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Full text of "William Carey College Catalog 2000-2001"

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Hattiesburg • Gulfport • New Orleans 
Catalog 2000-2001 



WILLIAM CAREY COLLEGE 



Catalog 
2000-2001 



Hattiesburg, Gulfport, New Orleans, 

Mississippi Mississippi Louisiana 

VOLUME XVIII March, 2000 Number 1 

Information contained in this catalog is subject to change without prior notice. 
Information contained herein shall not constitute a legally binding contract/ agreement 
upon William Carey College. 



Digitized by tine Internet Arciiive 

in 2010 witii funding from 

Lyrasis IVIembers and Sloan Foundation 



http://www.archive.org/details/williamcareycoll0001unse 



HATTIESBURG CAMPUS MAP 



Cherry St. 




GULFPORT CAMPUS 




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1856 Beach Dr. 



NEW ORLEANS CAMPUS MAP 



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TABLE OF CONTENTS 
INFORMATION AND POLICIES 

Calendars 2000-2001 10-12 

General Information and College History 13 

Governance 15 

Locations 15 

Accreditation 15 

Institutional Effectiveness 16 

Nondiscrimination/Disclaimer 16 

Policy on Privacy of Student Records 16 

Applications for Admission 17 

Applications for Housing 17 

Standards for Admission 17 

Hattiesburg Campus Facilities 23 

Gulfport Campus Facilities 25 

General Regulations for Students 26 

Housing Policy for Single Students 27 

FINANCIAL INFORMATION 

Student Expenses 28 

Terms of Payment 30 

Tuition Refund Policy 30 

Board and Rent Refund Policy 31 

Bookstore and Supplies 31 

Financial Aid to Students 31 

Financial Aid General Regulations 32 

Types of Financial Aid 32 

Additional Information on Financial Aid 33 

Institutional Scholarships and Awards 33 

Endowed and Named Scholarships 36 

Restricted Scholarships 44 

Faculty Endowment 46 

Mississippi Mission Endowment 46 

STUDENT LIFE AND CAMPUS ACTIYITIES 

Philosophy of Student Campus Life 47 

Religious Activities 48 

Student Government Association 49 

Student Publications 49 

Clubs and Organizations 49 

Career Services 53 

ADMINISTRATION OF THE ACADEMIC PROGRAM 

Academic Organization of the College 54 

Graduate Program 54 

Academic Guidance Program 54 

Classification of Students 55 

General Academic Regulations 55 

Requirements and Regulations for All Degrees 55 

Trimester Calendar 57 

Transfer Credits 57 

Credit by Examination 58 



Correspondence Credit 59 

Auditing Courses 59 

Listener's License 59 

Examinations, Grades, and Quality Points 59 

Computation of Grades 60 

Academic Discipline 60 

Scholastic Honors 61 

Academic Credits and Course Loads 62 

Attendance Regulations 62 

Change of Class Schedule 62 

Withdrawal from the College 63 

Course Numbering System 63 

Transcripts 64 

Undergraduate Degrees 64 

Core Curricula 65 

Majors and Minors 71 

Academic Program for the Gulfport Campus 73 

Academic Program for the New Orleans Campus 73 

The William Carey College Library System 73 

ACADEMIC PROGRAMS AND COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

School of Arts, Humanities, and Sciences 

Art n 

Biological Sciences 82 

Chemistry and the Physical Sciences 89 

History and Social Science 91 

Language and Literature 94 

Mathematics and Physics 99 

Philosophy 103 

Theatre and Communication 104 

School of Business 109 

School of Education and Psychology 

Education 115 

Health, Physical Education, Recreation, and Coaching _ 122 

Psychology 126 

Owen and Elizabeth Cooper School of Missions and Biblical Studies 129 

Donald and Frances Winters School of Music 132 

School of Nursing 141 

Special Programs 147 

Honors Program 147 

Keesler Center 148 

Bachelor of General Studies, and Keesler Center 148 

Foreign Study 148 

Student Support Services 148 

Servicemember Opportunity College 149 

PERSONNEL 

Board of Trustees 152 

College Administration 153 

Full-Time Faculty 155 

Part-Time Faculty 162 

Faculty Emeriti 162 

Staff 163 

Alumni Association 165 

7 



Information 

and 

Policies 



CALENDAR YEAR 2000 



January 


February 


March 


April 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


1 


12 3 4 5 


12 3 4 


1 


2 3 4 5 6 7 8 


6 7 8 9 10 11 12 


5 6 7 8 9 10 11 


2 3 4 5 6 7 8 


9 10 11 12 13 14 15 


13 14 15 16 17 18 19 


12 13 14 15 16 17 18 


9 10 11 12 13 14 15 


16 17 18 19 20 21 22 


20 21 22 23 24 25 26 


19 20 21 22 23 24 25 


16 17 18 19 20 21 22 


23 24 25 26 27 28 29 


27 28 29 


26 27 28 29 30 31 


23 24 25 26 27 28 29 


30 31 


1 




30 


May 


June 


July 


August 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


12 3 4 5 6 


1 2 3 


1 


12 3 4 5 


7 8 9 10 11 12 13 


4 5 6 7 8 910 


2 3 4 5 6 7 8 


6 7 8 9 10 11 12 


14 15 16 17 18 1920 


11 12 13 14 15 16 17 


9 10 11 12 13 14 15 


13 14 15 16 17 18 19 


21 22 23 24 25 26 27 


18 19 20 21 22 23 24 


16 17 18 19 20 21 22 


20 21 22 23 24 25 26 


28 29 30 31 


25 26 27 28 29 30 


23 24 25 26 27 28 29 


27 28 29 30 31 






30 31 




September 


October 


November 


December 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


1 2 


1 2 3 4 5 6 7 


12 3 4 


1 2 


3 4 5 6 7 8 9 


8 910 11 12 1314 


5 6 7 8 9 10 11 


3 4 5 6 7 8 9 


10 11 12 13 14 15 16 


15 16 17 18 19 20 21 


12 13 14 15 16 17 18 


10 11 12 13 14 15 16 


17 18 19 20 21 22 23 


22 23 24 25 26 27 28 


19 20 21 22 23 24 25 


17 18 19 20 21 22 23 


24 25 26 27 28 29 30 


29 30 31 


26 27 28 29 30 


24 25 26 27 28 29 30 
31 



CALENDAR YEAR 2001 



January 


February 


March 


April 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


12 3 4 5 6 


1 2 3 


1 2 3 


1 2 3 4 5 6 7 


7 8 9 10 11 12 13 


4 5 6 7 8 9 10 


4 5 6 7 8 910 


8 9 10 11 12 1314 


14 15 16 17 18 1920 


11 12 13 14 15 16 17 


11 12 13 14 15 16 17 


15 1617 18 19 20 21 


21 22 23 24 25 26 27 


18 19 20 21 22 23 24 


18 19 20 21 22 23 24 


22 23 24 25 26 27 28 


28 29 30 31 


25 26 27 28 


25 26 27 28 29 30 31 


29 30 


May 


June 


July 


August 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


12 3 4 5 


1 2 


1 2 3 4 5 6 7 


12 3 4 


6 7 8 9 10 11 12 


3 4 5 6 7 8 9 


8 9 10 11 12 13 14 


5 6 7 8 9 10 11 


13 14 15 16 17 18 19 


10 11 12 13 14 15 16 


15 16 17 18 19 20 21 


12 13 14 15 16 17 18 


20 21 22 23 24 25 26 


17 18 19 20 21 22 23 


22 23 24 25 26 27 28 


19 20 21 22 23 24 25 


27 28 29 30 31 


24 25 26 27 28 29 30 


29 30 31 


26 27 28 29 30 31 


September 


October 


November 


December 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


1 


12 3 4 5 6 


1 2 3 


1 


2 3 4 5 6 7 8 


7 8 9 10 11 12 13 


4 5 6 7 8 9 10 


2 3 4 5 6 7 8 


9 10 11 12 13 14 15 


14 15 16 17 18 1920 


11 12 13 14 15 16 17 


9 10 11 12 13 14 15 


16 17 18 19 20 21 22 


21 22 23 24 25 26 27 


18 19 20 21 22 23 24 


16 17 18 19 20 21 22 


23 24 25 26 27 28 29 


28 29 30 31 


25 26 27 28 29 30 


23 24 25 26 27 28 29 


30 






30 31 



10 



CALENDAR 2000-2001 

FALL TRIMESTER SESSION - 2000 

August 10 Fall Faculty Meeting 

August 11 ...General Registration, New & Readmitted Students, All Campuses 
Late Registration Begins, Continuing Students, All Campuses 

August 12 New Orleans Fall Trimester Classes Begin 

August 14 Late Registration, All Students, All Campuses 

Fall Trimester Classes Begin, Hattiesburg, Gulfport, Keesler 

August 28-29 Carey Lectures, Hattiesburg 

August 30 Carey Lectures, Gulfport 

September 4 Labor Day Holiday (Night classes meet) 

September 11 English Proficiency Exam, Gulfport, includes Keesler 

September 13 English Proficiency Exam, Hattiesburg 

September 15 English Proficiency Exam, New Orleans 

September Fall Convocation, Hattiesburg 

October 7 Family Day, Hattiesburg 

October 2-13 Advisement and Registration for Winter, All Campuses 

October 20 Last Day of Fall Classes 

October 21 Family Day, Gulfport 

October 23-26 Fall Final Examinations 

October 27 Grades Due 

October 27-November 5 Fall Trimester Break 

WINTER TRIMESTER SESSION - 2000-20001 

November 3. .General Registration, New & Readmitted Students, All Campuses 
Late Registration Begins, Continuing Students, All Campuses 

November 4 New Orleans Winter Trimester Classes Begin 

November 6 Late Registration, All Students, All Campuses 

Winter Trimester Classes Begin, Hattiesburg, Gulfport, Keesler 

November 18-26 Thanksgiving Holidays 

November 27 Classes Resume 

December 4 English Proficiency Exam, Gulfport, includes Keesler 

December 6 English Proficiency Exam, Hattiesburg 

December 8 English Proficiency Exam, New Orleans 

December 16 Christmas Holidays Begin 

January 2, 2001 Classes Resume 

January 15 Martin Luther King, Jr., Holiday (Night classes meet) 

January 16-26 Advisement and Registration for Spring, All Campuses 

February 2 Last Day of Winter Classes 

February 5-8 Winter Final Examinations 

February 9 Grades Due 

Commencement, New Orleans 
February 9-18 Winter Trimester Break 



11 



SPRING TRIMESTER SESSION - 2001 

February 16 ..General Registration, New & Readmitted Students, All Campuses 
Late Registration Begins, Continuing Students, All Campuses 

February 17 New Orleans Spring Trimester Classes Begin 

February 19 Late Registration, All Students, All Campuses 

Spring Trimester Classes Begin, Hattiesburg, Gulfport, Keesler 

March 10-18 Spring Break 

March 19 Classes Resume 

March 19 English Proficiency Exam, Gulfport, includes Keesler 

March 21 English Proficiency Exam, Hattiesburg 

March 23 English Proficiency Exam, New Orleans 

April 13 Easter Holiday 

April 16 Classes Resume 

April 16-27 Advisement & Registration for Summer & Fall, All Campuses 

April 25 Honors Day Convocation, Gulfport 

April 30 Honors Day Convocation, Hattiesburg 

May 4 Last Day of Spring Classes 

May 7-10 Spring Final Examinations 

May 11 Grades Due 

May 12 Commencement-Hattiesburg, Gulfport 

SUMMER SESSIONS - 2001 

Mini Term 

May 14 Registration and Classes Begin 

May 25 Tern\Ends 

Surmner Trimester and 5-Week Terms 

May 25 General Registration, New & Readmitted Students, All Campuses 

Late Registration Begins, Continuing Students, All Campuses 

May 26 New Orleans Summer Trimester Begins 

May 28 Memorial Day Holiday (night classes meet) 

May 29 Late Registration, All Students, All Campuses 

Summer Trimester & Term 1 Day Classes Begin, Hattiesburg, Gulfport, Keesler 

June 18 English Proficiency Exam, Gulfport, includes Keesler 

June 20 English Proficiency Exam, Hattiesburg 

June 22 EngUsh Proficiency Exam, New Orleans 

June 29 End of Term I 

July 2 Term II Classes Begin 

July 4 Independence Holiday (Night classes meet) 

August 3 Summer Academic Session Ends 

Grades Due 

Commencement, New Orleans 

August 4 Commencement, Hattiesburg, Gulfport 



MAKE-UP DAYS WILL BE SCHEDULED. 



12 



GENERAL INFORMATION AND COLLEGE HISTORY 

William Carey College claims two proud predecessors as it looks forward 
to a future of continued growth and development. The first of these was 
founded in 1906 as a private, coeducational institution known as South 
Mississippi College. With the legendary South Mississippi educator W. I. 
Thames as its president, the college quickly gained a reputation for a strong 
faculty, especially in art, music, history, and home economics. After a fire 
destroyed the immense administration building, including classrooms, library, 
and a 1500-seat auditorium, the young institution was forced to close. 

In 1911, W. S. F. Tatum, wealthy lumberman and Methodist layman, 
acquired the property and offered it as a gift to the Baptists. He set two 
conditions: successful operation of a Christian school for girls for five years 
and an enrollment of at least one hundred students the first year. The property 
consisted of two surviving frame buildings and ten acres of cut-over land. A 
corporation was organized to own and control the college with nine trustees 
chosen from Baptist churches in Hattiesburg. In September, 1911, the school 
opened again with a new name, Mississippi Woman's College under the 
leadership of President S. S. Rivers. In November, 1911, the college was offered 
to the Mississippi Baptist Convention free of debt and was accepted. 

The growth of Mississippi Woman's College was a source of pride for 
Mississippi Baptists. Under the leadership of President J. L. Johnson, Jr., 1912- 
1932, a splendid new administration building was completed in 1914 and 
named Tatum Court in honor of the college's major benefactor. New brick 
dormitories were added (Ross and Johnson Halls) as well as an infirmary and 
a model home. In the process the campus expanded to 40 acres. 

The college did not measure its progress simply .with physical 
achievements. An early objective of Woman's College was to train intelligent 
consecrated citizens who could establish Christian homes. Curricula and 
activities were designed with this primary objective in mind. By 1925 college 
stationery boldly proclaimed its letterhead, "Mississippi Woman's College: 
The School with a Mission." The student body dedicated itself to the mission 
of the college. Such dedication accounts for Woman's College becoming 
known by the late 1920s as one of the South's outstanding Christian colleges 
for women. Continued growth and an emphasis on missions characterized the 
presidency of W. E. Holcomb, 1932-1940. 

When the exigencies of the depression era forced the college to close in 
1940, its facihhes became available for use as army officers' housing for nearby 
Camp Shelby. In 1946 Mississippi Woman's College re-opened and 
underwent major renovations. Dr. I. E. Rouse was elected president in 1946 
and served until 1956. In 1953 the Mississippi Baptist Convention voted to 
move the college into coeducational status after more than four decades of 
having only female students. This vote necessitated a new name for the 
institution. In 1954 the board of trustees selected the name of William Carey 

13 



College in honor of the eighteenth century English cobbler-linguist whose 
decades of missionary activity in India earned him international recognition as 
the "Father of Modem Missions." 

Under the leadership of Dr. J. Ralph Noonkester, who was elected 
president of the college in 1956, William Carey College enjoyed significant 
growth. In one period of 14 years, a total of 14 new buildings rose on the 
Hattiesburg campus. The college attracted national attention with baseball, 
basketball, and tennis teams, the traveling chorale, the theatre performance 
groups, scientific honor societies, student mission efforts (one of the nation's 
leading colleges in number of mission volunteers), and pre-medical activities 
(frequently a leader in percentage of acceptances to medical school). 
Dr. Noonkester served as president from 1956 to 1989. 

In 1968 William Carey entered a new dimension when it announced a 
merger with the prestigious Mather School of Nursing in New Orleans. Still 
another dimension opened for William Carey in 1976 when the college 
purchased the Gulf Coast Military Academy campus in Gulfport. Known as 
William Carey College on the Coast, the Gulfport campus offers selected 
undergraduate and graduate degrees. 

In November of 1989, the board of trustees elected Dr. James W. Edwards 
the seventh president of William Carey College. Dr. Edwards served as 
chancellor, beginning in 1996 until 1997, when he resigned. While he was 
president, the enrollment reached its highest level in history. Dr. Larry 
Kennedy was appointed interim president in 1997 and, following a nationwide 
search, was appointed president in 1998. Since 1998 the physical facilities on 
the Hattiesburg and Gulfport campuses have undergone major repair and 
renovation. 

The college is organized into the following academic units: the School of 
Arts, Humanities, and Sciences; the School of Business; the School of 
Education and Psychology; the Owen and Elizabeth Cooper School of Missions 
and Biblical Studies; the Donald and Frances Winters School of Music; and the 
School of Nursing. 

The dramatic developments over the years demonstrate that William Carey 
College has accepted William Carey's challenging motto: 

"Expect great things from God; attempt great things for God." 



14 



GOVERNANCE 

William Carey College is a nonprofit corporation operating as an institution 
of higher learning from its domicile in Hattiesburg, Mississippi. The college 
operates under the governance of a board of trustees elected by the Mississippi 
Baptist Convention. 



LOCATIONS 

William Carey College has three campuses: 

HATTIESBURG is the home of the original parent campus, founded in 
1906. On 120 acres the campus faces a beautiful evergreen forest on the south 
side of the city. Thanks to its similar proximity to Jackson, Meridian, New 
Orleans, and Mobile, Hattiesburg is known as the Hub City. With a population 
of 100,000, the greater Hattiesburg area is served by two airports, train and bus 
facilities. Interstate 59, and several four-lane highways, one of which connects 
with Gulfport, an hour to the south, and with Jackson, an hour and a half to 
the north. 

GULFPORT, the second largest city in Mississippi, is the location of William 
Carey College on the Coast. Looking out on the beautiful waters of the Gulf of 
Mexico, the 20-acre campus lies in the fastest growing industrial and recreational 
area of Mississippi. Live oaks grace the campus, while the college fishing pier 
reaches into the Gulf itself. 

NEW ORLEANS is one of the sites of the School of Nursing. The school is 
housed in the auxiliary classroom building on the campus of the new Orleans 
Baptist Theological Seminary. "America's most unusual dty," historic New Orleans 
offers the student a rich mosaic of culture and tradition. The nursing program is 
also offered on the other two Carey campuses. 



ACCREDITATION 

William Carey College is accredited by the Commission on Colleges of the 
Southern Association of Colleges and Schools, 1866 Southern Lane, Decatur, 
Georgia 30033-4097; telephone number 404-679-4501, to award bachelor and 
master degrees. 

The Winters School of Music is an accredited institutional member of the 
National Association of Schools of Music. The music therapy program is 
accredited by the American Music Therapy Association. The School of Nursing 
is accredited by the National League for Nursing Accrediting Commission, 61 
Broadway, New York, NY 10006, 800-669-9656 ext. 153; by the board of 
trustees. Institutions of Higher Learning of the State of Mississippi, and 
approved in New Orleans by the Louisiana State Board of Nursing. 



15 



INSTITUTIONAL EFFECTIVENESS 

In an effort to engage in an ongoing quest for quality, the college maintains 
a comprehensive system of planning and evaluation in all major aspects of the 
institution. The Statement of Purpose for the college is used as the foundation 
for this evaluation. A variety of assessment methods are used, and the results 
are implemented to improve both the education programs and support 
activities. Educational quality is determined by how effectively the institution 
achieves its established goals. The results of the college's assessment 
procedures are incorporated annually into the college's planning process in 
order to achieve continual improvement in programs and services. 



NONDISCRIMINATION/DISCLAIMER 

In compliance with federal law, including provisions of Section 504 of the 
Rehabilitation Act of 1973, William Carey College does not illegally 
discriminate on the basis of race, color, national or ethnic origin, age, or 
disability in admissions or in the administration of its education policies, 
programs, and activities. In compliance with Title IX of the Education 
Amendments of 1972, the college does not illegally discriminate on the basis of 
sex in the administration of its education policies, programs and activities. The 
vice president of academic affairs has been designated as the responsible 
employee to coordinate efforts to carry out responsibilities and direct the 
investigation of complaints relating to discrimination. 



POLICY ON PRIVACY OF STUDENT RECORDS 

Under the "Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act of 1974" as 
amended, WilUam Carey College students have the right to inspect and review 
any and all records, files, and data directly related to them. The college will not 
ordinarily release students' records to any outside agency without the written 
consent of the student. 

William Carey College will release "directory information" as defined in 
the student handbook on students to any interested member of the public 
unless the student requests in writing that it be withheld. 



16 



APPLICATIONS FOR ADMISSION 

The prospective student must file a complete admission application and 
request the appropriate school officials to mail transcripts to the college as 
soon as the decision to apply has been made. Applications will be accepted 
during the spring and summer. Both freshmen and transfer students may enter 
the college's trimester system in August, November, February, or June. 

There are separate requirements for admission to the School of Nursing 
and to the teacher education program of the School of Education and 
Psychology. The student should consult program descriptions for those 
admission requirements. 

The college reserves the right to deny admission to any applicant or forbid 
any student's continued enrollment without assigning a reason. The college 
does not discriminate in admissions on the basis of race, religion, color, 
national origin, sex, age, or disability. 

APPLICATIONS FOR HOUSING 

The residential housing status form must be returned to the Student 
Development Office. A $100 security deposit is required to reserve a room in a 
residence hall in Hattiesburg. The deposit is refundable if a written request is 
made 30 days prior to the first day of classes. The reservation and security 
deposits for the Gulfport campus apartments are $100 (double occupancy) and 
$175 (single occupancy). 

STANDARDS FOR ADMISSION 

FRESHMEN 

The college solicits applications from individuals who desire to study in a 
learning environment committed to the achievement of personal and 
professional excellence. Each freshman applicant for admission must file with 
the Office of Admissions a complete apphcation consisting of the following: 

1 . A completed application for admission. 

2. An official high school transcript or GED score report (minimum average 
score of 45). A final transcript showing grades on all courses completed is 
required. An official transcript is defined as one mailed directly from one 
institution to another. 

3. A $20 nonrefundable application fee. 

4. Documented proof of two immunizations for measles and rubella if born 
on or after January 1, 1957. 



17 



5. Score reports on the American College Test (ACT) or the College Entrance 
Examination Board Scholastic Aptitude Test (SAT). A student who has not 
had one of these tests must complete the residual ACT prior to being 
considered for admission. The cost of the ACT wUl be collected at the time 
of testing. If a student has been out of high school for six or more years, a 
diagnostic placement exam may be substituted for the ACT for admission. 

The admissions committee uses the "whole student" concept in selecting 
applicants for admission to the college. The committee considers the following 
factors in its decisions to accept or reject applications of individual students: 

1. Class Rank 

Applicants must present evidence that they rank in the first or second 
quartiles (upper half) of the graduating class of a secondary school. 

2. Grades and College Preparatory Subjects 

Students must present official transcripts indicating they have achieved a 
minimum high school grade point average (GPA) of 2.0 on a 4.0 scale. A 
student is best prepared to do college work when the student has 
completed the following preparatory work in high school: four years of 
English with emphasis on grammar and composition; three years of 
mathematics (including algebra and plane geometry); 2.5 years of social 
sciences (history, government, and /or geography); and three years of 
natural science. 

3. Test Scores 

First-time freshmen applicants are required to submit official ACT or SAT 
test scores (minimum score of 15 on ACT or 710 on SAT). 

ACADEMIC ADVISING FOR FRESHMEN 

All new students are assigned an academic advisor in their major area of 
interest. Course placement in English and math will be based on ACT/SAT 
subscores. Students who are accepted to the college with an ACT composite 
score below 18, who have been required to take diagnostic placement tests, 
and /or who have a high school grade point average below 2.0 will be assigned 
for special academic advising and wUl be Umited to enrollment in 9-10 hours 
per trimester for the first year of enrollment. 

EARLY ENTRANCE PROGRAM 

The following requirements are used to determine admissibility of a 
student at the end of the junior year of high school. Students meeting these 
requirements are admitted to the freshman class without reservation and are 
not required to complete the senior year of high school. However, Federal 
regulations require proof of high school graduation or equivalency (GED) in 
order for students to receive Federal financial aid. 



18 



1 . Fifteen units of credit must be earned by the completion of the high school 
junior year. 

2. A qualified student must have at least a 3.5 grade point average on the 4.0 
system, v^hich is approximately a B+ average. 

3. An ACT composite score of 25 or SAT score of 1130 or the equivalent. 

4. The applicant must have a personal written recommendation from his or 
her high school principal specifically recommending for early entrance. 

CREDIT BY EXAMINATION 

Advanced placement and college credit are awarded to students who 
have college-level subjects in high school and who have earned the minimum 
score required by the college on the College Entrance Examination Board 
Advanced Placement tests. Credit for knowledge gained by nontraditional 
means may be substantiated by certain minimum scores on some of the CEEB 
College Level Examination Program tests or the American College Test 
Proficiency Examination Program tests. 

''1 ■ / 

HONORS PROGRAM ■ 

Students who are valedictorians, salutatorians, or who rank in the top five 
percent of their secondary school graduating classes or in the top ten percent 
nationally on the SAT, the ACT, the National Merit Scholarship Qualifying 
Test, or other nationally recognized college entrance tests may apply for 
admission to the freshman honors program. Students included in the honors 
program are those receiving academic scholarships based upon academic 
potential. Transfer students who meet admission criteria can request 
admission into the honors program. 

TRANSFER STUDENTS 

The college solicits applications from transfer students from junior or 
community colleges, senior colleges, or universities. An application from a 
student who is in good standing at another institution of higher learning will 
normally be approved if the student's academic record at that institution is 
equal to the minimum standards required of our own students (see p. 55). 

An appUcant who has college level work must submit the following: 

1 . A completed application for admission. 

2. A $20 nonrefundable application fee. 



19 



3. A complete and official academic transcript from each college previously 
attended. An official transcript is defined as one mailed directly from one 
institution to another. It bears the institution's seal, the signature of the 
registrar, and the date of issuance. 

4. Documented proof of two immunizations for measles and rubella if bom 
on or after January 1, 1957. 

NONDEGREE STATUS 

If a student wishes to complete certain undergraduate courses and not 
pursue a degree, the admissions committee may grant that person nondegree 
status provided the applicant submits the following: 

1 . Proof of high school graduation or the equivalent (GED). 

2. Proof of eligibility to return to the last school attended by means of an 
official transcript. 

3. A $20 nonrefundable application fee. 

4. Documented proof of two immunizations for measles and rubella if bom 
on or after January 1, 1957. 

5. Certification that the student is not under suspension from any college or 
university. A student found guilty of nondisclosure or misrepresentation 
in filling out the registration form, or students who find after em-ollment 
that they are ineligible for academic or any other reason to return to the 
last institution and who fail to report this immediately to the Office of 
Admissions, will be subject to disciplinary action, including possible 
dismissal from the college. 

The student registered in nondegree status is subject to all college 
regulations governing registration, attendance, and academic standing. Credit 
earned in nondegree status is recorded on the student's permanent record and 
may be applied in an undergraduate degree program when the student has 
satisfactorily established degree status by meeting entrance requirements to 
the college. 

Nondegree status students are not eligible for Federal financial aid. 

READMISSION 

A former William Carey College student (one who was not registered 
during the preceding trimester) must submit a completed application for 
readmission to the Office of Admissions. Official transcripts showing all 
college work taken since leaving the college must be submitted to the Office of 
Admissions. The applicant for readmission should meet the minimum 

20 



academic standards required of current and transfer students. Those not 
meeting minimum academic requirements are evaluated for admission by the 
admissions committee. All decisions of the admissions committee are subject 
to appeal. A student who has been out of school only during the summer does 
not need to apply for readmission. 

INTERNATIONAL STUDENTS 

William Carey College is authorized under Federal law to enroll non- 
immigrant alien students. 

1. Applicants must submit a completed Application for International 
Undergraduate Admissions to the Office of Admissions. 

2. Applicants must pay a $20 nonrefundable application fee. 

3. Applicants are required to score a minimum 525 on the TOEFL Exam or 
Proficiency Level II on the Michigan Level Exam. 

4. Applicants must take the William Carey College placement examinations, 
ACT, or SAT for the purposes of admission and academic advising. A 
minimum composite ACT score of 15 or SAT score of 710 is required for 
admission to the college. 

5. Applicants must submit official records (with an English translation) of all 
studies in each school attended, beginning with secondary school. These 
records should include all marksheets, diplomas, and certificates issued 
during that time. An official transcript is defined as one mailed directly from 
one institution to another. If only the original is available, copies of these 
records will be accepted as official papers. 

6. All international students must pay $500 (USA) advance tuition before 
an 1-20 will be issued from William Carey College. This payment will be 
subtracted from the student's bill at registration. Students who are on a 
scholarship from their country come under the above, unless there is a 
letter from an official of the scholarship committee /foundation on file in 
the Business Office. 

7. Cost for attending the college for nine months will be at least $10,500 
(USA). This does not include personal expenses or transportation. 
Students must be prepared to pay their bill in full on the day they 
register for class. Since the immigration laws do not allow a foreign 
student to hold a job during the first year in the United States, a student 
should not expect to earn any part of the expenses. 

8. International students should refer to the college calendar for dates of the 
trimester breaks, Thar\ksgiving holidays, Christmas holidays, and spring 



21 



break. All residence halls are closed during these periods, and students 
must provide their own living and meal arrangements during these 
breaks. 

9. It is NOT the policy of the college to permit students from other countries 
who are in the United States on a student visa to register in nondegree 
status. 

10. International students must have an 1-20 before they will be allowed to 
register for classes. 

ADMISSION STATUS 

Students may attend William Carey College under several status 
categories depending upon the level of compliance with published admissions 
requirements. 

1. An accepted student is one who has been officially accepted for admission, 
whether freshman, transfer, or readmission. 

2. A probational student is one who does not meet the minimum admissions 
standards but is allowed to attend WiUiam Carey College by action of the 
admissions committee. The student must meet the minimum academic 
standards required of current students on a minimum of six semester 
hours and a maximum of two trimesters. 

3. A provisional student is one who has been provisionally accepted based on 
preUminary coursework and is awaiting acceptance pending receipt of all 
official supporting documents. 

4. An incomplete student is one who has not supplied all necessary documents 
to be complete in admissions. 

Students in a provisional or incomplete status may be allowed to register 
on a conditional basis. The students must be prepared to pay at least 50% of all 
charges by the end of the first week of class and provide all documents 
required for admission by the end of the first term of attendance. No financial 
aid will be processed or paid on students who have not been officially 
accepted. Students who do not comply with the requirements of conditional 
registration, or who, upon receipt of official documents, do not meet the 
minimum standards for admission wUl be removed from classes, will receive 
no grades, and will be refunded according to the tuition refund policy. 
Permission for conditional registration does not indicate official acceptance to 
William Carey College. 



22 



HATTIESBURG CAMPUS FACILITIES 

• TATUM COURT— Constructed in 1914, this building of colonial design was 
renovated in 1974 into a facility housing administrative offices, faculty offices, 
classrooms, and the O. L. Quave Theatre. Additional exterior renovation was 
completed in 1999. 

• THE ROUSE LIBRARY— The library is a modular-designed, single-floor 
building, which houses print, nonprint, and internet media with a computer lab. 

• FAIRCHILD HALL — This building houses the department of education. 
The building has office suites for faculty members, five classrooms, a well 
equipped curriculum laboratory, and a research room for faculty and students. 

• GREEN SCIENCE HALL— The one-story portion of Green Science Hall 
accommodates chemistry and physics curricula. The two-story section houses 
Ross Lecture Hall, student study and work areas, laboratories, offices, and 
classrooms for the departments of biology, mathematics, nursing, psychology, 
and social sciences. 

• MARY ROSS BUILDING— An original building constructed for a campus 
hospital, this building now houses faculty offices and conference rooms for the 
School of Business. 

• THOMAS BUSINESS BUILDING— Completed in 1974, this facility contains 
The Kresge Lecture Room, the School of Business, classrooms, computer labs, 
continuing education, workshops, and graduate classes. 

• THOMAS FINE ARTS CENTER— The Fine Arts Center, dedicated in 1966, 
contains complete facilities for the Donald and Frances Winters School of 
Music, the Dumas L. Smith Auditorium, and the Lucile Parker Art Gallery. 

• CLINTON GYMNASIUM— Constructed in 1961, this building includes a 
gynmasium, offices, locker rooms, and a large physical education classroom. 

• LAWRENCE HALL — Lawrence Hall provides offices, classrooms and 
conference space for the Owen and Elizabeth Cooper School of Missions and 
Biblical Studies, student government association, student development, and 
student support services. 

• MCMILLAN HALL — Completed in 1964, this building houses the college 
bookstore, the post office, and offices for the School of Nursing. 

• WILKES HALL — This building includes a student dining room, a faculty 
dining room, the student center, and a dirung room for special groups. 



23 



• THE BENTLEY-POPE HOUSE— A two-story colonial style residence built 
in 1962 now houses the offices of external relations and alumni relations. Large 
formal entertainment areas occupy most of the first floor. 

• CRAWFORD HALL — This eight-room structure constructed in 1936 serves 
as the offices and activities center for the Baptist Student Union. 

• BASS HALL — Bass Hall is a three-story building that accommodates 150 
female residents. Built in 1963, the building has a large lounge and a resident 
manager's suite. Interior renovation was completed in the summer of 1999. 

• BRYANT HALL— Completed in 1966 and renovated in 1998, this building 
accommodates 110 male residents. 

• ROSS AND JOHNSON HALLS— These twin buildings are among the 
original structures on the campus. In 1984 Johnson Hall was completely 
renovated and converted into apartments, accommodating up to 48 residents. 
In the summer of 1999, interior restoration of Johnson and Ross Halls was 
completed. It accommodates approximately 60 female residents in suites 
containing private bathrooms. 

• POLK HALL — Originally built in 1962, this men's dormitory was renovated in 
1998. 

• CAMPUS FACILITIES BUILDING— This building houses the offices and 
equipment of the physical facilities department. 

• COMMON GROUNDS— Created in 1997 from a former carriage house, this 
facility houses a student-operated coffee house. 

• CHAIN GARDEN— This area of the campus was dedicated in 1992 in 
honor of Bobby and Betty Chain. 

• LUCILE PARKER GALLERY— Located in Thomas Fine Arts Center, the 
Lucile Parker Gallery is named for the late William Carey College professor of 
art emerita whose work in watercolor brought national acclaim. Exhibitions of 
artists enjoying national reputations are scheduled September through May. 
The college's permanent collection is exhibited usually June through August. 

• MISSIONS PLAZA AND TOWER— Dedicated in 1994, and prominently 
located in the front of Wilkes Hall, the Marjorie and Earl Kelly Missions Plaza 
and the Estelle Willis Missions Tower recall the legacy of William Carey and 
honor Southern Baptist missionaries, William Carey College alumni, faculty, 
staff, and students in foreign missions service. Gifts of Joseph and Nancy Fail 
made construction possible. Mr. Fail is a trustee and benefactor of the college. 



24 



GULFPORT CAMPUS FACILITIES 

The Gulfport campus consists of the following major buildings: ' ' '< ^;' ^ 

• FAIRCHILD ADMINISTRATION CENTER— This building houses 
administrative and faculty offices and a board room for special college 
meetings. 

• SARAH GILLESPIE GALLERY— Located in Parker Hall, this gallery houses 
the extensive Sarah Gillespie Collection, a regional collection spanning the 
twentieth century. Exhibitions of artists enjoying national reputations are 
scheduled September through May; selections from the Sarah Gillespie 
Collection usually are exhibited June through August. Frequent exhibitions of 
student art work showcase the gallery as well. 

• MCMULLAN LEARNING RESOURCES CENTER— This facility contains 
the library, computer laboratory, faculty offices, and classrooms. 

• PARKER HALL— Renovated in 1987, this building contains the Sarah 
Gillespie Gallery, classrooms, and a 150-seat auditorium. 

• ART COMPLEX — The art complex consists of five buildings, including 
studios and laboratories for painting, graphic design, ceramics, sculpture, 
wood carving, and a metal works area for casting. 

• STUDENT SERVICES CENTER— This building houses the bookstore, post 
office, student center, and athletic offices for men's and women's soccer. 

• STUDENT APARTMENTS — The apartments were completed in 1986 and 
consist of four, two-bedroom apartments, each containing 24 furnished or 
unfurnished apartments for a total residency of up to 384 students. 

• B.S.U. HOUSE — Open to all students, this center is the meeting place for 
the Baptist Student Union. 



25 



GENERAL REGULATIONS FOR STUDENTS 

HEALTH SERVICES 

On the Hattiesburg campus, students have access to immediate care clinics, 
and two hospital emergency rooms that extend 24-hour care. The clinics and 
emergency rooms are provided on a fee-for-service basis. Medical service for 
students on the Gulfport campus is provided by an arrangement with 
UrgiCare on a fee-for-service basis. New Orleans students have access to 
physicians and hospitals in the area. 

Irvformation about health insurance is available to students in Hattiesburg 
in the office of student development, in the office of the director of student 
services in Gulfport, and in the office of marketing and student services in 
New Orleans. 

VEHICLE REGISTRATION 

Registration of motor vehicles is a part of the academic registration procedure at 
the beginning of each year for all students who are permitted to bring cars on the 
campus. Students who bring unregistered vehicles on campus after any registration 
period must register them immediately after arrival on the campus. All college 
employees and students shall register their vehicles and secure a registration decal 
from the student development office. Failure to register a vehicle, to use the proper 
decal, or to observe all traffic regtilations will constitute a violation and subject the 
violator to certain penalties. 

CAMPUS SAFETY AND SECURITY 

Campus security personnel are located at four stations on the Hattiesburg 
campus and are available 24 hours a day. Security personnel at Gulfport are 
located at the campus secvirity station, and seoirity at New Orleai\s is provided 
by the New Orleans Baptist Theological Seminary. Any crime or suspicious 
activity should be reported promptly to campus security: Hattiesburg (601) 582- 
6300; Gulfport (228) 897-7223; New Orleans (504) 282-4455, ext. 3230 or 9444455 
(after 4:00 pm). 

STUDENT RIGHTS AND RESPONSIBILITIES 

Every student is expected to display proper conduct. However, violations of the 
student code of conduct will be dealt with according to the policies and procedures 
outlined in The Lance. The coUege reserves the right to require at any time the 
withdrawal of a student whose conduct or academic work does not meet college 
standards. Students have the right to appeal any decision through appropriate 
channels as outlined in Tlie Lance. 



26 



HOUSING POLICY FOR SINGLE STUDENTS 

PHILOSOPHY FOR RESIDENTIAL LIFE 

The college holds to the philosophy that living on campus provides an 
increased opportunity for developing better student relationships, encourages 
the exchange of cultural and intellectual thought, and promotes an 
environment for living and learning as part of the overall educational mission 
of the college. 

RESIDENCE REGULATIONS 

All unmarried students under the age of 25 attending the Hattiesburg and 
Gulfport campuses are required to live in one of the campus residence halls 
and, in Hattiesburg, to board in the college cafeteria. Exceptions to this 
requirement may be made for students who live with parents in a permanent 
residence within the immediate college community. Any unmarried student 
living off-campus without official approval will be required to pay full room 
and board charges for the trimester in which the violation occurs. 

Students must furnish their own linens, pillows, and, if desired, window 
curtains. Mini-blinds are furnished. Local and long-distance telephone service 
is available through the college's telecommunications system; however, 
students must furnish their own telephone set. Payment for local and long- 
distance telephone service is due monthly in the business office of the college. 

All resident students must make room reservations prior to each trimester. 
On the Hattiesburg campus, a one-time $100 deposit ($175 for Johnson 
apartments) is required of all new campus residents. Upon receipt of a written 
request from the student, the deposit will be refunded within 90 days of the 
student's permanent check-out. The amount of the refunded deposit is 
reduced by any unpaid charges, fines, or assessments for damage to the room 
or its furnishings. 

A deposit of $175 ($225 for single occupancy) is required at the time a 
student makes application for an apartment on the Gulfport campus. This 
deposit is refundable, less any assessment for damage or neglect of the room 
or its furnishings, when the student properly checks out of the room 
permanently. Housing is not provided on the New Orleans campus. 

The college reserves the right to inspect rooms and to move any student to 
another assignment for reasons of space management or for the maintenance 
of order. At the beginning of each school term, students without roommates 
may choose one of three options: 1) move together voluntarily with another 
student who is without a roommate, 2) be reassigned with another student 
who is without a roommate, or 3) pay the private room rate. Whatever the 
option chosen, the student must coordinate his or her actions with the resident 
hall director on the Hattiesburg campus or the housing director on the 
Gulfport campus. 

Students will not be allowed to remain in student housing for any period of 
enrollment in which they are not registered for course work. 

