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Full text of "Windham County, Conn., business directory ; containing the names, business and location of all the business men in the county, agricultural, manufacturing, and other statistics, with a history of each town"

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WINDHAM COUNTY 



CONN. 



^itsineBB ^irettorg 



-CONTAINING^ THE 



Mames, Business and location of aSI tlie Business 
Men in tlie Conniy, Agricultural, Man- 
ufacturing, and otiier statistics. 



WITS A 






PRINTED AT THE 

WINDHAM COUNTY TRANSCRIPT OFFICE, 
WEST KILLINGLY,— 1861. 



F/oz 



In presenting to the public for the first time a Business 
Directory of Windham County, it would perhaps be too much 
to hope that it will prove entirely free from errors. No pains 
have been spared on the part of the compilers to effect this end, 
and it is believed to be in all points nearly if not perfectly 
correct. The statistics have been carefully prepared from the 
returns of the last census and will be of great interest to every 
intelligent citizen of the county. The historical sketches are 
by citizens of the different towns and contain many interest- 
ing facts. 

To friends who have aided in the preparation, the compilers 
would give their most hearty thanks. 

Danielsonville, August 1861. 




A SKETCH 



-0 r- 



WINDHAM COUNTY. 



Windham County, consisting of the towns of Ashford, Brook- 
lyn, Canterbury, Chaplin, Eastford, Hampton, Killingly, Plain- 
field, Pomfret, Putnam, Scotland, Sterling, Thompson, Yolun- 
town, Windham and AVoodstock, occupies the north-eastern cor- 
ner of the State of Connecticut. Its surface has the general 
character of Eastern New England, a broken country without 
any high elevation, well watered by numerous brooks or small 
rivers, with some good farming land, and much that is sandy 
and stony, where a living must be obtained by hard labor if 
drawn from the soil. 

There is good land in the county. Parts of the towns of 
Woodstock, Thompson, Pomfret, Brooklyn and Canterbury 
present a connected body of as good land as we need wish for, 
and other detached portions are not inferior, while facilities for 
transportation and convenience to markets will render the far- 
ming interest always a leading one in the county. Its first 
settlers were farmers, and its present inhabitants are worthy 
children of sires who brought these beautiful hills and valleys 
from savage wildness to their present high state of cultivation. 
The farmers of the county, are live men and all the improvements 
of modern agriculture, both in implements and fertilizers, are 
freely used by them. In no part of New England or the coun- 



8 . WINDHAM COUNTY. 



'try can be found better houses or farms, more substantial walls 
and fences, cleaner fields or more excellent grades of cattle 
than in parts of this county. Such farming as may be found 
here is an honor to the men and the county. 

Yet there may stilly once in a while, be found an old-fashion- \ \ 
ed farmer,who holds fast to his father's and grandfather's ways, j ! 
and thinks all modern changes and improvements, humbug. — ii 
Such a man may gensrally be known by his poor barns, broken 
fences, wooden ploughs, Jong-nosed pigs and slab-sided cattle. 
He never takes an agricultural paper nor buys a mowing ma- 
chine. He dislikes gu^no, and thinks improved stock all a 
cheat. No trees or flowers grow round his house ; his children 
leave home, as soon as they can, to escape the drudgery of the 
farm. Let all, who desire the best interests of the county, be 
thankful that the number of such farmers is small and is daily 
growing less. 

Much of the interest in improved farming throughout the 
county is due to the influence of various agricultural societies, 
and especially to the County Society. Such institutions can- 
not be too highly valued or too heartily supported by the far- 
mers of the county. 

The statistics to be found in another part of this book, present 
many facts interesting to the farmers of the county, and can- 
not be carefully studied without profit. 

There are two branches an attention to which has often been 
urged upon the farmers of this county, in which there would 
seem still to be room for improvement — sheep culture and or- 
chards. The great obstacle in the way of the former is- the 
number of useless dogs which renders the keeping of sheep a 
very uncertain branch of farming. Many acres of land are 
lying idle, enough to pasture thousands of sheep, and wool and 
mutton will pay for the raising especially on such lands. It 
seems a pity that a good dog law can not be enforced and an 
animal so profitable as the sheep be more extensively kept. 



WINDHAM COUNTY. 9 



But orchards all may have. There are thousands of acres 
of land in the county which could be laid out in orchards with 
the greatest ease, and which when thus cultivated will yield a 
surer and more profitable return than any other part of the 
farm. In many respects the climate of New England seems 
to be changing, and some fruits, as peaches, are not as sure to 
thrive as they once were, but as good apples and pears can be 
raised here as any where, and good fruit can always be sold 
or consumed on the farm. 

The cultivated and uncultivated land as well as the differ- 
ent crops will be observed by the table to vary considerably in 
the different towns. Doubtless there is yet much land which 
will one day by draining and cleaning be made more product- 
ive than at present, still there will always be waste land, 
rocky and sterile. If every farmer will strive to improve his 
land, his buildings, and his stock, our farming can be made 
more pleasant and more profitable, and our young men will 
remain at home instead of going to cities, or anywhere to be 
away. The true farmer has a good gfCrden, is not ashamed to 
cultivate flowers to adorn his residence, and does not consider 
corn, oats, and hay the chief ends of living. May the number 
of such be increased and we may be sure that although other 
interests may make more noise and stir, still for years to come, 
as for years past, agriculture must be the leading pursuit of 
the county. 

But nature seems to have designed to add other pursuits to 
farming. Lying as the county does between and by means of 
railroads and boats> easily accessible to great cities, it possesses 
in its vast water power a mine of inexhaustible wealth. The 
Quinebaugand Slfetucket rivers have in their course many feet 
of fall, while numerous branches, large and small, furnish many 
other excellent privileges. These advantages were early seen, 
and for years manufacturing, mostly of cotton, has been a 
leading interest of the county. 

1# 



10 WINDHAM COUNTY. j 

, - i 

The first mill for the manufacture of cotton built in the ' 

county was erected in the year 1807 by a corporation called !' 

the Pomfret Manufacturing Company, on the site of the mill I 

owned by E. Wilkinson in the present town of Putnam. The ' 

next was in Plainfield at the present Tillage of Almyville, }, 

built in 1!l08. The 3d was in Danielsonville, built in 1809. j 

Both of these last building*! are standing as when first erected, i 

Since the construction of the Norwich & Worcester and Prov- j ' 

idence 4* Hartford and New London 4 Willimantic Railroads, i; 

this interest has vastly increased, and there are still many ! • 

unoccupied privileges where one day will echo the sound of the l^ 

loom and shuttle. \ 

Other manufactures than those of cotton are fonnd in the | 

I -county though to rather a limited extent. The statistics of i 

manufacturing as well as of farming will be found of great | 

interest, \ 

I The history of the county is yet to be written. The sketch- 
es of the different towns in this work give some of the facts ' 
of its early settlements. Many interesting incidents which ' 
might have been obtained a few years ago are lost forever, j 
The aged men,the fathers, are fast passing away. Town histo- 
ries are now in preparation in a number of towns in the j 
county, and it is to be hoped will fix permanently many of j: 
these fleeting memorials of the past, '' 
We can form no correct estimate of the hardships endu- i 
red by those early settlers to whom we owe this fair inheri- I 
tance. Their struggles and privations, great as they were, |; 
were cheerfully borne; they labored and we reap the fruits of 
their labors. The History of the county is not without its j; 
great names. Here Putnam lived and died, and many sons j| 
have gone out to do honor to themselves and to- her in difi^erent i I 
parts of the world. Their names belong to her record, and it [ | 
will be the province of the future historian to gather them up. 
It is beyond the limits of this work. 



WINDHAM COUNTY. 11' 

The future of the county may be read in its past. Its 
enterprise and intelligence, its industry and economy, must 
bring prosperity notwithstanding temporary reverses, and 
when all its resources shall be developed, all its capabilities 
cultivated to their fullest extent, no son of hers, either at 
home or abroad, need blush to own the place of his birth. 



OF 

WINDHAM COUNTY. 

1861.. 




AsMord 
Brooklyn,. 
Canterbury 
Chaplin,. . . 
Eastford,.. 
Hampton,. 
Killingly, . 
Plainfield, . 
Pomfret, . . 
Putnam,.. . 
Sterling, .. 
Scotland, . 
Thompson, 
Voluntown, 
Windham, 
Woodstock 



10 
9 
12 
7 
8 
7 

18 

14 

10 

7 

9 

5 

13 

10 

11 

17 



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Numbe 

Childr 

between 

16yrsof 


Amount 
Divid 
at $1 
pro ra 


^2 
oj ■■;:i 


11 


509 


$355 35 


5 




522 


600 30 


36 




427 


491 05 




16 


199 


228 85 




1 


295 


339 25 




12 


194 


223 10 


3 






1178 


1,354 TO 


27 






881 


1,013 15 


24 






354 


407 10 


16 






726 


834 90 




18 


291 


234 65 


26 




158 


181 70 




7 


866 • 


895 90 


15 




337 


387 55 




5 


1079 


1.240 85 


28 




805 


925 75 


.. 




r 



GENERAL REMARKS. 



AVhole number of Towns in Connecticut January, 1861, 161 

" " School Districts, 1,624 

" ** Children between 4 and 16, 108,389 

Capital of School Fund, $2,050,460 

From the ninth Annual Report of the State Pteform School, (lo- 
cated in Meriden,) May, 1861, it appears that Windham County sent 
4 to this Institution duriiig the past year, and previous years, 8,— 
Total from Windham County during 9 years, 12. 



STATISTICS OJ? 

BIRTHS, MARRIAGES AND DEATHS. 

The following table is compiled from, the annual report- of 
the State Librarian, and includes the year ending Dec. 31 1860. 



Towns 


Population 


|. Births 
31 


Marriages 


Deaths 


Ashford. - - - 


1231 


4 


•31 


Brooklyn. - 
Canterbury. - - 


2132 
1592 


5a 

32 


9 

6 


35 

20 


Chaplin. - - - 
Eastford. - - - 


788 
1006 


21 

27 


8 
5 


14 
15 


Hampton. 


989 


23 


7 


19 


Killingly. 


4960 


135 


60 


92 


Plainfield. - . 


3665 • 


78 


40 


53 


Pomfret. - - - 


1660 


35 


~ 


27 


Putnam. - - - 


2208 


65 


26 


57 


Scotland, - - ~ 


735 


11 


10 


8 


Sterling. - - - 


1050 


20 


4 


14 


Thompson. 
Voluntown. - - 


3995 
1061 


51 

27 


40 

8 


28 
22 


Windham. - - 


4261 


114 


48 


76 


Woodstock. - - 


3285 


72 
795 


17 

299 


31 


Total, 


34618 


542 



It appears from this Table that in this county there was one 
death to every 63 87-100 of its inhabitants. This compares i 
favorably with other counties in the State — Fairfield,, with the , 
least mortality, losing one in 68 80-100, and Middlesex; with- 
the greatest, losing one in 51 72-100 of its inhabitants. 

Of the 542 "deaths in this county, 293 were of those under 5 
years of age. Of the whole number, 77 died of consumption, , 
being about one in seven, or if those under 5 years of age die(^i 
of diseases peculiar to children, one third of the adults died of 
consumption. 



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MANUFACTUHING STATISTICS OF WINDHAM COUNTY. ' 


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Quantities manufactured 
700000 yards prints 

660000 yards sheeting 
260000U yards sheeting 
900000 yards sheeting 
624000 milling 9 tons yarn 
30000 yards satinet 
1830000 vards sheeting 
225,000 yards satinet 
100000 lbs twine 
1850000 yds shirting 
7400 )0 yards prints 
900000 'yards sheeting 
120000 lbs batting 
195000 yards satinets 
250000 cassimeres 
120000 yards kerseys 
352000yds wp 73200 Ibthd 
500000 yards warp 
830 )00 yards prints 
1700000 yards sheeting 
5000 bales twine 
15000 yards cassimeres 
225000 yards of sheeting 
416000 yards sheeting 
1720000 yards sheeting. 


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Eist Killingly 

Killingly 

Moosup 

Moosup 

Killingly 

North Stonington 

South Woodstock 

Putnam 

Thompson 

Canterbury 

Central ViUage . 

East Killingly 

West Killingly 

Killingly 

North Stonington 
Willimantic 

East Killingly 
Fisherville 
South Woodstock 
Woodstock Valley 
Ce.itral Village 
Canterbury 
Putnam 


Alexander Mill . . 
Attawaugan Mill, 
Ames, James B. • . 
Almy, Sampson . 
Ballou, Leonard . , 
Briggs, Spencer & Co. 
Cocking, L. & Son . 
Cutler, E. A.— 2 mills, 
Capron, L. . . . . 
Crandall Hezekiah 

Central Co 

Chestnut Hill Mill, . 
Danielson Minuf'g Co. 
Danielson Batting Mill, 
Dexter Mill, . . . 
Dellabare, E, . . . 
Dixon, R. H. . . . 
Dunham Manuf. Co. . 
Eagle Warp Co. . . 
Elliot Mills Co. . . 
Fisherville Co. . . 
Harris Bros. . . . 
Kenyon, Joseph & Son. 
Kennedy Mdl 
Leavens, J. & Son, . 
Morse, M. A. & Co. . 



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Capital 

^^00,000 

5,000 

24,000 

50,000 

14,000 

350,0(.0 
25,000 
15,000 
50,000 
0,600 
25,000 
2,000 

16(1,000 

8,000 

40,000 

15,000 

8,000 

35,000 

225,(100 
30,000 

20(1, 0"0 

375,000 
16,000 

200,000 

125,000 
40,000 
30,000 






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1 Quantities manufactured 
20C0ii0 yar*is satinets 
1900000 3 a. ds sheeting 
40000 dcz spools tliread 
*40000 yards sheeting 
986000 yards sheeting 
100000 lbs twine 
4664830 yards sheeting 
821000 yards sheeting 
127000 lbs yarn 
LOOUOO yards sheeting 
77000 lbs yarn 
500000 yards sheeting 
40000 lbs twine 
tl£08000 yd sheet & prints 
312000 yards sheeting 
435000 yards satinets 
195000 yards satinets 
7500 bales twine 
31000 bales twine 
10000 caees thread 
t500000 yards sheeting 
§7000 lO yards sinrtings 
3.;00000 yOsfheet & shirt. 
40 :)()Oi)yiirds sliceting 
162(JOOO yards sheeting 
1200000 yds prints & do 
630000 yards sheeting 
750900 yards sheeting 


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Spindles 

170) 

13500 

4000 
2000 
18000 . 
3100 
2500 
2000 
1000 
1500 

19000 

1000 

900 

700 

8000 
1600 

22r)00 
2300 
5700 
5600 
2500 
3500 




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1 





18 COUNTY OFFICERS, &C. 

COMMISSIONER?,. 

Geo. Buck, Putna'oi ; Henry WyV\e, Vol unto wn; Samuel 
Bingham, Windham. 

CLERK. OF COURTS, 

Uriel Fuller, .... Brooklyn. 

STATE ATTORNEY. 
Gilbert W . Phillips, (pro tern.) - Putnam. 

SHERIFF. 

David Greenslit, - - - Hampton. 

DEPUTY SHERIFFS. 

_. John A. Murphy,. Ashford ; Lysander Warren, West Kil- 

^^wg'iy ; Prescott May, Putnam ; Walter Bates, Thompson ; 

R. Do .vison, Willimantic. 

Depmty Jail-'R — John S. Searls, - - Brooklyn. 

CoryNTY Treasuueii — Edwin Newbury, - Brooklyn. 

D.'^PDTY Surveyor — John W. Trowbridge, - Eastford. 



Thompson Bank, (Thompson.) Talcott Crosby, President. 
Theodore F. Sharpe, Cashier. Capital, $70,000. 

Windham County Bank, (Brooklyn.) John Gallup, 2d, 
President. A. F. Fisher, Cashier. Capital, $106,000. 

Windham Bank, (Windham.) Henry S. Walcott, President. 
Samuel Bingham Cashier. Capital, $100,000. 



Windham County Mutual Fire Insurance Company, (Brook- 
lyn.) A. H. Storis, President. John Palmer, Secretary. 



Windham County Agricultural Society, located at Brooklyn. 
Its annual exhibition for 1861. will be held on (he 1 th, 19th 
and 20th of September. Apollos Richmond, President. — 
James B. VVhitconib, Recording Secretary, Brooklyn. Charles 
Mathewson, Corresponding Secretary, Pomfret 

Woodstock Agricultural Society. Its annual exhibition will 
be held at Arnold Town, (so-called,) on the of 

September. Horace Sabin, President. Joseph McClelian, 
Corresponding Secretary. E. C. May, Recording Secretary. 



LAWYERS. 


19 


X^A.TI^YEIftS. 


i 


NAMES. 


ADDRESS. 


Arnold, Joel R. 


Willimantic. 


Burriham, A. A, 


Windham. 1 


Cundall, Edward L. ' ;# 


West KiUingly. 


Clark, Edwards 


Windham, 


Cleveland, Chaiincey F. 


Hampton. 


Dyer. William 


Central Village. 


Fuller, Uriel 


Brooklyn. 


Frost, Daniel • 


Canterbury. 


Graves, Thomas E. 


Thompson. j 


flolbrook. John 


Abington. [ 


Hibbard, Calviu 


Windham. 


Johnson, Harrison 


Putnam. 


Lyon, Judson M. 


Woodstock. 


Martin, Earl [ - 


West Killingly. 


Phillips, G. w; 


Putnam. 1 


Penrose, John J. 


Central Village. 


Eichmond, Jared D.- 


Ashford. 


Stoddard, Geo. S. F. - 


Woodstock. 


1 Sumner, Elliott B. 


Wilhmantic. 


Tyler, Daniel P. 


Brooklyn. 


Williams, John F. 


W. Woodstock. 

1 

1 



20 


CLERGYMEN, 


J 


oi.er<3-y]>xe:]v. 


1 


NAMES. 


I>EN0MINATION. 


ADDRESS. i 


Adams, N. T. • 


Baptist, 


Willimantic, | 


j Aldrich, Justus 


" 


East Killingly. 


Ayer, Chas. 


Cong. 


Collamer. ! 


i Adams, C. C. 


Meth, 


Eastford. j 


Bosworth, L. A. 


w 


Canterbury. i 


Bachelcr, F. E. M. 


Cong. 


Killingly. 


"Benedict, W. A. 


(I 


Plainfield. 


Barrows, Sylvester 


Baptist, 


Brooklyn. 


Beatley, E. D. 


(C 


Willimantic. 


Branch, N. 


u 


W. Woodstock. 


Brown, Joseph P. 


c< 


Moosup, 


Burleigh, L. 


(( 


Central Village 


Burnham, Alfred 


Christian, 


Hampton. | 


I Conant, H. W. 


3Ieth. 


Putnam. | 


Case, John W. 


u 


W. Thompson. 


Camp, R. 


Episcopal, 


Brooklyn, 


Carpenter, Henry 


Advent, 


West Killmgly. 


Channiug, George G> 


Unitar. 


Brooklyn, 


Chamberlin C. 


Cong. 


Eastford, 


1 Dunning, Andrew 


<< 


Thompson. 


1 Button, Thomas 


((. 


Ashford, 


! Davenport, W. W. 


u 


West Killingly. 


j Ela, Walter 


Meth. 


E. Thompson. , 


1 Eldridge, R. B. 


Christian, 


Hampton. 1 


Fulton, Hugh 


Baptist, 


Ashford. ! 


Grosvenor, Lemuel 


Cong. 


Woodstock. 


i Gregory, H.T. 


Episcopal, 


Thompson. 


i Grosvenor, C. P. 


Cong. 


Canterbury. 


Greenslitt, Henry 


Christian, 


Scotland. 


Hunt, Daniel 


Cong. 


Pomfret. 


Heald, Jesse E. 


Episcopal, 


Central A^illage. j 


Horton, S. J. 


<< 


Windham. 


Huntington, Thomas 


Advent, 


Brooklyn. 


Kellen, Wm. 


Meth. 


Willimantic. 



1 ....-- 

CLERGYMEN PHYSICIANS. 21 


Matthewson, P. E. 


Baptist, 


Thompson. 


Morse, B. S. 


(. 


(( 


Pratt, E. H. 


Cong. 


E. Woodstock. 


Palmer, A. 


Meth. 


West Killingly. 


! Ramsdell, H. S. 


It 


Putnam. 


Randall. H. S. 


Cong. 


East Putnam. 


Randall, Henry C. 


' Epis. 


Pomfret. 


Stanley, Edwin S. 


Meth. 


Fisherville. 


Sessions, J. W. 


Cong. 


W. Woodstock. 


Stone, Oilman 


Baptist, 


N. \shford. 


Seymour, Chas. N. 


Cong. 


Brooklyn. 


Smith, Henry B. 


(( 


Abington. 


Soule, Geo. 


(( 


Hampton. 


Stearns, Geo, I. 


i( 


Windham. 


Tillotson, Geo. J. 


C( 


Putnam 


' Tefft, A. B. 


Baptist, 


Voluntown. 


White, John, 


Cong. 


N. Woodstock. 


Wil.'ard, S. G. 


{< 


Willimantic. 


1 Williams, Francis 


<i 


Chaplin. 


1 Walker, B. M. 


Meth. 


Moosup. 


Winsor, Samuel A. 


<( 


E. Woodstock. 


I>HYSIOIAIVS. 


Avery, C. S. 




Windham 


1 Bennett. Wm. A. 




Willimantic. 


Bennett, 




Westford 


Baldwin, Elijah 




Canterbury 


Barber, Smith 




<( 


Burgess, Frank S. 




Moosup. 


Bromley, Calvin B. 




Scotland 


Barstow, G. F. 




Putnam. 


Bradley, Ichabod 




u 


Bradford, Milton 




West Woodstock 


Cogswell, W. H. 

JL - 


#2 


Plainfield 



22 PHYSICIANS. 


i 
1 


Campbell, Harvey 


Voluntown 


Dean, David B. 


Eastford 


Dixon, Lewis E. 


Moosup 1 


Gallup, Albert 


Voluntown j 


Hunt, Cliester 


Windham ! 


Huntington, T. 


Brooklyn { 


Hughes, Dyer 


Hampton 


Hammond, Justin 


Killingly ' 


Hovoy, Daniel A. 


South " 


Hutchins/ Samue) 


West 


Hall, David E. 


(( u 


Holt, Hiram 


Pomfret 


Holbrook, Lowell 


Thompson 


Johnson, B. R. 


West Killingly 


Lewis' Wm. A. 


Sterling Hill 


McGregor, John 


Thompson 


Marcy, Lorenzo 


Woodstock 


Martin, J. W. 


West Killingly 


Otis, Wm. K, 


Willimantic 


Plimpton, D. B. 


Putnam 


Palmer, Joseph 


Canterbury 


Bobbins, Elisha K. 


Eastford 


Rogers, Charles H, 


Central Village 


Simmons, John H. 


Ashford 


Whitcorab, J. B. 


Brooklyn 


Woodbridge, Wm 


(( 


Witter, Orrin 


'Chaplin 


Witter, Orrin Jr., 


« 


Williams, Lewis 


Pomfret 


Witter, Asa 


North Wooditock. 



HISTORY OF ASHFORD 



The town of Ashford, embracing the present towns of 
Ashford and Eastford, was laid out as a township hj the Col- 
onial Legislature, in 1706. It was described as a tract of 
land six miles square, lying west of Pomfret, which was already 
settled and named, and north of Mansfield. The settlement of 
the town did not commence till 1710, when two families moved 
into its present limits. kSome authorities state that pioneers 
settled here as early as 1706. The inhabitants had so in- 
creased in 1714, that they petitioned the Legislature to be in- 
corporated as a town, which petition was granted. 

The history of the town has been marked by no incidents of 
great interest. Its character is that of a quiet, moral town, 
mostly interested in farming, with a people retaining many of 
the tastes and feelings of the past, which have been lost in 
towns brought into more intimate connection with modern 
changes. 

We give a tradition of its early times, indicative not of 
this town merely, but of the feeling in Connecticut, generally. 

