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Full text of "The Woodbridge cook book"



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Sewaren Improveinent Company 

M. IRVING DEMAREST, Agent, 
Sewaren, N. J. 



We believe that Sewaren is the most attractive and most 
accessible residential place on the salt water within twenty 
miles of New York. 

We believe that we have all the advantages which a modern 
All-the-year-round country town has. 

We are anxious to have all who are in any way interested 
in finding either a Summer or an All-the-year-round home 
of this kind, for a moderate amount of money, come to see us 
or write for particulars as to what we can offer in the way of 
improved or unimproved property. 

We have a few houses to sell, and may have one or two to 
rent in May. 

We have a number of attractive sites for houses on the 
water front. 

We shall be glad to entertain propositions, and for the right 
people will be willing to advance money with which to buy or 
build, on reasonable terms. In certain cases we have advanced 
as much as So per cent, or 85 per cent, of the price of the lot 
and the cost of the building to be erected, allowing the pur- 
chaser to select his own plans. We are willing to accept small 
payments on account, extending over a period of from five to 
ten years, so that the monthly payments would amount to no 
more than what one would have to pay in rent for a similar 
house, leaving the purchaser at the expiration of that time the 
absolute owner of the property, instead of simply the tenant. 

We will meet you on the arrival of any train by appointment 
or will call upon you at your convenience. 

Yours respectfully, 
SEWAREN IMPROVEMENT COMPANY. 



YAITNft'Q SEW BRUNSWICK'S LEADING YOTINfi'^i 
lUUnU MPARTHRNT STARR lUUllU 



Wh^ W oman Wanis 
=^SHE_GETS=^ 

IF she comes to the Young Store for it; 
and she's sure of satisfaction in the Style 
and Price of it, too. It's the Young way. 

Suits, Separate Skirts, Jackets, Waists, 
newest styles always, for Women, Misses and 
Children. Furs in Season. 

Infants' Garments of all Kinds, ready 
to wear. 

Undergarments, all Kinds, for Men, 
Women and Children's wear. 

Dress Goods and Silks, also full lines 
of Cotton Dress Fabrics. 

Dress Trimmings, Laces, Embroideries, etc. 

House Furnishings, Floor Coverings, Hang- 
ings, Window Shades, etc. 

Domestic Goods, Table Linens, Muslins, 
Bed Furnishings, etc. 

jl ^ EVERYTHING FOR THE HOUSEHOLD ^ jl 

p. J. YOUNG Dry Goods Co., £„%a 



THE WOODBRIDGE 



COOK BOOK 



We may live without poetry, music, and art ; 

We may live w^ithout conscience, and live without heart; 

We may live without friends ; we may live without books; 

But civilized man cannot live without cooks. 

He may live without books, — what is knowledge but grieving ? 

He may live without hope, — what is hope but deceiving ? 

He may live without love, — what is passion but pining ? 

But where is the man that can live without dining ? 

—Owen Meredith 




WOODBRIDGE, NEW JERSEY 
1903 



THE LIBRARY OF 
CONGRESS, 

Two Copifs Received 

SEP 5 1903 

, Copyrifcht Entry 

ClisS CW XXc. N« 

COPY B. 






Copyrighted, 1Q03, 

BY 

THE LADIES' ASSOCIATION OF THE FIRST 

CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH 

WOODBRIDGE, NEW JERSEY 



DEDICATED 

TO THE 

LADIES OF WOODBRIDGE 

WHO, IN GIVING THEIR TESTED RECIPES, HAVE ENABLED US TO 
PRESENT THIS BOOK TO THE PUBLIC 



THIS WORK WAS COMPILED AND ISSUED 

BY THE LADIES OF THE 
FIRST CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH 

OF WOODBRIDGE, NEW JERSEY 
Mrs. William Brokaw Brewster, Chairman 



PREFACE. 

Knowing that nearly every housekeeper has her special and 
favorite cook book, the one she is " used to, and can find things 
in," in putting on the market another and a new one, it may 
seem that we have joined the ranks of the carriers of coal. 

