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Full text of "Winsted; the development of an ideal town"

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The University of Connecticut 
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Winsted 

The Development 

of 

An Ideal To>vn 



)0^ 



Reprinted from 

The Connecticut Magazine 
1906 




WINSTED— THE DEVELOPMENT OF AN IDEAL TOWN 

STORY OK ITS GROWTH FROM THE D\YS WHEN IT 
WAS A PART OF THE NORTHWEST WOODS AND FELL 
INTO THE CONTROL OF HARTFORD— THE SETTLEMENT 
ON THE BRIDLE PATH BECOMES A PROSPEROUS MANU- 
FACTURING CENTER— HISTORICAL ARTICLE 

BY 

ROBEUT S. HULBERT 

Mr. Hulbert testifies to the thrift of Winsted, Connecticut, from his experience as a recorder of its 
progress while the editor of one of its leading newspapers. He was born at West Winsted, April 6, 1854, 
and received his early education in the schools of Winsted. He attended the Williston Seminary at 
Easthampton, Ma^s., and was graduated Irom the SheflSeld Scientific School at Yale University in the 
class of 1878. From 1893 to 1895 he was the editor of the Winsted Daily Herald, and since that time has 
been in active newspaper work and civil engineering. Mr. Hulbert is a member of the Connecticut Civil 
Engineers and Surveyors Association and has been a follower of the profession much of the time since 
1878. As a contributor to the Hartford Courant, and other publications, on Litchfield County, he is to-day 
recognized as an authority on matters pertaining to his. home town. The illustrations used in the 
article are from photographs by K. T. Sheldon, F. H. De Mars, T. M. V, Doughty, Harry D. Penney 
and others. Several of the plates are used by courtesy of the Central New Bngland Division of The New 
York, New Haven and Hartford Railroad.— -St^zVor 




'INSTED, whose name is de- 
rived from, the Alpha of 
Winchester and the Omega 
of Barkhamsted, is a Bor- 
ough lying within the former township, 
close to the line which divides it from 
the latter. It is a growing, beautiful, 
hill-encircled village with characteristics 
of which its citizens are proud, and 
which — so the more enthusiastic believe 
— differentiate it greatly from all other 
places. 

This belief may arise in part from the 
fact that the Town of Winchester, 
though comparatively young — of its 
neighbors in Litchfield county, only 
Colebrook is of lesser age — has a his- 
tory which has been unusually well told, 
and which seems to warrant a certain 
optimism. 

It was fortunate in being the birth- 
place and life-long residence of a man, 
accomplished and educated, who gath- 
ered the town's history into the in- 
valuable "Annals of Winchester." Its 
author, John Boyd, was born in Win- 
sted in 1799. His father was James Boyd, 



who, with his partner, Benjamin Jenkins, 
composed the firm of Jenkins & Boyd, 
"the pioneer manufacturers of Winsted." 

John Boyd graduated in 1821 from 
Yale College. He afterwards studied 
law and was admitted to the bar of New 
Haven County in 1825. From 1827 to 
1853 he was himself a manufacturer in 
Winsted, a member of the firm of J. 
Boyd & Son, except for the last three 
years, during which he carried on the 
business for himself. He filled many 
public offices. He was a representative 
to the General Assembly in 1830 and 
1835; county commissioner in 1840, 1849 
and 1850; town clerk from 1829 to 1833, 
from 1837 to 1841 and from 1855 to 1877; 
judge of probate from 1854 to 1869, when 
he was disqualified by age; State senator 
in 1854 and secretary of the State of 
Connecticut from 1859 to 1861. 

During all his career his tastes appear 
to have been literary and historical. It 
was while he was yet a student, that he 
found and rescued the famous Charter of 
the State of Connecticut from its immi- 
nent fate of being cut up and becoming, 



568 WINSTED— DEVELOPMENT OF AN IDEAL TOWN 




Photo by Harry E. Penney 
FIRST FRAME HOUSE IN WINCHESTER — BUILT BY CALEB BEACH ON HALL 
MEADOW ROAD— MASSIVE CHIMNEY IS ALL THAT NOW REMAINS 



not ignobly, for to say that would be un- 
gallant, but incongruously, — part of a 
lady's bonnet. Mr. Boyd, who died 
December i, 1891, never knew that the 
valuable document he had saved was the 
original, but always supposed it to be a 
duplicate. Evidence discovered and pub- 
lished within a year or two, seems to 
prove that it was the very Charter itself. 



It was the fear of losing this Charter, 
vith all that it meant to tl em, which 
s:ave the people of Connecticut Co>- 
ony the shock which they experienced 
upon the arrival at Boston of Sir Ed- 
mund Andros, in 1685, to assume the 
government of all New England. The 
same fear, indirectly, had much to do 
with Winsted's future. They determ- 




Photo by F. H. DcMars 

FIRST MEETING HOUSE— BUILT IN 1769 AT WINCHESTER FIRST FRAME HOUSE IN WINSTED BOROUGH -KNOWN 
CKNTER— IT WAS 30 FEET LONG BY 24 FEET WIDE AS OLD MILL HOUSB, BUILT BY DAVID AUSTIN 

ABOUT 1771 



WINSTED— DEVELOPMENT OF AN IDEAL TOWN 



569 



^ C Cj I € B ROOK 




TORRI NGTON 
/7a/ 



/77/ 



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MAP SHOWING DEVEIyOPMENT OK WINCHESTER 

Three distinct epochs are represented— 1761, the building of the old north and south roads— 1771 to 
1776, years respectively in which Austin's and Balcom's grist mills were built— 1779 when Greenwoods 
Turnpike was built on which Winsted developed in place indicated— Drawn by R. S. Hulbert 



ined not to give up the Charter if it 
could be avoided, but they also decided 
to save everything else possible if the 
Charter should be taken from them. 
The General Court immediately con- 
vened for action. 

Among things worth keeping belong- 
ing to the Colony, was a lot of unoc- 
cupied land of unknown value in the 
northwestern corner of the Colony, in- 
cluding all of what is now Litchfield 
County and considerably more. To save 



this land the General Court hastily gave 
it over, after a fashion, in a series of 
grants to different towns in the Colony. 
The action proved unnecessary in the 
sequel, for Andros not only failed to 
obtain the Charter, thanks to the re- 
puted incident of the Charter Oak, but 
in less than two years the revolution in 
England's politics brought his rule in 
New England to an abrupt end. The 
conduct of affairs in the Colony was 
then resumed under the old Charter, 




Photo by Sneid 

FIRST HOUSE ON MAIN STREET, WINSTED 

At extreme left is structure built in 1798 and used as Higley Tavern, afterward Union House 



570 WINSTED—DErilLOPMllKr Of AN IDEAL TOWN 



nearly as before. Anj' expectations, 
however, tliat the towns would hurry to 
give back to the Colony the lands which 
had been deeded to them against a con- 
tingency which never came, proved to 
be of the stuff of dreams. The favored 
towns did nothing of the kind. They 
kept quiet, "laid low," as the expression 
is, for a generation, and then cautiously 
began a set of manoeuvres designed to 
IJcrfect their title and make them secure 
in their ownership. 

Without following the details of the 
"deal," it sufiices to say that Hartford 




JOHN BOYD, HISTORIAN 

Plioto by T. M. v. Doughty 

was well in it from the first, and in 1732 
became the owner of that part of 
the "western lands" included in the 
towns of Winchester, Hartland, New 
Hartford, and the eastern half of Har- 
winton, with power to assign the terri- 
tory to the taxpayers of Hartford, who 
should divide it among themselves in 
proportion to the amcnmt of their taxes 
on the list of 1720. The men whose 
names were on the tax list of 1720, and 
their heirs, became, therefore, the "pro- 
prietors" of Winchester and the other 
towns mentioned. 




CHURCH IN WINCHESTER CENTER 
Dedicated June 30, 1842 

They had a corporate existence with 
the right to survey the lands and make 
the division among themselves when- 
ever they saw fit. They took their time 
for it, and it was 1758 before the 
first survey and report of the divi- 




REV. FREDERICK MARSH 
Born September 18, 1780— Died February 6, 187.S 



W I NSTED— DEVELOPMENT OF AN IDEAL TOWN 571 




WHERE THE ELECTRIC POWER FOR WINSTED IS GENERATED— TUNXIS FALLS 



572 



WINSTED—DEVBLOPMHNT OP AN IDEAL TOWN 




MEMORIAL FOUNTAIN— GIFT OF MRS. MARY ANN BI,AKE MITCHELL 

Located in Park at East part of Borough— Above view is looking toward Park Hotel and loaned 
by courtesy of Harvej' L- Roberts 



sion of the Winchester lands were 
made. A preliminary valuation had been 
made in 1732 when New Hartford was 
appraised at fifteen shillings per acre, 
Winchester and eastern Harwinton at 
ten shillings, and Hartland at seven shil- 
lings and sixpence. 



The division of the land of Winchester 
was by lottery, a drawing being held, 
and the town was legally open for settle- 
ment. As a matter of fact the pioneers 
were already here. 

The proprietors had lost so much 
time that the towns of Norfolk, Canaan 




RESIDENCE OF CAUEB J. CAMP 



Photo by K. T. Sheldon 



WINSr ED— DEVELOPMENT Of AN IDEAL TOWN 573 




Photo by T. M. V. Doughty 

COLONIAL MANSION BUILT BY SOLOMON ROCKWELL IN 1813 
For many years residence of John Boyd, historian, and now home of Miss Mary P. Hinsdale 




Photo by F. H. DiVtais 

HIGHLAND LAKE SHOWING WAKEFIELD BOULEVARD— LOOKING SOUTH 
TOWARD SECOND BAY 



574 IVINSTED—DEVliLOPMENT OF AN IDEAL TOWN 




Photo by K. T.Sheldu 



WINCHESTER CENTER 



and Goshen were ahead of them and were 
filling up with settlers. To reach these 
towns from Hartford and the east there 
were at this time two bridle paths, both 
of which ran for some distance into the 
town of Winchester, one through the 
northeast corner and the other in the 
southwest. Either stopping along these 
paths or coming back to them from 
the other towns, a few men had built 
rude huts within the limits of Winches- 



ter and were living in them when t!ie 
division of lands was made. They could 
not own the particular ground on wliich 
they had built, but some of them had 
bought "undivided rights" from proprie- 
tors who had grown impatient in wait- 
ing for the division. The buyers had 
then squatted on the theory that they 
were entitled to land somewhere in the 
town and might as well locate on corner 
lots on the bridle paths as anywhere. 




RESIDENCE OF ELLIOTT B. BRONSON— WINCHESTER CENTER 



W IN Sr ED— DEVELOPMENT OF AN IDEAL TOWN 575 




HOMESTEAD AT WINCHESTER CENTER BUII^T BY ISAAC BRONSON ABOUT 1800- 
NOW OCCUPIED BY EDMUND H. BRONSON 



The first of these settlers on the bridle 
path, mentioned in the records, was 
Caleb Beach. He came from Goshen and 
had bought an "undivided right" in Win- 
chester lands on May 21, 1750. It is 
said that he did not intend to build on 
his Winchester purchase but supposed 
when he put up his shanty that he was in 
the town of Goshen. Be that as it may, 
the building proved to be in Winchester 
on what is now called Hall Meadow, not 
far from the Goshen line. The original 
building was replaced some time later 



by the first frame house built in the 
town of Winchester. This house was 
standing in 1899. It has since been 
blown down and nothing remains except 
the chimney. Plans are now being per- 
fected to mark with a suitable monument 
the site, and it is possible that during 
the year the town will vote an appropria- 
tion for the purpose. It may be noted 
that when the division was made Mr. 
Beach received the land on which his 
house stood. 

Another notable settler on the bridle 




When Hurlbut Bank was organized iu 1857 the firm of S. & L. Hurlbut gave $1,000 to have it named 
after them — On first bank bills issued Samuel Hurlbut's portrait appears on flO notes and Lemuel 
Hurlbut's on $3 bills, while on S-'i notes is the picture of Lemuel Hurlbut's devon bull 



WINSTED— DEVELOPMENT OF AN IDEAL TOWN 



577 




Clark House — Erected about 1859 and demolished 
to make place for Hotel Winchester— First pro- 
prietor was William Forbes — C. B. Andrews was 
last proprietor — Photo by T. M. V. Doughty dur- 
ing Civil War 

path was Adam Mott, who actually built 
a "Public Inn" beside it. It stood near 
the present Hurlbut Cemetery and be- 
came somewhat famous in later years. 
At first, however, it was but a rude log 
house with a roof of hemlock bark, and 
its patronage must have been meager, 
furnished largely by hunters, w^ho were 
frequent visitors to these woods. 

Three other families, the Gilberts, the 
_J"illeys, and the Prestons, make com- 
plete, so far as known, the list of people 
living in Winchester before the official 
division of the lands in 1758. 

It would have been an unpromising 
prospect for one who might have come 
to Winchester at this time with the idea 
of building a city. He would have found 
a rocky wilderness covered with forests, 
in which hemlock predominated; with 
the valley of Mad river, which runs 
through the center of the present Bor- 
ough of Winsted, an, impassable and 
tangled morass. So uninviting would it 




have seemed, that he would probably 
hurriedly have abandoned his plans and 
moved on to the fairer and more hos- 
pitable looking lands, which lay not far 
away to the south and west. 