"A concourse of people were assembled on the hill in front 
of the meeting house, to witness the punishment of a man 
who had been convicted of neglecting to go to meeting on the 
Sabbath for a period of three months. According to the ex- 
isting law for such delinquency, the culprit was to be publicly 
whipped at the post. Just as the whip was about to be applied, 
a stranger on horseback appeared, rode up to the crowd of 
spectators, and inquired for what purpose they were assembled. 



24 ASHFORD. 



Being informed of the state of the case, the strange gentleman 
rose upright in his stirru^DS, and with emphasis addressed the 
astonished multitude as follows : 'You men of Ashford, serve 

God as if the D 1 was in you ! Do you think you can 

whip the grace of God into men ? Christ will have none but 
volunteers.' The people stared, while the speaker, probably 
not caring to be arraigned for contempt of court, put spurs to 
his horse, and was soon out of sight ; nor was he ever more 
seen or heard of by the good people ot Ashford." 

A description of Ashford, as written by a native of the 
place, says : — 

"The traveller, on arriving at Ashford, is greeted by no 
imposing spectacle. From the distant hill, as he approaches, 
he sees no ancient towers, nor, as he enters the old town, dots 
he meet with walled environs and a grand entry. Even in 
Spartan days, or in feudal times, the virtue and ihe hospitality 
which characterize such inhabitants, would have dispensed with 
walls and bulwarks. The simple view of a meeting house, an 
academy, two taverns, a cluster of neat dwellings, and sur- 
rounding scenery not particularly attractive, leaves no enduring 
impression upon the mind of the indifferent sojourner, who, 
after a night's repose or a well prepared meal, tenders a sin- 
cere farewell to his obliging host, and resumes his seat in the 
post coach. But he who would enjoy the native attractions 
of the place must be at leisure, and not wholly disinterested. 
Some strong tie, like that of consanguinity should be thrown 
around him. In fine he must be a good pedestrian. If he 
have these prerequisites, he may leave the turnpike and traverse 
a northern section of the township, where he shall find a region 
I worthy to have been the nursery of the eagle spirit of a 
' Knowlton. He shall stroll complacently among the pines 
I which embower the rocky upland and his eye shall dilate upon 
I the landscape, as viewed from the topmost shelf of the storm- 
beaten crag. He turns from this species of scenery, to anoth- 



ASHFORD. 25 



er not less enchanting. He may leave the mountain 
for the plain, and make his wa^ through the thickly wooded 
valley, where wanders the rivulet, which is destined, ere 
its waters reach the ocean, to bear a navy on its bosom. — 
Among these solitudes, he may recognise the streams 
among which, when a boy, he angled for dace and trout. And 
here, as the shades of the spreading beech falls upon the stream, 
a corresponding shade of melancholy may fall upon his heart, 
as memory recurs to his early friends and associates." 

Col. Thomas Knowlton, whose name is familiar to every rea- 
der of American history, was a native of this place, and was 
among the first who rallied around the standard of American 
Independence. He was originally a Captain in the regiment 
rais:d by Gen. Putnam, and his name appears as commander 
of a fatigue party of two hundred, on the expedition to fortify 
Bunker Hill, In the next February, Col. Knowlton, then hol- 
ding the rank of Major, by the express command of Washing- 
ton, with one hundred men, crossed to Charlestown on the ice, 
and in the face of a heavy fire, destroyed some storehouses oc- 
cupied by the British, and brought off their guns, without losing 
a man. He was in the unsuccessful^ campaign on Long Island, 
and accompanied the army afer the evacuation of New York, 
On the morning of the 16th of September, 1776, while enga- 
ged in a skirmish with a party of British, leading his men with 
the same intrepid'ty he exhibited at Bunker Hill and all the 
way through his short and brilliant career, he fell, pierced with 
balls. He was regarded by Washington and his fellow soldiers, 
as one of the most promising ofiicers in the army, and his loss 
was deeply felt and lamented. 

Ashford was early divided into two ecclesiastical societies, 
and in 1847 one of them, Eastford, was incorporated as a town, 
so that the early history of these towns is the same. 

The first settled minister in Ashford was Rev. James Hall, 
ordained in 1718, and the first church building stood on near- 
ly the same spot as the present one. 



26 ASUFORD. 



Crystal Pond, lying partly in Eastfbrd and partly in Wood- 
stock, is often spoken of by early visiters as a sheet of exceed- 
ing beauty, and is mentioned by its present name in the earliest 
records of the town. 

Farming is the principal pursuit, as the lack of sufficient 
water power and the distance from railroads prevent much en- 
gagement in manufactures. Its educational interests have not 
been neglected. It has good schools and an academy, and 
though not possessing any striking.scenery impresses the visitor 
as a prosperous quiet New England town. 



ASH FORD DIRECTORY. 

POST OFFICE ADDRESS, • - ASHFORD. 

Atwood, 0. F. & Co., Percussion Cap Manufacturer 

Austin Thomas, Hat Manufacturer 

Arnold Ezra P. Boot and Shoe Manufacturer 

Butler James, Variety store, 

Bugbee Zenas, Blacksmith. 

Clark ,i>. H. Hotel keeper. 

Gilford Jonas, Hat manufacturer. 

Gardner Wm. W. Blacksmith. 

Jackson Edward, Shoo manufacturer. 

Knowlton Eben, Wagon Maker and Variety Store. 

Lincoln Dwiglit, Tanner and Currier. 

Miller Wm. G. Saw Mifl, and manufacturer Crates. . 

Mathewson Charles, Saw, Shingle and Grist Mill, 

Nevil, Thomas M. Blacksmith. 

Phillips James, Variety Store and Hotel Keeper. 

Smith John C. Wagon Maker. 

Squire & Harwood, Saw and Shingle Mill. 

Trowbridge Amos, Saw Mil^ 

Warren 4- AValker, Saw Mill. 

Whittaker Joseph, Saw Mill. 



P. O. ADDRESS,— WESTFORD. 

Chism W. D. Saw and Shingle Mill. 

Bichmond J. Variety Store. 

Westford Glass Co., manufacture Glass -Bottles. 



P. O. ADDRESS— NORTH ASHFORD. 

Taft T. G. Saw Mill. 



-A^SHFORD 

TOWN GOVERNMENT. 



CLERK AND TREASURER, 

Benjamin C. Simmons. 



REGISTRAR, 

John H. Simmons. 



SELECTMEN. 
Horace Gaylord, Stephen Whiton, J. W. Knowlton. 



This town cannot cluim to be one of the Original Eight 
which formed this county when the county was incorporated,' 
(in 1726) but it is an offshoot of seventy-five years' growth, 
from the united stocks of Pomfrct and Oanteibury. The 
town of Windham is the ancestor of Canterbury and Brook- 
lyn, and the genealogy runs thus : i'laiiifield descended from 
Windham, and Canterbury from Piainfield. Brooklyn did not 
rise at once to the dignity of a town, nor did it at first have 
its present name. In the earliest s^age of its existence, — in 
its embryo state, so to speak, — it rejoiced in the euphonious 
name of Mortlake. In 1731, the inhabitants peiitioncd to be 
made a Society, in the following terms: 

'To the Honorable General Assembly of his Majesties Colony 
of Connecticut to be holden in New Haven, Oct. 14, 1731, 
The prayer of the Inhabitants of the jS'orth part of the 
town of Canterbury and of the South part of the town of 
Pomfrct, humbly shewing to your honours that. Whereas the 
General Assembly didjn May last at our request appoint a 
Committee to view a certain tract of Land in which we dwell 
and to report to this Assembly, and whereas your Honorable 
Committee have given their opinion the said tract of Land is 
not Suitable for a Township, yet have so far considered our 
difficulties as to report to your Honours in favor of our 
being a Parrish or Society. \\ pc take leave humbly to pray 
this Honorable Assembl / to Compassionate us under our great 
difficulty, atid grant us Parrish Privileges, according to your 
wonted goodness in like cases, on such conditions and to ^uch 
bounds as your honorable Committee have set forth in their 

3 



30 BROOKLYN. 



report to your honours, bearing date the 16th day of Sept. A. 
D. 1731 here described. And we shall as in duty bound ever 
pray &c." 

This petition was signed by thirty of the inhabitants, and 
an act was pissed, October, 1731, granting the prayer of the 
petitioners. It does not appear upon what grounds tlie "Hon- 
orable Committee" based their unfavorable opinion of "the 
said tract of Land." Since their time it has certainly become 
a very respectable "tnwnship". 

In 1747, the inhabitants, being desirous of setting up for 
themse ves, petitioned the General Assembly to elevate their 
Society into a Town. This request was refused, and even the 
name of the Society was taken away, so far as the legislature 
could do it, for the Assembly resolved that it should be called 
Pom fret. It appears, however, that this resolution was of no 
efficacy, for the. Society was known as Mortlake till 1754, 
when the name was changed to Brooklyn, and in 1786 it was 
made a town. In consequence of its position as the geograph- 
ical center of the County, the court-house was transferred to it 
from Windham in 1820. The first church was built in 1734, 
about ten rods north-west of the side of the one now occupied 
by the Unitarian Society, which was erected in 1771. The 
Eoclesiastical Society to which these churches belonged lud 
for its pastor the llev. Ephraim Avery, who died in 1754 and 
was succeeded by the well known Dr. Josiah Whitney, whose 
ministrations continued for the long period of 68 years, (from 
1756 to 1824.) The sociaty divided in 1818, in conEcquence 
of a difFerciice among the members on doctrinal points, some 
holding to "Orthodox" principles, while others had embraced 
Unitarian views. The Uni arians continued to occupy the 
church, and the Oongregat:onalists in 1820 built a chapel, in 
whicfi thi^y w.)r,^hippeJ until 1832, when the house now occu- 
pied was comjleteJ. Dr. Whitney went with them at the time 
of the scparaton, and continued 'to be their pastor until his 



BROOKLYN. 31 



death, in 1824, in the 94th year of his age. His immediate 
successor was the Rev. Ambrose Edson, who was settled in 
April, 1824, and dismissed in December 1830. The Rev. 
George J. Tillotson was settled in May, 1831, and dismissed 
in March, 1858. lie was succeeded by the Rev. C. N. Sey- 
mour, the present incumbent, who entered upon the duties of 
his charge in December, 1859. 

When the division above referred to took place, (in 1817,) 
the Rev. Luther Willson, at that time the colleague of Dr. 
Whitney, became pastor to the Unitarian Society, and resigned 
in 1818. The ordained and Resident Ministers succeeding 
him are as follows : 

Samuel J. May, 1822. 

George W. Kilton, 1836. 

William Coe, 1837. 

Herman Snow, - 1844. 

Jacob Ferris, 1848. 

George G. Channing, 1850. 

Courtland P. De Normandie, 1852. 

Henry L. My rick, 1857. 

George G. Channing (the present incumbent) 1860. 
The Episcopal church in this town was built in 1772, and 
the Rev. J)aniel Fogg, the first pastor, took charge of the par- 
ish the same year. His successors were : 

Rev. G. J. White, 1818. 

" Ezra B. Kellogg, 1828. 

'« Josiah M. Bartlett, 1835. 

" R. Camp, (the present pastor,) 1837. 
The Baptist church and society were constituted in 1828, 
and in 1832 purchased the Chapel then owned by the Congre- 
gational Society. They have scarcely had a settled ministry 
until within the last ten years, but a number of ministers have 
furnished temporary and occasional supplies. 



I! 32 



BROOKLYN. 



The Rev. John O. Birdsall preached for the ehurch in 1830 
and '31. 

, Rev. Thomas Huntington was the prinicpal supply in 1832 
—'33 and '34. 

Rev. N. Johnson in 1836. 

I Rev. B. N. Harris in 1839— '40. 

;i In 1844 — '45 and '46 there was no preacher, and the chapel 
I ! was closed. 

! I 

i: In the autumn of 1847 the Rev. E. Loomis commenced his 
' labors, and continued to discharge the duties of pastor until 
i tho spring of 1850. 

The Rev. N. Branch succeeded him for one year. 

The Rev. S. Barrows commenced his ministrations in May, 

1852, and is still connected with the church as their pastor. 

Although one might infer from the name of the town, that 

I Brooklyn possessed abundant water privileges, it is not much 

favored by nature in that regard, and therefore is principally 

a farming town, doing its full share to uphold the reputation of 

I I the county for excellent dairy products, unsurpassable fruit, 
|i and whatever else of value the skill and industry of New Eng- 
ij land farmers can extract from the soil. In this connection, we 
i may notice the nursery of the Messrs. Dyer, and the horticul- 
.1 tural establishment of Dea. E. Newbury, although they hardly 

I j need to be mentioned, as they are so well known, both in and 

I I out of the county, for the excellence and completeness of their 
i I stocks of flowers and trees. 

j| In the eastern part of the town, upon the Quinebaug River 
1 1 is a Cotton Factory, — the Quinebaug Mills — one of the larg- 
IJ est and best in the state., A.t the centre, are the Spectacle 
jj manufactory of Dea. Newbury, the Gold Pen manufactory of 
ji the Messrs. Bard, and the Watch Case establishment of Mr. E. 
j L. Preston. In the financial department, Brooklyn has a Bank, 
I' — the Windham County — and an Insurance Company; the 

former incorporated in 1822, and the latter in 1826. " Both 

are flourishing institutions. 



BROOKLYN. 



33 



There is hardly a town iu our land which does not contain 
some mementoes ef onr Revolutionary War. The fields of the 
various conflicts during that struggle, — the birth-places and the 
homes of the heroes, more or less known to fame, who aided in 
maintaining the contest for liberty, — these are sacred spots ; 
and in this hour of our Nation's peril, all reminiscences of the 
times which we are in some sort living over again, are invested 
with renewed interest. The place which was the home ot 
Israel Putnam, and the spot where his remains are sleeping, 
will never cease to be objects of interest^o the patriotic Amer- 
ican, and of pride to the inhabitants of me village which gave 
birth to a man who was found wtrthy of the confidence of a 
Washington. Gen. Putnam was born at Salem, Mass., Jan- 
uary 7th, 1718, and died at Brooklyn, May 29th, 1790. 

Brigadier General Tyler, a son of Brooklyn, is one whom 
any town might proudly claim. His father. Capt. Daniel 
Tyler, also a native of this place, '' was a distinguished officer 
of the Revolution, having served as aid to Gen. Putnam and 
Adjutant to the Connecticut regiment while the army was en- 
camped at Cambridge." The General, a worthy son of a pat- 
riotic father, is an officer high in the esteem of those who are 
best qualified to judge of military ability, and is now efficiently 
serving his country in command of a Division. 



3* 



BROOKLYN DIRECTORY 

F, O. ADDRESS— BROOKLYN. 



Atwood L. S. Grocery store. 

Bard Brothers & Co. Gold Pen manufacturers. 

Baker Eben, Carpenter and Joiner, 

Bassett Dvvight, Miller. 

Burton Lewis G. Carpenter and Joiner. 

Burdick C. E^el Keeper. 

Cleveland C. C. Variety store, 

Clark Elisha, Sash and Blind manufacturer. 

Clark Francis, Tanner and Currier. 

Dyer Paris & Henry A. Nurserymen. 

Davison Septimus, Judge of Probate. 

Fisher, A. F. Cashier Windham County Bank» 

Fuller Uriel, Clerk of Courts. 

Grant B. C. Dr}? Goods and Groceries. 

Gurnett G. Dry Goods and Groceries. 

Gallup John 2d, President Windham County Bank. 

Harris Erastus P. Wagon Maker and Blacksmith. 

Huntington Thomas, Physician and Surgeon. 

Kenyon Edward P. Blacksmith. 

Knapping Edwin E Carpenter and Joiner. 

Kendall Waldo, Butcher. 

Kingsley E. Ambrotype and Photograph Artist, 

Luther F. S. Musical Instruments* 

Main E. G. Hotel Keeper, 

Newbury Edwin, Jeweler and Florist. 

Palmer Jolin C. Secretary Insurance Company. 

Preston Enos L. Watch Case manufacturero 

Pond Enoch, Cabinet Maker. 

Pearl Charles, Harness Maker. 



BROOKLYN. 35 



Richmond, A. & Sou, Dry and Fancy Goods. 
Searls Lewis, Wagon maker and Blacksmith. 
Tyler Daniel P. Lawyer. 
Whitford Samuel, Tin Ware. 
Whitcomb J. B. Physician and Surgeon. 
Woodbridge William, Physician and Surgeon. 
Woodward W. W. News Dealer. 



F. O. ADDRESS— WEST KILLINGLY. 

Green Joseph K. Dry Goods and Grocerieso 
Johnson Andrew, Butcher. 
Kenyon Bradford, Dry Goods and Groceries. 
Tucker Wm. C. Superintendent Quinebaug Mi!L 



BROOKLYN 
TOWN GOVERNMENT. 



Clerk, Treasurer and Registrar. 
Septimus Davison. 



Selectmen, 
Levi Ross. Willard Lea vans. Jacob Kimball. 



BROOKLYN ADVERTISEMENTS. 



E. NEWBURY, 

GRiPE VINES, STRAWBERRIES, 

Owrrants, Hliiil>a.x*l>, Blaclibei-ries, 

RASPBERRIES, 

IDal)lia0, Ju5cl)ia5, ©cranium^, 

Roses and all kinds of Bedding Plants, Herbacious Plants, 

imm, mmmiii mummi 

Tulips, Shrubs, Poenies, Flower Seeds, &c. 
BROOKLYN, CT. 



BROOKLYN. 37 



NEW STORE 

—I N— 



Having removed from Providence, R. T. and taken the store iorm-vly 
occupied by S. Diivison & Sou., and supplied the same with a now nn d 
general assortment of 



¥ 



f * 



AND ' 

GROCERIES, 

Broadcloths, Cassimsres Union Ciotlis, Satinets 

j Vestings, Over Coat Cloths, Trimmings, Hosiery, Gloves, 

I Cravats, Stocks, Suspenders, Ribbons, Laces, Dress 

Goods, Edgings, Embroideries, 

I HATS & CAPS, BOOTS 8l SHOES, 

! 

■ Patent Medicines, Flavoring Extracts. Bixl Seeds, Atwood's Bitters, 
Clarke's and Royce's Sherry Wine Bitters, Spencer's, Wright's and 
Ayer's Pills; New York Kerosene Oil, Non-Explosive Burning Fluid, 
Lamps, Toilet Soaps, Confectionary, &c., and many other articles 

I usually called for in a country store. 

All kinds of G-arments Out and Made in the be st 
i Manner and the Latest Style. 

j Also, for sal% the ALUMINIUM PEN, which gives general <satisf>ic- 
I tion to all who have used them. 



38 BROOKLYN. 



l; BEOOKLYN HOTEL & LIVEEY STABLE, 

1 1 Where good teams can be procured at all times. 

' C. BURDICK, Agent. 



E. G. MAIN, 
PUTP4AM HOUSE, 



J. B. WlilTCOMB, 
PHYSICIAN AND SURGEON, 

OFFICE :— MAIN STREET. 



Melodeons, Seraphines, Church and Parlor Organs, (Pipe or | 
Keed,) Pianos, Fliitinas, Accordeons, Violins, &c., j 

REPAIRED IN EVERY PART AND TUNED. 

l3^~(r GRANT, 

ill mmi Mi ^iDaiiSi. 

Fai'rnina; 'I'oois &c. 
wlNDHAM^C^OUlsiTY BANK, 

JOHN GALLUP, 2d, President. A. F.' FISHER, Cashier. 

Office hours, 9 to 12 A. M. and 1 to 4 P. M. 



HISTORY OF CANTERBURY, 



The town of Canterbury was incorporated in October, 1703. 
taking the AVestern part of the territory of Plainfield, and 
having the Quinebaug river for a dividing line, except that on 
the South, Canterbury extended east of the river so that it 
includes part of the little village of Packerville. Portions of 
the original territory of this town have since been assigned to 
the towns of Brooklyn and Hampton on the north, but its 
limits are now as of old, Scotland on the west and Lisbon on 
the South. It contains about 40 square railcb in an irregular 
parallelogram, a'oout 8 miles from north to south and 5 miles 
from east to west. 

The surflice of the town is hilly and abounds in ledges of 
gneiss and granite. The soil is best adapted to pasturage, al- 
though in the eastern part there is some excellent land for 
tillage, especially along the Quinebaug. The people have 
always been engaged chiefly in agriculture, no large factories 
having been established within the town. The population his 
therefore iusrease.! vary little for the last fifty years,^ standing 
during that period at about 1G50. 

The first settlements made on this territory were made about 
1690, by men who came in part from older towns in the vicin- 
ity,- but mostly from Massachusetts. A le.* ding man was 
Maj. James Fitch, eldest son of Rev. James Fitch of Norwich 
a large land-holder and influential personage in the colony at 
that time; with him there came from Norwich individuals be- 



40 CANTEllBURJ. 



longing to the Adams, Backus, Bradford and Tracj families. 
There were also Adamses from Medfield, Browns, Cleav- 
lands and Spaldings from Chelmsford, Hjdes and Woodwards 
from Newton, Frosts from Charlestown, Davenports from 
I'orchester, Baldwins from Woburn, and Paynes from East- 
ham. 

These settlers Srst established themselves along the river 
valley and slowly spread themselves back on the less inviting 
hills in the Western part of the town. Included at first with 
« Flainfield, they participated in the endeavors of that people 
for the settlement of the ministry among them, and at one 
time claimed that the services of their first minister. Rev. 
Joseph Coit, should be divided equally between the two sides 
of the Quincbaug. With a view to their accommodation, it 
was proposed to build the PlainSeld meeting house on the top 
of Block Hill, a ridge which rises immediately from the east- 
ern bank of the; Quinebaug, opposite the vi lage of Canter- 
bury. But a division of the town was preferred, and secured, 
as above-mentioned, in 17* 3, nearly two years befpre the ordi- 
nation of Mr. Coit as pastor. 

The people of Canterbury now proceeded' independently, to 
the settlement of their ecclesiastical affairs. In 1705 Robert 
Green, for thirty shillings, deeded to the inhabitants of the 
town, three acres and a half, on a hill near his house, " to 
build and erect a meeting house on, or for training or any other 
use the said inhabitants of Canterbury shall see cause for." — 
This is the plot of ground long known as " Canterbury Green," 
which has been from the beginning, the site of the meeting 
house of the first ecclesiastical society. No record remains to 
show when the first house of Worship was erected, but we 
find that in 1719 the selectmen were ordered to " get the 
meeting house glazed at the town's charge." 

At an early date, Mr. Samuel Estabrook, a graduate of 
Harvard College, and son of the pastor of Concord, Mass., 



CANTERBURY. 41 



was employed as a uiinister, and on the 13th of June, 1711, 
he was ordained pastor of a church that day organized. The 
elders or pastors present and assisting on this occasion, were 
Ilevs. Samuel AVhitney, of ^Vindham; John Woodward, of 
Norwich; Salmon Treat, of Preston ; and Joseph Coit, of 
Plainfield, The charge which Mr. Estabrooks then received, 
he retained until his death, which occurred June 20th, 1727, 
at the age of fifty-three. The place thus vacated, was filled 
September 3d, 1729, by the ordination ot Mr. John Wads- 
worth, a native of Milton, Mass. and graduate of Harvard 
College. He continued in charge until^May 27th, 1741, when 
he resigned in consequence of charges seriously- afiecting his 
reputation. 

Daring his ministry, the second meetinghouse on the Green 
was built, the expense being partly defrayed by the proceeds 
of some town lands : this was in thi eour^ie of 1731-'35. 

About the lime of Mr, Wadsworth's departure, there 
occurred one of the most powerful and extensive religious 
awakenings ever known in this country. The people of this 
town were not a little affected by it, and a division of sentiment 
that arose thereabouts, prepared the way for divided action 
with regard to a new pastor. The pulpit had been supplied by 
various persons for a while, but in June, 1744, Mr. James 
Cogswell, a native of Saybrook, and a graduate of Yale College, 
was employed as a candidate. On the question of settling hira, 
an open schism took place, about half of the churcli separating 
permanently from their brethren. Notwithstanding this, how- 
ever, Mr. Cogswell was ordained by the consociation, after 
careful deliberation, Dec;mber 28, 1744, and continued in the 
pastorate nearly 27 3'ears, much longer than any other pastor 
of the same church, and retired at lenglh to accept a similar 
office in the neighboring parish of Scotland. During the long 
and dark period of 1770-'83, the church remained dependant 
upon supplies, which were often changed and probably some- 
times failed altogether. 

