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0119475 



William Geddes and Descendants 






with general history, items and notes pertaining to 
William Geddes and his wives — early ancestors, 
topographical and historical notes, incidents of 
Interest which have been collected from various 
sources: original records, letters, L.D.S. Church 
records, parish records, diaries, books. Interviews, 
family traditions and the family data and sketches 
which have been written by various members of the 
family. 



DATE WiCROFICHED 




_19_Z^ 



PBOJFCT ".r.a 
FICHK <* 



G. S. 

CALL # 



AR11QI2=^ 



ODmpiled 

28 February 1966 

by 



GENEALOGICAL SOCIETY 

OF THE CHURCH OF JESUS CHRIST 
OF LATTER-DAY SAINTS 



IP 2 9i98@ 



Martha Geddes 

67 East 2nd South 

Preston, Idaho 

EDUCATIONAL PRINTING SERVICE 

7B5 NORTH SEVCNTH EAST 
LOOAN, UTAH 



This book IS dedicated 
to William Geddes 



His Life -- Testimony — Character 



PREFACE 



For many years the compiler has realized the Importance of keeping records and 
history. When she found that it was nearly Impossible to locate the history, ancestry, 
and genealogical records of this family, she decided that she would gather what in- 
formation she could find from descendants, existing records, letters, diaries, books 
and family traditions and compile a "Who's Who" in the Geddes family. To date, no 
one has attempted to record and gather together under one cover the complete history and 
genealogy of William Geddes and his three families. The generation who emigrated to 
Utah from Scotland in the early 1850's has now passed on to Its reward. This is also 
true of William's children who were all born in Utah and Idaho. Much data, information, 
and detailed history could have been obtained from them if this book had been started 
fifty years earlier. It is hoped that this effort will inspire the present as well as all future 
generations to carry on the work. 

The compiler has attempted to sketch the biographical, historical, and genealogical 
data of William Geddes and his three wives together with their descendants and ancestors. 
She found it impossible to put the descendants of all three families on one chart so his 
descendants are on three charts according to the wife. This is the first time that the 
children of William Geddes have been separated into three separate families. All had 
always been considered one family, all brothers and sisters with no distinction or sep- 
aration . 

Some mistakes will no doubt be discovered in dates, places, spelling, etc. but 
every effort has been made to record the facts as they exist. The compiler discovered 
that some facts that had been recorded in ward, temple and state records differed widely. 
She has taken those which seem to be the most accurate. If errors are discovered which 
can by evidence be shown to be wrong, the compiler would appreciate the correction 
to be sent in for the sake of work to be done on future editions by others. 

The four facts required by research to establish proper identity and delineate one 
person from any other person are the following: names, dates, places, and relation- 
ships. The compiler, therefore, has used as many of these identifying facts pertaining 
to each person listed in this book as could be found. By cross reference to the page and 
number given on the chart of direct descent or blood line, it is possible to trace one's 
lineage back to the first ancestors shown. 

Each major part of this book is designed to account for the descendants of all who 
belong to that particular branch of the family. It should be noted by all that in the several 
generations of the family with which this book is concerned. Christian names are repeated. 
To reduce the risk of confusing any individual of one generation with a member of another, 
each descendant is given a number which will follow him wherever he is referred to in 
the book. For example: (1) William Geddes, (2) William Stewart Geddes, the eldest 
child; (3) Agnes Geddes, his second child. However, this was followed chronologically 
only for the first two or three generations and after that the descendants were numbered 
according to when they were sent to the compiler. 



The compiler has no apology to moke for the many grammatical errors found in the 
book. She has made little attempt to change the work sent to her by the various members 
of the family. If, in the opinion of some, she has gone too far into matters private and 
personal, it is to be hoped all will bear in mind that this book was written, not for the 
general public, but for those nearest and dearest to these people. These, I am sure, 
will not be critical upon these points. Indeed, they would feel disappointed if this 
book of their father's and mother's lives were anything else than a free, frank, and 
familiar statement of the doings, sayings, and recollections of their ancestors. 

The compiler wishes to say that our ancestors have not been able to bequeath to us 
gold, silver, fine houses and great wealth, but they have given us something far more 
precious, a testimony of the restored gospel of Jesus Christ. They have taught us true 
and noble principles and through their deeds in life, they have shed the light of truth 
upon the path they wished us to pursue. 



ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS 



Sincere thanks and appreciation are here expressed to all who have contributed 
data for this compilation and to those who have given valuable assistance in its pre- 
paration for publication. In this regard, I am particularly grateful and indebted to 
Sharon Hogge Steensma, Karia Geddes Cattani, Faung Geddes Hogge, Nona Geddes 
Goodson, Fern Geddes, Ruby Randall Davis, Lois England Thomas, Helen Greaves 
Burrup, Joan Geddes Jorgensen, Allene Sutherland, Alene Stephen Aller, Donna Fames 
Noyes, Margaret Head Winward, Helen Geddes Clement, Vanona Whitehead Geddes, 
Josie Geddes Nielsen, Irel Lowe Geddes, Ora Geddes Marstello. I would also like to 
extend appreciation and thanks to the publishing committee, especially the president, 
Ora Marstello, and the other members: Evans Murray, Dr. David Darwin Geddes, Joan 
Jorgensen . 

A heavy debt of gratitude must be expressed to Sharon H . Steensma who has presided 
with patience, dignity and love over the typing and proofreading of the manuscript. 
She also helped with the index which is an important part of the book. 

All those who helped in a monetary way with their pre-publication subscriptions 
have my grateful acknowledgement with a special thanks for all the money and time 
spent by my brother William Stewart Geddes and his wife Vanona Geddes. 

To all others who have so kindly allowed me to reprint material or helped in any 
way, I extend heartfelt thanks. Especially do I thank Edna Geddes Fames for her 
picture of the Geddes family group reunion held at the home of Elizabeth Carver. I 
would also like to thank Pearl Geddes Fames for the picture of the Geddes boys of the 
first two families . 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 

Page 

HISTORICAL BACKGROUND 1 

Part One: WILLIAM GEDDES AND HIS WIVES 

Biography, Diary, Letters, Citizenship Certificate of William Geddes ... 17 

Biography and Pedigree Chart of Elizabeth Stewart, First Wife 49 

Biography and Pedigree Chart of Martha Stewart, Second Wife 51 

Biography and Pedigree Chart of Emma Hope, Third Wife 54 

Part Two: DESCENDANT CHART, SKETCHES, FAMILY GROUPS OF FIRST FAMILY 

William Stewart Geddes 78 

Joseph Stewart Geddes 243 

Archibald Stewart Geddes 301 

Elizabeth Geddes 319 

Jedediah Morgan Grant Geddes 323 

Part Three: DESCENDANT CHART, SKETCHES, FAMILY GROUPS OF SECOND FAMILY 

Agnes Geddes 344 

Hugh Stewart Geddes 363 

Mary Geddes 435 

Annie Geddes 461 

Margaret Geddes 490 

James Stewart Geddes 505 

Part Four: DESCENDANT CHART, SKETCHES, FAMILY GROUPS OF THIRD FAMILY 

Robert Campbell Geddes 603 

Eliza Marie Geddes 648 

Sarah Geddes 677 

Susie Geddes 679 

David George Geddes 685 

Hyrum Smith Geddes 724 

Joan Campbell Geddes 727 

Part Five: RESEARCH DEPARTMENT 

Geddes and Graham Genealogical Work 753 

Stewart and Lyie Genealogical Work 758 



TABLE OF ABBREVIATIONS 



Numbers (1 , 
** 



B.Y.U. 

U. of U. 

U.S.U. 

L.D.S. 

Ire. 

Idh. 

Scot. 

Bapt. 

B. 

Chr. 

D. 

End. 

Md. 

G.S. 

P.O. 

Pt. 

Sid. 

Fom. 

Rec. 

N.E. 

F. 

Mill. 

Emig 

Bur. 

Poss. 

Dou. 

Ch. 

Bk. 

Cem. 



Star 



Indicates family genealogical pedigree chart 
2, 3) indicate family descendant chart 
Indicate biographical sketch 
Indicate pictures 

Brigham Young University at Provo, Utah 
University of Utah at Salt Lake City, Utah 
Utah State University at Logan, Utah 

Latter Day Saints for the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints 
Ireland 
Idaho 
Scotland 
Baptism 
Birth 

Christening or L.D.S. blessing, the giving of a name 
Death 

Endowment (s) 
Marriage 

Genealogical Society 
President's Office 
Part 

Sealing 
Family 
Records 
Northeast 
Film 

Millenial Star 
Emigration 
Buried 
Possession 
Daughter 
Church 
Book 
Cemetery 



HISTORICAL BACKGROUND 



The historical background of the Geddes family has been an interesting, but a 
very difficult task. Searching through old manuscripts, musty history books and gen- 
ealogical records has taken the compiler to university and genealogical libraries at 
Seattle, Portland, San Francisco, Denver, Salt Lake City, and Logan, Utah; but with 
little success. Finally a librarian at the Salt Lake City Public Library said that she had 
seen a new Geddes book listed by Taber and Taber Ltd., 24 Russel Square, London. 
She looked it up and it was written by Baron Auckland Campbell Geddes and called The 
Forging of a Family. Several books were ordered. The book had a historical forenote 
with legends and traditions much better than the one the compiler had been piecing 
together. It is for this reason that parts of it are being included here. It is felt that 
the information will give the reader background and insight into the history and char- 
acters of his ancestors. 



THE GEDDES BACKGROUND 



Historical Forenote (from book) 

Before beginning the story of who the original Geddeses were, and whence they came, 
there is a fragment of the history of Roman Britain which should be known. In itself it 
had nothing directly to do with any of our known ancestors; yet, indirectly it profoundly 
affected the Geddeses and set the stage for the medieval drama of our line. 

it is common knowledge that long before North Britain was called Scotland there 
was a considerable population in Lowland Caledonia; yet when the Scots came, they had 
no difficulty in spreading rapidly over the west and south of that land. They found the 
area sparsely populated; some parts, indeed, without human habitation. This note 
explains the emptiness of this fertile and pleasant country. 

Somewhere about A.D. 170-180 the Roman Garrisons of Britain were reduced almost 
to a vanishing point to provide men for the savage civil war raging in the Empire. The 
Caledonians, a mixture of Pictish and Belgic tribes, seized this opportunity for revenge 
and loot. They swept down on the Solway; captured it and destroyed most of it. How 
they did so much damage, without explosives. Is difficult to understand. Masonry 
ten feet thick, twenty feet high, was scattered in piles of broken debris. Gate-houses, 
forts and bridges were reduced to rubble. The tide of invasion swept south. The 
fortress of Chester was laid In ruins; and even farther south traces of this fierce invasion 
are stil I to be found . 

The end of the Civil War saw Severus the victorious Emperor, and the time of re- 
tribution from the Caledonians was at hand. The Legions returned to Britain. The 
country was cleared of the Northern invaders up to the Tyne-Solway line; and the trem- 
endous work of rebuilding the Wall of Hadrian was begun. The fortress of Chester and the 

1 



Legionary base at York were reconstituted. Early in the third century Roman power was 
firmly re-established in South Britain. 

In the meantime, the Belgic and Pictish tribes of Caledonian, foreseeing the coming 
storm, prepared for war on the grand scale — as the numerous hill forts of Lowland 
Scotland testify. Rome knew she could not hold Caledonia; but she also knew she could 
smite the Caledonians, and she did. Never was there such a revenge. The Emperor 
Severus took command and pushed his Legions through Lowland Caledonia to the 
Forth-Clyde Line; there he rebuilt the Wall of Antonine, not as a defense work against 
the attack from the north, but as a stop-butt against which to drive the population of 
the Lowlands. He cleared the country from the Solway to the Clyde, from the Tyne to 
the Forth of all its people. The tribes which surrendered were deported, men, women, 
and children, to the Wurttemberg Forest area . There the men were formed into the 
British Auxiliary Infantry units to guard Rome's frontier against the Germanic hordes. The 
names of many of these units have been found in Roman Inscriptions on stones In Wurttemberg. 

Tribes that would not surrender were exterminated. The slaughter must have been pitiless, 
especially of those driven out of the Lammermuirs and herded by the advancing Legions 
into a pocket which seems to have extended from North Berwick Harbour westward to 
Aberlady Bay. The final massacres took place not far from high-water mark. There are 
extensive areas of the North Berwick West Golf Course and the links between Gullane and 
the sea, and between DIrleton and the sea, where it is almost impossible to dig more than a 
few inches below the surface without turning out fragments of much disintegrated human bone. 
Some of these fragments were Identified by the anatomical department of the University of 
Edinburgh as certainly human, but too fragmented and too much disintegrated to be of value 
as anthropological specimens. This is just as we would expect, with corpses left lying on 
the surface, devoured by dogs or wolves, and ultimately hidden from sight by drifting sand. 

Even after he had depopulated the Lowlands, Severus had not finished with the 
Caledonians. He created a naval base at Cramond, on the Firth of Forth between Edin- 
borough and Queensberry, and proceeded to work up the east coast by land and sea . The 
fighting seems to have been bitter and the Roman casualties heavy; the work of revenge 
wanton until the Moray Firth was reached. Some units, probably naval, even penetrated 
to the Pentland Firth. There were no great sea battles and no resounding Roman victories. 
The Caledonians fought as guerrillas and never surrendered. This campaign lasted for 
nearly five years and then Severus, broken in body by the hardships he had endured, 
travelled south to York, where he died in the winter of A.D. 211-212. 

After his death the campaign was called off. The Roman armies fell back behind 
the Wall of Hadrian, beyond which they had made a desert, verily Pax Romano. And, 
it was peace for one hundred years. Even In the fifth century when the Scots came, the 
Lowlands were still In large port deserted. So it was through Rome that the transfor- 
rTKition of Caledonia to Scotland was made easy. 

Legends ond Tradi tions 

Most children wonder where their family comes from, and pester their elders with 



questions. Young Campbell in the early eighteen-eightles certainly did . He wanted 
to know why his family was called Geddes and where they came from; the answers he 
got puzzled him. His brother, Eric, said they were Highlanders and should wear the 
kilt; his sister. Mono, told him that the family came from Orkney, where there was a 
terrible old lady called Granny O'Hoy; sister Margaret said they were called Geddes be- 
cause that was father's name; his mother told him that the family were Northern Scots. 
One of his aunts said the original Geddes homeland was in Dumfriesshire; and his father, 
when the various points of view were laid before him, said that all these things were 
true, but that the first Geddeses came from Ireland and that he would understand it all 
when he was grown up. The man who really started him off on his long quest, however, 
was "Auld Wullie." 

Campbell 's first recollection of this remarkable old vagrant is of standing and watch- 
ing him with his long white beard, plaid of shepherd's tartan, and broad blue bonnet, 
sitting on the garden seat. Auld Wullie had been plentifully supplied with food from 
the house and he was getting ready to eat. Having removed his bonnet and saying grace, 
he started to eat and the child and the old man fell into conversation. Auld Wullie 
called Campbell "Pickerel;" and, when told that his name was "Geddes, " said: "Yes, 
of course . That's why I call you Pickerel." 

This was a puzzle, so Wullie explained: "A ged's a pike, and a little pike is a 
pickerel . " 

This set Campbell thinking. As the old man ate, the conversation continued. 
He said he was an old soldier, that he had served in the "Dirty Half-hundred" and that 
Campbell's grand-uncle was the Colonel, "and a very good Colonel too." 

"What are you now?" asked Campbell . 

"A wandering minstrel ." 

"Why do you wander?" 

"Because the bigots of the iron time have made my simple art a crime . " When he 
was asked to sing, he intoned this doggerel: 

"The Ged's land — ees fair to see, 
With valleys broad and rivers three; 
Where Eske and Annan, and the Nith 
Flow softly to the Solway Firth." 

When Campbell told him his family were Highlanders, his answer was: "No, Pickerel, 
the Geds all came from Solwayside." 

The Geds 

It took many years to pick up all the pieces of history and legend, and to find how 



they fitted together. Here is the picture that emerged. 

The Scots are, relatively speaking, a modern people. They first appear on the 
stage in the fourth century as a people of mixed racial origin in that part of Hibernia 
which is now called Ulster. Their fathers were raiding Northmen; their mothers, in- 
digenous Hibernians of dark Iberian stock, or Romano-British girls taken captive by 
the Northmen in their raids on the British coasts, or even girls from farther afield, 
from the Channel and Atlantic coasts of Gaul . As the fourth century advanced, these 
heathen savages organized themselves in seven septs, each calling itself after some 
animal or thing which its members especially admired. One of them selected as its 
exemplar the most ferocious and voracious of fresh-water fish, the pike; called, in 
the tongue of the Northmen, the ged . This is the origin of the Geddes name and the 
tap root of the Geddes stock. 

About the middle of the fourth century, the half-breeds, the Scots, were extending 
their power over Hibernia; and In A.D. 389 their leader, Niall, proclaimed himself 
High King of Hibernia. Under this famous warrior - perhaps pirate would be a better 
word - the Scots took heavy toll of loot and women from Britain and Gaul . To meet 
the threat of their raiding squadrons, Romano-British naval patrols were formed; and 
fortified bases were laid out on a new pattern on the British coasts. This meant harder 
fighting for the Scots, for loot and girls. In one of these sea fights, under the lee of the 
Isle of Wight, in the year A.D. 405, Niall was killed. 

As the Romano-British squadrons gained strength, a new way of raiding Roman 
Britain was devised by the Scots. They established settlements in Britain itself, but 
north of the Wall of Hadrian. It was in a settlement of this type, somewhere in the 
upper Nith Valley, that the Scottish Geddeses, the children of Niall, made their first 
home in Caledonia. 

Among the captive Romano-Bri tains carried off by the Scots in one of Niall's raids 
was a boy of fifteen and his two sisters, whose father was a Roman civil servant and a 
deacon of the Christian Church. The boy, later known to fame as St. Patrick, was not 
enslaved in Hibernia, for he soon appears again in history as a pupil at the Candida 
Casa, as the bright white-washed mission station of St. Ninian, at Whithorn in Wig- 
tonshire, built in A.D. 397 was called. From the geographical juxtaposition of the 
Nith Valley and the Candida Casa there is some plausibility in a tradition that young 
Patrick was actually captured by one of the Ged raiding parties. Of his sisters, nothing 
further is known; but it may fairly be assumed that their fate was that of the women of 
whom we have already heard. 

Although it has nothing to do with our story at this stage, it is on record that it was 
from the Candida Casa that Patrick went to continue his studies at Lerins, near Marseilles, 
under St. Victor, who was busy introducing Egyptian priest-craft and monasticism to 
the Christian Church in Gaul . 

In the year 432 the Blessed St. Patrick was created Bishop and dispatched by St. 
Germanus to see if anything could be done about Christianizing the Scots and other 
inhabitants of Hibernia. 



There Is nofhing known about the early doings of the Geds of the NIth Valley 
except that St. NInlan wrestled with their heathenism, and at some uncertain date they 
became, nominally. Christian . As was so often the case. It may well be that their 
women, many of whomwere Christianized Romano-British captives, taught their children 
what they remembered of Christianity, and were themselves taught by the disciples of 
St. NInlan. 

It was not long before the whole of south-west Scotland was peopled by Scots, 
and this led to that district being called Galloway, which means "the land of Immigrant 
strangers . " 

While the Geds were multiplying In Galloway, other Scots were moving into Ayrshire, 
pushing up the Clyde Valley, occupying Cantyre, and spreading out Into Dumbarton and 
Argyll . Gradually they consolidated their organization and formed the first Scottish 
Kingdom in Caledonia, Dalrlada. In the ebb and flow of tribal warfare, Cumbria, a 
kingdom formed In the upper Clyde Valley, spread its power to the western sea, cutting 
off the Scots of Galloway from direct contact wiih the Scots of Scotia, as the area they 
occupied north of the Clyde estuary had come to be called. This severance of the 
Geddeses in Galloway from their kinsmen to the northward forced on the Geddes stock 
a peculiar Isolation which was their main characteristic throughout the middle ages. 

They were the Moss Troopers, men of the Moss Hags, who rode, reived , and raped 
with complete impartiality in any direction which promised a hope of loot of cattle, 
sheep, and horses; especially horses, for they had now almost forsaken the sea and made 
their forays mounted. As a result of the revenge taken by the Roman Emperor, Severus, 
there was not much loot north of the line of Hadrian's Wall. But what had been Roman 
Britlan still preserved some treasures of the past, and It was from south of the Wall that 
the raiders lifted the cattle they so badly needed as food. 

When the development of Romano-British sea power had forced the Scots to establish 
settlements In Caledonia, the Romano-British reply to the new form of raiding was to 
establish mobile columns of armoured cavalry, whose commander-in-chief bore a title 
which may be rendered "Count of Britain . " The natural reply of the raiders from north 
of the Wal I to this mi lltary development was to turn themselves Into a highly mobile 
"light cavalry." If we think for a moment of straggling columns of fierce horsemen 
moving through the emptiness of northern England with its great forests, its marshes 
and moorland wastes, we get what Is probably a not Inaccurate picture of the life of our 
ancestors . 

The historical basis of the great body of legend, myth and poetry concerning King 
Arthur and his Knights can be accounted for because of the protection they gave the people 
from the swift and terrifying raiders — Scots, Angles, Saxons. 

It is remarkable that for many generations, perhaps thirty, the Geddes stock produced 
no man of such outstanding ability as to force his way on to the pages of history. Reivers 
and cattle-lifters they were; and so they remained until the day came when neither 



'Meaning to plunder, pillage, rob or loot. Oxford English Dictionary, 



Scotland nor England could tolerate them any longer. Then came dispersal, which 
scattered them over Scotland and even parts of England. Some, settling down In lowland 
Scotland, became respectable and appear In Scottish history as the Geddeses of Rachan In 
Peebleshire . Those finding refuge In England concealed their identity by adopting as 
their family name one of two variants of the Latin word for Pike, (lucius) LUCE or Lucy; 
or In plain English, "Pike." One party, a small one, escaped by sea to the far north 
of Scotland. They landed In on area of Lock Erriboll and offered their swords and services to 
the Chieftain of the Clan Mackay. It is from this party of Geddes refugees that we 
descend. They took with them, to their new home, scant provision of material wealth, 
but traditions by which they set much store. They were "Scots" of the original Scottish 
stock — children of NIall . They were Geds, and their badge was the free-swimming 
Pike. And, they were free men. 

These events belong, by date, to the middle of the fifteenth century; and, be it noted, 
from that day to this there has been no blood connection between the Geddeses who 
landed at Erriboll and any others of their name or its variants. But all the Geddeses 
and, so far as it Is known, also those who call themselves Luce, Lucy, and Pike, have 
retained in their crests, their arms and their badges, the device of the Ged, either as 
the whole fish, swimming free, or its head, or as in the arms of Geddes, as supporters 
of the central shield. The free-swimming Ged is, as a badge, much older than heraldry 
and has nothing to do with noble birth. 

At the time of the dispersal, a handful of the Geds managed to stay In their old home- 
land, and in the second quarter of the sixteenth century, we find them turning themselves 
into country gentlemen, building houses and accepting grants of arms. Sir Walter Scott, 
who knew the border country and Galloway as few have known it, gives a vivid picture 
of what their descendants had become in his day, in the seventh letter of his preface to 
Redgauntlet . Here is his description of a visit to the house and grounds on the old 
"Sharing-Knowe" — the place where garnered loot was portioned out. The owner was 
a Quaker called Joshua Geddes. Scott says: 

He proceeded to solicit my attention to the natural objects around us — 
our course lay through a little gate, into a pathway kept with great 
neatness, the sides of which were decorated with trees and flowering 
shrubs — till finally, my guide, shaking me cordially by the hand, 
made me welcome to Mount Sharon. 

The house fronted to the south-east, and from thence ~ the gardens sloped down 
to the water ~ with their shaven turf bleached a lleys and exotic trees and shrubs 
(they) greatly excelled anything of the kind which hod been attempted in the 
neighbourhood . 

Joshua Geddes conducted me to a small sashed door opening into a parlour of 
moderate size; the furniture of which In plainness and excessive cleanliness 
bore the characteristic marks of the sect to which the owner belonged . The 
parlour chimney engaged my attention. It was a pile of massive stone, 
entirely out of proportion . On the front had once been an armorial 
escutcheon; for the hammer — which had been employed to deface the 



shield — had left uninjured the scroll beneath, which bore the pious 
motto 'Trust in God.' 

Joshua Geddes paused when he saw my eye fixed on this relic of antiquity. 

"Thou canst read it," he said. 

I repeated the motto and added there seemed to be vestiges of a date. 
"It should be 1537, for so long ago did my ancestors, in the blinded times 
of Papistry, possess these lands and in that year did they build their 
house . " 

"Vanity of Vanities, saith the preacher," thus harangued Joshua Geddes, 
"if we ourselves are nothing in the sight of Heaven how much less than 
nothing must be our derivation from rotten bones and mouldering dust whose 
immortal spirits have long since gone to their private account? Yes, 
friend, my ancestors were renowned among the ravenous and bloodthirsty 
men who then dwelt in this vixed country; and so much were they famed for 
successful freebooting, roguery, and bloodshed, that they are said to hove 
been called Geddes, as likening them to the fish called a Jack, Pike, or 
Luce, and in our country tongue, a Ged — a goodly distinction truly for 
Christian men? Yet did they paint this shark of the fresh waters upon their 
shields and those profane priests of a wicked idolatry, the empty boasters 
called heralds, who make engraven images of fishes, fowls, and four-footed 
beasts, that men may fall down and worship them, assigned the Ged for the 
device and escutcheon of my fathers and hewed it over their chimneys and 
placed it above their tombs; and the men were elated in mind and became 
yet more Ged-like, slaying, leading Into captivity and dividing the spoil, 
until the place where they dwelt obtained the name of Sharlng-Knowe, from 
the booty which was there divided amongst them and their accomplices." 

Our story has nothing more to tell either of Moss-trooping and mounted forays 
or of the "ged's land-ees so fair to see." We turn to Sutherland, a harder and sterner 
land. There our Geddeses almost disappear in the body of the Clan Mackay; almost 
but not quite, for through some five generations, fathers told sons who they were, what 
was their badge and how their forefathers, taking to their boats, had voyaged north 
rather than bow the knee. 

They must have felt pretty much at home with the Mackays, as one or two tales 
will show. There is a Mackay record which tells how Neil, the Chieftain of the Mac- 
kays in the early 1590's was at loggerheads with the Earl of Caithness. The trouble 
started over the Earl's daughter. The details are obscure, but Neil the Chieftain, re- 
garded himself as having been insulted, and in 1592 he and his clansmen marched. 
They captured, sacked, and burned the Earl's town of Wick. According to our family 
traditions, the Geddeses, now a sept of the Clan Mackay, fought under the leadership 



An old Irish clan or tribe ruled by a patriarch . 



of Neil on this occasion. We con well Imagine, too, that to the Geddes's ancestral 
memories It must have seemed as If the good old days had come again. It Is quite clear 
that to the Earl of Caithness it seemed that he was dealing with a gang of ruffians who 
must be extirpated. He had at his disposal a semi -secret organization called the 
Sleight Eon Roy. This he ordered out to do the bloody work he planned. Neil, the 
Chieftain, his son, his brother, and several of his clan, were caught and killed. William 
More Mackay, nephew of the Chief, soon avenged these murders. He himself, with 
his own hand. In the course of one day, killed twenty-four of the Earl's murder gang. 
And that appears to have been the end of the matter. 

Another episode In which the redoubtable William More appears concerns our family 
even more closely and shows how the Geddeses had retained their identity. Blending 
Mackay records and Geddes tradition, the tale is told that certain of the Mackays, 
jealous that the Geddeses were close to the Chieftain, determined to eliminate them. 
To accomplish their end, the Mackay plotters Invited our ancestors to a great feast with 
the Intention of making the trustful Geddes worthies so drunk that they could not stand, 
then slaughtering them, thus purging the clan of this foreign body. William More, 
having heard of the banquet and its purpose, and being of the opinion that the idea 
was not a good one, put on full armour and went to the hall of feasting to prevent the 
massacure. He arrived in time, and alone, to save our inebriated forebears from Impending 
doom. This Is all we know. Again the curtain drops. 

The year 1648 was decisive for the ancient tribal organization of the Mackay. A 
later Neil was Chieftain and he was suddenly confronted by a new power called Law. 
It was proved in court that he possessed no charter for the land that had been the Mackays 
since time out of mind, when there were no charters. He must hove thought that the 
foundations of the world had moved when he found himself no longer the owner of the 
ancestral lands, but a landless man; stripped of his property by due process of law. He 
went to Thurso to lodge an appeal, and there the men who had coveted his property, and 
who had its ownership almost within their grasp, clinched the matter. They employed 
an Irish gentleman, named Donald McAlister Mullick, to murder poor Neil, the last 
fighting Chieftain of the Clan Mackay. This happy combination of legal process and 
tribal practice ended the argument. 

Out of the blurred picture of falsehood, fraud and slaughter a shadowy figure 
emerges; one Geddes male about whom we know little with certainty, not even his 
Christian name — but he is the Adam of our line . 



The Forging of a Family by Sir AucklandCampbell Geddes 



THE SCOTCH-IRISH 

Throughout this book, reference Is often made to the Scotch-Irish . These are a 
migratory race who had settled in both Ireland and Scotland and later in northern England. 



The Scotch-Irish are a mixture of Scotch, Irish, Danish, Norweglons, Swedish, Anglo- 
Saxons, Germans, Dutch, French Hugenots, and Normans. They became the clans of 
the Highlanders of Scotland and the family tribes or petty kingdoms of Ulster Province 
of Ireland. Whatever the blood of the genuine Scotch-Irish, one thing is certain; 
it is not mixed v^ith the ancient Celtic or pre-celtic race of southern Ireland. The ancient 
Celts are of the Cymrl race which ages ago migrated into Europe from Asia, while the 
Gael or Aryans which include the Scotch-Irish, were known In history as the Germanic 
tribes. From time Immemorial these two races have been hostile. They have fought 
bitterly during the centuries as the Greens of the South and the Orangemen of the North . 

The border clans of Scotland and the heathen tribes of Ulster were freedom-loving 
fighters and would do anything to retain their freedom. The Highlanders of Northern 
Scotland were not even captured by the great Roman armies. They were considered no 
better than common thieves by the Southern Irish and the English government. It took 
St. Patrick, George Fox and the printing press to civilize them. Although these fierce 
clansmen were difficult to subdue and civilize, when they once accepted the change, 
they accepted It wholeheartedly. The Bible was printed in the Scottish language in 
1501 and by 1579 every Scottish home had a Bible whether the people could read It or 
not. It was the dream of every child to get an education so that he could read the 
Bible and learn to think for himself. The Scottish free public school system is just about 
the oldest and the best in the world. 

The Geddes family were all originally Viking stock who emigrated from Norway to 
the north of Ireland about the year 900 A.D. In the 12th century or thereabouts they 
moved across to the southwest corner of Scotland where they lived largely on the proceeds 
of stolen English cattle and the loot they obtained from the high seas, as pirates or 
robbers of the English ships. They later joined with the Mackay Clan in the north and 
became the swift and terrifying raiders. Another group joined as Scots with the Anglo- 
Saxons in the south of England and became raiders. In about the 16th century a large 
group went to Galloway to a civilized life and a small group went to the Orkney Islands. 
The rest settled in Lanarkshire and Renfrewshire and northern Ireland. Many went to 
England but they changed their names to Luce, Lucy, or Pike. 

They all originally used the shield with three pike heads on a field of blue . The 
name Geddes comes from the Norwegian word "Gjedde" which means a pike or in 
Scotland, a "Ged" and their badge was the free-swimming pikes. They gloried In being 
free men and became more Ged-like . Their shield is much older than heraldry and has 
nothing to do with noble birth . It meant that they had a right to belong, to be a member. 
Today this shield Is used on seals, insignia rings, etc. The signet ring which all male 
members of the family after their twenty-first birthday used to wear. Is now used mostly 
by the Orkney branch of the family. The stone in the ring is a sardonyx, cut so that 
the blue forms the surface but the engraving goes through into the black of the stone. 
Judge James Geddes of Onondaga County, New York, had a similar device in the form 
of a seal: three pike's heads on a field of blue with the motto "Capta Jajora" written 
at the bottom of the shield. 

Because of their fierceness, their love of freedom, and their history of plunder, a 
price was put on their heads by the English and they were forced to go under cover in 
order to survive. An example of the prejudice which was held against them is evidenced 



in the records of the Privy Council about a murder. A Mr. William Geddes was killed 
in 1558 by the Tweedies, and thus began a long feud with that family. There is no 
information about this murder other than an entry in the Privy Council's records which 
states that a respite was granted under the Privy Seal to James Tweedie of Drumelzier 
(et al ■) for the cruel slaughter of William Geddes, son apparent heir of Charles Geddes 
of Cuthilhall on 29th December 1592, with a note saying, "This is the most dastardly 
crime ever upheld by English law." Years later James Geddes of Glenhigton fell, 
another victim to the treachery of the Tweedies in Edinburgh (Buchan III, pp. 282-283). 
This was also upheld by English law. 

While research was being done for this book and information about the Geddes name 
and history sought, my brother Stewart Geddes and his wife, Vanona, found a large Geddes 
history book in the Robert Burns Museum in Europe. They were not permitted to touch the 
book, however, because it was so old it was feared that it would crumble to dust. It 
is thought that the book belonged to Dr. John Geddes (1739-1799) a bishop of the Roman 
Catholic Church, residing in Edinburgh, who was an intimate friend of Robert Burns, 
the poet; or to his brother, Bishop Alexander Geddes (1737 - 1802) an eminent Biblical 
critic, translator and poet; and was given to the poet Robert Burns. Although the book 
perhaps could have shed much light on the Geddes history, its contents will never be 
known . 

^ The mother of William Geddes was Agnes Graham (Grahame, Graeme), the name of 
an illustrious familyof Anglo-Norman origin which settled in Scotland early in the 12th 
century. The first of the name recorded in Scotland is William de Graham who received 
from David I lands of Obercorn and Dalkeith and is a witness to several of that King's 
charters. This charter is undated, as was usual in those times, but as the chronicle of 
Melrose records the foundation of the Abbey in 1 128, the charter has been assumed to be 
the same date. William de Graham, however, appears in a charter the dates of which 
Sir Archibald Lawrie places at 1 127. "Walter, the gude man of Netherly being trouble- 
some on the Scottish Border In 1606 were transplanted from Cumbeland to Roscommon in 
Ireland." (Calender of State Papers of Ireland, 1603-1606). From the War of Independence 
downwards, the Grahams have taken a prominent part in the affairs of Scotland. 

Archibald Stewart, the father of Martha and Elizabeth, is the ancestor of William 
Geddes s w.ves. There are four ways of spelling the surname (Stewart, Steuart, Stuart, 
and Steward) besides the borrowed Gaelic form "Stwbhard ." The fame of Mary, Queen of 
Scots, who spelled her name Stuart after the French manner, and of the Young Pretender 
has made the French form more popular. The Scottish Royal Family of Steward descended 
trom a family of Breton nobles who were hereditary Seneschals of Dal . The first re- 
corded ,s Alan Daplfer who flourished about the middle of the 1 1 th century His son 
also named Alan became Lord Oswestry and appears as witness to a grant by Henry I of 
England to the Monks of Marmoutier, 1 100-1 108. Walter, one of the four sons of this 
Alan, was the first of his family in Scotland. He first appears in 1 142 when he attests 
a charter of David , the soir sanch for the crown to Melrose Abbey. He, also, appears 
a on! r th" W .r r ^o;/"^ °"' ^'^^ ^^^'^ ■ ^^^^^ ^'^ ^eath in 1 153 made a 
an o :lViu' ""^'r °' ''^"°^' °^ '^°^'°"^- No original record of this 

ZuSjJTTlTu V'°''' ^"^ ° '^°'''' °^ '^^'-l- 'V g-n^ed to Walter 
.n 1157 confirming to him and his heirs the donation which King David I gave him, namely 



10 



the lands of Renfrew, Paisley, etc. and which also gives to him and his heirs the Royal 
Stewartry (Senescllia) as King David gave the same. Walter the sixth Stewart fought at 
Bannockburn In 1314 and In 1319 he was successfully led by Edward III In person and 
was one of the signers of the Scottish Declaration of Independence In 1320. In 1315 
he had married Morgouy, daughter of King Robert, the Bruce, who bore to him a son, 
Robert, afterwards Robert II, first of the Royal line of Stewart crowned in 1371 . Many 
people imagine that all persons bearing the name Stewart (or Its variations) are of 
Royal descent, but it must be borne in mind that there were Stewarts and Stewarts, as 
King James the Sixth emphasized when he said that all Stewarts were not "sib" to the 
King. Every bishop and every Earl had his Steward who in his own particular domain 
was simply "John the Steward." Almost from the beginning, the Stewarts Identified 
themselves with their Scottish mores. The country of Scotland accepted them so whole- 
heartedly that the Stewart badge of the thistle was mode the national emblem of Scotland. 

"No Scotchman," says Sir Bernard Burke, "should ever forget the title of honour and 
respect which, the family of Stewart acquired before they began to reign by their fights 
for land against the wanton aggressions of the English. Wherever the banner of freedom 
was unfurled, it was sure to be bravely defended by the Lord High Stewart and all the 
nobles of his race . " The clans of Stewart were known as "the many"; the inner rings 
of the clan were made up of Gaelic or Norse races which were very different from the 
Celtic race, so that the clan members may or may not be blood relatives. George Thomas 
Edison, editor of the Stewart Clan magazine, states that it is very likely that our 
Archibald was a descendant of the Archibald who fled from the Isle of Bute about 1544 
and settled with his sons in County Antrim, Ireland. If so, we would be descendants of 
King Robert II, Stewart of Scotland. 

However, we know so little of our Archibald, It has been Impossible for Jeannie 
L. M. Stewart, an Irish researcher or Bryan Leese to make a connection. When our 
Archibald was forced to flee from Antrim, Ireland, he went back to Renfrew, the place 
which was first granted to the Stewarts of Scotland. Nothing on the parents of Arch- 
ibald has been found. 

Lyie was the surname of the mother of Martha and Elizabeth Stewart. In the train 
of William the Conqueror's 1066 famous roll of Battle Abbey appears names from which 
the LyIe, Lise, or Lyils surname could be derived. In point of fact this Is positively 
asserted. The Normans Introduced surnames Into England, Their conquest dates from 
1066. The term "de Insulaante" dates the Norman period so far as borne by the family 
In the Western Isles of Wight. A change in the language employed in the records from 
Latin to Norman-French is explanation of how the name "de Insula" became "de lisle." 
With Norman rule ended, the "de" was dropped and the surname became as it appears now. 
The different ways of spelling the name have little significance against a common origin 
so long as the sound is preserved. 

The time of the passage of Lyies into Ireland from Scotland Is in doubt, but It Is 
probable that some of the first of the Lyle names were of those colonists who were obliged 
to leave their settlements in Cantire of the West Coast of Scotland about 1606. They 
accepted the generous offer of Sir Randall MacDonnel, Earl of Antrim, to make homes 
on his large estates In County Antrim. These estates exceeded 300,000 acres. The 



11 



distance across the channel Is short; on clear days the opposite shores are visible. Sir 
Randall MacDonnel was a Roman Catholic, but nonetheless extended a generous welcome 
to the Scotch Presbyterians who came to Ireland. Investigations locate the earliest 
of the Lyies in Ireland on Lord Antrim's estates. From that area the family spread and 
became numerous in other parts of the county. 

The family in Ireland were generally in the farmer class. Some engaged in the 
linen industry about the time of their early movement to America; there was a scarcity in 
Ireland from several crop failures and much trouble with landlords over leases. Lands 
in Antrim were inadequate for the population and rentals were much too expensive. In 
preference to going into parts of Ireland where there were none of their country men, the 
Scotch-Irish elected to come to America where lands were plentiful and cheap and o 
religious liberty existed. In Ireland their religion had been tolerated with much 
suffering. 

The Lyie home in Ireland is nearly three hundred years of age. The property has 
never been entirely out of the family. A descendant is in possession of it even today, 
in 1966. I believe that my grandfather, William Geddes, and his wives, Martha and 
Elizabeth, were true descendants of the Scotch-Irish. 



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15 



William Geddes and His Three Wives 




William Geddes 
14 November 1832 






Elizabeth Stewart 
1 March 1831 



Martha Stewart 
10 May 1838 



Emma Hope 
17 April 1845 



16 



WILLIAM GEDDES^ 

William Geddes ' , son of Hugh Geddes and Agnes Graham was born the 14th day of 
November 1832, at Newton-Hamilton, Keadypar., Armagh, Ireland. Our first records 
state that the family had been forced to flee from Ireland and they became residents of 
Baillieston, a small town a few miles outside of Glasgow, Scotland. The Hugh Geddes 
home was very humble and poor In material goods but rich in spiritual values. From his 
ancestors, William inherited a strong faith in God and the courage to face any hardship: 
rather than compromise his ideals or surrender his freedom. These stalwart characteristics 
enabled him to remain true to his convictions throughout his life regardless of the personal 
sacrifices that were necessary. 

Very little is known about William's early life except that when only a srrxjll child, he 
was put to work in the coal mines to help support the family — the work required long hours 
in the dark, damp mines of Scotland and left little or no time for school or childhood 
pleasures. It did, however, teach him to accept responsibility and to be self-reliant . 
This training and the very religious environment in which he lived prepared him to make an 
important decision at the age of fourteen which was to change his entire life. 

Coming home from work one evening, this young lad stopped on a street corner in 
Glasgow to listen to two strange Americans. They were Latter-day Sainf Missionaries 
preaching the restored Gospel of Jesus Christ. Their message made a deep impression upon 
William. He was touched by their sincerity, and the humble, yet positive manner in which 
they testified of the truthfulness of the restored gospel . William studied the Bible and 
prayed about this new religion; whenever possible he listened to the Latter-day Saint 
Missionaries explain the principles of their gospel . Although he had felt within his heart 
the first time he heard the missionaries that their message was true, he became more con- 
vinced as his knowledge and understanding of the gospel of Jesus Christ increased. Soon 
his testimony of its truthfulness was so strong that he asked to be baptized into this new 
church. This request was granted and William Geddes became a member of the Church of 
Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints 17 November 1847. 

The news of his conversion to this very unpopular religion had reached the Geddes 
home before William's arrival . His father met him at the door and forbade him to enter 
unless he would denounce his newly acquired religion and promise, on his word of honor, 
to have nothing more to do with the Mormons, a name applied to members of the church. 
William was eager to explain the gospel to his family, but his father remained stern and 
unyielding . William must denounce his religion or be disinherited . 

This was a difficult decision to make. William loved his family and home very much. 
There was no sacrifice that he wouldn't make for them, but to deny his testimony of the 
truthfulness of the Gospel of Jesus Christ— this he could not do, even for them. So a very 
sad fourteen-year old boy turned away from his home without money, food, or clothes. 

For three days, William searched for work; each day he went farther from home. 
Being too backward to ask for help, he went without food druing this time and at night 
he slept on the damp ground under a hedge. Finally on the evening of the third day. 



17 



he secured work in a coal mine eighty miles away from his home. The next day he 
was able to work enough to buy some food — the first he had eaten since leaving home. 

William worked in the coal mines during the day for a meager subsistence and 
preached the gospel in the evenings with the Mormon missionaries. In his diary he 
wrote a brief account of this period. "I had to leave my father's home or give up my 
religion. I had received a testimony that the gospel was true and again restored to the 
earth . I could not give up my testimony, so I went away a distance of eighty miles 
to work and keep preaching the gospel for a period of seven years. I suffered much from 
hunger on account of my youth and backwardness." 

His yearning for home was so great that after an absence of two years, William 
decided to return home and face his father's wrath. His parents had relented sufficiently 
to welcome him home, but refused to have anything to do with his religion. While he 
was at home, an epidemic of cholera spread throughout Glasgow and the nearby settle- 
ments. People were dying in great numbers. William contracted the disease and in spite 
of everything his family could do for him, he grew steadily worse. Soon all hope for his 
life was gone. His father desirous of granting his son a last request, asked him if there 
was anything he wanted. The boy pleaded with his father to allow the Mormon mission- 
aries to administer to him. His father granted the request and sent for the missionaries. 
They administered to him through the power of the Holy Priesthood of God and promised 
him that he would be well . The boy arose from his sick bed, dressed himself and 
accompanied the missionaries to a meeting. He had been healed instantly. 

After this experience and manifestation of the power of the Priesthood, William had 
a great desire to spend as much time as possible studying and preaching the gospel . He 
became known on the streets of Glasgow as the "Boy Preacher." He converted many to 
the Gospel of Jesus Christ, but was saddened by the fact that he didn't have the opport- 
unity to baptize the members of his family. Later, however, when he returned to 
Scotland on a mission, he wrote In his diary: "My father repented and when I returned 
I preached the gospel to him and he believed It, but before he obeyed It, he died. I 
baptized many Into the church." 

As William grew In knowledge and understanding of the gospel of Jesus Oirist, he 
had a great desire to emigrate to Utah to become acquainted with the leaders of his 
church and to associate with the members. He saved all the money he could spare and 
In March of the year 1854, he purchased a first class cabin ticket on the ship, John M. 
Wood for the United States of America. 

In his diary, William gives us only a few facts regarding his voyage to America, 
but much insight into his charitable nature. "I continued to preach the gospel until the 
year 1854, March 12, when I emigrated on board the John Wood. As I gave my money 
to help the poor gather to ZIon, I worked as a Stewart on board the vessel ." Joseph S. 
Geddes, one of William's sons, explained that the "poor" referred to in his father's diary 
were a widow, Mrs. Stewart, and her five children . Mrs. Stewart didn't have enough 
money to buy tickets to America for herself and five children . William, hoping to spare 
Mrs. Stewart the heartbreak of leaving some of her children behind in Scotland, persuaded 
her to accept his cabin ticket; then he prevailed upon the Captain to allow him to work 
for his passage to America. 

18 



An account of the voyage of the ship John M. Wood was found in the Church 
Emigration Book, 1854, Seventy-fourth Company John M. Wood, 397 Scribs. which 
had been taken from the Millenlal Star, Volume XVI. 

On the 12th of March, 1854, the ship John M. Wood, Captain Hartley, 
sailed from Liverpool, having on board 397 souls, of whom 58 were from 
Switzerland and Germany. Elder Robert Campbell was appointed 
president of the Co. Elders A. F. McDonald and Charles Derry, ex- 
presidents of conferences, and Jabez Woodard, who had presided over 
the Italian Mission, also sailed on board this vessel. The vessel en- 
countered adverse winds in the Irish Channel the first week after sailing 
from Liverpool, after which the weather was favorable during the re- 
mainder of the voyage. Six persons, two adults and four children died 
on board; two children (twins) were born and one couple was married; 
one new member was also baptized on the 28 of April . At this time, 
the vessel arrived at the Balize, here it waited for a tug a short time. 
Proceeding up the river, the company landed at New Orleans on May 
2nd, and started the following day on board the steamboat Josiah 
Lawrence , for St. Louis, In due course of time the emigrants arrived 
safely at the outfitting place near Kansas City. 

At Kansas City, William joined a group of Mormons who were preparing to leave for 
Utah . They formed the Dan Gam Company. The only comment which could be found 
by William regarding this heartbreaking trek across the plains was from his diary which 
simply states: "I drove a team across the plains and arrived in Salt Lake City on 2nd 
of October 1854." 

Young William was used to privations, hardships, and suffering caused from cholera 
and evidently didn't want to remember the heartbreaking experiences of the Dan Garn 
Company, or else he felt that they were part of the sacrifices common to all those 
willing to leave family, home and even country for their religion. The Deseret News 
of August 31, September 28, October 5, 26 as recorded in the Millenlal Star , Volume 
XVI, pp. 281, 297, 441, 477, contains a more Informative account of the Dan Garn 
Company's trip to Utah. 

There were 38 wagons in Elder Gam's Company and cholera and other 
diseases raged more or less in all the trains. In the whole history 
of the L.D .S. emigration, scarcely anything Is met with that is more 
heart-rending than some of the scenes of 1854, with the exception of 
the handcart experiences two years later. Hundreds of the saints, 
who left the old world that year full of hopes and fond anticipations 
at the prospect of going to ZIon, were suddenly and unexpectedly cut 
short In their career by that most dreadful of all diseases, cholera, 
and Instead of being spared to cast their lot with the saints in the 
Rocky Mountains, they were lain quietly to rest by the wayside, and 
the last traces of the lonely graves on the banks of the Mississippi and 
Missouri Rivers were erased. 

The last trains were also exposed to great danger from the Sioux Indians, 

19 



who had taken the war-path, in consequence of the unwise 
interpreter . 

William found the newly settled territory of Utah very different from his beloved 
Scotland, but the people were friendly and shared with him a great love for the gospel 
of Jesus Christ. They were united and dedicated in building suitable homes, schools, 
and churches where they could worship God as they chose. A year before William's 
arrival in Salt Lake City and six years after the first pioneers entered the Salt Lake 
Valley, Brigham Young laid the cornerstone of a $4,000,000 Temple. The walls of 
the massive edifice were built of granite blocks hauled from Cottonwood Canyon. The 
need was great for skilled workmen to quarry the granite blocks and then to cut and 
shape them to fit perfectly together, (twos in this capacity that Wil liam was called 
to labor during his first five years in Utah. The training and experience he had 
received in the quarries and mines of Scotland prepared him well for this work. 

In 1855, less than a year after coming to Utah, this young Scottish emigrant married 
Elizabeth Stewart, the daughter of Mrs. E U^ofr cl U Lyie Stewart whom he had assisted 
financially in coming to America. A year later in 1856 in accordance with the teachings 
of his church regarding plural marriage, William married Martha Stewart, a second 
daughter of Mrs. Stewart. The two sisters, Elizabeth and Martha, loved and respected 
each other very much and lived harmoniously together. 

July 24, 1857 was a memorable occasion for the Latter Day Saints in Utah. Several 
thousands of them gathered at the head of Big Cottonwood Canyon to celebrate the tenth 
anniversary of the arrival of the Mormons In the Salt Lake Valley. About noon, four 
men, Abraham Smoot, Orrin Poter Rockwell, Judson Stoddard, and Judge Ellas Smith, 
rode into their midst and reported to Brigham Young that the United States Army was 
on the plains enroute to Utah. The exact purpose of the army was unknown, but the 
rumors were that they were coming to Utah to suppress the Mormons. Upon hearing this 
news. President Young sold: "Liars have reported that this people have committed 
treason, and upon their representations the President of the United States has ordered 
out troops to assist in officering the territory. We have transgressed no low, neither do 
we intend to do so; but as far as any nation coming to destroy this people, God Almighty 
being my helper, it shall not be." 

Brigham Young had expressed the determination of his people not to be suppressed 
by any nation . They had confidence in his leadership and were determined to fight to 
the last man to preserve their homes, 

William enlisted in the Utah Militia and volunteered for any type of service for 
which he was needed. During the period of military training, the commanding officer 
recognized William's leadership ability and promoted him to the rank of captain. In 
order to prevent Johnston's Army from entering the valley, all the approaches to Salt 
Lake City had to be guarded. Captain Geddes, with a group of men, was placed in 
charge of defending the approach through Echo Canyon. 

The Mormons were so well organized and their operations against the army so 
ettect.ve in destroying the supply trains and burning the feed for the army horses that 

20 , 



Commander Johnston and his men were prevented from entering the Salt Lake Valley in 
1857. This gave the United States government time to appoint a Peace Commission 
to Investigate the charges against the Mormons. With the help of Colonel Kane, a 
great friend of the Mormons, the Peace Commission found the charges to be false and 
the Mormons were vindicated in the eyes of the United States and the war was ended. 

Captain Geddes served with distinction during this conflict and remained in the 
Militia during the early military days of Utah . Andrew Jensen in the Latter Day Saint 
Biographical Encyclopedia stated that "Captain Geddes was one of the most cheerful 
and willing defenders of God's cause." 

In 1859, the William Geddes family, along with fourteen other pioneer families, 
was called to establish a new settlement west of Ogden in Weber County. Because of 
the barren plains, the new settlement was called Plain City. Here Elder Geddes and 
his family experienced all the privations and hardships known to the early pioneers. 
They had little but their bare hands and faith in God to help them conquer this barren, 
sun-baked soil . 

Food was very scarce. Crops would have to be grown if the settlement was to 
survive, but there was no water for crops and possibility of obtaining water seemed re- 
mote. Many families wanted to abandon the settlement and return to Salt Lake, but 
William encouraged them to remain. They had been called to establish a settlement and 
there could be no turning back. William felt that with time and hard work, they 
could supply water for their community. Before a crop of any kind could be raised, a 
canal nine miles long would have to be dug by hand through very rugged country. 
With wisdom and insight, William encouraged the settlers to remain and undertake 
this Herculean task. 

The survey for the canal was made and the work started. There were not enough 
shovels and spades available so the men were organized into shifts to make more effective 
use of their tools. From dawn to dusk the men shoveled dirt, grubbed brush, and 
hacked away rocks to reach a few more feet nearer to their objective. 

Besides the pressure of time and the hard work, the men suffered from malnutrition 
and hunger. Often their meals consisted of brown bread and molasses in very small 
amounts. They continued digging, however, even though the progress of the canal 
was slow and they were discouraged. 

After three years of exhausting hard work, the canal was completed and water 
flowed into Plain City. Crops could now be raised on what was once arid and worthless 
land. This canal bringing water from the Ogden River to Plain City was one of the first 
canals built in the West. Many of the "old timers" of Plain City have said that the 
success of the undertaking was due mainly to Brother Geddes's perserverence and hard 
work. 

Establishing homes in this pioneer community was as exhausting for the women 
as the men. The wives suffered with their husbands from malnutrition and overwork. 
The less vigorous ones could not withstand the deprivations and hardships. Elizabeth, 



21 



William's first wife, a frail girl from youth, was one of these. Her health began 
to fail soon after her marriage and it grew steadily worse after they moved to Plain 
City. In spite of the tender care of a devoted husband and loving sister, Elizabeth 
died on the 6th of May, 1866."^ William mourned her death very deeply. 

Martha, his second wife, was a wonderful mother; she took Elizabeth's five 
motherless children and cared for them as her own. There was never any favoritism 
shown Martha's children. Both families loved and respected each other as full brothers 
and sisters. They maintained this close family relationship throughout their lives. 

Jinre^ years after Elizabeth's death, her brother John Stewart died leaving a young 
widow, Emma Hope, and two children. William assisted this young widow in every 
possible way. He enjoyed her companionship and found this very pleasant association 
with her replacing the loneliness he had felt since Elizabeth's death. The next year, 
16 February 1870, they were married. From these three unions 23 children were born. 

Life was beginning to be a little easier for the settlers In Plain City. Each year 
more land was cleared of brush, cultivated, and planted Into crops. Fruit trees were 
beginning to bear fruit and even sugar cane was grown to provide sweetening for the 
settlers. William built a molasses mill to make molasses from the sugar cane. A net- 
work of irrigation ditches had been dug and now water was running in all directions 
over the parched land. The crops planted In the fall and spring were vigorous and the 
people were hopeful of a good harvest. At lost there would be sufficient food for 
everyone . 

Then come the grasshoppers -- hordes of them. No one knew where they came 
from or how to get rid of them. Trenches were dug and filled with water; straw was 
scattered upon the roads, around the hedges and byways and then set on fire. The 
villagers hoped to burn the grasshoppers at night while tney were asleep, but the grass- 
hoppers were too easily awakened. The bishop called upon men, women, and children 
to join in a grand march or grasshopper drive. Everyone responded to the call . 
They formed a single file across one end of the field. The men were armed with clubs 
and pitch forks, the women with brooms and ropes, and the children with sticks or 
anything else they could find to beat the ground. They marched from one side of the 
field to the other trying to beat the grasshoppers to death. They continued marching 
bock and forth across one field, then on to another one. This went on for several days, 
but was finally abandoned because there were as many grasshoppers behind the line as 
in front of it. Grasshoppers were everywhere; they even seemed to fill the sky. The 
sun which hadn't been seen clearly for several days had a dingy bluish appearance. 

The settlers had given up hope of conquering the grasshoppers, when suddenly the 
sky was filled with great flocks of seagulls. Each gull filled his craw with live grass- 
hoppers, then flew to the lake and vomited about a quart and a half of live grasshoppers 
into the lake. The salt water of the lake completed the job of extermination. The 
gull would then return to the fields for another load. This procedure was repeated 
again and again until all the grasshoppers were in great heaps along the shores of the 
Great Salt Lake. The grasshoppers were destroyed, but not before they had eaten all 
the wheat to the ground, stripped the bark and foliage from the trees, and eaten every 
green plant that was in their path. 

22 



The settlers of Plain City were discouraged but not beaten, and although their 
food supplies were very low, they were undaunted and in true pioneer spirit celebrated 
the 24 of July as described in a letter written to the Desert News by William Geddes, 
on 24 July 1866. 

The anniversary of the day, as all other national holidays auspicious in 
our history, was very agreeably celebrated by our citizens. Although 
somewhat oppressed with the grasshopper nightmare, the smiling morning 
of the 24th was greeted by them with the customary demonstrations. Sim- 
ultaneous with the firing of the musketry and the sound of martial music, 
the national flag was unfurled and waved proudly in the morning breeze. 
A spacious bowery was tastefully decorated with flowers, etc. Committee 
for the arrangements was Wm . Geddes, Wm . Skeen, and H. Peterson, 

As winter approached, most of the families of Plain City were without food. 
All efforts to obtain food from the neighboring towns had failed. It was generally 
known that a few families in Plain City had a little bran flour for themselves, but 
none to share with their neighbors. William's family had been without food for several 
days. He started out in search of food not knowing where to go, but determined to 
find food somewhere for his children. 

He stopped at one of these more fortunate families and asked for some flour, but 
received the customary reply, "We're very sorry but we have no flour." As he turned 
to leave, he noticed a small boy lying on a couch who looked very ill . He asked 
what was wrong with the child; the parents just shook their heads sadly and replied, 
"We don't know." William asked if he could administer to the child. The parents 
readily agreed and Elder Geddes placed his hands on the little boy's head. Through 
the power of the Holy Priesthood he blessed the child and promised him that he would 
be well . The little boy rallied, looked up at Elder Geddes and smiled. Nothing 
more was said about the flour until William reached the gate. Then he heard a voice 
saying: "Wait, Mr. Geddes, my wife won't let you go without taking some flour for 
your children." William humbly and gratefully accepted the flour. He testified 
many times that from that day he was never without flour and that he always had enough 
to share with all those in need of It. 

Somehow the settlers survived the terrible winter following the grasshopper scourge. 
There had been much suffering, hunger and sickness, but spring finally came and with It 
the promise of another harvest and the hope that there would be enough food for everyone. 

The earth seemed blessed and produced an abundant crop. William harvested the 
largest wheat crop that had been thrashed upto that time inWeber County, His granaries 
bulged with 666 bushels of wheat. While the people of Plain City were anticipating 
the coming winter with an abundance of food, their neighbors to the south in Cache 
Valley were without food. Grasshoppers had Invaded their valley and destroyed their 
crops . 

Many men crossed the mountains and came to Plain City seeking employment that 
they might obtain food for their families for the coming winter. The significant thing 

23 



about this was that William never turned anyone away from his door. All who came 
were given food and something to do to earn it. If nothing more important could 
be found for them to do, V\'illiam had them pull weeds or shock the grain which had 
been cut by the cradelers and bind it into bundles. The Geddes children wondered 
why their father had so many hired men, and why they were always fed first at meal 
time while the children had to wait for the second table. William knew how these 
men felt; they were not tramps but men willing to give honest labor for food for their 
families. 

In spite of grasshoppers, drought, and inclement weather and the suffering they 
caused the pioneers, converts to the Latter Day Saint Church came in a constant stream 
from Europe, Canada, and all parts of the United States to these undeveloped sections 
of the Utah Territory. Here they worshipped God as they chose, built homes and 
canals and literally made the desert provide sustenance for themselves and families. 

^'ater shortage continued to be a problem for Plain City as other settlements were 
established in Weber County. More canals were built which took water from the Ogden 
River. There was usually sufficient water for all these settlements early in the season, 
but during the dry season there just was not enough water for all of them. The various 
settlements began quarreling over the water rights of the Ogden River. Although Plain 
City was one of the first towns to build a canal from the Ogden River and had one of 
the oldest water appropriations, it was located near the end of the river system and was 
the last to receive water. Frequently the water was completely used before reaching 
Plain City. No irrigation district had been formed which would allow each community 
equal shares, so each community took water that probably did not belong to it and each 
one felt that some other community was taking its share of water. All the communities 
bickered and quarreled. 

VS'illiam Geddes became the leading exponent of the idea that all of the communities 
should get together and ask the District Court to make an allotment or decree specifying 
the rights which the thirteen communities had and establishing a basic principle upon 
which the rights of each could be respected. In this way the intercommunity quarreling 
and taking of water unfairly could be prevented. 

\Mlliam Geddes was elected president of the Plain City Irrigation Company. Pres- 
ident Geddes then set about to convert the thirteen communities to the idea of a 
voluntary adjustment of their water problems which were already beginning to involve 
high litigation costs, \^■illiam Geddes was successful in his undertaking. The various 
irrigation companies all joined together and in 1892 the Geddes Decree was issued. 
The judge and the various companies felt that the decree should bear the name of the 
man who had done so much to bring aboi't a co-operative solution to a problem that had 
caused so much contention heretofore. The basic principles established in this decree 
were the following: 

Claim No. 755 the Geddes Decision 
2167 \^ il liam Geddes et al . 
North Ogden Irrigation Decree 
District et al . 
Defendants 

24 



This cause having heretofore been referred to W. L. Maginnis, Esq. 
Referee with authority and direction to take the testimony and to make the 
finding of fact and conclusions of law; said reference having been made 
in open court with the consent of all parties to this action, and said re- 
feree having heard the testimony and reported the same together with his 
findings of fact and conclusions of law have been filed and are now 
adopted by the court and it appearing therefrom that the Plaintiffs are 
entitled to the relief demanded as hereinafter decreed it is ordered 
adjudged and decreed that the following named parties to this action 
are the owners of the water ditches of the right to use water thereby 
conveyed as herein stated, that is to say: Plain City Irrigation 
District by Trustees Ditch 12.8 feet wide at top 7.5 feet wide on the 
bottom and 3.2 feet deep and 0.12 feet fall per one hundred feet, date 
of appropriation 14 May 1859. 

That each of the parties aforesaid being the owners of the ditches and 
water rights above described are decreed to be entitled to the 
exclusive use of so much of the water of Ogden River as will flow 
in their said ditches according to the dates of their appropriation; 
that the first in point of time in appropriating said water and constructing 
said ditches are entitled to the first right in the water of said stream, 
and so on successively to the last appropriation. That in case the 
water is insufficient in said stream to fill all of said ditches, then those 
having the junior appropriation shall turn into the natural channel of the 
stream all of the water diverted by them until sufficient is turned into 
said stream to supply the ditches of any prior appropriations in point 
of time, and such junior appropriators and all persons acting in and or 
assistance of them are hereby enjoined and restrained from directing 
any part of the water of said river from the natural channel thereof, 
except it be at such times and seasons as there may be a surplus of water in 
said river after supplying the ditches of all appropriations upon said 
stream whose appropriations were prior in point of time to the said per- 
sons so enjoined. That the defendant of the Weber County Land and 
Live Stock Company be absolutely and perpetually enjoined from 
direction or using any part of the water of Ogden River except at such 
times and seasons, if any, as there may be a surplus in the said river 
after supplying the ditches of all other parties to this action. It is 
further ordered adjudged and decreed that C. H. McClure clerk of 
this court tax the costs and disbursements of all parties to this action 
from cost bills to be filed by their respective attorneys, etc. 

September 10, 1892 
C. H . McClure, clerk 

To this day this decree is recognized to be the most important one dealing with 
Irrigation water in Weber County and one of the most Important In Utah where irri- 
gation has had its modern re-establishment. Without a doubt this water decree 
effort represents an excellent example of far-seeing leadership and of co-operative 
enterprise . 

25 



V\ Illiam Geddes was a leader not only In irrigation matters but in all civic, 
educational, religious and Industrial activities in the community. He was always 
striving to improve conditions in all facets of community life. Although he himself 
had had a very limited school education, he recognized the great importance of 
education for the youth of Plain City and worked very hard to provide better schools 
for them. 

In the early nineties Plain City urgently needed enlarged school facilities. The 
old adobe school house located on the northeast corner of the public square was quite 
delapldated. The adobes above the rock foundation were badly worn by the weather. 
The single large room with a small frame addition in the rear for the class was very in- 
adequate for the growing population. 

Plain City was laid out in a rectangular shape. It was considerably longer in the 
north-south direction than in the east-west direction. The public square on which the 
L .D .S . Church and the school house were built was more accessible to the citizens living 
in the east and western parts of town than to those living in the northern or southern 
parts of town. The townspeople were undecided whether to build a new larger building 
on the square or to construct two one-room school buildings, one In the north end of town 
and the other in the south. They thought a school at each end of the town would more 
nearly equalize the distance for all concerned even though the cost of the two schools 
would be greater and they wo'ld not be able to provide as many facilities. 

William's home was in the northern end of the village. The one-room school would 
be more accessible for his children, but V\'illiam was not one to satisfy selfish interests; 
his concern was for the community. He took a strong stand against building two inferior 
schools and argued successfully the advantages of a larger, better school on the public 
square; whereby the older and younger children could be divided into separate rooms 
and the teachers could provide better instruction with fewer grades to teach. 

William Geddes's plan of consolidation was adopted. This was long before the idea 
of consolidated schools began to sweep the country and it anti-dated the Utah movement 
in this direction by several decades. 

Farming and stock raising were the main sources of income for the Geddes family, 
although William did other things as well . He operated a molasses mill using the sugar 
cane grown on the farms of Plain City to make molasses. He was also active in dev- 
eloping the salt industry west of Plain City. He took pride In being very up to date and 
owned the first clock, stove, wagon and organ in Plain City. 

From the time William first heard the gospel of Jesus Chri-St preached on the streets 
of Glasgow until his death, he had a burning testimony of its truthfulness and was willing 
to accept any call of service for his church. As a youth he had preached the gospel on 
the streets of Glasgow and throughout his life he never missed on opportunity to teach 
its principles. Thus in 1873 during October conference, he willingly accepted a call 
to fulfill a mission for his church in Europe. He was set apart the 8th of October 1873 
by Franklin D. Richards. His destination was to be his beloved Scotland. 

William left Salt Lake City October 20 and boarded the Oceanic in New York on 

26 



the first of November. The Mlllenial Star 3:792 records the voyage. 

The Oceanic left New York on the afternoon of the first of November, 
making the trip in a little more than 10 days and from what we have 
learned, experienced one of the smoothest and pleasantest passages that 
it has been the good fortune for that vessel to hove. Particularly so at 
the present season of the year, when the wind and weather are generally 
unfavorable to east-bound ships. All the brethren, whom we thus had 
the satisfaction of receiving, appeared to enjoy, when they landed, their 
usual good health and spirits. 

Elder Geddes was filled with joy and anticipation at the thought of seeing his family 
and homeland again. He was reunited with his 78 year-old mother and his brothers and 
sisters but was saddened because of the loss of his father who had passed away shortly 
after William emigrated to America. He preached the gospel to his family and to a 
large circle of friends. The reunion was short,however,for after William had been laboring 
In Scotland for six weeks, he was called by the mission president at Liverpool to succeed 
President R. Beauchamp as president of the Australian Mission . He left Scotland for 
Australia in January, 1874. The following letters relate some interesting Incidents which 
occurred on his way to Australia and give us a little more insight into his character. 

Great Britain 

Weymouth, January 13, 1874 

President L.J. Herrick 

Dear Brother: 

The Cyphrenes left London (with your humble servant on board) on 
Saturday, the 10th . We were under the necessity of coming into harbor 
at this place, in consequence of a very sad circumstance having occurred 
Immediately after we put to sea. The Captain of the vessel committed suicide, 
by jumping overboard. The cause of his doing so Is not known, other than 
that he had had some difficulty with the owners of the ship. He appeared 
to have been very much liked and judging by what I have seen of him, I 
took him to be a very fine man. We are expecting a Mr. Wood from Scot- 
land, to take the command. We sail tonight at seven o'clock. 

There are 15 cabin passengers on board all of whom appear to be 
very nice people. They call me the "American Gentlemen," and do not 
seek to hide their good opinion of me; but when they learn that I am a 
"Mormon" and going to Australia to preach the doctrines of the "pecul- 
iar people, " some, if not all, may change their present good opinion . I 
shall endeavor to make friends with all on board, and If the Lord wills It, 
I shall preach the gospel to them. There Is a "Reverend" among the pass- 
engers, but the people on board do not appear to like him. The Reverend 
and myself, however, are on the best of terms. Good night and God bless 
him. 

Your brother, Wm . Geddes 

(Doc. Hist. 128) 
(Mill. Star 36:43) 

27 



St . Helena Bay 
Feb. 12, 1874 
Pres . L. J. Herri ck 

Deer Brother: 

Last night, at half past 10 o'clock, we ran ashore in St. Helena 
Bay, about ninety miles from the Cape of Good Hope while making for 
the latter place to get an increased supply of coal . Since going ashore we 
have worked hard to get the vessel off, but our efforts, so far, have been 
unsuccessful . We have not commenced to take out her loading. We are 
in a very awkward situation, for the country, along the shore is settled 
by Dutch families, who are friendly and willing to render any needed assistance, 

Up to this date, we have had a very fine passage. The officers are 
not to blame in the circumstance of the vessel having gone ashore, for 
we have had some very foggy weather. Capt. Wood is a good sailor, and 
has been close to port. 

My health has been tolerable good, and I have received every 
reasonable attention from the officers. The Captain invited me to preach 
on two occasions, and had the saloon arranged for that purpose. All 
the passengers turned out to hear me. We had good meetings, and the 
Lord poured out his spirit on me, so that I was enabled to speak force- 
fully and without fear. I feel that I hove had the prayers of the faithful 
saints and have faith that I shall reach my journey's end in safety. 

13th 11:30a.m. 

Our ship is again afloat, all hands having worked day and night 
throwing our cargo overboard on the shore. It has been remarked by my 
fellow passengers that I can work as well as preach. I told my fellow 
passengers that that was part of my religion. We shall proceed to the 
Cape as soon as we re-load, when the vessel must necessarily undergo an 
examination before putting out to sea. 

Please publish this, as it will save me the necessity of writing many 
letters. 

15th 9 o'clock a.m. 

We have just arrived at the Cape all right. The ship is not in the 
dock. We shall probably stay here a week. My kind love to the 
British Saints. 

Your brother in the gospel 
Wm . Geddes 



28 



Australia 

24 April 1874 

We are in receipt of a letter from Elder Wm . Geddes, Pres . of the 
Australian Mission, written at Sydney, April 24th 1874. 

Brother Geddes's letter is chiefly on business matters, but in one 
part he says, "Our meetings have been announced in the papers, also 
my arrival, and where I came from, and this had brought a good many 
strangers to our meetings . We held a council meeting, at which James 
Nichols requested a rehearing of his case. He had been cut off from 
the church without any trial and accused of things he was not guilty 
of. The brethren agreed that his case was true, and we received him back, 
by his renewing his convenants. He held the office of an Elder and re- 
quests this item published in the Star, as he has a large circle of friends 
in the church, and his name appeared among those who were cut off, in 
the Star, November, 45 (Vol . 35, Mill. Star 36:491, Doc. Hist. 1412). 



Australia 
November 23rd 

We have been favored with the perusal of a letter from Elder Wm . 
GetJdes, dated Sydney, Sept. 25. Brother Geddes was busy in travelling, 
preaching, circulating tracts, conversing and endeavoring to spread 
the principles of the Gospel . Some were coming into the church and 
many were inquiring after the principles privately. A family of 
seven saints left Sydney by the same vessel as the letter, for San 
Francisco, and more are expected to leave in the spring. It cost 
L32 to emigrate a person from Sydney to Ogden at the cheapest rate. 

(Desert News 23:68) 
(Doc. Hist. 4732) 

During his travels as a missionary In Australia, Elder Geddes had many mani- 
festations of the power of the Holy Ghost. Once while staying at a hotel, he asked 
the proprietor to call him the next morning in time to secure passage on a certain 
boat that was sailing for an island near Australia. During the night he had a dream 
in which he saw the boat sink and all the passengers drown. The next morning, the 
proprietor called him as he had promised. Elder Geddes went down to the dock but 
refused to take passage on the boat. He warned all the passengers not to go saying 
that the boat would sink and they would lose their lives. They only laughed and 
waved goodbye to him. Before noon, word came that the boat had wrecked and all 
the passengers on board had drowned. 

Elder Geddes's mission experiences were varied but each one seemed to streng- 
then his testimony of the truthfulness of the work in which he was engaged. Part of 
a religious discussion between William Geddes and a minister was recorded In Elder 
Geddes's diary. 

29 



Minister: "Now, Mr, Geddes, I hope you will be able to answer a number 
of questions to satisfy this company of people." 

Geddes: "Reverend Sir, go right on and put all your questions and if I 
con answer them I will, and if I cannot, I will soon tell you and your 
great company of intelligent people, though I would much rather you had 
called on Brother C. Q. Cannon, for he could answer them much better. 
I will do the best I can." 

Minister: "Now, Mr. Geddes, you are a good people up here in Utah, you 
have made fine improvements and some fine cities. You are a very in- 
dustrious people but your Elders go to our people and tell them that they 
have to obey your gospel . They must be put down into the water or they 
will be dammed. Now we believe that you Mormons are a good people, but 
we believe that our people are as good as yours and we would like to know 
why we should obey your gospel or be lost forever. That is what these 
people that are with me want to know. There are other things too that 
this company wants to ask you about, but, Mr. Geddes, will you please 
explain those things to this group." 

Geddes: "My dear friends, I shall do so with pleasure. In the first 
place I wish to ask you good people if you all believe in the Lord Jesus 
Christ?" 

Minister: "Oh, yes, we all believe in Jesus Christ." 

Geddes: "Well, if you all believe in Jesus Christ, then you must 
believe Christ when he says in Matthew 24;14, 'And this Gospel, of the 
kingdom shall be preached in all the world for a witness unto all 
nations and then shal I the end come . ' Now if one of our Elders told 
you that we have a new Gospel of our own, then he made a mistake . We 
only claim to preach the same principles and doctrines taught by Jesus 
Christ when he was on earth. We claim that these principles were changed 
and modified by the rulers after the terrible persecution of the early 
Christians. That the authority to officiate in the name of God was taken 
from the earth and that is the main reason for the long period of the 
dark ages. We, therefore, claim a restoration of this authority and with 
it comes the restoration of the simple doctrines of Christ. We follow the 
same instructions Christ gave to his disciples in Mathew 28: 19-20, ' Go 
ye, therefore, and teach all nations, baptizing them in the name of the 
Father, and of the Son, and of the Holy Ghost. Teaching them to observe 
all things whatsoever I have commanded you, and lo, I am with you always, 
even unto the end of the world.' Now my dear friends even Jesus Christ 
was baptized because he said, 'It becometh us to fulfill all righteousness. 
And when Jesus was baptized, he went straightway out of the water.' 
Mathew 3: 13-16. There are many other passages of scripture in the 
New Testament which tell us to be baptized by one having the authority 
to do so. It is not that we are better than other people, but as the early 
Christians claimed allegiance to the kingdom by membership in the church 

30 



of Jesus Christ our Lord , so we in modern times claim that same allegiance. 
We say to you as Jesus said to Nicodemus, 'Except a man be born of water 
and of the spirit, he cannot enter into the kingdom of God.' 

This Is all that Aunt Joan Geddes Randall was able to find of William Geddes's 
diary regarding his mission experiences in Australia. 

After he had served in the mission a little over a year. President Geddes developed 
a serious illness. He was troubled with a severe bleeding in his lungs. Because he was 
unable to obtain adequate medical care, his condition grew worse. Although he 
continued to fulfill his duties, he grew very feeble. Public speaking seemed to aggravate 
the bleeding. He finally reported his condition to the authorities in Salt Lake City 
and received word from George Albert Smith to return home if his health had not improved. 
The bleeding continued so Elder Geddes left Sydney February 13, 1875 aboard the 
steamship Macgregor. The voyage was uneventful and the quiet, pressure-free climate 
of the journey homeward seemed to rejuvenate him physically. His health improved 
greatly and he arrived in San Francisco thirty-five days later in good spirits and health. 

The following letters taken from the files of the Desei;t News and the Documentary 
History of the Church give a report in President Geddes's own words of his mission . 



April 4, 24, 1875 
Deseret Evening News 

Coming Home — the Ogden Junction, of March 24, says — "Elder Wm . 
Geddes has reached San Francisco on his way home from Australia. We 
learn by telegram to Alderman Thomas that he will reach Ogden on Sunday 
next about 4p.m. Elder Geddes's return will be joyfully hailed by his 
family and many friends . " 

(Mill. Star 36:186) 



(Doc. Hist. 523 



March 29, 1875 
Desert News 



This morning Elder Wm . Geddes arrived from Australia. Elder 
Geddes left Sydney, Feb. 13th on the steamship Macgregor, arrived 
on San Francisco in 35 days. His health was but feeble when he 
started, but has greatly improved on the passage. Elder Geddes left 
for his home in Plain City, where he will receive a joyful welcome. 

Deseret Evening News 

This morning we received a call from Elder Wm. Geddes, of Plain City, 
who returned at the beginning of the present month from a mission to 
Australia. He left home in Oct. 1873 and consequently he travelled eost- 



31 



ward, visited and spent six weeks In Scotland, calling on his relatives 
and traveling in the various branches of the church. He also spent 
a couple of weeks in London. 

Elder Geddes's labors In Australia were principally confined to 
Victoria, New South Wales, and Tasmania. In Hobart Town, of the 
latter colony, he raised a small branch of the church, and among those 
baptized was the wife of the brother to the Mayor. The Gospel, so 
far as Elder Geddes could learn, was Introduced there for the first time 
by himself. He never saw a more Intense Interest manifested among any 
people regarding the truth than there is there, reminding him of the spirit 
of inquiry exhibited in his native country, Scotland, about 25 years ago. 

( Pes. News 24:173) 
( Doc. Hist. 783) 

Letter to Andrew Jensen 

Dear Brother, as you have requested me to give you a report about the 
.Australian Mission, I was called to take charge of that mission In 1874. I 
made mention to the Moner in New Tealsa in 1874 by request of President 
B. Young. I reported that they were a Branch of the House of Israel in 1874; 

I introduced the Gospel in the Colony of Tosmany In Oct. I spent 12 years 
in preaching the Gospel all together. 

Your brother In the Gospel 
WIl Ham Geddes 

May 11, 1877 

Letter to Mr. Clark in New Zealand 

Plain City 

I I May 1877 

Bro. Clark: I promised to give you a short account of my mission but 
I have neglected it up to the present. I was called at the October 
Conference 1873, to go to Scotland. Started on the 20th, of October In 
company with 17 Elders. Arrived in Scotland all well; I found my mother, 
78 years of age, and a large circle of friends. Went to work preaching the 
Gospel in that land. When there about four weeks I received notice from 
the President at Liverpool that I was appointed to take charge of the 
Australian Mission. I then started to London, took steamship for Sydney. 
Our ship ran ashore in St. Helena Bay. I held meetings in the vessel and 
preached the Gospel to 150 people. Introduced the Gospel in St. Helena 
and distributed a number of pamphlets. Then passed on to Africa, stopped 
there a few days at Cape Town. Introduced the Gospel and spread quite a 
number of pamphlets. Arrived in Sydney after a passage of 78 days. Labor- 
ed in the Colony of New Melbourne, the Colony of Victoria, and labored 
there for three months, then returned to Sydney and labored there about three 

32 



months, then in the Colony of New South Wales for two months, got the 
Branch In order. Then returned to Melbourne, labored there some time, 
then went to the colony of Tasmania, introduced the Gospel in that 
place, baptized a few people. Then I was taken with a severe sickness and 
being alone in the land, I was not able to speak in public on account of 
a severe bleeding of the lungs. I then returned to Melbourne and received a 
letter from President Geo. A. Smith to return home if my health was not 
better. 

I returned to Sydney, labored among the Saints a short time, and re- 
turned home having baptized 48 persons, in different places. Was gone 
one year and six months. This is a very short account of my travels, but 
you may get a few items. 

I remain your brother in the Gospel 
William Geddes 

( Doc. Hist. 2261) 

Elder William Geddes was joyously welcomed home to Plain City by his family 
and friends. Under the loving care of his family, his health continued to improve and 
soon he was active in community and church affairs again. In 1889 he was called 
to go to Southern Utah with other pioneers to assist in colonizing the Dixie County. 
No information could be found about his length of stay or the part he played in the 
settlement of Southern Utah. 

In the Deseret News of Jan 6, 1879, the following news item was published re- 
porting Brother Geddes's trip through Cache Valley for educational purposes. His 
special assignment was to encourage the use of the Deseret Alphabet in the schools 
throughout Cache Valley. TheDeseret Alphabet was a simplified phonetic alphabet 
consisting of 38 letters or symbols constructed under the direction of President Brigham 
Young and a committee composed of Orson Pratt, Parley P. Pratt, Wilford Woodruff, 
R. L. Campbell, and others. Orson Pratt rewrote the Book of Mormon and other 
scriptures using the Deseret Alphabet. However with the increased availability of 
printed books from the East, it was too expensive to reprint all the books using the 
Deseret Alphabet, so it was discontinued by the Church . 

Jan. 6, 1879 
Deseret News 



Supt. R. L. Campbell made a tour of Cache Valley accompanied by 
Supt. Budge and Brother Wm . Geddes. They made two appointments, each 
day advocating educational interests in general and holding forth in favor 
of the deseret alphabet in particular. 

Book 57: 467 p. 
A letter from William Geddes dated March 23, 1880 was printed in the Deseret 



33 



News reporting on another educational trip which he was requested to make through 
Cache Valley and surrounding towns. 

March 23, 1880 
Deseret News 

As my tour through Cache Valley is very near completed, I will give a 
brief account of my journey 

Logan is wonderful, though you have spoken of this beautiful city in your 
paper, yet columns could be filled on its unmentioned beauties. On my 
arrival I found that a priesthood meeting was in session in their beautiful 
new Tabernacle, and the energetic presidency engaged in making all nec- 
essary arrangements for continuing their labors on the new Temple in a 
vigorous manner. They have a great many stones cut, also mortar prepared 
so that there will be nothing to retard the work as soon as spring appears. 

At Smithfield I found not only a friendly and hospitable, but also an 
industrious and energetic people. I got a very good subscription list for the 
News and passed on to Franklin, where I met I. B. Nash, an old friend 
of mine, who is now doing a good work, as Sunday School Superintendent. 
The new wood factory there is ready and running and no doubt will do a 
good work . 

At Oxford I met Judge Crawford, who treated me with kindness; after 
attending to all necessary business here, I started south on the West side 
of Bear River. Through this part of the country the snow is about ten inches 
deep, feed very scarce and a great many of the stock are dying. 

I next found myself in a town by the name of Clarkston where the dramatic 
association was playing the very interesting drama of Ernest Maltravers, 
and a laughable farce. The people not only encouraged them by their talk 
but by their patronage, the presidency also, who see nothing is done contrary 
to the instructions of the presidency of this church . 

After attending meeting, I left for Newton, where I had the pleasure 
of seeing Bishop Rigby's extensive nursery. I continued my journey south 
with the aid of a good horse, and soon found myself talking with Brother 
Preston In Logan, who welcomed me on my return and desired me to visit 
the settlements in the South and hold meetings, which I did; but before 
my labors were completed in the South, I received an invitation from 
Brother Preston to attend a meeting of two days at Logan, which I accepted 
with pleasure. The meeting was very Interesting; the part which struck 
me most forcibly was an account read by the secretary of what each ward had 
done in the shape of temple and for donations. In one small ward, a five cent 
donation was taken for the children, which amounted to $80. Though when 
I came to meeting, I was quite snow-blind, after hearing Brother M. 
Thatcher speak, my eyes were all right and have been well ever since. This 

34 



meeting gave a good opportunity to speak about tiie News. I will 
close by saying that Cache Valley Is "booming." 

Respectfully yours, 

William Geddes 

( Doc. Hist . 900) 

As a result of increased anti-Mormon agitation against plural marriage. Congress 
passed the Edmonds Law in March of 1882. This law provided for the punishment of 
those living in polygamy. Although William had made arrangements with Martha to 
cease living with her as man and wife, he was arrested, tried, and convicted of un- 
lawful co-habitation. The following are court notes taken during the trial of William 
Geddes. 

November 27, 1886 

The court opened on Saturday (Nov . 27th at 10a.m.) 
The first case called was the U.S. vs. William Geddes, charged with 
unlawful co-habitation. Mr. Dickson and his assistant Hiles prosecuted, 
and Messrs. Ransford Smith, R. S. Richards, and J. L. Rawlins defended the 
case. 

Martha S. Geddes was the first witness examined for the prosecution. 
Defendant did not now co-habit with witness; has not done so since July 1 , 
1882. He usually goes about once a week to see the boys on business. 
Emma lives in Plain City; she has seven children. Defendent has not eaten 
meals at the house of witness for many months prior to the 6th of June of the 
present year. 

Emma Hope Geddes was the next witness. Defense objected to her being 
sworn, she being the legal wife. Martha Stewart Geddes was recalled and 
said that the farm on which her children worked belonged to her. It has been 
hers by deed since 1881 . 

William Geddes, the defendant was sworn. He was first married to 
Elizabeth Stewart In June, 1855. Fifteen months after that time he was 
married to her sister Martha. Both sisters were alive at the time of his 
second marriage. Subsequently he married Emma Hope a little more than 
a year after the death of Elizabeth. He has 20 children in all. He has lived 
with Emma, as his wife, ever since July, 1864. He does not know that 
he has done any act by which he has held out Martha as his wife since the 
passage of the Edmunds Law, as at that time he arranged with her that they 
should cease living as man and wife. He would provide her a home. They 
lived within the law from that to the present. To Dickson, he said he was a 
member of the Mormon Church, believed plural marriage was right. He was 
hard pressed by Dickson to say whether or not he still considered Martha as his 
wife today. Objected to by defense. Overruled. Witness said he re- 
garded her as his spiritual wife to have in the next world. He ceased to 
treat her as a temporal wife some four years since. This was by agreement with 
her. That Is that he could not acknowledge and treat her as his wife in the 

35 



full sense of the term until there comes a change in the low. 

Counsel then proceeded to ply witness with numerous questions as to 
his love, affection, regard, and respect for Martha, and If he still loves 
her as much as he did formerly. To the last question he replied that he did. 
But under the Edmunds Law they must cease to live as husband and wife 
until a change comes. Dickson insisted on asking witness if it was not the 
belief of the "Mormons" that men take more wives than one in order that they 
may beget spirits for themselves in the next world, etc. Objected to by 
defense and overruled. Defendant then said he did not think that such was 
the belief, and that he did not recollect ever hearing such doctrine. 

At six o'clock p.m. the judge charged the jury who then returned to 
make up their decision. The court took a recess until half past seven. 

At ten minutes past eight the jury filed into court and rendered their 
verdict of "guilty" on all the counts in the indictment, being four in number. 
Sentence will be passed on Monday, Dec. 6 Qjurt then adjourned till the 
29th. 

Dec. 2, 1886 

The case of Wm . Geddes of Plain City, deserves more than the notice 
given in the account of the trial in the first District Court. The consideration 
of other matters has occupied all the space at our command. The defendant 
was convicted of unlawful co-habitation, although the evidence was positive 
that he had lived only with the legal wife . The defendant and his two 
wives all testified, the wives being called by the prosecution and Mr. 
Geddes and the legal wife for the defense. Their united statements under 
oath were to the effect that the accused made an arrangement with his 
plural wife just before the passage of the Edmunds Law, by which he would 
cease to live with her and that he had not co-habited with her since July 1, 
1882. 

Dec. 6, 1886 
Deseret News 



William Geddes was brought down from Ogden last evening, and placed 
in the penitentiary. He was sentenced to the full term on one of the 
four counts on which he had been convicted for unlawful co-habitation. 
Judgement of the remaining courts was reserved. Judge Henderson being 
of the opinion that by the time the present sentence expires there might be a 
change . 

William served six months in the penitentiary. While there his health 
was much Impaired through privations and unsanitary conditions forced upon him 
and the other polygamist prisoners. In spite of these hardships, however, he 
expressed his feelings and love for his families in this letter. 



36 



Dear Brother, 

With pleasure I respond to your question. We are here in prison separated 
from our dear families because we love them, we will not suffer them to be 
turned away loose on the world. No, we will stand by them unto death . 

William Geddes 
Written to William H. Foster 

Although he was released after a six month period, he never regained the health 
and strength he had enjoyed prior to this time. 

William Geddes, a staunch defender of Mormonism, a true pioneer, and an 
enterprizing community builder died August 23, 1899 of heart failure. His death came 
without warning. Whether his life's ambition, to raise a family that would be a credit 
to his name, is realized depends upon us, his descendants. We hove a great progenitor 
to emulate who had left us a rich heritage of faithfulness, integrity and service to his 
God. Time will attest our worthiness. 



This is all that could be found of William Geddes 's Diary 

I would hove to leave my father's home to give up my religion. I had received a 
testimony that the gospel was true and again restored to the earth. I could not give 
up my testimony, so I went away a distance of eighty miles to work and keep preaching 
the gospel for a period of seven years. I suffered much from hunger on account of my 
youth and backwardness. 

My father repented and when I returned I preached the gospel to him and he believed 
it, but before he obeyed it, he died. I baptized many into the church. 

My father was the son of Joseph Geddes who had emigrated with his father into 
Scotland. Not knowing the genealogy correct, I will leave it for the present. 

I continued to preach the gospel until the year 1854, March 12, when I emigrated 
on board the "John Wood." I gave my money to help the poor to gather to Zion. 

I drove a team across the plains and arrived in Salt Lake City on 2 Oct. 1854. 

I worked a great deal on the stone quarry to procure rock for the Salt Lake Temple. 
I married Elizabeth Stewart on the 3 June 1855 at Salt Lake City and continued to 
work quarrying rock for five years. Then I moved to help make a new settlement in 
Weber County. This place was named Plain City. I married Martha Stewart 13 July 
1856. 



37 



The Stewart girls were the daughters of Archibald Stewart and Esther Lyie. Elizabeth 
born 1 March 1832 in Cathcart, Lanarkshire, Scotland. Martha Stewart was born in 
Netsale, Lanarkshire, Scotland on 10 May 1838 and she died 11 Aug 1900 Elizabeth 
died 6 July 1866 and was bur. on 10 Jb^1s866 at Plain City. 

I married my third wife Emma Hope Stewart, 21 Feb. 1870 in the Salt Lake Endow- 
ment House. She was the widow of John M. Stewart. John was a brother of my other 
wives. He was born in Pollokshaws, Lanarkshire, Scotland. She was the mother of 
two children, Emma and John M. Stewart. 

He then had a copy of theblrths of all of his children which I did not copy. 

I, William was born 8 Dec. 1832 in Baillieston, Lanarkshire, Scotland. My father's 
name was Hugh Geddes and my mother's name was Agnes Graham. I was baptized 30 
November 1847 by James Jorden. I was ordained a Seventy in 1854. 
Someone added that he died 23 August 1899 at Plain City, Weber, Utah . 

Plain City 20 Sept. 1893 

An account of work done In Logan Temple for the dead by William Geddes and my daughter 
Agnes Geddes Peterson. 

I was baptized, married, and sealed for my father, Hugh Geddes. I was baptized 
for my brother Joseph Geddes and my brother John Geddes, also, for my grandfathers, 
Joseph Geddes and Solomon Graham. 

My daughter, Agnes Geddes Peterson, was baptized, married, and sealed for my 
mother, Agnes Graham, and baptized for my sister, Hannah Geddes. 

The above Temple work was done 23 Dec. 1891 . 



My Genealogy As I Remember It 

I will leave it for my children to locate the dates and places and If possible names 
of the wives. They were all born In Ireland. 

My father's family - Hugh Geddes My mother's family - Solomon Graham 
Children William Children John 

Joseph Solomon 

Hugh * Mary 

John Jane 

Hannah Agnes 

Susan 

Mary My mother's grandfather -William Graham 
Margaret Children John 

Sarah Solomon 

Jane 



38 



My grandfather - Joseph Geddes 



Children 



James 

Henry 

William 

Joseph 

Mary (Ellen) 

Sarah 



My mother's gr. grandfather 
Children 



Solomon Graham 

John 

George 

William 

Jane 



My gr. grandfather - Hugh Geddes 
Children Joseph 

Joan 
Mary 



1 WILLIAM GEDDES 



B 14 Nov. 1832 
Bapt 17 Nov. 1847 
Md 3 June 1855 
End 21 Mar. 1856 
D 24 Aug. 1899 
Bur 27 Aug. 1899 

Father *Hugh Geddes 



Newtown Hamilton, Keyte Par., Aragh, Ireland 

Baillieston, Lanarkshire, Scotland 

Salt Lake City, Salt Lake, Utah 

Endowment House, Salt Lake, Utah 

Plain City, Weber, Utah 

City Cem., Plain City, Weber, Utah 

Mother *Agnes Graham 



1st Wife * ELIZABETH STEWART 



B 1 Mar. 1831 
Bapt 1 Mar. 1841 
End 21 Mar. 1856 
Sid 21 Mar. 1856 
D 6 May 186^ f^-:^ 
Bur 10 May 1866 f^W 

Father *Archibald Stewart 



Cathcart, Renfrewshire, Scotland 
Thornliebank, Renfrewshire, Scotland 
Endowment House, Salt Lake, Utah 
Endowment House, Salt Lake, Utah 
Plain City, Weber, Utah 
City Cem., Plain City, Weber, Utah 

Mother * Esther Lyie 



CHILDREN 



2 William Stewart Geddes 

4 Joseph Stewart Geddes 

6 Archibald Stewart Geddes 

8 Elizabeth Geddes 

10 Jedediah Morgan Grant Geddes 



B 5 April 1856, Salt Lake City, Salt Lake, Utah 

B 18 Dec. 1857, Salt Lake City, Salt Lake, Utah 

B 31 Jan 1860, Plain City, Weber, Utah 

B 8 Sept. 1862, Plain City, Weber, Utah 

B 10 July 1865, Plain City, Weber, Utah 



Other information and sources follow in Section II 



39 



1 WILLIAM GEDDES 



B 14 Nov. 1832 
Bapt 17 Nov. 1847 
Md 10 July 1856 

End 21 March 1856 
D 24 Aug. 1899 
Bur 27 Aug. 1899 

Father *Hugh Geddes 



Newtown Hamilton, Keyte Pari, Armagh, Ireland 

Baillieston, Lanarkshire, Scotland 

Salt Lake City, Salt Lake, Utah at the President's 

Office by Brigham Young 
Endowment House, Salt Lake, U+ah 
Plain City, Weber, Utah 
CityCem., Plain City, Weber, Utah 

Mother *Agne5 Graham 



2nd Wife MARTHA STEWART 



B 10 May 1838 
Bapt 23 March 1851 
End 13 March 1857 
Sid 10 July 1856 
D n Aug. 1900 
Bur 14 Aug. 1900 

Father *ArchIbald Stewart 



Netsale, Renfrewshire, Scotland 
Glasgow, Lanarkshire, Scotland 
Endowment House, Salt Lake, Utah 
President's Office, Salt Lake, Utah 
Plain City, Weber, Utah 
Plain City, Weber, Utah 

Mother * Esther Lyie 



CHILDREN 



3 Agnes Stewart Geddes 
5 Hugh Stewart Geddes 
7 Mary Geddes 
9 Annie Geddes 

1 1 John Stewart Geddes 

12 Susan Geddes 

14 Margaret Geddes 

15 James Stewart Geddes 
18 George Albert Geddes 



B n Aug. 1857, Salt Lake City, Salt Lake, Utah 

B 25 July 1859, Plain City, Weber, Utah 

B 18 Sept. 1861, Plain City, Weber, Utah 

B 20 Sept. 1865, Plain City, Weber, Utah 

B 18 Feb. 1867, Plain City, Weber, Utah 

D 25 Feb. 1867, Plain City, Weber, Utah 

B 9 Feb. 1868, Plain City, Weber, Utah 

D 9 Feb. 1868, Plain City, Weber, Utah 

B 9 Jan. 1871, Plain City, Weber, Utah 

B 18 May 1873, Plain City, Weber, Utah 

B 14 Aug. 1876, Plain City, Weber, Utah 



More information and sources given in Section III 



40 



2nd Husband 1 WILLIAM GEDDES 



B. 14 Nov. 1832 
Bapt. 17 Nov. 1847 
End. 21 March 1856 
Md. 21 Feb. 1870 
D. 24 Aug. 1899 
Bur. 27 Aug. 1899 

Father *Hugh Geddes 



Newtown Hamilton, Keye Par.. Armagh, Ireland 

Baillieston, Lanarkshire, Scotland 

Endowment House, Salt Lake, Utah 

Endowment House, Salt Lake, Utah 

Plain City, Weber, Utah 

City Cem., Plain City, Weber, Utah 

Mother * Agnes Graham 



3rd Wife * EMMA ELIZA HOPE STEWART 



B. 17 April 1845 
Bapt. 1853 

End. 24 April 1865 
Sid. 24 April 1865 

D. 21 Aug. 1929 
Bur. 25 Aug. 1929 

Father David Hope 



Burlage , Wiltshire, England 
Burlage , Wiltshire, England 
Endowment House, Salt Lake, Utah 

Endowment House, Salt Lake, Utah to first y i^ivir^d 
Xhusband, John McAuley Stewart "^ $afic,r.c 

Moreland, Bingham, Idaho 
City Cem., Moreland, Bingham, Idaho 



Mother 



Eliza Stone 



CHILDREN 



13 Robert Campbell Geddes 

16 Eliza Marie Geddes 

17 Sarah Geddes 

19 Harriet Susie Geddes 

20 David George Geddes 

21 Hyrum Smith Geddes 

22 Joan Campbell Geddes 

23 Gertrude Geddes 



B 
B 
B 
B 
B 
B 
B 
B 
D 



8 Dec. 1870, Plain City, Weber, Utah 
25 Sept. 1873, Plain City, Weber, Utah 

2 Jan. 1876, Plain City, Weber, Utah 
2 Mar. 1878, Plain City, Weber, Utah 

13 Aug. 1880, Preston, Franklin, Idaho 
13 Nov. 1882, Plain City, Weber, Utah 
8 Sept. 1885, Plain City, Weber, Utah 
13 March 1888, Plain City, Weber, Utah 

3 July 1898, Plain City, Weber, Utah 



Bapt. 14 Aug. 1900, Logan Temple, Cache, Utah 
End. 15 April 1931, Logan Temple, Cache, Utah 



3rd Husband, John England. Md . 20 Oct. 1920 at the Logan Temple at 
Logan, Cache, Utah to Emma Eliza Hope S. Geddes. They were not sealed. 

More information and sources given in Section IV. 



41 




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^>i^^^y^_ 



N'F.WS PHINT. ?^i lV» 




Top Row, left to right: Joseph S. Geddes, James S. 

Geddes, J. M. Grant Geddes. 
Bottom Row, left to right: Hugh S. Geddes, WiKTmn 

S ^ Godd o s; Arc -h^fagta^S^-eeddes AfcKib^U S-^ Wali^tv S. 




Standing: Agnes S. G. Peterson and Mary G. Thomas 
Sitting: Elizabeth G. Carver, Margaret G. Stephens and Annie G. Sutherland 




Emma Hope 
17 April 1845 






Robert Campbell Geddes 
8 December 1870 





Eliza Marie Geddes 
25 Septerrter 1873 






Harriet Susie Geddes 




Sarah Geddes 


2 March 1878 


David George Geddes 


2 January 1876 




13 August 1880 




Hyrum Smith Geddes 
13 November 1882 



Joan Campbell Geddes 
8 September 1885 



45 




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48 



ELIZABETH STEWART 



Elizabeth Stewart was born 1 March 1831. at Cathcart, Renfrewshire Scotland. She 
was the third child of Esther Lyie and Archibald Stewart. Elizabeth was, by nature re- 
served, quiet and thoughtful . As a child she had evidenced these qualities by her love of 
study and meditation. She was deeply religious and was concerned about the spiritual 
welfare of herself and her family. It was in this spiritually receptive young cirl that the 
message of the Mormon elders touched a spark. Elizabeth had studied and meditated on 
the messages of Jesus Christ in the Bible, but when she heard the elders, she felt the great 
impact of Jesus Christ as a real living personage. She felt and began to understand what 
the real meaning of Christ's mission had been. She no longer needed to worship a memory 
but a living personage . With this knowledge she immediately felt His presence. His help 
His guidance and a peace of mind which can only be obtained from a full acceptance of 
the Gospel of Jesus Christ. The truth of this testimony burned within her and she wanted 
to be baptized . Because of the unpopularity of the Mormons, her family strongly opposed 
her baptism. Through Elizabeth's strong conviction and earnest searching, however, her 
Granny had become interested in the Gospel and had read and studied the message of the 
Elders along with Elizabeth. She convinced the family that Elizabeth should be baptized 
and then received the ordinance along with her. The faith and conviction of Elizabeth 
were instrumental in bringing about the baptism of her parents and brothers and sisters. 

As a young girl, Elizabeth developed the qualities that had characterized her as a 
child. She had beautiful black hair, dark eyes and small bone structure. She dressed 
simply and neatly and had a quiet, reserved manner. She loved to discuss the gospel and 
spent many joyful hours on the ship voyaging to America reading and discussing the scrip- 
tures with the Mormon missionaries. Elizabeth herself was responsible for some of the con- 
versions on board the ship. She could always be found wherever a gospel discussion or an 
interested person was . 

It was on this same boat trip that Elizabeth met her future husband, William Geddes . 
Because of lack of funds for one passage, it was decided by the family members that 
Elizabeth should remain behind until she could make enough money for her own passage. 
To prevent separating the family, William Geddes gave them his passage money and worked 
his way across on the ship. William Geddes was also assigned the responsibility of driving 
the Stewart wagon from winter quarters to Salt Lake City, Utah . 

Elizabeth and William were married 3 June 1855, in Salt Lake City, one year after 
they arrived in the vol ley . For awhile they lived In a small log cabin which Wil Ham had 
built in the 20th Ward . One year after the marriage of William and Eiizabeth , William, 
In accord with the polygamy concept practiced and upheld by the members of the church. 
Took Martha, the sister of Elizabeth as his second wife. They were married In the old 
President's Office 13 July 1856, In Salt Lake City, Utah. 

The two sisters each had homes of their own while they lived in Salt Lake City, but 
when William took his wives to Plain City, they shared the same home because of the 
economic difficulties of starting a new settlement. Many times they didn't know where 



49 



fheir next meal was coming from. During the early years at Plain City, the two families 
were often in difficult financial situations. They suffered all the hardships and de- 
privations characteristic of a new settlement. One time William succeeded in obtaining 
a piece of fresh meat for his families. His wives, however, decided he needed the meat 
more than they did, so they sent it with his lunch . He brought it back so that his 
families could have it. This was repeated several days, and as a result the meat spoiled 
doing no one any good. 

In spite of the difficulty of sharing the same house, the sisters lived in harmony 
with each other. If jealousy existed. It was hidden from the others. Martha and 
Elizabeth had always been very close as sisters and shared a deep love for each other. 
They seemed to exemplify the Mary and Martha of the Bible during Christ's time. Eliz- 
abeth was intensely religious while Martha was intensely human. Elizabeth was always 
studying, reading, and praying while Martha was always cooking, nursing, and helping 
others. Because of Elizabeth's poor health, Martha assumed the heavier household tasks 
and chores such as cooking, milking the cows, washing, ironing, and making molasses 
while Elizabeth managed the housework, sewing, cording, spinning, and knitting. 

Five children were born to Elizabeth and William: William Stewart Geddes, Joseph 
Stewart Geddes, Archibald Stewart Geddes, Elizabeth Geddes and Jedediah Morgan 
Grant Geddes. Elizabeth was firm and strict with her children because she wanted them 
to develop strong testimonies of the gospel . She and her husband agreed completely on 
the discipline and activity of the children. She taught her children to sing, to read, 
and to appreciate and love the beautiful things of life. Her son Joseph stated that 
even though his mother died when he was quite young, she had lived long enough to in- 
fluence his life; she had had a part in shaping the course he took in life. 

Elizabeth was a liberal donator and helper in the Relief Society and other church 
organizations, but she was too shy and reserved to desire public offices. She was happiest 
when she was quietly reading or discussing the gospel, current events or school problems 
with her husband. 

She was a loving wife and a delightful companion to her husband and a wonderful 
Mother to her children. 

Elizabeth had always suffered from poor health and the strain and exertion of pioneer 
living and childbirth finally took their toll . She died 6 May 1866';-x Little can be 
found about the daily events in the life of Elizabeth but from the few, a whole volume 
could be written about the character of a woman who was strong enough in spite of a weak 
and fragile body to always choose the right course and blaze the trail for others to follow. 
Babcock's poem was written with such people in mind: 

Be strong' 

Say not the days are evil. 

Who's to blame'' 

And fold the hands and acquiesce 

-— O' Shame' 

Stand up, speak out, and bravely, 

50 



In God's Name . 

Be strong' 

It matters not how deep intrenched the wrong, 

How hard the battle goes, 

The day how long; 

Faint not, fight on' 

Tomorrow comes the song. 



/V\ARTHA STEWART 

Martha Stewart was born 10 May 1838, atNitshill, Scotland. She was a dark 
complexloned, curly-haired girl . One of her sons, Joseph, said that she had the most 
beautifully shaped hands he had ever seen. As a young girl she had a sunny disposition 
and a sense of humor which enabled her to find enjoyment in everything she did. It 
was reported by many that she was an excellent dancer, a good mixer and an asset to 
any group because of her spontaneous good humor and sharp wit. Socially she was well 
liked by all classes of people . 

Martha, along with the rest of her family, was converted to the gospel and worked 
hard to save enough money to come to Zion to be with the Saints. She worked long hours 
in the linen mills to gain the needed passage money for America. 

As sisters, Elizabeth and Martha were always close and shared many experiences. 
Elizabeth was rather shy and introspective while Martha was outgoing and socially inclined . 
The difference In their personalities was manifest during their boat trip to America. 
Elizabeth was concerned with the spiritual needs of the passengers and was Instrumental 
in converting several people to the church. Martha spent her time among the sick on 
board trying to ease their suffering and give relief. She was always concerned with 
the physical well being and comfort of her friends and loved ones. 

After their arrival In Salt Lake City, Martha along with her sisters, worked in 
the homes of the church members. One year after her sister married William Geddes, 
Martha decided that she could live In polygamy as William's second wife . They were 
married In the President's Office, 10 Jul.y 1856, in Salt Lake City, Utah. Martha 
started her married life in a log cabin built by her husband In the 20th Ward of Salt Lake. 
Here her first child was born and she planted mulberry trees around the cabin to make it 
as homey as possible. 

There were new settlements to be built up and a new culture to develop, so William 
along with other men, was sent to Plain City, Utah, to pioneer a new settlement. Al- 
though the financial difficulties and hardships were greater in the new area, pioneer 
living seemed to provide a challenge to Martha and gave her an opportunity to develop 
many skills and talents. She became Plain City's best cook, shirt-maker, nurse, and 
doctor. Many of the old settlers still remember her breads, cakes, molasses, butter, 
and canned fruit with relish. She loved to cook and loved to invite friends, relatives, 

GENEALOGICAL ^^-.-. > 

011947^ 51 ^^ '^^^ CHURCH OF JESUS CHklSl 

OF LAHER-DAY SAINTS 
fi» Z 9 ^968 



and visiting church officials into her home for Sunday dinner. Her warmth and 
enjoyment made her home a favorite place for friends to gather. On one occasion 
William had invited Bishop West and several church officials to his home for dinner. 
Martha had prepared vegetable soup, but when she went to set the table, she couldn't 
find any spoons . Her husband was very embarrassed, but her welcome was so sincere 
and generous that the visitors didn't mind using wooden spoons. About three months later, 
during potato harvest, the spoons were found sticking up around one of the largest potato 
hills. 

Martha loved children and often interceded on their behalf whenever she felt they 
shouldn't be punished. The children's happiness always came first with Martha. She 
always had time to play games with them, read them stories, or teach them how to do 
something. She felt that children should be able to celebrate all the holidays and 
often spent long hours preparing all the little things that children love. Fourth of July, 
Thanksgiving, Christmas, and Easter were all times of happy celebration for her children, 
even though there were times when her neighbors or her husband didn't approve of the 
festivities . 

The welfare of others was always very important to Martha and she was always willing 
to share her I ove and material possessions with anyone in need . Annie, one of her girls, 
remembers a time when she had been hiding eggs for two weeks for Easter. When Easter 
morning came, however, she couldn't find them anywhere. She asked her mother if she 
knew anything about them . Martha replied that she had given them to a poor boy who 
had nothing at all; not even a mother. Annie felt that she had been treated rather badly 
and declared that she wished she didn't have a mother because orphans seemed to get 
everything. ■ 

Although Martha loved all children, she had a special place in her heart for boys. 
Girls in her eyes, were not nearly so important as boys and everything about the home 
was done to make it more pleasant for boys. She always had some poor or motherless 
boy living with her. !t was easy for her to make friends with even the worst boys in 
town. She always understood their point of view and in that way she could always 
make them understand the better point of view. She could play most of their games as 
well as if not better than they could . If some mischief were planned, she would often 
keep them so busy, they either were too tired, or forgot about it. Any boy who got into 
some sort of fracas was never afraid to tell her all about it. She never excused them or 
got them off without paying the proper penalty, but she never allowed anyone to abuse 
them. She loved to do things for them' one year she knit mittens for every boy in town. 

One Fourth of July she found the younger boys of Plain City in tears. The mayor 
had helped the citizens spike the fence facing the ball park so the young boys wouldn't 
climb on the fence and watch, thus cheating them out of their reserved seats. Martha 
surveyed the situation, and then said, "If you boys will run home, I have several wide 
boards by the side of the house; bring these boards and I'll make some seats." When the 
boys came back with the boards, she placed them on the spikes and made a better seat 
for them than they had had before. To prevent any trouble, Martha climbed on the ■ 

fence and sat in the middle of the seat with the boys. She was sitting there enjoying 
the game when her husband and the major came walking around the side of the fence . Both 
of them were shocked and amazed, but Martha only laughed and continued to watch the game. 

52 



'-1 
when her sister Elizabeth died in 18^, Martha took charge of both families and 

reared her sister's children as her own. Joseph, one of Elizabeth's children, said that 

Martha was so good to tiem that If a favor could go to only one, Martha would always 

give Elizabeth's children the preference. 

Along with her family and church responsibilities, Martha aided her husband in pro- 
ducing molasses. Making molasses from cane sugar was one of the first paying Industries 
of Plain City, and the Geddes molasses became famous throughout the valley. William 
declared that he couldn't make the molasses unless Martha fed the sugar cane into the 
mill. 

When her husband married Emma Hope Stewart, the widow of her brother, Martha 
devoted all her time and energy to her children and to pi'bllc work. She became a ward 
Relief Society teacher. Plain City's undertaker, a nurse and a doctor. The first pre- 
sidency of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints called several pioneer women 
to take part in a special training in obstetrics. Martha was one of the women to be 
called and set apart for this special work and mission by President Young. She went to 
Salt Lake City and took a course in obstetrics and disease under Dr. Shipp, a graduate of 
the Women's Medical College of Pennsylvania in 1878. She graduated from this 
course and then devoted the rest of her life to Its practice. She cared for the sick and 
the poor and the dead of the community. Most of the babies In this vicinity were de- 
livered by her able care. She somehow had the ability to see the needs of other 
people. If she could not supply these needs, she would go to the people who could. 
Somehow she always got what she needed. Her youngest son, Jim, says that she spent 
her life nodding at the bedside of the sick or the dead. One of the old settlers said 
that a person of Plain City could not be buried properly If Martha had not supervised 
the washing and dressing. 

Not long before her death, she spent three days and nights with a sick man of a 
neighboring village. After the man's death, the bishop sent her home because he could 
see that she was sick. She was so exhausted that she slept about twenty-four hours 
without stirring. Just before the funeral, she jumped out of bed, dressed, and rushed 
to the funeral in spite of her children's entreaties for her to stay in bed. She rushed 
to the bishop to tell him that she must see how the dead man was dressed. At first the 
bishop refused, but when Martha told him that the man had appeared to her in a dream 
and that his robes were wrong, the bishop had the meeting house emptied. The man's 
robes were wrong just as they had been in Martha's dream. 

In 1898 Martha moved to Preston In order to be with her children. She brought 
six one-hundred pound sacks of dried apples with her to Preston. The apples were 
used to feed the men who were working on the town's irrigation ditches. Their diet 
was very scanty, so her gift was greatly appreciated. She loved being with her 
children, but she missed her friends of Plain City so badly that after a year's absence, 
she returned to her old home in Plain City. 

Martha was a woman who exemplified the human qualities of love, tenderness, 
sympathy, patience, loyalty, and devotion. She felt that it was more blessed to give 
than to receive, and closely following in the steps of the great Exemplor, she believed 



53 



that she came to earth not to be ministered to, but to minister. In all her teachings 
she tried to instill the highest qualities of character into the lives of her children At 
her husband's death, she said: "I want no wealth or property left to my children;' I 
want them to stand on their own characters." She was truly a woman of whom her 
family and community could say, "She was a woman of noble, heroic mold. " 

Her death was caused by a long, lingering disease, thought to be a growth. She 
suffered continuously during the last year of her life. The pain caused her untold 
agonies. Her last words to her daughter-in-law were "Teach your children to remain 
true to the principles of the gospel . I am not afraid to die, but it is the getting there 
Yes, Minnie, I want to see brother Geddes: all the unpleasant things will be forgotten." 
After these words she went into a stupor from which she did not rally. That night her 
son, Hugh and Jim sat by her bedside. They clasped hands and prayed over her body 
as she was dying. They felt that she had suffered so much they did not want any commotion 
at her death. The other members of her family were not awakened. Thus she passed 
quietly away during the night of August 1 1 , 1900, at the age of 62 years. She was 
buried beside her husband. 



EMMA HOPE STEWART GEDDES ENGLAND 

Emma Hope was born in Burlage, Wiltshire, England, 17 April 1845. She was 
the first child born to the union of David Hope and Eliza Stone. Nine children followed 
her, six brothers and three sisters. Little is known of her early life besides the fact 
that she spent her early years in England and that she accepted the L.D.S. Gospel there 
In 1864, when she was about nineteen, her Uncle William Davis and his family booked 
passage for America. Before they embarked, however, one of their children died. They 
took Emma Hope with them in place of the deceased child who was left with Emma's 
parents for burial . 