Quite likely, indeed, unfavorable re- 
ports of the region traveled back to 
the Hartford owners, for not one of 
the original proprietors ever settled 
on his Winchester holdings. Never- 
theless, despite inauspicious appear- 
ances, the growth of a town commenced 
as if predestined. About 1760, the travel 
over the bridle paths became so large 
that the General Assembly took the mat- 
ter of roads in consideration, and in 1761 
the "old north road" was built to super- 







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Homestead of William S. Holabird, I^ieutenant 
Governor of Connecticut 184-^-1844— Died 185-5 — 
Photo by T. M. V. Doughty 



Home of Rose Terry Cooke, poetess — Photo by 
K. T. Sheldon 

sede the still older bridle path in that 
part of the town, and in 1762 the other -^ 
bridle path, on which the few settlers 
had located, gave way to the "old south 
road." An influx of settlers began and 
in 1768 there were at least "eighteen fam- 
ilies containing sixty-two souls" within 
the township, mostly living along the 
south road. 

In 1771 there were thirty-two families 
and one hundred and seventy-nine souls 
and in 1782 the population of the town is 
given as 688. The majority of these 
lived near the beautiful section of the 
town known now as Winchester Center, 
or the Old Society, which was approach- 
ing the zenith of its importance and be- 
came the scene of its greatest activity a 
quarter of a century later, or about 1803. 



578 WI NSTBD—DEV BLOPM ENT OF AN IDEAL TOWN 




Old Methodist Church erected 1833— Old Second Congregational Church dedicated i857— Old First 
Congregational Church built 1800— Style of architecture is in contrast to new edifice shown below 

Photo by K. T. Sheldon 

Meanwhile the infant village of Win- let of Long Pona. There, looking out 

sted had been born. A man of the pion- over the lake as it lay shining in the 

eers on the south road seems, by some sunlight, untouched, but quivering as if 

hap, — hunting, fishing, or exploring, — vibrant with latent force, and noting the 

to have penetrated eastward to the out- wild, precipitous gorge down which its 




First Congregational Church erected 1891— Courtesy of H. J. Pierre 



WIN STED— DEVELOPMENT OF AN IDEAL TOWN 



579 




Second Congregational Church erected 1899 

waters tumbled in a drop of 150 feet in 
less than a quarter of a mile to the river 
below, he saw, perhaps, in prophetic vis- 
ion, the future Winsted made rich bj' 
this waiting and abundant power. At 
any rate he saw a good site for a grist 
inill. So in 1771 he hewed a cart 
path from the Old South Road "through 
the forest, down to Sucker Brook, and 
over the hills west of the pond to 
its outlet." There he built a mill 
and a shanty, and a little later the 
old "millhouse" in which he lived, 
and which is still standing and in- 
habited. It was the first frame house 
in the village, and to David Austin, its 




builder, must be given the honor of the 
title, "Founder of Winsted." The hardy 
old pioneer, restless, did not remain in 
town. His subsequent career has a 
touch of pathos in it, but that is another 
story. 

Five or six years after David Austin of 
the South Road built his grist mill at the 
Lake, John Balcom, a dweller on the 
North Road, is believed to have built 
another known as the Doolittle mill, 




Methodist Episcopal Church nearing cotaple- 
tion— Photo by K. T. Sheldon 



St. James Protestant Episcopal Church conse- 
crated 1848— Photo by K. T. Sheldon 

near the present William L. Gilbert 
Clock Company's works, reaching it by 
a road down Wallin's Hill. Around these 
two grist mills, separated by what is now 
the heart of the Borough of Winsted, 
but by what was then two miles of un- 
broken forest and thick underbrush, 
with probably not even a path con- 
necting them, small clusters of houses 
grew up; later a bridle path from 
one to the other was made by way 
of the present Lake street, Hins- 
dale and Wetmore avenues and North 
Main street, which subsequently devel- 
oped into a road. In 1799 the Green- 
woods turnpike was opened from New 
Hartford to Shefifield and a part of it be- 



s8o 



IVINSTED— DEVELOPMENT OF AN IDEAL TOWN 




Baptist Church erected 1889— Photo by F. H. De- 
Mars 

came the Main street of Winsted. The 
new turnpike immediately monopolized 
the through travel to the west which had 
formerly passed over the old North and 
South Roads, and it was at once an im- 
portant thoroughfare. North Main 
street was quickly extended down to it 
and the skeleton framework of Winsted 
streets was established, but it preceded a 
long time the day of the "Good Roads" 
movement. 

The year before the Greenwoods turn- 
pike was opened, the "Higley Tavern,",, 
afterwards the Union House, now torn 
down, was built in anticipation of the 
road and was the first frame house on 
the Main street of Winsted. 

The history of the next hundred years 
of Winsted's life, from the building of 
Austin's mill, can be but hastily sketch- 
ed here. It is given faithfully, ably 
and with minuteness in John Boyd's An- 
nals. It developed the town which the 
aged historian knew in his last years. It 
was a century of hard and plodding 



work, of increasing wealth, of growth of 
character. For after all they would be 
rude people in these days, those old an- 
cestors of ours. Stern, honest and nerve- 
strong they were, but bigoted, super- 
stitious, rough and uncouth in many 
ways, with the cider barrel always in 
the cellar, rum a common beverage, and 
conducting lotteries to support their 
churches. We are proud of them be- 
cause they were in advance of their 
own times, not of ours. 

The bigotry and superstition have de- 
creased steadily. The history of the 




St. Joseph's Roman Catholic Church erected 1853 
—Photo by K. T. Sheldon 




and Court House— Photo by F. H. De- 



churches shows in miniature the world 
movement toward tolerance. It could 
be traced in Winchester from the rigid 
orthodoxy of the first minister, Rev. Mr. 
Knapp, through the pastorates of his suc- 
cessors, to the time when its most hid- 
eous dogma, the damnation of children, 
weakened; an event of which the late 
Lewis Andrews wrote, "It was my hap- 
py lot to hear the late Rev. Marsh preach 
his first sermon at a child's funeral, so 
he said, where he was able to bring com- 
fort to a frantic mother's stricken heart." 



W IN STED— DEVELOPMENT Of AN IDEAL TOWN 581 




THE GIIvBERT SCHOOIv 



Courtesy of the Citizen Printing Co. 



We could trace the movement further, 
step by step down to the present time, 
when the Brotherhood of Man is be- 
coming the universal creed. As for sec- 
tarianism, its reign and subsidence are 
graphically pictured in Winchester his- 
tory, for Mr. Boyd says, "In those days" 
(when the first Methodist meeting house 
was built at the foot of Spencer street) 
"the Methodist and Congregational re- 
ligionists had little more sympathy or 



intercourse with each other than the old 
Jews and Samaritans. The circuit rider 
came on his rounds and declaimed a- 
gainst steeple meeting houses, pitchpipe 
singing and the doctrine of election 
and the Presbyterians, on the 
other hand, looked on the Methodists as 
interlopers and fanatics. . . . Time 
and circumstances have worn away the 
prejudices and softened the asperities of 
the two denominations. Intermarriages 




Photo by F. H. OeMars 

THE WIIvWAM L. GIIvBERT HOME FOR FRIENDI^ESS CHII^DREN 



;82 



WINSTED— DEVELOPMENT OF AN IDEAL TOV/N 




WILLIAM L. GILBERT, philauthropist 

liave led to mutual forbearance. The 
temperance movement brought the best 
men and women of the two orders into 
co-operation and the anti-slavery move- 



ment, fearlessly advocated by the living 
Christianity of both churches, was the 
deathblow of sectarianism." 

The belief in witchcraft and the per- 
sonality of the devil have greatly waned 
since the days of Caleb Beach and the 
other pioneers, but they were very living 
beliefs then. Mrs. Beach herself had 
some experiences, according to tradition, 
while living in the old house which has 
been pictured as the first house built in 
the town: 

"Mrs. Beach was an expert and excel- 
lent weaver. Once she had to finish a 
large quantity of work by a given time, 
but she was sick for a while and after 
that unable to do her daily 'stent.' There 
was then talk of an 'evil eye' in the neigh- 
borhood, and a 'spell' upon the weaver's 
loom. One night as the family sat 
around the huge fireplace, the sound of 
someone weaving in the back room 
startled them, but no one dared investi- 
gate in the dark. By the time the fire- 
knot was lighted and they had gone into 
the weaving room, the loom was silent 
and locked, but quite a strip of cloth 
had been completed of a different weave, 



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MEMORIAL LIBRARY BUILDING 



Photo by I-. H. DeMars 



W IN Sr ED— DEVELOPMENT OF AN IDEAL TOWN 



583 




Mrs. Delia Ellen (Rockwell) Miss Martha Beardsley — Born Mrs. Maria (Hewitt) Brown — 
Beardsley — Born January Iti, February 13, i85t>— Died Novem- Born September 23, 1812— Died 
1811— Died March 19, 1878 ber 25, 1890 January 28, 1899 



the work of a new hand. When they had 
returned to the front room the same 
thing happened again, and then again. 
It was pronounced witchcraft, and there- 
after the weaver worked in constant fear, 
but hurried to finish the cloth and it was 
completed the evening before the day 
set for it. During the night the treadles 
of the loom were heard distinctly sev- 
eral times and in the morning the out- 
side door was wide open and upon the 
newly fallen snow were tracks of a clo- 
ven hoof and marks as if some creature 



had brushed its tail in the snow." 

And all this was not so very long ago. 
It is a somewhat remarkable fact that 
there are people living today who have 
seen every church edifice ever built in 
the town. The first church was in the 
Old Society. It was thirty feet long by 
twenty-four wide, with nine feet posts. 
It was built in 1769. The handle of the 
door of this church is now owned by 
Elliot B. Bronson of Winchester Center. 
It was made by David Austin in his 
blacksmith shop before he built his grist 





Jenison J. Whitingf — Born January 9, 1818 — Died 
October 22, 1897— Photo by K. T. Sheldon 



Frederick B. Griswold — Born January 17, 1824 — 
Died April 14, 1901— Photo by K. T. Sheldon 



584 



W I NSTED— DEVELOPMENT OF AN IDEAL TOWN 




The late Hon. Lorrin A. Cooke— Governor of 
Connecticut 1897-1899 

mill in Winsted, and is stamped with his 
initials and the date, 1769. Near the 
church was a Sabbath Day house, where 
people could warm themselves and eat 
their luncheon during intermission. This 



church was afterwards removed from its 
site and used many years for a barn. The 
second church in the Old Society was 
built in 1785. It was used for more than 
fifty years before a stove was put into it, 
and was succeeded by the present build- 
ing, which was dedicated June 30, 1842. - 

The first meeting-house in Winsted 
Society was really over the line in Bark- 
hamsted. It was situated on Wallin's 
Hill and was used but a short time. 

In 1800 the First Congregational 
church was built. It was moved and re- 
modeled about 1850 and was used until 
iQOi, when the new church was erected. 
The first Methodist church was on Spen- 
cer street and is now a tenement house. 
The present Methodist church, which is 
soon to give place to the one now being 
built, was erected in 1833. St. James 
Episcopal church was consecrated in the 
fall of 1848. St. Joseph's Catholic church^ 
was first used in 1853. The Second Con- 
gregational church was dedicated in 
1857 and used until 1899, when the new 
church was finished. The Baptist church 
was built in 1889 and remodeled in 1902. 
A Second Advent chapel was built about 
1890 but was not well supported and is 
now made over into a tenement house. 

The material prosperity of the com- 
munity upon which all other progress, 
even religious, is undoubtedly more or 



J^ 




THE LITCHFIELD COUNTY HOSPITAL 



Photo l)y F. H. DeMar 



W IN STED— DEVELOPMENT OF AN WEAL TOWN 



585 



less dependent, came to Winsted from 
its valuable water power. About the 
time that David Austin built his grist 
mill, Richard Smith, an Englishman, 
built a forge at what is now Roberts- 
ville, in Barkhamsted, near the north- 
eastern corner of Winchester. At this 
forge pig iron was refined, which was 
brought, in saddle bags at first, thirty 
miles from the mines in Salisbury. 
Other forges, obtaining pig iron from 
the same source were built in the 
vicinity. Between 1800 and 1812, four 
at least were built in Winchester, some 
on the lake stream, between the lake and 
Mad river, and others on the river. At 
one of these forges, at a later date. Gen- 
eral H. A. Harvey, the inventor of Har- 
ve3dzed armor for battleships, carried 
on business under the name of the Har- 
vey Iron & Steel Co. All of the old 
forges have passed away and their sites 
are occupied by other buildings. The 
last one, the Timothy Hulbert forge, 
was torn down about fifteen years ago. 
But for half a century the forges did 
valiant work in the building of the town. 
and in conjunction with the scythe 
shops, which were started in 1792 by 
Benjamin Jenkins of Bridgewater and 




JUDGIi AUGUSTUS H. FENN 
Born Plymouth, Conn., Jan. 18, 1844— Civil War 
veteran— Judge of Supreme Court for eight years 
—Died Winsted, Sept. 12, 1897 

James Boyd of Windsor, under the name 
of Jenkins & Boyd, they gave to Win- 
sted what may well be styled its "Iron 
Age." 




Pliuiol.) K.T.Sheldon 
RESIDENCE OK LATE GOVERNOR LORRIN A. COOKE 



586 IVINSTED—DEJ^ELOPMENT OF AN IDEAL TOWN 



In the article which follows, on the in- 
dustrial progress of the town, will be 
found, in more detail, the history ot 
these early manufactures. 

^lany events in the town's history ac- 
companied the rise of its manufactures. 





esy HoiiKlitoii. Mifflin S: Co. 



Banker poet— Published Winsted Herald in the 
fifties with Stephen A. Hubbard 



ROSE TERRY COOKE, AUTHORESS 

Born 1827 West Hartford— Died 1892, Pittsfield, 
Mass. 