4 



42 CANTEKBUllY. 



The pastor next in.stallci, was llav. Solomon 31oi--nT), who 
continuod until 1797, and was followod by other candidates and 
suiplios for aSoiit eleven years. 

In 1803-5, the third hou>c of worship was creeled en (he 
G icon, part of the cost being pa'd by the avails of a lottery, 
I g anted for (ho purpose by the L3;^islntnrc. Since then tljcrc i 
liuve been the following pastors in Mic::ession : — 

llev. Georirc Loonard, from Feh. IStlH, to Ang. 1810 ; llev. 
Asa Mcech from Oat. 1812, to May, 1822; Rev. Thomas J. 
JMurdock, from Nov. 1822, till his death D^d. 15th. 1820, at 
the age of 313 ; llev. J«imes 11. Whc.'loc'c, from Dec. 182/, to 
April 1829; llev. Dennis Piatt, from March 1830, to January 
1833; lijv. Otis C. Whito 1, from June, 1835 to January 
1837; Rev. Charles J. Warren, from Sept. 1837, to April 
1840; Rev. ^Valtcr Clarke, from May 1842. to May 1845; 
Rev. Rjbert C. Learned, from De3. 1847. to Nov. 1858; 
Rev. Charles P. Grosvcvor, from Marsh 1859 to the pre.>:c:it 
time. 

It w*as intimated above that about the time of Mr. CogswellV 
ordination, a part of the people formed a new ecclesiastical or- 
ganization. They claimed, indeed, to be the original church of 
Can(erbury. and retained the ancient book of records; but 
they were commonly known as the Separate Church, or perhaps 
the Strict Congregational Church of Canterbury. This in 
fact was the first of a number of churches that were organized 
about this lime, not differing materially in theory, from tno 
congregational churches of the present day, but more evangel- 
ic in sentiment, and more enthusiastic in their practice, than 
were these same churches and their pastors at that time. They 
were necessarily independent of all patronage from the civil 
authority, and vvere wont to oppose with gicat force of lan- 
guage, the system of ministerial rates, as then practiced. — 
Gradually some of their views came into general acceptance, 
and tho others were abandoned by them, until at length they 



c.vN'ri:!inu:iY. 43 



I wc.-e (i'H.solvod. or united with othji* deiiaMi. nation:-. T.uis tlic 

i So):irato Ciiai'c'.i in C-intei-bui-Vi after a vigorous outset, daring 

I wMcli, tliey crc-jted a nicjt.ing house on \\\2 high ^''O'-^'^^^ ^^'^st 

j of the (i.eL'ii, and chose for themselves a luistor out o!' their 

j own nu!jr30', — Rev. Solomon Payne, ordained Se^Dt. 174G, and 

I d.e I Oat. 2)th, 1754, — 'jogan r-oon to lose ground. They in- 

I (loci chose a second pastor, I'ev. Joseph ]M:irshall, ordained 

I A )ri!, 1759, and disnrssed A;ir;l, 1708, but were never after- 

I v/ards so provide!. It is diffic^ult indecJ to trace their history 

I |)artiG.ilal-ly. Abaut 17,30, they reitioved their meeting house to 

I the "North S'^^lcty,'' so called, where it stood until the winter 

j oF 1 5!2-'j3, when it was taken down, liaviug been some time 

I in a ruinous condition. Various n)inisters Iiad indeed been em- 
ployed by the people in that vi^-inity at d'.lFjrent periods, but 

I the churcih had long since wa-stcd away. 

Just belbre Mr. Ojgsweir.s dismission from the First 

I G'uirch, the Society of W^'Cstminster was incorporated by ihc 

j Geicral ;' ssembly, ineluding all the western part of the 

town, except a small portion already embraced in Hanover j 

i Sacict\, Lisbon. Iho Ohur:;h was gathered in Ih's Sociity, ! 

! Ncember 20, 1770 aii 1 his ha. I five pastors. Kev. John j 



Staples, a native of Taunton, Mass., and g,,:aduate of New 

JjfSiy CjUege, was ord.iinj.l April 17, 177li, and continued 

his care of the Church till Irs death, which was occasioned by 

a putrid fever, Feb. 10. 1804, in the Gist year of his age. 

I llev. E.-astus Learned, a native of Killing'y. and graduate of 

I B.-own University, had bje i pastor at Charlton, Mass., was 

! installed at Westminster, Fjb. G. 1803, and continued in 

I charge till his death, Jan. :,0, 18J4. llev. Israel Gurley. 

\ ivose, who was a native ci' Coventry, and a graduate of Yale 

! College, was ordained at West minster, Marcli 9, 1825, and 

i dismissed Oct. 11, 1881. Ujv. Asa King, a native of Marsh- 

I field, had been pastor at I*omiret and Killin2;.vorth, before he 

was installed at Westminster, Jan. 23, 1833, where he died 

i De?. 2, 1843 in his 80th year. llev. Ueuben S. IIazen,a native 



i 44 CANTERBURY. 

{ of Danbridge, Vt., and graduate of Yale Collf.ge, was pastor at 
I Agawam, Mass., and Barkhamsted, before be was installed at 
I Westminster Sept. 26th, 1849, where he still continues. 
j Other religious denominations have not flourished in this 
town. A Methodist class was organized many years since and 
I then dissolvctl. Again reviving, this people held their meetings 
j for some years in the To\Yn House near the center of the town, 
I and in 1858, removed to a house in the village, which had been 
I erected about 14 years previously by parties attached to the 
j Universalist faith. They are now. regularly supplied with 
I preachers by the Providence Conference. 

! A number of Baptist families in Canterbury attend meeting 
I at Packerville and Unionville in Plainfield, but no other de- 
nomination has ever had a settled habitation in the Town. 
! Of the literary history of the town there is no need to speak 
I largely. The public schools were at first kept in private houses, 
and sometimes the sam^ teacher migrated from neighborhood 
to neighborhood, teaching perhaps ten weeks at Obediah 
Johnson's, four weeks at Edward Raynsford's, and six weeks at 
Deliverance Brown's. By degrees the town fell into the dis- 
trict system, so long followed in Connecticut. No incorporated 
academy was ever established in Canterbury. Schools, depend- 
ent on the energy of individuals, have, at various times, been 
started and flourished for a season. This was the case in the 
early part of the century, when master John Adams began in 
his native town a career in instruction, which he afterwards 
continued with credit and usefulness in Plainfield, in Colchester j 
and in Andover, Mass. Again, somewhat more than twenty 
years since, Mi«s Prudence Crandall established in this town a 
boarding school for young ladies, which her interest in the 
colored race, induced her to convert into a school for special 
benefit. So displeasing was this latter arrangement to the 
people of the town that measures were successfully taken to 
break up the school by the enactment and enforcement of a 
special statute law, for " such cases made and provided.,' 



CANTERBURY. 45 



Of the civil and political history of the town, there is little 
need to speak. It bore its full share in the toils and trials of 
the Revolutionary war, furnishing according to tradition some 
thirty men for the army. 

If there were space to enter into details about individuals or 
families, it might be shown that this town has furnished a good- 
ly number of men to do service in various departments of 
human labor. Some thirty Congregational clergymen have 
originated here, besides some of other denominations. But 
such particulars must needs bo omitted. 



CANTERBURY 

TOWN GOVERNMENT. 



Clerk, Treasurer and Registrar, 
Marvin H. Sanger. 



Selectmen, 

Marshall Smith, Henry Kendall, Charles Adams, C. W. Goff, 

L. N. Apley. 



4# 



CANTERBURY DIRECTORY. 

P. O. ADDRESS,— CANTERBURY. 

Ames Brothers, Carpenters and Builders. 

Adams I errin, Mason. 

Baldwin Elijah, Physician and Surgeon. 

Baldwin J- lijah Jr.. Physician and Surgeon, 

Baldwin Rufus, Carpenter. 

Bennett Charles, Carpenter. 

Barber Smith, Physician and Surgeon. 

Bond Daniel H. Shoe Maker. 

Congdon Frederick, Hlacksmith, 

Crandall Hezekiah, manufacturer of Bope Yarn. 

Eldridge eJohn D. Painter. 

Eldridge John C. Batting Mill and Agricultural Imple- 

ment3. 
Eaton M. L. F. Shingle manufacturer. 
Gordon Wm.H. Dry Goods and Groceries. 
Jencks E. M. Hotel Keeper. 
Kenyon Bodman, Grist Mill. 
Palmer Joseph, Physician and Surgeon. 
Robinson S. P. Judge of J^'obatc. 
Smith Wachington, Blacksmith. 
Smith John, Cotton Yarn and Twine manufacturer. 
Sanger Marvin H. Dry Goods and Groceries. 
Sweet Robert L. Carpenter. 
Satford Thomas, Saw and Shingle Mill. 
Safford Dwight, Saw, Shingle and Clover Mill. 

P. o7 ADDRESS— WESTMIJSSTER, 

Backus Isaac, Stove manufacturer. 

Brown Waterman, Carriage manufacturer, 

Hyde Nehemiah, manufacturer of Children's Carriages. 

Park Norman, manufacturer of Agricultural Implements. 

Robinson, Fowler u& Co., manufacturer of Hollow Ware, 

Stoves and x\gricultural Implements. 
Smith Eleazer, Saw, Shingle and Carding Mill. 
Spicer Peter, Wheel manufacturer. 

~p7o7 ADDRESS— PLAINFIELD. 

Leavens J. & Son., Cotton goods manufacturers. 



HISTORY OF CHAPUN. 



GuAPLTN is one of the young towns of the county, its birth 
datin:v in the present century. It was incorporated into a town 
in 1822, taking parts of the towns ot Mansfield, Hampton, and 
Windham. The principal part had existed since 1809 as a 
parish in the town of Mansfield and took its name from Dea. 
Benjamin Chaplin, who left a donation to be used for the bene- 
fit of the society. 

A few years since great attention was paid in this and neigh- 
boring towns, to the culture of the Mulberry and the raising 
of silk worms. Every farm had its orchard and all the females 
were engaged in the feeding ^and care of the worms, but of late 
years this branch of agriculture has almost wholly died out. 

The town is intersected by the Natchaug river, a never fail- 
ing stream of water, which passes through it diagonally from 
the northeast to the southwest. On this stream are many val- 
uable mill-seats, and eligible sites for factories or water-works 
of any description. The surface of the town is generally un- 
even, with a soil considerably strong and fertile, particularly in 
the valley of the Natchaug, where may be fojund as good land 
as in any part of the state. The distance from Brooklyn, the 
county seat, is 11 miles, from Norwich 22 miles, from Hartford 
33 miles. 

Among the original settlers in the easterly section of Mans- 
field, was Deacon Benjamin Chaplin, who removed from that 
part of the town of Hampton which formerly belonged to 



48 cnAPLiN. 



I Pomfret, and located himself near where the meeting house 
DOW stands, in the present town of Chaplin. To his energetic 
efforts, in a great measure, was owing the formation of .a society 
here, which was incorporated bj the Legislature in 1809, and 
I called Chaplin, after -the name of its friend and benefactor. 
I In 1822, this society obtained an act of incorporation, as a 
! town, by its present name. A church was formed here. May 
I 31st, 1810, with whom the Rev. David Avery labored as an 
i evangelist some length of time ; but it remained without any 
I settled minister until the year 1820, when the Ilev. Jarcd 
I Anirus was ordained as pastor. His ministry continued ten 
years, when he was dismissed in consequence of some dissatis- 
faction among the people of his charge. His successor, Rev. 
Lent S. Hough, was ordained August 17th, 1831, and contin- 
ued as stated pastor till December 20th, 183(5, when he was 
dismissed in compliance with his own request. The present 
pastor is Rev. Francis Williams. Ihe Ecclesiastical Society 
here have a permanent fund, amounting to $5,000, secured by 
bond and mortgage, the interest of which is devoted "toward 
the support of the gospel ministry." Among the principal do- 
nors of this fund was Dja. Benjamin Chaplin, who contributed 
the sura of £300. In works of benevolence and charit}^ Dea. 
Chaplin was ever tound among the foremost of his day. He 
was an economist of the " old school," and the strict attention 
w.th which he raanagoJ his farm and all his domestic concerns, 
enabled him to accumulaie wealth rapidly, and to add yearly 
to his possessions, until he became the- owner at one time of 
3,000 acres of ^nd, including a very considerable part of the 
town which now bears hiis name. 



CHAPLIN DIRECTORY 

P. O. ADDRESS—CHAPLIN. 

Bill Lester, Giocerv Store. 

Canada Harlen, Merchant. 

Dickey & Canada, Paper manufacturers. 

Eaton Edwin, Carpenter. 

Griggs D. A. &■ N. Spindles and Plow woods, 

Lincoln Allen, Variety Store. 

Rindge Erastus, Variety Store. 

Spafford & Co., Wagon Makers. 

Witter Orrin, Physician and Surgeon. 

Witter Orrin Jr., IMiysician and Surgeon. 



TOWN GOVERNMENT, 

Clerk and Treasurer, 
Erastus Rind^ze. 



Registrar, 



Orrin Witter. 



Selectmen, 
David A. Griggs, -Seth S. Chapman, John S. Ross. 



HISTORY OF EAblFORD, 



This towQ was orig'nally a Parish in t'lc .to\Yii of A.>;h?jrd, 
arid its eu-!y history is i ij:itis;ii with th:it to>vn. 

Tlic Ciaroh was formed Se )t. 2oJ, 171^. Its Pastors have 
been as fuliows : 

Andrew Jadscn, ordained Doscnijor 13th, 1778, died Nov- 
15th 1804. 

Iluiiis I^hinipaon, instailcd Dec. Gth, 1S09, dismissed May 
I IS, IBl'o.. 

iloLihcii Torrcy, ordai; ■'^ J- :o 1, 1820, distiiisscd April 23, 
1841). 

Frar.cis Williams, ordahicd te^jlcmber 20th., 1841, dismissed 
N,,vemher'12. 1851. 

(J laries C lamhorun, installed Airil 14, 1858. 

'i'hu town cfE-istibrd was ineor^joratcd in 1847. 1' includes 
in iidlliion to the ori dnai E-istford society a part of the Asli- 
io.d society. Tiie town has more varied and beautiful scenci-y 
than Ashford, though possessing the same genei-al features. — 
C.yt^ial Pond, a beautiful sheet of wat&r in the northern part 
of the town, is, as it has been ibr years, a favorite resort for 
plcasi/rc [larties from tiiis and ueighbrring places. 

One of the most striking natural featurc> of the town is "The 
Devil's Ptock" a large Hat reck just above the siyTacc of the 
g.-cmid, having on its top a nuuiher cfti-aeks indented into t'ae 
stono, evidently made when it was in a so't state. There arc 
Trades of men, dogs cnvs, sheep and hogs, and in one place a 



CIIAPLIX. 51 



ninrkofa clovRii foot, paid to bo that of the "Gentleman in I 

Blaok". The whole Forms one of the most remarkable natiual ' 

curiosities in the State. ! 

I ]']:istford hiis.had her share of tlie distinguished men who ; 

I have gone out fro:n this county to do honor to themgelverj and | 

i to the phico of their birth. {}. A. Grow, of Pennsylvania, a ; 

j distinguished member of Congress, and (he speaker of the I 

{ late Extra Session, v\'as born here. Gen. Nathaniel Lyon, j 

j who has borne sush a distinguished part during the hitc troubles | 

! in Missouri, and has fallen, bravely fighting at the head of his ; 

I men, was also a native of the phicc. He was a relative by i 

I his mother, to the brave Col. Thomas Kncwlton, of lievolu- 

! tionary memory, and was a gallant and ctFicient cfficer. ; 

The teacher, who had charge of the district school, to which | 

Gen. Lyon went when a bo}', is still living, and represents him j 

as a lad of uncommon industry and perseverance. Though so | 

] lately brought to notice, his brilliant career had turned upon | 

him the eyes of a nation. His death has been felt as a nation- | 

al loss. The town and county which gave him to his country, ! 

will ever preserve his memory by the side of a Putnam and a \ 

Knowlton. i 



EASTFORD DIRECTORY, 

P. O. ADDRESS— EASTFORD. 

Arnold Ezra P. Boots and Shoes. 

Burnham H. B. Variety Store. 

Ghapiii Darius, Blacksmith. 

Ghene}^ Wm. E. Wagon Maker. 

Dorsctt George Store and Hotel. 

Keith J. M. & Go., Stocking Yarn iranufacturers. 

Skinner Jonas, Mattrass nianutacturer. 

Sly Mansfield, Saw and Grist mill. 



F. O. ADDRESS— NORTH ASHFORD. 

Allen Z. N. Variety Store. 

'Morse Orin, Saw and Shingle mill. 



P. O. ADDRESS— FHCENIXVILLE. 

Latham Joseph B. Saw and Grist mill. 
Potter A. H. Saw and Grist mill. 
Wheaton S, Variety Store. 



EASTFORD TOWN GOVERNMENT 



Cle7'k and Treasurer. 
Joseph D. Barrows. 



Registrar. 
John B. Adams. 



Selectmen. 
Jos. B. Latham, Ezra Arnold, Horatio Carpenter. 



HISTORY OF HAMPTON, 



Hampton was Incorporated as a town in 1786. It was 
mostly formed from the second society of Windham, which 
was formed as a society in 1720, and was caUed Kennedy or 
Windham village. The place appears to have been so named 
from a Mr. Kennedy, who with his family were the first settlers 
in the society. They located themselves about two miles 
south of the Congregational church. It is believed that the 
first settlers came into this town about the year 1708. John 
Clark, the fourth settler, located himself nearly two miles 
northwest from the centre; Nathaniel Flint, one mile and a half 
to the southeast ; William and John Durkee, and George Mar- 
tin, near the centre ; Nathaniel Kingsbury located himself 
about three miles to the northwest. Daniel Denison, two 
miles north ; James Utley, two miles and a half, and Ebenezer 
GrriJfin, one mile and a half to the northeast. Benjamin Bed- 
lock, John Preston and John Holt, were also among the first 
settlers. The first meeting house lasted till 1754, when it 
was removed and a new one ejected, which is the church now 
standing. 

"The Congregational church in Hampton was organized 
J^une 5th, 1723, consisting of 17 members, the descendants of 
many of which are yet inhabitants of the town. Upon the 
same day, Rev. William Billings was ordained their pastor. 
He died May 22d, 1733, aged 36 years. His successor, Rev. 
Samuel Mosely, was ordained May 15th, 1734, and died July 



54 HAMPTON. 



26, 1791. in the 83d year of his age and 57th year of his min- 
istry. Rev. Ludovicus Weld, the next pastor, was ordained 
Oct. 27th, 1792, and at his request, in consequence of ill 
"health, was dismissed March 2d, 1824." Rev. Daniel G. 
Sprague, was installed May 26th, 1824. 

The present pastor is Rev. George Soule. 

The surface of the town is uneven, being considerably hilly. 
The soil is a gravelly loam, considei-ably strong and fertile, 
and is well adapted for grazing. Agriculture is the principal 
business of the inhabitants. The principal and central village 
of the town is situated on the summit of a considerably eleva- 
ted hill, 35 miles from Hartford and 6 from Brooklyn. The 
first mail opened in Hampton was on January 31st, 1820. 

About forty five years since, a sect of reformers, calling 
themselves Christ-iaiis, caused considerable excitement in this 
and some of the adjoining towns. They had a house of worship 
in this town, called the Goshen meeting house, (from a neigh- 
borhood of that name,) about two miles westerly from the cen- 
tre of the town. They appear to have been extravagant in 
their manner of conductlno; their meetino's : it is stated that 
they were so noisy as to be heArd the distance of two miles. 
It is also stated, that in order to humble themselves, and be- 
come literally like little children, they have been known to 
crawl or creep on the floor, roll over one another, &c. In 
some cases they would so far neglect their worldly business as 
to leave their cows unmilked, &c. A Mr. Smith and Mr. 
Varnura, appear to have been their principal preachers, or 
leaders. Varnum induced some%f the people, over whom he 
had a great influence, to move with him to Ohio, and there es- 
tablish a pure and holy church, and enjoy a kind of Paradise 
on earth. The people, however, that went with him, were 
generally miserably disappointed ; Varnum turned Shaker, 
and advised those over whom he had influence to follow his 
example, which was to some extent followed. 



iiAMProN. 55 

The first Christ-ians come to Hampton in 1816: they 
were also called Smitiiites, from one Elias Smith, who appears 
to have bean one of the fauaders of this seot. Varnum preten- 
ded to have soe^ial revelations from God, that such and such 
persons must give him some particular article, or a sum of 
money. In one instance, he went to a man who was then a 
justice of the peace, and told him that it was revealed to him, 
that he must give him his horse. The justice, thinking this 
rather a hard requisition, as he had already given him consid- 
erable in this way, asked if one half would not do, as the horse 
was a valuable one. Varnum reluctantly consented, on the 
ground that the revelation went for the whole ; he however 
promised the owner of the horse, that he would pay him back 
one half its value. Varnum took the horse and went off, but 
never fulfilled his promise. Varnum induced his followers, 
both male and female, old and young, to make a full confession 
of their sins in public, without regard to any of the generally 
received o|)inions of propriety or decency. 



HAMPTON TOWN GOVERNMENT, 



Clerk, Treasure?' and Registrar. 
Edirar H. Newton. 



Selectmen, 
Patrick II. Pearl, Alfred Hammond, Jere Church. 



HAMPTON DIRECTORY, 

F. O- ADDRESS— HAMPTON. 

Brown Wm. & Son, Dry Goods and Groceries, 

Button Chas. C. Harness maker. 

Bagington Leander, Machinist. 

Cadj Elijah, Blacksmith. 

Cleveland C. F. Attorney at Law, 

Fuller J. H. Blacksmith. 

Greenslit David, High Sheriff. 

Holt Newton M. Harness Maker. 

Holt George M. Carpenter and Joiner. 

Hughes Dyer, Physician and Surgeon. 

Litchfield Andrew M. Dealer in lumber. 

Mosely E. S. Fancy Pin Manufacturer. 

Snow G. G. Hotel Keeper. 

Tiffany H. D. Grocery Store. 

Williams Boger S. Blacksmith. 



SHERIFF OF WINDHAM COUNTY. 

OFFICE,— IN C. F. CLEVELAND'S OFFICE. 

ATTORNEY & COTJNSELLOE AT LAW. 

HAMPTON, CT. 



HISTORY OF KILLINGLY. 



KiLLiNGLY was first settled about the year 1700. An act 
was passed in 1708, granting the inhabitants the privileges and 
immunities of a township, which then included in its limits the 
town of Thompson. The land was purchased of the colony, 
and the grant was signed by Gov. Saltonstall at New Haven, 
Oct. 13th, 1709. 

Among the early settlers, whose descendants inhabit the same 
spot, were Messrs. Joseph Cady, James Danielson, Sampson 
Howe, and Ephraim Warren. The first white person buried 
here, was a female of Mr. Cady's family, the precise year of 
her death is forgotten. Her grave is still to be seen ; but as it 
always happens in early settlements, the graves of that period 
were left without any inscription. The oldest date to be found 
is 1720, and marks the burial of an individual of the same 
family. 