27 



FINANCIAL INFORMATION 

STUDENT EXPENSES 

Fees are subject to change without notice. All fees are due and payable 
prior to the beginning of each trimester. 

The schedule of expenses on a trimester basis for the Hattiesburg, Gulfport, 
and New Orieans campuses are: 

TUITION (UNDERGRADUATE) per semester hour $220 

Other Fees: 

Application Fee $20* 

Auditing a Course One half the regular tuition cost 

Late Registration Fee $50* 

Late Payment Fee $50* 

Deferred Payment Fee $35* 

Drop Class Fee $25* 

Withdrawal Fee $50* 

Independent Study or Directed Readings per semester hour $270 

Graduation Fee $50* 

Student Teaching Fee $75 

Returned Check Fee $35* 

Art Fee for Studio Classes (per class) $30 

Applied Music Fee (both major and nomnajor) per course $50 

Laboratory Fees: 

Nursing Labs (per lab hour) $30 

Science Labs (per class) $30 

Technology Fee (per trimester) $20 

Registration and Services Fee (excluding Keesler) $35* 

Parking Fee (Hattiesburg & Gulfport) $5* 

*Nonrefundable fees 



28 



ROOM AND APARTMENT RATES:* 

Hattiesburg Rooms: 

Housing Deposit $100 

Johnson Apartments $175 

BRYANT/BASS HALLS per trimester— nonprivate $380 

per five-week summer term $200 

per trimester — private $545 

per five- week summer term $270 

ROSS HALL per trimester — nonprivate $435 

per five- week summer term $230 

per trimester — private $680 

per five- week summer term $330 

POLK HALL per trimester— nonprivate $380 

per trimester — private $545 

JOHNSON HALL Apartments 

per trimester — 3 residents per urut $415 

per trimester — 4 residents per unit $320 

Gulfport Apartments (1-4 occupants, including spouse/children, per unit): 

Housing Deposit Semi-private $175 

Private $225 

Per Trimester 
Occupancy Levels 

— one occupant $1,500 

— two occupants .-. $750 

— three occupants (private room) $710 

— three occupants (semi-private) $410 

— four occupants $400 

BOARD (HATTIESBURG ONLY) 

20 meal plan (7 days) per trimester $650 

14 meal plan (5 days) per trimester $575 

All resident students are required to pay a summer board charge. 
Summer board rates are determined based on summer participation. 

OFF-CAMPUS MILITARY LOCATIONS 

Tuition (undergraduate)per semester hour $95 



*Room prices are per student and include local telephone, T.V., cable, and 
laundry equipment. 



29 



TERMS OF PAYMENT 

All fees are due and payable upon registration prior to the beginning of 
each trimester. However, a student may request to pay on the college's 
deferred payment plan. In order to register under this plan, a student must 
pay a minimum of one-half the tuition and fees, room, and board charges after 
deducting any student loans, grants, and scholarship amounts. The remaining 
trimester balance can be divided into two equal payments with the payments 
due at the times specified on the Deferred Payment Agreement. Failure to 
make payments by the due dates will result in a $15 late payment charge. If a 
student is more than 15 days late in making payment, the college reserves the 
right to terminate the student's enrollment. Should a student be granted 
permission to re-enter, a reinstatement fee of $10 will be assessed. This fee is 
nonrefundable and must be paid in cash. There will be a $25 fee assessed each 
trimester for the privilege of using the deferred payment plan. 

A budget payment plan, offered by Academic Management Services 
(AMS), is also available to students who would prefer to spread their annual 
cost evenly over an eight, nine, or ten month period. The business office or 
financial aid office has information about this plan. 



TUITION REFUND POLICY 

A portion of tuition and fees may be refunded to students who officially 
withdraw from the college or officially drop a course. Any claim for such 
refund will be based on the date on which the student files a completed 
request with the Registrar's Office for official withdrawal or dropping of a 
course. No refund is made when a student is dismissed for reasons of 
misconduct. The general tuition refund policy is applied as follows: 

During the first week of class 100% less $25/$50* 

During the second week 70% less $25/$50* 

During the third week 40% less $25/$50* 

After the third week None 

*$25 fee for dropping a class/ $50 fee for complete withdrawal 

For classes offered on a schedule shorter than a 10-week term, the refund 
period will be reduced in proportion to the length of the course. The effect 
of holidays on this schedule will be determined by the Business Office. 



30 



BOARD AND RENT REFUND POLICY 

Students withdrawing from the college will receive a pro-rata refund for 
board based on the number of days remaining on the applicable meal plan for 
the current trimester. No refund of board will be made for the Summer terms 
due to the nature of arrangements with the food vendor. Pro-rata refunds of 
residence hall room fees or apartment rent will be made after classes begin 
only if the room or apartment is rented to another student for the period that 
has been reserved by the student who is requesting a refund. Deposits are 
returned in accordance with the agreements under which they are made. 

BOOKSTORE AND SUPPLIES 

The college maintains a bookstore on each campus, through which books, 
stationery, ink, clothing, and other supplies may be purchased. 



FINANCIAL AID TO STUDENTS 

Scholarship, grants, work service, and loan funds at William Carey College 
are administered in conjunction with a nationally established philosophy of 
distributing financial aid. The basis of this philosophy is the belief that the 
student and parents have the primary responsibility for paying the cost of 
education and that financial aid from the college is available only for meeting 
the difference between the cost of education and the amount the students and 
parents can reasonably be expected to contribute. 

William Carey College utilizes an officially recognized procedure for 
determining expected family contribution. In making this determination, 
income, net worth, certain expenses as indebtedness, size of household, and 
number of family members in post-secondary education are considered. 

The purpose of William Carey College's financial aid program is to provide 
assistance to students who would be unable to attend college without such aid. 
Financial aid includes scholarships, grants, work service, loans, and part-time 
employment. These types of assistance are extended either singly or in 
combination. The financial aid award or "package" offered depends upon the 
student's academic record and need for assistance. It is understandable that most 
students would prefer assistance through a full scholarship or gift program, but 
the packaging concept enables William Carey to assist more students, thereby 
making it possible for larger numbers to attend. Each aid applicant will be 
considered for all aid programs administered by the office of financial aid. 

AU applications for financial aid v^ be processed on a first-come, first-served 
basis. Individuals must complete a Free Application for Federal Student Aid 
(FAFSA). These forms may be obtained by contacting the financial aid office at 
the college. The FAFSA is also available from high school counselors. 



31 



The institution requires that a FAFSA form be completed by any student who 
will be receiving a scholarship, loan, work service, grant or any other form of 
financial aid. Also, any student who receives a scholarship at William Carey 
College must early-register each trimester in order to retain the scholarship. 

FINANCIAL AID GENERAL REGULATIONS 

1. Financial aid applicants must be accepted for admission to William Carey 
before financial assistance can be awarded. Nondegree seeking students are 
not eUgible for Federal financial aid. 

2. Generally, financial aid is offered to the full-time student working on his or 
her first baccalaureate degree. If a student drops below half-time status, 
that student automatically becomes ineligible for financial aid. 

3. Ordinarily financial aid is awarded once per trimester of the regular 
academic year. 

4. In order to receive financial aid, students must maintain "Standards of 
Satisfactory Progress" toward their degrees and remain in good standing. 
Financial aid may also be withdrawn from students who are penalized by 
WilUam Carey College for serious breaches of discipline. The financial aid 
office reserves the right to withhold further assistance at the time it becomes 
evident that a student has abused or is abusing the financial aid programs. 

5. Students receiving financial aid from sources other than William Carey 
College must advise the director of financial aid of the amount and source of 
such aid. 

6. An application for financial aid must be completed annually. Financial 
aid is not automatically renewed. 

7. This institution is in compliance with Title VI of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 
and Title IX of the Educational Amendments of 1972 and does not 
discriminate against the handicapped or on the basis of race, creed, color, 
sex, or national origin. 

8. Students who are eligible for a refund can expect to receive their refund on 
Friday of the second week following receipt of their financial aid in the business 
office. 

9. Nondegree status students are not eligible for Federal financial aid. 



TYPES OF FINANCIAL AID 

The following financial aid programs are available to students who enroll at 
William Carey College. Specific ehgibility criteria and apphcations procedures 
for each program are available at the office of financial aid. 



32 



• STUDENT EMPLOYMENT: College Work Study Programs 

• GRANTS: Pell Grant, Supplemental Education Opportunity Grants 

(SEOG), State Student Incentive Grant (SSIG), Mississippi Tuition 
Assistance Grant (MTAG), Mississippi Eminent Scholars Grant 
(MESG), Teacher Education, Nursing Professional, and Psychology 
Grants are available through the Mississippi State Department of 
Education 

• REGULAR LOANS: Federal Stafford Loan, Federal Unsubsidized 

Stafford /PLUS, Federal Perkins Loan, Bobby Wingo Memorial 
Loan Fund (seniors only), Otis Seal Loan Fund (Ministerial 
students only). 

• EMERGENCY LOANS: Bass Loan Fund (short term emergency loans). 

• INSTITUTIONAL AWARDS: Scholarships based on academic, talent, 

alumni, church vocations, and leadership. 

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION ON FINANCIAL AID 

The director of financial aid and appropriate staff members are available to 
provide additional information regarding the financial aid program of William 
Carey College as required by the Student Information Requirements as stated in 
Title I of the Education Amendments of 1976. Appointments may be made by 
calling (601) 582-6153. 

William Carey College participates in all programs of the Veterans' 
Administration. Information and assistance with applications may be secured 
from the V.A. certifying officials on the Hattiesburg, Gulfport, or New Orleans 
campus. 

INSTITUTIONAL SCHOLARSHIPS AND AWARDS 

William Carey College makes financial aid commitments to qualified full- 
time students based on academic achievements, special talents, and 
dependents of groups related to its institutional mission. All financial aid 
commitments are made through the director of financial aid, based on 
recommendations from the scholarship committee, department chairs, deans 
of schools, and the athletic director. 

Financial aid may include scholarships, awards, grants, and loans. Aid may 
also be based on special talent such as art, music, theatre, science, and other 
academic areas. Scholarships funded directly by the college from endowment, 
memorial gifts, and aiuiual gifts are listed below. 

All scholarship commitments are made through the Office of Financial 
Aid based on recommendations from the scholarship committee, department 
chairs, deans of schools, and the athletic director. All applications will be 



33 



considered on a funds-available basis. All scholarship recipients must 
complete a minimum of 9 credit hours each trimester. 

Trustee Scholar: On-campus students may be awarded up to 75% of the cost of 
tuition on 30 hours per year, and commuting students may be 
awarded up to 50% of the cost of tuition on 30 hours per year. 

Freslunan eligibility: National Merit finalist, semi-finalist, or 29 ACT score. 

Transfer eligibility: 3.9 GPA with minimum of 54 semester hours completed. 

Recipients must maintain an overall GPA of 3.0 and participate in the college 
honors program. 

Presidential Scholar: On-campus students may be awarded up to 50% of the 
cost of tuition on 30 hours per year, and commuting 
students may be awarded up to 35% of the cost of 
tuition on 30 hours per year. 
Freshman eligibility: Valedictorian, salutatorian, STAR student, or 26 ACT 

score. 
Transfer eligibility: 3.7 GPA with minimimi of 54 semester hours completed. 
Recipients must maintain an overall GPA of 2.75 and participate in the college 
honors program. 

Academic Scholar: On-campus students may be awarded up to 35% of the 
cost of tuition on 30 hours per year, and commuting 
students may be awarded up to 20%) of the cost of tuition 
on 30 hours per year. 

Freshman eligibility: 23 ACT score. 

Transfer eligibility: 3.2 GPA with minimum of 54 semester hours completed. 

Recipients must maintain an overall GPA of 2.5. 

Collegiate Scholar: On-campus students may be awarded up to 20% of the cost of 
tuition on 30 hours per year, and commuting students may be 
awarded up to 15% of the cost of tuition on 30 hours per year. 

Freshman eUgibiUty: 20 ACT score. 

Transfer eUgibility: 2.5 GPA with minimum of 54 semester hours completed. 

Recipients must maintain an overall GPA of 2.0. 

PHI THETA KAPPA SCHOLARS 

Members of Phi Theta Kappa may receive an additional $500 per year. Proof of 
membership is required. 



34 



ALUMNI DEPENDENT SCHOLARSfflPS 

Children, grandchildren, siblings, and spouses of alumni of William Carey 
College may qualify for scholarships of up to $300 per year. 

TALENT SCHOLARSHIPS 

William Carey College offers talent scholarships in vocal music, instrumental 
music, theatre, forensics, and art (Gulfport only). For all talent scholarships, 
auditions or portfoUo viewing must be arranged with the appropriate dean or 
department chair. 

CHURCH RELATED SCHOLARSHIPS 

Baptist Student Scholarships of up to $300 per year are available for 
students who are recommended by a pastor of a Southern Baptist church. This 
amount may be added to academic and/or talent scholarships. Requires 
pastor nomination. 

CRV Dependent Student Scholarships of up to $1,000 per year are 
available for sons, daughters, and spouses of pastors, and other full-time 
ministerial employees of local Southern Baptist churches. Southern Baptist 
Associations, or other Southern Baptist agencies. This amount may be added 
to academic and /or talent scholarships. 

CRV Scholarships of up to 75% of the cost of tuition on 30 hours per year 
for on-campus students and up to 50% of the cost of tuition on 30 hours per 
year for commuting students are available for qualifying students. A CRV 
student is defined as one who has made a public commitment to a church- 
related vocation (ministry or missions) in a church affiUated with the Southern 
Baptist Convention. These amounts are comprehensive and may not be 
combined with any other scholarships or grants offered by WCC. (Requires 
letter from church or license/ordination certificate.) 

Southern Baptist CRV students may also apply to the Board of Ministerial 
Education of the Mississippi Baptist Convention for additional financial aid. 
This aid is applied for in a separate process through the School of Missions and 
Biblical Studies at William Carey College. 

ATHLETIC SCHOLARSHIPS 

For all athletic scholarships, tryouts must be arranged with the appropriate 
coach. 



35 



ENDOWED AND NAMED SCHOLARSHIPS 

THE AMBROSE MEMORIAL ART SCHOLARSHIP FUND was established 
in memory of Marc Carroll Ambrose, Betty Rainer Ambrose, and Charles 
Ambrose by family and friends. Charles Ambrose taught art at William Carey 
College from 1982-1988. The scholarship awards are made to art majors. 

THE ALUMNI SCHOLARSHIP FUND was established by alumni of the 
college to assist the child or grandchild of an alumnus. Children of employees 
of the college are not eUgible. 

THE LILLIAN LOTT AULTMAN MEMORIAL FUND was estabUshed by 
the family of Lillian Lott Aultman, a 1952 graduate of the college, in memory 
of Mrs. Aultman. The scholarship is awarded to a student in the field of 
religious education. 

THE HOWARD WILSON BAHR SCHOLARSHIP FUND was estabUshed 
from the estate of Dr. Howard Wilson Bahr, benefactor of the college. 

THE BESSIE MISTERFELDT BAILEY MEMORIAL FUND was estabUshed 
from Ms. Bailey's estate for the purpose of aiding needy students. 

THE ROBERT BARNES SCHOLARSHIP is awarded to a student who 
needs funds for use in the spring trimester. Preference is given to students who 
are preparing for church-related vocations. 

THE SALLY HARTNESS BATSON MEMORIAL SCHOLARSHIP FUND 
was established by the children of Mrs. Batson to provide financial assistance 
to students preparing for a career in early childhood /elementary education. 

THE TRUGEN BEARD MINISTERIAL SCHOLARSHIP, established by 
Miss Trugen Beard in honor of Dr. William M. Clawson, professor emeritus of 
reUgion, is awarded annually to a Southern Baptist student preparing for the 
preaching ministry. 

THE QUENTIN AND LUELLA BENEDICT SCHOLARSHIP FUND was 
established by Mr. and Mrs. Quentin Benedict of Hattiesburg, Mississippi. The 
income from the endowment corpus is used for general scholarships at the 
coUege. 

THE REX BRASWELL WORK AND SERVICE SCHOLARSHIP was 
established to honor the memory of Rex Braswell, former member of the board 
of trustees and active layman in the Baptist denomination. The scholarship is 
awarded to church-related vocations and business students who are 
committed to working their way through coUege. 

THE DOROTHY BRELAND SCHOLARSHIP IN MEDICAL 
TECHNOLOGY is an endowment donated by local physicians for scholarship 

36 



awards to outstanding Hattiesburg area students majoring in either nursing or 

medical technology. 

THE WILLIAM M. BRELAND AND ELLIE MAY BROWN BRELAND 
ENDOWED SCHOLARSHIP, established by Mrs. Mildred Breland Leake, 
provides annual funds for one or more worthy students who are committed to 
church-related vocations and are in need of scholarship assistance. 

THE MARY MADDOCKS BROWN ENDOWED SCHOLARSHIP was 
established by Mrs. Mildred Breland Leake and provides annual funds for one 
or more worthy female students who are committed to the teaching profession 
in the State of Mississippi and who need scholarship assistance. 

THE JACK P. AND MOLLY B. BURKE SCHOLARSHIP is awarded to the 
student who scores highest on a standardized world civilization examination 
administered each year. 

THE SARAH BURRUS SCHOLARSHIP was estabUshed in honor of Sarah 
Gray Emerson Burrus on the occasion of her retirement as college registrar for 38 
years. Income from the corpus, operated by the Mississippi Baptist Foundation, is 
used to provide assistance to worthy and needy students as chosen by the 
scholarship committee. 

THE CLARA BAUR BUSH MEMORIAL SCHOLARSHIP FUND was 
established by Wayne M. and Mary Alice Lovern in memory of Mrs. Bush, a 
church organist and music teacher in Hattiesburg, and in honor of the Hattiesburg 
Music Club. This fund provides music scholarships for students majoring in 
church-related music studies. 

THE LORENA WHITE COBB AND A. B. COBB SCHOLARSHIP FUND was 
estabUshed from the estate of Lorena W. Cobb. The scholarship is awarded to 
students who demonstrate scholastic abUity and who need scholarship assistance. 

THE ELOISE COOK SCHOLARSHIP FUND supports needy and worthy 
students. 

THE ELIZABETH THOMPSON COOPER SCHOLARSHIP FUND was 
established by the late industrialist, philanthropist, and Southern Baptist 
denominational servant, Mr. Owen Cooper of Yazoo City, Mississippi, in 
honor of his wife, Mrs. Elizabeth Thompson Cooper, a former trustee. 

THE RALPH E. CROMIS, I, SCHOLARSHIP is awarded annually to a 
theatre major. The scholarship was established by Mrs. Wilda Cromis in 
memory of her husband. 

THE ELISE CURTIS SCHOLARSHIP, estabhshed by Dr. Elise Curtis, an 
alumna of the college, former member of the board of trustees, a Mississippi 
educator, and former president of the Mississippi Education Association. It is 

37 



designated for a worthy student who needs assistance to obtain a college 
education. Preference is given to children of Southern Baptist foreign 
missionaries. 

THE EUGENIA DAWSEY MEMORIAL SCHOLARSHIP was established 
through the estate of Lucille D. Carter to assist students in obtaining a college 
education. The recipients must be serious students who have high moral 
standards and who have need for financial assistance. 

THE BUFORD E. AND ELLA MORGAN DELK MEMORIAL 
SCHOLARSHIP FUND was estabUshed by Mr. and Mrs. V. Randolph Delk as a 
memorial to Mr. Delk's mother and father. The recipient must maintain at least a 
"C" average. 

THE JOSEPH V. diBENEDETTO ENDOWED SCHOLARSHIP FUND was 
estabUshed for worthy and needy students majoring in the fields of music and 
business. 

THE HUGH L. DICKENS SCHOLARSHIP FOR EDUCATIONAL 
LEADERSHIP was established by the administration and board of trustees 
commending the contributions of Dr. Dickens, former administrative vice 
president and dean of the graduate school. It is awarded to students preparing 
for careers in teaching. 

THE DANNY MACK DICKERSON MEMORIAL SCHOLARSHIP FUND 
was established by Mrs. Jerrie Brewer in memory of her nephew who was a 
student at the college at the time of his death. The scholarship is awarded 
armually to a student majoring in the field of art. 

THE LOIS STICE DICKINSON SCHOLARSHIP was established by friends 
of the late Lois Stice Dickinson in her name for church music majors. A 
scholarship is available to a senior who will enter the music ministry and has 
maintained a satisfactory academic record. 

THE DENA SUE RUSHING DICKSON SCHOLARSHIP was estabUshed by 
Mrs. Stanford Owen to honor the memory of Ms. Dickson who attended the 
college. The recipient is chosen on the basis of financial need. 

THE KATHLEEN NEWTON DRISKELL SCHOLARSHIP FUND was 
established by Mrs. Kathleen Newton Driskell, an alumna of Mississippi 
Woman's CoUege. Priority is given to students majoring in education. 

THE WILEY FAIRCHILD SCHOLARSHIP FUND was estabUshed as a 
result of the Hub Award, which was given to Mr. Wiley Fairchild, to provide 
general academic scholarships for worthy students. 

THE FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH OF PASCAGOULA SCHOLARSHIP is 
provided armuaUy to worthy students selected by the college. 



38 



THE W. A. FORDHAM AND O. E. THOMPSON SCHOLARSHIP was 
established for church-related vocations students entering the preaching 
ministry by Gary Fordham in honor of his father. Rev. W. A. Fordham, and 
David Thompson in memory of his father. Rev. O. E. Thompson. 

THE FOREIGN MISSION SCHOLARSHIP was established by an 
anonymous Southern Baptist missionary to support mission volunteer 
students. 

THE MR. AND MRS. JOHN S. GARNER MEMORIAL SCHOLARSHIP 
FUND was established from the estate of Ms. Lucile G. Buderer for the 
purpose of general scholarship endowment. 

THE LOTTIE T. AND REV. W. W. GRAFTON SCHOLARSHIP FUND was 
estabhshed by Mrs. W. W. Grafton for students majoring in church vocations. 

THE JULIA GUESS SCHOLARSHIP was established by Mississippi 
Woman's College alumnae to honor their former professor of music. 
Preference is given to a female student who is taking voice lessons. 

THE HENRY W. HOLMELD SCHOLARSHIP was established in memory 
of Mr. Hohfield by his sister, Dorothy H. Thomsen, the first female broker- 
dealer in securities in Mississippi. The proceeds from the corpus support 
church-related vocations students who demonstrate scholastic ability and 
financial need. 

THE ROBERTA THOMPSON HOLLOWAY SCHOLARSHIP IN ENGLISH 
was established by Mr. and Mrs. Kirby Wesley Holloway for a senior English 
student in honor of Mrs. J. L. Johnson. 

THE ROY HOOD ENDOWED SCHOLARSHIP was established following 
the death of Mr. Hood, professor emeritus of biology and chair of athletic 
committee, to provide support for science majors and student athletes. 

THE SADIE H. HOPKINS MEMORIAL SCHOLARSHIP FUND was 
established in memory of Mrs. Sadie Haga Hopkins, the mother of Mrs. J. Ralph 
Noorvkester. This fund will provide scholarships for deserving students selected 
by the college. 

THE JOHN LIPSCOMB JOHNSON, JR., AND SUE BELL MOODY 
JOHNSON MEMORL^L SCHOLARSHIPS were established by Julia Toy Johnson 
Hewitt in honor of her parents, President and Mrs. J. L. Johnson, who provided 
significant leadership to Mississippi Woman's College for two decades. 

THE SUE BELL JOHNSON SCHOLARSHIP ENDOWMENT was 
established by Mr. and Mrs. Waller Batson to encourage the use of leisure time 
in the fine arts as a memorial to Mrs. J. L. Johnson, mother of Mrs. Waller 
Batson and wife of Dr. J. L. Johnson, president of Mississippi Woman's 
College, 1912-1932. 



39 



THE MARJORIE ROWDEN KELLY SCHOLARSHIP FUND was 
established by Dr. Earl Kelly, retired executive director of the Mississippi 
Baptist Convention Board, in honor of his wife Dr. Marjorie Rowden Kelly, 
former dean of women, instructor in religion and missions, and missionary to 
Israel. 

THE H. V. AND JESSIE LOU HATHORN LAIRD SCHOLARSHIP was 
established to aid deserving ministerial students who have a superior 
academic record and who demonstrate need. Request for assistance is made to 
the dean of the Cooper School of Missions and Biblical Studies. 

THE JESSIE LOU LAIRD MEMORIAL SCHOLARSHIP was estabUshed by 
a bequest from Mrs. Jessie Lou Laird to assist nursing students who maintain a 
3.0 grade point average. 

THE CARROLL D. MALONE, JR. MEMORIAL SCHOLARSHIP FUND 
was estabUshed to aid a freshman student attending William Carey College on 
the Coast who exhibits need. 

THE ELMA MCWILLIAMS SCHOLARSHIP FUND was estabUshed with a 
permanent gift from the Children's World, Inc. of Hattiesburg to honor Ekna 
McWilliams, former education teacher at the college. Proceeds from the fund 
will support scholarships in early childhood education. 

THE MISSISSIPPI GULF COAST CRAFTSMEN'S GUILD ENDOWMENT 
FUND was estabUshed by the Mississippi Gulf Coast Craftsmen's Guild for the 
purpose of supporting art scholarships at WiUiam Carey College on the Coast. 

THE FRANCES BELLE MOORE MEMORIAL SCHOLARSHIP FUND was 
established by Mr. and Mrs. John Farmer of Columbia, South Carolina, in 
honor of Mrs. Farmer's grandmother. The income from this endowment is 
awarded as a scholarship to a worthy student chosen by the president of the 
college, the business officer, and the dean of the Cooper School of Missions 
and Biblical Studies. 

THE BEATRICE HARRISON MORRISON SCHOLARSHIP IN 
JOURNALISM was established for an outstanding student in journalism or 
English. 

THE J. RALPH NOONKESTER SCHOLARSHIP FUND was estabUshed as 
a result of the Hub Award, which was given to Dr. J. Ralph Noonkester, to 
provide general academic scholarships for worthy students. 

THE BEVERLY G. NORMAN SCHOLARSHIP was estabUshed by Mr. and 
Mrs. Joe H. Norman and will be offered to a deserving student or students at 
the discretion of the college president. 



40 



THE VERNA ODEN SCHOLARSHIP FUND was established by friends 
and family of Miss Oden in her honor. The scholarship is available to a worthy 
student who plans to enter the teaching field. 

THE ELIZABETH DAVIS O'NEILL MEMORIAL SCHOLARSHIP FUND was 
established by Alice E. Davis in memory of her sister, Elizabeth Davis O'Neill (class 
of 32). The earnings from this fund are used to award scholarships to assist worthy 
students. Preference is given to students from Simpson County and to music 
majors. 

THE WILLL^M H. AND MARY B. PAYNE ENDOWED SCHOLARSHIP was 
established by a gift from these two alumni to provide annual scholarships to an 
outstanding student athlete or cheerleader to be selected by the athletic director. 

THE ELAINE COLEMAN PEARSON MEMORLAL SCHOLARSHIP FUND 
was given in her memory by her friends and relatives. It is designated for a worthy 
student who needs assistance to obtain a college education. 

THE PETAL ROTARY CLUB SCHOLARSHIP FUND was established by the 
Rotary Club of Petal, Mississippi. Earnings from the investment are awarded to 
students from the Petal area. 

THE JENNEVIEVE LUCY GEORGE PITTMAN SCHOLARSHIP was 
established by Crymes G. Pittman to honor the memory of his mother and is given 
to an education major. 

THE JAMES W. POPE MINISTERIAL SCHOLARSHIP FUND was 
established by Ruby Bentley Pope in memory of her late husband. The income 
from the fund is to aid worthy ministerial students. 

THE L. CRAIG RATLIFF MEMORIAL SCHOLARSHIP FUND was established 
by friends of Dr. L. Craig Ratliff, former commuiuty leader, scholar, and minister of 
University Baptist Church, Hattiesburg, Mississippi. 

THE JOANNA BALL MALONE RILEY NURSING SCHOLARSHIP was 
established by the family and friends of Joanna Riley to honor her memory. The 
scholarship is awarded to a student entering his or her senior year in the School of 
Nursing who has demonstrated a desire to give quality nursing care while 
exhibiting a sincere love, concern, and empathetic compassion for those patients 
placed in his or her care. 

THE JOYCE QUAVE ROBERTS MEMORLAL SCHOLAKSHIP, given by family 
and friends of the late Mrs. Roberts, is presented annually to a theatre major. 

THE EARL AND DORIS ROSEBERRY SCHOLARSHIP FUND was established 
by Mr. and Mrs. Earl Roseberry and other members of the family to provide 
scholarship funds for worthy and needy students. 



41 



THE DORA ROSS SCHOLARSHIP FUND was established by friends in 
memory of Miss Ross. This scholarship is available to a worthy student. 

THE ROBERT ROSS MEMORIAL SCHOLARSHIP FUND, contributed by Mrs. 
Robert Ross in memory of her late husband, a leading Hattiesburg business man, 
provides annual scholarships to a senior student with financial need and academic 
achievement. Preference is given to students majoring in business and music. 

THE DEWEY R. AND WILMA W. SANDERSON MEMORIAL 
SCHOLARSHIP was established by the family of Mr. and Mrs. Sanderson to 
provide scholarship funds for worthy and needy students. 

THE JESSE W. SANDBFER SCHOLARSHIP FUND was established from the 
estate of Jesse W. Sandifer. The income from this fund provides scholarships for 
worthy students. 

THE G.E. AND MARTHA SHOEMAKE ENDOWED SCHOLARSHIP 
funds nontraditional students who maintain a 3.0 average or better. 

THE JANET CAMPBELL SLADE MEMORIAL SCHOLARSHIP FUND, 
established by Mr. and Mrs. Louis C. Rhoden as a memorial to their niece, 
provides scholarship assistance to a dedicated Christian woman engaged in 
study on the Hattiesburg campus in some area of church music. 

THE LORENA ROSEBERRY AND DUMAS L. SMITH SCHOLARSHIPS 
were established to honor the memory of Dumas L. Smith and to honor Lorena 
Roseberry Smith, benefactors of the college. Recipients are students majoring 
in religion, business or other professions of service. 

THE GASTON SMITH MATHEMATICS SCHOLARSHIP FUND was 
established by the family of Dr. Gaston Smith, chair of the department of 
mathematics (1967-1992), on the occasion of his retirement. The scholarship 
provides assistance for a deserving junior or seruor mathematics student to be 
selected annually by the department of mathematics. 

THE CHARLES AND CECILE STANBACK SCHOLARSHIP was established 
in honor of these two William Carey alumni to provide financial assistance to 
young married couples majoring in business. 

THE GWENDOLYN STEADMAN SCHOLARSHIP was established by fiiends 
of Ms. Steadman, former supervisor of mvisic in Hattiesburg Public Schools. This 
scholarship is awarded annually to an outstanding senior majoring in music 
education. 

THE DON H. AND MONA D. STEWART SCHOLARSHIP FUND was 
established to provide an annual scholarship to a superior senior ministerial 
student. 



42 



THE MR. AND MRS. JOHN W. STORY, SR. SCHOLARSHIP was 
established by Dr. and Mrs. L. E. Green as a memorial honoring Mrs. Green's 
mother and father. It is established "to the glory of God and for the help of 
needy, worthy students." 

THE JOHN W. AND EMMA RAWLS STORY MEMORIAL FUND was 
established by Dr. and Mrs. L. E. Green as a memorial to her parents, to be 
awarded to needy, worthy students with preference to be given to 
Story/Green descendents through the fourth generation. 

THE NORMA WILLL\MS SULLIVAN SCHOLARSHIP was established by 
Norma Williams Sullivan, a Mississippi Woman's College graduate, to aid 
worthy and deserving students in theatre and music. 

THE DANIEL SUMRALL MEMORIAL SCHOLARSHIP FUND was 
established by Dr. and Mrs. Tommy King as a memorial to Dr. King's 
grandfather. The fund provides scholarships to worthy students with 
preference given to students from the Sumrall, Mississippi, area. 

THE JOHN D. AND OLLIE THOMAS FAMILY SCHOLARSHIPS were 
established by the late OUie and John D. Thomas, prominent business people 
of Mississippi and the Southeast, to provide assistance annually for two 
students who are majoring in music. Considerations are need, sophomore 
standing or above. Baptist faith, and a "C" average or above. 

THE ELIZABETH H. THOMPSON MEMORIAL SCHOLARSHIP FUND 
was established from the estate of the late Dr. James Thompson, spouse of 
Mrs. Thompson. The scholarship is awarded annually to a music major. 

THE RUBY M. THOMPSON SCHOLARSHIP FUND was estabUshed by 
Ms. Ruby M. Thompson of Clinton, Mississippi, an alumna of Mississippi 
Woman's College, for the purpose of scholarship endowment. 

THE T. J. WALTERS SCHOLARSHIP was established from a gift of Mr. T. J. 
Walters of First Baptist Church, EllisviUe, Mississippi. 

THE JANICE AIKEN WELDON MEMORIAL SCHOLARSHIP FUND was 
established by Dr. F. Edwin Weldon in memory of his late wife, Janice Aiken 
Weldon, and his father, Frank E. Weldon, Jr. The fund provides scholarships 
for needy and worthy students. Preference is given to Baptist students and to 
majors in the School of Business. 

THE ROY AND ROY WAYNE WELFORD MEMORIAL SCHOLARSHIP is 
awarded annually to a chemistry major upon the recommendation of the 
chairman of the department of chemistry. 

THE E. K. WHEELER MEMORIAL SCHOLARSHIP FUND is funded by 
Dr. E. Milton Wheeler, an alumnus of the college and professor of history, as a 

43 



memorial to his father, and by Mrs. E. K. Wheeler, as a memorial to her 
husbar\d. It provides a scholarship annually to a student who needs funds for 
the spring trimester. Preference is given to students who are preparing for 
church-related vocations. 

THE LUCY WHEELER SCHOLARSHIP FUND was established by Dr. E. 
MUton Wheeler, an alumnus and professor of history and geography, in honor 
of his mother. This scholarship is designated for students with an interest in 
missions. 

THE MR. AND MRS. O. J. WHEELER MEMORIAL SCHOLARSHIP 
FUND, given by Miss Eleanor Wheeler in memory of her father and mother, 
provides financial assistance to a needy and worthy student who is studying to 
enter some phase of the gospel mirustry. 

THE TRANNYE ODOM WHITE SCHOLARSHIP was estabUshed from the 
estate of Trarmye Odom White, a Mississippi Woman's College alumna. Two 
scholarships are to be made annually to deserving students. 

THE MARK WILKINSON MEMORIAL SCHOLARSHIP was established 
by friends of the late Mark Wilkinson to benefit theatre majors. Mr. Wilkinson 
was a theatre graduate of the college. 

THE CHRISTOPHER WILSON MEMORIAL SCHOLARSHIP FUND was 
established in memory of Christopher Wilson by friends of Mr. and Mrs. 
Rodney Wilson and Mr. and Mrs. Maurice McWhorter. 

THE FRANCES W. WINTERS SCHOLARSHIP FUND was estabUshed by 
family and friends of Mrs. Frances W. Winters in honor of her as professor emerita 
of music. Preference is given to church music majors. 

THE LOWERY A. WOODALL SCHOLARSHIP IN NURSING was established 
by Forrest General Hospital in honor of Mr. Lowery A. WoodaU, long-time chief 
executive officer of the hospital. 

THE WILLIAM WOODALL AND LAURA M. IZARD MEMORLAL FUND 
was established to help worthy and needy students from Copiah County, 
Mississippi. 

RESTRICTED SCHOLARSHIPS 

THE THERMAN BRYANT SCHOLARSHIP is administered by the Board of 
Ministerial Education of the Mississippi Baptist Convention and is awarded to a 
church-related vocations student from one of the three Mississippi Baptist colleges. 
A Carey student receives this scholarship once every third year. The scholarship 
honors the memory of Mr. Therman Bryant, a former member of the Board of 
Ministerial Education. 



44 



THE GRACE SELLERS CHAIN SCHOLARSHIP FUND was established by 
Mr. Bobby Chain of Hattiesburg in honor of his mother. The income is to be 
used to provide scholarships for Southern Baptist students who are studying 
for church vocations. 

THE ALON COLLETTI MEMORIAL SCHOLARSHIP is given annually to 
memoriahze Rev. Alon CoUetti, a Carey alumnus. The scholarship is awarded 
to a married music education or church music major. 

THE VERNA MAE TAYLOR CROSBY MEMORLAL FUND is administered 
by the Mississippi Baptist Foundation and supports students preparing for a 
church-related vocation. 

THE BOB CRUMPTON SCHOLARSHIP FUND was established in memory 
of a civic and denominational leader of Pensacola, Florida, and is given to a 
theatre major. 

THE EASTERN STAR TRAINING AWARDS FOR RELIGIOUS 
LEADERSHIP are awarded annually by members of the Grand Chapter 
of Mississippi, Order of the Eastern Star, to students who seek to 
advance their education in the field of religious study. 

THE nRST BAPTIST CHURCH FOUNDATION OF HATTIESBURG is a 
channel through which various members of the church from time to time 
provide scholarships for William Carey College students. 

THE FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH FOUNDATION OF LAUREL has 
established scholarships to assist 15 students who are preparing for the 
preaching ministry. Applications can be obtained from the scholarship 
committee. Preference is given to students from the -local area. The 
Foundation awards the scholarships. 

THE DAVID R. GRANT MEMORIAL SCHOLARSHIP, established by the 
board of trustees, honors the memory of Dr. Grant, fom^er Mississippi Baptist 
Convention president and member of the William Carey College board of trustees. 

THE DOROTHEA VAN DEUSEN OPDYKE FUND is a bequest left to the 
Southern Baptist Convention by Mrs. Ida Reed Opdyke of Jamestown, New York, 
as a memorial to her daughter, Dorothea Van Deusen Opdyke, and is to be used 
for the education of mountain people. Two scholarships are offered. 

THE BERNARD W. POWELL SCHOLARSHIP was established by coUeagues 
and friends of Mr. PoweU, honoring the memory of Mr. Powell's service at Carey as 
professor of education. Petal-Harvey Baptist Church selects the recipient. 

THE O. L. QUAVE THEATRE AWARD is presented to a theatre student 
who excels in the college theatre program. Although talent and ability are 
important criteria in the selection of a recipient, primary consideration is given 

45 



to academic achievement. The award, in honor of the chair of the department 
of theatre and communication, is funded by John T. Clearman, an alumnus. 

THE BILLY ROGERS SCHOLARSHIPS were established by Dr. and Mrs. John 
McGraw. These scholarships are for music students in memory of Mrs. McGraw's 
father, Mr. Billy Rogers, a Laurel and Hattiesburg public schools educator and 
church and dvic leader. 

THE DORIS SCHNEIDER AWARD IN TECHNICAL THEATRE is given to 
a theatre student who exhibits unusual talent or ability in an area of technical 
theatre. The award is given in honor of a distinguished theatre alumna who 
teaches in a state university in North Carolina. 

THE SODEXHO MARRIOTT SERVICES SCHOLARSHIP FUND was 
established to commemorate the Small Business Leadership Award and is 
designated for a student from the School of Business. 

THE R. B. THOMAS SCHOLARSHIP FUND was set up by Mr. and Mrs. R. B. 
Thomas of Hattiesburg to assist outstanding students with preference given to 
students preparing for full-time religious work. Grants are awarded by the Main 
Street Baptist Church of Hattiesburg, Mississippi. 

THE UNITED PARCEL SERVICES FOUNDATION SCHOLARSHIP is 
awarded each year to a student who demonstrates financial need and good 
academic standing. 

THE GORDON H. WHTTE COMMUNTTY LEADERSHIP SCHOLARSHIPS 
were estabUshed in memory of Gordon H. White by the board of trustees. Mr. 
White was a well-known civic leader and supporter of the college. These 
scholarships are intended to encourage students to emulate his example of service 
and leadership. 

FACULTY ENDOWMENT 

THE GILLESPIE CHAIR OF ART was estabUshed and endowed by Miss 
Sarah Gillespie in honor of her parents, Mr. William Gunn Gillespie and Mrs. 
Sallie Keith Gillespie. 

THE J. RALPH NOONKESTER ENDOWED PROFESSORSHIP OF HISTORY 
was established by a gift from Mr. WUey Fairchild to honor the president emeritus 
of William Carey College. 

THE J. D. SIMS CHAIR OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION was established 
and endowed by gifts through the First Mississippi Corporation. 

THE THOMSON CHAIR OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION was established 
and endowed by Mr. R. S. GIHck) Thomson in honor of his parents, Mr. and Mrs. W. 
A. Thomson, Sr. 