During the long trek across the plains to Salt Lake, the company was stricken with 
fever. Emma's Aunt and two of the Davis sons succumbed to the fever and were buried 
on the plains, adding three more to the thousands of nameless graves which blazed the 
trail to the West. Emma continued the heartbreaking journey with her uncle. 

When she arrived in Salt Lake, she made her home with a Bishop Hunter. It was 
while living here that she met and fell in love with John Stewart. Soon after their 
marriage the happy young couple moved to Plain City. Two children blessed this union 
Emma Elizabeth, born 22 July 1866, and John W., born 11 Oct. 1868. Her happiness' 
was short lived for the young father died, leaving Emma a young widow with two small 
children to care for. 

In 1870 she married William Geddes in polygamy. William Geddes was her brother-ii 
law, having married Elizabeth and Martha Stewart, sisters of her first husband, John 
Stewart. To this union eight children were born: Robert, Eliza, Sarah, Susie, David, 
Hyrum, Joan, and Gertrude. Emma was once again faced with sorrow when her oldest 
son, John W. Stewart was drowned. He was twenty-one years of age at the time of 
his death . 

54 



when her daughter, Eliza, was six weeks old, her husband, William Geddes, was 
called to fill a mission in his native Scotland. From Scotland he was transferred to 
Australia to preside over that mission. 

In 1880 the Geddes family moved to Preston, Idaho, where they took up a home- 
stead. They sold this farm a few years later and moved back to Plain City. While 
moving to Preston in the covered wagon, all the small children came down with measles. 
Because they were unable to give them proper care, some of the children developed defective 
eyes . 

Again tragedy struck at this courageous woman. On 23 Aug. 1899, while he was 
bagging grain on a thresher, William Geddes was stricken with a heart attack and died 
suddenly. This was a blow which was difficult for grandmother to bear. 

Three of her daughters married three sons of John England and moved to Moreland, 
Idaho. Eliza Geddes married William T. England, Susie Geddes married MIlo England, 
and Emma Stewart married John V. England. Grandmother, Emma, moved to Moreland 
to be near her daughters. She built a little home near her daughter, Eliza. She 
remained a widow for twenty years. 

Emma Hope Geddes had many trials but she never complained of her lot. I should 
like to relate a story I heard her tell of her baby, Gertrude. An epidemic of Spinal 
Mennengitis swept through Plain City, taking many lives. Her baby Gertrude con- 
tracted the disease and at the request of the doctors a pit was dug and filled with mud. 
Gertrude was then buried up to her neck in the mud. Grandmother could not bear the 
screams of the child and insisted that grandfather remove her and dedicate her to the 
Lord. As soon as he did this, her spirit left the little body. She was ten years old 
when she died . 

Grandmother used to come to our house once a week to do the family mending. 
She was a woman who could not be idle and if we had no mending for her she would not 
stay. 

I have many pleasant and happy memories of my grandmother in her later years. 
Since her modest home was close to ours, my sister and I would take turns staying over 
nights with her. I remember the ever-full cookie jar and the delicious new bread with 
the carroway on top. Grandmother was thrifty and a good manager and was financially 
independent. These sterling qualities she had developed through the many trials and 
hardships of her busy and productive life. 

One of the loveliest memories I shall ever treasure was the courtship of this lovely 
white haired lady and silver haired Grandfather John England. In the last years of their 
lives, these two lonely people found love and happy companionship with each other. I 
can remember grandfather calling and grandmother blushing like a young girl. They 
used to sit by the door holding hands like two young lovers. They were married 20 Oct. 
1920 and we reluctantly surrendered to Grandfather England our duties to Grandmother. 
They spent nine happy years together. Death came on Aug. 21, 1929. A noble woman 
was laid to rest. Her grave lies at the Moreland Cemetery. 

55 



On grandmother's SOth birthday, we had a big celebration for her. All of her 
children came with their children and grandchildren. This poem was written for this 
occasion by Mrs. Ida Wheeler, one of grandmother's neighbors, Mrs. Wheeler received 
the information used in this poem from grandmother. 

In far away England, a maiden fair. 

Free and without much worry or care 
Lived and enjoyed her girlhood days 

Studied and was educated in many ways. 

At the age of nineteen in eighteen sixty-four 

She left old England to return no more 
She left her friends, associates, and relations 

Left folks in tears, as she went to the station. 

An Uncle and Aunt, Wm. Davis and wife. 

Were to bring her over and guard her life. 
They had a safe voyage over the sea 

Little dreaming of what the trip over the plains would be. 

They were crossing the plains with slowox-team 
When the Aunt and her two boys were stricken 

And lo, the hand of death called them away 

Do you know how badly grandmother wished them to stay? 

She was left alone with Uncle and friends. 

She felt alone as each night she bent 
On her knees to bravely thank the Lord above. 

In her deep sorrow for his blessings and love. 

Did she give up and say no use 

And think her life was one of abuse? 
No! she shouldered her burdens and daily tasks 

Said, she was all right when friends chanced to ask. 

She had been on this journey the whole summer through 

And was glad indeed to get something to do. 
When they landed at last at Great Salt Lake 

Her home with Bishop Hunter she did make. 

She stayed at this home six months or more 

Until Dan Cupid knocked at her door. 
She married John Stewart a gallant young man. 

It was then that she thought her real life began. 

They hod only been married a few short years. 

When again dear grandmother was brought to tears 

With the loss of her partner, husband, and lover, 
A blow from which it was hard to recover. 

56 



With her two small children, a girl and a boy, 

She found great comfort and a measure of joy. 

Though deep in her heart she hod wished he could stay 
Yet she silently bore it day after day. 

Did she sit down, give up and whine? 

Did she grumble, or cry, or complain all the time? 
No! she busied herself as a noble woman should. 

She planned and schemed and did all she could. 

William Geddes she married, in Feb. of 1870 

It was then that polygamy was being questioned very heavy. 
To live in polygamy through trials and straits. 

Only proved some more of grandmother's good traits. 

Eight children in due time were born to them. 

Who all grew to be useful women and men. 
She was called to suddenly part with her oldest son. 

When he was drowned at the age of twenty-one. 

She was left with Eliza only six weeks old 

When grandfather to fill a mission was called. 

She helped him off and bravely kept going. 

While in Scotland and Australia, gospel seeds he was sowing. 

In later years, grandfather was called away. 

And again she was left to moke her own way. 

A widow she was for twenty years or more. 

When again Mr. Cupid knocked at her door. 

This time it was a gentleman portly and white 

Mr. England, who'd lived a good life and tried to do right. 
Of course she said, "Yes" it was the right thing to do. 

It filled their declining years with a golden hue. 

Now do you know why grandmother could wear 

A smile and bright look through the wrinkles of care? 

Now do you know why her children and grandchildren, too. 
Can reverence her loving memory so true? 

If you don't, let me whisper a word in your ear. 

For to me the true reason is perfectly clear. 
She's been the best kind of a wife and a mother 

She's done things in life which has made us all love her. 

She stood bravely by and was never a quitter. 

She did not give up to gossip and titter. 
She minded her business and each setting sun. 

Found some good word spoken or kindly act done. 

57 



Added by her daughter, Joan Randall: 

She died as she lived, noble and sublime. 

On August 21, 1929, leaving 
Fifty-six grandchildren, forty-six great grandchildren. 

And one great, great grandchild. 

At the present time there are 89 great grandchildren 

And 18 great, great grandchildren 
December 8, 1940. 

This sketch was compiled by her granddaughters, Lurlean England Wheeler, Priscllla 
England Hatch, and Lois England Thomas. 



1st Husband JOHN McAULEY STEWART 



B 6 Aug 1841 
Bapt 13 Aug. 185T 
End 24 June 1865 
Md 24 June 1865 
D 31 Aug. 1869 
Bur Sept 1869 

Father Archibald Stewart 



Pollokshaws, Lanarkshire, Scotland 
Glasgow, Lanarkshire, Scotland 
Endowment House, Salt Lake, Utah 
Endowment House, Salt Lake, Utah 
Plain City, Weber, Utah 
Plain City, Weber, Utah 

Mother Esther Lyie 



Wife EMMA HOPE 



B 17 April 1845 
Bapt 1853 

End 24 June 1865 
Sid 24 June 1865 
D 21 Aug 1929 
Bur 25 Aug. 1929 

Father David Hope 



Burlage, Wiltshire, England 
Burlage, Wiltshire, England 
Endowment House, Salt Lake, Utah 
Endowment House, Salt Lake, Utah 
Moreland, Bingham, Idaho 
Moreland, Bingham, Idaho 

Mother Eliza Stone 



CHILDREN 



Emma Elizabeth Stewart 
John McAuley Stewart 



B 22 July 1866, Plain City, Weber, Utah 

B 11 Oct. 1868, Plain City, Weber, Utah 

Bapt 23 April 1895, Plain City, Weber, Utah 

D 25 July 1891, Plain City, Weber, Utah 

End 24 April 1895, Endowment House, S.L., Utah 

Sid to Eliza Coy 1895 



58 



A notice of the death of John M. Stewart found In the Plain Gty Newspaper. 

"John M. Stewart died 31 Aug 1869 of dyptheria . He was born In Pol lokshaws, 
Lanarkshire, Scotland, 6 August 1843. He was baptized when eight years of age, 
emigrated to this country In 1854, went back to the middle states and helped the 
emigrating companies for two years In succession, was ordained a Seventy In 1865. 
He was the chief teacher In Plain Gty's Sunday School for two years preceding his 
death, was a good and faithful member of the L.D.S. Church and he was beloved by 
all who knew him. He leaves a wife and two children to mourn his loss . " 



JOHN VICILO ENGLAND 



B 20 March 1861 
I Bapt 2 July 1876 
' End 1 June 1887 

Md 1 June 1887 

Father John England 



Plain Gty, Weber, Utah 
Plain Gty, Weber, Utah 
Logan Temple, Cache, Utah 
Logan Temple, Cache, Utah 

Mother Laura Handsena Magdelina Thueson 



Wife EMMA ELIZABETH STEWART 



B 22 July 1866 
Bapt 2 July 1876 
End 1 June 1887 
Sid 1 June 1887 
D 22 May 1936 
Bur May 1936 

Father John McAuley Stewart 



Plain City, Weber, Utah 

Plain City, Weber, Utah 

Logan Temple, Logan, Cache, Utah 

Logan Temple, Logan, Cache, Utah 

Moreland, Bingham, Idaho 

Moreland, Bingham, Idaho 

Mother Emma Eliza Hope 



CHILDREN 



Emma Lorena England 
Laura Tressa England 
Elva Viola England 
Margaret Bertha England 



B 11 Sept. 1888, Plain Gty, Weber, Utah 

Md to Aha Bensen, B abt. 1884 

B 1 Aug. 1890, Plain City, Weber, Utah 

Md to Sim Hatch, B abt. 1886 

B 17 Oct. 1892, Ogden, Weber, Utah 

Md to Thomas Jolley, B abt 1888 

B 20 July 1895, Blackfoot, Bingham, Idaho 

Md to James Harper, B abt. 1891 



59 



Edith Harriet England 
Elmer John William England 
Hyrum Charles England 
Eva Gertrude England 
Jesse Stewart England 
Vicilo Geddes England 



B. 20 Dec. 1897, Moreland, Bingham, Idaho 

Md. to George Jolly, B. abt. 1893 

B. 30 March 1900, Moreland, Bingham, Idaho 

Md. to Alice Crump, B. abt. 1894 

B. 23 March 1903, Moreland, Bingham, Idaho 

Md. to Pearl Handy Bacon, B. abt. 1899 

B. 7 Oct. 1905, Moreland, Bingham, Idaho 

Md. to Harrison McKnight, B. abt. 1901 

B. 4 Jan. 1908, Moreland, Bingham, Idaho 

Md. to Aritta Mitchell, B. abt. 1904 

B. 28 Aug. 1910, Moreland, Bingham, Idaho 

Md. to Mildred Tanner, B. abt. 1906 



ELIZABETH STEWART ENGLAND 

Emma Elizabeth Stewart, daughter of John McAuley Stewart and Emma Hope, was 
born 22 July, 1866, at Plain City, Utah. She was the oldest child of this marriage having 
a brother, John, born 11 May 1868. She learned to accept the partings of loved ones 
very young as her father died 31 Aug. 1869, when she was but three years old and was 
greatly missed by his little daughter. On the 21 of February, 1870, her mother married 
William Geddes, who proved a real father to her two fatherless children. From this 
marriage there were eight children and as Emma was the oldest she had the responsibility 
of caring for the younger children. She took the responsibility cheerfully, never 
shrinking from the tasks although they were very hard to bear. One thing she always 
remembered was that when she was sent to borrow yeast she nearly always drank it all 
before reaching home, which caused her mother to scold and Emma to promise never to 
do it again . 

Her first school teacher recognized in her the ability to always get her lessons. 
One teacher, George Bramwell, said when anyone on a program failed he could always 
call on Emma Stewart and she would have a recitation ready although no notice had been 
given in time to prepare a new one. Many times her ready mind saved the teacher much 
embarrassment. 

President Brigham Young, George Q. Cannon and John Taylor made a tour of the 
church when she was about eight years old. When they visited Plain City, the children 
carried large armfuls of flowers and strewed them along the street for the brethren to 
walk on. Then returning they gathered up the flowers, carried them up to the front and 
again strewed them along to be walked on by a Prophet of God. Emma was among this 
happy band. Not all children have been blessed with such a privilege and she always 
prized the memory. 

She was baptized 2 July, 1876, at Plain City, Utah by Peter A. Green and was 
confirmed the same day by John Carver. She was a Sunday School teacher and when 
about eighteen years old she gave a lesson at a Sunday School Jubilee. Although much 



60 



frightened she gave the lesson very creditably. 

She worked out for the neighbors but always gave her wages to her mother. As a 
young girl she not only helped her own family but was of real service to her associates. 
The only time she was angry or gave her younger brothers and sisters spankings or scoldings 
was when they forgot to put on their sunbonnets. As they trooped out to play, Emma 
always came to the door and said: "Have you all your sunbonnets on?" 

On one occasion she was going with her step-father to Preston to spend the Oiristmas 
holidays, in a light buggy drawn by one horse. In crossing Bear River the buggy became 
stuck in the mud. The water was so deep that not only was their extra clothing soaked 
through but fhey thanselves got very wet and cold. A man on horseback came to their 
rescue and took them to shore. This was near where they intended to stay so they were 
soon warm and dry. 

The family of John England was their neighbor and the children of both families 
grew up together. The oldest son, John V., would get very jealous of Emma when a 
certain school teacher would have her come and sit up in front to recite, and he did not 
take kindly to other boys sitting by her. This emotion for this plain, hard-working, 
lovable girl ripened into love and she became his steady girl, going with him to dances 
and parties. Life was one glad song and love lightened their pioneer load. On 1 June, 
1887, they were married by Merrian W. Merrill in the Logon Temple. They traveled by 
team and wagon from Plain City to Logan, accompanied by one other couple. The trip 
required that they camp out one night on the road. On their way home after they were 
married, they were traveling alone. That night just as they were ready to retire, the 
horses started to leave and her husband went after them. It took him all night to catch 
them and bring them back, so Emma spent the first night of her married life sleeping alone 
in a wagon box. They made their home in Plain City, living with his parents the first 
summer. 

During the summer of 1887 a hard swelling appeared on her throat under her right 
ear near the juglar vein. She was token to a doctor and he said it was cancer and so 
near to the vein that there was no way of removing it. She was token to other doctors 
and was told the same thing. Her husband thought that If she would go to the temple 
and be anointed and prayed for, she would get well; so he went to the bishop and asked 
him for advice. The bishop told him to take her to a doctor in Salt Lake, who was the 
best in the state. They did this, but he was only more emphatic about the cose. He 
said they might as well cut her throat as to try to operate and that she would live maybe 
a week or a little longer but that was the best they could expect. They returned home 
with heavy hearts. One morning soon after, Emma was sitting on the bed, when suddenly 
she looked up and said, "If I con go to fast meeting and be administered to, I feel 
that I will get well." This was Thursday and fast meetings then were held on the first 
Thursday of the month. They Immediately prepared to go. She was administered to, 
old Father Carver anointing her. The anointing was sealed by John V's grandfather, 
John England, Sr. He promised that in two weeks the lump would move and she would 
get well . The day the two weeks were up the lump moved to the point of her chin, 
gathered and broke. It then healed but there was a scar under her ear, across her throat 
to her chin which she always carried as a reminder of the miraculous healing that was 
received by her through the faith of her husband and herself and the power of the Holy 
Priesthood, 

61 



On the 1 1 of September 1888, she became the mother of a baby girl whom they 
named Emma Lorena . Now life was a joy with love to lighten their struggles; they were 
indeed rich . The little girl was just becoming a lot of company for her mother when 
another little sister came to bless this home. She was born 1 August 1890 and named 
Laura Tressa . 

The family moved soon after the birth of this daughter to Ogden, Utah where her 
husband ran a butcher shop. Here on the 17 October, 1892, the third daughter, Elva 
Viola, was born . While living here they had the privilege of attending the dedication 
of the Salt Lake Temple. This was the second time they had been through the Temple 
before Its completion, having gone with a group of young folks some years previous through 
the unfinished building. 

In the fall of 1894 her husband came to Idaho and in the spring of 1895 he returned 
and brought his family. They lived in Blackfoot where her fourth daughter was born on 
20 July 1895. This little girl's name was Margaret Bertha. They moved to Moreland, 
Idaho in the spring of 1896 and lived on the old Lee Moyer farm. It seemed that some 
gruesome deed hod been committed here or at least evil spirits seemed to lurk here. Emma 
never felt safe and the children were afraid to go to bed. always waking, screaming that 
a man was after their mother. A very strange thing happened. It appeared that two men 
could be seen approaching the place but never passed; they would iust go so near and then the 
were gone. This was talked over and John said it was Emma's nerves One night Grandma 
Geddes came to stay with them. She saw the two men and described them so plainly 
that it seemed there was no doubt but what there was something to this. As this place 
could not rightly be called a home they moved to the farm north of the townslte. where 
the family have resided since except for short removals. 

Here on the 20th of December. 1897, a fifth daughter was born and named Edith 
Harriet. They set out trees and water had to be carried to them from a well some distance 
away. This was done by the mother and her small girl and was no easy task. Their 
home was a three room log house with a dirt roof. This house has been lived In from then 
until 1936 and still has a dirt roof. The family still lives there. In this home, 30 March 
1900 their first son was born and named Elmer John William. 

Emma had a patriarchal blessing given by O. N. Liljenqulst, which was a great con- 
solation to her all her life. These were very trying times to this industrious mother, her 
husband being away from home a great deal of the time. She had the responsibility of 
the family and it was noteasy to keep food enough for growing children. At one time 
the flour was nearly gone but her husband was expected home with some more that night 
or the next, when a neighbor came In to borrow some. So the last flour was loaned and 
the husband failed to return. One night her children went to bed hungry. 

Her home was a gathering place for the children. There was a large swing erected 
where the children of the neighborhood spent many happy hours. All of them loved 
Aunt Emma . 

On the 23 March, 1903, a second son was born and was named Hyrum Charles, 
Life was a routine of household duties but this did not stop her from performing many 

62 



church duties. She was for ten years a Relief Society teacher and filled this position 
with credit. On the 7 October 1905 their sixth daugher was born. Her name was 
Eva Gertrude. A telephone line had been extended to Moreland about this time and a 
phone was installed in their home where at all times of the day or night neighbors came 
to call for help in sickness and messages were cheerfully carried to members of the ward 
who didn't have a phone. This was a great boon to the people and she made everyone 
welcome giving help and advice to all . 

On the 4 January, 1908, a third son was born named Jessie Stewart. A lot of sick- 
ness was in our little town that year and death took toll of some of the members. Aunt 
Emma, as she was called, gave much comfort in these times of trial . 

On the 28 August 1910, their fourth son was born and named Vicilo Geddes . This 
made her the mother of ten children, six girls and four boys, all living and a very happy 
family. With her children all growing up in the way children should, her life was full. 
Home duties kept her busy and yet she progressed not in worldly wealth, but in spiritual 
power. In 1916 she was sustained as second counselor in the Moreland Ward Relief Society. 
This was a big job in these trying times as the Relief Society was the only help in sickness, 
death and other troubles. In this work she was indeed an angel of mercy and many 
homes were made happier by her presence. 

It was during this time that a family lived here, the husband teaching school . The 
mother and small son were very sick, the child being very much undernourished. As 
the mother had to go to the hospital, a place for the child was necessary and so Aunt 
Emma took the little one, so thin that he did not seem human. She kept him about two 
months when her grandchild took sick, so she asked the father of the child to come and 
get him. When he came, there were other children playing around and he could not 
tell which was his own child, he had gained so in health. 

Her husband was on the old folks committee many years and much of his success 
depended upon his wife. Whenever anyone failed them that was supposed to furnish cake, 
she was the one called on to supply the demand. This gave her a lot of extra work which 
she performed cheerfully. 

Aunt Emma has seen grandchildren taken in death, also Tressa her second daughter 
after growing to womanhood and raising a family. Her mother, brothers and sisters have 
gone and through It all the same serene, gentle, faithful spirit Is manifest. 

On 1 December, 1920, she with her husband and younger children, moved to Arlmo, 
Idaho, where she was a Relief Society teacher and raised poultry and flowers. A re- 
markable incident happened. One day a large expensive car stopped at their gate and 
the people came in and asked for a drink. Sister England not only gave them a drink but 
a large armful of flowers. Some time after this her husband was called on a six month's 
mission and as he was tracting one day he came to a magnificent home. He rang the door- 
bell and handed the servant his card who took It In to the man of the house. He Immediately 
came out, asked him in, and said, "Did you come from Arlmo, Idaho?" Whereupon 
Brother England replied that he did. The man then told him he had stopped there for a 
drink and a lady had given him flowers and that a man from Arlmo was always welcome 
to his home. When the man was told that It was Brother England's wife who had given 

63 



him the flowers, the elders were given a hearty welcome Into this wonderful home end 
much good was done. 

About 1930, she with her husband, returned to Moreland to take care of John's 
father. This was very hard work and lasted for two years when he died. As her 
health was not the best they decided to remain In Moreland but spent their summers In 
Arlmo for some years. 

In the spring of 1935, her health seemed to fall so rapidly that the doctors said she 
would not live but a short time. Although she was sick she was taken to Yellowstone 
Park where she spent a week going from one place of interest to another. On her re- 
turn she seemed Improved and was able to attend to her household and church duties. 

Early In the year of 1936 she became worse and In spite of all the core that could 
be given her, she did not recover. She was very patient and liked to tell of her early 
life. It was from her that most of this information was obtained by the writer. Her life 
span ended on the 22 May, 1936, and a noble wife and mother returned to a home of 
peace where she will be welcomed by her relatives and friends. The community will 
always feel the loss with her family. She had thirty-seven grandchildren and eight 
great grandchildren. 

Pioneer of Moreland, Idaho 1896 
Sketch was written by her daughters 



3rd Husband JOHN ENGLAND 



John England, son of John England. Dr. and Jane Pavard, was born at Bridgeport, 
Dorsetshire, England, Sept. 4, 1843. He was the sixth child In the family of 15 child- 
ren. His father was president of the local branch, and he baptized John when he was 
ten years old. Because of the feeling towards the church, he was baptized at 1 1 o'clock 
at night and the Ice had to be broken on the river. 

When he was twelve years old, cholera broke out. One nightjohn slept between 
his brothers Cave and George. The next day both died with this terrible sickness. 
They were both wrapped In a blanket and buried In the same grave. 

He attended the school of the Church of England. His sister Annie was the first 
to come to America. She lived with President Brlghom Young and worked In the Lion 
House. She married Charles NIel . 

At the age of seventeen he left his native land on the sailing vessel Manchester . 
When he arrived in New York he was almost broke. While at the station, he was given 
$2.50 by a young couple who asked him to go In the depot and buy them some lunch. 
When he returned with the food, the train was pulling out, so he ate the food and had 
the change which helped him very much . When he arrived in Omaha he got a job with 
the Telegraph Company driving the ox teams across the plains while the new lines were 

64 



being installed . For this service he was paid $18.50 a month . He left Omaha in 1861 
to cross the plains. The Indians were continually shooting the insulators from the poles. 
Once they grabbed hold of a chain fastened to the pole. This chain was charged with 
electricity. The Indians yelled and danced but could not let go of the chain. After 
this experience, they left the lines alone thinking that the Great Spirit had punished 
them . 

When John arrived in Utah he settled at Plain City and worked hard to save money 
to send for the rest of his family. On October 11, 1863 he was married to Laura 
Thueson . The marriage was performed by Wallace Raymond, the presiding elder of Plain 
City. Shortly after their marriage they moved to Gunnison where they made their home, 
for a little over two years. While in Gunnison they buried their first daughter, Laura. 
They lived with Laura's folks in their dugout. One morning part of the roof caved in . 
They all ran to the door and Laura's mother ran back to the bed for an adopted child, 
Alfred Stocker; the logs fell and killed her. They dug the dirt from the baby, admin- 
istered to him and he lived. 

While In Gunnison he served in the Blackhawk Indian war, serving under Mr. Madsen. 
One instance that he used to tell about was that after they had heard the war cries of 
the Indians all night, next morning a family near by was found scalped and a young baby 
had been left and it was crawling over their bodies. 

In the spring of 1866 they moved back to Plain City. It took them five days in the 
wagon and it rained all the way. 

On June 11, 1865, they received their endowments in the Old Endowment House 
with President Heber C. Kimball officiating. He received his naturalization papers in 
the Third District Court of the territory of Utah, May 20, 1878. 

While living in Plain City he followed the pursuit of farming and assisted in building 
the Plain City ditch bringing the water from the Ogden River for irrigation purposes and 
served for 18 years as one of the directors. He was in the butcher business and had a 
shop on 24th street in Ogden. He and his boys peddled meat to all the small towns 
around Ogden . 

In 1893 on advice of Apostle Richards he made his first trip into the Snake River 
Valley over the prospects for a new home for himself and family. He later filed on 
land In Moreland and started the location of an irrigation ditch which finally resulted in 
the building of the People's Canal . He served as one of the directors of said canal for 
a number of years . 

He went with Jim Wray to Lost River on a short term mission. In church work he 
was very active, serving in various capacities, such as home missionary, ward teacher, 
and counsellor in the presidency of the High Priest quorum of Blackfoot Stake from 1907 
to 1909. 

On August 5, 1913, they celebrated their Golden Wedding at their son's home in 
Moreland. On August 5, 1920 he was called to mourn the death of his wife, Laura, 



65 



who had stood by him In all his labor. They had lived together 57 years. They had 11 
children. They are Laura, John V., Julia, Ellen, William T., Charles Millo, Alice 
Louise, Violet, Ida A., Llllie M., and Alta D. 

On 20 Oct. 1920 he married Mrs. Emma Geddes at the Logan Temple and lived with 
her until her death 21 August 1929. On Thursday, April 21, he took sick and died April 
28, 1932 at 3:45 and was buried in t!e Moreland Cemetery May 1 , 1932. 



66 



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74 



1 WILLIAM GEDDES 



B. 14 Nov. 1832 
Bapt. 17 Nov. 1847 
Md. 3 June 1855 
Emig. 12 Mar. 1854 
Arrived 2 Oct. 1854 
End. & Sid. 21 Mar. 1856 
D. 24 Aug. 1899 
Bur. 27 Aug. 1899 

Father *Hugh Geddes 

Other Wives 

(2) 10 July 1856 

(3) 21 Feb. 1870 



Newtown Hamilton, Keyte Par., Armagh, Ireland 

Baillieston, Lanarkshire, Scotland 

Salt Lake City, Salt Lake, Utah 

Glasgow, Lanarkshire, Scotland to America 

Salt Lake City, Salt Lake, Utah 

Endowment House, Salt Lake, Utah 

Plain City, Weber, Utah 

City Cem., Plain City, Weber, Utah 

Mother *Agnes Graham 



*Martha Stewnrt (Sid. 10 July 1856 P.O.) 
*Emma Hope (Sid. 24 June 1865 E.H.) 



(1) Wife * ELIZABETH STEWART 



B. 1 Mar. 1831 
Bapt. 9 Jar . 1841 
Md. 3 June 1855 
Emig. 12 Mar. 1854 
Arrived 2 Oct. 1854 
End. 21 Mar. 1856 
Sid. 21 Mar. 1856 
D. 6 May 186^ f'gtg 
Bur. 10 May T866/g-t? 

Father *Archibald Stewart 



Cathcart, Renfrewshire, Scotland 

Thornliebank, Renfrewshire, Scotland 

Salt Lake City, Salt Lake, Utah 

Glasgow, Lanarkshire, Scotland to America 

Salt Lake City, Salt Lake, Utah 

Endowment House, Salt Lake, Utah 

Endowment House, Salt Lake, Utah 

Plain City, Weber, Utah 

City Cem., Plain City, Weber, Utah 

Mother * Esther Lyie 



2 William Stewart Geddes 



B. 5 Apr. 1856, Salt Lake City, Salt Lake, Utah 

Bapt. 17 Apr. 1865, Plain City, Weber, Utah 

Md. 20 Oct. 1877, Endowment House, Salt Lake, Utah 

to Mary Ann Carver, first wife (Sid. 20 Oct. 1877 EH) 

Md. 4 Dec. 1884, Logan Temple, Cache, Utah 

to Margaret Ferguson Cullen, second wife (Sid. 4 Dec. 

1884 LG) 

End. 26 Oct. 1876 Endowment House, Salt Lake, Utah 

D. 22 Aug. 1891 in Oregon & Bur. in Plain City, 

Weber, Utah 



75 



4 Joseph Stewart Geddes 



6 Archibald Stewart Geddes 



8 Elizabeth Geddes 



10 Jedediah Grant Morgan 
Geddes 



B. 18 Dec. 1857, Salt Lake City, Salt Lake, Utah 

Bapt.17 Apr. 1865, at Plain City, Weber, Utah 

Md. &Sld. 29 Dec. 1881, Logan Temple, Cache, 

Utah to Isabel le Dora Neeley. 

End. 29 Dec. 1881, Logan Temple, Cache, Utah 

D. 27 Dec. 1931, Preston, Franklin, Idaho & Bur . th' 

B. 31 Jan. 1860, Plain City, Weber, Utah 

Bapt. 5 June 1868, Plain City, Weber, Utah 

End. 5 July 1884, Endowment House, Salt Lake, Utah 

Md. & Sid. 5 July 1888, Logan Temple, Cache, Utah 

D. 1 June 1919, Preston, Franklin, Idaho & Bur. there 

B. 8 Aug. 1862, Plain City, Weber, Utah 

Bapt. 15 Sept. 1870, Plain City, Weber, Utah 

End. 24 Nov. 1881 Endowment House, Salt Lake, Utc 

Md.&Sld. 24 Nov. 1881, Endowment House, Salt 

Lake, Utah to George Henry Carver. 

D. 9 Sept. 1926, Preston, Franklin, Idaho & Bur. thf 

B. 10 July 1865, Plain City, Weber, Utah 

Bapt. 1 July 1875, Plain City, Weber, Utah 

Md. &Sld. 6 Dec. 1893, Logan Temple, Cache, Utal 

End. 6 Dec. 1893, Logan Temple, Cache, Utah 

D. 27 Nov. 1910, Baker City, Union, Oregon. 



Sources and Explanations 



1 . Copy of William Geddes Diary In poss. of Martha Geddes, 67 East 2nd South, 
Preston, Idaho. 

2. Fam. Recs. of Martha Geddes, 67 East 2nd South, Preston, Idaho. 

3. Fam. Recs. of Fern Geddes at 935 Tamarack N. E., Salem, Oregon 97303 . 

4. Joseph Geddes's temple BK. in poss. of Vera G. Merrill, 260 East 1st South, Preston, 
Idaho . 

5. The Stirlingshire LDS Church Records, Baillleston Branch section (GS call no. 14516 
F. Scot. 17 pt. 1). 

6. Baillleston parochial registers, Lanarkshire, Scotland 1840-1854 (GS coll no 1416 
F. Scot. 17 pts. 4 & 7). 

7. Plain City Ward records-early to 1948 (GS call no. Utah 1 1 pt . 1 & 2 now 6457 
pt. 1 & 2). 

8. Baker Ward records early to 1948 (GS coll no. F. Baker, Oregon B. pts. 1 & 2 
now 5025 B. pts. 1 & 2). 

9. Parochial registers of Cathcart, Renfrewshire, SctI . (chr. 1701-1854; mds. 1690- 
1854); (GS call no. F. Scot. 6 pt. Ill & 113). 

10. The Stirlingshire's LDS Church or Branch recs.; the Baillieston section of the film 
1840-1854; (GS call no. Scot. 17 pt. 1 14516). 



76 



11. Early LDS Mission recs. were searched at the Historian's Library. 

12. Andrew Jensen, Church historian's private files and records were examined. 

13. Index to sealings Salt Lake Temple records (Nauvoo sealings 1846-1856 recorded) 
(GS call no. 25163 pt. 3, p. 14 for William Geddes). 

14. Sealings for Salt Lake Temple (GS call no. 25164 pt. 4). 

15. Logan Temple Archives searched. 

16. 1854 Church emigration book searched at Historian Library. 

17. Parochial registers of Baillieston, Renfrewshire, Scotland (GS call no. 14516 Scot 
17 pts. 4 & 6). 

18. The Deseret News: 1854~Aug.31, Sept. 28, Oct. 5, Oct. 26. 

19. Mill. Star vol. 14, pp's: 187, 281, 297, 366, 441, & 477; vol. 25, p. 729; 
vol . 36, p. 43 . 

20. Desert News: 16 Feb. 1866, 24 July 1868, 18 Nov. 1873, 24 Apr. 184, 23 
Mar. 1880, 30 Mar . 1880, 27 Nov. 1886, 2 Dec . 1886, 6 Dec. 1886, also 
Desert News, Vol. 24, p. 173. 

21 . William Geddes listed his birth place as Baillieston, Lanarkshire, Scotland in the 
Glasgow Branch record, on the endowment house record, the ward record of Plain 
City, Emigration Book of 1854, of Scotland, the Logan Temple record, the Mission- 
ary record and, also, in his diary, but I had read the 1841 census of Baillieston, 
also 1851 & 1861 and he had been listed on the 1841 & 1851 as having been born in 
Ireland. Nothing has been found In Irish research by John McLeod of Edinburgh, 
Scotland; Jennie M. Stewart of Ireland; and Miss Horlacker of the Genealogical 
Society; Bryan Leese . a European Genealogical specialist and graduate of the London 
University. In the spring of 1965, I found a new L.D.S. Branch record of Stir- 
lingshire, Renfrewshire, Lanarkshire, etc. In the Baillieston section I found a re- 
cord of William and John, his brother, which indicated that they hod been born in 
Newtown Hamilton, Keyte Par., Armagh, Ireland. The minister of this place was 
contacted. He reported that his records did not go back that far because they had 
all been destroyed. It has not helped our research problem, but we are glad that 
we have at last found the exact place of his birth . 



71 



2 WILLIAM STEV'APT GEDDES 



B. 5 Apr. 1856 
Bapt. 17 Apr. 1865 
End. 26 Oct. 1876 
Md. 20 Oct. 1877 
D. 22 Aug. 1891 
Bur. 26 Aug. 1891 

Father 1 William Geddes 



Salt Lake City, Salt Lake, Utah 
Plain City, Weber, Utah 
Endowment House, Salt Lake, Utah 
Endowment House, Salt Lake, Utah 
Hood River, Hood River, Oregon 
Plain City, Weber, Utah 



Mother 



Elizabeth Stewart 



1st Wife MARY ANN CARVER 



B. 2 Oct 1857 
Bapt. 10 Oct. 1867 
End. 20 Oct. 1877 
Sid. 20 Oct. 1877 
D. 6 May 1955 
Bur. 10 May 1955 

Father John Carver 



25 Minnie Elizabeth Geddes 

27 William Carver Geddes 
30 Leona Geddes 
38 Eva Francilda Geddes 
42 John LeRoy Geddes 
48 George Hyrum Geddes 
58 Walter Sheridan Geddes 



Kaysville, Davis, Utah 
Plain City, Weber, Utah 
Endowment House, Salt Lake, Utah 
Endowment House, Salt Lake, Utah 
Farr West. Weber, Utah 
Plain City, Weber, Utah 

Mother Mary Ann Eames 



CHILDREN 




B 


22 


July 


D 


. 13 


Dec 


B 


16 Dec. 


B 


7 


Dec. 


B 


13 


Apr. 


B 


23 Jan. 


B 


31 


Jan . 


B 


10 


Apr. 



1878, Salt Lake City, Salt Lake, 

. 1878, Salt Lake City, Salt Lake, 

1879, Plain City, Weber, Utah 
1881, Plain City, Weber, Utah 
1885, Plain City, Weber, Utah 

1887, Plain City, Weber, Utah 
1889, Plain City, Weber, Utah 
1892, Plain City, Weber, Utah 



4 



UtaF 
Uk 



2 WILLIAM STEWART GEDDES 



William Stewart Geddes was a man dedicated to the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter 
Day Saints. He led a full and active life despite the fact that he departed from this 
earthly world while still a young man -- at the age of 35. 

He was born in Salt Lake City, Utah, 5 April 1856, the son of William Geddes and 
Elizabeth Stewart. His parents moved to Plain City, Utah on March 17, 1859, and it 
was here that William Stewart spent his childhood and completed his formal schooling. 



78 



He enjoyed activities, especially baseball and it was said that he and his brothers formed 
the larger part of the Plain City baseball team that travelled around the county taking 
on all comers. He also found time between farming and sports to learn to play the violin 
and other band instruments, becoming a member of the Plain City Brass Band. At that 
time this band was a very important institution of the community. While he was still 
very young, he, along with George Eames, taught all of the young men in the town the 
rudiments of education. They were called upon to do this because there were no qualified 
teachers available in this area. 

When he was nineteen, he was called to Salt Lake City to learn the stone cutting 
art in order to help build the new Mormon Temple. For four years, he was engaged in 
helping with the construction of this great house of worship. During this time he met 
and fell in love with Mary Ann Carver, whom he married In 1877. 

After four years of labor he was released from Salt Lake City and returned to his 
former place of residence where he was called to be the assistant to the Sunday School 
superintendent. 

In 1882, he was called to the Southern States Mission where he remained for one 
year teaching the gospel . He was then transferred to the European Mission where he was 
called to preside over the Glasgow Scottish Branch. In this assignment he developed 
leadership qualities, intellectual abilities and warmth and understanding for others. 

While he was In Scotland, he met Margaret F. Cullen whom he converted to the 
church. Later. In accord with the early church practices of polygamy, he married this 
fair Scottish lass who was an expert sllkloom operator. 

Because of strong federal pressure against the practice of polygamy, Brother Geddes 
was forced to escape to Oregon with the help of President Shurtliff and David Eccles. 
Federal pressure forced underground operation of their beliefs. With regard to this 
evacuation, his son, William Carver had this to say: 

Dad was being followed by deputy marshal Is and escaped by the skin of 
his teeth. When they came to Plain City In quest of father, he was working 
in the backyard. The marshal I asked if mother was at home and I called out 
that a man was In a buggy and wanted to see her. She simply waved her hand 
and father recognized the signal and was out of sight in a moment. 

He hurried to Aunt Mary Thomas and she concealed him until nightfall . 
From there he mode his way to the Southern Pacific depot at Ogden where he 
boarded a train for Oregon. The train was stopped at Corrine for a routine 
search. However, the conductor had forewarned him of the search point 
and told him he could get off the train and hurry ahead. Here the friendly con- 
ductor would again take him aboard the train. The ruse worked and father 
finally departed the train at North Powder-Hood River, Oregon. Here he 
began his new life by being employed by the Oregon Lumber Company. While 
under their employ, he was the plant manager, kept company books and 
was in charge of the company store. 

79 



while af Hood River, William Geddes was forced to adopt the assumed name of 
Stewart Williams to conceal his identity. 

After getting established, his second wife and one child joined him. Here they 
resided until June of 1891 . At this time Margaret Cullen and her family moved back 
to Plain City and Mary Ann Carver with her five children joined William at Hood River. 

Three months later William Stewart Geddes suffered a heart attac'c while working 
at his duties and died. Shortly after his death, two more children were born, one 
child to each of his two wives. Margaret Cullen gave birth to Wiliiamena, while 
Walter was the son of Mary Ann Carver. 

William Stewart Geddes was buried with high church honors In Plain City Cemetery. 
He had been a member of the High Priest Quorum. 

During his short life he gained the complete respect and acclaim of his fellow church 
workers and all those he came in contact with because of his steadfast adherence to the 
beliefs of his religion. He was a hearty, tall man with dark black hair and sincere 
penetrating dark grey eyes that prompted trust from his fellowmen. He was the kind of 
man who loved life and knew how to enjoy it by participating in good activities. He 
was a wonderful speaker and at one time was asked to speak at the famous Ogden 24th 
of July celebration. William Geddes was the father of ten children that he can be 
justly proud of today because of their full lives. 

In a final tribute, Mr. Clements, who lived In Plain City, had this to say about 
this remarkable man: "If I had my life to live over I would pattern it after William 
Stewart Geddes. His interests were religion, education, music, sports, a love for 
family and a love for his fellowmen . " 

The father of William often stated that his oldest boy had learned to be gentle and 
kind to all, especially to little children. By so doing, he had attained the height of 
perception with his religion -- a firm belief In God and in the true church to which he 
belonged . 

Sketch written by Winnie G. Nielson 



MARY ANN CARVER GEDDES 



This is a task I have always wanted to do, yet now that I sit down to write the facts 
of my grandmother's life, I feel quite inadequate to do justice to her story. 

There are some things about her life that even she has forgotten; there are many things, 
I am sure, she would ask me not to write just now. There are many other things that should 
be written, but that are difficult to put Into this account. I will do the best I can from my 
memory of her stories and from accounts written by others who have seen fit to write of her 
life. 

80 



"It's a good world, but it takes a lot of grit to get along In it. Sometimes you just 
have to put a little sand In your shoes." Have you ever had Aunt Min tell you this? 
Then you are one of the lucky ones, for that means you are one of those v^/hose path has 
crossed the path of a woman whose Influence must have made you a little better. 

Perhaps you were fortunate enough to spend some time in her friendly old kitchen. 
Were you tired when you came, or blue, or a little discouraged? Even the sight of the 
old adobe house with its trim neat lawns and bright flowers must have made you feel a 
little better, and when her white head appeared (it had been white so long) and both 
hands were stretched out to greet you, whatever burden you were bearing, must have felt 
a little lighter. And while you rested or unburdened yourself, Aunt Min bustled about 
and soon you found yourself sitting at a table loaded down with large pink slices of the 
most delicious ham you ever tasted, tiny new potatoes cooked in milk with sprinkles of 
parsley and crusty slices of bread, fresh from the oven, and juicy thick wedges of black 
currant pie. "One's troubles are never as bad when the stomach is full, " she often said . 
And then she listened if you wanted to talk or she told you of experiences that were similar 
to yours that would help you solve your own problems: then she told you of God and you 
left with a loaf of warm bread under one arm, several jars of luscious jams or jellies under 
the other, knowing that you truly had been helped by a good woman. 

When you had gone, more than likely, she put her old blue sunbonnet on her white 
head, tied a bucket around her waist and went out into the hot sun to pick a bucket of 
currants or strawberries or apples, so that the next time you came, she would be ready 
for you . 

This remarkable woman was born 2 October 1857, in Kaysville, Davis County, Utah, 
a daughter of John Carver and Mary Ann Eames. Her parents were deeply religious 
people who left England and came to America because of their love of the Church of 
Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints. 

Her only recollection of her Kaysville home was her nightly prayer when she asked 
God to bless the "Weavers, the Carvers, and the stubby-legged Jones." When she was 
two years old, the family moved to Plain City. Here they lived In a dirt cellar, 
furnished with furniture made by her father's own hands — table, beds and even a 
small chair for little Minnie . The cupboard was o ledge dug in the dirt wall . At the 
side of a four poster bed, made of posts set upright and rawhide strips crosswise to support 
the tick, was Minnie's bed. Two poles were placed horizontally, one end resting on the 
edge of her mother's bed, one end driven in the dirt wall and rawhide strips on which the 
straw tick was placed. The blue and white calico valance was quite stylish as It hung 
in folds from the high posts and hid the boys' trundle bed which was pulled out at night 
and hidden in the daytime. 

She loves to tell the stories of her childhood, especially those she remembers of a 
beloved mother, who passed away far too young. She tells of how her mother, reared 
in England by parents who were considered in those days to be financially well off, had 
the grit and determination to make a good life for her husband and children out in the 
wilderness. She likes to tell of how her mother sold her beautiful dresses that she had 
brought from England to obtain food for her children; and how her mother crawled to the 
cabin door to milk a cow to obtain milk for her chl Idren when she had a new baby because 

81 



the father had been delayed. Yet one of the strongest recollections in her life was the 
suffering of her mother during frequent childbirth, and it was one of the things which 
influenced her entire life. 

Her early girlhood was spent much as all pioneer children. She helped moke soap, 
starch, candles; she learned to spin, cord, and knit — besides there was milking, churn- 
ing, sewing, shoemaking, and cooking to be done. Most of the water was carried 
from the spring below the hill, but sometimes she would carry water from a well driven 
by Thomas Singleton, because it made better tea than the spring water. With the other 
children she helped gather greasewood for soap because ashes from this bush had more 
lye content than the sage brush. 

From Aunt Rachel, her father's second wife, she learned much of knitting and 
crocheting. Years later her children and many of her grandchildren's clothes were made 
prettier and fancier by her beautiful crocheting. She said she could never learn to be 
a good spinner — it was always lumpy; but she knit her own stockings when she was ten 
years old. Her first crochet hook was made from the hard Inner core of sage brush, 
scraped with a piece of glass. Lucky, too, are her children and grandchildren who 
own one of the beautiful handmade quilts she has made. 

Along with the other children she went to school under Mr. McGuire and took turns 
with what few books and smooth boards to write on that were available. In the winter 
there were shoes to wear, made from leather from hides her father took to town, but in 
the summer she and her brothers and sisters went barefoot to save the shoes. Her first 
pair of button shoes was purchased at a store owned by Joppa Folkman. It was there, too, 
that she tasted her first piece of peppermint candy, which Mr. Folkman broke up and 
passed around for all to taste. 

Some of her earliest recollections are of the days when the railroad first came in 1869. 
The school children saw the smoke rising from the engine stationed at the Utah Hot Springs. 
They made one bound out of school, ran across to the Hansens and stood upon a shed to 
get a better view. On the way bock, Mr. McGuIre waited at the door and as the child- 
ren filed past, each received a crack on the hand. Next day, however, school was dis- 
missed so that all could go to the Hot Springs to see this new wonder. 

Another exciting event was the day the smoke could be seen at Promitory Point where 
the railroads met and the golden spike was driven. 

She also likes to tell how the grasshoppers came and, as she says, "Sharpened their 
teeth on the fence at night to be ready In the morning." The grasshopper plague lasted 
for about seven years." She says, "We drove grasshoppers when they were little, we drove 
them when they were big — from morning until evening with the exception of a few hours 
during the middle of the day at which time hoppers would rise, circle about in the air 
with a humming sound much like the noise of the airplanes you could hear now overhead. 
They were in such numbers they shadowed the sun, making a shady spot on the ground be- 
low. At night the group would light on fences covering boards, until it looked black 
with their bodies. " 

The settlers tried to plant fruit trees and bushes, currants, gooseberries, and such to 

82 



replace the natural shade the hoppers destroyed, but It seemed almost a losing battle. 
She remembers covering a lone strawberry plant almost ready to bear, to save the fruit 
for her sick mother — only to find In the morning the grasshoppers had crawled under 
the pan, and eaten the entire plant. Broken-hearted she went to her mother who told 
her not to worry, that God would take care of things and sure enough, she said, "He did." 

When she was twelve years of age, her mother died, leaving John, George, Minnie, 
Wlllard, Joseph, Parley, and Nancy. Nancy passed away when she was eleven years 
old with Inflamatlon of the bowels or appendicitis. Although Aunt Rachel was a very 
good mother to the children, it seemed that her brothers turned more and more to sister 
Minnie and continued to do so all the days of her life, and she lived to see them all pass 
to their reward . 

When she was fifteen years old, she began her public career as a teacher In the 
Sunday School. John Spires was the first superintendent and Mr. Boothe, his assistant. 
The Bible, Testament, first and second readers were the textbooks. He took with him a 
big barrel of molasses, corn and wheat which had been donated by town people to be 
exchanged for books. She taught Sunday School from 1872 until 1879 teaching the 
Book of Mormon and arithmetic. 

In 1875 the M. I .A. was organized In Plain City and she was among Its first members . 
By this time she was a lovely young lady of eighteen years, and she had a great dramatic 
talent. The best entertainment of the day was the dramas enacted by the young people, 
and In these she always had a leading part. Her eyes still sparkle when she gl^essmall 
excerpts from these old plays. Another popular form of entertainment was the band 
concerts and the young neighbor of the Carvers, William Geddes, took a leading part in 
these. William was a steady, quiet boy who paid court to her in great seriousness. But 
there were other young men who sought her hand, and it wasn't until she was almost 
twenty years old that she decided William was the man to whom she wanted to entrust 
her life. 

She married him in August of 1877 and went to live in Salt Lake where her husband 
was working as a stone cutter on the L.D.S. Temple. This was a special mission and 
the men who received their call from President Brigham Young were required to stay there 
and only return home on special occasions. Her husband became an expert stonecutter. 
It was particular work done with a chopping knife and dust blown away until the desired 
shape was obtained. Some of the balls on the outside of the Temple were made by 
William Geddes. 

It was In Salt Lake that her first baby, Elizabeth, was born and in a few short months, 
died. This, too, was another experience that was to have a direct influence on the 
activities of her later life. Because of her mother's difficulties In chlldbearing and her 
own difficult time at Elizabeth's birth, she was always and forever trying to find ways 
and means of helping at the time of birth. It became a common thing in Plain City to 
run for Aunt MIn when a new baby was coming to town. How many times she helped at 
the coming of a new life would be impossible to estimate. It has been said that she helped 
at the birth of children in practically every family in Plain City. 

She was familiar to all the early doctors of Ogden, and they came to rely on her 

S3 



to such an extent that many times before a doctor would make the long trip to Plain 
City from Ogden with horse and buggy, they would instruct patients to have Aunt Min 
come to see if the services of a doctor were necessary, and then, if she felt it was 
essential, the doctor came. 

After a short time in Salt Lake, she returned to Plain City to the two-room adobe 
house her husband had built for her and here she has spent nearly three quarters of a 
century. Her home was built on the spot which had once been the camping grounds of 
an Indian tribe, but the Indians gave them very little trouble. 

In 1879 she became secretary of the Y.W.M.I .A. She was editor of the paper 
known as The Enterprise which was read at conjoint meetings. After this position she 
became first counselor in the same organization. In 1906 she became superintendent of 
the Religion Class Society from September 5, 1907 until December 2, 1911. At this 
time the Relief Society was an organization which was primarily interested in taking care 
of the sick and those unable to do for themselves. Aunt Min was one of the first women 
to see in this organization an opportunity for women to, as she said, ".. .improve their 
minds and further their education so that they can become better wives and mothers." 
She was one of those who was instrumental in planning and beginning class work in 
Relief Society. 

In 191 1 she was released from the presidency of the Relief Society that she might 
spend more time with her ailing father. In February, 1912 she became on aid in the 
Stake Board of the North Weber Stake, which position she held for twelve years. 

In 1882 her husband was called to fulfill a mission for the church in Scotland. She 
was happy that he had this opportunity to serve the church and she took care of their 
home and little family while he was gone with cheerfulness and love. He returned 
in 1884. 

If there were hardships in her married life, or moments of discouragement, never 
have you heard her speak of them. Nothing but words of deep devotion, love, and 
respect for every member of the entire family have ever passed her lips. 

She has been fiercely loyal to everyone who bears the Geddes name, yet her own 
family would be the first to tell you that if they needed correction or chastisement, 
they need look no further than home to receive it, for she has been one to council and 
advise, instruct, and scold if need be, every member of her family even down to the 
third generation. Wise has been her council and direct. Never has she discussed the 
problems or imperfections of any member of her family with any other member. She hod 
an almost Christ-like virtue of seeing some good In the worst of us. Intensely religious 
herself, she was always tolerant when she sought to understand the other person's point 
of view. 

After the death of her husband in 1891 leaving her five children and another little 
soul on the way, her need for the grit and determination she was born with was greater 
than ever; for it was not easy for a woman to make a living for a family in those days. 



84 



She did much hard work and early frained her children that it was by the sweat of 
the brow that there was bread to be eaten. More and more, she turned to the kind 
of work for which she was a natural, and it became a common sight on the dusty roads 
of Plain City to see Aunt Min, in summer a blue sunbonnet on her head, in winter, a 
knitted shawl around her shoulder -- tramping from one end of town to the other, tend- 
ing the sick, the dying, and the new born. Usually under one arm was a loaf of fresh 
bread, in her hand a pot of warm gruel, in her apron anything from a hot water bottle 
to a bottle of castor oil . Down the middle of the dusty road she trotted to bring comfort 
and aid to those who needed her. Morning, noon, or the dead of night, cold or heat, 
snow or rain made no difference to her; and Aunt Min became on "Angel of Mercy" 
to a whole community. 

She labored long and hard to get the money necessary for her children's living, 
yet money for money's sake has never meant a thing to her. She was as proud of the 
home her husband built her as if it had been Buckingham Palace, The new things her 
children bought her in her later life meant more to her, for the though tfu I ness in their 
hearts, than the convenience it meant to her. She gave of her means as freely as she 
gave of her time and talents. 

She has always been on admirer of others, like herself, who could take adversity 
and make of it a triumph, and she has always had an open heart and home for those who 
wished to come to her for her to help in any moral or spiritual sickness as well as 
physical illness. 

Her natural sunny disposition has been lightened by a ready wit and a quick tongue. 
As a girl she was vivacious and her quick wit is best described by a story she tells of a 
conversation between her and her husband. He once said to her, "Minnie, you'll have 
to admit I've been a good husband to you, I've never said a cross word to you in 
my entire life . " 

Minnie answered, "Well, I've been a better wife than you hove a husband then, 
for I've had to say lots of cross words to you." 

Nearly a century of living has dimmed her eyes and slowed her feet, but for you 
who would still find the time from the hectic living of this day to sit at her feet for but 
a few moments, you would find that you came away from her more akin with the Lamb, 
for didn't He say Himself, "Even as ye have done it unto the least of mine, ye have done 

it unto me . " 

So, pause for a moment and lend on ear, for there is much you can learn from she 
who has lived with -- 

Sand in her shoes. 
Healing in her hands. 
Wisdom in her head, and 
The love of God in her heart. 

"Sand In Her Shoes" Life story of Mary Ann Carver Geddes written by her grand- 
daughter, Selma Geddes Summers. June 15, 1953. 

85 






27 WILLIAM CARVER GEDDES 



B. 16 Dec. 1879 
Bapt. 3 July 1889 
End. 5 April 1900 
Md. 14 June 1905 
D. 17 Apr. 1959 

Father 2 William Stewart Geddes 



Plain City, Weber, Utah 

Plain City, Weber, Utah 

Salt Lake Temple, Salt Lake, Utah 

Salt Lake Temple, Salt Lake, Utah 

Lewiston, Nez Perce, Idaho 

Mother Mary Ann Carver 



Wife MAME THOMPSON 



B. 17 Dec. 1882 
Bapt. 13 April 1889 
End. 14 June 1905 
Sid. 14 June 1905 
D. 7 Sept. 1952 
Bur. Sept. 1952 



Ogden, Weber, Utah 

Ogden, Weber, Utah 

Salt Lake Temple, Salt Lake, Utah 

Salt Lake Temple, Salt Lake, Utah 

Lewiston, Nez Perce, Idaho 

City Cem., Lewiston, Nez Perce, Idaho 



CHILDREN 



156 Zola Geddes 

160 Norma Geddes 

162 Serge William Geddes 

212 Barbara Geddes 
266 Ruth Tracie Geddes 



B. 16 May 1906, Viento, Wasco, Oregon 
B. 12 Feb. 1908, Baker, Baker, Oregon 
B. 28 April 1909, Baker, Baker, Oregon 
D. 14 Feb. 1914, Winchester, Lewis, Idaho 
B. 28 Aug. 1916, Ogden, Weber, Utah 
B. 9 April 1924, Winchester, Lewis, Idaho 



27 WILLIAM CARVER GEDDES 



I was born in Plain City, Utah, the eldest son of a family of six, on December 16, 
1879. Plain City was a farming community on the outskirts of Ogden, and the area was 
then a territory, barred from statehood in the Union because of polygamy in the Church 
of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints, to which my grandparents were converts. We saw 
very little of our father as children . He was called on a two year mission to Scotland 
in 1882, and in 1883 took a second wife, Margaret F. Cullen, with the consent of my 
mother. To this union three daughters were born — my half sisters. 

The following year the prosecution of polygamists began, and our father moved with 
the second wife to North Powder, Oregon in March, 1887. He came back often to visit 
our family, but the visits were short and furtive, and he was like a romantic guest In our 



86 



home. In June 1891, Father sent for us to come to Oregon with him, but the wonderful 
idyll was abruptly shattered by his untimely death of a heart attack on August 23 of the 
same year. It was a sad cortege returning to Plain City for his burial . 

At twelve years of age, I became the head of the household of two mothers, five 
brothers and sisters and three half-sisters. My own mother became a practical nurse 
and in the years remaining until her death at the age of 93, she delivered almost the 
total population of Plain City. The second wife. Aunt Maggie, as we called her, was 
a pretty, helpless woman who later married into the wealthy Eccles family. 

At fourteen years of age, I quit school to help earn a livelihood by working at 
Pleasant Valley and Baker, Oregon, in the lumber mills. It was a rough life for a young 
boy. In 1896 I was in a train wreck near Bliss, Idaho. The damages paid by the railroad 
enabled me to attend Oneida Stake Academy at Preston, Idaho, by taking entrance exam- 
inations. I added to my interrupted schooling by enrolling in a business correspondence 
course with La Salle School of Chicago, Illinois, 

Preston, Idaho is not far from Ogden, Utah, and it was during the years at Oneida 
that I fell in love with Mame Thompson from Ogden, My trips home to see her were 
frequent, and as far as I was concerned there was never another girl in my life. In 1898 
the Thompson family moved to Baker, Oregon. In July 1899, I finished my schooling and 
in May 1900 was called upon a two year mission for my church to California. In 1902 
upon my return to Baker, I pursued my romantic ventures again, I was sent by the Oregon 
Lumber Company for whom I worked, first to Hood River, Oregon, in charge of the 
company store; and then to Viento, Oregon, to operate their mill , By now, my salary 
seemed sufficient to ask Mame's hand in marriage. On June 14, 1905 we were united 
in marriage in the Temple in Salt Lake City, Utah. 

Viento must have been a lonely spot for a young girl from the city with little to 
see but virgin forests and the mighty Columbia River rolling to the sea. In Viento, our 
first daughter, Zola, was born. The country doctor came by horse and buggy over 
primitive roads from Hood River, the nearest town. 

In 1907 I was transferred to Dee, Oregon, as superintendent in charge of woods and 
mill operations, and then to Ingalls, Oregon, as assistant manager. In the years that 
followed with the Oregon Lumber Company, owned by the Eccles family of Utah, there 
were many family quarrels and misunderstandings by which my own future was shaped. 
In 1908, we moved to Baker, Oregon with the Stoddard Lumber Company, remaining with 
them until 1912. During this time our daughter. Norma, was born, followed fourteen 
months later by our only son. Serge William, who died of an undiagnosed spinal ailment 
in 1914. 

In 1912, I ventured into the lumber Industry on my own, purchasing the timber and 
mill with money supplied by my close friends, William Patterson, William Pohlman, and 
W. H. Eccles. Although the venture was successful, I sold my share of the stock and 
became assistant to the manager of the Oregon Lumber Company. With this company, 
we moved from Baker, Oregon, to Ogden, Utah; then to Portland, Oregon and then back 
to Baker, Oregon. In Ogden, our daughter, Barbara, was born in 1916. I was in turn 
assistant sales and manufacturing manager and general manager. I reorganized the company. 

87 



In 1923, the opportunity come to buy stock and manage the Craig Mountain Lumber 
Company at Winchester, Idaho. The great depression came in 1929 and the mill-owned 
town and the mill itself was like a tomb. My life's savings and efforts seemed to be 
melting away. We were hopelessly insolvent. The bank, of which I was president 
closed its doors, and the horizon never looked blacker. In 1935 I secured a loan through 
the Reconstruction Finance Corporation, and paid the full indebtedness and the mill 
resumed operation. 

Before leaving the lumber phase of my life, I should like to say that I served with 
pride as president of the American Lumberman's Association and was chairman of the 
committee who chose the trade name for the western white pine timber, Ponderosa Pine, 
after the botanical name, Pinus Ponderosa. 

During these years at Winchester, our baby daughter, Ruth Tracie, was born and 
our daughters in turn left to graduate from the University of Idaho and each to marry 
her college sweetheart. We often visited the campus In the course of taking them to 
school. One of the proudest accomplishments of my life, since I was deprived of 
a college education myself, was to be appointed by two different Governors to the 
Board of Regents of the University of Idaho. 

For the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints on the Idaho campus, I helped 
secure the L.D.S. Institute, the first to be built by the church, and dedicated in 
1928. 

About 1945, Mame began to fail in health. From 1945 she fought a losing fight 
In her walking ability, and the greatest clinics of our land could not help her. She 
walked with a cane, an Invalid walker, and finally negotiated a wheel chair. In 
1948, I sold my business to Hallock and Howard Company of Denver, Colorado. We 
broke up the family home and moved into a small apartment in Lewiston, Idaho. Mamie 
was soon bedfast with three nurses daily, and though she seemed so frail, her will to live 
kept her alive for 38 months until her death, Deptember 7, 1952. Her passing was like 
moving the sun from my orbit. She was always the first in looking after the sick and 
poor and her cheerfulness and happy disposition made her beloved by family and friends. 

In my 78th year of life, I am still blessed with good health, children, grandchildren, 
and great grandchildren. These are the peaceful, twilight years, but alone tbey are 
the quiet, lonely ones. These have been years filled with activity, sorrows, joys, but 
more than a full share of blessings. 

William Carver Geddes died In Lewiston, Idaho, 17 April 1959 and is buried beside 
his wife In the cemetery in Lewiston, Idaho. 



MAME THOMPSON (GEDDES) 
Mame Thompson, the seventh child of George Thompson and Eliza Jane Sells, was 

88 



1 



born in Ogden, Utah, December 17, 1882. She was just two years younger than her 
sister, Nettie, so throughout their childhood they were together constantly. 

She was beautiful with her dark eyes and blond hair. Visitors always commented 
on her looks. One day her older sister, Maggie, cut Mame's hair so it could be curled 
easier. Their barber father was very upset about this, but as it was already done nothing 
could be done about it so he let it go and just devoted more time to the care and attention 
of Nettie's long hair. Mame had the opportunity of curling her hair in the latest 
fashion . 

From Mame's early childhood she was often called "the peacemaker." In fact, she 
was so friendly that the family would often find her out In the yard playing marbles with 
the neighborhood children when she was supposed to be doing dishes. 

During her teen years she had a very close friend, VIda Eccles. The Eccles family 
was wealthy but VIda loved to come home with Mame to get homemade bread and 
other good things. These two remained life long friends. 

Mame was not a whirlwind In school but always made her grades and still had 
a good time. 

Her father was interested in having the children develop musical ability and culture 
so he traded a horse and cart for a violin. Mame had lessons on the violin and as her 
teacher had an orchestra which played at the opera house, Mame was soon put into this 
orchestra. She played In this orchestra several years. When she got tired of the violin 
she traded it for a coat. 

When she was about seventeen years of age, Mame and her sister Nettie went to 
Salt Lake City and were baptized into the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints. 
This was done without their father's consent as he was Catholic and very anxious that his 
children be members of his faith. 

The trip to Salt Lake City was the first train ride for the girls but they were soon 
to have a longer ride when the family moved to Baker, Oregon. 

The family had friends in Baker but Mame had a special friend. Will Geddes. He 
and a friend. Will Jenkins, met Mamie and Nettie at the train and took them to dinner 
at the "Bon Tonn" Restaurant. Later in the evening. Will brought a crowd bock to the 
hotel to serenade the girls. 

The years in Baker, Oregon brought many good things. The girls sang in the choir, 
went to church three times on Sunday, M.I. A. on Tuesday and Choir Practice on Wed- 
nesday night, and there was always a word dance on Saturday nights. There were more 
boys than girls so the girls never lacked for company. 

However, in spite of the many good times in Baker, there were many heartaches. 
George Thompson, Mame's father, was becoming very difficult. He was very concerned 
about the differences in religion in his family. He, also was a very proud man, and 

89 



found If difficult to have lost his luxurlousbarber shopin Ogden and now was only an 
employee In a barber shop, where the owner was much better known and customers would 
wait for the owner rather than let George Thompson do their work. One afternoon, 
he became so angry he packed up his equipment and left. This sort of difficulty showed 
up in the family relationships and soon he left home and was divorced. 

Mame worked at the Baird Book Store, Mame and Nettie would arrange to go home 
for meals at the same time. The store hours were from 8:00 a,m, to 6:00 p.m. 

On June 14, 1905 Mame married William Carver Geddes, son of William Stewart 
Geddes and Mary Ann Garver of Plain Gty, Utah. They were married In the Salt Lake 
Temple and then went to live in Viento, Oregon, 

Viento must have been a lonely spot for a young girl from the city, with little to 
see but virgin forests and the mighty Columbia River rolling to the sea. In Viento, 
their first daughter, Zola, was born May 16, 1906. The country doctor came by horse 
and buggy over primitive roads from Hood River, the nearest town. 

Will was transferred to Dee, Oregon as superintendent in charge of woods and mill 
operations, and to Ingalls, Oregon as assistant manager. In 1908 they moved to Baker, 
Oregon with the Stoddard Lumber Company, remaining with them until 1912. During 
this time their daughter. Norma, was born, February 12, 1908. Fourteen months later 
their only son. Serge William was born, April 28, 1909, Even though this son only lived 
five years, he brought great joy to his parents. In spite of the long hard months of heart- 
ache when they had to stand by and see him suffer and die as a result of Muscular 
Atrophe, February 14, 1914, 

Their next move was to Ogden, Utah . It was here that another daughter, Barbara, 
was born, August 28, 1916, 

Their next move was to Portland, Oregon. Mame's brother. Earl, and his family 
lived in Portland and only a few months later Ben and his wife. Hazel came and then 
Nettle and Dave and their family. For about two years there was much visiting of 
relatives, Ben and Hazel did not stay long, Nettie and Dave and their family stayed 
about two years. 

The next move for Mame and Will was back to Baker. Then to Winchester, Idaho 
in 1923 to manage the Craig Mountain Lumber Company. The great depression came 
In 1929 and the mill-owned town and the mill Itself was like a tomb. The life savings 
and efforts seemed to be melting away. However, through the efforts of Well Geddes 
a loan was secured In 1935 through the Reconstruction Finance Corporation and the 
full indebtedness was paid. 

During these years at Winchester another daughter, Ruth Trade, was born April 9, 
1924. 

Mame was active in church work In Portland, Baker, and Ogden. She was a 
member of the Y. W.M.I. A. Stake Presidency, was active In Sunday School at Baker, 
Portland, Ogden, and Lewlston. There was no branch of the church at Winchester but 

90 



she attended Sunday School at Lewiston when possible. She was always the first in 
looking after the sick and poor, and her cheerfulness and happy disposition made her 
beloved by family and friends. 

In 1945 Mame began to fail in health. From 1945 she fought a losing fight in 
her walking ability and the best clinics of our land could not help her. She walked 
with a cane, an invalid walker, and finally negotiated a wheel chair. 

In 1949, Will sold his business interests to Hal leek and Howard Company of Denver, 
Colorado. The children were all married so Will and Mame took a small apartment 
in Lewiston, Idaho. Mame was soon bedfast with three nurses daily, but though she 
seemed so frail her will to live kept her alive for thirty-eight months until her death, 
September 7, 1952. She was burled at Lewiston, Idaho. 



Sketch written by Nettie Thompson Geddes, 1957 



ELBERT ANDREW STBLLMON (Lawyer) 



B . 3 May 1 904 
Bapt. 6 Aug. 1955 
Md. 3 Jan. 1930 
End. 3 Jan. 1957 

Father Jacob Andrew Stellmon 



Nez Perce, Lewis, Idaho 
Escondldo, San Diego, California 
Moscow, Latah, Idaho 
Salt Lake Temple, Salt Lake, Utah 

Mother Mary Frances (Mamie) Anderson 



Wife 156 ZOLA GEDDES 



B. 16 May 1906 
Bapt. 6 Aug. 1914 
End. 3 Jan. 1957 
Sid. 3 Jan .1957 

Children sealed to parents 3 Jan. 1957 

Father 27 William Carver Geddes 



Viento, Wasco, Oregon 

Baker City, Baker, Oregon 

Salt Lake Temple, Salt Lake, Utah 

Salt Lake Temple, Salt Lake, Utah 



Mother Mary Ann (Mame) Thompson 



CHILDREN 



427 William Andrew Stellmon 



440 Gail Tracie Stellmon 



B. 2 May 1933, Winchester, Lewis, Idaho 
Bapt. 6 Sept. 1941, Winchester, Lewis, Idaho 
B. 12 May 1937, Winchester, Lewis, Idaho 



91 



156 ZOLA GEDDES (STELLMON) 



Zola (Geddes) Stellmon, born May 16, 1906 at Viento, Oregon fo William Carver 
and Mame Thompson Geddes. 

I was baptized at Baker City, Oregon, in the Powder River because we had no bapt- 
ismal font in the chapel , 

My childhood experiences are very closely interwoven with all of our lives: eating 
cooked bread and milk around Aunt Nett and Uncle Dave's kitchen table, playing 
Punch and Judy to entertain the smaller children, riding to and from school with Uncle 
Earl in his cleaning wagon drawn by one horse which could be driven from one side to the 
other side of the road, the billy-goat with the little cart, playing store with Bud and 
Earline, watching a circus parade down the main street of Baker, listening to the band 
concerts in the park, camping trips with grown ups and all the kids, visits to Ogden 
and Salt Lake with Aunt Mag and Uncle Frank, where June and Margaret would go 
all out to entertain us; I well remember the ride they took us on down the Ogden Canyon 
River in Aunt Mag's wash tubs. Uncle Will and Uncle Ben with their constant teasing, 
which we loved, and their wonderful tunes played on harmonicas. These are but a 
few of the experiences that made my childhood a very happy one. 

We lived at Baker City, Oregon from 1908 to 1915; Ogden, Utah from 1915 to 
1919; Porland, Oregon from 1919 to 1921; Baker, Oregon 1921 to 1923 (At this time 
the word City had been dropped from the name Baker); Winchester, Idaho, 1923 until 
my marriage in 1930. 

I attended the University of Idaho from 1923-1929, graduating with a B. A. degree 
which included a major in history and zoology. I was affiliated with Alpha Chi Omega, 
Woman's National Sorority. While at the University, I earned a woman's "I" sweater 
in sports and two bronze medals for research papers written in history while attempting 
to avoid takiing the final examinations. How well I succeeded! Currently I am 
president of Alpha Rho of Alpha Chi Omega Corporation. 

In the summer of 1927 I began going with Elbert Andrew Stellmon, son of Jacob 
Andrew and Mame (Anderson) Stellmon of Nez Perce, Idaho. We were married at 
Moscow, Idaho, June 10, 1930 in the newlydedicated Latter-day Saint Institute by 
Elder Sydney B. Sperry. We were the first couple to be married in the Institute and 
the first marriage Elder Sperry had performed. 

At the time Elbert was the youngest Prosecuting Attorney in the United States. 
We lived at Nez Perce, Lewis County, Idaho, where I taught school for the next two 
years in order to make ends meet. We moved to Lewiston in June of 1934. 

We have two children: William Andrew Stellmon, born May 2, 1933 at Winchester, 
Idaho at Mother and Dad's home — Gail Trade Stellmon, born at Lewiston, Idaho, May 12, 
1937 and two grandsons born to Marlene Haag and William Andrew Stellmon, Jacob 

92 



Andrew born December 24, 1955 at Gardnerville, Nevada, and John Michael born 
March 18, 1957 at Lewiston, Idaho. 

Because I believe the four cornerstones of our civilization are the home, the church, 
the school, and the state, and that one should serve in each of these fields to pay for 
the space one occupies here on earth, I am listing my activities under these four headings: 

The Home. Our home has always been one filled with love and harmony, where 
young people gathered. Because we feel that home must of necessity include one's 
community, we became active in Community Concert Association; Knife and Fork Club; 
Boy Scout and Camp Fire work. I am a charter member of St, Joseph's Hospital Auxiliary, 
past president of Lewiston Welfare League; past Matron of Laurel Chapter "^13, Order 
of Eastern Star; past Guardian Bether "20 International Order of Job's Daughters; past 
Marshall of Malac Temple ^55 Daughters of the Nile, and currently on the Red Cross 
Board . 

The Church. I began teaching Sunday School when Elbert became superintendent 
of our Sunday School in 1936 before he was a member of the Church, at a time when we 
did not have enough men holding the Priesthood to fill all offices. I have taught in 
Sunday School and Relief Society continuously since that date, and at various times in 
Primary and Mutual . 

School . I taught school for three years and did substitute teaching during the World 
War II years. It has been my privilege for the past seven years with the cooperation of 
the parents of the high school senior class to organize and plan for a senior party after 
the graduation exercises. This plan evolved out of the tragic death of three Lewiston 
High School boys when our Bill was studentbody president and he turned to me, as his 
pal died, and said, "Can't something be done for the kids the night of graduation?" I 
am a member of a special Chamber of Commerce Committee for the welfare of the Lewis- 
Clark Normal School . 

State. I began in politics as a precinct worker and from this first step have been 
State Committee Woman of Nez Perce County; State President of Idaho Federation of 
Women's Republican Clubs; Vice-Chairman of Citizens for Eisenhower- Nixon Committees; 
District Chariman of Citizens for Eisenhower Committee. These last two positions 
enabled us to attend, as special guests, the first Inauguration of Dwight D. Eisenhower 
as President of the United States in 1952. This was one of the most interesting experiences 
I have enjoyed in politics. 

One of the most outstanding events of my life came after being married twenty-six 
years to have the privilege of going to the Temple of the Church of Jesus Christ of 
Latter-day Saints in Salt Lake City, Utah. There we were married for all Eternity and 
our children sealed to us. We also witnessed the marriage for all Eternity of Bill and 
Marlene on January 3, 1957. 

If I have accomplished anything at all I feel that all credit should go first to our 
Father in Heaven for the privilege of coming to earth in this "dispensation of the fulness 
of time" and on this "choice land." To our Grandmother Thompson who many times 



93 



In her English brogue — she always managed to put an R where it shouldn't be — used 
to say "Zola-r, Anything worth doing is worth doing well," and my grandmother Geddes 
who often said, as I trotted along beside her with the sand end dust of Plain City, Utah 
almost covering my shoes, "It is all right to have your head in the clouds, but you have 
to have some sand in your shoes" — and my shoes would be literally filled with sand. 

To my wonderful parents for the heritage that is mine, for the choice land from which 
came, my religious training and my education. 

To my sisters for their love and tolerance toward a "bossy big sister" who at the age 
of five said, "Well, if you would just mind sissy, then sissy wouldn't have to slap" and 
I am guilty still of that same bossy attitude. 

To my wonderful husband and children for their love, understanding, and patience, 
all of which have made my life complete and a very happy one. 

I 

To the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints for the many opportunities for 
service and knowledge, and finally to you the Thompson clan with your fine husbands, 
wives and children who have each contributed a part of yourselves to me and mine — 
I am deeply grateful for all these privileges and blessings. 



Sketch written by Zola Geddes Stellmon, 1957 
1962 - Zola has had a very serious illness, but is recovering satisfactorily. 

427 Wl LLI AM ANDREW STELLMON 



B. 2 May 1933 
Bcpt. 6 Sept. 1941 
Md. 12 Dec. 1954 
End. 3 Jon. 1957 

Father Elbert Andrew Stellmon 



Winchester, Lewis, Idaho 
Lewiston, Nez Perce, Idaho 
Lewiston, Nez Perce, Idaho 
Salt Lake Temple, Salt Lake, Utah 

Mother 156 Zola Geddes 



B. 17 May 1933 
Bapt. 19 Mar. 1955 
End. 3 Jan. 1957 
Sid. 3 Jan. 1957 



Wife MARLENE MAY HAAG 



Lenore, Nez Perce, Idaho 
San Diego, San Diego, California 
Salt Lake Temple, Salt Lake, Utah 
Salt Lake Temple, Salt Lake, Utah 



94 



CHILDREN 



859 Jacob Andrew Sf-ellmon 



860 John Michael Stellmon 

861 William Carver Stellmon 

862 Lisa Jo Stellmon 

863 Daniel Joy Stellmon 



B. 24 Dec. 1955, Gardnerville, Douglas, Nevada 
Bapt. 24 Dec. 1963, Lewlston, Nez Perce, Idaho 
Sealed to parents 30 Aug. 1961, Idaho Falls Temple 
B. 19 Mar. 1957, Lewiston, Nez Perce, Idaho 
Bapt. 19 Mar. 1965, Lewiston, Nez Perce, Idaho 
B. 31 Mar. 1959, Moscow, Latah, Idaho 
B. 28 Jan. 1961, Moscow, Latah, Idaho 
B. 9 Oct. 1963, Moscow, Latah, Idaho 



427 WILLIAM ANDREW STELLMON 



William (Bill) Andrew Stellmon was born May 2, 1933 to Elbert Andrew Stellmon and 
Zola Geddes at Winchester, Idaho, where my maternal grandparents were living. 

At the age of eighteen months my family moved from Nez Perce, Idaho to Lewiston, 
Idaho . 

At the age of two I fell into a fish pond in the neighbor's yard, almost ending my 
history at that tender age. However, my dog sounded the alarm and Mother fished me 
out. It was nip and tuck for a few hours but finally it was evident I would recover. For 
ten years, each year at the same time, my Dad came down with bronchitis. 

My childhood memories include a lemonade stand to raise money for General McArthur; 
watching the circuses unload; family night on Sunday, which included supper on a card 
table; and a strong desire to go to war against Japan. 

My experiences on the ranch, to which we moved, also filled my childhood with 
pleasure. I hunted ducks and pheasants, rode my horse, rode the yearling calves (much 
to my dad's amusement) and tended the garden. Fishing trips up the Clearwater River, 
deer hunting in the "Hells Canyon" section of the Snake River and Joseph Plains area on 
the Salmon River were also highlights of my boyhood days, and still are for that matter. 

I attended high school at Lewiston, Idaho, from 1946 to 1951 . During these years 
I played football, baseball, and managed the basketball team. I was studentbody president 
and football captain. My senior year I received the outstanding athlete award, which 
had been set up as a memorial to three of my best friends who had been killed in a car 
accident. I also received the American Legion Citizenship Award. During the summer 
of my high school years I worked at logging, farming, fighting forest fires and playing 
American Legion Junior Baseball . These were truly exciting years and they were made 
more worth while when I met, through my activities, the most wonderful girl in the school. 
She was elected secretary of the studentbody the year I was president. From then on we 
have been a team . 



95 



I was ordained on Elder in the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints in Lewiston, 
Idaho. 

( went to the University of Idaho in 1951 and became a member of Phi Gamma Delta 
fraternityond began my college career, which has not yet ended. From 1951 to 1953 I 
received two letters in football and two In baseball . 

During these years the Korean conflict was in progress and I finally could stand the 
mental battle no longer so decided to join the United States Marine Corps. 

Marlene Haage of Lewiston, Idaho and I were married December 12, 1954 by Bishop 
Baker. Our first son, Jacob Andrew Stellmon, was born in Gardnerville, Nevada, Dec- 
ember 24, 1955, under rather primitive conditions, for at this time the area was flooded 
and isolated from all other communities. To add to our plight, on the morning he was born 
we had eight inches of snow. The only doctor in the town was seventy-six years of age, 
who was called the first time just five hours before the baby was born. Jacob was born 
on the kitchen table, by kerosene lamp light, with myself and a neighbor lady assisting. 

In my life there have been several high points of pride and happiness. One of these 
was the conversion of Marlene to the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints with the 
privilege of baptizing both she and my father into the church . Another has been the birth 
of my two sons. The highest point of all, however, was the blessing which came to 
me January 3, 1957 when I was married to Marlene for all eternity, and sealed to my par- 
ents for all eternity in the Salt Lake Temple. 

At present I am again attending the University of Idaho In pre-law and again this 
spring earned another letter in baseball . My scholastic standing has been greatly benefited 
by the influence of my two sons and the realization they are depending upon me. 

The blessings of God have truly been showered down upon me. 

Sketch written by William Andrew Stellmon, 1957 



1962 - William Andrew (Bill) Stellmon Is the first in the family to become a bishop in 
the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. Reports are that he is doing an excellent 
job in this position. He was set apart as bishop of Lewiston Second Ward February 18, 
1962 by Apostle Ezra Taft Benson, ordained as high priest February 18, 1962 by Ezra 
Taft Benson at conference held in Lewiston, Nez Perce County, Idaho. 

As of August, 1962, he has four children. 



96 



CLETIS STAN WILLIAMS 



B. 17 Jan. 1937 
Md. 12 May 1958 

Father Cletis Williams 



Lewiston, Nez Perce, Idaho 
Lewisfon, Nez Perce, Idaho 

Mother Thelma Kinnear 



Wife 440 GAIL TRAGI E STELLMON 



B. 12 May 1937 
Bapt. 4 Nov. 1945 

Father Elbert Andrew Stellmon 



Lewiston, Nez Perce, Idaho 
Lewiston, Nez Perce, Ida'io 

Mother 156 Zola Gec'des 



CHILDREN 



864 Stan Timothy Williams 

865 Scott Andrew Williams 



B. 28 Aug. 1959, San Francisco, San Francisco, Calif. 
B. 14 Dec. 1961, Lewiston, Nez Perce, Idaho 



440 GAIL TRACIE STELLMON (WILLIAMS) 



Gail Tracie Stellmon was born May 12, 1937 to Elbert Andrew Stellmon and Zola 
Geddes at Lewiston, Idaho. I was baptized In Lewiston, Idaho, 

My childhood recollections are Inseparably connected with a Catholic family "The 
Kermans" who lived just across the alley from us. There were five children with whom 
we learned to share everything from bubble gum to religion; getting up at five in the morning 
and sitting on a sidehill with our mothers while the circus unloaded and marched by; build- 
ing forts on a vacant lot across from us each Christmas with the discarded Christmas trees. 

At the tender age of three I asked Mother what her washing machine was saying. 
She said, "It says I think I can, I think I can get these clothes clean. " My reply was: 
" Nope, It says, "You son of a bitch , you son of a bitch . " 

My outdoor life varied from family fishing trips to target shooting with Dad, riding 
horseback and swimming, and helping Mother cook hamburgers at the local auction. 

I remember listening to our favorite stories — Little Black Sambo, Jonah and the 
Whale, and Solomon and the two Babies — family nights on Sunday, dancing to Dad's 
piano chording whenever the Greenes were with us, and selling lemonade to raise money 
for General McArthur. 



97 



My acfivltles started when Mother and I joined the Camp Fire Girls. I continued 
into high school as a member of the Youth Activity Council, President of Bengal Claws 
(a service group), Loyalty Squad (honorary pep group). Junior and Senior Prom Committee, 
Student Council, and Drill Team. At present I am Past Honored Queen of Bethel ^20 
Inter-National Order of Jobs Daughters. 

In 1955 I entered the University of Idaho and am affiliated with Alpha Rho Chapter 
of Alpha Chi Omega. My college activities arestudent recruiter for the University of 
Idaho, Pre-Orchises and social chairman of Alpha Chi Omega. 

I married Cletis Stan Williams who served in the United States Navy and who returned 
from six months at the South Pole on "Operations Deep Freeze" under Admiral Byrd. We 
were married May 12, 1958 at Lewiston, Idaho. We have two sons, Timothy Stan, born 
August 28, 1959 at San Francisco, California and Scott Andrew born December 14, 1961 
at Lewiston, Idaho. 

Sketch written by Gail Tracie Stellmon 



GEORGE WISE GREENE 



B. 6 Oct. 1904 
Md. 30 May 1931 
Bapt. 25 Oct. 1959 
End 6 Aug. 1963 



Culdesac, Nez Perce, Idaho 

Boise, Ada, Idaho 

Washington D. C. 

Salt Lake Temple, Salt Lake, Utah 



Wife 160 NORMA GEDDES 



B. 12 Feb. 1908 
Bapt. 1916 

End. 6 Aug. 1963 
Sealed 6 Aug. 1963 



Baker, Baker, Oregon 
Winchester, Lewis, Idaho 
Salt Lake Temple, Salt Lake, Utah 
Salt Lake Temple, Salt Lake, Utah 



CHILDREN 



425 Barbara Jane Greene 
449 Timothy Geddes Greene 



B. 16 July 1932, Ontario, Malheur, Oregon 
B. 12 May 1939, Lewiston, Nez Perce, Idaho 
Bapt. 2 Aug. 1947, Lewiston, Nez Perce, Idaho 



98 



160 NORMA GEDDES GREENE 



I was born in Baker City, Oregon, on 12 Feb. 1908, daughter of Mame Thompson 
and William Carver Geddes. My childhood and youth followed a very normal pattern 
as we moved from Oregon to Utah and into Idaho. I managed to make good grades in 
school, and graduated with high honors with a B.A. degree from the University of Idaho 
in 1929. 

I met my husband, George Greene, during the summer following my freshman year at 
college. He was the son of Amy Alice Russell and John Greene of Culdesac, Idaho. He 
was working in the saw mill in our small town and playing baseball to earn enough money 
to return to college. It may have seemed expedient at the time to date the boss's 
daughter, or perhaps I had matured in my year away at school . At any rate, the summer 
romance did not fade, and though we hod vowed to the contrary we continued to go 
"steady." George remained at the university to get his master's degree during my senior 
year. After I had completed two years of teaching, George and I were married in Boise, 
Idaho, on 30 May 1931, and moved to Payette, Idaho, where George was teaching and 
coaching. 

We were in the midst of a great depression. In our farming community, a nice hen 
could be purchased for 35c;; but teachers' warrants could not be cashed. My pioneer 
ancestors had nothing on me as I converted my trousseau wardrobe from summmer to winter 
and found a new world of food in one small vegetable patch. 

Barbara Jane was born in Ontario, Oregon (an adjoining town) on 16 July 1932 — 
most beloved — most wanted — but completely unfinanced for years. These were hard 
years, but happy ones by any means. Some of our happiest memories and closest friend- 
ships are associated with this period of our lives. 

In 1933, an opportunity came to go to the State Normal School at Lewiston, where 
George was Dean of Men and the coach . Barbara grew up the only child in a men's 
dormitory, and Tim was born there on 12 May 1939. 

In 1941 we moved to Moscow, Idaho, where George became Athletic Director at 
the university. The war disrupted our lives from 1943 to 1946 while the children and I 
followed the fortunes and ill fortunes of Navy life as we trailed our now Navy Lieutenant 
Commander to Arkansas A. and M. College and California Institute of Technology. 
During these years, I returned to fulltime high school teaching and continued until we left 
Moscow in 1951 . 

In that year. Senator Herman Welker persuaded us to cast our lot with his in politics 
in the nation's capitol. At the present time, George is Legislative Liaison Officer for 
the Department of Commerce. Since we have been in Washington, Barbara has married 
and has two children, and Tim is about to leave for college. 

I ventured into department store employment with Woodward and Lothrop in Washington, 
D. C. in 1951 . I was promoted from a sales person to a service manager and finally to 

99 



Director of Personnel for their suburban store. I resigned in 1955 to do research work 
for the Office of the Architect of the Capitol . In this position I have compiled a 
complete history of the works of art in the Capitol. It will, when completed, be pub- 
lished as a public document. While it will be in the architect's name, it will be all 
mine — my contribution to posterity, though anonymous. 

In 1956 we celebrated our Silver Wedding Aniversary, and we look forward now 
to an equal number of happy years to mark the golden one. 

On 1 Jan 1966 I will become head of the Art and Reference Library in the Office 
of the Architect of the Capitol. I am proud to have been a manuscript contributor to 
the book. We, the People, published by the United States Capitol Historical Society. 
The book Compilation of Works of Art and Other Objects in the United States Capitol 
will be available after 20 Jan. 1966. It is 426 pages, with over 400 illustrations of 
works of art in the U.S. Capitol . I am co-author of this publication. 



LEROY EARL MOSMAN 



B. 

Md. 6 Sept. 1952 

Father 



Washington, D. C. 
Mother 



Wife 425 BARBARA JANE GREENE 



B. 16 July 1932 
Bapt. 5 Sept. 1952 

Father George Wise Greene 



Ontario, Malheur, Oregon 
Lewiston, Nez Perce, Idaho 

Mother 160 Norma Geddes 



CHILDREN 



866 Jill Mosman 

867 Michael Wise Mosman 

868 Craig Wise Mosman 

869 Matthew Fulton Mosman 

870 Wynn Robert Mosman 



B. 8 May 1954, Richmond, Henrico, Virginia 
B. 23 Dec. 1956, Richmond, Henrico, Virginia 
B. Lewiston, Nez Perce, Idaho 

B. Lewiston, Nez Perce, Idaho 

B. Lewiston, Nez Perce, Idaho 



100 



425 BARBARA JANE GREENE (MOSMAN) 



We members of the fourth generation labor under a disadvantage. I feel sure my 
mother has carefully chronicled my childhood from my birth in Ontario, Oregon to my 
high school graduation in Moscow, Idaho. And my husband had an undistinguished youth — 
now what can a poor fourth generationer tell to capture your interest. 

Let's begin with Roy. I wish you could all meet him — oh not all at once; I'm intro- 
ducing him to the clan in small doses. Even after almost five years of marriage I don't 
feel secure enough to spring all of you on him at once. LeRoy Earl Mosman is the son of 
Bessie Johnson and William LeRoy Mosman. His father is a mill worker and Roy followed 
his family to various mill towns in Oregon, California, and Idaho, final ly settling in Boise 
where he began and finished high school. He overcame a childhood handicap to play 
football and it was a football scholarship which brought him to the University of Idaho in 
his sophomore year. We met during the latter part of my freshman year. 

Despite the fact that Roy was an athlete and I harbored dreams of marrying a Bohemian- 
type poet, we dated and were "pinned" and then engaged. (I might add here that this 
process was considerably speeded up by the fact that the Stel Imons, Sanders, and Persnells 
were stuffing Roy with that good Thompson cooking. Had he known that I had not inherited 
that special touch with food, he might have been dragging his feet at this point). At 
any rate, at the end of my sophomore year my poor parents threw up their hands in dismay 
and said, "Well, Barbara, if you're not going to see all the historic sites in Washington, 
D. C. — stop mooning around the house and get married." We did just that. On Sept- 
ember 6, 1952 Roy and I were married in the home of Senator Herman Welker in Washington, 
D. C. 

We returned to Moscow where Roy graduated from the University. After a fling at 
physical therapy we decided to take a big jump and do something Roy had always wanted 
to do — go to law school. We moved to Eugene, Oregon to accomplish that in September 
1955 and we have been very glad ever since. Roy is completely engrossed in his work 
and doing well . 

Our three year old daughter, Jill, born May 8, 1954 in Richmond, Virginia, is a 
charming replica of her grandmother. Norma and two days before Christmas (1956) Michael 
Wise joined our household — and a nicer present would be hard to find. 

Our future is somewhat indefinite now. We would like to practice law in some 
small town in either Oregon or Idaho and settle down to a more stationary life. By that 
time we will probably have more little Mosmans and we will come swooping down on the 
Thompson fami ly reunion en masse. I feel there is safety in numbers. 



Sketch written by Barbara Jane Greene Mosman, 1957 

1962 - Roy E. Mosman was graduated from Oregon Law School, passed the Idaho Bar 
Examination and Is now practicing law in Lewiston, Idaho. We now have three more 
children, Craig William, Matthew Fulton, and Wynn Robert Mosman. 

101 



TIMOTHY GEDDES GREENE 



Born: May 12, 1939 in Lewiston, Idaho 

Son of: Norma Geddes and George Wise Greene 

On both maternal and paternal branches of Tim's family, his ancestors came to 
America from Great Britain seeking religious freedom. On the maternal side his great- 
grandmother, Jennie (Eliza Jane) Sells Thompson, became a convert to the Mormon faith 
and migrated to Utah as a young girl . On the paternal side Archibald Stuart left Ireland 
in 1727 because of religious conflict. His son, also Archibald Stuart, moved to the Vir- 
ginia colony and from this line of Virginians Tim is a descendant. On this family tree 
are the first president and a founder of Phi Beta Kappa, the dashing Civil War hero, J. 
E. B. Stuart, and many Illustrious barristers and judges of the state of Virginia. His 
grandfather, John Green, went west as a young man and did not return to his beloved 
state. In tracing genealogy it should be noted that the spelling "Greene" began with 
this family in 1920. 

Tim attended grade school in Arkansas and California during World War II and in 
Moscow, Idaho. He was graduated from Bethesda Chevy-Chase High School in 1957 
and enrolled in the University of Idaho for the 1957-58 term. For him the future lies 
ahead. 



Sketch written by Norma Geddes Greene, 1957 



1962 - Tim was graduated Cum Laude from the University of Idaho and with a great love 
for the West. He accepted a Ford Foundation Fellowship for advanced study in Economics 
at Brown University at Providence, R. I. For the fall term of 1962 he enrolled in the Law 
School at George Washington University and graduated in June, 1965. He passed the 
D. C. Bar Exam and Is presently working for the Securities and Exchange Commission in 
Washington, D. C. He Is unmarried at this date, November, 1965. 



162 SERGE WILLIAM GEDDES 



Serge William Geddes was born April 28, 1909, at Baker City, Oregon, to William 
Carver Geddes and Mame Thompson. He died of Progressive Spinal Muscular Atrophy of 
Childhood on February 14, 1914, at Baker City, Oregon, were he is buried. 

What events could be Included in the five short years of Serge's life that would 
make it different and distinct? And yet I believe that it was different. 

The only way I can express this is to use the words of our Mother: "I feel that I have 
indeed been blessed to be the Mother of a Spirit so choice that he did not have to live 

102 



out more than five short years of his second estate before returning to our Heavenly 
Father." 

I recall hearing Dad greet Serge alvk'ays as "Sunny Jim." My only recollections of 
him could best be expressed by these two words: "Smiling Patient." 



Sketch written by his sister Zola Geddes Stellmon 



CECIL ALBERT SANDERS 



B. 9 Aug. 1908 
Bapt. 1 Nov. 1925 
Md. 6 Mar. 1937 

Father Albert Oscar Sanders 



Pocatello, Bannock, Idaho 
Pocatello, Bannock, Idaho 
Pocatello, Bannock, Idaho 

Mother Bertha Dunivin 



Wife 212 BARBARA GEDDES 



B. 28 Aug. 1916 
Bapt. 5 Nov. 1924 

Father 27 William Carver Geddes 



Ogden, Weber, Utah 
Portland, Multnomah, Oregon 

Mother Mame Thompson 



CHILDREN 



461 Kay Lorraine Sanders 
563 James Michael Sanders 



B. 17 Sept. 1940, Spokane, Spokane, Washington 
Bapt. 1949, Lewiston, Nez Perce, Idaho 

B. 28 Sept. 1948, Seattle, King, Washington 
Adopted in 1944 by Cecil Albert Sanders and 
Barbara Geddes in Seattle, King, Washington 



212 BARBARA GEDDES (SANDERS) 



I, Barbara Geddes, was born in Ogden, Utah, on August 28, 1916, the fourth child 
of Mame Thompson and William Carver Geddes. During the pre-school age we moved 
from Ogden to Portland, Oregon. It was in Portland that I found that I had a large family 
or relatives, for it was there that we had many Sunday dinners with the Net Thompson 
Geddes (David Geddes) family. Also, the Earl Thompson family were frequent visitors. 

103 



It was In Portland that I first discovered that we were "Mormons" and, that as such, we 
always had missionaries around our house, especially at dinner time. I remember there 
was one missionary who teased me by telling me that he was going to cut off my ears. 
Perhaps, psychologically, that is why I still get mad every time a missionary calls on me. 

From Portland, Oregon we moved to Baker, Oregon, where I attended the first grade 
in school. From Baker we moved to Winchester, Idaho. It was here that Mother gave 
birth to our sister, Ruth Trade, when I was eight years old. Also at this tender age I 
was taken to Portland where I was baptized, as we had no Mormon church in Winchester. I 
I finished my grade schooling and graduated from Winchester High School with high honors 
in a graduating class of 13 students. I entered the University of Idaho and graduated 
in 1936 at the age of nineteen years — no honors, just lots of fun. 



1 



After graduation from the university (during the great depression) I applied for a 
teaching position at Aberdeen, Idaho. With the help of my two older sisters, Zola and 
Norma, I stated on the application blank that I could teach anything. Little did we 
realize that the Superintendent would take me at my word, and so I taught cooking, 
sewing, English, dramatics, and general science (with no laboratory for experiments), 
music, and girls' basketball were also assigned to me for my spare (?) time. The first 
girls' basketball game I had ever seen played was by my own team — and we won. "In 
the olden days," like those were, one had to be able to do almost everything (or at 
least make people think that you could do it) in order to get a job. 

On March 6, 1937, I was married to Cecil Albert Sanders in Pocatello, Idaho. He 
was the son of Bertha Dunivin and Albert Oscar Sanders and was born In Pocatello, Idaho 
on August 9, 1908. He attended the schools In Pocatello and graduated from the Univ- 
ersity of Idaho at Moscow In 1932. 

The first few years of our married life were spent in construction camps in Washington 
and Idaho. With Cecil's promotion to head office manager, we moved to Spokane, 
Washington, and built our first home. On September 17, 1940, our first child, a daughter, 
Kay Lorraine Sanders, was born. She was blessed In the church in Spokane. 

In 1944 we moved to Seattle, Washington. While in Seattle we adopted a baby 
born September 28, 1948, and named him James Michael. 

From Seattle (1949) we moved to Lewiston, Idaho, to spend two years near our family. 
Mother was in very poor health with multiple sclerosis and needed our help. In 1951, 
after the death of my mother-in-law, we moved to Boise, Idaho, because my father-in-law] 
was seriously III with leukemia and it was necessary to move him to a town that had a 
blood bank. Boise was the best location for a job and the blood bank. Mother was be- 
yond our help at this point in her life, being bedfast and almost completely paralyzed. 
Cecil, being the only child, had to take care of his father during this illness. After the 
death of Dad Sanders (1952) we decided to stay in Boise as we found It a very friendly 
place in which to live. 

Cecil passed his CPA examinations and now (1957) is with Cannon Sanders and Co., 
Accountants and Tax Consultants. 1962 - Cecil Sanders has been seriously III. He has 
shown considerable improvement but is still not a well man. 

Sketch written by Barbara Geddes Sanders 
104 



461 KAY LORRAINE SANDERS 



I, Kay Lorraine Sanders, was born In Spokane, Washington, on September 17, 
1940, the first child of Barbara Geddes and Cecil Albert Sanders. I was blessed at 
the age of six months in Spokane by my mother's cousin, Cy Greaves. 

At the age of four, we moved to Seattle, Washington, where we lived for four 
years. Soon after my eighth birthday we adopted a baby boy whom we named James 
Michael Sanders. 

In 1949 we moved to Lewiston, Idaho, to be near my maternal grandparents. It 
was here that I was baptized and confirmed a member of the Church of Jesus Christ of 
Latter-day Saints. 

In 1951 we moved to Boise, Idaho, where I completed my elementary and high 
school education. I married Charles Thomas Rank, April 11, 1961 at Boise, Idaho. 
My husband is the son of Anabe! Anderson and David Thomas Rank. 



Sketch written by Kay Lorraine Sanders 



563 JAMES MICHAEL SANDERS 



I, James Michael Sanders, was born in Seattle, Washington, on September 28, 1948, 
and was adopted by Barbara Geddes and Cecil Albert Sanders on October 3, 1948. The 
first six months of my life we lived in Seattle and then moved to Lewiston, Idaho. My 
cousin, Gregg Michael Presnell and I were blessed in Lewiston by Professor W. J. Wilde 
at the apartment where my maternal grandparents lived. The reason for this was that 
my grandmother was very ill and wished to see her grandchildren blessed. 

At the age of two we moved to Boise, Idaho, because my paternal grandfather was 
very ill with Leukemia. It was here that I first started to school . At the age of eight 
years I was baptized by Elder Kirk and confirmed by Victor Thompson in the First Ward 
at Boise, Idaho into the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. 



Sketch written by James Michael Sanders, 1957 



105 



PHILIP WILMER PRESNELL 



B. 18 Mar. 1923 
Bapt. 6 Apt. 1957 
Md. 17 Sept. 1944 

Father George Franklin Presnell 



Craignont, Lewis, Idaho 
Craignont, Lewis, Idaho 
Craignont, Lewis, Idaho 

Mother Naomi Davis 



B. 9 Apr. 1924 
Bapt. 29 Jan. 1933 



Wife 266 RUTH TRACE GEDDES 



Winchester, Lewis, Idaho 
Winchester, Lewis, Idaho 



Father 27 William Carver Geddes 



Mother Mame Thompson 



CHILDREN 



553 Pamela Lynn Presnell 
570 Gregg Michael Presnell 
614 Penny Diane Presnell 

866 Laurel Lee Presnell 

867 Philip Kent Presnell 



B. 29 Mar. 1948, Spokane, Spokane, Washington 
D. 29 Mar. 1948, Spokane, Spokane, Washington 
B. 20 Mar. 1949, Spokane, Spokane, Washingtoi 
Bapt. 6 Apr. 1951, Lewiston, Nez Perce, Idaho 
B. 4 Jan. 1952, Lewiston, Nez Perce, Idaho 
Bapt. 6 Feb. 1960, Lewiston, Nez Perce, Idaho 
B. 17 July 1955, Lewiston, Nez Perce, Idaho 
Bapt. 28 Sept. 1963, Lewiston, Nez Perce, Idaho 
B. 10 June 1959, Lewiston, Nez Perce, Idaho 



266 RUTH TRACIE GEDDES 



After momentarily being disappointed I wasn't a bouncing baby boy, Dad hurried home 
from the hospital elated with his beautiful little girl — but my sisters tell me I was horribly 
red, wrinkled, wet, and wailing. And I guess, so I'm told, I was not a delightful child. 

My fondest early childhood memories were having Uncle Jack and Aunt Dora stay with 
me, eating at the Winchester Inn with Cennle, and going camping with Zo and Elbert. 

I shall never forget my first day at school, the big fire at Winchester that burned most 
of Main Street (I had the measles and could not look at the bright flames), my first school 
play when I couldn't pronounce "vegetable, " and the long fought battle with my very 
best girl friend to get the better grade. 

106 



o 



w 



I remember very well my baptism at Portland, Oregon, and not long after that our 
trip to Denver to meet all my "cousins." Betv/een Lewlston and Denver with stops in Boise, 
Preston, Ogden, Plain City, and Salt Lake City I met thousands and thousands of them! 
We had such a wonderful time visiting that at my tender age I thought it quite inconsiderate 
of my sister. Norma, to have her first baby prematurely and call us back to Payette. How 
little did I realize the marvels of God and how blessed we were to have Norma and Barbara 
Jane come through together. The next year Bill was born, my sister Zola's first child — 
what thorns in my side. They were getting Into my things, playing with my best toys, 
tearing my good books, and messing up my neat playhouse. 

It was my first year in hmh school at a basketball game I saw Craignont's ^5 player 
and drooled, but it took another whole year before I could get him to look my way. His 

name was Phil Presnell . He was the son of George Franklin Presnell and Naomi Davis 

of Craignont, Idaho. 

That summer Aunt Nett and Marge came to visit us. Marge and I had a perfectly 
wonderful time together. We talked all night, slept all day, had boy friend troubles and 
joys and thrived on teen-age crushes. As I look back Mother and Aunt Nett must have 
had the patience of Job. After each summer we would shed a few tears of farewell until 
the next summer which seemed ages away. 

How well I remember December 7, 1941 . It was a Sunday and my dad was furious with 
me because I read the funnies that morning Instead of the headlines. Phil was home from 
Normal School that weekend and world affairs seemed so minor. But it suddenly dawned 
on me listening to President Franklin D. Roosevelt's declaration of war that maybe it 
wouldn't be over in a week or two. 

In May 1942 I graduated from Winchester High School as salutorian. 

The fall I entered the University of Idaho and pledged Alpha Chi Omega. It was a 
wonderful year, but that second semester was far from normal . Phil left that summer for 
the Navy, going first to V-12 school In Pocatello. My sophomore year we were indeed 
war conscious. In addition to 400 ASTP students the Navy had about 1,000 radio men 
stationed there and we were busy that year rolling bandages for the Red Cross, Minute- 
Maiding and promoting war bond sales. In April 1944 Phil and I were engaged and that 
summer he was sent back to Wellesley, Mass. for schooling before becoming an Ensign, 
USNR. I worked in Spokane and stayed with my sister Barbara. On September 17, 1944 
Phil and I were married in Craignont with big plans of six glorious months together in 
California before his ship was to leave. But upon arriving in San Pedro, California his 
orders were changed and he left immediately on the cruiser "San Juan" and I came back 
to Moscow to school . V-E Day on Campus was a joyous riot but it was nothing to V-J 
Day in Seattle that August. I went back to college my senior year and waited another 
eternity before Phil came into San Francisco after eighteen very long months. Finally 
in February 1946 he received his discharge and we hurried back to Moscow to enter school. 
June 1946 I graduated from the University with high honors. The next year I worked in 
the registrar's office while Phil finished college. 

He accepted a job with Randall and Emery, CPA's In Spokane, and after graduation 
we moved. We had our first heartbreaking experience in March, 1948 when we lost our 

107 



premature baby girl, Pamela Lynn. But exactly one year later we hod a wonderful 
healthy baby boy, Gregg Michael . 

April 1950 we moved to Lewiston where Phil opened a CPA practice of his own. 
How slow it seemed at first but what a fortunate move it was. Gradually he received 
more and more clients and by the time Penny Diane was born January 4, 1952 he was 
swamped. After tax season Phil took a partner, Don Fairley. 

That fall, September 7, 1952, we lost Mother whom we loved so deeply, but seeing 
her at peace after so much suffering warmed a very sad heart. 

In July 1955 Laurel Lee was born. We have such a nice family and we are so bless- 
ed. Phil and Don feel very proud of their business as it has grown and is growing to re- 
quire two more men and two girls. We are buying a lovely home. And just this year 
Marge Geddes Murray and I have become reacquainted and have so completely enjoyed 
each other and our families. 

Philip Kent Presnell was born on June 10, 1959, at Lewiston, Nez Perce County, 
Idaho. 

One of the most wonderful things of my whole life happened this April when I wit- 
nessed the baptism of my son and my husband into the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter- 
day Saints. 

How grateful I am for such a full pleasant thirty three years. . . .and I do thank God 
constantly for my wonderful family, our perfect health, and our nice home and job.. . . 
we truly are blessed. 



Sketch written by Ruth Tracie Geddes Presnell 



CYRUS LeROY GREAVES 



B. 19 Sept. 1882 
Bapt. 4 June 1891 
End. 12 May 1904 
Md. 5 June 1907 
D. 21 Dec. 1951 
Bur. 24 Dec. 1951 

Father John Cluley Greaves 



Logan, Cache, Utah 

Logan, Cache, Utah 

Logan Temple, Cache, Utah 

Salt Lake Temple, Salt Lake, Utah 

Preston, Franklin, Idaho 

Preston, Franklin, Idaho 



Mother 



Althea Card 



108 



Wife 



30 LEONA GEDDES 



B. 7 Dec. 1881 
Chr. 5 Jan. 1882 
Bapf. 3 July 1890 
End. 5 June 1907 
Sid. 5 June 1907 
D. 26 Sept. 1963 
Bur. 28 Sept. 1963 

Father 2 William Stewart Geddes 



Plain City, Weber, Utah 

Plain City, Weber, Utah 

Plain City, Weber, Utah 

Salt Lake Temple, Salt Lake, Utah 

Salt Lake Temple, Salt Lake, Utah 

Hyrum, Cache, Utah 

Preston, Franklin, Idaho 

Mother Mary Ann Carver 



CHILDREN 



161 Cyrus William Greaves 
166 Ora Geddes Greaves 
185 Paul Card Greaves 
205 Reed Geddes Greaves 



222 Helen Greaves 

241 Stewart Geddes Greaves 



B. 20 Mar. 1908, Preston, Oneida, Idaho 
B. 9 Sept. 1909, Preston, Oneida, Idaho 
B. 11 Feb. 1913, Preston, Oneida, Idaho 
B. 22 Apr. 1916, Preston, Franklin, Idaho 
Bapt. 26 Apr. 1924, Preston, Franklin, Idaho 
D. 4 July 1925, Preston, Franklin, Idaho 
End. 18 Jan 1928, Logan Temple, Cache, Utah 
B. 7 Apr. 1918, Preston, Franklin, Idaho 
B. 29 Aug. 1920, Preston, Franklin, Idaho 



30 LEONA GEDDES CREAVES 



"The crown of her soul is godliness; 
The glory of her soul is hospitality; 
The beauty of her soul is order; 
The blessing of her soul is compassion," 

These four lines epitomize the adult years of Leona Geddes Greaves. The main drama 
of her life centered around a home in Preston, Idaho, where all six of her children except 
Reed, who died of septicemia on July 4, 1925, reached adulthood in the most ideal family 
environment one can imagine. 

Leona was born December 7, 1881, at Plain City, Utah (a suburb of Ogden) to 
William Stewart Geddes and Mary Ann Carver. Following the death of her father on 
August 23, 1891, at North Powder, Oregon, the family returned to Plain City. Leona, 
being one of the eldest children, had the difficult task of helping her mother rear younger 
brothers and sisters during the years when there was very little money available . She 



109 



attended school In Plain City and the Oneida Stake Academy at Preston, Idaho. 



I 



In the fall of 1904 she went to Baker City, Oregon, where she lived with and worked 
for Uncle Grant and Aunt Martha Geddes. During her two year's sojourn in Baker City 
she was able to save enough money to re-enter school . She returned to Preston in the fall 
of 1906 and lived with her cousin, Elizabeth Thomas, who was teaching school . She 
enrolled in a special sewing class at the Academy where she was graduated, with honors, 
in May 1907. 

On June 5, 1907 she was married to Cyrus LeRoy Greaves In the Salt Lake Temple. 
Actually, Leona spent her married years In just three homes — all within a block of each 
other. The three still stand (1964) as a monument to her faith, personality, and character. 
A neat frame house was home for about a decade during the early years of her marriage. 
About 1917, the young family moved Into a new brick home at 162 North I West Street. 
Two years later Roy and Leona moved next door into a fine home built by John C. 
Greaves, Roy's father. It was in this large attractive home at 152 North I West Street 
where Leona's life blossomed, spreading a wonderful Influence to countless people of all 
ages. Roy and Leona Instilled in their children the desire for on education and each one 
was given the opportunity to attend college. One son, Cyrus William Greaves, fulfilled 
an L. D. S. mission to Great Britain. 

She was a devoutly religious person and her life was one of service to the church . 
She served as a Sunday School teacher. Primary president, and counselor. Primary stake 
board member, M.I. A. president and counselor. Her greatest love seemed to be the 
Relief Society where she served as a counselor on the Oneida Stake Board Relief Society, 
also as secretary, class leader, and visiting teacher In the ward. She was an active 
member of the Daughters of Utah Pioneers and the Travel and Hobby Club of Preston. 

Godliness, hospitality, order and compassion--these four pillars formed the structure 
of her noble life. The main structure was embellished with high intelligence, unique 
curiosity, boundless energy, enviable tolerance, and generosity unmatched In a century. 
A native drive from her parents and augmented by the love of her husband magnified these 
components of her character, reaching maximum intensity a dozen years before her death. 
On December 21 , 1951 , her life was shaken with the death of her husband. Her sorrow 
was intense as one might expect in a person so dynamic. 

She was a loving mother and a devoted wife. Her cheerful disposition endeared her 
to her family and innumerable friends. She came, however, from bold Scottish blood 
and could be sweetly stubborn on occasion. 

She possessed a special talent for homemaking. She was an excellent cook, met- 
iculous housekeeper, and always a gracious hostess. 

As a grandmother she was affectionate and generous. One of her granddaughters 
has said of her, "No one else would cut the bottom crust off a loaf of hot bread just to 
please a hungry grandchild. Or when three teenage granddaughters coaxed for toasted 
bread and honey late at night, who but Grandma would prepare and serve it to them in bed. 



110 



Her purse was opened countless times for the grandchildren and each time a small fist 
came out with some perfumed candies, a lifesaver or pennies. 

For a full half century, Leona was on stage playing a major role in the drama of 
life in Preston. Her performance in many roles was distinctive and to be long remembered 
by everyone whose privilege it was to know her. After suffering a series of strokes she 
passed away on September 26, 1963, at the age of 81, and was buried at Preston, Idaho, 
on September 28, 1963. 

