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Full text of "Woman's wisdom, a collection of choice recipes"

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LIBRARY OF CONGRESS. 

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Sliell-...-.Q'^,5l 



UNITED STATES OF AMERICA. 



Woman's Wisdom, 



COLLECTION OF 



Choice Recipes. 



•UBLISHED BV 



LADIES' SOCIETY 



^ {JL OF THE 



First Presbyterian CtiiArch, 

OWENSBORO, KENTUCKY. 



O. T. KENDALL, 

1890. 
OWENSBORO, KY. 



,f^ COPYRIGHT % 

OCT IOIR90 
















,__^3 



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Entered according to an Act of Congress, 
BY THE 
LADIES' SOCIETY OF THE FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH, 
of Owensboro, Kentucky, 
in the office of tlie Librarian of Congress, Washing- 
ton, D, C, in the year A. D. 1890. 




HrT has not been the intention of the compilers' 
. . of this book to originate anything new in the way 
of culinary lore, so much as to gather into one vol- 
ume a collection of practical recipes as nsed by ex- 
perienced cooks. These have all been thoroughly 
tested bv those who know them to be perfectly relia- 
ble. In some cases certain articles are recom- 
mended in the preparation of the recipes. They are 
in every respect just what they are represented, — goods 
of superior excellence, manufactured in a careful and 
wholesome manner. 

It is the hope of those interested in the publication of 
this book, that it may prove a safe and trusted guide to 
liousekeepers, in supplying their tables with those deli- 
cacies whcih render them attractive and inviting. We 
hope, also, by the sale of the book, to assist in furnish- 
ing our new Church ; to which cause we devote the 
proceeds of onr efforts. 

Thk Compilers. 



IVieasures and Weights. 

Ti^po ciipfuls of )>utler .* j pouml 

One quart of flow r i 

Two cupfuJs of sugar, granulated i 

Two heaping cupfuls of sugar, powdered i •* 

One pint of liquid — , * i " 

One pint of finely chopped meat i " 



RuJe for Cooking Vegetables. 

Asparagus ;o — 60 minutes. 

Beets I — 3 hours. 

Cabbage i — 2 hours. 

Carrots 1 — 2 hours. 

Green Corn 40—60 minutes. 

Onions 2 — 3 hours. 

Parsnips i hour. 

Peas . I hour. 

Potatoes, baked 45 minutes. 

Potatoes, boile d 30 — 40 mi nute& 

Shell beans , i — 2 hours. 

String l^eans 2 liours. 

Spinach , . . , , 20 — 30 minutes. 

Squash, baked . . i hour. 

Squash, boiled. 30 minutes. 

Tomatoes 30 minutes. 

Turnips i hour. 



Rule for Canning Fruits. 

Apples, sour , Boil 10 minutes. 6 oz. sugar per 

Pears Boil 5 minutes. 6 *' 

Cherries Boil 5 minutes. S " 

Raspberries Boil 6 minutes. 4 " 

Blackberries Boil 6 minutes. 6 " 

Plums Boil 10 minutes. 6 ** 

Stra-wberries , Boil 8. minutes. 8 '' 

-Peaches Boil 10 minutes. 4 " " "' 

Currants Boil 6 minutes. S " 

Grapes ... Boil 10 minutes. 8 " " *' 

Pineapple Boil 10 minutes. 6 '* 

Tomatoes Boil 20 minutes. 



SOUP^. 



BEKF SOUP. 



Take a five-cent soup bone ; put on early in the 
morning. Let it simmer until about ten o'clock, then 
add a pint of butter-beans, corn and potatoes, a quart 
of tomatoes, two or three carrots, and turnips, in fact 
any kind of vegetables. Let it boil until dinner-time, 
then strain^ and if not thick enough, thicken with a ta- 
blespoonful of flour in cold water — add salt, pepper, a 
pinch of ginger, allspice, cloves, mace. Let it boil up 
and serve. Mrs. b. w. g. 

BEEF SOUP. 

A twenty-cent soup bone, simmer in a large kettle 
ot water six or eight hours, K.eniove the meat, strain 
the liquor. Set away until next morning. Remove 
the fat which has risen. At ten o'clock put stock over 
to boil ; two large onions, sliced ; add three carrots^cut 
in dice; six potatoes; whole peppercorns. Just before 
serving add two tablespoonfuls tomato catsup or half 
can tomatoes strained; one tablespoonful of flour 
creamed with two of butter. Mrs. l. b. t. 

Bouillon, 

Made same as above, omitting all vegetables. Just 
before taking up add a tablespoonful of caromel to give 
an amber color. Season only with pepper and salt. 

Mrs. L. B. T. 

CALF'S-HEAD SOUP. 

After the head is thoroughly cleansed boil it in a 



Soups. 7 

large pot ot water until the bones can be taken out. 
Brown two tablespoonfuls of flour in another pot, and 
strain the liquor from the head on it. Put it on to boil 
with two large onions, a few cloves, a small cupful of 
powdered allspice, pepper and salt combined. In about 
an hour add the head cut up into small pieces. Pick out 
the brains and beat them up with flour, butter and chop- 
ped parsley to thicken the soup. Boil one hour after the 
head is put in, add force meat balls and two hard boiled 
eggs chopped fine. For the force meat, chop cold lean 
ham, or cold veal, mix with a raw egg. Make into 
balls and fry in butter. Mrs. m. a. t. 

CHICKEN SOUP. 

The water in which chicken has been boiled will 
inake excellent soup, by adding a few tablespoonsful of 
rice, cooked ; a little thickening, salt and pepper — also, 
a tew sprigs of parsley or celery, chopped fine. A little 
celery seed may be used instead. Mrs. s. c. w. 

CORN AND TOMATO SOUP. 

Save the water in which a leg of mutton has been 
boiled. When cold remove the fat The next day put 
the liquor over, with eight large tomatoes cut in pieces, 
and twelve ears of corn, use the corn cut from cob, also 
the cobs, to o^ive it a sw^eet flavor. Boil slowly for four 
hours. Season with salt and pepper, strain through a 
colander and serve. Mrs. s. T. L. 

BRUNSWICK STEW. 

Two cliickens or squirrels, one quart of tomatoes, 
peeled and sliced; one pint butter-beans; six potatoes, 
parboiled and sliced ; 'six ears green corn, cut from the 



Soups, 

cob ; one-half pound butter, one-half pound fat, salt 
[)od: ; one-half teaspoon cayenne pepper, one table- 
spoon salt, two tablespoons su^rar, one onion, sliced fine;, 
one gallon water. Boil slowly two hours and a half. 
Ten minutes before taking from fire, add butter rolled in 
flour, in small lumps. Mrs. A. s. B:. 

POTATO SOUP. 

Half a dozen large potatoes sliced thin, one quart of 
water. Cook until tender Add a pint of rich sweet 
milk, thicken with flour or cornstarch ; add butter size 
of an esrgy a little rice or macaroni may be used, but it 
is not necessary. This soup is good for invalids. 

Mrs. L. G. w. 

GREKN PEA SOUP. 

Take a chicken, after it has been cut up put in a 
quart and a half of water, a little parsley, one onion cut 
up, pepper and salt, two spoons of butter, one quart of 
peas after being shelled. When the peas have been 
boiled until the>' can be mashed, take them out, mash 
and strain through a colander, and put back in the soup. 
Let them boil a short time, then add butter mixed with 
a little flour. Just before taking off stir in a teacup of 
cream. Any kind of fresh meats will answer. 

Mrs. B, w. G. 

TOMATO SOUP. 

Six large tomatoes and one quart of boiling water- 
Boil until thoroughly tender then strain through a seive. 
Add to the liquor one-half teaspoon of soda ; salt, pep- 
per and butter to taste. Pour over a few rolled crack- 
ers. ' Mrs. M. F. V. R. 



Sdiips 



BEAN SOUP 



Three pints of beans, half gallon of water. Boil one 
hour, then add a small piece of bacon ; season to taste 
with pepper, and boil another hour. It will likely be 
thick enough, and is good warmed over, with a little 
water, lor next day. Mrs. l. g. w. 

CANNED CORN SOUP. 

One can of corn, drained and chopped fine, one quart 
of boiling water, three tablespoonfuls of butter, rolled in 
one tablespooniui of flour, two eggs, one tablespoonful of 
sugar ; salt and pepper. Boil one minute and stir in 
flour and butter. Have one quart of scalding hot milk 
and add it slowly to the beaten eggs. When the butter 
is thoroughly melted, stir eggs and milk into the soup ; 
boil one minute and pour out. Mrs. L. G. P. 

CREAM OF CELERY SOUP. 

A pint of milk, a tablespoonful of flour and one of 
butter, a head of celery, a large slice of onion and a 
small piece of mace. Boil celery in a pint of w^ater, 
from thirty to forty minutes ; boil mace, onion and milk 
together, mix flour with two tablespoons of cold milk 
and add to boiling milk, cook ten minutes. Mash cele- 
ry in the water in which it has been boiled, and stir 
with boiling milk ; add butter, and season with salt and 
pepper to taste, strain and serve immediately. The fla* 
vor is improved by adding a cupful of whipped cream 
when the soup is in the tureen. Mrs. b. \v. g. 

MOCK BISQUE SOUP. 

A quart can of tomatoes, three quarts of milk, a large ta- 



ro Fish and Oysters, 

blespoonful of flour, butter the size of an ^%%^ pepper and: 
salt to taste ; a scant teaspoon of soda. Put the toma- 
toes on to stew, and the milk in a double kettle to boil,, 
reserving, however, half a cupful to mix with flour. Mix 
the flour smoothly v*^ith the cold milk, stir into the boil- 
ino- milk and cook ten minutes. To the tomatoes add 

o 

the soda, stir well and rub through a strainer that is fine 
enough to keep back the seeds ; add butter,, salt and pep- 
per to the milk, and then the tomatoes ; serve immedi- 
ately. If hall the rule is made, stir the tomatoes well 
in the can before dividing, as the liquor portion is more- 
acid. Mrs. B. w. G. 

CROUTONS. 

Small pieces of bread, cut in dice and fried brown, 
to be used in soup. 

CAROMEIv FOR SOUP. 

Put a teacup of sugar in a small fry pan, and set over 
the fire ; stir continually until it is a bright brown col- 
or and sends forth a burning smell ; add half a pint of 
vinegar, boil, and when cool^ bottle. Add to soups at 
discretion, Mrs. l. b. t. 



FISH AND OYSTERS. 

Ohio River fish is improved by being put on ice over 
night. 

BOIIvED CAT FISH. 

The fish should weigh from six to ten pounds. Roll se- 
curely in a cloth, (with head on) cover with water. Boil 
from one and a half to two hours, according to size of 
fish. When done unpin the cloth and roll on fish dish 
whole, cover with ^''^^% gravy.^' Garnish dish with nas- 
turtium, flowers and leaves, or parsley. Mrs. S. c. w. 



Pisli and Oysters-. \\ 



EGG GRAVY. 

Take a pint of "chicken-water" ; add three or four 
^ard boiled eggs, well chopped ; a lump of butter about 
the size of a walnut, rolled in flour ; salt and pepper to 
suit taste ; boil in a sauce-pan to thicken. 

This receipt may be used for boiled fish, substituting 
plain water; also add a teaspoon of mixed or flour of 
mustard. Mrs. S; C. w. 

FRIED FISH. 

Get a fish about eight inches long, leave as w^hole as 
possible in dressing. Have ready a frying pan of hot 
lard ; salt, dredge in meal and fry to a beautiful brown. 
Take up the instant it is done. Mrs. n. m. a. 

BAKED FISH, 

Use a white fish or salmon, weighing three or four 
pounds. Prepare a rich stuffing of bread-crumbs. Fill 
the fish and tie or sew firmly. Lay thin slices of bacon 
over it, place in a pan containing a little water, baste 
frequently. Bake two hours. Mrs. l. b. t. 

TURBOT. 

Five pounds of white fish, boil and cool. For dress- 
ing,. take one quart of milk, one-quarter pound of flour. 
Wet with a little milk; one-quarter pound of butter,two 
eggs, two small onions, one-half bunch of thyme, one- 
half bunch of parsley, pepper and salt. Boil together 
until it thickens. Put in the baking dish a layer of fish, 
then a layer of dressing, a layer of bread crumbs. Grate 
cheese over the top, and bake half an hour. 

Mrs. A. G. c. 



I a Fish and Oyster. 