Our aim, however, has been to put in convenient shape a 
few tried recipes, written with such explicit and careful direc- 
tions that there will be no excuse for failures by even the most 
inexperienced cooks. These recipes have been selected with 
great care from our most competent cooks, and each one is 
vouched for by the contributors. They aim to cover every 
branch of the culinary department, and at the same time, keep 
within range of useful and practical recipes for the average 
housekeeper. 

While the space allowed in a work of this price is necessarily 
limited, still you will find a few menus, directions for setting 
tables and serving meals. For any detailed directions in regard 
to the etiquette of more elaborate meals, we refer you to any 
of the numerous books on etiquette or table service. 

We hope you will like our little book, and if it helps you 

" Epicurean cooks 
Sharpen with cloyless sauce his appetite," . 

our object will have been attained. 



CONTENTS. 



SOUPS 

PAGE 

Stock for Soup — Veal Stock — Asparagus Soup — Cream of As- 
paragus — Creamy Asparagus Soup — Beef Soup — Bean Soup 
— Black Bean Soup — Chicken Broth — Mutton Broth — Cream 
of Chicken — Cream of Game — Clam Broth with Whipped 
Cream — Clam Soup — Cream of Corn Soup — Leek Soup — 
Mock Terrapin Soup — Mutton Soup — Pea Soup — Cream of 
Pea— Split-pea Soup — Potato Soup — Tomato Bisque No. i — 
Tomato Bisque No. 2 — Tomato Soup — Turkey Soup — 
Creamed Vegetable Soup — Bouquet of Soup — Croiitons for 
Soup — Noodles for Soup — Cream of Tomato — Potato Soup — 
Burned Sugar or Caramel, 7 

FISH AND SHELL FISH 

Boiled Fish, Fresh— Baked Fish— Fish Chowder No. i— Fish 
Chowder No. 2 — To Cream Codfish — Salt Codfish Balls — 
Baked Halibut — Devilled Halibut — To Prepare Salt Mackerel 
to Cook — A Nice Way to Cook Salt Mackerel — Salmon Cro- 
quettes — Scalloped Salmon — Baked Shad — Fried Smelts — 
Clams a la Newport — Deviled Clams — Clam Chowder No. i — 
Clam Chowder No. 2 — Deviled Crab — Lobsters — To Boil and 
Open a Lobster — Lobster Farci — Lobster a la Newberg — 
Baltimore Fry — Oyster Cocktails — Creamed Oysters — Cream 
Oysters — Cuckoo Oysters and Chicken — A Delicious Way to 
Cook Oysters — Escaloped Oysters — Oyster Omelet — Ke- 
bobbed Oysters — Panned Oysters Cooked in Ramekins — To 
Fry Scallops, 19 

FISH AND MEAT SAUCES 

Drawn Butter — Browned Butter for Coloring Gravies — Bear- 
naise Sauce — Brown Sauce — Caper Sauce — Cranberry Sauce 

ix 



CONTENTS 



— Dressing for Baked Fish — Mint Sauce— Nut Brown Sauce 
— Tartare Sauce — Tomato Sauce — Sauce for Raw Oysters — 
White Sauce, 38 

MEAT 

Beef a la Mode — Fillet of Beef with Mushrooms — Beefsteak with 
Mushrooms — Steak Pie — Roast Beef with Yorkshire Pudding 
— To Roast Beef— To Pan a Beefsteak— Hamburg Steaks- 
Baked Beef Loaf — Beefsteak and Kidney Pudding — To Boil 
Corned Beef — Boiled Ham — Left-over Ham — To Bake or 
Roast a Quarter of Lamb — Boiled Leg of Mutton — Mutton a 
la Venison — Roast Pork — To Cook Sweet-Breads — Veal or 
Lamb Croquettes — Veal Squabs — Blanquette of Veal — Pressed 
Veal— Veal Cutlets— Bewitched Veal— Veal Loaf— Plain 
Hash, 43 

EGGS 

Egg Baked in Tomatoes — Deviled Eggs — Egg Farci — Escaloped 
Eggs — Omelet — Omelet — Variations of the Omelet — ^Eggs for 
Invalids — Limed Eggs for. Winter, 55 

POULTRY AND GAME 

Turkey — To Roast Chicken — Chicken Fricassee — Chicken Cro- 
quette No. I — Chicken Croquette No. 2 — Fried Chicken a la 
Maryland — Creamed Chicken — Pressed Chicken — Quail — 
Broiled Quails — Dressing for Turkey — Oyster Dressing for 
Turkey, , 59 

