. Settled at Dorches- 
ter in 1635 and received several grants of land there. He was a 
maltster and yeoman. His wife, Agnes, who was received into the 
church about 1637, died some time before him. His daughter, 
Mary (Long) , lived with him at Dorchester up to the time of his 
death in 1654. 

Andrew Lane. d. 1675. Son of William. Born in Ens:- 
land. Settled with his brothei*, George, at Hingham — one of the 
original proprietors of 1635. He had various grants and made 
many purchases of lands at Hingham and in that vicinity. He was 
a felt-maker and farmer. He died at Hingham May 1, 1675. His 
widow, Triphena, died at Hingham June 2, 1707, said to have been 
aged about 95. 



"to' 



Hannah Lane. 1658-1719. Daughter of Andrew. Born 
at Hingham Sept. 30, 1658. Married May 22, 1677, Jeremiah 
Beal. Died Sept. 19, 1719. 

* John Dwight of Dedham died in i66L Timothy Dwight, his oldest son, was for 
many j^ears town clerk of Dedham and also Representative in 1692. It is recorded of 
Timothy that " he inherited the estate and virtues of his father and added to both." 
He also, incidentally, added considerably to the family, as he had six wives and four- 
teen or fifteen children. His sixth wife died a few days after him in 1718. Two of his 
namesakes have beeu presidents of Yale University. 

t " July 18. 1660. Elizabeth, sometime wife to Thos. Thaxter and to \Vm. Ripley 
then to Mr Dwight at Dedham was drowned in a well." — Diary of Rev. P. Hobart. 



PROGENITORS OF ANNA LONGLEY. 49 

BATES. 

Clement Bates. 1595-1671. Son of James Bate of Lvdd, 
Kent, Eng. Brother of James of Dorchester (see p. 16). Came 
to America in the "Elizabeth," in 1635, with wife, Anna, and five 
children. Settled at Hingham, where he was a grantee of Sept. 18, 
1635. The old "Anchor Tavern" was on a portion of his estate. 
His wife, Anna, died at Hingham, Oct. 1, 1669, set. 74. Clement 
Bates died Sept. 17, 1671— "Sabb. day night" (Hobart). His 
oldest son, James, who married Ruth, daughter of Rev. John Ly- 
ford, was made his executor. 

Joseph Bates. 1630-1706. Son of Clement. Born in Eng- 
land in 1630. Married at Hingham Jan. 9, 1658, Esther, daugh- 
ter of William Hilliard. Was selectman at Hingham for many 
years. Died April 30, 1706. 

Joshua Bates. 1671-1757. Son of Joseph. Born at Hing- 
ham Aug. 14, 1671. Married Jan. 15, 1696, Rachel, daughter of 
Ibrook Tower. ' Died at Hingham in April, 1757. 

Hon. John Lewis Bates (b. 1859), who was elected governor of 
the state of Massachusetts, Nov. 4, 1902, is a descendant of Joshua 
and of the 9th generation from Clement. 

Rachel Bates. 1696-1780. Daughter of Joshua. Born at 
Hingham July 14, 1696. Married Dec. 14, 1715, Andrew Beal. 
Died Nov. 20, 1780. 

Another emigrant-member of this family was Edward Bates, who 
settled at Weymouth. Just what his relationship was to James and 
Clement has not been established. 

From Edward was descended Joshua Bates of Weymouth (b. 
1788) " whose munificence endowed and permanently founded the 
Boston Public Library." He died in London, Eng., as head of the 
house of Baring Brothers & Company, in 1864. 



HILLIARD. 

William Hilliard. An early resident of Boston and subse- 
quently of Hingham, with wife Esther. He had three children — 
William, Esther and Mary — baptized by the Rev. P. Hobart at 
Hingham, Feb. 25, 1655. 

Esther Hilliard. 1642-1709. Daughter of William. Born 
in Boston, March 25, 1642. Married Jan. 9, 1658, Joseph Bates. 
Died June 3, 1709. 



50 GENEALOGICAL NOTES. 

TOWER. 

John Tower. 1609-1702. Son of Robert and Dorothy (Da- 
mon) Tower. Baptized at Hingham, Eng., May 17, 1609. Set- 
tled at Hingham, Mass., in 1637. Had several grants and made 
many purchases of lands in Hingham. He married, Feb. 13, 1639, 
Margaret, daughter of Richard Ibrook. He took an active part in 
current affairs and opposed both civil and religious authorities when 
occasion required. He was prominent in the Lieut. Eames military 
difficulties. He fortified and garrisoned his house at his own ex- 
pense, but gained and kept the confidence of the Indians. He was 
a man of both courage and diplomacy. He died Feb. 13, 1702. 

Ibrook Tower. 1644-1731. Son of John. Born at Hing- 
ham, Feb. 7, 1644. Married April 14, 1668, Margaret, daughter 
of John Hardin. Married (2) Aug. 6, 1712, Patience, widow of 
Daniel Hobart, whose father, Edmund, was twin brother of Rev. 
Peter Hobart. He was selectman in 1699. Died Nov. 21, 1731. 
His widow. Patience, died Dec. 22, 1747, as. 80. His son, Daniel 
(b. 1671), died when on the ill-fated expedition to Canada, in 
1690, with Capt. Thomas Andrews. 

Rachel Tower. 1675-1757. Daughter of Ibrook. Born 
at Hingham, March 16, 1675. Married, Jan. 15, 1696, Joshua 
Bates, whom she survived. Died in old age, after 1757. 

Charlemagne Tower (1809-1889) of Philadelphia, distinguished 
as lawyer, soldier and man of affairs, author of the Tower gen- 
ealogy, was 7th in descent from John Tower. His son, Charle- 
magne (b. 1848), was appointed United States ambassador to 
Austria-Hungary in 1897, later to Russia, and is the present (1903) 
ambassador to Germany. 



IBROOK. 

Richard Ibrook. d. 1651. Probably from Suffolk co., 
Eng. Came to America with his wife and three unmarried daugh- 
ters and settled at Hingham in 1635. He died Nov. 14, 1651. 
His widow died April 4, 1664. He left no son. The name has 
been preserved as a given name among the descendants of his 
daughters. 



PROGENITORS OF ANNA LONGLEY. 51 

Margaret Ibrook. 1617-1700. Daughter of Richard. Bom 
in England about 1617. Married at Charlestown, Feb. 13, 1639, 
John Tower. Died at Hingham, May 15, 1700. Her sister, El- 
len, married Joshua, brother of Rev. Peter Hobart, and her sister 
Rebecca was second wife of Rev. Peter Hobart. Another sister, 
Christian, married in England William Cockraine and came with 
him to America in 1637. 



HAEDIN. 

The Hardins were among the very early settlers in New England. 
The first representatives of this name are believed to have come 
with Governor Robert Gorges, son of Sir Ferdinando, in 1623, and 
to have received their grants of land from him. Sir Robert Gorges, 
a kinsman of the above, married, in England, Mary, daughter and 
heiress of William Hardin or ^Harding. The Gorges plantation 
was at the ancient Wessagussett, now Weymouth and Brain tree. 



John Hardin. Was of Brain tree. He was probably a son of 
Joseph and Martha Hardin, of Braintree and Plymouth, and born 
about 1625. His uncle, Richard Hardin, who died at Braintree, 
Dec. 27, 1657, and who appears to have had a brother John and a 
son John, left a widow, Elizabeth, who was related to John Kent. 



Margaret Hardin. 1647-1705. Daughter of John. Born 
in 1647. Married April 24, 1668, Ibrook Tower. Died at Hing- 
ham, Nov. 19, 1705. Sarah, another daughter of John Hardin, 
married, in 1669, John Tower, brother of Ibrook. 



VI. 



THE PROGENITORS OF MARY ELIZA BATH. 



BATH. 

John Bath. 1751-1816. When the long struggles between 
English and French, for supremacy in old Acadia, were drawing to 
a close, England found herself in possession of a land, inhabited, 
as far as it was inhabited, by French people and by Indians with 
French sympathies.. The English, after forty years possession, did 
not succeed in founding a single English settlement, while the French 
population had steadily increased. In 1749, largely through the 
efforts of Capt. Thomas Coram, the British government was induced 
to exert itself to send some English-speaking people into the coun- 
try. In June, 1749, Col. Edward Cornwallis arrived and estab- 
lished at Chebouctou a colony of 2,500 persons — mostly retired 
soldiers. This was the foundation of Halifax. After the deporta- 
tion of the Acadians came the immigration of 1760, from New 
England, and in 1783 the "loyalist" immigration.* About mid- 
way between these two latter dates a number of families from the 
north of England settled in Annapolis county, f In one of these fam- 
ilies came a young Yorkshireman bearing the distinguished old family 
name of Bath. J John Bath came with his uncle, William Clarke, 

* These emigrations are often confounded by United States genealogical writers but 
they were entirely distinct movements and a quarter of a century apart. Concerning 
the "loyalists," " tories " or "refugees," a Canadian writer, Charles G. I). Koberts, 
says; "They brought to our making about thirty thousand peO])le, of the choicest 
stock the colonies could boast * * * Canada owes deep gratirude indeed to her 
southern kinsmen, who thus, from Maine to Georgia, picked out their choicest spirits 
and sent them forth to people our northern wilds." 

The emigration of 1760, to the western part of Nova Scotia, though a comparatively 
small affair, was more in the nature of the present (1902-3) great movement which is 
taking ])lace from the central and western states into the fertile, unoccupied lands 
of the Canadian North West. 

t About this time there came also several familit^s from the north of Ireland, includ- 
ing the Sproules, "a family whose male members were the equals of the Bents and 
Youngs ill muscular endowments." (Calnek). 

X Bath, Bathe or de Bathe — a very ancient English family, with Irish branches. Henry 
de Bathe was Lord Chief Justice of England in the reign of Henry III. There are 
people in the United States of the name of Bath who are of German origin. 