The first settlers were all athletic men, and inured to hard- 
ships ; yet they made but little improvement, on account of the 
roughness of the soil and the depredations of the Indians. The 
aborigines of this part of the country, were a branch of the. 
Nipmuck tribe, who were acknowledged to be less fierce and 
warlike than the Pequots ; but though the lives of the settlers 
were not often endangered, yet they sufiered great annoyance 
from their savage neighbors, who, being deprived of most of 
their game by the progress of the settlement,thought themselves 
justified in requiring the balance in the form of provisions, 
which the whites dared not refuse, notwithstanding the daily 

5* 



58 



KILLINGLY. 



call of their red friends. These sons of the forest sometimes 
travelled in companies of fifty or sixty, and took up their quar- 
ters at one house. They seldom showed violence to the inmates 
to obtain admission, yet they often employed artifice with won- 
derful success. For after they had been kept over night, eight 
or nine more would be found the next morning, whom they had 
contrived to conceal with their Pappooses, thus making thoir 
number apparently smaller than it really was, in order to gain 
admission more readily. While the whites and Indians in this 
manner had constant communication, and were on friendly 
terms with each other, they used to engage in favorite sports, 
by which they tested their comparative strength and ability. 
In tills respect the whites were in no degree inferior to the red 
mcii. As an example we may mention the following circum- 
stance : — 

Mr. Cady, soon after his arrival, was one day mowing in his 
lot at the foot of Mashentuck hill, when an Indian came from 
an adjoining wood, and expressed a desire to try a wrestling 
match v/ith the white man. Cady, without hesitation, dropped 
his scythe and grappled with his savage friend, who struggled 
long andlhard to throw him down. But he, knowing that by a 
display of strength and skill he might render the Indiaas less 
prone to hostility, was determined not to be worsted in this en- 
counter ; he made a desperate eflfort, and succeeded in throw- 
ing his antagonist. 13ut unexpectedly the head of the Indian 
struck on the points of the stubs of the brush just mown, which 
pierced his skull and killed him instantly. 

Many of these Indians embraced Christianity, and became 
partially civilized. The celebrated Sampson Occum, of the 
Mohegan tribe, preached among them a few times. But the 
continual v,'ars they had with other tribes, made it impossible 
to persuade many of them to conform to the precepts ot the 
Gospel. As already intimated, the aborigines of this quarter 
were less fierce and warlike than the Pequots ; yet the settlers 
were not entirely unprotected in case of sudden emergency, 
which had some influence in keeping their savage neighbors at ! 



KTLLIXGLY 



59 



peace. Two forts were built at the north parish and another 
at Danielsonvllle. 

On only one occasion were the whites in danger. A war like 
tribe came from the country south of Killiiiglj'-, with the inten- 
tion of murdering the whole white pojDulation. They arrived 
at a plain a quarter of a mile north of Alexander's Lake, and 
encamped beneath a large white oak tree, The settlers be"ng 
apprised of their arrival, were busy in preparation for defence. 
One of them, in the mean time, sallied Ibrth alone to the spot 
where the red men were assembled. At the same moment the 
Sachem was seen climbing the oak to reconnoitre the country. 
He had scarcely time to look, when he felt the bullet of the set- 
tler, Avho, knowing him to be the chief, had deliberately raised 
his musket, and given him a fatal wound. Though the indi- 
vidual who did this bold act was alone, yet the Indians, fear- 
ing that more lay concealed, and beln^^- without a leader, gave 
up the expedition. The same daj^ troops arrived from Massa- 
chusetts, and encamped over night on the plain which the In- 
dians had abandoned. The next day, they proceeded in pur- 
suit of the enemy, after burying one of their number, who had 
died ot sickness. 

Though the Indians of this quarter did not greatly annoy the 
whites, yet they frequently had (parrels v/ith other tribes. — 
The following tradition illustrates this. 

The Narragansetts residing near Stonington, on the sea shoj,'e, 
invited the Nipmucks to come down and attend a feast of shell 
fish. The invitation w^as accepted, they partook of the fish, 
were highly pleased, and in return invited the Narragansetts 
to come up and partake of a feast of lamprey eels, which was 
to be ready after "two moons". At the appointed time, a con- 
siderable portion of the tribe, leaving their squaws behind to 
cultivate the ground, proceeded on their way to share the hos- j 
pitality of their friends in Killingly. They arrived in safety, } 
and found the feast all prepared. Both parties seated them- | 
selves on logs, and the squaws were ordered to bring forward 
the fish in the kettles in which they had been cooked. A con- 



60 



KILLINGLY. 



venient supply was then provided for each of the guests, who, 
perceiving that they were cooked without dressing, were disgust- 
ed/ and refused to partake. As it was too late to remedy the 
raatter, there was a pause. Ashamed and vexed to think they 
had invited the Narragansetts to travel thirty miles to attend 
a feast of which they could not partake, the Nipraucks proceed- 
ed to hard words, to which their guests retorted with too much 
spirit to be borne. The JNipmucks seized their weapons, and 
attacked their guests, who were unarmed. Many Nipmucks fell, 
but of the Narragansetts all perished but two, who crossed the 
Quinnebaug and fled to their tribe, bearing the news of the 
massacre. 

Not long after, the remaining portion of the tribe came up, 
armed with bows and arrows, to avenge the slaughter of their 
countrymen. Their march was on the western side of the Quin- 
ebaug in Brooklyn, till they arrived about half a mile below 
Danielsonville, where the Nipmucks were encamped on the east 
side of the river. The latter saw them coming, and hastened 
to give them battte ; being warmly received, however, they 
dug a trench in the sandy soil on the bank of the river, and re- 
pelled the Narragansetts, who, being unable to cross, entrench- 
ed themselves on the other side, Both parties, being greatly 
exasperated, continued fighting three days. The surviving 
Narragansetts, at the end of the third day^ retreated, leaving 
the Nipmuck«! to bury their dead. The tradition adds, that on 
account of the transaction, the earth around the spot was blast- 
ed by a curse, so that to this day not a blade of grass will- 
grow over the bodies of the murdered Narragansetts. 

By such petty contests and the treachery of the whites, the 
Indians of this part of the country have gradually passed away. 
Within the memory of those still living, an aged and pious fe- 
male, named Martha, the last lineal descendant of the tribe re- 
siding here, has gone to repose in the burial place of her race, 
and no red people have been seen here since, except occasional- 
ly in small bands for the purpose of fishing. 

The first meeting house erected in Killingly. stood on a plain 
a quarter of a mile south of the present building at the north 
parish. It was subsequently removed to the spot on Break- 



KILINGLY. 



61 



neck hill, given to the town as a burial ground by Mr. Eiiezer 
\V'arren. Afterwards it occupied the ground where the town 
house now stands, at which place one of its pastors was Mr. 
Burroughs, father of the celebrated rogue. The present build- 
ing, which stands at the north parish, is placed on the highest 
ground in Killingly, (now East Putnam), in view of Thompson 
and Pomfret meeting houses. The first pastor was Rev. John 
Fisk. It contained at its organization, Oct. 19th, 1715, eleven 
members. 

Two other churches were subsequently organized, one at 
Westfield, and another at the south parish, and were all of the 
Congregational denomination. The church edifice of the West- 
field society, was taken down in 1855, and a nev/ one erected 
at a little distance from the site of the first one, in the village 
of West Killingly, one of the most beautiful and commodious 
houses of worship in the county or state. 

The first meeting relative to the formation of this church 
organization was held June 29th, 1801, and an ecclesiastical 
council was convened Aug. 25th, 1801, when the chnrch was 
formed, consisting of thirteen members. 

Rev. Gordon Juhnson, the first pastor, was ordained and in- 
stalled Dec. 12th, 1804, and dismissed January, 1809. 

Rev. Roswell VVhitmore, ordained and installed January 13, 
1813, and dismissed May 2, 1843. 

Rev. Thomas 0. Rice, ordciined and installed January 1st 
1845, and dismissed March 25th, 1856. 

Rev. T. T. Waterman, installed January 20ih, 1858, and 
dismissed January 30th, 1861. 

Rev. W. W. Davenport, ordained and installed August 21st 
1861. 

A curious fact is related of' one of the first pastors of the ; 
north parish church, who was accustomed to keep credit of the ! 
presents made him by his parishoners. In reading the credits I 
for one week, it was found they consisted of four lines, making i 



62 



KILLINGLY. 



an harmonious couplet with perfect rhyme and measure. We 
give it in the form current at the present clay : — 

Nell Alexander - - a few little fishes 

David Copp - - a goose 

, Sampson Howe - - a junk of beef 
J. Dean - - - a pair of shoes ! 

The most delightful portion of Killingly, in respect to sce- 
nery is around a small sheet of water, with an outlet to the 
Quinebiug, lying in the western part of the town, formerly 
known to the Indians as Lake Mashapaug, but now called Alex- 
ander's Lake. To account for the origin of this lake, a singu- 
lar tradition has been handed down to us by the aborigines. It 
is as follows : — ^ 

In ancient times, when the red men had long enjojed 
prosperity, when they had found plenty of game in the woods, 
and fish in the pond and rivers, tiiey at length fixed a time for 
a general powov»% a sort of festival for eating, drinking, smoking, 
singing and dancing. The spot chosen for this purpose was a 
sandy hill, or mountain, covered with tall pines, occupying the 
situation where the lake now lies. The pow-wovv lasted four 
days in succession, and was to continue longer, had not the 
Great Spirit, enraged at the licentiousness which prevailed 
there, resolved to punish them. Accordingly, while the red 
people in immense numbers were capering about upon the sum- 
mit of the mountain, it suddenly " gave way " beneath them, 
and sunk to a great depth, when the water from below rushed 
up and covered them all, except one good old squaw, who oc- 
cupied one of the peaks, which now bears the name of Loon's 
Island. It is said' that in a clear day, when there is no wind 
and the surface of the lake is smooth, the huge trunks and 
leafies:! branches of gigantic pines may be occasionally seen in- 
the deepest part of the water, some of them reaching almost 
to the surface, in such huge and gigantic forms as to startle the 
beholder . 

As regards the other portions of the scenerj'- there is noth- 
ing remarkable. The hills are still covered with forests; but 
the vales, through which flow the principal rivers, are lined 
with factory villages. 



KILLINGLY. 



63 



East Killingly, situated in the eastern part of the town, is 
a thriving village. The principal business is cotton manufac- 
turing. There aie three churches, two Baptist and one Advent. 

Dayville, in the northern part of the town, on the Norwich 
& Worcester railroad, is also engaged in manufai'turing, prin- 
cipally Satinets. There is one Congregational church here. 

West Killingly, is the largest and most important village in 
the town. It was united, with the village of East brooklyn, 
in 1850, into the Borough of Danielsonville. The railroad 
station is Danielsonville, and the Post Office address West 
Killingly. It is a flourishing village, largely engaged in man- 
ufactures. There are three churches here, 1 Congregational, 
1 Methodist and 1 Advent. 

There are several other small villages in the town, mostly 
engaged in manufacture. 



KILLINGLY DIRECTORY, 

P. O. ADDRESS— WEST KILLINGLY. 



Ames Anthony, Town Clerk and Registrar. 

Allen Nathan, Iron Foundry. 

Bacon William C. Furniture and Coffins. 

Bacon A. F. Cabinet Maker. ' 

Barker John A. Ambrotypist. 

Bargeron P. F. Variety store. / 

Bennett Miss H. Millinery and Fancy Goods. 

Brown William, Grocery store and Coffins. - 

Burlingham D. P. Groceries and Provisions, 

Burlingham E. & E. P. Agents patent Boiler Feeder. 

Bussey James, Shoemaker. 

Burdick C. L. Boarding-house Keeper. 

Carpenter E. Judge Sup. Court. 

Capron 0. M. Cotton Waste and Batting. 

Gard^ob D. Wagon Maker. 

Chapman Benj. F. Meat and Provisions. 

Chamberlin John P. Books and Stationery. 

Chamberlin Andrew, Carpenter and Joiner. 

Chamberlin Harvey, Stone Mason. 

Chamberlin Elisha, Carpenter and Joiner. 

Chamberlin William A. Merchant Tailor. 

Chollar W. H. Clerk Danielson Mfg. Co. 

Cochrane James L. Carpenter and Joiner. 

Crandall C. & Son. [C. C] Druggists and Apothecaries. 

Clark Wm. Barber. 

Cutrier A. J. Ready-made Clothing. 

Cundall E, L. Attorney and Counsellor at Law. 

Danielson George, Cotton Manufacturer. ^ 

Dimick, Daniel, Painter. 



KILLINGLY. 



65 



Day Horace, (see Spaulding, Day & Co.) 

Day Thomas M, «' " 

Edwards Rockwell, Confectionery. 

Farnham C. H. Vender of Patent Rights* 

Fagan A. H. Dentist. 

Franklin S. W. Merchant Tailor. 

Frissell Elisha, Boot and Shoe maker, 

Gleason Sylvanus, Depot Master. 

Graves Asa, Gunsmith. 

Griffiths George, Wagon maker. 

Hyde Silas & Co., Furniture, Stoves and Hard-ware. 

Hoar Hiram, Miller. 

Hammond S. T. Sewing Machines. 

Hutchins C, E. Hotel keeper. 

Hutchins Henry, Groceries. 

Hammond Henry, Railroad Commissioner. 

Hutchins Samuel, Physician and Surgeon. 

Johnson B. R^Physician and Surgeon. 

Kenyon JohnW Harness maker, 

Keech Ephraim, Blacksmith. 

Keech Chester, Wagon Maker. 

Leavans Willard, Power-Loom Harness manufacturer. 

Leavens George, Dry Goods, 

Lyon R. F. Druggist and Apothecary. 

Loffee J. K. Baker. 

Logee L. L. Confectionery. 

Martin Earl, Attorney and Counsellor at Law. 

Martin J. W. Physician and Surgeon. 

Mills C. S. Music Teacher. 

Moore Orin, Blacksmith. 

Miller J. R. Confectionary. 

Niles George A. Shingle and Grist mill. 

Perkins Joshua, Dentist. 

Peckham Amos, Minnetexit House. 

Pidge Jacob, Confectionary. 

Randall Levi, Shoe maker, 

Reynolds G. H. Groceries, 

Ricketson Samuel, Merchant Tailor. 

Ricketson Wm. Painter. 

Read H. N. Wood Turner. 

Roderick M. Merchant Tailor. 

6 



KILLINGLY. 



Short Wm. S. Reed manufacturer. 

Shumwaj Noah. Shoe maker. 

Shumway T. D. Dentist. 

Stevens John, (see S. Hyde & Co.) 

Snow John, Ready-made Clothing. . 

Snow Joseph, Livery Stable. 

Stone J. Q. A. Publisher Transcript. 

Stone Wm. A. Providence & Danielsonville Stage Line. 

Sanford Brothers Marble Workers. 

Spaulding Day 4* Co Carpenters. 

Scranton A. G-. Painter. 

Sears Miss S. Milliner. 

Truesdell George. Carpenter. 

Wiggin Wm. Boot & Shoe Maker. 

Warren Lysander. Deputy SheriflF. 

Worden Lewis, Attawaugan Hotel. 

Washburn Mrs. E. M. Dress Maker. 

Wilson Andrews. Machinist. Jjj^ 

Waldo John & S. S. Provisions & eProceries. 

Whitmore Nelson, Manufacturer. 

Young E. S. Manufacturer. 

Young Abner, Shoe manufacturer. 

Young Jerry, Carpenter. 



P. O. ADBUEiSS— KILLINGLY. 

Ballou Oliver, Soap Manufacturer. 

Atwood John, Super Williamsville Mill. 

Blanchard George, Carpenter. 

Builingame E. R. Saw and Grist mill. 

Ballard Isaac P. Lumber. 

Bugbee E. H. Clerk in Williamsville mill. 

Chase Harvey. Miller. 

Daniels Dan A. Manufacturer. 

Evans Thomas J. Livery Stable. 

Eldridge Aaron, Blacksmith. 

Hammond Justin, Physician and Surgeon. 

Jencks Leavens, Carpenter. 

Kingsbury George, Hotel keeper. 

Lewis 0. J. Hard-ware. 

Leland James P. Ax Handles. 

Potter Warren, Dry Goods and Groceries. 



KILLINGLY. 67 



Sayles S. & H. Satinet manufacturers. 
Spooner Wm. A. Watch repairer. 
Wells S. VV. Depot master. 
Withey Jonas, Carriage maker. 
Woodard Horace, Hotel keeper. 
Webster E. dealer in Iron. 



P. O. ADDRESS,— EAST KILLINGLY. 

Bartlett Almond, & Co. Groceries. 

Bartlett Welcome, manufacturer. 

Bennett Solomon, Broom manufacturer. 

Babbitt Silas, Carpenter. 

Babson James, Machinist. 

Chase Giles, Surveyor. 

French Thomas J. Hotel Keeper. 

Hill E. A. Physician and Surgeon. 

Hammond 0. C. Variety store, 

Kelly John, Lumber dealer. 

Law Paris, Miller. 

Murray John, Merchant Tailor. 

Mitchell Orin D. Miller. 

Newton Wm. A. Confectionery. 

Pettengili Daniel, Butche^ 

Oatley Joseph, Stone Mason 

Paine Almond M. Judge of Probate. 

Paine & Reynolds, Groceries. 

Pray Thomas, manufacturer. 

Spencer Daniel, Surveyor. 

Smith Silas, Blacksmith. 

Truesdell John B. Agent Bobinson mill. 

Tucker Geo. A. Miller. 

Whitman Samuel, Wagon maker. 

Westeott Henry, manufacturer. 



KILLINGLY TOWN GOVERNMENT. 

Clerk, Treasurer and Registrar. 

Anthony Ames. 

Selectmen, 

Isaac B, Ballard, Horace E. Davis, O. J Lewis, Leonard 

Day, Waldo Bartlett,, 



De. J. PERKINS, 

IS 



^^ 




OFFICE, : r r : ARCADE BUILDING, 

IDanielsorLVill©, Conn. 

Furnishes the three styles of Teeth, viz : 
on pure Gold or Silver Plates. 

GUM TEETH, <5n THE SAME. 

A N D 

BLOCK TEETH ON VULCANITE PLATES, 

with all recent improvements, 

JBlock Teeth, on V^-alcanite Base, 



are considered superior, by those wearing them, to all others 
for strength, lightness, cleanliness, perfect adaption and com- 
fort to the wearer. 

Prices will be lower and terms more favorable than by any | 
other Dentist in the County, and workmanship not excelled by 
any in the profession. 

References given to persons in this and adjoining towns now 
using my work of various styles. 

Repairing done as usual. Gold or Silver Fillings always 
warranted and Ether used in extraction, so as to avoid (in most 
cases) all pain. 



Aff iWiUSAi MfEi, 

Danielsonville, Conn. 

L. WORDEN, - PROPRIETOR. 

Is now open for the reception of transient and permanent cus- 
tom, being thoroughly furnished in the best style. The 
Proprietor offers the inducements o f a first 
class house to those who may favor 
him with their patronage. 



A.TTA.^\^^XJOAIV 





In connection with the above house, (in the rear,) the sub- 
scriber still continues to provide the traveling public with con- 
veyances of every description. 

. Hii MB mt Emm 

with or without drivers, with comfortable and stylish carriages, 
chaises or hacks, furnished at the shortest notice and on the 
most favorable terms. 

Teams and attendance famished at Funerals, 

Pleasure Parties, &c. Also, passengers carried to and from 
the cars. 

• Ofifice in the Hotel. v- 

L. WORDEN, Proprietor. 



6* 



W. A. CHAMBERLIN, 

AND DEALER IN 

GENTS FURNISHING GOODS, 

OF ALL DESCRIPTIONS. 



The subscriber keeps constantly on hand the largest 2nd best 
assortment of 

^- CLOTHS ^ 

in Eastern Connecticut, consisting in part of 

Light, Medium and Heavy Over Coatings, 

of all kinds ; Summer Goods in great variety. 



ot all descriptions. A large and carefully selected stock of 
Furnishing Goods,^ such as 

SHIRTS, COLLARS, TIES, GLOVES HOSE, &c. 
THE BEST CUTTER 

In this part of tlie State Avill T^e fotind h,er» 
A select stock of 

IKE Miil-liiE «li!M . 

ALWAYS ON HAND. 

All our work is done by careful and experienced workman, 
and we warrant it to give satisfaction. * 

Store in Attawaugan Building, Danielson villa. 

W. A. CHAMBERLIN. 

0. C. CHAMBERL^, Salesman. 







iraggist I |^p%(ar2, 

Where can be fouiid one of the largest and most complete 
stocks of 

DRUGS, MEDICINES, 

Grlass, Varnislies, Bruslies, 

GOLD & SILVER LEAF, COLORS, 

Tobacco, Cigars, Nuts, Confectionary, &c. 

IN THE STATE. 

A very choice selection of 

TMMt 

V E! R "Y I* O -W. 
AI.«0, PURE CREAM TAR FAR ANl>j5PICES 

Every article warranted as recommended. 



S. HYDE & CO. 



DEALERS IS 



AND 

HARD-WARE. 

The Subscribers, having erected a 

jrjBFr* nijrn cajfUfiooioiis store, 

Keep constantly on hand a large stock of Furniture, suited to 
the wants of the People of this County, consisting in part of 

MIRRORS, CHAMBER SETTS OF ALL STYLES. 
Paper Hangings, Oil Cloths, Curtain Fixtures. 

Also, A Large Assortment of 

COOKING,OFFICE& PARLOR STOVES, 

CARPENTER'S TOOLS, 

Ploughs, Cultivators, and other Farming Tools, - 

and all other kinds of Hardware, Woodenware. 
L<£AI> A]¥I> Oil-, 

Repairing of Iron and Tin ware done by an experienced 
workman. (C7" Picture Frames made to order. 

S. HYDE & CO. 



A. G. SCRANTON, 
HOUSE, SIGN AND CARRSAOE 



* . . 

Imitations of all kinds of 

MARBLE, WOOD AND STONE, CHINA GLOSSINa, 

Paper Ifaiagia^g^, Plaiss siicl jBt^corsstivr. 

iaiiiiililliiiillS 

oisr giLjJ^s&. 
SHOP IN THE BASEMENT OF 

ROTHWELL HALL, - DANIELSONVILLE. 

JOHN A BARKER, 



4 M^Wf%^r^WWW' h t^'lPlitJ^W" 



g) 



Main street, 



Danielsonville. 



Would call the attention of the public to the splendid pictures 
which he is now taking, and especially to the new style 

THE SERANOTYPE, 

which for elegance of finish and durability, cannot be surpassed 
I would further add, that perfect satisfaction is guaranteed 

for all pictures costing over 25 cents. 

Copying from Daguerreotypes and all the various kinds of 

pictures taken at the lowest prices. 

IV. siixj^i wXy, 

BOOTS AND SHOES MADE AND REPAIRED, 

Shop foot of Academy street. 



ATTOENEY AND COUNSELLOE AT LAW, 

OFFICE, ARCADE BUILDING. 
firm, c- Js^cojr, 

No. 1, Arcade Building, » Danielsonville. 
T^ftjy€>ic XXang-ixig:®; Oil Olotlis; Oarpets; 

Furniture, Cages, Pictures and Frames. 
[C7"Particular attention given to furnishing Coffins and 
Shrouds, at all times. 



• S. GLEASON, 

Dealer in 
Stcan Island and Peruvian 

Ooe^s &Loyd's Phosphates, Plaster and Ground Bone. 

Office at the Depot. 

REFRESHMENT SALOON 

in the Depot, where can be found at all times, 

FRUIT AND CONFECTIONERY, 

Tea, Ooffce, Pies aiKi Oalies, 

SODA WATER 

and everything that can be found in a first class Saloon, 
S. GI.lE^lSO^\ Proprietor, 



J. WALDO & CO., 

Having completed their 

Corner of Main and Academy streets, have now removed to 

it, where thej now offer for sale all articles that they 

have formerly dealt in, viz: 

GROCERIES, FLOUR, GRAIN, 

LIME, HAIR, CK ENT, 
BOOTS, SHOES, AND DOMESTIC GOODS, 

And all articles commonly kept in a country store. 

We shall be happy to see all our old customers, and as ma- 
ny new ones as may find it for their interest to favor us with 
a call. We still hold to our old motto : — 

"Quick Sales and Small Profits." 

WILLIAM WIGGIN, 

manufacturer of 

mmm mwm im iwmi 

Particular attention paid to Eepairing Boots & Shoes. 

Shop in Davis' Brick Block, - Danielsonville. 