46 



THE WINTERS CHAIR IN MUSIC was established and endowed by the 
McCarty Farms Company to honor the memory of Dr. Donald Winters, long-time 
dean and professor of music. 

THE HARRIET MATHER PROFESSORSHIP IN NURSING was estabUshed 
and endowed by a grant from Baptist Community Ministries in New Orleans. In 
honoring Harriet Mather, long-time dean of nursing at Mather School of Nursing in 
New Orleans, WiUiam Carey College has provided matching endowment income 
to join BCM and the contributions of the Southern Baptist Hospital League in their 
support of health care in Louisiana. 

MISSISSIPPI MISSION ENDOWMENT 

This endowment is funded by Mississippi Baptist churches and private 
gifts to support the quality of teaching, student scholarships, program 
enrichments, and facilities support. A total of $1,819,790 was endowed as of 
March 31, 1999. 



STUDENT LIFE AND CAMPUS ACTIVITIES 

Student life at William Carey College is an experience in community 
Christian living. All student life, all organizational life, and all social life is 
directed to the ultimate purpose of preparing a person for well-balanced 
vocational and social life. The college strives to give all students the 
opportunity to grow creatively in all aspects of personal and community Ufe. 

AH students are expected to assume responsibility for their own affairs and to 
respect the rights and privileges of other members of the campus community. 
Faculty and administrators of the college are interested in students and seek to 
help them to achieve mature, personal, responsible objectives. 

Students' spiritual, social, moral, intellectual, and vocational maturity is 
increased through their participation in community housing, organizational 
activity, their assumption of responsibilities for campus life, and the 
availability of many forms of student and staff guidance. 

Rules and regulations related to student campus life are set forth in The Lance, a 
publication of the office of student development. It governs matters of conduct and 
residential life and is distributed annually to all students. In addition, some 
academic programs provide separate handbooks related to the particular 
programs. These documents collectively set forth the various rights and 
responsibilities of students, both academically and in other matters related to 
matriculation. Procedures related to these rights and responsibilities, including 
appeals related to academic and conduct matters, are set forth in these documents. 



47 



RELIGIOUS ACTIVITIES 
CHAPEL 

The purpose of chapel is to provide through the regular assembly of the 
entire college family an opportunity for worship and inspiration, for learning 
in inspirational context, and for the creation of community. This will 
contribute to spiritual development of the student as a significant part of 
preparation for meaningful life. With certain exceptions, all undergraduate 
students on the Hattiesburg campus are required to attend. Requests for 
exemptions from the chapel requirement may be made by completing an 
exemption request form, which is available in the Cooper School of Missions 
and Biblical Studies, Room 112 of Lawrence Hall on the Hattiesburg campus. 

Chapel programs are presented each Wednesday morning on the Gulfport 
campus, and with certain exceptions, all undergraduate students are required 
to attend. Exemptions from the chapel requirement may be made by petition to 
the office of student services on the Gulfport campus. 

Students and faculty on the New Orleans campus attend general assembly, 
in which a varied program of professional, cultural, and /or religious nature 
plarmed by a student-faculty committee is presented. With certain exceptions, 
all undergraduate students on the New Orleans campus are required to attend. 
Requests for exemptions from the chapel requirement may be made by 
contacting the director of marketing and student services on the New Orleans 
campus. 

WILLIAM CAREY LECTURES 

The William Carey Lectures are held annually on the Hattiesburg campus, 
honoring the college's namesake and the Christian missions effort. A Religious 
Emphasis Day is held on the New Orleans and the Gulfport campuses. 
Outstanding leaders and scholars from the Christian community are brought 
to the campuses for these emphases. 

BAPTIST STUDENT UNION 

The Baptist Student Union (BSU) is a ministry for the campus which is 
designed to facilitate and enrich spiritual growth, to share Christ with all 
students, to encourage individual and group Bible study, to magnify church 
membership and loyalty, and to learn about and be involved in mission 
projects. The BSU seeks to provide a wholesome Christian fellowship through 
which all students can involve themselves in ministry and personal growth 
activities. 

The BSU is supported by area churches and affiliated with the Department 
of Student Work of the Mississippi Baptist Convention and the National 
Student Ministries Department of the Sunday School Board of the Southern 
Baptist Convention. 

48 



STUDENT GOVERNMENT ASSOCIATION 

William Carey College has adopted student government because of its 
democratic and creative implications. Each student who enrolls in the college 
automatically becomes a member of the Student Government Association. Each 
member is given an opportunity to participate in student government by voting 
in SGA elections, by the voice of representatives in the Student Government 
Council, and by the right of personal petition. The officers of the SGA work 
closely with the director of student activities in planning and implementing 
student programs and activities. The president and vice president of the SGA are 
welcome representatives of students on the Administrative CoimcU of the college. 
Both the New Orleans and the Gulfport campuses have autonomous Student 
Government Associations. 

STUDENT PUBLICATIONS 

The Cobbler is the student newspaper. It is a publication designed to report 
on past and future campus events and is produced by a volunteer staff of 
students under the direction of the office of student activities and a faculty 
advisor. For more information, contact the director of student activities. 

The Crusader is an annual publication that depicts and preserves the events 
that influence and shape the lives of the students during the course of a year. 

The Indigo is a collection of literary works written by students at Carey and 
published by the department of language and literature. 

Field Notes are articles of research conducted by students at Carey and 
published by student editors in Alpha Chi. 

PoUcies and procedures for the governance and funding of these and other 
publications can be found in the poUcies and procedures manual of the college. 

CLUBS AND ORGANIZATIONS 

African- American Cultural Society is a group of students organized to give 
recognition and promotion to the heritage and cultural contributions of African- 
Americans. Membership is open to all interested students. 

Alpha Chi is a national honor scholarship society made up of juniors and 
seniors who rank in the top ten percent of their class. The purpose of this 
organization is the recognition and promotion of scholarship and those 
elements of character that make scholarship effective. 

Alpha Psi Omega is a national honorary theatre fraternity. The purpose of 
the Sigma Chi Cast is to honor through election to membership those students 
who actively participate in theatre at Wilham Carey College. 



49 



American Music Therapy Association promotes opportunities and experiences 
for students in providing activities for persons with disabiUties. 

The Association of Campus Presidents is composed of the presidents of all 
campus organizations. 

The Baptist Student Union consists of every student interested in 
participating in its activities, and is dedicated to bringing all students the vital 
connection between an intellectual challenge and a spiritual inspiration. It 
seeks to do this by sponsoring student religious activities and encouraging 
students to take an active and personal part in its program. 

The Carey Carillon is a handbell choir which represents the college on and 
off campus. It is open to all students by audition. 

The Carey College Chorale is the principal choral organization of the 
college. Functioning within the chorale are the Concert Chorale, the touring 
choral group, and various ensembles. Membership is by audition. 

The Carey Cormection is a group of student recruiters who lead tours, take 
recruiting trips, and assist in Preview Day activities. 

The Carey Student Nurses Association — CSNA is composed of students 
majoring in nursing and aids in developing the individual as a future health 
professional to contribute to the improvement of health care of all people. 

Carpenter's Wood is a contemporary Christian vocal ensemble open to 
chorale members. Membership is by audition. 

Chi Beta Phi is a national science fraternity with over 30 chapters 
throughout the eastern United States. Chi Beta phi encourages scholarship and 
sponsors both social and scientific activities. Membership is open to students 
with 16 hours in math and science who have a grade point average of at least 
3.0. 

The Church-Related Vocations Fellowship is composed of church-related 
vocations students on campus, and its purpose is to promote Christian 
fellowship. 

The Cobbler Newspaper staff is responsible for the production of a campus 
paper each trimester. 

The Crusader Yearbook staff is responsible for the documentation and 
creation of the college yearbook. 

Delta Omicron International Music Fraternity installed the Omicron 
Sigma Chapter on the William Carey College campus on October 24, 1964. A 
music professional and honorary organization for women. Delta Omicron is 

50 



open to women music majors and minors who achieve its required academic 
performance and professional standards. 

The Drill Team is a group of women students who add spirit by presenting 
routines at all Carey home basketball games. 

Fellowship of Christian Athletes is affiliated with the State and National 
Fellowship of Christian Athletes. The local huddle is open to William Carey 
students who play on either varsity or intramural teams. 

Gamma Chi is a woman's social dub focusing on sisterhood and community 
service. 

The Hope Project is an organization dedicated to providing continuous 
opportunities for service learning in the Hattiesburg community. 

The International Relations Council exists to promote fellowship among 
the international students and better understanding of world citizenship, to 
develop understanding and contact with the people of the Hattiesburg area, 
and to promote expressions of international interest when feasible. 

Kappa Alpha Epsilon is a men's social club which focuses on brotherhood 
and community service. 

Kappa Mu Epsilon is a national honor society that promotes interest in and 
appreciation for mathematics at the undergraduate level. Members are 
selected from students of mathematics and other related fields who have 
attained academic distinction. 

Kappa Pi is an international art fraternity open to all art majors and others 
in art. The Gulfport campus chapter is Zeta Omega. 

Lambda Iota Tau is an international society for those with a major or minor 
in EngUsh or foreign language literature. Through membership the student has 
an opportunity to meet and to discuss literature with the best students in their 
college generation. 

Mu Kappa is a support group for campus MKs (missionary kids). 

Music Educators National Conference, Carey College Student Chapter, 
affords music students opportunity for professional orientation and 
development while still in school. Membership in the chapter is open to all 
music students, with emphasis given to those students who are preparing to 
teach music in public schools. 

Omicron Delta Kappa, William Carey College Circle, recognizes the high 
attainment of juniors and seniors as leaders in the areas of scholarship. 



51 



athletics, student government, social and religious affairs, publications, speech 
and drama, and music. Membership is by election. 

Phi Beta Lambda is a national business organization also known as PBL. This 
organization is open to all majors and is especially helpful to students n\ajoring in 
business. 

Phi Mu Alpha Sinfonia is the largest and oldest music fraternity for men. 
William Carey's Nu Xi colony of Phi Mu Alpha is open to qualified men interested 
in the brotherhood of music. 

Pi Gamma Mu is an organization promoting interest in the social sciences. 

Pi Kappa Delta is a national honorary forensics fraternity. Its purpose is to 
promote speech and debate activity on campus and to elect to membership those 
students who actively participate in the forensics program at the college 

Pi Omega is a women's social club focusing on sisterhood and commvmity 
service. 

The Psychology Club is an organization designed to enhance the 
educational experiences of its students through a wide range of extracurricular 
experiences involving both the school and community. This club is not limited 
to psychology majors, and others are encouraged to take part in club activities. 
Some of the activities include field trips, movies, lectures, and special service 
projects within the community. 

Residence Hall Councils are established on each residence hall for the purposes 
of hall programming and community building. 

The Serampore Players is an organization open to all students. Its purpose is 
to stimulate interest in the acting and backstage aspects of a performing theatre. 

Speech and Debate Team is Carey's nationally ranked and recognized 
intercollegiate forensics organization. 

Sigma Psi Nu is a men's social dub focusing on brotherhood and commimity 
service. 

Sigma Tau Delta is the international EngUsh honor society. The purpose of 
the society is (a) to confer distinction for high achievement in the English 
language and literature in undergraduate and professional studies; (b) to 
promote interest in literature and the English language on the local campuses 
and their surrounding communities; and (c) to foster the discipline of English 
in all of its aspects, including creative and critical thinking. 

The Student Education Association is an organizaiton dedicated to the 
training and development of students desiring to be educators. 

52 



The Student Goveniment Association is an organization whose purpose is 
to aid in governing the student body and help serve their needs. The SGA 
serves as a Haison between students and administration and also is a primary 
source for weekly campus activities. There are both elected and appointed 
positions. Each student who enrolls in the college is a member of the SGA. 

The Symphonic Winds is the principal instrumental orgaruzation of the college. 
Functioning within the organization are various instrumental ensembles. 
Membership is by audition. 

The Taekwondo Club fosters the development and unity of all martial arts. 

The Yoimg College Republicans Club meet to discuss politics and support the 
Mississippi Republican Party. 



CAREER SERVICES 

Career Services at William Carey College is designed to facilitate the 
transition of students from academic Ufe into a rewarding career experience. 
Career Services offers assistance in the development of job search skills such as 
resume preparation, interviewing techniques, and networking. Assistance is 
also available for application to graduate schools. The career library includes 
information about employment opportunities, career choices, career planning, 
and graduate schools. In addition. Career Services offers assistance to help 
students identify career interests, which is beneficial in determining a course of 
study. Services are available for students and alumni of William Carey 
College. 

SIGI Plus, a career planning software package, is available in both 
Hattiesburg and Gulfport. In addition, Hattiesburg and Gulfport campuses 
have copies of Peterson's Graduate Guides, which include information on 
graduate programs in many disciplines throughout the United States. William 
Carey College is a member of The National Association of Colleges and 
Employers and the American Association of Employment in Education. Both 
of these associations provide job search resources for students which are 
available in Hattiesburg, Gulfport, and New Orleans. 

Career resources are located in 129 Lawrence Hall in Hattiesburg; the 
McMullan Library in Gulfport; and in the office of the director of the nursing 
program in New Orleans. 



53 



ADMINISTRATION OF THE ACADEMIC PROGRAM 

William Carey College offers a variety of academic programs at the 
undergraduate level and a limited number of programs at the graduate level. 
This catalog sets forth the general academic regulations which the college 
follows as well as specific regulations and policies regarding the 
undergraduate program. Most undergraduate programs may be completed by 
successfully earning at least 128 semester hours of specified credit. 

The time period within which these programs may be completed varies. 
The program curricula generally allow completion in four years. That period 
may be shortened for students with outstanding records who are allowed to 
take higher course loads or who attend summer classes. It may also be longer 
for students who experience academic difficulty or attend on a part-time basis. 

ACADEMIC ORGANIZATION OF THE COLLEGE 

The coUege is organized into the School of Arts, Humanities, and Sciences, 
the School of Business, the School of Education and Psychology, the Owen and 
Elizabeth Cooper School of Missions and Biblical Studies, the Donald and 
Frances Winters School of Music, and the School of Nursing. Each of these 
schools has a dean responsible for its direction. 

GRADUATE PROGRAM 

William Carey College offers a program of graduate studies leading to 
degrees in selected areas of teacher education (M.Ed.), business (M.B.A.), and 
psychology (M.S.). All degrees are available in Hattiesburg and 
Gulfport. Information related to the graduate programs of the college is set forth in 
a separate catalog. 

For information or a graduate catalog, contact the Graduate Office, WilUam 
Carey College, 498 Tuscan Avenue, WCC Box #3, Hattiesburg, MS 39401-5499 
or William Carey College on the Coast, 1856 Beach Drive, Gulfport, MS 39507. 

ACADEMIC GUIDANCE PROGRAM 

William Carey College provides a guidance program for students through 
faculty conferences. Conferences are designed to assist students in the choice 
and mastery of academic subjects. 

1 . Each student is assigned to a member of the faculty who serves as advisor. 
Chairs or deans of the various departments or schools of the college are 
responsible for assigning advisors for their major students. 



54 



2. A program of orientation for all new students is provided. 

(a) An introduction to student life is provided by the dean of students. 

(b) Diagnostic tests are administered to new students prior to registration. 
Tests are administered in the following areas: English composition, 
reading, and mathematics. 

(c) Results of the required placement tests are used to recommend 
appropriate courses for students. 

CLASSIFICATION OF STUDENTS 

The undergraduate academic work of William Carey College is organized 
into four classes: the freshman class (29 semester hours or less), the sophomore 
class (30-59 hours), the junior class (60-89 hours), and the senior class (at least 
90 hours or graduating the following summer). 

GENERAL ACADEMIC REGULATIONS 
REQUIREMENTS AND REGULATIONS FOR ALL DEGREES 

1. English Proficiency Examination. All students must take the English 
Proficiency Examination upon completion of ENG 101-102. Any student 
who fails the examination must register for and satisfactorily complete 
English 105. 

2. Computer proficiency. All students must demonstrate computer 
proficiency by passing a computer skills proficiency examination or by 
completing at least one computer course. The computer course must focus 
on some aspect of computing that requires knowledge and skills in the 
basic use of computers. 

3. Graduation requirements may be met under any catalog in effect during 
the student's enrollment within six years of graduation. Community/ 
junior college students transferring directly to William Carey College 
under admissions standards in the current catalog may elect to follow the 
academic policies in the immediately preceding catalog, provided they 
were enrolled at the community/junior college at that time. Students 
seeking teacher or nursing licensure should follow currently approved 
programs. 

4. Second degree. Students desiring to earn a second undergraduate degree 
must complete the core requirements for the additional degree plus a 
second major. At least 30 semester hours beyond the minimal 128 
semester hours required for the first degree must be earned. 



55 



5. Upper-level hours. Forty hours in courses numbered 300 or above are 
required. (Courses transferred from community /junior colleges v^ill not 
be counted as upper-level hours.) 

6. Upper-level hours in the major field or concentration(s) field. At least 50 
percent of the required hours in the major field or a B.G.S. concentration 
must be upper-level hours. 

7. A minimum of 25% of the course credit required for a degree must be 
earned at William Carey College. 

8. The last 30 semester hours for any degree must be done at WilUam Carey 
College. An alternate way to meet this requirement is to take at least 48 
upper-level hours of work at William Carey College. 

9. Upper-level hours in the major or concentration(s) earned at William 
Carey College must total at least 12; students with two concentrations in 
the B.G.S. may achieve this upper level requirement through any 
combination of the 12 hours. 

10. Hours in the minor earned at William Carey College must total at least six. 

11. An average grade of C or above on the total academic hours attempted is 
required. 

12. An average grade of C or above on all of the work done at William Carey 
College is required. 

13. An average grade of C or above on courses in the major and minor fields 
is required. 

14. Application for degree. Students who are candidates for May degrees are 
required to file applications for their degrees in the registrar's office by 
January 31 prior to graduation. Candidates for February degrees on the 
New Orleans campus must file appUcations for their degrees by October 15. 
Candidates for August graduation must file application for their degrees by 
March 31. Late applications may be taken within 30 working days of these 
deadlines. There wiU be a $50 late fee in addition to the graduation fee. 

15. Graduation ceremony. Degrees are not conferred in absentia, except by 
special permission of the vice president of academic affairs. 

16. A maximum of nine hours in directed readings and independent study 

courses may count toward a baccalaureate degree. 

17. Only eight activity credit hours from PEG courses may count toward a 
degree. Activity credit for PEG courses are those semester hours awarded 
for participation in cheerleading, intercollegiate baseball, softball, 
basketball, golf, and soccer. Courses of this nature in which academic 
instruction occurs are not included. 

56 



18. Nursing students must have a grade of C or above in all nursing courses. 
Education students must have a grade of C or above in all education courses. 

19. The first six repeats at William Carey College will count as grade 
replacements. Thereafter, all grades will be calculated in the grade point 
average. 

20. A maximum of 64 semester hours earned in a community/junior college 
may be applied toward a degree at William Carey College. 

21. Students who wish to repeat courses taken at William Carey College must 
repeat those courses at the college in order to receive the repeated course's 
credit and quality points. The last WiUiam Carey CoUege grade earned on a 
repeated course is the grade counted toward the degree requirements and in 
the grade point average. 

22. When courses are repeated, whether resident or transfer credits, the last 
grade earned is the one that is counted for degree requirements and in the 
grade point average, but previous grades Vkdll remain on the record. 



TRIMESTER CALENDAR 

William Carey College operates on a trimester calendar. The semester hour is the 
unit of credit. 

All courses meet one hour and 15 minutes per week for each semester 
credit hour unless different meeting hours are specified in the course 
descriptions. The trimester is 11 weeks long, consisting of ten weeks of class 
and one week of final examinations, except during the summer when the term 
consists of a total of ten weeks. 



TRANSFER CREDITS 

A maximum of 64 semester hours earned in a community/junior college 
may be applied toward a degree at William Carey College. Once students have 
reached junior standing (i.e., with 60 semester hours) they may not transfer a 
course from a coirtmunity/junior college except by special permission of the 
vice president of acadennic affairs. 

Students enrolled at William Carey College who wish to earn credits at 
another college must make an application in advance to the vice president of 
academic affairs through their dean/advisor. The student must be in good 
standing at William Carey before permission will be granted to take a course 
elsewhere during any term. 



57 



Grades of D will not transfer if the student has a cumulative grade point 
average on all transfer credit for all college work attempted of less than 2.0. 

CREDIT BY EXAMINATION 

William Carey College awards college credit to students through CLEP 
examinatioris and Advanced Placement Testing. Requirements are listed below. 

Credit obtained by all CLEP and Advanced Placement examinations may 
not exceed 30 hours. Credit by CLEP may not be earned for a subject in which 
more advanced credit has been earned. Credit by CLEP may not be earned for 
a course if the prerequisite courses have not been taken. 

CLEF General Examinations. Students may, prior to or dviiing their first 
term of enrollment (for part-time or summer students prior to having 
completed 15 hours), obtain degree credit for satisfactory performance 
(minimum score — scaled score of 500) on one or more of the CLEP General 
Examinations, provided the student has not been enrolled in a comparable 
course for more than 30 calendar days. Six semester hours of credit may be 
obtained for each of the four General Examinations areas: humanities, 
mathematics, natural sciences, and social sciences-history. 

All credit by CLEP General Examination is elective credit. 

CLEP Subject Examinations. William Carey College grants credit for 
CLEP Subject Examinations in heu of enrollment in equivalent courses which 
are applicable to the degree program in which the student is enrolled. The 
minimum scaled score for each Subject Examination is determined by the 
appropriate academic department. Students may take Subject Examinations at 
any time during their college career, provided they have not been enrolled in 
the equivalent course for more than 30 calendar days. Credit may not be 
received for both the Subject Examination and its equivalent, either in another 
examination or in a course taken for credit. To receive credit for Freshman 
English 101, a student must take Freshman College Composition with essay. 
The essay portion of the CLEP Subject Examination will be graded by the 
department of language and literature at the college. 

Credit by examination may not exceed eight semester hours in any area or 
discipline except in foreign language which has a maximum of 12 hours. Such 
credit may be entered on a record only after the student has earned 12 hours of 
credit in classroom courses at William Carey College. 

Advanced Placement. Credit may be granted by examination on the College 
Board Advanced Placement Testing Program. No credit will be awarded for 
scores less than 3, and some academic departments may require a higher score 
than 3. 



58 



CORRESPONDENCE CREDIT 

Correspondence credit will not be accepted in the department of the 
student's major unless it is in addition to the minimum credit required for the 
major. All correspondence credit must be approved by the chairman of the 
major department and must carry a grade of at least C. Transcripts for 
correspondence credits to be used to meet graduation requirements must be 
received by the registrar at least two weeks prior to the date of graduation. 
Correspondence credit is limited to six semester hours for a degree. 

AUDITING COURSES 

A student who does not need or wish to obtain credit may attend a class as 
an auditor. Students who audit a course are expected to attend class on a 
regular basis and meet other requirements prescribed by the instructor. The 
credit option (audit to credit or credit to audit) may not be changed after the 
deadline for adding courses for credit. The fee for auditing is one-half the 
regular tuition. 

LISTENER'S LICENSE 

With permission of the instructor, regular classes may be taken as a listener. 
Class participation is limited, and the course does not appear on the transcript. 
There is no fee to be a listener at William Carey College. 

EXAMINATIONS, GRADES, AND QUALITY POINTS 

1 . Examinations are given during the last week of each trimester. 

a. No final examination may be held at any other time than that 
designated by the administration. A final examination by special 
arrangement may be given only by permission of the vice president of 
academic affairs. A fee of $25.00 per exam is charged for this service. 

b. All fees must be paid before examinations may be taken. 

2. No student will be granted a transcript of any kind until the account is 
settled in the business office. 

3. Grades are issued to students only. 



59 



Grades and Quality Points per Semester Credit Hour 

A Excellent 4 

B Above average 3 

C Average 2 

D Below average 1 

F Failure 

I Incomplete 

P Pass 

R Repeat 

N Course in progress 

W Course dropped in the third week of the trimester 

WP Withdrew passing 

WF Withdrew failing 

A grade of "I" (incomplete) will be assigned only when unavoidable 
circumstances prevent completion of the work of the course on schedule. 
When the work is completed satisfactorily, the "I" may be changed to any 
grade. If a grade of "1" is not changed to a passing grade by the end of the next 
trimester, it will automatically be changed to "F." 

Any junior or senior student is permitted to take one course each trimester 
on a pass /fail basis. Approval of the instructor is required. The course must be 
selected at the time of registration, and it must not be in the student's major or 
minor fields or in the core curriculum requirements for all degrees. A total of 
four courses may be taken on this basis. 

Students taking developmental courses (English 100, English 105, Mathematics 
100 or Study Skills) will receive grades of "P" for passing and wiU receive credit for 
the course, or a grade of "R" which indicates they must repeat the course. 

COMPUTATION OF GRADES 

Grade point averages are based on the number of hours attempted rather than 
the number of hours passed. This will include all hours attempted at WiUiam Carey 
College and all transfer credits. Grades of "I" (current) "N," 'T," "R," "W," and 
"WP" wiU not be counted in the total hours attempted. 

ACADEMIC DISCIPLINE 

GPA required 
Total Hours attempted to be in good standing 

0-30 1.40 

31-59 1.70 

60 and above 2.00 

The grade point average needed for academic good standing will be based 
on William Carey College credits only, but the hours attempted will be based 
on William Carey College credit plus all transfer credits. Students not meeting 

60 



the minimum standards as set forth will be placed on academic probation. 
Students on academic probation may not register for more than ten hours for 
the trimester. When a student attains the required academic average on all 
work, the student is officially removed from the probationary status. If a 
student is on academic probation for two consecutive trimesters, the student 
will be suspended. Letters of probation and suspension will be mailed shortly 
after the end of each trimester excluding the summer session. Suspended 
students who feel they have extenuating circumstances may appeal to the 
credits committee. A student who is suspended may apply for readmission 
after one academic trimester. The applicant for readmission should meet the 
minimum academic standards required of current and transfer students. 

SCHOLASTIC HONORS 

President's List and Dean's List. Those meeting the following 
requirements are included in the President's List and Dean's List. 

1 . The student must carry no less than rune semester hours of work exclusive of 
MUG, PED, PEG courses and THE 160, 260, 261, 360, and 361 during the 
trimester on which the scholastic average is based. 

2. The scholastic average must be 4.0 for the President's List and at least 3.5 
for the Deans' List. 

3. The grades for the trimester on which the scholastic average is based must 
include no grade lower than C or an incomplete. 

Graduation Distinctions. To receive graduation distinctions, a student must 
earn grades on at least 60 hours in college, at least half of which must be earned 
at William Carey College. 

1. A student who has earned a 3.6 grade point average graduates cum laude. 

2. A student who has earned a 3.8 grade point average graduates magna cum 
laude. 

3. A student who has earned a 3.9 grade point average, with no grade below 
B, graduates summa cum laude. 

Placement in each graduating class is determined for students who have 
completed a minimum of 64 hours at William Carey College. 

Graduation Honors. To receive graduation honors, students must complete 
an honors thesis in their major area of study. A student may register for honors 
thesis only by invitation of a faculty member who wishes to supervise the 
thesis. Students must register for the honors course numbered 499 in their 
major area. Students may register for the thesis course two or three times, as 
their work continues for two or three trimesters. Each thesis, if finally 
approved by the student's major area faculty and the honors committee, is 
recognized for either three or six hours credit, entitling the student to graduate 
with honors in the major area. 

61 



ACADEMIC CREDITS AND COURSE LOADS 

The maximum course load on the trimester system is 12 semester hours. 
Students on the Dean's List (scholarship average 3.5 or better) may take a 
maximum of 13 semester hours. Exceptions must be approved by the vice 
president of academic affairs. No student may take more than 15 hours during 
any trimester from any combination of courses. 

A full-time student is one taking a minimum of nine semester hours during 
a trimester. A half-time student is one taking a minimum of five semester 
hours but less than nine during a trimester. 

The maximum amount of work which may be earned in one five-week term 
of the summer session is seven hours. Loads for mini-term and specially 
scheduled courses vary with length of courses. 

A student should attempt to complete all core curriculum by the end of the 
second year in college. First-trin^ester freshmen and transfer students must take 
ENG 101-102 consecutively and sequentially until completed. English 
requirements include the English Proficiency Examination, which should be 
taken the trimester after successful completion of ENG 101-102. 



ATTENDANCE REGULATIONS 

Students are expected to attend classes. Excessive absences may seriously 
affect the work of the whole class as well as that of the individual students 
who are absent. Individual faculty members set their own attendance 
regulations for their classes and inform their students of them; however, 
students must attend 75% of the class meetings in order to receive credit for 
the course. The total number of absences of each student shall be reported for 
each class by each faculty member at time of fiUng trimester grade rosters. 



CHANGE OF CLASS SCHEDULE (Dropping and Adding Courses) 

1. No change of schedule, either in dropping a course or adding a course, 
may be made except by permission of the student's academic advisor and 
dean. Schedule changes that affect total hours may impact financial aid. 

2. No student may register for a course after 10% of class meetings have 
occurred. 

3. Courses dropped within the first three weeks of a trimester will be recorded 
as "W" (withdrawn). Courses dropped after three weeks and before the 
middle of a trimester are recorded as "WF' (withdrawn passing) or "WF" 
(withdrawn failing), and courses dropped after the midterm will receive a 
grade of "F." Any student dropping a course at any time without the 
required approval receives an "¥" in that course. 



62 



4. Courses offered in mini-terms or with special schedules will have 
add /drop dates proportionate to length of course. 

5. For related fees /refunds, see Financial Information— Student Expenses 
and Tuition Refund Policy. 

WITHDRAWAL FROM THE COLLEGE 

1. All students who desire to withdraw from the college must file a written 
request form and obtain permission from the vice president of academic 
affairs. Resident students must also obtain permission of the vice 
president of student services. 

2. Refunds upon withdrawal will be made only on condition that official 
permission has been granted. (See Tuition Refund Policy.) 

COURSE NUMBERING SYSTEM 

Each course is identified by a three-digit number. Generally, the first digit 
indicates the level of instruction: "1" for freshman, "2" for sophomore, "3" for 
junior, and "4" for senior. The letter "H" added to any course number 
indicates an honors section. 

The numbers 190, 290, 390, and 490 are used throughout the college's 
curriculum to designate courses that are named when taught. 

The numbers 193, 293, 393, and 493 are used in some departments to 
designate workshops that are named when offered. A workshop numbered in 
this manner gives one to three hours of credit. 

The numbers 149, 249, 349, and 449 are used to designate courses in 
independent study or directed readings. 

The number 480 designates courses in curricular practica. 

The number 497 designates courses in curricular internships. 

The number 499 is used to designate an honors thesis or a leadership 
project. A student may register for it only on invitation of a faculty member 
who wishes to supervise it. Normally the student registers for 499 two or three 
times, and the work continues for two or three trimesters. Each thesis or 
project, if finally approved by the student's department and the honors 
committee, is recognized for either three or six hours credit and entitles the 
student to graduate with honors in the major subject. 



63 



TRANSCRIPTS 

Transcripts are issued by the registrar's office. 

1 . An official transcript is one bearing the signature of the registrar and the seal of 
the college and is mailed directly to whatever official may be designated by 
the student. 

2. When a transcript bearing the stamp "Issued to Student" is given to the 
person whose credits are transcribed thereon, the college assumes no 
responsibility for its accuracy after it leaves the registrar's office. 

3. Transcripts of credit will not be issued for those students who have any type 
of administrative holds on their records. 



UNDERGRADUATE DEGREES 

William Carey College offers seven undergraduate degrees: Bachelor of Arts 
(B.A.), Bachelor of Fine Arts (B.F.A.), Bachelor of Science (B.S.), Bachelor of Music 
(B.M.), Bachelor of Science in Business (B.S.B.), Bachelor of Science in Nursing 
(B.S.N. ), and Bachelor of General Studies (B.G.S.). All degrees require the 
successful completion of at least 128 semester hours. 



64 



CORE CURRICULA 

BACHELOR OF ARTS CORE CURRICULUM 

(60 hours) 

The Bachelor of Arts (B.A.) degree is required for a major in art (with a 
concentration in art or art education), English, history, religion, or speech 
communication and theatre. With the exception of nursing, the B.A. may be 
earned for any other major, specifically including commurucation and music. 

Rehgion 101-102 '6 

English 101-102 6 

(these courses must be taken in sequence upon initial enrollment) 

Literature with an ENG prefix 3 

Foreign Language at the Intermediate Level 6 

(students with no foreign language proficiency must take 
twelve hours in one foreign language) 

Philosophy 201 or Literature with an ENG prefix . ,, - 3 

Communication 101 or 230 3 

History 101-102 6 

Philosophy, Literature with an ENG prefix, or History ' " ' 3 

Courses selected from one area of the following four areas: 6 

computing, fine arts, foreign language, natural/physical science 

Social and Behavioral Science 6 

geography, political science, sociology, psychology, and /or economics 

Laboratory Science — one four-hour laboratory science course - 4 

(biology, chemistry, physics, or physical science) 

Mathematics 131 or higher 3 

Fine Arts 3 

ART 200, MUM 101, or THE 135 (art, music, and theatre 
majors must consult with their advisers regarding this requirement) 

Physical Education 2 

(physical activity or human wellness or HEA 300; military science 
may be used to satisfy one hour of physical activity; varsity sports 
or cheerleading will not meet physical education requirements) 



65 



BACHELOR OF FINE ARTS CORE CURRICULUM 

(63 hours) 

The Bachelor of Fine Arts (B.F.A.) degree is the required degree for theatre 
majors or art majors coi\cer\trating in ceramics, painting, sculpture, graphic 
design, or combined studio. The B.F.A. is an option for the speech 
communication and drama teacher licensure program. 



Religion 101-102 6 

English 101-102 6 

(these courses must be taken in sequence upon initial enrollment) 

Literature with an ENG prefix 6 

Philosophy 201 or Literature with an ENG prefix 3 

Communication 101 or 230 3 

History 101-102 or 201-202 6 

(history requirement must be met by taking two trimesters of the 
same history sequence) 

Courses selected from one area of the following four areas: 6 

computing, fine arts, foreign language, natural/physical science 

Social and Behavioral Science 6 

geography, political science, sociology, psychology, and /or economics 

Laboratory Science — one four-hour laboratory science course 4 

(biology, chemistry, physics, or physical science) 

Mathematics 131 or higher 3 

Fine Arts 12 

(art, music, and theatre majors must consult with their 
advisers regarding this requirement) 

Physical Education 2 

(physical activity or human wellness or HEA 300; military science 
may be used to satisfy one hour of physical activity; varsity sports 
or cheerleading will not meet physical education requirements) 



66 



BACHELOR OF SCIENCE CORE CURRICULUM 

(57-59 hours) 

The Bachelor of Science (B.S.) degree is required for the major in biology 
(including pre-professional curricula) and health related professions 
(including medical technology). 

The B.S. may be earned in business administration, chemistry, communication, 
elementary education, mathematics, physical education, psychology, and 
social science. 



Religion 101-102 6 

English 101-102 6 

(these courses must be taken in sequence upon initial enrollment) 

Literature with an ENG prefix 3 

Philosophy 201 or Literature with an ENG prefix 3 

Communication 101 or 230 ^ 3 

History 101-102 or 201-202 6 

(history requirement must be met by taking two trimesters of the 
same history sequence) 

Courses selected from one area of the following four areas: 6 

computing, fine arts, foreign language, natural/physical science 

Social and Behavioral Science 6 

geography, political science, sociology, psychology, and /or economics 

Laboratory Science — one four-hour laboratory science course 4 

(biology, chemistry, physics, or physical science) 

Courses selected from two areas of the following four areas: 6-8 

computing, mathematics, natural science, physical science 

Mathematics 131 or higher 3 

Fine Arts 3 

ART 200, MUM 101, THE 135 (art, music, and theatre majors must consult 
with their advisers regarding this requirement) 

Physical Education 2 

(physical activity or human wellness or HEA 300; military science 
may be used to satisfy one hour of physical activity; varsity sports 
or cheerleading will not meet physical education requirements) 



67 



BACHELOR OF MUSIC CORE CURRICULUM 
BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN BUSINESS CORE CURRICULUM 

(51 hours) 

The Bachelor of Music (B.M.) may be earned only by church music, music 
education, music therapy, and performance majors. 

The Bachelor of Science in Business (B.S.B.) degree may be earned only by 
business administration majors. 



Religion 101-102 6 

English 101-102 6 

(these courses must be taken in sequence upon initial enrollment) 

Literature with an ENG prefix 3 

Philosophy 201 or Literature with an ENG prefix 3 

Communication 101 or 230 3 

History 1 01 -1 02 or 201-202 6 

(history requirement must be met by taking two trimesters of the 
same history sequence) 

Courses selected from one area of the following four areas: 6 

computing, fine arts, foreign language, natural /physical science 

Social and Behavioral Science 6 

geography, political science, sociology, psychology, and/or economics 

Laboratory Science — one four-hour laboratory science course 4 

(biology, chemistry, physics, or physical science) 

Mathematics 131 or higher 3 

Fine Arts 3 

ART 200, MUM 101, THE 135 (art, music, and theatre 
majors must consult with their advisers regarding this requirement) 

Physical Education 2 

(physical activity or human wellness or HEA 300; military science 
may be used to satisfy one hour of physical activity; varsity sports 
or cheerleading will not meet physical education requirements) 



68 



BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN NURSING CORE CURRICULUM 

(80 hours) 

The Bachelor of Science in Nursing (B.S.N.) degree may be earned only by 
nursing majors. 

Religion 101-102 6 

English 101-102 6 

(these courses must be taken in sequence upon initial enrollment) 

Business 102 3 

Literature with an ENG prefix 3 

Philosophy 201 or 250 • . - 3 

Commurucation 101, 230, or 302 ' 3 

History 1 01 -1 02 or 201 -202 6 

(history requirement must be met by taking two trimesters of 
same history sequence) 

Mathematics 131 or higher 3 

Biology 234-235 (anatomy and physiology), 260 (microbiology), 

306 (pharmacology) 15 

Chemistry 101-102 8 

Health 240 (nutrition and diet therapy) r ' 3 

Psychology 201 (general psychology), 305 (developmental ' ' ' 

psychology), 351 (psychological statistics) 10 

Sociology 101 ' 3 

■ .' .17,- ■,'■■• ■■:^_ I 

Fine Arts 3 

ART 200, MUM 101, THE 135 

Physical Education 2 

(physical activity or human wellness or HEA 300: military science 
may be used to satisfy one hour of physical activity; varsity sports 
or cheerleading will not meet physical education requirements) 

General Elective 3 



69 



BACHELOR OF GENERAL STUDIES CORE CURRICULUM 

(44 hours) 

The Bachelor of General Studies (B.G.S.) degree may be earned by any student, 
particularly a nontraditional student who wants one or two areas of 
concentration. 

Religion 101-102 6 

English 101-102 6 

(these courses must be taken in sequence upon initial enrollment) 

Philosophy, Literature with an ENG prefix, or History 3 

Communication 101 or 230 3 

History 101-102 or 201-202 6 

(history requirement must be met by taking two trimesters of the 
same history sequence) 

Social and Behavioral Science 9 

geography, political science, sociology, psychology, and/or economics 

Science — one three-hour science course 3 

(biology, chemistry, physics, or physical science) 

Mathematics 116 or higher level 3 

Fine Arts 3 

ART 200, MUM 101, THE 135 (art, music, and theatre majors 
must consult with their advisers regarding this requirement) 

Physical Education 2 

(physical activity or human wellness or HEA 300; mihtary science 
may be used to satisfy one hour of physical activity; varsity sports 
or cheerleading will not meet physical education requirements) 



70 



MAJORS AND MINORS 

The major represents the primary area of academic emphasis. With the 
exception of the Bachelor of General Studies degree, majors are required in all 
academic programs. Academic majors have a maximum of 42 semester hours 
except for those majors affected by accreditation standards (i.e. education, 
music, nursing) or professional competency expectations (i.e. art, business, 
theatre). A minor is a secondary area of emphasis outside the major, and 
minors are required of all students whose majors have 42 hours or less. A 
concentration is an area of emphasis within a major. Concentrations are not 
offered in all academic programs. The number of hours required in majors, 
minors, and concentrations vary, and specific requirements are listed by 
school and department. 

The Bachelor of General Studies degree requires either one 36-hour or two 18- 
hour emphasis areas. The emphasis areas within the Bachelor of General 
Studies degree are called concentrations. No minor is required for this degree. 

The following majors, minors, and concentrations are offered. 

indicates an academic major or minor available on both the Hattiesburg and Gulfport 

campus. 
**Indicates the one academic major available on the Hattiesburg, Gulfport, and New 
Orleans campuses. 