PROGENITORS OF MARY ELIZA BATH. 53 

"a highly respectable tenant farmer of Yorkshire," — so runs the 
tale — who brought with him his four children. His wife, Dorothy, 
died just before his departure from England. They sailed from the 
city of Hull, near which they had lived, to Halifax, N. S., bring- 
ing with them in the vessel their horses, farming implements, etc. 
Young Bath, who was only about nineteen years of age, was landed 
at Halifax, with the horses, and took them across Nova Scotia to 
Annapolis, though the road from Windsor was then but a mere 
trail, even the mails being carried on foot. John Bath was the 
first to convey His Majesty's mails to Halifax on horseback. At 
Annapolis, John Bath was joined by his uncle, who had come 
from Halifax by water, and they settled in the township of Gran- 
ville, on land bought from Mr. Fletcher, the Deputy Provost Mar- 
shal of the county. Being settled in his new abode yoimof John 
Bath followed the custom of the day and, about 1776, took unto 
himself a wife, in the person of one Kezla, a daughter of John 
Hill. John Bath became an honored citizen of the township of 
Granville. There he spent his days, tilling the fertile soil and cul- 
tivating the apple-trees of the beautiful Annapolis valley, and there 
he died Nov. 3, 1816, ». 6b. 
His children were : 

i. Elizabeth, b. May 19, 1777. m. about 1802, Obadiah Parker. 

d. January, 1867. 

ii. John, see below. 

iii. Mary, b. 1783. m. 1804, Israel Longley. d. Nov. 29, 1842. 

iv. Tamar, b. 1785. m. 1806, Valentine Troop. 

V. Hannah, b. 1787. d. 1802. 

vi. Robert, b. 1789. m. 1812, Minetta Willoughby. 

vii. Henrietta Cooper, b. 1792. m. 1812, Abner Troop. 

John Bath. 1779-1860. Son of John. Born in Granville, 
N. S., Jan. 18, 1779. Married (1) in 180:^, Elizabeth, daughter 
of Jacob Troop. Married (2) in 1820, Phoebe, also daugliter of 
Jacob Troop. Married (3) in 1842, widow Curry. He was 
Colonel in militia. Justice of the Peace, etc. He died in Gran- 
ville, May 11, 1860. 

His children were : 

i. Hannah Stoneth, b. 1804. m. Dec. 24, 1822, Israel Longley 
Bent. d. Oct. 29, 1847. 

ii. Kezia Ann, b. 1806. d. 1807. 

iii. Kezia Ann, b. 1809. m. Feb. 22, 1831, James Edwin Reed, 
d. Oct. 7, 1842. 

iv. John Fletcher, b. May 23, 1811. m. April 24, 1838, Eliza- 
beth Ann (b. l^sl6. d. Dec. 24, 1855), daughter of David 
Shaw and Catharine (Wade) Hall. Justice of the Peace, etc. 
Died Sept. 3, 1891. 



54 GENEALOGICAL NOTES. 

V. Mary Eliza, see below. 

vi. Jacob Valentine, b. 1818. d. 1841, iinm. 

vii. Elizabeth, b. May 3, 1822. m. February, 1851, Charles Fitz- 
Randolph.* d. April 30, 1877. 

viii. Abner Troop, b. April 28, 1825- m. Oct. 28, 1852, Sarah, 
daughter of William Handley Chipraan.t d. July 11, 1880. 
His widow, Sarah, m. Dec. 6, 1887, Charles Parker and was 
living in 1902. 

ix. Henrietta Maria, b. Jan. 29, 1833. m. March 24, 1856, 
Samuel Strong, Dry Goods merchant of Halifax, N. S. (d. 
March 5, 1895). Living in 1902. 

X. Robert, b. June 2, 1836 m. (1) Dec. 28, 1858, Matilda, daugh- 
ter of Rev. William Wilson. She d. March 23, 1880. He 
m. (2) Dec. 7, 1883, Ada, daughter of Silas Morse and Maria 
Anne (Witherspoon) Troop. Living in 1902. 

Mary Eliza Batli. 1813-1878. Daughter of John. Born 
in Granville, N. S., Sept. 29, 1813. Married Nov. 22, 1838, Gil- 
bert Bent. Died at St. John, N. B., Dec. 12, 1878. 



HILL. 

No family ante-dates the Hills in New England. One of this 
name came in the expedition of Bartholomew Gosnold in the " Con- 
cord " in 1602 — the first direct voyage across the Atlantic to New 
England. This was eighteen years before the soil at Plymouth was 
made sacred by the feet of the Pilgrims, and even before the first 
settlements were made in Nova Scotia by the French. Gosnold's 
plantation at Cuttyhunk, now in the town of Gosnold, did not prove 
a success, and the party returned to England, but the Hills have 
taken part in a large proportion of the settlements in New Eng- 
land since that date. 

* Charles Fitz-Randolph was proprietor of the " Belle " farm, near Bridgetown, N. S. 
His grandfather, Robert Fitz-Randolph, a loyalist, acquired this property from Col. 
Christopher Prince, M.P.P. It was originally known as " Bellivean's," from the name 
of the French Acadian proprietor, who was one of those unfortunate " exiles." 

Hon. Archibald Drummond Fitz-Randolph of Fredericton, N. B., of beloved and 
honored memoi-y, who was born in 1833 and died May 14, 1902, was a nephew of 
Charles. 

t William Handley Chipman of Bridgetown, N. S. (born 1801) was fifth in descent 
from the emigrant John Chipman, from Dorsetshire, Eng., in 1631 (see p. 24). He was 
a brother of Zachariah Chipman of St. Stephen, N. B., whose daughter, Alice Starr, 
married in 1867, Sir Samuel Leonard Tilley, CB., KCMG. (1818-1896), who was gov- 
ernor of the province of New Brunswick and finance minister of Canada. 

Also fifth in descent from John Chipman was Ward Chipman, (1754-1824), loyalist, 
justice of the Supreme Court of New Brunswick and father of Ward Chipman, (1787- 
1851), chief justice of New Brunswick. 



PROGENITORS OF MARY ELIZA BATH. 55 

John Hill. Was one of the emigrants of 1760 from Massa- 
chusetts* to Annapolis county, Nova Scotia. He went from Boston, 
Mass., by the "Charming Molly," May 17, 1760, and settled in 
Granville, N. S., where, in a census, taken in 1770, he was put 
down as having a household of five persons. He had three daugh- 
ters and one son, Samuel, married in Annapolis co., N. S. 

Kezia Hill. Daughter of John. Probably born in Massa- 
chusetts about 1753. Married in Granville, N. S., in 1776, John 
Bath. Died in Granville, N. S. 



TROOP. 

Valentine Troop. 1713-1776. Among the settlers, from 
Massachusetts, in the township of Granville, Annapolis co., Nova 
Scotia, within a few years after the granting of the township, in 
1759, was Valentine Troop. He probably settled there about 1763. 
The frontage of his lot on the Annapolis river is still known as 
Troop's Point. A half century before his advent this locality had 
been the scene of fighting between English and French, when a 
force from New England made the unsuccessful attempt of 1707 to 
capture Port Royal. Valentine Troop married, in Massachusetts, 
Catharine Church (Calnek's History). Several of his children were 
probably born before his settlement in Nova Scotia. 

Valentine Troop was probably an original immigrant^ who came 
to Boston not many years before his removal to Nova Scotia. 
Boston was his place of residence for several years prior to his 
migration. In April, 1762, "Valentine Troop, of Boston, in our 
County of Suffolk, Trader," recovered a judgment against Cornelius 

* He was probably a descendant of Master John Hill who may hare come to Boston in 
Gov. Wiuthrop's fleet in 1630. He went from Massachusetts to Plymouth. Was at Ply- 
mouth in 1632, and settled at Dorchester in 1633, where he had a large family by wife, 
Frances. He died at Dorchester, May 31, 1664. His widow, Frances, married Jonas 
Austin in 1667 and died in 1676. He had a son John (b. about 1638 j, who settled in 
Sherborn and married (1) Hannah Johnson, (2) Elizabeth (Thorpe), widow of Benjamin 
Bullard. He died at Sherborn, Jan. 23, 1718. The other sons of first John Hill were 
Jonathan, one of the early settlers of Bridgewater, Mass., Samuel, who died at Dor- 
chester in 1709, and Ebenezer who was of Dorchester. 

t Some genealogists have naturally supposed that Valentine Troop was a descendant 
of William Troop, 1638-1704 (the progenitor of the Throops), of Barnstable 1666 and 
Bristol 1687. William Troop, tradition has it, was a scion of the English house of 
Scrope (Scroop) who varied the name to Troop, upon coming to America, after the 
execution, by Charles 11., in 1660, of Col. Adrian Scrope, one of the judges of Chai-les 
I. Investigation, however, does not show any probability of Valentine having been a 
descendant of William. Some aver a connection with the Valentines of Long Island, 
N. Y. In Nova Scotia there is a firmly-rooted tradition that Valentine Troop came 
originally from Germany, though Troop does not appear to be a German name, and it 
would seem more probable that he was of Scotch or English origin. 



56 GENEALOGICAL NOTES. 

Bollan, Baker, of Boston, for £40 and costs, in the "Inferior Court 
of Common Pleas," Boston. An execution was issued, under which 
a property of Bollan, situated on Frog Lane, Boston, was taken 
and transferred to Valentine Troop, the execution being returned as 
satisfied July 19, 1762. (Suifolk Deeds.) 

Like others of the settlers who took up the Acadian lands, Val- 
entine Troop saw some military service in the campaigns against 
the French. He served under JefFry Amherst, in the expedition 
against the French in Canada, in 1759. In a return of that year, 
in the Massachusetts archives, his age is put down as 45, and resi- 
dence, Boston. He also served for eight months, in 1760, under 
Major eTeremiah Greene, in the company of Capt. Giles Harris. 
He received his discharge Oct. 30, 1760. This company may have 
been at Annapolis, N. S. Valentine Troop died in Granville, 
N. S., August 16, 1776. 

Many of his descendants have been prominent, in Canada, in 
Church and State, as well as in mercantile affairs. 

Jacob Troop, b. 1758. Son of Valentine. Born in Mas- 
sachusetts, about 1758, according to Calnek. In census of Gran- 
ville, N. S., in 1770, he is put down as a householder or proprietor. 
Married in 1774, Anna, daughter of Abner Morse. Died in Gran- 
ville, N. S. 

One of his grandchildren was Jacob Valentine Troop, who set- 
tled in St. John, N. B., founded the shipping house of Troop & 
Son, and was, at one time, a Representative from St. John to the 
New Brunswick House of Assembly. 

Elizabeth Troop. 1784-1818. Daughter of Jacob. Born 
in Granville, N. S., in 1784. Married in 1803, John Bath. She 
died in 1818, and John Bath married, for second wife, her sister 
Phoebe (b. 1798). 