VEGETABLES 

Time for Cooking Vegetables — Boiled Asparagus — Asparagus 
with Butter Sauce — Baked Beans — Cauliflower and Cheese — 
Creamed Cauliflower — Cabbage, very Delicious — Cream Cold 
Slaw — Hot Slaw — Boiled Green Corn — Corn Oysters No. i — 
Corn Oysters No. 2 — Corn Pudding — Corn Cakes — Green 
Corn Fritters — Green Corn Omelet — Cucumbers — Macaroni 
— Macaroni with Cheese — Stewed Mushrooms, Fresh — 



CONTENTS xi 

PAGE 

Mushrooms Cooked Under Glass— To Keep Lettuce Fresh 
— Escaloped Sweet Potatoes — Potatoes a la Clyde — 
Potato Croquettes— Potato Croquettes— Potato Finger Puffs- 
Potato au Gratin— Stuffed Potatoes— Lyonnaise Potatoes— 
Escaloped Potatoes— Boiled Parsnips— Rice Croquettes- 
Baked Squash— Baked Tomatoes— Fried Tomatoes— Escal- 
oped Tomatoes, ge 

SALADS AND SALAD DRESSINGS 

Cheese Salad— Egg Salad— Fruit Salad— Potato Salad— Sweet- 
Bread Salad— Tomato Salad— Waldorf Salad— Chicken Salad 
—Cabbage Dressing No. i— Cabbage Dressing No. 2— Salad 
Dressing, French— Salad Dressing No. i— Salad Dressing 
No. 2.— Salad Dressing No. 3— Salad Cream— Mayonnaise 
Dressing— Mayonnaise Dressing for Chicken or Cabbage 
Salad, jQ 

BREAD, ROLLS, ETC. 

Bread No. i — Bread No. 2 — Pumpkin Bread — Ocean Grove 

Bread— Milk Bread— Brown Bread — Boston Brown Bread 

Steamed Brown Bread— Corn Bread No. i— Corn Bread No. 
2— Corn Bread No. 3— Corn Cake— Corn Gems— Breakfast 
Corn Cakes — Biscuit — Raised Biscuit No. i — Raised 
Biscuit No. 2— Raised Biscuit No. 3— Apple Pancakes 
—Apple Fritters— Batter for Fritters or Egg Plant— Cin- 
namon Bun — Cinnamon Cake — Corn-Meal Gems — Coffee 
Cake— Fairy-Toast— French Rolls— Gems— German Puffs 
— Gloucester Waffles — White Muffins— Graham Bread No. i 
Graham Bread No. 2— Graham Gems— Graham Biscuits — 
Griddle Cakes— Raised Griddle Cakes— Milk Rolls No. i— 
Milk Rolls No. 2— Muffins— Corn Muffins— English Muffins 
—Muffin Bread— Parker House Rolls— Pop-Over— Rusk 
No. I — Rusk No. 2 — Rusk No. 3 — Rice Cakes— Sally 
Lunn No. i— Sally Lunn No. 2— Tea Rolls— Waffles— Quick 
Waffles, 86 

PUDDINGS 

Apple Dumplings (Old)— Baked Apple Dumpling— Apple Pud- 
ding—Apricot Pudding— Cabinet Pudding— Cherry Tapioca— 



xii CONTENTS 

PAGE 

Cherry Pudding — Chocolate Blanc Mange — Chocolate Pudding 
— Dandy Pudding— English Suet Pudding— Fig Pudding — 
Fruit Dumplings — Graham Pudding No. i — Graham Pudding 
No. 2 — Heavenly Rest — Honeycomb Pudding — Indian-Meal 
Pudding — Indian Pudding No. i — Indian Pudding No. 2 — 
John's Delight— Kenilworth Pudding— Lansingburgh Pudding 
— Lemon Pudding — Log Cabin Pudding — Mountain of Snow 
— Orange Baskets — Orange Served with Rice — Peach Pudding 
— Grandma Perry's Plum Pudding — Plum Pudding — English 
Plum Pudding— Potato Pudding— Prune Pudding No. i — 
Prune Pudding No. 2 — Queen of Puddings — A Thin Rice 
Pudding — Rice Meringue — Russian Cream — Salem Pudding — 
— Sherry Cream — Snow Pudding — Snow Pyramids — Spanish 
Cream — Strawberry Short Cake — Steam Suet and Fruit Pud- 
ding — Tapioca Cream — Wheat Pudding — Velvet Cream — A 
Pretty Dessert, 106 

