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Full text of "Williamson County, Illinois, in the World War : containing a brief review of the World War--complete history of Williamson County's activities--photographs and service records of Williamson County's soldiers, sailors and marines--industrial review of business and professional firms who have made this history possible"

THE UNIVERSITY 

OF ILLINOIS 

LIBRARY 

977.3993 
B /6w 

5 - a 



TT - WT01S 



Williamson County 

Illinois 

In the World 
War 



Containing a Brief Review of The World 
War Complete History of Williamson 
County's Activities Photographs and 
Service Records of Williamson County's 
Soldiers, Sailors and Marines Industrial 
Review of Business and Professional Firms 
Who Have Made This History Possible 



Edited by 
HAL W. TROVILLION J HE L | BRAR y gp 

Editor and Publisher of the Herrin News 

Compiled by FEB 2 1Q34 

S. S. BAIRD 
Journalist and Special Publicity Writer UNIVERSITY OF ILLINOIS 






PUBLISHED BY 

THE WILLIAMSON COUNTY WAR HISTORY SOCIETY 

MARION, HERRIN, JOHNSTON CITY, CARTERVILLE, 
HURST, CREAL SPRINGS 



600 




Copyright, 1919, 

by 

HAL W. TROVILLION 
All rights reserved 






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JJ ' ' ' J *-* -" "- 

!!E LIBRARY OF THE 
FE32 1934 

Introduction UNIVERSITY OF ILLINOIS 
^ 

* % V 7~E here highly reserve that these dead shall not have died in vain that this nation, un- 

\\ der God, shall have a new birth of freedom." These prophetic words of Lincoln at 
Gettysburg uttered more than a half a century ago furnish a most fitting text to the 
task we fall to in the following pages to record Williamson County's part in the great world war 
just closed. 

In compiling this local history, we have contended throughout with a certain reluctancy on 
the part of all soldiers who did not appear over enthusiastic to see their picture or war record in 
print. They wanted no gilt frame about the picture, nor festivities made of their part. They 
were almost to the man reserved and extremely modest in speaking, when they did speak, of 
what they saw, did or thought. But everywhere in America this seems to have been the attitude 
and probably may be put down as a national trait of our new soldiers. Now that the job is 
finished, they have the satisfaction of feeling that they upheld the honor and the glory of the 
country and lay claims to 1 no credit save that contentment that comes from a service well per- 
formed. 

Of course this history is not complete. It is practically an impossibility, or to say the 
least, an almost endless task to bring every person's part in this great undertaking up to exact- 
ness. No efforts were spared, however, by the Williamson County War History Society to ac- 
complish the task. Every individual who would lend the least bit of assistance was enlisted in 
preparing some portion of this work. Public men, business and commercial institutions of every 
sort, theaters, pulpits, schools and newspapers throughout the country were called upon for 
various tasks in helping collect data, pictures, compile facts and perform other necessary duties. 
Everyone of them responded with a willingness and promptness that was beautiful indeed. If 
any one had ever before been doubtful of the loyalty of Williamson County, Illinois, as we 
passed through the war, he could not have served on this society and been of the same mind 
when the book was ready for the printer. 

Few counties in Illinois have such a large number of foreign born men of military age re- 
siding in their communities in proportion to the native born population as did Williamson 
County at the outbreak of war. The coal mining industry had attracted labor from every- 
where. The mines, railroads and all other commercial institutions in the county were going at 
top speed and had been for months preceding our declaration of war against Germany. 

Never before had this county experience/! such high wages, nor had labor been as scarce 
and the de and so great as at this time. Prosperity was abroad in the land everywhere and 
everybody id money, especially the young men of military age. It was therefore a matter of 
Icug schooling and repeated urging before the spirit of national loyalty took hold of the com- 
munity at large and especially the young men. There were few volunteer enlistments in the army 
in the industrial centers of the county until the war got into the second year. 

Our cordial appreciation is extended to Mrs. John A. Logan of Washington, D. C., be- 
loved widow of General Logan, both of whom were residents of this section of the State, when 
the great Civil War broke out, for her contribution. Also our thanks are extended Governor 
Frank 0. Lowden of Illinois, the foremost War Governor, for his beautiful tribute. We also 
desire to acknowledge our indebtedness for the loan of several illustrations that illustrate these 
pages by Hon. Francis G. Blair, State Superintendent of Public Instruction and previously ap- 
pearing in a Peace Day publication recently issued by him. 



Herrin, Illinois, September 1919. 



HAL W. TROVILLION. 



^ c v 




R 



The Roster 



By HERBERT W. CANN 

EAD in this book while yet the Nation lives its Youth, 

Unfettered by the coils which ancient Empires weld, 
A timely reproduction of the glorious truth, 

That we still keep unspoiled the faith the Fathers held. 



No parish in the mighty state of Illinois, 

Where Lincoln's profile is on every heart engraved; 

Gave quite so freely or renounced its fullest joys, 

That other lands might live, be unoppressed and saved. 

Their homes left far behind, perhaps no more to know 
The warmth of kindly ways true friendship always gives; 

Parents and sweethearts too they left, alone to go 

Where carnage maimed and sleiv; through them the Nation lives. 

Bend low in reverent grief when reading down the page 
On which the names of those we knew in life are writ, 

Who never more will clasp our hand till every age 
Has passed its way; till Heaven's canopy is lit. 

With all the radiancy of love and hope and song 

Of joyous earth-freed souls, whose peace forevermore 

Rests on the Rock of Ages; and who walk among 
The myriad s,lad hosts of eons gone before. 

God grant we go not far from trails blazed out by those 
Who framed our environs with Freedom's spirit blest, 

That we, like them from whom that spirit always flows, 
Shall find when life is o'er, a faithful Patriot's rest. 




sato not rlcarlg not understood, 
im'lMim tljcmschies, to ilje master-fyand 
tacit in his part as beat he coulo 
Ulyeg pla^cb it tljroujjlf as tljc autlior planned. 



C-WILSON ) 



C WASHINGTON) 



C LINCOLN 



tPERSHfNGT) 



I HAIG 



DIAZ -O 



C - FOCH ) 





Biographical-Champions of Freedom 

pEORGE WASHINGTON Born February 22nd, 1732. The "Father of His Country" and the standard 
^ bearer of the American Colonies in their birth struggle for freedom against the tyranny of the Hanoverian 
king, George III of England, and the first Pn-sident of the new republic (1789-1797). It was Richard Henry 
Lee, of Virginia, who apotheosized him as "First in war, first in peace and first in the hearts of his country- 
ment," a place which will never be usurped by any other so long as the nation which his far-sighted wisdom, 
unswerving faith and superb generalship were instrumental in founding, remains true to the principles which 
he laid down for its guidance. 

n mi mil minimi mil mnmm mil minim mnmimiimnmniiini Illlllll mi mn mi mi mi mil miimimimimimiimimiimMimmmnmnmnm minimum iniiinmnmim mi 

A BRAHAM LINCOLN Born February 12th. 1809. President of the United States throughout the most 
-^*- critical period of the nation's history, and the one chiefly responsible for it remaining "One and indi- 
visible, now and forever." Big-hearted and with a knowledge of human nature which a lifetime of ordinary 
diplomatic training could not give, he was the savior of the United States during the dark days of the Civil 
War. His emancipation of the Southern slaves was a blessing in disguise to the owners, as it prevented the 
monopoly of that great section of the country by a few wealthy cotton planters, and forced the development 
of its great resources. His death at the hand of a fanatical assassin April 14, 1865, was a calamity to North 
and South alike. 

i it niiiiiii mill niiinmimnmiiimm iniinminiiniinmminmmmimimm minium Illimillllllll I mmniimmnmiinmniinmnmmiminmnmnmim Illimmmiimimilllll 

WTOODROW WILSON Born December 28th, 1856. The world gives to this American President a higher 
meed of credit for the ending of the Great War than to any other single individual, for it was his now 
famous '"Fourteen Points," as set forth in January, 1918, and their later modifications, that the German Chan- 
cellor asked to be taken as a basis for international peace. Although he not only strove to preserve this 
country's neutrality during the earlier years of the war, but even initiated several attempts to bring about 
a reconciliation of the European belligerents, when it became evident that the United States could no longer 
hold aloof with honor, he cast aside the pen for the sword, and prosecuted the war with fervor. His ideal is 
an International League as a basis for the future peace of the world. 
iiiiimtiiitmiiiiiiiiiMiiiiiimiiimmiiiiiiiMiiiiiiiiiiiimiiiiiiiiiiiMiimiHHiiiiimiimiiHiiiiiiiiiitiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiimimiiiiiiiiiiimuiiiiiiiimim^ mimiiiiiiiiiimiiiiiimiiiiiiiimiiiiiiimiiimii 

/""" ENERAL JOHN JOSEPH PERSHING Born September 13th, 1860. A West Pointer, and head of the 
^^ Southern Department of the United States Army up to the date of this country's entry into the war, 
and following the death of General Funston. Was in command of the American troops during the expedi- 
tion into Mexico. Went to the Philippines in 1899, where he saw years of efficient service, and is today 
regarded as the greatest living authority on the Moros. It was while in Mexico, in 1915, that the great 
tragedy of his life occurred, when his wife and three little daughters were burned to death in their home at 
the Presidio, San Francisco. His work in France, as head of the American Expeditionary Forces, is a glorious 
page in the nation's history. 

lllllllllllllllllllllinilllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllMIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIMIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIMIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIII iiiiinmimimiimnnmmminmnmmimmilimnmnmiiiiiimnmiiiniiimii 

FIELD MARSHAL FERDINAND FOCH Born August 4th, 1851. The present war is not the first in which 
the Generalissimo of the United States and Allied armies saw a clash between German and French 
troops. At the age of twenty he witnessed .the horrors of the Siege of Paris, and that same year (1871( 
entered the great French military academy. Forty-three years later, he played the greatest part of any general 
under Joffre in driving back the German offensive against Paris in 1914. And after the Battle of the Marne 
it was Joffre who declared him to be "the first strategist of Europe." He was made Generalissimo of all 
the forces operating against the Central Powers in March, 1918, and although suffering reverses for a time, his 
policy of a continued smashing offensive brought a complete and sweeping victory. 
nimiiiiiiiimiimiimiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiimiiiiimiiiiiiiiiiiiMimiiiiiiiiMiiiiiimimiiiiiiiMmmmiimiimimm^ imiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiimiimimiiimiiiiMiimil 



MARSHAL SIR DOUGLAS HAIG Born June 19, 1861. Known as the "Silent Haig," because 
of his habit of saying but little in councils of war, but of listening attentively to all suggestions, and 
invariably selecting the best advice. Before being called to assume command of all the British forces in the 
war just closed, Haig had seen much active service in India, Egypt and the Sudan. On December 15, 1915, 
he succeeded Field Marshal French as head of the British armies, and under him the British army, referred 
to by the German Kaiser as ''contemptible," soon became as powerful a force in curbing the Teuton blood- 
lust as the great British navy. 



Miiiiiiimiiiiiimmmiiiiiiii 



p ENERAL ARMANDO DIAZ Born in Naples in 1861. the "Savior of Venice," is thoroughly Italian. 
^ r although his name has caused many to think him a native of Spain, from which land his forefathers 
came three generations back. He took command of Italy's shattered forces in November of 1917. after their 
rout by the Austrians the preceding month, due to the alleged treachery of General Cadorna. The beautiful 
Queen of the Adriatic was almost within the grasp of the invaders, when Diaz by his superb generalship, 
plucked victory from defeat, and began a counter-offensive which swept back the Austrians across the Piave, 
finally compelling them to sue for peace on Italy's own terms. 



ROOSEVELT J 



CGENERAL WOOD ) 

A^".M^;S 



CPRES. POINCARE) 



("VICTOR EMMANUEL] 



( KING GEORGE ) 





Biographical-Champions of Freedom 

r FHEODORE ROOSEVELT Born October 27th, 1858. Elected to the Vice-Presidency, he succeeded to the 
-*- office of Chief Executive on the death of William McKinley, September 14, 1901, and was elected 
President in 1904 by the largest majority ever given to any candidate for that great office. Clear-thinking, 
aggressive and fearless, he was a man of letters as well as a man of action, and as contributing editor to a 
well-known magazine, often attacked President Wilson's policies during the war just closed. During the 
Spanish-American War he organized a troop of cavalry known as the "Rough Riders," which saw hard 
service in Cuba; and offered to raise and lead in person a division for service in the European War, but his 
offer was not accepted. His death occurred suddenly January 6, 1919. The Nation lost the most commanding, 
the most original, the most interesting and the most brilliant personality in American public life since 
Lincoln. 

miti iiiiiiiMMlMMliiiiiiiiiilliimMllMlllMllMiiiMimiiiMll imiimi mnmmmm i i i imnmimnmnmnmimMiiimimiiiiiimiiimiiiiiimiiiiinnmiiiiimiiiiiiiimiimiiimmmiimni 

1VTAJOR LEONARD WOOD Born, Winchester, N. H., October 9, 1860; appointed assistant army surgeon 
January 5, 1886; Captain assistant surgeon. January 5, 1891; volunteered with Roosevelt in the "Rough 
Riders" at the outbreak of the Spanish-American war as Colonel First U. S. Volunteer Cavalry, and was 
made major-general, December 7, 1898; awarded Congressional Medal of Honor, March 29. 1898; Military 
Governor of Cuba and later Governor of Moro Province, Philippine Islands. During the World War was 
appointed Commander Eighty-ninth Division, N. A., Camp Funston, Kans. Has been acclaimed the greatest 
military genius in the U. S. Army, but was retained in the United States presumably on account of his 
ability to train ciack divisions, other conditions would indicate "political reasons." 

iiiiimi I minmimmiim nn i IMNIIII mi niiiiim: in mil minium I mill mimitmimimiimimii MIMMMIMIIMI mimnm minimum 

A DMIRAL WILLIAM S. SIMS Born October 15th, 1858. The first American officer to have a command 
** abroad in the Great War. His high rank at the outbreak of the struggle was due to his excellent 
work in developing the gunnery of American seamen, which caused President Roosevelt to give him Com- 
mand of a battleship over the heads of many others then outranking him. Fearless in criticism of naval 
abuses, he caused many of them to be rectified. His work in directing the operation of the fleet of Ameri- 
can destroyers did wonders in keeping in subjection the menace of the German submarines, and is responsible 
for the fact that 3 000.000 American soldiers were carried to France with so little loss. 

'" NiiMlliiiiiiMllMllmimiiiiMlllil nmim inuinini i , Mimill.ll I II I imiimmiimiim Mill mum niimii I 

ALBERT, KING OF THE BELGIANS Born April 8th, 1875. A heroic leader of a heroic nation. When 
Germany, treacherously aiming to strike a death blow at France by pouring her armies over the border 
through Belgium, whose neutrality she had joined in guaranteeing, she insolently demanded that Belgium 
afford free passage to her troops. Albert's reply to the Teuton envoy was characteristic: "Belgium is a 
nation, not a road!" And although overwhelmed by the German onrush, all of her land but a few square 
miles a prey for four years to the invaders, the dauntless spirit of King Albert held together his army of 
Belgian heroes, who having saved France, have lived to return to their homes in triumph. 

"'' miiniim mn inn i n i in ,; , , , , Minimum i mum mini mini n 

J^ING GEORGE V OF GREAT BRITAIN Born June 3rd, 1865. A naval officer up to the time of his 
accession to the throne May 6, 1910, George V is known as England's "Sea King," and it is not to be 
expected that he will be disposed to yield much at the Peace Conference as regards a diminution in the 
strength and privileges of the British Navy. He is a thoroughly democratic sovereign, and has played a 
worthy part in the prosecution of the war, although the peculiarities of the English form of government did 
not permit of his taking the field in person, like the rulers of Belgium and Italy. 

imii..iimiimiimimiimi in mm mi mm mm: mum i inn mi inn mil mil mnnii mi mil mum 'mil Minimum mi minim ml mn mi r mi mil nil inn I'll mimin miMIIMimilllMlmiimimiimillMllimmji 

"D AYMOND POINCARE Born August 20th, 1860. After a lifetime of productive labor for his country, 
^-*- during which he had served as Minister both of Finance and of Agriculture, M. Poincare was elected 
President of the French Republic, taking his seat February 18, 1913. The beginning of the Great War was 
only eighteen months away; but without foreseeing it, he immediately set to work on the general principles 
of sound policy, and did much to strengthen the relations and alliances of France with other powers. With 
the nation actually at war he was quick to see the necessity for unity of thought and action and formed a 
coalition cabinet of statesmen of all political parties. His selection of "the old tiger," Georges Clemenceau, as 
Premier, had much to do with keeping France's armies in the field after her foes believed her "bled white." 

1 1 n 1 1 mimn i mil mi i inn in i inn un i mimnmn i mil u I in mini in I mm in mi mmnmnmnmimn mimiminmniiimnmnmnmnmnmiminmimnmnmnmnm nmnimiiuni 



EMMANUEL III Born November llth, 1869. His wife, Queen Helena, a Montenegrin princess, 
the sympathies of Italy's King were easily enlisted in the plight of the little Balkan kingdoms of Serbia 
and Montenegro when they were overrun by the Teuton hordes. But his was a difficult role, for Italy was 
nominally in alliance with both Germany and Austria. It was, however, one of defense only, and Italy 
refused to become, like Austria, a cat's paw for the German Kaiser's overweening ambition. Besides, 
Austria had long held lands which the Italians believed rightfully to belong to their country. Italy there- 
fore joined the Allies, and Victor Emmanuel, like Albert of Belgium, fought with his troops, and with them 
shares a well-earned victory. 

9 




Illinois' War Governor 




HON. FRANK 0. LOWDEN 

F'RANK 0. LOWDEN, Oregon, Illinois, Governor (Rep.), was born in Sunrise, 
Minn., January 26, 1861; moved to Hardin County, Iowa, in 1868, and taught 
school there for five years, beginning in his fifteenth year. He was graduated 
from the Iowa State University in 1885, from the Union College of Law (now North- 
western) in 1887, being valedictorian of his class in each institution. For several 
years he was president of the Alumni Association and trustee of the Northwestern 
University, the University of Chicago, and Knox College, Galesburg. He was law 
clerk in the office of Dexter, Herrick & Allen, Chicago, and in 1898 he formed the 
partnership of Lowden, Estabrook & Davis. His law practice was extensive and 
varied and he was regarded as a most successful trial lawyer. He occupied the chair 
of Federal Jurisprudence in the Northwestern Law School. Lowden Hall was named 
after him for his services there. He purchased Hemenway Farm, now Sinnissippi 
Farm, on Rock River near Oregon, in 1900. He was a candidate for the Republican 
nomination for Governor at the famous deadlock convention in 1904 and was de- 
feated on the seventy-ninth ballot, Charles S. Deneen being nominated. He served 
as Republican National Committeeman for Illinois and member of the executive 
body of the National Committee from 1904 to 1912 and was a member of Congress 
from the Thirteenth District from 1906 to 1911 when he retired on account of ill 
health. He was nominated for Governor on the Republican ticket in 1916 with a 
large plurality and elected by an overwhelming majority. He was married to Miss 
Florence Pullman, daughter of George M. Pullman, April 29, 1896. They have 
four children, one son and three daughters. 

10 
m*=&*=#=*=4&& 







Illinois In the World War 



BY FRANK 0. LOWDEN, Governor of Illinois. 



ILLINOIS sent 351,153 soldiers into the 
Federal service during the Great War. 
From the summoning of the National 
Guard to Camp Lowden in Springfield, until 
the discharge of the Marines in August, 1919, 
it was my privilege as Governor of Illinois 
to, see the flower of the State in training 
camp, marching with fearless eye to the 
transports, and returning from overseas. 
There was never any doubt in my mind of 
the record these men would make. They had 
a proud heritage to inspire them in their 
European service. Going from the State that 
produced Lincoln and the matchless soldiers, 
Grant and Logan, we could not expect them 
to do other than bring back our banners un- 
sullied and untarnished. We followed our 
soldiers in all the arduous months in which 
they were away from us. We followed them 
with love and pride. We are familiar with 
the great battles in which they were engaged. 
We know something of Hamel ; we know 
how Illinois men were among the first there 
to make all the world know what the Amer- 
ican soldier was and what he could do. We 
know something of the Mort Homme sector; 
we remember the Bois de Forges. We recall 
the trying days in the Argonne. Those names 
will be treasured forever in the history of 



Illinois and the history of the United States. 
We have not forgotten the comrades who will 
come back no> more. The memories of those 
brave men who fell upon the greatest bat- 
tlefields of history will be tenderly cherished 
in the heart of Illinois and in the heart of 
our common country. For, the living, our 
gratitude, our love; for those silent comrades, 
our gratitude, our pride, our tears. 

Those who spent months in camps in the 
United States and had none of the excite- 
ment and dangers of battle, but who never- 
theless served their country to the best of 
their ability, are entitled to praise and grati- 
tude. Home is Illinois, America, the best 
country in the world. It has always been 
worth fighting for. The men now sleeping 
on foreign battlefields have proven that it is 
worth dying for. 

Now that war is over, a new task awaits. 
It is the preservation of the liberties for 
which the young men of America risked their 
lives. It is the resumption of peaceful re- 
lations. Great problems lie ahead and these 
soldiers must aid in their solution. I am 
sure that they will not fail in the future any 
more than they did in the past when they 
were called upon to risk all. 




; w^ 



Incident of the Civil War 

By Mrs. John A. Logan, Washington, D. C. 




GEN. JOHN A. LOGAN 

[Probably the most important and exicting inci- 
dent connected with Civil War preparations in all 
Illinois took place on the public square in Marion 
shortly after the outbreak of the Rebellion when 
John A. Logan, the congressman from this district, 
returned from Washington to plead with his con- 
stituents to cast their lot with the Union cause. His 
beloved widow, still residing in Washington, has 
kindly contributed specially for this history the 
graphic picture of those anxious and dangerous days. 
To fully appreciate the situation we must remember 
that this portion of Illinois settled in an early day 
by Southerners was strongly inclined to the Con- 

HE mounted the wagon, and after waving 
a salutation to the throng who sur- 
rounded him, he began to speak in a 
voice so clear and so full of volume that 
every person, even those the farthest from 
him on the outside of the crowd, could hear 
him distinctly. In a few moments, a death- 
like stillness prevailed, the most turbulent 
spirit in the crowd was as quiet as the dead. 
You would hear only his sonorous voice, as 
he, with great deliberation, pictured the situ- 
ation of affairs, the inevitable consequences 
of rebellion to this great country, should the 
theory of secession prevail; telling them at 




MRS. JOHN A. LOGAN 

federacy. It required a brave man indeed to face 
his former closest friends, who were now the worst 
secessionists and ask them to give up their ideas 
and go against the land of their fathers. The 
thrilling midnight ride alone across these prairies 
by Mrs. Logan to Carbondale to meet her husband 
and escort him to Marion where he addressed the 
impatient crowd on the square mounting a farm 
wagon as a platform, reads like the most exciting 
piece of fiction. The story is fitting in connection 
with this present war history in that it presents 
altogether different conditions under which William- 
son County, always patriotic, rallied to arms in 1917 
to 1918. Editor.] 

what cost of blood and treasury the Republic 
had been established, and how certainly lib- 
erty would be forfeited and anarchy reign, 
were the Union once dissolved. Step by 
step, he led them on for nearly two hours, 
intensity and earnestness depicted in every 
lineament of his face, his bright, black eyes 
gleaming with emotion, every gesture empha- 
sizing the truthfulness of his remarks. 

The effect upon his hearers was magical. 
They were swayed by his eloquence until 
they fairly re-echoed his utterances. Toward 
the close, he said: "The time has come when 
a man must be for or against his county, not 



12 



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iLfC-' //- J'J 

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/ ft //- Jf 




for or against his state. How long could one 
state stand up against another, or two or three 
or four states stand against others? The 
Union, once dissolved, we should have nu- 
merous confederacies and rebellions. I, for 
one, shall stand or fall for this Union, and 
shall this day enroll for the war. I want 
as many of you as will to come with me. 
If you say, "No," and see your best interests 
and the welfare of your homes and your 
children in another direction, may God pro- 
tect you." 

Luke Sanders, an old fifer, six feet, four 
inches tall, and very large in proportion, was 
in the crowd. He had been a fifer in the 
same regiment with General Logan in the 
Mexican War. We had seen him previously 
and he had promised to come and bring his 
fife and at a signal from J. H. White, was 
to go up to General Logan, give him his hand 
as a volunteer, and then was to play a pa- 
triotic air on his fife, whereat Mr. White 
and a few others were to step in line and 
start the volunteering. General Logan did 
not know that Luke Sanders, the fifer, was to 
be there, or that he was to lead off in that 
way and when he saw the herculean figure 
of his old comrade striding through the 
crowd making for him, he lost control of his 
feelings and wept like a child. It is needless 
to add that through my own tears I witnessed 
the most affecting scene that had ever oc- 
curred in that or any other town. At the 
sound of Sander's fife, and the beating of the 
one old drum of Gabriel Cox, who was a 
member of the Drum Corps of the same regi- 
ment in which General Logan served in the 
Mexican War, whom Mr. White and Captain 
Looney and the friends had hunted up Gen- 
eral Logan jumped down from the wagon, 
stepped into the line that was speedily 
formed. J. H. White, clerk of the Court, 
Captain W. A. Looney of Johnson County, 
George W. Goddard, and a dozen other 



prominent men of the town, one after an- 
other falling into line. General Logan 
gave the command, "Forward March," and 
started round the square, followed by one 
hundred and ten men, as good and true as 
every carried a musket. All were enrolled 
for "three years or during the war," and 
Southern Illinois was saved to the Union by 
John A. Logan. 

Braver or truer men never followed the 
stars and stripes or were more unwavering 
in the discharge of their duty though many 
times they knew their opponents on the other 
field of battle were their kindred. From 
Marion, General Logan went to Saline County 
where faithful Captain Cain's company was 
raised. Every county in the district rallied 
to the cause and in a few weeks the gallant 
Thirty-first rendezvoused at Cairo, Illinois, 
and from the day of its organization as a 
regiment, was ever in the van. 

No county in Southern Illinois has a 
brighter record than has that of Williamson 
County. Her people have been among the 
most patriotic in the state. What has been 
said of the men of the Thirty-first Illinois, 
can, with equal pride, be said of the soldiers 
and sailors of the whole of Southern Illinois 
who took part in saving the Union. The 
highest ambitions seemed to have inspired the 
whole population to stupendous effort to be 
in the foremost rank of prosperity and true 
Americanism. The untiring energy of her 
people has made the most of her bountiful 
resources in agriculture, mineral wealth and 
intellectual development. 

In the intervening years between the close 
of the Civil War and the beginning of the 
world's war, Williamson County has made 
history of which every citizen should be 
proud. To me personally, the mention of 
Marion, Williamson County, Illinois, awak- 
ens memories and associations that are the 
dearest in life. 



L* IJ 1J IJ ' J 





14 



. 

s s 



3 0. 




Williamson County War History Society Organi- 
zation and Personnel 



" and now we come to write the history 
they made that those brave boys, who 
turned the world upside down in the greatest 
of all world wars, did not fight and die in 
vain, but that their deeds may illuminate the 
pages of permanent history so that future 
generations may cherish their memory for- 
ever." 

It is this idea that expresses perfectly the 
purpose of the publication of this history. 
No sooner had the armistice been signed than 
plans were being made to write Williamson 
County's part in the great war. As early as 
January 1919, Hal W. Trovillion, editor and 
publisher of The Herrin News, announced 
that he would compile a history commemorat- 
ing the deeds of Williamson County's two 
thousand five hundred soldiers, sailors and 
marines. Realizing the arduous task that such 
a work involved, the editor associated with 
him S. S. Baird, a well known journalist and 



LEON A. COLP, President, Marion, 
Attorney and Master-in-Chancery. 

JUDGE A. D. MORGAN, Vice-President, Herrin, 
Judge of Herrin City Court. 

HAL W. TROVILLION, Secretary-Treasurer, Herrin, 
Editor and Publisher of The Herrin News. 

S. S. BAIRD, Business Manager, Herrin, 
Journalist and Special Publicity Writer. 

TOM CRAIG, Marion, 

City Editor, Marion Post. 

CAPT. OLDHAM PAISLEY, Marion, 
City Editor, Marion Republican. 

REV. JOHN I. GUNN, Marion, 
Pastor, Christian Church. 

ED. M. STOTLAR, Marion. 
Lumber Merchant. 

R. H. H. HAMPTON, Carterville, ' 
Druggist. 



publicity writer of Springfield, Illinois, who 
was intrusted with the business management 
of the undertaking. They organized the 
Williamson County War History Society in 
March 1919, a volunteer organization made 
up of some of the most prominent citizens 
of the county. From that time until the book 
went to press, Mr. Baird devoted his entire 
time to the work, and the financial obligation 
incident to gathering the facts and other nec- 
essary expenses were borne by Mr. Trovil- 
lion. 

Considerable credit must be accorded to 
the officers and advisory committee for their 
co-operation which was given with the patri- 
otic spirit shown by Williamson County citi- 
zens. No officer or member of the advisory 
committee received any financial compensa- 
tion with the exception of the special man- 
ager. 

Following is the personnel of the society: 



REV. E. J. SABIN, Carterville. 

Pastor, Presbyterian Church. 
J. W. McKINNEY, Marion, 

County Superintendent of Schools. 
LIEUT. R. D. HENSON, Johnston City, 

Attorney. 
J. W. BURNETT, Creal Springs, 

Banker. 
ETHEL T. HOLLAND, Marion, 

Society Editor, Marion Post. 
EVA YOUNG, Marion, 

Vice-Chairman, Marion Red Cross. 
REV. E. SENESE, Herrin, 

Pastor. St. Mary's Church. 
T. P. RUSSELL, Hurst, 

Banker. 
WILLIAM J. SNEED, Herrin, 

President Sub-District 10, U. M. W. A. 
A. T. PACE, Herrin, 

Auditor U. M. W. A. 



15 










French visitors at Lincoln's Tomb Gen. Joseph Jacques Cesaire Joffre, Field 
Marshal of the French Army in middle of front line. 



16 




Review of the World War 



ON November 11, 1918, Civilization, 
war-weary but triumphant, planted the 
banner of Freedom over the prostrate 
wreck of Autocratic Militarism. For on that 
date the most stupendous, the costliest and 
the bloodiest war in the history of the world 
came to an end in the French village of Senlis 
with the signing by five German envoys of an 
armistice, the terms of which were set by the 
French Field Marshal Ferdinand Foch, Gen- 
eralissimo of the armies of the United States 
and the Allied Powers of France, Great 
Britain, Italy, Belgium and the smaller na- 
tions having armed forces in the field against 
the Teuton craze for world domination. It 
was the close of the most terrible war the 
world has ever known, for Terror and Fright- 
fulness were the watchwords of the German 
hordes from the day (July 29, 1914) when 
they swept across the Belgian border to at- 
tack France from a quarter which Germany 
herself had joined in solemnly declaring 
should be inviolate, all through the four and 
a quarter years of uninterrupted slaughter 
and rapine, pillage and brigandage. "Make 
yourselves as terrible as the hordes of Attila 
the Hun," said the German Kaiser to his 
troops, and as "Huns" they became univer- 
sally known and execrated. At the outset 
of the war, the two Teuton empires, Germany 
and Austria, faced only two other great Eu- 
ropean powers, Russia and France, together 
with the little kingdom of Serbia. But the 
rape of Belgium brought Great Britain into 
line against them, as well as Italy in less than 
a year. The powerful British navy rendered 
helpless the German surface warcraft, but the 
German submarines could not so easily be 
held in check. It was their ruthless and 
treacherous manner of preying upon bellig- 
erent and neutral shipping alike which con- 
tributed largely to Germany's undoing. For 
the torpedoing by them of the great trans- 
atlantic liner "Lusitania" off the coast of Ire- 
land on May 7, 1915, sent such a wave of 
indignation sweeping over the world, that 



even in this country neutrality became little 
more than a mere diplomatic phrase. 

Outrage followed upon outrage, in spite 
of lying promises, broken as soon as made, 
until in April of 1917 the United States threw 
itself and its vast resources whole-heartedly 
into the war, and Germany was doomed. 
Russia, honeycombed with graft, her whole 
political system poisoned with a combination 
of autocracy, ignorance and anarchy, had 
practically collapsed a year previous before 
the onrush of Von Hidenberg. Serbia de- 
serted by all of its Balkan allies except Rou- 
mania, had been crushed under the heel of 
Von Mackensen. Bulgaria and Turkey had 
allied themselves with the Teutonic forces, 
and Greece would have done so but for the 
staying hands of Great Britain and France. 
The collapse of Russia, which became an ac- 
tuality with the downfall of the Czar's regime 
and the abject treaty of Brest-Litovsk, signed 
with Germany by the Bolsheviki March 3, 
1918, threw a heavy burden on American 
shoulders; but by this time this country was 
well on its way to an effective war footing. 
Huge sums had been raised through four 
voluntary Liberty Loans, the combined sub- 
scriptions to which totalled $16,000,000,000; 
millions of the finest of its youth had been 
hastily drilled in camps and cantonments in 
this country and abroad, and by the aid of 
British transports a vast army had been as- 
sembled in Europe, under the leadership of 
Major-General John J. Pershing. At last they 
were ready to strike. But not before they 
were sorely needed. The Germans had 
started a tremendous offensive in March, 
1918, an offensive which seemed irresistible. 
The forces of Field Marshal Haig, the com- 
mander-in-chief of the British forces, and of 
General Petain, the head of those of France, 
were slowly but surely being pushed back 
under the sheer weight of German divisions 
released from the Eastern front. Never had 
matters looked so black for the Allies. On 
May 27 their line had been broken between 



17 





18 




Soissons and Rheims. The situation was des- 
perate. And then, the very next day, masses 
of youngsters in olive drab seemed to rise 
out of the earth. They marched, singing 
gaily, to the spot where the deadly hail was 
thickest, beat to pieces the flower of Prussia's 
troops and "Cantigny" was written on Amer- 
ica's battle-flags. But still the steam roller 
went on. Paris was threatened more nearly 
than ever since those dark days in the fall 
of 1914 when Von Kluck's army was thrust 
back from its very gates. 

At Chateau Thierry, on June 6, the French 
commander ground his teeth as he prepared 
to move back still further his hospital and 
supply base if the deadly German fire per- 
mitted even that. But they came in time 
the "Yankees"! Division after division of 
them. With bayonets fixed they plunged 
across No Man's Land, straight through a 
perfect hell of machine-gun fire, shrapnel 
and high explosives, and simply annihilated 
the guns and gunners. They were a devas- 
tating whirlwind, and they stopped the Ger- 
man drive and saved Paris. They did far 
more than that; they saved Europe and they 
saved Civilization, for when, on July 18, 
Marshal Foch began his great counter-offen- 
sive, it was to the First American Army that 
he delegated the all-important task of wip- 
ing out the St. Mihiel salient, the great bulg- 
ing advance of the Germans since March. 
On September 12 the Americans did it, tak- 
ing 15,000 prisoners and shortening the bat- 
tle line by a score of miles. It was the be- 



ginning of the end. Germany had staked her 
all on a last desperate drive and it had 
failed. Events of supreme importance be- 
came daily occurrences. Bulgaria was the 
first to surrender. She was soon followed by 
Turkey, whose armies in Syria had been de- 
cisively beaten by the British under General 
Allenby. The Italians, under General Diaz, 
recovered by force of arms all that they 
had lost the preceding October through the 
alleged treachery of General Cadorna; and 
Austria ceased to be a factor in the war. 
Beset by revolution at home and the con- 
sistently victorious advance of the Americans 
and Allies at the front, Germany begged 
President Wilson to use his endeavors to se- 
cure an armistice "on land, on sea and in 
the air." The proposal was referred to 
Marshal Foch, and four days after the Ameri- 
cans had captured the historic city of Sedan, 
where Germany had taken prisoner the Em- 
peror of the French forty-seven years ago. 
the empire of Bismarck and Von Moltke. 
which then had its birth, came to an inglori- 
ous end. For the signing of the armistice 
at Senlis was immediately followed by the 
abdication and flight to Holland of the Ger- 
man Kaiser, and a state of socialistic anarchy 
throughout Germany. The pagan "super- 
man" German doctrine that might makes 
right had been shattered, and in the immortal 
words of Abraham Lincoln, "government of 
the people, by the people and for the peo- 
ple" had not been permitted to perish from 
the earth. 



19 



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A Brief Historical Summary of the World War 



1914 

June 28 Archduke Ferdinand 
and wife assassinated in Sarajevo, 
Bosnia. 

July 28 Austria-Hungary de- 
clares war on Serbia. 

Aug. 1 Germany declares war 
on Russia and general mobiliza- 
tion is under way in France and 
A ustria-Hungary. 

Aug. 2 German troops enter 
France at Cirey; Russian troops 
enter Germany at Schwidden; Ger- 
man army enters Luxemburg over 
protest and Germany asks Belgium 
for free passage of her troops. 

Aug. 3 British fleet mobilizes; 
Belgium appeals to Great Britain 
for diplomatic aid and German 
ambassador quits Paris. 

Aug. 4 France declares war on 
Germany; Germany declares war 
on Belgium; Great Britain sends 
Belgium neutrality ultimatum to 
Germany; British army mobilized 
and state of war between Great 
Britain and Germany is declared. 
President Wilson issues neutrality 
proclamation. 

Aug. 5 Germans begin fighting 
on Belgium frontier; Germany 
asks for Italy's help. 

Aug. 6 Austria declares war on 
Russia. 

Aug. 7 Germans defeated by 
French at Altkirch. 

Aug. 8 Germans capture Liege. 
Portugal announces it will support 
Great Britain; British land troops 
in France. 

Aug. 10 France declares war 
on Austria-Hungary. 

Aug. 12 Great Britain declares 
war on Austria-Hungary; Monte- 
negro declares war on Germany. 

Aug. 15 Japan sends ultima- 
tum to Germany to withdraw from 
Japanese and Chinese waters and 
evacuate Kiaochow; Russia offers 
autonomy to Poland. 

Aug. 20 German army enters 
Brussels. 

Aug. 23 Japan declares war on 
Germany; Russia victorious in 
battles in East Prussia. 

Aug. 24 Japanese warships 
bombard Tsingtao. 

Aug. 25 Japan and Austria 
break off diplomatic relations. 



Aug. 28 English win naval bat- 
tle over German fleet near Helgo- 
land. 

Aug. 29 Germans defeat Rus- 
sians at Allenstein; occupy 
Amiens; advance to La Fere, six- 
ty-five miles from Paris. 

Sept. 1 Germans cross Marne; 
bombs dropped on Paris; Turkish 
army mobilized; Zeppelins drop 
bombs on Antwerp. 

Sept. 2 Government of France 
transferred to Bordeaux; Russians 
capture Lemberg. 

Sept. 4 Germans cross the 
Marne. 

Sept. 5 England, France, and 
Russia sign pact to make no sep- 
arate peace. 

Sept. 6 French win battle of 
Marne; British cruiser Pathfinder 
sunk in North Sea by a German 
submarine. 

Sept. 7 Germans retreat from 
the Marne. 

Sept. 14 Battle of Aisne starts; 
German retreat halted. 

Sept. 15 First battle of Sois- 
sons fought. 

Sept. 20 Russians capture Jaro- 
slau and begin siege of Przemysl. 

Oct. 9-10 Germans capture Ant- 
werp. 

Oct. 12 Germans take Ghent. 

Oct. 20 Fighting along Yser 
river begins. 

Oct. 29 Turkey begins war on 
Russia. 

Nov. 1 British cruiser fleet de- 
stroyed in action off coast of 
Chile. 

Nov. 7 Tsingtao falls before 
Japanese troops. 

Nov. 9 German cruiser Emden 
destroyed. 

Dec. 8 German fleet destroyed 
in battle off Falkland islands. 

Dec. 11 German advance on 
Warsaw checked. 

Dec. 14 Belgrade recaptured 
by Serbians. 

Dec. 16 German cruisers bom- 
bard Scarborough, Hartlepool, and 
Whitby, on English coast, killing 
fifty or more persons; Austrians 
said to have lost upwards of 100,- 
000 men in Serbian defeat. 

Dec. 25 Italy occupies Avlona, 
Albania. 

21 



1915 

Jan. 1 British battleship For- 
midable sunk. 

Jan. 8 R o u m a n i a mobilizes 
750,000 men; violent fighting in 
the Argonne. 

Jan. 11 Germans cross the 
Rawka, thirty miles from War- 
saw. 

Jan. 24 British win naval bat- 
tle in North Sea. 

Jan. 29 Russian army invades 
Hungary; German efforts to cross 
Aisne repulsed. 

Feb. 1 British repel strong 
German attack near La Bassee. 

Feb. 2 Turks are defeated in 
attack on Suez canal. 

Feb. 4 Russians capture Tar- 
now in Galicia. 

Feb. 8 Turks along Suez canal 
in full retreat; Turkish land de- 
fenses at the Dardanelles shelled 
by British torpedo boats. 

Feb. 11 Germans evacuate 
Lodz. 

Feb. 12 Germans drive Rus- 
sians from positions in East Prus- 
sia, taking 26.000 prisoners. 

Feb. 14 Russians report cap- 
ture of fortifications at Smolnik. 

Feb. 16 Germans capture Plock 
and Bielsk in Poland; French cap- 
ture two miles of German trenches 
in Champagne district. 

Feb. 17 Germans report they 
have taken 50.000 Russian prison- 
ers in Mazurian lake district. 

Feb. 18 German blockade of 
English and French coasts put into 
effect. 

Feb. 19-20 British and French 
fleets bombard Dardanelles forts. 

Feb. 21 American steamer Eve- 
lyn sunk by mine in North sea. 

Feb. 22 German war office an- 
nounces capture of 100000 Rus- 
sian prisoners in engagements in 
Mazurian lake region; American 
steamer Carib sunk by mine in 
North sea. 

Feb. 28 Dardanelles entrance 
forts capitulate to English and 
French. 

March 4 Landing of allied 
troops on both sides of Darda- 
nelles straits reported; German 
U-4 sunk by French destroyers. 

March 10 Battle of Neuve Cha- 
pelle begins. 





22 



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March 14 German cruiser 
Dresden sunk in Pacific by Eng- 
lish. 

March 18 British battleships 
Irresistible and Ocean and French 
battleship Bouvet sunk in Darda- 
nelles strait. 

March 22 Fort of Przemysl 
surrenders to Russians. 

March 23 Allies land troops on 
Gallipoli peninsula. 

March 25 Russians victorious 
over Austrians in Carpathians. 

April 8 German auxiliary 
cruiser. Prinz Eitel Friederich, in- 
terned at Newport News, Va. 

April 16 Italy has 1,200.000 
men mobilized under arms; Aus- 
trians report complete defeat of 
Russians in Carpathian campaign. 

April 23 Germans force way 
across Ypres canal and lake 1 600 
prisoners. 

April 25 Allies stop German 
drive on Ypres line in Belgium. 

April 29 British report regain- 
ing of two-thirds of lost ground in 
Ypres battle. 

May 7 Liner Lusltania torpe- 
doed and sunk by German sub- 
marine off the coast of Ireland 
with the loss of more than 1 000 
lives. 102 Americans. 

May 9 French advance two and 
one-half miles against German 
forces north of Arras, taking 2.000 
prisoners. 

May 23 Italy declares war on 
Austria. 

June 3 Germans recapture 
Przemysl with Austrian help. 

June 18 British suffer defeat 
north of La Bassee canal. 

June 28 Italians enter Austrian 
territory south of Riva on western 
shore of Lake Garda. 

July 3 Tolmino falls into Ital- 
ian hands. 

July 9 British make gains 
north of Ypres and French retake 
trenches in the Vosges. 

July 13 Germans defeated in 
the Argonne. 

July 29 W a r s a w evacuated ; 
Lublin captured by Austrians. 

Aug. 4 Germans occupy War- 
saw. 

Aug. 14 Austrians and Ger- 
mans concentrate 400000 soldiers 
on Serbian frontier. 

Aug. 21 Italy declares war on 
Turkey. 

Sept. 1 Ambassador Bernstorff 
announces Germans will sink no 
more liners without warning. 

Sept. 4 German submarine tor- 
pedoes liner Hesperian. 



Sept. 9 Germans make air raid 
on London, killing twenty persons 
and wounding 100 others; United 
States asks Austria to recall Am- 
bassador Dumba. 

Sept. 20 Germans begin drive 
on Serbia to open route to Tur- 
key. 

Sept. 22 Russian army retreat- 
ing from Vilna, escapes German 
encircling movement. 

Sept. 25-30-Battle of Cham- 
pagne, resulting in great advance 
for allied armies and causing 
Kaiser Wilhelm " to rush to the 
west front; German counter at- 
tacks repulsed. 

Oct. 5 Russia and Bulgaria 
sever diplomatic relations; Rus- 
sian, French. British, Italian, and 
Serbian diplomatic representatives 
ask for passports in Sofia. 

Oct. 10 Gen. Mackensen's 
forces lake Belgrade. 

Oct. 12 Edith Cavell executed 
by Germans. 

Oct. 13 Bulgaria declares war 
on Serbia. 

Oct. 15 Great Britain declares 
war on Bulgaria. 

Oct. 16 France declares war on 
Bulgaria. 

Oct. 19 Russia and Italy de- 
clare war on Bulgaria. 

Oct. 27 Germans join Bulgar- 
ians in northeastern Serbia and 
open way to Constantinople. 

Oct. 30 Germans defeated at 
Mitau. 

Nov. 9 Italian liner Ancona 
torpedoed. 

Dec. 1 British retreat from 
near Bagdad. 

Dec. 4 Ford "peace party" sails 
for Europe. 

Dec. 8-9 Allies defeated in 
Macedonia. 

Dec. 15 Sir John Douglas Haig 
succeeds Sir John French as chief 
of English armies on west front. 

1916 

Jan. 8 British troops at Kut-el- 
Amara surrounded. 

Jan. 9 British evacuate Galli- 
poli peninsula. 

Jan. 13 Austrians capture Ce- 
tinje, capital of Montenegro. 

Jan. 23 Scutari, capital of Al- 
bania, captured by Austrians. 

Feb. 22 Crown prince's army 
begins attack on Verdun. 

March 8 Germany declares 
war on Portugal. 

March 15 Austria-Hungary de- 
clares war on Portugal. 

23 



March 24 Steamer Sussex tor- 
pedoed and sunk. 

April 18 President Wilson 
sends note to Germany. 

April 10 P resident Wilson 
speaks to congress, explaining dip- 
lomatic situation. 

April 24 Insurrection in Dub- 
lin. 

April 29 British troops at Kut- 
el-Amara surrender to Turks. 

April 30 Irish revolution sup- 
pressed. 

May 3 Irish leaders of insur- 
rection executed. 

May 4 Germany makes prom- 
ise to change methods of subma- 
rine warfare. 

May 13 Austrians begin great 
offensive against Italians in Tren- 
tino. 

May 31 Great naval battle off 
Danish coast. (Battle of Jutland.) 

June 5 Lord Kitchener lost 
with cruiser Hampshire. 

June 11 Russians capture 
Dubno. 

June 29 Sir Roger Casement 
sentenced to be hanged for trea- 
son. 

July 1 British and French be- 
gin great offensive on the Somme. 

July 6 David Lloyd George ap- 
pointed secretary oT war. 

July 9 German merchant sub- 
marine Deutschland arrives at Bal- 
timore. 

July 23 Gen. Kuropatkin's army 
wins battle near Riga. 

July 27 English take Delville 
wood; Serbian forces begin attach 
on Bulgars in Macedonia. 

Aug. 2 French take Fleury. 

Aug. 3 Sir Roger Casement 
executed for treason. 

Aug. 4 French recapture 
Thiaumont for fourth time; Brit- 
ish repulse Turkish attack on Suez 
canal. 

Aug. 7 Italians on Isonzo front 
capture Monte Sabotino and Monte 
San Michele. 

Aug. 8 Turks force Russian 
evacuation of Bitlis and Mush. 

Aug. 9 Italians cross Isonzo 
river and occupy Austrian city 
of Goeritz. 

Aug. 10 Austrians evacuate 
Stanislau; allies take Doiran, near 
Saloniki, from Bulgarians. 

Aug. 19 German submarines 
sink British light cruisers Notting- 
ham and Falmouth. 

Aug. 24 French occupy Maure- 
pas, north of the Somme; Rus- 
sians recapture Mush in Armenia. 



I 






Aug. 27 Italy declares war on 
Germany; Roumanla enters war 
on side of allies. 

Aug. 29 Field Marshal von 
Hindenburg made chief of staff 
of German armies, succeeding 
Gen. von Falkenhayn. 

Aug. 30 Russian armies seize 
all five passes in Carpathians into 
Hungary. 

Sept. 3 Allies renew offensive 
north of Somme; Bulgarian and 
German troops invade Dobrudja, 
in Roumania. 

Sept. 7 Germans and Bulgar- 
ians capture Roumanian fortress 
of Tutrakan; Roumanians take 
Orsova, Bulgarian city. 

Sept. 10 G e r m a n-Bulgarian 
army capture Roumanian fortress 
of Silistria. 

Sept. 14 British for first time 
use "tanks." 

Sept. 15 Italians begin new of- 
fensive on Carso. 

Oct. 2 Roumanian army of in- 
vasion in Bulgaria defeated by 
Germans and Bulgarians under 
Von Mackensen. 

Oct. 4 German submarines sink 
French cruiser Gallia and Cunard 
liner Franconia. 

Oct. 8 G e r m a n submarines 
sink six merchant steamships off 
Nantucket, Mass. 

Oct. 11 Greek seacoast forts 
dismantled and turned over to al- 
lies on demand of England and 
France. 

Oct. 23 German-Bulgar armies 
capture Constanza, Roumania. 

Oct. 24 French win back Doua- 
mont, Thiaumont field work. Hau- 
dromont quarries, and Caillette 
wood near Verdun, in smash of 
two miles. 

Nov. 1 Italians, in new offen- 
sive on the Carso plateau, cap- 
ture 5,000 Austrians. 

Nov. 2 Germans evacuate Fort 
Vaux at Verdun. 

Nov. 5 Germans and Austrians 
proclaim new kingdom of Poland, 
of territory captured from Russia. 

Nov. 6 Submarine sinks Brit- 
ish passenger steamer Arabia. 

Nov. 7 Cardinal Mercier pro- 
tests against German deportation 
of Belgians; submarine sinks 
American steamer Columbian. 

Nov. 8 Russian army invades 
Transylvania, Hungary. 

Nov. 9 Austro-German armies 
defeat Russians in Volhynia and 
take 4,000 prisoners. 



Nov. 13 British launch new of- 
fensive in Sommu region on both 
sides of Ancre. 

Nov. 14 British capture forti- 
fied village of Beacourt, near the 
Ancre. 

Nov. 19 Serbian, French and 
Russian troops recapture Mona- 
stir; Germans cross Transylvania 
Alps and enter western Roumania. 
. Nov. 21 British hospital ship 
Britannic sunk by mine in Egean 
sea. 

Nov. 23 Roumanian army re- 
treats ninety miles from Buchar- 
est. 

Nov. 24 German-Bulgarian ar- 
mies take Orsova and Turnu-Sev- 
erin from Roumanians. 

Nov. 25 Greek provisional gov- 
ernment declares war on Germany 
and Bulgaria. 

Nov. 28 Roumanian govern- 
ment abandons Bucharest and 
moves capital to Jassy. 

Dec. 5 Premier Herbert As- 
quith of England resigns. 

Dec. 7 David Lloyd George ac- 
cepts British premiership. 

Dec. 8 Gen. von Mackensen 
captures big Roumanian army in 
Prohova valley. 

Dec. 12 Chancellor von Beth- 
man-Hollweg announces in reich- 
stag that Germany will propose 
peace; new cabinet in France un- 
der Aristide Briand as premier, 
and Gen. Robert Georges Nivelie 
given chief of command of French 
army. 

Dec. 15 French at Verdun win 
two miles of front and capture 
11.000. 

Dec. 19 Lloyd George declines 
German peace proposals. 

Dec. 23 Baron Burian succeed- 
ed as minister of foreign affairs 
in Austria by Count Czernin. 

Dec. 26 German proposes to 
President Wilson "an immediate 
meeting of delegates of the bellig- 
erents." 

Dec. 27 Russians defeated in 
five-day battle in eastern Wal- 
lachia, Roumania. 

1917 

Jan. 1 Submarine sinks British 
transport Ivernia. 

Jan. 9 Russian premier, Tre- 
poff, resigns. Golitzin succeeds 
him. 

Jan. 31 Germany announces 
unrestricted submarine warfare. 

25 



Feb. 3 President Wilson re- 
views submarine controversy be- 
fore congress; United States sev- 
ers diplomatic relations with Ger- 
many; American steamer Housa- 
tonic sunk without warning. 

Feb. 7 Senate indorses presi- 
dent's act of breaking off diplo- 
matic relations. 

Feb. 12 United States refuses 
German request to discuss matters 
of difference unless Germany with- 
draws unrestricted submarine war- 
fare order. 

Feb. 14 Von Bernstorff sails 
for Germany. 

Feb. 25 British under Gen. 
Maude capture Kut-el-Amara; 
submarine sinks liner Laconia 
without warning; many lost, in- 
cluding two Americans. 

Feb. 26 President Wilson asks 
congress for authority to arm 
American merchantships. 

Feb. 28 Secretary Lansing 
makes public Zimmerman note to 
Mexico, proposing Mexican-Japa- 
nese-German alliance. 

March 9 President Wilson calls 
extra session of congress for 
April 16. 

March 11 British under Gen. 
Maude capture Bagdad; revolution 
starts in Petrograd. 

March 15 Czar Nicholas of 
Russia abdicates. 

March 17 French and British 
capture Bapaume. 

March 18 New French minis- 
try is formed by Alexander Ribot. 

March 21 Russian forces cross 
Persian border into Turkish ter- 
ritory; American oil steamer 
Healdton torpedoed without warn- 
ing. 

March 22 United States recog- 
nizes new government of Russia. 

March 27 Gen. Murray's Brit- 
ish expedition into the Holy Land 
defeats Turkish army near Gaza. 

April 2 President Wilson asks 
congress to declare that acts of 
Germany constitute a state of war; 
submarine sinks American steamer 
Aztec without warning. 

April 4 United States senate 
passes resolution declaring a state 
of war exists with Germany. 

April 6 House passes war reso- 
lution and President Wilson signs 
joint resolution of congress. 

April 8 Austria declares sev- 
erance of diplomatic relations with 
United States. 



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9 British defeat Germans 
at Vimy Ridge and take 6,000 pris- 
oners; United States seizes four- 
teen Austrian interned ships. 

April 20 Turkey severs diplo- 
matic relations with the U. S. 

April 28 Congress passes selec- 
tive service act for raising of army 
of 500,000; Guatemala severs dip- 
lomatic relations with Germany. 

May 7 War department orders 
raising of nine volunteer regiments 
of engineers to go to France. 

May 14 Espionage act becomes 
law by passing senate. 

May 18 President Wilson signs 
selective service act. Also directs 
expeditionary force of regulars un- 
der Gen. Pershing to go to France. 

May 19 Congress passes war 
appropriation bill of $3,000000,- 
000. 

June 5 Nearly 10,000,000 men 
in U. S. register for military train- 
ing. 

June 12 King Constantine of 
Greece abdicates. 

June 13 Gen. Pershing and 
staff arrive in Paris. 

June 15 First Liberty loan 
closes with large oversubscription. 

June 26 First contingent Amer- 
ican troops under Gen. Sibert ar- 
rives in France. 

June 29 Greece severs diploma- 
tic relations with Teutonic allies. 

July 9 President Wilson drafts 
state militia into federal service. 
Also places food and fuel under 
federal control. 

July 13 War department order 
drafts 678,000 men into military 
service. 

July 14 Aircraft appropriation 
bill of $640,000.000 passes house; 
Chancellor von Bethmann-Holl- 
weg's resignation forced by Ger- 
man political crisis. 

July 18 United States govern- 
ment orders censorship of tele- 
grams and cablegrams crossing 
frontiers. 

July 19 New German Chancel- 
lor Michaelis declares Germany 
will not war for conquest; radi- 
cals and Catholic party ask peace 
without forced acquisitions of ter- 
ritory. 

July 22 Siam declares war on 
Germany. 

July 23 Premier Kerensky giv- 
en unlimited powers in Russia. 

July 28 United States war in- 
dustries board created to supervise 
expenditures. 



Aug. 25 Italian Second army 
breaks through Austrian line on 
Isonzo front. 

Aug. 28 President Wilson re- 
jects Pope Benedict's peace plea. 

Sept. 10 Gen. Korniloff de- 
mands control of Russian govern- 
ment. 

Sept. 11 Russian deputies vote 
to support Kerensky. Korniloff's 
generals ordered arrested. 

Sept. 16 Russia proclaims new 
republic by order of Premier Ker- 
ensky. 

Sept. 20 Gen. Haig advances 
mile through German lines at 
Ypres. 

Sept. 21 Gen. Tasker H. Bliss 
named chief of staff, U. S. army. 

Oct. 16- Germans occupy is- 
lands of Runo and Adro in the 
Gulf of Riga. 

Oct. 25 French under Gen. 
Petain advance and take 12,000 
prisoners on Aisne front. 

Oct. 27 Formal announcement 
made that American troops in 
France had fired their first shots 
in the war. 

Oct. 29 Italian Isonzo front 
collapses and Austro-German army 
reaches outposts of Udine. 

Nov. I S ecretary Lansing 
makes public the Luxburg "spur- 
los versenkt" note. 

Nov. 9 Permanent interallied 
military commission created. 

Nov. 24 Navy department an- 
nounces capture of first German 
submarine by American destroyer. 

Nov. 28 Bolsheviki get absolute 
control of Russian assembly in 
Russian elections. 

Dec. 6 Submarine sinks the 
Jacob Jones, first regular warship 
of American navy destroyed. 

Dec. 7 Congress declares war 
on Austria-Hungary. 

Dec. 8 Jerusalem surrenders to 
Gen. Allenby's forces. 

1918 

Jan. 5 President Wilson deliv- 
ers speech to congress giving 
"fourteen points" necessary to 
peace. 

Jan. 20 British monitors win 
sea-fight with cruisers Goeben and 
Breslau, sinking latter. 

Jan. 28 Russia and Roumania 
sever diplomatic relations. 

Feb. 2 United States troops 
take over their first sector, near 
Toul. 

27 



Feb. 6 United States troopship 
Tuscania sunk by submarine, 126 
lost. 

Feb. 11 President Wilson, in 
address to congress, gives four ad- 
ditional peace principles, includ- 
ing self- determination of nations; 
Bolsheviki declares war with Ger- 
many over, but refuse to sign 
peace treaty. 

Feb. 13 Bolo Pasha sentenced 
to death in France for treason. 

Feb. 25 Germans take Reval, 
Russian naval base, and Pskov; 
Chancellor von Hertling agrees 
"in principle" with President Wil- 
son's peace principles, in address 
to reichstag. 

March 1 Americans repulse 
German attack on Toul sector. 

March 2 Treaty of peace with 
Germany signed by Bolsheviki at 
Brest-Litovsk. 

March 4 Germany and Rou- 
mania sign armistice on German 
terms. 

March 13 German troops oc- 
cupy Odessa. 

March 14 All Russian congress 
of Soviets ratifies peace treaty. 

March 21 German spring of- 
fensive starts on fifty mile front. 
British prisoners and 200 guns. 

March 23 German drive gains 
nine miles. "Mystery gun" shells 
Paris. 

March 24 Germans reach the 
Somme, gaining fifteen miles. 
American engineers rushed to aid 
British. 

March 25 Germans take Ba- 
paume. 

March 27 Germans take Al- 
bert. 

March 28 British counter at- 
tack and gain; French take three 
towns: Germans advance toward 
Amiens. 

March 29 "Mystery gun" kills 
seventy-five churchgoers in Paris 
on Good Friday. 

April 4 Germans start second 
phase of their spring drive on 
the Somme. 

April 10 Germans take 10000 
British prisoners in Flanders. 

April 16 Germans capture 
Messines ridge, near Ypres; Bolo 
Pasha executed. 

April 23 British and French 
navies "bottle up" Zeebrugge. 

April 26 Germans capture 
Mount Kemmel, taking 6,500 pris- 
oners. 

May 5 Austria starts drive on 
Italy. 





28 







May 10 British navy bottles up 
Ostend. 

May 24 British ship Moldavia, 
carrying American troops, torpe- 
doed; 56 lost. 

May 27 Germans begin third 
phase of drive on west front; gain 
five miles. 

May 28 Germans take 15,000 
prisoners in drive. 

May 29 Germans take Soissons 
and menace Reims. American 
troops capture Cantigny. 

May 30 Germans reach the 
Marne, fifty-five miles from Paris. 

May 31 Germans take 45,000 
prisoners in drive. 

June 1 Germans advance nine 
miles; are forty-six miles from 
Paris. 

June 3 Five German subma- 
rines attack U. S. coast and sink 
eleven ships. 

June 5 U. S. marines fight on 
the Marne near Chateau Thierry. 

June 9 Germans start fourth 
phase of their drive by advanc- 
ing toward Noyon. 

June 10 Germans gain two 
miles. U. S. marines capture 
south end of Belleau wood. 

June 12 French and Americans 
start counter attack. 

June 15 Austrians begin an- 
other drive on Italy and take 16,- 
000 prisoners. 

June 17 Italians check Aus- 
trians on Piave river. 

June 19 Austrians cross the 
Piave. 

June 22 Italians defeat Aus- 
trians on the Piave. 

June 23 Austrians begin great 
retreat across the Piave. 

July 18 Gen. Foch launches al- 
lied offensive, with French, Ameri- 
can, British, Italian and Belgian 
troops. 

July 21 Americans and French 
capture Chateau Thierry. 

July 30 German crown prince 
flees from the Marne and with- 
draws army. 



Aug. 2 Soissons recaptured by 
Foch. 

Aug. 4 Americans take Fismes. 

Aug. 5 American troops landed 
at Archangel. 

Aug. 7 Americans cross the 
Vesle. 

Aug. 16 Bapaume recaptured. 

Aug. 28 French recross the 
Somme. 

Sept. 1 Foch retakes Peronne. 

Sept. 12 Americans launch suc- 
cessful attack in St. Mihiel salient. 

Sept. 28 Allies win on 250 mile 
line, from North sea to Verdun. 

Sept. 29 Allies cross Hinden- 
burg line. 

Sept. 30 Bulgaria surrenders, 
after successful allied campaign 
in Balkans. 

Oct. 1 French take St. Quen- 
tin. 

Oct. 4 Austria asks Holland to 
mediate with allies for peace. 

Oct. 5 Germans start aban- 
donment of Lille and burn Doual. 

Oct. 6 Germany asks President 
Wilson for armistice. 

Oct. 7 Americans capture hills 
around Argonne. 

Oct. 8 President Wilson re- 
fuses armistice. 

Oct. 9 Allies capture Cam- 
brai. 

Oct. 10 Allies capture Le Ga- 
teau. 

Oct. 11 American transport 
Otranto torpedoed and sunk; 500 
lost. 

Oct. 13 Foch's troops take 
Laon and La Fere. 

Oct. 14 British and Belgians 
take Roulers; President Wilson 
demands surrender by Germany. 

Oct. 15 British and Belgians 
cross Lys river, take 12,000 prison- 
ers and 100 guns. 

Oct. 16 Allies enter Lille out- 
skirts. 

Oct. 17 Allies capture Lille. 
Bruges, Zeebrugge, Ostend, and 
Douai. 



Oct. 18 Czecho-Slovaks issue 
declaration of independence ; 
Czechs rebel and seize Prague, 
capital of Bohemia; French take 
Thielt. 

Oct. 19 President Wilson re- 
fuses Austria peace plea and says 
Czecho-Slovak state must be con- 
sidered. 

Oct. 21 Allies cross the Oise 
and threaten Valenciennes. 

Oct. 22 Haig's forces cross the 
Scheldt. 

Oct. 23 President Wilson re- 
fuses latest German peace plea. 

Oct. 27 German government 
asks President Wilson to state 
terms. 

Oct. 28 Austria begs for sep- 
arate peace. 

Oct. 29 Austria opens direct 
negotiations with Secretary Lan- 
sing. 

Oct. 30 Italians inflict great 
defeat on Austria; capture 33,000; 
Austrians evacuating Italian ter- 
ritory. 

Oct. 31 T u r k e y surrenders ; 
Austrians utterly routed by Ital- 
ians; lose 500,000; Austrian en- 
voys, under white flag, enter Ital- 
ian lines. 

Nov. 1 Italians pursue beaten 
Austrians across Tagliamento riv- 
er; allied conference at Versailles 
fixes peace terms for Germany. 

Nov. 3 Austria signs armistice 
amounting virtually to uncondi- 
tional surrender. 

Nov. 4 Allied terms are sent 
to Germany. 

Nov. 7 Germany's envoys enter 
allied lines by arrangement. 

Nov. 9 Kaiser Wilhelm abdi- 
cates and crown prince renounces 
throne. 

Nov. 10 Former Kaiser Wil- 
helm and his eldest son, Friedrich 
Wilhelm, flee to Holland to escape 
widespread revolution throughout 
Germany. 

Nov. 11 Germany signs armis- 
tice, ending war. 



29 








30 




I 



Principal Battles of World War 



Aisne. battle of, began September 14, 1914. 

Aisne caverns, battle of October 23, 1917. 

Allenstein, battle of September 1, 1914. 

Ancre. battle of, began November 13, 1916. 

Antwerp, capture of, by Germans October 9-10, 
1914. 

Argesu, battle of December 3, 1916. 

Arras, battle of, began April 9, 1917. 

Artois. fighting in the September 26-October 2, 
1915. 

Bagdad captured by British March 11, 1917. 

Bainsizza plateau taken by Italians, August 25, 1917; 
recaptured by Austrians and Germans, October 25. 
1917. 

Baupaume captured by British March 17, 1917; 
lost to Germans, March 24, 1918; recaptured by 
British, August 29, 1918. 

Beersheba captured by British October 31, 1917. 

Belgrade occupied by Austrians December 2, 1914; 
recaptured by Serbians, December 14, 1914; taken 
by Germans and Austrians, October 9-10, 1915. 

Belloy en Senterre, battle of July 4, 1916. 

Brest-Litovsk captured by Germans August 25, 
1915. 

Bruges occupied by Germans October 14, 1914. 

Brussels occupied by Germans August 20, 1914. 

Bukharest captured by Germans December 6. 1916. 

Bullecourt taken by Australians May 12, 1917. 

Cambrai, battle of November 21, 1917; October 9, 
1918. 

Caporetto, battle of October 24, 1917. 

Carso plateau, battle of May 23-24, 1917. 

Cetinje captured by Austrians January 12, 1916. 

Champagne, battle of the September 25 39, 1915. 

Chateau Thierry, battle of July 15, 1918. 

Combles captured by French and British Septem- 
ber 26, 1916. 

Constanza captured by Germans October 23, 1916. 

Courcelette captured by British September 15, 1916. 

Craonne, battle of January 25-27, 1915; village re- 
captured by French, May 4, 1917. 

Ctesiphon captured by British March 8, 1917. 

Czernowitz, captured by Russians June 18. 1916. 

Dardanelles campaign begun November 3, 1914; 
ended January 9. 1916. 

Dardanelles forts, bombardment of, begun February 
19, 1915. 

Dogger bank British nava! victory January 24, 1915. 

Douaumont fort, captured by Germans February 26. 
1916; recaptured by French, October 21. 1916. 

Dubno captured by Russians June 11, 1916. 

Dunaje, battle of the May 1, 1915. 

Erzerum captured by Russians February 15. 1916. 

Erzingan captured by Russians July 25, 1916. 



Falkland Islands, naval battle of December 8, 1914. 

Festubert, battle of May 16-17, 1915. 

Flers captured by British September 15, 1916. 

Fleury, battles of July 11-August 17, 1916. 

Fiorina taken by Serbs August 18, 1916. 

Fresnoy captured by Canadians May 3, 1917. 

Gallipoli, allies land at April 22, 1915; evacuated 
by British, January 9, 1916. 

Gaza, battle of March 26-27, 1917. 

Geudecourt captured by British September 26, 1916. 

Gheluvelt, battle of October 31, 1914. 

Ghent captured by Germans October 12, 1914. 

Givenchy, battle of December 19-21, 1914. 

Goritz captured by Italians August 9, 1916; re- 
captured by Austro-Germans, October 28, 1917. 

Grandcourt captured by British February 7, 1917. 

Guillemont captured by allies September 3, 1916. 

Helgoland, naval battle of August 28, 1914. 

Hermannstadt, battle of September 30, 1916. 

Hill 70 (near Lens) captured August 15, 1917. 

Hindenburg retreat began March 11, 1917. 

Hooge, battle of August 3-9, 1915. 

Huloch, battle of September 25-October 2, 1915. 

Jaffa captured by British November 18, 1917. 

Jericho captured February 21, 1918. 

Jerusalem captured by British December 9. 1917. 

Jutland, naval battle of (Skager-Rak) May 31. 
1916. 

Kemmel Hill taken by Germans April 26, 1918. 

Kitchener, Lord, lost at sea June 5, 1916. 

Kovno captured by Germans August 17, 1915. 

Kronstadt captured by Roumanians August 30. 
1916; recaptured by Germans. October 8, 1916. 

Kut-el-Amara, surrender of British force at April 
29, 1916; recaptured February 22-26, 1917. 

La Bassee, battle of January 25-28, 1915. 

Le Gateau, battle of August 26, 1914; October 19. 
1918. 

Lemberg taken by Russians September 2, 1914; re- 
captured by Germans, June 22, 1915. 

Les Boeufs captured by British September 25, 1916. 

Libau occupied by Germans May 8, 1915. 

Liege captured by Germans August 5-8, 1914. 

Longueval taken by British July 14, 1916. 

Loos, battle of September 25 to October 8, 1915. 

Louvain burned August 26, 1914. 

Lublin captured by Germans July 31, 1915. 

Marne, battle of September 6-11, 1914; second bat- 
tle of, July 15, 1918. 

Martinpuich captured by British September 15. 
1916. 

Maubeuge captured by Germans September 7. 1914. 

Maurepas captured by French August 24, 1916. 

Menin road, battle of October 4, 1917. 



31 




r 



I 




32 




22, 

17, 



Uskup captured by Bulgarians October 24, 1915. 

Vaux, battle of July 1, 1918. ' 

Vaux, port, recaptured by French November 3, 

1916. 
Verdun, Germans attacks on, began February 

1916. 
Vermandovillers taken by French September 

1916. 

Vilna captured by Germans September 18. 1915. 
Vimy ridge captured by Canadians April 9. 1917. 
Warsaw captured by Germans August 4, 1915. 
Wytschaete captured by British June 7. 1917. 
Ypres, first battle of October 20-31, 1914; second 

battle of, April 22-24, 1915; third battle of, July 

30-August 2, 1917. 

Yser canal, battles along October 20-28, 1914. 
Zeebrugge and Ostend blockade by British April 

22 and May 9, 1918. 



Messines ridge taken by British June 7. 1917. 

Meuse-Argonne, battles of September 26, October 4 
and November 1, 1918. 

Monastir captured by Bulgarians December 2, 
1915; by allies, November 19, 1916. 

Monchy le Preux, battle of April 23-25, 1917. 

Monfalcone occupied by Italians June 9, 1915. 

Mons, battle of August 21-23, 1914. 

Monte Santo taken by Italians August 24, 1917; re- 
captured by Austrians and Germans, October 28, 
1917. 

Morval captured by British September 25, 1916. 

Neuve Chapelle, battle of March 10-12, 1915. 

Nish captured by Bulgarians November 5, 1915. 

Novo Georgievsk captured by Germans August 19, 
1915. 

Orsova captured by Germans November 24. 1916. 

Ostend occupied by Germans October 15, 1914. 

Peronne captured by allies-March 18, 1917; lost STATISTICS REI^TING~TO~UNITED STATES 

March 24, 1918; recaptured September 1 1918. FORCES, CASUALTIES, SHIPPING AND 

Piave, battles of-June 23 and October 28 1918. ^^ Qf opERATIONS FRQM ApRIL 

Pozieres captured by British August 9, 1916. , 1Q1 _ AD p, T , 1010 

n i i i n i M 1_ or "j I" 1 ( , J. \J Al JXlij O, iy 1-7, 

Pnsrend captured by Bulgarians-November 30, Regu , ar Army J2? 58g 

, , ,. National Guard in Federal service.. 80.466 

Przemysl, siege and capture of by Russians sep- 

n imr Reserve corps in service 4000 

lember 20, 1914, to March 22, 1915; recaptured ' 

by Germans, June 3, 1915. Total of soldiers 212,034 

Rancourt captured by French September 25, 1916. Personnel of Navy 65.777 

Rheims October 2-9, 1918. Marine Corps 15,627 

Richebourg, battle of May 9-24, 1915. April 6, 1917 

Sailly-Saillisel taken by French October 18, 1916. Total armed forces.. 293,438 

St. Eloy, battle of December 9, 1914. Army .3,764 000 

St. Juvin, battle of October 14, 1918. Navy 497.039 

St. Mihiel, battle of September 12, 1918. Marine Corps 78 017 

Saloniki, allies land at October 5, 1915. November 11, 1918 

Scutari captured by Austrians January 23, 1916. Total armed forces. 4.339.047 

Serbia, invasion of, begun October 7, 1915. Soldiers transported overseas 2.053 347 

Silistria captured by Germans September 10, 1916. American troops in action, November 

Skager-Rak, naval battle of May 31, 1916. H ? 1918 1.338169 

Soissons, first battle of September 15, 1914; second Soldiers in camps in the United 

battle of, January 8-12, 1915; lost by French, May States, November 11, 1918 1.700000 

29, 1918; recaptured by French, August 2, 1918. Casualties, Army and Marine Corps, 

Somme, battle of, began July 1, 1916. A. E. F... 282311 

Stanislau captured by Russians August 11, 1916. Death rate per thousand, A. E. F .057 

Suez canal, battle near February 2, 1915. German prisoners taken 44000 

Tannenberg, batle of August 26, 1914. Americans decorated by French, Brit- 

Tarnopol, battle of September 8, 1915. jsh, Belgian and Italian armies, 

Termonde destroyed September 18, 1914. about 10 000 

Thiepval captured by British September 26, 1916. Number of men registered and classi- 

Tolmino occupied by Italians July 3, 1915. fi e d under selective service law.... 23.700,000 

Torcy, battle of July 18, 1918. Cost of thirty-two National Army can- 

Trebizond captured by Russians April 17, 1916. tonments and National Guard 

Trentino, Austrian offensive in May 15, June 6, camps $179.629.497 

1916. Students enrolled in 500 S. A. T. C. 

Tsingtao captured by Japanese November 7, 1914. camps 170.000 

Turnu-Severin captured by Germans November 24, Officers commissioned from training 

1916. camps (exclusive of universities, ; 

Tutrakan captured by Germans September 7, 1916. etc.) 80.000 ; 

I dine captured by Austrians and Germans Oclo- Women engaged in Government war ; 

ber 30, 1917. industries 2.000.000 

33 





34 



I 



t 



BEHIND THE BATTLE LINES. 

Railway locomotives sent to France. . 

Freight cars sent to France 

Locomotives of foreign origin oper- 
ated by A. E. F 

Cars of foreign origin operated by 
A. E. F 

Miles of standard gauge track laid in 
France 

Warehouses, approximate area in 
square feet 

Motor vehicles shipped to France.... 

ARMS AND AMMUNITION. 

Persons employed in about 8.000 ord- 
nance plants in U. S. at signing of 
armistice 

Shoulder rifles made during war.... 

Rounds of small arms ammunition.. 

Machine guns and automatic rifles... 

High explosive shells 

Gas shells 

Shrapnel 

Gas masks, extra canisters and horse 

masks 

UNITED STATES NAVY AND MERCHANT 
SHIPPING. 

Warships at beginning of war 

Warships at end of war 

Small boats built 

Submarine chasers built 

Merchant ships armed 

Naval bases in European waters and 
the Azores 

Shipbuilding yards (merchant ma- 
rine) increased from 61 to more 
than 

Shipbuilding ways increased from 233 
to more than 

Ships delivered to Shipping Board by 
end of 1918 

Deadweight tonnage of ships delivered 

UNITED STATES FINANCES OF THE WAR. 

Total cost, approximately $24,620,000,000 

Credits to eleven nations 8,841,657.000 

Raised by taxation in 1918 3,694,000,000 

Raised by Liberty Loans 14,000,000,000 

War Savings Stamps to November, 
1918 834,253.000 

War relief gifts, estimated 4,000,000,000 

From "Commerce and Finance," New York. 




967 
13,174 

350 
973 
843 

23,000,000 
110,000 



4,000,000 

2,500,000 

2,879,148,000 

181,662 
4,250,000 

500,000 
7,250,000 

8,500,000 



197 

2,003 

800 

355 

2,500 

54 



200 
1,000 

592 

3.423,495 



CHIEF ARMIES OF THE GREAT WAR. 

Men Enlisted 

United States 3.000.000 

British Empire 7,500,000 

France 6,000.000 

Russia 14.000.000 

Italy 2,500.000 



Belgium, Serbia, Portugal 1,000,000 

Roumania 500,000 

Germany 10,500,000 

Entente Allies 34,500,000 

Austria-Hungary 7,000,000 

Bulgaria 500,000 

Turkey 2,000,000 



Teutonic Allies 20,000,000 



Total all 54,500.000 



STEAM VESSELS LOST IN THE WORLD WAR. 
From August 4, 1914, to October 31, 1918. 

Gross Tons 
War Marine Total 

Great Britain 7,753,311 L032J79 8,786,090 

Dominions of Great 
Britain 169,712 99,866 269.578 



Total 7,923,923 1,132,645 

U. S. A. (seagoing). 343,090 187,948 

Belgian 85,842 19,239 

Brazilian 20,328 10,951 

Danish 210,880 34,422 

Dutch 201,797 27,244 

French 722,939 84,138 

Greek 349,661 65,014 

Italian 745,766 115,669 

Japanese 119,764 150,269 

Norwegian 976,516 195,244 

Spanish 157,527 80,335 

Swedish 180,415 83586 



9,055,668 
531,038 
105,081 
31,279 
245.302 
229.041 
807.077 
414,675 
861,435 
270.033 

1,171,760 
327,862 
264,001 



Grand Total 12,038,448 2,186,704 14,314,251 

From "Commerce and Finance," New York City. 
MEN KILLED IN THE GREAT WAR. 



Two Years One Year 
Aug. 1, 1914 Aug. 1, 1916 

to to 

Aug. 1, 1916 Aug. 1, 1917 



England 205,000 

France 855,000 

Russia 1,500.000 

Italy 105,000 

Belgium 50,000 

Serbia 110.000 

Roumania 



Entente Allies 2.825,000 

Germany 885.000 

Austria-Hungary 718,000 

Turkey 150,000 

Bulgaria 25.000 



102,500 

427,500 

750.000 

52,000 

25,000 

55,000 

100.000 

1.512.000 

442,500 

359,000 

75,000 

12,500 



Total 
3 Years 

307.500 
1,282.500 
2.250.000 

157,000 
75,000 

165.000 

100.000 

4337,000 

1,327,500 

1,077,000 

225.000 

37,500 



Teutonic Allies 1,778.000 889,000 2,667.000 



Total all 4,603,000 2,401,000 7,004,000 



35 









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S g '5; 

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EC bC ^ 

1 .5 < 

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36 




' 

Officers of the United States Army and Navy 

lr 

Officers of the United States Army, in force now, consist of the following: 
The Commander in Chief of the United States Army and Navy, the President 
of the United States. 

Secretary of War. 

First Assistant Secretary of War. 

Second Assistant Secretary of War. 

Third Assistant Secretary of War. 

Two Generals. 

Two Lieutenant Generals. 

Six Major Generals. 

Thirty-five Brigadier Generals. 

Colonels. 

Lieutenant Colonels. 

Majors. 

Captains. 

First Lieutenants. 

Second Lieutenants. 

The number of field officers, beginning with colonel, and line officers vary in 
number according to the size of the army, while the number of the general officers, 
above mentioned, are continuous regardless of the size of the army, and additional 
general officers are commissioned temporarily for the increased army according to 
the demands of the service. 

The President of the United States is the Commander in Chief of the United 
States Navy. 

CABINET OFFICERS. 

The Secretary of the Navy. 

Assistant Secretary of Navy. 

Admiral of Navy. 

Admiral. 

Vice Admiral. 

Rear Admiral. 

Captain. 

Commander. 

Lieutenant Commander. 

Lieutenant. 

Lieutenant (Junior Grade). 

Ensign. 

U. S. MARINE CORPS. 

Major General. Captain. 

Brigadier General. First Lieutenant. 

Colonel. Second Lieutenant. 
Lieutenant Colonel. 

37 




Insignia of Rank Army and Navy 




Junior Lieutenant 



Pay Clerk 



WORN ONLY ON WHITE UNIFORMS AND OVERCOATS 

SHOULDER MARKS. NAVY 



AVIATION SECTION. ARMY 

Military Aviators and Observers wear U S and crossed 

flags of Signal Corps on collar. 

Enlisted men wear regular Signal Corps buttons on collar 
The Insignia of Military Aviators and Observers are 

embroidered in silver thread with gold U S and worn on 

left br 







Admiral Admiral Vice Rear 

of the Navy Admiral Admiral 







Captain Commander Lieutenant Lieutenant 
Commander 



ill! 



Lieutenant Ensign Midshipman Midshipman 
Junior First Class Second Class 




Ch. Boats wain Ch. Carpenter Boatswain Carpenter 
Ch Gunner Ch. Sat I maker Gunner Sail maker 

Mate Pay Clerk 



INSIGNIA OF RANK ON SLEEVE 
WORN ONLY ON BLUE COATS 

NAVY 



CHEVRONS. ARMY 






Regiment;* 1 Regimental Color 

Sergt Major Supply Sergt Sv rgcant 




Enlisted Men Enlisted Mechanician Obser< 



Scrgt. Scrytiint Corporal Lance Corpl. 



38 



, 




Insignia of Rank Army 



* 

* 

* 



(X) 




(X) 



Infantry Cavalry 



General Lieutenant Major 

General Genera 



Brigade 
Generil 






Engineers Quartermaster 



Marks worn by 
first-class 

privates 



Signal 





Colonel Lieutenant Major 

Colonel i Gold) 

( Silver) 






Farrier Horse Shoer 






- Lieutenant (Gold Bar) 

OFFICER'S SHOULDER STRAP 
INSIGNIA. ARMY 



Saddler Mechanic Wagoner 

SPECIALTY MARKS 



ARMY 



Officer's Overcoat I Back) Enlisted Man's Overcoat 
Two Bone Buttons Two Bronze Buttons 



5 rows: Colonel Gen Officer Service Coat 

" Lt " 
3 " ' Major 
2 " Capt 

I row 1st Lt. and I row brown 2nd Lt 
OFFICERS OVERCOAT AND SERVICE COAT SLEEVE 




Leather Leggin* O. D. Canvas 

worn by all Leggins 

officers while on worn by 

Campaign Hat duty soldiers 

ARMY 



SOLDIERS OVERCOAT AND SERVICE COAT SLEEVE 



39 



= TS-T~ff' "ff^'ff ff U ^>S f 




'' 




CJ 



40 





COPYRIGHT BY COMMITTEE ON PUBLIC INFORMATION 

A Yankee sniper, stationed in an American sector of Alsace, on soil that before 
1914 was in German possession. 



41 











Italian visitors at Lincoln's Tomb From left to right: John Picco, Italian Con- 
sul; Maj. Gen. Emilio Guglielmotti, Italian Regular Army; Hon. James M. 
Graham; Col. Stephen 0. Tripp; Sam Bonansinga; Caesare Sansone, Asst. 

Italian Consul. 

42 




Williamson County's Activities 
in the World War 



43 



+ 






I 




The Liberty Loan Campaign 

BY E. B. JACKSON 
Cashier Marion State Savings Bank 



WHEN America entered the war against 
Germany, April 6th, 1917, William- 
son County had been going along 
in her usual and peaceful manner, growing, 
prospering and advancing industrially, edu- 
cationally, morally and religiously. We were 
so far inland that the war and all of its 
horrors seemed a long way off. 

Our people were so busy accumulating 
money and developing the wonderful re- 
sources of old Williamson that many won- 
dered if we could wake up to our new con- 
ditions. However, we were not to be in 
doubt very long. The cruel barbarism of the 
Kaiser had already roused the fighting blood 
handed down to us by our Indian fighting 
pioneer grandfathers and when Uncle Sam 
decided to check Wilhelm in his mad career, 
the manhood of this country arose in its 
might and ' struck a blow for Liberty that 
could not be excelled by any county of like 
resources in the Union. 

Men, money and coal were needed and 
Williamson County had all of them. Real 
men rose up as if by magic; men of all ages, 
who were full of patriotic fervor, were ask- 
ing "what can I do?" Men who really wanted 
to go to the defense of their country. Men 
who were not afraid. Men who counted their 
country's honor above everything. Men who 
would bare their breasts joyously \o the bul- 
lets of the enemy and who would never give 
up until victory crowned their efforts. 

Uncle Sam wanted about 3,600 of these 
men to go into the army and navy and do 
the real fighting. He wanted more than as 
many more to stay at home and dig coal and 
the rest he needed to back them up with food 
and money. 

MONEY What a magic word! Without 
it the war could not have been won. Our 
government must have money, and back here 
in Old Williamson County the people had it. 



They had been making money for years, and 
now the time had come to use it in the great- 
est cause that had ever been known before. 

The population of this county contained 
no Millionaires, but it did contain thousands 
of honest, thrifty people who had accumu- 
lated a compentence and who now offered 
it on the altar of their country. The man 
with only $50.00 bought his Liberty Loan 
Bond just as eagerly and with just as much 
patriotism as the man with many thousands. 
Everybody bought in proportion to his abil- 
ity. Many who could not raise as much as 
$50.00 all at once, paid through the banks 
in installments of $1.00 per week or more 
and thus showed that, to the extent of their 
ability, they were backing up the boys at 
the front just as enthusiastically as anyone 
else. 

Until the great World War, many had 
looked upon the banks as rather cold hearted 
corporations that were simply out to make 
money and that nothing could move them 
to sacrifice profits, no matter how worthy 
the cause might be. 

Here was another ideal to be shattered. 
The Treasury Department at Washington 
asked John Herrin, Cashier of First National 
Bank, Herrin, and E. B. Jackson, Cashier 
Marion State & Savings Bank, to act as Co- 
Chairmen and organize an association for 
selling United States Bonds to the people of 
Williamson County to help carry on the war. 
The notice was so short that in the First 
Loan there was not time to make a thor- 
ough campaign among the people, so the 
managing officers of all the thirteen banks 
in the county were called together to con- 
sider the proposition. Now what do you 
think those "cold hearted, money grabbing" 
banks did? Why they didn't hesitate for one 
minute. As one man, they all said "we will 
call in our loans that are now drawing 6% 



44 



ri J/-ff-ff-JJ-fj 
^fr-l\ "tt Tfr-"\H 'VV 



or 7% interest and we will buy Uncle Sam's 
bonds at 4%." They said "Profits do not 
interest us when our country needs our 
money." Furthermore they said "If Uncle 
Sam needs more, we will get it and every 
time he asks for money from Old William- 
son, he is going to get it." And they kept 
their word all through the five successive 
loans asked for. Expenses increased, addi- 
tional help became necessary in many banks 
to handle the Liberty Loan Bonds, and 
profits declined alarmingly but the banks of 
Williamson County without exception stuck 
to their task and showed that patriotism does 
not live only on the field of battle. Every 
time that the people as individuals found the 




One widow woman whose only son was 
in the service saved enough from the small 
allotment he made her, to buy a $50.00 bond. 
An old veteran of the Civil War. drawing a 
pension of $30.00 per month and having no 
other means of support saved and bought a 
$50.00 bond in six months time. Clerks, me- 
chanics, laborers and people of small in- 
comes in various lines paid for bonds on the 
installment plan and in doing so sacrificed 
more comfort and the necessary things of life 
than many can imagine. Coal miners regu- 
larly deducted stated sums from their pay 
checks to pay for bonds and simply made 
the remainder of their pay do to live on. 

The patriotism that had seemed dormant 



^ 




JOHN HERRIN 

Cashier First National Bank 

Herrin 

load too heavy the banks raised the money 
and gave a larger subscription than was asked 
for. Every time Uncle Sam called for money 
he got more than he asked for and every 
time the test came, the people and the banks 
promptly went "over the top." 

All the glory of these Liberty Loan Cam- 
paigns does not belong to the banks how- 
ever. Many individuals deserve just as much 
or more praise. Space will not permit and 
it is not possible otherwise to chronicle here 
all the cases of self sacrifice, for many sacri- 
ficed so secretely that no one knew the full 
measure of it. 




E. B. JACKSON 

Cashier State Savings Bank 

Marion 

before was now in full blast. The idea in 
the minds of everyone was, "If my country 
needs my money, I will get along without it." 
"My boy or my neighbor's boy is at the 
front fighting my fight and I am going to see 
that he has money to provide for his needs, 
no matter how short may be my rations here 
at home." The spirit of Washington, Lincoln 
and all the old time patriots was alive again 
and living in the hearts of all our people. 
Truly it was a revelation to those who were 
engaged in selling Liberty Bonds to the peo- 
ple of Williamson County. No pro-German- 
ism here. German born citizens were just 



45 





Mr. and Mrs. T. P. Russell, Hurst, who directed the Liberty Loan campaign at Hurst and active workers in 

all war activities. 



as strong in the faith as others. One German 
in this county sold some very valuable and 
promising real estate in order to buy Ten 
Thousand ($10,000.00) Dollars worth of 
bonds. German born farmers bought bonds 
just as liberally as any others and that is 
saying a good deal, for the farmers of Wil- 
liamson County certainly did buy bonds to 
the limit. It had not before been believed 
that there was so much money in the hands 
of the farmers. Every farmer seemed to have 
money and was vicing with his neighbor to 
see who could turn his property into money 
and buy the most bonds. 

Business men and professional men were 
the same. One business man had contem- 
plated a new store that promised good profits 
but he cast aside the thought and bought 
bonds with the money and borrowed $5,- 
000.00 at 6% to buy more bonds at 41/ 2 %. 
A certain lawyer, having no ready cash, bor- 
rowed $4,000.00 at 6% and bought bonds at 
4l/o%. 

During the Liberty Loan Campaigns, the 
county chairman assigned quotas to each 
township and every township, every time, 
took its quota or more. However, as the 
subscriptions had to be made through the 
banks, the figures here given are given un- 



der the names of the banking towns and the 
communities that they serve. The bonds 
bought at the various banking towns during 
the five loans, were as follows: 

Marion $1,940,250.00 

Herrin 1,469,050.00 

Johnston City 739,050.00 

Carterville 545,050.00 

Hurst Bush 142,650.00 

Creal Springs 121,450.00 

Cambria . 107,750.00 



Total $5,065,250.00 

The organization for selling these bonds 
was as follows: 



.Co-Chairmen 



John Herrin 
E. B. Jackson 

Executive Committee 
John Herrin J. W. Burnett 

E. B. Jackson John Alexander 

J. C. Mitchell Mike Ferrell 

Ira Leigh M. W. Sizemore 

C. D. Hobbs 

Heads of Departments 

Director of Publicity C. W. Hay 

Director of Bank Subscriptions 

Wm. Hendrickson 

Director for Organizing Towns and cities 

L. C. Campbell 



46 




Director for Organizing Townships 

P. B. Wilson 

Director of Sales A. K. Elles 

Director of Distribution of Supplies 

0. S. Cole 

Director of Speakers Judge R. T. Cook 

City Committees were as follows: 

Marion 

A. J. Binkley George R. Stone 

0. W. Williams Harry Holland 

John I. Gunn 

Adv. John R. Pulley, Earl Collard 

Johnston City 

L. D. Hobbs Mrs. Ben LaMaster 

Gordon Pillow A. A. Pearce 

J. J. Gahm Dr. J. F. McKee 

Adv. G. M. Bowyer, J. S. Evans 

Herrin 

Joe Walker Mrs. Will Owen 

M. P. Zwick D. C. Grear 

L. C. Koen R. A. Karr 

Adv. 0. F. Harris 

Carterville 

Rev. A. E. Powell Mike Ferrell 
T. J. Moake J. B. Samuel 

Harry North Mrs. Tina Thompson 

Adv. S. S. Vick 

Hurst 

T. P. Russell Mrs. T. P. Russell 

Township Committees were: 
Corinth 

Dr. G. S. Roberts Thompsonville, 111. 

John Hartwell Route 1, Marion, 111. 

Will Holland Thompsonville, 111. 

Adv't Man 

R. W. Alsup Thompsonville, 111. 

East Lake Creek 

W. D. Sinks Route 1, Marion, 111. 

H. J. H. Becker Johnston City, 111. 

Adv't Man 

H. C. Duty Pittsburg, 111. 

Harvey Harris Johnston City, 111. 

J. I. Newton Route 1, Marion, III. 

Herrin Township 

Albert Storm Herrin, 111. 

Frank M. Roberts Johnston City, 111. 

W. J. Payne Herrin, 111. 

Charles Amati Herrin. III. 



Adv't Man 
Ralph Cox Johnston City, 111. 

Blairsville 

S. E. Storm Cambria, 111. 

Allen Kilbreath Clifford, 111. 

John Edmonds Hurst, 111. 

Jerome Childers Bush, 111. 

Dr. A. W. Springs Dew Maine, 111. 

Mrs. Chas. Young Cambria, 111. 

Adv't Man 
Ira Clark Carterville, 111. 

Carterville 

]. Wes Hayton Carterville, 111. 

M. L. Duncan Carterville, 111. 

John L. Bulliner Carterville, 111. 

Fred Grain Carterville, 111. 

Adv't Man 
Ed. Stearns Carterville, 111. 

Grassy 

Roscoe Baker Makanda, 111. 

L. L. Gallimore Carterville, 111. 

Wm. Coleman Carterville, 111. 

I. N. Lentz Wolf Creek, 111. 

Adv't Man 
I. N. Walker Wolf Creek, 111. 

Southern 

Jack Hudgens Hudgens, 111. 

J. C. Cox Goreville, 111. 

Henry Nolle Route 5, Marion, 111. 

J. T. Miller Route 5, Marion, 111. 

A. T. Mclnturff Route 5, Marion, 111. 

J. M. Mouser Route 5, Marion, 111. 

Adv't Man 

Robert Hudgens Hudgens, 111. 

Creal Springs 

Mrs. James Alice Creal Springs, 111. 

J. W. Burnett Creal Springs, 111. 

Robert Taylor Creal Springs, 111. 

John Simpson Creal Springs, 111. 

Wm. Schuey Creal Springs, III. 

Levi Ferrell Creal Springs, 111. 

Dr. D. H. Harris Marion, 111. 

Adv't Man 
John Morray Creal Springs, III. 

Stonefort 
R. L. Chancy Stonefort, 111. 

47 



! 

\'- 
! 



J. H. Davenport Creal Springs, 111. 

George Kelley Stonefort, 111. 

Marion Wright Stonefort, 111. 

Robert Tanner Stonefort. 111. 

Adv't Man 

T. F. Trammel Stonefort, 111. 

Crab Orchard 

George Neely Stonefort, 111. 

Milo Turner Crab Orchard, 111. 

Sam Clarida Crab Orchard, 111. 

Geo. S. Parks Crab Orchard, 111. 

J. H. Edwards Crab Orchard, 111. 

Adv't Man 
Roy Fiveash Crab Orchard, 111. 

East Marion 

E. L. Welbourn New Dennison, 111. 

Lloyd Bradley Marion, 111. 

P. N. Lewis Marion, 111. 

Guy Rex Marion, 111. 

Phillip Fluck Marion, 111. 

Adv't Man 
John Pulley Marion, 111. 

West Marion 

Samuel Stearns Marion, 111. 

John J. Wohlwend Marion, 111. 

Ed T. Aikman Marion, 111. 

A. W. Harpstripe Marion, 111. 

J. R. Turner Marion, 111. 

Adv't Men 

Earl Collard, W. A. Sanders Marion, 111. 

All this work was not done by the men by 
any means. The women of Williamson 
County had a complete organization and 
were equally zealous and efficient as the men. 
Their report in full follows this as it is de- 
serving of a special department. 

When the decendents of the present gen- 
eration read this history they must not look 
at the above list of names and think that 
these people alone did all for the Liberty 
Loans, but they must remember as well, those 
who put up the money; those who sacrificed 
but who were not in the spot light. This 
class includes nearly every citizen of the 
County and no county in America can boast 
a finer, more patriotic citizenry than William- 
son County, Illinois. 




The 4-Minute Men 

The first origination of the 4-Minute Men in 
Williamson County was perfected in June, 1917. 
with R. R. Fowler as Chairman. The members of 
the organization were, respectively, R. R. Fowler. 
Ed. M. Spiller, Geo. R. Stone, L. A. Colp, John I. 
Gunn, Rufus Neely, John M. Reid, W. 0. Paisley. 
W. W. Skaggs, and Wm. H. Warder. 

The primary purpose of the organization was to 
make four-minute talks at the different theaters in 
the city of Marion on subjects furnished by the 
Government, and these talks were to be made under 
the direction and instruction of the Government, 
thereby giving to the people as nearly as possible 




R. R. FOWLER, States Attorney 
Chairman, 4-Minute Men. 

the truth with reference to matters important that 
they should understand. One of the main purposes 
of the organization was to combat German propa- 
ganda, which was rife throughout this section of the 
country at the beginning of the war. 

The members of the organization were called upon 
to aid in all the financial drives made during the 
war, and it can be truthfully said for the 4-Minute 
Men that they did their full duty in that regard 
and never failed when called upon to respond 
heartily, not only to speak in the theatres but to 
go on the campaigns throughout the County, in all 
Townships and communities where meetings were 
held for the purpose of putting over the diffeffrent 
loans and raising money for the Red Cross and 
Y. M. C. A. 

It is impossible to give anything like the number 
of people addressed by the 4-Minute Men of this 
Country during the war, for the reason that they 
spoke on so many different occasions and to audi- 
ences varying from five hundred to five thousand. 
The 4-Minute Men patriotically and unreservedly 
gave of their services to the very best of their ability 
when called upon in their line of work. 



48 




Women and the Liberty Loan 

BY ETHEL TIDWELL HOLLAND 
Chairman of Townships 



THE women of the United States were not 
requested to assist in selling the Bonds 
of the First Liberty Loan. In Washing- 
ton and in other cities, as well as in the rural 
communities, the women responded so sur- 
prisingly well to the call to buy Bonds, that 
Secretary of the Treasury, William G. Mc- 
Adoo, appointed a National Women's Liberty 
Loan Committee to work in the Second Lib- 
erty Loan campaign and the subsequent cam- 
paigns. Several women from Illinois were 
appointed on this committee, among whom 
were Mesdames George Bass, Antoinette Funk 
and Kellogg Fairbanks. 

The State War Loan organization of the 
Women's Committee was perfected through 
the Illinois Federation of Women's Clubs, 
with a State chairman and twenty-five Dis- 
trict Chairmen in the State of Illinois. Mrs. 
T. S. Browning of Benton was made the chair- 
man for the Women's Liberty Loan Commit- 
tee of the Twenty-fifth Congressional District, 
which includes Williamson and seven other 
counties. Mrs. Browning appointed Miss 
Laura Belle Warder of Marion County chair- 
man for the Second Liberty Loan campaign. 
No official record of the amount of sales 
made by the women of Williamson County 
during that campaign was kept, however, 
women throughout the County were pur- 
chasers of Bonds of the Second issue. 

The District chairman appointed Celeste 
Benson Smith (Mrs. Wayne Smith) of Her- 
rin, chairman of the Women's Committee in 
Williamson County for the Third Loan and 
re-appointed her for both the Fourth and 
Fifth Loans. Mrs. Smith, in turn, immedi- 
ately selected six city chairmen in the County 
to conduct the actual sales campaign. Each 
of the six City chairmen served in the same 
capacity for the Third, Fourth and Fifth 
Liberty Loan campaigns. They were given 



the authority of selecting as many assistants, 
and of conducting their own campaigns as 
they chose. 

In Marion, the City chairman, Mrs. Ethel 
T. Holland selected the following committee 
for the Third Loan: Mrs. H. D. Norris, Mrs. 
B. Glenn Gulledge, Mrs. W. T. Holland, Mrs. 

A. C. Corley and Miss Evaylon Thurmond, 
who distributed literature and posters, and 
solicited Clubs, Lodges, Church societies and 
all women's organizations to support the 
Loan. The sales accredited to the work of 
the women's committee were pleasing. In the 
Fourth Loan, five Ward chairmen were se- 
lected: Mesdames W. S. Burkhart, Harriett 

B. Stephenson, F. G. Campbell, F. L. Shimer 
and H. D. Norris for Wards One, Two, Three, 
Four and Five respectively, who in turn 
named from twelve to twenty others to serve 
on their committees. They made a thorough 
house to house canvas of the city, placed 
workers in all the Banks, Post Office, Library, 
Churches and other public places on Volun- 
teer Days. The response to their well di- 
rected, concerted effort was exceptionally 
gratifying, giving them first place of all 
the women's committees in the County and 
District, and aiding very materially in plac- 
ing Williamson County first in the District, 
in both the amount of sales and number of 
subscribers to the Loan. 

In the Fifth or Thanksgiving Loan, as it 
was sometimes called, the five Ward chair- 
men were Mesdames Robert Blake, Raymond 
Shaw, Glenn Goddard. Mollie E. Boles and 
H. D. Norris, who conducted their campaign 
on a similar plan to that of the Fourth Loan. 
Mrs. Brooks Bond, a Marion florist, served 
as a decorating committee for Mass meet- 
ings in the fifth Loan drive. Madame Schu- 
man-Heinke was present in both Herrin and 
Marion one day of the Fifth campaign and 



49 



~Tlr~\ t 



r 
f 




. A,y -\x. i^ -\v-v 
-*?* ff-ff'-ff'&f'- 



spoke in the interest of the Loan, beside pur- 
chasing Bonds in either city. While in 
Marion she was given the official badge of 
the Women's committee salesmen, and 
proudly wore it with her many decorations 
at her concert in Herrin on the evening of 
the same day. The sales of the Marion com- 
mittee lacked but $1,350.00 totaling half of 
the entire amount of sales credited to the 
women of the County in the Fifth Loan. 

Stella Owen (Mrs. Will Owen) of Herrin 
was city chairman for Herrin for the Third, 
Fourth and Fifth Loan campaigns, and was 




CELESTE BENSON SMITH 
County Chairman 

assisted by large committees whom she 
named. In the Third Loan, the work was 
done through the women's organizations of 
the city, Ladies' Aid Societies, Clubs and 
Lodges, and also through the Public Schools. 
This committee far excelled all others in 
sales in this campaign. In the Fourth Loan, 
the women's committee had representatives in 
the three Banks on Volunteer Days. The 
Camp Fire Girls under the leadership of 
their Guardians, Misses Hester Renard and 
Lois Benson, sold Bonds from booths down 
town. Complete report of their work is given 
in a separate department. The entire faculty 
of the City and High Schools canvassed the 
city. In the Fifth Loan the work was done 
through the women's organizations. 



Other Cily chairmen were Mrs. Ben La- 
Master at Johnston City, who had a large 
and active committee, Miss Tena Thompson 
at Carterville, who conducted active drives 
with splendid assistants, Mrs. Belle Russell 
at Hurst, who made wonderful reports, Mrs. 
Charles Young at Cambria, who also served 
as chairman of Blairsville Township in the 
Fourth and Fifth campaigns and accom- 
plished great things, and Mrs. James Allee at 
Creal Springs, who also served as chairman 
of Creal Springs Township, and conducted 
successful drives. A "Liberty Bell" was rung 




ETHEL TIDWELL HOLLAND 

Chairman of Townships 

in Hurst for every sale made by the wom- 
en's committee in the Fourth campaign, and 
they have the unusual record of having 
placed a Fourth Loan window flag in every 
home in their city. In Johnston City the 
women's committee sold Fourth Loan Bonds 
from downtown booths as well as from 
house to house. 

All of the six City chairmen, with not a 
single exception, served throughout the 
Third, Fourth and Fifth Loan campaigns. 
Their drives were conducted in compara- 
tively similar methods to that of the County 
seat, Marion, which is described in detail, be- 
cause their figures were available for record. 

At the same time of Mrs. Smith's ap- 
pointment as County Chairman, Mrs. Ethel 



50 




T. Holland, Society Editor of the Marion 
Evening Post, was appointed County Chair- 
man of Townships of the Women's Commit- 
tee for Williamson County. She, also, was 
re-appointed for the Fourth and Fifth Loans. 
Mrs. Holland named a chairman together 
with four other women in each of the twelve 
Townships in the County, instructing them 
to confer and act with the members of the 
men's committee in promoting the sale of 
Liberty Loan Bonds. 

The Rural committees were named as fol- 
lows: 8-1, Blairsville; Mrs. Margaret Law- 
son, Bush, chairman, assisted by Mrs. W. E. 
Hosier of Hurst, Mrs. Charles Young of 
Cambria, Mrs. E. A. Kilbreth of Clifford and 
Mrs. William E. Downs of Colp. This com- 
mittee served in the Third Loan. At the time 
the Fourth Loan was floated, Mrs. Lawson 
had become the Field Secretary of the Wil- 
liamson County Chapter American Red Cross, 
and Mrs. Young was made Township Chair- 
man, and Mrs. Gus Hensley added to the 
committee. For the Victory Loan, the same 
committee was again named, with the ex- 
ception of Mrs. Kilbreth, who had moved 
away, and the name of Dr. McLain-Springs 
of Colp added. 

8-3, Herrin: Mrs. John S. Grant, Marion, 
R 1, chairman, and Mrs. Noah Hunter. 
Marion R 6, Mrs. Alma Veach Sanders, John- 
ston City, R 2, Mrs. Bessie Trout Kirk, 
Marion, R 6 and Miss Tressie Frick, John- 
ston City, R 2. This entire committee with 
the exception of Mrs. Grant served in the 
Fourth and Fifth Loan. Miss Lesta Murrah, 
Marion, R 6, was made chairman for the 
Fourth and Fifth Loan. 

8-2, Herrin: Mrs. John S. Grant, Marion, 
man, Mrs. Henry Grant, Marion, R 1, Mrs. 
John Baiar, Johnston City, R 1, Mrs. John 
Harris, Johnston City, R 1 and Mrs. Lloyd 
Sherertz, Pittsburg, served through the three 
campaigns. 

8-4, Corinth : Mrs. W. F. Tidwell, Thomp- 
sonville, R 1, chairman; Mrs. L. A. Malone, 
Galatia, R 1 ; Mrs. George L. Ray, Pittsburg, 
R 1; Mrs. W. S. Beers, Thompsonville, R 1; 



Mrs. Albert Duty, Thompsonville, R 1. This 
committee served in the Third and Fourth 
Loans without a change, and stood first in 
sales accredited to the Rural women in the 
Fourth Loan. Mrs. Tidwell moved from the 
Township, and Mrs. Fred Etherton, Thomp- 
sonville, R 1, was made the chairman for 
the Fifth Loan, who with the same members 
of the committee placed their Township sec- 
ond in sales. 

9-4, Crab Orchard: Miss R. Jane Barter, 
Carrier Mills, R 1, chairman; Miss Ethel 
Peebles, Crab Orchard; Miss Anna Hankins. 
Pittsburg, R 1; Mrs. George S. Parks, Pitts- 
burg, R 1 ; Mrs. George Neely, Stonef ort, R 2. 
This committee served admirably throughout 
the three Loans. 

9-3, East Marion: Third Loan Mrs. 
George Knobeloch, Marion, R 2, chairman; 
Mrs. Ida Allen, Marion, R 2; Mrs. H. C. 
Klope, Marion, R 3; Miss Elsie Corley, New 
Dennison and Miss Amelia Dahmer, Marion. 
R 3. Fourth Loan Mrs. George Cutrell. 
Marion, R 4, chairman; with Mrs. Allen. 
Mrs. Klope, Miss Corley, and Mrs. Will 
Hawkins, Marion, R 3. Fifth Loan Mrs. 
Erskine Burns, New Dennison, chairman, 
with the same committee which served in the 
Fourth Loan. They were the first Rural com- 
mittee to report a sale of Victory Bonds. 

9-2, West Marion: Mrs. Elijah Blanken- 
ship, Marion, R 5, chairman; Mrs. Sam 
Stearns, Marion, R 5; Miss Nora Aikman, 
Marion, R 6; Miss Gladys Grobe, Marion, 
R 6, and Mrs. Scott Chamness, Carterville. 
R 2, served throughout the three campaigns 
and did their best work in the last one. 

9-1, Carterville: Mrs. M. L. Duncan, 
chairman and Mesdames John R. Russell, 
John North, John L. Spires and Stella Alex- 
ander, all of Carterville Rural Routes, served 
during the three drives, and reported their 
largest sales in the Victory Loan. 

10-1, Grassy: Mrs. 0. E. Throgmorton. 
Carterville, R. F. D., chairman; Mrs. Roscoe 
Baker, Makanda, R. F. D. ; with Mesdames 
John L. Rushing, Thomas Collins and I. N. 



51 



V- 



Lentz, all of Carterville, R. F. D. They made 
no reports. 

10-2, Southern: Miss Edith Mouser, 
Marion, R 5, chairman; Mrs. John G. Miller, 
Marion, R 5; Mrs. A. J. Starrick, Creal 
Springs, R 3 ; Mrs. Robert Hudgens, and Mrs. 
Will Stanley, Goreville, R 2. This committee 
served for the three Loans, with second place 
in the Fourth Loan and first place in the 
Fifth the same record as that of Corinth 
Township, with reversed positions. 

10-3, Creal Springs: Mrs. James Alice, 
chairman, with Mesdames John Morray, John 
Simpson, Harry Carson and John Odum, all 
of Creal Springs were the committee for the 
three campaigns, and sent reports as a City 
and not as a Township. 

10-4, Stonefort: Mrs. G. R. Brewer, Stone- 
fort, chairman; Mrs. John Ridgeway and 
Mrs. George Simmons of Stonefort; Mrs. 
Irvin Nolen, Stonefort R. F. D.; Mrs. T. J. 
Radford, Creal Springs, R. F. D. This com- 
mittee was the same for the three Loans and 
made the best showing in the Fourth Loan 
sales. 

During the Third Loan the rural women 
were not thoroughly organized, and only four 
of the twelve committees of women actually 
assisted in the sale of Bonds. At the 
time of the Fourth Loan, which was without 
question the best received of any, the women 
throughout the entire were as thoroughly 
aroused as were the men. They rendered 
very material assistance in the support and 
sale of the Bonds, and themselves bought 
largely of the War Loans. 

The Victory Loan was staged at a time 
when people were busiest, and felt they had 
to sacrifice largely to be able to devote any 
time to promote the campaign. However, the 
Women's Committee went to work as soon 
as they received their official notification, to 
solicit subscriptions. Although they placed 
fewer subscriptions, the sales were in almost 
every instance larger than in any of the 
previous Loans. It is an established fact that 
the Banks of the County purchased more 




heavily of the Fifth or Victory Loan, than 
any of the proceeding Loans, while the in- 
dividual sales were considerably decreased. 
Therefore, when the figures show the percent 
of sales credited to the Women's Commit- 
tee, it is very flattering when compared with 
the percentage actually due to the work of 
the men's committee. 

Following is the financial report of the 
sales by the women: Third Loan 707 sub- 
scribers purchased $108,650.00 in Bonds, or 
17.51% of the County's quota, and they were 
requested to sell 25%. Fourth Loan 3,842 
subscribers purchased $535,700.00 in Bonds, 
or 40% of the County's quota, and they were 
asked to sell 33 l / 3 %. Fifth Loan 159 sub- 
scribers purchased $68,550.00 in Bonds or 
6.1% of the County's quota. About half of 
the Bonds of the Fifth Loan were sold to 
subscribers during the three weeks of the 
campaign, and they were almost entirely to 
people with money to invest, who realized the 
unequalled value of the investment. 

According to the reports as made to the 
County Chairman, Mrs. A. H. Joseph of the 
Fourth Ward of Marion has the distinction 
of having sold the largest single subscrip- 
tion of any member of the Women's Com- 
mittee in Williamson County, which was a 
$10,000.000 Victory Loan Bond. 

Not less than three hundred women fn 
Williamson County served in some capacity 
on War Loan committees for the Fourth 
Loan, and probably half that number actu- 
ally assisted in promoting the Victory Lib- 
erty Loan. War service medals made from 
captured German cannon were awarded by 
the United States Treasury Department for 
material and valued service to the govern- 
ment in the flotation of the Victory Liberty 
Loan, to one hundred and fifty women in 
Williamson County. A captured German offi- 
cer's helmet was awarded by the chairman of 
the committee on awards to Mrs. Ethel T. 
Holland of Marion for her service in the 
double capacity of County Chairman of 
Townships and City chairman of Marion 
during the Third, Fourth and Fifth Loans. 



52 






s 

1 




Williamson County Chapter American Red Cross 

BY MRS. FRED L. SHIMER Secretary 



THE Williamson County Chapter of the 
American Red Cross was organized on 
August 28, 1916, with a charter mem- 
bership of seven. The first officers were 
Chairman, Mrs. W. S. Charles; Vice-Chair- 
man, E. B. Jackson; Secretary, Mrs. W. 0. 
Paisley; Treasurer, Dr. W. E. Reid. This 
was first called "Marion Chapter," but at the 
request of the National organization, the 
name was changed to Williamson County 
Chapter, and the jurisdiction expanded to 
cover the county. 

The first organization was made long be- 
fore our country was in the war, and was 
through the efforts of Mr. and Mrs. F. Karl 
Lamb, the latter having assisted in Red Cross 
work on the Mexican border. A talk given 
by Mrs. Lamb before the Marion Woman's 
Club, through an invitation by Mrs. Paisley, 
was the means of starting this chapter, which 
was the first in the southern part of Illinois. 

When our country entered the war, the 
chapter had fifty-seven members. Mrs. W. S. 
Charles was the Chairman and Miss Eva 
Young the Secretary. 

The first person to join the organization 
after its formation was Miss Eva Young on 
the 4th day of September, 1916. The first 
annual meeting was held on the 9th day of 
October at which officers for the ensuing year 
were elected as follows: Chairman Mrs. W. 
S. Charles; Vice-Chairman, E. B. Jackson; 
Secretary, Miss Eva Young; Treasurer, Dr. 
W. Edward Reid. At this meeting an execu- 
tive committee was appointed, consisting of 
the officers of the Chapter and four other 
members as follows: Fred G. Campbell, Dr. 
Anna G. Reid, Mrs. W. 0. Paisley and W. 
S. Charles. A membership committee was 
appointed consisting of Miss Eva Young, W. 
H. Fly and Jean Burkhart. 

One of the first efforts made by the new 
organization was the inauguration of a mem- 



bership campaign. The town was canvassed 
to quite a large extent and especially the 
business section. And next began the work 
outside the city of Marion. A branch was or- 
ganized at Herrin and Carterville, and at- 
tempted to organize at Johnston City, but 
Johnston City desired a chapter of its own. 
Later Herrin and Johnston City both formed 
their own chapters. 

The Christmas season in 1916 came on 
and the Red Cross took up the sale of Red 
Cross seals. 

Mrs. F. Karl Lamb and Mrs. W. 0. Pais- 
ley organized three classes of twenty-five pu- 
pils each, in "First Aid to the Injured"; 
there being several graduates out of each 
class to receive diplomas. Dr. W. Edward 
Reid donated his services as instructor for 
the first class; Dr. D. D. Hartwell was in- 
structor for the second class; and Dr. H. A. 
Felts for the third, but Dr. Felts enlisted in 
the service and left for camp before the class 
was finished, and Dr. A. M. Edwards finished 
the instructions for the class. A First Aid 
class was also organized at Dewmaine with 
Dr. McLain Springs as instructor. A class 
was organized at Hurst with Dr. V. H. Burk- 
hart as instructor. 

During the next spring and summer Miss 
Eva Young and Mrs. W. S. Charles put on 
several bazaars and succeeded in raising con- 
siderable finances for carrying on the work 
of the Red Cross in Marion, and especially 
in supplying funds for the making of sup- 
plies such as sweaters, socks, bandages, hos- 
pital garments, etc. Mrs. F. G. Davis also 
put on a bazaar for the benefit of the Red 
Cross. 

The beginning of the work of making sup- 
plies was cumbersome and inconvenient and 
all work had to be taken to the home of the 
ones who did the work and now and then 
a few would gather at the homes of Mr. and 



53 



: 

:: 






Miss Eva Young. Vice Chairman, and active worker in all war activities; first member in Williamson 
County. John M. Reid, Assistant States Attorney, Chairman, 1918, when the big drives were made. 
Mrs. Fred L. Shimer, present Secretary, active worker in all Red Cross drives. 



Mrs. F. Karl Lamb, Dr. and Mrs. W. E. Reid, 
Dr. and Mrs. D. D. Hartwell, Miss Eva 
Young, Mr. and Mrs. W. 0. Paisley, and 
Mr. and Mrs. Fred Springer. W. H. Fly was 
the first chairman of the supply committee, 
and Mrs. W. 0. Paisley, secretary and treas- 
urer. This committee packed and sent in to 
Division headquarters: 

145 Tea bandages, 
48 Comfort bags filled, 
18 Shoulder wraps, 
23 Ice bag covers, 

134 Mixed bandages, 

120 Handkerchiefs. 

As the work increased Mrs. Paisley asked 
Mrs. D. D. Hartwell to take charge of the 
work and she secured rooms in the Shannon 
Holland building for Red Cross headquar- 
ters. W. H. Fly was the Chairman of this 
committee and did the building of the fires 
and the keeping of the rooms in condition 
during the winter of 1916 and 1917. He 
later enlisted in the Medical department of 
the United States Army and served until the 
close of the war. 

At the Williamson County Fair in the fall 
of 1917, the Red Cross had a tent and stand 
at which they conducted a sale of produce 
and articles donated to the Red Cross. Miss 
Martha Kreiger, a trained nurse, and later a 
Red Cross nurse in France, was in charge 



of the tent and took care of about ten cases 
of injuries happening at the Fair that year. 
The stand and donations netted the Red Cross 
about $300.00. It was also in the fall of 
1917 that the chapter established its new 
headquarters in the Warder building. Mr. 
Holland and W. H. Warder donating the rent 
of their buildings for the use of the Red 
Cross. 

The next annual meeting was held on Oc- 
tober 9, 1917, at which annual reports were 
given by the officers. The membership of the 
chapter had grown at that time to the num- 
ber of 945. The first war drive for the Red 
Cross had been put on and Fred G. Campbell. 
Chairman of the drive for the chapter, re- 
ported that a total of $1,059.09 had been col- 
lected for the war fund. At this meeting new 
officers were elected as follows: Chairman. 
Fred G. Campbell; Vice-Chairman, Miss Eva 
Young; Secretary, Miss Ethel Davis: Treas- 
urer, Paul W. Ballance; and the following; 
persons, together with the officers, were nom- 
inated and elected as the Executive commit- 
tee: W. H. Fly, W. 0. Paisley, Rev. John I. 
Gunn, Dr. W. E. Reid, Mrs. W. S. Charles. 
Mrs. P. B. Wilson and Mrs. D. D. Hartwell. 

Soon after this election the Red Cross 
planned and carried through the big dance 
and dinner at the Elks' Home at which they 
realized about $300.00. Another campaign 
for members was put on at Christmas. 1917. 



54 



s^ 




and about 600 new names were added to the 
roll of members. In April, 1918, Mr. Camp- 
bell handed in his resignation as chairman 
of the Chapter and John M. Reid was elected 
to fill out the term. Already Central Divi- 
sion at Chicago was pressing the Chapter to 
get ready for the big Second War Drive. The 
new Chairman, Mr. Reid, and the executive 
committee, took the matter in hand and be- 
gan preparations for the same. They first 
co-operated with the Elks in their Carnival 




MRS. MARGARET J. LAWSON 

Williamson County Chapter, Financial and 
Field Agent. 

by maintaining a stand at which they sold 
articles donated to the Red Cross. They 
realized about $350.00. The Chapter also 
brought Top Sergeant Harold Baldwin here 
to deliver his lecture "Holding the Line," 
from which they realized about $50.00. Just 
prior to the inauguration of the big War 
Drive the Chapter pulled off a big Red Cross 
parade, said to be one of the best parades 
ever had in Marion. The war drive pledges 
for the Red Cross were very satisfactory. 

About this time Miss Eva Young, John M. 
Reid and Mrs. D. D. Hartwell did consider- 
able organization work. 

The Civilian Relief Committee was ap- 
pointed and did a great amount of work. 
Miss Pauline Duncan was the first Chairman 
of this committee with the following assis- 



tants: Rev. John I. Gunn, Mrs. Hawley Coch- 
ran, Miss Mae Woodley; later Miss Duncan 
enlisted as a Red Cross nurse, serving until 
the close of the war, and the following com- 
mittee was appointed to carry on the work: 
J. M. Norman, Chairman; Attorney H. V. 
Ferrell, Adviser; Dr. A. M. Edwards, Phy- 
sician; Miss Gertrude Reed, Secretary; Miss 
Eva Young, Mrs. Harmon Brayfield, G. W. 
Paisley. Miss Reed later resigned as Secre- 
tary and G. W. Paisley was appointed. These 
committees have done very efficient work. 

Since the big War Drive no organized ef- 
fort in the way of raising funds has been 
attempted. However, the Juniors of the city 
have raised and given to the Williamson 
County Chapter quite a sum of money. Be- 
cause of the spontaniety of their effort and 
the voluntary way in which it was done these 
young folks deserve special credit for their 
work. 

During the summer of 1918, Mrs. Jane 
Lawson was appointed Williamson County 
Chapter's Financial and Field Agent. She 
organized several branches of the Williamson 
County Chapter, took a number of pledges 
of crops from the farmers and secured valu- 
able data from a number of school districts, 
besides helping in many other ways. In this 
way the Red Cross has been brought home 
to the larger part of the inhabitants of Wil- 
liamson County. 

Dennis Gent gave two automobiles to the 
Red Cross and to the Y. M. C. A. The one 
belonging to the Red Cross was put on sale 
at the Fair, in September 1918, and the sum 
of $683.00 was realized in the sale thereof. 

The Spring of 1918 witnessed the organ- 
ization of a surgical dressing class by the 
Woman's Club of Marion. Mrs. W. L. Dun- 
ston was put in charge of the work. Under 
her direction a room was well equipped at 
the Logan School building. Mrs. W. H. Hart 
of Benton was secured as instructor and a 
large class learned the work. They promptly 
filled all quotas sent to them and asked for 
more and larger quotas. Those who were es- 
pecially active in the work were Miss Stella 



55 




Hawkins, Miss Ada Edwards, Mrs. W. W. 
Miller, Mrs. Fred Martin, Mrs. P. R. Colp, 
Mrs. F. G. Campbell, and Mrs. E. A. Thomas, 
but many others also did creditable work. 

Mrs. D. D. Hartwell, Chairman of the Sup- 
ply Committee, devoted unselfishly and un- 
tiringly her time and energy to this work, as 
can be seen by her report below, and as 
shown by the perfect condition of her books 
kept on the work. Mrs. Hartwell had very 
efficient helpers as members of her Commit- 
tee. Mrs. F. G. Davis, Mrs. Fred Springer, 
Mrs. Fred Martin, W. H. Fly, Dr. Anna G. 
Reid, Mrs. S. E. Quindry, Mrs. Harmon Bray- 
field, and several other good faithful work- 
ers assisted this Committee in their work. The 
report is as follows: 

Number of cases sent to Division Head- 
quarters No. 65. The contents of cases 
are as follows: 

Fracture pillows 90 

White outing flannel nightingales 396 

Men's outing flannel drawers. . . . 190 
Men's outing flannel vests to 

match drawers 190 

Men's outing flannel bed jackets. 13 

Operating leggings 324 

Bandaged foot socks 120 

Hospital bed socks 312 

Hospital bed shirts summer and 

winter 1461 

Outing flannel pajamas 277 

French convalescent suits 16 

Summer pajama suits 20 

Property bags 400 

Filled army comfort kits 167 

Winter convalescent robes 50 

Button bags Italian comfort kits 100 

Men's Canton flannel drawers. . . 80 
Men's Canton flannel vests to 

match 80 

Surgeon's operating gowns 21 

Supplied about 325 filled comfort kits 
to the Williamson County boys in 
camp. 
Also sent about 10,000 gun wipes. 

Refugee Work 
Infant's Layettes 6 



Canton flannel under-drawers .... 74 

Blk. sateen pinafores 80 

Outing flannel petticoats 24 

Outing flannel pinafores 9 

Women's gingham aprons 25 

Women's unbleached muslin 

chemise 155 

Women's outing flannel morning 

jackets 63 

Children's sleeping garments. ... 10 
Children's outing flannel under- 
shirts 6 yr size 139 

Boys' outing flannel underdrawers 

-12 yr 115 

Boys' outing flannel shirts to 

match 115 

Women's outing flannel petticoats 65 

Women's flannel petticoats 50 

Boys' gingham suits 12 yr. size. 45 

Standard Dressings 

Many tailed bandages 1,850 

Triangular bandages 16,710 

Four-tailed bandages 132 

(T) bandages 456 

Abdominal bandages 875 

Assorted roller gauze bandages. . 234 

Linen tray cloths 6 

Tablecloths (linen) 4 

Sheets 2 

Handkerchiefs 8,470 

Wash-cloths 1,836 

Woven Articles Knitted 

Sweaters 595 

Helmetc. 162 

Scarfs 120 

Wristlets 108 pair 

Socks 614 pair 

When the armistice was signed we were 
working on a 200 sweater quota and a sock 
quota of 320 pairs. 

The Belgian Relief Committee did splendid 
work. They gathered up, packed and shipped 
numbers of boxes of garments for this work. 
The committee was composed of Mrs. Fred 
B. Peebles, Chairman, Mrs. W. 0. Paisley, 
Miss Pearle White, Mrs. Otis Brown, Miss 
Stella Hawkins, Mrs. G. G. Blackburn and 
Mrs. A. D. Davis. 



56 



The Third Annual election was held on 
February 5, 1919, (having been delayed on 
account of the influenza epidemic), and the 
following officers were elected: Chairman, J. 
M. Norman; Vice-Chairman, Miss Eva 
Young; Secretary, Mrs. Fred L. Shinier; 
Treasurer, William Wohlwend (Mr. Wohl- 
wend also served as Treasurer from October, 
1918, being elected following the resignation 
of Mr. Ballance) . The following executive 
committee was elected for the ensuing year: 
the four officers mentioned above and Dr. 
W. Edward Reid, Mrs. D. D. Hartwell, W. 0. 
Paisley, Mrs. Harmon Brayfield, Fred Tay- 
lor. The Chairman, Mr. Norman, appointed 
the following Civilian Relief Committee: 
Mrs. Harmon Brayfield, Chairman; G. W. 
Paisley, Secretary; Attorney H. V. Ferrell, 
Adviser; Dr. A. M. Edwards, Physician; Mrs. 
Paul Corder, Ward 1; Miss Mabel Todd, 
Ward 2; Mrs. Fred G. Campbell, Ward 3; 
Miss Pauline Duncan, Ward 4; and Mrs. 
Fred B. Peebles, Ward 5. 




175 many tailed bandages. 

6 pair wristlets. 

30 comfort kit bags (complete) . 
The members of this auxiliary who worked 
in behalf of the Red Cross to make an equi- 
valent of eight hundred hours are: 

Mrs. Wm. Ganter 

Mrs. E. A. Carson (Secretary) 

Mrs. J. G. Vaughan 

Mr. and Mrs. W. J. Smothers 

Mrs. Mae Smith 

Mrs. G. C. Hensley 

Mrs. F. Maybell 

Mrs. C. B. Springer 

Mrs. W. J. Moser 

Mrs. E. L. McKenzie 

Mrs. Belle Russell 

Mrs. Etta Elliott 

Mrs. Sadie Phillips (Treasurer) 

Mrs. V. H. Burkhart (Chairman) 



HURST AUXILIARY 

Final Report 

Money subscribed and collected: 

For the year of 1917 8 90.88 

For the year of 1918 2,356.96 

For the year of 1919 35.00 



Total $2,482.84 

Supplies shipped to Marion, 111.: 
267 dozen napkins. 
240 nightingales. 
577 feet warmers. 

54 hospital bed shirts. 
363 hospital leggings. 

118 dozen tringular bandages. 
36 sweaters. 
15 refugee petticoats. 
26 pair pajamas. 

55 property bags. 
13 pair socks. 

4 helmets. 




TONY MALONDRONE 
Secretary of Salvation Army War Fund 

Herrin's quota was $1,200. Tony solicited 
for the fund while on his city mail route. 
$1,425 was subscribed in six days. 






57 




Herrin Chapter Red Cross 

BY MISSES HESTER E. RENARD AND Lois 
BENSON 



E Herrin Red Cross Chapter was organ- 
ized April 12, 1917, under the plan of the 
national association for war work. A tem- 
porary committee for organization, consisting 
of D. C. Grear, Chairman; Dr. P. G. Capps, 
R. F. Mooneyham, George Crichton, Hal W. 
Trovillion, Frank Wollard, Laura Tygett, 
Frances Bandy, Berenice Baker, and C. T. 
Schaffner, met and made arrangements for 
a permanent organization. The first officers 
elected were D. C. Grear, Chairman; Frances 
Stearns Bandy, Vice-Chairman; Ross Moon- 
eyham, Treasurer, and Mrs. Chas. Murrah, 
Secretary. Before his term of office had 
elapsed, D. C. Grear resigned, and was suc- 
ceeded by Dr. P. G. Capps. Dr. Capps re- 
signed for overseas duty, and Mrs. J. M. 
Bailie filled out the first term and was re- 
elected for the second term. Ross Mooney- 
ham entered the service and was succeeded 
by Loren Margrave as Treasurer. Mrs. Irene 
McCoy succeeded Mrs. Murrah as Secretary- 
Treasurer. 

The second election returned these same 
officers for another year. The second year 
was completed without a change in the per- 
sonnel of the executive staff. The following 
officers were elected for 1918-19: 

Wayne L. Smith, Chairman. 

Mrs. Lulu Brown, Vice-Chairman. 

Mrs. Irene McCoy, Secretary. 

Frank Chew, Treasurer. 

In order that the work might be carried 
on more successfully the newly elected chair- 
man appointed twelve standing committees. 
They were and their chairmen: 

Membership H. A. Whittenberg. 

Finance R. A. Karr. 

Publicity W. C. Mahr. 

Schools Public, R. V. Jordan; Parochial, 
Rev. E. Senese; Township High, M. L. 
Beanblossom. 

Civilian Relief Rev. C. R. Phillips. 



Immediately after the election and organi- 
zation in 1917, the Chapter began a cam- 
paign for a war fund with which to carry on 
Red Cross work. To this first call the people 
of Herrin responded most generously, and 
thirty-five hundred dollars were raised. This 
was, for the most part, donated by the dif- 

Surgical Dressings Lois Benson. 

Hospital and Refugee Garments Mrs. 
James Gore. 

Knitting Mrs. 0. W. Curry. 

Purchasing and Distributing Mrs. Delia 
Grear. 

Warehouse and Shipping - - Leonard 
Phelps. 

First Aid Mrs. D. S. Boles. 

Instruction for Women Mrs. R. V. 
Jordan. 

ferent business firms and by the professional 
men. This campaign was carried on by the 
officers of the organization, who were Chair- 
man D. C. Grear, Vice-Chairman Frances 
Stearns Bandy, Treasurer Ross Mooneyham, 
and Secretary Genevieve Murrah. An active 
membership committee was appointed with 
Miss Kate Cully as Chairman. Through the 
efforts of this committee, the membership 
was increased to about eight hundred the 
first year. 

As the organization increased its scope of 
work it became necessary to have rooms for 
Red Cross headquarters. Charles Murrah, 
then cashier of the Herrin State Savings 
Bank, offered rooms in that building. There 
the organization was more nearly perfected 
and as our boys were now beginning to go 
over seas and there was a call for knitted 
articles daily instructions in knitting were 
given by the women of Herrin. Mrs. 0. W. 
Curry later became chairman of the knitting 
committee. A large amount of money was 
spent for yarn and hundreds of sweaters, 
scarfs, helmets, socks and wristbands were 



58 



made. Each time Herrin was given a quota 
she more than filled it. 

In January of 1918 a class in Surgical 
Dressings was organized with Lois Benson 
as chairman and instructor. One section of 
this class at first met in the basement of the 
Christian Church and another in the sewing 
room at the Township High School, but later, 
all the work was done in the club rooms of 
the Elks' Lodge. These rooms had been of- 
fered as permanent Red Cross headquarters 
for war work. Thousands of surgical dress- 
ings were made and shipped to headquarters 
in Chicago as they were needed. The Italian 




^^^7~yj^T77 




MRS. J. M. BAILIE. SR., Herrin 
Red Cross Chairman During Greatest Activities 

women as well as the American women, de- 
serve much credit for this work. Also many 
hospital and refugee garments were made. 
These were cut out and distributed from the 
Red Cross headquarters, but the sewing was 
done in the various homes. Mrs. James 
Bailie had charge of this sewing and she with 
her assistants made and shipped a great many 
badly needed garments. 

During the winter of 1917-18 the Junior 
Red Cross was organized with Mrs. S. A. 
Brockman as chairman. Through the efforts 
of the chairman and her assistants, every 
child in the city schools of Herrin became a 
member of the Junior Red Cross. This meant 
about twenty-five hundred members. In the 
different rooms in the schools where there 



were children unable to pay the membership 
fee, the other children would make up 
enough to pay it, until every room became 
100 per cent. The next year, under the 
chairmanship of R. V. Jordan, Superintend- 
ent of Schools, the same thing was done. 
Every child in the city schools again became 
a member of the Junior Red Cross. 

Also during the winter of 1917-18 the 
Home Service committee with Mrs. James 
Rollo as chairman, did a great amount of 
relief work among the dependent families of 
the soldiers who had gone from the city. 
The next year, 1918-19, the work was carried 
on by Rev. C. R. Phillips and also by Rev. 
W. C. Mahr. The work of this committee 
consisted in seeing that the dependents of 
the soldiers received their allowances and in 
seeing that soldiers received their mileage 
and bonus. This committee also investigated 
the needy dependent families and supplied 
food and clothing to the same. In fact this 
committee was one of the most active of the 
Red Cross. 

The second war drive began to be dis- 
cussed during the late summer and early 
fall of 1918. As plans were discussed and 
arrangements made for this drive, Wayne 
L. Smith was appointed chairman of the 
War Fund and through his efforts, Herrin 
went over the top by a little over three thou- 
sand dollars. The quota was $8,000 and 
$11,070 were raised. Wm. J. Sneed, A. T. 
Pace, and Hugh Willis were the members of 
the committee on the Miners' Locals and 
through their efforts the Local Unions gave 
a dollar for each member. All the business 
firms, lodges, churches, clubs, Hippodrome 
theater, and several hundred individuals 
donated to the fund. 

In November and December of 1918 a 
campaign for a Christmas Roll Call was 
launched. Allen Whittenberg was the cam- 
paign manager and he so conducted the cam- 
paign that the membership was raised to 
4,417 members, and from this enormous in- 
crease from 800 to 4,417 members, Herrin 
received special congratulations from the 
Illinois State Chairman stating that this was 










ff M f j ' if "^ r 



1 

ft 




one of the largest increases in membership 
in the State. 

At Yuletide the Christmas boxes were not 
forgotten. Mrs. Bailie was chairman of this 
committee and saw to it that almost every 
boy from Herrin who was across the seas 
had a box sent to him. To help make the 
big drives and campaigns mentioned above 
possible, the Camp Fire Girls and Boy Scouts 
did their part in canvassing the town, con- 
ducting tag days, selling flowers and pies and 
funds were raised by shows held on Sunday 
nights at the Herrin Opera House. 



During the first year the Herrin Red Cross 
Chapter was somewhat handicapped by a 
frequent change of chairmen, and an early- 
lack of supplies, but under the untiring ef- 
forts and energy of the second chairman, 
Mrs. J. M. Bailie, Sr., this was soon over- 
come and the organization became very active 
in all phases of war work. Then under the 
third chairman, Wayne L. Smith, the chapter 
attained a still more thorough organization 
and was easily ranked among the foremost 
Red Cross Chapters of the State. 



Johnston City Chapter Red Cross 

By BEN BAIAR, Secretary 



TN the early fall of 1916 a few of our pa- 
*- triotic citizens began to see the great need 
of a Red Cross Chapter in our city, in order 
that we might help with the work of carry- 
ing on the great World War, so a meeting 
was called for the purpose of organizing the 
Johnston City Chapter of the American Red 
Cross. At that time only a very few were 
deeply interested in the Red Cross work, but 
later on as the war continued to spread and 
draw nearer to our homeland, it will be seen 
that every citizen of our little city became 
enthusiastic in the work and at no time were 
we ever given a quota that did not go "over 
the top." 

This Chapter was organized with only ten 
charter members as follows: Dr. I. T. 
Roberts, Dr. L. H. Green, Dr. J. W. Clayton, 
H. E. Potter, A. G. Burnett, D. H. Henson, 
Dr. E. Slaton, Attorney R. Kenshalo, G. E. 
Ellis, and R. W. Jones. 

The Executive Committee: H. E. Potter, 
Chairman; A. G. Burnett, R. W. Jones, G. E. 
Ellis, L. D. Hobbs, Fred Cooper and Troy 
Lewis were appointed as a committee to 
visit the Local Unions, for financial support. 
The committee appointed to visit the Mer- 
chants, consisted of Ben Lamaster, L. L. 
Clayton and Ben Perrine. 

Those on the finance committee were: Ben 
Lamaster, Chairman; Ben Schull, L. L. Clay- 



ton, A. G. Burnett, H. E. Potter, Troy Lewis, 
Fred Cooper and Ben Perrine. 

With this organization established the Red 
Cross work was launched, and possibly no 
better work was accomplished by any other 
chapter according to the population on 
which to work. Perfect harmony was main- 
tained and every one worked hand in hand 
with the same ideals in view, and with the 
sole intention of leaving nothing undone that 
would help to put our city in its proper 
place in the history of the world's great con- 
flict. 

On the second of January, 1918, Chairman 
Potter tendered his resignation as chairman. 
It being accepted, Dr. E. Slaton was elected 
to fill the vacancy, with the following new 
members of the Executive Board: F. G. 
Cooper, A. A. Pearce, Thos. Hunter, and 
Ben Lamaster. F. D. Hall was made Secre- 
tary of the Chapter, all other officers holding 
over until June 1st, at which time R. W. 
Jones became chairman, holding same until 
October 10, 1918, when a new board was 
elected, as follows: D. H. Henson, Chair- 
man; Dr. E. Slaton, Vice-Chairman; Gordon 
Pillow, Treasurer; Ben Baiar, Secretary; 
which are the officers at the present time. 

During three years since the organization 
of the Chapter, much excellent work was 
accomplished. In all the Red Cross drives, 



60 




in the Liberty Loan drives, in raising Y. M. 
C. A. funds, Salvation Army funds, in fact in 
any work that was given this Chapter, not one 
time did it fail to raise its quota and always 
finishing with a good percentage above the 
mark given. 

This could not be accomplished only by cor- 
rect organization and backed by red blooded 
Americans. The miners, the operators, the 
local unions, and men of every craft, the 
farmer, the merchant, were all ready to re- 
spond to the call. The second war fund 
drive with a quota set at $5,000.00 for this 
Chapter was over-subscribed more than 




P. H. HENSON, Chairman 

$1,000.00. The Red Cross membership 
drive was 100 per cent in 1918. 

The Liberty Loan was oversubscribed, giv- 
ing Johnston City the distinction of flying the 
Honor Flag of the County for ten days, then 
turned over to Marion the County Seat. This 
honor was given our city from the fact that 
she went "over the top" with her subscrip- 
tions with a greater percentage than any 
other city in the County. 

The Red Cross work at Johnston City, 
however, was not carried on by the men 
alone. We are now coming to 'the point 
where the real help came in. Our women 
were just as loyal or maybe more so than the 
men, but of course no one person claims the 
honor of having done all the work. While 
possibly some did more than others, it is 
still possible that each one did what they 



felt able to do, and therefore one deserves 
as much credit as the other, but our women 
surely were a faithful lot, and one only 
needed to be in a position to watch them, 
to learn why Uncle Sam can raise the best 
army of any nation on the Globe. The 
weather was neither too hot nor too cold, 
too wet nor too dry, for some of them to be 
present when the time came the deeper the 
snow the harder they worked as they 
seemed to feel that their boy was somewhere 
in the cold needing perhaps the very gar- 
ment they were working on. The Red Cross 
headquarters were taken up at the City Hall 




BEN BAIAR, Secretary 

where some of the ladies met almost every 
day during the week. There the yarns were 
received and issued out, there is where the 
materials were kept and made up into wear- 
ing apparel for the boys. Electric sewing 
machines were installed, and many mothers 
spent their spare hours there, toiling away 
for some mother's boy, and perhaps for her 
own, and after all, who will dispute the fact 
that the mother, wife and sweetheart are the 
backbone of Uncle Sam's great army. 

The following is the board of directors 
that had charge of the ladies' work begin- 
ning September 5, 1918: 

Mrs. Eva Harrison, Chairman. 

Mrs. Mary E. Hedley, Vice-Chairman. 

Mrs. Herman Fellman, Secretary. 

Mrs. Chas. Hindman. 

Mrs. Henry Kuepper, Jr. 



61 




Mrs. Eulah Hunter. 
Mrs. Norma Mozley. 
Mrs. Henry Fellman. 
Mrs. R. F. Follis. 
Mrs. R. W. Jones. 

Chairman hospital garments, Mrs. A. Ben- 
nett; chairman knitting department, Mrs. 
Kate Bazue; recorder knitting supplies, Mrs. 
Dell Jones; committee on comfort kits; Loyal 
Girls of America; Miss Jessie Follis, Chair- 
man. 

Later Mrs. Mary Hedley was made chair- 
man of the ladies' organization. Under this 
organization much good work was accom- 




THOS. HUNTER, Member of Executive Board 
Very Active in All War Work 

plished and hundreds of garments were fin- 
ished and sent to headquarters to be dis- 
tributed among the boys at the front. We 
will not undertake to give the number of 
different articles that were furnished by 
these loyal women although it would be quite 



a record to go down in history, but suffice 
to say they were never found wanting and 
always furnished their quota whatever that 
might be. 

The Loyal Girls of America must also be 
commended for their great help, for their 
work always consisted of that which most 
people like to shun, such as soliciting, selling 
tags, serving lunches, giving ice cream 
socials, and such other work that they might 
be called upon to do, to help raise money 
to aid the boys at the front or in the camps. 
Theirs was a noble work and one that will 
long be remembered by all who were in a 
position to know just what they accomplished. 

In the latter part of the summer of 1918. 
when the call came to help the Belgium suf- 
ferers our ladies got real busy and made a 
canvass of the city and vicinity and in a 
very short time had a nice shipment of 
second hand clothing ready for shipment to 
the commissioner of Belgium relief. In the 
first shipment that was made there were 
twenty-two boxes containing 2,600 pounds of 
clothing. Other shipments were made later. 

Could an itemized report be made of all 
the work that was done by this Chapter it 
certainly would be a record for Johnston 
City, and vicinity to be proud of. Also a 
record of the work did by each individual 
as they appeared as leaders of the different 
drives that were made, would be a great 
incentive to all who read it, but that part 
will necessarily be left out, and our thanks 
to them was spoken very plainly in the way 
we backed them up and each and every one 
is real proud of the record made by Johnston 
City, and prouder still of the good type of 
Americans within her community that made 
it possible to establish such a record for us. 



62 





Loyal Girls of America Johnston City 



In the months following April, 1917, 
seeing the boys respond so nobly to our 
country's call, the girls of Johnston City felt 
that they too must enter some branch of their 
country's service. 

Being unorganized we drifted along, buy- 
ing Testaments for those we knew best, until 
the close of the first training camp at Fort 
Sheridan, when at the suggestion of one of 
the boys who had just received his commis- 
sion and was awaiting his call to camp, we 
began making comfort kits. 

On September 21st, 1917, just after the 
first Selectmen left for Camp Taylor, the 
girls who- worked at various occupations, 
and therefore couldn't work at the Red Cross 
rooms, met and organized a club to be known 
as The Loyal Girls of America. A member- 
ship fee of fifty cents was charged, twenty- 
five cents for a pin to be worn, and twenty- 
five cents expense money. 

Money was raised by donation from the 
miners' locals and citizens, and contents of 
the kits from merchants, all giving liberally. 

After electing Sylvia Henson, President; 
Linnie Jones, Vice President; Pearl Cham- 
ness, Secretary, and Fay Phillips, Treasurer, 
plans were made to buy a radiant fire, and 
were successful, thus affording a comfortable 
meeting place in the evenings to work. 

When the second quota of Selectmen left 
Marion we had kits containing smokes, 
thread, buttons, needles, pins, stationery, pen- 
cil, adhesive, bandage, salve, soap, scissors 
and tooth paste for every soldier in Johnston 
City and vicinity, known to any of the girls 
or their friends. 

During the evenings the girls met and 
sewed, making and filling in all approx- 
imately three hundred kits, made of khaki 
and lined with rubber sheeting. 

Victrola records were sent to the boys at 
Camp Taylor. 

Through a Mother's Chapter in Chicago 
there was secured some names of boys with 



no parents and perhaps few friends. To 
those we wrote occasionally. For Thanks- 
giving, eats were prepared and sent where 
distance kept the home box from coming. 

We assisted in the Y. M. C. A. drive with 
Tag Day, using the Red Triangle, bearing 
the inscription, "A Bit For the Sammies," 
which was quite a success. 

In November we rallied to a Red Cross 
banquet selling tickets and assisting other 
ways. 

Soon came election of officers: Nelle 
Meguiar was the succeeding President, Sylvia 
Henson, Vice President; Arel Ozment, Sec- 
retary-Treasurer. 

At the end of November our club was well 
organized and every girl busy sweaters, 
helmets, socks, mufflers were sent to boys 
from coast to coast. 

Christmas boxes for the home boys in 
France were on their way, then came the call 
to "Keep the Home Fires Burning," for those 
with no support. 

Many tons of coal were sent to the homes 
here in Johnston City, where the son or 
brother was in the service. 

Large quantities of smokes were sent to the 
different camps at Christmas for the boys. 

When the Red Cross drive came a call was 
made for the Loyal Girls, which found a 
ready response. 

Another Tag Day was resorted to, and at 
the close of day, a number of tired girls 
felt rested after learning we had taken in 
$375.00. 

Verbal Bearden was the next President 
elected, Mayme Wehr, Vice President; 
Sylvia Henson, Secretary-Treasurer. 

After the first contingent left Marion, no 
boy regardless of nationality, was known 
to leave without a kit and a word of cheer 
from the girls. 

Markets, bazaars, and socials were used to 
raise money and every one seemed willing 
to help. 



63 



===%= 




Our last President, Bertha Gore; Vice 
President, Nelle Meguiar; Secretary-Treas- 
urer, Essie Newton had the pleasure of re- 
ceiving the boys home again, with the help 
of the other club members, fifty-one girls in 
all, each trying in some way to do their bit. 

As the boys come home, we give them a 
hearty welcome, and have transformed our 
club, with the exception of our war and 
after the war brides, into a social club where 
we can keep that friendship, which was 
founded during the world war. 




BEN E. LA MASTER 
Chairman, Civilian Relief 



64 



JOHNSTON CITY CIVILIAN RELIEF 
COMMITTEE'S ACTIVITIES 

Members: 

Ben E. LaMaster, Chairman. 

Gordon Pillow, Secretary. 

Mrs. Ora Ellis. 

George Ellis. 

Fred Hall. 

I. T. Roberts, M. D. 

Since the organization of this committee 
in September, 1918, assistance has been ren- 
dered seventeen families by the distribution 
of food, clothing, coal and rent, and financial 
assistance for insurance premium, etc., to the 
amount of $698.84. Physicians' fees have 
been r>aid and nurses furnished where neces- 
sary. 