Area(s) of Study 



Art 



(Majors only on the 
Gulfport campus) 



Major(s) 

Art 
Concentrations 
Art 

Art Education 
Ceramics 
Graphic Design 
Painting 
Sculpture 
Combined Studio 



Minor(s) 



Art 



Biological Sciences 



Biology 
Health Related 
Professions 



Biology 



Business 



Business Administration * Business Administration 
Concentrations * Computer Information 

* Accounting Systems 

* Computer Information 

Systems 
Finance 
* Management/Marketing 



71 



Area(s) of Study 


Major(s) 


Minor(s) 


Chemistiy and the 
Physical Sciences 


Chemistry 


Chemistry 


Education * 


Elementary Education * 


Secondary Educatic 


Health and Physical 
Education 


Physical Education 


Physical Education 

Coaching 

Recreation 


History and 
Social Science 


History 
Social Science 


History 


Language and Literature 


EngUsh 


* EngUsh 
Spanish 


Mathematics and Physics 


Mathematics 


* Mathematics 


Music 


Church Music 


Music 


(Majors and minors 

only on the Hattiesburg campu 


Music Education 
*^ Music Therapy 
Performance 






Music (Bachelor of Arts) 



Nursing 

Philosophy 

Psychology 

Religion 



Nursing 

Psychology 
Religion 



Philosophy 

Psychology 
Gerontology 

ReUgion 



Theatre and Commurucation 



Communication Communication 

Speech Communication Speech Comm. 

and Theatre and Theatre 

Theatre Theatre 



72 



ACADEMIC PROGRAM FOR THE GULFPORT CAMPUS 

William Carey College on the Coast offers all of the college's undergraduate 
degrees except the Bachelor of Music (B.M.). AU acadenuc programs are designed 
to prepare graduates for positions of leadership in their communities and entry in 
their chosen professions. Majors currently offered on the Gulfport campus include 
art, business administration, elementary education, nursing, and psychology. 
Licensure to teach in the State of Mississippi is available on the Gulfport campus in 
elementary education and art education. 

The Bachelor of General Studies (B.G.S.) degree program is also available 
for students desiring a nontraditional blend of studies. The B.G.S. degree offers 
more flexibihty in the core requirements, and dual areas of concentration from 
academic or technical courses of study may be selected in the B.G.S. degree. 

ACADEMIC PROGRAM FOR THE NEW ORLEANS CAMPUS 

WilHam Carey College's New Orleans campus, located at the New Orleans 
Baptist Theological Seminary, offers only the Bachelor of Science in Nursing 
(B.S.N.) degree. 

THE WILLIAM CAREY COLLEGE LIBRARY SYSTEM 

Kyle S. Jones, Ed.D., Director 

PubUc Services Librarian Myers; Technical Services Librarian Yuen; Regional 
Librarian Gossage; Library Assistant Morrison; Administrative Assistant 
Cummins 

The goal of the WiUiam Carey College Library System is to support the 
curriculum and research needs of students and faculty through the provision 
of comprehensive resources, services, and facilities. Library resources are 
available to anyone; however, borrowing privileges are restricted to Carey 
students, faculty, staff, and resident Mississippi ministers. These constituents 
may borrow books from any of the library system libraries, and interlibrary 
loan services are maintained to expedite sharing of resources between the I. E. 
Rouse Library and regional Ubraries. 

Professional librarians are available at each campus library location to 
provide information services and instruction in the use of the library. 

A cooperative agreement provides expeditious loan services for William 
Carey College students between the Ubraries at Hattiesburg and Gulfport and 
the libraries of the University of Southern Mississippi. Information may be 
obtained at the WiUiam Carey College libraries. 



73 



THE I. E. ROUSE LIBRARY 

The I. E. Rouse Library, on the Hattiesburg campus, holds approximately 
110,000 resources including books, periodicals, music scores, microforms, 
phonodiscs, and other library materials that support the academic program. 
The library has a computer lab with Internet access, microform readers, music 
listening stations, photocopy services and audio-visual resources. Indexes to 
periodical literature are available electronically through FirstSearch, CD-ROM, 
and print formats. The UMl electronic databases provides over 2,300 full-text 
journals plus many other titles w^ith abstracts. Britannica Online is also 
accessible in full-text format. Online abstract databases include: MLA, 
CINAHL, and Psyclnfo. 

The 1. E. Rouse Library also holds the Clarence Dickiiison Collection, w^hich 
is centered around church music. It contains 5,600 items which include books, 
scores, manuscripts, microforms, phonodiscs, tapes, paintings, and 
memorabiUa. 

THE MCMULLAN LEARNING RESOURCES CENTER 

The McMullan Learning Resources Center, on the Gulfport campus, holds 
approximately 18,000 volumes, plus a substantial inventory of periodicals. The 
I. E. Rouse Library card catalog is duplicated here and allows Coast students to 
have access to the WUUam Carey College Library System's holdings. Internet 
access and photocopying service are available, and fax machines cormect the 
Hattiesburg and Coast Ubraries. 

THE NEW ORLEANS LEARNING RESOURCES CENTER 

The New Orleans Leariung Resource Center, located on the campus of the 
New Orleans Theological Seminary, serves the students and faculty of the 
School of Nursing at New Orleans. Internet access and photocopying are 
available and fax machines are used for copies of documents from the main 
library. The collection focus is primarily nursing education books and 
periodicals. 

KEESLER 

William Carey College has an agreement with the McBride Library at 
Keesler Air Force Base that gives students and staff in the Keesler program 
borrowing privileges, reference service, access to all public-service data bases, 
and use of computers designated for patron use. 



74 



m 



ifeiiJ?««M<!^W!J»«*SJAl;^^^^^^^ 




Academic 
Programs 

and 
Courses of 
Instruction 



School of Arts, Humanities, and Sciences 

Myron C. Noonkester, Ph.D. (Interim Dean) 

School of Business 
School of Education and Psychology 

Bonnie H. Holder, Ph.D. (Interim Dean) 

Owen and Elizabeth Cooper 
School of Missions and Biblical Studies 

Daniel P. Caldwell, Ph.D. (Dean) 

Donald and Frances Winters School of Music 

J. Milfred Valentine, Ph.D. (Dean) 

School of Nursing 

Mary A. Ware, Ed.D. (Dean) 

Special Programs 

Honors Program 

Mary Read Diket, Ph.D. (Director) 

Deborah Chatham, M.S., and Lynn Singletary, M.S. (Co-directors, Gulfport) 

Keesler Air Force Base Program 
Linda Commander, M.S., (Director) 



76 



SCHOOL OF ARTS, HUMANITIES, AND 
SCIENCES 

Myron C. Noonkester, Ph.D. (Interim Dean) 

DEPARTMENT OF ART 

Arthur Williams, D.A. (Chair) 

Professors Diket, WilUams; Assistant Professors Creyts, Day, Schmuki; 
Lecturer Dyess 

The goals of the department of art are 1) to provide an opportunity to practice, understand, 
and gain a high level of technical skill with several art media; 2) to offer future teachers of art a 
thorough foundation and broad experience in several areas; 3) and to prepare majors for graduate 
work and/or a career. The Gulfport facilities include the Sarah Gillespie Art Gallery, a Macintosh 
computer lab; metal casting foundry; pneumatic operated equipment; metal fabrication, painting, 
drawing, ceramic, and sculpture studios. A minor is offered on the Hattiesburg campus. 

REQUIREMENTS 

The department of art at the Coast campus offers a major and minor in art with 
programs leading to the Bachelor of Fine Arts degree or the Bachelor of Arts degree. 

The following art core courses are required for the B.F.A. and the B.A. degrees: 



Art Core 



Art History 12 hours (including Art History I and II) 

Drawing 12 hours (B.F.A.), 6 hours (B.A.) 

2D/3D Design 6 hours 

Ceramics 3 hours 

Painting 3 hours , 

Printmaking 3 hours -. ■ -^ 

Sculpture 3 hours 

Senior Seminar 3 hours 

Total 45 hours for the B.F.A. 39 hours for the B.A. 



Bachelor of Fine Arts, Art Major: Students interested in preparing for careers 
in studio art and /or graduate study are encouraged to pursue the Bachelor of Fine Arts 
degree with a concentration in painting, sculpture, ceramics, graphic design, or 
combined studio. Eighty-four hours of art are required for this degree. 



Art Core 

Art Major Concentrations 

Painting 
Ceramics 
Sculpture 
Graphic Design 
Combined Studio 

Art Electives 



30 hours in painting (studio) 

30 hours in ceramics (studio) 

30 hours in sculpture (studio) 

30 hours in graphic design 

36 hours (18 hours in two studio areas below) 

Drawing, Painting, Ceramics, Sculpture, Graphic Design 
balance of required courses 



77 



Senior Exhibition Graduating B.F.A. students must participate in a B.F.A. 

exhibition in the gallery during their senior year 

Art core, art major concentration, and art electives must combine to total 84 hours in art. 

Bachelor of Arts, Art Major: Students interested in pursuing careers which are 
broader in academic scope are encouraged to pursue the art major within the Bachelor of 
Arts degree with a concentration in art education or art. There are 51 hours required in 
art for this degree plus a minor in another discipline. 

Art Core 39 hours 

Art Major Concentration 12 hours 

Art Education 12 hours (6 additional hours of drawing plus 

ART 319 and EDU 446); requirements for educational 

certification must be met. 
Art 12 hours 

Art Minor: Eighteen hours in art to include: ART 101, 108, 109, 403, plus 6 upper 
level hours. 

Note: Education majors who desire a heavy studio concentration should consult with 
the art department about a B.F.A. with teacher certification. 

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS FOR ART (ART) 

*Studio courses requiring art fee. 

101. Drawing I: (3 hours) An introduction to drawing as a process of perception and 
projection. The course also explores visual structures, historical concepts, and 
contemporary movements. 

102. Drawing II: (3 hours) An introduction to the study of the human figure as an 
expression and reflection of nature.* 

108. 2-D Design: (3 hours) A basic course in the study of two dimensional work, this 
course includes a study of vocabulary and the elements of two dimensional design. 

109. 3-D Design: (3 hours) A basic course in the study of the third dimension, this course 
includes vocabulary, techniques, materials, and the elements of three-dimensional 
design.* 

121. Sculpture I: (3 hours) Introduction to sculpture including plaster, modeling, metal 
casting, and stone carving.* 

131. Painting I: (3 hours) An introduction to the basic concepts and procedures in painting. 

200. Art Appreciation: (3 hours) An introduction to the visual arts of the Western 
World. Lecture and discussion on the materials, forms and processes of art with the 
aim of giving insight into the functions and content of art objects. 

215. Photography: (3 hours) A creative approach to photography with emphasis on 
understanding materials and technique. (Students will be expected to provide all 
required photography equipment.)* 



78 



221. Sculpture II: (3 hours) A continuation of Sculpture I including an introduction to 
mold making.* 

231. Painting II: (3 hours) A continuation of Painting I with an emphasis on color, 
abstraction, and visual harmonics. 

241. Ceramics I: (3 hours) Introduction to ceramic materials and processes. Various 
hand building techniques including pinch, coil, and slab will be emphasized. Basic 
technical information will be introduced as well as the uses of slips and glazes.* 

242. Ceramics II: (3 hours) Introduction to the techniques of pottery making and 
sculpture utilizing the potter's wheel. Glaze making and the glaze firing process 
will be introduced.* 

253. Typography: (3 hours) The history and use of type as it applies to advertising 
design and visual problem solving. Acquaints the student with type and 
typespacing, and basic production techniques for one and two color printing. 
Prerequisites: Drawing 101, 102 and Design 108.* 

254. Computer Graphics: (3 hours) A study of the fundamentals of computer assisted 
graphic design, basic computer literacy and keyboarding. This course introduces 
the student to the computer through the Mac basics. Trouble shooting and 
maintenance will be emphasized. Prerequisite to graphic design courses requiring 
computer use.* 

301. Drawing III: (3 hours) An in-depth study of specific concepts and processes. 
Students explore the development of content and composition. 

302. Drawing IV: (3 hours) This course involves each student developing a body of 
drawings with an emphasis on individual vision and expression. 

303. 304. Drawing V, VI: (3 hours each) These courses concentrate on development of a 
personal technique. A mastery of materials and content is also emphasized. Larger 
scale and advanced techniques are explored as the student progresses. 

319. Art in the Elementary School: (3 hours) A study of the basic elements of art and 
how art can be used by the elementary classroom teacher. 

322. Sculpture III: (3 hours) A continuation of sculptural skills including woodcarving 
and pneumatic tools.* 

323. Sculpture IV: (3 hours) Advanced techniques with the student's choice of materials. 
Welding techniques are introduced.* 

324. 325, 421, 422, 423, 424. Sculpture V, VI, VII, VIII, IX, X: (3 hours each) The 
development of a personal technique and mastery of material with an emphasis on 
content. As the student progresses, larger scale works and advanced techniques are 
explored.* 

332. Painting III: (3 hours) An introduction to concepts in watercolor and technique. 

333. Painting IV: (3 hours) This course involves each student in developing a body of 
painting that emphasizes individual vision and expression. 



79 



334, 335, 431, 432, 433, 434. Painting V, VI, VII, VIII, IX, X: (3 hours each) These courses 
concentrate on development of a personal technique. A mastery of materials and 
content is also emphasized. Larger scale and advanced techniques are explored as the 
student progresses. 

341. Ceramics III: (3 hours) Continued development upon hand building and/or 
potter's wheel. Studio assignments will expand on skills covered in Ceramics I and 
II. There will be a focus on glaze formulation and development. The student will 
complete an individual investigation on an aspect of ceramic history.* 

342. Ceramics IV: (3 hours) Emphasis on craftsmanship and scale within the given hand 
built/wheel thrown assignments. Emphases on the quality of the hand made object 
as well as the concepts of utility, usage, and sculpture in the ceramic medium. The 
student will be expected to continue to investigate glaze formulation with an 
emphasis on various surface treatments.* 

343. 344, 441, 442, 443, 444. Ceramics V-X: (3 hours) Advanced ceramic courses 
designed to offer the serious ceramics student time and direction to complete an in- 
depth investigation cumulating in a cohesive body of work. The instructor must 
agree upon the direciton taken by the student. The course will also cover areas of 
ceramic history, contemporary issues in art, and the student's professional 
development.* 

351. Serigraphy: (3 hours) An introduction to screen printing including photostencil 
methods. 

353. Advertising Design I: (3 hours) An introduction to the principles, techniques, 
media tools and skills used in graphic design field. An overview of the advertising 
industry. Creative brainstorming from thumbnails to marker compositions to 
finished art will be emphasized.* 

354. Computer Imagery: (3 hours) Covers the use of the computer as a tool to create 
images that address the needs of the visual communications field. Through hands- 
on training in Quark Xpress, PhotoShop and Illustrator, the student will be able to 
create from one page advertisements to multi-page documents.* 

355. Graphic Illustration: (3 hours) Explores the creative process as it applies to 
advertising and editorial illustration. Traditional techniques will be used to create 
illustrations for various types of print advertising.* 

356. Graphic Illustration II: (3 hours) Advanced illustration methods explored. 
Students will learn the intermediate and advanced illustration techniques in 
traditional and in the most current graphics program.* 

362. History of Art I: Prehistoric through Gothic Art: (3 hours) An introduction to the 
art and architecture of pre-historic man, the ancient world (Mesopotamia, Egypt, 
the Aegean), Greece and the Roman Empire through early sixth century. Christian 
medieval art (Middle Ages) styles, function and meaning of the individual works of 
art are discussed. 

364. History of Art II: Renaissance through Twentieth Century Modem Art: (3 hours) 
An introduction to Western European art and architecture in the Renaissance, the 



80 



Baroque, the Enlightenment up to and including the 20th century, styles, function, 
and meaning of the individual works of art are discussed. 

403. History of Twentieth Century Art: (3 hours) A concentration on the art and 
architecture of the 20th century. This course explores abstract art (early phase), 
fantasy in art, traditional realism, post-World War II trends, post-abstraction 
(modern) up to and including contemporary time. 

408. History of Art of the Southern States: (3 hours) An historic overview of elements 
that make up Southern regional art. This course examines the art and architecture 
and includes an investigation into the rich folk art and the craft traditions in the 
South. It explores the art and writings of Gulf Coast artist Walter Anderson, 
George Ohr, and other southern artists from the past up to and including 
contemporary time. 

451. Woodcut: (3 hours) An introduction to woodcut techniques including the linoleum 
block. 

453. Advertising Design II: (3 hours) Advanced computer techniques, typography and 
advertising concepts will be used to create images for visual communications such 
as presentations and print.* 

454. Advertising Design III: (3 hours) Covers advance principles, practices and web 
page design skills in the graphic design industry. Students will construct a 4-color 
project and output the file to separations at an off-campus site in high resolution. 
Trapping and postscript files will also be discussed.* 

455. Advertising Design IV: (3 hours) Continuation of individual studies in portfolio 
preparation. Students will concentrate on finished art for a directed portfolio.* 

456. Psychology of Advertising: (3 hours) By studying the effects of stimuU on human 
behavior the student will learn to create advertising that motivates a particular 
target market. The student will complete an advertising proposal for a specific 
market based upon the research completed in this course.* 

461. Senior Seminar: (3 hours) Lectures and demonstrations by departmental artists 
and guest artists including preparation of slide portfolio and a written resume, 
examination of graduate school and entrance requirements; designing a personal 
studio, preparing an exhibition, exhibiting and marketing art work through 
galleries and museums 

481, 482. Apprenticeship in Art I, II: (3 hours each) An off-campus program prepared 
and monitored on an individual basis. It is to give practical experience in the 
everyday practice of art. When possible, the student is assigned as a helper to a 
professional artist. 

485. Research in Art: (1-9 hours). 

497. Internship in Art: (1-9 hours) An off-campus program prepared and monitored on 
an individual basis. Internships are designed to provide practical experience in the 
arts. (Offered with consent of department head.) 

*Studio courses requiring art fee. 



81 



SCHOOL OF ARTS, HUMANITIES, AND 
SCIENCES 

DEPARTMENT OF BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES 

Randall K. Harris, Ph.D. (Chair) 

Professor Martin; Associate Professor Harris; Assistant Professors 
Bailey, Singletary; Clinical Professors Covington, Cavett 

The department of biological sciences provides core curriculum courses in the biological sciences 
and appropriate undergraduate-level training for students planning careers in biological science, 
health related science, and science education. Students majoring in biological science will acquire a 
broad knowledge of the general principles of biological science to include the interrelationships of living 
organisms within the biosphere and the ways human populations impact these relationships. In the 
laboratories students develop skills in the use of the techniques and instrumentation used in modem 
biological science. These experiences provide optimum preparation for graduate study or careers as a 
professional biologist or a biology teacher. Health related programs or pre-programs provide 
counseling and training relative to gaining admission to the clinical phases of the programs or career 
advancement within a particular health related profession. 

Bachelor of Science degrees are offered with majors in biology and health related 
professions. Biology nnajors may choose an emphasis in microbiology or follow a 
curriculum leading to teacher certification in biology. All majors must fulfill the core 
curriculum requirements for the Bachelor of Science (B.S.) degree. 

REQUIREMENTS 

Biology Major: Required courses include BIO 103-104, 250, 260, 309, 310, 403, 419, 470, 
480, three hours of upper level (300/400) biology electives, and a minor in chemistry 
composed of CHE 111-112, 211-212, 405. Recommended general electives include PHY 101- 
102, MAT 132, 151-152, 220, and BUS 102. 

Biology Major, Microbiology Emphasis: This emphasis is designed to allow 
students to take the National Registry of Microbiologists exam as a Conditional 
Registrant (i.e. no work experience). Exams are offered in the areas of Clinical and Public 
Health Microbiology or Consumer Products and Quality Assurance Microbiology. 
Eligibility requirements for the exams are a minimum of a baccalaureate degree in the 
biological sciences with 12 additional hours selected from the following courses: BIO 
412, 413, 415, 416, and 420. 

Biology Major, Teacher Licensure: To be licensed to teach biology and general 
science at the secondary level, a student must meet the following requirements: 1) 
complete all core curriculum requirements for the Bachelor of Science [B.S.] degree, 
2) complete all professional requirements mandated by the State of Mississippi Licensure 
standards, and 3) complete the requirements for the major in biology with the exception 
of the chemistry minor. In place of the chemistry minor, students must complete a minor 
in education. Also, the degree program must include CHE 111-112, PHS 151, 201, and 
either PHY 101 or four additional hours in chemistry. Students must be advised from 
both the department of biological sciences and the department of education. 



82 



Biology Minor: Students must take a minimum of 18 semester hours of 
BIO/HRP/MTC courses. At least six hours must be upper level (300/400). 



DEGREE PROGRAMS IN THE HEALTH PROFESSIONS 

Health Related Professions Major: This curriculum provides a Bachelor of 
Science degree for individuals who are certified (registered or licensed) in a health 
related profession by an approved agency. To qualify for this program the student's 
professional education must equal at least 48 academic semester hours (one lecture 
hour, two laboratory hours; three clinical hours will be considered to equal l/15th of an 
academic semester hour). As an alternative, students with fewer than 48 hours may 
apply these hours toward a minor in biology. 

1. Major Requirements 

A maximum of 30 semester hours in the major can be awarded as a result of 
certification. The specific number awarded will be one-half the number of academic 
semester hours calculated from the student's professional education up to the 30-hour 
maximum. Relevant upper-level biological science courses will be taken as advised to 
provide a minimum total of 40 semester hours in the major. The hours should include 
the following courses: HRP 302, 303, 304. 

2. General Health Related Professions Requirements 

At least 30 hours in science are required, including two courses in anatomy and 
physiology, one course in microbiology, one course in pharmacology, one course in 
pathology, one course in genetics or cell physiology, and two courses in chemistry or 
chemistry/physics. Equivalent professional coursework will be given consideration 
when possible. 

3. Secondary Area of Concentration 

A secondary area of concentration in business, psychology, or gerontology is 
strongly recommended. A minimum of 18 semester hours should be taken in the 
selected area and at least six hours must be upper-level. These courses may be used to 
fill minor and/or core requirements. 

4. College Core Requirements ' 
See the core curriculum for the Bachelor of Science degree. 

Microcomputer applications, statistics and counseling psychology are recommended 
electives. 

Health Related Professions Major, Medical Technology Emphasis: Before entering 
the clinical phase of the program, students must take a minimum of 20 hours of biology 
courses to include BIO 234 or 101 or 103 and 235 or 309, 260, and 419; a minimum of 20 
hours of chemistry courses to include CHE 111, 112, 211, and 405; a minimum of ten 
hours of BIO/HRP courses to include any two courses from the group HRP 101, 302, 
303, 304, plus BIO 415, and complete all other college requirements for the Bachelor of 
Science degree. Recommended science electives include BIO 104, 310, 312; CHE 212, 301, 
415. 



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The senior year will be taken at a hospital site and consists of 12 months of 
professional didactic and clinical training in a medical technology program accredited 
by the National Accrediting Agency for Clinical Laboratory Sciences (NAACLS). The 
clinical site is Mississippi Baptist Medical Center in Jackson, Mississippi. Students must 
carry personal health insurance during their clinical year. Admission is competitive and 
requires a minimum GPA of 2.7 overall and in the science courses with at least a C in an 
required science courses. During the clinical phase of the program students will take 
MTC 420, 430, 440, and 450 for a total of 36 semester hours (each course is 9 hours). 
Upon satisfactory completion of the clinical phase of the program students will be 
eligible for national certifying exams including those administered by the American 
Society of Clinical Pathologists and the National Certification Agency. 

PRE-PROGRAMS IN THE HEALTH PROFESSIONS 

Pre-Medicine: Course requirements for admission to various medical schools are 
similar. They include specified courses in biology, chemistry, English, mathematics, and 
physics. Students should plan to complete a baccalaureate degree with a major and 
minor of their choice. Normally, the Medical College Admission Test (MCAT) is taken in 
the spring of the junior year and applications for medical school are submitted the 
following summer. Pre-medical students should have both an academic and pre-medical 
advisor. Minimum course requirements are as follows: BIO 103-104; CHE 111-112, 211- 
212; ENG 101-102; MAT 131-132 or 6 hours of advanced mathematics electives; PHY 101- 
102 or 211-212; 8 hours of advanced science electives (laboratory required) and 37 
additional hours of approved general electives. 

Fre-Dentistry: Course requirements for admission to various dental schools are similar. 
They include specified courses in the behavioral sciences, biology, chemistry, English, 
mathematics, and physics. Students should plan to complete a baccalaureate degree with a 
major and minor of their choice. Normally the American Dental Association Dental 
Admission Test (DAT) is taken in the spring of the junior year and applications for dental 
school are submitted the following summer. Pre-dental students should have both an 
academic and a pre-dental advisor. Minimum course requirements are as follows: 6 hours of 
behavioral science (PHI 201, PSY 201, SOC 101); BIO 103-104; CHE 111-112, 211-212; ENG 101- 
102, 211-212; MAT 131-132 or 6 hours of advanced mathematics electives; PHY 101-102 or 211- 
212; 4 hours of advanced biology or chemistry (laboratory required) and 29 additional hours 
of approved general electives. 

Additionally, pre-professional curricula for the Health Related Professions including 
pre-cytotechnology, pre-dental hygiene, pre-occupational therapy, pre-optometry, pre- 
pharmacy, pre-physical therapy, pre-respiratory therapy, and pre-veterinary medicine 
are available. The pre-professional advisor will assist the student in meeting the specific 
requirements for admission to a particular professional school. 

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS FOR BIOLOGY (BIO) 

101. General Biology I: (4 hours) A course introducing students to biological principles 
including chemistry, the structure and function of cells, heredity, and an 
introduction to tissues. A one semester hour laboratory experience is included. 

102. General Biology II: (4 hours) A continuation of BIO 101. The course deals with 
structure and function in organisms, population studies, ecology, and the 
environment. A one semester hour laboratory experience is included. Prerequisite: 
BIO 101. 



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103. General Zoology I: (4 hours) General biological principles and processes are 
emphasized as well as development, form, and functions of animal systems. A one 
semester hour laboratory experience is included. 

104. General Zoology II: (4 hours) Particular attention is given to morphologic and 
phylogenetic adaptations and ecological relationships of vertebrates and invertebrates. 
A one semester hour laboratory experience is included. Prerequisite: BIO 103. 

234. Anatomy and Physiology I: (4 hours) A general study of the anatomy and 
physiology of the cells, tissues, the skeletal system, the cardiovascular system, and 
muscles of the human body. A one semester hour laboratory experience is included. 

235. Anatomy and Physiology II: (4 hours) A study of the nervous, digestive, 
respiratory, endocrine, and urogenital systems. A one semester hour laboratory 
experience is included. Prerequisite: BIO 234. 

250. Botany: (4 hours) A course introducing structures, function, and classification of 
plants. A one semester hour laboratory experience is included. 

260. General Microbiology: (4 hours) A general survey of bacteria and allied 
microorganisms. The role of microorganisms in nature, health, food preservation, 
and industry is considered. Basic techniques of preparation of media, culturing, 
sterilization and staining are taught in the laboratory. 

306. Introduction to Pharmacology: (3 hours) An overview of the physiological action of 
drug groups including intended action, side effects and toxicology. Practical 
information on dispensing dosages, administration, and regulation is included. 

309. Vertebrate Form and Function: (Five Hours) The anatomy, physiology, behavior, 
and ecology of vertebrate taxa are considered in a broad-based integrative 
approach to understanding how vertebrates provide for their biological needs. The 
material is presented in phylogenetic order from fishes to mammals. The laboratory 
involves a system-by-system dissection of representative vertebrates and group 
participation in a physiological experiment. Groups will present oral and written 
reports of their experimental results. 

310. Genetics: (4 hours) An introduction to the fundamental principles of heredity with 
applications to human traits, diseases, behavior, populations, and evolution. A one 
semester hour laboratory experience is included. Prerequisite: BIO 101 or 103. 

312. Introduction to Pathology: (3 hours) An introduction to the basic processes of 
disease on the systems, organs, and cells of the human organism. Prerequisite: BIO 
234-235 or 309. 

403. Environmental Biology: (3 hours) Critical thinking and scientific principles are used 
in the analysis of enviror\mental issues from a social, political, economic, and natural 
science perspective. Issues such as population growth, global climate change, 
worldwide loss of habitat and biodiversity, pollution, and shrinking fossil fuel 
reserves are explored. Through participation in interactive projects and activities, 
students are encouraged to become actively involved in constructive solutions to 
environmental problems. Students v«th a minimal science background may take this 
course. 



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404. Environmental Science Practicum: (1 hour) Students in BIO 403 who wish to 
participate in community-based environmental-impact projects may request 
permission to take this practicum. The projects will not be laboratory dependent, but 
will involve campus and community field projects. To be taken concurrently with BIO 
403. Prerequisite: permission of the instructor. 

405-406. Biological Research: (1-8 hours) Provides students the opportunity to pursue 
further study in a specialized area in collaboration with a faculty mentor. 
Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. 

407. Vertebrate Embryology: (4 hours) An introductory study of vertebrate 
development. Special emphasis is given to the early development of the frog, the 
chick, and the pig. A one semester hour laboratory experience is included. 
Prerequisite: BIO 103-104. 

409. Vertebrate Histology: (4 hours) A study of the microanatomy of vertebrate tissues 
and organs. A one semester hour laboratory experience is included. Prerequisite: 
BIO 102 or 104. 

412. Hvunan Parasitology: (3 hours) A study of the classification of parasites of pathological 
importance to the human organism, including protozoan cysts, throphozoites, blood 
parasites, metazoan species, helminths, and medical entomology. A one semester 
laboratory experience is included. Prerequisite: BIO 260. 

413. Mycology: (3 hours) A study of pathogenic fungi. Methods of staining and identifying 
organisms and the correlation of laboratory data with infectious processes are 
considered. Prerequisite: BIO 260. 

415. Diagnostic Bacteriology; (4 hours) Clinical methods and techniques for 
identification of pathogenic organisms are presented including specimen handling 
preparation of media, culturing, sterilization, quality control and laboratory safety. 
Prerequisite: BIO 260. (May be taken as MTC 415) 

416. Applied Microbiology: (4 hours) A study of microorganisms and techniques of 
significance in industrial and environmental microbiology. The laboratory provides 
experience with these organisms and procedures. Prerequisite: BIO 260. 

419. Immunology: (4 hours) A study of the principles of acquired and natural immunity 
with references to antigens, antibodies, immune response, complement, and 
susceptibility. The concepts of mediated immunities and immunopathology are 
also considered. Prerequisite: BIO 235, 260. 

420. Virology: (4 hours) A general study of viruses, their roles in disease, and their 
applications in molecular genetics and biotechnology. Laboratory experiences 
demonstrate the basic principles of viral replication and activity. Prerequisite: BIO 260. 

470. Cell Physiology: (4 hours) A study of structure and function in eukaryotic cells. 

480-481. Seminar (One Hour Each) Presentations by visiting scientists and senior honors 
students. One hour of seminar is required for biology majors during their junior or 
senior year. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. 



86 



COURSE DESCRIPTIONS FOR THE 
HEALTH RELATED PROFESSIONS (HRP) 

101. A Survey of Health Careers: (1 hour) A brief review of the educational 
requirements, professional objectives and opportunities in various health 
occupations is presented. A practical exposure in a clinical setting will be included 
whenever possible. (May be taken as MTC 101) 

201. Medical Terminology: (1 hour) A study of technical terms peculiar to medical 
science. (May be taken as MTC 201) 

302. Ethics in the Health Related Professions (1 hour) A basic introduction to theories 
in ethics and their application to ethical dilemmas in health care including patients 
rights, euthanasia, allocation of limited resources, and other related topics. (May be 
taken MTC 302) 

303. Education in the Health Related Professions: (1 hour) The methods of instruction 
and measurement are presented as a basis for their application in adult learning 
situations such as clinical training and patient instruction often required in health 
careers. (May be taken as MTC 303) 

304. Management in the Health Related Professions: (1 hour) The theories of 
management and task maturity are presented as a basis for their application in health 
professions as encountered in supervision, employee development and departmental 
planning. (May be taken as MTC 304) 



COURSE DESCRIPTIONS FOR 
MEDICAL TECHNOLOGY (MTC) 

420., 430., 440., 450. Laboratory Science I, II, III, IV. (9 hours each) Coursework includes 
didactic study and clinical experience primarily in the four major disciplines of 
clinical chemistry, immunology, hematology and microbiology but also consists of a 
total exposure to the professional clinical laboratory. Coursework will cover a 
continuous full-time calendar year divided into four segments coinciding with school 
registration. Prerequisites outlined in discussion of major. 



GULF COAST RESEARCH LABORATORY PROGRAM 

William Carey College is affiliated with the Gulf Coast Research Laboratory (GCRL) 
in Ocean Springs, Mississippi. The GCRL is a nondegree granting institution of higher 
learning which is administered by the University of Southern Mississippi. The 50-acre 
site in Ocean Springs is adjacent to the Mississippi Sound and is surrounded by bayous 
and salt marshes that provide a natural laboratory for researchers and students. The 
GTCRL focuses on marine research in the disciplinary areas of biology, chemistry, 
geology, and physics of coastal and continental shelf waters. Research emphasis areas 
include marine aquaculture, aquatic animal health, aquatic biodiversity and systematics, 
coastal ecology, fate and effects of environmental pollutants, and fisheries sciences. 

The GCRL offers undergraduate summer courses in two 5-week terms which may be 
taken by William Carey College students for academic credit. Students may enroll in 
only one course each term, but may earn up to twelve semester hours credit during the 



87 



summer. Interested students should obtain more information and application forms 
from their academic advisor, or from the GCRL website at http://www.ims.usm.edu. 



88 



SCHOOL OF ARTS, HUMANITIES, AND 
SCIENCES 

DEPARTMENT OF CHEMISTRY AND 
THE PHYSICAL SCIENCES 

Rose G. West, Ph.D. (Chair) 

Professor West; Assistant Professor Cummings 

The courses in this department are designed to meet the interest and needs of the following 
students: (1) those wishing to acquaint themselves with some the of the fundamental principles of 
the physical sciences, (2) those whose professional goals require a foundation in chemistry and 
physics, including those preparing to teach, and (3) those whose major interest is in chemistry. 

REQUIREMENTS ^~ 

Chemistry Major: The courses required for a major are composed of a minimum 
of 32 hours in chemistry, including CHE 111, 112, 211, 212, and 16 hours of upper-level 
chemistry courses. Students are encouraged strongly to complete courses in biology, 
physics, and mathematics. Chemistry majors earn the Bachelor of Science (B.S.) degree or 
Bachelor of Arts (B.A.) degree. 

Chemistry Minor: Eighteen semester hours, including CHE 111, 112, 211, 212 and 
one of the following: CHE 301, 302, 405, 410, 415, 490, and physical chemistry. 

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS FOR CHEMISTRY (CHE) 

101. General Chemistry I: (4 hours) An introduction to inorganic chemistry designed 
for the non-chemistry major. 

102. General Chemistry II: (4 hours) An introduction to organic and biochemistry 
designed for the non-chemistry major. 

111. Inorganic Chemistry: (4 hours) The study of the fundamental principles of atomic 
structure, bonding, gas laws, liquids, solids, and electrochemistry. Prerequisite: 
MAT 131. 

112. Inorganic Chemistry: (4 hours) An introduction to thermodynamics, kinetics, 
acids, bases, and chemical equilibrium. Prerequisite: CHE 111 and MAT 131. 

211. Organic Chemistry: (5 hours) A systematic study of the compounds of carbon 
covering hydrocarbons, stereochemistry, aromatic compounds and organic 
instrumentation. Prerequisite: CHE 111-112. 

212. Organic Chemistry: (4 hours) A continuation of CHE 211 covering the basic 
functional groups encountered in orgaruc chemistry. Prerequisite: CHE 211. 

301. Analytical Chemistry I: (4 hours) Principles and methods of qualitative analysis. 
Prerequisite: CHE 112. 



89 



302. Analytical Chemistry II: (4 hours) Principles and methods of quantitative 
analysis. Prerequisite: CHE 301 . 

405. Biochemistry: (4 hours) A one-semester introduction to the chemistry of biological 
systems. Prerequisite: CHE 211-212. 

410. Qualitative Organic Analysis: (4 hours) Emphasis on the systematic identification 
of pure orgaruc compounds and the analysis of nuxtures. Prerequisite: CHE 212. 

415. Instrumental Analysis: (4 hours) An introduction to instrumental methods of 
analysis. Prerequisite: CHE 112. 



COURSE DESCRIPTIONS FOR PHYSICAL SCIENCE (PHS) 

151. Physical Science: (3 hours) A basic study of chemistry and physics. Three hours 
lecture. 

201. Earth and Space Science: (3 hours) An introduction to astronomy, geology and 
meteorology. 



90 



SCHOOL OF ARTS, HUMANITIES, AND 
SCIENCES 

DEPARTMENT OF HISTORY AND SOCIAL SCIENCE 

Myron C. Noonkester, Ph.D. (Chair) 

Professors Noonkester, M. Wheeler 

In accordance with the stated purpose of the college, this department strives to promote an 
understanding of past and present human societies. 

REQUIREMENTS 

History Major: Thirty hours, which must include HIS 101, 102, 421. History majors 
must pursue the Bachelor of Arts (B.A.) degree. 

History Minor: Twenty-one hours, which must include HIS 101, 102, 421. 

Social Science Major: Thirty-nine hours chosen from history, sociology, political 
science, and geography, at least 18 hours of which must be in history. Social science 
majors may pursue the Bachelor of Arts (B.A.) or Bachelor of Science (B.S.) degree. 

Social Science Major, Teacher Licensure: To be licensed to teach social science 
at the secondary level, a student must meet the following requirements: 
1) completion of all core curriculum requirements for either the Bachelor of Arts [B.A.] or 
the Bachelor of Science [B.S.] degree, 2) completion of all professional requirements 
mandated by the State of Mississippi licensure standards, and 3) completion of the 
requirements for the major in social science including SOC 101, 111, PSC 201, ECO 201- 
202, HIS 101-102, 201-202, 331, 369, 403 or 404, 421, sbc hours of upper-level electives in 
HIS, and three hours of upper-level electives in HIS, SOC, or PSC. Students must be 
advised from the both the department of history and social science and the department 
of education. 

Pre-Law: Pre-law students must discuss their curricular plans with the department 
chair. 

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS FOR HISTORY (HIS) 

101. World History to 1500: (3 hours) A survey of civilizations prior to the age of 
European expansion. 

102. World History since 1500: (3 hours) A survey of civilizations since the rise of the West. 

201. United States to 1865: (3 hours) A survey of United States history from the 
emergence of Native American culture to the Civil War. 

202. United States since 1865: (3 hours) A survey of United States history from 
Reconstruction to the present. 

301. Colonial America: (3 hours) A study of the colonial period of American history. 

303. Constitutional Development in the United States: (3 hours) Same as PSC 303; see 
description there. 

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304. Jacksonian Era: (3 hours) A study of the democratization of American society and 
the genesis of reform, originating in 1828-1848. 

305. Civil War and Reconstruction: (3 hours) The causes, events and consequences of 
the Civil War and Reconstruction. 

311. United States Foreign Policy: (3 hours) The policies and problems of the foreign 
relations of the United States from the foundation of the Republic to the Gulf War. 

323. The Ancient Near East: (3 hours) A study of the history, cultures, and religions of 
the ancient Near East from ca. 3000-333 B.C. Same as REL 303; HIS 323 may be 
taken by non-religion majors only. 

324. The Greco-Roman World: (3 hours) A study of the history, cultures, and religions 
in the Mediterranean basin from 333 B.C. to A.D. 476. Same as REL 304; HIS 324 
may be taken by non-religion majors only. 

331. Mississippi: (3 hours) The people and past of Mississippi from Poverty Point 
Culture to the current time. 

352. Europe 1200-1500: (3 hours) An investigation of the history and social assumptions 
of late medieval Europe. 

353. Europe 1500-1833: (3 hours) A study of the Renaissance, Reformation, Wars of 
Religion, the ancien regime, and the French Revolution in pre-industrial Europe. 

354. Europe 1833-1945: (3 hours) The democratization of Europe, with a consideration 
of the attendant wars. 

369. Introduction to World Geography: (3 hours) An introduction to world geography 
with an emphasis upon conceptual understanding of cultural and physical 
landscapes. 

401. Progressive Era: (3 hours) A study of reformers and reform in the Uruted States 
during the early twentieth century. 

403. Geography of the Americas: (3 hours) A survey of the cultural and physical 
geography of the Americas. 

404. Geography of Europe: (3 hours) A survey of the cultural and physical geography 
of Europe. 

405. Geography of Africa, Asia, and Australia: (3 hours) A survey of the cultural and 
physical geography of Africa, Asia, and Australia. 