The first town' meeting of Winchester 
was held July 22, 1771. The oldest as- 
sessment list of the town in existence 
was made in 1783. On it, the Win- 
chester Society's property footed up 
£4,242-i2s-9d and the Winsted Society's 
£i,42S-i2s-9d. The latter's growth was 
already becoming important, and in 1786 
an effort was made to form a separate 
incorporated town by uniting the east- 
erly part of Winchester and the westerly 
part of Barkhamsted, but this plan fail- 
ed. In 1790 it was voted in town meet- 
ing to set off and incorporate the So- 
ciety' of Winsted into a separate town 
from the town of Winchester, but the 
General Assembly "failed to pass the act 
of incorporation." In 1799 Winsted had 
grown sufficiently to cause the town to 
vote that one-third of the town meetings 
be held at the house of Horace Higley^ 
(the Higley Tavern, just built) and in^ 
t8o8 it was voted to hold one-half of 
the meetings in Winsted. In 1810 the 
assessment list gave Winsted $13,747.03, 



WINSTED— DEVELOPMENT OE AN IDEAL TOWN 



587 




Photo by F. H. DeMars 
MEMORIAL PARK AND SOLDIERS MONUMENT DEDICATED SEPT. 11, 1890 



and the Old Society $I7,398..^2. The 
two parts of the town were nearing the 
time when the child should become as 
strong as the parent. The famous Fourth 
of July celebration on the Green in 1810 
may be regarded, perhaps, as the culmi- 
nation of Winchester Center's glory. 
Thereafter, though it had a long era of 
prosperity, it was subsidiary in. import- 
ance to the growing village in the east. 
Strong men it had, indeed, most promi- 
nent among them the widely known 
Hurlbuts, merchants, farmers and drov- 
ers, from whom old John Brown bought 
cattle, Lemuel Hurlbut having "intro- 
duced upon his farm the pure Devon 
breed of cattle, the first of this beauti- 
ful and serviceable stock ever brought 
into the State." 

After 1810 one-half the town meetings 
were held for a time in Winchester Cen- 
ter; then only one-third; finally, about 
1840, this third was given up and all 
town meetings since have been held in 
Winsted. In i860, the long-established 
custom of selecting one candidate for 
representative to the General Assembly 
from the Old Society and one from Win- 
sted, and of holding a caucus in each 
place, was also broken. Thereafter all 
caucuses were held in Winsted and about 
1865 the separate tax list for Winchester 



Center was also abolished. The Old 
Hill settlement still exists, catching the 
first rays of the morning sun and look- 
ing westward over splendid vistas to dis- 
tant dreamy mountains, and there is 




ELDER MILES GRANT 

Born Torringfotd, Conn., Dec. 13th, 1819— Taught 
school in Winsted in the forties — Now occupying 
thie pulpit at age of 84 



588 



WINSTED— DEVELOPMENT OF AN IDEAL TOWN 




Photo by K. T. Sheldon 
RESIDENCE OK GEORGK h- FOSKETT ON SOUTH MAIN STREET 



prospect that the new era of summer 
homes for the dwellers in cities may 
bring it a great prosperity in the future, 
but whoever drives over the road from 
Winchester Center to "Danbury Quar- 
ter," once the most populous street in 




WII^LIAM C. PHEI^PS 

Born Colebrook, Conn., Sept. 4, 1808— At age of 96 
a now familiar figure in Winsted — For over 40 
years a school teacher— Last taught in First 
District, Winsted 



town, will see a long line of ancient cel- 
lars overgrown with briers, which tell 
a story of olden days which will never 
return. 

The century dating from the building 
of David Austin's mill and of the organ- 
ization of the town of Winchester, July 
22, 1771, ended in 1871, and that year 
saw the town's centennial celebration. 
Two years later the Annals of Winches- 
ter were published. Since then, though 
onlj'^ the third part of another century 
has passed, the population of the town 
has doubled. If change in conditions 
could be measured by the same direct 
ratio, we should find that it had more 
than kept pace with the increase of pop- 
ulation. That century was one of man's 
work in Winsted, and its products were 
of iron, hard and homely. The thirty- 
three years have brought many modifi- 
cations. Some of the old industries have 
disappeared. More ductile metals, more 
easily worked, made into beautiful 
shapes and shining with bright plating, 
go out from its factories. Soft wool is 
the material used in two large establish- 
ments; silk in brilliant colors is the sole 
output of another, and in these factories 
many girls are employed in clean and 
well-paid work. Winsted has become a 



WINSTED— DEVELOPMENT OF AN IDEAL TOWN 



589 



town of remarkably varied manufactures, 
so much so as to hold an almost unique 
position in this respect for a town of 
its size. 

Along in the seventies, at the be- 
ginning of the New Winsted, it be- 
came evident that the limit to the 
amount of power which could be de- 
rived from Long Lake was nearly reach- 
ed. When David Austin erected his mill 
in 1771, he built a wooden dam which 
raised the lake about four feet high- 




STlirilKN A. ilUBHARD 

Born August 20, 1827 Sunderland, Mass —With 
Thomas M. Clark, founded Winsted Herald 1853 
— Associated with Senator Joseph R. Hawley on 
Hartford Courant at time of his death, Jan. 11, 
1890 

er than its natural level. About 1806 
this dam gave way during a freshet, but 
the break had been expected and was 
repaired temporarily, averting disaster. 
The same year a new dam was built, 
made of two walls of stone, filled solid 
between, wide enough for a roadwaj' 
along the top. This new dam was a 
foot higher than the old one. Again in 
i860, when the Borough waterworks sys- 




THOMAS M. CI^ARK 

Born Jan. 30, 1830— For ten years, including Civil 
War period. Editor Winsted Herald— Died Nov. 
13, 1889 

tern was established, the Borough, by 
authorization of the legislature, raised 
the dam another four feet. Yet in many 
years there was a scarcity of water, and 
it was recognized that not more reser- 
voir capacity, but more water to fill the 
existing reservoir must be provided. For 




THEODOKK F. VAIl^l^ 

Born March 27, 1832— Editor of Winsted Herald 
from 1865 until his death, Feb. 8, 1876 



590 WINSTED— DEVELOPMENT OF AN IDEAL TOWN 




WINSTED— DEVELOPMENT OF AN IDEAL TOWN 



591 




Phnio tiv K 1 . hi eld(i 



RESIDENCE OF ARTHUR Iv- CLARK 



about ten years from 1875, the lake did 
not fill to overflowing even in the spring 
freshets. A bold plan was formed, 
which preliminary surveys in 1880 prov- 
ed to be practicable. Estimates of cost 
varying little from actual later results, 
were made. Ten years elapsed after 
these surveys before the construction be- 
gan. Then, by will of the late William 
L. Gilbert, $50,000 were given for the 
purpose, and with that amount as a nu- 
cleus, the Borough of Winsted complet- 
ed in 1894, a lasting monument to its 
energy. Briefly, a tunnel six feet high 
and six feet wide was bored through 
3,252 feet of solid granite and gneiss 
rock, and through this tunnel from a 
feeding reservoir, water which formerly 
ran to waste down Mad river is poured 
into Crystal Lake (formerly 'Little 
Pond') and from this by its natural out- 
let, through Sucker Brook into High- 
land (formerly Long) Lake. At the same 
time the storage capacity was increased 
by raising Crystal Lake by a dam, and 
pipes were laid to this lake, 300 feet a- 
bove the level of Main street, from the 
Borough waterworks system, which 
formerly took its supply from Highland 
Lake. 



The achievement of improving its 
water power is the most important event 
in the industrial history of Winsted dur- 
ing the last thirty years. 

V/e come now to a splendid factor in 
the town's development — the gifts of 
public - spirited citizens, benefactions 
which, in conjunction with the industrial 
changes, have transformed the town 
since the "Annals" were written. Wil- 
liam L. Gilbert, whose gifts made the 
tunnel a possibility, gave also to Win- 
sted the Gilbert Home' and the Gilbert 
School, two institutions endowed with 
over a half-million dollars each; the one 
situated on a commanding position on 
a hill in the west part of the village, 
owning a tract of land of over 200 acres; 
the other a massive building facing "the 
Green" in East Winsted. The Home is 
a refuge for friendless and poor chil- 
dren; the school is an institution offer- 
ing free to residents of Winsted, and to 
others for a small tuition fee, the ad- 
vantages not only of the best high 
schools, but of further advanced study. 
It is perhaps true that, up to the found- 
ing of the Gilbert School, Winsted had 
hardly kept pace in its public schools 
with the general progress along the line. 



592 



IVINSTED—DEVELOPMENT OF AN IDEAL TOWN 



There had been able teachers and the 
schools had advanced, but the old sec- 
tional feeling had retarded the move- 
ment. Some excellent private schools, 
notably the Winchester Institute, found- 
ed in 1858 by the Rev. Ira Pettibone, 
and continued with changes until about 
1885, had done good work, but their ad- 
vantages were not open to all. In later 
years the graded public schools had done 
tlie best possible under the conditions. 
Ilut witli one stride, at the opening of 
tlie Gilbert School in 1895, Winsted step- 
ped to an advanced position in education- 
al ranks. The graded schools, freed from 
iiigh school obligations, are able to con- 
centrate their energies on thorough 
preparation for the new school and its 
excellent courses. 

William L. Gilbert was a native of 
Litchfield, where he was born, a farmer's 
son, in 1806. He remained on the farm, 
securing a district school education only, 
till he was twenty-two years old. Then 
his instincts led him from the farm to 
business. He went to Bristol, and bor- 
rowing $300, began, with a brother-in- 
law, the manufacture of parts of clocks 
for other concerns. In 1841 he came 
to Winsted and with others bought the 
Riley Whiting Clock Works on the his- 
toric site of the Doolittle Mill. Nearly 
a half century later he died, having built 
the largest business in Winsted, and 
having amassed a large fortune. He left 
the greater part of it to do good for the 
town in which he lived. 

The educational awakening of Winsted 
was also helped in 1874 by Mrs. Delia 
FJlen Rockwell Beardsley, widow of El- 
liott Beardsley, who gave into the hands 
of trustees $10,000 for the founding of a 
library. For twenty-five years the 
books were in a pleasant room in the 
Beardsley building. Before his death in 
(897, the late Jenison J. Whiting began 
llie construction of the Memorial Li- 
brary. The building was completed af- 
ter his death by Mrs. Whiting, and with 
the lot on which it stands, representing 
.1 total outlay of about $20,000, was 
;_,nven to the town for the reception of 
libraries. The Beardsley Library, whose 



funds had been augmented by a gift of 
$1,000 from Miss Martha Beardsley at 
her death, and by $600 given by Rufus 
E. Holmes of Winsted, was placed in 
the building. The town then voted an 
appropriation of $1,500 annually, to meet., 
with other expenses, those for which a 
small fee had been charged, and the 
books in the library were made free to 
the public. 

Standing on the summit of a hill in 
the center of Winsted is a square tower 
of native gray rock. On the top is a 
massive figure of a soldier. The lines 
of the tower are simple but graceful. 
The whole gives an effect of great 
beauty and is the most striking struc- 
ture in the town. It is Winsted's tribute 
to the soldier dead of the Civil War. 
On tablets in the tower are inscribed the 
names of those who died for the Union. 
This impressive and unique memorial 
was made possible by money raised in 
various ways and by many contributors, 
prominent among them being Henry 
Gay and Mrs. Maria Brown. 

On another hill-top, less than a half- 
mile from Memorial Park and the Sol- 
diers' Monument, is another edifice e- 
rected through money furnished in great 
part by public-spirited individuals, — and 
the Litchfield County Hospital of Win- 
chester, opened in 1902, is proving one 
of the most beneficent institutions in 
northwestern Connecticut. The grounds 
on which the building stands and $2,500 
additional, were given by Mrs. Julia A. 
Batcheller. Mrs. Maria Brown left by 
her will $5,000 for furnishing a hospital; 
the late Frederick B. Griswold oequeath- 
ed a fund of $40,000 to become available 
in the future, and Mrs. Mary B. Mix 
gave, by her will, $8,000. Two unknown 
donors have given $5,000 each for the 
founding of free beds, and many persons 
yet living have contributed amounts 
ranging from $ioo to $2,500 each. 

A mile away from the hospital, on the 
Green in luist Winsted, is the Memorial 
Fountain, given by Mrs. Mary Ann 
niake Mitchell. 

There has been purposely left for the 
last in this recital, a legacy which has 



WINSTED— DEVELOPMENT OF AN IDEAL TOWN 593 




RESIDENCE OF DR. SAI^MON G. HOWD 




RECEPTION HALL IN RESIDENCE OF DR. SALMON G. HOWD 



594 U'INSTED— DEVELOPMENT OF AN IDEAL TOWN 



opened for the pleasure and recreation 
of the people the remarkable natural 
beauty of Winsted. Forbidding as the 
wilderness might have seemed for the 
building of a city when the forests were 
unbroken and trackless, it has become 
of the utmost beauty today. The be- 
quest by Harvey Wakefield of $10,000 
to the town of Winchester for any pub- 
lic use desired, was devoted by vote of 
the town to building a driveway around 
Highland Lake. As soon as the road 
was finished the erection of summer cot- 
tages began, and this movement was ac- 
celerated by the construction of a 
branch electric railway to the eastern 
shore. The "Boulevard" and the "Park" 
have now become the great summer 
pleasure resorts of Winsted. 

Where, one hundred and thirty-five 
years ago, David Austin looked upon a 
lonely lake, along whose borders an oc- 
casional red-skinned Indian stole in and 
out in search of game or fish, losing 
sometimes an arrow head, now the only 
memento of his presence, — the sum- 
mer visitor of today views a scene of 
gayety; watches moving panoramas of 
boats ; hears sounds of music, and 
through the foliage, where the Indian 
skulked clad in rude garments, catches 
sight of the summer girl arrayed in all 
her daintiness. 

On a tablet set in the rock of a high 
ledge beside the road on the west shore, 
is this inscription: "A tribute of remem- 
brance to Harvey Wakefield, a citizen of 
Winsted, whose generosity enabled the 
town to provide this beautiful lakeside 
drive, 1887." Mr. Wakefield was born 
in Colebrook, September 18, 1802, and 
died July 24, 1884. 