MORSE. 

Samuel Morse. 1585-1654. Born in England about 1585. 
Came to America in the "Increase" in 1635, with wife Elizabeth. 
Lived first at Watertown. Was one of the founders of Dedhara, 
where he settled in 1637. Was town treasurer and selectman at 
Dedham. When the settlement of Medfield was projected he cast 
in his lot with the new town. He died at Medfield, Dec. 3, 1654. 
His widow, Elizabeth, died at Dedham, June 20, 1655, ae. 68. 



PEOGENITORS OF BIARY ELIZA BATH. 57 

Daniel Morse. 1613-1688. Son of Samuel. Born in Eng- 
land in 1613. On his arrival in America he went to Watertown, 
where he became a freeman in 1635. A few years later he sold his 
lands at Watertown to John Sherman and settled in Dedham. He 
married, probably about 1638, Lydia, daughter of Anthony Fisher. 
He took a prominent part in the settlement of Medfield and Sher- 
born. Removed to Medfield in 1651. In 1658 he settled in the 
district which afterwards became the town of Sherborn, where he 
had purchased a tract of 800 acres of land. He sold his homestead 
in Medfield to Thomas Thurston. Was selectman at Medfield in 
1655-7, and at Sherborn from 1678 until his death. He died June 
5, 1688. It is written: "in all public meetings and elections in 
Sherborn precedence was uniformly yielded to him as long as he 
lived." 

Daniel Morse. 1641-1702. Son of Daniel. Born at Ded- 
ham, Jan. 31, 1641. Settled at Sherborn. Married in 1669, Eliz- 
abeth, daughter of Capt. George Barbour. Died at Sherborn, 
Sept. 29, 1702, leaving nine children. 

Daniel Morse. 1672-1719. Son of Daniel. Born at Sher- 
born, July 10, 1672. Married in 1696, Susanna, daughter of 
Thomas Holbrook. Died at Sherborn, April 4, 1719, leaving four 
children. 

Obacliah Morse. 1704-1753. Son of Daniel. Born Aug. 
15, 1704. He inherited the homestead of his father at Sherborn. 
Married Nov. 28, 1728, Mercy, daughter of William Walker. He 
died in 1753, leaving ten children and a large estate. Among the 
items of personal property in his inventory was " one negro man 
servant " valued at £300. His widow, Mercy, was appointed to 
administer- his estate. 

Abner Morse. 1731-1803. Son of Obadiah. Born at Sher- 
born, Sept. 25, 1731. Married at Sherborn, Feb. 19, 1756, Anna, 
daughter of Jonathan Church. He sailed from Boston, May 17, 
1760, by the sloop "Charming Molly" for Annapolis, N. S., tak- 
ing with him in the vessel 2 oxen, 2 cows and 1 three-year-old horse. 
He settled in the township of Annapolis, entering upon some of the 
former possessions of the banished Frenchmen. In 1770 he held 
1046 acres of land. He died in the township of Annapolis, Nova 
Scotia, Dec. 28, 1803. 

Anna Morse, b. 1758. Daus^hter of Abner. Born at Sher- 
born, Dec. 30, 1758. Married in Annapolis co., N. S., in 1774, 
Jacob Troop. Had nine children. Died in Annapolis co. 



58 GENEALOGICAL NOTES. 

FISHER. 

Antliony Fisher. 1591-1671. Son of Anthony Fisher, who, 
in the latter part of the reign of Queen Elizabeth, lived in Eng- 
land, in the parish of Syleham, county of Suffolk. His estate, 
known as Wignotte, was upon the south bank of the Waveney river. 
This Anthony Fisher died April 11, 1640. His will was probated 
in London in December, 1641. His wife was Mary, daughter of 
William Fiske* of the parish of South Elmham St. James, Suffolk 
CO. The Fiskes w^ere an old Puritan family of Suffolk, descended 
from Daniel Fisc, w^ho received a grant of land from King John in 
1208, through Symond Fiske of the manor of Stadhaugh in Suffolk. 

Anthony Fisher, the emigrant, was baptized at Syleham, Eng., 
April 23, 1591. He came to America with wife Mary, and chil- 
dren, probably in the "Rose," arriving at Boston, June 26, 1637. 
He settled at Dedham. His wife, Mary, was received into the 
Dedham church March 27, 1642, but Anthony was one of the men 
who did not bow promptly to the Puritan despotism. He proved 
very obstreperous. The minister and deacons had a great deal of 
trouble with him. He was "proud" and "haughty" and did not 
become sufficiently " humbled " to be " comfortably received into ye 
church " until March 11, 1645, when he was about 54 years of age, 
and, probably, as a necessary prelude to holding office. He was 
selectman at Dedham in 1646 and '47, Deputy in 1649, and held 
various other offices there. He was also selectman for several years 
at Dorchester. His wife, Mary, dying, he married (2) at Dorches- 
ter, Nov. 14, 1663, Isabel, widow of Edward Breck. He died at 
Dorchester, April 28, 1671. His widow, Isabel, died June 21, 
1673. 

Lydia Fisher. 1620-1691. Daughter of Anthony. Born 
in England about 1620. Married, probably about 1638, Daniel 
Morse. Died Jan. 29, 1691. 

The Worshipful Daniel Fisher, her brother, was Speaker of the 
House of Deputies for several years, and a member of the govern- 
ment of Massachusetts at the time of his death in 1683. 



BARBOUR. 

George Barbour. 1615-1685. Born in England about 1615. 
Sailed for America in the "Transport" July 4. 1635. He became 

* Several members of the Fiske family came to America in the early immigrations. 
Among notable Fiske descendants was John Fiske, the historian and scientist, who 
died in 1901. 



PROGENITOKS OF MARY ELIZA BATH. 59 

a townsman at Dedham in 1640, but did not take the freeman's 
oath there until 1647. He was a member of the Ancient and Hon- 
orable Artillery company in 1646. Was one of the founders of 
INIedfield, where he was chief military officer, served ten years on 
the board of selectmen, twenty-three years consecutively as town 
clerk* and many years as Deputy to the General Court. He mar- 
ried Xov. 24, 1642, Elizabeth, daughter of Rowland Clarke. She 
died in 1683. He married (2) Joanna (Faxon), widow of An- 
thony Fisher the second. 

Capt. George Barbour died in 1685 and administration of his 
estate was granted to his son Samuel. 

His widow, Joanna, died Oct. 16, 1694. 

Elizabeth Barbour. 1651-1714. Daughter of George. 
Born at Dedham, April 11, 1651. Married in 1669 Daniel Morse. 
Died at Sherborn, Sept. 22, 1714. 



CLAEKE. 

KoTvlaiul Clarke, d. 1638. Was a proprietor at Dedham 
in 1637, and there died Feb. 2, 1638. His widow, Mary, was ad- 
mitted to the church in April, 1642, and died May 22, 1642. 

Elizabeth Clarke, d. 1683. Daughter of Rowland. Prob- 
ably born in England. Married at Dedham, Nov. 24, 1642, Capt. 
George Barbour. Died at Medfield in 1683. 



HOLBROOK. 

Joliii Holbrook. Was of Weymouth and Dorchester. Prob- 
ably a brother of Thomas Holbrook of Dorset, Eng., who sailed 
from Weymouth, Eng., March 20, 1635, with wife and family, and 
settled in Weymouth, Mass. John Holbrook was made a freeman 
May 13, 1640. He purchased a large milhng property at Wey- 
mouth in 1656 and 1669. Appears also to have been a landowner 
at Braintree. He was Deputy from Weymouth in 1651. His first 

* Capt. George Barboui- drew and attested many documents for the people of Med- 
field. The pioneers, as a rule, were not good penmen. They wielded both the sword 
and the ploughshare better than the pen. A large proportion of our forefathers " made 
their marks." 



60 GENEALOGICAL NOTES. 

wife, Sarah, died Jan. 14, 1644. He married (2) Elizabeth. He 
died after 1674. 

John and Thomas Holbrook were both proprietors of the town of 
Rehoboth. 

Thomas Holbrook. 1624-1705. Son of John. Probably 
born about 1624. Made a freeman in May, 1645. He lived at 
Dorchester until about 1652, when he became one of the pioneers 
at Boggestow (afterwards Sherborn). He was selectman, etc., at 
Sherborn. Was a large landowner in Sherborn and Dorchester. 
He married (1) Experience, daughter of Hopestill and Experience 
Leland. He married (2) May 28, 1656 (the first marriage per- 
formed by the commissioners of Medfield) Hannah, daughter of John 
and Margaret Shepard of Brain tree. She died Aug. 28, 1668. He 
married (3) at Medfield, Jan. 26, 1669, Margaret Bowker.* She 
died April 9, 1690. He married (4) Oct. 31, 1693, Mary Rogers, 
whom he also survived. Thomas Holbrook died April 11, 1705. 
His will bequeathed his estate to eight children and three grandchil- 
dren. 

Susanna Holbrook. 1674-1717. Daughter of Thomas. 
Probably born at Sherborn about 1674. Married in 1696, Daniel 
Morse. Died at Sherborn April 14, 1717. 



WALKER. 

Thomas Walker, d. 1697. Was a resident of Boston in 
1661 and not long after this date settled in Sudbury, where he went, 
it appears, to take charge of a free school. He was innholder at 
Sudbury, in 1672. His daughter, Mary, married Rev. James 
Sherman. He died at Sudbury in 1697. The first bequest in his 
will is " to my wife, Mary Walker, all my moveables, and negro 
Sambo, to be solely at her disposal." His widow, Mary, married, 
about December, 1705, Capt. John Goodenow (q. v.). By a docu- 
ment dated Feb. 17, 1707, and recorded June 16, 1719, she gave 
her " negro Sambo " his freedom at her decease. She died at Sud- 
bury, Nov. 4, 1731. 

William Walker. 1666-1732. Son of Thomas. Born at 
Sudbury, July 22, 1666. Married May 6, 1686, Sarah, daughter 

* Edmund Bowker died at Sudbury in March, 1667, leaving a widow Margaret. This 
Edmund Bowker, or another, had lived at Dorchester and been miller there. 



PROGENITORS OF MARY ELIZA BATH. 61 

of John Goodenow. Died at Sudbury, Oct. 3, 1732. The old 
Walker garrison house at Sudbury was built by William Walker 
or his father. Among the items of his inventory is a considerable 
collection ^of books. 