411. History of Christianity: (3 hours) A study of Christianity's historical foundations, 
expansion, historical theology, and cultural influences. Same as REL 411; HIS 411 
may be taken by non-religion majors only. 

413. Renaissance and Reformation: (3 hours) A study of the Renaissance and the Protestant 
Reformation with primary attention given to the interrelationship of these movements. 
Same as REL 413; HIS 413 may be taken by nonreligion majors only. 



92 



421. Historiography: (3 hours) The theory and practice of historical writing from 
Herodotus to the antiquarian empiricists. 

458. The Contemporary World: (3 hours) A regional study of the world since 1945. 



COURSE DESCRIPTIONS FOR POLITICAL SCIENCE (PSC) 

201. American Federal Government: (3 hours) A survey of the structure and dynamic 
of the American polity. 

202. State and Local Government: (Three hours) A study of the organization and 
functions of state and local governments. 

301. Comparative Government: (3 hours) A comparative analysis of major European 
governments. 

311. United States Foreign Policy: (3 hours) The policies and problems of the foreign 
relations of the United States from the foundation of the Republic to the Gulf War. 
Same as HIS 311. 

410. Political Communication: (Three hours) Historical and critical study of leading 
political speakers, their speeches, and philosophies. Special attention is given to 
presidential communication. Same as COM 410. 



COURSE DESCRIPTIONS FOR SOCIOLOGY (SOC) 

101. Introduction to Sociology: (3 hours) The theory and practice of sociology. 
111. Introduction to Anthropology: (3 hours) A survey of cultural anthropology. 



93 



SCHOOL OF ARTS, HUMANITIES, AND 
SCIENCES 

DEPARTMENT OF LANGUAGE AND LITERATURE 

Rebecca M. Jordan, D.A. (Chair) 

Professor Swetman; Associate Professors Chestnut, Jordan; Assistant 
Professors EasterUng, Ford, Stewart; Instructor Maqueda; Lecturer Lee 

The aims of the English courses are to help the student learn to write with a high level of 
accuracy, effectiveness, and fluency; to give emphasis to research techniques, particularly for 
prospective graduate students in English; and to help the student to develop the ability to read 
critically and appreciatively the best of English, American, and continental literature. 

The aims of the foreign language courses are to develop foreign language skills which enable 
the student to engage in oral and written communication with other peoples of the world and 
provide an auxiliary skill in professions; to develop in students a linguistic sense sufficient for 
students to be able to compare a native tongue with other languages; to give the student through 
readings in foreign language a background of culture of the nations using this language; to enable 
the student to read scientific, literary, and other treaties in a foreign language. 

REQUIREMENTS 

English Major and English Major with Teacher Licensure: The English 
major must fulfill the Bachelor of Arts (B.A.) degree requirements, including 42 hours in 
English. In addition to ENG 101-102, 211-212, the major includes the following 
requirements: (1) two courses from ENG 300, 306, 310, 316, and 403; (2) ENG 303; (3) 
ENG 304; (4) one course from ENG 324, 326, 365; (5) one course from ENG 323 or 411; (6) 
one course from ENG 472 and 475; (7) one course from ENG 404, 406, and 435; (8) one 
course from 440, 450, and 460; and (10) ENG 498. All English majors must pass ENG 000, 
English Proficiency Exam, prior to being accepted by the department as an English 
major. In addition, all English majors must take an English exit exam before graduation. 

The English major not seeking teacher licensure must have a minor area of study 
comprising 18-21 hours selected in consultation with one's advisor. 

The English major desiring teacher licensure must (1) complete all professional 
requirements mandated by the State of Mississippi certification standards, (2) complete a 
minor in education, and (3) be advised by the department of language and literature and 
by the department of education. 

English Minor: Twenty-one semester hours in English, including ENG 101-102, 211- 
212, and nine hours of upper-level English courses. 

Spanish Minor: Eighteen semester hours. 



94 



CORE CURRICULUM REQUIREMENTS (ENGLISH) 

Core Curriculum: General requirements for all degrees are met by taking ENG 
101, 102, 000, and at least three hours (some degrees may require six hours) of a 
sophomore literature course with an ENG prefix. First-trimester freshmen and first- 
trimester transfer students must take English composition sequentially.. 

Students who take a junior-level English course (300 level) must have completed nine 
hours in English prior to taking a junior-level English course; likewise, students who 
take a senior-level English course (400 level) must have completed twelve hours in 
English prior to taking a senior-level English course. 

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS FOR ENGLISH (ENG) 

000. English Proficiency Examination: (0 hours) A two-hour essay exam that evaluates 
the student's abUity to communicate effectively in written form. This test is required 
for each student who earns a degree at William Carey College. AU students planning 
to major in English must pass this test prior to being accepted by the department as an 
English major. 

100. Skills in English: (3 hours) A course in basic English grammar, mechanics and usage, 
including practice in paragraph writing. Placement determined by results of English 
diagnostic examination. Three hours of lecture and recitation, two hours in writing 
laboratory. May not be substituted for EngUsh 101 or 102 nor used for core curriculum 
requirements. Grade: Pass/Repeat. 

101. Composition: (3 hours) A study of rhetorical principles and practices. Assigned 
reading and weekly themes are required. 

101.8. Composition Honors: (3 hours) Critical reading, with attention to rhetorical 
conventions, accommodates students in development of written texts for a variety 
of audiences and purposes. Students apply appropriate conventions in composing 
personal analytical, and persuasive texts. Students who enroll. in this class must 
either be participants in the honors program or have the approval of the instructor. 

102. Research and Composition: (3 hours) A course combining research techniques 
with intensive practice in composition skills. Prerequisite: ENG 101 or 101.8. 

102.8. Research and Composition Honors: (3 hours) In this course, students apply 
appropriate strategies in conducting and reporting research, developing logical 
arguments, and analyzing a variety of literary genres. Students who enroll in this 
class must either be participants in the honors program or have the approval of the 
instructor. Prerequisite: ENG 101 or 101.8. 

105. Essentials of Grammar and Writing Laboratory. (3 hours) A course designed to 
meet the English proficiency requirement for those whose test results show a need 
for more training in writing Grade: Pass/Fail. 

211. World Literature I: (3 hours) A survey of the major works of literature beginning 
with the Greek classics and ending with the late Renaissance. Prerequisite: ENG 
101 or 101.8 and ENG 102 or 102.8. 



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212. World Literature II: (3 hours) A survey of major works of literature beginning 
with the Age of Enlightenment and ending with the Modern Age. Prerequisite: 
ENG 101 or 101.8 and ENG 102 or 102.8. 

212.8. World Literature II Honors: (3 hours) A survey of the major work of literature 
beginning with the Age of Enlightenment and ending with the Modern Age. 
Students who enroll in this class must either be participants in the honors program 
or have the approval of the instructor. Prerequisite: ENG 101 or 101.8 and ENG 
102 or 102.8. 

300. Creative Writing: (3 hours) A study of artistic techniques in selected masterpieces 
of short fiction, drama, poetry and essay. Students submit original works following 
the review of each literary genre. 

303. American Literature I: (3 hours) A study of literature from the Colonial, Early 
National, and Romantic periods. 

304. American Literature II: (3 hours) A study of literature from the Realist through the 
Post-Modernist periods. 

306. Expository Writing: (3 hours) Rhetorical principles and practice in writing prose 
such as description, literary analysis, familiar essay, narration, etc. 

310. Pedagogical Grammar: (3 hours) A thorough review of descriptive grammar and 
prescriptive grammar with an emphasis on how this knowledge can be used in 
teaching writing, in academic and personal writing, and in editing manuscripts. 

316. History of the English Language: (3 hours) A study of the history and 
development of the English language from its Indo-European ancestry to the 
twentieth century. 

323. Survey of British Literature: (3 hours) A survey of masterpieces in British 
literature. 

324. The Novel: (3 hours) A study of representative European and/or American novels 

selected from literary, historic, or thematic types with an emphasis on various 
critical approaches. 

325. African American Literature: (3 hours) A study of three centuries of 
representative writings by African Americans, from narratives on the Middle 
Passage to polemics on contemporary issues. Participants will engage in close 
readings and rhetorical analyses of various genres from the 1700s to the present. 

365. Development of the Short Story: (3 hours) A study of selected short fiction as 
representative of the development of the genre. 

403. Linguistics and Advanced Grammar: (3 hours) A study of historical, geographical, 
and structural linguistics, and a study of grammar, emphasizing analysis of syntax, 
and incorporating insights from structural, transformational, and other modern 
schools. 

404. Survey of Drama: (3 hours) Critical and historical study of major plays from the 
classical Greek period through the 18th century. 



96 



406. The Pre-Renaissance Age: (3 hours) The literahire of the Middle Ages through the 
early English lyricists. 

411. The Age of Elizabethan and Jacobean Drama: (3 hours) A survey of 
representative plays. 

416. Manuscript Preparation and Publication: (3 hours) This course is designed to 
provide experience in manuscript preparation: editing, proofreading, production 
and publication of journals, in-house newsletters, brochures, and other pieces 
distributed for public dissemination. The class is responsible for the production 
and distribution of The Indigo and the department's newsletter. The Tattler. 

417. Methods of Teaching English: (3 hours) Studies in the theories, strategies, and 
materials of teaching English on the junior and senior high school levels. 

435. The Renaissance Age: (3 hours) A critical study of nonepic and nondramatic works 
of Milton and other 17th century writers. 

440. The Age of Enlightenment: (3 hours) A study of British prose and poetry of the 
18th century. 

450. The Romantic Age: (3 hours) A study in the British prose and poetry of the early 
19th century. 

460. The Victorian Age: (3 hours) A study in the British prose and poetry of the middle 
and late 19th century. 

472. Contemporary Literature: (3 hours) Poetry, fiction, and selected drama of the 
Western world from the late 19th century to the present. 

475. Modern and Contemporary Drama: (3 hours) A study of Western dramatic 
literature from Ibsen to contemporary dramatists. 

498. Senior Seminar: (3 hours) A capstone course required for the English major. A 
synthesis of selected American, English, and world literature that involves both 
study and practice of criticism, analysis, and research. 



COURSE DESCRIPTIONS FOR SPANISH (SPA) 

101-102. Elementary Spanish I-II: (3 hours each) Emphasis on conversational Spanish 
with oral drills, reading, grammar, and composition. 

103. Spanish Reading for Beginners: (3 hours) A course for students who desire to 
learn only the reading skill. Offered on demand. 

201-202. Intermediate Spanish I-II: (3 hours each) A review of pronunciation and 
grammar and selected readings of cultural materials. Prerequisite: SPA 101-102 or 
the equivalent. 

203. Intermediate Spanish Reading: (3 hours) A course for students who desire to 
learn only the reading skill. Prerequisite: SPA 103 or the equivalent. Offered on 
demand. 



97 



303. Reading Spanish Literature: (3 hours) A survey of Spanish literature with 
emphasis on reading comprehension. Prerequisite: SPA 202 or the equivalent. 

305. Advanced Grammar and Composition: (3 hours) An intensive review of grammar and 
composition. Prerequisite: SPA 202 or the equivalent. Offered on derriand. 

307. Conversational Spanish: (3 hours) Extensive practice in oral Spanish including 
drill in vocabulary, idiom, and basic linguistic structure. Prerequisite: SPA 201 and 
permission of the instructor. Offered on demand. 

311-312. Survey of Spanish Literature I-II: (3 hours each) Representative masterpieces. 
Prerequisite: SPA 202. Offered on demand. 

350. Life and Culture of Latin America: (3 hours) A study of all aspects of Latin 
American life. Offered on demand. 

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS FOR FRENCH (FRE) 

101. Elementary French I: (3 hours) An introduction to the vocabulary, grammar, and 
sentence structure of the French language. The course emphasizes both verbal and 
written communication. 

102. Elementary French II: (3 hours) A continuation of Elementary French 1. 
Prerequisite: FRN 101 or equivalent. 



COURSE DESCRIPTIONS FOR GERMAN (GMN) 

101. Elementary German I: (3 hours) An introduction to the vocabulary, grairunar, and 
sentence structure of the German language. The course emphasizes both verbal 
and written communication. 

102. Elementary German II: (3 hours) A continuation of Elementary German I. 
Prerequisite: GMN 101 or equivalent. 



98 



SCHOOL OF ARTS, HUMANITIES, AND 
SCIENCES 

DEPARTMENT OF MATHEMATICS 
AND PHYSICS 

Cloyd L. Ezell, Jr., Ph.D. (Chair) 

Professors Ezell, McShea; Assistant Professor Ehde; Lecturer Shepherd 

The aims of the department of mathematics are: (1) to give each student enrolled in the 
department an insight into the nature of mathematics and to acquaint students with some of its 
fundamental principles, (2) to offer the appropriate mathematical preparation to students 
pursuing a course of study for which certain mathematics courses are prerequisites, and (3) to 
provide training for those students whose major interest is mathematics, including those 
preparing to teach mathematics in secondary schools, those seeking industrial employment, and 
those planning to do graduate work in mathematics. 

REQUIREMENTS 

Mathematics Major A major consists of thirty semester hours including MAT 151, 
152, 251, 252, and eighteen additional hours in courses numbered above 252, excluding 
MAT 316 and MAT 345. The specific program of study for each student is planned with the 
consultation and approval of the faculty advisor. Students may elect either the Bachelor of 
Science (B.S.) or Bachelor of Arts (B.A.) degree. 

Mathematics Minor: A minor consists of eighteen semester hours including MAT 
151, 152 and six semester hours numbered above 252. No course numbered below 131 is 
to be used in meeting the requirements for a minor in mathematics. 

Mathematics Major, Teacher Licensure: To be licensed to teach mathematics at 
the secondary level, a student must meet the following requirements: 1) completion of 
all core curriculum requirements for the B.A. or B.S. degree, 2) completion of all 
professional requirements mandated by the State of Mississippi licensure standards, 
3) completion of the requirements for a major in mathematics that includes MAT 335, 
336 or 220, 341, 436, 441, and three hours of approved mathematics electives numbered 
above MAT 252. Students must be advised from the both the department of 
mathematics and the department of education. 



COURSE DESCRIPTIONS FOR MATHEMATICS (MAT) 

No student will be allowed to enroll in a mathematics course numbered below MAT 
131 after earning credit in a mathematics course numbered MAT 131 or above unless 
such a course is required by the program in which the student is enrolled. 

100. Elementary Mathematics: (3 hours) A course that is designed to provide basic 
skills in arithmetic, algebra, and geometry. Whole numbers, fractions, decimals, 
percentage problems, beginning algebra, formulas and measurement. The class 
meets five times a week. May not be used for core curriculum requirements. 



99 



109. Mathematics Seminar I: (1 hour) How to use graphing calculators or computer 
programs to explore mathematics topics. 

116. Fundamental Mathematics I: (3 hours) In this course special attention is given to the 
nature of mathematics as well as to the structure and properties of the real number 
system. Topics include logical reasoning, problem solving, the real number system 
and its subsystems: natural numbers, integers, and rational numbers. 

121. Intermediate Algebra: (3 hours) A course that treats beginning and intermediate 
topics in algebra including quadratic equations and systems of linear equations. 
Prerequisite: one unit of high school algebra. 

131. College Algebra: (3 hours) Linear and quadratic equations, graphs of relations and 
functions, systems of equations, polynomial functions, logarithmic and exponential 
functions. Prerequisite: Two units of high school algebra or MAT 121 . 

132. Trigonometry: (3 hours) Trigonometric functions, applications, trigonometric 
identities and equations, graphs, inverse trigonometric functions, and triangle 
solution. Prerequisite: Two units of high school algebra or MAT 121. 

150. Precalculus: (3 hours) A modified study of polynomial, rational, exponential, 
logarithmic, trigonometric, and two-variable functions. Emphasis is on analyzing and 
graphing these functions using analytic methods as well as with the use of graphing 
calculators. Prerequisite: Two units of high school algebra and one unit of geometry 
or MAT 131 or permission of the instructor. 

151. Calculus with Analytic Geometry I: (3 hours) Topics will include limits, 
derivatives and applications of derivatives. Prerequisite: MAT 131. 

152. Calculus with Analytic Geometry II: (3 hours) Topics will include the definite 
integral, analytic geometry, and transcendental functions. Prerequisite: MAT 132 
(or 150) and MAT 151. 

209. Mathematics Seminar II: (1 hour) A sophomore level course, primarily for 
mathematics majors or minors but open to all students. Sample topics: computer 
algebra systems, problem-solving. 

220. Elementary Statistics: (3 hours) Frequency distributions, central tendency, 
dispersion, normal distribution, and sampling. Prerequisite: Two units of high 
school algebra, MAT 116 or MAT 121. 

251. Calculus with Analytic Geometry III: (3 hours) Topics will include applications of 
integration, indeterminate forms, improper integrals, and infinite series. 
Prerequisite: MAT 152. 

252. Calculus with Analytic Geometry IV: (3 hours) Topics include vectors, analytic 
geometry in three dimensions, partial derivatives, and multiple integrals. 
Prerequisite: MAT 251. 

309. Mathematics Seminar III: (1 hour) A junior level course for mathematics majors or 
minors. Sample topics: famous theorems, readings in mathematics. 

316. Fundamental Mathematics II: (3 hours) Topics will include basic concepts of 
geometry, measurement, probability, and statistics, with an emphasis on reasoning, 
problem solving, and communication of mathematical ideas. Prerequisite: MAT 116. 

100 



335. Foundations of Mathematics: (3 hours) Logic, sets, relations, functions, 
denumerable sets, cardinal numbers, and ordered sets, with emphasis throughout 
on the nature and technique of mathematical proof. Prerequisite: Mathematics 131 
and consent of instructor. 

336. Probability: (3 hours) An introduction to probability with some statistical 
applications. Equally likely events, finite sample spaces, and random variables. 
Prerequisite: MAT 152. 

337. Mathematical Statistics: (3 hours) A study of statistical theory and applications 
with emphasis on inferential statistics. Topics include confidence intervals, 
hypothesis testing, correlation and regression, analysis of variance, and simulation. 
Prerequisite: MAT 336. • :.f.<. a- . 

338. Discrete Mathematics: (3 hours) Topics will include sets, mathematical induction, 
relations and functions, algorithms, difference equations, graphs, combinatorics, 
and Boolean algebra. Prerequisite: MAT 131 or MAT 150. 

341. Linear Algebra I: (3 hours) A first course in linear algebra. Systems of linear 
equations, matrices, determinants, vector inner product, vector cross product, and 
applications of linear algebra, with an introduction to vector spaces and linear 
transformations. Prerequisite: MAT 131. 

342. Linear Algebra II: (3 hours) A continuation of MAT 341. An in-depth study of 
linear algebra topics and applications with emphasis on vector spaces, inner 
product spaces, linear transformations, eigenvectors, eigenvalues, and an 
introduction to numerical methods. Prerequisite: MAT 341. 

345. Teaching Mathematics in the Secondary School: (3 hours) The study of methods 
and problems related to teaching mathematics in secondary school. 

353. Differential Equations: (3 hours) A first course in differential equations. 
Differential equations of the first order, applications, linear differential equations 
and series methods. Prerequisite: MAT 252. 

391. Mathematics and Physics for Radiological Technologists: (4 hours) An 
introduction to the basic mathematics and physics of electricity, magnetism, x-rays 
and radiation equipment. Three hours lecture and three hours laboratory a week. 

409. Mathematics Seminar IV: (1 hour) A capstone course for mathematics majors. A 
comprehensive overview of the mathematics curriculum with emphasis on a thorough 
knowledge of key concepts and an exploration of relationships between topics. 

436. Geometry: (3 hours) Euclidean and non-EucHdean geometries with emphasis given 
to their logical development from basic assumptions. Prerequisite: MAT 151. 

441. Abstract Algebra: (3 hours) The algebraic structure of the rational, real, and 
complex numbers. Prerequisite: MAT 151. 

451. Advanced Calculus: (3 hours) An intensive and detailed study of continuous and 
differentiable functions. Prerequisite: MAT 252. Offered on demand. 

471. History and Philosophy of Mathematics: (3 hours) The origins, philosophy, and 
chronological development of the mathematical sciences with emphasis on 



101 



mathematical concepts and their interrelations. Prerequisite: MAT 252 or 
permission of instructor. 

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS FOR PHYSICS (PHY) 

101-102. General Physics: (4 hours each trimester) A study of the fundamental principles 
of mechanics and sound the first trimester; of heat, light, magnetism, and 
electricity, the second semester. Prerequisite: Mathematics 131, 132. Three hours 
lecture and three hours laboratory a week, both trimesters. 

211-212. Engineering Physics: (4 hours each trimester) A study of the principles of 
physics with calculus designed especially for pre-engineering students. 
Prerequisite: Mathematics 151. Three hours lecture and three hours laboratory a 
week, both trimesters. Offered on demand. 



PRE-ENGINEERING 

Two years at William Carey College followed by two years in residence at a school of 
engineering will provide the opportunity of earning a degree in engineering. The specific 
program of study for each pre-engineering student is planned with the consultation and 
approval of the pre-engineering advisor. Details concerrung this program can be obtained 
from the chair of the department of mathematics and physics. 



102 



SCHOOL OF ARTS, HUMANITIES, AND 
SCIENCES 

PHILOSOPHY 

Professor Crockett; Lecturer Baker 

As the basis for all disciplines of investigation and research, philosophy orients the student to 
critical and logical thinking, reflective thought, and the development of philosophical issues, 
personalities, and schools. As the foundation of the liberal arts, philosophy is ideal for students 
seeking a minor to complement their major areas of study either in the arts, humanities, sciences, 
and religion or the professional disciplines. 

Minor: A philosophy minor is composed of 18 hours of coursework, including 
PHI 201, 250, 401, 450, and six additional hours in philosophy. 

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS FOR PHILOSOPHY (PHI) 

201. Introduction to Philosophy: (3 hours) An introduction to the problems, 
methodologies, and major areas of philosophy as exemplified in selected primary 
and secondary sources. 

250. Logic: (3 hours) A course in critical reasoning with an introductory study of 
language problems, deductive logic, inductive logic, and symbolic logic. 

350. Epistemology: (3 hours) A study of contemporary theory of knowledge, including 
the following issues: what knowledge is, perception, skepticism, propositions, 
truth theories, theories of justification, foundationalism, deduction, and induction. 
(Prerequisite: PHI 201) 

401. Philosophy of Religion: (3 hours) A study of the philosophical issues related to the 
logic of, challenges to, and problems for Christian theism. (Prerequisite: PHI 201) 

403. Moral Philosophy: (3 hours) A study of the major theoretical paradigms of ethics 
from the ancient Greeks through the contemporary theorists; attention is given to 
contemporary moral issues and problems. (Prerequisite: PHI 201) 

450. History of Philosophy: (3 hours) A study of the historical development of 
philosophy from the ancient Greek philosophers through the contemporary period. 
(Prerequisite: PHI 201) 



103 



SCHOOL OF ARTS, HUMANITIES, AND 
SCIENCES 

DEPARTMENT OF THEATRE AND 
COMMUNICATION 

Obra L. Quave, M.A. (Chair) 

Professor Quave; Associate Professor Robert; Assistant Professor 
Huebner; Lecturer Hester 

The objectives of the department of theatre and communication are (1) to improve the 
student's habits and abilities in communication in its various practical and artistic forms, and (2) 
to provide a background of knowledge and experience to help prepare the student for graduate or 
professional school and/or a career. 

REQUIREMENTS 

Theatre Major: (Leading to the professional degree. Bachelor of Fine Arts): Sixty 
semester hours including THE 230, 235, 240, 435, 436, and COM 375. No more than ten 
hours of theatre laboratory and/or rehearsal and performance courses may count toward 
this major. 

A student who desires a concentration in musical theatre follows an interdisciplinary 
degree program requiring 60 semester hours. A typical program includes the following: 
THE 230, 235, 240, 340, 430, 435, 436, and COM 375; at least two semester hours in 
movement/dance; plus electives in theatre; MUT 161, 162, 163 and MUM 312; six 
semester hours of voice; at least three semester hours of piano; plus electives in music. 
The student who selects this major follows the degree plan for the Bachelor of Fine Arts 
degree. 

While not required, it is strongly recommended that a minor field of study be 
selected by the student who pursues the Bachelor of Fine Arts degree. 

Theatre Major: (Leading to the degree. Bachelor of Arts): Forty-two semester hours 
including THE 230, 235, 240, 435, 436, and COM 375. No more than sbc hours of theatre 
laboratory and /or rehearsal and performance courses may count toward this major. 

Any student majoring in theatre must be active in the theatre program of the college 
during each trimester in residence. 

Theatre Minor Twenty-one hours, of which two to six must be in theatre laboratory. 

Speech Communication and Theatre Major: Forty-two semester hours, 
including COM 230, 375, and THE 235. This degree program may be selected by those 
planning to teach in the secondary schools and by those who desire a liberal arts degree 
with a communication-theatre emphasis. The student who selects this major follows the 
degree plan for the Bachelor of Arts (B.A.) degree. 

Any student majoring in speech communication and theatre must be active in the 
theatre program and /or the forensics program during each trimester in residence. 



104 



Speech Communication and Theatre Minor: Nineteen semester hours, 
including COM 230, 375, and THE 235. One hour of a laboratory course is required, but 
no more than one hour will apply in the requirements for the minor. 

Communication Major: Thirty-six hours above COM 101, and including COM 
230, 302, 375, 402, and 497. The student who selects this major follows the degree plan 
for the Bachelor of Arts (B.A.) or the Bachelor of Science (B.S.). 

Communication Minor: Eighteen hours above COM 101. 

Courses selected in each minor listed above must be approved by an advisor in the 
theatre /communication area. 

Speech Communication and Drama, Teacher Licensure Requirements: To 

be licensed to teach speech communication and drama at the secondary level, a student 
must meet the following requirements: 1) completion of all core curriculum 
requirements, 2) completion of all professional requirements mandated by the state of 
Mississippi licensure standards, 3) completion of the requirements for the major in 
theatre or speech communication and theatre or communication including COM 230, 300 
or 305, 375, THE 235, 240, 435, 436, and 12 hours selected from COM 301, 302, 303, 402, 
THE 440, 441. Courses may be substituted with the approval of the chair of the 
department of theatre and communication. Students must be advised from both the 
department of theatre and communication and the department of education. The B.F.A. 
degree is an option in the teacher licensure program. 

MISCELLANEOUS NOTES 

1. The flexibility permitted in the selection of courses in each degree program allows 
the individual student to plan a program of studies to meet his/her career goals. 
However, the selection of courses, as well as choices of a minor and general elecdves, 
must be approved by the academic advisor for the particular major. It is strongly 
recommended that the student majoring in communication take at least two upper-level 
writing courses in English. 

2. Each student who completes a major in the department of theatre and 
communication must take a comprehensive examination in the final trimester of study. 
Although no specific score is required, completion of the examination is necessary for 
graduation. 

3. At the end of the academic year, each student will be evaluated to determine if 
he/she will be allowed to continue in the degree program. 

CAREY DINNER THEATRE 

Founded in 1975, Carey Dinner Theatre operates in the summer and presents two 
musical theatre productions. Auditions for prospective performers and interviews for 
prospective technicians are held in the spring. Each member of the company receives a 
scholarship stipend. 

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS FOR THEATRE (THE) 

125, 126, 225, 226, 325, 326, 425, 426. Theatre Laboratory: (1 hour each trimester) 
Practical, hands-on theatre experience. 



105 



127, 128, 227, 228, 327, 328, 427, 428. Rehearsal and Performance: (1 hour each trimester) 
Participation onstage or serving in the capacity of stage manager or rehearsal 
assistant in a theatre production. 

135. Theatre Appreciation: (3 hours) A study of theatre as an art form and as a 
performance medium; limited consideration of dramatic literature. 

160. Movement and Dance for the Stage: (1 hour) A practical introduction to general 
movement techniques for the stage. Same as PED 160. 

230. Oral Interpretation of Literature: (3 hours) Techniques of reading to an audience. Same 
as COM 230. 

235. Introduction to the Theatre: (3 or 4 hours) The backgrounds and theories of the 
drama, a general introduction to the theatre, practical aspects of producing the 
play. The course has a required laboratory. 

240. Acting I: (3 hours) A study of acting technique and theory, with emphasis on 
improvisation, characterization, and scene study. 

260. Movement and Dance for the Musical Theatre (Tap): (1 hour) A practical 
introduction to tap dance as a tool in theatre. 

261. Movement and Dance for the Musical Theatre (Jazz): (1 hour) A practical 
introduction to jazz dance as a tool in theatre. 

335. Stagecraft: (3 or 4 hours) Continuation of THE 235 with stress on technical theatre. 
The course includes both lecture and laboratory components. (Prerequisite: 
THE 235) 

336. Scenic Design I: (3 hours) Fundamentals and techniques of scenic design. 
(Prerequisite: THE 335 or consent of instructor) 

337. Costume Design and Construction: (3 or 4 hours) Fundamentals and techniques of 
costume design; a study of the techniques of constructing costumes. (Prerequisite: 
THE 335 or consent of instructor) 

338. Rendering and Scenic Painting: (3 hours) Techniques of rendering and painting 
trompe I'oeil effects for the stage. (Prerequisite: THE 235) 

340. Acting II: (3 hours) Continuation of THE 240 with more intense study of 
characterization; introduction to audition techniques. (Prerequisite: THE 240) 

345. Practicum in Stage Lighting: May be repeated. (1-6 hours) 

346. Practicum in Scenic Design: May be repeated. (1-6 hours) 

347. Practicum in Stage Costume: May be repeated. (1-6 hours) 

(Note: All practica require individual projects and practical experience. Prerequisite: THE 335 and 
consent of instructor. ) 

348. Stage Makeup: (3 hours) A practical laboratory approach to the art of stage 
makeup. 



106 



I 



360. Movement and Dance for the Musical Theatre (Modern): (1 hour) A practical 
introduction to modern dance as a tool in theatre. 

361. Movement and Dance for the Musical Theatre (Ballet): (1 hour) A practical 
introduction to the ballet as a tool in theatre. 

420. Acting III: (3 hours) Continuation of THE 340; a study of period styles. 
(Prerequisite: THE 340) 

430. Musical Theatre: (3 hours) Study of the history, forms, styles, and production 
techniques. 

435. Play Directing I: (3 hours) A theory course emphasizing play analysis and methods 
of director-actor communication. (Prerequisite: THE 235, 240, and upper-level 
status as a theatre or speech commurucation and theatre major) 

436. Play Directing II: (3 hours) Practical application of the methods learned in THE 435 
through the direction of a one-act play for public performance. (Prerequisite: 
THE 435) 

438. Scenic Design II: (3 hours) Continuation of THE 336 with intensive drafting and 
rendering study. (Prerequisite: THE 336) 

440. History of Theatre I: (3 hours) A survey of physical trends, production techniques, 
important persons, and literature of the theatre from the ancient Greeks to 1642. 

441. History of Theatre II: (3 hours) A continuation of THE 440, from 1642 to the 
present day. 



COURSE DESCRIPTIONS FOR COMMUNICATION (COM) 

101. Public Speaking: (3 hours) Training in the preparation and delivery of short 
speeches, with limited consideration of group communication, listening, 
constructive evaluation, and interpersonal and non-verbal communication. 

120, 121, 220, 221, 320, 321, 420, 421. Forensics Laboratory: (1 hour each trimester) 
Practical experience as a member of the college debate team and/or as a participant 
in individual speech events competition. .. ., ; , -. 

230. Oral Interpretation of Literature: (3 hours) Same as THE 230. 

300. Persuasion: (3 hours) A study of major theories, models, and conceptualization of 
persuasion with particular emphasis in interpersonal, public, and mediated 
communication. 

301. Survey of the Mass Media: (3 hours) A study of the nature and impact of mass 
communication in contemporary society. 

302. Interpersonal Communication: (3 hours) A study of two-person interactions to 
increase students' understanding and appreciation of communication principles. 



107 



303. Nonverbal Communication: (3 hours) A study of nonverbal cues as they affect the 
communication process. 

305. Argumentation and Debate: (3 hours) Theories and practical application of 
argumentation; a study of the types of debate. 

310. Copy Editing and Newspaper Make-up: (3 hours) The principles of editing 
newspaper copy, writing headlines, and employing type and pictures in the 
makeup of newspapers. Offered on demand. 

312. Newswriting and Reporting: (1-3 hours) Practice in the writing of different types 
of news. Offered on demand. 

330. Organizational Communication: (3 hours) Systematic study and principles of 
effective communication in organizational settings. 

340. Advanced Public Speaking: (3 hours) Advanced study of preparation and delivery 
of various types of speeches. Special attention is given to extemporaneous and 
manuscript speeches. (Prerequisite: COM 101) 

375. Phonetics and Voice and Diction: (3 hours) A study of the International Phonetic 
Alphabet, improvement of voice and diction, limited consideration of voice science. 

401. Public Relations: (3 hours) A study of the principles and techniques of public 
relations, its role in society, and its relationship to mass media. 

402. Small Group Communication: (3 hours) Consideration of the problems and 
techniques for leaders and participants in small-group settings. 

410. Political Communication: (3 hours) Historical and critical study of leading political 
speakers, their speeches, and philosophies. Special attention is given to presidential 
communication. Same as PSC 410. 

430. Communication Theory: (3 hours) A study of major theories, models, and 
conceptualizations of human communication with emphasis on practical 
applications of research. 

497. Communication Internship: (3-6 hours) Field training in an area of 
communication. (Prerequisite: 21 hours of communication courses, senior status as 
a communication major, approval of the department chair, and 2.0 GPA overall and 
2.5 GPA in the major) 



108 



SCHOOL OF BUSINESS 

Professors Channel!, Shivers; Associate Professors B. Brown, D. Brown, 
Dale, Ellis, Forrest, Keasler; Assistant Professor L. Glaze; Instructors 
Brockway, Commander, Schamber; Lecturers Andrews, York 

The program of the School of Business is designed to provide the student with a broad-based 
professional education and understanding of the American free enterprise system. The school 
strives to instill a sense of high ethical standards for each student. The School of Business faculty 
emphasizes analytical skills and communication abilities in an international cultural context to 
prepare students for achieving their short-term and long-term goals in life. 

Each area of study is structured to provide the student with a thorough grounding in basic 
business principles, a professional competency in at least one major area of business, and the 
ability to apply knowledge as future leaders to the practical problems of management in a global 
economy. 

GENERAL INFORMATION 

A student who majors in the School of Business may earn the Bachelor of Science in 
Business (B.S.B.) degree, the Bachelor of Science (B.S.) degree, or the Bachelor of Arts 
(B.A.) degree. Concentrations are offered in accounting, computer information systems, 
finance, and management/marketing. Only the computer information systems and 
management/marketing concentrations are available on the Gulfport campus. 

The concentration in accounting provides students the accounting education 
required for careers as professional accountants in financial institutions, government, 
industry, nonprofit organizations, and public practice. The program also prepares 
students for graduate study in business or accounting. Students desiring to sit for the 
CPA exam in Mississippi and many other states must have completed 150 hours of 
academic credit before applying to sit for the examination, including 24 upper-level 
hours in accounting. The additional hours above the bachelor degree necessary to sit for 
the CPA exam may be acquired through graduate study in business; such as the M.B.A. 
in executive leadership offered by William Carey College, or through graduate study in 
accounting offered by many other colleges and universities. 

The college offers the M.B.A. on both the Hattiesburg and Gulfport campuses. For 
information, a separate catalog on that degree program may be obtained by writing the 
School of Business, William Carey College, 498 Tuscan Avenue, Hattiesburg, MS 39401- 
5499. 

Business Administration Major: The business administration major requires 
the completion of 60-66 hours of business courses. All students majoring in business 
administration must complete 45 hours of professional core requirements and 15-18 
hours of a concentration area in business. 

Required Professional Core: ACC 221, 222, 320 or 332; BUS 209, 216, 310, 311, 313, 314, 
315, 417, 480, 485; ECO 201-202. 

Areas of Concentration: Each student must select one of the following areas of 
concentration in business: 

• Accounting: ACC 321 , 322, 333, 421 , 422, 433, and 471 . Students planning to sit for the 
CPA exam are advised to take BUS 410. 



109 



• Computer Infonnation Systems: BUS 303, 312, 400, 402, 486. 

. Finance: BUS 31 7, 41 5, 41 8, 448; ECO 301 or 307. 

. Management/Marketing: BUS 31 8, 322 or 324, 414, 412 or 415, 425. 

Minors: A minor is required for aU students majoring in business. Since many career- 
oriented studies indicate long-term success is achieved by individuals who are broadly 
educated in the liberal arts, students who major in business are strongly encoiu-aged to 
take a minor in one of the non-business general core areas. Some nunors may result in 
more than 128 hours required for graduation and need to be chosen carefully with assistance 
from the academic advisor. 

Business Administration Minor: For students who are not majoring in business 
administration, a minor in business administration is available. The business 
administration minor requires eighteen hours including the following courses: ACC 221, 
BUS 309, 311, 314, 315, ECO 201. 

Computer Information Systems Minor: A minor in computer information 
systems is available, consisting of the following 18 hours: BUS 202, 303, 312, 400, 402, 
486. 

It is recommended that students completing the B.G.S. degree with an 18-hour 
concentration in business administration should complete the following courses: 
BUS 311, 313, 314, 315, 480, and 485. Students working to complete 36 semester hours in 
business administration are advised to complete the 18 hours above plus any additional 
18 hours in accounting, business, or economics. 



THE CENTER FOR ECONOMIC EDUCATION 

James H. Shivers, M.B.A., Director 

The Center for Economic Education at William Carey College was established in 
1977. The main purposes of the center are to: 1) provide assistance with pre-service 
education for school teachers who will be involved in economic education, 2) provide 
assistance with in-service education for school teachers involved in economic education, 
and 3) participate at the local, state, regional, and national levels in the promotion of 
economic education. 



110 



COURSE DESCRIPTIONS FOR ACCOUNTING (ACC) 

221. Principles of Accounting I: (3 hours) An introduction to financial reporting and 
accounting information systems. Prerequisite: MAT 131 or higher. 

222. Principles of Accounting II: (3 hours) A continuation of ACC 221 with an emphasis 
on corporations and partnerships. Prerequisite: ACC 221. 

320. Managerial Accounting: (3 hours) The use of financial information for internal 
administrative decision making. Prerequisite: ACC 222. ;.. 

321. Intermediate Accounting I: (3 hours) Accounting theory as applied to financial 
statement preparation and accounting practice. Prerequisite: ACC 222. 

322. Intermediate Accounting 11: (3 hours) A continuation of ACC 321. Prerequisite: 
ACC 321. ,, 

332. Cost Accounting: (3 hours) The accountant's role in cost control and responsibility 
accounting. Prerequisite: ACC 222. 

333. Federal Income Tax Accounting: (3 hours) The accountant's role in the preparation of 
federal income tax returns for individuals. Prerequisite: ACC 321 or consent of 
instructor. 

421. Advanced Accounting: (3 hours) A continuation of ACC 322. Prerequisite: ACC 322. 

422. Advanced Accounting II: (3 hours) A study of business mergers and consolidations, 
the techniquies used to report those results, and financial statement analysis. 

433. Governmental and Nonprofit Accounting: (3 hours) A study of the accounting 
standards and procedures used in governmental and nonprofit organizations. 
Prerequisite: ACC 222. 

471. Auditing: (3 hours) A study of the standards and procedures applicable to the attest 
function Prerequisite: ACC 322. 

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS IN BUSINESS (BUS) 

102. Fundamental Computer Concepts and Applications: (3 hours) An overview of the 
concepts and terminology of computing. (Lab fee). 

202. Programming I: (3 hours) An introduction to structured programming business 
applications with an emphasis on syntax, data editing, file structure, and control totals. 
Prerequisite: BUS 102 or equivalent. (Lab Fee) 

209. Legal Environment of Business I: (3 hours) A course in the fundamentals of everyday 
law, such as contracts, negotiable instruments, property, wills, deeds, mortgages, and 
torts. 

216. Business and Economic Statistics: (3 hours) An introduction to the principles of 
statistics and probability, emphasizing their application to problems in business and 
economics. Prerequisite: MAT 131. 



m 



303. Programming II: (3 hours) A continuation of structured programming techniques with 
application toward business problems. Problem analysis, design, and solution are 
emphasized. Prerequisite: BUS 202 or equivalent. (Lab Fee) 

309. Personal Finance: (3 hours) The study of charge accounts, installment buying, taxation, 
borrowing money, savings accounts, life insurance, annuities, social security, owning a 
home, and numerous other personal concerns. 

310. Microcomputer Applications: (3 hours) A study of the use of software tools, integrated 
software, and application packages in business. (Lab fee). Prerequisite: BUS 102 or 
equivalent. 

311. Marketing Management: (3 hours) A study of the management of marketing function 
and marketing policies and practices in the business envirorunent. 