CODFISH OMELETTE. 

Pick up one cup of salt codfish, soak over night' in 
just enough water to cover. Press dry and chop very 
fine. Put in three gills of milk, and let come to a boil- 
Stir one tablespoon of flour in butter half as large as au 
^^^. Stir in thoroughly, then add three eggs well beaten,, 
separatel}' . Turn into a buttered dish, set in a hot oven 
until it rises and browns over the top. Mrs. L. B. T. 

CEAM SOUP. 

Thirty small clams, scrubbed well with a brush and 
rinsed clean. Place in the oven in a dripping x^an; as 
soon as they open remove the clams carefully, saving 
the liquor. Chop the clams fine, mix with the liquor^ 
boil twenty minutes. Add a quart of milk, a dozen pep- 
percorns, a dash of onion, a tablespoon of flour cream- 
ed with a tablespoon of butter. Boil up and serve. 

Mrs. L. B. T. 

OYSTER SOUP- 

Wash a quart of oysters, then place in a kettle with a 
little cold water to plump. When hot skim out and set 
in a warm place, covered to keep hot. Add a quart of 
boiling water, pepper and salt, and half a cup of butter. 
When boiling add a quart of hot milk. When this comes 
to a boil add the oysters. Boil up once then pour over 
a bowl of broken crackers in a tureen. Serve hot. 

Mrs. S. T. L. 

FRIED OYSTERS. 

Wash oysters, dry them in a cloth, dip in beaten egg 
then in cracker crumbs salted. If preferred dip twice 
Then cook in boiling hot lard, take up, place on brown 
paper to absorb the grease, and serve at once. 

Mrs. N. M. A. 



Fish and Oysters. 13 



PANNED OVSTERvS. 

Wash a quart of oysters. Toss into a spider a large 
cup butter, a teaspoonful of salt, a dash ot pepper. 
When hot add the oysters. Cook two minutes then 
serve on dry toast. Mrs. s. T. l. 

OYvSTER PATEvS. 

Make a rich pufif paste and cut into round cakes,thos2 
intended for the bottom crust less than yi \\\q\\ thick, 
for the upper a little thicker. With a smaller cutter re- 
move a round of paste from the middle ol the latter, 
leaving a neat ring. Lay this carefully upon the bot- 
tom crust ; place a second ring upon ihis, that the cav- 
ity may be deep enough to hold the oysters ; lay the 
pieces you have extracted also in the pan with the rest, 
and bake in a quick oven. When done wash over with 
beaten ^^% and set in the oven to glaze. Fill the cavi- 
ty with the mixture prepared as below, fit on the top 
and serve. 

Mixture: One qt. of oysters, one cup of cream, one 
heaping tablespoonful of butter, one half cup of liquor 
from the oysters, two tablespconfuls of corn starch, wet 
with a little milk ; salt and pepper to taste. Boil 
all except the oysters a few minutes until it thick- 
ens, then pour in the ' oysters, boil one minute and 
fill the cavity in the paste shells. These shells can be 
bought in most cities, and then the dish is easily pre- 
pared. 

OYSTER PIE. 

Make a nice pufif paste, fill a pudding-dish with slices 
of bread, cover this with the puff' past^. When baked 



H 



Meats. 



take off the crust and remove the bread; fill with cream- 
ed oysters. Send to the table very hot. 

CREAMED OYSTERS. 

Fifty large oysters, one quart sweet cream, butter, 
pepper and salt to taste. Put the cream and oysters in 
separate kettles to heat, let them come to a boil; when 
sufficiently cooked, skim them, take out oysters and put 
in a bowl to keep warm ; put cream and oyster-liquor 
together, season to taste and thicken with powdered 
crackers ; when thick as cream add oysters. 

Mrs. E. B. T. 
SALMON CROUQUETTES. 

Half can oi salmon, remove skin and bones, pour off 
the liquor and mash very fine. Take half as much mash- 
ed potato as salmon, break into it two eggs, one table- 
spoon Worcestershire Sauce, salt and cayenne pepper 
to taste. Beat all thoroughly, roll into shape, dip in 
^%<g and bread crumbs, and fry in lard. Mrs. b. w. g. 



MEATS. 



" OLD-FASHIONED " STEAK. 

Beat the steak until tender, cut in small pieces and 
drop in cool water. Roll in flour, season with salt and 
pepper and fry in hot lard like chicken. 

Mrs. L. G. w. 

PANNED STEAK. 

Beat the steak, have a skillet very hot and perfectly 
dry. Put in the steak and as soon as it is seared on 
one side turn over. Season the seared side with but- 



Meats. 15 



ter, salt and pepper. Turn and season again. The 
oftener it is turned and seasoned the better. 

Mrs. L. G. w. 

FRENCH HASH. 

Use i^ potatos, ^ meat. Chop cold meat and po- 
toes fine, mix with one beaten egg, salt and pepper, but- 
ter size of an ^^%^ juice of a lemon and enough cream 
or rich mill: to moisten sufficiently to roll into form. 
Make a roll of the mixture, bake on a biscuit pan for 
half an hour. Serve with drawn butter poured around 
the roll. Mrs. s. T. l. 

BREAKFAST OR TEA DISH. 

An excellent dish for breakfast or tea can be made 
with the cold veal left from dinner. Melt two teaspoon- 
fuls of butter in the frying-pan, add one teaspoonful of 
flour and stir till smooth ; then add one cuplul of water, 
or stock if you have it, and season with and salt and 
pepper. When it boils add one quart of coarsely chop- 
ped cold veal. Let this heat thoroughly ; then dish it 
up on slices of nicely browned toast. A dropped ^g% 
put on the middle of each slice of toast and veal is liked 
by some. Serve all as hot as possible. Mrs. A. s. b. 

BEEF AIT GRATIN. 

Take cold roast or boiled beef, cut in small pieces ; 
butter a dish, sprinkle with bread crumbs, then meat ; 
season with salt and pepper, then another of bread ; and 
so on, till the dish is full. Pour over half a cup of v-^er 
or beef stock, and bake half an hour. Mrs. s. T. l. 

BEEF CAKE. 

Three pounds beef, cut fine ; 2 eggs, i cup milk, 3 



1 6 Meats. 



slices bread, chopped ; i teaspoon pepper, i saltspoon 
salt, I tablespoon bntter. Bake i ^^ hours. 

Mrs. L. B. T. 
TONGUE. 

After boiling as usual until tender, cut in small pieces 
and brown with flour and butter. Add some stock, sea- 
son highly, let boil a few minutes and serve hot. 

Mrs. H. R. 

VEAL LOAF. 

Three pounds veal, i pound salt pork, i dining- plate 
bread crumbs, i nutmeg, i tablespoon pepper. Chop 
the meat ; mix eggs with the crumbs, add to the meat 
and bake one hour. Mrs. L. B. T, 

TO PREPARE SWEET-BREADS. 

Carefully pull off all tough skin. Place in a dish of 
cold water for lo minutes. Always boil them 20 min- 
utes, no matter what the mode of cooking is to be. 

BROILED vSWEETBREADS. 

Split the boiled sweet-bread, sprinkle with flour, sea- 
son with salt, pepper and plenty of butter. Broil ten 
minutes over a quick fire, turning constantly. Serve 
with cream sauce. Mrs. b. w. g. 

BREADED SWEET-BREADS. 

After being boiled, season with salt and pepper. Dip 
in beaten ^<y^ and cracker crumbs. Fry a light brown, 
in hot lard, and serve with tomato sauce. 

RA(;OUT OF MUTTON. 

Three pounds of any of the cheap parts of mutton. 



Meats. 



6 tablespoons butter, 3 of flour, a large onion, a large 
white turnip, cut into small tubes, salt and pepper, a 
quart of water, a bouquet of sweet herbs. Cut the ir.eat 
in small slices. Put 3 tablespoonfuls of butter and 3 of 
flour into a stew-pan; when smooth and hot, add the 
meat. Cook imtil a rich brown, then add water and set 
where it will simmer. Put 3 tablespoons of butter in a 
frying-pan, when lint add onion and turnip, with a tea- 
spoon of flour. Stir constantly until a golden brown, 
then drain and put with the meat. Simmer i )/2 hours, 
garnish with rice, macaroni or mashed potatoes. Serve 
hot. Small cubes of potato can be added half an hour 
before serving. Mrs. B. w. G. 

SAUCE FOR MUTTON. 

Skim ^ pint of water in which mutton has been boil- 
ed. Beat 2 ^'g'g^^ stir them in the gravy with a table- 
spoon of flour. Let it stay on the fire until thick. Half 
a cup of butter must also be used. Mrs. dr. c. h. t. 

MINT SUACE. 

One cup of minced spearmint, ane-half cup of vine- 
gar, ^ cup of hot water, one tablespoon of sugar. Heat 
to the boiling point. Mrs. s. T. l. 

TO BAKE A HAM. 

For a 15-pound ham boil two hours; skim and trim 
the edge?, stick cloves all over the fat, half an incli 
apart; sprinkle a small quantity of ground cinnamon, 
mace, and allspice over it, then a thick layer of fine 
bread crumbs ; bake 2>^ hours in a ver\' slow oven, 
basting every 15 minutes with the following mixture: 
2 teacups molasses,! teacup sharp vinegar, i teacup wa- 
ter. The ham is improved by boiling one day and bak- 
ing the second day. Mrs. L. b. T. 



1 8 Vegetables. 



VEGETABLES. 



BOILED POTATOES. 
Water should be boiling \"hen potatoes are put in. 
When soft, pour off water, letting them stand on the 
stove a few minutes to dry. Then mash well, adding 
cream, butter and salt. Beat hard. If cream sauce is 
to be used, take a pint of fresh milk ; when it comes to 
a boil, stir in flour until as thick as desired. Season 
with salt and pepper. Mrs. s. c. w. 

Baked potatoes must be eaten as soon as they are 
done. When they are taken from the oven they should 
be put into a napkin or towel and the skin broken, so 
as to allow the steam to escape ; this will keep the po- 
tatoes mealy. If it cools without breaking the skin it 
will be watery and have an acid taste, which is caused 
by the retaining of a kind of juice which lies next the 
skin. Mrs. S. c. S. 

LYONNAISE POTATOES. 

One qt. cold, chopped potatoes, 2 tablespoon chopped 
onion, salt and pepper. Fry the onions until a light 
brown in 2 tablespoons butter. Add the potato and sea- 
soning, also 3 tablespoons more butter and stir with a 
fork five minutes. Mrs. S. T. l. 

FRIED POTATOES. 

Cut into dice enough cold boiled potatoes to fill a pint 
measure. Put a heaping tablespoon of butter in a hot 
skillet. Pour in the potatoes. Add a half cup of cream 
or milk. Put on a cover for five minutes. Salt and pep- 
per. Serve in a hot dish. Mrs. E. E. w. 



/ cgc tables. 



FRENCH KRIKl) POTATOES. 

Pare small, raw potatoes Divide into halves and cnt 
each half into 3 pieces, lengthwise. Cook in boiling- 
lard 10 minnte :. Drain, salt, and serve hot. 

Mrs. L. B. T. 

KENTUCKY POTATOES. 

The rav/ potatoes are sliced thin as for frying, and al- 
lowed to remain in cold water half an hour. The slices 
are then put into a pudding dish with salt, pepper and 
some milk — about half a pint to an ordinary dish. Bake 
half an hour. When taken from the oven a lump of 
butter half the size of an ^%g is cut into small bits and 
scattered over the top. The soaking in cold water hard- 
ens the slices so they keep their shape. The quantity 
ot milk can only be leared by experience ; if a little is 
left as a grav\- moistening the slices it is right. 

]\rrs. A. G. c. 

STUFFED POTATOES. 

Take large fair potatoes, bake until soft. Cut into 
lengthways. Scrape out the inside, mash the potato 
smooth, adding butter, cream, salt and pepper. Fill the 
skins with the mixture. Beat the whites of 2 eggs, 
spread a spoonful over each potato case. Bake in a very 
slow oven 45 minutes. Serve hot. Mrs. m. g. t. 

CREAMED POTATOES. 

Slice cold boiled potatoes. Put over the fire with a 
generous covering of sweet milk, a large lump of but- 
ter, salt and pepper. As it boils chop into tiny bits with 
a sharp knife. Do not let boil too dry. 

Mrs. M. F. V R. 



20 Vegetables 



A DISH OF POTATOKS AND CODFISH. 