Mercy Walker, b. 1709. Daughter of William. Born about 
1709. Married at Sudbury, Nov. 28, 1728, Obadiah Morse. 
Married (2) at Sherborn, May 25, 1757, Ezekiel Newton of South- 
borough. Probably died at Southborough at an advanced age. 



GOODENOW. 

Edmund GoodenoTV. 1611-1688. Born about 1611. Came 
from Dunhead, Wilts, England, with wife, Anne, two young sons 
and one servant, in the "Confidence," in 1638, and settled at Sud- 
bury, where he was one of the proprietors of 1639. His brothers, 
John and Thomas, with their wives and families, also came in the 
" Confidence,"* in which vessel came many others of the Sudbury 
settlers. Edmund Goodenow was Deputy from Sudbury, Captain 
of militia, etc. His wife, Anne, died at Sudbury, March 9, 1675, je. 
67. He died at Sudbury, April 5, 1688, leaving an only son John. 

Some of the Goodenow descendants have substantially benefitted 
the town of Sudbury by the Goodenow bequest for the poor, the 
Goodenow library, etc. 

John Goodenow. 1635-1721. Son of Edmund. Born in 
England about 1635. Married Sept. 19, 1656, Mary, daughter 
of Thomas Axtell. She died in 1704. He married (2) about 
December, 1705, Mary, widow of Thomas Walker, who survived 
him (see Walker) . 

In 1652 the town of Sudbury made a bargain with John Goode- 
now " to beat the drum twice every Sabbath and also to beat it for 
service on ^ Lecture Day.' " 

John Goodenow was clerk of Sudbury in 1667. He w^as Cap- 
tain of militia. He died at Sudbury, Aug. 6, 1721. 

Sarah Goodenow. Born 1666. Daughter of John. Born 
at Sudbury, July 2, 1666. Married at Sudbury, May 6, 1686, 
William Walker. She survived her husband and was living in 1734. 

* Among those who came to America in the ♦' Confidence " was a tall and sturdy lad 
of 18 by the name of Thomas Whittier. He settled in Salisbury and married Rnth 
Green. One of his descendants was John G. Whittier the poet. 



62 GENEALOGICAL N0TE8. 

AXTELL. 

Tliomas Axtell. 1619-1646. According to the records of 
St. Peter's church, Berkhamstead, Hertfordshire, England, Thomas 
Axtell was baptized Jan. 26, 1619. He was a brother of Col. 
Daniel Axtell (b. Berkhamstead May 26, 1622), an officer under 
Cromwell and one of the judges of Charles I,, who was executed 
when Charles II. ascended the throne. Thomas Axtell and wife, 
Mary, settled in Sudbury about 1642. He died there at the early 
age of twenty-seven and was buried March 8, 1646. His widow, 
Mary, married June 16, 1646, John Maynard, maltster, who died 
at Sudbury, Dec. 10, 1672, leaving a widow Mary. 

Mary Axtell. 1639-1704. Daughter of Thomas. Baptized 
at Berkhamstead, Eng., Sept. 25, 1639. Married at Sudbury, 
Sept. 19, 1656, John Goodenow. Died at Sudbury, April 14, 1704. 



CHURCH. 

Richard Cliurcli. 1609-1668. Born in England about 1609. 
Probably came to America in 1630, in the fleet of Gov. John Win- 
throp, and landed at Boston. He appears to have gone from Boston 
to Weymouth, and thence to Plymouth. He is referred to as being 
at Plymouth in a communication, dated Feb. 6, 1632, from the 
government of the Plymouth colony to that of the Massachusetts 
colony. He was a carpenter. He made the gun-carriages and 
coffins at Plymouth. In conjunction with John Tomson he built 
the first church edifice at Plymouth in 1648. He was a volunteer 
in the war against the Pequot Indians and served as sergeant under 
Myles Standish. He married, about 1635, Elizabeth, daughter of 
Richard Warren, who came in the "first ship." Had various land 
transactions at Plymouth. In 1649 he sold his estate at Plymouth 
(Eel River) to his brother-in-law Robert Bartlett, and soon after- 
wards settled in Hingham. He purchased at Hingham, Jan. 24, 
1653, from Thomas Joy, "one halfe or moytie of his corne mill." 
Was town officer and selectman at Hingham. He died Dec. 27, 
1668, at Dedham, probably at the home of his son Caleb, who set- 
tled there at about that time. Was buried at Hingham. 

His will gave his houses and lands, half-interest in mill, share in 
iron works at Taunton, etc., to his widow, Elizabeth, during her life. 

Richard Church had a family of twelve children, one of whom was 
the renowned Col. Benjamin Church. 



PROGENITORS OF MARY ELIZA BATH. 63 

Caleb Church. 1646-1722. Son of Richard. Probably born 
at Plymouth in 1646. He made a deposition April 1, 1686, in 
which he stated his age at "about thirty-nine years." He married 
(1) Dec. 16, 1667, Joanna, daughter of William Sprague. He 
married (2), previous to June, 1680, Deborah, who died at Water- 
town, Jan. 17, 1691. He married (3) at Watertown, Nov. 6, 
1691, Rebecca Scottow,* whom he also survived. She died, prob- . 
ably, in 1717. 

Caleb Church removed from Hingham to Dedham about 1668 
and there engaged in his business of miller and millwright. About 
1676 he left Dedham and settled in Watertown, where he again en- 
gaged in the milling business and where he also, according to Bond's 
History, kept tavern from 1686 to 1711. He does not appear to 
have been in any haste to submit himself to the Puritanical powers 
of the day. He did not become a " freeman " until March 22, 1690, 
when he was between forty and fifty years of age, and, apparently, 
as a necessary preliminary to his first election as a " selectman." He 
was selectman for seven years and Representative from Watertown 
in 1713. He had numerous real estate transactions. One of his 
deeds bears the names of Nathaniel Saltonstall, Thomas Danforth, 
Joseph Elliot and Cotton Mather. Among his various investments 
he purchased in connection with his brother. Col. Benjamin Church, f 

* She was probably the widow of John Scottow, who was born May 6, 1644, and died 
at Boston, in the small-pox epidemic of 1678, leaving a widow Rebecca. John Scottow 
was the only son of Thomas and nephew of the celebrated Joshua Scottow of Boston, 
Mass., and Scarborough, Me. Joshua Scottow acted as agent for Charles Latour in his 
dealings with the Massachusetts government and for forwarding ships, men and sup- 
plies fi-om Boston to Latour's fort at the mouth of the river St. John — the place where, 
in later days, 5000 stricken and persecuted " loyalists " found refuge and established the 
town and district of Parr, incorporated in 1785 as St. John. St. John, N. B., was the 
first and for a long time the only incorporated town in British America. Some of La- 
tour's and Scottow's contracts are on record at the Suffolk Registry of deeds, Boston, 
where there are also some bearing the name of the heroine of Fort St. John, Frances 
Mary Jacquelin, Lady de la Tour. Joshua Scottow was also attorney for Major Ed- 
ward Gibbons, who advanced large amounts to the Sieur de la Tour to aid him in his 
struggles with his rival and fellow-adventurer the Sieur d'Aulnay de Charnisay. Ma- 
jor Gibbons held a mortgagee on Latour's fort and property at St. John. At his house 
Latour staid when on his visits to Boston. 

Joshua Scottow made a vovage to Latour's fort at the river St. John and a second 
one to Port Royal (Annapolis, N. S.). He had a bill against Latour for oyer four thou- 
sand pounds. Some of Scottow's original accounts against Latour are in the Boston 
Public Library. 

fCol. Benjamin Church was the famous leader of the Colonial military forces and the 
hero of King Philip's war. In July, 1704, he commanded an unsuccessful expedition 
against Annapolis, IS. S. He wrote a history of King Philip's war, which was edited 
and published by his son Thomas, The wife of Col. Benjamin Church was Alice, 
daughter of Constant and Elizabeth (Collier) Southworth. Constant was son of Alice 
(Carpenter) Southw^orth who, upon the death of her first husband, in England, came 
to America and became the second wife of Governor William Bradford. Mary, an- 
other daughter of Constant Southworth, married David Alden, son of John Alden. 
The youngest daughter of Constant Southworth was named Priscilla, after Priscilla 
Molines, to whom John Alden " spoke." 

Edward Church, son of Benjamin, was the grandfather of the celebrated Dr. Benja- 
min Church, who favored the British cause m revolutionary times, and of Edward 
Church who was United States consul at Lisbon. Charles Church (1682-1747), son of 
Benjamin, was sheriff of Bristol county. Another member of this talented family was 
Hoa. Thomas Church of Rhode Island. 



64 GENEALOGICAL NOTES. 

a property adjoining Tiverton (now R. I.) which included the whole 
of the great water-power there. Caleb sold his half of the prop- 
erty to Benjamin, Aug. 8, 1691, for £100. Benjamin erected a 
saw-mill, grist-mill and fulling-mill there in 1703. In 1714 Ben- 
jamin Church, then resident at Little Compton, sold the whole prop- 
erty to Richard and Joseph Borden for £1000. Its value would be 
very large today, for upon this property and about the old Indian 
Quequechan — " falling water " — is now gathered the great manu- 
facturing city of Fall River. 

Caleb Church died at Watertown in the early part of 1722 (prob- 
ably Feb. 9). He left three married daughters and son Isaac. 

John Coolidge was appointed administrator of his estate. 

Isaac Church. 1678-1752. Son of Caleb. Born at Water- 
town, June 27, 1678. Had twin sister Rebecca. Married at 
Watertown, by Rev. Samuel Angier, May 14, 1702, Mary Hutch- 
ins, probably daughter of Nicholas Hutchins.* Isaac Church and 
wife, Mary, removed, with their son Jonathan, from Watertown to 
Sherborn in 1745. They occupied part of the same premises with 
Jonathan, both at Watertown and Sherborn. Isaac was livinor at 
Sherborn in 1747 and probably died there about 1752. 