SAUCES FOR PUDDINGS 

Creamy Sauce — Sauce for Cabinet Pudding — Egg Sauce — Extra 
Good Sauce — Golden Sauce — Hard Sauce — Milk Sauce — 
Pudding Sauce No. i — Pudding Sauce No. 2, . . . .126 

FROZEN DESSERTS 

Biscuit Tortoni No. i — Biscuit Tortoni — Coffee Mousse — Cran- 
berry Sherbet — Ice Cream without Cooking — Plain Ice 
Cream— Condensed Milk Ice Cream — Lemon Sherbet — Nes- 
selrode Pudding — Nesselrode Pudding No. 2. — Plum Pudding 
Glace— Tutti Frutti, 130 



PIES 

Flaky Pie Crust— Pie Crust — Cream Pie No. i — Cream Pie No. 2 
Cream Pie— Chocolate Pie — Lemon Pie No. i — Lemon Pie 
No. 2 — Lemon Pie No. 3 — Lemon Pie No. 4 — Lemon Meringue 
Pie — Lemon Pie with Raisins — Mother's Old-Fashioned Pie 
— Filling for Lemon Pie — Mince Pies No. i— Mince Pies — 
Pumpkin Pie— Raisin Pie— White Potato Pie, . . . .135 



CONTENTS xiii 

PAGE 

CAKE 

Angel Cake — Citron Cake — Chocolate Cake No. i — Chocolate 
Cake No. 2 — Chocolate Cake No. 3 — Chocolate Caramel Cake 
— Chocolate Roll — Coffee Cake No. i — Coffee Cake No. 2 — 
Currant Cake — Delicious Cake — Eggless Cake — Feather Cake 
— Fruit Cake — Fruit Cake No. 2 — Fruit Cake No. 3 — Gold 
Cake — Grafton Cake — Hickory Nut Cake — Hickory Nut and 
Raisin Cake — Hoosier Cake — Imperial Cake — Lemon Cake — 
Lily Cake — Molasses Cake — Plainfield Molasses Cake — Mo- 
lasses Gingerbread — Molasses Cake — Mother's Cake — Novelty 
Cake — Mother Brewster's One-Egg Cake — Orange Cake No. 
I — Orange Cake No. 2— Orange Cake— Layer Cake— Plain 
Cake — Fancy Pound Cake — Pound Cake — French Pound Cake 
— Scripture Cake — Silver Cake — Snow Cake — Sponge Cake 
No. I — Sponge Cake No. 2 — Sponge Cake No. 3 — Cream 
Sponge Cake — Hot Water Sponge Cake — Lemon Cream 
Sponge Cake — Stir Cake — Sunshine Cake — Variety Cake — 
Velvet Cake — Velvet Lunch Cake No. i — Velvet Lunch Cake 
No. 2 — Washington Cake — White Cake, 143 

SMALL CAKES 

Cookies No. l — Cookies No. 2 — Cookies No. 3 — Cookies No. 4 
Chocolate Cookies — Cocoanut Cookies No. i — Cocoanut 
Cookies No. 2 — Sugar Cookies — Cream Puffs No. i — Cream 
Puffs No. 2 — Crullers No. i — Crullers No. 2 — Dominoes — 
Connecticut Doughnuts — Raised Doughnuts — Hermits — Hick- 
ory Nut Macaroons — Jumbles — Little Pound Cakes — Mo- 
lasses Snaps — Meringues — Miss Mulford's Cakes — Nut 
Cookies — Sand Tarts — Santa Barbara's Cake — Soft Cookies — 
Waffles — Walnut Wafers, 163 