A pint bowl of salt codfish picked very fine ; 2 pints 
potatoes cut up. Put botli together and boil until thor- 
oughly done. Drain off the water well, mash with a po- 
tato-masher, add a piece of butter the size of an egg, 2 
well-beaten eggs, and a dash of pepper. Do not soak 
the fish, but wash well. Drop from spoon into hot lard. 
The mixture will take the form of crouquettes. The 
lard must be much hotter than for fried cakes. Garnish 
with celery-tops or parsley. Mrs. E. K. w. 

POTATO PUFFS. 

Take cold mashed potatoes, add the beaten white of 
an ^%%^ butter and salt. Roll into balls the size of an 
^^^. Dip in the yolk of the ^%%^ lay on a buttered pan, 
bake until a light brown. Serve hot. Mrs. s. T. l. 

POTATO OYSTRR PATS. 

Peel and boil 12 potatoes. Mash fine, salt to taste, 
and add a piece of butter the size of an ^%%^ 4 table- 
spoons sweet cream or milk. Beat lightly and when 
cold work into pats, putting 2 oysters into each pat. 
Dip in beaten ^'g^ and roll in cracker meal. Put a little 
lump of butter on the top of each. Bake a light brown 
in a quick oven. Mrs. E. E. w. 

GLAZED POTATOES. 

Parboil in the skins, peel quickly and lay in a pan in 
the oven, A crust will form on them in a short time. 
Baste with butter until they assume a golden brown. 
vSalt while boiling. Mrs. E. E. w. 



Vegetables, SI 

POTATO CROUQUETTES. 

Pare, boil and mash 6 large potatoes. Add i heap- 
ing tablespoon butter, ^ cup of hot cream, beaten 
■whites of 2 eggs, salt and pepper. Roll the mixture in- 
to shape. Dip in egg and crumbs and fry in lard. 

Mrs, S. T. L. 

ASPARAGUS. 

Having tied it in small bunches, boil until tender. 
Serve on buttered toast with drawn buttet, salt and pep- 
per. Mrs. s. c. w. 

COLD SLAW. 

Shave or chop half a head ot cabbage and put in dish-. 
A large coffee-cup, y^ full of cream., a heaped table- 
spoon of sugar stirred in. Finish filling the cup with 
vinegar. Mrs. S. E. S. 

STEWED CELERY. 

Cut the celery in sticks an inch long. Cover with 
boiling water and simmer until tender. Season well 
with salt. Pour off the water, add a pint of cream ; al- 
low this to heat thoroughly and serve. Mrs. L. b. T. 

CORN CLYSTERS. 

Shave from the ear as much corn as is needed for a 
meal. Add a little sweet milk, beat in an egg and a tea* 
spoon of flour. Drop by spoonful into boiling lard ; turn- 
ing over when brown on one side. When done spread 
with a little butter. Mrs. Sv c. w. 

CORN PUDDING. 

12 ears of corn, 3 eggs beaten separately, 2 table- 
spoons of melted butter, i tablespoon white sugar, i 



fZ Vegetables. 

heaping teaspoon flour, i teaspoon salt, i teacup milk. 
Cover and bake half an hour. Mrs. l. g. w. 

MACARONI. 

Break the macaroni in pieces an inch long, and put 
them in a pan of boiling water slightly salted. Stew 
gently until tender. Drain, lay in a buttered dish alter- 
nate layers of macaroni and cheese, with cheese at the 
top. Sprinkle each layer of macaroni with pepper and. 
bits of butter. When the dish is fall pour in enough 
milk to nearly cover and bake until nearly dry. 

Mrs. N. M.. A. 
RICE CROQUETTES. 

I^ cups of boiled rice, yi cup milk, i ^^^^^ i table- 
spoon sugar, I of butter, Y^ teaspoon salt, a little nut- 
meg. Put the milk over to boil, add the rice and sea- 
soning. When it boils, add the beaten egg. Stir one 
minute, then take off and cool. When cold make into 
forms and roll in egg and crumbs, and drop in hot lard. 
Serve very hot. Mrs. s. T. l. 

PARSNIP BALLS. 

Mash I pt. parsnips. Add 2 tablespoons butter, i tea- 
spoonful salt, a little pepper, 2 tablespoons milk or 
cream, i ^%% well beaten. Mix all the ingredients except 
the egg. Stir over the fire 5 minutes. Add the ^%<g and 
set away to cool. When cold, roll into balls, dip in ^%% 
and crumbs and fry in hot lard. Mrs s. T. l. 

PEAS. 

Cook the peas in enough water to cover them, until 
tender, then add a teaspoon of butter, a little sugar and 
salt; thicken with a teaspoonfal of flour. 

Mrs. M. F. V R. 



Vegetables. ^■^ 



SQUASH. 

Cut in small pieces, boil until tender. Then put them 
in a stew-pan, having mashed any hard pieces, add suf- 
ficient cream to make a soft mush. Stew until thick, 
add pepper, salt and butter. Mrs. s. c. w. 

SALSIFY. 

Scrape well, cut into pieces an inch long, dropping 
into cold water as cut. Put into a stew-pan and boil un- 
til done, then pour off the water ; add a little milk, but- 
ter, salt and pepper. Mrs. s. c. w. 

SCALLOPED TOMATOESo 

Put a layer of tomatoes in an earthen dish, stew with 
salt and pepper and bits of butter. Cover with a layer 
of bread crumbs, then tomatoes, and so on until the dish 
is full, having crumbs for top layer. Bake half an hour. 

Mrs. S. T. L. 
FRIED TOMATOES. 

Pare large, solid tomatoes and slice in thick slices. 
Dip on both sides in flour, and fry in butter on a griddle. 

Mrs. S. T. L. 



SALADS. 



DELMONICO'S MAYONNAISE. 

Yolks of 2 eggs, I teacup olive oil. Put the unbeat- 
en yolks in a soup-plate and stir with a silver fork ; add 
the oil slowly, work to the consistency ol butter. Take 
a cup with 2 tablespoons of vinegar, i teaspoon salt, i 
small teaspoon mixed mustard, y^ teaspoon white su- 



24 Salads. 



gar. a pinch of pepper. Mix well then stir gently on 
the dressing. Beat the whites of both eggs and use a 
tablespoon of lemon juice in place of the vinegar, 

MRS.. A, S. B. 
COOKED SALAD DRESSING, 

Yolks of 4 eggSy a teaspoon of pepper, 2 tablespoons 
of mustard, i of white sugar, 2 of vinegar, 4 of butter- 
Cook over boiling water 3 minutes. When done add Yx 
cup more vinegar, MRS. S. R. M, 

SALAD DRESSING, 

Four eggs beaten together, only yolks will do; i ta- 
blespoon dry mustard, i cup vinegar, salt and pepper to- 
taste. Beat thoroughly and boil in a dish of water, stir- 
ring constantly. When done add Vi cup sour cream, 

MRS. S- T. L. 

POTATO SALAD, 

Boil 6 or 7 large potatoes. When done peel, slice 
fine and season wnth salt and pepper. Cut i onion fine 
and put into a skillet in which a large tablespoon of 
lard is hot — let onions cook, but not fry ; when done, 
pour ^ pint of good vinegar and a ^ pint cf water 
mixed into skillet, and let come to a boil. Then pour 
all over potatoes and mix thoroughly. Prepared a short 
time before the meal improves it. ^^^s. j. L. N. 

CHICKEN SALAD, 

Two large chickens boiled tender. When cold, chop 
fine. Chop cabbage equal in amount to chicken. Mix 
thoroughly and sprinkle with a teaspoon of salt, and a 
tablespoon of celery seed. Beat the yolks of 6 eggs, a 
little, add to them a small teaspoon of pepper, butter the 



P/c/c/rs, Catsups. 25 



size of a walnut, a teaspoon of white sugar, a heapino' 
tablespoon of mustard mixed to a smooth paste with ^ 
of tumbler of strong vinegar. Cook all in a double ket- 
tle, stirring constantly, until a thick paste. When per- 
fectly cold pour over the ch'cken and add a tumbler ot 
chopped pickle. ]\'Iix well. Mrs. m. w. w. 



PICKLES, CATSUPS. 



GREEN CUCUMBER PICKLE. 

Green the cucumbers in vinegar and water, half and 
half, with a piece of alum the size of a walnut. Cover 
while greening with grape leaves. Peel and slice the 
onions, scald with boiling water. 3 gals, cucumbers, 12 
large onions, i 1-2 gals, cider vinegar, 2 tablespoons 
each of black mustard seed, white mustard seed, ground 
ginger, ground mace, celery seed, cinnamon, tuirerac, 
4 lbs. brown sugar. Stir the sugar and spices in the 
boiling vinegar and pour over the cucumbers and onions, 
mixed in jars. Mrs. w. H. c. 

SLICED CU.CUMBER PICKLE. 

Peel and slice thin, large cucumbers, sprinkle over 
a little salt, stand 24 hours. Drain off water thorough- 
ly, if too salt wash before putting in vinegar. Slice as 
many onions as for ordinary cucumbers. Pour boiling 
salt water on the onions and let them stand half an hour. 
Drain mix with the cucumbers. Put in porcelain ket- 
tle enough cider vinegar to cover them. Add a little 



26 Pickles^ Catsups. 

brown sugar, ground pepper, celery seed and whits mus- 
tard seed. When it boils add onions and cucumbers. 
As soon as hot pour into jars and seal. Mrs. R. T. 

NEW SPANISH PICKLE. 

3 dozen cucumbers, 2 large cabbage heads, chopped 
fine, half gallon onion, cut into small squares, cucumbers 
also cut into squares. Salt and let stand one hour. 
Scald all in vinegar, then season with horseradish, one 
box Lexington mustard, one oz. celery seed, one oz. tu- 
merac, one ft), sugar, 2 ozs. white mustard seed, ten pods 
of pepper. Mrs. j. h. m'h. 

MUSTARD PICKEE. 

Oie and a half gals, chopped cucumbers, a handful of 
saU. Stand 24 hours. Press out the salt water, boil 
until very tender in tresh water. Drain dry. Slice six 
small onions, boil until tender, and mix with cucumbers. 
To this add 20 cents' worth of mustard, 10 of ginger, 5 
of tumerac, one teaspoon of pepper, 2 tablespoons olive 
oil. Cover with vinegar and let com 2 to a boil. 

Miss S. R. M. 

SWEET CHOPPED PICKLE. 

8 fbs. green tomatoes, chop fine, add 4 ft)s. brown su- 
gar ; boil 3 hours. Add a qt. of vinegar, i teaspoon each 
of mace, cinnamon and cloves. Boil 15 minutes ; when 
cool put in jars. Mrs. A. G. c. 

WATERMELON PICKLE. 

Peel and cut in small, narrow pieces the rind ot 2 me- 
dium size melons. Let stand over night in strong ginger 
tea of unground ginger, boil the melon in this until ten- 



/ ^icklcs , L \i I sups . 2 7 



der. Put enough vinegar to cover over the fire, adding i 
lb. sugar to each pint of vinegar, 2 tablespoons white 
mustard seed, %^ lb. stick cinnamon and some of the gin- 
ger tea. When this boils, add the fruit and boil i hour. 

Mrs. A. S. B. 
DAMSON SWEFT PICKI.E. 

Perforate the skins of 9 pts. of Damsons. 3 pts. vine- 
gar, 4 lbs. brown sugar and pour on the fruit. Let them 
stand 24 hours. Pour off the vinegar, boil, and pour on 
the fruit. Do this 4 days. The fourth day add cinnamon 
and spices. Boil until the syrup is as thick as molasses. 
Peaches or pears may be pickled in the same manner. 

Mrs. S. C. w. 

GRAPE PICKLE. 

Pack the grapes, on the stems, in jars. Make a syrup 
of 5 lbs. sugar to i qt. vinegar. Add mace and cinnamon 
to taste. Boil the syrup until thick, pour over the grapes 
and seal. Mrs. a. s. b. 

TOMATO CATSUP. 

Ten qts. of tomato pulp strained through a colander, 
2 qts. vinegar, 5 tablespoons black pepper, 3 of white 
ginger, 4 of grated horseradish, 4 of English mustard, 2 
of cloves, 2 of allspice, 3 of celery seed, 3 of grated nut- 
meg. Six grated onions, 4 teacups brown sugar, salt to 
taste, boil till thick, and bottle. Mrs. M. w. w. 