This committee was instrumental in ob- 
taining the release of Constantine Coin, a 
French boy, who formerly lived in Johnston 
City a prisoner of war held by the Germans 
in a French village. The release was affected 
by communications and telegrams through 
the Central Division of the Red Cross. He 
was returned safely to his parents here. 

Through the efforts of this committee our 
discharged soldiers have speedily obtained 
their bonus and refund on railroad fare. 




Piankeshaw Camp Fire Girls Herrin 




Top row, left to right Eva Orwin, Nona Stroud Bailie, Dorris Herrin, Christine 
Manning, Miss Renard, guardian; Hazel Brown, Feme Quigley, Alice Manning. 
Second row, left to right Cecille North, Violet Whittenberg, Gladys Sanders, Lucille 
Vick, Gertrude Galligan. 

Other members Florence Pope, Mae Chew Smith, Iva Kemp Atwood, Dorothy Mc- 
Clintock, Wanda Treece. 



The Piankeshaw Camp is the original 
Camp Fire organization of Herrin. The girls 
organized in September, 1916, with Miss 
Hester Renard as their guardian. They have 
been one of the most active organizations in 
war work in the city and have rendered in- 
valuable aid in all war enterprises. They 
appeared as Red Cross nurses in the initial 
war Tag Day, for the Red Cross, June 5, 
1917. They have helped to make successful 
Tag Days for the first and second Red Cross 
War Funds, United War Work, and for the 
Fatherless Children of France. They also 
served the drafted soldiers at a barbecue 
given in their honor in the fall of 1917. 



They conducted a canvass of the entire town 
for the first Red Cross War Fund, and joined 
with the Boy Scouts and the Wahwahteysee 
Camp in a canvass of the town for the second 
Red Cross War Fund. They also conducted 
flower stands and made over eighty dollars 
($80.00), which they donated to the Red 
Cross and to other war enterprises. They 
assisted in the sale of Liberty Bonds for the 
second, third and fourth Liberty Loan drives 
and helped to put Herrin "over the top." 
The Piankeshaw Camp has been one of the 
most patriotic organizations in the city, and 
has made a record for usefulness that i& 
hard to equal. 



65 




Wahwahteysee Camp Fire Girls Herrin 




Top row, left to ri^ht Margaret Cline, Marie Perrine, Florine Gasaway, Martha 
Brown, Eva Sanders. 

Second row, left to right Margaret Chapman, Geneva Whittenberg, Lotta Snyder, 
Julia Harrison. 

Other members Florence Steele, Bessie Zwick, Chloe Deason. 



The Wahwahteysee Camp is the second 
to organize in Herrin. The girls organized 
in the winter of 1917 with Miss Lois Benson 
as their guardian. They have assisted in a 
large number of affairs, for war aid. They 
originated the idea of a public pie sale, 
soliciting pies and selling them from the 
band stand downtown. They made forty dol- 
lars ($40.00), which they turned over to the 
Red Cross from this first sale. They have 
assisted in conducting successful Tag Days, 



for Second Red Cross War Fund, United War 
Work, and for the Fatherless Children of 
France. They assisted in a canvass of the 
town for the Second Red Cross War Fund, 
and conducted a special Tag Day for the 
Junior Red Cross. They assisted in the sale 
of Liberty Bonds for the second, third and 
fourth Liberty Loan drives. The Wahwah- 
teysee Camp has certainly justified its exist- 
ence by its patriotic endeavor. 




United War Work Campaign in Williamson County 



BY T. E. CRAIG 
City Editor Marion Evening Post 



The United War Work Campaign of No- 
vember llth to 18th, 1918, was composed 
of seven welfare agencies which merged their 
total interests into one national budget. 
Coming as it did at the close of hostilities 
many predicted that the amount asked for, 
$170,500,000, would not be raised. The 
prophecy proved false, as the nation "went 
over the top" with subscriptions. 

To facilitate the work, the state of Illinois 
was divided into twenty-two districts, the 
county of Williamson being the twentieth, 
composed of Randolph, Perry, Franklin, 
Hamilton, White, Jackson, Williamson, Saline 
and Gallatin. The apportionment of the dis- 
trict was $233,100.00, of which amount 
Williamson was assigned the task of raising 
$39,000. 

The county was placed in charge of an 
executive committee, composed of the fol- 
lowing most active workers: 

Y. M. C. A. L. A. Colp of Marion. 

Y. W. C. A. Ethel T. Holland of Marion. 

National Catholic W. C. Otis J. Presson 
of Herrin. 

Jewish Welfare Board A. H. Joseph of 
Marion. 

American Library Association Mark 
Woodley of Marion. 

War Camp Community Service Wm. H. 
Warder of Marion. 

Salvation Army George G. Otey of Her- 
rin. 

Victory Boys' Club Ed. M. Stotlar of 
Marion. 

Victory Girls' Club Mrs. W. W. Miller 
of Marion. 
Woman's Division Agnes Smith. 

Labor Division Hugh Willis of Herrin. 

Director of Publicity A. D. Morgan of 
Herrin. 



Speakers' Bureau R. R. Fowler. 
The distribution of Williamson county's 
quota was as follows: 

Corinth Township $ 1,280.00 

Crab Orchard Township 1,070.00 

Stonefort Township .... 1,020.00 

Creal Springs Township 1,540.00 

Southern Township 1,240.00 

Grassy Township 850.00 

Blairsville Township (west half of 

Township) 2,350.00 

Carterville Township 3,500.00 

Johnston City Township (includes 
two miles east and three miles 

west of city) 5,000.00 

Pittsburg (east two-thirds of Lake- 
creek Township) 1,150.00 

Herrin Township, High School 

District 10,000.00 

Marion (includes East and West 

Marion Township) 10,000.00 

Total $39,000.00 

Of this amount the Y. M. C. A. subscribed 
$22,004.00, the Y. W. C. A., $2,568.60. No 
detailed report of the other organizations is 
available, but Williamson county's quota was 
oversubscribed. 

THE Y. W. C. A. 

The Young Women's Christian Associa- 
tion made the clearest and most complete 
report of any organization. This because 
they concentrated their efforts and kept good 
records, easily available. The report of their 
work, made by their county chairman, Mrs. 
Ethel T. Holland, follows: 

Womens' Work was organized through the 
Federated Clubs organization, Mrs. Mary 
Wall of Murphysboro, chairman of the 25th 
District Y. W. C. A.; Mrs. Ethel T. Holland, 



67 




chairman for Williamson country. Fourteen 
city chairmen were appointed, as follows: 

Marion Mrs. Fred Martin. 

Herrin Mrs. O. W. Curry. 

Johnston City Mrs. Cora Baiar. 

Carterville Miss Effie Colp. 

Hurst-Bush Mrs. Gus Hensley. 

Creal Springs Mrs. James Alice. 

Pittsburg Miss Leda Duty. 

Crab Orchard Mrs. Chas. Cox. 

Stonefort Mrs. G. R. Brewer. 

Colp Mrs. Wm. E. Downs. 

Clifford Mrs. E. A. Kilbreth. 

Dewmaine Dr. H. McLean Springs. 

Corinth Mrs. W. S. Beers. 

Cambria Mrs. Charles Young. 

TAG DAY 

On the first day of the big drive for the 
War Work fund, the women held a tag day, 
tags being given all who contributed even the 
smallest amount. In this work the city of 
Herrin led by raising the largest amount; 
Marion came in second, Johnston City third, 
Carterville fourth, followed by Hurst-Bush 
and smaller localities. More than ten thou- 
sand tags were sold. 

Mrs. Elizabeth Jones Howard of Marion, 
wife of Dr. G. W. Howard, who was in 
France, sold an even $100 worth. 

This organization solicited subscriptions 
from women and women's organizations, 
clubs, churches, societies, lodges, etc., and 
rural communities raised their quotas 
through school districts and reported to the 
county treasurer of the fund through their 
local treasurer. 

Mrs. Elza Cash of Marion was appointed 
county chairman to supervise the after-the- 
war or reconstruction work and had ap- 
pointed her committees throughout the 
county. These committees were practically 
the same, with but two exceptions. Mrs. 
Cash passed away on April 23, 1919, before 
her work was completed. 

A district convention of the United War 
Work for the Twentieth District had been 
held on October 28, 1918, where organiza- 
tion was completed and plans for the drive 
made. Those invited to attend as special 
workers from Williamson county were the 
following: Rev. H. H. Hampton, Rev. E. J. 
Sabin and Jas. A. Lauder of Carterville; 
Robt. Hopper, A. K. Elles, Geo. G. Otey. 



68 



Wayne Smith of Herrin; L. D. Hobbs, L. L. 
Clayton, Gordon Pillow, Mark Ferges and 
D. H. Henson of Johnston City; Ed M. Slot- 
lar, Dr. John I. Gunn, J. H. Siekman, Harry 
Holland, Geo. C. Campbell, W. H. Warder, 
and John M. Reid cf Marion. 

John R. Mott, Director General of the 
United War Work Campaign, designates this 
as "The largest voluntary offering in his- 
tory." Read his enthusiastic words in the 
following extracts from his report: 

"In the history of mankind the largest sum 
ever provided through voluntary offerings 
for an altruistic cause was the great fund 
given in November in the United War Work 
Campaign. In the period beginning Novem- 
ber llth, a day forever memorable as the 
one on which hostilities ceased in the Great 
World War, the entire American people 
the rich and the poor, the members of all 
parties, races and religious faiths united 
their gifts and sacrifices in rolling up the 
vast sum of over $200,000,000. This fact 
alone would give the campaign unique dis- 
tinction. 

"When the unfavorable circumstances 
which attended this great effort are borne in 
mind, it becomes all the more remarkable. 
If the success of an enterprise or the greatness 
of a victory are determined by the number 
and extent of the difficulties and obstacles 
overcome, then the triumph achieved by the 
multitude of workers who carried through to 
a successful issue this patriotic endeavor was 
indeed notable and truly great. In the his- 
tory of financial campaigns, when was there 
ever one conducted in the face of so many 
difficulties? 

"The United War Work Campaign has fur- 
nished the most impressive example thus far 
afforded of religious unity and co-operation. 
When before have the leaders and the many 
millions of followers of the Protestant, 
Roman Catholic and Jewish religious bodies 
of a great nation joined forces for the accom- 
plishment of a common unselfish object? In 
doing this no one of them has obscured, 
minimized or apologized for that which is 
most distinctive in its life and work. The 
campaign has been an illustration of inter- 






denominationalism rather than of undenom- 
inationalism. It might have been regarded 
as wonderful had these bodies come together 
on a platform of putting aside their differences 
and all that is most characteristic of them; 
but it has been far more wonderful that they 
have been able to come together and work 
together and speak together just as they are, 
each being true to its own best self. 

"Never before have foundations, corpora- 
tions, companies, banks, industries and the 
rural population of America participated so 
generally and so generously in a great popu- 
lar subscription. Through all the coming 
years the gifts and sacrifices of many mil- 
lions, from the richest to the poorest and 
from the youngest to the oldest, in every 
corner of our country and from neighboring 
as well as distant lands will be held in grate- 
ful memory. 

"Above all, as we remind ourselves of the 
difficulties, humanly speaking insuperable, 
which have attended this great undertaking 
and as we recall the wonderful miracle which 
has been wrought in ushering in the world- 
wide and, as we trust, enduring peace which 
synchronized with the launching of the cam- 
paign, let us reverently and gratefully ac- 
knowledge Almighty God as the great and 
only efficient Cause of this great victory of 
peace, as He was the great victory of the 
war." 





C. W. BISHOP, Carterville 

Active War Worker and Able Assistant of 
Herrin Local Board. 



.A^ ij L ', \y \\ \y ^\ m 
*7^-7y-ry rr iff ir tr /> 



The Marion Woman's Club 



By Miss EVA YOUNG 



The Marion Woman's Club is one of the 
most progressive federated Clubs of Marion. 
There is a large membership composed of 
ladies who are wideawake, industrious and 
patriotic. 

The Club was organized in 1913, and its 
officers and members have done much good 
work in Marion since its organization, par- 
ticularly along philanthropic lines. It has 
been their custom to have an annual "tag 




THE GODDARD CHAPEL 

day", the proceeds of which have been spent 
for the worthy poor of Marion. The sum of 
$360.87 was collected for this purpose on 
Oct. 30, 1918. The members also collected 
and distributed the past year, 218 garments, 
and assisted thirty-five poor families with 
clothing, coal and other necessities, the past 
winter. Every Christmas they send out a 
number of well-filled baskets, which brings 
comfort and cheer to the many good, deserv- 
ing families. 

The Woman's Club has assisted financially 
and otherwise in securing medical aid to sick 
persons who were unable to help themselves, 
and several cases where operations were nec- 
essary. 

It was through the Civil Department of 
The Marion Woman's Club that Hon. L. A. 
Goddard of Chicago, became interested and 



69 



erected the beautiful chapel in Rose Hill 
cemetery, at an approximate cost of $35,000. 

The ladies of this Club took an active part 
in every war activity, and especially the Red 
V Cross work. A surgical dressing class was 
organized from the Club and completed a 
great amount of work. The Club purchased 
a Liberty Bond, and also adopted a French 
war orphan. 

A committee from the Club secured $100,- 
000 worth of subscriptions on the third Lib- 
erty Loan, and $2,000 on the second Red 
Cross war drive, and sold $3,000 War Saving 
Stamps. A Silver Tea was given at the home 
of one of its members, proceeds amounting 
to $23.00, which was donated to the Queen 
Elizabeth fund for the Belgian Relief. The 
proceeds from a food exchange $31.00 was 
donated to the United War Work drive. 

Through the Woman's Club, the services 
of a trained nurse were secured, and a free 
course in home nursing was given to those 
desiring to take the lessons. 

A committee from the Club also helped in 
the Salvation Army drive. 

This Club has always helped in every good 
and worthy cause, being united in their ef- 
forts to improve the community creating 
mutual sympathy and higher civilization. 

The present officers are: 

Miss Eva Young, President; 

Mrs. P. R. Colp, 1st Vice-President; 

Mrs. P. B. Wilson, 2nd Vice-President; 

Dr. Anna G. Reid, Rec. Sec'y: 

Mrs. S. E. Quindry, Cor. Sec'y; 

Mrs. Curtis Brown, Treasurer; 

Mrs. W. F. Burkhart, Parliamentarian. 




^ 



The American Protective League 

This was a branch of the service during 
the war that received very little comment 
and is one feature that should not be over- 
looked in our Williamson County History. 
Prof. J. H. Siekman, President of Brown's 
Business College, was selected County Cap- 
tain, and this work, even though it did not 
receive much publicity, the importance of 
this particular branch of the service and 
those connected with it certainly deserve 
honorable mention. 



Food Administration 

Probably one of the citizens of our county 
to whom credit is due and who has probably 
received as little credit, is Prof. J. H. Siek- 
man, President of Brown's Business College, 
at Marion, 111. Prof. Siekman was appointed 
County Food Administrator for Williamson 
County early in the year of 1918. He worked 
faithfully and untiringly in the year of 1918 
at a tremendous loss of time and personal 
expense (traveling, stenographic and office 
help, telegrams, etc.), without any reimburse- 
ment for his work. This was done simply as 




PROF. J. H. SIEKMAN 

a patriotic duty. Prof. Siekman is thankful, 
indeed, for the co-operation of the citizens 
in Williamson County who were anxious to 
assist in controlling the food administration 
work, although there were some who were 
not loyal to their country or to the boys 
"OVER THERE." In most cases, however, 
the citizens of Williamson county were al- 
ways ready to co-operate with us when they 
knew just what the ruling was, governing 
the consumption and distribution of food 
supplies. 

The efficient assistants, most of whom 
stayed with Prof. Siekman throughout the 
year, handling the work in the immediate 
vicinity, and who also deserve credit for the 
faithful work done and their careful attention 
to the distribution and conservation of food 
supplies in Williamson county are the fol- 
lowing: 



70 




Carterville T. J. Moake, Ira 
Clark and C. W. Bush. 

Herrin Charles Murrah and 
Carl Neilson. 

Johnston City W. W. Hig- 
gerson. 

Corinth Dr. George Roberts. 

Marion P. W. Balance, W. 
G. Metzinger, and Elza Cash. 

Chamness J. M. Mouser. 

Creal Springs John B. Mor- 
ray. 



Second Meeting Williamson Post, American Legion 




U. S. Department of Labor 

At the beginning of demobolization, Prof. 
J. H. Siekman of Marion, President of 
Brown's Business College, was appointed 
County Chairman to take charge of this im- 
portant work. The object of this work was 
to secure employment for the returning sol- 
diers. As soon as the soldier was released 
from government service his name was sent 
to the County Chairman and was taken up 
with the different committees throughout the 
county in the different places in order that 
the returning soldier should be given an 
opportunity for a position with his former 
employer on returning to civil life. 

Those who assisted in the different cities in 
Williamson County are as follows: 

J. H. Siekman, Marion, 111., County Chair- 
man. 

Marion G. J. Frick, Chairman; A. B. McClaren, 
Judge Rufus Neeley. 

Johnston City Fred Cooper, Chairman; Ralph 
Mitchell, Ben La Master. 

Herrin Hugh Willis, Chairman; Geo. McArtor, 
William Sneed, Jr., A. T. Pace. 

Carterville Lewis Gibbons, Chairman; Charles 
Rudder. 

The American Legion 

BY LIEUT. OLDHAM PAISLEY 

The first post of the American Legion to 
be formed in this county was that formed at 
Marion, Illinois, in September, 1919, when 
the name of Williamson Post was selected. 



A. A. Mozley was selected as temporary 
chairman and Robert Williams was selected 
as temporary secretary-treasurer. 

The organization was first formed with 
temporary officers and no permanent officers 
were selected until after the national con- 
vention which was held in November, 1919. 
The charter for Williamson Post was closed 
on September 15 and the list of charter mem- 
bers was as follows: 



Fred C. Whitlock 
Thomas H. Howells 
Wiilis H. Saunders 
Eliab J. Aikman 
O. R. Fischer 
Ben F. Reed 
Howard Moore 
Charles Cochran 
Lester M. Davis 
Leo Holliday 
John Durham 
Charles Fowler 
Evo B. Cirrito 
William H. Forker 
Carl C. Bradbury 
Harry Parks 
Carl Williams 
Leroy S. Mitchell 
Loren L. Fowler 
Harvey A. Felts 
Oldham Paisley 
Arthur Gravannis 
Joseph PirreUo 
Howard McCluskey 
Hugh J. Musgrove 
Aaron L. Walker 
Joseph Disalvo 
Luke P. Baccus 
Lory Price 
Robert M. Williams 
A. A. Mozley 
J. H. Hendrickson 
Paul Mitchell 



Earl O. Choat 
Tony Digraca 
Edgar N. Atwood 
Jack J. Goddard 
James H. Short 
Robert L. Edwards 
Sidney B. Sage 
J. Howard Flaughter 
Ruel Youngblood 
Pauline Duncan 
Ralph Thurmond 
John Azemis 
William B. Jones 
Gus Chamness 
Lei and F. Lough 
J. W. Ferguson 
Sam Dunaway 
John L. Otey 
Ira D. Sheretz 
H. L. Robert 
Herman C. Jeter 
James W. Russell 
Leslie Brigham 
Fred A. Darter 
Roy Reed 
John C. Keltner 
J. H. Flaughter 
Edgar Craig 
Sam Goodall 
L. C. Raybourne 
Fred W. Sage 
John Reynolds 



71 




Williamson County Woman s Committee 
State Council of Defense 

The Williamson County Committee of the Illinois State Council of National Defense was 
organized in June, 1917. 



Mrs. Paul R. Colp, Marion, Chairman. 

Mrs. W. E. Grisham, Johnston City, Vice-Chairman. 

Mrs. Fred G. Campbell, Marion, Secretary. 

Mrs. Robert Thompson, Carterville, Treasurer. 

Mrs. R. A. Parks, Marion, Co-ordination. 

Mrs. Cora Baiar, Johnston City, Registration. 

Mrs. W. 0. Paisley, Marion, Food Production. 

Mrs. Elza Cash, Marion, Conservation. 

Mrs. Wayne Smith, Herrin, War Savings. 

Mrs. Otis Brown, Marion, Allied Relief. 

Miss Eva Young, Marion, Red Cross. 



Mrs. George Otey, Herrin, Community Singing. 

Mrs. George Ellis, Johnston City, Fatherless Chil- 
dren of France. 

Mrs. Jane Lawson, Marion, Information. 

Mrs. Harry Carson, Creal Springs, Home Charities. 

Miss Alice Kennedy, Cambria, Social Hygiene. 

Mrs. M. E. Hedley, Johnston City, Publicity. 

Mrs. C. R. Phillips, Herrin, Speakers. 

Mrs. D. J. Kelley, Johnston City, Child Welfare. 

Miss Jane Barter, Spring Grove, Women and Chil- 
dren in Industry. 



Under the direction of the Co-ordination chairman, Mrs. R. A. Parks, units were organ- 
ized. There were units in the county with the following chairmen: 



Mrs. J. W. Burnett Creal Springs 

Mrs. Charles Hampton Hudgens 

Miss Jane Barter Spring Grove 

Dr. B. E. McLain-Springs Dewmaine 

Mrs. Margaret Sprague Cambria 



Mrs. W. P. Moore Marion 

Miss Effie Colp Carterville 

Mrs. Geo. Ellis Johnston City 

Mrs. James Rollo Herrin 

Mrs. V. H. Burkhart Hurst 

Mrs. Allen Kilbreath Clifford 

The first big piece of war work done by this committee was the registration of women for 
service. There were approximately 10,000 women in Williamson County who registered for 
either paid or free service. These registration cards have been kept and filed by the differ- 
ent units and have been of great value in furnishing workers for governmental drives, nurses 
in recent epidemics and for many other purposes. 

A large campaign for conservation was carried on. Seven thousand food pledge cards 
were signed. Classes were held to teach the use of the new substitutes, the remaking of 
clothes and the necessity for the elimination of waste. 

The Allied Relief committee furnished hundreds of garments for the war stricken fami- 
lies in France and Belgium. The policy of the Fatherless Children of France Committee was 
to maintain children in their own homes, to be brought up by their mothers in the religion of 
their fathers and to establish such a personal relationship between the "Donor" and the child, 
that the "Donor" not only be assured that his money reached its proper destination, but also 
corresponded with the child or its mother. $36.50 a year, added to the small allowance of the 
French government would help give a strong, well trained child to the new France. Fifty or 
more of these orphans were adopted throughout the county. A great many girls registered 
for active service as nurses. Miss Pauline Duncan of Marion, the only Army Camp Nurse 
called from this county, served 6 months in Camp Jackson, South Carolina. A number of 
girls were assigned to civilian hospitals. 

Girls Patriotic Welfare Leagues were formed in a number of communities. They had 
community choruses, did all kinds of war work and helped to raise $500 for the Y. W. C. A. 
Drive. 

72 




The Local Draft Boards 



Based upon its population, Williamson 
County was divided into two draft board 
districts. Local Board No. 1. was the Marion 
district and embraced all the townships in 
the county except Herrin, Blairsville, Carter- 
ville and Grassy townships which comprised 
No. 2 district or the Herrin board district. 
The estimate of the draft population being 
about equally divided between these two dis- 
tricts was poorly made, for the Marion board 



in the June 5, 1917, registration got but 2006 
registrants, while the Herrin board ran over 
a third more, registering 3036. 

Upon recommendation of Governor Lowden 
of Illinois, President Wilson appointed the 
members of the local boards, at first three in 
number, late in June, 1917. Later on other 
appointments were added as associate mem- 
bers, such as appeal agents, etc. 



The Marion Local Board 

BY CAPT. OLDHAM PAISLEY 



The Local Board Number 1. of Williamson 
County had its headquarters in Marion and 
went through the war with but one change in 
composition and that was made when one of 
its members entered the service. 

The board as originally formed was com- 
posed of Rufus Neely of Marion, who was 
chosen secretary; W. H. Grant of Johnston 
City, R. F. D. chairman, and Dr. D. D. Hart- 
well of Marion. Dr. A. M. Edwards later 
replaced Dr. Hartwell as examining physi- 
cian. 

The board was in complete harmony at all 
times and no friction ever marred its pro- 
ceedings. Judge Neely had two sons in the 
service as did also Mr. Grant, while both 
Dr. Hartwell and Dr. Edwards were in the 
service. This is a record unequaled in the 
state, propably. 

Dr. Hartwell was commissioned in the 
Medical Reserve Corps as a first lieutenant, 
but when he became the examining physician 
for the selective service board, the govern- 
ment refused to order him to active and field 
duty but he kept the mails busy until he was 
given orders and he again kept things busy 
until he got to France and into action, and 
his record stands out prominently in the 



county. He was paralyzed as a result of the 
war work and is just now recovering his 
speech. 

Dr. Edwards was among the first physicians 
from Williamson county to enter the service 
as a first lieutenant in the medical corps, but 
he was later given an honorable discharge 
because of physical conditions. He fully 
demonstrated his loyalty by the untiring as- 
sistance given the board in the physical ex- 
aminations. 

The first examinations were held in the 
Elks home and later in the City Hall. The 
offices of Attorney Neely, Gallimore and 
Cook were used as headquarters for the board 
and the records were kept there until for- 
warded to state and national headquarters 
for permanent file. 

The attorneys of the county were all loyal 
in their assistance extended to the board. 
Attorney Spiller D. Lewis was chairman of 
the legal advisory board, and Judge D. T. 
Hartwell and Attorney Ed M. Spiller served 
as members. States Attorney R. R. Fowler 
served the board as government appeal agent. 

The physicians of the city came forward 
patriotically to the assistance of Drs. Hart- 
well and Edwards. Among those assisting 



73 



I 



; 






W.H. Grant-. 




ma W/iitcomli. 



MEMBERS OF THE MARION LOCAL BOARD 



were Dr. S. G. J. Baker and L. B. Casey and 
Dentist M. W. Bal lance. 

Among the clerks who assisted in the work, 
the service of Miss Emma Whitcomb, chief 
clerk, was probably the most appreciated. 
She gave up her work as stenographer for 
the law firm of Neely, Gallimore and Cook to 
handle the government work for the county 



board and she sacrificed quite as much and 
worked as hard as any member of the board. 
She was assisted from time to time by Mrs. 
Mamie Bracy, Misses Jettie Bolder, Iva 
Harris, Hattie Mitchell, and Helen Reece. 

Eight hundred and five men were inducted 
into service by Local Board No. 1. The total 
registration reached 5512. 



The Herrin Local Board 

BY H. W. T. 



The Herrin board consisted of C. H. Pope, 
Hal W. Trovillion and Dr. Carl Baker, all 
of Herrin. On June 30, 1917, the members 
met at The Herrin news office and organized 
as follows: C. H. Pope, chairman; Hal W. 
Trovillion, secretary, and by virtue of his 
profession, Dr. Carl Baker was made exam- 
ining physician. This organization continued 
until the close of the year when Dr. Carl 
Baker tendered his resignation because of 
his leave-taking from the city to go to Chi- 
cago to take a post graduate course in medi- 
cine. Dr. R. E. Ransmeier was appointed 
to succeed him. In the spring of 1918, owing 
to differences that arose on the board, a 
great deal of friction resulted. On August 
24th, C. H. Pope resigned, and pending the 
appointment of a new member, Dr. R. E. 
Ransmeier served as chairman and also 
handled the work of head examining physi- 
cian, making his duties very trying and caus- 
ing him at times to abandon his business 
completely. Out of justice to his sincere 



loyalty, it should be stated that Dr. Ransmeier 
never accepted from the government any pay 
for his services as examining physician, 
freely donating his time and labors to the 
government. 

Only a few days before the armistice was 
signed Judge W. F. Chapman was appointed 
by President Wilson to fill the vacancy on 
the board caused by Mr. Pope's resignation. 
He made a most attentive member and 
throughout the rest of the war period the 
board worked in perfect harmony. 

Attached to the board in an advisory ca- 
pacity were several officers and Judge A. D. 
Morgan served throughout the war as chair- 
man of the legal advisory board, and Judge 
R. T. Cook and Attorney Charles Murrah as 
associate member.s The board rendered ex- 
cellent services in assisting registrants in 
filling out their questionnaires and also in 
apprizing them of their rights under the 
selective service law. 



74 



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. 

fj \ fJ ,j ,1 




Judge R. T. Cook was appointed govern- 
ment appeal agent early in the history of 
the board and handled a great deal of work 
up to the summer of 1918 when the pressure 
of his legal business necessitated his resig- 
nation. 

Governor Lowden filled the vacancy by 
appointing A. K. Elles, head of the Herrin 
Supply Company. A more fortunate selec- 
tion as Judge Cook's successor could not have 
been picked. No person connected with the 
draft board assumed his duties more earnestly 
than did Mr. Elles, despite his extreme busi- 
ness with his big commercial and mercantile 
interests which demanded every minute of 
his time each day. He set aside a certain 
amount of time each day for government 
work and was as punctual in his appoint- 
ments as if life depended upon it. He came 
into office just at the time that the WORK 
or FIGHT order came into effect, and his 
department was the busiest in all the draft 
board until the armistice was signed. 

Hugh Willis of Herrin, executive board 
member of the miners, was appointed several 
months before the war closed as Industrial 
Agent for the county and rendered valuable 
services to the boards in an advisory ca- 
pacity. 

Attorney Richard R. Fowler of Marion, 
State's Attorney, served very efficiently as 



county appeal agent aid rendered useful 
services to the local boards. 

Herrin local board first opened headquar- 
ters in the council chamber of the City Hall 
which was generously offered the board by 
Mayor George K. Crichton and City Clerk 
John D. Perrine. The office was established 
here on July 2, 1917, and with an office force 
of stenographers, the task of copying regis- 
tration cards was begun. It was found in a 
short time to be ill suited as an office and a 
suite of rooms were rented upstairs in the 
City National Bank building. The quarters 
proved unsatisfactory later and a third move 
was made in May, 1918, to a suite of rooms 
in the Herrin building, where the office re- 
mained located until it was abandoned. 

During the life of the Herrin board a 
number of clerks were employed. Miss Dora 
Malandrone started in with the board upon 
its organization and was later made chief 
clerk and held this important post until the 
office was closed in April, 1919. Among the 
other clerks connected with the office from 
time to time were Misses Berenice Baker, 
Clara Streicher, Florence Pope, Delilah Har- 
mon, Beulah Blair, Mae Chew, Olean Jenk- 
ins, Nona Stroud, Elsie Gregory, Mabel 
Brown, Rhea Moudy, Mrs. Anna Reed Ben- 
ton, Mrs. Violet Trovillion, Mrs. Caroline 
Hickson. 



1 





Guardians of Liberty the First Large Contingent to Leave Herrin, Sept. 18, 1917. 




V.I 




Jucldg__C:'ook 



a.H.Elles. 



In September the Herrin board was as- 
signed two soldier clerks, Tony Garavaglia 
of Herrin and Charles Newton of Johnston 
City. They were with the board until Febru- 
ary, 1919. 

The total registration recorded by the 
Herrin local board for the three registration 
dates June 5, 1917; August 24, 1918; Sep- 
tember 12, 1918, was 8,588. There were 
fifteen nationalities represented. A large 
number of the foreigners were aliens and a 
few enemy aliens. The largest foreign ele- 
ment the board had to handle was Italian, 
and as a whole, this class was very loyal. 
A great number waived their alien rights 
and permitted themselves to be drafted, while 
quite a few enlisted. 

Herrin local board met every call for in- 
duction that was made on it and achieved a 
one hundred per cent record for filling its 
quota. The total number of men inducted 
during the operation of the draft law was 
957. 

The physicians residing in Herrin board 
district who assisted Dr. Carl Baker while he 
was head of the medical examining board 
and later Dr. R. E. Ransmeier, who suc- 
ceeded Dr. Baker, were as follows: Drs. W. 
R. Gardiner, Columbus Brown, D. S. Boles, 
J. C. Black, J. S. Waldman, G. C. Chamness, 
all of Herrin; Dr. C. M. Evans of Clifford; 
Drs. J. F. McKee, I. T. Roberts and J. W. 
Clayton, all of Johnston City, and Drs. W. 
H. Perry, F. M. Miller and J. W. Vick of 
Carterville. These physicians all made noble 
sacrifices, especially during the Spanish in- 
fluenza epidemic of 1918, when they were 
rushed hardest in practice and when the gov- 
ernment was pushing the board on examining 
registrants. 



The entire number of draft registrants in 
the county was 14,100, and the total num- 
ber inducted by the two boards reached 
1,762. 

The number to enlist in the entire county 
is not available, but is estimated from 500 
to 700, making the grand total of soldiers 
furnished the nation approximately 2,400. 
which is from four to five per cent of the 
population of the county. 



DEPARTURE OF HERRIN'S FIRST 

SOLDIERS 

War has never been brought so closely 
home to Herrin people as on that cool 
autumn morn of the fifth of September, nine- 
teen seventeen, when fourteen stalwart young 
fellows went marching out from the local 
board office in the City National Bank build- 
ing, in double file to the Illinois Central 
Railroad station to entrain for Camp Taylor, 
Ky., on the 5:40 A. M. train. The city band 
was out to send them away with music. 
Never before had the early morning breezes 
carried band music down the street at such 
on early hour, and never before did the 
musicians play with such verve. Proudly 
they headed the early morning procession as 
it swept rhythmically down the street fol- 
lowed by weeping friends, parents and sweet- 
hearts, breaking into the marching line here 
and there for a parting word to the boys. In 
this strange moving theater as it passed 
along, no figure towered more majestically or 
swept along with more gusto than that of 
W. 0. Nail, who with fife ever to his lips, 
tirelessly piped away, unloosing on the cool, 
keen breezes of the early morning shrill, 
stirring, martial notes that awoke in every 
heart the spirit of war. 

Once the station platform was reached, it 
was a surging sea of anxious and excited 
people. Had it been the funeral of these 
boys, some that bade them farewell could 
not have taken on more, nor shed more tears. 
It appeared that the entire city had been 
summoned on short and unexpected notice, 
for in all stages of dress they came. Only 
the children and little boys seemed to find 
anything in the scene but sadness, though to 



' 



77 



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f f ,'r-,y rr \tr // >f- 




Flag Raising Day for Liberty Loan Campaign, May 22, 1919. Showing Contingent Shortly to Leave. 




them it was a matter of noisy cheering and 
a light-hearted farewell. Just before the 
train pulled in, an itinerant evangelist, who 
was holding a series of meetings here in a 
tent, mounted a baggage truck and briefly 
addressed the vast audience that had come 
out breakfastless to pay tribute to this new 
army. "Men never went forth to fight for 
a nobler cause," he told them. Then a prayer 
was said and from down the track just as 
the sun was getting ready to raise its head 
on that unusual day that will long be remem- 
bered in Herrin, loomed up the train, letting 
out a long and mournful whistle as it neared 
the station. It seemed that the whistle never 
sounded stranger or pierced so deep the 
hearts of those who heard it. 

As the fourteen boys stepped aboard, there 
were sobs and weepings and last, fond em- 
braces and shouts of Godspeed from those 
of stronger hearts. As the pulsing crowd 
moved back, cheering and weeping and the 
band playing its loudest, the train slowly 
moved away bearing Herrin's first contribu- 
tion to the great war. 

Every man in that little band of fellows 
save one has come home safely. That one 
is Tom Abbott, who was among the first 
of Herrin's soldiers killed in action. Tom 
today sleeps where he fell in the fields of 
France. It was a bomb from a Zeppelin 
that got him. He was attached to the British 
tank corps. 

The men who made up this company of 
fourteen, all volunteered to fill the first quota 
called for by this board. Their names are 
as follows: Eugene William Fultz, Frank 
Alexander Yuill, John Chiodini, Matteo 
Pettina, Loren Isaac Robinson, George Owen, 
Gerald Weaver, Earl W. Cox, James T. 
Abbott, Willis Myers, Ross Frank Mooney- 
ham, Charley Ross Ford, all of Herrin; 
William Francis Kilduff of Johnston City 
and Clarence Watson of Carterville. 

Hervie Dillingham and Robert B. Temple- 
ton, with grips packed stood in line as alter- 
nates, as was required, but did not get to go 
with this first party, as the quota was com- 
plete without them. 



EARLY CONTINGENTS FROM MARION 

TO TRAINING CAMPS 

BY W. 0. PAISLEY 

On September 6, 1917, the first selectmen 
from District No. 1 of Williamson County 
Local Board, left Marion for Camp Taylor, 
Ky. There were nine men in this first con- 
tingent, and while there was a feeling of 
sadness among all in the big crowd which 
assembled to bid them God speed, still all 
were inspired with the same feeling of deter- 
mination to win the war which filled the 
spirits of the men, and the parting was one 
which strengthened the men for the task 
before them. Chester H. Simmons, who had 
served for six years in the U. S. army, was 
in charge of the squad. The other members 
were Edgar Craig, Byron Durham, Jack Fly, 
Iva Hampton, Richard P. McAllister, Joe 
Onstatt, Wm. T. Scurlock and James Lee 
Sullivan. Every man called was present at 
this time as was also every man called for 
the next contingent. 

On September 21, under leaden skies and 
with the rain falling when the train left the 
station, seventy-five more soldiers left Marion 
for the training camp. The Johnston City 
Drum Corps was present at this meeting and 
it was also at the train when every other 
contingent from District No. 1 answered the 
call to the colors. There was an immense 
gathering of citizens present as these boys 
left at 8 A. M. 

On October 5, the third group of select 
men left for Camp Taylor. There were 
thirty-eight at this time, making a total of 
one hundred and twenty-two to go from 
Williamson County District No. 1 during the 
first month after that training camp was 
opened. The farewell meeting to these men 
was one of the most inspiring of the war. 
Bishop William A. Quayle spoke to the men 
as they left the court house and then marched 
with them to the train. "Soldiers, I have a 
son on his way to battle," said the famous 
divine, and these opening words touched the 
hearts of everyone, as few in the county did 
not have some one in the service or who 
would soon be called. 



79 




A farewell reception was given at the Bap- 
tist church on the evening of September 4, 
before the first selectmen left for the train, 
and a rousing send-off was given to each 
group of men as they left for the camps. 
A large number of volunteers had already 
entered the service before the first selectmen 
were called and others joined later, giving 
the district a showing in every branch of the 
service. 



HOW WE GOT ALONG WHEN THE 
BOYS WENT AWAY 

It was hard sledding in every department 
of business and even inconvenienced every 
household when the boys marched forth to 
put the kibosh on Kaiser William. Those 
left here at home did the best they could to 
close up the gaps, but made a poor job of it. 

The war seemed to weed out most of the 
efficients out of the day's work and a great 
change came over help. Help came mighty 
near being no help at all. Sometimes, in- 
deed, it was a positive hindrance. Every 
business was more or less afflicted with this 
sort of thing. The mails were full of mis- 
directed letters. Elevators were run by peo- 
ple who couldn't stop on a floor level to 
save their necks. There were clerks in stores 
who did not even know what business the 
house was in. Almost nobody got his own 
bills, which was tremendous insight as to 
what others owed. Automobiles became an 
even greater peril to one another than they 
were to the rest of us. The plumber who 
came out to fix your furnace so you could 
burn soft coal in it, fixed it so you couldn't 
burn anything in it. The watchmaker took 
the wheels out of your watch and couldn't 
put them back. The repair shop took your 
automobile and aggravated its disorders until 
you joined the army to get where the good 
mechanics had gone. The painter came 
around and fell off the roof. The bank 
records showed at the end of the month that 
you had $100.00 more than your own records 



showed and you had the terrible experience 
of having to give it up to its owner, who was 
a hundred short. The waiter blundered 
around behind you until he poured soup 
down your back. Mixing drinks (hush!) 
passed from an art to an avocation. The 
milkman found your card marked for one 
quart of milk and a half pint of cream, and 
left you two quarts of buttermilk. Your 
new stenographer sent a letter which was to 
go to Campbell, Mo., to Camp Belly, Mo. 
The office 'boy had a choice among 18 jobs 
with as many degrees of pay, and left at the 
end of a week taking with him all the secret 
formulas of the business. The man who 
came to put in your wood tried to carry it 
all in two or three loads, and fell down the 
cellar stairs, and broke a whole set of ribs. 
You ordered a food chopper shipped out to 
your place in the country and got a barrel 
of salt. The newspaper reporter who came 
around to talk to you on some important 
topic, quoted you with an interview he got 
from somebody else about something you 
never heard of. The washerwoman no longer 
had to support her two grown sons, who had 
been drafted, and quit washing. Your cook 
who had been with you five years and had 
just begun to understand, resigned her place 
to go back to the farm and run a tractor. 
The paperhanger was without help and finally 
hung himself. An express package started 
to you from Chicago, and the next trace you 
got of it came from San Francisco, where it 
was seen going towards the ship wharves. 
You ordered beans, flour, baking powder and 
soda from the grocer, and some time during 
the night a boy got you out to let him in 
with a half dozen brooms and two pounds 
of clothesline. All the people who smoothed 
the rough edges of life for you and made 
this, that and the other things all hunkydory 
were gone to war. You were arrested if you 
overchecked your account; the cleaner sent 
you some one else's green trousers with your 
gray coat and vest; and the man who came 
to fix the telephone left it in such shape that 
when you took down the trumpet you turned 
in a fire alarm. Help was hell! 



80 



-If-/4 Jf J4 Jir^fL JJ^ 
"V\ V\ U \\ \\ "\\ ">^- 




Evolution of Our Public Schools Their Part in the World War 

BY J. W. McKiNNEY 
County Superintendent of Schools 



With Wouter Van Twiller, the second Director 
General of New Netherlands, came in 1633, Rev. 
Everardus Bogardus, for the Church, and Adam 
Roelanstan, the first schoolmaster; and the paro- 
chial school over which he presided, and which is 
still carried on by the Reformed Dutch Church in 
New York, is now the oldest existing school in 
America. Moreover, it was our first free school in 
America, for it was supported in part by a school 
tax of four pounds. 

It is interesting to note the varied and useful 
duties at this period of the New England school- 
master. Besides inspiring his pupils to the practice 
*>i reading, ciphering, and in some instances, of 
writing, he trained the children in the catechism 
and religious doctrines of the church, acted as 
Court Messenger, served summonses, conducted cer- 
tain ceremonial services of the church, led the Sun- 
day school choir, rang the bell for public worship, 
digged graves, and performed other occasional 
duties. 

Three great ideas were gradually developed, viz.: 
that some education should be provided for every 
child; that the State must support the schools, and 
that the schools must be brought under intelligent 
and systematic supervision. 

The celebrated Ordinance of 1787 was passed by 
the Continental Congress, under the Articles of Con- 
federation, and provided for the government of the 
Northwest Territory, of which the present State of 
Illinois, was then a part. Article Three of that 
Ordinance made the following reference to the value 
of schools and education: "Religion, morality and 
knowledge being necessary to good government and 
the happiness of mankind, schools and means of 
education shall forever be encouraged." The idea 
then seemed to be that education was necessary to 
good government and happiness. This is the true 
idea today, and a government will be good or bad, 
and its citizens happy or unhappy, as its citizenship 
are educated or ignorant. From this little embryo 
in the Ordinance of 1787, has grown our great 
school system of today, embracing all the rural and 
elementary schools of the State. 

The first Constitution of Illinois, which was 
adopted in 1818, provided that Section 16 in every 
Township, or other lands of equal value, should be 
granted to the inhabitants of such Township, for 
the use of schools, but did not specify in what par- 
ticular way the schools should be organized. The 
same Constitution further provided, that three per 
cent of the proceeds of all Public Lands in the 
State, should be appropriated by the Legislature of 
the State for the encouragement of learning, and 
that one-sixth of this three per cent, should be 
exclusively bestowed upon a State College or Uni- 



versity. This reference to the College or University, 
was in anticipation of a need of higher education 
in our school system. 

At the time Illinois was admitted into the Union, 
in 1818, the schools of New England were making 
noticeable improvement, but the conditions west of 
the Alleghanies were much the same as in the 
pioneer days of New England Even with the 
assistance of the government, the schools were in 
bad condition. The people were too poor to tax 
themselves to pay the teachers, and the receipts 
from the school lands, much of which were sold at 
$1.25 an acre, brought but little relief. A law 
taxing the people for the support of the schools 
was passed in 1825, but there was so much opposi- 
tion, that it was repealed four years later. Mean- 
while, the cause of public education fell to a very 
low stage. The school houses were either poorly 
built of logs, or some abandoned building was used 
for the purpose. The courses of study were usually 
limited to instruction in the three R's "Readin', 
'Ritin' and 'Rithmetic." The whole school studied 
and recited together from such books as could be 
brought from home. In some instances a spelling 
book or the New Testament was made to do duty 
for the entire school, the pupils reciting "out loud," 
and in concert. The teacher, who was too often 
an incompetent adventurer, either "boarded around," 
or traveled from house to house, spending part of 
the day instructing the children of each family. 
Sometimes he received his pay in produce, pork, 
beef, corn or tallow and in one instance at least, 
a calf. There was no fixed standard by which 
teachers' certificates were granted, the principal 
question asked the applicant being whether he could 
"keep order." 

The second Constitution of Illinois, which con- 
tinued from 1848 to 1870, made no special change 
relative to the school system, except to leave the 
whole matter in the hands of the General Assembly, 
with some encouraging references to favorable school 
legislation. The General Assembly in 1855, passed 
the first law establishing free school districts in 
each Township, sufficient in number to meet the 
necessities of the sparse population of that time. 
Two years later, in 1857, the General Assembly 
provided for the establishment of the First Normal 
School near Bloomington. Ten years later, in 1867, 
the State University was established at Champaign, 
and two years later, in 1869, the General Assembly 
provided for the establishment of the Normal School 
at Carbondale. Thus, we see our school system 
made a decided advancement under the two Consti- 
tutions, both in the elementary schools and in 
schools of higher grade. 

The third Constitution of Illinois, adopted in 1870, 



81 




/. W. McKinney 



James W. McKinney, minister, educator, 
and county superintendent of schools, was 
born in Williamson County, March 13, 1873. 
He was educated in the public schools and 
prepared for his chosen profession by attend- 
ing school at the S. I. N. U. at Carbondale 
and the Valparaiso University in Indiana. 
His executive ability was regarded and 




he taught seven rural schools, then he served 
as superintendent of city schools at Johnston 
City, Golconda, Carterville, and Creal 
Springs. 

Mr. McKinney is the eldest son of Mr. 
and Mrs. James H. McKinney, and was born 



and raised on a farm in Williamson County. 
He taught school twenty years. He was 
married to Miss Agnes Neilson in 1895. 
They have four children: Harvey Lee, 
Robert, Wendell and Ruth. The first named 
served fifteen months in the World War. 

He and his esteemed wife have always 
worked for the benefit of others. As a min- 
ister of the Baptist Church, he has preached 
the gospel for the entire time of his 25 years 
as teacher and county superintendent. He is 
a polished speaker, full of the spirituality 
that endears. 

An ardent Republican, he was the unani- 
mous choice of his party to represent the 
office of superintendent of schools, and his 
candidacy was received with favor by all 
classes, his worth and purity of character 
appealing to all who knew his record as a 
preacher and teacher. He was returned 
triumphantly at the polls last year, having 
no opposition in either party, and his later 
conduct of the office has more than justified 
the golden opinions held of him by the 
people. 

Mr. McKinney is a Mason, an Odd Fel- 
low, and is affiliated also with the Modern 
Woodmen and Woodmen of the World. He 
is a son of a veteran, is patriotic, and his 
citizenship has always been for the good of 
his country. He has done much for the 
betterment of matters and methods of teach- 
ing, and his interest in the welfare of Wil- 
liamson County is well known. 



82 




made more emphatic demands on the General 
Assembly for the expansion of the public school 
system. Article Eight, consisting of five Sections, is 
xj devoted exclusively to the subject of Public Schools. 
Section one of that Article declares that "the Gen- 
eral Assembly shall provide a thorough and efficient 
system of Free Schools, whereby all children of the 
State may receive a good common school education." 
By this time, the old districts had become inadequate 
for the rapidly increasing school population, and 
in order to make the school system more thorough 
and efficient, it became necessary to re-district the 
Townships and make the districts smaller. The 
new districts that were established were usually 
about two miles square, making nine in each Town- 
ship. Many districts formed at that time retain their 
original boundaries to this day. This establishment 
of our school system, gave much better school op- 
portunities than before. The branches provided by 
law for the rural and elementary schools at that 
time were called the seven common branches, and 
included orthography, reading, penmanship, arith- 
metic, grammar, geography, and United States his- 
tory. The first school house was built in 1825 and 
others soon followed. Some of the first school 
houses were built of gum logs, which sprouted, and 
had to be cleared about once a year. 

Williamson County was organized in 1839, and 
what has been said of the early days of New Eng- 
land, and of Illinois, is largely true of the pioneer 
days of Williamson County. The first teachers 
taught spelling, reading and writing; but in 1840, 
a few fine scholars came into the County who under- 
stood grammar and arithmetic. The free school 
law met a heavy opposition from some of our old 
men, and notwithstanding our school system has 
exerted a powerful influence in the civilization of 
the County, yet, it is still defective. 

A. N. Lodge, the first real superintendent, lifted 
up the sick form of the system, renovated and 
infused new life and destiny into it, until it was in 
a better condition than ever before; but it still 
needed talent. 

A teacher in those days, describing his first exam- 
ination, says: "The only question asked me at my 
examination was, what is the product of 25c times 
25c?" As this question did not occur in Pike's 
Arithmetic, I could not answer it. The examiner 
thought it was 6%c, but was not sure. We dis- 
cussed its merits for an hour or more, when he 
decided that he was sure I was qualified to teach 
school, and a first class certificate was issued. 

The first Official Record pertaining to the Public 
Schools of Williamson County, date from the year, 
A. D. 1840, when Mr. Wm. T. Tanner, School Com- 
missioner of the new County of Williamson, receipted 
Scion H. Mitchell, then School Commissioner of 
Franklin County, for Williamson County's share of 
the school funds. The records in the County Super- 
intendent's office at present, show that Mr. Tanner 



served as Commissioner for one year. He was suc- 
ceeded by Henry W. Perry, who also served one 
year. H. H. Mulkey served from 1842 to 1848; 
N. B. Calvert, from 1848 to 1856; J. H. Swindell 
from 1855 to 1859; John N. Calvert from 1859 to 
1860; W. H. Scoby, from 1860 to 1862; Wm. R. 
Scurlock, from 1862 to 1866; David G. Young, 
from 1866 to 1869. In Mr. Young's report of the 
schools of Williamson County, he says: "The matter 
of examination of teachers has been regarded as a 
matter of little importance, and the effect of such 
a course has been bad indeed. I cannot be as 
strict in the examination of teachers as I would 
like to be, for the number of applicants is not large, 
and if I should not give certificates to some who do 
not really deserve them, many districts would be 
without schools. We have few teachers who make 
teaching a profession; numbers have been in the 
habit of teaching, or rather tutoring a school, not 
because they liked teaching, but to secure the 
$200.00." 

The files in the office of the County Superin- 
tendent show that the first written report was made 
by William R. Scurlock in 1863. The contract is 
so striking with the reports made in the last few 
years, that it deserves to be given herein. Some 
statistics of the report are as follows: 'Number of 
teachers, 39; number of first grade teachers, 14; 
number of second grade teachers, 10; number of 
third grade teachers, 10; no expenditures for school 
furniture and apparatus; amount reported as ex- 
pense for repairs, $1.67; amount expended for teach- 
ing, 17,397.94; for all school purposes for the year 
1863, $9,194.59. At this time, Marion school dis- 
trict had five months of school. Other schools of 
the County ranged in terms from one to five 
months." David G. Young, above mentioned, and 
now called "County Superintendent" instead of 
"County School Commissioner," was succeeded by 
A. N. Lodge, who served from 1869 to 1877. He 
held the first County Institute. This Institute con- 
tinued five days, beginning December 27. The num- 
ber enrolled was fifty-five. Paid instructors, $4.00. 
Total expense of Institute, $12.00 Instructors were 
W H. Andrews, Dr. F. M. Straiten, Dr. J. D. F. 
Jennings, J. H. Patrick, Theodore James, Clark 
Broden, Dr. S. H. Bundy and J. H. Clemensten. 

At the expiration of A. N. Lodge's last term, 1877, 
Dr. J. M. Fowler was elected to serve until 1882. 
It was not until the expiration of Dr. Fowler's term, 
that the County Superintendent of Schools was al- 
lowed by law any stated or special salary for service, 
their emolument being 2 per cent for money dis- 
tributed and loaned, and such pay as the County 
Commissioner saw fit to allow them for actual official 
service rendered. 

During Mr. Fowler's term, a special effort was 
made to awaken a better professional interest among 
teachers, and this, by Teachers' Institutes. For 
some several years past, it seems all the efforts that 



83 




*, 






had been made were mostly as regarded the interest 
of the Institute. His report to the State Department 
in 1878, says in part: "Held ten days' institute. 
A great success. I am persuaded it has accom- 
plished much good. No provisions were made by 
the County Commissioners to help pay the expense 
for institute, and we had to charge a tuition fee 
sufficient to defray expenses. D. G. Ray, Instructor." 

It is clearly seen that the County Superintendent 
and the school interest in general were handicapped 
for lack of funds to pay instructors for the teach- 
ers' institute, which led to the passage of a law by 
our State Legislature, making provision for the 
adequate maintenance of an annual institute. 

John H. Duncan succeeded Mr. Fowler as County 
Superintendent, and served until 1890. During all 
this time, since the organization of the County, the 
old log school houses had been gradually giving 
place to frame buildings, with some pretense to 
comfort and convenience. The close of Mr. Dun- 
can's term. 1890. left only one log school house, 
an old Moss Covered Land Mark, of the early school 
days of Williamson County. This District, in 1893, 
replaced the log house with a frame building, to- 
gether with good board furniture, and some ap- 
paratus. The Teachers' Institute had become an 
established fact, provision having been made by the 
Legislature for payment of instructors and other 
necessary expense by requiring the applicant for 
certificate, to pay a fee of $1.00. During the term 
of Mr. Duncan as County Superintendent, the first 
step looking to the grading of the country, or com- 
mon schools, was made by suggesting the use of 
the Manual and Guide, a rudimentary course ot 
study introduced by John Trainer. Under this law, 
the first Township or Central and Final Examina- 
tions were held. The writer took the first Central 
examination held by Mr. Duncan, and had taken 
the next two, before he passed the required aver- 
age; also, during the last term of Mr. Duncan, the 
first volumes of a Teachers' County Library were 
bought, and the County Superintendent made 
Librarian. 

Dr. Duncan's successor was T. J. Youngblood, 
who served until 1898. By this time the County 
contained several good High Schools, which included 
Marion, Carterville, Creal Springs and Crab Orchard 
Academy, and Creal Springs College and Conserva- 
tory of Music. In addition to the support of the 
Annual Institute by law, the good of the schools 
demanded mor e meetings, and regular monthly 
teachers' meetings were held during -the school term 
at Marion or some other convenient point in the 
County. At these meetings, questions and problems 
were discussed which directly touched upon the 
duties of the hour. A course of professional reading 
for the teachers, recommended by a State Commit- 
tee, was also discussed. The State course, "Old 
Manual and Guide of Study," came in for some 
discussion at almost every meeting and was op- 




posed by not a few good teachers. The result of 
these meetings and an ambition of some of the 
teachers of the County to see what the other teach- 
ers of adjoining counties were using, resulted in the 
organization at Stone Fort, in February, 1893, of a 
Tri-County Union Teachers' Meeting, composed of 
the counties of Williamson, Saline and Johnston 
(since joined by Pope County). (This organization 
was dispensed with but a few years ago) . The 
writer taught his first six schools under Mr. Young- 
blood and holds a high regard for his work as 
superintendent. 

M. N. Swan was elected in the fall of 1898 to 
succeed Mr. Youngblood, and served until Decem- 
ber, 1902. Mr. Swan left a strong and helpful 
educational sentiment throughout the County. He 
emphasized the importance of professional prepara- 
tion, maintaining that qualification of teachers should 
and must be kept at par with the expenditures for 
school properties. The attendance at the annual 
institute and monthly teachers' meetings, show how 
well the teachers fell in with this professional im- 
provement. 

Mr. Swan was suceeded by R. O. Clarida, who 
served twelve years. During this time, the popu- 
lation of the County doubled in numbers. This, 
of course, increased the responsibility and perplex- 
ing problems along the teaching line. The number 
of teachers required in 1902, 159; in 1914, there 
were 320. The great growth made in educational 
lines is noticed in the value of school property 
increasing about 600 per cent within the past twelve 
or fifteen years. The most important along with 
the increased value of property, is the better school 
equipment and the better sanitary buildings and 
school conditions. Long before any State law was 
enacted, concerning properly lighting and ventilat- 
ing school buildings, Williamson County had several 
model school buildings, as suggested by the State 
Superintendent of Public Instruction. 

The Williamson County Fair Association has ren- 
dered great assistance along this particular line, first 
by erecting a model one room school building in the 
fair grounds. This, with liberal premiums offered 
every year, has given quite an impetus to the 
County. 

Williamson County at this time had four ac- 
credited High Schools, two of which were excellent 
Township High Schools, and with the requirements 
under the law for scholarship, and more adequate 
preparation, the County was better prepared to meet 
this law than a good many other counties not so 
well favored with excellent school conditions. 

Mr. Clarida was succeeded by J. W. McKinney, 
the present incumbent, who is putting forth efforts, 
not only to maintain, but to make continued progress 
along educational lines. He was elected in 1914, 
and again in 1918. Now we have the four High 
Schools before mentioned, which are accredited with 
the State University, all of which have made marked 



85 



ff ft - ff-ff 
^ 




OIST.49 SKAGGS 



JSJL. 



ES 




improvement. Marion High School is a member 
of the North Central Association. The Marion and 
Herrin Township High Schools have added several 
departments, including Domestic Science, Manual 
Training, and Agriculture. The number of teach- 
ers and enrollment of pupils in each of these High 
Schools have almost doubled within the past five 
years. Everything considered, we think these schools 
rank well with the best High Schools of Southern 
Illinois. Carterville and vicinity voted a new Com- 
munity High School District in 1918, and is now 
operating under the Community High School Board 
with increased efficiency. An adequate building will 
be erected in the near future. The Johnston City 
High School has been taken over by a new Town- 
ship High School District, voted in the Spring of 
1919, and is now operating under the new Township 
High School Board. The contract has been let for 
a new building to cost approximately $115,000.00. 
Besides these High Schools, Williamson County now 
has four High Schools, recognized by the State 
Department as follows: Creal Springs was given 
permanent recognition for three years of work in 
the year 1916. Hurst-Bush erected a fine building 
and organized a two years' High School course, 
which was given permanent recognition in the year 
1915. Stone Fort was given probationary recogni- 
tion for two years in the year 1915, and was changed 
to permanent recognition for a three years' course 
in the year 1918. Crab Orchard was given proba- 
tionary recognition for a two years' High School 
course in the year 1919. The enrollment in High 
Schools last year was 904 86 graduated. This year 
there were 509 eighth grade graduates and the 
number enrolled in the High School will be more 
than one thousand. Marion and Herrin are both 
building additions to accommodate the increased en- 
rollment, which will aggregate about $150,000.00. 

We need the advantages of the High School to 
prepare for the increasing demands of the day. 
There is no important avocation of life today but 
what is demanding a higher standard of education 
than ever before. All lines of business are demand- 
ing it. He who engages in business without the 
advantage of a liberal education will not have the 
same assurance of success as those who possess this 
education. The same is true in all the professions. 
The High School training is needed to prepare for 
the teaching profession, the medical profession, the 
legal profession and for the ministry. The profes- 
sional man today without the advantage of a liberal 
education, is a failure. 

In 1919, the General Assembly enacted a law 
creating a Non-High School District in all counties 
of the State, which is composed of all territory of 
the County not included in a Township High School 
District or a Community High School District, or a 
district maintaining a recognized four years' High 
School course, for the purpose of levying a tax to 
pay the tuition of all eighth grade graduates residing 



in such Non-High School District, including pupils 
attending a recognized two or three years High 
School, conducted by a local school district. This 
makes it possible for all eighth grade graduates to 
attend High School, and the expense for tuition will 
be paid by the Non-High School Board at the rate 
of the per capita cost of maintaining the High 
School attended. 

The number of tuition students and the amount 
of tuition paid to the respective High Schools for 
the year ending June 30, 1919, was as follows: 
Carterville, per capita cost, $62.00; tuition students, 
16; amount of tuition received from Non-High 
School territory, $1,006.10. Marion Township High 
School, per capita cost, $53.18; tuition students, 16; 
amount of tuition received from Non-High School 
territory, $724.83. Herrin Township High School, 
per capita cost, $55.00; tuition students, 5; amount 
is the tuition for 14 students at a per capita of 
$230.00. Johnston City, per capita cost, $54.30; 
tuition students, 8; amount of tuition received from 
Non-High School territory, $247.22. 

The following recognized High Schools are in 
Non-High School territory, and the Non-High School 
Board is required to pay the total cost of maintain- 
ing the High School, which was as follows: Creal 
Springs, 22 tuition students, at a per capita cost 
of $91.86; total tuition, $1,684.67. Stone Fort is 
located in two counties, Williamson County's part 
are the tuition for 14 students at a per capita of 
$107.91, counting only days present at school, 
amounting to $1,294.92. Hurst School had an en- 
rollment of 19 students at a per capita cost of 
$54.73, amounting to $1,040.00; the total amount 
of tuition paid by the Non-High School Board was 
$6,227.74. These tuitions being paid, not only makes 
it possible for all eighth grade graduates to attend 
High School, but it enables the Board of Education 
to maintain a better High School for those who 
attend. 

In 1915, the General Assembly enacted a Sani- 
tation law, standardizing the heating, ventilation, 
lighting, seating, water supply, toilets and safety 
against fire for the public school rooms and build- 
ings, making it the duty of the County Superin- 
tendent to inspect the plans and specifications for 
building and O. K. the same, and authorizing the 
withholding of the State funds of said districts until 
the minimum requirements of the new law be met. 
Williamson County led other counties in meeting 
this law, 50 new school buildings have been erected, 
and all but three of the remaining buildings of the 
County have been remodeled to meet the require- 
ments, 40 of which are almost the equivalent of 
new ones. We have been slow to standardize until 
every rquirement be made. At present, we have 
15 standardized schools, and about 60 others that 
could standardize with an expenditure of from 
$25.00 to $50.00. 



87 




All but about three schools have modern heaters,* 
single seats, slate blackboards, teacher's desk, a com-' 
plete set of wall maps, globe, dictionary and a fair 
library. A number have a large flag and a bell. 
The Boards of Education in the City Schools set 
aside a good sum for materials to be used by the 
teachers in construction work, drawing, writing, etc., 
and a number of the rural boards are coming to 
do the same. We believe that within the next two 
or three years most of these schools will be teaching 
the rudiments of music, serving hot lunches and 
make a number of other advanced steps. 

The organization of schools is much better than 
formerly, since every school in the County favors 
the Illinois State Course of Study. This not only 
insures a uniformity of work throughout the County 
and State, but pupils do the particular work best 
adapted to their each and every development, and 
their time is conserved, since there is but little or 
no repetition. The rural schools alternate, teaching 
first, second, third, fifth and seventh year's work 
in the terms beginning in the even years and the 
first, second, fourth, sixth and eighth year's work 
in the terms beginning in the odd years. By follow- 
ing the State Course, pupils are ready for the 
County Superintendent's examinations, and their 
work may be standardized and pupils prepared for 
promotion. We have a few teachers who oppose 
the State Course of Study, and they are "singing 
their last little song." 

The enrollment in the grades and High School 
is 14,434. The number of teachers the present year 
is 350, 50 of whom are High School teachers. The 
qualifications of the teaching body are as follows: 
Six are graduates of both a College and State Nor- 
mal School; 20 are graduates of a College only; 
28 are graduates of State Normal only; 40 are 
graduates of a four year High School, only; 4 have 
attended College; 237 have attended State Normal; 
7 have attended High School. The number and 
class of certificates held by teachers of Williamson 
County are as follows: Third class, 19; second 
class, 245; first class, 85; kindergarten certificates, 
6; special certificates, 8; High School certificates, 
19; Supervisor's certificates, 19; State certificates, 
5; total, 406. 

The amount of salaries paid teachers is 8204,- 
486.00. The total value of school property is $842,- 
450.00. The total number of books in the libraries 
of the schools, 12,519. 

The new certificating law requires that the teacher 
hold a certificate in keeping with the grade she is 
teaching, which insures a special preparation for the 
respective positions. A state examining board has 
been created, which passes upon the literary quali- 
fications of teachers, while the County Superintend- 
ent passes upon the moral qualifications and high 
professional attitude. 

A uniform professional credit sheet has been 
aHooted throughout the State, requiring all teachers 



employed, to earn 200 professional credits for re- 
newal, and registration of their certificates, and for 
teachers not employed, 100 professional credits. 
These credits are distributed so as to allow for 
successful teaching, attendance at the annual insti- 
tute, County meetings, National, State and Divi- 
sional meetings, local meetings, doing the State read- 
ing circle work and reading other professional books, 
school journals, attending school, making reports 
promptly, and such other credits as the County 
Superintendent may deem proper to extend their 
professional attainment. Thus, it will be seen, that 
a teacher cannot remain in the work without becom- 
ing a better teacher. 

The General Assembly enacted a State Teacher's 
Pension and Retirement Fund law for Illinois, 
which is managed by a board of trustees, and went 
into effect July 1, 1915. All teachers having con- 
tracts prior to that date were known as elective 
members, and may elect as they choose, any time 
prior to September 1, 1920. All teachers beginning 
July 1, 1915, are compulsory members, and their 
board of directors is required by law to check off 
one dollar per month for the first five months of 
their salary. There are three classes of contributors: 
Up to ten years of experience they pay one dollar; 
the second class, those who have taught more than 
ten years, but not more than fifteen years, pay two 
dollars per month; the third class are those who 
have taught more than fifteen years, who shall pay 
six dollars per month for the first five months of 
each school year. In addition to this money with- 
held from the teachers' salaries, the State contributes 
one-fifth of one mill annually to the support of this 
fund. When one has taught twenty-five years and 
attained the age of fifty years, she may retire on 
a pension of $400.00 a year. Williamson County 
has now about one hundred fifty contributors; 
three have retired and become annuitants. 

It will be interesting to note the contract between 
the last institute held August 18-22, 1919, and the 
first one held in the County. We held five days. 
The instructors were Dr. Robert A. Armstrong of 
the University of West Virginia; Dr. H. T. McKin- 
ney of the University of Illinois; Professor J. W. 
Yoder of Philadelphia; Miss Marie Burns of Free- 
port, 111. The enrollment was 326. The total cost 
of the institute was $509.00. Last year the Institute 
Fund had a balance on hand of $336.01. Besides 
the monthly teachers' meeting, held under the direc- 
tion of the County Superintendent, and a series of 
Township meetings held in each Township, the 
Teachers' Association annually votes an extra assess- 
ment of one dollar to maintain a two days' meeting 
following Thanksgiving, at which time the best 
talent in the country is secured, and a meeting equal 
to that of any educational meeting held in the State 
is brought to our County for the benefit of the 
teachers, officers, and as many of the patrons as 
may be interested. 



89 



m 







j 





Roll of Honor Service Men 
Williamson County Schools 



OREL TURNER 
CLIFTON L. BAKER 
LESLIE DEASON 
HENRY PRITCHETT 
LAWRENCE CHAMNESS 
HARRY MUNDELL 
CLAUDE HUDCENS 
LEO ODUM 

HERMAN L. KESSLER 
ELMER PULLEY 
ROBERT SIMMONS 
GEORGE CUTRELL 
A. R. LEDBETTER 
ROBERT LENTZ 
EARL SIMMONS 
0. L. RUSHING 
RAYMOND SMITH 
CHARLES SUMMERS 
W. B. HUGHES 
W. 0. ROESSLER 
OTTIE REESE 
J. ARTHUR WILLIAMS 
CARL GREGG 
BYRON PHILLIPS 
L. W. SHAKELFORD 
OREN COLEMAN 
ALVIN FELTS 
HUGH BELFORD 
LLOYD MCDONALD 

H. C. CRAIG 



FLOYD BRACEY 
ROBERT MORGAN 
LENN GRANT 
CARL CHAMNESS 
EARL MILLER 
LEONARD McARTHY 
WALTER GRAY 
GEORGE CAVITT 
RALPH BURNS 
E. B. BROCKETT 
DICKSON ODUM 
RALPH STRINGER 
JOSEPH BOZARTH 
ALVIN BRATTEN 
HARRY LENNON 
CARL ALLEN 
R. R. PYATT 
TROY WELPER 
ALBERT LEDBETTER 
I. A. PALMER 
THOMAS COBB 
EMERY WILLIAMS 
EUGENE ECKERT 
LEE McANELLY 
W. T. BATTS 
HOSEA STOTLER 
ELVIS HOLMES 
ALDEN DEATON 
CLAUDE FERRELL 



91 



=#==*=== 



55^S 





u ti^ n n 



WAR WORK OF THE SCHOOLS. 

The teachers of Williamson County have done 
their part in winning the great war. Some have 
returned, some are in the cantonments, and a num- 
ber are in France. However, we shall welcome 
them back as rapidly as their work is done, and 
their certificates shall be made valid without a fee. 
This Honor Roll represents some of our most suc- 
cessful teachers and they were equally successful 
in serving their country. 

We have come to the conclusion that working to 
win the war has improved school work. Our teach- 
ers agree that the war work has not interfered with 
the work of which the system of education is main- 
tained, but that on the other hand participation in 
these activities has resulted in very definite changes 
which will enable the schools to function much more 
completely as an educational institution. 

The public schools of Williamson County have sold 
"Thrift" and War Saving Stamps, Libnr'y Bonds. 
Organized Junior Red Cross Societies, sold Red Cross 
Seals, and otherwise contributed their part in this 
the greatest of all wars. All these with food con- 
servation and surveys increased the interest in arith- 
metic; the work in geography has been stimulated by 
studying relations that existed before the war with 
the changing conditions; the study of history has 
received a new impetus as the facts of the past are 
considered relative to their bearing on the present 
crisis. Other wars are now studied with a new 
motive. Other studies have likewise received new 
motivation. 

While the schools have bsnefitted, as above stated, 
they were on the other hand greatly handicapped. 
Millions of men were called into the army; hundreds 
of thousands, both men and women were needed for 
munition plants, ship-yards and other industries con- 
nected with the war. The burden of supplying food 
and raw material for the Allies was great. Calls 
for subscriptions to loans and other war work act- 
ivities were continued; the cost of living was much 
greater than before the war. With the decrease in 
the purchasing power of money, and the increase 
in the need for labor, wages increased to such an 
extent, that the temptation became even stronger 
for older boys and girls to leave school and work 
for wages, and for teachers to leave their work for 
other forms of employment in which the pay was 
larger. Many of the best teachers remained in the 
service of the schools, in the face of temptation of 
large pay elsewhere, which certainly was a patriotic 
service, worthy of mention. 

We shall speak of some of the work done by the 
schools as a whole, and later refer to individual 
schools. The Junior Red Cross work was universal. 
The report for the year ending April 1, 1919, showed 
a total of $1575.89 turned in from the schools and 
about 75 schools having contributed, many of which 
were 100 per cent. Following is a report by schools, 
which is not complete: 




DISTRICT NUMBERS: 2, $65.36; 3, $10.75; 5. 
$2.75; 8, $3.25; 11, $5.50; 12, $4.00; 15, $5.50; 
16, $3.50; 17, $28.75; 18, $12.50; 20, 6.00; 21, 
$7.00; 22, $20.75; 24, $23.75; 26, $5.25; 28, $10.00; 
33, $5.50; 34, $4.50; 36. $8.60; 40 $15.00- 41 
89.75; 42, $4.75; 45, $3.25; 46, $3.75; 48, 75c; 49, 
$7.25; 50, $9.75; 51, $36.00; 53, $3.10; 54, $12.50; 
55, $12.75; 56, $6.00; 57, $5.25; 61, $5.00; 62 
$14.00; 63, $8.75; 65, $4.50; 66. $8.00; 67, $23.75; 
71, $8.00; 72, $7.25; 78, $6.50; 83 $3.75; 89, $8.25; 
91, $12.50; 93, $7.75; 94, $17.50; 95, $7.75; 96, 
$7.00; 100, $4.75; 102, $24.00; 106, $3.75; 14, $8.00; 
85, $8.00; 109, $3.00; 107, $5.00; 108, $2.50; 113. 
$5.50; 114, $43.79; 116, $4.25. 

The schools were also organized for the purpose 
of selling Red Cross Seals. Most schools of the 
County sold a number of these, but for lack of 
space, we shall not mention the work done by in- 
dividual schools. Suffice it to say that several 
hundred Dollars worth of Red Cross Seals were 
sold by the schools. 

The county was organized by Townships for the 
purpose of entering into an essay contest for cap- 
tured German helmets, which were to be given for 
the best essay on "Why my father or mother should 
buy Victory Bonds." Each contestant was required 
to have his father or mother read the essay and 
endorse it as follows: "I have read and approved 
this essay." The City schools and Township High 
Schools were permitted to contest among them- 
selves. Eighteen helmets were given away, which 
goes without saying that the schools were more 
than instrumental in the selling of many Victory 
Bonds. 

Following is a brief account of the work done 
by some of the City schools: 

The Johnston City Schools wish Prof. C. J. Ram- 
sey, Supt., took an active part in the Y. M. C. A., 
Red Cross, and other war work, a Junior Red 
Cross being organized in the schools with a mem- 
bership of 824, some rooms being 100%. Also 
through the schools, $6,000.00 worth of Thrift and 
War Savings Stamps were sold by the children. 
A nice flag was offered by some leading citizens 
as a prize in a contest between the East Side and 
West Side Schools, thus creating much interest in 
the sale of War Savings Stamps. 

The Hurst Schools were very active in the war 
work. The school consists of 600 pupils, and every 
pupil became Junior Red Cross members. Most 
all bought Thrift Stamps, a number buying to the 
amount of $100.00. All helped in the raising of 
the flag, and in the Red Cross Drive, $750.00 was 
raised by the School. 

The Carterville schools enroll approximately 1000 
students. Through the efforts of Superintendent O. 
A. Towns and his efficient corps of teachers, the 
school was made 100% in Junior Red Cross mem- 
bership. A Red Cross Sewing Club was organized. 



93 



consisting of the sixth, seventh and eighth grades, 
under the leadership of Mrs. Brotherton. The girls 
labored gladly through the long summer months 
making some of the necessary articles that might 
prove a source of comfort to those suffering across 
the sea. The school took great interest in the Y. M. 
C. A. work, the largest amount given from any 
one room being $42.00, which won the prize, offered. 
On Red Cross County Tag Day, under the leader- 
ship of Mesdames O. A. Towns, Effie Dowell, and 
Tena Thompson, a contest was entered into by 
fourteen girls. These tags were to be sold for not 
less than 10 cents, and before night more than 
$200.00 had been realized from this sale. Two 
girls. Irene Stewart and May Brown selling through 
the day, $94.00 worth of tags. Thrift Stamps, 
Bonds and War Saving Stamps, received their share 
of attention. Nellie Rowatt, a pupil of the eighth 
grade, sold the largest amount of bonds through 
the schools, having sold $4000.00 worth at one 
time. During the remaining months of the war, 
the school participated in every activity, including 
the "Four Minute Men Essay", and when the 
struggle was finally ended, the Carterville schools 
could say, "We have at least done our best". 

The Marion City Schools were thoroughly or- 
ganized for the Junior Red Cross work. They 
contributed in 1917-18 and '19, about $950.00. They 
also contributed largely to the Y. M. C. A. and 
Army fund, considerable work was done by the girls 
in the schools in making clothing for the Belgian 
children and bandages for the wounded soldiers. 
They bought liberally of War Saving Stamps and 
Liberty Bonds, aggregating $25,000.00. The pupils 
were responsive to the needs of the times, and the 
spirit of patriotism and loyal service was ever pre- 
sent. Two teachers, Leon W. Grant and Hugh 
Belford responded to their Country's call, and were 
in active service in France. Marion City Schools 
are well organized. The welfare of the children 
is the first and fundamental proposition. Their 
aim is to make socially efficient boys and girls, and 
to help develop them into socially efficient men 
and women. Much credit is due city Supt. B. F. 
Parr. 

The Herrin City Schools, with Prof. Roy V. 
Jordan, Supt., did their part. Every one of the 
seven men teachers of the System, were registered 
for service. Of these, George Cutrell, Emry Wil- 
liams, E. B. Brockett, Robert Morgan and Eugene 
C. Eckert were either called to the colors or vol- 
unteered. These men went in the true spirit of 
service and made honorable records. A large num- 
ber of former pupils of the schools saw service, 




many of them over seas, where they made the 
supreme sacrifice and now rest beneath "The Lilies 
of France or Poppies of Flanders". All the teachers 
of the System gave a large amount of time in act- 
ing as advisors to the registrants in the filling of 
their questionnaires. When the school closed down 
for the "flu"' last November, the teachers spent a 
day canvassing the City for the "Fourth Liberty 
Loan". This canvass did a great deal to stimulate 
the sale of bonds among patrons of the school. 
The teachers turned in $6000.00 subscriptions as 
the result of the days work. The school helped 
in every "Drive" which the Government made. As 
soon as Thrift Stamps were issued, the schools be- 
gan their sale. There was also distributed all kinds 
of Government Bulletins. The Herrin City Schools 
organized a "Modern Health Crusade", which was 
promoted with great success. Eleven hundred 
pupils won the title of "Knights" in the Modern 
Health Crusade, and received Pins. To become a 
"Modern Health Crusader", and receive a certi- 
ficate of enrollment and the title of Page in Health 
Knighthood, each pupil was obliged to perform at 
least fifty-four chores for two weeks. Seventy-two 
chores per week a perfect record, while it is pos- 
sible to earn seventy-seven. From Page, the pupils 
advanced in rank as follows: Five weeks, Squire; 
Ten weeks, Knight; and fifteen weeks. Knight Ban- 
neret. The result of the Modern Health Crusade, 
was physical improvement and preventing disease 
among children and their families, moral discipline 
through regular attendance hygenic duties and the 
awakening of community responsibility. The total 
number enrolled in the Health Crusade in the Her- 
rin City Schools, was 1302. There were 1244 who 
ranked as Squires and 1168 as Knights. 

The Creal Springs City Schools, Prof. John Stout, 
Supt., and the Stone Fort Schools, Prof W. Ray 
Holloway, Supt., were organized for War Activites 
and made excellent records. The Weaver school 
won honor in the sale of War Saving Stamps. Other 
schools deserve individual mention, but we are 
compelled to end our story for lack of space. 

The Marion and Herrin Township High Schools 
are to write an individual story. 

Now that the war is over and the days of re- 
construction have come, the call upon this Country 
for men and women of the highest and best training 
for help in rebuilding the world is also large and 
insistent. This help is to be supplied largely 
through the education of our schools. Then let us 
endeavor to keep our schools of all grades, up to 
the fullest measure of efficiency, and secure as 
far as possible, the maximum attendance. 



: 
: 
: 



95 



I 

' 




MARION CITY SCHOOLS 





S J ^ 7 ^ g7 ^ 7 ? 1*1 



Personnel Williamson County Schools 



TOWNSHIP TRUSTEES. 
TOWNSHIP 8-1. 

Ernest Alsop, Blalrsville, 111. 

Tobe Snyder, Colp, 111. 

James M. Rollo Herrin, 111. 

TOWNSH-P 8-2. 
J. H. Norman,. .Johnston City, 111. 

F. M. Roberts, Herrin, 111. 

H. P. LaMaster Herrin, 111. 

TOWHSHIP 8-3. 

W. H. Fowler,.. Marion, 111. R. 1. 
M. Sherertz,..Pittsburg, 111., R. 1. 
Wm. Allen,.. Pittsburg, 111., R. 1. 

TOWHSHIP 8-4. 

H. S. Stewart,.. Thompsonville, 111. 
J. D. Malone, . .Thompsonville, 111. 
M. H. Hendrickson, . Pittsburg, 111. 

TOWNSHIP 9-1. 

J. C. West, Carterville, 111. 

P. H. Williams,.... Carterville, 111. 
H. P. Grain, Carterville, 111. 

TOWNSHIP 9-2. 

D. T. Owens,.. Marion, 111., R. 6. 
L. D. Hartwell, Marion, 111. 

G. W. Cannady, Marion, 111. 

TOWNSHIP 9-3. 

W.H. Motsinger. .Marion, 111. R. 3. 
K. S. Wadkins.. Marion, 111., R. 2. 
Will Rector.... Marion, 111., R. 2 

TOWNSHIP 9-4. 

Lusco Parks, Pittsburg, 111. 

J. M. Corder, Marion, 111. 

J. F. Fivash,..Crab Orchard, 111. 

TOWNSHIP 10-1. 

Nat. Penland.. Carterville, 111., R. 2. 
H. Richardson,. Carterville, 111. R.2 
Orie Ogdon,.. Carterville, 111. R. 2. 

TOWNSHIP 10-2. 

A. J. Miller,... Marion 111., R. 5. 
H. N. Kelley,. .Goreville, 111., R. 1. 
W. J. James,.. Goreville, 111., R. 2. 

TOWNSHIP 10-3. 
T.M. Camden,. .Creal Springs, 111. 

D. Odum, Creal Springs, 111. 

J. A. Slagar,. .Creal Springs, 111. 

TOWNSHIP 10-4. 

J. F. Parks,. .. .Creal Springs, 111. 
W. Tanner, .... Creal Springs, 111. 
R. Carter, Creal Springs, 111. 

SCHOOLS AND TEACHERS 

TEACHERS No. and Dist. 
2. McKinley, Daisy Edwards; 3. Pond 
Creek, Charles Pogue ; 4. Fairview, 
George L. Ray; 5. Corinth, Mrs. Jennie 
Malone; 6. Pleasant Grove, John R. 
Stewart; 7. Partridge. Virgil B. Dooley ; 
8. Brick. Theodore Dean; 9. Concord, 
Lulu Odum; 10. Williams Prairie. James 
R. McAnelly: 11. Harris, Albert Backer; 
12. Leigh. William Oeth. 



DIST. 13. JOHNSTON CITY 

C. J. Ramsey, Supt. 
HIGH SCHOOL 

Principal W. G. Lathrop ; Latin and 
English Ruth M. Miller; Mathematics- 
Hazel G. MacCracken. 
WASHINGTON SCHOOLS 

Principal Florence Hill; 8th Grade- 
Dora Richerson; 7th Grade Beatrice Un- 
derwood; 6th Grade Virginia Mozley; 
6th and 5th Grade Fannie Prove; 5th 
Grade Ethel Jones; 4th Grade Rosalie 
Russell; 3rd and 4th Delsia Gibson; 
3rd Grade Verna Bell; 1st and 2nd 
Irene Stewart; 1st Grade Ruth Hyre ; 
1st Grade Jewell Jones. 
JEFFERSON SCHOOLS 

Principal L. D. Swan; 6th Grade 
Mattie Lane; 5th Grade Marie Wheat- 
ley; 4th Grade Mabel McGowan; 4th 
Grade Mayme Youngblood ; 3rd Grade 
Mary Matthews; 3rd Grade Lanore Dill- 
man ; 2nd Grade Grace Murrah ; 2nd 
Grade Alice Odaniell; 1st Grade Marie 
Stanley; 1st Grade Sylvia Henson. 
CENTRAL SCHOOLS 

Principal Lucy Taylor; 4th Grade 
Edna Fox; 3rd and 2nd Grades Era 
Rector; 1st Grade Linnie Jones; 14. 
Jeffersonville Ethel Rush; 15. Grand 
Center D. O. Davis; 16. Liberty 
Lenna Jent; 17. Union Grove Lela 
Sanders; 18. Fowler Mrs. Berta God- 
dard ; 19. Western Star Daisy Kelley ; 
20. Schoharrie O. R. Kerley, Prin.; 
Otha Kerley; Frances Veach ; 21. Chitty- 
ville A. W. Hundley, Prin.; Bessie 
Kirk; 22. Boyd Knob Ada English. 
Prin.; Mae English; 23. Ferges Pearl 
Chamness, Prin.; Hazel Peterson; 24. 
Bandyville Mrs. Alma Sanders. 

DIST. 25. HERRIN 
R. V. Jordan, Supt. 

E. B. Brockett, (Sup't. of Music and 
Drawing) ; Belle Longbons, Violin. 
STOTLAR SCHOOL, S. 14TH ST. DE. 

PARTMENT SCHOOL. J. R. Creek, 

Principal. 

J. R. Creek, History; Mrs. Anna 
Buckner, Arithmetic ; Carmen Young- 
blood. Penmanship; Mrs. C. L. Ben- 
ninghof, Grammar; Mrs. Ethel Walston, 
Geography; Mrs. Blanche Higdon, Read* 
ing; Louis Gram, Spelling; Mrs. Frances 
Hickok, 4th Grade; Noma Cocke, 4th 
Grade; Louis Belts, 6th Grade; Pauline 
Sheppard. 3rd Grade. 
POPE SCHOOL, S. 14TH ST., J. R. 

Creek, Principal. 

Nellie Aikman, 6th Grade; Mabel Al- 
liston, 6lh Grade; Edith Sutton, 6th 
Grade; Gertrude Ncely, 5th Grade; J. 
Arthur Williams, 5th Grade; Oma 
Bridges, 5th Grade; Bessie Atwell, 3rd 
Grade; Blanche DeLoach, 3rd Grade; 
Olean Jenkins. 2nd Grade; Mary Good- 
all. 2nd Grade: Florence Edwards. 1st 
Grade ; Donnie Bratcher, Assistant ; Lena 
Hudgens, 1st Grade; Grace Walker, As- 
sistant. 
PERRINE SCHOOL, 22'D AND OAK 

STS. 

O. W. Oliver. Prin. 5th Grade; Bes- 
sie McDaniell, 4th Grade; Hattie Nelson, 
3rd Grade; Gladys Ackman, 2nd and 
3rd Grades; Hazel Hill, 2nd Grade; 
Maude Walker, A Primary; Elsie Earth, 
B Primary; Ara Mornin, Assistant. 

97 



HARRISON SCHOOL 

Eugene Eckert, Prin. 4th Grade; Le- 
ora Bozarth, 3rd and 4th Grade ; Elsie 
McArthy, 3rd Grade; Florence Pope, 2nd 
Grade ; Marie Margrave, 2nd Grade ; 
Louise Doerr, 1st and 2nd Grade ; Er- 
byl Gram, A Primary; Mrs. E. N. Creek, 
B Primary ; Mary Batson, Assistant ; 
Mrs. Myrtle Carey, Assistant ; Vera 
Whitlock, Assistant; 26. North Bend 
Beulah Lewis. 

DIST. 27. HURST 
H. A. Wilson Supt. 

Gladys Morse, Nannie Hundley, Fern 
Crawford, Ruby Bales, Edith Deason, 
Bessie Peer, Dorothy Vaughan, 28. 
Blairsville Ida Avery, Prin. ; Effie 
Cletcher ; 29. Colp Rodger Tippy, 
Prin.; Claire Watts; Pearl Roberts; Os- 
sie B. Tygett. 

Lola Autry, Prin. ; Bessie Sadberry, 
Grace N. Cowper; 30. Sunny side Tom- 
mie O'Neal (N. Side), Mary Hartwell, 
Clarie E. Mornin, John Alexander, Prin. 
(S. Side) ; Mae Alexander; 31. Dew- 
maine T. L. Alston, Prin. (Col.); Fan- 
nie Lamberg, Myrtle V. Howard, Elva 
Redden (White School); 32. Cambrai 
Don Moss, Prin.; Verna Opal Pulley, 
Vcrn L. King; 33. West Beaver Cecil 
Jack; 34. Eight Milo Ruth Bauder. 

DIST. 35. CARTERVILLE 
O. A. Towns Supt 

HIGH SCHOOL 

A. C. Ray, Principal; Mildred M. 
Maschmcier, Helen D. Craig, Belle 
Wooldridge ; Department School Agnes 
Stewart, Gaynell Dempsey-Griffin, Zoe 
McNeill ; 6th Grade Minnie Greer, 
Maud Spires; 5th Grade Sara White- 
sides, Mabel Towns, Ruth Lauder; 4th 
Grade Lottie Elder. Violet Wagner ; 
3rd Grade Vada Greer, Ruth Rowatt ; 
2nd Grade Lena Beasley, Beatrice 
Dowell ; 36. Hurricane Raymond Child- 
ers; 37. Crainville John L. Spires, 
Prin. ; Anna D. Payne, Libbie Moulton ; 
38. Foreville Julia Williamson ; 39. 
Stone Lela McCormick; 40. North Ag- 
nes Ferrill ; 41. Hayton Fay Grain ; 42. 
West Hampton Walter Gray ; 43. String- 
town Mrs. Ida Spires ; 44. East Hamp- 
ton Lillie Stroud ; 45. Chamness Pearl 
Gray ; 46. Whittier Fay Arms ; 47. 
Whiteville Mrs. Nora Lily Grant ; 48. 
Bainbridge Nancy Ballard ; 49. Skaggs - 
Mary Chamness ; 50. Mission Ridge 
Ruth Aikman ; 51 . LaMaster O. P. 
Brown, Prin.; Ruth Cloud, Ada Blake. 

DIST. 52. MARION 

B. F. Parr, Supt. 

SEVENTH AND EIGHTH GRADE DE- 
PARTMENTS 

Elmer Finley, Prin. ; Ada Edwards, 
Ellen Simmons White, Fannie Barham, 
Mae Carmical, Ethel Woodard, Bertha 
Neely, Marie Campbell, Arizona Russell. 
Floy Welton Miller, Sewing ; Eugene 
Grant, Manual Training; Helen Morris, 
Music Supervisor ; Marie Sutherland 
Fourth Grade ; Florence Mercer Third 
Grade; Nelle Jenkins Second Grade; 
Mary Dowell First Grade. 







LOGAN SCHOOL 

Sixth Grade, Departmental Roy L. 
Shirley, Prin. ; Robbie Lawrence, Kath- 
ryn Mozley ; Cecil True Fifth Grade; 
Bessie Horsley Fourth Grade; Elizabeth 
Longbons Third Grade; Alma Groves 
Second Grade; Mabel Dunaway First 
Grade. 

JEFFERSON SCHOOL 

D. O. Jones, Prin. Fifth Grade; 
Maud Wilson Fifth Grade; Stella Mc- 
Arathy Fourth Grade; Ethel H. Holmes 
Third and Fourth Grade; Mary Borum 
Third Grade ; Myrtle Garrison Second 
Grade; Grace McDonald First and Sec- 
ond Grades; Lora Campbell First 
Grade. 
McKINLEY SCHOOL 

Sixth Grade, Departmental: W. W. 
Kimmel, Prin.; Parlee Aikman. Birdie 
Mathis; Edith Owen Fifth Grade; Eve- 
lyn Forester Fourth Grade; Belva Hun- 
ter Third Grade; Nellie Mercer Sec- 
ond Grade; Bessie Wolf First Grade. 
LINCOLN SCHOOL 

M. N. Swan, Prin. Fifth Grade; 
Mrs. W. B. Hughes Fourth Grade; 
Mrs. Luda Hancock Third Grade; Mrs. 
Henrietta Oglesby Second Grade; Ter- 
zah Carver First Grade; Helen Pa- 
quotle First Grade. 
DOUGLAS SCHOOL (Colored) 

B. F. Washington, Prin. ; Florence 
Johnson . 
RURAL SCHOOL 

Dist. 53. Thorn Thicket Mrs. Ger- 
trude Moore; 54. Spillertown Charlie 
Bradley, Prin.; Lula Kerley, Effie Gul- 
ley; 55. Cross Roads Edw. P. Fosse: 
56. Crabtree Rhomaine Henderson; 57. 
Cherry Valley Hobart Motsinger; 58. 
Corley Letha White; 59. Wilson- 
Gladys G. Grobe; 60. Pulley Kate 
Sturm; 61. Pleasant Grove Norvel 
Shreve; 62. Crab Orchard Lyman E. 
Davis, Prin.; Verna E. Shreve; 63. 
Motsinger Mabel Neely; 64. Parks Ir- 
vin Nolen ; 65. Center A. A. Clarida ; 
66. Possom Valley S. C. Shreve; 67. 
Weaver D. S. Holmes, Prin.; Marion 
McCall, Nell H. Trovillion; 70. White 
Mina Wasson ; 71. Mayhew Lynn 
Shreve; 72. Black Ina Sims; 73. Shel- 
ton Fern Reed Neely ; 74. Arnold Lola 
M. Shreve; 75. Wright Elizabeth Lol- 
less; 76. Henshaw C. N. Gilley; 77. 
Stonefort W. Ray Holloway. Prin.; 
Noma Davis, (H. S.) ; Earl Edmondson. 
Myrtle Ellen Martin; Fern G. Black- 
man, Chloe Joyner; 78. Pleasant Valley 
Frank Simmons; 79. Oak Grove W. 
H. Schafer; 80. Free Silver J. W. 
Rose; 81. Creal Springs John H. Stout. 
Supt. ; Theodore Lollar, (H. S.) I. L. 
Gifford. Mae Chamness, Ruth Lunn. 
Rubby Mayer. Flo Copeland ; 82. Odum- 
berg Fred Simpson; 83. Willeford 
George Sturm: 84. Donaldson Elsie 
Simpson; 85. Howerton Thelma Demp- 
sey; 87. White Oak Elvia Holmes; 88. 
Kimmel Randolph Howerton ; 89. Moake 
Finnie Borum; 90. Serilda George W. 
Ward; 91. Good Hope Elmer Hicks; 
92. Neilson H. J. Rodgers; 93. Lentz 
--Ruby Simmons; 94. Cooksey Tillif 
Sturm; 95. Robinson Carl Jack; 96. 
Meneese T. R. Blankenship ; 97. Poplar 
Grove W. S. Gray; 98. Crain Mary 
Onstott; 99. Flats Secel B. Terry; 100. 
Armstrong Eldo Taylor; 101. Ogden 
Claude Cox; 102. Oak Grove Eva Mae 
Futrell; 103. Wolf Creek Hubert Hill; 
104. Palestine Bertha Lindle ; 105. Ren- 
clleman O. R. Damron ; 106. Cana 
Mrs. Delia Bain: 107. Mann C. M. Ed- 
wards; 108. New Hope Raiman Dam- 
ron: 109. Oaks Myles Webb; 110. 



Phelps May Brandon; 111. Clifford 
C. S. Barnett, Prin. ; Helen Barnett, 
Emma Stonum, Emma Vaughan, Edna 
Throgmorton. Lela Moon (Col.); 112. 
Energy Zilpha McKinney. Prin.; Ethel 
Chamness, Marie Williams: 113. East 
Beaver Earl Collard. Ruth Stroud ; 114. 
Pittsburg Herrin Jones, Nellie Byars; 
115. Centerfield Delia Davis; 116. 
White Ash J. L. D. Hartwell, Ethel 
Jackson, Glenn B. Webb, Osha B. San- 
ders. 

DIST. 200. TWP. H. S. 

Arno Bratton, Prin.; Erwin Touve. 
Manual Training; Sue Dibble. Language; 
Ada V. McCall, English; Lenora Brewer, 
Commercial; Ruth Bentley, History; Au- 
gustus Sisk, Mathematics; Margaret Por- 
ter, Mathematics; Mae L. Ormsby, 
Chemistry and Biology; Edwin H. 
Schrieber, Physics and Athletics; Velma 
Dumas, Music; Ruth Michaelis, Home 
Economics; Agnes Kennedy. History and 
English: Adwina Day, English. (To take 
place of Caroline W. Ewing.) 

DIST. NO. 201. 
HERRIN TOWNSHIP HIGH SCHOOL 

M. L. Bcanblossom, Prin.; Lois Ben- 
son. Mathematics; Mae Trovillion, Eng- 
lish; Hester E. Renard. History; C. L. 
Benninghof, Science; Ethel Butler, 
Commercial; Marion E. Price, Home 
Economics; Anna E. Cotton, Language; 
J. R. Pulley. Manual Training; T. L. 
Alston, (Colored Dept.) 

TOWNSHIPS SCHOOL 
TREASURERS 

8-1 P. H. Weir, Herrin. 

8-2 John Herrin, Herrin. 

8-3 W. E. Moore, Johnston City. 

8-4 F. C. Roberts, Thompsonville, 

R. F. D. 

9-1 M. W. Sizemore. Carterville. 
9-2 E. S. Blankenship, Marion, R. 

R. 5. 

9-3 H. C. Klope. Marion. R. F. D. 
8-4 Ceo. S. Parks, Pitts. R. F. D. 
10-1 James A. Chitty, Carterville, R. 

R. 2. 

10-2 Thomas Miller, Goreville, R. F. D. 
10-3 R. M. Camden. Creal Springs. 
10-4 J. M. Edmondson. Creal Springs, 

R. F. D. 

M. S. D. No. 52, T. J. Youngbloo-l. 
Marion. 

DIRECTORS 

The following arrangement is ob- 
served throughout this directory: 

1. President of School Board. 

2. Clerk of School Board. 

3. Other Members of School Board. 

TOWNSHIP 8-1 
District No. 26 North Bend School. H. 

N. Lenon. 
District No. 27 Hurst Bush School. 

J. W. Buzbec, Hurst, III.; O. E. 

Sutton, Hurst; J. B. Treadway, 

Hurst; E. T. Oneall, Hurst; W. R. 

Clark. Bush; W. E. Hosier. Bush. 
District No. 28 Blairsville School. Jno. 

Simpkins, Blairsville; Ves Tanner, 

Blairsville; Ceo. Clark, Blairsville. 
District No. 29 Colpville School. W. 

L. Hudson, Colp.; Herman Vancil. 
District No. 30 Sunnyside School. G. 

M. Telfrcy, Herrin, R. F. D. ; Mrs. 

J. E. Adams, Herrin, R. F. D.; Dock 

Steward. Carterville. R. R. 1. 
District No. 31 Dewmaine School. A. 

W. Springs, Dewmaine; H. E. Davis. 

Dewmaine; A. J. Bowers, Dewmaine. 

98 



District No. 32- Cambria School. 
District No. 33 West Beaver. J. E. 

Lovelace, Cambria; Herman Phillips. 

DC Solo, R. R. 2; W. H. Walker, 

De Solo, R, R. 2. 

District No. 67 Weaver School. 
District No. Ill Clifford Schools. E. 
A. Kilbreath, Richard Davis. 

District No. 113 East Beaver. Frank 
Lansford, Carterville, R. F. D. ; 
Grant Cruse, Carterville, R. F. D. ; 
James Broshears, Carterville, R. F. D. 

District No. 2f Schoharrie School. J. 
M. Richmond, West Frankfort, R. F. 
D.; Robt. Richmond, West Frank- 
fort, R. F. D. ; Will Smith, West 
Frankfort, R. F. D. 

District No. 21 Chittyville School. Ira 

L. Davis, Herrin ; Leonard Shelby, 

Herrin; J. E. Smith, Herrin. 
District No. 22 Boyd Knob School. 

L, L. Sanders, Johnston City, R. R. 

1 ; E. M. White, Johnston City, R. 

R. 1; Otis Sanders, Marion, R. R. 2. 
District No. 23 Ferges School. Rick 

Reed, Marion, R. R. 6; Otto Grant, 

Marion, R. R. 6; Chas. Cox, Marion, 

R. R. 6. 
District No. 24 Bandyville School. 

Alvin Reed, Herrin ; Albert Bandy, 

Herrin ; Matt Watson, Herrin. 
District No. 112 Energy School. Amos 

Rushing, Energy; John Cross, Energy; 

James Kilbreath, Energy. 
District No. 115 Centerfield School. 

Milo Kirk. Herrin; Albert Parsons. 

Herrin; Fred Sherrard, Herrin. 

District No. 25 Board of Education. 
Ilerrii. City Schools, D. C. Grear, 
Herrin; W. L. Smith. Herrin; A. T. 
Pace, Herrin; Joe E. Grizzcll, Her- 
rin ; Ben A. Pope, Herrin ; U. L. 
Walker, Herrin ; Columbus Brown, 
Herrin. 

District No. 201 Board of Education. 
Herrin Township High School. J. M. 
Bailie, Herrin; J. H. Yuill, Herrin: 
W. J. Sneed, Herrin; N. M. Me- 
Neill, Herrin; H. O. Fowler, Herrin; 
Carl Neilson, Hcrrin ; L. V. Clinc, 
Herrin. 

District No. 10 Williams Prairie. Cal- 
vin Rains, West Frankfort, R. R. 3; 
T. J. Dorris. West Frankfort, R. R. 
3; John Slicker, West Frankfort, R. 
R. 3. 

District No. 11 Harris School. Will 
Jent, West Frankfort, R. R. 3; An- 
ton Eherhart, Johnston City, R. R. 1 ; 
L. O. Blades, West Frankfort, R. 
R. 3. 

District No. 12 Leigh School. Roy 
Jent, Johnston City, R. R. 1 ; P. M. 
Collins. Johnston City, R. R. 1. 

District No. 13 Board of Education, 
Johnston City Schools. Frank Rice, 
Johnston City; E. W. Stilley, John- 
ston City; Geo. Dodson, Johnston 
City; W. S. Dorrety, Johnston City; 
J. H. Pembcrton, Johnston City; 
Frank Shelton, Johnston City; J. T. 
Hunter, Johnston City. 

District No. 14 Jeffersonville School. 
M. C. Roberts, Johnston City, R. R. 
1; Elmer Samples. Johnston City; 
Frank Hoffart, Johnston City. 

District No. 15 Grand Center School. 
A. A. Becker, Marion, R. F. D. ; E. 
S. Jent, Johnston City, R. R. 1; 
D. O. Davis Johnston City, R. R. 1. 

District No. 16 Liberty School. J. T. 
Wilhite. Johnston City, R. R. 1 ; Geo. 
Hunter. Johnston City, R. R. 1 ; Web 
Smith. Johnston City. R. R. 1. 







District No. 17 Union Grove School. 
Mon Owens, Johnston City, R. R. 1 ; 
N. G. Riggs, Pittsburg, R. R. 1; G. 
W. Clark, Johnston City, R. R. 1. 
District No. 18 Fowler School. J. L. 
Owens, Marion, R. R. 1; J. H. Her- 
[in-tuii. Johnston City, R. R. 1; R. 
W. Hudgens, Marion, R. R. 1. 
District No. 19 Western Star School. 
Fred Spiller, Marion, R. R. 1; Oli- 
ver Atwood, Marion. R. R. 1 ; Ezra 
Jones, Marion, R. R. 1. 
District No. 114 Pittsburg School. 
Roy Craig, Pittsburg; H. C. Duty, 
Pittsburg; Aud Felts, Piltsburg. 
District No. 116 White Ash Schools. 
H. N. Sanders, White Ash; T. H. 
Nelson, White Ash; H. L. Phelps, 
White Ah. 
District No. 68 Union School. (Mostly 

in Franklin County.) 
District No. 204 Board of Education, 
Johnston City Township High School. 
D. H. Henson, Johnston City; S. S. 
Vick, Johnston City; Frank Wentee, 
Johnston City; A. A. Pearce. John- 
ston City; Fred Becker, Marion, R, 
R. 1. 

TOWNSHIP 8-4 

District No. 2 McKinley School. H. 
C. Sanders, Thompsonville, R- F. D.; 
Henry Arms, Thompsonville, R. F. 
D. ; Leamon Finney, Thompsonville, 
R. F. D. 

District No. 3 Pond Creek School. 
Marshall Edwards, Thompsonville, R. 
F. D. ; Anna Hedge, Thompsonville, 
R. F. D. ; Flora Price, Thompson- 
ville, R. F. D. 

District No. 4 Fairview School. J. H. 
Williams. Pittsburg; R. O. Roberts. 
Pitlsburg; W. W. Smith, Thompson- 
ville. 

District No. 5 Corinth School. Clark 
Stewart. Thompsonville; J. F. Rob- 
erts, Thompsonville; J. W. Williams, 
Thompsonville. 

District No. 6 Pleasant Grove. Oscar 
Fletcher, Thompsonville; J. R. Bar- 
low, Thompsonvillc; J. T. Richey, 
Thompsonville. 

District No. 7 Partridge School. Mood 
Smothers, Thompsonville. R. F. D. ; 
C. R. Phillips. Thompsonville, R. F. 
D. ; Chas. Bridges. Thompsonville, 
R. F. D. 

District No. 8 Grant School. M. A. 
West, Thompsonville; A. J. Doughty, 
Pittsburg. R. F. D. ; M. L. Banks, 
Pittsburg, R. F. D. 

District No. 9 Concord School. J. W. 
Greeny; Pittsburg, R. F. D. ; T. C. 
Blades, Pittsburg, R. F. D. ; O. R. 
Hankins. Pittsbure. R. F. D. 

District No. 86 (Mostly in another 
County.) 

TOWNSHIP 9-1 

District No. 34 Eight Mile School. 
Ed Sanders, Carbondale, R. F. D. ; 
Ed Sterns, Carbondale. R. F. D. : 
Noble Hammond, Carbondale. R. F. 
D. 

District No. 35 Board of Education, 
Carterville City School. J. C. West. 
Carterville; C. I. Hammock. Carter- 
ville: Frank Impson. Carterville; L. 
E. Watson. Carterville: Fred Rich- 
art. Carterville. Mike Ferrell. Carter- 
ville ; Arthur Baker, Carterville. 

District No. 36 Hurricane School. 
Sylvester Barwick, Carterville; Aha 
Lanagan, Carterville. 

District No. 37 Crainville Schools. H. 
L. McNeill, Carterville, R. F. D. ; Lee 
Emery. Carterville, R. F. D. ; Oscar 
Wynn. Carterville, R. F. D. 



District No. 38 Foreville School. 

Cha. Hock, Carterville, R. F. D. ; 

M. S. Russell, Carterville, R. F. D. ; 

John Richardson, Carterville, R. F. D. 
District No. 39 Stone School. Henry 

Benton. Carterville. R. F. D. ; S. H. 

William.. Carterville, R. F. D. ; Jeff 

Swafford, Carlcrville, R. F. D. 
District No. 40 North School. John 

Province. Carterville, R. F. D.; T. 

H. North, Carterville. R. F. D. ; 

James North, Carterville, R. F. D. 
District No. 41 Hayton School. George 

Hayton, Carterville, R. F. D. ; Milo 

Phemister, Carterville, R. F. D. ; 

G. A. Phemisler. Carterville, R. F. D. 
District No. 42 West Hampton. J. T. 

Cagle, Carterville, R. F. D. ; Tony 

Hampton, Cartcrville, R. F. D. ; Er- 

win Hampton, Carterville, R. F. D. 
District No. 43 Stringtown School. 

Roger Tippy, Carterville, R. F. D. ; 

Irvin Phemister, Carterville, R. F. D. ; 

W. M. Taylor, Carterville, R. F. D. 
District No. 44 East Hampton School. 

W. J. Hunsaker. Carterville, R. F. 

D. ; G. W. Chilclers, Carterville, R. 

F. D. ; Charles Spence, Carterville. 

R. F. D. 

TOWNSHIP 9-2 
District No. 45 Chamness School. D. 

M. Chamness, Marion, R. F. D. : 

Chas. Cagle, Carterville, R. F. D.; 

J. S. Chamness, Carterville, R. F. D. 
District No. 46 Whittier School. Ed. 

McAlpin. Marion, R. F. D. ; C. L. 

Byars. Marion. R. F. D. ; F. B. 

Clendennin, Marion, R. F. D. 
District No. 47 Whiteville School. 

John Henderson, Marion, R. F. D. ; * 

John Crenshaw, Marion, R. F. D. ; 

Ed Eignranch, Marion, R. F. D. 
District No. 48 Bainbridge School. 

Jacob Wohnwend, Jr.. Marion, R. F. 

5; A. E. Stephens, Marion, R. R. 5; 

T. E. Dugger. Marion. R. R. 5. 
District No. 49 Skaggs School. Thorn- 

as Fleming, Marion, R. R. 5; J. W. 

Tippy, Marion, R. R. 5; Herbert 

Rush, Marion, R. R. 5. 
District No. 50 Mission Ridge School. 

E. P. Fosse. Marion. R. R. 5; Robt. 

Sparks, Marion, R. R. 5. 
District No. 51 LaMaster School. C. I. 

Pease, Marion, R. F. D.; Rufus Dun- 

can, Marion, R. F. D. ; Roscoe Jeter. 

Marion. R. F. D. 
District No. 52 Board of Education, 

M. S. D. 
District No. 200 Board of Education, 

Marion Township High School. 

TOWNSHIP 9-3 
District No. 53 Thorn Thicket School. 

A. H. Mclnturff. Marion. R. R. 4; 

Elmer Newton, Marion, R. R. 4; 

Wm. F. Pape, Marion, R. R. 4. 
District No. 54 Spillerlown School. 

Oliver Travelstead, Marion, R. R. 1 ; 

L. R. Dunn. Marion, R. R. 1; T. P. 

Taylor. Marion, R. R. 1. 
District No. 55 Cross Roards School. 

A. M. Spitzness. Marion, R. F. D. ; 

Aaron Cowsert, Marion, R. F. D. ; 

Soevis Norman. Marion, R. F. D. 
District No. 56 Crabtree School. H. C. 

Kruckebere. Marion. R. R. 2; W. J. 

Worley. Marion. R. R. 2; Henry 

Haunslemann. Marion. R. R. 2. 
District No. 57 Cherry Valley School. 

Otto Linclney, Marion. R. R. 3; Os- 
car Hanks. Marion, R. R. 3; James 

Campbell, Marion, R. R. 3. 
District No. 58 Corley School. Fred 

Russell, Marion. R. R. 3: Chas. J. 

Moore, Marion. R. R. 3: Elvis Shaw. 

Marion, R. R. 3. 

99 



Stahlhut, Marion, R. R. 3; Ferd Rhue, 
Marion. R. R. 3; C. L. Dahmer, 
Marion, R. R. 2. 

District No. 60 Pulley School. H. P. 
Fluke, Marion, R. R. 3; Robert 
Wherry, Marion, R. R. 3; AlU 
Echols, Marion, R. R. 3. 

TOWNSHIP 9-4 

District No. 61 Pleasant Grove. Wal- 
ter Mofteld, Pittsburg; Earl Patron, 
Marion, R. F. D. ; Frank Thurston. 
Marion, R. F. D. 

District No. 62 Crab Orchard School. 
M. H. Coonts. Crab Orchard; Roy 
Fiveash, Crab Orchard; W. S. Mot- 
singer, Crab Orchard. 

District No. 63 Motsinger School. W. 
R. Il.niki.i-. Marion, R. F. D. ; C. F. 
Fry, Marion, R. F. D. ; Ezra Carter, 
Marion. R. F. D. 

District No. 64 Parks School. Roy 
Swan, Marion, R. F. D. ; Elmer Tur- 
ner, Marion, R. F. D. ; Robt. Tan- 
ner, Marion, R. F. D. 

District No. 65 Center School. 

District No. 66. Possum Valley. Beu- 
lah Moore, Pittgburg, R. F. D. ; 
Grace Duty, Pittsburg, R. F. D. ; 
Geo. Moore, Pittsburg, R. F. D. 

District No. 70 White School; Fate 
Loller, Carrier Mills. R. F. D. ; Gus 
Newman. Carrier Mills. R. F. D. ; 
Eom Smith, Carrier Mills, R. F. D. 

District No. 71 Mayhew School. Aud 
Parks, Carrier Mills, R. F. D.; J. C. 
Absher, Carrier Mills, R. F. D. ; B. 
F. Richey. Carrier Mills, R. F. D. 

District No. 72 Black School. Wm. 
Reed. Stonefort; Wright Black. 
Stonefort, R. F. D. ; Roy Turner, 
Stonefort, R. F. D. 

TOWNSHIP 10-1 
District No. 101 Ogden School. Nathan 

Penland, Carterville, R. R. 2; Hosea 

Richardson, Carterville, R. R. 2; Orie 

Ogden, Carterville, R. R. 2. 
District No. 102 Oak Grove. D. C. 

Hopkins. Carterville. R. R. 2; Mar- 

shal Crain. Carterville, R. R. 2; A. 

N. Craig, Carterville, R. R. 2. 
District No. 103 Wolf Creek School. 

I.entz. Wolf Creek; L. T. Mann, 

Carterville, R. R. 2; R. H. Barnett. 

Wolf Creek. 
District No. 104 Palestine School. S. 

M. Chitty, Cartcrville, R. R. 2; T. 

J. Throgmorton, Goreville, R. F. D. ; 

C. C. Allen, Coreville, R. F. D. 
District No. 105 Rendleman School. 

David Hunsaker, Makanda, R. R. 1 ; 

W. A. Brandon. Makanda. R. R. 1 ; 

Nathan Barnes, Makanda. R. R. 1. 
District No. 106 Cana School. W. F. 

Sanders, Cartcrville, R. R. 2; C. A. 

Damron, Carterville, R. R. 2; John 

William,. Carterville. R. R. 2. 
District No. 107 Mann School. A. N. 

Ice, Carterville, R. R. 2; John L. 

Rushing. Carterville, R. R. 3 ; T. J. 

Taylor, Carterville, R. R. 2. 
District No. 108 New Hope School. 

N. J. Crain, Carbondale, R. F. D. : 

M. C. Smith, Carbondale. R. F. D. ; 

J. O. Chrislee. Carbondale, R. F. D. 
District No. 109 Oaks School. James 

Cox, Makanda. R. R. 2; George M. 

Crimes. Makanda, R. R. 2; H. H. 

Burklow, Makanda, R. R. 2. 
District No. 110 Phelps School. James 

McCill, Makanda, R. F. D. ; Grover 

Etherton. Makanda. R. F. D. ; W. 

L. Watson, Makanda. R. F. D. 




^\is * > t*y * 

'Y^^W 




11 






. 



TOWNSHIP 10-2 

District No. 91 Good Hope School. 
J. N. Lannoni, Goreville, R. R. 2; 
G. F. Adams, Gorcvillo, R. R. 2; 
Win. McGill, Coreville, R. R. 2. 

District No. 92 Neilson School. W. E. 
Avers. Hudgens, Ehud Watson, Hudg- 
ens; W. R. Hoi], Hudgeiru. 

District No. 93 Lent* School. C. E. 
McAnelly. Marion, R. R. 5; Nathan 
Moake. Marion. R. R. 5; Ezra Hudg- 
ens, Marion, R. R. 5. 

District No. 94 Cooksey School. Mil- 
ton Simmons, Marion, R. R, 5; C. 
B. Phillips. Marion, R. R. 5; Allen 
Surratt, Marion, R. R. 5. 

District No. 95 Robinson School. J. D. 
Simmons, Marion. R. R. 5; Thro. 
Huilgens. Marion. R. R. 5; Zach Nor- 
ris, Marion, R. R. 5; 

District No. 96 Mencese School. Wni. 
Stanley, Goreville, R. F. D. ; David 
M. Davis, Goreville, R. F. D. ; Ira 
King, Goreville, R. F. D. 

District No. 97 Poplar Grove School. 

G. W. Green, Goreville, R. R. 1; C. 

A. Morgan, Goreville. R. R. 1; W. 

H. Jones, Goreville. R. R. 1. 
District No. 93 Grain School. Edgar 

Krantz. Goreville. R. R. 1; J. M. 

Jack, Goreville, R. R. 1; G. E. 

Meneese, Goreville, R. R. 1. 

District No. 99 Flats School. A. J. 
Stephens, Carterville, R. R. 2: W. 
E. Manning, Carterville, R. R. 2; 
Dennis McCree, Carterville, R. R. 2. 




District No. 100 Armstrong School. 
E. R. Gulledge, Cartervillc, R. F. D. ; 
Perry A. Stephens, Carterville, R. F. 
D.; Mary A. Armstrong, Carterville, 
R. F. D. 

TOWNSHIP 10-3 

District No. 81 Board of Education,. 
Creal Springs City Schools. J. F. 
Blanchard, Creal Springs; E. E. 
Copeland, Creal Springs; R. M. Tay- 
lor, Creal Springs, R. C. Dorris, 
Creal Springs, R. O. Jennings. Creal 
Springs; O. T. Cosby, Creal Springs; 
W. W. Rodgers. Creal Springs. 

District No. 82 Odumburg School. E. 

E. White, Creal Springs, R. F. D. ; 
Will Mayer, Crcal Springs, R. F. D. ; 
J. F. Collins. Creal Springs. R. F. D. 

District No. 83 Willeford School. R. 
S. Carter, Creal Springs. R. F. D. ; 
J. A. Hartwell, Creal Springs, R. F. 
D. ; W. J. Stotlar, Creal Springs, R. 

F. D. 

District No. 84 Donelson School. J. W. 

Donelson, Great Springs, R. F. D. ; F. 

J. Donaldson. Creal Springs. R. F. D. 
District No. 85 Howerton School. L. 

W. Lyerla. Creal Springs, R. F. D. ; 

W. H. Kimmel. Creal Springs, R. F. 

D. ; W. F. Mencese, Creal Springs, 

R. F. D. 
District No. 87 White Oak School. S. 

D. Clark, Marion, R. R. 4; W. M. 

Parks. Creal Springs, R. F. D. ; Orval 

Parks, Marion, R. R. 4. 
District No. 88. Kimmel School. L. H. 

Baker. Creal Springs, R. F. D. 
District No. 89 Moake School. T. S. 

Borum, Marion. R. R. 4; W. E. 

Lewis, Marion. R. R. 4; Hosea Bor- 
um, Marion, R. R. 4. 



District No. 90 Serrilda School. 
Thomas Dunn. Marion. R. R. 4; W. 
B. McBride. Marion, R. R 4; C C. 
Ward, Gorcville, R. F. D. 

TOWNSHIP 10-1 

District No. 73 Shellon School. Lillian 
McSparin. Stonefort, R. F. D. ; Curtis 
Harris, Stonefort, R. F. D. ; Fletch 
Greeney, Stonefort, R. F. D. 

District No. 74 Arnold School. John 
Boyd, Stonefort. R. F. D. ; Wm. 
Youngblood, Creal Springs, R. F. D. ; 
R. M. Parks, Creal Springs. R. F. D. 

District No. 75 Wright School. John 
Arnold, Creal Springs. R. F. D. ; 
Frank Vandike, Creal Springs, R. F. 
D. ; T. J. Raclford, Creal Springs, R. 
F. D. ; Ceo. Buckncr, Crcal Springs, 
R. F. D. 

District No. 77 Stonefort, School. R. 
O. Pankey, Stonefort; L. B. Craig, 
Stonefort; D. D. St. Johns, Stonefort. 

District No. 78 Pleasant Valley. J. A. 
Deaton, Creal Springs; J. L. Murray, 
Creal Springs; Geo. Russell, Creal 
Springs. 

District No. 79 Oak Grove School. L. 
S. Simmons, Creal Springs. R. F. D. : 
W. M. Holmes, Creal Springs. R. F. 
D.; T. J. Holmes. Creal Springs, 
R. F. D. 

District No. 80 Free Silver School. 
John Murrie, Creal Springs; W. O. 
Chism, Creal Springs; A. Tanner, 
Creal Springs. 




Camping On Historical Battlefield of Watterloo, Chas. 

Green, of Herrin, with Canadian forces, standing 

in center. 



101 



FRANK YUILL. FRED COLLIHS. 

A 
K' 



D. C LL. 



JAMES W/L5ON, 



STUR6US SMITH. CLARENCE WALHEp. 



BfN BULMf>. . 



JOYCf MARGRAVt '. LABOH CARTER. 



ROY FOWLER. ARTHUR WH/TTNBERG. 

W? 

EUGENE FULTZ.. MACH BRANDON. 



RALPH STRINGER. 
TROY WELPEH. T^f^ J*g^. GtO. BENSON. 



/.A- PALMER . HAROLD CKA IN. 



SERVICE MEN OF HEREIN TOWNSHIP HIGH SCHOOL 





-tr-tfTtf- 



Historical Sketch of the Herrin 
Township High School 



r PHE Herrin Township High School is the out- 
growth of the Herrin High School which was 
first definitely organized in 1903 in an old frame 
building which stood near where the south side 
grade-school buildings now stand. It was first organ- 
ized as a three-year high school and there were less 
than 30 pupils enrolled. The first faculty was com- 
posed of the following members: Mr. Gilbert 
Ferrell, Superintendent; Mr. H. T. McKinney, Prin- 
cipal; and Miss Crow, Assistant. The first gradu- 
ating exercises occurred in 1906 with the following 
members: James Wilson, Richard Stotlar (de- 
ceased), Lelle Stotlar-Otey, Eva Howard-Russell, 
Lizzie Kelley, Bernice Baker, Edna Ingraham-Bowie, 
and Joe Benson. Another class of eight was gradu- 
ated in 1907, and then the high school was changed 
into a four-year school and placed on the "recog- 
nized" list. Because of this change there was no 
class in 1908; but in 1909 the following individuals 
were the first to graduate from the four-year plan: 
Chanie Hindman (deceased), Ethel Tate, James 
Colombo, Avis McNeill-Walker, Alberta Eubanks- 
Morgan, and Anna Dale-Krebs. The faculty of the 
first four-year class were: H. T. McKinney, Super- 
intendent; M. L. Beanblossom, Principal; L. A. 
Mifflin and Miss Jesse Covell assistants. 

The high school continued to grow in size and 
influence and was taken over by the Township in 
1913, and the first class to graduate from the Town- 
ship High School was in 1914, and consisted of 11 
members. At that time there was an enrollment 
of 110 and a faculty of 8; now there is an enroll- 
ment of 255 and a faculty numbering 12. Soon 
after the inauguration of the Township system, a 
high school was constructed at Dewmaine as an 
annex to Herrin Township High and for the con- 
venience of the colored people living there. The 
enrollment at Dewmaine this year is 21. The class 



of 1919 was the largest in the history of the school, 
consisting of 32 members. The present faculty is: 
M. L. Beanblossom, Principal; Hester E. Renard, 
History; Bessie Railey and Ralph Stringer, English; 
Anna Cotton, Language; Guy D. Nicholson and 
Laura Hanley, Commercial; Chester B. Davis, Sci- 
ence; Blanche Williams, Mathematics; Lydia Royce, 
Home Economics; L. A. Bozarth, Manual Training; 
and T. L. Alston, Colored Department. 

During the World War, the Herrin Township 
High was always "over the top" in every activity. 
The pupils and faculty not only gave until "it 
hurt;" but spent many and many an hour canvass- 
ing, selling tags, peddling benefit tickets and the 
like. The school purchased more than $300 worth 
of Victory buttons, maintained a French orphan, 
bought many hundred dollars' worth of bonds and 
war stamps, all became members of either the Red 
Cross or the Junior Organization, and contributed 
freely as a school and as individuals to all of the 
many "drives." 

Last year the basketball team won the Southern 
Illinois Tournament and stood fourth at the State 
Tournament. The school won third place at the 
Southern Illinois Track Meet. This year we are 
organizing football, continuing basketball and base- 
ball, are putting on a $500 Lyceum Course, have a 
glee club, dramatic club, literary societies, orchestra, 
quartettes, etc. All in all, we believe we have one 
of the best if not the best high school in the south- 
ern part of the State. This is the only high school 
in the County that could qualify for the Smith- 
Hughes appropriation, it is on the North Central 
Association accredited list, and last year was given 
the maximum extension of three years by the Uni- 
versity of Illinois. When the $50,000 gymnasium is 
completed this will enable us to do even greater 
things at the communities Citizen Factory. 



103 





es 

o 

H 




Marion Township High School 



TN September, 1912, the Marion Township High 
School was organized with a corps of seven 
teachers and an enrollment of one hundred ninety- 
two students. Due to the fact that the new building 
had not then been erected, the high school was 
housed for the first year of its existence in the old 
Logan building on East Main Street. 

But in September, 1912, the new building on West 
Main Street was ready for occupancy, and the term 
was opened with an increased attendance. And every 
September since that date has witnessed a growth 
in attendance that is in harmony with the growing 
industrial enterprises of Marion and of Williamson 
County. From the hundred ninety-two enrolled in 
1912, the number has grown to four hundred thirty 
in September, 1919, and the faculty has grown from 
seven to seventeen. This increase of almost one 
hundred twenty-four per cent in eight years, is the 
best evidence that the young people of Marion and 
vicinity are awake to the new demands and the 
new responsibilities of the new age and the new 
phases of American life. It is also an eloquent 
tribute to the high scholastic standards and the 
general efficiency maintained from the beginning in 
the Marion Township High School. 

So rapid was the growth of our high school that 
by the Fall of 1918 the Board of Education were 
convinced that they could no longer delay the begin- 
ning of an addition to the school building. As a 
result of their decision and of their efforts, a new 
addition is now being constructed at a cost of one 
hundred twenty thousand dollars. This addition 
consists of a new auditorium, a new gymnasium, and 
a "wing" that will contain seven classrooms. The 
auditorium will accommodate from six to eight 
hundred students, and, with the added classrooms 
and the improvements made in the old building, 
doubles the capacity of the school plant. All new 



equipment will be in keeping with the excellence of 
the new building and with the general standards 
of the school, and the people of the township dis- 
trict may soon congratulate themselves upon having 
a high school entirely adequate to the needs of the 
community. 

The Marion Township High School was active in 
the various fields of war work. Teachers and stu- 
dents took an active part in selling bonds and war 
savings stamps. In addition to these means of 
assistance, funds were raised for the care of one 
French war orphan, and contributions were made 
to assist the Junior Red Cross. But perhaps the 
most important single item in the financial activ- 
ities, was the purchase of a hundred dollar Liberty 
Bond. It was decided, by vote of the students, that 
the bond should be sold after the war was won, 
and the proceeds used for buying books that treat 
on the great war problems, and especially upon the 
ideas and ideals of American government and democ- 
racy. In this way it was hoped that a permanent 
means to better citizenship would be put into the 
high school, while at the same time material aid 
would be extended to the government in its hour 
of need. 

Nor was the high school deficient in another way 
of performing war work. Teachers and students 
who were within the age limits set by the govern- 
ment, went into the service until more than fifty of 
those in high school, or of those who had attended 
the Township High School, were placed upon our 
honor roll. All of these served faithfully, and two 
of them made the supreme sacrifice. As it is the 
aim of American education in general, it shall be 
the aim of the Marion Township High School in 
particular, "that these dead shall not have died in 
vain," and that our school shall renew its efforts 
to make the aims of American education come truf. 



105 




~-Cr~73^77^T7^7} 77 



St. Mary's Church and Parochial School 
in War Time 



BY REV. FR. SENESE 



St. Mary's Catholic Church and Parochial 
school from the very beginning of the declar- 
ation of the war showed their loyalty and 
support to the government in every way and 
they were second to none in Herrin in every 
line of work in which every loyal citizen was 
called upon to do his bit. The men and 
ladies of the parish, especially the young 
people, encouraged by the patriotic addresses 
given by their pastor, Rev. E. Senese on sev- 
eral occasions, always came forward to hand 
their moral and financial support to the good 
cause. 

On July 16, 1918, a very beautiful service 
flag, the largest in the city, decorated with 
152 stars, was solemnly blessed and dedicated 
in honor of the congregation's brave and true 
soldier sons and immediately after, a parade 
took place consisting of band, Boy Scouts, 
school children, mothers, sisters and wives of 
soldiers carrying service flags; societies of 
the parish with flags representing eight nation- 
alities of which the parish is composed; auto- 
mobiles brought up the rear of the parade, 
which covered the downtown district, and 
back to the church grounds where an elab- 
orate program took place. Rev. E. Senese, 
Mayor Geo. K. Crichton, Wm. J. Sneed, Judge 
D. T. Hartwell of Marion and Rev. J. J. 
Downey of Cairo, were the orators of the oc- 
casion. The crowd attending these exercises 
was estimated at from 2500 to 3000. 

When in May, 1918, Italian Day was ob- 
served by the order of President Wilson, 
through the untiring efforts of Father Senese, 
the anniversary of the third year of Italy's 
entrance in the war was most splendidly cele- 
brated. There were 400 parochial school 



children in the parade and Father Senese's 
"petit batallion" consisting of twenty-eight 
little soldier boys between the ages of five 
and seven years, all dressed in khaki and 
shouldering a little gun brought forth much 
comment. In the drive for the Y. M. C. A., 
also K. of C., and other war organizations, 
the Catholic congregation gave a splendid 
example of unprejudiced support, but in the 
drives for the Red Cross, St. Mary's Church, 
with the example of the pastor at the head 
was always in the first line and even the 
parochial school children set a wonderful 
record in Herrin when fully one hundred per 
cent became members of the organization. 
These good little children, whenever neces- 
sary and called upon, were always ready to 
respond very liberally. They helped in the 
sale of Liberty Bonds, in the purchasing of 
War Saving Stamps, in collecting old clothes 
for the Red Cross work, in aiding the poor 
Armenians, in adopting war orphans, French 
children, etc., and even gave exhibitions of 
fancy work made in the school which were 
sold and the proceeds were gladly and cheer- 
fully handed to the local chapter of the Red 
Cross. 

On one Liberty Loan Sunday, after Father 
Senese had spoken on the duty of every Cath- 
olic to stand by the Stars and Stripes and of 
the necessity of helping the government in 
the hour of need, both children and young 
people, at the door of the church in less than 
an hour had solicited subscriptions to the 
amount of $10,000.00. Everyone in Herrin 
can testify to the loyalty and patriotism bbth 
of the pastor and the people of St. Mary's 
church and school, during the whole period 
of the war. 



107 




Hurst Bush School, District No. 27 



'"THE District was organized in 1865 under the 
name of Russell School. The following com- 
prised the first board of directors: T. P. Russell, 
John Hall and E. A. Spraig. Three frame buildings 
have been erected on the present site. In 1916 a 
magnificent brick building consisting of eight 



The present board consists of J. W. Buzbee, presi- 
dent; O. E. Sutton, clerk; W. R. Clark, W. E. 
Hosier, E. T. Onealj J. M. Robison, Bert Treadway. 

Many pupils who have attended the school have 
become prominent in the business world. Among 
the great number of successful business men are 




rooms and basement, with modern equipment, was 
erected and in January, 1917, was dedicated by 
Assistant State Superintendent W. S. Booth. Inas- 
much as the school accommodates both Hurst and 
Bush, the name was changed to Hurst-Bush School. 

The patrons of the school have always been 
awake to the school interests, and support to the 
fullest, any move for the betterment of the school 
conditions. 

Many of the pioneer citizens of the district who 
have labored so zealously to promote the school 
interests have either passed to the Great Beyond or 
have moved to distant places, so that few of them 
are left. Among the older citizens are C. W. Rus- 
sell, John Edmonds, Jerry Hestand and T. P. 
Russell. 

These older citizens are as active in school affairs 
as they were years ago. This fine spirit of the 
older citizens has been transferred to the present 
inhabitants and we challenge any district in this 
section of the state to produce men of greater school 
visions. 

The present corps of teachers is H. A. Wilson, 
principal; Miss Gladys Morse, assistant principal; 
I. L. Sidwell, supervisor of music; Helen Ballence, 
Ruth Phillips, Daisy Kelley, Ruby Mayer, Bessie 
Peer. Johanna Ruppel and Myrtle Hull. 



T. P. Russell, banker, Hurst; T. J. Campbell, at- 
torney and county judge, Chamberlain, S. D. ; W. B. 
Hall, largest real estate dealer in southern Illinois, 
Du Quoin, 111. The district furnished more than 
eighty men during the war and many of the number 
from the school. Among the names are Joe V. 
Russell, T. P. Russell, Jr., Ernest Robison, Loren 
Robison, William Robison, Noal Robison, Roy 
Hubbs, John Duddy, Kenneth Short, George 
Vaughan, E. Rosenswipe, Roland Springer, Ottis 
Peppers and David Signaigo. 

The school was the first in the county to dedicate 
a service flag and the first south of Springfield to 
raise a centennial banner. The only school in the 
county to give an entire day to celebrating "Cen- 
tennial Day" at which time a pageant was given. 
Every teacher and pupil in the school were Red 
Cross members, and most every pupil in school 
bought from 25c to $100.00 of Thrift Stamps or 
War Savings Stamps. The school took part in two 
flag raisings, by parading and singing, and helped 
in Red Cross drives. The school is accredited for 
two years of High School work. The playground 
contains four acres and has one hundred fifty trees 
of natural growth. 

There are at present five hundred sixty-five pupils 
enrolled. 



108 










Williamson County Churches 



By REV. JOHN I. GUNN 



The part taken by Williamson County 
Churches, was very creditable, as the mem- 
berships were active in all war work. The 
task of compiling detail data and giving 
names was too much of a task and consume 
space in the history that should be devoted to 
our boys who enlisted in the service. 



An attempt was made to get information 
from every church in the County, but the 
pastors of a few failed to reply to the re- 
quests, and for that reason have been com- 
pelled to limit the church report to what is 
given below. 



CHRISTIAN CHURCHES 

CHRISTIAN CHURCH, Marion 
John I. Gunn, Minister 

Blue Stars 44 

Gold Stars 4 

Silver Stars 2 

Y. M. C. A. Worker 1 

Red Cross Worker 1 

CHRISTIAN CHURCH, CARTERVILLE 
E. A. Powell, Minister 

Blue Stars 40 

Gold Stars 1 

Silver Stars 1 

Red Cross Nurses.. ... 2 



SPRING GROVE M. E. CHURCH 

Rev. W. P. White, Pastor 
Blue Stars 5 

CRAB ORCHARD M. E. CHURCH 

Rev. W. P. White, Pastor 
Blue Stars . .11 



CHRISTIAN CHURCH, Herrin 
John L. Brandt, Jr., Minister 

Blue Stars 70 

Gold Stars 2 

CHRISTIAN CHURCH, HURST 
Irl R. Sidwell, Minister 

Blue Stars 60 

Gold Stars 2 

Silver Stars 4 

CHRISTIAN CHURCH, JOHNSTON 

CITY 
R. 0. Rogers, Minister 

Blue Stars 21 

Gold Stars 1 

CHRISTIAN CHURCH, CAMBRIA 

Geo. W. Osteen, Minister 
Blue Stars ... 6 



PLEASANT GROVE M. E. CHURCH 

Rev. W. P. White, Pastor 
Blue Stars 11 

PITTSBURC M. E. CHURCH 

Rev. W. P. White, Pastor 

Blue Stars 18 

UNION GROVE M. E. CHURCH 
Rev. W. P. White, Pastor 

Blue Stars 7 

Gold Stars 1 

JOHNSTON CITY M. E. CHURCH 
Rev. S. D. Berst, Pastor 

Blue Stars 49 

Gold Stars 1 



METHODIST EPISCOPAL 

CHURCHES 

FIRST M. E. CHURCH, MARION 
Rev. W. C. McCurdy, D.D., Pastor 

Blue Stars 58 

Gold Stars 4 

Y. M. C. A. Worker.. 1 



PRESBYTERIAN CHURCHES 

HERRIN PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH 

Rev. W. C. Mahr, Pastor 

Blue Stars 26 

Gold Stars 1 

MARION PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH 
Rev. G. A. Adamson, Pastor 

Blue Stars 11 

Gold Stars 1 



CARTERVILLE PRESBYTERIAN 

CHURCH 
Rev. E. J. Sabin, Pastor 

Blue Stars 24 

Gold Stars 1 

109 



NORTHERN BAPTIST CON- 
VENTION CHURCHES 
(Formerly Free Baptist) 

WARDER STREET BAPTIST CHURCH 
/. W. McKinney, Pastor 

Blue Stars 11 

LIBERTY CHURCH 

Rev. W. F. Smart, Pastor 

Blue Stars . 1 



FREEDOM CHURCH 

Rev. W. T. Smart, Pastor 

Blue Stars . . 14 



HARMONY CHURCH 

W. A. Pittman, Pastor 

Blue Stars 2 

SECOND BAPTIST CHURCH, JOHNS- 
TON CITY 
Rev. F. C. Stalker 
Blue Stars . . 19 



UNION CHURCH 
F. V. Wright, Pastor 

Blue Stars 11 

Gold Stars 1 

McKiNNEY CHAPEL 

Rev. Marshall Jones 

Blue Stars . . 4 



SECOND BAPTIST CHURCH, 

CARTERVILLE 

Rev. F. V. Wright, Pastor 
Blue Stars 17 

CAMBRIA CHURCH 
Rev. J. H. Browning, Pastor 

Blue Stars 18 

Gold Stars 1 




CRAINVILLE CHURCH 

Rev. Wm. Barringer, Pastor 

Blue Stars .14 



COTTAGE HOME CHURCH 
Rev. J. H. Browning, Pastor 

Blue Stars 11 

Gold Stars 3 



LONE OAK CHURCH 

Rev. Lee Futrell, Pastor 

Blue Stars 5 



SOUTHERN MISSIONARY 

BAPTIST CHURCHES 

MARION BAPTIST CHURCH 

Rev. Julian. Atwood, Pastor 

Blue Stars 68 



CARTERVILLE CHURCH 

Allen Ferrell, Pastor 

Blue Stars 23 



HERRIN CHURCH 
James A. Gore, Pastor 

Blue Stars 37 

Gold Stars 3 



CRENSHAW CHURCH 

C. Ray Chrisman, Pastor 

Blue Stars 6 



CANA CHURCH 
T. C. Milton, Pastor 

Blue Stars 13 

Gold Stars l 



FAIRVIEW CHURCH 

Arthur Travelstead, Pastor 

Blue Stars l 

SHILOH CHURCH 
Pastor 

Blue Stars g 

Gold Stars \ 

SPRINGHILL CHURCH 
T. 0. Milton, Pastor 

Blue Stars 36 

Gold Stars 3 



HURRICANE CHURCH 

B. E. Green, Pastor 

Blue Stars 2 

DAVIS PRAIRIE CHURCH 

Blue Stars 3 

Gold Stars 2 

INDIAN CAMP CHURCH 

Arthur Travelstead, Pastor 

Blue Stars 23 



CRAB ORCHARD CHURCH 
Chas. B. Taylor, Pastor 

Blue Stars 

Gold Stars .............. 



20 



CREAL SPRINGS CHURCH 
H. R. Bur/chart, Pastor 

Bhie Stars 39 

Gold Stars 3 

JOHNSTON CITY CHURCH 
J. E. Hart, Pastor 

Blue Stars 34 

Gold Stars 3 



METHODIST EPISCOPAL 

CHURCH, SOUTH 

M. E. CHURCH, SOUTH, MARION 

Rev. William Graham, Pastor 

Blue Stars 30 

Silver Stars 2 

Gold Stars l 

M. E. CHURCH, HERRRIN 
Rev. C. R. Phillips, Pastor 



Blue Stars 



43 



M. E. CHURCH, CARTERVILLE 
Rev. George Van Eman Gray, Pastor 

Blue Stars 42 

Silver Stars 4 

Gold Stars 1 



110 




Miner's War Activities 



BY A. T. PACE 



During the Great World War, the Ameri- 
can workingman played a vital part. While 
all the workers measured up to the standard, 
the United Mine Workers of America de- 
serve special mention, on account of their 
unswerving loyalty and true devotion to their 
country in its most critical period. 

The Williamson County miners are among 
the very best to be found anywhere. They 
are conservative, loyal to their Government, 
and one hundred per cent American. A 
large per cent of the miners of Williamson 
County own their own homes. 

During the war the miners laid aside their 
own personal interests in order to increase 
production, as coal was an important ele- 
ment in the winning of the war. 

There were in Williamson County during 
the war, eleven thousand members of the 
United Mine Workers of America. The 
officers of the Miners during the war in this 
immediate section were as follows: Hugh 
Willis, Board Member District 12; A. T. 
Pace, Traveling Auditor, District 12; Fred 
Cooper, Investigator, Sub-District Nos. 9 and 
10. The Sub-District officers were: Wm. J. 
Sneed, President; Fox C. Hughes, Vice- 
President; Wm. G. Davis, Secretary-Treas- 
urer. Board members: A. A. Pearce, Sam 
E. Evett, Chas. M. Jones. Auditors: David 
Babington, George Baker, and Jerry E. Tay- 
lor. International organizers: Albert Frank- 
lin and Wm. Prentice. 

The coal report shows that more coal was 
produced during the war than was ever pro- 
duced during any like period. This was 
due to the effort and enthusiasm the miners 
put into their work, in their desire to back 
up the boys at the front. 

The miners bought in Liberty Bonds, and 
contributed to other war activities, such as 
the Red Cross, Salvation Army, Knights of 
Columbus, War Saving Stamps, and Y. M. 
C. A., one and one-quarter million dollars. 



Every Local Union in Williamson County 
conducted its own individual drive, and in 
every instance "went over the top." There 
was a friendly rivalry between Local Unions 
to see which Local Union would excel in this 
great work. 

Notwithstanding the great number of so- 
called foreigners, the miners were one hun- 
dred per cent Americans, as is shown by their 
magnificent record in increasing coal produc- 
tion, and the purchase of Liberty Bonds, 
War Saving Stamps and also in the different 
war drives. 

The officers of the miners were staunch 
workers for the government, and while their 
own work was at times arduous, yet they de- 
voted all their spare time, day and night, in 
addressing meetings and serving on commit- 
tees in the interest of "backing up the boys" 
in France and Flanders. 

The miners of Williamson County fur- 
nished twelve hundred soldiers in the select- 
ive service and among the volunteers. This 
quota was made up of practically every na- 
tionality. When it came to patriotism, all 
classes, regardless of color or nationality, 
showed their "true blue" patriotism in their 
devotion to their country. 

When the government needed men to serve 
in responsible positions, the miners answered 
the call to duty and served with ' credit to 
themselves, and distinction to the American 
Government. 

For these and many other reasons, the 
miners of Williamson County deserve ever- 
lasting credit for their humble part in win- 
ning the war in order that "The world might 
be made safe for Democracy." 

Number of men in service 1,200 

Bonds purchased by individual 

members $1,300,000 

Local unions 30,000 



111 





Top row, left to right A. T. Pace, Hugh Willis, Wm. G. Davis, Fox C. Hughes. 
Bottom row, left to right George F. Cooper, Wm. J. Sneed. 



HUGH WILLIS 37 years of age, member 
of Local Union No. 1248, U. M. W. of A.; has 
filled practically every position of trust in 
his local union and is now serving his third 
elective term as Board Member of the district 
organization. He was the labor member of 
the County Council of Defense during the 
World War; was instrumental in helping to 
secure a substantial increase in wages for the 
motormen and conductors on the Coal Belt 
interurban lines that connect Herrin, Marion 
and Carterville, without a strike, which other- 
wise would have resulted in the mines around 
Marion and Carterville being tied up for 
want of transportation for the miners, as 
coal at that time was the chief necessity of 
Uncle Sam. He is a member of the Masons, 
Red Men and W. 0. W. 



sub-district auditor the old seventh sub- 
district of district twelve, U. M. W. of A.; 
represented Williamson county miners twa 
terms as scale committeeman in joint confer- 
ence with the coal operators of Illinois; has 
served as organizer for Illinois State Federa- 
tion of Labor, Western Federation of Miners 
and the National Union of the U. M. W. of 
A.; has attended practically all the miners' 
conventions of recent years; a member of 
Local Union No. 886, U. M. W. of A., of 
Herrin, and at the present time is serving his 
second term as president of Sub-district No. 
10, U. M. W. of A. of district twelve. Mr. 
Sneed is of the Baptist faith, a thirty-second 
degree Mason Royal Arch and Shriner, a 
member of the Odd Fellows, K. of P. and 
Red Men. 



WM. J. SNEED Born December, 1883, 
near Benton, 111.; left school at the age of 
fourteen to enter the mines at Du Quoin, 
affiliating with Local Union No. 98; has 
worked in the mines practically all the time 
since with the exception of about two years 
for the United States as postal clerk in the 
Herrin postoffice; he has held every office in 
his local union and served several terms as 



FOX C. HUGHES 36 years of age, a 
member of Local Union No. 388, Clifford, 
111.; has served his local as president, 
also the United Mine Workers of America 
as organizer from district twelve, operating 
in Hopkins County, Ky. His services with 
his local union as president and experience 
in conventions have well fitted him for the 



112 



TJ FT /7 IJ~ 



m 




position of vice-president of Sub-district No. 
10, U. M. W. of A., in which position he is 
now serving his second term. 



WM. G. DAVIS 31 years of age, a mem- 
ber of Local Union No. 388, Clifford, 111.; 
has been employed for the last eight and a 
half years as check weighman for the miners 
at No. 8 mine of the Big Muddy Coal and 
Iron Company at Clifford, 111.; he has served 
as sub-district auditor three terms, state 
teller, state auditor, and is serving his second 
term as sub-district secretary-treasurer of 
Sub-district No. 10, U. M. W. of A. Mr. 
Davis is a member of the Masons, Red Men, 
and K. of P. 



ARTHUR T. PACE 39 years of age, 
member of Local Union No. 1000, U. M. W. 
of A.; has been prominent in labor circles 
in Williamson county for a number of years; 
has filled every office in local unions and the 
Herrin Trades Council and also served as 
state teller, and state auditor, and now travel- 
ing auditor, which position brings him in 
touch with the miners of Southern Illinois; 
he served as secretary of the last auditor's 
convention. At the present time his services 
are given to the Herrin Improvement Asso- 
ciation, of which he is president. Mr. Pace 
is a member of the Masons Royal Arch, 
Red Men and W. 0. W. 



GEORGE F. COOPER Born, Isle of 
Wight, England, 1880; came to Canada in 
1881 and lived there until 1899, and then 
came to the United States and started mining 
coal in Pittsburg in 1900; almost from the 
first has held office in the United Mine Work- 
ers of America, in the different locals he has 
been a member of. Was naturalized at 
Marion, 111., June 8, 1912, and elected mayor 
of Whiteash, 111., 1913-14; commissioned as 
notary public Nov. 15, 1918; elected clerk 
of the city court at Johnston City, 111., May, 
1919; appointed investigator for the legal 
department of the Illinois miners, July 1918, 
which position he is holding at the present 
time. 



U. M. W. of A. Locals' Bit 
In the War 

TAYLOR COAL COMPANY Mine No. 1. 

GRANT L. SAYLOR, Superintendent. 
LOCAL UNION No. 2469 Herrin. 
Geo. Smith, President. 
Jim Ritchie, Recording Secretary. 
Jesse Kane, Financial Secretary. 
Jim Barclay, Treasurer. 

Liberty Bonds purchased by Union $ 100.00 

Contributed to Red Cross 170.00 

Liberty Bonds purchased by individual 

members, independent of Local 6,700.00 

Estimated amount of Victory Loan Bonds 

purchased by individual members 6,700.00 

Assessed 50 cents per member for Red 

Cross during period of the War. 
Number of members of Local who served 
in the military and naval forces of the 
United States 26 



TAYLOR COAL COMPANY Mine No. 2. 

GRANT L. SAYLOR. Superintendent. 
LOCAL UNION No. 766 Herrin. 
Ed Mornin, President. 
W. J. Gibbs, Recording Secretary. 
Lee Thompson, Financial Secretary. 
Lee Pierce, Treasurer. 

Contributed to Red Cross $ 291.00 

Liberty Bonds purchased by individual 

members, independent of Local 11.650.00 

Estimated amount of Victory Loan Bonds 

purchased by individual members 11,650.00 

War Savings Stamps purchased by indi- 
vidual members, independent of Local.. 300.00 
Assessed 25 cents per member for Red 

Cross during the period of War. 
Number of members of Local who served 
in the military and naval forces of the 

United States 8 

Number of members of local who served 
in French Army 7 



TAYLOR COAL COMPANY Mine No. 3. 

GRANT L. SAYLOR, Superintendent. 
LOCAL UNION No. 1491 Herrin. 

John B. Baker, President. 

John D. Daugherty, Recording Secretary. 

Louis B. Jones, Financial Secretary. 

L. A. Holbrooks, Treasurer. 

Liberty Bonds, purchased by Union $ 300.00 

Contributed to Red Cross 250.00 

Contributed to Y. M. C. A 270.00 

Liberty Bonds purchased by individual 

members, independent of Local 10,000.00 

Estimated amount of Victory Loan Bonds 

purchased by individual members 10.000.00 

Assessed 25 cents per member for Red 
Cross during the period of War. 



113 







Number of members of local who served 
in the military and naval forces of the 
United States . 