FILLINGS AND ICINGS 

Boiled Icing No. i — Boiled Icing No. 2 — Cream Filling for Cake 
— Chocolate Filling No. i — Chocolate Filling No. 2 — Chocolate 
Filling for Cake No. 3 — Currant Jelly and Walnut Filling — 
Fig Filling for Cake — Fig Filling for Cake — Hickory Nut 
Filling — Maple-Sugar Icing — Orange Icing — Orange Filling, 174 



xiv CONTENTS 

PAGE 

JELLIES AND PRESERVED FRUITS 

Aspic— To Clear Aspic— Gelatine Apricots— Coffee Jelly— Pre- 
served Fruits— Currant Jelly No. i — Currant Jelly No. 2 — 
Currant and Raspberry Jelly — Quince Jelly — Apple Ginger — 
Currant and Oranges — Spiced Grapes — Orange Marmalade 
No. I — Orange Marmalade No. 2 — Canned Pears — Pickled 
Pears or Peaches — Pear Jam — Preserved Pumpkin — Spiced 
Tomatoes — Wine Jelly — To Keep Fresh Strawberries from 
Softening, 178 

PICKLES 

Bordeaux Sauce — Raw Catsup — Chili Sauce No. i — Chili Sauce 
No. 2 — Chili Sauce No. 3 — Sliced Cucumber Pickle — Cucum- 
ber Pickle — ^Jersey Pickle — Mustard Pickles — Mustard Pickle 
No. 2 — Tomato Catsup No. i — Tomato Catsup No. 2 — Tomato 
Chow-Chow — Green Tomato Pickle — Green Tomato Soy — 
Ripe Tomato Soy, 187 

SANDWICHES 

Brown Bread Sandwiches — Canapes of Caviare with Lemon — 
Cheese Canapes — Club Sandwiches — Cream Cheese and Olive 
Sandwiches — Lettuce Sandwiches — Peanut Sandwiches — Sar- 
dine Sandwiches, 195 

RELISHES 
Salted Almonds — Cheese Straws — Lemon Cheese, .... 199 

FOR THE CHAFING DISH 

Scrambled Eggs — Lobster a la Newberg — Oysters a la Chamber- 
lain — Chafed Oysters — Welsh Rarebit — Welsh Rarebit, . . 202 

DRINKS 

Boiled Coffee — Drip Coffee — Coffee for Entertainments — Black- 
berry Wine— Cherry Cordial— Dandelion Wine — Egg-Nogg 



CONTENTS XV 

PAGE 

— Fruit Punch — Home-Brewed Ginger Beer — Grape Juice — 
Orange Cordial — Pineapple Lemonade — Raspberry Vinegar — 
To Make Tea — Tea a la Russe — Tea Punch — Wine Whey, 205 

CANDY 

Fondant — Cream Fondant — Butter Scotch — Caramels — Chocolate 
Taffy — Cocoanut Balls — Creamed Dates — Stuffed Dates — 
Fudge — Smith College Fudge — Nut Candy — How to Candy 
Flag Root — Orange Straws — Sugar Candy, . . . .211 

MISCELLANEOUS 

Care of Stove — For Sweetening Kitchen Sinks — Ants — Gilt 
Frames — Fruit Stains — To Remove Ink Stains — For Renovat- 
ing Silk — How to Wash Blankets — To Wash Dress Goods — 
To Clean Furniture — Furniture Polish — Furniture Cream — 
Furniture Paste — Furniture Polish — To Make Shellac that is 
Fine and Will Not Crack — A Good Cold Cream — Excellent 
Skin Food — A Good Shampoo — Hair Wash — Slippery Elm 
Tea — Rheumatism Cure — Bites and Stings of Insects — Burns 
— An Old-Fashioned Receipt for a Little Home Comfort — 
Table of Weights and Measures, 217 



THE WOODBRIDGE COOK BOOK 



SUGGESTIONS FOR TABLE SERVICE AND MENUS, 

ETC. 

BREAKFAST 

Grape Fruit. 

Cream of Wheat with Cream. 

Broiled Shad. Cream Potatoes. 

Cucumbers with Spanish Onions. 

Finger Rolls. 

Coffee. 



BREAKFAST 

Fruit. 

Oatmeal Mush with Cream. 

Broiled Steak. French Fried Potatoes. 

Cornmeal Muffins. 

Coffee. 