•<^i^ 



2S Pies. 

PIES. 



MINCE PIES. 

One and a half lbs. heart or tongue, 2 lbs. beef suet, 4 
lbs. pippin apples, 2 lbs. raisins, 2 lbs. currants, 2 lbs. 
citron, 2 lbs. su^ar, 2 large oranges, i qt. white wine, r 
qt. brandy, wine-glass rose water, 2 grated nutmegs, i y^ 
ozs. cloves, cinnamon and mace, i teaspoon salt. Par- 
boil the meat (it must weigh \y^ lbs. without skin or fat.) 
When cold chop very fine. Mix with the chopped suet, 
adding the salt. Add the chopped apples, chopped rai- 
sins and other fruit. Then the sugar, spices, peel and 
juice of the oranges, rose-water and I'.quor. Mix all 
well. ■ Mrs. M. A. T. 

PUMPKIN PIES. 

Pare the pumpkin, cut into pieces an inch square. Put 
over the fire with very little water. As it begins to get 
soft, put over a slow fire, and stir frequently to prevent 
burning, for it must cook until all the water has evapo- 
rated. Then rub through a colander, and it is ready for 
use. P'or 4 pies, take 3 pints of sweet milk, 6 eggs, i 
s'.nall nutmeg, i teaspoon of cinnamon, 2 tablespoons of 
butter, a little salt. Beat the ^^%s., add the milk, spices, 
salt and the butter melted, then add sugar until quite 
s.veet, and enough of the stewed pumpkin to make it the 
consistency of boiled custard. Mrs. M. F. v R. 

SWEET POTATO PIE. 

Boil 3 large sweet potatoes. When done peel and 
slice thin. To this add 2 cups sweet preserves, i cup 



Pics. 29 

sugar, I cup butter, i teaspoon clover, i teaspoon all- 
spice, a little nutmeg. Bake with a top crust. Tliis 
makes 2 large pies, usually maae in pudding dishes. 

Mrs. J. L. N 

MOLASSES PIES. 

Two eggs, half-pint of molasses, two tablespoons of 
butter, one nutmeg. Beat well the eggs, add the molas- 
ses and melted butter, then the nutmeg. Roll the pastry 
thin, and line two tins, then pour in the mixture. 

Miss M. Y R. 

FRENCH CREAM PIE. 

Three eggs, one cup white sugar, one and a half cups 
flour, I teaspoon Cleveland's Superior Baking Powder, 
two tablespoons cold water. Split while warm and spread 
with cream filling. Cream: Boil I pt. sweet milk. To 
this add when boiling, 2 small tablespoons corn starch 
beaten in milk, mixed with two eggs, i scant cup su2:ar. 
When nearly done add half cup butter and two table- 
spoons vanilla. Sprinkle the top with sugar and grated 
cocoanut. Mrs. j. b. s. 

COCOANUT PIE. 

Grate a cocoanut. Boil a qt. of rich milk, pour upon 
it ; add 4 eggs beaten very light, with a coffee-cup of 
sugar, a tablespoon of melted butter, half teaspoon of 
salt, a little cinnamon. Line two deep plates with pie- 
crust. Bake till firm. Mrs. L. B. T. ♦ 

PEACH MERINGUE PIE. 
Line a pie-plate with pastry, and bake. Pare and halve 



^o Pies. 

ten peaches, stew until tender in a cup of water and one 
of sugar. Lay the peaches on the pastry, thicken the 
syrup with a tablespoon of flour and pour over the 
peaches. On each piece of fruit place a teaspoon of 
meringue, prepared by beating the white of an ^%<g with 
a tablespoon of sugar: Bake until a light brown. 

Mrs. L. B. T. 

GRAPE PIE. 

Fill a pie-crust with fresh grapes, washed and pick- 
ed from the stem. Bake half an hour. When done pour 
over it a batter of eggs, i cup sugar, i cup flour, two ta- 
blespoons water, two teaspoons Cleveland's Superior 
Baking Powder. Brown in the oven enough for two pies. 

Mrs. c. J. Q. 

TRANSPARENT PIES. 

One large cup of sugar, one small cup of butter, 8 
eggs, I lemon, juice and peel. Cream the butter and 
sugar, add the yolks of the eggs and then the lemon. 
This makes 3 large pies. Make a meringue of the whites 
and spread over the pies when done. Put back in the 
oven until slightly browned. miss m. v r. 

CHESS CAKE. 

Yolks 8 eggs, one-half lb. butter, one-half lb. sugar. 
Beat well, put over the fire and thicken. Bake on thin 
pastry. Makes 3 pies. Mrs. M. w. w. 




Deserts. 31 



DESERTS. 



PLUM PUDEING. 

Half lb. raisins, half lb. currants, i/{ lb. citron, sprinkle 
with a little flour; 6 eggs, beaten separately; half lb. 
flour, half lb. sugar, scant % lb. butter, half lb. suet, a 
little salt, scant half pint milk, in which soak two slices 
baker's bread. Mix the whites and yolks, add sugar 
and butter, stir in suet, milk and flour, one nutmeg mix- 
ed in a teaspoon of brandy. iVdd the fruit and boil four 

hours. Mrs. B. W. G. 

JEFF DAVIS PUDDING. 

Three cups sugar, i cup molasses, i cup beef suet 
chopped fine, i cup sour cream, i cup raisins, seeded and 
split open ; put in at the last a little salt. 

Mrs. M. W. W. 
FRUIT PUDDING. 

One cup butter, i cup sugar, 2 cups flour, yolks 4 eggs, 
4 tablespoons sour cream, i teaspoon soda, 1% cups 
of jam or cherries, or i cup raisins and half a cup of cur- 
rants. Bake one hour. Beat the whites of the eggs to 
a stiff froth, spread over the top, return to the oven and 
brown slightly. To be eaten with sweet sauce. 

Mrs. M. F. V R. 
CHOCOLATE PUDDING. 

Two eggs, 7 tablespoons sugar, i tablespoon butter, i 
small cup milk or cream. When the pudding is nearly 
done spread with a meringue of ^gg^ sugar and vanilla. 
Set in the oven to harden. Bake in a rich puff paste. 

Mrs. B. W. G. 



«2 Deserts. 



LEMON PUDDING. 
Seven eggs, 3 lemons, 3 teacups white sugar, i lb. but- 
ter. Use half the whites for the icing. Boat the yolks 
and sugar together, add the lemon juice with the grated 
peel of two lemons and half a nutmeg. Beat half the 
whites well, mix wdth the butter, suear and lemons. Bake 
on a rich thin pastry. When done put on the icing and 
brown. ^^'^- ^^ W. w. 

BLACK PUDDING. 

One pt. molasses, i pt. blackberry jam, i teacup but- 
termilk, I teaspoon soda, i of nutmeg and i of cinna- 
mon, enough flour to make a stiff batter. Steam or 
bake. Mrs. s. E. S. 

FIG PUDDING. 

i/< lb. figs, chopped fine ; 6 oz. su2:ar, 6 oz. suet, ^ 
lbs. bread crumbs, 2 eggs, i teacup milk, ^/^ teaspoon 
soda, a little salt. Steam 3 hours. ^^^s. M. R. B. 

GINGER PUDDING. 

One cup molasses, i cup brown sugar, i cup lard, i 
teaspoon ginger, 2 teaspoons soda, 3 eggs beaten sepa- 
rately, flour to make as stifiF as cake. Bake quickly. 

Mrs. L. G. \V. 

MARCH PUDDING. 

One cup dried apples, i ^'g'g^ i cup molasses, \y^ cups 
flour, i<( cup butter, i^, teaspoon cloves, i teaspoon so- 
da, I teaspoon cinnamon. Wash and soak the apples 
over night. Cut fine and add the other ingredients, and 
bake at once. Serve hot with a sauce of half cup but- 
ter and I cup sugar beaten smooth and flavored. 

Mrs. L. B. T. 



' Deserts. 33 



WHITE STEAMED PUDDING. 
One cup sweet milk, half cup sugar, i ^gg^ half tea- 
spoon soda, I cream tartar, butter size of half egg, 2>^ 
cups flour. Steam one and a half hours. Is delicious 
with raisins or fiuit. ^^^- ^- ^ ^• 

APPLE-BATTER PUDDING. 

6 or 8 large apples, i qt. sweet milk, to large table- 
spoons of flour, 4 eggs, i spoon Cleveland's Superior 
Baking Powder in the flour, a pinch of salt. Pare and 
core the apples and steam until tender, but not enough 
to break. Then peel in a baking dish and pour over 
them a batter made by beating the eggs well and adding 
the milk and salt. Then stiffen with the flour. Bake 
thirty minutes and serve immediately with sauce. 

Peach batter pudding is made in the same way, unless 
the peaches are very ripe, when they need not be steamed. 

Mrs. M. F. V R. 
CREAM RICE PUDDING. 

% cup rice, half cup suear, i qt. sweet milk. Put in 
pudding dish with bits of butter over the top. Flavor 
with nutmeg. Bake slowly until the rice is cooked, then 
stir in a tablespoon of corn starch dissolved in a little 
milk. It will then have the consistency of cream. If too 
thick add a little milk. Serve hot or cold. 

Mrs. N. M. A. 
TAPIOCA PUDDING. 

I cup tapioca soaked over night. Grate 2 large apples 
and I lemon, i cup sugar, i tablespoon butter. Place on 
stove and boil. When taken off" add 3 well beaten eggs. 
Serve with whipped cream. Miss l. n. 

vSPONGE CAKE PUDDING: 

3 eggs, I cup sugr.r, beat with two tablespoons water, 



34 Deserts. 



I cup flour, two teaspoons Cleveland's Superior Baking 
Powder. Bake in two layers. Filling: Beat i ^%%^ and 
half cup sugar, y^ cup flour, wet with a little milk. Stir 
this mixture into half pt. boiling milk. When thick, 
flavor and spread between the layers. Eat with lemon 
sauce. Mrs. C, j, Q- 

SUNDERLAND PUDDING. 

One pt. milk, 4 eggs beaten separately, 3 tablespoons 
flour, a little salt. Beat volks, add flour and milk, then 
whites. Bake in a well-greased pudding dish about 20 
minutes, or until set like a cu-tard. Serve the moment 
it comes from th^ oven, with hot sauce. 

Mrs L. B. T. 
PEACH COBBLER. 

Stew and sweeten the peaches, bake in a pudding 
dish with upper and lower crust. Before serving, raise 
the crust and pour in some cream and butter. A good 
way to make cobbler, is to roll pastry in sheets the same 
size and bake. Pile it with fruit, in layers. On top lay 
some slender strips of pastry, sprinkle with sugar and 
serve with cream. Mrs. B. w. G. 

PRUNE vSOUFFLE. 

Cook ^ lbs. of prunes until tender, chop fine. Beat 
the whites of 5 eggs to a stiff froth, with 10 tablespoons 
sugar, Add 2 tablespoons chopped prunes. Pour into 
a well-greased pudding dish, cover with a colander and 
bake in a moderate oven 20 minutes. Serve at once 
with cold cream. Care must be taken not to disturb 
the pudding while baking. The dish should not be 
more than two-thirds full when put in the oven, as the 
eggs rise. Mrs. c. G. 



Deserts. 35 



CHOCOLATE MERINGUE. 

Ten cents' worth of shelled almonds, 5 of sweet choco- 
late, I teacup rolled crackers, i lemon, juice and rind ; 
2 tablespoons cinnamon, i of cloves, i of allspice, 2 cups 
powdered suyar, 6 eggs. Flavor. Two teaspoons 
Cleveland's Superior Baking Powder. Bake, Then 
spread on fruit jelly and frosting and bake until a light 
brown. Mrs. j. H. m'h. 

CREAM SAUCE. 

Hall cup butter, i cup powdered sugar, Y^ cup cream, 
I teaspoon vanilla. Beat the butter to a cream, add the 
sugar, stirring constantly, then the flavoring and cream, 
slowly. When smooth set in hot water and cook until 
creamy. Mrs. b. w. g. 

SAUCE. 

Boil I cup of sugar and i cup of water 3 or 4 minutes, 
then stir in i tablespoon of butter well mixed with one 
tablespoon of flour. Remove f;om the fire for a few 
minutes, and stir in the yolk of i ^%g well beaten. 

Miss .M. V R. 

LEMON SAUCE. 