A. F. BACON, 

CABINET MAKER, 

Particular attention paid to Painting Blinds. Shop in 
Eagle mill, Summer street, Danielsonville. 

~ A. S. WILSON, 

MACHINIST, 

Eagle Mill, Summer street, - Danielsonville. 



EDWARD L. CUNDALL, 

(Successor to Carpeater & Cundall,) 

ATTOENEY & COUNSELLOK AT LAW. 

Arcade Building, - ; Danielsonville, 

PRACTICAL DENTIST, 

OfSce opposite the Methodist Church, Danielsonville. 

CARPENTER AND BUILDER, 

D3^ Sash, Bliuds and Doors furnished to order. ' ^j^n 
.. -^ I 



i MONUMENTS, GRAVESTONES, &c. 

|i H. D. Sanford, Webster, Ms., M. L Sanford, Danielsonville 



DRESS Mi^KEK, 

OPPOSITE THE ARCADE. 

WILLARD LEAVANS, 

Manufacturer of 

POWER-LOOM HARNESSES. 



sr^vi.Dijrei, hjitc a co„ 
CARPENTERS & BUILDERS, 

Eagle Mill, Summer street. 

Providence & Danielsonville Daily Stage Line, 

Leave Providence at 11 A. M , every day, Sundays except- 
ed, Danielsonville at 7 1-2 A. M. 



TRANSCRIPT 

JOB PRINTING 



' 1/' m m ^ V «M D 

During the past few months we have added to our office 

Two ]Ne\v Presses; 

(the Job Press being of the most moiern pnttern.) and other prin- 
ting materials, wiiich give us facilities for duiug all kinds ot 

in the most modern style and at reasonable prices, a*, our office in 

ID-A.3XriE3LSOKI VIIL.11.E, 

Paflfhphlets, FhoAV M Is, Shop Bil-s, Bill Heads, Posters, 

Circulas-s, Manufacturers Ta^s, Business & Wedding Cards, 

&c., &c., &c., &c. 

Done in the best manner, at short notice. 



A Local Family Newspaper, 

IS PUBMSriKD KVERY THURSDAY MORNING, 
By J. Q. A. STONE, Editor and Proprietor. 

g^" The Traiiscript is a County Paper, containing al'. the ..^p 

County News, War News, and a general summary 
of all the News of- tli€ Day. 

Terms: ^l,.*?© prr yenv^ ^nvnrinhljj ii\ advance. 

Advertiseme:its inserttd at leasonable prices. 

7 



G H. REYNOLDS, 

Keeps constantly on hand a large stock of 

Groceries, Flour and Grain, 

CEMENT, LIME &, HAIR. 

PERUVIAN GUANO, 

and I.loi/cVs Supcr'phosphate af I^iunc^ 

FARMING TOOLS OF ALL KINDS. 

GRASS SEED, 

and all other artiole.s kept in a first clas.s Grocery Store. I am pre- 
piired te sell as low as can be bought elsewhere. 

At tlie Old Stand, Nos. 1 & 2 Mechanic street, 

I>A.\IELS0NVILL!,\ 



MmufictUier of 

SEWED AND PEGGED. 

OCT* All work warranted to suit. ^_/^ 

Sliop on Cottage street, nearly opposite tlio Engine House, D.inielfonville 



B- R, JOHNSON, M. D. 

would respectfully i)f )rm tlie citiz( in of Dinielsonville and vicinity 
that he haqtconcluded to become a resident of this place, and ' 
otf.M's his pi'otes.floiial services to the public. 

Dr. J. has hid si.^ yj irs' expjrien ;e in the hospitals of New York. 

1^" Residence in the house occupied by Mr. Joseph Snow, west 
side of the railroad. 

Refers to Dr Parsons, Providence ; Dr. Tracy, Norwich. 



JOHN S. KENYON, 

HiVRNESS AND REPAIR SHOP, 

Opposite the Arcade, - Daiiielsonville. 
The subscriber makes and Keeps constantly on hand. 

All kinds and styles of Harnesses, 

CHEAP FOR CASH. 

Particuhir attention paid to Repairing, Cleaning and Oiling Har- 
nesses. 

U*Itips^Iit jrse iSrushe'ii Curry Combs, Slankeis 
.Vi'is, Grass CSoih Sheets, Ar. [ 

^^ Harness Trimmings constantly on hand. / 



BREAD CRACKER AND CAKE BAKER, 

At his new Bakery on Main street. 



PAINTING AND PAPER HANqiNG 

EXi^:0UTED IN TilE NEATEST STYLp. 



AGENT FOR WHEELER & WILSON, S 

SEWING MACHINES, 



HORACE WOODARD, 
DAYVILLE HOTEL 

DAYVII.LE, CT. 



WM. A. NEWTON, 

FEUIT, OONFECTIONARY AND OIGABS, 

East Killingly. 



I THOMAS PAEKER, 

I DAYVILLE, CT., 

J Has in store^ a large stock of Goods, consisting of 

! Broadcloths, Doeskins, 
I READY-MADE CLOTHING, 

- ah extensive assortment, and fashionable styles, warranted to fft and 
sold clieap. A large assortment of 

HATS 86 CAPS, 
'.TRUNKS, VALISES, CARPET BAGS, UMBRELLAS, &Q. 

{ ITT^- CUSTOM TAILORING..v::j 

Jn the style of onr Garrr.ents and the qnality of our goods» we in- 
teiid to acknowledge no siiperior in Windham County. Call and 
~^se'e our goods and styles. anct ilie prices will salt reasonable customers 



JOHN MURRAY, 

ERCHANT TAILOR, 

Ready-niade Clothing always on hand. - - East Killingly. 



: ALMOND BARTLETT&CO, 

Dry Goods, Groceries & Crockery, i 

East Hiilln^gy. \ 




In June, 165i), Gov. Winthop obtained liberty of the As- 
sembly to purchase a large tract at Quinnebaug. He had al- 
ready, in 1653, made a purchuse of the native proprietors, of 
the lands comprized in the townships of Plainfield and Canter- 
bury, lying on both sides of the Quinnebaug. There was but 
a small number of families on the lands at the time, and the 
planters were scarce until the year 1689, when a number of 
people, chiefly from Massachusettts, made a purchase of the 
heirs of Gov. Winthrop, and began settlements in the northern 
part of the tract. In May. 1699, the General Assembly vested 
the inhabitants with town privileges, and the next year it was 
named Plainfield. We give below a copy of the original Seed 
from the Winthrops. 

To all people to whom this present act and Deed s^hall come. 
Greeting :~ Whereas the Hon'ble John Winthrop, Esqr. Late 
Gov'r of the Collony of Connecticott, in New England, deceas- 
ed, Did Long since, to witt, in the year 1653, purchase of the 
Indian sachems, then Inhabitants and native Proprietors of a 
Considerable Tract of Land in the Quinebaug Country, on 
both side the river called the Quinebaug River ; which said 
purchase was afterwards allowed of by the Gcnll assembly of 
the said Collony of Connecticott with liberty to settle a Plan- 
tation there, and whereas by the approbation, direction and al- 
lowance of John Winthrop Esqr., the now present Gov'r. of 
said Collony, and Maj'r Gen'll Wait Winthrop, of Boston, in 
the Province of the Massachusetts Bay, in New-England, sons 
of the afore'sd John Winthrop, Esquire; a plantation or Town- 
ship called and known by the name of Plainfield, hath of late 

7* 



82 PLAINFIELD. 



been settled on part of the Land aforesaid, according to the 
agreement and Reservations hereinafter mentioned, By Joseph 
Ooit, Clark, John Gallup, llenadara Gallup, Wm, GaUup," 
Henrj Stevens, Peter Crery, Samul Dean. Wm. Marsh, Stephen 
Hall, Thomas Stevens Junr., John Gallup Jr., John Smith, 
Thomas Stevens, Nathaniel Jewell, Joshua Whitney, Benjamin 
Palmer, Ebenezar Harris, John Fellows, Matthias Button, FA' 
ward ^paulding, the Heirs of Thomas Pierce deceased, John 
Spaulding, Jacob Warren, Edward Yeomans, John Yeomans, 
Samuel Kingsbery, Joseph Spaulding, Timothy Pierce, benja- 
min Spaulding, Thomas Williams, Samuell Shepard, William 
Douglas, Joseph Farkhurst, Samuel How, Isaac Wheeler, Eph- 
raim Wheeler and Peter Crery, Jr.; all or most of whom have 
already made considerable Improvements in the plantation 
aforesaid. Know all men therefore by these presents that we 
the said John and Wait Winthrop, as well for and in conside- 
ance of the summ of one hundred and fifty two pounds cur- 
rant, silver money to us well and truly paid, the Beceipt of 
which is hereby acknowledged, and of the, same and every part 
and parcell thereof full and am[ile discharge given as also for 
the avoiding of all doubts, disputes, Quarrells, coutrovers'.es and 
Law suites that have, shall or may happen to arise, be moved 
or prosecuted Belating to the said tract of land by them posses- 
sed and isnproved as aforesaid, or to any part or parcle thereof 
with the members andiippurtenances thereof and Improvements 
thereupon, within the bounds hereinafter named, and that the 
same may be held and enjoyed by the afore named Grantees 
and Inhabitants as their and each of their own proper Right, 
free hold Estate and inheritance, we the said John Winthrop 
and Wait Winthrop Have Granted Ratified Confirmed Remis- 
sed Released and for ever Quit claim and Do by these presents 
for ourselves Heirs and the Heirs of Each and Either of us ful- 
ly Ratify &c. unto the aforenamed Joseph Coit &c. all the 
(^rante b a' 0V3 named Inhabitants of the Town cf Plainfield, 
all our Right Title interest in and to the Tract of Land 
called and known by the name of plainfield bounded and but- 
ted as follows viz: The south west corner beginning at Quin- 
abare River in Norwich Line where s'd Line Crosses s'd River 
tjtience one mile and a quarter East and by South to an old 
Dead tree with an heap of stones about it marked with the Let- 
ters N. and P. P. which is norwich north east corner, thence 



PLAINFIELD. 83 ! 



an East lyne up a fair Rising Hill so Cross a miery Swamp 
being bounded partly by Norwich partly by Preston and part- 
ly by the Volunteers Land six miles and three quarters in 
breadth to a great heap of stones Lying on a flat rock on the 
East South East side of a boggie medow, which heap of stones 
is the South East corner of the s'd Township, from thence North 
to Greenwitch path through ci aggedLedges of Hocks then half a 
mile East by the said path to a heap of stones, from thence 
north Crossing Providence old Koad, thence by marked trees 
north to it- fair white oak tree Standing in a Rocky Gully with 
a gr^at heap of stones about it being about half a mile north 
East of a large fresh meadow which white oak tree is the north 
East corner of Plaintield Town ship being seven miles and an 
hundred Kodds in Length From thence a west Line a littel to 
the Southward of James his fort in a Rock thence west T)ver 
short Hills and Rarren plains a iittel to the north ward of a 
fresh meadow, thence to Quinabaug River to an oak tree on the 
Brink of said River which is the northwest corner of Plaiiifield 
Township and si a line tree stated b}' the gentlemen appointed by 
the gcnerall court to settle the bounds of plainfield being three 
miles and a half from the N. E. to the N. \V. corner and from 
said tree Obliquely as the River Quinabciug Runs to the place 
above \nentioned whear norwich Line crosses Quinabaug River, 
with all soiled uplands meadows meadow grounds, Whatsoever 
contained in the boundaries and Lines afore said, now being in 
their actual seizen and possession, with all woods and under 
woods, commons, pastures, Herbage, Seedings, stone, Rivers, 
Rivulets, Streams, Ponds, waters, Emoluments, Commodities, 
Hereditaiments, and appurtinances thereunto belonging or in 
any wise appurtaining, and their with now so occupied used or 
injoyed, all so all the Estate Right title interest use property 
Claims or demand which we the said John Winthrop, Wait 
Winthrop or either of us now have, ever had or in time to come 
might have or which our Heirs or the Heirs of either of us 
might have challenged or demanded in or to all the afore s'd 
discribed and Granted and Released premises b}'- vertue of the 
afore mentioned purchas or grant from the native Proprietors, 
or by any other manner of ways or means whatsoever ; — To 
have and to hold all the said granted and Released premises 
and appurtenances to them the above said Joseph Coit, <fec. 
to their and each and every of their Heirs and Assigns Respec- 



84 PLAINFIELD. 



' tively for ever, in equal proportions in all Divisions &c.; Ke- 
servina: only to ourseives the lands ni"ivileo:es and aonurtenan- 
j: CCS here ill after mentioned, within the Lines and boundaries 
ii above mentioned to bo to us, our Heirs and Assigns for ever, 
ij viz: Two Letts already laid out with proportionable in com- 
|! monago and undivided lands, also one lott Keccvered from Jo- 
;i seph Johnson by law, with all the privileges belonging to it: 
i| Ten acres upon Greenwich plain, also Ten acres llecovered by 
i| law fr«m Is ac Sheppard, and several divisions that are with- 
j! in the generall field that belongs to the lott over Moosup River 
,: to be hvid out adjoining to the Ten acres that was recovered 
1 1 from Isaac Sheppard. Excepting the Black hill lott, also the 
I free Liberty and full power of disposing of all Cerlar Swamps 

I that may or shall be found within the boundaries expressed 

I I (save only that it may and shall be lawfull for the grantees a 
Ij fore said, their Heirs and assigns to make use of Timber in the 
!; said swhamps for bilding and fencing in the said Town and not 
j; otherwise) also all minerall and ore of all sorts, that shall or 
i| may be found in or upon any of said land, also all Quarries of 
Ij stones, vnth full and free liberty of digging, improving and 
ij transporting the same on or fiom the places where they shall 
jj be found, also all convenient places for mills and water works, 
11 with free liberty of diging Earth and making Dam needfuU for 

\ the same. Reserving also to ourselves Heirs and ass'gns for ev- 
j ver, a Tract or neek of land Lying on the East side ofQuinna- 
baug River, butting on the River west and on the mill brook 
north, in quantity about ninety acres be it more or less; with 
full warrantee to Defend the above Granted premises and Ap- 
purtenances (the above Reservations only excepted) to the a 
fore mentioned Grantees and each of them, their Heirs and As- 
signs forever,, against the Lawfull claims and Demands of all 
persons that may or jshall by from or under Either of us, our 
Heirs or the Heirs of John Winthrop, Deceased, or any or all 
ol them. Claiming anj^ Right, Title or interest therein. 

in witness where of we have here unto put our hands and seal 
this 29th day of november In the fifth year of her majesties 
Reign, Annoque Domini 1706. 

Signed, sealed & delivered by John & Wait Winthrop. 

From that time the settlement of the town progressed until 
it is now one of the most important in the county. Its manu- 



PLAINFlELD. 85 



facturing capabilities have been largely improved. Plainfield 
has from a very earl}^ pi riod, liberally provided the means for 
educating the great mass of the people. The Academy was 
chartered as early as 1782, and the institution had been in ex- 
istence for many years previously, its board of officers being 
known as the 'Trustees of the Brick School. It is still in a 
flourishing condition. 



PLAINFIELD TOWK GOVERNMENT, 



Clerk and Treasurer, 
Lyman Spaulding. 



Registrar. 
Joseph A. Walker. 



SelectmeTiy 

Wm. Shepard, Caleb Bennett, Jos. Hutchins, Jr., J. S Smith, 
Henry Colvin. 



PLAINFIELD DIRECTORY, 

P. O. ADDRESS— PLAINFIELD. 



(/ard Albert, Carriage maker. 

Congden James, Biack.smith. 

Coggswell Wm. H. Phy.siciaii and Surgeon. 

Davis Robert, Stone Maaon. 

Denison Nathan, Saw and S'lingle mill. 

Fry Wm. Tanner <ind Saw and Grist mill. 

Grandy Wm.. W. Depot Master. 
I Leavens J. Manufacturer. 

Otis Nathaniel, Mason. 

Packer Stephen & Co., Cotton manufacturer. 

lloode Joseph, Saw nnd Shingle mill. 

Tiliinghast '\Valdo, Hotel keeper. 
j Tingley Geo. C. Principal Academy. 

j Wakeiield Otis, Soap Chandler. 

! Weilman Elijah, Shoe maker. 



I P. O. ADDRESS— CENTRAL VILLAGE. 

j Ames Jesse, (^ee Dyer & Ames.), 

I Boswe'.l J., W. Blacksmith. 

j Burleigh Lucian, Principal High School. 

] Cutler I. K. Dry Goods. 

I Coggswell Henry, Tin Ware. 

I Call He/iry S. Harness maker. 

I Collins J. cS: W.. Hotel keepers. 

j Dyer & \mes, Grist mill. 

I Dyer Wm. (see Dyer & Ames.) 

I Dyer Wm. Attorney at Law. 

i Edwards L. ilefreshment Saloon. 

I Fenner Arnold, Agent Central Co, 

I Gorton Jonathan, Groceries, Flour and Grain. 

j Hyde Lester, Depot Master. 

1 Herrick A. II. Jr., Jewe er. 

I Loritig Geo. Tin Ware. 

Munroe Nathan, Machinist. 

Mathevvson Phillip, Merchant. 

Morse John L. Saloon at Depot. 



I'LAIXFIELD. 87 



Penrose J. J. Attorney at L i\v. 

Kochc M. M. Boot and Shoe Maker. 

Smith E. Y. ^ Co., Dry Goods. 

Tainier K. M. Jjivery Stable. 

Walker J. A. Druggist and Apothesary. 

Wilcox J. M. jNJeichunt Tailor. 

AVeaver Reuben, Dry Goods and Groceries. 

Wakefield C. W. Wagon maker. 

Webster C. H. Agent Kennedy niilL 



P. O. ADDRESS— MOOSUP. 

Aldrich Daniel, Flou'- and Grain. 

Alniy Sampson, Cotton Manufacturer. 

Burgess Frank S, Physician and Surgeon-. 

Burgess Jared, B;ack.-niith. 

Bennett Albert Patent TuFt Work 

IVixon L. E. Physician and Surgeon. 

Dunlap George, Depot Master. 

Dellabarr E. Woolen Manufacturer, 

Hill Edwin E. Groceries. 

Kenyon Miss C. G. Millinery nnd Dress m; king. 

Kenyon S. P. Fruit and (Jonfeationery. 

Lathrop Pv. S. Agent Gladden Mill. 

Lovegrove George, Agent Alnivville Store. 

Mills J. C. Dry Goods 

Miller Jabez, Harness Maker. 

Miller Simon, Woolen Manufacturer. 

Hounds Miss L. H. Fancy Goods and Millinery, 

Salisbury T. B. Fruit and Coufeotionery. 

Tillinghasr C. A. Machinist. 

Weaver Thomas, Hotel Keeper. 



P. O. ADDERSS—WAUREGAN, 
Atkins H. A. Dry Goods and Groceries. 
Atwood J. S. Agent Wauregan mill. 
Gundall C. C. Pnysician and Surgeon. 
Covell Geo. }{. (see Scott \' Covell.) 
Johnson H. Bookkeeper \Vauregan mill. 
Leavens N. Boarding House kee^)er. 
Scott v'fe CjvcII Variety Store. 
Scott E. W. Depot Master. 



HENRY A. ATKINS, 

WAUliKPr AN, CONN. 
Denier in 

Bry Goods and Groceries, 

READY-MADE CLOTHING, 

Cloths, Oass'meres, Vestings, Dress Goods, 

§a!5, Cap5, BooUi aui) Sljoco, 

Hosiery, Gloves and Cravats, Laces, Edgings, Fmbroideries, 

GLASS, FLOUR, NAILS, SALT FiSH, PORK, 

Crockery, China & Glass Ware, Burning Fluid, Kerosene Oil, 

Books, Sationery and Wall Paper, 

DRUGS 8c iVJEDIClNES. 

Fine Toilet Soaps, Perfumery, Hair and Tooth Brushes &c. 

CTCTCUN D A I X, M dT 
PHYSICIAN & SURGEON. 

Office in Wauregan Hall Building, - Wauregan. 



JONATHAN GORTON, 

iHamifactuvcr of iHopcil Hiiruicljcs, 

and dealer in 

GROCERIES, FLOUR & GRAIN, 

Lime, Cement, Paints and Oils, 
Central Vill li^e, Ct. 

L. EDWARDS. 
DINING SALOON, 

Oppc ^ e the Depot, - - Central Village. 



CENTRAL HiGH SCHOOL, 

AT CENTHAL VILLAGE. 

REV. L. BURI.EIGH, - - Principal. 

Miss. GERTRUDE E. BURLEIGH, Assistant. 
C. S. MILLS, - - Teacher of Music. 

This school has been long and favorably known to the pub- 
lic, and recsntly its accouiffiodatitjns have been greatly increas- 
ed, and the teachers will use their best endeavors to confer on 
theia pupils the greatest amount of good. The course of study 
will be comprehensive and extended ; especially in all the sub- 
stantial branches suited to the wants of practical business, in 
all the relations of life. Teackers' classes will be termed, and 
special pains taken to fit those, who desire to teach, for their 
responsible duties. 

I^^A^TES OF TTJITTOnsr = 
Common English, - - $3,50 

Higher Branches, - - 4,00 

Music (f-c, an extra charge. A small charge for fuel and 
incidental expenses will be added to each bill. 

Terms will Commence as Follows : — Fall Term, August 
i 12, 1861 ; Winter Term, Nov. 11, 1861 ; Spring Term, Feb. 
3, 1862; Summer Term, May 5, 1862. 

Application should be made to the principal 

ISAAC K. CUTLER, ) p^^^,.,,,, 
JEREMIAH SHEPARD, ^ ^o"^°^^«®^- 

I. K» CUTLER. 

Dealer in 



READY-MADE CLOTHING, 

\Cr HATS, CAPS, BOOTS & SHOES, ^yj^ 

Carpetings, Paper Hangings, (fee. 



CENTRAL VILLAGE. 



H a r n e s s ]M[ a k e r ^ 

Harnesses Repaired, Cleaned and Oiled. Central Village. 



R. S. LATHROP, 

MOOSUP, : CONN. 

Agent for 

W. E. BRA MAN & GO'S 






(Double thread, for family use.) 

This Machino possesses advantages over anything now in use 

It is very simply constructed, not liable to get out of repair. 

It runs more rapidly and quietly than any other Machine. 

It need not be taken apart to be Oiled or Cleaned. 

It will embroider. 

It will gather. 

It takes a firm elastic stitch. 

It takes both upper and under thread from the original 
spool, thereby saving the trouble of re-winding. 

It also uses a straight needle, which is an advantage over 
most other Machines. 

DRUGGIST & APOTHECARY, 

STATIONERY AND FANCY GOODS, - .Central Village. 

Tin "W^are JVEaniafact^irer, 

CENTRAL VILLAGE. 



HISTORY OF POMFRET. 



The tract of land originally known as the " Mashamoquet 
purchase," and afterwards incorporated as the town of Pom- 
fret, containing fifteen thousand one hundred acres, was deeded 
by Capt. James Fitch, of Norwich, for the consideration of 
thirty pounds lawful money, to Samuel Ruggles, Sen., John 
Chandler, Benjamin Sabin, Samuel Craft, John Grosvenor and 
Samuel Ruggles, Jun., of Roxbury, Mass., and six other per- 
sons whom they might choose to be joint proprietors with them. 
The persons chosen were, John Pierpont, John White, John • 
Ruggles, John Gore, Samuel Gore and Thomas Morey. 

The deed was executed May 5th, 1668. It was signed by 
James Fitch, also by Owaneco, sachem of the Mohegans, and 
his son Josiah. 

This purchase was confirmed by the Geiieral Assembly of 
Connecticut, with a view to its becoming a town, July 8th, 
1686. An agent was employed to survey the " purchase," and 
to divide one half into twelve parts of equal value, which were, 
severally, assigned to the proprietors by lot. The remaining 
one half was held as joint stock. 

Some of the proprietors settled upon their lands as soon as 
the allotment was made ; others, at diiferent periods, after- 
wards ; while some never came, but sold the diviobd part, and 
ultimately, the whole of their shares. 