Jonathan Church, b. 1712. Son of Isaac. Born at Wa- 
tertown. Baptized May 11, 1712. Married Aug. 21, 1734, 
Thankful, daughter of Jonathan Bullard. He sold his lands in 
Watertown and removed, in 1745, to Sherborn, where he purchased 
a large property from Francis Brinley. He also bought, June 11, 
1744, 100 acres of land in Marlborough. He was a member of the 
board of assessors at Sherborn for five years. In 1760 he removed 
to Nova Scotia in the emigration caused by the proclamation of Gov- 
ernor Lawrence, opening up for English settlers the lands of the 
deported French Acadians. He sailed from Boston to Annapolis, 
N. S., by the sloop " Charming Molly," May 17, 1760, and settled in 
Annapolis county. Probably died in Annapolis co., Nova Scotia. 

* Among the patentees to whom the charter of the Massachusetts Bay company was 
granted, was Thomas Hutchins. He was one of the " assistants " in the government 
of the company in England and may have come to America or had grants of land 
here. John Hutchins ( 1604-1686) with wife Frances was of Newbury and Haverhill. 
In 1653 the wife of John Hutchins of Haverhill was brought before the court charged 
with the awful offence of wearing a silk hood. Upon evidence being presented that 
she was "brought up above the ordinary way " she was discharged, without any pen- 
alty being inflicted. Nicholas Hutchins was of Lynn. He married April 4, 1666, Eliz- 
abeth, daughter of George Farr. Was a soldier in King Philip's war. Removed about 
1681 to Groton. Died at Lancaster in 1693, leaving a widow, Mary. His son, John, 
was admitted administrator of his estate. Joseph "Wheelock, of Lancaster, was ap- 
pointed Jan. 10, 1694, guardian of his daughter Mary. This name appears to have been 
spelled also Hudson. Nicholas Hudson was admitted a freeman of Massachusetts, 
March 9, 1637. Thomas Hudson was one of the early grantees of Lynn. 



PROGENITOES OF MARY ELIZA BATH. 65 

Anna Chnrcli. 1737-1811. Daus^hter of Jonathan. Born 
at Watertown, Nov. 20, 1737. Married by Rev. Samuel Porter 
at Sherborn, Feb. 19, 1756, Abner Morse. Died in 1811 in the 
township of Annapolis, Nova Scotia. 



WAEREN. 

Kichard Warren. 1580-1628. Pilgrim Father. Born in 
England, probably about 1580. Master Kichard Warren came to 
America in the "Mayflower" in 1620. He was not of the original 
band of Pilgrims, but came from London. His wife, Elizabeth, 
and five daughters came out in the "Anne" in 1623. He had two 
sons born in New England. "Grave Kichard Warren" was the 
twelfth signer of the celebrated "compact" of Nov. 21, 1620. 
"Bore a deep share in the difficulties and troubles of the settlement." 
(Nathaniel Morton). He escaped the first sickness, which followed 
the landing upon the bleak New England coast just at the beginning 
of winter, and which carried off so many of that brave little band 
of pioneers, but died at Plymouth in 1628. His widow, Elizabeth, 
died at Plymouth, Oct. 2, 1673, ae. about 90, having survived her 
husband 45 years and lived to see at least 75 great grandchildren 
among her Mayflower descendants. 

Elizabeth Warren. 1616-1670. Daughter of Richard. 
Born in England about 1616. Married at Plymouth in 1635, 
Kichard Church. Died at Hingham, March 4, 1670. 



SPRAGUE. 

William Spragne. 1609-1675. Three brothers of the name of 
Sprague — Kalph, Kichard and William — came to America together 
and landed at Naumkeag (now Salem) in 1628 or '29. They came, 
it appears, on their own account and at their own cost, not being 
of those bodies of emigrants who were shipped to America by the 
Merchant Adventurers' companies. They were sons of Edward 
Sprague of Upway, Dorsetshire, England, who died there in Octo- 
ber, 1614, leaving a widow. Christian, and six children. They 
came either with John Endecott, in the " Abigail " — which sailed 
from Weymouth, England, June 20 and arrived at Naumkeag, 



GQ GENEALOGICAL NOTES. 

Sept. 6, 1628 — or very soon afterwards. Upway, the home of the 
Spragues, is but a few miles from Dorchester, in Dorsetshire, whence 
came John Endecott.* William was the youngest of the three 
brothers, being about 20 years of age when he arrived in America. 
In the summer of 1629 he went, with a few others, on an expedi- 
tion through the woods from Naumkeag to a place called by the 
Indians Mishawum, where he was among the first to form a settle- 
ment — the foundation of Charlestown. He found there one white 
man, a settler by the name of Thomas Walford, a smith, who was 
ens^ao^ed in "manufacturing contrabands of war for the Indians." 
After a considerable settlement had been established at Mishawum 
there was still on the opposite promontory, called by the Indians 
Shawmut, but one white settler, a man by the name of Blaxton or 
Blackstone.f The city of Boston is there now. William Sprague 
married, in 1635, Milicent, daughter of Anthony Eames. He re- 
moved, in 1637, with his father-in-law, from Charlestown to Hing- 
ham. He was selectman and held various other offices at Hingham. 
He died at Hingham, Oct. 26, 1675. 

Joanna Sprague. 1645-1678. Daughter of William. Born 
at Hingham, December, 1645. Married there Dec. 16, 1667, 
Caleb Church. Died at Watertown, July 11, 1678. 



EAMES. 

Anthony Eames. Born in England, probably about 1590. 
Was at Charlestown, with wife, Margery, in 1634. Removed to 
Hingham in 1637, where he was Deputy for several years. He 

* John Endecott was one of the six original grantees of the Massachusetts territory, 
March 19, 1628, and Avas governor of the Massachusetts colony for some sixteen years. 
He was a Puritan fanatic and religious despot. In 1659 and '60, under his administra- 
tion, four Quakers, (also fanatics), one of whom was a woman, Avere hanged on Bos- 
ton common on account of their religion. They came to America seeking religious 
freedom but happened upon an ecclesiastical despotism in Massachusetts nxuch Avorse 
than anything they had left behind them in England. In Massachusetts ''the clergy 
evervAvliQre justified that compulsory conformity Avhich in England they had resisted 
to the death." (Haliburton). 

These terrible persecutions of the Quakers were only stopped by Royal interference 
in the shape of a mandamus from Charles II. to John Endecott under date of Sept. 9, 
1661. 

t William Blackstonc, an English dissenter, settled at Avhat is now Boston as early, 
probably, as 1625 or '26. The Puritans found him liA'ing there and claiming the terri- 
tory by right of disoOA'ery and possession. He found the bigotry and intolerance of 
the ncAv-comers unbearable and fled from the community, remarking, in the bitter- 
ness of disappointed feeling, that he had left England because he did not like the " Lord 
Bishops " and should noAv leaA^e them because he could not stand the " Lord Brethren." 
He Avent, in 1635, to a place knoAvn by the Indians as Wawepoonseag, noAv Cumber- 
land, R. I. He Avas the first settler AAdthin the original limits of the town of Rehoboth. 
After him came Roger Williams, the Quaker. Blackstone died in 1675. 



PEOGENITOES OF MARY ELIZA BATH. 67 

was the first military commander of the town. Was chosen Cap- 
tain of the Hingham train-band in 1645. His election was dis- 
puted and resulted in the famous controversy which long convulsed 
the colony. He does not appear to have always been in accord 
with the Puritan powers. In 1651 he and his son Mark bought 
property at Marshfield and removed there. He was Deputy for 
many years from Marshfield. He or his son was Deputy to the 
General Court for about thirty years. Probably died at Marsh- 
field. 

Milicent Eames. d. 1696. Dauo-hter of Anthonv. Born 
in England. Married at Charlestown, in 1635, William Sprague. 
Died at Hingham, Feb. 8, 1696. 

Another daughter of Anthony Eames was the first wife of the 
brave Captain Michael Pierce, who was killed, with nearly the 
whole of his command, in an eno-aoi-ement with the Indians in 1676. 



BULLAED. 

cTeorg-e Bullarcl. 1608-1689. Born in England about 1608. 
Was an early settler at Watertown, where he was made a freeman in 
1641. His first wife, Margaret, died at Watertown, Feb. 8, 1640. 
He married (2) the same year Beatrice Hall. She was admitted 
to the church in Boston, June 20, 1640, and died at Dedham, May 
29, 1652. He married (3) April 30, 1655, the widow Mary 
Marplehead. He removed to Weston, probably about 1660. Died 
Jan. 14, 1689. 

Jonathan Bullarcl. 1647-1724. Son of George. Born at 
Watertown, July 12, 1647. Large landowner at Watertown. 
Married Dec. 9, 1669, Esther, daughter of Joseph Morse. Mar- 
ried (2), in 1721, Elizabeth, widow of Richard Barnes of Marl- 
borough. She survived him. He died at Weston, Aug. 12, 1724. 

Jonathan Bullarcl. 1672-1719. Son of Jonathan. Born 
at Watertown, Dec. 25, 1672. Settled at Weston. Married, 
previous to 1700, Anna. Died Sept. 14, 1719. 

His widow, Anna, was appointed to administer his estate and as 
guardian to his minor children. 

She married, May 24, 1727, Edward Harrington of Watertown, 
who died in 1736. She survived him. 



68 GENEALOGICAL NOTES. 

Thankful Billiard, b. 1715. Daughter of Jonathan. Bom 
Dec. 2, 1715. Married by the Rev. Seth Storer at Watertown, 
Aug. 21, 1734, Jonathan Church. Probably died in Annapolis 
CO., Nova Scotia. 



MORSE. 

Joseph Morse. 1587-1646. Born about 1587. Came from 
Ipswich, England, about 1635, and settled at Ipswich, Mass. He 
was a brother of Samuel, of Dedham. He brought various proper- 
ties at Ipswich. Died at Ipswich in 1646. His will made his 
widow, Dorothy, his sole executrix and gave to her and his son 
John each a dwelling-house. He gave his new cloak to Joseph, 
his great bible to Hannah and other bibles and books to his children. 

Joseph Morse. 1610-1691. Son of Joseph. Born in Eng- 
land about 1610. Came to America in the "Elizabeth," from 
Ipswich, England, in 1634. His father came out a year or two 
later. He settled at Watertown, where his name is on the earliest 
list of proprietors. He married, in 1636, Esther, daughter of John 
Peirce. He died March 4, 1691, and his estate was administered 
by his son John. 

Esther Morse. 1645-1719. Daughter of Joseph. Born at 
Watertown, March 7, 1645. Married at Watertown, Dec. 9, 1669, 
Jonathan BuUard. She was living in 1711 and probably died 
about 1719. 