One cup sugar, y^. cup b:itt?r, creamed. Add the 
yolks of 2 eggs and i pt. boiling water, with the juice 
of a lemon, then the beaten whites. Mrs. s. T. L. 
EGG SAUCE 

One cup sugar beaten with 2 eggs, i heaping table- 
spoon butter. Cook and ssrve hot. Mrs. s. T. L. 

CHARLOTTE RUSSE. 
One qt. cream, i teaspoonvmilla, 3^ cup 2:ranulated 



ifi Deserts. 



sugar, i^ pack Chalmer's gelatine, lady fingers. In 
using Aidnery cream, mix with milk. Line the.moMs 
with lady fingers. Soak the gelatine in half cup cold 
milk. Whip the cream to a stiff froth ; set the bowl in 
a dish of ice-water. Sprinkle over the cream, the sugar 
and vanilla. Pour y^ cup boiling milk or water over the 
soaked gelatine. When well dissolved, strain. Stir gent- 
ly until it begins to thicken, and add the cream from the 
top. When it will just pour, fill the molds and set away 
on ice. Mrs. s A. v. 

RUSSIAN CREAM. 

Dissolve half box Chalmers gelatine in ^ cup cold 
water. Put over i qt. milk, when hot, add the oelatine, 
yolks of 4 eggs beaten with i teacup sugar. Cook un- 
til a custard, remove from the fire, add the beaten whites 
and I teaspoon vanilla. Pour into molds. Serve with 
cream. Mrs. s. T. l. 

ITALIAN CREAM. 

One qt. cream whipped, i oz. Chalmer's gelatine dis- 
solved in >^ pt. hot water, i teacup sugar ; flavor to 
taste. . Mrs. s. T. i.. 

SNOW-BALL PUDDING. 

Half box Chalmer's gelatme dissolved in i pt. boiling 
water, 2 cups granulated sugar, juice 2 lemons ; strain 
and cook. When quite thick add whites 3 eggs beaten 
stiff. Beat all together till a white froth ; let it harden 
in cups. Make a custard with 3 yolks, i whole ^g^, i >^ 
pts. milk ; flavor with vanilla. Pour into a glass dish. 
When cold lay the balls on the custard. 

Mrs. L. B. T. 



Deserts. 37 



LEMON SPONGE. 

To I oz. Clmlmer's gelatine add i pt. cold water. Let 
it stand 5 minutes, then dissolve over the fire. Add the 
rind of 2 lemons and the juice of 3, with ^ lbs. wh'te 
sugar. Boil 2 minutes, strain, and let stand until near- 
ly cold. Add the white? of 2 eggs beaten stiff. Whip all 
until the consistency of sponge. Mrs. M. R. b. 

COFFEE JELLY. 

I qt. strong coifee. Sweeten to suit the taste ; settle, 
and strain perfectly clear. Dissolve half box Chalmer's 
gelatine in half cup boiling water, add to the coffee. 
Pour in molds wet with cold water. Serve with whip- 
ped cream. Mrs s. T. L. 

iCUSTARD. 

12 eggs, 4 qts. new milk, i pt. white sugar. Put su- 
gar in the milk, beat the eggs together. When milk 
boils, pour on the beaten eggs. Return to the fire and 
stir until it begins to thicken. Cook in a dish with wa- 
ter around it. Mrs. L. G. w. 

VANILLA ICE-GREAM. 

1 pt, milk, I cup sugar, scant ^ cup flour, 2 eggs, i 
q'. cream, i tablespoon vanilla. Let the milk come to 
a boil, add the sugar and flour, well mixed together, 
then the well-beaten eggs. Cook until a rich custard. 
When cold add the cream, flavoring, and another cup of 
sugar. Mrs. s. T. L. 

STRAWBERRY ICE-CREAM. 

2 qts. berries, mashed smooth ; 2 qts. cream. Whip 
the cream well, add the berries, make very sweet and 
freeze. Mrs. L. G. w. 



38 Deserts. 



LEMON SHERBET. 

To each can of pineapple add ;uice of 4 lemons and 
I qt. of water. Whites of 3 eggs ; make rather sweet 
and freeze. Mrs. l. g. w. 

ORANGE SHERBET. 

I qt. water, i pt. sugar, juice of 4 oranges and 3 lem- 
ons, whites of 2 eggs beaten to a stiff froth, stirred in 
jUvSt before freezing. Mrs. s. A. v. 

JUNKET. 

Take one-half pint fresh milk, heated as hot as can be 
agreeably borne by the mouth (about 115° F.), add i tea- 
spoonful of Fairchild Bros. & Foster's Essence of Pep- 
sine, and stir just enough to mix. Let it stand till firm- 
ly curded ; may be served plain or with sugar and grat- 
ed nutmeg. 

WHEY. 

Curd warm milk with Es ence of Pep.-ine, as above 
directed. When firmly curded beat up with a fork until 
the curd is finely divided. Now strain and the whey is 
ready for use. 

Whey is a highly nutritious fluid food, containing in 
solution the sugar and the salts (the mineral constitu- 
ents) of the milk, and holding also in suspension a con- 
siderable portion of caseine and fat (cream) which pass 
through the strainer. It is peculiarly useful in many ail- 
ments and always valuable as a means of variety in diet 
for the sick. It is frequently resorted to as a food for in- 
fants to tide over periods of indigestion, summer com- 
plaints, etc. 



Cakes^ Icing Cookies^ Etc. 39 



CAKES, ICING, COOKIES, ETC. 



FRUIT CAKE. 

I It), flour, I lb. sugar, i heavy lb. butter, 2 % lbs. rai- 
sins, I fb. citron, i^ lbs. currants, i doz. eggs, 2 nut- 
megs, I tablespoon ground cloves, i oz. ground ginger, 
I gill brandy. Cream the butter and sugar. Whip the 
eggs and pour into the sugar and butter. Then add the 
flour. Cut the fruit, mix alternate handful into the bat- 
ter ; put in spices and brandy last. Bake 3 hours in a 
moderate oven. Mrs. M. A. T. 

CURRANT BUN. 

Seed 2 fbs. raisins, 2 lbs. Sultana raisins, 2 ft)s. currants, 
I lb. blanched almonds, ^ lb. orange peel, ]/{ lb. citron 
peel, I nutmegs, i lb. sugar, 6 oz. butter, 4 lbs. breap 
dough ; ^2 oz. ground carraway seed, i oz. ground gin- 
ger, y^ oz. ground cinnamon, half oz. ground corriander 
seeds. Make a hole in the dough, put in the butter and 
set before the fire until it melts ; then [work in well. 
Keep out y^ the dough, mix the fruit in the rest ; press 
into the pan, turn out, and press with the hands a little, 
all around. Line the pan with the remaining dough, 
put in the fruit mixture, and cover with the dough. 
Bake in a bread oven 3 hours. Mrs. m. r. b. 

NUT CAKE. 

I cup butter, 2 cups sugar, i cup sweet milk, 4 cups 
flour, whites 6 eggs, i heaping teaspoon Cleveland's Su- 
perior Baking Powder, 2 cups pecan kernels. 

Mrs. N. M. A. 



40 Cakes^ Icings Cookies^ Etc. 



COFFEE CAKE. 

2 eggs, 2 cups clear coffee, i pt. raisins, i pt. cur- 
rants, I tablespoon cinnamon, i-2 tablespoon cloves, i 
nutmeg, i even tablespoon soda, y^ cup butter, 31-2 
cups flour. Mrs. A. s. B. 

GINGERBREAD. 

I ft), flour, I pc. N. O. molasses, i teacup hot water, 
21-2 teaspoons ginger, i of cinnamon, 5 oz. butter. 

Mrs, S. D, 
LEMON POUND CAKE. 

I ft), flour, I ft), sugar, ^ ft), butter, 7 eggs, juice of 2 
lemons. Miss l. n. 

WHITE CAKE. 

I cup butter, 2 cups sugar, 4 cups flour, i cup sweei 
milk, whites of 8 eggs, 2 teaspoons Cleveland's Superior 
Baking Powder. Mrs. j. R. w. 

SPONGE CAKE. 

12 eggs, 1 3^ pints sugar, \y pints sifted flour. Beat 
whites of the eggs to a stiff troth. Into the well-beat- 
en yolks, gradually stir the sugar and then the beaten 
whites. Remove your spoon from this mixture and 
with a large knife cut in the sifted flour. Never stir it 
after putting in the flour. Mrs. s. A. v. 

ROLL JELLY CAKE. 

. One cup sugar, 2 eggs, well beaten, 2 tablespoons wa- 
ter. Mix I 1-2 easpoons Cleveland's Superior Baking 
Powder in i 1-2 cups flour. Stir a very little after add- 
ing the flour. P^lavor to taste. Bake in a dripping pan 
in a quick oven. Spread with jelly, roll and slice. 

Mrs. c. J. Q. 



Cakes ^ Icings Cookies ^ Jitr. 41 



PRINCK ALBERT CAKK. 

White. Whites 4 eggs, 2 cups sugar, i cup sweet 
milk, I cup butter, 3 cups flour, i teaspoon Cleveland's 
Superior Baking Powder. 

Dark. I cup brown sugar, 3 eggs, half cup milk 
or cream, half cup butter, 1^2. cups stoned raisins, 2 cups 
flour, half teaspoon Cleveland's Superior Baking Pow- 
der, I teaspoon cloves, cinnamon and allspice. Bake in 
long pans : put icing between. Airs. M. W. W. 

BLACK CHOCOLATp: CAKE. 

1 cup butte*-, 2 cups sugar, 5 eggs, whites of 2, i cup 
milk, 2 teaspoons Cleveland's Superior Baking Powder? 
half cake chocolate. 

Filling. I tb. sugar wet with cold water, i cup cocoa- 
nut, whites 3 eggs, half cake chocolate. Cook over wa- 
ter, stirring constantly. Mrs. l. b. T. 

BROWN STONE FRONT CAKE. 

Whites oi 4 eggs, i cup milk, half cup butter, 2 cups 
sugar, 3 cups flour, 3 teaspoons Cleveland's Superior 
Baking Powder. Make a paste of half cake chocolate, 
half cup milk, i cup sugar, yolk of i Q<g'g. Boil until a 
thick caromel. When nearly cold stir into the cake. 
Bake in 4 layers and put together with boiled frosting. 

Mrs. s. T. E. 

COCOANUT CAKi:. 

2 cups sugar, half cup butter, 3 eggs, i cup milk, 3 
cups flour, 3 teaspoons Cleveland's Superior Baking 
Powder. Flavor to taste. Cream the butter and sugar, 
add the eggs, mix quick with the milk, then pour into 



42 Cakes ^ Icing Cookies^ Etc. 



the butter and sugar and eggs : add the flour. The bat- 
ter must be so thick that it has to be spread in the pans 
with a knife. Bake very quickly in a hot oven without 
allowing time to brown. Filling : Whites 4 eggs, half 
cup sugar, i ground cocoanut. Spread the top with 
icing and sprinkle on cocoanut. Mrs. M, w. w. 

CREAM CAKE. 

3 ^fe<?s, I cup sugar, 2 tablespoons cold water, i ^/^ 
cups flour, I teaspoon flavoring. Bake in 2 jelly pans. 
dream: Let i pint milk come to a boil, then add i cup 
sugar, 2 eggs, and a small piece butter, beaten together. 
Let all come to a boil. Do not allow it to boil or it will 
curdle. Pour out and when cool, flavor. Split the cakes 
in half and spread the filling between. Mrs. H. w. 

ICE CREAM CAKE. 

2 cups white sugar, i cup butter, i cup sweet milk, 
whites 8 eggs, 2 teaspoons Cleveland's Superior Baking 
Powder, 3^ cups flour. Bake in layers. Filling: 3 cups 
sugar, I cup water, boil to a thick syrup; pour*the boil- 
ing syrup over the whites of 3 eggs, well beaten ; add a 
teaspoon powdered citric acid, flavor with lemon or va- 
nilla : spread on each layer. Mrs. H. w. 
WHITE CAROMEL CAKE. 

Whites of 10 eggs, 2>^ cups sugar, i cup butter, i 
cup milk, 4 cups flour, 3 teaspoons Cleveland's Superior 
Baking Powder. Filling: 3 cups white sugar, i j^ cups 
cream, i cup butter. Boil until it candies, stirring 
constantly. Mrs. m. w. w. 

MARSH-MALLOW CAKE. 