BREAKFAST 

Fruit. 

Wheatlet with Cream. 

Lamb Chops, Broiled. Lyonnaise Potatoes. 

Popovers. Coffee. 



WOODBRIDGE COOK BOOK 

LUNCHEON 

Bisque of Oysters. 

Curry of Chicken in Rice Border. 

Rolls. 

tamb Chops. Peas. Olives. 

Salad of Lettuce. 

Wafers. Neufchatel. 

Biscuit Tortoni. 

Assorted Cakes. 

Bonbons. Coffee. 



SIMPLE LUNCHEON 

Raw Oysters on Half Shell. 

Saltines. 

Bouillon. 

Cold Sliced Ham. 

Creamed Potatoes. 

Small, Hot, Raised Biscuit. 

Olives. Salted Almonds. 

Chicken Salad. 

Ice Cream. 

Fruit. Bonbons. 

Coffee. 



LUNCHEON 

Grape Fruit. 

Clam Bouillon with Whipped Cream. 

Shad Roe. 

Steamed Mushrooms under glass 

Orange Sherbet. 

Squab on Toast. 

Lettuce Salad, French Dressing. 

Biscuit Tortoni. 

Fruit. Fancy Cake. 

Coffee. 

Creme de Menthe. 



WOODBRIDGE COOK BOOK 

LUNCHEON 

Oyster Cocktail in Grape Fruit. 

Chicken Consomme, with Whipped Cream. 

Salmon in Timbale dishes, with Cream Sauce. 

Larded Sweetbreads, Ball Potatoes, and Small Boiled Carrots. 

Round Cakes of Puff- Paste, covered with coils of Spaghetti. Cream. 

Sauce. 

Quail on Toast. 

Peas. Currant Jelly. 

Lettuce Salad, Mayonnaise. 

Ice Cream. 

Bonbons. Cake. 

Coffee. 

Creme de Menthe. 



DINNER. 

Oysters on Half Shell. 

Clear Soup. 

Broiled Shad Roe. 

Stuffed Mushrooms. 

Crown Roast Lamb. 

Potato Roses. Mint Sauce. 

String Beans. 

Broiled Chicken. 

Lettuce Salad. 

Ice Cream in Forms. Cakes. 

Coffee. 

Creme de Menthe. 



DINNER. 

Caviar. 

Little Neck Clams. 

Salted Almonds. Olives. 

Green Turtle Soup. 

•Boiled Halibut, Sauce Hollandaise. 

Sweetbreads a la Poulette, 



WOODBRIDGE COOK BOOK 

Fillet of Beef 

Potatoes. French Peas. 

Roman Punch. 

Spring Squab on Toast. 

French Salad. 

Nesselrode Pudding. 

Nuts. Fancy Cakes. 

Coffee. 



THANKSGIVING DINNER 

Blue Points. 

Clear Soup. 

Olives. Celery. Salted Nuts. 

Sweetbreads in Ramakins. 

Roast Turkey, Cranberry Sauce. 

Sweet Potato. Croquettes. Cauliflower. 

Ginger Sherbet. 

Nut Salad. Cheese Crackers. 

Mince and Pumpkin Pies. 

Ice Cream. Fancy Cakes. 

Fruits, Nuts, Raisins, and Bonbons. 

Coffee. 

Creme de Menthe. 



CHRISTMAS DINNER 

Oysters on Half Shell. 

Tomato Bisque. 

Olives. Celery. Salted Nuts. 

Roast Turkey, Oyster and Celery Stuffing, Cranberry Sauce. 

Orange Sherbet. 

Chicken Pie. Escalloped Sweet Potatoes. 

Lettuce Salad. French Dressing. 

Crackers and Cheese. 

Plum Pudding. Ice Cream. 

Nuts. Raisins. Bonbons. 

Coffee. 

Creme de Menthe. 



^ aOOJD IIOTJSEir:EBrER 
Must always have at hand a good supply of Canned Goods, 

To be ready To be ready for 

for family use unexpected guests 

For these and all other emergencies. 

is the housekeeper's friend. 
Always on hand - - Stocks of choicest brands 

Teas, Codecs, Caruxed Goods, Frixit, 
Nuts, etc. 