The town was subsequently enlarged bj several purchases — 
one of Governor Belcher, including the territory lying east of 
the Mashamoquet purchase, and extending to the Quinebaug 
river ; another, made by John Black well, including the eastern 
part of the present town of Brooklyn ; another, by William 
Stoddard, Esq., lying in the western part of Brooklyn, and in 
the eastern part of Hampton ; and lastly, by a narrow strip of 
land lying between the Mashamoquet purchase and the Stod- 
dard land, which was made by Mr. Benjamin. 



92 POMFRET. 



The original purchase, being- a part of the country called the 1 1 
" Wabbaquasset Hills," was once a favorite residence of the jj 
Indians. Some families were residing here, when the first jj 
white people came, and the remains of their habitations contin- j | 
ued many years. . j 

The geological formation of this town gives character to its ' ' 
scenery and to its soil. The hills, many of which have co.isid- | 
erable elevation, are oblong with their shortest axes from east j j 
to west, and are curved with great regularity. In the Ian- I 
guage of Dr. D wight, who described th^m fifty years ago, — j- 
"They are remarkably exact and singularly elegant." The I' 
stones upon the surface, particularly upon the Mashamoquet 
purchase, were brought by the " drift formation.'^ The rock, 
in places, is wholly decomposed on the surface, cropping out | j 
only in the valleys and ravines. Ii 

The proportion of clay in the soil makes it retentive of water, 
i and consequently stiff and cold in the spring. It also gives , 
j more than an average dampness to the atmosphere throughout 1 1 
j the year, and reduces the mean temperature below that of ad- i i 
j joining towns. But the soil is strong — contains a large pro- 
portion of organic matter, and when thoroughly worked, gives 
j full returns of grass and grain. There is probably but little 
I land in the State which pays better for the labor which is be- 
I stowed upon it. 

There are three streams of water winding through this town, j i 
which retain their original Indian names. The largest is the I ! 
Mashamoquet, from which the first purchase took its name. 
The other two empty into this — viz : the Wappoquians, which 
runs by the burying ground in the first parish, and the Nee- 
wichewanna,^which comes from the hills in the south part of 
the town. 

The early inhabitants of this town were persons who feared 
God and loved the institutions and ordinances of the gospel. 
They bore to the wilderness here the impressions which that 
holy and enterprising servant of Christ, John Elliot, of Eox- 
bury, their pastor, had made upon their hearts. As soon as ■ 
their numbers and circumstances would admit they commenced 
exertions to have the stated ministry of the gospel and a 
sanctuary. 

On the 28th of October, 1713, the town by vote, applied to 
Mr. Ebenezer Williams, of Roxbury, to come and preach to 



POMPRET. 93 



them. On the 23d of December of that year, he came and 
began his labors. There was but one framed house in the town, 
I three miles from the place ot preaching, where Mr. Williams 
boarded. On the 16th of February, 1714, the town voted to 
invite Mr. Williams to become their pastor, and he accepted 
their invitation. In the summer of 1715, a church was or- 
ganized and Mr. Williams was ordained, fie continued the 
pastor -of the church until his death, which occurred* March 
28th, 1753. Mr. Williams belonged to a family which has 
been highly distinguished in the history ot the country, and 
was himself an eminent minister of the gospel. 

Since the death of Mr. Williams, the church has had five 
pastors, occupying a period of one hundred and eight years. 

Two churches have been formed from this first church in 
Pomfret, viz : — the Congregational church in Brooklyn, which 
was originally, the second church in Pomfret, organized Nov. 
21st, 1734, and the church in Abington, organized Jan. 28th, 
1753. Churches of other names, have been formed within the 
limits of the town, in years comparatively, recent, viz — a 
Baptist church in 1806, an Episcopal church in 1830, and an 
Advent society in 1843; the Friends also, have a meeting 
house, which was erected in 1820. 

The educational history of the town is worthy of some no- 
tice. It appears from the records of the town, that immedi- 
^ately upon the erection of the meeting house, and before it 
was finished, they voted to " erect a school house near the 
meeting house." A committee was also appointed to oversee 
the aflfairs of the school, in general. In 1723 there were three 
schools established and in ftrfl operation, one in the center, one 
in the north and another in the south part of the town. In 
1729 it was voted, "to raise one penny on the pound to defray 
the expenses of the schools," the town also directed the select- 
men to allow any number of families living remote from the es- 
tablished school, upon request, to establish one in their vicini- 
ty. Thus arrangements were early made for the instruction of 
all the youth of the town. These arrangements continued with 
some modifications, until the dispensation of the "School Fund, 
and the system of laws connected therewith. 

The early inhabitants made special eflForts to furnish themsel- 
ves with the means of general and useful knowledge. In 1739, 
sixteen men raised the sum of two hundred and fifty-four pounds 

8* 



94 POMFRET. 



for the establishment of a library. After the formation of the 
society others quickly joined them, and paid an additional sum 
of one hundred and eighty five pounds. With these funds a 
valuable purchase of books was made in London, and presents 
of books were also received from gentlemen in England. — 
There is a vote of thanks on the record of the society, to Rev. 
Dr. Guise of London, for his published works. To this associ- 
ation, G'en. Israel Putnam was admittecl Aug. 27th, 1753, and 
paid sixteen pounds "old tenor." 

The early history of this town in the cause of civil freedom 
is most honorable. The first inhabitants were themselves free 
men; they belonged to a race who, like their pastor and teacher, 
John Elliot, "knew no king but Jesus." They considered all 
others to be usurpers, both temporally and spiritually. In the 
belief and practice of this sentiment, they lived through their 
colonial state. The character of Putnam was but an exponent 
of the principles and feelings of the people around him; the in- 
habitants of his vicinity made the man. 

The following letter from the Selectmen of Boston to the Se- 
lectmen of Pomfret, July 8th, 1774, when the British troops 
were quartered there, will show the state of feeling in both pla- 
ces. 

"Gentlemen: — By the hand of Mr. Elias Wells we received 
your generous and kind benefaction for the poor of this distress- 
ed town. We cannot enough express our gratitude for this 
instance of your bounty, in which you have liberally contribu- 
ted to the releif of many. What you have thus lent to the 
Lord, we trust and pray that He will pay you again. It gives 
us great consolation amidst our complicated and unparalelled 
sufferings, that our brethren in other colonies show such christ- 
ian sympathy and true benevolence towards us. That we are 
greatly distressed needs no comment. Our harbor blockaded 
hj a fleet of ships; our foreign trade actually annihilated; thou- 
sands of poor reduced to extreme want; troops continually pour- 
ing in upon us to insult us in our distress: is a consideration 
that must excite the pity of the most obdurate. However, al- 
though we thus sufier, we are willing to suffer still more, rather 
than give up our birthright privileges. With great regard, we 
are your brethren and humble servants." 

In 1774, a company was formed in this town, with reference 
to the threatening appearance of the times. Stephen Brown 



POMFEET. 95 



was the captain, subsequently killed at the taking of Mud Fort, 
and Thomas Grosvenor, afterwards Colonel, the Lieutenant. — i 
Immediately after the news of the battle of Lexington, this com- ; 
pany marched to Cambridge, and was engaged in the battle of [ 
Bunkpr Hill, where three Pomfret men were killed, and fifteen | 
wounded I 

At a town meeting in March, 1779, the town voted to ap- I 
point a committee to supply the families of the poor, whose hus- \ 
bands and fathers were gene into service. Then the question j 
was put, whether the town would take any measures to encou- i 
rage and promote the speedy raising and enlisting of men to fill j 
up the number to be raised in the town, according to the pro- ! 
posal of the Governor and council, — passed in the affirmative. ; 
Also, voted, and agreed to firmly unite among ourselves, and I 
strictly, to adhere to the laws regulating prices, and to use our ! 
joint and several influences, to support and maintain the same 
as a very important regulation, for the support of the army, 
and preventing every measure, artfully taken for the oppres- 
ion of the poor. Also, voted, that the sum of twenty-four 
pounds, lawful money, be paid to each effective man that has j 
or shall enlist into the continental army, for three years or 
during the war in this town by the 7th day of April, next, 
not exceeding eighty men." This money appears to have been 
raised partly by subscriptions, and partly by tax. 

Under this encouragement, s3venty-one men, from this town, 
enlisted into the continental service. The town paid them 
a bounty of three thousand four hundred and seven pounds ; 
and for the support of their families, two thousand eight 
hundred and eighty-nine pounds, in all, six thousand two hun- 
dred and ninety-six pounds ; or twenty thousand nine hundred 
and sixty-five dollars, ($20,965). 

Since the Revolution, the history of Pomfret has been that 
of a quiet agricultural town, varied by the small occasions 
which arise in such a community. We have no water-power. 
The construction of railroads has changed the course of travel 
in relation to us and moved the centres of business. Parts of 
the town have been pared off to make other towns. Our sur- 
face has been contracted, our population diminished, But 
what remains, we love, — our soil is vr, luable. We hope that 
the character and the spirit of freedom, which belonged to 
the original inhabitants will go down through all the genera- 
tions to come. 



CHOLLAR & WILLIAMS, 

Dealers in 

DRY GOODS AND GROCERIES, 

BURNING FLUID, KEROSENE OIL, 

PATENT MEDICINES, &c. 
Fertilizers of every Description. 

SILKS, DELAINES, PRINTS, 

Slieetings, Furnish-ing Qoods &c., 
BOOT, JACKET, WOOLEN and COTTON YARN. 

Pomfret Landing. 

SURGEON DENTIST, 

Pomfret. 

Blacksmiths and Wagon Makers, 

. Pomfret Landing. 



BLACKSM ITH, 

Pomfret. 



POMFRET DIRECTORY, 

P, O. ADDRESS -POMFRET, 

Davis F. Merchant. 

Holmes Samuel, Carpenter. 

Holt Hiram, Physician and Surgeon. 

Richmond John. Shoe maker. 

Smith Grin, Blacksmith. 

Sessions Lewis, Furniture manufacturer^ 

Wright Henry, Carpenter. 

Williams Lewis, Dentist. 



P. O. ADDRESS— POMFRET LANDING. 

Chollar & William;?, Dry Goods and Groceries. 

Chollar Jared, (see Chollar & Williams.) 

Cox T. Blacksmith. 

Kingslej Ralph N. Butcher. 

Martin C. H. Wagon Maker. 

Underwood Samuel, Carpenter. 

Underwood Albert, Carpenter. 

Webb Geo. Grist mill. 

Williams Charles G. (see Chollar & Williams.) 



P. O. ADDRESS— ABINGTON. 

Clapp James, Variety Store. 

Dresser Sanuiel. Shoe maker. 

Dennis Amos P. l>ry Goods and Groceries. 

Grosvenor Charles I. Judge of Probate. 

Holmes Samuel, Carpenter. 

Ligalls George S. lilacksmith. 

Marcy Orin, Blacksmith. 

Pike Willis, Carpenter. 

Sharpe George H. Butcher. 



POMFEET TOWN CtOYEENMENT. 

Clei'k and Treasurer, 

Job Williams. 

Registrar. 

Hiram Holt. 

Selectmen, 

Wm. H. Sabin, Alanson Peck, P. B. Johnson. 



SCOTLAND DIRECTORY, 

P. O. ADDRESS— SCOTLAND. 

[The history of this town, previous to its organization, is em- 
braced in the history of the town of Windham. 

This town was originally a part of the town of Windham, 
and was incorporated as a town by the Legislature of 1857, 
and the first town meeting under its act of incorporation was 
held at 9 o'clock, A. M., on the 0\'st Saturday of July, 1^57, 
at the vestry room of the Congregational Meeting House in 
said town of Scotland.] 

Anthony Wm. J. Blacksmith. 

Adams Thomas L. Painter. 

Billings George H. Hotel keeper. 

Bennett James, Variety store. 

Bromley & Smith, Variety store. 

Carey Alfred W. Machinist. 

Cook Calvin, Manufacturing carpet yarn. 

Davison Wm. Merchant. 

Ensworth & Carey, Saw & Shingle mill. 

Gager John P. Jr. Saw mill. 

Hebbard A. P. Mason. 

Palmer Alfred, Wheelwright. 

Pray xVnthony, Mason. 

Kood Henry, Blacksmith. 

Spafford Darius, Carpenter. 

Watson S. N. Saw & Shingle mill. 



SOOTLAID TO¥/N GOVEENMENT, 

Clerk, Treasurer and Register, 
Benjamin Hovey. 



Selectmen. 
Calvin B. Bromley, Wm. P. Noyes, Marcus Benham. 



STERLING. 



Sterling, formerly a part of Yoluntown, was incorporated 
as a town in 1794. The town is of an oblong shape, 8 miles 
in length from North to South, and has an average breadth of 
three. It is bounded N. by Killingly, E by the Rhode Isl- 
and line, S. by Voluntown, and W. by Plainfield. The face of 
the township is generally uneven, but there are some sections 
of pine plains. The soil is a light gravelly and sandy loam. 
The land is best adapted to a grain culture. The town is 
watered by two branches of the Moosup river, on which are 
four cotton flictories. 

Near the centre of this town was a cavern, called the Devil's 
Den, possessing very singular and curious features. It is situ- 
ated within a ledge of rocks, and has a circular area of about 
100 feet in diameter. The rock is cleft in two places, forming 
at each a chasm or fissure about fifty feet in depth, through 
one of which there runs a small stream of water ; the other 
communicates with a room about 12 feet square, at the inte- 
rior part of which there is a fire place, and a chimney extend- 
ing through the rock above, forming an aperture of about three 
feet square. In another part ot the rock there is a natural 
staircase, winding round it from the bottom to the top. In 
the cold season of the year, a large mass of ice is formed in 
the room above described, by the dashing of water down the 
chimney, which continues there through nearly the whole of 
the warm months ; the sun being almost excluded from this 
subterranean recess. 

The railroad being considered of more importance than this 
den, has cut through it, and thus the romantic features of the 
place have been destroyed. 



SimiNG DIRECTORY, 

P. O. ADDRESS— STERLING. 

Bennett Solomon, Dry Goods and Groceries. 
Crane Charles, Groceries. 
Douglas Archibald, Judge of Probate. 
Gaiffiths Silas, Saw and Shingle Mill. 
Knight, 11 K. Blacksmith. 
Martin William, Grist Mill. 
Potter Edwin, Warp Manufacturer- 
Potter George, Blacksmith. 
Potter William, Groceries.- 
Pike William & Co. Chemical Works. 
Spaulding Joseph, Groceries. 
Taylor Jeremiah, Wood Turner. 
Westcott Harry, Blacksmith. 
Wilbur Thompson, Blacksmith. 



STERLING TOWN GOVERNMENT. 

Clerk, Treasurer and Registrar, 
Archibald Douglas. 



Selectmen^ 
Wheaton Wood, Charles Mason, A. Douglas, 



HISTORY OF VOLUNTOWN, 



The town of Voluntown was recognized as early as October 
1715. It comprised a territory on the border of Rhode 
Island, perhaps twelve miles long and not half that breadth. 
It is said to have been named from certain grants made of its 
territory to military volunteers. The surface of the town is 
rough and hilly, and the soil of moderate fertility. The peo- 
ple have been mostly farmers though small manufacturing 
villages exist in different parts. In May 1794 the northern 
part of Voluntown was incorporated as the town of Sterling 
giving 26 square miles to the new town and leaving 38 in the 
old. 

The first church in Voluntown was formed Oct. 15th, 1723 
It was Presbyterian in its discipline, many of the early settlers 
of the town being of Scotch-Irish origin. Its pastor was Rev. 
Samuel Dorrance, a native of Ireland, and graduate of the Uni- 
versity of Glasgow ; ordained Pastor at Voluntown, Dec 23d, 
1723, and dismissed Dec. 12th, 1770. He died in the town, 
Nov 12th, 1775, aged 90 years. He was buried with his peo- 
ple, near t'leir then place of worship, on the site now lying in 
the tow" [ Sterling 

In I i 45 there was a separation from the Presbyterian Church 
and Alexander Miller was ordained their Pastor, April 15th, 
1751, but the Church was afterwards united with the Separate 
Church of Plainfield, and Mr. Miller removed to that town. 

A Congregational Church was formed in the -south part of 
Voluntown, ('Nazareth Society,) Feb. 12th, 1772. The only 
pastor was Rev. Solomon Morgan, ordained Apr. 15th, 1772, 
dismissed Feb, 26th, 1782, and afterwards settled in Canterbu- 
ry and Canaan. This Church has for many years been practi- 
cally extinct. 

After the Presbyterian Church, of which Mr. Dorrance was 
pastor, had fallen into decay, a Congregational Church took its 
place, organized June 30th, 1779. Over this there have been 

9 



102 VOLUNTOWN. 



' settled four pastors. Rev. Micaiah Porter, a native of Brain- 
tree, Mass., and a graduate of Brown University, was ordain- 
ed Nov. 22d, 1781, and continued till dismissed, Aug. 28th, 
1800. He was afterwards settled in Plainfield,. N. H. 

Bev. Otis Lane was born in Wrenlhara, Mass., and grad- 
uated at Harvard College, was installed at Voluntowu, Oct. 
,r 29, 1828, (having been previously pastor at S:urbridge, jMass.,) 
and dismissed Sept. 10, 1834. Rev. Jacob Allen, a native of 
Columbia, and graduate of Dartmouth College, who had been 
pastor at Tunbridge, Vt., and Eastbury, was installed at Vol. 
untown, Oct. 11th, 1837, and dismissed Nov. 25th, 1849, but 
after one year's absence, returned and supplied the people till 
his death, March 13th, 1856. Rev, Charles L Ayer, a native 
of North Stonington, was ordained pastor, Jan. 8th, 1859. 

After the division of the town, the people connected with the 
last namei church erected a house of worship on the boundary 
between Voluntown and Sterling, hence called the ' Line Meet- 
ing house." This house has lately been replaced by a new one 
on the same site. It stands on an elevated ridge, commanding 
a wide view to the east and west, and is surrounded by pleas- 
ant farmhouses. The nearest Post Office is called Gollamer. 



VOLUNTOWN TOWN GOVEENMENT. 

Cterky Treasurer and Register^ 

Elisha Potter. 

Selectmen. 

Wm. C. Stanton, C. E. Main, A. W. Gallup. 



VOLUNTOWN DIEEOTOEY. 

p. O. ADDRESS — VOLUJVTOIVJ^. 

Brown Palmer A. Wagon Maker. 

Briggs, Spencer & Co. Cotton Manufactarers. 

Dixon R. H. Kersey Manufacturer. 

Gallup N. S. Judge of Probate. 

Lester John G. Shingle Mill. 

Main Charles E. Carpenter. 

Pope J. A. Cotton Manufacturer. 

Starkweather Joseph, Hotel Keeper. 

Sanders Martin, Grist Mill. 

Starkweather and Jencks, Cotton Yarn Manufacturers. 



HISTORY OF WINDHAM, 



Joshua, an Indian sachem, son of Uncas the celebrated 
Mohegan chief, gave by one of the provisions of his will, dated 
Feb. 29, 1675, (March 10, 1675, N. S.) to sixteen gentlemen, 
mostly residents o: Norwich, the tract of land comprising an- 
cient Windham. It embraced most of the territory now inclu- | 
ded in the towns of Windham, Mansfield, Hampton, Chaplin, 
and Scotland, with a portion of Canterbury. It is thus descri- 
bed in the v/ill. -'I Give and Bequeath all that tracke of land 
lying to the Westward of Appaquage Estward from Williman- 
! tuck River South from Appaquage pond eight miles broad &c. 
To C'apt John Mason, Lieut Samuel Mason, Mr. Daniel Mason, 
Mr. James Fitch Senr., James Fitch Jr., John Birchard, Lieut 
Thomas Tracy, Thomas Adgate, Simon Huntington, Thomas 
Letfingwell Sr., John Olmstead, William Hide, William Backus 
Hugh Calkins, Capt. George Denison, Mr. Daniel Wctherell." 
These were the original proprietors of Windham, and are usu- 
ally called "Joshua's legatees." Appaquage, the in'tial boun- 
dary of this track is near the N.E. Corner of Hampton. The 
grant contained from 50 to 60,000 acres of land. Additions 
were made to it from time to time, and some changes were ef- 
fected in the boundary lines. 

In the spring of 1686, preparations were ma,de to settle a 
plantation on this tract. Lots were laid out at (what is now) 
Windham Centre, Mansfield Centre, and Willi mantic". It was 
jiot however, until 1689, that a settlement was effected. In 
the spring of that year, according to tradition, John Cates 
built the first house at Windham Centre. Mansfield began to 
be settled soon after, but Willimantic not till some years later. 

The "new plantation" received from the General Court, in 
1692, a grant of town privileges, and was named Windham. — 
Very little is known of Cates, the first settler. He came from 
Eno-land, where he left a family, and according to tradition, Ian- 



104 WINDHAM. 

ded in Virginia, from whence he came to Norwich, where he 
purchased a "1000 acre right" in the Windham tract, and be- 
came the pioneer settler. He was evidently a pious and bene- 
volent man, and by his will gave 200 acres of land for the ben- 
efit of the poor of the town, and 200 more for a school house, 
besides a legaf y to the church. He died July 16th, 1697. 

Jonathan Ginnings (now written Jennings) was probably the 
first settler with a family, and the father of the first child born 
in Windham. The following were the accepted inhabitants in 
1693, and of course the earliest settlers: — Joshua Ripley, Jo- 
nathan Hough, Jonathan Orane, Jonathan Ginnings, Samuel 
Hyde, Thomas Huntington. William Backus, John Larrabee, 
Thomas Bingham, John Read, John Royce, John Backus", 
Jeremiah Riple3^ John Gates, Samuel Birchard, Robert Wade, 
Peter Cross, Richard Hendee, James Birchard, Samuel Lin- 
coln, John Arnold. The inhabitants increased quite rapidly, 
and in 1703 Mansfield was set off from Windham and made a 
town. Hampton became a town in 1786 ; Chaplin, (mostly 
from Mansfield and Hampton) in 1822, and Scotland was set 
off from Windham in 1857. 

The first church was organized at Windham, Dec. 10, 1700, 
and the Rev. Samuel Whiting, of Hartford, who had for sev- 
eral years preached to the people, was ordained the first pas- 
tor. The second church was organized at Hampton in 1723, 
and the third at Scotland in 1735. The parish in which each 
was located became an ecclesiastical society. 

Windham was made the County seat of Windham County 
on its organization in 1726, and continued to be the county 
town until 1820. The county was originally composed of the 
following towns, viz : AVindham, Lebanon, Plainfield, Canter- 
bury, Mansfield, Coventry, Pomfret, Killingly, Ashford, Vol- 
untown, Mortlake, Woodstock and Union. 

Windham was formerly a town of much importance, being a 
,j political and commercial centre, and has produced many emi- 
nent men, such as Rev. Eleazar Wheelock, D. D., originator of 
the celebrated Indian Charity School at Lebanon, and founder 
and first President of Dartmouth College. Hon. Samuel 
Huntington, one of the signers of the Declaration of Indepen- 
dence, and Governor of Connecticut; Hon. Eliphalet Dyer, 
member of the first American Congress^ Chief Judge of the 
State of Connecticut, &c., besides many others, distinguished 
in the civil, military and religious professions. 



WINDHAM. 105 



Windham became famous, the world over, on account of a 
singular affair that occurred in the town during the summer of 
1758, called the "Battle of the Frogs." There seem.s to be no 
doubt that the people were greatly frightened one night by 
some unusual demonstration among the bull-frogs. It is not 
easy at this day to ascertain what occasioned the rumpus in 
frog-dom : but the current tradition is, that owing to a severe 
drought, the water in the pond became very low, and the frogs 
fought among themselves for the enjoyment of what remained. 
During the battle they made a terrible noise, which greatly 
frightened the staid people of the town, some of whom believed 
the French and Indians were coming, while others supposed 
the day of Judgment was at hand. A great amount of ridicule 
has been showered upon the people of the town in consequence 
of this curious affair, and they not unfrequently at the present 
day have to bear the reproach of being descendants of the 
heroes of the frog fight. 