Three cups sugar, i >^ cups butter, 5 cups flour, i cup 



Cakes ^ Cookies^ Icings Etc. 43 



sweet milk, the whites of 12 eggs, 2 teaspoons Cleve- 
land's Superior BaKing Powder. Cream the butter and 
sugar, then add the milk slowly, then half the eggs and 
half the flour : the other half the eggs and the rest of 
the flour into which first stir the baking powder. Bake 
in layers, spread icing between and split the mash-mal- 
lows and lay tiiem on very closely together. Ice the top 
and lay on whole marsh-mallows. One and a half fts. 
marsh-mallows will be required. Miss :m. v. r. 

ICING. 

Whites 2 eggs, i tablespoon vinegar or lemon juice, i 
teaspoon starch, thicken with sugar. Wrap a silver 
fork with cloth : stir the above. Mrs. M. W. W. 

LEMON FILLING. 

Juice and grated rind of 3 lemons, i cup sugar, i cup 
butter, 3 eggs. Beat the ego^s, stir in lemon, sugar and 
butter. Cook until thick, stirring constantly. 

Miss S. R. M. 

COCOANUT FILLIiNG. 

Whip I pint cream, sweeten and flavor with vanilla. 
Into this stir lightly a grated cocoanut. Miss M. V R. 

ALMOND FILLING. 

Whites 3 beaten eggs, 2 small cups powdered sugar, 
half cup almonds, blanched and powdered fine : stir in- 
to the icing. Flavor with rose-water or bitter almond. 
This is very nice made of whipped cream instead of 
eggs. Miss M. V R. 

GINGER SNAPS. 

One and a half cups molasses, i cup brown sugar, i 



44 Cakes^ Cookies^ Icings Etc. 



large cup lard, i tablespoon soda. Cinnamon and salt. 
Boil 15 minutes. When cold mix stiff with flour, roll 
ve^y thin and bake in a quick oven. Mrs. S. T. L. 

HARD GINGER CAKES. 

6 pints flour, i tfe. sugar, i pt. molasses, 5 tablespoons 
ginger, i teaspoon soda, i ft. lard, 6 tablespoons butter- 
milk. Roll thin and bake quickly. Mrs. M. R. B. 
SOFT GINGER CAKES. 

I heaping cup butter, i large cup sugar, i pt. molass- 
es, half pt. milk, i oz. soda, i oz. cinnamon, i nutmeg. 
Bake in a dripping pan ; when nearly cold, cut in 
squares. • Mrs. L. B. T. 

CINNAMON CAKES. 

1 ft), butter 2 ft>s. flour, i ft), brown sugar, yolks 6 eggs. 
Make a thin icing. Roll the cakes thin, .spreading with 
the icing ; sift on cinnamon. Before quite dry sift over 
with powdered sugar. Mrs. R. T. 

SAND TARTS. 

2 eggs well beaten, half teaspoon soda, 3 tablespoons 
water, flour to roll thin. Sprinkle on top with sugar, 
cinnamon, raisins or almonds. Bake in a hot oven. 

Mrs. B. W. G. 

TEA CAKES. 

4 eggs, two and a half cups sugar, ^ cup butter, 3 
teaspoons Cleveland's Superior Baking Powder. Flavor 
to taste and flour enough to roll well. Mrs. J. W. R. 

FRIED CAKES. 

3 eggs, 2 cups sugar, i pt. sweet milk, i heaping ta- 



Preserves ^ Jellies. 45 

hlespoon butter, i t^^i^spoon salt, one and a half table- 
spoons vanilla, 4 teaspoons Cleveland's Superior Baking 
Powder, sifted with the flour. Mix soft. Cream butter 
-and sugar, add yolks of eggs, butter and vanilla. Add 
beaten whites with the flour, last. Mrs. L. B. T. 



PRESERVES, JELLIES. 



PRESERVED STRAWBERRIEvS, 

To I It), of berries use ^ ft. of sugar, in layers. 
Place in a kettle on back of the stove until the sugar 
'dissolves, then let it come to a boil, stirring from the 
bottom. Spread on plates and set in the sun until the 
syrup thickens. It may require two or three days. Pour 
into cans and seal. Mrs. L. B. T, 

RASPBERRY AND CURRANT PRESERVEvS, 

Take % red raspberries and y^ of currants. Weigh 
them, put a pound of sugar to a pound of fruit, and 
let them boil 20 minutes, or until the syrup begins to 
jelly. Mrs. M. F. V R. 

PEAR PRESERVES. 

Pare and quarter the pears, weigh, and if hard, boil in 
a little water until soft before adding the sugar, pound 
for pound. When nearly done add a sliced lemon to 
every four pounds of fruit. Cook until the syrup when 
cold forms a thin jelly. Mrs, M, F. V R. 

QUINCE MARMALADE, 

Pare and cut the fruit fine. Boil the corings and par- 
ings, then strain and add the quinces Let them boil 



4^ Preserves^ Jellies. 



until soft : mash fine and add ^ tb. sugar to i lb. fruits 
Cook gently 2 hours or until a thick jam. 

Mrs, R, T. 

PINE APPLE MARMALADE. 

Pare and chop the pines, To i lb, fruit add i yi lbs, 
granulated sugar. Place in an earthen dish and stand 
in a cool place for 24 hours. Heat thoroughly and can,. 

Mrs, S. T, L. 

GOOSE^BERRY JELLY. 

To each gallon of well-grown, but not ripe berries, al- 
low 3 pts. water. Boil until tender. Pour into a flan- 
nel bag to drip. To each pt. of juice allow i lb. of su- 
gar, Boil quickly until it will jelly. Mrs. S. C, W, 
LEMON FRUIT JELLY. 

Make a rich lemonade of the juice of 6 large lemons,, 

2 cups sugar, i ^ qts, water. Add small slices of citron 
and the yellow part of lemon and orange peel, Heat^ 
and add i box Chalmer's gelatine, already dissolved in i 
pt. water, Pour one-third the preparation into moulds: 
arrange slices of orange, bananas and pineapple in it 
and let it partially form, add another third and ar- 
range fruit as in the first. Then pour in the remainder 
and let stand on ice over night. In very hot weather a 
little more gelatine is required. When removing trom 
the moulds, dip in hot water only an instant, as it melts 
rapidly. Mrs. A, C- S. 

PINEAPPLE JELLY. 

I box Chalmer's gelatine, i can grated pineapple, juice 

3 lemons, sugar enough to sweeten. Soak the gelatine 
an hour in i pt, cold water. Add i pt. boiling water, 
then the lemon juice and pineapple. Miss M. V R. 



Drinks. 47 



DRINKS 



COFFEE. 

I small teacup coffee, i qt. fresh cold wai.er. Boil the 
coffee 3 minutes, then set it where it will keep warm un- 
til ready for use. Mrs. L. G. w. 

CHOCOLATE. 

Dissolve i^ cake Baker's chocolate in i qt. boiling 
water. Boil rapidly, stirring constantly, 5 minutes. 
Add % cup sugar, and i qt. hot milk When the mixture 
begins to boil stir in a heaping teaspoon of corn starch, 
previously dissolved in cold milk. Boil tor a minute, 
remove from the fire and add a teaspoon of vanilla. Serve 
with whipped cream, Mrs. s. T. l. 

STRAWBERRY ACTD. 

Dissolve 5 ozs. tartaric acid in i pt. water and pour 
over 12 lbs, sugar. Let stand 24 hours and add 12 qts. 
strawberry juice. Bottle. Mrs. R. T. 

RASPBERRY VINEGAR. 

To 8 qts. berries add 4 qts. vinegar. Let stand 48 
hours. Strain, and to every quart of juice allow % lb. 
-sugar, boil 10 minutes and bottle* Mrs. s. T. l. 

BLACKBERRY CORDIAL. 

Select coarse-grain, well-ripened berries. To each 
gal. allow 3 pts. water. Boil in a porcelain kettle. 
When soft, strain out the seeds and pulp. To each gaL 
of the liquid add 3 lbs. lump sugar, 3 sticks cinnamon 



Candies'. 



2 doz. cloves, a large tablespoon allspice. Boil lo min- 
utes. When cold strain out the spices and stir in i qt.. 
old whiskey. Mrs. s. c. w. 

UNITERMENT^ED WINE. 

Mash the grapes, and boil or not, as convenient ; by 
boiling more color is extracted from the skins. Strain 
the juice, sweeten to taste, fill the bottles and set on a. 
firm foundation in a big kettle with water to the neck 
of the bottles. i\llow the water to boil lo minutes. 
Refill the bottles, cork and seal while hot. Poured on 
ice and water it makes a most refreshing drink ; no 
headache in it, Mrs. L. G. w. 



CANDIES. 



MOLASSEvS CANDY. 

a cups molasses, i cup sugar, i tablespoon vinegar, a 
small piece of butter. Boil until brittle. Before tak- 
ing from the stove add a little soda. Miss u. R. T. 

BUTTER SCOTCH. 

I cup brown sugar, i cup N. O. molasses, ^ cup but- 
ter. Boil until crisp. Pour on buttered tins and mark 
in squares. Mrs. B. w. G. 

CREAM CANDY. 

2>^ cups sugar, ^4 cup boiling water, 2 teaspoons vin- 
egar, butter size of a hickory nut. Boil 15 minutes 
without stirrino. Miss u. R. T. 



Candies. 49 



BROWN SUGAR CANDY. 

3 lbs. sugar, Yz cup boiling water, 2 teaspoons vine- 
gar, a large tablespoon butter. Boil without stirring. 
Pull with the ends of the fingers, when cool. 

Mrs. s. c. w. 

CHOCOLATE CARAMELS. 

Yz lb. butter, 3 lbs. N. O. brown sugar, Y^ 1^. Baker's 
chocolate, Y^ P^- morning's milk. Stir often. When 
done add Y^ oz. vanilla, pour on greased pans and cut 
in squares. Mrs. B. w. G. 

COCOANUT CANDY. 

2 lbs. sugar, the milk from the cocoanut with enough 
water added to make a pint. Let it boil, without stir- 
ring, until brittle in water. Pour over the grated cocoa- 
nut and beat until it thickens, then drop in small cakes 
or pour in pans and cut in squares. Mrs. b. w. g. 
PEPPERMINT DROPS. 

1 pt. sugar, half pt. water, boil until thick. Take 
from the stove, add 6 drops oil peppermint, and beat 
hard. When it turns milky, drop from a spoon. 

Mrs. b. w. g. 
CHOCOLATE CREAMS. 

2 cups granulated sugar, 3 tablespoons water in a tea- 
cup : fill the cup wite milk. Boil 20 minutes. Stir un- 
til cool enough to roll in the hands. Make into balls 
and drop in melted chocolate. Mrs. S. T. L. 

CREAMED WALNUTS. 
2 cups sugar, i cup water, one and a half tablespoons 
arrowroot. Mix and boil 7 minutes, stirring constantly. 
Remove, stir to a cream, add i teaspoon vanilla. Boil 
into balls,press down with an English walnut meat. 

Mrs. s. T. L. 



50 Bread\ Biscuits^ VVajfles^ Etc. 



BREAD, BISCUITS, WAFFLES, ETC. 



YEAST. 

12 medium-sized potatoes boiled and mashed, i pt.. 
hot water, i pt. cold water, i teacup sugar, i tablespoon 
salt. Sift all through a seive. i cake Gaff, Fleisch- 
man's yeast. Let it rise, stirring down two or three 
timesy as it rises quickly. Put away in a cool place. Use 
a teacup of yeast to i qt, flour. Mrs. L, R, M. 

SALT RISING BREx\D. 

Into ^ cup of hot milk stir 2 tablespootis meal with 
pinch of salt and half teaspoon sugar. Let stand all 
night, or until it puffs up and looks light. Then pour 
over it i teaspoon sugar and i of salt, i pt, hot water. 
Wlien cool, stir in the mixture that stood over nighty 
with flour enough to make a stiff" batter. Beat well, set 
in a warm olace and if made right will be light in one 
hour. Then take i qt, water, half cup sugar, half cup 
lard, I scant tablespoon salt, add rising and enough 
flour to knead well without sticking. Put in pans, keep- 
warm ; when light bake. Mrs, N. M, A. 

VELVET ROLLS. 

3 pts. sifted flour, measured with a spoon so as not to 
pack ; I teacup morning's milk, warm ; i teacup yeast. 
Beat until it blisters. Put to rise from 4 to 6 hours. 
Beat again until it puffs up. Make into rolls, greasing 
around each with lard. Put in a baking pan and set to 
rise 2 hours. Bake. Mrs. R. T. 