12 



ERNEST COAL COMPANY Johnston City. 

RALPH MITCHELL, Superintendent. 
LOCAL UNION No. 1426 Johnston City. 

Henry Hayden, President. 

Edgar Stiritz, Recording Secretary. 

Fred Cooper, Financial Secretary. 

Sam McMullen, Treasurer. 

Liberty Bonds, purchased by Union $ 500.00 

Contributed to Red Cross 500.00 

Contributed to .Y. M. C. A 500.00 

Liberty Bonds purchased by individual 

members, independent of Local 33.000.00 

Estimated amount of Victory Loan Bonds 
purchased by members, independent of 

Local 33,000.00 

War Savings Stamps purchased by individ- 
ual members, independent of Local .... 750.00 
Number of members of local who served 
in the military and naval forces of the 

United States 34 

Number of members of local serving in 

Canadian Army 3 



ERNEST COAL COMPANY Johnston City. 

R. B. MITCHELL, Superintendent. 
LOCAL UNION No. 4320 Pittsburg. 

Robert Saulsby, President. 

Jno. Smothers, Recording Secretary. 

J. H. McNeil, Financial Secretary. 

Chas. Graves, Treasurer. 
Note: Local formed after drives were made. 



BIG MUDDY COAL AND IRON COMPANY. 

GEO. BOWIE, Superintendent. 
LOCAL UNION No. 388 Clifford. 
Jake Whitecotton, President. 
John A. Trosper, Financial Secretary. 
William Suffill, Recording Secretary. 
Jake Niesinger, Treasurer. 

Liberty Bonds purchased by Union $ 2,000.00 

Contributed to Red Cross 510.00 

Contributed to Y. M. C. A 236.50 

Liberty Bonds purchased by individual 

members, independent of Local 18.000.00 

Estimated amount of Victory Loan Bonds 

purchased by individual members 18.000.00 

War Savings Stamps purchased by individ- 
ual members, independent of Local.... 200.00 
Number of members of Local who served 
in the military and naval forces of the 

United States 34 

Number of members of Local who served 
in the Canadian Army 1 



HENDERSON WALLACE COAL COMPANY. 

GEORGE WALLACE, Superintendent. 
LOCAL UNION No. 518 Marion. 

Josh Killman, President. 

Chas. Bochman, Recording Secretary. 
Dode Youngkin, Financial Secretary 

Newt Robinson, Treasurer. 

Liberty Bonds purchased by Union $ 100.00 

Contributed to other purposes 15.00 

Liberty Bonds purchased by individual 
members, independent of Local 6,500.00 

Estimated amount of Victory Loan Bonds 

purchased by individual members 6,500.00 

War Savings Stamps purchased by indi- 
vidual members, independent of Local.. 100.00 

Number of members of Local who served 
in the military and naval forces of the 
United States 8 

Number of members of Local who served 
in the Canadian Army 1 



W. P. REND COAL AND COKE COMPANY. 

JACK OHLE, Gen. Superintendent. 
THOS. DAUCHERTY, Superintendent. 
LOCAL UNION No. 655 Rendville. 
Otis Clark, President. 
Robert Morris, Recording Secretary. 
Thos. P. Engler, Financial Secretary. 
Luke Raisbeck, Treasurer. 

Liberty Bonds purchased by Union $ 2,000.00 

Contributed to Red Cross 520.00 

Contributed to Y. M. C. A 275.00 

Liberty Bonds purchased by individual 

members, independent of Local 36,000.00 

Estimated amount of Victory Loan Bonds 

purchased by individual members 36,000.00 

Number of members of Local who served 
in the military and naval forces of the 
United States . 68 



MARION AND PITTSBURG COAL COMPANY. 

BEN SCHULL, Superintendent. 
LOCAL UNION No. 698 -Pittsburg. 
Robert Nicholson, President. 
Frank Lee, Recording Secretary. 
Chas. Simmons, Financial Secretary. 
T. C. Nicholson, Treasurer. 

Liberty Bonds purchased by Union $ 1,000.00 

Contributed to Red Cross 810.84 

Liberty Bonds purchased by individual 

members, independent of Local 7,500.00 

Estimated amount of Victory Loan Bonds 

purchased by individual members 7,500.00 

Number of members of Local who served 
in the military and naval forces of the 
United States . 11 



114 




WILLIAMSON COUNTY COAL COMPANY. 

WM. RUFF, Superintendent. 
LOCAL UNION No. 711 Johnston City. 
H. W. Foster, President. 
Frank Wente, Recording Secretary. 
Arthur Bell, Financial Secretary 
O. C. Baiar, Treasurer. 

Liberty Bonds purchased by Union $ 500.00 

War Savings Stamps purchased by Union. 45.50 

Contributed to Red Cross 667.00 

Contributed to Y. M. C. A 243.00 

Contributed to other War funds 25.00 

Liberty Bonds purchased by individual 

members, independent of Local 16,300.00 

Estimated amount of Victory Loan Bonds 

purchased by individual members 16,300.00 

War Savings Stamps purchased by indi- 
vidual members, independent of Local. . 1,060.00 
Number of members of Local who served 
in the military and naval forces of the 
United States 28 



Number of members of Local who served 
in French Army 



WATSON COAL COMPANY. 

ALBERT PERRINE, Superintendent. 
LOCAL UNION No. 923 Crenshaw. 
George Phelps, President. 
Ralph Phelps, Recording Secretary. 
Ed Melville, Financial Secretary. 
Everett W. Yule, Treasurer. 

Contributed to Red Cross $ 30.00 

Liberty Bonds purchased by individual 

members, independent of Local 1,200.00 

Estimated amount of Victory Loan Bonds 

purchased by individual members 1,200.00 

War Savings Stamps purchased by indi- 
vidual members, independent of Local.. 300.00 
Number of members of Local who served 
in the military and naval forces of the 
United States . 1 



T. G. WARDEN COAL COMPANY. 
JACK GOALBY, Superintendent. 
LOCAL UNION No. 944 Herrin 
A. M. Belcher 
Wesley Davis 
Presidents. 

Roy Crompton, Recording Secretary. 
H. T. Crompton, Financial Secretary. 
H. R. Thompson, Treasurer. 

Liberty Bonds purchased by Local $ 500.00 

Contributed to Red Cross 413.00 

Liberty Bonds purchased by individual 

members, independent of Local 1,400.00 

Estimated amount of Victory Loan Bonds 

purchased by individual members 1,400.00 

Assessed 50 cents per member for Red 

Cross during the period of the War. 
Number of members of Local who served 
in the military and naval forces of the 
United States and Canadian Army 36 



BIG MUDDY COAL AND IRON COMPANY. 

GARNER WILLIAMS, Superintendent 
LOCAL UNION No. 986 No. 7, Herrin. 
Jasper Metzger, President. 
J. L. McKay, Recording Secretary. 
Guy Young, Financial Secretary. 
G. L. Spiller 
Jno. Aaron 
Treasurers. 

Contributed to Red Cross f 400.00 

Contributed to Y. M. C. A 192.50 

Contributed to other purposes 200.00 

Liberty Bonds purchased by individual 

members, independent of Local 21,500.00 

War Savings Stamps purchased by indi- 
vidual members, independent of Local. . 100.00 
Estimated amount of Victory Loan Bonds 

purchased by individual members 21,500.00 

Number of members of Local who served 
in the military and naval forces of the 
United States 29 



POND CREEK COAL COMPANY, 

Now 
FREEMAN COAL MINING COMPANY. 

FRED DICK 

ELVIS SKACGS 
Superintendents. 
LOCAL UNION No. 1000 Herrin. 

Grant Winchester, President. 

Paul Kirk, Recording Secretary. 

Chas. Hundley, Financial Secretary. 

E. E. Hanks, Treasurer. 

Liberty Bonds purchased by Union $ 500.00 

Contributed to Red Cross 281.00 

Contributed to Y. M. C. A 125.00 

Contributed to other purposes 163.25 

Estimated amount of Victory Loan Bonds 

purchased by individual members 10,000.00 

Members of Local Union in Army and Navy 20 



CARTERVILLE AND BIG MUDDY COAL CO. 

W. C. KRIECKHAUS, Gen. Superintendent. 
LOCAL UNION No. 1055 Cambria. 
Jeff Vaughn, President. 
Lee Storme, Recording Secretary. 
S. E. Storme, Financial Secretary. 
Carl Johns, Treasurer. 

Liberty Bonds purchased by Union $ 500.00 

Contributed to Red Cross 3,000.00 

Liberty Bonds purchased by individual 

' members, independent of Local 20,000.00 

Estimated amount of Victory Loan Bonds 

purchased by individual members 20.000.00 

Members of Local Union now serving in 
the military and naval forces of the 
United States . 25 



115 




S. E. Storme, financial secretary, made the canvas 
of the mine for Red Cross and Liberty Bonds. This 
mine went over 100 per cent on every war activity. 

This mine, owned and controlled by local capital, 
donated the coal product of the mine on two occa- 
sions, making an output of two days, to the War 
Charity Fund. The employees co-operated in the 
good work by donating their time for the two days. 



WEST VIRGINIA COAL COMPANY. 

GEO. WALLACE, Superintendent. 
LOCAL UNION No. 1117 Marion. 
A. M. Thompson, President. 
Harry Dunbar, Recording Secretary. 
Ottis Ferrell, Financial Secretary. 
Harry Mattox, Treasurer. 

Liberty Bonds purchased by Union $ 500.00 

War Savings Stamps purchased by Union 500.00 

Contributed to Red Cross 85.00 

Contributed to Salvation Army 52.75 

Liberty Bonds purchased by individual 

members, independent of Local 20,000.00 

Estimated amount of Victory Loan Bonds 

purchased by individual members 20,000.00 

War Savings Stamps purchased by indi- 
vidual members, independent of Local . . 7,000.00 
Number of members of Local who served 
in the military and naval forces of the 

United States 18 

Number of members of Local Union now 

serving in Italian Army 2 



MADISON COAL CORPORATION. 
WM. TURTIN, Superintendent. 
LOCAL UNION No. 1144 Colp. 
Henry Johnson, President. 
Wm. Ratliffe, Recording Secretary. 
Jerry E. Taylor, Financial Secretary. 
J. E. Hagler, Treasurer. 

Contributed to Red Cross $ 514.00 

Contributed to Y. M. C. A 250.00 

Liberty Bonds purchased by individual 

members, independent of Local 30,000.00 

Estimated amount of Victory Loan Bonds 

purchased by individual members 3,000.00 

Number of members of Local who served 
in the military and naval forces of the 
United States 46 



MADISON COAL CORPORATION. 

WM. TURTIN, Superintendent. 
LOCAL UNION No. 1228 Dewmaine. 

John Neely, President. 

Homer Kelley, Recording Secretary. 

S. A. Traylor, Financial Secretary. 

Allen Mayberry, Treasurer. 

Liberty Bonds purchased by Union $ 1,000.00 

Contributed to Red Cross 412.00 

Contributed to Y. M. C. A.. 206.00 



Liberty Bonds purchased by individual 

members, independent of local 6,600.00 

Estimated amount of Victory Loan Bonds 
purchased by individual members 6.600.00 

Number of members of Local who served 
in the military and naval forces of the 
United States . 24 



CHICAGO, 



WILMINGTON AND 
COAL COMPANY, 

Was 



FRANKLIN 



CHICAGO AND CARTERVILLE COAL CO. 

FRED HAUCK, Superintendent. 
LOCAL UNION No. 1248. 

Louis Elders, President. 

Will Finney, Recording Secretary. 

Robert Clem, Financial Secretary. 

Ed Smith ) 

,-,, , ~. f Treasurers. 

Claude lanner ) 

Liberty Bonds purchased by Union $ 1,000.00 

Contributed to Red Cross 1,200.00 

Liberty Bonds purchased by individual 

members, independent of Local 28,000.00 

Estimated amount of Victory Loan Bonds 

purchased by individual members 28.000.00 

Assessed 50 cents per member for Red 

Cross during the period of War. 
Number of members of Local who served 

in the military and naval forces of the 

United States 48 



CHICAGO AND BIG MUDDY COAL AND COKE 

COMPANY. 

A. B. McLAREN, Superintendent. 
LOCAL UNION No. 1380 Marion. 

A. G. Goodall, Recording Secretary. 
Robt. Cash, Financial Secretary. 
Owen Berry, Treasurer. 

Liberty Bonds purchased by Union $ 100.00 

Contributed to Red Cross 440.00 

Liberty Bonds purchased by individual 

members, independent of Local 14.000.00 

Estimated amount of Victory Loan Bonds 

purchased by individual members 14,000.00 

War Savings Stamps purchased by Union. 1.000.00 
Number of members of Local who served 
in the military and naval forces of the 
United States . 22 



CHICAGO, WILMINGTON AND FRANKLIN 
COAL COMPANY. 

FRED HAUCK, Superintendent. 
LOCAL UNION No. 1795 Herrin. 

Frank Meece, President. 

Jno. Barbaglia, Recording Secretary. 

A. W. Sjobolom, Financial Secretary. 

H. S. Whiteside, Treasurer. 

Liberty Bonds purchased by Union $ 500.00 

Contributed to Red Cross. . 334.00 



116 




Liberty Bonds purchased by individual 
members, independent of Local 20,000.00 

Estimated amount of Victory Loan Bonds 

purchased by individual members 20,000.00 

Number of members of Local Who served 
in the military and naval forces of the 
United States 45 

Number of members of Local Union serv- 
ing in Canadian Army 



PEABODY COAL COMPANY. 

PH LIP WH TE, Superintendent. 
LOCAL UNION No. 1880 Marion. 
John Browning, President. 
Leo Eveland, Recording Secretary. 
James Penley, Financial Secretary. 
Monroe Arms, Treasurer. 

Liberty Bonds purchased by Union $ 

Contributed to Red Cross 

Contributed to Y. M. C. A 

Liberty Bonds purchased by individual 

members, independent of Local 30,000.00 

Estimated amount of Victory Loan Bonds 

purchased by individual members 30,000.00 

War Savings Stamps purchased by indi- 
vidual members, independent of Local.. 20,000.00 
Number of members of Local who served 
in the military and naval forces of the 
United States 52 



500.00 

154.75 

67.50 



SCRANTON AND BIG MUDDY COAL 
MR. HILL, President-Superintendent. 
LOCAL UNION No. 2129 Marion. 
Jeff Goddard, President. 
Roy Sellers, Recording Secretary. 
E. C. Radford, Financial Secretary. 
Benjamin Hoy, Treasurer. 

Liberty Bonds purchased by Union $ 

Contributed to Red Cross 

Contributed to Y. M. C. A 

Liberty Bonds purchased by individual 

members, independent of Local 

Estimated amount of Victory Loan Bonds 
purchased by individual members. . . . 
War Savings Stamps purchased by indi- 
vidual members, independent of Local. . 
Number of members of Local who served 
in the military and naval forces of the 
United States 



CO. 



500.00 

207.00 

50.00 

5,000.00 
5,000.00 
1,500.00 

21 



DUNCAN COAL COMPANY. 

OSCAR McNsiLL, Superintendent. 
LOCAL UNION No. 2621 Herrin. 

W. A. McCall, President. 

R. C. Bozarth, Recording Secretary. 

Louie Misker, Financial Secretary. 

Willis Yancy, Treasurer. 

Contributed to Red Cross $ 

Contributed to Y. M. C. A 



250.00 
250.00 



Liberty Bonds purchased by individual 
members, independent of Local 10,000.00 

Estimated amount of Victory Loan Bonds 

purchased by individual members 10,000.00 

Assessed 25 cents per member for Red 
Cross during the period of War. 

Number of members of Local who served 
in the military and naval forces of the 
United States 21 



RIDGE COAL COMPANY. 

W. T. CHENEY, Superintendent. 
LOCAL UNION No. 2704 Marion. 
Wm. Emery, President. 
Will Fosse, Recording Secretary. 
Elmer Butts, Financial Secretary. 
Ray Alexander, Treasurer. 
Number of members of Local who served 
in the military and naval forces of the 

United States 

No report. 



16 



JOHNSTON CITY WASHED COAL COMPANY. 

CHAS. NORMAN, Superintendent. 
LOCAL UNION No. 2710 White Ash. 
A. E. Hartwell, President. 
Chas. Day, Recording Secretary. 
D. W. Williams, Financial Secretary. 
Thos. McConnelly, Treasurer. 
Liberty Bonds purchased in name of Local 

Union 

Contributed to Red Cross 

Contributed to Y. M. C. A 

Liberty Bonds purchased by individual 

members, independent of Local 1.400.00 

Estimated amount of Victory Loan Bonds 

purchased by individual members 1,400.00 

Assessed 25 cents per member for Red 

Cross during the period of War. 
Number of members of Local who served 
in the military and naval forces of the 
United States . 22 



200.00 

400.00 

65.00 



WEST FRANKFORT COAL COMPANY. 

BRUNO SCHUTTLER, Superintendent. 
LOCAL UNION No. 4177 Herrin. 

Ray Walker, President. 

John Megenhardt, Recording Secretary. 

C. M. Coleman, Financial Secretary. 

T. R. Ward, Treasurer. 
Note: Local formed after first drives were made. 



JOHNSTON CITY COAL COMPANY No. 2. 

JACK WHITE, Superintendent. 
LOCAL UNION No. 3192 Johnston City. 

Wm. Forester, President. 

C. R. Hansel, Recording Secretary. 

M. M. Rentfro, Financial Secretary. 

G. H. Moore, Treasurer. 
Liberty Bonds purchased by Union $ 100.00 



117 



SaSEgEE3=g=gE 



Contributed to Red Cross 241.00 

Contributed to Y. M. C. A 27.00 

Contributed to other purposes 142.00 

Liberty Bonds purchased by individual 

members, independent of Local 20,000.00 

Estimated amount of Victory Loan Bonds 

purchased by individual members 20,000.00 

Number of members of Local who served 

in the military and naval forces of the 

United States 10 

Number of members of local who served in 

the Canadian Army 1 




CARTERVILLE COAL CORPORATION. 

WM. THOMPSON, Superintendent. 
LOCAL UNION No. 3749 Cambria. 
J. N. Beltz, President. 
L. L. Morris, Recording Secretary. 
Lee Stone, Financial Secretary. 
Perry Powell, Treasurer. 

Contributed to Red Cross $ 185.00 

Liberty Bonds purchased by individual 

members, independent of Local 2,000.00 

Estimated amount of Victory Loan Bonds 

purchased by individual members 2,000.00 

War Savings Stamps purchased by indi- 
vidual members, independent of Local.. 200.00 
Number of members of Local who served 
in the military and naval forces of the 
United States . 7 



JOHNSTON CITY COAL COMPANY No. 1. 

JACK WHITE, Superintendent. 
LOCAL UNION No. 2215 Johnston City. 
Tom Cosgrove, President. 
Will Spires, Recording Secretary. 
David Cull, Financial Secretary. 
Troy Lewis, Treasurer. 

Liberty Bonds purchased by Union $ 1,000.00 

War Savings Stamps purchased by Union. 150.00 

Contributed to Red Cross 1,500.00 

Contributed to Y. M. C. A 500.00 

Contributed to other purposes 50.00 

Liberty Bonds purchased by individual 

members, independent of Local 60,000.00 

Estimated amount of Victory Loan Bonds 

purchased by individual members 60,000.00 

Number of members of Local who served 
in the military and naval forces of the 
United States 46 



SEARLS COAL COMPANY. 

WM. HENDRICKSON, Superintendent. 
LOCAL UNION No. 1239 Johnston City. 

Thos. McPheron, President. 

Rich Curry, Recording Secretary. 

A. A. Pearce, Financial Secretary. 

Ed Rogers, Treasurer. 
Liberty Bonds purchased by Union 



100.00 



Contributed to Red Cross 800.00 

Contributed to Y. M. C. A 350.00 

Contributed to other purposes 2,500.00 

Liberty Bonds purchased by individual 

members, independent of Local 48,000.00 

Estimated amount of Victory Loan Bonds 

purchased by individual members 48,000.00 

War Savings Stamps purchased by indi- 
vidual members, independent of Local. . 5,000.00 
Number of members of Local who served 
in the military and naval forces of the 
United States . 33 



CONSOLIDATED COAL COMPANY. 

ROBERT BOWIE, Superintendent. 
LOCAL UNION No. 91 Johnston City. 
Robert Wilson, President. 
Harry Wilson, Recording Secretary. 
Geo. Hope, Financial Secretary. 
David Babington, Treasurer. 
War Savings Stamps purchased by Union. $ 102.00 

Contributed to Red Cross 790.00 

Contributed to the Y. M. C. A 400.00 

Contributed to other purposes 2,226.00 

Liberty Bonds purchased by individual 

members, independent of Local 46,000.00 

Estimated amount of Victory Loan Bonds 

purchased by individual members 46,000.00 

"Number of members of Local who served 
in the military and naval forces of the 

United States 34 

Canadian Army 4 



FEDERAL COAL COMPANY. 

WM. RUDDER, Superintendent. 
LOCAL UNION No. 1146 Carterville. 

Louis Gibbons, President. 

P. H. Beasley, Recording Secretary. 

Joe Rodgers, Financial Secretary. 

L. G. Grain, Treasurer. 
Not reported. 



KEYSTONE COAL COMPANY. 

MR. COOL, Superintendent. 
LOCAL UNION No. 3221 Pittsburg. 

Henry Brown, President. 

Jake Frye, Recording Secretary. 

J. V. Pulley, Financial Secretary. 

Jas. Sanders, Treasurer. 
Not reported. 



BLACKBURN COAL COMPANY. 

CHAS. GENT, Superintendent. 

LOCAL UNION No. 3542 Marion. 

- President. 

Ottis Grear. Recording Secretary. 
Lem Stone, Financial Secretary. 
C. H. Green, Treasurer. 
Not reported. 



118 



==%== 



I 



ORCHARD COAL COMPANY. 

CHAS. NORMAN, Superintendent. 
LOCAL UNION No. 3731 Marion. 

Henry Brown, President. 

A. C. Bullock, Recording Secretary. 

Will Boyd, Financial Secretary. 

Lloyd Davis, Treasurer. 
Not reported. 




SLOGO COAL COMPANY. 

GEO. CALHOUN, Superintendent. 
LOCAL UNION No. 3844 Marion. 

Thos. Hunt, President. 

Clyde Nolen, Recording Secretary. 

S. G. Ramsey, Financial Secretary. 

Bert Nolen, Treasurer. 
Not reported. 



PRATT BROTHERS COAL COMPANY. 

JOHN HOWELL, Superintendent. 
LOCAL UNION No. 2678 Jeffrey. 

Thos. Pengilley, President. 

E. A. Gurley, Recording Secretary. 
A. D. Peters, Financial Secretary. 

F. E. Burklow, Treasurer. 



Number of members of Local who served 
in the military and naval forces of the 

United States 

No report on war work. 



HAFER WASHED COAL COMPANY. 

JACK McGoNiCAL, Superintendent. 
LOCAL UNION No. 2556 Carterville. 

L. Feltz, President. 

Ed. N. Lindsey, Recording Secretary. 

Henry Skelcher, Financial Secretary. 

Louis Young, Treasurer. 
Not reported. 




30 



BIG MUDDY FUEL COMPANY. 

ROY STEWART, Superintendent. 
LOCAL UNION No. 1941 Johnston City. 

Clem Whitson, President. 

Jas. Ballowe, Recording Secretary. 

Harry Bonder, Financial Secretary. 

Chas. Duncan, Treasurer. 
Npt reported. 



Record of Williamson County Mining 
Industry in the War 



BY MARK WOODLEY, Marion 



In submitting the following as a record 
of the work of the mining industry of the 
County during the war, I do it hesitatingly, 
and apologetically, because I realize that 
what I have written, does not do> the industry 
justice, for the unselfish, sacrificing, vigorous 
effort put forth by all concerned to produce 
coal. 

During the strenuous time of the war 
period, there was probably no industry 
upon which so much depended, as that of 
Coal Mining. 

The call for "MORE COAL" went up from 
every industrial center. 

Coal was needed in increased quantities 
for transportation of soldiers and supplies, 
and of munitions of war. The factories were 
kept going day and night, and needed a 
double supply of coal. The usual amount 
was needed for domestic purposes also. 

The government through its Fuel Admin- 



istration went into every coal mining center 
of the Nation and urged both operator and 
miner to do their utmost in the production 
of coal. So thorough was the campaign for 
increased production of coal, that the agents 
of the government, who were mostly returned 
soldiers, visited every coal mining camp 
throughout the land, and appealed to em- 
ployer and employee alike to do their utmost 
to produce more coal, urging its great need 
and that without it we could not win the 
war. 

Southern Illinois, because of its quality 
and quantity of production, was appealed to 
strongly by the government to increase its 
production if at all possible. Notwithstand- 
ing the fact that our young men were taken 
out of the mines in large numbers for active 
military service, this was done. 

Williamson county can well be proud of 



119 



its record, in response to the call of the 
Nation. The increased production during the 
war period reflects credit to every person 
who was engaged in the business. 

Our County, which was the greatest coal 
producing county of the State for ten years, 
broke all previous records in production 
during the war period. The following figures 
which are taken from the State Coal report, 
is a silent tribute to the loyalty of the men 
who so untiringly and unselfishly toiled to 
bring about .such a splendid result in re- 
sponse to our Nation's call and need. 

In the year 1916, Williamson county pro- 
duced 7,904,528 tons of coal, which was a 
slight increase over that of 1915. The aver- 
age tons of coal produced per man employed, 
being approximately 930 tons for the year. 

In the year 1917, the total output of the 
County was 9,634,680 tons. The average 
coal produced per man being 1,043 tons for 
the year. 

In the year 1918, we produced 11,685,101 
tons, an increase of approximately of two 
million tons over that of 1917, and four 
million tons over that of 1916. The average 
coal produced per man being 1,170 tons for 
the year. 

It will be noticed that as the production 
of coal for the county increased each year, 
the production per man also increased. This 
proves conclusively, with what unselfish en- 
ergy, the men in the mines of Williamson 
county responded to the call of the Nation 
for "MORE COAL." 

The men on the firing line in France, 
whom we all honor and revere, who paid 
the supreme sacrifice, and those who were 
willing to do so if necessary, among whom 
were many miners from Williamson county; 




^\ v > v-i \y vi y \\ '7i'_- 
fi rr~rf~ff' !/T fj 7^~Y7-^r 



did not serve their country any more pa- 
triotically and unselfishly, than the man who 
stayed at home and toiled in the mines to 
produce the coal that was so much needed. 

The spirit of "WIN THE WAR" imbued 
both the soldier abroad and the workman 
at home, and- both went to- the limit of 
physical endurance to accomplish that end. 

The Mining Industry of our County gave 
liberally to the government in all of its calls 
for financial aid. Government Bonds and 
War Savings Stamps were bought by all en- 
gaged in the business. 

The appeals of the Red Cross, Salvation 
Army, Y. M. C. A. and associated societies 
were always responded to liberally. 

It can be said to the credit of both em- 
ployer and employee that no industry of any 
nature, gave more liberally and willingly 
than did the coal mining industry. This is 
especially so of the mining industry of 
Williamson county. Each appeal for funds 
was met with a hundred per cent response 
by the miners of the county. 

Surely with a record that shows an in- 
creased production per man, for the years 
mentioned, from 930 tons to 1,170 tons for 
a year, and an increased production in the 
county from 7,904,528 tons to 11,655,101 
tons, it can be said in writing the record of 
Williamson county in the "WORLD'S WAR 
FOR DEMOCRACY," that the miners "DID 
THEIR BIT." 

It is a record that can be handed to 
posterity with pride and self satisfaction by 
those who were in active service, as an ac- 
complishment of the mining industry of 
Williamson county, in a time of our Nation's 
need. 



120 




In Memoriam 



TT is the nature of things and part of human 
experience that we cannot go far in the 
journey of life without losing our com- 
rades and companions as we go. We start out 
with a light heart, apparently well equipped 
for the road, compact, with a cheerful sense 
of entire security, 'but we have not gone far 
before one and another falls from the ranks 
and we are left behind. This is the tragedy 
in the ordinary course of human life with its 
record of bright faces and familiar forms 
left behind in that great solitude we call the 
Past. 

How much more impressive is the tragedy 
of war and the experience of the soldiers in 
the day of battle as one by one their com- 
rades suddenly fall in the ranks and their 
places become vacant! While not unmindful 
of the devoted services of those who survived 
the awful ordeal, it is the memory of the 
fallen that will be specially cherished. They 
freely gave their lives for their country's 
cause. They will always be held in loving 
remembrance. As we name them in our 
hearts, we thank God that at the call of duty 
they did not falter and in the hour of death 
they knew no fear. Though absent in body 
they will be with us in Memory. 

It singeth low in every heart, 

We hear it each and all 
A song of those who answer not 

However we may call; 
They throng the silence of the breast, 

We see them as of yore 
The kind, the strong, the true, the brave, 

Who walk with us no more. 

More homelike seems the vast unknown 

Since they have entered there; 
To follow them were not so hard, 

Wherever they may fare; 
They cannot be where God is not, 

On any sea or shore; 
What'er betides, Thy love abides, 

Our God, forevermore. 



They gave the world an object lesson of 
the manly and the heroic, the courage that 
cares for neither danger nor devil, they were 
inspired with a patriotic fervor that would 
be anathema for the cause of Liberty for: 

Of what avail 
Is plow or sail 
If freedom fail. 

The soldier's sacrifice of himself is under- 
standable only if he is an immortal spirit 
and has lost nothing in giving his life in the 
supreme hour that tested him. 

This is widely true of that glorious com- 
pany of youth who went to the front from 
Williamson County, and were not in the 
marching columns of those who returned in 
triumph. Many of them discovered the un- 
seen world and saw, suddenly revealed, their 
own immortal souls when the time came for 
the supreme sacrifice for a noble ideal. 

Our hearts will continue to mourn the 
absence of the dear ones who won for us the 
World's freedom which was involved in the 
great struggle; but we are comforted by the 
blessed hope of immortality and we rejoice 
in the assurance of Him who said "Because 
I live ye shall live also," and we think with 
love and gratitude of that mighty host who 
have, for our sakes, given up their own lives 
and preserved for us that glorious heritage 
whose foundations were laid by patriarchs 
and pioneers now long ceased from their 
labors. 

"How sleep the brave, who sink to rest, 
By all their country's wishes blest! 
By fairy hands their knell is rung, 
By forms unseen their dirge is sung; 
There honor comes, a pilgrim gray, 
To bless the turf that wraps their clay, 
And Freedom shall awhile repair, 
To dwell a weeping hermit there." 



121 






r 




GOLD STARS 

[1] ABBOTT, JAMES T., (Herrin) mechanic; 
age 26; B., Newark, Ohio, son of Mrs. Esther 
Abbott, Newark, Ohio; married Miss Dorothy 
Roland. Entrained Sept. 5, '17, Herrin; over- 
seas Mar. 30, '18. Killed in action; heavy tank 
service; Co. C., 301st Heavy Tank Battalion, 
U. S. Tank Corps with British forces in France. 
First U. S. soldier killed in Heavy Tank Corps. 

[2] BRAYFIELD, CORP. OTIS; (Cambria) 
coal miner; age 24; B., DuQuoin, son of Mr. and 
Mrs. Walter Brayfield; married Miss Essie Win- 
Jet, Herrin; daughter Jewel. Entrained Mar. 
12, '18; overseas Sept. 19, '18. Killed in action 
Nov. 7, '18. Attached Co. M., 84 Div. 1st Div. 
when killed. 

[3] DAVIES, DAVID E.; (Herrin) coal min- 
er; age 23; B., South Wales, G. B., son of Wil- 
liam and Charlotte Davies. Entrained Apr. 29, 
'18; overseas May 18, '18; killed Sept. 23, '18, 
by shrapnel east of Vieville en Laie; front line; 
3rd platoon runner; buried near spot killed. 
Co. D., 311th Inf. 

[4] DAY, GEORGE P.; (Carterville) farmer; 
age 26; B., Grassy Township, son of W. S. and 
Florence Day. Entrained June 27, '18, Herrin; 
died of influenza at Camp Mills, L. I., while wait- 
ing transportation to France. 

[5] DRAPER, CECIL; (Herrin) coal miner. 
Battle of Bellicourt; killed by shrapnel; throat 
cut and only lived a short time; buried in Dixie 
cemetery, near Bellicourt, France. 

[6] DUNCAN, EDWARD L; (Carbondale) 
farmer; age 22; B., Herrin, son of Mr. and Mrs. 
M. L. Duncan. Entrained June 27, '18, for 
Camp Wheeler, Ga. 124th Inf. Died Nov. 1, 
'18, near Camp Shelby, Miss. 

[7] DUNCAN, HOWARD N.; (Johnston City) 
clerk; age 24; B., Lake Creek, son of George 
and Nannie Duncan. Enlisted Mar. 12, '18, Chi- 
cago; overseas July 30, '18; returned to U. S. 
April 3, '19. Died June 6. '19 from effects of in- 
fluenza at Denver Hospital No. 1. Attached 
Supply Co., 71st Artillery, C. A. C. 

[8] ROBERTS, HERBERT ELMER; (Marion) 
yard foreman; age 22; B., Marion, son of Wil- 
liam W. and Mary L. Roberts. Entrained Sept. 
21, '17, Marion; overseas May 28, '18; battles 
of Ypres, Vormazeele, Mt. Kemmel, Bellicourt, 
Nouroy, Fremont, Voux Audigny, Selle River. 
Died Nov. 3, '18, influenza. Attached Co. C. 

[9] HEYDE, ALBERT D.; (Marion) merch- 
ant; age 26; B., Carrollton, Mo., son of George 
C. and Jennie Heyde; married Miss Vanolo 
Haverporth; son, George C.; enlisted April 23, 
'17, Omaha, Nebr. ; overseas June 1, '17; battles 
of Bethlemont, Rombcourt, Cantigny; died at first 
aid hospital from wounds received at Cantigny. 
Attached Co. L., 16th Inf., 1st Div. 

[10] HOLLAND, LLOYD; (Herrin) druggist, 
age 27; B., Corinth, son of Roily and Mary 
Roberts Holland of Marion. Married Miss Faye 
Broad of Marion October 13, 1914. Enlisted July, 
'18; died Sept. 23, '18, Great Lakes, 111. 
122 




pff- ^ J ft = R = #= ; fr > #=& : 



- C. 




[11] HOWELL, ROBERT HENRY; (DeSoto) 
farmer; age 28; B., Cambria, son of Mrs. Mar- 
tha Howell, DeSoto. Entrained Sept. 20, '17, 
Herrin; overseas Mar. 18, '18; killed in action, 
heavy tank corps. Attached Co. C., 301st Heavy 
Tank Corps. 

[12] HUNSAKE, DALLAS; (Makanda) far- 
mer; B., Makanda. Entrained June 27, '18, Her- 
rin; overseas Oct. 7, '18; died at sea with double 
pneumonia. Attached Co. M., 122 Inf., 31st 
Div. 

[13] LADD, OTIS C.; (Herrin) coal miner; 
age 18; B., Cobb, Ky., son of Mr. and Mrs. J. 
C. Ladd. Enlisted July 16, '17; died of pneu- 
monia at Fort Snelling, Minn., April 2, '18. At- 
tached Co. K., 36 Inf. 

[14] LANEY, LOYD JAMES; (Marion) coal 
miner; age 26; B., New Burnside, son of Wil- 
liam and Bell Oneal Laney. Entrained May 28, 
'18; overseas Oct. 6, '18; died Oct. 20, '18, three 
days after landing. Attached Co. G., 113 am- 
munition train. 

[15] MACURDY, LIEUT. WM. VINCENT; 
(Marion) Y. M. C. A. Worker; age 26; B., 
Waukon, la., son of W. C. and Mary E. Ma- 
Curdy. Enlisted July 31, '17, St. Louis; com- 
missioned 2nd Lieut., Nov. 5, '18, Barren Field, 
Everman, Tex. Killed in aeroplane accident 
Nov. 14, '18, near Barren Field. 

[16 McNEILL, MIKE; (Carterville) coal min- 
er; age 31; B., Carterville, son of Atlas N. and 
Ida McNeill. Entrained June 27, '18, Herrin; 
overseas Oct., '18; died of influenza, Dec. 2, '18. 
Attached Co. G., 123 Inf. 

[17] PILLOW, CORP. EARL H.; (Marion) 
bookkeeper; age 27; B., Shawneetown, son of 
Mr. and Mrs. George W. Pillow. Enlisted Apr. 
29, '18; overseas May 19, '18; battles of Arras, 
St. Mihiel; wounded and carried from field at 
Grand Pre in Argonne Forest while leading his 
crew in routing a machine gun nest; died at 
Base Hospital No. 19, Vichy, France, Nov. 25, 
'18. Attached Co. M., 311th Inf. 

[18] PROPES, ROSCOE; (Herrin) coal min- 
er; age 23; B., Lawrence County, son of Mr. 
and Mrs. G. J. Propes; married Florence Penny- 
baker; son, William. Entrained Sept. 21 '17 
overseas Dec., '17; Killed in action Sept. 27, '18. 
Attached to Co. D., 115 Machine Gun Battalion. 

[19] ROBERTSON, JOSEPH HAL; (Marion) 
farmer; age 26; B., Marion, son of Joe and Le- 
ona Robertson. Enlisted June 18, '18, Marion; 
Aviation Corps, Great Lakes Naval training 
school, ready for ocean service, died Sept. 24. 

[20] ROBISON, NOEL C.; (Hurst) railway 
clerk; age 18; B., Marion, son of Thomas D. and 
Lizzie Robison. Enlisted April 16, '17; over- 
seas Aug. 18, '17; Marines engagements at Chat- 
eau-Thierry, Soissons, Reims, St. Menehould, 
Verdun and Somme-Py, died Oct. 4, '18, of 
wounds received in action. Attached to Co. 75, 
6th U. S. M. 

123 





I 







[21] SHAFFER, CHARLES; (Hurst) railway 
trainman; age 35; B., Carterville. Enlisted Sept. 
10, '16, Winnipeg, Canada; overseas Sept. 20, '16; 
killed in action June 2, '17. Attached to 44 Bat- 
talion, Canadian forces in France. 

[22] SHERERTZ, WALTER CLYDE; (Mar- 
ion) farmer; age 31; B., near Pittsburg, son of 
Albert E. and Annie D. Sherertz. Entrained 
April, '18, Marion; died Oct. 20, '18, at Camp 
Mills, L I., N. J. Attached Co. K., 122nd "Inf. 

[23] STATON, PRESTON; (Herrin) mine ex- 
aminer; age 21; B., Perry County, son of J. M. 
and Angelina Staton, Herrin. Enlisted Nov. 
10, '17, Jefferson Barracks, St. Louis; ov- 
erseas Mar., '18; battles of Argonne for three 
months; killed Oct. 14, '18, between Romagne 
and Cirges, France. Attached Co. F., 7th Eng. 

[24] STROBLE, EZRA; (Marion) coal miner; 
age 24; B., Marion. Entrained June 27, '18, 
Marion; overseas Aug., '18; died, March 17, '19, 
spinal meningitis. Attached Co. L., 327th Inf. 

[25] SULLINGER, SHEFFER S.; (Herrin) 
coal miner; age 24; B., Marion, Ky., son of John 
and Flora Sullinger. Entrained June 23, '18, 
Marion. Ky. ; overseas Sept. 20, '18; died Oct. 4, 
'18, broncho-pneumonia; buried at American 
Cemetery, Lambre Zelle, France. Attached 400 
Casual Co., Company clerk. 

[26] WADDINGTON, LEONARD; (Herrin) 
coal miner; age 22; B., near Carbondale, son of 
James and Emily Moore Waddington. Enlisted 
June 1, '17, Jefferson Barracks, St. Louis; over- 
seas April 20, '18; battle of Verdun; killed, Oct. 
4, '18, at Romagne. France, while carrying ma- 
chine gun under terrific fire; cited for distin- 
guished conduct in action. Attached Co. D., 15th 
Machine Gun Bn. 

[27] WORLEY, JAMES E.; (Marion) mechan- 
ic; age 29; B., Marion. Entrained May 28, '18, 
Marion; overseas Oct. 6, '18; died Oct. 19, '18, 
Stockford, Eng. Attached Co. B., 137 Inf., 38th 
Div. 

[28] LOLESS, ELMER; (Marion) coal miner; 
age 27; B., Creal Springs, son of Mrs. Margarete 
L. Loless. Entrained Feb. 2, '17, Marion. Died 
in Camp. Attached Co. D., 335th Inf. 

[29] MILLER, JAMES; (Marion) coal miner; 
age 30; B., Scotland, son of Alexander Miller, 
Scotland, and Anna Drwon, Marion; married 
Isabelle Drwon; son, Kenneth. Enlisted May 
16, '18, Canada; overseas from Canada, Sept., 
'18; died with pneumonia three weeks after land- 
ing. Attached 5th Canadian Engineer, C. E. 
Reinf. Four brothers in Scotch Army, two of 
whom were killed. 

[30] HUNTER, CLARENCE V.; (Marion) de- 
liveryman; age 20; B., Marion, son of Charles 
Hunter. Enlisted April 4, '17, Jefferson Bar- 
racks, St. Louis; overseas with 1st Div., June, 
'18; killed, July 20, '18, instantly in action, sec- 
ond battle of the Marne. Attached Co. I., 18th 
Inf. 

124 





OFFICERS 

[1] CLINE, MAJOR HARRY X.; (Marion) 
age 31; B., Marion, son of J. M. and Alice Cline; 
married Grace Goodall. Brigade bugler under 
Gen. Lee during Spanish-American war. Enlisted 
Burbank, Calif.; com. captain July, '17, and later 
mayor; 313th Sanitary Train, 88th Div., France. 

[2J MURRAH, MAJOR FRANK C.; (Herrin) 
age 36; B., Frankfort, son of H. C. Murrah, 
Creal Springs; com. 1st Lieut., June 2, '17, Capt., 
Jan. 15, '18, Major, March 5, '19; overseas May 
10, '18; battles of Vesle Sector, St. Mihiel, Meuse- 
Argonne. Reg. surgeon 16 F. O., 4th Div. Dis- 
charged, Camp Dodge, Iowa, Aug. 12, '19. 
[3] PAISLEY, CAPT. OLDHAM; (Marion) 
age 24; B., son of W. O. Paisley; married An- 
nette Sourse; daughter, Elizabeth Jane. Enlisted 
May '15, '18; 2nd Lieut, at Ft. Sheridan and 
later 1st Lieut., staff of Gen. Andrews, 172nd 
Inf. Brig., 86th Div., overseas Sept. 3, '18, brig, 
adj. Discharged, Camp Grant, 111., April 30, '19. 
Com. Capt. reserve corps, June 19, '19. 

[4] BAKER, CAPT. L. WADE; (Herrin) age 
30; B., Cottage Home, son of Miles D. Baker; 
married Elizabeth Rushing; daughter, Margaret. 
Enlisted June 30, '17, Mt. Vernon; overseas July 

18, '18; battle of Meuse-Argonne ; attached to 
Amb. Co. 144, lllth S. T., 36th Div. Discharged, 
Grant Grant, July 8, '19. Capt., Feb. 25, '19. 
[5] BURKHART, CAPT. RALPH; (Marion) 
age 28; B., Marion, son of Mary Ellen Burkhart; 
married Fannie Hartwell. Enlisted July 11, '17, 
St. Louis. 1st Lieut. D. R. C., Aug. 4, '17; Capt., 
April 30, '18. Attached Air Service School, 
Memphis, Tenn. 

[6] FERGUSON, CAPT. JAMES W.; (Mar- 
ion) age 25; B., Marion, son of J. W. Ferguson; 
married Bess Dunway. Enlisted May 5, '17, 
Camp Pike, Ark.; overseas Aug. 27, '18, 305, 
312, 313, 314 and 320 Supply Co. 
[7] FOWLER, CAPT. LORIN L.; (Marion) 
age 40; B., Marion, son of Sidney Fowler; mar- 
ried Maud McDonald. Enlisted June 8. '17, 1st 
Lieut. M. R. C.; Capt, Mch. 23, '18. Overseas, 
Aug. 23, '18. Discharged, St. Louis, Feb. 18, '19. 
Prior service, Philippine Islands, 1900 to 1903. 
[8] FORD, CAPT. WILLIAM H., (Herrin) 
age 40; B., Carbondale, son of Mrs. Amanda 
Ford; married Miss Nora Stotlar; child, Lorane. 
Enlisted July 20, '17, 1st Lieut.; overseas Nov. 

19, '17, chief surgeon's office, London, tour of 
inspection. Scotland, ill with pneumonia. Dis- 
charged West Baden, Ind., April 1, '19. 

[91 GIVENS, CAPT. FRED G.; (Herrin) 
miner; age 22; B., Springlick, son of J. W. 
Givens. Enlisted April, '17; overseas May 16, 
'18; battles of Argonne Forest, Mercheville and 
Colverts. Attached to Co. F.. 130 Res. 
[10] HARTWELL, CAPT. DOUSA D.; (Mar- 
ion) age 39; B., Marion, son of J. L. D. and 
Lizzie Hartwell; married Miss Rita Drake. En- 
listed Jan. 7, '18, Ft. Riley, Kans. Overseas May 
13, '18; operated behind line final offensive; suf- 
fered breakdown; attached to M. C. One of the 
greatest surgeons in France. 

125 



. 



J 




[11] MOONEYHAM, CAPT. ROSS F.; (Her- 
rin) banker; age 26; B., Mulkeytown, son of 
Robert Mooneyham, Mulkeytown; married Wilma 
D. Eaton. Entrained Sept. 4, '17, Herrin; com. 
2nd Lieut, June 4, '18; 1st Lieut, Oct. '18; Capt 
Inf., U. S. R., June 20, '19. Asst. to Camp Ad- 
jutant Discharged June 2, '19, Camp Pike, Ark. 
[12] NEELEY, CAPT. HERMAN; (Marion) 
attorney; age 36; B., Marion, son of Mrs. Nancy 
Neeley; married Miss Ressa Holman; children 
Robert, Jack and Ruth. Enlisted April, '17. 
Reserve Corps. Served Philippine war. 
[13] DELL'ERA, LIEUT. JOE (Herrin) hotel 
manager; age 20; B., Murphysboro, son of L. and 
Mrs. Dell'Era. Enlisted July 15, '17; 2nd Lieut 
Inf., Nov. 27, '17; promoted 1st Lieut., Aug. 30, 
'18; overseas Dec. 30, '17; battles, German offen- 
sive, St. Quentin, Mar., '18; gassed Aug 27 '18 
Attached Co. A., 320 Inf., Co. D., 321 Inf., D. G. 
O., 85th Div.; 2nd Army Hdq., Toul, France. Dis- 
charged, Jan. 8, '19, Camp Kendrick, N. J. 
[14] ELLES. LIEUT. ED. C.; (Herrin) mer- 
chant; age 25; B., Carterville, son of A. K. and 
Orian J. Elles; married Miss Estelle Perry. 
Enlisted Aug. 27, '17; overseas Dec. 24, '17; bat- 
tles, Ypres, spring, '18; Artillery instructor, 
training center No. 2, from June, '18 to Nov., 
'18; promoted to 1st Lieut, C. A. C., Oct. 11, '18. 
Discharged, Mar. 17, '19, Camp Grant 
[15] KENSHALO, LIEUT. D. RALPH; (John- 
ston City) attorney; age 26; B., Fail-field, son 
of Mary Ann Kenshalo. Married Edith C. Schrae- 
der, Chester. Enlisted May 12, '17, Johnston 
City; commissioned 2nd Lieut. Inf., Aug. 15 '17- 
promoted to 1st Lieut., Aug. 24, '18. Discharged' 
Mar. 14, '19, Camp Devans, Mass. 

[16] HENSON. LIEUT. ROY D.; (Johnston 
City) attorney; age 23; B., Vergennes, son of 
D. H. and Carrie J. Henson. Enlisted May 12 

17; 1st Lieut. Inf., Sept. 13, '18. Served as 
Judge Advocate from Sept. 1, '18 to Mar 7 '19 
Discharged Mar. 7, '19, Camp Grant. 
[17] BRADBURY, LIEUT. M. C.; (Salem) 
dentist; age 25; B., Marion, son of J. W. and 
Alma Bradbury, Marion; married Miss Gladys 
Evans; son, M. L., Jr. Enlisted May 6, '17, Ft. 
Sam Houston, Tex.; 1st Lieut., Co. A., D. R C 
Discharged Dec. 23, '18, Ft Sam Houston. 
[18] DENHAM, LIEUT. R. W.; (Herrin) min- 
er; age 18; B., Princeton, Ky., son of W. P. and 
Ella Denham; married Miss Audie Juhan, Prince- 
ton, Ky. Enlisted Dec. 12, '11, St. Louis; service 
on Mexican border with punitive ex.; gas and 
bayonet instructor at Camp Gordon. 

[19] GREEN, LIEUT. L. H.; (Johnston City) 
physician and surgeon; age 28; B., Alto Pass, son 
of Mrs. Nettie C. Green; married Miss Hazel 
Deason; daughter, Genevie. Enlisted May, '17; 
commissioned 1st. Lieut., M. R. C., June 27 '17 
Discharged, Sept. 1, '18, Camp Devers, Tex. 

[20] FEHRENBAKER, LIEUT. C. E.; (John- 
ston City) merchant; age 21; B., Jasper Coun- 
ty, son of Mr. and Mrs. Fehrenbaker. Enlisted 
May 5, '17, and later to 1st Lieut.; overseas Sept. 
23, '17; attached to 341st Field Artillery, 89th 
Div. Discharged July 9, '19, Baltimore, Md. 

126 




V 







[21J AIRD, LIEUT. ANDREW JOHN; (Car- 
terville) physician and surgeon; age 50; B., Bel- 
fast, Ireland; parents deceased; married Miss 
Florence E. Smith; children, Edgar H. and Mar- 
garet R. Enlisted June 27, '17; commissioned 
1st. Lieut., M. C. Attached medical corps, Camp 
Travis, Texas; recommended for promotion June 
21, '18; discharged, Dec. 17, '18, Camp Travis. 

[22] BOLES, LIEUT. D. S.; (Herrin) physi- 
cian and surgeon; age 41; B., Carterville; son 
of S. C. and Lou M. Boles; married Miss Daisy 
Baker; son, Edward. Enlisted Oct. 23, '18; com- 
missioned 1st Lieut. M. C.; attached to 51st M. 
0. T. C., Ft. Riley, Kans. Discharged Dec. 7, '18. 

[23] HENDRICKSON, LIEUT. FRED H.; 
(Marion) farmer; age 17; B., Marion; son of 
Wm. and Rosalie Hendrickson. Enlisted Aug. 
11, '1898, Spanish-American War; Cuba., Oct. 
15, 1898; Philippines, Mch. 15, 1902; Panama 
Mch. 17, '1915. Rose from the ranks; 2nd Lieut. 
Aug. 23, '18; att. Camp Grant and Veteran of 
Combat unit in three wars. 

[24] CASEY, LIEUT. CLYDE L.; (Marion) 
physician and surgeon; age 28; B., Marion, son of 
Levi and Laura Casey; married Miss Margaret 
Highy; daughter Jane. Enlisted June 1, '18; com- 
missioned 1st Lieut. M. C.; attached Co. 21, 6th 
Bat. Discharged Jan. 1, '19, Camp Custer, Mich. 

[25] COPELAND, LIEUT. PAUL R., (Creal 
Springs) physician and surgeon; age 23; B., 
Creal Springs, son of Elmere and Delia E. Cope- 
land; married Elizabeth G. Plaeger. 1st Lieut. 
M. C., Aug. 4, '17; called active duty Dec. '17, Ft. 
Riley, Kans. Attached to Jefferson Barracks, St. 
Louis, assist, to surgeon. 

[26] MITCHELL, LIEUT. EVERETT E. 
(Marion) civil engineer; age 25; B., Marion, 
son of J. C. and Lila Mitchell; married Miss Hel- 
en Hartman; son, Charles. Enlisted July 26, 
'18, Muskogee, Okla.; Lieut., '18; overseas, Aug. 

25, '18. Attached Co. B., 48th Engineers. Dis- 
charged July 23, '19, Washington, D. C. 

[27] BRANDON, LIEUT. MAC.; (Herrin) 
clerk; age 22; B., Carterville, son of Lee and 
Violet Brandon. Enlisted Mar. 10, '15, St. Louis. 
Commissioned Lieut., '18; overseas May 27, '18. 
Discharged Mar 13, '19, Ft. Lee, Va. 

[28] COLE, LIEUT. DAUSA WEBSTER; 
(Marion) automobile dealer; age 20; B., Gore- 
ville, son of Mr. and Mrs. O. S. Cole. Enlisted 
June 27, '17, Chicago; Flying Cadet, Oct. 8, '17 
to Mar 22, '18; commissioned! 2nd Lieut. R. M. 
A., Mar. 22, '18, Rich Field, Waco, Tex., Camp 
Dick, Dallas, Tex. Discharged Dec. 13, '18. 

[29] CASEY, LIEUT. FERNA L.; (Marlon) 
dentist; age 26; B., Tunnel Hill, son of D. W. 
and Marina Casey. Enlisted Oct. 1, '18, Camp 
Shelby, Miss.; commissioned 1st. Lieut. D. C. Dis- 
charged Mar.. '19, Camp Shelby, Miss. 

[30] TEAGUE, LIEUT. MARK A.; (Herrin) 
miner; age 18; B., Hopkins County, Ky., son of 
Mr. and Mrs. Luke A. Teague. Enlisted Nov. 

26, '15, Madisonviile, Ky. Commissioned 2nd 
Lieut. Oct. 16, '18, Camp Hancock, Ga. At- 
tached 49th Inf. Discharged Aug. 8, '19. 

127 








Qj^fj Ji_ n n ft 7TJ-7? 








[31] SULLIVAN, LIEUT. JAS. L.; (Marion) 
age 21; B., Illinois, son of E. G. and Sarah Sul- 
livan. Enlisted June 2, '17; 2nd Lieut., Pursuit 
Pilot. Disc. Dec. 31, '18, Garden City, N. Y. 

[32] FERGES, LIEUT. ROY; (Johnston City) 
merchant; age 18; B., Carterville, son of Mr. 
and Mrs. W. G. Ferges. Enlisted June 3, '18, Ft. 
Sheridan; 2nd Lieut., Sept. 15, '18; served as Bat. 
Com., University of Minn. Training Detachment 
No. 2, U. S. Army. One of the youngest -officers 
in the U. S. Army. Discharged Dec. 30, '18. 

[33] McINTOSH, LIEUT. JOHN R.; (Gore- 
ville) age 23; B., Marion; son of Dr. and Mrs. 
J. L. Mclntosh. Entrained Feb. 25, '18, Marion; 
overseas Sept. 2, '18, 335 Inf. officers training 
school, La Valbonne; 2nd Lieut. R. C., Feb. 1, 
'19; active service Apr., '19 as Inspector, Gen- 
eral's Dept. Dis. July 8, '19, Camp Dix, N. J. 

[34] BULMER, LIEUT. BENJAMIN L.; (Her- 
rin) B., Centralia, son of Benjamin and Julia 
Bulmer, West Frankfort. Entrained Mar. 11, 
'18, Herrin; Attached Co. L., 335 Inf., Co. A., 
309th Engrs., 4th officers training school; 2nd 
Lieut., Inf., Aug. 26, '18, and assigned to 158th 
Depot Brig., Camp Sherman. Dis. Dec., '18. 

[35] BYARS, LIEUT. ELWOOD; (Marion) 
clerk; age 22; son of Benton Byars. Enlisted 
May 5, '17, Murphysboro; attached Co. G., 57th 
Inf.; Corp., Sept. 20, '17; Sgt., June 10, '18; 2nd 
Lieut., Aug. 27, '18, transferred to Co. H., 80th 
Inf. Discharged Feb. 1, '19, Camp Custer. 

[36] BOLGER, LIEUT. EDWIN GIBSON; 
(Marion) mining engineer; age 29; B., Altoona, 
Penn., son of Samuel Phillips and Retta Bolger, 
Altoona, Pa. Enlisted Sept., '17, Marion; com. 
Lieut., A. S. A. R. M. A.; attached as pilot Avia- 
tion Corps. Dis. April, '17, Post Field, Okla. 

[37] COCHRAN, LIEUT. CHAS.; (Marion) 
lumberman; age 25; B., Benton, son of Wiley 
G. and Hawley E. Cochran. Enlisted July 26, 
'17; commissioned 2nd. Lieut. Attached 5th 
Lt. Sch. Battery, F. A., C. O. T. S., Camp Tay- 
lor. Discharged Nov. 30, '19, Camp Taylor, Ky. 
[38] WILSON, LIEUT. JAMES A.; (Herrin) 
age 28; B., Aiken, son of Henry and Nancy E. 
Wilson. Entrained Private, Oct. 1, '17; over- 
seas Aug. 1, '18. Promoted 2nd Lieut. May 21, 
'18. Discharged July 15, '19, Camp Taylor. 
[39] WHITLOCK, LIEUT. FRED C.; (Mar- 
ion) salesman; age 22; B., Creal Springs, son 
of Robt. Whitlock. Entrained private; commis- 
sioned 2nd Lieut. Attached Co. C., 325th M. 
G. Brig. Discharged Dec. 15, '18, Camp Lee. 
[40] CHAMNESS, LIEUT. WILLIAM A.; 
(Marion) bookkeeper; age 24; B., Crainville, son 
of W. M. and Martha L. Chamness, Goreville. 
Enlisted July 7, '17, Aviation School, Univer- 
sity of Illinois, Sept. 3 ; completed course in two 
months; overseas and landed Liverpool, Eng., 
Dec. 8; France, Dec. Uncompleted at French 
and American bombing school May 28th, '18, and 
commissioned 2nd Lieut.; Croix de Guerre, three 
German planes; Fouragerie for two citations 
and French Brevet for 30 hours over the lines. 
A decoration that only three or four Americans 
have won. Discharged Feb. 3, '19, Garden City. 

128 



=g=g=#==5g 




ff-tf 






I 






[41] SHERWOOD, LIEUT. GEORGE W.; 

(Marion) clerk; age 24; B., Dahlgren, son of R. 
L. and Mary Sherwood, West Frankfort. En- 
listed June 19, 16, Kankakee; Corporal, Sept. 1, 
'16; Sergeant June 1, '17; commissioned 2nd 
Lieut., June 1, '18; overseas May 17, '18; bat- 
tles, Hammel, Gressaire Woods, Chippilly Ridge, 
Meuse-Argonne, Bois De Chaumes; wounded, 
Oct. 9, '18. Attached Co. G., 131 Inf. Dis- 
charged June 21, '19, Camp Grant. 

[42] GOODALL, LIEUT. SAM H.; (Marion) 
age 24; B., Marion, son of Sam H. and Lizzie 
C. Goodall. Entrained private Mar. 28, '18; 
commissioned 2nd Lieut., Camp Gordon, Ga. 

[43] MOZLEY, JAMES MARSHALL; (John- 
ston City) secretary; age 21; B., near Vienna, 
son of Dr. John Marshall and Nonna E. Mozley. 
Enlisted Nov. 15, '17, Chicago; promoted to cor- 
poral; commissioned 2nd Lieut. Q. M. C., U. S. 
A., Sept. 17, '18. 

[44] GODDARD, LIEUT. JAMES, (Marion) 
age 22; B., Marion. 'Son of John D. and 
Emma Spiller Goddard. Married Julia Jochum. 
Enlisted June 3, '17. Overseas Aug. 28, '18. En- 
gaged in Meuse-Argonne offensive and served in 
the army of occupation. Attached to 313 Mach. 
Gun Battalion, 80th Div. Discharged July 19, 
'19, at Camp Grant. Com. Lieut. Nov. 26, '17, 
Ft. Sheridan. 

[31] WELBER, HARRY E., (Herrin) age 31; 
B., Lykens, Penn. Son of Mrs. Annie Stroud, 
Herrin, 111. Employed Motor Man. Entrained 
May 29, '18. Overseas July, '18. Engaged in 
Argonne Forest. Attached Co. L., 28th Inf. 
Killed in action, October 1, '18. Buried in Ar- 
dennes, France. 

[32] SMITH, JAMES; (Herrin) age 28; B., 

Murphysboro, 111. Son of Henry Smith, No- 

komis, 111. Employed coal miner. Entrained 

May 29, '18, Herrin, 111. Died at Camp Custer, 

Mich., Oct. 11, '18, influenza. 
RAY EVANS, who en- 
listed in February, 1917, 
before war was declared, 
was the first soldier over- 
seas from Williamson 

county. He took part in LEDFORD, LIEUT. ROBERT CURTES- (Car- 
several battles and lost terville) druggist; age 27; B., Kaolin, Ala., son 
his right arm in the bat- o f Benton, Sr., and Belle Ledford. Enlisted 
tie of Chateau-Thierry. Aug. 27, '17; commissioned 2nd Lieut., Nov. 27, 
His home was in Carter- '17. Promoted to 1st Lieut., Mar. 16, '18; bat- 
ville and he was only tles of st Mihiel and Argonne-Meuse. Dis- 
eighteen years old when charged July 1, '19, Louisville, Ky 
he went in service. He 
was sent to Walter Reid 

hospital in Washington, WASHBURN, LIEUT. FRANK HAROLD; 
D. C. when he returned to (Carterville) dentist; age 29; B., Carterville. 
this country and dis- Enlisted June, '17, Mt. Vernon; commissioned 1st 
charged from service in Lieut. D. R. C., Sept. 18, '17; not called to ser- 
January, 1919, and upon vice, still on active list, 
returning home was mar- 
ried to Miss Fannie Cal- 
vert of Marion. He was 
cited for bravery and 
bears several medals. 

129 







* 







Red Cross Nurses 

KRIEGER, MARTHA M., (A. N. C.) ; Mar- 
ion; entered service Mar. 16, '18 at Ft. Logan, 
Colo.; overseas, Sept. 8, '18; attached base 62, 
Mars, Sur Allur, Central France; Jan. 12, '19, 
Treves, Germany, evacuation hospital No. 12; 
demobilization station Vaunes, France; ar- 
rived New York June 20, '19. 



No. 69, Savernay, France and Camp hospital 
No. 85, Montoir, France. 



SNYDER, VELMA, (A. N. C.) ; Carterville; 
aged 25; B., Carterville, daughter of W. W. 
and Emma Snyder. Enlisted Aug. 30, '18; 
overseas Nov. 16, '18; attached base hospital 



WALDRON, CLARA BELL, (A. N. C.), Car- 
terville; age 22; B., Carterville, daughter of 
David and Margaret N. Waldron. Enlisted 
Sept., '18; overseas Nov., '18; eight months 
active service in France. Discharged June, '19. 

DUNCAN, PAULINE; Marion; daughter of 
Supreme Judge W. W. and Ella G. Duncan. 
Enlisted Aug., '18; attached base hospital 
Camp Jackson, S. C. Discharged March, '19. 




PARENTS OF 
CHARLES SHOFFER, Hurst, 

killed in action with the Canadian 
Forces in France, June 2, '17. 



130 



Camp Group containing' many Carterville and Williamson County Boys 





[1] ABSHER, LEE ROY, (Marion) age 27; 
B., Saline County, 111. Son of Louis and Anna 
Absher. Traveling salesman, Marion, 111. En- 
trained July 25, '18, Lansing, Mich. Attached 
Hdqs. Det. 160 D. B. Reg. Discharged March 

22, '19, Camp Custer, Mich. 

[2] ADKINS, LANY, (Marion) age 22; B., 
Stonefort, 111. Son of Robert and Martha 
Adkins. Married Dorris Robertson. Coal 
miner. Entrained Sept. 21, '17, Camp Taylor, 
Ky. Overseas May 11, '13. Engaged in Ypres 
Salient, Mt. Kemorell, Bellecourt, Nauroy, 
Hindenburg Line, Fremont Vaux, Vernezelle 
and Audigny, Selle River. Attached Hdq., 115 
M. G. Bn. Discharged, Camp Grant, 111., April 
10, '19. 

[3] ALEXANDER, CORP. FARNECE OTIS, 
(Marion) age 26; B., Williamson County, 111. 
Son of J. C. and Nanie Alexander. Married 
Miss Bessie Laningham. Employed with gas 
company. Entrained Sept. 21, '17. Overseas 
Oct. 31, '18. Attached Base Hospital 119, A. E. 
F. Discharged, Camp Taylor, Ky., July 24, '19. 

[4] ALLEN, CORP. AUDIE L., (Marion) 
age 21; B., Carrier Mills, 111. Son of J. L. 
and Eliza Allen, Marion, 111. Coal miner. 
Enlisted April 9, '17. Discharged, Waco, 
Texas, Dec. 9, '18. Re-enlisted April 11, '19. 

[5] ALLEN, EMERY, (Marion) age 23; B., 
Crab Orchard, 111. Son of J. L. and Elsie 
Allen. Employed as assistant fire chief, 
Marion, 111. Entrained Oct. 5, '17, Camp Tay- 
lor, Ky. Attached to Co. E, 345 Inf. Dis- 
charged from Camp Grant, 111., Jan. 4, '19. 

[6] ALLEN, SGT. WILLIAM T., (Marion) 
age 29; B., Marion, 111. Son of Thomas and 
Adaline Allen, Marion, 111. Married May 
Walker. Traveling salesman. Entrained June 
14, '18. Overseas Sept. 28, '18. Attached 526 
Motor Truck Co. Discharged, Camp Grant, 111., 
July 16, '19. 

[7] ANDRIS, WILLIAM WALTER, (Marion) 
age 19; B., Marion, 111. Son of E. A. and 
Martha Andris. Merchant. Enlisted Sept. 

23, '18. Discharged, James Millikin Univer- 
sity, Decatur, 111., Dec. 21, '18. 

[8] AVERY, CORP. CLARENCES. (Marion), 
age 28; B., Grass Valley, Calif. Son of S. D. 
and Mrs. A. D. Avery. Pipe fitter. Married 
Iva Kinser. Entrained Camp Wheeler, Ga., 
June 27, '18. Overseas Sept. 29, '18. Attached 
Co. M, 49 Inf. Discharged, Ft. Leavenworth, 
Kan., Feb. 15, '19. 

[9] BAKER, GEORGE R., (Marion) age 24; 
B., Golconda, 111. Son of John and Mary 
Baker. Married Miss Juanita Rbberts. Em- 
ployed as rigger, Marion. Enlisted Aug. 9, 
'17, Jefferson Barracks. Overseas Jan 12, '18. 
Attached to M. G. Co., 26 Inf. Engaged in 
active service at Cantigny and Soissons. Dis- 
charged April 12, '19, at Camp Grant, 111." 

[10] BELL, JOHN E., (Marion) age 18; B., 



Shawneetown, 111. Son of Mrs. Hattie Hicks, 
Marion, 111. Coal miner. Entrained May 2, 
'18, Great Lakes, Chicago, 111. Left overseas 
on U. S. S. Henderson, Transport, Aug. '18. 
In submarine attack in which his ship sank 
a submarine. Attached U. S. S. as Sailor. 
Still in service. 

[11] BEARDEN, RUEL E., (Marion) age 
21; B., Marion, 111. Son of Amos and Alice 
Bearden. Married Mabel Deason. Coal 
miner. Entrained Sept. 6, '18, Camp Forest, 
Ga. Overseas Oct. 21, '18. Attached Co. C., 
128th Engineers. Discharged, Camp Grant, 
111., July 3, '19. 

[12] BLUE, OSCAR, (Thompsonville) age 
24; B., Williamson County, 111. Son of D. H. 
and Alice Blue. Married Miss Orphie Hast- 
ings. Farmer, Thompsonville, 111. Entrained 
April 1, '18, Marion, 111. Overseas Nov. 15, 
'18. Attached to R. R. Co. 21. Discharged 
June, '19. 

[13] BOLES, WILEY P., (Marion) age 25; 
B., Williamson County, 111. Son of Josh and 
Oneida Boles. Married Miss Flossie Hastings. 
Employed as miner, Marion. Entrained Feb. 
25, '18 for Camp Taylor, Ky. Overseas Sept. 
3, '18. Attached to Co. C, 361 Reg. Engaged 
in active service at Flanders and Argonne 
Front. 

[14] BORDEN, OLIVER V., (Marion) age 
21 ; B., Stonefort, 111. Son of James and Har- 
riet Borden. Enlisted June 13, 1914, at Jef- 
ferson Barracks. Overseas June 4, 1918. En- 
gaged in active service at Luzy Sector, St. 
Mihiel Offensive, Eavezin Sector, Meuse-Ar- 
gonne Offensive. Was injured at Beaumont, 
France. Served three years in the Philippine 
Islands. Served overseas in the 89 Div., M. G. 
Co., 355 Inf. Now Camp Provost Guard at 
New York. 

[15] BOWLS, LOYD A., (Marion) age 20; 
B., Marion, 111. Son of Marshal and Eula 
Anna Bowls. Married Ruby Furlong. Coal 
miner. Enlisted May 14, '18, Jefferson Bar- 
racks, Mo. Served in Field Artillery. Dis- 
charged, Jefferson Bks., Mo., Jan. 28, '19. 

[16] BRUCE, CARL, (Marion) age 18; B., 
Corinth, 111. Son of J. B. and Eva Bruce. 
Road dispatcher. Enlisted June 6, '18, Jeffer- 
son Bks., Mo. Attached Quarter Master De- 
tachment. Discharged May 9, '19, Camp Eus- 
tis, Va. 

[17] BRATTEN, ALVIN L., (Marion) age 
21; B., Creal Springs, 111. Son of G. W. Brat- 
ten. Farmer. Enlisted May 16, '17. Overseas 
Jan. 29, '18. Engaged in Meuse Argonne, 
Oise-Aisne, Alsace Sector. Attached Co. E, 
107 Inf. Discharged, Camp Custer, Mich., May 
27, '19. 

[18] BRACY, FLOYD PARKER, (Marion), 
age 21-; Marion, 111. Son of Sam Bracy. Book- 
keeper, Marion, III. Enlisted June 18, '18, 
Great Lakes, 111. Discharged Jan. 5, '19. 



133 



[1] BAKER, SGT. MILES L., (Marion), age 
20; B., Marion, 111. Son of M. L. and Almanda 
M. Baker. Student of Dentistry. Enlisted 
Oct. 16, '18, Jefferson Bks., Mo. Attached S. 
A. T. C., Medical Unit. Discharged St. Louis, 
Mo., Dec. 16, '18. 

[2] BRYAN, NOAH, (Marion) aged 18; B., 
Creal Springs, 111. Son of Frank and Anna 
Bryan. Coal miner. Entrained April 3, '18, 
Jefferson Bks. Mo. Attached Co. A, 40th Art. 
Discharged Camp Grant, 111., Dec. 10, '18. 

[3] BUCKNER, FRED, (Marion) age 26; B., 
New Burnside, 111. Son of Van and 
Rebecca Buckner, Marion, 111. Married Virta 
Thompson. Coal miner. Entrained June 5, 
'18. Overseas Oct. 5, '18. Attached Co. G., 
121 Inf. Discharged, Camp Grant, 111., May 
27, '19. 

[4] BUIE, JOHN, (Marion) aged 23; B., 
Anna, 111. Son of Benton and Sarah Buie. 
Fireman. Entrained Feb. 25, '18. Overseas 
Aug. 9, '18. Engaged in Argonne-Meuse. 
Attached Co. H., 357 Inf. Discharged, Camp 
Grant, 111., July 17, '19. 

[5] BURNETT, JOHN H., JR., (Marion) 
age 21; B., Marion, 111. Son of Mrs. Eliza- 
beth Burnett, Marion, 111. Student. Enlisted 
May 27, '18, Fort Mayes, Va. Overseas June 
14, '18. Attached Co. C, 57 Reg. Engrs. Dis- 
charged, Camp Grant, 111., July 18, '19. 

[6] BUTLER, CORP. ELIGH, (Marion) age 
25; B., Marion, 111. Son of Huldah Ann But- 
ler. Coal miner. Entrained Oct. 5, '17. Over- 
ppas Sept. 3, '18. Attached Co. D.. 325 M. G. 
Bn. Stationed Camp Mills, Long Island, N. Y. 

[7] CAGLE, THOMAS LINK, (Marion) age 
25; B., Marion, 111. Son of Moody and Alice 
Cagle. Employed as barber, Marion. En- 
trained from Carterville Sept. 21, '17. At- 
tached to Co. B, 37th Inf., Camp Mclntosh. 

[8] CAGLE, NOAH, (Marion) aged 36; B., 
Carterville, 111. Son of Mr. P. E. and Flora 
Cagle. Married Stella Wilson. Machinist. 
Enlisted Aug. 4, '18. Overseas Sept. 30, '18. 
Attached Co. C, 137 Engineers. Discharged 
Camp Grant, 111., July 23, '19. 

[9] CANNEDY, FRANK HARRISON. (Ma- 
rion) age 26; B., Marion, 111. Son of Geo. 
and Alice Cannedy. Employed as welder. 
Entrained May 28, '18 for Camp Grant, 111. 
Discharged from Camp Grant, 111., March, 
1919. 

[10] CAMPBELL, JAMES B., (Marion) age 
23; B., Carbondale. Son of Joseph and 
Elizabeth Campbell. Married Miss Florence 
Ebert. Employed as miner, Marion. En- 




trained May 23, '18. 
'19, at Ft. Mclntosh. 



Discharged Feb. 8, 



[11] CAMPBELL, ELIJAH, (Marion) age 
25. Married Mattie Harden Campbell. Coal 
miner. Entrained May 29, '18, Ft. Thomas, 
Ky. Attached Co. B., 40 M. G. B. Discharged 
Camp Grant, 111., Jan. 28, '18. 

[12] CARMICAL, WALTER, (Marion) age 
28; B., Marion. Son of John and Sarah Car- 
mical. Employed as miner, Marion. En- 
trained April 29, '18. Overseas May, '19. At- 
tached to Co. M, 311 Inf., 78 Div. Engaged 
in active service at St. Mihiel and Argonne. 
Discharged June 3, '19, at Camp Grant, 111. 

[13] CARTER, CLYDE W., (Marion) aged 
22; B., Marion, 111. Son of Godfrey and Mar- 
garet Carter. Bookkeeper. Enlisted June 15, 
'18. Attached Co. C, 3rd Training Bn., Signal 
Corps. Discharged Camp Grant, 111., Jan. 
22, '19. 

[14] CASEY, NORMAN, (Marion) age 27; 
B., Tunnel Hill., III. Son of G. R. and Laura 
Casey. Employed as miner, Marion. En- 
trained May 28, '18, for Camp Shelby, Miss. 
Overseas Oct. 6, '18. Attached to Battery D, 
137 Field Artillery. Discharged Jan. 14, '19, 
at Fort Benj. Harrison. 

[15] CASEY, (CORP.) BOMER L., (Ma- 
rion) aged 22; B., Tunnel Hill, 111. Son of 
D. W. and Marina Casey. Married Mis^s Eu- 
lalah Simpson. Employed as miner, Marion. 
Enlisted April 28, '18, at Camp Dix, N. J. 
Overseas May 15, '18. Attached to Battery F, 
309 Field Artillery. Discharged May 22, '19, 
at Camp Grant, 111. 

[16] CHANERY, MORGAN, (Marion) age 
27; B., Morganfield, Ky. Son of D. and Ger- 
trude Chanery. Coal miner. Entrained April 
27, '18. Overseas May 19, '18. Engaged in 
St. Mihiel and Limay Sector, Verdun Sector, 
Argonne Forest. Slightly gassed. Attached 
Co. B, 308 M. G. Batt. Discharged Camp 
Grant, 111., May 22, '19. 

[17] CHOATE, CARL J., (Marion) age 22; 
B., New Burnside, 111. Son of William and 
Mary Choate. Coal miner. Entrained Feb. 
25, '18. Overseas Sept. 3, '18. Engaged in 
Lys-Scheldts, Belgium. Attached Co. B, 361 
Inf. Discharged Camp Grant, 111., April 28, 
'19. 

[18] COURTNEY, CPL. JAMES LEO, (Ma- 
rion) age 23; B., Marion, 111. Son of James 
T. and Tennessee Courtney. Married Zona 
Anderson. Hoisting engineer. Entrained 
April 29, '18. Overseas May 26, '18. Engaged 
in St. Mihiel, Limey Sector, Argonne Forest. 
Attached Co. C, 303 Engrs., 78th Div. Dis- 
charged Camp Grant, 111., June 19, '19. 



135 




[1] COLEMAN, CLYDE, (Marion) age 23; 
B., Equality, 111. Son of James and Mollie 
Coleman. Married Miss Jewell Moore. Em- 
John Copher. Coal miner. Entrained June 27, 
at Jefferson Barracks. Was first class gunner 
in Coast Artillery at Newport, R. I. Dis- 
charged Dec., '17. 

[2] COPHER, JOHN EVERET, (Marion) 
age 25; B., Marion, 111. Son of Jane and 
John Copher. Coal miner. Entrained June 27, 
'18, Camp Wheeler, Ga. Overseas Oct. 26, '18. 
Attached 150 Trans. Corps, A. P. O. 762. Still 
in service. 

[3] COPHER, CLOID, (Marion) age 22; B., 
Marion, 111. Son of R. E. Copher and Rosa 
Copher. Farmer. Entrained Sept. 21, '17. 
Overseas Sept. 3, '18. Sailed with 84th Div., 
325 M. G. Bn. Attached Co. 249 M. P. C. 
Discharged June 11, '19, Camp Grant, 111. 

[4] COX, SGT. EARL, (Marion) age 23; B., 
Goreville, 111. Son of John and Laura Cox. 
Barber in Herrin, 111. Entrained Sept. 5, '17. 
Special duty 1st Prov. A. S. S. D. Discharged 
Camp Dodge, Iowa, Dec. 29, '18. 

[5] CRAIG, EDGAR, (Marion) age 26; B., 
Mason City, 111. Son of Thomas and Cath- 
erine Craig. Married Cleo Benson Dunaway. 
Traveling salesman. Entrained Sept. 6, '17, 
Camp Taylor, Ky. Overseas Sept. 3, '18. At- 
tached Hqrs. 49 Inf. Discharged Ft. Leaven- 
worth, Kans., Feb. 12, '19. In Officers' train- 
ing camp when armistice was signed. 

[6] GRAIN, WILLIAM FLOYD, (Marion) 
age 27; B., Carterville, 111. Son of Wm. B. 
and Laura Grain. Married Miss Flora Shock- 
ley. Farmer and miner. Entrained April 29, 
'18. Overseas May 17, '18. Wounded Oct. 24, 
'18, in Argonne Forest and lost one eye. Dis- 
charged Feb. 16, '18, Baltimore, Md. 

[7] GRAIN, GROVER CLEVELAND, (Ma- 
rion) age 25; B., Carterville, 111. Son of James 
and Ellen Grain. Farmer. Entrained March 
12, '18. Overseas Sept. 22, '18. Attached Co. 
C, 28 Inf. 

[8] GRAIN, CLARENCE JOSEPH, (Marion) 
age 23; B., Williamson County, 111. Son of 
Wm. and Laura Grain. Farmer and miner. 
Entrained Feb. 25, '18. Overseas Sept. 2, '18. 
Discharged May 20, '19, Camp Grant, 111. 

[9] CULBREATH, FREMAN, (Marion) age 
17; B., Corinth, 111. Son of Cora Pine. Em- 
ployed as miner, Marion. Enlisted May 24, 
17. Attached to Co. A., 3rd Ammunition 
Train. Now stationed with A. E. F. in Ger- 
many. 

[10]CUTRELL, GEORGE, (Marion) age 23; 
B., Marion, 111. Son of John and Mary Cut- 
rell. Married Antice Worley. Teacher. En- 



listed May 18, '18, Camp Meade, Md. Attached 
Co. B, 69th Engineers. Discharged, Camp 
Taylor, Ky., Dec. 22, '18. 

[11] DARTER, CLAUDE, (Marion) age 22; 
B., Vienna, 111. Son of Frank and Vena Dar- 
ter. Employed as miner, Marion. Enlisted 
Feb. 8, '17, at Johnston City. Attached to 
Marine Rifle Team, Naval Rifle Range. Sta- 
tioned at Wakefield, Mass. 

[12] DARTER, FRED A., (Marion) age 23; 
B., Vienna, 111. Son of Frank and Vena Dar- 
ter. Employed as miner, Marion. Entrained 
June 24, '18. Overseas Aug. 6, '18. Attached 
to Co. D, 125 Regiment, 32 Div. Saw active 
service at Argonne Forest. Wounded by 
shrapnel at Romagne, Oct. 16, '18. Discharged 
May 24, '19, at Camp Sherman, Ohio. 

[13] DAVIDSON, ALBERT L., (Marion) 
age 30; B., Marion, 111. Son of John and 
Diademia Davidson. Steel contractor. En- 
listed May 11, '17, Jefferson Barracks, Mo. 
Overseas Aug. '17, for 15 months. Gassed 
once. Attached to 2nd Engineers, Co. D. 
Discharged, Camp Dodge, Iowa, May 9, '19. 

[14] DEASON, LEWIS, (Marion) age 28; 
B., Creal Springs, 111. Son of Geo. and Lydia 
Deason. Employed as barber, Marion. En- 
trained May 28, '18 for Hattiesburg, Miss. 
Overseas Sept. 29, '18. Attached to Co. C, 5th 
M. G. Bn. Stationed with A. E. F., Hearch- 
book, Germany. A. P. O. 710. 

[15] DE LOACH, BRYAN W., (Marion) age 
21; B., Paducah, Ky. Son of Thomas and 
Bettie De Loach. Employed as mechanic, Ma- 
rion. Enlisted April 25, '17, at Lansing, Mich. 
Overseas Feb. 22, '18. Attached to Battery D, 
52 Artillery. Engaged in active service at 
St. Mihiel offensive, the Argonne and Battle 
of Meuse. Discharged Jan. 22, '19, at Camp 
Custer, Mich. 

[16] DOUGLAS, LAWRENCE, (Marion) age 
22; B., Marion, 111. Son of J. C. and E. Doug- 
las. Employed at powder plant. Entrained 
May 27, '18. Attached to Co. L., 48 Inf. 
Discharged from Camp Jackson, Feb. 11, '19. 

[17] DUTY, DELOS L., (Marion) age 35; 
B., Attila, 111. Son of Hiram and Paradine 
Duty. Lawyer. Enlisted July 28, '18. Jef- 
ferson Barracks, Mo. Attached to 5th Co., 2nd 
Bn., I. C. O. T. S., and Co. K, 2nd Inf. Dis- 
charged Camp Grant, 111., Nov. 26, '18. 

[18] DUNAWAY, SAM L., (Marion) age 23; 
B., Marion. Son of Thomas and Emma D. 
Dunaway. Employed as ass't manager of 
White Ash Mine. Entrained Sept. 5, '18, for 
Camp Custer, Mich. Attached to Co. C., Quar- 
termaster Bn. Discharged March 30, '19, at 
Camp Custer, Mich. 



137 




m ^~ 



[1] EDWARDS, HERMAN, (Marion) age 
21; B., Marion, 111. Son of George and Mary 
Edwards. Coal miner. Entrained April 29, 
'17. Overseas May 20, '17. Engaged in Ar- 
gonne and St. Mihiel. Slightly wounded in 
right jaw. Attached Co. L, 311 Inf., 78 Divi- 
sion. Discharged Camp Grant, 111., June 1, 
'19. 

[2] EDWARDS, ROBERT L., (Marion) age 
18; B., Crab Orchard, 111. Son of W. F. and 
Flora Edwards. Employed as miner, Marion. 
Enlisted April 13, '17, at Murphysboro, 111. 
Overseas July 31, '18. Attached to Co. D, 5th 
Engrs. Engaged in active service at Puvenelle 
sector, Oct. 8, '18, to Nov. 11, '18. Discharged 
March 29, '19, at Camp Taylor, Ky. 

[3] ELLIOTT, WILLIAM THOMAS (Ma- 
rion) age 26; B., Creal Springs, 111. Son of 
Green and Mary Elliott. Coal miner. En- 
trained May 28, '18, Camp Shelby, Miss. 
Overseas Oct. 5, '18. Got to firing line when 
armistice was signed. Attached Co. E, 328 
Inf. Discharged Camp Grant, 111., May 31, 
'19. 

[4] EMERY, GUY, (Marion) age 21; B., 
Parker City, 111. Son of Columbus and Mary 
Emery. Employed as miner, Marion. En- 
trained Sept. 21, '17, Camp Taylor, Ky. Over- 
seas Aug. 18, '18. Attached to 325 M. G. Bn.; 
84 Div. Discharged June 2, '19, at Camp 
Grant, 111. 

[5] ERWIN, ROBERT E., (Marion) age 24; 
B., Harrisburg, 111. Son of Wm. and Lora 
Erwin. Employed as chauffeur, Marion. En- 
trained April 29, '18. Attached to Co. E, 303 
Engineers. Engaged in active service at 
Limey sector, St. Mihiel, St. Juren, Meuse, and 
Argonne offensive. Discharged June 14, '19, 
at Camp Grant, 111. 

[6] FLY, MORTON, (Marion) aged 27; B., 
Wolf Creek, 111. Son of T. M. and Victoria 
Fly. Married Dora Daws. Coal miner. En- 
trained Oct. 4, '17, Camp Taylor, Ky. At- 
tached Co. A, 325 M. G. Bn. Discharged, 
Camp Taylor, Ky., Feb. 26, '18. 

[7] FOX, WM. L., (Marion) age 21; B., Crab 
Orchard, 111. Son of Will and Josie Fox. Em- 
ployed as fireman, Marion. Enlisted Feb. 25, 
'17, Camp Taylor, Ky. Overseas Aug. 3, '18. 
B, 361 Regiment. Engaged in active service 
on Flanders front. Discharged Apr. 28, '19 at 
Camp Grant, 111. 

[8] FOWLER, CHAS H. (Marion) age 22; B, 
Crab Orchard, 111. Son of Sidney Fowler. 
Lawyer. Enlisted Aug. 23, '17, Ft. Sheridan, 
111. Overseas Oct. 17, '17. Engaged in St. 
Clement Sector, Baccarat Sector, L'Esperance 
Sector, Champagne Defensive, Aisne-Marne 
Offensive, Fismes Sector, Toul Sector, St. 
Mihiel Off.,Essey-Pannes Sector, Meuse-Ar- 
gonne Off. Army of Occupation in Germany. 
Attached to Battery B, 149 F. A., 42 Div. 
Discharged Camp Grant, 111., May 10, '19. 



[9] FOWLER, SGT. WILLIAM H., (Marion) 
age 30; B, Marion 111., Son of Sidney Fowler. 
Lawyer. Enlisted Nov.., 7, '17. Attached 113, 
Aero Squadron, Throughout service was in- 
structor in machine gunnery for Pilots and 
Observers at Ellington Field, Texas. Promot- 
ed to Sgt. Major of the Gunnery School. 
Dicharged Camp Grant, 111., July 3, '19. 
[10] FRIES, ARTHUR C. B., (Marion) age 
28; B., Mascoutah, 111., Son of August and 
Margaret Fries. Married Clara K. Uhley. 
Coal miner. Entrained Sept. 21, '17, Camp 
Taylor, Ky. Attached Auxiliary Remount 
Depot. Discharged Camp Sherman, Ohio, 
March 3, '19. 

[11] GABRIEL, THOMAS E., (Marion) age 
23; B., Sand Run, Ohio. Son of John and 
Margaret Gabriel. Coal miner. Enlisted Jan. 
4, '18. Overseas May 29, '18. Engaged in a 
submarine battle July 18, '18. Attached to 
U. S. Naval Flying Corps. Discharged Hamp- 
ton Roads, Va., March 13, '19 
[12] GARRISON, HERMAN C., (Marion) 
age 22; B., Saline County 111. Son of John 
Herman and Cora Garrison. Married Sadie 
Hinckle. Bookkeeper. Entrained June 27, '18. 
Overseas Oct., 11, '18. Attached 331 Inf.. 82 
Div: Discharged, Camp Grant, 111., Feb. 6, '19. 
[13] GERACI, ANTHONY FRANK, (Ma- 
rion) age 22; B., Pennsylvania, Son of Frank 
and Irene Geraci. Coal miner. Entrained 
May 28, '18. Overseas Oct., '18. Engaged in 
Meuse-Argonne. Attached Co. K., 312 Inf., 
Discharged Camp Grant, 111. 
[14] GERSTKEMPER, CORP. TREVOR A., 
(Marion) age 17; B., Crab Orchard, 111., Son 
of Augustus and Nelia Gerstkemper. Student. 
Enlisted May 28, '17. Overseas May 3, '18. 
Engaged in St. Mihiel, Argonne-Meuse, North 
Sector of Wesserling Sector Vosges, Gerard- 
meo, Sommedieu Sector. Attached to Co. D., 138 
Inf. Discharged Camp Funston, Kans., May 
13, '19. 

[15] GIBSON, K. CHAS., (Marion) age 21; 
Brownfield, 111. Son of Samuel D. and Re- 
becca J. Gibson. Enlisted Oct. 1, 1918, for 
Newport News, R. I. Overseas first trip April 
12, '19. Attached to Co. "E" F. I. C. U. S. N. 
Not yet discharged. 

[16] GILL, LLOYD, (Marion) age 23; B., 
Marion, 111., Son of Sallie and E. E. Gill. En- 
trained Feb., 25, '18. Spent most of army 
life Camp Taylor, Ky., Discharged Carlisle, 
Penn., Feb., 23 '19. 

[17] GORDON, SGT. VIRGIL, age 25; B., 
Tindly, 111., Son of J. A. and Dosha Gordon. 
Employed on R. R. Entrained April 29, '18. 
Overseas May 17, '18. Engaged in St. Mihiel, 
Argonne Off. Attached Co. L., 311 Inf. Dis- 
charged Camp Grant, 111., June 1, '19. 
[18] GRANT, JESSE W. (Marion) age 24; 
B., Galatia, 111., Son of L. R. and Ella Grant. 
Clerk. Entrain d June 27, '18, Camp Wheeler, 
Ga., Overseas Oct., 10 '18. Attached Co. H., 
193 Inf. Discharged Camp Grant, April 4, '19. 



189 




[I] GRADY, PAUL, (Marion) age 18; B., 
Creal Springs, 111. Son of J. J. Grady. Student 
University Illinois. Enlisted Oct. 1, '18, Ur- 
bana, 111. Discharged Dec. 21, '18, Urbana, 111. 
[2] GRAVES, HERMAN ALBERT, (Marion) 
age 29; B., Galatia, 111. Son of Light and 
Eizabeth Graves. Married Jewel Jack Graves. 
Miner. Entrained June 27, '18. Attached 
to Co. C., 124 Inf. Discharged at Camp Hola- 
bird, Md., Jan 27, 19. 

[3] GRAVANIS, CORP. AELANASIOS, 
(Marion) age 26; B., in Greece. Merchant. 
Entrained Feb. 25, '18. Overseas Sept. 3, '18. 
Attached to Co. "A", 361 Inf. Engaged in 
Lys, Scheldt-Belgium. Discharged at Camp 
Grant, III., April 28, '19. 

[4] GROVES, CORP. LEO DUDLEY, (Ma- 
rion) age 22; B., Marion, 111. Son of Sarah 
Norman Groves. Coal Miner. Entrained June 
27, '18. Attached to Co. 5 Development Bat- 
talion. Discharged at Camp Wheeler, Ga., 
Nov. 30, '19. 

[5] GULLEDGE, VERNELL, (Marion) age 
23; B., Marion, 111. Son of Elizabeth Gulledge. 
Entrained July 30, 1918. Attached Q. M. 
Corps. Discharged Syracuse, N. Y., April 23, 
1919. 

[6] HALBIN, ROY MARION, (Marion) age 
21; B., Marion, 111. Son of Frank and Anna 
Halbin. Employt as Gas Engine Expert. En- 
trained Sept. 19, '17, Camp Taylor, Ky. At- 
tached to Co. C., 325 M. G. Bn. Discharged 
at Camp Taylor, Ky., for permanent disability. 

[7] HALBIN, M. ALPHEUS, (Marion) age 
30; B., Lebanon, 111. Son of Mrs Halbin. 
Married Emma Forbes. Employed as line fore- 
man. Entrained June 27, '18. Overseas 
Aug. 11, '18. Attached to Co. H., Search 
Light Engrs. 56. With Second Army in St. Mi- 
hiel Sector, October 3. Discharged at Camp 
Grant, 111., March 28, '19. 

[8] HAWKINS, FRED, (Marion) age 30; B., 
Marion, 111. Son of Fielding and Nannie 
Hawkins. Employed as musician, Marion. 
Enlisted Dec. 13, '17. Overseas Aug. 26, '18. 
Attached to 334 F. A. Regiment. Discharged 
March 15, '19 at Camp Pike, Ark. 

[9] HEADLEY, JAY BENNETT, (Marion) 
B., Angola, 111. Son of E. E. and Sadie 
Headley. Entrained June 27, '18 for Camp 
Wheeler, Ga. Overseas Oct. 5, '18. Attached 
to Co. Headquarters, S. O. S. Stationed at 
Camp Mills, Long Island N. Y. 

[10] HENDRICKSON, JOHN HENRY, (Ma- 
rion) age 24; B., C. Orchard, 111. Son of Tyris 
and Adaline Hendrickson. Married Jennie 
Lue Cagle. Entrained April 29, '18. Over- 
seas May 20, '18. Engaged in St. Mihiel Off., 



St. Mihiel Sector 'and Meuse-Argonne. At- 
tached Co. K., 311 Inf. Discharged Camp 
Grant, 111. June 1, '19. 

[11] HENDRICKSON, STEPHEN, (Mari- 
on) ; B., New York. Son of Peter and Lena 
Hendrickson, Marion, 111. Entrained April 28, 
1918 for Camp Dix, N. J. Overseas May 19, 
'18. Engaged in battles of St. Mihiel, Argon- 
ne-Forest, Grand Pre, Thaucourt, Janlny, and 
in Reserves at Arras. Attached to Co. "C," 
308 M. G. Bn. Discharged at Camp Grant, 
111. May 1919. 

[12] HEWLETT, FRANK, (Herrin) age 25; 
B., Blairsville, 111. Son of James Walker, 
and Martha L. Walker. Married Edith Cro- 
well. Miner. Entrained June 27, '18, Camp 
Wheeler ,Ga. Attached to 1st Co. Develop- 
ment. Discharged, Camp Wheeler, Ga., Oct. 
22, '18. 

[13] HEYDE( PHIL H., (Marion) age 25; 
B., Marion, 111. Son of Mrs. Jennie Heyde. Show 
Manager. Entrained April 29, '18. Overseas 
May 26, '18. Attached Co. E. 303 Engineers. 
Engaged in St Mihiel Off., Meuse and Argonne 
Forest. Discharged June 14, '19, Camp Grant, 
111. 

[14] HILL, GILBERT, (Marion) age 25; b., 
Hudgens, 111., Son of John and S. A. Hill. 
Coal Miner. Entrained Oct., 21 '17. Camp 
Taylor, Ky., Overseas Aug., 3 '18. Attached 
Co. D. 112 M. G. Bn. Discharged, Camp 
Grant, 111., June 2, '18. 

[15] HILL, ORION, (Marion) age 22; B., Ma- 
rion, 111. Son of Mrs. S. A. Menees. Married 
Miss Rubie Schaubert. Employed as miner, 
Marion. Entrained Sept. 6, '18. for Camp 
Forest. Discharged June 14, '19, Camp Grant, 
111. 

[16] HINCKER, STANLEY, (Marion) age 
25; B., Thomsonville, 111. Son of Beatrice 
Hincker. Married Miss Ora Davis. Employed 
as miner, Marion. Entrained Sept. 19, '17, 
at Benton, 111. Attached to Co. 36. A. Bn; 159 
Depot Brigade; Discharged Dec. 6, '18 at 
Camp Taylor, Ky. 

[17] HINCHCLIFF, HARRY, (Marion) age 
23; B., Marion. Son of Lula Hinchcliff. Em- 
ployed as plumber, Marion. Entrained Oct. 4, 

17, Camp Taylor, Ky. Overseas March 31, 

18. Wounded in hip, November. Attached 
to 131 Co., Grand Div. Discharged Feb. 7. 19 
at Camp Grant, 111. 

[18] HOGAN, GEORGE M., (Marion) age 27; 
B., Thompsonville, 111. Son of Jack and Mollie 
Hogan. Employed as switchman, Marion. 
Entrained June 27, 18. Overseas Oct. 14 18. 
Attached to Co. E., 143 Inf., 36 Div. Dis- 
charged June 10, 19 at Camp Grant, 111. 
NO. 6 



141 



J 




[1] HOLMES, E. CECIL, (Marion) age 22; 
B., Creal Springs, 111. Son of Charles and 
Anna Holmes. Married Ethel E. Henderson 
Baker. Entrained May 29, '18. Stayed in 
service 8 months, but did not leave the states. 
Sent to Ft. Thomas, Ky., Fort Sheridan and 
Camp Custer, Mich. Attached to M. G. Co. 40th 
Inf. Discharged Camp Sherman, Ohio, Jan., 
20. '19. 

[2] HOLLICK, RAYNARD, (Marion) age 19; 
B., Marion, 111. Son of Lonzo and Clara 
Hollick. Miner. Enlisted June 24, '18, Jeff- 
erson Barracks, Mo. Overseas Oct., '18. At- 
tached Base Hospital 61, U. S. Marines. 
Discharged Key West, Fla., July, 2, '19. 

[3] HOOD, SGT. CLYDE, (Marion) age 19; 
B., Creal Springs, 111. Son of Elijah and 
Eliza Hood. Miner. Enlisted March 1, '12, 
Paducah, Ky. Overseas June 5, '16. Attached 
3rd. Engineers. Stationed Engineer detach- 
ment, A. E. F., Siberia. 

[4] HOWELLS, THOMAS H., (Marion) age 
20; B., Du Quoin, 111. Son o. W. A. and Emma 
Howell. Salesman. Enlisted June 11, '18. 
Overseas Aug. 13, '18. Attached to Base 
Hospital 115. Discharged, Camp Grant, 111., 
April 7, '19. 

[5] HOWARD, S. BARNEY, (Marion) age 
26; B., Carterville, 111. Son of Scott and Mary 
Howard. Married Hazel Hayter. Miner. 
Entrained June 27, '18. Overseas Oct. 8, '18, 
reached front when armistice was signed. At- 
tached Headquarters Co. 30 Inf., 3d Div. 

]6] HUDGEONS, IRA, (Marion) age 22: B., 
West Frankfort, 111. Son of Josephine Cham- 
nees. Carried Miss Opal Wyatt. Miner. 
Enlisted April 15, '17, Yokum, Texas. At- 
tached U. S. Naval Hospital Corps., New 
Orleans, La. Discharged Feb., 13 '19. 

[7] HUGHES, WILLIAM JERRY, (Marion) 
age 23; B., Murphysboro, 111. Son of Francis 
and Jennie Hughes. Fireman. Enlisted Dec. 
23, '17. Attached 221, Aerial Squad. Dis- 
charged Carlstorm Field, Fla., April 18, '19. 

[8] HUNTER, LOYD P., (Marion) age 27; 
B., Marion, 111. Son of George and Laura 
Hunter. Switchman. Entrained June 27, '18, 
Camp Wheeler, Ga. Overseas Oct. '18. At- 
tached Engineers, 150th Transportation Corps. 
Served as conductor on train that ran out of 
Le Mans. Discharged, Camp Grant, 111., 
June '19. 

[9] IRVIN, CECIL MILO, (Marion) age 17; 
B., Marion, 111. Son of Frank and Jennie 
Irvin. Coal miner. Enlisted Sept. '17. 
Helped to fight the German Submarine that 
came to U. S. coast in June '18, and sank 14 
vessels. Was sailor on U. S. Submarine. Dis- 
charged Long Island, N. Y. 



[10] JETER, HERMAN G.,(Marion) age 18; 
B., Marion, 111. Son 01 Theodore and Mary M. 
Jeter. Chauffeur. Enlisted Aug. 5, '18. Fell 
with Airplane and wounded. Attached to 336 
Co. Discharged, Miami, Fla., March 27, '19. 

[11] JOHNSON, HARRY R., (Marion) age 
32; B., Crainville, 111. Son of Frank Johnson. 
Married Eva McCowan. Coal miner. Entrain- 
ed Oct. 5, '17. Overseas Sept. 3, '18. Attached 
Co. B., 325 M. G. Bn. Discharged Camp 
Grant, 111., June 2, '19. 

[12] JONES, CORP GEORGE, (Marion) age 
25; B., Pittsburg, 111. Son of P. and Louisa 
Jones. Entrained June. Overseas Sept. 25, 
'19. Attached Co. A., 328 Inf. Discharged 
Camp Grant, 111., May 1, '19. 

[13] JONES, GUY, (Marion) age 28; B., 
Belle River, 111. Son of W. P. and Mrs. Min- 
erva Jones. Coal miner. Entrained May 28, 
'18. Overseas Sept. 15, '18. Attached Co., F. 
113 Engineers. Discharged Camp Grant, 111. 
June 26, '19. 

[14] JONES, WILLIAM VERNAL, (Ma- 
rion) age 26; B., Scranton, Penn. Son of 
Oswald and Mary Jones. Employed as civil 
engineer, Marion. Enlisted May 28, '18 at 
Camp Shelby, Miss. Overseas Oct. 6, '18. At- 
tached to 138 Field Artillery, 63 Brigade, 38 
Diy. Served as marine for four years. Par- 
ticipated in capture of Vera Cruz. On battle 
ship Utah for two years. Discharged Mar. 1, 
'19 at Camp Taylor, Ky. 

[15] KING, JAMES A., (Marion) age 18; B., 
Harrisburg, 111. Son of James and Mary King. 
Farmer, Marion, 111. Enlisted July 7, '17, 
Ft. Sill, Oklahoma. Overseas April 30, '18. 
Attached to Co. H., 140 Inf. Was captured in 
Argonne Forest and released after two months. 
Discharged April 28, '19, Camp Taylor, Ky. 

[16] KING, ROBERT S., (Marion) age 20; 
B., Harrisburg, 111. Son of James and Mary 
King. Employed as miner, Marion. Enlisted 
April 12, '17, Jefferson Barracks. Overseas 
April 15, '18. Attached to Co. E., llth Inf. 
Engaged in active service at Argonne Forest 
and Chateau-Thierry. 

[17] LANNIS, WILLIE McKINLEY, (Ma- 
rion) age 27; B., Stonefort. Son of John L. 
Lannis. Married Fay Shaw. Coal miner. 
Entrained Feb., 25, '18, Camp Taylor, Ky. 
Overseas Sept. 2, '18. Engaged in Flanders. 
Attached Co. H., 362nd Inf. Discharged Camp 
Grant, 111., May 30, '19. 

[18] LAWRENCE, SGT. ERNEST G., 
(Marion) age 25; B., Mo. Son of Grace 
Lawrence. Married Miss Robbie Williams. 
Entrained Sept. '17, Camp Taylor, Ky. Dis- 
charged Jefferson Barracks, Mo. 



143 






S3E335S 

il\ U \\ ^ 



[1] LAY, HARRY G., (Marion) age 23; B., 
Hampton, Ky. Son of C. H. and Eva Lay. 
Bookkeeper, Marion, 111. Enlisted May 14, '17, 
Buffalo, N. Y. and worked at bookkeeping in 
Curtiss Aeroplane, Factory. Discharged 
Buffalo, N. Y., April 1, '19. 

[2] LEACH, EMMETT F., (Marion) age 22; 
B., Coppell, Texas. Son of U. J. and Lora 
Leach. Enlisted Sept. 15, '18. Attached Co K. 
Dicharged, Chicago, 111., University Dec 5, '18. 

[3] LEE, JOHN HERMAN, (Marion) age 21; 
B., Marion, 111. Son of John and Mary Lee. 
Chemist. Enlisted July 18, '18, Ft. Sheridan, 
111. Discharged Dec. 21 '18, Greenville, Tenn. 



[4] LODGE, NORMAN, (Marion) age 22; B., 
Murphysboro, 111. Son of Harry and Eliza- 
beth Lodge. Coal miner. Entrained Sept., 6, 
'18, Camp Forest, Ga. Overseas Oct., '18. 
Attached Co. C., 128 Eng., A. E. F. 



[5] LOLESS, ELMER, (Marion) age 27; B., 
Creal Springs, 111. Son of Margaret L. Loless. 
Coal miner. Entrained Feb., 2, 1917. 



[6] MACURDY, HAROLD, 'Marion) age 21; 
B., Maquoketa, Iowa. Son of W. C. and Mary 
Macurdy. Employed in Y. M. C. A. work. 
Enlisted July '18, Jacksonville, Fla. Attached 
to Naval Reserve Aviation and was mustered 
out of service after the signing of armistice. 



[7] MACURDY, WARREN C., (Marion) age 
25; B., Waukon, Iowa. Son of W. C. and 
Mary Macurdy. Marion 111. Electrician. En- 
listed Oct., '18. Inf. signal corps service and 
was taking Officer's Training Course at Yale 
University. Discharged Dec., '18. 



[8] McANELLY, JESSE, (Marion) age 22; 
Son of Anderson and Parthan McAnelly. 
Farmer. Entrained July 27, '18. Overseas 
Oct., 17, '18. Attached to Co. C., 325 Inf., 82 
Div. Discharged Camp Grant, 111., May 21 '19. 




27, '18, Camp Wheeler, Ga. Overseas Oct.,17, 
'18. Attached Co. K. 124 Inf., 31st Division. 
Discharged Camp Grant, 111., May 2, '19. 

[ii] MCDONALD, SGT. LLOYD A. (Marion) 

age 26; B., Marion, 111. Son of Rosa Groves. 
Marion 111. Clerk. Entrained May 28, '18, 
Camp Shelby, Miss. Discharged Camp Grant, 
111., July 11, '19. 



[12] McCLUSKIE, JOHN, (Marion) age 22; 
B., Carbon Hill, 111. Coal miner. Entrained 
May 23, '17. Attached Supply Co., 37 Inf. 
Discharged Laredo, Texas, March 26, '19. 



[13] McCLUSKEY, CORP. HOWARD, (Ma- 
rion, age 22; B., Metropolis, 111. Son of 
William and Jennie McCluskey. Married Miss 
Geraldine Lee. Employed as ass't cashier 
Citizens Trust & Banking Co. Entrained Sept. 
21, '17 for Camp Taylor, Ky. Attached to Co. 
C., 325 Machine Gun Battalion. Discharged 
Feb. 6, '18 at Camp Taylor. 

[14] McCUAN, ROY, (Marion) age 18; B., 
Pocahontas, Ark. Son of Wm. and Julia 
McCuan. Coal miner. Enlisted April 16, '19, 
Murphysboro, 111. Overseas May 20, '19. At- 
tached 149 Guard Co. A. S. C., A. P. O. 701, 
A. E. F. 



[15] McINTOSH, EARL C., (Marion) age 22; 
B., Marion, 111. Son of Dr. J. L. Mclntosh, 
Marion 111. Mechanic. Enlisted March 18. 
Overseas July 4, '18. Attached Battery E. 
344th F. A. Discharged, Camp Grant, 111., 
June 27, '19. 



[16] McKINNEY, HARVEY LEE- (Marion) 
age 22; B., Williamson Co. Son of James 
and Agness McKinney. Employed as R. R. 
clerk. Entrained May 23, '18 at Marion, 111. 
Was transferred from Jefferson Barracks to 
Mexican Border. Attached to Co. D., 37 Inf. 
Now stationed at Fort Mclntosh, Laredo, 
Texas. 



[9] McANELLY, CORP. ALTA, (Marion) 
age 31; B., Marion, 111. Son of Roland and 
Sarah McAnelly. Employed on R. R. Marion, 
111. Entrained May 28, '18, Camp Gordon, 
Ga. Overseas July 20, '18. Attached Co. E. 
329 Inf. 83rd Div. Discharged Camp Grant, 
111., May 2, '19. 



[10] McANELLY, JALES LEE, (Marion) 
age 24; B., Marion, 111. Son of Roland and 
McAnelly. Married Minnie Bell Norman. 
School-Teacher, Marion, 111. Entrained June 



[17] MILLER, CLARK, (Marion) age 25; 
Son of Dr. and Mrs. J. B. Miller, Marion, 
111. Mechanic. Attached Co A. 309 Engrs. 
84th Division. 



[18] MILLER, DON, (Marion) age 24; B., 
Coal City, 111. Son of Mary Miller. Married 
Miss Inez Slade. Employed with C. & B. M. 
Coal Co. Enlisted May 4, '18, Great Lakes, 
111.. Naval Station. Overseas Sept. 21, '18. 
Musician on U. S. S. Prairie. Stationed 
Guantanamo, Cuba. 



145 




[1] MILLER, FRANK E., (Marion) age 19; 
B., Equality, 111. Son of William and Hattie 
Miller. Mining. Entrained May 5, '17. Over- 
seas Oct. 1917. Engaged in battles of Meuse- 
Argonne, St. Mihiel, Arracourt-sector, and 
others. Attached to 1st Anti-air-craft Bat- 
talion, 22nd Battery. This battery has 
credit for bringing down 11 German Aero- 
planes. Discharged at Camp Taylor, Ky., 
April 8, '19. 

[2] MITCHELL, THOMAS L. (Marion) age 
31; B., Marion, 111. Son of Winfield Scott 
Mitchell. Miner. Entrained April 4, '18, 
Camp Dix. N. J. Overseas Oct. 13, '18. At- 
tached Co. G., 312 Ammunition train. Dis- 
charged Camp Grant, 111., March 26, '19. 

[3] MITCHELL, GEpRGE WILLIAM, (Ma- 
rion) age 23; B., Corinth, 111. Son of George 
C. and Margarette Mitchell. Student. En- 
listed Nov. 23, '17. Great Lakes. 111. Attached 
Co. J. Reg. 7. Discharged, Great Lakes, 111., 
May 23, '19. 

[4] MITCHELL, ROY F. ( (Marion) age 27; 
B., Marion 111. Son of Winfield Scott and 
Marbilla Mitchell. Coal miner. Entrained 
June 27, '18, Camp Wheeler, Ga. Overseas 
Oct. 10, 19. Base Hospital 90, A. P. O. 706, 
A. E. F. 

[5] MITCHELL, OSCAR J., (Marion) age 
22; B., Colorado Springs, Colo. Son of Win- 
field Scott and Marbilla Mitchell. Married 
Miss Mae Boles. Clerk. Entrained May 28, 
Camp Shelby, Miss. Attached Co. H., Casuals. 
Discharged Camp Grant, 111., Dec. 28, '19. 

[6] MOAKE, CORP. ROBERT A., (Marion) 
age 22; B., Marion, 111. Son of A. J. and 
Agnes Moake. Stenographer. Entrained Ap- 
ril, '18, Camp Dix, N. J. Attached Hdqs. Co., 
9 Training Bn. 

[7] MOLLER, JOHN G., (Marion) age 27; 
Entrained June 27, '18, Camp Wheeler, Ga. 
Overseas Oct. 8, '18. Attached Co. E., 49th 
Inf. Discharged Ft. Leavenworth, Kans., May 
16, '19. 

[8] MONTGOMERY, GEORGE, (Marion) age 
28; B., Rockwood, Tenn. Son of John and 
Nancy Montgomery. Married Lela Shillings. 
Coal miner. Entrained Sept. 21, '17, Camp 
Taylor, Ky. Overseas May 6, '18. Engaged 
in Voormozacle, Mt. Kemmel, Hindenburg line, 
Bellecourt-Mauroy. Attached Co. D., 115 Ma- 
chine Gun Bn. Discharged, Camp Grant, 111.. 
April 10, '19. 

[9] MOORE, IRA R., (Marion) age 30; B., 
Spillertown, 111. Son of D. N. and Nanie 
Moore. Painter. Entrained May 11, '18. 
Overseas July 6, '18. Engaged in Argonne- 



Meuse, Vosges sector. Attached Co. H., 54th 
Inf., 6th Division. Discharged Camp Grant, 
111., June 22, '19. 

[10] MOORE, HOWARD C., (Marion) age 21; 
Marion, 111. Son of George and Mary Moore. 
Stenographer. Enlisted May 20, '18. Over- 
seas Aug., 13, '18. Engaged in Argonne forest, 
St. Mihiel and Belleau Wood. Attached A. P. 
O. 701 A. E. F., 2nd Div. 

[11] MORGAN, CARLOS A., (Marion) age 
18; Son of O. A. and Addie Morgan. Sales- 
man. Enlisted May 1, '18, Great Lakes, 111. 
Attached Supply Dept. Discharged Great 
Lakes, 111., July 18, '19. 

[12] MOZLEY, CORP. A. A. (Marion) age 28; 
B., Buncombe, 111. Son of Dr. J. M. and 
Norma Mozley. Married Katherine Carter. 
Accountant. Entrained June 27, '18. Over- 
seas Sept. 16, '18. Attached Co. B., 106th 
Engrs. Built and maintained Camp Pontane- 
zen, Brest, France. This Engrs. Co. having 
charge of all the construction of the Camp. 
Discharged Garden City, L. I., May 28, '19. 

[13] NEELY, HORACE, (Marion) age 25; 
B., Crab Orchard, 111. Son of Judge and Mrs. 
Rufus Neely. Enlisted April '17, Washington 
University Base Hospital Unit No. 21. Over- 
seas May '17. Attached Mobile Unit No. 4., 
France. Saw service in Germany. 

[14] NEELY, RALPH, (Marion) age 21; B., 
Absher, 111. Son of Rufus and Emma Neely. 
Clerk. Entrained April 10, '18. Attached 3d 
Arsenal Co. Discharged March 29, '19, Camp 
Grant, 111. 

[15] NEWLIN, LEE, (Marion) age 17; B., 
Marion, 111. Son of John and Anna Newlin. 
Coal miner. Enlisted April 1, '18, Jefferson 
Barracks Mo. Overseas June 5th. Attached 
Co. 7. 

[16] NEWTON. HALLIE, (Marion) age 21; 
B., Crainville, 111. Son of Luke and Cora 
Newton. Coal miner. Enlisted April 26, '18. 
Attached Co 14, Mine laying service. Dis- 
charged Camp Dodge, Iowa, Jan. 15, '19. 

[17] NORMAN, CORP. WALTER M. (Ma- 
rion) age 33; B., Crab Orchard, 111. Coal 
miner. Enlisted April 26, '18, Murphysboro, 
111. Overseas Oct. 1, '18. Attached Hdqts., 
38th Brigade, C. A. C. Discharged Camp 
Grant, 111., March 10, '19. 

[18] NORMAN, CORP. LEON, (Marion) age 
18; B., Marion, 111. Son of Milton Norman, 
Marion, III. Carpenter. Enlisted Dec 15, '14. 
Overseas Oct. 10, '18. Attached Battery E., 
2nd. Field Artillery. 



147 




*JL^|V Al .i 

~tr >f th 



[1] NORRIS, DEL, (Marion) age 25; B., 
Marion, 111. Son of Joel and Lydia Norris. 
Farmer. Entrained June 5, '17. Overseas 
Sept. 29, '18. Attached Co. E., 7th Inf., 3rd. 
Div. Left Germany June 12, '19. 

[2] O'NEIL, DELBERT, (Marion) age 21; 
B., Pope County, 111. Son of Mollie Springs. 
Employed as coal miner. Enlisted Sept. 6, 
1918. Overseas Oct. 18, 1918. Attached to Co 
"C," 128th Engineer Corps. Discharged at 
Camp Grant, 111., May 26, 1919. 

[3] ONSTOTT, HARVEY A., (Marion) age 
26; B., Pulaski County. Son of Samuel and 
Delia Onstott. Farmer. Entrained June 27, 
'18. Overseas Oct. 7, 1918. Attached Head- 
quarters 115 Inf. Discharged, Camp Grant, 
111., June 1, '19. 

[4] OTEY, SGT. JOHN L., (Marion) age 
21; B., Pittsburg, 111. Son of Wm. and Syd- 
ney Otey. Coal miner. Enlisted Aug. 14, '18. 
Overseas Nov. 12, '18 for six months. At- 
tached Evac. Amb. Co. No. 67. Discharged 
Camp Grant, 111., June 7, '19. 

[5] OWENS, HERMAN M., (Marion) age 
22; B., Johnston City, 111. Son of Lon and 
Sina Owens. Coal miner. Enlisted May 28, 
'18, Camp Shelby, Miss. Overseas Oct. 6, '18. 
Attached Co. E., 137 Inf. Discharged Ft. 
Benjamin Harrison, Ind., Jan. 14, '19. 

[6] OWENS, BENNIE F., (Marion) age 20; 
B., Marion, 111. Son of B. F. and Sallie Owens. 
Farmer. Enlisted May 4, '17. Overseas June 
15, '17. Slightly gassed Oct. 1, '18. Attached 
Hdq., 16th Inf., 1st Div. Saved several 
comrades and engaged in nine battles. 

[7] OWENS, BENJAMIN, (Marion) age 19; 
B., Marion, 111. Son of Benjamin and Sarah 
Owens. Farmer. Enlisted May 4, '17. Over- 
seas June 6 '17. Engaged in Cantigny, Soisons, 
St. Mihiel, Somilly, Verdun, Meuse,-Argonne. 
Attached Hdq. Co. 16th Inf., 1st Division. 

[8] OWENS, DALTON, (Marion) age 25; 
B., Marion, 111. Son of Benjamin and Sarah 
Owens. Married Altha Gower. Coal miner. 
Entrained June '18. Overseas Sept. '18. At- 
tached Hdqs., 29th Division. Discharged 
Camp Grant, 111., June 1, '19. 

[9] PARKS, ROBERT, (Marion) age 25; B., 
Marion, 111. Son of Robert and Mary Parks. 
Clerk. Entrained June 27, '18. Overseas 
Oct. 5, '18. Attached Co P., 115th Inf. Dis- 
charged June 1, '19, Camp Grant. 

[10] PARKS, RANDALL G., (Marion) age 
18; B., Crab Orchard, 111. Son of Aud and 



Lora Parks. Bookkeeper. Enlisted July 5, '18. 
Attached 3rd. Co., 2nd. Bt. I. C. O. T. S. 
Discharged Camp Grant, 111., Nov. 30, '18. 

[11] PATTERSON, AUD, (Marion) age 23; 
B., Saline County, 111. Son of Gilbert and 
Nancy Patterson. Section hand. Entrained 
June 27, '18, Camp Wheeler, Ga. Overseas 
Oct. 4, '18. Attached Co. G., 123rd Inf. Dis- 
charged Camp Grant, 111. Feb. 24 '19. 

[12] PAQUETTE, HAP.RY W., (Marion) 
age 22; B., Lawrenceburg, Tenn. Son of 
Frank G. and Beatrice Paquette. Miner. En- 
trained April 29, '18. Overseas Aug. 17, '18. 
Engaged in St. Mihiel Off. Argonne-Meuse Off. 
Army of Occupation. Attached Co. F., 26th 
Engineers. 

[13] PERRY, SGT. JOHN GLIDE, (Marion) 
age 22; B., Hudgens, 111. Son of W. W. and 
Nancy Perry. Laborer. Enlisted April 19, 
1905. Overseas April 1, '18. Eneaged battles 
of Champagne-Marne Def. Aisne-Marne Off. St 
Mihiel Off. Meuse Argonne Off. Chemindes 
Dames, Army of Occupation. Attached Hdq. 
Troop. 3rd. Div. 

[14] PERRY, GUY CECIL., (Creal Springs) 
age 21 ; B., Simpson, 111. Son of Laura Perry, 
Creal Springs, 111. Employed C. & N. W. Ry. 
Chicago, 111. Freight Brakeman. Entrained 
April 29, '18, Marion, 111. Overseas May 20, 
'18. Engaged in battle of St Mihiel & Ar- 
gonne Forest. Burned with mustard gas, Oct. 
29, '18. Attached Co. L., 311th Reg., 78th 
Div. Discharged Camp Grant, III., Feb. 25, '19. 

[15] PHILLIPS, WESLEY, (Marion) age 
19; B., Marion, 111. Son of Wm. and Mary 
Phillips. Farmer. Enlisted March 20, '18. 
Discharged Camp Grant, 111., Jan. 7, '19. 

[16] PHELPS, JOHN (Marion) age 22; B., 
Creal Springs, 111. Son of I. and Lestie 
Phelps. Brakeman. Entrained June 15, '18. 
Overseas Oct. 1, '18. Attached Co. A., 
W. P. T. 302. 

[17] PIRRELLO, JOSEPH, (Marion) age 23; 
B., San Cataldo, Italy. Son of Angelo and 
Mary Pirrello. Coal miner. Enlisted Feb. 12, 
'17. Overseas July 8, '18. Engaged in St. 
Mihiel sector Argonne Sector. Attached Co. 
D., 42nd Art., C. A. C. Discharged Camp 
Eustis, Va., March 26, '19. 

[18] PRICE, LORY L. (Marion) age 27; B., 
Rock Castle, Ky., Son of Mary Dufour. Coal 
miner. Enlisted Feb. 22, '18. Benton 111. 
Overseas May 17, '18. Attached Co. B. 311th 
Inf. Engaged in St. Mihiel, Bosde-Grand 
Fontaine, and Lima sector. Discharged June 
6, '19. Camp Grant, 111. 



149 



I 



[1] PRITCHETT, AUGUST, (Marion) age 
21; B., Marion, 111. Son of George and Fannie 
Pritchett. Brick Layer. Attached Supply Co., 
4th Reg. of Illinois National Guard. Dis- 
charged June 6, '17, Vandalia, 111. 

[2] PRITCHETT, JOHN (Marion) age 27 B., 
Marion 111. Son of George and Fannie Prit- 
chett. Brick layer. Enlisted June 9, '17, 
Hammond, Ind. Attached 8th Co., Coast Artil- 
lery. Discharged Camp Sherman,. Ohio. 
March 18, '19. 

[3] PULLEY, JOEL CLIFTON, (Marion) 
age 24; B., Crab Orchard. 111. Son of Milton 
and Mina Pulley. Employed as clerk, Marion. 
Entrained May 28, '18. Overseas Oct. 6, '18. 
Attached to Co. D., 113 Supply Train 38th 
Division. Discharged May 24, '18 at Camp 
Lee Va. 

[4] PURDUE, HARRY, (Marion) age 22; B., 
Creal Springs, 111. Son of Lum and Lydia 
Purdue. Coal miner. Enlisted Sept. 21, '17. 
Attached Marine Dept. Discharged New Lon- 
don, Conn., March 12, '19. 

[5] REED, CORP. BENJAMIN F. (Marion) 
age 20; B., Indianapolis, Ind. Son of Kate A. 
Reed, Marion. 111. Enlisted June 5, '17. Over- 
seas June 18, '18. Attached 139th Machine 
Gun Bn., 38th Division, 76th Brigade. Dis- 
charged Camp Sherman, Ohio, June 18, '19. 

[6] REEL, IRA GILBERT, (Marion) age 27; 
B., Marion 111. Son of Jacob and Carrie Reel. 
Enlisted Nov. '14. Attached 15th U. S. Reg. 
Discharged Philadelphia, Pa., Nov. 11, '18. 

[7] REYNOLDS, JOHN DUKE (Marion) 
age 19; B., Marion 111. Son of Drew and 
Dollie Reynolds. Civil Engineer. Enlisted 
April 13, '17, Murphysboro, 111. Overseas July 
31, '18. Attached Hdqs. Det, 5th U. S. Engi- 
neers. Engaged in Puvenelle sector, West of 
Moselle and Puvenelle Off. Discharged Camp 
Taylor, Ky., March 29, '19. 

[8] RIDDLE, ROY, (Marion) age 19; B., 
Creal Springs, 111. Son of Louisa Springs. 
Laborer. Enlisted May 11, '17. Overseas 
June 14, '17. Engaged in Rambecourt sector 
Def.; Breyes sector Def.; St. Mihiel off. At- 
tached Hdq. 16th Inf. Discharged Camp Dev- 
ans, April 24, '19. 

[9] ROBERTS, CLYDE, (Marion) age 26; 
B., Marion, 111. Son of C. C. and Agnes 
Roberts. Married Edith Bobbett. Coal miner. 
Entrained June 27, '18. Camp Wheeler, Ga. 
Overseas Oct. 10, '18. Attached Hdqs. Co., 
30th Inf. 3rd Division. Discharged Camp 
Mills, N. Y. June 28, 19. 




[10] ROBERTS, MELV1N LUTHER, (Ma- 
rion) age 27; Son of J. S. and Margaret 
Roberts. Coal miner. Entrained June 26, '18, 
amp Taylor, Ky. Overseas Sept. 9, '18. At- 
tached Co. A., 326th Field Artillery. Dis- 
charged, Camp Grant 111., March 1, '19. 

[11] ROOD, SGT. ARCHIE, (Marion) age 22; 
B., Union County, Son of L. M. and Sarah 
Rodd. Married Elva Hastings. Miner. En- 
trained Oct. 5, '17 Camp Taylor, Ky. Over- 
seas Sept. 9, '18. Attached Co. C., 325th M. 
G. Bn. Discharged Camp Taylor. Ky., Feb., 
'19. 

[12] ROCHESTER, GEORGE W.. (Marion) 
age 18; B., Marion, 111. Student. Enlisted 
July 24, '18 at Great Lakes, 111., attached to 
U. S. S. Gopher. Discharged Dec. 6, '18 at 
League Island Navy Yard, Philadelphia, Pa. 

[131 ROMANS, JOHN N., (Marion) age 27; 
B., Marion, 111. Son of Lewis and Viola Ro- 
mans. Married Miss Dana Johns. Employed 
as motor runner, Marion. Entrained May 28, 
'18 for Camp Shelby, Miss. Overseas, Oct. 6, 
'18. Attached to Battery F., 139 Field Artil- 
lery. Discharged Jan. 16, '19 at Ft. Benj. Har- 
rison, Ind. 

[14] RUSH. CLYDE G., (Marion) age 19; 
B., Marion, 111., Son of James and Hannah 
Rush. Clerk. Entrained March 14, '18. At- 
tached Medical Corps. Discharged Columbus, 
Ohio, June 10, '19. Re-enlisted for another 
year. 

[15] SANDERS. CHAS. DEWEY, (Marion) 
age 19; B., Creal Springs, 111. Son of W. and 
Lela Sanders. Coal Miner. Enlisted May 1, 
'18, Great Lakes Naval Training School. At- 
tached Supply Dept. 

[16] SANDERS, JOHN L., (Marion) age 
18; B., Marion, 111. Son of O. H. and Ada 
Sanders. Machinist. Enlisted April 21, '17, 
Lansing, Mich. Overseas March 22, '18. At- 
tached Battery C., 54 Art. In Limoges Hosp. 
Base 28 for 3 months. Gassed and wounded at 
Mericourt. Discharged Camp Custer, Mich., 
April 28, '19. 

[17] SCHAFER, CORP. JOSEPH W-, (Mar- 
ion) age 22; B., Creal Springs, 111. Son of 
John and Ida Schafer. Entrained Feb. 25, 
'18 at Marion, 111. Overseas Sept. 17, '18. At- 
tached to Co. E., 309 Sup. Train, 84 Div. Dis- 
charged June 20, '19 at Camp Grant, 111. 

[18] SHACKLEFORD, LAWRENCE W., 
(Marion) age 24; B., Marion, 111. Son of H. 
U. and Martha Shackleford. Teacher. En- 
trained May 28, '18. Overseas Oct. 6, '18. At- 
tached Co. G., 142 Inf. Discharged Camp 
Grant, 111., June 11, '19. 



151 




[1] SHACKELFORD, ARTHUR, (Marion) 
age 21; B., Crab Orchard, 111. Son of J. L. 
and Isabelle Shackelford. Married May Boren. 
Coal Miner. Enlisted July 2. Attached Co. 
C., 50 Field Art. Discharged Camp Grant, 
111., Feb. 11. 

[2] SIMMONS, SGT. CHESTER A., (Mar- 
ion) age 27; B., Equality, 111. Son of David 
and Nancy Simmons. Married Zella Norman. 
Farmer. Entrained Oct., '17. Overseas Aug., 
'18. Attached Co. B., 325 M. G. Bn. Engaged 
in service 6 years before draft. 

[3] SIMMONS, SGT. FRED. (Marion) age 
26; B., Equality, 111. Son of David and Nancy 
Simmons. Married Ella Skogen. Hospital 
work. Enlisted Jan., '18, Ft. Riley, Kans. 
Served through war period in U. S. Gen. Hos- 
pital. 

[4] SIMMONS, DAVID, (Marion) age 16; 
B., Equality, 111. Son of David and Nancy 
Simmons. Coal Miner. Enlisted April 26, 
'18, Murphysboro, 111. Attached 2nd Regt., C. 
A. C. 

[5] SIMMS, TROY ERNEST, (Marion) age 
20; B., Marion, 111. Son of Edgar and Ada 
Simms. Coal Miner. Enlisted May 23, '17. 
Overseas May 3, '18. Engaged St. Mihiel, 
Meuse-Argonne, off., North Sector of Wesser- 
burg, and Gerardner Sub-sector. Attached 
Co. D., 138 Inf. Discharged Camp Funston, 
Kans., May 13, '19. 

[6] SISK, LAYTON D., (Marion) age 21; 
B., Rockport, Ky. Son of Dell and Leona Sisk, 
Marion, 111. Entrained Sept. 21, '18. Over- 
seas March 28, '18. Attached Co. B., 164 Inf., 
41 Division. Discharged Camp Grant, 111., 
Feb. 26, '19. 

[7] SMITH, GEORGE V., (Marion)age 25; 
Son of Mrs. Amanda Smith. Coal Miner. En- 
trained Sept. 21, '17. Overseas May 7, '18. 
Engaged in Aisne-Marne off., St. Mihiel off., 
Meaux-Vesle, Toulon Sectors and Meuse-Ar- 
gonne. Attached Co. I, Reg. 58, 4th Division. 
Discharged Camp Grant, 111., Aug. 8, '19. 

[8] SNYDER, VANCE C., (Marion) age 19; 
B., Marion, 111. Son of S. W. and Amanda 
Snyder. Salesman. Enlisted April 29, '18, 
Great Lakes, 111. Was Navy wireless oper- 
ator on board submarine. Discharged New 
London, Conn., Feb. 12, '19. 

[9] SPARKS, W. F.. (Marion) age 22; B., 
New Burnside, 111. Son of Edgar and Etta 
Sparks. Coal miner. Enlisted Sept., '17, 
Camp Logan, Houston, Texas. Overseas May, 
'18. Engaged in Chateau-Thierry, St. Mihiel, 
and Argonne forest. Gassed twice during 
these engagements. Attached Co. E, 130 Inf. 
Discharged Camp Grant, 111., May 30, '19. 

(10) STARRICK, HENRY LEN., (Marion) 
age 21; B., Marion, 111. Son of Chas and Susan 



Starrick. Employed as miner, Marion. En- 
trained Sept. 6, '18 for Camp Forest, Ga. At- 
tached to Co. K., Casual Detachment. Dis- 
charged Dec. 27, '18 at Camp Custer, Mich. 

[11] STEVENSON, AUDRA, (Marion) age 
27; B., Harrisburg, 111. Son of Emma and 
Will Kelley. Married Mattie Langsford. Coal 
miner. Entrained June 27, '18. Overseas Oct. 
5, '18. Discharged Camp Grant, 111., May 10, 
'19. 

[12] STOVER, LEON L., (Marion) age 23; 
B., Williamson County, 111. Son of George and 
Lizzie Stover. Laborer. Enlisted April 17, 
,17. Overseas Aug. 25, '17. Engaged in 
Champagne and others. Gassed 8 days and 
blinded. Attached Co. H., Reg. 8, C. A. C. 
Discharged Camp Grant, 111., March 8, '19. 

[13] SUMMERS, CHARLIE, (Marion) age 
25; B., Thompsonville, 111. Son of R. F. Sum- 
mers and Irene Smith. Farmer. Enlisted 
July 30, '18. Attached 341 Fire & Guard. 
Discharged New Cumberland, Pa., May 7, 
'19. 

[14] SUMMERS, AUDIE, (Marion) age 21; 
B., Franklin County, 111. Son of Louis and 
Ora Summers. Married Madge Chitty. Coal 
miner. Entrained Sept. 21, '17. Overseas 
Sept. 3, '18. Attached Co. B, llth M. Gun 
Bn., 4t}i Division. Spent 4 months in Ger- 
many. Discharged Camp Lee, Va., June 22. 
'19. 

[15] TANNER, MATT, (Marion) age 30; 
B., Newark, N. J. Son of Isaac and Anna 
Tanner. Married Zelma Pearl Baker. Coal 
miner. Entrained Sept. 21, '17. Guarded 
Mexican border 10 months. Attached Co. B., 
21st Bn., U. S. G.. U. S. A. Discharged Hous- 
ton, Texas, Dec. 21, '18. 

F16] THOMPSON, JOE. (Marion) age 23; 
B., Marion, 111. Son of George and Virginia 
Thompson. Entrained May 28, '18. Over- 
seas Oct. 4, '18. Attached Co. G., 39th Inf. 

[17] THORNTON, FRANK J., (Marion) 
age 26; B.. Stonefort, 111. Son of A. T. and 
Elizabeth Thornton. Employed as electrical 
engineer, Marion. Entrained Oct. 5, '17 for 
Camp Taylor. Overseas Mar. 1, '18. Attached 
to 126 Transportation Corps. Stationed at 
Bordeaux. 

[18] THROGMORTON, CORP. WALTER, 
(Marion) age 30; B., Ozark, 111. Son of Mrs. 
Elizabeth Throgmorton. Married Carrie Olix- 
er. Electrician. Entrained Camp Taylor, Ky., 
Sept 21, '17. Overseas Feb. 28, '18. Attached 
Co. B., 127 Engineers. Discharged Camp Lee, 
Va., June 18, '19. 



153 




[1] THURMEND, SGT. G. R., (Marion) 
age 22; B., Franklin County, 111. Son of E. 
M. and Ida Thurmend. Marble and granite 
dealer. Entrained July 30, '18. Attached 
Casual Co. Discharged Camp Grant, 111., Jan. 
5, '19. 

[2] TURNER, CHAS. S., (Marion) B., 
Brush Creek, Tenn. Son of S. W. and Delia 
Turner. Employed on R. R. Enlisted May 
18, '18. Overseas July 25, '18. Attached 14 
Trans. Corps, 14th Division. 

[3] TURNER, CORP. OREL, (Marion) age 
22; B., Crab Orchard, 111. Son of Lewis and 
Melvina Turner. Teacher. Entrained Sept. 
21, '17. Overseas Sept. 3, '18. Engaged in 
Meuse-Argonne. Attached Co. C., 12 M. G. 
Bn., 4th Division. Discharged Ft. Sheridan, 
111., July 31, '19. 

[4] USREY, VERGIL R., (Marion) age 20; 
B., Creal Springs, 111. Son of Andrew J. and 
India E. Usrey. Student. Enlisted May 25, 
'18, Chicago, 111. Overseas Jan 20, '19. On 
U. S. S. Mexican. Did transport service from 
Jan. 20 until July 25. Discharged St. Louis, 
Mo., Aug. 6, '19. 

[5] VICKERY, JOHN H., (Marion) age 19; 
B., Creal Springs, 111. Son of George and 
Tillie Vickery. Married Eunice Baker. Coal 
miner. Enlisted June 7, '16. Attached Co. 
F., 33 Inf. Discharged July 23, '19. Served 
on Mexican border. 

[6] WALKER, ORLAN E., (Marion) age 
23; B., Sesser, 111. Son of Geo. W. and So- 
phia Walker. Salesman. Enlisted July 27, 
'17. Overseas Oct. 27, '17. Engaged Toul 
sector, St. Mihiel off., Verdun sector, Meuse- 
Argonne off.; Army of Occupation. Attached 
91st Aero Sq. Two French citations and one 
American. Discharged Camp Grant, 111., July 
2, '19. 

[7] WALKER, AARON L., (Marion) age 
22; B., Sesser, 111. Son of George and Sophia 
Walker. Clerk. Enlisted July 27, '17. Over- 
seas Oct. 27, '17. Engaged in Toul sector, 
St. Mihiel off., Verdun sector, Meuse-Argonne 
off.; Army of Occupation. Attached 91st 
Aero Sq. Two French citations and one 
American. Discharged Camp Grant, 111., July 

2, '19. 

[8] WALKER, SGT. AMOS LEE, (Marion) 
age 23; B., Marion, 111. Married Myrtle Hun- 
ter. Entrained Sept. 21, '17. Overseas Sept. 

3, '18. Under shell fire for 48 hours. At 
tached Hdqs. Co. Classification Camp, St. 
Augnern. 

[9] WASHBURN, CHAS F.. (Marion) age 
20; B., Galatia, 111. Son of Joe and Dora 
Washburn. Married Dorce Norman. Student 
Enlisted Sept. 18, '16. Overseas June 13, '17. 
In Navy. 



[10] WEBB, ROSCOE WESLEY, (Marion) 
age 17; B., Johnson County, 111. Son of Allen 
and Virginia Webb. Employed as butcher. 
Enlisted May 4, '17 at Murphysboro, 111. Ov- 
erseas June 12, '17. Attached to Hdq. Co., 
16 Inf., I Div., Reg. Army. Engaged in ac- 
tive service at Cantigny, Soissons, St. Mihiel, 
Argonne Forest. Stationed at Dernbach, Ger- 
many. 

[11] WEBB, VERN, (Marion) age 19; B., 
Creal Springs, 111. Son of L. C. and Cynthia 
Ellen Webb. Married Mabel Crossley. Em- 
ployed by Oil Co. Enlisted May 5, '17, Jef- 
ferson Barracks, Mo. Attached 8th Co. Dis- 
charged Ft. Randolph, Canal Zone, May 1, 
'19. 

[12] WHERLEY, OTIS, (Marion) age 21; 
B., Big Bay, 111. Son of Leonard and Mary 
Wherley. Salesman. Enlisted May 16, '17, 
Minneapolis, Minn. Naval Training Station. 
Did patrol duty at Loire, with aviators. In- 
structor of American aviation officers in 
France. Discharged Rockaway Beach, N. Y., 
Feb. 1, '19. 

[13] WHITE, GILBERT H., (Marion) age 
20; B., Olney, 111. Son of John and Vinni 
White. Student. Enlisted May 14, '17, Balti- 
more, Md. Transferred March '18 to school 
military Aeronautics, Princeton U. Finished 
June 22. Transferred Everman, Texas. Dis- 
charged Everman, Texas, Nov. 29, '18. 

[14] WHITE, SGT. FRED F., (Marion) age 
25; B., Creal Springs, 111. Son of George B. 
and Laura White. Enlisted July 27, '17. At- 
tached Ordinance Dept. Discharged Newport 
News, Va., Jan. 26, '19. 

[15] WILEY, WEBSTER, (Marion) age 19; 
B., Marion, 111. Son of Carey and Effie G. 
Wiley. Student. Enlisted Aug. 7, '18 for 
Naval training station, Paris Island, S. C. At- 
tached Co. H., U. S. Navy Yard, Philadelphia, 
Pa. 

[16] WILLIAMS, ROBERT M., (Marion) 
age 20; B., Creal Springs, 111. Son of Otis 
W. and Anna Williams. Engaged furniture 
business. Enlisted Aug. 15, '17. Overseas 
Jan. 31, '18. Served 6 months in England and 
seven in France. While in France was at- 
tached to 3rd Aviation instruction centre. 
Landed in U. S. March 7, '19. Discharged 
Camp Grant, Mar. 27, '19. 

[17] WILLIAMS, CARL, (Marion) age 17; 
B., Marion, 111. Son of O. W. and Anna 
Williams. Enlisted June 29, '17, Tampa, 
Fla. Attached Motor Supply Train 429. 

[18] WINEGARNER. GEORGE HARRI- 
SON, (Marion) age 25; B. Centralia, 111. Son 
of Rachael Chandler. Butcher. Entrained 
June 1, '18, Clinton, 111. Attached Co. H., 46 
Reg. Discharged Camp Taylor, Ky., Jan. 28, 
'19. 



155 



[1] ABERNATHY, SERG. ARTHUR T., 
(Herrin) age 27; B., Oriole, Mo; Married 
Miss Blanche Rupple. Employed as laborer, 
Herrin. Entrained May 29, '18 for Camp 
Shelby, Miss. Attached to Co. 71 I. R. & T. 
T. Discharged Jan. 29, '19 at Camp Grant, 
111. Qualified as bayonet instructor. 

[2] ANDERSON, GRANT, (Johnston City) 
age 22; B., Hopkinsville, Ky. Son of James 
and Anne Anderson. Married Miss Grace 
Smith. Entrained Mar. 12, '18, for Camp 
Taylor, Ky. Attached to Base Hospital, Camp 
Shelby. Discharged from Camp Shelby, Miss., 
Jan 28, '19. 

[3] ANTONINI, CARLO, (Herrin) age 28; 

B. Italy. Son of Madeline Antonini. Em- 
ployed as coal miner at Herrin, 111. Entrained 
with the first draft of Herrin. Oversea Oct. 
15, 1918. Attached to Co. A., 121 Inf. Dis- 
charged April, 1919, at Camp Grant, 111. 

[4] ARNOLD, JOHN F., (Herrin) age 22; 
B., Makanda, 111. Son of William Arnold. Em- 
ployed as salesman, Herrin. Entrained April 
21, '18, Chicago. Attached to Co. G, 35 In- 
fantry. 

[5] ARMSTRONG, CECIL W., (Herrin) 
age 18; B., Herrin. Son of John Armstrong. 
Enlisted March 27, '18 at Louisville, Ky. Ov- 
erseas, July 14, '18. Attached to 54 C. A. C. 
Discharged July 10, '19, at Camp Grant, 111. 

[6] ASHLEY, GEORGE, (Herrin) age 23. 
Son of Joe Ashley. Entrained for Camp 
Wheeler, Ga., June 27, '18. Attached to Co. 

C. 131 Regiment. Discharged from Camp 
Wheeler, Sept. 25, '19. 

,[7] ATESS, WILLIAM, (Herrin) age 28; 
B., Murphysboro, 111. Married Miss Lillie 
Newton. Entrained Oct. 4, '17. Overseas 
Sept. 3, '18. Attached to Co. D., 11 M. G. Bn: ; 
A. P. O. 746, 4th Div, Germany Engaged in 
the Argonne offensive Nov. 9, 10 and llth. 
Stationed with Army of Occupation in Ger- 
many. 

[8] BARBEE, OTIS RAY, (Irondale, Mo.) 
age 21; B., Auburn, 111. Employed as railroad 
clerk. Son of O. E. and Etta Barbee. En- 
trained Sept. 4, '18. Overseas Oct. 15, '18. 
Attached to Co. D., 116 Engrs., 41st Div. Dis- 
charged at Camp Grant, 111., March 8, '19. 

[9] BARNETT, L. BEN., (Herrin) age 24; 
B., Kentucky. Son of Mr. and Mrs. G. W. 
Barnett. Coal miner. Enlisted July 27, '17, 
Murphysboro, 111. Attached to Co. A. R. D., 
318, 40th Reg. Discharged Camp Sherman, 
Ohio, April 17, '19. 




Vi-Vl 

w t 



[10] BARNHILL, WALTER, (Herrin) age 
28; B., Murphysboro, 111. Son of Horace 
Barnhill. Employed as Signal Engineer. 
Entrained July 1, '18. Attached to Company 
Battery A., llth P. A. R. D. Discharged at 
Camp Sherman, Ohio, January, 1919. 

[11] BARNHILL, CHARLIE, (Herrin) age 
26; B., Kinmundy, 111. Son of Horace and Mary 
Barnhill. Employed as Fireman. Entrained 
June 27, '18. Overseas Oct. '18. Attached to 
144 T. C., 16 Grand Div., in France. 

[12] BARNHILL, JOE, (Herrin) age 30; B., 
Murphysboro, 111. Employed as railroad engi- 
neer. Son of Horace Barnhill. Entrained 
Mar. 12, '18. Overseas Sept., '18. Attached to 
Co. A, 309th Engineers. 

[13] BAKER, HERBERT H., (Herrin) age 
24; B., Murphysboro, 111. Employed as coal 
miner. Entrained Aug., '18. Overseas, Dec., 
'18. Attached to Co. A., 13 Am. Tn., A. E. F. 

[14] BAXTER, FRED, (Herrin) age 21; B., 
Carbondale, 111. Son of Elmer and Addie Bax- 
ter. Employed as miner, Herrin. Enlisted 
May 13, '18. Overseas Aug. 15, '18. Attached 
to Co. A., 604th Engineers. Engaged in the 
battle of Argonne Forest. Wounded Nov| 18, 
Argonne. 

15] BEAN, WILLIAM, (Herrin) age 23; 
B., Ridgeway, 111. Married Miss Opal Walden. 
Entrained May 28, '18 at Plumfield, Mo. Ov- 
erseas Aug. 16, '18. Attached to Co., M., 350 
Inf., 88 Div. Engaged in active service at 
Toul Sector and Alsace. 

[16] BENITONE, FRANK, (Herrin) age 
23. Son of Antonio and Luigia Benitone. B., 
Gallup, New Mexico. Employed as miner, 
Herrin. Entrained Sept., '17. Overseas Sept. 
12, '18. Attached to Co. D., llth M. G. Bn., 
4th Div., with the army of occupation in Ger- 
many. 

[17] BENSON, SGT. JOE P., (Herrin) age 
28; B., Marion, 111. Employed cashier City 
National Bank, Herrin, 111. Entrained Oct. 
15, '18. Attached Co. I Training Detachment, 
Section B, S. A. F. Discharged Dec. 6, '18, 
Chicago, 111. 

[18] BERRA, AMBROSE, (Herrin) age 23. 
Employed as miner at Herrin. B., Cuggiono, 
Italy. Son of Luigia Berra. Enlisted June 
27, '18. Overseas Nov,. 18. Attached to Co. 
D, 102 Inf., 26 Div. Discharged May, '19, at 
Camp Grant, 111. 



157 



- 

. 





II] BERRA, CHARLES R., (Herrin) age 
22; B., Cuggioni, Italy. Son of Maria Berra. 
Painter, Herrin, 111. Entrained May 26, '18. 
Overseas Sept. 1, '18. Attached to Co. D., 310 
Inf., 78th Div. Engaged in battle of Meuse- 
Argonne offensive. Discharged Camp Grant, 
111., June 11, '18. 

[2] BIGGS, RALPH, (Herrin) age 21; B., 
Murphysboro, 111. Son of E. H. and Eliza 
Biggs. Enlisted April 12, 1918. Attached to 
Marine Corps. Received three medals for 
sharp-shooting. Discharged at Quantico, Va., 
March 31, '19. 

[3] BIGGS, CYRUS, (Herrin) age 28; B., 
Duquoin, 111. Son of Mrs. Biggs, West Frank- 
fort. Coal miner, Herrin. Entrained June 
25, '17, Benton. Attached to Co. B., 5th Inf. 
Discharged Camp Taylor, Ky., March 3, '19. 

[4] BIONE, JOHN, (Herrin) age 23; B., 
Rivolio, Italy. Son of Victor and Nina Bione. 
Married Miss Dora Malandrone. Merchant, 
Herrin, 111. Entrained June 27, '18. Overseas 
Sept., '18. Attached to Co. I., 140 Inf., 35 Div. 

[5] BOWEN, EUGENE, (Herrin) B., Ala- 
bama. Coal miner, Herrin, 111. Entrained 
May, '18, Camp Taylor, Ky. Still in Camp. 

16] BOZARTH, SGT. ERNEST, (Herrin) 
age 22; B., Ridgway, 111. Son of Logan and 
Lavine Atteberry Bozarth. Clerk, Carterville, 
111. Enlisted June 22, '16, Carbondale, 111. 
Overseas May, '18. Attached to Hdqs. Co., 
130 Inf., 23 Div. Discharged from Camp 
Grant, 111., May, '19. 

[7] BOZARTH, AARON T., (Herrin) age 
23; B., Ridgway, 111. Son of Logan and La- 
vine Atteberry Bozarth. Civil Engr. En- 
trained Mar. 12, '18. Overseas Sept., '18. At- 
tached to Co. B., 18th Inf., 1 Div. Discharged 
Camp Grant, 111., April 19, '19. 