The present town of Windham embraces Windham Centre, 
the villages of North and South Windham, and the Boroufjh of 
Willimantic. The latter place contains about 3000 inhabi- 
ants, more than twice the number in the rest of the town. It 
has been built up as a manufacturing village by the excellent 
water power afforded by the Willimantic river, which passes 
through it, and has here a fall of about 100 feet in a mile. 

Some few families settled at Willimantic Fall, — as this 
part of Windham was anciently called, — soon after 1700, and 
a saw and grist mill were built here before 1710, at the place 
afterwards called the "State." In 1776 Elderkin and Wales of 
Windham established a Powder mill at this place under 
the patronage of the government ; and a considerable part of 
the powder used during the war of the Revolution by the 
Connecticut and other Continental troops, was manufactured 
here. The present village of Willimantic dates its existence 
from 1822. Daring that year P. 0. Richmond of Providence 
built the first Cotton factory, and several others were erected 
in the course of a few years. 

From that time until the present, the progress of the vil- 
lage has been onward, and it now stands among the first in 
Eastern Connecticut, in point of thrift and business activity. 



9* 



WINDHiM DIRECTORY 



P. O, ADDRESS— WILLIMANTIC. 

Arnold Joel H. Attorney at Law. 

Alpaugfi & Hooper, I'rv Goods. 

Avery William B, Boots, Shoes and Clothing. 

At wood Warren, Sash and Blind Manufactory. 

Avery Henry W. Boots and Shoes. 

Babcock Courtland, Groceries. 

Baldwin Lloyd E. Master Builder. i i 

Bassett (Jos. C.) & Wilson, Tin Ware, 

Brown Harrison, Groceries. 

Brooks A. E. European House. 

Burnham George W. Groceries and Flour- 

Brainard Henry, Brainard's Hotel. 

Clark Silas, Machinist. 

Clark Isaac A.. Boots and Shoes.. 

Clark Lucian H. Dry Goods. 

Clark & Backus, Tin Ware. 

Conant H. Machinist. 

Congdon T. R. & J. Crockery and Glass Ware, 

Crane Edmund, Mason, 

Cushman J. E. Furniture and Coffins. 

Davison (R.) & Moulton, Groceries and Furniture. 

Dean Chester, Livery Stable. 

Elliott George C. Boots and Shoes. 

Elliott George E. Clothing. 

Edson J. M. Soap and Candle Manufacture.. 

Pitch James O. Dentist 

Griswold 0. B. Marble and Gravestones. 

Harris Edward, Meat market. 

Hall Horace. Groceries and Drugs. 

Hannover George W. Dry Goods and Groceriea. 

H; rtshorn Z. C. Boots and Shoes. 

Hayden Whiting, Agent Smithfield Mfg. Co. 

HaydenVVhiting & Co. Dry Goods and Groceries. 

Hayden James E. Book Keeper. 

Jacobs L. W. Dry Goods. 



WINDHAM. 107 



Jillson C. Book keeper. 

Jillson Asa W. Insurance Agent. 

Johnson D. F. Carpenter and Joiner, 

Jordan Lyraan, Mason. 

Johnson M. Groceries. 

King J. Drugs and Medicines. 

Kinibel S. H. Boots and Shoes. 

Keigwin John G. Clothing, 

Lathrop Lee, Depot Master.. 

Lester John, Depot Master. 

Lewis Francis, Nurseryman. 

Lincohi Allen, Dry Goods and Groceries™ 

Lord Daniel, Broker. 

Lord Joshua B. Cotton Warp manufacturer. 

Lewis Stephen, Dry Goods and Groceries. 

Lyon Warren, Mason. 

Moulton Albert, Millwright. 

Olin Nathaniel, Mason. 

Perkins O. S. Groceries and Provisions. 

Porter Samuel A. Carpenter and Joiner. 

Rice S. V/. & G. S. Blacksmiths & Wagon makers. 

RoUinson Joseph, Soap Chandler. 

SaiFord Jason, Drugs and Medicines. 

Sparks John & Son, (John L.) Bakers. 

Stanniford James C. Variety Store. 

Stearns N. A Harness maker. 

Tanner Warren, Livery Stable. 

Thresher S. S. Millinery. 

Tracy John. Agent Windham Mfg. Co,. 

Tucker David K. Barber. 

Turner Thomas, Dry Goods. 

Turner (M.) & Wilson, Livery Stable^ 

Walden James, Books and Stationery 

Watson Joseph A. Book keeper. 

Wilson John, (see Bassett & Wilson. 

Wilson I (see Turner <^ Wilson.) 

P. O. ADDRESS— WINDHAM, 

Bingham Samuel, Cashier Windham Bank. 
Burnham Alfred A. Attorney at Law. 
Burnham Edwin I. Merchant. 



108 WINDHAM. 

j Dyer Benjamin, Druggist. 

Follet Abner, Blacksmith. 
Follett Marvin, Pointer. 
Hamlin George, Dentist 
•Hebbard John W. Mason. 
Huntington Rufus, Merchant. 
Ingraham Lucius, Hatter. 
Johnson James M. Horse dealer. 
Johnson William, Cattle dealer. 
Maine Sumner P. Brick maker. 
McCollum Henry, Mechanic and Inventor. 
Perry Albert, Carpenter. 
Bobbins Thos. C. Timber Merchant. 
Rood Rufus, Blacksmith. 
Starkweather Abel, Lumber Merchant. 
Swift Justin, Manufacturer. 
Swift William, Variety Store. 
Thompson Charles, Hotel keeper. 
Waldo AVilliara, Mason. 
Woodworth Chester A. Merchant, 

P. O. ADDRESS— SOUTH WINDHAM, 

Byrne Sami. G. & Co. Variety Store. 

Card Martin, Butcher, 

Chappel Ralph, Master Builder. 

Kinney Alfred, Groceries. 

Smith Charles, Manufacturer.. 

Smith William, Machinist. 

Smith, Winchester S: Co., Paper Machine manufacturer. 

Weaver F. B. Machinist. 

Weaver H. B. Manufacturer. 

Weaver Alpheus H. Machinist. 

Winchester Harvey, (see Smith, Winchester 4* Co.) 

Woodward Asa C. Blacksmith. 

Woodworth Leonard, Blacksmith. 



P. O. ADDRESS— NORTH WINDHAM, 

Lincoln D wight. Felt manufacturer. 

Lincoln George, '' " 

Lincoln Frank M. Merchant. ' 



WINDHAM. 109 ; 



Lincoln Ralph, Merchant. 

Lincoln Stowcll, Woolen Manufacturer. 

Spencer Freeman D. Manufacturer. 

V/INDEAM TOWN GOVERNMENT, 

Clerk and Treasurer, 
William Swift. 

Registrar. 
William L. Weaver. 
! Selectmen, 

! Horace Hall, F. M. Lincoln, E. E. Burnhani. 



FLOUR, GRAIN AMD GROCERIES, 

Lime, CJeraent <fec. 

Dry Goods G-rocerics, Boots and Shoes^ 

CHAPLIN AND WILLIMxiNTIC. 

BRAINARD'S HOTEL, 

HENRY BRAINARD, - - PROPRIETOR. 



L I VER Y STABLE, 

Horses and Carriages to Let. - 0pp. the Depot. 

G R O C E R I i : S , 
DRUGS AND MEDICINES. 



THOMAS TURNER, 

Dealer in 

FOREIGN, FAMCY AND DOMESTIC 

A N D — 

CARPETS, 

CUSTOM ^6 READY-mADE CLOTHING 
Broad Cloths, Oassimeres, and Vestings. 

Millinery, Hats, Caps, Boots and Shoes, 

GREAT BARGAINS FOR CASH. 
Store next east of Brainord's Hotel, - Willi maiitic. 



STEPHEN LEWIS, 



ha.s on hand, and intends to keep a good siippW of choice 



^ n 



^ 



' {^ 



'mV 



i 



% w w *i m m w mk 
DRY eOOQS, BOOTS, SHOES, 

and all Goods nsuall-v in a general Variety Store which he intends 
to sell at a small profit for CASH, or its equivalent. 

Farmers' Produce taken in excliange for Goods. 
AT THE WINDHAM COfviPANY STORE, - WILLIi\^ANTIC. 



T. R. & J. CONGDON, 

Wholesaln and Retail dealers in. 




mkx% €\)m, mm, 



1 



SILVER PLATED WARE, 

Britannia, Japanned, Tin and Wooden Ware. 

TABLE & POCKET OUTLEIIY, 

CORDir, LINES, BRUSHES, STOVES, &0. 
JflaiH sSrcei, . - - - fWHlHrnaniiCn 

JOHN G*KEIGWIN, 

Dealer in 

Ready- made Clotlii iig*, 

AND FURNISHINQ GOODS, 

iilljif Llliili. f Miili,., 



Oax'pet and Eiia.iiielc<l Uags, &c. I 

No. 2 Brainard's Building, opp. the Depot, 
WILLLMANTIC. 



EUROPEAN HOUSE, 

OPPOSITE THE DEPOT, - . - . WIfXIMANTIC. 

CONDUCTED ON THE EUEOPEAN PLAN. 