Our story is almost ended, and yet 
little of what might be written of Win- 
sted has been told. It is the home of 
patriotism. Rose Terry Cooke, in her 
glowing description of "Mytown" in 
Harper's, of October, 1877, bespeaks its 
spirit. Winchester's Daughters of the 
American Revolution may well be proud 
of their town's record. Says Mr. Boyd, 
"Our infant town had her representa- 
tions at Ticonderoga, Bunker Hill, Que- 



bec, Long Island, Saratoga, and many 
other battlefields. . . . Scarcely a ves- 
tige is found (on the muster and pay- 
rolls) of the service of drafted militia re- 
peatedly called out from Litchfield coun- 
ty to Danbury, Horse Neck, Long Island, 
Peekskill, and other points on the North 
river during the long protracted struggle 
for the possession of the Highlands. 
Probably not an able-bodied man of the 
town failed of being called out more than 
once on this harassing duty." 

And to this summary of the days of 
'76, might be added Mr. Boyd's vivid 
account of the effect in Winsted, made 
by the announcement of the news of the 
firing on Fort Sumpter in 1861, and the 
long and honorable record of Winches- 
ter's part in the Civil War. 

There are records other than those 
of war where names will be found which 
shed lustre on the town. John Boyd, 
Secretary of State from 1859 to 1861; 
William S. Holabird, Lieutenant-Gov- 
ernor from 1842 to 1844 ; Augustus H. 
Fenn, Judge of the Supreme Court of 
Connecticut from 1893 to his death in 
1897; and Lorrin A. Cooke, Governor of 
the State from 1898 to 1900; — are a- 
mong those who have been politically- 
honored. 

Of the literary world, Edmund C. 
Stedman and Rose Terry Cooke have 
lived and written in Winsted, as have 
also such newspaper men as Thomas 
AI. Clarke, Stephen A. Hubbard, and 
Theodore F. Vaill. 

But finall}', to all these human inter- 
ests that invest the town, there is added 
the charm of a marvellous scenery which 
vests like a halo upon varied events. 
The new life of the springtime, bursting 
from field and bush, has made the ser- 
mon of the minister a sanctified mes- 
sage of love and hope; the grandeur of 
a winter tempest among the rugged hills 
has nerved the physician to fight and 
win from death itself. Drives through 
woodland roads when foilage was gor- 
geous with burning color, have left bright 
reminiscences, and the romance of even- 
ings on the lake — of the moonlight and 
the rippling water — lingers in many 



WINSr ED— DEVELOPMENT OF AN IDEAL TOWN 



595 



memories. For all who live and toil in 
this town of the hills, there are notes 
of joy which come from nature in her 
gladdest form, and from "the great 



paeon of Being that nature chants — notes 
in the divine diapason of life — of life 
singing its cosmic song." 



NOTE— Since this article was submitted to the publishers, Miss Amanda E. Church, a native of 
Winsted, who lived all her life in the house where she was born, has died at the age of eighty 
years, leaving an estate valued at over $10,000 to the Beardsley I^ibrary 



THE FINANCIAL AND INDUSTRIAL HISTORY 

OF WINSTED 

MANUFACTURING— BANKING— BUSINESS IN- 
TERESTS— WITH HISTORICAL SKETCHES 
OF THEIR PROMOTERS— WRITTEN IN COIv- 
IvABORATlON WITH ROBERT S. HULBERT 

BY 

EDWARD BAILEY EATON 



IN the preceding sketch of the gen- 
eral development of Winsted, 
many details of its progress and 
industries have necessarily been 
omitted, and yet material prosperity is 
possibly the most fascinating phase of 
history. 

The Winsted of today, risen from a 
rocky wilderness, has about 10,000 in- 
habitants and an assessment list of $5,- 
000,000. It is the center of trade of over 
500 square miles of territory, lies at the 
junction of two railroads, and is con- 
nected with its nearest large neighbor. 
Torrington, ten miles away, by an elec- 
tric railway. 

It has what is probably one of the 
finest water supplies in New England, 
a well-equipped fire department and low 
insurance rates. It is lighted by gas and 
electricity, supplied from large modern 
plants, the one producing electricity be- 
ing situated at the romantic falls of the 
\_^ Tunxis, about three miles from the Bor- 
ough. It has also two telephone sys- 
tems, supplying about one telephone to 
every ten persons, and the manufactories 



v^ 




Photo by Mrs. Alice Doughty Sanford 



REMAINS OF THE FIRST FORGE IN 

WINCHESTER 

Built about 1795 by Jenkins & Boyd— Old water 
wheel is all that remained twelve years ago 



596 



WINSTED— FINANCIAL AND INDUSTRIAL 







t—T. 



^^. 



'r,;i?^ 



From painiing by Mrs. Aiice Doughty Sanford 
THE LAST FORGE IN WINCHESTER 



^ 


: ■ 


1 , 

1>^ 




A SK*. ■ 


'" 


-.■■ 




1 


■PP||J1" 




5^w^ 


Jimm 


urtijlp 



Known as the Timothy Hulbert Forge— Built about 1803 by the Rockwell Bros.— Torn down about 
fifteen years ago 



of Winsted turn out probably over four 
million dollars worth of products in a 
year. 

In the progress of this manufacturing 
may be traced the evolution of the me- 
chanical arts. There has been a mar- 
velous change from the primitive meth- 
ods of years ago to the present facilities 
for supplying the demands of a world's 
trade, and as the history of manufact- 
uring is largely a narration of individual 
success, this chapter of progress must 
be somewhat biographical. 

In Mr. Hulbert's article it is said that 
the early part of the last century might 
be called the "Iron Age" of Winsted. 
Besides the large output of refined iron 
and scythes, there had been made in the 
town, before i860, from iron and steel. 
the following products: Nails, by Jesse 
Byington, in 1810, who, during the War 
of 1812, "employed more men as cutters 
and headers, than were employed by any 



other branch of business in the place;" 
axes, whose manufacture was introduced 
by Elizur Hinsdale about 1804; iron wire, 
the drawing of which from rods was a 
prosperous business near the present 
clock shop about 1812, and was carried 
on by Samuel and Luther Hoadley and 
James Boyd; hay and manure forks, 
made about the same time by hand in 
several shops; hoes, shovels and car- 
penters' tools, the making of which was 
.started about 1828 by Samuel Boyd on 
the south side of Mad river; washers, 
nuts and bolts, made by the Clifton Mill 
Co., which succeeded him; table cutlery, 
manufactured first by the Eagle Co., on 
the site where the T. C. Richards Co. 
now stands; pocket cutlery, made first 
by Thompson & Gascoign in 1853, the 
business being developed into the pres- 
ent Empire Knife Co.; augurs, which 
were manufactured from 1853 to i860 by 



WINSTED— FINANCIAL AND INDUSTRIAL 



597 



the Winsted Augur Co., where the Em- 
pire Knife Company's works are now 
situated; carriage axles, in the manufact- 
ure of which Reuben Cook & Sons em- 
barked about 1840; shovels, tongs and 
other fire irons, which were made, about 
1854, where the Woodruff Feed Mills 
now ^tand, the business being soon dis- 
continued, as Mr. Boyd rather naively 
remarks, because the concern "lacked 
capital, energy and business skill;" join- 
ers' tools, made by the Winsted Plane 
Co. for a few years from 1851 on the site 
now occupied by the Strong Mfg. Co., 
and finally pins, which have gone out 
from Winsted in millions upon millions 
since the Hartford Pin Co., the pred- 
ecessors of the New England Pin Co., 
began making them in 1852. In addition 
to these articles of wrought iron and 
steel, several foundries for making cast 
iron products were in existence at dif- 
ferent times, turning out clock bells, 
stoves, plows, and a great variety of oth- 
er castings. 



There were other important industries, 
however, in the town in the early days; 
grist mills, two of which have been men- 
tioned in the preceding article, and saw 
mills necessarily followed closely the 
early settlers. The first saw mill is be- 
lieved to have been built in Winchester 
Center, near the Hurlbut Cemetery. 
Others were built in different parts of 
the town. Lumber and various wooden 
articles including oars, wooden bowls and 
cheese boxes were made. Tanneries on 
a large scale were started in 1802 by two 
colonels, Hosea Hinsdale and James 
Sheperd, and have been always since 
then important industries of the town. 
The manufacture of woolen cloth was 
several times undertaken, but appears 
not to have been conducted long or 
profitably. In 1807, Samuel and Luther 
Hoadley and Riley Whiting began the 
manufacture of clocks, and that business, 
under different owners, has continued 
for nearly a century and has become the 
largest manufacturing industry of the 
town. 




From sketch by Mrs. Alice Doughty Sanford 
THE OLD THAYER SCYTHE SHOP ON MAD RIVER 
Built in 1831 and operated successfully for over fifty years 



WINSTED— FINANCIAL AND INDUSTRIAL 



599 



A brief history of this large concern 
may be interesting. When the Hoad- 
leys and Mr. Whiting started the busi- 
ness they made wooden clocks. "The 
machinery was carried by a tin wheel 
on an upright iron shaft. The cog 
wheels were of cherry, the pinion was of 
ivy (or calmia) and the face of white- 
wood, all home products. These, with a 
very little wire, a very little steel, brass, 



The buildings have a floor space of over 
90,000 square feet. The rooms are filled 
with the most modern and improved 
machinery. About 500 operatives are. 
employed, turning out 2,000 clocks each 
day. These clocks are bewildering in 
their styles and sizes. They are of all 
prices, from the cheapest to the most 
e.Kpensive, and it is a long step from the 
crude modern affairs of 1807 to the 



tin and cordage made up the staple of beautiful objects of the clock-making art 



material in the old one-day shelf clock 
which they produced and scattered all 
over the United States and Canada." 

Luther Hoadley died in 1813 and Sam- 
uel entered the army in the same year, 
retiring from the business. Mr. Whit- 
ing enlarged the business, tore down 
the historic grist mill, built new shops 
and began making eight-day clocks. He 
died in 1835. Lucius Clarke bought the 
business in 1841, the year that William 
L. Gilbert became identified with it. It 
was then carried on under the name of 
Clarke, Gilbert & Co., and W. L. Gil- 
bert, until its incorporation as The Gil- 
bert Manufacturing Company in 1866. 
It was reorganized in 1871 as the Wil- 
liam L. Gilbert Clock Company. The 
old building built by Mr. Whiting was 
burned down in 1870. It was replaced 
by two large three-story brick buildings 
which have been added to at intervals. 
In 1902 a handsome new office building, 
fronting on North Main street, was e- 
rected. The present extensive plant, an 
illustration of which is presented, is a 
striking example of industrial progress. 



which go out from the factory in 1904. 

Steadily, for nearly a century, the con- 
cern has extended its trade, until now 
it has the world foi its market. 

The company has established sales- 
rooms in New York, Chicago, San Fran- 
cisco, Philadelphia, Montreal, London 
and Rio Janeiro. Besides the sale of 
these goods throughout the United 
States, large shipments are made to 
China, Japan, South Africa, Australia, 
South America, and to a great many 
European countries, particularly to Eng- 
land. It would be difficult to find an 
illustration more typical of all that is 
involved in the building up of a great 
manufacturing industry, than is afforded 
by the history of this establishment, 
which has been identified so long with 
Winsted, 

The large interests of the concern are 
at present managed by a board of di- 
rectors composed of James G. Woodruff, 
George B. Owen, Lyman R. Norton, B. 
F. Marsh and Henry Gay, and by the 
officers, J. G. Woodruff, president and 
treasurer; George B. Owen, vice-presi- 
dent and general manager; E. S. Brown, 
secretary, and Arthur W. Owen, assist- 
ant treasurer. 



6oo 



W I NSTED— FINANCIAL AND INDUSTRIAL 



Next to the clock company, in order 
of age, of the present manufacturing 
concerns of Winsted, is a representative 
of the tanning industry, The George 
Dudley & Son Company. 

In the first half of the last century, 
there were, around Winsted, several 
small tanneries for the tanning and fin- 
ishing of shoe leather. The tanning was 
all done in still vats, the skins being 
poled around by hand. When tanned 
they were made up into shoes in the 
same shop. 

It was in this way that George Dudley 
started in the leather business in 183T. 
He had a small tannery on the New 
Hartford road, near what is known as 
the Kellogg place. He remained there, 
however, only one year, buying, in 1832 
of Alanson Loomis, the tannery in Win- 
sted now called the "Home Tannery," 
and soon after took up the tanning of 
sheep and calf skins and English splits 
in hemlock bark for book purposes. 

It was at about this time that he gave 
up the old method of tanning and made 
use of the paddle wheel, which is the 




GEORGE DUDLEY— PIONEER IN THE TAN- 
NING BUSINESS IN WINSTED 

method used at the present time. The 
skins are put in a vat filled with the 




III m l,y F. 11. DeMars 
THE "HOME TANNERY" OF THE CEORGE DUDLEY & SON COMPANY 
Showing great piles of hemlock bark stacked in immense quantities in the yard of the tannery 



JVINSTHD— FINANCIAL AND INDUSTRIAL 



6oi 




Photo by F. H. DeMirs 
THE "ROCKWELL TANNERY" OF THE GEORGE DUDLEY & SON COMPANY 



liquor from hemlock bark. A paddle 
wheel being set in motion makes a cur- 
rent in the liquor which keeps the skins 
constantly in motion. By this method 
the old fashioned and arduous work of 
hand stirring was done away with. An- 
other result was the shortening of the 
length of time necessary for the tanning 
of the skins. 

In 1853, Mr. Dudley, finding that his 
business had outgrown his capacity, tore 
down his old tannery and rebuilt it 
practically as it stands today. 

In 1867 he took his son, George Dud- 
ley, Jr., into partnership, when the busi- 
ness which had been condvicted under 
the name of George Dudley was now 
done as George Dudley & Son. 