312. Data Communication and Networks: (3 hours) An introduction to data 
communications appropriate to the study of management information systems and 
distributed data processing. Prerequisite: BUS 102 or equivalent. 

313. Business Communication: (3 hours) A brief review of the basic mechanics of 
grammar, punctuation, and letter styles; emphasis on the principles of business 
correspondence and employment communication. Prerequisite: Proficiency in ENG 
101, 102, and keyboarding skills highly recommended for use in completing business I 
vrating assignments. 



4 



314. Principles of Management: (3 hours) Principles and concepts of planning, organizing, 
controlling, and operating a business enterprise with emphasis on these problems in 
production. 

315. Managerial Finance: (3 hours) Application of mathematics to financial problems 
involved in the organization and conduct of a business enterprise. Prerequisite: ACC 
221-222 or consent of instructor. 

317. Investments: (3 hours) Principles of determining investment policy for individuals and 
institutional portfolios. 

318. Human Resources Management: (3 hours) A study of the employing and managing of 
personnel in industry and government. Prerequisite: BUS 314. 

320. General Insurance: (3 hours) A study of the principal types of insurance coverage. 
Emphasis is given to risk, measurement, rate making, and the position of the insurance 
company in our economy. 

322. Sales and Advertising Management: (3 hours) Study of the selection, trairung and 
supervision of salespersons, sales organizations, sales forecasting and managing the 
sales force. Special emphasis on advertising and its effects on sales. Prerequisite: 
BUS 311. 

324. Consumer Behavior and Retailing: (3 hours) Focus on the individual buyer and his 
role in the marketing system; retail operation, the needs and wants of buyers, 
importance of product image, brand package influence, and store image in influencing 
consumer purchases. Prerequisite: BUS 311. 



112 



I 



340. Real Estate Principles: (3 hours) An introduction to real estate development — glossary 
of real estate terms, preparation for real estate license. 

400. System Analysis and Design: (3 hours) Traditional methods of designing and 
implementing business information systems. Prerequisite: BUS 102 or equivalent. 

402. Database Management Systems: (3 hours) Design and implementation of business 
information with state-of-the-art DBMS packages. (Lab fee). Prerequisite: Consent of 
ii\structor. 

410. Legal Environment of Business IL (3 hours) A study of business law with an 
emphasis on government, partnerships, and corporations. 

412. International Marketing: (3 hours) A study of the techniques and practices used to 
market products and services internationally. Prerequisite: BUS 31 1 . 

414. Small Business Management: (3 hours) A study of small business operations. 
Prerequisite: BUS 314. 

415. International Finance: (3 hours) An in-depth exploration of the multi-facets of 
international business, including the cultural and legal environment, and the financing 
requirements unique to exports /imports. Prerequisite: BUS 315. 

417. Production Management: (3 hours) Management of processes converting resources 
into the output of goods and services; resource mix policy designs; and productivity 
and efficiency analysis techniques and concepts. Prerequisite: BUS 314. 

418. Portfolio Analysis: (3 hours) Analysis of data for portfolio investment and decisions; 
risk theory and measurement; timing of securities purchases and sales; and policies for 
portfolio mix decisions. 

425. Marketing Analysis: (3 hours) Analytical concepts and techniques in marketing 
research and decision making; integration of marketing policy and planning into 
overall marketing strategies for business organizations. Prerequisite: BUS 311. 

448. Management of Financial Institutions: (3 hours) A study of the problems and issues 
of managing financial institutions involving bank, savings and loans, and other 
financial organizations. 

480. Practicum: (3-6 hours) This is a writing intensive course intended to assist students in 
the practical application of the theory related to their academic concentration. The 
course involves application of composition, conceptual, and communication skills in 
relation to each student's selected area of business study. Prerequisite: Senior status or 
consent of the dean of the School of Business. 

485. Strategic Management: (3 hours) Corporate strategy and policy formulation 
integrating senior-level management perspectives including ethical and public policy 
factors in the business environment and decision making processes. 

486. Management Information System Policy and Analysis: (3 hours) A strategy and 
p)olicy course designed for senior level students in the computer information systems 
concentration. 



113 



COURSE DESCRIPTIONS FOR ECONOMICS (ECO) 

201. Principles of Economics I — Macroeconomics: (3 hours) A view of the economy as a 
whole with emphasis on national income accounting, employment theory, fiscal and 
monetary policy, and international trade. 

202. Principles of Economics II — Microeconomics: (3 hours) A one semester course 
emphasizing microeconomics. An exploration of the mechanics of demand and supply, 
and the pridng of products and resources by individual firms. 

301. Intermediate Macroeconomics: (3 hours) A course in aggregate economic analysis 
plarmed to provide a detailed, comprehensive study of modem macroeconomic theory. 
Prerequisite: ECO 201 and ECO 202. 

307. Money and Banking: (3 hours) A study of monetary and banking principles and 
practices, business cycles and banking systems problems of social policy, and 
international banking since World War II. Prerequisite: ECO 201 or consent of 
instructor. 









114 



SCHOOL OF EDUCATION AND 
PSYCHOLOGY 

Bonnie H. Holder, Ph.D. (Interim Dean) 

DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION , 

Professors Diket, Hasselman, Hetrick, Richmond; Associate Professors 
Abrams, Holder, Hornsby, Metts; Assistant Professors Sonnier-York, 
Stanford, Waldrip; Lecturers Butler, Steverson, Ward 

The purpose of the department of education is to provide professional training and study that 
will prepare the education student to pursue a career in the field of education. This training is 
characterized by course content, field assignments, practica, and clinical experiences. 

The department of education is responsible for the development of undergraduate and 
graduate curricula in (1) elementary education, (2) secondary education, and (3) other add-on 
certification areas and for supervision and preparation of teachers with majors in those areas. 

TEACHER EDUCATION COMMITTEE 

Teacher education is considered to be an institution-wide function at William Carey 
College. The teacher education committee broadly represents the departments interested 
in the preparation of teachers for elementary and secondary schools. 

The teacher education committee formulates policies for teacher education consistent 
with state law and subject to the approval of the college administration. These policies 
deal with philosophy and objectives, organization and administration, curricula and 
student personnel services. Curriculum changes must be approved by the academic 
council and /or the graduate committee. 

SELECTIVE ADMISSION AND RETENTION 
IN TEACHER EDUCATION 

POLICIES AND PROCEDURES 

I. Admission procedures: 

A. Students need to make application for admission to the professional program in 
teacher education prior to taking courses in education. 

1. Students should make application for admission by the end of their 
sophomore year in college. Transfer students should make application prior 
to registering for their first trimester of courses at Carey. 

2. All students must be formally admitted before they will be permitted to take 
more than six hours (secondary majors) or nine hours (elementary majors) of 
300 level education courses. A student who has not been admitted will not be 
permitted to take 400 level education courses. 



115 



B. All applications for admission will be processed by the department of education 
faculty. A file will be maintained on each student. 

C. Students who make proper application will be admitted to teacher education 
when they meet these requirements: 

1. Achieve and maintain an overall grade-point average of 2.5 or better on 44 
semester hours of the teacher education liberal arts core. 

2. Achieve the required score on PRAXIS I (Pre-Professional Skills Test) which 
includes all subtests (Reading, Writing, Mathematics). A student may also 
meet these tests' requirements with a score of 21 of better on the ACT with 
no score below an 18 on any subtest. 

3. Achieve a grade of C or better in English 101 and 102. (Students who have 
earned a D in English 101 and 102 may be conditionally admitted to the 
professional program in teacher education. However, they must remove the 
condition by rescheduling English 101 and/or 102 and earning a grade of C 
or better the following regular trimester or summer session they enroll at 
William Carey College.) 

II. Retention procedures: 

The education department faculty will review the status of students formally 
admitted to the professional program in teacher education and will take proper action in 
the following instances: 

A. when advisors or other faculty members request to review the continued 
eligibility of a student. 

B. when the grades of a student warrant such a review (consistent faiUng grades, a 
failure to make normal progress ). 

C. when the student makes application for student teaching 

D. when the supervising teacher, the school principal, or the director of student 
teaching indicates unsatisfactory progress in student teaching. 



TEACHER EDUCATION LIBERAL ARTS CORE 

Students seeking teacher certification must fulfill 44 hours of particular liberal arts 
core courses for admission to teacher education. For students earning a Bachelor of 
Science degree, the following 44 hours of courses are required for admission to teacher 
certification: ENG 101-102, six hours of English literature, MAT 131 or higher, PSY 201, 
COM 101, HIS 101-102 or 201-202, three hours of fine arts, four hours of laboratory 
biology, eleven hours of science including two lab sciences, and three hours of a social 
studies elective. 

ADDITIONAL REQUIREMENTS 

Additional noneducation courses required for teacher certification are: REL 101-102, 
BUS 102 or a higher computer course, PSY 202 or 305 (elementary education majors) or 
PSY 203 or 305 (secondary education certification), PSY 204 and two hours of physical 
education activity courses or HEA 300. Elementary education majors are required to 
complete an interdisciplinary concentration, including the following courses: MAT 116, 



)l 



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316, a social science elective, ART 319, MUE 320, PED 338, BUS 102, EDU 308, 311, and 
372. 

REQUIRED PROFESSIONAL COURSES 

For teacher licensure, required professional education courses are: EDU 300, 300.1, 
372, 436, 450, and twelve hours of 483, 484, or 496. 

NOTE: All students are required to complete student teaching including teacher 
assistants. 



STUDENT TEACHING REQUIREMENTS 

A student may take directed teaching (EDU 483, EDU 484, EDU 496) in one of the 
cooperating school districts during his/her senior year provided the following 
requirements have been met: 

1 . Be a senior (completed at least 90 semester hours). „ , , 

2. Have been admitted to teacher education for one trimester. 

3. Pass the required English Proficiency Examination. 

4. Have earned an overall grade point average of 2.5 or better. 

5. Have earned grades of C or better in all professional education courses. 

6. Have earned a grade of C or better in all courses in major teaching field. 

7. Make an application for spring student teaching by September 15 or make an 
application for fall student teaching by March 1 preceding. 

8. Have approval of the chair of the education department and/or director of student 
teaching. 

9. In addition to admission to teacher education requirements, the student must also 
achieve the required scores on PRAXIS II (Principles of Learning and Teaching and 
Specialty Area). The student must have the scores on all of these tests reported to the 
Mississippi Department of Education. 

10 Have a statement from the student's advisor certifying the student's competency in 
the subject area in which the student is seeking certification. 

11. Must have completed all specialty and professional courses with a minimum grade 
of C or better in each course. Special permission from the chairman, department of 
education must be secured to take courses after student teaching. 

Student teachers are required to spend 60 full calendar school days in the assigned 
classroom. The student is required to complete the seminars on the MTAI or INTASC 
prior to or during the student teaching experience. 

SPECIALIZATION REQUIREMENTS 



117 



Elementary Education Major. Students majoring in elementary education earn a 
Bachelor of Science (B.S.) degree. Elementary education majors are required to complete ( 
courses for a K-4 licensure and are recommended to complete courses sufficient to obtain i 
a 4-8 endorsement. 

All elementary education majors are required to complete the teacher education i 
liberal arts core (44 hours); additional college requirements (11 hours); an 
interdisciplinary concentration (30 hours), professional education courses (12 hours); 
specialty clinical courses (33 hours); and for 4-8 endorsements, concentrations as 
required (9-12 hours). 

Students are encouraged to complete requirements to be eligible for the 4-8 
endorsement. Although this requires an additional two concentrations, these 
concentrations may be earned with six to nine hours beyond the minimum graduation 
requirements. 



1. A concentration in reading is recommended strongly and is attained by taking EDU 
308, 311, 344, 407, 441, and 474. This concentration also will give the student the 
requirements for an endorsement in remedial reading. 

2. A second concentration must be from an academic area such as English, 
mathematics, science, or social studies. Coursework is to be selected in consultation 
with the advisor. The student may elect to have a second academic concentration in 
lieu of the reading concentration. 

Special Education (Mild/Moderately Handicapped) Add-on Endorsements 

An elementary education or secondary education major can add certification in 
special education (mild/moderately handicapped) by completing the following 
additional courses: EDU 461, EDU 462, EDU 463, EDU 464, and EDU 460. 

Secondary Education Requirements For Teaching High School Subjects 

Students who plan to teach at the high school level should major in a secondary subject 
matter field. Secondary teaching certification requirements include the college core (outlined 
elsewhere in this catalog for the B.A., B.S., or B.M. degree), additional teacher education core 
courses, the specialty area courses (outlined under the respective department sections of this 
catalog), and all professional education courses including EDU 300, EDU 300.1, EDU 436, 
EDU 450, EDU 372, EDU 446, EDU 484, PSY 203 and PSY 204. Students completing these 
courses also receive a minor in secondary education. 

Secondary teaching licensure is offered in biology/general science, English, 
mathematics, social studies, and speech communication and drama. 

Special Subject Areas 

Students who want to teach in the areas of art, music, and physical education are 
licensed to teach grades K-12. 

Those students pursuing degree programs that meet K-12 licensure requirements 
must complete the college core (outlined elsewhere in this catalog for the B.A., B.S., 
B.F.A., and B.M. degrees), additional teacher education core courses, the specialty area 
courses listed within the respective departments, and professional courses including 
EDU 300, EDU 300.1, EDU 372, EDU 436, EDU 496, PSY 202, 203, or 305, and PSY 204. 

118 






Music students may substitute EDU 436 for PSY 204. 

LICENSURE PROCEDURE 

Students are responsible for making the proper application to the Mississippi 
Department of Education, for requesting their licensure. Forms are available in the 
registrar's office or the department of education office. The student must also fill out a 
release-of-records form. 

Completion of the teacher education program does not guarantee licensure. The 
student must meet all requirements specified by the Mississippi Department of 
Education and current law. 

NOTE: All education programs and requirements are subject to change due to requirements 
set forth by the Mississippi Department of Education and state law. The current 
requirements for licensure — if different from this catalog — will supersede the catalog 
descriptions. 

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS FOR EDUCATION (EDU) 

300. Introduction and Foundations of Education: (3 hours) An overview of the teaching 
profession with emphasis on functions of the school, school policies, school law, 
and the effects of court decisions on educational practice. 

300.1. Pre-teaching Field Experience: (0-1 hour) A 21-hour field experience in a local 
school taken concurrently with EDU300. Transfer students must take this course for 
one-hour credit if field experiences were not required. (Pass/Fail grade) 

308. The Reading Process: (3 hours) A study of the interactive reading process with an 
emphasis on phonology, morphology, syntax, semantics, and schematics. The 
concepts of ermergent literacy and reading and writing as communications are 
presented along with their theoretical backgrounds and research bases. 

311. Practicum in Teaching Reading in the Elementary School: (3 hours) A study of the 
methods and materials of elementary reading with supervised practicum 
experiences in teaching reading in an elementary classroom. Prerequisite: EDU 308. 

338. Child Development: (3 hours) A survey of the physical, social, emotional, and 
cognitive development of young children. Required to add kindergarten 
endorsement to existing elementary certificate. 

344. Literature for Children: (3 hours) A study of the classic and current literature for 
children in print and non-print media. The integration of literature into the 
elementary school curriculum is emphasized. 

345. Social Studies in the Elementary School: (3 hours) The scope and sequence of the 
elementary social studies curriculum is examined. An emphasis is placed on the 
development of concepts and generalizations appropriate for the elementary child. A 
field exfjerience in an elementary school is a component of this course. Prerequisites: 
social science core. 

346. Science in the Elementary School: (3 hours) An integrated approach to teaching 



119 



science through discovery and hands-on experiences. A field experience in an 
elementary school is a component of this course. Prerequisites: Science core. 

372. Survey of the Exceptional Child: (3 hours) A study of individuals with 
exceptionalities from the gifted to the profoundly disabled. Includes a multicultural 
component which explores the diverse ethnic, cultural, and linguistic backgrounds 
of students and techniques for providing an effective relevant education. 

407. Communication in the Elementary School: (3 hours) Emphasis is placed on 
helping the elementary teacher develop skill in teaching oral and written 
communication skills. The use of an integrated approach with an emphasis on 
children's literature is stressed. Prerequisites: EDU 308, EDU 345, EDU 346. 

409. Principles of Early Childhood: (3 hours) An in-depth study of the theory, 
organization, curriculum, and development of early childhood programs. Required 
of students who wish to add kindergarten certification to an existing elementary 
license. 

413. Mathematics in the Elementary School: (3 hours) Methodology based on current 
research and practice is explored using an NCTM Standards-based program with 
an emphasis on mathematical understandings, using manipulatives, and acquiring 
problem-solving skills. A field experience in an elementary school is a component 
of this course. Prerequisites: MAT 116, 131, 316 and admission to teacher 
education. 

436. Classroom Management: (3 hours) This course provides information to help 
students develop pro-active strategies to manage the classroom environment and 
student behavior. Emphasis is placed on students' development of a personal and 
unique classroom management plan. Prerequisite: Admission to Teacher Education. 

440. Kindergarten Education and Practicum: (3 hours) A study of appropriate educational 
practices and programs in kindergarten with an emphasis on Mississippi guidelines. 
The class includes seminars and teaching experiences in a local kindergarten class. 
Prerequisites: EDU 308, 407, 413 and admission to teacher education. 

441. Diagnosis and Correction of Reading Disability: (3 hours) A study of the 
diagnosis and remediation of reading disabilities. Students diagnose and evaluate 
the skills of an individual child in a clinical setting and develop and carry out a 
plan of remediation based on the diagnosis. Prerequisites: EDU 308, EDU 311, and 
admission to teacher education. 

446. Teaching in the Secondary School: (3 hours) The study of methods and problems 
related to teaching in the student's major field. Prerequisite: Admission to teacher 
education. 

449. Independent Study in Education: (1-6 hours) This course will be designed to 
supplement the credit hours needed to fulfill requirements for teacher licensure. 
Permission of the instructor, the chair of the education department, and the vice 
president of academic affairs are required to take this course. 

450. Tests, Measurements, and Evaluation: (3 hours) The study of the measurement 
and evaluation of student learning with both criterion and norm-referenced 
procedures. Prerequisite: Admission to teacher education. 

460. Organizational Procedures for Special Education: (3 hours) This course addresses 



120 



organizational procedures of special education as required by the Mississippi State 
Department of Education. In addition, legislative and court decisions associated 
with special education are covered. Prerequisite: EDU 372. 

461. Mental Retardation: (3 hours) This course is an overview of mental retardation 
including definitional perspectives, etiology and syndromes, theoretical research 
bases, and social, emotional, physical, and intellectual characteristics. 

462. Teaching the Individuals with Mild Retardation: (3 hours) This course addresses 
basic assessment procedures, selection and utilization of instructional methods, 
materials, and individualized programming for individuals with mild mental 
retardation. Prerequisites: EDU 372 and EDU 461 . 

463. Learning Disabilities: (3 hours) This course is an overview of the field of learning 
disabilities including historical development, theoretical research bases, and social, 
emotional, physical and learning characteristics. Prerequisite: EDU 372. 

464. Teaching the Individuals with Learning Disabilities: (3 hours) This course 
addresses basic assessment procedures, selection and utilization of instructional 
methods, materials, and individual programming for individuals with specific 
learning disabilities. Prerequisites: EDU 372 and EDU 463. 

474. Reading in the Middle and Secondary School: (3 hours) The development of 
reading skills in the content areas is explored. Emphasis is on helping the middle 
and secondary school student read more effectively. 

483. Directed Teaching in the Elementary School: (12 hours) The student is assigned to 
an approved supervising teacher in a local school for 60 school days. Attendance at 
scheduled seminars on the MTAI or INTASC is required. 

484. Directed Teaching in the Secondary School: (12 hours) The student is assigned to 
an approved supervising teacher in a local school for 60 school days. Attendance at 
scheduled seminars on the MTAI or INTASC is required. 

496. Directed Teaching in Special Subject Areas (Art, Health and Physical Education, 
and Music): (12 hours) The student is assigned to an approved supervising 
teacher in a local school for 60 school days. Attendance at scheduled seminars on 
the MTAI or INTASC is required. 



121 



SCHOOL OF EDUCATION AND 
PSYCHOLOGY 

DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH, PHYSICAL EDUCATION, 
RECREATION, AND COACHING 

Benjamin Waddle, Ed.D. (Chair) 

Professor Waddle; Assistant Professors Halford, Knight; Instructors 
Byrd, English 

The purpose of the department is to provide opportunity for the individual to learn activities 
which are invigorating and enjoyable and will lead to positive physical, emotional, mental, and 
spiritual growth. Emphasis is placed on physical growth by stressing the importance of 
developing and maintaining a strong, sound body. The emotional, mental and spiritual growth of 
the student is enhanced through development of sport skills which will enable the student to 
participate in worthwhile recreational activities. Through these activities, students will be able to 
make emotional and mental adaptations. 

It is also the aim of the department to give physical education majors, minors, and coaches a 
clear understanding of procedures, methods, techniques, and materials for effective, competent 
teaching and coaching. 

REQUIREMENTS 

Physical Education Major: Thirty-six semester hours from any theory courses in 
health or physical education. The student may elect either the Bachelor of Arts (B.A.) or 
the Bachelor of Science (B.S.) degree. 

The college provides intercollegiate competition in basketball, soccer, and golf for 
both men and women, baseball for men, and softball for women. A varsity athlete may 
receive a maximum of four semester hours' credit for intercollegiate competition in each 
of these sports with no more than eight hours total. 

Physical Education Minor: Eighteen semester hours, including FED 337 and FED 

339. Twelve semester hours may be elected from any other theory courses. 

Teacher Licensure: Thirty-six semester hours, including: HEA 230, HEA 323, FED 
231, FED 324, FED 325, FED 331, FED 333, FED 336, FED 432, FED 433, FED 436, and 
FED 437. FED 337 and FED 339 must be taken as methods courses. Additional licensure 
requirements are listed under special subject areas in the education department. 

Coaching Minor: Twenty-one semester hours, including FED 222, 329, 432, and six 
hours from the following FED 331, 333, 334, or 335. Six additional hours may be elected 
from any FED theory course. 

Recreation Minor: Eighteen semester hours of recreation courses. 



122 



COURSE DESCRIPTIONS FOR PHYSICAL EDUCATION (PED) 

222. Organization of Practice and Scouting of Team Sports: (3 hours) Principles for 
organizing and administering a practice session. Scouting techniques for football, 
basketball, and baseball. 

231. History and Introduction to Physical Education: (3 hours) Physical education in 
America from the Colonial days to the present. 

324. Anatomy-Physiology: (3 hours) A study of the physical structure of the body and 
how each system relates in its function. 

325. Motor Development and Creative Rhythms for Elementary School: (3 hours) The 
development and refinement of skillful performance in gymnastics, rhythms, and 
games. 

326. Motor Learning: (3 hours) Practical application and analysis of motor learning. 

329. Philosophy and Psychology of Coaching: (3 hours) A study of how sports became 
a part of the school and society; an analysis of the purpose, values, nature, and 
scope of coaching. 

331. The Theory and Practice of Coaching Basketball: (3 hours) 

333. The Theory and Practice of Coaching Baseball: (3 hours) ,. , ^ .... 

334. The Theory and Practice of Coaching Soccer: (3 hours) 

336. Kinesiology: (3 hours) The scientific principles of movement, muscles and 
muscular actions, and mechanical principles, such as levers, laws of motion, 
stability, and momentum. 

337. Methods of Teaching Health and Physical Education in Elementary Schools: 

(3 hours) A study of principles of learning, principles of teaching, class 
organization, teaching techniques, and materials of elementary school. 

338. Health and Physical Education in Elementary Schools: (3 hours) A study of how 
physical education, physical fitness, health and wellness, and movement can be 
effectively used in the elementary grades. 

339. Methods of Teaching Health and Physical Education in Secondary Schools: 

(3 hours) A study of principles of learning, principles of teaching, class 
organization, teaching techniques, and materials of secondary school. 

432. The Care and Prevention of Sports Injuries: (3 hours) Basic fundamentals and 
techniques in the prevention, diagnosis, treatment, and care of injuries. 

433. Organization and Administration of Physical Education: (3 hours) General 
principles of administration and their effects upon the organization of a physical 
education program. 

.1-^ •! »<> 



123 



436. Tests and Measurements in Physical Education: (3 hours) Techniques of 
constructing, administering, and analyzing written and skill test in health and 
physical education. 

437. Physical Education for the Exceptional Child: (3 hours) The nature of certain 
physical and mental handicaps and methods for working with handicapped 
students in a physical education program. 



COURSE DESCRIPTIONS FOR HEALTH EDUCATION (HEA) 

230. First Aid: (3 hours) Methods of caring for injuries and applying first aid to the 
injured, together with methods of preventing injuries and accidents. 

240. Nutrition and Diet Therapy: (3 hours) Role of nutrition in high level wellness. 
Therapeutic diets prescribed for common medical problems. 

300. Health and Exercise for a New Lifestyle: (3 hours) This course is designed to 
teach the student how to be totally healthy, including information on healthy diets 
and types of exercise that are best for achieving and maintaining optimal strength. 

321. Methods of Safety: (3 hours) Methods of preventing automotive, pedestrian, and 
school accidents. 

323. Consumer Health: (3 hours) A study of the effects tobacco, alcohol and other drugs 
have on the body; drug abuse in today's society; the eating habits of today's young • 
people; and family relationships. 

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS FOR RECREATION (REC) 

301. Outdoor Recreation: (3 hours) This course is designed to give students an overview i 
of outdoor recreation. Emphasis will be given in camping, canoeing, fishing, and i 
hiking. 

302. Intramural: (3 hours) This course is designed to give students the knowledge of 
how to organize an intramural program in a recreational setting. 

303. Recreation for Children: (3 hours) This course is designed to give students the 
knowledge of recreational games for children and young adults. 

304. Recreation for Adults: (3 hours) This course is designed to give the students the 
knowledge of recreational games for adults and how to administer a program for 
senior citizens. 

305. Practicum in Recreation: (3 hours) Practical field experience under the supervision 
of a specialist. 

306. Leisure Services: (3 hours) This course is designed to inform the student of 
available services in public and private recreation. 

307. Recreation for Persons with Handicapping Conditions: (3 hours) This course is 
designed to give the student a knowledge of the organization and administration of 
a recreation program for persons with a handicap. 



124 



ACTIVITY COURSES (FED) 

Excuses: No student will be excused from pnrticipation in the activity courses except the 
physically handicapped. Students who are unable to participate in an activity course may be 
permitted to take courses in theory subjects of health education to make up for the deficiency 
in hours incurred by physical disability. It is suggested that courses such as First Aid and 
Personal Health be substituted for the required activity courses. 

100. Orientation to Activity: (1 hour) Three hours a week. 

111. Aerobics: (1 hour) Three hours per week. 

112. Human Wellness: (1 hour) Three hours a week. 
114. Golf: (1 hour) Three hours a week. 

117. Badminton: (1 hour) Three hours a week. 

118. Tennis: (1 hour) Three hours a week. 

119. Bowling: (1 hour) Three hours a week. 

121. Beginning Swimming: (1 hour) , 

160. General Movement and Dance for Theatre: (1 hour) 

162. Dance for Theatre: Jazz: (1 hour) 

163. Dance for Theatre: Tap: (1 hour) 

164. Dance for Theatre: Modem: (1 hour) 

165. Dance for Theatre: Ballet: (1 hour) 

ACTIVITY CREDIT (PEG) 

Note: A maximum of eight semester hours of the following courses may count toward a 
degree . 

101, 102, 103, 104. Intercollegiate Basketball: (1 hour) 

106, 107, 108, 109. Intercollegiate Baseball: (1 hour) 

121, 122, 123, 124. Cheerleading: (1 hour) 

141, 142, 143, 144. Intercollegiate Soccer: (1 hour) 

151, 152, 153, 154. Intercollegiate Softball: (1 hour) 



125 



SCHOOL OF EDUCATION AND 
PSYCHOLOGY 

DEPARTMENT OF PSYCHOLOGY 

William T. Rivero, Ph.D. (Chair) 

Professors Gotten, King, Rivero; Associate Professor C. Jones; Lectxirers 
Burkett, Cunimings, Hanson, Ramsey 

The purposes of the department of psychology are: 

1. To offer an undergraduate major in psychology that will serve as a concentration for the 
liberal arts student. 

2. To prepare students for graduate study leading to an advanced degree for the professional 
psychologist. 

3. To enable students to gain a better understanding of themselves and others and to learn to 
cope effectively with their environments. 

4. To provide services for other departments and schools within the college to supplement their 
curricula and to enable their students to fulfill the requirements for certification in their 
respective fields such as education, medicine, music, nursing, and religion. 

Students majoring in psychology may choose a degree program suitable to their 
plans for the future, and they may work toward the Bachelor of Arts (B.A.) or the 
Bachelor of Science (B.S.) degree. 

Laboratory fees are $26.00 per term for PSY 351 and PSY 441. 

REQUIREMENTS 

Psychology Major: Thirty-five hours, including PSY 201, 204, 327, 351, 410, 430, 
441, 480, 497 and six additional hours in PSY. 

Psychology Minor: Twenty-one hours, including PSY 201, 204, 351, 410, and eight 
additional hours in PSY. 

Gerontology Minor: Eighteen hours: GER 370, 371, 372, 373, 374, and 497. 

The fastest growing segment of the population in the United States is individuals 60 
years of age and above. To ensure personnel are prepared to assist in meeting the needs 
of this population, William Carey College is providing training in the field of 
gerontology. Coursework provides the student with not only textbook oriented courses 
but also practical experience through practice served. Such training may lead to a 
certificate and an academic minor in the field of gerontology, depending upon the 
desires of the student. 

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS FOR PSYCHOLOGY (PSY) 

201. General Psychology: (3 hours) The fundamentals of psychology. Emphasis on 
learning, motivation, emotion, perception, psychological measurement, personality 

126 



behavior disorders and physiological bases of behavior. This course is a 
prerequisite for all other courses in psychology. 

202. Child Psychology: (3 hours) Significant aspects of child growth and development 
from the standpoint of psychology and related disciplines. Emphasis on principles 
of growth, stages of physical growth, motor development, and behavior pertaining 
to social, intellectual, and personality development. 

203. Adolescent Psychology: (3 hours) Significant aspects of adolescent behavior and 
development. Emphasis on physical, mental, social, emotional, and moral 
development of adolescents. 

204. Educational Psychology: (3 hours) The study of the process of learning and the 
behavior of children in school. Emphasis on teacher personality; the relationships of 
growth, learning and teaching; the nature of the learner; intelligence and individual 
differences; and the improvement of the teaching-learning situation. 

305. Developmental Psychology: (3 hours) A life-span approach to the study of human 
development emphasizing the physical, social, and cultural influences on the 
cognitive and psychological processes of the individual. 

306. Dynamics of Personality: (3 hours) A study of personality theories and human 
behavior for effective living. 

318. Social Psychology: (3 hours) The role of psychology in the investigation and 
evaluation of interpersonal relationships. 

327. Counseling Psychology: (3 hours) This course is designed to provide students with an 
orientation to counseling psychology. Emphasis on counseling theories and practices. 
Prerequisites: 12 hours of psychology or consent of ii\structor. 

351. Introduction to Psychological Statistics: (4 hours) (Lab Course) A foundation for 
more advanced courses in statistics. Computation of measures of central tendency, 
variability, and correlation. Tests of significance and introduction to analysis of 
variance. No mathematical ability is assumed beyond the basic gkills of arithmetic 
and algebraic manipulations. 

360. Principles and Theories of Learning: (3 hours) An empirical and theoretical 
analysis of learning theory, memory, and cognitive processes. 

370. Introduction to Gerontology: (3 hours) Same as GER 370. 

371. Social Aspects of Aging: (3 hours) Same as GER 371. Prerequisites: PSY 201, 
PSY/GER 370. 

372. Psychological Aspects of Aging: (3 hours) Same as GER 372. Prerequisites: PSY 201, 
PSY/GER 370. 

373. Biology/Physiology/Health Aspects of Aging: (3 hours) Same as GER 373. 

374. Introduction to Case Management: (3 hours) Same as GER 374. 

375. Use and Interpretation of Tests: (3 hours) Theory of individual and group tests of 
intelligence, personality, interests, and attitudes. 



127 



410. Abnormal Psychology: (3 hours) The dynamics of normal and abnormal behavior, 
major psychiatric disorders, and a survey of modem therapy. 

430. History and Systems of Psychology: (3 hours) A historical survey of psychology 
with special reference to schools of psychology. 

441. Experimental Psychology: (4 hours) (Lab Course) Introduction to psychological 
experimental techniques. Prerequisites: PSY 201 and 351. 

480. Practicum in Psychology: (1-6 hours) Directed work in the psychology laboratory 
or other suitable supervised practical work experience. 

497. Internship in Psychology: (1-6 hours) Actual work experience which is supervised by 
the employer and the academic advisor. Prerequisites: PSY 327 and 480. 

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS FOR GERONTOLOGY (GER) 

370. Introduction to Gerontology: (3 hours) This course provides an introduction to the 
area of gerontology helping the student to see this age as another stage of 
development of the person. Emphasis is on an interdisciplinary approach to the 
assessment and provision of services. An introduction is given to the health, 
psychology, and sociology aspects of this stage. Same as PSY 370. Prerequisite for 
all other GER courses. 

371. Social Aspects of Aging: (3 hours) The purpose of this course is to expand upon 
the sociological aspects of aging discussed in the Introduction to Gerontology 
course. The role of the social worker as well as sociological factors surrounding the 
person who is aging will be emphasized. Same as PSY 371. 

372. Psychological Aspects of Aging: (3 hours) The purpose of this course is to expand 
upon the psychological aspects of aging discussed in the Introduction to Gerontology 
course. The role of the psychologist as well as the psychological factors surrounding the 
person who is aging will be emphasized. The importance of planning for this stage of 
life in order to remain psychologically healthy will be discussed. Same as PSY 372. 
Prerequisites: PSY 201, PSY/GER 370. 

373. Physiology/Health Aspects of Aging: (3 hours) The purpose of this course is to 
expand upon the health aspects of aging discussed in the Introduction to 
Gerontology course. The role of the health professionals as well as ways in which 
to remain healthy will be emphasized. Material will relate both to healthy as weU 
as pathological aging. Same as PSY 373. Prerequisites: PSY 201, PSY/GER 370. 

374. Introduction to Case Management: (3 hours) The course will begin with a 
discussion of case management from a generic standpoint. The student will be able 
to use case management as an approach to service delivery which ensures that 
aging persons with complex, multiple needs receive the needed services in a timely 
and appropriate manner. Emphasis will be placed on networking and linkage 
using varied roles and techniques. Same as PSY 374. 

480. Practicum in Gerontology: (1-6 hours) Directed experience with elderly persons. 

497. Internship in Gerontology: (1-6 hours) This course provides the student with 
practice in applying material obtained in other courses to persons who are elderly. 
Experience is provided both with well elderly persons as well as persons experiencing 
physical, psychiatric, or cognitive difficulties. 



128 



OWEN AND ELIZABETH COOPER SCHOOL 
OF MISSIONS AND BIBLICAL STUDIES 

Daniel P. Caldwell, Ph.D. (Dean) 

Professors Browning, Crockett, Kennedy, Laird; Associate Professor 
Caldwell; Instructor T. Glaze; Lecturer Baker 

The Cooper School of Missions and Biblical Studies seeks (1) to inform and enrich every 
student's understanding of the Judeo-Christian historical, literary, and theological heritage, (2) to 
instruct undergraduate religion majors from a liberal arts perspective as to prepare them for graduate 
level study, and {3} to prepare students for missions service or ministerial leadership roles. 

REQUIREMENTS 

Religion Major: Students who take a major in religion must earn the Bachelor of 
Arts (B.A.) degree. The reUgion major includes 30 hours of coursework in addition to the 
core curriculum courses. The following courses are required: REL 203, 204, 240, 303, 304, 
320 or 420. Twelve additional hours must be taken from 400 level courses. 

Students who major in religion are required to take a minor. A minor in any area within 
the arts, humanities, or sciences is recommended (i.e. philosophy, history, English, 
communication, theatre, Spanish, mathematics, biology, chemistry). 

To fulfill language requirements, the student may elect any one of the following 
options: 1) 12 hours of Greek, 2) 12 hours of Hebrew, 3) six hours of Greek and six hours 
of Hebrew, or 4) 12 hours in a modern language (i.e. Spanish). Also, in fulfilling core 
requirements, students must take PHI 201, one psychology course, one course from 
sociology, political science, or economics, and six hours of Uterature with an ENG prefix 
(i.e. ENG 211-212). 

Religion Minor: The religion minor includes 15 hours of coursework in addition to 
REL 101-102. The required courses for the religion minor are: REL 204, 240, 320 or 420, 
and six hours of upper-level religion courses. 

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS FOR RELIGION (REL) 

101. Introduction to the Old Testament: (3 hours) An introduction to the history, 
literature, and theology of the Old Testament. 

102. Introduction to the New Testament: (3 hours) An introduction to the history, 
literature, and theology of the New Testament. 

203. The Baptist Heritage: (3 hours) The history, function, structure, doctrine, and 
interrelationships of Southern Baptist denominational work. (This course is 
required of all students who receive ministerial aid from the Mississippi Baptist 
Convention Board of Ministerial Education.) 

204. Principles of Interpretation: (3 hours) A study of the formation of the Bible, the 
history of biblical interpretation, and modem methods of biblical interpretation. 



129 



240. Introduction to Christian Missions: (3 hours) A study of the biblical, theological, 
and practical foundations of Christian missions. 

303. The Ancient Near East: (3 hours) A study of the history, cultures, and reUgions of 
the ancient Near East from ca. 3000 B.C. to 333 B.C.E. Prerequisite REL 101. 

304. The Greco-Roman World: (3 hours) A study of the history, cultures, and religions 
in the Mediterranean basin from 333 B.C.E. to 476 C.E. Prerequisite REL 102. 

320. Christian Theology: (3 hours) A study of Christian theology from the standpoint of 
the New Testament, historical Christianity, and modem day systematic theological 
expression. 

340. History of Christian Missions: (3 hours) A study of the worldwide expansion of 
Christianity. Special emphasis will be given to the life and contribution of William 
Carey. 

401. Old Testament: (3 hours) An intensive historical and literary analysis of a selected 
portion of the Old Testament (may be repeated as a different topic. Prerequisite: 
REL 101. 

402. New Testament: (3 hours) An intensive historical and literary analysis of a selected 
portion of the New Testament (may be repeated as a different topic. Prerequisite: 
REL 102. 

403. Christian Ethics: (3 hours) A study of the major theoretical paradigms of ethics 
from the ancient Greeks through the contemporary theorists, including Christian 
ethicists; attention is given to the application of ethical theory to contemporary 
ethical issues. Same as PHI 403. 

404. Philosophy of Religion: (3 hours) A study of the philosophical issues related to 
the logic of, challenges to, and problems for Christian theism. Same as PHI 401. 

411. History of Christianity (3 hours) A study of Christianity's historical foundations, 
expansion, historical theology, and cultural influences. 

413. Renaissance and Reformation: (3 hours) A study of the Renaissance and the 
Protestant Reformation with primary attention given to the interrelationship of 
these movements. 

420. History of Christian Thought: (3 hours) A study of the philosophical and cultural 
influences on the development of Christian theology and ideology. Same as 
PHI 450. 

430. History of the Bible: (3 hours) A study of the languages, texts, canons, and 
translations of the biblical literature; specific attention is given to the history of the 
English Bible. 

440. Biblical Archaeology: (3 hours) A study of the contribution of archaeological 
research to biblical studies and the proper relation of the two fields with attention 
to specific issues. 

443. Travel in Biblical Lands: (1-3 hours) An intensive travel program in lands of the 
Bible, with specific attention given to archaeological and historical sites, especially 
those of importance for biblical studies. 

130 



444. Archaeological Field Work: (1-3 hours) Participation in an archaeological 
excavation in a biblical land with emphasis on field methodology and application 
of the results of biblical studies. 

450. The Dead Sea Scrolls: (3 hours) A study of the background, discovery, 
translation, contents, and impact of the Dead Sea Scrolls on the world of Judaism, 
100 B.C.E. to 100 C.E., from which classical Judaism and Christianity developed. 

480. Service Practicum: (1-3 hours) A supervised learning experience in mission work 
overseas or in the United States. 

481. Christian Preaching: (3 hours) A study of the history, content, theory, and practice 
of Christian preaching. 

482. Christian Ministries (3 hours) A study of the various responsibilities of ministers 
within the total church program with special emphasis given to pastoral care and 
administration. 



COURSE DESCRIPTIONS FOR GREEK (GRK) 

201-202. Introductory Greek I-II: (3 hours each) An introductory study of Koine 
vocabulary, morphology, and grammar. 1 John will be translated along with other 
selected passages from the New Testament. 