•Meals (ft €?H hours or Ihe day, 

A. E. BROOKS, Proprietor 

~~~ xErcxjSH:M:A_M, 

Manufacturer and Dealer in 

FURNITURE AND COFFINS, 

WILLI JI ANTIC. 



Manufacturers of 

Satinet Warps, Harness Twine and Cotton Thread. 

CHESTS R nE.lJ^\ 

LIVERY STABLE, 

^^7- HORSES AND GAKRIAGES TO LET. jj^ 
JOEI. Ml, ^lUjroi.13, 

ATTORNEY AT LAW. 



I.. "^V. JACOBS, 

AMERICAN AND FOREIGN 

FANCY GOODS and • MILLINEEY. 



RESIDENT DENTIST, 

OFFICE, - - - - ATWOOD'S BUILDING. 



O. S, PEUMljrS, 

GROCERIES AND PROVISIONS 

OPPOSITE THE DEPOT. 



HISTORY OF WOODSTOCK. 



Woodstock was settled in 1686, by a colony from Roxbury, 
Mass., consisting of 39 families, who divided the lands among 
themselves by lot. The names of those who thus obtained 
titles to house lots and farms are as follows : — Thomas and 
Joseph Bacon, James Corbin, Benj. Sabin, Henry Bowen, 
Thomas Lyon, Eben Morris, Matthew Davis, Wm. Lyon, 
Sevin and Eben Cass, John Chandler, Senior, Peter Aspin- 
wall, John Frizell, Joseph Frizell, Jona Smithers, John Butch- 
er, Jona Davis, Jona Peake, Nathaniel Gary. John Bowen, 
Nath, Johnson, John Hubbard, Geo. Griggs, Benj. Griggs, 
Wm. Lyon, Jr., John Leavans, Nathaniel Sanger, Sam Scar- 
borough, Sam Craft, Sam May, Jos. Bugbee. Sam Peacock, 
Arthur Humphriey, John Bugbee, John Ruggles, Andrew 
Watki.is, John Marcy, Edward Morris, Joseph Peake, John 
Holmes, John Chandler, Jr, s 

In 1687, a grant of land was made to Wm. Bartholomew, 
of Branford, Conn., and another to Isaac Bartholomew, on 
condition that the former should build and maintain a grist 
mill '* on the falls below Muddy Brook Pond," now Harrisville. 

Soon after the settlement of Woodstock, a Congregational 
Church was organized, and about 1690, Rev. Josiah Dwigbt 
was settled as pastor. A meeting house and school house were 
speedily erected. Mr. Dwight, was dismissed in 1726. Rev. 
Amos Throop was settled over the church in 1727, and died in 
1736. Rev, Abel utiles was settled 1737, and dismissed in 
1759, when he and part of the church organized the Congre- 
gational church at Muddy Brook, or Eist Woodstock. 

In 1747, the Congregational church at AVest Woodstock was 
organized, composed chiefly of members of the first church. 
Rev, Stephen Williams was ordained pastor, and continued 
there till his death in 1795. 

In 1763, Rev. Abiel Leonard was settled over the first 
Congregational church, and continued till May, 1775, when 



114 WOODSTOCK. 



he was appointed chaplain in the 3J Connecticut ren;iment, 
(Gen. Putnam'^;,) and left for Cambridge. He continued with 
the army till a short time previous to his death in 1777. 

In 1779, Kev. E. Lyman was settled over the first Congre- 
gational fhurch, and was dismisf^ed in 1824. 

In 1801, Woodstock Academy was incorporated. It has a 
commodious edifice for instruction, and another and much larger 
building tor boarding the pupils. 

In 1831, a colony from East Wood8tock Congregational 
church, organized the Congregational church at North Wood- 
stock. 

The present church edifices c.f the four Cor:grogaticnal 
churches in Woodstock, were built as follows: — 

First church built in 1821, co.st $4000, and has 129 mem- 
bers ; West Woodstock, in 1>21, cost $2500, and has 99 mem- 
bers ; North Woodstock, in 1831, cost $5000, and has ]C6 
members ; East Woodstock, in 1831, cost $3000 ; and has 180 
members. There is a Baptist church in South Woodstock, or- 
ganized in 1792, and another in West Woodstock, which is 
still more ancient. There is a Methodist church in East 
Woodstock, and another in West Woodstock, also a Universa- 
liist church. 

i ALM'iculture is fhe great business carrie.I on in Woodstock, 
the land being very fertile, and especially adapted for /.razing. 
But manufacturing operations are carried on extensively, there 
are five manufactories of cotton twine, thiee of woolen cloths, 
one of thread, and one of cotton cloth. In North Woodstock 
there is a large carriage manufactory, carried on by \j. M. 
Dean, Esq., where a large number of excellent carriages, both 
light and heavy are annually m-ide. 
! The town of Woodstock has always baen noted for patriotism. 
In the old French war, she furnished many troops, and one 
whole company was destroyed by the enemy near Jiake Ceorg'", 
scarcely a single man returned alive. In the revolutionary 
war, she sent more men to Boston, immediately after the battle 
of Lexington, than any other town in the stat , — the colonial 
records say 189 men in s:x companies, one of which was a 
company of 45 horsemen, commanded by Capt. afterwards 
Gen. Samuel McLellan. a lineal ancestor of our youthful but 
already distinguished General of the same name. 

Woodstock can boast of havmg furnished her full share of 



WOODS rocK. 1^5 



eminent men in all the various walks and occupations of life. 
This town was the birrh place of Uev. Dr Morse, of Charles- 
town, Mass., father of the immortal inventor of the electric 
telegraph. Kere also were horn Rev. Dv. Holmes, of Cam- 
bridge, father of Oliver Wendell Hohiies ; Gen. Eaton of 
African re^jutation, whose interestinix career, long almost for- 
gotton, is now awakening new interest in the minds of his 
countrymen, as is manifested by its lately forming the subject 
of an elaborate article in Harper's Magazine, and also by 
another article in the Atlantic Monthly; Commodore Morris, 
of the U. S. Navy, was also born here, <ind many others, livin<T 
and dead, who have done honor to their country and the town 
ol their nativity. 



WOODSTOCK TOWN CtOVEENMENT. 

Clerk, Treasurer and Rejistrar, 
Ezra C. May. 

Selectmen, 
Saiuuel M. Fenner, Asa Goodell, Hezekiah Bishop. 



p. O, ADDRESS-^WOODSTOCK, 

Arnold k Lake, Dry Goods and Groceries, 

Austin E xNJ anufacturer. 

Austin W. B. 

Arnold Christopher. Manufacturer. 

Uarrett Anson, Carpenter aud Joiner, 

Barrett Samuel. " *' 

Carroll Win. D. Painter. 

Cocking L. & Son, Satinet manufacturers. 

Fenner S. M. Dry Ooods and Groceries. 

Flynn Francis W. Blacksmith. 

Fisher D. Blacksmith. 

Green Marquis, Carpenter. 

Hammond Ezra, Shoe maker. 

Harris Bros. Twine manufacturers and Variety store. 

Lyon Judson M. Attorney at Law. 

Lake John, Sash and Blind manufacturer. 

Lester , Civil Engineer. 

Morse Jonah T. Shoe manufacturer. 

Marcy Lorenzo, Physician and Surgeon, 

Palmer Charles D. Sash and Blinds. 

Stetson • John H. Carpenter and Joiner. 

Sanger Wm. Wheelwright. 

Siiiith Geo. P. manufacturer. 

Sawyer Jam3S G. Artist. 

Sanger John, Wheelwright. 

Snow Walter P. Shoe manufacturer. 

Stoddard Geo. S. F. Attorney at Law. 

Tiffany E. Boot and Shoe maker. 

Warner T. & Son, (A. F.) Twine manufacturers. 

Warner Daniel, Twine manufacturer. 

Warner Thomas, Twine manufacturer. 

Warner Franklin, Hotel keeper. 

Whitney Wm. G. Miller. 

Young, Nelson, Butcher. 



> P,0. ADDRESS^NORTH WOODSTOCK. 

Backus Thomas, Salesman L. M. Dean's carriage estab't. 
Dean Leonard M. Carriage manufacturer. 
Lyon Albert, Carpenter. 
Lombard O. E. Blacksmith. 



WOODSTOCK, 117 



May E. 0. & Co. Thread manufacturers. 

Masoa John A. Shoe manufacturer. 

May,. Kara C. Dry Goods and Groceries. 

Morse Nelson, Wagon Spring manufacturer. 

Potter Stephen L. Judge of Probate. 
j Smith & Stetson, manufacturers of Cotton goods. 

! Rawson Charles D, Dentist. 

Royce N". B. Hotel keeper. 

Wells Henry, Saw and Grist mill. 

Whitney Wm. S. Saw and Shingle mill. 

Witter Asa, Physician and Surgeon, « 

P. O. ADDRESS— EAST WOODSTOCK 

Brunt A. J. Blacksmith, 
Chamberlin Palmer, Cooper. 
Chandler Perley, Harness maker, 
Chaflfee Peter, Wagon maker. 
Dean Ezra, Tanner and Currier, 
Lyon Elisha, Blacksmith. 
Mason Oliver M. Painter. 
Morse Nathan E. Sash and Blind manufacturer. 
I'aine Geo. A. Dry Goods and Groceries. 
Phipps Edward D. Plow and Rake manufacturer. 
Rivers F. X. Merchant Tailor. 
Sanger Abiel, Wheelwright. 
Whitney Pliny C. Dry Goods and Groceries. 
Walker James, Blacksmith. 
P. O. ADDRESS— WEST WOODSTOCK. 
Bradford Milton, Physician and Surgeon. 
Bruce A. K. Hotel keeper. 
Brown & Marcy, Saw and Shingle mill. 
Griggs 4' Stetson, Saw and Shingle mill, 
Hiscox Alba, Saw and Shingle mill. 
Marcy & Chamberlin, Saw and Shingle mill. 
Rich Rufus K. Dry Goods and Groceries. 
Wyllis Dimmick, Blacksmith. 
Williams John F. Attorney at Law. 

P. O. ADDRRESS— WOODSTOCK VALLEY. 

Kenyon Eli, Cassimere manufacturer. 
Kenyon J oseph, Cassimere manufacturer. 
Leonard Wm. Grocery store, 
Leonard Thomas C. Grocery store. IQ* 



L. M. DEAN, 



Carriage Manufattor, 



NORTH WOODSTOCK, CT. 



Keeps constantly on hand, and manufactures to order every descrip- 
tion of '"^ 

Carriao-es and B[ariiesses, 

His stock com;:)rises 

Garryalls, Chaises, Phaetons, Open and Top 

Buggies of evsry Description. 

EIPEISS WAGOl^S, SKELETONS, &o„ &c. 

Repairing in all its branches, done at short notice. 

E. C. MAY, 

Dealer in 

P^loiiPj Grain^ Feed. 

FAMILY GROCERIES & PROVISIONS, 

Drugs and Medicines, Boots, Shoes, Hats, 
CAPS. HAKDWAEE and CEOCKEEY, 

VAIMIiEE r<}0TI01VS, &c., &0, 

JSTOKTH -WrOODSTOCK, CT. 



ARNOLD 8l LAKE, 

DEALERS IN DRY GOODS, GROCERIES, 

Boots, Shoes, Jcc 

Post OiEce Building, - Woodstock. 




[The histories of Putnnm and Tlionipson were not received in 
season to go in tlieir uppiopriate places.] 

The Town of Putnam is 20 square miles in extent, lying on 
both sides of the Quinebaug River, extending to the Khode 
Island State line on the East, and being about 7 miles from 
the Massachusetts State line on the North, having an average 
breadth of about 4 milgs and is about 7 miles in length from 
East to ^Vest, being bounded hj Woodstock and Pomfret on 
the west, Thompson on the north and Kiliingly on the south. 
It contains about 3300 Inhabitants, and has but one village of 
any size within its limits. It was original y a portion of 
Thompson, Pomfret and Kiliingly. It was incorporated by the 
Legislature in 1855, after one of the most severe and bitter 
strugorles with the old towns from whom it was taken that 
the St.ite has ever known. The contest was commenced in 
1849, and continued through the successive years; each Legis- 
lature was besieged by the friends and opponents of the meas- 
ure; Lobby-members reaped a golden harvest ; and much other 
business was seriously embarrassed by this bitter and useless 
strife ; past politics was invoked by both sides; to the demo- 
crats it was going to make a whig town and leave the old towns 
hopelessly wdiig, a result to be fearfully dreaded ; and to the 
whigs, it wculd nakea dimccialic tcwn and inevitably fix de- 
mocracy as the ruling power in the old towns and thus ruin 
the state and county ; to the miserly man the taxes would be 
increased enormously in both the old and the new town. The 
legislature becoming finally wearied of a never ending importu- 
nity, incorporated the town and let all the direful calamities 
come if they would, but strange to say, none of them ever 
came. It numbered 2319 inhabitants ; 9 1-2 square miles 
and 1876 inhabitants being taker from Thompson, and 7 1-2 
square miles and 275 inhabitants taken from Kiliingly, 3 
square miles and 168 inhabitants taken from Pomfret at the 



120 PUTNAM. 



time of its incorporation. The original petition included that 
part of Woodstock known as Harrisville, but was finally aban- 
doned, it having arrayed among the combatan:s the town of 

Woodstock. I 

The village of Putnam is the centre of all the business done ,| 

in its limits, being on the line of the Norwich & Worcester I 

railroad and easy of access from all parts ot the town, and to | 

all its inhabitants. The village contains about 2700 inhabi- | 

tants, being more than three-fourths of all the inhabitants of ! 

the town. Here are all the stores, public offices, records, I 
Physicians, Attorneys and business of the town. Its streets 
are thronged from early morn until late at night with a busy 
crowd ; neighboring farmers are here seen from Woodstock 

and Pomfret, peddling their vegetable crops and the products j 

of their farms. j 

There is no town or village that exhibits more thrift, enter- I 

prise and life than this busy little town. It has been known j 

at diflferent times under the name of " Pomfret Factory," \ 

" Pomfret Depot," " Wilkinson," " Quinebaug" and "Putnam." j 

It was originally known before the building of the Norwich & I 

Worcester railroad through it, as " Pomfret Factory Village." \ 

Here was erected the second cotton manufactory in the United i 

States, it was consumed by fire in 1849 ; it was commenced in j 

1804 and raised on the 4ih day of July 1805. i 

The Falls of the Quinebaug River at Putnam are among \ 

the finest in New England and were originaly known among \ 

the Indians and in the early history of the county as the "Nip- i 

mack Falls." The Nipmuck tribe of Indians calling them after i 

their own name they inhabiting the banks of the Quinebaug in j 

this vicinity. Here was erected a grist mill in the early days j 

of the county to grind the white man s Indian corn, it was for j 

many years prior to 1704, known as the "Cargil Mill" being ' 

owned by one Cargil and was the resort for the inhabitants in I 

those days, for many miles around. The water power, mill \ 

privilege and some two thousand acres of land around were j 

sold in 1804, to the Pomfret Manufacturing Company; amaig j 

the most active members of this company, and one to whom the i 

village and town of I'utnam owe, more ths n to any other, their j 

prosperity, was Smith Wilkinson, the father of Edmund Wil- I 

kinson of Putnam, the present owner of a large amount oi wa- I 

ter power and land in and around the village. He died here j 



PUTNAM. 121 



in 1854, a model of industry and honesty, one of the fathers of 
Cotton Manufacturing in the county. Samuel Slater, the foun- 
der of cotton spinning in this country, the father of the Slaters 
at Webster, was an Englishman, and came to this country soon 
after the discovery of cotton spinning in England, where he had 
learned something ot the art and mystery of the business. He 
soon became acquainted with Ozias Wilkinson ofPawtucket, 
the father of Smith Wilkinson, who was at that time a black- | 
smith and anchor maker at that place. Young Slater interes- 
ted him in the then wonderful business, and he was induced, |j 
with some others to hire an old building and invest what they jj 
had in the new enterprize, and young Slater was set at work to jl 
build and arrange the rude machinery, and here it was that the j! 
first cotton yarn was spun in America, through the efiorts of |j 
Ozias Wilkinson, on machinery, that in these days would be ta- j i 
ken for agricultural purposes instead of cotton spinning. Smith j | 
Wilkinson, then a young man, worked for his father in the tuc- jj 
tory, and soon became acquainted with the busine:^ and so in- i i 
terested in it, that scarcely then twenty one years of age, he be- jl 
gan the formation of a company for that purpose. The Pom- jj 
fret Manufacturing Company, of which young Wilkinson was || 
a member, gathered together a little capital at Pawtticket, and jl 
came to Connecticut in the spring of 1804, and purchased of jj 
Cargil his mill and privilege, and commenced the erection of a j] 
cotton factory. This was long before the invention of the wj:- |j 
ter power loom, and the yarn was spun in the factory, on the j 
rude spinning frames and jennies, and sent out among the far- | 
mers to be woven by hand. "Pomfiet Factory Village" was | 
the resort of the mothers and grown up daughters for miles j 
around, who came here to bring home their webs of coarse cot- ■ 
ton cloths, woven in the family, on the old hand loom, and get I 
the skeins of yarn to commence the new piece. It furnished || 
the means of obtaining many a good "fit out" for the marriage jj 
day, and the houseful of daughters could by this means each ob- |! 
tain a good pair of sheets for the new goose-feather bed, with- '| 
out which no daughter was prepared to commence house keep- j 

i"g- j 

Here in this village the rough, coarse cotton goods were bleach- j 

ed and dyed, and during the war of 1812, often sold as high as j 

fifty cents per yard, a good cloth, well calculated for the strong i 

rough fathers of that age. The cotton was all hauled by ox I 



122 puTNAai. 



teams from I'rovidence, anJ the cloth there found a market. — 
Among the poor farmers around, the Factory was a great place ij 
to make money, for here their children could all find em jloy- I 

ij mont. ! 

1 1 Ln 1826, a portion of the members having been bought out ' 

1 1 by Smitii Wilkinson, the present stone mill at the lower village j 

ll was erected, li I80O, James lihodes, of Pawtucket, 11. J.., 

j: one of the -former members of the company, commenced the 

ij e.-eorion oF the brick mill at the Upper Falls, now known as ' 

j! llhodesville. ! 

ij In 183i), the ^[orwich & Worcester railroad was opened j 

i; through the villap;e, and the hitherto secluded factory village. I 

h was brought nearer to a good market and easy and constant j 

1 1 connnuaication with the cities, and hc^a to give signs of j 

ji change. But little evidence and trace is now le,t of the old j 

ji villagj, the land-mc.i-ks are fast fading away, by the constant ■ 

ji march of improvement. The old brick school house that like | 

1 1 a light house, was always the first thing to be seen on entering, , 

ji and the last on leaving the village, standing high on the hill j 

ji back of the present Congregatioual church has gone, and its 

jl place supplied by a five school building on the east of the vil- j 

i lage, nsar%e quiet woods. The old barn and the little old ' 

i! dwelling on the opposite hill, seeming like a link that bound us 

j to former days, have within the past year, !allen and given I 

jjv place to the fine and costly residence of Harrison Johnson, I 

! Jl]sq. The old stone factory is there, but as if to make the ! 

I contrast more strong, the superb and splendi<l country seat of ' 

I Eimund Wilkinson is placed inclose proximity to it. The | 

i destructive hand of improvemei*t. has with seeming cruelty, I 

I almost swept away the last trace of one of the most historic | 

I villages in eastern Connecticut. The little factory village I 

I burying ground, on the west side of the village, " where the | 

I rude fore iathers of the hamlet sleep,'' has been abandoned for I 

{ the fine cemetery with marble monuments and iron railings, on j 

I the east of the village. 1 

I Let him who in his early days knew Pomfret Factory village, | 

I if he would re-visit any of the old familiar scenes, come now, | 

; or it will be too late, ■ j 

i In 1846, Ilosea liallou commenced and built the large stone j 

j mill, 200 feet long and 5 stories high, at the upper falls ; and | 

I about the same time, Milton S. Morse, George C. Nightingale, j 



PUTNAM. 123 



CrawforJ Allen and ot!iers, of Pj-ovldonce, erestcl two othor 
larnre stone mills. Tlie villag3 contains one woolen njill, and a 
new mill just finished by A. J. Currier, of Norwicn, and five 
cotton mills, operating about 1000 looms; a small portion of 
the water power is yet in operation. 

Tais is destined to be one of the largest villages in Connec- 
ticut, whe:i the times shall warrant tHe profitable use of all the 
water power now lying idle, and running to waste over its rocky 
fal's. The village contains six churches and places of ! uMic 
Worship, Baptist, Catholic, Congregationalist, Methodist, Spir- 
itualist and occasionally episcopalian. There are five public 
halls, a h >tel, a number of dry goods stores, and as large a imm- 
beroffine private dwellings as any village of its size in New 
JOng'and. No place in Ne.v England offers better opportuni- 
ties to the mechanic or capitalist than the town which worthily 
bears the name of the honored dead, who sleeps in the quiet 
church yard ot the pleusant village of Brooklyn, "Who dared 
to lead where any dared to follow.*' 



PUTMM DIRECTORY, 

P. O. ADDRESS— PUTNAM. 

Babbitt H. Blacksmith and Wheelwright. 

Brown H. N, Merchant Tailor and Post Master. 

Bradley I. L. Botanic Physician. 

Bailey Franklin, Book keeper. 

Brewster F. A. Shoe Store. 

Bartlett liichard \. Shoe Manufacturer. 

Barstow G. F. Physician. 

Burlingham Walter, Miller. 

Bund3' Prosper, Painter. 

Clark Mrs. John B. Milliner. 

Carpenter Nelson, Mason. 

CI rk William U. Carpenter. 

Cutler Hobart, Flour and Grain. 

Cutler E. A. Cotton Manufacturer. 

Clarke Edg-ar, Civil Enofineer. • 

Carpenter John, Mason. 

Chamberlin William H. Carpenter. 

Chamberlin Francis, Carpenter. 

Carpenter C. F. Harness Maker. 

Cutler & Tucker, Dry Goods. 

Carpenter John, Book-keeper, 

Cap well Thomas, Saloon. 

Dyer Wm. T. Daguerrian Artist. 

Darling John H. Jeweller. 

Darling Mis. R. Milliner.- 

Davison K. H. &Co. Flour and Grain. 

Durfe^ohn C. & Son, Blacksmiths. 

Dresser Mrs. A. Milliner. 

Freeman F. 11. Cattle Drover. 

Fisher & Whitmore, Boot and Shoe Man'fs. 

Fox John 0. Station Agent. 

Fcnn S. P. <^ C. N, Furniture. 

French H. M. Quinebaug Hotel. 

Flagg John L. Fruit and Confectionery, 

Gay Joseph S. Merchant. 

Goodspeed A. Music Teacher. 

Hough tienry W. Physician. 



PUTNAM. 



125 



Herendeen H. Carpenter. 

Hazeihurst H. Surgeon Dentist. 

Holmes Lucian N. Agent for Emery Brothers' Agridultu- 

ral Machinery. 
Johnson H. Attorney. 
Keith 0. E. Book Agent. 
Leech Henry, Groceries. 
Lincoln Charles F. Livery Stable. 
Lippett N. H. Section Master, N. & W. R. R. 
May Prescott, Deputy :: heriif and Market. 
Maoning J. W. Dry Goods. 
Morse M. S. &Co. ])ry Goods, and Man'fs. 
Olney W. M. Ready Made Clothing. 
Plimpton D. B. Druggist and Apothecary. 
Pierce i- . M. Barber. 
Pressey Isaac, Railroad Agent. 
Pjt^ie Thomas L. News Depot. 
Phillips G. W Attorney at Law. 
Randall Sanford H. Butcher. 
Richmond (H. H.) and Williams. Dry GoodSx 
Ross John E. Manufacturer. 
Sea mans Horace, Judge of Probate. 
Sawyer E. Merchant. 
Segur Benj. Druggist and Apotheeary, 
Spauldiuj]^ Stephen, Tin-Ware. 
Sharpe Wm. H. Dentist. 
Stock well D. R. JeweHer. 
Stone Simeon, Groceries. 
Sprague Mrs. S. C. Milliner. 
Smith Mrs. Mary, Milliner. 
Smith Riley E. Livery Stable. 
Thurbur Henry, Tailor. 
Talbot E. & W. Wheelwrights. 
Truesdell Albect, Architect. 
Tutker Lindly, (see Cutler & Tucker.) 
Winslow Wm, Fish Market. 
Wilkinson E. Cotton Manufacturer. 
Whipple Horace, Mason. 
Williams Lewis, (see Richmond & Williams.) 
Whitford Jared, Mason. 



11 



WM T- DYER, 

^ljotjgra|)l)ic |^rfet 

ALSO, AGENT FOR 
\ri I. i.ia jfi s Si o SI r / .s ' s 

SEWING MACHINE. 

This Machi?ie ranks among among the hest machines now in use 

on account of its durability and siuipU ity 

Machines delivered and ins ruction given at tl'.n above lo— pric(», 
Best of references given. Please call and examine tliis Muchine 

at my residence. 

PUTNAM DEPOT, CT. ^ 

STEPHEN SPAULDING, 

At the old stand of S^)au!diiig <t Nichols, No. 2 Bi-ick Block, 
Putnam, Ct. 

"~- Having taken great pains in selecting a la'-ge lot of Cooking and 

I'iirlor StovHs, is piepared tosliovv his ciiston»eis oncof the 
':' BEST ASSOIlTMhNTS to be found in ti.e county, among whicli are 

THE MODEL STOVE, 

STEWARTS AIR TIGHT, 

Harp, Pilot, Banner, New England, State Leader, 
Victor, Fame, &o, Also on hand, 

TIN and JAPANNED WAR?, 

Lead Pipe, Pumps, Wooden Ware, Sinks, Oven Mouths, Sad 
Irons, Coal Hods, Patent (^lidirons, Bird Caget?, &c. 

ALSO, AGENT FOR 

E I.JL B^n ys t'^TEJTT 

India 1-lubber l-^aint Ibr Tin Hoofs- 



J. W. MANNING, 

Dealer in 
I^areig-n and Domestic 



Constantly on handy a large and varied assortment of 

Silks, Slia^vls, Cloaks, 
TALMAS, CLOTHS, 

DRESS AND FANCY GOODS, 

in all the new styles and fabrics, as fust as they appear in 
the market. 



S. P. & C. N. FENN, 

Manufacturers of, and Wholesale ani Retail Dealers in 

€ABIi£f f ttliff eiC 

OF EVERY DESCRIPTION. 

Looking Glasses and Looking Glass Plates, 

Plain, Ornamental, Gilt, and Wood Picture Frames, Curtain Fixtures, 
Tassels, Cord and Cornices, Metallic, M;jhoo;otiy, Black Wal- 
nut and Imitation Walnut Coffins, Cuffin Plates and 
Shrouds. Also, a Hearse to attend Funerals. 

Furniture Repaired, Upholstered and Varnished 

T«^os. ± Sc 2. Feian^s Bloclc, J^Eaiia St. r»XJTN"-A.]Vt. 



Harness Maker and Carriage Trimmer,; 

Particular attention paid to Repairing, Cleaning & Oiling Harnesses- , 
Shop oppos te Urick Block, Putnam. 



RICHMOND & WILLIAMS, 

Dealer in 

FOREIGN AND DOMESTIC 

111 «IIOBS» 

PUTNAM. 

cwistantly on hand, a large assortment of 

DeLainss, Cashmeres, Thibets, Prints, 

BIL.A.CK: and FA.]VOY SILKS; 

Gloves Hosiery, Erabroderies, Dress Goods, Hoop Skirts, &c. 
We also keep a good assortment of 

CHOIC E FAMtLY GROCERIES. 

D. B. PLIMPTON, 

PHYSICIAN AND APOTHECARY, 

PUTNAM, CT. 

DEALER IN DRUGS, CHEMICALS, 

Toilet Articles, Paints, Oils, Dyes, Books & Stationery. 

Medicines furnislied, advice given, and visits promptly made. 

H. N. BROWN\ 

GENTS. FURNISHING GOODS, &C. 



'% 



And Dealer in 



No. 4 Brick Block, ... Putnam. 



nSHER 4r WHWTJflORE, 

Manufacturers of Women's Misses' and Childrens' Pegged 

BOOTS AND SHOES. 



E. M. PIERCE 

Does the 

SHAVINQ AND HAIR DRESSING, 

1 11 r* 11 til ti 111 , 

and will furnish all with his excellent 

Dyes, Oils, Tonics, Perfumery, E^zors &c,&c. 

Saloon in Potter's Block, opposite the Depot. 

QUINEBAUC HOUSE, 

JPritnafn, Ct, 

1 M. 31. I^IiElIVCXi:, Proprietor. 

' This House now oflFers the best accomodations to the travelling pub- 
j lie, an J a pleasant, agreeable home to regular boarders. 
1 The Proprietor will also keep constantly on hand for sale, 

I Carnages, Buggies and Business Wagons, 

I of every description, all made of the best material and in the latest style. 



RESIDENT DENTIST, 

Office in Brick Block, up Stairs, Putnam. 

FASHIONABLE TAILOR, 

Continues his business at the old stand, opposite the Depot, where 
all orders in the line of his profession will be promptly attended to. 



11^ 



HISTORY OF THOMPSON. 



On what is now the beautiful village green, bearing so many 
marks of civilization and refinement, on the part of the sur- 
rounding villagers, once, before civilization and refinement had 
begun their tasteful work hereabout, stood the courtly wigwam 
of Quinnatisset, a chief of the Nipmucks. A little east of 
the village was one of the' forts or strongholds of the tribe. 
For generations this tribe of Indians had hunted these forests 
and fished these streams. Here, for generations, they worship- 
ped the Great Spirit, and here, at last, under the preaching of 
Cecum, some were led to embrace christianitj'. 13ut long ago 
the rain washed out the last foot print of the red men and even 
their graves sunk to the level of the common earth. The Nip- 
mucks were the " original proprietors." 

Thompson, then a part of the town of Killingly, was first 
settled by whites, early in the eighteenth century. This whole 
territory was conveyed by letters patent from the Crown to 
Thompson, Saltonstall, Wolcott, Dav}^ and others. The first 
recorded deed, of several hundred acres in the centre of the 
town, is dated April 10th, 1716, and is from Josiah Walcott 
and Mary, his wife, of Salem, Mass , to John Sabin. In 1728 
the people formed themselves into an ecclesiastical society, 
called at first the " North Society of Killingly," and then the 
" Thompson Parish.'^ Jonathan Clough was Moderator of the 
first society meeting, held July 9th, of that year. Thompson 
Society became the town of Thompson, in the year 1785, as 
the following record shows : — 

" At a General Assembly of the State of Connecticut, hold- 
ed at Hartford, on the second Thursday of May, Anno Domini 
1785 :— 

Upon the memorial of the Town of Killingly, in the County 
of Windham, showing that said town is about eighteen miles 
long and seven miles wide, that the inhabitants are becoming 
very numerous and their situation such that many cannot con- 



THOMPSON. 131 



veniently attend their town and freeman's meetings, and pray- ! ; 
ing for a division of said town in manner following, viz : that ]■ 
the North society in said town, called Thompson Parish, may | 
lie incorporated and made a distinct town by itself: — 

Eesolved by this Assembly, that the North Society or Parish [ \ 
in said town of Killingly, and the inhabitants thereof bo, and i! 
they are hereby incorporated, constituted and made a distinct j; 
town by the name of Thompson, <J'C.'' j: 

At the first town meetings seventy-eight persons were enrolled I : 
as freemen. Jason Phipps was chosen moder^ator : Jacob i; 
Dresser, Town Gierk ; Thomas Dyke, Paine Converse, Simon j; 
Larned, Jason Phipps, and Stephen lirown, Selectmen. Gen. i 
Daniel Larned was the fir4 representative of the town in the \\ 
General Assembly. il 

In 1850. the population was 4638. In 1855, the south- |; 
easteri portion of the town was set off, to form in part the i' 
town of Putnam, by which the area, population and wealth of i; 
Thompson was considerably diminished. Before this division, j' 
it was the largest and wealth?fest town in the county. J! 

The village at the centre, is one of the most pleasant and I' 
healthy in Eastern Connecticut. It slandson "a commanding i 
eminence," and from many points in the neighborhood, the ; 
scenery, though not bold and wild, is picturesque and beautiful, i : 
I Within the limits of the town, along the several streams, there j 
I are a number of thriving manufacturing villages, — Mechanics- '• 
ville, lleadville, Masonville, Finhcrville, Wilsonville, New '| 
Boston, East Thompson and Quodduck. * 1 1 

Partly in this town and partly in Webster, Mass., reposing j 
between the hills, is one of the largest and most romantic lakes '! 
to be found in the vicinity. The Indian name is Chargogga- • j 
goggmanchogaggogg. The lake, following its indendations, is ! 
said to be sixty miles^ in circumference. |j 

The first ecclesiastical society was formed in 1728. The first 
meeting house wag built in 1729 ; the second in 1816, and the 
present house in 1856. The Congregational church was or- 
ganized in 1730. The first minister of the town, and pastor 
of the church just named, was Rev. Marston Cabot. He was 
ordained in 1730, and died in 1756. In 1757, Rev. Noadiah 
Russell was ordained, and died in 1795. The third pastor. 
Rev. Daniel Dow, D. D., was ordained in 1796 and died in 
1849. The present pastor, Rev. Andrew Dunning, was in- 
stalled in 1850. 



132 THOMPSON. 



j! A six-principle Biiptist churcti was organized in 1750 
I' through the efforts of Kldcr Wightraau Jacobs, who seems to 
i have been its only pastor, dying among his people. This 

I church became extinct about 1772. 

ij The first Calvinist Baptist church in the town, was formed 
|i Sept. 9th, 1773. On the day the church was constituted, they 
j| called Elder John Martin to be their minister. He held that 
j| office with them till Oct. 12th, 1797. Then followed :— 
;| Parson Crosby, from 1798 to 1819, John Nichols, from 

I I 1819 to 1821. ^ Arthur A Ross, from 1821 to 1823 James 
II Grow, from 1823 to 1834. Bela Hicks, from 1834 to 1836. 
ij In 1836, the church separated into two branches, and wor- 
\' shipped in two places. The pastors were. 

Central Branch,— Bela Hicks, from 1836 to 1837. Hervey 
i; Fittz, from 1837 to 1839. Silas Bailey, from 1839 to 1842. 
i' L. G. Leonard, from 1843 to 1845. Charles Willett, from 
1 1 1845 to 1846. 

ii East Branch. —James Grow, from 1836 to 1837. James 
jl Smither, from 1838 to 1840. N. Branch, from 1841 to 1842 
\\ Jaraes Grow, from 1844 to 1845. . 

Ij In 1846, the church was divided and two distinct churches 
|i formed. '• The Central Thompson Bapt'st Church," and the 
ii " East Baptist Church." The pastors were, 
j! Central Church, -C. Willett, from 1846 to 1847. T. Dow- 
j ling, from i848 to 1851. E. II. Warren, from 1852 to 1853. 
1 1 M. Curtis, from 1854 to 1857. B. S. Morse, from 1858. 
'! East Church,— J. Grow, 1846. J. C. Carpenter, from 1847 
1 1 to 1849. L. W. Wheeler, from 1850 to 1852. J. B. Guild, 
•'; 1853. P. Mathewson, from 1854, the present pastor. 
\\ The old church worshiped in four meeting houses. The 
|i fir..t was built at Brandy Hill. When it was built is not known. 
1 1 The second was built at the same place, in 1803. The third 
|! was built at the centre of the town, 1836. The fourth was 
I' builfc at Brandy Hill, in 1845. 

1 1 Ttiere are three Methodist churches in the town. The 
;! church in West Thompson was organized about the year 1795. 
' Fisherville church in 1842. East Thompson church in 1843. 
1 1 The present pastors are, — West Thompson, lie v. John W. 
1 1 Case; Fisherville, llev. E.C.Stanley; East Thompson, Rev. 
11 Walter Ely. 

In the Central village, a flourishing Family and Classic 
School has been in operation for several years, under the care 
of Rev. A. Rawson and Mr. H. S. Parker, A. M. 



THOMPSON DIRECTORY 



P. O. ADDRESS— THOMPSON, 

Arnold AVilliam L. Merchant. 

Bridgtord George, Machinist. 

Bates \Valter, Cabinet maker. 

Baldwin A. B, Carriage maker. 

Cunningham J. M. Station Agent. 

Crosby Stephen, Hotel keeper. 

Cranskee James, Shoe Dealer. 

Comins Waldo, Harness maker. 

Crosby T. Pres. Thompson Bank & Judge of Probate 

Cundall George A. Painter. 

Case William K. Shoe manufacturer. 

Elliot Hannah M. Milliner. 

Emlot Anthony, Miller. 

Eddy John, Blacksmith. 

Graves T. E. Attorney at Law. 

Holbrook L. Physician and Surgeon. 

Hill James, Blacksmith. 

Joslin George B. Shoe maker, 

Kinney Danforth, Carpenter. 

Knight Erastus, Variety Store. 

McGreggor John, Physician and Surgeon. 

Munyon James M. Groceries. 

Mills Andrew, Music Teacher. 

Nichols Benj. 0. Machinist. 

Olney Jeremiah, Dry Goods and Groceries. 

Popeland Daniel, Stone Cutter. 

Randall John S. Shoe Manufacturer 

Rawson Alanson, Boarding School. 

Sharpe Theo. F. Cashier Thompson Bank. 

Shaw George W. Comb maker. 

Sharpe Charles H. Merchant. 

Sherman Isaac, Dry Goods and Groceries. 

Upham R. Carpenter. 

P. oTaddress— westYhomFson. 

Brayton Charles E. Shoemaker. 

Randall James, Cotton Twine Manufacturer. 



THOMPS^'N. 



Rarnsdell Hezskiah, Manniacturei 



P. O. ADDRESS— ISEIV BOSTON. 

Jordan Parley, Edge Tool ManuFactai-er. 
Young liufus, tiotel keeper. 

P. O. ADDRESS— FISHERVILLE. 



Adams I^'aiuue], Dry Goods and Groceries, 

] > u 1- ':e. ^si D a 1 f J i- ! 1 , i^ 1 i 1 1 w r i a;h t . 

Converse Je!s>e, BlL-e'^smith. 

Oay.( !i Liithcr, Agent Mlg. Co. 

Ca';:ou A. Bjt k keeper. 

- : Mi:^^ iioiraiiiiii. Carpenter and Joiner. 

1 1: :e,' —Depot iMaster. 



►Sherman Isaac, Merchant. 

^Vood Asa, Carpenter 

THOMPSON TOWN GOVEENMENT. 

Clerk, Treasurer and Reyistrar , 
Erastus Knight. 
Selectmen, 
Dyer N. Elliott, Edward ,A]drich, "Welcome Bates 



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AI'R 75 



^^"^ N. MANCHESTER. 
"u^^ INDIANA