The business grew rapidly. For years 
they supplied the United States govern- 
ment with all the sheep and calf skins 
used in their bindery at Washington. 
On account of the increasing demand for 
their leather, it became necessary to 
buy more tanneries, among them being 
what was known as the "Woodruflf Tan- 
nery" on North Main street, and two in 
West Norfolk, Conn. Of these, one in 



West Norfolk is still in use, the rest 
having been dismantled. 

In 1882, Mr. Dudley and his son having 
both died, it became necessary to in- 
corporate the business, since which time 
the business has been carried on under 
the firm name of The George Dudley & 
Son Co. 

In 1888 the firm bought of John T. 
Rockwell the tannery in Winsted which 
his brother and himself had operated un- 
der the firm name of J. S. & J. T. Rock- 
well. 

Up to 1895 the whole attention of the 
company had been centered on the man- 
ufacture of book leather. In that year, 
however, a new branch was taken up, 
the tanning and preparing of sheep skins 
for use in organs, piano players, etc. 
This branch has grown to such propor- 
tions that practically all of the output 
of the "Rockwell" tannery is used in 
supplying the demands of this trade. 

The company has now three tanneries 
in constant operation, two in Winsted 
and one in West Norfolk, Conn. 

The present officers are: George E. 
Dudley, president; Dudley S. Vaill, treas- 
urer, and Andrew Fox, secretary. 



602 



WINSTED— FINANCIAL AND INDUSTRIAL 




ElvIrlOT BEARDSI^EY 

The Empire Knife Company is an il- 
lustration of those industries established 
a half-century ago. Nevertheless, this 
company, manufacturing pocket cutlery, 
is one of the oldest manufacturers of this 
class of goods in the United States, in 
fact, they are the third oldest concern, 
and it is something over 50 years since 
the first pocket knives were made here 
in Winsted. In 1852, two Englishmen, 
Thompson & Gascoigne, came to Win- 
sted and commenced to make pocket 
knives, and an old publication of the 
Winsted Herald has an advertisement 
showing that the firm of Beardsley & 



JAMES R. Al,VORD 

Alvord, country merchants at that time, 
acted as the agents for them, selling their 
product. It was in 1856 that the Empire 
Knife Company came into existence, 
when Elliot Beardsley, who was a man- 
ufacturer of the Beardsley scythes, and 
James R. Alvord, who was his partner in 
the mercantile business of Beardsley & 
Alvord, took up the business of these 
two Englishmen, and formed the part- 
nership of the Empire Knife Co., the 
business has been in the Beardsley and 
Alvord families from that day to this. 
In 1890 this company was merged into 
a joint stock company, with the follow- 



f'*'-'*^^J 




THE PI.ANT OF THE EMPIRE KNIFE COMPANY ON MAD RIVER 



WINSTED— FINANCIAL AND INDUSTRIAL 



603- 



ing officers, who are today managing 
the business: Charles L. Alvord, presi- 
dent; George S. Alvord, vice-president; 
and S. Landon Alvord, secretary and 
treasurer. 

This company employs over one hun- 
dred hands, made up of the most skilled 
workmen, and their product is very wide- 
ly distributed, the goods being largely 
used in the finest city trade, where the 
competition is keenest with the highest 
grade of English goods. 

The factory of this company, for thir- 
ty years, was on Lake street, water 
power of the first factory coming from 
Highland Lake, but in 1880 the old table 
cutlery factory property, the first water 
power on the Norfolk road, was pur- 
chased, and the works were removed to 
that point, where, in new and modern 
buildings, thoroughly equipped for this 
business, the company is now manufac- 
turing their well-known brand of Empire 
knives. 

The earliest factory work carried on 
in Winsted was the making of scythes. 
The first scythe shop in the town (and 
the third in the country) was on the 
same site where the only one re- 
maining in the town is now situated, and 
the concern which operates it — The 
Winsted Manufacturing Company — has 
also the distinction of being the oldest 
organized company in the town. 

The organization of the Winsted Man- 
ufacturing Company was efifected Aug- 
ust 22, 1835, with the following officers 
(all of whom are now deceased) : Direct- 
ors, Theron Rockwell, E. Grove Law- 
rence, Lyman Wakefield, Jonathan E. 
Hoyt, William S. Holabird; president 
Theron Rockwell; secretary, John Camp, 
treasurer, Lyman Case. Mr. Camp was 
the active manager from the organiza- 
tion until his death in 1862. Joseph H. 
Norton succeeded Mr. Camp, August 30. 
1862, as agent and secretary, and under 
Mr. Norton's efficient management a 
large and profitable business was carried 
on. Allen H. Norton, son of Joseph H., 
was elected secretary in 1875, and during 
the latter years of his father's life, was 
the active manager. Joseph H. Norton 
died in 1895, and his son, Allen H. Nor- 



ton, in 1901. The strict integrity and 
honesty in all business dealings which 
has characterized the management of 
this company since its organization, is 
a record of which those who come after 
them and assume the future burdens 
may be proud. 

Since Mr. Norton's death the business 
has been carried on by its present offi- 
cers: President, Lyman R. Norton; treas- 
urer, Arthur L. Clark; secretary, George 
H. Raidart. 

One of the most conspicuous buildings 
that the visitor notes on his arrival in 
Winsted, is the magnificent plant of the 
New England Pin Company, situated on 
Bridge street immediately opposite the -^ 
Naugatuck railroad station. With an im- 
posing frontage of over 100 feet on 
Bridge street, the handsome new build- 
ing, five stories in height, erected in 1901, 
is a testimonial to progressive industry 
in Winsted. 

This business was established by J. G. 
Wetmore, and incorporated under the 
present name in 1854, with a capital of 
$100,000. Since its inception, a career 
of success has marked the history of the 
enterprise which is today one of the 
largest plants in Winsted. 

The product of this industry is pins 
of many varieties, and the output is enor- 
mous, the modern machinery of the plant 
turning out from 12,000,000 to 15,000,000 
pins per day, equal in weight to about 
one ton of solid metal. The company re- 
cently purchased the hair pin plant of 
L. E. Warner of Oakville, and during the 
past year has practically doubled its 
capacity. The Winsted Paper Box Com- 
pany is owned and operated by the New 
England Pin Company, and not only 
manufacturers the boxes used by the lat- 
ter company, but supplies many of the 
other local manufacturers. 

About 125 skilled operatives are busily 
engaged in the manufacture of the shin- 
ing product of the company that has a 
market not only in this country but 
abroad. 

The present officers of the company 
are: George W. Curtis, president; Jay E. 
Spaulding, secretary, treasurer and gen- 
eral manager, and George F. Drake, as- 
sistant secretary. 



6o4 



WINSTED— FINANCIAL AND INDUSTRIAL 




^ 






SUBSTANTIAI. BUILDINGS OF THE NEW ENGLAND PIN COMPANY 



The decade of the Civil War with the 
three years following, to the panic of 
1873, was a time of great prosperity for 
Winsted manufacturers and laid the 
foundations of many fortunes. One bus- 
iness only, that of making planters' 
hoes, was destroyed by the war, while 
several new concerns were started. 
Among them were the Strong Manu- 
facturing Co., making coffin trimmings; 
the business now known as the Franklin 
Moore Bolt Co., started by Edward 
Clarke and the late Franklin Moore; the 
Henry Spring Co., making carriage 
springs, and a large condensed milk fac- 
tory, organized by Gail Borden and 
others, which was operated from 1863 
to 1866. 

In i860, in the town of East Hampton, 
Connecticut, where so many kinds of 
bells are made that Edgar Allen Poe 
might have found material for at least 



one more stanza if he had lived there, 
were two young men, who, having begun 
the business of silver plating bells for 
manufacturers in 1856, had in the follow- 
ing four years added to it the making of 
a small line of coffin tacks, screws and 
handles from white metal. It was the 
beginning of the more extensive business 
of the Strong Manufacturing Company 
of Winsted. For several years there- 
after, in East Hampton, the firm of 
Markham & Strong carried on its busi- 
ness, sometimes under the direction- of 
David Strong, sometiines under that of 
his brother, Clark, who had returned to 
liis home in East Hampton from Mis- 
souri at the breaking out of the war, 
and while both of the Strongs were 
wearing the blue in the service of their 
country, it was entirely under the man- 
agement of Mr. Markham. 

In 1866 the business came to Winsted. 
The Strong Manufacturing Company was 
formed and David Strong was author- 
ized to buy out Markham & Strong, 



WINSTED— FINANCIAL AND INDUSTRIAL 



605 




First Factory Building of The Strong Manufacturing Company Where the company began its 

career in Winsted in 1866 



including the interest of Bevin Brothers, 
who were silent partners. The original 
stockholders of th€ company which was 
formed were William L. Gilbert, Nor- 
mand Adams, A. L. Weirs, David 
Strong, Clark Strong, Charles B. Hal- 
lett, Joseph H. Norton, Ezra Baldwin 
and Theophilus Baird. The first presi- 
dent of the company was William L. 
Gilbert, who held the office for three 
years. Normand Adams was then presi- 
dent for one year and in 1871 David 
Strong was elected to the office and has 
held it since then to the present time. 
In the first year of the company Clark 
Strong was secretary and A. L. Weirs, 
treasurer. From 1867 to 1870 Clark 
Strong was secretary and treasurer. 
In the latter year he was made agent, an 
office which he held to 1877, the year 
before his death, when Henry G. Colt 
succeeded to the office, rendering effic- 
ient and successful service, dying on 
November 2i&t, 1897. He was succeeded 
in turn bj' Luman C. Colt, who still holds 
the ofhcc. In 1870, Harvey L. Roberts, 



who for three years had been bookkeeper 
for the company, took the office of sec- 
retary and treasurer and has retained it 
till the present time. The present board 
of directors consists of the above three 
mentioned officers, including also Lester 
C. Strong and Frederick C. Strong. 

Such has been the personnel of the 
management of the company during the 
nearly forty years of its life in Winsted. 
Few concerns see less changes in an 
equal time. 

The growth of the business was rapid. 
During the first few years David Strong 
carried on under his own name the 
manufacture of burial robes and casket 
linings, selling the goods to undertakers, 
including in his sales the products of the 
Strong Manufacturing Company. In 
1872 his business was consolidated with 
that of the company. 

While the goods made by the Strong 
Manufacturing Company are of the kind 
necessarily associated with sombre re- 
flections, many of the articles are in 
themselves of great beauty. The first 



6o6 



WINSTED— FINANCIAL AND INDUSTRIAL 




DAVID STRONG 
Founder of the Strong Manufacturing Company 

coffin handles made by Markham & 
Strong were plain drop handles of white 
metal. Later these handles were silver 



plated and, as time passed on, the few 
comparatively simple handles gave way 
to a greatly extended line in which the 
designer's art has vied with the plater's 
in producing the most elaborate and ele- 
gant articles. In every department of 
the company the men in charge are mas- 
ters of their business. The products of 
the factory range widely in cost. They 
are seen on the caskets of the lowliest 
and have been on those which held the 
mortal remains of many of the most 
prominent men of the country. When 
General Grant died in 1885, the casket 
handles, solid silver, and the name plate 
of solid gold were furnished by this com- 
pany. It supplied also the handles and 
plate for the caskets of ex-President 
Harrison and Cornelius Vanderbilt. 

The factory of the Strong Manufactur- 
ing Company is situated in the heart of 
the business district of the east part of 
the Borough. When the company was 
first organized, it occupied a small wood- 
en building, but in 1873 a new brick fac- 
tory was built. This was added to in 
1886 and the buildings now form one of 
the most substantial of Winsted's fac- 
tories. 




Photo by K. T. Sheldon 
PI^ANT OF THE STRONG MANUFACTURING COMPANY AS IT APPEARS TODAY 



WINSTED— FINANCIAL AND INDUSTRIAL 



607 



Of the manufacturing industries which 
have been started within the last quarter 
of a century, the Winsted Hosiery Com- 
pany may be taken as a typical concern. 
This company was organized in 1882 
for the manufacture of hosiery by L. W. 
Tiffany and W. F. Taylor of New Hart- 
ford and J. S. Watson of the Norfolk 
and New Brunswick Hosiery Company, 
Norfolk. 

The original capitalization was $40,- 
000, but this has been increased from 
time to time to $200,000. The company 
began business in the small wooden fac- 
tory building shown in the accompany- 
ing illustration, with about 30 or 40 
hands. Mr. E. B. Gaylord became asso- 
ciated with the company in 1885 as as- 
sistant treasurer, and one year later, on 
the retirement of Mr. Taylor, was ap- 
pointed treasurer and general manager. 

The business has taken rapid strides 
in its progress since its inception, neces- 
sitating the extensive enlargement of 
the plant that is indicated in the illus- 
tration, where about 300 operatives now 
find regular employment producing an 
output to the value of about $600,000 
annually. 

The new and handsome buildings ot 
the Hosiery Company, equipped with 




Origiual Building of The Winsted Hosiery 
Company 

modern machinery and deriving the mo- 
tive power from steam, fittingly represent 
recent progress in manufacturing lines. 
The prosperity which has attended its 
operation is a source of gratification to. 
Winsted people, not only because the 
manufacture of this class of goods adds 
so much to the earning capacity of many 
families, but also because it shows that 
Winsted, even without its excellent 
water power, is well fitted to be a profit- 
able manufacturing center. 

The present officers of the company 
are David Strong, president, and E. B. 
Gaylord, secretary and treasurer. 




PRESENT PIvANT OF THE WINSTED HOSIERY COMPANY 

In marked contrast to above illustration— Indicating the material progress of the company in 

less than a quarter of a century O. 