301-302. Intermediate Greek I-II: (3 hours each) A review of morphology and further 
study of Koine vocabulary and syntax through extensive translation from various 
hellenistic documents, including the New Testament. (Prerequisite: GRK 201-202) 



COURSE DESCRIPTIONS FOR HEBREW (HEB) 

201-202. Introductory Hebrew I-II: (3 hours Each) A study of introductory vocabulary, 
morphology, and grammar. Selected passages in the Hebrew Bible will be 
translated and analyzed. 

301-302. Intermediate Hebrew I-II: (3 hours Each) A review of morphology and a study 
of the syntax of the Hebrew Bible. (Prerequisite: HEB 201-202) 



131 



DONALD AND FRANCES WINTERS 
SCHOOL OF MUSIC 

J. Milfred Valentine, Ph.D. (Dean) 

Professors Gotten, Keever, Valentine, Winters, Young; Associate 
Professors D'Arpa, Loncar, Roberts; Instructor Vail 

Music study at the Winters School of Music is designed to realize the purpose and specific 
objectives of the college. Students are challenged to discover and develop their own musical 
capacities and interests, so they may fully realize their own self-expression, may enjoy music as 
recreation, or may utilize music as a profession. 

William Carey College is an accredited institutional member of the National 
Association of Schools of Music. 

Graduates with the Bachelor of Music education degree will have fulfilled all 
requirements leading to licensure with the Mississippi State Department of Education 
for teaching K through 12. The Bachelor of Music degree with a major in music therapy 
is approved by the American Music Therapy Association. Graduates of the music 
therapy program will have fulfilled all requirements leading to certification by the 
American Music Therapy Association. 

ADMISSION TO MUSIC CURRICULA 

1. MUSIC AUDITION. Prior to adnnission, each candidate should perform before the 
music faculty selections of vocal and/or instrumental music representative of the 
student's highest level of proficiency. In certain cases, a student may be admitted as a 
music major who has not had the formal training necessary to perform the suggested 
literature but who demonstrates exceptional talent. 

2. EVALUATION OF TRANSFER CREDITS. Transfer credit in music theory is 
validated only upon successful completion of a written diagnostic exam. Advanced 
standing in applied music is granted only upon successful completion of upper-level 
and/or proficiency examinations (see below). 

REQUIREMENTS 

Bachelor of Arts with a Major in Music. (135-138 hours) General core: 60 hours; 
Music Core: 34 hours (Freshman and Sophomore Music Theory — 18 hours; Music History 
and Literature — 8 hours; Ensemble — 8 hours); Music Major 23 hours; Outside Minor 18- 
21 hours (obtain curriculum plan from the School of Music). 

NOTE: The Bachelor of Arts degree does not meet the requirements for public school 
teaching, nor does it meet prerequisite requirements for graduate study in music education. 

Bachelor of Music with a Major in Qiurch Music. (130 hours) General core: 42 

hours (9 additional hours of fine arts are included in music courses); Music Core: 36 hours 
(Freshman and Sophomore Music Theory — 18 hours; Music History and Literature — 8 
hours; Elementary Conducting — 2 hours; Ensemble — 8 hours); Church Music Major 52 
hours (obtain curriculum plan from the School of Music). 



132 



Bachelor of Music with a Major in Music Education—Vocal or Instrumental 

Certification. (142 hours); General Core: 45 hours (9 additional hours of fine arts are 
included in music courses); Music Core: 36 hours (Freshman and Sophomore Music 
Theory — 18 hours; Music History and Literature — 8 hours; Elementary Conducting — 2 
hours; Ensemble — 8 hours); Music Education Major: 40 hours; Professional 
Education: 21 hours (obtain curriculum plan from the School of Music). 

Bachelor of Music with a Major in Music Therapy. (140 hours) General Core: 

52 hours (9 hours of fine arts are included in music courses); Music Core: 36 hours 
(Freshman and Sophomore Music Theory — 18 hours; Music History and Literature — 8 
hours; Elementary Conducting — 2 hours; Ensemble — 8 hours; Music Therapy Major: 
52 hours, including 2 hours for a six-month internship in an AMTA approved facility 
(obtain curriculum plan from the School of Music). 

Bachelor of Music with a Major in Performance — Concentration in Guitar, 
Organ, Piano, or Voice. (132-135 hours). General core: 42-54 hours (9 additional hours 
of fine arts are included in music courses; vocal performance majors must take 
Elementary French and German); Music Core: 36 hours (Freshman and Sophomore 
Music Theory — 18 hours; Music History and Literature — 8 hours; Elementary 
Conducting — 2 hours; Ensemble — 8 hours); Performance Major: 45 hours; Free 
Electives: 0-9 hours (obtain curriculum plan from the School of Music). 

Music Minor: Twenty-five hours: MUT 161, 162, 163 — 9 hours; two of three: MUM 
310, 311, 312 — 4 hours; Applied Music — 6 hours, leading to successful completion of a 
proficiency exam; Ensemble— 6 hours; recital attendance for two years (no credit). 

ADDITIONAL REQUIREMENTS 

1. RECITALS. All students pursuing the B.M. degree will perform at least a half recital 
(25 to 30 minutes) in the senior year. Music education majors may choose to complete 
an appropriate music project instead of the senior recital. 

Performance majors will perform at least a half recital in the juruor year and a full 
redtal (45 to 55 minutes) in the senior year. 

Each student pursuing the B.M. degree will register for Applied Music Concentration 
until all recital requirements have been met. 

2. RECITAL ATTENDANCE. Attendance at recitals and school concerts is considered 
an integral part of each student's development as both a performer and an informed 
listener. Music majors will register for MUR 000 — recital class (no credit) each 
trimester of study, requiring attendance at 75% of all weekly student recitals, degree 
recitals, faculty recitals, and special concerts presented by the School of Music. 
During the final trimester of study, students will register for MUR 001-Recital class 
completion. 

3. UPPER-LEVEL EXAMINATIONS. At the end of the sophomore year, there will be 
a special examination to determine each student's eligibility for upper-level music 
study. This exam will consist of a 12 minute program in the applied concentration 
and a short sight-singing proficiency. A student must continue to register for 
applied music at the sophomore level until the exam is successfully completed. 



133 



Transfer students with two previous years of college credit in their concentrations 
will be allowed to register for upper-level study, but must pass the upper-level exam 
by the end of their first trimester of study at Carey to receive advanced course credit. 

4. PROFICIENCY EXAMINATIONS. All students pursuing the Bachelor of Music 
degree must pass the piano proficiency exam. All music majors and minors must 
pass a proficiency exam in their secondary area of Applied Music. 

NOTE: For additional information regarding School of Music requirements 
and policies, refer to the Winters School of Music Handbook, available front 
the music office. 

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS FOR CHURCH MUSIC (MUC) 

331. Church Music Education: (3 hours) Methods and materials related to performance, 
listening, and creative activities for the graded choirs kindergarten through junior 
high school. 

332. Church Music Administration: (3 hours) The churchwide program of music, its 
basic organization, philosophies, and objectives. Planning the church music 
curriculum and its coordination with the total educational program of the church. 
Field studies in approved church music programs. 

333. 334. Survey of Hymnology: (2 hours each) A study of hymnody from earUest Old 
Testament references to the present. The historical development, classification, 
criticism, and use of hymns. 

432. Church Music Literature: (2 hours) Choral repertory for adult and youth church 
choirs dealing chiefly with smaller forms such as motets and anthems from the 
sixteenth century to the present. 

437. Music in Worship: (3 hours) The art of individual and corporate worship and the 
development and use of the church's music as an aid to worship and to evangelism. 
Service planning. 

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS FOR MUSIC EDUCATION (MUE) 

111. Voice Class: (1 hour) Application of the fundamentals of vocal technique through 
vocalises and song literature with an emphasis on EngUsh and Italian Art Songs. 
For nonmusic majors or for music majors studying at the freshman-secondary level. 
Two lab hours per week. 

121. Freshman Piano Class: (1 hour) Study of elementary piano literature and 
techniques in sight reading and improvisation. For nonmusic majors or for music 
majors studying at the freshman-secondary level. Two lab hours per week. 

211. Sophomore Voice Class: (1 hour) Application of intermediate vocal technique 
through vocahses and song literature including German Lieder. For music majors 
and minors studying at the sophomore-secondary level. Two lab hours per week. 



134 



221. Sophomore Piano Class: (1 hour) Study of intermediate piano literature and 
techniques in sight reading and improvisation. For nonmusic majors or for music 
majors studying at the sophomore-secondary level. Two lab hours per week. 

313. Music in Elementary Schools: Music Major. (2 hours) Methods and materials 
related to singing, music reading, rhythmic responses, creative activities, music 
appreciation, and the school room orchestra. 

314. Music in Secondary Schools: (2 hours) A consideration of techniques and materials 
for general music, mixed chorus, glee clubs, show choirs, voice class, theory, music 
appreciation, and program design. 

315. Music in Middle Schools: (2 hours) Methods and materials related to both vocal 
and instrumental musical development through individual and ensemble 
instruction. 

316. Music in Secondary Schools: Instrumental: (2 hours) A consideration of 
techniques and materials for instrumental music organizations such as marching 
band, concert band, jazz orchestra, and other smaller ensembles. Development and 
administration of secondary instrumental programs. Two class meetings per week. 

317. Music in Middle Schools: Instrumental: (2 hours) Methods and materials related 
to instrumental music development through individual and ensemble instruction. 

320. Music in Elementary Schools: Education Major. (3 hours) A study of the basic 
elements of music and how music can be integrated into all areas of the curriculum. 

325. Guitar Class: (1 hour) Introductory course; elementary functions of the guitar as an 
adjunct for teaching. Two lab hours per week. 

326. Stringed Instruments Class: (1 hour) Elementary group instruction. The study and 
application of the fundamentals of playing stringed instruments. Two laboratory 
hours per week. 

330. Handbell Class: (1 hour) Performance practice and directing, rehearsing, and 
arranging skills for handbell ensembles. 

331. Elementary Conducting: (2 hours) The fundamentals of choral and instrumental 
conducting. Two class meetings per week. 

332. Choral Conducting: (2 hours) Intermediate skills in choral conducting including 
score preparation, rehearsal techniques, and acoustics. Two class meetings per 
week. 

333. Instrumental Conducting: (2 hours) Intermediate skills in instrumental conducting 
including score preparation, rehearsal techniques, and acoustics. Two class 
meetings per week. 

347. Piano Pedagogy I: (2 hours) A study of methods, materials, curriculum, and 
fundamental concepts of teaching piano with emphasis on beginning and 
elementary level students. 



135 



348. Piano Pedagogy II: (2 hours) Methods and materials for teaching piano with an 
emphasis in intermediate and advanced techniques. Two class meetings per week. 
(Organ concentration: addition of two hours of free electives) 

350. Advanced Piano Skills. (2 hours) A performance oriented course with emphasis 
on developing keyboard skills of harmonization, modulation, transposition, 
improvisation, accompanying, score reading, and service playing. 

357. Italian Diction. (1 hour) A study of the rules of pronunciation and articulation 
within the context of Italian vocal literature. 

358. German Diction. (1 hour) A study of the rules of pronunciation and articulation 
within the context of German vocal literature. 

359. French Diction. (1 hour) A study of the rules of pronunciation and articulation 
within the context of French vocal literature. 

362, 363, 364. Band Instruments Class (Woodwinds, Brass, Percussion): (1 hour each) 
Practical elementary class instruction on brass, percussion and woodwind 
instruments. Attention devoted to correct tone production, techiuque, and care of 
instruments. Two lab hours per week. 

411. Vocal Pedagogy. (3 hours) The physiological, psychological, and acoustical 
problems of singing. Principles and methods pertaining to voice production and the 
teaching of voice to individuals and to groups. 

412. Directed Teaching of Voice. (2 hours) Advanced consideration of the principles and 
problems of voice production and voice teaching presented from a practical 
standpoint. Supervised experience in teaching voice supplemented by demoristration 
and discussion in class. 

420. Instrumental Pedagogy. (2 hours) A study of beginning and intermediate 
methods dealing with pedagogical problems in both private and classroom 
instruction. Supervised teaching in both private and classroom instruction. Two 
class meetings per week. 

421, 422. Instrumental Literature and Technique. (1 hour Each) Survey of 
characteristics and development of band and orchestral instruments. Study of 
instrumental literature from all historical periods relevant to each instmment. Two 
lab hours per week. 

432. Organ Construction and Design. (Two Hours) A study of the development of the 
construction and design of the European organ from the Renaissance to the present 
and of the American organ in the twentieth century. Special emphasis on the 
process of choosing a builder and design for a new church organ. Two class 
meetings per week. 

435. Service Playing. (2 hours) A study of the fundamentals of playing the organ for 
worship services, including basic hymn playing, creative hymn introductions, 
modulations, and improvisation. Other topics include service repertoire, choral and 
solo accompanying, and registrational procedures. 

439. Guitar Pedagogy. (2 hours) A course in the theory and practice of teaching guitar 
at beginning and intermediate levels. Proper application of classical guitar 

136 



technique to various styles of music and principals of transcription and arranging 
are addressed. Two class meetings per week. 

441. Advanced Conducting: (2 hours) A further refinement of conducting skills with an 
emphasis on Medieval, Renaissance, and 20th century forms. Score preparation is 
emphasized. 

ENSEMBLE (MUG) 

182, 382. Symphonic Band: (1 hour each) Open to all William Carey College students 
by audition. Instrumental literature from all periods studied and performed. 
Selected small ensembles will function from within the Symphonic Band. Three 
meetings per week. 

192, 392. Chorale: (1 hour each) Primary performing ensemble of the School of Music. 
Open to all William Carey College students by audition. Choral literature from all 
periods are studied, memorized, and performed. Selected ensembles functioning 
within the chorale are the Madrigal Singers and Carpenter's Wood. Five laboratory 
hours per week. 

362. Opera Workshop: (1 hour) Preparation and performance of opera scenes. 

388. Guitar Ensemble. (1 hour) An ensemble performing both traditional and popular 
guitar music and representing the college both on and off campus. Two lab hours 
per week. 

396. Handbells: (1 hour) A handbell choir representing the college on and off campus. 
Two laboratory hours per week. , . , , 



COURSE DESCRIPTIONS FOR MUSIC THERAPY (MUH) 

132. Practicum — Geriatric: (1 hour) Orientation, observation and session planning 
experience with geriatric populations. 

167. Orientation to Music Therapy: (3 hours) An introduction to the population v^dth 
whom music therapy is used, the historical bases for the therapeutic uses of music, 
the organizational structure and proceedings of NAMT, and an orientation to 
professional ethics. 

235. Practicum — General Hospital: (1 hour) Orientation, observation, and session 
planning experiences with patients in pediatric and oncology units of a general 
hospital. 

333. Practicum — Mentally Retarded: (1 hour) Orientation and observation experiences 
with mentally retarded populations in residential and special education settings. 

362. Recreational Music: (3 hours) An introduction to the innovative ways in which 
music may be applied in helping individuals (including exceptional and 
handicapped persons) utilize their leisure time. 

365. Music in Therapy I: (3 hours) Techniques of therapy utilized with physically and 
educationally handicapped children and youth. 



137 



366. Principles of Music Therapy: (3 hours) A review of the theoretical bases and 
experimental evidence of the influence of music in clinical settings. 

418. Psychology of Music: (3 hours) An introduction to basic acoustics and the 
psychological effects of music perception. 

434. Practicum — Psychiatric: (1 hour) Orientation, observation, and session planning 
experiences with emotionally disturbed, and substance abuse patients in a 
psychiatric hospital setting. 

466. Music in Therapy II: (3 hours) Techniques of music therapy with physically, 
mentally, and psychologically handicapped adults. 

497. Internship in Music Therapy: (2 hours) Students must serve a six month internship 
at an approved NAMT facility prior to being graduated. 



COURSE DESCRIPTIONS FOR MUSIC HISTORY AND 
LITERATURE (MUM) 

101. Music Appreciation: (3 hours) A non-technical study of music designed for the general 
student. Appreciation of musical art forms based upon defiiution, aural recognition, 
and analysis. This course does not meet the music history and literature requirements 
for a major or minor in music. 

110. Music Literature I: (1 hour) A survey of music literature from antiquity through the 
early eighteenth century. Two lab hours per week. 

111. Music Literature II: (1 hour) A survey of music Uterature from the early eighteenth 
century to the present, including popular music and music from various cultures. 
Two lab hours per week. 

310. Music History I: 2 hours) Survey of Early Music through the Renaissance. Two 
lecture hours and one lab hour per week. 

311. Music History II: (2 hours) Survey of the Baroque and Classical periods. Two 
lecture hours and one lab hour per week. 

312. Music History III: (2 hours) Survey of nineteenth and 20th century music. Two 
lecture hours and one lab hour per week. 

320. Song Literature. (2 hours) A brief history of the evolution of the French, German, 
and Italian Art Song and the major composers of the genre, including performance 
practices. Once lecture hour and one lab hour per week. 

390. Special Topics in 17th and 18th Century Music: (2 hours) 

404. Survey of Oratorio and Cantata Literature: (2 hours) A study of the larger choral 
forms from the Baroque to the present. 

410, 411. Piano Literature I and II: (2 hours each) An historical survey of styles and 
forms in harpsichord and piano music, from the Renaissance to the present. Includes 
score study and aural recognition of major works. Two class meetings per week. 



138 



420, 421. Organ Literature I and II: (2 hours each) A survey of organ repertoire from the 
sixteenth century to the present. Two class meetings per week. 

430, 431. Guitar Literature I and II: (2 hours each) A study of the development of the 
guitar and its repertoire. Major composers and style characteristics of all periods 
from the Renaissance to the twentieth century. Two class meetings per week. 

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS FOR MUSIC THEORY (MUT) 

161, 162, 163. Freshman Theory I, II, and III: (3 hours each) Basic music skills, 
elementary harmony, keyboard harmony, sight singing, and ear training. Three 
regular class periods plus one lab hour per week. 

261, 262. Sophomore Theory I and II: (3 hours each) Advanced harmony, 20th century 
techniques along with keyboard harmony, sight singing, and ear training. Three 
regular class periods plus one lab hour per week. 

320. Fretboard Theory. (2 hours) The application of harmonic theory to the guitar, 
including techniques of jazz and popular music. Two class meetings per week. 

351. Counterpoint: (3 hours) A compositional and analytical approach to the principles 
of 18th century contrapuntal practices. 

355. Form and Analysis: (3 hours) Exploration of the standard forms of tonal music. 
Continuation of sight singing and ear training for sophomores. Three regular class 
meetings plus one lab hour per week. 

357. Composition: (2 hours) Original composition and arranging in a variety of musical 
styles. Basic instrumentation and scoring techniques. 

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS FOR APPLIED MUSIC 

GUITAR (MUA) BRASS (MUB) PERCUSSION (MUD) PIANO (MUP) 
ORGAN (MUQ) VOICE (MUV) WINDS (MUW) 

MU_ (A, B, D, P, Q, V, or W) 110, 210, 310. Applied Music Elective: (1 hour) Private 
instruction primarily for students other than music majors or minors, or for music 
majors or minors who have fulfilled degree requirements in Apphed Music. 

MU_ (A, B, D, P, Q, V, or W) 120, 220. Applied Music Secondary: (1 hour) Private 
instruction for music majors in their second area of performance, students 
pursuing the Bachelor of Arts in music, or music minors. 

MU_ (A, B, D, P, Q, V, or W) 130, 230, 330, 430. Applied Music Concentration: (1 or 2 

hours) Private instruction for music majors in their principle area of performance. 

MU (A, P, Q, or V) 340, 440. Performance Majon (1 or 2 hours) Private instruction 

for upper-level students pursuing the Bachelor of Music degree with a major in 
performance. 

MLI_ (A, B, D, P, Q, V, or W) 000. Proficiency Examination in Applied Secondary: (0 

credit) 



139 



MU_ (A, B, D, P, Q, V, or W) 001. Upper-Level Examination in Applied 
Concentration: (0 credit) 

MU_ (A, P, Q, or V) 002. Junior Recital. (0 credit) 

MU_ (A, B, D, P, Q, V, or W) 003. Senior Recital. (0 credit) 



140 



SCHOOL OF NURSING 

Mary A. Ware, Ed.D, (Dean) 

Professors Mitchell, Ware, J. Williams; Associate Professors Cooksey, 
Knobloch, Morris, Sullivan; Assistant Professors Brantley, Chatham, 
Ferguson, Garin, Johnston, Mansell, Nesbitt, Onate, Payne, Robinson, 
Thompson; Instructors Justice, McDonald 

As an integral part of William Carey College, the School of Nursing shares the overall 
pur}wse and objectives of the college. It seeks to prepare individuals for self-directed practice and 
continuing growth in professional nursing; for formal graduate study; and for service to people as 
an expression of the Christian life and commitment. 

Nursing is offered on all three campuses of the college with a director on each campus. The 
overall operations of the School of Nursing are administered by the dean of nursing. 

The School of Nursing is accredited by the National League of Nursing Accrediting 
Commission, 61 Broadway, New York, NY 10006, (800) 669-9656 ext. 153; by the Board of 
Trustees, Institutions of Higher Learning of the State of Mississippi , and approved in New 
Orleans by the Louisiana State Board of Nursing. 

GRADUATE COMPETENCIES 

Upon completion of the program of study in William Carey College School of 
Nursing, the professional nurse graduate is expected to be able to perform the following 
competencies: 

• Synthesize knowledge drawn from the liberal arts, the biological, physical, social, 
and behavioral sciences, the religious domain and nursing to assist clients in a 
variety of settings to meet health care needs. 

• Use the nursing process in delivering care to individuals, families, groups, and 
communities in varying positions on the health continuum throughout the life 
span. 

• Facilitate attainment of optimal levels of wellness on the health continuum by 
employing restorative, palliative health promotion and maintenance, illness 
prevention, and rehabilitative functions. 

• Use a systematic approach to identify and facilitate a positive response to the 
environmental systems that impact the health of individuals, families, groups, and 
communities 

• Integrate principles and techniques of communication in providing nursing care for 
clients from diverse and multicultural populations. 

• Use nursing research and critical thinking skills to advance professional nursing 
practice and the delivery of health care. 



141 



• Use leadership skills and knowledge of political systems to enhance the quality of 
nursing care, collaborate with other health care providers and encourage other 
professionals and the public to promote the health and well being of society. 

• Demonstrate responsibility and accountability as a member of the nursing 
profession, the health care team, and the community . 

• Integrate Christian principles and values in service to individuals, families, groups, 
and communities. 

ADMISSION OF STUDENTS 

Applicants to the School of Nursing must be students in good standing at William 
Carey College and must have completed designated core courses.* All applicants 
seeking the B.S.N, must apply for admission to the School of Nursing on the campus to 
which application is being made. An application will be considered on one campus only 
per admission period. Applicants are responsible for completing the entire application. 
No incomplete applications will be considered. 

In addition to completion of the designated courses, each applicant must have: 

1. Passed the English Proficiency Examination or ENG 105 

2. Have a grade point average of 2.5 or higher on pre-nursing coursework and a 
score of 100 or above on the NLN Pre-Entrance Examination 

OR 

Have a grade point average of 2.25-2.49 on pre-nursing coursework and a 

NLN score of 110 or above 

OR 

Have a grade point average of 2.75 or higher and a NLN score of 90-99. 

Hours taken at William Carey College are also considered in the application process. 
Admission to the School of Nursing is competitive and these requirements are 
minimum. Students being admitted to the college or meeting these minimum 
requirements are not guaranteed admission to the School of Nursing. Students having 
made two Ds or Fs in the same required course must make a written request to the 
nursing admission committee for permission to apply. Students having recently made 
two Ds or Fs in nursing courses are ineligible. If the Ds or Fs were made five or more 
years previously, an appeal may be presented to the dean of nursing. 

*The following 50 hours are required for admission to the School of Nursing: BIO 
234, 235, 260, 306; BUS 102; CHE 101, 102; COM 101; ENG 101, 102; HEA 240; MAT 131; 
PSY 201, 305; SOC 101. In addition, all except 15 hours of the remaining core curriculum 
courses must be completed. 

Nursing Curriculum Courses Hours 

NUR 303 Fundamentals of Nursing 4 

NUR304 Health Assessment/Health Promotion 4 

NUR 305 Dosage Calculation 1 

NUR 306 Nursing of the Adult I 4 

NUR 307 Pathophysiology 3 

NUR 314 Mental Health Nursing 4 

NUR 315' Concepts of Baccalaureate Nursing (4) 

NUR 321 Nursing of the Childbearing Family 4 

NUR 322 Nursing of the Childrearing Family 4 

NUR 326 Nursing of the Adult II 4 

NUR 390 Nursing Elective 3 



142 



NUR412 Introduction to Research 2 

NUR 414 Writing iind Reporting Research 1 

NUR423 Complex Health Problems 4 

NUR 424 Managing Health Care 2 

NUR 431 Community Nursing 4 

NUR 444 Preceptorship 3 
*RNs only 

1. Total Nursing 51 

2. Core Curriculum 80 
TOTAL HOURS 131 

The faculty reserves the right to make curricular changes to maintain standards 
consistent with the changing needs of society and of the profession. 



COURSE DESCRIPTIONS FOR NURSING (NUR) 
(Credit hours/Lechire hours/Lab hours) 

303. Fundamentals of Nursing: (4/3.75/3.75) A course designed to famiUarize the 
student with the nature of nursing and the nurse's role in health care. Emphasis is 
placed upon critical thinking, nursing process, study and practice of basic 
techniques and skills of nursing care and the application of appropriate scientific 
principles. Prerequisite: Admission to nursing major. 

304. Assessment and Health Promotion: (4/3.75/3.75) A study of basic concepts and 
the development of skills to assess the health status of the individual, the family 
and/or the community. Emphasis is placed upon health promotion/disease 
prevention and health teaching in one-to-one or small group situations. 
Prerequisite: Admission to nursing major. 

305. Dosage Calculation: (1/1.25) Includes systems of measurements for drugs and 
calculation of dosages and solutions. Prerequisite: Admission to nursing major. 

306. Nursing of the Adult I: (4/2.5/7.5) Organized around the nursing process, this 
course provides theory and clinical application in the bio-psycho-social-spiritual 
adaptation of body systems in the adult. It covers a broad range of common 
conditions experienced by adults. Prerequisites: NUR 303, NUR 304, NUR 305. 

307. Pathophysiology: (3/3.75) A study of the disturbances of normal physiology, the 
mechanisms producing these disturbances and the ways in which they are 
expressed symptomatically. 

314. Mental Health Nursing: (4/2.5/7.5) Exploration of the theories of mental 
health/illness and clinical applications using the nursing process. Emphasis is 
placed on nursing interventions to promote mental health with the individual, 
family, group, and community. Chemical dependency and child, adolescent, and 
geropsychiatric nursing are also included. Prerequisites NUR 306, NUR 307. 

315. Concepts of Baccalaureate Nursing: (4/5) A bridge course to assist the RN in 
making the transition to baccalaureate nursing. Basic clinical skills are assessed and 
emphasis is placed on the current issues of health care, health care delivery and the 
changing roles of health care givers. Roles and opportunities for baccalaureate 
nurses are explored. 



143 



321. Nursing of the Childbearing Family: (A/2.5/7.5) Emphasis is on the role of the 
nurse in the management of families experiencing childbirth. The birth process 
from preconception to post partum is explored. Prerequisite; NUR 306, NUR 307. 

322. Nursing of the Childrearing Family: (4/2.5/7.5) Focuses on the needs of the 
childrearing family utilizing the stages of human growth and development as the 
foundation for formulating nursing care; fosters the integration of concepts and the 
use of the nursing process with children and their families from infancy through 
adolescence. Prerequisite: NUR 306, NUR 307. 

326. Nursing of the Adult II: (4/2.5/7.5) Organized around the nursing process, this 
course provides theory for clinical application of the bio-psycho-spiritual 
application. It covers a broad range of common conditions experienced by adults, 
building on concepts learned in NUR 306. Prerequisite: NUR 306, NUR 307. 

412. Introduction to Research: (2/2.50) A course studying various nursing theorists and 
the role of the professional nurse in research. An understanding of research design 
is utilized in critiquing current nursing research. The basic steps to developing a 
proposal for a nursing problem in a selected population will be learned. 
Prerequisite: NUR 314, NUR 321, NUR 322, NUR326. 

414. Writing and Reporting Research: (1/1.25) The writing, oral presentation and 
evaluation of the research proposals begun in NUR 412 will be done in this course. 
Prerequisite: NUR 412. 

423. Complex Health Problem (4/2.5/7.5) The nursing needs of individuals 
experiencing complex health problems with unpredictable outcomes are studied. 
The concepts of humankind, society, health, and nursing with their subconcepts 
and theories are built upon and expanded. A broad range of complex biophysical 
and psychosocial disorders are discussed, building upon the content of previous 
courses. The nursing process is used as a model for nursing care, and students are 
encouraged to explore creative approaches of meeting the changing health needs of 
society. Selected clinical and laboratory experiences with emphasis on critical care 
areas are utilized to meet course objectives. Prerequisite: NUR 314, NUR 321, 
NUR322, NUR326. 

424. Managing Health Care: (2/2.50) The study of basic leadership theories and skills, 
models for health care delivery and the political, socioeconomic and professional 
issues of the workplace. Prerequisite: NUR 314, NUR 321, NUR322, NUR326. 

431. Community Nursing: (4/2.5/7.5) Underscores the utilization of the nursing process 
outside the acute care setting. Community nursing theory is taught and 
implemented. Man, nursing, health, and environment are analyzed as to their effect 
on community health. Prerequisites: NUR 314, NUR 321, NUR 322, NUR 326. 

444. Professional Nursing Preceptorship: (3/-/37.5 hrs per week x 3 wks) An 
opportunity at the end of the program for the student to begin to synthesize and 
utilize previously acquired knowledge and experience. This assists in the 
exploration of career options and the transition to the workplace setting. 
Prerequisite: NUR 414, NUR 423, NUR 424, NUR 431. 



144 



INSURANCE 

All students in nursing courses must have malpractice insurance before entering 
the clinical setting. 

ATTENDANCE 

Refer to School of Nursing student handbook and individual course syllabi. 

HEALTH EXAMINATIONS 

All students entering nursing courses are required to have health examinations. All 
students must submit the results of appropriate screening for TB annually. Failure to do 
so will result in the inability to attend the clinical portion of a course. 

HEALTH PROFESSIONAL CPR CERTIFICATION 

All students must complete Health Professional CPR Certification each year. This 
can be taken at an institution/agency of the student's choice. Students are responsible 
for submitting evidence of current certification to the nursing office for their file. Failure 
to do so will result in the inability to attend the clinical portion of a course. 

PROGRESSION 

Students must complete all nursing courses with a grade of C or better. In the 
event two grades of D or F are earned in clinical nursing courses, the student is 
permanently ineligible to continue in nursing. Should the student fail any one required 
nonclinical nursing course two times, the student is permanently ineligible to continue 
in nursing. 

Students must meet the prerequisite requirements for each course. No student may 
progress through clinical courses without successfully completing with a grade of C or 
better the clinical course(s) previously attempted. 

Progression through the courses in the nursing major is in three levels. Level I 
courses must be completed before progressing to Level IL No student may progress to 
clinical courses in Level III without successfully completing, with a grade of C or better, 
all required courses in Level II. 



COURSES AT EACH LEVEL 



Level I Level II Level III 

NUR412 
NUR414 
NUR 423 
NUR424 
NUR 431 
NUR 444 



NUR 303 


NUR 314 


NUR 304 


NUR 321 


NUR 305 


NUR 322 


NUR 306 


NUR 326 


NUR 307 


NUR 390 



145 



ADVANCED PLACEMENT FOR REGISTERED NURSES 

Registered nurses wishing to pursue a baccalaureate degree in nursing may 
complete the nursing component within 15 months at William Carey College. Non- 
nursing courses may be completed at an individualized pace within six years of initial 
enrollment at William Carey College. 

Requirements for admission to Advanced Standing in Nursing are: 
(1) graduation from a nationally accredited associate degree or diploma nursing 
program, (2) unencumbered licensure as a registered nurse, (3) good standing at William 
Carey College, (4) completion of designated core and support courses, (5) successful 
completion of the English Proficiency Examination or English 105, (6) cumulative grade 
point average of 2.5 on all courses taken towards meeting the nursing degree 
requirements. 

Nursing classes are scheduled to meet on two days every other week in order to 
accommodate student needs. Clinical experiences are individually arranged. 



REQUIREMENTS FOR GRADUATION 

To be eligible for the degree of Bachelor of Science in nursing, the student must 
have fulfilled all requirements of the college for graduation, completed all nursing 
courses with at least a "C" and be recommended by the dean and faculty. Graduates are 
eligible to apply to write the registered nurse licensure examination (NCLEX-RN) 
following successful completion of the curriculum. 



146 



SPECIAL PROGRAMS 

HONORS PROGRAM 

Professor Diket, (Director) 
Assistant Professors Chatham, Singletary (Gulfport Co-directors) 

The honors program is designed for qualified high-achieving students whom the college 
recognizes with honors scholarships. Scholarship awards are based upon superior academic 
background or upon demonstrated talent in the area of the visual or performing arts. Students 
receiving honors scholarships are required to participate in the honors program. Other students 
interested in the advanced academic pursuit offered in the honors program may apply to 
participate. 

Academic Honors* 

The student participates in honors sections of selected academic core classes. In 
addition, the student participates in a variety of special seminars and coUoquia. 

Talent Honors* 

The talent honors program is designed for qualified high-achieving students 
recognized for superior ability and demonstrated talent in areas of the visual or 
performing arts. Students enter the talent honors program at the invitation of the 
scholarship committee. Selection is based upon the student's aptitude for advanced 
performance in one of the following fine arts areas: visual art, music, or theatre. 

In addition to advanced participation within the primary talent discipline, students 
will attend mini-seminars and performances in related talent disciplines. 

"Students should see the honors director or academic advisor for the specifics of the 
program on a particular campus. All honors awards are based upon superior 
scholarship. 

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS FOR HONORS (HON) 

HON 201. (1 hour) An intra-interdisciplinary course for honors students on the 
sophomore level. Required for honors students on the Gulfport campus. 

HON 301. (1 hour) An intra-interdisciplinary course for honors students that is 
required in the junior year. This course will famiUarize students in the arts, humanities, 
and sciences with current topics and research questions within and across disciplines 
and emphasizes professional study. Required of all honors students on the Hattiesburg 
and Gulfport campuses. 

HON 401. (1 hour) An intra-interdisciplinary course for honors students on the senior 
level. Required for honors students on the Gulfport campus. 



147 



BACHELOR OF GENERAL STUDIES 

The Bachelor of General Studies degree is a flexible degree oriented toward the 
nontraditional student. The B.G.S. degree serves the nontraditional student with a diversity 
of educational experiences. It also serves the student from technical and other backgrounds 
not easily integrated into a traditional degree program. 

The B.G.S. degree requires 36 semester hours in one area or two areas of 18 semester 
hours each, excluding hours in clinical courses. No special /specific courses are required 
in the general studies major. Credit may be given for transfer students from technical 
programs. In the concentration(s), 50 percent of the courses must be upper-level courses. 

The Bachelor of General Studies degree is not available for students who must meet 
state or national certification (i.e. nursing, teacher licensure). 



KEESLER CENTER 

William Carey College is committed to the educational needs of adult students who 
serve in the defense of our nation. The college currently offers the following degree 
programs at Keesler Air Force Base: the Bachelor of General Studies (B.G.S.), the 
Bachelor of Arts (B.A.), the Bachelor of Science (B.S.), the Bachelor of Science in Business 
(B.S.B.), and the Master of Business Administration (M.B.A.). The B.A., B.S., and B.S.B. 
may be earned in business with concentrations in management/marketing or computer 
information systems. The B.G.S. degree program may be completed with approved 
concentrations by the program director. The B.G.S. degree allows students to maximize 
their military training credits earned through the Community College of the Air Force 
and/or other military branch service. Completion of the B.A., B.S., B.S.B., or B.G.S. will 
enable an individual to pursue the M.B.A. degree. For more information concerning 
these programs, please contact the program director at 228-377-0090. 

FOREIGN STUDY 

William Carey College offers study tours to Europe, Israel, Asia, the Near East, and 
Latin America. In addition, William Carey students enter competition for Fulbright, 
Rotary, and other prestigious programs, for foreign study. 

Credit for a course taken by a student enrolled in a foreign university course of study 
(including course number, lectures, examinations) will be treated the same as transfer 
credit from another institution in this country. 

Courses of foreign study, Umited to six hours toward degree requirements, require prior 
approval by the vice president of academic affairs, and they are counted as elective credit. 



STUDENT SUPPORT SERVICES 

Joe E. Garvin, M.S. (Director) 

Student Support Services is a support program designed for a target group including 
first generation students, the physically disabled, and those from low income families. 
Services include reading and study skills improvement, academic classes, a writing 



148 



laboratory, tutorial services, academic advisement, vocational and personal counseling, 
and referrals to appropriate agencies or schools when needed. 

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS FOR STUDY SKILLS 

SSS 100. Study Skills Improvement: (3 hours) A course designed to meet the 
individual needs of each student in reading comprehension and study techniques. 
Emphasis is given to vocabulary development. This course will not fulfill any core 
curriculum requirement. 

HUM 200. Strategies in Learning: (3 hours) A course designed to provide techniques for 
effective reading comprehension and critical thinking. Emphasis is given to time 
management, notetaking techniques, patterns of paragraph organization and 
development, and evaluation of written material. This course will not fulfill any 
core curriculum requirement. This course will not fulfill any core curriculum 
requirement. 



SERVICEMEMBER OPPORTUNITY COLLEGE 

William Carey College has met criteria established by the Department of Defense to 
be recognized as a Servicemember Opportunity College; therefore, active duty military 
personnel are extended educational opportunities that are sometimes distinct from 
common institutional practice. Policy stipulates flexibiUty essential to the improvement 
of access by servicemembers to undergraduate educational programs, and further, that 
institutional policies and practices be fair, equitable, and effective in recognizing special 
and often limiting conditions faced by mihtary students. Academic residency is satisfied 
by 25 percent of the undergraduate degree courses being completed with William Carey 
College. 



149 



Personnel 

2000-2001 



151 



BOARD OF TRUSTEES— 2000 

Dr. Bryant Barnes, Tupelo 

Mrs. Mary Alice Braswell, Hattiesburg 

Mr. William C. Browning, Laurel 

Rev. Gerald Buckley, Petal 

Rev. Ben Carlisle, Pascagoula 

Dr. Bill Duncan, Starkville 

Dr. Daniel Edney, Vicksburg 

Mr. Tommy Everett, Magee 

Mr. Joseph Fail, Bay Springs 

Mr. Gary Fordham, Hattiesburg 

Mr. Louis Griffin, Laurel 

Dr. Eddie Hamilton, Jackson 

Ms. Betty Hart, Sandy Hook 

Rev. Ed Holmes, Gulfport 

Mr. John Keyes, Collins 

Dr. John McGraw, Laurel 

Mr. Ethan Moore, Hattiesburg 

Mr. Lewis Myrick, Sr., Hattiesburg 

Mr. Mike Randolph, Hattiesburg 

Dr. LaRue Stephens, Long Beach 

Dr. William Stewart, Sr., Eupora 

Ms. Doris Tullos, Magee 

Dr. Brett Valentine, Hattiesburg 

Dr. Randy Von Kanel, Tupelo 



152 



COLLEGE ADMINISTRATION 

1999-2000 

LARRY W. KENNEDY— B.A., Th.M., M.A., Ph.D. 

President and Chief Executive Officer 

',' ^ t •; ," 
VAN N. OLIPHANT— B.B.A., M.B.A., D.B.A. , „, . ..w?-.riJ 

Executive Vice President and Provost 

mis C. EASTERLING— B.S., M.Ed. 

Executive Assistant to the President for Development and External Relations 

DANIEL P. CALDWELL— B.A., M.Div., Ph.D. 

Vice President of Church Relations; Dean, Cooper School of Missions and 
BibUcal Studies 

BENNIE R. CROCKETT, JR.— B.A., M.A., M.Div., Th.D. 

Vice President of Institutional Effectiveness and Planning » ( ' 

CLOYD L. EZELL, JR.— B.S., M.S., Ph.D. 
Vice President of Academic Affairs 

BRENDA F. WALDRIP— B.S., M.S. 

Vice President of Student Services and Em-ollment Management ' 

MYRON C. NOONKESTER— A.B., M.A., Ph.D. 

Interim Dean, School of Arts, Humanities, and Sciences 

BONNIE H. HOLDER— B.S., M.S., Ph.D. 