[8] BOZARTH, IRA A., (Herrin) age 17; 
B., Ridgway, 111. Son of Logan and Lavine 
Atteberry Bozarth. Clerk, Herrin. 111. En- 
listed Sept, '17, Indianapolis, Ind. Overseas 
June, '18. Attached to Field Hosp. 17, 5th 
Div. 

[9] BRANSON, RICHARD A., (Herrin) age 
27; B., Blodgett, Mo. Son of Anna Branson. 
Painter, Herrin, 111. Entrained April, '18. 
Stationed Camp Hospital, Morrison, Va. 

110] BRANDON, SGT. ROBERT L., (Her- 
rin) age 20; B., Carbondale, 111. Miner. En- 



listed June 3, '18, Centralia, 111. Attached Co. 
A., 3rd Reg. Engrs. Discharged Camp Tay- 
lor, Ky., Jan. 17, '19. 



[11] BROWN, ORVILLE COLLINS, (Her- 
rin) age 21; B., Madisonville, Ky. Son of 
Jonah and Hollen Brown. Married Joy Rey- 
nolds. Coal miner. Enlisted May 5, '18, Jef- 
ferson Bks., Mo. Overseas Sept., 18. At- 
tached to Co. C., 75 Reg., C. A. C. Discharged 
at Camp Taylor, Ky., March, '19. 



[12] BURTON, BARNEY, (Herrin) age 24; 
B., Dawson Springs, Ky. Son of Dora Burton. 
Coal miner, Herrin, 111. Entrained May 6, 
'18, Paducah, Ky. Overseas Aug. 17, '18. At- 
tached to G. I. S. D., A. P. O. 713, 34 Engrs. 



[13] BUZARD, JOHN JULIUS, (Herrin) 
age 20; B., Wisconsin. Son of Henry Buzard. 
Cook. Enlisted July 10, '18. Attached to 
12 Aero Squadron. 



[14] CALCATERRA, EDWARD, (Herrin) 
age 22; B., Fredonia, 111. Son of Louis Cal- 
caterra. Chauffeur, Herrin, 111. Enlisted 
July 23, '18 Great Lakes, 111. Attached to 469 
Co., 14th Reg., U. S. S. Wisconsin. Discharged 
Philadelphia, Pa., Feb. 26, '19. 



[15] CALCATERRA, CORP. JOHN, (Her- 
rin) age 25; B., Carterville, 111. Son of Louis 
Calcaterra. Married Mary Rovetta. En- 
trained April 29, '18. Attached to Provost 
Guard Co., Camp Lee, Va. Discharged Camp 
Taylor, Ky., March 17, '19. 



[16] CALCATERRA, ROBERT J., (Herrin) 
age 29; B., Cuggioni, Italy. Son of John and 
Antonia Calcaterra. Coal miner, Herrin, 111. 
Entrained May 28, '18. Attached to Q. M. C., 
Detention Camp, Camp Shelby, Miss. Dis- 
charged Camp Shelby, Miss., Feb. 7, '19. 



[17] CALCATERRA, HARRY, (Herrin) 
age 23 ; B., Herrin, 111. Son of Louis Calcater- 
ra. Entrained May 29, '18. Overseas Oct. 
5, '18. Attached to 325 Inf.,Machine Gun Co. 
Discharged Camp Grant, 111., June 24, '19. 

[18] CALCATERRA, JOE, (Herrin) age 
23; B., Italy. Son of Angeline Calcaterra. 
Coal miner. Entrained Sept., '17. Overseas 
April, '18. Attached to Co. C., 28th Inf., 
American E. F., A. P. O. 729. Army of Oc- 
cupation. 



159 



-Ty // //" ff rrrr-rrfr 



[1] CAREY, STEVE, (Herrin) age 24; B., 
McLeansboro, 111. Son of Lania Carey. Mar- 
ried Miss Chloe Bennett. Coal Miner, Herrin, 
111. Entrained March 28, '18. Overseas Sept., 
'18. Attached to Co. D., 28 Inf., Army of Oc- 
cupation. 

[2] CARGAL, GORDON, (Herrin) age 21; 
B., Echols, Ky. Son of Mrs. Hallie Cargal. 
Electrician, Herrin, 111. Enlisted July 14, '18 
in St. Louis. Put on active service Dec. 22, 
'18. Engaged in transport service. 

[3] CARNAGHI, SGT. HENRY, (Herrin) 
age 19; B., Murphysboro, 111. Son of Ed and 
Rosie Carnaghi. Miner. Enlisted June 24, 
'17. Attached to Hdq. Co., 46 Inf., Fort Ogle- 
thorpe, Ga. Stationed at Fort Riley, Kan. 

[4] CERIOTTI, MORDIO, (Herrin) age 17; 
B., Italy. Son of Geo. and Louisa Ceriotti. 
Coal miner. Enlisted May 27, '18, Jefferson 
Bks., Mo. Co. 23 Discharged from Jefferson 
Barracks, Dec. 8, '18. 

[5] CERUTTI, JOE, (Herrin) age 25; B., 
Cuggionio, Italy. Son of Mary Cerutti. Coal 
miner. Entrained March 12, '18. Overseas 
Sept. 3, '18. Attached to Co. C., 28th Inf., 1st. 
Div. Discharged at Camp Grant, 111., April 
15, '19. 

[6] CHAMNESS, CARL BYRON, (Herrin) 
age 25; B., Marion, 111. Son of Albert and 
Lyde Chamness. Married Ethel Kilbreth. Coal 
miner. Entrained June, '18, Camp Wheeler, 
Ga. Overseas Oct., '18. On firing line when 
armistice was signed. Attached to Co. G., 102 
U. S. Inf. Discharged at Camp Grant, 111., 
April, '19. 

[7] CHERNALIS, ANTHONY, (Herrin) 
age 22; B., Lithuania, Russia. Son of William 
and Anna Chernalis. Baker at Herrin, 111. 
Entrained Sept., '17, Camp Taylor, Ky. Over- 
seas Oct. '18. Attached to 325th M. G. Bn. 
Discharged from Camp Grant, 111., May 14, 
'19. 

[8] CHEW, CORP. FRANK MERRILL, 
(Herrin) age 23; B., Murphysboro, 111 Son of 
Frank and Cynthia Chew. Entrained May 28, 
seas Oct., '18. Attached to 325 M. G. Bn. 
Gun Co., 327 Inf. Discharged Camp Grant, 
111., Mny 27, '19. 

[9] CHILDERS, CHARLES C., (Herrin) 
age 29; B., Herrin, 111. Son of Mrs. Buny 
Childers. Coal miner, Herrin, 111. Entrained 
for Camp Taylor, Ky., March 12, '18. Over- 
seas Sept. 3, '18. Attached to 310 Inf., 78 Div. 
Discharged Camp Grant, 111., June 11, '19. 




[10] CHITTY, LEO, (Herrin) age 22; B., 
Makanda, 111. Son of Mattie Chitty. Coal 
miner. Enlisted May 2, '18, Jefferson Bks., 
Mo. Attached to U. S. S. Sovereign. Dis- 
charged April 22, '19 at New York. 

[11] CHIODINI, JOHN G., (Herrin) age 23; 
B., St. Louis, Mo. Son of Louis Chiodini. 
Married Miss Rosa Merlo. Employed as bak- 
er, Herrin. Entrained Sept. 5, '17. Overseas 
Sept. 4, '18. Attached to 304 Bakery Co., A. 
P. 0. 708. 



[12] CLEM, RALPH C., (Herrin) age 20; 
B. Thompsonville, 111. Son of T. T. and Jen- 
nie Clem. Mine clerk, Herrin, 111. Enlisted 
May 22, '18 in Murphysboro, 111. Overseas 
Sept 1, '18. Atached Co. D., 27th Engrs. En- 
gaged in Argonne Forest, St. Mihiel and 
Chateau-Thierry. Gassed at Chateau-Thierry. 
Discharged Camp Grant, 111. 

[13] CLEM, JESSE, (Herrin) age 23; B., 
Benton, 111. Son of Robert and Amanda Clem. 
Employed as miner, Herrin. Entrained June 
27, '18. Overseas Sept. '18. Attached to Co. 
C., 307 Inf., 77 Div. Discharged May 10, '19 
at Camp Grant, 111. 

[14] CLEM, ERNEST E., (Herrin) age 23; 
B., West Frankfort, 111. Son of T. T. and 
Jennie Clem. Employed as farmer. Entrained 
May 28, '18. Overseas Oct. 5, '18. Attached 
to Co. A., 144 Machine Gun Bn, 40 Div. Dis- 
charged from Camp Grant, April 29, '19. 

[15] COBB, CPL. JAMES, (Herrin) age 22; 
B., Tenn. Employed as miner, Herrin. En- 
trained Apr. 28, '18. Attached to Co. B., 1 
Tr. Bn.; Provisional Guard. Discharged May 
20, '19 at Camp Grant, 111. 

[16] COLLARD, CHAUNCEY, (Herrin) 
age 21; B., Norris City, 111. Son of M. Col- 
lard. Married Eva Ridenhower. Painter. 
Enlisted July 6, '18, Chicago, 111. Engaged 
in transport service on the U. S. S. Jason. 

[17] COLLARD, SGT. DUKE J., (Herrin) 
age 23; B., Norris City, HI. Son of Gertie 
Collard. Entrained Aug. 1, '17, for Jefferson 
Barracks, Mo. Attached to Salvage Co., A. 
M. C. Discharged March 14, 1919. 

[18] COLLINS, SGT. FRED R., (Herrin) 
age 20; B., Anna, III. Son of Robert and 
Zella Collins. Shoe salesman. Enlisted June 
22, '17. Spent nine months on the Mexican 
Border. Overseas November, '17. Attached 
to Marines and stationed in the Azores 
Islands. 



161 




[1] COPELAND, CLARENCE, (Herrin) 
age 22; B., Herrin, 111. Son of C. G. Copeland. 
Merchant, Herrin. Entrained Sept. 4, '18 for 
Camp Grant, 111. Attached to 5th Training' 
Regt. Discharged from Camp Grant, 111., Dec. 
13, '18. 

[2] COX, EZRA, (Herrin) age 29; B. Mc- 
Leansboro, 111: Son of Wesley and Rosie Cox. 
Married Lillian Beavers. Coal miner. En- 
trained June 27, '18, Camp Wheeler, Ga. Dis- 
charged on account of physical disabilities 
July, '18. 

[3] COX, JAMES A., (Herrin) age 25; B., 
Hamilton Co., 111. Son of Wesley and Rosie 
Cox. Coal miner, Herrin. Entrained Sept. 1, 
'18. Attached to Co. F., 121 Inf. Overseas 
Nov., '18. Discharged from Camp Merritt, N. 
J., May 22, '19. 

[4] COX, CLYDE, (Herrin) age 29; B., Ken- 
tucky. Son of J. J. and Clara Cox. Mar- 
ried Viola Fuller. Druggist, Herrin. En- 
trained Sept. 20, '17. Overseas Sept 2, '18. 
Attached to Medical Corps, 325 Machine Gun 
Bn; Hospital Duty. Discharged June 12, '19. 
Camp Grant, 111. 

[5] CRABTREE, BENJAMIN E., (Herrin) 
age 23; B., Williamson County, 111. Son of 
Johnson Crabtree. Coal miner, Herrin. En- 
listed Feb. 1, '17 at Marshalltown, Iowa. At-' 
tached to Co. K., 21 Inf., Regular Army. 

[6] GRAIN, LEON REX, (Herrin) age 21; 
B., Carterville, 111. Coal miner. Son of John 
and Etta Grain. Enlisted June 3, '18 for 
Great Lakes. Sailed July 26, 1918. Made 
eight trips across. 

(7) GRAIN, HAROLD M., (Herrin) age 18; 
B., Carterville, 111. Son of John and Etta 
Grain. Student in H. T. H. S. Enlisted Dec. 
10, '17. Murphysboro, 111: Overseas July 17, 
'18. Discharged Mar. 7, 19, Camp Taylor, 
Ky. 

[8] CRESPI, GEORGE, (Herrin) age 27; 
B., Cuggiono, Italy. Married Maggie Ellena. 
Son of Angelina Crespi. Musician. Entrained 
Oct. 22, '18. Discharged Camp Wheeler, Ga., 
Dec. 23, '19. 



[10] DALE, RALPH, (Herrin) age 23; B., 
Herrin, 111. Son of H. Dale. Mining engineer. 
Entrained March 12, '18. Overseas Aug. 19, 
'18. Engaged in Meuse Argonne. Received 
citation. Attached to Co. E. & H., 114 En- 
gineers. Discharged at Ft. Bliss, Texas, June 
20, '19. 

[11] DALE, LEO A., (Herrin) age 22; B., 
Cambria, 111. Son of John Dale and Theresa 
Dale. Coal miner. Entrained March 12, '18. 
Overseas Sept. 1, '18. Attached to 28th Inf. 

[12] DALTOW, GEORGE, (Bush) age 18; 
B., Denver, Colo. Son of Mary Daltow. En- 
listed April 20, '18, Jefferson Barracks, Mo. 
Overseas Sept., '18. Engaged in Argonne. 
Attached to Base Hospital 65, France. Dis- 
charged Camp Grant, 111., July 16, 1919. 

[13] DEAVERS, GEORGE, (Herrin) age 
30; B., McLeansboro, 111. Son of Wm. Deav- 
ers. Married Sarah Mezo. Entrained May 
28, '18. Overseas Oct. 6, ; 18. Attached to 
Co. E, 138 Field Artillery. Discharged at 
Camp Grant, 111., March 15, '19. 

[14] DEASON, EARL, (Herrin) age 24; B., 
West Fvankfort, 111. Son of G. W. and Mary 
Deason. Married Miss Nellie Mann. Book- 
keeper, Herrin. Entrained April 29, '18, Camp 
Dix. N. J. Discharged Feb. 3, '19. 

[15] DELVIDA, PETE, (Herrin) age 30; 
B., Italy. Coal miner. Entrained Sept. 20, 
17, Camp Taylor, Ky. Overseas, July 8, '18. 
Attached to Co. H, 1st Pioneer Inf. Engaged 
Aisne, Marne, Oise, Aimes, Meuse-Argonne. 
Discharged Camp Grant, 111., July 18, '19. 

[16] DELVIDA, SEVERINE, (Herrin) age 
21; B., St. Johns, 111. Mechanic. Enlisted 
May 31, '18, Jefferson Barracks, Mo. At- 
tached to Battery A, Reg. 36. 41 Brigade. 
Discharged at Camp Taylor, Ky., Dec. 18, 
'18. 

[17] DELLARIA, ANGELO, (Herrin) age 
31; B., Italy. Son of Santo and Jacemine 
Dellaria. Coal miner, Herrin. Entrained 
June 27, '18. Attached to Co. 6, Development 
Bn. Discharged Nov. 30, '18 at Camp Wheel- 
er, Ga. 



[9] CUTRELL, CORP. JOHN T.. (Herrin) 
age 21: B.. De Spto. 111. Son of M. L. Cut- 
rell. Married Winifred Bailey. Coal miner. 
Enlisted April 9, 1917, Jefferson Barracks, 
Mo. Overseas June 14, 1917. Engaged in 
battle of Lesprey, Cantigny and Soissons. 
Discharged at Camp Grant, 111., April 11, 1919. 



[18] DELVIDA DOMINIC, (Herrin) age 
29; B., Italy. Son of Gregory and Triesa Del- 
vida. Electrician, Herrin. Entrained Apr. 
28, '18, Camp Grant, 111. Attached to Co. C;, 
303 Engrs., 78th Div. Overseas May 28, '18. 
Engaged St. Mihiel and Argonne Forest. Dis- 
charged June 14, '19. 



163 




f^sc-^Jy^Ci.- -S*L~f5 



[1] DELVIDA, JOHN, (Herrin) age 21; B., 
Duquoin, 111. Son of George and Mary Del- 
vida. Chauffeur, Herrin, 111. Enlisted Jan., 
'18, Jefferson Bks., Mo. Attached to Flying 
school detachment, Lovefield, Dallas, Texas. 



[2] DEMURI, JOHN, (Herrin) age 23; B., 
Caltrani, Italy. Son of John and Minnie De- 
muri. Miner, Herrin, 111. Entrained Sept., 
'17. Overseas March, '18. Attached to Co. E., 
310 Engrs., A. E. F. Six months service on 
the firing line. 



[3] DONAHUE, PAUL, (Herrin) age 18; 
B., Pinckneyville, 111. Son of Grace Donahue. 
Miner, Herrin, 111. Enlisted Aug. 23, '17, 
Marion, 111. Overseas Jan. 9, '18. Present 
address, Marine Detachment, Naval Base 13, 
clo P. M. New York City. 



[10] ELDRIDGE, ROY, (Herrin) age 17; 
B., Mulkeytown, 111. Son of Sam and Eva 
Eldridge. Miner, Herrin, 111. Enlisted Dec. 
30, '17, Jefferson Bks., Mo. Attached to Bat- 
tery B., Coast Artillery, 36 Regt. Discharged 
Camp Grant, Dec. 21, '18. 

[11] EVERLY, HUGH, (Herrin) age 25; B., 
Island, Ky. Son of J. F. Everly. Fireman, C. 
B. & Q. R. R. Entrained May 28, '18. Over- 
seas Oct. '18. Attached to Co. G., 142 Inf., 
36 Div., A. E. F. Discharged June 11, '19, 
Camp Grant, 111. 

[12] FELKINS, NOAH, (Herrin) age 19; 
B., Indiana. Son of Wm. and Amanda Fel- 
kins. Miner, Herrin, 111. Enlisted Sept. 4, 
'17. Overseas March 12, '18. Attached to 
M. S. T. U., 364 A. P. O. 796, A. E. F., 36 
Div. 



[4] DOUGHTY, W. R., (Herrin) age 25; B., 
Kingston, Tenn. Son of W. L. Doughty. 
Married Mae Morgan. Miner, Herrin, 111. On 
U. S. S. South Dakota when a submarine was 
sunk. Attached to U. S. S. South Dakota. Dis- 
charged New York, April 2, '19. 



[5] DOUGHERTY, SGT. JAMES M., (Her- 
rin) age 24; B., Tenn. Son of James and 
Harriet Dougherty. Oil worker, Herrin, 111. 
Enlisted May 15, '17, Jefferson Bks., Mo. At- 
tached to Machine Gun Troop, 13th Cavalry. 
Present address, Fort Clark, Tex. 

[6] DUNNING, SGT. G. R., (Herrin) age 
33; B., Dawson Springs, Ky. Son of Mary 
Dunning. Miner, Herrin, 111. Enlisted Dec. 
6, '16, Murphysboro, 111. Overseas June, '17. 
Engaged at Argonne. Wounded in foot during 
Argonne Offensive. Attached Co. G., 14th 
Inf. Stationed Camp Grant, 111. 

[7] EALEY, WILL H., (Herrin) age 26; B., 
Indiana. Son of Calvin and Mary Ealey. Mar- 
ried Nellie Mandls. Miner, Herrin, 111. En- 
trained Sept., '17. Attached to Co. A., 40th 
Inf. Discharged Camp Custer, Mich., Oct. 8, 
'18. 



[8] EDWARDS, ED., (Herrin) B., Alabama. 
Coal miner, Herrin, 111. Entrained May, '18. 
Overseas 1918. In Camp at present. 

[9] EIDMAN, WILLIAM, (Herrin) age 21; 
B., Jackson Co., 111. Son of Susan Eidman. 
Miner, Herrin, 111. Entrained Sept. 20, '17. 
Overseas Aug. '18. Attached to 211, M. P. 
Co., A. P. O. 915, A. E. F. 



[13] FELTS, CORP. FRANK L., (Herrin) 
age 22 ; B., Benton, 111. Son of R. B. and Mary 
Felts. Miner, Herrin, 111. Entrained March 
12, '18, Camp Taylor, Ky. Attached 2d Co., 
1st Trg. Bn., 159 Depot Brigade. Discharged 
Dec., '18, Camp Taylor. 

[14] FERRERO, JOE, (Herrin) age 21; B., 
Engleville, Colo., Son of Joe and Marie Fer- 
rero. Mechanic, Herrin, 111. Entrained Oct. 
14, '18. Attached to S. A. T. C. Sec. B, Uni- 
versity Chicago. Discharged Dec. 8, '18, Chi- 
cago. 

[15] FISHER, SGT. ELGIN, (Herrin) age 
24; B., Carbondale, 111. Son of J. S. and 
Eliza Fisher. Railroad car inspector, Herrin, 
111. Enlisted April 27, '18. Overseas April 
22, '19. Attached to 38th Co. T. C. Present 
address, 38th Co. T. C., A. P. O. 713, A. E. F. 

[16] FISHER, SGT. HENRY C., (Herrin) 
age 23 ; B., Adairville, Ky. Son of Mrs. J. W. 
Phelps. Mechanic, Herrin, 111. Enlisted Oct. 
4, '17. Overseas July 16, '18. Attached 219 
Aero Squadron. Discharged Dec. 24, '19, 
Camp Grant, 111. 

[17] FOGLE, CLYDE, (Herrin) age 24; B., 
Prentiss, Ky. Son of S. O. and America 
Fogle. Miner, Herrin, 111. Entrained March 
12, '18, Camp Taylor, Ky. Overseas several 
months. Attached to 28th Div. Still in Ger- 
many. 

[18] FOLLIS, RAY, (Herrin) age 24; B., 
Williamson Co., 111. Son of Wm. and Sarah 
Follis. Miner, Herrin, 111. Entrained May 
20, '18. Overseas Sept., '18. Attached to Co. 
C., 321 M. G. Bn. 



165 




[1] FORD, JOHN T., (Herrin) age 22; B., 
Grantsburg, 111. Miner, Herrin, 111. Enlisted 
May, '16, Carbondale, 111. Overseas May, '17. 
Engaged in Chateau-Thierry and others on 
the Western Front. Attached to Co. E., 130 
U. S. Inf., 33 Div. Discharged May 1, '19, 
Camp Mills. Re-enlisted after first discharge. 

[2] FORD, SGT. JAMES D., (Herrin) age 
21; B., Anna, 111. Son of Chas. F. Ford. Mar- 
ried Alma L. Ward. Engineer on C. B. & Q. 
R. R. Enlisted July 27, '17. Attached to Co. 
B., 45 Reg., U. S. Reg. Army. Discharged 
Camp Taylor, Ky., March 27, '19. 

[3] FORTNER, SGT. ELLIOT, (Herrin) 
age 21 ; B., Diamond Springs, Ky. Son of J. 
C. and Sarah Fortner. Married Floy E. Mc- 
Reynolds. Coal Miner. Enlisted Dec. 11, '16, 
Jefferson Bks., Mo. Overseas June 14, '17. 
Engaged Normandy, Guesprey, France. 
Wounded in right and left arm. Attached 
to Co. C., 18th Inf. Served on Mexican bor- 
der until journey over sea. Discharged Camp 
Devans, Mass., April 22, '19. 

[4] FOWLER, ROY A., (Herrin) age 23; 
B., Wolf Creek, 111. Son of Silas and Amanda 
Fowler. Bill clerk, Herrin, 111. Attached to 
1st Provisional Co., A. S. C., Unassigned. Dis- 
charged Dec. 30, '18, Burlington, Vermont. 

[5] FRANKLIN, GRANT, (Herrin) age 24; 
B., Princeton, Ky. Son of Mr. and Mrs. 
Franklin. Coal miner, Herrin. Discharged 
April, '19, Camp Shelby, Miss. 

[6] GAREGNAMI, CARL, (Herrin) age 21; 
B., Albany, Ind., Son of John and Santina 
Garegnami. Coal miner. Entrained June 2, 
'18. Attached to 84th Div. Discharged Camp 
Taylor, Ky., March 21, '18. 

[7] GENDICE, PHILLIP, (Herrin) age 21; 
B., Italy. Employed as miner, Herrin. Enlist- 
ed May 28, '18. Attached to Battery A, 71 
Field Artillery. Discharged from Camp Knox, 
Ky., Jan 30, '19. 

[8] GIVENS, HERBERT, (Herrin) age 21; 
B., McHenry, Ky. Son of James Givens. En- 
listed Feb. 18, '18, Houston, Tex. Overseas 
May 16, '18. Engaged in Argonne Forest, 
Mercheville and Alberts. Wounded Nov. 10, 
'18 in left hip. Attached to Co. F., Regt. 130. 
Discharged Camp Grant, 111., May 31, '19. 

[9] GOODWIN, R. B., (Herrin) age 29; B., 
Cerulean Springs, Ky. Son of Robert and 
Florence Goodwin. Laborer. Entrained Aug. 
16, 18. Attached to Fire & Guard Co., 343. 
Discharged Camp Grant, 111., April 22, '19. 



[10] GOODEN, ERVIE, (Herrin) age 28; 
B., Carterville, 111. Motorman, Herrin, 111. 
Entrained May 28, '18. Overseas Oct. 5, '18. 
Attached to C. P. W. E. Co., No. 1, A. P. 0. 
724, A. E. F. Bugler. 

[11] Graves, William L., (Herrin) age 23; 
B., Saline Co., 111. Son of Sarah Wheeler. 
Miner, Herrin, 111. Entrained Oct. 5, '17. 
Overseas June 20, '18. Attached to Co. B., 
102 Inf. Engaged in active service at Chateau- 
Thierry. Discharged Camp Grant, 111., June 6, 
'19. 

[12] GREEN, CHAS. H., (Herrin) age 30; 
B., England. Clerk, Herrin, 111. Enlisted 
in Canadian Army Feb. 15, '18. Enga.ged in 
active service at Cambria, Eponey, and Val- 
enciennes. Attached to Co. I., Reg. 4, Batl. 
C. M. G. C. Discharged June 16, '19, Toronto, 
Canada. 

[13] GREEN, RALPH, (Herrin) age 23; 
B., Goreville, 111. Son of Mary J. Green. Coal 
miner, Herrin, 111. Entrained June 29, '18 
Camp Wheeler, Ga. Discharged Camp Wheel- 
er, Ga., Dec., '18. 

[14] GRISSON, FRANK, (Herrin) age 18; 
B., Metropolis, 111. Son of Mrs. Etta Hester. 
Coal miner, Herrin, 111. Enlisted July 3, '18. 
Sailor. Attached to Co. 11, Cape May, New 
Jersey, and Wisahichan, Bks. Discharged 
June 4, '19 at St. Louis, Mo. 

[15] GROWBARGER, WILLIAM THEO- 
DORE, (Herrin) age 23; B., McHenry, Ky. 
Son of Wm. Leonard and Violia Growbarger. 
Coal miner, Herrin, 111. Entrained Sept., '17, 
Camp Taylor, Ky., with second detachment to 
leave Herrin. Attached to Co. E., 345 Inf. 
Discharged Camp Pike, Little Rock, Ark., Dec. 
15. 

[16] GUALDONI, LOUIS, (Herrin) age 25; 
B., Cuggiono, Italy. Son of John and Rosa 
Gualdoni. Merchant. Entrained June 24, 
'18. Overseas July 31, '18. Engaged in Toul 
Sector, Nov. 2 until Nov. 11. Attached to Hdq. 
Co., 329 Field Art. Discharged April 24, '19 
Camp Custer, Michigan. 

[17] GUIDA, ONOFRIO, (Herrin) age 23; 
B., Italy. Miner, Herrin. Entrained June 
28, '18. Attached to Co. K., 121 Inf. Dis- 
charged Nov. 30, '18 at Camp Wheeler, Ga. 

[18] HAGLER, ALLEN (Herrin) age 29; 
B., Murphysboro, 111. Son of Sarah Hagler. 
Miner, Herrin, 111. Entrained June 27, '18. 
Overseas Sept. 15, '18. Attached to Co. C., 
324 M. G. Bn. Discharged Camp Grant, 111., 
Feb. 12, '19. 



167 



rf Tf ~fj 



II 



[1] HAGLER, WILLIAM, (Herrin) age 19; 
B., Murphysboro, 111. Son of Sarah Hagler. 
Employed as miner, Herrin. Enlisted Dec. 
7, '17 at Murphysboro. Overseas June 10, 
'18. Attached to 5th Anti Air Craft Bat. 
Engaged active service Verdun, Aug. 28, to 
Nov. 11. Discharged Jan. 7, '19 Camp Grant, 

[2] HALE, ALLEN JAMES, (Carbondale) 
age 22; B., Cottage Home, 111. Son of Jeffer- 
son Hale. Married Clara Flye. Employed as 
miner. Entrained at Herrin, 111., March 28, 
'18. Discharged from Jefferson Barracks, Mo., 
Oct., '18. 

[3] HALCOMB, CORP. JAMES D., (Her- 
rin) age 23; B., Bigstone Gap, Va. Son of 
Jane Clarkston Whitson. Married Miss Golda 
Norris. Employed as miner, Herrin. En- 
trained Sept. 22, '17. Overseas Jan. 4, '18. 
Attached to Co. A., 345 Machine Gun Battery. 
Discharged Apr. 9, '19 at Camp Taylor, Ky. 

[4] HALL, CORP. JOE E., (Herrin) age 
22; B., Kensee, Ky. Son of Tom Hall. Em- 
ployed as miner, Herrin. Entrained June 
27, '18 at Herrin. Overseas Oct., '18. At- 
tached to Hdqts. Co., 83 Div. Discharged at 
Camp Grant, 111., Aug., '19. 

[5] HAMBY, HERSHEL ALBERT, (Daw- 
son Springs, Ky.) age 23; B., St. Charles, 
Ky. Employed as farmer. Son of Charles 
and Martha Hamby. Entrained May 10, '18. 
Overseas July 5, '18. Attached to Co. F., 54 
Inf. Discharged at Camp Taylor, Ky., June 
21, '19. 

[6] HAMPTON, ALBERT, (Herrin) age 
22; B.. Madisonville, Ky. Son of J. P. and 
Lucy Hampton. Married Miss Rado Bumpus. 
Employed at C. B. & Q. R. R. Enlisted June 
10, '18 at Chicago, 111., transferred from Great 
Lakes to Erie, Pa. Inspector at Erie Forge 
& Steel Co. Discharged Apr. 25, '19 at Erie, 
Penn. 

[7] HARDCASTLE, BEN, (Herrin) age 29; 
B., in Tennessee. Employed as miner. Son 
of C. V. and Jane Hardcastle. Went in first 
draft from Herrin, 111. Attached to 3rd, 1st 
Bn., 159 D. B. Discharged at Camp Taylor, 
Ky., Feb. 19, '19. 

[8] HARLAND, THOMAS, (Herrin) age 
26; B., Barnsley, Ky. Son of Thos. and Esther 
Harland. Employed on I. C. R. R.. Herrin. 
Enlisted May 22, '18 Great Lakes, 111. Over- 
seas July 20, '18. Attached to R. R. service 
in France, transferred to Navy, on board U. 
S. S. Kaiserine Auguste Victoria; Transport- 
ing troops. 

[9] HARRISON, G. FRED, (Herrin) age 
19; B., Herrin, 111. Son of Geo. H. Harrison. 
Enlisted Oct. 1, '18. Attached to S. S. A. T. 
C., University of Illinois. Discharged at Ur- 
bana, 111., Dec. 21, '18. 




[10] HARRISON, CARL B., (Herrin) age 
24; B., Herrin, 111. Son of Geo. H. Harrison. 
Employed as farmer. Entrained Oct. 5, '17. 
Attached to Co. A., Machine Gun Battalion 
325. Discharged at Camp Taylor, Ky., Oct. 
30, 17. 

[11] HARRIS, PAUL L., (Herrin) age 24; 
B., New Burnside, 111. Son of D. J. and Alice 
Harris. Employed as book-keeper, Herrin. 
Enlisted Dec. 11, '17 at St. Louis. Overseas 
Mar. 6, '18. Attached to 375 Aero Squadron. 
Discharged June 18, '19 at Camp Mills, N. Y. 

[12] HARRIS, FLOYD, (Herrin) age 22; 
B., Plumfield, 111. Son of Dolly Harris Brown. 
Employed as book-keeper at Herrin State- 
Savings Bank. Entrained May 28, '18. Ov- 
erseas Oct. 6, '18. Attached to 304 Military 
Police, Division Criminal Investigation. Dis- 
charged July 9, '19 at Camp Grant, 111. 

[13] HAZEL, OSCAR B., (Herrin) B., 
Kentucky. Son of George Hazel. Employed 
coal miner, Herrin, 111. Enlisted June 28, 
'18. Discharged at Glenburnie, Md., Dec. 
22, '18. 

[14] HAZEL, ARTHUR, (Herrin) age 27; 
B., Kentucky. Son of George and Dolla Hazel. 
Entrained May 28, '18, Herrin, 111. Overseas 
Aug. 18, '18. Attached to Co. M, 350 Inf. 
Discharged at Camp Taylor, Ky., June 2, 
'19. 

[15] HERRELL, WILLIAM C., (Herrin) 
age 26; B., Rockport, Ind. Son of Willis and 
Belle Herrell. Married Miss Lena Kercheral. 
Employed in ice cream factory, Herrin. En- 
listed July 31, '18 at Chicago. Discharged 
Jan 3, '19 from U. S. S. Massachusetts. 

[16] HOLLAND, MAURICE, (Herrin) age 
24; B., Robard Station, Ky. Son of Betty 
Holland. Employed as electrician. Entrained 
May 29, '18. Attached to Hdqts. Co., 78 Inf., 
14 Div. Motorcycle Dispatch Rider. Dis- 
charged Jan 21, '19, from Camp Custer, Mich. 

[17] HOLLICK, REYNARD L., (Herrin) 
age 18; B., Marion, 111. Son of Lon and Clara 
Hollick. Enlisted May 2, '18 at St. Louis, 
Mo. Overseas Aug., '18. Attached to 78 U. 
S. Marines, 6th Regiment, 2 Div. Engaged in 
Belleau Wood, St. Mihiel and Argonne For- 
est. Wounded at Argonne by shrapnel. Dis- 
charged Key West, Fla., June 23, '19. 

[18] HUDSON, SERG. LELAND W., (Her- 
rin) age 24; B., Amherst County, Va. Son 
of Alma Hudson of Clifford, Va. Employed 
as steel constructor. Married Virla Welsh. 
Enlisted Dec. 14, '17. Attached to U. S. N. 
Air Station, Hampton Roads, Va. Discharged 
June, '19. 



169 



Y 




[1] HUGGINS, WILLIAM HENRY, (Her- 
rin) age 30; B., Williamson Co., 111. Son of 
J. M. and Rebecca Huggins. Coal miner. En- 
trained April 29, '18. Attached to 16 Co., 4th 
Bn.. 155 Depot Brigade. Discharged Camp 
Lee, Va., Oct. 1, '18. Disqualified physically. 

[2] IVOALDI, CHARLIE, (Herrin) age 27; 
B., Montan, Mo. Son of Charlie Ivoaldi. Min- 
er, Herrin, 111. Entrained May 28, '18. Ov- 
erseas Oct. 6, '18. Attached to Battery P., 
137 Field Artillery. Discharged Ft. Benja- 
min Harrison, Ind., Jan. 17, '19. 

[3] JARVIS, CHARLIE, (Herrin) age 21; 
B., Kentucky. Son of James and Minnie Jar- 
vis. Miner, Herrin, 111. Enlisted May 1, '19, 
Murphysboro, 111. Attached Co. 2,C. A. C. 
Present address, Hawaii Island, Ft. Kame- 
hameha. 



[4] JENKINS, OLLIE, (Herrin) age 29; B., 
Deerlick, Ky. Son of Wyatt and Mattie Jen- 
kins. Married Miss Violet McPherson. Em- 
ployed as miner, Herrin. Entrained May 29, 
'18. Attached to Co. 11, 40 Inf. Discharged 
Jan. 18, '19 at Camp Sherman, Ohio. 

[5] JONES, PVT. OSCAR, (Herrin) age 21; 
B., Wolf Creek, 111. Son of James Jones. Mar- 
ried Mae Crowell. Miner, Herrin, 111. En- 
trained Sept. 21, '17. Overseas Sept. 3, '18. 
Attached 325 Machine Gun Bn. 

[6] JONES, JOHN J., (Herrin) age 21; B., 
Blockton. Ala. Son of Morgan and Catherine 
Jones. Clerk, Herrin, 111. Enlisted May 28, 
'18. Overseas Sept. 25, '18. Attached Battery 
F., 62 Artillery, C. A. C. Discharged Camp 
Taylor, Ky., March 13, '19. 

[7] JONES, SGT. THOMAS JEFFERSON, 
(Herrin) age 23; B., Hopkinsville, Ky. Son 
of Holland and Sophia Jones. Miner. En- 
trained Sept. 20, '18, Camp Taylor, Ky. Ov- 
erseas June 25, '18. Attached Co. L., 161 
Reg. With Supply Co. 



[8] JONES, EVAN, (Herrin) age 18; B., 
Blockton, Ala. Son of Morgan and Catherine 
Jones. Miner, Herrin, 111. Enlisted July 6, 
'16, Portland, Ore. Overseas May 2, '17. At- 
tached U. S. S. Sixala, C I O., P. M., New 
York. 



[9] JONES, ROBERT L., (Herrin) age 21; 
B., Murphysboro. 111. Son of Holland and 
Sophia Jones. Miner. Herrin, 111. Entrained 
June 28, '18, Camp Wheeler, Ga. Attached 1st 
Reg., 11 Co., Prov. Bn. Discharged July 3, 
'18, Camp Wheeler, Ga. 



[10] KELLER, CLEO, (Herrin) age 23; B., 
Union Co., 111. Son of H. S. and Sophrona 
Keller. Employed as clerk, Herrin. Enlisted 
June, '18. Assigned to Div. in Oregon. Dis- 
charged at Camp Taylor, May. '19. 



[11] KELLER, GUY, (Herrin) age 31; B., 
Union Co., 111. Son of H. S. and Sophrona 
Keller. Truck driver, Herrin, 111. Entrained 
May 28, '18, Camp Shelby, Miss., Discharged 
June 4, '18, Camp Shelby, Miss. 



[12] KELLER, FERN H., (Herrin) age 21; 
B., Union Co., 111. Son of H. S. and Sophro- 
nia Keller. Chauffeur. Entrained March 12, 
'18. Overseas July 14, '18. Attached to 111 
Aero Repair Squad. Wounded by a German 
bomb while delivering message, two ribs brok- 
en. Now in Paris, France, A. P. O. 702. A. 
E. F. 



[13] KENNER, WALLACE JAMES, (Her- 
rin) age 21; B., Murphysboro, 111. Son of 
Geo. Kenner. Mechanic, Herrin, 111. Enlist- 
ed June 21, '18, Great Lakes, 111. Attached 
U. S. S. Balch, U. S. S. Massachusetts, N. T. 
S., Great Lakes, 111. 2nd Class engineer. Dis- 
charged June 20, '19. 



[14] KESLER, HERMAN L., (Makanda) 
age 24; B., Williamson County, 111. Son of 
Wm. Daniel and Mary Eveline Kesler. School 
teacher. Entrained June 27, '18. Overseas 
Oct. 16, '18. Attached Co. M., 82 Div. Dis- 
charged Camp Grant, 111., May 20, '19. 



[15] KIRK, SGT. ED, (Herrin) age 23; B., 
Herrin, 111. Son of Lon and Nancy Kirk. 
Salesman. Entrained Sept. 21, '17. Overseas 
Sept. 3, '18. Attached Hdqs. Co. Class Camp, 
A. E. F., France. 



[16] KOEN, LAWRENCE CLIFFORD, 
(Herrin) age 20; B., Ava., I. Son of L. C. 
and Minnie Keen. Enlisted Dec. 4, '17 at 
Great Lakes, 111. Attached to U. S. S. Sago. 
Made one trip to Cuba, two to Germany, and 
one to Scotland. 



[17] LAMAR, EDWARD, (Herrin) age 33; 
B., Missouri. Miner, Herrin, 111. Enlisted 
Dec. 7, '17, St. Louis, Mo. Overseas March, 
'18. Attached Mine Sweeper 37. P. O. New 
York City. 1st Class seaman. 



[18] LA MASTER, CHARLIE, (Herrin) 
age 22; B., Plumfield, 111. Son of Alice La 
Master. Miner. Enlisted July 22, '17. Made 
two trips to France. 



171 



[1] LATIMER, ORVILLE E., (Herrin) age 
18; B. ( Carterville, 111. Son of A. J. and 
Odessa Latimer. Employed as miner, Herrin. 
Enlisted July 11, '18 at St. Louis. Attached 
to Motor Truck Co. 553. Discharged Mar. 31, 
19 at Camp Taylor, Ky. 

[2] LAWSON, THOMAS J., (Herrin) age 
21; B., Johnston City, 111. Son of Thomas and 
Anna Lawson. Married Miss Marie Durham. 
Employed as miner, Herrin. Entrained Sept. 
6, '18. Attached to 211 Engineers, Camp 
Meade, Md. Discharged Jan. 17, '19. 

[3] LEFFEW, CHARLES E., (Herrin) age 
27; B., Mt. Vernon, Ind. Employed as miner, 
Herrin. Entrained July, '18. Overseas Sept., 
'18. Attached to Co. D., 162 Inf. Discharged 
Mar., '19 at Camp Sherman, Ohio. 

[4] LANKUTIS, WILLIAM, (Herrin) age 
27; B., Swalku Gubernes, Russia. Son of 
Pete and Maggie Lankutis. Employed as 
miner. Entrained April 27, '18. Overseas 
Oct. 22, '18. Attached to Co. A., 310 Inf. 

[5] LILLY, HERSHAL, (Herrin) age 24; 
B., Ky. Son of Mrs. Alice Lilly. Married 
Rhoda Baker. Coal miner, Herrin, 111. En- 
trained June 27, '18, Herrin, 111. Attached to 
Co. E., 329 M. R. U. Discharged Camp Grant, 
111., Feb. 13, '19. 

[6] LIACOPULOS, EFSTATHIS, (Herrin) 
age 24; B., Greece. Son of George and Cath- 
erine Liacopulos. Employed as miner. En- 
trained July 5, '18. Overseas Sept. 25, '18. 
Attached to Co. E., 106 Engineers, 31 Div. 

[7] LOVELACE, ROY F., (Herrin) age 22; 
B., Mannington, Ky. Son of C. M. and Ella 
Lovelace. Telegraph operator, Herrin. En- 
listed May 1, '18. Overseas. A sailor. At- 
tached Co. U. S. S. DeKalb Wireless Operat- 
or. Discharged at Newport News, Va., Mar. 
12, '19. 

[8] LUCINI, TONY, (Herrin) age 27; B., 
Italy. Son of Caurinino and Rose Lucini. 
Miner, Herrin, 111. Entrained Mar. 12, '18. 
Overseas Sept. 12, '18. Attached Co. D., 3 
Regiment, M. G. Bn. With the Army of Oc- 
cupation, Molsberg, Germany. 

[9] LUTHER, SGT. JAMES, (Herrin) age 
23; B., Murphysboro, 111. Son of Mrs. Luther, 
Carbondale, 111. Miner, Herrin. Entrained 
June 28, Harrisburg, 111. Attached Battery 
B., 15 F. A. R. D. Discharged Dec. 25, '18 at 
Camp Taylor, Ky. 

[10] MABRY, QUINCY, (Herrin) age 24; 
B., Benton, 111. Son of G. W. and Anna Ma- 
bry. Married Miss Alma Clark, Herrin, 111. 
Entrained Mar. 12, '18. Overseas Sept., '18. 




Engaged in the battle of the Argonne Forest. 
Attached Co. D., 28 Inf. I Div., Army of 
Occupation. 

[11] MAUSHARDT, LOYE, (Herrin) age 22; 
B., Union Co., Ky. Son of Will Maushardt. 
Miner at Herrin. Entrained Sept. 23, '17. Ov- 
erseas April 19, '19. Attached Co. D., 3rd 
Supply Train. 

[12] MANKER, J. BERT, (Herrin) age 22; 
B., Johnston City, 111. Son of J. E. and Mar- 
tha Manker. Electrician, Herrin, 111. En- 
trained March 12, '18. Attached Elect. Dept. 
Utilities, Camp Upton, N. Y. Discharged 
June 3, '19, Camp Grant, 111. 

[13] MARLOW, PETE, (Herrin) age 21; 
B., New Mexico. Son of Dela Marlow. Em- 
ployed as miner. Entrained in 2nd draft. Ov- 
erseas Apr. 25, '18. Attached to Co. D., 3 
Inf. Wounded Coblenz, Germany. Now with 
the Army of Occupation. 

[14] MARLOW, CHARLES, (Herrin) age 
34; B-, Cuggioni, Italy. Employed as miner, 
Herrin. Enlisted May 28, '18. Attached to 
Co. C., 35 Regiment. Discharged Dec. 4, '18 
at Camp Travis, Tex. 

[15] MARLO, MARIO, (Herrin) age 22; 
B., Cuggioni, Italy. Son of Tony Mario. Min- 
er, Herrin, 111. Entrained Sept. 20, '17. Ov- 
erseas July 9, '18. Engaged in Aisne, Marne, 
Oise, Meuse-Argonne. With Army of Occu- 
pation. In Germany six months, and with 
the first troops to enter Germany. Attached 
to Co. I, 1st. Pioneer Inf. Discharged at 
Camp Grant, 111., July 18, '19. 

[16JMATHENY, WILLIAM J., (Herrin) age 
20; B., Carbondale, Ky. Son of W. M. Ma- 
theny. Miner, Herrin, 111. Enlisted Apr. 4, 
'17. Overseas June 28, '18. Engaged in St. 
Mihiel, Argonne Forest, Meuse and Verdun. 
Gassed Oct. 27, '18. Attached Co. E., 1 Gas 
Regiment. Discharged Camp Taylor, Ky., 
Feb. 24, '19. 

[17] MATHENY, JESSE, (Herrin) age 18; 
B., Carbondale, Ky. Son of Will Matheny. 
Employed as miner, Herrin. Enlisted Mar. 
24, 18, Louisville, Ky. Overseas July 15, '18. 
Attached to Battery F., 70 Art., C. A. C. 
Discharged Mar. 25, '19, Camp Taylor, Ky. 

[18] MAUGHAN, WILLIAM, (Herrin) age 
19; B., England. Son of Wm. and Mary Ann 
Maughan. Plumber, Herrin. Enlisted Apr. 
17, '18, Ft. Sheridan. Overseas Sept 18, '18. 
Attached 3 Army of Occupation, Coblenz, Ger- 
many. Engaged in active service at St. Mi- 
hiel and Argonne Forest. Discharged at Camp 
Grant, July 9, '19. 



173 



[1] MAZZONI, ERNEST, (Herrin) age 21; 
B., Italy. Employed as miner, Herrin. En- 
trained Oct. 4, '17. Attached to Co. C., 115 
M. Gun Bn. Overseas May 19, '18. Dis- 
charged Apr. 10, '19 at Camp Grant, 111. 

[2] McCOSKEY, CHAS., (Herrin) age 28; 
B., Murphysboro, 111. Married Grace Ferrell. 
Son of F. M. McCoskey. Employed as switch- 
man, C. B. & Q. Ry., Herrin. Entrained May 
22, 18. Overseas Sept. 1, '19. Attached to 
Co. C., 68 Engineers. Discharged at New 
York, May 22, '19. 

[3] McNELLY, GEORGE W., (Herrin) age 
24; B., Marion, 111. Son of Sam and Sarah 
McNelly. Employed as miner, Herrin. En- 
trained Sept. 21, '17. Attached to Co. D., 11 
Machine Gun Bn., A. E. F. Overseas Sept. 6, 
'18. Engaged in battle of Argonne Forest 
and along the Meuse. 

[4] MCLAREN, CORP. JAMES, (Herrin) 

age 18; B., Scotland. Son of James B. and 
Margarette McLaren. Employed as miner at 
Herrin, 111. Enlisted May 22, '19. Overseas 
Sept. 1, '18. Attached to Co. L., 309 Inf., Div. 
78. Discharged at Camp Grant, 111., May 28, 
'19. 

[5] MEZO, WALTER, (Herrin) age 27; B., 
Mt. Vernon, 111. Son of Jake Mezo. Employed 
as printer, Chicago. Enlisted Apr. 28, '17, at 
Chicago. Attached to 74 Co., 6 Reg. U. S. 
Marine Corps., 2 Div. Overseas Sept. 17, '17. 
Engaged in St. Mihiel, Argonne Forest. Sois- 
sons, Chateau Thierry and Verdun. Gassed 
April 13, '18, Verdun. Discharged Quantico, 
Va., Apr. 12, '19. Received Croix de Guerre 
for services at Chateau Thierry. 

[6] MILAM. LENIS, (Herrin) age 23; B., 
Six Mile, Ala. Son of J. W. Milam. Em- 
ployed as miner, Herrin. Entrained Apr. 25, 
'18. at Blockton, Ala., Attached to Musician, 
3 class 20 qd.. 114 F. A. Overseas May 28, '18. 
Engaged in St. Mihiel, Meuse-Argonne, and 
Toul sector. Discharged April 8, '19, at Ft. 
Oglethorpe, Ga. 

[7] MILAM, M. C., (Herrin) age 21; B., 
Blockton, Ala. Son of J. W. Milam. Em- 
ployed as miner, He^rm. Enlisted May 28, 
'18 at Murohysboro, 111. Attached to Co. 19, 
Discharge Unit. Overseas Aug. 28, '18. Dis- 
charged Feb. 18, '19, at Camp Grant, 111. 

[8] MILANI. CORP. JOHN D., (Herrin) 
age 22; B.. Joliet. 111. Son of Anty and Rosie 
Milani. Employed as butcher, Herrin. En- 
trained June, '18 Overs^s Oct.'IS. Attached 
to 501 Q. M. C., Det. A. P. O. 716, A. E. F. 

[9] MIRIANI, C4.ESAR. (Herrin) age 30; 
B., Italy. Son of Josip Miriini. Employed as 
shoemaker. Herrin. Entrained May 29, '18. 
Attached to Hdq. Co . 40 Inf. Discharged 
Jan. 18, '19 at Camp Sherman, Ohio. 




[10] MONROE, T. JOHN, (Herrin) age 30; 
B., Crainville, 111. Son of Albert and Martha 
Monroe. Employed as miner at Herrin. En- 
trained Oct. 5, '17. Overseas May 11, '19. 
Attached to Co. D, 115th Machine Gun Bn. 
Gassed at Belgian Front. Discharged at Camp 
Grant, 111., April 10, '19. 

[11] MOORE, LEE ERNEST, (Herrin) age 
24. Employed as miner. Entrained April 29, 
'18 for Camp Dix, New Jersey. Sailed over- 
seas June 23, '18. Attached to Co. G., 147 Inf. 
Discharged from Camp Grant, 111., May 23, '19. 

[12] MORRIS, FLOYD F., (Herrin) age 21; 
B., Central City, Ky. Son of T. C. Morris. 
Employed as miner, Herrin. Enlisted June 
1, '18, at Chicago. Engaged in foreign ser- 
vice. Overseas July 14, '18. Discharged Feb. 
20, '19, Pelliam Bay, N. Y. 

[13] MURRAY, HOB ART, (Herrin) age 23; 
B., Carterville, 111. Son of Hattie Baldwin. 
Employed as miner, Herrin. Entrained May 
28, '18. Attached to Co. M., 36 Div., 142 Inf. 
Overseas Oct. 3, '18. Discharged June 12, 
'19 at Camp Grant, 111. 

[14] MURRAY, WALTER, (Herrin) age 
21; B., Carterville, 111. Son of Hattie Bald- 
win, West Frankfort, 111., R. F. D. Em- 
ployed as miner, Herrin. Enlisted May 28, 
'18 at Murphysboro, 111. Attached to 11 Co., 
C. A. C., S. A. R. D., Unit 1; 54 Regiment. 
Overseas Sept. 25, '18. Discharged Mar. 21, 
'19, Camp Grant, 111. 

[15] NAILEN. FRANCIS J., (Herrin) age 
23; B., Ridge Port, 111. Son of James and 
Rose Nailen; married Miss Anna Cougler. 
Employed as miner, Herrin. Entrained June 
27, '18 at Herrin. Attached to Co. E, 168 Inf., 
Rainbow Div. Overseas Oct., '18. Discharged 
May 14, '19 at Camp Grant, 111. 

[16] NELSON. ROBERT, (Herrin) age 24; 
B., Kentucky. Son of W. T. Nelson; married 
Miss Bessie Hancock. Employed as miner, 
Herrin. Attached to Co. D., 144 Infantry. 
Entrained June 27, '18 at Herrin. Overseas 
Oct. 7, '18. Discharged June 13, '19 at Camp 
Grant, 111. 

[17] NEWTON. EARL, (Herrin) age 22; 
B., Carterville, 111. Son of Samuel Newton. 
Employed as coal miner at Herrin. Entrained 
March 12. '18, Herrin. Overseas Sept. 12, 
'18. Attached to Co. D. 28 Inf., 1st Division, 
Army of Occupation in Germany. Engaged in 
battle at Argonne. 

[18JNOSSOTTI, AMBROSE. (Herrin) age 
21; B., Buffalora, Italy. Son of Domeneco 
Nossotti. Employed as coal miner. Entrained 
Sept. 20, '17. Overseas July 9, '18. Partici- 
pated at Aisne. Marne. Oise Aisne, Meuse- 
Argonne, 1st Pioneer Inf., 1st Division. With 
A. O. and among the first to enter Germany. 
Discharged at Camp Grant, 111. 



175 



\fr-l\ w w- J w- 



[1] ODELL, SERG. HARRISON STEELE, 
(Herrin) age 22; B., Peoria, 111. Son of F. 
H. and Mary Odell. Employed as cashier 
C. B. & Q. Ry., Herrin. Entrained June 22, 
'18, at Chicago, 111. Overseas Sept. 12, '18. 
Attached to Headquarters Co., 3 Repl. Regt. 
Stationed at Hdqrs., Am. Emb., Center Adjt's. 
Office, Le Mans, France. 

[2] OLDANI, TONY, (Herrin) age 30; Son 
of Joseph Oldani. Employed as bar tender, 
Herrin. B., Italy. Married Mary Bossi. En- 
trained May 29, '18. Attached to 3 Co., 2 
lice. Discharged at Camp Shelby, Miss., Feb. 
4, '19. 

[3] OSBURN, CORP., MARION, (Herrin) 
age 22; B., Stonefort, 111. Son of M. E. Os- 
burn. Employed as salesman, Herrin. En- 
trained May 29, '18. Attached to 3 Co., 2 
Bat., S. Co., T. S. Discharged Nov. 30 at 
Camp Grant, 111. 

[4] OWEN, GEORGE L., (Herrin) age 29; 
B., Carterville, 111., son of C. E. and Dena 
Owen. Employed as mine check weighman, 
Herrin. Entrained Sept., '17. Attached to 
325 Machine Gun Bn. Discharged Nov., '18 
at Camp Sherman, Ohio. 

[5] PARSONS, JAMES, (Herrin) age 25; 
B., Williamson Co., 111. Son of Joseph W. 
Parsons. Employed as miner, Herrin. En- 
trained May 28, '18. Attached to A. R. D., 
313 Remout Troop. Discharged May 9, '19 
at Camp Grant, 111. 

[6] PEFFER, GEORGE, (Herrin) age 18. 
Employed as baker at Herrin, 111. B., Bish 
Oplriggs, Scotland. Son of Mrs. David L. 
Love. Enlisted June 7, '18. Naval Station 
duty only in U. S. Attached to Aviation Gal- 
ley, Reg. 15th. Discharged at Great Lakes 
Naval Station, Feb. 26, '19. 

[7] PENGILLEY, EDWARD, (Herrin) age 
25; B., Yorkshire, England. Employed as 
miner. Son of Michael and Emma Pengilley; 
married Willa West. Entrained May 28, '18. 
Overseas Oct. 6, '18. Attached to Co. D, 139 
Machine (Swiner). Discharged at Camp 
Grant, 111., Feb. 12, '19. 

[8] PERRINE, LOYED, (Herrin) age 27; 
B., Marion, 111. Son of Geo. A. Perrine. Em- 
ployed as miner, Herrin. Enlisted Mar. 7, '18 
at Murphysboro, 111. Overseas Sept., '18. At- 
tached to Co. G., 28th Inf., A. P. O. 729. Army 
of Occupation, Germany. 

[9] PEROTTI, JOS, (Herrin) age 20; B., 
Italy. Son of Pio and Theresa Perotti. Mar- 
ried Miss Rhea Moudy. Employed as miner, 
Herrin. Entrained Oct. 15, '18. Chicago Un- 
iversity Training School. Discharged Dec. 7, 
'18. 

[10] PETKEUICZ, JOE, (Herrin) age 19; 
B., Pittston, Penn. Son of Aggie and Andrew 




Petkeuicz. Employed as miner at Herrin. En- 
listed June. '17 at Murphysboro, 111. At- 
tached to 18 M. G. Bn., A. E. F. Overseas 
Jan., '18. 

[11] PETKEUICZ, JOE, (Herrin) age 19; 
B., Pittston, Penn. Son of Aggie and Andrew 
Petkeuicz. Employed as miner at Herrin. 
Enlisted Sept. 6, '17. Overseas July 7, '18. 
Engaged in battles of Vosges Sector, Sept. 3 
to Oct. 12, and Meuse-Argonne Offensive. At- 
tached to Co. B., 18th M. G. Bn. Discharged 
at Camp Grant, 111., June 30, '19. 

[12] PLOCK, FRED B., (Herrin) age 31; 
B., Carmi, 111. Son of Henry and Elizabeth 
Plock. Employed as blacksmith, Herrin. En- 
trained Sept. 5, '17 at Benton, 111. Attached 
to 43 Co., 11 Bn; 160 D. B. Discharged Jan. 
3, 19 at Camp Taylor, Ky. 

[13] POPHAM, PARLEY E., (Herrin) age 
22; B. DuQuoin, 111. Employed as coal miner 
at Herrin. Married Edith Stocks. Son of 
George and Rachel Popham. Entrained Sept. 
21, '17. Overseas May 11, '18. Engaged in 
battle of St. Mihiel, Meuse, Argonne Offensive, 
2nd battle of the Marne. Attached to Co. D., 
11 M. G. Bn., A. E. F. A. 746. 

[14] PURICELLI, CHARLIE, (Herrin) age 
24; B., Wisconsin. Son of Angella Puricelli. 
Employed as miner, Herrin. Entrained with 
the last draft from Herrin. Overseas Oct. 5, 
'18. Attached to O. A., 116 Inf., 29 Div. Dis- 
charged May 25, '19 at Camp Grant, 111. 

[15] QUALLS, TED R., (Herrin) age 22; 
Son of William and Elsie Quails. Married 
Miss Anna Francis. Employed as ticket ag- 
ent at I. C. Ry office, Herrin. Entrained May 
28, '18. Attached to Supply Co., 39 Inf. Over- 
seas Oct. 3, '18. Discharged June 20, 19 at 
Camp Mills, Long Island. 

[16] Rader, Robert R., (Herrin) age 22; B., 
Marion, 111. Son of Milton and Gertie Rader. 
Employed as railroader, Herrin. Enlisted 
July 8, '18 at St. Louis, Mo. Attached to U. 
S. S. Salem. Discharged June 24, '19 at Great 
Lakes, 111. Also saw service on Mexican bor- 
der from April, '16 to Mar., '17. 

[17] RANCILIO, SERG. LOUIS J., (Her- 
rin) age 22; B., Carterville, 111. Son of John 
and Margaret Rancilio. Employed as elec- 
trician, Herrin. Enlisted May 20, '17 at De- 
troit, Mich. Overseas Jan. 5, '18. Attached 
to M. T. Co., 316 M. T. C. 731, A. E. F. En- 
gaged in battle at Chateau Thierry and Ar- 
gonne Forest. Gassed at Chateau Thierry. 

[18] RAY, ALEX L., (Herrin) age 24; B., 
Carterville, 111. Son of Anna Wilson. Em- 
ployed as miner, Herrin. Entrained Apr. 27, 
'18, Benton, 111. Attached to Co. 22 as Mil- 
itary Police. Discharged Dec. 11, '18 at Camp 
Dix, N. J. 



177 




[1] RAY, LEROY, (Herrin) age 25; B., 
Carterville, 111. Son of Anna Wilson. Mar- 
ried Marie Stanley. Printer, Herrin, 111. En- 
trained Sept. 19, '17, Benton, 111. Attached to 
Co. C., 346 Inf. With Cooks & Bakers school, 
Camp Merritt, N. J. Discharged July 11, 
'19, Camp Grant, 111. 

[2] REED, WILLIAM R., (Herrin) age 23; 
B., Kentucky. Son of Jesse Reed. Married 
Delia Thetford. Miner, Herrin, 111. En- 
trained May 28, '18. Overseas Oct., '18. At- 
tached to 102 M. G. Inf., 26 Div. Discharged 
Camp Grant, 111., June 1, '19. 

[3] REINBOLD, HOMER G., (Centralia) 
age 25; B., Fairfield, 111. Son of John Reinbold, 
Centralia, III. Married Eva Hopkins. En- 
trained Sept. 20, '17. Overseas Mar. 29, '18. 
Attached Co. A., 325 M. G. Bn. Discharged 
Camp Grant, 111., Feb. 7, '19. 

[4] REED, SGT. CLAUDE, (Herrin) age 
22; B., McHenry, Ky. Son of J. B. and Domie 
Reed. Miner, Herrin, 111. Enlisted July 22, 
'17, Murphysboro, 111. Re-enlisted April 8, 
'19 in Medical Corps. Attached 22 Co., Medi- 
cal Dept., San Francisco. To go to Hawaii. 
Discharged Camp Taylor, Ky., March 26, '19. 

[5] RHYNES, HOMER, (Herrin) age 24; 
B., Centralia, 111. Son of Ed and Ora Rhynes. 
Married Miss Xenia Crowell. Coal miner, 
Herrin, 111. Entrained May 28, '18. Over- 
seas Oct. 6, '18. Attached to Battery E., 138 
Field Artillery, Cyclone Div. Discharged 
Camp Taylor, Ky., Jan 11, '19. 

[6] ROBERTS, CLARENCE H., (Herrin) age 
24; B., Johnston City, 111. Son of F. L. and 
Emma Roberts. Married Elsie Copier. Coal 
miner, Herrin, 111. Entrained Sept. 21, '17. Ov- 
erseas Sept., '18. Attached to Co. A., 112 Ma- 
chine Gun Bn. Discharged Camp Grant, 111., 
May 15, '19. 

[7] ROBERTS, CORP. AURA O., (Herrin) 
age 31 ; B., Cottage Home, 111. Son of James 
R. and Catherine Roberts. Married Miss 
Lexie Allen. Coal miner, Herrin, 111. Enlist- 
ed Oct. 1, '17, Murphysboro, 111. Overseas 
June 10, '18. Attached to Co. F., 5 Supply 
Train, 5 Div. Engaged in active service at 
St. Die Inould S., Trapella Offensive, St. 
Mihiel Off., Argonne-Meuse Defensive. Dis- 
charged Camp Mills, N. Y., June 23, '19. 

[8] ROBINSON, CORP. RALPH E., (Her- 
rin) age 22; B., Murphysboro, 111. Son of 
J. C. and Olive Robinson. Coal miner, Her- 
rin, 111. Entrained March 12, '18. Overseas 
Sept. 3, '18. Attached to Co. M., 28th Inf., 
1st Div. Engaged in Verdun, near Sedan. 
Wounded Nov. 7, '18 in left thigh and head. 
Discharged May 8, '19, Camp Grant, 111. 

[9] RUGGERI, CHARLES, (Herrin) age 
23; B., Buscati, Italy. Son of Mary Ruggeri. 
Butcher. Entrained March 12, '18. Overseas 
Sept. 3, '18. Attached to Supply Co., 335 Inf. 
Discharged Camp Grant, 111., May 30, '19. 



[10] RUSHING, LEE W., (Makanda) age 
22; B., Carbondale, 111. Son of W. T. and Et- 
ta Rushing. Farmer, Makanda, 111. Entrained 
June 27, '18. Overseas Nov. 1, '18. Attached 
to Co. E., 102 Inf. Engaged in active service 
at Verdun. Discharged Camp Grant, 111., 
April 10, '19. 

[11] ROLANDO, SGT. FRANKIE F., (Jol- 
iet) age 26; B., Braidwood, 111. Son of Jen- 
nie Rolando. Coal miner, Herrin, 111. En- 
trained Mar. 12, '18, Herrin, 111. Attached 
to 306, Guard & Fire Co., A. M. C. Sent to 
Brooklyn, N. Y. as Military Police for 11 
months. Discharged Camp Grant, til., March 
9, '19. 

[12] SANDERS, SGT. LEBRON, (Herrin) 
age 19; B. De Soto, 111. Son of Walter and 
Josie Sanders. Coal miner, Herrin, 111. En- 
listed June 26, '17, Benton, 111. Sent to 
Houston, Tex. Overseas May 15, '18. At- 
tached to 33rd Div. of National Guard. En- 
gaged at Verdun. Stationed with Army of 
Occupation in Luxemburg. 

[13] SANDERS, ROBERT DEWEY, (Her- 
rin) age 19; B., Marion, 111. Son of Dr. F. M. 
and Dela Sanders. Student, Chicago, 111. En- 
trained Sept. 3, '18 at Cody, Wyo. Engaged 
in Red Cross Work in Chicago, 111. Attached 
to U. of Chicago. Discharged U. S. Naval 
Training Station, Dec. 21, '18. 

[14] SAVIO, TONY, (Herrin) age 21; B., 
New Mexico. Son of Paul and Mary Savio. 
Coal miner, Herrin, 111. Entrained Sept. 
21, '17. Overseas Sept. 15, '18. Attached 
to Co. C., 11 M. G. Bn., 4th Div., A. E. F. 

[15] SCHWEGMAN, WILLIAM H., (Her- 
rin) age 27; B., Metropolis, 111. Son of Wil- 
liam Schwegman. Married Miss Helen Lauder. 
Employed as salesman, Herrin. Enlisted May 
28, '18, St. Louis, Mo. Discharged Dec. 14, 
'18 at Chicago, 111. 

[16] SHACKLEFORD, WILLIS, (Herrin) 
age 23; B., near West Frankfort, 111. Son 
of Henry and Ellen Shackleford. Married 
Hattie Fligor. Coal miner. Entrained Sept. 
20, '17. Overseas Sept. 3, '18. Attached to 
325 M. G. Bn. Discharged at Camp Grant, 
111., April 29, '19. 

[17] SHANKLIN, LEONARD C., (Herrin) 
age 18; B., Cambria, 111. Son of A. S. and 
Mrs. A. S. Shanklin, De Soto, 111. Laborer. 
Enlisted April 23, '17. Overseas Oct. 16, '18. 
Engaged in American Expeditionary Forces 
in France. Discharged Hampton Roads, Va., 
Aug. 11, '19. 

[18] SHANKLIN, SGT. PAUL R., (Herrin) 
age 20; B., Cambria, 111. Son of Mr. and Mrs. 
A. S. Shanklin, De Soto, 111. Laborer. En- 
listed March 19, '17, Jefferson Bks., Mo. Over- 
seas Aug. 14, '17. Engaged in St. Mihiel Of- 
fensive, Argonne Offensive, Verdun Offensive, 
and Xinuray Countee Offensive. Discharged 
Camp Eustis, Va., April 28, '19. 



179 



[ 



[1] SHERRARD, SGT. GEORGE, (Herrin) 
age 18; B., Crabtree, Ky. Son of S. M. Sher- 
rard. Married Miss Berniece Jessup. Em- 
ployed as miner, Herrin. Enlisted July 7, 
'16 at Terre Haute, Ind. Attached to Co. 
4, Fort Smallwood, Md. 

[2] SIMOKAT, JOHN, (Herrin) age 26; B., 
Kindulen, Russia. Married Miss Isabelle Bit- 
kauski. Employed as miner, Herrin. En- 
trained June 27, '18. Overseas Oct. 20, '18. 
Attached to Co. B., 126 Engineers. Now sta- 
tioned at Brest, France. 

[3] SITTON, FRANKLIN GLEN, (Herrin) 
age 19; B., Cairo. Son of Maggie Gammon. 
Employed as farmer, Herrin. Enlisted June 
26, '18 at Murphysboro, 111. Attached to 1 
Co., Ft. Pickens, Fla., C. A. C. 
[4] SIZEMORE, ALBERT M., (Herrin) age 
28; B., Cobb, Ky. Son of Sam and Fannie 
Sizemore. Coal miner. Entrained March 11, 
'18, Herrin, 111. Overseas Sept. 3, '18. At- 
tached to Co. I, 335 Inf. Discharged Camp 
Grant, 111., July 25, '19. 

[5] SMITH, CLYDE G., (Herrin) age 18; 
B., Corydon, Ky., son of Geo. and Hallie Smith. 
Employed as coal miner at Herrin. Enlisted 
Jan., '19 in Texas. Attached to Co. A, Reg. 
22, N. D. Now stationed at Camp Lawrence, 
Great Lakes, 111. 

[6] SMITH, HARRISON, (Herrin) age 27; 
B., Anna, 111. Son of W. W. and Alice Smith. 
Married Helen Carson, Herrin. 111. Coal 
miner. Enlisted July, '18, Great Lakes Naval 
Training Station. Discharged November, '18. 

[7] SMITH, PETE F. (Herrin) age 22; B., 
Forest City, Pa. Son of Joe and Margarette 
Smith. Journeyman . Entrained Oct. 4, '17, 
Camp Taylor, Ky. Overseas Sept, '18. At- 
tached to Hospital Co. A., 325 M. G. Bn., 84 
Division. Discharged Camp Grant, 111., July 
22, '19. 



[8] SMITH, THOMAS W.. (Herrin) age 21; 
B., Riverton, 111. Son of Thomas and Emma 
Smith. Car trimmer, Herrin, 111. Enlisted 
June 3, '18, Springfield, 111. Overseas Aug. 3, 
'18. Did active service on destroyer Roe for 
4 months, and in several submarine attacks. 
Attached to U. S. S. Roe. Discharged Charles- 
ton, S. C., Jan. 17, '19. 

[9] SMITH, ANDREW, (Beech Creek, Ky.) 
age 31: B., Rendville, 111. Son of G. S. 
and Mary Smith. Coal miner. Entrained 
June 27, '18. Overseas Sept. 1, '18. Attached 
to Co. D., 27 Engineers. Discharged Camp 
Grant, 111., April 4, '19. 




[10] SNYDER, FRANK L., (Herrin) age 
23; B., Jonesboro, 111. Son of Mrs. John Har- 
ris. Married Edna Randleman. Bookkeeper. 
Entrained Oct. 17, '17. Discharged Jan. 16, 
'19, Camp Pike. 

[11] SOKLIASKI, ALEX, (Herrin) age 33; 
B., Poland. Son of Frank and Mehilin Sokli- 
aska. Entrained May 16, '17. Overseas Aug. 
14, '18. Engaged in Argonne. Wounded Nov. 
10, '18. Lost left arm at front. Attached to Co. 
34, Div. 7. Discharged Camp Grant, 111, June, 
19. 

[12] SPRINGS, GUY E., (Herrin) age 23; 
B., Odin, 111. Son of B. H. and P. M. 
Springs. Employed as fireman, Herrin. 
Entrained May, '18. Overseas Sept 1, '18. 
Attached to Co. C., 68 Engineer Corps. Sta- 
tioned at Monterchamme, France. 

[13] SPILLER, STANLEY, (Herrin) age 
22; B., Marion, 111. Son of William J. Spiller. 
Married Miss Lora Childers. Employed as 
mechanic, Herrin. Entrained May 28, '18. 
Overseas Oct. 3, '18. Attached to M. G. Co., 
331 Inf. Discharged Feb. 6, '19 at Camp 
Grant, III. 

[14] STACY, SGT. ELISHA, (Herrin) age 
21; B., DuQuoin, 111. Son of Allie Griffin. Em- 
ployed as miner, Herrin. Enlisted May. '17 
at Murphysboro, 111. Attached to Co. C., 35 
Inf. Discharged May 10, '19 at Camp Travis, 
Texas. Reenlisted immediately in same Co. 
and regiment. 

[15] STONUM, GEORGE, (Herrin) age 25; 
B., Johnson County, 111. Son of William 
Stonum. Carpenter. Entrained Feb. 12, '18, 
Jacksonville, Fla. Overseas Aug., '18. At- 
tached to Co. 441, M. S. T. 414. Discharged 
June 24, '19. 

[16] STOTLAR, LOUIS E., (Herrin) age 
24; B., Herrin. Son of H. M. and E. C. Stot- 
lar. Employed as farmer, Herrin. Enlisted 
May 27, '18 at Tuscaloosa, Ala. Overseas July 
31, '18. Attached to Co. B., 322 Inf. Actively 
engaged at Raon Le Tape, St. Die and Verdun 
sectors. Discharged Apr. 17, '19 at Camp 
Gordon, Ga. 

[17] STRINGER, R. E., (Herrin) age 22; 
B., 111. Son of F. M. Stringer. Employed as 
language instructor in H. T. H. S. Enlisted 
Dec. 15, '17 at St. Louis. Overseas July 16, 
'18. Stationed in France with the A. E. F. 

[18] STULL, WALTER M.. (Herrin) age 
30; B.. Marion. 111. Son of A. V. and Lora 
Stull. Married G'advs Roseberry. Baker, Her- 
rin, 111. Entrained May 28, '18. Overseas 
Oct. 3, '18. Attached to Co. 60, 217 P. W. E., 
Savenay, France. Discharged April 30, '19, 
Camp Gi-ant, 111. 



181 



vrY- -ffrPPt 




[1] STUTSMAN, BLAND DEWEY, (Her- 
rin) age 20; B., Assumption, 111. Son of H. 
F. and Annie Stutsman. Miner. Entrained 
May 22, '18. Attached to Co. A, 73rd Regi- 
ment of Engineers. Discharged at Camp 
Grant, 111., Jan. 11, '19. 



[2] SULLENGER, GEORGE FOWLER, 
(Herrin) age 23; B., Marion, Ky. Son of 
John and Flora Sullenger. Coal miner, Her- 
rin, 111. Entrained Mar. 12, '18 for Camp 
Taylor, Ky. Attached to 126th Guards. Cook. 
Overseas Sept. 3, '18. Discharged Camp 
Grant, 111., Aug. 15, '19. 



[3] SULLENGER, LEE ALVIS, (Herrin) 
age 19; B., Marion, Ky. Son of John and 
Flora Sullenger. Coal miner, Herrin. En- 
listed Mar. 4, '19, Great Lakes. Attached to 
Co. 32, 17 Regiment. Now stationed at Camp 
Luce, Great Lakes, 111. 

[4] TINDALL, WALTER, (Herrin) age 28; 
B., Carbondale, 111. Son of Eli Tindall. Coal 
miner, Herrin. Entrained Sept. 27, '17. At- 
tached to Co. L, 301 Regiment. Stationed 
Camp Merritt, N. J. 

[5] TURNER, ENNICE, (Herrin) age 25. 
Son of J. H. and A. L. Turner. Coal miner, 
Herrin. Entrained Sept. 24, '18. Attached 
to Co. F., Hospital Corps. Discharged Jan. 
18, '19 at Camp Grant, 111. 

[6] TURNER, CORP VERNA V., (Herrin) 
age 21; B., Johnson Co., 111. Son of John 
Turner. Coal miner, Herrin. Enlisted July, 
'17 at St. Louis. Overseas May 20, '18. En- 
gaged at Argonne Forest. Attached to 282 
M. P. Co, 141 Bn; A. P. O. 775. With the 
Army of Occupation. 



[7] TUTKUS, WILLIAM, (Herrin) age 24; 
B., Pennsylvania. Son of George and Eva 
Tutkus. Coal miner, Herrin. Entrained May 
29, '18. Attached to Co. C. G., 4 Inf. Dis- 
charged Jan. 20, '19 at Camp Sherman, Ohio. 

[8] TYGETT, HERBERT LEE, (Herrin) 
age 27; B., Makanda, 111. Son of Luella Ty- 
gett. Employed claim clerk, I. C. R. R. En- 
trained May 11, '18, Ft. Thomas, Ky. Over- 
seas June '18. Attached to 54 Inf., A. E. F., 
Montmoyer, France. 

[9] UMSTOT, FERDDIE, (Herrin) age 26; 
B., in Illinois. Son of Mr. Umstot, Martins- 
ville, 111. Carpenter, Herrin. Entrained 
with last draft. Overseas Oct. 15, '18. Dis- 
charged May 29, 1919, at Fort Leavensworth, 
Kansas. 




[10] VAUGHN, ARLIE R., (Herrin) age 
23; B., Goreville, 111. Son of D. L. Vaughn. 
Coal miner. Entrained June 26, '18. Over- 
seas Sept., '18. Attached to Co. L, 322 Inf., 
82 Division. Discharged at Camp Grant, 111., 
May 30, '19. 



[11] VAUGHT, JOHN L., (Herrin) age 26; 
B., Mud River, Ky. Coal miner. Son of Jes- 
sie and Annie Vaught. Enlisted June 14, '18, 
Peoria, 111. Overseas Oct. 6, '18. Attached 
to Co. A Unit. Discharged at Camp Taylor, 
Ky., Feb. 11, '19. 



[12] VANZANDT, HERSHAL, (Herrin) 
age 21; B., Mulkeytown, 111. Son of Cancey 
Vanzandt. Miner. Enlisted April, '16, Roy- 
alton, 111. 



[13] VENEGONI, MIKE, (Herrin) age 21; 
B., Italy. Employed at Sesser, 111. Entrained 
Oct. 17, '19. Discharged at Camp Wheeler, 
Ga., March, '19. 



[14] VERNA, JOHN E., (Herrin) age 28; 
B., Genoa, Italy. Son of Martha Verna. Elec- 
trician. Entrained Aug. 14. '18. Attached to 
Trng. Co., No. 2, M. T. D. Discharged Jan. 14, 
'19 at Camp Hancock, Ga. 



[15] VITERISI, PETER, (Herrin) age 32; 
B., Ortie, Italy. Son of Guisseppi and Ama 
Viterisi. Coal miner. Entrained May 28, '18. 
Overseas Sept. 30, '18. Attached to Co. H, 
168 Inf. Discharged at Camp Grant, 111., 
May 15, '19. 



[16] WALKER, CLARENCE V., (Herrin) 
age 22; B., Stonefort, 111. Son of U. L. 
and Oda Walker. Employed as lumber man, 
Herrin. Entrained Mar. 12, '18, for Camp 
Taylor, Ky. Overseas Sept. 18, '18. At- 
tached to Co. A., 309 Engrs. Stationed at 
Nazaire, France, 701 A. P. O. 



[17] WALKER, JOE V., (Herrin) age 28; 
B., Carterville, 111. Son of Joe V. Walker. 
Married Jane Mitchell. Merchant. Enlisted 
April 19, '18, Great Lakes, 111. Attached to 
1st Reg. Band. Discharged Feb. 2, '19. 



[18] WALKER, VANCE, (Herrin) age 23; 
B., Cambria, 111. Son of James and Martha 
Walker. Coal miner, Herrin. Entrained 
June 27, '18. Overseas Sept. 16, '18. At- 
tached to Co. C., 106 Engineers. 



183 



Sfeg 




[1] WALL, EDWARD, (Herrin) age 25; B. 
Anna, 111. Son of John and Nancy Wall. Mar- 
ried Miss Lela Davis. Employed as miner, 
Herrin. Entrained June 27, '18. Attached 
to Provost Guard, M. P. Company. Dis- 
charged Mar. 6, '19 at Camp Wheeler, Ga. 

[2] WARD, CORP. LESTER, (Herrin) age 
17; B., Marion, 111. Son of Mrs. Rosella 
Hoddy. Enlisted at Dardnella, Ark. Over- 
seas May, '18. Attached to Co. E., 33 Inf. 
Discharged Apr., '19 at Camp Merritt, New 
Jersey. 

[3] WARREN, SGT. ARTHUR, (Herrin) 
age 34; B., Carbondale, 111. Employed as 
R. R. agent. Enlisted April 16, '16, Jefferson 
Barracks, Mo. Attached to Co. D., 22 Inf. 
Stationed in N. Y. 



[4] WATSON, WALTER, (Herrin) age 21; 
B., Owensboro, Ky. Son of Jerry and Aman- 
da Watson. Employed as miner, Herrin. En- 
trained Sept. 1, '18 for Camp Taylor, Ky. Ov- 
erseas. Attached to Co. K, 6 Inf. A. P. O. 
745, A. E. F. Wounded at Verdun. 



[5] WATSON, G. O., (Herrin) age 23; B., 
Wolf Creek, 111. Son of James Watson. Coal 
miner. Entrained May 28, '18. Overseas Oct. 
5, '18. Attached to Co. D., 328 Inf. Dis- 
charged at Camp Grant, 111., May 30, '19. 

[6] WELCH, ERNEST, (Herrin) age 26; 
B., Williamson Co. Son of Andrew and Nan- 
cy Welch. Married Miss Kate Jones. Em- 
ployed as farmer, Herrin. Entrained June 
27, '18 at Camp Wheeler. Wounded while 
training at Camp Columbus, S. C. Discharged 
Jan. 12, '19, Camp Grant, 111. 

[7] WELCH, EARL BRIEN, (Herrin) age 
22; B., Williamson Co., 111. Son of Andrew 
and Nancy Welch. Farmer at Herrin, 111. 
Entrained Sept. 6, '19. Overseas Oct. 25, '19. 
Attached to Co. A., 302 Engrs., 77 Div., V. 

I. A., France. 

[8] WHEELER, MARION, (Herrin) age 
26; B., Kentucky. Employed as miner, Her- 
rin. Entrained Sept. 21, '17. Attached to 
Co. A, 325 M. G. Bn. Discharged Jan., '18 at 
Camp Pike, Ark. 

[9] WHITTENBERG, FRANK ARTHUR, 
(Herrin) age 22; B., Murphysboro, 111. Son 
of John and Loretta Whittenberg. Employed 
as railroader, Herrin. Enlisted Dec. 10, '17 
at Great Lakes. Transferred to Army, Mar. 

II, '18 at Camp Taylor, Ky. Discharged U. 
S. Navy Radio School, Cambridge, Mass., Feb. 
29, '19. 



[10] WHITTENBURG, PAUL H., (Herrin) 
age 20; B., Murphysboro, 111. Son of John C. 
and Mrs. L. E. Whittenburg. Shipping clerk. 
Enlisted July 18, '18. With U. S. Marines 
guarding Naval Radio Station in Virginia. 

[11] WILLIAMS, NOAH, (Herrin) age 23; 
B., Murphysboro, 111. Son of Clara Williams. 
Employed as miner, Herrin. Entrained Mar., 
'18. Overseas Apr., '18. Attached to 37 Div. 
Discharged from Camp Dix, April, '19. 

[12] WINGETT, CHARLES CECIL, (Her- 
rin) age 18; B., Carterville, 111. Son of Abe 
and Anna Wingett. Employed as miner, Her- 
rin. Enlisted June 7, '18 at Brooklyn. Over- 
seas Oct. 18. Made two trips on the U. S. S. 
Roepat. 

[13] WOOLSEY, FRANK D., (Herrin) age 
26; B., Murphysboro, 111. Son of Lon and 
Mae Woolsey. Employed as miner, Herrin. 
Entrained Sept. 21, '17. Attached to Co. A., 
325 Machine Gun Bn., 84 Div. Discharged 
Oct. 1, '18 at Camp Taylor. 

[14] WOOLSEY, HARRY E., (Herrin) age 
29; B., Carbondale, 111. Son of Lon and Mae 
Woolsey. Married Miss Maud Jackson. Em- 
ployed as miner, Herrin. Entrained Oct. 5, 
'17. Overseas Sept. 3, '18. Attached to Co. 
D., 11 Machine Gun Bn. A. P. O. 746, 4 Div., 
A. E. F. Engaged in active service on the 
Metz Front. 

[15] WYATT, WILLIAM L, (Herrin) age 
30; B., Wilbertsville, Ky. Son of George and 
Betty Wvatt. Married Elizabeth Donahue. 
Miner. Entrained March 12, '18. Overseas 
Sept. 3, '18. Engaged in Baramount, Nov. 5; 
Sedan, Nov. 6. and slightly gassed. Attached 
to Co. C., 28th Inf. Discharged at Camp 
Sherman, Ohio. 

[16] YUILL, HARVEY D., (Herrin) age 23; 
B., Murphysboro, 111. Son of Ellen Yuill. 
Merchant. Entrained Oct. 15, '19. Chicago, 
111. Attached to Co. I, S. A. T. C., Section B. 
Discharged at Chicago University, Dec. 9, 
'19. 

[17] YUILL. SGT. FRANK A., (Herrin) 
nere 24: B., Murphysboro, 111. Son of Mrs. 
F,llen Yuill. Employed as merchant, Herrin. 
Entrained Sept. 5, '17. Overseas Aug. 30, 
'18. Attached to Co. H., 309 Inf., 78 Div. 
Discharged June 11, '19, at Camp Grant. 

[18] ZUCCA, STEVE. (Herrin) age 22; B.. 
Saint Gusto. Son of John Zucca. Entrained 
Sept. 20, '17. Overseas July 9. '18. Engaged 
in battle of Aisne, Marne. Oise, Meuse-Ar- 
gonne. Wounded in neck by shrapnel in bat- 
tle of Meuse-Argonre. Attached to Co. 12, 
1st. Pioneer Inf. Discharged at Camp Grant, 
111., July 18, '19. 



185 




[1] BELLETT, CORP. D. L., (Herrin) age 
22; B., Braidwood, 111. Son of Mrs. Theo. 
Monjot. Married Miss Nellie Metzger. Em- 
ployed as coal miner. Entrained Sept. 20, 
'17, Camp Taylor, Ky. Overseas Aug. 27, 
'18. Attached Co. E., 345 Inf., 87th Div. 
Discharged Feb. 4, '19, Camp Grant, 111. 

[2] BERRA, GEORGE C., (Herrin) age 21; 
B., Murphysboro, 111. Son of Mr. and Mrs. 
Henry Berra. Married Jennie Calcaterra. 
In grocery work. Entrained Oct. 15. At- 
tached to S. A. T. C. Discharged Chicago, 
111., Dec. 3, '18. 

[3] BROWN, CORP. HENRY L., (Herrin) 
age 27 ; B., Ohio Co., Ky. Son of R. T. Brown. 
Married Miss Mollie Maughan. Employed at 
First National Bank. Entrained Sept. 4, '18 
'for Camp Grant, 111: Discharged Dec. 20, 
'18. 

[4] BRYSON, HUGH A., (Herrin) age 31; 
B., Unaka, N. C. Mine examiner. Entrained 
April 9, '18. Attached to 16th Battery, O. A. 
R. D. Left Camp Jackson, S. C., Oct. 29 for 
overseas. Aboard a transport one day when 
armistice was signed. Discharged Dec. 26, '18, 
Camp Grant, 111. 

[5] DOUGHERTY, SGT. JAMES M., (Her- 
rin) age 23; B., Tennessee. Son of Jas. and 
Harriet Dougherty. Miner and oil worker. 
Enlisted May 15, '17, Jefferson Bks., Mo. At- 
tached to Machine Gun Troop, 13th Cavalry. 
Discharged at Fort Clark, Tex., Aug. 14, '19. 

[6] DRIEMEYER, VALLEY, (Herrin) age 
22; B., Pickneyville, 111. Son of Chas. H. and 
Ella Driemeyer. Boiler maker and helper. 
Landed in England Oct., '18. Attached to 
Machine Gun Co., 327th Inf., 82 Div. 

[7] DUNN, ORVILLE R., (Herrin) age 16; 
B., Loogootee, 111. Son of G. G. and Clara 
I. Dunn. Employed as salesman. Enlisted 
July 2, '18. Attached to Co. C., 211 F. S. Bn., 
Lafayette Div.. Camp Meade. Md. Discharged 
Feb. 4, '19 at Camp Taylor, Ky. 

[8] FAUGHN, FRED, (Herrin) age 29^., 
Hopson, Ky. Son of T. L. Faughn. Mar- 
ried Grace Blair. Fireman. Enlisted June 
10, '18. Overseas July 15, '19. Present ad- 
dress, Matsonia, N. Y. 

[9] FRANKLIN, CORP. JOSEPH LEE, 
(Herrin) age 21; B., Lvon County, Ky. Son 
of Lee and Anna Franklin. Mechanic. En- 
trained Sept. 6. '18 from Herrin, 111. At- 
tached to 344 Motor Transport Co., Camp 
Custer. Mich. 

[10] FULTZ, SGT. EUGENE, (Herrin) age 
26; B., Carbondale, 111. Son of Jacob and 
Lula Fultz. Married Daisy Guthrie. Motor- 



man at No. 7 mine, B. M. C. & L. Co. En- 
trained July, '17 Camp Taylor, Ky. Overseas 
Sept. 3, '18. Attached to 2nd Bn., Hdq. 23 
Reg. Engrs. He was No. 258 in Herrin dis- 
trict and went with the first quota from this 
city. 

[11] HALANEY, MOSES, (Herrin) age 27; 
B., in Syria. Son of George and Tillie Hal- 
aney. Employed as clerk. Entrained June 
27, '18 for Camp Wheeler, Ga. Discharged 
March 7, '19, Camp Wheeler, Ga. 

[12] MURRAH, CHARLES C., (Herrin) 
age 35; B.. Frankfort. 111. Son of H. C. and 
Gertrude Murrah. Married Genevieve Con- 
Ian. Lawyer. Enlisted Sept. 1. '18, Camp 
Gordon, Ga. Attached to 3rd Co., Convalescent 
Battalion. Discharged at Camp Gordon, Ga., 
Feb. 6, '19. 

[13] McCREERY, HORTON S., (Herrin) 
age 25; B.. Thompsonville. 111. Son of J. M. 
and Isabelle McCreery. Employed as engi- 
neer on 111. Cent. Ry. Entrained March 12, 
'18 for Camp Taylor. Ky. Overseas Sept. 
1. '18 to France. Attached to Co. A., 309 
Engrs., France. 

[14] SMITH. WILLIAM H., (Herrin) age 
26; B.. Murphysboro, 111. Son of J. H. and 
Anna Smith. Engineer on C. B. & Q. Ry. 
Entrained May 22, '18 for Camp Meade, Md. 
Overseas June 30, '18. Attached to Co. E., 
66th R. T. C. Discharged at Camp Grant, 111., 
Aug. 26, '19. 

[15] TAVEGGIA, CHARLES W., (Herrin) 
age 22; R., Murohysboro, 111. Son of Charles 
F. F>T\d Emma Taveggia. EmnloyeH as elec- 
trician with F. O. Bailey & Co. Entrained 
March 12, '18 for Camp Taylor, Ky. Over- 
seas Aug. 2, '18. Attached to Bakery Co. 
314, France. 

[16] WARD, DOLAND D., (Herrin) age 
23: B., Tidal Wave. Ky. Son of A. C. and 
Elisabeth Ward. Married Miss Harleith In- 
graham. Miner. Entrained Mar. 12, '18, 
Camp Taylor, Ky. Overseas Sept. 3, '18. En- 
gaged in battles of Areonne Forest, and Se- 
dan. Attached to 1st Div., Army of Occupa- 
tion, Baden, Germany. 

[17] WILLIAMS. JOHN J., (Herrin) age 
26; B. Ewing, 111. Son of M. R. and 
Susan E. Williams. School teacher and farm- 
er. Entrained Oct. 4, '17 for Camp Taylor, 
Ky. Discharged at Camp Hancock, Ga., Dec. 
5, '18. 

[18] WILCOX. W. D., (Herrin) age 23; 
Son of J. R. Wilcox. Married Miss Mary 
Turner. Employed as clerk, Herrin. En- 
trained June 27, '18. Overseas Oct. 8. '18. 
Discharged Feb. 6, '19 at Camp Grant, 111. 



187 



[1] EARTH, CARL E., (Herrin) age 22; B., 
Carterville, 111. Son of Mrs. Louise Earth. 
Miner. Entrained June 27, '18. Overseas 
Oct. 17, '18. Attached 28 Division. Discharged 
Camp Grant, 111., May 15. '19. 



[2] CAMPBELL, CHAS. W., (Herrin) age 
22; B., Render, Ky. Son of Agnes Campbell, 
Herrin, 111. Coal miner. Entrained May 28, 
'18. Attached Co. A., 137 Machine Gun Bat- 
talion. Discharged Camp Grant, 111., Jan. 4, 
'19. 



[3] CAREY, JAMES L., (Herrin) age 21; 
B., Kentucky. Son of George Carey. Miner. 
Entrained March 12, '18. Overseas Aug., '18. 
Attached Co. B., 28th Inf., 1st Div., Army of 
Occupation. 



[4] CRAIGHEAD, CLURA TRAVIS. 
(Rendville) age 21; B., Moss, Tenn. Son of 
N. H. Craighead and Jane Craighead. Miner. 
Entrained Sept. 6, '18. Overseas Oct. 31, 
'18. Attached Co. A., 110th Eng. Dischaiged 
Camp Grant, 111., May 3, '19. 



[5] ELLENA, JOHN, (Herrin) age 19; B., 
Calumet, Mich. Son of Mr. and Mrs. F'rank 
Ellena, Herrin, 111. Driver. Enlisted March 
14, '18. Served in England from Aug. 14, 
until Dec. 1, '18. Attached 10th Aerial Con- 
struction Co. Discharged Camp Grant, 111., 
Dec. 28, '18. 



[6] HANCOCK, WALTER, (Marion) asre 
24; B., Dunmore, Ky. Son of John and Alice 
Hancock. Miner. Entrained April 29, '18. 
Overseas May 19, '18. Attached Hdqs., 311 
Inf. Discharged Camp Grant, 111., March 29, 
'19. 



[7] HOWELL, SGT. GEORGE W., (Herrin) 
age 21 ; B., Wolfcreek, 111. Employed as coal 
miner. Entrained Mar. 12, '18, Herrin, 111. 
Overseas Sept. 3, '18. Engaged in battle of 
Verdun near Sedan, Argonne Forest. Attached 
to Co. M., 28th Inf., 1st Div. Was with Army 
of Occupation. Among first of troops to enter 
Germany. Discharged Sept. 25, '19, Camp 
Grant, 111. 

[8] LAFHOFF, JIM E., (Herrin) age 30; 
B., Bulgaria. Coal miner. Entrained May 
29, '18, Ft. Thomas, Ky. Discharged Camp 
Sherman, Ohio, '19. Accidentally shot and 
killed himself after discharge. 

[9] MARKS, SGT. MONROE JAMES, (Her- 
rin) age 24; B., Carterville, 111. Married 
Beulah Morgan. Miner. Entrained March 




12, '18. Overseas Sept. 3, '18. Engaged in Ar- 
gonne Forest, Chateau-Thierry. Attached Co. 
D., 28 Inf., 1st Div. 

[10] MORGAN, TROY G., (Herrin) age 20; 
B., Chamness, 111. Son of Wm. and Mrs. E. 
C. Morgan, Herrin, 111. Coal miner. Enlist- 
ed May 20, '18. Overseas Sept. 22, '18. At- 
tached Battery B., 73rd Art. Discharged 
Camp Devans, Mass., Dec. 29, '18. 

[11] NICK, GEORGE, (Herrin) age 29; B., 
Bulgaria. Employed as miner at Stiritz 
Mines. Entrained May 28th, '18, for Shelby, 
Miss. Not overseas.. Discharged at Camp 
Shelby, Miss., April, '19. 

[12] RANDOLPH, CORP. ODE, (Rend- 
ville) age 22; B., Madisonville, Ky. Son of 
John Randolph. Married Lola Haven. Coal 
miner. Enlisted June 20, '17. Attached 48th 
Inf., 20th Div. Discharged Camp Taylor, 
Ky., Jan. 1, '19. 

[13] RUSHING, LEONARD E., (Herrin) 
age 21; B., Carbondale, 111. Son of W. T. and 
Etta Rushing. Clerk. Entrained Sept. 6, '18. 
Attached Co. K., Casual Co., Engrs. Dis- 
charged Camp Custer, Mich., Dec. 27, '18. 

[14] SMITH, RICHARD WEAVER, (Her- 
rin) age 25; B., Ashley, 111. Son of Adam and 
Ella Smith. Coal miner. Entrained Oct., 
'17, Camp Taylor, Ky. Overseas June 30, 
'18. Engaged Aisne-Marne, St. Mihiel, Meuse- 
Argonne. Army of Occupation. 

[15] SOHN, DANIEL, (Herrin) age 23; B., 
Riga, Russia. Salesman. Son of E. L. Sohn. 
Entrained March 12, 18. Engaged in battle 
of Meuse-Argonne, wounded at Sedan, France 
Nov. 7, 18. Attached to Co. D., 28 Inf., 1st. 
Div. 

[16] UNDERBILL, CHAS. THOMAS, 

(Herrin) age 23; B., Percy, 111. Son of M. 

T. and Sarah Underbill. Married Golda Griz- 
zell. Entrained Sept. 21, '17. 

[17] WHEAT, JESSE P., (Herrin) age 23; 
B., Thompsonville, 111. Son of G. A. and 
Lillie Wheat. Employed as clerk. Entrained 
March 12, '18. Overseas Oct. 16, '18. At- 
tached to Base Hospital. Still in camp. 

[18] WYATT, ERNEST, (Herrin) age 25; 
B., Gilbertsville, Ky. Son of Betty Wyatt. 
Employed as miner, Herrin. Entrained May 
28, '18. Overseas Oct., '18. Attached to Co. 
D., 319 Inf. Stationed at Hospital No. 3, 
New York City. 



189 



li 

t 

f 




[1] ALLEN, WILLIAM M., (Johnston City) 
age 27; B., Williamson County. Son of W. 
P. and Belle Allen. Coal miner. Entrained 
May, '18, Camp Taylor, Ky. Attached Head- 
quarters C., 40th Inf. Discharged Camp 
Sherman, Ohio, June 26, '19. 

[2] ALLEN, IRBY R., (Johnston City) age 
23; B., Williamson County, 111. Son of W. 
P. and Belle Allen. Farmer. Entrained June 
'18, Macon, Ga. Overseas Sept., '18. At- 
tached to Co. B., 106 Engineers, 31 Div. 

[3] ATWOOD, JESSE E., (Johnston City) 
age 23; B., Marion, 111. Son of W. R. and 
Elizabeth Atwood. Employed as motor truck 
driver. Enlisted May 28, '18 at Marion, 111. 
Overseas Oct. 2, '18. Attached to Co. D, '138 
M. G. Bn., 38 Div. Discharged May 5, '19., at 
Camp Grant, 111. 

[4] BACINO, ROSARIO, (Johnston City) 
age 24; B., Burgio, Italy. Son of Natale and 
Triola Bacino. Entrained May 27, '18. At- 
tached to Cavalry. Discharged Nov., '18 in 
California. 

[5] BARHAM, FLOYD, (Johnston City) 
age 22; B., Johnston City, 111. Son of Joe 
and Ada Barham. Married Helen Rhodes. 
Carpenter. Entrained April 2, '18. Attached 
to C. A. C., N. A. Discharged Camp Grant, 
111., Dec. 20, '18. 

[6] BECKER, LEO PETER, (Johnston 
City) age 21; B., near Johnston City, 111. Son 
of H. J. D. and Caroline Becker. Farmer. 
Entrained Feb. 25, '18. Overseas Sept. 3, 
'18. Attached to Co. C, 361 Inf., 91 Div. 
Discharged April 28, '19, Camp Grant, 111. 



tie Smith. Electrician. Entrained June 27, 
'18. Overseas Oct., '18. Attached to Co. A., 
31 Div., A. E. F., 121 Inf. 

[11] CLAYTON, MILO WARD, (Johnston 
City) age 17; B., Johnston City. Son of 
Viola Lawrence. Farmer. Enlisted Jan. '17, 
Jefferson Barracks, Mo. Overseas June 25, 
'17. Engaged in Marne and slightly wounded 
in both lungs. Attached to First Co. 

[12] CURRY, CP'L. JOHN G., (Johnston 
City) age 21; B., England. Son of Thomas 
and Louise Curry. Carpenter. Enlisted Apr. 
4, '18. Overseas Sept. 15, '18. Attached to 
Motor Command 13. Discharged Camp Grant, 
111., July 15. '19. 



[13] DAVIS, MORRIS, (Johnston City) age 
16; B., Madisonville, Ky. Son of U. S. and 
Willis Davis. Coal miner. Enlisted April 
12, '17. Attached to Co. E., 149 Inf. Dis- 
charged Hattisburg, Miss., Nov. 12, '17. 

[14] DEMETRUSLIAS, ANGELO, (John- 
ston City) age 27; B., Calamata, Greece. Son 
of George and Angela Demetrulias. Employed 
in Confectionery. Entrained May 28, '18, 
Camp Shelby, Miss. Overseas Sept. 6, '18. 
Attached to 151 Ambulance, 113 Sanitary 
Train. Discharged Feb. 17, '19, Camp Taylor, 
Ky. 

[15] DUDDY, JOHN P., (Johnston City) 
age 18; B., Anna, 111. Son of John and Cath- 
erine Duddy. Coal miner. Enlisted May 28, 
'17. Sent to Alaska in July, '17 for 16 mos. 
Attached to Co. A., 14 Inf. Discharged Camp 
Dodge, la., May 1, '19. 



[7] BLAKE, ESCO CHARLES, (Johnston 
City) age 23; B., Galatin County, 111. Son of 
Charley and Emma Blake. Married Bertha 
Madge Williams. Miner. Entrained May 23. 
'18. Attached to Co. D, 37th Inf. Discharged 
Feb. 26, '19, Texas. 



[16] DUDDY, THOMAS J., (Johnston City) 
age 23; B., Anna, 111. Son of John and Cath- 
erine Dudy. Coal miner. Entrained May 28, 
'18. Overseas Oct. 6, '18. Attached to M. G. 
Co., 326 Inf. Discharged June 7, '19, Camp 
Grant, 111. 



[8] BONDI, HENRY, (Johnston City) age 
26; Coal miner. Entrained May, '18, Camp 
Shelby, Miss. Overseas Nov., '18. Attached 
Co. C. Discharged June 20, '19, Camp in 
Ga. 

[9] BOUMAN. CHARLES, (Johnston City) 
age 19; B., Williamson County, 111. Son of 
August and Adia Bouman. Coal miner. En- 
listed May 1, '19. Overseas May 26, '19. At- 
tached A. P. O. 701, A. E. F. 

[10] CARGAL, JOHN ROBERT, (Johnston 
City) age 29; B., McHenry, Ky. Married Ger- 



[17] FEHRENBAKER, R. J., (Johnston 
City) age 24; B., Johnston City, 111. Son of 
L. I. Fehrenbaker. Paper hanger and painter. 
Entrained Sept. 23, 17, Camp Taylor, Ky. 
Overseas Sept. 4, '18, 312 Machine Gun Bat., 
29 Div., A. E. F. Discharged June 2, '18, 
Camp Grant, 111. 

[18] FELTS, ALVIN, (Johnston City) age 
25; Son of Geo. C. and Sophia Felts, Johnston 
City, 111. Teacher. Entrained June 27, '18. 
Overseas Oct. 14, '18. Attached Co. L., 123 
Inf., A. S. C. Discharged Camp Grant, 111., 
July 24, '19. 



191 



UJJ -IJ^4f- 




[1] FLEMING, CORP. HUGH (Johnston 
City) age 23; B., Johnston City, 111. Son of 
R. G. and M. E. Fleming. Electrician. En- 
trained April 29, '19. Attached 13th Co., 4th 
Bn., 153 O. N. Discharged Augusta, Ga., Dec. 
6, '18. 

[2] FRICK, JOHN WILLIAM, (Johnston 
City) age 22; B., Franklin Co., 111. Son of 
U. B. and Katharine Frick. Married Miss 
Lillian Sanders. Employed as fireman. En- 
trained June 27, '18 for Camp Wheeler, Ga. 
Overseas Oct. 7, '18. Attached to Co. C., 
144th Inf. 

[3] FRIEDMAN, ISADOR KERMIT, (John- 
ston City) age 19; B., St. Louis, Mo. Son of 
Samuel and Ida Friedman. Student. Enlist- 
ed Oct., '18. Attached Officers Material School. 
Discharged Great Lakes, 111. 

[4] GODDARD, CORP. FRED D., (Johnston 
City) age 24; B., Williamson County, 111. Son 
of W. L. and Janie Goddard. Tailor. En- 
trained Sept. 21, '17, Camp Taylor, Ky. Ov- 
erseas June 20, '18. Attached Hdq. Co., St. 
Aignn. 

[5] GRANT, HENRY STANLEY, (John- 
ston City) age 28; B., Johnston City, 111. Son 
of W. H. Grant. Employed as farmer, John- 
ston City. Entrained Feb. 25, '18. Overseas 
Sept. 3, '18. Attached to Co. A., 320 M. G. 
Bn., A. E. F. Discharged May 20, '19 at 
Camp Grant, 111. 

[6] HAMBY, CHAS. H., (Johnston City) 
B., Caldwell Co., Ky. Son of Chas. and Mar- 
tha Hamby. Farmer. Entrained June 27, 
'18. Overseas Oct. 6, '18. Attached Co. H., 
142 Inf. Discharged Camp Grant, 111., June 
12, '19. 

[7] Hampton, Jesse A., (Johnston City) age 
23; B., Johnston City, 111. Son of J. T. and 
Lizzie Hampton. Miner. Entrained May 28, 
'18, Camp Shelby, Miss. Overseas Oct. 3, 
'18. Attached Co. D., 308 M. G. Bn., 78 Div. 
Discharged Camp Dix, May 20, '19. 

[8] HERZOG, ERNEST, (Johnston City) 
age 28; B., Hawsville, Ky. Son of Mrs. Mar- 
garet Herzog. Coal miner. Enlisted Aug. 
2, '17, Jefferson Bks., Mo. Overseas May 5, 
'18. Engaged Aisne-Marne; St. Mihiel; Meuse- 
Argonne, and Vesle. Attached Co. M., 59th 
Inf. Discharged Camp Grant, 111., Aug. 12, 
'19. 

[9] HUCK, WILLIAM 0., (Johnston City) 
age 24; B., Johnston City, 111. Son of John 
and Mary Huck. Bookkeeper. Entrained May 
29, '18. Attached Co. B., 40th Inf. Dis- 
charged Camp Sherman, Ohio, Aug. 9, '19. 



[10] HUMPHRIES, CHARLES E., (John- 
ston City) age 21; B., Cobden, 111. Son of 
Steve and Mary Humphries. Coal miner. 
Enlisted July 18, '17. Overseas May 26, '18. 
Engaged St. Mihiel; Argonne Forest; Ar- 
gonne-Meuse. Slightly gassed once. Dis- 
charged Camp Grant, 111., June 7, '19. 

[11] HUMPHRIES, GEORGE D., (Johnston 
City) age 20; B., Murphysboro, 111. Son of 
Steve and Mary Humphries. Miner, tn- 
listed July 13, '17. Overseas May 26, '18. 
Engaged St. Mihiel, Argonne Forest, and Ar- 
gonne-Meuse. Discharged Camp Grant, 111., 
June 7, '19. 

[12] HUNTER, CLAUDE R., (Johnston 
City) age 22; B., Robards, Ky. Son of J. T. 
and Eula Hunter. Coal miner. Enlisted May 
6, '17, Murphysboro, 111. Overseas July 6, 
'18. Engaged in Meuse-Argonne. Vosges Sec- 
tor. Attached Hdq. Co., 53 U. S. Inf. Dis- 
charged Camp Grant, 111., July 5, '19. 

[13] HUNTER, THOMAS WAYNE, (John- 
ston City) age 18; B., Henderson, Ky. Son 
of J. T. and Eula Hunter. Coal miner. En- 
listed April 20, '17. Overseas May 3, '18. En- 
gaged St. Mihiel Off., Somme Die Sector. 
Attached Co. C., 138 Inf., 35 Div. Under shell 
fire 128 days. Discharged Camp Funston, 
Kans., May 12, '19. 

[14] JONES, WILLIAM R., (Johnston City) 
age 27; B., Athens, Ohio. Son of Richard and 
Altha Jones. Coal Miner. Entrained May 
28, '18, Camp Shelby, Miss. Overseas Oct. 
4, '18. Attached Co. D., 141 Inf., 36 Div. 
Discharged Camp Sherman, June 13, '19. 

[15] KEMPER, FRED, (Johnston City) age 
18; B., St. Charles, Ky. Son of John and 
Carrie Kemper. Clerk. Enlisted Aug. 8., 
'18, Mt. Vernon, 111. Attached Co. C., 13th 
Bn., Great Lakes, 111. Discharged Great Lakes, 
111., June 18, '19. 

[16] KIDWELL, JOHN CARROLL, (John- 
ston City) age 26; B., Franklin County, 111. 
Son of J. L. and Lula Kidwell. Switchman. 
Entrained May 28, '18, Camp Shelby, Miss. 
Attached Co. E., 113 Engrs. 

[17] KING, LAYN, (Johnston City) age 26; 
B., Corinth, 111. Son of Tom King. Farmer. 
Went in first draft. Overseas June, '18. En- 
gaged in three battles. Gassed twice and in- 
jured in head. Attached Co. E., 101 Inf. 
Discharged Camp Grant, 111., April, '19. 

[18] KOSANOVICH, GEORGE, (Johnston 
City) age 29: B., Jasenak, Croatia. Son of 
Peter and Ana Kosanovich. Miner. En- 
trained June 27, '18. Overseas Oct. 21, '18. 
Attached Co. B., 106 Supply Train. Dis- 
charged Camp Grant, 111., July 15, '19. 



193 



f 



[1] LEIGH, CARNIE EDWARD, (Johnston 
Cit) age 24; B., Marion, 111. Son of M. A. 
Leigh, Madison, la. Married Ethel M. Mar 
tin. Telegraph operator. Entrained May 29, 
'18. Discharged Camp Sherman, Ohio, Jan. 
19, '19. 

[2] LOCKEY, SGT. JOHN R., (Johnston 
City) age 22; B., Winlaton, England. Son 
of Robert A. Lockey. Bookkeeper. Entrained 
May 28, '18. Overseas Oct. 6, '18. Attached 
Hdq. Co., Amb. Section, 113 Sanitary Train, 
38 Div. 




[3] McNEILL, MARK, (Johnston City) age 
19; B., Williamson County, 111. Son of Maude 
and H. McNeill. Wagoner. Entrained May 
2, '17. Overseas May, 18. Engaged in front 
line trenches. Attached 5 Div., A. E. F. 

[4] MORRIS, WILLIAM I., (Johnston City) 
age 26; B., Williamson County. Son of Ed- 
win and Jemima Morris. Chauffeur. En- 
trained May 28, '18. Overseas Oct. 2, '18. At- 
tached Motor Transport Corps. Discharged 
Camp Grant, 111., June 11, '19. 

[5] MUZZARELLI, JIOVAVI, (Johnston 
City) age 25; B., Italy. Son of Ricardo and 
Modena Muzzarelli. Married Elizabeth Pa- 
tarezzi. Coal miner. Entrained May 11, '18. 
Overseas July 6, '18. Engaged Argonne- 
Meuse Off., Larcy sub-sector. Attached Co. 
E., 54 Inf. Discharged Camp Grant, 111., June 
21, '19. 

[6] NEWTON, PAUL, (Johnston City) age 
18; B., Johnston City, 111. Son of Roy New- 
ton. Clerk. Overseas Dec., '18. Attached 
14th Balloon Co., A. E. P. 

[7] NEWTON, JACOB ORWIN, (Johnston 
City) age 26; B., Johnston City, 111. Son of 
George A. and Lucina E. Newton. Book- 
keeper. Entrained Oct. 5, '17. Overseas Sept. 
5, '18. Discharged Camp Grant, 111., June 2, 
'19. 

[8] ODUM, PAUL H., (Johnston City) age 
28; B., Franklin County, 111. Son of Mary 
A. Odum. Enlisted May 4, '17. Overseas 
April 4, '18. Engaged St. Mihiel, Argonne- 
Meuse. and St. Die Sector. Attached Supply 
Co., llth Inf. Discharged Camp Grant, 111., 
July 26, '19. 

[9] OETH, CARL P., (Johnston City) age 
30; B., North of Johnston City, 111. Son of 
Anton A. and Elizabeth Oeth. Married Katie 
E. Becker. Farmer. Entrained June 27, '18. 
Overseas Oct. 4, '18. Slightly wounded in 
arm. Attached Hdq. Qo., 325 Inf., 82 Div. 
Discharged Camp Grant, 111., May 27, '19. 



[10] OZMENT, GEORGE L., (Johnston 
City) age 18; B., Carrier Mills, 111. Son of 
Maude and M. Ozment. Student. Enlisted 
Oct. 1, '18. Attached S. A. T. C. Discharged 
Camp Taylor, Ky., July 7, '19. 

[11] REITER, SGT. VICTOR,. (Johnston 
City) age 18; B., W. Va. Son of Alice and 
Henry Reiter. Coal miner. Entrained May 
2, '17. Overseas July 7, 18. Engaged Ar- 
gonne-Meuse off*., and Vosges. Attached 6th 
Military Police Co. Discharged Camp Grant, 
111., June 24, '19. 

[12] RICE, BARNEY T., (Johnston City) 
age 18; B., Franklin County, 111. Son of 
Frank and Emma Rice. Employed Pharmacy. 
Enlisted June 2, '14, St. Louis, Mo. Made 
several trips across sea. 

[13] RICE, ARTIE T., (Johnston City) age 
18; B., Franklin County, 111. Son of Frank 
and Emma Rice. Employed as coal miner. 
Enlisted Dec. 27, '17. Overseas July 26, '18. 
Attached to 5th Div., A. E. F. Not dis- 
charged. 

[14] SCHER, RESIEL, (Johnston City) age 
22; B., Norfolk, Va. Son of Benjamin and 
Minnie Scher. Clerk. Entrained June 15, 
'18. Overseas Aug. 15, '18. Engaged in Ar- 
gonne, Theau Court and Metz. Attached to 
Co. K., 112 Inf., 28th Div. Discharged Camp 
Dix, N. J., May 8, '19. 



[15] SIMMONS, DELMAR T., (Johnston 
City) age 22; B., Spillertown, 111. Son of Jacob 
L. and Alice Simmons. Miner. Enlisted May 
14, '17. On way over sea when armistice was 
signed. Attached to Co. C, 1st Prov. Tng. 
Rgt. Discharged at Camp Grant, 111., Dec. 
23, '18. 



[16] SOWELL, BEN L., (Johnston City) age 
25; B., Johnston City, 111. Son of Jeff and 
Nancy Sowell. Married Mary Bagwell. Min- 
er. Entrained Sept. 4, '18. Attached Air 
Craft Div., Detroit, Mich. Discharged Camp 
Grant, 111., Jan., 19. 



[17] STOLLER, ANDREW, (Johnston City) 
age 23; B., Austria. Son of Mrs. Mary Stol- 
ler. Miner. Entrained Sept. 20, '17 for 
Camp Taylor, Ky. Overseas May 18. At- 
tached to Co. P., 44th Supply Train. 

[18] WENT, SGT. EDWARD H., (Johnston 
City) age 18; B., Nashville, 111. Son of Frank 
and Martha Went. Enlisted Aug. 7, '18. 
Went to Cuba. Received Medal for sharp 
shooter. 



195 




[1] EARTH, JESSE E., (Carterville) age 
26; B., Williamson County, 111. Son of John 
and Hattie Barth. Miner. Entrained May 
28, '18. Discharged Camp Shelby, Miss., June 
3, '18. 



[10] GREEN, CORP. WILLIAM ROSS, 
(Carterville) age 22; B., Carterville, 111. Son 
of Ida B. Green. Coal miner. Enlisted May 
30, '17. Attached Co. E., 13th Cavalry. Dis- 
charged Fort Clark, Texas, March 20, '19. 



[2] BEASLEY, SGT. McKINLEY, (Carter- 
ville) age 22; B., Tenn. Son of Frank and 
Ellen Beasley. Coal miner. Entrained Sept. 
20, '17. Overseas Sept. 3, '18. Attached Co. 
A., 325 M. G. Bn. Discharged Camp Grant, 
111., March 18, '19. 

[3] BEVARD, DR. LLOYD W., (Carterville) 
age 28; B., Carterville, 111. Son of F. C. and 
Mary Bevard. Dentist. Entrained April 29, 
'18. Attached 344 Inf. Dental Unit at Camp 
Grant, 111. Discharged Camp Grant, 111., Aug. 
10, '19. 

[4] BULLINER, DAVID, (Carterville) age 
22; B., Carterville. Son of John Bulliner. 
Married Miss Inez Phemister. Employed as 
chauffeur, Carterville, 111. Entrained Sept. 
20, '17. Overseas May 11, '18. Attached to 
Wagoner Hdq. Co., 115 Machine Gun Bn. En- 
gaged in active service at Ypres salient, Ver- 
meyelle, Mt. Kemmel, Bellecourt, Naurey, Pre- 
mont-Vaux, Audigny and Selle River. Dis- 
charged April 10, '19 at Camp Grant, 111. 

[5] CALHOUN, HERMAN N., (Carterville) 
age 25; B., Du Quoin, 111. Son of Mrs. Mary 
Calhoun. Miner. Entrained March 12, '18, 
Camp Taylor, Ky. Overseas Sept., '18. At- 
tached Co. B., 28th Inf., 1st Division. 

[61 CHILDERS, CORP. CLYDE, (Carter- 
ville) age 25; B., Carterville, 111. Son of G. 
W. and Ida Childers. Farmer. Entrained 
Sept. 20, '18. Attached Co. F., 16th Inf. Dis- 
charged Camp Grant, 111., Nov. 13, '18. 

[7] CRAIG, ERNEST, (Carterville) age 30; 
B., Carterville, 111. Son of James and Sarah 
Craig. Employed as a farmer, Carterville. 
Entrained Sept. 21. '17. Overseas May 6, '18. 
Attached to British Div., 18 M. G., Kripp, 
Germany. Engaged in the battles of St. Mi- 
hiel, Meuse and Argonne Forest. 

[8] CRAIG, ORAL, (Carterville) age 24; B., 
Carterville, 111. Son of Albert and Martha 
Craig. Employed as farmer, Carterville. En- 
trained June 24, '18. Overseas Oct.. '18. At- 
tached to Co. B., 123 Inf., 31 Div. Discharged 
April 15, '19, Camp Grant, 111. 

[9] CRUSE, McKINLEY. (Carterville) age 
21; B., Carterville, 111. Son of Oscar and 
Massie Cruse. Clerk. Enlisted June 8, '18, 
Great Lakes, 111. Discharged Bremerton, 
Wash., March 10, '19. 



[11] HALL, HARRY D., (Carterville) age 
23; B., Molden, Mo. Son of Otis and Ida Hall. 
Automobile mechanic. Entrained Sept., '17. 
Overseas Dec., '17. Attached Motor Transpor- 
tation Corps in motor repair shop in Paris 
during entire foreign service. 

[12] HARRIS, JAMES C., (Carterville) age 
24; B., Williamson County, 111. Son of Nora 
J. Harris. Married Sylvia Weiss. Farmer. 
Entrained June 27, '18. Attached to Co. I., 
62 Inf. 

[13] HASTIE, SGT. FERN. (Carterville) 
age 22; B., Carterville, 111. Son of John and 
Margaret Hastie. Clerk. Entrained Feb. 25, 
'18. Overseas Sept. 8, '18. Attached Battery 
D., 325 Field Art. Discharged Camp Grant, 
111., Feb. 28, '19. 

[14] HASTIE, REX, (Carterville) age 23; 
B., Carterville. 111. Son of John and Margar- 
et Hastie. Married Dora Hampton. Coal 
miner. Enlisted Dec. 4, '17. Saw active ser- 
vice on board U. S. S. San Diego. Discharged 
Great Lakes, 111., Jan. 15, '19. 

[15] MANN, EBERT N. C., (Carterville) 
age 22; B., Vergennes, 111. Son of Wm. Mann. 
Coal miner. Entrained June 5. '18. Overseas 
Oct. 17, '18. Attached 82 Division. Dis- 
charged Camp Grant, 111., May 20, '19. 

[16] MARTIN, RALPH, (Carterville) age 
21; B.. Williamson County, 111. Son of Mr. 
and Mrs. William Martin. Coal miner. En- 
listed Aug. 2, '17. Jefferson Barracks, Mo. 
Overseas May 5, '18. Engaged in Chateau- 
Thierry. Marne, St. Mihiel, Argonne. Gassed 
Sept. 28 at Argonne. Attached Co. K.. 59th 
Inf. Discharged Camp Grant, 111., May 1, 
'19. 

[17] MARTIN. JAMES S., (Carterville) 
age 18: B.. Williamson County, 111. Son of 
Mr. and Mrs. William Martin. Coal miner. 
Enlisted October '17, Jefferson Barracks, 
Mo. Overseas March. '18. Engaged in Cha- 
teau-Thierry. St. Mihiel, Argonne Forest, 
Marne. Slightly wounded, Marne River. At- 
tached Army of Occupation, Co. E., 38th Inf. 

[18] McCLUSKY. CLYDE. (Carterville) 
age 26: B.. Crab Orchard. 111. Son of J. A. 
and Julia McClusky. Coal miner. Entrained 
Sept. 3, '17. Overseas Sept. 2, '18. Attached 
Co. A.. 325 M. G. Bn. Discharged Camp 
Grant, 111., March 18, '19. 



197 



^ 

-cx>^ VB <i,oo- 




13 



[1] ARDERY, VIRGIL, (Carterville) age 
24; B., Chamistown, 111. Son of John and 
Opha Ardery. Coal miner. Entrained April 
29, '18. Overseas May 25, '18. Engaged in 
Argonne and St. Mihiel. Attached Co. E., 
303 Engrs. Discharged Camp Grant, 111., 
June 14, '19. 

[2] HADFIELD, GEORGE HENRY, (Car- 
terville) age 24; B., Carterville, 111. Son of 
George and Joie Hedfield, Carterville, 111. 
Coal miner. Enlisted May 29, '18, Boston, 
Mass. Overseas Oct. 4, '18, returned Feb. 4, 
'19. Discharged Boston, Mass., Feb. 20, '19. 

[3] MOORE, JOHN S., (Carterville) age 21; 
B., Carterville, 111. Son of Sheridan Lee and 
Gertrude E. Moore. Machinist. 'Enlisted 
March 14, '18, Jefferson Barracks, Mo. At- 
tached Co. E., 236 Aero Squadron. Dis- 
charged Long Island, N. Y., Dec. 11, '18. 

[4] PHILLIPS, SGT. JOHN HENRY, (Car- 
terville) age 21; B., Carterville, 111. Son of 
John and Mary Phillips. Coal miner. En- 
trained March 12, '18, Camp Taylor, Ky. Ov- 
erseas Sept. 2, '18. Attached Co. M., 28th 
Reg., 1st Division. Engaged in active ser- 
vice at Sedan. Now with the Army of Oc- 
cupation. 

[5] SAMUEL, CHARLES T., (Carterville) 
age 25; B., Carterville, 111. Son of J. B. and 
Dell Samuel. Lumberman. Entrained March 
12, '18. Attached 306 Guard & Fire Co. 
Discharged Camp Grant, 111., March 12, '19. 

[6] SCHREVE, TED, (Carterville) age 18; 
B., Carterville, 111. Son of Frank and Alice 
Schreve. Clerk. Enlisted Aug. 8, '18, St. 
Louis. Mo. 2nd Class Seaman. Attached 
Signal Corps, U. S. Navy. Discharged Great 
Lakes, 111., Feb. 8, '19. 

[7] SMITH, HARRY N., (Carterville) age 
19; B., Denning, Ark. Son of J. T. Smith. 
Married Vinnie Lou Carter. Coal miner. En- 
listed Aug. 11, '18. Discharged Boston, Mass., 
March 23, '19. 

[8] SPILLER, WALTER ROLLA, (Carter- 
ville) age 29; B., Carterville, 111. Son of 
John and Mary Spiller. Employed as miner, 
Carterville. Entrained May 28, '18. At- 
tached to Co. D., 139 M. G. Bn. Discharged 
Jan. 10, '19 at Camp Hancock, Ga. 

[9] STOCKS, SAM H., (Carterville) age 19; 
B., Carterville, 111. Son of Walter and Ida 
Stocks. Coal miner. Enlisted April 27, '15, 
Jefferson Barracks, Mo. Overseas July 4, 
'18. Engaged in Meuse-Argonne. Attached 
Co. A., 54th Inf. Discharged Camp Grant, 
111., June 19, '19. 




[10] TANNER, PVT. ALVUS, (Carterville) 
age 17; B., Carterville, 111. Son of Clint Tan- 
ner, Bush, 111. Enlisted April 14, '17. Over- 
seas Oct. 9, '18. Attached to Battery B., 6th 
Trench Art. Discharged at Camp Taylor, 
Ky., Jan. 30, '19. 



[11] TILLEY, SERG. EUGENE, (Carter- 
ville) age 16; B., Shawneetown. Employed 
as farmer and miner, Carterville. Enlisted 
'06 at Jefferson Barracks. Attached to Troop 
F., 8 Cavalry. Stationed at Marfa, Texas. 



[12] TOTTLEBEN, WILLIAM, (Carter- 
ville) age 27; B., Cartervillle. Son of Malissa 
Tottleben. Employed as miner, Carterville. 
Entrained June 27, '18 at Herrin. Overseas 
Sept., '18. Attached to Co. M., 78 Inf. Dis- 
charged June 1, '19 at Camp Dix, N. J. 



[13] TRIPLETT, C. R., (Carterville) age 
23; B., Grantsburg, 111. Son of Calvin and 
Susie Triplett. Telegraph operator. Enlisted 
May 28, '18, Boston, Mass. Overseas Oct. 
16, '18. Served in Merchant Marine. Dis- 
charged New York, N. Y., Feb. 5, '19. 



[14] TYNER, HARRISON, (Carterville) 
age 23; B., Carterville, 111. Son of Sam and 
Julia Tyner. Coal miner. Enlisted May 19, 
'14, Jefferson Barracks, Mo. Attached 1st 
C. A. C. Discharged Fort Caswell, N. C., July 
3, '19. 



[15] WALKER, NORMAN, (Carterville) 
age 23; B., Carterville, 111. Son of Geo. and 
Laura Walker. Coal miner. Entrained May 
11, '18. Attached Co. G., 54th Irf Dis- 
charged Camp Taylor, Ky., Jan. 16, '19. 



[16] WILLIAMS, CPL. ELMER, (Carter- 
ville) age 21; G., Anna, 111. Coal miner. En- 
trained Sept. 6, '18. Overseas Oct. 20,' 18. 
Attached Co. C., 128 Engrs. Discharged 
Camp Grant, 111., July 22, '19. 



[17] WILLIAMSON, GUY, (Carterville) 
age 23; B., Cerluan, Ky. Son of George and 
Docia Williamson. Employed as miner, Car- 
terville. Entrained Mar. 12, '18 for Camp 
Taylor. Overseas Sept. 2, '18. Attached to 
Co. B., 28 Regiment. Engaged in battle of 
Sedan. 



[18] YUCUS, A. J., (Carterville) age 28; 
B., Danville, 111. Son of Joseph and Mary 
Yucus. Entrained May 28, '18. Overseas 
Oct. 2, '18. Attached Co. C., 47th Inf., Army 
of Occupation. 



199 



$ 




f 



[1] BATSON, SGT. GEORGE E., (Hurst) 
age 17; B., Carbondale, 111. Son of Dan S. 
and Alice Batson. Clerk. Enlisted Dec. 15, 
'17, Jefferson Barracks, Mo. Overseas Mar. 
16, '18. Attached Hdq. Troops, 6th Cavalry. 
Discharged Long Island, N. Y., May 15, '19. 
Served three years and saw active service in 
Mexico. 



[2] CALVERT, JOHN, (Hurst) B., Hurst, 
111. Son of Albert and Scintha Calvert. 
Switchman. Enlisted May 5, '17, Jefferson 
Bks., Mo. Attached Motor Transport Corps. 
Discharged Key West, Fla., May 19, '19. 

[3] COUNCE, WALTER, (Hurst) age 23; 
B., De Soto, 111. Son of J. H. and Emma 
Counce. Entrained March 12, '18. Attached 
Provisional Military Police Co. Discharged 
Camp Taylor, Ky., May 11, '19. 

[4] COUNCE, SGT. GEORGE R., (Hurst) 
age 18; B., De Soto, 111. Son of J. H. and 
Emma Counce. Car man. Enlisted May 4, 
'17, Murphysboro, 111. Attached Battery A., 
36 Art. Discharged Camp Grant, 111., Dec. 
20, '18. 



[5] COUNCE, CHAS. E., (Hurst) age 28; 
B., De Soto, 111. Son of J. H. and Emma 
Counce. Switchman. Enlisted May 4, '17, 
Murphysboro, 111. Attached 3rd., C. A. C., 
Coast Def., Tampa, Fla. 

[6] COYLE, CLYDE S., (Hurst) age 21; 
B., Picket County, Tenn. Son of Mrs. Fannie 
Coyle. R. R. clerk. Enlisted May 2, '17. 
Overseas July, '17. Engaged in Cantigny, 
Soissons, St. Mihiel. Attached Co. E, 6 Field 
Art.. 1st Div. Discharged Camp Grant, 111., 
April 15, '19. 

[7] GRAIN, EUGENE N., (Hurst) age 18; 
B., Chester. 111. Son of Herman and Ollie 
Grain. Bill clerk. Enlisted June 16, '18 
Attached Navy, Puget Sound, Wash. Dis- 
charged Puget Sound, Wash., Feb. 10, '19. 



[8] DEASON, ROLLIE RAY, (Hurst) age 
23; B., De Soto, 111. Son of Edward and Ol- 
lie Deason. Clerk. Entrained April 29, '18. 
Overseas June 23, '18. Engaged in Meuse- 
Argonne, Ypres-Lys. Attached Co. K., 147 
Inf. Discharged Camp Grant, 111., April 13, 
'19. 



[9] DUDDY, JOHN, (Hurst) B., Fountmeal, 
Ind. Son of Mrs. Addie Duddy Coal miner. 
Enlisted May 2, '17. Overseas March 22, T 
Engaged in St. Mihiel and Argonne-Meuse. 
Attached Hda. Co. G. A C.. 32nd Brigade, 
Discharged Camp Grant, 111., Jan. 27, '19. 



[10] GANTER, JOSEPH P., (Hurst) age 
18; B., St. Louis, Mo. Son of William and 
Hanna Ganter. Machinist. Entrained May 
21, '18. Overseas. Engaged in Marne, Vesle, 
St. Mihiel, Meuse-Argonne. Army of Occu- 
pation. Attached Hdq. Co., 4th F. A. Brig., 
4th Div. Discharged Long Island, June 23, 
'19. 

[11] GARRAGHAN, ANDREW J., JR., 
Hurst) age 17; B., Creal Springs, 111. Son 
of Mrs. Belle Adams. Coal miner. Enlisted 
Jan. 16, '16, Columbus, Ohio. Injured for 20 
days at Flat River, Mo. Attached Co. D., 
41st Inf. 

[12] HARRISON, CORP. CHARLES T., 
(Hurst) age 28; B., Shawneetown, 111. Son 
of J. M. and Elizabeth Harrison. Entrained 
March 12, '18. Discharged at Camp Sher- 
man, Ohio, Nov. 5, '18. 

[13] HECKMAN, JOS., (Hurst) age 23; B., 
Ellis Grove, 111. Son of Jas. and Lillian 
Heckman. Carpenter. Entrained June 24, 
'18. Overseas Oct. 30, '18. Attached 304 R. 
H. Supply, Q. M. C. Discharged Camp Grant, 
111., July 31, '19. 

[14] HECKMAN, DEWEY L., (Hurst) age 
20; B., Ellis Grove, 111. Son of Jas. and Lil- 
lian Heckman. Pumper. Enlisted May 25, 
'19. Attached Battery E., 37th Reg., C. A. 
C. Discharged Camp Grant, 111., Dec. 19, 
'18. 

[15] HECKMAN, HENRY, (Hurst) age 25; 
B., Ellis Grove, 111. Son of Jas. and Lillian 
Heckman. Painter. Entrained June 14, '17. 
Overseas July 28, '17. Engaged Somme Def.; 
St. Mihiel; Cambrai Def.; Cambrai Off. At- 
tached Co. E., 12 Eng. Discharged Camp 
Funston, Kan., May 16, '19. 

[16] HOPKINS, CLAUDE, (Hurst) age 24; 
B., Carterville. 111. Son of Albert and Mag- 
gie Hopkins. Miner. Entrained June 27, '18. 
Attached to Provost Guard and M. P., 31 Div. 
Discharged at Camp Wheeler, Ga., March 12. 

[17] HOUSEWRIGHT, ARCHIE E., 
(Hurst) age 26; B., Pulaski County. Son of 
John and Mary Housewright. Married Nellie 
M. Webb. Coal miner. Entrained May 28, 
'18. Attached Supply Co., 40th Reg. Dis- 
charged Camp Sherman, O., Jan. 18, '19. 

[18] KEENAN, FRANK B., (Hurst) age 
20; B., Murphysboro, 111. Son of Fred Keen- 
an, Hurst, 111. Enlisted Feb. 6. '17. Over- 
seas August 6, '17 and engaged in the fol- 
lowing- : Argonne, St.. Mihiel. Chateau Thierry 
and others. Gassed in one battle and slightly 
wounded in battle of Chateau Th'rry. At- 
tached to Co. C. of Ammunition Train, 1st 
Div. Not discharged. 



201 



iys "T\V "Xy is "r{~ TV" 'rT-^xfr- 




[1] KENNEDY, LEWIS A., (Hurst) age 
22; B., Mt. Vernon, Ind. Son of Mrs. Joe 
Villmore. Clerk. Entrained Feb. 22, '18. Ov- 
erseas May 11, '19. Engaged Ypres, Belli- 
eourt, Voormezelle, Fremont, Escam re, St. 
Baum, St. Souplet and Mazrigheim. Wounded 
in head. Attached Co. G., 119 Inf., 30 Div. 
Discharged Camp Grant, III., April 14, '19. 

[2] MARTIN, JOHN PATRIC, (Hurst) B., 
Illinois. Son of Dora Williams. Married. 
Libby Jarvis. Enlisted Aug., '18, Murphys- 
boro, 111. Attached 15th Co., R. O. Ret., G. 
M. S. N. A. Discharged Jefferson Barracks, 
Mo., Dec. 9, '18. 

[3] NAIER, WILLIAM D., (Hurst) age 
19; B., Mountain Home, Ark. Enlisted May 
4, '17. Sailed oversea March 17, '18, landed 
Mar. 29. Engaged in St. M'hiel Sector, Cham- 
pagne and others. Gassed once. Attached 
Battery E., 44th Art., C. A. C. Discharged 
Camp Grant, 111., April 7, '19. 

[4] PEPPERS, OTIS, (Hurst) age 18; B., 
De Soto, 111. Son of Louisa Harper Peppers. 
Entrained June 17, '19. Discharged at Brem- 
erton, Wash., April 30, '19. 

[5] PINKSTON, PERCY E, (Hurst) age 
26; B., Carbondale, 111. Son of J. L. and 
Alice Pinkston. Brakeman. Enlisted April 
2, '18, Jefferson Bks., Mo. Attached Co. C., 
139 M. G. Bn , 38 Div. Discharged Camp 
Shelby, Miss., Dec. 4, '18. 

[6] ROBINSON, LORAN L, (Hurst) age 
23; B., Marion, 111. Son of Jacob and Lizzie 
Robinson. Clerk. Entrained Sept. 6, '17. 
Overseas Sept. 5, '18. Attached Co. A., 324 
M. G. Bn., 84 Div. Discharged Camp Taylor, 
Ky., Feb. 7, '19. 

[7] ROBINSON, ERNEST L., (Hurst) age 
18; B., Marion, 111. Son of Jacob and Lizzie 
Robinson. Clerk. Enlisted May 2, '17. Ov- 
erseas to Panama Canal, May 15, '17. At- 
tached C. A. C., Fort Randolph. Discharged 
Panama Canal, May 4, '19. 

[8] ROBINSON, WILLIAM E., (Hurst) age 
23; B., Marion, 111. Son of Thomas and Liz- 
zie Robinson. Boiler maker. Entrained Mar. 
11, '18. Overseas Sept. 3, '18. Attached Co. 
L., 335 Inf. Discharged Camp Grant, 111., 
July 12, '19. 

[9] RUSSELL, T. P., JR., (Hurst) age 20; 
B., Hurst, 111. Son of T. P. Russell. Em- 
ployed as Bank clerk, Hurst. Enlisted May 
4, '17 at Jefferson Barracks, Mo. Attached 
to Co. 4, Regiment B. Injured at Fort H. G. 
Wright, N. Y. Discharged Dec., '18 at Wash- 
ington, D. C. 



[10] RUSSELL, JOSEPH, (Hurst) age 19; 
B., Blairsville, 111. Son of C. W. and Martha 
Russell. Coal miner. Enlisted April 15, '17. 
Attached U. S. Marines. One of the first to 
leave Hurst, 111., as volunteer. Discharged in 
Va. 



[11] SIGNAIGO, DAVID C., (Hurst) age 17; 
B., Carbondale, 111. Son of John and Mary 
Signaigo. Barber. Entrained July 25, '17. 
Attached Co. E., 30 Inf. Discharged Houston 
Texas, Nov. 8, '17. 

[12] SMITH, ELMER E., (Hurst) age 24; 
B., Elkville, 111. Son of Daniel and Ida Mae 
Smith. Married Ena Smith. Switchman. En- 
trained March 12, '18. Overseas June 30, 
'18. Attached 85th Co., Trans. Corps. Dis- 
charged Camp Grant, 111., July 26, '19. 

[13] ST. JOHN, GEORGE, (Hurst) age 29; 
B., Maron, 111. Son of John and Sarah St. 
John. Married Etta Dorris. Carpenter. En- 
trained Sept. 21, '17, Camp Taylor, Ky. At- 
tached Co. B., 112 M. G. Bn. Discharged 
Camp Grant, 111., June 2, '19. 

[14] SHORT, KENNETH, (Hurst) age 15; 
B., Tamaroa, 111. Son of Van R. and 
J. W. Short, Bush, 111. Student. Enlisted 
May 4, '17, Murphysboro, 111. Overseas June 
12. '17. Engaged in Aisne-Marne; St. 
Mihiel; Meuse-Argonne and Noyon. Shot 
through left shoulder Oct. 4, '18. Attached 
Co. F., 16th Inf., First Div., A. F. in G. 

[15] VAUGHN, GEORGE G., (Hurst) age 
18; B., Carterville, 111 Son of J. G. Vaughn, 
Hurst, 111. Enlisted June 5, '18. Attached 
to U. S. Navy. 

[16] MIGLIORI, LOUIS. (Bush) age 26; B., 
Italy. Son of Jim and Domannica Migliori. 
Coal miner. Entrained Sept. 18, '17. Over- 
seas May 27, '18. Engaged in Mt. Kemmell 
Hill, Hindenburg Line, and Ypres. Attached 
Co. D., 115 M. G. Bn. Discharged Camp 
Grant, 111., April 10, '19. 

[17] PETERSON, JAMES O., (Bush) age 
22; B., Buncombe, 111. Married Miss Lela 
Peterson. Coal miner. Entrained Sept. 6, '17. 
Overseas March, '18. Attached Co. E., 365 
Inf., 87 Div. Discharged Camp Grant, 111., 
April 16, '18. 

[18] RILEY, WILLIAM, (Bush) age 24; B., 
Ava, 111. Son of W. E. and Ella Riley. Mar- 
ried Pearl Kelly. Coal Miner. Entrained 
Sept. 7, '17. Attached Co. D., 325 M. G. Bn. 
Discharged Camp Taylor, Ky., Oct. 13, '17. 



203 




[1] BRASWELL, LEWIS, (Cambria) age 
26; B., Carterville, 111. Son of Thomas and 
Florence Braswell. Fireman. Entrained May 
23, '18, Great Lakes, 111. Attached U. S. Nav- 
al Band. Discharged New York, N. Y., Dec. 
13, '18. 

[2] BRASWELL, THOMAS M., (Cambria) 
age 25; B., Carterville, 111. Son of Thomas 
and Florence Braswell. Married Mabel Neeley. 
Railroader. Entrained May 28, '18. Over- 
seas Oct. 1, '18. Attached 131 M. P. Bn. Dis- 
charged Camp Grant, 111., June 13, '19. 

[3] BRASWELL, MINOR, (Cambria) age 
31; B., Carterville, 111. Son of Thomas and 
Florence Braswell. Railroader. Enlisted Apr. 

5, 18, Great Lakes, 111. Attached U. S. Naval 
Band. Discharged New York City, Dec. 13, 
'19. 

[4] BROOKHOUSE, CORP. AMOS A., 
(Cambria) age 23; B., Marion, 111. Son of 
A. J. Brookhouse. Miner. Entrained April 
29, '18. Overseas May 19, '18. Engaged in 
St. Mihiel, Meuse-Argonne. Received a shot 
at St. Mihiel that took off right ear. At- 
tached Co. D., 311 Inf., 78 Div. Discharged 
Camp Grant, 111., June 1, '19. 

[5] BROWN, CLAUDE E., (Cambria) age 
22; B., De Soto, 111. Son of Chas. and Leona 
Brown. Mechanic. Entrained March 12, '18, 
Camp Taylor, Ky. Overseas Sept. 9, '18. At- 
tached Co. A., 309 Eng. Discharged Camp 
Dix, N. J., June 3, '19. 

[6] BUSH, ROSCOE R., (Cambria) age 34; 
B., Jackson Co., 111. Son of Marion and Laura 
Bush, Carbondale, 111. Railroader. Enlisted 
July 19, '17. Overseas April 19, '18. Engaged 
Aisne-Marne Def.; Aisne-Marne Off.; St. 
Mihiel Off.; Meuse-Argonne Off.; N. E. of 
Rheims; Chateau-Thierry Sector. Slightly 
wounded June 5, '18 by bomb dropped from air 
plane. Attached Amb. Co. 7, 3rd Div. Dis- 
charged Germany, May 25, '19. Re-enlisted 
for one year May 26, '19. 

[7] CULLEN, JOHN WILLIAM, (Cambria) 
age 31; B., Dunbar, Pa. Son of Luke and 
Mary Cullen. Married Gearldeen Conley. 
Electrician. Entrained March 12, '18, Camp 
Taylor, Ky. Attached 2nd U. S. D. B. Guard. 
Discharged Fort Leavensworth, Kans., May 

6, '19. 

[8] DEPALM, ANTON, (Cambria) age 22; 
B., Vienna, Austria. Son of Carl and Mary 
Depalm. Coal miner. Enlisted June 19, '17. 
Attached Co. G., 36 Reg., 12 Division. Dis- 
charged Camp Grant, 111., July 1, '19. 

[9] DIXON, FLOYD, (Cambria) age 24; B., 
Carbondale, 111. Son of Nancy and Frank 
Dixon. Coal miner. Entrained June 27, '18. 
Overseas Sept. 27, '18, but didn't reach front. 
Attached Co. A., 112 Inf., 28 Division. Dis- 
charged Camp Grant, 111., May 15, '19. 



[10] DIXON, EDGAR, (Cambria) age 25; 
B., Carbondale, 111. Son of Nancy and Frank 
Dixon. Farmer. Entrained June 27, '18. At- 
tached Co. C., 329 Unit, M. T. C. Discharged 
Camp Grant, 111., April 20, '19. 

[11] EVERETT, EARL MARION, (Cam- 
bria) age 28; B., De Soto, 111. Son of P. W. 
and M. I. Everett. Married Edith Jones. 
Miner. Entrained Oct. 5, '17. Attached Co. 
A., 325 M. G. Bn. Discharged Camp Taylor, 
Ky., June 5, '18. 

[12] GRIFFETH, THEODORE, (Cambria) 
age 22; B., Cambria, 111. Son of W. F. and 
Tabitha Griffeth. Coal miner. Entrained 
May 28, '18. Overseas Oct. 3, '18. Attached 
Co. M., 310 Reg. Inf. Discharged Camp Grant, 
111., June 3, '19. 

[13] HAGLER, HARRY, (Cambria) age 26; 
B., Williamson County, 111. Son of Grover 
and Annie Hagler. Coal miner. Enlisted 
April 10, '18. Overseas Aug. 26, '18. Engaged 
St. Mihiel, Argonne Forest, Champagne Sec- 
tor. Wounded in right hand Oct. 4, '18. At- 
tached 17th Co., 5 Reg. of U. S. Marines. Dis- 
charged Virginia, May 26, '19. 

[14] JERALDS, BURKE, (Cambria) age 20; 
B., Carterville, 111. Son of George and Anna 
Jeralds. Married Daisy Campbell. Coal min- 
er. Enlisted Dec. 15, '17, Jefferson Bar- 
racks, Mo. Overseas Oct. 4, '18. Attached 
Bat. A., C. A. C., 49th Art. Discharged Camp 
Grant, 111., Mar. 28, '19. 

[15] JERALDS, ALBERT, (Cambria) age 
22; B., Williamson County, 111. Son of Richard 
and Martha Jeralds. Farming. Entrained 
Sept. 5, '17. Attached Co. E., 345 Inf. Dis- 
charged Camp Pike, Ark., Feb. 16, '18. 

[16] LANSFORD, HARRY, (Cambria) age 
23; B., Harvel, Butler Co., Mo. Son of William 
and Martha Lansford. Married Callie Vaughn. 
Coal miner. Entrained Sept. 21, '17, Camp 
Taylor, Ky. Overseas Aug. 17, '18. Engaged 
in Argonne Forest, 4 Div. 

[17] LEDBETTER, ALBERT O., (Cambria) 
age 25; B., Cambria, 111. Son of John and 
Lois I. Ledbetter. Married Eunice Hudson. 
Teacher. Entrained May 10, '18. Overseas 
July 7, '18. Engaged Gerardmer Off., Sept. 3, 
until Oct. 12, Meuse-Argonne Off., Oct. 29, un- 
til Nov. 11. Gassed once near Grand Pre, Nov. 
9. Attached Co. D., 18 M. G. Bn., 54 Reg., 
6th Div. Discharged Camp Grant, 111., June 
23, '19. 

[18] LEDBETTER, CORP. ALDEN K., 
(Cambria) age 29; B., Cambria, 111. Son of 
John A. and Lois Ledbetter. School teacher. 
Entrained June 27, '18. Overseas Oct. 6, '18. 
Did not reach front. Attached Co. F.. 147 Inf., 
37 Div. Discharged Camp Grant, 111., April 
13, '19. 



205 



jr 

F 




[1] ADAMS, IRAN J., (Creal Springs) age 
21; B., Creal Springs, 111. Son of H. R. and 
Mattie Adams. Farming. Entrained June 
5, '18. Overseas Oct. 2, '18. Attached Co. C., 
122 Engrs. Discharged Camp Grant, 111., July 
19, '19. 



[2] ATWOOD, EDGAR N., (Creal Springs) 
age 26; B., Creal Springs, 111. Son of E. N. 
Atwood. Farmer. Entrained Sept. 21, '17. 
Overseas June 28, '18. Attached Co. C., 115 
M. G. Bn. Discharged Camp Grant, 111., April 
10, '19. 



[3] BARGER, BEN, (Creal Springs) age 28; 
B., Eddyville, 111. Son of Geo. Barger, Creal 
Springs, 111. Entrained, '18. Overseas Oct. 
6, '18. Discharged at Camp Grant, 111., July 
20, '19. 



[4] BARGER, FRANK, (Creal Springs) age 
26; B., Eddyville, 111. Son of Geo. Barger. 
Overseas Sept. 12, '18. Discharged at Camp 
Grant, 111., June 26, '19. 



[5] BELTZ, LOUIE EDWARD, (Creal 
Springs) age 20; B., Carterville, 111. Son of 
Geo. and Emma Beltz. School teacher. En- 
listed Sept. 26, '18. Attached 6th University 
111., S. A. T. C. Discharged Dec. 21, '18, Ur- 
bana, 111. 



]6] BORDERS, ROSCOE, (Creal Springs); 
B., Creal Springs, 111. Son of Sarah Borders. 
Farmer. Entrained May 28, '18, Marion, 111. 
Overseas Oct. 2, '18. Attached 34 Co., 153 
Depot Brigade. Discharged Camp Grant, 111., 
March 1, '19. 



[7] BRUNTY. WEAVER O., (Creal Springs) 
age 25; B., Eldorado, 111. Married Loudene 
Creal. Barber. Entrained June 27, '18, Mar- 
ion, 111. Discharged Macon, Ga., July 2, '18. 