She is survived by her four sons and one daughter, ten grandchildren and seven great- 
grandchildren; three half-sisters, Edna C. Eames, Margaret G. Head, and Winnie G. 
Nielson , 



161 CYRUS WILLIAM GREAVES 



B . 20 Mar . 1 908 
Bapt. 6 May 1916 
End. 21 Nov. 1929 



Preston, Oneida, Idaho 
Preston, Oneida, Idaho 
Salt Lake Temple, Salt Lake, Utah 



Father Cyrus LeRoy Greaves 



Mother 30 Leona Geddes 



Wife DORA McGregor 



B. 17 Oct. 1907 
Bapt. 3 Dec. 1915 
End. 28 Aug. 1932 
Md. 22 Aug. 1932 
Sid. 28 Aug. 1932 

Father James Davies McGregor 



Cleveland, Bannock, Idaho 
Cleveland, Bannock, Idaho 
Salt Lake Temple, Salt Lake, Utah 
Salt Lake Temple, Salt Lake, Utah 
Salt Lake Temple, Salt Lake, Utah 



Mother 



Ruth Curtis 



CHILDREN 



428 Marian Greaves 



439 Helen Doreen Greaves 



448 Gary LeRoy Greaves 



B. 28 Oct. 1933, Preston, Franklin, Idaho 

Bapt. Nov. 1940, Spokane, Spokane, Washington 

Md. to James D. Bench 

B. 7 Apr. 1937, Boise, Ada, Idaho 

Bapt. 5 May 1945, San Diego, San Diego, California 

Md. to Carl R. Okelberry 

B. 18 Mar. 1939, Boise, Ada, Idaho 

Bapt. 29 Mar. 1947, San Diego, San Diego, California 

Md. to Norma Darlene Rains 



m 



161 CYRUS WILLIAM GREAVES 



A native of Preston, Idaho, William Greaves v^^as born 20 Mar. 1908. His parents 
were Cyrus LeRoy Greaves and Leona Geddes. After attending grade and high schools 
in Preston, he studied one year at the Idaho Technical Institute at Pocatello, Idaho. 
He transferred to the Utah State Agricultural College at Logan, Utah. He graduated 
from here with a Bachelor of Science in 1929. During the summer vacations he worked 
in the family-owned bank at Preston. In the fall of 1929 he left on a two-year mission 
for the L.D.S. Church; his mission was to England. 

In 1932 he married Dora McGregor of Cleveland, Idaho. Their family includes 
three children: Marion (Mrs. James D. Bench of San Diego, California), Doreen (Mrs. 
Carl Okelberry of Salt Lake City, Utah), and a son, Gary LeRoy Greaves of San Diego. 

In 1942, Cy and Dora moved to San Diego, California, where he became manager of 
Public Relations for the consolidated-Vultee Aircraft Corporation. After 18 years with 
Convoir, he moved into the advertising and Public Relations business. He became Public 
Relations director for Barnes Chase Advertising. In 1961 he completed courses at San 
Diego State College for his Master's Degree. In June of 1965 he received the appointment 
as manager of campus relations for the University of California at San Diego. 

He has held several positions in the church in San Diego, having taught the Seventy 
Priesthood class in the sixth ward for several years. Currently, he is teaching the Gospel 
Doctrine class in his ward Sunday School . 



166 ORA GEDDES GREAVES 



B. 9 Sept. 1909 
Chr. 7 Nov. 1909 
Bapt. 29 Dec. 1917 
End. 11 Nov. 1932 
Md, 11 Nov. 1932 

Father Cyrus LeRoy Greaves 



Preston, Oneida, Idaho 
Preston, Oneida, Idaho 
Preston, Franklin, Idaho 
Logan Temple, Cache, Utah 
Logan Temple, Cache, Utah 

Mother 30 Leona Geddes 



Wife CLARA FARNES 



B. 31 Aug. 1909 
Bapt. 29 Dec. 1917 
End. 11 Nov. 1932 
Sid. 11 Nov. 1932 



Logan, Cache, Utah 
Logan, Cache, Utah 
Logan Temple, Cache, Utah 
Logan Temple, Cache, Utah 



112 



CHILDREN 



429 Richard Ora Greaves 



441 Mary Ann Greaves 



527 Susan Greaves 



B. 24 Nov. 1933, Salt Lake City, Salt Lake, Utah 
D. 25 Nov. 1933, Salt Lake City, Salt Lake, Utah 
B. 8 June 1937, Salt Lake City, Salt Lake, Utah 
Bapt. 28 June 1945, Salt Lake City, Salt Lake, Utah 
Md . to David S. Huefner 
B. 2 July 1946, Salt Lake City, Salt Lake, Utah 



166 ORA GEDDES GREAVES 



He was born at Preston, Idaho, to Cyrus LeRoy Greaves and Leona Geddes Greaves 
on Sept. 9, 1909, He attended grade school in Preston. He, also, graduated from Preston 
High School in 1927. He then attended Utah State University at Logan, Utah, from 
September 1927 until he graduated in June 1931 with a Bachelor of Science Degree in 
accounting and business administration. 

He married Clara Fames of Preston in the Logan L. D.S. Temple on Nov. 11, 1932. 
They are the parents of three children: Richard Ora Greaves, Mary Ann Greaves (Mrs. 
David S. Huefner), Susan (who is now a student at Brigham Young University at Provo, 
Utah). They have three grandsons: Jeffrey Greaves Huefner, Douglas Greaves Huefner, 
and Richard Greaves Huefner. 

He has been active in the L . D . S . Church ,. serving as a member of the Elders Quorum 
Presidency, President of the 30th Quorum of Seventy, Second Counselor and later First 
Counselor in the bishopric of Capitol Hill Second Ward, Salt Lake Stake. He served as 
stake clerk of Salt Lake Stake. Presently, he is a home teacher in the Cherry Hills Word, 
Denver South Stake, Denver, Colorado. 

He was employed by S. H. Kress Company, Salt Lake City, from August 1932 until 
May 1937, and by Standard Oil Company of California from July 12, 1937 — he is still 
employed by a subsidiary of Standard Oil Company of California, (California Oil Company- 
Western DIvison in Denver, Colorado), 



Sketch written by Helen G. Burrup 



113 



185 PAUL CARD GREAVES 



B. n Feb. 1913 
Chr. 6 Apr. 1913 
Bapt. 26 Feb. 1921 
End. 19 Sept. 1935 
Md.l9 Sept. 1935 

Father Cyrus LeRoy Greaves 



Preston, Oneida, Idaho 
Preston, Oneida, Idaho 
Preston, Oneida, Idaho 
Salt Lake Temple, Salt Lake, Utah 
Salt Lake Temple, Salt Lake, Utah 

Mother 30 Leona Geddes 



Wife ORA BISHOP 



B. 7 Aug. 1913 
Chr. 5 Oct. 1913 
End. 19 Sept. 1935 
Sid. 19 Sept. 1935 



Preston, Oneida, Idaho 
Preston, Oneida, Idaho 
Salt Lake Temple, Salt Lake, Utah 
Salt Lake Temple, Salt Lake, Utah 



CHILDREN 



438 Karren Greaves 



518 Paul Rand Greaves 



B. 22 Nov, 1936, Preston, Franklin, Idaho 
Md. 26 Nov, 1958, Logan Temple, Cache, Utah 
Md, to Stephen Merrill Erickson 
B. 18 Aug. 1945, Preston, Franklin, Idaho 



185 PAUL CARD GREAVES 



Paul Card Greaves, son of Cyrus LeRoy Greaves and Leona Geddes was born Feb. 1 1, 
1913 in Preston, Idaho. He v/as blessed Apr. 6, 1913 by Lars P. Christensen. He was 
baptized 26 Feb. 1921 by George Bench and confirmed 6 Mar. 1921, by David G. Eames. 
Paul graduated from the Preston High School and also from the Utah State University at 
Logan, Utah. He received a degree from the school of commerce. 

On 19 Sept. 1935 he married Ora Bishop in the Salt Lake Temple, Salt Lake, Utah. 
They have one son and one daughter and one granddaughter. 

Paul has been active in civic affairs in Preston and has been active in the L.D.S. 
Church . He has served as first counselor in the ward. President of the Y.M.M. I . A. of 
his ward. He has served as assistant ward clerk, and as ward clerk in two different wards 
and as superintendent of the Sunday School in the vard he now lives. He has also 
served as a teacher in the various priesthood quorums. 



114 



He began working for the McCune Motor Co. when he graduated from school . It is 
the Ford Authorized Sales & Service dealer in Preston. He is still working for the same 
dealer. 

Karren Greaves Erickson, daughter of Paul C. and Ora Bishop Greaves, was born 
22 Nov. 1936 in Preston, Idaho. She was blessed 3 Jan. 1937 by her father Paul Card 
Greaves. She was bapt. at Smithfield, Utah, on 5 Jan. 1945 and confirmed 4 Feb. 
1945 by her father. She attended school in Preston, Idaho, both grade and high school . 
She then attended the Brigham Young University, from which she graduated in 1958. 
She taught elementary school for five years. 

She married Stephen Merrill Erickson on 26 Nov. 1958 in the Logon Temple, Cache, 
Utah. They adopted a little girl, Dana, who was born 9 Jan . 1963. She was sealed to 
them in the Logan Temple on 15 Feb. 1964. 

Paul Rand Greaves, son of Paul Card and Ora Bishop Greaves was born 18 Sept. 1945, 
in Preston, Idaho. He was blessed 2 Dec. 1945 by his father. He was baptized at Preston, 
Idaho, 26 Sept. 1953 by his father and confirmed the some day by his father. He attended 
school both grade and high school at Preston. At the present time he is at school at the 
Brigham Young University in Provo, Utah. 



Sketch written by Helen Burrup 



CLYDE LeROY BURRUP 



B. 31 Oct. 1912 
Chr. 1 Dec. 1912 
Bapt. 21 Feb. 1921 
Md. 16 Feb. 1946 
End. 24 Oct. 1949 



Downey, Bannock, Idaho 

Downey, Bannock, Idaho 

Downey, Bannock, Idaho 

Preston, Franklin, Idaho 

Idaho Falls Temple, Bonneville, Idaho 



Father William Edward Burrup 



Mother Elizabeth Fox 



Wife 222 HELEN GREAVES 



B. 7 Apr. 1918 
Chr. 21 June 1918 
Bapt. 25 May 1926 
End. 24 Oct. 1949 
Sid. 24 Oct. 1949 



Preston, Franklin, Idaho 

Preston, Franklin, Idaho 

Preston, Franklin, Idaho 

Idaho Falls Temple, Bonneville, Idaho 

Idaho Falls Temple, Bonneville, Idaho 



Father Cyrus LeRoy Greaves 



Mother 



30 Leona Geddes 



115 



CHILDREN 



583 Roger Clyde Burrup 
Jay Greaves Burrup 



B. 14 Jan. 1950, Downey, Bannock, Idaho 
B. 12 Mar. 1957, Downey, Bannock, Idaho 



222 HELEN GREAVES BURRUP 



She was born to Cyrus LeRoy Greaves and Leona Geddes in Preston, Idaho on 7 Apr. 
1918. She attended grade school as well as Preston High School at Preston and graduated 
in 1935. She attended Idaho State University at Pocatello, Idaho; transferred to Utah 
State University at Logan, Utah and was graduated from there with a Bachelor of Science 
degree in June 1940. 

From 1940 to 1946 she was employed in various positions as stenographer and secretary: 
secretary to the director of Public Health Nursing, Boise, Idaho; secretary at Remington 
Arms Company in Salt Lake City, reservations agent for United Air Lines, and stenographer 
for the Standard Oil Company of Salt Lake City; clerk at the War Rations Board in Preston, 
Idaho. 

She was married to Clyde Burrup on 16 Feb. 1946. They are residents of Downey, 
Idaho, where Clyde is principal of the Downey Elementary School . They are the parents 
of two sons: Roger Clyde Burrup, a student at Marsh Valley High School; and Jay Greaves 
Burrup, a third-grade student at Downey Elementary School . 

She has held numerous positions in the Church. At present, she is a teacher in the 
Y. W.M.I. A. and organist for the Downey Second Ward Relief Society; she is a member of 
the Downey Study Club and the Marsh Valley Hospital Auxiliary Organization. 



Sketch written by Helen G. Burrup 



241 STEWART GEDDES GREAVES 



B. 29 Aug. 1920 
Chr. 3 Oct. 1920 
Bapt. 2 Oct. 1928 
End. 3 July 1942 
Md, 3 July 1942 



Preston, Franklin, Idaho 
Preston, Franklin, Idaho 
Preston, Franklin, Idaho 
Logan Temple, Cache, Utah 
Logan Temple, Cache, Utah 



116 



Father Cyrus LeRoy Greaves 



Mol-her 



30 Leona Geddes 



Wife DOROTHY PALMER 



B. 25 Aug. 1922 
Chr. 1 Oct. 1922 
Bapt. 1 Sept. 1930 
End. 3 July 1942 
Sid. 3 July 1942 

Father Jededlah Morgan Palmer 



Preston, Franklin, Idaho 
Preston, Franklin, Idaho 
Preston, Franklin, Idaho 
Logan Temple, Cache, Utah 
Logan Temple, Cache, Utah 

Mother Ann Forsgren 



CHILDREN 



515 Patricia Greaves 



B. 28 June 1945, Preston, Franklin, Idaho 



241 STEWART GEDDES GREAVES 



He was born to Cyrus LeRoy Greaves and Leona Geddes on 29 Aug. 1920, at Preston, 
Franklin, Idaho. He attended grade school and the high school at Preston. After grad- 
uating from the Preston High School, he attended Brigham Young University at Provo, Utah; 
Montana State University, Missoula, Montana; and Idaho State University, Pocatello, Idaho. 
He served in the United States Navy during World War IL 

Stewart married Dorothy Palmer of Preston on July 3, 1942, in the Logan Temple, 
Cache, Utah. They are the parents of one daughter, Patricia, who is attending the 
Brigham Young University at Provo, Utah. 

Dorothy is Executive Secretary for the San Diego Dental Society. Stewart is 
currently the manager of the Valencia Rexall Pharmacy in San Diego, California. 



Sketch written by Helen G. Burrup 



17 



ALMON DELL DANIELS BROWN 



B. 31 Jan. 1884 
Chr. 24 Feb. 1884 
Bapt. 7 July 1892 
Md . 1 1 Mar . 1 903 
End . 11 Mar . 1 903 
D. 11 Jan. 1960 
Bur. 16 Jan. 1960 

Father Thomas Daniels Brown 



Harrisville, Weber, Utah 

Harrisville, Weber, Utah 

Harrisville, Weber, Utah 

Salt Lake Temple, Salt Lake, Utah 

Salt Lake Temple, Salt Lake, Utah 

Mesa, Maricope, Arizona 

Ogden City Cemetery, Weber, Utah 

Mother Esther Wardle 



Wife 38 EVAFRANCILDA GEDDES 



B. 13 Apr. 1885 
Chr. 1 June 1885 
Bapt. 3 July 1893 
End. n Mar. 1903 
Sid. 11 Mar. 1903 
D. 22 Sept. 1957 
Bur. 25 Sept. 1957 

Father 2 William Stewart Geddes 



Plain City, Weber, Utah 

Plain City, Weber, Utah 

Plain Gty, Weber, Utah 

Salt Lake Temple, Salt Lake, Utah 

Salt Lake Temple, Salt Lake, Utah 

Farr West, Weber, Utah 

Ogden City Cemetery, Weber, Utah 

Mother Mary Ann Carver 



CHILDREN 



153 Almon Lawrence Dell Brown 

157 Thelma Daniels Brown 

162 Harold Daniels Brown 

179 Geddes Daniels Brown 

192 Leona Esther Daniels Brown 

228 Clarence Verdun Daniels Brown 

264 Roland Walter Daniels Brown 



B. 26 June 1904, Plain City, Weber, Utah 
B. 26 July 1906, Plain City, Weber, Utah 
B. 4 Nov. 1908, Farr West, Weber, Utah 
B. 10 Jan. 1912, Farr West, Weber, Utah 
B. 11 Aug. 1915, Farr West, Weber, Utah 
B. 5 Jan. 1919, Farr West, Weber, Utah 
B. 15 Jan. 1924, Farr West, Weber, Utah 



(2) Wife FLORENCE KINGSTON NIELSEN 
Md. 15 Aug. 1958 at Salt Lake City, Salt Lake, Utah 

38 EVAFRANCILDA GEDDES 



Eva Francilda Geddes was born April 13, 1885 in Plain City, Weber County, Ogden, 

118 



Utah. She was a daughter of William Stewart Geddes and Mary Ann Carver. She had one 
sister, Leona Geddes Greaves, and four brothers, William, Jack, George, and Walter. 
She had three half-sisters and one half-brother. Her father died when she was only six 
years old. Her mother spent the last five of her 98 years with Eva. 

Eva had a fervent desire to obtain an education, but because of financial need, her 
education was limited and she worked in factories and tended children to help sustain the 
family. 

A pleasant childhood was enjoyed by Eva, with fun, laughter, and dancing. In fact, 
it was on the dance floor that she met the young man of her choice, Almon Dell Brown. 
They were married March 1 1 , 1903 in the Salt Lake L.D .S . Temple. 

In many respects, life was hard for Eva Francilda Geddes. Seven months before 
her first child was born, Dell left for the Southern States to fulfill a mission for the Church 
of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. Eva lived with Dell's parents until the baby, Almon 
Lawrence, arrived; then she spent the remainder of the two years with her mother. 

When Dell returned from his mission, they purchased their first home on 16th Street 
in Ogden, Utah. It was here that a daughter, Thelma, blessed their home . Three 
years later they moved to Harrisville and rented their home while Dell worked in the brick 
yard and creamery. In so doing, they obtained enough money to make a down-payment 
on a farm in Farr West. The succeeding years brought four more boys and another daughter 
to fill their home with love. They were Harold, Geddes, Leona, Clarence, and Roland, 
respectively. 

Dell was active in the church, serving many years in the North Weber StakeMutual 
Improvement Association and on the High Council . He was Bishop of the Farr West Ward 
and second counselor in the Farr West Stake Presidency. Eva served as a counselor in the 
Farr West Ward Relief Society and spent several years In various positions in the Primary 
organizations. She and her neighbor. Sister Catherine Higley, had many faith-promoting 
experiences as they gathered children in their buggy to take them to Primary each week. 

Eva was blessed with the ability to cook and had a fervent desire to render service 
to others. Some of her happiest moments were spent as she and Dell entertained the 
General Authorities of the Church in their home. The Prophet of the Lord, President 
David O. McKay, and his wife visited with them In their home on their Golden Wedding 
Day. 

Eva was very religious and her foremost thoughts were to support her husband in his 
Priesthood callings and see that each child took advantage of all church opportunities. 
Together as parents their greatest desire was to instill a testimony of the Gospel in the 
hearts of their children. 



119 



153 ALMON LAWRENCE DELL BROWN 



B. 26 June 1904 
Bapt. 7 July 1912 
End. 30 Oct. 1925 
Md. 28 Nov. 1930 

Father Almon Dell Daniels Brown 



Plain City, Weber, Utah 

Farr West, Weber, Utah 

Salt Lake Temple, Salt Lake, Utah 

Salt Lake Temple, Salt Lake, Utah 

Mother 38 Eva Francilda Geddes 



Wife GLADYS MAE WATSON 



B. 10 Dec. 1900 
Bapt. 6 Nov. 1909 
End . 28 Nov . 1 930 
Sid. 28 Nov. 1930 

Father Albert E. Watson 



Butte, Silverbow, Montana 
Butte, Silverbow, Montana 
Salt Lake Temple, Salt Lake, Utah 
Salt Lake Temple, Salt Lake, Utah 

Mother Mary Pearl Brown 



CHILDREN 



424 Vilate D. Brown 



437 Ray Daniels Brown 



B. 20 Feb. 1932, Ogden, Weber, Utah 

Md. to Victor Grabow -- Children — Elizabeth, 

Chuck, and Susan 

B. 26 Sept. 1936, Pocatello, Bannock, Idaho 

D. 26 Sept. 1936, Pocatello, Bannock, Idaho 



RICHARD CY HOLMES 



B. 28 Apr. 1907 
Bapt. 3 July 1915 
End. 9 Sept. 1932 
Md. 9 Sept 1932 

Father William N. Holmes 



Wilson, Weber, Utah 

Wilson, Weber, Utah 

Salt Lake Temple, Salt Lake, Utah 

Salt Lake Temple, Salt Lake, Utah 

Mother Johanna A. Ebel 



Wife 157 THELMA DANIELS BROWN 



B. 26 July 1906 
Bapt. 2 Aug. 1914 



Plain City, Weber, Utah 
Plain City, Weber, Utah 



120 



End. 9 Sept. 1932 
Sid. 9 Sept. 1932 

Father Almon Dell Daniels Brown 



Salt Lake Temple, Salt Lake, Utah 
Salt Lake Temple, Salt Lake, Utah 

Mother 38 Eva Francilda Geddes 



CHILDREN 



432 Carol Jean Holmes 



444 Marian Katherine Holmes 



475 Helen Patricia Holmes 



B. 8 Jan, 1935, Ogden, Weber, Utah 

Md. to Alma Davis Anderson — Children — 

Alan Holmes, Susan Kay Holmes, and Ronald 

Davis Holmes 

B. 14 May 1938, Ogden, Weber, Utah 

Md. to Calvin Eugene Dodd — Child — 

Marianore Dodd 

B. 21 May 1942, Murray, Salt Lake, Utah 



157 THELMA DANIELS BROWN HOLMES 



I was born July 26, 1906, a daughter of Almon Dell and Eva Francilda Geddes Daniels 
Brown, at Plain City, Ogden, Utah. My parents at this time were living on I6th Street 
in Ogden City, but my birth took place in my grandmother Geddes's home. It was a very 
humble adobe house and a place where much love and Joy existed. It was here my 
grandmother reared her six children practically alone because of the very early death of 
grandfather. She lived a very humble life, then passed away at the age of 98. She was 
truly blessed to be able to maintain all her faculties up until the time of her death, 

I am blessed with five brothers and one sister: Almon, Harold, Geddes, Leona, 
Clarence D,, and Roland, All five brothers have graduated from college and received 
their B.S- degrees; three have fulfilled L.D,S. missions, Leona and I have three years 
of college . 

I graduated from Weber Jr, College in 1927 and began teaching school that year at 
Warren, Utah, This teaching experience was indeed a pleasure, I loved the children, 
and I enjoyed giving my service to them, I then taught school for the next five years, 
and helped when I could with Almon and Harold in the mission field. 

When Harold was born, my parents moved from Ogden Gty to a small farm in Farr West. 
Here I grew up under very meager circumstances. All of us children worked along with 
Mother and Dad on the farm to make a living. Thinning sugar beets, stripping sugar cane, 
making molasses, pulling weeds, herding cows, and picking tomatoes were our daily duties. 
Money was extremely difficult to obtain those days; but when we all helped, we never went 
hungry. At times the food was very plain — however, it was good. Mother was noted 
for her excellent cooking, so anything she cooked was delicious. 

Mother and Dad were especially fond of dancing and were noted for their excellence. 

121 



They danced right up to the time of their deaths. I also enjoy dancing; I did a great 
deal in my early life. 

I was reared in a very religious home, where keeping the Sabbath Holy was a must. 
Prayer was said morning and night, and each member participated. My father, being 
stake M.I. A. superintendent for many years, later ward Bishop, and even later serving 
as counselor in the Stake Presidency, left a great deal of the rearing of the children up 
to Mother. I had very wonderful parents and they tried to teach us to be honest, honor- 
able, righeous-living children. Their aim was to teach us to "do unto others as you would 
have them do to you." 

As I look back on my early life, the one thing I remember most is that I was my father's 
shadow. I always preferred helping him in the field to housework. Dad and I looked alike, 
worked alike and thought alike; this made a very close companionship throughout our lives. 

While teaching school at North Ogden, I met a truly wonderful man, Richard Cy 
Holmes. I married him two years later, September 9, 1932, in the Salt Lake Temple. 
During the first year of our marriage we both taught school at Plain City, Utah. This year 
I taught home economics. 

Our first home after marriage was in Wilson. It was a small tfiree-room house. Our 
toilet facilities were outside; there was no bath. We had a coal stove, and a well that 
we had to pump for water. 

Our first little daughter, Carol Jean, was born here in 1935. She had an extremely 
long, hard birth; and as a result, she had a cerebral hemorrhage which paralyzed her left 
side. For ten days she lay at death's door, but through faith and prayer she slowly re- 
covered. She was a beautiful, lovely baby, and when she was nine months old she walked 
across the room to me. Our hearts were filled with joy and many tears were shed because 
the very thing we had so earnestly prayed for had been fulfilled. Our baby could walk. 
This we had been told she would never do because of her illness at birth. She has grown 
to be a very normal woman. 

When Carol Jean was two, we moved to Logan so that my husband could complete his 
college. In 1936, he received a B.S. degree from Utah State University; and in 1960, 
he received his M.S. degree from the University of Utah . After receiving his B.S. degree 
he accepted a school teaching job in Granite High School in Salt Lake City, 

In 1938, our second daughter, Marian Kathryn, was born. She was a healthy baby. 
When she was six weeks old she had a serious case of whooping cough. This dread disease, 
at that time, almost took her life. We were grateful once again that her life was spared with 
no ill effects. 

In 1942, another wonderful baby girl was born to us. We named her Helen Patricia. 
She has been an extremely healthy girl and has had no serious illness thus far in her life. 

Our aim was to have a big family, but existing circumstances prevented this. 



122 



Carol Jean is now 26 years old. She graduated from Granite High and attended 
iBrigham Young University for two years. There she met her husband. Dr. Alma D. Anderson, 
They now have three lovely children; Annette, Alan, and Susan. Her special talents are 
music and business . 

Marion also graduated from Granite High, an honor student. She attended B.Y.U. 
for four years and received her B .S . degree in elementary education in 1960. She taught 
school in Granite District this year of 1960-61. On June 1, 1961, she married Calvin 
Eugene Todd in Salt Lake Temple, He, at the present time, is attending Utah State Uni- 
versity and will graduate in industrial business management. Marian's talents are music 
and teaching . 

Helen Patricia has graduated with honors from Granger High; and her special talents 
are music and business . She graduated from B.Y.U. and received her B .S . degree In 1965 . 
On June 7, 1965 she was married in the Salt Lake Temple to James J. Jewell from Phoenix, 
Arizona. She, at the present time. Is teaching school at Provo, Utah, while her husband 
is working on his Master's degree . 

My activities in the Church have been in several areas. In my early teens it was 
Sunday School work. All during my thirties I was in the M.I.A. program; Stake Bee Hive 
advisor, ward counselor and stake counselor, Sunday School Coordinator, young girls' 
coordinator. Relief Society work and Primary program. I was especially Interested in 
working with the youth of the Church and it added a great deal to my life. 

In 1950, we built a new home on a 10 acre lot. My husband is the principal of an 
elementary school, and we farmed as a side issue to supplement our income. We are at 
present living in this home at 4510 South Redwood Road, Salt Lake City, Utah. 

Ij I hope the remaining years of my life can be of service to my fellowmen, and that I 

can see my children and grandchildren grow in a way suitable to the Lord, and that we 
all together can Inherit eternal life. 

May I pay tribute to my father and mother. I am proud to be their daughter, I just 
hope and pray that I may live to be worthy to be with them in eternity. Their noble 
characters were those of patience, kindness, and deep love for their family. 



Sketch written by Thelma Daniels Brown Holmes 



ALMA DAVIS ANDERSON 



B 4 Sept . 1 928 
Md 2 June 1955 
End 2 June 1955 

Father Roy C. Anderson 



Tremonton, Cache, Utah 

Salt Lake Temple, Salt Lake, Utah 

Salt Lake Temple, Salt Lake, Utah 

Mother Rozella Davis 



123 



Wife 432 CAROL JEAN HOLMES 



B 8 Jan. 1935 
Bapt 6 Mar. 1943 
End 2 June 1955 
Sid 2 June 1955 

Father Richard Cy Holmes 



Ogden, Weber, Utah 

Murray, Salt Lake, Utah 

Salt Lake Temple, Salt Lake, Utah 

Salt Lake Temple, Salt Lake, Utah 

Mother 157 Thelma Daniels Brown 



CHILDREN 



Annette Anderson 

Alan Holmes Anderson 
Susan Kay Anderson 
Ronald Davis Anderson 
Janet Marie Anderson 



B 9 June 1956, Salt Lake City, Salt Lake, Utah 
Bapt 26 June 1964, Salt Lake City, Salt Lake, U^ 
B 3 Feb. 1958, Portland, Multnomah, Oregon 
B 31 Mar. 1959, Portland, Multnomah, Oregon 
B 15 Apr. 1962, Salt Lake City, Salt Lake, Utah 
B 15 Mar. 1965, Salt Lake City, Salt Lake, Utah 



432 CAROL JEAN HOLMES ANDERSON 

January 8, 1935, at 6:49 p.m. was a very important day in my life and in the lives 
of my parents. I was the first born of the union of R. Cy and Thelma Brown Holmes — born 
this day under the everlasting covenant at the Thomas Dee Memorial Hospital In Ogden, 
Utah. I am told and my pictures attest that I had a good set of lungs, lots of real dark hair 
and a little round face . I weighed in at 7 lbs . 9 1/2 oz . Upon my entry into this world I 
sustained an injury which resulted in paralysis of my left side. It was thought that my visit 
in mortality might be of very short duration and if I were to live I would be unable to walk 
or talk throughout my life. Allow me to here insert a more accurate account of the peril 
which accompanied my first few days of life as related to me by my wonderful mother. 

"January the 1 1th at 10:00 a.m. it was feeding time for the babies and my baby was 
brought to me on the usual schedule . This, of course, is a big thril I for a mother . So 
with loving care I unwrapped my baby and noticed that she seemed extra warm and I immed- 
iately detected a high fever. Being very alarmed I drew the attention of one of the nurses 
near by and told her of this fever at which time the nurse immediately took my baby back 
to the nursery. I was very disturbed, of course, but couldn't find out any information con- 
cerning my baby from the nurses . It was about a half hour later when to my surprise stand- 
ing by my bed was Myrtle Woods, a very dear friend, who was a clerk at the hospital 
office . I don't know when I was ever so grateful to see anyone . She was an angel to me 
and learning of my distress went to see about my baby. About 10 minutes passed when 
Myrtle, one doctor, and two nurses were at my side — "Yes, Thelma you have a real sick 
baby and we are afraid she won't live. Where can we reach your husband?" By this 
time I was wheeled to a private room and in 20 minutes my husband and my father and 
mother were at my side to give our baby a name and a blessing. As I remember those 20 
minutes, Carol Jean, while we were waiting for your father were very sad ones . Myrtle 



124 



with tears rolling down her face, mixed with my tears, a sad heart and a mother's love 
trying with all its power to cling to her dying child--those were hard moments filled with 
grief. We tried to decide on a name and since the doctor had given me a sedative I began 
to bring myself under control . As my eyes dimmed to go to sleep, I could hear in a distance 
words from Myrtle saying, "Thelma, your baby is just like a Christmas Carol so let's name 
her 'Carol' and as I dropped off to sleep I called you, Carol Jean. Your Grandfather A. 
D. Brown cave you your name and a blessing at the hospital and your father gave you a 
blessing at fast and testimony meeting. Fever, convulsions, transfusions, etc. went on for 
three days and then you gradually began to show signs of holding your own . It was Sunday 
and President J. Gould Stone came to the hospital to visit someone. He felt impressed to 
go to the hospital that Sunday evening after just being sustained in the North Weber Stake 
Presidency. As he walked up the steps of the hospital, there sat my father waiting and 
President Stone asked him why he was there. Upon hearing about you, Carol Jean, he 
commented to my father "I was impressed to leave my home this evening and come here 
and administer to someone and it must be your baby." They gave you a beautiful blessing 
wherein the Lord was petitioned to let you live if you could be normal. He also gave me 
a blessing of comfort, one I will never forget. All the power in his being was placed upon 
my head and a blessing given to me that no one but me will ever remember. He didn't say 
that you would live but that all would be well . This ray of hope is the thread I clung to 
for 12 long days . You gradually and very gradually improved and on the 12th day when the 
nurse laid you in my arms to go home, there was a prayer of gratitude said in two parent's 
hearts that we had the privilege of taking our bundle of joy home at last. The nurse gave 
us several instructions while I was sitting in the wheel chair with my baby in my arms: 
"Mrs. Holmes, your baby has been very, very ill . You are lucky to be taking your baby 
home. She has had a cerebral hemorrhage. Her left side was paralyzed and she may never 
walk, but she seems to be getting better now. Do the things we have asked you to do and 
enjoy her while you can . " You were a beautiful , fat, lovely baby with real dark curly 
hair and your parents were as proud as parents could be. We knew more than doctors and 
nurses because we had a conviction in our hearts that all would be well with you . Your 
parents, grandparents, friends, and neighbors prayed for your recovery and through this, 
your life was spared and made whole again. From the moment we took you home you 
appeared lovely and acted as a normal child. As you developed and grew each day the 
joy increased in our home . Yes, our anxious hearts beat every day watching for new 
things you did. When you were seven months old, I found you standing in a baby buggy 
holding to the top of the hood. When you were nine months old you walked across the 
room to us. On this day tears of joy were shed by us as we realized an answer to our 
prayers ." 

How eternally grateful I am for my wonderful parents and all who loved and prayed 
for me during those crucial days and for the power of the priesthood which was exercised 
in my behalf, for it is through this power that I am here to write my life story today. 

The first year and one-half of my life was spent in Ogden and Logan, Utah, where my 
father attended school . Upon the completion of my father's schooling we moved to Salt 
Lake City, Utah, where he was employed by the Granite School District as a teacher at 
the Granite High School . 

During my second grade of school our family moved to a farming community called 
Taylorsville, Utah. This rapidly growing community is located just west of Murray, Utah. 

125 



Our home was located at 4502 South Redwood Road. I completed my elementary and junior 
high schooling at the Plymouth and Valley Jr. High Schools and graduated on May 22, 1953, 
from Granite High School where my father had formerly taught. I graduated from the Granite 
L.D.S. Seminary on May 21 , 1953. During my sophomore year at Granite my parents built 
a new home on Redwood Road. 

Upon my graduation from high school, I went to work for a real estate and insurance 
comfxiny. I worked there until the end of December 1953, when I enrolled at Brigham 
Young University. This necessitated my leaving my two wonderful sisters, Marian and 
Helen whose companionship has meant much to me during my life 

Monday, December 7, 1954, while attending B.Y.U., I met my husband. Alma Davis 
Anderson. Our courtship ultimately resulted in our marriage on June 2, 1955 in the Salt 
Lake Temple. We lived in Provo, Utah, the following school year while my husband 
attended B.Y.U. studying pre-dentistry . 

June 9, 1956 our first child was born . She was a beautiful little daughter and words 
cannot describe the joy and happiness that we as her parents felt at this time. Her father 
gave hero name and blessing on July 8, 1956 — the name being Annette Anderson. 

September 21, 1956, we moved to Portland, Oregon where my husband entered the 
University of Oregon Dental School, the realization of a dream we had been waiting for. 
We lived at 9075 North Woolsey Court the entire duration of our schooling there. We had 
so many wonderful friends there and enjoyed so many wonderful times together. These ex- 
periences will be some of our very choicest in life, I am sure. There were four L.D.S. 
couples with whom we associated closely. 

I was extremely close to my Grandmother Brown, as close as any Grandmother and 
Granddaughter can be. In July of 1957 my Mother called me and said I had better come 
home and see Grandma if I wanted to see her alive, as she was extremely ill at this time, 
dying with cancer. I came to Utah and spent a couple of weeks here and visited her as 
much as possible. When I left to return to Portland it was very hard to go as I realized 
that this was probably the last time I would see my wonderful grandmother on this earth. 
She passed away the latter part of September, 1957. We were all grateful she had been 
relieved of her suffering, but even so it was pretty hard to accept the loss that was ours. 

It was during our sophomore year at the dental school In Oregon, February 3, 1958, 
that our second child made his entry into this world. Our baby was a little son and we 
were so thrilled and proud of him. Alma my husband, blessed and gave the name Alan 
Holmes Anderson to our son on March 2, 1958. 

Finally it was time for us to begin our third year at the dental school . The time was 
going by at an unbelievable rapid rate. We especially enjoyed this year of school because 
the fellows spent about half of their time in the clinic actually doing the work they had 
been studying the past two years. They didn't have very many studies at night and there 
wasn't the pressure that was felt the senior year which all made for a very enjoyable year. 
The students were In school from 8;00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. Monday through Friday and a 
half day on Saturday the entire four years of dental school at the University of Oregon . 

126 



March 31, 1959, our third child was born to us . She was another beautiful little daughter 
for which we were so thankful . In May 1959, A! blessed and gave the name Susan Kay 
Anderson to our baby daughter. She has always been such a pleasant and loving little 
sweetheart and we are so grateful for her. 

The fourth and final year of dental school passed by so quickly. Toward the end of the 
year there were so many parties given for the graduating seniors and their wives. I will 
never forget graduation day. The thrill I received as I watched my husband receive the 
degree of Doctor of Dental Medicine, a goal for which we had worked and prayed, can 
never really be expressed. The competition was keen and we were grateful we had been 
able to weather the storm. In January, 1960, we received word, very suddenly, that my 
beloved Grandfather Brown has passed away, suffering a heart attack. 

Moving back to Utah and leaving all our friends In Portland was much harder to do than 
'when we left Utah and moved to Oregon. We didn't realize how difficult an adjustment 
this could be. Yet it was so wonderful to be back home near our wonderful families again 
and to be able to bring up our children close to the center of the Church . 

Upon our return to Utah, we moved to Kearns which Is located about 12 miles west of 
Salt Lake City, where we had lived. My husband practiced dentistry there until May, 
1961, when we moved our home and office to Taylorsville, Utah. My parents built us a 
beautiful new dental clinic In Taylorsville for which we are so grateful to them. In time 
we hope to buy this from them and have a building of our own . We thank them for this 
opportunity in life they have given us. 

We would like to express our sincere appreciation to our wonderful parents who so 
unselfishly helped us complete dental school . Whenever we expressed a need they Immed- 
iately responded to it. The completion of the goal in life can in large part be attributed 
to our wonderful parents. Appreciation would not be complete without acknowledgment 
'Of my wonderful grandparents. Grandma Holmes, and Grandpa and Grandma Brown. Their 
lives of kindness, words of counsel and guidance have always been appreciated. 



On April 15, 1962, a fine son, Ronald Davis Anderson, was born, evening the score 
to two sons and two daughters. He was a handsome son and has been a great joy to us. 



I As the Taylorsville area grew, our practice grew by leaps and bounds. Certainly the 

blessings of the Lord were with us. We have always endeavored to serve the Lord and keep 
His commandments and the windows of Heaven have been opened unto us. And from one 
of these windows came a bit of heaven itself in the form of a new baby daughter who we 
named Janet Marie — born March 15, 1965. Certainly the Lord must love us to entrust us 
with these five wonderful children. We realize that our greatest responsibility and mission 
in life is to bring these precious Spirits back into His presence In cleanliness and purity. 
We pray daily for the courage, strength, wisdom, and intellect to accomplish this great task, 



127 



162 HAROLD DANIELS BROWN 



B 4 Nov. 1908 
Bapt 2 Aug. 1916 
End 21 Nov. 1929 
Md 6 Sept. 1933 

Father Almon Dell Daniels Brown 



Farr West, Weber, Utah 

Farr West, Weber, Utah 

Salt Lake Temple, Salt Lake, Utah 

Salt Lake Temple, Salt Lake, Utah 

Mother 38 Eva Francllda Geddes 



Wife ORETTA HANNAH CHUGG 



B 13 Oct. 1912 
End 6 Sept. 1933 
Sid 6 Sept. 1933 

Father Moroni Oiugg 



Farr West, Weber, Utah 

Salt Lake Temple, Salt Lake, Utah 

Salt Lake Temple, Salt Lake, Utah 

Mother Ida Taylor 



CHILDREN 



430 Janet Oretta Daniels Brown 
436 Reid Harold Daniels Brown 

447 Gordon Daniels Brown 

483 Ranae Ida Daniels Brown 

552 Roger C. Daniels Brown 
592 Craig Dell Daniels Brown 



B 19 July 1934, Ogden, Weber, Utah 
D 16 July 1935, Ogden, Weber, Utah 
B 30 Apr. 1936, Ogden, Weber, Utah 
Bapt 6 May 1944, Ogden, Weber, Utah 
Md to Evelyn Gertie Casper — Children — 
Nannette Casper and Arvin Casper. 
B 11 Feb. 1939, Ogden, Weber, Utah 
Bapt 29 Mar. 1947, Ogden, Weber, Utah 
Md to Vera Patricia Howes 
B 26 Apr. 1943, Ogden, Weber, Utah 
Bapt 5 May 1951, Ogden, Weber, Utah 
Md to Kirk L. Smith 
B 28 Feb. 1948, Ogden, Weber, Utah 
Bapt 31 Mar. 1956, Ogden, Weber, Utah 
B 22 Sept. 1950, Ogden, Weber, Utah 



162 HAROLD D. DANIELS BROWN 

I was born November 4, 1908, on the Tuesday night that mother and father had cast 
their vote for President Howard A. Taft of the United States. My father, Almon D. Brown, 
was the youngest son of Thomas Daniels Brown and Esther Wardle and was truly a wonderful 
father. I'm proud of this heritage. My mother, Eva F. Geddes Brown, bless her memory, 
was like most mothers, the best that God could give to man and I hope I shall always do as 
she taught. As a boy, I enjoyed her wonderful cooking especially the new bread and all 
the ooodies. 



128 



My boyhood days were pleasant memories. Riding to the brick yard in Harrisville before 
daylight, with father a hold of the lines, gave assurance to me that all was well . 

Time soon slipped by and I found myself in the first grade learning the three R's under 
the tutorship of Mrs. Bessie Purdy. My brother Almon and sister Thelma being older, took 
care of me during those first school days. You see, I was very small and quite often sick, 
but I came through the boyhood days in spite of several serious afflictions. My younger 
brother Geddes and I were pals. As a boy in school I remember someone coming and getting 
the Brown grandchildren — which took a large portion of our little school — to come to the 
bedside of Grandma Brown as she was dying. But being so young, I remember only a few 
events of her death and funeral, such as the beautiful white horses and glass coach. 

The experiences of the farm in the north end of Farr West are really to be cherished. 
The old two-room house, the shanty, and all the work we did by hand are memories of 50 
years ago . 

Geddes and I were playing in our front yard one morning on the bank of a ditch . 
Suddenly Geddes fell into the stream and all I could see were his tiny fingers. I ran back 
to the shanty where mother was washing and said "Geddes fell in the ditch." How con- 
cerned the folks were as they restored his life. Another interesting event soon took place 
at the A. D . Brown home when all of us children were rushed off to stay all night with 
Uncle Harry and Aunt Gloria Brown, and of course the next morning our sister Thelma was 
' proud to announce the birth of a little curly haired girl whom we named Leona often re- 
cited little Orphan Annie at the church parties, to the joy of her parents. By this time the 
World War I was becoming top news and the calling of the boys of our community to go 
serve Uncle Sam was now becoming a reality. We looked with envy upon those heroes of 
our town. Father sold our team to Uncle Sam and I remember how I wanted to go drive and 
feed them for I was afraid they would be unkind to our horses. However, Father assured 
me all would be well and with reluctance I bid goodby to my favorite horse, "Ned." 

' Many more interesting experiences were mine at Christmas and Thanksgiving. We 

always had a good Christmas. Somehow the folks were able to meet all their obligations 
and still provide their children with a few extras. 

In 1917 and 1918 the great flu epidemic took Its toll , but we got by without serious 
after-effects and were blessed by the Priesthood of our Father. 

In 1919 a likeable newcomer arrived at our house. We called him Clarence . By now 
we had built a large new brick home and were we ever proud. The war was over and all 
looked rosy. Life was made more interesting now by the addition of a new Model T Ford. 
No more walking and everyone was joining the parade. During these happy days my young- 
est brother Roland was born and of course we all babied him. Almon was now called on a 
mission to France and I finished my high school days at the new Weber County High School 
In 1926-27. After high school I tried Weber College for a year before being called by the 
church to fulfill a mission to the North Central States with headquarters in Minneapolis. 
The next two years 1929-31, of course were wonderful and I hope my children will have 
the same privilege . 



129 



Upon returning home in December of 1931, I entered Weber Qjllege trying to finish 
enough school to get a teaching certificate. This I did with great financial difficulty as 
the depression had now begun and the folks were unable to help. The years of 1932 and 
1933 came, but no contract and I struggled at every job possible, from the selling game to 
driving a truck in Wyoming for a construction company. During the winter of 1932 I found 
my future wife, Oretta Chugg. We dated at the church and civic affairs and found pleasures 
in our associations, even if I did receive a bad injury to my left shoulder, during a ball 
game. Oretta and I were married on September 6, 1933 in the Salt Lake Temple. Times 
were hard, but I received a contract to teach at the Roy school for $685.00 a year. In 
July of 1934 our elder child Janet was born. She met a tragic death a year later swallow- 
ing a navy bean which became lodged in the bronchial tube . At the time of her death, I 
was attending the U.S.A.C. I continued teaching In Roy, Taylor, West Weber, and Plain 
City until I received a B.S. degree In the summer of 1941, at which time I was transferred 
to Weber Caunty High School. I remained here for 18 years until 1960, when I was trans- 
ferred to the new Bonneville High In South Ogden as head of the Life Science Department. 

Our second child, Reid, was a welcome babe In 1936. He grew to manhood, fulfilled 
a mission to the Southern States and was graduated as a civil engineer from the U.S.U. In 
Logan, Utah in June 1961 . In June of 1959 he married the former Evelyn Casper of Idaho 
Falls. They now have a lovely daughter, Nannette and a son ArvIn . As usual grandparents 
really love their grandchildren — I being no exception. Reld will be awarded a Ph.D. from 
Purdue University in June of 1967. 

Gordon our third child was born February 11, 1939. He recently returned from an 
L.D.S. mission to the Eastern States. He, too, is planning for the future at the U.S.U. 
Gordon will be awarded an M.D. degree from U. of U. Medical School in June of 1967. 

Ranae our fourth arrival was a welcomed guest on April 26, 1943, and was one big 
reason why World War II left me at home. She has just completed high school and Is plan- 
ning a college career at Utah State University In Logan, Utah. Ranae graduated from 
U.S.U. In 1965 and Is teaching elementary school . She is married to Kirk L. Smith from 
Arimo, Idaho. 

Roger C, the fifth-born, February 28, 1948, is loved by us all. He had an extreme 
illness at the beginning, but seems full of vitality now. 

Craig Dell, our loveable baby boy. Is a joy to all. He came to town in September 
22, 1950, and as all babies received the love of all his family. My hope is that I'll be 
able to live to see the two little boys return from missions. 

In civic activities I have served my profession as president of the Utah Educational 
Association and delegate to National Educational Association Convention at Detroit as 
well as having served in local and state committees. I have served six years as a North 
Ogden City Councilman and ten years as planning commission member. 

My church activities have been varied and rich, and I enjoy each new assignment. 

Sketch written by Harold D. Daniels Brown 

130 



179 GEDDES DANIELS BROWN 



B 10 Jan. 1912 
Chr 3 Mar. 1912 
Bapt 4 July 1920 
Md 25 Nov . 1 933 
End 19 Dec 1934 

Father Almon Dell Daniels Brown 



Farr West, Weber, Utah 

Farr West, Weber, Utah 

Farr West, Weber, Utah 

Farmington, Davis, Utah 

Salt Lake Temple, Salt Lake, Utah 

Mother 38 Eva Franc i I do Geddes 



i| 



Wife KATHERINE FARR 



B 21 Feb. 1914 
Chr 29 Mar. 1914 
Bapt 6 Aug. 1922 
End 19 Dec. 1934 
Sid 19 Dec. 1934 

Father Archibald Poulter Farr 



Riverdale, Weber, Utah 
Riverdale, Weber, Utah 
Riverdale, Weber, Utah 
Salt Lake Temple, Salt Lake, Utah 
Salt Lake Temple, Salt Lake, Utah 

Mother Katherine Fife 



CHILDREN 



433 Marilyn Kay Daniels Brown 



476 Richard Lewis Daniels Brown 



624 Diane Daniels Brown 
665 Marie Daniels Brown 



B 8 Feb. 1934, Ogden, Weber, Utah 

Bapt. 6 Mar. 1943, Ogden, Weber, Utah 

End 21 Aug. 1956, Salt Lake Temple, S.L., Utah 

Md 21 Aug. 1956 to Vern Thomas Nielson 

Salt Lake Temple, Salt Lake, Utah 

Children — Nancy and Scott 

B 22 May 1942, Ogden, Weber, Utah 

Bapt 23 Sept. 1950, Ogden, Weber, Utah 

End 6 June 1956, Salt Lake Temple, S.L., Utah 

Sid 6 June 1956, Salt Lake Temple, S.L., Utah 

Md to Helga Karen Jones, 26 July 1964 

B 15 May 1952, Ogden, Weber, Utah 

Bapt 4 June 1960, Arlington, Arlington, Virginia 

B 15 July 1954, Ogden, Weber, Utah 

Bapt 4 Aug. 1962, Arlington, Arlington, Virginia 



131 



WAYNE HANSEN 



B. 2 Sept. 1913 
Bapt. 1 Oct. 1921 
End. 17 Sept. 1937 
Md. 17 Sept. 1937 

Father Heber J. Hansen 



Benjamin, Utah, Utah 
Benjamin, Utah, Utah 
Salt Lake Temple, Salt Lake, Utah 
Salt Lake Temple, Salt Lake, Utah 

Mother Margaret Davis 



Wife 192 LEONE ESTHER DANIELS BROWN 



B . 1 1 Al 


)g. 1915 


Bapt 


. 2 Sept. 


1922 


End. 


17 


Sept. 


1937 


Sid. 


17 


Sept. 


1937 



Father Almon Dell Daniels Brown 



Farr West, Weber, Utah 

Farr West, Weber, Utah 

Salt Lake Temple, Salt Lake, Utah 

Salt Lake Temple, Salt Lake, Utah 

Mother 38 Eva Francilda Geddes 



CHILDREN 



454 James Wayne Hansen 



485 Paul Brown Hansen 



503 Norma Hansen 



548 Fay Hansen 



B. 1 Mar. 1940, Hollister, San Benito, Californic 
Bapt. 3 Apr. 1948, Hollister, San Benito, 

California 
Md. 8 June 1963, St. George Temple, Wash- 
ington, Utah to Karen Lyon 
B. 30 May 1943, Hollister, San Benito, Californic 
Bapt. 30 June 1951, Hollister, San Benito, 

California 
Md. to Judy Horn, 17 Dec. 1965, Salt Lake Temp, 

Salt Lake, Utah 
B. 15 Oct. 1944, Modesto, Stanislaus, Californic 
D. 28 Oct. 1944, Modesto, Stanislaus, Californit 
B. 3 Oct. 1947, Modesto, Stanislaus, California 
Bapt. 8 Oct. 1955, Modesto, Stanislaus, Calif- 
ornia 



228 CLARENCE VERDUN DANIELS BROWN 



B. 5 Jan. 1919 
Chr. 2 Mar. 1919 
Bapt. 10 Apr. 1927 
End. 15 Feb. 1939 
Md. 4 June 1945 



Farr West, Weber, Utah 

Farr West, Weber, Utah 

Farr West, Weber, Utah 

Salt Lake Temple, Salt Lake, Utah 

Salt Lake Temple, Salt Lake, Utah 



132 



( 

I 



Father Almon Dell Daniels Brown 



Mother 38 Eva Francllda Geddes 



Wife ELAINE HANOCK 



B. 15 Aug. 1926 
Bapt. 2 Sept. 1934 
End. 4 June 1945 
SId, 4 June 1945 

Father Reuben Edgar Hanock 



West Weber, Weber, Utah 

West Weber, Weber, Utah 

Salt Lake Temple, Salt Lake, Utah 

Salt Lake Temple, Salt Lake, Utah 

Mother Mamila Favorite Taylor 



CHILDREN 



526 Ronald Dell Daniels Brown 

577 David Edgar Daniels Brown 
632 Susan Elaine Daniels Brown 



B. 2 June 1946, Ogden, Weber, Utah 
Bapt. 4 July 1954, Ogden, Weber, Utah 
B. 30 July 1949, Ogden, Weber, Utah 
B. 9 Jan. 1953, Ogden, Weber, Utah 



264 ROLAND WALTER DANIELS BROWN 



B. 15 Jan. 1924 
Chr. 2 Mar. 1924 
Bapt. 6 Mar. 1932 
End. 19 Nov. 1942 
Md 19 Nov 1942 

Father Almon Dell Daniels Brown 



Farr West, Weber, Utah 

Farr West, Weber, Utah 

Farr West, Weber, Utah 

Salt Lake Temple, Salt Lake, Utah 

Salt Lake Temple, Salt Lake, Utah 

Mother 38 Eva Francilda Geddes 



Wife FLORENCE LaVERNE CROWTHER 



B. 13 Jan. 1924 
Chr. 2 Mar. 1924 
Bapt. 7 Feb. 1932 
End. 19 Nov. 1942 
Sid. 19 Nov. 1942 

Father William Leslie Crowther 



Harrisville, Weber, Utah 
Harrisville, Weber, Utah 
Ogden, Weber, Utah 
Salt Lake Temple, Salt Lake, Utah 
Salt Lake Temple, Salt Lake, Utah 

Mother Laura LaVerne Taylor 



133 



CHILDREN 



"i 



I 



514 Karen Daniels Brown 

564 Alan Daniels Brown 
649 Lynn Daniels Brown 
Connie Daniels Brown 



B. 23 Apr. 1945, Ogden, Weber, Utah 
Bapt. 28 May 1953, Ogden, Weber, Utah 
B. 1 Oct. 1948, Ogden, Weber, Utah 
B. 12 Sept. 1953, Ogden, Weber, Utah 



42 JOHN LEROY GEDDES (known as Jack) 



B. 23 Jan. 1887 
Chr. 3 Feb. 1887 
Bapt. 19 Sept. 1895 
Md. 25 Sept, 1909 
End. 5 Oct. 1914 
D. 21 Feb. 1957 
Bur. 24 Feb. 1957 

Father 2 William Stewart Geddes 



Plain City, Weber, Utah 
Plain City, Weber, Utah 
Plain City, Weber, Utah 

Salt Lake Temple, Salt Lake, Utah 

Baker, Baker, Oregon 

Normal Hill Cem., Lewiston, Nez Perce, Idaho 

Mother Mary Ann Carver 



1st Wife DORA TAYLOR 



B. 12 July 1889 
Bapt. 25 Aug. 1897 
End. 5 Oct, 1914 
Sid. 5 Oct, 1914 
D. 24 June 1953 
Bur. 26 June 1953 

Father Luman Green Taylor 



Clifton, Oneida, Idaho 
Clifton, Oneida, Idaho 
Salt Lake Temple, Salt Lake, Utah 
Salt Lake Temple, Salt Lake, Utah 
Lewiston, Nez Perce, Idaho 
Lewiston, Nez Perce, Idaho 

Mother Louisa Howell 



CHILDREN 



173 Merlin LeRoy Geddes 
195 Maurice Carver Geddes 



B. 9 July 1910, Baker, Baker, Oregon 
Bapt. 4 Aug. 1918, Baker, Baker, Oregon 
B. 25 June 1915, Baker, Baker, Oregon 
Bapt. July 1923, Baker, Baker, Oregon 



2nd Wife PAULINE GOSSET 



134 



1 1 



42 JOHN LEROY GEDDES 



John LeRoy Geddes was born 23 Jan. 1887 at Plain City, Weber, Utah, the fifth child 
of William Geddes and Mary Ann Carver. Since his father died when the children were 
very young, they would go to aunts and uncles in the summer to help on their farms. Uncle 
Jack was sent to his Uncle Bert and Hyrum Carver's farms at Huntsville, but because he 
was not too strong as a boy it was difficult for him to do such work. 

He was very close to his mother, partly because of his health and in a large measure 
because of his sweet and thoughtful concern for his mother. His schooling consisted 
only of that required by his mother. 

He married Dora Taylor 13 Nov. 1908, but it was not until 5 Oct. 1913, that they 
were sealed In the Salt Lake Temple for time and eternity as a family; he had his two 
children sealed to them. 

He came to Austin, Oregon in 1916 to work in the Oregon Lumber Co. In 1917 he 
went to Bates, Oregon, as sawyer and mill superintendent for the Oregon Lumber Co. 
owned by the David Eccles family. 

He came to Winchester In 1923 as mill superintendent for Craig Mountain Lumber 
Company along with my father, William Carver Geddes. Uncle Jack stayed on with the 
Craig Mountain Lumber Co., after Dad left and went to Lewlston. In 1952 he joined 
Smith Nielson Lumber Co. as foreman In Spaulding, Idaho. In 1953 he joined the 
Riggins Saw Mill as foreman, at Riggins, Idaho. In 1954-1957 he joined the Halfway 
Oregon Saw Mill as foreman at Halfway, Oregon. 

As long as I can remember Uncle Jack was always there to help, guide, and love 
all of us as well as his own family. We knew that he could fix anything from a cut finger 
to a broken heart. In fact. Uncle Jack and Aunt Dora were like a second set of parents; 
when our own mother and father had to leave, they with their sons. Merlin and Maurice, 
would come to our home and stay, so we have been close to them and still love the boys 
as brothers. Even now when we can get together we have such a wonderful time. 

To sum up Uncle Jack's life, I think the axiom: "There is a destiny that makes us 
brothers, none goes his way alone; all that we put into the lives of others, comes back into 
our own" — would apply to Uncle Jack . He put so much Into the lives of so many. So 
much could be said of Uncle Jack because he was so thoughtful and kind to all . He was 
also so capable; I do believe he could have done anything. All who knew him loved him 
dearly. 

Sketch written by Zola Stellmon 



135 



173 MERLIN LeROY GEDDES 



B. 9 July 1910 
Bapt. 4 Aug. 1918 
Md. 31 Oct. 1931 

Father 42 John LeRoy Geddes 



Baker, Baker, Oregon 
Baker, Baker, Oregon 
Lewiston, Nez Perce, Idaho 

Mother Dora Taylor 



Wife HILMA McMURRAY 



Father Monte Judson McMurray 



Mother Rose Iva Agee 



NO CHILDREN 



173 MERLIN LeROY GEDDES 



A short outline concerning my self. Merlin LeRoy Geddes. I was the oldest child of 
John LeRoy Geddes (known as Jack ) and Dora Taylor, born 9 July 1910 at Baker, Oregon, 
I was given a name and a blessing by my father. I was baptized in the L.D.S. Church, 
4 Aug, 1918 at Baker, Oregon. I attended the grade schools at Baker, graduated from 
Winchester High School, attended the Lewiston State Normal then the University of Idaho. 
At present my brother Maurice and I have a dry cleaning establishment in Lewiston, where 
I am acting as manager, I also operate a ranch in the Blue Mountains of Oregon. I 
love to play golf, hunt, and fish. 



195 MAURICE CARVER GEDDES 



B. 25 June 1915 
Bapt. 25 July 1923 
Md. 31 Mar. 1940 

Father 42 John LeRoy Geddes 



Baker, Baker, Oregon 
Baker, Baker, Oregon 
Winchester, Lewis, Idaho 

Mother Dora Taylor 



Wife MARJORIE JAN HUNTER 



B. 23 Mar. 
Chr. 



1920 
1937 



Prairie City, Grant, Oregon 
Marks Espiscopal Church at Tacoma, Pierce Co. 
Washington 



136 



Father Joseph Claire Hunter 



Mother Avis Grace McHaley 



CHILDREN 



868 Norman Del Geddes 

869 Kaye Lynne Geddes 

870 David Hunter Geddes 



B 13 Feb. 1941, Winchester, Lewis, Idaho 
B 22 Oct. 1942, Seattle, King, Washington 
B 13 Sept. 1944, Seattle, King, Washington 



195 MAURICE CARVER GEDDES 



Maurice Carver Geddes was born 25 June 1915 at Baker, Oregon. He lived in Oregon 
until 1923 when he moved with his parents and brother Merlin to Winchester, Idaho. He 
went through high school in Winchester, then worked in the lumber mill . He married 
Marjorie Jan Hunter 31 March 1940. Their son, Norman Del was born 13 Feb. 1941 . 

In October of 1941 Maurice moved his family to Seattle, Washington to attend school . 
When war was declared In December of 1941; he was employed by the Todd Pacific Ship- 
building Corporation in Seattle as welder leadman. Their daughter Kaye Lynne was born 
October 22, 1942 and a son, David Hunter, was born September 13, 1944. 

After the war in 1945, Maurice worked for the Railway Express Agency and moved 
his family to Milton, Washington. 

In 1950 he moved his family to a small ranch in Eastern Oregon until 1954 when they 
moved to Pullman, Washington. Here they owned two small businesses. Here he built 
their present home . They sold one business in 1958 and the other in 1961 . In 1958 
Maurice went to work at Washington State University for Central Stores and is still em- 
ployed there in the chemical supplies department. 



868 NORMAN DEL GEDDES 



B 13 Feb. 1941 
Bapt 1956 

Md 27 Apr. 1962 

Father Maurice Carver Geddes 



Winchester, Lewis, Idaho 
Moscow, Latah, Idaho 
Moscow, Latah, Idaho 

Mother Marjorie Jan Hunter 



137 



wife VIVIAN BONITA DICKAMORE 



B 27 Nov. 1941 
Chr 30 Sept. 1956 

Father Donald Davis Dickamore 



Lewiston, Nez Perce, Idaho 

First Baptist Church, Lewiston, Nez Perce, Idah 

Mother Neva Belle Nichols 



CHILDREN 



Brian Barton Geddes 



B 17 Oct. 1962, Moscow, Latah, Idaho 



HAROLD RAYMOND JACOBS 



B 17 Dec. 1942 
Chr 10 Jan. 1943 
Md 8 July 1961 

Father Harold Raymond Jacobs 



Colfax, Whitman, Oregon 

St. Boniface, Unlontown, Whitman, Oregon 

Seattle, King, Washington 

Mother Agnes Cecelia Walker 



Wife 869 KAYE LYNNE GEDDES 



B 22 Oct. 1942 
Chr Nov. 1942 

Father Maurice Carver Geddes 



Seattle, King, Washington 
Seattle, King, Washington 

Mother Marjorle Jan Hunter 



CHILDREN 



Bradley Scott Jacobs 
David Del Jacobs 



B 16 Apr. 1962, Moscow, Latah, Idaho 
B 3 Sept. 1964, Moscow, Latah, Idaho 



138 



48 GEORGE HYRUM GEDDES 



B. 30 Jan. 1889 
Chr. Feb. 1889 
Bapt. 2 Sept. 1897 
Md. 13 Nov. 1908 
End. Sept . 1910 
D. 18 Dec. 1958 

Father 2 William Stewart Geddes 



Plain City, Weber, Utah 

Plain City, Weber, Utah 

Plain City, Weber, Utah 

Vale, Malheur, Oregon 

Salt Lake Temple, Salt Lake, Utah 

Boise, Ada, I daho 

Mother Mary Ann Carver 



Wife EDITH MYRTLE BARKER 



B. 26 Oct. 1891 
Chr. 4 Feb. 1892 
Bapt. 5 May 1900 
End. Sept. 1910 
Sid. Sept. 1910 
D. 15 Dec, 1953 

Father James Cicero Barker 



Salt Lake City, Salt Lake, Utah 
Riverdale, Weber, Utah 
Riverdale, Weber, Utah 
Salt Lake Temple, Salt Lake, Utah 
Salt Lake Temple, Salt Lake, Utah 
Boise, Ada, I daho 

Mother Edith Josephine Thomason 



CHILDREN 



167 Elsie Margaret Geddes 

181 Shirley George Geddes 
223 Mary Josephine Geddes 



B. 9 Sept. 1909, Weiser, Washington, Idaho 
Bapt. 9 Sept. 1917, Weiser, Washington, Idaho 
Sid. to parents Sept. 1910 
B. 8 Feb. 1912, Weiser, Washington, Idaho 
D. 4 June 1912, Weiser, Washington, Idaho 
B. 2 May 1918, Weiser, Washington, Idaho 



48 GEORGE HYRUM GEDDES 



George Hyrum Geddes, son of William Stewart Geddes and Mary Ann Carver, was 
born in Plain City, Utah, 30 Jan. 1889. He died In Boise, Idaho in 18 December, 1958. 
He married Edith Myrtle Barker, 13 November 1908, at Vale, Oregon, who preceded him 
in death in Boise, Idaho, 15 December 1953. 

George attended school in Plain City, Utah and also at the Intermountain Institute 
in Weiser, Idaho. 

At the age of 17 he went to Baker, Oregon, to work for a lumber company. After 
several months he moved to Weiser, Idaho, where he lived until July 1928 when he and 
his family moved to Boise, Idaho. 

139 



George H. Geddes was very active In the organization of the L.D.S. church in 
Welser, Idaho. Weiser was a part of the Northwestern Mission District and the first 
meeting to organize a branch church was held 17 May 1908, with approximately 35 mem- 
bers of the church In attendance. He was Sunday School Superintendent for many years 
in Weiser and held a similar position in the Boise First Word church, 

George H. Geddes had three children: Elsie Margaret, Shirley George, and 
Mary Josephine. 



167 ELSIE MARGARET GEDDES 



Elsie Margaret Geddes was born in Weiser, Idaho, the daugher of George H. and Edith 
Myrtle Barker Geddes, grandaughter of William Stewart Geddes and Mary Ann Carver. 

She attended grade school and high school In Weiser, Idaho. She was a graduate of 
the University of Washington, Seattle, Washington, and has master's degree in Special 
Education from San Francisco State College, San Francisco, California. 

Elsie Is a teacher in the Boise Public Schools. For several years she worked with 
the mentally retarded children and then did speech therapy work and hearing tests for the 
schools in Boise. She started a program of educating the blind and partially seeing childrer 
In the regular public schools. At the present time she works with children in thie visually 
handicapped program, those with speech problems and is a consultant for all children with 
a physical handicap. 

She worked for one year for the bureau of ships in Washington, D. C, and one year 
at the Washington State Cerebral Palsy Center, Seattle, Washington. She taught two 
summers at the University of Idaho, Moscow, Idaho, and San Francisco State College, 
San Francisco, California. 



181 SHIRLEY GEORGE GEDDES 



Shirley George Geddes, son of George Hyrum and Edith Myrtle Barker Geddes, 
grandson of William Stewart Geddes and Mary Ann Carver was born 8 February 1912, 
Weiser, Idaho. 

Shirley George was blessed by Missionary J . W. Bright, 11 February 1912. 

Shirley George died 4 June 1912 at Weiser, Idaho. Services were held in Weiser, 
5 June 1912 with burial in Plain City, Utah. 



140 



FREEMAN HASCAL ESTES 



B. 5 Aug. 1918 
Md. 1 June 1944 

Father Raymond Stanley Estes 



Homedale, Owyhee, Idaho 
Pueblo, Pueblo, Colorado 

Mother Mary Emmellne Johnston 



Wife 223 MARY JOSEPHINE GEDDES 



B. 2 May 1918 
Chr. 1 June 1918 
Bapt. 3 July 1927 

Father 48 George Hyrum Geddes 



Weiser, Washington, Idaho 

Weiser, Washington, Idaho 

Weiser, Washington, Idaho 

Mother Edith Myrtle Barker 



521 Margaret Leile Estes 



CHILDREN 

B. 10 Jan. 1946, Boise, Ada, Idaho 



223 MARY JOSEPHINE GEDDES 



Mary Josephine Estes was born in Weiser, Idaho, the daughter of George Hyrum and 
Edith Myrtle Barker Geddes,granddaughter of William Stewart Geddes and Mary Ann 
Carver , 

She went to school in Weiser and Boise, Idaho. She attended Boise Junior College 
and the Utah State University at Logan, Utah. 

During the war she worked for the American Red Cross at Gowen Field, Boise, Idaho. 
She also attended a Red Cross training school in Washington, D. C. 

She married Freeman Hascal Estes 1 June 1944 at Pueblo, Colorado. They have one 
doughter, Margaret Leile Estes. 

Mary Josephine and her husband have their own business called the E. H. Estes 
Industrial Insulation Company, Boise, Idaho 



141 



521 MARGARET LEILE ESTES 



Margaret Leile Estes was born 10 January 1946 at Boise, Idaho, daughter of Mary 
Josephine Geddes and Freeman H . Estes, granddaughter of George Hyrum Geddes and Edith 
Myrtle Barker, great-granddaughter of William Stewart Geddes and Mary Ann Carver. 

Margaret Leile Estes was blessed and named 4 August 1946 by her grandfather, George 
Hyrum Geddes in the firstwardof the L.D.S. church at Boise, Idaho. 



58 WALTER SHERIDAN GEDDES 



B. 10 Apr. 1892 
Bapt. 1 July 1900 
Md. 23 Dec. 1914 
End. 23 Dec. 1914 
D. 30 June 1921 
Bur. 3 July 1921 

Father 2 William Stewart Geddes 



Plain City, Weber, Utah 

Plain Cty, Weber, Utah 

Salt Lake Temple, Salt Lake, Utah 

Salt Lake Temple, Salt Lake, Utah 

Plain City, Weber, Utah 

City Cem., Plain City, Weber, Utah 

Mother Mary Ann Carver 



Wife ANNIE KNIGHT 



B. 22 Jan. 1895 
Bapt. 7 June 1903 
End. 23 Dec. 1914 
Sid. 23 Dec. 1914 

Father Joseph Knight 



Plain City, Weber, Utah 

Plain Gty, Weber, Utah 

Salt Lake Temple, Salt Lake, Utah 

Salt Lake Temple, Salt Lake, Utah 

Mother Julia Frances Wayment 



CHILDREN 



202 Selma Geddes 
232 Leah Geddes 



B. 4 Dec. 1915, Plain Cty, Weber, Utah 
B. 30 Aug. 1919, Plain City, Weber, Utah 



58 WALTER SHERIDAN GEDDES 



On April 10, 1892, a son was born to Mary Ann Carver Geddes and the late William 
Stewart Geddes. He was named Walter Sheridan Geddes. Born with an extremely bad 
heart condition, it was expected that he wouldn't live out of babyhood, yet he lived to 
be 29 years of age. 



142 



On December 23, 1914, he was married to Annie Knight in the Salt Lake Temple. 
Two daughters came to bless their home. 

Although he was constantly hampered by ill health, he was a gentle and devoted son, 
husband, and father. He loved the church and served in the presidency of the Elder's 
Quorum, first counselor in the Plain City Ward Sunday School, and a ward teacher. 

He was serving as secretary-treasurer for the Plain City Baseball at the time of his 
death . 

He was also local manager of the Utah-Oregon Lumber Company in Plain City, 

He died on June 30, 1921, in Plain City and was laid to rest in the Plain City 
Cemetery on July 3, 1921 . 

He brought joy to a home filled with grief and discouragement due to his father's 
recent death. He faced ill health with courage and fortitude. He was loved by family, 
friends, and neighbors; his mother once said he was one of the few who was ready to 
meet his Maker when the time came to do so. 



ANNIE KNIGHT GEDDES 



On December 23, 1914, Annie Knight became the wife of Walter Sheridan Geddes. 
She was the daughter of Joseph Knight and Julia Wayment Knight. She had been born 
in Plain City on January 22, 1895. 

This year, 1964, she will have been married for fity years. Out of these fifty 
years she has spent 44 years as a widow, forced to rear her two young daughters alone 
due to the early death of her husband. 

Besides making a living and a comfortable home for her family she has managed to be 
active in the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. She has served as president 
of the Religion Class, secretary and teacher in the Sunday School, officer in the M.I. A. 
organization, member of the ward choir. Relief Society teacher, and officer in the 
Daughters of Pioneers Organization. 

She managed the Utah Oregon Lumber Yard after the death of her husband; clerked 
for John Maw's Store, worked for the U. S. Government at Hill Air Force Base, and 
helped Dr. Joseph Geddes with some research work for the Utah State University in Logan, 

Her life has been filled with love and devotion for her family and her Father in 
Heaven . 



143 



CHARLES RENDER SUMMERS 



B. 9 Oct. 1910 
Bapt. 25 June 1920 
Md. 17 Aug. 1939 
End. 16 Aug. 1939 

Father George Wallace Summers 



Clinton, Davis, Utah 

Clinton, Davis, Utah 

Salt Lake Temple, Salt Lake, Utah 

Salt Lake Temple, Salt Lake, Utah 

Mother Dina Fuit 



Wife 202 SELMA GEDDES 



B. 4 Dec. 1915 
Bapt. 3 Aug. 1924 
End, 16 Aug. 1939 
Sid. 16 Aug. 1939 



Plain City, Weber, Utah 

Plain City, Weber, Utah 

Salt Lake Temple, Salt Lake, Utah 

Salt Lake Temple, Salt Lake, Utah 



CHILDREN 



471 Charles Geddes Summers 



557 Marilyn Summers 



B. 24 Dec. 1941, Ogden, Weber, Utah 
Bapt. 6 Mar. 1950, Ogden, Weber, Utah 
B. 17 May 1948, Ogden, Weber, Utah 



202 SELMA GEDDES SUMMERS 



Selma Geddes Summers was born Dec. 4, 1915, a daughter of Walter Sheridan and 
Annie Knight Geddes. 

Her early life was spent in Plain City where she was active in the L .D .S . Church . 
As a young person, she was active as a teacher in M.I.A. and Sunday School organizations 
She graduated from Weber High School, Weber Seminary, and Weber College. After her 
graduation, she taught school in Weber County until her marriage. 

On August 16, 1939, she was married to Charles Render Summers in the Salt Lake 
Temple. Charles Render Summers is the son of George Walter and Dina Fuit Summers. 

They are the parents of two lovely children, a son Charles Geddes Summers and a 
daughter Marilyn Summers. 

Charles, 22, Is a recent graduate of Utah State University where he graduated with 
honors. He is a member of Phi Kappa Phl Fraternity and is currently doing graduate work 
at the Logan University. 

144 



L 



Marilyn, 16, is a junior at Clearfield High School where she also is an honor student 
and active in extra curricular activities. She is also an accomplished ballet dancer. 

Selma has remained active in the church and community affairs having served as 
teacher in Sunday School , M. I .A. , and Primary, and Relief Society. She has been a 
stake board v^^orker in M.I.A. and has been especially active in P.T.A. and local school 
organizations. 



1st Husband ROBERT SIMPSON BLAKELY 



Md. 31 July 1942 
End. 31 July 1942 



Logan Temple, Cache, Utah 
Logan Temple, Cache, Utah 



Wife 232 LEAH GEDDES 



B. 30 Aug. 1919 
End. 31 July 1942 
Sid. 31 July 1942 



Plain City, Weber, Utah 
Logan Temple, Cache, Utah 
Logan Temple, Cache, Utah 



Father 58 Walter Sheridan Geddes 



Moth 



er 



Annie Knight 



NO CHILDREN 



2nd Husband RICHARD HAYNES 



B. 26 Aug. 1918 
Chr. 1 Jan. 1919 
Bapt, 7 Nov. 1926 
Md. 1 Mar. 1946 
End. 1 Mar. 1946 

Father Harry Raymond Haynes 



Ogden, Weber, Utah 
Ogden, Weber, Utah 
Ogden, Weber, Utah 
Logan Temple, Logan, Utah 
Logan Temple, Logan, Utah 

Mother Pearl Drake 



2nd Wife 232 LEAH GEDDES 



B. 30 Aug. 1919 
Chr. 2 Nov. 1919 
Bapt. 31 July 1942 
End. 31 July 1942 



Plain City, Weber, Utah 
Plain City, Weber, Utah 
Plain City, Weber, Utah 
Logan Temple, Logan, Utah 
Do not seal 



145 



Father 58 Walter Sheridan Geddes 



Mother Annie Knight 



536 Kay Haynes 

572 Glenna Haynes 
615 Deborah Ann Haynes 



CHILDREN 



B. 19 Feb. 1947, Ogden, Weber, Utah 
Bapt. 27 Mar. 1955, Ogden, Weber, Utah 
B. 8 Apr. 1949, Ogden, Weber, Utah 
B. 27 Jan. 1952, Provo, Utah, Utah 



« 



232 LEAH GEDDES 



Leah Geddes was born in Plain City, Utah on August 30, 1919, daughter of Walter 
S. and Annie K. Geddes. I spent my early life in Plain City with my interests and 
activities centered mainly around the L.D.S. Church . I was assistant Sunday School 
organist at the age of 12, working on from there as organist in the Sunday School, Mutual, 
Relief Society, stake Sunday School and as stoke organist of the North Weber Stake. 

I graduated from Weber County High School and L.D.S. Seminary in 1937 and from 
Weber College in 1939. I worked for the County Agriculture agent where I met Robert S. 
Blakeley whom I married on July 31, 1942. We were married in the Logan L.D.S. Temple. 
Bob wasafirst Lieutenant in the Air Force. He was a fighter pilot and was killed in action 
over the Mediterranean Sea on April 18, 1943. 

During the war years I worked at Hill Air Force Base, Ogden, Utah . I married J 

Glen R. Haynes on March 1, 1946 in the Logan L.D.S. Temple. We lived in Ogden ' 

where Glen completed his X-ray training, then moved to Orem, Utah, where he was chief 
X-ray technician at the Utah Valley Hospital in Provo, Utah, and I worked for Dr. Nephi 
K. Kezenan. In 1959 we moved to Carmichoel, California. Glen is chief X-ray technician 
tor the Sacramento Radiology Group at Mercy Hospital in Sacramento and I work for the 
same group at one of their outlying offices as receptionist. 

We are both active in the L.D.S. Church, having both worked in the word Sunday 
School , stake Sunday School , and Mutual . Glen is now secretary of the Elders Quorum 
and I am word and choir organist. 



She 



is now a senfo n I ^ "^u-tV'u .^"^ ^°^ ^^''^ ^eb . 19, 1947 in Ogden, Utah . S 

accomplished pianis^t o'tTr.^i^^^"^°°' °."^ ° ^'°^'''"' of L.D.S. Seminary. She is an 
accomplished pianist, at present being assistant word organist. She is also an accomplished 

swimmer, having participated in the high schools "Sea Gals" aquacade show for the past 

three years. Glenna was born April 8, 1949 in Ogden, Utah, is now a sophomore and is 

a o an accomplished pianist at present being assistant Sunday School pianTst. She is 

also a -e-ber of the high school's "Sea Gals" and swam in the aquacade show this spring. 

Deborah Ann (Debbie) was born Jan 27 19'i9 m Pr«w^ i i* u cl • • .l -,.l j j 
„i „ I .. • . ' ^^ '" f^rovo, Utah. She is in the 7th grade and 

also plays the piano, swims and is active in girls softball . 



146 



2 WILLIAM STEWART GEDDES 



5 April 1856 
Ippt, 17 Apr. 1865 
Ud. 26 June 1876 
l-^d. 4 Dec. 1884 

). 22 Aug. 1891 

ur. 26 Aug. 1891 

,- other 1 William Geddes 



Salt Lake City, Salt Lake, Utah 
Plain City, Weber, Utah 
Salt Lake Temple, Salt Lake, Utah 
Logan Temple, Cache, Utah 
Hood River, Hood River, Oregon 
Plain City, Weber, Utah 



Mother 



Elizabeth Stewart 



2nd Wife MARGARET FERGUSON CULLEN 



23 March 1865 
(apt. 14 March 1881 
End. 4 Dec. 1884 
JId. 4 Dec. 1884 
D. 6 Nov. 1954 
Jur. 8 Nov. 1954 

'other James Cullen 



Glosgov/, Lanarkshire, Scotland 
Glasgov/, Lanarkshire, Scotland 
Logan Temple, Cache, Utah 
Logan Temple, Cache, Utah 
Preston, Franklin, Idaho 
Salt Lake City, Salt Lake, Utah 

Mother Elizabeth Hart 



CHILDREN 



39 Stewart Thomas Geddes 

44 Margaret Elizabeth Geddes 

52 Flora Edna Geddes 

55 Williameno Martha Geddes 



B. 17 Aug. 1885, Salt Lake City, Salt Lake, Utoh 
D. Jan. 1889, Salt Lake, Salt Lake, Utah 
B. 24 July 1887, North Powder, Union, Oregon 
B. 20 Sept. 1889, North Powder, Union, Oregon 
B. 15 Jon. 1892, Plain City, Weber, Utah 



MARGARET FERGUSON CULLEN GEDDES ECCLES 



In the year of 1864, my mother and father were married. Mother was Elizabeth Hart, 
father was James Cullen both of Glasgow, Scotland. I, their eldest child was born to 
them 23 March 1865, 

On 1 April 1867, my mother gave birth to twin babies, o boy named James and a 
girl named Sarah, after her mother. I hod been named Margaret after Mother's mother. 
My brother James died of congestion of the lungs when he was 14 months of age, in 1869. 

We hod a confectioners shop and I can still remember the joy my sister Sarah and I 



147 



experienced when looking In at the beautifully arranged sweetmeats In the window. The 
wide-mouthed bottles with their brass lids and bright colored candles were also a source 
of pleasure to us. One evening, my sister Sarah and I were engaged in this pleasant pastime 
when a man came along and stole a large bunch of children's jumping ropes which father 
had placed at the door for sale. I remember dashing into the store and saying, "Father, 
a man stole the jumping ropes and ran through the entrance into a building." Father ran 
and overtook him and came back with the jumping ropes. 

In 1869 or 70 another little sister came to us, but Mother died after her birth , Father 
took us three and our maid, whom we loved, and went to the home of his mother. We 
lived with Grandmother Cullen for a long time. The moid stayed and took care of Sarah 
and me, while Grandmother Cullen attended to the baby sister who was named Elizabeth 
for my mother. We were very happy at Grandmother Cull en's. 

Our room was very beautiful and the fire was always kept burning. Sarah and I always 
ate alone in our beautiful room; the maid attended us but ate in the kitchen. After two 
or three years my father became very ill and I can remember the maid taking us to the 
hospital to see him. Soon after this he went to Ireland to recuperate but he died there. 
My sister Sarah and I then went to live at Grandmother Hart's house, but we were so noisy 
that she persuaded Grandmother Cullen to take Sarah and she would keep me, as Sarah hod 
been named for Grandmother Cullen and I for Grandmother Hart. So we were reared apart. 
Little Lizzie, as I remember her, was a beautiful child of two when she died of whooping 
cough . 

I was very happy with my grandmother and an Aunt Katherine, who was years older 
than I. When I was about ten years old. Aunt Katy left Glasgow to join my Aunt Flora 
and her husband in Brooklyn, New York, 

I always attended a private school and I took a church singing class. I was very happy 
OS Grandmother's maids were always good to me, doing my hair and my boots and attending 
to my clothes when I retired. When I was 14, we had word from America that my Aunt 
Flora and Uncle David were coming home to Glasgow. 

I never remember seeing them till they come and lived with us. She, Aunt Flora, 
was my mother's sister and they were Mormons or Latter-day Saints. Aunt Flora asked 
Grandmother if she would let me go to the Mormon meetings with her. Grandmother con- 
sented. We were (my grandparents and I) members of the congregational church. I was 
curious to learn about the Mormons, I was rather disappointed when I got to where they 
met. The hall and floors were bare and most of the people were very poorly dressed. 
They were saving money for their immigration and when the speakers addressed the Saints, 
it seemed like all theysaid was that Joseph Smith was a true Prophet of God and the Book 
of Mormon was true. I couldn't understand why they didn't preach from the Bible, but I 
continued to go and investigate for almost two years. I felt that Joseph Smith was a 
Prophet and that whenever the Lord had a people on the earth in bygone days that he also 
had a Prophet to show them the way and lead them to life eternal . 

A few days before my sixteenth birthday I applied for baptism. I asked my Grand- 
mother's permission. She gave it to me, but told me not to tell her the time that I was 
going to be baptized as she feared my grandfather might not give his consent. 

148 



I asked Brother Alexander Burt to baptize me. I did not dare take any extra clothing, 
so I was baptized in the River Clyde in Glasgow, Scotland, on a Wednesday evening in 
my underwear and petticoat. The river at the edges was icy, but I put my dry clothes over 
my wet ones and went home . My folks were all in bed so I sat by the fireside a while, took 
off my wet clothing, hung them up and dressed for bed. As usual the maid had left my 
hot drink on the hob, so I drank it and retired. I was very happy as a member of the 
L.D.S. Church. 

I was a member of the Relief Society choir whose membership was Emma May, Eliz- 
abeth Hamilton, Mrs. Chesney, Mrs. Bain, Nellie Grey, Francilda Burnside Hunter, 
Maggie Burnside Miller, Jean Wilson, Maggie Cullen Geddes, Maggie Bueamon, and Jeanie 
, Lewith. 

I I enjoyed tracting although I was threatened many times if I went back again. I 

would go back anyway to get the little booklet I had left and ask them to take another. 
I enjoyed walking four and five miles to hold open air meetings; usually there were four 
girls that would go to help sing, so as to gather the crowd. After three years, when I 
was 19 years old, I immigrated to Utah. 

I arrived in Salt Lake City, 1 June 1884. I lived in Salt Lake City with my Aunt. 
I belonged to the 18th ward. Aunt Margaret Young was a dear friend to me. She 
invited me to have lunch with her every Wednesday afternoon at the Lion House and she 
introduced me to a number of her friends. I had a very enjoyable summer and when I 
went to the Logan Temple to marry Wm. S. Geddes, Aunt Margaret chaperoned me. 
I was married 4 Dec. 1884 by Apostle Merrill . i was 19 years and 8 months old. 

Before arriving in the country, I had learned to be a brocader of the Silk, Weavers 
Guild. So in the summer of 1885, several brethren visited me to procure my services to 
weave a cut of brocaded satin on the Jacquard or power loom. As a cut is usually 60 yards 
of silk and I was an expectant mother, I refused, but Brother Musser came to see me and 
told me that the church was anxious to have me do the weaving; there was no one else that 
they knew who could manipulate the power loom but me. He told me I could name my 
own price, but I told him if I did the weaving, I would rather have a dress piece than 
money. So the next morning I went to see the loom and started to work. The silk mill 
was located on Canyon Road and was managed by a Mr. Chambers. 

The Jacquard loom is a loom for fancy weaving. It has a chain of perforated cards 
passing over a rotating prism. The perforations permit the passage of wires that determine 
the raising of the threads and thus cause the figures to be woven as pre-arranged by the 
cards, when the piece or cut was finished. The loom was run by water power, the 
water coming from the city creek. The silk was of excellent quality and black in color; 
the pattern used was that of the thistle and rose. There was enough yardage to furnish 
material for six dress patterns;when the bolt of silk was finished, it was put on exhibition 
in one of the windows of Z.C.M.I. "Mrs. Geddes, as requested, received one dress 
length of the silk and it was given to her. One dress pattern was sent to Mrs. Grover 
Cleveland, wife of the President of the United States, a sister of President John Taylor 
also had a dress length. Miss Taylor and Mrs, Geddes wore dresses made from this silk 
at the wedding festival of Moses Taylor and Sarah Campbell which was celebrated at the 

149 



Garden House. Taken from Tales of a Triumphant People, page 221 . The brocaded satin 
made me two waists and a skirt, which came in very handy after my son was born . 

As I was a plural wife, I lived for a short time In Salt Lake City, then In the Granite 
Ward, Preston, Clarkston, and then In 1887 I joined my husband In North Powder, Oregon. 
Both Margaret and Edna were born there. I lived in North Powder until the later part of 
June 1891 when I came back to Utah. 

I enjoyed living in Oregon as we had no trouble with the law. I sang the solos for 
the Methodist's and the Baptist's Churches. We also took part In their theatricals as there 
wasn't any branch of our own church. My husband died August 22, 1891. I was visiting 
In Salt Lake City. My daughter, Winnie, was born 15 January 1892 in Plain City, Utah. 
I lived in Plain City for several years. 

While I lived in Plain City, I was a member and chorister of the Relief Society of 
Tarmers Ward, Buron Ward, and the LaGrand ward. I was chorister of the LaGrand 
Daughters of Utah Pioneers and the Yule D.U.P. Now I am chaplin of the Yalecrest 
D.U.P. The Yale and Yalecrest D.U.P. camps selected me to pose for the marker of the 
camp as I represented the silk weaving. Avard Fairbanks, the sculptor, erected the marker 
which stands In the grounds of the Yalecrest chapel . 

I have enjoyed my life in Salt Lake City as it enabled me to attend the concerts of the 
Symphony Orchestra, the civic music, to take classes at the Lion House and to do many 
other things. My children and grandchildren and great grandchildren hove just celebrated 
my 80th birthday in Preston, Idaho, with a family dinner and party. One of my grand- 
daughters also gave me a party In celebration of my being up there. I have three daughters, 
one son, twenty grandchildren and fifteen great grandchildren at this time. The Lord has 
been very merciful to me and I thank Him for his loving kindnesses to me. 

I have had three wonderful trips to Europe. I visited ten countries in Europe and then 
visited In Halifax, Nova Scotia; then I went to Alberta, Canada with my daughter Winnie 
to see the dedication of the Canadian Temple. I've also visited Mexico and many of the 
states. In 1921 I traveled to Europe with my son. We were away almost five months. We 
went back the following year when I flew from London to Paris and visited In all the countries 
which we had visited before, with the exception of Spain, [jhe son referred to is Albert 
Eccles. Margaret Cullen Geddes was married to Mr. Eccles about 1898 In January In 
Baker, Oregon by Apostle Merrill . This marriage claim was mode after the death of Mr. 
Eccles and upheld by the U.S. court. Albert Eccles received a son's full inheritance] 

I went back to Scotland and England alone in 1929. I remained there eight months. 
While in Glasgow in 1929, accompanied by my nephew and niece, I attended the perfor- 
mance of the celebrated dancer Pavlova. I had seen her In the Salt Lake Theatre and ad- 
mired her very much; she was considered the most graceful and accomplished ballet dancer 
in the world . While traveling in this continent to keep an engagement, something went 
wrong with the train and the passengers had to get out in the cold, she contracted a cold 
and died. I enjoyed all the ballet performances that came to Salt Lake, but no one in my 
estimation has ever reached the heights that Pavlova did In her "Dying Swan." This Is 
certainly a beautiful memory to me. 

150 



when the depression came after the last world war, we lost nearly everything In the 
Ashton Jenkins Real Estate Company. I sold my beautiful home at 1521 Harvard Ave. I 
am now living In the Sharon Apartment House. I am thankful to the Lord for all His mercies 
to me. 

An autobiography written by Margaret Ferguson Cullen Geddes Eccles, 3 April 1945, 
for her daughter, Margaret Geddes Head, who finished the sketch. The rest of this 
sketch was written by a daughter, Maggie Head. 

Mother celebrated her 89th birthday at my home; Albert and Caroline were here from 
Salt Lake City, Edna and Ariel Eames, Winnie and Carl Nielson, Will and myself. Albert 
took some pictures which we are thankful for, as they are the last we have of Mother. We 
had a grand dinner and o wonderful time. Margaret gave Mother a beautiful corsage that 
she wore all day. She looked so beautiful and seemed to enjoy herself. I'm so thankful 
she had her last birthday at my house. 

In the afternoon several of the grandchildren and great grandchildren called to wish 
her a happy birthday. She stayed about six weeks with us; we enjoyed her a lot. She 
loved to watch TV especially April Conference. She could see everyone so clearly; she 
was even able to pick out Albert and Caroline in the choir. 

We are so thankful she was here when she passed away. She was at Edna's home when 
the last came . She always said she never even had a headache or backache in all her life . 
She passed away very quickly and peacefully. She looked very beautiful and much younger 
than her 90 years . 

The lady who spoke at her funeral services said It had only been two years since she 
had been an active member of the book of Mormon class held at the Lion House. She was 
still chaplln of the Daughters of Utah Pioneers. Her prayers and blessings were the most 
beautiful ones I had ever heard. She also said Mrs. Eccles didn't have to have a formal 
education to be a princess, as she was really born a princess. Mother died 6 November 
1954 at about 5 o'clock a.m. We had her at Webbs Funeral Home for our friends to see . 
We left for Salt Lake City on Monday morning where services were held at 124-4th East 
Salt Lake . 

Schrlner played the prelude and also a beautiful solo on the organ. 

Prayer by H. Carl Nielson 

Ariel Eames gave a short biography of Mother. 

Male Quartette . 

Mrs. Melborn, an old friend of Mother's was the main speaker. 

Albert Jr. and Fay Eccles sang a beautiful number. 

Closing prayer by Orson Kofoed . 

There were many beautiful floral pieces and I tied the ribbon on Mother's veil, which 
thrilled me to still be doing the very last thing for Mother dear. 



151 



News item: There were three participants In the L, D, S. Relief Society centenlal 
pageant which was typical of hundreds of such programs and observances to be held this 
week. The participants were Mrs. Louis A. Roser, Mrs. Margaret F, Eccles, and Mrs, 
Amy Brown Lyman. The three appeared on a Bonneville ward program. 



1st Husband EARL HAWKES 



B. 13 Aug. 1886 
Chr. 5 Oct. 1886 
Bapt. 4 Oct. 1894 
Md. 3 April 1907 
End. 3 April 1907 
D. 7 Aug. 1910 
Bur. 7 Aug. 1910 

Father William Hawkes 



Preston, Franklin, Idaho 

Preston, Franklin, Idaho 

Preston, Franklin, Idaho 

Salt Lake Temple, Salt Lake, Utah 

Salt Lake Temple, Salt Lake, Utah 

Preston, Franklin, Idaho 

Preston, Franklin, Idaho 

Mother Susie Lamb 



Wife 44 MARGARET ELIZABETH GEDDES 



B. 24 July 1887 
Bapt. 31 Aug. 1897 
End. 3 April 1907 
Sid. 3 April 1907 

Father 2 William Stewart Geddes 



North Powder, Union, Oregon 
Plain City, Weber, Utah 
Salt Lake Temple, Salt Lake, Utah 
Salt Lake Temple, Salt Lake, Utah 

Mother Margaret Ferguson Cull en 



CHILDREN 



159 Elden Earl Hawkes 
171 Edna Geddes Hawkes 



B. 8 Jan. 1908, Preston, Franklin, Idaho 
B. 24 Sept. 1910, Preston, Franklin, Idaho 



44 MARGARET ELIZABETH GEDDES HAWKES HEAD 



"Oh, Lovey, Love/ Williams, " a small dark -eyed woman was calling to an attractive, 
auburn-haired child. Lovey Williams was Margaret Elizabeth Geddes; this name, Lovey 
Williams, was the child's name during the polygamy days. Her father, William Geddes, 
was on the "undergound" manymonths and part of his family with him. William's first wife, 
Minnie Carver Geddes, her two girls and four boys were at the home in Plain Gty, Utah. 
William Geddes had served on a mission to Scotland and it was while he was here that he 
met Margaret Ferguson Cullen, who came to Utah 1 Jan. 1884, He married her on 6 Dec. 



152 



1884 in accordance with the polygamy practiced in the church at this time. 

The couples' first child, a son, died. Margaret Elizabeth, their second child, was 
born 24 July 1887 in North Powder, Oregon. Here she was the first Mormon girl born 
at the lumber camp. Preston Nibley was the first boy born at the camp. The occupants 
of this camp were men with their families who had been driven from Utah because of the 
law against plural marriages. Charles Nibley gave Margaret Elizabeth a beautiful pair 
of gold earrings, with a pearl in the center of a floral design. At the age of two, one 
of Margaret's ears was pierced by her mother; just after she had finished piercing the ear, 
her father came home from work. He would not allow her to pierce the other ear, for he 
did not think it the right thing to do. The next day, however, after he left for work, 
Margaret's mother pierced the other ear; then she placed the gold earrings in little Margaret's 
ears and to this day she still wears these dainty earrings. 

When Margaret was 5 years of age, her beloved father, aged 35, died, leaving the 
two families to care for themselves: Maggie, age 5; Edna Flora, age 3; five half-brothers 
and sisters. After his death, a child was born to each family, Winnie, and Walter, 

Margaret's mother made homemade ice cream and on Sunday afternoon they would 
sell it. Then during the week, she would sew and make hats for a living, Margaret sat 
on the floor at her mother's feet and made paper patterns for her doll for hours at a time. 
It wasn't long before she could sew beautiful dresses for her doll , 

As Margaret was the eldest of her family, much responsibility was placed on her shoulders, 
When she was rather young, she was told to scrub the large kitchen floor; she scrubbed it, 
but not to her mother's satisfaction, so Margaret scrubbed the floor over and over three or 
four times before it passed inspection. This taught her to do the task first rate the first 
time and she never forgot the lesson. 

Margaret started school in Tooele, Utah, living with her Uncle David, Aunt Flora 
Nielson, and her great grandmother Hart, who had reared Margaret's mother. Uncle 
David was very good to little Margaret and he told her if she received 100% in spelling 
and arithmetic for that semester, he would buy her a double slate. She worked very 
hard and was soon holding her prized slate; now she could write on four sides instead of 
two. When she was in the third or fourth grade she would cry and roll on the floor be- 
cause a pain in her stomach was so severe. Her teacher would give her a spoonful of 
soda in water to try to ease the pain. 

In Margaret's classroom at school, a child who belonged to a very poor family would 
often bring bread spread with lard and salt for her lunch, Margaret felt so sorry for this 
child, she would trade her lunch for his, but she could not eat the lunch because of the 
pain in her stomach , 

The Geddes family moved from Salt Lake back to Plain City, Utah. Here it was 
Margaret's job to see that there was wood to burn. If the neighborhood children went out 
to play and if they wanted Margaret to play with them, the whole group would go with 
her to pick up wood and carry it to the wood box; then the group would play "Kick the 
Can," "Run Sheep Run," and other games. Even to this day, it is hard for Margaret to 
pass up a nice piece of wood, 

153 



On celebration days, Margaret, Edna, and Winnie were each given an egg to spread. 

When Margaret's sister Edna was four years old, Edna went to Preston, Idaho, to 
live with their Uncle George and Aunt Lizzie Geddes Carver; later these people adopted 
her, leaving Margaret and Winnie. Then Margaret F. Geddes moved her family to Salt 
Lake City, Utah. Here they lived in one room in the Constitution Building. They had 
no lights, so Margaret would sit on the stair step under the hall light to do her lessons. 
She also worked for a lady who ran a boarding house; here she did the dishes, set the tables, 
and peeled potatoes for one dollar a week. While the family lived here, her mother married 
David Eccles. When she was 12 years old, her half brother, Albert, was born and 
Margaret dearly loved her new brother and took care of him. 

A few years later, Margaret moved to Preston, Idaho, to live with Uncle George and 
Aunt Lizzie Carver and to attend school at the Oneida Academy. It was here she met 
Earl Hawkes, son of William and Susie Lamb Hawkes, whom she married 3 April 1907 in the 
Salt Lake Temple. He left a short time after their marriage for a mission to Japan. When 
Earl arrived at Boston, Mass., the church authorities decided that a five-year mission 
was too long for a newly married man, so he served a two-year mission in the Eastern states. 
While her husband was on his mission, Margaret lived with her inlaws and here she gave 
birth to a son, Elden Earl Hawkes on the 8 Jan. 1908. He brought her much company and 
happiness, 

( 

It was necessary for Margaret Elizabeth or Maggie, as she was now called, to earn 
a living, so she cooked for threshers. When Mrs. Jody Sharp died, leaving eight child- 
ren, Maggie took care and helped rear this family. Later she took in sewing. 

Her husband returned home 15 Aug, 1909, Eleven months later on the 5 Aug, 1909, i 
he was on a threshing machine going down the second hill east of Preston, when the machine '' 
tipped over, pinning Earl down and scalding him very severely. He died 6 Aug. 1910 
and was buried 7 Aug. 1910. 

Many heartaches and lonely hours followed the widow of 23 with her two children, 
their youngest daughter, Edna having been born Sept. 24, 1910. Mrs. Mary Jensen 
tended the two small fatherless children while their mother worked in Larson's store and 
took in sewing to earn a living for her family. ' 

In 1910 William Daniel Head, son of James A. Head and Hannah Maria Head, returned 
home from a mission in Ireland. William started going with Maggie and on 18 Dec. 1912 
they were married in the Salt Lake Temple. William has often laughed and said, "Not 
many men can say they sent a son to school the first year of marriage!" 

William was a wonderful father to these fatherless children and he loved them as his 
own. On 30 Nov. 1913 a daughter was born to William and Maggie; they paid a gold 
piece for the services of Father Cutler, M.D, They named this girl Margaret. In 1914 
the couple and their three children moved to Cottonwood to homestead. Here there was 
much hard work to be done and many hired hands to be fed. William and Maggie worked 
together in love and faith. The years added to their family: Earl, Edna, Margaret, Albert, i 
Rulon, LaRue, Marcells, Milton and a tiny baby boy who was born dead. 

154 



In going back over the lives of this good couple, a person v/onders how Maggie and 
William did all that v^as required of them. Again Maggie sewed into the wee hours of 
the morning so that the four girls could have new dresses and four boys could have new 
shirts and pants on Easter, Christmas and the fourth of July. 

Sunday morning found the eight children, faces shining, their shoes polished, hair 
combed and in place wending their way to church; it was unthinkable to miss church . 
After church services were over, the family would come home to a wonderful Sunday 
dinner; usually several of the children brought home one or two friends for dinner and to 
spend the day. 

I In the northwest corner of the kitchen stood a black coal stove, old but highly polished. 

Here one could see Maggie bringing out an eight loaf dripper cake; later she would ice 
the cake with Minnie Ha Ha icing gaily dripping over the sides. The next day that same 
black dripper would be holding eight loaves of delicious crusty bread. Every other day 
eight fresh loaves of bread would be baked. Her heavy black frying pan was so well trained, 
that Maggie could cook with her eyes shut. 

Maggie and Will always told their family to bring their friends home, so their humble 
home was the scene of much merriment and noise. Often there would be several children 
on the piano, one on the drums, one on the bass violin and the phonograph going. Maggie 
would add her bit with cake, pies or cookies, or sometimes a slice of fresh bread and 
chokecherry jelly, 

I Maggie taught many years in the Sunday School and Primary. 

Christmas time was a happy time for the family, not in worldly goods but In the real 
Spirit of Christmas. One Christmas, Maggie was very III in the hospital but the good 
neighbors all came with their arms loaded for the eight children. Their table was truly 
laden down with blessings. Maggie was operated on the next day and was very III for a 
long time. She always had faith, however, that she would be able to live to raise her 
large family. 

I William was Franklin County Sheriff for 18 years, then Chief of Police for 7 years 

and a policeman for many more years. Here the family shared many experiences together. 

Maggie now turned to planting a beautiful flower garden and doing exquisite hand 
work: netting, tatting, hairpin lace, etc. Then too, she could make a good meal out of 
almost nothing. 

' In 1930 the family moved from their beloved third ward to a large white house in the 

fourth ward. Here Maggie became a counselor in the Relief Society and active in the 
Daughters of the Utah Pioneers. 

^ By 1941 the parents had sent all their children to college and this year said goodby 

to their four boys and one girl, all to serve in the armed forces of their country. They 
gave courage, hope and faith to their children, never missing a week in writing a letter 
to them and even now those who are away receive their letters every week. 

155 



This couple now have 29 grandchildren and 5 great grandchildren. On Dec. 18, 
1963 they celebrated their 51st wedding anniversary. They were surrounded by family 
and friends: over 250 people called during the afternoon. 

When William retired, Maggie taught him to do hairpin lace, needlepoint, cross 
stitch and now at the age of 78, he has learned to do solid stitch. They have earned 
many blue ribbons and have displayed their handiwork hundreds of times in the wards 
of the county they live in. 

Will and Maggie have taught their family prayer, faith in God and love for their 
fellowmen. The family has truly been blessed to have had the parents they have had, for 
they are truly loved and respected. William loves Maggie with a love that is beautiful 
to see. He fusses over her and she over him. These are truly their golden years. 



2nd Husband WILLIAM DANIEL HEAD 



B. 5 Nov. 1886 
Bapt. 30 June 1894 
End. 18 Dec. 1912 
Md. 18 Dec. 1912 

Father James Anthony Head 



Whitney, Franklin, Idaho 
Whitney, Franklin, Idaho 
Salt Lake Temple, Salt Lake, Utah 
Salt Lake Temple, Salt Lake, Utah 

Mother Hannah Maria Pernall 



Wife 44 MARGARET ELIZABETH GEDDES 



B. 24 July 1887 
Bapt. 31 Aug. 1897 
End. 3 April 1907 

Father 2 William Stewart Geddes 



North Powder, Union, Oregon 

Plain City, Weber, Utah 

Salt Lake Temple, Salt Lake, Utah 

Mother Margaret Ferguson Cullen 



CHIDREN 



188 Margaret Geddes Head 

204 William Albert Head 

224 La Rue Geddes Head 

243 Rulon James Head 

257 Marcella Geddes Head 

275 Milton Bartlett Head 



B 30 Nov, 1913, Preston, Franklin, Idaho 
B. 19 Feb. 1916, Preston, Franklin, Idaho 
B. 7 Aug. 1918, Preston, Franklin, Idaho 
B. 2 Jan, 1921, Preston, Franklin, Idaho 
B. 6 Mar. 1924, Preston, Franklin, Idaho 
B. 19 May 1925, Preston, Franklin, Idaho 



156 



159 ELDEN EARL HAWKES 



B. 8 Jan. 1908 Preston, Franklin, Idaho 

Chr, 2 Feb. 1908 Preston, Franklin, Idaho 

Bapt. 8 Jan. 1916 Preston, Franklin, Idaho 

Md. 16 Nov. 1930 Farmington, Salt Lake, Utah 

End. 22 July 1958 Monti Temple, , Utah 

Father Earl Howkes Mother 44 Margaret Elizabeth Geddes 



Wife EDYTHA RICH 
B. July 1908 Rich, Bingham, Idaho 

Father Heber Charles Rich Mother Edna Matilda Shepherd 

CHILDREN 

506 Rich Howkes B. 10 Nov. 1944, Dayton, Montgomery, Ohio 

Bapt. 12 July 1957, Cambridge, MIddlessex, Moss. 
End. June 1965, Salt Lake Temple, Salt Lake, Utah 



159 ELDON EARL HAWKES 



Eldon Earl, son of Margaret Elizabeth Geddes and Earl Hovvkes, was born 8 January 
1908 at Preston, Franklin, Idaho. His father was in the Eastern States, serving on on 
L.D.S. Church mission at the time of his son's birth . Upon his return, his father met with 
an accident and was killed 7 August 1910. 

Earl's mother married William Daniel Head 18 Dec, 1912. Earl loved and respected 
his step-father, as if he were his own father. 

Earl attended grade and high school at Preston, graduating with honors 18 May 1932. 
This he did in three years. He then attended the Utah State Agriculture College; he 
was a Phi Kappa Phi and one of their top honor students with a degree in business admin- 
istration and a major in accounting. 

Earl married Edytho Rich 16 Nov. 1930, and on 22 July 1958, they were sealed in 
the Monti Temple . 

Earl joined the Hearst Enterprises in 1936 and moved to Washington, D. C. In 1939 
he moved to New York to supervise radio stations and head the American Weekly News- 
print and General Management Group. 

157 



He was drafted into the U.S. Army Air Corps as a private in May 1943, receiving 
a direct commission five months later. He served until Oct. 1945. Since that time 
he has been in Boston as chief accountant, business manager, and general manager for 
tv^enty-eight years. 

He has always been active in his church. He served as a teacher in Sunday School; 
for ten years he acted in the Branch Presidency of the Cambridge Branch and for two years 
OS Stake Mission President and as a member of the High Council of Boston Stake, 

Earl was appointed editor and general manager of the Deseret News 16 April 1964. 
He now resides at Salt Lake City, Utah . 

He and his wife have one son. Earl Rich Hawkes, who was born 10 Nov. 1944 at 
Dayton, Ohio. Rich graduated from Shady Hill School or Cambridge, then he attended 
Boston University; last year he attended the University of Utah, He was a member of 
the Tabernacle Choir until he left for a mission to Australia, 21 June 1965, 



ORSON KOFOED 



B. 28 Jan. 1882 
Chr. 20 Feb. 1882 
Bapt. 3 April 1900 
End, 16 Dec. 1908 
Md, 4 Nov. 1936 
D. 36 Jan. 1957 



Weston, Franklin, Idaho 

Weston, Franklin, Idaho 

Weston, Franklin, Idaho 

Salt Lake Temple, Salt Lake, Utah 

Salt Lake Temple, Salt Lake, Utah 



Father Hans Arker Kofoed 



Mother Thora Mary Anderson 



Wife 171 EDNA GEDDES HAWKES 



B. 24 Sept. 1910 
Chr. 6 Nov. 1910 
Bapt, 24 Sept, 1918 
End. 3 April 1935 
Sid. 4 Nov, 1936 

Father Earl Hawkes 



Preston, Franklin, Idaho 

Preston, Franklin, Idaho 

Preston, Franklin, Idaho 

Salt Lake Temple, Salt Lake, Utah 

Salt Lake Temple, Salt Lake, Utah 

Mother 44 Margaret Elizabeth Geddes 



CHILDREN 



443 Narveen H , Kofoed 



B, 30 July 1937, Preston, Franklin, Idaho 
Bapt. 30 July 1945, Preston, Franklin, Idaho 



158 



456 Orson Ray Kofoed B. 14 May 1940, Preston, Franklin, Idaho 

Bapt. 3 July 1948, Preston, Franklin, Idaho 



171 EDNA GEDDES HAWKES 



Edna Geddes Hawkes, daughter of Margaret Elizabeth Geddes and Earl Hawkes, was 
born 24 Sept. 1910, at Preston, Franklin, Idaho. Her father had died in August and she 
was born in September. Her step-father made her feel as if she were his beloved first 
daughter. 

Edna attended grade and high school at Preston. She graduated in 1929 with many 
honors. She received a distinction never before attained in Preston High School . She 
was valedictorian, received a scholarship from the First National Bank, and another from 
the Federal State Bank for the best all around student in scholarship, activities in contests 
debating, school paper, class, and studentbody positions. 

Edna attended Ricks College for one year. She then got a job at J. C. Penny 
Company. This position she held for many years. During these years, she was active 
in the L.D.S. Church — holding many stake and ward positions. 

She married Orson Kofoed 4 Nov. 1936 in the Salt Lake Temple. The couple had 
two children, Narveen and Orson Ray. 

Edna then gave piano lessons and started to teach school at Clifton, Idaho. In the 
winter she took correspondence courses and in the summer she took summer school courses. 
She finally graduated from the Utah State University as an honor student. 

Edna's husband died 26 January 1957. Her children hod left home by this time; her 
daughter had married and her son had served in the U.S. Army and was now attending 
school . 

She decided to sell her home in Clifton, Idaho, and move to Bremerton, Washington, 
where she is librarian in two schools. 

Edna loves to do all sorts of handiwork; she is an excellent seamstress, making most 
of her own clothes; she plays the piano and organ. 

Edna is very unselfish with her many talents and shares with her family and friends 
her lovely handiwork and knowledge. 

Narveen married Gary Clawson; they have three lovely children — Kelly, Bret, and 
Brad. 

Ray has decided he loves music best of all other studies. He has a band of his own 
and lives in California. 



159 



GARY CLARK CLAWSON 



B. 

Md. 12 Jan. 1959 

Father Frank Clawson 



Sterling, Alberta, Canada 
Clifton, Franklin, Idaho 



Mother 



Brandley 



Wife 443 NARVEEN KOFOED 



B. 30 July 1937 
Bapt. 30 July 1945 

Father Orson Kofoed 



Preston, Franklin, Idaho 
Preston, Franklin, Idaho 

Mother 171 Edna Geddes Hawkes 



CHILDREN 



1048 Kelly Clawson 

1049 Brett Gary Clawson 

1050 Brad Clawson 



B. 4 Aug. 1951, Provo, Utah, Utah 

B. 29 Dec. 1958, Preston, Franklin, Idaho 

B. 19 Sept, 1960, Provo, Utah, Utah 



WOODROW W. WINWARD 



B. 19 Jan, 1913 
Chr. 21 Feb. 1913 
Bapt. 19 Jan. 1921 
End. Sept. 1931 
Md. 21 April 1936 

Father Bertie William Winward 



Whitney, Franklin, Idaho 
Whitney, Franklin, Idaho 
Whitney, Franklin, Idaho 
Logan Temple, Cache, Utah 
Logan Temple, Cahce, Utah 

Mother Lula Effie Dal ley 



Wife 188 MARGARET GEDDES HEAD 



B. 30 Nov. 1913 
Chr. 4 Jan. 1914 
Bapt. 24 Dec. 1921 
End. 21 April 1936 
Sid. 21 April 1936 

Father William Daniel Head 



Preston, Franklin, Idaho 
Preston, Franklin, Idaho 
Preston, Franklin, Idaho 
Logan Temple, Cache, Utah 
Logan Temple, Cache, Utah 

Mother 44 Margaret Elizabeth Geddes 



160 



CHILDREN 



467 Margaret Diane Winward 

487 Sandra Winward 

528 Tamara Sue Winward 

566 Rulon W. Winward 

619 Elizabefh Winward 



B. 20 July 1941, Preston, Franklin, Idaho 
Bopt. 6 Aug. 1949, Preston, Franklin, Idaho 
B. 5 July 1943, Preston, Franklin, Idaho 
Bapt4Aug. 1951, Preston, Franklin, Idaho 
B. 2 Aug. 1946, Preston, Franklin, Idaho 
Bapt, 4 Sept. 1954, Preston, Franklin, Idaho 
B. 20 Oct. 1948, Preston, Franklin, Idaho 
Bapt, 3 Nov. 1956, Preston, Franklin, Idaho 
B. 10 March 1952, Preston, Franklin, Idaho 
Bapt. 26 Mar, 1960, Preston, Franklin, Idaho 



188 MARGARET GEDDES HEAD WINWARD 



My parents, Margaret Elizabeth Geddes and William Daniel Head, often said to me 
when I was a child, "We paid triple your weight in gold pieces to Father Cutler when you 
were born, but as we gazed into your eyes on the cold crisp day 30 Nov, 1913 all other 
matters seemed of little importance to us." 

My great grandmother, Mary Jane Mclellan Head, would pat me on the head and say, 
"Yes, you have a head with a double crown, auburn hair and blue eyes. Yes, you are 
truly a Head and we're glad to keep you." 

John Condie, my first Bishop, blessed me and gave me the name of Margaret Geddes 
Head and from that time he called me one of his girls. I was the oldest of my mother's 
nine children. In such a large household, a great deal of work simply had to be done 
each day. My parents, being wise, decided to divide up the work. They gave each child 
a number of tasks which each child had to finish each day. My tasks were dusting, 
dishes, and the making of the beds; later I was responsible for most of the meals; these are 
my favorite tasks even today. As we all worked, we all song. I now wonder how Mother 
and the neighbors could stand to listen to so many different songs — each child had his own 
song and he was trying to out do and out sing the others. 

While I was very young, I became seriously ill with Spinal Meningitis. For many 
weeks I lay very ill, I know now that it was through the faith and prayers of my parents 
and Doctor Cutler that I am living today. Doctor Cutler gave my younger brother, Albert, 
shot to prevent him from having the disease — the serum poisoned him and he swelled up 
and was very ill for about two weeks. Even after I was better, I was unable to speak as 
the disease had affected my throat. One morning. Dad was preparing my cooked cereal and 
apparently it didn't suit me, as I threw my spoon on the floor and said, "Oh, Daddy," in o 
very disgusted voice. Mother said there was much laughter and many tears shed that day 
in our home. Yes, it was a household of faith . 