6o8 



WINSTED— FINANCIAL AND INDUSTRIAL 




Photo by K. T. Sheldon 
PLANT OF THE WINSTED SILK COMPANY AND THE SALTER SILK COMPANY AT WINSTED 



In 1747, Jonathan Law, governor of 
Connecticut, wore the first coat and 
stockings made of New England silk, 
and in 1750, his daughter the first silk 
dress made from domestic material. Not- 
withstanding all the efforts made, very 
little raw silk is now produced in this 
country at a profit. The opening up to 
commerce of the ports of the far East, 
greatly increased the supply of raw silk 
available for Europe and America. The 
United States today is one of the princi- 
pal silk manufacturing countries, with a 
product valued at over $80,000,000 per 
annum, and with the growing prosperity 
of the country a demand has been stim- 
ulated that now places the United States 
as the largest consumer of manufactured 
silk. 

Winsted has been recognized in the 
silk industry since 1874. In that year 
the business of the present Winsted Silk 
Company was established as a co-part- 
nership. In January, 1883, by a special 
act of the General Assembly, a charter 
was granted, the company being incorpo- 
rated as The Winsted Silk Company, with 
a capital of $150,000. The Salter Silk 



Company has since become a constituent 
of this company. The present officers of 
The Winsted Silk Company are: A. H. 
Livermore, president and treasurer; E. 
P. Wilcox, secretary, and James J. Law- 
ler, superintendent. 

The Salter Silk Company was incorpo- 
rated under the laws of the State of New 
Jersey, in February, 1894, and the offi- 
cers are: A. H. Livermore, president and 
treasurer; A. S. Livermore, secretary and 
assistant treasurer. 

The plant of the two companies is sit- 
uated on Munro street near the Mad 
river, and employs about 175 operatives, 
mostly girls, exclusive of a large corps 
of traveling salesmen, and the clerical 
force of the various offices and sales- 
rooms of the companies in New York, 
Boston, Chicago, Detroit, St. Paul, St. 
Louis, and Johnstown, N. Y. 

The product of the two companies is 
silk threads of all kinds, consisting of 
sewing silks, machine twist, embroidery 
silks (of all the different varieties), cro- 
chet silk, knitting silk, and purse silk. 

In addition to the above the Salter 
Silk Company makes a specialty of Den- 



WINSTED— FINANCIAL AND INDUSTRIAL 



609 



tal Flosses, both waxed and plain, for 
Dental use and Toilet purposes. Salter's 
Dental Floss is known throughout this 
country and in many parts of Europe, 
the Company manufacturing fully 80 per 
cent, of the entire output of this country, 
placing it on the market largely with the 
dry goods stores and druggists in the 
form of spools, and also in dainty fiat 
disks or bobbins that fit the purse or 
pocket. 

The most recent additions to the man- 
ufacturing industries of Winsted, have 
enlarged still more the great variety of 
its products. 

The Goodwin & Kintz Company, 
whose factory is situated on Rowley 
street, manufactures a line of high grade 
metal goods. This company was incor- 
porated in 1897, and was first situated 
in Shelton, Conn. In 1899 they moved 
their business to Winsted, Conn., and 
purchased the factory of the Winsted 
Clock Co., on North Main street. The 
business grew rapidly and their quarters 



soon became cramped. In 1903 they ac- 
quired the factory of the Winsted Shoe 
Company, and added thereto two modern 
brick buildings. They now have a plant 
thoroughly up-to-date in manufacturing 
facilities, and have lately increased their 
capital stock to $50,000, as a preliminary 
to a further extension of their business. 

They devote- particular attention to 
the manufacture of clock cases and clock 
materials, also small novelty clocks in 
fine Ormolu gold, and produce a large- 
line of fine m.etal goods, including vases, 
candelabra, mirror plateaux, gas and 
electric portables. They do special sheet 
metal work to order and devote particu- 
lar attention to the production of prem- 
ium goods for trading stamp houses and 
similar concerns. 

The officers of the company are James 
G. Woodruff, president; Clemens Kintz, 
secretary; and Winslow Goodwin, treas- 
urer. The directors of the concern, in 
addition to the above, are E. B. Gaylord 
and A. W. Owen. 




Photo by F. H. DeMars 



FACTORY OF THE GOODWIN & KINTZ COMPANY 



6io 



WINSTED— FINANCIAL AND INDUSTRIAL 



The series of articles by C. A. Quincy 
Norton, on "Lights and Lamps of Early 
New England," now appearing in The 
Connecticut Magazine, is attracting 
widespread attention, evolving, as it 
does, the development and improvement 
in the methods of lighting from the dark 
hour when the first flaring brand cast 
its flickering, smoky rays on the walls 
of the abode of some prehistoric cave- 
dweller, down to the present time, when 
chemists and inventors are striving zeal- 
ously to reach a perfection (if possible) 
in illuminating methods. 

"The lamp, in some form, has always 
been a necessity in the active life of 
man, and has been the means of length- 
ening his career on earth. So when we 
consider how much of the world's ad- 
vancement toward the realization of a 
higher civilization has been accomplish- 
ed by the aid of artificial illumination, 
we shall comprehend something of the 
importance of the lamp as a factor in 
the intellectual and material growth of 
mankind," says Mr. Norton. 

It is interesting and timely to note at 
this time, that here in Winsted the skill 
of the inventor is being put to practical 
service in the creation of a portable 
house light which it appears should prove 
of inestimable value in lighting methods. 
By this invention it becomes possible 
for the lonely dweller on the hills or in 
the small towns removed from the pop- 
ulous centers, to have an illuminant 
equal and perhaps better than is afford- 
ed in the cities. The manufacture of the 
"Britelite" acetylene house lamp is one 
that should more and more give Winsted 
a widespread reputation, as the product 
of the manufacturer is placed on the 
market. Acetylene lighting is not en- 
tirely new, but the method of producing 
a house light that is at once brilliant, 
non-explosive and automatic in action, 
is the element of value which the par- 
ticular construction of this lamp make? 
possible. 

Under spectroscopic analysis which 
unerringly separates the rays, is reveal- 
ed the fact that those of acetylene gas 
are almost like natural rays. The "Brite- 
lite" lamp will stand a yet severer test; 
colors, which under other artificial 



lights evade discrimination, may be read- 
ily and truly distinguished. The news- 
paper or book may be read with com- 
fort and ease, without the eye-strains oc- 
casioned by other artificial lights. It was 
my privilege to be shown through the 
plant of the company and to see the 
lamps under tests. The quality of the 
light and the mechanical contrivances in 
the lamps are marvelous, and bespeak 
years of study and application in its per- 
fection, which has also required the ex- 
penditure of nearly $50,000 before the 
first lamp was placed on the market. 




The " Brightlight" — A Winsted Product 

An invaluable quality of the "Britelite" 
lamp is the absolute safety in its use. 
It is built under the supervision of 
acetylene experts in the Winsted fac- 
tory. The system of generation (carbide- 
feed) is recognized by the leading acety- 
lene authorities as being at once practi- 
cal and safe. The lamp is constructed in 
accordance with the rules of the National 
Board of Eire Underwriters, was tested 
and approved by their consulting en- 
gineers, and is included in the list of 
permitted devices issued by them. The 



WINSTED— FINANCIAL AND INDUSTRIAL 



6ii 



practical operation of the "Britelite' 
lamp is simplicity itself. Its mechanical 
devices cannot get out of order. The 
turning of a bottom releases the carbide 
which drops through a valve into the 
water below, producing a "cool genera- 
tion." This action is automatic. When 
charged, the lamp will give a bright, 
steady and brilliant light for ten hours. 
It is designed for use in the library, re- 
ception room and parlor, or indeed for 
any room in the house. The size of the 
flame is so small that there is no percept- 
ible heat from the lamp. It can be turn- 
ed on and ofif and lighted like city gas. 
When turned off the generation ceases 
instantly, which is a source of economy 
and convenience, and the gas cannot es- 
cape. The re-charging requires very 
little trouble, and when re-charged, the 
lamp will burn for approximately three 
evenings. The lamp emits no odor, re- 
quires no chimneys or wicks, and gives 
an illumination that has yet been un- 
equalled. This invention is the product 
of the "Britelite" Lamp Company, which 
has its main office at 45 Broadway, New 
York City. 



In olden days in New England it was 
considered almost criminal to give time 
or thought to the body or countenance. 
The "ornament of a meek and quiet 
spirit" was the only one advertised or 
recommended in New England at that 
time, and was doubtless worn by many 
who would now be considered very un- 
tidy persons. Of late a different saying 
has gained in prominence, and the idea 
that "cleanliness is next to Godliness" 
is growing on us, and inventive genius, 
to promote cleanliness, has found ex- 
pression in Winsted in the form of the 
Hollow-Toothed Rubber Brush, an all- 
flexible brush, having a surface compos- 
ed of hollow projections (suction cups). 
The basic patent for this form of brush 
v/as granted the inventor, John G. 
Doughty, March 8th, 1898. Joseph R. 
Sanford became interested with Mr. 
Doughty, other patents were granted to 
Mr. Sanford, details of construction were 
perfected, and the first goods — the 
Military Horse Brush — placed on the 
market in the year 1900. These were 
warmly received, and realizing that the 
patent was practically applicable to an 




Photo by F. H. DeMars 
A BUSINESS SHCTION IN WEST PART OK BOROUGH 
Showing old Second Congregational Church in center, and chapel beyond— After church was vacated 
Henry Gay to preserve property, purchased and remodeled buildings for business purposes 



6l2 



WINSTED— FINANCIAL AND INDUSTRIAL 




I'lu. oby K. T.Sheldon 
THE BEARDSLEY HOUSE WEST PART OF BOROUGH 
One of the best known hostelries in I,itchfield County — Conducted by Charles B. Andrews — Five 
minutes walk from Highland Lake — The traveler finds an air of homelike comfort at this hotel 
with its handsome office and spacious varandas — Commercial service is two dollars per day, with 
special rates for a week or more 



endless variety of brushes and applian- 
ces, especially for bathing and massage, 
the inventors organized a joint stock 
company for the promotion of the pat- 
ents and the manufacture and sale of 
the goods. 

The Flexible Rubber Goods Company 
was incorporated under the laws of the 
State of Connecticut, March, 1901. Of- 
ficers of the company are: President, 
John G. Doughty; secretary and treas- 
urer, Joseph R. Sanford; directors, 
Henry Gay, John G. Doughty, J. R. San- 
ford. 

Quite a full line of all flexible, hollow- 
toothed rubber brushes, mitts, rollers. 
etc., is manufactured, and the company 
is constantly bringing out new articles 
embodying original ideas for appliances 
to meet the popular demand for prac- 
tical aids to the perfection and preserva- 
tion of health and beauty. 
The goods have already gained a Na- 
tional reputation, and The Flexible Rub- 
ber Goods Company has every prospect 
of being an important factor in the 
manufacturing life of Winsted. 

The history of the medical profession 
is replete with important discoveries in 
analysis, compounding and surgery, and 
the world is each year receiving the ben- 



efit of the devotion and life study of such 
public benefactors. 

Over fifteen years ago. Dr. George W. 
Brown, a long-time resident of Winsted, 
compounded a remedy which he intro- 
duced among his patients as a family 
medicine, and a substantial demand was 
soon crea'^ed. 

In 1902 it was decided to prepare the 
remedy in large quantities, and a stock 
company was accordingly organized to 
handle the business more energetically. 
The company was incorporated under 
the name of The Brown's Anodyne Com- 
pany, with the following officers: Gilbert 
L. Hart, president; Darwin S. Moore, 
secretary, and Charles B. Moore, treas- 
urer and manager. The formula was 
then purchased of Dr. Brown, and under 
t"lie present management the business 
has taken rapid strides and has added 
another article to Winsted's varied out- 
puts. 

In 1903 the companj' purchased the 
formula and stock of Dr. Bartlett's Alka- 
line Poultice Powder, which is also be- 
ing prepared for the market. 

The headquarters of The Brown's An- 
odyne Company is at No. g Lake street, 
near Main street, in the west part of 
the Borough. 



WINSTED— FINANCIAL AND INDUSTRIAL 



613 




6i4 



WINSTED— FINANCIAL AND INDUSTRIAL 



The printer's art has long been recog- 
nized as an essential factor to industrial, 
commercial and educational success. 

Among Winsted's industrial achieve- 
ments is the Winsted Printing & En- 
graving Company, owned and conducted 
by J. R. and C. Durand, brothers, who 
acquired the plant September 24, 1901, 
and from a modest beginning have ex- 
perienced a steady increase and devel- 
opment, which has necessitated adding 
much new machinery and the remodeling 
of the establishment, which is today a 
well-equipped job and book printing of- 
fice. 

The plant is situated in the center of 
the Borough, occupying the large and 
well-lighted building, Nos. 471, 473 and 
475 Main street, and turns out much 
work for the manufacturers and com- 
mercial institutions of Winsted in the 
line of catalogues, booklets and labels 
of all descriptions. They also furnish 
illustrating plates in half-tones, line etch- 
ing, electrotypes, plates, etc. 

A specialty is made of out of town 
business through mail orders, and they 
ship large quantities of every kind of 
printing to all parts of the United 
States. 

Manufacturers and business men gen- 
erally would no doubt profit by com- 
municating with Durand Brothers for 
samples and prices which will be 
promptly and willingly submitted by the 
company. 

It may be of value in this article to 
note some of the commercial interests 
of Winsted aside from the examples 
which have been cited of its manufac- 




HIGHLAND I.AKE HOTKL 
The one hotel situated on lake shore— Broad ver- 
andas — Commanding views — Shaded grounds — 
Boating facilities— Accomodates forty guests — A. 
M.;Graut, winsted offers property for sale or rent 



turing interests. The Local Telephone 
Exchange, established in 1894, does as 
its name applies, a local business only, 
extending, however, to Riverton, Cole- 
brook, Winchester Center and Burrville. 
It now has 425 subscribers at rates of 
$18 a year for offices and $12 for resi- 
dences. The only other places in Con- 
necticut having similar systems are Shar- 
on and Lakeville in one system, Wood- 
bury in another, and New Hartford, Col- 
linsville. Canton, Unionville and Farm- 
ington, having a central station in Col- 
linsville. 