[8] BUCKNER, FRED, (Creal Springs) age 
25 ;B., Stonefort, 111. Son of J. W. and Mar- 
garet Buckner. Employed as barber. En- 
trained June 27, '18. Attached to Headquar- 
ters Co., 121 Inf. Discharged at Camp Grant, 
111., Jan. 2, '19. 



[9] CLINE, OSCAR, (Creal Springs) age 
22; B., Creal Springs, 111. Son of Curren and 
Rutha Cline. Married Miss Hazel Odelsberger. 
Employed as miner, Creal Springs. Enlisted 
Oct. 12, '17, Philadelphia. Attached to Marine 
Corps. Discharged Mar. 11, '19. 



[10] GALTIMORE, FRED, (Creal Springs) 
age 20; B., New Burnside. Son of N. D. Gal- 
timore. Painter. Enlisted Sept., Great 
Lakes, 111. Went overseas several times to 
France and England on torpedo boat. Served 
three years. Enlisted again 1916 for three 
years. 

[11] HAILEY, ROY E., (Creal Springs) age 
26; B., Creal Springs, 111. Son of John and 
Nan Hailey. Married Nellie McRoy. Coal 
miner. Enlisted Sept. 19, '17. Overseas Aug. 
23, '18. Attached Co. D., 346 Inf. Discharged 
Camp Grant, 111., May 7, '19. 

[12] HORN, ROBERT M., (Creal Springs) 
age 26; B., New Burnside, 111. Son of James 
R. Horn, Marion, 111. Enlisted July 26, '17, 
Jefferson Barracks, Mo. Attached Co. C., 68th 
Inf. Discharged Camp Taylor, Ky., Feb. 8, 

[13] KELTNER, SERG. J. CLYDE, (Creal 
Springs) age 24; B., Simpson, 111. Son of 
Sarah C. Keltner. Married Miss Mary H. 
Randolph. Employed as asst. cashier, Citizens 
State Bank, Creal Springs, 111. Entrained 
May 29, '18 at Marion, 111. Attached to Sup- 
ply Co., 78 Inf., Wolverine (14th) Div. Dis- 
charged Jan. 21, '19 at Camp Custer, Mich. 

[14] KIMMEL, LESTER CLAY, (Creal 
Springs) age 22; B., Creal Springs, 111. Son 
of E. M. and Alice Kimmel. Farmer. En- 
trained June 27, '18, Marion, 111. Overseas 
Oct. 7, '18. Attached Hdq. Co., 143 Inf., 36th 
Div. Discharged Camp Grant, 111., June 10, 

iff i 

[15] LANEY, SGT. JOE, (Creal Springs) 
age 22; B., Creal Springs, 111. Son of W. L. 
Laney. Miner. Entrained Sept., '18. Dis- 
charged Camp Grant, 111., Feb., '19. 

[16] MALCOM, RAY (Creal Springs) age 
21; B., Creal Springs, 111. Son of J. T. and 
Samantha Malcom. Carpenter. Entrained 
Sept. 6, '18. Attached 26th Engrs. Discharged 
Camp Forest, Jan. 4, '19. 

[17] ODUM, JOSEPH ROBERT, (Creal 
Springs) age 27; B., Creal Springs, 111. Son 
of Martin and Mary Odum. Married Mattie 
E. Bearden. Farmer. Entrained Camp Wheel- 
er, Ga., June 28, '18. Overseas Oct. 16, '18. 
Attached Co. D., 325 Inf. Discharged Camp 
Grant, 111., May 21, '19. 

[18] ODUM, DICK, (Creal Springs) age 22; 
B., Creal Springs, 111. Son of A. E. and Orpha 
Odum. Entrained May 28, '18. Overseas Oct. 
6, '18. Attached to Co. C.. 113 Ammunition 
Train. Discharged at Camp Grant, 111., August 
8, '19. 



207 



I 




[1] COX, FRED, (Clifford) age 30; B., Eng- 
land. Son of Arthur Cox. Married Ester 
Smith. Coal miner. Enlisted April 8, '18. Ov- 
erseas May, '18. Engaged Arras, Douai, Val- 
enciennes, Lille and Mons. Gassed at Valen- 
ciennes. Attached 1st Division Canadian 
Engrs. Discharged March 1, '19, Toronto, 
Canada. 

[2] PULOSKI, TONY (Clifford) age 22; B., 
Russia. Son of Steve and Agnis Puloski. 
Miner. Entrained Sept., '17. Overseas April, 
'18. Engaged at Metz, Verdun, Chateau- 
Thierry and Argonne. Wounded Argonne 
Oct. 14, '18. Shot through face by machine 
gun. Attached Co. K., 6th Inf., 5th Division. 
Discharged Camp Grant, 111., March 5, '19. 

[3] STONUM, NOAH C., (Clifford) age 26; 
B., Vergennes, 111. Son of J. A. and Rachel 
Stonum. Employed as miner, Clifford. Mar- 
ried Miss Emma Phillips. Entrained May 28, 
'18. Overseas Oct. 6, '18. Attached to Co. 
A., 308 M. G. Bn., 78 Div. Now stationed at 
Marigny, France. 

[4] WHITECOTTON, EDGAR, (Clifford) 
age 29; B., Herrin, 111. Miner. Entrained 
April 29, '18. Overseas May 18, '18. En- 
gaged St. Mihiel and Meuse-Argonne. At- 
tached Co. C., 311 Inf. Discharged Camp 
Grant, 111., June 5, '19. 

[5] KIMBRO, RAYMOND L., (Carterville) 
age 23; B., Anna, 111. Son of J. W. and Mat- 
tie Kimbro, Carterville, 111. Salesman. En- 
trained Sept. 4, '18, Herrin, 111. Attached Head- 
quarters Co. Inf., Central Officers Training 
School. Discharged Camp Grant, 111., Jan 11, 
'19. 

[6] GREEN, LOYD, (Goreville) age 21; B., 
Goreville, 111. Son of George Washington and 
Mary Alice Green. Farmer. Goreville, 111. 
Enlisted Oct. 12, Marion, 111. Attached Co. 
K. Discharged Dec. 5, '18, Chicago, 111. 

[7] KELLEY, ORAL, (Goreville) age 24; 
B., Johnston City, 111. Son of H. N. Kelley. 
Married Madge Gallemore. Farmer. En- 
trained Oct. 5, '17. Overseas Sept. 3, '18. At- 
tached Co. C., 112 M. G. Bn. Discharged 
Camp Grant, 111., June 2, '18. 

[8] MAZE, IRA F., (Goreville) age 22; B., 
Johnson County, 111. Son of Harvey Maze. 
Farmer. Entrained June 27, '18. Overseas 
Oct. 27, '18. Present address, Prisoner of 
War Escort Co. 206, A. P. O. 701, American 
E. F., France. Attached P. W. E. Co., 206, 
Army Service Corps. 

[9] ROBERTS, WILLIAM L, (Goreville) 
age 22; B., Goreville, 111. Son of Mack and Inez 
Roberts. Fireman. Entrained April 29, '18. 
Overseas '18. Attached Co. G., 312 Ammuni- 
tion Train. Discharged Camp Grant, 111., 
March 28, '19. 



[10] DILLINGHAM, HERVIE, (West 
Frankfort) age 22; B., Princeton, Ky. Son 
of W. M. and Lee Dillingham. Mgr. Herrin 
Supply Store in West Frankfort, 111. En- 
trained Sept. 20, '17. Attached 14th Co., 4th 
Bn., 159 Depot Brigade. Discharged Camp 
Taylor, Dec. 25, '18. 

[11] PALMER, SGT. GROVER, (West 
Frankfort) age 26; B., Benton, 111. Employed 
as bricklayer. Entrained May 26, '18. Over- 
seas July '18. Attached to Co. C., 326 Inf. 
Discharged Jan. 12, '19 at Camp Grant, 111. 

[12] SULLIVAN, ROY E., (West Frank- 
fort) age 26; B., Thompsonville, 111. Son of 

E. G. and Sarah Sullivan. Married Miss Vida 
Randolph. Employed as clerk, West Frank- 
fort. Entrained June 27, '18. Overseas Oct. 
5, '18. Attached to Hdqs. Co., 121 Inf. Dis- 
charged April 17, '19 at Camp Grant, 111. 

[13] TANNER, ROSCOE E., (Stonefort) 
age 26; B., Williamson Co. Son of Chas. and 
Tinie Tanner. Employed as miner, Stonefort. 
Entrained June 27, '18. Attached to 5 Co., 1 
Prov. Regt., 31 Div. Discharged July 1, 18 at 
Camp Wheeler, Ga. 

[14] SPILLER, ARTHUR, (Whiteash) age 
18; B., Whiteash, 111. Son of Henry and Nan- 
nie Spiller. Coal miner. Enlisted May 22, 
Jefferson Bks., Mo. Attached Battery C., 70th 

F. A. Discharged Camp Henry Knox, Ky., 
Jan 31, '19. 

[15] STONE, ALLEY, (Colp) age 28; B., 
Wayside, Union Co., 111. Son of Nancy Stone. 
Employed as miner, Colp. Entrained June 27, 
'18. Overseas Oct. 4, '18. Attached to M. 
P. Co. 36. Stationed at Dounounie Jaune, 
France. 

[16] STONE, RAY, (Colp) age 24; B. 
Creal Springs, 111. Son of Nancy Stone. Em- 
ployed as farmer, Colp. Entrained June 27, 
'18. Overseas Sept. 28, '18. Attached to Guard 
Co. 312, 78 Bn. Stationed at Rue De Pisso 
of Bussy La Grand, France. 

[17] SPRINGS. EDO, (Crab Orchard) age 
26; B., Galatia, 111. Son of M. E. and Susan 
Springs. Entrained July 25, '18, Camp Wheel- 
er, Ga. Assigned to No. Co. Discharged Aug. 
1, '18, Camp Wheeler, Ga., on account of 
physical disabilities. 

[18] ZOIA. HENRY, (Colp) age 28; B., 
Venice, Italy. Son of Joseph and Tressie 
Zoia. Married Rosa Gualdoni. Coal miner. 
Entrained April 29. '18. Overseas June 28, 
'18. Attached Co. G., 147 Inf.. 37 Div. Dis- 
charged Camp Grant, 111., April 13, '19. 



209 




[1] ABSHER, SAMUEL, (Marion) age 18; 
B., Murphysboro, 111. Son of Louis and Anna 
Absher. Mechanic, Marion, 111. Enlisted 
April 23, '17, Lansing, Mich. Overseas Aug. 
15, '17. Stationed on the Metz front for nine 
months. Enlisted for 3 years. Attached Sup- 
ply Co., 1st Army Hdq. Rgt., A. P. O. 716. 

[2] BRADBURY, SGT. CARL C., (Marion) 
age 21; B., Marion, 111. Son of J. W. and 
Alma Bradbury. Clerk. Enlisted Aug. 15, 
'18, Evanston, 111. Attached Co. A., 427 Tele- 
graph Bn., Wireless Telephone Section, 11 
Reg. Discharged Jan. 1, '19, Camp Meade, 
Md. 

[3] BRADLEY, CORP. EARL (Marion) age 
22; B., Goreville. 111. Son of James D. and 
Clara Bradley. Farmer. Entrained Sept. 21, 
'17. Attached Co. G., 3rd Bn., 1st Gas Reg't., 
C. W. S. Discharged Camp Sherman, Ohio. 
Dec. 15, '18. 

[4] CIRRITO, EVO B., (Marion) age 22; 
B., Messina, Italy. Commission merchant. En- 
trained June 27, '18. Overseas Oct. 7, '18, on 
board of S. S. Euripeedis. Attached Co. B., 
30 Inf;',^3rd Div. Discharged Camp Grant, 
111., Aug. 26, '19. Stationed Mayen, Germany, 
with Army of Occupation. 

[5] DURHAM, JOHN E., (Marion) age 21; 
B., Benton, 111. Married Nellie Hull. Barber. 
Enlisted Dec. 29, '16. Attached to Co. G., 62 
Inf. Graduated from 4th Officers Training 
School, Camp Fremont, Calif. Discharged 
Camp Lee, Va., Jan. 22, '19. 

[6] FARTHING, CLAUDE, (Marion) age 
21; B., Stonefort, 111. Son of Charlie and Ma. 
gie Farthing. Married Clara Stricklin. Em- 
ployed in wholesale house. Entrained Oct. 5, 
'17, Camp Taylor, Ky. Overseas Sept. 1, '18. 
Attached to Co. A., 4th Division. 

[7] FORKER, SGT. WILLIAM H., (Mar- 
ion) age 28; B., New York City, N. Y. Son 
of Mrs. Lena B. Cirrito. Commission mer- 
chant. Entrained June 27, '18. Attached to 
Headquarters, War Prison Barracks, No. 1, 
McPherson, Ga. Discharged at Fort McPher- 
son, Ga., June 10, '19. 

[8] FOWLER, CHARLES P., (Marion) age 
24; B., Marion, 111. Son of Elizabeth Fowler, 
Marion, 111. Married Edeth Sellers. Em- 
ployed as coal miner. Entrained June 27, '18. 
Attached to Co. M., 130th Inf. Discharge^ 
at Camp Wheeler, Ga. on Oct. 9, '18. Killed 
July 11, '19 at Keystone mines, Pittsburg, 

[9] FOWLER, ORVAL M., (Marion) age 
31; B., Marion, 111. Son of Elizabeth Fowler. 
Married Bertha Kobler. Farmer and miner. 
Entrained June 27, '18. Overseas Oct., '18. 
Eleven months in Germany in the Army of 
Occupation. Attached to Co. M., 30th Inf. 
Discharged at Camp Grant, 111., Aug. 29, '] 



[10] FLY, JAMES JACKSON, (Marion) 
age 26; B., Marion, 111. Son of J. P. an. 
Mary Elizabeth Fly. Coal miner. Entrained 
Sept. 5, '17. Attached to Co. B., 325 M. G. 
Bn. Discharged San Antonio, Texas, Dec. 18, 
'18. 

[11] PIAZZA, ROCCO, (Marion) age 24; 
B., Italy. Son of Carlo and Mary Piaz 
Coal miner. Entrained April 29, '18. Over- 
seas May 19, '18. Engaged in Arras-Somme 
Hill, Argonne. Wounded at Argonne Oct. 23 
in arm. Attached to Co. L., 311 M. G. Bn. 
Discharged at Camp Grant, 111., June 3, '19. 

[12] REED, ROY, (Marion) age 22; B 
Johnston City, 111. Son of George and Dell 
Reed. Married Dixie Parmley. Electrician. 
Entrained Oct. 5, '17. Overseas Sept. 3 '18. 
Attached to Co. D., 112 M. G. Bn., 84 Div. 
Discharged at Camp Grant, 111., June 1, '19. 

[13] AKIN, KENNETH C., (Johnston City) 
age 24; B., Galatia, 111. Son of Lewis and 
Alice Akin. Miner. Entrained June 27, '18. 
Overseas Oct. 6, '18. Attached to Co. M., 
328 Inf. Discharged at Camp Grant, 111., May 
30, '19. 

[14] BROWN, FRED L., (Johnston City) 
age 19; B., Johnston City, 111. Son of William 
and Lourinia Brown. Employed as coal miner. 
Enlisted May 2, '17, Murphysboro, 111. At- 
tached to 322d Supply Co. Discharged at 
Camp Jackson, Columbia, S. C., March 11, '19. 

[15] CASTRALE, MARTIN, (Johnston 
City) age 21; B., Torino, Italy. Son of Pat- 
testa and Maddalena Castrale. Coal miner. 
Entrained March 9, '18. Overseas Aug. 10. 
Engaged in St. Mihiel, Argonne-Meuse. At- 
tached lllth Engineers. Discharged Camp 
Grant, 111., June 10, '19. 

[16] EDWARDS, LEMUEL CLAUDIUS, 
(Johnston City) age 25; B., near Johnston 
City, 111. Son of John and Annie E. Edwards. 
Farmer. Enlisted in U. S. Navy May 30, '17, 
Chicago, 111. Overseas July. On U. S. S. 
Ericsson. Sank one submarine and fired at 
others. Served 16 months in war zone as fire- 
man on U. S. S. Ericsson. 

[17] WHILLHITE, JAMES N, (Johnston 
City) age 21 ; B., Lockport, 111. Son of James 
T. and Martha Whillhite. Clerk, Johnston 
City. Entrained Oct. 5, '17. Overseas Sept. 
25, '18. Attached to Supply Co., 71st Art., 
C. A. C. Discharged at Camp Grant, 111., 
March 29, '19. 

[18] ZUCCA, CORP. STEVE (Johnston 
City) age 23; B., Italy. Son of John and 
Mary Zucca. Employed as miner, Johnston 
City. Entrained Sept. 21. '17. Overseas July. 
Attached to Co. K., 1st Pioneer Inf., A. E. F 
Wounded in action Oct. 11. 



2tt 



211 




[1] LAWWILL, CORP. CLYDE, (Clifford) 
ag-e 18; B., Herrin, 111. Son of James and 
Rosa Lawwill. Enlisted July 29, '18. At- 
tached 20th Inf. Stationed Pittsburgh, Pa. 
Discharged Chillicothe, Ohio, April 19, '19. 



[2] JOHNSON, GORDON THOMAS, (Creal 
Springs) age 27; B., Creal Springs, 111. Son 
of James and Lucy Johnson. Salesman. En- 
listed Aug. 28, '17, Great Lakes, 111. Over- 
seas Nov. 14, '18. Attached Naval Band. Dis- 
charged New York, Feb. 27, '19. 



[10] LA MASTER, EARL, (Herrin) age 
22; B., Marion, 111. Son of George La 
Master. Employed on R. R., Herrin, 111. En- 
trained June 5, '18. Overseas Oct. 3, '18. At- 
tached Co. G., 327 Inf. Discharged Camp 
Grant, 111., May 26, '19. 



[11] MARCHETTI, JOE, (Herrin) age 26; 
B., Italy. Employed as coal miner. Entrained 
Sept. '18. Overseas Oct., '18. Attached to 
Co. D., llth M. G. Bn., A. E. F. A. P. L 
746. 



[3] MURPHY, SGT. CHARLES, (Creal 
Springs) age 26; B., Creal Springs, 111. Son 
of Lawrence and Arista Murphy. Married 
Alice Adlesberger. Farmer. Entrained Sept. 
21, '17, Camp Taylor, Ky. Overseas July, '18. 
On firing line 2 weeks before Nov. 11. At- 
tached Co. C., 325 M. G. Bn. 



[12] PARENT, LEON L., (Herrin) age 18; 
B., Liege, Belgium. Son of Albert and Wil- 
maw Parent, Herrin, 111. Miner. Enlisted 
May 11. '18, Great Lakes, 111. Discharged 
from U. S. N. R. F. to U. S. N. Sept. 17, '19. 
Re-enlisted. 



[4] PROCTOR, CLYDE C., (Creal Springs) 
age 23; B., Black Rock, Ark. Son of George 
J. and Sarah J. Proctor, Creal Springs, 111. 
Barber. Entrained May 28, '18. Overseas 
Oct. 2, '18. Discharged Camp Grant, 111., Aug. 
26, '19. Service in France, Belgium, England 
and Germany with 38th, 41st, and 42nd Div., 
and in Provost Marshall General Dept. 

[5] COLLINS, CLIFFORD C., (Marion) age 
19; B., Marion, 111. Son of William and Lou 
Collins, Marion, 111. Enlisted Aug. 6, '18, 
Chicago, 111. Overseas Oct. 29, '18. Attached 
U. S. M. C. Present address, Camp Montoir, 
France, 68th Guard. 



[6] FERGES, MARK, (Johnston City) B., 
Blairsville, 111. Employed with Stotlar Her- 
rin Lbr. Co. Enlisted June 23, '18. Attached 
to Lumber inspector during the time of ser- 
vice. Discharged Jan. 31, '19. 



[7] COOKI, LOUIS, (Herrin) age 28; B., 
Italy. Married Addie Winchester. Coal min- 
er. Entrained July 24, '18, Funston, Kan. 
Attached Co. E., 210 Engrs., 10th Division. 
On way overseas when armistice was signed. 
Discharged Camp Mills, N. Y., Feb., '19. 



[8] ECKERT, SGT. EUGENE C., (HerrhO 
age 22; B., Marissa, 111. Son of Louis and 
Alene Eckert. Teacher. Entrained April 29, 
'18. Attached Co. 18. 5th Bn., 153 D. B. Dis- 
charged Camp Dix, N. J., Oct. 30, '18. 



[9] HUBBS. ROY, (Elkville) Son of J. A. 
and Ida Hubbs. Employed Post Office. En- 
trained from Herrin, 111. Overseas Oct., '18. 
Still in Germany. 



[13] POLLACK, HARRY (Herrin) age 26; 
B., Chicago, 111. Son of Siman and Mary 
Pollack. Junk Dealer. Entrained May 28, '18. 
Overseas Oct. 2, '18. Attached Co. L., 151 
Reg. Discharged Camp Grant, 111., July 18, 
'19. 



[14] STEPHENS, EARL, (Herrin) age 20; 
Son of Martha Stephens, Herrin, 111. Enlist- 
ed July 6, '18, Great Lakes, 111. Overseas 
Jan. Attached U. S. Transport Leviathan, 
New York City. Promoted first class fire- 
man. Still serves in transportation service. 



[15] CARTER, LABON, (Carterville) ag-e 
19; B., Carterville, 111. Son of B. H. and 
Media Kemp Carter, Carterville, 111. En- 
listed Jan. 6, '18. Discharged at Cambridge, 
Mass., Jan 28, '19. 



[16] GRAIN, BARNEY H., (Carterville) 
age 24; B., Carterville, 111. Son of E. M. and 
I. M. Grain. Enlisted May 27, '18. Overseas 
Oct. 6, '18. Attached to M. G. Co., 326 Inf. 
Discharged at Camp Grant, 111., June 7, '19. 



[17] TREGONING, WELSHIRE, (Carter- 
ville) age 18. Son of Chas. and Quinnie 
Tregoning. Miner. Enlisted Sept. 9, '18. 
Overseas Nov. 12, '18. Discharged at Chicago, 
111., January 5, '19. 



[18] TREGONNING, NORMAN CHARLIE, 
(Carterville) Son of Charlie and Minnie Tre- 
gonning, Carterville, 111. Enlisted in Navy 
Dec. 9, '17. Attached Co. R., 12th Regt. Dis- 
charged Great Lakes, 111., April 10, '19. 



213 



[1] CALVERT, AUDIE L., (Hurst) age 18; 
B., Murphysboro, 111. Son of Albert and 
Cynthia Calvert, Hurst, 111. Enlisted May 4, 
'17, Jefferson Barracks, Mo. Overseas March 
14, '18. Engaged in battles of St. Mihiel, 
Verdun, and Argonne-Meuse. Attached to 
Hdq. Co., 32 Art. Brig., C. A. C. Discharged 
at Camp Grant, 111., Jan. 24, '19. 

[2] CARNAGHI, LEE, (Herrin) age 26; B., 
Murphysboro, 111. Employed as miner. Son 
of Edd Carnaghi. Enlisted Sept., '17, De- 
troit, Mich. Overseas June, '18. Engaged in 
several battles. Wounded in arm and gassed 
twice. Attached to Co. H, 128 Inf. Discharged 
at Camp Grant, 111., June 27, '19. 

[3] COLYER, HERBERT L., (Herrin) age 
27; B., Whitesville, Ky. Employed as miner. 
Son of Mr. and Mrs. J. L. Colyer. 
Enlisted May 4 at Hartford, Ky. Overseas 
July 23, '18. Engaged in battle of St. Mi- 
hiel and Argonne. Slightly gassed. Attached 
to Co. C , 48th Engrs. Promoted to Sergeant 
and served until discharged at Camp Grant, 
111., June 28, '19. 

[4] BAILIE, JAMES M., (Herrin) age 20; 
B., Springfield, 111. Employed as tipple weigh- 
man. Married Nona Stroud. Son of J. M. 
and Etta Bailie. Enlisted Dec. 10, 1917, Great 
Lakes. Took a course at Harvard University 
and graduated with 3rd class rating. Also a 
course at Pensacola, Fla., and ordered to in- 
active duty March 1, '19. 

[5] BENEDICT, CARLTON E., (Herrin) 
age 28; B., Pomona, Tenn. Employed as 
fireman. Son of Adin and Lillian Benedict, 
Pomona, Tenn. Entrained July 4, '18. Served 
4 years in Navy. Enlisted Feb. 11, '09 and 
served until Feb. 11, '13. Attached to Co. 
F., 45 Reg., 9th Div. Discharged at Camp 
Gordon, Ga., June 12, '19. 

[6] GREENWOOD, FLOYD M., (Johnston 
City) age 23; B., Johnston City, 111. Son of 
A. B. Greenwood. Employed as clerk. En- 
trained Feb. 23, '18. Overseas Sept. 3, '18. 
Engaged in Theil River, Belgium, Flanders 
Front. Attached to Co. H. Discharged Camp 
Grant, 111., April 29, '19. 

[7] JOHNSON, CARL H., (Johnston City) 
age 21; B., Carbondale, 111. Son of James R. 
and May Johnson. Employed as drug clerk. 
Enlisted April 30, '18, Great Lakes, H. At- 
tached Hospital Corps. Discharged Sept. 13, 
'18, Great Lakes, III. 

[8] LEE, CLARENCE P., (Herrin) age 26; 
B., Tamaroa, 111. Son of C. M. and Minnie 
Lee. Employed Carpenter. Entrained Mar. 
12, '18. Overseas Sept. 3, '18. Attached Hdq., 
335 Inf. Discharged Camp Grant, 111., July 
12, '18. 




[9] LOUNSBURY, HAROLD E., (Herrin) 
age 21; B., Dubois, 111. Son of J. E. .and 
Clarisa Lounsbury. Employed clerk. Enlist- 
ed May, '18, Aviation Service, Paulellac, 
France. Discharged Nov., '18. 

[10] MOULTON, OVA L., (Marion) age 18; 
B., Creal Springs, 111. Son of E. H. and 
Maude Moulton. Student. Enlisted April 28, 
'18, Great Lakes, 111. Overseas Jan 2, 19. Dis- 
charged May 24, '19, Coco Solo, C. Z. 

[11] ODUM, LEO, (Marion) age 22; B., 
Williamson County. Son of Carroll Marshall 
Oduin. School teacher. Entrained May 28, 
'18. Overseas Oct. 6, '18. Attached Co. A., 
137 M. G. Bn., 38th Div. Discharged June 
9, 19, Camp Grant, 111. 



[12] THOMPSON, ARBY, (Herrin) age 30; 
B., Pinckneyville, 111. Employed coal miner at 
Herrin. Entrained Mar. 3, '18, Camp Taylor, 
Ky. 

[13] SANDUSKY, AQUILLA, (Herrin) age 
25; B., McLeansboro, 111. Son of R. A. San- 
dusky, Herrin, 111. Married Miss Hassie 
Goins. Employed miner. Entrained May 23, 
'18. Attached Headquarters Co., 37th Inf. 
Discharged Feb. 7, '19, Fort Mclntosh, Tex. 

[14] SNYDER, WALTER W., (Carterville) 
age 23; B., Carterville, 111. Son of W. W. and 
Emma Snyder, Carterville, 111. Stenographer. 
Enlisted June, '17, Kansas City, Mo. Overseas 
June '18. Discharged Aug. 19, '19. Accepted 
commission 1st Lieut., American Red Cross. 

[15] SPRINGER, ROLAND B., (Hurst) B., 
Pocahontas. 111. Son of Charles B. and Jennie 
Springer. Student. Enlisted Mar. 1,. '18, Chi- 
cago, 111. Still in service. 

[16] STOCKS, MARION, (Carterville) age 
24; B., Carterville, 111. Mining. Entrained Oct. 
4, '17, Camp Taylor, Ky. 

[17] SULLIVAN, EVERETT W.. (Carter- 
ville) age 24; Son of Thomas G. Sullivan. Em- 
ployed Ford agent. Enlisted June '18. Over- 
seas Sept. 2, '18. Discharged Camp Lee, Va., 
June 23. 



[18] WOODBRIDGE, THOMAS REED, 
(Marion) age 23; B., Sac City. Iowa. Son of 
Theo. H. Woodbridge. Married Miss Nella 
True. Employed fireman. Enlisted Dec. 14, 
'17, St. Louis, Mo. Overseas Sept. 15, '18. 
Engaged in sinking of submarines off E. Coast, 
Aug., '18. Discharged Great Lakes, 111., July 
17, '19. 



215 




^ 



[1] BAUDINO, JOHN, (Herrin) age 22; B., 
Gallup, New Mexico. Son of James and Tresa 
Baudino. Mechanic. Entrained Oct. 4, '17, 
Herrin, 111. Attached Co. A., 325 M. G. Bn. 
Discharged Boston, Mass., July 2, '19. 

[2] BOOTH, ERNIE, (Marion) aga 23; B 
Marion, 111. Coal miner. Entrained June 
28, '18, Camp Wheeler, Ga. Discharged Camp 
Wheeler, Ga. Died after discharged. 

[3] CARNAGHI, CHARLIE, (Herrin) age 
27; B., Cuggiono, Italy. Son of Rosa Berra, 
Cuggiono, Italy. Coal miner. Entrained Oct. 
4 '17, Herrin, 111. Overseas June 20, '18. At- 
tached Co. C., 6th Eng. Discharged Ft. Sher- 
idan, 111., Sept. 27, 19. 

[41 CRENSHAW, GEO. WASHINGTON, 
(Marion) age 23; B., Marion, 111. Coal miner. 
Entrained bept. 21, '17, Camp Taylor, Ky. 

[5] HOLIDAY, SGT. LEO, (Marion) age 
^2- B., Wickliffe, Ky. Son of Robert E. and 
Laura Holiday. Clerical worker. Entrained 
Sept. 8. '17, Chicago, 111. Overseas Sept. 1*,, 
18. Attached Co. C., 311 Supply Tram, 80 
Div. Discharged Camp Grant, 111., July 26, 
'19. 

[6.1 HOWELL, LEE ROY, (Carterville) age 
21; B., Carterville, 111. Son of W. A. and 
Mary A. Howell. Enlisted June 13, '18, Bos- 
ton Mass. Overseas Oct. 19, '18. Attached 
to Merchant Marine Transport Service. Dis- 
charged New York, N. Y., Feb. 15, '19. 

[7] HOLMES, E. C., (Carterville) age 25; 
B., Prague, Okla. Son of Geo. R. and Daisy 
W Holmes, Prague, Okla. Garage owner. 
Entrained May 16, '18, Herrin, 111. Engaged 
in special technical training at Lewis insti- 
tute, Chicago. Machinist for Provost Guard, 
Camp Meade, Md. Attached Bat. A., 312 
Field Art. 

[8] GARAVAGLIA, TONY, (Herrin) age 
23; B., Murphysboro, 111. Son of Caesar and 
Sarah Garavaglia, Herrin, 111. Post office 
clerk. Entrained Sept. 7, '18, Herrin, 111. 
Discharged Camp Grant, 111., March, '19. 

[9] HAYTON, MAURICE, (Carterville) age 
27; B., Carterville, 111. Son of Wm. and Cora 
Hayton, Carterville, 111. Automobile dealer. 
Entrained May 23, '18, Herrin, 111. Attached 
Co. H., 37th Inf. Discharged March 15, '19. 
Stationed on Mexico border. 

[10] NEWTON, CHARLES A., (Johnston 
City) age 24; B., Johnston City, 111. Son of 
Mrs. Alice Newton. Married Miss Stella 
Walker. Chief clerk Ernst Coal Co. Entrained 
Sept. 7, '18, Herrin, 111. Discharged Camp 
Grant, 111., March, '19. 



[11] PENROD, JAMES O., (Carterville) 
age 23; B., Anna, 111. Son of F. M. and Mary 
Penrod, Carterville, 111. Coal miner. En- 
trained May 23, '18, Herrin, 111. Attached 
Hdq. Co., 37th Inf. Discharged Ft. Mclntosh, 
Texas, Feb. 24, '19. 

[12] PRIDDY, CHARLES S., (Carterville) 
age 18; B., Cambria, 111. Son of Henry and 
Sarah Francis Priddy, Carterville, 111. Coal 
miner. Enlisted March 10, '17, Jefferson Bar- 
racks, Mo. Engaged in St. Mihiel Off.; Ar- 
gonne and Meuse. Attached Battery D., 52nd 
Artillery, C. A. C. Discharged Camp Eustis, 
Va. 

[13] SOLDNER, EDWARD W., (Marion) 
age 29 ; B., St. Peter, 111. Son of John A. and 
Minnia Soldner, Marion, 111. Farmer. En- 
trained Oct. 5, '17, Marion, 111. Overseas May 
7, '18. Engaged Aisne, Marne, St. Mihiel, 
Meuse, Argonne. Attached Co. C., 12 M. G. 
Bn. Discharged Camp Grant, 111., Aug. 9, 
'19. 

[14] SIZEMORE, SGT. WILLIAM PERRY, 
(Carterville) age 20; B., Carterville, 111. Son 
of Andrew J. and Mrs. Rebecca Sizemore, Car- 
terville, 111. Clerk. Enlisted June 9, '17, 
Kansas City, Mo. Overseas June 12, '18. At- 
tached Base Hospital No. 28, Discharged Camp 
Funston, Kansas, May 14, '19. 

[15] SPRINGER, ADELBERT JOHNSON, 
(Hurst) age 20; B., Chicago, 111. Son of 
Charles B. and Jennie Springer, Hurst, 111. 
Enlisted July 23, Chicago, 111. Overseas Oct. 
5, '18. Attached U. S. S. President Grant. 
Discharged Great Lakes, 111., July 23, '19. 

[16] STANLEY, CPL. CLELL H., (Marion) 
age 24; B., Pulleys Mill, 111. Son of Grant 
and Annie Stanley, Marion, 111. Coal miner. 
Entrained April 29, '18, Marion, 111. Over- 
seas May 28, '18. Engaged St. Mihiel, Meuse- 
Argonne. Attached Co. D., 303 Motor Supply 
Train. Discharged Camp Grant, 111., June 
11, '19. 

[17] STEGER, HOMER B., (Herrin) age 
23- B., Cadiz, Ky. Son of Samuel L. and 
Susan Hallick Steger, Herrin, 111. Coal miner. 
Entrained May 28, '18, Herrin, 111. Overseas 
Oct. 2, '18. Attached Co. A., 310th Inf. Dis- 
charged Camp Grant, 111., June 11, '19. 

[18] WADE, SANDERS CHESLEY. (Car- 
terville) age 27; B., Cottage Home, 111. Son 
of Thomas M. and Lucille Sanders. Married 
Nellie Brown. Salesman. Enlisted June 15, 
'18. Ready for overseas when armistice was 
signed. Attached Naval Aviation Corps. 



217 



[1] LEDBETTER, J. E., (Cambria) age 23; 
B., Williamson County, 111. Son of John A. 
and Lois Ledbetter. Married Norma McCor- 
mick. Coal miner. Entrained May 28, '18. 
Overseas Oct. 6, '18. Attached Co. D., 308 
M. G. Bn. Discharged Camp Grant, 111., May 
23, '19. 

[2] LIFE, EDGAR, (Cambria) age 29; B., 
Carbondale, 111. Son of David and Sidney 
Lipe. Coal miner. Entrained July 29, Syra- 
cuse, N. Y. Attached Co. 343 Fire & Guard 
Co. Discharged Columbus, Ohio, Feb. 18, '19. 

[3] LOVEL, EDMOND, (Cambria) age 27; 
B., Blairsville, 111. Son of Wm. and Mildred 
Level. Coal miner. Enlisted May 8, '18, St. 
Louis, Mo. Overseas Aug. 19, '19, Argonne 
Forest. Attached 74th Co., Reg. U. S. Marines, 
2 Div. 



[4] MODGLIN, LEE ROY, (Cambria) age 
24; B., Jackson County, 111. Son of A. J. and 
Rosa Modglin. Coal miner. Enlisted June 
12, '18. Lost right eye while in service. At- 
tached U. S. Navy. Discharged Great Lakes, 
111., July 11, '19. 

[5] REEVES, JOHN H., (Cambria) age 25; 
B., Williamson Co., 111. Son of C. A. and 
Lanonia Reeves. Coal miner. Entrained Aug., 
'18. Attached 336 Guard & Fire. Discharged 
Camp Grant, 111., Jan. 5, '19. 

[6] SILVERIA, DALLAS, (Cambria) age 
21 ; B., Williamson County, 111. Son of Joseph 
and Winnie Silveria. Coal miner. Entrained 
Sept. 6, '18, Camp Forest, Ga. Overseas Oct. 
30, '18. Attached 5 Co., 116 Reg. Inf. Dis- 
charged Camp Sherman, Ohio, Jan. 9, '19. 

[7] SIMONDS, CHAS., (Cambria) age 22; 
B., Mount Carmel, 111. Son of A. N. and Bertha 
Simonds. Married Mae Tetford. Entrained 
May 27, '1!J. Attached 15 Detention Camp. 
Discharged Camp Shelby, Miss, on account of 
disability June 2, '18. 

[8] SMITH, J. M., (Cambria) age 30; B., 
Williamson County, 111. Son of Coleman and 
Fredonia Smith. Engineer. Entrained June 
27, '18. Overseas Oct. 17. '18. Attached 1st 
Co., 124 Inf , 31 Div. Discharged Camp Grant, 
111., July 10, '19. 

[9] SN/DER, GARDNER, (Cambria) age 
29; B., Carbondale, 111. Son of Robert and 
Grace Snyder. Married Miss Essie Fuller. 
Employed as miner, Cambria. Entrained Oct. 
21, '18. Attached to 4 Inf. Discharged Nov. 
30, '38 at Camp Wheeler, Ga. 




[10] TYNER, PAUL, (Cambria) age 22; B., 
Cambria, 111. Son of J. M. and Josephine 
Tyner. Miner. Entrained May 28, '18. Over- 
seas Oct. 3, '18. Attached M. G. Co., 101 
Inf., 26 Div. Discharged Camp Grant, 111. 



[11] TYNER, WM. HENRY, (Cambria) age 
24; B., in Williamson County. Son of Mon- 
roe and Josephine Tyner. Miner at Cambria. 
Entrained Oct. 4, '17. Overseas Aug. 18, '18. 
Attached to Co. E., 345 Inf. Discharged at 
Camp Grant, 111., Feb. 4, '19. 



[12] WARD, PRESTON LEO, (Cambria) 
age 22; B., State of Ohio. Son of John and 
Ella Ward. Married Mary Jones. Coal miner. 
Entrained June 27, 18. Overseas Oct. 7, '18. 
Landed at Brest, France. Attached 152 Trans- 
portation Corps. Discharged Camp Grant, 
111., May 20, '19. 



[13] ROSENSWIPE, ERA, (Hurst) age 21; 
B., Carterville, 111. Son of Fred Rosenswipe. 
Miner. Entrained Sept. 20, '17. Overseas 
Aug. 24, '18. Served with A. E. F. Attached 
to 210 Military Police. Discharged at Camp 
Grant, 111., July 3rd, '19. 



[14] WOOD, CLARENCE L., (Cambria) 
age 28; B., Princeton, Ky. Son of J. E and 
Duricella Wood. Married Mary Thomas. En- 
trained June 23, '18. Attached Hdq. Co., F. 
A. R. D., Reg. 7. Discharged Camp Taylor, 
Ky., Dec. 24, '18. 



[15]RILEY, DON I., (Bush) age 23; B., Ava, 
111. Son of W. E. and Ellen Riley. Enlisted 
April 2, '19. Overseas May, '19. Attached 
Co. B., 8th Inf. 



[16] RILEY, CHAS., (Bush) age 16; B., 
Ava, 111. Son of W. E. and Ella Riley. Coal 
miner. Enlisted April 2, '19. Overseas May, 
'19. Attached Co. B., 8th Inf., A. E. F., 
France. 

[17] SOLOVAN, SGT. ANDREW, (Bush) 
B., Wyoming, Penn. Son of Andy and Feklia 
Solovan. Coal miner. Enlisted May 10, '17, 
Jefferson Bks., Mo. Overseas June 14, '17. 
Engaged in Cantigny, Alsace Front and oth- 
ers. Attached Co. D., 116 Ammunition Train. 
Discharged Camp Grant, 111., Mar. 11, '19. 



[18] VARACALLE, TONY, (Bush) age 24; 
B., Italy. Son of Frank and August Varacalle. 
Coal miner. Entrained May 28, '19. Attached 
Section Service. Discharged Ft. Thomas, Ky., 
May 31, '19. 



219 



[1] ODUM, THOMAS L., (Creal Springs) 
age 22; B., Creal Springs, 111. Son of J. B. 
and Cynthia Odum. Jeweler. Entrained 
Sept. 3, '18. Attached Co. H., 5 L. S. Dis- 
charged Camp Grant, 111., Nov. 30, '18. 



[2] REINBOLT, LESTER. (Creal Springs) 
age 19; B., Simpson, 111. Son of W. S. and 
Mary Reinbolt, Simpson, 111. Painter. En- 
listed July 22, '16, Creal Springs, 111. Over- 
seas Sept. 3, '17. Engaged St. Mihiel Drive, 
Chateau-Thierry. Attached Co. A., 44th Art. 



[3] RECTOR, RUEL, (Creal Springs) age 
24; B., Creal Springs, 111. Son of John and 
Cretia Rector, Creal Springs, 111. School 
teacher. Entrained Sept. 3, '18, Camp Grant, 
111. Attached Co. H., 5th Reg. Discharged 
Camp Grant, 111., Sept. 19, '18. 



[4] SLATER, JAMES, (Creal Springs) age 
26; B., West Frankfort, 111. Son of William 
and Mary Slater. Entrained June 5, '17. At- 
tached Co. D., 42 Reg. Discharged Camp 
Grant, 111., Jan. 2, '19. 



[5] TANNER, HARRY CECIL, (Creal 
Springs) age 26; B., Creal Springs, 111. Son 
of Stephen and Samantha Tanner. Farmer. 
Entrained June 27, '18. Overseas Oct. 6, '18. 
Attached Co. A., 107 Inf., 27 Div. Discharged 
Camp Grant, 111., April 5, '19. 



[6] WILLARD. ASHLEY, (Creal Springs) 
age 26; B., Creal Springs, 111. Son of T. J. 
Willard and Mary Willard. Farmer. En- 
trained May 28, '18. Overseas Oct. 6, '18. At- 
tached Co. F., 138 Field Art. Discharged Camp 
Taylor, Ky., Jan. 11, '19. 



[7] WILLYARD, HENRY, (Marion) age 
24; B., Marion, 111. Son of Sarah Willyard. 
Farmer. Entrained June 27, '18. Overseas 
Oct. 14, '18. Attached Co. E., 138 Inf., 35 Div. 
Discharged Camp Grant, 111., May 13, '19. 



[8] WILSON, FRED L., (Marion) age 24; 
B., Wolf Creek, 111. Son of George Wilson and 
Polly Wilson. Coal miner. Entrained June 
27, '18. Overseas Oct. 6. Attached Co. A., 
107 Inf. Discharged Camp Grant, 111., April 
29, '19. 



[9] WOODLEY, RALPH, (Marion) age 21; 
B., Carbon Hill, 111. Son of Mark and Sarah 
Woodley. Student. Enlisted May 1. '18. Great 
Lakes, Til. Present address U. S. S. Waukau. 




[10] WRIGHT, ROY F, (Marion) age 21; 
B., Marion, 111. Son of Armel P. and Norah 
Wright. Brakeman. Entrained Sept. 21, '17. 
Overseas Sept. 3, '18. Attached Co. A., 112 
M. G. Bn., 29th Div. Discharged Camp Grant, 
111., June 2, '19. 



[11] YEARACK, VICTOR, (Marion) age 
31 ; B., Coal City, 111. Son of Victor and Anna 
Yearack. Miner. Entrained July 23, '18. At- 
tached Co. H., 67th Reg. E. C. Discharged 
Uamp Taylor, Ky., Feb. 22, '19. 



[12] YEARACK, SGT. STEVE, (Marion) 
age 28; B., Coal City, 111. Son of Anna and 
Victor Yearack. Coal miner. Entrained 
Sept. 18, '17, Camp Funston, Kans. Overseas 
June 22. Engaged at Marne River, Argonne 
and St. Mihiel. Attached Co. L., 109 Inf. Dis- 
charged Camp Grant, 111., May 17, '19. 



[13] YEARACK, JOE, (Marion) age 24; B., 
Coal City, 111. Son of Anna and Victor Year- 
ack. Coal miner. Entrained Oct. 2, '17, Trin- 
idad, Colo. Overseas Aug. 31, '18. Attached 
Battery C., 335 F. A. Discharged Camp Grant, 
111., April 15, '19. 



[14] ZOELLER, ADOLPH, (Marion) age 
27; B., New Athens, 111. Son of Jacob and 
Amelia Zoeller. Coal miner. Entrained June 
28, '18, Camp Shelby, Miss. Overseas Oct. 
10, '18. Attached Co. E., 138 Field Art. Dis- 
charged Ft. Thomas, Ky., Jan. 1, '19. 



[15] CROVETTI, CORP. JOHN, (Bush) age 
27; B., Italy. Son of Angelo and Frances 
Crovetti. Married Irene Lenzini. Coal miner. 
Entrained Oct. 4, '17. Attached Co. D., 325 
M. G. Bn., 84th Div. Discharged Camp Sevilo, 
S. C., Dec. 19, '18. 



[16] DALTOW, SYLVESTER, (Bush) age 
27; B., Chicago, 111. Son of Mary Daltow. 
Coal miner. Entrained June 27, '18. Overseas 
Oct., '18. Attached Co. E., 305 Inf., 77 Div. 
Discharged Camp Grant, 111., May 9, '19. 



[17] FERRARI, EUGENE, (Bush) age 28; 
B., Modena, Italy. Son of John Ferrari. Coal 
miner. Entrained Sept. 20, '17. Attached 
25th Recruit Co. Discharged Fort Slocum, N. 
Y., Jan. 14, '19. 

[18] FRANLINI, ANGELO, (Bush) age 24; 
B., Modena, Italy. Son of Emilio Farnlini. 
Coal miner. Entrained Sept. 19, '17. At- 
tached Co. 329, Aux. Premount Station 2, N. 
C. Discharged Camp Grant, 111., May 21, '19. 



221 



[1] ALBERT, GROVER C., (Herrin), age 30; 
B. Baldwin, 111. Son of Jacob and Margaret Al- 
bert, Marissa, 111. Employed as drug clerk, 
Cline's Drug Store, Herrin. Entrained Aug. 
1, '18 for Syracuse, N. Y. Attached to 343rd 
F. G. Discharged April 22, '19, Camp Grant, 
Illinois. 

[2] BLAKE, HENRY, (Herrin), age 27;B.E1- 
dorado, 111. Son of Charles and Emma Blake. 
Employed as painter. Entrained April 29, '18 
for Camp Dix, N. J. Attached to Co. 4, 155th 
Depot Brigade. Discharged Oct. 29, '19, Camp 
Lee, Va. 

[3 1 CHAPMAN, RAY, (Herrin), age 28; B. 
McHenry, Ky. Son of Mr. and Mrs. R. E. Chap- 
man. Married. Miss Katharine Daly of Cleve- 
land, Ohio. Employed as professional ball 
player, short stop Cleveland American League 
team. Enlisted June 17, '18 in the navy. Dis- 
charged Jan. 1, '19, Cleveland, Ohio. 

[4] DEAVOURS, WILBUR, (Herrin), age 27; 
B. Fayette County, Ala. Son of Martha Dea- 
vours Married Miss Edith Copeland. Em- 
ployed as miner. Entrained May 1, '18 for 
Camp Forrest, Ga. Overseas July 6, '18. En- 
gaged in battle of Meuse Argonne. Attached 
to Co. E, 52nd Inf. Discharged June 20, '19, 
Camp Gordon, Ga. 

[5] DUNCAN, GUY, (Carterville), age 29; B. 
near Herrin, 111. Son of M. L. and Lina Dun- 
can. Employed as farmer. Entrained May 
23, '18. Overseas Oct., '18. Attached to Am- 
bulance Co. Discharged April 1, '19, Camp 
Grant, 111. 

[6] GODDARD, JACK, (Marion), age 18; B. 
Marion, 111. Son of J. D. Goddard. Married 
Miss Sarah Jo Alsbrook. Enlisted June 28, 
1916 and made ten complete trips to France. 
Rated as first class yeoman. Discharged New 
York, N. Y., Aug. 16, '19. 

[7] HODGES, CPL. ORVILLE H., (Herrin), 
age 21; B. Beaver Dam, Ky. Son of J. T. 
Hodges. Employed Goodrich Rubber Co., 
Akron, Ohio. Entrained Oct. 15, '18. Attached 
to 1st Training Att., Public School, Cincinnati, 
Ohio. Discharged Dec. 21, '18. 

[8] SADDLER, GARLAND R., (Herrin), age 
21; B. Hopkinsville, Ky. Son of Mr. and Mrs. 
William J. Saddler. Married Miss Mary Wise 
of Detroit, Mich. Employed as automobile 
factory worker. Entrained Oct. 1, '18. At- 
tached to Coast Artillery, stationed at New- 
port News, Va. Discharged Dec. 20, '18. 

[9] SMITH, WALTER, (Herrin), age 24; B., 
Murphysboro, 111. Son of Henry and Ella 
Smith. Employed as miner. Entrained May 
28, '18. Overseas Oct. 10, '18. Attached to 
Co. D, 137th Field Artillery. Discharged Jan. 
15, '19, Camp Pike, Ark. 







[10] SPENCE, JOHN, (Herrin), age 18; B. 
Carbondale, 111. Son of H. B. and Lula Spence. 
Employed as chauffeur. Enlisted March 20, 
'18. Overseas May 9, '18. Attached to Co. 
323, 406th Motor Supply Train. Disharged 
Aug. 9, '19, Camp Grant, 111. 

[11] WHITCOMB, CHARLES H., (Marion), 
age 28; B., Paducah, Ky. Son of Charles H. 
Whitcomb. Employed as foreman Republican 
Leader office, Marion, Illinois. Enlisted June 
14, '18, and sent to Valparaiso University, Ind. 
Attached to 7th Reg. Bat. E., F. A. R. D. 
Discharged Dec. 28, '18, Camp Taylor, Ky. 

[12] VINCENT, EUGENE WALLACE, (Her- 
rin), age 21; B. Earlington, Ky. Son of Wallace 
and Jennie Vincent. Married Miss Celestine 
Branson. Employed as coal miner. Entrained 
May 22, '18. Attached to Co. C., 37th Inf. 
Discharged Jan. 1, '19, Laredo, Texas. 

[13] HOWARD, SGT. THOMAS A., (Herrin), 
age 27; B. Cobden, 111. Son of D. C. and Rebecca 
J. Howard. Married Miss Anna Kemp. Em- 
ployed as miner. Entrained March 12, '18. 
Attached to Supply Reg., 47th Inf. Dis- 
charged Dec. 5, '18, Camp Dix, N. J. 

[14] BUTTON, JOHN, (Herrin), age 29; B. 
Murphysboro, 111. Son of Alex Hutton. Married 
Miss Ida Crain of Carterville. Employed as 
miner. Entrained Sept., '17, at Belleville, 111. 
Overseas Sept., '18. Discharged April, '19, 
Camp Grant, 111. 

[15] MERLO, CHARLES, (Herrin), age 36; B. 
Cuggiono, Italy. Enlisted and saw service on 
the Mexican border. Discharged Nov., '18, 
Camp Grant, 111. 

[16] MONROE, CHARLES RAYMOND, (Mar- 
ion), age 29; B. Williamson County, 111. Son 
of William Monroe. Married Miss Ethel 
Wood. Employed as Clothing salesman. En- 
trained June 28, '18, for Camp Wheeler, Ga. 
Overseas Oct. 17, '18. Saw service on Verdun 
front. Attached to Co. L, 102 Inf., 26th Div. 
Discharged April, '19, Camp Grant, 111. 

[17] McINTOSH, FRED J., (St. Louis, Mo.) 
Son of Dr. and Mrs. J. L. Mclntosh, Goreville, 
111. Married Miss Gertrude Judd. Employed as 
special Sunday writer for the Globe Democrat. 
Enlisted Aug. 18, '18, for Y. M. C. A. work 
and sailed Sept. 13, '18, in capacity of pub- 
licity man and was made chief of Section of 
La Suze Div. Released April 23, '19. 

[18] REDFEARN, CHARLEY M., (Herrin), 
age 23 ; B. Van Buren, Ark. Son of D. J. and 
Mary Redfearn. Employed as miner. En- 
trained June 24, '18 for Ft. Smith, Ark. Over- 
seas Aug. 16, '18. Attached to Co. D., 161st 
Inf., 41st Div. Discharged July 3, '19, Camp 
Pike, Ark. 



223 




Additional Service Records 

(It is a. matter of much regret that the following records are not accompanied by pictures. Every 
effort was used to secure pictures of each man who entered the service, but for a number of reasons 
the pictures of the following could not be obtained, hard as the publishers endeavored to get them. 
Editor.) 



ABLES, DAN, (Carterville) age 25, B., Carter- 
ville, 111. Employed Carterville, 111. Farming. En- 
trained Feb. 25, '18, Camp Taylor, Ky. 
ABBOTT, PAUL, (Johnston City) age 22 ; B., 
Troy, Mo. Employed near Stiritz mine. Farming. 
Entrained May 4, '18, Camp Taylor, Ky. 
ADAMSON, EARL R., (Johnston City) age 22 ; B., 
McLeansboro, 111. Employed at Johnston City Coal 
Co. Mining. Entrained -May 28, '18, Camp Shelby, 
Miss. 

ADAMS, ANDY, (Carterville) age 25 ; B., Carter- 
ville 111. Employed Anna State Hospital, Anna, 111. 
Attendant. Entrained June 27, '18, Camp Wheeler, 
Ga. 

ADAMSON, JOHN BERTIS, (Johnston City) age 
30 ; B., McLeansboro, 111. Employed at Ziegler Bros., 
Johnston City, Ilk Clerk. Entrained May 28, '18, 
Camp Shelby, Miss. 

ADAMS, GEORGE (Carterville) age 25 ; B., Car- 
terville, 111. Employed C. & C. Coal Co., Herrin, 
111. Mining. Entrained May 28, '18, Camp Shelby, 
Miss. 

ADAMS, HAROLD, (Herrin) age 22 ; B., Carter- 
ville, 111. Employed Chicago & Carterville Coal Co. 
Entrained June 27, '18, Camp Wheeler, Macon, Ga. 

AGNELLO, COLOGERO, (Whiteash) age 21 ; B., 
Castle Termini, Italy. Employed at Johnston City 
Coal Co. Coal Miner. Entrained May 28, '18, Camp 
Shelby, Miss. 

AGATINO, ALEO, (Herrin) age 24 ; B., Villa 
Rosa, Italy. Employed C. & C. Coal Co., Herrin, 
111. Entrained May 29, '18, Ft. Thomas, Ky. 
AIKMAN, ELIAB JAMES, (Marion) age 23 ; B., 
Marion, 111. Farmer. Entrained Feb. 25, '18, Camp 
Taylor, Ky. 

ALLEN, LEWIS, (Marion) age 25 ; B., Creal 
Springs, 111. Son of Mary J. Allen, Creal Springs, 
111. Employed Peabody Coal Co. Coal Miner. En- 
trained Sept. 21, '17, Camp Taylor, Ky. Discharged 
Feb. 5, '18, disability. 

ALLEN, OSCAR, (Marion) age 25 ; B., Creal 
Springs, 111. Son of Mary J. Allen, Creal Springs, 
III Employed Peabody Coal Co. Coal Miner. En- 
trained Feb. 25, '18, Camp Taylor, Ky. Rejected at 
Camp. 

ALLEN, CARL ELMER (Marion) age 22.; B., St. 
Louis, Mo. Son of E. E. Allen, Marion, 111. Prin- 
cipal of West Frankfort, High School. Enlisted in 
Navy, Nov. 26, '17. 

ALLENSWORTH, JOHNSON, (Marion) age 20 ; B., 
Grand Chain, 111. Son of Ferguson and Isabelle Al- 
lensworth. Cook. Enlisted April 15, '17, Jeffer- 
son Bks., Mo. Overseas to Hawaii Islands, May 5, 
'17. Attached to Co. K., 25th Inf. Discharged 
Arizona March 20, '19. 

ALLEN, JAMES H., (Bush) age 27; B., Midville, 
Ga Employed at Iron Mt. R. R., Bush, 111. Lo- 
comotive Fireman. Entrained May 23, '18, Jeffer- 
son Bks., Mo. 

ALEXANDER, EDWARD, (Carterville) age 27 ; 
B.. O'Fallon, 111. Employed Madison Coal Corp., 
Colp, 111. Coal Miner. Entrained April 29, '18, 
Camp Dix, N. J. 

ALEXANDER, FRED, (Carterville) age 21 ; B., 
Goreville, 111. Employed Hafer Coal Co., Carter- 
ville. 111. Mining. Entrained May 28, '18, Camp 
Shelby, Miss. 



ALICCI, JAMES, (Colp) age 26 ; B., Gerace Mar- 
ino, Italy. Employed at Madison Coal Co., Colp, 
111. Miner. Entrained March 11, '18, Camp Tay- 
lor, Ky. 

ALEXANDER, PETE, (Herrin) age 21 ; B., Rich 
Hill, Mo. Employed Chicago & Carterville Coal Co. 
Coal Miner. Entrained May 25, '18, Camp Shelby, 
Miss. 

AMES, HIRAM, (Herrin) age 23 ; B., Union Co., 
Kentucky. Employed Taylor Coal Company. Min- 
ing. Entrained May 23, '18, Jefferson Barracks, Mo. 

AMBROGIO, MERCHI, (Herrin) age 29; B., Lun- 
driro, Italy. Employed C. & C. Coal Co., Herrin, 
I1L Entrained May 28, '18, Camp Shelby, Miss. 

ANTONINO, ANZELMO, (Johnston City) age 2o ; 
B., Burgio, Italy. Son of Natale Anzelmo, Bonrgio, 
Italy. Employed at Johnston City Coal Co., John- 
ston City, 111. Coal Mining. Entrained May 29, '18, 
Ft. Thomas, Ky. Rejected at Camp. 

ANGELO, PAUL D., (Johnston City) age 23, B., 
Costllevmin, Italy. Employed at Johnston City Coal 
Co. Coal Mining. Entrained June 27, '18, Camp 
Wheeler, Ga. 

ANDERSON, CHARLES EPHRAM, (Stonefort) 
age 28 ; B., Stonefort, 111. Employed at I. P. R. R. 
Bridgeman. Entrained Sept. 21, '17, Camp Taylor, 
Ky. 

ANDERSON, BLANCHARD (Creal Springs) age 
25 ; B., Romb, 111. Farming. Entrained Sept. 3, 
'18, Camp Grant, 111. 

ANDERS, JOHN, (Herrin) age 29 ; B., Russia. Em- 
ployed Rend Coal Co., Weaver, 111. Mining. En- 
trained June 27, '18, Camp Wheeler, Ga. 
ANTONINI, CHARLEY, (Herrin) age 27 ; B., Mal- 
vaglio. Italy. Employed Big Muddy Coal & Iron 
Co., Herrin. 111. Mining. Entrained June 27, '18, 
Camp Wheeler, Macon, Ga. 

ARMSTRONG, GILBERT, (Marion) age 23 ; B., 
Bankhead, England. Employed Cadillac Motor Car 
Co., Automobile Mechanic. Entrained April 29, '18, 
Camp Dlx, N. J. 

ARMS, JESSE, (Thompsonville) age 23 ; B., Corinth, 
111. Son of Alice Arms, Thompsonville, 111. Farmer. 
Entrained Sept. 3, '18, Camp Grant, 111. 
ARMES, JESSE, (Creal Springs). Son of John 
Armes, Creal Springs, 111. 

ARMSTRONG, ROBERT R., (Herrin) age 25, B., 
Hopkinsville, Ky. Employed Taylor Mining Company. 
Miner. Entrained April 29, '18, Camp Dix, N. J. 
ASKEW, GEORGE LAFAYETTE, (Marion) age 
24 B., Creal Springs, 111. Employed Southern 111. 
Plbg. & Ht'g. Co., Marion, 111. Plumber. Entrained 
April 29, '18, Camp Dix, N. J. 

ASA, WILLIAM W., (Herrin) age 24 ; B., Pomqra. 
111. Employed C. & C. Coal Co., Herrin, 111. Mining. 
Entrained June 27, '18, Camp Wheeler, Ga. 
ATWOOD, SELLOS NEWTON, (Marion) age 29 ; 
B Willeford, 111. Son of Susan Atwood, Marion, 111. 
Employed Marion Supply Co. Clerk. Entrained May 
29, '18, Ft. Thomas, Ky. 

AVERY, LOY L.. (Johnston City) age 24 ; B., East 
Lake Township, 111. Employed at Pittsburg Coal 
Co., Pittsburg, 111. Coal miner. Entrained Oct. 5, 
'17, Camp Taylor, Ky. 

AZEMIS, JOHN (Marion) age 24 ; B., Greece. Mer- 
chant. Entrained June 27, '18, Camp Wheeler, Ga. 



224 



BAKER, CHESTER, (Vienna, 111.) age 25; B., 
Vienna, 111. Son of John R. Baker, New Denison, 
III Employed I. C. R. R. Instructural Iron Worker. 
Entrained June 27, '18. Rejected Camp Wheeler, Ga. 
BALZEWICY, CHARLES, (Edwardsville) age 24 ; 
B., Sudark, Russia. Coal Miner. Entrained June 27, 
'18, Camp Wheeler, Ga. 

BAILEY, JAMES THEODOR, (Johnston City) age 
23 ; B., Clarksville, Tenn. Son of W. D. Bailey, Rap- 
ton Ky. Employed Searls Coal Co., Johnston City, 
111. Coal Miner. Entrained June 27, '18, Camp 
Wheeler, Ga. 

BARHAM, LEE A., (Johnston City) age 23 ; B., 
Johnston City, 111. Farmer. Entrained May 28, '18, 
Camp Shelby, Miss. 

BARLOW, ED, (Johnston City) age 29 ; B., Smith- 
boro, 111. Employed Williamson Coal Co. Mining. 
Entrained Sept. 20, '17, Camp Taylor, Ky. 
BATTS, EDGAR,- (Johnston City) age 24 ; B., John- 
ston City, 111. School teacher. Enlisted May 23, 
'18, Jefferson Barracks, Mo. 

BAIAR, HARRY SANDUSKY, (Johnston City) age 
22 ; B., Johnston City, 111. Son of John Baiar, John- 
ston City, 111. Employed Consolidated Coal Co., 
Johnston City. 111. Coal Mining. Entrained April 10, 
'18, Peoria, 111. 

BAUMGARTNER, CHARLES HENRY, (Johnston 
City) age 25 ; B., Williamson County, 111. Son of 
Fred K. Baumgartner, Johnston City, 111. Clerk. 
Entrained Feb. 25, '18, Camp Taylor, Ky. 
BATSON, HERMAN LEE, (Makanda) B., Jackson 
County, 111. Farmer. Entrained June 27, '18, Camp 
Wheeler, Ga. 

BATSON, CHARLEY F. (Makanda) age 29 ; B., 
Makanda, 111. Employed Williamson Co. Farming. 
Entrained Oct. 4, '17, Camp Taylor, Ky. 

BARTH, OSCAR, (Marion) age 27 ; B., Marion, 111. 
Son of Dick Earth, Marion, 111. Employed Peabody 
Coal Co. Coal Miner. Entrained April 29, '18, Camp 
Dix, N. J. 

BAKER, CHARLEY, (Marion) age 21 ; B., William- 
son County, 111. Employed West Va. Coal Co. 
Coal Miner. Entrained Oct. 5, '17, Camp Taylor, Ky. 

BARHAM, FRANK HARROLD, (Marion) age 2i ; 
B., Marion, 111. Son of Mrs. Laurie Barham, St. 
Louis, Mo. Waiter. Enlisted May 23, '18, Jeffer- 
son Barracks, Mo. 

BALLS, JESSE J., (Marion) age 22 ; B., Marion, 111. 
Son of Josh Balls. Enlisted Feb. 22, '18, Marion. 
Overseas Sept. 3, '18. Engaged in Argonne-Meuse. 
Attached Co. C, 361 Reg. Discharged Camp Grant, 
111., Jan. 24, '19. 

BARNES, JOHN FREEMAN, (Carterville) age 21 ; 
B., Princeton, Ky. Employed Taylor Coal Co., Her- 
rin, 111. Miner. Enlisted July 25, '18, Navy, St. 
Louis, Mo. 

BAKER, CLIFTON L., (Carterville) age 21 ; B., 
Williamson Co., 111. Employed Dist. 31, Dewmaine, 
111. School teacher. Entrained Sept. 20, '17, Camp 
Taylor, Ky. 

BALDWIN, CHARLES EDWIN, (Carterville) age 
24 ; B. Jackson Co., 111. Employed Claud Howell, 
Williamson Co., 111. Farming. Entrained Sept. 20, 
'17, Camp Taylor, Ky. 

BAYLESS, JAMES MARTIN, (Creal Springs) age 
21. Farming. Entrained June 27, 'IS, Camp Wheeler, 
Georgia. 

BAYLESS, JOHN, (Creal Springs) age 24 ; B., 
Creal Springs, 111. Farming. Entrained June 27, 
'18, Camp Wheeler, Ga. 

BAKER, HARLIN, (Herrin) age 23 ; B., Carter- 
ville, 111. Employed by E. E. Mitchell. Farmer. En- 
trained May 28, '18, Camp Shelby, Miss. 

BAGA, PAUL, (Herrin, 111.) age 25 ; B., Turbigo, 
Lombard, Italy. Employed C. & C. Coal Co., Mine 
A., Herrin, 111. Mining. Entrained May 28, '18, 
Camp Shelby, Miss. 




BARNES, LUTHER W., (Herrin) age 21 ; B., 
Stewart, Tenn. Employed C. B. & Q. R. R. Shops, 
Herrin, 111. Entrained Oct. 25, '18, Camp Wheeler, 
Macon, Ga. 

BOLEN, LESTER, (Herrin) age 21 ; B., Benton, 
IU. Employed C. T. Bass, Herrin, 111. Chauffeur. 
Entrained June 27, '18, Camp Wheeler, Macon, Ga. 

BOWHR, ROBERT, (Herrin) age 26; B., McHenry, 
Ky. Employed Rend Coal Co., Weaver, 111. En- 
trained Sept. 20, '17, Camp Taylor, Ky. 

BASS, OSCAR, (Herrin) age 27 ; B., Flora, 111. 
Employed Herrin, 111. Laborer. Entrained Sept. 
20, '17, Camp Taylor, Ky. 

BENTON, ELVIS WESLEY, (Carbondale) age 21 ; 
B., Carterville, 111. Son of H. F. Benton. Farmer. 
Enlisted June 12, '18, in U. S. Naval Reserve at 
St. Louis, Mo. 

BEASLEY, EDGAR, (Thompsonville) age 23 ; B., 
Corinth, 111. Son of S. M. Beasley, Thompsonville, 
111. Farmer. Entrained June 27, '18, Camp 
Wheeler, Ga. 

BEASLEY, ERNEST ROBERT, (Crab Orchard) 
age 21 ; B., Stonefort, 111. Farming. Entrained 
Feb. 25, '18, Camp Taylor. Ky. Discharged July 
22, '18. 

BELLAVIA, JOE, (Johnston City) age 22 ; B., 
Argona, Italy. Employed Johnston City Coal Co. 
Miner. Entrained May 28, '18, Camp Shelby, Miss. 

BERRY, ARTHUR, (Johnston City) age 23 ; B., 
Hanson, Ky. Employed Consolidated Coal Co., John- 
ston City, 111. Coal Miner. Entrained Sept. 21, 
'17, Camp Taylor, Ky. 

BEALL, JOHN MORTIS, (Johnston City) age 25 ; 
B., Williamson County, 111. Son of Jacob Beall, 
Johnston City, 111. Farming. Entrained June 27, 
'18, Camp Wheeler, Ga. 

BEAN, EARL JACKSON, (Johnston City) age 22 ; 
B., New Castle, 111. Son of Delia C. Bean, John- 
ston City, 111. Employed at Johnston City Coal Co., 
Johnston City, 111. Coal Miner. Entrained June 27, 
'18, Camp Wheeler, Ga. 

BEDRITISKI, ALEX, (Clifford) age 25 ; B., Rus- 
sia. Employed Big Muddy Coal Co., Clifford, 111. 
Mining. Entrained Sept. 20, '17, Camp Taylor, Ky. 

BELLOLI, JOE, (Clifford) age 29 ; B., Inveranni, 
Italy. Employed at Big Muddy Coal & Iron Co. 
Mine No. 8. Coal Miner. Entrained May 28, '18, 
Camp Shelby, Miss. 

BELFORD, HUGH OTHEL, (Marion) age 24 ; B., 
Eddyville, 111. Son of Charles Belford, Marion, 111. 
School Teaching. Enlisted Dec. 28, '17. Assigned 
Camp Joseph E. Johnston, Fla. 

BECHES, CARL L., (Marion) age 27 ; B., Law- 
rence, Mass. Employed Pittsburg Electrical Spec. 
Co Salesman. Enlisted Aug. 2, '17. Aviation Sec- 
tion White Signal Corps, Ft. Slocum, N. Y. 

BERRY, THOMAS, (Marion) age 24 ; B., Litch- 
fleld, Ky. Son of J. M. Berry, Marion, 111. Show 
Mgr. Entrained May 28, '18, Camp Shelby, Miss. 

BERRY, HUBERT, (Marion) age 22 ; B., Union 
City, Tenn. Son of J. M. Berry, Marion, 111. Sales- 
man. Entrained April 29, '18, Camp Dix, N. J. Dis- 
charged May 23, '18. Disqualified. 

BEASLEY, HERMAN, (Marion) age 23 ; B., Creal 
Springs, 111. Son of Lewis Beasley, St. Louis, Mo. 
Concrete Worker. Entrained June 27, '18, Camp 
Wheeler, Ga. 

BEDWELL, LEONARD JOS., (Carterville) age 
23 ; B., Benton County, Tenn. Farmer. Enlisted 
April 23, '18, Marine Barracks, Paris Island, S. C. 
BERSANO, JOHN, (Herrin) age 26 ; B., Italy. Em- 
ployed Jeffrey Coal Co. Entrained Mar. 12, '18, 
Camp Taylor, Ky. 

BELLOSSI, PETE, (Herrin) age 29 ; B., Buscate, 
Italy. Employed Madison Coal Co., Colp, 111. Min- 
ing. Deceased. 



225 







BEVARD, LEON E,., (Carterville) age 23 ; B., Car- 
terville, 111. Son of G. W. and Jennie Bevard. Mer- 
chant. Entrained May 28, '18, Herrin, 111. Over- 
sea Oct. 5, '18. Attached to Co. L, 152 Inf. Dis- 
charged Camp Grant, 111., May 27, '19. 

BIEHL, CHARLIE LOUIS, (Johnston City) age 

22 ; B., Johnston City, 111. Farming. Entrained 

June 27, '18, Camp Wheeler, Ga. 

BINKLEY, EARL JACKSON, (Marion) age 26 ; 

B., Marion, 111. Son of Charles Binkley, Marion, 111. 

Coal Miner. Entrained June 27, '18, Camp Wheeler, 

Georgia. 

BILLINGSBY, JOHN, (Herrin) age 26 ; B., Moss. 
Term. Son of J. A. Billingsby. Employed W. P. 
Rend Coal & Coke Company (Weaver). Miner. En- 
trained March 12, '18, for Camp Taylor, Ky. 

BILLUE, JAMES R., (Herrin) age 25 ; B., Jasper, 
Ala. Employed Lumaghi Coal Co., Collinsville, 111. 
Mining. Entrained May 28, '18, Camp Shelby, Miss. 
BLACKBURN, CYRUS CLARENCE, (Energy) 
age 23 ; B., Carrier Mills, 111. Employed at Taylor 
Coal Co., Herrin, 111. Coal Miner. Entrained Sept. 
21, '18, Camp Taylor, Ky. Member of Rainbow 
Division ; was in all important drives, and not in- 
jured. 

BLOODWORTH, EZRA, (Marion) age 28 ; B., Ben- 
ton Co., Tenn. Employed American Creosoting Co. 
Laborer. Entrained Oct. 5, '17, Camp Taylor, Ky. 

BLACKBURN, ED. (Marion) age 26 ; B., William- 
son County, 111. Clerk. Entrained Feb. 25, '18, 
Camp Taylor, Ky. 

BLOODWORTH, GUY, (Marion) age 21 ; B., 
Southern Township, 111. Son of H. G. Bloodworth, 
Marion. 111. Farmer. Entrained June 27, '18, Camp 
Wheeler, Ga. 

BLOODWORTH, JOHN, (Marion) age 24 ; B., Cam- 
den, Tenn. Son of Benand Parthulia Bloodworth. 
Coal Miner. Entrained June 27, "18. Overseas Oct. 
6, '18. Attached Co. C, 326 Inf. Discharged, 
Camp Grant, 111., June 7, '19. 

BLEVINS, JESSE J., (Marion) age 23 ; B., Knox- 
ville, Tenn. Son of Newton and Jane Blevins. Em- 
ployed as miner, Marion. Enlisted May 2, '17. At- 
tached to Co. K., 76 Inf. Discharged Feb. 12, '19, 
at Camp Grant, 111. 

BLAIR, ANDREW, (Herrin) age 26 ; B., Crain- 
ville, 111. Employed Herrin, 111. Stage Carpenter. 
Entrained Sept. 20, '17, Camp Taylor, Ky. 
BLAKE, HENRY H., (Herrin) age 26 ; B., Galla- 
tin Co., 111. Employed by Al Edmonds. Painter. 
Entrained April 29, '18, Camp Dix, N. J. 
BOLES, FRED, (Goreville) age 21 ; B., Marion, 
111. Farming. Enlisted in Army. 
BONELLI, VINZIN, (Freeman) age 21 ; B., Tur- 
brigo, Italy. Employed Haefer Coal Co., Free- 
man. Miner. Entrained May 9, '18, Camp Taylor, Ky. 
BOLES, HOMER, (Goreville) age 24 ; B., Vienna, 
111. Farming. Enlisted Sept. 6, '17, in Ret. Med. 
Dept.. Jefferson Barracks, Mo. Assigned to Base 
hospital, Fort Riley, Kansas. 

BOWMAN, ROY, (Johnston City) age 21 ; B., Bain- 
bridge. 111. Son of August Bowman, Johnston City, 
111. Employed Franco Coal Co., Marion, 111. Coal 
Miner. Entrained September 6, '18, Camp Forrest, 
Lytle, Ga. 

BOZZOLA, EUGENE, (Johnston City) age 29 ; B., 
Fonzaso, Italy. Employed E. C. Searles Coal Co., 
Johnston City, 111. Mining. 

BOSI, FERDINANDO. (Johnston City) age 24 ; B., 
Italy. Son of Michel! Bosi, Italy. Employed Lake 
Creek Coal Co., Johnston City, 111. Coal Miner. 
Entrained Feb. 25, '18, Camp Taylor, Ky. 

BOLES, JESSE JAMES, (Marion) age 22 ; B., Mar- 
ion, 111. Son of Josh Boles, Marion, 111. Employed 
Big Muddy Fuel Co. No. 1. Coal Miner. Entrained 
Feb. 25, '18, Camp Taylor, Ky. 

BORUM, VIRGIL, (Marion) age 22 ; B., Creal 
Springs, 111. Farming. Entrained June 27, '18, Camp 
Wheeler, Ga. 



BOWMAN, ED, (Marion) age 29 ; B., Spillertown, 
111. Son of Mrs. Mary A. Bowman, Marion, 111. Em- 
ployed West Virginia Coal Co. Coal Miner. En- 
trained Sept. 6, '18, Camp Forest, Lytle, Ga. 
BOLES, FRED, (Marion). Enlisted. 
BOATRIGHT, JOSEPH L., (Marion) age 25 ; B., 
Harrisburg, 111. Son of M. A. and Dennie Boatright. 
Coal Miner. Entrained May 28, '18, Camp Shelby, 
Miss. Overseas Oct. 3, '18. Served with A. E. F. 
Oct. 9, 'IS. Attached Co. D., 138 M. G. Bn. Dis- 
charged, Camp Grant, 111., April 26, '19. 
BOYD, MARION, (Creal Springs) age 23 ; B., Creal 
Springs, 111. Farming. Entrained Oct. 5, '17, Camp 
Taylor, Ky. 

BORUM, WILLIAM OSCAR, (Creal Springs) age 
23, B., Marion, 111. Farming. Entrained June 27, 
'18, Camp Wheeler, Ga. 

BOSHERA, WILLIAM, (Herrin) age 27 ; B., 
Hamey, Syria. Employed Herrin, 111. Merchant. 
Entrained June 27, '18, Camp Wheeler, Ga. 

BORTOLI, PETER, (Herrin) age 30 ; B., Classe 
Nuova, Italy. Employed C. & C. Coal Co. Mine B. 
Miner. Entrained May 28, '18, Camp Shelby, Miss. 

BRZNKOS, PETER, (West Frankfort) age 29 ; B., 
Poland, Russia. Employed at Ernest Coal Co., 
Stiritz Mine. Mining. Entrained Sept. 20, '17, Camp 
Taylor, Ky. 

BRANN, JAMES T., (Carterville) age 25 ; B., Car- 
terville, 111. Son of James and Rosa Brann, Carter- 
ville, 111. Employed Coal Miner. Enlisted Nov. 24, 
'17, St. Louis, Mo. Served with U. S. Navy. Dis- 
charged July 7, '19, Pittsburgh, Pa. 

BRADLEY, CONRAD LEO, (Goreville) age 21 : 
B., Goreville, 111. Son of John H. Bradley, Gore- 
ville, 111. Employed Carterville post office. Mail 
Carrier. Entrained Sept. 6, '18, Camp Forrest, 
Lytle, Ga. 

BRADLEY, GEORGE W., (Crab Orchard) age 23 ; 
B., Corinth, 111. Son of James E. Bradley, Carrier 
Mills, 111. Farming. Entrained June 27, '18, Camp 
Wheeler, Ga. 

BRISCOE. SAMUEL, (Johnston City) age 24 ; H., 

Sturgis, Ky. Employed Consolidated Coal Co., 

Johnston City, 111. Mining. Entrained Sept. 4, '18, 
Camp Grant, 111. 

BROWN, JOSEPH WESLEY, (Johnston City) age 
24 ; B., Makanda, 111. Son of James H. Brown. 
Frankfort Heights, 111. Employed at Searls Coal 
Co. Mining. Entrained May 28, '18, Camp Shelby, 

Miss. 

BRIDGES, CORDAS, (Energy) age 26 ; B.. Gore- 
ville, 111. Employed Egyptian Powder Co. Powder 
Maker. Entrained April 29, '18, Camp Dix, N. j. 

BRYANT, PRENTISS, (Crab Orchard) age 21 ; 
B., Harrisburg, 111. Son of Emily Bryen, Pittsburg. 
111. Employed Scranton Big Muddy Coal Co., Alar- 
ion, 111. Coal Miner. Entrained Feb. 25, '18, Camp 
Taylor, Ky. 

BRUMMETT, WALTER WM., (Marion) age 21 ; B., 
Dayton, Tenn. Son of W. E. Brummett. Employed 
Watson Coal Co. Coal Miner. Entrained Feb. 25, 
'18, Camp Taylor, Ky. 

BRADLEY, MONTIE, (Marion) age 24 : B., New 
Denison, 111. Son of A. L. Bradley, Marion, 111. 
Employed Scranton Big Muddy Coal Co. Coal 
Miner. Entrained Feb. 25, '18, Camp Taylor, Ky. 

BROWN, TROY RICHARD, (Marion) age 28 ; B., 
Benton, 111. Employed Myer & Thomas Construc- 
tion Co. Street Laborer. Entrained Sept. 21, '17, 
Camp Taylor, Ky. 

BROWN, HOBERT, (Colp) age 21 ; B., Illinois. 
Employed at Madison Coal Corp., Colp, 111. En- 
trained Oct. 21, '18, Camp Wheeler, Ga. 

BRACY, RALPH CRAIN, (Marion) age 21 ; B., 
Marion, 111. Employed Bracy Supply Co. Miller. 
Entrained Sept. 5, '18, Camp Custer, Mich. 



226 



| 




BRADLEY, FLOYD HOGAN, (Marion) age 25; 
Carterville, 111. Employed West Va. Coal Co. Coal 
Miner. Entrained Oct. 5, '17, Camp Taylor, Ky. 
BRUCE, CHARLES, (Marion) age 21 ; B., Marlon, 
111. Son of G. W. Bruce, Marion, 111. Employed 
Chicago & Big Muddy Coal Co. Blacksmith. En- 
listed July 9, '18, U. S. Naval Reserve Force. 
BRADLEY, FRED, (Marion) age 30 ; B., Marion, 
111. Son of A. L. Bradley, Marion, 111. Employed 
Scranton Mine, Pittsburg, 111. Coal Miner. Enlisted 
Feb. 27, '13, Paducah, Ky. In Alaska 3 years 
guarding gold fields. 20 months in France. 
BRUSH, LOREN E., (Marion) age 22 ; B., Gol- 
conda. 111. Son of D. B. Brush, Marion, 111. Em- 
ployed Henderson-Wallace Coal Co. Coal Miner. 
Entrained June 27, '18, Camp Wheeler, Ga. 
BRADLEY, LINCOLN, (Marion) age 26 ; B., 
Marion, 111. Son of A. L. Bradley, Marion, 111. Em- 
ployed Scranton Big Muddy Coal Co. Coal Miner. 
Entrained June 27, '18, Camp Wheeler, Ga. 
BRIGHAM, LESLIE D., (Marion) age 20; B., 
O'Fallon, 111. Son of Wm. D. and Anna Brigham. 
Coal Miner. Enlisted April 16, '17, Jefferson Bks., 
Mo. Overseas June 14, '17. Engaged in Cantigny, 
Soissons. Wounded by high Explosive, in left arm 
and ankle. Attached Co. D., 2nd M. G. Bn., 1st 
Div. Discharged, Ft. Sheridan, 111., Aug. 2, '19. 
BRATTEN, WILLIAM ARTHUR, (Creal Springs) 
age 25 ; B., Johnson Co., 111. Farmer. Entrained 
June 27, '18, Camp Wheeler, Ga. 

BRATCHER, OWEN, (Herrin) age 23 ; B., Nelson, 
Ky. Employed Sunnyside Coal Co., Herrin, 111. 
Miner. Entrained Alay 28, '18, Camp Shelby, Miss. 
BRADLEY, JOHN M., (Herrin) age 22 ; B., Bas- 
ket Station, Ky. Employed, Coal Miner. Entrained 
June 27, '18, Camp Wheeler, Ga. 
BRADSHAW, CLYDE, (Herrin) age 21 ; B., Mar- 
ion, 111. Employed W. P. Rend Coal Co. Mining. 
Entrained May 28, '18, Camp Shelby, Miss. . 
BRENNAN, PETE, (Herrin) age 30 ; B., Murphys- 
boro, III. Employed W. P. Rend Coal Co., Weaver, 
111. Mining. Entrained May 28, '18, Camp Shelby, 
Miss. 

BRACY, LLOYD POWELL, (Marion) age 23 ; B., 
Marion, 111. Son of B. D. Bracy, Marion, 111. Trav- 
eling Salesman. Enlisted San Antonio, Tex., Dec. 1, 
'17 Discharged. 

BROOKS, STANLEY O., (Herrin) age 24 ; B Car- 
bondale. 111. Employed T. G. Warden. Herrin, 111. 
Blacksmith. Entrained May 28, '18, Camp Shelby 
Miss. 

BURGESS, ZEFFIE, (Johnston City) age 27 B 
Benton, 111. Son of J. W. Burgess. Johnston City, 
111. Employed Robert Dick Coal Co., Herrin, 111 
Coal Mining. Entrained May 28, '18, Camp Shelby, 

Miss. 

BURCHFIELD, LUTHER, (Johnston City) age 23 
B., Cohart, Ala. Employed Carterville Herrin Coal 
Co. Miner. Entrained March 12, '18, Camp Taylor 
Ky. 

BURNS, THOMAS GILBERT, (Johnston City) age 
21 ; B., Fairmount, 111. Employed Jeffries Mining 
Co., Johnston City, 111. Coal Mining. Entrained 
Sept. 21, '17, Camp Taylor, Ky. Discharged Feb. 
17, '18. 

BURNS, DANIEL, (Johnston City) age 27 B , 
Providence, Ky. Employed C. & C. Coal Co., Her- 
rin, 111. Mining. Entrained May 28, '18, Camp 
Shelby, Miss. 

BUTTERIO, MIKE, (Clifford) age 30; B., Moranna 
Varbona, Italy. Employed Big Muddy Coal & Iron 
Co., Clifford, 111. Mining. Entrained May 28, '18, 
Camp Shelby, Miss. 

BURNS, RALPH JEFFERSON (Marion) age 26 
B., Marion, 111. Son of Henrietta Burns, Marion 111 
Farming. Entrained June 27, '18, Camp Wheeler 
Ga. 

BUTWILL. BEN-NY, (Herrin) age 26; B., Russia. 
Employed B. M. C. & I. Co., No. 7 Mine, Herrin, 
111. Miner. Entrained April 29, '18, Camp Dix, N. J. 



BURRECIA, IGNAZIO, (Whiteash) age 24 ; B., 
Italy. Employed West Virginia Coal Co. Coal 
Miner. Entrained Feb. 25, '18, Camp Taylor, Ky. 
BURESS, JESSE, (Herrin) age 22 ; B., Cerulean, 
Ky. Employed Sunnyside Coal Co. Mining. Entrain- 
ed June 27, '18, Camp Wheeler, Ga. 
BUNTIN, WILLIAM B., (Herrin) age 26 ; B., 
Providence, Ky. Employed W. P. Rend Coal Co 
Herrin, 111. Mining. Entrained June 27, '18, Camp 
Wheeler, Macon, Ga. 

BURCHELL, BENJAMIN, (Carterville) age 28; 
B., Harrisburg, 111. Employed Carterville & South- 
ern Illinois Gas Co. Laborer. Entrained May 28, 
'18, Camp Shelby, Miss. 

BUSH, HAL VICK, (Carterville) age 21 ; B., Crab 
Orchard, 111. Employed Wayside, 111. Farming En- 
trained May 29, '18, Ft. Thomas, Ky. 
BURGESS, HUGH, (Johnston City) age 28 ; B., 
near Johnston City, 111. Son of Mrs. Alzada Burg- 
ess, Johnston City, 111. Married Grace Davis. Mer- 
chant. Entrained June 27, 1918. Overseas Sept. 
13, '18. Was on duty at Camp Hospital No. 52, 
practically all the time while in France. Remained 
in France 6 mo., and 5 days. While in U. S. was 
with the 121 Inf., Medical Detachment, at Camp 
Wheeler, Ga. Discharged <a Camp Grant, 111., 
May 18, 1919. 

BYRN, TROY EDWARD, (Marion) age 21 ; B., 
Marion, 111. Son of W. E. Byrn, Marion, 111. Em- 
ployed West Va. Coal Co. Coal Miner. Entrained 
Sept. 6, '18, Camp Forrest, Lytle, Ga. 
BYARD, EARL, (Herrin) age 25; B., Goreville, 
111. Employed Taylor Coal Co., Herrin, 111. Min- 
ing. Entrained Sept. 20, '17, Camp Taylor, Ky. 
CARAMAEZZA, LOUIS, (Johnston City) age 23 ; B., 
Atanona, Italy. Employed Johnston City Coal Co., 
Johnston City, 111. Coal Miner. Entrained June 25, 
'18, Camp Upton, L. I., New York. 
CHEW, WILLIAM H., (Carterville) age 25; B., 
Jackson County, 111. Employed Williamson County, 
111. Farming. Entrained June 27, '18, Camp Wheel- 
er, Ga. 

CHAMNESS, TROY, (Carterville) age 21 ; B., Car- 
terville, 111. Employed on farm. Farming. Entrain- 
ed June 27, '18, Camp Wheeler, Ga. 
CHOWRIEA, KESCIO, (Herrin) age 28 B., Golicia, 
Austria. Employed W. P. Rend Coal Co., Weaver, 
111. Muling. Entrained Oct. 4, '17, Camp Taylor, 
Ky. 

CHITTY, MILES R., (Herrin) age 28 ; B., Car- 
terville, 111. Employed W. P. Rend Coal Co., Her- 
rin, 111. Mining. Entrained June 27, '18, Camp 
Wheeler, Macon, Ga. 

CHAPMAN, PAUL, (Herrin) age 21 ; B., Beaver, 
Dam, Ky. Employed Herrin, 111. Bookkeeper C. 
& C. Coal Co. Entrained June 27, '18, Camp Wheel- 
er, Ga, 

CHODENE, MIKE (Herrin) age 25 ; B., Marco, 
Italy. Employed Madison Coal Co. Mining. En- 
trained May 28, '18, Camp Shelby, Miss. 

CHAMNESS, BEN, (Marion) age 22 ; B., Marion, 
111. Employed at Big Muddy Coal Co. Stationary 
Foreman. Entrained March 12, '18, Camp Taylor 
Ky. 

CHAPMAN, HENRY WATERSON, (Herrin) age 
24 ; B., Beaver Dam, Ky. Employed Big Muddy 
Coal & Iron Co., Herrin, 111. Mining. Entrained 
Sept. 20, '17, Camp Taylor, Ky. 

CIRRITO, EVO BADALAMENTI, (Marion) age 
21 ; B., Messina, Italy. Son of J. B. Cirrito. Em- 
ployed Cirrito Co. Fruit Business. Entrained 
June 27, '18, Camp Wheeler, Ga. 

CLEMENT, LEON, (Johnston City) age 25 ; B., 
Louyclich, France. Son of Leon Clement. Johns- 
ton City, 111. Employed Consolidated Coal Co. En- 
trained June 27, '18, Camp Wheeler, Ga. Rejected 
at Camp. 

CLAYTON, ALBERT JAMES, (Marion) age 25 ; 
B., Dahlgren, 111. Son of Seymour Clayton, Marion, 
111. Employed Peabody Coal Co., Marion, 111. Coal 
Miner. Entrained May 28, '18, Camp Shelby, Miss. 



227 



^= 







CLUCK, JAMES A.. (Herrin) age 21 ; B., Hopkins- 
ville, Ky. Employed Sunnyside Coal Co., Herrin, 
111. Miner. Entrained June 27, '18, Camp Wheeler, 
Macon, Ga. 

CLUCK, JAMES ALBERT, (Herrin) age 22 ; B., 
Hopkinsville, Ky. Son of Alice Blanche Cluck. Em- 
ployed as miner, Herrin. Entrained June 27, '18. 
Attached to M. G. Co., 124 Inf. Discharged Dec. 
28, '18, at Camp Zachary Taylor, Ky. 
CLAIR, THOMAS, (Whiteash) age 29 ; B., Long 
Riggerd, Scotland. Employed B. M. Fuel Co. Min- 
ing. Entrained Sept. 20, '17, Camp Taylor, Ky. 
CLAYTON, EARL J., (Herrin) age 21 ; B., Johns- 
ton City, 111. Employed C. B. & Q. Railroad. Fire- 
man. Entrained Oct. 21, '18, Camp Wheeler, Macon, 
Ga. 

COBB, CHARLES, (Johnston City), age 27; B., 
Johnston City, 111. Son of Nancy H. Cobb, Johnston 
City, 111. Employed Searles Coal Co., Johnston City, 
111. Coal Miner. Entrained May 28, '18, Camp 
Shelby, Miss. 

COFFEE, HUBERT C., (Marion) age 29 ; B., Ga- 
latia. 111. Clerk. Entrained Sept. 7, '18, Camp Grant, 
111. Rejected. 

COX, CLAUD RICHARD, (Marion) age 22 ; B., 
New Burnsides, 111. Employed C. I. P. S. Co. 
Stationary Engineer. Entrained July 20, '18, Camp 
Wheeler, Ga. 

COYNE, ANTHONY EDWARD, (Marion) age 28 ; 
B., Cynthiana, Ky. Clerk. Enlisted in Army. 
COLEMAN, OREN, (Marion) age 30 ; B., Carter- 
ville, 111. Son of Wm. J. Coleman. Employed Marion 
High School. Teacher. Enlisted Feb. 14, 'IS, Trav- 
is, Texas. 

COLEMAN, ABE, (Makanda) age 27 ; B., Wayside, 
111. Employed in Williamson Co., 111. Farming. En- 
listed May 23, '18, Jefferson Barracks, Mo. 
CASTRALE, PIETRO, (Johnston City) age 30 ; 
B., Asselis, Italy. Son of Battista Castrale, Italy. 
Employed Lake Creek Coal Co., Johnston City, 111. 
Coal Miner. Entrained June 27,, '18, Camp Wheeler, 
Ga. 

CARTER. EVERT ESTES. (Johnston City) age 
25 ; B., New Burnside, 111. Employed Searl Coal Co., 
Johnston City, 111. Coal Miner. Entrained Feb. 25, 
'18, Camp Taylor, Ky. 

CASTRALE, MARTINO, (Johnston City) age 21 ; 
B., Italy. Employed Lake Creek Coal Co., Johns- 
ton City, 111. Coal Miner. Entrained Feb. 25, '18, 
Camp Taylor, Ky. 

CARDWELL, ROY, (Marion) age 23 ; B., West 
End, 111. Laborer. Entrained Sept. 20, '17, Camp 
Taylor, Ky. 

CALVERT, FRED C., (Marion) age 27 ; B.. Marion, 
111. Son of Clark Calvert, Marion, 111. Employed 
U. S. Government. Mail Clerk. Entrained June 27, 
'18, Camp Wheeler, Ga. Rejected at Camp. 
CASH, IRA, (Marion) age 28 ; B., Marion, 111. Son 
of W. C. Cash, Marion, 111. Chauffeur. Entrained 
June 27, '18, Camp Wheeler, Ga. Rejected at camp. 
CARMICHAEL, JAMES HERMAN, (Marion) age 
23 ; B., Marion, 111. Son of John W. Carmichael, Mar- 
ion, III. Employed American Creasoting Co. Tim- 
bering & Treating Inspector. Enlisted in U. S. 
Xaval Reserve Force, Sept. 13, '17. 
CASH, HARRY, (Marion) age 25 ; B., Marion, 111. 
Son of Clarence Cash, Marion, 111. Undertaker. 
Entrained April 29, '18, Camp Dix, N. J. 
CARTER, GEORGE THOMAS, (Marion) age 30 ; 
B., Corinth, 111. Son of H. T. Carter, Marion, 111. 
Court Clerk. Entrained June 27, '18, Camp Wheel- 
er, Ga. 

CARTER. GEORGE THOMAS, (Marion) age 31 ; 
B., near Corinth, 111. Son of H. T. Carter. Clerk. 
Marion, 111. Entrained June 27, '18, Marion, III. 
Overseas Oct. 6, '18. Attached Hdqs. Co., 30 Inf. 
A. P. O. 740, via, N. Y. With Army of Occupation, 
Mayen, Germany. 

CASEY, ROY, (Energy) age 21 ; B.. Williamson 
Co., 111. Employed at Egyptian Powder Co. En- 
trained April 29, '18, Camp Dix, N. J. 



CARTER, CLAUDE, (De Soto) age 21 ; B., Mis- 
souri. Employed at Ernest Coal Co.. Johnston City, 
111. Miner. Entrained June 27, '18, Camp Wheeler, 
Ga. 

CARZIGLIO, CARMELO, (White Ash) age 21 ; B., 
Italy. Employed at West Virginia Coal Co. Coal 
Mining. Entrained May 28, '18, Camp Shelby, Miss. 
Discharged Nov. 6, '18, Disability. 

CARUSO, FRANCESCO, (Colp) age 23, B., Gerace 
Marissa, Italy. Entrained June 27, '18, Camp Wheel- 
er, Ga. 

CAGLE, HOWARD, (Carterville) age 22 ; B., Car- 
terville, 111. Grocery Clerk. Entrained Sept. 20, 
'17, Camp Taylor, Ky. 

CARMICHAEL, MARION F., (Carterville) age 
22 ; B., Chillicothe, 111. Employed Madison Coal 
Corp., Colp, 111. Miner. Entrained Oct. 4, '17, 
Camp Taylor, Ky. 

CANNON, LAWRENCE, (Carterville) age 21 ; B., 
Carterville, 111. Son of W. A. Cannon. Farmer. 
Entrained Feb. 25, '18, Camp Taylor, Ky. 
CARNEY, NORMAN, (Carterville) age 21 ; B., 
Carterville, 111. Miner. Entrained May 28, '18, 
Camp Shelby, Miss. 

CALVERT, TROY L., (Carterville) age 21, B., 
Carterville, 111. Employed Madison Coal Corp. Min- 
er. Entrained Oct. 21, '18, Camp Wheeler, Ga. 

CAGLE, OVA L., (Carterville) age 23 ; B., Car- 
terville. Farmer. Entrained Sept. 4, '18, Camp 
Grant, 111. 

CAMDEN, CARL C., (Creal Springs) age 23 ; B., 
Stonefort, 111. Son of R. M. Camden. Employed Me- 
chanic. Entrained May 28, '18, Camp Shelby, Miss. 
Rejected and later entrained for Limited Service, 
Sept. 3, '18, Camp Grant, 111. (Rejected.) 

CAMDEN, WILLIAM RICHARD, (Creal Springs) 
age 21 ; B., Stonefort, 111. Employed David Stott 
Flour Mills, Detroit, Mich. Bookkeeper. Enlisted 
in U. S. Naval Reserve Force, July 5, '18. 

CARAMAEZZA, LOUIS, (Johnston City) age 23 ; 
B., Atanona, Italy. Employed Johnston City Coal 
Co., Johnston City, 111. Coal Miner. Entrained June 
25, '18, Camp Upton, L. I., New York. 

CASH, BURNIE, (Johnston City) age 24 ; B., Oma- 
ha, 111. Employed Searls Coal Co., Johnston City, 
111. Miner. Entrained June 27, '18, Camp Wheeler, 
Ga, 

CALCATERRA, ANGELO, (Herrin) age 26 ; B., 
Cuggioni, Lombard, Italy. Employed Taylor Coal 
Co., No. 3. Miner. Entrained Mar. 12, '18, Camp 
Taylor, Ky. 

CAREY, JAMES L., Herrin) age 21 ; B., Henshaw, 
Ky. Employed T. G. Warden, Herrin, 111. Mining. 
Entrained Mar. 12, '18, Camp Taylor, Ky. 

CARNAGHI, JOE, (Herrin) age 25 ; B., Cam- 
bria, 111. Miner. Entrained Oct. 21, '18, Camp 
Wheeler, Ga, 

CAPPELLANO, ANDREA, (Herrin) age 30 ; B., 

Gianclana, Italy. Employed Madison Coal Corp., 

Colp, 111. Miner. Entrained Oct. 4, '17, Camp Tay- 
lor, Ky. 

CAMPBELL, ELMER, (Herrin) age 23 ; B., Mur- 
physboro, 111. Employed Rend Coal Co. Miner. 
Entrained May 10, '18, Ft. Thomas, Ky. 

CALL, THOMAS J., (Herrin) age 21 ; B., Wash- 
ington, Ind. Employed Pueblo, Colo. Window Trim- 
mer. Entrained May 25, '18, Cody, New Mexico. 

CALCATERRA, FRANK, (Herrin) age 30 ; B., 
Cuggioni, Italy. Employed C. & C. Coal Co., Herrin, 
111. Miner. Entrained May 28, '18, Camp Shelby, 

Miss. 

CARICO, LAWRENCE, (Herrin) age 28 ; B., Mad- 
isonville, Ky. Employed C. & C. Coal Co., Herrin, 
111. Miner. Entrained May 28, '18, Camp Shelby, Miss. 

CARNAGHI, CAESER, (Herrin) age 27 ; B.. Ber- 
nate, Italy. Employed C. & C. Coal Co., Herrin, 
111. Miner. Entrained June 27, 18, Camp Wheeler, 
Ga. 



228 



BQ 



CALCATERRA, WEDO, (Herrin) age 21 ; B., Mes- 
oro, Lombardo, Italy. Employed Taylor No. 2. Min- 
er. Entrained May 28, '18, Camp Shelby, Miss. 
CHANCY, HOMER ARDELL, (Johnston City) age 
26 ; B., Pomona, 111. Son of Silas Chancy, Marion, 
111. Employed Williamson County Coal Mine, Johns- 
ton City, 111. Coal Miner. Entrained Feb. 25, '18, 
Camp Taylor, Ky. 

CHRIST, BERT, (Marion) age 23 ; B., Marion, 111. 
Son of W. M. Christ, Marion, 111. Employed Hender- 
son Wallace Coal Co., Marion, 111. Blacksmith. En- 
trained Feb. 25, '18, Camp Taylor, Ky. 
CHRIST, WILLIAM LEE, (Marion) age 24 ; B., 
Marion, 111. Son of W. M. Christ, Marion, 111. Em- 
ployed Henderson Wallace Coal Co., Marion, 111. Coal 
Miner. Entrained Oct. 5, '17, Camp Taylor, Ky. 

CHAMNESS, RAYMON K., (Marion) age 21 ; B., 
Marion, 111. Son of Mrs. Delia Chamness, Marlon 
111. Farming. Enlisted in navy, Dec. 14, '17. 

CHITTY, ALFRED A., (Wolf Creek, 111) age 23 ; 
B., Williamson County, 111. Farming. Entrained 
June 27, '18, Camp Wheeler, Ga. 

CHEW, JOHN F., (Makanda) age 23 ; B., Jackson 
County, 111. Farming. Entrained June 27, '18, Camp 
Wheeler, Ga. 

CHANEY, ERNEST (Stonefort) age 22 ; B., Stone- 
fort, 111. Employed at Peabody Coal Co., Marion, 
111. Coal Miner. Entrained Sept. 21, '17, Camp 
Taylor, Ky. 

CHANEY, BYRD LEE, (Crab Orchard) age 29 ; 
B., Crab Orchard, 111. Employed at State Hospital, 
Athens, Ohio. Entrained Sept. 21, '17, Camp Taylor, 
Ky. 

CHAMNESS, DAN, (Carterville) age 22 ; B., Car- 
terville, 111. Employed near Carterville, 111. Farm- 
ing. Entrained Sept. 20, '17, Camp Taylor, Ky. 
CHAMNESS, HERMAN, (Carterville) B., Marion, 
111. Employed Marion, 111. R. F. D. Mail Carrier. 
Entrained May 5, '18, Camp Dix, N. J. 

COX, CLARENCE C., (Marion) age 24 ; B., Wil- 
liamson County, 111. Son of T. A. and Nancy Cox, 
Marion, 111. School Teacher. Enlisted May 10, '18, 
Decatur, 111. Attached to 23rd Co., C. O. T. S. 
Discharged at Camp Gordon, Ga., Nov. 28, '18. 
CONWAY, GEORGE, (Herrin) age 28 ; B., Carbon- 
dale. Married Hattie Blankenship. Coal Miner. En- 
trained June 15, 1918. Discharged at Camp Wheel- 
er, Ga., June 15, '19. 

COVACHOFF, NICOLES M., (West Frankfort) 
age 30 ; B., Bogatavo, Bulgaria. Employed at Er- 
nest Coal Co. Mining. Entrained May 28, '18, Camp 
Shelby, Miss. 

COX, WILLIAM GEORDIUS (Vienna. 111.) age 20 ; 
B., Ozark, 111. Son of Jackson M. Cox. Employed 
at Peabody Coal Co., Marion, 111. Coal Miner. En- 
trained Oct. 2, '18. 

COPELAND, DENZIL R., (Energy) age 23 ; B., 
Clifford, 111. Employed at 111. Central R. R. Co. 
Switchman. Entrained April 29, '18, Camp Dix, N. J. 

COCKRAN, JOHN, (Colp) age 23 ; B., Murphys- 
boro, 111. Employed Madison Coal Corp. Colp, 111. 
Mining. Entrained Sept. 20, '17, Camp Taylor, Ky. 
COLLIER, ALMUS NANZELL, (Carterville) age 
23 ; B., Jackson County, 111. Employed Carterville, 
111. Farming. Entrained Sept. 4, '18, Camp Grant, 
111. 

COLLINS, FLOYD. (Carterville) age 21 ; B., Wil- 
liamson Co., 111. Employed Hafer Coal Co., Car- 
terville, 111. Mining. Entrained Oct. 4, '17, Camp 
Taylor, Ky. 

COLP, HARRISON EVERETT, (Carterville) age 
28 ; B., Carterville, 111. Employed Boonville, Mo. 
Cinematographer. Enlisted Oct. 27, '17, 108th En- 
gineers at Chicago, 111. 

J COSTER, PAUL (Johnston City) age 24 ; B., 

France. Employed Big Muddy Coal Co., Johnston 

City, 111. Mining. Entrained June 27, '18, Camp 
Wheeler, Ga. 




COBB, GUY, (Johnston City) age 22 ; B., Morgan- 
field, Ky. Son of W. F. and Vina Cobb. Johnston 
City, 111. Farmer. Entrained June 27, '18, Camp 
Wheeler, Ga. Rejected at Camp. 

COLURA, STEFANO, (Johnston City) age 25 ; B., 
Aragona, Italy. Son of Frank Colura, Johnston 
City, 111. Employed Searls Coal Co., Johnston City 
111. Coal Mining. Entrained May 28, '18, Camp 
Shelby, Miss. 

COLP, WILLIAM P., (Hurst) age 25 ; B., Clif- 
ford, 111. Employed Hurst. 111. Farming. Entrain- 
ed Mar. 12, '18, Camp Taylor, Ky. 

COOK, ARTHUR, (Herrin) age 30 ; B., Crab Tree, 
Ky. Employed Taylor Mining Co. .Mining. En- 
trained May 28, 'IS, Camp Shelby, Miss. 

CONNELL, LOUIS F., (Herrin) age 23 ; B., Vien- 
na, 111. Employed Herrin, 111. Works at City water 
works. Entrained Oct. 21, '18, Camp Wheeler, Ga. 
COX, RALPH, (Herrin) age 24, B., Murphysboro, 
111. Employed Pond Creek Coal Co. Mining. En- 
trained Aug. 1, '18, Camp Wheeler, Ga. 

COPASS, ARTHUR G. (Herrin) age 21 ; B., 
Tompkinsville, Ky. Employed Carbondale, 111. Farm- 
ing. Entrained June 27, '18, Camp Wheeler, Ga. 
COFFEE, HENRY (Herrin) age 22 ; B., Chicago, 
111. Employed Pond Creek Coal Co., Herrin, 111. 
Miner. Enlisted Dec. 8, '17, Coast Artillery, Jeff- 
erson Barracks, Mo. 

CRAIN, CARL (Marion) age 27 ; B., Marion, 111. 
Employed Howard & Casey Co. Wholesale Grocers, 
Marion, 111. Enlisted in Navy July '13, at present 
Chief Petty Officer of the U. S. S. Montana. 
CROSSON, GUS McKINLEY, (Marion) age 21 ; 
Employed New Virginia Mine, Marion, Illinois. 
B., Marion, 111. Son of J. A. Crosson, Marion, 111. 
Coal Miner. Entrained Oct. 15, '18, Chicago Uni- 
versity. 

CRAIN, ARTHUR JERRY, (Marion) age 27 ; B., 
Carterville, 111. Son of James and Ellen Crain. 
Married Myrtle Smith. Farmer. Entrained June 
27, '18. Overseas Oct. 15, '18. Discharged April 
7, 1919 at Camp Grant, 111. 

CRAIG, CHARLES K., (Carbondale) age 23 ; B., 
Carbondale, 111. Employed Carbonoaie, 111. Farm- 
ing. Entrained April 29, '18, Camp Dix, N. J. 
CRAIG, ERNEST, (Wolf Creek) age 27 ; B., 
Grainville, 111. Employed at Herrin & Carterville 
Coal Co., Herrin, 111. Miner. 

CRAIG, HARRY C., (Stonefort) age 24; B., Stone- 
fort, 111. Employed at Stott Milling Co., Detroit, 
Mich. Cashier. Entrained Sept. 21, '17, Camp Tay- 
lor, Ky. 

CRAIG, JOHN HENRY (Dewmaine) age 22 ; B., 
Albany Ky. Employed at Madison Coal Corp., 
Dewmaine, 111. Bill Clerk. Enlisted Dec. 13, '17, 
Ft. Oglethrope, Ga. 

CRESPI, JOHN, (Clifford) age 29 ; B., Italy. Em- 
ployed at Big Muddy Coal Co. Mining. Entrained 
March 11, '18, Camp Taylor, Ky. 

CRAIN PAUL, (Carterville) age 21 ; B., Carter- 
ville, 111. Married Anna Mae Gulley. Son of H. P. 
and Amanda J. Crain, Carterville, 111. Employed 
Law Student. Entrained Mar. 12, '18, Overseas 
Sept. 8, '18. Attached Co. A., 309th Engineers. 
Discharged May 3, '19, at Camp Dix, N. J. 
CRAIN, MIKE, (Carterville) age 23 ; B. Crain- 
ville, 111. Employed Crainville, 111. Farmer. En- 
trained May 28, '18, Camp Shelby, Miss. 
CRAIN, FERRELL, (Carterville) age 25; B., 
Crainville, 111. Employed Taylor Coal Co., Herrin, 
111. Miner. Entrained June 27, '18, Camp Wheeler, 
Ga. 

CRAIN, TEMPLE, (Carterville) age 28 ; B., Car- 
terville, 111. Employed Federal Coal Co., Carter- 
ville, 111. Mining. Entrained June' 14, '18, Aeronau- 
tic Corps., Vancouver, Washington. 
CRAIN, WILLIAM ELIAS, (Carterville) age 28 ; 
B., Wayside, HI. Farmer. Entrained May 28, '18, 
Camp Shelby, Miss. 



229 




CRAINE, PAUL, (Carterville) age 21, B., Carter- 
vine, 111. Employed on Farm. Farming. Entrain- 
ed Mar. 12, '18, Camp Taylor, Ky. 

CRAIG, DENNIS, (Carterville) age 29 ; B., Wolf- 
Creek. Employed Taylor Coal Co. Miner. En- 
Teamster. Entrained June 27, '18, Camp Wheeler, 
Ga. 

CRAIN, JOE E., (Carterville) age 23 ; B., Carter- 
ville, 111. Employed Taylor Coal Co., Herrin, 111. 
Bookkeeper. Entrained Sept. 20, '17, Camp Taylor, 
Ky. 

CREWS, ROBERT, (Carterville) age 26 ; B., 
Princeton, Ky Employed C. & E. I. R. R. Co. 
Switchman. Enlisted Sept. 10, '17, 124th F. A. Bat- 
tery F., Camp Logan, Texas. 

CKEAL, JONES EDWARD, (Creal Springs) age 
21 ; B., Creal Springs, 111. Employed Chicago & Big 
Muddy Coal Co., Marion, 111. Coal Miner. Entrain- 
ed May 28, '18, Camp Shelby, Miss. (Rejected.) 
CAIN, JOSEPH, (Harrisburg) age 26 ; B., Dan- 
ville, 111. Son of Catharine Cain. Employed at 
O'Gara Co-tl Co. Coal Miner. Entrained June 27, 
'18, Camp Wheeler, Ga. 

CREIGHEAD, CLURA T., (Herrin) age 21 ; B., 
Clay Co., Tenn. Employed W. P. Rend Coal Co. 
Weaver, III. Entrained Sept. 25, '18. 



JAMES, (Herrin) age 23 ; B., Mur- 

Employed Chicago & Carterville Coal 

Entrained May 23, '18, Jefferson Bar- 



CROMPTON 
physboro, 111. 
Co. Mining, 
racks, Mo. 

CRAIG, CLAUDE, (Herrin) age 24 ; B., Wolf 
Creek. Employed Taylor Coal Co. Miner. En- 
trained April 19, '18, Camp Dix, N. J. 

CRESTARILLO, ROSARIO, (Herrin) age 28 ; B., 
Ardore, Italy. Employed Pond Creek Coal Co. 
Miner. Entrained June 27, '18, Camp Wheeler, Ga. 

CROMPTON, FRANK LESLIE, (Herrin) age 21 ; 
B., Murphysboro, 111. Employed C. & C. Coal Co., 
B., Herrin, 111. Miner. Entrained Sept. 20, '17, 
Camp Taylor, Ky. 

CUMMINGS, CHAS. HENRY, (Johnston City) age 
21 ; B., Henderson, Ky. Son of Mary Cummings, 
Johnston City, 111. Employed Searls Coal Co., John- 
ston City, 111. Coal Mining. Entrained June 27, '18, 
Camp Wheeler, Ga. 

CURTNER, ERNEST, (Stonefort) age 23 ; B., 
Stonefort, 111. Son of Daniel Curtner, Creal Springs, 
111. Farming. Entrained June 27, '18, Camp Wheel- 
er, Ga. 

CUTRELL, ELIAS, (Herrin) age 26 ; B., DeSoto, 
111. Son of Maria Woodard Cutrell, Herrin, 111. Coai 
Miner. Entrained April 29, '18. Overseas May 24, 
'18. Engaged in battle of St. Mihiel and Argonne- 
Forest. Attached to Co. C., 303rd Engineers 78th 
Div. Discharged at Camp Grant, 111., June 18, '19. 

DAVENPORT, HERMAN, (Thompsonville) age 25 ; 
B., Corinth, 111. Employed Pittsburg, 111. Farm 
laborer. Entrained April 29, '18, Camp Dix, N. J. 

DARAHULA, PAUL, (Johnston City) age 29 ; B., 
Poland. Employed Johnston City Coal Co. Miner. 
Entrained May 17, '18, Ft. Benjamin Harrison, Ind. 

DANKS, ED, (Johnston City) age 24 ; B., William- 
son County, 111. Son of Barbara Danks. Johnston 
City, 111. Employed Consolidated Coal Co., Jonns- 
ton City, 111. Coal Mining. Entrained May 28, '18, 
Camp Shelby, Miss. 

DAVIS, HERSCHEL JASPER (Johnston City) age 
26 ; B., Outon, Ky. Employed Searls Coal Co., 
Johnston City, 111. Coal Miner. Entrained Sept. 
21, '18, Camp Taylor, Ky. 

DAVIS, ROBERT, (Marion) age 21 ; B., Marion, 
111. Son of Laura Davis, Johnston City, 111. Em- 
ployed Peabody Coal Co., Marion 111. Coal Miner. 
Entrained May 28, '18, Camp Shelby, Miss. 

DAVIS, LESTER M., (Makanda) age 21 ; B., Wil- 
liamson Co., 111. Employed at Geo. Davis Farm, 
Carbondale, 111. Farming. Entrained May 28, '18, 
Camp Shelby, Miss. 



DAVENPORT, THOMAS, (Thompsonville) age 26 ; 
B., Corinth, 111. Farming. Entrained June 27, '18, 
rejected at Camp Wheeler, Ga. 

DALTON, BEN, (Herrin) age 28 ; B., Elroy, 111. 
Employed Big Muddy Coal & Iron Co., Clifford, 111. 
Boiler Fireman. Deceased, July 5, '17. 

DAWSON, DUDLEY, (Herrin) age 22 ; B., Zeigler. 
111. Employed C. B. & Q. Ry. Yard Clerk. En- 
listed June 3, '18, Navy, Chicago, 111. 

DAVIS, FRED, (Creal Springs) age 21 ; B., Creal 
Springs, 111. Son of Hannah Dunston. Employed. 
Farming. Entrained May 23, '18, Jefferson Bar- 
racks, Mo. 

DANIELS, DAVID, (Herrin) age 23 ; B., Belle Elm, 
Ala. Employed Bell & Zoller Mining Co., Zeigler, 
111. Mining. Deceased. 

DANIEL, RAY, (Herrin) age 22; B., Beaver Dam, 
Ky. Employed Pond Creek Coal Co. Mining. En- 
trained Mar. 12, '18 Camp Taylor, Ky. 

DARNELL, JAMES VERNER, (Herrin) age 22 ; 
B., McLeansboro, 111. Employed C. B. & Q., Her- 
rin, 111. Entrained May 21, '18, Camp Meade, Mary- 
land. 

DAVIS, McKINLEY, (Creal Springs) age 23 ; B., 
Stonefort, 111. Son of Aaron Davis. Employed 
Farming. Entrained June 27, '18, Camp Wheeler, 
G. (Rejected.) 

DARESKEWICZ, PAUL,, (Herrin) age 30 : 
Osmana, Poland, Russia. Employed W. P. Rend 
Coal Co., Herrin, 111. Mining. Entrained Mar 12, 
'18, Camp Taylor, Ky. 

DALLAS, ELBERT, (Carterville) age 28 ; B., Cob- 
den, 111. Employed A. J. Armstrong, Carterville, 
111. Blacksmith. Entrained Mar. 12, '18, Camp Tay- 
lor, Ky. 

DAVID, LOUIS, (Herrin) age 29 ; B., Ania Sharia, 
Syria, Turkey. Employed Williamson County. Ped- 
dler. Entrained May 28, '18, Camp Shelby, Miss. 

DEASON, LESLIE CLARENCE, (Johnston City) 
age 23 ; B., Creal Springs, 111. Son of J. B. Deason, 
Marion, 111. Teaching. Enlisted Aviation Section. 
Signal Corps., Dec. 15, '17, Jefferson Barracks, Mo. 

DEATOX, WALTER WOODFORD, (Marion) age 
28 ; B., New Burnsides, 111., Employed Herrin, 111. 
Engine Fireman C. B. & Q. R. R. Entrained July 
30, '18, Syracuse Recruit Camp, Syracuse, X. Y. 
Rejected at camp for limited service. 

DEATOX. OLLIE CLAREXCE. (Stonefort) age 
28 ; B., Stonefort, 111. Son of James A. Deaton, 
Stonefort, 111. Farming. Entrained Feb. 25, '18, 
Camp Taylor, Ky. 

DEMING, L. E., (Bush) age 25: B.. Dawson 
Springs, Ky. Employed at Western Coal & M. G. 
Co., Bush, 111. Mining. Entarined Sept. 4, '18. Camp 
Grant, 111. 

DEATON, ORB, (Marion) age 21 ; B., Johnson Co., 
111. Employed Peabody Coal Co. Coal Miner. En- 
trained Oct. 5, '17, Camp Taylor, Ky. 

DEATON, LOYD, (Marion) age 23 ; B., Xew Burn- 
side, 111. Son of George and Lizzie Deaton. Coal 
Miner. Entrained June 23, '18. Attached Co. C., 
66th Field Art. Discharged, Camp Grant, 111., Dec. 
23, '18. 

DEATOX, JOHX ALDEN, (Stonefort) age 23, B., 
Stonefort, 111. Son of Lanson Deaton, Creal Springs. 
111. Farming. Entrained June 27, '18, Camp Wheel- 
er, Ga. 

DEATON, ALONZO, (Creal Springs) age 30 ; B., 
Johnston City, 111. Son of Rebecca Deaton. Em- 
ployed Creal Springs, 111. I C. R. R. Entrained 
Feb. 25, '18, Camp Taylor, Ky. (Rejected.) 

DECIECHI, HOTALE, (Herrin) age 22 ; B., Cor- 
betta, Italy. Employed C. & C. Coal Co., Mine A. 
Mining. Entrained May 28, '18, Camp Shelby, Miss. 

DECKARD, HENRY A., (Herrin) age 22 ; B., 
Logan. Ohio. Employed W. P. Rend Coal Co. Min- 
ing. Entrained April 29, '18, Camp Dix, N. J. 



230 




DIXGRANDO, LIBIRIO, (Marion) age 27; B., It- 
aly. Son of Joe Dingrando. Employed Peabody Coal 
Co., Marion, 111. Coal Miner. Entrained June 27, 
'18, Camp Wheeler, Ga. 

DIRAMONDO, JOSEPH, (Herrin) age 23 ; B., 
Olessandri Rocco, Italy. Employed C. & C. Coal 
Co. Mining. Entrained May 17, '18, Ft. Benjamin 
Harrison, Ind. 

DIDIO, CATINO, (Herrin) age 24 ; B., Villarosa 
Caltanossetta, Italy. Employed Taylor Coal Co. 
Mining. Entrained May 2S, '18, Camp Shelby, Miss. 

pIMITROFP, PETE, (Herrin) age 29 ; B., Bor- 
isoro, Rousse, Bulgaria. Employed C. & C. Coal 
Co., Herrin, 111. Mining. Entrained Mar. 10, '18, 
Jefferson Barracks, Mo. 

DORRIS, HAILARD ARVIL, (Johnston City) age 
23 ; B., Johnston City, 111. Employed Consolidated 
Coal Co. Coal Miner. Entrained June 27, 'IS, 
Camp Wheeler, Ga. 

DORRELL, OLIN HERBERT (Marion) age 24 ; 

B., Goreville, 111. Employed Big Muddy Coal & 

Coke Co. Mining. Entrained May 28, '18, Camp 
Shelby, Miss. 

DOERIXG, ADOPH J., (Marion) age 21 ; B., Wil- 
liamson County, 111. Farming. Entrained Sept. 21, 
"17, Camp Taylor, Ky. Wounded in action. 

DORRELL, HENRY EDWARD, (Marion) age 28 ; 
B., Goreville, 111. Employed Chicago & Big Muddy 
Coal Co., Marion, 111. Coal Miner. Entrained May 
28, '18, Camp Shelby, Miss. 

DOTY, E. FRANK. (Marion) age 29 : B., Jackson 
Co., 111. Son of W. H. Doty, Marion, 111. Carpenter. 
Entrained July 31, '18. Discharged Nov. 29, '18. 

DORLINSKI, JAKE, (Herrin) age 27 ; B., Bridge- 
port, Ohio. Employed Weaver, 111. Chauffeur. En- 
trained May 28, 'IS, Camp Shelby, Miss. 

DOWN. JOHN, (Carterville) age 23 ; B., Carter- 
ville, 111. Farmer. Entrained June 27, '18, Camp 
Wheeler, Ga. 

DOAN, SAM, (Herrin) age 25 ; B., Chumin. Bul- 
garia. Employed W. P. Rend Coal Co., Herrin, 111. 
Mining. Entrained June 27, '18, Camp Wheeler, Ga. 

DOERFLING, JOHN W., (Herrin) age 26 ; B., 
Belleville, 111. Employed with Pete Cardani. Brick 
Mason. Entrained April 29, '18, Camp Dix, N. J. 

DRAKE, RAYMOND, (Marion) age 22 ; B., Shaw- 
neetpwn. 111. Employed Marion & Eastern R. R. 
Section Hand. Entrained Sept. 21, '17, Camp Tay- 
lor, Ky. 

DREW, ED, (Carterville) age 27 ; B., Carterville, 
111. Employed Federal Coal Co., Carterville, 111. 
Mining. Entrained Sept. 20, '17, Camp Taylor, Ky. 

DRURY, FRANK, (Carbondale) age 24 ; B., Car- 
terville, 111. Employed Carbondale, 111. Farming. 
Entrained Oct. 4, '17, Camp Taylor. Ky. 
DURHAM, RANSOM, (Johnston City) age 21 ; B., 
Marion, 111. Son of John Durham, Johnston City, 
111. Employed Ernest Coal Co., Johnston City, 111. 
Coal Miner. Entrained June 27, '18, Camp Wheel- 
er, Ga. 

DUNCAN, HOWARD NEWTON, (Johnston City) 
age 23 ; B., Johnston City, 111. Son of Geo. W. 
Duncan, Johnston City, 111. Employed St. Louis, 
Mo. Salesman. Entrained March '18, Jefferson Bar- 
racks, Mo. 

DUNGEY, VERNIE, (Marion) age 24 ; B., Padu- 
cah, Ky. Son of Mollie Dungey. Marion, III. Plast- 
erer. Entrained Oct. 5, '17, Camp Taylor, Ky. 

DUNGEY, JOHN, (Marion) age 26 ; B., Woodville, 
Ky. Employed Marion, 111. Plasterer. Entrained 
May 23, '18, Jefferson Barracks, Mo. 

DUKE, FOREST, (Marion) age 23. Son of George 
Duke, Marion, 111. Actor. Entrained June 27, '18, 
Camp Wheeler, Ga. 

DUGGER, CHARLES, (Marion) age 21 ; B., Creal 
Springs, 111. Employed Chicago & Big Muddy Coal 
Co. Coal Mining. Entrained April 29, '18, Camp 
Dix, N. J. 



DUNCAN, GUY, (Carbondale) age 28 ; B., Herrin, 
111. Employed Farmer. Entrained May 28, '18, 
Camp Shelby, Miss. 

EATON, ALBERT, (Carterville) age 24 ; B., Car- 
terville, 111. Employed Federal Coal Co., Carter- 
ville, 111. Miner. Entrained May 28, '18, Camp 
Shelby, Miss. 

EADY, JOE, (Herrin) age 27 ; B., Fruitharris, 
Ala. Employed Pond Creek Coal Co., Herrin, 111. 
Miner. Entrained June 27, '18, Camp Wheeler, Ga. 
EATHERLY. CHARLEY. E., (Johnston City) age 
23 ; B., Pittsburg, 111. Son of W. L. Eatherly, John- 
ston City, 111. Employed Johnston City, 111. Farm- 
ing. Entrained May 23, '18. Jefferson Barracks, 
Mo. 

EBERHARD, MILTON. (Johnston City) age 21 ; 
B., Lake Creek, 111. Son of Elizabeth Eberhard, 
Johnston City, 111. Farmer. Entrained June 27, 
'18, Camp Wheeler, Ga. Discharged Oct. 28, '18. 
EBERHARDT, DANIEL WEBSTER, (Johnston 
City) age 26 ; B., Williamson County. 111. Son of 
Elizabeth Eberhardt, Johnston City, 111. Employed 
Searles Coal Co. Coal Miner. Entrained June 27, 
'18, Camp Wheeler, Ga. Rejected Camp Wheeler, 
Ga. 

ECKOLS, AUD L., (Pittsburg) age 21 ; B., Marion, 
111. Employed at Jacksonville State Hospital. At- 
tendant. Entrained Feb. 25, '18, Camp Zachary 
Taylor, _Ky. Discharged Aug. 20, '18. 

ECKORD, LEE ELMER, (Herrin) age 28 ; B., 
Savanna, 111. Employed C. B. & Q. Ry., Herrin, 
111. Switchman. Entrained May 28, 18, Camp Shel- 
by, Miss. 

EDWARD, AUD, (Thompsonville) age 22 ; B., Cor- 
inth, 111. Farmer. Entrained Oct. 5, '17, Camp 
Taylor, Ky. 

EDWARDS, LEON, (Marion) Enlisted. 

EDWARDS LAWRENCE CALVIN, (Thompson- 
ville) age 23 ; B., Thompsonville, III. Employed 
Anna State Hospital. Attendant. Enlisted Dec. 15, 
'17, Jefferson Barracks, Mo. 

EDWARDS, LEONARD E., (Galatia) age 32, B., 
Galatia, 111. Employed at St. Louis Sanitarium. 
Overseer. Enlisted Oct. 1, '17, Ft. Oglethrope, Ga. 
Transferred to Camp McArthur, Waco, Texas. 
Transferred to Camp Funston. Kansas, and dis- 
charged, Camp Funston, Feb. 18, '19. 

EDWARDS, RAY, (Marion) age 21 ; B., Crab Or- 
chard, 111. Son of J. L. Edwards, Crab Orchard, 
111. Employed Scranton Big Muddy Coal Co., Pitts- 
burg, 111. Coal Mining. Entrained May 29, '18, Fort 
Thomas, Ky. 

EDWARDS, RAY, (Marion) age 21 ; B., Marion, 111. 
Son of Marten Edwards, Marion, 111. Employed Pea- 
body Coal Co., Marion, 111. Coal Miner. Entrained 
May 28, '18, Camp Shelby, Miss. Rejected. 

ELAND, WILBUR H., (Johnston City) age 23 ; B., 
England. Chauffeur. Entrained May 28, '18, Camp 
Shelby, Miss. 

ELLIOT, CLAUDE, (Bush) age 30; B., William- 
son County, 111. Chaffeur, Bush, 111. Entrained 
Sept. 20, '17, Camp Taylor, Ky. 

ELDERS, MARION, (Carterville) age 21 ; B., Car- 
terville, 111. Employed Carterville, 111. Farming. 
Entrained Sept. 4, '18, Camp Grant, 111. 

ELLIS, GEORGE, (Herrin) age 22; B., Carter- 
ville, 111. Employed C. & C. Coal Co. Mining. En- 
trained May 28, '18, Camp Shelby, Miss. 

EMBODEN, CLYDE OWEN, (Stonefort) age 21 ; 
B., Stonefort, 111. Son of Lura Emboden. Carrier 
Mills, 111. Employed Peabody Coal Co. Miner. En- 
trained June 27, '18, rejected Camp Wheeler, Ga. 
Reclassified for limited service Sept. 3, '18, Camp 
Grant, 111. 

EMERY, LINDOLPH, (Carterville) age 22 ; B., 
Tunnell Hill, III. Employed Federal Coal Co., Car- 
terville, 111. Miner. Entrained Sept. 4, '17, Camp 
Taylor, Ky. 



231 



" " " 



EMERY, OSCAR, (Marion) age 21 ; B., Parker 
City, 111. Employed at Peabody Coal Co., Marion, 
111. Coal Miner. Entrained Sept. 6, '18, Camp 
Forrest, Lytle, Ga. 

ENGLISH, BARNEY, (Metropolis) age 25 ; B., 
Grantsburg, 111. Employed at Colp, 111., Madison 
Coal Co. Mining. Entrained March 12, '18, Camp 
Taylor, Ky. 

ENNIS, JAMES (Johnston City) age 24 ; B., Green- 
ville, Ky. Son of Amanda Wallace, Greenville, Ky. 
Employed Searls Coal Co., Johnston City, 111. Coal 
Miner. Entrained May 28, '18, Camp Shelby, Miss. 

ERURIX, HERMAN, (Crab Orchard) age 24 ; B., 
Crab Orchard, 111. Son of Elmer Erurin. Em- 
ployed at Scranton & Big Muddy Coal Co., Marion, 
111. Mining. Entrained Feb. 25, '18, Camp Tay- 
lor, Ky. 

EUBANKS, FRED, (Marion) age 23 ; B., Marion, 
111. Enlisted in Navy, '15, with Reg. Band. 

FARRIS, SAMUEL (Marion) age 23 ; B., Somerset, 
Ky. Employed Carterville, 111. Miner. Entrain- 
ed June 27, '18, Camp Wheeler, Ga. 

FARBUSH. HARVEY. (Marion) age 24 ; B., Cob- 
den, 111. Son of W. H. Farbush. Clerk. Entrain- 
ed May '18. Camp Shelby, Miss. Overseas Sept. 12, 
'18. Attached Co. B., 113th Engineers. Discharg- 
ed, Camp Grant, 111. J.uly 9, '19. Landed in U. S. 
June 30, '19. 

FARRARIO. ALEX. (Herrin) age 26 ; B., Trin- 
bel, Wisconsin. Employed C. & C. Coal Company. 
Mining. Entrained May 28, '18, Camp Shelby, Miss. 

FACK. FRED. (Johnston City) age 28 ; B., Aus- 
tria. Employed Searls Coal Co. Miner. Entrained 
May 23, '18, Jefferson Barracks, Mo. 

FELTS, WALTER BERTON, (Marion) age 22 ; B., 
Pittsburg, 111. Employed Marion Pittsburg Coal Co. 
Coal Miner. Entrained May 29, '18, Ft. Thomas, 
Ky. 

FELTS, WILLIS LEE. (Johnston City) age 25 ; 
B.. Johnston City, 111. Son of T. J. Felts, Johnston. 
City, 111. Salesman. Entrained May 28, '18, Camp 
Shelby, Miss. 

FELLMAN, HENRY, (Johnston City) age 25 ; B.. 
Cotton Berg. Germany. Employed Johnston City 
Coal Co. Miner and Electrician. Entrained April 
29, '18, Camp Dix, N. J. 

FERRANDELLI, CIRO. (Johnston City) age 23 : 
B., Burgio, Italy. Employed Johnston City Coal 
Co. Coal Mining. Entrained May 28, '18, Camp 
Shelby, Miss. 

FERRELL, DENT, (Carterville) age 27 ; B., Car- 
terville, 111. Employed Chicago B. & M. Coal Co., 
Marion. 111. Electrician. Enlisted Oct 1, '17, Avi- 
ation Section, University of Illinois, Urbana, 111. 

FELTS, LEMMA. (Marion) age 23 ; B., Williamson 
Co., 111. Son of Sarah Felts, Marion, 111. Farming. 
Entrained April 29, '18, Camp Dix, N. J. 

FERGUSON, CLARENCE C., (Marion) age 23 ; 
B., New Burnsides, 111. Son of Minnie L. Fergu- 
son, Marion, 111. Employed Coal Belt Electric Ry. 
Co., Marion, 111. Motorman, Conductor. Entrain- 
ed April 29, '18, Camp Dix, N. J. 

FELTS, DR. HARVEY, (Marion) Enlisted. Dis- 
charged. 

FELTS, HARVEY A., (Marion) age 32 ; B., Lake 
Creek, 111. Married Miss Mabel Warinner. Em- 
ployed as physician. Enlisted July 7, '17 at Allen- 
town, Pa. Overseas Jan 9, '18. Attached to 
Battery E., 42nd Artillery C. A. C., Surgeon. Later 
transferred to 1 Bn. 43 Art. Surgeon. Engaged 
in active service at Champagne and the Argonne 
and Meuse Offensive. Discharged Jan. 21, '19, at 
Camp Sherman, Ohio. 

FISCHER, OSCAR ROY, (Marion) age 22 ; B., 
Marion, 111. Son of Mrs. Andrew Fischer, Marion, 
111. Employed at Missouri Pacific R. R. Co. Book- 
keeper and Clerk. Entrained April 29, '18, Camp 
Dix, N. J. 




FIEWEGER, THOMAS E., (Marion) age 26; B., 
Menasha, Wis. Civil Engineer. Appointed Second 
Lieutenant, Nov. 27, '17, in Coast Artillery Reserve 
Corps. Assigned C. D. of New Bedford, Fort 
Rodman, Mass. 

FISHER, WILLIAM ROBERT, (Marion) age 26; 
B., Murphsboro, 111. Son of Mrs. W. L. Fisher, Mar- 
ion, 111. Horseshoer. Entrained Feb. 25, '18, Camp 
Taylor, Ky. 

FLETCHER, ALBERT, (Johnston City) age 23 ; 
B., Johnston City, 111. Son of Will Fletcher, Johns- 
ton City, 111. Farming. Entrained May 23, '18, 
Jefferson Barracks, Mo. 

FIORIO, EMIL, (Herrin) age 30 ; B., Carlo, Can- 
ovese, Italy. Employed W. P. Rend Coal Co., Her- 
rin, 111. Miner. Entrained June 27, '18, Camp 
Wheeler, Ga. 

FLY, WILLIAM H., (Marion) age 29 ; B., Prog- 
ress, 111. Son of J. W. B. Fly, Makanda. 111. Drug- 
gist. Enlisted Medical Department, Dec. 11, '17. 

FLUCK, LOUIS ALFRED, (Marion) age 23 ; B., 
Marion, 111. Son of Henry Fluck, Marion, Lll. Farm- 
ing. Entrained May 29, '18, Ft. Thomas, Ky. 

FLEMING, ALEXANDER, (Marion) age 22 ; B., 
Diamond, 111. Son of John & Grace Fleming. Mar- 
ried Leah McMurray. Coal Miner. Entrained Feb. 
25, '18, Camp Taylor, Ky. Overseas June 12, '18. 
Engaged in Scheldt, Belgium. Attached M. G. Co., 
346th Inf. Discharged, Camp Grant, 111, April 29, 
1919. 

FORKER, WILLIAM, (Marion) age 27 ; B., New 
York, N. Y. Son of Mrs. J. B. Cirrito, Marion, 111. 
Merchant. Entrained June 27, '18, Camp Wheeler, 
Ga. 

FOWLER, ROBERT CECIL, (Marion) age 21 ; B., 
Buncombe, 111. Son of J. B. Fowler, Creal Springs, 
111. Employed Peabody Coal Co., Marion, 111. Min- 
ing. Entrained April 29, '18, Camp Dix, N. J. 
FOLLOWELL, GROVER, (Blairsville) age 25 ; B., 
Lennia, 111. Employed Mo. Pacific Railroad, Bush, 
111. Car Repairer. Entrained May 29, '18, Fort 
Thomas, Ky. 

FOLLIS, HERBERT, (Herrin) age 24 ; B., Schol- 
arria, 111. Son of James J. and Lou Follis. Mar- 
ried Gazella Culbreth. Miner. Entrained June 27, 
'18, Camp Wheeler. Ga. Attached to Co. M. P. 
Provost Guard. Discharged at Camp Wheeler, Ga., 
March 6, 1919. 

FOLETTI, BATISTA, (Johnston City) age 24 ; B., 
Italy. Employed Consolidated Coal Co. Coal Min- 
ing. Entrained May 28, '18, Camp Shelby, Miss. 

FOWLER, HOWARD K., (Johnston City) age 24 ; 
B., Illinois. Son of Susie Leigh, Johnston City, 111. 
Employed Scranton Big Muddy Coal Co., Marion, 111. 
Coal Mining. Enlisted in U. S. Naval Reserve Force 
June 12, '18. 

FOLI, GUY, (Johnston City) age 21 ; B., Italy. 
Employed Consolidated Coal Co. Entrained Sept. 
6, '18, Camp Forrest, Lytle, Ga. 

FREECE, JESSE, (Marion) age 25 ; B., Marion, 111. 
Son of J. T. Freece, Marion, 111. Employed William- 
son County Coal Co., Marion, 111. Coal Miner. En- 
trained June 27, '18, Camp Wheeler, Ga. 

FRIES, ADOLPH HENRY, (Marion) age 26 ; B., 
Belleville, 111. Son of August Fries, Marion, HI. 
Farming. Entrained Feb. 25, '18, Camp Taylor, Ky. 

FRIEZE, PERRY (Marion) age 28 : B.. Dongola, 
111. Employed C. & E. I. R. R. Railroad Con- 
ductor. Enlisted. 

FOWLEY, FRANK, (Stonefort) age 30 ; B., Stone- 
fort, 111. Farming. Entrained April 29, '18, Camp 
Dix, N. J. 

FOLLOWELL, CHESTER, (Colp) age 23; B., 
Lerria, 111. Employed at Mo. Pacific Ry., Bush, 
111. Car repairer. Entrained May 28, '18, Shelby, 
Miss. 

FOLLIS, RAYMOND, (Herrin) age 24 ; B., John- 
ston City, 111. Employed West Frankfort, 111. Min- 
er. Entrained May 28, '18, Camp Shelby, Miss. 




FOSTER. ALVIN, (Herrin) age 28 ; B., Herrin, 
111. Employed Sunnyside Coal Co., Herrin, 111. Min- 
er. Entrained Sept. 20, '17, Camp Taylor, Ky. 

FOLLOWELL, GUY G., (Herrin) age 24 ; B., Coles 
County, 111. Employed Duncan Coal Co., Herrin, 
111. Miner. Entrained Oct. 4, '17, Camp Taylor, Ky. 

FORD, CHARLES ROSS, (Herrin) age 21 ; B., 
Durant, Okla. Employed Pond Creek Coal Co. Min- 
ing. Entrained Sept. 5, '17, Camp Taylor, Ky. 

FOSTER, FRED, (Herrin) age 22 ; B., Herrin, 
111. Employed Sunnyside Coal Co. Miner. Enlist- 
ed Sept. 6, '17, St. Louis, Mo. 

FRANKLIN, JOHN HENRY, (Marion) age 22 ; B., 
Creal Springs, 111. Employed Big Muddy Fuel & 
Coal Co. Enlisted in Army. Stationed at Camp 
Logan, Houston, Texas. 

FRICK, OSCAR, (Marion) age 22 ; B., Christo- 
pher, 111. Son of Henry Frick, Marion. 111. Driver 
for Standard Oil Co., Marion, 111. Entrained May 
28, '18, Camp Shelby, Miss. 

FRANKLIN, FRED CARL, (Marion) age 29 ; B., 
Crab Orchard, 111. Son of Josie Franklin, Marion, 
111. Farming. Entrained June 27, '18, Camp Wheel- 
er, Ga. Rejected. 

PREY, LUTHER, (Carterville) age 24 ; B.. Marlon, 
111. Farmer. Entrained Sept. 4, '18, Camp Grant, 
111. 

FRAZIER. VERNIE, (Herrin) age 26 ; B., Sebree, 
Ky. Employed Ernest Coal Co., Johnston City, 
111. Coal Miner. Entrained Sept. 21, '17, Camp 
Taylor, Ky. Discharged In forty days. Depend- 
ency. 

FREEMAN, HENRY. (Herrin) age 30 ; B., Perry 
City Mo. Employed Jefferson Hotel, Herrin, 111. 
Waiter. Entrained April 29, '18, Camp Dix, N. J. 

FRANCIS, RAY, (Herrin) age 22 ; B., Render, Ky. 
Employed C. & C. Coal Co., Herrin, 111. Miner. En- 
trained Mar. 12, '18, Camp Taylor, Ky. 

FROSKI, SCROFINO, (Herrin) age 21 ; B., St. 
Merimonto, Italy. Employed C. B. & Q. Ry., Herrin, 
111. Entrained Sept. 6, '18, Camp Forrest, Lytle, 
Ga. 

FURLONG, CARL, (Marion) age 21 ; B., Crab 
Orchard, 111. Son of Frank Furlong, Marion, 111. 
Employed Scranton Big Muddy Coal Co., Pittsburg, 
111. Coal Mining. Entrained May 29, '18, Ft. 
Thomas, Ky. 

FULLER, GEORGE ACLE (Marion) age 25 ; B., 
Metropolis. 111. Employed Peabody Coal Co., Marion, 
III Coal Miner. Entrained June 27, '18, Camp 
Wheeler, Ga. 

FUTRIL, TROY, (Carterville) age 25; B., Way- 
side, 111. Employed Wayside, 111. Farming. En- 
trained July 19, '18, Camp Wheeler, Ga. 
FURLOW, TAYLOR, (Marion) age 25 ; B., Blalrs- 
ville, 111. Son of John Marshal Furlow, Marion, 111. 
Farmer. Entrained May 23, '18, Camp Jefferson 
Barracks, Mo. 

FUTRELL, LEWIS, (Herrin) age 21 ; B., Herrm, 
111. Employed Taylor No. 2, Herrin, 111. Mining. 
Entrained June 27, '18, Camp Wheeler, Ga. 

GATHERCOLE, WALTER, (Marissa) age 27 ; B., 
Sheridan, Iowa. Employed at Pond Creek Coal 
Co., Herrin, 111. Entrained Sept. 20, '17, Camp Tay- 
lor, Ky. 

GARREFFA, SAM, (Dewmaine) age 23 ; B., Cala- 
bria, Italy. Employed at Dewmaine, 111., Madison 
Coal Co. Mining. Entrained March 12, '18, Camp 
Taylor, Ky. 

GALLAGHER, JAMES, (Johnston City) age 26 ; 
B., England. Employed Johnston City, 111. Coal 
Miner. 

GARLAND, CHARLES THEODORE, (Johnston 
City) age 22 ; B., West Frankfort, 111. Son of 
Annie Gunter, Frankfort, Hts., 111. Employed 
Searles Coal Co., Johnston City, 111. Coal Miner. 
Entrained April 29, '18, Camp Dix, N. J. 



GALLAGHER, CHARLES OTIS, (Marion) age 26 ; 
B., Marion, 111. Son of Wm. Gallagher, Marion, 111. 
Employed Gallagher Lumber Co., Marion, 111. Lum- 
ber Salesman. Entrained Feb. 25, '18, Camp Tay- 
lor Ky. 

GALLAGHER, CLYDE EMERSON, (Marion) age 
24 ; Marion, 111. Son of Wm. Gallagher, Marion, 111. 
Employed at Gallagher's Lumber Yards, Marion, 
111. Entrained May 11, '18, Ft. Thomas, Ky. 

GALLEHER, JESSE WALTER, (Marion) age 25 ; 
B., Harrisburg, 111. Son of Robert Galleher, Mar- 
ion, 111. Employed W. M. Lough & Son. Concrete 
work. Entrained May 28, '18, Camp Shelby, Miss. 

GALLEHER, ANDREW WILSON, (Marion) age 
22 ; B., Harrisburg, 111. Son of R. W. Galleher, Mar- 
ion. Laborer. Entrained Feb. 25, '18, Camp Tay- 
lor, Ky. Discharged Aug. 3, '18, disability. 

GALLIMORE, HAL G., (Carterville) age 22 ; B., 
Carterville, 111. Son of Mr. and Mrs. J. L. Gall- 
imore. Lawyer. Enlisted Dec. 6, '17, St. Louis, 
Mo. Attached to 1st Regt., A. S. T. C. Discharged 
at Portland, Ore. Dec. 7, 1918. 

GARNER, CLARENCE P., (Carterville) age 25 ; 
B., Carterville, 111. Employed Carterville. 111. Shoe- 
Salesman. Entrained Oct. 4, '17, Camp Taylor, Ky. 

GALLIGAN, JAMES, (Herrin) age 27 ; B., Mur- 
physboro, 111. Employed W. P. Rend Coal Co. Min- 
ing . Entrained Sept. 4, '18, Camp Grant, 111. 
GAETINO, PETE, (Herrin) age 28, B., Rock- 
ville, Colo. Employed W. P. Rend Coal Co. Min- 
ing. Entrained Mar. 12, '18, Camp Taylor, Ky. 
GALYEAN, SAM, (Herrin) age 28, B., Carter- 
ville, 111. Employed C. & C. Coal Co. Mining. En- 
trained May 28, '18, Camp Shelby, Miss. 
GEMIARTI, VINCENZO, (Whiteash) age 23 ; B., 
Italy Son of Bendette Gemiarti. Johnston City, 
111 Employed at Big Muddy Coal & Fuel Co. Min- 
er. Entrained May 28, '18, Camp Shelby, Miss. 
GERALDI, ESIDORO, (Johnston City) age 24 ; B., 
Burgio Italy. Son of Francisco Geraldi, Bourgio, 
Italy Employed Johnston City Coal Co. Coal 
Mining. Entrained May 29, '18, Ft. Thomas, Ky. 

GEISTDORFE, JAKE, (Cambria) age 30 ; B., 
Pinckneyville, 111. Employed Cambria, 111. Mining. 
Entrained May 28, '18, Camp Shelby, Miss. 
GIOMETTO, ANTONIO, (Johnston City) age 29 ; 
B., Italy. Employed Johnston City, 111. Mining. En- 
trained May 9, '18, Camp Taylor, Ky. 
GIBBS, HERSCHEL, (Marion) age 24 ; B., Marion, 
111. Son of Levi Gibbs. Plumber Helper. En- 
listed April 2, '17, Jefferson Barracks, Mo. Over- 
seas May 2, '18. Attached Co. C. 15th Machine 
Gun Bn. 

GIBBS, ROSCOE, (Marion) age 27 : B., Marion, 
111. Son of Levi Gibbs, Marion, 111. Enlisted April 
2, '17, Jefferson Barracks, Mo. Overseas July 4, 
'18. Attached Cook, Co. A., 52nd Inf. 
GIOLA, ANDREA, (Colp) age 27 ; B., Burtagaral- 
fo, Lombardy, Italy. Employed Big Muddy Coai 
Co., Clifford, 111. Mining. Entrained May 29, '18, 
Ft. Thomas, Ky. 

GILPIN. CYRUS, (Crab Orchard) age 23 ; B., 
Paragould, Ark. Son of Joseph Gilpin, Jackson- 
ville, 111. Farming. Entrained Feb. 25, '18, Camp 
Taylor, Ky. 

GIBSON, HENRY, (Herrin) age 28 ; B., Birming- 
ham, Ala. Employed C. & C. Coal Co. Mining. En- 
trained April 29, '18, Camp Dix, N. J. 