One summer. Grandmother Eccles had my cousin Donna Eames and I stay with her in 
Salt Lake. She would take us all over the city. It was like a dream come true for these 

161 



two little country girls. All of the girls in that neighborhood wore ankle socks. Donna 
and I had never heard of such a thing. Grandmother made us wear them. I said, "No! 
No! I don't want my knees to show." Grandmother said, "If you want to go with me you 
must look like the other girls." So I took off those horrid long black ones. Oh, I 
remember how embarassed I was . 

The year I was eleven years old. Mother was in the hospital at Logan — it was 
Christmas — and oh how sad we all were. My sister and I decided we would act or play 
Santa for the younger children. I still believed in Santa. It was very hard for me. Then 
all of the good neighbors came in with their arms loaded with goodies, so we all tried to 
make it a happy Christmas. 

Dad was a policeman for eight years and sheriff for eighteen years. One cold winter 
night, my bother and I were playing with Dad's handcuffs. We each had an arm in each 
cuff and It snapped shut. As neither of our parents were home, we pinned our coats around 
us and walked two miles to the Deputy Sheriff's home and had him unlock the handcuffs. 
After we got back home, Albert said he would show the kids what had happened. The 
cuffs snapped shut again on his arms and you should have seen the look of unbelief on 
Albert's face. But this time it was to late for him to go back to Jack Raton's, the Deputy 
Sheriff. So he went to bed and to sleep with his two arms held tight in the encircle of the 
iron cuffs . 

Dad came home one day with a shining new black model T Ford. A few days later 
they announced that all ten of us were going to Salt Lake City. Oh, what fun we all had. 
I don't think Salt Lake was ever the same after our visit. Uncle Albert Eccles took 
us to Salt Air — we tried everything. A happy band of tired kids climbed in the car for 
the trip home . We arrived in Plain City at 8:30 p.m . at the home of Aunt Eva Brown. 
There were eleven Browns and ten of us. There was very little room for sleep walking that 
night. In fact, very little "shut eye" at all for me — but, oh, what fun! 

When I became of Mutual age I was elected Queen of the Third Ward Gold and Green 
Ball and later went on to be Queen of the Oneida Stake. This was truly a thrill for me. 
It was my first dress to be bought in a store, a lovely beige lace one. Oh, my cup was full 
when they presented me with a beautiful crown and an armful of roses. 

In my sophomore year in high school, I had a ruptured appendics. As there was no 
sulfa or penicilln drugs, Mother was one year trying to get the infection out of my system. 
Then, when I began to get better, Mother took ill and I stayed home to take care of her. 
I was out of school for two years and a half. All of my school friends had graduated. I 
decided to go back to school and finish my high school . I worked hard and made new 
friends. I even held several offices — NDC Club, Pep Club, secretary and associate 
editor of the Blue and White, the school paper. To top off my year, I was elected Junior 
Prom Queen, 

In my senior year I graduated from Seminary as an honor student. I worked at the 
isis Theatre and the Utah Poultry Association after school and taught a class In Primary. 
I enrolled the next year at the USU at Logan. Here I met Woodrow W. WInward and we 
were married at the Logan Temple 21 April 1936. At the time Woodrow was 2nd counselor 
in the Bishopric of the Whitney Ward. He had returned a few months before from a mission 

162 



to Holland. He later served as ward clerk, scout master, etc. He has his thirty-five year 
service pin, full Eagle Scout, Order of the Arrow, Silver Beaver, Special Scout Master's 
Certificate 1954, 1957, 1964. In 1952 and 1956 in the 1957 General YMMIA conference. 
President Curtis honored him in the Tabernacle as one of the first men to receive "the 
Special Distinquished Leadership Citation. He had gone the extra mile for his ward boys. 
He was also Jim Bridger atthe 1957 Valley Forge World Jamboree and acted as the Cache 
Valley Scout Master. He has and does a great deal of Temple work. In civic work he is 
secretary of the city water works. President of several other organizations. 

I feel that by our united efforts and the blessings of the Lord, we have been able to 
work in the church and the community as well as on our farm to help ourselves and others. 

I have worked in the ward and on three different stake boards — Primary for eleven 
years as stake activity leader of group I and II, then as in-service trainer - teacher, ward 
counselor, then as President, on the YWMIA Board as Bee Keeper for nine years, then 
Gleaner leader for five years — as ward counselor. Relief Society Stake Board as literature 
leader for five years, then as theology leader for five years, I was then visiting teacher 
leader and in 1960 I went in as Ward President. I am now teaching a young people's class 
in Sunday School, lesson teacher on the County D.U.P. Board and as ward genealogical 
checker. 

I have been Captain of our Daughter's of Utah Pioneer Camp for a couple of terms. 
Then, I was elected as captain of the county chapter; this I really enjoyed. I wrote and 
directed the centennial pageant at Salt Lake convention. I, also, had the opportunity 
to speak at two of the meetings given at the Utah hotel . I am now serving on the 
county chapter as lesson leader. 

My husband and I have a family of five children: Margaret Diane, Sandra, Tamara 
Sue, Rulon W. and Elizabeth, We feel very happy and very grateful for our lovely 
children. 

Margaret Diane was born 20 July 1941, at Preston, Idaho, She attended the grade 
school and graduated from high school in 1958, attended the U.S.U. for two years majoring 
in English, and minoring In music and art. Her career was cut short by falling in love with 
James Lyie Archibald, son of James Mark Archibald and Leone McBride, They were 
married 8 Sept, 1961 . They have one darling daughter, Lisa, born 12 April 1962, at Logan, 
Cache, Utah. Diane has acted as a Primary and Sunday School teacher. She is employed 
at J. C. Penny's as their decorator. 

Sandra was born 5 July 1943 at Preston, Franklin, Idaho, our second daughter. She 
attended grade and high school at Preston. She did not want to go to a university but she 
went to Henegar Business College. Upon graduation, she obtained work as the secretary 
to the administratorof the L..D.S. Hospital . She married Gary Vern Nelson, 21 Feb. 1962. 
They moved to Denver, Colorado, Sandra taught both in Primary and Sunday School. 
Then she became Relief Society secretary. Their first child, Todd W,, was born 14 Dec. 
1962, Gary is now attending the U.S.U. and Sandra is employed at the Prudential Saving 
and Loan. She enjoys sewing and public speaking. 

Tamara Sue was born 2 Aug. 1946 at Preston, Franklin, Idaho. She attended grade 

163 



and high school at Preston, graduating In the spring of 1965, also, from fourth year seminary 
She was active in band, playing the clarinet. She was sophomore social manager, the 
same in her junior year, then the school's social manager for her senior year. She was 
president of Zeta Phi Club. She plans on going to Ricks College in the fall of 1966 at 
Rexburg, Idaho. 

Rulon W. was born 20 Oct. 1948 at Preston, Franklin, Idaho. He attended grade 
school at Whitney and high school at Preston. He truly loves sports. He takes an active 
part in basketball, softball, football, and swimming. He was president of the eighth grade 
class, an Eagle Scout and received the "Order of the Arrow" in scouting. He was runner 
up in the district for a trip to Hawaii for the boy scouts. He is now an explorer and active 
in his priesthood quorum. He plays the piano and bass horn. He has nimble fingers and 
likes to do crocheting and cross stitch, that is if no one is looking. I am so happy that 
he and his father work and play so well together. 

Elizabeth was born 10 March 1952 at Preston, Franklin, Idaho. She attended grade 
school at Whitney and Preston High School . She will graduate from Primary this fall. 
She plays the piano, takes clarinet, sings in a girl's chorus. She loves dancing and has 
taken lessons at Preston and Logan and is now taking a course at Salt Lake City in both 
ballet and tap under an instructor from Los Angeles. She seems to be gifted with her hands 
and she does most of her own sewing and her needlework Is almost perfect. 

We as a family feel we have been blessed with most of the good things of life. We 
are so happy that our children, no matter where they go, ore active in the L.D.S. Church. 



JAMES LYLE ARCHIBALD 



6 Feb. 1942 

Bapt. 4 March 1950 

Md. 14 Sept. 1961 

Fatfier James Mark Archibald 



Dayton, Franklin, Idaho 

Dayton, Franklin, Idaho 

Preston, Franklin, Idaho 

Mother Leona McBride 



Wife 467 MARGARET DIANE WINWARD 



B. 20 July 1941 
Bapt. 6 Aug. 1949 

Father Woodrow W. WInward 



Preston, Franklin, Idaho 
Preston, Franklin, Idaho 

Mother 188 Margaret Geddes Head 



1047 Lisa Archibald 



CHILDREN 

B. 12 April 1962, Logan, Cache, Utah 



164 



GARY VERN NELSON 



B. 15 Sept. 1942 
Bapt. 23 Sept. 1950 
End. 23 June 1964 
Md. 21. Feb. 1962 



Preston, Franklin, Idaho 
Preston, Franklin, Idaho 
Logan Temple, Cache, Utah 
Preston, Franklin, Idaho 



Father Severine Vern Nelson 



Mother Verda Oliverson 



487 SANDRA WINWARD 



B. 5 July 1943 
Bapt. 4 Aug. 1951 
End. 23 June 1965 
Sid. 23 June 1965 

Father Woodrow W. Winward 



Preston, Franklin, Idaho 
Preston, Franklin, Idaho 
Logan Temple, Cache, Utah 
Logan Temple, Cache, Utah 

Mother 188 Margaret Geddes Head 



CHILDREN 



1045 Todd W. Nelson 

1046 Beverly Nelson 



B. 14 Dec. 1962, Denver, Denver, Colorado 
B. 29 Sept. 1964, Preston, Franklin, Idaho 



204 WILLIAM ALBERT HEAD 



B. 19 Feb. 1916 
Chr. 12 Mar. 1916 
Bapt. 14 Feb. 1924 
Md. 10 Dec. 1938 

Father William Daniel Head 



Preston, Franklin, Idaho 
Preston, Franklin, Idaho 
Preston, Franklin, Idaho 
Reno, Washoe, Nevada 

Mother 44 Margaret Elizabeth Geddes 



Wife EDYTHE SMITHBUSEN 



B. 16 Jan. 1918 



510 Pamela Ann Head 
532 William Dennis Head 



CHILDREN 



B. 15 Jan. 1945, Chico, Butte, California 

B. 29 Oct. 1946, East Oakland, Contra Costa, Calif. 



lo5 



204 WILLIAM ALBERT HEAD 



William Albert, son of Margaret Elizabeth Geddes and William Daniel Head, was 
born 19 Feb. 1916, at Preston, Franklin, Idaho. From the time Albert was able to 
hold a spoon, he beat time. He became an outstanding drummer in high school. He 
developed his own dance band. 

Albert graduated from high school in 1934. He received his letter in football, 
track and boxing. He was also active in the Pep Club and the F.F.A. Club. He 
then attended Idaho State College and became one of the college's main boxing 
champions. During the summer he left for Sloat, California to work in the lumber mills. 
He later became a certified lumber grader. 

The war found Albert in the Air Corp — teaching code and radio at Corpus Christi, 
Texas. Later Albert was in a plane that was shot down over the ocean. He and his 
parachute were found. He gave each of his sisters a piece of his parachute as a keepsake. 
He met and married Edythe Smithbusen. They have two children: Pamela, the oldest, 
is in business, the head telephone operator; Bill is in college training to become a dentist. 



CHARLES CARSON COOLEY 



B. 8 Sept. 1914 
Md. 18 Nov, 1939 

Father Clyde Adrian Coo ley 



Glenwood, Ope, Minnesota 
Preston, Franklin, Idaho 

Mother Ella May Carson 



Wife 224 LaRUE GEDDES HEAD 



B. 7 Aug. 1918 
Chr. 1 Sept. 1918 
Bapt. 2 Sept, 1926 

Father Wlliam Daniel Head 



Preston, Franklin, Idaho 
Preston, Franklin, Idaho 
Preston, Franklin, Idaho 

Mother 44 Margaret Elizabeth Geddes 



CHILDREN 



484 Margaret Jill Cooley 

524 Susan Kay Cooley 
573 Steven Charles Cooley 



B. 1 May 1943, Salt Lake City, Salt Lake, Utah 
Bapt. 26 April 1952 

B. 28 Jan. 1946, Salt Lake City, Salt Lake, Utah 
B. 8 April 1949, Lynnwood, Los Angeles, Californ 



I 



166 



224 LaRUE GEDDES HEAD 



LaRue is the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. William Daniel Head. She was born 7 
August 1918 at Preston, Franklin, Idaho. She received her education In Preston, 
graduating from the Preston High School In 1936. LaRue has been an active person, 
holding many positions In both school and church. The one she liked best v/as that of 
majorette for the band. She then attended the Idaho State College. It is here that 
she met and married her husband, Charles Carson Cooley, 18 Nov. 1939. He graduated 
from the college of pharmacy as a qualified druggist. 

They have three children: Jill and Susan are attending business college; Steven is 
a senior in high school and a star in football . 

LaRue and her husband own several drug stores in and around Camarillo, California. 
Both of them are active in civic affairs. Her husband is now President of the Chamber 
of Commerce and was voted as the "man of the year." LaRue is known for her decorating 
ability and does marvelous knitting of sweaters and coats, etc. 

She loves to travel and enjoys landscape gardening. She has a charming personality 
and a marvelous sense of humor. 



243 RULON JAMES HEAD 



B. 2 Jan. 1921 

Chr. 5 Feb. 1921 

Bapt. 2 Jan. 1929 

Md. 15 Dec. 1951 {2nd Wife) 



Preston, Franklin, Idaho 
Preston, Franklin, Idaho 
Preston, Franklin, Idaho 
Port Angeles, Clallam, Washington 



Father William Daniel Head 



Mother 44 Margaret Elizabeth Geddes 



1st Wife VENNETTE SPUTE 



B. abt. 1923 
Divorced 7 April 1945 



2nd Wife MRS. JEWEL LUDWIG PETERSON 
(a widow with 3 sons) 



B. abt. 1931 



Father Floyd Ludwig 



167 



243 RULON JAMES HEAD 



Rulon James Head, son of Margaret Elizabeth Geddes and William Daniel Head, was 
born 2 January 1921 at Preston, Franklin, Idaho. 

Rulon attended school at Preston graduating from high school in 1938. While in 
high school he belonged to the boxing squad, football team, track, scouts, and FFA. He 
won his letter in boxing. 

In 1939 Rulon left for Sloat, California, to work in lumber. War was declared 
and he joined the U. S. Marine Corp for four years. Two of these years were spent 
in fighting in the South Pacific. While in the Marines, he received several medals, 
a Presidential Medal of Honor, a two star medal, and several for outstanding work. 
His Eagle Scout award was sent to his parents while he was in the South Pacific and 
they mailed it to him. 

A newspaper article stated, "March 30, 1944, Rulon Head was among the first 
soldiers to set foot on the Marshall Islands." In Oct, 1944 he was sent back to the 
US and stationed at Bremerton, Washington, at the Navy Yards as military police. He 
received an honorable discharge 8 July 1946. In Oct. 1946 he began working for the 
Bremerton Police Force; this appointment was a Civil Service job. Rulon has received 
several promotions in his work. His fellow officers hold him In high esteem. His last 
promotion was In Sept. 4, 1965; he had been serving as a detective, now he is the 
Sergeant of the division . 

Rulon has held many civic positions, but the one he enjoys best is scout master of 
the boys In Bremerton. He loves his three stepsons and now has three grandchildren to love. 
He, his wife, and family enjoy being out of doors together; they especially like fishing 
and boating. Their home Is in Bremerton, Washington. He Is very handy with his hands 
and has learned beautiful tatting. 

Rulon has been an honest, straightforward and cheerful person — he Is loved and 
respected by all who know him. 



KEITH AUSTIN MERRILL 



B. 2 Nov. 1919 Mound Valley, Bannock, Idaho 

Bapt. 30 June 1928 Mound Valley, Bannock, Idaho 

Md. 12 May 1946 Preston, Franklin, Idaho 

Father Austin Merrill Mother Alice Perry 



168 



I 



Wife 257 MARCELLA GEDDES HEAD 



B. 6 March 1923 
Chr. 1 April 1923 
Bapt. 6 March 1931 

Father William Daniel Head 



Preston, Franklin, Idaho 

Preston, Franklin, Idaho 

Preston, Franklin, Idaho 

Mother 44 Margaret Elizabeth Geddes 



CHILDREN 



Baby boy (Twin) 

Baby boy (Twin) dates same for both 

591 Linda Merrill 

662 Keith Allen Merrill 

744 Katherine Alice Merrill 

745 Kirstin Ann Merrill 

746 Barbara Merrill 



B. 9 May 1947, New Orleans, Jefferson, Louisana 
D. 9 May 1947, New Orleans, Jefferson, Louisana 
B. 17 Sept. 1950, New Orleans, Jefferson, Louisana 
B. 16 April 1954, East Hartford, Hartford, Connecticul 
B. 1 Nov. 1956, East Hartford, Hartford, Connecticul 
B. 25 May 1960, Manchester, Hartford, Connecticut 
B, 23 Nov. 1963, Manchester, Hartford, Connecticut 



257 MARCELLA GEDDES HEAD 



Marcella was born 6 March 1923 at Preston, Franklin, Idaho, Her parents were 
William Daniel Head and Margaret Elizabeth Geddes. She was a ray of sunshine to her 
parents who loved her dearly. She attended grade and high school at Preston, Franklin, 
Idaho. She graduated from high school 23 May 1941. Marcella specialized in fun and 
social activities both in school and church. 

When war was declared, Marcella went to work in Salt Lake at the small arms plant. 
Then on the 13 April 1943, she joined the Waves. She took her training at Hunters 
Womans College, New York, Wisconsin and South Carolina. Upon graduating she acted 
as an instructor in radio and code. 

When the war was over, she came back to Preston to get ready to marry Keitfi Austin 
Merrill which she did 12 May 1946. They moved to New Orleans where Keith attended 
college at Tulane University and Marcella attended business colleges. After graduating, 
Marcella worked for the government to help her husband through college. Keith grad- 
uated in engineering in 1953. They then moved to East Hartford where Keith obtained work 
as an engineer with the Pratt and Whitney Aircraft Company. 

Since then, Marcell has been very active with her family. She went to the State 
Congress for the PTA in Connecticut to help get several school bills passed. Keith and 
Marcella are the parents of four little girls and three boys; her twin boys died just after 
birth. 



169 



Keith and Marcella enjoy several hobbies: golf, rose gardens, collections of 
old coins and stamps. They have made them family projects. Their home is v/here 
family and friends are made welcome with love, good food, and genuine hospitality. 

Besides having a sincere love for people, they enjoy entertaining visitors because 
as they say, "Our visitors have been good for our children; they teach them courtesy, 
consideration and help to develop grace and poise in them." 

Sketch written by Margaret WInward 

275 MILTON BARTLETT HEAD 



B. 19 May 1925 
Chr. 2 Aug. 1925 
Bapt. 6 June 1933 
Md. /Sept. 1947 
End. 18 April 1966 



Preston, Franklin, Idaho 
Preston, Franklin, Idaho 
Preston, Franklin, Idaho 
Malad, Oneida, Idaho 
Logan Temple, Cache, Utah 



Father William Daniel Head 



Mother 44 Margaret Elizabeth Geddes 



1st Wife DONNA THORPE 



B. abt. 1927 Malad, Oneida, Idaho 

Md. 7 Sept. 1947 Malad, Oneida, Idaho 

Feb. 1948 Milton got an annulment at Preston, Idaho 



2nd Wife MARLENE JOHNSON 
(widow of Kenneth Hatch) 



B. 7 May 1928 
Chr. 1 July 1928 
Bapt. 10 Oct. 1936 
Md. 27 Aug. 1950 

Father Palmer Johnson 



Preston, Franklin, Idaho 
Preston, Franklin, Idaho 
Preston, Franklin, Idaho 
Reno, Washoe, Nevada 

Mother Donna Kirby 



CHILDREN 



596 James Antony Head 

630 Jacqulin Bartlett Head 

657 David Bartlett Head 

679 Robert Milton Head 



B. 12 Feb. 1951, Preston, Franklin, Idaho 
B. 10 Dec. 1952, Preston, Franklin, Idaho 
B. 22 Jan. 1954, Preston, Franklin, Idaho 
B. 19 Oct. 1955, Preston, Franklin, Idaho 



170 



275 MILTON BARTLETT HEAD 



Milton Bartleft Head was born 19 May 1925, the son of Margaret Elizabeth Geddes 
and William Daniel Head. He had dark eyes and hair which was curley and what seemed 
like a very winning smile. When but just a very small boy, he would sing many songs, 
much to the delight of all who heard him. 

Milton went to both grade school and high school at Preston, graduating in 1943. 
He was rather smart but did not work for high grades. He won his letter in football, 
the AAU championship in boxing and was fair in basketball but he preferred Softball. 
It might be said of him he truly loved all sports and was good at anything he truly tried to 
do. 

He was also active in all church activities; primary, scouting, M.I. A., and his 
priesthood activities. 

Our country was in war in 1943. The boys in this class enlisted into the service as 
soon as school was out. Milton joined the Army as an infantryman. Just before he left for 
boot camp at Fort Ord, California, the bishop ordained him an Elder in the Melchizedek 
priesthood. 

After the minimum amount of training, they were sent over seas for active duty. 
Milton has received several medals for sharp shooting and marksmanship, but he was not 
prepared for war. He fought in two major battles in the New Guinea campaign. He 
then contracted malaria. He was sent to a hospital but his case needed special care so 
he received a medical discharge and was sent to the Letterman Hospital in California, 
then to Bushnell at Brigham City and was in and out of the Veteran's Hospital at Salt Lake 
City the rest of his life. 

When he was at last released from the Veteran's Hospital, he returned home and 
enrolled at the Utah State University but his nerves were shot and the malaria kept coming 
back, so college seemed out of the question. The tragedy of war is that the battles end, 
but the casualties go on and on. He, then took the Civil Service exams and passed with 
an unusually high rating. 

He obtained work at the Preston Post Office. He then obtained a promotion to act 
as a distributor of mail for the U. S. department of mail on the railroad. He then began 
working for Kennecott, where he worked for many years. 

With his new work, he left Preston and established a new home at tfie Kern's new 
housing development in the Salt Lake area. He had married Mrs, Marlene Johnson Hatch, 
27 Aug, 1950, a widow with three small daughters. They had four children of their own: 
three boys and one little girl, but he always said that they had four girls and three boys. 
He dearly loves his family and his new home and he loved to entertain relatives and friends. 

There were many dark and lonely spots in his life which caused him suffering but even 
so he had time to do many worthwhile things for people such as coach the junior league 
Softball team of Kern's. He also, helped many boys to master their games in sports. He 

171 



died 13 March 1963 In Salt Lake City at the age of only thirty-eight years and he 
was buried in the family lot at Preston, Idaho. 

Milton was a very kind and friendly person with a winning personality and a smile 
that was worth a million dollars. 

Sketch written by Margaret Winward 



AERIAL GUY EAMES 



B. 18 July 1889 
Bapt. 31 July 1897 
End. 24 Apr. 1912 
Md. 24 Apr. 1912 

Father David Cullen Eames 



Preston, Oneida, Idaho 
Preston, Oneida, Idaho 
Salt Lake Temple, Salt Lake, Utah 
Salt Lake Temple, Salt Lake, Utah 

Mother Elizabeth Greaves 



Wife 52 FLORA EDNA GEDDES 



B. 20 Sept. 1889 
Bapt. Sept, 1897 
End. 24 April 1912 
Sid. 24 April 1912 

Father 2 William Stewart Geddes 



North Powder, Union, Oregon 
North Powder, Union, Oregon 
Salt Lake Temple, Salt Lake, Utah 
Salt Lake Temple, Salt Lake, Utah 

Mother Margaret Ferguson Cullen 



CHILDREN 



196 Donna Geddes Eames 

216 Veda Geddes Eames 
226 Edna Geddes Eames 

250 Nathaniel Howard Eames 

267 Aerial Geddes Eames, Jr. 

294 George Albert Eames 



B. 24 July 1915, Preston, Franklin, Idaho 
B. 10 June 1917, Preston, Franklin, Idaho 
B. 21 Oct. 1918, Preston, Franklin, Idaho 
B. 30 Sept, 1921, Preston, Franklin, Idaho 
B. 20 Apr. 1924, Preston, Franklin, Idaho 
B. 9 Dec. 1927, Preston, Franklin, Idaho 



AERIAL GUY EAMES 



Aerial Guy Eames was born July 18, 1889. I was the fifth child of a family of eight. 
My father is David C. Eames and my mother is Elizabeth Greaves Eames, They lived in 



172 



Logan when the three older children were born, then moved to Preston to live and home- 
stead the 80 acres northwest of town where I was born and reared. I went to school in 
a one-room school house called the Yellow Jacket. My son, George, bought the school 
house in the spring of 1960 and moved on the farm to use as a hay barn. At the age of 
12 years I started to school at the Oneida Stake Academy for my seventh and eighth grades 
and three years of high school . In the fall of 1909 I received a call to go on a mission 
to England so I discontinued school and came home to prepare for my mission. I had 
always been taught to go to church so I attended Sunday School, Mutual, and all my 
Priesthood Quorum classes. I was ordained a Deacon, Teacher, Priest and an Elder before 
going to England . 

During my high school and college years I made some very dear friends who have 
meant a great deal to me through the years. I married Edna Geddes on April 24, 1912, 
and left for England one week later. May 1, 1912. I sailed from Canada May 10, 1912, 
on the Virginian and arrived In Liverpool May 18. Harley Greaves met me at Liverpool 
and I was assigned by President Rudger Clawson to the Manchester District where I labored 
and presided over three different branches: Swinton, and then Burey, and Manchester 
for the last 14 months. The summer of 1913 Harley Greaves, George Parker, Parley 
Hatch and myself (all missionaries) toured the Continent. We sailed from Hull to Amsterdam, 
to Germany, Bern Switzerland, Geneva, then to France, to London and back to Man- 
chester. My wife, Edna, came to England in February, 1914, and stayed until I was re- 
leased about May 20, 1914. Then we toured England, Ireland, Scotland, Wales, 
Holland, Belgium, Switzerland, and France. We left Liverpool July 2 for home and 
arrived in Preston July 22, 1914. My mission was the greatest experience of my life, 
and I made many friends and a few converts to the church. 

I have been a farmer and raised cattle and sheep through the years. We lived with 
brother and sister George H. Carver In part of their house for four years where Donna, 
Veda, and Edna were born. Then we bought a red brick house in Preston, 37 North 
1st West, where Nathaniel was born in 1921 . In the spring of 1924 we bought the Tippets 
home where Aerial Jr. and George were born. We lived there until September 1957, 
when we moved in town, 257 North 1st East, Preston. 

After returning from England I worked in the M.I. A. and Sunday School for four 
years. I was ordained a Seventy and was Secretary of the Quorum until I was sustained 
as Second Counselor in the Third Ward Bishopric on June 10, 1917 to Harrison R. Merrill. 
Four years later. Brother William Hawkes was chosen Bishop and I was sustained First 
Counselor for 14 years in the Third Ward. I was a member of the City Council for four 
years when George E. Crockett was Mayor. 

Mom and I got a lot of pleasure in rearing our six children and we tried to give them 
a good education and it was not always easy. We have 27 wonderful grandchildren, 
three great grandchildren, and are proud of them all. George and Edna have each lost 
baby and about 8 years ago, July 28, 1957, dear sweet Barbara, Veda's daughter, passed 
away after a serious heart illness. Then last spring on March 31 , 1965, Donna's youngest 
daughter, Diane, passed away after a short Illness. We all loved them both. 

I had a coronary thrombosis attack in April 7, 1957, so we turned the farm over to 
George and moved in a nice new home in Preston, 257 North I East, where we are taking 

173 



life a little easier and have a little more time to relax and enjoy each other and 
family when they can drop in. 



52 FLORA EDNA GEDDES 



Flora Edna Geddes was born in North Powder, Oregon, on September 20, 1889. 
She was of Scottish descent and the daughter of William Stewart Geddes and Margaret 
Ferguson Cuilen. Her father died when she was only two years old. When she was 
eight years of age, she came to Preston, Idaho, and made her home with George Henry 
and Elizabeth Geddes Carver who was her father's only sister. 

She received her education at the Oneida Stake Academy and the Brigham Young 
University at Provo, Utah. As a young girl she was active in the auxiliary organizations 
as organist, teacher and as stake Y.W.M.I .A. board member. 

On 24 April 1912 she married Aerial Guy Eames in the Salt Lake Temple. He was 
the son of David and Elizabeth Greaves Eames. Aerial left for his mission to England 
on May 1912 shortly after their marriage. He labored in the Manchester district. 

In February 1914, Edna left for Europe. She met Aerial in Liverpool, England, 
and they spent six months traveling in Europe after Aerial was released from his mission. 
They toured in England, Ireland, Scotland, Wales, Holland, Belgium, Switzerland, and 
France. She met some of her mother's relatives in Scotland and stayed with them for 
awhile. 

This union has been blessed with six children, three girls and three boys: Donna, 
Veda, Edna, Nathaniel, Aerial Jr., and George. All three sons and two sons-in-law 
served in the United States armed forces during World War II. 

She has worked as 1st counselor in the presidency of the Third Ward Primary and the 
Y.W.M.I .A. , also as class leader in Mutual and Relief Society. She was a stake board 
member of the Relief Society under President Nellie Porter Head. She was also president 
of the Franklin County Daughters of Utah Pioneers. 

Aunt Lizzie Carver made her home with them after the death of her husband, George 
Carver. She lived with them for four years, until she passed away from a heart attack. 
When Aerial's mother was 86 years old, she lived with them most of the last three years 
of her life. Edna's mother, who was 89 years old, also lived with them part of the last 
year of her life. 

The first four years of their married life they lived on the farm with Aunt Lizzie 
and Uncle George, living in two rooms of the house. In 1918 they purchased a red brick 
home in town and in 1924 they bought the home at 41 North 1st West. They lived there 
for 12 years until they bought Aerial's father's farm. They lived on the farm until 1957 
when Aerial had a serious heart attack. They sold the farm to George and moved into 
Preston where they purchased a home at 257 North 1st East. 

174 



They have visil-ed California a number of times and also attended the World's 
Exhibition in San Francisco, taking Veda, George and Beulah Spongberg with them. 
Four of their children attended the University of Idaho at Moscow, Idaho: Donna, 
Veda, Edna, and Aerial Jr. Donna and Edna received their degrees from the university. 

They took several trips through the northwest and British Columbia, taking the 
whole family while the children were attending school at Moscow. Nathaniel graduated 
from Woodberry's Business College at Los Angeles, California. 

They have visisted Denver (where Veda lives) many times and in the fall of 1957 
in company with Robert and Etta Gibson, they visited Arizona, New Mexico, and the 
Grand Canyon of the Colorado and Bryce Canyon. 

Edna has had several serious illnesses and operations, but remains in fairly good 
health. At the present time they have 23 grandchildren. 



Sketch written by Donna Geddes Fames Noyes 



VON ORAL NOYES 



B. 22 Jan. 1911 
Bapt. 23 Aug. 1919 
End. 6 Nov. 1936 
Md. 14 June 1939 

Father John Henry Noyes 



Hanksville, Wayne, Utah 
Hanksville, Wayne, Utah 
Salt Lake Temple, Salt Lake, Utah 
Salt Lake Temple, Salt Lake, Utah 

Mother Edith Jane McDougall 



Wife 196 DONNA GEDDES FAMES 



B. 24 July 1915 
Chr. 12 Sept. 1915 
Bapt. 24 July 1923 
End. 14 June 1939 
Sid. 14 June 1939 

Father Aerial Guy Fames 



Preston, Franklin, Idaho 

Preston, Franklin, Idaho 

Preston, Franklin, Idaho 

Salt Lake Temple, Salt Lake, Utah 

Salt Lake Temple, Salt Lake, Utah 

Mother 52 Flora Edna Geddes 



CHILDREN 



458 Stephen Fames Noyes 



B. 20 June 1940, Preston, Franklin, Idaho 
Bapt. 3 July 1948, Preston, Franklin, Idaho 



175 



477 Edith Jane Noyes B. 8 Aug. 1942, Preston, Franklin, Idaho 

Bapt. 4 Nov. 1950, Preston, Franklin, Idaho 

522 Marian Noyes B. 13 Jan. 1946, Preston, Franklin, Idaho 

Bapt. 6 Feb. 195^, Preston, Franklin, Idaho 

575 David Von Noyes B. 5 June 1949, Preston, Franklin, Idaho 

601 Diane Noyes B. 10 March 1951, Preston, Franklin, Idaho 

Bapt. 28 Mar. 1959, Preston, Franklin, Idaho 
D, 31 Mar. 1965, Preston, Franklin, Idaho 
End. 30 June 1965, Preston, Franklin, Idaho 



VON ORAL NOYES 



Von Oral Noyes was born in Hanksville, Utah, on the 22 of January 1911, the son 
of John Henry Noyes and Edith Jane McDougall . When he was fifteen years of age the 
family moved to Decio, Idaho. He has been a farmer all of his life. He has always 
been active in the church. He has served in the M.I. A. superintendency, has been 
Sunday School superintendent, and was second counselor in the Third Ward Bishopric for 
five years. He was scout master for many years and High Priest's group leader. At 
the present time he is Deacons' supervisor. 

In 1951 he accepted a call to the Western States mission. He labored in Alamosa, 
Colorado, for several months and then was transferred to Laramie, Wyoming, where he 
labored for one year. He was then transferred to Grand Island, Nebraska, and became 
district president over the West Nebraska district. After returning from his mission he 
became Third Word M.I. A. superintendent. He was a member of the ward genealogical 
committee for many years and was High Priest group instructor. He is now a member of 
the district scout committee. 

Von married Donna Geddes Fames June 14, 1939, in the Salt Lake Temple. They 
lived in DecIo for a few months and then moved to Preston where they purchased the George 
Carver farm. 



196 DONNA GEDDES FAMES NOYES 



I was born on the George Carver farm one mile west and one-half mile north of 
Preston, Idaho. We now own this farm. I attended the Central School for tbe first 
four grades; however, I skipped the third grade, I graduated from the eighth grade in 
the Jefferson School and from high school in the old rock building. Then I attended the 
U.S.A.C. for two years. The first year Carmen Nelson and I had an apartment In the up- 
stairs of the Swenson home In Logon just below the college on fifth north. Blaine and 
Wanda Johnson hod another apartment upstairs. Four of their brothers and cousins boarded 
with them. The second year I lived at the Hyrum Tippets residence at 527 East 5 North. 
Their daughter, Jean, and I had always been very close friends. Tippets had lived next 

176 



door to us in Preston for a number of years. During my junior and senior years I attended 
the University of Idaho. I lived at Forney Hall . My roommates for both years were 
Eva Nice from Oregon and Loanda Ricks from Rexburg, We were very active in the social 
life of the L.D.S. Institute at Moscow. While there I was organist of the Institute Sunday 
School one year and secretary another. 

When I graduated I received a book from the Institute. Books were given to the 
three outstanding L.D.S. graduates. I received my B. S. degree in Education from the 
University of Idaho. My parents come up to the commencement exercises. 

The previous summer I had stayed for summer school and the whole family came to 
Moscow for me and we took a trip throughout the Northwest. We went to Portland, 
Seattle, British Columbia and came home down the Columbia River highway. This was a 
very interesting trip and I have never forgotten it. 

I taught school for two years in Decio, Idaho. I boarded at Vosbergs with some of 
the other teachers. I enjoyed my work there very much. I taught high school English, 
home economics, and music. I made many friends there: Maudie Cox, Pat Pickett, 
Ma and Cliff Dorrington, Fern Boynton, Otis Williams, Delia Street, Don Schwaegler, 
Virginia Serrot, and Lorin McGregor, These people taught school there and married 
within two or three years. I often went to Rupert for the weekend with Maudie or to 
Burley with Fern. I met Von while I was teaching there and with the above mentioned group 
we had a very enjoyable time. While there I was DecIo Ward organist and Gleaner leader. 
Von gave me an engagement ring for my birthday in 1938. I went to Burley and stayed with 
Fern for a week at that time. 

The following year I taught at Soda Springs. I taught English, speech and home 
economics. I boarded with Leo and Verba Greaves the first part of the year; and when he 
was transferred, I lived at the hotel with Gladys Wilson. I was ward chorister that year. 

I have always enjoyed music. I learned to play the piano while young and was in 
I many recitals in Preston and went to Pocatello for the music contests. I studied under 
Mrs. Paul. I remember one recital where we had several pianos and played double duets 
on them. When I was in high school I learned to chord on the guitar. Fern and I 
sang together a great deal at DecIo and here in Preston I have sung on numerous occasions 
with others. I have spent many hours playing the piano for dance practices and accompanying 
people. I have always enjoyed dramatics and have been in a number of plays and given 
readings and stories. 

When I was young my father would take us to Bear Lake each summer; we looked for- 
ward to these trips. We also went swimming and to the canyon. One year we had an 
Eames family reunion at the farm. The Gledhills came from Richfield and the Tippets 
from Pocatello. We had a wonderful two days getting to know our cousins better. Aunt 
Ruby Eames used to come out from New York every two years and we always looked 
forward to her visit. We always had her make cinnamon rolls and cherry pies for us. I 
loved to go and see my Grandmother Geddes in Salt Lake. She had so many lovely 
things in her home. My cousin Margaret and I went to stay with her a month one summer. 
She took us all over and we had a wonderful time. Many Sunday afternoons I spent at 



177 



Aunt Pearl's with Venice. We liked to go horseback riding and have weiner roasts and 
picnics . 

I was married 14 June 1939 in the Salt Lake Temple. Mother had a party for me 
at home and Invited our relatives and I showed them my things. I had a lot of things 
that I had bought during the three years I taught school . Mother and Dad went to 
Salt Lake with us, also Jean Tippets Chipman. After the temple ceremony, my sister 
Veda gave a lunch for us in the Gold Room of the Hotel Utah. That evening we went 
out to Saltair and then stayed at the Temple Square Hotel , The next day we went back 
to Preston and the following day to Declo. In November I came back to Preston with the 
folks who had been to see us. Von came in December and we stayed with the folks until 
March when we rented our present home and moved there. I had been born in this house 
and remember living here when Aunt Lizzie and Uncle George lived here. We have 
five children: Stephen, Edith, Marian, David, and Diane. 

In 1951 Von went on a mission to the Western States for 16 months. The folks took 
us to Laramie to see him one time and David and I went on the bus to Denver to see him 
another time and stayed with Veda, He came home for his father's funeral and as I had 
been ill, he was released. John and Leia (Von's sister) moved up here for a year and 
ran the place. We divided the house in half. 

I have been very active in church work since my marriage. I have been Sunday 
School organist, leader In the stake Primary, first counselor In the stake Primary, ward 
Gleaner leader, stake drama director in the M.I. A., first counselor in the stoke M.I.A., 
organist in the stake Relief Society, member of the word Singing Mothers, organist in the 
ward Relief Society, co-ordlnator of the Sr. Sunday School, ward and stoke dance director 
a member of the ward Genealogical committee and hove taught several Genealogy classes 
in the ward. I 

During the war, I taught here a year when Stephen and Edith were small, I taught ^ 
English, speech, and history. Our family and Browers (Von's sister) went to Yellowstone I 
Park one summer for a few days. We also took the family to Hanksvlllein 1955 to a 
McDougall reunion; this was where Von was born. We have danced in the festivals in 
Logon and Salt Lake which was on enjoyable experience. We were members of the first 
square dance club which we organized here and for many years, we square danced once i 
a week. We put on many exhibitions and taught many others to square dance. ' 



In 1957 we went by train to Flint, Michigan, to get a new car. We took the three 
girls with us. We drove up into Canada, went to Niagara Falls, Palmyra, New York, 
where we visited the sacred grove and the Hill Cumorah; Chicago; Nauvoo. We stayed 
In Denver with my sister Veda. 

I have been Franklin County Woman's Chairman of Farm Bureau for the post five 
years. In December 1959 I accompanied our state talent winners to the National Farm 
Bureau Convention at Chicago. This was a very interesting and enjoyable experience. 
In Feb. 1960 I accompanied nine West Side girls to Boise to the Farm Bureau Youth-power 
conference. Outstanding speakers were present and It was a very Interesting experience. 
We went by bus. In the summer of 1961 I went with Forsgrens to the Western Region Farm 
Bureau convention at McCall, Idaho. This Is a beautiful little town on the shore of Payett 

178 



Lake. Some of the best speakers that I have ever heard v^ere there. They had wonder- 
ful luncheons, a patio barbeque, beach breakfast, and banquet. The first year as 
Woman's Chairman we put on a big banquet honoring Ezra Taft Benson, who was then 
United States Secretary of Agriculture. We held it in the new gymasium. The women 
were in charge of the food. We served over 1100 people. It was an outstanding success, 
but I have never worked so hard in my life. For several years I have been chairman of tfie 
Community Booths at the county fair. The Farm Bureau women make these booths and 
they have been very outstanding. We have entered a float in the Rodeo Parade for 
several years; this has been a lot of work, but the results are very satisfying. I have enjoyed 
working on the Farm Bureau very much. 

I belong to the Fine Arts Club which is a study club and social group. I enjoy this 
and have made many good friends in this group. 

In 1957 I went to Denver for a week and stayed with Veda when her daughter Barbara 
passed away. This was a very sad experience for all of us. Diane went with me as she 
has had diabetes since she was four years old and I have to give her a shot every day. 

I have been going to the Salt Lake Genealogical library once a month for the past 
seven years with the Geddeses. We take turns taking our cars. We have been getting 
names from the Scotch microfilms. We have sent thousands of names to the library. Von 
and I have also done a great deal of work on the Noyes' line. This work is very rewarding. 

One year I sang in the Relief Society chorus under the direction of Sister Madsen . We 
sang in the Relief Society general conference and for the Friday session of October conference, 
This was a wonderful experience to sing in the tabernacle. I have always enjoyed singing. 
Our Relief Society chorus sings for most funerals in the ward and for many years we have 
given a Christmas program in sacrament meeting. 

At the present time our son Stephen is on a mission to Florida. He went to the 
Southern States mission in July 1960, but it was divided the following January. Edith is 
attending U.S.U. and taking a secretarial course. 

I have always had poor eyesight but I love to read. I would thoroughly enjoy 
spending all of my spare time reading if my eyes would permit. I enjoy poetry and have a 
nice collection. I like to help with stunts and skits and usually help with some of these 
in our ward reunions. I don't particularly like to do housework, but I love to cook. We 
have belonged to the Rendezvous Dance Club for many years. This has been a very enjoy- 
able experience as we made friends with people from the other stake that we might not 
have come in contact with . 

I think in the future that I would like to spend more time doing genealogy work, as I 
feel that it is one of the most important things we can do. 



Sketch written by Donna E. Noyes 



179 



458 STEPHEN EAMES NOYES 



B. 20 June 1940 
Bapt, 3 July 1948 
End. 16 June 1960 
Md. 6 Nov. 1962 

Father Von Oral Noyes 



Preston, Franklin, Idaho 
Preston, Franklin, Idaho 
Salt Lake City, Salt Lake, Utah 
Logan Temple, Cache, Utah 

Mother 196 Donna Geddes Eames 



Wife VERA JACQUELINE (Jackie) CRUMP 



B. 9 July 1941 
Bapt. 4 June 1959 
End. 23 Oct. 1962 
Sid. 6 Nov. 1962 

Father Edward Percy Crump 



Fort Myers, Lee, Florida 
Fort Myers, Lee, Florida 
Logan Temple, Cache, Utah 
Logan Temple, Cache, Utah 

Mother Mary Ella Fill Yaw 



CHILDREN 



Angela Leone Noyes 
Clesta Dav/n Noyes 



B. 16 Aug, 1963, Preston, Franklin, Idaho 
B. 14 May 1965, Preston, Franklin, Idaho 



458 STEPHEN EAMES NOYES 



Stephen Eames Noyes was born June 20th 1940 in Preston, Idaho, He is the son 
of Donna Geddes Eames and Von Oral Noyes. He attended school in Preston. During 
his junior year in high school he was president of the seminary. He sang in a boy's 
quartet during his junior and senior years. He bought a guitar and learned how to play it 
and sang on many programs. During his senior year he was president of the Future Farmers 
of America and had the privilege of going to Kansas City to the national convention of the 
Future Farmers of America. Stephen had the leading male part in the high school opera 
Oklahoma . He took the part of Curley. He also had the lead in the high school play 
The Rainmaker . The male quartet of which he was a member sang the Preston High School 
song at the graduation exercises, 

Stephen was always active in scouting and became an Eagle Scout and earned his Duty 
to God award. He went to California to an Explorer "Citizens Now Conference" and 
helped put on a similar conference at Logan, 

Stephen went to Utah State University for his freshman year. While there he took 
a number of agriculture classes. He was a member of the Meistersingers and he and another 
fellow played their guitars and sang on numerous programs. He was a member of the quartet 

180 t 



in the opera Most Happy Fella. 

In the fall of 1959 he joined the National Guard. He went to Fort Ord in California 
for the first 6 weeks training period and then to Fort Sill, Oklahoma, for the rest of the 
six month training period. Two years later he took officers training at Boise and at the 
present time is a 2nd lieutenant in the guard. 

In July of 1960 Stephen was called on a mission to the Southern States. He was 
sent first to Moutlrie, Georgia where he remained for 2 months and then he was sent to 
Albany, Georgia. Stephen had many worthwhile experiences while on his mission. He 
was sent to the large church farm of Deseret where he labored for 4 months. Stephen hod 
a narrow escape while helping fight a fire that broke out in a large shed in which the corn 
was stored. He was hospitilized for two days suffering from smoke inhalation. He taught 
seminary during this time. After Stephen had been In the mission field for six months, 
the Southern States mission was divided and the Florida mission was formed. During the 
last six months of his mission Stephen was 2nd Counselor in the Florida mission to President 
Karl R. Lyman and he had the privilege of traveling throughout the mission and working 
with the missionaries. Stephen lived at the mission home in Winter Park, Florida, during 
this time . 

Stephen arrived home from his mission In July of 1962. He met Jacqueline (Jackie) 
Crump of Fort Myers, Florida, who was working in Salt Lake, and they were married 
November 6, 1962 In the Logon Temple. They have two daughters, Angela and Celeste, 
During the winter months of 1964 and 1965 Stephen took on additional three months 
National Guard officer training course at Fort Knox, Kentucky. Jackie and Angela 
went with him and they lived In a trailer. They went to Fort Myers, Florida, to spend 
the Christmas holidays with her family. 

After returning home from his mission, Stephen was made superintendent of the 
Y. M.M.I. A. After a few months he was released from this position to be come 2nd 
assistant In the Oneida Stake Y. M.M.I. A. presidency. After two years he was released 
from this position to become scout master of the Preston Third Ward, He has taught a 
Sunday School class for the past three years and Is a home teacher. 

Stephen gives guitar lessons to a number of students. He works at the Preston radio 
station as an announcer and has a half hour talent program over KPST every Saturday 
afternoon. Stephen, Jackie, David and Diane formed a quartet and sang at a number of 
programs In the county and surrounding towns. Stephen is associated with his father In 
farming. 



VERA JACQUELINE CRUMP NOYES 



I was born July 9, 1941 in Fort Myers, Florida, to Mary Ella Fillyaw and Edward 
Percy Crump. I have one brother, Harry Ellsworth Crump and on adopted brother, Joseph 
Allen Crump. I attended Edgewood Elementary School In Fort Myers and Brigham Young 
Elementary In Winter Haven, Florida. I also attended Winter Haven Junior High for a 

181 



short time while my father was employed at Bartow Air Force Base as a master hydraulic 
specialist. When I was 13, we then moved back to Fort Myers where I graduated from 
Fort Myers High School, I was active in Glee Club, National Forensic League, drill 
squad, and Future Homemakers of America. 

After graduating from high school and working for awhile for Winn-Dixie, a grocery 
chain store, I decided to move to Salt Lake and find work there. While in Salt Lake, I 
worked for a short time for the Young Mens Mutual Improvement Association. I then 
was employed by an orthopedic surgeon in Salt Lake as medical secretary and assistant. I 
also spent two of my high school summers in Windsor, Connecticut, working for the Shade 
Tobacco Growers Association. We took many tours while there, and did some mountain 
climbing in Vermont and through New England. We visited New York on the way home 
every summer where we had Broadway show tickets, I enjoyed this very much, but was 
always glad to get home. 

Stephen and I have two beautiful girls whom we love very much. We have many 
things in common and enjoy singing together. Since being in Preston, I have been drama 
director in the Mutual in our ward. I enjoyed this very much. 



477 EDITH JANE NOYES 



On August 8, 1942, I was born to Von Oral Noyes and Donna Geddes Fames at 
Preston, Franklin Co., Idaho. Since I was the first girl in the family born after my 
Grandmother Noyes died, I was named after her — Edith Jane Noyes. 

I guess one of the first things I became acquainted with was my family — Mom, Dad, 
and Stephen. Later on Marian, David, and Diane were born. I was raised on a little 
farm one mile from the town which has through the years grown into a 300 — acre farm 
with 50 Grade A dairy cows. As time passed, I grew to love this farm with its big white 
house, its apple, cherry, plum, and box elder trees; its acres of beets, wheat, hay, and 
corn crops; Its curiousbrighf-eyed animals as they watched you walk by; the huge front 
lawn on which we used to play baseball but always hated to mow; the peace and quietness 
of the summer days; and the smell of freshly cut hay. No where, I thought in all the world 
could there be a place as beautiful and as peaceful as this. As I grew older, I sometimes 
wished during the summer months that I didn't live on this big farm, because while my city 
friends were out playing In the cool shade, I was out cooking in the hot sun while sitting 
on the tractor or else walking up and down rows of beets with a hoe in my hand. 

Along with all the work there was to be done, we always managed to get in a lot of 
playing. Steven and I and a few of the neighbor kids built tree houses in every available 
tree we could find in our orchard, swam in the irrigation ditch, and played on the rafters 
in the hay barn. We also enjoyed eating green transparent apples with salt until our 
mothers were afraid that we would be sick for a week with a stomach ache. We had a lot 
of pets as we were growing up such as cats, dogs, horses, lambs, ducks, geese, and 
rabbits. 



182 



I attended school in Preston from the 1st to the 3rd grade in the Central, from the 4th 
to the 7th in the Jefferson, and from the 7th on up to graduation in Preston High. I always 
liked school . Since we lived so far from town, we had to ride the bus to and from school 
every day and eat our lunch in the cafeteria. In high school I was a member of the Pep 
Club, a member of the choir and participated in several operas, and during my senior year 
was secretary of the Girl's League. In 1960 I graduated from high school. Graduation 
day was a happy day in my life for I had looked forward to the goal of a high school 
graduate for a long time, and yet it was one of the saddest days of my life. 

When I was quite young, mom started me taking piano and dancing lessons. I must 
admit that I liked the dancing much better than the piano. I took dancing from the time 
I was nine until I graduated from high school . I danced in all our operas that we put on 
in junior high and high school and on quite a few assemblies. When I was working in Logan 
during the year 1965, I started taking roller skating lessons. I was in a few of the roller 
rhapsodies and really enjoyed skating. 

V\'hen I was 14, Bishop Roper asked me to be a teacher in the Primary. I taught the 
Sunbeams (four year olds) for two years and really enjoyed it. Then when I was 17, I 
was elected President of the Laurels (Junior Gleaners) in our stake. I received my Silver 
Gleaner Award. In 1959 I graduated from the L.D.S. Seminary. 

After graduation from high school I attended college for two years at Utah State 
University in Logan, Utah. I took classes mostly in secretarial science since I was planning 
on being a secretary. During these years, I was a member of Lambda Delta Sigma. 

In the year 1962 I quit school and got a job as a secretary in the Agricultural Economics 
Department at Utah State University where I am currently working. I live in the University 
3rd Ward where I have held church jobs as Relief Society visiting teacher, a member of the 
Fellowshipping Committee, secretary of the Sunday School, and at present I am secretary 
of the Stake Sunday School . I have graduated from the L.D.S. Institute, and also enjoyed 
receiving a special certificate for work beyond graduation. I really enjoy my work in 
the church and feel that it really is a strong influence in my life, and a great blessing. 

I have had the opportunity of taking a few big trips in my life. When I was 14, I 
went back East with my parents where we visited Nauvoo, Carthage, and Palmyra. There 
we saw the landmarks of the church. I have also visited southern and northernCalifornia 
and last summer I went to Florida for three weeks. 



522 MARIAN NOYES LUMBRERAS 



Marian Noyes, the daughter of Von Noyes and Donna Geddes Eames was born Jan. 13, 
1946 in Preston, Idaho. She attended school in Preston where she graduated from seminary 
and high school . Marian liked to dance and she took part in the dances in the junior high 
and high school operas. She enjoyed singing in the high school choir. Marian was a 
member of the F.H.A. and during her senior year was secretary of the organization. She 



183 



was also a member of the pep club. During her last two years in high school, Marian 
worked at the A & W Root Beer stand in Preston. In the fall of her senior year she went 
to Florida with her sister-in-law for fv/o weeks. 

Marian was married the 9th of Sept., 1964 to Henry Lumbreras. They live in 
Mercedes, Texas where their son, Edward, was born 18 June 1965. At the present time, 
Marian is secretary of the Primary and Relief Society in the branch at Mercedes. 



575 DAVID VON NOYES 



David Von Noyes was born 5 June 1949 in Preston, Idaho. He is the son of Von Noyes 
and Donna Geddes Eames. He grew up on the farm one mile west and one-half mile north 
of town. He liked the farm and helped with the farm work during the summer and with the 
milking in the winter. David was active in 4H Club work for several years and had a calf 
project and took electricity. He enjoyed going to Bear Lake to 4H camp. 

David is taking his 3rd year of seminary at the present time. He has been active in 
the F .F . A. at school and has held the office of chapter sentinal and reporter . 

David has always enjoyed singing and has sung with his brother Stephen and with the 
quartet. He has been in the high school operas and enjoys singing with the high school 
choir. David Is active in scouting. He received his Eagle Scout badge in 1965. In 
July 1964 he attended the National Boy Scout Jamboree at Valley Forge . They went by 
plane to Buffalo, New York, and then took a bus to Niagara Falls and Palmyra, New York. 
He spent four days in New York where he saw the Worlds Fair. After an exciting week at 
Valley Forge, the scouts went to Washington, D. C. and after seeing places of interest they 
returned home by plane. In the summer of 1965 he attended the L.D.S. International 
Explorer Conference at the B.Y.U. in Provo . 

David has been active in his Priesthood work. At the present time, he is a Priest 
and is looking forward to receiving his Duty to God award this spring, 

David has always enjoyed camping, hunting and fishing. In the summer of 1965 he 
accompanied his mother and Edith to Florida and Texas for a three weeks vacation. 



6-1 DIANE NOYES 

Diane was born March 10, 1951 in Preston, Idaho. She was the youngest daughter 
of Donna Geddes Fames and Von Oral Noyes. She was a fat, healthy baby, but when 
she was four years of age she developed diabetes. Diane learned to accept the shot every 
morning but she always hated it and didn't want people to know that she had diabetes. 

Diane was always a loving and affectionate child and liked to do things for people. 

184 



I 



whenever her classes had a party she always volunteered to bring something and she 
liked to help with the games and program. When Diane was five years old she went 
with her parents and two sisters on the train to Flint, Michigan to get a car. When she 
was eleven, she accompanied her parents to Fort Myers, Florida. She enjoyed this trip 
very much and many interesting places such as Carlsbad Caverns, New Orleans, St. 
Augustine, Florida and others were visited. Diane always enjoyed visiting her cousins and 
going to the family reunions. Diane enjoyed cooking very much and liked to fix a meal 
for the family and decorate the table. She was very happy when her niece Angela was 
born and loved to help take care of her. Diane was taking a genealogy class and was 
very interested in decorating her book of remembrance. 

During the summer of 1964 Diane went with her parents, grandparents and sister 

Edith to California. They went to Dunsmuir near Mt. Shasta to visit Aerial and his family. 

After staying there for several days they drove to the coast and through the redwoods to 

San Francisco for an enjoyable 2 days of sightseeing. Diane enjoyed these trips with her 
family. She had a keen sense of humor and liked to tell jokes, bhe brought much joy and 

happiness into the home. She became seriously ill March 30 and died March 31, 1965 

and was buried in the Preston Cemetery. The following obituary was given at her funeral 

by a neighbor, Grace Gamble. 

"Diane loved life and lived it fully. She was very sweet, sunny dispositioned person. 
She had many friends, not only those her own age but very young and older. She could 
play dolls or house with the very young and enjoy it; she could share the joys and trials 
of teen agers her own age and older, or she worked with, and was a source of inspiration 
and help to adults. She loved her sister-in-law, Jackie, like a sister and adored her 
little niece, Angela, Diane was completely happy when she had charge of her. You 
could see love radiate from her for Angela. Diane was a girl of many talents. She had 
completed five years in 4H Club work; she especially loved cooking. Diane sang and 
loved it. As recently as a week ago she was in a junior high school assembly. 

Diane has been giving talks and taking part in Sunday School since she was very young. 
She would often volunteer to give her help. She was a person you could call on at the 
last minute and she would respond in a way that would make your heart sing. She was 
dependable. Shen she said she would do something, you knew she would be there to do it. 
She has achieved in the M.LA. programs. She has taken part in M,I.A, plays, filled 
honor badges In the Bee Hive program, played on the girls' softball team, worked on the 
welfare farm as well as other activities. Diane had a wonderful sense of humor. She 
loved a good joke, both to tell and to enjoy. 

Diane had a great amount of Faith , She was unfortunate enough to become a diabetic 
as the early age of four. She never seemed to complain about her lot. It has been 
very difficult for her nevertheless . When she would become ill , it was always harder 
on her because of her diabetes, but the first thing Diane wanted was to be administered 
to by those having the Priesthood — and until this last illness, felt the great power of 
healing and expressed feeling better. 

Diane was a very thoughtful person — even beyond her young years. We have had 
the joy as a family of having Diane in our home many hours. She never forgot our birth- 
days, not one of us. If she went on a trip, she would write a card to us and usually return 

185 



with little gifts for each one. It was the same at Christmas. She remembered us all . 

Yes, Diane loved life and giving of herself — and though we will all miss her, we 
know that she will go on in her sweet spirit." 



The Ship 



Author Unknown 



"I am standing upon the seashore. A ship at my side spreads her 

white sails to the morning breeze and starts for the blue lagoon. 

"She is an object of beauty and strength and I stand and watch her until, 

at length, she is only a ribbon of white cloud just where the sea and 

sky come to mingle with each other. 

"Then someone at my side says, "There! She is gone! Gone where? 

Gone from my sight - That is all ." 

"She is just as large in mast and hull as when she left my side and 

just as able to bear her load of living freight to the place of 

destination . 

"Her diminished size is in me, not in her, and just at the moment 'There! 

She is gone!' There are other voices glad to take up the shout, 

"There! She comes 1 1 ! " 



STERLING WATROUS BABB 



B. 30 Oct. 1912 
Md. 26 Oct. 1940 

Father George Sterling 



Amarlllo, Porter, Texas 

Salt Lake City, Salt Lake, Utah 

Mother Winifred Louise Hutsell 



Wife 216 VEDA GEDDES EAMES 



B. 10 June 1917 
Chr. 1 July 1917 
Bapt. 10 June 1925 

Father Aerial Guy Eames 



Preston, Franklin, Idaho 
Preston, Franklin, Idaho 
Preston, Franklin, Idaho 

Mother 52 Flora Edna Geddes 



CHILDREN 



504 Barbara Jean Babb 



B. 29 Sept. 1944, Denver, Arapahoe, Colorado 
Bapt. 27 Mar. 1954, Denver, Araphoe, Coloradc 
D. 28 July 1957 
186 



End, 26 Feb. 1959, Logan Temple, Cache, Utah 
539 Robert Sterling Babb B. 14 Apr. 1949, Denver, Arapahoe, Colorado 



216 VEDA GEDDES EAMES BABB 



Veda Geddes Eames Babb, the second daughter of six children of Aerial and Edna Eames 
was born in Preston, Idaho, June 10, 1917. 

She attended schools In Preston through high school, then went to college at U.S.A. C. 
at Logan, Utah and U. of I . at Moscow, Idaho. She was active in speech, dramatics, 
and 4 H club work. She worked for five years as a secretary for Libby McNeill and Libby 
in Salt Lake City, and there met and married Sterling Babb on October 26, 1940. 

Sterling Watrous Babb, the son of Winifred Hutsell and George Sterling Babb, was born 
in Amarillo, Texas, October 30, 1912. He has one brother, Newton Hutsell Babb of 
Colorado Springs, Colorado. 

He attended schools in Amarillo through junior college. He was active in scouting 
and an eagle scout; he also was an accomplished musician on the trumpet and baritone. 

Sterling and Veda made their home in Denver, Colorado, until Sterling was called to 
serve in World War II as a Sergeant in the infantry, attached to the Third Army. He was 
wounded in Germany and received the Purple Heart. He spent several months in army 
hospitals in France and England. 

He moved back to Denver after the war and resumed work as an automotive man- 
ufacturers representative. 

Sterling has been active In his Automotive Booster Club, serving as President in 
1947. He has worked as a Scout Leader for several years, 

Veda has been working at Montgomery Ward in their catalog telephone order depart- 
ment since 1956. 

Barbara Jean Babb was born September 29, 1942 and Robert Sterling Babb, April 14, 
1947 in Denver, Colorado. 

Barbara Jean was the first girl born in the Babb family In fifty years. She was very 
active in the church organizations and played the piano and organ for the Junior Sunday 
School at Denver First Ward. She was an outstanding student and a beautiful girl . In 
spite of heart trouble, she had an abundance of energy and drive. 

On July 28, 1957, Barbara Jean passed away, seventeen days after heart surgery . 
She was laid to rest In Fairmount Cemetery, Denver, Colorado. 

Robert, now a senior In high school. Is an Eagle Scout; he carried a paper route for 

187 



three years and is now working port time at Belcaro Animal Mospital . He has been active 
in all sports. His specialty is pole vaulting. In 1964 lie placed second in the City of 
Denver and third at the Rocky Mountain Junior Olympics . 

Sketch was written October 24, 1964 



EDWARD JAY DENNING 



B 14 July 1920 
Bapt 5 Aug. 1928 
Md 7 Feb. 1945 
End 16 June 1959 

Father Warren Phillip Denninc 



Ammon, oonneville, Idaho 

Ammon, Bonneville, Idaho 

Preston, Franklin, Idaho 

Idaho Fai'? Tf^mple, Bonneville, Idaho 

Mother Bertie Mabel Null 



Wife 226 EDNA GEDDES EAMES 



B 21 Oct. 1918 
Chr 24 Nov. 1918 
Bapt 21 Oct. 1926 
End 16 June 1959 
Sid 16 June 1959 

Father Aerial Guy Fames 



Preston, Franklin, Idaho 

Preston, Franklin, Idaho 

Preston, Franklin, Idaho 

Idaho Falls Temple, Bonneville, Idaho 

Idaho Falls Temple, Bonneville, Idaho 

Mother Z2 Flora Edna Geddes 



CHILDREN 



1057 Richard Denning 
535 Edward Jay Denning 
560 Lynne Denning 
578 Douglas Eames Denning 
600 Mark Eames Denning 
629 Merri Dennino 



B 12 Nov. 1945, Preston, Franklin, Idaho I 

D 12 Nov. 1945, Preston, Franklin, Idaho ' 

B 21 Ja : 1947, Idaho Falls, Bonneville, Idaho 
Bapt 6 A.Aar. 1955, Idaho Falls, Bonneville, Idaho; 
B 9 Jul) 1948, Idaho Falls, Bonneville, Idaho ^' 
Bapt 5 Jan. 1957, Idaho Falls, Bonneville, Idaho- 
B 2 Nov. 1949, Idaho Falls, Bonneville, Idaho 
Bapt 24 /Vcr. 1958, Idaho Falls, Bonneville, Idchc 
B 8 Mar. 1951, Idaho Falls, Bonneville, Idaho 
Bapt 28 mar. 1959, Idaho Falls, Bonneville, Idahc 
B 27 Sep! . 1952, Idaho Falls, Bonneville, Idaiio 
Bapt 5 Nov. 1960, Idaho Falls, Bonneville, Idaho 



188 



649 Robyn Denning 
683 Jill Denning 
1058 Scoff Eames Denning 



B. n Sepf. 1953, Idaho Falls, Bonneville, Idaho 
Bapf. 7 Ocf, 1961, Idaho Falls, Bonneville, Idaho 
B. 2 Feb. 1956, Idaho Falls, Bonneville, Idaho 
Bapf. 29 Feb. 1964, Idaho Falls, Bonneville, Idaho 
B. 20 Dec. 1956, Idaho Falls, Bonneville, Idaho 
Bapf. 2 Jan. 1965, Idaho Falls, Bonneville, Idaho 



EDWARD JAY DENNING 



Edward Jay Denning was born in Ammon, Idaho, July 14, 1920, son of Berfie Mabel 
Null and Warren Phillip Denning. He grew up in fhe early years wifh lack of many modern 
conveniences and led quife a hard life for a young boy. Buf like our pioneers, fhis dev- 
eloped in him sfrengfh bofh physically and in characfer. The early years his fafher 
herded sheep so fhe family lived in fhe hills in fhe summer. Here his love of nafure and 
fhe ouf of doors was developed. His main feacher was God and nafure. He remembers 
riding horses like an Indian wifh only a loop in fheir moufh. 

"I can remember fhe hills, sheep, horses, buf besf of all fhe squirrels. As a small 
boy I can see foday fhe sfrings I puf around fhe hole in fhe ground, fhen waif hours fo pull 
fhe sfring and cafch fhem when fhey would sfick fheir heads up, fhe liffle wagons ouf of 
mafch boxes I builf for fhem fo pull, fhe cuffing off of fheir fails, fhe clipped off ear and 
brand of my big E. D. on fheir hips. These things I remember so vividly." 

He was reared in a family of seven boys and fhree girls. Two sisfers, Befh and Dora, 
died while fhey were very young. The winfer years were spent in fhe village of Ammon. 
Hard work was one of his virtues. During high school years he hauled coal from the Blind 
Bull Coa\ Mine for Everett Purcell who held fhe contract for the coal for bofh fhe school 
and church in the village of Ammon. 

He worked for fhe Nielson Brothers and Everett Purcell of Ammon. Many days besides 
going fo school he would haul a load before school and a load after school of sugarbeef 
pulp; every day from the Lincoln Factory, four miles, and six loads on Saturday and again 
on Sunday. This was shoveled off and on by hand, and because of fhe cold, much of fhe 
time he spent walking behind the horses and sleigh to keep from freezing. 

He was an outstanding athlete in baseball, basketball, football, and was noted for 
being a clean player and a good sport. 

The Ammon Basketball Team went to state play two years. Ammon High School burned 
down in 1936. The team gained much publicity by wearing basketball shorts made from 
gunnysacks and fringed around the legs. He graduated from seminary and high school at 
Ammon just out of Idaho Falls. 

In 1940, he met Edna Eames who was teaching home economics in Ammon. On 
December 1941, shortly after World War II was declared, he and Athus DeLoss Russell were 
fhe first from that community to join the service. He was in the Second Marine Division 

189 



of the U.S.M.C. He served three years and nine months, of which 27 months were in the 
South Pacific, He went through the Battles of Guadalcanal, Tarawa, Tinian, and Saipan. 
He was injured while on Saipan, and received an Honorable Discharge, October 8, 1945, 
from the Marine Barracks, Navy Yard Mare Island, California. He received the Presidential 
Citation through the 2nd Marine Division. 

He married Edna Geddes Eames, February 7, 1945, at Preston, Idaho, by Bishop Alfred 
Kern. This marriage was later solemnized in the Idaho Falls L.D.S, Temple, June 16, 1959 

He was a member of the L.D.S, Church, but became inactive during the war years 
until about 1958. His reactivation is very interesting. Apostle Mark E, Peterson was in 
attendance at an Idaho Falls Stake Conference; Ed Denning told of his reactivation at 
the Priesthood Session, Bishop J. Edgar Mason advanced him to a Priest so he could 
baptize his son, Douglas. Douglas was called up to be confirmed the next day at Fast 
Meeting; he looked back and when his Dad wasn't following him, he went back and sat 
down. A crowded chapel of people waited while a little eight year old boy told his Dad 
he'd just wait until he could confirm him. With a promise that he'd confirm Mark, the next 
child, when he was eight, Douglas marched on to the front of the Chapel and was con- 
firmed. "Oh, the faith of a little child," He became active in the church and advanced 
to a High Priest. He was also an outstanding speaker. ■ 

Known as a "Boys Man," Ed Denning has devoted many years to cub scouts, boy scouts, 
Explorers, ward M J. A. superintendent and stake activity leader. He and his oldest son, 
Eddie, received their Eagle Scout awards at the same time. 

He is a wonderful husband and father and a hard worker. He received mechanical 
and technical training both in and out of the service. In 1953, he went to work at the 
Atomic Energy Site in Idaho Falls for Argonne National Laboratory. 



i 



His eight living children were enthralled with the wonderful storytelling of their father. 
Vacations and weekends were spent camping, hunting, and fishing. In the fall Ed, his 
older boys and two or three neighbor boys hunted deer, elk, or whatever happened to be in 
season. m 

One day in the fall of 1962 he wounded a deer and tried to follow it in tfie waist-high 
snow. Near exhaustion he finally had to return back to camp. His underclothes from 
the knees to the ankles were covered with blood that he had sweat. He ended up in the 
hospital with pneumonia. 

Ed always displayed much courage and will power. While a young man, he broke 
his back in a car accident. It was injured again while he was in the service. From then 
on there has been very little time that he has not been in pain with his back. , 

In 1965-66 he was P.T.A. Co. President of Bel Aire Elementary School and attended 
the state convention as a delegate in Lewiston, Idaho. 

He and his son Mark just finished a play for the stake M,I,A. 

Today he still works for A.N.L. as a chief operator of one of their many reactors. 

190 



I 



He works in reactor operation and development, was on operations of Borax when we first 
furnished electric power to Arco, Idaho, in his years with Argonne, he has worked on 
development of many reactors, E.b .RJ . , Bo'-ax ! through 5, Z.P.R. I and II, E.B.R. II 
and at present the Treat Facility. In these years, he has worked with three laboratory 
directors: Dr. Walter H. ZInn (53-56), now vice-president. Combustion Engineering, Inc. 
Nuclear Division; and Dr. Norman Hilberry fl956-61) now professor of nuclear engineering 
at the University of Arizona; Dr. A- V. Crewe now laboratory director. The Idaho Director 
Is Meyer Novick, Idaho Division. His present director of Treat Facilities is James Boland, 
a brillant scientist and wonderful person to work with in creative engineering of new and 
better nuclear power plants. For someday nuclear power will be the world's resource of 
power and be very economical . 

"This work ( do enjoy." 



Sketch written by Edward Jay Denning 



226 EDNA GEDDES FAMES DENNING 



Edna Geddes Fames Denning was born October 21, 1918, at Preston, Idaho. She was 
the third child of Flora Edno Geddes and Aerial Guy Fames. As a baby, she was cross and 
cried a lot. Aunt Lizzie Carver used to say "Edna, if you ever live to raise that child she 
will be the best worker you have." 

She was blessed with a wonderful heritage. Her parents were honest, industrious, 
clean, righteous people and made a wonderful home for their three girls and three boys. 
Edna's father was in the bishopric for 18 years, so church activities were always part of the 
family life . 

When Aerial Jr. was a baby, he was very ill . Prayer became such an important part 
of her life then . Three little sisters kneeling by the baby's crib and praying for him helped 
him to recover. 

She led a carefree happy life, made friends easily, and was noted for her cheerful 
disposition. She spent many hours helping her Dad In the fields, riding horses, and help- 
ing with the chores. Uncle John Greaves always called her "Little Aerial" because she 
looked and acted so much like her father. Another nickname was "Little Edna" because 
of three relatives named Edna on the Geddes side of the family. 

She and her sister Veda were active in 4H Club work. Several years they won medals 
at the Eastern Idaho State Fair for Demonstrations and their work on judging teams. 

She attended Prest'on High School where she was active in school functions; she sang, 
danced and enjoyed all activities. 

Her love of people and ability to work with them helped her decide early in her life 
that she wanted to become a homemaking teacher. 

191 



She had many outstanding memories of church activities. She attended with her family 
the Centennial Pageantat the Tabernacle In Salt Lake City honoring the 100 year founding 
of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints. She sang with an all church mutual 
group at the Tabernacle in Salt Lake under Nobel Cain which was a choice experience. 
President Heber J . Grant of the L .D.S . Church was an ideal . A choice memory is shaking 
hands with him in Salt Lake and talking to him at Stake Conference in Preston. 

Edna Eames graduated with honors from Preston High School in 1936. She attended 
the University of Idaho Southern Branch at Pocatello from 1936-38, She was a member of 
Sigma Sigma Beta sorority. Delta Epsilon Kappa, (service honorary) Omecron Club, and 
was sophomore class treasurer. Gleaner girl president. 

In 1937, she went to the National Home Economics Convention at Kansas City, 
Missouri as a delegate. The University of Idaho at Moscow was her home in 1938-40 where 
she completed her college work. She was a charter member of Lamba Delta Sigma church 
sorority and served as its vice-president one year. She also belonged to the home economics 
club there. While at the University of Idaho at Moscow she received an award from the 
Institute of Religion with the following inscription. 

Presented to Edna Eames, representative L.D.S. student for the year 
1939-40, in recognition of your outstanding leadership and activities 
and your living and promoting of Latter-day Saint ideals. 

The first home economics practice cottage at Moscow was purchased and furnished 
her senior year and she was in the first group that lived there. 

She graduated with a Bachelor of Science degree in home economics in 1940. Sitting 
on the stand during her graduation were John W. Condie, who at one time was superintendent 
of Preston schools and William C. Geddes, an uncle. They were members of the Board 
of Regents of the State of Idaho. She received her secondary teaching certificate. The 
education office at the U. of I . said she had some of the most outstanding references of 
any new teacher they had graduating that year. 

The next five years she taught homemaking at Ammon High School for three years and 
Rupert High School for two years. An outstanding teacher, she was loved by her students 
and did much for the school and community wherever she was working. 

While she was teaching in Ammon, she met and fell in love with Ed Denning. In 
1941 when war was declared Ed enlisted in the United States Marine Corps, They became 
engaged before he went overseas. It was nearly three years before she saw him again. 
But through their letters they kept in touch and she kept busy teaching, doing U.S.O. 
work and other war work. 

After the battle of Saipan he returned back to the United States on a thirty day leave, 
February 7, 1945, Bishop Alfred Kern of the Preston Third Ward, Oneida Stake, united 
in marriage Edna Geddes Eames and Edward Jay Denning, He was dressed in the dress 
blues of the United States Marine Corps and she in a beautiful white wedding dress and 
veil , The ceremony was attended by a few close friends and relatives, A wedding 



192 



breakfast was held at the Hanna Tea Room. Ed went back to the service in San Francisco 
where Edna joined him at the end of the school year. They lived in San Francisco until 
World War II was over, then moved to Idaho Falls, Idaho. 

This union was blessed with nine children: Richard, who died shortly after birth, 
Edward Jr. (Eddie), Lynne, Douglas Fames, Mark Fames, Merri, Robyn, Jill, and Scott 
Fames. She was a devoted Mother and wife. The children will remember her for her 
cooking, baking, sewing and all the thoughtful things she did for them and their friends. 

Christmas time was always a special time at the Denning household. The entire 
family joined together in getting a tree, decorating the house, and the Christmas cooking, 
baking, and having fun. The true spirit of Christmas always reigned in their home. 
Family Christmas dinner was always held Christmas Fve . All day Christmas there was 
plenty left for everyone. Their home was always open to the young peoples' friends. 
With eight lively children to raise, there were many broken arms, legs, hospitals and such 
but their faith always pulled them through. 

On June 16, 1959 their marriage was solemnized in the Idaho Falls Temple. Fight 
living children and one by proxy were sealed to them. President William Killpack per- 
formed the ceremony and said at that time it was the largest family group he had had the 
pleasure of sealing. 

She was always active in school and community activities. She has worked in every 
auxiliary in the church. At present, she is in the Relief Society presidency of the 14th 
Ward, Idaho Falls Stake. She and her husband are Co-presidents of Bel Aire Elementary 
P.T.A. They attend the state P.T.A. convention at Lewiston, Idaho. In 1965 she was 
awarded an Honorary P.T.A. Life Membership, She has been associated with the organ- 
ization in some way for 25 years. 

At the present time, they live at 927 East Elva Street, Idaho Falls, Idaho. All 
eight children are in the public schools there and they are a very typical, happy American 
family. 



250 NATHANIEL HOWARD FAMES 



B. 30 Sept. 1921 
Chr. 6 Nov. 1921 
Bapt. 30 Sept. 1929 
Md. 26 Dec. 1949 

Father Aerial Guy Fames 



Preston, Franklin, Idaho 
Preston, Franklin, Idaho 
Preston, Franklin, Idaho 
Miles City, Custer, Montana 

Mother 52 Flora Edna Geddes 



193 



Wife JOYCE WINIFRED MANAIGE 

B. 4 Oct-. 1927 Miles City, Custer, Montana 

Father Edwin Leo Manaige Mother Hazel Louise Dunlap 

CHILDREN 

681 Todd M. Ecmes B. 18 Nov. 1955, Salt Lake City, Salt Lake, Utal- 

675 Craig M, Fames (adopted) B. 10 June 1955, Miles City, Custer, Montana 

1059 Tracy Eames B. 10 June 1958, Salt Lake City, Salt Lake, Utah 

250 NATHANIEL HOWARD EAMES 



I was born September 30, 1921 to Edna and Aerial G. Fames. I attended elementary 
and high school in Preston, Idaho, and Woodbury College, Los Angeles, California. In 
September, 1942, I entered the Navy, being discharged November, 1945. After being 
discharged from the Navy I worked for Chevrolet Motor Division, Salt Lake Zone from 1946- 
1959. My headquarters were in Montana. 

I met Joyce Manaige and we were married December 26, 1949, in Miles City, 
Montana. We moved to Billings, Montana, in February, 1950, and were transferred to 
Salt Lake City, Utah in 1951 where we remained until 1960. Joyce and I are the parents 
of three children. We adopted Craig M. Fames who was born in Miles City, Montana, 
June 19, 1955. We then had Todd M. Fames November 18, 1955, in Salt Lake City, Utah, 
and Tracy Fames, June 10, 1958, also in Salt Lake City. 

We moved to Annandale, Virginia, in 1960 where I worked for National Automobile 
Dealers Association. I resigned in 1961 to join Volkswagen distributor. In the summer of 
1962 we moved to Baltimore, Maryland to open the new Volkswagen agency of which I am 
vice-president and general manager. 

We belong to Turf Valley Country Club. 

In October, 1963 we combined business and pleasure on a European trip. While 
there, we visited the countries of Belgium, Holland, Germany, France, Switzerland, 
and Luxemburg. We had many exciting adventures while in Europe. 

My hobbies include bowling, golf and swimming. I also enjoy doing many other 
things. 



194 



JOYCE WINIFRED MANAIGE 



I was born in Miles City, Montana, October 4, 1927 to Hazel Louise Dunlap and 
Edwin Leo Manaige, My father passed away in May, 1947, I have one sister, Patricia 
Louise Manaige Schecklath. My ancestery is French, Irish, Welsh, 

I attended Miles City Elementary and High School , After graduating from school 
I worked for Chicago, Milwaukee, and St, Paul Railroad from 1945-1949 as private 
secretary to the division manager. 



267 AERIAL GEDDES EAMES, JR. 



B. 20 Apr, 1924 
Bapt. 23 Apr, 1932 
Md, 28 Aug. 1960 

Father Aerial Guy Fames 



Preston, Franklin, Idaho 
Preston, Franklin, Idaho 
Waddington, Saint Lawrence, New York 

Mother 52 Flora Edna Geddes 



Wife MRS. MILDRED ISABELLA ASSELIN PEMBERTON 
B, 16 Jan, 1920 Cornwall, Ontario, Canada 

Father Joseph Donah Asselin Mother Mary Hughena Kennedy 

CHILDREN 



871 Darin Aerial Fames (twin) 

872 Karen Ann Fames (twin) 



B. 26 May 1963, Redding, Shasta, California 
B, 26 May 1963, Redding, Shasta, California 



267 AERIAL EAMES, JR. 



I was born April 20, 1924 to Edna and Aerial G. Fames, I graduated from Preston 
High School in May of 1942 and entered the University of Idaho in the fall of 1942, major- 
ing in civil engineering. In December of 1944 I was inducted into the Army and took my 
basic at Camp Roberts, California. I was sent to the South Pacific, 163rd Infantry Regiment, 
41st Division, After the war, I was transferred to Tokyo as one of Mac Arthur's Honor 
Guards and was discharged December 1946. 

I decided to continue my schooling so went back to the University of Idaho but withdrew 

195 



in 1948, I worked in building construction in Idaho and Nevada for a year, then tried 
selling a couple of years, but went back to construction in 1951 . I worked at the Atomic 
Test Site in Nevada, with the Bureau of Public Roads in Alaska, building part of the 
Richardson "C" highway, doing siesmic survey work in Colorado and Wyoming, joined Peter 
Kiewit Sons Co. in 1953 and worked at Greenland and Baffin Island on military instalations 
during 1953, 1954, and 1960. From 1955 to 1958 I worked on the St. Lawerence Sea-Way 
and while there I met "Mid" in 1957. I worked on the interstate hi-way in Ohio and at 
Flaming Gorge Dam in Utah, then went back to Greenland. Upon return, I married "Mid" 
in Waddlngton, New York on May 28, 1960. 

We moved to Oregon in the fall of 1960 where I worked on the Carmen-Smith Hydro- 
electric project. Then we were transferred to Redding, California for Tunnel and Dam 
Key-Way job. On May 26, 1963, our twins, Kerren and Darren were born. We then 
moved to Platte, South Dakota for a bridge job then back to Dunsmuir, California to build 
McCloud Dam, I worked on jobs as surveyor, engineer, and superintendent. 



MILDRED ASSELIN 



I was born in Cornwall, Ontario, Canada on January 16, 1920 to Joseph Donah 
Asselin and Mary Hughena Kennedy, My parents are still alive and living in a rest 
home in Cornwall . Dad is 80 years old and was born July 17, 1884, Mother is 79 years 
old and was born March 15, 1885. My mother was a twin. Her twin brother, Hugh, 
died when he was in his 20's. My father was married twice. His first wife died when my 
half sister Evelyn was about three months old. There were three children from Dad's 
first marriage — my half brother Hayden, who was killed overseas on July 5, 1942; my 
half sister, Gutrude is married and living in Montreal , Canada; my other half sister, Evelyn, 
died in November of 1957, My full brother Bernard lives in Cornwall, is married and has 
two children, 

I went to a French Catholic School from the 1st to 8th grade. My parents sent me 
there in order to learn to speak French, 

The high school was called CCV.S. (Cornwall Commercial and Vocational School). 
I took one year metriculation then transferred to commercial and took the three year comm- 
ercial course, 

I have three wonderful children from my former marriage, I took up hairdressing in 
Cornwall when Brian was four months old. It took me three years to get my license as I 
took the apprenticeship course through the Canadian government, I lived with my parents 
while working. My three children's names are Sharon, Gary, and Brian. 

In 1955 we moved to Rochester, New York. I worked at hairdressing there. We 
lived there for two years. In 1957 I moved back to Waddington, New York and set up 
my own beauty salon. This is where I met Aerial, We lived there for two years then 
moved to Niagara Falls in September of 1959. I worked as a hairdresser there and we lived 



196 



there till Aerial came home from Greenland and we were married. 

Our twins, Kerren and Darren, were born in Redding, California on May 26, 1963. 



294 GEORGE ALBERT EAMES 



B . 9 Dec . 1 927 
Chr, 30 Jan. 1928 
Bapt. 9 Dec. 1935 
Md . 5 Aug . 1 949 

Father Aerial Guy Eames 



Preston, Franklin, Idaho 

Preston, Franklin, Idaho 

Preston, Franklin, Idaho 

Preston, Franklin, Idaho 

Mother 52 Flora Edna Geddes 



Wife VILATE ELWOOD 



B, 21 Feb. 1932 
Chr, 1 May 1932 

Father Herbert Elijah El wood 



Lewiston, Cache, Utah 
Lewiston, Cache, Utah 

Mother Elvira Stephensen 



CHILDREN 



589 Bruce George Eames 

605 Ronald Eames 

626 Richard Craig Eames 

650 Carolyn Eames 

873 Linda Eames 

874 David Brian Eames 

875 Baby girl (stillborn) 



B. 11 June 1950, Preston, Franklin, Idaho 
Bapt. 5 July 1958, Preston, Franklin, Idaho 
B. 22 July 1951, Preston, Franklin, Idaho 
Bapt. 5 Dec. 1958, Preston, Franklin, Idaho 
B. 6 Aug. 1952, Preston, Franklin, Idaho 
D. 12 Nov. 1952, Preston, Franklin, Idaho 
B. 12 Oct. 1953, Preston, Franklin, Idaho 
B. 20 Aug. 1957, Preston, Franklin, Idaho 
B. 13 Sept. 1958, Preston, Franklin, Idaho 
B. 27 Aug. 1962, Preston, Franklin, Idaho 



294 GEORGE ALBERT EAMES 



George Albert Eames was born December 9, 1927 at Preston, Idaho, He is the sixth 
child and third son of Aerial and Edna Geddes Eames, He attended school in Preston, 
Idaho, and graduated from high school in May 1946, George entered the army in September 
of 1946 and served with the military government during the occupation of Japan. He was 

197 



released in March 1948. 

Vilate Elwood was born February 21, 1932 at Lewiston, Ul-ah, the 12th child of 
Herbert and Elvira Elwood. She attended school at Lewiston and Richmond, Utah. 

They were married August 5, 1948. George worked with his father on the farm and 
also for the sugar factory. In 1957, George's father had a serious heart attack and 
George bought the farm and moved on to it. He has engaged in full time farming ever 
since. They have had six children, five of them are still living. 



HYRUM CARL NIELSON 



B. 15 Nov. 1885 
Re-bapt. 19 Oct. 1904 
End. 19 Oct. 1904 
Md. 12 Oct. 1910 

Fatfier Hyrum Nielson 



Preston, Oneida, Idaho 
Logan, Cache, Utah 
Logan Temple, Cache, Utah 
Logan Temple, Cache, Utah 

Mother Hannah Christina Spongberg 



Wife 55 WILLIAMENA (WINNIE) MARTHA GEDDES 



B. 15 Jan. 1892 
Bapt. 30 Mar. 1901 
End. 12 Oct. 1910 
Sid 12 Oct. 1910 

Father 2 William Stewart Geddes 



Plain City, Weber, Utah 
Salt Lake City, Salt Lake, Utah 
Logan Temple, Cache, Utah 
Logan Temple, Cache, Utah 

Mother Margaret Ferguson Cullen 



CHILDREN 



177 Hyrum Carl Nielson 
214 Gwen Geddes Nielson 
242 Faye Nielson 



276 Roma Geddes Nielson 
876 Joyce Nielson (stillborn) 



B. 13 Oct. 1911, Preston, Oneida, Idaho 
B. 16 Apr. 1917, Preston, Franklin, Idaho 
B. Dec. 1920, Preston, Franklin, Idaho 
Bapt. 30 June 1930, Preston, Franklin, Idaho 
End. 6 May 1934, Preston, Franklin, Idaho 
D. 6 May 1933, Preston, Franklin, Idaho 
B. 15 July 1925, Preston, Franklin, Idaho 
B. 3 June 1931, Preston, Franklin, Idaho 



198 



H. CARL NIELSON 



It would be a pleasure to write the story of my father's life If only I had the talent 
and ability to put Into It the love, courage, ambition and joy of living that were Daddy's. 
"Come on now, let's get the job done, " still rings In my memory as the way he lived. If 
there was something to be done (and you can be sure there usually was) it was let's do it 
when it should be done, and do it right, and with everybody In on it, helping, running the 
errands, or just standing by with interest and moral support. 

On November 15, 1885, in a small one-roomed log house in Southern Idaho, a baby, 
the only boy, was born to "goodly parents," Hannah Christine and Hyrum NIelson. He 
was a beautiful baby, given life himself almost at the price of his mother's life. She 
was torn terribly and Inflammation set in, and as a result, she nearly died. There was no 
medical help available, only a midwife, at the cost of five dollars, who assisted in the 
delivery. His mother lay ill fighting desperately against death for months. With a baby 
and two other small children, Olive, four, and Theressa, two. It was a difficult time. 
Neighbors came in to help during the long struggle. But little Carl was a very good baby. 
His mother said, "How can he be so good, when I am so sick?" 

When Carl was two years old, the family moved Into their new home which was built 
on the farm known now as "WInnette Farms." 

During his young life, Carl practically lived on implements. He was put to work 
when he was very young. He drove three head of horses when he was just five years old. 
His father built platforms around the seats of the machinery which he drove as a protection 
against his falling asleep while working because he was so small . When he was a little 
older, he would get lonesome in the fields all day, so he would get his little sister, Gwen, 
to go with him to keep him company and he would hold her on with him as he worked. 

He used to help milk many cows. Strangely, one of the first things he remembers 
about his childhood was when his father sold twenty head of milk cows. The other parties 
involved in the purchase were Charlie Spongberg and Pete NIelson. The men flipped a 
coin for first choice, then they would take turns picking and choosing until all twenty cows 
were sold. This reminded him of another tale of a cow, only this one took after him. She 
was gaining on him when he headed for a straw stack. Just in the nick of time, he plunged 
headlong into the straw stack in one leap, thus saving himself from an unfortunate and 
possibly dangerous "connection." 

Another close call, only much more serious, came to him when he was leading the 
derrick horse for the first model of the Jackson Fork stacker. It was designed with one 
large pole stuck in the ground with ropes tied to it. It was not very stable, and suddenly, 
the pole went over backwards! His father shouted a warning and excitedly screamed, 
"Run! Run!" Carl started running as the pole came crashing down just inches In front of 
him, so close It left them all shaken and terrified. 

He always went with his father and worked with him. One day he was watching his 
father with a team of horses scrape an old well full of dirt. One horse stepped off the edge 

199 



Without any close neighbors or any brothers to play with, it was often lonesome for a 
young boy. One day when he desired companionship, he saddled up his pony and rode 
to his friend, Francis Clayton's place. So he wouldn't have to dismount to open gates, he 
had his horse trained to jump the fences, which he did this particular day until the return 
trip at the last fence. Carl's folks happened to see him coming and saw the pony stubbornly 
turn at the fence and refuse to jump. They also saw Carl stubbornly refuse to give in to the 
horse and get off and walk through the gate. He reined the horse around to try again, 
with all the family watching the performance. Again they made a run for the fence and 
again the pony turned. Time and again the boy would spur his horse some distance from 
the fence and then make the running approach, his anger rising a little more each time. 
With his temper growing short, and his determination growing more stubborn, he reined the 
pony around, trotted back several rods, then lashed the pony with his bridle reins, let out 
a whoop and charged! Boy and horse in a flurry of speed came to the fence together, but 
the horse planted his feet firmly into the ground and stopped, while the boy continued flying 
over the horse's head, fence and all-alone! and he hit hard! 

The family always had a school teacher or somebody staying with them. In the winter, 
they would go to school in a little cutter, and the snow was deep. Feed for the stock was 
sometimes quite scarce, and the straw was rationed out with a forked stick. 

Carl's schooling was very limited, for he was always late starting and was taken out in 
the spring to help his father with the work. It must have been hard on him and disappointing, 
for he liked school and never took one of his own children out for even a day no matter 
how badly he needed the help. In spite of this disadvantage, he was a very good student. 
He graduated from high school and attended the Oneida Stake Academy, B. Y. C. and Utah 
State Agricultural College. 

As well as being ambitious and hard-working, he had much energy left for mischief, and 
was always teasing people, tormenting his sisters constantly. They all remember how in 
the evenings, he would lie down in a cozy spot by the stove and fall asleep there. His 
sisters would struggle, and work to get him carried upstairs to bed. Then and only then, to 
their dismay, would he wakeup. When he was a man and married, he rolled his sisters 
all back down those same stairs wrapped up in a feather bed. 

His pets and the animals were also victims of his teasing. He had a nice gaited horse 
called Model . He teased her until she would always meet him with her ears laid back 
and her lips curled. She was a rascal herself, and a good match for Carl. There wasn't 
a gate or door lock on the farm she couldn't open. She used to open the granary and help 
herself to the grain. More serious than the wasted grain was the danger of the horse 
foundering. Something had to be done for Model's protection, and so Carl did it. He elec- 
trified the lock, and then hid to watch the reaction. Presently, here came Model sauntering 
smugly up to the grain bin to get her extra rations. Innocently she raised her nose to the 
lock. With the shock she was thrown back on her haunches. For a moment, she stared at 
the lock, then turned away, and she never bothered the grain bin again. 

Another time, Carl built a trick lock on the barn door, and again, he hid himself to 
wutch . Model became quite frustrated, but wouldn't give up. Suddenly realizing what it 
was all about, she worked her nose and her hoof, opened and held the lock, pushed open 
the door and went smartly out, switching her tail behind her! 

200 



wa 



As Carl was leaning over one stall preparing some feed. Model, always on the alert 
when he wc3 around, saw her chance to get even. She quickly leaned her head over the 
partition, snatched his shirt off, then stood up in her stall, head facing straight forward, 
with the most innocent look on her face as if nothing at all had happened. But, oh, how 
Carl knew she was giving him the horse laugh. 

When he was about the independent age of fifteen, he and o cousin, Carl Wold, 
stayed down on the "sand hills" by themselves and hod the responsibility of milking and 
caring for a big bunch of cows. They had both contracted a light case of Small Pox and hid 
out from the officers whose duty it was to quarantine them. The highlight of that episode 
was his dad's big shotgun. They made their own bullets with powder, shot, and wad, and 
used it to hunt ducks, during the hours between chores. One day they spied a flock of 
ducks and quickly got off their horses and started crawling through the brush. They crawled 
and crawled, slowly, cautiously, with growing anticipation, then at a close distance, settled 
themselves in a bush and prepared for the attack. Carl raised the heavy gun to his shoulder, 
took aim, and fired! Bang! He went flying through the air along with the ducks and 
feathers only in a different direction, for he was kicked clear out of his bush I In spite of a 
lame shoulder for days, it was worth it, for when they got through gathering and counting 
ducks, they found they had outdone the little tailor of old with "thirteen in one shot!" 

Carl has always been a great lover of music and dramatics, and had talent in both 
of these arts. His first dramatic experience was in grade school when he was six years 
old. At sixty-nine, he could still quote his first entrance lines. He was speaking to his 
sister, Theressa, who was "Lottie" in the play, and holding two feathers up in his hand, he 
cried, "Oh, Lottie! Do you know that horrible cat has gobbled down your two canaries, 
and only left these two feathers?" 

When he was quite young, he got a guitar, and learned to play without lessons. Later 
he delighted his own children by playing and singing to them. He also learned by himself 
to play the piano while in the mission field. 

As a young man, his favorite hobby was singing in the town quartet with the two Clark 
brothers and Marion McNiel. They sang all over the country, at programs, rallies, etc. 
His beautiful voice helped him so much in the mission field, with the street and cottage 
meetings and making contacts and friends. In fact, because of it, a married lady fell madly 
in love with him, even writing to him after he had returned home. He sang the bass, 

Carl was always a great sportsman. He put up the first basketball ring in Preston, and 
was on the firstand championbasketball team. He also liked playing baseball . Always a 
faithful and vitally interested spectator of the high school and college games; if he couldn't 
go, he listened on the radio, and later watched on televison. (When I was in high school, 
he and mother entertained the coach and all the athletes of the school at a dinner several 
different times in their home). 

Later on, trout fishing became his favorite active sport, and he became an expert at 
fly casting. 

Good, home-made play equipment was always provided for us children by Dad. We 

201 



always had the highest swing in the country, and "whlrli-glg teeter-totter," which was an 
ingenius device with a plank with ahole in the middle which fitted on an Iron peg protruding 
from a big square post, A piece of carpet was thoughtfully tacked on each end for our 
comfort (he was such a stickler for detail and finish) and we would ride up and down and 
around at the same time. I have never seen another one like it anywhere. 

Then he built a beautiful tennis court in our own yard, and later put up spot lights 
for night playing. I can still hear his delighted chuckle as he made an especially difficult 
or artistic return, sometimes jumping high in the air, whirling swiftly with perfect coor- 
dination, always with grace and deftness in his movements. We all learned the gome and 
loved to play with him. 

In winter, it was a long sturdy toboggan, again built with his own hands, which he 
fastened behind the car, to give us a thrill never-to-be-forgotten, and add to our happy 
days . 

Carl filled a successful mission for the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints J' 
from October 1904 to July 17, 1907, in the Northern States Mission under President 
Germany Ellsworth. He loves to tell of his missionary experiences, and testifies that there 
is no experience in life to compare with living in such close harmony with God and serving 
Him as a missionary. The joy of study, the particular work and routine of the missionary, 
the spiritual blessing, the enriching influence, are things forwhich he is truly thankful. He 
greatly enjoyed preaching the Gospel and making new friends and acquaintances, in spite 
of his self-described Inferiority complex. He had determination, and, as always, believed 
it took work to get the job done right. He practiced writing every opportunity and develope 
a beautiful hand. He studied diligently, believing In preparation as well as inspiration, 
and organized his talks carefully, developing his line of thought. He never just talked at 
random, which fact greatly impressed his mission president. 

He was particular about choosing Interesting subjects which would attract a street crowd 
for his street meetings. At one such meeting, his sub ject was "Revelation." One man 
In the crowd approached him and said, "Young man, that was sure a fine talk. But you 
didn't say anything about polygamy . " Carl answered, "I know I didn't, and what's more, 
I'm not going to." And he went on with the meeting. The man came up again to ask more 
questions. One of the interested observers grabbed him and sat him down — hard — on 
the curb, so the missionary could continue uninterrupted. 

In Wisconsin, people had traveled twenty miles to hear the missionaries, and there were 
more people standing outside trying to hear them than were crowded Inside, After it was 
over, the people wanted them to stay longer, so they held a street meeting while waiting for 
the train. They still begged for one more song, so they sang until the train pulled out. 

Some of his companions were Elder Hess from Shelley, Idaho, who labored with him in 
St, Paul, Minnesota; Elder Morrison, Elder Dixon, and Elder Anderson from Cornish, Utah, 
He spent quite some time in Southern Illinois and thirteen months In Canada, It was there 
that he met his life long friend, Florence Adams, While In Wisconsin, their quartet was 
organized. At every conference, the quartet was always there singing, 

(He said he got quite a kick out of the flats In Chicago with their bells and tubes,) 

202 



^ 



It was always gratifying when people went out of their way to make them welcome. 
One little community which had a little church invited them to stay there and hold meetings. 

After Carl really got on to the meetings, he always took the lead. One time his 
companion reached out and grabbed his coattall, pulled him back and said, "You watch 
the crease in my pants for awhile." 

He went to a conference in Winnipeg, after he had been laboring thirty months, 
expecting his release. He was not only surprised but disappointed when he did not get it. 
President Hammond said to his companion, "Take Elder Nielson out and hold a street 
meetin, and have him talk!" Carl replied, grudgingly, "I'll go with you, but don't ask 
me to talk . " He felt depressed and stubborn, didn't feel like talking, didn't want to talk, 
and wasn't going to talk! He decided that he would just introduce the meeting and throw 
it back to his companion. Elder Dixon. Finally, in awe, he realized that he had been 
talking through inspiration for a solid hour. The crowd was enthralled and they had never 
moved . 

One highlight was when he talked at eight meetings in one day at St. Paul and Minn- 
eapolis, after which he had some fascinating interviews. 

The first street meeting he attended. President Hammond, (who was one of the six who 
originally opened the Manitoba Conference in Canada in 1906) talked on Brigham Young and 
the Mormons. He drew such a crowd that they blocked the traffic and the street cars. 
Someone went inside a store close by and brought out a huge box on top of which they put 
President Hammond to finish his talk. It caused such a commotion that a meeting of the City 
Council was called and they ruled no more street meetings on that corner. The Salvation 
Army set up across the street to run some competition, but the police told them to move on; 
the Mormon missionaries were there first. They estimated around 4,000 people congregated 
at that meeting. 

Shortly after he returned home from his mission and still had that polished missionary 
"air," he had an experience with molasses — "molasses, Icky-stlcky gue . " He went to the 
Lewiston sugar factory with a big wooden tank on a wagon after a load of syrup, which was 
free for the taking. On the return trip, the back wheels hit hard while crossing a ditch 
and broke off the sprinkler pipe, allowing the molasses to start pouring out. Carl, a man 
of action, rushed back to plug the hole with a gunny sack. As he hurriedly stuffed the 
gunny sack at the hole trying to get it in, the molasses squirted this way and then that. In 
his face, up his sleeves, down his chest. He was soon like the little fly he often sang about 
which "got into a molasses jug and got so very very much — stuck up." The arrogant Carl 
Nielson was molasses from head to foot, and that night, to end the misfortune, the whole 
thing tipped over and all the molasses was lost. 

As a man, he was a very dashing and handsome young heartsmasher, enthusiastic, 
and ambitious. When the young boys of the community gathered in the barber shop on 
Saturday afternoons, Carl would help the barbers out when they were rushed. 

He and the girl who later became his wife had occasion to enjoy each other's company 
at a house party, but Carl was too busy enjoying himself with two adoring girls, playing the 
piano and singing. They were really having a marvelous time, and they monopolized the 

203 



whole party with their singing. Winnie and her boy friend wearied of them, considering 
them quite the show-offs, and left the party. 

He had better luck the next time he tried to make an impression on the vivacious young 
city girl who was visiting with her sisters. It was on a bet that he first took the proud and 
independent Winnie Geddes for a ride in his buggy. He always had the latest style in 
buggies with good-looking harnesses, and then clothes to match the outfits! One buggy he 
was particularly proud of had a fringed parasol top. He and a group of the young fellow 
were congregated on the street corner and many an admiring glance was cast her way as the 
Geddes girl passed on the other side, walking with her head in the air, looking neither to 
the right nor the left. Carl boasted that he could pick her up and take her riding in his 
buggy. The others, knowing Winnie, wagered he couldn't But what they didn't know, was 
that Carl was considered a personal friend of the family since he was the brother of the wife 
of Winnie's Uncle Jim Geddes, So, although they didn't know each other very well, 
Winnie graciously, and unsuspecting, accepted the offer of the ride as a gesture of consider- 
ation and thoughtfulness. Nor did she even guess that she was the victim of a wager when 
Carl, with a wide grin on his face and his eyes twinklin, proudly trotted past the surprised 
and envious group on the corner. 

But he turned out to be the real victim — a victim of her charm, grace, wit, and spark- 
ling eyes — for he fell in love with the lovely young girl from tfie "city" and never let her 
return again to her mother or friends, for fear of losing her, before the knot was tied 
securely making her his for time and eternity in the Logan Temple, October 12, 1910. As ' 
always, he knew what he wanted and went after it. 

He took his eighteen year old bride to Banlda where they fixed up a granary to live 
in and Carl ran a dry farm. They had fifty head of pigs, which, to Winnie's horror, used | 
to get under their granary-home and scratch and rub their backs. They couldn't even 
afford a ten cent picture show. The first thing they bought was a sewing machine. Carl's 
good management and hard work rewarded them that fall with a nice income with which 
they purchased the baby grand piano (which is still a lovely thing in their home today) and 
other furniture. 

On October 13th, just a year and day after they were married, they were blessed with 
a son, Hyrum Carl NIelson, II. 

Thinking always of his family and planning for the future, he traded his homestead In 
Banlda to his father for sixty acres m Preston. 

In the following years, they both worked very hard, struggling through good times and 
bad, knowing happiness and disappointment, but always working and planning together for 
their home and family and church. He took such pride in his farm, "his little world" as 
he called it; his beautiful clean fields, straight drilled rows, good crops, neat fence lines, 
and always a beautiful yard. 

One incident they both laugh at happened when Winnie used to lead Old Blanche, the 
derrick horse, before any of the children were old enough to take over. He shouted at her 
which hurt her feelings and made her very angry. She left and went Into the house, and 



20^ 



while waiting for his apology, went about her own household tasks. When the expected 
apologydidn't come, she wosovercome with curosity, wondering howhe could ever manage 

without her, and went out to see what was happening. There was Old Blanche working 
as faithfully and efficiently as though she were being led, responding to the signals given 
by Carl as to when to go, when to whoa, and when to back up. 

As well as a farmer, Carl was an Inventor. Although he never went to the bother of 
having anything patented, he built a manure spreader, a land leveler, a beet and pea 
loader, an automatic clothes line, and his favorite, the Sky Hook, together with his son. 
In 1912 he put a motor on the old washing machine, which had been run by hand. 

Being progressive, he was the first In his community to put running water in the house, 
the first to have a furnace, a radio, an automatic ironer, an automatic washer, and tele- 
vision. 

Most of his winters were spent remodeling and carpentering. This practical hobby 
eventually resulted In a dream come true. He, always with Winnie's help, built a home. 
This project has brought him more joy, satisfaction and pride than any other one thing they 
accomplished. Another hobby which contributed to their lovely home, as well as the homes 
of his children, was rebuilding and refinishing furniture. 

One moring in the early summer when he was at the age of 61 , he come home from 
pitching peas very ill. He was never completely well from that time. That sun stroke, 
or heart spell, or whatever it was. Is believed to be the beginning of the serious and painful 
illness which overcame him three years later. It was at a Knife-and-Fork dinner that 
suddenly he had a heart attack and the doctor who was also attending told his companion 
that he was gone. But Winnie wouldn't let him go. Through her prayers and faith he 
revived. Artificial respiration from an oxygen tank was administered and he was taken to 
the hospital . He had thrombosis in his right leg. The clot had to be dissolved. He was 
a restless patient his first time in the hospital, and his clothes had to be taken away in order 
to keep him there, for he was going to go home. Only Dad and Mother know the depth 
of the suffering and pain and despair which followed. He underwent two operations, one 
for his arteries and the other for the amputation of his left leg, which caused excrutiating 
pain. A new way of life which was very difficult for such a previously active person to 
adjust to became bearable by the love, patience, and attention of his devoted wife, and 
the courage of both 

The greatest tragedies in his life were the deaths of his loved ones; his father died with 
cancer, followed in one year by his mother from a blood clot. At this time he was bent 
with rheumatism a*pd walking with crutches, and his wife was very ill, also. It seems that 
trouble often comes in big doses. And then he lost Faye, his third child. She had been 
such a companion and joy to him that her sudden death from ptomaine poisoning after an 
appendectomy was a shock from which he never quite recovered. I remembered that before 
this sadness came into his life, he got up every morning of the world singing (usually 
"If I had a Talking Picture of You" and he knew only the first two lines). After Faye's 
death, he never sang again in the morning, and seldom at all, and his hair turned white in 
a year. 

Sketch written by Gwen Nielson Seely 

205 



55 Wl LLI AMENA MARTHA (Wl NNIE) GEDDES Nl ELSON 



This is a tribute to beauty and to one who loves beauty. 

Wil liamena Martha "Winnie" Geddes, daughter of William and Margaret Ferguson 
Cullen Geddes was born January 15, 1892 at Plain City, Utah. She was named after 
her father William who had passed away five months prior to her birth. 

Singing and an inborn desire to create enjoyment for other people came quite naturally 
for Winnie. One of her earliest memories centers around a ceremony honoring the man 
who had organized the Ogden Sunday School . She was selected to represent the children 
of the Mormon Church in presenting Brother Richard Balantyne a large bouquet of flowers 
and to give a little speech appropriate to the occasion. At one time after a singing per- 
formance at the age of four, her Grandfather Geddes was so delighted that he walked 
through the audience to the front of the stage and swung his little granddaughter into his 
arms and proudly strutted away. It is no wonder that mother loved performing in public. 

When she was six her mother married David Eccles and the family moved to Salt Lake 
City, Utah. Mother was an active youngster and her enthusiasm for fun led to the label 
of "Tomboy" around the neighborhood. She was an expert tree climber among other 
antics and the other kids tagged her with the name of "Billie." However, all was not fun 
during her early years. On one occasion during a 4th of July celebration she was marching 
down the sidewalk tooting a toy horn when a drunk lunged into her raming the horn down 
her throat. Her throat was badly torn. Another time she received a very painful gash 
in her upper leg. Since her mother did not trust doctors she treated the injury by pouring 
salt into the open wound as a safeguard against infection. Mother still carries a wide 
scar that resulted from this home cure method. 

Winnie was educated in the Salt Lake City public school system and at the L.D.S. 
University. She studied vocal under Professor Evan Stevens, leader of the Tabernacle 
Choir. She sang in the children's choir and on one occasion led the children's singing 
group during Primary Conference. She was twelve years old at the time. Her mother was 
a member of the Tabernacle Choir and would take Winnie with her frequently during 
practice sessions . 

In her teens. Mother's sparkling eyes, fresh beauty, wit and fun-loving personality won 
her admirers. She was the envy of all the young girls when a fellow named Sherl Winder 
asked her for a date to attend the opera. Dressed in an elegant antique white, ankle length 
satin opera cape she was thrilled when they sat in Apostle Winder's private box at the Salt 
Lake Theatre and listened to the opera. 

PIcnicing, getting together with other young people at socials, singing and dancing 
were the popular pastimes of the day. Mother enjoyed all of these with the vigor of her 
youth . 

Romance came to Mother while she was visiting with her married sisters in Preston, Idaho. 



206 



There she met a handsome, debonair returned missionary who captivated the heart of 
this lovely eighteen year old girl from the city. He was H. Carl NIelson and after some 
three months of courting Winnie, they were married in the Logan Temple. The date 
was October 12, 1910. 

One year later, October 15, a baby boy whom they named Hyrum Carl was born to 
them. Although this young couple lived in a converted granary during the first year of 
marriage and raised pigs for a living, the first piece of furniture they purchased for their 
home was a baby grand piano . It was an instrument of beauty and was destined to fill 
their future homes with music. This quality of bringing beauty into her life and to those 
with whom she associated — no matter what the circumstances — was an integral part of her 
life. She had music in her heart. Many were the times that she would sing to us children 
as she rocked us or while she was going about her daily work. 

Her husband, her home, and her children were the centers of the universe as far as 
Mother was concerned. Although she gave birth to five children, only three are living 
today. They are H. C. Nielson who lives in Preston, Idaho, Gwen Seely of Craig, 
Colorado, and Roma Nelson, who makes her home wherever her husband's Air Force assign- 
ments take them. Death claimed baby Joyce shortly after birth , Another great tragedy 
occured when daughter Faye died at the age of twelve and a half years old. During this 
period of tremendous personal heartbreak Mother carried on with a cool courage that put 
our needs and feelings above her own . Her hair was the only outward sign of her anguish . 
it turned snow white within the year following Faye's death. 

Mother had a deep understanding for my father's needs. When his little companion 
Faye passed away, there was a deep void in his life. He was a man that needed companion- 
ship, so I would go with him to ram sales, boxing matches, basketball games, and on sheep 
buying trips. With the amount of work on the farm, I know that Mother needed my help 
many times but she realized that Daddy needed a child's hand more than she needed my help 
around the house . 

When I think of home I can almost smell the fresh air drifting in the house through 
wide open doors. I see shining clean windows, bouquets of flowers about the house — little 
vases of cut flowers cheering up rooms. Mother prides herself in raising beautiful flowers 
and keeping a beautiful yard. Her spry figure was a familar early morning sight as she 
used to bob about the garden caring for her flowers. 

Mother's hospitality is felt and remembered by all who have been welcomed into 
her home — they are many. No one has ever left without an offer of food or refreshment 
be it a full course meal or just a treat, depending on the occasion. She has a talent for 
putting a delicious meal on the table quickly without advance notice or much preparation . 
Her well-stocked shelves always abounded with the fruits of the field and her efforts in home 
canning. If any family was ever In need of food. Mother's basket was among the first to 
arrive. 

Mother has made the time to spread herself in areas outside of the home. Because of 
her command of words and thought, she has always been In demand for talks, skits, tributes, 
executive and teaching positions. Her book reviews are memorable and have been enjoyed 



207 



by hundreds. Some of her church and civic responsibilities have included P.T.A. 
vice-president and secretary, officer of Polio and Red Cross drives, and county president 
of the Daughters of Utah Pioneers, In the ward organization she accepted the challenge 
of all positions along v/ith serving on the Stake Primary Board and Relief Society Stake 
Board. Even before the Preston Fifth Ward was organized she belonged to a group ffiat 
held religious classes in the school house. She was instrumental in starting Primary classes 
at the same location. The Fifth Ward Relief Society recently paid her special tribute 
for her more than thirty years as a dedicated social science teacher. She was released 
reluctantly from this position because of failing eye sight. 

When we were still children we were awakened one winter night rather roughly by 
Mother shaking us and saying, "Hurry, get up. The house is on fire," She bundled us 
in blankets and we fled the burning house. During the excitement of battling the blaze 
Mother had a heart attack--one of the many she has endured. The house was a mess of 
water, blackened furniture and chemicals when the fire was finally out but I can't remember 
that it was al I unhappiness . 

As new walls and plaster went up and paint went on. Mother kept us happily looking 
forward to the time when our old-fashioned square house would be transformed into the 
beautiful home that we loved with its open stairway and rooms of our own. After our home 
was finished we lived many happy moments in it until brother H, C. was married. Mother 
and Daddy moved out of their lovely home into the temporary shelter of a sheep trailer 
so that H . C. and his bride would have a home of their own to start their life together. 
Mother preferred to camp out during the many months that it took to build their new home. 
I remember her saying, "Carl, we will move out. Two families should not live in the 
same house." As feminine as Mother has always been she climbed up on the roof In a pair 
of baggy overalls to help nail shingles on the new home. She has always been determined 
to own and keep her own home and to be dependent on on one. The house they built together 
still stands. To me it symbolizes their life together — a firm and true foundation with the 
best of materials put into its structure. 

Christmas morning was always a gala occasion that our entire family looked forward to 
from one year to the next. All of our cousins, aunts and uncles and their house guests 
would end up at our home. Our clothing for the day was casual, to say the least, for 
everyone would wear items of new apparel they had received for Christmas. A new house 
coot, slippers, a jacket or anything in any combination added to the gaiety. As a child 
it was fun and exciting confusion but as I grew older I realized and appreciated the 
wonderful closeness of this big family. We all ate Christmas breakfast together. The 
pounds of bacon, the dozens of eggs and the hours of preparation Mother used were enormous. ' 
Since her children have grown up and moved away with families of their own this traditional ' 
morning is no more. It is sorely missed but will remembered. 