PEIRCE. 

John Peirce. 1588-1661. Born about 1588. Is thought 
to have come from Norwich, Norfolk co., England. Was an early 
settler at 'Watertown. Made a freeman in March, 1639. Was 
one of the original proprietors of Lancaster but does not appear to 
have ever lived there. Died at Watertown, Aug. 19, 1661. His 
widow, Elizabeth, died at Watertown, March 12, 1667, a. about 79. 

Esther Peirce. Daughter of John. Born in England. Mar- 
ried in 1636, Joseph Morse. Was living in 1667. Probably died 
before her husband. 



PROGENITORS OF MARY ELIZA BATH. 69 

Master John Peirce was one of the company of London mer- 
chants which "financed" the Pilgrims. In his name the first patent 
of the Plymouth company was taken out and he is the "Mr. I. P." 
to whom is dedicated that fiimous old document " Mourt's Relation " 
of the settlement at Plymouth. His relationship to the above John 
Peirce, of Watertown, who is described as a man of " very good 
estate," is not known, but no doubt many of the relatives and con- 
nections of those merchants first interested in the emigration enter- 
prises, came to America. 



NAMES OF PERSONS. 



Name may appear more 


than once upon a page. 


• 4 




Alden, David . 


. 63 


Barnes, Elizabeth . 


67 


John 


63 


Richard 




. 67 


Mary . 


. 63 


Bartlett, Robert 


• 


62 


Priscilla . 


63 


Bate, James 




16,49 


Amherst, Jeffry 


. 56 


Thomas . 


• 


16 


Andrews, Elizabeth 


44 


Bates, Alice 




. 16 


Ephraim 


. 44 


Anna 


• 


49 


Hannah 


. 43, 44 


Clement 




. 49 


Joseph 


43,44 


Edward . 


• « 


49 


Richard 


44 


Esther 




. 49 


Thomas 


. 44, 50 


family 


• 


. 16 


Andros, Sir Edmund 


. 45, 46 


James 


. 15 


, 16, 49 


Angier, Rev. Samuel 


. 64 


John Lewis 




. 49 


Appleton, Major . 


40 


Joseph , 




49 


At Lese, Lucy . 


. 29 


Joshua 


46 


, 49, 60 


Angary, John 


33 


Mary 




. 15,16 


Austin, Frances 


. 55 


Rachel 


46 


, 49, 50 


Jonas 


55 


Richard . 


• 


16 


Axtell, Daniel . 


. 62 


Ruth . . . . 




. 49 


Mary- 


. 61, 62 


Bath, Abner Troop 


• i 


54 


Thomas 


61,62 


Ada . 




. 54 


Bacon, Abigail 


26 


Elizabeth 


. 53 


, 54, 56 


Alice . 


. 25 


Elizabeth Ann . 




. 53 


Daniel 


25 


family 




52 


John . 


. 25, 26 


Hannah 




. 53 


Mary 


22, 23, 26, 27 


Hannah Stoneth 




53 


Michael 


25, 26 


Henrietta Cooper 




. 53 


Nathaniel 


26 


Henrietta M. . 




54 


Rebecca 


. 25 


Jacob Valentine 




. 54 


Samuel . 


26 


John . . 11, 52 


!, 53,54 


, 55, 56 


Sarah . 


. 25 


John Fletcher . 




. 53 


Stephen . 


. 22, 26, 27 


Kezia 




53,55 


Bagley, Jonathan 


. 34 


Kezia Ann 




. 53 


Bancroft, Alice 


25 


Mary 




53 


Elizabeth . 


. 25 


Mary Eliza 


11) 


62, 54 


George . 


25 


Matilda . 




54 


Thomas 


. 25 


Minetta 




. 63 


Barber, Elizabeth . 


. 24, 25 


Phoebe . 




53,56 


Richard 


. 24, 25 


Robert 




53,54 


Barbour, Elizabeth 


. 57,59 


Sarah 




54 


George 


57, 58, 59 


Tamar 




. 53 


Joanna . 


59 


Bathe, Henry de . 




62 


Samuel 


. 59 


Batter, Edmund 




. 30 


Bardsley, Charles W. . 


46 


Beal, Andrew 


. '42, 


46, 49 


Baring Brothers & Compa 


ay . .49 


Hannah 




46, 48 



72 



GENEALOGICAL NOTES. 



Beal, Jeremiah 

John . 

Mary- 
Nazareth 

Rachel . 

Sarah 
Beard, Mary . 
Bent, Abigail 

Allen H. 

Amelia 

Amelia Ray- 
Anna . 

Anne 

Annie Maria 

Charles . 

Chas. Grandison 

David 

Elijah . 

Elizabeth 

Elizabeth A. 

Experience 

family 

Prank G. 

George 

Gilbert . 

Gilbert O. . 

Grace 

Hannah S. . 

Hopestill 

Israel Longley 

John 

John Bath . 

Joseph . 

Josiah 

ISIaria Ignacia 

Martha 

Mary 

Mary Eliza 

Matilda . 

Micah 

Nedabiah 

Peter 

Robert . 

Rufus 

Samuel . 

Silas . 

Susan Morse 

Thomas 

William . 
Besbedge, Alice 

Mary 

Thomas 
Best, Robert . 
Bigg, Patience . 

Rachel 
Black stone, William 
Blood, Elizabeth 
Isabel 
Richard . 
Bollan, Cornelius 
B ond, Henry . 



9, 



8 



8, 10, 
10, 



8. 



. 46,48 

45, 46, 47 

45 

45, 47 
42, 46, 49 

46, 48 
44 

15,43 

7 

. 10 

11 

. 10 

. 8,23 

. 11 

9 

. 10 

10, 22, 23 

9, 10 

8, 12, 14 

. 11 
. 15,43 

10, 52 
11 

. 9 
. 11,54 

. 11 
. 9,18 

. 53 

9, 10, 14 

. 53 

12, 15, 43 

. 11 

11, 15, 35 

. 10 

9 

. 7 

9, 10, 23 

11, 54 
11 

9, 10, 18 

10 

10, 12, 15 

9 

. 8 

10 

. 9 

11 

. 10 

9 

. 14 

13, 14, 15 

13, 14, 15 

27 

. 15 

15 

. 66 

39 

. 39 

31,39 

. 56 

63 



Borden, Joseph 

Richard . 
Bourne, Alice 

Elizabeth 

John . 

Richard . 

Ruth . 
Bowker, Edmund . 

Margaret . 
Boydon, Thomas . 
Bradford, Alice 

Gov. William 
Bradstreet, Rev. Dudley 
Breck, Edward 

Isabel 
Breeze, Matilda 
Brewer, Hannah 
Brigham, Mercie . 

Peter Bent 

Robert Breck 

Thomas 
Brinley, Francis , 
Brock, Elizabeth 

Henry 

Rev. John . 

Sarah 
Brown, Rev. Edmund 

Edward . 

Elizabeth . 

Eunice . 

Hannah 

Mary 

Patience 

Thomas . 

William 
BroAvne, Thomas . 
Buckminster, Joseph 
Bullard, Anna 

Beatrice 

Benjamin 

Elizabeth . 

Esther .. 

George 

Jonathan * 

Margaret 

Mary 

Thankful . 

William . 
Caille, M. . 
Cakebread, Sarah . 

Thomas 
Calnek, W. Arthur 
Carpenter, Alice 
Carson, Kit . 
Chandler, Rev. Seth . 
Charles I., King 
Charles II., King 
Charnisay, d'Aulnay de 
Child, Robert . 
Cbipman, Alice S. 

Hope . 



8, 



10, 



37, 



. 64 

64 
. 14 

14 
. 14 

24 
. 24 

60 
. 60 

41 
. 63 

63 
. 34 

58 
. 58 

11 
. 18 

17 

. 8 

8 

. 17 

64 

. 24 

24,25 

24, 25 

24 
. 13 

14 

13, 14 
14 

. 14 

14, 15 

13, 15 

14, 15 

14, 15 

30,31 

. 9 

67 

. 67 

55 

55, 67 

67, 68 

. 67 

64, 67, 68 

. 67 

43, 67 

64, 68 

42,43 

. 32 

19 

. 19 

52, 55, 56 

. 63 

9 

. 40 

55, 62 

55, 62, 66 

63 

. 36 

54 

. 24 



8, 



13, 

13, 
13, 



NAMES OF PEKSONS. 



73 



Chipman, John 

Ruth . 

Sarah 

Ward 

William H. 

Zachariah . 
Church, Alice 

Anna 

Benjamin 

Dr. Benjamin 

Caleb . 

Catharine . 

Charles . 

Deborah 

Edward . 

Elizabeth . 

Isaac 

Joanna 

Jonathan 

!Mary . 

E-ebecca . 

Richard 

Thankful 

Thomas 
Clarke, Dorothy 

Elizabeth . 

Mary 

Rowland 

William . 
Clemence, Apphia 

John 
Cockraine, Christian 

William . 
Collier, Elizabeth 
Cook 

Coolidge, John 
Coombs, Deborah 

Elizabeth . 

Henry 
Coram, Thomas 
Cornwall, Duchess of 

Duke of 
Cornwallis, Edward 

Lord . 
Crispe, Benjamin 

Bridget 

Deliverance 

Elizabeth 

Joanna . 

Jonathan 
Cromw^ell, Oliver 
Curry, Widow 
Cutler, Anna 

Elizabeth 

James 

Lydia 

Mary 

Phoebe 
Damon, Dorothy 
Danforth, Mary 

Thomas , 



62, 



57, 



• 


24,54 




. 24 


• 


64 




. 54 


• 


54 




. 64 


• 


63 




57, 65 


'62, 


63, 64 




. 63 


63, 


64, 66 




. 55 


• 


63 




. 63 


■ 


63 




62, 65 


ft 


64 




63, 66 


64, 


65, 68 




. 64 




63, 64 


62, 


63, 65 




64, 68 




. 63 




53 




. 59 




59 




, 59 




52 




. 45 




45 




. 51 




51 




. 63 




14 




. 64 




43, 45 




. 45 




43,45 




. 52 




29 




. 29 




52 




. 11 


31, 


40, 41 




. 41 




31, 32 




40,41 




31,41 




. 31 




41, 62 




. 53 




20 




18,20 


18, 


19, 20 




19, 20 




20 




. 20 




50 




. 13 




63 



Danforth, Dep.-Gov. Thomas 




. 13 


D'Aulnay de Charnisay 




63 


Davies, Bridget 




. 27 


Robert .... 