Besides the educational advantages of 
the Gilbert School, there is in Winsted 
a commercial institution of learning of 
high order. 

The Winsted Business School was es- 
tablished in 1898 by Mr. H. C. Bentley, 
and has built up an enviable reputation as 
a business training school for young men 
and women. On February ist, 1903, it 
was purchased by the present principal 
and proprietor, Mr. H. N. Roberts, who 
has had many years' experience as teach- 
er in, and manager of business schools. 

It is the purpose of this school to 
thoroughly prepare young men and 
women to fill, in the most satisfactory 
manner, office positions in the business 
world. Thorough work and accuracy is 
the ambition of the proprietor. 

Three courses of study are offered, 
viz.: Commercial course, stenographic 
course and commercial - stenographic 
course. 

The school is finely equipped for its 
work and has all up-to-date office ap- 
pliances, with about fifty desks in its 
large study room, an illustration of 
which appears. 

The center of business activity in the 
east part of the Borough, is at the cor- 
ner of Main and North Main streets, com- 
monly known as "Nisbet's Corner." 
The roads leading into the Borough from 
Torrington, New Hartford, Barkham- 
sted, Riverton, Colebrook, and other 
towns beyond, all center here, making it 
one of the busiest of localities. The 
beautiful east village park with its new 
memorial fountain is at the intersec- 
tion of these roads. At the north end of 
the park stands the First Congregational 



WINSTED— FINANCIAL AND INDUSTRIAL 



615 




BUSINESS SECTION IN 
Commonly known as Nisbet's Corner — The First 
and Baird's Pharmacy, are located at this point 

church and the Episcopal church, while 
at the south end is situated the Gilbert 
School and Park Hotel. "Nisbet's Cor- 
ners" takes its popular name from the 
dry goods store of which William Nis- 
bet has been owner since April, 1889. 
Before purchasing the business of L. R. 
Norton & Company, his predecessor on 
the corner, Mr. Nisbet conducted a 
iarge and successful dry goods store at 
Putnam, Conn., selling that out in the 



Photo by F. H. DeMars 
EAST PART OF BOROUGH 

National Bank, William Nisbet's Store, Post Office 

early fall of 1888. The constantly in- 
creasing business on the corner has de- 
manded more room almost every season, 
till the store now occupies nearly the 
whole of two buildings, the one on the 
corner and the next adjoining, making 
a floor space of some 10^000 feet. Be- 
cause of its well-earned popularity and 
its progressive advertising methods, it 
is probably one of the best known dry 
goods houses in Northwestern Connec- 
ticut. 




THE PARK HOTEL— EAST PART OF BOROUGH Photo by K. T. Sheldon 

A homelike family and commercial hostelry conducted by N. H. Whiting— The spacious corridors 
and broad verandas impress the visitor— Commands a cheerful outlook on the broad elm shaded 
park directly opposite— Electric cars take one directly to Highland Lake from hotel— The service 
is two dollars per day, with special rates for regular guests 



6i6 



WINSTED— FINANCIAL AND INDUSTRIAL 




WINSTED— FINANCIAL AND INDUSTRIAL 



617 






.■^^ii^ 



w 




t-*«* 






^^miA'[ 






— ^- -.~- 





HIGHLAND LAKE AND WAKEFIELD BOULEVARD 
Looking south from the shore front on Joseph F. Carey's property 



There has never been a "boom" in 
Winsted. The place has been noted for 
its quiet, steady and healthy growth. 
The nearest approach to a sudden in- 
crease of land value has been caused by 
the popularity of the shores of High- 
land Lake as sites for summer cottages 
since the building of the Wakefield 
Boulevard around it. One of the most 
fortunate of those who have profited by 
this increase of values is Joseph F. 
Carey. With his brother, who has since 
died, Mr. Carey bought some twenty or 
twenty-five years ago, over 800 acres of 
farm land, including nearly all of the 
shore front on the east side of the lake. 
The greater part of this is available for 
cottage sites, and has been surveyed and 
staked out for that purpose. Mr. Carey 
sold a few lots some years ago, but has 
until now declined to part with much 
of his holdings since that time. In the 
nearly two miles of shore which he 
owns, there is a great variety of sites. 
Some are wooded, some clear. Part of 



them terminate at the lake in rocky 
bluffs, while others slope gently to the 
water's edge. The boulevard on the 
east side of the lake is at varying dis- 
tances from the shore, so that some of 
the lots lie between the road and the 
lake, while in others the road crosses the 
lot. There has been little speculation 
in cottage sites, but the increasing de- 
mand for them has forced prices steadily 
upward. Mr. Carey's lots will be sold at 
different prices, depending on their sit- 
uation, but it is the last large tract that 
can be opened up on the shores of High- 
land Lake. The great diversity of these 
lots will permit at first a selection suit- 
able to the taste or means ot almost any 
purchaser. Several views are shown 
herewith which give a good idea of the 
general characteristics of the land own- 
ed by Mr. Carey, and of the cozy nooks 
and corners for pleasant little cottages, 
as well as of the commanding sites suit- 
able for more pretentious buildings. 



WINSTED— FINANCIAL AND INDUSTRIAL 



619 




SWEEP OF SHORE FRONT ON BURTON E. MOORE S PROPERTY 
The site commands a magnificent view of Highland Lake, and is one of the most attractive on the lake shore 



There are some other tracts of simi- 
lar area which have been staked off and 
are for sale. Among these is one on the 
west shore owned by Burton E. Moore 
of Winsted. His lots are very prettily sit- 
uated, as to healthful surroundings, view 
of the lake and encircling hills, and are 
easy of access. They are supplied with 
good clear spring water (through a sys- 
tem of well-laid pipes and reservoir) for 
all modfirn improvements in the cot- 
tages. The tract of land includes a 
beautiful grove of hemlock trees, afford- 
ing shade, but not obstructing the view. 



The remainder of the land is more open, 
but has a number of trees for shade. 
The land lies in such a position that 
from some portions of it both ends of 
the lake may be seen. This tract was 
opened up last year, and building sites 
for cottages or permanent homes have 
already been sold from it. A map show- 
ing the location of the property is given 
on the opposite page, while the above 
cut shows a portion of this tract, in- 
cluding the hemlock grove, a portion of 
Wakefield Boulevard and also of the 
lake. 



620 



WINSTED— FINANCIAL AND INDUSTRIAL 



On March 23, 1904, the Hurlbut Na- 
tional Bank of Winsted completed its 
fiftieth year. The institution was in- 
corporated March 23, 1854, as The Hurl- 
but Bank, with $130,000 capital stock. 

On July 12, 1865, it was voted to adopt 
a charter under the National Currency 
Act and become a member of the Na- 
tional Banking Association. William H. 
Phelps was elected president on the date 
of incorporation, March 23, 1854, and on 
June 1st of the same year, George Alvord 
was elected cashier, holding the position 
until May 14, 1857, when Rufus E. 
Holmes was elected to the office, 
which Mr. Holmes relinquished to ac- 
cept a similar position (cashier) with 
the Winsted Bank on December 12, 1863. 

On the death of the president, William 
H. Phelps, August 26, 1864, Mr. Holmes 
again became associated with the insti- 



tution, being elected to the presidency to 
succeed Mr. Phelps and remaining in 
that capacity until 1874, when upon the 
creation of a new ofhce of vice-presi- 
dency, Mr. Holmes was elected to fill 
that position and William L. Gilbert was 
chosen president. Mr. Holmes has held 
the vice-presidency of the institution 
continuously since. 

After Mr. Holmes severed his con- 
nection with the bank in 1863, George 
W. Phelps was elected cashier to fill the 
vacancy, and resigning in 1865 was suc- 
ceeded temporarily by Warren Phelps, 
who was in turn succeeded after his res- 
ignation, January 24, 1866, by Charles B. 
Holmes, who was then teller of the Cit- 
izens National Bank of Indianapolis, In- 
diana. Mr. Holmes remained cashier 
until 1874, when Henry Gay was elected 
cashier and Mr. Holmes made assistant 




SUBSTANTIAL HOME OF THE HURLBUT NATIONAL BANK 
Erected in November, 1898, on Main Street, close to site of the old Higley Tavern 



IVfNSrF.D^F/NAXCIAL AND INDUSTRIAL 



621 




HANDSOME INTERIOR OF THE HURLBUT NATIONAL BANK 



cashier. On the death of William L. Gil- 
bert, June 29, 1890, Henry Gay was elec- 
ted president, which office he now holds. 
and Charles B. Holmes was made cash- 
ier. Mr. Holmes dying on October 27. 
1900, was succeeded on November 2 of 
that year by William H. Phelps, grand- 
son of the founder and first president of 
the bank, and he still holds this office. 

The first increase of the capital stock 
of the bank was made June 3, 1857, when 
the amount was advanced to $200,000. 
It is interesting to note a still further 
increase: On October 23, 1863, the bank 
officials received a letter from Roland 
Mather, treasurer of the American Asy- 
lum for the Deaf and Dumb of Hartford, 
requesting a subscription to the bank's 
stock to the amount of $5,000, and a 
check for that amount was enclosed. 
The stock of the former increase had all 
been taken at the time, but under an 
act of the legislature which permitted 
charitable institutions to subscribe at 
par for the capital stock of any bank 
chartered by the State of Connecticut, 
the capital stock was accordingly fur- 
ther increased to $205,000, where it 
stands today. 

Sinceitsorganizationasanationalbank 
it has paid back to its shareholders $827,- 
175, or more than four times the amount 
of its capital stock, besides accumulat- 



ing a surplus of $102,500, one-half of its 
capital stock, and an additional undivid- 
ed profit account of over $36,000. 

The present board of directors con- 
sists of Caleb J. Camp (one of the orig- 
inal incorporators), Chauncey S. Foster, 
Rufus E. Holmes, W. H. Williams, W. 
T. Batcheller, J. G. Woodruff, and Hen- 
ry Gay. 




WILLIAM H. PHELPS 

Founder of The Hurlbut National Bank. — Bom Cole- 
brook, Ct., April 5, 1818; died Winsted, August 26, 1864 



622 



W/NSTED- FINANCIAL AND INDUSTRIAL 




INTERIOR OF THE FIRST NATIONAL BANK 
Situated in the Winsted Real Estate Company's Block in the East part of the Borough 



The First National Bank of Winsted 
was chartered in 1879 with $50,000 capi- 
tal, which has since been increased to 
$100,000. Heretofore all the banks with 
the exception of the Mechanics Savings 
Bank, had been situated in the west end 
of the town and owing to the increasing 
manufacturing interests it seemed best 
that deposit and discount facilities should 
be offered on the east side. 

The bank began its operations in the 
office of the Mechanics Savings Bank, 
over Baird's drug store. It moved to its 
present location in the Winsted Real 
Estate Company's block in January. 
1882. 

The original directors were Elias E. 
Oilman, David Strong, Charles B. Hal- 
lett, Francis Brown, Lyman R. Norton, 
Franklin Moore and George S. Burn- 
ham. Messrs. Strong, Hallett, Norton 
and Burnham are still members of the 
board. 

Elias E. Oilman was the first president 
and he was succeeded by David Strong 



in September, 1883, who still holds that 
office. Frank D. Hallett was the first ac- 
tive cashier, having served continuously 
since April, 1879. Lorenzo M. Blake is 
vice-president and Charles P. Hallett, as- 
sistant cashier. The present directors 
are David Strong, Lyman R. Norton, 
Charles B. Hallett, Oeorge S. Burnham, 
Harvey L. Roberts, Lorenzo M. Blake, 
Luman C. Colt, James O. Woodruff and 
Frank D. Hallett. 

An improved burglar-proof vault was 
constructed in 1902 and a safe deposit 
department installed. This feature is a 
great public convenience and is far su- 
perior to the old tin box system. 

From humble beginnings in the corner 
of a clothing store in the Camp block, 
on Main street, with only sufficient space 
for desk room, the Winsted Savings 
Bank has expanded its interests until to- 
day it possesses a building of its own, 
with a handsome well-lighted interior, 
that is the result of 43 years of conser- 
vative financial judgment. 



WINSTED— FINANCIAL AND INDUSTRIAL 



623 



At the May session of the General As- 
sembly in i860, a charter was granted to 
The Winsted Savings Bank and the or- 
ganization was perfected in July of the 
same j'car, with Warren Phelps, presi- 
dent, and Lyman Baldwin, treasurer. 
Resigning the presidency of the institu- 
tion in 1862, ]\Ir. Phelps was succeeded 
by Closes Camp. Mr. Camp declined a 
re-election in 1874, and Henry Gay was 
made president, which office he resigned 
in August of the same year, when John 
T. Rockwell succeeded him, holding the 
office until 1878. 

Upon the death of Treasurer Baldwin 
in 1S74, the vacancy was filled by L. M. 
Blake, who acted as treasurer until his 
resignation in September, 1875, when the 
present treasurer, George S. Rowe, was 
elected. 

In August, 1878, John Hinsdale was 
made president and served in that capac- 
ity until 1899, when he declined a re-elec- 
tion on account of advancing years and 
was succeeded by the Hon. Lorrin A. 
Cooke. Upon the death of Mr. Cooke in 
August, 1902, Arthur L. Clark was cho- 
sen president, in which office he still pre- 
sides. 

In 1868, eight years after the organiza- 
tion of the bank, the growing number of 
depositors and the accompanying :in- 
crease of the business required larger 



quarters, and tlie building of the Win- 
sted Bank (an institution which had just 
retired from business) was purchased, 
and has since been the home of the Win- 
sted Savings Bank. 