Gentleness and genteelness are two of Mother's most outstanding attributes. She 
hates harshness in any form whether it be in dress, manner of speech, or actions. One 
thing which she has no sympathy for is weakness or lack of individual courage in people 
who fail to face up to the reality of life. The isolation of farm life has not detered Mother 
in keeping abreast of the times. She has always been an avid reader and keeps current 
on the activities of the day whether it be church or governmental activities. She loves 
books and keeps her mental growth active to this day. 

208 



of the well and fell in. With a shovel, his father worked the rest of the day digging 
him out. 

The men used to go into the canyon with wagons and teams after their own lumber and 
posts. Carl, when he was as young as eight years old, went, too, with his father, but 
driving his own team and wagon load. They were long days, day after day, starting before 
daylight in the morning until after dark at night. He would get so very tired. (In fact, 
at sixty-eight, he still sighed a great big sigh in memory of his weariness). The roads 
were not improved, of course, and some of the hills were very steep. Carl remembers one 
tense incident when the brave determination and fearless action of his father saved him 
from a frightening accident. He was plodding along down the canyon with a load of 
slabs. As the road plunged into a steep slope, he couldn't get the brake pulled back 
tight enough to hold the heavy wagon load, and the horses were pushed and went racing 
down the perilous trail. His father, hearing the commotion behind him, quickly guessed 
at the reason, jumped from his wagon and ran up the hill to meet the runaway outfit! With 
desperate sureness and courage, he grasped the bridle bits of the excited horses. Clouds 
of dust, the heavy heaving of the horses, the froth from their mouths, the rattle of the 
harnesses, the wagon, and the lumber filled the air and seemed to intensify the furious 
struggled. Finally the lunging rolling mass was brought under control, but still had to be 
taken on home by the youthful driver. It was after dark when they arrived home, and Carl 
was sent to the pasture with the horses. He saw something, whirled and ran every step of 
the way home and breathlessly told his dad that he had seen a bear! Together they walked 
back and found — nothing. 

Kind and hard-working were his parents, and they "spared the rod." Carl can 
remember the one and only spanking he ever had at the hands of his motlier. He said he 
was undoubtedly very deserving of it, for she chased him up through the field north of the 
house with a stick in her hand which she used in the conventional way when she caught him. 

The only spanking in the memory of his sister, Theressa, rendered by their father has a 
\ story behind it which gives reason enough to provoke any father to a reprisal . 

The family by the name of Scott, who had bought their old homestead came with their 
two little girls to visit the Nielson's one evening. The children coaxed and coaxed the 
elders to leave the little girls and allow them to stay all night. Unable to get the answer 
I they wanted, all four children took out and hid in the willows lining the banks of Worm 
Creek, the small stream which wound its way along the bottom of the hollow below the 
house. When it came time for the Scotts to take their leave, there were no children to 
be found. The two men started out to hunt, and as they emerged from the shadows of the 
barn into the moonlight, the four little renegades spied them, and saw them follow the lane 
leading to the creek, and heard them calling their names all the while. Cautiously the 
runaways moved along down the creek keeping in the shelter of the willows until they were 
in a direct line from the big straw stack which stood silhouetted on the brink of the hill . 
Quickly, with the thrill of the chase in every step, they cut up the hill, and with muffled 
giggles crawled into a big hole In the stow stack which had been hollowed out by pigs. 
With growing concern, the fathers, after a thorough search through the farm buildings, 
willows and creek bottom, finally came upon their hiding place; and the same willow which 
had earlier been their refuge was now their punishment. 



209 



Of all of the wonderful qualities embodied in Mother probably her devotion to 
Daddy during his extended illness was most outstanding. She nursed and cared for his 
many needs night and day for nine long years. Her determination to comfort kept her 
going at times hours after her physical strength was depleted. During this trying time, 
she was, on occasion, not too well herself, but she kept on going and never uttered one 
solitary word of complaint. Nothing was too much effort or trouble if it would make him 
any happier or could make him more comfortable. The whole household and schedule was 
rearranged to suit his convenience. How they fought that battle together! Throughout 
all of their years together Daddy always referred to Mother affectionately as "My Lady." 

When Mother's partner, husband and sweetheart was taken from her, she reached 
deep into her bank of strength and found the courage to start living alone. She had stored 
and saved well . The two had lived a full life together giving to each other-not taking 
away. 

Before Daddy died he was so logical in thought. He didn't like to travel but knew 
that Mother had always yearned to travel and see the world. He told her that after he 
was gone that she could tour all of the countries and places she had always wanted to see. 

Shortly after Daddy died Mother packed her courage, love and trust of her fellowman 
and started out alone to see the world. She visited Hawaii and spent her first Thanksgiving 
away from home. The next year she sailed the Caribbean, landed in Italy and toured all 
of the free countries. As all Geddeses know, our blood longs to visit our mother country 
and Mother visited beloved Scotland. The heather in bloom was a familiar sight because 
her own Scottish mother always had a vase of heather about her home. 

Mother is spending her evening years graciously giving of herself with an enthusiasm 
for living that Is contagious. Her children love her but even more than that they have a 
feeling of pride, admiration, and respect for this full, rich, and strong woman. 

At the time of this writing, June, 1963, Winnie Nielson Is the mother of three, 
grandmother of twelve and great-grandmother of three. All have been endowed with a rich 
heritage thanks to the tireless efforts of this good woman who has given so much of herself 



Sketch written by daughters, Roma and Gwen 



177 HYRUM CARL NIELSON JR. 



B. 13 Oct, 1911 
Chr, 3 Dec. 1911 
Bapt. 30 Mar. 1920 
End. 1 Feb. 1935 
Md . 26 May 1 939 

Father Hyrum Carl Nielson 



Preston, Oneida, Idaho 
Preston, Oneida, Idaho 
Preston, Franklin, Idaho 
Logan Temple, Cache, Utah 
Logan Temple, Cache, Utah 

Mother 55 WIlHamena (Winnie) Martha Geddes 
210 



Wife NETTIE SHUMWAY 



B 20 July 1909 
Chr 12 Sept. 1909 
Bapt 20 July 1917 
End 26 May 1939 
Sid 26 May 1939 

Father Charles Mendon Shumway 



Treasureton, Oneida, Idaho 
Treasureton, Oneida, Idaho 
Treasureton, Franklin, Idaho 
Logan Temple, Cache, Utah 
Logan Temple, Cache, Utah 

Mother Caroline Hymas 



CHILDREN 



455 Faye Nielson 

468 Carl Craig Nielson 

494 Maurice Hyrum Nielson 



519 Lona Nielson 
567 Stacy Nielson 
625 Christine Nielson 



B 28 Ap, . 1940, Preston, Franklin, Idaho 
B 22 July 1941, Preston, Franklin, Idaho 
B 3 Nov. 1943, Preston, Franklin, Idaho 
Bapt 3 Nov. 1951, Preston, Franklin, Idaho 
End 19 Dec. 1962, Logan Temple, Cache, Utah 
B 15 0ci. 1945, Preston, Franklin, Idaho 
Bapt 5 Dec. 1953, Preston, Franklin, Idaho 
B 12 Feb. 1949, Preston, Franklin, Idaho 
Bapt 2 /v\ar. 1959, Preston, Franklin, Idaho 
B 13 Ju-e 1952, Preston, Franklin, Idaho 
Bapt 2 July 1960, Preston, Franklin, Idaho 



177 HYRUM CARL NIELSON, JR. 



H. Carl Nielson, Jr. was born October 13, 1911 to Hyrum Carl Nielson, Sr . and 
Williamena M. Geddes at the Nielson farm home on east Oneida, Preston, Idaho. All 
the Nielson family were happy to welcome this male child as his father was an only son . 
He was also an only son in his family. His childhood was a normal process of growth and 
development. He loved machinery, an interest that he never outgrew and one that he 
shared with his father. Early in life he developed an admiration for sports and good sports- 
manship. His family called him H. C. and his father went by the name of Carl and his 
grandfather was called Hyrum. 

H. C. graduated from the Preston L.D.S. Seminary in 1928. The following year he 
graduated from Preston High School . The next two years were spent in college at the 
U.S.A.C. at Logan. During his last year, he was high point man in intermural sports. 

j Then came the call to the Northern States for an L.D.S. mission which proved to be 

'one of the richest experiences of his life. He received an honorable release in February, 
1937 and came home to farm with his father on the family farm. H. C. was married to 

211 



Nettie Shumway, a Preston school teacher and daughter of Charles M. Shumway and 
Caroline Hymas, on May 26, 1939, in the Logan Temple. They have lived in the home 
his grandfather built on the Nielson farm. Six children came to bless this home. 

Fay Nielson born 28 April 1940, a delicate baby that grew into a healthy young 
woman. She graduated from Preston seminary and high school and then attended U.S.A.C. 
at Logan for three years where she graduated from the L.D.S. institute. Then came a 
call to the Brazilian South Mission, Fay was an outstanding missionary and was very 
successful in reaching the people. She has now finished her college work and has signed 
a contract to teach third grade at Blanding, Utah for the rest of this 1964 year. 

Carl Craig Nielson was born July 22, 1941 and is known as Craig. He has always 
been strong and healthy and able to accomplish what he wanted to. At high school he 
was on the football team and Captain of his team. His senior year he was voted "preferred 
man" of his school and was also president of his class. He conducted the commencement 
exercises with dignity. He was a graduate of the Preston L.D.S, seminary. After high 
school graduation he joined the National Guard, Next he spent 2 1/2 years as a missionary 
to Denmark, He was the conductor of the Aarhus L,D.S, choir for three months and really 
enjoyed his mission. After returning home, Craig helped his father on the farm in the summer 
and returned to college in the autumn. He isnow in his sophomore year of college. 

Maurice Hyrum Nielson was born November 3, 1943, a delicate child who developed 
into a robust adult. His childhood was one of good mischief and activity. He became an 
Eagle Scout, Like his brother, Craig, he played football , was voted "preferred man" and 
graduated from both high school and L.D.S. seminary. He attended U.S.A.C, at Logan 
for one quarter and then was called to be a missionary in Scotland. At this writing he 
is still in Scotland experiencing real joy every time he takes a person into the waters of 
baptism, ! 



Lona Nielson was born October 15, 1945, She has always been a healthy and lovely j 
girl . One thing Lona excels in is dancing. She is very graceful and her dancing teachers 
have always wanted her to continue her study of dancing. After graduation from high 
school and L.D.S, seminary, Lona attended U,S,U, for one quarter, but was not satisfied 
with college. She entered beautician school where she is very happy to be "doing some- 
thing" as she has expressed it. 

Stacey Nielson was born Feb. 12, 1949, the year of the terrible blizzards. His 
cute turned-up nose and heavy eyebrows have given him a distinction all his own. He is 
now a freshman at high school and played football his first year. He Is an excellent worker 
on his father's farm and is active in scouting, 

Christine Nielson was born Friday, June 13, 1952, She came into this world with a 
hole in the lower partition of her heart but by the time she was nine years old, the hole 
had closed by itself. It was a rare miracle, as the doctors described it, Christine loves 
the animals and the out of doors. She is a healthy normal eleven year old and the perfect 
ending to a family, 

H. C. and his family are very active In the Fifth Ward of the Franklin Stake, They 
attend church regularly and take advantage of the opportunities the church has to offer, 

212 



The family works together on the farm, 
or sheep right along with the boys. 



The girls drive trucks, hoe weeds, trail cattle 



At this writing, H. C. teaches the adult class in Sunday School and the junior class 
in Mutual . He took his basketball boys to the all-church basketball tournament last year 
and his team lost to Logan Ward this year for the privilege of going. His wife is Primary 
president. Fay teaches the social science class in Relief Society and Craig has a priesthood 
class. H. C. did the machine work in building the Preston golf course. It can be said 
that this man's family are enjoying the good life. 



REYNOLD LEE RALPHS 



B. 15 Apr. 1940 
Chr. 2 June 1941 
Bapt. 4 June 1948 
End. 10 Aug. 1960 
Md.. 26 June 1964 

Father Alvin Leo Ralphs 



American Falls, Power, Idaho 

Rockland, Power, Idaho 

Rockland, Power, Idaho 

Idaho Falls Temple, Bonneville, Idaho 

Logan Temple, Cache, Utah 

Mother Celia Lois Walker 



Wife 455 FAYE NIELSON 



B. 28 Apr. 1940 
Chr. 2 June 1940 
Bapt. 1 May 1948 
End, 8 June 1961 
Sid, 26 June 1964 

Father 177 Hyrum Carl Nielson Jr. 



Preston, Franklin, Idaho 
Preston, Franklin, Idaho 
Preston, Franklin, Idaho 
Logan Temple, Cache, Utah 
Logan Temple, Cache, Utah 

Mother 55 Will iamena Martha Geddes 



CHILDREN 



877 Trina Ann Ralphs 



B. 25 July 1965, American Falls, Power, Idaho 



455 FAYE NIELSON RALPHS 



Fay Nielson was born April 28, 1940, in Preston, Idaho, of Franklin County, the 
daughter of Hyrum Carl Nielson Jr. and Nettie Shumway. 



213 



I was the oldest of three brothers and two sisters. I grew up In Preston, Idaho, 
attending school at the Whitney Elementary School and Preston High School , I graduated i, 
from the eighth grade as Salutatorlan of my class and always maintained good grades In ! 

school . 

My father was a farmer so I grew up knowing a farm life and learning to love It. My 
father and mother taught me the value of hard work and I find much enjoyment In work 
well done. As well as learning the work and care of a home and family, I hove learned 
to do much of the work that keeps a farm running and I enjoy them both, 

I am a member of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints and was baptised a 
member of the church in 1948 at the age of 8 years. My heritage made me a member of 
this church as my family are all members but I, myself, have gained a testimony that It Is 
the one true church of Jesus Christ. I have always been active In the church and Its ; 

organizations. For three years during my teens I was the organist for the Jr. Sunday School ■ 
and for two years have taught the social science lesson in Relief Society, 

I graduated from Preston High School In the spring of 1958 and that fall I entered Utah 
State University in Logan, Utah. I also attended classes at the church institute from which ■ 
I graduated In the spring of 1961 . I participated In many extra curricular activities and 
was a member of the service organization, "Spurs." I enjoyed very much the wide variety 
of classes I took. There seemed to be so many interesting things to learn. j 

i 

My college education was interupted In the spring of 1961 when I received a call from 
the church to serve for two years in the Brazilian South Mission as a missionary, teaching 
the gospel of Jesus Christ. I accepted this coll and spent two of the happiest, most eventful 
years of my life in Brazil teaching the gospel . 

in July of 1963, I returned to the United States and that fall again entered Utah State j 
University to continue my studies. By spring of 1964, I had completed all requirements 
and graduated from the university with a bachelor of science degree and a teaching certificate 
and a librarian certificate. 

In March of 1964 I went to Blanding, Utah and taught a third grade for the remaining 
school year and then returned to Preston and married Reynold Lee Ralphs in the Logan Temple,' 
June 26, 1964. I met Reynold that January at school and we courted until I left Logan 
to teach school In Blanding. I feel my wedding day is the most important event of my life. 



REYNOLD LEE RALPHS 

Reynold Lee Ralphs was born April 15, 1940 in American Falls, Idaho, of Power County, 
the son of Alvin Leo Ralphs and Cello Lois Walker. He is the oldest of one brother and 
three sisters. He lived and grew up In Rockland, Idaho, where his dad is a dry farmer. 
It soon became Reynold's ambition to become an efficient, successful farmer. He also 
learned the value of hard work as he worked hand in hand with his father. 



214 



He attended the Rockland Elementary School where he graduated from the eighth 
grade as Valedictorian of his class. He also attended the Rockland High School where 
he was very active in sports, band and held different class and school offices being the 
school president during his senior year. 

Upon graduating from high school in the spring of 1958 he entered Idaho State Univer- 
sity in Pocatello, Idaho, where he attended school for one semester. The next year he 
attended school for two quarters at Weber State College in Ogden, Utah. 

He is a member of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints and has always 
been active and participated in the church organization. In the fall of 1960 the church 
gave him a mission call to serve two years as a missionary in the Northern California 
mission. This he did fulfilling an honorable mission and returning home to Rockland in 
the fall of 1962. 

After returning from his mission he continued his school education at Utah State Univer- 
sity in Logan, Utah. He again returned to Utah State University in January of 1964 for 
one quarter of school . It was at this time he met me and we were married that spring, 
June 26, 1964. 

Reynold and I now make our home in Rockland, Idaho where Reynold is fulfilling his 
ambition to become an efficient, successful farmer. He is dry land farming with his father 
and one brother. I am fulfilling an ambition of being a wife and mother. 

Reynold teaches a Sunday School class and the Priesthood class of teachers in our ward. 
I am teaching a Primary and a Relief Society class. 

I have been well accepted into the small community of Rockland and It Is truly my 
home as this Is where Reynold brought me to live with him and make our home. 

We were blessed with the birth of our little daughter, Trina Ann on July 25, 1965. 
She is now very much a part of our home and makes us a real family. 

As I write this our lives and home are full of love, happiness, and plans with faith 
for a bright future . 



Sketch written by Fay NIelson Ralphs, Nov. 11, 1965 



468 CARL CRAIG NIELSON 



B. 22 July 1941 Preston, Franklin, Idaho 

Bapt 6 Aug. 1949 Preston, Franklin, Idaho 

End. 29 Sept. 1960 Logan Temple, Cache, Utah 

Md. 2 July 1965 Logan Temple, Cache, Utah 



215 



Father 177 Hyrum Carl NIelson 



Mother Nettie Shumway 



Wife KATHLEEN HERD 



B. 26 Mar. 1945 
Bapt. 28 Mar. 1953 
End, 2 July 1965 
Sid. 2 July 1965 

Father Garland William Herd 



Logan, Cache, Utah 
Preston, Franklin, Idaho 
Logan Temple, Cache, Utah 
Logan Temple, Cache, Utah 

Mother Venna Swainston 



468 CARL CRAIG NIELSON 



Carl Craig Nielson was born 22 July 1941, son of Hyrum Carl Nielson and Nettie 
Shumway of Preston, Idaho. He was baptized 6 Aug. 1949 in the Franklin Stake House. 

He attended the Whitney grade school, the Preston Junior and Senior High Schools at 
Preston, Idaho, At high school, he was active in athletics, was captain of the football 
team, played in the band, participated in dramatics. During his senior year, he was 
president of his class and participated in the graduation program. He graduated from his 
high school and L.D.S. seminary May of 1959, 

He then enlisted in the Army National Guard, serving at Fort Ord, California, and 
Fort Sill, Oklahoma for six months. | 

In the spring of 1960, he attended one quarter at Brigham Young University, Then 
he received a call to serve his church as an L.D.S. missionary in Denmark. He left In } 

October of 1960 and returned In May 1963, He acted as district president while In \ 

Denmark. On his way home, he with several fel low-missionaries, traveled through countries 
of Europe, 

He attended the Utah State University in the fall of 1963, graduating from the L,D,S, 
institute in May, 1965, He is at present attending the Utah State University and working 
part time in the school cafeteria. 

He married Kathleen Herd In the Logan Temple on July 2, 1965, They are very happy 
living in an apartment at Logan. He is going to school and she Is working. 

He has been active in the home guard, YMMIA secretary, Sunday School teacher, 
Aaronic priesthood advisor and Explorer past advisor. 



216 



KATHLEEN HERD NIELSON 



I, Kathleen Herd, was born 26 March 1945, in Logan, Utah, My parents are 
Garland William Herd and Venna Swains ton . I have two sisters and one brother of which 
I am second to the oldest. 

I was baptized following my eighth birthday on 28 March 1953, in the Franklin 
Stake House and was confirmed by my father, 

I attended kindergarten in Logan during 1950-51 , My family then, moved to Preston, 
Idaho where I attended garde school and high school . During 1954 I took piano lessons 
and continued until 1960. 

In high school I studied vocal, sang in the choir and held leading roles in operas and 
plays. During this time I was editor of the school paper, graduated from seminary, part- 
icipated in the marching club, pep club, Thespians, Spanish club, and Quill and Scroll. 
I also enjoyed working in 4H clubs and camps and worked at the local A and W Root Beer 
Stand during my three years at high school , 

I held positions in the Preston 4th Ward Primary as a teacher, Sunday School teacher, 
and MIA organist, 

I graduated from Preston High School 25 May 1963 and taught swimming in the old 
Nielson Gym that summer. 

In September of 1963 I enrolled at the Ricks College School of Nursing at Rexburg, 
Idaho for two years; during this time I was junior Sunday School teacher in the college 
Third Ward and ward organist in the college Fifth Ward. During nurses training, I was 
active In my national and state nursing associations and participated in club activities and 
assemblies. My hospital experience was mainly gained from the Idaho Falls L.D,S. 
Hospital. I graduated from Ricks College May 26, 1965, I then prepared to travel to 
Boise, Idaho for state board exams so that I might become a registered nurse In my own 
state. Upon passing my exams on 29 and 30 June 1965, I returned to Preston. 

I was married to Carl Craig Nielson at the Logan Temple for time and all eternity 2 
July 1965, This was the happiest day of my life, Craig and I had met five years pre- 
viously on a blind date. We liked each other, but he left shortly after for a mission to 
Denmark. Upon his return in 1963 we were attending school for two years, 175 miles 
apart; he at Utah State University and I at Ricks, 

We now live in Logan, Utah where Craig is attending school and I am working at the 
Budge Clinic for a heart specialist. We are very happy that our lives have been bound 
together for time and eternity. We are looking forward to a long life of happiness to- 
gether. 



217 



LOWRY SINGLETON SEELY 



B, 16 Apr. 1916 
Chr. 4 June 1916 
Bapt. 4 Oct. 1924 
End. 21 Dec. 1937 
Md. 21 Dec. 1937 

Father David Randolph Seely 



Castle Dale, Emery, Utah 
Castle Dale, Emery, Utah 
Castele Dale, Emery, Utah 
Logan Temple, Cache, Utah 
Logan Temple, Cache, Utah 

Mother Eva Singleton 



Wife 214 OWEN GEDDES NIELSON 



B. 16 Apr. 1917 
Chr. 10 June 1917 
Bapt. 15 Nov, 1925 
End. 21 Dec. 1937 
Sid. 21 Dec. 1937 

Father Hyrum Carl Nielson 



Preston, Franklin, Idaho 
Preston, Franklin, Idaho 
Preston, Franklin, Idaho 
Logan Temple, Cache, Utah 
Logan Temple, Cache, Utah 

Mother 55 Williamena (Winnie) Martha Geddes 



CHILDREN 



446 Sonya Nielson Seely 
459 David R. Seely 
517 Lov/ry Geddes Seely 



B. 19 Dec. 1938, Price, Carbon, Utah 
B. 11 Aug. 1940, Vernal, Uintah, Utah 
B. 7 Aug. 1949, Hayden, Routt, Colorado 



LOWRY SINGLETON SEELY 



When I first met my husband, Lov/ry, I was impressed with two things: his sharp- 
pressed pants and his shoulders. As I knew him better, two other things impressed me 
enough to become interested: they were his maturity, he seemed so much older and more 
capable than the other young men his age, and the other was the respect and love with 
which he spoke of his mother and grandmother. 

Lowry was the third child born to Elva Singleton and David Randolph Seely, April 16, 
1916, in Castle Dale, Utah, a town settled by his grandfather. Bishop Orange Seely througf- 
a call by Brigham Young. The adjoining town, Orangeville, bears his name, as well as 
Seely Creek. 

His mother said he was a congenial child, easy to talk to, and a darling with his beaut- 
iful dark blue eyes and curly blonde hair. He developed a peculiar way of always putting 



218 



s's with his h's in the initial position. One day he came to his mother, crying, "I 
fell off the shorse and bumped my shead on the shaddle and lost my shot!" One neighbor 
always teased him about his "black" hair. When he saw her approaching their house, he 
hid behind the corner and yelled over and over to impress her, each time getting louder, 
"My shair ain't black, neider! My shair ain't black neider!" 

Lowry loved the outdoors and Seely's love of horses and livestock was bred in him. 
He has always had a good horse, beautiful, well-bred and well-trained. He couldn't live 
happily without his stock. He grew up in a small town of only 600 population and yet 
in the spring he was anxious to go with his father to the wild Indian Hill Oeek country in 
the Book Cliff Mountains where they homesteaded. In answer to his mother's query 
"Why?" He said, "I need room to breathe!" 

When he was only eight, he, with his older brother, Hugh, raised 80 bum lambs in 
that lonely wilderness, batching by themselves in an old cabin. At thirteen, he was all 
alone herding bucks and lambs, and the next year he moved sheep camp by pack mule. 
When he went to Thompson Springs for the moil and supplies, it would take him two days 
by horse and pack mule He rode the range every summer and got right in the middle of 
the impulsive practical jokes the cowboys pulled for fun, like nailing a man's boots to a 
log in the river with spikes, pouring molasses in the Cook's boots, and the water fights 
were Incomparable for variety, quantity, time-span (sometimes they went on for hours, 
even days) and the drenchings. 

With his gang he dug caves In the Cottonwood River banks where they roasted rabbit 
over a bonfire. When the same river was roaring full of water with the spring run-off, 
he rode a mule into Its swirling waters which had to swim to cross and get out. 

In school, he had more than his share of fights and wins, but later used up that energy 
playing on their champion high school basketball and football teams. He was also a 
member of the Utah State football squad of 1936 Championship fame. He graduated from 
that university in 1938 with a degree in animal husbandry and range management. He 
worked for the United States Forest Service in the summer of 1937 in Southern Utah. He 
said he dated lots of girls and that he always chose the pretty and popular ones. He 
was a good dancer and a very romantic suItor„ For instance, besides the red roses, love 
letters, heart-shaped candy boxes, etc, he would write Instead of just Owen or a check 
mark as the others did, such endearments as "My dream girl," "Sweetheart," "With love," 
when he filled In our dance program. He was a member of the PI Kappa Alpha fraternity 
and attended the National Convention at New Orleans, Louisiana in 1936. 

On October 4, 1924, at the age of eight years, Lowry was baptized a member of the 
Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. He was ordained a Deacon on February 3, 1929, 
and a Teacher, February 7, 1932; an Elder, November 27, 1937, and a High Priest, May 24, 
1956. He graduated from seminary and was active in M.I, A, 

In spite of his daring and rugged life, Lowry has enjoyed excellent health. His most 
serious Illnesses were the result of accidents, football, and horses. His nose was broken 
several times requiring surgery, and he was kicked, dumped and battered by his horses. 
Just before Christmas he broke through the ice of a beaver pond at the Williams Fork ranch 



219 



while tending the stock. He had the flu, but finished feeding the cattle in his wet 
freezing clothing. He developed pneumonia and spent Christmas in the hospital , 

While we were still in college, we were married in the Logan Temple, December 21, 
1937, After graduating the next spring, Lowry went into ranching in Colorado with his 
father. They ran sheep in Moffat, Routt and Rio Blanco Counties, After his brother 
joined the company, he and Hugh went to an auction sale in Hayden and bought the start 
of his cattle business. He worked very hard and conscientiously, from early to late, 
seven days a week, year in and year out. In 1945, he bought a home and 200 acres in 
Craig so the children would be close to school and church. He and Hugh bought some 
race horses. They really seemed to enjoy training, running and caring for those beautiul 
hot-blooded thoroughbreds, although they never bet on them. In 1958, he dissolved part- 
nership with D. R. Seely and Sons, Inc., buying a cattle ranch located at Lay and 
Hamilton. He operated this ranch which consisted of about 1000 head of cattle on 
10,000 acres of land. This was the life he loved. It was more hard work and discouraging 
at times, but challenging and interesting. He improved his herd until even his banker 
was impressed with the change in quality in such a short period. He has real ability to 
judge livestock and has a knowledge for feeding and running them. His blue ribbons, 
championship banners and trophies won by his show cattle cover the wall of a room. 

Lowry likes to hunt elk, and during the season he guides several big game hunting 
parties. 

He has given time and effort also to his community as well as to the church, serving 
offices in and as president of the Moffat County Cattlemen's Association and vice president 
of the Moffat County Farm Bureau , In church, he has been scout master, young men's I 

Mutual Improvement Association Superintendent (recently our stake president, Lewis R. ' 

Livinston, said he thought of Brother and Sister Seely as Mr. and Mrs. M.I. A.), counselor 
in the Bishopric and then the first Bishop set apart in the Craig Stake. He served in this 
capacity for nearly five years. There were many tears and expressions of love and app- 
reciation when he was released. He had the Craig Ward in the best position financially 
and organizationally In the stake, had inspired a wonderful spirit of love and cooperation 
in the ward, and had the confidence of the young people who brought many problems to his i 
office. One of Lowry's most outstanding qualities is his kindness. 

He Is a respected citizen in our community, a man of honor and honesty. Even In 
California, a dean from Fresno State College upon meeting him said, "You have a good 
reputation In this country, Mr, Seely, They tell me you are a man to be trusted." 



Sketch written by Gwen Geddes Nielson Seely 

214 GWEN GEDDES NIELSON SEELY 
Early one frosty morning on the sixteenth of April, 1917 old Dr. Cutler came bumping 

220 



over the frozen ground in his buggy with one horse, and delivered me, Gwen Geddes 
Nielson, to H . Carl and Winnie Nielson . It had been about five years since my one and 
only brother had been born and I was the second living child, I had two younger sisters, 
Faye, who died when she was only twelve, and Roma, who is now married to Major George 
Nelson . I had black eyes and an abundance of black hair which grew lighter unti I it 
was blonde at four, then it darkened again to a medium brown shade with copper highlights 
, until the white strands have now replaced the copper. 

My brother was exceptional as brothers go, for he never teased me or quarreled with 
me, and he was good and patient. Trying to help me, he used to kneel at my feet and try 
to get me to stop squealing. As I got older, he complained to my mother that she was 
spoiling us girls and allowing us to do things which he felt was detrimental to our health, 
such as wearing high heels to "dress up" in . I have no recollection of ever having a 
fight or quarrel with my brother, and very few with my sisters. We only quarreled when 
we made the beds together, not being able to agree on where the pillows should be. The 
only time I recall my mother slapping me was over this stubborn attitude and a good shaking 
until she shook the truth out of me when I had lied. The only spanking I remember of 
having received at the hand of my father was administered because of the same stubborn 
trait when he had asked me to shut the door and I had refused, openly defying him, saying, 
"no." He finally compromised by taking my hand in his and thus, together, forced me 
to shut the door, but at the same time vowing that he would never again by punishment make 
child do something. He and mother were always kind. 

As a little child I didn't have much of an appetite and almost ilved entirely for 
one period on white tea — hot water, milk, and sugar. Mother said that I lived by my 
nose, meaning that everything had to smell just right to suit me or I wouldn't eat. I 
still enjoy or otherwise life by its odors and fragrant smells . 

j I had a happy childhood and the play equipment furnished by Dad added a lot of fun, 

such things as the tennis court, the big swings, the whirl-i-gig, the toboggans. I cherish 
the companionship of my sister Faye. I think our favorite play was building play houses 
in the corner of the living room, upstairs in the old "East Room," In the orchard, behind the 
shed, in the old shanty, various corners of the big porch which went more than half way 
around the house, in the hayloft in the barn, any place which looked interesting, and 
then "playing house." Next in preference was "dressing up" in Mother's old high heeled 
slippers, dresses, old curtains and pieces of chiffon. Then came paper dolls. I didn't 
need a play mate for this game, and my brother never tore my dolls. They were cut from 
^Aontgomery catalogues and magazines. Faye and I often played with my cousins, Olive 
3nd Beth Geddes, and If It should be nice weather you can be certain It was always the 
same thing — pretending we were pioneers. We called it "Betty and Bobby," Oh, the 
experiences we had, the traveling we did (usually with a red wagon), and the camps we 
iet up! 

Many happy hours were spent exploring the creek, wading, playing in the willows and 
)n the banks, and many are the shoes lost In those muddy waters because we hated the 
eel of the soft mud on the bottom. One hot summer day, my brother and I were supposed 
o be hoeing beets, but enticed by the shade, we spent nearly the whole of the afternoon 
jiulldlng a fascinating little city with a network of highways and dugways in the steep 



221 



shaded bank of the old creek. The water mode it possible to "hard top" the roads, and 
"cement" the buildings. 

I loved to climb. I climbed apple trees and pear trees, the high board fence of the 
corral, the barn, to the top of the silo, the sheds, the chicken coops, and even all over 
the top of the house once, for this v^'os taboo because of damaging the shingles. The big 
thrill of each summer was the ride on the Jackson fork to the top of the very last hay stack of 
the season. This was a reward for steady duty to the job of derrick horse rider. 

Our home was built on the brink of a hollow which afforded a perfect sleigh riding 
hill close and handy. We also did a little skiiing, only shushing for we had only straps 
over our feet, no clamps. Dad built us a long sturdy toboggan which he used to pull 
behind the car. One time we rode all the way to Banida (a distance then of about 15 
miles) on one of these sleds during the holidays. 

As we learned to talk we learned to say our prayers at night and take our turns say- 
ing the blessing on the food. We always attended Sunday School and Relief Society meet- 
ings with Mother, I always disliked the night board meetings, they seemed so long and 
tiresome. 

We each had a bank in which to save our pennies, and we were taught thrift. I 
always carried some small change in my pocket, but seldom spent It, never foolishly. We 
always had a new dress for the Fourth of July instead of for Easter as is now the custom. 
Mother's cellar was full of canned fruits, jellies and jams, and the root cellar with potatoes, 
carrots, cabbages, mother hubbard squash, onions, and apples. We all did our share 
working In the big garden, and picking fruit in the orchard. 

Threshing time was always exciting, but I liked the romance of the pea harvest 
which was done so much In the cool of the night or early morning, I thrilled at the sight 
of the loaded wagons lined up one after the other in the yard and down the lane, their 
shapes gradually silhouetted against the early morning sky before the sun Itself came up 
to see. The time element was very Important to save the juice of the peas. There 
was nothing that tasted quite so good as the creamed new peas Mother made at that time, 

i 
My friends were always welcome at home, and I used to have many parties, i 

I always loved school and my teachers. I think I really enjoyed arithmetic and 
English studies the best, I entered a radio essay contest for introducing Morning Milk when 
I was about 11 or 12, One of the biggest thrills of my life came that Saturday morning 
when I was sitting on the stairs still half asleep and heard my name announced as a winner. 
Mother and Dad took me to Salt Lake City and I read it over KSL, 

I loved taking parts in the plays and programs in school and Mutual, and the road- 
shows, I remember the last school assembly before I graduated; I hardly had time to 
change from one costume to another I took such a variety of parts, singing, tap dancing, 
and narrating for a fashion review. In spite of my shyness and inferiority complex, I 
was a member of the crowd who thought they ran the school, enjoyed being secretary of 
the studentbody and pep club, an officer in the popular social club, the N. D. C.'s, 



222 



and one of the royalty for the Junior Prom, an attendant to the queen. For high school 
graduation, I received my first wrist watch and my first corsage, I also had the privilege 
of attending and graduating from the L. D. S, seminary. 

My tasks in the home besides those already mentioned included dusting on Saturdays, 
' helping with the supper dishes, keeping my own room in order, straightening the living 
room before going to school and some cooking. I learned to moke bread and prepare a 
meal . Although I helped in the hay and garden and beets. Dad never allowed me to thin 
or top beets because he thought that was too hard for girls. 

I have always loved every kind of active sport. I have tried them all but mastered 
none. Swimming was my favorite and I was just learning to dive when I suffered such a 
severe attack of sinus infection that I was forced to give It up. 

The greatest tragedy in my life was the death of my sister, Faye . She was the 
beautiful one In our family and the most talented. She had such a warm unselfish personal- 
ity that everyone who knew her loved her. She brought sunshine Into every life she 
touched. I was with her in the hospital the night she went into shock after an appendectomy 
(that was In the days before penicillin). I'll never forget how Daddy quit singing after 
that, and it was then that I lost faith in prayer for a time. 

Attending college was a wonderful experience. I think that period was the most 
fun of my life. As well as academic learning, I received valuable social experiences, 
and confidence in myself, I became affiliated with the Alpha Chi Omega sorority and 
enjoyed immensely the close association with the girls living In the sorority house. 

I met Lowry at a college dance my sophomore year. He said he had tried to make 
an impression on me long before but the first time I really noticed him was at a costume 
party. During the intermission of the dance, he whisked me away from my own date and 
In the two weeks which followed before the Christmas holidays we were going pretty steady. 
He sent me a dozen red roses for love for Christmas. Lowry always maintained that we 
were meant for each other, and presented as one proof the fact that our birthdays came on 
the same day. Lowry was lots of fun, very gallant and courteous, and very perservering. 
|l He seemed older for his age than most of the fellows, and he was popular with the other 
young men. He dressed beautifully and always had a good press in his pants. One of 
the things which impressed me most was his consideration and affection for his mother and 
grandmother. 

My first big trip came in the spring when I was 19 years old (1937) which took me 
OS far east as Detroit^ Michigan and across the river to Canada; I started out alone by 
bus to meet my brother who was being released from his mission. Dad got worried and 
sent Mother to join me in Omaha. We drove home in H. C.'s new car. 

The summer which followed is the one which stands out in my memory as being 
filled with thrills, romance, and gay times. This was the same summer I was first attendant 
to the Queen of the Rodeo. 

When my mother realized that 1 courted some serious thoughts about Lowry Seely, 
after having received a letter from him every day all summer, she accepted his and his 

223 



mother's invit-ation to join them and make a trip to southern Utah to see Lowry who was 
working for the government range survey program. Mother, my sister, Roma, and I 
drove to Castle Dale and from there in the company of the Seelys had an interesting trip 
visiting St. George, Boulder Dam, Zion and Bryce National Parks. 

Lowry and I were married for time and eternity December 21, 1937 in the Logan 
Temple during the Christmas holidays. Our mothers and H. C. accompanied us through 
the Temple. Mother and Dad gave me a beautiful reception for which I used gold as 
the theme color. I still remember how beautiful my cousins, aunts, and friends looked 
that night as they assisted, and how gracious and handsome our families were, and how 
lovely the old home was. 

I shed too many tears before and after I was married at the thought of living away 
from home, for we had always been so close as a family. I had an extremely difficult 
time growing up and getting adjusted and weaned from home. Mom and Dad were just 
wonderful to come and see me at least once every year and Lowry was good about letting 
me go home for visits. 

Our first home together was a nice apartment on 4th North in Logan. Lowry 
graduated in the spring and I finished my junior year. We went to the ranch in Colorado ; 
and Lowry's sister, Morjorie, whom I love, and I cleaned and redecorated an old bachelor's ' 
log cabin. That winter we moved to Castle Dole and lived with his mother and youngest 
brother, Preston, and Lowry worked in their store, Sonya was born two days before our 
first wedding oniversary on December 19, 1938. She was a good healthy baby with a 
happy disposition which was the reason my mother started calling her "Sunny, my little 
merry sunshine." This nickname. Sunny, suits her so well it has and will stay with her 
through her life. She was exceptionally active as a baby, walking all over the house hang- 
ing on to Dad's big finger when she was only five months old. With Dad's start, she took 
her first steps alone at only 7 1/2 months and was really walking at 9 months. She was 
friendly with strangers and made an extra fuss over the men. 

When we decided to live in Vernal, Lowry went there to buy us a home. I tasted 
bitter disappointment when he wrote the news that he and his mother had purchased a 
company house to be our next home. Margaret and Hugh decided to move there also, 
so we divided the house into two apartments. I really learned to know and love Margaret 
from that close association. But I'll remember that winter as one of the most miserable I 
ever spent. It was so cold and friendless, and Lowry was gone all the time except to 
come home about once a month for a bath and a shave, and he smelled of sage brush and 
mutton grease. Sonya thought she had two daddys—Daddy Hugh and Daddy Lowry. 

David came to bless our home August 11, 1940. He was thin and melancholy. 
When only a few months old, he suffered his second operation which was for a boil . He 
had much earache and bronchitis, but, oh, how he could snuggle when he was rocked! 
Where Sunny always wanted to be in the middle of things, David could entertain himself 
for hours by himself. He was a cute talker, using big and sometimes original words, 
and learned young. It was a surprise and wonder to discover how each child is so 
different and individualistic. 

We spent most of our time on the ranch which was a busy and Interesting life even 
though we would get snowed in in the winter, parking our car miles down the canyon and 

224 



using a little cutter sleigh when we had to get out to go to town. We had few colds 
and no Illness requiring a doctor. Besides the dogs, cats, cows, horses, sheep, geese, 
turkeys, and chickens, we raised a deer and an elk. They became real pets and the 
deer would follow and play with the children like a dog. It would even try to follow 
us to town . 

We bought our place in Craig in 1945, and it was fun to get all my thiings together 
i in a home of my own, and enjoy some of the lovely things we received as wedding gifts. 
I I liked the people of Craig and their friendliness, I joined the Women's Civic Club and 
t the Ladies Recreation Club and of course the P.T.A. and took my turn in offices. Once 
again we had the opportunity of attending church quite regularly, Craig Branch was then 
a small organization but with an optimistic and faithful spirit. I am pleased to have been 
a part of its amazing growth. Since we lacked adequate faithful priesthood leadership, 
' I was called as a counselor in the Sunday School Superintendency, 

Our third child was born the seventh of August, 1945 In the Hayden Hospital, the 
same year that World War II ended. While lying in the hospital, I heard the news of VJ 
Day over the radio. It was a time to be especially thankful . Shortly before that I had 
seen a strange manifestation in the clear blue sky. A huge pure white V was formed as 
precisely and clean cut as it could possibly be by clouds, and it held that way for many 
minutes, then Instead of breaking up and changing the way clouds usually do, it just 
straightened out and then spread away in thin cloudy wisps. 

I Geddes was a tiny round baby and he started out in the world with troubles, having 

a double hernia. He used to sigh and moan in his sleep until he was quite old. He was 
slower than the other children in every thing he did, such as cutting teeth, walking, talking, 
etc. He was handicapped with poor muscular coordination which even affected his 
speech, A long series of doctors, specialists, speech therapists, and clinics verified our 
fear of brain injury. In spite of the concern we have always felt for him, we have enjoyed 
every minute he has been with us. He has always been a very sensitive and affectionate 
child, and I think he had been the happiest until he got out of high school and met up with 
so many frustrations and disappointments. One of his peculiarities has been his passionate 
attachment to one particular thing in each stage of his life. He resents changes and 
things that upset his schedule and plans. He has brought so much joy, and understanding 
and tolerance, patience, and appreciation, and enriched our lives so much, blessings 
we never would have had without the privilege of raising him, I'm grateful to all my 
family on both sides for all the love and kindness they've shown him. 

The summer of 1954, when Geddes was eight years old, I took him to Utah State 
Agricultural College in Logan for speech therapy. We took classes together, commuting 
from home in Preston every day for six weeks. It helped Geddes tremendously. 

There are so many things I remember through the years, but can't take the space 
to write here, among them are our trips to Yellowstone Park, down the coast of the Pacific, 
and the time I accompanied Mother and Dad to San Francisco on the train in 1952, where 
Dad underwent a serious operation on his arteries. We were indeed thankful for the 
priesthood at this time and their administrations It has been through this experience and 
other such trials in my life and fasting that I have regained my faith in prayer. Besides 
the many hours spent each day in the hospital, we enjoyed a variety of sightseeing experiences 

225 



and I discovered whaf a wonderful travel companion and good sport Mother v/as. I have 
always accompanied my husband on his business trips and cattle shows. 

The year 1960 was especially eventful: Shirley was baptized Into our church in 
March and we all went over to Greeley for this important event; David and Shirley were 
married June 9; Sunny received her B. A. degress at B.Y.U.; and she and Hardy were 
married in the Salt Lake Temple Sept. 2. Even though I thought I had been preparing 
myself for these changes in our family, as a mother, it was a real emotional crisis. There 
is such a mixture of concern, gladness, gratefulness and sadness, stress and a sense of 
loss — and gain , 

We have had an interesting life, full of love, and our children have given it purpose. 
We've had broken bones, and operations, fevers and diseases, but through any kind of 
trial, the gospel has been our anchor. We have worked hard; I've always had hired men 
and extra people to do for, but it has been a good life, and we've been abundantly blessed. 
Our economic problems are always with us, pressing, sometimes depressing us; but I have 
faith in the future and in the fruits of honest toil , Politically we have been Republicans, 
thankful for our great country, never failing to exercise our right to vote. We believe 
In freedom, responsibility, independence and law. During Craig's Golden Jubilee 
celebration, I had the honor of serving as one of the chairmen. My assignment was the 
pageant, in which I was also one of the three readers. 

I am grateful for the opportunities we have had to serve and work in the church, 
realizing the growth and blessings we receive from it, and the happiness from doing our 

best. I've had the privilege of serving In all auxllliaries of the church, with many 

extra assignments. I started while in high school as secretary of Y. W.M.I .A. Other 

offices in that organization have been drama director, teacher, activity counselor, 

president and district president in the Western States Mission. I've been teacher and 

counselor In Primary, the same In Sunday School; starting as a visiting teacher In Relief 

Society, I've had precious experiences as president. Grand Junction Stake Counselor, 

education counselor and Craig Stake president. It Is my prayer that we may continue 

In the sincere service of our Saviour, Jesus Christ. 

I have a great appreciation for my parents, for their qualities of character and per- 
sonality, for their unselfish love, kindness, wisdom and genuine courage, and the back- 
ground they have given me from the gospel to a wholesome sound philosophy, from training 
to the material gifts of life. I have been blessed with goodly parents. Bits of phil- 
osophy that have been important to me to live by and that have really helped me are: 

"Unnecessary scoldings are like hailstones across the garden of a child's heart." 

"Take Monday's catastrophe with Tuesday's equilibrium!" 

"Life, taken by the yard, is hard; by the Inch, it's a cinch," 

"May God grant me the patience to accept the things I cannot change; the courage to 
change the things I should; and the wisdom to know the difference." 



226 



517 LOWRY GEDDES SEELY 



Lowry Geddes Seely came to our family in answer to the prayers of David and 
Sonya who wanted a new baby. He was born in the Hayden hospital August 7, 1945 
just before VJ Day — the end of World War II. He was such a cute little round baby, only 
5 1/2 lbs,, but with problems from the start. He had a double hernia and finally had 
to have surgery to correct the bod one. He was a sweet child requiring lots of love and 
affection . 

When just toddling around the yard, he grabbed the tail of an unbroke pony and got 
kicked unconscious on the front side of his head. The shape of the hoof was visible in 
a raised white imprint. Later he had a bad fall from a run-away horse when he was only 
four. (His father blamed these accidents for the brain injury Geddes sustains, but the 
fault could be a birth defect). 

He went through years of seeing doctors and speech therapists and taking tests, 
searching for answers and assistance in curing, guiding, and educating. 

He never seemed to be ostracized at school, but rather was treated with friendliness 
and kindness. Most of his teachers, the high school superintendent and principal, his 
Cub Scout leader and others who became better acquainted with him seemed to develop 
a real affection for him. Everyone called him "Sparky," a pet name given him by his 
Grandpa Dave when only six months old. 

He has always liked to drive, but started a little young, too little to see through 
the windshield, so he drove into the chicken coop, took the corner off the house, ditched 
Uncle Hugh's pick-up, and gave the whole Craig garage personnel a scare when a new 
Cadilac went gliding across the floor with no visible driver; but he also drove the truck 
for his daddy to feed baled hay to the stock. He Is now a good driver, strictly observing 
all traffic laws and regulations. He has an excellent sense of direction and a good 
memory for places and directions, 

Geddes enjoys reading, music and television, A bookcase which almost covers 
the wall of his room is filled with good books. With his first prize steer money, he bought 
on organ and learned to play it. 

He has alv/ays loved school . It was a real heartache for him when he was not able 
to make the grade to go to college. He graduated from seminary, and although he hod 
to go to seminary class at 7 am. he completed the full four years. He used to run around 
town (to school and church) In a Truckster Scooter with a bunch of kids In the back. Being 
athletic manager to the basketball team which went to state and to the track team which won 
the state championship added much to the interest and excitment of his senior year at 
Moffat County High School , He was also a member of the annual staff and Future Farmers 
of America, He had the fun every year of driving Homecoming royalty In the parade and 
at the game half-time In the red convertible. 

He won a great many honors, ribbons, and trophies showing beautiful prize winning 

227 



Hereford caHle. He was fortunate to have a father who could judge and furnish the cattle 
and then teach him the art of fitting and grooming them to win. He won Grand 
Champion fat steer every year he showed in his 4 H and FFA projects and also Grand 
Champion Female Hereford not only at the Moffat County Fair, but at the Arizona National 
Livestock Show. These challenges and strain of contest were hard for Geddes because 
he lacks a real competitive spirit and enjoys the more congenial and easier life, but 
the honors and prestige of winning did a great deal for his self confidence. In 1965, he 
signed up for a Worlds Fair and Hill Cumorah Pageant Tour. It was a wonderful experience 
for him. He thought the most impressive of all the interesting places he visited was the 
Sacred Grove at Palmyra and the spirit he felt in that hallowed spot • 

Lowry Geddes has been faithful and active in his church and has been greatly 
blessed for it. He was baptized August 7, 1953 along with his two cousins Randy Reeve 
and Kathleen Seely who were born the same summer as he. Being afraid to have his face 
covered with water, he felt panic when he went under, struggled and was not completely 
submerged. He had to have the baptism three times. He was ordained a Deacon August 13 
1957, a teacher, September 27, 1959, a priest, August 13, 1961, and Elder April 18, 1965 
all by his father, except as a priest by his cousin, Bruce Seely. Geddes has a strong 
desire to serve a mission for his church and has had a special saving for this purpose. With 
the faith and help of our bishop and the prayers of our friends and relatives, we believe 
he will have that privilege. 



Sketch written by his mother, Gwen Geddes Seeiy 



CHARLES HARDISON REDD 



B. 19 June 1936 Rrovo, Utah, Utah 

Bapt. 28 Jan. 1945 Provo, Utah, Utah 

End 6 Sept. 1956 Salt Lake Temple, Salt Lake, Utah 

Md. 2 Sept. 1960 Salt Lake Temple, Salt Lake, Utah 

Father Charles Redd Mother Annaley Naegle 



Wife 446 SONYA NIELSON SEELY 

B. 19 Dec 1938 Price, Caribou, Utah 

Bapt. 2 Feb. 1947 Craig, Moffat, Colorado 

End. 1 Sept. 1960 Salt Lake Temple, Salt Lake, Utah 

Sid. 2 Sept. 1960 Salt Lake Temple, Salt Lake, Utah 

Father Lowry Singleton Seely Mother 214 Gwen Geddes Nielson 



228 



CHILDREN 



878 Charles Hardlson Redd 

879 Dawn Natasha Redd 



B. 11 June 1961, Logan, Cache, Utah 

B. 31 Mar. 1963, Monticello, San Juan, Utah 



CHARLES HARDISON REDD 



Charles Hardlson Redd was born 19 June 1936, in the Crane Maternity Home, Provo, 
Utah . He was the second child of eight and oldest son of Charles Redd and Annaley 

Naegle. His first home was the ranch house on the home ranch at LaSal, San Juan, Utah. 

Hardy was blessed by Albert R. Lyman of Blanding now the Patriarch of the San Juan 
Stake. He was named after his father, Charles, and his grandfather, Lemuel Hardison 
Redd, 

Hardy was almost nine when he was baptized 28 Jan. 1945 in Moab, Grand, Utah, 
He was baptized in a boiler room in which boards had been put in the door and then the 
room flooded. 

The school which Hardy attended grades one through six was a two-room white frame 
building located 1 1/2 miles from his home on the old LaSal townsite. The kids traveled 
to and from school in an old 1932 stationwagon and often on horseback. Church was held 
in the same building. Because of the remote location and low pay, getting teachers for 
this rural community was always a problem and often Charlie, his father, would hove to 
find the teacher and add on to the wages San Juan County could then afford. 

When Hardy entered the seventh grade, his parents sent him to Wasatch Academy, 
a Presbyterian boarding school, in Mt, Pleasant, Utah. The next year the family moved 
to Provo and Hardy was enrolled in the Brigham Young Laboratory School. This move 
to Provo made at great expense and inconvenience to his father is indicative of the concern 
Charlie had for the education of his children and the desire to keep the family together 
during the school years. Hardy wanted to stay at the ranch and resented the move to Provo, 
As a result he feels he did not do as well in school as he could have done nor did he take 
;full advantage of opportunities afforded to him. 

His summers were spent "cowboying" with Chet Smith in Dry Valley and on the LaSoi 
Mountains. When he was 7 years old, he went on a trailherd to Colorado. He can 
remember being lifted onto a big horse named Canary in the dark at Old LaSal and travel- 
ing to Colorado behing the "drags." He was showing off by turning a calf smartly in front 
of some girls who had come out from Bedrock to help, the calf turned abruptly, so did 
Canary; Hardy didn't and ended up on the ground, 

I Hardy attended B. Y. High School and graduated in 1954, He served as athletic 

manager and was active In the Spanish Club, in extemporaneous speaking, and as a Thespian 
olayed the part of Robin Goodfellow in the play, "Prince Fellowfoot." 



229 



He entered Brigham Young University in 1954, He participated in the Stockman's 
Club and pledged the Gold Bricker social unit. 

In 1956 he was called to the Uruguayan mission . He served in Paraguay and Uruguay 
and had a hand in introducing the Gospel to many people there. During those 2 1/2 
years he learned for himself through experiences of those with whom he worked that Christ's 
rules for living were made for man's happiness and progress and unhappiness comes when 
these rules are not followed. 

Upon his return from the mission field, he attended Utah State University. He was 
President of the Animal Husbandry Club and a member of the livestock and wool judging 
teams Hardy was active in studentbody politics and participated in several philosophical 
discussion groups He has been influenced by two of his professors. Dr. John Butcher 
and Dr, Milt Madsen who became personal friends with whom he shared many confidences. 
He graduated in 1961 with a degree in Animal Husbandry and Agricultural Economics, 

On 2 Sept, 1960 we were married in the Salt Lake Temple., President Henry D, 
Moyle performed the ceremony. We lived in Logan while Hardy finished school and then 
moved to the ranch in LaSal where Hardy kept books and worked with Redd Ranches, 
a family corporation. 

The greatest influence in Hardy's life has been his father, Charlie Redd, a prominent 
rancher in Southeastern Utah and Colorado, This is not only because he was the owner 
of the community, but because of his strong mindedness and ideas about boys working. He i! 
was continually after the kids to keep busy picking up nails, rocks, and hoeing weeds. 
Hardy was always made to feel that just because he was the boss's son he did not have the 
right to assume advantages over anyone else. Hardy learned to value fairness, integrity, 
and hard work. He has a deep appreciation of the fact that nothing is free and everything 
has to be paid for in one way or another. To Hardy, his father was an example of these 
fine qualities. 

Hardy has always been active in the Church and has served in many capacities in- 
cluding priesthood teacher, Sunday School teacher, and Sunday School Superintendent, 
In LaSal he has served as a counselor in the Branch Presidency and as Branch President, 

Hardy has felt that the gift of a glib tongue has allowed him to get by with less 
than the best that he could do. This may be true; but he is straight forward and fair in 
all his dealings and an intelligent man of integrity. He is a good husband and wonderful 
father who adores his children. 



Sketch written by Sonya Seely Redd 

446 SONYA "N" SEELY REDD 

was born 19 Dec, 1938 in the Price Hospital, Price, Carbon, Utah, the oldest 

230 



child and only daughter of Lowry Singleton Seely and Gwen Geddes NIelson . My 
parents were living in Castle Dale, Emery, Utah, at the time and for a few months that 
was my first home. I was blessed and named by my father 5 Feb. 1939 in the Castle Dale 
Church House . 

We them moved to Vernal , Uintah, Utah, and It was here that my brother David 
Ray Seely was born 11 Aug. 1940. 

Our next move was to a ranch in Colorado some 35 miles from Craig, Moffat, 
I Colorado, where Daddy went into ranching with my grandfather, David Randolph Seely. 
I It was on this ranch that I have my first memories. 

I recall the doll houses Mother made from wooden boxes with windows, pictures, 
rugs cut from Montgomery \A'ard catalogs. The furniture was made from old playing cards 
and spools. One Christmas during the war David and I received rifles cut by Mother 
from a piece of lumber, sanded, and painted black and brown with shoe polish, it seems 
that we always had wagons or beds or some other object made from match boxes and 
couches and chairs fashioned from wooden orange crates. I remember going on the sleigh 
in the winter with Daddy, Mother, and David to feed the cattle and how we would bury 
down into the hoy to keep warm. 

I have wonderful memories of the many pets we had. One of the several deer we 
had was named Bambi . Once it was very sick and we were sure it would die; Gilbert 
Wilde, a relative and hired man, fed it chewing tobacco. The deer recovered rapidly. 
Now as I recall this incident I think of the 89th Section of the D & C which says "tobacco 
is not for the body, neither for the belly, and is not good for man, but is an herb for 
bruises and all sick cattle, to be used with judgment and skil I . " During hunting season 
red handkies and bells were hung around the necks of the deer. Once some hunters 
I returned a bell saying that the deer had followed them all over the hills scaring off the 
game deer . 

Daddy usually had good Collie dogs, and we were all heartbroken when one called 
Lassie came home poisoned. Daddy poured hot lard down his throat and tried every way 
he knew to save him, but he was too far gone. 

Other animals among the menagerie that would strutt in front of the barn were fight- 
ing roosters, turkeys, ducks and white geese. One year several of the geese entertained 
themselves and a human audience, much to the discomfort of the bulls, by pulling the toils 
of the bulls while they were eating their grain . Finding geese nests in the barns and duck 
eggs, usual ly laid in the swamp, was an exciting occasion . A Tom turkey who had a 
very bad habit of jumping up on the backs of the men as they worked around the barnyard 
ended up as a delicious dinner when Daddy, feeling that he was behind him and wanting to 
avoid having him on his back, turned and accidentally stepped on one of his legs, breaking 
it. 

Daddy was very attached to and proud of Prince, a beautiful bull elk caught when 
a calf. We children usually kept our distance since our first experience with him was his 
stamping his feet at us. He ran with the milk cows, or rather "ran" them; he was quite the 



231 



boss. We were all disgusted and very unhappy when at three years old some hunters hit 
him over the head with an ax, cut our fence to tie him to their car, and carried him to town. 

When Mother first came to the ranch. Daddy took her to visit some neighbors. 
They had 14 children including 3 sets of twins. As they drove up, children were everywhere- 
some peeking around buildings and some naked. Mother was horrified and as most mothers, 
before they had children of their own or theirs are very small and not getting around, vowed 
her children would never be caught in that state. A couple of years later she and Aunt 
Margaret Seely were looking for 3 lost youngsters. As they went up the lane along the 
ditch, they discovered some shoes and socks, and then some shirts and overalls, and then 
some underpants. As they reached the gate a stranger was passing and asked if they were 
looking for 3 small children. Mother said they were. He pointed up the hill and as 
Mother raised her eyes 3 little "bares" were scurrying up the sidehill. 

When I was 18 months, I fell off the grainery steps breaking my collar bone. Uncle 
Preston David Seely walked with me all night in the house and out in the barnyard until 
they could take me to town to a doctor. 

i 

We were far from being angels as we grew up and caused our parents much anxiety 
and some anger. The only spanking I recall at the hands of my father occured after re- 
peated warnings about playing on the ice on the creek that ran close to the house. Water 
holes were cut for watering the livestock and obtaining water for the house. In addition, 
the creek ran quite swiftly and the ice was often thin. Several ducks and geese had gone 
under the ice on different occasions. One day Mother found us on the Ice again. She 
told Daddy when he came home; he stripped us bare, spanked us good, and put us to bed 
without dinner. 

One spring Grandma Seely had an especially nice bunch of baby chickens which 
she had just turned out In the yard. The day after we had been out with the men docking 
lambs, we were caught in the garden cutting the tails off the chickens with extremely 
dull rocks. Many died due to the ordeal . 

Pocket knives were prized possessions. Grandpa Dave usually was the one who kept 
us supplied with new ones when we lost the old ones. One day after receiving new ones 
from town we went to the grainery to cut jerky. After being bored with the jerky or just 
full, we proceeded to cut holes in all the grain sacks. At dinner Daddy asked who did it. 
The boys, David and my cousin Bruce, said, "Sonya." I was placed over Daddy's knee, 
I held my breath which scared the parents and was put under the water faucet. This 
apparently saved us all from a deserved spanking. 

Grandpa Dove was a wonderful whittler. In the summer we would sit down by.the 
coal shed and wood pile under a very old Cottonwood tree. The thick bark from this 
tree was whittled into lovely redish-brown boats which we floated In the creek. It seems 
that we usually had several in our possession. 

Mother often took us on walks in the meadows and the hills. I remember her sing- ^_ 
ing, "There's a bright golden haze on the meadow, there's a bright golden haze on the meadow, 

and the corn is as high as an elephants eye "or "Hello little echo how do you do?" 

and the rocks at the bottom of Horse Mountain answering. Once as we were crossing an 

232 



old tree which had fallen across the river we disturbed a bees nest. My mouth was open 
OS usual and a bee flew down stinging me in the throat. It could have been serious, 
but was just painful for several days. 

Another fond memory I have of the ranch Is the baths Mother, Aunt Marjorie, Aunt 
Margaret, and I took In the river. The water was usually quite chilly even in the summer; 
but It was so much fun to splash and swim around and come out clean. 

When we were older, we spent a lot of time riding calves and horses. We were 
also in the race horse business for a time and it was the kid's responsibility to exercise 
them and then cool them out. One day I was riding with Grandpa Dave exercising some 
horses. I was on Bonnie Kay leading Silver Slippers. We decided we would cut the 
cooling period by walking them half way down to the firebox, then running them the rest 
of the way down and half way back, then walking them on home. We started to run, 
but I had neglected to let Silver Slippers know our plans. As Bonnie Kay took off, my 
hold on Silver Slipper's halter very swiftly lifted me out of the saddle and set me down 
on the ground. Grandpa promised that he would not tell the boys since they would really 
laugh and give me a bad time. They were very hard on me anyway for holding onto the 
horn of the saddle when riding. Daddy always came to my defense saying that he held 
onto the horn and that was what it was for. 

In 1945 prior to my starting school Daddy bought a 200 acre ranch and home 1 mile 
south of Craig. At this time, my second brother, Lowry Geddes Seely, was born 7 Aug. 
1945 In the Hayden Hospital, Hoyden, Routt, Colorado. I was disappointed since I 
had wanted a sister so badly. But he was such a cute little guy that I couldn't help but 
love him. Nana (Winnie Geddes Nielson) came to stay with us shortly after Geddes 
was born since David came down with scarlet fever. One time when he was getting 
better we were playing peek-a-boo through one of the doors. Once we bumped noses 
and Nona washed my face with Lysol . I can still smell that disinfectant. 

I was baptized 2 Feb. 1947 by my father, Lowry Singleton Seely and confirmed a 
member of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints on 2 Feb. 1947 by Lorraine 
R, Allen In the Craig Church House. 

I attended grades one through high school graduation In Craig. I was fortunate 
to have excellent teachers throughout my schooling. School was quite easy for me and I 
received good marks. Grandma Seely attributed this to my being older since my 
birthday was in December. I always felt I was a year behind and was determined to 
catch up. 

I graduated from the 8th grade in 1953 second high scholastlcally In the class. I 
also received the American Legion Good Citizenship Award. Andy Kester, my date for 
the dinner and 8th grade prom, received the same award for the boys. I remember writing 
on my program "O Happy Days," 

In the spring prior to 8th grade graduation I attended school for 3 weeks at Preston 
Junior High, Preston, Idaho. I left Craig because of the vulgarity of some of the boys 
in my class. I was V. P. of the studentbody. 



233 



After I started school I spent many of my summers in Preston, Franklin, Idaho, with 
my grandparents, H. Carl Nielson (Gramps) and Winnie Geddes (Nana). It was Nana 
who nicknamed me "Sunny" at a very young age. The name has stuck and I used it almost 
exclusively in college. Atone time Mother considered having me renamed Sunny Carl, 
but it cost $50 to have it changed on the state records and it didn't seem worth that. I 
was very close to my grandparents and have fond memories of the time I spent with them, 
I also had the opportunity to become well acquainted with other relatives in thiat area. 

It was during this time that I learned to love and admire Uncle H. C. Nielson, and 
Nettie Shumway and their wonderful family. When I was younger I marvelled at the 
love and closeness in that home and the spirit of cooperation. All the kids were good 
workers and I often wondered how they managed it. Aunt Nettie really hod no secret; she 
just went out in the fields and worked with them. That is how they were taught to work 
and to appreciate it, 

I spent many days in the sugar beet fields weeding during those summers. One 
summer I worked to buy one black Jantzen sweater. Aunt Nettie tells how I wore it to 
town on an extremely hot day in August and with beads of perspiration standing out on my 
forehead said, "I'm not too hot, are you?" 

My cousin. Fay Nielson, and I became very close during those summers in Preston, 
I always admired her sweet humble spirit; and she was so much fun. I attended so many 
Shumway reunions that I almost felt I could claim the Shumways as part of my family. Fay 
and I worked and played and attended Primary and M.I, A. together. We also played 
baseball on the "Egypt" 5th Ward team. It was while playing baseball that I became 
acquainted with Ida Mockli , She influenced me in setting goals and standards for myself. 
For several years I would not wear pants on Sunday since Ida maintained that by wearing 
a dress one would not bedoing things on Sunday which would be breaking the Sabbath , 

Mother told me that she let me spend so much time in Preston for the close association 
with Fay since I had been reared with my brother, David and cousin Bruce, 

During one of the summers when I was 10 years old I decided to pierce my ears. 
Fay and I retired to the back steps with mirror, alcohol, ice cubes, needle, and thread. 
We got the needle part way through but couldn't get it the rest of the way. We went 
to Nana for help. She was horrified, but in order not to just let that needle stay in my 
earshehelped us get it through though we had to promise not to do the other ear until 
Gramps or Uncle George J, Nelson was there to help. Both men declined to help so the 
next day found Fay and me out on the steps again, equipment assembled. We got the 
second needle through. 

During this same summer I had my right knee operated on for osteomyelitis. I had 
had trouble with my knee for some time and the many doctors that I had visited could not 
find the trouble. I had begun to limp and it gave way occasionally. Finally Nana 
took me to the Salt Lake Clinic and Dr. Mulligan discovered that probably due to some 
injury the cartilage had decayed, I was operated on in August and when I went back for 
a check up in November he discovered that I had a small break in the kneecap of the left 
knee so I wore a cast on that leg for a month. I am lucky that neither leg gives me too 
much trouble. 

234 



In the summer of 1953 I had an exploratory appendectomy operation. And in 
the winter of 1955 1 slipped on the ice going out to the bus and broke my right collar 
bone . 

I did not enjoy high school and about my only aim was to "get through . " This 
I did in 3 years completing the requirements for graduation at the end of 3 years if I 
would maintain an A average and still take part in extracurricular activities. I grad- 
uated second scholastically in the class, but was deprived of any honors. I received 
a Forensic scholarship from Brigham Young University and was happily on my way to 
college. 

In high school I participated in speech receiving several Superior ratings on a 
district and state level for "Lasca" by Frank Desprez and "China Blue Eyes" by Alma 
Prudence Foss . I won the district American Legion Oratorical Contest and received 
a nice trip to the state contest at Boulder. I also had the romantic lead in the senior 
class play, "January Thaw." I was a member and officer in the National Torch Honor 
Society, I always wanted to be a cheerleader but never made it. 

In high school I enjoyed the close association of several of my teachers — Mrs, 
Jobe, Miss Bowen, Mr. Roth, and Mr. Mohler. 

During high school I worked for Jim Brinks at the Craig Drug Store as clerk, for 
Mr. Gentry at the Cosgriff Hotel as assistant clerk and dining room hostess, and for Frank 
Estey at the Moffat County Abstract as typist. During the summer between my freshman 
and sophomore years at college I worked at the drug store and Abstract Company 12 hours 
a day, 6 days a week saving money to go to La Unlversidad de Mexico. I also worked at 
the Seely Drug Store In Parma, Idaho, the summer after high school graduation. I lived 
with Uncle Preston David Seely and Aunt Katherlne Jenkins. 

On 29 Jan, 1956 I received my Patriarchial Blessing from Patriach Elmer Owen 
Bair In Craig, Colorado. It has been a source of great strength and power. It reminds 
me of potential and encourages me to live according to the blessings promised. 

My freshman year at BYU I lived at Knight Mangum Hall with 3 sweet girls: Ellen 
Boyd, Alice Neal, and Nancy Hansen. I ran for Vice-president and Senator of the freshman 
class and won by 6 votes out of a class of 4,000 students over Dick Groberg of Idaho Falls, 
Idaho. I ran for Belle of the Y placing second in the cake baking contest and pledged 
Vol Norn social unit. College was everything that I had dreamed It would be. I met 
wonderful people and had many friends whose goals and Ideals were the same as mine, 

I majored in Spanish until the spring of my sophomore year when I changed to bus- 
iness education, I stayed active in student government attending two leadership confer- 
ences, one at Bryce Canyon and the other at Sun Valley. I was student nurses' coordinator, 
ran for Vice-president of Culture, and Homecoming Queen, I learned to ski, though my 
teacher, Mary B. Jensen, didn't think that I would ever be able to complete a turn with- 
out falling, and was active in the Alpine Club. My first job at college was typing 
address lists to pay for Miller safety bindings after I had wrenched both knees. During 
Winter Quarter 1959 I taught skiling for BYU under Cynthia Cowan Hurst. 



235 



It was after I began majoring in business that I became acquainted with Dr. Edward 
L. Christiansen, Dr. Max Waters, and Dr. Richard DerMont Bell. I was looking for a 
job and Dr. C, started me working for Max Waters. He was working on his master's 
degree project and I was hisfirst secretary. Later when Dr. C's secretary quit he moved 
me to his office. He was department chairman at the time. My association witfi these 
men and the work and office training I received under them was valuable personally and 
in my professional education. 

My first contact with Dr. Bell was in the Second Ward MIA. The first MIA meeting 
of the year I was asked to lead the singing and do some fun songs. After we had finished 
he came up to me and said he hoped I would show as much enthusiasm in his shorthand 
class in which I had enrolled as I did leading the singing. He was an excellent teacher, 
but scared me to death. When he could call on me to read, I would shake and my voice 
would crack. I would never have dared go unprepared to his class. I believe he was the 
most sarcastic person I have ever known. 

My junior year I took a Book of Mormon class from Dr. Briant S. Jacobs, English 
teacher and author of Relief Society literature lessons for several years. I did very well 
and he tried to persuade me to major in English. I wish I had because I believe it would 
have added depth, richness, and insight to my life which my business training did not. 
I also enjoyed teaching English in high school. Dr. Jacobs and his wife, Barbara, are 
good friends of mine and of my husband's family. 

In 1959 Mike Yoshino, a friend of mine and graduate student in business management, 
got me a job with Dr. Clinton Oaks, Business Management Department chairman. This 
was a wonderful opportunity to get practical business training. I supervised the hiring 
of several girls working under me and organized the office work. 

In October 1959 I began student teaching at North Cache High School, Richmond, 
Utah, under Mrs. Mae (Glenn) Winn. I lived in Preston, Idaho, with Nana and drove 
to school each day. I worked with two beginning shorthand classes, a second year 
shorthand class, a second year typing class, and a business English class. Teaching was 
fun and challenging. I readily discovered how little I had really absorbed from my 
college classes. I should like to have gone back and taken them all over and seriously 
applied myself. 

Uncle Robert Dahle was the principal at North Cache. I was thrilled at the love 
and respect the students felt for him. One of his philosophies in working with boys and 
girls was that if you tell them they are good and expect them to behave most often they 
will live up to your expectations; but if you are constantly telling them how bad they are, 
they will behave badly. 

In November Superintendent Oral Ballam offered me a position replacing Mrs. 
Carolyn Larsen who was expecting a baby. Since I had not graduated from the Y, I 
began working on the possibility of completing graduation requirements in summer school . 
There were several problems; but by taking a quarter's work In half a quarter In a class 
that was not offered in summer school I was able to do it. I signed the contract to 
teach on a letter of authorization in December. I was twenty years old. 



236 



I taught junior remedial English, two sophomore English classes, a beginning type 
class, and the N C Aires, a precision marching group. The remedial English class 
was discouraging; the others were very enjoyable. 

The N C Aires, consisting of 27 darling girls, was fun and exciting. Working 
out new routines and practicing them to perfection was challenging. We marched at 
a half time for a Utah State basketball game and participated in a contest at Idaho Falls 
In which we placed second, and participated in a contest In Preston in which we placed 
first. We were also invited to march in a parade in Provo which was a fun experience 
for the girls. Working with the girls was rewarding and I have fond memories of the 
trip to Idaho Falls (Mother and Nana went) and the slumber party at Nona's. 

The winter I taught at North Cache I also taught skiing at Brighton, Utah on the 
weekend. Having failed the certification examination at Alta in December, It was a 
glorious day when I passed at Jackson Hole, Wyoming, March 1960. I have had my own 
ski schools at Beaver Mountain in Logan Canyon and at Blue Mt,, Montlcello, Utah, 
since certifying. I have done some racing and placed third In the woman's division of 
the Millicent Cup at Brighton In 1960 and placed first at Blue Mt, , Montlcello, 1965. 
I have taken a trip to Sun Valley and several fun trips to Aspen. During one of the trips 
to Aspen 25 BYU students slept at our home in Craig in sleeping bags. Mother went with 
us on one trip and broke her leg. 

In the summer of 1959 I was one of five finalists In the Colorado Miss Wool contest. 
It was while competing in this contest at Glenwood Springs, Colorado, that I first met 
my husband. Hardy. On a bet he danced with all the contestants and was surprised to 
discover that one was a Mormon and attencjing BYU- He met my parents and gradmothers. 
Nana was very impressed with him. The next winter while I was living with her, she would 
say after meeting each fellow that I was dating, "Why don't you look up that nice Mr. Redd?' 
I tried to do just that, but didn't ever get in touch with him; but his roommate, Harry 
Davis, took the message and the last of May he came to the school looking for me. He 
tells that when he asked some of the students where he could find Miss Seely they giggled 
and sighed. Before ! left Preston, I went swimming with him and to an Animal Husbandry 
Club meeting at which his father spoke about Australia. 

During June he came to Provo; we wrote and called . By the first part of July, I 
knew he was the man I would probably marry. We returned to Glenwood Springs to the 
Wool Grower's Convention and he again met my parents, but in a different light. On 
August 6 I travelled to LaSal to meet his family. At the first meal there Charlie asked, 
"Young Lady, do you make bread?" I was tickled I could answer, "Yes!" 

I graduated from Brigham Young University 19 Aug. 1960 with a B. A. degree: a 
major in Business Education and Office Management, a minor In Accounting and Economics, 
and a secondary teaching certificate. 

My plans prior to meeting Hardy were to leave for Europe the end of September 
with a girlfriend, Pat Robinson. These plans were cancelled. 

On 1 Sept. 1960 I received my endowments In the Salt Lake Temple. Mother, 



237 



Aunt Nettie, and Hardy went through with me. Hardy and I were married 2 Sept. 1960 
in the Salt Lake Temple by President Henry D. Moyle. Annaley and Charles Redd, 
Lowry and Gwen Seely, Winnie Nielsen, and Richard Moyle attended the ceremony. 

Following the wedding we were honored at an open house at the Redd home in 
Provo. We then flew to San Francisco for a week's honeymoon. We returned to Craig 
for a reception at my home. Mother had done all the work and it was lovely. 

We went to LaSal and were honored at an open house at the home of George White 
and then spent several days at a cow camp in Colorado before moving to our apartment 
in Logan. 

Our first Christmas was spent in Provo. We took Hardy's younger sisters to Disney- 
land while his parents were in New York. Mother, Nana, and Geddes went with us. 

Hardy completed the requirements for a private pilot license In the spring and 
graduated from Utah State University in June. 

The day after graduation I gave birth to our first child, Charles Hardison Redd, 11 
June 1961 in the Logan L.D.S. Hospital, Logan, Cache, Utah. He was such a darling 
little guy with beautiful blonde curls and brown eyes. He was a very healthy child, active, 
and smart. And how our Nana loved that little boy. He knows his Heavenly Father 
loves him and pays his tithing. He has a sweet, smiling personality, but inherited a 
strong will from both families. 

We made our home in LaSal in the summer of 1961 , We have enjoyed our small 
community and have many wonderful friends. 

Our second child and first daughter, Natasha Dawn Redd, was born 31 Mar. 1963 
in the Monticello Hospital, Monticello, San Juan, Utah, Grandma Seely called her, 
"My little brown eyes, " but she did not have the curly hair with which Charles was blessed. 
She bubbles with personality, is agile and quick. She is a natural performer and really 
wins the menfolk . She is a mimic and thinks her brother is pretty special , She inherited 
the same determined spirit and strong will which Charles did. 

The Church has always been important in my life and I have held positions con- 
tinuously since I was made Primary organist in the seventh grade. Some positions which 
I have held include Word, Primary, Sunday School, Relief Society, and MIA organist 
and chorister; Sunday School secretary; Relief Society literature teacher; and Relief 
Society educational counselor. I was set apart as MIA president In the BYU 2nd Ward 
when I was 18 and have served in that capacity in LaSal for the past 3 years. In my 
patriarchial blessing I was told that I would preside over different auxiliaries of the Church 
and that my talents should be enlarged and magnified through service. My life is richer 
and stronger because of my activity in the Chruch, I am also better qualified as a wife 
and mother. 

In my life I have been fortunate to know two sets of grandparents - David Randolph 
Seely and Elva Singleton Seely; H, Carl Nielson and Winnie Geddes Nielson - and two 

238 



great-grandmothers - Clarabell Lowry Singleton and Margaret Cullen Geddes Eccles. I 
appreciate the heritage which they have given me; and their lives have added depth and 
richness to mine, and have been influential in determining what is really important to me 
in life and what my eternal goals should be. 



459 DAVID RAY SEELY 



B. 11 Aug, 1940 
Bapt. 3 Oct. 1948 
Md. 9 July 1960 

Father Lowry Singleton Seely 



Vernal, Uintah, Utah 
Craig, Moffat, Colorado 
Craig, Moffat, Colorado 

Mother 214 Gwen Geddes Nielson 



Wife SHIRLEY MAY SEALS 



B. 27 Sept. 1941 
Bapt. 23 Apr. 1960 

Father Archie Jefferson Seals 



McCook, Red Willow, Nebraska 
Greeley, Weld, Colorado 

Mother Mary Ellen McEntee 



CHILDREN 



880 Kimberly Ann Seely 

881 Lisa DIanne Seely 



B. 16 May 1961, Craig, Moffat, Colorado 
B. 18 July 1963, Craig, Moffat, Colorado 



459 DAVID RAY SEELY 



David Ray Seely was born August 11, 1940 in Vernal, Utah. He was the first 
son and second child of Gwen Nielson and Lowry Singleton Seely. When only three 
weeks old he made the trip to Colorado, moving from a beautiful heirloom wicker bassinette 
to a wooden box . 

It seems David was always doing things beyond his years, starting with walking. He 
tried to keep up with his sister twenty months his senior and his cousin, Bruce, three months 
older, and bent one leg crooked pushing himself faster than a crawl and walking sooner 
than he should have. He talked young and used such an interesting vocabulary for such 
a little fellow, even coining words to suit his inventions. When just three, he would 
tell us about the red and white corpuscles that were in his blood. He would say, "Grandma 



239 



Seely's heart is lonesome for me. " And it was. 

It's a wonder David ever grew up for he crawled into the river several times, broke 
through the ice in the deep water in the winter, drank formaldehyde, a cup of coal oil, 
was asphyxiated, had such high fevers with his illnesses that he looked purple and had 
scarlet fever, all kinds of measles, tonsilitis, appendectomy, broken bones, asthma and 
hay fever; he was bucked off horses and Brahma calves, had the saddle turn with him, fell 
on his head from the top of a pine tree, had rheumatic fever infection and Schuermann's 
disease, exploded in the kitchen gun powder which he made to see if it would really work, 
rolled over the pick-up hunting rabbits at night, and numerous other accidents with the 
machinery and animals.. 

David was well behaved in church and was a good student and a leader. He was 
elected class president several times. He has always loved to fish and hunt. He killed 
his first big trophy bull elk while still in junior high , He enjoyed other sports like 
football, playing through junior high too freshman in college when he was injured and 
gave it up, M Men basketball, skiing, water skiing, swimming and skating. He has a 
natural grace and athletic ability. 

As children, he, cousin Bruce and sister. Sunny, were a lively and imaginative 
threesome. They always had something going, enjoying their home-made hobby horses, 
the river and their ponies. They really loved the daily baths we all took in the South 
Fork river or creek which ran right by the house. 

David spent many hours in the forest close to our home after we moved into Craig 
and helped build a raft for the slough near by, and a club house. He was quite a 
"Huckleberry Finn . " 

With a great spirit of adventure he added excitement not only to his own life but the 
community at times. Early one morning he patched up a borrowed rubber raft and with 
two buddies started on a river trip to the K Diamond Ranch at Lay without revealing his 
plans to anyone. (It is a distance of about 30 miles by road, about 50 miles by river). 
High water was past and the flow of water was so slow that they didn't reach their des- 
tination as planned. They had taken a lunch but it was gone before noon. Darkness 
overtook them so they pulled their raft on shore and spent a cold hungry night underneath 
it. We sent planes out searching for them the next morning after putting enough evidence 
together to decide where they were. The first plane missed them because they were 
hiding. They had spotted a deer herd; they were so hungry they had tried to get one. 
Their guilty consciences thought the plane to be the game warden. The second search 
discovered them back on the river. The word spread and they received a hero's welcome 
that evening by a car load of envious boy friends who drove down to meet them at the 
ranch and bring them back home. 

David graduated from Moffat County High School, lettering in football and band, 
and chose to go his first year to Brigham Young University. He missed his buddies and 
Shirley, so changed to Colorado State Teachers College at Greeley, Colorado where they 
were going. David had dated one of the most popular girls in high school, but wasn't 
satisfied. There were many girls who longed for his attentions but he chose Shirley Seals. 



240 



This lovely young girl was his only sweetheart and they were married July 9, I960 in 
Craig. They made their home at the Wellsweep Ranch at Hamilton, after a honeymoon 
trip to Canada, and David started working with his father, deciding that the rugged 
independent life of mountains and soil was for him. They now have two beautiful little 
daughters, Kimberly Ann, 4, and Lisa Dianne, 2, 

Shirley is an exceptionally excellent secretary in the Primary and David is second 
counselor in the Sunday School. He also served as Y. M.M.I, A. secretary and assistant 
clerk in the Craig Stake. 

David has had the same battle with an inferiority complex as manyof us Nielsons have, 
and his share of disappointments and heartaches, but he has a beautiful smile and a nice 
personality in spite of his critical disposition. He has always had lots of friends and is 
dearly loved by all who know him . He has a clever wit, and really had a reputation in 
high school for his sense of humor. Sunny has always been proud of the neat way her 
brother wears his clothes and his handsome appearance. Shirley Seely loves his sweetness, 
thoughtfulness, and sincerity, and is always pleased over the nice things said about his 
outstanding and beautifully expressed prayers. He has a strong sense of ethics, sports- 
manship, and fair play He tries to live honestly by the golden rule. The men in the 
family say he is a good worker and that seems to be the ultimate in compliments from them. 
I am indeed grateful for this fine son with whom we have been blessed. 



Sketch written by mother, Gwen Geddes Nielson 



SHIRLEY MAY SEALS SEELY 



I, Shirley May Seals, was born September 27, 1941 in McCook, Nebraska, the 4th 
girl child of Archie Jefferson Seals and Mary Ellen McEntee, I have a younger brother and 
another sister. I lived on a farm about 36 miles south of McCook in Red Willow County 
until I was about six years old. I attended a one room county school for about two months 
before moving to Craig, Colorado, Here I attended grade school through senior high 
school. 

In my junior year of high school I started dating David Seely. It was quite a change 
in my life as David was a Mormon and I, a Roman Catholic. Although I attended Mass 
every Sunday and on required occasions I really didn't know Catholicism well . I didn't 
know about other religions either, so I was content in the way I was living. 

David invited me to attend church and gave me the Book of Mormon to read. I 
didn't make a decision until we became engaged when I was a freshman at Colorado State 
College in Greeley, Colorado. Then we realized that we would have to be agreed on the 
important matter of religion to have a happy and successful marriage. I began taking 
instructions from the missionaries in Greeley. I was baptized there on Saturday, April 23, 
I960, (by David). I was confirmed the next day at Sacrament meeting. 



241 



David and I were married by Bishop Lewis Livingston on Saturday, July 9, 1960. 
We visited Yellowstone Park, Jackson Hole, Glacier National Park, and Banf and Lake 
Louise in Canada on our honeymoon. 

We now have two lovely little girls, Kimberly Ann born May 16, 1961, and Lisa 
Dianne born July 18, 1963. 

Shirley is a poised beautiful girl, an excellent cook and an accomplished seamstress. 
Everything she does she does well . Uncle Preston Seely stated one time, "Shirley is the 
best thing that ever happened to the Seelys," She has a stable sound philosophy, an 
ability to see to the heart of things for one so young, and is dependable and cooperative. 
We all love her dearly. 

Sketch written by Gwen Geddes Nielson 



BRIGHAM POPE ALLEN 



B. 7 Apr. 1923 
Chr. 5 Aug. 1923 
Md. 19 Aug. 1946 
D. 14 Nov. 1946 
Bur. 18 Nov. 1946 

Father Reuben Franklin Allen 



Logan, Cache, Utah 

Logan, Cache, Utah 

Preston, Franklin, Idaho 

Salt Lake City, Salt Lake, Utah 

Logon, Cache, Utah 

Mother Agnes Matilda Pope 



B. 15 July 1925 
Bapt, 13 Nov. 1933 



Wife 275 ROMA GEDDES NIELSON 

Preston, Franklin, Idaho 
Preston, Franklin, Idaho 



Father Hyrum Carl Nielson 



Mother 55 Williamena (Winnie) Martha Geddes 



537 Brigg Carl Allen 



CHILDREN 

B. 4 Apr. 1947, Preston, Franklin, Idaho 



B. 7 Apr. 1923 
Chr. 3 June 1923 
Bapt. 14 Apr. 1931 
Md. 11 Oct. 1947 
End- 13 Jan. 1953 



2nd Husband GEORGE JULIUS NELSON 

Providence, Cache, Utah 
Providence, Cache, Utah 
Providence, Cache, Utah 
Logan Temple, Cache, Utah 
Logan Temple, Cache, Utah 

242 



Father George Nelson 



Mother Ann Rigderknetch 



Wife 275 ROMA GEDDES NIELSON 



B. 15 July 1925 
Chr. 6 Sept, 1925 
Bapt. 13 Nov. 1933 
End. 13 Jon. 1953 
Sid. 13 Jan. 1953 

Father Hyrum Carl Nielson 



Preston, Franklin, Idaho 
Preston, Franklin, Idaho 
Preston, Franklin, Idaho 
Logan Temple, Cache, Utah 
Logan Temple, Cache, Utah 

Mother 55 Williamena (Winnie) Martha Geddes 



CHILDREN 

537 Brigg Carl Allen was blessed In the 5th Ward, Preston, Idaho — 4 May 1947. 

His name was changed to Carl Winn Nelson when he was legally adopted by George 
J. Nelson. He was sealed to George J. Nelson and his mother 13 Jan. 1953. 
569 George Scott Nelson B. 18 Feb. 1949, Salt Lake City, Salt Lake, Utah 

602 Rand McKay Nelson B. 24 Apr, 1951, Preston, Franklin, Idaho 

All of the children were sealed to their parents on 13 Jan„ 1953. 



4 JOSEPH STEWART GEDDES 



B. 18 Dec. 1857 
Bapt, 17 Apr. 1865 
Md. 29 Dec. 1881 
End. 29 Dec. 1881 
D. 27 Dec. 1931 
Bur. 30 Dec. 1931 

Father 1 William Geddes 



Salt Lake City, Salt Lake, Utah 
Plain City, Weber, Utah 
Endowment House, Salt Lake, Utah 
Endowment House, Salt Lake, Utah 
Preston, Franklin, Idaho 
Preston, Franklin, Idaho 

Mother Elizabeth Stewart 



Wife ISABELL DORA NEELEY 



B. 26 June 1861 
Bapt. 26 June 1870 
End. 29 Dec. 1881 
Sld. 29 Dec. 1881 
D. 23 May 1923 
Bur, 25 May 1923 

Father Aremlus Neeley 



Brigham City, Box Elder, Utah 
Brigham City, Box Elder, Utah 
Endowment House, Salt Lake, Utah 
Endowment House, Salt Lake, Utah 
Preston, Franklin, Idaho 
Preston, Franklin, Idaho 

Mother Susan Morgan 



243 



CHILDREN 



33 Pearl Lorena Geddes 

35 Joseph Arch Geddes 

46 Dora Blanch Geddes 

50 Ruby Lavlno Geddes 

54 Ivy Mildred Geddes 

62 Ira Geddes 

65 Hazel Kirk Geddes 

76 Elizabeth Vera Geddes 

83 Josie Neeley Geddes 

89 Paul Stewarf Geddes 

104 Lyie Neeley Geddes 



B. 22 Feb. 1883, Plain City, Weber, Utah 
B. 27 Nov. 1884, Plain City, Weber, Utah 
B. 30 Sept. 1887, Plain City, Weber, Utah 
D. 2 Jan. 1890, Ogden, Weber, Utah 
B. 22 Apr. 1889, Plain City, Weber, Utah 
D. 6 June 1910, Ogden, Weber, Utah 
B, 8 May 1891, Plain City, Weber, Utah 
D. 2 Jan. 1896, Plain City, Weber, Utah 
B. 27 March 1893, Plain City, Weber, Utah 
D, 6 Apr. 1893, Plain City, Weber, Utah 
B. 30 Dec. 1894, Plain City, Weber, Utah 
D. 1 Oct. 1899, Preston, Oneida, Idaho 
B. 7 Feb. 1898, Preston, Oneida, Idaho 
B. 10 March 1900, Preston, Oneida, Idaho 
B. 3 Apr. 1902, Preston, Oneida, Idaho 
B. 25 Oct. 1905, Preston, Oneida, Idaho 
D. 8 Sept. 1929, Preston, Franklin, Idaho 



4 JOSEPH STEWART GEDDES 



Joseph Stewart Geddes, son of William Geddes, and Elizabeth Stev/art, was born 
18 December 1857, in Salt Lake City, Utah. He was married to Isabella Dora Neeley, 
on the 26 December 1881 in the Endowment House in Salt Lake City, Born to this union 
were eleven children: Pearl Lorena, Joseph Arch, Dora Blanche, Ruby Lavina, Ivy 
Mildred, IraB., Hazel Kirk, Elizbeth Vera, Josie N., Paul Stewart, and Elias LyIe. 

Joseph S. Geddes must have been chosen to be a leader, before this earth life. 
From the time he was chosen to lead the singing in his Deacon's Quorum, he was made 
President of many priesthood groups. Finally he became President of one of the stakes of 
Zion. He fulfilled a twenty-seven month mission in the Southern States. He acted as 
president of two conferences much of that time. While in the southern states, one of his 
little girls. Ivy, five years of age, died. He came home for two weeks to comfort his 
wife. He was called upon his return home to act as a home missionary in the Weber Stoke, 

In the fall of 1897, he moved his family from Plain City to Preston, Idaho. Shortly 
afterwards. President George C. Parkinson called him to teach a religion class. People 
came from many miles to hear the newly returned Elder speak. Shortly before the family 
came to Preston, Mathias Cowley was made an Apostle,, Joseph Geddes was called to 
fill his place in the Stake Presidency, as second counselor. Some years later, he was 
made first counselor, then when President Parkinson was released, he was chosen to be 
President of the Oneida Stake, 25 September 1910. 

Joseph was active in civic affairs; serving in many capacities: two terms as pres- 

244 



ident of the town board, (during which Preston's first city water system was installed), 
superintendent of the city park, four or five times as probate judge, etc. He worked 
unceasingly to help abolish the open saloon in Franklin County. To do this, he met 
with legislators, |udge;, and civic groups that were in the county, convincing them that 
saloons were a menace. This was a long bitter fight. 

The William Geddes family owned the first organ in Plain City. Joseph learned 
to play it without a teacher. He then gave lessons on it for some years. He led the 
Plain City choir, the town brass band, playing most any instrument that was needed to 
complete the band, it was a pioneer custom to sernade people during holidays or after a 
marriage ceremony. The band owned a wagon similar to the kind owned by circuses of 
today. This wagon was painted white and gold. It was a very exciting day when the 
band stopped at your gate,, Joseph usually was the one to lead out in these affairs but one 
day on his birthday, the band stopped at his place to play his favorite tunes. 

Joseph, while living in Plain City, used to take loads of fruit into Ogden Valley 
and places on north. The children were allowed to go these journeys and they have many 
happy memories of their father while on these trips. As reported by Pearl, "We usually 
started the day before a holiday. The early apples would be ready for the twenty-fourth 
celebration. We covered a double-bed wagon box with a layer of straw then a layer of 
apples, then straw, then apples until the box was full. Long before daylight we were 
ready to start. Jus*- at dawn while the air was cold, and fresh, we would start our adventure 
of selling apples, I loved to sit with fat^her on the high spring seat, watching the horses 
trot along at a slow pace and hear father tell tales, I remember he would let the Indians 
climb up onto the wagon and eat until they were satisfied, without pay, I learned many 
lessons in dealing kindly with people; how to speak properly, why it pays to be honest. A 
nickel is too heavy to carry if it does not belong to you, or your word should be as good 
as your note, never speak unkindly to children or old people. He guided us through many 
dangers of youth with patience, and wisdom; teaching us that the way to happiness is by 
living a Christ-like life. He often played the organ early In the morning when we were 
not quite awake, I sometimes wondered if I were in Heaven." 

Joseph and his wife played and sang together a great deal in public. They were both 
active in pioneer dramatics. His home was frequently filled with music, plays, and people. 

Joseph was forced to find several avenues of income for his large family. He 
encouraged his children to get a good education and gave them such advantages as they 
desired in music, etc. His various occupations included teaching, farming, building, 
contracting, salesmanship (Beneficial Life Insurance), He held many civic positions, 

Joseph enjoyed doing Temple work. He learned to handle a typewriter after a 
fashion after he was seventy years of age. Two days before his death, he walked to his 
office to perform the duties of probate judge. 

At his funeral Apostle Melvin J. Ballard said, "Brother Geddes never hesitated to 
perform a task. His name and memory mean more to his family than if he had left them 
millions in wealth. He died a rich man and takes living wealth with him. Be happy and 
proud that you had such a father. God bless the family and help them to cherish his 
memory." 

245 



Joesph became known for what he did and said rather than for what he knew. 
Like his father before him, he owned comparatively few books beyond church works. 
These he studied carefully and often . 

He was a man of great energy and was most happy in using it. It was the things 
he did rather than the things he thought that endeared him to those who came to know him. 
His friends were legion. He was what Emerson would call a ready man. With his great 
energy, it was natural for him to lead out. During his father's extensive missionary work. 
It fell to him more than anyone else to get the boys out early and keep the work going until 
after sundown. His sisters liked his natural leadership and felt It an honor when permitted 
to work with the boys in the fields. Nearly always he was the one to get his row finished 
first, then he helped the one furtberest behind who was probably the youngest. 

Along with energy, natural Initiative developed fruitfully within him. Perhaps 
It was his superb physical condition that caused his mind to break through the limitations 
of pioneer educational opportunity now and then with unusual clarity. Some incidents 
may help to clarify these characteristics. 



Incident 1 . Natural ability. When William Geddes purchased the first organ 
in Plain City, no one in the village could play it or teach others to play It, About this 
time a musician by the name of Baird came down from Willard to Plain City and gave a 
six-week course in sight reading, coming down once a week. Joseph took this course 
and applied it to the new organ working ardently whenever he could all week between 
classes. By the time the course was completed, he had the basic information he needed. 
Practice soon brought the ability to play the hymns. After awhile the bishop asked him 
to be the church choir leader. When he married Dora Neeley, who possessed a lovely 
voice, the two of them built up a choir which for many years provided the village with 
special anthem singing in addition to the hymns,, thus giving a musical atmosphere to the 
village. 

Incident 2. Initiative . Pioneer life placed a premium on Initiative, particularly 
in finding ways out of problem situations. As a boy, Joseph's father sometimes left him 
with the boys to do work in the fields and sometimes took him along. One day when about 
half-way to Ogden with a load of grain, one end of the double tree split as the horses strainec 
through In mud hole. Greatly upset, William became strongly vocal about the misfortune, 
seeing no Immediate way out of the situation. Leaving him to his pronouncements, young 
Joseph found a stretch of barbwire and by binding it tightly over the entire split end of the 
double tree and attaching the single tree to It, was ready with a make-shift repair job that 
was strong enough to get them to Ogden. Surprised, his father, a returned missionary, 
was barely through his vocal objections to adverse circumstances when the boy climbed up 
on the seat ready to test out the mended double tree. It held. 

Incident 3. Emotional depth - The Love Song. Although he did not carry his emotion 
on his sleeve and was sometimes accused by Dora of being a Geddes cold fish like his father, 
he possessed feelings of depth. 

A Mormon mission has always been a large undertaking. In this case, with 4 children 



246 



and a total Income of $20 a month from rent which must take care of the family and keep 
the missionary, it was indeed hard for Dora to make ends meet. When gentle, beautiful 
Ivy, five years old, came down with scarlet fever and died after three weeks of fever- 
racked suffering, everything looked dark and forbidding Joseph down in South Alabama 
boarded a train at once but did not arrive home until after the burial . He felt he must 
finish his mission, but during the two weeks at home he built a stairway on the south 
and east sides of the single room in which the family lived. The stairs replaced a ladder 
and led to a boarded floor upstairs where Dora and the children slept. Only the one room 
upstairs had boards on the floor. He added a few more boards to make room for another bed, 

j When he got back to Alabama, the stark realities of the hardships he was putting 

I on his family weighed heavily upon him. That dangerous ladder to the loft where they 
must sleep he had rectified by building the stairs, but they still had to carry water from a 
neighbor's pump. Was It the water situation that had cost little Ivy's life? Had he been 
wrong in going back? Finally, he got some paper and a pencil and began working on an 
ode to his wife involving their courtship days. Maybe this would encourage them. When 
it arrived In Plain City, it took a great load off Dora's shoulders and is still precious to the 
children , 



Joseph's Love Song To Dora 

I'm thinking dear of days gone by 
When you and I were young. 
You were but 18 years of age 
And I but twenty-one. 

With arm entwined about your waist 
And you so near my side 
Oh! How we'd plan that happy day 
When you would be my bride. 

And oh ! Those songs you used to sing 
I can still hear them now. 
The kiss yet burns upon my lips 
That sealed tfie sacred vow. 

The mocking bird would cease her song 
And fold her tiny wings 
To listen for the echo of the music 
When you'd sing. 

And when your graceful figure 
Would appear upon the lawn 
He'd hide his golden plumage 
As he'd sing his pretty song. 



247 



Above them all there's one that shines 
Beyond the leaf of gold 
Just draw your chair up closer, love 
The leaf I will unfold. 

You see it now as well as I 
I read it in your smile 
I read it in the kiss you gave 
And in the broken sigh. 

Nor can we ere forget It, Dear 
While God shall give us life 
It was that day that happy day 
That made us man and wife. 

But since that day the tune has changed 

To lullaby and rock 

The cradle must be swinging now 

For mother's little tots. 

And dinner must be ready 
We must have some sugar plums 
And kisses for Daddy dear 
To greet him when he comes. 

But mama, she is bashful 
And hides behind the door 
But wants her share of kisses 
And a dozen or two more. 

Now they taste much sweeter, love 
Since we are growing old 
As the shining silver threads 
Are streaked among the gold 

And when the shining silver threads 
Have replaced all the gold 
We'll love each other dearer then 
Because we're growing old. 

A skilled critic would find evidence of lack of acquaintance with Shakespeare 
here, but he would also be quick to observe that passages like "the kiss yet burns upon my 
lips" or "the mockingbird would cease her song and fold her tiny wings to listen for the 
echo's of the music when you'd sing" are rich In imagery, picturesque in conception, and 
heart-warming in human understanding. He had known what it was to love deeply. 

(Thanks Dad. You did what you could and hung on. We love you very much). 



248 



Incident 4 So cialized en ergy-The last load. Father Geddes, now 67 and a widower, 
divided his time between his own home where his daughter Vera and her husband Ray lived 
and his oldest daughter Pearl's home some two miles northwest of town where she and her 
husband Dave operoted a moderate-sized inigated farm. At this time, the fall of 1924, 
hard times were still being faced by the farmers. Entering the fourth winter of the agricul- 
tural depression which began in 1920, resources had dwindled. Difficulties in such times 
are usually compounded. To low prices and unemployment had come a third enemy — a 
severe drouth. Feed was scarce To keep basic stock alive till spring was a pressing 
problem to almost every dairy, stock, and sheep owner, 

A major source of cash income for Dave and his family was a small herd of holstein 
cows. The weather was cold A heavy winter was setting in. Sugar beet pulp could 
be had at the Refinery for those who had raised beets in small quantities. The demand for 
pulp, however, farout ran the supply. Wagons, stretching a half-mile long, lined up 
before daylight Loading began at sun-up and stopped at sun-down, with many waiting 
wagons going home empty. 

On a particularly cold but clear morning In early December, Father Geddes took over 
the job of getting a load of pulp so that Dave could take care of his farm work. 

Although he ar.ived at the factory as the first break of day began to show, the line 
i of wagons ahead of him was several blocks long. Since each wagon moved up as the lead 
wagon was loaded, there was not much a man could do but sit in his own wagon and move 
it up to fill the space vacated by the driver ahead. !n this way, the procession slowly 
moved toward the loading station. Quilts were used to keep feet from freezing. Here 
and there a fire blazed around which men gathered between moves. 

Towards 10 o'clock Father Geddes deserted his wagon and went up to help with the 
laoding as It had become obvious to him that a large number would get no pulp. The 
customary procedure was for the three or four teamsters nearest the front wagon to help with 
the loading to keep the wagons moving, He had brought no lunch Loading continued 
steadily through the noon hour and on during the afternoon. Slowly the wagon train 
moved forward. Long since the Geddes wagon had lost its place in the slow-moving 
procession Drivers had turned out and closed up the gap, gradually straightening the line 
so that the wagon stood off by itself. An yet, few realized that one of the loaders re- 
mained while the others took shifts . 

About an hour before sun-down, a group of men had been sizing things up The 
lone wagon had intrigued them Soon the picture cleared and they decided to do some- 
thing about it They gathered together some sandwiches and moved up to the loading 
platform One of them said to Father Geddes, "Let me 'spell you" while you take time 
out to eata sandwich. " "Well! Thanks, I could do with one, " said he . A couple of them 
stayed to chat with him while he was eating Three others moved back along the waiting 
line of wagons, got In the Geddes wagon and drove it up to the front stopping along side 
- of a teamster who in his anxiety had been cutting in a little when chance lent opportunity. 
As the wagon ahead was filled, two of the men took positions near the "bits" of the team 
belonging to the over anxious man, thus preventing him from moving As the loaded wagon 
in front moved on, the third man drove the Geddes wagon into the vacated space. The 
sun was already well down 

249 



The next item on the program of this unorthodox group whose wagons were still 
considerably to the rear was to present themselves to the loading boss with this ultimatum. 
"The last load to be loaded today will not be at sun-down, but when the Geddes wagon 
is loaded and we will give the word when the last shovel full goes on." 

It was nearly dark when Father Geddes, tired but happy, cracked his whip and 
called out "getup." The biggest load that had pulled out that day was on the way home. 

Sketch written by Pearl, Joseph A , Vera, and Josie 



ISABELL DORA NEELEY 



Dora Neeley Geddes was born in Brigham City, Utah, on the 26 June 1863. She 
was the daughter of Aremenius Neeley and Susan Morgan. When she was very young, the ^ 
family moved to Cache Valley, Idaho. They homsteaded the old Neeley farm at the 
mouth of Cub River Canyon. 

Her memories of this early childhood were very happy ones A large water ditch, . 
dug by her father and brother for irrigating purposes, was used by the children for swimming.' 
It was one of their chief delights. They also had an old white horse which they could 
use in any capacity they wished . This horse was a source of delight both winter and summer 
At one time on this farm, a fire was started by one of the children. It burned everything 
they owned, the house, four stacks of grain, the sheds, barn and all of their clothes and 
furniture. It was a complete burn-out and made life very hard for a long time. 

Grandfather Neeley was a peace-maker among the Indians. He learned their lang- 
uage and was their friend, always being fair with them When disputes and disagreements 
arose between the Indians and the white people, grandfather was called in to help the 
settlement. At one of these councils for a sack of corn, the Indians gave him two wooden i 
dolls which were beautifully carved. They were very large dolls and a delight to any 
little girl. He gave them to mother and her sister, Lauretta. The girls played with them 
from morning until night, neglecting their unwashed dishes and unswept floors Their 
Welch mother could stand such action no longer; one morning the dolls were put into the i 
fire. The stove was not long enough for the dolls, and as they burned, the legs hung out 
in front of the stove. Mother said she never forgot the heart-broken feeling she had as she 
watched those dolls burn. I think that this feeling had something to do with the way she 
showered us girls with dolls at Christmas. 

One time when she was small, she was playing in front of their home; a band of 
Indians passed by and an old Brave cooly picked her up onto his horse and carried her to 
their camp, which was located on the south side of the Little Mountain at Franklin, She 
was very frightened and this fear remained with her long after this experience.. Grandfothe 
and his friends soon got their guns and rode into the camp for her. The old Indian claimed 
he had only meant to scare them all, but it was no scare for Mother, it was a terrifying 
experience . 



250 



when Mother was sixteen, her mother died, leaving a new-born baby just four 
hours old and ten other children younger than Mother to be cared for. Since Mother 
was the oldest, she was responsible for their care. When I asked her how she fed the 
baby, she said that she put a little sugar In a clean rag and dipped It into warm milk 
for the baby to suck That baby, who was Aunt Susan Dunkley, now lives In Salt Lake 
City Only the other day she was telling me about the time when she was a baby. 
She had thrown her last milk bottle at a tree and had broken It to smithereens. She 
said that she wasn't going to drink the stuff any longer. From then on she was allowed 
to eat with the family It must have been hard on a girl as young to keep house and cook 
for twelve brothers and sisters and a Father, We know that she loved them because she 
had a great capacity for love Perhaps we who were closest to her didn't fully realize 
the priceless gift that was ours, Percllla Neeley,a motherless cousin of mine, told me 
recently, "How I loved to visit the old white house of Oneida Street, where Aunt Dora 
could love me.- I used to dream of Heaven being a place like that" 

Dr, Wilky Blood, of Salt Lake City, told me about the same thing once when I 
was In his office with my young daughter. Nan. When he learned that I was Dora and 
Joseph S Geddes' youngest daughter. He said that he used to spend weekends at our 
home with Joseph A. when they were both attending school at Logan; "You know you came 
from one of the best homes in this nation. How I loved your folks." The Stuart family 
have also added their tribute to this Mother of ours; "I hope we can all be neighbors in 
Heaven " 

Mother and her brother, Ezra, sang duets together when they were young , They 
were willing to use this talent whenever and wherever needed and were much in demand. 
At the time of her marriage, she had memorized over one hundred songs and could play 
the accompaniment to them. Dramatics was another enjoyment In the recreation of the 
pioneers . 

Mother and Father belonged to a group that traveled about the surrounding towns in 
buggies, giving plays and dramatic entertainments. My friends and I loved to listen to 
the stories of "The MIstle-toe, " "Enoch Arden, " etc. 

A few years before Mother met Father, she saw the name of Geddes on a flour sack. 
She told a friend who was with her: "That's the name I am going to have when I get 
married" She little dreamed that a man by that name would come to teach school In their 
town and that they would fall In love and marry. Oh, the stories we've been told of tfiat 
courtship, the parties, dances and the many good times they had. Father called her the 
"belle" of Cache Valley. They were married In the Endowment House In Salt Lake City, 
Utah, 29 Dec. 1881 They lived in Plain City, Utah, during the time that the crickets 
were so bad Mother remembered one time they even ate the clothes off of the clothes 
line and every bit of grass, garden, and every speckof green In sight; this happened before 
the sea-gulls came to devour them. 

During the year 1884, Mother with two children came to Cache Valley to help 
prove up on some homestead land. Their quarter section was a mile west and a half-mile 
north of the city of Preston; It was known as the old George Carver Farm. This was a 
very difficult time , They had to haul water many miles. The railroad passed near their 
land At one time some tramps stole two of their meager supply of quilts This land was 

251 



later sold and the family moved back to Plain City. The final move to Preston v/as 
made in 1896. 

Just before making this move to Cache Valley, Father was called on a mission to 
the Southern States. There were five small children and another one was expected. To 
our many questions, "Where did you get the money to live on while he was gone, and 
where did he get the money to go?" she always answered the same way — "The Lord 
helped us. " Father filled the cellar with coal, and hauled a huge pile of sage brush 
before he left. Father filled thatmission with scarcely any money at all , going almost 
all the time without purse or script. In Ogden at the railroad station, when he was 
leaving for the mission field, he kissed them all goodbye; then suddenly turned back 
and kissed one of his little girls again. He came home for the funeral for she died a few 
months after he had left. He wanted to stay home then, at least until her child was born, 
but Mother insisted that he return and finish his mission. Many times we have heard 
Father say, "I never would have finished my mission if it hadn't been for your Mother's 
faith and determination. " 

One incident that Pearl remembers so vividly in her early life was at tithing 
settlement time. There were four children in the family; it was late November and Father 
had finished building a house. He was paid ten twenty-gold pieces. We children played 
with the money whi le he and Mother talked . There was need for winter fuel , blankets, 
warm clothing, and food. The two hundred dollars was soon spent on paper as they talked, 
for the needs of the family were great. Finally Father said, "Dora, we owe it all for 
tithing; you will have to decide what to do with it," After he had gone. Mother put on 
her children's shabby coats, and took them across the square to the Bishop's office and paid 
him the whole amount for tithing. In a few days. Father was summoned to appear in court 
at Ogden as a witness. The case lasted ten days; when it was closed, the judge handed 
him two hundred dollars, full payment for a pioneer family's faith in one principle of the 
gospel . 

Joseph A, says that his happiest memories of Mother areof the picnics and trips 
that she planned for the family. No time was too busy to go with the children on an 
excursion to the Little Mountain in Franklin, and weekend trips to Cub River Canyon are 
priceless memories to him. One plan they carried through was for Jos., to give tbe land; 
Father, the one room building; and Mother, the furniture for a widow with two children 
to have the deeds to the first home she had ever owned. Mother was generous to a fault, 
especially to the unfortunate, or the handicapped. Many children's lives were made 
happy by her love and kindness. She cast her bread upon the waters and it has come back 
over and over again in the lives of her children.. My children and I call it the cake, all 
frosted from Grandma's bread. 

Mother served many years as chorister of the Oneida Stake Relief Society Board; 
in fact she was their first chorister. She held many other positions in the church during her 
life time. Father once said, "I could have not accomplished my work in the stakes and 
wards if it had not been for the help given me by my wife. " "Your mother has always been 
so staunchly behind me, giving of her great faith to the Lord's work, that I could do and I 
have done the work asked of me." 



252 



Mother kept her faith, sweetness and testimony in the gospel of Jesus Qnrist until 
her death 23 May 1923 The last three years of her life were full of pain and suffering. 
Her courage and love taught a lesson in patience, and what the true fruits of the gospel 
are like in the hearts of its humble followers. She didn't complain, she counted her 
blessings, and her voice would ring out in song as the tears streamed down her cheeks. One 
time she was singing, "Count your blessings," and I in my youthful arrogance said, "Mother, 
stop it; you haven't any blessings." She looked at me startled, then her blue eyes began 
to twinkle as she said, "You are one of my greatest blessings, I've lived to know the last 
verse of that song, "Angels did attend, help and comfort give her to her journey's end." 

There are four of her children left, out of her eleven. In this sketch, I do not 
mean to give the impression that our Mother was perfect, but to us, her good points 
outweighed her bad. To her children, she was a glorious mother. She made every 
sacrifice she could that her children could have every advantage possible. To them 
her memory is sacred. 

Sketch written by Pearl, Joseph A., Vera, and Josie 



DAVI D GREAVES EAMES 



B. 29 Sept, 1879 

Re. Bapt . 8 Oct, 1902 

End. 8 Oct. 1902 

Md. 25 March 1905 



Logan, Cache, Utah 

Logan Temple, Cache, Utah 

Logan Temple, Cache, Utah 

Logan Temple, Cache, Utah 



Father David Cull en Eames 



Mother Elizabeth Greaves 



Wife 33 PEARL LORENA GEDDES 



B. 22 Feb. 1883 
Bapt. 22 Feb. 1891 
End. 10 Feb. 1904 
Sid. 25 March 1905 



Plain City, Weber, Utah 
Plain City, Weber, Utah 
Logan Temple, Cache, Utah 
Logan Temple, Cache, Utah 



Father 4 Joseph Stewart Geddes 



Mother Isabella Dora Neeley 



CHILDREN 



155 David I vo Eames 

165 Melba Geddes Eames 

175 Waldo Geddes Eames 

186 Roberta Geddes Eames 

194 Venice Geddes Eames 



B. 25 April 1906, Preston, Franklin, Idaho 
B. 14 May 1909, Preston, Franklin, Idaho 
B. 11 April 1911, Preston, Franklin, Idaho 
B. 25 April 1913, Preston, Franklin, Idaho 
B. 23 April 1915, Preston, Franklin, Idaho 



253 



215 Wendell Geddes Eames 

231 Ruby Geddes Eames 

265 Dora Deane Geddes Eames 

285 Garth Geddes Eames 



B. 30 May 1917, Preston, Franklin, Idaho 
B. 19 July 1919, Preston, Franklin, Idaho 
B. 6 March 1924, Preston, Franklin, Idaho 
B. 10 May 1927, Preston, Franklin, Idaho 



DAVID GREAVES EAMES 



David Greaves Eames was born Sept. 29, 1879 in Logan, Utah, a son of David 
Cullen Eames and Elizabeth Cluley Greaves. He was the oldest child in a family of five 
boys and four girls. 

His family moved to Preston, Idaho, when he was five years old. He spent his 
boyhood on his father's farm north of Preston. He attended the Central School and the 
Oneida Academy in Preston. He also attended the Brigham Young College in Logan, Utah. 

He was called on a mission to represent the Latter-day Saint Church on Oct. 13, 
1902. He was sent to the northwestern states and labored in Tacoma, Washington, and 
British Columbia, Canada. He was the first missionary to represent the Preston Third 
Ward. 