27 


Dawson, Annie M. . 




. 11 


Samuel E. . . . 




U 


Thomas 




. 11 


Dewey, Admiral George 




46 


Margaret . . . . 




46,47 


Dinah, negro slave 




26 


Downing, Emanuell 




. 30 


Drake, S. A. ... 




8 


Draper, Mary . 




. 27 


Dudley, Paul 




14 


Dummer, Jer. . 




. 14 


Dupont, Marie Madeleine 




32 


D wight, Elizabeth . 




. 48 


John 




48 


Timothy 




25, 48 


Eames, Anthony . 


50, 


66, 67 


Margery 




. 66 


Mark .... 




67 


Martha 




. 17 


!Milicent 




66, 67 


Thomas 




. 17 


Eaton, Aaron 




10, 11 


Jonas 




. 21 


Lydia .... 




10 


Mary 




. 10 


Eaton & Ray 




10 


Edward III., King . 




. 29 


EdAvard IV., King 




29 


Eliot, Rev. John 




. 22 


Elliot, Joseph 




63 


Elizabeth, Queen 


21, 


35, 58 


Endecott, John . 


36, 


65, 66 


Errington, Ann 




19, 20 


Rebecca 




19, 20 


Evangeline 




. 23 


Evans, Henry 




22 


Farnet, Matthias Claude . 




, 33 


Farnsworth, Matthias . 




33 


Farr, George . 




. 64 


Elizabeth 




64 


Faxon, Joanna . . . . 




. 59 


Felch, Anne .... 




23 


Daniel . . . . 




22, 23 


Ebenezer . . 9, 


22, 


23, 26 


Elizabeth . 


21, 


22, 24 


Hannah .... 


21, 


23, 24 


Henry 


21, 


22, 24 


John . . . 21, 


22, 


23, 24 


Margarett . 




. 21 


Mary . . . 9, 21, 


22, 


23, 26 


Stephen . . . . 




. 23 


Fellows, George Troop 




11 


James I. . . 




. 11 


Susan Morse . 




11 


Felton, E. C. . 




. 7 


Ferguson, Henry . 




45 


Fisc, Daniel 




. 58 



74 



GENEALOGICAL NOTES. 



Fisher, Anthony . 

Daniel 

Hannah . 

Isabel 

Joanna . 

Lydia , 

Mary 
Fiske family . , 

John 

Mary . 

Symond . 

William 
Fitz-Randolph, Archibald D 

Charles 

Elizabeth . . 

Robert 
Fletcher, Mr. 
Foster, Hopestill 

Mary 

Patience . 

Richard . 

Rev. Thomas 
Gannett, Benjamin 

Deborah . 

Hannah 

Joseph 

Matthew 
George III., King 
Gibbons, Edward 
Gifford, Margaret 

Nicholas 
Glover, Alice . , 
GofFe, Joanna . 

Thomas 
Goodenow, Anne . 

Edmund . 

John 

Mary 

Sarah 

Thomas 
Gorges, Sir Ferdinando 

Lady Mary 

Gov. Robert . 

Sir Robert 
Gosnold, Bartholomew . 
Gowing, Elizabeth . 

Robert . 
Green, Ruth 

Samuel A. 
Greene, Jeremiah 
Griffin, Elizabeth . 

Hugh 
Griswold, Elizabeth 

Francis 

Hannah . 

Mary 
Grout, John 
Ilaliburton, Thomas Chandler 
Hall, Beatrice 

Catharine W. 

David S. 



13 



13 



60 

60 



57, 58 59 

. 58 

23 

. 58 

69 

57, 58 

58 

. 58 

58 

. 58 

58 

. 58 

54 

. 54 

54 

. 54 

53 

15, 16 

15, 16 

15, 16 

15 

. 15 

43 

43, 45 

42, 43, 44 

42, 43, 45 

43, 44 

. 41 

41,63 

. 23 

23 

. 16 

29, 30 

29,30 

61 

. 61 

61, 62 

,61, 62 

60, 61 

. 61 

51 

. 51 

51 

. 51 

54 

22,24 

22, 24 

. 61 

32 

. 56 

19 

. 19 

42 

42, 43 

42, 43 

. 42 

20 

. 66 

67 

. 63 

63 



41 
41. 



Hall, Elizabeth A. 

Rebecca . , 
Hardin, Elizabeth 

John 

Joseph 

Margaret 

Martha 

Mary 

Richard 

Sarah 

William 
Harrington, Anna 

Edward 
Harris, Giles . 
Hathorne, John 
Haugh, Rev. Samuel 

Sarah 
Haynes, John 

Rachel 
Hazen, Samuel 
Herds, Silence . 
Hickling, Catharine G. 
Hill, Ebenezer . 

Elizabeth 

family 

Frances . 

Hannah 

John 

Jonathan . 

Kezia . . 

Samuel 
Hilliard, Esther . 

Mary . 

William . 
Hobart, Daniel . 

Edmund 

Ellen . 

Garret A. 

Joshua 

Margaret 

Nazareth . 

Rev. Nehemiah 

Patience 

Rev. Peter . 44, 

Rebecca 

Sarah 
Holbrook, Elizabeth 

Experience 

Hannah 

John 

Margaret . 

Mary 

Sarah . 

Susanna . 

Thomas 
Holland, Elizabeth 
Hough, Franklin B. 
Houghton, Deborah 

Robert jr. . 
House, Deborah 

Joseph 



45, 



46 



47 



,48, 



49, 



57, 



. 53 

25 

. 51 

50,51 

. 51 

50, 51 

. 51 

51 
. 51 

51 
. 61 

67 
. 67 

56 
. 30 

24 
. 24 

27 
. 27 

34 
. 14 

38 
. 55 

55 
. 54 

65 

. 55 

53,55 

. 65 

53,55 

. 55 

49 
. 49 

49 

. 50 

, 47, 50 

. 51 

47 

. 51 

46,47 

46,47 

46 

. 50 

50,61 

. 51 

47 
. 60 

60 

. 60 

59, 60 

. 60 

60 

. 60 

57, 60 

69, 60 

40 
. 33 

34 
. 34 

45 
. 45 



NAMES OF PERSONS. 



75 



Howe, Adam 
David 

Ezekiel . 
LjTnan 
Samuel . 
Howland, Hope 

John 
Hubba, Norse Sea- Kin 
Hubbard, Thankful 
Hubert, Saint . 
Hudson, Nicholas 

Thomas 
Hunt, Mercie . 

William 
Hurd, Mercie 
Hutchins, Elizabeth . 

Frances . 

John . 

Mary 

Nicholas . 

Thomas . 
Hutchinson, Eliakim 
Ibrook, Christian^ . 

Ellen . . " . 

Margaret 

Rebecca 

Richard 
Jacob, Mary- 
Nicholas 
Jacquelin, Frances Mary 
Jaramillo, Maria Ignacia 
Jobson, John 
John, King . 
Johnson, Hannah 
Joy, Thomas 
Kalakaua, King 
Kearney, Gen. S. W. 
Kent, Anna 

Duke of . 

Ebenezer . 

Hannah . 

Isaac . 

James . , 

John 

Joseph . 

Joshua . 

Rachel . 

Thomas 
King, Bridget 

George E. , 

Lydia 

Mary . 

Thomas (Lancaster) 

Thomas (Sudbury) 
Lamson, Barnabas 

Martha 
Lane, Agnes . 

Andrew 

George . 

Hannah 

Mary 



41, 
35 

41, 42 



7 

. 7 

7 

. 7 

7 

. 24 

24 

. 46 

14 

. 46 

64 

. 64 

17 

. 17 

17 

. 64 

64 

. 64 

64 

. 64 

64 

. 14 

51 

. 51 

50, 51 

. 51 

50, 51 

. 45 

45 

. 63 

9 

. 7 

58 

. 55 

62 

. 39 

9 

35, 42 

41 

42,43 

42, 43 

42, 46 
41 

43, 51 
41 

. 41 

42,46 

. 41 

27 

. 10 

10 

. 20 

20, 36 

. 27 

27, 28 

27, 28 

48 

46, 48 

48 

46,48 

48 



Lane, Triphena 

William . 
Langley, Edmund de 

Lucy 

Thomas 

William . 
Latour, Charles 

Lady 
Lawrence, Gov. Charles 

Elizabeth 

George 

Hannah . 
Leber, Jacques . 
Leland, Experience 

Hopestill . 
Lidgett, Elizabeth 

Peter . 
Liliuokalani, Queen 
Loker, Anne 

Bridget . 

Elizabeth . 

Hannah . 

Henry 

John 

Mary 

Rachel . 

Sarah 
Long, Mary . 
Longfellow, Henry W. 
Longley, Anna 

Avard 

Betty 

Bridget 

Deborah . 

Deliverance 

Israel 

James Wilberforce 

Joanna 

John . 29, 30 

Jonas 

Joseph . 

Joshua 

Lydia 

Mary 

Richard . 

Sarah . . 

William 29, 30,31, 
40,41 

Zachariah 
Lothrop, Rev. John . 
Lyford, Rev. John 

Ruth . 

Sarah 
Madeleine, Sister 
Mansfield, Andrew 
Marguerite, Sister 
Maricort, M. de 
Marplehead, Mary . 
Mather, Cotton 

Increase 

Samuel . 



. 48 

48 

. 29 

29 

. 29 

29, 30 

. 63 

. '63 

. 9, 22, 64 

. 40, 41 

40, 41 

. 40, 41 

• • • Oil 

60 

. 60 

28 

> • • ^o 

39 

. 27 

27 

. 18, 27 

18 

18, 27 

26, 27, 37, 38 

. 26, 27, 37, 38 

27 

. 27 

48 

7, 23 

10, 29, 35, 42 

• • • OD 

32 
. 40 

34 

. 31, 32 

10, 34, 35, 42, 53 

35 

. 29, 30, 31, 41 

31, 32, 33, 34, 37 

. 34 

34 

. 40 

. 31, 32 

34, 39, 53 

30 

. 34, 37 

32, 33, 34, 35, 39, 

34 

. 14 

. 47, 49 

. 49 

47 
. 32 

30 
. 32 

32 

. 67 

. 44, 63 

. 44 

44 



76 



GENEALOGICAL NOTES. 