GLASS, GARNETT, (Carterville) age 25; B., 
Princeton, Ky. Employed Big Muddy Coal & Iron 
Co. Mining. Entrained Mar. 12, '18, Camp Tay- 
lor, Ky. 

GLOYD, GEORGE DOLLAS, (West Frankfort) 
age 28 ; B., Effingham, 111. Son of Mary V. Gloyd, 
West Frankfort, 111. Employed at West Frank- 
fort, 111. Undertaker. Entrained May 29, '18, 
rejected, Ft. Thomas, Ky. 



233 










GLOVER, WILLIAM, H., (Marion) age 25 ; B., 
Marion, 111. Farming. Entrained Feb. 25, '18, Camp 
Taylor, Ky. 

GLASS, CHARLES (Carterville) age 28, Prince- 
ton, Ky. Employed Big Muddy Coal & Iron Co., 
Clifford, 111. Mining. Entrained June 27, '18, Camp 
Wheeler, Ga. 

GODDARD, HEBER, (Creal Springs) age 21 ; B., 
Creal Springs, 111. Son of G. R. Goddard. em- 
ployed C. & E. I. R. R. Telegraph Operator. 
Entrained May 23, '18, Jefferson Barracks, Mo. 

GOTHARD, WILLIAM A., (Clifford) age 24 ; B., 
Sale Creek, Tenn. Employed Big Muddy Coal & 
Iron Co., Clifford, 111. Entrained June 27, '18, Camp 
Wheeler, Ga. 

GOODRICH, MIKE JAS, (Energy) age 23 ; B., 
Pueblo, Colo. Employed Taylor No. 2, Herrin, 111. 
Mining. Entrained May 29, '18, American Lake, 
Wash. 

GOWER, AUD., (Marion) age 25 ; B., Illinois. Son 
of James Gower. Employed Peabody Coal Co. Coal 
Miner. Entrained May 29, '18, Ft. Thomas, Ky. 

GOODWIN, CLARENCE FRANK, (Creal Springs) 
age 25 ; B., Frankfort. S. Dakota. Son of Geo. D. 
Goodwin. Employed Peoria State Hospital. At- 
tendant. Entrained May 28, '18, Camp Shelby, Miss. 
GOODEN, ERVIE, (Clifford) age 20 ; B., Carter- 
ville, 111. Employed CliffoYd, 111. Mining. Entrain- 
ed May 28, '18, Camp Shelby, Miss. 

GOURLEY, HENRY E., (Herrin) age 30 ; B., 
Grandou, Mo. Employed Herrin, 111. Bartender. 
Entrained May 28, '18, Camp Shelby, Miss. 

COALBY. RAYMOND, (Herrin) age 21 ; Belleville, 
111. Employed Mining. Entrained June 14. '18. Val- 
pa,raiso, Ind. 

GORNATI, CHARLES, (Herrin) age 25 ; B., Bus- 
cate, Italy. Employed Madison Coal Corp. Mining. 
Entrained May 23, '18, Jefferson Barracks, Mo. 
GOALBY, RAYMOND, (Herrin) age 21 ; Belleville, 
lespie, 111. Employed St. Joseph, Mo. Baseball 
Player. Entrained May 28, '18, Camp Shelby, Miss. 
GOTHARD, WALTER, (Herrin) age 30 ; B., Sail 
Creek, Tenn. Employed C. & C. Coal Co.. Herrin, 
111. Mining. Entrained Aug. 27, '18, Camp Taylor, 
Ky. 

GOFARTH, DANIEL W., (Herrin) age 21 ; B., 
Chattanooga, Tenn. Employed St. Louis, Carter- 
ville Coal Co., Herrin, 111. Mining. Entrained June 
27, '18, Camp Wheeler, Ga. 

GRIZZELL, CLYDE ENLO, (Herrin) age 21 ; B., 
Ava, 111. Employed Herrin, 111. Retail Clerk. En- 
trained Oct. 21, '18, Camp Wheeler, Ga. 

GRIMES, HUGH, (Herrin) age 26 ; B., Wolf Creek, 
111. Employed Sunnyside Coal Co. Weighman. En- 
listed Nov. 6, '17, St. Louis, Mo. 

GREEN, EARNEST, (Herrin) age 24 ; B., Island 
Sta., Ky. Employed Southern Coal & Mining Co., 
Belleville, 111. Mining. Entrained June 27, '18, Camp 
Wheeler, Ga. 

GRIFFIN, NATHAN ORLEY, (New Denison) age 
23 ; B., Harrisburg, 111. Son of M. P. Griffin, New 
Denison, 111. Farming. Entrained July 20, '18, 
Camp Wheeler, Ga. 

GREGORY, JESSE, (Colp) age 26 ; B., Tyro, Miss. 
Employed at Madison Coal Corp. Mining Entrain- 
ed Oct. 18, '18, Norfolk, Va. 

GRATEHOUSE, GEORGE, (Clifford) age 22 B., 
Clifford, 111. Employed Clifford, 111. Farming. ' En- 
trained April 29, '18, Camp Dix, N. J. 

GREATHOUSE, MOODY, (Colp) age 30 ; B , Car- 
terville, 111. Employed State Prison, Menard, 111. 
Convict. Entrained June 27, '18, Camp Wheeler, Ga. 
GRANT, U. S., (Marion) age 21 ; B., Marion, 111. 
Son of Juda L. Grant, Marion, 111. Farming En- 
trained June 27, '18, Camp Wheeler, Ga. 

GRAVES, ARVIL, (Marion) age 24 ; B., Saline 
.1 County, 111. Son of William Graves. Farming. En- 
trained June 27, '18, Camp Wheeler, Ga. 



GROVES, WILLIAM CLYDE (Marion) age 28 ; 
B., Marion, 111. Son of Jonathan Groves, Marion, 
111. Employed at St. Louis and Fallen Coal Co. 
Coal Miner. Entrained July 30, '18, Syracuse Re- 
cruit Camp, Syracuse, N. Y. Rejected. 

GRANT, WENDELL LEON, (Marion) age 24 ; B., 
Williamson County, 111. Son of E. L. Grant, Marion, 
111. Employed Marion City School. Teacher-Farm- 
ing. Entrained May 20, '18, Camp Sheridan, Ala. 

GRANT, SGT. HARVEY LESTER, (Johnston City) 
age 19 ; B., Johnston City, 111. Son of W. C. Grant, 
Johnston City, 111. Miner. Enlisted Apr. 25, '18, 
at Jefferson Barracks, Mo. Discharged at Camp 
Dodge, la., Mar. 5, '19. 

GRAVES, THOMAS, (Marion) age 21 ; B., Saline 
Co. Son of William Graves, Marion, 111. Farmer. 
Entrained June 27, '18, Camp Wheeler, Ga. 

GRACYNANI, CARLO, (Herrin) age 21 ; B., Mes- 
ero, Italy. Employed Sunnyside Coal Co. Miner. 
Entrained March 12, '18, Camp Taylor, Ky. 

GREEN, FINIS CLARENCE, (Spillertown) age 
26 ; B., Roaring Springs, Ky. Son of William 1). 
Green, Spillertown, 111. Employed at Big Muddy Fuel 
Co. Coal Miner. Entrained May 29, '18, Ft. Thom- 
as, Ky. 

GREENEY, CHARLEY, (Thompsonville) age 21 ; 
B., Murphysboro, 111. Farming. Entrained May 29, 
'18, Ft. Thomas, Ky. 

GRANT, BEN, (Pittsburg) age 25 ; B., Williamson 
Co., 111. Son of Ulysses Grant, Pittsburg, 111. 
Farming. Entrained Sept. 6, '18, Camp Forrest, 
Lytle, Ga. 

GRIFFITH, JAMES WM., (Carterville) age 27 ; B., 
Carterville, 111. Employed Madison Coal Co.. Colp, 
111. Mining. Entrained May 29, '18, Ft. Thomas, 
Ky. 

GURLEY, ANDREW, (Marion) age 28 ; B., Union 
County, 111. Son of Dan and Lizzie Gurley. Married 
Myrtle Davidson. Coal Miner. Entrained May 23, 
'18, Marion, 111. Attached to Bat. A.. 66th Light 
Field Art. Discharged Camp Grant, 111., Dec. 23. 
'18. 

GULLEDGE, GEORGE BURTON, (Johnston City) 
age 21 ; B., Saline County, 111. Employed Johnston 
City Coal Co. Mining. Entrained Oct. 4, '17, Camp 
Taylor, Ky. 

GUNN, DONALD CUSHMAN, (Marion) age 18 ; B., 
Farmer City, 111. Son of John I. Gunn, Marion, 111. 
Entrained Oct. 15, '18. University of 111., S. A. T. 
C. 

GULLEY, BARNEY (Marion) age 21 ; B., William- 
son County, 111. Son of Mrs. W. A. Harris, Marion, 
111. Employed Harris Garage, Marion, 111. Garage 
Helper. Entrained May 29, '18, Ft. Thomas, Ky. 

GULLEY, JAMES (Carterville) age 21; B., Cai - 
terville, 111. Farming. Entrained June 27, '18, Camp 
Wheeler, Ga. 

GULLEY, JOE, (Carterville) age 24; B., Carter- 
ville, III. Farming. Entrained June 27, '18, Camp 
Wheeler, Ga. 

GUIDA, ONFRIO, (Herrin) age 22 ; B., Gianceo- 
nia, Italy. Employed Carterville. Herrin Coal Co., 
Herrin, 111. Entrained June 27, '18, Camp Wheeler, 
Ga. 

GUALDONI, CAESAR, (Herrin) age 29 ; B., Crig- 
ginio, Italy. Employed Herrin, 111. Saloonkeeper. 
Entrained Sept. 20, '17, Camp Taylor, Ky. 

GUALDONI, CHARLES, Herrin). Entrained June 
'27, '18, Camp Wheeler, Ga. 

GUYE, RAYMOND, (Crab Orchard) age 22 ; B., 
Crab Orchard, 111. Son of M. A. Bell, Stonefort, 
III Employed at Peoria State Hospital. Entrained 
Feb. 25, '18, Camp Taylor, Ky. 

HAUNYAN, JOHN, (Bush) age 24 ; B., Lovejoy, 
111. Employed at Western Coal & Mining Co. Min- 
ing. Entrained May 28, '18, Camp Shelby, Miss. 



E2:i I 

^1 



234 




HAYES, GEORGE W., (Thompsonville) age 29; B., 
Corinth, 111. Farming. Entrained Sept. 21, '17, Camp 
Taylor, Ky. Wounded in action. 

HARTWELL, EDD., (Pittsburg, 111.) age 26 ; B., 
Marion, 111. Employed Pittsburg Coal Co., Pitts- 
burg, 111. Coal Mining. Entrained Aug. 14, '18, 
Lewis Institute, Chicago, 111. In Class 2. Inducted 
at his request. 

HAYTON, HERMAN H., (Carbondale) age 28; B., 
Carbondale, 111. Employed Carbondale, 111. Farm- 
ing. Entrained June 21, '18, Camp Wheeler, Ga. 

HATFIELD, GLENN, (Whiteash) age 23 ; B., Lin- 
ton, Ind. Employed Johnston City Washed Coal Co., 
Whiteash. 111. Coal Miner. Entrained April 29, '18, 
Camp Dix, N. J. 

HARRIS, JOHN WESLEY, (Crab Orchard) age 27 ; 
B., Carrier Mills, 111. Farming. Entrained Sept. 
21, '17, Camp Taylor, Ky. Discharged after six 
weeks for disability. 

HASTINGS, FOUNTAIN M., (Johnston City) age 
25 ; B., Cobden, 111. Employed Lake Creek Coal 
Co., Johnston City. 111. Coal Miner. Entrained 
Sept. 21, '17, Camp Taylor, Ky. 

HAMPTON, BERT EARL, (Johnston City) age 
22 ; B., Johnston City, 111. Son of Lizzie Hampton, 
Johnston City, 111. Coal Miner. Enlisted Oct. 20, 
'17, Jefferson Barracks, Mo. 

HACKLEY, FRANK DEE, (Johnston City) age 26 ; 
B., Carterville, 111. Employed Searls Coal Co., John- 
ston City, 111. Coal Miner. Entrained June 27, '18, 
Camp Wheeler, Ga. 

HARRIS, JOHN LOGAN, (Johnston City) age 28 ; 
B., Williamson County, 111. Employed Louis Morri 
Saloon, Herrin, 111. Bartender. Entrained April 
29, '18, Camp Dix, N. J. 

HALL, DORRIS MARTIN. (Johnston City) age 21 ; 
B., Sebra, Ky. Employed Johnston City Coal Co. 
Mining. Entrained May 28, '18, Camp Shelby, Miss. 

HALL, FRANK HARLAND, (Johnston City) age 
24 ; B., Sebree, Ky. Employed Johnston City, 111. 
Coal Miner. Enlisted June 5, '18, Navy, St. Louis, 
Mo. 

HANDEGAN, ARTHUR, (Johnston City) age 24 ; 
B., Roanoke, 111. Employed Searls Coal Co., Johns- 
ton City, 111. Coal Mining. Entrained Sept. 6, '18, 
Camp Forrest Lytle, Ga. 

HAMPTON, JESSE ALLEN, (Johnston City) age 
22; B.. Williamson County, 111. Son of Lizzie Hamp- 
ton, Johnston City, 111. Employed Consolidated Coal 
Co., Johnston City, 111. Coal Miner. Entrained May 
28, '18, Camp Shelby, Miss. 

HARMAN, JEFF W., (Johnston City) age 21 ; B., 
Sebree, Ky. Son of Fannie Harman, Johnston City, 
111. Employed Jacksonville, State Hospital. Attend- 
ant. Entrained May 28, '18, Camp Shelby, Miss. 

HANSFORD, WILLIE, (Johnston City) age 24 ; B., 
Johnston City, 111. Employed Williamson Co. Coal 
Co. Mining. Entrained June 27, '18, Camp Wheel- 
er, Ga. 

HAWKINS, FRED, (Marion) age 30 ; B., Wolf 
Creek, 111. Employed Peabody Coal Co. Coal Min- 
er. Enlisted in army, Jan. '18, 334 Field Art., Camp 
Pike, Ark. 

HAMPTON. IVAN H., (Marion) age 30 ; B., Mur- 
physboro, 111. Son of Mary A. Hampton, Marion, 111. 
Salesman. Entrained Sept. 6, '17, Camp Taylor, Ky. 

HARRIS, HARRY, (Marion) age 25 ; B., Creal 
Springs. Son of W. T. Harris, Marion, 111. Sales- 
man. East St. Louis, 111. Entrained June 27, '18, 
Camp Wheeler, Ga. 

HASTINGS, CARL (Marion) ; B., Marion, III. Son 
of Will Hastings, Marion, 111. Employed Scranton 
Big Muddy Coal Co. Coal Miner. Entrained Sept. 
6, '18, Camp Forrest, Lytle, Ga. 

HARTWELL, CORP. CASEY, (Marion) age 19 ; 

B., Marion, 111. Son of Louise Hartwell, Marion, III. 

Employed Davey Tree Expert Co. Tree Surgery. 

Entrained Nov. 3, '18, Camp Polk, Raleigh, N. C. 



HALE, ALLEN J., (Carterville) age 23; B., Ma- 
kanda, 111. Farmer. Entrained March 11, '18, Camp 
Taylor, Ky. 

HARRISON, EDGAR EUGENE, (Marion) age 30 ; 
B., Ashley, 111. Salesman. Entrained May 28, '18, 
Camp Shelby, Miss. 

HARTWELL, SEVILLE GORDON, (Marion) age 
24 ; B., Marion, 111. Son of W. O. Hartwell, Marion, 
111. Employed Peabody Coal Co., Marion. 111. Coal 
Miner. Entrained Feb. 25, '18, Camp Taylor, Ky. 

HOLLIS, CLAUDE, (Marion) age 26 ; B., Indiana. 
Son of L. B. Hollis. Farming. Entrained June 27, 
'18, Camp Wheeler, Ga, 

HALL, VERNON EVERETT, (Marion) age 21 
B., West End, 111. Son of Robert L. Hall, Marion, 
111. Employed Lansing, Mich. Railroading. En- 
trained June 1, '18, Camp Dix, N. J. 

HAMLET, ELMER GUY, (Marion) age 23 ; B., 
Creal Springs, III. Son of Louisa Hamlet. Marion, 
111. Farmer. Entrained Feb. 25, '18, Camp Taylor, 

HAILEY, PAUL C., (Marion) age 21 ; B., Tunnell 
Hill, 111. Son of J. T. and Annie Hailey. Fireman. 
Enlisted in Naval Service June 3, "18, Mt. Vernon, 
111. Overseas Feb. 3, '19, returned March 11, '19 
with 7563 soldiers. Made second trip March 24, 
'19. Present address TI. S. S. Nausemond, care 
Postmaster, New York City. 

HAMPTON, CHARLES T., (Carterville) age 27 ; 
B., Carterville, 111. Son of Mr. and Mrs. R. H. H. 
Hampton, Carterville. Illinois. Employed Druggist 
Entrained Mar. 12, '18. Overseas Sept. '18. At- 
tached 335th Company. Field Hospital. Discharged 
June 1, '19, Camp Grant, 111. 

HADFIELD. GEO. H., (Carterville) age 23 ; B., 
Cartel villp. 111. Employed Federal Coal Co., Car- 
terville, in. Mining. Entrained May 29, '18. 

HARSLEY, NOAH M., (Carterville) age 21 ; B., 
New Bnvrsidp. II.. Employed Hafer Coal Co., En- 
ergy. 111. Miner. Entrained May 28, '18, Camp 
Shelby, Miss. 

HAYTON, MAURICE, (Carterville) age 26 : B., 
Carterville, 111. Employed Hayton Bros.. Carter- 
ville. 111. Chauffeur. Entrained May 23, '18, Jeff- 
erson Barracks, Mo. 

HARRIS, IVAN, (Carterville) age 26 ; B., Alto 
Pass Til. Employed Madison Coal Corp.. Dewmaine. 
111. Mining. Entrained June 27, '18, Camp Wheeler, 
Ga. 

HADFIELD. GEORGE HENRY. (Carterville) age 
23 : B., Carterville. 111. Employed Federal Coal Co. 
Mining. Enlisted May 29, '18, Boston, Mass. 

HADFIELD, FRANK ANDREW. (Carterville) age 
21 ; B.. Carterville. 111. Employed Electrician. En- 
listed St. Louis, Mo. 

HARPER. MARTIN. (Herrin) aee 21 ; B., Nelson, 
Ky. Employed Chicago. Carterville Coal Co. Min- 
ing. Entrained April 29, '18, Camp Dix, N. J. 

HAUGHEE. R^LPH. (Herrin) age 29: B., Lead- 
ford, 111. Employed Taylor Coal Co. Mining. En- 
trained Sept. 6, '18, Camp Custer, Battle Creek. 
Mich. 

HASSLER, JOSEPH, (Herrin) age 29 : B., St. 
Louis, Mo. Employed Athletic Tea Co., Herrin. 111. 
Salesman. Entrained April 29. '18. Camp Dix. N. J. 
HADFIELD. HARRY. (Carterville) age 21 ; B., 
Carterville, 111. Employed Federal Coal Co., Car- 
terville. Mining. Entrained June 27, '18, Camp 
Wheeler, Ga. 

HARRIS, EARL, (Hurst) age 24 ; B.. Halliday- 
boro. 111. Employed Western Coal & Mining LO., 
Bush. 111. Mining. Entrained Aug. 12, '18, Camp 
Wheeler, Macon, Ga. 

HASTIE, WILLIAM, (Carterville) age 27; B., Car- 
terville, 111. Employed Federal Coal Co., Carter- 
ville, 111. Mining. Entrained Sept. 20, '17, Camp 
Taylor, Ky. 



235 




HARRIS, SETH, (Carterville) age 25 ; B., Carter- 
ville, 111. Employed Taylor Coal Co., Carterville, 
111. Mining. Entrained May 28, '18, Camp Shelby, 
.Miss. 

HARRIS, HOMER, (Herrin) age 27 ; B.. luka, 111. 
Employed C. E. Owens Jewelry Store. Watchmak- 
er. Enlisted July 29, '17, St. Louis, Mo. 

HARRIS, LEO, (Herrin) age 25 ; B., Herrin, 111. 
Employed Big Muddy Coal & Iron Co., Herrin, 111. 
Entrained May 28, '18, Camp Shelby, Miss. 

HART, DAVE, (Herrin) age 27 ; B., Gerard, 111. 
Employed W. P. Rend Coal Co., Weaver, 111. Min- 
ing. Entrained Mar. 12, '18, Camp Taylor, Ky. 

HAOLER. HARRY, (Cambria) age 24 ; B., Cam- 
bria, 111. Employed Carterville Big Muddy Coal Co. 
Mining. Enlisted April 10, '18, St. Louis, Mo. 
HEIGLER, ED., (Colp) age 23 ; B., N. C. Em- 
ployed at Colp, 111. Mining. Entrained Aug. 2, '18. 
Camp Grant, 111. 

HENDERSON, ORA, (Energy) age 24 ; B.. Lake 
Creek, 111. Employed Taylor Coal Co., Herrin. 
111. Coal Miner. Entrained May 28, '18, Camp 
Shelby, Miss. 

HEXDRICKSOX, ALBERT, (Hudgens) age 30 ; 
B., New York City, N. V. Employed at Marion, 111. 
C. & E. I. R. R. Section Hand. Entrained June 
27, '18, Camp Wheeler, Ga. 

HEWELETT, FRANK, (Johnston City) age 24 ; B., 
Blairsville, 111. Employed Taylor Coal Co., Herrin, 
111. Mining. Entrained June 27, '18, Camp Wheel- 
er, Ga. 

HEADLEY, JAY BENNETT, (Marion) age 27 ; B., 
Angolo, Ind. Son of E. E. Headley, Marion, 111. Em- 
ployed Blackburn Coal Mines. Steam Shovel En- 
gineer. Entrained June 27, "18, Camp Wheeler, Ga. 

HESTER, EVERETT, (Marion) age 23, B., Car- 
terville, 111. Son of Sam Hester, Marion, 111. Em- 
ployed C. W. & F. Mining Co. Coal Miner. En- 
trained Sept. 21, '17, Camp Taylor, Ky. 

HERRING, MELVIN, (Herrin) age 23 ; B., Ya- 
landy. Ala. Employed Pond Creek Coal Co., Her- 
rin, 111. Mining. Entrained Sept. 9, '17, Camp Tay- 
lor, Ky. 

HERRING, ARTIE, (Creal Springs) age 23 ; B., 
Creal Springs, 111. Farming. Entrained June 27, 
'18, Camp Wheeler, Ga. (Rejected.) 

HEAFER, JAMES E., (Clifford) age 21 ; B., Knox 
Co., Ky. Son of Jacob Heafer. Miner. Clifford, 
111. Entrained Sept. 19, '17. Overseas May 1, '18. 
Attached to Co. B., 59th Inf. in France. 

HEATON, DAVID C., (Herrin) age 25 ; B., New 
Burnsides. 111. Employed Herrin, III. Farming. En- 
trained May 27, '18, Camp Shelby, Miss. 

HERRING, ROBERT, (Herrin) age 26 ; B., Bir- 
mingham, Ala. Employed Pond Creek Coal Co. En- 
trained May 28, '18, Camp Shelby, Miss. 

HILL, GILBERT, (Hudgens) age 26 ; B., Hudgens, 
111. Son of Susan Menuse, Marion, 111. Farming. 
Entrained Sept. 21, '17, Camp Taylor, Ky. 
HILLIARD, JOSEPH PAUL, (Johnston City) age 
21 ; B., Johnston City, 111. Employed Scranton Big 
Muddy Coal Co. Mining. Entrained May 23, '18, 
Jefferson Barracks, Mo. 

HILL, WILLIAM ANZI, (Marion) age 21 ; B., Crab 
Orchard, 111. Son of Eda Hill. Marion, 111. Em- 
ployed Wells Fargo Express Co., Marion, 111. Ex- 
press Messenger. Entrained June 27, '18, Camp 
Wheeler, Ga. 

HILL. GEORGE B., (Herrin) age 21 ; B., DeSoto, 
111. Employed Herrin. 111. Farming. Entrained 
Sept. 20, '17, Camp Taylor, Ky. 

HINES, LOREN, (Herrin) age 22 ; B., Elizabeth- 
town, 111. Employed Pond Creek Coal Co., Herrin, 
111. Mining. Entrained May 28, '18, Camp Shelby, 
Miss. 



HIGGINS, CAMPBELL, (Herrin) age 29 ; B., 

Cleveland, Tenn. Employed C. & C. Coal Co., 

Herrin, 111. Miner. Enlisted June 27, '17, Camp 
Taylor, Ky. 

HILLER, JOHN, (Herrin) age 23 ; B., Makanda, 
111. Employed Big Muddy Coal Co. Mining. En- 
trained May 23, '18, Jefferson Barracks, Mo. 

HOBBS, LEE, (Clifford) age 22; B., New Burn- 
sides, 111. Employed Madison Coal Co., Colp, 111. 
Top Laborer. Entrained June 27, '18, Camp 
Wheeler, Ga. 

HOOFER JAMES ELBERT, (Clifford) age 21 ; B., 
Gray, Ky. Employed Big Muddy Coal & Iron Co. 
Mining. Entrained Sept. 20, '17, Camp Taylor,' Ky. 

HOGG, GEORGE, (Colp) age 22 ; B., Colp, 111. Em- 
ployed at Madison Coal Co., Colp, 111. Mining. En- 
trained May 28, '28, Camp Shelby, Miss. 

HOLT, CLARENCE, (Johnston City) age 23 ; B., 
Macomb, Mo. Employed Searls Coal Co., Johnston 
City, 111. Coal Mining. Entrained June 27, '18, Camp 
Wheeler, Ga. 

HOGAN, GEORGE MONROE (Marion) age 26 ; B., 
Franklin Co., Ill Son of Emery Hogan, Marion, 111. 
Livery Stable Man. Entrained June 27, '18, Camp 
Wheeler, Ga. 

HOWERTON, BILL. (Marion) age 25 ; B., Creal 
Springs, 111. Farming. Entrained. Feb. 25, '18, 
Camp Taylor, Ky. 

HOUSE, HOWARD S., (Marion) age 21 ; B., BrooK- 
port, 111. Son of William and Josephine House. Em- 
ployed as Machinist. Marion, 111. Enlisted Oct. 15, 
'18 at Training School, Chicago. Attached to Co. 
I., Section B. S. A. T. C. Discharged Mar. 22, '19, 
at Chicago, 111. 

HOLLAND, OSCAR, (Marion) age 29 ; B., Cor- 
inth Township, Williamson County. Son of Roily and 
Mary Holland. Civil Engineer. Entrained April 29, 
'18. Overseas May 22, '18. Engaged in St. Mihiel, 
Meuse-Argonne. In action 70 days on Western 
front. Slightly gassed. Attached to Hdq. Co., 
303rd Engrs. 1st Class Private. Discharged, 
Camp Grant, 111., June 15, '19. 

HOLMES, DOWE SHERIDAN, (Creal Springs) age 
25 ; B., Creal Springs, 111. Son of Thomas J. Holmes. 
Farming. Entrained May 23, '18, Jefferson Bar- 
racks, Mo. (Rejected.) 

HOLMES, ELVIS, (Creal Springs) age 24 ; B., 
Creal Springs, 111. Son of Emma Holmes, Marion, 
111. Married Mae Smith, School Teacher. 

HOOVER, GROVER. (Carterville) age 26 ; B., 
Carterville, 111. Employed Hemlock Coal Co., Her- 
rin, 111. Mining. Entrained May 28, '18, Camp 
Shelby, Miss. 

HOLMES, EDWARD C., (Carterville) age 24 ; B., 
Prague, Okla. Employed Carterville, III. Garage 
owner and mechanic. Entrained May 16, '18, Lewis 
Institute, Chicago, 111. 

HODGE, SAMUEL. (Herrin) age 24 ; B., Nash- 
ville, 111. Employed C. & C. Coal Co., Herrin, 111. 
Mining. Entrained June 27, '18, Camp Wheeler, Ga. 

HOPKINS, CLAUDE, (Hurst) age 24 ; B., Wolf 
Creek, 111. Employed Western Coal & Mining Co., 
Bush, 111. Mining. Entrained June 27, '18, Camp 
Wheeler, Ga. 

HOPE, SCHRADER McKINLEY. (Carterville) age 
24 ; B., Carterville, 111. Employed T. B. Outhouse 
& Co., Murphysboro, 111. String Battery Specialty 
Man. Entrained April 9, '18, Bradley Institute, Pe- 
oria, 111. 

HOPKINS, LAWRENCE, (Herrin) age 21 ; B., Wm. 
Co., Illinois. Employed Taylor Coal Co. Miner. 
Entrained June 27, '18, Camp Wheeler, Ga. 
HUNT. THOMAS, (Energy) age 25 ; B., McLeans- 
boro. 111. Son of G. M. Hunt, Energy, 111. Employed 
at Taylor Coal Co., Herrin, 111. Entrained May 28, 
'18, Camp Shelby, Miss. 

HUDGENS, OSCAR, (Dewmaine) age 29 : B., Cor- 
val, Tenn. Employed Madison Coal Co. Mining En- 
trained Aug. 2, '18, Camp Grant, 111. 



\ 




HUBBARD, WILLIAM H., (Makanda) age 25 ; B., 
Makanda, 111. Employed Makanda. Farming. En- 
trained April 29, '18, Camp Dix, N. J. 
HUNT, JACE, (Energy) age 22 ; B., McLeansboro, 
111. Son of George Hunt, Energy, 111. Employed 
at Taylor Mining Co., Herrin, 111. Coal Miner. En- 
trained May 28, '18, Camp Wheeler, Ga. 
HUBBARD, JOHN R., (Makanda) age 22 ; B., Ma- 
kanda, 111. Employed .Makanda, 111. Farming. En- 
trained June 27, '18, Camp Wheeler, Ga. 
HUBBS, VALLIE L., (Hurst) age 24 ; B., Bush, 
111. Employed Mo. Pacific R. R. Co., Bush, 111. Boil- 
ermaker. Entrained June 27, '18, Camp Wheeler, 
Ga. 

HUNTER, GEORGE, (Marion) age 21 ; B., Fife, 
Scotland. Coal Miner. Tilden, 111. Entrained Sept. 
21, '17, Camp Taylor, Ky. 

HUNTLEY, JOHN BENJAMIN, (Johnston City) 
age 24 ; B., St. Johns, 111. Son of Mary Hedley, 
Johnston City, 111. Employed Consolidated Coal 
Co., Johnston City, 111. Mule Driver. Entrained 
May 28, '18, Camp Shelby, Miss. 

HUGHES, ZACH R, (Herrin) age 23 ; B., Jellico, 
Tenn. Employed Standard Oil Co. Teamster. En- 
trained April 9. '18, Bradley Institute, Peoria, III. 

HUTTON. GILBERT N., (Herrin) age 30 ; B., 
Hurlford Agishure, Scotland. Employed W. P. Rend 
Coal Co., Weaver, 111. Mining. Entrained May 23, 
'18, Jefferson Barracks, Mo. 

HUDGENS, RAYMOND R., (Herrin) age 28 ; B., 
Johnston City. Son of William and Harriet Hudgens. 
Employed as farmer. Entrained June 26, '18, at 
Monticello, 111. Overseas Oct. 5, '18. Attached to 
Co. C., 307th Inf. Discharged May 9, '19 at Camp 
Grant, 111. With the Reserves at Raucourt Huge- 
court and Haraucourt in 77th Div. 

HUNNICUTT, HOMER VIRGIL, (Herrin) age 23 ; 
B., Cottage Home, 111. Employed St. Louis, Carter- 
ville Coal Co., Herrin, 111. Mining. Deceased. 
HUDGENS, JESSE, (Herrin) age 26 ; B., Gore- 
ville, 111. Employed Yuill Bros. Store. Butcher. 
Entrained May 28, '18, Camp Shelby, Miss. 
HURLEY, ELMER, (Carterville) age 28 ; B., 
Princeton, Ky. Employed Hater Coal Co. Mining. 
Entrained April 29, '18, Camp Dix, N. J. 
HUFF, JOE, (Carterville) age 28; B., Carterville, 
111. Farming. Entrained April 29, '18, Camp Dix, 
N. J. 

HUDSON, JOHN A., (Marion) age 31 ; B., William- 
son County, 111. Pharmacist. Enlisted Nov. 15, '17, 
in Navy. Great Lakes, 111. 

HUDGENS, JOHN PAUL, (Marion) age 21 ; B., 
Creal Springs, 111. Son of A. J. Hudgens, Marion, 
111. Enlisted June 18, '18, U. S. Naval Reserve 
Force. 

HUGHES, WALTER BERTRAM, (Marion) age 30 ; 
B., Castle Rock, Colo. High School Instructor. En- 
trained Aug. 14, '18, Kvanston, 111. 
HUGHES, CHARLES MARSHALL, (Marion) age 

26; B., Illinois. Chauffeur. Entrained May 23, '18, 
Jefferson Barracks, Mo. Honorably Discharged. 

HUFFSTUTTER, ROY, (Herrin) age 22 ; B., Mc- 
Leansboro, 111. Employed C. & C. Coal Co., Her- 
rin, 111. Mining. Entrained June 27, '18, Camp 
Wheeler, Macon, Ga. 

INMAN, OTTO HOMER, (Johnston City) age 26 ; 
B., Harrisburg, 111. Painter. Enlisted June 2, '17. 

INGRAM, LEO C., (Herrin) age 21 ; B., Render, 
Ky. Employed C. & C. Coal Company. Mining. En- 
trained May 28, '18, Camp Shelby, Miss. 

ING, PAUL ALFRED, (Marion) age 24 ; B., 
Thompsonville, 111. Son of George Ing, Marion, 111. 
Employed Marion & Eastern R. R. Fireman. En- 
trained April 29, '18, Camp Dix, N. J. 

ISSLER, WILLIAM, (Marion) age 21 ; B., William- 
son County, 111. Son of John Issler, Marion. 111. 
Employed Peabody Coal Co. Coal Miner. Entrain- 
ed Sept. 6, '18, Camp Forrest, Lytle, Ga. 



JACOBS, WILL (Marion) age 21 ; B., Laurence- 
burg, Tenn. Employed Peabody Coal Co., Coal Min- 
ing. Entrained Sept. 3, '18, Camp Grant, 111. 
JAKUBONI, STANLEY, (Johnston City) age 23 ; 
B., Russia. Employed Johnston City Coal Co. Coal 
Miner. Entrained June 27, '18, Camp Wheeler, Ga. 
Rejected at Camp. 

JAMES, LEONARD, (Hurst) age 24 ; B., Carter- 
ville, 111. Son of T. J. James. Railroad Switchman. 
Entrained Sept. 19, 1917. Attached to Co. A., 
325th M. G. Bn. Discharged at Camp Taylor, Ky., 
Feb. 4, 1918. 

JACOBSON, RUFUS RALPH, (Illmo, Mo.) age 28; 
B., Belle River, 111. Employed Mo. Pacific Rail- 
way, Bush, 111. Clerk. Entrained Sept. 20, '17, 
Camp Taylor, Ky. 

JAIMET, GUSTIVE CHARLEY, (Bush) B., Grand 
Chain, 111. Employed on Mo. Pacific Railroad, Bush, 
111. Laborer. Entrained May 28, '18, Camp Shelby, 
Miss. 

JASKIAVEZ, JOHN, (Herrin) age 30 ; B. Polanu, 
Russia. Employed C. & C. Coal Co., Herrin, 111. 
Miner. Entrained Sept. 20, '18, Camp Taylor, Ky. 

JAMES, LEE, (Herrin) age 24 ; B., Crainville, 111. 
Employed Pond Creek Coal Co., Herrin, 111. Miner. 
Entrained June 27, '18, Camp Wheeler, Ga. 

JETER, CLOID, (Marion) age 23 ; B., Marion, 111. 
Employed Peabody Coal Co. Coal Miner. En- 
trained June 27, '18, Camp Wheeler, Ga. Rejected. 

JENKINS, CHARLES CALVIN, (Marion) age 29 ; 
B., Rosiclare, 111. Son of Sarah Smith Jenkins. Car- 
penter. Entrained June 27, '18. Attached Co. E., 
106th Military Police. Discharged, Camp Wheeler, 
Ga., March 6, '19. 

JENKINS, CHARLES W., (Crab Orchard) age 27; 
B., Corinth, 111. Son of Electa Jenkins, Pittsburg, 
111. Farmer. Entrained Feb. 25, '18, Camp Tay- 
lor, Ky. 

JENKINS, HESTER H., (Pittsburg) are 25 B , 
Corinth, 111. Son of Electa Jenkins, Pittsburg 111 
Farming. Entrained June 27, '18, Camp Wheeler, 
Ga. 

JENKINS, HESTER H., (Plttsbuig) age 25; B, 
Corinth, 111. Son of Electa Jenkins, Pittsburg 111 
Farming. Entrained June 27, '18, Camp Wheeler 
Ga. 

JENKINS, WINFIELD S., (Crab Orchard) age 
30 ; B., Corinth, 111. Son of Electa Jenkins, Pitts- 
burg. 111. Farming. Entrained June 27, '18, Camp 
Wheeler, Ga. 

JENDERZEZAUSKI, PETE (Clifford) age 27 ; B., 
Capnowo, Poland. Employed at Big Muddy Coal 
Co. Miner. Entrained May 28, '18, Camp Shelby, 
Miss. 

JOHNSON, WILLIAM MOSS, (Marion) age 19; B., 
Villa Ridge, 111. Son of Holleck Johnson, Mounds, 
111. Employed Whittington Wallace Drug Co. Clerk. 
Entrained Oct. 15, '18, University of 111., S. A. T. 

JONES, DAVID RICHARD, (Johnston City) age 
30 ; B., Coalton, Ohio. Employed Johnston City, 
111. Coal Miner. Entrained Sept. 21, '17, Camp 
Taylor, Ky. Discharged Oct. 15, '17. 

JONES, SAMUEL E., (Goreville) age 23 ; B., Jack- 
son County, 111. Son of Julia Jones, Goreville, 111. 
Married Mattie E. Curry. Farmer. Entrained Oct. 
5, 1917. Overseas May 11, 'IS. Engaged Ypres Sa- 
lient, Bellecourt, Hindenburg line, Voorezello, Mt. 
Kennel, Vaux. and Vudigny. Also Selle River. At- 
tached to Hdqrs. Co., 115th M. G. Bn. Discharg- 
ed at Camp Grant, 111., April 10, 1919. 

JOHNSTON, HENRY, (Johnston City) age 22 ; B.. 
Rosina, Ky. Employed Searls Coal Co. Coal Min- 
er. Entrained June 27, '18, Camp Wheeler, Ga, 

JOHNS, ALFRED (Clifford) age 26 ; B., Pitts- 
burg, Ky. Employed at Big Muddy Coal & Iron Co., 
Clifford, 111. Entrained May 28, '18, Camp Shelby, 
Miss. 



237 




JONES, GEORGE, (Crab Orchard) age 26; B., 
Crab Orchard, 111. Son of P. Jones. Crab Orchard, 
111. Farming. Entrained June 27, '18, Camp Wheel- 
er, Ga. 

JONES, FLOID, (Goreville) age 25 ; B., Carbon- 
dale, 111. Son of Julia Jones, Goreville, 111. Em- 
ployed Farmer. Entrained June 27, '18, Camp 
Wheeler, Ga. 

JONIKS, LOUIE, (Herrin) age 25 ; B., Tuke. Rus- 
sia. Employed as Miner at W. P. Rend Coal Co., 
Weaver, 111. Entrained March 1918 for Camp Tay- 
lor, Ky. 

JONES, ARTHUR H., (Csrterville) age 29 ; B., 
Ooreville, 111. Farmer. Entrained Sept. 20, '17, 
Camp Taylor, Ky. 

JOHNSTON, ORAS, (Herrin) age 30 ; B., Mc- 
Leansboro, 111. Employed W. P. Rend Coal Co. 
Mining. Entrained Mar. 12, '18, Camp Taylor, Ky. 
JONES, ELBERT (Marion) age 21 ; B., New Den- 
ison. 111. Carpenter. Entrained Sept. 21, '17, Camp 
Taylor, Ky. 

JOHNS, ROSCOE, (Marion) age 23 ; B., Creal 
Springs, 111. Son of T. J. Johns, Creal Springs, 111. 
Farming. Entrained May 28, '18, Camp Shelby, 
Miss, Discharged Nov. 15, '18, Disability. 

JONES, GUY, (Marion) age 27 ; B., Bellrive, 111. 
Son of Minerva Jones, Marion, 111. Employed Pea- 
body Coal Co. Coal Miner. Entrained May 28 '18, 
Camp Shelby, Miss. 

JONES, ED, (Marion) age 24 ; B., Belle Rive, 111. 
Employed Peabody Coal Co. Coal Mining. En- 
trained Feb. 25, '18, Camp Taylor, Ky. Honorably 
discharged. 

KAYKO, MIKE, (Johnston City) age 26 ; B., Rus- 
sia. Employed Johnston City Coal Co. Coal Miner 
Entrained May 28, '18, Camp Shelby, Miss. 
KANLUBI, GEORGE, (Herrin) age 30; B., Lip- 
cre, Austria. Employed W. P. Rend Coal Co., Her- 
rin, 111. Mining. Entrained Sept. 20, '17, Camp 
Taylor, Ky. 

KEUPPER, HUBERT, (Johnston City) age 27 ; B., 
Stranton, III. Employed Johnston City, 111. Feed 
Store. Entrained May 29, '18, Ft. Thomas, Ky. 

KEE, MOSES LEONARD, (Jhnston City) age 23 ; 
B., Devina, 111. Son of Lizzie Kee. Employed Con- 
solidated Coal Co. Coal Mining. Entrained July 20, 
'18, Camp Wheeler, Ga. 

KESSLER, HENRY CHARLES, (Johnston City) 
age 23 ; B., Hecker, 111. Principal of High School, 
Johnston City, 111. Enlisted in Artillery, Camp 
Grant, 111., Aug. 15, '17. 

KERLEY, AUGHTY O., (Carterville) age 27; B., 
Bloomfleld, 111. Employed Carterville, 111. Labor- 
er. Entrained May 28, '18, Camp Shelby, Miss. 

KEELER, ROY, (Carterville) age 25 ; B., Evans- 
ville, Ind. Employed Pond Creek Coal Co., Her- 
rin, 111. Mining. Entrained May 28, '18, Camp Shel- 
by, Miss. 

KEASTER, ARTHUR SAMUEL, (Stonefort) age 
25 ; B., Burnsides. 111. Son of W. J. Keaster, Stone- 
fort, 111. Employed at Southern 111. Ry. & Power 
Co., Harrisburg. 111. Concreting. Entrained April 
29, '18, Camp Dix, N. J. 

KELTNER, JOHN CLYDE, (Creal Springs) age 
23 ; B.. Simpson, 111. Employed Citizens State Bank. 
Creal Springs, 111. Assistant Cashier. Entrained 
May 29, '18, Ft. Thomas, Ky. 

KELLEY, LUTHER, (Goreville) age 21 ; B., Mar- 
ion, 111. Son of Henry N. Kelley, Goreville, 111. 
Farmer. Entrained June 27, '18, Rejected Camp 
Wheeler, Ga. 

KELLY, LORAN L. (Pittsburg) age 30 ; B., Il- 
linois. Son of W. J. Kelly, Pittsburg, 111. Employ- 
ed Arley Sinks, Pittsburg, 111. Entrained June 27, 
'18, Camp Wheeler, Ga. 

KELTON, RALPH, (Marion) age 23 ; B., Attila, 
111. Son of John Kelton, Marion, 111. Clerk. En- 
trained Sept. 3, '18. Attached 6th Service Co., 
Signal Corp. Discharged Chicago, 111., Jan 2, '19. 



KEUPPER, ED E., (Johnston City) age 22 ; B., 
Staunton, 111. Employed Johnston City. Feed Store. 
Entrained April 29, '18, Camp Dix, N. Y. 
KELLEY, COY, (Creal Springs) age 21 ; B., 
Johnston Co., 111. Farming. Entrained June 27, 
'18, Camp Wheeler, Ga. 

KELTON, HOWARD M., (Creal Springs) age 21 ; 
B., New Burnsides, 111. Son of John M. Keltner. 
Employed C. & N. W. Railroad at Chicago. Brake- 
man. Entrained Sept. 6, '18, Camp Forrest, Lytle, 
Ga. 

KERLEY, OTTIE L., (Herrin) age 24 ; B., Villa 
Ridge, 111. Employed I. G. Watson, Herrin, 111. 
Mining. Entrained June 27, '18, Camp Wheeler, Ga. 
KELTON, CHARLES, (Marion) age 21 ; B., At- 
tila, 111. Employed Peabody Coal Co., Marion, 111. 
Coal Miner. Entrained Sept. 21, '17, Camp Tay- 
lor, Ky. 

KEYS, JAMES FLOYD, (Stonefort) age 21 ; B., 
Stonefort, 111. Son of James R. Keys. Employed 
at Wasson Coal Co., No. 2. Coal Miner. Entrain- 
ed May 23, '18, Jefferson Bks. Mo. 
KELLEY, JOSEPH, (West Frankfort) age 26; B., 
Ureche Minsk, Russia. Employed at Johnston City, 
111. Miner. Entrained May 29, '18, Ft. Thomas, Ky. 
KESLER, HERMAN LESTER (Makanda) age 23 ; 
B., Williamson Co., 111. Employed Williamson Co., 
Grassy Precinct. Farming. Entrained June 27, 
'18, Camp Wheeler, Ga. 

KING, GEORGE AUD., (Johnston City) age 21 ; 
B., Corinth, 111. Son of Ellen King, Johnston City, 
111. Farming. Entrained Oct. 5, '17, Camp Tay- 
lor, Ky. Rejected at Camp. 

KILDIFF, WILLIAM FRANCIS, (Johnston City) 
age 28 ; B., Weir City, Kansas. Employed at Wm. 
Co. Coal Co., Johnston City, 111. Mining. Entrain- 
ed Sept. 5, '17, Camp Taylor, Ky. 

KING, STANLEY, (Herrin) age 27 ; B., Eddy- 
ville, 111. Employed Taylor Coal Co., "ierrin, 111. 
Miner. Enlisted Dec. 4, '17, Navy, St Louis, Mo. 
KISTNER, ROY, (Hurst) age 26 ; B. Eddyville, 
Ky. Employed Taylor Coal Co., Herrin, 111. Min- 
ing. Entrained May 28, '18, Camp Shelby, Miss. 

KING, HURLEY, (Herrin) age 24 ; B., Eddyville, 
111. Employed C. & C. Coal Co., Herrin, 111. Min- 
ing. Entrained June 27, '18, Camp Wheeler, Ga, 

KIRKS, ERNEST GAYLON, (Paducah) age 26; 
B., Paducah, Ky. Son of Nancy Kirks, Paducah, 
Ky. Employed at Thacker Medicine Co., Chatta- 
nooga, Tenn. Salesman. Entrained June 27, '18, 
Rejected Camp Wheeler, Ga. 

KILLMAN, THOMAS, (Stonefort) age 21 ; B., Gal- 
atia, 111. Son of Wes Killman, Stonefort, 111. Em- 
ployed at Wasson Coal Co., Harrisburg, 111. Coal 
Miner. Entrained June 27, '18, Camp Wheeler, Ga. 

KLIMAS, FRANK, (Herrin) age 23 ; B., Sunzeth- 
ski, Poland Russia. Employed Sunnyside Coal Co. 
Mining. Entrained April 29, '18, Camp Taylor, Ky. 

KLUTTS, FRANK, (Marion) age 30 ; B., Marlon, 
111. Farming. Entrained April 29, '18, Camp Dix, 
N. J. 

KNIGHT, WILLIAM PICKNEY, (Herrin) age 23 ; 
B., Paragould, Ark. Employed Taylor Coal Co., 
Herrin, 111. Mining. Deceased. 

KNIGHT, EARL (Marion) age 24 ; B., Murphys- 
boro, 111. Son of George W. Knight, Marion, 111. 
Employed Republican Leader, Marion, 111. Press- 
man. Enlisted June '17, Harrison, Ind. Discharg- 
ed Jan. 15, '19. 

KNIGHT, FRANK, (Marion) age 29 ; B., Crafton, 
Ky. Employed Chicago Big Muddy Coal & Coke 
Co. Coal Miner. Entrained Oct. 5, '17, Camp Tay- 
lor, Ky. 

KOMEZ, JOSEPH, (Johnston City) age 24 ; B., 
Austria. Employed Johnston City, 111. Coal Miner. 
Entrained April 29, '18, Camp Dix, N. J. 

KOSANOVICH, BOZIDAR, (Johnston City) age 
25 ; B., Jasanak, Russia. Employed Ernest Coal 
Co., Johnston City, 111. Coal Miner. Entrained 
June 27, '18, Camp Wheeler, Ga. 



238 



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P 




! 

; 

i 



KONCUS, PETE, (Johnston City) age 24 ; B., Rus- 
sia. Employed Lake Creek Coal Co., Johnston City, 
111. Entrained June 27, '18, Camp Wheeler, Ga. 
KOCH, THEODORE ARNOLD, (Marion) age 26 ; 
B., Trela, Mo. Son of Wm. P. Koch, Wright City, 
Mo. Employed Central 111. Pub. Serv. Co. Elect- 
rical Eng. Entrained Feb. 25, '18, Camp Taylor, 
Ky. 

KRANTZ, JOHN' HENRY, (Johnston City) age 
27 ; B., Marion, 111. Employed Searls Coal Co., 
Johnston City, 111. Coal Mining. Entrained Sept. 
3, '18, Camp Grant, 111. 

KRISCHWNAS, ADAM, (Johnston City) age 27 ; B., 
Gaisru, Russia. Employed Williamson County Coal 
Co., Johnston City, 111. Track Layer. Enlisted 
July 31, '17, Columbus, Ohio. 

KYLE, ROY, (Cambria) age 27; B., Sebree, Ky. 
Employed Cambria, 111. Mining. Entrained May 
28, '18, Camp Shelby, Miss. 

LAWRENCE, EZRA CLYDE, (Johnston City) age 
21 ; B., Johnston City. 111. Son of Ida Lawrence, 
Marion, 111. Employed Johnston City, 111. Team- 
ster. Entrained May 28, '18, Camp Shelby, Miss. 
LAMBERT, LYMAN, (Marion) age 26 ; B., Gol- 
conda, 111. Son of Joe and Julia Lambert. Miner 
Entrained June 27, '18, Camp Wheeler, Ga. Over- 
seas Oct. 7, '18. Attached 2nd Prov. Guard Co. 
LA MASTER SGT. BEN H., (Marion) age 22- B 
Marion, 111. Son of W. B. and Augusta LaMaster. 
Married Bertha Binkley. Salesman. Enlisted June 
23, '18. Overseas Sept. 28, '18. Attached Motor 
Transport Co., 523rd, Motor Supply Train 424tn. 
Discharged, Camp Grant, 111., July 29, '19. 
LAMBERT, LUCIAN, (Marion) age 23 ; B., Gol- 
conda. III. Son of Joe and Julia Lambert. Mar- 
ried Bertia Lasley. Coal Miner. Entrained June 
27, '18, Camp Wheeler, Ga. Overseas Oct 7 '18 
Attached to Co. P., 115th Inf. Discharged, Camp 
Grant, 111., June 1, '19. 

LAYMAN, ERNEST, (Herrin) age 18 ; B., Cairo, 
111. Son of Jack Layman. Employed as Federa- 
tion Worker. Enlisted June 26, '17 at Cairo, 111. 
Overseas Feb. 10, '18. Attached to Co. C., 16th 
Field Artillery. Engaged in active service at Vesle 
at Chery-Chartucere, St. Mihiel, and Argonne For- 
est. Discharged Mar. 11, '19, at Jefferson Bar- 
racks. 

LAWSON, RUSSELL H., (Seattle, Wash.) age 21 ; B., 
Coulterville, 111. Son of Margaret J. Lawson. Em- 
ployed as Salesman. Enlisted Aug. 15, '17, at Seat- 
tle, Wash. Spent boyhood days in Herrin. Dis- 
charged Vancouver Barracks, Jan. 30, '19. 
LATHAM, ESSEL, (Marion) age 29 ; B., near 
Marion. Son of John Latham. Employed as con- 
crete worker, .Marion. Enlisted in Coast Artillery 
and has been in the army for eight years. 
LAMAXDIN, COLTEM (West Frankfort) age 22 ; 
H., Spring Valley, 111. Employed at Johnston City 
Washed Coal Co., Johnston City, 111. Miner. En- 
trained Oct. 4, '17, Camp Taylor, Ky. 
LATERZA, DOMINIC, (West Frankfort) age 28 ; 
B., Pategnano, Italy. Employed at Ernest Coal 
Co., Johnston City, III. Miner. Entrained June 27, 
'18, Camp Wheeler, Ga. 

LAWSON, WILLIAM M., (Clifford) age 27 ; B., Cot- 
ton, Ohio. Employed Big Muddy Coal & Iron Co., 
Clifford, 111. Entrained May 28, '18, Camp Shelby, 
Miss. 

LASATO, STANLEY, (Clifford) age 30; B., Dem- 
bola Poland, Austria. Employed at Big Muddy Coal 
& Iron Coal Co., Clifford, 111. Miner. Entrained 
Sept. 20, '17, Camp Taylor, Ky. 

LANEY, JOE, (Creal Springs) age 22 ; B., Creai 
Springs, 111. Son of W. L. Laney, Creal Springs. 
111. Coal Miner. Entrained Sept. 6, '18. Attached 
to 26th Co., Engineers. Discharged at Camp Grant, 
111., Feb. 5, '19. 

LANG, ALBERT FREDERICK, (Marion) age 26; 
B., Marion, 111. Son of Ernest F. Lang, Marion, 111. 



Employed Bracy Supply Co., Marion, 111. Farming. 
Entrained Feb. 25, '18, Camp Taylor, Ky. 



LAUNIUS, WM. McKINLEY, (Stonefort) age 26 
B., Carrier Mills, 111. Employed Wasson Coal Co., 
Carrier Mills, 111. Coal Miner. Entrained Feb 25 
'18, Camp Taylor, Ky. 

LATHAM, ALBERT, (Marion) age 25 B Wil- 
liamson County, 111. Son of John Latham. Marion, 
111. Employed grocer company clerk. Entrained 

LAMBERT, WILLIAM, (Crab Orchard) age 22 ; 
B., Elizabethtown, 111. Farming. Entrained Sept. 
21, '17, Camp Taylor, Ky. 

LAFFERTY, J. P., (Herrin) age 27 ; B., Wang- 
pun, Pa. Employed C. & C. Coal Co., Herrin in. 
Electrician. Entrained June 27, '18, Camp Wheel- 
er, Macon, Ga. 

LAUDERDALE, JOE FRANCIS, (Creal Springs) 
age 25 ; B., Dixon Springs, 111. Musical Director. 
Entrained June 27, '18, Camp Wheeler, Ga. 

LAVENDER, ODIS SYLVESTER, (Hurst) age 
25 ; B., Rugbyroad, Tenn. Employed Mo. Pacific 
Ry., Bush, 111. Ry. Clerk. Entrained Sept. 4, '18, 
Camp Grant, 111. 

LAVENDAR, OTIS S., (Hurst) age 26 ; B., Rugby 
Road, Tenn. Son of Lizzie Lavender, Hurst, HI. 
Married Myrtle Sweeny. Entrained Sept. 4, '18. At- 
tached to Co. F., Limited Service. Discharged at 
Camp Grant, 111., Nov. 30, 1918. 

LAWSON, JOHN T., (Herrin) age 21 ; B., Johns- 
ton City, 111. Employed C. W. & F. Mining Co., 
Herrin, 111. Entrained Sept. 6, '18, Camp Forrest. 
Lytle, Ga. 

LATHAM, JOHN, (Marion) age 23 ; B., Marion, 111. 
Son of John Latham, Marion, 111. Surveyor. En- 
listed in Navy Dec. 31, '16. U. S. S. Penn. Now in 
Cuba. 

LAMBERT, EZRA L., (Marion) age 22 ; B., Stone- 
fort, 111. Son of Eliza Lambert, Marion, 111. Em- 
ployed Iron Mountain R. R. Section Hand. En- 
trained June 27, '18, Camp Wheeler, Ga, 
LEE, HARRY SCOTT, (Johnston City) age 23 ; 
B., Nashville, 111. Employed Hamilton Ice Co., 
Johnston City, 111. Iceman. Entrained Sept 21, 
'17, Camp Taylor, Ky. 

LEONI. AUSTINO, (Johnston City) age 26 ; B., 
Italy. Employed Lake Creek Coal Co., Johnston 
City, III. Coal Miner. Entrained May 23, '18, Jef- 
ferson Barracks, Mo. Emergency call. 
LEHR, ROSCOE H., (Herrin) age 26 ; B., Havana, 
111. Son of Chas. Lehr. Employed as R. R. Clerk, 
Herrin. Entrained Mar. 11, '18. Overseas Sept. 
3, '18. Attached to Hdqrs. Co., 335th Inf. Dis- 
charged Jan. 16, '19, at Camp Grant, III. 

LEWIS, ROBERT LEE, (Oak Grove, Mo.) age 23; 
B., Aullville, Mo. Son of W. F. Lewis, Oak Grove, 
Mo. Farmer, Harrisburg, 111. Entrained May Z8, 
'18, Camp Dodge, Iowa. 

LEWIS, WILLIAM R., (Carbondale) age 24 ; B., 
Carbondale, 111. Farmer. Entrained June 27, '18, 
Camp Wheeler, Ga. 

LEWIS, C. H., (Cambria) age 28 ; B., Jackson Co., 
111. Son of Chas. D. and Rosia B. Lewis. Married 
Callie Snyder. Coal Miner. Entrained Sept. 19, 
'17. Overseas June 18, '18. Attached to Hdq. Co. 
Troops 9, C. A. C. Discharged at Camp Grant, 
111., June 13, '19. 

LEVANTE, ATILIO, (Herrin) age 23 ; B., Paris, 
France. Employed C. & C. Coal Co., Mine A., 
Herrin, 111. Miner. Entrained May 28, '18, Camp 
Shelby, Miss. 

LENTZ. ROBERT FERN, (Wolf Creek) age 25 
B., Wolf Creek, 111. Dental Student. Enlisted, St. 
Louis, Mo. 

LEDFORD, BENTON C., (Carterville) age zt ; 
B., Lookout Mountain, Ala. Employed Federal Coal 
Co., Carterville, 111. Enlisted Mar. 19, '18, Naval 
Reserve, St. Louis, Mo. 

LEWIS, WALTER, (Hurst) age 27 ; B., Coal Creek, 
Tenn. Employed Big Muddy Coal & Iron Co., Clif- 
ford, 111. Miner. Entrained May 29, '18, Ft. Thom- 
as, Ky. 



239 



LEE, GEORGE DAVIS, (Marion) age 22 ; B., Mar- 
ion, 111. Son of C. M. Lee, Marlon, 111. Stenographer. 
Enlisted Coast Artillery, Jefferson Barracks, Mo., 
Nov. 16, '17. 

LE CROSS, LEON, (Herrln) age 30 ; B., France. 
Employed Sunnyside Coal Co., Herrin, 111. Miner. 
Entrained May 29, '18, Ft. Thomas, Ky. 
LEE JOHN THOMAS, (Marion) age 27 ; B., Mar- 
ion, 111. Son of C. M. Lee. Farming. Entrained 
May 28, '18, Camp Shelby, Miss. 

LIGON, ROY STARLING, (Johnston City) age 
28 B., Robarts, Ky. Employed at Johnston City 
Coal Co., Johnston City, 111. Coal Miner. Entrain- 
ed Sept. 21, '17, Camp Taylor, Ky. Discharged Jan. 
14, '18. 

LIPISKI, STANLEY, (Clifford) age 27 ; B., Ryper, 
Russia. Employed at Big Muddy Coal & Iron Co., 
Clifford, 111. Miner. Entrained May 28, '18, Camp 
Shelby, Miss. 

LINTON, WILLIAM EARL, (Herrin) age 24 ; 
B., Cambridge, Ohio. Employed Herrin. Mechanic. 
Entrained Sept. 20, '17, Camp Taylor, Ky. 
LINGLE, I. FRANKLIN, (Marion) age 21 ; B., 
Goreville, 111. Employed Marion & Pittsburg Coal 
Co. Horse Shoer. Entrained July 29, '18, Van- 
couver Barracks, Washington. 

LOLESS, ALMIS, (Marian) age 22 ; B., Creal 
Springs, 111. Son of Margaret Loless, Marion, 111. 
Employed Peabody Coal Co. Coal Miner. Entrain- 
ed Sept. 21, '17, Camp Taylor, Ky. Wounded in 
action, Aug., '18. 

LUCINI, LOUIS, (Herrin) age 21 ; B.. Euboldo, 
Italy Employed Sunnyside Coal Co., Herrin, 111. 
Miner. Entrained Oct. 2, '18, Camp Wheeler, Ga. 
LOHR, JOHN H. A., (Herrin) age 30 ; B., Cen- 
tralia 111. Employed Skating Rink Operator. En- 
trained May 16, '18, Ft. Benjamin Harrison, Ind. 
LOVEL EDMOND, (Cambria) age 26 ; B.. Cam- 
bria, 111. Farming. Enlisted May 22, '18, Marine 
Corps, St. Louis, Mo. 

LOUGH, LELAND F. O., (Marion) age 21 ; B., 
Arcola, 111. Contractor. Entrained June 15, 18, 
Bradley Polytechnic, Peoria, 111. 

LUDICA, SANTO, (Johnston City) age 22 ; B., It- 
aly Employed Williamson County Coal Co., John- 
ston City, 111. Miner. Entrained May 28, '18, Camp 
Shelby, Miss. 

LUCINI, ANTONIO, (Herrin) age 27: B., Oboldo, 
kanda 111. Employed Robert Dick Coal Co., Her- 
rin, 111. Entrained Mar. 12, '18, Camp Taylor, Ky. 
MATTHEWS, JOHN, (Johnston City) age 28 ; B., 
Uanticoke, Perm. Employed E. C. Searls Coal Co. 
Coal Miner. Enlisted in Army, Dec. 15, '17. 
MANNING, FRANK O., (Herrin) age 30 ; B., Ma- 
kanda, 111. Employed Robert Vick Coal Co., Her- 
rin, 111. Mining. Entrained Sept. 4, '18, Camp 
Grant, 111. 

MAINWARING, WILLIAM. (Marion) age 27 ; B., 
Braceville, 111. Employed Peabody Coal Co., Mar- 
ion, 111. Blacksmith. Entrained June 14, '18, Val- 
paraiso, Ind. 

MASON, HERBER. (Herrin) age 24 ; B., Scranton, 
Kas. Employed B. M. C. & I. Co., Herrin, 111. 
Miner. Enlisted Aug. 25, '17, Signal Corps, St. 
Louis, Mo. 

MADDOX, JASPER W., (Herrin) age 21 ; B., Mc- 
Henry, Ky. Employed W. P. Rend Coal Co., Weav- 
er, 111. Miner. Entrained Sept. 6, '18, Camp For- 
rest, Lytle, Ga- Deceased. 
MAZZONI, EGILDO, (Herrin) age 27 ; B., 
bardo, Italy. Employed C. & C. Coal Co. 
Entrained Mar. 12, '18, Camp Taylor, Ky. 
MALICO, WILLIAM, (Herrin) age 26; B., Cary- 
ville, Tenn. Employed C. & C. Coal Co., "B" 

' 




Lqm- 
Mining. 



. . Her- 

rin, 111. Top Man. Entrained May 23, '18, Jerter- 
son Barracks, Mo. 

MARKS, JAMES M., (Herrin) age 24 ; B., Carter- 
ville 111. Employed Big Muddy Coal Co. Mining. 
Entrained Mar. 12, '18, Camp Taylor, Ky. 



MAZE, IRA F., (Goreville) age 21 ; B., Gore- 
ville, 111. Son of H. H. Maze, Jacksonville, III. .m- 
ployed at Jacksonville State Hospital, Jacksonville, 
111. Entrained June 27, '18, Camp Wheeler, Ga. 

MANDRELL, JESSE EARL, (Crab Orchard) age 
25 ; B., Harrisburg, 111. Fireman. Employed at 
Athens State Hospital, Athens, Ohio. Entrained May 
28, '18, Camp Shelby, Miss. 

MALAER, JOHN ELDEN, (Goreville) age 21 ; B., 
Goreville, 111. Son of Thomas Malaer, Goreville, 
111. Farmer. Enlisted in U. S. Naval Reserve 
Force, June 11, '18. 

MALLONO, FRANCESCO, (Herrin) age 26 ; B., 
Adroro, Italy. Employed Pond Creek Coal Co. 
Mining. Entrained Sept. 4, '18, Camp Grant, 111. 

MADDOX, CARL, (Herrin) age 24 ; B., McHenry, 
Ky. Employed W. P. Rend Coal Co., Rend, 111. 
Mining. Entrained June 27, '18, Camp Wheeler, Ga. 

MABRY, JESSE E., (Herrin) age 21 ; B., Ewing 
111. Employed W. P. Rend Coke Co., Herrin, 111. 
Miner. Entrained Oct. 21, '18, Camp Wheeler, Ga. 

MAMINI, JOE, (Herrin) age 30; B., Laczzle, It- 
aly. Farmer. Entrained June 27, '18, Camp 
Wheeler, Macon, Ga. 

MALCOM, RAY, (Creal Springs) age 21 ; B., Creal 
Springs, 111. Son of John T. Malcom. Employed 
Creal Springs, 111. Carpenter. Entrained Sept. 6, 
'18, Camp Forrest, Lytle, Ga. 

MANNING, JESSIE, (Herrin) age 29 ; B., Reno, 
111. Employed Pond Creek Coal Co. Mining. En- 
trained Sept. 4, '18, Camp Grant, 111. 

MARGRAVE, LOREN CLAY, (Herrin) age 24 ; 
B., Creal Springs, 111. Employed, Marion Pittsburg 
Coal Co., Pittsburg. 111. Clerk. Entrained May 10, 
'18, Ft. Thomas, Ky. 

MAFFE, DOMINICK, (Herrin) age 26 ; B., Villa 
Regent, Italy. Employed C. & C. Coal Co., Her- 
rin, 111. Mining. Entrained June 27, '18, Camp 
Wheeler, Macon, Ga. 

MALTOGNATO, TONY, (Herrin) age 30 ; B.. Bu- 
feloro, Italy. Employed Herrin, 111. Restaurant 
Owner. Entrained April 29, '18, Camp Dix, N. J. 

MARLOW, JOE, (Herrin) age 28 ; B., Mozetti, Italy. 
Employed C. & C. Coal Co. Mining. Entrained 
April 29, '18, Camp Dix, N. J. 

MASON, GEORGE, (Herrin) age 27 ; B., Scranton, 
Kans. Employed Big Muddy Coal & Iron Co., Her- 
rin. 111. Mining. Entrained Sept. 20, '17, Camp 
Taylor, Ky. 

MANDERINO, JOE, (Herrin) age 22 ; B., Portig- 
liola, Italy. Employed Detroit, Mich. Machinist. 
Entrained Sept. 20, '17, Camp Taylor, Ky. 

MARTINO, DAVID AUSTIN, (Johnston City) age 
21 ; B., Crafton, Ky. Employed Johnston City Coal 
Co. Mining. Entrained May 23, '18, Jefferson Bar- 
racks, Mo. 

MAISCCHI, AMBROGIO, (Johnston City) age 27 ; 
B., Qontanetto, Italy. Mining. Entrained Sept. 4, 
'18, Camp Grant, 111. 

MASON, MOSES EARWING, (Johnston City) age 
21 ; B., Russellville, Ky. Son of Mattie Harrison, 
Drakesboro, Ky. Employed Consolidated Coal Co. 
Coal Miner. Entrained June 27, '18, Camp Wheel- 
er, Ga. 

MALAER, WILLIAM WALTER, (Marion) age 24 ; 
B., Goreville, 111. Son of W. F. Malaer, Goreville, 
111. Employed American Creosoting Co. Laborer. 
Entrained June 27, '18, Camp Wheeler, Ga. Re- 
jected at camp. 

MATHIS, ALSON, (Herrin) age 28 ; B., Creal 
Springs, 111. Employed W. P. Rend Coal Co., Weav- 
er, 111. Mining. Entrained Sept. 20, '17, Camp 
Taylor, Ky. 

MARTIN, HARRY EVERETT (Marion) age 25 ; 
B., Bowling Green, Ky. Son of Laura Akins, White- 
ash, 111. Employed Williamson Co. Coal Co. Coal 
Mining. Entrained June 27, '18, Camp Wheeler, Ga.. 
Discharged Oct., '18. 



240 



McKINZY, ADOLPH, (Herrin) age 29 ; B., Rus- 
sia. Employed W. P. Rend Coal Co., Weaver, 111. 
Mining. Entrained April 29, '18, Camp Dix, N. J. 

McGEE, CARLEY, (Carterville) age 21 ; B., Car- 
terville, 111. Farmer. Enlisted June 27, '18, 
Camp Wheeler, Ga. 

McCLUSKY, HERBERT, (Carterville) age 21 ; B., 
Crab Orchard, 111. Employed Hafer Coal Co., Car- 
terville, 111. Farmer. Entrained June 27, '18, 
Taylor, Ky. 

McNETT, JAMES GARDNER, (Marion) age 23 ; 
B., Lincoln, Neb. Photographer. Entrained Sept. 
21, '17, Camp Taylor, Ky. 

McGOWAN, EARL, (Carterville) age 22 ; B., 
Crainville, 111. Employed Hafer Coal Co., Carter- 
ville, 111. Mining. Entrained Mar. 12, '18, Camp 
Taylor, Ky. 

McGINNIS, CHARLES F., (Carterville) age 21 ; 
B., Energy, 111. Employed Carterville, 111. Farm- 
ing. Entrained Oct. 4, '17, Camp Taylor, Ky. 

McINTURFF, JESSE FLOYD, (Creal Springs) age 
21 ; B., Creal Springs, 111. Son of Ed Mclnturff. 
Employed Union Pacific R. R., Brute, Nebraska. 
Night Agent. Entrained June 27, '18, Camp Wheel- 
er, Ga. 

McGOWAN, ELMER, (Carterville) age 25; B., 
Carterville, 111. Employed Hafer Coal Co., Car- 
terville, 111. Mining. Entrained June 27, '18, Camp 
Wheeler, Ga. 

McCLINTOCK. NORMAN A., (Herrin) age 22 ; u., 
Montgomery, Ind. Painter and Paper Hanger. En- 
trained May 28, '18, Camp Shelby, Miss. 

Me CLINTOCK, BASIL, (Johnston City) age 25 ; 
B., Murphysboro, III. Son of John McClintock, El. 
St. Louis, 111. Employed B. M. Coal Co. Ma- 
chinist. Entrained May 29, '18, Ft. Thomas, Ky. 
Rejected. 

McCORMICK, CHARLES, (Johnston City) age 29 ; 
Stonefort, 111. Son of J. W. McCormick, Johnston 
City, 111. Barber. Entrained June 27, '18, Camp 
Wheeler, Ga. 

McMULLEN. GILBERT, (Johnston City) age 28 ; 
B., Spottsville, Ky. Employed Searles Coal Co., 
Johnston City, 111. Mining. Entrained Sept. 20, '17, 
Camp Taylor, Ky. 

McCLINTOCK, EARL ALEXANDER, (Johnston 
City) age 27 ; B., Murphysboro, 111. Insurance Ad- 
juster. Entrained Sept. 21, '17, Camp Taylor, Ky. 

McLUSKI, STEVE, (Johnston City) age 22 ; B., 
Shenandoah, Penn. Employed Johnston City Coal 
Co. Mining. Entrained May 28, '18, Camp Shelby, 
Miss. 

MCLAREN, WILLIAM SYLVESTER, (Marion) age 

21 ; B., Carbon Hill, 111. Son of Archibald B. Mc- 
Laren, Marion, 111. Employed Chicago & Big Muddy 
Coal Co. Coal Inspector. Entrained Aug. 3, '18, 
Chicago, 111. Rejected at Camp. 

McDONALD, CLYDE, (Marion) age 25 ; B., New 
Dennison, 111. Clerk. Entrained Oct. 5, '17, Camp 
Taylor, Ky. 

MCALLISTER, RICHARD p., (Marion) age 28 ; 

B., St. Charles, Ky. Son of Jack McAllister, Mar- 
ion, 111. Employed Murphysboro Telephone Co., Mar- 
ion, 111. Electric Lineman. Entrained Sept. 6, '17, 
Camp Taylor, Ky. 

McINTOSH, ED, (Herrin) age 22 ; B., St. Charles, 
Ky. Employed Pond Creek Coal Co., Herrin, 111. 
Mining. Enlisted Nov. 30, '17, St. Louis, Mo. 

McALPIN, LEE, (Marion) age 27 ; B.. Marion, 111. 
Son of J. B. McAlpin, Marion, 111. Farmer. En- 
trained June 27, '18, Camp Wheeler, Ga. Overseas 
Oct. 7, '18. Attached Co. L., 143d Inf. Discharg- 
ed June 10, '19, Camp Grant, 111. 

McCLUSKY, JOHN A., (Carterville) age 24 ; B.. 
Metropolis, 111. Son of J. A. and Julia McClusky. 
Miner. Entrained Oct. 25, "17. Overseas Sept. 2, 
'18. Attached to Co. A., 325th M. G. Bn. Dis- 
charged, Camp Grant, 111., March 18, '19. 




McMULLIN, MURRAY G., (Johnston City) age 17; 
B., Robards, Ky. Son of Robert M. and Lynda G. 
McMullin, Johnston City, 111. Enlisted April 28, '19, 
Columbus, Ohio. Present address Signal School, 
Great Lakes, 111. 

McCREE, ROLLIE, (Cambria) age 23 ; B., Cam- 
bria, 111. Son of Wm. McCree. Coal Miner. En- 
trained Nov. 14, '17. Engaged in Chateau-Thierry 
and received 11 gun shot wounds. Attached to Co. 
G., 101st Inf., 26th Division. Discharged at Camp 
Taylor, March 12, 1919. 

McCLUSKY, HELEER, (Carterville) age 22 B , 
Crab Orchard, 111. Son of J. A. and Julia McClusky. 
Married Ola Preedy. Chauffeur. .Entrained Sept. 
3, '17. Overseas Sept. 2, '18. Engaged in Argonne. 
Attached to Co. A., 325th M. G. Bn. Discharged, 
Camp Merritt, N. Y., July. 

McCLINTOCK, JOHN A., (Herrin) age 27 ; B., 
Carterville, 111. Employed W. P. Rend Coal Co., 
Herrin, 111. Blacksmith. Entrained June 14, '18, 
Vancouver, Washington, Aeronautic Corps. 
McCRARY, WILL, (Clifford) age 21 ; B., Pakton, 
Ky. Employed at Big Muddy Coal Co., Clifford 111. 
Mining. Entrained Aug. 2, '18, Camp Grant, III. 

McGILL, CLARENCE, (Goreville) age 21 ; B., 
Marion, 111. Son of W. M. McGill, Goreville, 111. 
Employed at Big Muddy Fuel Co., Marion, 111. Coal 
Miner. Entrained Sept. 6, '18, Camp Forrest, Ly- 
tle, Ga. 

McCABE, WALTER CARCHUES, (Stonefort) age 
26 ; B., New Burnsides, 111. Employed at Chicago 
& Eastern 111. R. R. Fireman. Entrained April 
fD, '18, Camp Meade, Maryland. 

McINTOSH, JOHN R., (Goreville) age 23 ; B., Mar- 
ion, 111. Farmer. Entrained Feb. 25, '18, Camp 
Taylor, Ky. 

McMILLAN, OTIS, (Carterville) age 26 ; B., Ga- 
latia, 111. Employed Federal Coal Co., Carterville, 
111. Mining. Entrained Sept. 20, '17, Camp Taylor, 
Ky. 

McMILLAN, RAYMOND, (Carterville) age 21 ; B., 
Carterville, 111. Employed Federal Coal Co., Car- 
terville, 111. Entrained Aug. 1, '18, Camp Wheeler, 
Ga. 

MEADOWS, CHARLES O., (Herrin) age 25 ; B., 
Lomsburg, Ky. Employed Herrin, 111. Carpenter. 
Entrained May 28, '18, Camp Shelby, Miss. 

MEZO, JAMES H., (Herrin) age 23 ; B., Town of 
Levare. Employed Herrin, 111. Farming. Entrain- 
ed June 27, '18, Camp Wheeler, Ga. 

MEZO. WILLIAM H., (Herrin) age 22 ; B., Mc- 
Leansboro, III. Employed Weaver Mine, Herrin, ill. 
Laborer. Entrained May 28, '18, Camp Shelby, 
Miss. 

MEFFORD, WALTER DALE, (Herrin) age 30 ; 
B., Newton, 111. Employed Herrin, 111. Cook. En- 
trained May 28, '18, Camp Shelby, Miss. 
MERCIER, GUS, (Johnston City) age 22 ; B., 
Quveechin, France. Employed Johnston City Coal 
Co. Mining. Entrained July 15, '18, Camp Wheeler, 

MERCIER, GEORGE, (Johnston City) age 27 ; B., 
Belgium. Employed Ernest Coal Co., Ernest, 111. 
Mining. Entrained Oct. 4, '17, Camp Taylor, Ky. 
MERIDETH, CLYDE, (Marion) age 21 ; B., Creal 
Springs, 111. Son of Sula Shrenes, Marion, 111. Em- 
ployed Holmes & Odum's Garage. Mechanic. En- 
trained Sept. 6, '18, Camp Forrest, Lytle, Ga. 

MEADOWS, JACK, (Hurst) age 24 ; B., Kentucky. 
Son of Homer and Hattie Meadows. Married Pearl 
Furlow. Blacksmith. Entrained May 28, '18. Over- 
seas Oct. 6, '18. Attached to 138th F. A. Dis- 
charged at Camp Grant, 111., June 5, '19. 

MEADOR, WILLIAM, . (Herrin) age 23 ; B., Sharan 
Grove, Ky. Employed C. & C. Coal Co., Herrin, 
III. Mining. Entrained Mar. 12, '18, Camp Taylor. 
Ky. 

MELLIGES, MART (Colp) age 26 ; B., Centralia, 
111. Employed at Western Coal & Mining Co., Bush. 
111. Entrained May 28, '18, Camp Shelby, Miss. 



241 




MELLIGES, FRED, (Colp) age 28 ; B., Centralia, 
111. Employed at Madison Coal Corp., Colp, III. 
Mining. Entrained Sept. 20, '17, Camp Taylor, Ky. 

MINTON, CARL DUFF, (Herrin) age 21 ; B., Al- 
to Pass, 111. Employed Mo. Pacific R. R. Co., 
Hurst and Bush, 111. R. R. Clerk. Entrained May 
29, '18, Ft. Thomas, Ky. 

MILLER, RAYMOND A., (Carterville) age 29 ; B., 
O'Fallon, 111. Employed Madison Coal Corp., Dew- 
maine. 111. Electrician. Entrained Oct. 4, '17, Camp 
Taylor, Ky. 

MITCHELL, MARION M., (Energy) age 25 ; B., 
CarterviHe. 111. Employed at Taylor No. 2, Her- 
rin, 111. Mining. Entrained March 12, '18, Camp 
Taylor, Ky. 

MICELLI, GIOSCHINO, (Herrin) age 27 ; B., 
Burgio, Italy. Employed Sunnyside Coal Co., Her- 
rin, 111. Mining. Entrained June 27, '18, Camp 
Wheeler, Ga. 

MITCHELL, HARRY, (Energy). B., Cobdin, 111. 
Son of George Mitchell, Energy, 111. Employed at 
Watertown State Hospital. Attendant. Entrained 
May 29, '18, Camp Shelby, Miss. 

MINES. FRED WILLIAM, (Johnston City) age 22 ; 
B., Sparta, 111. Employed Ernest Coal Co., Johns- 
ton City, 111. Coal Miner. Entrained Oct. 5, '17, 
Camp Taylor, Ky. 

MITCHELL, ALEX, (Johnston City) age 26 ; B., 
Burgio, Italy. Employed Big Muddy Coal Co., John- 
ston City, 111. Mining. Entrained June 27, '18, 
Camp Wheeler, Ga. 

MICHALIC, NICK, (Johnston City) age 24 ; B., 
Austria. Employed Johnston City Coal Co., John- 
ston City, 111. Mining. Entrained Sept. 20, '17, 
Camp Taylor, Ky. 

MICELI, PASQUALE, (Johnston City) age 22 ; B., 
Bulgrio. Italy. Mining. Entrained June 29, '18, 
Camp Grant, 111. 

MILLER, EARL EDWARD, (Marion) age 25 ; B., 
Marion, 111. Son of Mr. and Mrs. J. T. Miller, Gore- 
ville, 111. Teacher and Farmer. Entrained May 
28, '18, Camp Shelby, Miss. 

MITCHELL, NICK, (Marion) age 24 ; B., Italy. 
Employed Peabody Coal Co. Coal Mining. Entrain- 
ed May 28, '18, Camp Shelby, Miss. Discharged Oct. 
19, '18. Disability. 

MILLER, LEWIS VERNIE, (Herrin) age 22 ; B., 
Grayson Springs, Ky. Employed C. & C. Coal Co., 
"A", Herrin. 111. Mining. Entrained July 27, '18, 
Camp Wheeler, Ga. 

MINEHEFF, CHRIST, (Herrin) age 25 ; B., Bul- 
garia. Employed W. P. Rend Coal Co., Herrin, 111. 
Mining. Entrained Sept. 20, '17, Camp Taylor, Ky. 

MILES, CLYDE F., (Herrin) age 27; B. Brad- 
ford, Ala. Employed Big Muddy Coal & Iron Co., 
Herrin, 111. Mining. Entrained May 29, '18, Ft. 
Thomas, Ky. 

MITCHELL, EVERETT E., (Marion) age 26 ; B., 
Marion, 111. Son of J. C. Mitchell, Marion, 111. Civil 
Engineer. Enlisted in Army. 

MILLER, WARNER WILTON, (Marion) age 25 ; 
B., Bluffton, Ohio. Civil Engineer. Entrained May 
23, '18, Jefferson Barracks, Mo. 

MILLER, BENJAMIN A., (Cambria) age 24 ; B., 
Cobden, 111. Employed I. C. R. R. Co., Cambria, 
111. Ass't. Foreman, Track Dept. Entrained Oct. 
4, '18, Camp Taylor, Ky. 

MILLER, CHRIS, (Marion) age 20; Son of Dr. J. 
D. Miler. Student. Enlisted May 30, '18. Attended 
to Co. B. Discharged, Paris Island, May '19. 
MILLER, CASSIUS A., (Marion) age 27 ; B., St. 
Louis, Mo. Son of Moses and Mary E. Miller. Ma- 
chinist. Enlisted Dec. 4, '17, Camp Meade, Md. En- 
gaged in St. Mihiel, Argonne. Attached to Co. H., 
23rd Engineer Corp. Discharged, Camp Grant, 111., 
June 18, '19. 

MILLER, GEORGE, (Cambria) age 22 ; B., Cob- 
den, 111. Employed Madison Coal Corp., Colp, 111. 
Mining. Entrained May 23, '18, Jefferson Barracks, 
Mo. 



MITCHELL, NICK, (Marion) B., Italy. Merchant. 
Marion, 111. Entrained May 28, '18, Camp Shelby, 
Miss. Discharged Dec. 8, '19. 

MILLER, THOMAS, (Colp) B.. Lehigh, Okla. Em- 
ployed at Colp, 111. Teamster. Entrained June 2V, 
'18, Camp Wheeler, Ga. 

MITCHELL, DAVE, (Energy) age 24; B., Central 
City, Ky. Employed at C. & C. Coal Co., Herrin, 
111. Mining. Entrained April 29, '18, Camp Dix, 
N. J. 

MORRIS, ROY, (Herrin) age 23 ; B., Herrin, 111. 
Employed Taylor Coal Co., Herrin, 111. Mining. 
Entrained May 28, '18, Camp Shelby, Miss. 
MORETTO, JOHN, (Herrin) age 21 ; B., DeSoto, 
111. Employed Hafer Washed Coal Co., Herrin, 111. 
Mining. Entrained June 27, '18, Camp Wheeler, Ga. 

MOREFIELD, WALTER HEZ, (Creal Springs, 111.) 
Son of E. L. Morefield. Employed Stonefort, 111. 
Farmer. Enlisted May '18, in the Navy. 

MOORE, EARL, (Creal Springs) age 22 ; B., Stone- 
fort, 111. Son of J. L. Moore. Employed Wasson 
Coal Co., Carrier Mills. Ill Farming. Entralneu 
May 28, '18, Camp Shelby, Miss. 

MOORE, CHARLES HOWARD, (Marion) age 21 ; 
B., Marion, 111. Son of G. N. Moore. Clerk U. S. 
Steel Co. Enlisted in Marines, May 21, '18, St. 
Louis, Mo. Overseas Aug. 13, '18. Engaged in 
Argonne Forest. Attached to 6th Reg., 2nd Div. 
Marine Corps. 

MODGLIN, JOHN, (Creal Springs) age 22; B., 
Grantsburg, 111. Employed Telegrapher, Dupo, 111. 
Entrained May 29, '18, Ft. Thomas, Ky. 

MONTGOMERY, LAWRENCE G., (Herrin) age 
30 ; B., Duquoin, 111. Employed Herrin, III. Laborer. 
Entrained March 12, '18, Camp Taylor, Ky. 

MOSCHENROSE, ANDREW, (Energy) age 22 ; B., 
Gorham, 111. Employed Taylor Coal Co., Herrin, 111. 
Mining. Entrained Sept. 4, '18, Camp Grant, 111. 
MOAKE, MARSHACK, (Johnston City) age 22 ; B., 
Johnston City, 111. Son of Viola Moolard, Johnston 
City, 111. Employed Searles Coal Co., Johnston City, 
111. Coal Miner. Entrained June 27, '18, Camp 
Wheeler, Ga. Rejected. 

MOSS, CHARLEY, (Marion) age 21 ; B., Thomp- 
sonville, 111. Son of Logan Moss, Thompsonville, 111. 
Stenographer. Entrained May 28, '18, Camp Shelby, 

Miss. 

MORGAN, JOHN, (Johnston City) age 28 ; B., Per- 
ry County, Ohio. Son of Isaac Morgan, Shawnee, 
Ohio. Employed Johnston City Coal Co., Coal Min- 
er. Entrained July 1, '18, Camp Wheeler, Ga. 

MORGAN, ORVILLE, (Johnston City) age 22 ; B., 
Benton, 111. Son of John Morgan, Johnston City, 
111. Employed Lake Creek Coal Co., Johnston City, 
111. Coal Mining. Entrained Sept. 3, '18, Camp 
Grant, 111. 

MOORE, MASON, TEMPLETON, (Marion) age 21 ; 
B., Clover Hill, Ohio. Employed West Va. Coal Co. 
Motorman. Entrained Sept. 21, '17, Camp Taylor, 
Ky. 

MORGAN, ROBERT, L., (Marion) age 22 ; B., 
Pulley Mills, 111. Son of Wm. E. Morgan, Carbon- 
dale, 111. Farming. Enlisted in Navy, Dec. 14, '17 ; 
Great Lakes, 111. 

MOORE, GUY NELSON. (Marion) age 23 ; B., 
Stonefort, 111. Farming. Son of Bella Moore, Mar- 
ion, 111. Entrained Sept. 3, '18. Rejected. 

MOELLER, JOHN GEORGE HENRY, (Marion) 
age 28 ; B., Oak Dale, III Son of William Moeller, 
Marion, 111. Farming. Entrained June 27, '18. Camp 
Wheeler, Ga. 

MORRIS, HARRY, (Marion) age 28 ; B., Summer- 
field, 111. Son of Frankie Morris, Marion, 111. Em- 
ployed I. C. R. R. Section Hand. Entrained May 

II, '18, Ft. Thomas, Ky. 

MOORE, CHARLEY JAMES, (Marion) age 25 ; B., 
Stonefort, 111. Son of Mary Belle Moore, Marion, 

III. Farming. Entrained June 27, '18, Camp Wheel- 
er, Ga. Rejected at Camp. 



242 



m 



MONROE, CHARLEY RAYMOND, (Marion) age 
28 ; B., Cottage Home, 111. Son of Rachel Monroe, 
Marion, 111. Salesman. Entrained. June 27, '18, 
Camp Wheeler, Ga. 

MOORE, AUDIE ARVIL, (Marion) age 21 ; B., 
Attila, 111. Employed Chicago & Big Muddy Coal 
Co., Marion, 111. Coal Miner. Entrained Sept. 6, 
'18, Camp Forrest, Lytle, Ga. Rejected at Camp. 
MORGAN, CARLOS, (Marion) age 19 ; B., Marion, 
111. Son of O. A. Morgan, Marion, 111. Student. En- 
listed in Navy, Aug., '18, Great Lakes Training Sta- 
tion. 

MORNIN, NEAL, (Herrin) age 30 ; B., Norton, 
Ohio. Employed Sunnyside Coal Co.. Herrin, 111. 
Entrained Mar. 12, '18, Camp Taylor, Ky. 

MORRIS, ELIGA L., (Herrin) age 23 ; B., Benton. 
111. Employed Taylor No. 5, Freemanspur, 111. 
Mining. Entrained Mar. 12, '18, Camp Taylor, Ky. 

MORRIS, ROBERT, (Colp) age 22; B., Princeton, 
Ky. Employed at Big Muddy Coal Co., Clifford, 111. 
Mining. Entrained March 12, '18, Camp Taylor, 
Ky. 

MORABITO, JAMES, (Dewmainpl age 29 ; B., Ad- 
ora Bejjo Cal, Italy. Employed at Madison Coal 
Corp., Dewmaine, 111. Mining. Entrained May 28, 
'18, Camp Shelby, Miss. 

MORGAN, SILES ERVIN. (Blairsville) age 25 ; 
B., Carterville, 111. Employed at Madison Coal Corp., 
Colp, 111. Mining. Entrained May 28, '18, Camp 
Shelby, Miss. 

MOSLEY, IRA, (Stonefort) age 28 ; B., Crab Or- 
chard, 111. Son of J. M. Mosley. Employed at Stone- 
fort, 111. Carpenter. Entrained June 27, '18, Camp 
Wheeler, Ga. 

MOTSINGER, ROBERT, (Stonefort) age 29 ; B., 
Carrier Mills, 111. Son of M. A. Motsinger. Farmer. 
Entrained June 27, '18, for Camp Wheeler, Ga. 
MORGAN, ROBERT L., (Carbondale). Enlisted. 
MURROW, WALTER FREEMAN, (Marion) age 26 ; 
B., Crab Orchard, 111. Employed Dunlap & Dip- 
pold. Laborer. Entrained June 28, '18, Camp Lew- 
is, Washington. 

MURRAY, DALTON, (Marion) age 29 ; B., Mar- 
ion, 111. Employed Chicago Big Muddy Coal & Coke 
Co. Entrained June 27, '18, Camp Wheeler, Ga. 
MURRAY, FRED, (Bush) age 22 ; B., Dunlap, 
Tennessee. Employed at Western Coal & Mining 
Co., Bush. 111. Miner. Entrained Aug. 1, '18, Camp 
Wheeler, Ga. 

MURPHY, DENNIS FRANCIS, (Stonefort) age 26 ; 
B., Stonefort, 111. Son of James Murphy, Creal 
Springs, 111. Entrained June 27, '18, Camp Wheel- 
er, Ga. 

MYERS, WILLIS, (Herrin) age 26 ; B., Ledford, 
111. Employed Big Muddy Coal & Iron Co., Her- 
rin, 111. Mining. Entrained Sept. 5, '18, Camp Tay- 
lor, Ky. 

MYERS, WALTER, (Herrin) age 26 ; B., Murphys- 
boro, 111. Employed Big Muddy Coal Co., Herrin, 
111. Mining. Entrained June 27, '18, Camp Wheel- 
er, Ga. 

NAPOLEON, JACK, (Herrin) age 22 ; B., Villa 
Rose, Italy. Employed C. C. Coal Co., Herrin, 111. 
Mining. Entrained Sept. 20, '17, Camp Taylor, Ky. 
NEWCOMB, CARL C., (Herrin). Entrained Oct. 
21, '18, Camp Wheeler, Ga. 

NESLOR, DANIEL, (Herrin) age 23 ; B., Enfield, 
111. Employed Herrin Supply Co., Herrin, 111. Clerk. 
Entrained May 28, '18, Camp Shelby, Miss. 
NELSON, CLYDE, (Herrin) age 30 ; B., Morgan 
Co., Ohio. Employed Stiritz Coal Co., Herrin, 
111. Mining. Entrained June 27, '18, Camp Wheeler, 
Ga. 

NEWCOMB, CASSIE, (Herrin) age 26 ; B., Wheat- 
craft, Ky. Employed St. Louis & Carterville Coal 
Co. Mining. Entrained Oct. 4, '17, Camp Taylor, 
Ky. 

NELSON, AMER, (Marion) age 22 ; B., Marion. 111. 
Son of W. B. Nelson. Employed Farming. Entrain- 
ed Feb. 25, '18, Camp Taylor, Ky. 




NELSON, EZRA, (Energy) age 21 ; B., Carterville. 
Employed C. & C. Coal Co. Coal Miner. Entrained 
Feb. 25, '18, Camp Taylor, Ky. 

XEWLINS, LYLES E., (Marion) age 28 ; B.. Gore- 
ville. Son of Lyles E. and Mrs. L. J. Newlins, Mar- 
ion, 111. Coal Miner. Enlisted July 27, 1917, Oran, 
Mo. Engaged in Vosges Sector, Lorraine Sector, 
St. Mihiel, Argonne-Meuse. Attached to Co. L., 
140th Inf. Acted as stretcher bearer in the Meuse- 
Argonne Offensive. For his heroic work was rec- 
ommended for a distinguished service cross. Dis- 
charged, Camp Funston, Kans., May 13, '19. 

NEWTON, HALLIE, (Scottsboro). Enlisted. 

NICHOLSON, DEMPSEY ARTHUR. (Creai 
Springs) age 29 ; B., New Burnsides, 111. Son of 
James A. Nicholson. Farming. Entrained June 27, 
'18, Camp Wheeler, Ga. 

NOEER, CHARLES, (Herrin) age 26 ; B., Russia. 
Mining. Entrained April 29, '18, Camp Dix, N. J. 

NOZOTTI, VICTOR, (Herrin) age 24 ; B., Buf- 
fabora Licino, Italy. Employed C. & C. Coal Co., 
Herrin, 111. Mining. 

NOWBRAY, ROBERT, (White Ash) age 28 ; B., 
Scotland. Employed Big Muddy Fuel Co., Johnston 
City, 111. Miner. Entrained Oct. 5, '17, Camp Tay- 
lor, Ky. 

NORMAN, WALTER, (Scottsboro). Enlisted. 

NOLTE, CHARLES L., (Marion) age 22 ; B., Mar- 
ion, 111. Son of Fred Nolte, Marion, 111. FarmTng. 
Entrained June 27, '18, Camp Wheeler, Ga. Re- 
jected at Camp. 

NOEN, EUGENE E., (Johnston City). Entrained 
Oct. 21, '18, Camp Wheeler, Ga. 

NOTO. GUISEPPE, (Johnston City) age 29 ; B., 
Alexandria Delia Rocco, Italy. Employed Johnston 
City Coal Co. Mining. Entrained June 27, '18, 
Camp Wheeler, Ga. 

OAKLEY, JIM, (Marion) age 22 ; B., Madisonville, 
Ky. Employed Coal Belt Bottling Works. Bottser. 
Entrained April 29, '18, Camp Dix, N. J. 
ODUM, DICKSON, (Creal Springs) age 21 ; B., 
Williford, 111. Son of A. E. Odum. Employed Farm- 
Ing. Entrained May 28, '18, Camp Shelby, Miss. 

ODUM, JAY, (Marion) age 25 ; B., Marion, 111. Son 
of Lottie Odum, Marion, 111. Farmer. Entrained 
June 27, '18, Camp Wheeler, Ga; 

OETH, GEORGE, (Marion) age 23 ; B., Lake 
Creek, 111. Farming. Entrained June 27, '18, Camp 
Wheeler, Ga. 

OLIVER, FRANK, (Marion) age 21 ; B., Ozark, 
111. Son of Will Oliver, Ozark. 111. Employed Mar- 
ion, 111. Farming. Entrained Sept. 6, '18, Camp 
Forrest, Lytle, Ga. 

OLIVERI, MICHELE, (Marion) age 24 ; B., Italy. 
Son of Melchiore Oliver, Italy. Employed West Va. 
Coal Co., Marion, 111. Mining. Entrained May 28, 
'18, Camp Shelby, Miss. 

OMER, ALLEN CLAYBOURN, (Herrin) age 24 ; 
B., Caseyville, Ky. Employed Pond Creek Coal Co., 
Herrin, 111. Miner. Entrained May 29, '18, Ft. 
Thomas, Ky. 

ONSTOTT, JOSEPH H., (Crab Orchard) age 26 ; 
B., Pulaski, Ky. Son of Samuel Onstott, Marion, 
111. Farming. Entrained Sept. 6, '17, Camp Taylor, 
Ky. 

OSTRANDER, JAMES, (Herrin) age 28 ; B.. Sag- 
inaw, Michigan. Employed W. P. Rend Coal Co.. 
Weaver, 111. Mining. Entrained May 28, '18, Camp 
Shelby, Miss. 

OTTOLINI, CAESAR, (Herrin) age 28 ; B., Bus- 
cate, Italy. Employed C. & O. Coal Co., Herrin, 111. 
Miner. Entrained April 29, '18, Camp Dix, N. J. 

OTTOLINI, FREDO, (Herrin) age 21 ; B., Bus- 
cate, Italy. Baker. Entrained May 28, '18, Camp 
Shelby, Miss. 

OTEY, ED RAINEY, (Marion) age 19 ; B., Mar- 
ion, 111. Son of Frank Otey, Marion. 111. Student. 
Entrained Oct. 6, '18, University of 111., S. A. T. C. 



243 



= -rr~y i fr T) 




OWEN, FREEMAN LEO, (Herrin) age 23 ; B., 
Pittsburg, 111. Employed Davis Bros. Garage, Her- 
rin, 111. Mechanic. Entrained Sept. 20, '17, Camp 
Taylor, Ky. 

OWENS, AUSTIN, (Marion) age 22 ; B., Marlon, 111. 
Employed Scranton Big Muddy Coal Co., Pittsburg, 
111. Coal Miner. Entrained Oct. 5, '17, Camp Tay- 
lor, Ky. Rejected at Camp. 

OWENS, BARNEY McKINLEY, (Marion) age 21 ; 
B., Marion, 111. Son of Robert Owens, Marion, 111. 
Employed West Va.- Coal Co. Coal Mining. En- 
trained May 28, '18, Camp Shelby, Miss. Rejected 
at Camp. 

OZMENT, JAMES, (Creal Springs) age 28 ; B., Car- 
rier Mills, 111. Son of S. R, Ozment. Farming. En- 
trained June 27, '18, Camp Shelby, Miss. 
PARKS, EAR!,, (Stonefort) age 26 ; B., Carrier 
Mills, 111. Son of W. B. Parks, Stonefort, 111. Farm- 
ing. Entrained June 27, '18, Camp Wheeler, Ga. 
PATRICK ALVA, (Clifford) age 21 ; B., Elnora, 
Ind. Employed Big Muddy Coal & Iron Co., Clif- 
ford, 111. Mining. Entrained March 12, '18, Camp 
Taylor, Ky. 

PARKS, RAY, (Stonefort) age 21 ; B., Carrier Mills. 
111. Son of W. B. Parks, Stonefort, 111. Employed 
Stonefort, 111. Farming. Entrained Feb. 25, '18, 
Camp Taylor, Ky. 

PATE, ROBERT LEE, (Johnston City)" age 29; B., 
Webster County, Ky. Employed Big Muddy Fuel Co., 
N. Va. Mine. Mining. Entrained May 29, '18, Ft. 
Thomas, Ky. 

PALDRMO, CALOGERO, (Johnston City) age 
25 ; B., Burgio, Italy. Employed Johnston City, 111. 
Pool Hall. Entrained May 9, '18, Camp Taylor, Ky. 
PATTERSON, WILL, (Marion) age 21 ; B., Harris- 
burg, 111. Employed Marion Pittsburg Coal Co. 
Coal Mining. Entrained Sept. 6, '18, Camp Forrest, 
Lytle, Ga. 

PAPE, HENRY CHARLIE, (Marion) age 26 ; B., 
Edwardsville 111. Son of William Pape, Marion, 111. 
Farming. Entrained June 27, '18, Camp Wheeler, 
Ga. 

PARKS, CHARLES HARRISON, (Marion) age 28 ; 
B., Crab Orchard, 111. Employed Southern 111. Gas 
Co., Marion, 111. Shop and Street Foreman. En- 
trained May 17, '18, Washington Barracks, Washing- 
ton, D. C. 

PARKS, CHARLES C., (Marion) age 28 ; B., Crab 
Orchard, 111. Son of R. L. Parks, Marion, 111. Em- 
ployed Pittsford Dry Goods Co., Wheaton, 111. Gen- 
eral Manager. Entrained July '18, Camp Travis, 
Texas. 

PARKS, ELDRIDGE TED, (Marion) age 29 ; B., 
Crab Orchard, 111. Bartender, Marion, 111. En- 
trained Sept. 21, '17, Camp Taylor, Ky. 
PAQUETTE, FRANK T., (Marion) age 24 ; B., 
Carthage, 111. Son of Frank G. & Beatrice Paquette. 
Married Helen Evans. Clerk. Entrained June 28, 
'18. Camp Wheeler, Ga. Overseas Nov. 11, '18. Dis- 
charged Camp Grant, 111., Feb. 24, '19. 
PATRICK, JOSEPH W., (Carterville) age 27 ; B., 
Carterville, 111. Employed I. C. R. R., Carterville, 
111. Laborer. Entrained May 28, '18, Camp Shel- 
by, Miss. 

PARRENT, JOE E., (Murst) age 28 ; B., Ava, 111. 
Employed Western Coal Mining Co., Bush, 111. Min- 
ing. Entrained May 28, '18, Camp Shelby, Miss. 
PACKMAN, MORRIS, (Herrin) age 25 : B.. Os- 
tropol, Valgn, Russia. Employed S. M. Stein. Herrin, 
111. Clerk. Entrained April 29, '18, Camp Dix, 
N. J. 

PARLO, ALDO, (Herrin) age 21 ; B., Isola, Italy. 
Employed W. P. Rend Coal Co., Herrin. 111. Mining. 
Entrained Mar. 12, '18, Camp Taylor, Ky. 
PARENT, JOSEPH, (Herrin) age 28; B., Bech, 
Belgium. Employed C. & C. Coal Co., Herrin, 111. 
Mining. Entrained May 23, '18, Jefferson Barracks, 
Mo. 

PALMER, JOHN E., (Hurst) age 24 ; B., Mt. Ver- 
non. 111. Employed Mo. Pacific R. R. Co., Bush, 111. 
Boiler Maker. Entrained May 28, '18, Camp Shelby, 
Miss. 



PAMATAH, SAM, (Herrin) age 23 ; B., Scuvalkl, 
Russia. Employed W. P. Rend Coal Co., Herrin, 
111. Miner. Enlisted July 10, '17, Jefferson Bar- 
racks, Mo. 

PARKER, EDDIE, (Creal Springs) age 28 ; B., 
Massac Co., 111. Son of John Parker. Farming. En- 
trained Feb. 25, '18, Camp Taylor, Ky. 
PERRINE, HENRY, (Herrin) age 20 ; Employed 
as Coal Miner. Son of George and Harriette Per- 
rine. Enlisted Oct. 10, 1918. Attached to McKend- 
rell Unit of S. A. F. C. Discharged at McKendree, 
Dec. 10, 1918. 

PERRY, ELSA, (Centralia, 111.). Enlisted. 
PEARSON, OSCAR, (Johnston City) age 30 ; B., 
Longstreth, Ohio. Employed at Williamson Co. 
Coal Co. Mining. Entrained May 29, '18, Camp Sher- 
man, Ohio. 

PENROD, JESSE FRANKLIN, (Johnston City) 
age 21 ; B., Madisonville, Ky. Son of Anna Gill, 
Johnston City, 111. Employed Searles Coal Co., 
Johnston City, 111. Coal Miner. Entrained Sept. 6, 
'18, Camp Forrest, Lytle, Ga. 

PECORARO, BATISTA, (Johnston City) age 27 ; 
B., Italy. Employed Lake Creek Coal Co., Jonns- 
ton City, 111. Coal Miner. Entrained May 28, '18, 
Camp Shelby, Miss. 

PEARCE, MARVIN JONES, (Johnston City) age 
20 ; B., Sebree, Ky. Son of Maggie Pearce, Johns- 
ton City, 111. Student. Entrained Oct. 11, '18, Uni- 
versity of 111., S. A. T. C. 

PERRY, CHARLIE MOODY, (Marion) age 23 ; B., 
Pulley's Mill, 111. Son of Ella Perry, Marion, III. 
Employed Otis Graves. Porter. Entrained May 
28, '18, Camp Shelby, Miss. Rejected at Camp. 
PEEBLES, BURNEY F., (Marion) age 21 ; B., 
Marion, HI. Tailor. Entrained May 28, '18, Camp 
Shelby, Miss. 

PERRY, BEN, (Carterville) age 24 ; B., Carter- 
ville, 111. Law Student. Entrained May 28, '18, Camp 
Shelby, Miss. 

PETERSON, FRED TAYLOR, (Creal Springs) 
age 22 ; B., Creal Springs, 111. Farming. Entrain- 
ed Sept. 21, '17, Camp Taylor, Ky. 
PENROD, JAMES, (Carterville) age 22; B., Don- 
gola, 111. Employed Hafer Coal Co., Carterville, 111. 
Mining. Entrained May 23, '18, Jefferson Barracks, 
Mo. 

PERI, JOE, (Herrin) age 26 ; B., Nazzara Delval- 
lo, Tropany, Italy. Employed Pond Creek Coal Co., 
Herrin, 111. Mining. Entrained Sept. 20, '17, Camp 
Taylor, Ky. 

PERRINE, DALLAS E., (Herrin) age 23 ; B., Car- 
terville, 111. Employed W. P. Rend Coal Co., Her- 
rin 111 Mining. Entrained Mar. 12, '18, Camp Tay- 
lor, Ky. 

PETTINA, MATTEE, (Herrin) age 29 ; B.. For- 
ni, Italy. Employed C. & C. Coal Co., Herrin, 111. 
Mining. Entrained Sept. 5, '17, Camp Taylor, Ky. 
PHILLIPS, MARTIN ARLIGH, (Crab Orchard) 
age 21 ; B., Corinth, 111. Son of C. R. Phillips, 
Thompsonville, 111. Blacksmith. Entrained April 29, 
'18, Camp Dix, N. J. 

PHILLIPS, RAY, (Carbondale) age 25 ; B., Car- 
terville, 111. Employed at Carbondale, 111. Farm- 
ing. Entrained Aug. 14, '18, Northwestern Univer- 
sity, Evanston, 111. 

PHILLIPS, WILLIAM, (Clifford) age 22 ; B., Col- 
gate, Okla. Employed at Big Muddy Coal & Iron 
Co., Clifford, 111. Motorman at Coal Mine. Entrain- 
ed May 28, '18, Camp Shelby, Miss. 
PHILLIPS, BYRAN E., (Crab Orchard) age 25; 
B., Crab Orchard, 111. Son of C. R. Phillips, Thomp- 
sonville, 111. Employed at Spillertown, 111. Teach- 
ing. Enlisted in Navy, 1918. 

PHILLIPS, COY, (Marion) age 25; B., Creal 
Springs, 111. Son of Milton Phillips, Marion, 111. 
Farming. Entrained June 27, '18, Camp Wheeler, 
Ga. 

PHALP, JOHN OLIVER, (Marion) age 24 ; B., 
Durham, England. Employed Peabody Coal Co. Coal 
Mining. Entrained Sept. 21, '18. Camp Taylor, Ky. 
Discharged Feb. 5, '18. Disability. 



244 




PHILLIPS, FRED C., (Carterville) age 24; B., 
Carterville, 111. Son of J. H. and Dora Phillips. 
Miner. Carterville, 111. Entrained Mar. 12, '18. On 
duty at Camp Shelby, receiving overseas patients. 
Now at Base Hospital, Camp Shelby, Hattiesburg, 
Miss. 

PHILLIPS, HARVEY, (Creal Springs) age 28 ; B., 
Williamson Co., 111. Son of Josie Phillips. Employ- 
ed Harco Mining Co., Harrisburg, 111. Coal Miner. 
Entrained June 27, '18, Camp Wheeler, Ga. 

PHILLIPS, WILLIAM KEITH, (Hurst) age 23 ; 
B., DeSoto, 111. Employed Western Coal & Mining 
Co., Bush, 111. Laborer. Entrained Sept. 20, '17, 
Camp Taylor, Ky. 

PHILLIPS, JAMES MARION, (Creal Springs) age 
30 ; B., Hudgens, 111. Son of Mat Philips. Em- 
ployed Harco Coal Co., Harrisburg, 111. Coal Min- 
ing. Entrained Feb. 25, '18, Camp Taylor, Ky. 
PIAZZA, GUISEPPE, (White Ash) age 26; B., It- 
aly. Employed at Big Muddy Fuel & Coal Co., 
Johnston City, 111. Coal Mining. Entrained May 
28, '18, Camp Shelby, Miss. Discharged Nov. 21, '18. 
PIAZZA, VINCENZO, (Whiteash) age 21 ; B., Bur- 
gio, Italy. Employed at West Virginia Coal Co., Mar- 
ion, 111. Entrained May 29, '18, Camp Shelby, Miss. 
Discharged Aug. 5, '18. Disability. 
PIAZZA, ROCCO, (Whiteash) age 21 ; B., Italy. 
Employed at Big Muddy Fuel Co. Coal Miner. En- 
trained April 29, '18, Camp Dix, N. J. 

PINA, LUDOVIC, (Colp) age 26 ; B., Lasnigo, 
Lombardy, Italy. Employed at Madison Coal Corp., 
Colp, 111. Mining. Entrained April 29, '18, Camp 
Dix, N. J. 

PINA, CAESER, (Colp) age 30 ; B., Lamigo, Lom- 
bardo, Italy. Employed at Colp, 111. Teamster. 
Entrained April 29, '18, Camp Dix, N. J. 
PICKETT, LINCOLN, (Colp) age 28 ; B., White- 
ville, Tenn. Employed at Big Muddy Coal & Iron 
Co Clifford, 111. Mining. Entrained Aug. 21, '18, 
Camp Grant, 111. 

PIPIA, GIROLANO, (Johnston City) age 22 ; B., 
Burgio, Italy. Employed Johnston City Coal Co. 
Mining. Entrained June 27, '18, Camp Wheeler, Ga. 

PICHON, LOUIS, (Johnston City) age 27 ; B., Kel- 
leyville, 111. Employed Searls Coal Co., Johnston 
City, 111. Mining. Entrained April 29, '18, Camp 
Dix, N. J. 

PICKERING, THOMAS, (Johnston City) age 26 ; 
B., Harrisburg, 111. Employed Williamson County 
Coal Co., Johnston City, 111. Coal Miner. Entrain- 
ed Oct. 5, '17, Camp Taylor, Ky. 

PIKE, WILLIAM, (Marion) age 27 ; B., Carter- 
ville, 111. Son of George Pike, Herrin, 111. Employ- 
ed West Va. Coal Co. Coal Mining. Entrained 
May 29, '18, Ft. Thomas, Ky. Rejected at Camp. 
PILTZ, LEO, (Carterville) age 30 ; B., Carter- 
ville, 111. Employed Federal Coal Co., Carterville, 
111. Mining. Entrained May 10, '18, Ft. Thomas, Ky. 

PINKSTON, CHARLEY E., (Hurst) age 25 ; D., 
Carbondale, 111. Employed Mo. Pacific R. R., Bush, 
111. Locomotive Fireman. Entrained Mar. 12, '18, 
Camp Taylor, Ky. 

PLAUSKEY, VINCENT, (Spillertown) age 26 ; B., 
Klovana, Russia. Son of Simon Plauskey, Spiller- 
town, 111. Employed West Virginia Coal Co., Marion, 
III Coal Miner. Entrained Feb. 25, '18, Camp 
Taylor, Ky. 

PLEGGE, CLARENCE, (Marion) age 25 ; B., Mar- 
ion, 111. Employed Williamson County Coal Co. Ma- 
chine work. Entrained Feb. 25, '18, Camp Taylor, 
Ky. 

PLATING, LOUIE, (Johnston City) age 27 ; B., 
Foutanetto Agogna, Italy. Employed Consolidated 
Coal Co., Johnston City, 111. Mining. Entrained 
Sept. 4, '18, Camp Grant, 111. 

PLEGGE, EDGAR OTTO, (Marion) age 30 B , 
Herrin, III. Son of Ed Plegge, Marion. 111. Team- 
ster. Entrained June 27, '18, Camp Wheeler, Ga. 
POSTLE, WM. LESTER, (Chicago, 111.) Son of 
Mrs. Martha Postle, Chicago, 111. Enlisted. 



POE, JOHN W., (Johnston City) age 26 ; B Daw- 
son Springs, Ky. Employed at Williamson County 
Coal Co., Johnston City, 111. Mining. Entrained May 
28, '18, Camp Shelby, Miss. 

POSTLE, WILLIAM LESTER, (Marion) age 27; 
B, Braceville, III. Son of Martha Postle, Chicago, 
111. Fire Marshal. Enlisted in army. 
POWELL, JOHN M., (Marion) age 24 ; B., Alma, 
111. Son of Sarah Powell, Marion, III Livery Stable 
Man. Entrained May 28, '18, Camp Shelby, Miss. 
POTTER, ALSEY A., (Marion) age 30 ; B., Ga- 
latia, 111. Employed Geneva, 111. Chauffeur. En- 
trained June 27, '18, Camp Wheeler, Ga. Rejected 
at camp. 

POLI, FRANK, (Herrin) age 28 ; B., Cella Dat, 
Cremona, Italy. Employed Sunnyside Coal Co., Her- 
rin, 111. Mining. Entrained May 23, '18, Jefferson 
Barracks, Mo. 

POPE, LEONARD MURPHY, (Herrin) age 21 ; B., 
Herrin, 111. Employed Bracy Fruit Co., Herrin, 
111. Enlisted Great Lakes Training School, July, 

POPHAM, JOHN H., (Herrin) age 27 ; B., Glyn- 
cordag, Wales, G. B. Employed R. L. Adams, Her- 
rin, 111. Mining. Entrained Aug. '18, Camp Hum- 
phries, Va. 

PREEDE, JOHN, (Energy) age 27 ; B., Riga, Rus- 
sia. Employed at Egyptian Powder Co., Marion, 111. 
Millwright. Entrained April 29, '18, Camp Dix, 
N. J. 

PRICE, BEN, (Pittsburg) age 22 ; B., Brandwood, 
111. Employed at Ernest Coal Co., Pittsburg, 111. 
Coal Miner. Entrained May 28, '18, Camp Shelby, 
Miss: 

PRITCHETT, RAY, (Goreville) age 21 ; B., Gore- 
ville, 111. Son of Alfred Pritchett, Goreville, 111. 
Farmer. Entrained Sept. 6, '18, Forrest, Lytle, Ga. 

PRITCHETT, WILLIAM C., (Goreville) age 23 ; 
B., Goreville, 111. Son of A. L. Pritchett, Goreville, 
111. Farmer. Entrained June 27, '18, Camp Wheel- 
er, Ga. 

PRZYKOPANSKI, HENRY, (Lincoln) age 26; B., 
Lincoln, 111. Employed W. P. Rend Coal Co., Her- 
rin, 111. Mining. Entrained Sept. 20, '17, Camp Tay- 
lor, Ky. 

PRIDE, LEO BRYAN, (Marion) age 21 ; B., Mar- 
ion, 111. Carpenter. Entrained July 29, '18, Van- 
couver Barracks, Washington. 

PRIDE, ROBERT E., (Marion) age 23 ; B., Mar- 
ion. 111. Employed Lamb Construction Co. En- 
trained June 23, '18, Kansas City, Mo. Honorably 
discharged. 

PRICE, JARRETT, (Marion) age 27 ; B., Parrish, 
111. Son of James Price, Marion, 111. Teamster. En- 
trained Sept. 21, '17, Camp Taylor, Ky. Discharg- 
ed after 40 days service National Guardsman for 
9 months prior to induction. 

PRESLEY, FRANK, (Marion) age 25 ; B., Marion, 
111. Son of Wm. Presley, Marion, 111. Section La- 
borer. Entrained June 27, '18, Camp Wheeler, Ga. 
PRESLEY, WILLIAM J., (Creal Springs) age 28 ; 
B., Sparta, 111. Employed C. & E. I. R. R. Co., 
Neilson, 111. Telegrapher. Entrained May 28, '18, 
Camp Shelby, Miss. 

PRATHER, JESS F., (Energy) age 21 ; B., Polk 
County, 111. Employed at Coal Belt Elect. Ry., Her- 
rin, 111. Fireman. Entrained April 29, '18, Camp 
Dix, N. J. 

PULLEY, ELMER, J., (Stonefort) B., Stonefort, 
111. Son of E. E. Pulley, Stonefort, 111. Dentist. En- 
listed Dec. 14, '17, in Medical Enlisted Reserve 
Corps, Fort Benjamin Harrison, Ind. 
PULLEY, RALPH BRYAN, (Stonefort) age 21 ; 
B., Stonefort, 111. Son of E. E. Pulley, Stonefort, 
111. Employed at Continental Nat'l Bank, Indianap- 
olis, Ind. Bookkeeper. Enlisted in Navy, July 22, 
18. 

PULLEY, GUY ALTA, (Marion) age 26 ; B., Crab 
Orchard, 111. Son of Lucy Pulley, Marion, 111. Em- 
ployed Colp Coal Co., Pittsburg, 111. Fireman. En- 
trained June 27, '18, Camp Wheeler, Ga. 



245 



tf ri if 
\ -\\ *y\ - 




PULLEY, WILLIS GREEN, (Marion) age 21 ; B., 
Marion, 111. Farmer. Entrained Sept. 6, '18, Camp 
Forrest, Lytle, Ga. Rejected at Camp. 

PULLEY, WAYNE CARAL, (Marion) age 23 ; B., 
Crab Orchard, 111. Son of Ike Pulley, Creal Springs, 
111. Employed Scranton Big Muddy Coal Co. Fire- 
man. Entrained May 28, '18, Camp Shelby, Miss. 

PULLEY, CHESTER PERSA, (Marion) age 24 ; B., 
Crab Orchard, 111. Son of Lucy A. Pulley, Marion, 
111. Employed Colp Coal Co., Pittsburg, 111. Min- 
ing and farming. Entrained May 23, '18, Jefferson 
Bks., Mo. 

PULLEY, HARLEY NAY, (Marion) age 24 ; >., 
Marion, 111. Farming. Entrained Oct. 5, '17, Camp 
Taylor, Ky. Discharged Aug. 21, '18. Disability. 
PULLIAM, JOHN LESTER, (Carterville) age 21 ; 
B., Carterville, 111. Employed Federal Coal Co., 
Carterville. Mining. Entrained Oct. 21, '18, Camp 
Wheeler, Ga. 

PUCKETT, SAMUEL B., (Herrin) age 21 ; B., 
Benton, 111. Employed Herrin, 111. Barber. En- 
trained May 21, '18, Camp Pike, Little Rock, Ark. 

PUDZELIS, PETE, (Herrin) age 30 ; B., Laukawa. 
Russia. Employed W. P. Rend Coal Co., Herrin. 
111. Mining. Entrained June 27, '18, Camp Wheel- 
er, Ga. 

RAINS, AUDIE H., ( Thompson ville) age 22 ; B.. 
Corinth, 111. Employed Dewmaine, 111. Merchant. 
Entrained May 28, '18, Camp Shelby, Miss. 

RAMSEY, LUTHER, (Johnston City) age 21 ; B., 
Wolf Creek, 111. Employed with Ernest Coal Co., 
Johnston City, 111. Motorman. Entrained May 28, 
'18, Camp Shelby, Miss. 

RADER, JOHN LEMUEL, (Marion) age 21 ; B., 
Pulleys Mill. 111. Son of L. F. Rader, Marion, 111. 
Employed West Va. Coal Mine. Bookkeeper. En- 
trained Sept. 6, '18, Camp Forrest, Lytle, Ga. Hon- 
orably discharged. 

RADER, HARRY EUGENE, (Marion) age 23 ; B., 
Marion, 111. Employed West Va. Coal Co. Coal 
Miner. Enlisted in Navy, Jan. 4, '18. 

RAMSEY, MARION M.. (Carterville) age 27; B., 
Carterville, 111. Employed Madison Coal Corp., 
Colp, 111. Miner. Entrained June 27, '18, Camp 
Wheeler, Macon, Ga. 

RENTFRO, CHARLES, (Johnston City) age 23 ; 
B., Mulkeytown, 111. Employed at Lamb Construc- 
tion Co., Johnston City. 111. Laborer. Entrained 
May 28, '18, Camp Shelby, Miss. 

REUTER, WILLIAM PAUL, (Marion) age 23 ; 
B., Carbon Hill, 111. Son of Freda Renter, Chey- 
enne, Colo. Employed Peabody Coal Co. Mining. 
Entrained May 15, '18, Chicago, 111. 
REMLEY, MARSHALL. (Herrin) age 22 ; B., Co- 
lumbus, Ky. Employed George Young. Farmer. 
Entrained May 28, '18, Camp Shelby, Miss. 
REFERNO, FRANK. (Herrin) age 31 ; B., Turino, 
Italy. Employed W. P. Rend Coal Co., Herrin, 111. 
Miner. Entrained June 27, '18, Camp Wheeler, Ga. 

REEVES, JOHN HENRY, (Cambria) age 24 ; B., 
Cambria, 111. Employed Carterville Big Muddy Coal 
Co., Cambria, 111. Coal Miner. Entrained Aug. 1, 
'18, Syracuse, N. Y. 

RENWICK, ROBERT. (Herrin) age 25 ; B., Ham- 
ilton, Scotland. Employed W. P. Rend Coal <_o.. 
Herrin, 111. Miner. Entrained Oct. 4, '17, Camp 
Taylor, Ky. 

REESE, OTIE, (Creal Springs) age 26 ; B., Mar- 
ion, I1L Farmer. Entrained Sept. 21, '17, Camp 
Taylor. Ky. 

REESE, ERNEST GOTTLIEB, (Creal Springs) 

age 22 ; B., Marion, 111. Employed Harrison White 

Farm. Farming. Entrained June 27, '18, Camp 

Wheeler, Ga. 

REDNOUR, CHARLES, (Bush) age 26 ; B., Car- 

bondale. 111. Barber. Entrained May 28, '18, Camp 

Shelby, Miss. 

RICCI, ANGELO, (Johnston City) age 27; B., 

Snardi, Italy. Employed Johnston City, 111. Baker. 

Entrained May 28, '18, Camp Shelby, Miss. 



RICHARDS, JOHN J., (Bush) age 23; B., Dunlap, 
Tenn. Employed at Royalton, 111. Brick Layer. En- 
trained March 12, '18, Camp Taylor, Ky. 
RICHEY, MILO, (Stonefort) age 23 ; B., Crab Or- 
chard, 111. Son of Frank and Fannie Richey. Farm- 
er, Stonefort. Entrained June 27, '18, Camp Wheeler, 
Ga. Attached to 1st Pro. Regt., 31st Div. Dis- 
charged July 1, '18, at Camp Wheeler, Ga. 
RICHEY, ALBERT, (Stonefort) age 26 ; B., Wil- 
liamson Co., 111. Son of A. Richey. Entrained June 
27, 1918, for Camp Wheeler, Ga. Overseas Oct. 8, 
'18. Attached to Co. D., 144th Machine Gun, 31st 
Division. Discharged at Camp Grant, 111, May 14, 
'19. 

RIGGS, HUGH, (Marion) age 22 ; B., St. Louis, Mo. 
Employed Ernest Coal Co., Pittsburg, III Coal 
Miner. Entrained June 27, '18, Camp Wheeler, Ga. 
RIBSTEIN, NATHAN LEWIS, (Marion) age 25 ; 
B., Kovna, Russia, Salesman. Entrained Sept. 17, 
'18, Camp Taylor, Ky. Rejected at Camp. 
RICCHIVTI, JOHN W., (Marion) age 25 ; B., It- 
aly. Employed Peabody Coal Co. Coal Mining. En- 
trained May 28, '18, Camp Shelby, Miss. 
RICE, CHARLEY, (Herrin) age 21 ; B., Ever- 
green, Ala. Employed Big Muddy Coal & Iron Co., 
Herrin, 111. Coal Miner. Entrained May 23, '18, 
Jefferson Barracks, Mo. 

RIMKAS, CHARLIE, (Herrin) age 29 ; B., Rus- 
sia. Employed W. P. Rend Coal Co., Herrin, 111. 
Miner. Entrained June 27, '18, Camp Wheeler, Ga. 
RIDGEWAY, ELZO R., (Herrin) age 21 ; B., Ma- 
kanda, 111. Farmer. Entrained June 27, '18, Camp 
Wheeler, Ga. 

RINADO, JOE, (Johnston City) age 29 ; B., Bas- 
sass Co., Italy. Employed Johnston City Coal Co., 
Johnston City, 111. Coal Miner. Entrained May 23, 
'18, Jefferson Bks., Mo. 

^RILEY, WILLIAM, (Bush) age 23 ; B., Ava, 111. 
Employed at Western Coal & Mining Co., Bush, 111. 
Miner. Entrained Sept. 20, '17, Camp Taylor, Ky. 
RICCI, ERNEST, (Freeman) age 29 ; B., Swoorti, 
Italy. Employed at Freemanspur, 111. Baker. En- 
trained May 28, '18, Camp Shelby, Miss. 
RICHARDS, HERBERT, (Bush) age 27 ; B., Pike- 
ville, Tenn. Brick Layer. Entrained March 12, 
'18, Camp Taylor, Ky. 

ROBERTS, EDWARD E., (Thompsonville) age 21 ; 
B., Carbondale, 111. Son of Ella J. Roberts, Thomp- 
sonville, 111. Farming. Entrained June 27, '18, 
Camp Wheeler, Ga. 

ROTRAMEL, GEORGE LAWRENCE. (Johnston 
City) age 24 ; B., Thompsonville, 111. Son of Mar- 
shal Rotromel, Johnston City, 111. Employed Searls 
Coal Co:, Johnston City, 111. Electrician. Entrain- 
ed May 28, '18, Camp Shelby, Miss. 
ROBINSON, JR. JOHN M., (Johnston City) age 21 ; 
B., Murphysboro, 111. Employed Johnston City, 111. 
Bookkeeper. Entrained June 14, '18, Bradley In- 
stitute, Peoria, 111. 

RODASTO, JOCO, (Johnston City) age 25 ; B., 
Burgeo, Italy. Employed Johnston City, 111. Team- 
ster. Entrained May 9, '18, Camp Taylor, Ky. 
ROBERTS, HERMAN L., (Johnston City) age 27 ; 
B., Williamson County, 111. Farmer. Entrained 
June 27, '18, Camp Wheeler, Ga. 
RODASTO, GIROLANO, (Johnston City) age 26 ; 
B., Burgio, Italy. Employed at Williamson County 
Coal Co., Johnston City, 111. Miner. Entrained 
Mar. 18, '18, Ft. Oglethorpe, Ga. 

ROTRAMMEL, ORLIE E., (Johnston City) B., 
Thompsonville, 111. Son of Mary Rotrammel, Johns- 
ton City, 111. Employed at Consolidated Coal Co., 
Whiteash, 111. Entrained May 28, '18, Camp Shelby, 
Miss. 

ROWLAND, RAY, (Goreville) age 21 ; B., Gore- 
ville, 111. Son of J. E. Rowland. Farming. En- 
trained June 27, '18, Camp Wheeler, Ga. 
ROSS, JAMES, (Clifford) age 21 ; B., Murphys, 
Miss. Employed at Big Muddy Coal & Iron Co., 
Clifford, 111. Coal Miner. Entrained April 29, '18, 
Camp Grant, IU. 



246 



I 



ROCASSI, RALPH, (Hurst) age 31 ; B., Italy. Son 
of Alesso and Rosa Rocassi. Clerk, Hurst. En- 
trained June 22, '18, Herrin, 111. Attached to llth 
Prov. Regt. 31st Div. Discharged at Camp Wheel- 
er, Ga., June 27, '18. 

ROMONIO, JIM, (Herrin) B., Italy. Son of Dom- 
inic and Tressa Romonio. Married Mary Varacoli. 
Coal Miner. Entrained Sept. 6, '18, Camp Forrest, 
Georgia. Attached to 52nd Engineer Co. Dis- 
charged Camp Custer, Michigan, Dec. 28, '18. 
RODGERS, LEE ROY (Marlon) age 21 ; B., He- 
lena, Ark. Employed Chicago Big Muddy Coal & 
Coke Co. Coal Mining. Entrained June 27, '18, 
Camp Wheeler, Ga. 

RONNEY, JIMMY, (Marion) age 22. Son of Mary 
Ronney, Marion, 111. Student. Enlisted in Canadian 
Army in the year '15. Honorably discharged. Ed- 
ucated by Canadian Government. Now resides with 
wife in Scotland. 

RODGERS, WILLIAM, (Marion) age 21 ; B., But- 
ler, Ky. Employed C. & E. I. R. R. Brakeman. 
Entrained Oct. 5, '17, Camp Taylor, Ky. 
ROGERS, JAMES M., (Marion) age 28 ; B., Cor- 
inth, 111. Son of W. C. Rogers, Johnston City, 111. 
Farming. Entrained June 27, '18, Camp Wheeler, 
Ga. 

RONNEY, THOMAS. (Marion) age 22 ; B., Scot- 
land. Son of Mary Ronney, Marion, 111. Employed 
Peabody Coal Co. Mining. Entrained April 29, '18, 
Camp Dix, N. J. 

ROBERTS, DUFF, (Marion) age 23 ; B., Marion, 
III Son of J. A. Roberts, Marion, 111. Employed 
O. S. Cole Motor Sales Co. Mechanic. Enlisted 
Dec. 11, '17, Aviation Corps, Mechanic, Scott Field. 

ROBERTS, LOUIE PEARL, (Marion) age 30 ; B., 
Marion. 111. Enlisted in Marine Corps, March 9, '18. 
ROACH, HOWARD W., (Marion) age 20 ; B., Car- 
terville, 111. Son of E. D. Roach, Marion, 111. Em- 
ployed Federal Coal Co., Carterville, 111. Chief 
Clerk. Entrained Oct. 15, '18, Chicago, 111. Re- 
jected. 

RODGERS, EZRA, (Marion) age 24 ; B., Campbell 
County, Ky. Son of Lewis Rogers, Marion, 111. Em- 
ployed Peabody Coal Co. Coal Mining. Entrained 
June 27, '18, Camp Wheeler, Ga. 

ROCCHI, SESTO, (Nevada, la.) age 29; B., Riol- 
onato, Italy. Son of John Rocchi. Coal Miner. En- 
trained Mar. 12, '18. Overseas June 19, '18. Eye 
shot out in battle of Argonne Forest. 

ROARK, MARVIN, (Herrin) age 27 ; B., McHenry, 
Ky. Employed C. & C. Coal Co., Herrin, 111. Min- 
er. Entrained May 29, '18, Ft. Thomas, Ky. 

ROBERTSON, CHAS. H., (Creal Springs) age 30 ; 
B., Stonefort, 111. Son of Mrs. Abbie Robertson Bar- 
ber. Entrained May 28, '18, Camp Shelby, Miss. 

ROMEO, CARMELO, (Colp) age 25 ; B., Gerace 
Manina, Italy. Employed at Madison Coal Co., Colp, 
111. Mining. Entrained May 28, '18, Camp Shelby, 

Miss. 

ROSS, HENRY, (Carterville) age 25 ; B., Big Bay, 
111. Employed Madison Coal Corp., Colp, 111. Coal 
Miner. Entrained April 29, '18, Camp Dix, N. J. 
ROBINSON, CORBITT, (Herrin) age 24 ; B., Nor- 
tonville, Ky. Son of Albert and Virginia Robinson. 
Employed as Miner, Herrin. Entrained Sept. 21, '17 
for Camp Taylor, Ky. Attached to Co. A., 325th 
M. G. Bn. Discharged Dec. 20, '17, at Camp Pike, 
Ark. 

ROMANOZIKY, MIKE, (Colp) age 21 ; B., Tim- 
bovckoe, Russia. Employed at Madison Coal Co., 
Colp, 111. Coal Miner. Entrained July '18, Camp 
Wheeler, Ga. 

ROCCHI, SESTO, (Bush) age 27; B., Riolunato, 
Italy. Employed at Western Coal Mine Co., Bush, 
III. Coal Miner. Entrained Mar. 12, '18, Camp 
Taylor, Ky. 

ROMEO, JOE, (Colp) age 21 ; B., Greace, Marina, 
Italy. Employed at Madison Coal Corp., Colp, 111. 
Coal Miner. Entrained Mar. 12, '18, Camp Taylor, 
Ky. 




RUHE, EDWIN, (Johnston City) age 22 ; B., New 
Memphis, 111. Employed Ernest Coal Co., Johnston 
City, 111. Coal Miner. Entrained Mar. 12, '18, 
Camp Taylor, Ky. 

RUBUFFANE, SAM, (Johnston City) age 28 ; B., 
Italy. Employed at Lake Creek Coal Co., Johnston 
City, 111. Coal Miner. Entrained May 23, '18, Jef- 
ferson Bks., Mo. Emergency Call. 
RUFF, CARL JOSEPH, (Johnston City) age 23 ; 
B., Troy, 111. Employed at Williamson Co. Coal Co., 
Johnston City, 111. Coal Mining. Entrained June 
27, '18, Camp Wheeler, Ga. 

RUSSELL, GEORGE L., (Clifford) age 27 ; B., 
Brookport, 111. Employed Big Muddy Coal & Iron 
Co., Clifford, 111. Entrained May 23, '18, Jefferson 
Bks., Mo. 

RUSHING, WILLIAM (Whiteash) age 28 ; B., P im- 
once. 111. Son of Joel Rushing, Marissa, III. Kni- 
ployed at Johnston City, 111. Coal Miner. !' 'train- 
ed May 2,8, '18, Cam,) Shelby, Jliss. 
RUSSO, RALPH, (Pittsburg) age 27 ; B., Italy. 
Employed at West Va. Coal Co., Marion, 111. Coal 
Miner. Entrained May 28, '18, rejected at Camp 
Shelby, Miss. 

RUSHING, HENRY, (Marion) age 27 ; B., Ozark, 
111. Employed Chicago & Big Muddy Coal & Coke 
Co. Coal Miner. Entrained June 27, '18, Camp 
Wheeler, Ga. 

RUSSELL, JOSEPH HENRY, (Marion) age 30 ; 
B., Marion, 111. Son of Joseph H. Russell, Marion, 
111. Employed Chicago Big Muddy Coal & Coke 
Co. Coal Miner. Entrained June 27, '18, Camp 
Wheeler, Ga. Rejected at Camp. 
RUSHING, CLYDE, (Marion) age 21 ; B., Anna, 
111. Son of J. L. Rushing, Marion, 111. Farmer. 
Entrained Sept. 6, '18, Camp Forrest, Lytle, Ga. 
RUGGERI, ANGELO, (Herrin) age 27 ; B., Tur- 
bigo, Lombardo, Italy. Employed C. & C. Coal Co., 
Mine A., Herrin, 111. Miner. Entrained Mar. 12, 
'18, Camp Taylor, Ky. 

RUGGERI, ANGELO, (Herrin) age 29 ; B., Tur- 
bigo, Italy. Employed with Garavaglia & Columbo. 
Bartender. Entrained May 28, '18, Camp Shelby, 
Miss. 

RUSSELL, ALEX, (Herrin) age 23 ; B., Dalserf, 
Scotland. Employed W. P. Rend Coal Co., Herrin, 
111. Miner. Entrained Oct. 4, '17, Camp Taylor, 
Ky. 

RUSSELL, JAMES WALTER, (Creal Springs) age 
25 ; Parker, 111. Son of Lizzie Russell. Employed 
W. W. Rodgers. Tailor. Entrained May 28, '18, 
Camp Shelby, Miss. 

RUTHFORD, JAMES E., (Carterville) age 26 ; B., 
Murphysboro, 111. Employed Snyder & Atwood Shows. 
Drummer. Entrained Mar. 12, '18, Camp Taylor, 
Ky. 

RUSSELL, LOYD, (Carterville) age 29 ; B., Du- 
quoin, 111. Employed Madison Coal Corp., Dew- 
maine, 111. Miner and Farmer. Entrained June 27, 
'18, Camp Wheeler, Macon, Ga. 

RUSSELL, WILLIAM CARRELL, (Carterville) 
age 22 ; B., Carterville, 111. Employed Taylor Coal 
Co. Miner. Entrained May 28, '18, Camp Shelby, 
Miss. 

RUSSELL, NORMAN H., (Carterville) age 21 ; B., 
Carterville, 111. Student Browns Business College, 
Marion, 111. Enlisted Mar. 19, '18, Navy, St. Louis, 
Mo. 

RUSSELL, JAMES TRENT, (Carterville) age 25 ; 
B., Carterville, 111. Employed Taylor Mining Co., 
Herrin, 111. Miner. Entrained May 29, '18, Ft. 
Thomas, Ky. 

RUSHING, OREN L., (Carterville) B., Carterville, 
111. Farmer. Entrained Mar. 12, '18, Camp Taylor, 
Ky. 

SADLER, HORACE, (Herrin) age 18 ; B., Hopkins- 
ville, Ky. Son of W. J. and Jane Sadler. Employed 
Miner. Enlisted May 17, '18. Overseas Aug. 26, 
'18. With Army of Occupation. Attached to Co. C., 
U. S. Engineers. Discharged Sept. 25, '19, Camp 
Grant, 111. 



247 



*=& 




SANDERS, JAMES, (Pittsburg) age 25; B., Pitts- 
burg, 111. Grandson of T. J. Sanders, Marion, 111. 
Employed at Keystone Big Muddy Coal & Coke Co. 
Coal Miner. Entrained May 28, '18, Rejected at 
Camp. 

SANDERS, MATHEW, (Freeman) age 29 ; B., near 
Johnston City, 111. Employed at W. P. Rend Coal 
Co., Weaver, 111. Miner. Entrained May 10, '18, 
Ft. Thomas, Ky. 

SARAFIN, ALFREDO, (Johnston City) age 28 ; &., 
Italy. Employed Johnston City, 111. Coal Mining. 
Entrained June 27, '18, Camp Wheeler, Ga. 
SANDERS, JOHN PALMER, (Whiteash) age 26 ; 
B., Johnston City, 111. Employed at Big Muddy Fuel 
Co., Johnston City, 111. Coal Miner. Enlisted. 
SANDERS, CALVIN, (Johnston City) age 29 ; B., 
Herrin, III. Employed Carterville & Herrin Coal 
Co., Herrin, 111. Mining. Entrained May 28, '18, 
Camp Shelby, Miss. 

SAMKO, JOHN, (Johnston City) age 25 ; B., Suin, 
Poland. Employed Johnston City Coal Co., Johns- 
ton City, 111. Mining. Entrained Oct. 4, '18, Camp 
Custer, Mich. 

SANDERS, JOSEPH HENRY, (Marion) B., Car- 
bondale. 111. Tool Dressing. Entrained Sept. 21 ; 
'17, Camp Taylor, Ky. 

SANDERS, LEON, (Marion.) Enlisted. 
SAUL, CHARLEY TROY, (Marion) age 25 ; B., 
Johnston City, 111. Son of Mary Saul, Marion, 111. En- 
trained June 27, '18, Camp Wheeler, Ga. Rejected. 
SALVO. JOE DI, (Marion) age 21 ; B., Villapanea, 
Italy. Son of Tony Di Salvo, Marion, 111. Employ- 
ed Peabody Coal Co. Coal Miner. Entrained Sept. 
6, '18, Camp Forrest, Lytle, Ga. Rejected at Camp. 
SANDERS, JOHN ANDREW, (Marion) age 21 ; B., 
Marion. 111. Employed at Ernest Coal Co., Pitts- 
burg. 111. Coal Miner. Entrained Sept. 21, '17, 
Camp Taylor, Ky. 

SANDERS, WILLIS HARRISON, (Johnston City) 
age 28 ; B., Lake Creek, 111. Employed Ernest Coal 
Co., Johnston City, 111. Coal Miner. Entrained Sept. 
21, '17, Camp Taylor, Ky. 

SANDERS, CHESLEY WADE. (Carterville) age 
27; B., Cottage Home, 111. Employed Carterville, 
111. Chauffeur. Enlisted June 3, '18, St. Louis, Mo. 
SADOSKI, JOHN, (Herrin) age 28 ; B., Lonizia, 
Poland, Russia. Employed W. P. Rend Coal Co., 
Herrin, 111. Mining. Entrained Mar. 12, '18, Camp 
Taylor, Ky. 

SARTORELLI, JOE, (Herrin) age 26 ; B., Busto 
Garffo, Italy. Employed C. & C. Coal Co., Herrin, 
111. Mining. Entrained April 29, '18, Camp Dix, N. 

J. 

SALOON, CHARLIE, (Herrin) age 29 ; B., Kama, 
Syria, Turkey. Employed Williamson & Franklin 
County, 111. Peddler. Entrained May 23, '18, Jef- 
ferson Barracks, Mo. 

SCARLETT, GUY EVERETT, (Whiteash) age 23 ; 
B., Benton, 111. Son of George Scarlett, Whiteash, 
111. Employed at Johnston City Washed Coal Co., 
Whiteash, 111. Coal Miner. Entrained May 28, '18, 
Rejected at Camp Shelby, Miss. 

SCURLOCK, HAROLD CAMERSON, (Johnston 
City) age 21 ; B., Marion, 111. Son of Mrs. Julia 
Scurlock, Johnston City, 111. Employed at Central, 
111. Public Service Co. Supt. Entrained June 5, 
'18, Camp Taylor, Ky. 

SCHWETZLER, ALBERT ROY, (Pinekneyville) 
age 22 ; B., Pinekneyville, 111. Employed Madison 
Coal Co., Dewmaine, 111. Butcher. Entrained Sept. 
20, '17, Camp Taylor, Ky. 
SCARDINA, TONY, (Marion.) Enlisted. 
SCOTT, HARRY, (Herrin) age 26 ; B., Hopkins 
City, Ky. Employed W. P. Rend Coal Co., Herrin, 
111. Mining. Entrained June 27, '18, Camp Wheeler, 
Macon, Ga. 

SECCANANI, SORTOLO, (Herrin) age 26 ; B., 
Anfo, Italy. Employed C. & C. Coal Co., Herrin, 
111. Mining. Entrained May 28, '18, Camp Shelby, 

Miss. 



SEVANT, PETE, (Johnston City) age 25 ; B., 
Coossola, Tornios, Italy. Employed Lake Creek 
Mine, Johnston City, 111. Mining. Entrained May 
10, '18, Ft. Thomas, Ky. 

SHIRLEY, ERVY, (Bush) age 24 ; B., Jackson Co., 
111. Employed in Williamson Co., 111. Farming. En- 
trained April 28, '18, Dix, N. J. 

SHIPLEY, HERBERT, (Clifford) age 27; B., Sale 
Creek, Tenn. Employed at Big Muddy Coal & Iron 
Co., Clifford, 111. Miner. Entrained June 27, '18, 
Camp Wheeler, Ga. 

SHORT, RAYMOND, (Marion) age 21 ; B., Makanda, 
111. Coal Miner. Entrained June 27, '18, Camp 
Wheeler, Ga. 

SHERERTZ, IRA DAVE, (Marion) age 24 ; B., 
Pittsburg, 111. Son of Martha Sherertz, Marion, III. 
Farming. Entrained June 27, '18, Camp Wheeler, 
Ga. 

SHERERTZ, EVERETT LOREN, (Marion) age 
18 ; B., Marion, 111. Son of Dave Sherertz, Marion, 
111. Civil Engineer. Entrained Oct. 6, '18, University 
of 111., S. A. T. C. 

SHREVE, LEON TED. (Marion) age 19 ; B., Car- 
terville, 111. Son of Frank L. Shreve, St. Louis. Mo. 
Employed St. Louis Independent Packing Co. Ship- 
ping Clerk. Enlisted in U. S. Naval Reserve, Aug. 
8, '18, St. Louis, -Mo. In training at Great Lakes 
Naval Training Station. 

SHUTIS, WILLIAM, (Johnston City). Employed as 
Miner, Johnston City. Son of John and Maggie Shutis. 

SHORT, HAYWOOD, (Carterville) age 21 ; B., Se- 
bree, Ky. Employed Carterville, 111. Plumber. En- 
listed Aug. 22, '17, St. Louis, Mo. 

SHERETZ, TROY, (Herrin) age 29 ; B., Marion. 
111. Employed W. P. Rend Coal Co., Herrin, 111. 
Mining. Entrained May 28, '18, Camp Shelby, Miss. 

SHERETZ, VIRGIL BRYAN, (Herrin) age 23 ; B., 
Carterville, 111. Employed Herrin, 111. Clerk. En- 
trained Aug. 1, '18, Syracuse, N. Y. 

SIZEMORE, JOHN CARLOS, (Johnston City) age 
22 ; B.. Whiteash, 111. Son of T. M. Sizemore. Ceru- 
lean, Ky. Attended St. Louis College of Pharmacy. 
Druggist. Entrained June 27, '18. Camp Wheeler, 
Ga. Graduated in Pharmacy and received diploma 
before induction. 

SILVIO. BONDI, (Johnston City) age 23 ; B., It- 
aly. Employed at Johnston City Coal Co. Coal 
Mining. Entrained June 27, '18, Camp Wheeler, Ga. 

SIMS, MADISON O., (Thompsonville) age 23 ; B., 
Corinth, 111. Employed at Pittsburg. 111. Marlon 
Pittsburg Coal Co. Mining. Entrained Sept. 21, '17, 
Camp Taylor, Ky. 

SIMPSON, WALTER, (Colp) age 24 ; B., Macomb, 
Miss. Employed Madison Coal Corp., Colp. 111. 
Mining. Entrained Aug. 2, '18, Camp Grant, 111. 

SIMPSON, EDWARD F., (Colp) age 23 ; B., Bon- 
air, Tenn. Employed Madison Coal Corp., Dew- 
maine, 111. Mining. Entrained Aug. 2, '18, Camp 
Grant, 111. 

SIMONS, EARNEST, (Bush) age 24 ; B., Herrin. 
111. Employed Williamson Co., 111. Farming. En- 
trained May 28, '18, Camp Shelby. Miss. 

SINGLER, ERVIN HERMAN, (Marion) age 21 ; B.. 
Marion, 111. Son of Edward Single, Marion, 111. Em- 
ployed Peabody Coal Co. Machinist. Entrained 
June 15, '18, Peoria, 111. 

SINGLER, GEORGE MATT, (Marion) age 23 ; B.. 
Marion, 111. Son of Ernest Singler, Marion, 111. 
Farming. Entrained June 27, '18, Camp Wheeler, 
Ga. 

SIZEMORE, ROSCOE, (Cambria) age 27 ; B., Wil- 
liamson County, 111. Son of L. W. Sizemore. Coal 
Miner. Entrained May 22, '18. Attached to Deten- 
tion Camp. Rejected on account of disability. Dis- 
charged Camp Shelby, Miss, June 4, '19. 

SIZEMORE, ROSCOE, (Carterville) age 25; B., 
Carterville, 111. Employed Madison No. 9, Colp. Hi. 
Mining. Entrained May 28, '18, Camp Shelby, Miss. 



248 




SIZEMORE, ALBERT M., (Carterville) age 27: 
B., Princeton, Ky. Employed Hafer Washed Coal 
Co., Herrln, 111. Mining. Entrained Mar. 12, '18, 
Camp Taylor, Ky. 