He married Pearl Geddes of Preston, Idaho, 25 Jan. 1905, in the Logan Temple at 
Logan, Utah . They bought a farm two miles northwest of Preston and spent their married 
life there . 

He has always been active in scouting. He helped initiate the early organization 
of scouting when It was introduced into Cache Valley. He has been a member of the 
Executive Board, the Finance Committee, Chairman of the Oneida District and also Vice 
President. He received the Silver Beaver award in recognition of his outstanding service 
to boyhood in 1945 . 

He has served his church and community in various capacities. He served sixteen 
years as superintendent of the YMMIA of the Oneida Stake. He was superintendent of 
his ward Sunday School for four years. He was a member of the Bishopric of the Preston 
Third Ward for several years. He served as a Stake High Counselor and a member of 
the Genealogical committee for ten years. He served as first counselor in the Oneida 
Stake Presidency for ten years when President Taylor Nelson was president. He was 
made a Stake Patriarch in the Oneida Stake in 1939. 



He represented Franklin County twice in the Idaho State Senate and was Probate 
Judge in Preston for two years. He was a trustee of the Preston school board for twelve 
years . 



The spirit of the gospel has always been in our home, 
to visit have felt this spirit and commented about it. 



People who have come here 



254 



I have always had such profound respect for my father and I am so very proud of 
him. I am truly thankful for the good name he and Mother gave me and I hope to merit 
their association in the eternities. 

Sketch written by Ruby Geddes Eames Booth 



33 PEARL LORENA GEDDES EAMES 



Pearl Lorena Geddes Eames was born February 22, 1883, at Plain City, Weber, Utah, 
the daughter of Joseph S. Geddes and Dora Neeley Geddes. Her childhood was a happy 
one spent under the guidance of parents who lived the principles of the gospel and taught 
their children to keep the commandments. 

When Pearl was a very young child, she was chorister of the Primary organization. 
When she was 13 years of age, her parents moved to Preston, Idaho. Here she was the 
kindergarten teacher in the First Word Sunday School . Some years later she was called 
to the presidency of the M,I,A. At the age of seventeen she was a member of the 
Mutual stake board. Sister Meda Nelson was the President. Before her marriage, she 
, did endowment work in the Logan Temple with her father and aunts for several weeks. 

She attended the Preston Academy at Preston, Idaho and the Brigham Young College 
at Logan, Utah. She worked for two years at J. C. Smiths and John Larsen's Mercentile 
stores for $20.00 a month. 

She was married 25 Jan. 1905 to David G. Eames in the Logan Temple at Logan, 
Utah. They are the parents of four sons and five daughters. They spent their married 
life on a farm in Preston, Idaho. 

Her husband served his church and community in various capacities. He spent two 
years in the Northwest Mission for the Latter-day Saint Church. He was first counselor 
in the Oneida Stoke Presidency for ten years and is stake Patriarch at the present time. 
He was always active in scouting and received the Silver Beaver Award in 1945. He 
represented Franklin County twice in the Idaho State Senate and was Probate Judge for 
two years. He was a trustee on the school board for twelve years. 

For a number of years Pearl was second counselor on the Primary Stake Board and 
first counselor in the Relief Society to Anna R. Hawkes . For years she has been a visiting 
Relief Society teacher and president of the Third Ward Relief Society twice. During the 
year 1941, she did endowment work in the Logan Temple for one hundred and thirty people. 

The last year, 1957-58, they have done temple work in the Logon, Alberta, Monti, 
St. George, and Los Angeles temples. They have spent the lost few summers visiting 
their children and grandchildren in the different ports of the country. They sent eight 
of their children to college and two of them on foreign missions to represent the L.D.S. 
Church. They have found great \oy in the service they hove rendered to their family, 
church, and community. 

255 



During the first part of January 1958, my husband and I had the 
privilege of going to St. George for a short vacation. The temple 
apartments were filled but a very kind widow let us stay in her 
home. We had the use of all of the conveniences of her large 
home for twenty-five dollars a month . She was lonely so we ate 
together as one family. Her children were far away and she 
didn't hove the best of health so we were mutually benefited . 

The people of St. George seem to enjoy the spirit of Brigham 
Young and the early pioneers more than any other community we 
have ever had the privilege of living in. Every kindness and 
consideration was given to us and when the time came for us to 
return home, we felt like the missionaries, really sad to leave. 
Melba, our oldest daughter, made three trips of three hundred 
miles each to visit with us during the time we were there. We 
were able to complete seventy-one endowments during the month 
of January. The testimonies we listened to and the principles of 
the gospel that were explained each day in the temple meetings and 
ward organizations will never be forgotten or the great spirituality 
of those Latter-day Saints in Southern Utah. 

This poem exemplifies how I feel about my mother. 



Through My Mother's Eyes 

By Hastings L. Herring 

What simple faith you had, my dear. 
And yet you were so wise 
You showed me beauty in the stars. 
And In the sun and skies. 

You walked with me beside the stream. 
With flowers all along; 
And then you turned my heart to hear 
The music in the breeze. 

You showed me beauty in a smile. 
And In a kindly deed 
How simple understanding faith 
Would fill my every need. 

How I must stand so firm and strong, 
Without a doubt or fear; 
But best of all -- of, best of all 
You showed me God, my dear 

Sketch written by Ruby Geddes Eames Boothe 
256 



155 DAVID IVO EAMES 



B. 25 Apr. 1906 

Bapt. 28 Apr. 1914 
End. 22 May 1931 

Md. 22 May 1931 

Father David Greaves Eames 



Preston, Oneida, Idaho 

Preston, Oneida, Idaho 

Salt LaKe Temple, Salt Lake, Utah 

Salt Lake Temple, Salt Lake, Utah 
Mother 33 Pearl Lorena Geddes 



Wife SARAH ESTELLA RICHARDSON 



B. 11 Feb. 1904 
Bapt. 1 Mar. 1913 
End. 22 May 1931 
Sid. 22 May 1931 

Father Hiram Sylvester Richardson 



Vernal, Uintah, Utah 

Vernal, Uintah, Utah 

Salt Lake Temple, Salt Lake, Utah 

Salt Lake Temple, Salt Lake, Utah 

Mother Jerusha Carry NIelson 



CHILDREN 



435 Baby boy Eames 

442 Elizabeth Eames 
464 Carolyn Eames 



B. 8 Jan. 1936, Salt Lake City, Salt Lake, Utah 
D. 8 Jan. 1936, Salt Lake City, Salt Lake, Utah 
B. 22 June 1937, Salt Lake City, Salt Lake, Utah 
B. 3 Apr. 1941, Salt Lake City, Salt Lake, Utah 



155 DAVID IVO EAMES 



David Ivo Eames v/as born 25 April 1906 at Preston, Franklin, Idaho, the son of 
David Greaves Eames and Pearl Geddes. He was the oldest of nine children who are 
all living at the present time, 7 July 1958 . He was sick for a considerable time as a child . 
After one of these illnesses he had to learn to walk over again; at one time he lost his 
finger and toe nails from a skin disease. He was active in the church and served as 
president of the Deacons, president of the Teachers, then as secretary of the Priests, and 
councelor of the Elder's quorum. In the north 20 Ward in Salt Lake, he was superintendent 
of the Mutual and was on a committee of three to raise funds for the new church house in 
the 11 Ward in Bountiful, Utah. 

By working in a grocery store, correcting papers for two professors and working three 
hours a day In a cafeteria, he was able to graduate from Utah State Agriculture College 
owing only $100. He earned a letter in track in both high school and college for running 
the 4:40 and for broad jumping. 

He was appointed Dairy Herd Improvement Tester for Franklin County from May 1929 



257 



to April 1932 and then assisted in the organization and later managed the Franklin County 
Co-op Cream Pool from May 1932 to June 1934. He won a scholarship at the University 
of Southern California and attended graduate school there the winter of 1934 and 1935. 

He and Estella Richardson, a school teacher, were married in the Salt Lake Temple, 
22 May 1931 . Their first child, a son, passed away at birth . Of their two daughters, 
Elizabeth was born in Salt Lake City, Utah, 22 June 1937; and Carolyn was born in 
Provo, Utah 3 April 1941. 

Ivo started to work for the United States Department of Agriculture in January 1935 
and held the following positions: County Supervisor at Vernal and Provo; District 
Supervisor and Area Specialist at Richfield, Utah; Stake Director at Logan; Chief 
Production Loans and Water Facility Specialist and Real Estate Loan Officer at Salt 
Lake City, Utah. In 1957 he was awarded a Superior Performance Award by the Farmers 
Home Administration. 

By working weekends and vacation time he completed the requirements for a Masters 
degree at Utah State Agriculture College and received the degree 29 June 1943 in rural | 
sociology. i 

Sketch written by David Ivo Fames 



MAX R. PARKER 

B. 20 Mar. 1910 Joseph, Sevier, Utah 

Chr. April 1910 Joseph, Sevier, Utah 

Bopt. 20 Mar. 1918 Joseph, Sevier, Utah 

Md. 7 July 1934 Salt Lake City, Salt Lake, Utah 

Father John A. Parker Mother Mary Catherine Gilbert 

Wife 165 MELBA GEDDES EAMES 

B. 14 May 1909 Preston, Oneida, Idaho 

Chr. 4 July 1909 Preston, Oneida, Idaho 

Bapt. 14 May 1917 Preston, Franklin, Idaho 

Father David Greaves Fames Mother 33 Pearl Lorena Geddes 

CHILDREN 

450 Max Fames Parker B. 4 Aug. 1939, Seattle, King Washington 

Bapt. 1 Nov. 1947, Richfield, Sevier, Utah 
550 Pearl Catherine Parker B. 30 Nov. 1947, Richfield, Sevier, Utah 

258 



165 MELBA GEDDES EAMES 



A daughter was born to David Greaves Eames and Pearl Geddes Eames on May 14, 
1909 in Preston, Idaho. She was blessed Melba Geddes Eames by David C. Eames on 
July 4, 1909. 

Melba's childhood was happy in a devout L.D.S. home with intelligent, congenial 
parents, brothers and sisters on a productive farm. Short trips with parents to Bear Lake, 
local canyons. Salt Lake City to conference, Boise when Dad was a Senator were 
delightful . These vacations were earned by sharing work at home. 

Grandparents provided a wealth of joyous training for this child. Cousins visiting at 
the farm were summer highlights . Trips with Vera and Raymond Merrill and Ruby and 
Nathaniel Eames to Yellowstone Park, to Sadei and Arthur Tippetts home in Driggs, Idaho 
were wonderful . 

The Third Ward in Preston offered many opportunities to practice the religious Ideals 
instilled in every child of this family by their parents. Melba was an organist In the 
Primary at thirteen. Since that time she has always been active in music, speech, lit- 
erature, and the dance in different auxiliaries of the church and in various wards and on 
stake boards. Each two years she has changed positions to help keep alert and active. 

Always she has taught young people. In May 1927 Melba was graduated from Preston 
High School and Seminary. She attended the A. C. in Logan, received a Normal Cert- 
ificate and taught kindergarten at the Woodruff School in Logan. She had the first 
kindergarten in Preston for the summer session and assisted with one at the college for 
trainees 

In the spring of 1931 she received a B.S. degree from the A.C. She was a member 
of Phi Kappa Phi . The following four years she taught at South Cache High School. In 
1933 she toured the south, eastern coast and Canada for six weeks. 

Melba met Max R. Parker from Joseph, Utah as he transferred from Ft. Collins to 
the A.C. to finish his education. Max received his B.S. degree and did two quarters of 
graduate work before teaching in Elsinore and Salina High School. They were married 
In 1934 and in the fall of 1936 decided to change professions. They moved to Hereford, 
Arizona to manage a large cattle ranch for a wealthy Chicago manufacturer. 

In May 1939 they moved to Seattle, Washington, where a son. Max Eames Parker, 
was born to them August 4, 1939. 

On March 26, 1941, the Parkers bought John A. Porters farm and fine mountain ranch 
in Utah. They also have mining interests in the Marysvale area and in the southern 
Arizona country in which they lived in a few years In the thirties. 

A daughter. Pearl Katherine Parker was born to them in Richfield, Utah, on Nov. 30, 
1947. Dr. T. R. Gledhill, an uncle, was their physician at that time. A South Sevier 



259 



High School senior has become the second studeni- at that school in many years to be 
accepted as a freshman at the University of Utah under the early- entry program. 

Miss Kay Parker, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Max Parker, has begun classes as a 
freshman at the U. of U. after entrance examinations in English, speech, and biological 
science placed her in the top 4% ofall freshmen applying for entrance at the school . 

Because of her oustanding academic achievements, all of Miss Parker's high school 
classes have been waived and she v^ill receive her high school diploma in the spring, at 
the same time she concludes her first year in college. (This article was written about Kaye 

Max is attending the University of Utah at the present and has completed his army 
training. Pearl Kay is attending school in Elsinore. One of their happy experiences 
was a trip with their grandparents to Seattle in August 1959. 



Sketch written by Melba Geddes Eames Parker 



175 WALDO GEDDES EAMES 



B. n Apr. 1911 
Chr. May 1911 
Bapt. 11 Apr. 1919 
Md . 20 Dec . 1 939 

Father David Greaves Eames 



Preston, Franklin, Idaho 
Preston, Franklin, Idaho 
Preston, Franklin, Idaho 
Paris, Bear Lake, Idaho 

Mother 33 Pearl Lorena Geddes 



Wife REDA HADLEY 



I 



B. 17 Nov. 1912 
Chr. 3 Nov. 1913 
Bopt. 22 June 1921 

Father James Andrew Hadley 



Swan Lake, Bannock, Idaho 
Swan Lake, Bannock, Idaho 
Swan Lake, Bannock, Idaho 

Mother Ida lone McNiel 



CHILDREN 



460 Katheryne Eames 
501 Barbara Eames 



B. 25 Aug. 1940, Preston, Franklin, Idaho 
Bapt. 4 Sept. 1948, Preston, Franklin, Idaho 
B. 8 July 1944, Preston, Franklin, Idaho 
Bapt. 2 Aug. 1952, Preston, Franklin, Idaho 



260 



I 



175 WALDO GEDDES EAMES 



Waldo Geddes Eames, the third child of David Greaves and Pearl Geddes Eames, 
was born April 11, 1911 in Preston, Idaho. He spent his chi Idhood on his father's 
farm and enjoyed many happy hours with his maternal and paternal grandparents. 

He was educated In the grade schools and high schools of Preston, Idaho, 

He has always had a great love for animals and as a result of this interest during his 
teenage years he spent most of his time fitting and showing livestock at fairs and livestock 
shows all over the western states. He showed his stock in Portland, Denver, Salt Lake, 
Los Angeles and San Francisco . He won many blue ribbons during this work . 

At an early age, he began buying livestock for the Ogden livestock Auction. He 
then became co-owner and ring-master for the Pocatello livestock Auction. For ten years 
during this period he was also affiliated with the government sale of cattle from the Indian 
reservation in Blackfoot, Idaho. 

He married Redo Hadley from Swan Lake, Idaho and they are the parents of two 
daughters, Katheryne and Barbara. Both girls now live in Salt Lake City, Utah. Barbara 
is employed in Salt Lake while Katheryne married Gordon Oliverson; they have one child, 
David Bradley. 

Waldo owns a ranch in Franklin county and Is a breeder of registered pol led-Hereford 
cattle and outstanding thoroughbred bosses. 

Sketch written by his wife. Redo Hadley 



WAYNE L, DAILY 



B. 10 Nov. 1916 
Md. 1 Nov. 1951 



Memphis, Shelby, Tennessee 
Memphis, Shelby, Tennessee 



Wife 186 ROBERTA GEDDES EAMES 



B. 25 Apr. 1913 
Chr, May 1913 
Bopt. 25 Apr. 1921 



Preston, Franklin, Idaho 
Preston, Franklin, Idaho 
Preston, Franklin, Idaho 



Father David Greaves Eames 



Mother 33 Pearl Lorena Geddes 



NO CHILDREN 
First Husband was Rufus RIddlesbarger; no children (divorced), 

261 



186 ROBERTA GEDDES EAMES DAILY 



Roberta Geddes Eames Daily was born April 25, 1913 in Preston, Idaho. She spent 
her childhood on the family farm. She loved the outdoors and helped her father in many 
ways on the farm. 

She graduated from Preston High School and then attended Utah State University. She 
graduated from this University in June 1935 with a B. S. degree and a teaching major in 
secondary education. 

She spent two years working in Preston before her marriage to Rufus Riddlesbarger . 
Through his business interests they did extensive traveling in the United States, Hawaii, 
and Central America. 

On November 1, 1951 Roberta married Wayne L. Daily. He is a contractor and 
builder. They purchased a cattle ranch in Hamilton, Montana. They built their own 
home on the ranch as well as their home in Arizona. They spend the winters in Mesa, 
Arizona . 

Wayne served in the U.S. Army in World War II for several years. 

Roberta has always been very generous. She sent one sister to the University of 
Arizona for 2 1/2 years. She also helped Ruby on her mission to Finland. She was always 
concerned that Mother and Dad would have the things they needed. 



Sketch written by her sister. Ruby Eames Booth 



RIELLY D„ CONRAD 



B. 23 Apr. 1915 
Md. 20 Nov. 1941 
Bapt. 4 June 1960 
End. 14 June 1961 

Father Leslie D. Conrad 



Reno, Washoe, Nevada 
Reno, Washoe, Nevada 
Reno, Washoe, Nevada 
Logan Temple, Cache, Utah 

Mother Alma Daniels 



Wife 194 VENICE GEDDES EAMES 



B, 23 Apr, 1915 

Chr 4 July 1915 

Bapt. 28 June 1925 

End. & Sid. 14 June 1961 



Preston, Franklin, Idaho 
Preston, Franklin, Idaho 
Preston, Franklin, Idaho 
Logan Temple, Cache, Utah 

262 



Father David Greaves Eames Mother 33 Pearl Lorena Geddes 



CHILDREN 



495 Rielly Eames Conrad B. 19 Nov. 1943, Augusta, Columbia, Georgia 

520 David Garth Conrad B. 1 Nov. 1945, Seattle, King, Washington 

571 Daniel Thomas Conrad B. 31 Mar. 1949, Seattle, King, Washington 

The children were sealed to their parents 14 June 1961 , 



194 VENICE GEDDES EAMES 



Venice Geddes Eames Conrad was born on April 23, 1915 in Preston, Idaho to David 
and Pearl Geddes Eames, She was fifth in a family of nine children. After high 
school, Venice entered nurses training at the Dee Hospital in Ogden, Utah, graduating 
in 1938. She worked as a general duty nurse and head nurse until 1940 when she entered 
the U.S. Army Nurse Corps stationed at Letterman General Hospital in San Francisco, 
California. There she met Rielly D. Conrad, automotive engineer, who was serving a 
years' active duty as First Lieutenant in the Coast Artillery Corps. They were married 
November 20, 1941 in Reno, Nevada. The first child, Mary Eileen, who lived only 
forty-five minutes was born July 18, 1942 in El Paso, Texas. The second child, Rielly 
Eames, was born November 19, 1943 in a military hospital in Augusta, Georgia. 

After discharge from the army, the family moved to Seattle where Rielly D. went 
to work for the Kenworth Motor Truck Company as an engineer. After several years 
he was made a staff engineer. Two more children were born in Seattle, David Garth, 
November 1, 1945, and Daniel Thomas, March 31, 1949. Rielly E. attended Western 
Washington State College two years and Brigham Young University one year before 
leaving on a mission to Finland on September 20, 1965. David attended Brigham Young 
University one and one-half years before leaving on a mission to the Central States 
Mission in February 1965. Daniel is a junior in Highline High School. He is very 
active in church and school activities and loves basketball . 

Rielly D. was baptized into the L. D. S, Church on June 4, 1960. The couple were 
sealed to each other and the children were sealed to them in the Logan Temple on June 14, 
1961 . Rielly D. has been active in scouting and is age group counselor In the YMMIA. 
Venice has taught In the Primary, Relief Society and YWMIA. She served as Girls' 
Program Secretary on the Seattle Stake Board and is secretary-treasurer for the Twelfth 
Ward M.I. A. 

Sketch written by Venice Geddes Eames Conrad 



263 



215 WENDELL GEDDES EAMES 



B. 30 May 1917 
Chr. June 1917 
Bapt. 2 June 1925 
Md. 6 Apr. 1939 
End. 8 Aug. 1956 

Father David Greaves Eames 



Preston, Franklin, Idaho 
Preston, Franklin, Idaho 
Preston, Franklin, Idaho 
Gooding, Twin Falls, Idaho 
Logan Temple, Cache, Utah 

Mother 33 Pearl Lorena Geddes 



Wife NEDRA COLE 



B. 29 Dec. 1919 
Chr. 1 Feb. 1920 
Bapt, 15 Jan. 1928 
End. 8 Aug. 1956 

Father Leslie Cole 



Fairview, Franklin, Idaho 
Fairview, Franklin, Idaho 
Fairview, Franklin, Idaho 
Logan Temple, Cache, Utah 

Mother Loui McKimmon 



CHILDREN 



453 Brent Cole Eames 



B. 6 Jan. 1940, Washington, D, C. 
Bapt. 1 Feb. 1948, Washington, D. C. 



215 WENDELL GEDDES EAMES 



Wendell Geddes Eames, son of David Greaves Eames and Pearl Geddes Eames, was 
born on the family farm in Preston, Idaho, on May 30, 1917. He attended Preston public 
schools along with his three brothers and five sisters. As a boy scout in Preston Third 
Ward's Troop Thirty-two, he was elected Senior Patrol Leader three times and became a 
Four Palm Eagle Scout, 

While in high school, he acquired some dairy cows and joined a 4-H Club. Through 
his work in this club, he received a scholarship to the University of Idaho, where he 
received a B.A degree with a major in political science. He later attended graduate 
school at New York University and North Eastern University. 

In 1939 he married Nedra Cole of Fairview, Idaho, and they moved to Washington, 
D. C, where their son Wendell Brent was born in 1940. Wendell was employed in 
private industry as a historical researcher for a power company and as a host for a large 
restaurant chain until 1940 when he entered the service of the Federal Bureau of Invest- 
igation He served as a Special Agent in the Federal Bureau of Investigation in Miss- 
issippi, Pennsylvania and Washington, D. C. and later became the Bureau's Records 

264 



Management Officer. 

After twenty years service in the Federal Bureau of Investigation, he was appointed 
Director of the National Driver Register Service which he organized and administered in 
the United States Department of Commerce. In February 1965, he was awarded the 
Department's Silver Medal for his work in establishing and developing this service. 

As a member of the Washington Ward of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day 
Saints, he served as a member of the Boy Scout Troop Committee, as Scout Master, 
Bishop's Counselor, and Bishop. 

Sketch written by Wendell Geddes Fames 



FLOYD R. BOOTHE 



B, 5 Oct, 1909 
Bapt. 14 Oc. 1917 
Md. 14 June 1961 
End. 12 June 1961 



Weston, Franklin, Idaho 
Weston, Franklin, Idaho 
Logan Temple, Cache, Utah 
Logan Temple, Cache, Utah 



Father Nathaniel Boothe 



Mother Eunice Wickham 



Wife 231 RUBY GEDDES EAMES 



B 19 July 1919 
Chr. 14 Sept. 1919 
Bapt. 19 July 1932 
End . 4 Nov . 1 949 
Sid. 14 June 1961 



Preston, Franklin, Idaho 
Preston, Franklin, Idaho 
Preston, Franklin, Idaho 
Logan Temple, Cache, Utah 
Logan Temple, Cache, Utah 



Father Greaves Fames 



Mother 33 Pearl Lorena Geddes 



NO CHILDREN 



FLOYD R. BOOTHE 



Floyd R. Boothe was born in Honeyville, Utah, October 5, 1909. He was the 
fourth son of eleven children born to Nathaniel Boothe and Eunice Jane Wickham. He 
spent the first 19 years of his life in Honeyville, Utah on his parent's farm. He attended 
elementary school in Honeyville, Utah and Box Elder High School in Brigham City, Utah. 

265 



He worked as a bus driver for the San Francisco City Municipal Railway for thirty 
years. He spent three years in the U. S. Navy Seabees. He spent 18 months in the 
South Pacific, He saw action in both places. He is a veteran of World War II. 

He married Geneive La Berge 19 June 1933. They had a daughter, Charmaine 
Delores Boothe, born July 5, 1934 in San Francisco, California, Charmaine was married 
to John A. Wootness, June 30, 1956, in Monteray, California. They have three 
children; Gwenna Rose Wootness, Wendy Lee Wootness, and John A. Wootness. 

Floyd became active in the Latter-day Saint Church in 1956. He was ward teaching 
supervisor, first counselor and president of the Elder's quorum while he was in San Fran- 
cisco. 

He met Ruby Eames at church in the summer of 1958. They were married in the 
Logan Temple June 14, 1961 . They spent their first year of marriage in San Francisco. 
In June 1962 they moved to Preston, Idaho and bought the family farm and are residing 
there at the present time. 

Sketch written by wife. Ruby Geddes Eames 



231 RUBY GEDDES EAMES 



She was born at her home in Preston, Idaho, July 19, 1919, the daughter of Pearl 
Geddes Eames and David G. Eames. Her childhood was a happy one spent with her 
family on the farm in Preston, Idaho. 

She was graduated from Preston High School In 1937, She attended the U.S.A.C. 
at Logan, Utah and received her B.S. degree in 1941 with a major in child development 
and elementary education. She attended Merrill Palmer School in Detroit, Michigan 
the spring quarter of her senior year at college. Her first teaching assignment was the 
second grade in Cedar City, Utah, for one year. She was head teacher in the child care 
centers in Salt Lake City, Seattle and San Francisco for five years. She was guidance 
teacher at the University of Utah nursery school for one year. 

She wanted to go overseas with the Red Cross during the war and received an assignment 
as overseas staff assistant to go to England in 1945. She was sent to Washington, D. C. 
to attend a school before leaving and the war ended, so the class she was scheduled to go 
with was cancelled. 

She has been active In church work all her life. She graduated from Primary and 
seminary and was play leader in the Primary organization when she attended high school. 
She has taught classes in Primary, Mutual or Sunday School nearly continuously since 
she finished college. She taught the teacher training class In the Preston Third Ward 
Sunday School . She was coordinator of the Junior Sunday School at Ames, Iowa while 



266 



atfendlng school there in 1955. She served as a stake missionary in the San Francisco 
Stake for nearly two years in 1947 and 1948. She was called on a foreign mission to 
Finland in 1949. She and her companion Merle Lloyd were the first two lady missionaries 
ever assigned to Finland. It was a very challenging and spiritual experience. She 
toured fifteen different countries on her way home from her mission. 

She was a graduate assistant at Iowa State College while working for her Master's 
degree She received her Master's degree in child development in August 1955 from the 
Iowa State College in Ames, Iowa. She is an Assistant Professor in the department of 
Family Living and Child Development and Supervisor of the Child Development Laboratory 
at Utah State University at Logan, Utah, where she has taught for the past four years. 

She has done temple work since she returned from her mission and she helps record 
sealings once a week at the Logan Temple. She has enjoyed the companionship of her 
parents, brothers and sisters and their children. The past few years she has traveled 
with her parents to visit the different temples and to visit with members of her family. 
This summer she plans to attend the University of Honolulu and to do temple work in the 
Hawaiian Temple. 



GRANT B. HALL 



B 25 Apr. 1921 
Chr. 5 June 1921 
Bapt. 31 July 1929 
Md. 1 Sept. 1946 
End. 28 Aug. 1964 

Father Thomas John Hall 



Fairvlew, Franklin, Idaho 

Fairview, Franklin, Idaho 

Fairview, Franklin, Idaho 

Preston, Franklin, Idaho 

Idaho Falls Temple, Bonneville, Idaho 

Mother Harriet Matilda Bodily 



Wife 264 DORA DEAN E EAMES 



B.6Mar 1924 
Chr, Apr. 1924 
Bapt. 12 Apr, 1932 
End. 28 Aug. 1964 
Sid. 28 Aug. 1964 

Father David Greaves Eames 



Preston, Franklin, Idaho 

Preston, Franklin, Idaho 

Preston, Franklin, Idaho 

Idaho Falls Temple, Bonneville, Idaho 

Idaho Falls Temple, Bonneville, Idaho 

Mother 33 Pearl Lorena Geddes 



549 Karen Marie Hall 



CHILDREN 

B. 8 Nov. 1947, Moscow, Latah, Idaho 



267 



607 Wade Grant Mali (twin) 

608 Deborah Hall (twin) 
880 Kent Eames Hall 



B, 13 Aug, 1951, Spokane, Spokane, Washington 
B, 13 Aug. 1951, Spokane, Spokane, Washington 
B. 27 Apr, 1956, Qildwell, Canyon, Idaho 



The children were sealed to their parents 28 Aug. 1964 in the Idaho Falls Temple, 
Bonneville, Idaho. 



GRANT B. HALL AND DORA DEANE EAMES 



Dora Deane Eames was born 6 Mar. 1924 at Preston, Idaho, the eighth child of 
David Greaves Eames and Pearl Lorena Geddes. 



I 



She attended grade school and high school at Preston. She was active and participated 
in her church and school activities. She graduated from the Preston High School in 
May 1942. Then, she attended the University of Arizona at Tucson, for 2 1/2 years. 
She at this time decided to leave college and marry her high school sweetheart, Grant B. 
Hall . They were married 1 Sept. 1946 in her parents' home at Preston, Idaho, 

Grant B, Hall, her husband, was born at Fairview, Franklin, Idaho, 25 April 1921. 
His parents were Thomas John Hall and Harriet Matilda Bodily. 

He attended the Fairview grade school and the Preston High School. After graduation 
from high school he enlisted in the United States Marines. He served his country as 
a Lieutenant in World War II. Then, he was promoted to the rank of Captain. In all 
he served four years in the United States Marines. 

They decided it would be better to go to school on the G. I. bill than for Grant to 
find job. Grant thought he would have a better chance In school if he attended the 
University of Idaho at Moscow, He believed he wanted to get his degree in dairy work. 
He obtained work as a dairy herdsman at the University from the fall of 1946 to 1950. 
It was here that their first child was born, a daughter, Karen Marie. After receiving his 
degree they moved in Sept. 1950 to Bonners Ferry where he became the county agent. It 
was while they were living at Bonners Ferry that their twins were born, Deborah and Wade 
Grant. 

In July 1952 they were transferred to Caldwell, Idaho, Here their fourth child, 
Kent Eames was born. 

In 1959-1960 Grant decided he wanted to get his Master's degree at the university 
of Idaho at Moscow. It was a hard year for them but it paid off. After graduation they 
returned to Caldwell with a Master's degree in their possession in the summer of 1960, 

They had been working in the L, D. S. Church since moving to Caldwell. Dora 
Deane had acted as a teacher, counselor and president of the YWMIA. At the present 
time she is counselor in the Caldwell 2nd Ward Relief Society. Grant has been Ist 



268 



counselor in the Sunday School for several years, but in the fall of 1965, the Bishop 
put him in as 1st counselor in the YMMIA with the special job to work with the Scouts 
and Explorers. 

A great event in their lives was when they went to Idaho Falls to the L. D. S. Temple 
28 Aug. 1964 to take out their endowments and be sealed to each other for time and eternity, 
They also had the privilege of having their children sealed to them the same day. 

The fall of 1965 finds Karen a freshman at the University of Idaho, Wade and Debby 
freshmen in the Caldwell High School and Kent a fourth grader. Grant has been busier 
than ever with County Agent work as he is now State President of the Association. Dora 
Deane is acting as secretary in the District Seminary Office, during school hours. 



Sketch written by Dora Deane Eames Hall 



285 GARTH GEDDES EAMES 



B. 10 May 1927 
Chr. 3 July 1927 
Bapt. 13 May 1935 
End. Aug. 1947 
Md. 4 April 1951 



Preston, Franklin, Idaho 
Preston, Franklin, Idaho 
Preston, Franklin, Idaho 
Logan Temple, Cache, Utah 
Logan Temple, Cache, Utah 



Father David Geaves Eames 



Mother 33 Pearl Lorena Eames 



Wife SHIRLEY RAE ROBINSON 



B, 11 April 1932 
Chr. 5 June 1932 
Bapt. 4 May 1940 
End. 16 March 1951 
Sid. 4 April 1951 

Father Duane Robinson 



Preston, Franklin, Idaho 
Preston, Franklin, Idaho 
Preston, Franklin, Idaho 
Logan Temple, Cache, Utah 
Logan Temple, Cache, Utah 

Mother LaRue Golightly 



CHILDREN 



618 


LaRue Eames 


641 


Christine Eames 


669 


Jill Ray Eames 


881 


Timothy Eames 


882 


Kelly K. Eames 



B. 28 Feb. 1952, Preston, Franklin, Idaho 
B. 2 July 1953, Preston, Franklin, Idaho 
B. 16 Oct. 1954, Preston, Franklin, Idaho 
B. 1960, Rupert, Minidoka, Idaho 

B. 15 Mar. 1966, Rupert, Minidoka, Idaho 



269 



285 GARTH GEDDES EAMES 



Garth Geddes Eames was a late comer to the Eames family. His father, David 
Greaves Eames and mother Pearl Lorena Geddes were 48 and 45 years old respectively 
when their last child was born May 10, 1927. He grew up on the family farm in Preston, 
Idaho. Garth spent his summers herding cows, hoeing beets, and riding the horse, that 
is when he wasn't off with the neighbor kids playing. 

During the winters he attended school in Preston, Upon graduating from high school 
he went to sea as a merchant seaman for a year. He helped deliver one of the first ship- 
loads of supplies to Japan at the close of World War II . When he returned home he was 
called to serve in the U. S. Air Force. Most of his time was spent traveling, but he spent 
several months on Okinawa before his honorable discharge. 

He helped his father on the farm one summer and then was called on a mission to Great 
Britain. As a result of his preaching there was no great stampeed of converts into the 
church, buthe did preach in hundreds of street meetings and bore his testimony to thousands 
of Englishmen. While there he served as president of the Nuneaton Branch and later was 
president of the Burmingham District. 

After returning from his mission he attended U.S.U. a short time and then quit to 
help his father, whose health was failing, run the farm. That winter he met and successfully 
courted Shirley Roe Robinson. The next spring they were married on April 4, 1951, in 
the Logan Temple and began to live happily ever after. While living In Preston two 
daughters were born to them, LaRue, born Feb. 28, 1952, and Christine, born July 2, 1953. 

On April 23, 1954 the family moved to the sagebrush desert of south central Idaho 
to take up the rigor of modern homesteading. The land was cleared, the water was pumped 
from underground and the desert began to blossom as the rose. At the end of that hectic 
summer their third daughter was born on Oct. 16, 1955. She was named Jill Ray Eames. 
Along with taming the desert, they worked in the kingdom, Shirley as a counselor in the 
Stake Relief Society and later as a 2nd Ward M.I. A. president. Garth was a bishop for 
6 years and later called to be a high councilman. 

On June 26, 1959 the spell was broken and a son Timothy Robinson was welcomed 
into the family. 

Along with raising children and potatoes, grain, hay, and beets they have been active 
in farm organizations and Garth has served as district and council finance chairman for 
the Boy Scouts of America. He also served one term as County Commissioner for Minidoka 
County. 

Sketch written by Garth Geddes Eames 



270 



35 JOSEPH ARCH GEDDES 



B . 27 Nov. 1884 
Bapt. 27 Nov. 1892 
End. 20 Nov. 1907 
Md. 17 Sept. 1914 

Father 4 Joseph Stewart Geddes 



Plain City, Weber, Utah 

Plain City, Weber, Utah 

Salt Lake Temple, Salt Lake, Utah 

Salt Lake Temple, Salt Lake, Utah 

Mother Isabella Dora Neeley 



Wife GRACE WOOLLEY 



B. 9 Feb. 1888 
End, 17 Sept. 1914 
Sid. 17 Sept. 1914 

Father Ezra Wool ley 



Kanab, Kane, Utah 

Salt Lake Temple, Salt Lake, Utah 

Salt Lake Temple, Salt Lake, Utah 

Mother Grace Hemingw^ay 



CHILDREN 



198 Joseph Wool ley Geddes 

213 Dora Marjorie Geddes 

236 Ezra Woo I ley Geddes 

277 Grace Elizabeth Geddes 

287 Gayle Geddes 



B. 25 Sept. 1915, Preston, Franklin, Idaho 

B. 16 Apr, 1917, Preston, Franklin, Idaho 

B. 25 Dec. 1919, Cedar City, Iron, Utah 

B, n Nov. 1926, Logan, Cache, Utah 

B. 17 May 1927, Logan, Cache, Utah 



JOSEPH ARCH GEDDES 



Joseph A., second child and eldest son of Joseph Stewart Geddes and Isabella Dora 
Neeley Geddes, was born November 27, 1884, in Plain City, Utah, a village our grand- 
father William Geddes along with two wives, three children, and 18 other families founded 
March 17, 1859. 

Marriage and Family 

Joseph A. married Grace Woolley, September 17, 1914, at age 30 - she, 26. Here 
he is pleased to say, was his greatest achievement. On September 25, 1915, Joseph 
Woolley, eldest and greatly beloved son, was born In Preston, Idaho. He was a source of 
pride and gratitude to his parents from the day he was born until the day he died, March 21, 
1943, piloting a B-17, in an attack on a Japanese airdrome In Raboul, New Britain. On 
April 16, 1917, Dora Marjorie, our fair-haired, blue-eyed daughter came to make her home 
with us. Happy day, Ezra Woolley arrived on Christmas morning December 25, 1919, In 
Cedar City, Utah. Ezra has shown inner durability and quiet strength combined with 



271 



substantial purpose. Grace Elizabeth, named after her mother and her great grandmother, 
was born November 11, 1925, in Logan, Utah, How much we owe this cheerful, com- 
petent daughter. Finally, on May 17, 1927, also in Logan, Gayle Woolley, our youngest 
daughter, came to join the family. Gayle has contributed love and understanding more 
than she can know - 



Education 

Joseph A.'s education is probably best indicated by possession of the A.B. degree 
from the Brigham Young G)llege in 1907, the A.M. degree from Columbia University in 
1913, and the Ph . D degree from Columbia University in 1924, 



Services 



Played on the BYC basketball team two years and on the baseball team four years. 

Elected President BYC Athletic Assn. (Later the Studentbody Assn) 

Served as Executive Utah Basketball League (1905-1906) 

Ward clerk, Preston First Ward 

An L.D.S. mission to Northern States (1907-1910) 

Board member, Oneida Stake Sunday School Board 

Board member, Utah State Conference of Social Work 

Board member and chairman, Utah State Self-Help Cooperative Board 

Board member. Consumer's Cooperative Assn. Headquarters, Kansas City, Mo. 

Board member. National Cooperative Inc., Chicago, Illinois 

Board member. Cooperative League of the U.S.A., Chicago, Illinois 

Board member, Utah Cooperative Assn. and Executive Committee member. Salt Lake City, Ut 

Chairman, Retirement Committee CCA. Kansas City, Mo. 

Chairman, Retirement Committee UCA, Salt Lake City, Utah 

Chairman, U.C.A. Long Range Planning Committee 



Administrative Experience 

President Deacons', Teachers', and Priests' Quorums 

Manager, BYC baseball, basketball teams 

President, Chicago Conference Northern States L.D.S. Mission 

Principal, Oneida Academy 

Director BYC Division of Arts and Sciences 

Head, Department of Sociology USAC 

Director, Graduate Division of Social Work, USAC 

Chairman, Self-Help Cooperative Board 

Director, Utah Cooperative Rural Research (Federal -State) 

Chairman, Long Range Planning Committee of U.C.A. 

President, Utah Academy of Arts, Sciences, and Letters 



272 



Some RecogniHons 

1 . His United Order Among the Mormons - designated "the standard reference" 

2. Honor Award - Utah Academy Arts, Sciences and Letters for Distinctive Achievements 
In the Social Sciences. 

3. Chosen to give the Annual USAC Faculty Lecture designated by the Director of the 
Experiment Station as, in his opinion, the greatest monograph that has come off the 
Hill 

4. Elected a Fellow Utah Academy Arts, Science and Letters 

5. Sociology Department, of which he was chairman, chosen by 12 related departments 
as the best staffed and best equipped to offer Ph.D. degree in 12 department areas 

6. Given a standing ovation by 300 delegates to the 1960 biannual Congress of the Cooperative 
League of USA on his retirement 

7. Presented a Shield Award by 500 Utah Cooperators as founder of Utah Cooperative 
Assn . 

8. Became an Honorary Life Member - Utah Conference on Social Welfare 

9. Elected a Fellow, American Association for the Advancement of Science 



His Job 

At 38, Joseph has completed his training for the Ph.D. degree In the two seats of 
learning he had chosen — The University of Chicago and Columbia University — and was 
ready for his "bit" of contribution to the culture of his inheritance which he had come to 
love in spite of growing awareness of its shortcomings. Favorable opportunity was not 
immediately available. At 40 It came with an offer to teach at Utah State University (then 
College) half-time teaching and half-time research on social problems. For the next 
30 years, he kept steadily at the two-fold goal of building what has been assessed as a 
strong Sociology Department and the completion of studies at the Experiment Station which 
would unravel the basic guidelines underlying mountain culture which consciously or un- 
consciously is being built. Unconsciously to quite a degree, for at this time, social 
planning had become very much of a lost art. His desire was to help revive it. 

A serious problem soon arose with the completion of the first master's thesis written by 
Mrs. Caroline Hendricks on "Practices Among Succeeding or Problem-Solving Families." 
He could either center effort on the strengths of the existing culture and its leadership 
or on their weaknesses. If the first named were chosen jne could ride along rather easily 
towards acceptance by the "powers that be." If this were done, however, how would the 
people ever become conscious of their grave weaknesses which he had, by now, come to 
realize were of a serious nature? A century of isolation, of overemphasis on a narrow 
cultural base, of fighting the great trends, of direction by aged leadership, had taken 
large toll? Studies directed at strategic points of cultural inadequacies would undoubtedly 
bring resentment and increasing censure. The question of progress protruded, not personal 
progress for him but of emerging advancement for a people who had slowly become enmeshed 
in a host of static retardations of which they had become unconscious through a system of 
unparal leled Indoctrination . Whatever his limited contribution was to be, it is worthy of 
note that he chose the path of awakening through studies, clarifying weaknesses and limit- 
ations as the better way to get cultural fences mended. This was largely untrod ground, 
for Utah's sons had not yet begun seriously to inquire, with the methods of science, about 

273 



the causes of so many unsolved problems. So, such studies as these appeared one after 
another: 

1 . The two Plain City bulletins which clarified: 

a. The advantages of fringe or edge or suberbia living 

b. The regretable fact that in a TOO year period we had failed 
to overcome land fragmentation. One Plain City man wore 
out his machinery in moving it to more than a score of small 
pieces of land he had acquired. 

2. Failure to save capital and develop Utah's natural resources by the native 
population had resulted in an exportation or out-migration of more than 1,600 
USU graduates by 1940. 

3. The bulletin on Migration: a problem of youth in Utah revealed grave errors in 
Mormon leadership and planning, 

4. The Honor Faculty lecture. Institution Building in Utah was repeated in the joint 
session of the annual meeting of the Utah Academy of Sciences, Arts and Letters. 

5. Cemeteries of Box Elder and Summit Counties appeared in 1951 . This badly needed 
study was confiscated by the chairman of the Board of Trustees, who was a member 
of the Presiding Bishopric. It was difficult it appears, for him to face the fact 
that a large proportion of all cemeteries in the two counties were still owned by 
the L . D . S . Church , and most of them were weed patches . Such an cbuse of power 
suggests the need — if USU is to become a university of high standing — for a 
reevaluation of the custom of having a high church official chairman of the Board 
of Trustees. 

6. Libraries as Social Institutions was printed in 1956. At this time, Utah's 
small town libraries were much as they had been 40 years before, with limited 
stocks of books, no satisfactory means of circulation, no personnel standards, no 
adequate base for support. Today, Utah's Ubrarles under a new state law are 
undergoing a profound revolution in both urban and rural communities. 

7. The YMMIA Senior Manual of 1935-36 was written by him and called The Community 
High Road, was an introductory study intended to awaken young people to the 
importance of building a worthy culture rather than to boast about a rather un- 
developed one, through extreme emphasis on missionary work which uses up capital 
and prevents normal economic growth. L.D.S. leaders, however, rejected the 
idea and greatly expanded proselyting. 

8. Two recent essays — 1 . Retarding Forces in Utah Economy and 2, An Access Road 
deal with the abandonment of agrarian criteria in economic planning and the more 
rapid development of an industrial society capable of applying capital to rich 
natural resources. M 

These are a few of many studies and essays that have appeared over the years, not a few 

274 



of them dealing with cooperatives. Rejected by religious leaders and yet honored and 
respected, this Geddes closed out his active career with these sobering words: 

I STEP ASIDE 

A good bit of realism has tempered nearly a third of a century of sustained sociological 
research in which an effort has been made to direct impersonal observation on Utah's 
social agencies and institutions. Impersonality has not always been fully achieved. But 
there has been struggle towards it. The intent has been to help, the result has, at times, 
seemed unkind. It appears difficult, particularly for leaders of institutions, to look at 
their handiwork through the glasses a social scientist must wear. 

A people who live on mountain tops and In high valleys may have, but do not nec- 
essarily have, the vision or the inner strength to build a noteworthy culture or to sustain one. 
The modern Aztec Indians of the high Andes are far less ingenious than were their ancestors. 
The upward thrust of a people may not be observable In a year, but should be somewhat 
clarified In a decade. In a century, the outline becomes quite definite. At the close 
of a mlllenlum, if the direction Is upward, a considerable structure emerges. Civilization 
seems to rise and fall, flounder, get a new start In another focus and rise again to greater 
heights . 

The Inner reservoir of spiritual power from which a people are nourished who continue 
to progress, is not too clear on the surface, but the board workings manifest themselves In 
the manner of building and in the kind of Institutions which emerge. Material-minded 
men see progress in buildings, factories, airlines, and wealth, spiritual leaders In the nature 
and quality of the unifying processes which make men free and make possible the creation 
of good environments; intellectual leaders. In the rate of growth of knowledge that emerges, 
is organized and passes to the people; the statesmen in Increasing welfare and in the 
effectiveness and economy of the control machinery that preserves and sustains. 

A people are not likely to rise high or get far who do not uphold honest research, who 
fear constructive criticism, who prefer not to make use of those who know In the physical 
and the social worlds. 

The institutions a people build become the reflectors of the spiritual strength within. 
The conquest of this dynamic age requires Ingenuity and vision, not regimentation and 
unbending forms. The safety that is available lies in preference for and use of tested 
knowledge as the climb becomes steeper and the ascent more rapid. Those who have 
confidence that the people In the mountains have a strong, powerful potential for continuous 
growth know full well that regimentation shackles; that undue worship of the past weakens; 
that culture lag is a malingering sickness; that Imbalance in culture building means a bent 
structure that Invites collapse. 

The open road lies ahead. Will great values and firm goals enable this people to 
keep the pace steady as their feet, with great difficulty, unshackle themselves from the 
decoylngentanglements thatthe past has left on the roadway? 

The great love the people have for education should lead them to greener pastures, 
but here again questions persist. What is the nature of the education provided? Does 

275 



if deal with tested knowledge based essentially on truth? Or does inculcation bind the 
minds of youth to values that do not stand up well under objective testing? Does ugly 
propaganda parade as sound knowledge? Do the half truths of older generations enter the 
portals of the new without appraisal? 

Institutions, whether they be libraries or school, or health or welfare, or recreation 
agencies, clearly indicate the quality of the people who build them. Can the people 
produce the leadership that has the vision to see and the strength to build a harmonious 
culture of inner consistency and power? Or will the difficulties ahead cause them to 
take refuge in rationalizations and escapest thinking? Will they wear themselves out 
in carrying messages they have not yet made valid by accomplishment? 

Group faith, courage, vision, ingenuity, resourcefulness, and the preservation of 
inner health should produce both the leaders and sustaining strength required to do it. 
God go with us. 



Sketch written by Joseph A. Geddes 



198 JOSEPH WOOLLEY GEDDES 



B. 25 Sept. 1915 
Bapt. 25 Sept. 1923 
End. 17 Feb. 1936 
Md. abt. 1941 



Preston, Franklin, Idaho 

Logan, Cache, Utah 

Logan Temple, Cache, Utah 



Father 35 Joseph Arch Geddes 



Mother Grace Wool ley 



Wife BARBARA NELSON 



B. abt. 1919 



474 Joseph Nelson Geddes 



CHILDREN 

B. 27 Mar. 1942, Santa Anna, Orange, California 



198 JOSEPH WOOLLEY GEDDES 



Essentials 

Joseph, the first child and eldest son of Joseph Arch and Grace Woolley Geddes, was 
born September 25, 1915 in Preston, Idaho. 



276 



His education included a B.S. degree and an M.S. degree from Utah State University 
with a major In Sociology, and one year at Cornell University, during which he passed 
successfully the language examinations in German and French. He v^as also elected Pres- 
ident of the Cornell Sociology Club in the spring of this year. At the close of the academic 
year in 1941, he was inducted into military service In World War II. 

While on a week's visit home before Induction, he married Barbara Nelson. From 
this union a son, Joseph Nelson Geddes, was born on March 27, 1942. When grown, Joe 
N. resembled his father in many respects. Slightly taller, 6' 3", than his father, 6' 2", 
he excelled in basketball much as his father had done in tennis. At the State Tournament 
in 1960, representing Olympls High School, he scored 100 points in the four games. His 
nearest competitors were tied at 81 points each. 

Joseph W. filled a mission to Germany and served for more than a year as Mission 
Superintendent of Sunday School . He also, on his return, helped to organize and become 
president of Lamba Delta Sigma, serving two years. 

He was commander of Sigma Nu social fraternity and was elected a member of the Blue 
Key Honor Society and of Pi Gamma Mu Honor Society. 

During the two years of military training as a pilot, he was advanced from 2nd Lieut- 
enant to 1st Lieutenant to Captain. Shortly before going overseas, he became Squadron 
Maintenance Chief, a ground position. Desiring more active service, he was granted a 
short leave for observer pilot work. 

It Is not the routines of work, food and sleep that fasten themselves in memories but 
rather events or incidents that live on . I think Joe was proud of his father at times. I 
know I was proud of him on many occasions. Among a large number of such incidents that 
come to mind about Joe, I will attempt to describe a few briefly. 



Incidents 1 and 2 The Big City 

We were small village people, the children knew nothing about a big city until we 
came to live in New York City. Joe, the eldest, turned six soon after our arrival and 
had to start school In a Jewish sector some distance away. To new surroundings and strange 
things must now be added a multitude of new associates. Without a friend or acquaintance 
would the strangeness of so much of the unknown be too much for the small, thin lad? 
So my thoughts ran as I took his little hand, went with him into the school building, found 
the teacher and introduced him to her and did what I could, as a father does, to ease 
the day and the burden for him. Then turned resolutely toward the University a mile and 
a half away. 

The depression was at Its worst. We, like many others, were very poor. Small 
Ezra was two years old and had been troubled with enlarged glands under his ear. The 
visiting doctor recommended removal of tonsils for both he and Joe. The hospital would 
not permit us to remain with them. We must bring them to the hospital early in the morning. 



277 



1 



leave them there that day and the next night but could call for them the following morn- 
ing. We told Joe he was to take care of Ezra. When the next morning came, it was tender 
parental hearts that watched the long stairs for sight of them. When they came in sight, 
little Ezra hardly able to walk, Joe holding his hand, both of them with glad eyes when 
they saw us, but with dry, parched lips for they had not been permitted a drink. There were 
two disturbed, humble, thankful parents that day. 



Incident 3 



We were in Logan now, had a job and were beginning to pay off our accumulation 
of debts . 



The sixth grade had been completed in the Tenth Ward School . It was late August 
and time to enter the large junior high school down town. Miss Daniels, principal of 
the Tenth Ward School, felt she should go with her graduating class on the opening day to 
help get them started. The seventh grade Into which they were to be absorbed was com- 
posed of eight classes representing differing abilities, beginning with the ablest and con- 
tinuing down to the least able. Miss Daniels designated Joseph for the No. 1 class, 
insisting that was where he belonged. Now it so happened that the principal and a few 
of the teachers had become offended at Joe's father, head of the U.S.U. Sociology Depart- 
ment, for his inisiting that teachers should do more in preparing students for life's pro- , 
blems than was being accomplished at the present time. Within a few days, young Joe 
found himself moved out of the first section and placed unceremoniously down in the eighth 
section. Too sensitive and too chagrined to tell his parents, it was two months before they 
learned about it. After considerable parental discussion, it was concluded that the father 
should visit the school . This he did at a late afternoon class. The teacher, care worn 
and tired, gave him a chair and proceeded with the day's work. For every question raised 
by the teacher, Joe gave his answer or comment first. Slowly thereafter the rest of the 
class began to warm up to the discussion. 

At the close of the half hour, the teacher came over, expecting criticism. Instead 
the father complimented her on conducting a good class discussion. Then, on her own 
volition, she said, "I've told them repeatedly that Joe does not belong in this section 
and should never have been placed here." He thanked her and after a word of greeting to 
Joe, left the school . A few days later, Joe came home with the word he had been 
transferred to the No. 2 section. Here he found some of his friends and made a more 
happy and successful integration. 



Incident 4 



It was the last match for the Northern Utah Regional High School tennis title. Joe 
was one of the players. Logan High had come through thus far with a clean slate. Only 
South Cache High remained. The singles match was to be played on the Logan City tennis 
court which lay directly inside the side walk fence. We had a clear view of the game. 
It was the first time his mother had watched him play a match . This could hove had 
something to do with his showing. In any case, considerable skill, dexterity, and court 
maneuvering were already beginning to be apparent. The score for the two matches was 
6-1, 6-0. 

278 



Incident 5 

A few months later, preparations were underway for the annual fall tennis tournament 
on USAC campus. Joe, just up for high school, decided to enter for the experience, not 
being given much chance against the college lettermen who also entered. It was a three 
day event. Many were eliminated the first day. By nightfall of the second day, all but 
two were out of competition. Saturday forenoon was designated for the final match. 
Surprisingly, Joe was one of the two finalists. Few thought he had any chance against 
the powerful service and experienced court coverage of the college's ace singles man. 
But interest had increased, the tall, thin youth would probably make a fight of it and 
many wanted to see what he could do against tough opposition. Again Mother and I 
were on hand in the old Buick. 

The contest began. The fast service of the more experienced player appeared certain 
to carry the day but Joe's shots were a little better placed and he was playing a steady, 
calculated game. The score reached five all before Joe's service was broken and the 
set went to his opponent at 7-5, The second set was not greatly different. It was a see- 
saw struggle except that in the end it was Joe who finally broke through and the set ended 
9-7, in his favor. By now interest had risen to a high pitch. The tall lad was not only 
making a very real contest out of the struggle, he was holding his own. The contest would 
go the full three sets, both contestants were sweating profusely, the sun was nearing a 
vertical position, surely rhe thin lad would weaken before the hard drives of his more mature 
and well muscled antagonist, but the parents could not see any signs of weakness. Deter- 
mination was stamped on the boy's face and in his movements. The crucial set began. 
Service, as before, dominated the score but a difference began to show. The boy was 
becoming accustomed to the speed serves of his opponent. The early serves he had to meet 
went back direct and to his advantage. In the fourth serve he broke through and took 
the opponent's service. The apex of the struggle had probably been reached earlier in 
the second set but it was there that he proved his durability. It was not he, but his more 
robust competitor who weakened. The set ended suddenly at 6-4. For the first time in 
the history of the college, a freshman had become the top tennis player on the campus. 

Father's soliloquy: As the boy brought the trophy over and handed it to his mother 
with a smile of pleasure and pride, far away echoes reverberated in the heart of his father 
from forebears long gone who had forced the opposition and turned the tide back down. 
"He's in the good breed," thought his father, "I am proud of him. He's a true son." How 
much of this went into the quick exchange of glances that passed between them may not be 
known but something strong and enduring was there. 



Incident 6 

One more tennis event. It was in Joe's sophomore year. The tennis matches with the 
U. of U. were being played in Salt Loke City on the University campus. Of five matches, 
two singles and three doubles, the college won four of them, Joe's share was a victory 
in the singles and in the doubles in which he played. Joe also won in this year, in the 
singles against the Brigham Young University. Shortly after the close of school , he follow- 
ed his friend, Richard Hill, to the mission field in Germany. Serving during the 



279 



last year of his mission as Superintendent of the Sunday Schools, After two years he 
was released and entered the University of Paris to study French. He never did regain 
tennis form after his return from the mission field. 



Other Things 

Joe did not make Phi Kappa Phi . His low grades during the winter and spring quarters 
while he was convincing his father that the mission field was the place for him rather than 
to finish college first, precluded that. However, after his return from the mission field, 
he accumulated 70 hours of straight A's, a convincing record. 

In the war effort, a scarcity of personnel in chemical warfare and general reluctance 
to enter such a field was responsible for a special call for volunteers. Joe volunteered. 
After a few months, the country's needs shifted to Air Force personnel . Joe answered the 
need. His good eyesight and quick muscular coordination that had enabled him to succeed 
with tennis stood him well in Air Force training. 

Shortly before going overseas he was placed in charge of maintenance of B-24 planes, 
a squadron job and a ground job. But he was determined to secure more active experience 
and was given temporary leave from this job for active service. He was assigned as an 
observer pilot on a B-17. With this injunction from his squadron C. O. "Your leave for 
bombing must be brief because you are needed for maintenance in this squadron." On 
March 21, 1943, the plane he was in was shot down. Four parachuted out and are known 
to have been in the Rabaul New Britain Japanese prison for six months. None survived 
the war. It appears that Joe and six others attempted to bring the damaged plane down for 
a river landing 30 miles away after dropping bombs on a Rabaul New Britain Japanese 
air drome. The plane crashed on the river bank, none survived. They are buried in the 
Jefferson Barracks Memorial Cemetery, located on a beautiful site on the high banks of the 
Mississippi River In St. Louis, Missouri. World War I, World War II and Korean War 
soldiers are burled there. 



Joseph lived abundantly, briefly, courageously, 
to make a troubled world safe for those he loved. 



Peacefully he rests from his labors 



Sketch written by Joseph A. Geddes 



WILLIAM HAYES 



B. 27 June 1915 
Bapt. 16 Apr. 1925 
Md. 25 July 1937 

Fattier William Hayes 



Pocatello, Bannock, Idaho 

Pocatello, Bannock, Idaho 

Pocatello, Bannock, Idaho 

Mother Jean Scott 



280 



213 DORAMARJORIE GEDDES 



B. 16 Apr. 1917 
Bapt. 16 Apr. 1925 

Father 35 Joseph Arch Geddes 



Preston, Franklin, Idaho 
Logan, Qjche, Utah 

Mother Grace Wool ley 



CHILDREN 



452 William Geddes Hayes 
481 Joseph Geddes Hayes 



B. 30 Sept. 1938, Logan, Cache, Utah 
Bapt. 1949, Logan, Cache, Utah 

B. 2 Dec, 1942, Logan, Cache, Utah 
Bapt. 1950, Logan, Cache, Utah 



213 DORA MARJORIE GEDDES HAYES 



A Journey Into the Past 



My name is Dora Mar jorie Wool ley Geddes Hayes, born 4-16-17 in Preston, Idaho. 
In case you think the name is long to hong onto an unsuspecting baby, let me assure you 
it wasn't planned that way. My parents took me to church to be blessed with the more 
conventional name of Marjorie Woolley Geddes. My little Welch grandmother came 
along, all dressed up in her best clothes expecting to be honored. Her disappointment, 
when this did not occur, wasdiscernoble to my perceptive parents and immediately afterwards, 
they hastened to make amends by re-blessing meat home. 

At the time I was born, my father, Joseph A. Geddes, was principal of the Oneida 
Academy. My mother, Grace Woolley Geddes, was a non-practicing graduate nurse. I 
came along 19 months after my older brother Joe, younger brother Ezra, was born in Cedar 
City, Utah, on Christmas day, 1919, almost three years later. My two brothers and I 
formed the nucleus of Mother's and Dad's first family. They waited approximately six 
years before adding Grace and Gayle to the family group. 

I must have been about four years old when Dad and Mother decided to go back to 
New York where Dad would work on his Ph.D. at Columbia University. It was quite 
an undertaking for them with three children, but I recall it as a happy experience. We 
children were made a part of it so it was a group undertaking. 



While we were there we lived in an apartment just across the street from a park, 
and I spent many hours playing there. 



Joe 



My lovely young mother arranged that her children saw all of the wonders of New York, 



281 



We visited Grant's Tomb, climbed up the winding stairs in the Statue of Liberty, went 
to the top of the Woolworth building (then, the tallest building in the world). I can 
still recall my awe in seeing people from the top story who looked like ants scurrying 
around. We went to Sunday School on the banks of the Hudson River. I believe it 
was here that a family story came into being. My parents were insisting that Joe wash 
up for church and were concentrating on his dirty hands. His only defense against this 
ignomy was to wail "Don't I always keep them in mypockets!" Mother took us many times 
to New York City's wonderful Zoological Park where she bought us Gacker Jack popcorn. 
It was our favorite because we had the additional anticipation of finding a prize. We 
also enjoyed the occasional peanuts that were scattered throughout the box. We rode 
an escalator and went out to Coney Island. There we took off our shoes and waded in 
the vast Atlantic Ocean. I was afraid to let a wave wash over my feet, but Ezra was 
absolutely fearless. I expected that kind of performance from Joe, but was crushed to be 
outdone by both my brothers. 

I shall never forget the day my mother took me to the Metropolitan Museum of Art. 
She has always loved beautiful things, both in philosophy and the finer arts. The reverence 
in her voice as she showed her small daughter a Rembrandt has had a lasting impression 
on me . 

Time went by. One day my Mother dressed us In our very best clothes. My best 
outfit was a handsmocked, embroidered, fine wool dress that had been made for me with 
loving care by my mother's sister, Leah . With it, she had sent me a petticoat with 
about four inches of tatting on the bottom. I didn't know that a photograph could be 
taken without showing the lace on your petticoat. Joe wore a dark brown knickerbocker 
suit with a matching cap and brown fur-lined gloves . He was an exceptionally handsome 
boy with blond hair and large brown eyes. People were always commenting about his 
good looks. Ezra was dressed In white knit pants and sweater with a matching cap that 
buttoned under his chin. The reason for our dressing up in this festive fashion was that 
we were to meet my father at Grant's Tomb for a most important reason. That morning 
he was taking his orals for his Doctorate and we would learn there If he had passed them. 
I can still see my handsome young father as he walked towards us that day. His shoulders 
were back. He was happy and elated. He looked as if he had conquered the world. He 
had Indeed conquered his world at that time. His showing had placed him in the top four ; 
of the seventeen candidates, which carried with It an invitation to breakfast with the 
Executive Officers. 

My father always talked to us at our level, instead of towering above us. We gathered 
around him, after he had communicated with Mother, and he told us that a very important 
thing had happened that would profoundly affect our lives. I did not fully understand what 
he had accomplished, but I felt a sense of achievement because we were a part of it, • 

My father was offered an instructorship at the University of Pittsburg. He decided agains 
it because he wanted to have his children know open fields and streams and to rear them in 
his own culture. He took an offer at the Brigham Young College at Logan, Utah, We 
children were enthralled with the animal life that was running free and were not In cages. 
We collected pollywogs, toads, field mice, and baby rabbits . We spent hours lugging water f 
to drown out ground squirrels. 



282 



Joe and I began taking piano lessons from Mrs. George W. Thatcher in her lovely 
Georgian-type home. Joe would peddle me on his bike and I would hold the music. 
One of us would read while the other played for Mrs. Thatcher. She had a delightful 
children's library and Joe and I were avid readers. In comparing notes after we were 
more grown up, we admitted a preference for the reading above the music; but it did 
help to set standards for us and to teach us a deep enjoyment of classical music. 

No history of our family would be complete without mentioning our dog, Laddie. 
Laddie was a beautiful thoroughbred Collie. He was out of a national champion and 
was truly a lovely dog. He presumably belonged to Joe, but he was impartial in his 
affection. Mother was not entirely pleased with his acquisition, as she worried about 
us getting worms' eggs from him. She had a theory that was backed up by one of the 
visiting summer professors who lectured at the college, that dogs and cats carried worms' 
eggs in their mouths. As a consequence, we were periodically wormed. This didn't 
lessen our enthusiasm for Laddie. He went everywhere with us and when he was quite 
small we would take turns carrying him across streets so he wouldn't get run over. People 
used to stop us to examine him as there weren't many like him in Logan then. He had a 
broad forehead, long nose, and deep-set diamond-shaped eyes, with a collar and front 
of pure white, the rest of him was sable. He was death on cats and certainly did his part 
to prevent a cat population explosion. We had Laddie 13 years and the only time I ever 
saw my brother Joe cry was the day he died. 

When the B.Y.C. was closed, my father was made Associate Professor of Economics 
and Sociology at U.S.U. Within a few years he became Head of the Department of Sociol- 
ogy and eventually also became Director of the Graduate Division of Social Work. My 
sisters, Grace and Gayle, came along during our years at Logan. They were later year 
children for Mother but have been two of the family's greatest blessings. 

My brother Joe completed two years of college and then went on a mission. While 
he was gone, I met and married my husband, William Scott Hayes. We were married 
July 25, 1937. 

My husband is a graduate forester and is now assistant manager of the Montana Fire 
Rating Bureau. We have two sons, William Geddes Hayes, born 9-30-38, in Logan, Utah 
and Joseph Geddes Hayes, born 12-2-41, also in Logan. During the war years while my 
husband was overseas, I completed my college work and received a degree from U.S.U. I 
am now a Casework Supervisor for the Cascade County Welfare Department at Great Falls, 
Montana. 

I do not believe that even Father, wise as he is, fully realized the ramifications 
of the family achievement that culminated at Grant's Tomb that memorable sunny day. 
Both of his sons followed the course that was chartered there as they went on for their Ph . D . 's 
at Cornell University. My sons in turn, who are the eldest grandchildren, have set their 
feet upon the same path. Bill is at the University of Texas at Austin, working on a 
Doctorate in Clinical Psychology. Joe Is completing a Master's at U.S.U. I was indeed 
fortunate to be blessed with such wonderful parents. 



Sketch written by Dora Marjorie Geddes Hayes 
283 



236 EZRA WOOLLEY GEDDES 



B. 25 Dec. 1919 
Bapt. 18 Dec. 1928 
End. 22 May 1944 
Md. 24 Dec. 1943 

Father 35 Joseph Arch Geddes 



Cedar City, Iron, Utah 

Logan, Cache, Utah 

Mesa Temple, Maricopa, Arizona 

Carlsbad, Eddy, New Mexico 

Mother Grace Wool ley 



Wife CLEONE LYLE HANSEN 



B. 8 Aug. 1923 
Bopt. 5 Sept. 1931 
End. 22 May 1944 
Sid. 22 May 1944 

Father Clarence Joseph Hansen 



Ogden, Weber, Utah 

Ogden, Weber, Utah 

Mesa Temple, Maricopa, Arizona 

Mesa Temple, Maricopa, Arizona 

Mother Lena Barker 



CHILDREN 



581 Alan Karl Geddes 
61 1 David Hansen Geddes 

643 Brian Lynn Geddes 



B.16 Dec. 1949, Ithaca, Tompkins, New York 
B. 27 Nov. 1951, Albuquerque, Albuquerque, 

New Mexico 
B. 6 Aug. 1953, Alburquerque, Albuquerque, 

New Mexico 



236 EZRA WOOLLEY GEDDES 



Ezra Woolley Geddes was born in Cedar City, Utah, December 25, 1919 to Joseph 
Arch Geddes and Grace Woolley. He married Cleone Lyie Hansen on December 24, 1943 
in Carlsbad, New Mexico, Cleone is from North Ogden, Utah, a daughter of Clarence J. 
and Lena Barker Hansen, and holds an A.M. degree from Cornell. Their children are 
Alan Karl, born December 16, 1949 in Ithaca, New York; David Hansen, born September 27, 
1951 in Albuquerque, New Mexico; and Brian Lynn, born August 6, 1953 in Albuquerque, 
New Mexico. The family lives in Santa Monica, California. 

Alan is a Life Scout and is a junior at Santa Monica Senior High School where he plays 
clarinet in the band and considers chemistry and mathematics his most interesting subjects. 
His hobbies are coin and stamp collecting. 

David and Brian are at Lincoln Junior High. David's primary hobby is target shooting. 



284 



Also, he fixes things that don't work. Brian is enthusiastic about tropical fish and amateur 
radio. He finds friends readily and keeps bringing home small trophies for athletic events. 
All three of the boys are interested in swimming and canoeing and are active scouts. 

Ezra's school interests were in learning what he could about people; sociology, psy- 
chology, social psychology, personal and social problems, anthropology and religion, the 
social sciences and social organization. He yearned for knowledge of how the good life 
could be developed. 

After service as a pilot in World War II, he obtained a Ph .D. in Sociology af Cornell 
University in 1950, taught for 8 years, one at the Duluth Branch of the University of 
Minnesota and seven at the University of New Mexico. He then joined the System 
Development Corporation where he has been employed since 1958. His major activities 
at SDC have been to serve as a system training program field representative at the 33rd 
Air Division, Defense in the Air Defense Command; to participate in design of a large 
scale digital computer based command and control system for the Strategic Air Command; 
to conduct a feasibility study and direct early technical development of an identification 
and intelligence system for the State of New York involving a statewide computer supported 
information pool on persons processed by police, courts, probation, correctional institutions 
and parole; and, currently, to participate in development of computer based support for 
satellites launched by the Air Force Satellite Control Facility. 

Spare time is spent with the family and as a sponsor of Synanon. In the latter activity 
he is recording secretary for the Santo Monica Sponsor organization which is developing 
a program of financial and other assistance to the former narcotics addicts andalcholics who 
are rehabilitating themselves in the Synanon organization. 



Sketch written by wife, Cleone Hansen 

Postscript from his father, his mother participating: 

Ezra tends to operate quietly with little friction so that, at times, you are hardly aware 
he is there; seldom raises his voice, which has a friendly tinge, but after a while you become 
conscious of a considerable strength; he Is durable; grows on you If he Is around for any 
length of time; understands things and acts quickly where situations ripen; seldom ever takes 
the most comfortable choir; a pleasant man; a growing force. He was fortunate and highly 
favored to find Cleone Hansen for a wife. 



WILLIAM WALLACE MARSDEN 



B. 27 Jan. 1923 
Bapt. 27 May 1933 
End. 3 July 1947 
Md. 3 July 1947 

Father William Marsden 



Logan, Cache, Utah 
Logan, Cache, Utah 
Logon Temple, Cache, Utah 
Logan Temple, Cache, Utah 



1 



Moth 



285 



er 



Wife 277 GRACE ELIZABETH GEDDES 



B. 11 Nov. 1926 Logan, Cache, Utah 

Bapt. 5 May 1934 Logan, Cache, Utah 

End. 3 July 1947 Logan Temple, Cache, Utah 

Sid. 3 July 1947 Logan Temple, Cache, Utah 

Father 35 Joseph Arch Geddes Mother Grace Woolley 



CHILDREN 



I 



565 William Geddes Marsden B. 19 Oct. 1948, Salt Lake City, Salt Lake, Utah 

Bapt. 3 Nov. 1956, Ogden, Weber, Utah 
609 Blair Geddes Marsden B. 9 Sept. 1951, Ogden, Weber, Utah 



WILLIAM W. MARSDEN 



William W. Marsden received his B.S. degree in civil engineering from Utah State 
University in 1947. He worked in increasing positions of responsibility from trans! tman 
to resident engineer for the Utah State Department of Highv/ays. He is an Eagle Scout 
and has been awarded the highest scouting honor in the Pineview District and In the Lake 
Bonneville Council, the Award of Merit and the Silver Beaver. He is also holder of the 
Scouters' Key and Scouters' Award. He has been working In scouting since the age 
of 12 and has been assistant patrol leader, troop quartermaster, patrol leader, senior patrol 
leader, assistant scoutmaster and scoutmaster of three troops. He has served as activity 
counselor and MIA superintendent. He has been chairman of the scout committee, 
Cubmaster for 5 1/2 years and Webelos Den leader. 



277 GRACE ELIZABETH GEDDES MARSDEN 



Grace received her B.S. degree at Utah State University In 1947. She served as 
president of the Bonneville Elementary School in Ogden, Utah In 1958. She has served 
as the Ogden Council PTA president from 1960 to 1961, was a member of the Youth 
Citizenship Development Board, United Fund Dental Clinic Board, Youth Protection Com 
mittee Board, White House Conference Steering Committee In 1960, Ogden School 
Curriculum Committee member. Probation Officer of the Juvenile Court in 1961, Sunday 
School, Mutual, and Primary teacher. Relief Society literature and theology teacher. 
Relief Society president of the Ogden 51st Ward In 1962-63, Regional Coordinator for 
Utah Committee on Children and Youth, Printer's Devil, Social Worker for the Utah State 
Industrial School . 



286 



I 
I 



565 WILLIAM G. MARSDEN 



William G. Marsden was an Eagle Scout in 1965, YMMIA secretary in 1965, 
Webelos cub scout in 1960, president of the Teachers' quorum in 1964, Duty to God 
recipient in 1965, member of Lake Bonneville Camp staff in 1964-65, member of Student 
National Honor Society 1965-66. 



609 BLAIR GEDDES MARSDEN 



Blair Marsden was an Eagle Scout in 1965, president of the Deacons' quorum in 1965, 
Webelos cub scout in 1963. 



JOHN WILLIAM WORK 



B. 4 Aug. 1925 
Md. 14 Nov. 1946 



Athol, Worchester, Massachusetts 
Logan, Cache, Utah 



Father John Work 



Mother Helen Sullian 



287 Wife GAYLE GEDDES 



B. 17 May 1927 
Bapt. 17 May 1935 



Logan, Cache, Utah 
Logan, Cache, Utah 



Father 35 Joseph Arch Geddes 



Mother Grace Wool ley 



CHILDREN 



543 John Geddes Work 
645 David Geddes Work 



B. 17 July 1947, Logan, Cache, Utah 

B. 1 Sept. 1953, Phoenix, Maricopa, Arizona 



287 



ELMER RAYMOND MERRILL 



B. 12 Aug. 1897 
Chr. 5 Sept. 1897 
Bapt. 13 Aug. 1905 
Md. 4 Sept. 1918 
End. 4 Sept. 1918 

Father Elmer Samuel Merrill 



Mapleton, Oneida, Idaho 
Mapleton, Oneida, Idaho 
Mapleton, Oneida, Idaho 
Logan Temple, Cache, Utah 
Logan Temple, Cache, Utah 

Mother Annie N. Naef 



Wife 76 ELIZABETH VERA GEDDES 



B. 7 Feb. 1898 
Bapt. 7 Feb. 1906 
End. 4 Sept. 1918 
SId. 4 Sept. 1918 

Father 4 Joseph Stewart Geddes 



Preston, Oneida, Idaho 
Preston, Oneida, Idaho 
Logan Temple, Cache, Utah 
Logan Temple, Cache, Utah 

Mother Isabel' Dora Neeley 



CHILDREN 



235 Yvonne Merrill 

245 Raymond Geddes Merrill 



B. 26 Nov. 1919, Preston, Franklin, Idaho 
B. 28 March 1921, Preston, Franklin, Idaho 
D. 31 March 1921, Preston, Franklin, Idaho 



76 ELIZABETH VERA GEDDES MERRILL 



My parents, Joseph S. Geddes and Dora Neeley Geddes, moved to Preston, Idaho, 
from the Ogden Valley in 1897. I was born the next year, 1898, on 7 Feb. Father was 
a school teacher, a farmer, a contractor, and in his spare time wrote life insurance. He 
and my older brother built our rommy, brick house themselves. It had to be large because 
there were so many of us. Mother gave birth to eleven children, and always had an extra 
orphan, or an aunt, uncle, or cousin living with us. Many times Father would bring an 
immigrant, or convert family to stay until a home could be found for them. The fireplace 
and the pianowere the center of our happy home . There was always a year's supply of 
food stored away. Father was President of the Oneida Stake for over twenty years, and 
in all the public life of the community. How on earth Mother managed, I will never cease 
to marvel. He filled a mission, leaving Mother with three small children and one expected. 

In 1917 I graduated from the Oneida Academy, taking part in dramatic and musical 
events. One singing group I belonged to, stayed together many happy years, singing in 
contests, conferences, conventions. Through my music I earned a scholarship to the USAC 



at Logan, and was invited to sing with a summer Chautauqua. I attended school at 
Albion State Normal, a summer school at Chicago Musical College. I taught school at 
Fairview, Idaho, and was secretary and librarian at the Oneida Academy. I have 
attended summer work shops at Utah State at Logan and at the McCune School of Music 
at Salt Lake City. 

Married life began in 1918 when I was married in the Salt Lake Temple to Ray Merrill, 
A year later our daughter, Yvonne, was born. She has been a joy and a blessing to us. 
She graduated from Preston High School and from Utah State College at Logan. She 
taught school several years and was married to Glenn Hawkes in the Logan Temple in 1941 . 
Glenn obtained his Doctorate at Cornell University at Ithaca, New York and at present 
they with their four children live at Ames Iowa, where Glenn is Head of the Child Psychology 
Department. They have a thriving branch of the church there. 

We have had many interesting experiences in church activity. At present my husband 
is President of the High Priests Quorum in the Franklin Stake. I have been a teacher, 
organist, chorister in all the ward organizations. I worked as chorister for ten years on 
the M.I A. Stake Board while the contest work was in full swing. Many wards did fine 
work, but I was glad when the church changed the policy about the first place, so that the 
efforts of all could be appreciated. I worked five years on the Primary Stake Board and 
then I served as ward organist in the Preston First Ward for twenty-five years. i was called 
to the Relief Society Stoke Board in 1932 as organist. Bertha P. Larsen was the President 
with Alice Merrill and Sylvia Jensen as counselors. The work was interesting and stim- 
ulating. We attended all of the Relief Society general conferences af Salt Lake and 
Leadership Week at Provo, Utah, the Family Life Conferences and planned board meetings 
and conventions. Work in the church has helped to keep my testimony strong and vital. 
At present I am acting as organist for the First Ward Singing Mothers which I enjoy very 
much , 

My older brother is presently being retired after teaching school for forty years. 
Dr. Geddes soys that he never plans to stop working. We are grateful for parents who 
taught us that work is a wonderful blessing. 

Three times in my life I hove been in terrific storms. When I was 18, while in Chicago, 
I went on an excursion trip with my brother, his wife and baby. We were on a big boat 
on Lake Michigan when a wind and rain storm gave us a bad time until we were rescued. 
Another time while flying to New York, a violent electric storm almost ended our flight. 
Returning from a visit to Ames, Iowa, to see our family, we missed two twisters which des- 
troyed homes and property, bridges, and highways; these we missed by a very few hours. 
We feel as though we were guided and protected. 



289 



GLEN ROGERS HAWKES 



B. 28 April 1919 
Chr. 5 July 1919 
Bapt. 29 April 1927 
End, Nov. 1938 
Md. 18 Dec. 1941 

Father William Hawkes 



Preston, Franklin, Idaho 
Preston, Franklin, Idaho 
Preston, Franklin, Idaho 
Logan Temple, Cache, Utah 
Logan Temple, Cache, Utah 

Mother Rachel Rogers 



Wife 235 YVONNE MERRILL 



B. 26 Nov. 1919 
Bapt. 26 Nov. 1927 
End. 18 Dec. 1941 
SId. 18 Dec. 1941 

Father Elmer Raymond Merrill 



Preston, Franklin, Idaho 
Preston, Franklin, Idaho 
Logan Temple, Cache, Utah 
Logan Temple, Cache, Utah 

Mother 76 Elizabeth Vera Geddes 



CHILDREN 



502 Kristen Hawkes 

542 William Ray Hawkes 

628 Gregory Hawkes 

883 Laura Hawkes 



B. 5 Sept. 1944, Ft. Lewis, Pierce, Washington 
Bapt. 3 Sept 1952, Ames, Stone, Iowa 
B. 21 May 1947, Preston, Franklin, Idaho 
Bapt. 5 June 1955, Ames, Stone, Iowa 
B. 8 Sept. 1952, Ames, Stone, Iowa 
B. 3 May 1956, Ames, Stone, Iowa 



RANDALL L, NIELSEN 



B. 13 Oct. 1899 
Bapt. 22 Nov. 1907 
End. 28 May 1926 
Md. 28 May 1926 

Father Nephi Heber Nielsen 



Monroe, Sevier, ' 'tah 
Monroe, Sevier, Utah 
Logan Temple, Cache, Utah 
Logan Temple, Cache, Utah 

Mother Zelaine Lisonbee 



Wife 83 JOSIE NEELEY GEDDES 



B. 19 March 1900 
Bapt. 19 March 1908 



Preston, Oneida, Idaho 
Preston, Oneida, Idaho 



290 



End. 28 May 1926 
Sid. 28 May 1926 

Father 4 Joseph Stewart Geddes 



Logan Temple, Cache, Utah 
Logan Temple, Cache, Utah 

Mother Isabella Dora Neeley 



CHILDREN 



286 Blaine Randall Nielsen 
298 Clifford Joseph Nielsen 
313 Bruce Heber Nielsen 



331 Narlynn Nielsen 

343 Lyie Geddes Nielsen 
351 Nancy Pearl Nielsen 



B. 19 May 1927, Monroe, Sevier, Utah 
B. 28 Dec. 1928, Monroe, Sevier, Utah 
B. 18 Nov. 1930, Monroe, Sevier, Utah 
Bapt. 28 Jan. 1939, Monroe, Sevier, Utah 
End. 4 May 1951, Monti Temple, Sanpete, Utah 
B. 17 Feb. 1934, Monroe, Sevier, Utah 
Bapt. 17 Feb. 1942, Monroe, Sevier, Utah 
B. 17 Sept. 1935, Monroe, Sevier, Utah 
B, 2 Apr. 1937, Monroe, Sevier, Utah 



83 JOSIE GEDDES NIELSEN 



I don't like history. I would rather live in the present; it is nicer, but perhaps if 
I start with the present and trail back, the way won't seem quite so distant and far away. 

The present life is fun. Here we are in sunny California in January. Randall is 
enjoying his work at the church. He works in the Mutual and genealogical organizations 
and goes to the Los Angeles Temple frequently. I wish I could but I'm so tied up with 
children and meetings that it is hard to find time. I am on the genealogical committee, 
however, and I always find time for that. I spend the day with 33 California's mamma's 
darlings, so I am pretty tired tonight. These extra curricular activities take a lot too. 
This year I am chairman of the Jr. Red Cross and on the science committee for the Little 
Lake P.T,A. I have the character development too, so I am pretty busy and here I am 
getting up in the night to write a history. There is no time in the daytime and I can't 
sleep anyway, perhaps it is because I am worrying about tomorrow. Just imagine, 66 ten 
and eleven-year-olds, 13 parents and 2 teachers going on a bus to see the stars and the zoo. 
What a combination ! But maybe it too will be fun . We are all going to be happy and 
we are all going to be nice (I hope) or else! 

Yes, I am really enjoying California, but then I did enjoy Logan and college life in 
that tin quonsit hut before I came here. I was afraid to go back to school at the age of 
56 and take classes with young college kids. But I didn't want to die without graduating 
from college, and the world did need more school teachers and I love kids and teaching. 
I knew I could teach school — I used to do it way back when I was young. So after the 
car accident with all my family grown up and scattered, I entered college again . The 
University at Logan was wonderful to me and those G.l's and their wives at the college 
apartments, I'll never forget, nor the Logan Temple where I could do endowments. 



291 



But fhen life has always been wonderful . When I think back on the married years 
of child rearing, I wouldn't trade them for any kind of life. Six children and a husband 
running farms, raising cattle and feeding sheep for a living, spell work and worry and debts 
and joy that can't be measured. We worked in the church together, Randall and I, 
whenever possible: genealogy for 30 years, stake missionaries for 6 years, then he went 
into the Bishopric and I became chairman of the girl's organization, and then president of 
the Primary. How I loved those two organizations. I taught in the Primary in Monroe 
North Ward for fifteen years and almost that long in Sunday School . I was Relief Society 
class leader and block teacher for years. It was easy to work in the church with our family. 
We all went together. Yes, we did do things together, whether it wasriding home In the 
moonlight from a day of picking up spuds, singing at the top of our voices, or when the boys 
milked night and morning, their voices ringing out in song. Qjmlng home from Grand 
Canyon one day, Nancy stopped us right in the middle of "Utah Trails" to exclaim, "Oh, 
I'm happy I was born into this family where we sing and work and go on trips together!" 
One night I'll never forget, coming home from the northwest (we'd been visiting Blaine and 
Peggy) the blizzard was fierce and we were so worm and cozy in the old Buick, but I was 
afraid of the slick highways and strange roads. Narlynn and Lyie started to sing the old 
songs my Mother used to sing to me . I had to join In and soon I had forgotten all fears 
In the joy of "Sweet Clover," "Georgia Brown," "By the Old Mill Stream," and the song 
Father wrote for Mother while he was on a mission in the South, long years before I was 
born, "Those Songs You Used to Sing." I love that song and so do my children. 

It used to be so wonderful and peaceful when they were little and all safely asleep 
in bed. Tonight they are all so scattered. Blaine and Peggy and their boys live in the 
Northwest. They live on a tree farm In Enumclaw, Washington. Narlynn Is living near 
them teaching school in Seattle. Cliff and Doreen and their two children live here In 
Whittler. He Is teaching school In Little Lake District where I am. LyIe and Clela and 
their two children are still living in college apartments at Logan, Utah. He'll get his 
degree this year. Nancy married Gene Moore and Is living in the old red brick home In 
Monroe, Utah, She can put flowers on Bruce's grave and work In the Primary. 

Yes, my married life has been full of joy and sorrow, work and play. It was hard 
to lose Bruce. I'll never get over that, but life goes on. I forgot, I'm going back 
Instead of forward. So the teaching years before I married were fun years, all five of 
them . 

Everyone should have a few carefree years of earning money and spending It as one 
chooses. Bringing my brother, LyIe, and his gang up to see the dog races in Ashton left 
a bright memory In my life. That was the year another school teacher and myself got lost 
In the deep timber of Island Park . A stray dog brought us back after twelve hours of 
wandering among dense pines. 

The year I taught in Banida, Idaho, we puton shows and took them to al I the neighboring 
towns even to Treasureton, about seventeen miles away by bob sled. It was cold, but it 
was fun. The year at Moreland and the year at Monroe were full of beaus and dances and 
dates. At the Halloween party In the haunted house, I first met Randall — the potash-min€ 
dance we gave — the horseback rides to the sheep herd for sourdough bread and mutton ■ 
it was fun. The last year of teaching when my school was termed the model rural school 
of Cache Valley made me very proud. I wish I could climb to that heighth again In teaching 

292 



But I'm old now and competing with the young teachers with their knowledge of art and 
science is much more difficult, I'll have to achieve through character development and 
goodness knows California youth need that. 

But time is wasting; I must go back . The college years at B . Y.C. and B .A.C. and 
summer at Idaho Tech. in Pocatello were full of joyous memories, dates and pranks. The 
Washmobile Band, rocks in the ice-cream freezer and ghosts in the grave-yard stand out 
clearly through the years. College was fun, but high school wasn't. Now I'm getting 
back to the shy little dark-haired girl that could be hurt so easily. Life holds some stern 
experiences, as most of us discover, and I've learned to take them with clear eyes and head 
high, but at the old Oneida, my eyes were clouded and my head low so many times over 
those blessed green caps. 

The Jefferson School and the Old Central — it's still standing and teaching other little 
girls the three "R's" and how to spell Albuquerque. I can still repeat the United States 
capitals if I sing them to the old tune I memorized in the fourth grade. We lived in what 
was known then as the big white house on Oneida Street with the tall poplars and shady 
elms around a beautiful lawn. The cousins used to come to visit Percila, Noran, Allene — 
yes, I have wonderful memories of the early years, going on canyon trips with mother and 
Aunt Myme or going up Cub Canyon to the Wool ley Ranch or Uncle Harvey and the trips 
to Salt Lake to conference. The tabernacle was such an old familiar friend. 

Well, this history must end as all histories begin i . e . with the date on birth . I, 
Josie Geddes, was born on the 10 March 1900 of goodly parents who lived their gospel 
and taught their children to walk in the paths of rightousness, and I honor the names of 
Joseph Geddes and Dora Neeley and am so thankful I was sent to their home to stay — 
(using the words of Dr, Welkes Blood) in one of the best homes, no, the best home in the 
nation. 



286 BLAI NE RANDALL Nl ELSEN 



B. 10 May 1927 
Bapt. 10 May 1935 
End. 25 Sept. 1946 
Md. 25 Sept. 1946 

Father Randall L. Nielsen 



Monroe, Sevier, Utah 

Monroe, Sevier, Utah 

Salt Lake Temple, Salt Lake, Utah 

Salt Lake Temple, Salt Lake, Utah 

Mother 83 Josie Neeley Geddes 



Wife PEGGY DICKSON 



B. 8 Oct. 1925 
Bopt. 6 Jan. 1935 
End. 25 Sept. 1946 
Sid. 25 Sept. 1946 



Aberdeen, Grays Harbor, Washington 
Aberdeen, Grays Harbor, Washington 
Salt Lake Temple, Salt Lake, Utah 
Salt Lake Temple, Salt Lake, Utah 



293 



CHILDREN 



I 



660 Blaine David Nielsen 



686 Randall Dan Nielsen 



B. 8 Mar. 1954, Tacoma, Pierce, Washington 
Bapt. Mar. 1962, Tacoma, Pierce, Washington 
B. 25 May 1956, Tacoma, Pierce, \A'ashington 
Bapt. 25 May 1964, Tacoma, Pierce, Washington 



286 BLAI NE RANDALL NIELSEN 



\ 



Blaine Randall Nielsen was born 10 May 1927 at Monroe, Utah . He was the son of 
Randall L. Nielson and Josie Neeley Geddes . Blaine, being the oldest of six children, 
hod many responsibilities and chores at a very early age. He learned that work well done 
could bring joy and dignity to his young life. 

His father went on on L . D .S . mission when he was only twelve years of age . This 
meant that the management of the farm was up to him; he also, tried to act as the man 
of the family. He with his brothers milked twelve cows night and morning by hand. They 
did not have milkers at that time. They hauled hay every day in the winter and all other 
work was taken core of in winter and summer. 

He nursed the old blue horse through distemper after the veterinarian had given It 
up OS a hopeless cose. In many coses he did not do the study necessary for his school work. 

He has been active In oil of his priesthood quorums -- President of his deacons, his 
teachers, his priest's and elder's quorums. The Bishopric hod just about decided to set 
him opart as one of the Presidents of Seventy when they decided to moke him a High Priest 
and a councilor in the Bishopric . Later he was made a Bishop of the Buckley Ward, 
Tacoma Stake. 

He left the South Sevier High School to join the Navy. He fought In the Korean 
war. While in the Navy stationed at Seattle, he met his wife, Peggy Dickson. When 
he was discharged from the Navy, he and Peggy decided to get married. They were 
married in the Salt Lake Temple on 25 Sept. 1946. They stayed in the city so he could 
attend the University of Utah . But he did not like school . 

He then decided to go to Washington and work for his father-in-law; which he did 
for the next ten years. In 1955 he decided to go into business for himself contracting 
and cutting timber. Then in 1957, he bought an 80 acre farm. He is now running white 
faced cattle on his ranch. He truly loves his ranching and cattle. 

After they hod been married for ten years they became desirous to have a family even 
if they could not hove one of their own . They then adopted a darling boy whom they named 
Blaine David and in two years they adopted^pnother son, Randall Don, whom they call 
"Danny." They are very happy with their little family and ranch . 

Sketch written by his mother, Josie Nielsen 
294 



298 CLIFFORD JOSEPH NIELSEN 



B. 28 Dec. 1928 
Bapt. 24 Mar. 1937 
End. 13 June 1949 
Md. 31 Aug. 1956 
Sid. 31 Aug. 1956 

Father Randall L. Nielsen 



Monroe, Sevier, Utah 

Monroe, Sevier, Utah 

Monti Temple, Sanpete, Utah 

Salt Lake Temple, Salt Lake, Utah 

Salt Lake Temple, Salt Lake, Utah 

Mother 83 Josie Neeley Geddes 



Wife DOREEN COX (Widow) 

B. 18 May 1932 Overton, Clark, Nevada 

Bapt. 2 Nov. 1940 Overton, Clark, Nevada 

End. 31 Aug. 1956 Salt Lake Temple, Salt Lake, Utah 

Her oldest child was sealed to his mother and his adopted father on 31 Aug. 1956 

Father James Lawrence Cox Mother Frances Lynett Huntsman 

CHILDREN 



885 Brad Cox Peterson Nielsen 

886 Jaylene Nielsen 

887 Taunes Nielsen 



B. 2 Sept. 1954, Salt Lake, Utah 
Sid. 31 Aug. 1956, Salt Lake Temple, Salt Lake, Utah 
Bapt. 1 Sept. 1962, Whittler, Los Angeles, California 
B. 19 Mar. 1957, Salt Lake City, Salt Lake, Utah 
Bapt. 27 Mar . 1965, Whittler, Los Angeles, California 
B. 3 Oct. 1958, Whittier, Los Angeles, California 



298 CLIFFORD JOSEPH NIELSEN 



Clifford Joseph Nielsen, the second son of Randall and Josie Geddes Nielsen, was 
born in Monroe, Sevier County, Utah, 28 December, 1928. 

He grew up during the great depression when hard work on a farm was a must; but life 
in Monroe was fun for the lad who loved fishing in the mountain streams or climbing the 
huge mountains that towered over the home and farm. Hunting pheasants with "Irish" his 
pet pointer, was a joy; and there was "school ." 

"Oh, Mommy, school is so wonderful ! Everybody wants to sit by me ! " That was 
his first oral report brought home for his parents to consider. That was an accurate gauge 
for Cliff in his youth and young manhood, whether in Monroe Elementary, South Sevier 
I High School, or at the University of Utah. Clifford loved school and so got the most out 
of it. 



A Latter-day Saint mission to France where he labored two and a half years in Bordeaux 

295 



and La Mogeaues, France was a highlight in his life. 

The two years for Uncle Samwas another experience for growth and development, 
as he was sent to Frankfort, Germany to act as an interpreter for the French language. 

On returning to Utah, he again enrolled at the U. of U. intending to get his Doctorate 
in world history there; but life had other plans for him and a young widow with one son 
changed his outlook on life. Doreen Cox is the daughter of Lawrence James Cox and 
Francis Lynett Huntsman. She was born 18 May 1932 at Overton, Nevada. Clifford 
and Doreen were married in the Salt Lake Temple on the 31 of August 1956. A year 
later found the young family moving to Los Angeles where he has taught school for the 
last few years at Los Altoes High School in Hacienda Heights. He has taken his Master's 
degree at California State in counseling and psychology, and really enjoys counceling 
at the school . 

Cliff and Doreen's young family, Brad, Jaylene, and Taunes, love life in smoggy 
California, but as Cliff says, "They weren't raised in the mountainous valleys of Utah 
and so don't know the real Joys of the great out doors." 



Sketch written by his mother, Josie Nielsen 



ELIJAH BRIMHALL DICKSON 



B. 31 Dec. 1926 
Bapt. 6 Jan. 1934 
End. 25 June 1948 
Md. 11 June 1958 
Sid. 11 June 1958 

Father Owen Hickman Dickson 



Aberdeen, Grays Harbor, Washington 
Aberdeen, Grays Harbor, Washington 
Salt Lake Temple, Salt Lake, Utah 
Los Angeles Temple, Los Angeles, California 
Los Angeles Temple, Los Angeles, California 

Mother Euroca Brimhall 



331 Wife NARLYNN NIELSEN 



B. 17 Feb. 1934 
Bapt. 17 Feb. 1952 
End. 11 Feb. 1958 

Father Randall L. Nielsen 



Monroe, Sevier, Utah 
Monroe, Sevier, Utah 
Los Angeles Temple, Los Angeles, California 

Mother 83 Josie Neeley Geddes 



296 



CHILDREN 



888 Elijah Nielsen Dickson 

889 Benjamin Nielsen Dickson 

890 Joshua Nielsen Dickson 

891 Samuel Nielsen Dickson 



B. 19 Mar. 1959, Tacoma, Pierce, Washington 

B. 25 May 1960, Tacoma, Pierce, Washington 

B. 19 Apr. 1962, Tacoma, Pierce, Washington 

B. 16 Mar. 1964, Tacoma, Pierce, Washington 



331 NARLYNN NIELSON DICKSON 



I was born 17 February 1934 In Monroe, Sevier, Utah, the oldest daughter of Randall 
Nielsen and Josle Neeley Geddes. I was reared to womanhood in a peaceful farming 
community in central Utah where the virtues of thrift and industry were daily practiced and 
the Gospel of Jesus Christ was quietly observed. In such a manner, I have shaped my own 
life and attempted to direct the lives of my children. 

As a young girl, I attended Utah State University and upon completion of my work re- 
ceived a B.S. degree In elementary education. I have devoted the past few years to the 
instruction of the young. I am at present studying at the University of Washington. 

I was married In the Temple at Los Angeles in June of 1958 to Elijah Brimhall Dickson, 
the oldest son of Owen Hickman and Euroca Brimhall Dickson. My husband spent the 
early years of his youth in the logging camps of the vast timberlands of Western Washington. 
In this environment he was trained to operate earth moving equipment and it is thus he 
makes his living. As a youth of thirteen he donned a work helmet and commenced a long 
and useful career as an operating engineer and construction foreman. 

He graduated from Lincoln High in Tacoma where he was active with a swimming team 
and in football . He enlisted In the Marines just prior to the close of World War II, during 
which time he headed a demolition crew. 

We make our home on the inland waters of Puget Sound, and here amid the beauty 
and Intrigue of marine life, our four sons have been born . They are Elijah, Benjamin, 
Joshua, and Samuel . 

We serve quietly In the various auxiliariesof the church . I have worked in the Primary, 
M.I .A. , Sunday School , and as Social Science Instructor on the Puget Sound Stake Board. 
Elijah has been president of the Elders Quorum, active on a stake mission, as a ward clerk, 
and as a member of the Tacoma Stake High Council . 

We were both born of goodly parents and reared In homes abundantly blessed by the 
Powers of Heaven. Our goal In life is to perpetuate this pattern for the everlasting 
benefit of our children. 



297 



343 LYLE GEDDES NIELSEN 



B. 17 Sept. 1935 
Bapt. 17 Sept. 1943 
End. 17 Sept. 1953 
Md. 17 Sept. 1953 

Father Randall L. Nielsen 



Monroe, Sevier, Utah 
Monroe, Sevier, Utah 
Monti Temple, Sanpete, Utah 
Monti Temple, Sanpete, Utah 

Mother 83 Josie Neeley Geddes 



Wife CLELA SAMPSON 



B. 24 May 1935 
Bapt. 5 Sept. 1943 
End. 17 Sept. 1953 
Sid. 17 Sept. 1953 

Father Delos Sampson 



Monroe, Sevier, Utah 
Monroe, Sevier, Utah 
Monti Temple, Sanpete, Utah 
Monti Temple, Sanpete, Utah 

Mother Blanch Christionson 



CHILDREN 



666 Margo Kae Nielsen 

892 Dee Ann Nielsen 

893 Teresso Lynn Nielsen 

894 Robin Nielsen 

895 Lyie Dean Nielsen 



B. 26 July 1054, Richfield, Sevier, Utah 

Bapt. 26 July 1962, Whittier, Los Angeles, Colifcl 

B. 22 May 1958, Logan, Cache, Utah ^| 

B. 19 Apr. 1960, Provo, Utah, Utah 

B. 18 July 1962, Whittier, Los Angeles, Californi'; 

B. 28 Jon. 1965, Whittier, Los Angeles, California 



343 LYLE GEDDES NIELSEN 



LyIe Geddes Nielsen was born 17 Sept. 1935, at Monroe, Utah. He was the son of 
Randall L. Nielsen and Josie Neeley Geddes. The first thing said by his parents, "Well, 
the Lord mustnothove known just what He was doing when he sent us this baby boy. He 
surely should have been a baby girl . " But as usual , our Father In Heaven always knows 
what Is best for us . 

The terrible sickness of his father, Randall L. Nielsen, and the crippling effects of 
arthritis mode his father unable to carry on his form work. The baby boy was now an 
absolute necessity. Young LyIe, as his brother hod done before him, had to take over the 
milking and farm work at a very early age. He too, learned to work hard at everything. 
He became dependable, trustworthy, and reliable In all of his dealings with people and 
things. 

298 



He attended grade school at Monroe, South Sevier High School, Utah State University, 
andB. Y. University at Provo . 

He became an Eagle Scout at the early age of thirteen. He loved school, but he 
loved music best. He worked at it in most of his spare time. His high school and college 
was filled with joy because of glee clubs, choir, and band . 

He served his two years In the United States Army as a paratrouper. His company 
spent part of their time In Alaska . 

He married Clela Sampson in the Monti Temple, 17 Sept. 1953. They spent years 
going to school on the Gl Bill and part time jobs. They made fun out of all the hardships. 
And they enjoyed their school work. 

They are now living in Hacienda Heights, California. He teaches school and loves 
every minute of it. He is also active in the L. D .S. Church . He teaches in Sunday School, 
acts as a home teacher, and sings in the ward choir. 

They have four lovely daughters; Morgo, age 1 1; Dee Ann, 8 years old; Teressa, age 6; 
and Robin, a shy baby of 4; their baby is a husky one-year old baby boy, Lyie Dean . 

Life for this family today is fun, busy and Interesting. TViey love their home in 
smoggy California, yet they have deep and happy memories of Utah, fishing and hunting 
In the mountains around Monroe, Logan, and Provo, of singing in glee clubs and choirs 
for church and school . Yes, life Is good, for this family and their lives are full of love, 
fun, and work . 

Sketch written by mother, Josie Nielsen 



GENE FLOYD MOORE 



B. 1 Mar. 1936 
Bapt. 2 Mar. 1944 
Md. 27 July 1956 
End. 27 July 1956 

Father Floyd Levi Moore 



Antimony, Piute, Utah 
Antimony, Piute, Utah 
Monti Temple, Sanpete, Utah 
Monti Temple Sanpete, Utah 

Mother Grace Hillman 



Wife 351 NANCY PEARL NIELSEN 



B. 2 Apr. 1937 
Bapt. 2 Apr. 1945 
End. 27 July 1956 
Sid. 27 July 1956 

Father Randall L. Nielsen 



Monroe, Sevier, Utah 
Monroe, Sevier, Utah 
Monti Temple, Sanpete, Utah 
Monti Temple, Sanpete, Utah 

Mother 83 Josie Neeley Geddes 

299 



CHILDREN 



896 Jody Lynn Moore B. 1 Jon. 1959, Ogden, Weber, Utah 

897 Gene Bruce Moore B. 1 Feb. 1962, Ogden, Weber, Utah 



351 NANCY PEARL NIELSEN 



Nancy Pearl Nielsen, the last baby of Randall L. Nielsen and Josie Neeley Geddes, 
was born 2 April 1937, in the old red brick home at Monroe, Utah. From her first radiant 
smile, her mother knew that her Nancy was made for love and songs. Even the other member: 
of the family and friends adored her. She has hosts of friends. Everywhere she went, 
sunshine followed her, because says her mother, she made roses out of snow. This song 
seemed to have been written for her alone. Many others have noticed and remarked about 
this rare trait she has possessed to make sunshine and happiness. 

Her mother soys, "I do believe her pony "Smoky" and her Dad's truck, which was 
named "the green monster," were possessed by fairies because they made her girlhood so 
wonderfully interesting and exciting," ■j 

Her memories all seem to be happy ones — home talent shows — Gold and Green Balls — 
high school and college fun, yes, glorious fun. Then, a dark-eyed boy from Marysvale 
found his way into her heart. He became her fairy prince. Her plans changed and she 
begged her Dad to let her go to beauty school In Ogden Instead of finishing her college 
work . It wouldn't take so long to finish, she begged . At last her Dad consented If she 
would promise to finish her beauty course before she married. This she promised and this 
she did. 



They were married in the MantI Temple 25 July 1956. They went to California for 
their honeymoon; Gene got a job and they stayed there one year, but neither of them liked 
it. They then moved to Monroe to help out her folks, but they didn't like this either so 
they moved back to Ogden and have been wildly happy ever since. 

They have a lovely home In the 18th Ward. To them, it is the nicest home, city, 
ward, and stake In the whole world. Her song has now changed to lullabies and "Rock Me 
To Sleep, My Darling," 

They now have two beautiful children; Jody Lynn, seven years, and young Bruce, 
four years. They make life mighty interesting, fun, and busy for their parents. 

They are active in the L.D.S. church — Elders quorum presidency, president of the 
Young Married 's Group, Sunday School stake board. Primary ward work, Sunday School 
ward work . 

Nancy has to keep her beauty parlor open, she says, for fun and to keep up with the 
changes. 

300 



I 



All in all they are leading a full, happy, and normal life, 
and butter things and many of the fancy dress-up thrills. 



They have all the bread 



6 ARCHIBALD STEWART GEDDES 



B. 31 Jan. 1860 
Bapt. 5 June 1868 
End. 3 July 1884 
Md. 5 July 1888 
D. 1 June 1919 
Bur. June 1919 

Father 1 William Geddes 



Plain City, Weber, Utah 
Plain City, Weber, Utah 
Endowment House, Salt Lake, Utah 
Logan Temple, Cache, Utah 
Preston, Franklin, Idaho 
Preston, Franklin, Idaho 

Mother Elizabeth Stewart 



Wife HELEN MARIA REID 



B. 30 Nov. 1868 
Bapt. 5 Aug. 1877 
End. 5 July 1888 
Sid. 5 July 1888 
D . 26 Mar . 1 935 
Bur. 30 Mar. 1935 



Salt Lake City, Salt Lake, Utah 
Salt Lake City, Salt Lake, Utah 
Logan Temple, Cache, Utah 
Logan Temple, Cache, Utah 
La Grande, Union, Oregon 
La Grande, Union, Oregon 



Father Peter Reid 



Mother Diana Davidson 



CHILDREN 



49 Archie Waldo Geddes 
59 Donna Reid Geddes 



66 irma Geddes 
73 Fern Geddes 



85 Helen Mather Geddes 

88 Grant Geddes 

101 Reid Geddes 

116 Margaret Geddes 



B. 17 Apr. 1889, Salt Lake City, Salt Lake, Utah 
B. 17 Apr. 1892, Salt Lake City, Salt Lake, Utah 
Bapt. 2 June 1900, Salt Lake City, Salt Lake, Utah 
D. 12 Nov. 1913, Baker City, Baker, Oregon 
End. 10 Oct. 1914, Salt Lake Temple, Salt Lake, Utc 
B. 31 Jan. 1895, Salt Lake City, Salt Lake, Utah 
B. 4 July 1897, Salt Lake City, Salt Lake, Utah 
Bapt. 4 July 1905, La Grande, Union, Oregon 
End. 19 June 1951, Salt Lake Temple, Salt Lake, Uto 
B. 3 May 1900, Salt Lake City, Snlt Lake, Utah 
D. 6 May 1901, Salt Lake City, Salt Lake, Utah 
B. 16 Feb. 1902, Baker City, Baker, Oregon 
B. 6 Mar. 1905, La Grande, Union, Oregon 
B. 20 June 1908, La Grande, Union, Oregon 



301 



6 ARCHIBALD STEWART GEDDES 



Archibald Stewart Geddes was born In Plain City, Utah, January 31, 1860, and was 
the son of William Geddes and Elizabeth Stewart, early pioneers from Scotland. His 
father had been asked to go to Plain City, Utah, by President Brigham Young to assist 
in colonizing that section of the state. Arch's mother died when he was si* years of age 
and he and his brothers and sister were reared by his father's second wife, who was also 
his mother's sister. The love and devotion she gave to her sister's children was always 
remembered by Father. 

Arch was always a student and loved the scriptures, literature, music and all of the 
fine arts. When he was about sixteen years of age, he went to Salt Lake City to attend 
school and in 1878 he graduated from the University of Deseret, now known as the University 
of Utah. He lived at the home of President Joseph F. Smith for four years and often spoke 
of the happiness and love in their home. 

He taught in the Salt Lake City schools and later was in the clothing business. For 
two years he travelled through Utah and Idaho writing articles for the Salt Lake Tribune. 
He was also active In politics and was County Commissioner for Salt Lake County from 
January 1, 1895 to January 4, 1897. 

On July 5, 1888, Father was married to Helen M. Reid of the Sixteenth Ward of ■ 

Salt Lake City. Helen had a beautiful singing voice and Father was so proud of her and 
always said he had fallen In love with her when he heard her sing "The Lost Chord," when 
she was fifteen. To their union were born eight children; three sons and five daughters — 
Archie Waldo, Donna, Irma, Fern, Helen, Grant, Reid, and Margaret. 

Our family moved from Salt Lake in 1901 to Baker, Oregon, and two years later 
to La Grande, Oregon, where father was in the grocery business with his brother. Grant. 

In 1891 he was called on a special mission in Salt Lake by the First Presidency and 
appointed as a missionary to labor In the Interests of the Young Men's Mutual Improvement 
Association. All of his life he was active In the church and was counselor In the first 
bishopric in La Grande Ward in Union Stake. Later he was called to the stake superlntendem 
of the Sunday School . Father possessed unusual speaking ability and was often called on 
to speak at civic affairs as well as his church activities. He was generous in coaching 
others. Including many speakers in the church and had unlimited patience and understanding. 
Father was blessed with the gift of healing and was frequently called in the middle of the 
night to go to the home of someone seriously ill and people who were in trouble often called 
on him for assistance because of his sympathy and understanding. 

He was vitally Interested In genealogy and with his brothers and sisters helped organize 
the Geddes Family Organization in the early 1900's. 

Father never spoke harshly to any of his children, but treated us as individuals. 
The loss of two daughters, one grown, one in infancy, would have been unendurable had 
it not been for his knowledge and love of the gospel and one of our sweetest memories 
was his pride and love for his beloved wife and companion and his joy In his children. 

302 



His health failed about 1914 and after several serious illnesses, he died on 1 June 
1919, in Preston, Idaho. 



Sketch written by Fern Geddes 



HELEN M GEDDES 



Helen M. Geddes was born 30 Nov . 1868 in Salt Lake City, Utah. She was the 
youngest child and only daughter of Peter and Diana Reid, who were pioneers from Scotland. 

From her earliest years. Mother seemed to show great talent. In the early days of 
the Salt Lake Theatre, she was one of the prominent members of many of the casts and showed 
remarkable dramatic and musical ability. Her voice endeared her to everyone and she 
possessed a radiant personality, and an interest in life and people. 

Her father was quite successful financially and she was given many advantages as a 
girl. However, her father and mother gave her much responsibility, and while still a 
young girl, she managed their home while her mother worked in the temple. She was a 
member of the Tabernacle Choir and was prominent in musical circles in Salt Lake, besides 
being president of the Y. W.M. I .A. in the 16th Ward . 

She married Archibald S. Geddes in 1888 when she was nineteen. In 1901 she and 
Daddy moved to Baker, Oregon and it was here they lost their baby, Helen, who was their 
fifth child. Mother spoke of her often — we children who had never seen her felt she 
was always close. 

In 1930 Mother and Father moved to La Grande, Oregon and here three more children 
were born, completing the family of eight children consisting of three sons — Archie Waldo, 
Grant, and Reid, and five daughters — Donna, Irma, Fern, Helen, and Margaret. Here 
also Daddy and Mother lost Donna. Mother's abiding faith seemed to be all that re- 
conciled her to this loss. 

From 1908 to 1910 she was ward Relief Society president in the La Grand 1st Ward and 
from 191 1 to 1912 she' was stake chorister. From 1912 to 1919 she was Stake Relief Society 
president. 

In March 1919 we moved to Wyoming to be with Daddy. It was here he suffered a 
paralytic stroke. We moved to Preston, Idaho in an effort to regain Daddy's health, but 
he passed away on June 1 , 1919. 

Mother and the children returned to La Grande and she worked for two years in the 
religion class and was second counselor In the stake Y. W.M. I. A. for four years. 

During her lifetime she worked in almost every auxiliary in the church. Her musical 



303 



ability was always in demand and she never refused an assignment or request unless it was 
impossible for her to attend the meeting. She seemed to be blessed with many talents 
and in addition to being an outstanding leader she possessed the art of conversation and 
could talk to everyone and was always interested In helping anyone who had met with mis- 
fortune either spiritually or temporally. 

Her remarkable sense of humor never failed her. She died on 26 March 1935 and her 
patriarchal blessing was fulfilled which promised that her passing would be peaceful; 
she never lost her unusual energy and vivacity. 

Her influence among her children and friends has always been present; her refusal 
to compromise with truth, her joy and zest in living and above all, her consideration 
and sympathy for others, have left an indelible imprint on the lives of those she loved and 
knew . 



I 



Sketch written by Margaret G. Lee 



49 ARCHIE WALDO GEDDES 



B. 17 Apr. 1889 
Chr. 6 June 1889 
Bapt. 5 June 1897 
Md. 15 Apr. 1915 
End. 4 Oct. 1945 
D. 23 Oct. 1947 
Bur. Oct. 1947 



Salt Lake City, Salt Lake, Utah 
Salt Lake City, Salt Lake, Utah 
Salt Lake City, Salt Lake, Utah 
Baker City, Baker, Oregon 
Salt Lake Temple, Salt Lake, Utah 
Salem, Marian, Oregon 
Salem, Marian, Oregon 



Father 6 Archibald Stewart Geddes 



Mother Helen Maria Reld 



Wife LULU ADELE SPEELMAN 



B. 29 Sept. 1889 
Bapt. 6 June 1937 
End. 4 Oct. 1945 
Sid. 4 Oct. 1945 

Father Luther Martin Speelman 



Wingville, Baker, Oregon 
Haines, Baker, Oregon 
Salt Lake Temple, Salt Lake, Utah 
Salt Lake Temple, Salt Lake, Utah 

Mother Kathryn Fosnot 



CHILDREN 

200 Archie Donald Geddes B. 7 Oct. 1915, Magna, Salt Lake, Utah 

221 Helen Kathryn Geddes B. 15 Jan. 1918, Paul, Minidoka, Idaho 

254 David Darwin Geddes B. 17 May 1922, Haines, Baker, Oregon 

He was sealed to parents 26 June 1951, Salt Lake Temple, Salt Lake, Utah 



304 



269 Darlene LaVon Geddes 
292 Gordon Eugene Geddes 



B. 11 July 1924, Haines, Baker, Oregon 
B. 21 Nov. 1927, Haines, Baker, Oregon 
D. 5 Jan 1944, Salem, Marion, Oregon 
Sid. 4 Oct. 1945 



Second Husband — Everett Wesley Walker. Dates not given. 
Wife Lulu Adele Speelman divorced him; no date given. 