Breads Biscuits, Waffles, Etc. 5^ 



SODA BISCUIT. 

I qt. flour, I even teaspoon soda, i heaping teaspoon 
Cleveland's Superior Baking Powder, butter or lard size 
of an ^gg, I pt, fresh buttermilk. Work enough to make 
the dough look smooth and bake quickly Mrs. L. w. G. 

BAKING POWDER BISCUIT. 

1% pts. flour, measured after being sifted ; 2 teaspoons 
Cleveland's Superior Baking Powder, put in flour and 
sift again. Rub into the flour butter the size of an ^gg. 
Mix soft and quickly with milk. Bake immediately, in 
hotovem Mrs. L. b. t. 

VIRGINIA I^APLANDS. 

I pt. flour, I pt. milk, i tablespoon salt, 4 eggs. Bake 
in an even oven until thoroughly done. Mrs. R. T. 

beaten biscuit. 

1 patent sifter of flour, i teaspoon salt, i large heap- 
ing spoon lard, ^ pt. water. Mix very stiff". Knead 
and beat until smooth and full of blisters. Cut and 
prick. Bake in a hot oven, with the bottom the hotter. 
The heat must be steady. If too hot they will blister. 

Mrs. B. w. G. 
SALLY LUNN. 

3 eggs, 2 cups sweet milk, ^ cup fresh yeast, i table- 
spoon butter, 2 tablespoons sugar, 1 teaspoon salt. Stit 
in enough flour to make a stiff batter. Set to rise, beat 
thoroughly and set to rise a second time, beat again and 
put in buttered dishes. Bake. Mrs. S. E. S. 

sally lunn. 

2 eggs, I tablespoon sugar, i cup sweet milk, 2 pints 



52 Bread^ Biscuits^ Waffles^ Etc. 

flour, 2 teaspoons Cleveland's Superior Baking Powder, 
butter size of an ^^^. Miss s. R. m. 

SCALDED CORN BREAD. 

I pt. meal in which is mixed a large pinch of salt. 
Pour on boiling water, stirring constantly, until a thick 
mush. When cool, beat in one ^%<g. Melt a small piece 
of lard in the pan to prevent sticking. Drop in with a 
spoon. Bake quickly. Mrs. S. C. W. 

SOFT BATTER BREAD. 

I pt. corn meal, i egg, piece of lard size of half an 
egg ; make the batter very thin with milk ; bake quick- 
ly. Mrs. M. W. W. 

PUMPKIN BREAD. 

Having pared and stewed the pumpkin to the con- 
sistency of mush, take out as much as will be needed 
for a meal. Add as much corn meal as the pumpkin 
will take. Form into small pones with the hands. Add 
a little salt and enough lard to make it short. Bake in 
a quick oven. Mrs. S. C. W. 

FLANNEL CAKES. 

Make a rising of Y^ lb. flour, y^ pt. water, i/( teacup 
salt. In 5 or 6 hours it will be well risen, beat 4 eggs 
light, stir in 2 pts. warm milk, 3 lbs. flour. Add the 
rising with a teaspoon of salt. Mix well and set to rise 
again for about 2 hours. Bake on a hot griddle slightly 
greased. Mrs. M. W. W. 



RICE BATTER BREAD. 
I teacup meal, ^ teacup boiled rice, i^pt/|milk, 3 



Breads Biscuits^ Waffles^ Etc, 53 



eggs, I teaspoon salt, i teaspoon Cleveland's Superior 
Baking Powder. Mrs. R. T. 

RICE WAFFLES. 

Pass I pt. warm soft boiled rice through a seive, and 
add to it a small teaspoon salt ; i tablespoon fl@ur, sifted 
with 2 teaspoons Cleveland's Superior Baking Powder. 
Beat the whites of 3 eggs stiff. Beat the yolks as light 
as possible and mix with 3 gills of milk. Stir into the 
rice and flour and add i oz. melted butter. Add the 
whites. Mix all thoroughly and pour into the waffle- 
irons, which should be filled two-thirds full. 

Mrs. M. W. W. 

RICE MUFFINS. 

I cup boiled rice, i cup sweet milk, 2 eggs, 2 table- 
spoons melted butter, i teaspoon sugar, 2 teaspoons 
Cleveland's Superior Baking Powder, enough flour to 
make a batter ; beat hard, adding the baking powder 
last. Bake in muffin rings. Mrs S. T. L. 

FRITTERS. 

Half pt. milk, 2 cups flour, 3 eggs, i tablespoon melt- 
ed butter, I of sugar, 3 teaspoons Cleveland's Superior 
Baking Powder. Salt. Fry in lard. Mrs. L. B. T. 

APPLE FRITTERS. 

Make a batter of i cup sweet milK, 2 cups flour, a 
heaping teaspoon Cleveland's Superior Baking Powder, 
2 eggs beaten separately, i teaspoon sugar, a little salt. 
Heat the milk a little more than milK-warm, add slowly 
to the beaten yolKs and sugar, then add flour and whites 
of eggs. Stir all together and add slices of sour apple. 



54 Bread^ Biscuits^ Waffles^ Etc. 

Drop into boiling lard, in large spoonfuls, with a piece 
of apple in each. Mrs. C. G. 

PORRIDGE. 

To make good porridge the water must be boilingibe- 
fore the oatmeal is put in. Pour the meal in a continu- 
ous stream with the left hand, stirring constantly till it 
boils. Boil ten minutes, then add salt. Salting at first 
hardens the meal and prevents its swelling. Boil lo 
minutes more. Mrs. M. R. B. 



Iiqdc'^ ^0 (Sonl'nbulHDPS. 



Mrs- A. S. B.- Mrs. J. D, Brashear. 

" A. C. Q.— Mrs. A. C. Queen. 

*' A, G,— Mrs. A. Groscurth. 

^' B. W. G.— Mrs. Clinton Griffith. 

" H, N. W.— Mrs. Henrietta Weill. 

" J. B. S.— Mrs. J. B. Solomon, 

'' J. R.— Mrs. John Reinhardt. 

" L. B. T. —Mrs. L. B. Taylor, 

" L. G. W.— Mrs. John Weir, 

*' L. N. G. — Mrs. Joseph Gasser. 

'' M. A. T.— Mrs. M. A. T^lfc. 

'' M. F. V R.— Mrs, M. F. Van Rensselear, 

'' M. W.W.— Mrs. A. C. Wood. 

" M. R. B.— '^ Robert Brodie. 

^' N. M. A.— " F. C. Ames. 

" R, T. — " Dr. C. H. Todd. 

" S. C. W. — " James Weir. 

" S. E. S. — " James Sawyer. 

" S. T. L. — ^' C. P. Luce. 

'' J.H.M'H— " John H. McHenry. 

" S. A. V. — " T. S. Venable. 
Miss H. M. —Miss Henrietta Marble. 

'' M. V. R.— '^ Minnie Van Rensselaer 

" R. M. — " Sadie Marble. 

" L. N. — " Ivorena Neicam. 



W.H.SfiaekelferdScBrQ. 

[Successors to Lindley & Shackelford], 

f obbers and l^el'ailcpz of 

T)?2 ©oods, 'Bol'iong, 

(Q Carpets, Window Shades, 

LACE CORTAINS. ^^^^^^ BOOTS AND SHOES, 

si^i CLOAKS. i^;c> 



-] *Bo a Sl'riei'l^ 

(Sash 1Bu2inc2Z.[- 



a^ ALWAYS READY WITH ^ 



^ Come and See Us- ^ 

Gor. Main and Daviess Streets, • Owensboro, Ky. 



LOUISVILLE, KENTUCKY. 

Orpnizeft Under State Charter 186]. 

j / CAPITAL, - - - - $5000,000.00. 

v/y^SURPLUS, . - . - $7500,000.00. 
|(r UNDIVIDED PROFITS, - $60,000.00. 



THEODORE HARRIS. President. 
DR. J. E. SUTCLIFFE, Vice President. 
JNO. H. LEATHERS, Cashier. 
W. S. STONE, AsstSTANT Cashier. 



Accounts of Banks, Firms, Corporations and Individuals Solicited. 

* INTEREST PAID ON TIME DEPOSITS 1 * 

This Bank Pays Quarterly Dividends. 



Pillsbury-Wasburn Flour Mills Co. 



Limited, 

MiNNEAPOLS. Minn. 



CHAS. A. PILLSBURY, Managing Director 

Operating 

Pillsbur\' A, 

. Pillsbury:B, 

Palisade, 

Anchor and 

Lincoln Mills. 



M-"^— "PILLSBURY'S BEST." 



J. C. RUDD, W. M. RUDD, 

M. V. MONARCH, F. W. CLARKE 



Insurance. 

227 St. Ann, OwENSBORO, Ky 



REINHARDTS Don't Advertise Right. 

So said a man on Ma?in street. Wonder 
». . ♦ . ♦ ^ what would happen if they advertised right? 






THEIR trade in reliable Food Products and 
Fine Groceries is growing all the time as it 
is, MUST be some other reason. lyet's try 
them awhile and fi^d out. 



"Quality and not Quantity is our Motto." 

Apnts for CLEVELAND'S BAKING POWDER, 
W. F. REINHARDT & BRO. 




=..^ Armour's ==ai== 

Ixtrad 8f Beef 

(Chicago), 

To? "Pop 



S0UPS SftDEES, GRAVIES, ETC, 

^ItisttieBesl.^ 




w. M. Mccarty, 



'^p^ — 



DRUGGIST, 



15) 



m^ 



No. 306 Frederica Street, Owensboro, Ky. 

Keeps everything in Stock usually found in a 

Barlow's Indigo Blue. 



Its merits as a WASH BLUE have been fully tested and indorsed by thous- 
ands of housekeepers. 

Your Grocer ought to have it on Sale! Ask himfor it. 
D. S.WILTBERGER, Proprietor, 

22-, N. Second Street, PHILADELPHIA. 



OFFICERS. 

J. D POWERS, President. 

J. H. HICKMAN, VICE PRESIDENT. 
PHIL. T. WATKINS. CASHIER: 



Directors. 

J. D. POWERS, J. H. HICKMAN, 

E. H. LUCKETT, JAMES SAWYER, 

E. W. WOOD, JAY HARDY, PHIL. T. WATKINS. 



'E}i?zf llaMot^al IBank. 

(Sapital and |urplus, 200,000.?^ 

OWENSBOHO, KENTUCKY, 

A. C. TOMPKINS, 

Tobacconist, 

0\A^ENSBORO, Ky. 




A/LOTH BRS, 

Wl)at Do You Feed Uly^ Baby? 
^# LACTO-PREPARATA, S- 

A PREPARED HUMAN MILK, 
Is a Pure Milk Food, designed more especially for infants under 6 mcnt-S old. 

It is the nearest approach to mother's milk that can be produced and be per- 
manent. It is prepared from cow's milk and contains no cereal carbohydrates, 
and being partially peptonized, will digest as readily and nourish the child as 
perfectly as human milk. 



CARNRICK'S soluble: KOOD 

Is composed of cow's milk, partially predigested, to which has been added a su""- 
ficient proportion of wheat the starch of which has been converted into dex- 
trine and soluble starch and milk sugar, to make the total percentage of car- 
bohydrates equal to that of human milk. 

WE CLAIM FOR BOTH THESE FOODS : 

1. That they are superior to any othsr prepared foods. 

2. That they are perfect foods in themselves, requiring no addition of cow's 
milk as do another foods offered for sale , thus avoiding the danger from the 
use of cow's milk, especially in the large cities 

3. That the casein is partially digested, so as to be as readily assimilated a 

4. That the milk in these preparations has been sterilized, and that they 
are prepared with scientific skill in every detail. 



Our Baby's First and Second Years, 

a book of ^4 pages, by Marion Har'nnd, s^^'Ut free 

REED & CA^NI!C"<, New York. 




ye Dalntjc Madyes, Please Me Notice. 



HARRIET HDBBARD AYER, 

305 m AttiM, Nm York Bit). 



m ReEarr|ierp™PAllTioNs. 



«f^jRF,CAMIER CREAM 

For Tan, Sunburn and Pirn 



p,eJliese Preparations are Famous 

©-^ AvS THE ONES i._^ 

Endorsed and Used • 



«f^ RECAMIER BALM 

A Beautifier Pure and Simple. 