Maynard, John 


. 62 


Parker, John .... 


S8 


Mary 


62 


John P. . . 


. 39 


Meeke, Thomas 


. 30 


Joseph . . . 34, 


38, 39, 40 


Melvni, Bridget 


40 


Margaret . . . . 


. 38 


Metcalfe, Elizabeth . 


. 25 


Mary .... 


. 34, 39 


Middleton, Anne . 


8 


Obadiah . . . . 


. 53 


Milton, Elizabeth . 


. 23 


Rebecca .... 


38 


John 


23 


Samuel . . . . 


. 39 


Minshull, Elizabeth . 


. 23 


Sarah .... 


54 


Margaret 


23 


Parris, Mary . . . . 


. 10 


Sarah 


. 23 


Samuel . . . 


10 


Thomas . 


. . 23 


Penn, William . . . . 


. 23 


William . 


. 23 


Peirce, Elizabeth . 


68 


Molineaux, Alice . 


. . 35 


Esiher . . . . 


. 68 


Molines, Priscilla 


. 63 


John .... 


. 68, 69 


Montoya 


9 


Philip, King . . . . 


. 15 


Moore, Elizabeth 


17, 18, 19 


Phipps, Mary 


13 


Jacob 


18 


Solomon . . . . 


. 13 


John . 


. 17, 18, 19, 20 


Sir William . 


44 


Lydia 


19, 20 


Pierce, Michael 


. 67 


Morse, Abner . 


56, 57, 65 


Platts, Mary .... 


36 


Anna 


. 56, 57, 65 


Porter, Rev. Samuel 


. 65 


D aniel 


. 57, 58, 59, 60 


Prescott, Alice 


35 


Dorothy 


68 


Benjamin . . . . 


. 38 


Elizabeth . 


56, 57, 59 


Catharine G. . 


38 


Esther . 


67, 68 


Elizabeth . 


. 35, 38 


Hannah 


. 68 


Ellen .... 


35,36 


John 


68 


James 


. 35 


Joseph 


67, 68 


Sir James 


35 


Lydia . 


. 67, 58 


John . . .20, 


35, 36, 37 


Mercy 


. 57,61 


Jonas .... 


34, 37, 38 


Obadiah 


.57,61 


Mary .... 


36, 37, 38 


Samuel 


. 56, 57, 68 


Ralph .... 


35 


Susanna 


. 57, 60 


Roger . . 


. 35 


Morton, Nathaniel . 


. 65 


Sarah .... 


34, 37, 38 


McKenzie, Anne . 


8 


William . 


. 38 


McKinley, William . 


. 47 


William H. . 


38 


Nelson, Admiral . 


11 


Prestwich family 


. 29 


Newhall, Thomas 


. 30 


Prince, Christopher 


54 


Newton, Anne 


27 


Ramezay, Claude de . 


. 33 


Ezekiel 


. 61 


Rand, Robert 


30 


Mercy . 


61 


Ray, Amelia 


. 10 


Richard 


. 27 


Charles .... 


• -l- i 


Nichols, Ebenezer. 


23 


Charles R. . 


• « X i 


No well, Increase 


. \. . 42 


Gilbert T. 


. 10, 11 


Orcutt, Wm. Dana 


. \ . 15 


Robert 


• six 


Oughtsorangoughton, 


Chief . \ . 18 


William Hallet 


• -L X 


Page, John . 


\ 20 


William Loutret 


• ■ X X 


Phoebe 


. \ 20 


Read, Rebecca 


38 


Palmer, Acalua L. 


11 


Read & Wright 


. 11 


Amelia Ray 


. 11 


Reed, James Edwin 


53 


Elizabeth 


42 


Kezia Ann 


. 53 


Jonas 


. 42 


Rice, David .... 


9, 18, 20 


William . 


14 


Edmund 


. 17, 27 


Parker, Abigail 


. 39 


Elizabeth . . 17, 


18, 19, 20 


Abraham 


38 


Grace 


. 9, 17, 18 


Charles 


. 54 


Henry .... 


. 17, 19 


Elizabeth 


. 39, 53 


Israel 


. 18 


Hannah 


. 39 


Jonathan 


17, 18, 19 


Jacob 


38 


Martha 


17, 27, 28 


James 


31,37,38 


Matthew 


. 27, 28 



NAMES OF PERSONS. 



77 



Rice, Mercie 

Patience 

Rebecca 

Sarah 

Silas . 

Tamazine 

Timothy 
Riple)', Elizabeth . 

Sarah . 

William . 
Robbins, Judge 
Roberts, Charles G. D, 
Rogers, Mary . 
Roosevelt, President 
Saffin, Elizabeth 

John 
Saltonstall, Nathaniel 
Sambo, negro 
Sampson, Abigail 

Deborah 
Sargent, Hannah 

Hugh . 

Margaret . 

Marie 

Roger 

Ruth 

Sarah 

"William 
Savary, A. W. 
Sawin, Abigail 

Thomas 
Sawtell, Abigail . 

Elizabeth . 

Good wife 

Hannah . 

Obadiah 

Richard 
Scammon, Elizabeth 
Scottow, John 

Joshua . 

Rebecca . 

Thomas 
Scrope, Adrian 

family . 
Sewall 

Samuel . 
Shakespeare, William 
Shaw, Ellen 
Shepard, Hannah 

John 

Margaret . 
Sherman, Rev. James 

John 

Mary 
Sholan, Chief . 
Shurtliife, Robert 
Southworth, Alice 

Constant 

Elizabeth 

^lary 

Priscilla . 



21 



21 



39 



. 17 


Sprague, Christian 


65 


14 


Edward . 


. 65 


18, 19 


Joanna . 


. 63, 66 


27 


Milicent . 


66, 67 


. 18 


Ralph . 


. , . 65 


17 


Richard . 


. 65 


. 18 


AVilliam 


63, 65, 66, 67 


48 


Sproule family 


. 52 


46, 48 


Standish 


35 


46, 48 


Myles 


. 62 


. 8 


Stone, John 


. 27, 28 


52 


Storer, Rev. Seth . 


. 68 


. 60 


Strong, Henrietta M. . 


54 


39 


Samuel 


. 54 


. 28 


Tanguay, Abbe . 


32 


28 


Tarbell, Louis 


. 33 


. 63 


Mitchell 


33 


60 


Peter 


. 33 


15, 43 


St. Jean Baptiste . 


33 


43 


Sarah 


. 32 


23,24 


Thomas 


. 33, 39 


23 


Tennyson, Alfred 


. 30 


. 23 


Thaxter, Elizabeth 


48 


23 


Thomas . 


. 48 


. 23 


Thorpe, Elizabeth 


55 


24 


Throop family 


. 55 


. 23 


Thurston, Thomas 


57 


23, 24 


Tilley, Alice S. 


. 64 


. 10 


Sir Samuel Leonard 


54 


26 


Tomson, John 


. 62 


. 26 


TookanoAvras, Chief 


18 


39, 40 


Tower, Charlemagne 


. 50 


. 40 


Daniel . 


50 


40 


Dorothy . 


. 50 


40, 44 


Ibrook . 


. 49, 50, 51 


40, 41 


John 


50, 51 


. 40 


IMargaret 


. 50, 51 


28 


Patience . 


. 50 


. 63 


Rachel . 


. 49, 50 


63 


Robert 


. 50 


. 63 


Sarah . 


51 


63 


Townsend 


. 14 


. 55 


Troop, Abner 


53 


55 


Ada .... 


. 54 


. 14 


Anna . 


. 56, 57 


13, 46 


Catharine . 


. 55 


. 29 


Elizabeth . 


. 53, 56 


35 


Henrietta C. . 


. 53 


. 60 


Jacob . 


. 53, 56, 57 


60 


Jacob V. . 


. 56 


. 60 


Maria Anne . 


54 


60 


Phoebe 


53, 56 


. 57 


Silas M. 


54 


60 


Tamar 


. 53 


. 36 


Valentine 


53, 55, 56 


43 


William . 


. 55 


. 63 


Troop & Son 


56 


63 


Valentine family 


. 55 


. 63 


Van Blarcom, Anne 


23 


63 


Anthony . 


. 23 


. 63 


Victoria, Queen . 


41 



78 



GENEALOGICAL NOTES. 



Yinal, Anna . 
Wade, Catharine . 

John 

John Chipman 
Walford, Thomas 
Walker, Mary- 
Mercy 

Sarah . 

Thomas . 

William 
Walton, Mr. . 
Warren, Elizabeth 

Richard . 
Watson, John 

Rebecca . 
Weller, Mr. Samuel 
Whale, Elizabeth 

Philemon 

Sarah 
Wheeler, Elizabeth 
Wheelock, Joseph 
Whittier, John G. 

Ruth 

Thomas 
Wilder, Deborah 

John 



. 43 


Willard, Abijah 


53 


Elizabeth 


. 10 


Jonathan . 


10 


Mary . 


. 66 


Rev. Samuel 


. 60, 61 


Simon . 


57, 61 


Williams, Roger 


. 60, 61 


Willoughby, Minetta 


60, 61 


Wilson, Matilda 


57, 60, 61 


Richard 


45 


Rev. William . 


. 62, 65 


Winslow, Jonathan 


62, 65 


Ruth 


18, 19, 20 


Winthrop, Gov. John 


18, 19,20 


Witherspoon, Maria A 


14 


Wolfe, Gen. James . 


18, 19 


Wright, Lydia 


. 18, 19 


Samuel 


. 19 


Wyborne, Elizabeth 


18 


John 


. 64 


Mary . 


61 


Thomas . 


. 61 


Yonge, Charlotte M. 


61 


York, Duchess of . 


. 34 


Duke of 


34 


Young family . 



36, 37, 



47 



38 
38 
14 
14 
31 
39 
66 
53 
54 
42 
54 
24 
24 
, 55, 62 
54 

. 10 

19,20 

19, 20 
21 

. 21 
21 

. 21 
46 

. 29 
29 

. 52 



Ah! whither shall we go? 
Down to the grave, down to those happy shades below, 
Where all our brave progenitors are blest 
With endless triumph and eternal rest. 

— POMFRET. 



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BOSTON PUBl ir i id« 

3 JiiBiiiii 

^ yy^S 06174 358 7 



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