49 ARCHIE WALDO GEDDES 



Archie Waldo Geddes was born April 16, 1889, in Salt Lake City, Utah, the first 
child of Helen Reid, and Archibald Stewart Geddes. He possessed a pleasant, loving 
disposition almost from birth. This trait stayed with him throughout his life. He loved 
people, and as a young child, invited every passerby into his home. Waldo, as he was to 
be called, spent his early years in Salt Lake City, 

When Waldo was thirteen years of age his family moved to Baker, Oregon, and from 
there on to La Grande, Oregon. Here, his father was in the grocery business. Waldo 
learned much about this business from his father during these years, as he worked in the 
store in his off -school hours. He loved music and played a bass horn in the La Grande 
High School band (much to the dismay of the neighbors he always said). He was always 
very active in sports of all kinds, and showed exceptional skill and coordination in these 
fields . He was a member of the school athletic teams . He was also a member of the M.I .A. 
basketball team. 

Upon graduation from high school, Waldo enrolled in Oakland Polytechnic School, 
Oakland, California which he attended two years. He was called home suddenly due to 
the serious illness of his sister. Donna, who was just three years younger. His birthday 
wasAprill6th and Donna's was April 17th. These two were very close. Soon after Waldo's 
arrival Donna passed away. She told her family repeatedly that she would wait until 
Waldo got there, which she did. Waldo spoke of his beloved sister. Donna, all his life 

On April 15, 1915, Waldo was married to Lula Adele Speelman of Baker, Oregon. 
Waldo and his new wife moved to Utah soon after their marriage. Here his skill in sports 
stood him in good stead. He was offered a contract to play professional baseball in 
the Salt Lake Copper League. He had developed a very good throwing arm and was a 
top rate pitcher in this league . Waldo received a serious arm injury pitching against the 
Kansas City Red Sox. His pitching defeated this team for the first time in the West. 
However, his arm was never the same afterwards, and he was forced to give up the work 
he loved. He played baseball until the day he died. It seemed to all who watched him 
that he just couldn't play baseball if it weren't for chewing gum. He was never without 
it during a game, and chewed the gum nearly as hard as he played. He was not content 
to be a spectator, but wanted to get into the game. 

From Salt Lake City, Waldo moved his family, which now consisted of his wife, a young 



305 



son, Archie Donald, and an infant daughter Helen Kathryn, to Baker, Oregon. Here 
he was manager of the Safeway Store. His early training from his father helped him into 
this position. While living in Haines, near Baker, three more children were born. They 
were, David Darwin, Darlyn LaVonne, and Gordon Eugene. This completed his family 
of five children. He loved his family very dearly. Christmas mornings the living room 
of our home looked like a department store. Waldo was generous to a fault, always 
giving and expecting nothing in return. He worked very long and hard for his family. 

From Baker he was transferred to La Grande, Oregon, to manage the Safeway Store 
there. Waldo was a gifted artist, and each week he painted something new, and (it 
seemed to us) magnificent on the grocery store windows. People from miles around would 
drive into town purposely to see each new painting. He ranged from cartoon characters 
to very beautiful things, and left his family a small collection of pencil drawings. He was 
never one to blow his own horn, so to speak. He was called on constantly to paint 
scenery for schools, fund raising drives, churches, and other businesses in town. He would 
never take money for this, and even furnished his own materials for his work. Somehow 
he managed to find the time to do this. He had gone to his work by the time we children 
awoke in the mornings, and was not yet home when we went to bed. This left most of 
the upbringing to our Mother. He felt he had to work very hard for his family, and these 
were extremely difficult times. Waldo also served as first counselor In the M. I .A . while 
in La Grande . 

In 1941, Waldo received an offer from Governor Earl Snell, a longtime friend, to 
work as a gosoline tax auditor for the state of Oregon. His health was failing from the 
many years of hard work he had done, so he accepted this chance at an easier occupation. 
This meant moving to the state Capitol of Salem, Oregon. The family moved in July, 1941. 
Donald and Helen, the two eldest had married. This left David, Darlyn, and Gordon at 
home. Waldo loved the city of Salem, as did his family. He soon made many new friends, 
and enjoyed the slower pace of living. Everywhere he went people loved him. He always 
had a friendly smile for young and old alike. The young people especially loved him 
for his quick wit and sense of humor. He sometimes went in for practical jokes such as 
dropping ice cubes down one's back or putting pie tins In the bed. He also enjoyed an 
occasional wrestling match with one of his boys, usually in the middle of the living room. 
But It was always in fun, and these are some of the things we remember best. For the 
first time in his life, Waldo had all the time he wanted to devote to church work. He 
served as first counselor in the M.I. A., then as ward clerk for many years, and was then 
called to serve as first counselor to the bishop of Salem Ward. 

In January, 1944, Gordon Eugene was stricken with cerebral meningitis, which 
took him from his family very suddenly. Of all the children, Gordon was most like his 
father. He was an outstanding athlete, tall and well developed, and his father's hopes 
were centered In him. Waldo never quite recovered from the loss of his youngest son. 
His spirit seemed to be broken . His health steadily declined . On October 23, 1947, 
he suffered a coronary occulusion, and the next day he passed away. His funeral was 
attended by hundreds of people with many standing, and some outside. Among them was 
Governor Snell and Secretary of State, Robert Farrell . Both died In a plane wreck one 
week later . He is stil I spoken of with love and respect by everyone who knew him . One 
man, not a member of the church, said several years later, he would like to be baptized 



306 



a member of our church because he hod never known anyone who was nearer a Saint 
than was Waldo. Often, ten years after his death, people bear their testimonies and tell 
about the pat on the back or the word of encouragement which they received from him, 
and which helped them over a bad spot in their lives. Several credit him with bringing 
them back into the church, others remark on his friendly smile and ever ready helping hand, 



Sketch written by Fern Geddes 



200 ARCHIE DONALD GEDDES 



B. 7 Oct. 1915 
Bapt. 6 Apr. 1924 
Md. 14 Apr. 1939 



Magna, Salt Lake, Utah 
La Grande, Union, Oregon 
Welser, Washington, Idaho 



Father 49 Archie Waldo Geddes 



Mother Lulu Adele Speelman 



1st Wife DOROTHY HARP 
(no information) 



2nd Wife THORABEAN 



B. 12 Jan. 1918 
Bapt. 6 Feb. 1926 



La Grande, Union, Oregon 
La Grande, Union, Oregon 



Father Victor Vern Bean 



Mother Mildred Lindsay 



CHILDREN 



469 Michael Vern Bean Geddes 



B. 24 July 1941, La Grande, Union, Oregon 



DONALD BISHOP SIMMON 



B . 1 925 

Md . 9 Aug . 1 947 



La Grande, Union, Oregon 
La Grande, Union, Oregon 



Fath 



er 



Moth 



er 



307 



Wife 221 HELEN KATHRYN GEDDES 



B. 15 Jan. 1918 
Bapt. 1 May 1927 

Father 49 Archie Waldo Geddes 



Paul, Minidoka, Idaho 
Haines, Baker, Oregon 

Mother Lulu Adele Speelman 



254 DAVID DARWIN GEDDES 



B. 17 May 1922 

Bapt. 21 Dec. 1930 

Md. 17 Apr. 1946 

End. 6 Oct. 1947 

SId. to parents 26 June 1951 

Father 49 Archie Waldo Geddes 



Haines, Baker, Oregon 

Haines, Baker, Oregon 

Salem, Marion, Oregon 

Salt Lake Temple, Salt Lake, Utah 

Salt Lake Temple, Salt Lake, Utah 

Mother Lulu Adele Speelman 



Wife MARISE ALDER WHITWORTH 



B. 8 Jan. 1924 
Bapt. 1932 

End. 6 Oct. 1947 
SId. 6 Oct. 1947 

Father Francis M. Whitworth 



Preston, Franklin, Idaho 

Preston, Franklin, Idaho 

Salt Lake Temple, Salt Lake, Utah 

Salt Lake Temple, Salt Lake, Utah 

Mother Wanda K. Nye 



CHILDREN 



663 Lee Ann Geddes 

SId. to parents 13 June 1955 
747 David Gordon Geddes 

SId. to parents 15 July 1961 



B. 31 May 1954, Salt Lake City, Salt Lake, Utahl 
St. George Temple, Washington, Utah 
B. 18 Oct. 1957, Salt Lake City, Salt Lake, Utol; 
Swiss Temple, Bern, Switzerland 



RAYMOND ALFRED STRAWN 



B. 2 Oct. 1925 
Bapt. 1 Apr. 1950 
Md. 11 Jan. 1946 
End. 20 Nov. 1965 

Father Alfred Lee Strawn 



McLaughlin, Carson, South Dakota 

Salem, Marion, Oregon 

Salem, Marion, Oregon 

Oakland Temple, Alameda, California 

Mother Elma Whittaker 



308 



Wife 269 DARLENE LAVON GEDDES 

B. 11 July 1924 Haines, Baker, Oregon 

Bapt. 7 Aug. 1932 Haines, Baker, Oregon 

End. 20 Nov. 1965 Oakland Temple, Alameda, California 

Sid. 20 Nov. 1965 Oakland Temple, Alameda, California 

Father 49 Archie Waldo Geddes Mother Lulu Adele Speelman 

CHILDREN 

749 Diana Lynn Strawn B. 28 Apr. 1948, Salem, Marion, Oregon 

750 David Ray Strawn B. 3 June 1950, Salem, Marion, Oregon 

751 Kevin Daniel Strawn B. 25 Oct. 1953, Salem, Marion, Oregon 

752 Brian Gregor Strawn B. 8 Nov. 1958, Salem, Marion, Oregon 
Children were sealed to parents 20 Nov. 1965 at Oakland Temple, Alameda, California 



DONNA REID GEDDES 

Donna Reid Geddes, second child of Helen M. Reld and Archibald Stewart Geddes 
was born April 17, 1892, in Salt Lake City, Utah. She was a happy, active child, who 
was very devoted to her family. 

When she was about 7 years old she contracted Scarlet Fever, which was soon followed 
by Inflammatory Rheumatism, or Rheumatic Fever. These two diseases damaged her heart 
extensively and from then on Donna's activities were greatly curtailed and she was not 
able to do anything of a strenuous nature. 

When Donna was about 13 years of age the doctor advised Mother and Father that 
she would have to discontinue her schooling or she would not reach maturity. Father had 
been a teacher and he tutored her at home. She was an excellent student and an avid 
reader. She studied piano, voice, and china painting. She was exceptionally artistic 
and talented and painted many beautiful pieces of china. Some of these were given to 
friends and we have some lovely pieces in the family. 

Donna was never strong after her illness, but she never complained although she missed 
physical activity and the only thing she ever envied anyone was physical strength. 

She spent two summers in Seattle, Washington where the altitude was lower and the 
sea air was beneficial . 

In the fall of 1913 her health started to decline and her energy and strength seemed 
to ebb away. She was soon confined to her bed. 

The bond between Mother and Donna was unusually close, probably because of Donna's 
delicate health and It was a very difficult time for Mother. Mother and Father's constant 

309 



care and medical help were of no avail and Donna passed away on November 12, 1913 
and is buried in the family lot in La Grande, Oregon, next to Mother, 

She was always a vital part of the family — and seemed an integral part of the family 
circle even though she had been taken away from us . 



Sketch written by sister. Fern Geddes 



CLARENCE CARL THIESSEN 



B. 26 Oct. 1882 Lewiston, Nez Perce, Idaho 

Md. 24 Feb. 1919 Lewiston, Nez Perce, Idaho 
Divorced 9 Feb. 1927 

D. 24 Mar. 1948 Lewiston, Nez Perce, Idaho 

Bur. Mar. 1948 Lewiston, Nez Perce, Idaho 

Father John David Christian Thiessen Mother Elizabeth Meistor 



Wife 66 IRMA GEDDES 

B. 31 Jan. 1895 Salt Lake City, Salt Lake, Utah 

Chr. 4 Apr. 1895 Salt Lake City, Salt Lake, Utah 

Bapt. 31 Jan. 1903 Baker City, Baker, Oregon 

End. 19 June 1951 Salt Lake Temple, Salt Lake, Utah 

Father 6 Archibald Stewart Geddes Mother Helen Maria Reid 



CHILDREN 
258 Dale Geddes Thiessen B. 16 Apr. 1923, Burns, Harney, Oregon 

66 IRMA GEDDES 



Irma Geddes was born 31 Jan. 1895 in Salt Lake City, Utah . She was the third 
child and second daughter of Archibald S. and Helen R. Geddes. Most of her life has 
been lived in La Grande, Oregon. 

On 24 Feb .1919 she married Clarence C. Thiessen at Walla Walla, Washington. A 
son was born to this couple 16 Apr. 1923, named Dale Geddes Thiessen. On 9 Feb. 1927 
they were divorced. 

310 



Most of her life's work has been with public utilities. For four years she worked in 
the superintendent's office for the Union Pacific in La Grande, Oregon. For 25 years 
she worked for the Eastern Oregon Light and Power Company and the California Pacific 
Utilities Company in La Grande, Oregon. At the present time and for the past eight 
years, she has been employed at Zimmerman's Furniture and Hardware Store in La Grande 
as the office manager. 

Irma has worked in various organizations of the L . D . S . church . At the present 
time, she is stake secretary of the Union Stake Welfare Committee and has served in this 
capacity for eleven years. She is also stake secretary of the Union Stake Relief Society 
board and has held this position for ten years. 



1855. 



All four of her grandparents joined the church in Scotland and immigrated to Utah by 



Sketch written by Irma Thiessen 



258 DALE GEDDES THIESSEN 



B. 16 Apr. 1923 
Bapt. 3 May 1931 
Md. 18 Feb. 1950 
End. 19 June 1951 



Burns, Harney, Oregon 
La Grande, Union, Oregon 
Portland, Multnomah, Oregon 
Salt Lake Temple, Salt Lake, Utah 



Father Clarence Carl Thiessen 



Mother 66 Irma Geddes 



Wife MARGARET LOUISE RANDALL 



B. 8 May 1927 
Bapt. 24 Aug. 1935 
End. 10 June 1951 
Sid. 10 June 1951 



Houston, Harris, Texas 
Houston, Harris, Texas 
Salt Lake Temple, Salt Lake, Utah 
Salt Lake Temple, Salt Lake, Utah 



Father Leslie Pratt Randall 



Mother Mary Caroline Letham 



CHILDREN 



599 Catherine Mary Thiessen 



616 Vicky Lynn Thiessen 



B. 25 Feb. 1951, Nampa, Ada Idaho 

Sid. to parents 11 June 1951, Salt Lake Temple, 

Salt Lake, Utah 
Bapt. 6 June 1959, Klamath Falls, Klamath Falls, 

Oregon 
B. 12 Feb. 1952, Klamath Falls, Klamath Falls, 

Oregon 



311 



653 Sharron Lee Thiessen 



711 Susan Leslie Thiessen 

712 Nancy Dale Thiessen 

713 Randall Reid Thiessen 

898 Christopher Geddes Thiessen 



B. 4 Nov. 1953, Klamat+i Falls, Klamath Falls, 

Oregon 
Bapt. 4 Nov. 1961, Klamath Foils, Klamath Falls, 

Oregon 
B. 1 July 1955, Klamath Falls, Klamath Falls, 

Oregon 
B. 18 May 1957, Klamath Falls, Klamath Falls, 

Oregon 
B. 3 Aug. 1958, Klamath Falls, Klamath Falls, 

Oregon 
B. 20 June 1963, Klamath Falls, Klamath Falls, 

Oregon 



258 DALE GEDDES THIESSEN 



He was born 16 April 1923 at Burns, Oregon, the only child of Clarence C. Thiessen 
and Irma Geddes Thiessen. He was raised in La Grande, Oregon and attended both 
grade and high school there. In 1942 he enlisted in the Air Force and remained in the 
service for four years. He served in the United States and the European theatre of war. 

He attended college at La Grande, Oregon for two years and then finished his work 
at the University of Oregon where he graduated in 1948 in business administration and 
merchandising. Since graduation he has worked with J. C. Penney Company for five 
years, and is currently with the National Biscuit Company. 

He married Margaret L. Randall on 18 Feb. 1950 and currently lives in Klamath 
Falls, Oregon. They have five daughters and two sons. 

He has served in various capacities in the L.D.S. church. He was recently re- 
leased as superintendent of Klamath Ward Sunday School to accept a call on a stake 
mission where he is now serving. He is also active in the reserve unit of the Air Force 
with the rank of first Lieutenant. 

Sketch written by Irma Thiessen 



73 FERN GEDDES 



I was born July 4, 1897, in Salt Lake City, Utah, and am the fourth child of 
Archibald Stewart Geddes and Helen M. Reid Geddes. 

When I was about three years old we moved to Baker, Oregon, and about two years 
later to La Grande, Oregon, where I spent most of my life until 1940. 



312 



I have worked for the Pacific Telephone Company for thirty-three years, the 
past twenty years in supervisory and executive positions in La Grande, Klamath Falls, 
Salem and Portland, Oregon, where I now live. 

Most of my church activities have been in the Young Women's Mutual Improvement 
Association in Union'Stake, Klamath Falls Branch, Portland Stake and Colonial Heights 
Ward, Portland, Oregon, and one year in Relief Society in the Salem, Oregon Ward- 

At the present time I am the "Reid" family genealogist; my mother's family, whose 
father and mother, Peter Reid and Diana Davidson Reid came from Scotland to Salt Lake City 
October 24, 1855, in the Milo Andrus Company. 

Sketch written by Fern Geddes 



35 HELEN MATHER GEDDES 



Helen Mather Geddes, fifth child of Helem M. Reid and Archibald Stewart Geddes, 
was born May 3, 1900 in Salt Lake City, Utah. Helen was a beautiful baby with wavy 
hiar, violet colored eyes and a sunny disposition. 

Her sweet spirit was taken from us very early in her mortal life. When she was less 
than a year old she contracted Scarlet Fever and only lived a few days. She died May 6, 
1901 in Baker, Oregon. 

Scarlet Fever was a highly contagious disease and our home was quarantined. Uncle 
Grant, Father's brother took the body to Salt Lake City, our former home, for burial . She 
was buried in the City Cemetery in Salt Lake City where she lies by the side of Grandfather 
and Grandmother Reid who died in 1902 and 1903. 



Sketch written by sister. Fern Geddes 



88 GRANT GEDDES 

B. 16 Feb. 1902 Baker, Baker, Oregon 

Bapt. 6 Mar. 1910 Baker, Baker, Oregon 

Md. 17 Mar. 1927 Boise, Ada, Idaho 

End. 14 May 1952 Salt Lake Temple, Salt Lake, Utah 

D. 21 Mar. 1964 San Francisco, San Francisco, California 

Bur. 24 Mar. 1964 Cypress Gardens Cem . , San Francisco, California 

Father 6 Archibald Stewart Geddes Mother Helen Maria Reid 



31^ 



Wife Nona Barbara Jacobson 



B. 24 June 1905 
Bapt. 24 May 1938 
End. 14 May 1952 
Sid. 14 May 1952 

Father Andrew Christian Jacobson 



Nampa, Canyon, Idaho 
Nampa, Canyon, Idaho 
Salt Lake Temple, Salt Lake, Utah 
Salt Lake Temple, Salt Lake, Utah 

Mother Hannah Peterson 



CHILDREN 

316 Jay Reid Geddes B. 10 Aug. 1931, Stillwater, Payne, Oklahoma 

714 Barbara Ann Geddes B. 27 Nov. 1934, Enid, Garfield, Oklahoma 

Children were sealed to parents 15 May 1952, Mesa Temple, Maricopa, Arizona 



316 JAY REID GEDDES 



B. lOAug. 1931 
Bapt. 12 May 1940 
End. 19 Mar. 1954 
Md. 19 Mar. 1954 



Stillwater, Payne, Oklahoma 
Enid, Garfield, Oklahoma 
Mesa Temple, Maricopa, Arizona 
Mesa Temple, Maricopa, Arizona 



Father 88 Grant Geddes 



Mother Nona Barbara Jacobson 



Wife SONDRA ALENE HATCH 



B. 31 Apr. 1934 
Bapt. 6 June 1942 
End. 19 Mar. 1954 
Sid. 19 Mar. 1954 

Father John Robert Hatch 



715 David Grant Geddes 

716 Linda Ann Geddes 

717 Stephan Robert Geddes 



Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California 
Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California 
Mesa Temple, Maricopa, Arizona 
Mesa Temple, Maricopa, Arizona 

Mother Carma Thatcher 



CHILDREN 



B. 19 Dec. 1955, Ventura, Ventura, California 
B. 18 Nov. 1957, San Jose, Santa Clara, Californ 
B. 21 Apr. 1959, San Jose, Santa Clara, Californ! 



2nd Husband DOUGLAS KIRK STEWART 



B. 14 Jan. 1938 
Md. 18 Aug. 1962 



New York City, New York County, New York 
Salt Lake City, Salt Lake, Utah 

314 



Father Oscar M. Stewart 



Mother Ruth S. Puree 1 1 



Wife 714 BARBARA ANN GEDDES 

B. 27 Nov. 1934 Stillwater, Payne, Oklahoma 

Bapt. 29 Nov. 1942 Enid, Garfield, Oklahoma 

Md. (1) 30 Jan, 1960 Joseph James Lawson (died) 



Father 88 Grant Geddes 



Mother Nona Barbara Jacobson 



NO CHILDREN 



101 REID GEDDES 



B. 6 Mar. 1905 
Bapt. 6 Apr. 1913 
Md. 29 Nov. 1939 

Father 6 Archibald Stewart Geddes 



La Grande, Union, Oregon 
La Grande, Union, Oregon 
Bonners Ferry, Boundary, Idaho 

Mother Helen Maria Reid 



Wife ENID MARY SHANKLAND 



B. 13 Nov. 1912 

Father Arthur Croft Shankland 



Cranbrook, British Columbia, Canada 
Mother Anne Hill 



718 Richard Brian Geddes 

719 Linda Jean Geddes 



CHILDREN 



B. 5 Feb. 1941, Cranbrook, British Columbia, Canada 
B. 20 June 1944, Cranbrook, British Columbia, Canada 



101 REID GEDDES 



I was born 6 March 1905, in La Grande, Oregon, the son of Archibald S. Geddes and 
Helen M. Geddes. I attended grade and high schools at La Grande, Oregon and later 
attended the Palmer School of Chiropractic, Davenport, Iowa. I moved to Canada in 1931 
and have resided at Cranbrook, British Columbia since that date. 

On 29 November 1939 I married Enid Mary Shankland. Enid was born 13 November 
1911 at Cranbrook, British Columbia, the daughter of Mr . and Mrs. A. C. Shankland. 

315 



Both of Enid's parents were born in London, England. We have been blessed with two 
children: Richard Brian, born 5 Feb. 1941 in Cranbrook, B.C., and Linda Jean, born 
20 June 1944 in Cranbrook, B.C. 



I confess with a measure of regret that the history books will never record the feats 
or achievements of one Reid Geddes . I was born and reared in the L . D . S . Church . I 
was baptized and later ordained a Deacon, Teacher, and I am not sure, but I think a Priest 
also. After I was 18 my church affiliations deteriorated to nil due to various circumstancesj 
My wife is a member of the United Church of Canada in which she Is active. My children 
have attended her church but have never become members or been confirmed. For many 
years after my coming to Cranbrook, B.C. there was no branch of the Latter-day Saint 
Church here, but of the last ten years, there has been an organized branch and chapel . 

I have tried to justify my existence by being a good citizen and have expended my 
energies in civic betterment. I support wholeheartedly better schools, churches, re- 
creational facilities. I derive enjoyment from civic improvements, residential beautification,t' 
playground, and park facilities. In short, I believe in leaving your community in better 
shape than you find it especially where youth is concerned. 

i 

My interests run to sports for the youth. Chamber of Commerce activities. I have been 
president of our local Gyro Club, also Lieutenant Governor of District Gyro Clubs. For 
the past eight years I have been president of the Golf Club which we built by volunteer 
endeavor. I was chairman of this project at the time of inception until completion. At 
the present time we are concentrating all our efforts as a Gyro Club in the building of a 
five acre park and playground for our expanding city. Again there is where my interests 
are. During the last war, I was not in uniform but worked on many projects toward ultimate 
victory on the home front, such as War Bond drives, food and clothing drives. Salvation 
Army drives, etc. I would say that I am an average citizen trying to pull my share of the 
load rather than have someone else do it for me. I am proud of the city I coll my home and 
make every effort possible to Improve living conditions where and when the opportunity 
presents itself. 

Sketch written by Reid Geddes 



JOHN ARTHUR LEE 



B. 14 Dec. 1913 
Bopt. 3 July 1949 
Md. 14 Feb. 1942 
End. 3 Oct. 1951 

Father Harold Arneson Lee 



Portland, Multnomah, Oregon 
Salem, Marion, Oregon 
Portland, Multnomah, Oregon 
Salt Lake Temple, Salt Lake, Utah 



Moth 



er Marthea Johansen 



Wife 166 MARGARET GEDDES 



B. 20 June 1908 
Chr. 28 June 1908 



La Grande, Union, Oregon 
La Grande, Union, Oregon 

316 



Bapt. 16 July 1916 
End. 3 Oct. 1951 
Sid. 3 Oct. 1951 

Father 6 Archibald Stewart Geddes 



La Grande, Union, Oregon 

Salt Lake Temple, Salt Lake, Utah 

Salt Lake Temple, Salt Lake, Utah 

/Vbther Helen Maria Reid 



CHILDREN 



720 Karen Lee 



721 Janice Oiristine Lee 



722 David Reid Lee 



B. 12 Sept. 1944, La G^ande, Union, Oregon 
Sid. to parents 3 Oct. 1951 at Salt Lake Temple 

Salt Lake, Utah 
B. 8 July 1949, Salem, Marion, Oregon 
Bapt. 4 Aug. 1957, Salem, Marion, Oregon 
Sid . to parents 3 Oct. 1951 , Salt Lake Temple 

Salt Lake, Utah 
B. 13 Nov. 1952, Salem, Marion, Oregon 
Bapt. 5 Dec. 1960, Salem, Marion, Oregon 



116 MARGARET GEDDES LEE 

I was born on June 20, 1908, in La Grande, Oregon, and was the youngest 
of eight children of Archibald S. Geddes and Helen M. Geddes. 

I lived in La Grande for approximately thirty years and was a stenographer 
and comptometer operator prior to my marriage on February 14, 1942, to J. Arthur 
Lee of Portland, Oregon. 

My husband was not a member of the church, but was baptized on July 3, 1949, 
and has been very active. He has completed one stake mission and at the present time 
is on his second mission and is District President. 

I spent one year in Texas where my husband was stationed during World War II. 
I returned to La Grande for the duration of the war and then moved to Salem with my 
husband after his discharge from the Army and have lived in Salem since January, 
1947. 

We have three children, a daughter Karen, who is 13, a daughter, Janice, who 
is 8, and a son, David, who is 5. 

I worked on the Stake Sunday School board in La Grande and have worked In 
the Salem Ward Mutual and Relief Society and at the present time I am President of 
the Salem Ward Primary. 

Sketch written by Margaret Geddes Lee 



317 



JAMES MICHAEL DOSDALL 



B. 26 Apr. 1945 
Bapt. 26 Mar. 1965 
Md. 26 Dec. 1964 

Father Michael Walter Dosdall 



Red Wing, Goodhue, Minnesota 
Salem, Marion, Oregon 
Salem, Marion, Oregon 

Mother Agnes Terressa Oppek 



Wife 720 KAREN LEE 



B. 12 Sept. 1944 
Bapt. 3 Oct. 1952 

Father John Arthur Lee 



La Grande, Union, Oregon 
La Grande, Union, Oregon 

Mother 116 Margaret Geddes 



720 KAREN LEE 

Karen Lee is the daughter of J. Arthur Lee and Margaret Geddes Lee and was 
born on September 12, 1944, in La Grande, Oregon. 

Karen is an eighth grade student in Parrish Junior High in Salem, Oregon. 
She is very active in church and school and has studied piono for 7 years. 

Sketch written by Margaret Geddes Lee 



721 JANICE CHRISTINE LEE 

Janice Christine Lee is the daughter of J. Arthur Lee and Margaret Geddes Lee. 
She was born July 8, 1949, in Salem, Oregon. 

Janice is in the third grade and participates in both church and school activities 
and is in her second year of piano. 

Sketch written by Margaret Geddes Lee 



722 DAVID REID LEE 

David Reid Lee Is the son of J. Arthur Lee and Margaret Geddes Lee. He was 
born November 13, 1952, at Salem, Oregon. David will enter the first grade next 
fall. 

Sketch written by Margaret Geddes Lee 



318 



GEORGE HENRY CARVER 



B. II Nov. 1854 
Bapt. Aug. 1865 
Md. 24 Nov. 1881 
End. 12 June 1879 
D. June 1922 
Bur. June 1922 



Kaysville, Davis, Utah 
Kaysville, Davis, Utah 
Endowment House, Salt Lake, Utah 
Endowment House, Salt Lake, Utah 
Preston, Franklin, Idaho 
Preston, Franklin, Idaho 



Father John Carver 



Mother Mary Ann Fames 



Wife 8 ELIZABETH GEDDES 



B. 8 Aug. 1862 
Bapt. 15 Sept. 1870 
End. 24 Nov. 1881 
Sealed 24 Nov. 1881 

Father I William Geddes 



Plain Gty, Weber, Utah 
Plain City, Weber, Utah 
Endowment House, Salt Lake, Utah 
Endowment House, Salt Lake, Utah 

Mother Elizabeth Stewart 



NO CHILDREN 



GEORGE HENRY CARVER 

George Henry Carver was born II Nov. 1854, in Kaysville, Utah. In 1859 his 
family moved to Plain City, Weber, Utah. The father and eleven other men laid out 
the town of Plain City, Utah. Times were very hard and the children never really knew 
what It was to have enough to eat. One fall the father came in and told the mother 
to give the children all the bread and sorgham they could eat, as he had enough wheat 
for another year's use with plenty for the next year's crops. 

In his boyhood he assisted his father in working on the farm and in building new 
homes in and around Plain City. He did not have many advantages In gaining an education 
because of the scarcity of books and schools. He once made the statement: " I was 
desirous of learning; I would study at almost every opportunity . " 

When he was 18 years of age, his father sent him to the Ogden Seminary where he 
stayed for one year. Then he taught school for three terms In Plain City. In the 
summer he would farm and work in the canyons. 

He received o call to go on a mission to the Southern States Mission, 17 June 
1879. He left Ogden by train In company with other missionaries. He was assigned to 
labor in the Tennessee branch Opposition against the Mormons was very strong; one 



319 



of the missionaries In the Georgia Branch was murdered by a mob. The missionaries 
traveled mostly by foot; they would go many miles to see one convert. In their 
travels they came upon one old lady who had been baptised In 1843. She had tried to 
live the Gospel but she couldn't read so she didn't know much about the church. They 
taught her many of the gospel principles and how to be a real Mormon. 

Most of their meetings were held in the homes but they liked to hold them In 
the school houses. At one place they asked for permission to use the school house and 
the man said he was not going to allow the devils to enter the school house. 

George baptised his first convert, 30 Oct. 1879. He had been gone nearly a year 
before he was offered his first ride In a wagon. He often found It difficult to find 
a place to stay at night. One time, he built a shelter from fence posts. At another 
time he and his companion received a note signed "Block Hawk Men," it told him to 
leave the vicinity at once . He was also arres ted for using a church house to hold a 
meeting. Everywhere ministers advised the people not to listen to the missionaries, as 
they were only out to steal horses and women. 

He and his companion were sent to open up a new district. They found, however, 
that a preacher had been there before them. This preacher had prepared the people 
for baptism but said he did not have the authority to baptise them, but that some 
missionaries would come who would have the authority. This made their work easy and 
ver y fruitful . 

Later In his travels he met a preacher who preached the same doctrine as our 
missionaries, but he never baptised his converts. George wrote to Pres. John Taylor to 
find out who the man could be. Pres. Taylor said that the man was one of the three 
Nephltes who was to carry the gospel until the return of Onrlst, George and Hyrum 
Belnap, his companion, met this man on a number of occasions. He was a medium- 
sized man and wore a brown suit. He even slept with them on a number of occasions. 
One night after they had retired, George awoke to find the man hurriedly dressing; he said 
that a mob was coming for him and he would have to leave. Soon the mob arrived and 
searched the house but they could not find any trace of the mysterious stranger. At 
another time while George and his companion, Hyrum Belnap, were sitting on a log in 
the woods studying and praying, this stranger came up to them. He sat down and talked to 
them for a long time and then said he must be on his way. They looked around to say 
goodbye, but he had vanished. 

The last of Dec. 1880, George received word that he had been released. Upon 
his return from his mission to Plain City, he taught school for three years. He worked 
on his father's farm during the summer and on Saturdays. 

He married Elizabeth Geddes In the Endowment House at Salt Lake City, Utah, 
24 Nov. 1881 . They were not blessed with children, but they sort of adopted all of 
their relatives — both Carver's and Geddes 's. A/fany of them were able to attend school 
because of the help given by George and Elizabath. Then they took Elizabeth's brothers' 
child to rear as their own offer the death of the child's father. Edna Geddes Eames 



320 



received all the love and affection any child could ask for by her adopted parents, 
George Carver and Elizabeth Geddes. 

George and his brother opened a merchandising establishment at Plain City about 
1883 till about 1889. In the fall of 1889 he went to Oregon to become the superintendent 
of the Oregon Lumber Co. He remained in Oregon until the fall of 1896. He was then 
called on another mission to the Northwestern States. He labored in Montana for his entire 
two years. 

Previous to going on this last mission, he had purchased a large farm in Preston, 
Idaho. It was one and one half miles northwest of Main Street. He therefore, 
returned to his farm in Preston when his mission was completed 

He became Preston's deputy assessor, the first year he was in Preston. In 1900 
he was elected county surveyor. He became chairman of the school board and acted 
in this capacity for many years. He laid the cornerstone for the Jefferson School 
building. He was also a director of the Preston, Riverdale and Minkcreek Canal 
for many years. 

During this time he was also an active church member, acting in many capacities. 
He first served as High Councilman for the Oneida Stake, then when Preston was divided 
into several wards, he was asked to be the first bishop of the third Ward, in which 
capacity he served for fifteen years. The new ward had few experienced people and 
many of the stake people felt sorry for the new Third Ward membership. Bishop Carver 
said, "Give us a few years and we will officer the stake for you." Bishop Carver's 
interest and work was with the young people of the ward. His love and help gave 
many a young person a start in life. 

After fifteen years work as bishop, George was again made a High Councilman 
of the Oneida Stake, which position he held at the time of his death. 

George belived so strongly in education he sent about 14 people to high school 
and several of them he sent through college. All his life he was an advocate of culture 
and refinement. He never was known to swear at anything; he was a stii ct observer of 
the Word of Wisdom and a strict tithe payer. In June of 1922 he met with an accident 
while hauling lumber. He received a skull fracture and died three days later. 

Sketch by Edna Geddes Eames 



8 ELIZABETH GEDDES 

Elizabeth Geddes Carver, daughter of William Geddes and Elizabeth Stewart 
was born 8 Aug, 1862 in Plain City, Utah.. Elizabeth 's mother died at the age of 
thirty-few, when Elizabeth was ^^^T-^fe^r" yeat^s of age; the mother left five children 
the oldest child was only six years old. William Geddes' second wife, a sister of Elizabeth, 
reared and mothered the children as if they had been her own. 



321 



The pioneer families had many hardships, especially while their father, William, 
spent seven years as a missionary in Europe and Australia. He traveled around the 
world twice going to and from his missionary work, 

Elizabeth received her education in the district school of Plain Gty. Many 
weeks during the coldest weather, Elizabeth was unable to attend school because she 
hod no shoes. To keep their large white kitchen floor spotless, tfie girls scoured 
the floor with sand when they scrubbed. Elizabeth could iron her six brothers' white 
shirts so beautifully that they wanted no one else to ir.on them. She had to sometimes 
gather the sage-brush as well as cut it to make a fire to heat the flat-irons. 

Elizabeth married George H. Carver Nov. 1881. She and her husband taught 
school in Huntsville and Eden for several years during the winter months. They 
owned a merchandizing establishment in Plain City and there they built their first 
home, of stone, which still stands. 

She and her husband moved to Oregon where Mr. Carver became the superintendent 
of the Oregon Lumber Co. and also the manager of the company store. Elizabeth did rrxjst 
of the work in the store . Whenever the L .D, S., missionaries or the Oregon company men 
came to that part of Oregon, they always made their home with the Carvers. They 
lived in Oregon for eight years and then moved to Preston, Idaho, where they had 
previously bought land one and a half miles northwest of Preston. 

Mr. Carver had done missionary work while in Oregon; now he was called to 
Montana to finish his mission. While he was on the mission three nephews lived with 
Elizabeth. They helped her to run the farm while she boarded them and helped them 
to attend the Oneida Stake Academy. 

Elizabeth took Edna Geddes, the daughter of her brother, William Geddes, to rear 
at the time of his death. Later she and George adopted her. They reared her as If she 
were their own child. 

Elizabeth Carver was president of the Oneida Stake Primary for many years; she 
made all of her visits by horse and buggy. She was first counselor in theThird Ward 
Relief Society for many years; she was also counselor in the Mutual for the Third 
Ward. At different times in her life she acted as a class leader In almost all of 
the different organizations of the church. 

Elizabeth Carver never had any children of her own, but she spent her life helping 
other people's children. She and her husband helped about twelve young people to 
attend school and helped several go to college. She provided several of her nieces 
with clothes and furnished them with a trousseau when they were married. She went 
without things for herself to buy a pretty hat, dress, or coat for a young girl . She 
would say, "It doesn't matter to me, but to a young girl something pretty and attractive 
means so much In their life/' 



322 



I 



Her husband was Bishop of the Preston Third Ward for fifteen years and during 
that time, it was not an uncommon sight to see Mrs Carver travelling in her one horse 
buggy from one place to another. Her buggy was loaded with bedding, clothes, butter, 
fruit, meat, milk, or flour. This was taken to the place it was needed most. She 
would often stay and assist in the home, taking care of those that were ill and doing 
things for the children. If a mother was seriously III, she would often bring the 
small children home with her. She would care for them, often buying them warm, new 
clothes. She would keep them until the mother was well enough to take care of thf 
again. 



lem 



At one time one of Elizabeth's brothers became seriously ill; as they were without 
funds, Elizabeth sent for the family and they lived with the Carvers for several months 
until the brother's death . In helping people her policy was " Never let your right hand 
know what your left hand doeth." 

Elizabeth had poor health most of her life; she had a number of serious operations. 
In her later life she was in a runaway. The buggy tipped over and she received a broken 
back and was bedfast for many months. She died on the 19 Sept. 1926 of a heart attack. 

Her life was one of service; she had a keen mind, was well Informed and she was 
a great reader. She was also an excellent cook. After the death of her husband, she 
took a room In Logan where she spent several days a week working at the temple. She 
did this as long as her heal th permitted . 



10 JEDEDIAH MORGAN GRANT GEDDES 



B. 10 July 1866 
Bapt. 1 July 1875 
End. 6 Dec. 1893 
Md. 6 Dec. 1893 
D. 27 Nov. 1910 
Bur. 30 Nov. 1910 



Plain City, Weber, Utah 

Plain City, Weber, Utah 

Salt Lake Temple, Salt Lake, Utah 

Salt Lake Temple, Salt Lake, Utah 

Baker City, Baker, Oregon 

Logan, Cache, Utah 



Father 1 William Geddes 



Mother Elizabeth Stewart 



Wife MARTHA ANN STODDARD 



B. 6 May 1874 
Bapt. 1 June 1882 
End. 6 Dec. 1893 
Sealed 6 Dec. 1893 



Wellsville, Cache, Utah 
Wellsville, Cache, Utah 
Salt Lake Temple, Salt Lake, Utah 
Salt Lake Temple, Salt Lake, Utah 



Father John Stoddard 



Mother Sarah Gated 



323 



CHILDREN 



67 Grant Howard Geddes 

II Leslie Stoddard Geddes 
86 Elmer Stoddard Geddes 
90 Merrill Stoddard Geddes 
103 William Stoddard Geddes 

III Fred Stoddard Geddes 



B. 12 May 1895, Baker City, Baker, Oregon 
B. 13 May 1898, Baker City, Baker, Oregon 
B. 29 Aug. 1900, Baker City, Baker, Oregon 
B. II Aug. 1902, Baker City, Baker, Oregon 
B. 6 June 1905, Baker City, Baker, Oregon 
B. 16 July 1907, Baker City, Baker, Oregon 
Bapt. 4 Mar. 1916, Baker Gty, Baker, Oregon 
D. 2 Aug. 1950, Baker City, Baker, Oregon 
( Did not marry) 



10 JEDEDIAH MORGAN GRANT GEDDES 

Grant, as he was always called, was the baby that his mother, Elizabeth Stewart, 
left for her sister to rear. He was loved with all the heart Martha had to give. At 
one time Annie Sutherland, who was the same age as Grant, told her mother that she 
wished she didn't have a mother; then maybe she could get some of the attention and 
good things that Grant always enjoyed. 

He was never known to make a disturbance or to be unpleasant. I remember 
hearing one of my uncles soy that he could leave him for hours at a time and he would 
never cry, or make a fuss. One day all the children and their parents were weeding 
a field of grain and they left Grant in the wagon all afternoon. He made no noise 
or trouble all through those many hours. When the family got back to the wagon, 
Grant had taken everything out of his father's coat pockets. He hod torn up all the 
papers into little pieces , Among the things torn was a ten dollar bill the family had 
planned to use for tickets to a circus. His father didn't say a word to the child, but 
began to pick up all the little greenpieces that belonged to the bill . Then, his wife, 
Martha, proceded to paste the pieces together on a thin piece of paper and the 
family were able to attend the circus on the patched bill . 

As Grant grew older, he spent most of his time reading, playing the organ, or 
helping his step-mother care for the sick. Martha taught him to love the good in 
people as she did . He didn't see them as old, lazy, selfish, but as children of God 
to be loved and understood and helped. 

He was, also, like his own mother Elizabeth, very deeply religious and very easily 
influenced by the spirit of God. Many times he would feel that certain people needed 
help. When he answered this feeling he would find that his help had come as an 
answer to a prayer. An example of this occured one night while his brother Hugh 
Geddes was on a mission in New Zealand; he felt impressed go to Aunt Teen for 
she needed help very bad I y . He got out of bed and hurried to her home. When he got 
there he found that her children were very sick with scarlet fover. Aunt Teen had been 
praying to her Heavenly Father to send her help. Grant administered to the children 



324 



and helped her take care of them that night. Stella says that she remembers her mother 
telling her how miraculously they had been healed during the night. He often helped 
people in this way, even when he was just a young boy. 

To Grant, everything in life was good and beautiful . He failed to see the seamy 
side of life, for he was always looking for the best and somehow the best in people and 
things were invariably brought to the surface. 

He loved little children and he could amuse or play any game as well or better 
than any child . I remember hearing Aunt Martha say that he was always as bad as the 
kids at Christmas time. He hated to wait when he had found something that one of his 
boys really wanted. The Christmas before his death he had been on a business trip 
to Salt Lake City, and on his return, he had found a large teddy bear; just what his 
baby boy hod been asking Santa Clous to bring him. He had been so excited about it 
that he had wanted to give it to the boy at once, but his wife said no; for if they gave 
it to him at once, then he wouldn't have anything to give him on Christmas. She 
said that she had always been sorry, because Grant died before Christmas arrived. 

He was very good in business and through his management, the lumber business 
in Baker City, Oregon had become very successful . He was considered very wealthy 
at the time of his death. People tell me that he was a natural born executive. His 
business administration was very skilled and highly successful . 

He married Martha Ann Stoddard, 6 Dec. 1893 in the temple at Salt Lake City, 
Utah. They were very happy during their married life. They were blessed with six 
healthy, stalwart sons: Grant Howard Geddes, Leslie Stoddard Geddes, Elmer Stoddard 
Geddes, Merrill Stoddard Geddes, William Stoddard Geddes, and Fred Stoddard Geddes. 
Oh, how he loved his boys! 

According to the Baker Ward records, the family was very active in the church 
and attended all of their church activities. Grant held many positions i n the church 
both at Plain City, Utah and in Baker City, Oregon. He was always willing to do 
whatever he was asked by those in authority over him. 

His Aunt Annie Higham says that she had a dream about William Geddes. In the 
dream. Brother Geddes (as she called him) was very sad as he walked by a beautiful 
wheat field. She asked him why he was so sad and he said that his wheat field was 
already to harvest and it represented his ancestors. They were ready and willing to 
join the church but he could not get to his boys. And they were not doing anything 
about genealogy and temple work. He, then, told her that she was the only one he 
could get through to and he surely wished she would tell his sons about his ancestors 
and how much he wanted them to do the work for him. She promised him that she 
would tell the first Geddes boy she saw. 

A few days later Grant was in Salt Lake City and called on her, for he said that 
he was sure she had wanted him to come. She told him how she had promised his father 
that she would deliver his message. She told him about her dream and he told her that 
he would get busy on the work, as he was financially fixed so that he could do the work . 



325 



Then, he told her that he had been called on a foreign mission and that maybe he 
could do the two things at the same time. Before he could do either of them, however, 
he died very suddenly of a heart attack while sitting down to the breakfast table . 
He died the morning after he returned from Salt Lake City. He died the 27 Nov. 1910 
at his home in Baker Gty, Oregon. 

Grant attended to all the little things in life that try men's souls by trying 
hard each day to overcome life's small irritations. By overcoming the small things, 
he grew in stature until when the big things came along, he was prepared to look after 
them He was not one to linger undecided, or shiver about the results, or procrastinate 
until later. He had learned early in life, that most things are "a cinch," if only he 
could take the first plunge . Thus by doing all of these little things, he was prepared 
for success in the big things when they came his way. 

I believe that he truly subscribed to the basic creed of Mormonism: To know and 
live up to all the standards and ideals of Jesus Christ as set forth by his modern day 
Prophet, Joseph Smith; to work for the building up of God's Kingdom on earth; to 
work hard for the community you live in by helping to bu lid up the people, schools, 
and church; to maintain a united effort and approach to all things and at all times; 
to never allow favoritism to obstruct justice or righteousness; to have all acts be in 
consonance with the ideals of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints; to love 
one's God and neighbors as one's own self; to remember that the glory of God Is 
intell igence. 

Sketch written by Martha Geddes 



67 GRANT HOWARD GEDDES 



B. 12 May 1895 
Chr. 21 July 1895 
Bapt. 12 May 1903 
Md. 29 Aug. 1929 
D. 18 Apr. 1945 



Baker Gty, Baker, Oregon 
Baker Gty, Baker, Oregon 
Baker City, Baker, Oregon 
Youngstown, Mahoning, Ohio 
Veteran's Hospital, Youngstown, Mahoning, 
Ohio 



Father 10 Jedediah /Vbrgan Grant Geddes Mother Martha Ann Stoddard 



Wife FRANCES MARIAN FARLEY 
B. 31 Dec. 1900 OIney, Richland, Illinois 

Father Edward Weir Fapley /Vbther Gertrude Bowrel 1 






CHILDREN 



311 John Fapley Geddes 
341 Edward Fapley Geddes 



B. 28 Sept. 1930, Rio De Janerio, Brazil 
B. 24 Aug. 1935, Rio De Janerio, Brazil 



326 



77 LESLIE STODDARD GEDDES 



B. 13 May 1898 
Bapt 13 Jan. 1906 
Md. 7 Aug 1926 
D 16 Oct. 1943 
Bur 19 Oct 1943 



Baker City, Baker, Oregon 
Baker Gty, Baker, Oregon 
Baker City, Baker, Oregon 
Rock Island, Rock Island, Illinois 
Rock Island, Rock Island, Illinois 



Father 10 Jedediah Morgan Grant Geddes Mother Martha Ann Stoddard 



Wife VERA J ADAIR 



B. 30 April 1897 

Father Beverly R. Adair 



Illinois 

Mother Velma Roberts 



B. 29 Aug 1900 
Bapt. 29 Aug. 1908 
Md= 4 April 1919 
End 26 Feb 1920 



NO CHILDREN AS FAR AS ANY ONE KNOWS 



86 ELMER STODDARD GEDDES 



Baker Gty, Baker, Oregon 
Baker City, Baker, Oregon 
Logan, Cache, Utah 
Logan Temple, Cache, Utah 



Father 10 Jedediah Morgan Grant Geddes Mother Martha Ann Stoddard 



Wife LUNA JOCELYN THOMAS 



B. 26 Apr, 1902 
Bapt 26 April 1910 
End. 26 Feb. 1920 
Sealed 26 Feb. 1920 

Father David Hyrum Thomas 



Logan, Cache, Utah 
Logan, Cache, Utah 
Logan Temple, Cache, Utah 
Logan Temple, Cache, Utah 

Mother Kathryn Thatcher 



255 Kathryn Joyce Geddes 



CHILDREN 



B. 20 June 1922, Logan, Cache, Utah 
Bapt. 7 June 1931, Logan, Cache, Utah 
Md. 27 Oct. 1943 to Harry C. Crowder 



327 



273 David Grant Geddes 



290 Martha Patricia Geddes 



308Thomas Stoddard Geddes 



B. 8 Feb. 1925, Logan, Cache, Utah 
Bapt. 6 Sept. 1934, Logan, Cache, Utah 
Md. 23 April 1948 to Margaret Sheppard 
B. 12 Sept. 1927, Burley, Cassia, Idaho 
Bopt, 6 Sept. 1936, Boise, Ada, Idaho 
Md. 1 Feb. 1946 to Elmer Everet Thatcher 
B. 25 June 1930, Boise, Ada, Idaho 
Bapt. 5 Nov. 1939, Boise, Ada, Idaho 
Md . II Aug. 1951 to Nona Sanders 



B. II Aug^ 1902 
Bapt, 4 Sept. 1910 
Md. 18 Sept. 1923 



90 MERRILL STODDARD GEDDES 



Baker Gty, Baker, Oregon 
Baker Gty, Baker, Oregon 
Baker Gty, Baker, Oregon 



Father 10 Jedediah Morgan Grant Geddes Mother Martha Ann Stoddard 



Wife THERERA BLANCH DEARDORFF 



B, 7 Nov. 1903 
Bapt. II Aug. 1910 



Praire Gty, Grant, Oregon 
Proire Gty, Grant, Oregon 



Father Robert Lyman Deardorff 



A/tother Mercy Matilda Axe 



CHILDREN 



263 Mary Blanche Geddes 



B. 26 April 1924, Bates, Oregon 

Bapt. 8 Nov. 1938, Botes, Oregon 

h/d . 14 Oct. 1950 to John Henry Jaring 



103 WILLIAM STODDARD GEDDES 



B. 6 June 1905 
Bapt. 5 Oct. 1910 
Md. 29 Aug. 1929 



Baker Gty, Baker, Oregon 
Baker City, Baker, Oregon 
Preston, Franklin, Idaho 



Father 10 Jerediah Morgan Grant Geddes Mother Martha Ann Stoddard 



Wife EVA JOHNSON 



B. 2 Oct. 1907 
Bapt. 3 Oct. 1915 



Preston, Franklin, Idaho 
Preston Franklin, Idaho 



328 



Father John Johnson 



Mother Eveline Matilda Jensen 



CHILDREN 



339 June Arlene Geddes 
353 Sharon Lynn Geddes 
392 Lynn Geddes 



B . 30 May 1935, San Jose, Santa Clara, Cal . 
Bapt, 31 July 1943, Palo Alto, San Mafeo, Cal 
B. 9 May 1937, San Jose, Santa Clara, Cal. 
Bapt. 6 July 1946, Palo Alto, San Mateo, Cal . 
B. 3 Oct. 1945, Palo Alto, San Mateo, Cal. 
Bapt. 5 Dec. 1953, Palo Alto, San Mateo, Cal 



329 



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340 



WILLIAM GEDDES 



B. 14 Nov. 1832 
Bapt. 17 Nov 1847 
Emig. 12 Mar. 1854 
Md. & Sid. 10 July 1856 

End, 21 Mar. 1856 
Arrived 2 Oct. 1854 
D 24 Aug. 1899 
Bur. 27 Aug 1899 

Father *Hugh Geddes 



Newtown Hamilton, KeadyPar., Armagh Ireland 

Baillieston, Lanarkshire, Scotland 

Glasgow, Lanarkshire, Scotland to America 

P .O . by Brigham Young, Sal t Lake City, Salt Lake, 

Utah 
Endowment House, Salt Lake, Utah 
Salt Lake Gty, Salt Lake, Utah 
Plain City, Weber, Utah 
Gty Gem, Plain City, Weber, Utah 

Mother *Agnes Graham 



Other (I) 3 June 1855 Elizabeth Stewart ( Sid. 21 Mar 1856 E. H), 
Wives (3) 21 Feb. 1870 Emma Eliza Hope ( Sid. 24 June 1865 E.H). 



(2) * MARTHA STEWART 



B. 10 May 1838 
Bapt. 23 Mar. 1851 
Emig. 12 Mar. 1854 
Arrived 2 Oct. 1854 
Md & Sid. 10 July 1856 
End. 13 Mar. 1857 
D. II Aug. 1900 
Bur. 14 Aug. 1900 

Father *Archibald Stewart 



Netsale, Renfrewshire, Scotland 
Glasgow, Lanarkshire, Scotland 
Glasgow, Lanarkshire, Scotland 
Salt Lake Gty, Salt Lake, Utah 
P O Salt Lake City, Salt Lake, Utah 
Endowment House, Salt Lake, Utah 
Plain City, Weber, Utah 
City Cem., Plain City, Weber, Utah 

Mother * Esther Lyie 



CHILDREN 



3 Agnes Stewart Geddes 



5 Hugh Stewart Geddes 



B. II Aug. 1857, Salt Lake Gty, Salt Lake, Utah 
Bapt. 17 Apr. 1865, Plain City, Weber, Utah 
Md. & Sid. 8 Jan. 1880, Endowment House, Salt 

Lake, Utah 
End. 8 Jan. 1880, Endowment House, SaltLake, 

Utah 
Md . to Augustus Peterson 
D. 12 Sept. 1851, Preston, Franklin, Idaho 
Bur. Sept. 1851, City Cem, Preston, Franklin, 

Idaho 
B. 25 July 1859, Plain City, Weber, Utah 
Bapt 30 Aug. 1868, Plain City, Weber, Utah 
Md. & Sid. 18 July 1883, Endowment House, 

Salt Lake, Utah 



341 



7 Mary Geddes 



9 Annie Geddes 



II John Stewart Geddes 



14 Margaret Geddes 



15 James Stewart Geddes 



Md 



End 



18 George Albert Geddes 



Md . to (I) Martena Peterson 

(2) 5 Dec 1928 Catherine Strong (Sid. 5 Dec. I82£ 

Salt Lake, Utah 
End. 12 July 1883, Endowment House, Salt Lake 

Utah 
D. 24 Aug. 1934, Preston, Franklin, Idaho 
Bur. Aug. 1934, City Cem., Preston, Franklin 

Idaho 
B. 18 Sept. 1861, Plain City, Weber, Utah 
Bapt. 15 Sept, 1870, Plain City, Weber, Utah 
Md. Sid 18 Sept. 1879, Endowment House, 

Salt Lake, Utah 
To James Madison Thomas 
End. 18 Sept 1879, Endowment House, Salt Lake 

Utah 
D. 8 Feb. 1917, Plain City, Weber, Utah 
B. 20 Sept. 1865, Plain City, Weber, Utah 
Bapt. 2 July 1875, Plain Gty, Weber, Utah 
SM. & Sid 29 Apr. 1884, Logan Temple, Cache 

Utah 

to Thomas Grieve Sutherland a convert 

from Scotland . 

. 29 Apr. 1885, Logan Temple, Cache, Utah 
B. 18 Feb. 1867, Plain City, Weber, Utah 
D. 25 Feb. 1867, Plain City, Weber, Utah 
B. 9 Feb. 1863, Plain City, Weber, Utah 
D. 9 Feb. 1868, Plain Gty, Weber, Utah 
B. 9 Jan. 1871, Plain Gty, Weber, Utah 
Bapt. 24 Aug. 1879, Plain City, Weber, Utah 
Md. & Sid, 29 Jan 1902, Logan Temple, Cache 

Utah 
Md . to Alfred William Stephens 
End. 29 Jan l9Ui, Logan Temple, Cache, Utah 
D. 15 June 19-t/, Preston, Franklin, Idaho 
Bur. June 1949, Gty Cem., Preston, Franklin 

Idaho 
B. 18 May 1873, Plain Gty, Weber, Utah 
Bapt. 7 July 1881, Plain Gty, Weber, Utah 
End. 29 Sept. 1897, Salt Lake Temple, Salt 

Lake, Utah 
Md. and Sid. 4 Apr. 1900, Salt Lake Temple, 

Salt Lake, Utah 
D. 14 Nov. 1921, Worland, Washkie, Wyoming 
Bur. 19 Nov. 1921, City Cem., Preston, Franklin 

Idaho 
Md . to Dorothea Olive Nielson 
B. 14 Aug, 1876, Plain City, Weber, Utah 
D. 13 June 1877, Plain City, Weber, Utah 



342 



y 



SOURCES OF INFORMATION & EXPLANATIONS 

1. C^py of William Geddes's diary in poss . of Martha Geddes, 67 East 2nd South 

Preston, Idaho. 

2. Fam. records of Margaret Stephens now in poss. of Alene Aller at 136 Nbrth 1st 

East, Preston, Idaho 

3. Fam. records of Allene Sutherland 

4. Fam. records of Martha Geddes, 67 East 2nd South, Preston, Idaho. 

5. Baillieston Branch L.D.S. Oiurch record Lanarkshire, Scotland 1840-1854 (GScall 

no . 14516 F . Scot. 17 pt. I .) (The Stirlingshire's L .D. S. Qiurch record has 
Glasgow, Eastwood, Oldmonkland, etc.) 

6. Baillieston parochial registers Lanarkshire, Scotland (GS cal no. 14516 F. Scot. 17 

pt. 4 &6) 

7. Plain City Ward Records—early to 1848 (GS call no Utah II pt. I & 2 now 6457 pt. 

I &2,) 
8= Baker Ward records.early to 1948 (GS call no F. Baker, Oregon B . pts 1 . & 2 now 
5025 B pts I & 2.) 

9. Early LDS Mission records were searched at the Historian's library. 

10. Andrew Jensen, church historian's private files and records were examined. 

11. Index to sealings Salt Lake Temple (Nauvoo sealings 1846-1856 recorded) (GS call 

no 25163 pt. 3 p. 14 for William Geddes). 

12. Sealings for Salt Lake Temple ( GS call no 25164 pt. 4 p 14) 

13. Logan Temple Archives search . 

14. 1854 Church emigration book searched at Historian library. 

15. Parochiol registers of Cathcart, Renfrew, Scot. Chr. 1701 -185 4-mds 1890-1854- 

Bur 1820-1854 (GScall no 14505 F. Scot. 6 pt 111) 

16. Parochial Registers Eastwood, Renfrew Scot, shr . 1674-1854, mds. 1693-1854 

(GScall no 14505 F Scot. 6 pts 113-114) Town Old Monkland, Renfrew, Scotland. 

17. The Desert News: I854-Aug3l, Sept. 28, Oct. 5, Oct. 26. 

18. Mill. Star vol. 14 pp's 187, 281, 297, 366, 441, & 477; vol. 35, p. 729; vol. 36 

p. 43. 

19. Desert News: 16 Feb. 1866, 24 July 1868, 18 Nov. 1873, 24 Apr. 1874, 23 Mar. 1880, 

27 Nov. 1886, 2 Dec. 1886, also. Desert News vol. 24, p. 173. 

20. I asked the general authorities if one could be sealed before he had taken out his 

endowments and they said, "Yes", it was in the early days before the temples 
were completed. There were many problems in those days to consider. It was 
a common practice and was as binding upon the parties concerned as if it had 
been in the temple. Another reason that necessitated the use of the President's 
Office instead of the Endowment House was the practice of polygamy. Some 
officers and people were fighting this law of the LDS Church and tried to use 
the temple records as proof in the courts. By using the P. O. , they could not 
link up the parties and use the records in court. 
21 . William Geddes listed his birth place as Baillieston, Lanark, Scotland in the Glasgow 
Branch record on the Endowment House record, the Plain City Ward record. 
Emigration Book of 1854, the Logan Temple record, the Missionary record, and 
also, in his diary, but I read the 1841 Census of Baillieston, also 1851 & 1861 and 



343 



he had been listed on the 1841 & 1851 as having been born in Ireland . Nothing 
had been found in Irish research by Jennie M. Stewart an Irish researcher; Miss 
Horlacker the Irish researcher for the G.S. and Bryon Leese, a European Genea- 
logical specialist and a graduate of the London University. In the Spring of 
1865, I found a new LDS Branch record of Stirlingshire, Renfrewshire, Lanark- 
shire and etc. In the Baillieston Section I found a record of William and John 
which indicated that they had been in Newtown Hamilton, Keyte Par., Armagh, 
Ireland. The minister of this place has been contacted . He reported that his 
records did not go back because all of their early records had been destroyed. 
It has not helped our research problem, but we are glad that we have found 
the exact place of his birth. 



AUGUSTUS PETERSON 



B. 8 July 1848 
Bapt. I860 

End. 8 Jan. 1880 
Md. 8 Jan. 1880 
D . 5 Dec . 1 936 
Bur. 1936 



Copenhagen, Zealand, Denmark 

Copenhagen, Zealand, Denmark 

End. House, Salt Lake City, Salt Lake, Utah 

End. House, Salt Lake City, Salt Lake, Utah 

California 

Preston, Franklin, Idaho 



Father Hans Peterson 



MDther Annie Mar tena Anderson 



3 AGNES STEWART GEDDES 



B. II Aug. 1857 
Bapt. 22 April 1865 
End. 8 Jan. 1880 
Sealed 8 Jan. 1880 
D. 12 Sept. 1922 
Bur. Sept. 1922 



Salt Lake Gty, Salt Lake, Utah 

Plain City, Weber, Utah 

End. House, Salt Lake City, Salt Lake, Utah 

End. House, Salt Lake City, Salt Lake, Utah 

Preston, Franklin, Idaho 

Preston, Franklin, Idaho 



Father I William Geddes 



Mother Martha Stewart 



CHILDREN 



26 Augustus Peterson 
28 Joseph Hans Peterson 



32 Elmer George Peterson 
36 Preston Geddes Peterson 

40 Delia Ruth Peterson 

41 Ray Howard Peterson 



B. and D. 1880, Plain City, Weber, Utah 
B. 9 May 1881, Plain City, Weber, Utah 
Bapt. 9 May 1888, Plain City, Weber, Utah 
End. 21 Nov. 1900, Plain City, Weber, Utah 
B. 26 Aug 1882, Plain Gty, Weber, Utah 
B. 2 Dec. 1884, Preston, Oneida, Idaho 
B. about 1886, Preston, Oneida, Idaho 
D. when she was 7 years old . 
B about 1888, Preston, Oneida, Idaho 



344 



53 Hugh Carroll Peterson 



61 Edith Elizabeth Peterson 



B. about 1890, Preston, Oneida, Idaho 

Bapt. work done 21 Sept. 1940 

End. 8 Oct. I 940. 

B. 27 June 1895, Preston, Oneida, Idaho 



3 AGNES GEDDES PETERSON 

Agnes Geddes Peterson, wife of Augustus G. Peterson, was born in Salt Lake, 
Utah. She was the mother of eight children: Augustus ( who died in early youth), 
Joseph H. ( who died in Pocatello), Elmer G. Peterson, Logan, Utah; Preston G. 
Peterson ( who died in Provo), Delia Ruth Peterson ( who died in Pocatello at the age 
of seven years), Ray H. Peterson, Salt Lake, Utah; Hugh C. Peterson ( who died in 
the state of Washington), Edith P. Woodruff, Washington, D.C. Thus three of her 
children are still alive. 

Augustus G. Peterson, Agnes and their family of two boys, Joseph and Elmer, 
(Augustus had died in Plain City, Utah) moved from Plain City, where the three children 
were born, to Preston, Idaho, in the middle 80's (about 1886 as I remember), and they 
settled on the sand hills about two miles west of Preston. 

Later the family moved to Pocatello, Idaho, where they operated a dairy just 
across the Portneuf in Pocatello. From there they moved on about 1896 to Baker Gty, 
Oregon. There they lived until about 1906, when the parents moved to Logan, Utah. 
The three older boys in the meantime had gone to college. Joseph was graduated from 
Columbia Law School, the George Washington University in Washington, D.C. after 
his return from an L.D.S. Mission. Elmer, Preston, Ray Hugh and Edith attended Utah 
State Agricultural College at Logan; Elmer and Preston both graduated. 

From Logan, Utah, the parents moved to Preston, Idaho, about 1907, where they 
remained until Mother's death on 12 Sept. 1922. Father later died in California, where 
he was living with his daughter, Edith . 

Throughout this varied experience Mother demonstrated great capacity as a leader. 
Father likewise was constantly seeking to advance the interests of the family and 
contributed much not only to the excellent heredity expressed in the children, but 
also in the grace and gentlemanly quality which innately characterized his life. 

It is difficult to write about AAother without becoming very enthusiastic because 
of her great qualities of character, an intelligence of high order, and stamina and 
perserverance in times of hard trial, which only later the children came to realize was 
nothing short of monumental . I have often said that I know of no one among all the 
beautiful characters whom I have known or of whom I have read who was greater in 
that combination of heart, mind, and spirit than Agnes Geddes Peterson. Her life 
was a complete and high dedication to the great principles she espoused and which she 
represented practically in her wonderful struggle against adversity. 



345 



Probably her greatest contribution, aside from the virile inheritable qualities 
of mind and heart, our mother made to her children was In her imparting to them and 
Implanting It into their very beings, a sense of their worthiness. We of the family 
never felt the sting of poverty, although our earlier days were modest in the extreme . 
Mother somehow, by a magic only great mothers possess, made us feel that we were 
Intrinsically of excellent quality and that, as she once said to her little brood in 
the depth, as I remember, of the depression In the late 90's, when the future seemed 
dork and hopeless. If we all kept clean, worked hard and maintained our faith in 
God we would be unconquerable. That was the faith Implanted in us; it was as 
real in our lives as the very arms and hands of our bodies. 

Thus the measure of hardship which we experienced (as it was experienced by 
almost all except a very few In those early pioneering days) was to us not hardship at 
all; it was high adventure on the road to achievement. We would not change it, any 
of us I believe, for any other environment of childhood. It came from a fine Father 
and a wonderful Mother, who, we so often now regret, did not live to enjoy much of 
the material blessings of life. Mother's sacrifice was thus almost complete in its 
dedication to her family; and I may say this same spirit made her a blessed friend to 
many neighbors who leaned heavily on her advice and her other help. 

Her satisfactions in seeing some of her hopes and dreams realized in her children, 
was likely a greater compensation than anything by way of material comfort and blessing 
that could come to her. At least her grateful children, as they think over the good 
history of their childhood comfort themselves In this reflection. In reflecting with deep 
regret that they were able to do so little. 

Of such women is our culture and our civilization made -- not the famous only 
or those who live in the midst of public acclaim, but the humble, the strong, and the 
spiritually excellent, the unsung mothers who gave their all that their children might 
live to reap the fruits of their toll and suffering. 

God must have a high place In his kingdom for such. 

Sketch by E. G. Peterson 

22 ELMER GEORGE PETERSON 



B. 26 Aug. 1882 
Bapt. 6 June 1897 
End. 3 Sept. 1913 
Md. 3 Sept. 1913 
D. 16 May 1958 
Bur. 20 May 1958 

Father Augustus Peterson 



Plain City, Weber, Utah 
Preston, Franklin, Idaho 
Logan Temple, Cache, Utah 
Logan Temple, Cache, Utah 
Salt Lake City, Salt Lake, Utah 
Logan, Cache, Utah 

Mother 3 Aqnes Geddes 



346 



Wife PHEBE ALMIRANEBEKER 

B. 3 June 1890 Laketown, Rich, Utah 

Bapt. 4 Sept. 1898 Laketown, Rich, Utah 

End. 3 Sept. 1913 Logan Temple, Cache, Utah 

Sealed 3 Sept. 1913 Logan Temple, Cache, Utah 

Father Hyrum Nebeker Mother Phebe Almira Hulme 



CHILDREN 

*20l Phebe Marian Peterson B. 17 Nov. 1915, Logan, Cache, Utah 

238 Elmer George Peterson B. 29 Feb. 1920, Logan, Cache, Utah 

260 Martha Almira Peterson B. 29 April 1923, Logan, Cache, Utah 

303 Chase Nebeker Peterson B. 27 Dec. 1929, Logan, Cache, Utah 



COLORFUL CAREER AT UTAH STATE aOSES FOR 
PRESIDENT EMERITUS ELMER G. PETERSON 

The flag on the tower of Old Main was lowered to half mast when news came 
of the passing of our beloved Aggie and great leader of Utah State, Dr. Elmer George 
Peterson who died in a Salt Lake City hospital on Friday, /V\ay 16, 1958, following 
heart surgery. He was 75 years of age. 

Dr. Peterson was born in Plain City, Utah, August 26, 1882, a son of Agustas 
and Agnes Geddes Peterson, who represented pioneer Utah families. He grew up on 
forms in Utah and Idaho, and come to Utah State University as a student in 1900. 
He was married to Phebe Nebeker of Laketown September 3, 1913, in the Salt Lake 
L .D ,S. Temple . She survives, along with two daughters and two sons: Mrs . 
Madison {Marian Thomas, Salt Lake City; Mrs. Nad ( Martha) Peterson, Washington, 
D.C. ; Elmer George Jr., Logan, and Dr. Chase Peterson, Boston; nine grandchildren, 
a brother and a sister, Ray H. Peterson, Salt Lake City, and Mrs, Edith Woodruff, 
Sierra Madre, California. 

Funeral services for Dr. Peterson were conducted in the Logan llth Word on 
May 19, 1958, with Bishop Reed Bullen officiating. Burial was in the family plot in 
the Logan City Cemetery. The following tribute was read on behalf of the Alumni 
Association: 

Everyone concerned with the education of youth and the improvement and welfare 
of Utah State University and mankind in general must view the passing of Dr. E. G. 
Peterson with sadness. The membership of the Alumni Association of Utah State University 
feels the loss of this great man with special keenness because of the many contributions 



347 



which he made to the progress of the Association and to our Alma AAater. Therefore, 
we extend our deepest sympathy to Mrs. Peterson and the family. We also express 
solemn gratitude to God for the benefactions which he made for aiding man's physical, 
mental and spiritual progress. 

We are proud to recall that he first came to Utah State University in 1900 as 
a student. He became a student leader and later professor, extension director, and in 
1916, at 34 years of age, was selected as the sixth president of Utah State. From his 
unpretentious but dignified office, which characterized this noble executive, he directed 
the destiny of one of the major Land-grant institutions in the West for some 29 years. 
With honor and distinction he watched our Alma Mater grow as an institution of higher 
learning from its adolescence into adulthood. 

He served Utah State with a firm conviction that it had a g'eat future being 
located in this great, typical American area, which he considered the most typically 
American area In the United States — an area where American ideals are preserved and 
nurtured, human freedom fostered and human dignity maintained. 

He fused educational ideals with great and noble religious fundamentals. He 
believed that religious ideals of thought, personal cleanliness, and regard for moral 
and spiritual ideals were a definite part of Christian civilization. 

In his great plan of Institutional service he took educational opportunities Into 
the fields and forests, out onto the range. Into the dairy barn, the nursery, the kitchen, 
into business and engineering enterprise and Into the industrial shop. He considered 
the application of science and art to rural life and to human industry the fundamental 
upon which our institution Is founded. 

He believed firmly in the role of the student and his importance . Many are 
the times when he made it possible for young men and women to progress when the way 
seemed blocked . 

With wise, firm and yet loving leadership he brought strength to Utah State. 
By broadening the curriculum and raising tfie standards of research and teaching, he 
brought into the institution its full heritage as one of the great Land-g-ant universities 
of America . 

The thousands of students who had the opportunity to know President "E. G." 
are deeply grateful for the many contributions which this great and good man has given 
to our Alma Mater, the State, the Nation and the world. Through his wise and sympathetic 
teaching, his humble spirit, his friendly and courteous nature, his power as an administrator, 
and his Inspirational leadership of men and women, young and old, he has exerted a many- 
sided Influence which will never die. 

WESLEY D. SOULIER 
President, Utah State University Alumni 
Association 



f 



348 



ACCOMPLISHMENTS AND AFFILIATIONS: 

He graduated from Utah State in 1904 and enrolled as a graduate student at the 
University of Chicago in 1906 and received his master degree at Cornell University in 
1909 and his doctorate at the same institution tv/o years later. 

He was awarded the honorary LLD. degree by USU in 1945 and at the time of 
his death was chairman of the board of the Utah Scientific Research Foundation, an 
organization which he helped to establish on the USU campus and which is devoted to 
scientific research . 

From 1940 to 1944 he was a member of the executive committee of the American 
Association of Land-grant Colleges and Universities; was a member of the national council, 
Boy Scouts of America; The American Genetic Association; Academy of Political and 
Social Science; Farm Economic Association; fellow of the Geographical Society; The 
National Agricultural Society; The National Economic League; The National Economic 
Council; Utah Academy of Arts, Sciences and Letters, Mercomen Society; The International 
Farm Congress; The World Agricultural Society. 

He was a charter member and former president of the Logan Rotary Club and had 
been active in support of most civic betterment in Cache Valley and Utah for the past 
half century, and has been an ardent supporter of the Alumni Association, and was 
currently president of the Golden Anniversary Chapter. 

Among the monuments to this splendid man is the Elmer George Peterson Ag"icultural 
Science Building at Utah State, dedicated in 1956. He will be long remembered as a 
personable and capable worker on behalf of better things for his native state. 



TRIBUTE TO DR. E„ G, PETERSON 

It was peculiarly appropriate that Dr. E. G. Peterson, a man whose heart 
and mind were cast in the same mold as Abraham Lincoln's, guided the destiny of the 
College for 29 years of phenomenal growth and expansion. A great Land Grant College, 
founded by the Great Commoner. 

I am reminded that Lincoln as a young man attempted to speak at the funeral 
service of a friend but his emotions overcame him and he sat down, unable to utter 
a word. At this moment I feel that same thing should happen to me now. Death has 
laid his finger on the lips of a man who shaped my own career, under whose direction 
and counsel I taught for 29 rich years; a man whom I have respected and loved for 
half a century. This is an hour of sorrow, but memories of E. G. 's nobility and service 
to mankind make tears give way to gratitude. Hear these lines from "Thanatopsis": 

"So live that when thy summons comes to join The innumerable 
caravan that moves to that mysterious realm, where each shall 
take his chamber in the silent halls of death. 



349 



Thou go not, life the quarry-slave at night. Scourged to his 
dungeon, but sustained and soothed By an unfaltering trust, 
approach thy grave Like one who wraps the drapery of his 
couch About him, and lies down to pleasant dreams. " 

Anyone who can do that, and E. G. has done it gloriously, is indeed the 
Happy Warrior. His is the laurel wreath of victory; victory, mind you, not over on 
opposing army but victory over life inself and victory over death that conquers life. 
Thus we say with the Apostle Paul: 

" Oh death, where is thy sting, O grave, where is thy victory? " 

Just what was the heart of E. G. 's power? There was once a Greek philosopher 
who sought a rrxDtto for his library which he prized above everything else. He chose 
two Greek words which translated into English read: 

"The Healing Place of the Soul ." 

Without knowing more about him we know that he was a wise man. 

When E.G. was President of the College he sought a motto for the library, 
one that would express the real meaning and mission of books. He chose the Biblical 
Proverb: "With all thy getting, get understanding. " Thousands of students have been 
confronted by these words as they stood at the Library desk drawing out books. Untold 
thousands will, in the future, do likewise. Like the Greek philosopher, E. G. was a 
wise man . 

His choice of the Biblical motto is not strange because It expressed his own 
superb attainment. In his getting of information, of vast knowledge in many fields, 
scientific, cultural, and religious he had gotten understanding, without which all 
learning is a tinkling cymbal and a sounding brass . 

To illustrate his understanding with which we are all familiar, I shall relate 
an incident or two; experiences trivial on the surface but really revealatory. We were 
at a house-warming in the lovely new home of a friend. It had a wide hearth and graceful 
and hospitable fire-place. "But," said our host, "It is superfluous because the home is 
heated with hot wnter installation" . There was a rrxsment of silence . ThenE. G. said 
quietly, "Yes, superfluous likea sunset". The amenities of life, the graces and refinements 
of the spirit, were to him essentials - not luxuries as they are to the thoughtless. 

He liked to tell the story of the telephone conversation when a man in London 
was talking to a man in Los Angeles. It was Christmas time. "How are things in California?' 
asked the Englishmen. "Wonderful I Warm sun and blue sky, roses, roses everywhere. Real 
estate booming! How are things in London?" 

"Grey, chilly, fog so thick you can cut it with a knife; gardens frozen over, 
not a flower or green leaf in sight." 



350 



"Well, chuck it all and come to Los Angeles and really live!" 

"No. Think I'll stick it out. If this little spot was good enough for Chaucer, 
Shakespeare, Keats, Shelley and the rest of the boys. It's good enough for me." 

There are things in life more precious than real-estate or physical comfort. 
But, it takes understanding to realize that truth as E. G. did so fully. 

May I remind you here, as a sort of footnote, of the thought I am trying to develop 
of the wisdom that characterizes E. G., that these two isolated incidents are warmed 
by kindly humor, with which E. G. was blessed, priceless to any man and necessary to 
any community; because prejudice, fanaticism and bigotry, so destructive to people 
and to society and the world, cannot live under the same roof with humor. E. G. 
cannot be fully understood without sensing that, and sadly I say it, humor, the universal 
heart tonic, is disappearing from mankind . This milk of human kindness is giving way 
to the witty arrow dipped in acid . Great causes, great battles of Ideas, are never won 
with deadi y weapons . 

E. G.'s humor helped his leadership prevail, humor as creative as poetry that 
bloomed with his ideas, wisdom and understanding. 

In all thy getting, get understanding. Pontius Pilate asked Jesus a question, an 
unforgettable one: "What Is truth?" It is the central question in anyone's life. E. G. 
answered it as well as anyone I have known, and as eloquently; not by rhetoric, word 
pyrotechnics, or beautiful phrases. He was like John Ruskin who. In his maturity, 
immediately struck out any phrase In his writing that he thought beautiful . It might 
be artificial and stand in the way of the message, so away with it! Like Ruskin, E. G. 
was no showman. He showed not himself but the truth whether in culture, science or 
religion. The highest truth, like great music. Is almost unexplainable . Many great 
thinkers, Plato for example, have tried to tell us what music means. There have been 
as many words as notes and still we don't know. Then, In our own day, along comes 
Leonard Bernstein, leader of the New York Symphony. He makes a very few penetrating 
remarks accompanied by simple Illustration of the piano, disappears from sight as he 
starts the full choir, and the glory of Bach bursts upon us for the first time. 

I mention Bernstein because his handling of music Is like E. G. 's handling of 
truth . In religion, for instance, he has stood at the pulpit of many a ward chapel , with 
the Bible In his hand, put the passage he had chosen to read in its setting, with a few 
brief penetrating comments, such as only he could make, and then read, modestly, 
the selected scripture and lo! the glory of the Sermon on the Mount, or the resurrection 
of Jesus bursts upon the congregated saints for the first time In fullness. You have all 
experienced it. 

Understanding! A pearl beyond price. We shall now be without that ministration, 
and the loss is very real and very great to congregations and groups everywhere. Our 
satisfaction, only a partial one, is that he has gone to a reward as great as was his 
service to us . 



351 



I said in the beginning that E. G. was like Abraham Lincoln. He was in his 
democracy, in his sincerity, his simplicity, his humor. Finally now, I think of him 
as a character from Bunyan's "Pilgrim's Progress", for he had the solidity and sanity 
of Hopeful or Christian, Some years ago he brought that delightful American essayist, 
Samuel Mc Chord Crothers to Logan to lecture at our Summer Session. He was a whole- 
some man, boyish and natural like E. G. He gave a lecture on "Pilgrim's Progress" at 
the close of day in the amphitheater that E. G. loved for its beauty. A red sunset turned 
his hair to gold as he concluded: 

"Then", said Valiant for Truth, "I am going to my father's. My sword I give him 
that shall succeed me in my pilgrimage and my courage and skill to him that can get it. 
My marks and scars I carry with me to be a witness for me that I have fought His battles, 
who now will be my rev<arder." When the day that He must go hence was come, many 
accompanied him to the river into which as He went, he said, "Death where is thy 
sting? Grave where is thy victory?" So he passed over, and all the trumpets sounded 
for him on the other side." 

Dr. E. G. told me again and again how deeply he was impressed by those 
memorable words. He loved and believed them. He knows righteous leaders are 
so rewarded . 

THE POINT IS, OF COURSE, aEAR TO ALL. PRESIDENT E.G. IS ANOTHER 
VALIANT FOR TRUTH, AND AS HE CROSSED THAT RIVER THOSE SAME ETERNAL 
TRUMPETS SOUNDED FOR HIM ON THE OTHER SIDE IN FULL CHORUS. 

Now a word about the love life of E. G. and Phebe. I hope that my feet may 
tread lightly in that delicate path which leads to sacred and private ground that 
belongs to the family rather than to the public. 

Phebe, a member of the great Nebeker family, has always been associated in 
my mind with the fine women of the Bible. In beauty, character and stature. She 
is like Mary, Esther or Ruth . For 45 years she and E. G. have shared the thunder and 
the sunshine. Anyone who has borne the responsibility E. G. has, fights many a battle 
against well-meaning, but short sighted selfish men. Through it all she, his wife, 
supported, succored, refreshed, and restored his soul In the heat of the day. Without 
her, E. G. could not have reached the heights. Scripture tells us that the wife and 
mother who keeps that tent is as mighty as the warrior who goes forth from it to battle. 
A year ago we were all gladdened when the College gave Phebe an honorary Doctor's 
Degree in realization of that truth. 

That is one side of their love life. There is another side more personal and more 
secret. It belongs to them alone. But I glance at It, with permission, from afar. We 
have had in America two famous lovers, important phases of whose love have been made 
public by two books: "The Life of Alice Freeman Palmer" by her famous husband, 
George Herbert Palmer and "An Academic Courtship" containing the letters of these 
lovers, made available to the public by Mrs. Palmer's sister after their deaths. 



352 



These two American lovers compare favorably, I think, with the two great British 
lovers known to all the world, Robert Browning and Elizabeth Barrett Browning. 

At Christmas, five years ago, the four stalwart children, Marian, George, Martha 
and Chase gave the book "An Academic Courtship" to their parents. On the fly-leaf was 
this inscription: 

"To the Alice Freeman and the George Herbert Palmer of the West--who were 
generous enough to share their lives with four thankful children as well as with each 
other and society. " 

Was there ever a more fitting and touching filial tribute! We get the romance of 
E.G. and Phebe's love in these lines from "The Rubaiyat of Omar Khayam": 

"A book of verses underneath the bough, A jug of wine, 
a loaf of bread - and thou Beside me singing in the 
wilderness - Oh wilderness were Paradise enow!" 

A Paradise, the memory of which in the bereaved days and years ahead will lead Mrs. 
E . G . into green pastures, beside still waters, and restore her soul , so that she wil I dwell 
in the House of the Lord forever! Even so it is but a preJude to a greater one, when, whe, 
too, has crossed the river and entered into the many splendored Paradise of Eternity with 
her beloved . 

All -through the grace and power of our Lord and his beloved Son, the Redeemer of 
mankind . 



(Delivered by Dr. N. A. Pederson at the funeral of Dr. E. G. Peterson, Logan, Utah, 
AAay 19, 1958.) 



We end this sketch with a tribute from the students and a couple of remarks by E. G. 
Peterson: "For his faith in youth and our ambitions, for twenty-five years of unceasing 
contribution to the guiding of our college to its present significant position — Also for his 
enthusiasm and belief in our abilities — We offer our sincere esteem and acknowledgment— 

in respectfully dedicating this volume of the Buzzer to President Elmer G. Peterson — 

1941. 

My fellow workers, "If the Lord can make Israelites out of the stones of the wad — 
You and I can make ladies and gentlemen out of any who come here! USD 

We all seek happiness. I do not mean the fleeting things which demand a heavy toll 
of misery. I mean permanent satisfaction. Any temporary pleasure which mars the body 
or the spirit we are better without. The satisfaction I speak of is inseparable from toil . 



353 



No life Is worth the living which Is not a life of continuous effort. This Is often blind, 
we do not know what is to come. Yet it Is a law of life, as positive In its application 
OS is gravity, that the toil and the suffering. If it is the suffering which accompanies 
righteous endeavor, then comes the renumeratlon . What we put Into life by way of 
honest effort we take from life In golden treasure, which Is wisdom and power. These 
two come only when the price Is paid for them. There Is no short cut to their attainment. 
And when they come, they are accompanied by that attribute which dignifies men be- 
yond all-else — FAITH — 

President E.G. Peterson - 1920 Yearbook 



PHEBE ALMIRA NEBEKER 



Phebe Almira Nebeker was born 3 June 1890 in a log cabin on the shores of Bear 
Lake six miles north of Laketown, Utah. She attended school in Logan, graduated from 
high school at the Brigham Young College; she then attended the New England Conserva- 
tory of Music at Boston, Massachusetts. She returned to Utah and graduated with a B.S. 
from the Utah State Agricultural College. 

She was married 3 Sept. 1913 to Elmer George Peterson. They lived on the Utah 
Agricultural College Campus for twenty-nine years while her husband was president. 
The college Is known as the Utah State University presently. It was here their children 
were all born; they grew up through grade and high school at Logan, Cache, Utah. 

The Honorary Degree of Doctor of Humanities was conferred on Mrs. Elmer George 
Peterson by the Utah State University 1 June 1957. She has always been active In church 
and civic organizations. She has gone out of her way to be of service to all mankind. 

She has served as Sunday School teacher, as a stake board member on both the Relief 
Society and YWMIA, many years as Stake Relief Society president, also, as YWMIA 
president, as president of Civic Music Association, LDS Hospital Board member, vice- 
president of Utah Federation of Womans clubs, president of Utah State Faculty Women's 
League, UAC Woman's Club, the president of the Friendship Circle of Salt Lake City. 

She is an honorary member of Phi Kappa Phi and Delta Kappa Gamma, (an organi- 
zation for fostering the interests of International teachers.) 



Sketch by her son, Elmer George Peterson 



354 



238 ELMER GEORGE PETERSON 



B 29 Feb. 1920 
Chr 7 Mar. 1920 
Bapt 12 June 1928 
End 29 Aug. 1946 
Md 29 Aug. 1946 



Logan, Qjche, Utah 

Logan, Cache, Utah 

Logan, Qjche, Utah 

Salt Lake Temple, Salt Lake, Utah 

Salt Lake Temple, Salt Lake, Utah 



Father 32 Elmer George Peterson 



Mother Phebe Almira Nebeker 



Wife CATHERINE FOSTER 



B 11 Mar. 1926 
Bapt 24 April 1940 
End 29 Aug. 1946 
Sid 29 Aug. 1946 

Father Harry Douglas Foster 



Preston, Lancashire, England 
Preston, Lancashire, England 
Salt Lake Temple, Salt Lake, Utah 
Salt Lake Temple, Salt Lake, Utah 

Mother Euzegaih Smith 



CHILDREN 



556 Ellen Foster Peterson 
610 Preston George Peterson 



B 6 May 1948, Logan, Cache, Utah 
B 27 Oct. 1951, Logan, Cache, Utah 



238 ELMER GEORGE PETERSON 



Elmer George Peterson, Jr. was born the 29 Feb. 1920 at the Logan City Hospital 
Cache, Utah. He attended the Logan City Schools and Culver Military Academy where 
his commanding officer wrote of him, "I have every confidence in George because he is 
fundamentally sound, honest, courteous, manly and intelligent." 

He secured his B.S. degree at Utah State University just in time to answer the draft. 
He served four years in the Army in World War II, three of which were spent in England 
in the Signal Corps as a teletype operator. While in England he met Catherine Foster at 
the Preston Lanes Branch of the LDS church. They were married three years later, 29 Aug. 
1946 in the Salt Lake Temple. They have two wonderful children. Ellen is in senior high 
school and Preston Is In the junior high school . 



355 



After his army service he engaged in the turkey business of his grandfather's farm at 
Bear Lake. He produced high quality birds and was considered an expert with them, but 
without big capital backing they proved too much of a gamble. 

His health, (a problem of long standing) became acute, and was considerably re- 
lieved by a critical operation. After his health had been restored, they moved to Logan 
and he secured a position at the Utah State University where at the present he is a member 
of the library staff. 

They are considered a musical family and often entertain the ward members and local 
clubs. They are all active in their church — George is teaching a Sunday School class 
and has been advanced in the priesthood as a High Priest. Catherine is a teacher in 
Sunday School, a Primary teacher, president of the ward Primary and a member of the 
stake board . 

His brother Chase adds, "his brothers and sisters credit him with being the family 
story teller and like his father, the only one who can simultaneously carve a Sunday 
roast and tell a humorous anecdote." 

Sketch by himself, Elmer George Peterson 



NAD ALMA PETERSON 



Md 

End 



6 Sept. 
6 Sept. 



1948 
1948 



Salt Lake Temple, Salt Lake, Utah 
Salt Lake Temple, Salt Lake, Utah 



Wife 260 MARTHA ALMIRA PETERSON 



B 29 April 1923 
Chr U June 1923 
Bapt 17 June 1931 
End 6 Sept. 1948 
Sid 6 Sept. 1948 

Father 32 Elmer George Peterson 



Logan, Cache, Utah 

Logan, Cache, Utah 

Logan, Cache, Utah 

Salt Lake Temple, Salt Lake, Utah 

Salt Lake Temple, Salt Lake, Utah 

Mother Phebe Almira Nebeker 



356 



CHILDREN 



363 Anne Carroll Peterson 
706 Christian Nad Peterson 

785 Elizabeth Chase Peterson 

786 Frederick Lane Peterson 

787 Robert Wendell Peterson 



B 25 Feb. 1953, Washington, D.C. 
B 18 Oct. 1955, Washington, D.C. 
B 4 Feb . 1960, Santa Monica, Los Angeles, 

California 
B 3 Dec. 1962, Santa AAsnica, Los Angeles, 

California 
B 3 Dec. 1962, Santa Monica, Los Angeles, 

California 



260 MARTHA ALMIRA PETERSON 

Martha Almira Peterson was born 29 April 1923 at Logan, Cache, Utah. She attended 
the grade and high schools of Logan. She attended Dickinson College at Pennsylvania and 
Utah State University, graduating with a Phi Kappa Phi . She secured her social certificate 
from the University of Utah and her Masters degree on a work study scholarship at the 
Catholic University of America at Washington, D.C. While she was employed by the 
Child Welfare Division of the Bureau of Public Welfare, Washington, D.C, her husband, 
whom she married In the Salt Lake Temple 7 Sept. 1948 was attending George Washington 
Low School. He is an assistant council for Rexall Drug Co. 

They live at West Wood, Los Angeles, California and have five healthy and happy 
children, their last child turned out to be twins, Robert and Frederick. The family is 
active in all the church organizations. Nad has been a bishop and superintendent of the 
Sunday School . Martha served as Junior Sunday School supervisor and director of music 
in the Primary association . She is affiliated with the Mary Duque Charitable Institution. 

Sketch written by George Elmer Peterson 



303 CHASE NEBEKER PETERSON 



B 27 Dec. 1929 
Chr 22 June 1930 
Bapt 22 Jan. 1938 
End 8 June 1956 
Md 8 June 1956 

Father 32 Elmer George Peterson 



Logan, Cache, Utah 

Logan, Cache, Utah 

Logan, Cache, Utah 

Salt Lake Temple, Salt Lake, Utah 

Salt Lake Temple, Salt Lake, Utah 

Mother Phebe Almira Nebeker 



357 



End. 8 June 1956 
Sid. 8 June 1956 



Wife ANNE GRETHE BALLIF 



Salt- Lake Temple, Salt Lake, Utah 
Salt Lake Temple, Salt Lake, Utah 



788 Erika Elizabeth Peterson 

789 Stuart Ball if Peterson 

790 Edward Chase Peterson 



CHILDREN 



B. 18 Sept. 1959, Salt Lake Gty, Salt Lake, M 
B. 21 Sept. 1961, Salt Lake, Salt Lake, Utah 
B. 15 Nov. 1965, Salt Lake, Salt Lake, Utal 



303 CHASE NEBEKER PETERSON 

Chase Nebeker Peterson was born 27 Dec. 1929, at Logan, Cache, Utah. He 
attended the Logan City schools. From junior high school he won a regional scholarship 
to Middlessex — a preparatory high school at Concord, Massachusetts. He graduated 
there as valedictorian and won the National Scholarship to Harvard. 

At Harvard the students elected him to represent them on the council three 
consecutive years and the fourth he was on the Board of Directors of the Harvard 
Cooperative Society. He was assistant to Dr. George Albert Smith (Dean of the Harvard 
Business School), in his junior year he was a teacher in the LDS Sunday School at 
Cambridge and a member of the Porcellian Club. He graduated from Harvard with a BA 
degree in 1952. He then was admitted to the Harvard Medical College assisted by 
another scholarship. He graduated from the medical college in 1956 with an MD . 

The 7 June, 1956 he and Anne Grethe Ball if, a Radcliff girl from Provo, Utah, 
were married in the Salt Lake Temple. He has three happy, healthy children. They 
have been active in church as teachers. Chase in the LDS Sunday School and Anne in 
the Primary. They live in the Federal Heights Ward at Salt Lake City. 

He served two years in the Army Medical Corps in Germany. He is now a 
member of the Salt Lake Clinic with a specialty in Internal Medicine. Many 
additional honors came to Chase during his school days and also, since beginning his 
practice in the Salt Lake Clinic. 

Sketch written by Elmer George Peterson 



B. 2 Dec. 1884 

Bapt. 

Md. 5 Jan. 1909 



36 PRESTON GEDDES PETERSON 

Preston, Oneida, Idaho 
Provo, Utah, Utah 



358 



D. 22 Feb. 1945 
Bur. 26 Feb. 1945 

Father Augustus Peterson 



Provo, Utah, Utah 

Provo Cemetery, Utah, Utah 

Mother 3 AqnesGeddes 



Wife ERMA JANE LOOSE 



B. 5 Jan. 1889 

Bapt. 
I D. 6 Sept. 1950 
' Bur. 9 Sept. 1950 

Father Charles Edwin Loose 



169 Clayton Loose Peterson 
176 Preston Robert Peterson 
199 Edwin Loose Peterson 



Payson, Utah, Utah 

Cedar Gty, Iron, Utah 
Provo Cemetery, Utah, Utah 

Mother Mary Jane Patten 



CHILDREN 



B. I Jan. 1910, Provo, Utah, Utah 
D. I Jan. 1910, Provo, Utah, Utah 
B. 16 June 1911, Provo, Utah, Utah 
D. 30 July 1927, Provo, Utah, Utah 
B. 27 Oct. 1915, Provo, Utah, Utah 



36 PRESTON GEDDES PETERSON 

Preston Geddes Peterson was born on 2 December 1884, at Preston, Idaho, the 
son of Augustus and Agnes Geddes Peterson. When he was five years old his family 
moved to Pocatello, Idaho, where he attended the public schools. He later attended 
school at Baker, Oregon and finished his "Prep" work at the Agricultural College of 
Utah, (now Utah State University) in Logan, Utah, In 1902. 

While at Utah State, "Pres" (as he was known to thousands of associates) was 
active in many student activities. He was a member of the R.E.A. Fraternity, president 
of the Debating Club, president of the Agricultural Club, associate editor (1904-05) 
and editor of Student Life (1905-06). 

Pres was always active in athletics; he played various positions on the baseball 
team and was captain in 1905. For two years he was on the track team (sprints) and 
captain of the basketball team in 1907-08. During his senior year he played quarter- 
back on the football team. 

After graduation in 1907, with a B.S. degree In Agronomy, he acted as assistant 
editor of the Deseret Farmer. In 1907-08 he became assistant Professor of Agriculture 
at the Brigham Young University at Provo. In 1908-09 he was advanced to full Professor. 



359 



In 1909 he married Miss Erma Jane Loose of Provo, fhe daughter of Colonel C. E. 
Loose. He resigned his position at B .Y. U. In 1909 and associated himself with the mining 
business of Colonel Loose. 

He was always an active member of the Re()ublican Party. He was associated with 
the "Bu" Moose" movement in Utah in the election of 1912. In 1916 he was appointed to 
the State Tax Commission where he served until 1920. In 1920 he was appointed to the 
State Road Commission where he served until 1940. The Road Commission constituted o 
major part of his adult life, and was one of the real 'loves' of his life . 

As a member of the State Road Commission, Pres served under three Utah Governors. 
He was Chairman of the Commission under Mabey and the minority (Republican) member of 
the Commission under Governors Dern and Blood. At the time of his death the Salt Lake 
Tribune noted editorially that "Pres Peterson is the man who got Utah out of the mud." He 
built more roads in Utah than had been built in the previous 50 years. 

Pres became well known not only In Utah but throughout much of the United States 
for his keen Interest and ability In road work. He was often called upon to testify before 
Congressional Committees on road matters and his counsel was often sought by the U.S. 
Bureau of Public Road officials of the Department of the Interior. 

Under his direction the first Utah State Highway Patrol was organized; he was the 
"Father of the Highway Patrol ." He also organized the first Utah Bureau of Aeronautics 
which operated under the State Road Commission. 

The current numbering system of national highways was originated by him. The idea 
grew out of his dislike of an uncoordinated system of highway names which changed at 
each state line... the "Arrowhead Trail," or the "Lincoln Highways" ect. He proposed 
the current system of naming highways by numbers. . .major north and south lines starting 
on the east coast as U.S. "l , and each major highway of a north-south pattern being 
numbered and Increasing In size as they moved west. . .thus today the main north-south 
belt along the Atlantic Coast, Maine to Florida, Is U.S. '^l . The major final belt from 
Canada to Mexico via Washington-Qregon-Californla Is U.S. ^101, (with U.S. 89 and 
U.S. 91 running through Utah). East-west highways were to be numbered the same, from 
north to south with even numbers. (Thus U.S. 40 and U.S. 50 run through Utah also, but 
east and west .) 

After leaving the Road Commission In 1941, Pres engaged in small mining operations 
in Southern Idaho. He was unable to take a position with the U.S. Bureau of Public Roads 
on the then-important "Alcan" Highway because of the health of his wife. 

Pres was preceded in death by two sons. His eldest son, Clayton, died at birth in 
1910. His second son, Preston Robert, born In 1912, died 30 July 1927. His wife Erma 
died In Cedar City, Utah, September 5, 1951 . Pres died In Provo 22 February 1945. 



360 



199 EDWIN LOOSE PETERSON 



B. 27 Oct. 1915 
Bapt. 1929 

AAd. II Feb. 1939 

Father 36 Preston Geddes Peterson 



Provo, Utah, Utah 
Provo, Utah, Utah 
Logan, Cache, Utah 

Mather Erma Jane Loose 



Wife Z ETTA BENSON 



B. 20 Aug. 1916 
Bapt. 2 Dec. 1924 

Father Serge Ballif Benson 



Whitney, Franklin, Idaho 
Logan, Cache, Utah 

Mother Linda Nielson 



CHILDREN 



466 Erma Leita Peterson 

598 Lizette Peterson 

646 Edwina Peterson 

781 Edwin Theodore Peterson 



B. 5 July 1941, Logan, Cache, Utah 
B. 24 Feb. 1951, Cedar City, Iron, Utah 
B, I Sept. 1953, Cedar City, Iron, Utah 
B. 5 July 1957, Logan, Cache, Utah 



199 EDWIN LOOSE PETERSON 

Edwin L . Peterson was born in Provo, Utah, 27 October 1915, son of Preston 
' Geddes and Erma Jane Loose Peterson. He was the third son of the family. 

l| Edwin, or "Eddie" as he has always been called, was educated in the Provo 

public school system. He was graduated from Provo High school in 1933 with a College 
Preparatory Course. 

I| In high school Eddie was active in athletics. He played in the football team 

for four years and was selected "All State" in 1931 and 1932. He excelled in the shot- 
put in track and broke school, district, state and national records in his senior year. 
He was the first man in Utah to put the 12 pound shot over 50 feet. He competed in 
AAU meets in both the 12 pound (high school) and the 16 pound (college) shot in his 
senior year. 

In 1933 he entered Utah State Agricultural College (now Utah State University). 
In college he also participated in sports, being selected on the All Conference (Rocky 
Mountain Conference) teams in 1934-35-36. He played on the now-famous '36 Team, 
and received All American Rating in 1936. He played guard on this team. He won 
the conference shot-put in 1934, 1935, and 1937. He received an invitation to part- 
'icipate in the 1940 Olympic Games which were to be held in Helsinki, Finland, but 
were cancelled because of the war. 



361 



Edwin was graduated from U.SoA.C. In 1937 with aB.S. in History. He was 
a member of the Sigma Chi social fraternity, a member of PI Gamma Mu professional 
fraternity and Scabbard and Blade honorary military fraternity. He was commissioned 
a 2nd Lt. in the Coast Artillery Corps upon graduation. 

In 1937 he accepted a position as coach and instructor in social science at the 
Branch Agricultural College in Cedar City, Utah ( now the College of Southern Utah). 

In 1939 he ceased coaching and devoted full time to teaching. He became 
Dean of Men at B .A. Co in 1940. In 1940-41 he did graduate work at the University of 
California at Berkeley and finished his M.A, degree in Political Science at Utah State 
in the spring of 1941 . 

Following Pearl Harbor in 1941 , he was called to active duty with the U.S. 
Army. He served briefly at Camp Wallace, Texas and was sent to the Panama Canal 
Zone in early 1942. He served in the Caribbean Defence Command and was designated 
as a "specialist" In searchlight installations. He served in much of the Caribbean and 
Gulf regions. In 1943 he was shipped back to the U.S. after spending several months 
in the hospital with malaria. 

In April of 1943 he was transferred to the Army Air Corps and assigned as a Tactical 
Officer at his old Alma Mater, Utah State. He served one year at Utah State as Tactical 
Officer and later Commandant of Cadets of the 318th College Training Detatchment of 
the USAF. 

He later served as Commandant of Cadets at Texas Technilogical College at 
Lubbock, Texas, and then as I cSi E (Information-Education) Officer at Marana and 
Luke Air Fields . He ended the war on the staff on General B . K . Yount in the Training 
Command of the Army Air Corps with the rank of Major. He was active in the original 
planning for what became the Air Force Reserve Officer Training Corps. 

Following the war, he returned to Cedar City to teach. He also held several 
civic positions in Cedar City. He served in the City Council, Young Republican Chairman, 
and Iron County Republican Chairman and a member of the Republican Central Committee 
from Iron County. He later held this same position from Cache County. He served as 
Vice-President of the Wildlife Federation, Vice-President of Lions Club and Secretary 
of the Lions Clubs of Utah, Secretary of the Escalante Knife and Fork Club. He also 
served as a sports broadcaster over radio station K,S,U.B. from 1947-55. 

In 1955-55 he did graduate work at the University of California at Los Angeles 
and finished his PhD. degree at Utah State in 1957 in Sociology. 

In 1955 he accepted a position as Administrative Assistant to Congressman H.A. 
Dixon of Utah. He served in this capacity during the 84th Congress. In 1956 he returned 
to become a member of the staff of Utah State University. 



362 



He has been active in the American Legion, being a member in Cedar Gty and 
Logan. He was instrumental in moving the Boys' State Program to Logan in 1959 and 
has served on the staff of Boys' State since that time. He has been Americanism 
Chairman for Utah since 1961 to date (65) and was appointed to the National Americanism 
Commission of the Legion in 1964. 

He married Zetta Benson of Logan II February 1939. They have four children: 
Erma Leita (1941) now finishing her PHD at University of Southern California and teaching 
at Rolling Hills High School; Lizette (1951) Logan Jr. High School; Edwina (1953) 
Logan Jr. High School; and Edwin Theodore (1957) Edith Bowen School . 

Currently (1965) he is Professor of Geography at Utah State University, Chairman 
of the Athletic Council, Coordinator of Military Affairs and newly elected Commander 
of the American Legion Utah State University Post ^12. 



5 HUGH STEWART GEDDES 



B. 25 July 1859 
Bapt. 30 Aug. 1868 
Md. 12 July 1883 
End. 12 July 1883 
D. 24 Aug. 1934 
Bur. Aug 1934 



Plain City, Weber, Utah 

Plain City, Weber, Utah 

End. House, Salt Lake City, Salt Lake, Utah 

End. House, Salt Lake City, Salt Lake, Utah 

Banida, Franklin, Idaho 

Preston, Franklin, Idaho 



Father I William Geddes 



Mother Martha Stewart 



First Wife MARTENA PETERSON 



B, 14 Oct. 1864 
Bapt. 6 Sept. 1874 
End. 12 July 1883 
Sealed 12 July 1383 
D. 26 Jan. 1928 
Bur. 31 Jan. 1928 



Plain City, Weber, Utah 
Plain City, Weber, Utah 
End. House, Salt Lake, Utah 
End. House, Salt Lake, Utah 
Banida, Franklin, Idaho 
Preston, Franklin, Idaho 



Father Hans Peterson 



Mother Anna Martena Anderson 



37 Estella Esther Geddes 
45 Hu^ Lester Geddes 
56 Maude Lausetta Geddes 
63 Moses Peterson 



CHILDREN 



18 Mar. 1885, Preston, Franklin, Idaho 
28 July 1887, Plain City, Weber, Utah 
31 Jan. 1892, Preston, Franklin, Idaho 



B 
B 
B 
18 Sept. 1894, Preston, Franklin, Idaho 



363 



74 Grant Peterson Geddes 



84 Elva Peterson Geddes 



94 Archibald Peterson Geddes 

99 William Peterson Geddes 
110 Donald Peterson Geddes 

120 Ralph Thomas Geddes 



B. 23 July 1897, Preston, Franklin, Idaho 
End. 24 Nov, 1920 

Md . 8 Oct. 1925 to Anna May Christensen 
Bapt. 6 Aug. 1905, Preston, Franklin, Idaho 
B. 31 Mar. 1900, Preston, Franklin, Idaho 
Bapt, 26 May 1908, Preston, Franklin, Idaho 
Md. 19 Nov. 1930 to William Leslie Bell 
End. 5 May 1932 

D. 17 Mar. 1931, Washington D.C. 
B. 12 Feb. 1903, Preston, Franklin, Idaho 
D. 5 Jan. 1908, Preston, Franklin, Idaho 
B. and D. 1905, Preston, Franklin, Idaho 
B. 9 May 1908, Preston, Franklin, Idaho 
D. 12 Jan. 1908, Preston, Franklin, Idaho 
B. 25 April 1909, Preston, Franklin, Idaho 
Bapt. 6 Oct. 1917, Preston, Franklin, Idaho 
D. 16 Sept. 1924, Banida, Franklin, Idaho 
End. 21, Jan. 1925 



n 



Second Wife CATHERINE STRONG 



B. 7 Sept. 1881 
Bapt. 29 Feb. 1912 
End. 24 Jan. 1918 
Md. 5 Dec. 1928 
Sealed 5 Dec. 1928 
D. 13 May 1948 
Bur. 17 May 1948 



London, London, Erhgland 

New Zealand 
Salt Lake Temple, Salt Lake, Utah 
Salt Lake Temple, Salt Lake, Utah 
Salt Lake Temple, Salt Lake, Utah 
Salt Lake Qty, Salt Lake, Utah 
Preston, Franklin, Idaho 



Father Phillip Strong 



Mother Emma Hawkins 



HUGH STEWART GEDDES 

My father, Hugh Stewart Geddes, was born 25 July 1859, the first son of William 
Geddes and Martha Stewart and the second child born in Plain City, Utah, 

He was one of a large family, in fact he was a polygamous child . His father 
married sisters, Elizabeth and Martha; his mother, Martha, was the second wife and 
reared her sister's five children making eleven in all - six boys and five girls. In 
those days they had very few comforts and not many opportunities for schooling. My 
father was no exception. 

I remember him telling how the family had to work in the fields when they were 
children. One day grandpa took them all out in the wheat field to hoe. He had made 
each one of them a little hoe just to fit between the rows of wheat, and each one took 
a row to weed. They had left the baby in the wagon to play while they worked. When 



364 



they got back to the wagon, baby Grant had pulled all of the papers out of grandpa's 
vest pocket and torn them into bits; among the papers had been a ten dollar greenback 
grandpa had put aside for the circus. You see, grandpa had promised the children that 
if they got the field al I done he would take them to Ogden to the Bornum Circus . This 
was the first circus to come to Ogden, and of course, they were all excited about going. 
They all thought baby Grant had fixed their trip, but grandpa picked up all of the little 
bits and grandma pasted them together on a thin piece of paper and they all went to the 
circus. 

The only fuel they had for their winter fires was sage brush, so in the fall they 
had to haul in a large supply for the winter. My father, only eight years old, was 
the one grandpa always picked to help him go to the little mountain to gather in the 
brush . The boys, he said, had to go to school . On one of the trips, my father asked 
when he could start to school and grandpa said next winter because one of the boys 
had to stay at home and keep the wood box filled . 

So Pa was past nine before he started school and of course he was way behind 
the other boys of his age. He felt so ashamed that he would stay out whenever he got 
the chance and that came pretty often. 

Pa was small for his age and he seemed to just stay short and chubby; what made 
it worse was that his sisters would sing a little ditty about the little men. Pa prayed 
that he might grow up to be a big tall man. He finally began to grow, and he becqne as 
tall as, if not a little taller, than any of his brothers. 

Being discouraged about school, he turned his interests to sports. He became 
a good baseball player and a very fast foot racer. In fact he could beat any of the boys 
at sports. He won most of the races on the fourth of July celebrations But, of course, 
he realized that his education was lacking and his knowledge of books very limited . 

I His brother Joseph asked him if he would not like to come to Ogden and work 

in the dobie yard. His brother was one of the overseers, while he could be only one 
of the hodcarriers. He now felt more than ever the loss of an education. He began to 
feel inferior to his brothers. So right there he made up his mind to go back to school . 
But how, that was the question. 

His father told him he could learn the blacksmith trade and he felt that even 
this would be better than a hodcarrier. He started to work for Oiristopher Folkman in 
Plain City. He worked for Mr. Folkman for about a year. 

The Oregon Short Line was being constructed from Granger to Pocatello, so Pa 
having a pretty good team, decided to try to get work with the construction line. The 
company shipped the men's horses and equipment from Ogden to Evanston, Wyoming. 
Pa was started on his first real job with a team of horses and a scraper. 

Just when he decided he could not make any money if he had to pay for his own 
grain and hay, the blacksmith got sick and had to be sent home. When tbey found out 
that Pa was a blacksmith, he was given the job. This time he was prepared as he had 
orought his tools along just in case he might need them. From this time on he began to 

365 



make real money, thinking of school , but sharpening plows, shoeing horses, etc. He 
saved nearly everything that he made, again thinking that maybe now he could go to 
school later. 

One day a preacher came into the camp and asked the boss if he could hold 
a med"ing. He said he had a very important and interesting subject to discuss. The 
Boss gave his permission and told the boys to clean up the storeroom and tfiey could hold 
the meeting there. By ni^t the place was clean, the planks were in place and the boys 
were seated. The preacher, instead of giving a sermon, began to slander the /Vbrmons, 
and when he got through asked if there were any Mormons present. Sorreone shouted 
"Yes!" "Here is a Mormon!" and pointed to Pa. Pa had been wondering how he could 
defend his people, but when the preacher called, "Bring him up, " Pa walked up without 
any assistance, praying that his HeaveHy Father would help him defend his people. As 
soon as the Boss saw who they were talking about, he arose to his feet and called the men 
to order. He said, "If this young man's people are the ones you are talking about, then 
there must be some mistake, for he has been with us nearly six months and in all that 
time, we have not even seen him take a drink, or smoke a cigarette, nor has he gone 
to Evanston for immoral purposes." The crowd was silent for about a minute, then they 
began to clap and shout. The preacher was so frightened he jumped for the back door 
and ran for the nearest railroad station. Pa continued to work about two months longer 
then decided to go home and go to school . 

He started at the Brigham Young Academy at Logan, Utah. It was at the mid- 
term and he found it almost impossible to get the back work required by the teachers. 
He then asked his brother Joe If he might attend his school in Melville. So he and 
his brother Arch stayed with Joe and attended school for the rest of the school term. 
His efforts were successful for the first time and he went home in the spring all aglow 
with pride In his scholastic accomplishments. 

A call came through Plain Gty from the general authorities of the church for 
volunteers to work on the Salt Lake Temple Quarry. Pa with his brothers and Father 
then began working at the stone quar'-y, cutting and drilling rock for the temple. Pa 
said it seemed that those big boulders of granite were just put there for the temple. 
Pa felt amazed that they needed so little cutting. They worked several rrranths, then 
they were given a receipt to take to their bishop who gave them credit for working on 
the temple . 

Pa was married to Martena Peterson on 12 July 1883, in the Endowment House, 
Salt Lake, Utah. He was twenty-three years old and felt that he had be tter get his 
family started. When they reached the outskirts of Plain City on their return from 
Salt Lake, they heard a band playing the wedding march . They found that the band's 
new suits had just arrived so the band boys had decided to give them the grand home 
welcome. They were thus accompanied through the streets to the bride's home. Everyone 
in the city was out on the streets to see what the occasion was. Thus their wedding 
supper was more than over-flowing with guests; some invited and some not, but it made 
no difference; their food was for everyone. 



366 



Pa moved an old log stable to Salt Lake into a city lot his father had given him. 
Here they made their first home. During the summer months he continued to work on the 
temple quarry. That fall they fixed the stable into two rooms and bought some new furniture. 
They were very comfortoble and happy that winter. Pa had taken a contract to gather 
and mill salt for a big company in the city. He made enough money to pay for the 
furniture, the remodeling and to pay his debts. 