^ ^ ^ ^ By the Most Beautiful Women of Every 

BS? RECAMIER LOTION ^ Country. 

For Removing Moth and Freckles. 



mm- RECAMIER POWDER ^^^^ 

Will Not Make the Face Shine. Testimonials 

tm- RECAMIER SOAP 

Delicate, Healing and Pure. 



Adelina Patti Nicolini, 
Bernhardt, 
Langtry, 
Potter, 
Modjeska, 
Clara Louise Kellogg, 
And thousands of others 



C9~^ ALSO i._G) 



Concentrated Odors For the Handkerchief, 

Notably the Follov^ing White Flower Perfumes: 
WHITE VIOLET, WHITE LILAC, A^HITE IRIS, WHITE HELIOTROPE- 




Scented Waters, Sachet Powders, Dentrifices. Manicure Goods 

and Objects of Art for the Toilet Table, in Silver, Rare Porcelain, Ivory, 

etc. Sachets for Bureau Drawers, Skirts and Bodices of Gowns, Closet 

Linings, Household and Personal Linen. 

Every Requisite and Luxurious Appointment of a Gentlewoman's 

Toilet. 
agg^For Sale Throughout the Country by Dealers in Toilet Goods. 
K^,Mail orders from all parts of the country promp#y attended to. 



Send for Cirulars 
and endorsements. 



HARRIET HUBBARD AYER, ^ N^i^^rNtRlTcTtv. 



-^ COME TO OUR (®^ 



r^iAa.rr)rr)o\lr) «■ Housed- 

FOR GENUINE BARGAINS IN 




Foreign and Domestic Dress Gools 






White Goods, Laces, 

Embroideries, Hosieri, Gloves^Gorsets Jlioos, 

(garnets, (gurtaius, l^ms, IBilliasrj, k, 



i^yrEARE THE LARGEST dealers in Western Kentucky, and guariiit 
(li I-Oini=R RRICES than you will find wfst of the Alleghanio. 

■^ Plea.se Remember, -i 

we make a specialty of 

BLACK GOODS . 

PHllililPS BR8S. S- MgATDE 




T^EMP LE THEATR E. 

1VIORTO.\' WATKINS & CO., Managers. 



^""m Am AND DAVIESS STREETS. EeSeiTefl Ml oil Sale AT THEATRE 



^4 Dicnmons 



mo 



IT. 



TOBA CCONISTS 

OWENSBORO, Ky. 






WILL J, HON 



Wholesale and Retail 



PIANOS * AND * ORGANS, 



5l?eet n"\usie, (r\usie Bool^s, 



KND 



%H Kinds 2mall TBuzieal ©ocds, 

No. 106 Main Street, 
Oweiisboro, Kentiackiy. 



f.EilJ.PARRIS 




MAIN STREET, 

Large Stock of Fii-iiily, Pocket and Teachers' Bibles, 

Song Books, aiiH S. S. Libraries. 
Nice Line of B ooks and Wail Paper, Lowest Prices co All , 

FregeriptioFi ©rMggist, 

/)l AND DEALER IN /k 

'^ Perfumeries, Toilet Goods^ 1 

Driaggists Su.nd.ries, Etc., ! 

280 THIRD vSTREET. 



,akery and Confectionery, 



ICii CREAM PARLOR AND OYSTER RESTAURANT.f 

ALSO DEALER IN 

Blank S» Bros Jeiwiieil -^ 

205 W Main St., opp. Court-House, OvVEnsboro^ Ky. 



eSTKBUISHED 1SB8. 



ffi^a DKNXISXS. 




Frederica Street. 



S. M. DEANE. President. jas. H. PARRISH, Cashier. 

THE OWENSBORTSAYINGS BANK. 

Capital, :$5o,ooo. Surplus, $27,000. 

Undivided Profits, $1,010.90. 
— — ^.^ 

TN addition to this, by the terms of its Charter, every stockholder 
f is responsible for all they are worth. A sure guarantee of safe 
T Management. 

BANK OF DEPOSIT. 

We receive deposits from $1.00 up. Giving the poor and the rich 

equal advantages. On Time Deposits we pay interest, for 12 

months 5 per cent, per annum ; 6 months 4 per cent, per 

annum ; 4 months, 3 per cent, per annum. 

bajnk of discount. 

We lend money in sums to suit the people. We lend money on real 

estate. We lend money on personal security and on collateral. 

BANK OF EXCHANGE. 

We buy and sell checks on this and foreign countries, If you want 

to send money to or get money from any country, give us 

call. Our facilities for accommodating the public in 

a safe, legitimate banking business, are unsurpassed. 



a 
ic in 



R. M. CONWAY 



Real Estate, 



117 St. Ann Street, 



OWENSBORO, KV 



A NEW DEPARTURE. 



On and after this Date, 



^ JoRr # ^e.m^(Br<i\, ^ 



Dealer in 



FURNITURE! 

Will inaugurate the "Installment Plan," and 
will sell goods on 

Easy Weekly 

Payments, 

And at Reasonable Prices. 



He has a full line of 

Parlor and Bed-Room Suits, 
Beds, Lounges, Wardrobes, 
Sideboards, Extension Tables, 
Mattresses, Chairs, 

and all goods found in a First-class Furniture House ! 

Come and See Us. 



CHALMERS, 

(Formerly with J. & G. COX, Scotland,) 



Received 

the only 

Medal and 



At Centen- 




iGELATINE.v 



JAS. CHAI.MERS' SON'S Brands of Gelatine for Family and Hotel 
use has been manufactured in this country for i8 years, and 
has built up a reputation solely on the 

Merits of tie Goods and their 2-oz. Pkt. 

For family use is now as popular as Cox's or Wilson's. BeingJ 
a domestic article of merit, it has the preference when once 
used Be-ware of imitations claiming to be as good as ours ! 

Saperior to any and Much Cheaper i\t^ Imported, 

8®- AS'K YOUR GROCER tor our 2-oz. Packet, 

And Take No Other. 

James ©balmcps' 5on, 

WILLIAMSVILLE, N. Y. 



The Arnold 

JOTOMATHi STEA£COOKER 

Is Unequaled for Cooking Anything That Can Be 
Boiled Baked or Roasted. 



it is constructed so 
that the MOST je;f- 

FEGTIVE RESTTLTS 

are obtained 

for the Least 

Amount of Fuel, 

Time and 1 rouble. 




It Can he Used Oil 
any EiiKl of Stoye, 
Coal, Wool 
Oil or &aE., 



ADVANTAGES. 

A whole dinner can be put in at once, covered up and let alone 
until it is ready to serve. 

A poor cook cannot spoil the meal if she tries 

A good cook can cook better with one than without it. 

The ordinary heat of a cooking-stove, or a gas, gasoline or oil 
flame, will generate steam in three minutes. 

No steam or odor escapes into the room. 

The meal may be kept for hours without spoiling. 

Everything cooked in it is healthier and more easily digested 
than when cooked by any other method. 

It saves nearly one-third of the food that is lost by the ordinarv 
methods. 

All the nutriment, richness and flavor of the food is retained. 

It saves the labor of watching. 

Burning, scorching, smoking or overcooking is impossible. 

It never boils over. 
These Cookers are made from 2 quarts to 5 gallons, in one to three 
compartments. Price, $1 50 to $5 00. 

MANUFACTURED BY 

WILlOf, CASTLE & CO,, Rocliester, N. Y. 

Send tor pamphlet on "Wholesome Cooking" — FREE* 



J^8ti}a l^if^ 



li^surai^e^^o. 



— OF — 



l7artford, - Qoppeetieut. 



W. L. HORNE, State Agent, LOUISVILLE, KY. 



SAUNDERS & BRASHEAR, ^ OWENSBORO, 

y Agents, 
PEDLEY & STIRMAN, j KENTUCKY^ 






-# THE #-- 

STRICTLY CASH STORE 



<S> OF= -iS^ 



THE A. J. MITCHELL COMPANY, 

1 J Is the place for ALL CASH BUYERS of DRY 
■i/yr GOODS, CARPETS, LADIES' FINE SHOES 
Mf AND DRESS GOODS, to spend their money. 



They buy for Cash, jsell for cash, and can and willj^<^ 

SAVE YOU MONEY ! ^ 

Try a Pair of their Wonderful $1.90 Shoes ! They 

ar,e the marvel of the age! Nearly 1,000 pairs sold, 

and never a complaint ! 

THE A. J. MITCHELL CO.J'lieCaskfc of Oweiistoo. 



Pol hi I rn'^ Choicest Spices, 

Vyv/IUUIII O The Perfection of Flavor and Pungency 

P n I h 1 1 P n ' Q Philade] phia Mustard, 

V U I U U I II O The King of Condiments. 

P n I h 1 1 r n ' Q Laundry Blue, 

U U I U U I I I ^ The Finest Blue Made. 

Pnlhlirn'9 Worcestershire Sauce 

V U I U U I I I O Piouant and Appetizing. 



THE A. COLBURN CO., 

MANUFACTURERS. 

110 & 112 N. Second Street, ?[^!UDELPH!A, PA. 



"^he ©Id l^eliable 




TIT = -u li M Trii !/irH-li Yri= i.-irH ii 

i |::;:n Ju::i t.:::h"i i:.4;:^ui |::::0?::3 p-tiyr-^ H""--*l i-^vr-^ Jr-vi"-'! |-:"ri' 



i;^ ^i^£iia| jl^tiy^ pXi^ fat^ lillHI 





FAMOUS STEAM LAUSDRY 

The Oldest and Best in South-west Kentucky. 

Collars and Cuffs a Specialty. 

^^^"Telephone No. i. Goods called for & delivered. 



319 WEvST Third Street. 

Hager & Katterjohn 



v^Ssili 




F. A. Ames & Co 



Wholesale and Retal Manufacturers of 



Pleasure Vehielez. 



J5^"Catalogue and Prices Furnished on Application, 



K. A. Amks & Co. 



W. B. ARMENDT, 



''tM^S 



Dentist. 

E\)e fr\o^b (^on)plebe Office 



IN THE STATE, 
Office— no W. Third Street, near Post-Office, 

SwensbQFQ, KentackY 



PHIL R. ZULAUF, 
DiamondSjWatches, Clocks, 

Silver and Plated Ware 

♦— • 

8^ REPAIRING A SPECIALTY. -^ 



Pianos and Organs Constantly on Hand. 

304 Frederica Street, opposite First National Pauls 

--# Please Call. #- 



F. N. SMITH, 



DEALER IN 

"Eresb and 



5alfed "Mccitz, 

Lard, Bacon, 

Vegetables, Etc., 



ii6 Main Street. 



* StirmaQ 9 p^dley, * 

Property Bought, Sold Exchanged and Rented. 

Fire, Life, Accident, Tornado, 

Marine Boiler, and 

^ Plate ^ Glass ^ Ir)surar)ce. f 



Office: With Owensboro Banking Company. 



tJohn A. Head, 

Jobber and Retailer of 

Drugs, Medicines, Paints, Gils, Etc. 

Fine Perfumeries and Toilet Goods for the Ladies ! 

Your patronage vvni be appreciated. \Y^-, 
^ 105 Ti^KIN STREET, 5(=:^- 

To successfully carry out any of the Recipes given in 

this work, it will be necessary to have the 

proper cooKing apparatus. For quicK and 

even baKing, use a 

BIRTHDAY STCYE OR RANGE. 

stoves, Mastels, Lamps Tinware, Hardware, Etc. 

W A. GUENTHER & SON, 
Frederica Street, - Owensboro, Ky. 




31RK & B^^- 

I^H '^^^^'2 ®^<^2eP2 and 

ie.<stm ©offes Rasters, 

324 Frederica Street. Owensboro, Ky, 



^J. F. HITB ^ 

Wholesale and Retail Dealer in 



f/i^o Drugs, Stationery, ^^^^^ 
Fancy Goods, "^^ 

and the best articles of 

Flavoring Extracts, Cream Tartar, 

Bakmg Powder and Spices, 

that the market affords. 

No, 103 Main Street, OWENSBORO, KY, 



Kaufman, Straus &l Co. 

Successors to 

^ Small Bros., ^ 



Dealers in 



r f?irsb=(^lass @re^^ floods, 

Notions, Ribbons, Gloves, Embroideries, Laces, Etc. 

Agents for BnttericK's Patterns. 
Mat/ Orders Receive Projnpt Attention. 

X—X X—X OWENSBORO, KY. 



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