SIMMONS, OSCAR, (Creal Springs) age 25 ; B., 
Vienna, Johnson Co., 111. Son of Sarah A. Simmons. 
Employed Farmer. Entrained Feb. 25, '18, Camp 
Taylor, Ky. Discharged Nov. 1, '18. 

SISK, WILLIAM V., (Herrin) age 29 ; B., Dawson 
Springs, Ky. Employed C. & C. Coal Co., Herrin, 
111. Mining. Enlisted June 30, Poplar Bluff, Mo. 
SKELCHER, GUT FREDERICK, (Energy) age 
24 ; B., Carbondale, 111. Son of James Skelcher, 
Energy, 111. Employed Taylor Coal Co. Mining. 
Entrained May 11, '18, Ft. Thomas, Ky. 
SLANKARD, CHARLES E., (Marion) age 27 ; B., 
Marion, 111. Son of W. D. Slankard. Employed Old 
Ben Coal Co., West Frankfort, 111. Coal Miner. En- 
trained June 27, '18, Camp Wheeler, Ga. 

SLANKARD. GEORGE T., (Marion) age 24 ; B., 
Marion, 111. Son of W. D. Slankard, Marion, 111. Em- 
ployed Wesley Stafford. Printing. Entrained May 29, 
'18, Fort Thomas, Ky. 

SLATER, JAMES, (Creal Springs) age 25 ; B., 
West Frankfort. 111. Son of William Slater. Laborer. 
Entrained June 27, '18, Camp Wheeler, Ga. 
SMOTHERS, ALVIN, (Hudgens) age 30 ; B., 
Thompsonville, 111. Son of M. J. Smothers, Hudgens, 
111. Farming. Entrained May 28, '18, Camp Shelby, 
Miss. 

SMITH, CECIL RAY, (Goreville) age 20 ; B., Mar- 
ion, 111. Son of J. D. Smith, Goreville, 111. Em- 
ployed at Big Muddy Coal Co. Coal Miner. En- 
trained Oct. 11, '18, University of 111., S. A. T. C. 

SMITH, RAYMOND, (Crab Orchard) age 21 ; B., 
Carmi, 111. Son of Lura Smith, Carrier Mills, 111. 
Farmer. Entrained June 27, '18, Camp Wheeler, Ga. 
SMOTHERS, ANDREW J., (Hudgens) age 28 ; B., 
Thompsonville, 111. Section laborer. Entrained Sept. 
21, '17, Camp Taylor, Ky. 

SMITH, JAMES M., (Johnston City) age 29 ; B., 
Carterville, 111. Employed Johnston City, 111. Hoist- 
ing Engineer. Entrained June 27, '18, Camp Wheel- 
er, Ga. 

SANDERS, LEE. (West Frankfort) B., Herrin, 
111. Employed at Taylor Coal Co., Herrin, III. 
Mining. Entrained Sept. 20, '17, Camp Taylor, Ky. 

SMITH, BERNARD HERBERT FINIS, (Johnston 
City) age 26 ; B., Burmingham, Ky. Student. En- 
trained Oct. 5, '17, Camp Taylor, Ky. 
SMOTHERS, JOHN, (Hudgens) age 24 ; B., Ben- 
ton, 111. Son of M. O. Smothers, Hudgens, 111. Farm- 
ing. Entrained May 28, '18, Camp Shelby, Miss. 
SMITH, WALTER AUSTIN, (Marion) age 29 ; B., 
Spillertown, 111. Employed West Va. Coal Co. Coal 
Miner. Entrained Sept. 21, '17, Camp Taylor, Ky. 
Discharged May 15, '18, Disability. 

SMITH, LAWRENCE L., (Marion) age 24 ; B., 
Opdyke, 111. Employed Prest-O-Lite Co., Indianap- 
olis, Ind. Storage Battery Repairman. Entrain- 
ed April 29, '18, Camp Dix, N. J. 
SMITH, JOHN E., (Marion) age 21 ; B., Williamson 
County, 111. Son of W. E. and Belle Smith. Farm- 
er. Entrained May 29, '18. Overseas July '18. At- 
tached to Co. D., 218th Inf. 

SMOTHERS, CHARLES WALTER, (Creal Springs) 
age 29 ; B., Missouri. Son of J. L. Smothers. Farm- 
ing. Entrained May 28, '18, Camp Shelby, Miss. Dis- 
charged July 21, '18. 

SMITH. WALTER I., (Herrin) age 23 ; B., Mur- 
physboro. 111. Employed Pond Creek Coal Co., Her- 
rin, 111. Top Foreman. Entrained May 28, '18, Camp 
Shelby, Miss. 

SMITH, CHANCEY, (Herrin) age 23 ; B., Aken, 
111. Employed Pond Creek Coal Co., Herrin, 111. 
Mining. Entrained Mar. 12, '18, Camp Taylor, Ky. 

SMITH, STURGUS W., (Herrin) age 28 ; B., Wil- 
liamson Co., 111. Employed Herrin. 111. Shoe Sales- 
man. Entrained Oct. 4, '17, Camp Taylor, Ky. 



SMITH. JAMES, (Herrin) age 26: B., Murphysboro. 
111. Employed C. & C. Coal Co., Herrin, 111. Mining. 
Entrained May 29, '18, Ft. Thomas, Ky. 

SORTING, SAM, (Johnston City) age 27 ; B., Bur- 
gio, Italy. Son of Antonio Sortino, Burgio, Italy. 
Employed at Johnston City Coal Co., Johnston City, 
111. Coal Miner. Entrained May 29, '18, Ft. Thomas, 
Ky. 

SCURLOCK, WILLIAM T., (Marion) age 27; B., 
Marion, 111. Son of V. A. Scurlock. Employed Cen- 
tralia, III., Centralia Ice & Cold Storage Co. En- 
trained Sept. 6, '17, Camp Taylor, Ky. 

SOCHSKI, STANLEY, (Herrin) age 29 ; B., Lon- 
jwok, Poland, Russia. Employed W. P. Rend Coal 
Co. Mining. Entrained April 29, '18, Camp Dix, 
N. J. 

SOUTHERLAND, HARRY FRANKLIN, (Herrin) 
B., Herrin, 111. Entrained June 27, '18, Camp Wheel- 
er, Ga. 

SPRINGS, HARRY L., (Johnston City) age 21 ; B., 
Marion, 111. Employed at Big Muddy Fuel Co. En- 
trained Oct. 21, '18, Camp Wheeler, Ga. 

SPRINGS, EDO, (Crab Orchard) age 25 ; B., Mar- 
ion, 111. Son of M. E. Springs, Carrier Mills, 111. 
Farming. Entrained June 27, '18, Rejected at Camp 
Wheeler, Ga, 

SPENCER, SAMUEL JOSEPH, (Marion) age 26; 
B., Drew, Mo. Employed L. C. Wolfe. Singing 
Evangelist. Enlisted in U. S. Naval Reserve Force, 
4th Class, Jan. 17, '18. 

SPRAGUE, FLOYD A., (Marion) age 22 ; B.. 
Okla. Son of Belle Sprague, Marion, 111. Employed 
New Va. Coal Co. .Mining. Entrained May 20, '18, 
Camp Meade, Md. 

SPANN, KIRTLEY, (Herrin) age 24; B. Murray, 
Ky. Employed Herrin, 111. Carpenter. 

STURM, ARTHUR WILLIAM, (Crab Orchard) age 
27 ; B.. New Athens, 111. Son of Emma Sturm, Pitts- 
burg, 111. Farmer. Entrained June 27, '18. Re- 
jected Camp Wheeler, Ga. 

STEPHENSON, EARL ELLIOTT, (Johnston City) 
age 23 ; B., Nashville, 111. Son of Minnie M. Steph- 
enson, Johnston City, 111. Employed. Johnston City, 
111. Clerk in Post Office, U. S. Entrained Sept 3, 
'18, Camp Grant, 111. 

STIRITZ, THEODORE C., (Johnston City) age 
30 ; B., Alton, 111. Employed Johnston City, 111. 
Merchant. Enlisted in Army prior to Dec. 15, '17. 
STEFANCIS, ALBERT, (Johnston City) age 28 ; 
B., Austria. Employed at Searls Coal Co. Coal 
Miner. Entrained June 27, '18, Camp Wheeler, aa. 
STEPHENS, CHARLIE FORMAN, (Whiteash) age 
23 ; B., Greenwood, Ky. Son of Mary Stephens, 
Whiteash, 111. Employed Johnston City Washed Coal 
Co., Whiteash, 111. Entrained May 23, '18. Emerg- 
ency Call. 

STENSON, ALLEN HARVEY, (Fairfield) age 28; 
B., Fairfield, 111. Son of Lucy Stenson, Fairfield, HI. 
Employed at Produce Business. Entrained June 27, 
'18, Camp Wheeler, Ga. Rejected at Camp. 

STEWART, JAMES W., (Crab Orchard) age 23 ; 
B., Corinth, 111. Employed at Saline Co. Farmer. 
Entrained Sept. 5, '18, Camp Custer, Mich. 

STANLEY, LEO, (Marion) age 21 ; B., Makanda, 
111. Son of John Stanley, Marion, 111. Employed Mar- 
ion, 111. Peabody Coal Co. Mining. Entrained Feb. 
25, '18, Camp Taylor, Ky. Rejected at Camp. 
STANLEY, BOB, (Marion) age 21 ; B., Pulleys Mill, 
111. Son of Anna Stanley, Marion, 111. Employed Hen- 
derson-Wallace Coal Co. Coal Miner. Entrained 
Oct. 15, '18, Chicago University, Chicago, 111. 

STROHMEIER, EDWARD, (Marion) age 22 ; B., 
Madison Co., 111. Son of Gottlieb Strohmeier, Mar- 
ion, III. Farming. Entrained June 27, '18, Camp 
Wheeler, Ga. 

SANALTKI, STANLEY, (Marion) age 25 ; B., Russ 
Poland. Son of Anthony Sonaltki, Poland. Em- 
ployed Va. Coal Co. Coal Miner. Entrained May 
23, '18, Jefferson Barracks, Mo. 



249 



gfe 




STOVER, LEO B., (Marion) age 27 ; B., Williamson 
County, 111. Son of Geo. L. and Lizzie Stover. Coal 
Miner. Enlisted June 4, '17, Port D. A. Russell, Wyo. 
Attached 1st Cavalry Hdq. Troops. Now in U. 
S. General Hospital 20, Prescott, Arizona. 

STOCKS, SGT. LOYD JAMES, (Carterville) age 
27 ; B., Ogden, Utah. Son of Nora E. Stocks. Coal 
Miner. Carterville, 111. Entrained April 29, '18. 
Attached to 4th Training Bn. Discharged Nov. 27, 
'18, at Camp Dix, N. J. 

STEELE, THOMAS E., (Carterville) age 21 ; B., 
Pinckneyville, 111. Employed Madison Coal Co., 
Colp, 111. Mining. Entrained May 28, '18, Camp 
Shelby, Miss. 

STOCKS, J. LOYD, (Carterville) age 26; B., Og- 
den, Utah. Employed Madison Coal Co., Dewmaine, 
111. Ass't. Machine Boss. Entrained April 29, '18, 
Camp Dix, N. J. 

STROUD, JOHN S., (Carterville) age 26; B., Mar- 
ion, 111. Son of Logan Stroud. Employed Rural 
Mail Carrier. Entrained May 23, '18, Jefferson 
Barracks, Mo. 

STINEBOUGH, CLARK, (Herrin) age 27 ; B., 
Naepersville, Tex. Employed W. P. Rend Coal & 
Coke Co., Herrin, 111. Mining. Entrained Sept. 25, 
'17, Camp Taylor, Ky. 

STOTLAR, VALLE, (Herrin) age 24 ; B., Her- 
rin, 111. Employed Egyptian Powder Co., Herrin, 
111. Ass't. Manager of Company. Entrained May 
28, '18, Camp Shelby, Miss. 

STANTON, LEONARD, (Herrin) age 29 ; B., Mur- 
physboro, 111. Employed Taylor Coal Co., Herrin, 
111. Mining. Entrained Sept. 20, '17, Camp Taylor, 
Ky. 

STEWART, GORDON, (Herrin) age 24 ; B., Ceru- 
lean Springs, Ky. Employed Sunnyside Coal Co., 
Herrin, 111. Mining. Entrained Aug. 9, '18, Camp 
Wheeler, Ga. 

STACY, ELMER, (Herrin) age 23 ; B., Carter- 
ville, 111. Employed Taylor Coal Co., Herrin, 111. 
Mining. Entrained Sept. 4, '18, Camp Grant, 111. 
STANTON, HENRY, (Herrin) age 28 ; B., Grand 
Tower, 111. Employed W. P. Rend Coal Co., Herrin, 
111. Miner. Entrained Sept. 4, '18, Camp Grant, 111. 
SUPFILL, JOHN ED, (Clifford) age 25 ; B., E. 
Palestine, Ohio. Employed at Big Muddy Coal & 
Iron Co., Clifford, 111. Miner. -Entrained June 27," 
'18, Camp Wheeler, Ga. 

SUMMERS, CHARLEY, (Thompsonville) age 24 ; 
B., Corinth, 111. Son of Robert P. Summers, Thomp- 
sonville, 111. Farming. Entrained July 30, '18, Camp 
Syracuse, N. Y. 

SULLIVAN, JAMES LEE, (Marion) age 21 ; B., 
Parrish, 111. Son of E. G. Sullivan, Marion, 111. 
Employed Produce Company, Marion, 111. Manager. 
Entrained Sept. 6, '17, Camp Taylor, Ky. Honor- 
ably discharged. 

SUTHERLAND, WM. PINKNEY, (Creal Springs) 
age 29 ; B., Creal Springs, 111. Employed Horse 
business. Entrained Sept. 21, '17, Camp Taylor, 
Ky. 

SULLIVAN, WILLIAM C., (Herrin) age 28 ; B., 
Fawls, Ala. Employed W. P. Rend Coal Co., Wea- 
ver, 111. Mining. Entrained June 27, '18, Camp 
Wheeler, Macon, Ga. 

SULLIVAN, JOHN LAWRENCE, (Hurst) age 25 ; 
B., Carrier Mills, 111. Employed Mo. Pacific R. R. 
Co., Bush, III. Machinist Helper. Entrained May 
28, '18, Camp Shelby, Miss. 

SWEET, HERMAN, (Crab Orchard) age 22 ; B., 
Crab Orchard, 111. Son of George Sweet, Carrie 1 . 1 
Mills, 111. Farming. Entrained June 27, '18, Camp 
Wheeler, Ga. 

SWINDELL, THOMAS, (Herrin) age 29 ; B., Nel- 
sonville, Ohio. Employed W. P. Ren-J, Weave e, HI. 
Mining. Entrained June 2t, '18, Camp Sherman, O. 

SWAN, LEON G., (Johnston City) age 23 ; B., Mar- 
ion, 111. Employed at Scranton Big Muddy Coal Co. 
Coal Mining. Enlisted in U. S. Naval Reserve, June 
5, '18. 



SWINFORD, FRANK, (Clifford) age 22 ; B., Wil- 
liamson County, 111. Farming. Enlisted Sept. 24, 
'17, St. Louis, Mo. 

SWINFORD, FRED, (Clifford) age 27; B., Jack- 
son County, III. Teamster. Enlisted Aug. 1, '17, 
St. Louis, Mo. 

SWIFT, THOMAS, (Johnston City) age 25 ; B., 
Kilinville, Ky. Employed Johnston City Coal Co., 
Johnston City, 111. Mining. Entrained Oct. 4, '17, 
Camp Taylor, Ky. 

SWAFFORD, PAUL, (Marion) age 22 ; B., Marion. 
111. Employed Marion & Pittsburg Coal Co. Coal 
Mining. Entrained Sept. 21, '17, Camp Taylor, .Ky. 
Discharged April 2, '18. Disability. 

SWOFPORD, ROB, (Marion) age 24 ; B., Marion, 
111. Chauffeur. Entrained May 28, '18, Camp Shelby, 
Miss. 

SYZMAZAK, JOSEPH, (Herrin) age 31 ; B., Po- 
land, Russia. Employed W. P. Rend, Weaver, 111. 
Mining. Entrained April 29, '18, Camp Dix, N. J. 

SYZMAZAK, MIKE, (Herrin) age 23 ; B., Poland, 
Russia. Employed W. P. Rend foal Co., Weaver, 
111. Mining. Entrained Sept. 4, '18, Camp Grant, 111. 

TANNER, ROSCOE ELMER, (Stonefort) age 25 ; 

B., Stonefort, 111. Son of Charles Tanner. Stonefort, 

111. Farming. Entrained June 27, '18, Rejected at 

Camp Wheeler, Ga. 

TANNER, HERMAN J., (Carterville) age 21 ; B., 

Carterville, 111. Farmer. Entrained Oct. 4, '17, 

Camp Taylor, Ky. 

TANNER, ROY, (Crab Orchard) age 22 ; B., Crab 

Orchard, 111. Farming. Entrained June 27, '18, 

Camp Wheeler, Ga. 

TANNER, WILLIAM HERMAN, (Creal Springs) 
age 22 ; B., Stonefort, 111. Son of Henderson Tan- 
ner. Employed Farming. Entrained June 27, '18, 
Camp Wheeler, Ga. 

TANNER, FRANK, (Creal Springs) age 23 ; B., 
Creal Springs, 111. Employed Peabody Coal Co., 
Marion, 111. Coal Mining. Entrained June 27, '18, 
Camp Wheeler, Ga. 

TANNER, EDD., (Creal Springs) age 21 ; B., Palzo, 
111. Employed Farming. Entrained June 27, '18, 
Camp Wheeler, Ga. 

TATUM, JOE, (Herrin) age 24 ; B., Hopkinsville, 
Ky. Employed C. & C. Coal Co., "B", Herrin, 111. 
Miner. Entrained May 28, '18, Camp Shelby, Miss. 
TATUM, HARRY, (Herrin) age 25 ; B., Hopkins- 
ville, Ky. Employed Sunnyside Coal Co., Herrin, 
111. Entrained May 23, '18, Jefferson Barracks, Mo. 
TATUM, JAMES B., (Herrin) age 22 ; B., Hopkins- 
ville, Ky. Employed Sunnyside Coal Co. Miner. 
Entrained April 29, '18, Camp Dix, N. J. 

TACKETT, RAYMOND ELBERT, (Herrin) age 
23 ; B., Thompsonville, 111. Employed St. Louis Car- 
terville Coal Co., Herrin, 111. Miner. Entrained 
Sept. 20, '17, Camp Taylor, Ky. 

TURETTI, FRANK JOE, (Clifford) age 30 ; B., 
Milano, Italy. Employed at Big Muddy Coal & Iron 
Co., Clifford, 111. Miner. Entrained June 27, '18, 
Camp Wheeler, Ga. 

TURNER, NORM, (Crab Orchard) age 29, B., 
Crab Orchard, 111. Farming. Entrained Sept. 21, 
'17, Camp Taylor, Ky. 

TANNER, RUFUS, (Stonefort) age 27 ; B., Stone- 
fort, 111. Farming. Entrained Sept. 21, '17, Camp 
Taylor, Ky. 

TANNER, MACK, (Stonefort) age 27 ; B., Stone- 
fort, 111. Son of J. C. Tanner, Stonefort, 111. Farm- 
ing. Entrained Feb. 25, '18, Camp Taylor, Ky. Dis- 
charged July 26, '18, Disability. 

TEMPLETON, WALTER TREGONING, (Herrin) 
age 23 ; B., Centralia, 111. Employed C. & C. Coal 
Co., Herrin, 111. Miner. Enlisted Aug. 8, '17, Paris 
Island, S. C. 

TEMPLETON, ROBERT, BURNS, (Herrin) age 
21 ; B., Centralia, 111. Employed Pond Creek Coal 
Co., Herrin, 111. Miner. Entrained Sept. 20, '17, 
Camp Taylor, Ky. 



250 




I 



THROGMORTON, WALTER, (Johnston City) age 
30 ; B., Ozark, 111. Employed Peabody Coal Co. 
Electrician. Entrained Sept. 21, '17, Camp Taylor, 
Ky. 

THORNTON, JESSE FRANKLIN, (Marion) age 
26; B., Stonefort, 111. Son of A. L. Thornton. Em- 
ployed Ideal Plumbing Co., Carbondale, 111. Elec- 
trician. Entrained Oct. 5, "17, Camp Taylor, Ky. 
THOMAS, JOSIAH WINSTORD, (Marion) age 23 ; 
B., Marion, 111. Son of Josiah Joshaway Thomas. 
Employed Peabody Coal Co., Marion, 111. Coal 
Mining. Entrained May 23, "18, Jefferson Barracks, 
Mo. 

THOMAS, AMON STANLEY, (Marion) age 24 ; B., 
Williamson Co., 111. Employed Marion & Eastern R. 
R. Section hand. Entrained Feb. 25, '18, Camp 
Taylor, Ky. 

THOMAS, A. S., (Marion) age 25 ; B., Pittsburg, 
III Son of Frank and Sarah Thomas. Coal Miner. 
Entrained Feb. 25, '18, Camp Taylor, Ky. At- 
tached to Co. D., 335th Inf. Discharged, Fort Leav- 
ensworth, Kans., June 19, '19. 

THOMAS, LEONARD F., (Carterville) age 21 ; B., 
Wayside, 111. Entrained June 27, '18, Camp Wheel- 
er, Macon, Ga. 

THROGMORTON, CECIL, (Herrin) age 21 ; B., 
Wolfcreek, 111. Employed C. B. & Q. Ry., Herrln, 
111. Boiler Washer. Entrained June 27, '18, Camp 
Wheeler, Ga. 

THOMAS, CHARLES F., (Herrin) age 23 ; B., 
Wolfcreek, 111. Poolroom Owner. Enlisted June 3, 
'18, Navy, Chicago, 111. 

THORPE, THOMAS WILLIAM, (Herrin) age 22 ; 
B.. Render, Ky. Employed Ernest Coal Co., Johns- 
ton City, 111. Mining. Enlisted Dec. 9, '17, Navy, 
St. Louis, Mo. 

THOMPSON, AUD. (Crab Orchard) age 25; B., 
Crab Orchard, 111. Son of William Thompson, Pitts- 
burg, HI. Farming. Entrained Feb. 25, '18, Camp 
Taylor, Ky. 

TISCH, JOHN RICHARD, (Johnston City) age 23 ; 
B., Ranckler, 111. Employed Williamson Co. Coal 
Co., Johnston City, 111. Coal Miner. Entrained May 
28, '18, Camp Shelby, Miss. 

TISCH, WILLIAM. (Johnston City) age 21 ; B., 
Breese, 111. Son of Ida Tisch, Johnston City, 111. 
Employed at Wm. County Coal Co., Johnston City, 
111. Coal Miner. Entrained May 28, '18, Camp Shel- 
by, Miss. 

TIPPY, LAWRENCE. (Marion) age 24 ; B., Crab 
Orchard, 111. Employed New Virginia Coal Co., 
Marion, HI. Coal Miner. Entrained Sept. 21, '17, 
Camp Taylor, Ky. 

TIPPY, ROSCOE, W., (Carterville) age 22 ; B., 
Carterville, III. Barber. Entrained May 28, '18, 
Camp Shelby, Miss. 

TOMLINSON, ROBERT, (Carbondale) age 25 ; B., 
Carterville, 111. Employed at Williamson Co. Farm- 
ing. Entrained June 27, '18, Camp Wheeler, Ga, 
TOVIGO, FRANCESCO, (Johnston City) age 26 ; 
B., Italy. Employed Ernest Coal Co., Johnston City, 
111. Coal Miner. Entrained Feb. 25, '18, Camp 
Taylor, Ky. 

TOTTLEBEN, WILLIAM K., (Carterville) age 25 ; 
B., Carterville, 111. Farmer. Entrained June 27, 
'18, Camp Wheeler, Ga. 

TOMSKWIEZ, TONY, (Herrin) age 30 ; B., Poland. 
Employed Taylor Coal Co., Herrin, 111. Mining. En- 
trained Sept. 20, '17, Camp Taylor, Ky. 
TODOFF, NICK, (Herrin) age 29 ; B., Trustouck, 
Bulgaria. Employed W. P. Rend Coal Co., Herrin, 
111. Miner. Entrained Sept. 20, '17, Camp Taylor, 
Ky. 

TONEFF, JOHN, (Herrin) age 23 ; B.. Bulgaria. 
Employed W. P. Rend Coal Co., Herrin, 111. Miner. 
Entrained Sept. 20, '17, Camp Taylor, Ky. 
TOLL, WILLIAM D., (Herrin) age 28 ; B., Mc- 
Henry, Ky. Employed Big Muddy Coal & Iron Co., 
Herrin, 111. Mining. Entrained May 28, '18, Camp 
Shelby, Miss. 



TREGONING, JOHN M., (Carterville) age 28 ; B., 
Alloway, Scotland. Employed Federal Coal Co., 
Carterville, 111. Mining. Entrained Aug. 1, '18, 
Camp Wheeler, Ga. 

TRANBARGER, BEN F., (Carterville) age 24 ; B., 
Carterville, 111. Employed Mt. Vernon Car Shop, 
Mt. Vernon, 111. Clerk. Entrained Mar. 12, '18, 
Camp Taylor, Ky. 

TREECE, LAWRENCE, L., (Herrin) age 28 ; B., 
Anna, 111. Employed I. C. Ry., Herrin, 111. Switch- 
man. Enlisted Aug. 12, '18. Emergency Fleet, 
Philadelphia, Pa. 

TROMBETTA, GWSEPPE, (Colp) age 28 ; B., St. 
Eufemia, Calabria, Italy. Employed at Madison 
Coal Co., Colp, 111. Mining. Entrained May 28, '18, 
Camp Shelby, Miss. 

TRETTER, HENRY, (Johnston City) age 24 ; B., 
Austria. Merchant. Entrained March 12, '18, Camp 
Taylor, Ky. 

TRUE, ELBERT, (Marion) age 24 ; B., Marion. 
111. Employed Anderson-Gunn Stock Co. Musician. 
Entrained June 23, '18, Sweeney Auto School, Kan- 
sas City, Mo. 

TURNER, JAMES ARTHUR, (Stonefort) age 29; 
B., Crab Orchard, 111. Employed at Big Four R. 
R. Co. Laborer. Entrained May 28, '18, Camp 
Shelby, Miss. 

TURNER, LUTHER HARRISON, (Stonefort) age 
24 ; B., Crab Orchard, 111. Son of J. M. C. Turner, 
Stonefort, 111. Employed at Big Four R. R. Co. 
Section Hand. Entrained May 28, '18, Camp Shel- 
by, Miss. 

TUBES, CLEVE, (Johnston City) age 23 ; B., Cul- 
Iman, Ala. Employed Carterville & Herrin Coal Co., 
Jeffery. Mining. Entrained April 29, '18, Camp 
Dix, N. J. 

TURBERVILL. STANLEY, (Carterville) age 25 ; 
B., Ponty Pool, Wales. Employed Madison Coal 
Corp., Dewmaine, 111. Miner. Enlisted June 18, '17, 
Navy, Chicago, 111. 

TURNAGE, JOHN CALVIN, (Creal Springs) age 
22 ; B., Creal Springs, 111. Employed Bricklayer and 
Truck-driver. Entrained May 28, '18, Camp Shei- 
by. Miss. Honorably Discharged. 

TURNER, CREED, (Creal Springs), B., West 
Frankfort, 111. Employed Creal Springs. 111. Farm- 
ing. Entrained Oct. 5, '17, Camp Taylor, Ky. 
TURNER, BROWNIE, F., (Stonefort) age 24 ; B., 
Marion, Ky. Son of Ida Dean Turner. Stonefort, 
111. Farming. Entrained Feb. 25, '18, Camp Taylor, 
Ky. 

TWOMBLY, MARION C., (Carterville) age 21 ; B., 
Carbondale, 111. Farming. Entrained Oct. 25, '18, 
Camp Wheeler, Ga. 

VARACALLE, ANTHONY, (Bush) age 23 ; B., 
Cinina, Italy. Employed at Western Coal & Mining 
Co., Bush, 111. Mining. Entrained May 29, '18, Camp 
Ft. Thomas, Ky. 

VANZANDT, ALBERT, (Bush) age 21 ; B., Cam- 
bria, 111. Employed at Western Coal & Mine Co., 
Bush, 111. Entrained Oct. 25, '18, Camp Wheeler, 
Ga. 

VAUGHN, HARRY, (Crainville) age 21 ; B., New 
Burnside, III. Employed at Taylor Coal Co., Her- 
rin, 111. Entrained Mar. 12, '18, Camp Taylor, Ky. 

VACCARO, VERTO ANTONIO, (Johnston City) 
age 24 ; B., Italy. Employed Johnston City Coal 
Co., Coal Miner. Entrained May 9, '18, Camp Tay- 
lor, Ky. 

VAUGHN, ORLIE, (Marion) age 21 ; B., Goreville, 
111. Son of D. L. Vaughn. Farming-Machinist. En- 
trained June 27, "18, Camp Wheeler, Ga. Rejected. 
VAUGHN, WILLIAM T., (Carterville, age 22 ; B., 
Tunnell Hill, 111. Employed Madison Coal Corp.,- 
Dewmaine. 111. Grocery Clerk. Entrained Oct. 4, 
'17, Camp Taylor, Ky. 

VAUGHN, WILLIAM RAY, (Carterville) age 23 ; 
B., New Burnside, 111. Employed Hafer Coal Co., 
Carterville, 111. Mining. Entrained June 27, '18, 
Camp Wheeler, Ga. 



251 




VAUGHN, SAM, (Carterville). B., New Burnside, 
111. Employed Duncan Coal Co., Herrln, 111. Miner. 
Entrained May 28, '18, Camp Shelby, Miss. 

VAUGHN, HOBERT, (Colp) age 18 ; B., Morton's 
Gap. Ky. Son of Andy Vaughn. Miner. Colp. En- 
listed July 25, '17, Metropolis, 111. Overseas Apr. 
6, '18. Attached to Co. M., 370th Inf. Wounded in 
left shoulder. Discharged Feb. 25, '19, at Rock- 
ford, III. 

VANCE. WILLIS, (Herrin) age 25 ; B., Wylan, Ala., 
Employed Pond Creek Coal Co., Herrin, 111. Min- 
ing. Entrained June 27, '18, Camp Wheeler, Ga. 

VEATCH, JOHN, (Herrin) age 21 ; B.. Opdyke, 
111. Employed Carterville & Herrin Coal Co., Her- 
rin, 111. Mining. Entrained May 28, '18, Camp Shel- 
by, Miss. 

VINCENT, CAPHAIRRIS, (Clifford) age 22 ; B., 
Carterville, Ga. Employed at Big Muddy Coal & 
Iron Co., Clifford, 111. Miner. Entrained Aug. 2, '18, 
Camp Grant, 111. 

VICKERS, AARON, TOLBERT, (Marion) age 25 ; 
B., Polk Co., 111. Son of Carrie Vickers. Employ- 
ed Coal Miner. Entrained May 28, '18, Camp Shel- 
by, Miss. 

VICTORY, CLOVER, (Herrin) age 28 ; B., Barns- 
ley, Ky. Employed Big Muddy Coal & Iron Co., 
Herrin, 111. Mining. Entrained June 27, '18, Camp 
Wheeler, Ga. 

VOGT, JOHN, (Marion) age 30; B., Altaville, 111. 
Employed Marion, 111. Farmer. Entrained Sept. 
21, '17, Camp Taylor, Ky. 

VOILS, MITCHELL, (Hurst) age 29 ; B., Shirley, 
Tenn. Employed Mo. Pacific R. R. Co., Bush, HI. 
Car Oiler. Entrained July 18, '18, Camp Wheeler, 
Ga. 

WARD, LUTHER H., (Clifford) age 30 ; B., Cam- 
bria, 111. Employed at Madison Coal Corp., Carter- 
ville, 111. Mining. Entrained Mar. 12, '18, Camp 
Taylor, Ky. 

WESTOFETRO, SALVATURE, (Herrin) B., Italy. 
Son of Jack and Angela Westofetro. Married Miss 
Stella Lombarde. Entrained May 29, '18. Discharg- 
ed May 6, '19, Miss. 



WHITTINGTON, SYLVESTER E., (Marion) age 

24 ; B., Benton, 111. Son of W. W. and Mary E. 
Whittington. Married Ora Wise. Coal M ner. En- 
trained May 29, '18. Attached to M. G. Co., 40th Inf., 
14th Div. Discharged, Fort Sheridan, 111., Feb. 18, 
'19. 

WHITESIDE, EARL ROY, (Marion) age 21 ; B., 
Cobden, 111. Son of Thomas Whiteside, Marion, HI. 
Coal Miner. Enlisted Sept. 18, '18. Discharged, 
Camp Taylor, Ky., Dec. 20, "18. 

WRIGHT, MONROE, (Carterville) age 25 ; B., 
Carterville, 111. Son of Ed. A. and Martha Wright, 
Carterville, 111. Entrained May 28, '18. Overseas 
Oct. 3, '18. Attached to Co. B.. 325th Inf. Dis- 
charged at Camp Grant, 111., June 7, '19. 
YOUNGBLOOD, REUEL ERWIN, (Marion) age 

25 ; B., Marion, 111. Son of Thos. and Nora Young- 
blood. Bookkeeper, Marion, 111. Entrained June 27, 
'18. Attached to Co. A., 62nd Inf. Stationed at 
Camp Lee, Virginia. 

ZARECAR, BERNIE ALLEN, (Stonefort) age 22 ; 
B., Waverly, Tenn. Son of S. B. Zarecar. Em- 
ployed Stonefort, 111. Farming. Entrained Feb. 
25, '18, Camp Taylor, Ky. 

ZAUESTAUNICK, JOHN, (Johnston City) age 28 ; 
B., Uzgeoreles, Russia. Employed Lake Creek Coal 
Co.. Johnston City, 111. Coal Mining. Entrained 
Sept. 6, '18, Camp Forrest, Lytle, Ga. 
ZEEBOR, TADDY, (Herrin) age 30; B., Russia. 
Employed Taylor Mining Co. Herrin, 111. Mining. 
Entrained June 27, '18, Camp Wheeler, Ga. 
ZELINSKI, DOMINIC, (Johnston City) age 25 ; 
B., Poland, Russia. Employed Searls Coal Co., 
Johnston City, 111. Coal Miner. Entrained May 28, 
'18, Camp Shelby, Miss. 

ZERO, PETE, (Herrin) age 29, B., Welno, Russia, 
Employed Big Muddy Coal & Iron Co., Clifford, 111. 
Mining. Entrained October 4, '17, Camp Taylor, 
Ky. 

ZOELLER, ADOLPH, (Marion) age 26 ; B., New 
Athens, 111. Son of Adam Zoeller. Employed Big 
Muddy Fuel Co., Marion, 111. Coal Mining. En- 
trained May 28, '18, Camp Shelby, Miss. 

ZOIA, HARRY, (Herrin) age 27 ; B., Inveruno, 
Italy. Employed Madison Coal Corp., Colp, 111. 
Miner. Entrained April 28, '18, Camp Dix, N. J. 



252 



fi-Ji-JJ- 





'Colored Boys" 



[1] BLACKBURN, NATHAN, (Marion), 
age 22; B. Marion, 111. Son of Isaac and Mag- 
gie Blackburn, Marion, 111. Employed Me- 
chanic. Entrained Aug. 2, '18. Overseas Sept. 
27, '18. Attached Headquarters Reg. 803rd. 
Discharged Camp Sherman, Ohio, Apr. 14, '19. 

[2] CHAVONS, BARNEY V., (Marion), age 
21; B. Thompsonville, 111. Married Ruth 
Blackburn. Son of Clevelan Chavons, Marion, 
111. Employed cook. Entrained June 5, '18. 
Attached Co. 51, Depot Brigade. Discharged 
Camp Grant, 111., Dec. 16, '18. 

[3] DUNCAN, MALACHI, (Colp) age 26; 
B. Tyler, Ala. Son of Taylor and Mary Dun- 
can. Employed Miner. Entrained Aug. 2, '18. 



Overseas Sept. 17, '18. Engaged Meuse-Ar- 
gonne Off. Attached Co. I, 803rd Pioneer Inf. 
Discharged Mitchelfield, L. I. N. Y., Aug. 6, 
j.y . 

[4] PERSON, FODIE, (Dewmaine), B., 
Bells, Tenn. Son of Will and Mary Person, 
Dewmaine, 111. Employed Miner. Entrained 
Aug. 2, '18. Attached Co. D., 416 Bn. Dis- 
charged Camp Grant, 111., Nov. 23, '18. 

[5] WHITE, ALLIE O., (Marion), age 25; 
B., Marion, 111. Son of Presley and Mary 
White, Marion, 111. Employed Farming and 
Mining. Entrained June 2, '18. Overseas 
Sept. 7, '18. Attached Co. H, 803rd Pioneer 
Inf. 



BARNETT, WILLIAM, (Marion) age 21; B. Ma- 
rion, 111. Son of Nelson Barnett, Marion, 111. Em- 
ployed A. H. Bruner's Cafe, Cook. Entrained 
Sept 26. '18, Camp Grant, 111. 

BARNETT, POWELL, (Marion) age 24 ; B., Marion, 
III Son of Nelson Barnett, Marion, 111. Empjoy- 
ed at post office, Marion, 111. Entrained Aug. 2, '18, 
Camp Grant, 111. Honorably Discharged. 

BAXTER, SAM, (Colp) age 22 ; B., Ashley, Ind. 
Employed at Madison Coal Co., COlp, 111. Miner. 
Entrained April 29, '18, Camp Grant, 111. 

BARTEO, ALBERT, (Colp) age 24 ; B., Murphys- 
boro. 111. Employed at Madison Coal Corp., Colp, 
III. Entrained Aug. 2, '18, Camp Grant, Rockford, 

BARNETT, ROBERT, (Colp) age 27; B., Pulaski, 
111. Employed at Madison Coal Co. Miner. En- 
trained August 2, '18, Camp Grant, Rockford, 111. 

BARNETT, HOWARD G., (Marion) age 23 ; B., 
Marion, 111. Son of Nelson Barnett, Marion, 111. Em- 
ployed W. T. Hendspeth, Porter. Entrained April 
29, '18, Camp Grant, 111. 



ill imiiiiiiiiiiiiini i in 

BESTER, RICHARD, (Colp) age 21 ; B., Pratt, 
Alabama. Employed with Madison Corporation, 
Colp, 111. Miner. Entrained Aug. 2, '18, Camp 
Grant, 111. Rejected. 

BIGHORN, JENIE W., (Dewmaine) age 28 ; B., 
Ecru, Miss. Employed Madison Coal Corporation, 
Dewmaine, Illinois. Mining. Entrained August 2, 
1918, Camp Grant, 111. 

BREWINGTON, FRED, (Colp) age 26 ; B., Bon 
Air, Tenn. Entrained Aug. 2. '18, Camp Grant, 111. 
CARTER, TOMMIE, (Colp) age 23 ; B., Muning 
City, Tenn. Employed at Madison Coal Corp. Min- 
ing. Entrained Aug. 2, '18, Camp Grant, 111. 
BRIDGES, MARCELLO, (Colp) age 24 ; B., Ful- 
ton, Ky. Employed at Madison Coal Corp. Colp, 
111. Miner. Entrained Aug. 2, '18, Camp Grant, 111. 
CARR, WAYNE, (Colp) age 20 ; B., Basket Station, 
Ky. Employed at Stanton Mining Co.. Marion. 111. 
Entrained Sept. 25, '18, Camp Grant, 111. 
CASEY, CLARENCE, (Marion) age 29 ; B., Tren- 
ton, Tenn. Son of Nila Casey, Metropolis, 111. Em- 
ployed at Chicago & Eastern 111. R. R., Goodwine, 
111. Laborer on Ry. Entrained April 29, '18, Camp 
Grant, 111. Discharged July 3, '18. Disability. 

253 



CAVANAUGH, JAMES R., Marion) age 22 ; B., 
Galatia, 111. Son of Allie Green, Cairo, 111. Em- 
ployed at Watson Coal Co. Coal Miner. Entrained 
April 29, "18, Camp Grant, 111. Discharged June 
25, '18. 

CHERRY ODIE, (Colp) age 23 ; B., Carbondale, 
111. Employed at Madison Coal Co., Colp, 111. Min- 
ing. Entrained Aug. 2, '18, Camp Grant, 111. 
COLEMAN, ROBERT, (Colp) age 25 ; B., Beaver 
Dam, Ky. Employed at Madison Coal Corp. Min- 
ing. Entrained Aug. 2, '18, Camp Grant, 111. 

CRUSE, TIMOTHY, (Colp) age 23 ; B., East Bern- 
stadt, Ky. Employed at Madison Coal Corp., Colp, 
111. Mining. Entrained Aug. 2, '18, Camp Grant, III. 
DORCH, ALONZO, (Marion) age 25 ; B., Vienna, 
111. Employed at West Virginia Coal Co. Coal 
Miner. Entrained April 29, '18, Camp Grant, 111. 
Severely wounded in action. 

DODSON, JOE, (Colp) age 21 ; B., Tennessee. Son 
of Decie Rogges, Mule City, Tenn. Employed at 
JIadison Coal Corp., Dewmaine, 111. Blacksmith, 
Auto Mechanic. Entrained Sept. 26, '18, Camp 
Grant, 111. 

FIELDS, WILLIE, (Colp) age 24 ; B., Clarksville, 
Tenn. Employed at Big C. Company, Clifford, III. 
Miner. Entrained August 2, 1918, Canfp Grant, 111. 
FLIPPIN, BURNEY, , (Dewmaine) age 27 ; B. 
Greenfield, Tenn. Employed at Madison Coal Cor- 
poration, Dewmaine, 111. Miner. Entrained Aug. 2, 
'18, Camp Grant, 111. 

FOSTER, SOLEMAN, (Marion) age 26 ; B., St. 
Charles, Mo. Son of Hannah North, Marion, 111. Em- 
ployed Watson Coal Co. Coal Miner. Entrained 
April 29, '18, Camp Grant, 111. 

FOULKS, WILLIAM, (Marion) age 27 ; B., Union 
City, Tenn. Employed at C. & E. I. R. R. Co., 
Carrying Ties. Entrained Aug. 2, '18, Camp Grant, 

GILL, ARTHUR, (Colp) age 23 ; B., Villa Ridge, 
111. Employed at Colp. 111. Mining. Entrained Aug. 
2, '18, Camp Grant, 111. 

GORDEN, WALTER, (Marion) age 24 ; B., New- 
man, Tenn. Son of Katie Stubblefield, Perks, 111. 
Employed with American Creosoting Co. Laborer. 
Entrained April 29, '18, Camp Grant, 111. Discharg- 
ed June 22, '18. 

GORDON, SAM, (Colp) age 25 ; B., Trenton, Tenn. 
Musician. Entrained Aug. 







Employed at Colp, 111. 
2, '18, Camp Grant, 111. 
GREGORY, OLIVER, 



(Dewmaine) age 30 ; 



Employed at Madison Coal 
Mining. Entrained Aug. 2, 



B., 
Co., 
'18, 



Woodstock, Ga. 

Dewmaine, 111. 

Camp Grant, 111. 

HATCHETT, WILLIAM, (Clifford) age 26 ; B., 

Richmond, Va., Employed at Big Muddy Coal Co., 

Carterville, 111. Entrained Aug. 2, '18, Camp Grant, 

HAYES, JAMES, (Dewmaine) age 30 ; B., Rock- 
castle, Ky. Employed Madison Coal Co., Dewmaine, 
111. Mining. Entrained Aug. 2, '18, Camp Grant, 

JACKSON, LOUIE, (Marion) age 30 ; B., Marlon. 
Ill Son of J. F. and Georgia Jackson. Coal Miner. 
Entrained June 25, '18, Camp Funston, Kan. At- 
tached to Co. M., 65th Pioneer Inf. Discharged 
Camp Funston, Kan., Nov. 7, '18. 

JACKSON, JOSEPH, (Marion) age 28 ; B., Marion, 
111. _Son of J. F. and Georgia Jackson. Married 
Mary Arnold. Coal Miner. Entrained Sept. 26, 'li, 
Camp Grant, 111. Attached to Co. D., Development 
Bat. 5. Discharged Camp Grant, 111. Dec. 16. '18. 
JACKSON, JOSEPH, (Marion) age 27; B., Marion, 
111. Employed at New Goodall Hotel. Porter. En- 
trained Sept. 26, '18, Camp Grant, 111. Honorably 
discharged. 

JONES, ERNEST, (Marion) age 21 ; B., Wetang, 
111. Employed at Wm. Lough & Son's, Marion, 111. 
Laborer. Entrained Aug. 2, '18, Camp Grant, 111. 
JOHNSON, WILLIAM, (Dewmaine) age 27; B., 
Coal Creek, Tenn. Employed at Madison Coal Corp., 
Dewmaine, 111. Miner. Entrained Aug. 2, '18, Camp 
Grant, 111. 



JORDON, ALFRED, (Dewmaine) age 30 ; B., Grand 
Tower, 111. Employed at Madison Coal Corp., Dew- 
maine, 111. Miner. Entrained Sept. 25, '18, Camp 
Grant, 111. 

LAFONT, OLLIE, (Colp) age 27 ; B., New Madrid, 
Mo. Employed at Madison Coal Corp., Colp, 111. 
Miner. Entrained Aug. 2, '18, Camp Grant, 111. 

MARTIN, LEONARD, (Marion) age 25 ; B., Yazoo 
City, Miss. Employed Goodall Hotel, Marion, 111. 
Cook. Entrained Aug. 2, '18, Camp Grant, 111. Dis- 
charged Oct. 8, '18. 

MACK, DALLAS, (Pulaski) age 21 ; B., Pulaski, 
111. Employed at Dewmaine, III. Farmer. Entrain- 
ed Aug. 2, '18, Camp Grant, 111. 

MORRISON, WALTER, (Colp) age 21 ; B., Sparta, 
111. Employed at Madison Coal Corp., Dewmaine, 
111. Miner. Entrained Aug. 2, '18. Camp Grant, 

MEEKE, WAYMAN, (Dewmaine) age 22; B., Villa 
Ridge, 111. Employed at Madison Coal Corp. Colp, 
111. Mining. Entrained Aug. 2, '18, Camp Grant, 111. 
MEEKE, ROY L., (Dewmaine) age 23 ; B., Pulaski, 
111. Employed at Madison Coal Co., Dewmaine, 111. 
Mining. Entrained Aug. 2, '18, Camp Grant, 111. 

MONTAGUE, ARCHIE, (Colp) age 30 ; B., Bells, 
Tenn. Employed at Madison Coal Corp., Colp, 111. 
Mining. Entrained Oct. 18, '18, Camp Norfolk, Va. 

McCOY, ARTHUR, (Colp) age 27 ; B., Coal Creek, 
Tenn. Employed at Madison Coal Co., Dewmaine, 
111. Mining. Entrained August 2, '18, Camp Grant, 

OLIVER, HENRY, (Colp) age 21; B., Ocsoloa, Ark. 
Scm of Mrs. Sarah Oliver. Employed at Madison Coal 
Corporation, Colp, Illinois. Mining. Entrained July, 
1918 for Camp Grant, Illinois. 

PERKINS, FRANK, (Dewmaine) age 30 ; B., 
Pulaski, 111. Employed at Madison Coal Co., Dew- 
maine, 111. Mining. Entrained April 29, 1918, Camp 
Grant, 111. 

SMITH, GEORGE, (Dewmaine) age 23; B.. Coal 
Creek, Tenn. Employed at Big Muddy Coal & Iron 
Co., Clifford, 111. Coal Miner. Entrained Aug. 2, 
'18, Camp Grant, 111. 

SMITH, IREATA, (Sparta) age 21 ; B., Chicago, 
111. Employed Madison Coal Corp. Mining. En- 
trained Aug. 2, '18, Camp Grant, 111. 

SMITH, COLONEL, (Dewmaine) age 22 ; B., Wil- 
liamsburg, Tenn. Employed Clifford, 111. Mining. 
Entrained April 29, '18, Camp Grant, 111. 

SNEED, CLYDE HENRY, (Marion) age 21 ; B., 
Marion, 111. Son of Richard Sneed. Coal Miner. 
Entrained Aug. 2, '18. 

STEWARD, ALVIE, (Dewmaine) age 23 ; B., Green 
Wood, Ark. Employed Big Muddy Coal & Iron Com- 
pany, Herrin, Illinois. Mining. Entrained September 
25, 1918. 

STEWARD, BENNIE, (Colp) age 30 ; B., Marlon, 
Alabama. Employed with Madison Coal Co., Colp, 
111. Mining. Entrained August 2, '18, Camp Grant, 
111. 

STOVER, JOHN, (Colp) age 21 ; B., Alabama. Em- 
ployed at Madison Coal Corp., Colp, 111. Mining. En- 
trained Aug. 2, '18, Camp Grant, 111. 
SWAGDETY, FRANK, (Dewmaine) age 26 ; B., 
Newport, Tenn. Employed at Madison Coal Corp., 
Dewmaine. 111. Mining. Entrained Aug. 2, '18, Camp 
Grant, 111. 

THOMPSON, EWELL, (Colp) age 21 ; B., Elk- 
ville, 111. Employed at Madison Coal Corp., Colp, 
111. Entrained Aug. 2, '18, Camp Grant, 111. 

TIDEWELL, WALLACE, (Dewmainei age 22 
Mohnown, Tenn. Employed at Madison Coal 
Dewmaine, 111. Mining. Entrained Aug. 22, 
Camp Grant, 111. 

VINCENT, EUGENE, (Herrin) age 26 ; B., Car- 
terville, Ga. Employed at Big Muddy Coal & Iron 
Co., Clifford, 111. Miner. Entrained Aug. 2, '18. 
Camp Grant, 111. 



254 




These Backed Up Over Here the Brave 
Boys Over There 

'T'HE following pages deal with that big army which was all of the time backing up 
* here at home, by economizing, buying Liberty Bonds, contributing to war funds and 
tirelessly pushing their respective trades and industries at fullest capacity that the boys 
over there might feel the fullest support and carry their arms to final success just in 
the manner that they did. 

With the same loyalty and unselfishness that characterized the business and profes- 
sional men, the commercial and industrial interests of the county during the war, so these 
men, firms and corporations represented in the following pages show themselves still to 
be backing the soldier now that he is home from battle by ordering these accountings 
of their stewardship in those perilous days and thus making possible such an elaborate 
and permanent history in which to preserve the glorious deeds of the soldiers from this 
county. 

In that the end of the war marks the opening of a new epoch in the history of this 
nation, the Williamson County War History Society deemed it quite fitting that the 
professional, business and industrial conditions be reviewed at this time. For when the 
future historians look to this period for material they will have a true and complete 
picture of the county in all its activities in this important period. It will serve as a 
"Who's Who" book of the period something, unfortunate to say, we have been left at 
the close of no other war. 

Every business, every public official, every corporation, every industry in this county 
was cordially invited and those not responding, urgently solicited to be represented in 
these pages. It was fully explained to those who held out and are still not represented 
that every patron of these pages mean a contribution to the most permanent and fitting 
memorial that could be erected to the honor of the soldier. Every man who answered 
the call of his country to arms in this county will be able to see for himself those ever 
patriotic men who did respond to our request and thereby thought enough of the soldier 
to aid the society in preserving for this and future generations his part in the Great 
War. The response was indeed magnificent and none certainly will ever feel ashamed 
of what is written here. The following pages speak for themselves. 




255 




Taylor Coal Company 

PRODUCERS OF ENERGY COAL 

HERBERT H. TAYLOR, President; E. H. KELLER, Vice-President ; B. L. SHEPARD, Secretary; 
H. J. ENIS, Treasurer; R. W. CLASSEN, Adv. Mgr.; GRANT SAYLOR, Mine Supt. 

Main Office: Old Colony Building, Chicago. 




No. 2 MINE AND WASHER AT HERRIN, ILL. 



OOME ten or fifteen years ago, Herbert 
^-' Taylor, of Chicago, a young man with 
considerable experience in the coal trade, 
organized the Taylor Coal Company. The 
company's first venture was the acquisition 
of two mines and the washer just outside of 
Herrin, Illinois, and at the same time Mr. 
Taylor hit upon a name for his coal and a 
trademark that have since become famous in 
the coal trade. The name itself, Energy, has 
had a good deal to do with the building of 
the morale of the organization, for often, 
especially after the men went to France, was 
the organization spoken of as the Energy 



family. As a family it is not wrongly 
named for it is one of the brighest and livest 
organizations in the coal trade today, an 
organization in which Mr. Taylor takes a 
tremendous personal pride, asking but one 
thing of his men, unswerving loyalty. 

What has all this to do with Williamson 
County's part in the war? Just this. The 
man who gives his employer the best that is 
in him gives his country the same kind of 
loyalty and every report from the mines 
bringing new names to be added to the 
bronze Roll of Honor hanging in the Chi- 
cago office was read with pride and interest, 



256 



3 




for these were the men who put Energy into 
the fight. 

It has been hard to get the individual 
records of the men but the names of four 
are' marked with gold stars. 

Mike McNeil, Co. I, 49th Inf., died in 
camp in this country; Preston Staton, Co. F, 
7th Engineers, was killed in action, as was 
also Cecil Draper, Co. A, 120th Inf. Edward 
N. Davis, of the Chicago office of the Com- 
pany, a member of the machine gun com- 
pany of the 130th Infantry, died of wounds 
received in action. Of those who went over 
and came back with decorations there is no 
record nor is there any record of the promo- 
tions received by the men. That they acquit- 
ted themselves with honor goes without say- 
ing and is indicated in the tables which slip 
out on rare occasions. 

The men who entered the service of the 
government are not by any means however 
the only ones who served. Theirs was the 
dangerous, the hard, uncomfortable, dis- 
agreeable and sacrificing service, but, al- 
though in a lesser degree, the men who 
stayed at home served as well. Never in the 



^ 



history of the coal trade were the men asked 
to work as they were during the period of 
the war, never did they rise to an emergency 
more loyally. The four mines of the com- 
pany clustered about Herrin have a daily 
capacity of about 7500 tons and they together 
with the other mines did noble work. 

In addition to their daily work a number 
of the men put in extra time on the Liberty 
Loans, and all of the war work campaigns. 
Among the men in the Chicago office there 
were three or four who worked on every loan 
and every war work campaign while six of 
the others gave half of their time to work in 
the Fuel Administration offices in Chicago. 

Such is the record of the Taylor Coal Com- 
pany in the war of 1917-1918. 

One hundred and twenty-five, out of one 
thousand to twelve hundred men, in active 
service, the balance doing their bit at home, 
is a record of which any firm may well be 
proud of, and the Taylor Coal Company 
takes this opportunity to pay tribute to the 
members of the Energy family who served 
their country, particularly those who sacri- 
ficed all. 



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THE BRONZE ROLL OF HONOR OF THE TAYLOR COAL COMPANY 
WHICH HANGS IN THEIR CHICAGO OFFICE. 

258 








B 



Ernest Coal Company 



.. 



T^RANCO COAL" has become well known 
among the large coal users, through 
the sales agency of Cosgrove & Company, 
Old Colony Building, Chicago, who are sell- 
ing agents of the Ernest Coal Company. This 
company operates three mines, one at Johns- 
ton City and two at Pittsburg, in Williamson 
county. One of the mines at Pittsburg began 
production the past summer. 

The veins of the Franco mines run from 
nine to eleven feet in thickness and are what 
is known as the celebrated No. 6 vein, which 
in these particular mines tests 13,000 B. T. U. 
a remarkable heating figure in comparison 
with hard coal. 

These mines are equipped with the very 
latest screening devices which makes "Franco 
Coal" uniform from top to bottom. Besides 
the screening devices they maintain a special 
ever moving picking table and shaking 
screen, which very few mines use, producing 
a select coal sorted and picked for domestic 
or family use. 



The executive officers are H. J. Meeham, 
president, Johnstown, Penn.; Frank Finsth, 
secretary-treasurer, Cherry Tree, Penn. J. S. 
Crosgrove, Chicago, is president of the Pitts- 
burg mine, the other officers are the same as 
the Johnston City mine. The main office is 
maintained at Johnston City and the local 
officers there are: R. B. Mitchell, superin- 
tendent; B. H. Schull, assistant superintend- 
ent, and Harry Woods, chief clerk. 

The company employs a large number of 
miners and other employees they and the 
officers were very active in all war work and 
have a splendid record, the Johnston City 
mine having the distinction of being the first 
mine in the State making a 100 per cent 
record on the third and fourth Liberty Loan 
drives, every employee subscribing for bonds 
and War Savings Stamps. 

The honor roll of the two mines in 
operation during the war period is given 
as complete as possible on the following 
page. 




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DEDICATED BY 

1 ERNEST COAL COMPANY J 


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'''./'/' 

Of Employees Who Answered the Call to 
Colors in the World War. 1917-1919. 

JJ JOHNSTON CITY H. Hamby 
]\l!N E L. Downard 




i 


Alf. Richardson G. Walker 
Pete Yurgin - Pledger 
Ed Carr Geo - Nicks 
; ; Bert Hampton PITTSBURG MINE 
i> A. Hampton 
Jas. Palmer Prentice Bryan 


I 


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W K Miller Chester Motsmger 
Gus Mercer Lemmie Felts 
Leo Mercer John Sanders 
Robt. Littlefair g eo> ^ ens 




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J m }.. Elfil J Ed Tyler 
William Jones Oscar Barth 

Fred Mines Gilbert Drake 
Fred Williams Charlie Norton 
, Willis Sanders R a y Browman 
/I Cal Sanders R a y Bowman 
A John Wallace Walter Felts 
'!! Walter Wallace Lester Davis 
U. Hamby Elmer Floyd 


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260 



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DEDICATED BY 

JOHNSTON CITY COAL COMPANY \ 


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G*>SSi" ' mini in i , igsfe-ty 

Of Employees Who Answered the Call to 
Colors In the World War, 1917-1919. 

MINE No. 1 Tony Giannetti Earl Adamson 
Steve McClusky Leonard Adamson 
b Kalpn Hardy Joe Renauldi Oscar D. McDaniel C 


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| 


1 


Joe Burgess W m. Cain Jno. R. Lockey 
Pat Leonard j^ Cain Mike Kyoko 
J. Duddy, Jr. Mac Allen Joe Bellavida 
Mart McNeil Jo h n j er eb Robt. Walters 
Wm. Shukites E. Norcavage Pete Petrikas 
Ed. Grissley Rosv Marcioni 
Wayne Hunter j $ p^ick MlNE No 2 
Victor Reiter Cortland Price Pau l D'Angelo 
Martin Leonard, Jr. i sado re Geraldi Carmello Agnello 
Claud Hunter William Molonosky Frank Boinek 

ni rt - M - Kn P ick John Harris 
Chas. Miller Arthur Herron Edd Lovell 
Joe Traverne j. p. Grissom Veto Maniscolco 
T. H. Swift j. Sczuka James R. McCoy 
Lester Derrmgton Dave Fisher Joe Notti 
Alex McClusky Paul Manfulletta Lawrence Oremovich 
Sam Davis Sherman Holt Isadore Geraldi 
Henry Fellman Ora Martin *Wm. G. Storey 
Rosario Maniscalco Alfred Hill Sam Sartino 
Carmelo Consiglio Ben Sowell H. E. Scurlock 
Paul Darabula Veto Salerno J. B. Stephens 
Charles Barlow J as . Ramshaw Frank Sarafino 
Dave Martin Jos. Ashbridge Joe Vucellio 


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DEDICATED BY 

C. W. & F. COAL COMPANY 

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Of Employees Who Answered the Call to 
Colors In the World War, 1:117-1:11:1. 

"A" Wedo Calcaterra Jesse Ma 
Robt. Calcaterra Goble Ma 
npbell Frank Calcaterra Mm. Mey 
strong Alex Ferrio Norman 
Idonia Wm R Reed E(]w pe 

"' August Dalto *Preston 
Floyd Morris Wm. Sha 
Tony Lucinnio Jack Sut 
" Chas. Childers James T 
X* Joe Ceretti Joe Tatu 
*" Orbie Thompson Chas. Wi 
Jack Montgomery Amos Be 
! er Wm. Maughn, Jr. D. L Be 
irnL-hi Joe Marl Geo. Con 

ith Ceasar Otto M - Fishb 
,.. Lewis J. Rancillio Earl Goo 

x;rson Gordon Cargel Ampher 
rtin John Laffert y Melvin I 
netoni Paul s P iller Ray Huff 
llins CHfton Williams C. B. Lai 

io MINF "R" Joe Marc 
d . Bettino J 

Dzetti Fred Baxter Joe Maul 
as Thos. Brann Wm. Mul 
Garavalia Chas. Carnaghie H. Murr; 
"'homas W. R. Devours Jack .Mui 
'ropes H. Garris Jas. Rash 
conti Jos. Hall Wm. Sis! 
eozzoni John Killer R. H. Si 
>raro Walter Hancock Harrison 
ilemeras T. H. Jackson Pete Vit 
Parker Mike Leontas Van Wic 
Dggeria Joe Mario Fred Wh 


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Ellis Arm 
John Gau 
Veto Noze 
Dominick 
Allen Haj 
Jesse Clei 
James A. 
Ignozio G 
Jule Pent 
Verna Mi 
James Lu 
Ceasar C< 
Willie Srr 
Thos. Ma 
Verna Pe 
Ralph Ma 
Frank Be 
Claud Mu 
Tony Sav 
Earl Bail 
Angelo N 
Sam Lock 
Dominick 
Fayette 1 
*Roscoe ] 
Guido Vis 
Ernest M 
Tony Pic( 
Betastis 
*Robt. L. 
Angelo R 

*Gold Stars 

3 


McClintock 
igilley 
Staton 
ckleford 
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itum 
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llet 
llet 
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ack 
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Higgins 
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Killed in action. 




262 




03 


pitlil ".. illia^^iS^izsill - ; . ; --;- ; ,. :..:.:,:.,.: 






DEDICATED BY 

CHICAGO & BIG MUDDY COAL COMPANY 


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_KAAAJU- 



Of Kmployees Who Answered the Call to 
Colors In the World War, r.MT- liil'.i. 



4 



Dent Ferrell 
Ralph Woodley 
Fred Williams 
Vernell Gulledge 
W. S. McLaren 
Guy Emery 
Arthur Fries 
Cloid Gopher 
Frank Knight 
Elijah Butler 
Mat Tanner 
Ben Chamness 
Chas. Dugger 
Alfred Penn 
Don Miller 
Alex Gilmour 



Harry Paquotte 
Guy Jones 
John McCluckie 
L. E. Brush 
Dalton Murrah 
Lee Rogers 
Fred Darter 
Henry Rushing 
Dudley Groves 
Chas. Bruce 
Barney Howard 
Clyde Rushing 
Casey Hartwell 
Donald Gunn 
S. T. Norris 
Chas. Canada 



*Offices, Chicago and Marion. Officers: A. B. McLaren, Pres.; 
M. Woodley, Vice-president; O. M. Burnett, Gen'l Sales 
Mgr.; M. A. Canavan, Sec'y; J. T. Dean, Asst. Treas. 





IX 






263 





DEDICATED BY 

FREEMAN COAL COMPANY 




Of Employees Who Answered the Call to 
Colors hi the World War, 1917-1919. 



Frank Feltz 
Chancey Smith 
Walter Tennel 
Ray Daniels 
Jim Cobb 
Will Meadows 
Thomas Shaw 
Homer Steiger 
Joe Eady 
Frank Malano 
Frank Maning 
Enes Turner 



Henry Gibson 
Sam Eldridge 
John Vaught 
Eugene Vincent 
Fowler Sullenger 
Earl Newton 
Clay Fisher 
Earnest Clem 
Clarence Lee 
William Hagler 
Clyde Smith 
John Simokat 



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DEDICATED BY 

MADISON COAL CORPORATION 






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Of Employees Who Answered the Call to 
Colors to the World War, 1917-1919. 

MINE No. 9. 


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Dave Hartwell Joe Watson 




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Alex Lippett Allie Stone 
Jeff Medlock Frank Coruse 
Chester Robinson Lee Hobbs 
Robert Vaughn Robert Chappie 
Fred Millenger John Baudino 
John Cochran E. Schoonover 














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Curnel Smith Ceaser Pina 
Edward Alexander Louis Pina 
Harry Watson R. Tudolo 








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Lenard McAurthor Grover Walker 
W. E. Jones Will Huggens 
Wm. J. Griffith Fred Waldron 
Earl Steele Grover Folowell 
George Hogg Troy Ogden 
Ray Stone John Verna 






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DEDICATED BY 

CONSOLIDATED COAL COMPANY OF ST. LOUIS | 




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Of Employees Who Answered the Call to 
Colors, in the World War, 1917-1919. 

Jas. Shearer Sam Rubifone 
Joe Williams Richard Watson 




| 


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Arthur Berry Mose Mason 
Battista Colombo p e t e Castrale 
* Thomas Tyson p ete Kancus 
Leslie Brigham Cella Bondi 

J A u ^ lmnl0 Avry Dorris 
A. H Chancy Q FolHo 

nJf^M Castr ^ e John Krantz 
Otto Muzzaral o Ambrose Mariochio 
John Muzzarallo ,-, ,. u .. 
Frank Foiago FM Hastings 

Archie Clark i h " Pf^ 11 ?' 1 ? 1 
Pete Savant Fred Rossibia 
Robt. Watson -J ? Comas 
Wm Eland John Zanestamch 
Aug. Leoni Am P Wells 
John Huntley Ben Johnston 
Ed. Dobbs Alfred Barham 
O. Rotrammel Battista Maggi 
*Dom. Ossallo John Batts 
Dom Zelinski Orville Morgan 
Battista Falletta Fred Bossilla 


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266 



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DEDICATED BY 

PRATT COAL COMPANY 

i 


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-- '- . - " -' - .." '.'. - .-'.- "'- .-"."- -.'.'- .-.-.'' .. '- .".' .-.-..'.', ' , ,:-" ' - 




HOiftOR ROLL 



Of Employees Who Answered the Call to 
Colors In the World War, 1917-lBltt. 




McKinley Maxwell 
Steve Zucco 
Joe Leddell 
James Nevill 
Henry Cole 
Ben Hansford 
Joe Beroletta 
Wm. Patterson 
Vernie Turner 
Geo. Henderson 
Powell Burchfield 
Luther Burchfield 
Geo. Mason 
Frank Gibson 



H. A. Lohr 
Ernest Trout 
Dan Burns 
Geo. Crenshaw 
J. Monroe Wright 
Wm. Hansford 
Sam Farris 
Cleve Tubbs 
Howard Veach 
Ernest Eads 
John Ficke 
Gluver Vickrey 
Jess Manning 
Luther West 
Otice Herdic 



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DEDICATED BY 

W. P. REND COAL COMPANY. 

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Of Employees Who Answered the Call to 
Colors In the World War, 1917-1919. 

Lem Allen Joe Sadoski Eugene Bown 


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1 




Joe Nash Alfred Vaughn Walter Kerchesky 








4 


0} 


. . . * (jreo. McJNally Clyde JNelson Louis Yankis 4= 
Pete Gaettina Ralph Haughee Frank Zaro 
Pete Perrero Joe Nunn Leo Stover 
Leonard Staunton Angelo Todoroff Jesse Maddox 
Allison Mathis Aura Roberts Otis Bennett 
. Claud Fogle Elmer Staunton Miles Hill 
John Berno Koscie Chounaunea Jesse Mabry 


M 


&' 








Alex Sokolosky Quincy Mabry Leonard Mezo 
Chas. Galligan Ode Randolph Sam Deavers 
W. F. Capley Steve Carey John Billinsly 
A ' Alex Verefeski Pete Zero STORE AND OFFICE 










1= 






x.-. 






xi\/ 


Ollie Jenkins Henry Carnaghi 
Carl Maddox Stanley Sanoski Carrol Minton 
Wm. Buntin W. C. Sullivan Nick Tudoff 
Jas. Galligan Troy Sherertz J. A. Irby 
Parley Popham Tony Maski Harold Lounsbury 
Hugh Blair Orval Shackleford 
N| Wm. Atess Travis Craghead DECEASED 
Geo. Nigo Robert Waldrop *Marvin Roark 
John Clinetti Joe Wadoski *W. J. Smith 
James Ostrander Harry Wolsey *Otis Ladd 


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MARION Joe Parent Curtis R. Woodside 

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Emery Allen Wm . Mainwaring G eorge L. Askew 
Fred Hawkins Earl Buckner Leo Dudle y Groves 
Oren Bullock Loren Cook Dalton Owens 
Hallie Newton Ezra Rogers Charles Gallagher 
Ralph Lansine Dalton Owens Sevil Hartwell 
Walter Norman Lucian Lambert Lester Postle 
George Moffitt Herman Graves T - R - Woodbridge 
Luther Woodworth William Amzi Hill Will Launius 
Wm. Herman Sham- Fred Buckner Alex Fleming 
ness John E. Mull Joe L. Boatright 
Leroy L. Price Paul H. Whitten- Anthony Frank Ge- 
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CARTERVILLE McKinley Beasley 
Rpn Pprrv Marion Carmichal 




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Templeton Grain Harr y Williamson 
G. H. Hadfield Norman Tregoning 
Harry Hadfield Paul Woods 
Jas. Rutherford Gu y Williamson 
Fred Phillips B. C. Ledford 
Jack Watson Fred Sheppard 
Ed Drew J e Watson 
Ray McMillen Dolph Emery 
Lyle Peterson (M.S.) Henry Ross 
Dave Billiner Norman Walker 
Otis McMillen Norman Russell 
Wm. Hastie Leo Pilte 
Rex Hastie Roy Williams 
Fern Hastie Sam Stocks 


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Williamson County Agricultural Association 




E one Williamson county institution that 
every man, woman and child takes pride 
in and eagerly awaits the opening date, is 
the Williamson County Fair. Usually this 
fair is held after the opening of the schools 
in the fall, but it has long been a practice 
to close school for one or two days and also 
all the business houses of the county for at 
least a day to give every one an opportunity 
to take part in Williamson county's big gala 
week. 

The Williamson County Agricultural Asso- 
ciation was organized in 1856. John Good- 
all was president; John H. White, secretary; 
and 0. H. Wiley, treasurer. The first fair 
grounds consisted of ten acres west of and 
near the village limits on West Main Street, 
now in the city. Since then, except during 
the Civil War, the Association has held regu- 
lar annual fairs. The first extensive improve- 
ment was the adding of fourteen acres, after 
a reorganization, this has been added to from 



time to time until the present site contains 
fifty-three acres. Without exception it is the 
best shaded, the best watered and in the best 
condition of any fair association in Southern 
Illinois. Rain or shine, the fairs have been 
held as advertised and every cent of obliga- 
tion has been met. 

The plan and arrangements of the grounds 
and buildings are artistic and well carried 
out, and the general appearance and en- 
semble of the whole is attractive and very 
pleasing to the eye and taste of the most 
exacting. Two amphitheatres are new, and 
this year was added a series of box seats 
formed into a neat grandstand for the con- 
venience of those who desire and can afford 
to pay for private boxes to view the high 
class show that is constantly passing the 
grand stands. The exposition buildings 
consists of the agricultural, domestic science, 
poultry and educational. In addition there 
are extensive classified stock buildings for 



271 




exhibition purposes and racing stables. Nice 
commodious, convenient subways have re- 
cently been built, leading from the amphi- 
theatre side under the track to the elegant 
park in the track circle, which can be used 
at all times without danger from running 
horses on the track. 

The agricultural department is conducted 
upon broad lines, and the fanner is encour- 
aged by every inducement modern methods 
may offer to better conditions op. the farm. 
If there is any one department that gives 
supremacy in attention and effort it is the 
agricultural section, and this attention has 
been appreciated by exhibitors and it is 
hoped that the facilities offered by the asso- 
ciation will be enjoyed and taken advantage 
of to the fullest extent by the farmers of 
Williamson county at all future exhibitions. 
The live stock department is a particularly 
important feature, and the showing made by 
the stock raisers is especially gratifying. 
Magnificent horses, blooded cattle, fancy bred 
hogs and the finest strains of poultry are 
on exhibit each year. Last, but not least, 
the lowly mule is at his best because William- 
son county is the largest producer of fine 



mules in Southern Illinois, and Marion is 
the central market from which is shipped 
each year the cream of the mule product of 
Southern Illinois. 

The premiums are large and varied, cov- 
ering every important exhibit. The volume 
of gross expenditure in premiums is not ex- 
ceeded by any fair in the state with the ex- 
ception of the State Fair, and in a great 
many features the State Fair is rivalled. 

Considerable credit is given the different 
officers and directors who serve from year 
to year without remuneration of any kind, 
except the secretary who receives a very nom- 
inal fee for continuous work the year round 
to make each fair outrival the past year's 
efforts. The secretary for the past twenty- 
four years has been George C. Campbell, 
whose untiring efforts are credited, in a large 
measure, the association's present success. 

The present officers are: Wm. L. Dunston, 
president; Roy Hawkins, vice-president; 
Geo. C. Campbell, secretary; Fred Stotlar, 
treasurer. Directors: E. H. Bulliner, Lloyd 
Bradley, Chas. M. Lee, Snyder Vick, Jno. W. 
Gray. 




272 



Sw 




Marion State and Savings Bank 



THE Marion State & Savings Bank of 
Marion was organized in 1890 by C. H. 
Denison and J. H. Searing and joined in a 
few months by J. H. Burnett with a capital 
of $30,000.00. 

Incorporated July 24, 1902, as the Marion 
State & Savings Bank, with a capital of 
000.00 and in 
four years in- 
creased its cap- 
ital to $100,- 
000.00 from net 
profits. 

C. H. Deni- 
son was presi- 
dent from 1890 
to the time of 
his death June 
26, 190 8. At 
this time J. H. 
Burnett became 
president, and 
still holds that 
office. E. B. 
Jackson, who 
had been book- 
keeper, and 
then cashier in 
the new institu- 
tion, has held 
the office of cashier down to the present time. 

This has been a successful bank from the 
day it started. A money maker all the time. 
Conservative, yet progressive and at all times 
using its resources and influence toward the 
upbuilding of Marion and Williamson 
County. 

Few country banks have been blessed with 
two such able financiers as C. H. Denison and 
J. H. Burnett. Their conservative and pro- 
gressive ideas have become deeply imbedded 
in the character and life of E. B. Jackson, 
who for so many years has been associated 




with them as cashier, making this a mighty 

good bank to tie to. 

Their slogan "Solid as a Rock," very aptly 

expresses the outstanding characteristic of the 

Marion State & Savings Bank. 

With present capital, surplus and profits of 

$142,000.00, and resources of $1,400,000.00, 

the present 
officers and di- 
rectors are: 

Officers J. 
H. Burnett, 
president; W. 
J. Aikman, vice 
president; E. B. 
Jackson, c a s h- 
ier; B. Glenn 
G u I 1 e d g e, 
assistant cash- 
ier; J. R. Brad- 
bury, assistant 
cashier; and 
Elaine Pearce, 
assistant cash- 
ier. The direct- 
ors are: Geo. 
A. Wallace, B. 
D. Bracy, J. H. 
Burnett, Dr. G. 
J. Baker, A. J. 

Binkley, E. B. Jackson, Samuel Sterns, W. J. 

Aikman, J. C. B. Smith, L. 0. Caplinger. 

This bank did its bit throughout the war 
period most nobly. The fact that its cashier, 
Mr. Jackson, was early selected as county 
chairman of the Liberty Loan compaign, 
brought the institution into prominence and 
made it a busy clearing house for the 
county's war finances. The members of the 
board of directors and depositors as well 
were enlisted in the work from the first in 
various patriotic ways that called for 
finances. 



273 




Brown's Business College 




"DROWN'S BUSINESS COLLEGE of Marion, 111., 
is one of the many schools which go to make 
up the chain of the efficient business training schools 
bearing this name. At the close of the Civil War, 
Mr. G. W. Brown, seeing the need of a business 
training for the boys who fought to preserve the 
Union, determined to establish an institution for 
business training to meet the increasing demands 
for efficiency along business lines. This was in 1866. 
From that time to this these schools have rapidly 



grown to an enormous chain, all of which are ac- 
credited. 

Prof. J. H. Siekman of the Marion school took 
charge of this important school June 1, 1913. Since 
then he has increased the enrollments of this school 
2300 per cent, and his students are a living adver- 
tisement to this famous business training school. 
The business interest throughout Southern Illinois 
and in many other states of the Union will testify 
to the efficiency and ability of the student who 
takes his business training with Brown's of Marion. 



274 




First National Bank of Marion 



E First National Bank of Marion was 
organized in January, 1891, with a 
capital of $50,000, in succession to the Ex- 
change National Bank, which for a number 
of years prior thereto had been conducted 
under practically the same officers as the 
organizers of the First National. It is one 
of the strongest financial institutions in 
Southern 
Illinois, and 
under c o n- 
servative yet 
liberal man- 
agement ex- 
tending 
every per- 
missible ac- 
c omm oda- 
tions to cus- 
tomers. The 
officers and 
directors are 
among the 
most sub- 
stantial 
b u s i n e s s 
men and 
citizens, and 
in their per- 
sonalities alone afford every guarantee to 
depositors, known to banking. The First 
National Bank has long since adopted the 
policy of lending all assistance and encour- 
agement consistent with safe banking methods 
to all new industries seeking location in this 
section. 

The members of the directorate of the First 
National have taken a prominent part in all 
movements for the growth and advancement 
of Marion and Williamson county. They 
have witnessed the progress made here with 
great satisfaction and their bank has been a 
potent factor in the development of Marion. 

Several of the officers have been identified 




with the institution almost continuously since 
its organization the president, Shannon Hol- 
land, has been president since 1894; J. C. 
Mitchell, since 1891, the capable and con- 
scientious cashier; Lloyd C. Campbell, assist- 
ant cashier, first came to the bank as book- 
keeper in 1892 and three years later was pro- 
moted to assistant cashier. The present offi- 
cers other 
than those 
p r eviously 
men tioned 
are: J a o b 
G o o d a 1 1, 
vice- presi- 
dent; W. S. 
B u r k h art 
assistant 
cashier, and 
B. E. Mitch- 
ell, assistant 
cashier. 

The pres- 
e n t capital 
stock is 
,$100,000 
with surplus 
and u n d i- 
vided profits 
of $107,895.10 and deposits of $1,453,057.91. 
The elegant banking house here pictured 
was built in 1916 at a cost, including fixtures, 
of over $66,000. It is two stories in height 
with modern office rooms on the second 
floor. 

The bank is safeguarded in every modern 
manner, and its large and commodious 
lobby and reception rooms make it a very 
popular institution. 

The new and modern safety deposit boxes 
in the most up to date and burglar proof 



vault has 



are in use 
tomers. 



fulfilled a 
by the 



popular demand and 
large number of cus- 



275 



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f 




Motor Sales Company 




/~\NE of the largest distributors of automo- 
^-^ biles in southern Illinois is the Motor 
Sales Company of Marion, established fifteen 
years ago by 0. S. Cole. 

Mr. Cole was born at Goreville, February 
18, 1872. He was educated in the public 
schools at Vienna and S. I. N. U. at Carbon- 
dale. His education and training fitted him 
for the position he holds in the automobile 
field of southern Illinois. He was reared on 
a farm, taught school for ten years, was in 
the mercantile business for twelve years and 
established the Motor Sales Company at 311 
West Main Street in 1913. In 1895 he was 
married to Miss Clara Foster, and they have 
two sons, D. W., aged twenty-three, and Cline, 
aged seventeen. The eldest son was in the 
aviation service during the world war, record 
in the officers' section of this history, and 
now taking an active interest in the business. 

After death of his wife he married her sis- 
ter Celia in 1907. 



The Motor Sales Company has handsome 
and commodious sales rooms, which were 
remodeled this year into the most complete 
exhibition rooms outside of the largest cities. 
These rooms display new cars and a large 
assortment of used cars practically any 
priced car can be found in the large number 
always on hand. The new cars are the Max- 
well, Nash and Dodge Brothers, which are 
distributed through this firm for a large sur- 
rounding territory. 

Reliable mechanics are employed for pos- 
sible service on new cars and for reliable 
repairing. The repair rooms are modern in 
every respect and none but the best mechan- 
ics can work for the Motor Sales Company, 
as they must be experts. The automobile 
public has given the Motor Sales Company 
its confidence no time is added to your 
repair bills here, one pays for exactly what 
they get. Complete parts are carried for the 
Maxwell, Dodge Brothers and Nash cars. 



276 



a 




Citizens Trust and Banking Co. 



T^STABLISHED in Marion, January 2, 
*-' 1907, the Citizens Trust and Banking 
Company has long been recognized as one 
of the leading financial institutions of Marion 
and Williamson County. This bank was 
organized with a capital stock of $100,000.00 
by the following officers and directors: Miles 
Parks, president; W. W. Clemmons, vice- 



in deposits was reached, which is creditable. 
The present officers are: A. B. McLaren, 
president; Wm. Hendrickson, vice-president; 
Wm. Wohlwend, cashier; P. W. Ballance, 
assistant cashier; Altha Perry, assistant cash- 
ier; Rufus Neely, attorney. The directors 
are A. B. McLaren, R. 0. Clarida, Wm. 
Hendrickson, R. T. Owens, John J. Wohl- 




president; Roscoe Parks, cashier; Wm. 
Hendrickson, assistant cashier; W. 0. Potter, 
attorney. Directors: A. L. Cline, A. B. Mc- 
Laren, A. C. Hentz, John W. Gray, E. T. 
Gallagher, C. A. Gent, T. N. Cripps and A. 
R. Chamness. 

The Citizens Trust and Banking Company 
has enjoyed a steady growth from organiza- 
tion, and in 1918, the one-half million mark 



wend, Jas. H. Feltz, E. L. Wellborn, M. A. 
Atwood, Ed Alexander, Geo. W. Mercer, and 
A. C. Corley. 

At this writing, October, 1919, plans are 
all drawn and fixtures bought for a new 
banking room on the corner of East Main 
and the Square. This will give them one of 
the modern and spacious banking rooms in 
southern Illinois. 



277 



I 




The Cagle Garage 




HE building pictured here is of unique 
interest for it was established and is 
operated by the man who owned the premier 
auto vehicle business in Williamson County, 
Hosea Cagle. The building has been remod- 
eled from time to time and now extends the 
entire depth of the block. 

The auto man and exponent of goods roads 
has always a good word for Cagle's Garage. 
The sign manuel of finished workmanship, 
fine repairs, auto parts and supplies, and 
headquarters of tourists. Mr. Cagle does not 
devote as much time to the business as for- 
merly, and only keeps the reliable mechan- 
ics that means his maintenance as the pre- 
mier automobile man of Williamson County. 

This large garage building has a large 
storage capacity and is the home of more 
automobiles than any garage in the county. 

Hosea Cagle was born in Williamson 
County in 1880. He was educated in the 
public schools, and located in Marion, 111., 
November, 1905. He established a general 



garage business on North Market Street in 
1906. He had the experience that counted, 
an experience not only as the first owner of 
an auto in Marion, but as a man who knew 
quality and workmanship. He studied the 
makes, and did work for the public that 
placed him and his men in the front rank of 
mechanics. 

Mr. Cagle was married in 1905 to Miss 
Delia Smith. He is a thoroughbred citizen, 
and has lots of friends. He has done much 
for a good road system, and taken a great 
interest in the affairs of this county. 

As this history was being printed, Mr. 
Cagle retired from the garage business and 
has begun the work of constructing a large 
amusement resort about two miles west of 
Marion on the hard road. The resort will 
consist of a large lake, bathing pool, golf 
links, aeroplane landing, and many other 
amusements. Certainly an innovation for 
Southern Illinois and one that should be ap- 
preciated and well patronized. 



278 




\- 



The Marion Republican-Leader 



A Newspaper's War Record 



of 



the Marion Republi- 
one scarcely equaled 



HE war record 

can-Leader is one scarcely equaled in 
Southern Illinois. The Marion Daily Re- 
publican, "the home paper of Williamson 
County," is the paper with the largest daily 
circulation i n 
the county. 
During the war 
it was the only 
paper in the 
county carry- 
ing a tele- 
graphic war 
report every 
day. It carries 
a n illustrated 
service of time- 
ly events and 
has many spe- 
cial features. 

The personal 
war record of 
this office is un- 
equaled in the 
county, as this 
paper furnished 
three men for 
active duty, 
being the only 
newspaper o r 




office 



in 



W. 0. PABLEY, Editor 
the county to furnish that 



printing 
number. 

Oldham Paisley, city editor and vice-presi- 
dent of the corporation was among the first 
to volunteer for service. He was commis- 



sioned as a second and later advanced to a 
first lieutenant. He served on the staff of 
General L. C. Andrews in the U. S. A. and 
in France and was later assigned to Pershing's 
headquarters for duty. He now holds the 

rank of cap- 
tain in the Offi- 
c e r s' Reserve 
Corps. 

W. 0. Pais- 
ley, editor and 
manager, and 
secretary of the 
c o r p oration, 
was one of the 
four minute 
speakers for 
the county. He 
was an officer 
in the Marion 
chapter of the 
Red Cross and 
active in all of 
the Liberty 
Li o a n drives. 
He also assist- 
ed the Selective 
Stervice Board 
in their work. 
The Marion 
Daily Republican and the Marion Semi- 
Weekly Leader have as their mottos, "All 
the News, When it is News," and they follow 
their motto very closely. Both papers enjoy 
a wide and growing circulation. 



CAPT. OLDHAM PAISLEY 



m 



279 








Congressman E. E. Denison 



TfDWARD E. DENISON was born at 
-^ Marion, Illinois; graduated at Baylor 
University, Waco, Texas, receiving the B. L. 
(Bachelor of Literature) and A. B. (Bach- 
elor of Arts) degrees; graduated at Yale 
University Law School, receiving the A. B. 
degree, and at Columbia University Law 
School, receiving the 
LL. B. (Bachelor of 
Laws) and L. L. M. 
(Master of Laws) de- 
grees. Admitted to the 
bar at Springfield, Illi- 
nois, and practiced 
law at Marion, Illi- 
nois, first in partner- 
ship with Judge W. 
W. Duncan, under the 
firm name of Duncan 
& Denison; then alone, 
and afterwards with 
Judge Ed. M. Spiller, 
under the firm name 
of Denison & Spiller. 
He was elected to the 
Sixty-fourth Congress 
in 1914, defeating 
Hon. R. P. Hill, then 
Congressman, majority 
2,330; was re-elected 
to the Sixty-fifth con- 
gress, 1916, defeating 
A. J. Rendleman, majority 3,880; was re- 
elected to the Sixty-sixth congress in 1918, 
defeating D. T. Woodward, majority 7,886. 
Since coming to Congress he has served on 
the Committee of Labor, and Committee of 
Mines and Mining, and is now a member of 
the Interstate & Foreign Commerce Commit- 
tee, one of the most important committees of 




the House. He supported every preparedness 
measure for increasing the army and navy 
during the period immediately preceding the 
war and supported every war measure and 
every war appropriation bill during the war. 
While representing a far down-state dis- 
trict, Congressman Denison is held in highest 
regard by his contem- 
poraries in Illinois 
and the nation as well. 
He keeps in as close 
touch with the action 
of congress as any 
member and never 
neglects his duty on 
his committees. His 
attentiveness to his 
constituents was 
proved over and over 
again during the recent 
war. No letter from 
a soldier or soldiers' 
friends or relatives 
was received but got 
the promptest atten- 
tion. 

It has been many a 
day since this congres- 
sional district has been 
represented by as 
strong a man as Con- 
gressman E. E. Deni- 
son. Even those who do not vote the Republi- 
can ticket have no hesitancy in admitting this. 
When not in Washington, Congressman 
Denison spends his time in Marion, where 
he maintains a law office in the State and 
Savings Bank Building. He is unmarried 
and lives with his aged mother on West 
Main Street, Marion. 



280 




Supreme Judge Warren W. Duncan 



WILLIAMSON COUNTY has furnished 
" several leading statesmen in its time, 
but among the most highly honored, however, 
and residing in this county now is Chief 
Justice Warren W. Duncan of the Illinois 
Supreme Court. From a poor country boy 
with an ambition to 
make something of 
himself to achieving 
the highest position in 
the gift of the people 
in his chosen life 
work, is a story of 
Judge Duncan's career 
in life that is an in- 
spiration to every 
young man. 

He was born on a 
farm near Lake Creek, 
Williamson County, 
January 21, 1857. 
From six to seventeen 
years of age he at- 
tended the common 
schools and experi- 
enced every hardship 
known to farm toil in 
those days. In 1874 
he entered Ewing Col- 
lege, where he re- 
mained five years and graduated with the de- 
gree of A. B. In 1883 he received the degree 
of A. M. from that institution. In June, 
1881, he began the study of law under Judge 
W. H. Williams of Benton, in 1884 read law 
under Judge G. W. Young of Marion. On 
October 13, 1884, he entered the St. Louis 
Law School and took up senior studies and 
was admitted to practice in the courts of 
Illinois, at Mt. Vernon, February 25, 1885, 
about which time he returned to law school 
and graduated, receiving degree LL.B., 
magna cum laude. He first began to practice 
at Marion in August, 1885, and in June, 




1903, was elected Circuit Judge, and was 
re-elected in 1909. He served on the Ap- 
pellate Bench four years in Chicago and two 
years at Mt. Vernon, Illinois, and was elected 
to the Supreme Bench in 1915. 

On the Appellate Bench, Judge Duncan 
was considered one of 
the leading legal 
authorities in this end 
of the state. When 
the vacancy occurred 
in the supreme court 
in this district, all eyes 
turned to Judge Dun- 
can. Nominated by 
convention which was 
in session three days, 
his election was merely 
a formal matter. Since 
assuming his duties, 
he has proved very 
worthy of the ermine 
and his decisions have 
been highly ranked. 
In 1918 when the su- 
preme court organ- 
ized, he was elected 
chief justice. The 
Judge is averse to pub- 
licity in every form 
relating to him personally, and no amount 
of persuasion could have secured even this 
brief sketch of him had it not been for the 
cause it is. "If it's to perpetuate the mem- 
ory of our soldier boys, I am glad to do 
anything you require of me," he told the 
editor. And so he proved himself through 
out the period of the war, and all local and 
national public activities. 

His family consists of his wife and only 
child, Miss Pauline, who was a Red Cross 
nurse and ready to go overseas when the 
armistice was signed, having been in training 
for several months. 



281 




Egyptian Press Printing Co. 




S. B. CASEY 



'T'HE Egyptian Press Printing Company, 

- located at 1000 Public Square, publishes 
the following publications: The Marion 
Evening Post (Daily), The Egyptian Press 
(Semi-Weekly), and The Illinois Baptist. 

The Egyptian Press has one of the best 
equipped offices in Southern Illinois and oc- 
cupies its own building. The plant is 
equipped with linotype, intertype, two-revolu- 
tion book and news press, and a full equip- 
ment of everything necessary for 
first-class work. 

The Egyptian Press was estab- 
lished in 1872, and the Evening Post 
in 1902. Both have enjoyed a con- 
tinued existence without lapse or 
failure; and the Egyptian Press 
Printing Co. is one of the substantial 
business institutions in the county. 
S. K. Casey and James H. Felts are 
the publishers and proprietors. 

The Marion Evening Post has con- 
tinued an uninterrupted existence 
since its first issue in March, 1902. 
The present city editor is T. E. Craig, 
and the society editor is Mrs. Ethel 
T. Holland. 

Elva R. Jones is foreman of the 



mechanical department, Minto Brad- 
ley is the linotype operator, and J. E. 
Perryman operates the intertype. 

Mr. Casey assumed control of the 
Egyptian Press in 1895, and has 
continued as editor ever since. With 
Mr. Felts he established the Marion 
Evening Post in 1902. In politics 
both papers are Democratic. Both 
gentlemen are first-class business 
men and enjoy the confidence of 
the public, which has brought them 
a large and continued business. Mr. 
Felts has served two terms as repre- 
JAMES H. FELTS sentative from his district in the 

Illinois Legislature and has been 
frequently mentioned for higher honors. 
During the war the papers owned by them 
have done thousands of dollars' worth of free 
work in the various activities, publishing free 
advertising and making large contributions 
in a financial way. Their policy has always 
been to give the best service and treat every- 
body fairly. 

All their publications enjoy a wide circu- 
lation throughout the community. 




T. E. CRAIG 
City Editor 

282 



ETHEL T. HOLLAND 
Society Editor 



^ 




Judge D. T. Hartwell 



HE best known man in Williamson County 
is Judge Hartwell, and while he has been 
a member of the circuit bench now for a 
number of years, nearly everybody says in 
speaking of him, Dee, and not Judge Hart- 
well. Some one has said that no man is a 
real celebrity until the public forgets his 
given name and calls 
him only by his sur- 
name. This rule misses 
out completely in 
politics. So it is Judge 
Hartwell when strangers 
speak of him or when 
he is being referred to 
at the bar, but to the 
man on the street, in the 
mines and on the farm, 
just Dee is sufficient, 
for everyone knows that 
means Judge Dee T. 
Hartwell. This at once 
asserts the popular 
esteem he is held in 
everywhere in the 
county of his birth and 
rearing, as well as 
the nearby counties of 
this judicial district. 

In practical politics 
and every day life, Judge Hartwell lives 
closer to the antique law "Stick to your 
friends" than most men found today in 
public life. Unlike many men with such a 
motto in life, who have a few bosom friends 
and evidently follow the rule set by the be- 
loved Robert Louis Stevenson, "To keep a 
few friends, but these without capitulation," 
he numbers his friends by legions. He holds 
them because he serves them. 

But his multitude of friends have not 
contributed wholly as a cause of the great 
success Judge Hartwell has achieved. He is 
counted everywhere as the most successful 
young lawyer that his profession knows in 




this portion of the state. He has always 
been a shrewd student of men and affairs. 
And while he has held safe and close to an- 
other one of the adages of that careful liver, 
Stevenson, who pled with us "To be honest, 
to be kind, to earn a little and spend a little 
less, to make upon the whole a family hap- 
pier for his presence, 
to renounce when that 
shall be necessary and 
not to be embittered," 
he has also travelled 
the road of hard knocks 
in achieving a college 
education and working 
his way through a law 
school, earning his own 
bread as he prepared 
himself for his chosen 
profession. 

Judge Hartwell is the 
son of L. D., a veteran 
of the Civil War, and 
Sicily H. Hartwell, born 
in Marion, July 8, 1879. 
After graduating from 
high school, he attended 
Northern Indiana Nor- 
mal College for a year 
for a preparatory 
course, and then entered Columbia Law Col- 
lege at Washington, D. C., graduating in 
1902, and for two years with Attorney George 
R. Stone read law in the law office of Judge 
Hartwell's father. He began to practice law 
in Marion, was later elected city attorney and 
afterwards state's attorney, both offices he 
served with marked distinction. In 1915 he 
was elected as circuit judge for this judicial 
district and is serving in that position now. 
Judge Hartwell was married to Miss Frances 
Freeman of Danville, 111., November 4, 1914. 

Judge Hartwell was very active in all war 
activities, his natural ability always being in 
demand. 




Fowler and Reid, Attorneys 



T> _ R. FOWLER Born November 28, 1862, 
*-* six miles northwest of Marion, Illinois. 
After going through the country schools, at- 
tended Ewing College two years. Taught 
school one term, was then appointed Deputy 
Circuit Clerk for Williamson County; later 
served as Dep- 
uty S h e r iff. 
Finished read- 
i n g law and 
took Bar exam- 
ination in 1892, 
after which 
practiced 1 a w 
at Williamson 
County Bar, 
until elected 
States Attorney 
in 1896 for a 
period of four 
years. Elected 
States Attorney 
again in 1904. 
Became City 
Attorney in 
1912, serving 
two years. En- 
gaged at pres- 
ent time in 
law practice in firm of Fowler & Reid, also 
States Attorney of Williamson County, hav- 
ing been again elected to that office in 1916. 




JOHN M. REID Born October 7, 1877, 
two miles north of Marion, Illinois. At- 
tended country school, and graduated from 
Marion High School, Class of 1898. Taught 
school, attended College and University six 
years. A graduate of Denver University, Dik- 
ing the B. A. 
degree in 1904, 
L.L.B. in 1906. 
Attended 
Columbia Uni- 
versity, New 
York City, 
1906-07, taking 
the M. A. De- 
gree in the 
spring of 1907. 
Practiced 1 a w 
in Denver, Colo- 
rado, a little 
more than six 
years; prac- 
ticed law in An- 
c h o r a g e, 
Alaska, three 
years. Now en- 
gaged in the 
practice of law 
with R. R. Fow- 
ler in the law firm of Fowler & Reid. Assist- 
ant States Attorney for Williamson County 
at the present time. 



284 



=%=$ 



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Sheriff's Office 



Jkf ELVIN THAXTON, Sheriff, was born in this 
county, Grassy township, son of William H. 
and Millie Thaxton. Son of a farmer, he has always 
made farming his vocation except when busy on the 
public work to which the people have elected him. 
Mr. Thaxton was tax collector for three successive 
terms, and township 
supervisor until elected 
sheriff in 1918. He 
was married to Miss 
Janie Phemister, 
daughter of Andy and 
Sophronia Phemister, 
near Carterville. Mr. 
and Mrs. Thaxton are 
the parents of three 
children Hazel, born 
April 14, 1907; Ralph, 
born January 28, 1910; 
and Paul, October 1, 
1914. 

Always an active Re- 
publican, he has won 
the confidence and re- 
s p e c t of represent- 
ative people of both 
parties, and retains his 
popularity even in his 
present trying position. 
He gives his lodge 
preference to the Odd 
Fellows and Elks. 

JOHN S. LAYMAN, 
deputy sheriff, was 
born 1881, in Jackson 
county, near Murphys- 
boro, son of James M. 
and Mary E. Layman. 
He lived on a farm 
until 16 years of age and then enlisted in the U. S. 
Navy for four years, and after his discharge played 
professional baseball for two seasons. Mr. Layman 
later worked in the mines and served the local union 
as president for three years. During 1914, he was 
Assistant Chief of Police of Herrin, and in 1916 
was appointed Chief of Police; during the interval 
he was special agent for the Illinois Central. He 
left the Herrin police department to accept the 
present position, in December, 1918. 

Mr. Layman married Miss Gertrude Henninger in 
1906. He is a member of the Elks, Knights of 
Pythias, and Moose. 

J. A. SCHAFER, deputy sheriff, was born near 
Creal Springs, 1872, son of William and Caroline 
Schafer. He began his public life as constable at 
Creal Springs, and upon moving to Marion served 




for several years as justice of the peace, and deputy 
sheriff. He was appointed to the present position 
in December, 1918. His record in public life has 
been clean cut. He is an active Republican and a 
real organizer for his party. Mr. Schafer married 
Miss Ida F. Harris, daughter of I. P. and Rachael 
Harris. Mr. and Mrs. 
Schafer are the pa- 
rents of eight children, 
seven of which are liv- 
ing: Sherman, Joe, 
Ruth, Ruby, John, Har- 
ris, and Lawrence. Mr. 
Schafer is a member 
of the Odd Fellows, 
Modern Woodmen, and 
the Moose. 

S. E. STORME, deputy 
sheriff; born 1882, in 
Kentucky; father later 
settled in Williamson 
County, and our sub- 
ject was employed in 
the mines, but also 
served as town clerk 
and supervisor of 
Blairsville township. He 
served his local union 
as financial secretary 
for 15 years, and has 
held all offices besides 
attending several state 
and national conven- 
tions. He was very 
active in all war work, 
serving as Chairman of 
the Liberty Loan or- 
ganization, and can- 
vassing the mines for 
all charities. Mr. Storme was married in 1905 to 
Miss Lona Reeves. They are the parents of four 
children, Glenn, Retha, Juanita, and Torence. 

He gives his fraternal preference to the Odd Fel- 
lows, Masons, and Knights of Pythias. 

Because of its cosmopolitan and transient popu- 
lation, Williamson county is a difficult community 
to police. There are many outlying points to be 
covered by these officers, but Sheriff Thaxton and 
his efficient staff have made a record for preserving 
the peace of the - community and have run down 
many well organized bands of criminals and law 
violators since they have been in office. Automobile 
thieves especially have found it hard going in this 
county which seemed picked early in the game as 
a rendezvous for assembling stolen cars and dis- 
posing of them in the prosperous mining camps. 



285 



\ 



' 




Ed. M. Heaton, County Treasurer 



W/1LLIAMSON COUNTY had never been 
" credited with being so strongly Repub- 
lican in politics as it proved itself in the 
general election in the fall pf 1918, when 
Ed. M. Heaton was elected county treasurer 
by a majority of over 2,000, the largest ma- 
jority ever before given a candi- 
date of this party in the county. 
County Treasurer Ed. Heaton 
was born in this county, near 
Creal Springs on a farm, May 
16, 1876, the son of C. W. 
Heaton, member of a prominent 
pioneer family of this section. 
He spent his early life on the 
farm and managed to secure an 
education that prepared him as 
a school teacher, which noble 
profession he followed for eight 
years after leaving the farm. He 




attended college at Creal Springs and the 
Southern Illinois Normal at Carbondale. 

He was elected and served a term as town- 
ship collector for East Marion. For a time 
he engaged in the retail coal business in 
Marion and also did general road and bridge 
contracting. 

Mr. Heaton married Gertrude 
Simmons, for a number of years 
superintendent of the primary 
department of the Herrin 
schools, daughter of Ephriam 
and Susan Simmons. 

Fraternally, Mr. Heaton is an 
enthusiastic member of the Ma- 
rion camp of the Modern Wood- 
men lodge. 

Sandy Miller is the efficient 
and accommodating deputy in 
the treasurer's office. 



nil I nun I llmiimiiiili I mm iiimiiliilliitlllini inn i iimiiimm 



I mm I i minimum 



L. O. Cap Linger, County Clerk 



Tj^OR seven consecutive years now almost two 
terms, Leslie 0. Caplinger of Marion, has served 
the people of Williamson county as an efficient and 
careful circuit clerk, and ex-officio county recorder. 
It would be a task to find a more orderly circuit 
clerks' office in all Illinois than Mr. 
Caplinger's, for he is a man of method 
with a place for everything and 
insists always on everything being 
kept in its place. Abstractors and 
others who have frequent need to look 
over country records comment often on 
his excellent system maintained. He had 
excellent training for the position he 
now holds, for he served for six years, 
previous to being elected circuit clerk, 
in the office as a deputy. He was elected 
first in 1912, and again succeeded himself 
in the fall of 1916. His deputies are 
J. E. Mayer and Forrest McDonald. 




Mr. Capliner is a native of this county. He was 
born in the country some seven miles southeast of 
Marion, 111., February 2, 1879, and after going 
through the rural schools, entered Crab Orchard 
Academy in this county, from which he was grad- 
uated in the Teachers' Scientific course 
and bookkeeping in 1898. For seven 
years he followed the profession of 
teacher in the country schools until he 
was given the appointment as deputy 
circuit clerk. 

Politically, Mr. Caplinger is a Republi- 
can, and untiring in his activities for 
the success of the party when election 
rolls around. His church affiliations are 
with the Christian church. 

Always a booster for his town and 
county, Mr. Caplinger is progressive and 
ready to do his "bit" in all public af- 
fairs. 



286 



I 1 




Ed. Scobey, County Recorder 



rpWENTY-FIVE years spent as teacher in 
-*- the public schools of Williamson county, 
training its young men and women for the 
duties of citizenship, ought to qualify a per- 
son to handle the business of the people as 
county clerk quite efficiently, and this is 
exactly what it did for E. H. 
Scobey, the present county clerk 
of Williamson county. 

Mr. Scobey was born in this 
county October 7, 1869, and was 
educated for his chosen profes- 
sion as teacher in the Crab Or- 
chard Academy in this county. 
He spent a quarter of a century 
as teacher. He became one of 
the most prominent educators in 
Williamson county. 

In 1914, he entered the race 
for county clerk on the Republi- 




can ticket and was elected by a big majority. 
His term of office was to the general satisfac- 
tion of the people and he had no trouble in 
again being nominated and elected in the fall 
of 1918 to succeed himself with a satisfactory 
majority. Mr. Scobey looks upon public 
office as a trust held for the peo- 
ple and he regards himself as a 
public servant and right well he 
serves the people in this connec- 
tion, too. 

In the office, Mr. Scobey is ably 
assisted by his deputies, Frank 
Jenkins and A. B. Burleson. 

There is no busier county 
clerk's office in southern Illinois 
than that of Williamson county, 
and few offices of such enormous 
business operated so economic- 
ally and efficiently. 



iiimiimimiimimiiiiimiitmniimiimi 



iiminmimiuiimiiiiiiiliiiliiitmmi 



Elijah Lewis, Mayor of Marion 



TT'ARM boy in his youth, country school 
* teacher during his early manhood to a 
position of assistant superintendent of a rail- 
road and now prominent business man of 
Marion of which city he has only recently 
been honored by being chosen as its mayor, 
is the steps by which Mayor Elijah Lewis 
has scaled the ladder of success. 

He was born on a farm near Creal Springs 
February 27, 1878, son of John P. Lewis. 
Leaving the farm upon attaining his sixteenth 
year, he prepared himself for a school 
teacher by attending Crab Orchard Academy 
and later Southern Illinois Normal at Car- 
bondale. After leaving college, he taught 
school for three years and gave up the pro- 
fession to take work more profitable, con- 
nected with the construction of the electric 
line then building from Marion to Herrin 



and Carterville, now known as The Coal Belt 
Railroad. His faithful services with this 
road led to his promotion and in 1904, he 
became assistant superintendent. He severed 
his connections a few years ago and entered 
the coal business, developing a mine which 
was operated under the name of the Herrin 
& Big Muddy Coal Co. He is now also in- 
terested in the Dimond Motor Sales Com- 
pany, holding the position of manager. Mr. 
Lewis first entered politics in the spring of 
1919, when he was nominated as the Repub- 
lican candidate for mayor of Marion, and 
elected by a safe majority in a heated 
contest. 

In 1905 he was married to Miss Lucy 
Allen, daughter of E. L. Allen of Marion. 
They have two children, Evelyn, born in 
1907, and Theron, in 1914. 



287 




\ 



Geo. R. Stone, Attorney 



*' \ MERICA means opportunity," said Emerson. 
An example of this truth is very fittingly 
proved in the career of Attorney Geo. R. Stone, 
practicing lawyer of Marion. Born on a farm near 
Thompsonville, Franklin County, Illinois, in 1878, 
the son of Nathan L. Stone and Minnie H. (Weir) 
Stone, he passed through the district schools at the 
age of sixteen, sharing the common hardships inci- 
dent to a country boy's life in that 
community in those days. Determined 
to possess a good education, he spent 
a year at the State Normal at Car- 
bondale and later attended High 
School at Marion, graduating in the 
class of '98. He and Judge D. T. 
Hartwell began reading law in the 
office of the latter's father. Judge L. 
D. Hartwell, in 1898, and later in 
the office of W. F. Slater and Duncan 
& Rea. In 1900 he was selected Police 
Magistrate of the City of Marion and 
served for four years. He was admit- 
ted to the bar in October, 1907, and 
formed a partnership with Geo. W. 
Pillow and J. C. B. Smith, under the 
firm name of Pillow, Smith & Stone. This part- 
nership continued until 1910 when Attorney Smith 
retired from that firm, and the new firm of Pillow 
& Stone continued until January 1, 1917, since which 




time Attorney Stone has maintained an office alone, 
enjoying a very lucrative practice. 

In politics he has always been an active Republi- 
can. In 1900 he lost the nomination for County 
Judge to W. F. Slater by a margin of eighteen votes. 
Beginning in 1912 he served three years as Assistant 
States Attorney of Williamson County under Judge 
D. T. Hartwell. the then States Attorney. In 1915 
he made the race for nomination for 
States Attorney for the unexpired 
term of Judge Hartwell and lost the 
nomination to Mr. Delos L. Duty, in 
quite a memorable campaign. 

He is at present representing the 
United Mine Workers of America in 
Sub-District 10, and a portion of Sub- 
District 9, as General Attorney, and 
is also District Attorney for the Cen- 
tral Illinois Public Service Company, 
besides doing a general practice. 

In 1904 Attorney Stone was married 
to Miss Mae Smith,, daughter of J. C. 
Smith, and who was also a member of 
the Marion High School graduat- 
ing class of '98. They had one child, 
Helen May, who died in 1916 at the age of one 
year. 

Fraternally, Attorney Stone is an Elk, Mason, 
Modern Woodman and Woodman of the World. 



iiiimiiitiiitiiimiiiiiiii' 



Judge W. O. Potter 



TF the young men of southern Illinois, struggling 
today to secure an education or fighting to pre- 
pare themselves for the work in life they think 
they are cut out for, could study in detail the hard 
struggles Judge W. O. Potter underwent some 
thirty years ago, they might derive wonderful en- 
couragement therefrom. He was born February 17, 
1871, in a log cabin in the southern part of Rock 
Creek precinct, near Crab Orchard in this county. 
While in his infancy, his father fell ill of a mental 
disorder and had to be taken to a sanitarium, never 
being restored to good health again and passing 
away in 1904. The duties of supporting the mother 
and a family fell upon this young man. These bur- 
dens did not cloud his ideals or his ambition to 
obtain an education and prepare for his chosen pro- 
fession that of law. He went from the country 
schools into Crab Orchard Academy, later gradu- 
ating, and then entered life as a teacher. He held 
the principalship of the Harrisburg and later the 
Johnston City public schools. During this time he 
began to read law and was admitted to practice, 
taking up his residence in Marion, but not until he 



had served as clerk, city attorney and finally as 
mayor of Johnston City. Upon removing to Marion, 
where he now resides, he was appointed master-in- 
chancery. In 1907 he formed a law firm with Judge 
Neely, which took in other members later and was 
styled Neely, Gallimore, Cook & Potter. The firm 
was dissolved a few years ago, and Judge Potter 
now has a lucrative law business of his own. 

In 1906 Judge Potter was sent to the General 
Assembly as senator for this district by the Republi- 
cans and succeeded himself for a term of four years 
in 1908. He was author of several popular measures 
and was given important committee appointments. 
In 1914 he was elected judge of the city court of 
Marion and re-elected to succeed himself in July, 
1919. 

Few men of the 59th Senatorial district are 
better known than Judge W. O. Potter. He has 
been a foremost Republican for a number of years 
and his council is frequently sought by those who 
want to know what is going on in politics of Illinois 
and especially its relations to this section. 



288 



:=#=fer<HHP^ 




Leon A. Colp, Attorney 



WILLIAMSON COUNTY and southern 
Illinois have today many examples of 
well educated young men who have passed 
from college into the world and succeeded 
from the first in their chosen profession of 
law. Prominent among them in the county 
is Attorney Leon A. Colp, master-in-chancery 
at Carterville, now re- 
tired. Educated in the 
country schools and 
Carterville grade 
schools, he passed into 
the Northern Indiana 
Normal University at 
Valparaiso, Indiana, 
where he prepared 
himself for the Uni- 
v e r s i t y of Illinois, 
of the circuit court, 
who resides in Marion 
and maintains offices 
on the third floor of 
the State & Savings 
Bank building. 

Mr. Colp was born 
on a farm near Car- 
terville, on January 
18, 1881, the son of 
John Colp, farmer, 
later prominent miller 
which institution he entered later and was 
graduated from in 1904 with the degree 
of LL.B. 

Upon finishing his legal education at this 
university, he came to Marion and located 
with Attorney Hosea V. Ferrell, who was just 
out of a law school, and for five years they 
practiced their profession under the firm of 
Colp & Ferrell. 

In 1915, Attorney Colp was appointed 
master-in-chancery for Williamson County. 
He has made a most excellent officer, being 
exceptionally fitted to the position by virtue 
of his legal training and most fortunately, 




too, for this county, whose master's work is 
heavier than in any other county in this end 
of the state. 

During the Illinois state centennial year, 
1918, Attorney Colp was appointed by the 
governor as member of the state centennial 
commission and served throughout the period 
with much credit. 

In the war period, 
he was head of the 
Y. M. C. A. drive and 
through his direction 
this county made a 
mark unequalled in 
p r op ortion to the 
quota allotted it by 
any other county in 
this part of the state. 
He was equally prom- 
inent in other war 
work activities. Nat- 
urally enough, he very 
willingly pledged his 
support to give every 
assistance possible to 
the organization of the 
Williamson County 
War History Society 
early this year and 
while against his 
wishes, he was persuaded to accept the chair- 
manship of the society. 

In 1909, Attorney Colp was married to 
Miss Ethel Burkhart, daughter of J. M. 
Burkhart, one of the county's pioneer mer- 
chants. They have one daughter, Katherine, 
born July 30, 1910. 

The Elks, of which he was exalted ruler 
for three years, K. of P., Shriner and 
Masons claim Attorney Colp's preference in 
fraternal circles. 

Attorney Colp was one of the first to sug- 
gest a county war history. 



289 



^-N^ - 




Coroner William McCowan 



pTAPPY, congenial and accommodating "Bill" 
McCown is the way everyone thinks of Coroner 
McCown of Marion. 

Coroner McCown had been active in Republican 
politics in his home township for years before his 
friends induced him to come out for a county office. 
He had always been a winner'in elec- 
tions, for as a campaigner, his bitter- 
est opponents agree that he has no 
equal. Following the advice of 
friends, he entered the primary for 
nomination for coroner, and it proved 
one of the hottest primary contests of 
that election. In the general election, 
no man on the entire ticket put up a 
stronger campaign. His majority in 
the final election was very large. 

During his term of office, he has 
proved a prompt and efficient officer. 
Many times in the last three years, 
he has received calls to be at two 
different place at practically the same 
hour and held inquests, and the 
promptness with which he attended 




Hosea V . Ferrell, Attorney 

TJOSEA V. FERRELL, regarded in south- 
ern Illinois as an authority on corpora- 
tion and municipal law, who maintains a law 
office in Marion in the First National Bank 
building, was born October 6, 1880, in Car- 
terville. His education was obtained at the 
University of Missouri, Columbia, Mo., from 
which institution he was graduated with the 
class of 1902. The next year he spent at 
Northwestern University, Evanston, 111., and 
was graduated from the law department in 
1903. He then entered the law office of 
Attorney W. A. Schwartz at Carbondale, and 
remained with this prominent Jackson county 
attorney for three years, and then went to 
Marion, where he entered the law partnership 
with Attorney Leon A. Colp, the firm being 
styled Colp & Ferrell. This partnership con- 
tinued for five years, when it was dissolved 
by mutual agreement, Attorney Ferrell estab- 
lished a law office of his own. 



to these calls surprised the people. Two thing* 
Coroner McCown is proud of above all others. 
One is that he was born and brought up here in 
Williamson county. The second thing is that he 
is a Republican, for he has unshaken faith in its 
principles and practices. 

He was born on the west side of 
the county in February, 1864. While 
still in his teens, he removed to 
Marion, which city he trustfully 
served in 1913 as tax assessor and 
two years later as tax collector. He 
at one time worked as a coal miner, 
later became a dealer in coal and in 
a small way engaged in the opera- 
tion of a coal mine. 

Fraternal orders receive much of 
his attention and time. He is a 
member of the Knights of Pythias 
and the Order of Moose. He still 
retains his membership in the U. M. 
W. of A. 

He is one of the busiest coroners 
in Southern Illinois. 



liliiiiiiiiimmiiimiiiiiuiimmiiimimiimummiiiiimlimir 



S. E. Quindry, Attorney 

SE. QUINDRY, who has recently entered 
the practice of law in Marion, with 
offices on the second floor of the Marion State 
and Savings Bank building, brings into his 
practice a rare experience. For several years 
editor of two staunch Republican papers, the 
Carmi Times and Albion Journal, he served 
his city as City Attorney, and his county as 
State's Attorney. He came to Marion from 
Edwards county in 1915 to accept an appoint- 
ment as Secretary to Supreme Judge Warren 
W. Duncan. He has been in active practice 
since 1907 and has handled many important 
cases requiring skill both as a court and jury 
lawyer. He is in the prime of life, 39 years 
old, has a family of a wife and three chil- 
dren. 

His experience and mature judgment has 
qualified him excellently as a safe counselor 
and a careful lawyer, has appeared in many 
important cases and is especially gifted before 
a jury. 




Walter W. Skaggs, Attorney 



CINCE January 1, 1908, Walter W. Skaggs has 
been a member of the legal fraternity of William- 
son county. By hard work and persevering tactics 
he has forged to the front as one of the leading 
commercial lawyers in the state, and is now one of 
the prominent members of the Commercial Law 
League of America and of the Illinois State Bar 
Association, with offices on the third 
floor of the Marion State and Savings 
Bank Building. 

Mr. Skaggs has never been an 
office holder and politics has never 
interfered with his attention to pro- 
fessional affairs. He has held only 
one office, that of City Attorney of 
Marion, during the years 1912 and 
1913. 

Born May 23, 1879, of humble 
parentage, on a farm four miles 
southwest of Marion, in a log house 
in the midst of the virgin forest, Mr. 
Skaggs assisted in the clearing and 
breaking of the new ground and the 
development of the farm. Until he 
was seventeen years of age he at- 
tended the country school regularly, 



E. M. Spiller, Attorney 

(~)NE of the best known members of the William- 
son county bar is E. M. Spiller, of the law 
firm of Denison & Spiller. 

Mr. Spiller was born at Carbondale, Sept. 28, 
1863, the son of Elijah Spiller, former merchant of 
Carbondale and later of Marion. He is a graduate 
of the Valparaiso University and was admitted to 
the bar in 1892, and was for some time a member 
of the law firm of Spiller & White, but since 1916 
has been associate with Congressman E. E. Denison, 
and on account of the duties of the Congressman 
the burden of the large practice of this popular 
firm has been in the capable hands of Mr. Spiller. 
Their practice consists largely of corporation prac- 
tice in all the Southern Illinois Courts and Federal 
courts. 

Mr. Spiller was married in 1890 to Miss Nanie 
Edwards, daughter of Mathias A. Edwards. His 
large practice has prevented him from seeking poli- 
tical honors, but was selected in 1915 as States 
Attorney to fill the unexpired term of Judge Hart- 
well. 




after which he attended Southern Illinois Normal at 
Carbondale, from which he graduated in 1901. In 
the Normal University he was an active member of 
the Socratic Literary Society. After graduation he 
taught in the Marion high school one year and then 
went to Mattoon, where he taught in the high school 
for a period of three years. While in Mattoon he 
registered in the office of Andrews & 
Vanse, a leading law firm of Central 
Illinois, and after three years of hard 
study in that office was admitted to 
the bar in 1906. 

Mr. Skaggs was intensely patriotic 
during the war with Germany and 
gave his time and energy to work 
assigned him as a member of the 
Legal Advisory Board, and was a 
liberal purchaser of Liberty Bonds, 
although extending his credit was 
essential to do so. He was also a 
liberal contributor to the causes of 
charity growing out of the war and 
has been enthusiastic in his support 
of every effort to perpetuate the 
memory of the soldiers and sailors of 
this county. 



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Geo. W. Pillow, Attorney 

'"THE Bench and Bar of Williamson County is 
honored by having for one of its members, 
George W. Pillow, who was born in 1850 at Metrop- 
olis. In education he is a self-made man and for 
several years practiced law in Gallatin County, locat- 
ing in Marion in January, 1902. 

At this writing Col. Pillow has practically retired 
from active practice, but still maintains offices on 
the third floor of the Marion State and Savings 
Bank building. That Mr. Pillow is one of the 
strongest lawyers in southern Illinois is the common 
verdict. He has been called upon to prosecute and 
defend more murder cases than any other southern 
Illinois lawyer. 

When war with Spain was declared, Judge Pillow 
became a colonel of Pillow's Provisional Regimen' 
of Illinois Volunteers, and "like father, like son,'' 
the Judge's son, Earl, enlisted in the wor'd war and 
was mortally wounded in action record in the Gold 
Star section of this history. 

Colonel Pillow is a member of the K. of P. and 
B. P. O. E. lodges of Marion. In politics he has 
always been a Republican, and every campaign has 
witnessed him in the thick of the fight for his 
party. As a platform orrtor he has few equals. 



291 




Marion Green Houses 



'T'HE Marion Green Houses were established in 
1901 by James P. and Minnie Lilley Copeland, 
his wife. Mr. Copeland died February 19, 1914, his 
name being retained in title of firm as a memorial. 
James P. Copeland served in the Union Army with 
honor, being mustered out with rank of lieutenant, 
September 23, 1864. He was the founder and for 
over thirty years editor of the Marion Leader. His 
editorials in support of Republican principles were 
read by a large constituency and widely copied. 
He died a member of the K. of P. and I. 0. O. F. 
lodges, the Grand Army of the Republic, and trustee 
of the Methodist church. He was postmaster from 
1881 to 1885 and was a faithful and painstaking 
public servant. When Lieut. James P. Copeland 
was called to final muster, Marion lost one of its 
most desirable citizens and his name will be handed 
down to future generations as one of Williamson 
County's most patriotic, honest and industrious 
Christian men. Mr. Copeland's first wife was Miss 
Louisa Washburn of Vienna, and his father was 
Judge Samuel Copeland, also of Vienna. 

Minnie Lilley Copeland bought the entire Cope- 
land estate, assuming control November, 1914. She 
is a tireless worker, honest and fair in all her deal- 



ings and a gifted artist. The designs and floral 
work of the Marion Green Houses are complimented 
throughout southern Illinois, Mrs. Copeland having 
been taught special work by an Eastern artist of 
note at much expense. She was born April 22, 1873, 
Union County, Illinois. Was educated in the public 
schools and southern Illinois Normal and taught 
school seven years. Her father, Boston Lilley, a 
farmer and teacher, was a man of marked refine- 
ment, well educated, industrious and a deep thinker, 
of pleasing address. The entire community mourned 
his demise in 1886. 

Mr. and Mrs. Copeland were blessed with six 
children, Ida and Whittier, dying young, and B. F. 
Copeland, editor of Polk County News, Tryon, 
N. C.; Mrs. Addie Strike, Toledo, Ohio; Raymond 
Brooks, Chicago; and John Wallace of Marion. It 
has often been said of Mrs. Copeland that she never 
spent an idle moment, often doing public work. 
She taught a class of young women twenty-one years 
in the Methodist Sunday school, resigning on ac- 
count of war and business. 

Her motto is "Time is a beautiful and valuable 
gift in trust." 



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Milllinimimj 



/. C. B. Smith, Attorney 

A RECORD of the members of Williamson County 
bar would not be complete without mention of 
J. C. B. Smith, who is located in the State and 
Savings Bank building. He hails from New Colum- 
bia, Massac County. He was born February 3, 1859, 
and comes from a distinguished family. He was 
educated at the Evansville Commercial College and 
at the S. I. N. University at Carbondale, and was 
admitted to the bar in 1887. 

Mr. Smith has practiced law in Marion since 
February, 1889, and for three years was a member 
of the law firm of Pillow, Smith & Stone, but retired 
from the firm in 1910, but at the present time is 
Secretary of the Marion Building and Loan Associa- 
tion, with offices in the same suite. 

Attorney J. C. B. Smith has taken quite an interest 
in the affairs of the city and county. He is an 
advocate of improvements. As a member of the 
Masonic order, he is active in its interest. As a 
professional man he can always be relied on, and 
in this as in other things, he stands to the front in 
the esteem of his fellow members of the bar. 



McNett's Studio 

'"PHIS high class studio was started in Marion by 
James G. McNett, who in 1916 sold out to A. A. 
Davis, of Carterville, the present proprietor. 

The lovers of the refined and artistic have recog- 
nized the superior work produced at the McNett 
Studio, as it is perfect in both portrait and com- 
mercial. It is rare to see the artistic and commer- 
cial combined in a unique and beautiful photo- 
graphic business. The public at large as well as 
the commercial man gets the benefit. While com- 
mercial work is a feature, the studio is adorned 
with masterpieces that only the professional photog- 
rapher could turn out. The samples on exhibition 
shows the finished product equal to any from the 
large cities. 

Examples of Mr. Davis' work is shown in this 
history as the groups in the County School section 
are his work, which speaks for the class of com- 
mercial work. 

While the studio specializes in high grade por- 
traits they also have a fine line of medium priced 
work. 

Mr. Davis is one of the progressive citizens of 
Marion taking an active interest in everything for 
the upbuilding of his city. 



292 




JF. flay, Mercantile Co. 




E of the most modern and best ladies' 
stores in Southern Illinois is that of 
C. W. Hays, who operates under ' the trade 
name of Hay Mercantile Company, north 
side of Public Square at Marion. This store 
is considered by the best shoppers as the 
place to buy the latest style at right prices. 
Mr. Hay is known as a styleologist and lives 
up to this reputation by giving the latest 
styles all the time, considerably maintained 
by selling the famous French-American line 



of apparel of which no two garments 
are alike. The best goods for the best 
stores, such as Soroses shoes, Madam 
Grace corsets, La France underwear, Onyx 
and Everwear hosiery are sold in this 
store. 

Mr. Hay was born and reared in Car- 
bondale and was educated in the public 
schools of Southern Illinois Normal. He 
was married December 27, 1915, to Miss 
Thurmond, daughter of E. N. Thurmond. 
He began business life as a clerk in Car- 
bondale and later in 1900 in Marion. 
Receiving a fine offer he then began as 
traveling salesman selling shoes for A. J. 
Bates and later the Carlise brand. Two 
years later he established a shoe store but 
sold out and was again a traveling sales- 
man and real estate dealer. He started 
his present business in 1917 after build- 
ing the fine building pictured here. Mr. 
Hay was very active in the war work and 
served as country director of publicity 
during all the drives. 

The second floor of the building is a 
conservatory of music, conducted by Mrs. 
Hay, who has few equals in southern Illi- 
nois as a vocal and piano instructor. Mrs. 
C. W. Hay is a graduate of Ewing College 
of 1910 and a post graduate of the same 
college in 1912, and was instructor of 
voice and piano there for the following 
two years. She later graduated from the 
Bush Temple Conservatory of Music of 
Chicago. She received special training on 
piano from Edgar A. Nelson of Chicago, a 
nationally known teacher of piano and pipe 
organ and also special instruction in voice 
from Madame Justine Wagner of the Wilman- 
strasse Conservatory of Music of Berlin. 



293 




Marion Supply Company 

At the. County Seat of Williamson County 




1%/TARION is lots bigger than it was when 
we started, but we have grown with it 
we had to supply so many people in 
the city and country we kept the merchan- 
dise they wanted and our customers know we 
could supply them at prices that are right. 



The same policy prevails in this corpora- 
tion as prevailed in our parent Elles Store 
Co. read its history on page 367 also 
Herrin Supply Co., page 330. 

WE THANK YOU. 



. 



294 



I 



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f ; 
1 







Frick and Hudgens 




'T'HIS progressive firm of undertakers and 
* embalmers are located at 215 North Mar- 
ket Street, Marion. It is a partnership com- 
posed of G. J. Frick and E. T. Hudgens, 
organized in 1917. Both partners are gradu- 
ated embalmers. The equipment is of the 
very latest and consists of the modern motive 
hearse here pictured, first class ambulance 
and a horse drawn hearse, which is only used 
when roads are unfit for the modern hearse. 

Information concerning the business ex- 
perience of Mr. Frick will be found on 
another page. 

Mr. Hudgens is a Williamson county boy, 
born near Creal Springs, in June, 1878. He 
is a son of Z. Hudgens, sheriff of Williamson 
county from 1872 to 1874. The family in- 
cluded fourteen children, thirteen of whom 
are living, and Egbert is the seventh son. 



The family has for many years been a very 
prominent one in this county. He was edu- 
cated in the Creal Springs high school. His 
early manhood was spent in learning the 
mercantile business, and for several years 
was a commercial traveler and as such won 
golden opinions. He located in Marion in 
1900, and for six years was in partnership 
with his brothers in The Marion Clothing 
Company. He has been honored in public 
office as city treasurer and made a record in 
this important financial office. 

Mr. Hudgens was married August, 1899, 
to Miss Bessie Wright, daughter of W. F. 
and Ellen Wright of Creal Springs. Mr. and 
Mrs. Hudgens are the parents of one daugh- 
ter, Muriel, born 1901. He is a member of 
th Odd Fellows, K. of P. and Modern 
Woodmen. 



295 




Duncan-Baker Hardware Co. 



T^HE Duncan-Baker Hardware Co. is one 
*- of the oldest and strongest mercantile 
corporations in Williamson County. It was 
established at Marion by John H. Duncan, 
and M. L. Baker, deceased, as a partnership, 
in August, 1897. This partnership continued 
until October 
14, 1903, when 
the Duncan- 
Baker Hard- 
ware Co. was 
i n c o r porated 
with a capital 
stock of $30,- 
000.00. John 
H. Duncan was 
made President, 
James R. Spill- 
er, Vice - Presi- 
dent, and M. L. 
Baker, Secre- 
tary and Treas- 
urer. A branch 
store was im- 
mediately estab- 
lished at Johns- 
ton city, with 
John Hathaway 
as manager, 
and in the 
spring of 1905, 
the store of 
the Harrisburg 
Hardware Co., 
at Harrisburg ,was purchased, and Mr. A. 
R. Clark assumed the management of same. 
The capital at this time was increased to 
$50,000.00, making it the biggest exclusive 
hardware store of this section. 

The Duncan-Baker Hardware Co. have 
never attempted the spectacular, but have won 
success by good service and square dealing. 
They have invariably kept high class goods, 
believing that quality in merchandise was of 
first importance. The business has had a 
steady growth from the first, until the volume 




of hardware, furniture, rugs and house fur- 
nishings they now handle is probably not 
exceeded by any similar concern in this sec- 
tion. 

They were early to adopt a profit sharing 
system with their employees, and the fact 

that only a 
few changes 
have occurred 
in all these 
years in the 
personnel of 
the working 
force as well as 
in the manage- 
m e n t, is u n- 
doubted proof 
of the wisdom 
of the plan. 

The present 
officers of the 
company are: 

John H. Dun- 
can, President; 
James R. Spill- 
er, Vice - Presi- 
dent; Raymond 
H. Shaw, Secre- 
r e t a r y - treas- 
urer; Chester 
A t w o o d and 
Roscoe C. Nor- 
man, Directors. 
Most of the 
officers and directors have grown up with the 
business and are progressive in every sense 
of the word. 

In January, 1915, the Harrisburg store 
was sold to the Clark-Martin-Hawkins Hard- 
ware Co. and in June of the present year the 
Johnston City branch was sold to Hathaway 
& Co. 

Notwithstanding these changes the capital 
of the present company continues at $50,- 
000.00 and the growth and development at 
Marion is more rapid than before. 



296 




The B. and B. Confectionery 




E most popular resort of Marion is the 
B. B. Confectionery, located at 904 Pub- 
lic Square, where the people gather when 
in want of refreshments and amusements. 
Not only is this modern confectionery fitted 
in a magnificent manner, as can be seen by 
the photograph here produced, for catering 
to the wants in every kind of refreshments 
found in the up to date confectionery, but 
the second floor is retained as a ball room, 
where the elite of the city gather every few 
evenings for dancing. R. W. Boatright, the 
proprietor, is commended for establishing 
and maintaining such a high class institution, 



but the people expected that a man of Mr. 
Boatright's experience would give them the 
best, as he was for ten years previous travel- 
ing salesman for Howard & Casey Wholesale 
Grocery, by which work he was able to gather 
the ideas he has incorporated in his present 
business. 

Mr. Boatright was born in Harrisburg, 
January 19, 1889, and is married to Miss 
Clara Strautz of East St. Louis. He is a very 
popular young business man and will always 
be found boosting for the upbuilding of 
Marion. Mr. Boatright is a member of the 
Elks and Modern Woodmen. 



297 



= -p*-.y'"// r fJ~-?f-fr~Tr-rr?i 




Harry Holland 



TTARRY HOLLAND was born on a farm near 
Corinth, Williamson County, Illinois, August 12, 
1880, where he continued to reside until the spring 
of 1901, when he located in Marion, Illinois, and 
began his active business career. He was educated 
in rural schools of his home school district, the 
Harrisburg High School, and completed a course in 
the business college in Mt. Vernon, 111. 

He was employed in the capacity of 
bookkeeper by the old Crab Orchard 
Coal Co., and was later with the First 
National Bank of Marion, 111., in a 
similar position for four and one-half 
years. He engaged very successfully 
in the real estate and insurance busi- 
ness in Marion for several years. 

Mr. Holland has been affiliated with 
the Democratic party all his life, and 
is an earnest, ardent supporter of and 
worker for the success of the party. 
He received the appointment of Post- 
master at Marion by President Wood- 
row Wilson, and assumed the duties of 
that office in July, 1913, and was later 
reappointed to the same office. 




Together with his brother, Lloyd Holland, Ph.G., 
he established the Holland Drug Company at Herrin, 
111., in June, 1914, with a branch store at West 
Frankfort, III., in June, 1917. He is also connected 
with the Holland & Company, Undertakers, with 
establishments at both Herrin and West Frankfort, 
Illinois, both prosperous enterprises. 
These varied interests of Mr. Holland, are all 
flourishing and successful enterprises, 
and are evidence of a high organiza- 
tion's ability, which has won for him 
a front rank among the executives of 
large industrial combinations of the 
County. 

Mr. Holland gave largely and gen- 
erously of his time for the promo- 
tion of all war activities during the 
period of the World War, and since, 
assuming his responsibility as an em- 
ployee of the Government, and at the 
same time carrying out his ideas of 
what all loyal citizens should do; 
ready at all times to put the Liberty 
Loan or Red Cross and other war ac- 
tivities drives "over the top." 



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Isaam Harrison 

T TNDER the proprietorship of Isam Harri- 
*-' son, the Model Clothing Store has grown 
within a short time to a position of import- 
ance among Marion business houses. 

Mr. Harrison was born in Williamson 
county, near Crab Orchard, in 1881, and 
since his start in the business world has been 
engaged in the clothing business, fitting him- 
self for the further experience of his own 
store. For some time he was employed with 
Joseph, as well as with other Marion dealers. 

In 1916, Mr. Harrison entered the business 
circles of Marion as proprietor of The Model, 
where he now has an excellent business, man- 
aging the same in a careful conservative mari- 
ner. Such lines as Carter underwear, Lion 
shirts, Mallory hats, Lamar neckwear, and 
Faultless pajamas are among the well known 
brands which Mr. Harrison handles, and 
which have done much towards the establish- 
ment of the clientele which the Model pos- 



A. H. Brunner 

A MONG the popular restaurant men of 
^*- Marion, A. H. Brunner has justly won 
a place. Mr. Brunner's occupation has al- 
ways been that of a cook, thereby especially 
qualifying him as an expert caterer. 

Mr. Brunner was born in New York City 
forty-seven years ago. He was married to 
Pearl O'Neal-Boles, March 15, 1913. One 
child was born to Mr. and Mrs. Brunner, 
Katherine Pearl, now deceased. Mrs. Brun- 
ner has a child, Willard Boles, by her former 
husband. 

Mr. Brunner came to Marion from Kansas 
City about six years ago, and established a 
real restaurant here which soon won for him 
a large patronage. During the summer of 
this year, Mr. Brunner sold his Marion cafe 
the little Gem and has since opened the 
"Ever Eat Cafe" at Johnston City, but Mr. 
and Mrs. Brunner still make their home in 
Marion. 



298 







J. M. Cline, Druggist 



(~)NE of the pioneer business men of Marion, the 
subject of this sketch, J. M. Cline, was born 
in Allen county, Kentucky, December 25, 1848, mov- 
ing to Illinois in 1850, and with the natural aptitude 
for business soon began buying live stock and 
poultry, which he continued until 1877, and 
desiring to enter 
other fields purchased 
a drug store then 
situated on the west 
side of the public 
square, where he con- 
tinued, and then 
moved his store to 
the southeast corner 
for 14 years and then 
to present location. 

Mr. Cline was mar- 
ried to Miss Alice 
Vick, April 26, 1876, 
Vick, member of a 
prominent pioneer 
family of the county, 




and to this union has been born five children; the 
eldest Dr. John V., who enlisted in the medical 
corps and served in France, receiving the commis- 
sion of Major while in foreign service; L. V., born 
1880, druggist of Herrin; John V., born in 1882, 
killed in an automobile accident in 1914; 

Hazel, born 1888, 
] died 1896; and 
Philip, born 1890, 
druggist of West 
Frankfort. 

Our subject is a 
member of the Odd 
Fellows, K. of P. and 
the Elks. 

This short sketch 
cannot record the 
achievements of this 
pioneer business man, 
but it does show his 
success as a citizen 
that Williamson 
county is proud of. 



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Marion Electric Shop 

^PERATING under the trade mark of "Electric 
Battery Cover," E. B B. Cover, who purchased 
the business of W. E. Fish, in April, 1918, has 
become one of Marion's active and popular business 
men. 

Mr. Cover has the reputation of being one of the 
best electrical engineers in Southern Illinois, and 
his many contracts for the State of Illinois, is proof 
of his ability. Many of the largest business build- 
ings and fine residences of Carbondale, where he 
was formerly in business, the electrical work shows 
that he is master of his profession. There are also 
many large contracts in Marion and vicinity being 
added to his large list. 

Before starting in business for himself, Mr. Cover 
was engineer for the Central Ice Co., Mounds; 
Fruit Growers Power & Refr. Co., Marion, and Nat'l 
Lbr. & Woodenware Co., Cairo. 

Mr. Cover was married to Miss Myrtle Thornton, 
on Christmas, 1913. He is a member of the Elks 
and Moose, and an active worker in the Marion 
Chamber of Commerce. 



The Home Bakery 

'"THE New Home Bakery is operated by M. A. 
Vanzettie, who came to Marion from Chicago in 
1915, but had previously worked in Marion. Mr. 
Vanzettie is an expert baker and makes a specialty 
of the highest grade pastry. In Chicago and other 
large cities where he was employed he was con- 
sidered an artist, making the high class decorations 
and flowers used on expensive wedding cakes and 
other pastry for the elite on special occasions. 
There being very little call of this class of trade 
in Marion, Mr. Vanzettie has made an effort to 
produce other bakery goods better than the ordi- 
nary bakery products are considered to be, and has 
won a reputation on his genuine home made bread. 

Mr. Vanzettie was married to Miss Iva Hornet, 
of St. Louis, May 30, 1910. He is a native of 
France, born in Moden, France, in 1873, and has 
been in the United States about 25 years. 

The people of Marion and vicinity expect better 
bread and pastry from the New Home Bakery and 
are never disappointed. 



299 



B 




LeRoy A. Goddard 



T EROY A. GODDARD was born in Marion, 
*-^ Illinois, June 22,. 1854, the son of James 
T. and Winifred (Spiller) Goddard. His 
grandparents from Virginia settled in 1832 
near where Marion was afterwards located. 
Mr. Goddard's father opened a general store 
in Bainbridge, near Marion, in 1841, and 
later moved to Marion and erected a three- 
story brick building where the Marion State 
and Savings bank is now located. He was 
educated in the public schools in the winter 
time, working at odd jobs in the summer 
until sixteen years of age, when he quit 
school to devote his entire time to clerking 
in stores until he was twenty-one. He was 
a merchant and banker at Marion from 1875 
until 1890. He organized and was president 
of the First National Bank of Mt. Carmel, 
111., from 1890 until 1892. On August 1, 
1892, he assumed the position of cashier of 
the Fort Dearborn National Bank of Chicago; 
and later was elected vice-president, filling 
both positions until January, 1903, when he 
was elected president. He resigned June 1, 
1908, to accept the vice-presidency of the 
State Bank of Chicago; was elected its presi- 
dent May, 1909, and in June, 1919, resigned 
as president to accept a position as chairman 
of the Board. 

Mr. Goddard was two years president of 
the Chicago Clearing House Association, two 
years treasurer of the Chicago Stock Ex- 
change, a year president of the Bankers' Club 
of Chicago, also of Union League Club of 
Chicago, for several years president of the 



Chicago Peace Society, and member of the 
Executive Council, American Bankers' Asso- 
ciation. At this writing he is president of 
the Illinois Bankers' Association and a mem- 
ber of the Normal School Board of Illinois. 

He was elected city treasurer of Marion at 
the age of twenty-one and mayor at twenty- 
three and was re-elected two years later. 

He has been an active member for Illinois 
Supreme Council thirty-third degree Masons, 
and treasurer since 1912; Grand Master of 
Masons of Illinois in 1894 and 1895, and 
Grand Treasurer since 1903; Grand High 
Priest of the Grand Chapter of the Royal 
Arch Masons in 1905. 

November 14, 1888, he married Anna 
Breidenthal of Vincennes, Indiana. She was 
born and raised in Louisville, Ky., where her 
father, Col. H. Breidenthal was a pioneer 
miller. Her mother, Elizabeth Hall Breid- 
enthal, was a direct descendant of Lyman 
Hall, one of the signers of the Declaration 
of Independence. Not being blessed with 
children of their own, Mrs. Goddard has ever 
been active in the education of other children 
and in philanthropic work. Besides various 
committees, she has served as president of 
the League of Religious Fellowship, treas- 
urer of the Chicago Woman's Club, trustee 
of the Illinois Industrial School for Girls, 
president of Robert Browning Study Class, 
fitting up a Browning Room in Abraham 
Lincoln Center, and is a member of Board 
of Trustees of the Crippled Children's Home 
of Chicago. 



300 



f 
f 




Frick 



44 TIM" FRICK, as he is usually known, is one of 
Marion's most popular middle aged business 
men. He has made a success of everything he has 
undertaken, and at the present time is a member 
of the undertaking firm of Frick & Hudgens, and 
also conducts a grocery store at 606 W. Boulevard. 

Mr. Frick was born on a farm in Franklin county, 
near Christopher, but came to this country when five 
years of age. When only fifteen years of age he 
worked in a grocery store in Belleville, and later 
employed on the street cars in Venice, but soon 




formed a partnership with his brother and estab- 
lished a grocery business in Venice, which they 
continued two years, "Jim" then moving to Johnston 
City, where he was employed in the mines for 
a while but on account of his wife's ill health he 
homesteaded in New Mexico, selling out, returning 
to Marion two years later. In 1915, he formed a 
partnership with Charles Ozmont in the undertaking 
business. This business was sold to the Miners 
Co-operative Association, and Mr. Frick later formed 
a partnership with E. T. Hudgens, locating at the 
address of the present grocery store for a few months 
and then moving to their present 
building, which is finely 
equipped for its purpose. 

Mr. Frick was married to 
Miss Pearl Wilbanks in 1903. 
| They have four children, Irene, 
Howard, Mabel and James A. 
"Jim" is well known in fra- 
ternal circles, being a member 
of the Masons, in which he has 
reached the Consistory degree, 
I. O. 0. F., Elks, Moose, Modern 
Woodmen and the U. M. W. 
of A. 



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Goddard Grocer Company\ 



'"PHE wholesale grocery house of Goddard & Co., 
is operated in Marion as a branch of the large 
wholesale institution in St. Louis, which was incor- 
porated in 1872. The present officers are as follows: 
Warren Goddard, president; S. P. Goddard, vice- 
president; and G. H. Fob, secretary-treasurer. W. 
G. Metzinger, the local manager of the company, has 
been in their em- 
ploy for twelve 
years, five years 
in the St. Louis 
office, and seven 
years as manager 
in Marion. He 
was bom in St. 
Louis, Nov. 16, 
1889; educated in 
the common 
schools and later 
finishing a course 
in the Columbia 
Business College. 
He is a progres- 
sive citizen and 
has made the 
Goddard Grocery 




Company a Marion and Williamson county insti- 
tution. 

With a superb warehouse and office, unequalled 
facilities for handling goods, and splendid trans- 
portation mediums, its promptness in meeting the 
orders of a large number of customers in Marion 
and surrounding country is evidence of a com- 
plete system. 
Some of the 
standard brands 
which have be- 
come favorites are 
Marion Club, 
Sweet Home, 
Goddard's 1872, 
Sugar Loaf (ex- 
clusive agency) , 
Hunt Bros, 
canned fruits, 
Festal Hall and 
canned fruits, Fes- 
tal Hall and Aero 
Brand Coffee, and 
Cowboy Baking 
Powder, for which 
they are the sole 
distributors. 



301 



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Bernhart-Smith Grocer Company 



A HIS wholesale grocery institution is nominally a 
home institution. It was first established in 
St. Louis, but for the past six years the main office 
has been located in Marion, and is the only whole- 
sale grocery in Williamson County that has their 
main office in this county. 

The officers are F. E. Rheinhart, president; J. T. 
Smith, vice-president; E. T. Reinhart, director; Wm. 
Welge, secretary-treasurer; and J. E. Blair, man- 
ager. The officers have all been identified with the 
institution for many years. The manager, Mr. Blair, 
for eighteen years, 
thirteen of which 
he has been the 
Marion manager. 
The company also 
maintains branches 
at Metropolis and 
Eldorado, the Me- 
tropolis branch 
being established 
four years ago and 
the Eldorado 
branch this year. 
Among the lead- 




ing brands of groceries which this firm handles 
and has made popular are: Flag brand, fancy 
canned goods; Dream and Belle of Egypt, which 
are private brands of canned and package goods; 
La Armida, the popular ten cent cigar, and many 
other well known brands of merchandise. They are 
distributors for the Blatz Brand near beer. Their 
salesmen are J. T. Smith, John H. White, J. D. 
Sutherland, and H. D. Mitchell. Office employes 
are Clara Campbell, who has been with the firm 
thirteen years, and Caroline Noetzelmann. 

There are many 
wholesale grocerers 
in William- 
son County, but 
none that is more 
identified with the 
County and its up- 
building with offi- 
cers and employees 
citizens of the 
County making it a 
Williamson County 
and home institu- 
tion. 



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Gallagher Lumber Co. 

\ SCION of the pioneer who established a lum- 
ber business in Marion in 1870, Wm. Galla- 
gher, is a native of Columbus, Ohio, and was born 
there in 1854. He was educated there in the public 
schools and became a born lumberman. He served 
his apprenticeship in the school of experience and 
his knowledge of lumber and builders material 
made of him a worthy successor to his father, estab- 
lishing his business in Marion in 1880. or ten years 
after his parent's successful inauguration of what 
has since grown to a most extensive business. He 
has done much for the progress and upbuilding of 
Marion and Williamson county. 

The Gallagher Lumber Co. is located on North 
Market Street, and is the recognized headquarters 
for kiln dried lumber, carefully inspected and 
stocked on the ways, assortment for all dsmands 
by the contractor, builder or private citizen, with 
cement, lime, chat, rock and sewer pipe in fact 
everything for building anything at the right price. 



Garrison Bros. 

/~\NE of the leading furniture stores of 
^-^ Williamson county is that of Garrison 
Brothers of Marion, who established them- 
selves in business on Franklin Avenue near 
Public Square in 1908, and two years 
later buying the stock of Vance and Goddard 
and moved their stock to the latter location. 
The stock is large and varied, consisting of 
practically everything to furnish a home, such 
as furniture for every purpose, stoves and 
floor coverings. 

The Garrison Brothers are from Saline 
County. A. M. Garrison came to this county 
in 1899, teaching school and selling real 
estate and insurance for several years. D. M. 
Garrison came to Marion in 1902 and was 
employed by Wilson and Moss, who owned 
the present store previous to Vance and God- 
dard. 

The firm has always given the customers 
a square deal and have thereby prospered in 
spite of the severe competition in their line. 



302 




A. C. Hentz 



\ MONG the citizens of this county who have had 
"^ much to do with the community's development 
from a civic as well as an educational point of view 
is A. C. Hentz of Marion, for the past year attached 
to the Secretary of State's office, Springfield, Illinois. 

Mr. Hentz was born in Lawrence County, Illinois, 
near Chauncey. After a struggle to obtain an edu- 
cation, he attended Danville Normal College and 
prepared for teaching. He married Miss 
Emma G. Wathen, who died in 1902, 
and in 1904, Miss Jennie R. Hendrickson 
of Marion. 

In 1893 he came to this county and 
located in Herrin, where he became head 
of the schools and later city attorney, 
serving with marked distinction. In 1893 
he took a position at Marion in the office 
of Sheriff H. S. Harris as office deputy, 
later was Assistant State Parole Agent at 
Chester penitentiary, afterwards for nine 
years District Game Warden. 




He helped organize in 1906, the Marion Citizens 
Trust and Banking Company and the Williamson 
County Loan & Improvement Association, holding 
important positions in both. 