In the spring of 1884, Pa and Gus Peterson, a brother of Ma's , moved to Preston, 
Idaho. They rook out homesteads on *he east of Bear Rive' . !n March their first child, 
Estella, was born 18 March 1885. She was born in a dugout on the side of a hollow, 
just east of Bea-" River. Later that spring Pa built a two-room log house on a piece of 
; flat ground about one mile south , near the big spring. 

People said that Pa had picked the wrong place to build; he would never be 
able to dig a gpod well in that location. But Pa only had to dig twenty feet to find 
good sandstone, and whe"^ he picked his way through the sandstone, he found good 
drinking water. Ma worked along with Pa and pulled al! of the sand, rock and mud up 
with what they called a windlass that Pa had made by hand. What chances they took 
In those days! It is a wonder that Pa wasn't buried alive from just a simple little cave 
In, for they had several while digging the well . 

In those days you couldn't get money for anything you had to sell; the store- 
keeper would check your eggs, butter, or grain and if they amounted to more than what 
you purchased, then he would give you what was called "scrip." This was no good 
except to use for items you wanted at the store. 

Ma took care of the children, cattle, cows, chickens, while Pa worked on the 
canals. They followed this procedure for the first two years of their stay in Preston, 

j Idaho . They did not have a crop to harvest either fall . 

I 

On the 28 July 1887, their second child, a boy, was born. They namedhim 
Hugh Lester Geddes, That fall Pa had to go back to work in Salt Lake. He left his 
wife to take care of the children and the livestock, and to shift as best they could down 
on the sand hill , She had two brothers living a short distance from her. This helped 
somewhat, but she had a very hard time of it, Only in a case of emergency did she 
ask for help. 

' While Pa was working in Salt Lake he got a call to go on an L.D.S. mission. 

He was called to go to New Zealand in the summer of 1888. William C. Parkingson 
his bishop, gave him a farewell party and two-hundred dollars. His wife told him to 
go and she would take ca'^e of things. He moved his wife back to Plain City, where she 
would be close to her father and mother, then he reported for his mission. His wife 
found it impossible to sell their live stock. She decided to keep a few cows and let 
her brother care for the rest. To support herself, two children and send Pa a little 
money now and again, she did work during the day. She was a good worker so never 
lacked for something to do. With two children to tend, she could not take the easy 
jobs. She did general house work, washings on the board, special cooking jobs, or 
general house-cleaning or whitewashing. 



367 



She worked long, hard hours, but she somehow managed to be happy and cheerful . 
"I've watched her stand on a chair or on the top of a table and whitewash high ceilings 
from early morning until late at ni^t and then milk our cow, get our supper, and put 
us to bed without a word of complaint. The only time I remember seeing her cry was one 
night when little Hugh and I had scarlet fever. We were very sick and I woke up to see 
her kneeling by our bed crying and praying that someone would come to help her sick 
children. I guess we were very sick and she was oil alone with us and didn't dare leave 
for help. Then, as if in a dream. Uncle Grant was standing by our bed . I don't remember 
if he administered to us, but I do remember Ma telling us how miraculously we had been 
healed." 

Pa was twenty-eight days on the ocean going to New Zealand. It had been a 
glorious experience as he had not been sick for one minute during the entire trip. To 
his surprise he found that New Zealand was having their most beautiful spring weather. 
Pa was assigned to labor among the Maal people. He was then confronted with the task 
of learning a new language as well as learning how to be a good missionary. Pa asked 
if he could have permission to live with a Maori family, for he felt that if he was to 
learn the language, he must be where he could not talk the English language. He was 
granted permission to live with a Maori family; he found that it helped for he soon 
was able to speak in the language. It was at this time he met AAary Faunge, a woman 
who was to be his friend during his two years mission. In fact, at one time when it looked 
as if he mi^t die, she nursed him back to heal th . Her home became headquarters and 
whenever he was anywhere In or near this district, he would stay at her home. Pa spent 
two years and a half on this mission to New Zealand , He was released in the spring of 
1891 . 

When he returned from New Zealand, he returned his family to Preston to the log 
house he had built years before. "I was only a little girl, but I remember how awFul the 
house looked to us. The windows and doors had been broken out by other people's 
cattle. It seemed that they had used the house for a stable, while we were away." ^ 

Somehow Ma made a home out of it and In a few weeks, we were living quite comfortably 
in that same log house, with the sand hills as our backing and Bear River just below us. 

That summer Pa was made superintendent of the Preston Ward Sunday School . 
He acted as director and secretary of the two principle canals of Preston and planted 
a big crop that year. 

On the 31 Jan. 1892, Maud Loretta Geddes, a third child was born. It was 
about this time that Pa's brother Jim came to live with us. He wanted to attend the 
Oneida Stake Academy. It Is no wonder that Uncle Jim always seemed like a big brother 
to me. Together we rode horseback to school . He lived with us a couple of years and 
then he was called on a mission to the Northwestern States Mission. 

Pa now bought a place nearer town which had a two-room log house . Pa built 
four more rooms, two downstairs and two upstairs. It was in this house that the rest of 
their children were born: Moses, Grant, Elva, Arch, William Donald, and Ralph. 



368 



Pa was chosen as the first president of the 116 Quorum of Seventies at the time 
of its formation and organization. He held this position until the spring of 1901 when 
he was made a High Priest and the second counselor of Bishop John Larson. He held 
this position until the Preston Ward was divided. He was released from the old ward, 
to become the first bishop of Preston's new Second Ward on 3 Feb. 1902. The church 
house was in the boundaries of the Second Ward so it was decided that the property was 
to be sold to the Second Ward. The money obtained in the sale was to be divided equally 
among the other three wards. Pa soon had the ward completely organized. His most 
outstanding organization was the T.A. Montague's ward choir. By the fail of 1902 
this new ward had several missionaries out in the field; Lorenzo Hansen and Joe Golightly 
were the first two . 

■ In December of 1908 our family came down with scarlet fever. Pa could get no 

nurses to help take care of his five children so he and his wife with the help of old Dr. 
Cutler did everything that medical profession could recommend, but to no avail. Arch 
died 6 Jan. 1908; Donald the baby died 12 Jan. 1908, and just one week later it looked 
as If AAoses, Elva and Maud would not live until morning. Pa's brother Joe Geddes came 
in, quarantine or not, and administered to them and they were raised as if from the dead. 

j It took weeks before things were normal , but we were very glad that some of us were 
getting better. 

I During the holidays when things looked very bad, sister Julia Jensen, brother 

and sister Montague got the organ into a bob sleigh and called up all the choir members 
to serenade their bishop and his sick family. "Out of a clear blue sky, we heard strains 
of music and when we looked out of the window we saw the organ and the whole choir, 
we felt like we were in heaven. How wonderful it seemed to us, a real inspiration. It 
was truly heart-breaking and yet it was soothing to our souls." 

' No one was ever able to understand how Mother and Father stood up under the 

terrible strain of those horrible treatments they had to give their children both those 
that lived and those who died. In the spring the quarantine was lifted and Hugh L. 
came home from his mission. We all tried to be brave and pick up the fragments of 
our lives. "I have always felt that /Vbther's sorrow was so great that she was never 
quite the same again." 

I Pa was in the real estate business with J.N. Larson and financially he was doing 

'very well . He was also a county commissioner in the old Oneida County. He also 
served as one of the first Franklin County Commissioners. 

Ralph was born on the 17 April 1909. This baby was Mother's joy and he helped 
to heal her torn heart. He was the one that AAother most loved because he was always 
givi ng her peace of mi nd . 

Pa was released from the bishopric in the Second Ward. He was called on his 
second mission in 1912. It was another mission to New Zealand. His finances were 
in pretty good shape but the farm and livestock needed a lot of attention to keep them 
on a paying basis. This meant that someone must do a lot of work . Maud was nearly 
twenty and she was teaching school . Hu^ and Estella were married, but Moses, Grant 
and Elva were in their teens. They all needed a lot of discipline that a father should 
give them. 

369 



Ma realized she had a hard deal ahead but as always when she felt It her duty, 
she was willing to put her shoulder to the wheel . She gave Pa her blessing of good will 
and faith. But if I was to say this mission took more stamina and strength than the first 
had done, I would not be far wrong. So as always. Ma put Pa's church duties before 
all else and she willingly gave him her love and blessings. She then began to assume 
all of his extra work and worry. 

Pa had been gone only a few months when their home burned to the ground. 
They were not even able to save a few pieces of furniture. They only had one thousand 
dollars insurance on the home. Uncle Jim, Pa's brother, took things into his hands 
and with the help of everyone in the Second Ward, a new house was built. It was a 
nicer house than the old one had been. Everyone gave them some furniture so that 
everything was taken care of except for things that could not be replaced. 

The following July, a large company of Maories and elders who had labored in 
the New Zealand Mission called in Preston to see Brother Geddes' home and family. 
President Joe Geddes, a brother of Pa, called a special meeting for all of the people 
in Preston to meet the Maories from New Zealand. The AAaories spoke in their native 
language and Bryant Mecham, a former missionary, acted as interpreter. After the 
meeting, they had a real community banquet for them. In the evening they all met at 
Ma's home for a real family party. The Maories took pictures and many happy memories 
back with them. They shared these with Pa who still had another year before he would 
be released from his mission. 

Pa was delighted to meet and welcome the Maories back to New Zealand. 
The Maories from far and near were gathered together as well as the missionaries and 
what a welcome they received! They could hardly wait to show Pa his home and family. 
His eyes filled with tears as he sat spellbound, looking over those pictures. 

It was nearly a year before he was released from his mission. He had hardly 
got settled before his son Moses was called to the New Zealand Mission. About this 
time Pa decided to sell his home in Preston and move to Banida. They had a pretty 
good home there and now that there were prospects of getting electricity, it wouldn't 
be bad to live there and It would be much easier to run the farm. Hugh was already 
out there and it wouldn't be long until Moses would be home. They sold out In Preston 
and moved to Banida. The stake had been divided by this time, so now they would 
belong to the Oneida Stake. At one of the stake conferences after the move, 15 Nov. 
1925, Pa was ordained as Patriarch by Apostle Joseph S. Smith. 

Pa had at this time filled two missions and sent all three of his sons on missions. 
Now World War I broke out and Grant enlisted. Elva was going to school in Provo and 
Ralph the youngest son was now In high school . 

It was Sept. and school had just got started, but the boys' thoughts hadn't yet 
settled down to real school work. It was almost duck season and Ralph and Hu^'sboy 
Paul had been planning on going duck hunting together. They had planned to go the 
night before the duck season opened and camp by the reservoir, so to be the first ones 
there in the morning. A few nights before, however, Paul's mother had had a dream and 



370 



it worried her. She had seen a funeral procession go by. So as Paul was preparing, his 
mother came out and said, "Paul, I don't think you boys had better go together; one 
of you go one way and the other the other way. " The boys were very disappointed and 
wanted to know why, but Liddie only said, "I think it best. " Paul decided not to go till 
morning. Ralph had planned and Pa and Ma had given their consent, so he saddled his 
pony, tied a sack of grain on one side and his lunch on the other and as he went he 
waved goodbye to Pa. 

Before he left Pa had told him to be sure to get home in time for school in the 
morning. In the morning Pa was up early; he did the chores and came in the house 
and lay down on the couch . He must have dozed off to sleep, but awakened with a 
start. He looked at the clock; it was just past nine and Ralph was not there, this 
wasn't like Ralph . Pa was almost panicky by this time, but felt that Ma must now know 
how he felt. He acted calm and said, "I believe I'll jump on a horse and ride up to the 
resevoir, for Ralph is going to be late for school . " When he got within a short distance 
of the resevoir he could see where Ralph had camped. There was his bedding all rolled 
up but no signed of Ralph or of the pony. 

Pa reached the resevoir and then he walked around in almost a frantic run. 
He then started home, trying to think that Ralph and he had missed each other, but 
when he got to the house there had been no mistake; Ralph had not been there. He 
went down to the school and got Paul to go back to the resevoir with him. There was stil 
no sign of Ralph or his pony, but as Paul and Pa began walking around the resevoir 
hand In hand, they saw something floating on the water. Pa reached out and picked It 
up and sure enough it was Ralph's hat. Pa fell to his knees and sobbed . "Oh, Paul , 
Ralph was under that hat. I'm sure he is under the water right here." 

They were both convinced that Ralph was in the resevoir. In less than an hour 
the bank was crowded with boys and men wading and diving in the deepest parts to see 
If they could not locate him. They would have drained the resevoir, but they knew it 
would do no good, too much time had gone by. It was almost sundown before the diver 
located him. They brought the youngest son home Just as the sun sank in the west. Pa 
was heartbroken and bewildered. He tried to hold up under the terrible shock and sorrow 
and be brave for Ma's sake, but Ma could not recover from the shock. She was never 
well from that day on. Her heart seemed to be broken. Just four years from that day 
on the 26 Dec. 1928 at the age of 63 she passed away. 

After her death Pa again was lost in the depths of sorrow. At the next stake 
conference. President Taylor Nelson asked him If he thought he could go on a six 
month mission to California. Pa said he would try to arrange things so that he could 
go. As soon as his call came 9 April 1929, Pa left for his third mission. His head- 
quarters were in Sacramento, California. His companion was a boy from Preston, 
Kenneth Stevenson. 

Pa was put in president of the district; he enjoyed it a great deal . He was 
released 4 Oct. 1928, and arrived in Salt Lake just in time for Oct. conference. He 
met many friends, missionaries and relatives. 



371 



Pa then came home and visited his children a few days. He really did not have 
a home to go to as his farm and house had been rented under contract. He v/ent to 
visit his daughter Elva who was teaching school at Blackfoot, He had some very dear 
missionary friends in Blackfoot by the name of Masons. He had a good time with them 
and in talking over old times and their experiences in New Zealand, they reminded 
him of their trip home and thar mutual friend Catherine Strong. Pa learned that she 
was living in Salt Lake City and working for some very nice people. Pa asked if it 
wouldn't be all right if he went down to see her. She was an old maid and she might 
be lonely too, I think she was much too young a woman for an old man like Pa. Any- 
way the first chance Pa had he went to Salt Lake to see her. They were married 5 Dec. 
1928, in the Salt Lake Temple. That winter they rented an apartment from Uncle Joe 
Geddes and lived in Preston for a year. 

When the lease on his Banlda property was up they moved out to the old place, 
but the old home was never home to Pa's family again; this caused him a lot of sadness. 
He died of heart trouble 24 Aug. 1934 at the age of seventy-five. He was a true and 
devoted and loving father, one who will always be remembered with loving pride and 
thankfulness. I will always cherish his memory. 

Sketch written by Estella G. Paton 



First Wife MARTENA PETERSEN 

Martena Petersen was born in Plain Gty, Weber, Utah, October 14, 1864, a 
daughter of Hans and Anna Martena Petersen. Her parents were born in Ostermane, 
Bornholm, Denmark. She was the fifth in a family of eight children . She went to 
school and experienced hardships and pleasures not unusual to pioneer life. She learned 
to work at an early age and helped with the tasks required. One of her most favored 
pastimes was gathering wild flowers. 



Mother was modest and unassuming. She was married in the Salt Lake Endowment 
House to Hugh Stewart Geddes of Plain City at the age of eighteen. One of her most 
outstanding characteristics was her great love for her husband. 



I 



1 



Several years after her marriage she was moved to a small house in Preston, Idaho 
It was here that her first two children were born. Her husband was called on an L .D.S. 
Mission to New Zealand when her baby boy was about one year old . Father thought 
that Mother would receive money from the sale of cattle that could be used for the 
support of herself and the little ones while he was away, but the money was never paid 
and Mother worked at washings, cleaning, whitewashing to support herself and her childrer 
while Father was away in New Zealand. 



Mother was humble and prayerful and was blessed in miraculous ways. Her 
favorite song was "Did you think to Pray." If Father were blue or discouraged. Mother 
buoyed him up with words of thankfulness for his safe return. She told him how grateful 



I 



372 



i 



she was for the health and strength they both enjoyed. Mother's faith, her sacrifice 
and her hard work were the contributing factors in the accomplishments of her husband 
and children. 

Mother cared for Father's youngest brother, Jim, as though he were one of her 
own children. She nursed him through several sicknesses; in fact, if she could help 
anyone she was always willing and ready to aid . If Mother thought she could render 
service in any way to friends or acquaintances, the night was never too dark or the 
distance too far. Mother was kind to animals and people. Many a cold night she 
has brought a new lamb or an ailing baby chick, or baby pig into the house for 
warmth and food. All the farm animals seemed to love her; she could do most any- 
thing with them. When horses or cows were in the open field and no one could catch 
them. Mother would walk out to the field and call and any of the horses or cows would 
come running out to her. 

Mother was a loyal member of the L .D. S, Church; especially was she zealous 
of her Relief Society membership. She was an acting Relief Society teacher from her 
marriage till her death . When she bought anything at a bazaar or fair and someone 
said, "I think you paid plenty," Mother's answer was, "Well that's all right. I 
bought this from the Relief Society." In the early days she helped with the gathering 
and the storing of the Relief Society wheat. She made many contributions both in 
service and money to the Relief Society. 

Mother always helped Father by giving him encouragement and inspiration. 
Many times she did the chores and finished his work In the fields so he could get off to 
some civic or church job. Mother was faithful and true to her God and to her church 
at all times Her faith gave her courage to bear the hardships and trials and the death 
of her loved ones. 

In 1912 Mother's home burned to the ground; her husband was on another mission 
in New Zealand at the time, but she wrote to her husband to finish his mission; and 
with the help of friends, relatives, and neighbors she would be able to rebuild the home. 
It was finished and the family had moved in before her husband's return from his mission. 

Her pride in her new home soon suffered a blow as her son Hu^ L. Geddes, 
persuaded her husband to sell their home and all of their property in Preston and buy a 
dry farm at Banlda, Idaho. She went along without question as had been her custom, 
but the move broke her heart. She never found any joy and happiness in her new home. 
She missed her fruit, berries, garden, and her friends. 

Mother had nine children: Estella Esther Geddes, Hugh Lester Geddes, Maude 
Lausetta Geddes, Moses Peterson Geddes, Grant Peterson Geddes, Elva P. Geddes, Arch 
Peterson Geddes, Donald Geddes, and Ralph Thomas Geddes. Three of her children 
are still living. Estella G, Paton of Preston, Idaho; Maude Murray of Ogden; and 
Grant Peterson Geddes of Eugene, Oregon. 

Mother died at the age of 63 at her home in Banlda, Idaho. To the end she was 
a loyal, faithful and loving mother. 

Sketch written by Mauu'e Lausetta Geddes Murray 

373 



Second Wife CATHERINE STRONG 

Catherine Strong was the daughter of Phillip Strong and Emma Hawkins; she was 
born 7 Sept. 1881, In London, England. 

I met her but a few times but they were unforgetable . Our personalities were 
very congenial; we loved many of the same things. ! loved to hear her tell about 
the culture and charm of "Merry England." She knew the folklore, history and had 
read much of the literature of her beloved country. Oh how she loved to talk about 
the ceremony of Royalty. She could give the history and pageantry of the Royal 
Family, including the magnificent record of the Royal Life Guards at Whitehall. She 
knew Stratford-on-Avon and Shakespeare's plays very well; In fact she could recite 
many passages from almost all of his plays. 

To Catherine, London had the glamor and charm of the world's greatest city. 
She never tired of talking about the Tower of London, the beauty of St. Paul's Cathedral, 
and falling water in Trafalgar Square, the wonders of Westminster Abbey, the luxuries 
of the Convent Gardens (London's market of fruit, flowers, vegetables) or of Nelson's 
Column, (the enbankment that runs along the left bank of the Thames from Westminster 
Bridge to Blackfriars). 

I never knew how old she was nor why she left London for New Zealand, but 
it was In New Zealand where she met the L.D.S. missionaries. She worked for many 
years in New Zealand after joining the church before coming to Salt Lake Gty, Utah. 
She met Hugh Geddes while he was on his second mission to New Zealand. She also 
was with the group of Saints who accompanied Hugh Geddes back to Utah . 

She obtained work In Salt Lake City, while her dearest friends, the Masons, 
came on to Banida, Idaho, to live near Hugh Geddes. 

After the death of Hugh Geddes' first wife, he went on his third mission to 
California; it was a short term one. Upon his return he visited with rrrast of his old 
friends from New Zealand; among them was Catherine Strong. They hod a short court- 
ship and then were married 5 Dec. 1928 in the Salt Lake Temple, accompanied by many 
mutual friends. 

Hugh's farm had been leased when he went on his mission, so the couple lived 
in an apartment of his brother Joe's home for the first year of their married life. Hugh's 
brother, sisters, and many friends found the couple very friendly and she was accepted 
by them all . When they moved into his home at Banida, Idaho, the ward accepted 
them gladly and Catherine soon had many dear friends. She was always active in the 
ward . 

She soon proved to be one of the best cooks In the family. Many of her English 
dishes were delicious and enjoyed by all of her friends and neighbors. She felt that 
the fare of England was solid and substantial . She said that meat of any kind should 



374 



be roasted, grilled or boiled but never fried . She loved her cup of black tea, many 
different cheeses, cider, pastries, Yorkshire pudding and relishes. Her cookies, 
especially her oatmeal ones v/ere liked by young and old. I never saw her cookie jar 
empty. 

She had the ability to make her home friendly and livable. She brought with 
her from New Zealand many wonderful keepsakes which she arranged around to beautify 
her home. One of her neighbors said she was always doing something to make you happy 
while you were in her home. Some thought her rather fussy, but most people enjoyed 
her many acts of thoughtful ness. She worked according to her own system; for example, 
her curtains were changed each spring and fall : she had summer ones and winter ones. 

She helped her husband meet many financial reverses and took care of him during 
his many last sicknesses. At his death she had no money nor any insurance. The Banida 
ward moved her to Idaho Falls at her request, bought her a small home and paid for the 
first two down payments. Her friends, the Masons, helped her obtain work. She at 
all times was a brave and courageous person and little by little she was able to meet 
the payments on her home. She made many new friends in Idaho Falls who were always 
willing to help her. She had a beautiful cat to keep her company and on the whole 
she was happy and did much good. 

When she became seriously ill , she turned her home over to her ward bishop who 
in turn took care of her. He sent her to Salt Lake to the L.D.S, hospital where her last 
days were made happy by many friends and her two nieces Allene and Francilda Sutherland, 

She died 13 May 1948 in the L.D.S. hospital at Salt Lake Gty, Utah. Allene 
Sutherland put a nice write-up in the Salt Lake Tribune after her death . The Idaho 
Falls bishop took her back to her home ward for the funeral services. He then brought 
her to the Preston Cemetery where she was buried by the side of her husband and his 
first wife. 

She was loved by many people in New Zealand, Salt Lake City, Preston, Banida, 
and Idaho Falls. It might be opyly said of Her: 

Be strong 

We are not here to play, to dream, to drift . 
We have hard work to do and loads to lift. 
Shun not the struggle, — face it; 'tis God's gift. 

Be strong! 

Say not the days are evil . Who's to blame ? 
And fold the hands and acquiesce, — O shame! 
Stand up, speak out, and bravely, in God's name. 

Be strong! 

It matters not how deep intrenched the wrong. 
How hard the battle goes, the day how long; 
Faint not, — fight on! Tomorrow comes the song. 

Maltbie D. Babcock 
375 



To me this is what Aunt Catherine did. 

Sketch written by Martha Geddes 



1 



JACOB ALONZO PATON 



B. 5 May 1884 
Bapt. 2 Aug. 1893 
Md. 18 June 1908 
End. 12 Oct. 1904 

Father James Osburn Paton 



Preston, Oneida, Idaho 
Preston, Oneida, Idaho 
Logan, Temple, Cache, Utah 
Logan, Temple, Cache, Utah 

Mother Rachel Ann Hall 



Wife 37 ESTELLA ESTHER GEDDES 



B. 18 March 1885 
Bapt. 23 March 1893 
End. IB June 1908 
Sealed 18 June 1908 

Father 5 Hugh Stewart Geddes 



Preston, Oneida , Idaho 
Preston, Oneida, Idaho 
Logon Temple, Cache, Utah 
Logan Temple, Cache, Utah 

Mother Mortena Peterson 



168 Marcella Geddes Paton 



180 Blanche Geddes Paton 



190 Donna Martena Paton 



210 James Larch Paton 



227Elva Annetta Paton 



259 Stewart Geddes Paton 



CHILDREN 



i 



B. 10 Sept. 1909, Preston, Oneida, Idaho ; 

Bapt. 26, Jan. 1915, Preston, Franklin, Idahor 
Md. 17 March 1930 to Frank R. Wilson * 

B. 15 Jan. 1912, Preston,Oneida, Idaho 
Bapt, 17 April 1921, Preston, Franklin, Idaho 
Md. 17 May. 1930 to Warren Fithean 
B. 4 May 1914, Preston, Franklin, Idaho 
Bapt, 20 Jan. 1923, Preston, Franklin, Idaho 
Md. 20 Jan. 1934 to La Grand Thompson 
B, 2 Aug, 1916, Preston, Franklin, Idaho 
Bapt. 15 Nov. 1924, Preston, Franklin, Idaho 
Md, 19 May 1935 to Carma Taylor 
B, 11 Dec. 1918, Grace, Bannock, Idaho 
Bapt. 20 Nov, 1927, Preston, Franklin, Idaho 
Md, 19, Sept, 1939 to Edwin Dursteler 
B, 22 April 1923, Preston, Franklin, Idaho 
Bapt. 23 June 1932, Preston, Franklin, Idaho 
Md. 12, July 1941 to Margie Tripp 



376 



246 Erma Geddes Paton 



B. 15 April 1921, Preston, Franklin, Idaho 
Bopt, 23 June 1930, Preston, Franklin, Idaho 
Md. 22 Nov. 1937 to Bartch Burnlusel 



45 HUGH LESTER GEDDES 



B. 28 July 1887 
Bapt. 5 June 1898 
End. 24 May 1906 
Md. 4 June 1909 
D. 1 Nov. 1941 
Bur. 5 Nov. 1941 

Father 5 Hugh Stewart Geddes 



Plain City, Weber, Utah 
Preston, Oneida, Idaho 
Salt Lake Temple, Salt Lake, Utah 
Logan Temple, Cache, Utah 
Preston, Franklin, Idaho 
Preston, Franklin, Idaho 

Mother Martena Peterson 



Wife LYDIA DONEY LOWE 



B. 31 Dec. 1887 
Chr. 7 Jan. 1888 
Bapt. 31 Dec. 1895 
End. 4 June 1909 
Sealed 4 June 1909 

Father James Gal lov/ay Lowe 



Franklin, Oneida, Idaho 
Franklin, Oneida, Idaho 
Franklin, Oneida, Idaho 
Logan Temple, Cache, Utah 
Logan Temple, Cache, Utah 

Mother Eliza Doney 



CHILDREN 



170 Paul Lowe Geddes 
178 Eliza Barta Geddes 
187 Hugh James Geddes 
193 Huitau Lowe Geddes 
208 Scott Lowe Geddes 
220 Dean Lowe Geddes 
230 Fern Lowe Geddes 

240 June Lowe Geddes 
252 Grace Lowe Geddes 
262 Jennie Bon Geddes 
274 Lucille Lowe Geddes 
283 Irel Lowe Geddes 
299 Garth Lowe Geddes 
I, 326 Ora Lowe Geddes 



B. 27 Feb. 1910, Franklin, Oneida, Idaho 
B. 7 Nov. 1911, Franklin, Oneida, Idaho 
B. 31 May 1913, Preston, Oneida, Idaho 
B. 30 Sept. 1914, Banida, Franklin, Idaho 
B. 27 May 1916, Banida, Franklin, Idaho 
B. 26 Dec. 1917, Banida, Franklin, Idaho 
B. 141 April 1919, Banida, Franklin, Idaho 
D. 1 Aug. 1919, Banida, Franklin, Idaho 
B. 14 June 1920, Banida, Franklin, Idaho 
B. 20 Nov. 1921, Banida, Franklin, Idaho 
B. 25 Aug. 1923, Banida, Franklin, Idaho 
B. 17 March 1925, Banida, Franklin, Idaho 
B. 3 Feb. 1927, Banida, Franklin, Idaho 
B. 7 Feb. 1929, Banida, Franklin, Idaho 
B. 22 Mar, 1933, Banida, Franklin, Idaho 



377 



45 HUGH LESTER GEDDES 

Hugh L. Geddes was born in Preston, Idaho, July 28, 1887, the first son 
of Hugh Stewart Geddes and Martena Peterson. He was one of a large family; 
his mother had ten children, seven boys and three girls. When he was two years 
old, his father was called from Preston on a mission to New Zealand, so they moved 
back to Plain Gty, Utah, their home town, so that his wife could be near her family 
and friends, for at that time Preston was a very scattered little settlement, and their 
homestead was on a flat about three miles west of Preston near Bear River, with 
not even a well . They had to carry their water straight up a hill from a spring in 
a nearby hollow . 

My first recollection of life was when my father left for his mission. We 
were all af Grandma Peterson's, and we all knelt in prayer. Of course I didn't 
know what it all meant, though the habit of prayer in the home was a daily occurrence; 
but all I remember was looking through the hall at Grandma's winding stairway and 
waiting until the prayer was over. Pa took me up in his arms and kissed me again 
and again. Then he held little Hugh such a long time, kissing him and crying. 
When he put him down, Hugh clung to Pa's leg and cried as though he knew . Of 
course. Ma waa standing close by and I remember she tried to take him, but he 
screamed all the more. 

I never knew where my father had gone, although at night Ma would take 
us both in her arms and tell us Pa was away across the big ocean preaching to the 
Maories in New Zealand, and would soon come back to us. Then she would rock 
us to sleep. Those days and nights must have been long and hard ones for Ma. For 
every day she would take little Hugh and me and go out washing and white-washing 
all day, and once I remember I asked her why she had to do other women's work, 
why they didn't do it for themselves. She took me in her arms, kissing me, and told 
me she had worked all the days for wood and coal, and now we'd have enough to 
keep us warm all winter. One winter Hugh and I had scarlet fever, and one night 
Uncle Grant, Pa's brother, walked clear from Ogden. When he got to our place. 
Ma met him at the door and told him he couldn't come in, as we had the scarlet fever. 
He said, "Yes, Tean, I'm coming in, for that's why I've walked all the way from 
Ogden; I felt that I was needed". He administered to Hugh and me and I remember 
him holding out his arms and saying, "Look, Tean, the fever has gone into my arms. 
They will get well " . 

Finally his mission was over, and Pa was given an honorable release. He 
came home and we moved back to Preston on the flat by the river. Pa built a new 
log house and there was where our early childhood began . Pa was a blacksmith 
and, of course, Hugh and I gathered up all the old irons and horseshoes, and Hugh 
was the blacksmith while I swept the dirt away and had a little room right next to 
his shop where I'd sit and rock my doll . 

A few years later. Pa bought a place nearer town so we wouldn't have so 
far to go to school . Both Hugh and I went to the Oneida Stake Academy. Still we 
had almost a mile to walk and it seemed after milking and the other chores were 

378 



all done, we were generally late. When Hugh was but a mere youth, they were 
building the flour mill, and Hugh helped carry the brick to build it. So after all, 
I guess he worked his way through school, though no one knew it until the building 
was about up and school was over. 

He was a champion marble player and a great athlete, a real fast runner, 
high-jumper, and baseball player. He always had a good pony, and was an excellent 
horseman. He took the missionary course at the Oneida Stake Academy, and ful- 
filled an honorable mission in the Southern States Mission from 1906 to 1908. He 
was married to Lydia Lowe in the Logan Temple, June 4, 1909. 

Hugh was always interested in public speaking and dramatic work. He 
wrote his own talks, and took first place in his compoation and delivery. He was 
a leader. Even in middle life, when we had our own families. Pa wanted us to get 
together and put on a play. So at Pa's request, our own family played "The Noble 
Outcast," and Hugh was the coach. He was a great actor and always had to carry 
the most difficult part, that of the villain, and he put his soul into everything he 
once began. I remember even now how frightened I would get to just have him 
come toward me, he was that convincing an actor. And to wind up things the way 
Pa planned, we took the play to Plain City, Pa's and Ma's old home town, and 
though it was a thriving little town just a few miles out of Ogden City, the play 
went over with honor for Pa and his Family. 

Hugh was a very intelligent man, a wonderful brother, and a loving and 
devoted husband and father. 

Part I, the words of his sister, Estella Geddes Paton 



While attending school at the old Oneida Stake Academy, I met Estella 
Geddes, Hugh L . 's older sister, who also attended school . Through her I met 
the parents of Estella and Hughie, that is what everyone called him. This was 
in 1907 or 1908, while Hugh Lester was on a mission to the Southern States Mission. 
After his return home I met him, and we were married on June 4, 1909, in the Logan 
Temple. 

Our first home was on a dry farm north of Preston some fifteen miles, a one- 
room house sitting up on a hill hot and dry with sage brush as far as the eye could 
see. Here we lived, cleared sage brush, killed snakes, hauled water for 14 months, 
then we borrowed three dollars, made a cash entry, and the land 150 acres, was 
ours. 

By this time a townsite had been established about a mile and a half from 
our homestead. Grandpa Geddes (Hugh Stewart) had given us a lot on which to 
build us a home, so we moved our one-room house there to that location, where 
Hugh L . later built a large home, and this was our home for the next 30 years. 



379 



By this time there were enough people living in and around to create a ward 
organization. H. L. was one of the men that met with the Oneida Stake Presidency 
for the creation of o ward. In time the request was granted, and James Daniel 
Taylor was its first Bishop. There was hardly enough people to officer the ward, 
but we carried on as best we could, Hugh L . holding many different assignments, 
president of the Y.M.M.I .A. , superintendent of the Sunday School , and at one 
time a counselor in the b'ishopric. 

At first we met in the different homes, until a church could be built, the 
male members going to the canyon getting out logs for lumber to be used in the building. f 
Jed Miles, Ernest Dixon, H. L. Geddes, Bo^ (or Robert) Geddes, Daniel Taylor, 
John Casperson, Don Baxter, Ether Esplin, were some of the names I remember. We j 
were all united, and worked for the good of all . Then we got a school which was 
held in the church also. Several names were suggested for the new ward, which was : 
finally named by Ezra J . Allen, As part of the land around about was in Bannock ; 

Caunty, and the other part was in Oneida County, he took the first three letters, : 

"Ban", from Bannock, and the last three letters, "ida", from Oneida, and gave 
if the name of "Banida". 

It was in Banida that our fourteen children were born: Paul , Barta, Hugh 
James, Huitau, Scott, Dean, Fern, June, Grace, Jennie Bon, Lucile, Irel, Garth, 
and Ora. Fern died when three months of age, August, 1919. All the rest have 
grown to man and womanhood. H. L. provided well for his family. Though we 
didn't have luxuries we always had food to eat and clothes to wear. 

Then in 1939 we walked out and left our home and land which we had lost 
through crop failures, and moved to the Fort Hall Indian Reservation, where we 
rented land . Hugh L . was suffering with a heart condition and could not work: and 
after living at Fort Hall, Idaho, for three years, we moved to Pocatello, built two 
log cabins on a 5-acre plot H . L . bought from a Mrs . Maggie Pheney . Dad's 
illness worsened, and on November 1, 1941, he died in the hospital in Preston, 
Idaho, and is buried in the Preston Cemetery, 

Part II, the words of his wife, Lydia Doney Lowe Geddes 



Perhaps this part should be written by one of Dad's children who remembers 
him well . I was just at the age when I began to notice the people around me, when 
Dad discovered he had heart trouble, and to me he was never a vigorous, active 
person, as most people remember him. To me Dad was a man conscious of his sickness, 
and he didn't lift anything, or do any work, but superi vised his family, and rested 
often on the couch . One of the most vivid memories for me is the little box which 
contained the little light-green capsules he used to have to swallow for his heart 
condition. But I remember Dad was a master at mathematics, and had a brihHant 
mind . 

I'm sure his heart trouble was hard for Dad to accept, after he had been so 
active all his life, never having to give a thought to his body, because it had always 



380 



been equal to any task he hod put it to. But at the time Dad became sick, he still 
had a large young family to care for, he was in debt, and it was in the time of the 
Great Depression. Under these conditions, it's a wonder to me that Dad found the 
courage, after the home in Banida had been lost to the mortgage company, to move 
his family north to Fort Hall, Idaho, and there literally to begin again from "scratch" 
a sick man, who had less than five years to live. But in the spring of 1937, that's 
what he did. We moved from Banida to Fort Hall, Idaho, where Dad rented some 
Indian land on the Indian Reservation there. 

So for three years we farmed 120 acres of wonderful Indian land, with plenty 
of water for irrigation, and I know there was no better farming done on the Reservation, 
It was all done under Dad's management only, because he could do little more than 
supervise, but even so, he was known as a man who accomplished things. 

At the end of those three years our lease expired, and Dad and Mother, 
with the proceeds from the three years on the farm, bought a little acreage in 
Pocatello and built another home, where Dad lived a little more than a year. On 
this acreage we had cows and chickens, pasture, and raised peas and early potatoes 
to sell to the stores, and I think Dad's planning and preparation for his family 
during the time when he knew he wouldn't be with them, was very evident. Through 
this time his health was becoming more and more a problem to him. One day he 
discovered he had lost the sight of one of his eyes, which his doctor explained 
was the result of a blood clot which might have killed him if it had struck in another 
part of the body. 

There were still many problems at this time, I suppose children to be raised 
and educated was the main one. Jobs were not easily found, and at this time his 
daughter Huitau started an enterprise in Pocatello. Huitau had learned to invisibly 
mend silk and nylon hosiery, and established such a business in a department store 
in Pocatello. I think it was hard to get es tablished, and very slow at first. Huitau 
probably never made a dime with it, but after the business was established it event- 
ually gave employment to some of Dad's other daughters, Grace and Lucille, and 
Dad was grateful to Huitau for making this possible. 

Then in November of 1941, I remember Dad was sitting in the big chair 
in the living room as we said goodnight to him. We knew he'd acquired a cold 
which seemed to be getting worse, and we'd been told that in the morning Dad would 
leave for Preston where he could see Doctor Cutler, the doctor who had cared for 
him all through his illness. That was the last time I ever saw Dad alive. He went 
to Preston, was confined to the hospital; in about a week or so lapsed onto a coma, 
then finally passed away November 1, 1941, 



170 PAUL LOWE GEDDES 

B. 27 Feb, 1910 Franklin, Oneida, Idaho 

Chr. I May 1910 Preston, Oneida, Idaho 

Bapt. 30 Mar. 1918 Banida, Franklin, Idaho 



381 



Md. 29 May 1939 
End. 23 June 1943 

Father 45 Hu^ Lester Geddes 



Washington D ,C. 

Logan, Temple, Cache, Utah 

Mother Lydia Doney Lowe 



Wife JOHNETTA WORLEY 



B. 16, July 1917 
Chr. 2 Sept 1917 
Bapt. 2 Aug. 1925 
End. 23 June 1943 

Father John Pehrson Worley 



Arimo, Bannock, Idaho 
Arimo, Bannock, Idaho 
Arimo, Bannock, Idaho 
Logan Temple, Cache, Utah 

Mother Eleanor Larsen 



CHILDREN 



478 Paul Lowe Geddes, Jr, 
423 Ralph Worley Geddes 



B. 28 Aug. 1942, Washington, D.C. 

B. 22 Jan. 1946, Pocatello, Bannock, Idaho 



170 PAUL L. GEDDES AND FAMILY 

Paul L. Geddes was born to Hugh Lester Geddes and Lydia Lowe Geddes 
at Preston, Idaho, on February 27, 1910, He lived with his parents during his 
formative years at Banida, Idaho; was g^aduated from Preston High School in 1927, 
and from Utah State with a B.S. degree in 1936. Later, he took further work and 
graduated from Columbia University, Washington, D.C, in 1942, with an LLB . 

He married Johnetta Worley at Washington, D.C, on May 29, 1939. 
From this union was born Paul L. Geddes, Jr. on August 28, 1942, at Washington D.C. 
and Ralph Worley Geddes, January 22, 1946, at Pocatello, Idaho. 

His employment history in capsule form was two years as a grade school 
teacher from 1933 to 1935, and two years as a high school teacher from 1936 to «,' 

1938. In 1939 he began service with the government where he served, including 
military service, until 1946, leaving as an investigator with the U.S. Ovil Service 
Commission. For two and a half years he endeavored in the field of real estate 
as a broker in Idaho. In 1948 he returned to government service and continued 
in this work until 1955 when he resigned as a Security Analyst at Atomic Energy 
Commission in Idaho Falls, Idaho, to take up a homestead at Rupert, Idaho. He 
proved up on this homestead two years later and returned to government service 
in Los Angeles, California, in February of 1957, where he is presently employed 
by the Los Angeles Air Procurement District as Security Officer, l 



He is an Elder in the El Monte Ward of Covina Stake in California. His 
son Paul is a teacher, and his son Ralph a deacon in the same ward . His wife 



382 



■ 



Johnetta Worley Geddes is secretary of the Young Ladies Mutual Improvement Assoc- 
iation in the ward . 

His philosophy of life is simple. He believes that education is not limited 
to the formative years; but that every day brings a new opportunity for learning 
in every kind of situation in which a man might find himself. He believes as his 
father, Hugh Lester Geddes was once to say, "Every man knows something that 
you want to know and can benefit from, if you can just get him to teach you." 

He and his family are at home to their relatives and friends at 336 Walnut 
Street, El Monte, California. 

Sketch written by Paul L. Geddes 



CARL PRICE TAYLOR 



B. 24 Nov. 1913 
Chr. 4 Jan. 1914 
Bapt. 4 Feb. 1922 
Md. 30 Nov. 1932 
End. 1 June 1934 



Paris, Bear Lake, Idaho 
Paris Bear Lake, Idaho 
Paris, Bear Lake, Idaho 
Logan, Cache, Utah 
Logan Temple, Cache, Utah 



Father Arthur Taylor Mother Mary Ann Price 

Wife 178 ELIZA BARTA GEDDES 



B. 7 Nov. 1911 
Chr. 3 Dec. 1911 
Bapt. 23 Nov. 1919 
End. 1 June 1934 
Sealed 1 June 1934 

Father 45 Hu^ Lester Geddes 



Franklin, Oneida, Idaho 
Franklin, Oneida, Idaho 
Banida, Franklin, Idaho 
Logan Temple, Cache, Utah 
Logan Temple, Cache, Utah 

Mother Lydia Doney Lowe 



CHILDREN 



431 Lois Marie Taylor 
451 Barbara Taylor 

497 Carl Geddes Taylor 
513 JoAnn Taylor 
639 Margie Taylor 



B. 8 Sept. 1934, Paris, Bear Lake, Idaho 

B. 17 Sept. 1939, Paris, Bear Lake, Idaho 

Bapt, 3 Jan. 1948, Logan, Cache, Utah 

B, n Jan. 1944, Montpelier, Bear Lake, Idaho 

B. 26 March 1945, Montpelier, Bear Lake, Idaho 

B. 9 April 1953, Logan, Cache, Utah 



383 



aVDE ODELL RIGBY 



B. 19 April 1934 
Chr. 3 June 1934 
Bapt. 5 June 1942 
Md. 4 Sept. 1953 
End. 4 Sept. 1953 

Father John Rollin RIgby 



Montpelier, Bear Lake, Idaho 
AAjntpelier, Bear Lake, Idaho 
Montpelier, Bear Lake, Idaho 
Salt Lake Temple, Salt Lake, Utah 
Salt Lake Temple, Salt Lake, Utah 

Mother Geneva Keller 



t 



f 



Wife 431 LOIS MARIE TAYLOR 



B. 8 Sept. 1934 
Bapt . 5 Dec . 1 942 
End. 4 Sept. 1953 
Sealed 4 Sept. 1953 

Father Car\ Price Taylor 



Paris, Bear Lake, Idaho 

Paris, Bear Lake, Idaho 

Salt Lake Temple, Salt Lake, Utah 

Salt Lake Temple, Salt Lake, Utah 

Mother 178 Eliza Barta Geddes 



CHILDREN 



I 



700 Fern Rl^y 



B. 13 June 1954, Pocatello, Bannock, Idaho 



187 HUGH JAMES GEDDES 



B. 31 May 1913 
Chr. 3 Aug. 1913 
Bapt. 22 Oct. 1921 
Md. 4 July 1939 
End. 17 Dec. 1941 

Father 45 Hu^ Lester Geddes 



Preston, Oneida, Idaho 
Preston, Oneida, Idaho 
Banida, Franklin, Idaho 
Ogden, Weber, Utah 
Logan Temple, Cache, Utah 

Mother Lydia Doney Lowe 



Wife SARAH MILES 



B. 5 Dec. 1915 
Chr. 11 Dec. 1915 
Bapt. 22 Dec. 1923 
End. 30 Nov. 1934 
Sealed 17, Dec. 1941 

Father Jeddie LeRoy Miles 



Banida, Franklin, Idaho 
Banida, Franklin, Idaho 
Banida, Franklin, Idaho 
Salt Lake Temple, Salt Lake, Utah 
Logan Temple, Cache, Utah 

Mother Amelia Almira Smith 



384 



CHILDREN 



472 Oarole Geddes 
509 Harry Miles Geddes 
490 Jeddie Hugh Geddes 
593 Phillip Miles Geddes 
620 Jack Miles Geddes 



B. 16 Jan. 1942, Banida, Franklin, Idaho 
B. 15 Aug. 1943, Banida, Franklin, Idaho 
B. 16 Jan. 1945, Banida, Franklin, Idaho 
B. 5 Dec. 1950, Preston, Franklin, Idaho 
B. 27 March 1952, Presfon, Franklin, Idaho 



187 HUGH JAMES GEDDES 

I, Hugh James Geddes, was born 31 May 1913 at my Aunt Ada Hart's home 
in Preston., Franklin, Idaho. My father's name was Hugh Lester Geddes, my mother's 
name was Lydia Lowe. I was the third child of a family of fourteen. 

My parents homesteaded a piece of land in Banida, Franklin, Idaho where 
I spent most of my childhood days. I went to school in a two room school, four 
grades in a room. I remember having many happy memories there. I lived close 
to the school and when the bell rang I could run and be early. 

During my childhood we moved to Preston 2nd Ward one winter and for a 
short time lived in Grand Junction, Colorado, In Grand Junction I used to chase 
quail out of the garden with a shot gun. 

Oh how I loved to go to my Grandma Lowes in the summer for vacation where 
I could fish in a little stream that ran past her home. I caught some mighty nice 
ones on a willow and my Grandmother would cook them for me. 

Work was scarce when I grew up; I joined the CCC's for one summer and 
then I came home and worked in my father's sawmill at Cottonwood, Idaho. Ray 
Smith and I would cut the trees and haul them down and saw them into lumber, 

I have always loved to hunt and fish. 

Later Dad rented a farm at Fort Hall, Idaho; I helped him move up there 
and helped him with his row crops. Then I rented a piece of land and married Sarah 
Miles, 4 July 1939; we lived in Fort Hall until 1945, while there we had two 
children Carole and Harry Miles, then I moved back to Banida, Idaho. I bought 
my father-in law's, Jed Miles, place where I live today in 1965, 

I have worked in the church being a counselor in M.I. A., a Scout Master 
and at the present time I am the Ward Clerk. 

In Banida, Idaho we had three more children: Jeddie Hugh, Phillip Miles, 
and Jack Miles. 



385 



Wife SARAH MILES 

I, Sarah Miles, married Hugh James Geddes 4 July 1939. We moved to 
Fort Hall, Idaho and lived there until 1945, TViose were happy days even though 
primitive; we didn't have any electricity. While there we had two children, Carole 
and Harry Miles, i helped in the Primary while I was there. 

I have always been active in the church; at the age of 18 I went on a mission 
to the Western States for two years. I have worked in Primary, with the LDS Girl 
Program In MIA, Sunday School and at present I am counselor in Relief Society, 
Sunday School and Primary teacher. 

We have had five children; Qirole married Richard Max Pilgrim, Harry 
Miles married Josephine Gregersen, Jeddie Hugh In the Armed Services, Phillip 
Miles and Jack Miles in school . 



RICHARD AAAX PILGRIM 



B. 27 Mar. 1941 
Chr. 17 May 1941 
Md. 17 May 1963 
Bapt. 27 Mar. 1949 



Malad, Oneida, Idaho 
Malad, Oneida, Idaho 
Banida, Franklin, Idaho 
Malad, Oneida, Idaho 



Father John Max Pilgrim 



Mother Theda Ward 



Wife 472 CAROLE GEDDES 



B. 16 Jan. 1942 
Chr. 1 Mar. 1942 
Bapt. 4 Feb. 1950 



Banida, Franklin, Idaho 
Banida, Franklin, Idaho 
Preston, Franklin, Idaho 



Father 187 Hu^ James Geddes 



Mother Sarah Miles 



509 HARRY MILES GEDDES 



B. 15 Aug. 1943 
Bapt. 3 Nov. 1951 
End. 13 Feb. 1962 
Md. 12, Feb. 1965 

Father 187 Hu^ James Geddes 



Banida, Franklin, Idaho 
Preston, Franklin, Idaho 
Logan Temple, Cache, Utah 
Logan Temple, Cache, Utah 

Mother Sarah Miles 



386 



Wife JOSEPHINE GREGERSEN 



B 15 April 1944 
Bapt 3 May 1952 
Md 12 Feb. 1965 
End 12 Feb 1965 
Sid 12 Feb 1965 

Father Fredick Lauritz Gregersen 



Preston, Franklin, Idaho 
Preston, Franklin, Idaho 
Logan Temple, Cache, Utah 
Logan Temple, Cache, Utah 
Logan Temple, Cache, Utah 

Mother Frieda Mockli 



HARRY LAMONTE MILES 



B 21 Sept. 1912 
Chr 3 Nov. 1912 
Bapt 28 Nov. 1920 
Md 5 April 1932 
End 19 Nov. 1943 

Father Jeddie LeRoy Miles 



Banida, Franklin, Idaho 
Banida, Franklin, Idaho 
Banida, Franklin, Idaho 
Brigham City, Box Elder, Utah 
Logan Temple, Cache, Utah 

Mother Amelia Almira Smith 



Wife 193 HUITAU LOWE GEDDES 



B 30 Sept. 1914 
Chr 13 Dec. 1914 
Bapt 30 Sept. 1922 
End 19 Nov. 1943 
Sealed 19 Nov. 1943 

Father 45 Hugh Lester Geddes 



426 Beverly Roe Miles 
496 Dawn Miles 



540 Harry Lamonte Miles 



B 18 June 1929 
Bapt 1 Dec. 1940 
End 15 Oct. 1949 
Md 12 Dec. 1951 



Banida, Franklin, Idaho 
Banida, Franklin, Idaho 
Banida, Franklin, Idaho 
Logan Temple, Cache, Utah 
Logan Temple, Cache, Utah 

Mother Lydia Doney Lowe 
CHILDREN 

B 27 Dec. 1932, Banida, Franklin, Idaho 
B 1 Jan. 1944, Preston, Franklin, Idaho 
Bapt 29 March 1952, Preston, Franklin, Idaho 
Md 22 Feb. 1961 to Delbert V. Ramsey 
B 6 March 1947, Preston, Franklin, Idaho 

BLAINE LEE OLSEN 

Huntsville, Salt Lake, Utah 
Huntsville, Salt Lake, Utah 
Logan Temple, Cache, Utah 
Logan Temple, Cache, Utah 



Father Harry George Olsen Mother Leona Elsie Christensen 

Wife 426 BEVERLY RAE MILES 



B 27 Dec. 1932 
Chr 5 March 1933 
Bapt 3 May 1941 



Banida, Franklin, Idaho 
Banida, Franklin, Idaho 
Banida, Franklin, Idaho 



387 



End 12 Dec. 1951 
Sealed 12 Dec. 1951 

Fafher Harry Lamonte Miles 



Logan Temple, Cache, Utah 
Logan Temple, Cache, Utah 

Mother 193 Huitau Lowe Geddes 



CHILDREN 



696 Jacquelynn Olsen 
701 Randy Blaine Olsen 

740 Joseph Harry Olsen 

741 Patricia Lee Olsen 



B 5 Nov . 1952, Preston, Franklin, Idaho 

B 9 Sept. 1954, Mesa, Maricopa, Arizona 

B 22 Oct. 1959, Ogden, Weber, Utah 

B 26 June 1963, Ogden, Weber, Utah 



208 SCOTT LOWE GEDDES 



B 22 May 1916 
Bapt 6 July 1924 
Md 20 May 1935 

Father 45 Hugh Lester Geddes 



Banida, Franklin, Idaho 
Banida, Franklin, Idaho 
Preston, Franklin, Idaho 

Mother Lydia Doney Lowe 



First Wife ALICE INGA LARSON 



B 5 Dec. 1916 
Bapt 6 June 1925 
D 9 May 1941 

Father Harold Axel Larson 



Froby, Bingtun, Sweden 
Banida, Franklin, Idaho 
Sloat, Plumas, California 

Mother Ellen Cecelia Ringdiom 



CHILDREN 



434 Shirley Ann Geddes 
423 Patricia Geddes 



B 25 Aug. 1935, Ogden, Weber, Utah 
B 28 Feb. 1939, Preston, Franklin, Idaho 



Second Wife LOIS NELSON SHAFFER* 



B 15 Sept. 1913 

Md 19 Feb. 1942 

* First Husband was William Jackson Long 

Father John Martin Shaffer 



Preston, Franklin, Idaho 



Mother Julia Ann Nelson 



CHILDREN 



488 Lowell Scott Geddes 



B 20 July 1943, Salt Lake City, Salt Lake, Utah 
Bapt 4 Jan. 1952, Salt Lake City, Salt Lake, Ut 



388 



530 Gale Lawrence Geddes B. 22 Sept. 1946, Salt Lake City, S.L., Utah 

Bapt. 29 April 1955, Salt Lake City, S.L., Utah 



208 SCOTT LOWE GEDDES 

I was born May 27, 1916 at Banida, Idaho and was the son of Mr. and Mrs. 
HughL. Geddes. I was a small child in physical stature in comparison with the 
other boys in the family. I spent my childhood in Banida and Preston, Idaho. 
School was enjoyable for me and I was a good student scholastical ly; I also had 
a good sports record in the broad jump and high hurdle in high school . In 1934 I 
graduated from high school and went to Butte, Montana, where I worked around 
the country doing farm work . After g-aduation from high school , I married Alice 
Inga Larson. 

From 1936 to 1941 I worked in the woods in Portola, California. It was 
here that Alice died bearing our third child . Two daughters survived her, Shirley 
Ann^and Patricia . 

I married Lois Shaffer on February 19, 1942. We worked and lived in 
Washington, D.C., until July 1, 1942 and then returned to Pocatello, Idaho, where 
I trained as a switchman for the Union Pacific railroad. 

In August of 1943 I joined the Navy and was trained in Navy Seabees 
demolition. I was stationed in Adak and on Okinawa. I was released from the Navy 
in November of 1945. 

I had two sons by Lois, Lowell Geddes, born July 20, 1943 and Gale 
Lawrence Geddes, born September 22, 1946. In September of 1947 I attended 
Henager's School and worked part-time advertising and printing at Utah Lumber 
Company until December 1949. I also worked in building material and plans and 
am presently at Deseret Lumber Company where I am the business manager. 

My paramount business has been lumber. Experience and my work with 
contractors has taught me a great deal and has made me an authority in the lumber 
business . 

DEAN CHENEY ALLEN 

B. 7 Feb. 1932 Fairview, Sanpete, Utah 

Md. 16 July 1954 Salt Lake City, Salt Lake, Utah 

Father Orin Cheney Allen Mother Annie Rath Christenson 



Wife 434 SHIRLEY ANN GEDDES 
B. 25 Aug. 1935 Ogden, Weber, Utah 

389 



Father 208 Scott Lowe Geddes Mother Alice Inga Larson 



CHILDREN 

703 Danny Dean Allen B. 22 March 1955, Salt Lake City, S.L., Utah 

781 Vicky Lyn Allen B. 17 March 1957, Salt Lake City, S.L., Utah 

782 Deanna Allen B. 1962, Salt Lake City, S.L., Utah 



434 SHIRLEY ANN GEDDES ALLEN 

I was born August 25, 1935, at Ogden, Utah, the daughter of Scott Lowe 
Geddes and Alice Inga Larson Geddes. I lived quite a few places when I was 
young, and my memory is not too good as to all the places and the dates, but I 
will do the best I can. I will start with Blackfoot and Fort Hall , Idaho . In 1939 
I was presented with a little sister, Patricia Geddes. She was born in Preston, 
Idaho. We then moved to California when Daddy was in the lumber business . 

In 1941 , great tragedy came to our family. Our beloved Mother passed 
away bearing her third child . The little child, a boy, died also . Our Father took 
us by train to Idaho where our mother was buried in the Preston cemetery. My 
father, not knowing which direction to turn, was glad to have help from different 
members of the family. My grandparents, Mr. and Mrs. Harold A. Larson, took 
me in and made me a member of their family, until Daddy could once again rejoin 
us. I still feel as though I am a daughter instead of a grand-daughter . They set 
a great example in life for me, one that I will never forget and never stop using. 

In 1942 Daddy married Lois Shaffer. She was from Preston, Idaho. He met 
her and married her in Washington. After remarrying. Daddy came to get Pat and 
me and we moved to Salt Lake City, where we lived until Daddy joined the Navy; 
then we moved to Preston, Idaho again. Just two weeks before we moved to Preston, 
we were presented with a beautiful little brother, Lowell Scott Geddes. Daddy 
returned from the Navy in 1945 and we once again returned to Salt Lake Gty. We 
received our next little brother in 1946, who received the name of Gale Lawrence 
Geddes. I tended Gale after school because Lois started working shortly after 
Gale turned one . 

I attended the first grade in Banida, Idaho, while I was living with my 
grandparents. I attended the second grade in Salt Lake City at Riverside the year 
Daddy remarried. I attended the third and fourth grades in Preston while Daddy 
was in the Navy. I attended the remainder of the fourth and fifth and sixth grades 
in Madison Elementary School . 

I also attended Madison in the seventh grade, then we moved to a different 
part of Salt Lake and I attended Jordan Junior High until I graduated from junior 
high, then I attended West High School. I graduated from West High in 1954. 



390 



I then started working in an insurance office as a secretary. 

I was married in Salt Lake City, July 16, 1954, to Dean C. Allen, son of 
Mr. and Mrs. Orin C. Allen, Fillmore, Utah. Before my marriage I taught Junior 
Sunday School for five years. I enjoy teaching small children. 

In 1955, March 22, I had my first baby, a little boy. We named him Danny 
Dean Allen. He was born here in Salt Lake City, Utah. We moved to Fillmore, 
Utah, where Dean leased a farm for two years. During our time there, I was activity 
counselor in the Mutual, a primary teacher to the Blazers, and a mutual teacher 
to the Mia Maid girls . I enjoy working in the church . It is a very rewarding job . 

In 1957 on March 17, another blessed event arrived in our family — a little 
girl by the name of Vicky Lyn Allen. 

In 1957 we moved back to Salt Lake City, where Dean is a route salesman . 
He sells breads of all sorts. We are now waiting for a home to be built in Kearns 
where we plan to spend the rest of our time . Of course it is awful ly hard to say 
where you are going to be the rest of your lives because things will change. 

We have hopes that in the near future we can go through the temple and have 
our children sealed to us and also that we may be sealed for time and eternity. 



ROBERT STAPLEY 

B. about 1925 

Md. 20 July 1957 Salt Lake City, Salt Lake, Utah 



Wife 723 PATRICIA GEDDES 
B. 28 Feb. 1939 Preston, Franklin, Idaho 

Father 208 Scott Lowe Geddes Mother Alice Inga Larson 

CHILDREN 
783 Denny Robert Stapley B. 14 May 1958, Salt Lake City, Salt Lake, Utah 

723 PATRICIA GEDDES STAPLEY 

I was born February 28, 1939, in Preston, Idaho, to Scott Lowe Geddes and 
Alice Inga Larson Geddes. When I came home from the hospital I was g-eeted by my 
sister, Shirley Ann. She was three and a half when I was born. 



391 



In 1941 our mother died bearing her third child, a little boy, who also died 
at birth . 

In 1942 Daddy married Mrs. Lois Shaffer Long in Washington, D.C., where 
he was going to school and Lois was working. We made our home in Salt Lake City, 
Utah, until Daddy joined the Navy in 1943 and then we moved to Preston, Idaho. 

In 1943 we were presented with a little brother by thie name of Lowell Scott 
Geddes. He was born about two weeks before we moved to Preston. When Daddy 
returned from the Navy in 1945, we moved back to Salt Lake City and have made 
that our present home. Gale Lawrence Geddes was born September 22, 1946. 

I attended Madison Elementary School and Riverside Elementary School . I 
also attended Jordan Junior High School. I graduated from junior high into West 
High School, where I just attended my sophomore year and decided that I wanted 
to take a beauty course. I attended Ex-Cel-Sis Beauty School . 

I married Robert Stapley July 20, 1957, in Elko, Nevada. My sister and 
her husband accompanied us. They were also our witnesses at our wedding. I am 
expecting my first baby in May of this year, 1958. 



488 LOWELL SCOTT GEDDES 

i, Lowell Scott Geddes, was born July 20, 1943, to Scott Geddes and Lois 
Nelson Shaffer Geddes. I was born in Salt Lake City, Utah. After I had been home 
but a couple of days, we moved to Preston, Idaho. My father had joined the Navy 
so Mother took us to her home town to live until his return from the Navy in 1945. 
We then moved back to Salt Lake City, where we have made our present home. In 
1946 I was presented with a little brother, by the name of Gale Lawrence Geddes. 

Mother went to work in 1947 so she put us in a nursery school during the 
day. I started school in 1949. I attended Franklin Elementary for two years, and 
then transferred to Riverside Elementary until I graduated into junior high school . 
I attended the Jordon Junior High School and am now in the ninth grade. 

I have just recently been ordained a Teacher in the Church of Jesus Christ 
of Latter Day Saints. I am president of our Sunday School class, and secretary in 
the Priesthood, I have hopes that when the time comes I will be able to fill a mission 
for our church . 



530 GALE LAWRENCE GEDDES 

I, Gale Lawrence Geddes, was born in 1946, September 22, in Salt Lake 
City, Utah to Scott Lowe Geddes, and Lois Nelson Shaffer Geddes. 



392 



My mother started working when I was just a year old, so my oldest sister, 
Shirley Ann, tended me after she got home from school, and a baby tender tended 
me during the day. I have two half-sisters: Shirley Ann Geddes Allen and Patricia 
Geddes Stapley. My father had them by a previous marriage. Their mother died In 
1941. Mother and Daddy were then married in 1 942 in Washington, D.C.. My 
brother, Lowell Scott Geddes, was born In 1943. 

I attend Riverside Elementary School where I am in the sixth grade. I go 
to Primary and will graduate this fall Into Mutual . I was baptised Into the Church 
of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints when I was eight years old . My interests are 
basketball , fishing and all kinds of outdoor sports. I am taking trumpet lessons In 
school . 



220 DEAN LOWE GEDDES 



B. 26 Dec. 1917 
Chr. 3 Feb. 1918 
Bapt. 26 Dec. 1925 
Md. 2 Sept. 1941 

Father 45 Hugh Lester Geddes 



Banlda, Franklin, Idaho 
Banida, Franklin, Idaho 
Banlda, Franklin, Idaho 
Pocatello, Bannock, Idaho 

Mother Lydia Doney Lowe 



BERNITA FRANCES BAUER 



Catholic B. 3 Feb. 1918 
Record Chr. 6 Feb. 1918 
Bapt. 6 Feb. 1918 

Father Anthony J. Bauer 



Dubuque, Dubuque, Iowa 
Dubuque, Dubuque, Iowa 
Dubuque, Dubuque, Iowa 

Mother Mary A. Borghorst 



479 Cody Bauer Geddes 



CHILDREN 

B. 21 Sept. 1942, St. Anthony, Fremont, Idaho 



VERNON THOMAS ERICKSON 



Luthern B. 17 Feb. 1918 
Record Md . 4 May 1941 

Father Thomas Erickson 



Pocatello, Bannock, Idaho 
Mother Sel ma Zacherlason 



393 



wife 240 JUNE LOWE GEDDES 



B. 14 July 1920 
Chr. 1, Aug. 1920 
Bapt. 1 June 1929 

Father 45 Hugh Lester Geddes 



CHILDREN 



505 Lydia Kay Erickson 
525 Thomas Rick Erickson 



Banida, Franklin, Idaho 
Banida, Franklin, Idaho 
Banida, Franklin, Idaho 

Mother Lydia Doney Lowe 



B. 7 Nov. 1944, Pocotello, Bannock, Idaho 
B. 13 May 1946, Pocotello, Bannock, Idaho 



I 



240 JUNEL. GEDDES ERICKSON 

I was born June 14, 1920, the 8th child of Lydia Lowe Geddes and Hugh 
Lester Geddes, at Banida, Idaho. I am a born member of the Church of Jesus 
Christ of Latter Day Saints, for which I am very thankful . 

My childhood was a happy one, with 12 1 iving brothiers and sisters to share 
my good and bad times . Our fan il y had the appearance of two smaller families, 
as the older ones, Paul^arta, Huitau, Hugh J ., and Scott, were away at school 
or working; while Dean, June , Grace, Jennie Bon, Lucille, Irel , Garth and Ora , 
were the younger ones at home . I, being the oldest girl of the younger family and 
sort of a "tom-boy, " was supposed to keep my eyes out for my younger sisters . 
Try as I would to frighten them by telling tall tales and making the horses jump, 
the cows run, the pigs scatter, wherever I went — following me were Grace, 
Jennie Bon, and little Lucille, who would stumble and fall over the rocks and stubble, 
Consequently, Mother called me the "ring leader," and the one who thought up 
all the devilment. I was the one who received the most "butter paddlings." This 
is a process applied to the best paddled area of the body and the secret is to keep 
your hands away from that area. I wonder now that I am raising my family how 
Mother ever managed, but we would go to bed at night our clothes all dirty, and 
awaken in the morning to have clean, freshly ironed clothes, ready to wear. 

Irma Payton, my cousin who lived in Preston, came to Banida each summer 
and what I couldn't think of - she could. Daddy and Mother had lots of chickens, 
and we could take 2 eggs to the little store and receive a nickle's worth of candy. 
One summer Irma and I decided we would take eggs without asking Mother so we 
went to the chicken coop and gathered about one dozen each, and placed them 
in our pantaloons which were black cotton, and they fit loosely except them were 
tight around the knees. We were walking carefully past our house on the way to 
the store when Mother came out and asked us what we were doing. We tried to 
act nonchalant about all the eggs in our bloomers, and in an effort to prove that 
nothing was wrong, we sat down in the swings! 1 1 ! What a mess of broken eggs 
we had. We never took eggs again without consent. 



394 



About 12 years of happy childhood memories passed, and I went to Preston 
to high school . This was comparatively uneventful; because of lack of funds I 
worked for the superintendent of public schools during the 4 years. During my 
senior year Mother and Father moved to Fort Hall, Idaho, because we had lost 
our homestead in Banida, but I stayed in Preston to finish school . 

I attended Southern Branch of the University of Idaho at Pocatello for one 
year, and because of lack of funds quit school and went to work for tfie Mountain 
States Telephone Company, where I was working when I met my husband. I married 
Vernon T. Erickson on May 4, 1941 . Mother and Father both thought Rick ( my 
husband) was a fine boy, but they asked me not to marry out of our church . I 
felt I could convert Rick to Mormonism, and I am still trying. My married life 
has been happy In many ways, but a rather stormy course because of several separations 
and divorce and re-marriage. If I had converted Rick to Mormonism before our 
marriage, I really think we might have had a more smooth married life. If in years 
to come anyone reading this has a similar problem, try desperately to convert your 
future husband before marriage. 

My husband, Vernon T. Erickson, and I June L. Geddes Erickson, have 
three wonderful children as a result of this marriage; Lydia Kay Erickson, born 
November 7, 1944, Pocatello, Idaho; Thomas Rick Erickson, born May 13, 1946, 
Idaho Falls, Idaho; and Cindy Lu Erickson, born December 20, 1957, Idaho Falls, 
Idaho. Our two older children were blessed as infants and baptised into the Church 
of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints at the age of eight. 

Our child Cindy Lu, born to us in our more mature years, has caused my 
testimony of the gospel to be greatly increased, and her father, who is a nonmember 
of the Church, has seen a miracle with his own eyes My prayer is that he will soon 
become an investigator and join my church . This tiny little baby was 6 weeks old 
when she developed a sore throat and without consulting a doctor, I gave her nose 
drops which were too strong (adult size), which caused a central nervous system 
depression, but which improved her sore throat However, after administering the 
nose drops, I noticed that our baby became lathargic and bluish in color with sob- 
like respirations. I called the doctor's office, but they didn't think it was an emergency, 
so they gave me an appointment for the next day. However, I didn't take my eyes 
off her for the rest of the day. All at once her sob-like respirations stopped — 
frantically I rushed her to the L.D.S. Hospital where a nurse Immediately started 
artificial respiration and oxygen . She wasn't breathing on her own at al I , and they had 
been workingwith her for over an hour. My sister Lucille, was with me and she said, 
"June, would you like the baby to be administered to?" "Oh 1 Yes, Lucille, I do . ", 
was my reply. Because my parents had taught me the importance of prayers, I started 
praying with all my heart and soul . Lucille left the room and In a few minutes returned 
with two Elders of the Mormon Church . The/ annointed her little head, and while 
she was still under oxygen and being encouraged to breathe with artificial respiration, 
the Elders started their prayer. In the middle of this pra/er , our little girl started 
shallow breathing on her own. This was very weak at first, but as the night changed 
Into morning, her respirations were almost normal, and she was allowed to be out 
of oxygen . 



395 



This I saw with my own eyes, and I am thankful for the Elders of our Oiurch, 
for my husband, my parents, all of my family, my children, and I pray for help in 
raising them to be fine men and women, that they may profit from my mistakes. 

I have heard it stated that you have not repaid your parents for your up- 
bringing until you have successfully raised your doubters and sons, and I ask 
that God be with me in this task. 



Written by Mrs. June L, Geddes Erickson 



JESSE HOWARD GALLOWAY 



B. 4 May 1940 
Bapt. 5 Feb. 1949 
Md. 29 Dec. 1961 



Idaho Falls, Bonneville, Idaho 
Idaho Falls, Bonneville, Idaho 
Idaho Falls, Bonneville, Idaho 



Father Jesse Howard Galloway 



Mother Mercenia Marie Shanbi 



Wife 505 LYDIA KAY ERICKSON 



B. 7 Nov. 1944 
Bapt. 17 Dec. 1952 

Father Vernon Thomas Erickson 



Pocatello, Bannock, Idaho 
Pocatello, Bannock, Idaho 

/vVather 240 June Lowe Geddes 



Jayme Lynn Galloway 
Angila Kay Galloway 



CHILDREN 



i; 

B. 19 July 1962, Idaho Falls, Bonneville, Idaho' 
B. 5 Aug. 1965, Idaho Falls, Bonneville, Idaho ^; 



EPHRAIMLEE JORGENSEN 



k 



B. 16 Jan. 1921 
Chr. 6 March 1921 
Bapt, 17 March 1929 
Md. 21 Aug. 1942 

Father Joseph O. Jorgensen 



.tSfewdale, Madison, Idaho 
Newdale, Madison, Idaho 
Newdale, Madison, Idaho 
Salt Lake Temple, Salt Lake, Utah 

Mather Mary Verlilly Wi^t 



I 



Wife 252 GRACE LOWE GEDDES 



B. 20 Nov. 1921 
Chr. 1 Jan. 1922 
Bapt. 2 July 1930 



Banida, Franklin, Idaho 
Banida, Franklin, Idaho 
Banida, Franklin, Idaho 



396 



End. 21 Aug. 1942 
Sealed 21 Aug. 1942 

Father 45 Hugh Lester Geddes 



Salt Lake Temple, Salt Lake, Utah 
Salt Lake Temple, Salt Lake, Utah 

Mather Lydia Doney Lowe 



CHILDREN 



492 Bonnie Lee Jorgensen 

538 Joseph Bruce Jorgensen 
620 Carey Brent Jorgensen 



B. 24 Aug. 1943, Pocatello, Bannock, Idaho 
Bapt. 5 July 1952, Idaho Falls, Bonneville, Idaho 
B. 4 April 1947, Logan, Cache, Utah 
B. 1 April 1952, Idaho Falls, Bonneville, Idaho 



252 GRACE LOWE GEDDES JORGENSEN 

I v/as born November 20, 1921, and lived in Banida until 1937 when we moved 
to Fort Hall, Idaho. I graduated from Pocatello High School in 1941. I enroJIed at 
Ricks College at Rexburg, Idaho, for the year 1941-42, where I met my husband, 
Ephraim Lee Jorgensen. We were married in the Salt Lake Temple on August 21, 
1942. My husband entered the armed services on Sept. 1 of that year. 

Bonnie Lee, our first born, came into the world on August 24, 1943, at 
Pocatello, where I lived with my mother. In November of 1944 I moved to the 
home of my father-in-law, Joseph O. Jorgensen in Idaho Falls, where I remained 
until Lee was discharged from the Army In 1945. During that time I worked as a 
window and interior display girl in a department store. 

When Lee came home, he decided to get his deg-ee in physical education, 
so we moved to Logan, Utah, where he graduated with a B.S. in 1949. A son, 
Joseph Bruce, was born to us In Logan In 1947. 

After graduation, we moved back to Idaho Falls where Lee coached and 
taught biology at the high school until 1952. A second son, Carey Brent, was born 
on April I of that year. For the three years previous to Brent's birth, I worked as 
a salesgirl and display manager at Carroll's in Idaho Falls. At that time I retired 
to the more important job of wife and mother. Also, Lee quit the teaching profession 
and became a salesman. He Is with Wilson Sporting Goods, handling the wholesale 
outfitting of school and church sporting programs . 

We, at present, are living at 480 East 1130 North in Bountiful, Utah, and 
we are members of the Thirteenth Ward, Bountiful Stake. Bonnie Lee is active in 
Mutual and Sunday School work and Bruce and Brent love Primary. Lee and I are 
neither active at the present time, but at various times I have worked in the Primary, 
Cub-Scout work, and as drama director In the M. I .A. 



397 



ARTHUR ALEXANDER ROWE 



B. 20 Feb. 1923 
Bapt. 5 Jan. 1954 
Md. 18 Jan. 1946 

Father Anthony Rowe 



Lewiston, Androscoggin, Maine 
Idaho Falls, Bonneville, Idaho 
Pocatello, Bannock, Idaho 

Mother Winifred Louise Thompson 



Wife 262 JENNIE BON GEDDES 



B. 25 Aug. 1923 
Chr. 4 Nov. 1923 
Bapt. 1 July 1932 



Banida, Franklin, Idaho 
Banida, Franklin, Idaho 
Banida, Franklin, Idaho 



Father 45 Hugh Lester Geddes Mother Lydia Doney Lowe 

CHILDREN 



568 Sidney Thompson Rowe 

654 Wendy Rowe 

655 Winifred Rowe 

656 Jennifer Rowe 



B. 18 Feb. 1949, Pocatello, Bannock, Idaho 
B. 20 Nov. 1953, Idaho Falls, Bonneville, Idaholj 
D. 21 Nov. 1953, Idaho Falls, Bonneville, Idaho' 
B. 20 Nov. 1953, Idaho Falls, Bonneville, Idaho 
B. 20 Nov. 1953, Idaho Falls, Bonneville, Idahoi; 



262 JENNIE BON GEDDES ROWE 

I was born to Hu^ L. and Lydia Geddes on August 25, 1923, at Banida, Idaho. 
My first demands in the world were high and loud, but only a few months later, I found 
out that my parent's love and attention, food and shelter were being shared with nine 
other children and that I was only the tenth; in a few more months there would be 
another tiny baby, Lucille, to take my place, and soon several more, Irel, Garth, 
and Ora. With Mother always having a smaller baby to care for, it was up to the 
older brothers and sisters to care for us middle ones. I (according to my sister, 
Huitau) bawled every awake hour with very musical tones of "Towey! Towey!" to 
demand her attention — and got it. 

During the years from 1927 to 1932 or 1933, my childhood at our home at 
Banida was a happy one. Lots of hours were spent in the old swimming hole under 
the willow tree near Grandpa Geddes's farm. The muddy water would rush and splash 
from the old irrigation ditch headgate, and no matter hew little or big the stream, 
there were always from ten to twenty kids in the water, and most of their names were 
Geddes. At this same ditch a culvert took the water under the road to another field 
where my little brother Garth, at the age of two or three, fell in and went under the 
vvrater and on through the 15 foot culvert. By the time he came out on the other side, 
my sister Grace was in the ditch up to her knees waiting for him. He was in good 
condition, thank God, but I was still sitting on the bank unbuttoning my 6 button 
shoes in preparation to go in the water to catch him and save his life. 



398 



I'll never know why I thought the shoes were so important. 

I had passed my eighth birthday when my sisters Grace and Lucille, and my 
brotherlrel and I were bringing the cows home from Coulum pastures (about sundown) 
when Mom and Dad came along in a car, picked me out of the group to go to Clifton 
Twin Lakes to be baptized a member of the church , After being baptized and 
confirmed, I was ready for the bigger things in life, so I was permitted to ride on 
the milk truck with Joe Christensen to Preston every Saturday to take tap dancing 
lessons. This was to teach me my right foot from my left, but the efforts were all 
In vain. I still have two left feet. I also was given the opportunity on the piano, 
instructed by our grade school teacher. Miss Alice Caldwell . She tried hard, but 
I didn't — for I still can't find middle "C"; I can surely play by ear, however, two 
songs "Put Your Shoulder to the Wheel," and "! Own Da Rach O Grandy," and 
even sing, too . 

Our Saturday afternoon and Sunday morning routine consisted of haircuts. 
It was a standing rule that we get one of Dad's soiled dress shirts from the dirty 
clothesbasket and pin it nice and tight around our neck witfi a large diaper pin. 
The shirt was used because it was easier to shake the hair off rather than a towel . 
The boys got a nice high close shingle and we girls all got the straight dutch bang 
with high shingle back. 

In preparation to get off to school, 1 can still see Grace, Lucille and I 
standing by the front room heater waiting for Mom to come and fasten our garter- 
belts to our long stockings that were stretched up over our long legged underwear. 
We didn't have but about a block to walk to school, but by the time we crossed 
the road, walked back and forth and up and down all the huge snow drifts and across 
the fields to meet our cousins and friends, we had walked miles before the bell rang. 

At this time in my life, when I was about 8 or 9 years old, I took the respon- 
sibility of being the first one up in the morning, taking out the cold ashes from the 
kitchen and front room stoves and building both fires, putting the tea kettle on 
for hot water and a pot of water for Mom to make the cooked whole wheat mush 
for breakfast. I can remember her comments on the fly-ash that would be on 
everything in the house, but neverthless, I continued this for some years without 
ever setting the house or myself on fire. 

One night we were all getting ready for bed when someone smelled smoke 
and discovered a fire just starting in one of the closets in the middle bedroom. We 
all formed a water gang, pots and pans were being filled with water and coming from 
every direction. Grace grabbed a pot full of soaking beans from the cook stove and 
SHWISH ! — beans, water, and more beans — the fire was under control . 

Keeping all the clothes clean and mended was one of Mom's biggest jobs. 
Every day or so the old boiler was put on the old hot coal stove with the plates moved 
so OS to heat water quicker, a gentle shake of lye into the boiler would make the 
hard water come to the top and Mom would very carefully skim It off, so as to have 
nice hot softened water for the washer. This was one of Mom's secrets, along with 



399 



the scrubbing board treatment, for her snow white dish towels, sheets and clothes. 
I still think she wore holes in our clothes by rubbing them so hard, but after they were 
washed and ironed she always found time to do lots of mending. She always did say 
that her mother told her that clean mended clothes were as good as a new outfit. 

Mom was also a first class nurse. One day Grace and I had a squabble over 
who was to go into the house from the garden and do the dishes. Mom settled the 
argument in a hurry after I had thrown a clod of dirt and hit Grace in tfie back . I 
was sent to the house to do the dishes on the double. In my fit of temper, I went 
to set a glass bowl up on the top of the stove and hit the edge of the warming oven. 
It broke and fell on my forearm cutting deeply into an artery; with blood shooting 
a foot high with every heartbeat, I ran for Mother crying, "Shall I run to Goldies?" 
(I was thinking of Goldie Onristensen for they were the only ones in town with a car 
and I just knew I had to go to Preston to the hospital to be saved. Mom. ran to 
the house with me, applied a Tourniquet with strips of old sheets and a stick . The 
blood flow stopped, the wound was wrapped with more strips of clean sheets and I 
didn't have to do the dishes. 

Easter Sunday was always one of the biggest events of the year. We all had 
nice new or sparkling clean clothes for Easter Sunday School . After church we all 
had Easter baskets with plenty of our favorite raisin-filled cookies and butter cake, 
boiled eggs and sandwiches. We hurried home from church, changed our clothes 
and were off to the foothills. It was a race to see who could pick the first buttercup, 
bluebell , or Indian paint brush . Then after a mad scramble of rolling hard boiled 
eggs down the hills, we would settle down to eat our lunches, sand, dirt, grit and 
all — it was wonderful . 

We moved to Fort Hall when I was about eleven years old. Dad leased a 
farm from the Indians on the reservation. Here we had the experience of making 
all new friends and acquaintances. One in particular was the Indian family, the 
Sunshines, that came almost every meal time — Frank and Ida Sunshine and five or 
six little Sunshines. No matter how many Mom had to feed, it seemed there was 
always room for one more. 

Our home consisted of two rooms, and for extra bedrooms we had two bunk 
houses that sat close to the two-room house, one with two double beds for the boys 
and one with two double beds for the girls. Sleeping out there in the summer was 
very nice, but the cold winters with the temperature below freezing were a little 
rough. The five to seven quilts over us must have weighed as much as we did and 
once we got under them, we never moved until we heard Dad call from the porch, 
" Grace! Jennie Bon! Lucille! Irel ! Garth ! JUMP! " and we knew that he meant 
business. 

One night I went to bed feeling a little sick but didn't say anything about 
my stomach pains. I was very uncomfortable all night but dosed to sleep once in 
awhile only to awaken with more pain. In the early hours of the morning I stumbled 
into the house to Mom and Dad's' bedroom and told them of my pains all night. They 
both decided it was serious enough to drive from Fort Hall to Preston to see Dr. Cutler. 



400 



We drove 75 miles on bad roads to Preston and I was rushed Into surgery for an 
appendectomy. Dr. Cutler informed Dad that it was way toobiga risk to drive 
that far with a bad appendix ready to rupture any minute, but I guess a miss is 
as good as a mile and we all recovered nicely. 

On our farm on the reservation we all worked hard and played hard and 
went to school at Pocatello by bus and to church every Sunday via car "Sivelvy" 
or all aboard the old red International form truck. 

We moved from Fort Hall into Pocatello about 1937 where Dadhad bought 
a small acreage and built a very comfortable five-room log house at 550 McKinely. 
At this time Dad's health wasn 't too good, his heart condition wouldn't allow him 
to be as active as he had been all his life and I think trying to slow down and take 
life easy was as hard on him as overworking had been in the past. Nevertheless, 
Dad was still providing ways and means for all of us to go to school . In the fall of 
1941 Dad was hospitalized for a short time. He passed away on November 1, 1941 . 

Mom's flowers and garden at Pocatello have always been a joy and comfort 
to her and to everyone that calls on her. They're always beautiful and show hours 
of thoughtful care and love. In the past 10 or 15 years since most of us have married 
and left home. Mom has kept herself busy making a baby quilt for each of the grand- 
children and has been making the most beautiful braided rugs. The one that took 
the blue ribbon at the Eastern Idaho State fair is now in her front room. It almost 
covers the entire floor and is a masterpiece. 

I graduated from Pocatello School of Beauty Culture in January 1942 and 
had practiced as an apprentice cosmetician for a year prior to this. I then operated 
a beauty shop at Downey, Idaho for a short while and then went to Salt Lake to 
work in a larger beauty shop. After about a year of this I got tired of hair dressing 
and got a job at a radio tube factory. In September 9, 1943, I joined the Navy 
and became a Pharmacist Mate Second Class. I took the regular boot training at 
Bronx, New York , was rushed through about a 6 week course of nursing and medics 
then sent to hospital duty at St. Albans, New York. From here I was transferred 
to Brooklyn Naval Hospital on Flushing Avenue, then to Memphis Naval Training 
Center Hospital in Memphis, Tennessee . I had been at Memphis only a short time 
when I met the man who is now my husband, Arthur A. Rowe, from Lewiston, Maine. 
We were both out of the Navy and the war was over when we were married on 
January 18, 1946, in the presence of my mother, Irel, and Ora, by Reverend Albert 
B. Parrett, minister of the Methodist Church at Pocatello, Idaho. 

We made our home at Pocatello for Art to further his education in electronics 
at Idaho State College. I operated my own beauty shop. In 1947 we planned a trip 
to Art's hometown in our first car, a 1932 Model B . Ford . Only a day or two before 
we were to leave, a rod went through the engine on the Ford, so we took the trip by 
train. I met all of Art's folks and friends and found that Maine is beautiful . Because 
I was from Idaho and a Mormon, I was under pretty close observation. I must have 
passed their approval because they made me feel right at home and one of the family. 



401 



They couldn't believe that I was really from a family of 14 children and that when 
Art married me he automatically became the uncle to 32 nieces and nephews. This 
was strange to him because on his side there were only his brother and sister and 
no nieces and nephews. 

On the 18 February, 1949, our first son was born, Sidney T. Rowe, 8 lbs. 
7 oz . , 21 1/2 Inches long. At this time my husband had graduated from electonic 
school and had been employed by the telephone company. In 1950 we were transferred 
to Rexburg, Idaho, and there I continued to work In a beauty shop 8 to 10 hours a 
day; we both took care of our boy and the household duries In the evenings and 
week ends. In 1953 we were transferred to Idaho Falls, Idaho, where we bought 
our first home at 1057 Jefferson. On November 20, 1953, we were weary but 
the proud parents of triplet girls: Wendy, 3 lbs., 16 inches; Winifred, 3 lbs. 15 1/2 
Inches; Jennifer, 3 lbs. 7 1/2 oxs, 16 1/2 inches. Here I would like to give credit 
for the faithful aid of my younger sister, Lucille, a registered nurse at the L .D. S. 
Hospital at Idaho Falls, who stood at my side and assisted the doctor In my every 
need . With the three tiny babies In incubators we felt we should call on my brother 
Irel and Lucille's husband, both Elders in the church, to go In the nursery and give 
the girls a blessing and names. With the fdith and prayers of my family we gained 
health and strength with the exception of our first born triplet, Wendy. She passed 
away In the early evening of November 21 , 1953, just 18 hours old . 

We were able to bring the two girls home on New Years day, January 1954, 
and with the dally assistance of Lucille, June and Grace with diapers, formulas, 
baths, back rubs and burps, we soon had them gaining wel^t and growing like 
perfectly normal babies. I must give honorable mention to a very faithful and 
loving husband, for he was always busy day or night with one while I or one of my 
sisters or /v\other had the other one. 

During the summer of 1954 when the girls were just 5 months old, my husband's 
Mother, Mrs. Winifred Rowe, made her first trip out west to visit us and see her 
grandchildren. 

In April 1954 my husband was baptised a member of the L .D.S. Oiurch and 
on June 6, 1954 was ordained a Deacon; on August 29, 1954 ordained a Teacher; 
on December 12, 1954 ordained a Priest; and on AAay 15, 1955 ordained an Elder. 
In the spring of 1957 we were transferred to Boise, Idaho with a promotion with 
the telephone company. We again made a purchase of a new home, this time 
with three bedrooms and a full basement. In order to keep up with daily expenses 
I went back to work doing halrdressing. For the first time in my career I entered 
a local hair styling contest on November 12, 1957 and took first place. 

On February 1, 1958, our son, Sidney, was baptized and confirmed a member 
of the church. Up to this date, March 10, 1958, Mr. and Mrs. Arthur Rowe (Jennie 
Bon Geddes), Sidney, 9 years old and the two girls, Winifred and Jennifer, 4 years 
old, are all well and happy. 



402 



RANDALL KEITH JENSEN 



B. 2 March 1919 
Bapt. 1 May 1927 
Md, 13 April 1946 
End. 6 Nov. 1946 

Father Joseph Jensen 



Sigurd, Sevier, Utah 

Sigurd, Sevier, Utah 

Dillon, Beaverhead, Montana 

Salt Lake Temple, Salt Lake, Utah 

Mother Frances Janette Kni^t 



Wife 274 LUCILLE LOWE GEDDES 



B. 17 March 1925 
Chr. 3 May 1925 
Bapt. 20 June 1933 
End . 6 Nov . 1 946 
Sealed 6 Nov. 1946 

Father 45 Hugh Lester Geddes 



Banida, Franklin, Idaho 
Banida, Franklin, Idaho 
Banida, Franklin, Idaho 
Salt Lake Temple, Salt Lake, Utah 
Salt Lake Temple, Salt Lake ,Utah 

Mother Lydia Doney Lowe 



CHILDREN 



545 Deanne Jensen 

580 Gregory Keith Jensen 



B. 30 July 1947, Pocatello, Bannock, Idaho 
B. 21 Nov. 1949, Pocatello, Bannock, Idaho 



274 LUCILLE GEDDES JENSEN 

I vv'as born the eleventh in a family of 14 on March 17, 1925, at Banida, Idaho, 
the daughter of Hugh Lester Geddes and Lydia Doney Lowe. I do not recall any of 
my pre-school years, but have been told that I was quite independent but more or 
less introverted. I have also been told I was pampered and spoiled a tiny bit more 
than some of the preceding babies because I occupied the throne of being baby of 
the family for two whole years, and when was baby girl for ei^t years. 

I do not remember being much of a Mamma's girl, but if my older sister 
Huitau tried to do anything without me, she had to do some flawless planning. 
Daddy never had time to spoil any of his children and the older ones have often 
said he was overly strict, but I do remember being called "Daddy's girl" and being 
allowed more than just my turn to unlace his knee-high boots and zip and unzip 
his leather jacket. 

MDst of the children have a reason for being given their particular name, but 
by the time they got down to me they had run out of both reasons and names, I am 
told that they were planning to name me Constance, but while walking to the church 
the Sunday I was blessed, they decided that "Lucille" fit me to a "T". This seemed 



403 



to be a very difficult name for my next older sister, Jennie, to pronounce, so by 
her own interpretation and pronunciation, I was known as"E.T. " 

When I was still the baby of the family, we moved into Preston and from 
there to Grand Junction, Colorado. This business endeavor was not too successful 
and we returned to Preston by the time Irel was born. It was not long until we 
returned to Banida and it was there I received my basic church teachings and 
elementary schooling. 

There were six children in the community my age, four girls and two boys. 
One of these boys was a cousin and it was just understood that the other boy and one 
of the other girls were always together so tinis made boy-girl association a little 
difficult. Being a little backward, I was willing to be an onlooker rather than a 
main participant. 

Our little Banida Ward chapel was a typical small-town, one-room church 
with a pot-bellied stove in the middle where you cooked if you sat to the front and 
froze If you came in late and sat to the back. The class rooms were provided by 
pulling drapes along overhead wires, thus dividing the room up into six or eight parts. 
Here I attended my Primary and Sunday School classes. I was baptized and confirmed 
June 20, 1933 at the Logan Temple. 

The Banida school house was a yellow-brick, two- room affair. The little 
room contained the first to the fourth grades, and the big room the fifth to the eighth 
grades. 1 only had two teachers in my six years at Banida, Mrs. Clarice S. Anderson 
for four years, and Loren D. Stevenson for the fifth and sixth grades. 

By this time it was apparent that it was impossible for Dad to make a living 
at Banida and his health was failing, so we moved to Fort Hall where he rented 
ground for three years, and with the help of the older boys, did some fabulous farming 
We made enough to buy a small acreage on the outskirts of Pocatello where he and 
the boys built a small five-room house where, as he stated, "It woul d be convenient 
for Mother to raise the rest of the kids." His condition was getting worse and he 
realized he did not have long to live. 

While living at Fort Hall we attended the Tyhee Ward. 1 was able to attend 
Sunday School more regularly than Primary because Mother attended Sunday School 
with us and with her instigating the excursion there was always a way provided. 
My Primary and Mutual classes were very irregular because we had to catch a ride ' 
with someone or walk four miles, and it often occurred to me that it was easier to 
stay home. 

I attended the 7th and 8th grades at Irving Junior High School in Pocatello. 
It was quite a different experience for me to have a teacher for each subject and 
30 to 40 students in the same class. Being a school bus student I was not able to 
attend any clubs, games or extra activities. It was very hard for me to make friends 
and associate with strangers, and thus 1 did not enjoy or excell in school . 



I 
I 



404 



Daddy's condition seemed to be getting worse, and he knew his time was 
getting shorter and shorter, and he did everything in his power to help Mother and 
all of us to be able to understand and be able to cope with the future. Two of my 
older sisters, Huitau and Grace, had established and were operating a hosiery 
mending concession in an exclusive department store in Pocatello. It wasn't a get- 
rich-overnight profession but they were making a fair profit. Daddy told me that 
if I would practice this hosiery mending, he would pay me so much an hour. I 
had no Intention of learning to do It, but the possibilities of earning a little spending 
money were enticing, so whenever I needed money I would practice. It was not 
long before I could mend hose as well as the other girls, and soon Huitau retired 
and Grace and I carried on the business. I don't recall how much we helped with 
the family expenses, but we provided for our own needs and gave Mamma a little 
for family uses . 

Daddy died In the middle of my sophomore year. After Mamma was left alone, 
I felt I should work a little harder and earn as much and help as much as I could, so 
I worked at the concession before school in the morning, during my free hours during 
the day and after school at night, then when the store closed I would take work home 
with me to do what I could until bedtime. With this type of schedule I didn't 
have time for extracurricular activities. Grace went to college during my junior 
and senior years and I carried on the business alone. 

I graduated from Pocatello Senior High School June 1, 1943. In the fall of 
1943 I felt like 1 needed a change, so obtained a job packing parachutes at the 
Pocatello Army Air Base„ By spring the new had worn off from this, so a girl friend 
and I decided to go to California to work and see a little new country. I wasn't 
much of a socialite, and I became bored with the long evenings after work, so I 
got a job part-time at a little candy shop, and this way I was able to content myself 
and keep out of mischief. 

About mid-summer I decided I had better start thinking about a profession 
and a future, so I entered nurses training as a cadet nurse at the L. D, S. Hospital 
Training School, Idaho Falls, Idaho, in Sept. 1944. During one of the student 
nurses social activities, I met and later married Randall Keith Jensen of Moore, 
Idaho . 

We had a civil ceremony on April 13, 1946, performed by the Rector of St. 
James Parish, Lewis D. Smith, at Dillon, AAsntana. I continued with my nurses 
training until the first of June, then decided to resign and accompany my husband 
on the farm at Moore, Idaho . We were both active in the church at the Lost River 
Ward, and were convinced we wanted a temple marriage. We were sealed as husband 
and wife according to the ordinance of God for time and eternity in the House of 
the Lord at Salt Lake City, November 6, 1946. 

Our first child, Deanne, was born July 30, 1947 and our first son, Gregory 
Keith on November 21, 1949. My husband's health looked rather questionable at 
this time, and our farming didn't seem to be much of a paying profession, so I 
obtained a job and worked in the cafeteria at the A.E.C. site on the Arco desert 

405 



for 1 1/2 years. We still were not sure about my husband's health, and I felt I 
had to have a better paying job, so I made a rran cements to return Marshall , 1953, to the 
L.D.S. Training School to finish my nurses training. The road was rough and rocky, 
but having always had an abundance of determination and ability to work hard, and 
to do a good job, I graduated November 6, 1954. Since graduating I have specialized 
in maternity nursing, surgical nursing and at the present time am supervisor of nurses 
at a local clinic, Idaho Falls , Idaho. 



545 DEANNE JENSEN 

Deanne Jensen, daughter of Randall Keith Jensen and Lucille Geddes 
Jensen, was born July 30, 1947, at Pocatello, Idaho. She was born on the exact 
day she was expected and in a very normal and uncomplicated manner, and during 
the near eleven years of her life this has been a typical pattern of her way of life — 
very exact and according to "Hoyle." She was blessed November 2, 1947, by her 
father in the Lost River Ward, Lost River Stake, Moore, Idaho. 

She has never been a robust, active child. In 1951 we discovered that she 
had a congenital heart deformity, but of a nature that did not demand immediate 
attention. During the past years of observing her condition, we have been advised 
to observe and delay any steps to correct her condition until such time as medical science 
has developed a more perfect method of repair. 

She has been anxious and eager to progress in her Primary, Sunday School 
and public school projects. She was baptized a member of the church November 26 
1955 and was confirmed November 26, 1955, in the 18 Word, North Idaho Falls 
Stake, Idaho Falls, Idaho. 



580 GREGORY KEITH JENSEN 

Gregory Keith Jensen, sonof Randall Keith Jensen and Lucille Geddes, was 
born November 21, 1949, at Pocafello, Idaho. Greg was over a week late in 
arriving and labor had to be induced . He was delivered in an unusual manner and 
during his eight years this has been a typical pattern of his way of life. He never 
does today what he can put off until tomorrow. If he can argue and prolong the 
undertaking, he will do It even It it's easier to fact facts and act immediately. 

He was blessed December 4, 1949, by his father at the Lost River Ward, 
Lost River Stake, Moore, Idaho. 

Greg has to be coaxed, praised, bribed and often forced to attend Primary 
and Sunday School, but after attending, he will always say something about It 
being enjoyable and interesting. He was baptized November 23, 1957, and confirmed 
a member of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints November 24, 1957, 
in the 18 Ward, North Idaho Falls Stake, Idaho Falls, Idaho. 



406 



283 IREL LOWE GEDDES 



B. 3 Feb. 1927 
Chr. 1 May 1927 
Bapt. 17 June 1935 
AAd. 30 May 1961 

Fat'her 45 Hugh Lester Geddes 



Preston, Franklin, Idaho 
Preston, Franklin, Idaho 
Pocatello, Bannock, Idaho 
Idaho Falls, Bonneville, Idaho 

AADfher Lydia Doney Lowe 



Wife META JOHANNEBRIGITTE MAI 
B. 21 Aug. 1940 Radebeut, Saxony Province, Germany 

Father Gustov Horst Mai Mother Hilde Felicitas Johanna Mutze 



CHILDREN 



791 Johanna Tau Mai Geddes 



B. 16 Feb. 1963, Pocatello, Bannock, Idaho 



283 IREL LOWE GEDDES 

I don't understand the reason we were living at Preston, Idaho, at the time, 
but we were, and that was where I was born on February 3, 1927. All the other 
children before and after me were born at Banida, Idaho, where it seemed we always 
lived. After I grew up and needed a birth certificate when I wanted to join the 
Navy, I discovered that I had been born on February 5, 1957. But Mother thinks 
this was a mistake on the part of the person who prepared the certificate, and I 
am inclined to agree with her, that I was actually born February 3, 1927. 

After my birth, we soon moved back to Banida, and until I was ten, we lived 
there. My childhood was spent during the Great Depression, but that didn't mean 
a thing to me. I remember Scott and Hugh J. both spent time in the CCC's but to 
me that didn't seem out of the ordinary. At Banida when I was a child I remember 
mostly the Oiristmases when we kids used to get up two or three times before Santa 
Oaus had come; the Fosters and the hikes all the kids used to take; the gardens 
we used to have and how good the corn tasted; the biscuits and butter we'd have 
when Mom baked (Mom was famous all over the valley for these); the big thrill 
it was to go to Gaulam with Hultau for the Mail ( It seemed to me Hultau was awfully 
brave to walk onto the track and wave to the engine crew so they'd know she was 
there, then stand at the side of the train to exchange pouches); excursions on foot 
to Twin Lakes where we used to catch chubs on any kind of bait we'd throw in; 
Sunday School ( which I liked): Primary ( which I didn't); my first grade teacher, Mrs. 
Anderson ( when you twisted around In your seat and hung your head into the aisle 
and looked at her face upside down, she looked just like George Washington, I thought), 

407 



One day Mother husHed me out of bed and got me ready to go to Logan to be baptised. 
Virgil and LaPriel Geddes called for me, and took me, Robert Geddes, G)leen Geddes, 
and Howard Miller, down to the Logan Temple for this ordinance. I remember thinking 
after being baptised that I didn't have a sin to my name, but I'm afraid my sinless 
status didn't last long. I remember times when we were bathed and put to bed 
Saturday night, and on Sunday morning went to church in clean clothes which had 
been washing and Ironed sometime during the night, because they were the same 
clothes we had kicked off when we took our baths. I remember each of us coming 
to Mother and laying our heads in her lap while she said a prayer with each of us. 
i remember one time during our childhood. Mother bought Garth and I identical 
suits, navy blue tops and white bottoms. I was mindful, and always came home after 
church and changed my little suit, but Garth never did show up until it was too 
dark to do anything but go home, and you'd never have guessed that Mother started 
him out In the morning with a spotless little suit of clothes. How I often wish I'd 
been as carefree as he. 

I don't remember much about Dad during this time. He was always away 
in Downey earning our living. It was just when I began to remember things that Dad 
developed heart trouble, and I don't remember much about him that wasn't somehow 
connected with that heart condition, although the older kids remember Dad as a 
vigorous and active man. I do remember he gave me a switching once that seemed 
quite vigorous. I remember that he did wear motorcycle trousers, I guess that's 
what they are called, full around the top part of the legs, then the bottom fit Into 
boots. Dad would let us take his boots off when he came home. That always seemed 
quite an honor, and I was always glad when Dad would say his feet felt a lot better, 
when I got to take his boots off. 

I remember Grandpa having breakfast over at our place once In a while, 
and the curious way he sprinkled sugar on his mush, and how he never stirred It, 
But we all stirred ours. Aunt Catherine, Grandpa's second wife, the only one I 
remember, wasn't very popular with the family, or we weren't popular withi her, I 
never have quite understood the situation, but I remember once of being with Dad 
when we went to visit with Grandpa and visited through the window as Grandpa 
lay sick from his heart trouble. I remember the day he died, and all the questions 
I asked Mother. 

When I was ten, we moved from Banlda to Fort Hall, Idaho, where Dad had 
rented some Indian land. We spent three wonderful, busy years at Fort Hall, raising 
sugar beets and hay and potatoes. I'm glad we had those years. We had such nice 
fields, and beautiful hay, and always a wonderful garden. We handpumped water 
for the family's use, and in the winter for the livestock. Mom had a place fenced 
off in front of the house and a little irrigation ditch made over to It, and Mom had 
what I suppose was the nicest clover lawn in Fort Hall . It wasn't there when we 
came, and after we moved the fences were torn down and the lawn reverted back to 
a dusty road. Besides having such a lovely time in Fort Hall, we earned enough 
money to buy a little acreage at Pocatello, where Dad built us a home, to which 
we moved in 1940. He didn't live there with us for very long, his heart trouble 
which had been with him since Banida days finally causing his death in November, 1941, 

408 



Those years after Dad's death were bleak, it seemed to me. We learned to do a lot 
of things Dad had always taken care of before. We were on government relief, I 
think we received the sum of $30 per month, and with that Mom did the best she 
could to send us to school and provide for the necessities of life. All during this 
time we had cows. I don't think we ever made a dime on them, but at least we had 
milk and butter, and it kept us busy milking and hauling hay for them. When I 
graduated from h'gh school in 1944, I got a job at the Naval Ordnance Plant at 
Pocatello and relief was discontinued. It has always seemed good to be able to 
make my own way, and I hope I am always able to do this. 

When I was 17, I had a great desire to join the Navy. All my friends were 
already in the service, but i was a little younger. I signed up, but when I took 
my entrance examination, I fainted when they took a blood test, and I wasn't accepted. 
This was a great disappointment to me, but I chose what I considered second best, 
the Army, and they accepted me even knowing I suffer from the malady called "Needle 
Fever", and I served from 1946 to 1948; then when the Korean War began in 1950, I 
was recalled and served another 13 months. 

I started working for the Union Pacific Railroad as a machinist helper In 
1944. Mother didn't want me to have that job, because I came home too dirty, so 
I transferred to the position of engine crew caller, went from that position to others, 
until in 1957 I secured the position of secretary to the general superintendent of 
the Eastern District, and transferred to Cheyenne. It is a very fine job for a person 
of my education and experience, but I yearn to return to Idaho where my "roots" are. 

At the present time I live at Cheyenne. I have never married, but I feel 
1 definitely have missed the greatest thing in life by not having had a wife and 
family to share my life with. So at 31, it is my greatest desire to marry and rear 
an honorable family, if God is willing that this be my lot. 

Addition to my history Irel L. Geddes. 

I have been repeatedly asked by Martha Geddes and my sister Ora to add 
to my own history for the book about to be published on William Geddes and his 
descendants, but I haven't been able to find my copy of the original history I wrote, 
so I don't know where to begin this addition. I understand the end of it was that I 
was either engaged or thinking quite seriously about marrying Brigitte Mai from 
Detmold, Germany, It was in 1959 that I first went to Germany and met her personally, 
though we had written to each other prior to that. Then in 1960 I again went to 
Germany on my vacation and on that trip we bought some rings and became engaged 
according to the custom of the Germans. From 1960 to 1961 we wrote le|tters and 
although I know Brigitte's parents weren't particularly convinced it was the right 
thing to do and gave her every opportunity and maybe even encouragement to back 
out and remain in Germany, Brigitte remained true to her word and in May of 1961 
sailed for the United States to marry me, with crates of clothing, books, dishes, etc. 



409 



At the time she arrived it happened to be the style for the women to wear 
white lipstick, I believe the style is still In vogue but moderated somewhat. But 
anyway, she arrived in New York wearing her white lipstick and looking quite 
unnatural to me, and I remember leaning up against those crates of her possessions 
while waiting for the customs men, and wondering - "What the hell have I done, 
bringing this little girl all the way from Germany, and really - what do we have in 
common after all?" I suppose she had a few misgivings about me too. Knowing 
Brigitte as well as I do now, I know she could not even consider backing out without 
some very good reason, and the thought occurs to me at the time that I could either 
make a go of this or retreat back to being Mother's little helper, and as the years 
went on, I g-ew to hate that role, not that Mother and I didn't get along well 
enough, but I just longed for something I could call my own, a life of my own. 

I thought the decent thing to do was to marry Brigitte just as soon as arrange- 
ments could be made east, but Brigitte didn't take kindly to this Idea until could 
get out west and sfee for herself just how things were going to be. So we piled into 
my little 1959 Ford and In a few days arrived in Idaho, and apparently she figured 
things were good enough, because she married me on May 30, 1961, at Idaho Falls, 
Idaho she baiing 20 at the time and strikingly pretty, and I being 34 and strikingly 
unhandsome. 

We moved around an awfully lot from apartment to apartment to house those 
first two years of our marriage. I figured I was In the real estate business besides 
holding down a job with the Union Pacific Railroad, but the fly In the ointment 
was that some of my apartments bordered the Portneuf River, and in February 1962 
we had a couple of feet of water In the apartment we lived In, and in February 
1963 when we were living In a basement apartment, we had about 4 or 5 feet of 
water In that apartment. We were surely busy February 3, 1963, getting all the 
furniture and stuff onto higher ground for the flood we knew was on its way, and 
worked from morning until evening just as hard as we could. It was my birthday, 
and Brigitte was very very pregnant at the time, but working as hard as I was, and 
In fact Johanna was born just 13 days later by Cesarean Section. After we finally 
got finished with the work that had to be done, we started walking toward the car 
and were going to stay with Mother until the flood waters went down again. 
Suddenly Brigitte thought of something and started to cry. I said, "What are you 
crying for?" She said, "It's your birthday, and I didn't get anything for you." 
Then I started to cry, and It wasn't because she didn't get anything for my birthbay. 

After the flooding in 1962 and 1963, we figured we were going bankrupt 
fast trying to buy the apartments and keep them repaired and rented, so we decided 
to turn them back to the owners, which we did, and the money we had put into them 
and all the labor is just chalked up to dear experience. We move to 583 Roosevelt 
to a house we had moved to the location and fixed up. We found a baby tender for 
Johanna, just two months old, and Brigitte went to work at Farmers Insurance, Pocatello, 
where she still works at the time this Is written. 

In 1964 during her vacation, she took Johanna with her to Chicago, and from 
there flew to Germany and visited with her parents during the month of August. Two 

410 



or three of my family came and expressed their opinion to me that Brigitte wouldn't 
return. I don't know whether it was because they had no faith in Brigitte or no 
faith in me but I suspect it was me they had no faith in. But a month later I went 
to Chicago and met Brigitte and Joey on their return flight. 

So the last 2 1/2 years we have lived happily at 583 Roosevelt Avenue, 
slowly paying off our debts, and enjoying life. I love my wife, and I suspect she 
likes me a little bit, and Johanna, called Joey, nearly 3, is an qbsolute joy to us. 



299 GARTH LOWE GEDDES 



B . 7 Feb . 1 929 
Chr. 14 Apr. 1929 
Bapt. 9 May 1937 
End. 13 Oct. 1949 
Md. 29 May 1952 

Father 45 Hugh Lester Geddes 



Banida, Franklin, Idaho 
Banida, Franklin, Idaho 
Pocotello, Bannock, Idaho 
Logan Temple, Cache, Utah 
Logan Temple, Cache, Utah 

Mother Lydia Doney Lowe 



Wife NORDITH SIMMONS 



B. 31 July 1930 
Chr. 7 Sept. 1930 
Bapt. 1 Aug. 1938 
End. 29 May 1952 
Sealed 29 May 1952 

Father Thomas Yates Simmons 



Beaver Dam, Box Elder, Utah 
Beaver Dam, Box Elder, Utah 
Beaver Dam, Box Elder, Utah 
Logan, Temple, Cache, Utah 
Logan Temple, Cache, Utah 

AAsther Sylvia Sarah Ann Ericksen 



CHILDREN 



637 Jody Geddes 
668 Claudia Geddes 

792 Lynn Geddes 

793 Christine Geddes 

794 David Garth Geddes 



B. 13 March 1953, Logan, Cache, Utah 

Bapt. 13 Mar. 1961, Neubrucke, Nahe, Germany 

B. 1 Oct. 1954, Logan, Cache, Utah 

Bapt. 1 Oct. 1962, Neubrucke, Nahe, Germany 

B. 3 Dec. 1956, Ogden, Weber, Utah 

Bapt. 5 Dec. 1964, Neubrucke, Nahe, Germany 

B. 3 Dec. 1959, Neubrucke, Nahe, Germany 

B. 9 May 1961, Neubrucke, Nahe, Germany 



299 GARTH LOWE GEDDES 

I was born in the 7 of Feb . 1929, the thirteenth child and sixth son of Hugh 
Lester Geddes and Lydia Doney Lowe. My earliest recollections of my home in Banida 



411 



are rather jumbled as to their chronology, but many of my memories of these early 
years are very vivid and almost all are happy ones. 

Our home v/as a large frame house, rather fashionable for its day, I suppose. 
It v/as situated on a corner on the main road and seemed to be a v^ay-station for the 
neighbor kids as they came to and from church or school . It seemed that almost 
everyone v/ould stop on his w^ay home from Sunday School to read the latest 
thrilling episode of "Little Orphan Annie" or the "Katand jammer Kids" from the 
Sunday funnies on the Geddes front porch . 

If there was ill will or dissentlon in our home, I wasn't aware of it. I 
loved my parents and was loved of them. Each night, I with my brothers and 
sisters knelt, one at a time, at mother's knee and under the tender caress of her 
well-worn hand offered a prayer of love and thanksgiving. My daily prayers even 
to tbis day reflect the simple rhetoric of those early prayers taught by my mother. 

Those were the wonderful, carefree days of childhood with genuine Boy Scout 
shoes, the time when an egg could be bartered for any candy bar at Goldie Oiristensen's 
store, when each Easter meant a trek up to Big Rock to eat sandwiches and boiled 
eggs and Easter candy, when Oiristmas meant a new pair of mittens and a dollar bill 
from Ora Perkins. 

In the summer I herded the cows, which I too often brought home bloated 
because of my inattention. For reasons beyond the comprehension of my young rriind, 
we had to leave Banida. I was in the second grade when we moved to Fort Hall, 
Idaho. Our new home was an old frame two-room house with a rickety slant-floored 
porch attached to the back side. A coal shed of a later vintage, built for u tility 
rather than beauty, was also nailed to the backside of the house adjoining the porch. 
The problem of putting all ten of us in a two-room house was solved when Dad procured 
two tar-paper , frame, out-buildings that looked like refiugees from a CCC Camp. After 
being dragged up close to the house, they became the boys and girls' bedrooms. 

I don't remember exactly how many of us children still lived home, but the 
school bus made a special stop to pick up the Geddes kids: Grace, Lucille, Jennie 
Bon, irel. Garth, and Ora. I think Hugh J. and Dean were there part of the time 
and perhaps June also. 

The summers in Fort Hall were busy ones. Each child had a hoe and we thinned 
sugar beets and weeded and hoed potatoes alqng with the dozens of Indians, Mexicans 
and transients who were hired by Dad during the rush season of the summer. My early 
playmates came from these rough, hard-working people. I recall sharing tortillas 
and child repasts with the Mexican laborers on many occasions. It was also at Fort 
Hall that I graduated from "derrick-horse-rider" to "hay-tromper." 

Winters were severe there on that bleak hillside. Horses had to be watered and 
cows and pigs fed. In the winter time all the water had to be pumped from an old rusty 
hand pump near the house. Dad told us that we would have to pump water as long 
as a horse would stand and drink. It always seemed to me that we had the biggest horses 



412 



who could drink longer than any other horses in Idaho. They g^ew shaggy and long- 
haired to protect themselves against the wintry blast, I can recall riding bareback 
behind Hugh on those hairy, big-footed beasts as they bucked through the snow along 
Hugh J . 's weasel and muskrat trap lines. 

Our metal -framed beds in the tar-paper bedrooms were piled high with corduroy 
and wool patch-work quilts that had come off a resourceful mother's quilting frames. 
They were extremely heavy, but they warmed us against the winter's cold and snow 
that sifted through a thousand cracks in those buildings. A warmed smooth rock or a 
hot flat iron wrapped in a towel I served as a bed-warmer to take the chill off the 
ice-cold beds in the winter months. 

I attended school in Tyhee. I didn't establish any scholastic records but I 
did "sluff" a day of school about as early in life as anybody I know. After riding 
the bus all the way to school , ! slipped away into a dry canal that ran adjacent 
to the school . It took me all day to walk the six miles back home. It wasn't as much 
fun as I thought it would be, and Mother wouldn't write an excuse for me — so I 
wrote my own and si