Situated on Main street in the west 
part of the Borough, adjacent to the old 
Methodist church, the building has re- 
cently undergone extensive alterations 
and additions, and is today a handsome 
and well-equipped banking house, afford- 
ing its depositors every modern conven- 
ience. The work on the interior has been 
in progress during the winter months, 
and includes not only an additional build- 
ing in the rear, but a complete dismem- 
berment of the entire old interior, and 
the substitution of a magnificent bank 
screen of quartered oak, with doors and 
window casings to match, and modern 
desks throughout, all of which was de- 
signed and built by C. H. Dresser & Son 
of Hartford. A spacious modern vault 
has also been installed by the Reming- 
ton & Sherman Company of New York 
and Philadelphia, which affords an in- 
vulnerable protection. The floor is of 
tile of a handsome design, and the whole 
interior is noteworthily tasty. 

The bank carries on its books the ac- 
counts of 4,954 persons, with deposits 
aggregating $1,800,480.06 and a surplus 
of $91,000. 




RICHLY FINISHED INTERIOR RECENTLY COMPLETED — WINSTED SAVINGS BANK 



624 



WINSTED— FINANCIAL AND INDUSTRIAL 




INTERIOR DARWIN S. MOORE S INSURANCE AGENCY 
Established by Deacon John Hinsdale in 1852— Is the oldest insurance agency in Winsted 



The oldest and a typical branch of the 
insurance business in Winsted, is the 
agency of Darwin S. Moore. This agen- 
cy was established in 1852 by the late 
Deacon John Hinsdale. The first com- 
pany represented by him was the Aetna 
Insurance Company of Hartford, and the 
first policy written was for Edward P. 
Seymour, of Colebrook, Conn. Policy 
No. 2 was written for J. S. & J. T. Rock- 
well, as a joiner's risk on the present so- 
called Rockwell Tannery, situate on 
Main street near the Second Congrega- 
tional church. This policy has been re- 
newed every year since that date and the 
company has never been called upon to 
pay a loss under this policy. Deacon 
Hinsdale continued the agency until 
1866 when he took into partnership his 
son-in-law, Robert R. Noble. This con- 
tinued until January 1870, when the firm 
name changed to Noble & Beach. This 
was continued for about two years when 
Mr. Noble sold his interest to Mr. Beach, 
who in turn sold it to his son-in-law, 
Charles K. Hunt, and the firm name was 
Beach & Hunt. After the death of Mr. 
Beach in 1886, Charles K. Hunt contin- 
ued the agency until April ist, 1898. Mr. 
Hunt then consolidated his business with 
that of the present owner of the insur- 
ance agency, Darwin S. Moore. This 



partnership only lasted until October, 
1898, when Mr. Moore bought Mr. 
Hunt's interest and has continued the 
agency since that time. It might be in- 
teresting to note that this agency has 
represented the Aetna of Hartford since 
1852, and has written, for that company 
alone, 10,326 policies. The Home of New 
York has been with the agency since 
1864; the Insurance Company of North 
America since 1866; the Continental of 
New York since 1870; the Connecticut of 
Hartford since 1873; the Royal of Liver- 
pool since i860, and the German-Ameri- 
can of New York since 1876. 

The general agency of the Phoenix 
Mutual Life Insurance Company was es- 
tablished with this agency in 1857, and 
the general agency of the Travelers In- 
surance Company in 1858. Both com- 
panies have continued with the agency. 

This agency has been fortunate in its 
52 years of prosperity in having good 
business men to look after its welfare. 
The agency has grown steadily until it 
has become one of the largest and best 
known agencies in the State. The total 
assets of the companies represented are 
$151,634,986.00, and the combined surplus 
is $51,388,601.00. These companies have 
all been tried in the big conflagrations 
of the United States and are well known 
to the insuring public. 



C. L ROCKWELL, President 



C. F. ROCKWELL, Sec. and Treas. 



THE MILLER BROS.' 
CUTLERY COMPANY 




Manufacturers of 



^ine !Pocket Cutleri/^ Snk 
Erasers and Oteei SPons 



Factory, 

jMeriden, 

Con oec tic Lit. 




New York Office, 

IVluttaal Reserve 

Building, 

30Q Broad-Mray. 



MILLER BROS.' STEEL PENS 



J ARE 




'AMERICAN AND BEST" 



Send for Samples, they are yours for the asking. 



The Miller Bros.' Cutlery Co., 

MERIDEN, CONNECTICUT. 



"^r 



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QUILTED nUSLIN 
MATTRESS PADS 

Are made in all suitable sizes for Beds and 
Cribs. They are a Sanitary necessity. 



QUILTED CRIB 
SCREEN PADDING 

1?^ Inches Wide, 

is the most useful article that a mother can buy for 
the comfort of her baby. When put around Crib it 
saves from draughts and protects arms, legs and head 
from contact with metal frame of bed. 

Ask Dry Goods Dealer and send 
to us for Sample. 

EXCELSIOR QUILTING CO., 

15 LAIQHT STREET, N. Y. CITY. 

Please Mention the Connecticut Maoakinb when patronizing our Advertisers. 



SECURITY COMPANY t^.ir.^ko'7^^Z 

Acts as Executor, Administrator, Guardian, Conservator and Trustee, and Transacts a 

General Banking Business 



Capital, $200,000 



Surplus, $100,000 



The Officers of the Company will be pleased to consult at any time with those who 
contemplate availing themselves of the services of a Trust Company 

Atwood Collins, President Henry E. Taintor. Vice-President 

Chas. Edward Prior, Sec. and Treas. Chas. Edward Prior, Jr., Asst. Treas. 




Why 



Use Impure, Unclean flilk 
Bottle Caps? Get Our Clean 

Sanitary Opruce J^ibre. 

THM BAVIBR NOVELTY COMPANY, 
WINDSOR, CONN. 



ALSO MANUFACTURERS OF 

MAYNARD LAWN MOWER SHARPENER. Try One! 



■ ^ORGANS 



FOR 



..Churches and Residences.. 



Self Playing 
Organs for 
Residences a 
Specialty 




Electric and 

Tubular 

Pneumatic 

Organs. 

Austin Universal 

Air Chest 

System 



High Grade Organs Only. Write for Descriptive Catalogue. 

AUSTIN ORGAN COMPANV 

HARXKORD, CONN. 

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" The Leading Fire Insurance Comp»ny of America " 




WM. B CLARK, President. 
W. H. KING. Secretary, A C ADAMS, HENRY E. REES, 
C. J. IRVIN, A. N. WILLIAMS, Assistant Secretaries. 



Case, Lockwood & Brainerd 
Company 

HARTFORD, CO?>lNeCTICUT 

ll. Printers and I 



MAKERS OF THE 

Patent Flap Opening Blank Books 

BINDERS OF THE 

Connecticut Quarterly 



THE 

Randall Studios 

HIGH CLASS 

Portraiture 



HA R TFORD. NEW HA VEN, 

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN. 

First Awards in U. S. and Murope 

Twenty Years of Success. 



G^^^^^e^^^ciM^: 



s.aoToin. 



■££: 



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TAKE ELEVATOff. 






C. D. PINNEY, 

LIVERY-BOARDING 

l^acKs for punerals, (/9eddin^s and Parties. 
SINGLE OR DOUBLE RIGS. 

25 to 39 Scoville Street, - - Waterbury, Conn. 




^^ '\.'%.f* ^ Magazine of the 

Wttt l/VeSt Old Pacific and the 



■New 



Edited by CHARLES F. LUMMIS 
Los Angeles, CALiForiNiA. 



The American Author 

N:^W YORK 

Published Monthly Under the Auspices of 
The Society ot AMERICAN AUTHORS 



corr:^spond^nce relating to g^neai^ogical matters 

IS INCITED BV THE 

RESEARCH PUBLICATION CO. 

OF" BOSTON 

Researches undertaken anywhere in New England or Great Britain, reliable work, reasonable fees 

THE RESEARCH PUBLIC A TION COMPANY, 14 Beacon Street, Boston, Mats. 
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mm 


Jhe (urtiss'\yay ^^ 

Incorporated. 














l<^rinters 
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Manufacturers' 
Work Solicited 

Suggestions and 

Estimates 
Furnished 


Flat and Curved 
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We have all the latest 
machines for making 
same 










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THE LaRGEST 
MaNUFaCTURERS ©F 

Calendars 

and 

Calendar Pads 

IN NEW ENGLaNO. 






Advertising 
Novelties 

Wood, Leather, 
Aluminum, Memo 
Books, Blotters, 

Etc., Etc. 


The Best 

Work 

That can be pro- 
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workmen and up- 
to-date machinery 


















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\l^.\^:.l%\M Meriden. eonn. 




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Distinctiveness, without Extravagance, 
in Women's Costumes. 

This month of March, 1904, we reach the fifty-second anniversary of the 
foundation of this business. 

Fifty-two years of continuous and solicitous watchfulness of women's 
fashions in general. 

Fifty-two years of study and experience in the whims and preferences of 
Connecticut women in particular. 

There is no wonder that we enjoy the confidence and the patronage of 
that important class of women-the women who care for distinctiveness, taste- 
fulness and "dressiness" in their garments, but who care 'also for the cost 
of things. 

A visit to our " School of Style," now in the fullest Spring bloom, will 
show how we have succeeded in the difficult problem of combining elegance 
with economy. 



Established March 1852. 




NEW HAVEN. CONN. 



THE /ETNA NATIONAL BANK OF HARTFORD 



CAPITAL, $525,000.00 



SURPLUS AND PROFITS, $550,000.00 
DEPOSITS, $3,000,000.00 



A. Spencer, Jr., Pres. 

DIRECTORS 
Morgan O. Bulkeley, Appleton R. Hillyer, 
James B. Cone, Morgan B. Brainard. 
Alfred Spencer, Jr , A. G. Loomis, W. R 
G. Corson. 



OFFICERS 
A. R. Hillyer, Vice-Pres. 



W. D. Morgan, Cashier 



Safe Deposit Boxes 

For rent from $3 to $20 per year. This bank offers to de- 
positors every facility which their balances, business and 
responsibility warrant. Special accomodation for ladies 
and new money paid to them. 



GONNEGTIGDT TRUST flHD SAFE DEPOSIT G01ilIPfl|lV 

COR. MAIN AND PEARL STREETS. HARTFORD 



Capital, $300,000 



Surplus, $300,000 



Banking Business 

Conducts general banking busi- 
ness. Accounts opened and De- 
posits received subject to check at 
sight. Accounts solicited- 



Safe Deposit Vault 



The most Capacious in the City 
1100 Safe Boxes for Rent 

at from $10 to |100 per annum ac- 
cording to size. 



Trust Department 

Is authorized by its charter to act 
as Trustee for individuals and cor- 
porations. Executor or administra- 
tor of Estates, Guardian of -Minors, 
Etc. 



Mbigs H. Whaplkp, President 

John P. Wheeler, Treasurer 



Henry S. Robinson, Secretary 

IIosMKR P. Redfiki.d, A ss't Treasurer 



Please Mention the Connecticut Magazine when patronizing our Advertisers. 



Foa^ovE^i 5 Yearb 

A VALUABLE HOUSEHOLD REMEDY. 

Internal or External Use. 



Dr. BROWN'S 
ANODYNE 



SAMPLE BOTTLE FREE 



id' 

•AMILY 
MIDICINE :| 

I A SPtioy CURE 

f .Urn CfciMl, Cmup. C»« „ 
C- «mp«, «.'«'« . ^ g„„^ .5 



INTERNALLY 

Brown's Anodyne is an invaluable remedy for 

COUGHS, COLDS, 

CHILLS, CRAMPS, 

SORE THROAT, TOOTH ACHE, 
DIARRHCEA, DYSENTERY. 



BY FlXJBBIWCi TAT-EXjL 

INTO THE EFFECTED PARTS 

BROWN'S ANODYNE 

lb A PROMPT AND EFFECTIVE REMEDY FOR 

SPRAINS, RHEUMATISM, 
BRUISES, NEURALGIA, 

BURNS, FROST BITES, 

SCALDS, CHILBLAINS. 



IN FACT IT IS 



THE BEST FAMILY MEDICINE 

Proved by many testimonials from our own Townspeople. 



pre:pared only by 
THE BROWN'S ANODYNE COMPANY, INC. 



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Qnlvafitty ef Connaetfcut Library 



GOOD PRINTING 

OUR SPECIALTY 



« « « 



THE NEW HAVEN PRINTING COMPAN 
OUR MOTTO: 66-71 ORANGE STREET, 

Delivered When Promised. NEW HAVEN, CONN 




SPENSER 

Oct. U J903 AUTOMAT] 

SEWING MACHINE 
$10 

To introduce we shall eell our new SPENSER Auct- 
matic Hand Sewing Machine at $10. 



A LETTER 

My friend Mrs. C. has recently ordered one of yoi.r 
new machines which she is delighted with. ^ ,,,.-0.1, f ^ 
purchase one and enclose check for $10. 



I wish to 



The above is one of many similar letters we have 
recently received, 
It is not necessary for you to wait to see your friend's SPENSER machine. Ordei 
now and if t is not satisfactory on two Weeks' trial return it to us a our expense and we 
wHl refund price paid. The SPENSER is adapted for the household sewing ^nd weighs 
hilt four Dounds We should be pleased to send you circulars and full detailed information 
of our'ne^'SPENSsS Send fo? free booklet of\he SPENSER^ An orders and corres- 
pondence should be addressed to our m ain store. 213 Tr emont St., Boston, iiass. 

SPENSER SEWING MACHINE CO. 



213 Tremont Street, 

BOSTON, MASS. 



32 West J 4th Street, 

NEW YORK CITY. 



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