In 1913 he acquired a controlling interest in the 
Republican Leader of Marion, the official Republi- 
can County paper, taking editorial and business 
management. Later he disposed of his interest to 
W. O. Paisley, the present editor. 

His acquaintance in southern Illinois is 
extensive. He is a member of the Meth- 
odist church, and in politics is a staunch 
Republican, always taking active lead at 
election time. In the campaign of 1918, 
he was secretary of the county central com- 
mittee and largely through his efforts the 
county rolled up a record majority of 
near 2,000. Fraternally he is an Elk, 
K. of P. and Modern Woodman, besides 
holding membership in numerous civic 
organizations that benefit the community. 



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Marion Steam Marble Works 



'TPHE Marion Steam Marble Works are owned by 
E. M. Thurmond & Son. This firm has built 
up a very satisfactory business in this section of 
the State. 

The plant pictured here is one of the most com- 
plete in Southern Illinois, is located at 608 North 
Van Buren Street. They specialize in marble and 
granite and handle everything in the monument line. 

E. M. Thurmond, the head of the firm, was born 
in Franklin County, March 6, 1864. He was edu- 
cated at Ewing College, a school which has a wide 
reputation for graduating many men who have made 



marked successes in business and professions. Mr. 
Thurmond was married to Miss Ida Ingram in 1886. 
They are the parents of five children, Lena, Eva, 
Alliba, Ralph, and Edith, deceased. 

Mr. Thurmond came to Marion October 1, 1909, 
and has made many friends in this section. His 
home is at 1118 N. Van Buren Street. 

In 1916, Mr. Thurmond & Son purchased the 
entire stock of marble and granite, also the equip- 
ment of Wright & Son, who then retired from busi- 
ness giving Thurmond & Son a larger field, which 
they catered honestly and fairly. 




303 



>' 
' 




Howard-Casey Co., Wholesale Grocery 



A S a branch of the parent company located 
** at Mt. Vernon, Howard-Casey was estab- 
lished in Marion more than 20 years ago 
and was the first wholesale grocery to be 
located in Williamson county. They were 
the first in the field and naturally have built 
up a large business and many business firms 
in Marion and surrounding territory are their 
regular and satisfied customers. 

0. A. Morgan 
has been their 
Marion manager 
for fifteen years, 
and it is to his 
efforts that How- 
ard-C a s e y are 
recognized as a 
large and per- 
manent Marion 
institution. Mr. 




Morgan is a citizen that Marion is proud of, 
taking an active interest in all affairs for the 
betterment and upbuilding of the com- 
munity. 

Their regular salesmen are Joe Long, who 
has been with the firm for 14 years; Carlos 
Morgan, son of the manager, four years with 
the institution, and B. E. Lovett, who has 
been associated with the firm for the 

past two years. 

Their regular 
line of private 
brands and the 
several in which 
they specialize 
are given in the 
Herrin page de- 
scribing the same 
company and its 
activities there. 



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/. B. Heyde Son & Company 



/~\NE of the old reliable firms of Marion 
^^ and Williamson county is J. B. Heyde 
Son & Company. This firm was established 
in Marion thirty-five years ago by J. B. 
Heyde, who came here from Mascoutah, St. 
Clair County, where he was born in 1862, 
first engaging in the blacksmith and imple- 
ment business. By reliable workmanship and 
reliable business methods, Mr. Heyde soon 
built up a business demanding several em- 
ployees and to make it possible to keep the 
same employees the year round he, nine years 
later, added a line of pianos and organs for 
winter selling, and also later added a general 
line of hardware, but this was disposed of to 
devote more attention to implements, pianos 
and organs. 

Mr. Heyde was married in 1889 to Miss 
Ellie Fisher. Their children are Walter, 



Mattie, Louise, Flossie and Theodore. Mr. 
Heyde was a member of the state militia for 
three years and was called for active service 
during the East St. Louis race riots. 

In 1914 the firm name was changed as at 
present, the son Walter and son-in-law, Fred 
Sanders, becoming partners in the business. 

J. B. Heyde Son & Company are headquar- 
ters for every kind of farm implements, in- 
cluding the J. I. Case tractors, engines, and 
Case threshers, Massey-Harris binders, J. B. 
Heyde Son & Co. and Geo. Deelker buggies 
and De Laval cream separators. The line of 
pianos are Bush & Gerts, Price & Teeples and 
Cable & Nelson. 

Complete shops for all kinds of black- 
smithing, horse shoeing, woodwork and har- 
ness repairing are maintained with skilled 
workmen in charge. 



304 




L. H. Bainbridge 



T H. BAINBRIDGE, proprietor of the Bainbridge 
Jewelry Store and Bainbridge Millinery Shop, 
is a Marion boy. Born in this city in 1888, he was 
educated in Marion public schools and was especially 
fitted for his profession. After finishing an ap- 
prenticeship to the watchmaking 
trade he finished a watchmaking 
and optical school in St. Louis 
in 1907, then worked in a manu- 
facturing jewelry factory, learn- 
ing diamond and stone setting 
and jewelry repairing. Return- 
ing home he purchased an in- 
terest in the jewelry store in 
1910, that his parents had estab- 
lished in 1882. In 1912 he took 
over the entire store and since 
has conducted the business very 
successfully. Finding it neces- 
sary to spread out he added to 
the store the lines of millinery 
and novelties and runs the two 
stores as one, and now has one 
of the best stores in Egypt, and 
the best citizens are numbered 




among his many patrons. In 1911 he was married 
to Miss Lottie Eyre of Coulterville. 

Mr. Bainbridge is a life member of the Elks and 
a conservative Mason. Also a member of the Ameri- 
can National Retail Jewelers' Association and a 
registered optometrist. When the 
government called for the mo- 
bilizing of American watchmak- 
ers for duty in France, he sent 
in his application and was en- 
rolled as available and expected 
his call at any time. 

This institution met every 
duty it was called upon to per- 
form during the war. It lent its 
influence to all patriotic move- 
ments unselfishly. 

There are few jewelers who 
look upon their profession with 
higher regard than does Mr. 
Bainbridge. He views it with a 
high ethical respect and looks 
upon the business as an institu- 
tion that is to honestly serve the 
people with the same confidence 
of a bank in dealing with values. 



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Hub Clothing Company 



'"THE fine interior view shown here is the modern 
clothing store owned by Jake Pfeffer, formerly 
known as the Hoffman Clothing Store. 

The store is well 
known, being the old 
Cantor stand, estab- 
lished over forty 
years ago and always 
enjoyed a good busi- 
ness, but since Mr. 
Pfeffer secured pos- 
session he has im- 
proved the fixtures 
and added many 
thousand dollars' 
worth of merchan- 
dise, until now it is 
complete in every re- 
spect as a shopping 
bazaar for gents' 
clothing and furnish- 
ings, that Marion is 
proud of. 

This store is the 
home of many na- 
tionally advertised 



brands of wearing apparel, among which are Kirsch- 
baum clothes, Dubblebuilt boys' clothes, Beacon 
shoes and Stetson hats, and many others. 

Previous to pur- 
chasing, Mr. Pfeffer 
was a partner and 
active manager 




of 



the store for seven 
years, and it is due 
to his fine personal- 
ity and modern pro- 
gressive business 
methods, that this 
store is one of the 
largest in this sec- 
tion. 

Mr. Pfeffer was 
married to Miss 
Freda Silberstein of 
St. Louis in 1914. 
They have one son, 
Newton, born March 
25, 1916. Mr. Pfeffer 
is a popular member 
of Elks, and Cham- 
ber of Commerce. 



305 




Marion Clothing Company 



"PHIS popular clothing and gents' furnishing store 
was established in January, 1911, at the corner 
of North Market Street and Public Square, by live 
wires who have made their mark as exponents of 
the square deal. With a large and commodious 




store, dealing in goods that have the standard repu- 
tation clothiers and tailors in every style that 
appeals to the well dressed citizen, gents' furnish- 
ings that are modern and fashionable, and all the 
refined accessories that grace the display windows 
and elegant glass cases, the Marion 
Clothing Company occupies a distinct 
position in mercantile circles in Marion. 
Lee R. Hudgens, the manager, is a 
Williamson County boy, born Dec. 19, 
1885, on a farm at Hudgens, near Creal 
Springs. He attended the district 
school and later at Creal Springs, but 
at the early age of 17 began the cloth- 
ing business and was for nine years in 
the employ of M. Canter. This long 
service in this line of business has 
given Mr. Hudgens an expert knowl- 
edge of the clothing and gents' furnish- 
ing business which the customer will 
readily perceive when buying in the 
Marion Clothing Company's store. Mr. 
Hudgens was married March 8, 1905, 
to Miss Clara M. Thompson, daughter 
of R. C. and Anna Thompson. 



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Marion Ice Cream Company 



'T'HE Marion Ice Cream Co. are manufacturers of 
Velvet ice cream which is rapidly becoming 
the favorite for Marion and vicinity. The handsome 
home of Velvet Ice Cream was completed in the 
summer of 1919. 

The modern ice cream machinery pictured here 
is the very latest direct expansion machinery. By 
the use of such machinery the ice cream must be 



right all the time. The plant has a capacity of 
about 800 gallons a day, while the storage vaults 
has a capacity of over 2,500. 

Direct refrigerating machinery produces the tem- 
perature necessary for freezing and storage. Ice is 
only used in packing the cream for shipping pur- 
poses. Besides the Velvet cream special creams and 
bricks are made when ordered. 




306 




Central Illinois Public Service Co. 



THHE Central Illinois Public Service Com- 
*- pany now serves 147 communities in cen- 
tral and southern Illinois with electric light 
and power service. In a number of these 
towns, the company also operates ice, gas, 
water and heating utilities. This company 
serves 18 towns in southern Illinois with elec- 



two or three large modern power stations. 
In a number of towns there were small light- 
ing plants of various types, most of which 
were inadequate to the needs of the rapidly 
growing cities which they served. 

The company has constructed near Harris- 
burg, 111., a modern power station having at 




tftt- ~3*i> ^ 

^)\i"" K E N 



TERRITORY COVERED BY CENTRAL ILLINOIS PUBLIC SERV- 
ICE COMPANY'S SYSTEM. 



trie light and power service, in addition to 
the cities it also supplies a large number of 
coal mines with electric power, there being 
at the present time 26 mines in this territory 
receiving their power from the transmission 
system of the Central Illinois Public Service 
Company. 

Upon entering the public utility field in 
southern Illinois in 1912, the Central Illinois 
Public Service Company proceeded to con- 
struct a network of transmission lines con- 
necting all of the cities which they serve 
with electric light and power service, with 
a view to serving the entire territory from 



the present time a capacity of 12000 K. W., 
and work is in progress at the present time 
upon additions which will make this the 
largest modern power station in Illinois out- 
side of the city of Chicago, having when com- 
pleted, a capacity of 15,000 K. W. The 
company also purchases energy from the Old 
Ben Coal Coporation at Christopher. 

In addition to supplying electrical energy, 
the company operates ice plants at Harris- 
burg, Marion, Carbondale, Anna, Mounds and 
Cairo, Illinois, which supply a large propor- 
tion of the ice used in the extreme southern 
portion of Illinois. 



307 



DAVIS BROTHERS 




A. B. PERRY 



H ERR IN GARAGE 




Davis Brothers 



/^\NE of the largest, if not the largest, Ford 
agencies in Southern Illinois, is that of 
the Davis Brothers, who operate in Marion, 
Johnston City and Herrin. The brothers are 
Fred B., Pearl S. and W. Scott, named in the 
order that they became identified with the 
business. The first agency was establishd in 
Johnston City in January, 1912, by Fred B. 
Davis. In 1914 he opened a branch in 
Marion and the next year, 1915, his brother 
Pearl S. became identified with the business, 
and during this year the Herrin branch was 
opened. W. Scott, the elder brother, joined 
the company in 1917. 

The large and ever increasing business of 
this agency has demanded larger quarters 
from time to time. Last year a handsome 
two-story garage, 50x100, was built in Johns- 
ton City at a cost of $30,000, and at the time 
this book is going to press they are com- 
pleting at Herrin 100x100 feet, two stories, 
which will be the most modern garage in 
Southern Illinois. Next year they will build 
a new garage at Marion, which will be prac- 
tically the same size as the new Herrin ga- 
rage. 



From the small beginning, selling only a 
few cars, to a business averaging over $300,- 
000 a year has been the record of this firm 
in about seven years. The Davis brothers 
were born in Kentucky Scott, Feb. 17, 
1871; Pearl S., Feb. 8, 1879; and Fred B., 
July 12, 1882; coming to Illinois in 1911 
and locating in Johnston City, where they 
were employed in the mines until starting in 
the Ford agency business. 

A. B. Perry has been their regular sales- 
man since 1914, and W. T. Jewell, the book- 
keeper, since May 27, 1917. 

This year the sale of cars will be about 
400, and they have already sold 30 Fordson 
tractors. In the seven years this firm has 
sold more than 2,000 Ford cars. Their terri- 
tory is all of Williamson county with the 
exception of a few townships on the west 
side of the county. They carry all parts for 
the car and tractors, and maintain expert 
repair men, who make a specialty of repair- 
ing Ford cars, at each plant. All kinds of 
automobile necessities especially adapted for 
Ford cars are kept in stock. 




309 



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i ' 

$ 

L- 



' 



J.VI.Walker&Sons Clo. Co. 



J.V. Walter. 



CARTERVILLE 5TORE. 




Carl 3. Walker 



Interior S&nton Store. Jo. V. Wdlker. 



JOHNSTON CITY STORE 




N. N. M"r NeilL. 



Claude Brown. 



Ben E. La Masters. 



1 




/. V. Walker & Sons Clothing Co. 



E J. V. Walker & Sons Clothing Com- 
pany, one of the oldest clothing firms 
in Southern Illinois, with stores in Carter- 
ville, Herrin, Christopher, Johnston City and 
Benton, is the result of a steady growth of a 
business founded by J. V. Walker in 1884. 

Mr. Walker was born in Williamson 
County in 1858. The first years of his life 
were spent on the Walker farm between Car- 
terville and Marion. He was successful from 
the start in the mercantile business at Carter- 
ville and lived to see his three sons, Fred, 
Carl and Jo, into business operating stores 
under his direction at Carterville, Herrin and 
Christopher. Incorporating in 1910, the 
stockholders included members of the J. V. 
Walker family, Ben E. La Master and Claude 
Brown, with J. V. Walker, president; Fred 
S. Walker, vice-president; Carl S. Walker, 
treasurer, and Jo V. Walker, secretary. The 
business was directed by Mr. Walker until 
his death in October, 1913. 

The progressiveness of this firm is plainly 
evident in that their stores have always kept 
ahead of the development of southern Illi- 
nois. The Herrin store is one of the most 
modern in the state and has an extraordi- 
nary beautiful front. Each store is equipped 
with the same style New Way Grand Rapids 
fixtures. 

The year 1916 saw Ben E. La Master 
placed at the head of a Walker store in Johns- 
ton City. The four stores were operated 
through the great war with the loss of Jo 
from the Herrin store and Carl from the 
Christopher store. During this period the 
Herrin store was in charge of Noah McNeill 
and the Christopher store in charge of Albert 



C. Gibson. Jo served in the United States 
Navy and Carl with the American Expedi- 
tionary Forces with the railway engineers in 
France. Both returned in the summer of 
1919 in good health and anxious to get back 
to selling clothing. 

With the full united force again after the 
war and an opportunity in Benton for a 
Walker store, Mr. Brown of the Carterville 
store was sent to Benton, and is now oper- 
ating successfully in that place. 

The success of this popular firm is due 
principally to three reasons: First, the con- 
centration of purchases. The stores are now 
selling the same standard lines of merchan- 
dise selected by Mr. Walker back in the early 
days of the business, such as Hart Schaffner 
& Marx clothes, W. L. Douglas shoes, Stetson 
hats, Manhattan shirts, Cooper's underwear, 
and Black Cat hosiery. Second: Selection 
of the right men and maintaining them. Mr. 
McNeill has been with the firm fourteen 
years, Mr. Brown fourteen years, Mr. La 
Master ten years, Albert C. Gibson, seven 
years, and John M. Powell, who is respon- 
sible for the beautiful windows at all the 
stores, has been with the firm six years. 
Third: Unshaken faith in the future of 
Williamson County and Southern Illinois. 

Mr. Walker was always optimistic about 
this section of Illinois and was never afraid 
to borrow money and invest in a home propo- 
sition. After his death, with the eldest son, 
Fred, at the head of the business, it continues 
to have the same belief, and the Walker firm 
has advanced right along with the develop- 
ment of Williamson and Franklin Counties. 



311 




Stotlar-Herrin Lumber Company 



INCORPORATED 




HPHE Stotlar-Herrin Lumber Company, 
dealers in lumber, builders hardware 
and builders' supplies, was organized April 
1, 1901, and incorporated May 1st of that 
year. The organization was brought about 
by the consolidation of the W. H. Stotler 
Lumber Yard of Herrin and the Paul D. 
Herrin Lumber Yard of the same place and 
taking in new members and stockholders. 
The incorporated company also took over 
the interests of the W. N. Stotlar and Thos. 
Stotlar Lumber Yard at Johnston City, then 
being conducted by C. C. Stotlar as manager. 

W. N. Stotlar was the first president and 
Thos. Stotlar its vice-president and E. M. 
Stotlar was made secretary-treasurer, which 
office he has held throughout the entire 
period of corporate existence of the com- 
pany. The other stockholders were Paul D. 
Herrin, Fred Stotlar and Harry Stotlar. 

In August, 1901, it was decided to open a 
branch yard in Marion and Fred Stotlar, then 
a young man of twenty-two, was designated 
to take charge of the enterprise. Marion was 
undergoing such rapid development that Fred 



soon found more than he could well take 
care of and accordingly called for E. M. 
Stotlar to come to his assistance and before 
October had arrived they were launched in 
a trade that took the builders' supplies faster 
than they could get shipments to fill orders. 
Much of the lumber was unloaded directly 
from the cars to the building sites and car- 
loads were sent directly to the mines. 

In 1902 a branch yard was opened at De 
Soto and Harry Stotlar was designated to be 
manager of that plant. Though there was a 
fair trade in that vicinity there was not suffi- 
cient demand for building materials to justify 
the investment and in 1907 the yard was 
discontinued. 

In 1903 C. C. Stotlar, who had been man- 
ager of the Johnston City branch became a 
stockholder and so continued until 1908, 
when he gave up his interest for the newly 
acquired yard at Carbondale, then being 
managed by his son, John Y. Stotlar, for 
Chas. Reith. 

In 1905 the Snyder-KIotzer yard at Chris- 
topher was taken over with Mr. Snyder hold- 



312 



iffrrtr 



ing a partner's interest, and on account of 
the heavy trade coming on at once because 
of coal development, Harry Stotlar was 
called from the De Soto yard to help organ- 
ize the business there. 

In 1904 Paul Herrin, who had become 
manager of the Herrin yard, sold out his 
interest in the company to the other stock- 
holders, and Fred Stotlar was called to take 
charge of the business at that point owing 
to the failing health of the president, W. N. 
Stotlar. 

In 1905 the company suffered its first 
serious reverse when a general conflagration 
swept the entire business district of Johnston 
City, burning the entire plant of the company 
there. However, before the embers had quit 
smoking wagons commenced to arrive from 
Herrin and Marion with new framing lumber 
for a new yard building. Cars of material 
that were on the road for other yards were 
immediately diverted to this point and the 
contractors who were depending upon the 
yard for their material were being supplied 
, in a few days as if nothing unusual had 
transpired. As it was, the company lost the 
savings of over two years' accumulation that 
was not covered by insurance. 

In 1907 a new yard was opened at Pitts- 
burg, 111., a new town just promoted six 
miles northeast of Marion, and S. W. Webb, 
who had been left in charge of the De Soto 
yard, was made manager of the new yard. 
After five years of precarious existence the 
yard was discontinued and that vicinity was 
without further accommodations for builders' 
supplies. 

During this year two of the best yards of 
Benton were bought and consolidated and 
Harry Stotlar was called from Christopher 




to the management of it. The impulse given 
to building because of the new coal develop- 
ment in Franklin County made trade lively 
for several years and the further develop- 
ments of mines to the south led the company 
to purchase the yard of the Frisco Lumber 
Company at West Frankfort in the autumn 
of 1908. 

The acquirement of West Frankfort yard 
completed a chain of yards over Williamson 
and Franklin Counties. D. C. Jones was 
called to the management of this yard and 
has since continued in that capacity. Some 
of the most remarkable developments of the 
coal industry for southern Illinois has taken 
place around West Frankfort. In order to 
finance building operations and promote 
home ownership a Building and Loan Asso- 
ciation was early organized and a large per 
cent of the present home owners has come 
through the Loan Association. 

Since then yards have been placed at 
Buckner, Valier and Pershing. 

Perhaps one of the most phenominal cam- 
paigns of building ever launched in southern 
Illinois, was that conducted through the man- 
agement of the company with their estab- 
lishment of a new yard at Joseph Leiter's 
town of Zeigler. The city was owned entirely 
by Mr. Leiter and he conceived the idea of 
disposing of his residence and business prop- 
erty and selected the Stotlar-Herrin Lumber 
Company to carry forward the campaign of 
home ownership. The result was that over 
two hundred residences were constructed and 
more than three hundred home owners were 
located there in less than two years. Instead 
of a city of rampant radicalism it has been 
transformed into an orderly home-loving 
community of permanent citizens. The recent 



313 



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LI 
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completion of what is said to be the largest 
mine in the state in the midst of the finest 
body of coal in the state makes this one of 
the most promising of communities and the 
rapidly increasing number of home owners 
assures this once riotous community the 
peace and permanence of the best industrial 
settlement. 

At this writing, November, 1919, the 
Stotlar-Herrin Lumber Company controls ten 
retail yards located in Williamson and 
Franklin Counties. Wherever their yards are 
located, they have had to do more or less 
financing the home owners and have always 
been very patient with the fellow who is 
struggling to possess his own home. 

During the years most of the earnings of 
the company have been put back into the 
extended business. In 1908 the capital stock 
of the corporation was increased to $100,- 
000.00 and the lines of goods carried have 
doubled and trebled many times since the 
beginning. For example, when the business 
was started, it was a fair order to purchase 
for the trade ten bags or three barrels of 
Portland cement, which was imported by 
builders' supply houses from Germany. Now, 
it is a common and frequent item to order 
carloads of six hundred to eight hundred 
bags for each yard, and frequently the trade 
is so heavy that it is necessary to have more 
than a carload on hand at a time. Then, 
nails were purchased by the ten to twenty 
keg lots; now, carload lots are handled by 
all the main yards of the company. Then, 
there was no such item as prepared roofing; 
now, this item is handled in car lots. Then, 



fence posts were an unknown stock item; 
now, several of the yards handle six to ten 
carloads of cedar fence posts per year. 

The personnel of the company has under- 
gone some changes in that the older members 
of the firm have retired or passed away and 
the younger members of the family are en- 
tirely in charge. The president is Fred 
Stotlar, living in Marion; his brother, Harry 
Stotlar, living in Benton, is vice-president; 
E. M. Stotlar of Marion is secretary-treasurer 
and the other stock is held in the W. N. 
Stotlar estate. The daughter, Mrs. Ruby 
Herrin, will ultimately assume charge of this 
interest, although she has entrusted her 
mother with that detail since her father's 
death. The personnel of the company is 
somewhat unique in that the stockholders are 
all double cousins except, of course, the rela- 
tion of brother between the president and 
vice-president. 

It has been the constant endeavor of the 
company to keep everything needed to build 
a house or barn. By this policy the con- 
tractor or home builder is enabled to secure 
his whole supply at one place avoiding shop- 
ping around from place to place to secure 
his supplies. Standard items of builders' 
requirements are constantly maintained in 
stock and of the best qualities for the grade. 
Absolute honesty and square dealing is the 
constant caution of the management. Errors 
or mistakes when made are always cheer- 
fully righted and the theory of a "satisfied 
customer" is attributed as one of the chief 
contributions for the large trade enjoyed by 
the company. 



314 




James P. Mooneyham 



JUDGE JAMES P. MOONEYHAM, who repre- 
" sented this senatorial district in the General 
Assembly at the close of the war period, is almost 
as well and as favorably known in Williamson 
County as in Franklin, where he was born nearly 
forty-eight years ago, son of John Mooneyham, a 
pioneer from Tennessee, who came to Illinois in 
1838, and in the Civil War assisted in organizing 
the 31st Illinois Volunteer Infantry 
(Logan's Regiment) and was made 
first lieutenant of Company I, later 
lieutenant Company F, 15th Illinois 
Cavalry. His mother was a Minerva 
J. Mannering, also of a pioneer 
family. 

Rounding out his preliminary edu- 
cation at Ewing College and later 
at the State Normal at Carbondale, 
he turned to reading law while still 
a young man and was admitted to 
the bar at the age of twenty-five. 
The same year he was an unsuccess- 
ful Republican candidate for states 
attorney of Franklin County. From 
1897 until the fall of 1901, he served 
the State Hospital at Anna, as chief 




clerk, appointed by Governor Tanner, leaving this 
position to practice law in Benton. The next year 
the Republicans elected him county judge. In 1918, 
he was elected to the General Assembly. In the 
legislature, he has proved a good Solon and gives 
excellent account of the stewardship entrusted him 
to the extent that merits the approval of his con- 
stituents. His attendance was almost perfect and 
he gave careful attention to the busi- 
ness. 

In fraternal circles, Judge Mooney- 
ham is quite prominent, being a 
Royal Arch Mason, K. of P. and 
Eastern Star He is regarded as a 
progressive and enterprising citizen 
with an interest in the civic welfare 
of his community always. He gave 
of his time and means very liberally 
during the war, assisting in the vari- 
ous drives for the Red Cross, Y. M. 
C. A. and other work of a similar 
nature. 

Judge Mooneyham married Miss 
Anna Spangler of Dongola, Illinois, 
November 15, 1899, and they reside 
at 519 N. Main Street, Benton, 111. 



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Murphysboro Telephone Company 



TVTO single industry in Williamson County 
* ' has contributed more to the growth and 
development of this County in recent years 
as that service provided by the Murphysboro 
Telephone Company, which serves almost ex- 
clusively this County and adjoining Counties, 
annihilating distances and bringing the far 
outlying mining camps right to our door for 
business and social purposes. 

The Company came into this field as soon 
as the mining industry began to develop. It 
has kept apace with other developments and 
has been held back only when labor and 
materials to work with were not available. 
The many settlements and towns springing 
up all about the County has taxed the ca- 
pacity of the system and with the war com- 
ing on, serious problems had to be faced by 
the Company. 

The Murphysboro Telephone Company accom- 
plished a feat during the war period equalled by 
no other corporation doing business in this end of 



Illinois. Despite the steady and ever increasing cost 
of maintenance and operations, this Company never 
increased its rate one penny. It bore its burdens, 
which were many, loyally and with the spirit of a 
real patriot. Its officers and entire operating force 
faithfully performed their duty tirelessly and pa- 
triotically. This is a record that it well can be 
proud of. 

At present the Company has upwards of Thirty- 
five Hundred Subscribers in the County. All service 
in the County is free and only in going outside of 
the County is there a toll charge. The property 
consists of some Eight Hundred Miles of Line and 
Exchanges are established in practically every city 
and town in the County. 

"Please the people all the time," is the motto of 
the Company. 

A. B. Minton of Murphysboro has been President 
and General Manager for a number of years; Judge 
O. A. Harker, Vice-President ; A. J. Phillips, Sec- 
retary; John G. Hardy, Treasurer; and Walter 
Alexander, Auditor. 

The same system extends into Jackson, Saline, 
Franklin, Perry, Union, Johnson, Massac, Alexander 
and Hamilton Counties and is one of the most 
extensive in this end of Illinois. 



315 




Robert O. Clarida 



"DOBERT 0. CLARIDA is of Irish, Scotch, Eng- 
lish pareTitage, born near Crab Orchard, Wil- 
liamson County, Illinois, July 19, 1868. His father 
was a native of Virginia and his mother of Ten- 
nessee. He was reared and educated in Williamson 
County and lived on the farm until 1902. His 
father, Archibald Clarida, died while Robert was 
quite young and to his mother belongs the credit of 
his rearing and ambitious training. 

He began teaching school at twenty 
and continued for fourteen successive 
years, completing a four-year course 
at Crab Orchard Academy in 1896. 

In 1902 he was elected county 
superintendent of schools and served 
twelve years, declining a fourth term. 
During his term the county doubled 
in population, likewise the teaching 
body. When he left office the county 
had a uniformity of text books and 
four high schools on the accredited 
list of the State University, with a 
uniform course of study. He pro- 
moted a higher equalification of 
teachers and encouraged a better 




school equipment and rural life conditions. He was 
president of the Farmers' Institute, of County Sun- 
day School Association, and later of the Williamson 
County Fair Association. Upon retiring from office, 
he became president of the Citizens' Trust and 
Banking Company, which position he held until 1919. 
In May, 1917, he was elected to his present posi- 
tion of secretary of State Teachers' Pension and 
Retirement Fund, affiliated with the 
State Supt. of Public Instruction. 

On May 27, 1891, he was married 
to Miss Dora Wilson of Crab Orchard, 
111. They have six children, three 
boys and three girls. 

During the war Mr. Clarida tried 
to enlist for special military duty, but 
was rejected on account of his age. 
He. however, was arranging to go 
over as a secretary of the Y. M. C. A., 
when the armistice was signed. 

He is an active member of the 
M. E. church, also A. F. and A. M.; 
I. O. 0. F.; K. of P.; Red Men; 
Woodmen; Mystic Worker and B. P. 
0. E. lodges 



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ilimiillllllimiimimmmilliiMiiimimillliliiiimiiiiimiiiiiiiitiiiiiiiiimtmr 






L. G. Binkley 



/~\F the young men of this generation who 
^^ have climbed the ladder with safe and 
sure footing and gone out into the world and 
continued to make good, no better example 
is offered than the career of L. G. (Roy) 
Binkley. "Bink," as he was known among 
the fellows not many years back, gave early 
evidence of business ability. He was affable 
to begin with, knew how to mix and get along 
in the world and learned early the art not 
only of making friends but the finer art of 
cultivating their esteem and holding them. 
No wonder is it now that in Chicago, where 
he took up his residence some three years 
ago, that he is vice-president of the Midland 
Engineering & Construction Company, a cor- 
poration of nation wide repute. 

Mr. Binkley was born in the country some 
three and a half miles north of Marion, 
Illinois, March 28, 1882. He attended the 
Marion High School and was graduated in 



the class of 1899, and afterwards attended 
college at Ohio Wesleyan, Delaware, Ohio. 
He returned to Marion in 1901 and for four- 
teen years was connected with the Egyptian 
and Equitable Powder Companies, whose 
plants were located near Herrin, Alton and 
Fort Smith, Arkansas, in various official ca- 
pacities. He went to Chicago in 1916 with 
Mr. F. S. Peabody of the Peabody Coal Com- 
pany, and in conjunction with him and 
others organized and was president for two 
years of the Railway & Mine Supply Com- 
pany. In 1918 he left this organization to 
become vice-president of the Midland Engi- 
neering & Construction Company, which posi- 
tion he now occupies. Still counting his 
years safely this side of forty, he has achieved 
a success and position in life that rarely 
comes to few men with any more oppor- 
tunities than he had when he started out in 
life. His success is inspiring. 



316 




Charles Curren 



/CHARLES CURREN has represented this 
^ senatorial district in the General As- 
sembly so well and so long that his constitu- 
ents only trouble themselves to remember 
when his term expires that they may return 
him to office. He has been succeeding himself 
by handsome Republican ma- 
jorities since his first election in 
1912. He enjoys the rare dis- 
tinction of seeing every bill he 
has introduced become a law. 
During the last session of the 
legislature Mr. Curren was chair- 
man of the committee on farm 
drainage and served on the fol- 
lowing important committees: 
appropriation, insurance and in- 
dustrial affairs. He is attentive 
to all business coming before the 
general assembly and especially 
watchful of matters that concern 




his district, never neglecting the business of 
his constituents. 

In local affairs in his home town of Mound 
City, he is not without honor, but for the 
past consecutive twenty-eight years has been 
a member of the city council. He is engaged 
in the real estate and insurance 
business in Mound City. 

He was born there July 16, 
1864, and was compelled to con- 
tribute to the support of a large 
family early in life. 

While still a boy he was able 
by strict economy and thrift to 
enter business for himself a few 
years after the death of his father 
and is now one of the leading 
business men of the community. 
In 1889 he married Miss Kate 
Cummings, and they have a 
family of five children. 



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IIIIMIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIU 



John M. Dodd 



A MONG the men who have been prominent 
*"* in the public life of this county and are 
still kindly remembered is John M. Dodd of 
Marion, who served the county continuously 
for a dozen years as county clerk, but now 
residing in Springfield, where he has a state 
position in the office of the State Auditor. 
Mr. Dodd has had unusually good training 
for public life and especially for the impor- 
tant post he occupies at present at the state 
capitol. He began working at an early age 
as agent for the Illinois Central Railroad at 
Thompsonville, Illinois, and later was trans- 
ferred to New Athens, Illinois, where he re- 
mained four years, leaving there for Marion 
in 1887, where he served as railroad agent 
for fifteen years, finally retiring upon the 
entreaties of Republican friends to run for 
county clerk in 1902, to which office he was 
elected and returned to office two consecutive 



terms. Upon his own volition, he retired from 
the office of county clerk to accept a position 
with the Marion State and Savings Bank as 
assistant cashier which he held until January 
20, 1917, when he accepted a position at the 
state capitol under the Hon. Andrew Russell, 
Auditor of Public Accounts, which position 
he assumed in February that year. 

He has been generally prominent in city 
affairs in Marion, serving as member of the 
board of education, clerk of the Modern 
Woodmen Lodge, secretary of K. of P., and 
I. 0. 0. F., all of which positions he held a 
number of years. 

Mr. Dodd served most successfully as 
chairman of the Republican County Central 
Committee for the last six years that he was 
county clerk. He proved a thoroughly effi- 
cient organizer and always rolled up big 
majorities at each election. 



I 

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317 



m 



GEO.E.PflRSONS, May6r = 



CITY H/9LL, HERRJN. 




I 



[ 

r ' 

- : 




City of Herrin Official Roster 



1919 



WYLIE STORME, Clerk 



Ward One 
W. A. PERRINE 
J. S. LAYMAN 



Elective Officers, Term 1919-1921 

GEORGE E. PARSONS, Mayor 

CHARLES C. MURRAH, Attorney G. J. TURNER, Treasurer 
FRANK WOLLARD, Police Magistrate 

ALDERMEN 



Ward Two 
J. A. WARD 
PETE WEIR 



Ward Three 
H. A. COWAN 
J. E. GRIZZELL 



Ward Four 
DR. T. M. TREECE 
WILLIAM MILLER 



Appointive Officers 

POLICE DEPARTMENT 

ED NESTLER, Ass't Chief. E. C. FRICK, First Special 

WATERWORKS DEPARTMENT 

JAMES BESHEARS, 1st Pumpman PERCY HALL, 2nd Pumpman 

LIBRARY BOARD 

Miss EDITH BLAIR, Librarian 
MRS. GERTRUDE CRICHTON, Secretary 

REV. E. SENESE 
CHARLES SPILLER 

BOARD OF HEALTH 

SAM NAUSLEY, 1st Ward T. B. STOUT, 2nd Ward HEZZIE MOORE, 3rd Ward ED MORNIN, 4th Ward 

BOARD OF LOCAL IMPROVEMENTS 

MAYOR GEORGE E. PARSONS J. E. GRIZZELL J. A. WARD 

FIRE DEPARTMENT CEMETERY STREET COMMISSIONER 

FRANK BRANSON, Chief M. VEACH, Sexton JAMES STOLTAR 

City Council in War Period 



A. M. WALKER, Chief 



HORACE G. BARNHILL, Supt. 



ROHERT W. HOPPER, President 

MRS. JAMES GORE 
MRS. JAMES BAILIE 



JOHN HERRIN, Treasurer 

MRS. STELLA ELLES 
MRS. 0. E. SPILLER 



GEORGE K. CRICHTON, Mayor 
JOHN D. PERRINE, Clerk 



1917-1919 

WILL R. KEE, City Attorney 
TOM C. KEARNS, Treasurer 



ALDERMEN 



Ward One 
JOE M. BOND 
W. A. PERRINE 



Ward Two 
PETE WEIR 
J. A. WARD 



Ward Three 
H. H. MURRAY 
H. A. COWAN 

HFRRIN CITY COURT 



A. D. MORGAN, Judge Miss AFTON WOLLARD, Deputy Clerk 
ORVILLE WOLLARD, Clerk HAL W. TROVILLION, Master-in-Chancery 

319 



FRANK WOLLARD, Police Magistrate 



Ward Four 
DR. T. M. TREECE 
CHARLES LINTER 



Miss DELILAH HARMON, Reporter 
J. S. LAYMAN, Deputy Sheriff 



I 



^>gf ^ 



Brief History of City of Herrin 



TTERRIN. the largest soft coal mining city 
in the United States, situated within the 
whistle sound of thirty-five large shipping 
mines, was incorporated as a village April 
26, 1898, and adopted city government May 
16, 1900. The official census in 1900 was 
1,576; in 1910 it was 6,864, and the official 
census taken by the city in June, 1917. was 
10,402. The population at present within 
the corporate limits will exceed 11,000. No 
other city in Southern Illinois has had the 
magic growth that has attended this place. 
Today the city enjoys the distinction of being 
the best wage city in the Mississippi Valley, 
furnishing a greater number of working days 
the year around and a higher wage for the 
working man than any other city in the state 
and probably the Middle West. 

Herrin has all the facilities of a modern 
city. Its shipping facilities are unequalled. 
Two lines of the Illinois Central, the Bur- 
lington and the St. Louis, Iron Mountain & 
Southern Railroads and Coal Belt Electric 
Railway enter the city. The total freight 
earnings will reach $6,000,000 annually. 

The city has three banks with a total re- 
source (official report September 12, 1919) 
of $3,201,039.62. There are excellent schools, 
public, a township high school and a paroch- 
ial school, with a total attendance of close 
on to 2,900. 



The city owns its waterworks system and 
filtration plant constructed at a cost of 
$150,000. All the business district of the 
city is paved and two new paving districts 
have just been established in the residence 
section. There are thirty miles of granitoid 
sidewalks built by the city at a cost of 
$75,000, and an adequate sewer system which 
cost $60,000. The city hall was erected in 
1913 and cost $22,000. 

Postal savings deposits amount to $10,000. 
Post office money orders business for the 
fiscal year ending June, 1919, was a quarter 
of a million dollars. 

Throughout the war period Herrin meas- 
ured up one hundred per cent on every war 
fund drive and exceeded its quota every time. 
It had the distinction of raising more money 
for the first call for funds by the Red Cross 
of any city in Egypt. 

No sooner had peace been declared than 
the new administration took up the problem 
of pushing local improvements. A large 
sidewalk district has been laid out and a 
paving district in the residential section on 
the south side and both confirmed by the 
city council and contracts are to be let soon. 

No city in the entire Coal Belt of Southern 
Illinois has a brighter business outlook than 
Herrin, known everywhere now as the liveliest 
place in Southern Illinois. 



320 




The Herrin Improvement Association 



Slogan - "Boost Herrin ' 



A T a mass meeting held at the City Hall 
*"* February 11, 1919, the Herrin Improve- 
ment Association was organized. Its purpose 
is to boost every interest that pertains to the 
welfare and growth of the city and espe- 
cially to encourage the construction of hard 
roads. It is the common council where the 
laboring man, the banker, the business and 
professional man meet on the same level and 
consider propositions that pertain to the 
common welfare of the city and community. 
It has accomplished a great deal of good and 
lasting benefit in the short time it has been 
organized, giving great assistance to work 
incident to the wind-up of the war. This 
organization was the first to give a Home- 
Coming reception and banquet for the re- 
turning soldier boys. It entertained in the 
same fashion this spring the basket ball team 
which made such a good showing at the 
University of Illinois interscholastic contest 
for state championship. 

The committees have made several trips 
out of town in behalf of propositions that 
mean much to the commercial and business 
interests here in Herrin. 

There is no regular time of meeting for the 
entire membership of the association, but 
meetings are subject to the call of the presi- 
dent. The business is transacted largely 



through the executive committee which meets 
fortnightly in the directors' room of the State 
Savings Bank building. 

The membership will exceed three hundred 
and fifty. The minimum annual dues are 
fixed at one dollar a year. 

The officers chosen for a term of one year 
at the organization last February and who 
are now serving are as follows: 

A. T. PACE, President 

W. C. KRIECKHAUS, Secretary 

JOHN HERRIN, Treasurer 

THE EXECUTIVE BOARD MEMBERS 

R. A. KARR, Chairman 

0. W. LYERLA, Secretary 

A. K. ELLES 

W. J. SNEED 

A. D. MORGAN 

L. V. CLINE 

GEO. K. CREICHTON 

CHARLES C. MURRAH 

HUGH WILLIS 

JOE GUALDONI 

MAYOR GEORGE E. PARSONS 

ALDERMAN H. A. COWAN 



321 




First National Bank 



HE large resources and deposits of this 
bank has given it the reputation as being 
the strongest financial institution in Southern 
Illinois, and has builded its reputation on 
strictly adhering to conservative and legiti- 
mate banking rules and policies. 

The First Na- 
t i o n a 1 Bank 
was organized 
in 1900, with a 
capital of $25,- 
000, at which 
time it sue- 
ceeded the Ex- 
change Bank, a 
private bank 
owned by D. R. 
Harrison, who 
became the first 
president of the 
First National 
Bank. The 
other officers at 
this time were 
Ephriam H e r- 
rin, Vice-Presi- 
dent; and John Herrin, Cashier, and the di- 
rectors were D. R. Harrison, G. H. Harrison, 
Ephriam Herrin, J. D. Peters, and Ed. A. Ellis. 

In 1904 the capital stock was increased 
to $50.000, which is the present capital. 

The present officers are Geo. H. Harrison, 
President; A. K. Elles, Vice-President; John 




Herrin, cashier; H. A. Whittenberg and J. P. 
Adams, assistant cashiers. 

The efficient cashier, John Herrin, has been 
the cashier since the organization, and the 
rapid rise from a small bank of only $25,000 
to the leading banking institution of Southern 

Illinois, with 
total resources 
of $1,920,564 at 
last report, is 
principally due 
to his adminis- 
t r a t i o n. Mr. 
Herrin was co- 
chairman with 
Earl Jackson of 
Marion, in the 
Liberty Loan 
campaigns o f 
the late war, 
and their ef- 
forts were 
mainly respon- 
sible for Wil- 
liamson county 
going over the 
top on every loan on every Liberty Loan. 

The bank building occupied by the First 
National Bank is the same building in which 
the bank was established. It is equipped with 
modern vaults and safes and also electric bur- 
glar alarm system, in fact, every safeguard is 
thrown around their depositors' money. 



322 




Geo. K. Crichton, Attorney 



TJERRIN has always been called a 
'--*- young man's town, because the young 
man has his opportunity here to an appa- 
rently greater degree than in other cities that 
boast of years and learned and aged men. 
That this is quite true is borne out by the 
career of a single young man who seized 
opportunity at the flood tide 
Attorney George K. Crich- 
ton, twice city attorney and 
once mayor of the city and 
still counting his years this 
side of thirty-three. 

Attorney Crichton is of 
direct and pure Scotch de- 
scent, born in Staunton, 111., 
later residing in Taylorville, 
where he attended high 
school, and afterward re- 
moving with his parents to 
Herrin 1906, where for a 
time he was employed in the 
mines earning money with 
which to attend college. 

At the age of nineteen, 
he entered Washington Uni- 
versity, St. Louis, Mo., and 
was graduated from the law 
department of that institu- 
tion in 1909. He successfully passed the 
Illinois bar examination that same year and 
located a law office in Herrin shortly after- 
ward. 

He fell into the political life of the com- 
munity quite naturally. Before he was old 
enough to hold office, he was well under way 
running a winning race for city judge of 
Herrin. The fact of his age was found to 
be against him holding the office, led him to 
withdraw with election a certainty, but was 
honored with an appointment as master in 
chancery of the first city court Herrin ever 
had. 




In 1911 at the age of twenty-four, he was 
nominated and elected city attorney and suc- 
ceeded himself two years later for an- 
other term. He proved himself well fitted 
for this important position and served 
through some of the most critical periods of 
the city's history and at a time when some of 
the greatest local improve- 
ment work was under way. 
After leaving the city attor- 
ney's office, he devoted his 
entire time to the practice of 
his profession. 

A committee of prom- 
inent citizens waited on him 
when the selection of a can- 
didate for mayor was a 
problem in the spring of 
1917 and presuaded him to 
pitch his hat in the ring, 
which he finally consented 
to do with the result that 
he was elected by a big ma- 
jority. He served from 
April, 1917, to April of this 
year, and had a most har- 
monious council throughout 
his entire administration as 
well as a successful term. 
It was his intention several times to resign 
and join the colors, but the state and city 
affairs did not permit it, his best friends 
argued. He finally decided to serve out his 
term and retire and enter the army, but the 
signing of the armistice precluded this also. 
Throughout the war period Attorney Creigh- 
ton, then mayor, rendered much service to 
the local and legal advisory boards. 

In the fall of 1918, he was married to Miss 
Gertrude Fleming of Olney, 111., who at this 
time was a member of the faculty of the 
Southern Illinois Normal University at Car- 
bonclale. 



323 



ft 

Li 







Judge Ambert D. Morgan 



A LEADING representative of his profes- 
-^*- sion at Herrin is Ambert D. Morgan, 
who was a graduate in 1909 from the Illinois 
College of Law of Chicago, admitted to the 
bar of Illinois in 1909 and has since been 
practicing in Herrin. He stands high in the 
Williamson County Bar, and has an excel- 
lent practice throughout the county. 

Ambert D. Morgan 
was born at Hamp- 
shire, Illinois, Octo- 
ber 29, 1885, a son 
of L. D. and Eliza- 
beth (Helmer) Mor- 
gan. His father is 
now seventy and his 
mother sixty - one. 
The great- grand- 
father Morgan was a 
prominent citizen of 
Syracuse, New York, 
while grandfather 
Morgan came from 
that state to Illinois 
and was one of the 
early settlers of Mc- 
Henry County, fol- 
lowing a career as a 
farmer. D. D. Mor- 
gan, a Civil War vet- 
eran, was born near 
Marengo in McHenry 
County. He and his 

wife were the parents of six children, of 
whom Judge A. D. Morgan of Herrin, Illinois, 
is the fifth. 

Judge Morgan received his early educa- 
tion in the public schools of Kane County, 
attended the Elgin, Illinois, High School for 
two years, was a student in the University of 
Illinois in the science department, and spent 
three years at the Illinois College of Law, 
Chicago, Illinois. He is a member of the 
County Bar Association, has served on the 
township high school board, and has fraternal 
affiliations with the Mississippi Valley Con- 
sistory, the Scottish Rite Temple, East St. 




Louis, Illinois, the Royal Arch Chapter of 
Masonry, the Independent Order of Odd Fel- 
lows, and the Modern Woodmen of America. 
On December 25, 1910, he married Miss 
Alberta Eubank of Centralia, Illinois, daugh- 
ter of James S. and Olive Eubank of Cen- 
tralia. They have two children, Lillian 
Eugenia Morgan, born in 1912, and Harriet 
Elizabeth, in 1914. 

In August, 1918, 
Judge Morgan was 
elected judge of the 
city court of Herrin, 
which position he 
now holds. He has 
on several occasions 
been called to Cook 
County, Illinois, to 
hold circuit court in 
the city of Chicago. 

During the period 
of the war, Judge 
Morgan was among 
the most patriotic of 
his profession in this 
county. Under his 
supervision and sug- 
gestion, the first cele- 
bration following the 
declaration of war 
held in this county 
was given in this city, 
and he got up the 

first send-off picnic for the departing 
soldiers. When the draft law was passed, 
Judge Morgan was getting up a company of 
volunteers and giving them preliminary 
drills on the street at night. All through the 
war he served as chairman of the legal ad- 
visory board and directed the arduous task 
of handling the questionnaire board. His 
office during the war was open to free counsel 
of every soldier and his relatives. 

Judge Morgan is a prominent member of 
the Herrin Improvement Association and 
takes a keen interest in all matters that per- 
tain to the civic welfare of Herrin. 



324 



m 




City National Bank 



THE City National Bank was organized in 
1907, with a capital of $50,000, to meet 
the needs of another national bank for the 
rapidly growing city of Herrin. Business 
was conducted in C. H. Pope's furniture store 
until a new 
building could 
be completed, 
which was de- 
stined to house 
one of the most 
popular bank- 
ing institutions 
in the county. 
The building 
was erected at 
a cost of $25,- 
000 on the cor- 
ner of Park and 
Monroe Streets. 
The officers at 
the time of or- 
ganization 
were: John 
Alexander, 
President; R. 
A. Karr, Vice- 
President; Paul 
D. Herrin, 
Cashier; Alex. Frazer, Asst. Cashier. The 
first Board of Directors other than officers: 
Louis Dell 'Era, C. H. Pope, John Hollo, W. 
C. Alexander, Fred Stotlar, R. T. Cook and 
J. D. Peters. 

Modern banking methods and the good will 
of the clients have caused the business to 
grow rapidly until the present assets amount 
to approximately $900,000.00. 

Joe P. Benson, the present cashier, started 
in the bank as bookkeeper in 1912, and dur- 
ing the time that Mr. Frank Chew, who suc- 
ceeded Paul D. Herrin as cashier, he was 
assistant cashier and held this position until 
elected cashier in January, 1917. Mr. Ben- 




son has been connected with the bank con- 
tinuously since 1912, with the exception of 
a few months when in army service in 1918. 
At the time of the first draft R. F. Mooney- 
ham, Asst. Cashier, was selected as one of 

the first four- 
teen drafted 
men sent to 
C a ro p Taylor. 
During the two 
years he was in 
service, he 
arose to the 
rank of captain. 
L o r e n C. 
Margrave suc- 
c e e d e d Mr. 
Moon eyham, 
but was also 
called to the 
colors and 
served with the 
A. E. F. Upon 
his return he 
was given posi- 
tion of assist- 
ant bookkeep- 
er, but later 
was offered a 
similar position in a bank at Gorham. 

The present officers are John Alexander, 
President; R. A. Karr, Vice-President; Joe 
P. Benson, Cashier; Geo. G. Otey, Asst. Cash- 
ier; R. F. Mooneyham, Asst. Cashier; Miss 
Pearl Lynn, Bookkeeper. Directors other 
than the officers: W. C. Alexander, Joseph 
Berra, C. H. Pope, A. J. Will, and Geo. W. 
Bradshaw. 

The City National bank building at the 
corner of N. Park Ave. and E. Monroe St., is 
one of the busiest spots in Herrin and oc- 
cupies one of the most valuable corners. The 
bank building was the first business of any 
size to venture this far north on Park Ave. 



325 







Albert G. Storme, Funeral Director 




E business personnel of Herrin is to a 
large extent made up from men who rose 
from the ranks, very few coming to Herrin 
with capital, and in this class may be placed 
Albert G. Storme, one of the successful men 
who by his own efforts has won an enviable 
reputation as head of the undertaking estab- 
lishment that bears his name. 

Before starting in business, Mr. Storme 
was employed in the mines for five years, 
and served as financial secretary of his Local 
Union during the entire time. He attended 
every state convention of the U. M. W. of A. 
as delegate during this period, and two 
national conventions. 

His first business experience was in 1896 
with the Elles Store Company in a respon- 
sible position as manager of the Cambria 
branch store. After serving for five years, 
he decided there was an opening in Herrin 
in the undertaking and embalming business. 
To properly fit himself in this profession, he 
attended the Barnes College of Anatomy at 
Chicago, and after graduting and securing a 
state embalmer's license, he opened his un- 
dertaking parlors in Herrin 1902, and success 



has come to him in a large deserved degree. 

His popularity is attested by the fact that 
he has held several public offices city alder- 
man of Ward 1, and at the present town 
clerk of Herrin township. During the war 
period, he was chairman of the Herrin town- 
ship Liberty Loan organization and did 
effective work in helping to put the township 
"over the top" on the different drives. 

Mr. Storme was married to Miss Hallie 
Crowell, daughter of A. S. Crowell of 
Cambria, March, 1907. They have two 
daughters, Marie, born March, 1909, and 
Hugh Wilmar, February, 1917. 

In fraternal work, he is a member of the 
Masons, Odd Fellows, Elks, Modern Wood- 
men, K. of P. and the Red Men, and takes 
an active par tin civic affairs. 

Mr. Storme's funeral equipment is prob- 
ably the largest and most complete in South- 
ern Illinois. He maintains elegant parlors 
at 105 N. 16th Street. He operates two mod- 
ern motor hearses, one the latest product of 
the famous Sayers & Scoville, pictured here, 
and also a late style ambulance all finished 
in a two-tone gray. 



326 




Herrin State Savings Bank 



HE rapid growth of Herrin soon called 
for an increased banking facilities, and 
the second bank to be organized was the 
Herrin State Savings Bank in 1904. The 
first officers were Thomas Stotlar, President; 
Will Stotlar, Vice-President ; N. P. Lewis, 
Cashier. Directors other than the officers: 
E. N. Dillard, Ed. Stotlar, Wm. Mornin, and 



The later success of this bank is attributed 
to modern banking methods, new and modern 
equipment being installed to better protect 
the ever increasing deposits and facilitating 
the handling of business. 

This institution has the very latest burglar- 
proof safe, made by the Mosler Safe Com- 
pany, and many new safety deposit boxes. 




Dr. W. H. Ford. The capital stock was at 
this time $25,000.00. At present it is $50,- 
000.00, with a surplus fund of $10,000.00, 
and total assets close to half a million. The 
original bank building burned in 1912, but 
was at once replaced practically as before. 

In 1917 0. W. Lyerla, the present cashier, 
became identified with the bank, purchasing 
a large amount of stock, and began to put 
new life in the business. Up to this time, 
he has been cashier only eighteen months, 
and during this short period the deposits 
have increased more than $200,000,.00. 



This bank was among the first in the 
county to install the new mechanical book- 
keeping method, which reduces bookkeeping 
to an economic system, making it possible to 
balance depositor's pass books and render the 
daily balance in a few minutes, where it for- 
merly took hours. 

The present officers are: E. N. Dillard, 
President; E. M. Stotlar, Vice-President; 0. 
W. Lyerla, Cashier; W. C. McCormick, 
Assistant Cashier. Directors other than offi- 
cers: J. J. Dillard, Sarah Stotlar, Nora 
Ford. 



327 







M P. 

TV7HILE Herrin was still a prairie town 
with only a few houses and no railroad, 
there came to this section a young Russian, 
who immigrated to this county when only 19 
years of age and traded with the citizens by 
carrying his stock with him from house to 



clothing for every member of the family. 
In September, 1917, seventeen years from 
starting his first small store, he leased a big 
store room in the new Herrin Building at the 
principal business corner at Park Avenue 
and Cherry, where he moved his men's cloth- 




house. The merchan- 
dising knowledge thus 
gained by hard experi- 
ence showed this young 
merchant, M. P. Zwick, 
that Herrin was a com- 
ing city. Having ac- 
cumulated sufficient cap- 
ital to buy a small 
stock of goods, he 
started in business in 
1900, at the corner of 
Monroe and 14th, where 
he remained for two 
years, and then moved 
to the Elles building 
for two years. By this time his trade had 
increased to the extent that he could build 
for himself, and he bought a business lot on 
the corner of Park and Monroe and erected 
a building 25x80 feet. 

Six years later it was necessary to increase 
the floor space, so he bought the adjoining 
lot and remodeled the building into a hand- 
some two-story structure shown here in lower 
picture as the ladies' store. Durnig this time 
his stock consisted of general dry goods and 



ing and furnishing stock. He now has one 
of the most modern men's stores in Southern 
Illinois. Mrs. Zwick, who has always been a 
real helpmate, still manages the ladies' store. 
Just recently a branch store has been opened 
at Carterville. 

Mr. and Mrs. Zwick are the parents of five 
children; Bessie, Julius, Leon, Evelyn, and 
Sander. The two oldest boys only fourteen 
and fifteen years of age, are already taking 
an active interest in the stores. 



328 



I 




European Hotel and Cafe 



' ["'HIS representative industry is the result 
-* of the indomitable spirit of one of Her- 
rin's leading citizens, Louis Dell-Era, de- 
ceased, but who leaves behind a heritage that 
shows his success as a business man, father 
and leader of men. Mr. Dell-Era was born 
in Cuggiono, Milan, Italy, February 8, 1866. 
While yet a young man, he crossed the Alps 
into France, 
where he be- 
came proficient 
in the French 
language. The 
longing for his 
native country 
caused him to 
return and en- 
ter the engineer 
corps of the 
army. This 
army experi- 
ence was the 
foundation of a 
p rofession 
which took him 
to Egypt, Abys- 
sinia, and later 
to the Congo 
Free State, Africa. After two years on rail- 
road engineering work there, he accepted a 
contract for similar work in Salonika, Tur- 
key. Having friends in America, he then 
decided to try his fortune in this land of the 
free, his first business venture being in Mur- 
physboro, where he formed a partnership 
with Joseph Berra, which became known as 
Berra & Dell-Era. At this time the news 
of the new coal fields opening up in William- 




son county attracted him to start in business 
with his partner in Herrin, which was then 
just booming. Success crowned their efforts 
from the start. With his partner he invested 
heavily in real estate and kept up his reputa- 
tion as a builder. Franklin, four miles north 
of Herrin, a fifty-two acre plat, and Dell- 
Era of sixteen acres, besides a three-story 

brick opera 
house destroyed 
by fire in 1918, 
and the present 
European Hotel 
and Cafe are a 
few examples 
of the result of 
this partner- 
ship. 

Before com- 
ing to this coun- 
try Mr. Dell- 
Era was mar- 
ried June 17, 
1893, to Dora 
B i o 1 1 i. The 
children born 
were Joseph, 
who was a lieu- 
tenant in the world war, and Aida and 
William. 

The firm of Berra & Dell-Era continued 
until the return of Joseph from the army 
in February, 1919. The holdings of Mr. 
Dell-Era are now managed by the estate of 
Louis Dell-Era. The Hotel and Cafe is man- 
aged by Joseph, who it is believed will con- 
tinue building the business left as a heritage 
by his worthy sire. 



329 




1909-Herrin Supply Co.-1919 



Herrin, III. 



WAR HISTORY 
r | 1 EN years old this year! 
*- Could we do anything for the war? 
Well, we sent forth two first lieutenants, one 
sergeant, one corporal and two privates; We 
supplied Red Cross workers, workers in 
every drive for Red Cross, Y. M. C. A., in 
every Liberty Loan drive and furnished 
Local Board No. 2 with a government appeal 
agent; we also supplied the citizens of the 
county with nearly three-quarters of a mil- 
lion dollars worth of merchandise in 1918 
at a uniformly low price consid- 
ering the prevailing high prices. 

To readers of this review, if 
you are not a customer of ours, 
try us and you will be. "We sell 
everything under the sun." If you 
don't believe us call on us and 
we will prove it. 

When you are in Herrin, Mur- 
physboro, Carbondale, Hillsboro, 
West Frankfort, Eldorado or Ben- 
ton, ask for Herrin Supply Co.'s 
stores trade at them and you 
will come out ahead. 

Don't fail to read about Elles 
Store Co. on page 367 and 
Marion Supply Co. on page 394 
we are kin. 

WE THANK YOU. 






THE HERRIN STORES 
330 



1 



8 C 




Big Muddy Land & Lumber Co. 




HPHIS large industry, dealing in every kind 
of building material, was organized in 
1907, by Ed. A. Elles, Walter C. Krieckhaus 
and G. W. Bevard the first plant being 
opened in Royalton. The business grew 
rapidly and a new building was completed 
in Heirin in 1910, and a new plant estab- 
lished. Mr. Krieckhaus purchased Mr. Be- 
vard's interest in 1909, and from that time the 
business was controlled by Elles & Kreick- 
haus, operated under the firm name of Big 
Muddy Land & Lumber Co. The business 
was sold to the Park Lumber Co., September, 
1919. 

SANITARY PLUMBING & HEATING CO. 
was organized by Fred Krieckhaus, Ed. A. 
Elles and Walter C. Krieckhaus in July, 1913, 
to complete the plan to sell, build and install 
complete materials for all kinds of construc- 
tion work. Walter C. Krieckhaus soon pur- 
chased his brother's interest and the modern 
building pictured herein was erected. Some 



of their large contracts are as follows: 
Herrin City Hall, Carterville School, Berra 
& Dell 'Era hotel and a theater building at 
Sesser, Herrin Building, Kahn Building, 
European Hotel, Commercial Hotel and 
Boyd Hotel. The business was sold and 
building leased to the Park Sanitary Plumb- 
ing & Heating Co., composed of Herrin 
capital, Sept. 1, 1919. 

HERRIN CONSTRUCTION CO. Some 
of the largest contracts on construction 
work in Herrin and vicinity have been done 
by the Herrin Construction Co., composed of 
Ed. A. Elles, Walter C. Krieckhaus and A. K. 
Elles, which created the construction end of 
the above combination. Their largest con- 
tracts was the South Side School, New South 
Side School and the paving for district No. 
1, Herrin. The superintending of construc- 
tion was done by Walter C. Krieckhaus, who 
has gained a reputation as a thorough and 
efficient contractor and builder. 



331 




The Hippodrome Theatre 




'"PHERE have been any number of theater exploits 
in this section of the state and Herrin has in 
the years that have passed, had her share of them. 
It remained, apparently for John Marlow, manager 
of the Hippodrome, to have the right plans and put 
them in force and succeed. At a cost of $65,000 
he built the Hippodrome, which was opened for 
business November 24, 1917. It is the largest ground 
floor theater of its kind in Illinois, having a seating 
capacity of 1,500. The stage is large enough to 
accommodate any road show that travels between 
cities in this portion of the country. Every device 
and improvement known in theater building was put 
to use in the construction of this playhouse by the 
builder, Pete Cardani. A big pipe organ was in- 
stalled at a cost of $5,000, and a ventilating system 
costing $10,000. 

No sooner had Mr. Marlow got well under way 
with managing the Hippodrome, than he saw the 
need of theaters of like nature, reasoning that a 
string of good houses in this end of the state would 
attract a better class of shows. He purchased one 
of the choicest business sites in Murphysboro early 
this year and will open the doors of a fine $90,000 
theater in that city some time in December, a sister 
house to the Hippodrome. Booking arrangements 
have been made with other houses in southern Illi- 
nois that will practically place Mr. Marlow in a 
position of dictating the routing of the best shows 



that venture into this section of Illinois. 

A few months ago, Mr. Marlow bought the valu- 
able lot just west of the Hippodrome, with a 100 
foot frontage on Park Avenue, and is erecting an 
annex theater there which will be devoted exclu- 
sively to high grade pictures. This house will be 
ready to open early next year. 

The Hippodrome has made Herrin the capital city 
in Theaterdom by the high class attractions, both 
in pictures, artists and plays offered. Last season's 
bill at the Hippodrome offered Madame Schumann- 
Heink, St. Louis Symphony Orchestra, Frank La 
Forge, and others. Fully as great artists are to be 
booked for the next season. 

The Hippodrome is owned and controlled by the 
Grand Opera Company, incorporated, consisting of 
the Marlow brothers, who are, John, George and 
James Marlow, and Paul Columbo. 

Manager Marlow was born on December 12, 1885, 
at Pilot Knob, Mo. He came to Herrin with his 
parents when a small boy. For a time he was in 
the general merchandise business under the firm 
name of Marlow Brothers. He foresaw the need of 
an opera house in Herrin and success has crowned 
his efforts from the first. 

Many times during the war period, the Hippo- 
drome was thrown open for benefit shows. The 
theater in this manner performed its bit very pa- 
triotically on many occasions. 



332 







/. B. Kahn 




\ MONG the merchants of Herrin who have 
-^"*- done much to put this city on the map 
as a shopping center, is J. B. Kahn, founder 
of the Kahn Store, who came here in August, 
1907, from St. Louis, and located the "busy 
store on the corner" at 16th and Cherry 
Streets. For the first three years Mr. Kahn 
was building up his business as outfitter for 
man, woman and child to the proportions, 
which in his judgment would make for the 
most economical merchandising. Since that 
time, he maintained about the same amount 
of stock which had proved was the correct 
amount to carry to keep the overhead costs 
at the minimum. His success as a business 
man has proved that his system was right 
and did reduce to the selling price, to his 
numerous customers who "walk a block and 
save a dollar" and is evidence a plenty that 
they are finding real merchandising values. 
Mr. Kahn has also been very successful 



in other business enterprises in Herrin, as 
his large real estate investments and holdings 
have shown. 

At the time of this review, Mr. Kahn had 
just finished negotiations for a third interest 
in the Paris Style Garment Company, a large 
wholesale institution in St. Louis, and will 
reside in that city in the future, but will 
continue his store here with W. J. Harmon, 
who has been manager since 1917, in charge. 

The evidence of good fellowship of Mr. 
Kahn is shown by the fact that he is a mem- 
ber of several of the leading fraternal organi- 
zations: Masons, Odd Fellows, Elks, Red 
Men, Modern Woodmen, and others. 

The many friends and customers of Mr. 
Kahn wish him success in his new efforts and 
know that with the same reliable business 
principles as he has shown in Herrin, that 
the wholesale institution will prosper under 
his wise and careful management. 



333 




Herrin City Hospital 

Dr. J. T. Black, Supt, 




r f^0 fill the need of a hospital for the 
*- rapidly growing City of Herrin, the City 
Hospital here shown was built in 1912, and 
was operated from that time until August, 
1918, by Drs. Carl Baker and W. R. Gardi- 
ner, at this time Dr. J. T. Black purchased 
the interests of Drs. Baker and Gardiner, and 
became superintendent. 

Dr. Black graduated from the Southern 
Illinois Normal, at Carbondale, in 1904, and 
from the St. Louis College of Physicians and 
Surgeons in 1909. After graduating there, 
he desired hospital practice before starting 
on his career and was connected with the 
Lincoln State Hospital and Colony for a 
time before beginning his practice at Herrin 
in February, 1910. Sometime later, to be 
better prepared in his profession, he took a 
post graduate course at the Chicago Post 



Graduate Hospital, and now ranks as a leader 
in his profession. 

Dr. Black was married March 13, 1913, 
to Miss Maud Reid. To them have been born 
two sons, Waldo Briggs, born August, 1914, 
and James Taylor, born March, 1917. 

As a fraternal worker, Dr. Black has been 
very active, having reached the Shriners in 
the Masons, and also is a member of the 
Odd Fellows, Red Men, Modern Woodmen 
and Woodmen of the World. 

The hospital is equipped with X-Ray and 
other electrical apparatus for the treatment 
of such diseases as has been found to yield 
to electrical and other modern treatments. 

The other physicians of the city take ad- 
vantage of this complete hospital for their 
patients, and it is one of the institutions that 
Herrin is quite proud of. 



334 




The Herrin News 

"Coal Belt's Greatest Newspaper" 



E HERRIN NEWS is recognized in 
Williamson County and throughout 
southern Illinois as an honest and fearless 
critic of events and of public opinion. While 
Republican in politics, which is reflected 
only in its editorial column, it is not an organ 
of any party or group or individual. Its 
publisher is of the school of personal jour- 
nalism, believing as Greeley and Dana did as 
to what constitutes an approach to an ideal 
newspaper. The purpose of this paper is to 
survey from week to week the most significant 
things that are happening in this community 
and section of the state and to point out, so 
far as possible, the real nature and per- 
manent worth of what is being thought, said 
or done. Its test of social value, not whether 
this or that thing is popular or likely to 
prevail, but whether it is honest, whether it 
is just, whether it promises benefit for all 
rather than profit for a few. 

The Herrin News is among the very few 
newspapers in this section of the state, that 
observes from week to week an editorial 
column and has always in these columns an 
honest and fearless discussion of some timely 
topic and usually of a local nature. The 
paper enjoys the enviable position in south- 
ern Illinois journalism of being the most 
widely quoted in news stories and editorials. 
It therefore wields a political and social in- 
fluence that is rarely to be found in a country 
weekly. 

In the history of the city, there have been 



many newspapers established here, and two 
or three of them were dailies, but with a 
single exception, The Herrin News has seen 
them all pass. It was the first newspaper in 
Herrin, being virtually founded with the city 
by Charles L. Ingraham in 1899. The plant 
that first printed the little five column, hand 
set, quarto, ready print inside, was brought 
overland from Makanda, where it had for a 
few years issued The Makanda News. 

In October, 1904, Hal W. Trovillion of 
Bloomington, Ind., bought the plant and busi- 
ness of Mr. Ingraham and has continued to 
operate the plant and edit the paper ever 
since. One of the first innovations put into 
effect by the new publisher was to advocate 
the organization of a typographical union 
which was largely made up of employees of 
The Herrin News office and to place the union 
label in the sub-head, and which has remained 
there to this day. 

The Herrin News office is located in the 
Odd Fellow's building at 217 N. Park Ave. 
The publication clay is Thursday and the 
subscription rate is $1.50 per year. The 
plant in addition to handling The Herrin 
News and also printing The Zeigler News, 
of which Mr. Trovillion is editor, supports 
one of the most modern printing establish- 
ments to be found in southern Illinois. "The 
Coal Belt's Greatest Newspaper," is an earned 
title which The Herrin News has gone under 
for a number of years, and its career still 
warrants the undisputed use of the title today. 



335 




Howard & Casey, Wholesale Grocers 




T ''HIS large wholesale grocery was estab- 
* lished in Herrin, May 1, 1913, by Howard 
& Casey of Ml. Vernon, 111., the parent com- 
pany. This firm has another large branch 
at Marion, the history of which is given 
under the Marion section of this book. The 
business was first located in the Ford build- 
ing and later in Dillard's garage until the 
present commodious building, erected espe- 
cially for the business, was completed in 
August, 1915, and which consists of two 
floors, 50x100 feet each. A large warehouse, 
50x100, across the street, is also used. 

Their large trade in this section of South- 
ern Illinois can be credited in a large man- 
ner to their efficient manager, Carl Neilson, 
who has been with the firm since first estab- 
lished here. 

The sales force of an institution of this 



kind is also the builders of the business 
the sales force of the Herrin branch are 
A. K. King, Du Quoin, city salesman, 14 
years service; R. E. Bandy, Herrin, 5 years' 
service; and Fred Mosier, Herrin, 5 years' 
service. 

The territory supplied by this branch con- 
sists of Christopher, Sesser, Zeigler, Orient, 
Pershing, Royalton, Bush, Hurst, Clifford, 
Colp, Carterville, Energy, Cobden, Makanda. 
Carbondale, Johnston City, and Freeman. 

The private trade marks of this firm 
"HO-CA-CO" and "HOWARD" are guaran- 
tees of the best when seen on the shelves of 
your grocery. They are also the distributors 
of the "SERV-US" brand for Southern Illi- 
nois. "Scout" brand coffee, their private 
blend, is without an equal for this priced 
coffee. 



336 




=^a^-3j 



The Herrin Journal 



D. C. Grear, Proprietor 



rriHE HERRIN JOURNAL was established 
- in 1913, by D. C. Grear, who had pre- 
viously conducted only a job printing busi- 
ness, coming here from Marion in 1911, 
where he was city editor of the Marion 
Leader for two years. 

Mr. Grear is one of those printers and 
publishers who "grew up" in the business. 
Born in Murphys- 
boro, III., April 17, 
1878, where his 
father was editor and 
publisher of the Mur- 
physboro Independ- 
ent, "Dave," as he is 
called by most every- 
one that knows him, 
says he started 
; 'stickin' type" when 
he had to stand on a 
box to reach the case. 
Several years' ap- 
prenticeship with his 
father resulted in 
making him a real 
printer, but as the 
wages for printers in 
those days were in- 
adequate and stories 
of the big wages in 
the Herrin coal fields 
drew him hence and 
away from his early 
profession, but the adage of "once a printer 
always a printer" held good in Dave's case 
and later he joined his father in publishing 
the Du Quoin Daily Herald in 1908, and 
later in charge of the West Frankfort Ameri- 
can, until he went to the Daily Leader of 
Marion. 




Mr. Grear was married to Miss Delia 
Bailie, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. James M. 
Bailie, of Herrin, in 1902. They are the 
parents of a son, Herald, born 1910, and one 
son, Earl, who passed away in 1915 at the 
age of 19 years. 

Mr. Grear has never been active in politics, 
but has been elected as president of the 
board of education 
two terms and is the 
present incumbent. 

He is a very popu- 
lar fraternal worker, 
being a member of 
about every fraternal 
organization in Her- 
rin, among which are 
the Elks, Masons, 
Red Men, Eastern 
Star, and Court of 
Honor. In the Ma- 
sonic work he has 
reached the degree 
of Royal Arch. 

The Herrin Jour- 
nal is a semi-weekly 
publication, issued on 
Tuesday and Friday 
of each week and 
enjoys a creditable 
circulation and ad- 
vertising patronage, 
which speaks highly 
of Dave's ability and good fellowship, as 
Herrin is not a one-paper city. 

The job department of the Journal is com- 
pletely equipped, and as should be expected 
from one who grew up in the business, the 
work is of a very high quality and the shop 
enjoys a profitable business. 



337 






I 




Herrin Ice and Cold Storage Co. 




HE very modern and adequate plant of 
the Herrin Ice & Cold Storage Company 
of Herrin is an institution of which the com- 
munity is proud as well as fortunate in hav- 
ing. While other cities about here are suf- 
fering of ice famines in the hottest seasons of 
the year, the big Herrin plant is taking care 
of this entire community in the most popu- 
lous region of Williamson County. 

The plant was built some eight years ago 
by George S. Cook and his son, C. D. Cook, 
of Columbus, Ind., and until three years ago 
operated by the latter as manager. They were 
practical ice manufacturers and put in the 
most modern machinery then known to the 
business. 

Three years ago, the entire plant was sold 
out to Du Quoin interests, who have a similar 
plant in that city, and the new owners have 
done quite a little repairing and built many 
additions and made enlargements to take 
care of the ever increasing business. At 
present the capacity of the plant is seventy- 
five tons of ice a day with a very large stor- 
age capacity for 600 tons of ice. The com- 



pany manufactures more than it can dispose 
of locally at times and ships throughout the 
year many cars. 

A large and commodious storage is main- 
tained and a number of wholesale fruit and 
grocery companies avail themselves of this 
cold storage. The storage capacity is twenty 
tons. 

A large sanitary ice cream factory is an 
important adjunct to the business. This de- 
partment supplies practically all of the ice 
cream used in this end of the county. The 
capacity of the cream plant is a thousand 
gallons a day and a storage is provided for 
three thousand gallons. The popular brand 
is "Jersey" cream. 

Five trucks are operated to take care of 
the business and there are fifteen employes 
given regular work when the season is in 
full swing. 

The officers of the company are as follows: 
W. R. Hayes, president; James Naumer, vice- 
president; C. H. Weinberg, secretary-treas- 
urer. R. Kunz is general manager and F. C. 
Smith is manager of the ice department. 



338 



>' 

! 




Southside Supply Company 




'"PHE Southside Supply Company, a well known 
general merchandise establishment of Herrin, 
southwest corner of 14th and Walnut Streets, was 
incorporated in 1917. It succeeded the Harry Dale 
store which served largely the employees of the St. 
Louis-Carterville Coal Company. I. D. Gosnell be- 
came president of the new organization and early 
in the spring of 1919, F. H. Odell bought stock in 
the company and was made general manager of the 
business. 

A. general line of merchandise is carried. There 
is a meat and grocery department and mining sup- 
plies are also carried. From a small business this 
institution has grown rapidly until it takes rank 
with any of the medium sized department stores in 
Herrin. 

Mr. Gosnell, the president of the company, was 
born in the old village of Blairsville in this county 
in 1877, and came to Herrin in 1896, and took a 
place in the mines. He was superintendent of the St. 
Louis-Carterville Coal Company for nine years, ac- 
quiring an interest in the company, which he dis- 



posed of a few years ago and then went into the 
mercantile business. Mr. Gosnell was married to 
Miss Lula Boren in 1900. Fraternally he is an Elk 
and a Mason. 

F. H. Odell, manager of the firm was born April 
21, 1866, in Peoria, Illinois. His father was a mer- 
chant and he early learned the business, but later 
went into railroad service. While a young man he 
spent four years in the west and upon returning 
entered the employ of the C. B. & Q. Railroad in 
April, 1888, and later became agent for that line in 
Peoria. Several years ago he was transferred to 
this city, which was one of the biggest shipping 
stations on the entire system of the Burlington. He 
resigned from railroad service in February, 1919, 
and retired from the service altogether after putting 
in over thirty consecutive years. 

Throughout the war period this firm contributed 
generously to all war work and subscribed to the 
various drives. Mr. Odell's only child, Harrison, 
went into service and served in France throughout 
the war, coming out with the rank of sergeant. 



339 




Brothers Mercantile Co. 




'T'HIS enterprising firm is one of Herrin's newest 
general merchandise corporations, organized in 
1918. It has two stores, one located at 115 West 
Cherry Street in Herrin, the other at Freemanspur, 
in the north end of the county and only recently 
established. The officers of the corporation are: 
H. H. Taylor of Chicago, president; J. B. Irwin, 
vice-president; John H. Yuill, treasurer; H. D. Yuill, 
secretary. This company serves the Taylor Coal 
Company's employees as also the general public. 
President Taylor is also head of the mining company 
which bears his name. 

The Yuill Brothers started in business under the 
firm name in 1915 when they bought out the Herrin 
City Meat Market, located in a portion of the build- 
ing they now own. The individual members of this 
firm were John H., Archie, Frank A., and Harvey 
D. Yuill, all brothers, all possessing excellent busi- 
ness training. This business was conducted until 
1918 when the Yuill Brothers corporation was 
formed and the business enlarged and a general 
merchandise and full grocery line added, making it 
up to the standard in a general store along with any 
in Herrin. 

"Quality Supreme" is the motto of this growing 



business establishment. They have builded their 
trade up on a close observance of this slogan and 
are holding their place by fair dealing and honest 
merchandising in this community. 

When the war came, two members from this firm 
answered the call to colors. Frank was captain of 
the first inducted party of soldiers that went from 
this board district to Camp Taylor, Ky. He served 
throughout the war in France and won a commis- 
sion as lieutenant. Harvey went -away in an early 
draft contingent to Ft. Thomas, Ky., and was im- 
mediately rejected for physical reasons and placed 
in limited service class. At his own expense, he 
later submitted to an operation and conditioned 
himself for another examination and asked to be 
permitted to be sent again to a cantonment. He 
was in one of the last contingents sent out, being 
specially inducted and sent to Chicago University 
training school where he remained until discharged 
after the armistice was signed. 

Few firms have such a record of furnishing fifty 
per cent of their local managing force for the army 
as was the record set by the enterprising and loyal 
firm of Yuill Brothers Mercantile Company of 
Herrin. 



340 




-tf ff^-t 



D. M. Dawson 




JUST as the name W. L. Douglas stands for 
reliable shoes all over this nation, so D. 
M. Dawson means good "furniture, rugs, 
stoves and linoleums," to the people of Her- 
rin and this portion of Williamson County. 
With the recent establishing of a branch store 
at Christopher, the name is being widespread 
now throughout Franklin County and with 
the same meaning, as well as at Carterville 
in this county, where he has just opened a 
third big furniture store under the same 
name. 

Mr. Dawson began in the furniture busi- 
ness in a humble way and like all big insti- 
tutions that have succeeded, he grew steadily 
until a few years ago, he enlarged his store 
on N. 16th Street, until today it is the largest 
furniture emporium in southern Illinois. 

"Your credit is good here," is the trade 
slogan of this big store, and that policy, 
honestly adhered to, has brought comfort 
and good taste into many a home that would 
not otherwise be enjoying them today. By 
handling only the products of old establishd 



and reliable houses, fair treatment to all, the 
greatest furniture business in Williamson 
County has been built up, and is increasing 
every year. 

Mr. Dawson was born in Franklin County, 
near Christopher, Illinois, November 4, 1875, 
the descendant from an old Alabama family 
of prominence. After attending the country 
schools of his vicinity, he was for a time a 
student at the Southern Illinois Normal Uni- 
versity. He taught school for a time after 
leaving college and later came to Herrin and 
entered a partnership with his brother, the 
late C. C. Dawson, in 1898, in the mercantile 
business. The partnership was dissolved 
later and in 1907, Mr. Dawson engaged for 
a time in the implement business. It was 
some two years later when he seemed to 
strike the business he was best cut out for 
when he established a furniture store, which 
by energy and hard personal work he has 
builded up to a proportion that he might 
fittingly be styled "the furniture king of 
Egypt." 



341 



"^-">ft ^VSYr" 




Lombard Society Store 



pROBABLY the most successful mercantile 
- establishments in this county owned and 
managed by Italian-American citizens is the 
Lombard Society Store and Meat Market, 
located at 110-114 North 14th Street, in the 
city of Herrin. Starting back in 1901 as a 
small store, it has 
grown steadily 
until today it is 
doing next to the 
largest business 
of any store in 
this end of the 
county. 1 1 h a s 
been singularly 
fortunate in the 
selection of man- 
agers and execu- 
t i v e committees 
which have con- 
tributed largely 
to its success. 
The business first 
was a co-oper- 
ative partnership, 
and grew to such 
a degree that in 
1917 the business 
was incorporated 
and each mem- 
ber became a 
shareholder. 

There are now 
in excess of four 
hundred m e m- 
bers. Of this number some fifty or more are 
residents of Murphysboro. 

The store handles a complete line of dry 
goods, shoes, domestic and imported gro- 
ceries, hardware and miners' supplies. Its 
meat market is the largest in Williamson 
county as well as the busiest. 

While the stockholders in this institution 
are all of the Italian colony of Herrin, the 
trade of the firm is not confined to its own 




people, but enjoys a profitable general trade 
from the public at large. 

Up until three years ago, the firm occu- 
pied rented quarters. Seeing the need for 
more room as well as the opportunity to 
secure a permanent home, the firm purchased 

the Raddle build- 
ing which was 
formerly o c c u- 
pied partly by 
the postoffice. 
This big two- 
story handsome 
brick is now oc- 
cupied up-stairs 
and down-stairs 
by the company, 
and also the ad- 
joining room to 
the south, which 
is leased. 

The p resent 
officers are as 
follows: Bart 
Colombo, presi- 
dent ; Emil Pes- 
s i n i, vice-presi- 
dent; Chas. F. 
Taveggia, m a n- 
ager; John Bar- 
baglia, secretary; 
Frank Branca, 
treasurer. The 
executive c o m- 
mittee consists of 
Bart Colombo, chairman; Agostino Puricelli, 
Guiseppi Rancillio, Batista Merlo, Ernesto 
Vansaghi, Michele Merlo, Egildo Garaglio. 

During the war period this firm gave sev- 
eral of its members and clerks to the service. 
The firm was always one hundred per cent 
in meeting its war work assessments and 
donations. The membership was very pa- 
triotic in assisting with all war drives and 
bought Liberty Bonds liberally. 



342 



fiWF 



f 

1 




Turner Hardware Company 




CTARTING his business 
career in 1901 with the 
Herrin Supply Company, 
G. J. Turner, of Herrin, 
first located on North Six- 
teenth street in a frame build- 
ing, which was later de- 
stroyed by fire, and where 
he conducted a combination 
grocery, market and hardware 
store, and then moving to his 
present location on West 
Cherry street. He disposed 
of the grocery business in 
1914. For some time he also 
had an interest in the Herrin 
City Meat Market, but gave 
up his other interests to de- 
vote his energies exclusively 
to the general hardware line, 
and his present complete 
hardware store shows his 
wise business judgment as it 
is complete in every detail. 

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A large line of stoves and 
ranges and accessories and 
his many orders for the 
installation of Mueller 
furnaces attest to the popu- 
larity of his business. Mr. 
Turner was married to 
Miss Minnie Kerley, 
daughter of John R. Kerley, 
Simpson, 111., in 1894. Their 
children are a daughter and 
a son. Mary, born March 
30, 1895, and John R., Octo- 
ber 26, 1897. 

Mr. Turner never sought 
political honors, but his fel- 
low citizens elected him as 
township school trustee in 
1915-1918, and at the last 
city election, 1919, he was 
elected City Treasurer. He 
is a popular member of the 
Masonic order. 



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Jo Vick, Druggist 



T^HE first drug store establishd in Herrin 
was that of Jo Vick, who came here from 
Marion in 1899, opening a drug store at 108 
South Park Avenue, where he has been con- 
tinuously since that time. Mr. Vick came 
to Herrin when it was just a prairie town 
with very few stores, and has the record of 
the oldest business man operating continu- 
ously and at present doing business in the 
original building. 

Mr. Vick was born at Marion in 1858, and 
started in the drug business in 1874, being 
employed with the Cline Drug Store at 
Marion from 1877 until he came to Herrin 
in 1899. He was married to Miss Carrie 



Eubanks in 1889. Mr. and Mrs. Vick have 
one daughter, Lucille. 

The Jo Vick drug store is stocked with 
everything found in a complete and modern 
drug store and where .prescriptions are care- 
fully compounded by an old line expert. 
Here may be found a full line of druggists' 
sundries, toilet preparations, perfumes and 
the Santox and Red Cross line of proprietory 
medicines, school supplies, stationery, 
candies, cigars and tobacco, etc. 

Mr. Vick is an esteemed member of the 
Independent Order of Odd Fellows, and 
stands high among the people of this city 
and section. 



343 



j^^N^gN*^ 

1 




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H. A. Tate 



CELLING automobiles in these days when there 
are so many makes of machines on the market 
and so many features to give one car an advantage 
over another is no easy profession, and no one in 
Williamson county has probably mastered the art 
of successful salesmanship to the degree that is 
possessed by H. A. Tate of Herrin, sales agent for 
the Motor Sales Company of this county. He has 
been connected with this firm since 
1913, and in that time has disposed 
of many cars in this part of the 
County, probably selling more cars 
than any one man in the County. The 
past year he has sold in excess of one 
hundred high grade automobiles and 
trucks. The Maxwell, Nash, Dodge 
Brothers and Jordan embrace the cars 
sold by this firm. 

Mr. Tate was born near Galatia in 
Hamilton county, on a farm, the son 
of Oscar Tate. After leaving the farm 
when a young man, he was for two 
years clerk in a department store in 
Benton, and in 1900 came to Herrin, 
where he followed his avocation as a 
salesman, being connected with the 

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B. E. Hamilton, Grocer 

EARED in Pope County, son of Dr. and 
Mrs. S. J. Hamilton, B. E. Hamilton 
started to work in a grocery store in Golconda 
at an early age and continuing there for seven 
years, when he moved to Herrin and entering 
{he employee of the Herrin Supply Co. He 
continued with this firm, in the grocery de- 
partment, for eight years, and then decided 
to start . in business for himself, but at this 
time could find no suitable location and 
established a temporary location until he 
could secure his present location on the 
northeast corner of Harrison and Park Ave- 
nue. 

Mr. Hamilton was married to Miss Blanche 
Connell, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Geo. Con- 
nell, of Vienna, 111., and have three children 
Connell, born October, 1907; Mary, born 
July, 1910; and Jack, born July, 1913. 

Mr. Hamilton gives his lodge preference 
to the W. 0. W. 




Harry Dale store and later with the W. A. Stotlar 
store. In 1907 he entered a partnership with H. O. 
Fowler and L. C. Koen, operating under the firm 
name of Fowler, Tate and Koen, which firm built 
up a big business but was voluntarily dissolved 
eight years later, Mr. Tate becoming associated with 
the Motor Sales Co., whose headquarters are in 
Marion history on another page. 

, Mr. Tate was married in 1898 to 

Miss Julia Kayes, daughter of George 
Kays, a prosperous farmer, residing 
near Thompsonville. They have one 
son, Otto, born February 21, 1900, who 
is a gifted baritone singer and was ac- 
cepted by a leading lyceum bureau at 
Chicago, for a prominent place among 
the talent furnished for high class en- 
tertainment. 

Mr. Tate is a citizen that Herrin is 
proud of. His genial and happy nature 
is popular and his many customers are 
proof of his popularity and ability. 

His reliability as an automobile 
salesman is so well established that 
the public knows his recommendations 
are real values. 



F. O. Bailey 

Iff O. BAILEY, who has the only exclusive elec- 
tric supply shop in Herrin, began business in 
this city eight years ago under the firm name of 
Bailey & Smith, associating with him Carl Smith. 
The partnership was dissolved some five years ago 
and since that time Mr. Bailey has had a very com- 
plete electric supply shop at 115 N. 14th Street, 
handling practically everything needed in the elec- 
trical line in this community. He is at present 
employing six men. Recently he has added to the 
line automobile accessories. 

Mr. Bailey came to Herrin some eleven years ago 
from Birmingham, Ala., where he was born April 
26, 1884. For a number of years he was employed 
in the mines in Herrin and in connection with his 
duties there learned a lot about electricity. By hard 
home study in books, he became a good practical 
electrician and a year before engaging in business 
for himself, he was connected with the Central 
Illinois Public Service Company. 

He was married in 1907 to Miss Anna Nichol. 
They have seven children, four of which died in 
infancy. The three living are: James, aged seven; 
Samuel, five; Charles, two years. 

Mr. Bailey is an energetic business man and pos- 
sesses much enterprise. He has built up a good 
business, developing it from a very small beginning. 



344 



I 




The Cash Store 

L. C. KOEN & SON. 




T5ELIEVING that living necessities can be sold 
less for cash and desiring to enter this line of 
business, L. C. Koen & Son sold out their store at 
104 W. Cherry, 
Herrin, February, 
1915, and started a 
new store with a 
new stock of mer- 
chandise and de- 
cided to sell for 
cash only and sell 
for less. 

Previous to the 
store at 104 W. 
Cherry, Mr. Koen, 
Sr., was for seven 
years a member of 
the firm of Fowler, 
Tate & Koen. He 
came here from 
Ava, Illinois, in 
1908. 

Mr. Koen, Sr., 
was married to Miss 
Minnie May Cotton 
at Ava in 1893, 

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and besides L. C. Jr., who was born February, 1897. 

they have a daughter, Lorene, born January, 1912. 
L. C. Jr. was one of the Herrin boys who joined 

the navy soon after 
the United States 
entered the World 
War. He enlisted 
December 21, 1917, 
and was discharged 
August 21, 1919. 
He was a wireless 
operator on mer- 
chant transports 
and saw much for- 
eign service. 

The Cash Grocery 
enjoys a large trade 
and especially rec- 
ommends the cash 
system and to buy 
for less. 

Mr. Koen, S r., 
was very active in 
war work through- 
out the entire 
period. 



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Good Luck Clothing Company., (Inc.} 



^THROUGHOUT this and Franklin County, the 
Good Luck Clothing Company, Inc., is known 
as the home of Society Brand and Clothcraft clothes, 
Manhattan shirts, Mallory and Stetson hats, and 
Bostonian shoes. There isn't a more progressive 
clothing store in the entire Coal Belt that has be- 
lieved so sincerely in proclaiming its high grade lines 
of merchandise through newspaper and other reliable 
mediums of advertising as this progressive firm, 
ranked as one of the county's foremost clothing 
establishments. 

The firm was established in this city ten years 
ago by David H. Sohn, president of the firm. Mr. 
Sohn had had years of experience in merchandising. 
Previously to coming to Herrin he was for a time 
with the Good Luck store in Granite City, 111., and 
at first established this firm as a branch of that 
business, later building up an enormous business 
and buying his partners out. Before coming to 
Granite City, he travelled for a number of years in 
the East and Middle West for the American Silk 
Mills. 

The present members of the Good Luck Clothing 
Company are Mr. Sohn, president, his brother, Dan, 
who is still in the service, treasurer, and Max Kohls- 



dorf as secretary. 

In September, 1918, a branch store was opened 
at Zeigler and Mr. Kohlsdorf placed in charge. A 
new brick building is contemplated for this store 
next spring on the circle, the principle section of 
that fast growing city. 

The Good Luck Company was first located in 
the States Savings Bank building until 1912, then 
a building was specially erected for the store and 
a long time lease closed with the owner, F. Apple- 
gath. This location at 107 West Cherry Street is 
today the home of the firm, and there isn't a finer 
or more completely stocked clothing ?tore in all 
southern Illinois than is the Good Luck Clothing 
Company's Herrin emporium. 

When the war came, Dan entered service and left 
Herrin March 12, 1918. He was quickly rushed 
to France and soon went to the front. He was 
seriously wounded in the battle of Meuse-Argonne, 
near Sedan, and was in the hospital in a dangerous 
condition for a number of months. He was invalided 
to the States last spring and is now a patient in 
the hospital at Jefferson Barracks, Mo., where he 
must undergo still more operations to heal up his 
wounds. 



345 



^>> 




L. V. Cline, Druggist 



TT is fifteen years now since L. V. Cline, then a 
young man, who had been in the employ of his 
father as drug clerk in Marion, threw open the 
doors of his new drug establishment in this city. 
H e r r i n had just 
suffered a big fire 
and in one of the 
best structures then 
going up in the 
burnt district, Mr. 
Cline, with the 
ambition and cour- 
age that has caused 
him to succeed, 
risked as big an 
investment for 
stock as his credit 
would secure for 
him. From the first 
his business suc- 
ceeded. He gave it 
careful attention 
down to every little 
detail and today 
Cline's Drug Store, 
and Rexall line of supplies and other sundries. 

Two years ago he bought out a large drug store 
in West Frankfort which is known as the Cline 
Drug Store of that city. 

In August, 1918, in conjunction with Snyder Vick 
of the Vick Drug Company of Carterville and Johns- 




more recently called "The Rexall Store," is a house- 
hold word throughout this end of Williamson County. 
He early won a reputation of giving special attention 
to prescriptions and did not fail at the same time 

standard lines in 
to reach out after 
c i n e s and other 
proprietary m e d i- 
stocks usually car- 
ried by a store of 
this kind. A few 
years ago an addi- 
tion was put onto 
the building which 
he has continued to 
occupy at 109 East 
Cherry Street to 
take care of the in- 
creasing business. 

He handles a 
line of stationery, 
leading magazines, 
musical instru- 
ments, Eastman line 
of kodaks, victrolas 
ton City, he established a drug store at Zeigler, 
Illinois, and the firm is known as the Cline-Vick 
Drug Company, one of the busiest stores for its age 
to be found in southern Illinois. 

Mr. Cline is a member of the Herrin Township 
High School Board and a Mason and Elk. 



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John D. Perrine 



JOHN D. PERRINE has the distinction of being 
the youngest postmaster ever appointed in Her- 
rin, and probably the first Republican ap- 
pointed in Illinois by President Wilson to 
an office of this classification. 

He was born January 22, 1895, in Herrin, 
the son of Albert and Anna Perrine. His 
father was postmaster from 1909-13, and is 
now city alderman in Ward one, and super- 
intendent of the Watson Coal Company. 
Postmaster Perrine graduated from Herrin 
High School in the class of '13, and spent 




the next year in Barnes' Business College in St. 

Louis. He entered the employ of the Watson Coal 
Company after finishing his business training 
as bookkeeper. From 1917 to 1919, he served 
as city clerk of Herrin. He was appointed 
postmaster here in July, '19, and assumed 
office the first day of the following October. 

He was married shortly after finishing 
business college to Miss Martha Kearns, 
daughter of Mr. and Mrs. T. C. Kearns of 
Herrin. 



346 



3 




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Sam Susman 



'IPHE only exclusive ladies' ready to wear store in 
Herrin is that of Sam Susman, located at 111 
N. Park Avenue, 
and known through- 
out a large territory 
as "Susman" style 
shop, the home of 
the latest styles in 
ladies' apparel at 
the right price all 
the time. 

Mr. Susman be- 
gan business at the 
early age of 17 at 
1713 Market Street 
in St. Louis, own- 
ing and operating 
a most complete 
ladies' store at this 
early age. He still 
retains an interest 
in this store. 

Mr. Susman was 
born in St. Louis in 
1885, and was mar- 
ried to Miss Minnie 




Fleisher of St. Louis, Oct. 26, 1913. Mrs. Susman 
is a valuable assistant of her husband in the store. 

The Herrin store 
was opened May 1, 
1918, and in the 
short time has be- 
come a leader 
among the mer- 
chandising institu- 
tions of Herrin. Mr. 
Susman is popular 
and progressive, 
and p r o gr e sive 
taking an active in- 
terest in all affairs 
for the betterment 
and upbuilding of 
the city. 

Mr. Susman 
could always be 
counted on to give 
very liberally of 
both time and 
means in all war 



work. 



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Sizemore & Company 

rpHE firm of Sizemore & Company at 121 West 
Cherry street, in Herrin, is composed of W. I. 
Sizemore and Frank Chew, as successors ot Sizemore, 
Grizzell & Son, which they bought out in July, 1919. 
This firm deals in fancy and staple groceries of the 
highest quality, featuring some of the well estab- 
lished brands of groceries. 

W. I. Sizemore was born in this county and was 
employed at the mines as hoisting engineer before 
entering the mercantile business. He went into the 
firm of Sizemore, Grizzell & Son a number of years 
ago, and became senior member of the neV firm 
when Mr. Chew bought in. 

Frank Chew was born in Jackson County, Illinois, 
where he served as deputy county clerk, later county 
treasurer, coming to Herrin in 1903, establishing 
the firm of Chew Mercantile Company, later Martell 
& Chew, and then selling out to take a position in 
the City National Bank, of which institution he 
became cashier. After leaving the bank, he bought 
out Joe Grizzell's interest in Sizemore & Company. 



Warner & Co. 

(~)NE of the youngest business men of Herrin is 
Sam Warner, proprietor of Warner & Co., who 
deserves special mention on account of the efforts 
made to bring himself into the business world. Sam 
worked in the mines from boyhood, but being ambi- 
tious, determined to start into business for himself 
and get out of the mines, and in June this year 
bought out the firm of Lazzare & Lioni, 204 South 
Park Avenue, adding new fixtures and stock making 
a most complete grocery and market, where one can 
always find a clean line of groceries, fresh and 
salted meats. At the head of the meat department 
is Joe Kelley, who is well known in Herrin as an 
expert in his line giving the people the very best 
cuts of meats at the very lowest price. 

In giving patronage to Mr. Warner one is always 
assured of genial and courteous treatment, and the 
satisfaction of lending encouragement to a deserving 
young business man. 



347 




R. A. Karr., Druggist 



A LTHOUGH still a young man, R. A. Karr, owner 
and proprietor of the drug and book store that 
bears his name, is a pioneer in the business world 
of Herrin. Back in 1901 when he first came to 
Herrin, fresh out of a pharmacy college, this city 
was as uninviting 
as the most frontier 
village one can im- 
agine. With his 
keen foresight, he 
reckoned wisely 
and established at 
once a progressive 
drug business in a 
little frame build- 
i n g at 119 E. 
Cherry Street, 
where his present 
commodious store 
stands. In 1904, 
only three years 
after opening busi- 
ness here, Herrin's 
most disastrous fire 
made ashes of this 
ambitious young 




man's business, but he fell to the task of rebuilding 
as soon as the embers had cooled. In 1905, he went 
into his new building, and two years later built an 
addition on the rear. 

Mr. Karr has been generally prominent in busi- 

the Herrin Loan & 
Improvement Asso- 
ciation and chair- 
man of the execu- 
tive committee of 
the Herrin Im- 
provement Associa- 
tion. 

He was married 
in 1905 to Miss 
Sallie Hardy of 
Jackson, Tenn. 
They have three 
children, Helen, 
born March, 1906; 
Roberta, March. 
1909, and Edward, 
March, 1916. 

Mr. Karr is an Elk, 
K. of P., and Mason 
in fraternal circles. 

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Sunnyside Supply Company 



HPHE Sunnyside Supply Company, succes- 
sors to the Warden Stores Company, the 
largest west side general store in Herrin, 
serving the Sunnyside settlement and West 
End Heights, is a co-partnership, formed in 
September, 1918. The members of this firm 
are Alderman P. H. Weir, C. E. Leathers 
and W. I. Megee. 

Mr. Weir, senior member of the firm, was 
for seven years manager of the store when 
it was owned and operated by the Sunnyside 
Coal Company. He was for seven years be- 
fore that employed as clerk in the store. He 
is serving the second ward in which he resides 
now as alderman as well as being school 
treasurer of Blairsville township. 



C. E. Leathers was for a number of years 
employed in the store while it was owned 
and operated by the mining company. He 
has served his township of Blairsville as 
town clerk for a term. 

As the other two partners, Mr. Megee was 
also connected with the business as salesman 
before it was sold to this firm by the mining 
company. 

These three young men are all hustlers 
and it would be hard to find anywhere a trio 
more progressive or more business like in 
their dealings. And this is why the Sunny- 
side Supply Company is still the biggest 
general store on the west side and continues 
a most prosperous business. 



348 



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IHIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIMI 

Louis Spezia 

OPEZIA'S CONFECTIONERY at 212 North 
Park Avenue, in Herrin, owned and man- 
aged by Louis Spezia, is one of the popular 
rendezvous for the younger set of that city. 
Five years ago he established this business, 
and by careful attention to the little details 
that go to make up for the success of such 
a place, his business has grown to be one of 
the leading confectioneries of the city. He 
is ably assisted by his two daughters, Misses 
Pauline and Martha, and his son Mario. 

Mr. Spezia was born in Cuggiono, Italy, 
February 2, 1874. He came to America in 
1891, settling first at Detroit, Mich., and in 
1898, he came to Herrin. He has been prom- 
inently connected with the Italian colony in 
this city and commands the respect of all 
who know him. 



S. M. Stein 



IN searching for a new location to in- 
crease his business, the merchandis- 
ing instinct of S. M. Stein brought him to 
Herrin in 1907, from Goodland, Ind., 
where he was in the general merchan- 
dise business for eleven years. 

He first located at 202 S. Park Ave- 
nue, and then removed to 104 N. 14th 
Street. Deciding that there were bet- 
ter business opportunities nearer Park 
Avenue, he moved to 111 West Cherry 
Street, where he located until John 
Alexander of the City National Bank 
erected a store building specially fitted 
to his needs at 105 West Cherry Street, 
where his place of business is now 
commodiously housed. 

His present store is full of merchan- 
dise of fine quality and here one can 
find everything wanted to fully clothe 
man, woman or child, at very reasonable 
prices. 

Mr. Stein was married to Miss Sophia 
Cassell in 1898. They have four chil- 
dren : Charles, Herald, Salina and 
Belva. The eldest, Charles, now assists 
his parents in the store. 

Mr. Stein also has a large store at 
Senatobia, Miss., which he started four 
years ago, under the management of 
Wm. Yaffe, a cousin of Mrs. Stein's. 
This business venture has been a suc- 
cess from the first. Like the Stein 
store in Herrin, it has been character- 
ized by its fair dealings and kind treat- 
ment to every one. 

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Louis Oldani 

/~\F the young Italian business men who 
^ have made a success in Herrin, Louis 
Oldani, clothing and gents' furnishing, de- 
serves special mention. Starting in a small 
way in a little store on 14th Street, he was 
enabled the following year to move into 
larger quarters at 20 East Monroe, where he 
now maintains a very modern store and keeps 
a full line of the very latest wearing apparel 
for men and boys. 

Mr. Oldani was married to Miss Geneva 
Colombo, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Bart 
Colombo. Their children are Fred, born 
June 29, 1911, and Jim, born June 27, 1913. 

The high regard that the Italian colony 
of Herrin maintain for Mr. Oldani is shown 
by the fact that there was on display at his 
store a large and interesting group of photos 
of Herrin's service boys, who sent the pic- 
tures to him while in the army. 

A large line of articles of vogue such as 
trunks, suitcases and traveling bags is carried 
in this complete men's store. 



349 




/. M. McCoy 



BEGINNING the sheet metal working trade at an 
early age, J. M. McCoy, of Herrin, was fore- 
man of a shop in Princeton, Ky., for sixteen years 
before moving to Herrin 1904. He started in busi- 
ness here in 1905, lo- 
cating on West Cherry 
street, where he re- 
in a i n ed until 1913, 
when the big fire 
which destroyed the 
block caused him to 
move to 205 West 
Monroe street, where 
he continued his busi- 
ness until his present 
new building on West 
Walnut street was 
completed in July, 
1919. 

Mr. McCoy was mar- 
ried in 1876 to Miss 
Lynn Ferguson of 
Louisville, Ky. Two 




children were born Frank, 1881, at present pay- 
master at Pratt Bros. Coal Co., and Edna, 1879, 
wife of Walter Ramsey, cashier I. C. depot. Mr. 
McCoy in 1895 married Louise, sister of his deceased 
first wife. 

He has been a mem- 
ber of the Odd Fellows 
over forty-two years. 

The new store built 
in the spring of 1919 
at 117 West Walnut 
street is very complete 
for his line of work, 
which consists of all 
kinds of tin and sheet 
metal work. A large 
number of business 
houses and private 
homes of Herrin and 
environs are equipped 
with National and Buck 
furnaces, sold and in- 
stalled by Mr. McCoy. 



C. E. Anderson 



C< E. ANDERSON, usually known among his 
friends as "Mage," was mayor of Herrin from 
1911 to 1915, for two terms, being the only mayor 
in the history of that municipality to succeed himself 
to this office. During his administration, the city 
did more permanent public improvement than in all 
of its history up to that time. A waterworks system 
at a cost of $150000.00 was installed, a sewer sys- 
lem costing $78 000.00, two paving districts at a 
cost of $110000.00; sidewalks built to the amount 
of $66000.00, and a city hall erected at a cost of 
over $30000.00. Few cities in all Illinois were so 
progressive as was Herrin under Mage Anderson's 
administration. 

Mr. Anderson, after retiring as mayor, accepted 
a position with the James A. Pugh Stores Company 
of Chicago and remained with this firm until July. 
1917. when Governor Lowden appointed him as 
Arbitration Agent for the Industrial Commission of 
Illinois. His district embraces the southern Illinois 



coal fields which district furnished fully one-third 
of the entire cases that come before the commission. 
Mr. Anderson was born at Raum, Pope County, 
Illinois, December 13, 1877, the son of Andrew and 
Martha Anderson. His father was a veteran of the 
Civil War and died when C. E. was three months 
old. The son had a hard struggle in his early life, 
but secured a good education, graduating from the 
Northern Indiana Normal University at Valparaiso, 
Ind., in the class of 1898. He volunteered in the 
Spanish American War and served throughout. 
After being discharged, he entered the employ of 
the Elles Stores Company at Carterville and later 
was sent to Herrin as manager of the company's 
business here. In 1910, he bought a gents' furnish- 
ing establishment in Herrin and operated this busi- 
ness until four years later, when he sold out. 

He was married to Miss Bertha Perry, the daugh- 
ter of Dr. W. H. Perry of Carterville, and they have 
five children, Edward, Ruth, John, Mary and Joe. 
Mr. Anderson resides at 221 S. 14th Street, Herrin. 



350 



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m 




Jefferson Hotel and Cafe 




\ MONG the leading business firms of Herrin is 
the Jefferson Hotel and Cafe of which Ben 
Smith is proprietor. He has for many years been 
one of the leading hotel and restaurant men of the 
county, conducting a hotel in Marion for a number 
of years and previously the famous Ozark Hotel of 
Creal Springs for four years. During his manage- 
ment this hotel became a mecca for the invalid as 



well as the vacationist and became widely known. 

Mr. and Mrs. Smith are the parents of six chil- 
dren. Lee, Don, Everett, Lena, Ralph and Herbert. 
The older boys and Mrs. Smith are active assistants 
to Mr. Smith in his business. 

As a caterer the Jefferson Cafe is in demand on 
all special occasions and there is rarely a banquet 
in Herrin that it does not serve. 



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George C. Berra 



\ MONG the young business men of Herrin, who 
by their own energy and thrift have succeeded 
from a small beginning, George C. Berra is most 
prominent. He was born in Murphysboro, June 18, 
1897, the son of Mr. and Mrs. Harry Berra. who 
immigrated to this country from Italy. Mr. Berra 
came to Herrin when ten years of age with his 
parents and attended public schools until fourteen 
and then entered the employ of the 
Lombard Society Store, where he 
soon learned the general merchan- 
dise business. Later he became a 
member of the firm of Bione & Berra. 
when only 19 years old. He entered 
the army service Oct. 15, 1918 and 
was stationed at the Chicago Univer- 
sity in special training until dis- 
charged Dec. 5, 1919. Upon his dis- 
charge, he purchased the interest of 
his partner and also obtained an in- 
terest in a store at West Frankfort, 
where the business was conducted 
under the name of Calcaterra & 
Company, while the Herrin store was 
known as Berra & Co. During 
August, 1919, the larger interest in 




West Frankfort demanding his attention, he sold 
his business here, and to give his entire time to 
the West Frankfort store, where with an extensive 
grocery and general market, his business is growing 
steadily, which attests to his popularity and good 
business ability. 

Mr. Berra was married this spring to Miss Jennie 
Calcaterra, one of Herrin's most popular members 
of the young Italian set, daughter of 
Mr. and Mrs. Joe Calcaterra of 
Herrin. 

No sooner had the war got under 
way than Mr. Berra made application 
for admission for entrance in an offi- 
cers' training school. He was called 
to Champaign, 111., and examined and 
his application placed on file and told 
that he would be called later, and 
permitted to return home. He grew 
tired of waiting action on his appli- 
cation and listed up with the local 
board for special induction a few 
days before his application was fa- 
vorably acted on, but he preferred 
at that time to enter Chicago Univer- 
sity for special training which he did. 



351 




Bracy-North Hardware Co. 



/~iNE of the most complete hardware stores of the 
county was established in Herrin in July, 1917, 
when the Bracy-North Hardware Company of Car- 
terville, purchased the 
stock of Pope Bros. & 
Company, and added 
many new lines and 
suitable stock for a 
modern hardware store. 
B. F. Bracy, the senior 
member of the firm, 
took up his residence 
in Herrin and became 
local manager and one 
of the Herrin live 
boosters. 

The firm of Bracy- 
North was organized 
in Carterville in 1913, 
when Mr. North, for- 
merly of the North- 
Arnold Lumber Com- 
pany, bought an inter- 
est in the Bracy Hard- 
ware Company. 
Mr. Bracy, while a 
newcomer, is one of Herrin's most enterprising citizens, 




established the Bracy Hardware Company, had had 
long experience in the business, being employed by 
B. L. Washburn in Carterville for nine years, and 
then entered a part- 
nership with Mr. Crane, 
which business was 
conducted under the 
name of Crane & Bracy 
for a year, and then 
entered business for 
himself and buying out 
the store of his former 
employer, B. L. Wash- 
burn, and consolidated 
the two stores at Car- 
terville in 1910. 

Mr. Bracy was mar- 
ried to Miss Ruth 
Cash, daughter of Mr. 
and Mrs. C. M. Cash, 
of Carterville, and are 
the parents of three 
children, Wm. Layne, 
born August 22, 1901; 
Frederick Lucian, 
born March 21, 1901, 
and Frank Junior, born July 25, 1911. 



John Maurizio, Confectioner 



XT' OR seven years, John Maurizio has had an 
ice cream parlor and confectionery lo- 
cated in the east room of the City National 
Bank building on E. Monroe Street, in Herrin, 
and it has been a popular confectionery, hold- 
ing a steady business all these years. Mr. 
Maurizio had had three years' experience in 
the grocery business before he entered the 
confectionery business in this city and knew 
the art of buying candies and fruits. 

Mr. Maurizio was born in Torino, Italy, 
July 22, 1873, and came to America when 



only twenty-two years old. He first located 
at Kansas City, Kans., where he worked in 
the mines for a year and a half, and then 
came to Clifford, 111., and worked as a miner 
for a short time before he entered the grocery 
business there. He was married April 15, 
1885. to Miss Marie Cristo, and they have two 
daughters, Marguerita and Mrs. Jessie Oldani. 
Mr. Maurizio is a prominent Republican in 
the Italian colony here and was one of the 
organizers and at present secretary of the 
Italian Political Club. He is also a member 
of the Moose, Caribou and Aurora Societa. 



352 




Holland Drug Company 



'"PHE Holland Drug Company was established in 
Herrin in June, 1914, by Harry Holland, post- 
master at Marion, and his brother, Lloyd Holland, 
Rp. Phg., who a short time before was graduated 
from the Northwestern University of Chicago, and 
who was in active 
charge of the busi- 
ness until he en- 
listed in the navy 
in July, 1918, and 
died while in serv- 
ice. 

Since that time 
E. Waggener has 
been manager of 
the business, hav- 
ing been employed 
by the firm since 
December, 1917. 
He was for twelve 
years previous to 
this in the employ 
of the Red Cross 
Drug Store of Ex- 
celsior Springs, 
Mo., his home city, 
the last five years of that time as manager, and 
since then with the McPike Drug Company, whole- 
sale dealers of Kansas City, Mo., in the pharma- 
ceutical department. 

At the present time, Mr. Waggener is assisted by 
Louis L. Eubanks, registered phamacist, who is in 
special charge of the prescription department of the 
firm, Mrs. Essie Brayfield and Paul Earth. 

The store handles the Nyal line of proprietary 
remedies, also specializes in H. K. Mulford Com- 
pany and Parke-Davis & Company's biological pro- 
ducts, acting as their local distributors; the well 




known Eaton, Crane & Pike's line of stationery, 
Parker fountain pens and Claxtonola talking ma- 
chines. 

A well kept fountain is also operated and all 
drinks of the season served. 

The store was 
first located in the 
south room of the 
Walker - McNeil 
building and in 
January, 1918, was 
removed to its pres- 
ent location in the 
new Herrin build- 
ing. 

Lloyd Holland, 
one of the foun- 
ders of the busi- 
ness, heeded the 
call to colors as 
the war went on 
and enlisted in the 
navy at the Great 
Lakes.- Illinois na 
val training station. 
Shortly after he 
went in service, he was taken ill with influenza, fol- 
lowed by pneumonia, and passed away on September 
22, 1918. 

There is a Holland Drug Company in West Frank- 
fort, established by Harry and Lloyd Holland, of 
the parent store, and George N. Kimberlin. who is 
the local manager there and is a member of the firm. 
Both stores enjoy a profitable business which is 
growing all of the time, by virtue of the fact that 
their trade is carefully and systematically handled 
and only high quality drugs carried, as well as the 
patrons very courteously treated at all times. 



Frank Taveggia 



AT the southeast corner of Monroe and 14th 
Streets, in the city of Herrin, Taveggia's 
confectionery had stood for a number of years, a 
favorite gathering place for the younger set of the 
city. This popular refreshment resort was estab- 
lished many years ago by Henry Taveggia, who died 
in 1917, and the business was taken in charge by 
his brother, Frank Taveggia, the present owner and 
manager. 

Frank Taveggia was born in Cuggiono, Italy, 
February 20, 1875, and came to America when 



twenty-three years old, first locating in Murphys- 
boro, where he resided for six years, working in the 
mines, and then came to Herrin in 1904. For nine 
years he was manager of the Lombard Society store 
in this city. Two years ago he bought from his 
deceased brother's estate the confectionery. In the 
conduct of the business, he is assisted by his son 
Louis and daughter Mary and Miss Maggie Ellena. 
A sanitary and well kept soda fountain and a 
fresh supply of candies, nuts, cigars and tobaccos 
are always to be found at this place. 



353 




McMinn-Jones Shoe Company 



r PHE only complete shoe store in Herrin is that of 
4 ; McMinn-Jones, which is strictly a shoe store 

dealing in the highest grade footwear for men and 
women, which includes the well known brands of 
Crossett's for men and E. P. Reed, Drew and Johan- 
sen for ladies. 

Gordon McMinn, the Herrin member of the firm, 
was born on a farm near Carterville in 1885, and 
when only 15 years 
of age entered the 
employe of Sharp 
& Roberts, general 
merchants, of Mur- 
physboro, and with 
them 11 years, com- 
ing to Herrin in 
1916, and entered 
the employ of J. 
B. Kahn, where he 
remained for two 
years and then in 
partnership with B. 
M. Jones, train dis- 
patcher of Mur- 
physboro, opened 




the Minn-Jones Shoe Co. The firm from the opening 
day has enjoyed a good patronage, and the fact 
that they sell the best footwear at the very lowest 
prices is winning for them an ever increasing pat- 
ronage. 

Mr. McMinn was married June 1, 1905, to Miss 
Katherin Armstrong, daughter of J. N. Armstrong, 
contractor, of Murphysboro. Mr. McMiniu gives his 

fraternal preference 
to the Elks and K. 
of P. 

This firm has 
demonstrated to a 
certainty that a well 
stocked and care- 
fully managed ex- 
clusive shoe store 
in as small a city 
as Herrin will suc- 
ceed, although be- 
ing established on 
the heels of two un- 
successful attempts 
by others to operate 
such a store. 



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Pete Cardani 



"W70ULD you behold his monument, look 
about you, was said of the great Chris- 
topher Wren, England's immortal architect, 
It may be said with equal felicity of Pete 
Cardani, architect and builder of Herrin. For 
in this city, Mr. Cardani has builded all of 
the big structures put up within the last few 
years and for a number of years has had 
something to do with practically every build- 
ing of any consequence. Among the edifices 
to his credit are the Hippodrome, Hippo- 
drome Annex, Davis Brothers Garage, Com- 
mercial and Boyd hotel, Eph Herrin build- 
ing, all in Herrin, and the postoffice and City 
Hall buildings in Johnston City. 

His honesty, straightforwardness and his 
ability to get things through on schedule time 
as well as his agreeableness with labor have 
all contributed to make him one of the most 



popular and sought-after contractors in this 
end of the state. 

Mr. Cardani was born in Buenos Ayres, 
South America, in 1889, where his father was 
a prominent contractor. At the age of five, 
his parents moved to the province of Lom- 
bardy, Italy, where Pete spent his childhood. 
He came to America alone at the age of 
seventeen and took employment in a brick 
factory in St. Louis, Mo., where he later 
completed his trade as a bricklayer, coming 
to Herrin in 1906. For a time he was a 
member of the firm of Parotti and Cardani, 
later of the firm of Cardani and Williams, 
and some two years ago going in business 
alone. He has just contracted with the 
Masonic lodge of this city to erect their new 
temple in Herrin and several other large 
contracts in this vicinity. 



354 




Harry Fowler, Grocer 



/~\NE of the most modern and sanitary 
^-' grocery stores in Herrin or Williamson 
county is that of Harry Fowler, located at 
200 South Park Avenue, where the most sea- 
sonable vegetables and fresh stock of every- 
thing kept in a first- 
class grocery is to 
be found. 

Mr. Fowler was 
born in Arkansas in 
1880, and came to 
Herrin in 1882 
with his father, who 
was a general con- 
tractor. He received 
his merchandising 
training with the 
Elles Store Com- 
pany, being in 




their employe seven years before starting in 

business for himself. 

As a war worker, assisting in the task of 

backing up the boys at the front, Mr. Fowler 

was very active. Most of his duty was serving 
on the soliciting 
and p u r c h a s ing 
committees of the 
Red Cross and 
other organizations. 
He served Her- 
ron as city treas- 
urer for a term, 
1904-1906. 

He is an active 
member of the Ma- 
sons and Odd Fel- 
lows fraternal 
orders of this city. 



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East Bros. Transfer Company 

OOME four years ago there came to Herrin 
^ W. E. East, one of those who believed 
there was a future in Herrin awaiting him. 
Purchasing a horse and wagon on borrowed 
capital, he started in the transfer business 
and by close attention to the duty and re- 
liable service his business grew rapidly. The 
following year found his business too large 
for horses and wagons, and he purchased his 
first Ford truck and then another machine 
in the same year. 

In four years, the business has grown to 
the extent that two three ton, one two ton 
and one one and a half ton Denby trucks 
besides a team and wagon are required. 

The first of 1919, his brother J. E. East 
bought an interest in the business and the 
name was changed from East Transfer Com- 
pany to East Brothers Transfer Company. 

The present office is- maintained in the 
Jefferson Hotel, but as soon as the new Davis 
Bros. Garage is completed the office will be 
maintained and trucks stored there. 



"mi nun i i i i MIIII i .111:111. .in i mll 

Joe Brenner 

\ VERY important industry at the present time, 
during the high price of shoes, is the shoe 
repairer who makes the old shoes take the place 
of new. Herrin has an expert in this line, Joe 
Brenner, more generally known as "Uncle Joe," who 
has for many years taken a delight in making new 
shoes out of old. 

Mr. Brenner was born in Rockport, Ind., 1861, 
moving to Paducah, Ky., with his parents in 1875. 
where he took up the shoemaking trade when a 
young man. He came to Herrin in 1908, and estab- 
lished himself in his chosen trade. 

The shoe making equipment of "Uncle Joe's" is 
complete in every respect, with all the new elec- 
trical machinery used in modern shoe repair shops. 
Naturally the work is dependable as it has long 
been his pride to have satisfied customers. 

Mr. Brenner was very active here during the war 
period and was always among the first to help put 
over the different activities. 



355 



: 



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Brenner's Home Steam Bakery 



r>RENNER'S HOME STEAM BAKERY was estab- 
lished in Herrin in 1901 by A. F. Brenner, the 
present proprietor and owner. Mr. Brenner was 
brought up in the bakery business, learning the 
business at Paducah, Ky. Upon coming to Herrin 
in 1901, he managed for a time the bakery depart- 
ment for the Elles Store Company, four years later 
establishing the firm that bears his name at 206 
S. Park Avenue, where the parent shop is still 
located. Three years ago the business grew to such 
an extent that Mr. Brenner opened a north side 
bakery at 120 N. 14th Street, and placed Miss Mary 
Schwegman in charge of the business. Both shops 



are equipped with all modern machinery. A con 
tinuous oven of the most improved type, bread mold- 
ing and cake machines are employed in the work. 
The cake department alone employs four men and 
the bread department required five men. This is 
the largest bakery in southern Illinois and supplies 
an immense trade in Herrin and vicinity. Brenner's 
cream bread is a favorite brand in the Coal Belt 
everywhere. At the south side shop, Mr. Brenner 
is assisted in the work by his daughter, Miss Lottie, 
who is head bookkeeper. Two auto trucks are used 
in making city deliveries. The shops enjoy a big 
suburban trade. 




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Jerry Palladino 

/DOMING to Herrin, September 20, 1914, 
^-** from Chicago, where he had been em- 
ployed for several years with the Royal 
Tailors, Jerry Palladino started in the same 
line of business here, and by his close atten- 
tion to business and expert knowledge, he 
has built up an extensive business in clean- 
ing, pressing, altering and custom tailoring. 
Jerry is one of Herrin's most popular citi- 
zens of Italian birth, born in Campagne, 
Italy, and coming to the United States in 
1907. He was married to Miss Geraldine 
Senese, sister of Rev. Fr. Senese, in 1911. 
Mr. and Mrs. Palladino have three children 
Concetta, born May, 1912; Rosa, born 
February, 1914; and Arcadia, born October, 
1916. 

Since locating here Mr. Palladino has 
made many loyal friends and enjoys the 
confidence and respect of all with whom he 
comes in contact. 



Gus Avripas 



/^ US AVRIPAS, dealer in general merchandise 
and groceries, at 216 N. 14th Street in Herrin. 
has been in business in that city since February 7, 
1919, buying out Joe Helleny, who conducted the 
store until that time. Mr. Avripas, by his honest 
dealings and courteous treatment of his patrons, 
has built up a good trade which has increased from 
the time he took over the business. 

He had had some experience in the merchandising 
business, gained in the large store of New York 
City and Chicago, where he resided previous to 
coming to Herrin in 1911. 

He was born in Greece and from a boy dreamed 
of coming to America and grasping the oppor- 
tunities of this great country he had read and 
heard so much about. In 1910 his dream came 
true and he entered the country through the port 
of New York, where he spent some time before 
coming on west. 

He is married and has a family of three children. 
His wife was Miss Sudie Holland before marriage. 

Mr. Avripas had a hrother, Nick Avripas, now 
of Washington. D. C., in the service during the 
war, and he himself did his bit throughout the war 
period. 



356 




Blue Grass Butter Company 




(~)NE of the very necessary business 
institutions of Herrin is the Blue 
Grass Butter Co., located at 208 N. 
14th Street, which has been established 
here about three years. The head office 
of the company is located at Murphys- 
boro, but B. H. King, the president of 
the company, spends considerable of 
his time here. 

This company churn a high grade 
butter which is trade marked "Blue 
Grass," which is strictly a high grade 
creamery butter. The Herrin planl 
maintains modern milk pasteurizing 
machinery and are also large buyers 
of poultry and eggs. 

Besides the Herrin plant this com- 
pany also maintains large stores at 
Murphysboro and Alva. 

Farmers will always be able to 
obtain the very highest prices for milk 
and cream at the Blue Grass Butter 
Company. 

The Herrin employees are Miss 
Katie Shomaker, bookkeeper and milk 
tester; Y. G. Gaines and Joe Brazaitis. 



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Lockos Bros. 

'T'HERE are many good citizens of foreign 
'- birth in Herrin, the class that adopt this 
country as their own, and among such are 
Nick and Louis Lockos, who are proprietors 
of the 0. K. Shining Parlor and hat repair 
works. 

Nick came to the United States in 1906 
and to Herrin in 1909. He has his naturali- 
zation papers. 

Louis came to this country in 1909 and 
to Herrin to join his brother in 1910. He 
has his first papers, and will soon be a full- 
fledged citizen. 

They have a brother, Sam, also a citizen 
of Herrin, who served in the army during 
the late war. They are natives of Greece, 
being born and reared in Batras, Greece. 

The Lockos Brothers are good citizens and 
are examples of the world's greatest melting 
pot that the United States has been proud to 
claim. 



Lee Hand's Laundry 

TTERRIN'S only public laundry today and 
-*--*- throughout the war period was Lee's 
Laundry, located at 116 E. Walnut Street. 
This popular laundry was established by Lee 
Wah, some twelve years ago. He came here 
from Chicago and built up a splendid trade 
which his successor has maintained and 
added to. 

Some two and a half years ago, Lee ob- 
tained the ownership and assumed the man- 
agement of the business. He is quite Ameri- 
canized and in the war period did his bit in 
all war funds and charities. 

Several laundries have been established 
from time to time since this business was 
located, but have soon dropped out and now 
Lee's laundry has a clear field. The reputa- 
tion built up has been founded on good 
workmanship, prompt service and reasonable 
prices. The fact that practically all of the 
work is done by machinery is a feature that 
has long made this laundry preferable. 



357 




Citizens State Bank 



'T'HIS bank, organized in October, 1907, is a very 
popular and strong financial institution of Johns- 
ton City, and as such plays a very important part 
in the upbuilding of Johnston City and community. 
The present officers are: W. H. Grant, president; 
Harry Barlow, vice-president; L. D. Hobbs, cashier; 




and J. S. Evans, assistant cashier. Directors other 
than the officers are: J. H. Felts, Chas. Cazaleen 
and J. D. Lurnaghi. 

L. D. Hobbs, the efficient cashier, is a Williamson 
county product, being reared in Creal Springs, where 
he was railroad agent for some time and later be- 

came auditor. About five 

years ago he became cash- 
ier of the Citizens State 
Bank and previously was 
connected with the Johns- 
ton City Coal Company. 
Mr. Hobbs is a municipal 
leader and at the present 
time mayor of Johnston 
City. He was a tireless 
worker in all war activities 
and acted as Red Cross 
treasurer for some time. 
He is a staunch Republi- 
can and has served his 
party on several occasions. 

Mr. Grant is a well 
known retired farmer. He 
served during the war as 
president of Local Board 
No. 1, and his picture will 
be found in another section 
of the book. 

The last financial state- 
ment of the bank, Sept. 12, 
1919, was as follows: 

RESOURCES Loans and 
discounts, $309,825.85 ; 
Overdrafts, $2,808.21; Lib- 
erty Loan Bonds, $8,200.00; 
Certificates of Indebtedness, 
$5,000.00; War Savings 
Stamps, $834.00; other 
bonds and stocks, $50,- 
369.25; Banking house, fur- 
niture and fixtures, $23,- 
365.41 ; other real estate, 
$910.00; due from banks, 
41,351.46; cash, $34,847.67; 
exchanges, checks and col- 
lections, $1,539.23; total 
resources $553,051.08. 

LIABILITIES Capital stock 
paid in $25,000.00; surplus 
fund, $9,000.00; undivided 
profits (net), $2,955.08; 
deposits, 516,096.08; total 
liabilities, $553,051.08. 



358 





Johnson City Bottling Works 




'T'HIS large business institution was organ- 
ized in 1912 and was later re-organized 
with John Visconti of Carterville as president 
and J. H. Colombo of Johnston City, secre- 
tary and treasurer. 

The Johnston City Bottling Company has 
a very large and ever increasing business. 
With the most modern machinery for its pur- 
poses this plant has a capacity of more than 
five hundred cases of soda water per day 
and also manufactures very high class ginger 
ale. Their ice cream, which is known as 
"Sanataire" ice cream, has met with popular 
favor, and as the ice cream department is 
equipped for five hundred gallons per day 
is proof of the demand for this pure and 



delicious frozen dainty. This company are 
agents of a fine mineral water and distribut- 
ors of Cook's Goldblume, Griesedieck Stag, 
Pape's Product Co. "Jiffy" and National 
Everage "Buck." They have a branch at 
West Frankfort and employ ten people and 
three trucks in the Johnston City plant. 

J. H. Colombo is the son of Bart Colombo 
of Herrin. He graduated from Illinois Uni- 
versity in 1913 and was married to Miss 
Fern Curtis of Champaign in November, 
1913, Mr. and Mrs. Colombo have one daugh- 
ter, Mary, born in 1915. 

Mr. Colombo is a very popular and pro- 
gressive citizen and takes an active interest 
in all municipal affairs. 



359 




Johnson City State Bank 



RGANIZED as a state bank in 1904 with 
a capital of $50,000.00, the Johnston 
City State Bank has become well known in 
banking circles of Williamson County. The 
officers and directors are as follows: Peter 
Wastier, president; A. C. Stiritz, vice-presi- 
dent; W. S. Hardesty, cashier. The directors 
are Peter Wastier, H. J. H. Becker, J. F. 
Becker, A. C. Stiritz, E. M. Stotlar, Ira 



M. Leigh, A. A. Becker. The insert picture 
is that of the president, Peter Wastier. 

This bank is very admirably situated in a 
modern bank building and nicely furnished 
in the most modern style with facilities that 
any bank could be proud of possessing. The 
last financial statement given here shows the 
condition of the Johnston City State Bank 
on the 30th day of June, 1919. 




RESOURCES 

Loans and discounts $365,071.01 

Overdrafts 690.29 

Securities 136,734.00 

Investments 65,000.00 

Banking house, furniture, fixtures 24,729.42 

Furniture 6,725.81 

Other real estate 4,591.47 

Due from other banks 141,215.96 



LIABILITIES 



Capital stock paid in 
Surplus fund 
Undivided profits (net) 
Deposits 



$ 50,000.00 

6,750.00 

6,667.80 

622,840.16 



Total resources 



,257.95 



Total liabilities $686,257.96 



360 




Store 



'"PHIS large general store was established in Johns- 
ton City in 1912 by W. G. Ferges, who came 
here from Herrin where he was engaged in the 
general mercantile 
business. A very 
successful mer- 
chant, he trained 
his two sons, Mark 
and Ray, in the 
business, and upon 
their discharge 
from service in the 
late war, Mark 
serving in the navy 
and Ray in the 
army, their records 
and photographs 
will be found in 
the honor roll sec- 
tion of this history 
w ere put in 
charge of the busi- 
ness, assuming pro- 
prietorship. 

The Ferges Store 
is one of the most 

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complete of its kind, carrying a splendid stock of 
everything in groceries, fruits and produce, and 
all customers are accorded prompt and courteous 

attention. The dry 
goods department 
has a very clean 
and up to date line 
of the best goods 
obtainable. This 
store has won its 
success by adhering 
strictly to the 
policy of handling 
only the best grades 
of goods, selling 
them at the lowest 
consistent prices, 
and by upright and 
enterprising b u s i- 
ness methods. 

Mark and Ray 
are popular busi- 
ness men and, like 
their father, have 
the respect and 
confidence of all. 



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Emit Moroni 



T^MIL MORONI, one of the west side gen- 
eral merchandise stores of Johnston City, 
was born in the city of Cuggioni, Province of 
Milano, Italy, on February the llth, 1888. 
His brothers before him had all come to 
America and in this great land of unlimited 
opportunities succeed and it was early the 
wish of his brother to follow in their tracks. 
Nine years ago he left the old country and 
came to the States. He came direct to Johns- 
ton City, where he joined his brother, Louis 
Moroni, who at that time was in the general 
merchandising business. He was employed 
with his brother for a time, later acquiring 
an interest and in April, 1919, he took over 
the entire business and his brother retired 
from the business, to devote his entire time 
in the theatre business in Johnston City. 
Louie has almost a monopoly of the theatre 
business there and is just now completing a 



handsome theatre building fronting on East 
Broadway. 

Since taking over the business, Mr. Moroni 
has enjoyed a big trade. He has built up his 
business through untiring efforts to please his 
customers and they are today his best adver- 
tisers. He has added much to the line, carry- 
ing a stock of furniture, miners' supplies, 
hardware, stoves and ranges, having some of 
the old line that are nationally advertised. 
He is satisfied with reasonable profits and has 
a good trade among the Italian colony as 
well as the general public in Johnston City 
and vicinity. Satisfaction guaranteed or 
money refunded has been a motto with this 
firm for years and Mr. Moroni makes it a 
practiced rule in the conduct of the business. 

In 1912, Mr. Moroni was married to Miss 
Louisa Lolli of Johnston City. They have 
three children, John, Gracie and Rena. 



361 




S. S. Vick 




ONE of the latest business men of 
^ Johnston City, and in the short time 
he has been a citizen, one of the most 
popular, is S. S. Vick, usually known as 
"Snyder" by his many friends in William- 
son County. Mr. Vick came here in 
1918 from Carterville, disposing of an 
interest in his drug store there to his 
brother, Jay Vick. 

S. S. Vick was born in 1881, the son 
of Dr. J. W. Vick of Carterville. He 
attended the Marion High School and 
then the Northwestern University, 
where he took a special course in chem- 
istry, finishing in 1903, returning to 
Carterville, where he started a new 
drug store and later buying out Joe B. 
Kelley. 

-Mr. Vick was married to Miss Grace 
Davis, daughter of W. T. Davis of 
Marion. 

Mr. Vick is also a partner in the 
Cline-Vick Drug Store at Zeigler, which 
they established in 1918. 

The store at Johnston City is a 
Rexall store, as are all the stores in 
which Mr. Vick is interested. Besides 
the Rexall line of proprietary remedies 
and specialties, he also has the Nyal 
line .which is also composed of a large 
number of remedies meeting the demand 
of a remedy for every purpose ready 
prepared. This drug store is also the 
news headquarters of Johnston City 
all the daily papers and latest maga- 
zines are obtainable. A music room is 
in the rear of the main store, where 
sheet music and musical instruments 
are sold, such as Victor talking ma- 
chinse, latest records, Adam Schaaf and 
Vose pianos and players. 



Co-Operative Association, Inc. 



r 

b J 



TJ EDUCING the cost of living was the occasion 
for organizing the Co-operative Association, Inc., 
of Johnston City. The association was organized 
and incorporated August, 1915, under the Roachdal 
system of co-operative stores, the principle of which 

is to sell mer- , 

chandise at the 
prevailing prices 
and return the 
profits to mem- 
bers in dividends. 
These dividends 
are either pay- 
able in cash or 
stock in the Asso- 
ciation. There are 
at the present 
lime 110 mem- 
bers in the Asso- 
ciation, which is 
a guarantee for 
sufficient custom- 
ers for the store 
to take an impor- 
tant part in the 
affairs of the city. 







The manager of the Association is Noble Bell, a 
very popular young business man who has been 
employed with the Association since its organization, 
first as assistant manager and then manager. Mr. 
Bell has had a great deal of experience in the gen- 
eral merchandis- 
ing business, be- 
ginning his career 
with Joe Williams 
and then seven 
years with Chas. 
Alexander. Mr. 
and Mrs. Bell have 
two children, Ber- 
nard, age 4, and 
Boling, age 2. 

Officers are : Geo. 
Hedley, Pres.; 
T h o s. Cosgrove, 
Sec-Treas. ; Thos. 
Smith. Vice-Pres. 
Directors : Isaac 
Burnley, V. R. 
Wilson, Harry 
Morgan, Robt. 
Wilson and Robt. 
Gobois. 




- v 

Henson and Kenshalo, Attorneys 



HE law firm of Henson & Kenshalo sup- 
plied two recruits for Uncle Sam's army. 
Mr. Ray D. Henson was born Nov. 1, 1893, 
near Vergennes in Jackson County. His 
father, D. H. Henson, moved to Johnston 
City in October, 1896, and has been a resi- 
dent of that city for 
about twenty - three 
years. His only 
son, Ray, grew to 
manhood there and 
after finishing high 
school entered the 
Southern Illinois 
State Normal Uni- 
versity at Carbon- 
dale. After two 
years of work he 
was graduated in 
1912. He then en- 
tered the University 
of Illinois at Ur- 
bana and took up 
the study of law. He finished the law course and 
was awarded his L. L. B. in 1916; was admitted to 
the bar, formed a partnership with D. R. Kenshalo 
and took up the practice of law at Johnston City 
in the early summer of the same year. 

In March, 1917, he applied for a commission in 
the Reserve Corps of the U. S. Army. He was sent 
to the officers' training school at Fort Sheridan; was 
commissioned a Second Lieut. Inf., Aug. 15, 1917; 
was commissioned a First Lieut. Inf., Aug. 24, 1918. 
Discharged March 7, 1919, at Camp Grant. 

He resumed the practice of law with his former 
partner at Johnston City shortly after his discharge. 




Iff LIEUT RAY D.HEMSOM 



iiiiimiimimniii 



-IE other partner of the firm, D. Ralph 
Kenshalo, was born Dec. 9, 1890, near 
Fairfield, Wayne County. 

After finishing the common schools he en- 
tered the Southern Illinois State Normal Uni- 
versity at Carbondale. After four years of 
work he was grad- 
uated in 1913. He 
entered the law 
school of the Uni- 
versity of Illinois 
and was awarded 
the L. L. B. degree 
in 1916. He was 
admitted to the bar, 
formed a partner- 
ship with Ray D. 
Henson and began 
the practice of law 
in Johnston City the 
same year. 

D RALPH KENSHALO His mother, Mrs. 

Tyra Kenshalo, 
lives at Fairfield. He was married May 5, 1917, to 
Miss Edith C. Schroeder of Chester. 

In March, 1917, he applied for a commission in 
the Reserve Corps of the U. S. Army, and was sent 
to the officers' training school at Fort Sheridan. He 
was commissioned a Second Lieut. Inf., Aug. 15, 
1917: was commissioned a First Lieut. Inf.. Aug. 
24, 1918. Discharged March 15, 1919, at Camp 
Devens, Mass. Resumed the practice of law with 
his former partner at Johnston City shortly after 
his discharge. 

Henson & Kenshalo are very popular and active 
in all affairs pertaining to the upbuilding of their 
town and are winning a deserved success. 



W. H. Lannon 



E of the real boosters for Johnston City 
and a man who is active in all affairs 
for the upbuilding of his city, is W. H. Lan- 
non, secretary of the Johnston City Commer- 
cial Club and manager of the Economy Va- 
riety Store, owned by the H. Lancaster Co., 
a corporation owning stores at Du Quoin, 
Marion, Christopher and Johnston City, of 
which Mr. Lannon is vice-president. 

Mr. Lannon was born in 1892 at Creal 
Springs, the son of J. C. and Sarah Lannon. 



He was graduated from high school in 1911 
and taught school and then went to Cali- 
fornia, where he clerked in a store for three 
years, returning to Williamson County and 
engaging in the present business in 1916. 

He was married in 1912 to Miss Bernice 
Odonnell, daughter of F. and Ellen Odonnell 
of Creal Springs. Mr. and Mrs. Lannon are 
the parents of three children, Marie, Kenneth 

Mr. Lannon by his public spiritedness has 
won a host of friends in Johnston City. 



363 




Automotive Sales Company 



HPHE Automotive Sales Company are successors 
of the Frankfort Auto Company, which was 
organized in 1916 by Ralph Mitchell, Robert Medill, 
Charles A. Newton and H. E. Kirkpatrick. Mr. 
Newton was in the service, but upon his discharge 
became the active manager. The firm was reorgan- 
ized and changed to the Automotive Sales Company, 
January, 1919, and the present officers are as fol- 
lows: Chas. A. Newton, president and treasurer; 




H. E. Kirkpatrick, secretary; J. H. Newton, vice- 
president. Charles A. Newton before entering the 
automobile business was employed by the Johnston 
City State Bank and later by the Ernest Coal Com- 
pany. H. E. Kirkpatrick, formerly manager, was 
employed by the Ernest Coal Company and previous 
to that was in the insurance business. J. H. New- 
ton, father of Charles A. Newton, is the newest 
member of the firm acquiring an interest when re- 
organizing, is a retired farmer. 

The Automotive Sales Company do 
a very extensive business and are 
among the largest dealers in automo- 
biles in southern Illinois. They have 
the agency of several automobiles, de- 
pending at times on the ability of 
manufacturers to make deliveries, but 
always have cars that they can recom- 
mend and guarantee. They also sell 
trucks, tractors, and the famous Curtis 
aeroplanes. 

The members of this firm are all 
well known business men and natives 
of the community, They are reliable, 
and are safe people to do business with 
and the automobile public is giving 
them extensive patronage, 



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Friedman's Department Store 



T^HE large department store pictured here 
- was established in 1904 by I. Friedman, 
who came to Johnston City from St. Louis. 
In 1910 it was necessary to increase the floor 
space by two additional rooms and in 1915 
the third room was added. This large depart- 
ment store handles everything in the ladies' 
and gents' ready-to-wear apparel 
and also a large and varied as- 
sortment of dry goods of every 
description. 

Mr. Friedman has associated 
with him his son, Isadore, age 
twenty years, who was in the 
service from August, 1918, until 
March, 1919, five months of 
which was spent in the navy and 
two months in the reserve officers' 
training school. 

Mrs. Friedman is also very 
active in the business and is a 



valued assistant to her husband. This large 
business has been created by giving the 
public big values for their money. 

The citizens of Johnston City and vicinity 
have shown hteir appreciation of this large 
bargain center by extending a most liberal 
patronage from which it has builded. 




3G4 



j3 




Jones Drug Company 



'"PHIS drug store is one of the largest and most 
complete in Williamson county, and was pur- 
chased by John W. Jones and Ira E. Jones from 
Potter Bros., December, 1917. 

The Jones brothers are progressive citizens John 
W. was with the Central Illinois Public Service Co. 
for about - - years, and Ira W. was formerly 
connected with the weekly "Progress," and mail 
carrier on the rural 
route. They are real 
business men and well 
qualified to conduct a 
business such as the 
Jones Drug Co. They 
employ an expert phar- 
macist for their pre- 
scription department. 

The store is complete 
in every respect with 
handsome fixtures and 
modern soda fountain 
equipment. A com- 
plete stock of drugs 
for every purpose al- 
ways fresh and of the 




i mini IIIIIMIII 



highest quality dispensed by an expert; the popular 
line of Pensular family remedies and all other pro- 
prietory remedies to meet the wishes of the public; 
a large assortment of books and all kinds of sta- 
tionery, toilet goods, candies and cigars, in fact every- 
thing found in a high class drug store. 

A nice music room in connection, with an entrance 
at 104 South Washington, is maintained. Here are 
the Edison and Co- 
lumbia graphophones. 
Kimball player pianos 
and other leading 
makes of pianos, sheet 
music, records, and 
everything for the 
lover of music. 

The ever increasing 
business of the Jones 
Drug Co. is proof of 
their popularity and 
business ability. Don't 
forget to call No. 83 
when they can be of 
service in any of their 
varied lines. 

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Ben L. Baiar 

J^OCATED at 109 S. Washington Street, Ben L. 
Baiar, the popular dealer in buggies, wagons 
and farm implements, has been in business since 
November 15, 1915. 

Mr. Baiar is the son of J. A. Baiar, a prosperous 
farmer of Lake Creek Township. He is one of the 
most popular business men of Johnston City, and 
at present secretary of the Johnston City Red Cross 
Chapter. He took a very active interest in all war 
work and was the leader of the Johnston City drum 
corps which was active during the war and made 
special trips to Marion to escort the boys when 
they went away. 

The stock of harness in his store is very complete 
and varied and one can find everything necessary 
for horse furnishings. Farm implements of every 
description are sold and kept in stock, and nothing 
but the best guaranteed buggies and wagons are 
sold here. Selling at small profits and the best of 
everything has won for Mr. Baiar a large and in- 
creasing patronage. 



Charles Cazaleen 

'"PHE subject of this sketch is a native of Italy, 
born November 11, 1870, at Rivalba, province 
of Torine. He came to the United States in 1889 
and first located at Coral City, where he worked in 
the mines and at railroad work for ten years, and 
later in Elkville and Braidwood, coming to Johnston 
City in 1899 and engaged in business until 1912 
and for a time in the bakery business. 

Mr. Cazaleen is at present and for about seven 
years engaged in real estate and insurance business. 
He is a notary public and represents the Italian 
consul in this district, besides a steamship agency 
where he obtains transportation for foreign ' travel 
on all lines. 

He was very active in home work during the war 
and was chairman of the legal advisory board. A 
prominent Republican in politics, he has for a num- 
ber of years served as precinct committeeman. He 
is one of the directors of the Citizens State Bank. 

Mr. Cazaleen's family consists of a wife and 
three children. He is a respected citizen, actively 
identified with all public activities. 



365 





.Side Drug Co. 



'TPHE West Side Drug Company is a 
co-partnership of Dr. L. H. Green 
and J. L. Love, which was consum- 
mated May 15, 1919. Dr, Green came 
to Johnston City from Cambria about 
five years ago and in the short time 
built up a wonderful practice, but of 
course like most patriotic physicians, 
when possible, enlisted in the service 
bf his country, being commissioned as 
first lieutenant, medical corps. 

Mr. Love is well known in business 
circles of Williamson County having 
been for thirteen years traveling audi- 
tor for the Madison Coal Corporation. 

This drug store is very modern in 
every respect and is equipped with a 
most modern soda fountain and up-to- 
date drug store fixtures of every kind. 
A specialty is made of the Red Cross 
and Dike's line of family remedies. 
This drug store also has the distinction 
of having the largest line of toilet 
preparations in southern Illinois besides 
the full line of family remedies and 
drugs, they are selling the Aeolian and 
Vocalion line of phonographs. 

The persons shown in picture are: 
J. L. Love, Kile Morris. Jean Leigh and 
Chas. S. Ingham, from left to right. 



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D. H. Henson 



'T'HE D. H. Henson Grocery Company began busi- 
ness in its present location in 1901. The owner, 
Mr. D. H. Henson, was born on Jan. 17th, 1855, 




near Vergennes in Jackson County, Illinois. He 
followed farming and the merchandise business in 
Jackson County until 1896, when he moved to Johns- 
ton City, Illinois. Here he was engaged 
in farming and mining until 1901. 

His grandfather, Mr. Benjamin Hen- 
son, was a pioneer of Kentucky. He 
afterwards moved to Illinois and set- 
tled near Grand Tower. Here Mr. Ben- 
jamin Henson, Jr., who was the father 
of D. H. Henson, was born in 1819. 

Mr. Henson and Carrie J. Campbell, 
a daughter of William Campbell, were 
united in marriage in July, 1877. To 
them were born five children, Mrs. 
William Pugh, Mrs. Ora Baiars, Mrs. 
Myrtle Crisenberry, Miss Sylvia and 
Ray D. Henson. 

During the great war Mr. Henson 
was the able and efficient president of 
the Johnston City Chapter of the 
American Red Cross. 

He contributed quite a little time and 
very generously in money in all war 
activities that were required to help 
win the war and none worked more 
unselfishly than he did. 



JM! 



I If II 
\ V, \\ 




Williamson County's Largest Mercantile Industry 



ELLES STORE CO. 
1897-1919. 

IN 1871, the first railroad was compl