Interim Dean, School of Education and Psychology ' ' ' ' 

J. MILFRED VALENTINE— B.M., M.M., Ph.D. 

Dean, Winters School of Music "• • ; 1 - 

MARY A. WARE— B.S.N., M.S.N., M.Ed., Ed.D. 
Dean, School of Nursing 

GERALD BRACEY— B.S., M.B.A. 

Administrative Dean, Gulfport Campus 

DAVID HESTER— B.S., M.A. 
Dean of Student Development 

DENISE M. BROWN— B.S., M.S., Ph.D. 

Associate Dean of Academic Programs, Gulfport Campus 

JEFFREY S. ANDREWS— B.S., M.B.A. 

Director of Budgeting and Financial Analysis 

DAVID J. BROCKWAY— B.S., M.S. 
Systems and Network Analyst 



153 



LINDA COMMANDER— B.A., M.Ed., M.S. 
Director of Keesler Center 

WILLIAM N. CURRY— B.S., M.Ed. 
Director of Financial Aid 

MARY READ M. DIKET— B.A.E., M.A.E., Ph.D. 
Director of Honors Program 

JOE GARVIN— B.S., M.S. 

Director of Student Support Services 

LAURA JOYCE GARIN— B.S., M.S., M.B.A. 
Director of Nursing, New Orleans Campus 

THOMAS HUEBNER, JR.— B.A., M.A. 
Director of Admissions 

KYLE S. JONES— A.B., M.A., M.L.S., Ed.D. 
Director of Libraries 

TOMMY KING— B.A., M.R.E., M.A., M.Ed., Ed.D. 
Director of Off -Campus Programs 

STEVEN H. KNIGHT— B.S., M.Ed. 

Director of Intercollegiate Athletic Programs 

NOELLE LINDSAY— B.S., M.S. 

Director of Pre-nursing, New Orleans Campus 

MARTHA MORRIS— B.S.N., M.S.N., Ph.D. 
Director of Nursing, Hattiesburg Campus 

JOE RILEY— B.S. 

Treasurer/Controller 

WILLIAM T. RIVERO— B.A., M.A., Ph.D. 
Director of Institutional Research 

HUBERT LESLIE STEVERSON— B.S., M.Ed., Ed.D. 
Director of Student Services, Gulfport Campus 

CATHY R. VAN DEVENDER— B.S.B.A., M.Ed. 
Registrar 

DONNA WHEELER— B.S. 

Director of Alumni Relations and Annual Fund 

JANET K. WILLIAMS— B.S., M.S.N., M.B.A., Ph.D. 
Director of Nursing, Gulfport Campus 

LINDA YORK— B.S.B.A., M.P.A., C.P.A. 

Assistant Controller and Director of Accounting 



154 



FACULTY 

1999-2000 

IRIS B. ABRAMS, Associate Professor of Education; B.M.Ed., Delta State University; M.Ed., 
Ed.D., University of Southern Mississippi (1993). 

JEFFREY S. ANDREWS, Lecturer in Business and Director of Budgeting and Financial 
Analysis; B.S., M.B.A., University of New Orleans (1999). 

SYDNEY E. BAILEY, Assistant Professor of Biology and Medical Technology; B.S., Tulane 
University; M.S., University of Southern Mississippi (1981). 

BILL R. BAKER, Distinguished Lecturer of Biblical Studies and Director of Church Relations, 
Gulfport Campus; B.A., Mississippi State University; B.D., New Orleans Baptist 
Theological Seminary; M.A., University of Mississippi; Ph.D., Mississippi State 
University (1996). 

GERALD C. BRACEY, Lecturer in Business and Administrative Dean, Gulfport Campus; B.S., 
M.Ed., WiUiam Carey College (1999). 

NELWYN L. BRANTLEY, Assistant Professor of Nursing; B.S.N. , Mississippi College; 
M.N., University of Mississippi Medical Center (1996). 

DAVID J. BROCKWAY, Instructor of Business and Systems and Network Analyst; B.S., 
University of South Alabama; M.S., University of Southern Mississippi (1995). 

BILLY F. BROWN, Associate Professor of Business, Director of M.B.A. and Business Programs, 
Gulfport Campus; B.P.A., University of Mississippi; M.B.A., William Carey College; J.D., 
University of Mississippi (1992). 

DENISE M. BROWN, Associate Professor of Business and Associate Dean of Academic 
Programs, Gulfport Campus; B.S., Michigan State University; M.S., University of 
California, Davis; Ph.D., University of Missouri, Columbia (1995). 

DANIEL C. BROWNING, JR., Professor of Religion; B.S., University of Alabama in 
Huntsville; M.Div., Ph.D., Southwestern Baptist Theological Seminary (1990). 

OLIVD\ CAMERON BURKETT, Lecturer in Psychology; B.A., M.A., Ph.D.; University of 
Southern Mississippi (1999). 

WALTER BUTLER, Lecturer in Education; B.S., Millsaps College; M.A., Ed.D., University 
of Southern Mississippi (1998). 

CARRIE BYRD, Instructor of Physical Education; Head Coach of Women's Softball; B.S., 
University of West Alabama; M.S., University of Southern Mississippi (1996). 

DANIEL P. CALDWELL, Associate Professor of Religion; Vice President of Church Relations 
and Dean of Cooper School of Missions and Biblical Studies; B.A., William Carey College; 
M.Div., Ph.D., New Orleans Baprist Theological Seminary (1991). 

C. DAVID CHANNELL, Professor of Business and Economics; Holder, Thomson Endowed 
Chair of Business and Ecotwmics; B.B.A., University of Mississippi; M.B.A., University of 
Southern Mississippi; Ph.D., Louisiana Tech University (1994). 



155 



DEBORAH H. CHATHAM, Assistant Professor of Nursing and Co-Director of Honors 
Program, Gulf-port Campus; B.S.N., University of Mississippi Medical Center; M.S., 
University of Southern Mississippi (1991). 

ALLISON C. CHESTNUT, Associate Professor of Language and Literature; B.S., M.A., 
Mississippi University for Women; Ph.D., Louisiana State University; additional 
graduate study. University of Southern Mississippi (1992). 

LINDA E. COMMANDER, Instructor of Education and Business and Director of Keesler 
Center; B.A., Centenary College; M.Ed., M.S., University of Southern Mississippi (1998). 

MARILYN COOKSEY, Associate Professor of Nursing; B.S., University of Southern 
Mississippi; M.S.N., University of South Alabama; Ph.D., University of Southern 
Mississippi (1991). 

PAUL D. COTTEN, Professor of Music and Psychology; B.M.Ed., M.S., Ph.D., University of 
Southern Mississippi (1989). 

MARIA CREYTS, Assistant Professor of Art; B.F.A., Kansas City Art Institute; M.F.A., Yale 
University (1999). 

BENNIE R. CROCKETT, JR., Professor of Religion and Philosophy and Vice President of 
Institutional Effectiveness and Planning; B.A., Mississippi College; M.A., University of 
Southern Mississippi; M.Div., Th.D., New Orleans Baptist Theological Seminary; Ph.D. 
(cand.). University of Wales, Lampeter (1985). 

LISA HIRE CUMMINGS, Assistant Professor of Psychology; B.S., M.S., University of 
Southern Mississippi; Ph.D., Saint Louis University (1999). 

RICHARD C. CUMMINGS, Assistant Professor of Chemistry; B.S., William Carey College; 
Ph.D., University of Southern Mississippi (1997). 

CHERYL D. DALE, Associate Professor of Business; B.S., Mississippi State University; 
M.B.A., University of Southern Mississippi; Ph.D., University of Alabama (1997). 

JOSEPHINE A. D'ARPA, Associate Professor of Music; B.M., William Carey College; 
M.C.M., Southwestern Baptist Theological Seminary (1965). 

SUZANNE DAY, Assistant Professor of Art; B.S., Sacred Heart University; M.F.A., 
Syracuse University (1998). 

MARY READ M. DIKET, Professor of Art and Education and Director, Honors Program and 
Creative Scholars Center; B.A.E., University of Mississippi; M.A.E., University of Southern 
Mississippi; Ph.D., University of Georgia (1992). 

KATHY DYESS, Lecturer in Art and Director of Lucile Parker Gallery; B.A., Mississippi 
University for Women; M.Ed., University of Southern Mississippi (1993). 

IRIS C. EASTERLING, Assistant Professor of English and Executive Assistant to the President 
for Development and External Programs; B.S., University of Southern Mississippi; M.Ed., 
William Carey College; additional graduate study, Louisiana State University and 
University of Southern Mississippi (1988). 



156 



MARTIN EHDE, JR., Assistant Professor of Mathematics; B.A., M.A., Ph.D., Bob Jones 
University; M.A.L.S., Wesleyan University (1981). 

ROBERT W. ELLIS, Associate Professor of Business and Director of Management Information 
Systems, Gulfport Campus; B.S., M.S.I.S, Arkansas State University; D.B.A., Mississippi 
State University (1993). ^ 

TRACY A. ENGLISH, Instructor of Physical Education, Coach, Women's Basketball, Assistant 
Coach, Men's Basketball, Coach, Men's and Women's Golf; B.S., M.Ed., William Carey 
College (1991). 

CLOYD L. EZELL, JR., Professor of Mathematics; Vice President of Academic Affairs; B.S., 
Tulane University; M.S., University of Southern Mississippi; Ph.D., Vanderbilt 
University (1994). 

BARBARA W. FERGUSON, Assistant Professor of Nursing; B.S.N. , Texas Christian 
University; M.N., Louisiana State University Medical Center (1994). 

BETTE FORD, Assistant Professor of English; B.S., University of Southern Mississippi; 
M.A., M.Litt. (cand.) Middlebury College (1996). 

PJ FORREST, Associate Professor of Business; B.A., Mississippi University for Women; M.B.A., 
D.B.A., Mississippi State University (1999). 

LAURA JOYCE GARIN, Assistant Professor of Nursing and Director, New Orleans Campus 
Nursing Program; B.S., Marillac College; M.S., California State Uruversity; M.B.A., Tulane 
University; additional graduate study, University of New Orleans (1995). 

LAURIE H. GLAZE, Assistant Professor of Business, Director of Career Services; B.B.A., M.B.A., 
Mississippi State University (1995). 

TIMOTHY J. GLAZE, Instructor of Religion and Director, Baptist Studetit Union; B.A., Mississippi 
College; M.Div., M.R.E., Nev^ Orleans Baptist Theological Seminary (1995). 

PEGGY H. GOSSAGE, Instructor of Education and Regional Librarian, Gulfport Campus; B.S., 
University of Southern Mississippi; M.L.S., Florida State University (1989). 

ROBERT W. HALFORD, Assistant Professor of Physical Education and Head Coach of 
Baseball; B.S., M.Ed., William Carey College (1977). 

RANDALL K. HARRIS, Associate Professor of Biology; Chair, Department of Biological Sciences; 
B.S., Belmont University; Ph.D., Vanderbilt University (1994). 

GERALD J. HASSELMAN, Professor of Education; Director of Education Programs, Gulfport 
Campus; B.A., Millsaps College; M.Ed., Ed.S., Mississippi College; Ed.D., Mississippi State 
University (1997). 

DAVID W. HESTER, Lecturer in Communication and Dean of Student Development; B.S., 
Mississippi State University; M.A., Baylor University; additional graduate study, 
Uruversity of Southern Mississippi (1997). 



157 



WILLIAM M. HETRICK, Professor of Education; B.S., Bowling Green State University; 
M.Ed., Spec, Eastern Michigan University; Ed.D., Western Michigan University (1993). 

BONNIE H. HOLDER, Associate Professor of Education and Interim Dean, School of Education 
and Psychology; B.S., Mississippi College; M.S., Ph.D., University of Southern Mississippi 
(1997). 

JUNE G. HORNSBY, Associate Professor of Education and Director of Student Teaching; B.S., 
Mississippi College; M.S., Ed.D., University of Southern Mississippi; additional graduate 
study, Southwestern Baptist Theological Seminary (1992). 

THOMAS M. HUEBNER, JR., Assistant Professor of Communication and Director of Admissions; 
B.A., Southwest Baptist University; M.A., University of Georgia; Ph.D. (cand.). University of 
Southern Mississippi (1994). 

BARBARA M. JOHNSTON, Assistant Professor of Nursing; B.S. Stetson University; B.S.N., 
University of Florida; M.N., Louisiana State University Medical Center (1997). 

CAROL B. JONES, Associate Professor of Psychology and Program Director of Psychology and 
Counseling Services, Gulfport Campus; B.A.E., M.Ed., Ph.D., University of Mississippi (1994). 

KYLE S. JONES, Associate Professor of Education and Director of Libraries; A.B., Lenoir 
Rhyne College; M.A., Appalachian State University; M.L.S., North Carolina Central 
University; Ed.D., North Carolina State University (1997). 

REBECCA M. JORDAN, Associate Professor of Language and Literature and Chair, 
Department of Language and Literature; B.S., M.S., University of Southern Mississippi; 
Ed.S., Jackson State University; D.A., University of Mississippi (1992). 

ROBIN C. JUSTICE, Instructor of Nursing; B.S.N., M.S.N., University of South Alabama 
(1999). 

HUBERT L. KEASLER, JR., Associate Professor of Business; B.S., M.P.A., D.B.A., 
Mississippi State University (1999). 

HOWARD T. KEEVER, Professor of Music and Music Program Advisor; B.M., Eastman 
School of Music, University of Rochester; M.M., Ph.D., Florida State University (1985). 

LARRY W. KENNEDY, Professor of Religion; President and Chief Executive Officer of the 
College; B.A., Louisiana College; Th.M., New Orleans Baptist Theological Seminary; 
M.A., Ph.D., Mississippi State University (1991). 

TOMMY KING, Professor of Psychology; Director of Off-Campus Programs; Director of 
Master's Program in Psychology; B.A., William Carey College; M.R.E., New Orleans Baptist 
Theological Seminary; M.A., Liberty University; M.Ed., Ed.D., University of Southern 
Mississippi (1999). 

STEVEN H. KNIGHT, Assistant Professor of Physical Education; Coach of Men 's Basketball; 
Athletic Director; B.S., University of Southern Mississippi; M.Ed., William Carey College 
(1982). 

ANNETTE KNOBLOCH, Associate Professor of Nursing; B.S.N., Louisiana State 
University Medical Center; M.P.H., Tulane University (1998) 



158 



K. DORMAN LAIRD, Pr-ofessor of ReligUm; B.A., William Carey College; B.D., Th.D, 
New Orleans Baptist Theological Seminary (1968). 

BARBARA MAUER LEE, Lecturer in English and Assistant Registrar, Gulfport Campus; B.A., 
Mississippi College; M.A., Mississippi State University (1997). 

NOELLE LINDSAY, Instructor of Psychology; Director of Pre-nursing, Neu> Orleans Campus; 
B.S., Northwestern State University of Louisiana; M.S., University of Southern 
Mississippi (1997). 

MIROSLAV LONCAR, Associate Professor of Music and Artist-in-Residence; B.M., M.M., 
Academy of Music, Graz, Austria; D.M.A., University of Southern Mississippi (1995). 

JULIA ANN D. MANSELL, Assistant Professor of Nursing; B.S.N., M.S., University of 
Southern Mississippi (1989). 

CHERYL HURST MAQUEDA, Instructor of Spanish; B.A., University of Mobile; M.A., 
University of Southern Mississippi (1999). 

BILLY J. MARTIN, Professor of Biology; B.S., M.S., University of Southern Mississippi; 
Ph.D., Rice University (1992). 

SHARON D. McDonald, instructor of Nursing; B.S.N., University of Southern 
Mississippi; M.S.N. University of South Alabama (1997). 

CHARLOTTE A. McSHEA, Professor of Mathematics and Education; B.S., Mississippi College; 
M.S., University of Southern Mississippi; Ph.D., University of Texas at Austin (1990). 

NANCY K. METTS, Associate Professor of Education; B.A., M.A., Ed.D.; University of 
Mississippi (1993). 

KATHLEEN MITCHELL, Professor of Nursing and Interim Dean, New Orleans Campus; 
B.S.N. , M.S., D.N.S., Louisiana State University Medical Center (1991). 

MARTHA C. MORRIS, Associate Professor of Nursing and Director of Nursing, Hattiesburg 
Campus; B.S.N., M.S.N. , University of Mississippi Medical Center; Ph.D., University of 
Southern Mississippi (1993). 

JIMMY DALE MYERS, Instructor of Education and Public Services Librarian; B.A., M.A., 
Southeastern Louisiana University; M.Ph., M.L.S., University of Southern Mississippi 
(1987). 

MARY NESBITT, Assistant Professor of Nursing; B.S., Indiana State University; M.A., Ball 
State University (1986). 

MYRON C. NOONKESTER, Professor of History; Interim Dean, School of Arts, Humanities, 
and Sciences; Chair, Department of History and Social Science; A.B., Duke University; M.A., 
Ph.D., University of Chicago (1984). 

VAN N. OLIPHANT, Professor of Business, Executive Vice President and Provost; B.B.A, 
University of Mississippi; M.B.A., Memphis State University; D.B.A., Mississippi State 
University (1998). 

MARTHA J. ONATE, Assistant Professor of Nursing; M.S.N. , University of South Alabama 
(1999). 

159 



MARGARET B. PAYNE, Assistant Professor of Nursing; B.S.N., Henderson State I 
University; M.N.Sc, University of Arkansas Medical Sciences Campus at Little Rock 
(1993). ] 

OBRA L. QUAVE, Professor of Theatre and Communication; Chair, Department of Theatre and 
Communication; B.S., M.A., University of Southern Mississippi; additional graduate 
study, State University of Iowa and The Banff School of Fine Arts, Uiuversity of Calgary 
(1960). 

E. ANN RAMSEY, Lecturer in Psychology; B.A., M.A., University of Southern Mississippi 
(1999). 

ELIZABETH A. RICHMOND, Professor of Education; B.A., M.Ed., Ed.S., University of 
Mississippi; Ph.D., University of Southern Mississippi (1982). 

WILLIAM T. RIVERO, Professor of Psychology; Chairman, Department of Psychology; and 
Director of Institutional Research; B.A., Louisiana State University; M.A., Ph.D., University 
of Southern Mississippi (1974). 

SHANNON T. ROBERT, Associate Professor of Theatre and Communication; B.F.A., B.A., 
William Carey College; M.F.A., Florida State University; additional graduate study, J 



University of Southern Mississippi (1992). 

'ssor of Music; B.M., M.M., Louisiana State 

i 



CONNIE D. ROBERTS, Associate Professor of Music; B.M., M.M., Louisiana State 
University; D.M.A., University of Southern Mississippi (1994). 



MARY EVONNE ROBINSON, Assistant Professor of Nursing; B.S., Nichols State 
University; M.N., Louisiana State University Medical Center (1995). 

ALBERT E. SCHAMBER, Lecturer in Accounting; B.S., M.P.A., University of Southern 
Mississippi (1996). 

JULIE HABER SCHIAVO, Instructor of Education and Regional Librarian, New Orleans 
Learning Resources Center; B.G.S., University of New Orleans; M.L.I.S., University of 
Southern Mississippi (1997). 

JEFF SCHMUKI, Assistant Professor of Art; B.F.A., Northern Arizona University; M.F.A., 
Alfred University (1999). 

CARL A. SHEPHERD, Lecturer in Mathematics; B.S., William Carey College; M.Ed., 
University of Southern Mississippi (1997). 

JAMES H. SHIVERS, Professor of Business and Director, Center for Economic Education; B.S., 
M.B.A., University of Southern Mississippi (1972). 

LYNN B. SINGLETARY, Assistant Professor of Biology and Co-Director of Honors Program, Coast 
Campus; B.S., M.S., and additional graduate study. University of Southern Mississippi (1981). 

CHARLOTTE SONNIER-YORK; Assistant Professor of Education; B.S., M.S., University of 
Southern Mississippi; Ph.D., University of Alabama (1999). 

BARBARA W. STANFORD, Assistant Professor of Education; M.Ed., Meredith College; 
B.S., Ed.D., University of Southern Mississippi (1999). 



160 



HUBERT LESLIE STEVERSON, Lecturer in Education and Director of Student Services, 
Gulfport Campus ; M.Ed., Mississippi College; B.S., Ed.D., University of Southern 
Mississippi (1998). 

JOHN STEWART, Assistant Professor of English and Assistant Director of Development; 
B.A., Wake Forest University; M.A., Washington College (1999). 

MARILYN D. SULLIVAN, Associate Professor of Nursing; B.S., Southeastern Louisiana 
University; M.S., University of Southern Mississippi; D.N.S. (cand.). University of 
Alabama in Birmingham (1993). 

GLENN ROBIN SWETMAN, Professor of Language and Literature and Writer-in-Residence; 
B.A., M.A., University of Southern Mississippi; Ph.D., Tulane University (1991). 

CANDACE W. THOMPSON, Assistant Professor of Nursing; B.S.N., Vanderbilt 

University; M.N., Emory University (1995). 

KATHY VAIL, Instructor of Music; B.M., M.M., Mississippi College (1997). 

J. MILFRED VALENTINE, Professor of Music; Dean, Winters School of Music; Holder, 
Winters Endowed Chair of Music; B.M., M.M., Louisiana State University; Ph.D., 
University of Southern Mississippi (1991). 

BENJAMIN WADDLE, Professor of Health and Physical Education, Recreation, and Coaching; 
Chair, Department of Health, Physical Education, Recreation, and Coaching; B.S., East 
Tennessee State University; M.S., Ed.S., George Peabody College; Ed.D., Florida State 
University (1967). 

BRENDA F. WALDRIP, Assistant Professor of Education; Vice President of Student Services 
and Enrollment Management; B.S., William Carey College; M.S. and additional graduate 
study, University of Southern Mississippi (1977). 

PATRICIA L. WARD, Lecturer in Education; B.S., M.Ed., Ed.S., Ed.D., University of 
Southern Mississippi (1998). 

MARY ANN WARE, Professor of Nursing and Dean, School of Nursing,; B.S.N., University 
of Mississippi Medical Center; M.S.N., Mississippi University for Women; M.Ed., Ed.D., 
University of Mississippi (1992). 

ROSE G. WEST, Professor of Chemistry; Chair, Department of Chemistry; B.A., Ph.D., 
University of Southern Mississippi (1968). 

E. MILTON WHEELER, Professor of History; B.A., William Carey College; M.A., Ph.D., 
Tulane University (1963). 

ARTHUR WILLL\MS, Professor of Art; Chair, Department of Art; Holder, Gillespie Endowed 
Chair of Art;, B.A., B.A., M.A., Harding Uruversity; M.F.A., University of Mississippi; D.A., 
Carnegie-Mellon University (1992). 

JANET K. WILLIAMS, Professor of Nursing; Director of Nursing, Coast Campus; B.S., 
University of Southern Mississippi; M.S.N., University of Alabama in Birmingham; 
M.B.A., University of South Alabama; Ph.D., University of Southern Mississippi (1990). 



161 



DONALD EUGENE WINTERS, Professor of Music; B.M., B.A., M.M., William Carey 
College; Ph.D., norida State University (1979). 

LINDA T. YORK, Lecturer in Business and Assistant Controller; B.S.B.A., M.P.A., 
University of Southern Mississippi (1997). 

DAVID W. YOUNG, Professor of Music and Director of Instrumental Music Program; B.M.E., 
Delta State University; M.M.E., Mississippi State University (1992). 

PATRIVAN K. YUEN, Technical Services Librarian; B.A., Chiangmai University; M.A., 
East Tennessee State University; M.Ed., Indiana University of Pennsylvania; (cand.) 
M.L.S., Uruversity of Southern Mississippi (2000). 



PART-TIME FACULTY 

BETTYE COVINGTON, Program Director, Mississippi Baptist Medical Center School of Medical 
Technology; B.S., Millsaps College; M.Ed., University of Michigan; M.T. (1994). 

JAMES RICHARD CAVETT, HI, Medical Director, Mississippi Baptist Center School of Medical 
Technology: B.S., Georgia Institute of Technology; M.D., University of Texas, Southwestern 
Medical School; Certified by the American Board of Pathology (1997). 



FACULTY EMERITI 

CHARLES E. AMBROSE Professor Emeritus of Art 

H . KATHLEEN ARRINGTON Associate Professor Emerita of Business Education 

BESSIE T. BATES Librarian Emerita 

JENNIE LOU BRELAND Assistant Professor Emerita of Piano 

WALTER BUTLER Professor Emeritus of Education 

ELMA McWILLlAMS CAMERON Professor Emerita of Elementary Education 

WILLL\M M. CLAWSON Professor Emeritus of Religion 

S. ALFRED FOY Professor Emeritus of Education 

DAVID F. GRUCHY Professor Emeritus of Biology 

GEORGL\NN C. HOLLIMAN Assistant Professor Emerita of English 

BARBARA JOHNSON Professor Emerita of Nursing 

EVELYN H. McCLURE Professor Emerita of Home Economics 

HELEN T. McWHORTER Assistant Professor Emerita of Music 

J. RALPH NOONKESTER President Emeritus 

GASTON SMITH Professor Emeritus of Mathematics 

GRACE C. SMITH Associate Professor Emerita of English 

STAFF 2000 

BILL R. BAKER Director of Church Relations, Gulfport Campus 

MARY BETH BANKSON Director of Student Activities 

SUE BENNETT Administrative Assistant, School of Arts, Humanities, and Sciences 

DARRELL BLOUNT Campus Facilities, Hattiesburg 

BARBARA BONO Administrative Assistant, Student Development 



162 



UNA BOSWELL Secretary, School of Business, Gulfport Campus 

BECKY BOURDENE ...Administrative Assistant, Cooper School of Missions and Biblical Studies 

LARON BRUMFIELD Sports Information Director and Assistant Men's Basketball Coach 

CARRIE BYRD Softball Coach and Director of Housing 

ROBYN CILWIK Financial Aid Loan Specialist 

JOSEPH COLLINS Housekeeping 

BOBBIE COW ART Housekeeping 

KARON CUMMINS Administrative Assistant, Rouse Library 

SUSAN CURRY Assistant Director of Institutional Research 

WAYNE DICKENS Campus Facilities 

ROGER DICKENS Maintenance, Grounds Supervisor 

SUSAN DICKEY Administrative Assistant to the Registrar 

DEDE DUKES Accounts Payable Coordinator 

ELIZABETH DUFOUR Assistant Director, Financial Aid, Gulfport Campus 

LYDIA EASTERLING Administrative Assistant to the Dean, Gulfport Campus 

ETHEL MAE EDWARDS Housekeeping Supervisor 

RUTH FERRELL Resident Director, Ross Hall 

BRENDA DAVIS Counselor, Student Support Services 

HEATH GINN Student Accounts Representative 

LAURIE GLAZE Director of Career Services, Retention Specialist 

TIMOTHY GLAZE Director, Baptist Student Union 

ROMA GRAHAM Bookstore Manager 

JEANNA GRAVES Secretary, Department of Theatre and Communication, Public Relations 

JAN GUILLOTT Grounds Maintenance Supervisor, Gulfport Campus 

J. C. HAHN Director of Physical Plant and Telecommunications 

ASHLEY HAIGLER Assistant Director of Student Marketing and Admissions, Gulfport 

MELISSA HEINZ Women's Soccer Coach 

EARLINE HERRIN Administrative Assistant, School of Education and Psychology 

JESSE HUNTER Grounds 

MICHAEL HYATT '. Housekeeping 

MARTHA JOHNSTON Business Office Supervisor, Gulfport Campus 

NICKI KAUFMAN Academic Coordinator, Student Support Services 

ALISSA KING Associate Director of Admissions 

RICHARD KINSEY Supervisor, Telecoynmunications 

COLLEEN LAWLESS Administrative Assistant to the President 

and Executive Vice President /Provost 

JIM LAWLESS Campus Facilities, Hattiesburg 

BARBARA LEE Assistant Registrar, Gulfport Campus 

JANINE LOFTUS Cash Management Accountant 

BRIAN LUCAS Counselor, Office of Admissions 

RICHARD MAYS Grounds 

LINDA McCOY Secretary, School of Nursing, Gulfport Campus 

SHARMCBRIDE Secretary, School of Music 

THERASA MCBRIDE Application Processing Coordinator, Office of Admissions 

NANCY McMillan Administrative Assistant, Office of Academic Affairs 

PATRICIA McMORROW Secretary, Alumni Relations 

SANDRA MEELER Administrative Assistant, Business School 



163 



TAMMY MORGAN Secretary, Department of Art, Gulfport Campus 

JEANIE MORRISON Library Assistant, Gulfport Campus 

JESSICA NEAL Administrative Assistant, School of Nursing, New Orleans Campus 

JOYCE NORRIS Administrative Assistant, School of Nursing 

DEBRAOGLE Bookstore Associate 

DONNA O'QUINN Financial Aid and Pell Grant Specialist 

LORETTA PEARCE Records Specialist, Registrar's Office 

REBECCA PIERCE Administrative Assistant to the Registrar 

BRENDA PITTMAN Assistant Director of Financial Aid 

SPARKLE POLK Records Specialist, Registrar's Office 

GINGER REAVES Counselor, Office of Admissions 

RENA REGISTER Secretary, Financial Aid 

FELICIA ROBINSON Student Accounts Representative 

LINDA ROWELL Housekeeping 

MITCHELL SHARP Campus Facilities, Hattiesburg 

WANDA SHOEMAKE Director of Payroll 

DEIDRA SHOWS ...Supervisor of Accounts Receivable and Assistant to Director of Accounting 

KEVIN SHOWS Campus Facilities, Hattiesburg 

AMANDA STAUTER Resident Director, Bass Hall 

LEE STAUTER Administrative Assistant, Off-Campus Programs 

DOUGSTOVALL Men's Soccer Coach 

ROBERT STUTZ Maintenance Supervisor, Gulfport Campus 

PAM SULLIVAN Coordinator of Certification and Special Projects, Gulfport Campus 

HAROLD SUMNERS Bookstore Supervisor, Gulfport Campus 

DIANE TAYLOR Administrative Assistant for External Relations and Development 

BARBARA TILLERY Coordinator, Desktop Publishing 

INEZ WATSON Housekeeping 

COLLEEN WATTS Assistant Registrar, New Orleans Campus 

ROBIN WILLIAMS .Assfstonf Director of Financial Aid/Business Office, New Orleans Campus 

STACY WILSON Counselor, Office of Admissions 

MELINDA WINSTEAD Administrative Assistant, Student Support Services 

MELINDA YOUNGBLOOD Secretary, Student Services and Housing Director 



164 



WILLIAM CAREY COLLEGE ALUMNI ASSOCIATION 

Donna Wheeler, Alumni Relations Director 

One of the most valuable assets any institution of higher learning has is its alumni. 
This is certainly true of William Carey College as our former students spread our name 
abroad, give vocal and financial support, and tell the College about prospective 
students. The William Carey College Alumni Association includes former students who 
have completed at least twenty-four hours of academic credit. 



OFFICERS 

President Jessie Laird '91 

Vice President George Berger '64 

Assistant Vice President Bobby Byrd '93 

Hattiesburg Campus Representative to be chosen 

Gulfport Campus Representative Jerry Bracey '87 

New Orleans Campus Representative Laura Garin 

Mississippi Woman's College Representatives Lynette Long Howell '53 



AT-LARGE MEMBERS 

Dorothy McKenzie Fortenberry '58 Paul Hughes '79 

Ray Strebeck '55 Keith Mitchell '81 

Doyle Wheat '58 Jeff Murphy '84 

Josephine D'Arpa '60 Don Stewart '81 

Nancy Kent '65 Christy Walters '92 

Troy Flowers '67 Robbie Hitt '92 

Juruthin Woullard '78 '■ Scott Vickery '99 
Pat Sylvest Jones '74 



The Carey Capsule is the official publication of the Carey Alumni Association and is 
mailed to nearly 12,000 former students and friends whose current addresses are on file 
in the alumni office. 

Continued alumni support is vital to the future of Christian education at William 
Carey College. The time and money you give in support of Carey is not spent — it is 
invested! 



165 



INDEX 



Academic Calendar 11 

Academic Credits and Course Loads .62 

Academic Discipline 60 

Academic Guidance Program 54 

Academic Program 

Administration of 54 

Academic Regulations, General 55 

Accounting, Courses in Ill 

Accreditation 15 

Activity, Courses in 125 

Adding and Dropping Courses 62 

Administration 153 

Admission 17 

Application for 17 

Standards for 17 

Advanced Placement 58 

Advisement, Academic 18 

African-American Cultural Society 49 

Alpha Chi 49 

Alpha Psi Omega 49 

Alumni Association 165 

American Association of Music 

Therapy Students 50 

Application for Degree 56 

Arts, Humanities, and Sciences 

School of 77-108 

Art, Majors/Courses in 77 

Association of Campus Presidents 50 

Attendance Regulations 62 

Auditing Courses 59 

Baptist Stiident Union 48 

Biological Sciences, Major/Courses ...82 

Board of Trustees 152 

Bookstore and Supplies 31 

Business Administration, 

Major /Courses in 109 

Business, School of 109-114 

Calendar Years 2000-2001 10 

Calendar 2000-20001 Academic Year..ll 

Can\pus Locations 15 

Career Services 53 

Carey Capsule, The 165 

Carey Carillon, The 50 

Carey Dinner Theah-e 105 

Carey Student Nurses Association 50 



Center for Economic Education 110 

Chapel, Purpose and Attendance 48 

Chi Beta Phi 50 

Chemistry, Major/Courses in 89 

Chorale, The Carey College 50 

Church Music, Courses in 132 

Church-Related Vocations 

Fellowship 50 

Financial Aid 35 

Course Loads 62 

Class Attendance 62 

Classification of Students 55 

CLEP 58 

General Examinations 58 

Subject Examinations 58 

Clubs and Organizations 49 

Coaching, Minor /Courses in 122 

Cobbler,The 49 

Communication, Major /Courses in .104 
Computer Information Systems, 

Minor/Courses in 110 

Cooper School of Missions and 

BibUcal Stiadies 129-131 

Core Curricula 65 

Correspondence Gnside Back Cover) 

Correspondence Credit 59 

Course Numbering System 63 

Credit by Examination 19, 58 

Crusader, The 50 

Cytotechnology, Pre-Professional 84 

Dean's List 61 

Degrees, Undergraduate 64 

Delta Omicron Music Fraternity 50 

Dental Hygiene, Pre-Professional 84 

Dentistry, Pre-Professional 84 

Dropping and Adding Courses 62 

Early Entrance Program 18 

Economics, Courses in 114 

Education and Psychology 

School of 115-128 

Elementary Education, Major/ 

Courses in 115-121 

Admission to the Teacher 

Education Program 115 

Student Teaching Requirements. ...117 



166 



Engineering, Pre-Professional 102 

English, Major/Courses in 94 

English Proficiency Examination ..55, 95 

Examinations 59 

Facilities 

Hattiesburg Campus 23 

Gulfport Campus 25 

Faculty 

Full-Time 155 

Part-Time 162 

Emeriti 162 

Fellowship of Christian Athletes 51 

Financial Information 28 

Student Expenses /Tuition 28 

Terms of Payment 30 

Tuition Refund Policy 30 

Board and Rent Refund Policy 31 

Financial Aid to Students 31 

Financial Aid General 

Regulations 32 

Types of Financial Aid 32 

Foreign Study 148 

French, Courses in 98 

General Information and 

College History 13 

General Studies 148 

German, Courses in 98 

Gerontology, Minor/Courses in ...126 

Governance 15 

Grades 59 

Grade Point Average 

Computation 60 

Graduate Program 54 

Graduation Honors 61 

Greek, Courses in 131 

Gulfport Campus Program 73 

Health Education, Courses in 124 

Health Related Professions, 83 

Pre-Professional 

Health Services 26 

Hebrew, Courses in 131 

History, Major/Courses in 91 

Honors Program 19, 147 

Housing Pohcy for Single Students.... 27 

Institutional Effectiveness 16 

International Relations Council 51 

International Students 21 

Kappa Mu Epsilon 51 



Keesler Center 148 

Lambda Iota Tau 51 

Law, Pre-Professional 91 

Library System 73 

Loans 31 

Locations, William Carey College... 15 

Majors and Minors 71 

Maps, Campus 3, 4, 5 

Mathematics, Major/Courses in 99 

Medical Technology 83 

Medicine, Pre-Professional 84 

Missions, Minor/Courses in 129 

Music, Winters School of 132-140 

Admission Requirements 132 

Curriculum Plans/Majors 132 

Proficiency Examinations 1 34 

Recital Requirements 133 

Upper-Level Examination 1 33 

Music, Applied 139 

Music Education, Courses in 134 

Music Educators National 

Conference 51 

Music Ensemble, Courses in 137 

Music History and Literature, 

Courses in 138 

Music Theory, Courses in 139 

Music Therapy, Courses in 137 

New Orleans Baptist Theological 

Seminary 15 

New Orleans Campus Program 73 

Nondegree Students 20 

Nondiscrimination/ Disclaimer 16 

Nursing, School of 141-146 

Admission of Students 142 

Advanced Placement, RN 146 

Attendance 145 

Courses at Each Level 145 

CPR Certification 145 

Curriculum/Courses 143 

Graduate Competencies 141 

Graduation Requirements 146 

Health Examinations 145 

Insurance 145 

Progression 145 

Occupational Therapy, 

Pre-Professional 84 

Omicron Delta Kappa 51 

Optometry, Pre-Professional 84 



167 



Organization of the College 54 

Pell Grant 33 

Personnel 151 

Pharmacy, Pre-Prof essional 84 

Phi Beta Lambda 52 

Philosophy, Minor/Courses in 103 

Physical Education, Major/ 

Courses in 122 

Physical Science, Courses in 89 

Physical Therapy, Pre-Professional ....84 

Physics, Courses in 102 

Political Science, Courses in 93 

Pre-Law 91 

President's List 61 

Privacy, Student Records 16 

Psychology Club 52 

Psychology, Major/Courses in 126 

Purpose of College 

(See Inside Front Cover) 

Quality Points 59 

Readmission 20 

Recreation, Minor /Courses in 122 

Refund Policy 30 

Religion, Major/Courses in 129 

Religious Activities 48 

Requirements for All Degrees 55 

Repeating of Courses 57 

Residence Regulations 27 

Residential Life, Philosophy for 27 

Respiratory Therapy 

Pre-Professional 84 

Safety and Security 26 

Scholarships, Institutional 

Scholarships and Awards 33 

Church Related Vocations 35 

Athletic 35 

Endowed and Named 36 

Restricted 44 

Faculty Endowment 46 

Mississippi Mission Endowment ....47 

Scholastic Honors 61 

Second Degree 55 

Serampore Players 52 



Servicemember Opportunity 

College 149 

Social Clubs 49 

Gamma Chi 51 

Pi Omega 52 

Social Science Major 91 

Sociology, Courses in 93 

Spanish, Courses in 97 

Special Programs 147 

Speech Communication and 

Theatre Major /Courses in 104 

Staff 162 

Statement of Purpose 

(Inside Front Cover) 

Student Government 

Association 49, 53 

Student Life and Campus Activities ..47 

Student Publications 49 

Student Support Services 148 

Table of Contents 6-7 

Teacher Licensure Procedure 119 

Theatre, Major /Courses in 104 

Transcripts 64 

Transfer Credits 57 

Transfer Students 19 

Trimester Calendar 57 

Vehicle Registration 26 

Veterinary Medicine, 

Pre-Professional 84 

William Carey College 

Academic Organization of 54 

Accreditation 15 

Addresses (Inside Back Cover) 

General Information 13 

Governance 15 

History 13 

Locations 15 

Purpose of (Inside Front Cover) 

William Carey Lectures 48 

Withdrawal 63 



168 



CORRESPONDENCE 

(Hattiesburg Campus) 

Academic Programs Vice President of Academic Affairs 

Application for Admission Director of Admissions 

Contributions, Gifts, Endowments Executive Assistant to the President 

Curriculum Clarification Vice President of Academic Affairs 

Financial Aid Director of Financial Aid 

(Academic Scholarships, Work-Study Programs, Loans, and Grants) 

General Information External Relations 

Graduate Business Program M.B.A. Director 

Graduate Education Program Dean, School of Education and Psychology 

Graduate Psychology Program Director, Masters in Psychology Program 

Honors Program Director of Honors Program 

Housing Dean of Student Development 

Student Affairs Dean of Student Development 

(Counseling and Social Activities) 

Transcripts and Class Schedules : Registrar 



College Mailing Addresses 

WILLIAM CAREY COLLEGE 

498 Tuscan Avenue 1856 Beach Drive N.O.BT.S. 

Hattiesburg, MS 39401-5499 Gulfport, MS 39507 3939 Gentilly Blvd., Box 308 

601-582-5051 228-897-7100 New Orleans, LA 70126 

504-286-3275 



170 



171 



172 




William Carey College 
Hattiesburg • Gulfport • New Orleans 



1-800-962-5991 
www.wmcarey.edu