Daily Deliveries. 51 MAIN STREET, 

Telephone, N. Y. & N. J., 4 a. WOODBRIDGE, N. J. 

C. J. WAKE^ 

377 George St., - - New Brunswick, N. J. 
BUTCHER. 



Dealer in Nothing but First-class 

MEATS, OA-ME and F OTJLTRY. 

J. H. & F. HILSDOHin, 

Dealers in 

Fine Groceries, Provisions, Fruits, Vegetables, 

etc. 



Two Stores: 

132 Smith St., Main St., 

Perth Amboy. Woodbridge, 

Blue Front Grocery. 



SfdeS/plf;rc?f Woodbridge- 

Ideal place for nice home. 
Every Convenience. Every Accommodation. 



Intending Residents cannot do better than call upon 
MR. ELLIS EDGAR. 



For ALL the NEWS of 
WOODBRIDGE 

Read the Register 

J. OSTEJ^^WIOH, 



DEALER IN 



Boots and. ©lioes, 

Made t'o"oSe?" Main St., Woodbridge, N. J. 

Misses' and Children's ^ A full line ^ Repairing Neatly 
Shoes a Specialty .. • "^ of Rubbers '^ Done.. 7 



PROPER ACCOMPANIMENTS FOR PRINCIPAL 
DISHES AT FAMILY DINNERS 

Soups. — Bread sticks, crackers, or finger rolls; with brown soups, 
croutons, forcemeat balls, and noodles. 

Boiled Fish. — Egg, or cream sauce, sliced lemon, sliced hard boiled 
eggs, watercresses, or curled parsley, are used for garnishes. 

Baked Fish. — Tomato or Worcestershire sauce may be used. The 
choice, where there are a number of entrees, will be no vegetables with 
fish. When this, however, is the principal entree following the soups, 
potatoes boiled white and mealy, served whole, mashed potatoes, or 
macaroni are used. With boiled salmon boiled rice is frequently served, 
and used to garnish. No other vegetables are the correct choice with 
fish. 

Roast Beef. — Chili sauce, potatoes baked with the meat, or York- 
shire pudding. Also sweet or white potatoes. Mashed turnips, toma- 
toes, macaroni with cheese, cold slaw or celery. 

Roast Mutton. — Currant jelly, sweet and white potatoes, tomatoes, 
beans, salsify, asparagus, squashes, cauliflower or beets. 

Roast Veal. — Horse-radish sauce, sweet and white potatoes, parsnips, 
spinach, cauliflower or cold slaw; hominy. 

Roast Lamb. — Mint sauce, mashed potatoes, green peas, asparagus, 
dressed salad or lettuce. 

Roast Pork or Pig. — Apple sauce, mashed potatoes, onions or turnips. 

Baked Ham. — Apple sauce, sweet and white potatoes, spinach, or hot 
slaw. 

Venison. — Currant jelly, mashed potatoes, macaroni in cream. 

Beef a la Mode. — Tomatoes, squash, potatoes in cream, rice, boiled 
or in croquettes. 

Beefsteaks. — Mashed potatoes, squash, oyster plant, hominy, or toma- 
I toes. 

Veal Cutlets. — Stewed potatoes, corn, cauliflower. 

Roast Turkey. — Cranberry sauce, potatoes mashed, squash or sweet 
potatoes, turnips, or canned corn; celery. 

S 



6 WOODBRIDGE COOK BOOK 

Roast Chicken. — Cranberry sauce, mashed potatoes, boiled onions, 
or oyster plant, mashed turnips, or squash ; celery. 

Roast Duck. — Currant jelly, boiled onions, mashed potatoes, celery, 
corn or beans. 

Roast Goose. — Apple sauce, sweet and white potatoes, onions, or 
turnips; cold slaw. 

Boiled Turkey. — Oyster sauce, pickled peaches, celery, turnips, corn, 
potatoes. 

Boiled Chicken. — Oyster saucej mashed potatoes, macaroni, or rice 
croquettes. 

Boiled Mutton, — Caper sauce, potatoes, tomatoes, canned peas. 

Boiled Corned Beef. — Tomato catsup, white potatoes, turnips, and 
cabbage. 

Veal Pot Pie. — Mashed potatoes, beets, string beans, or corn. 

Lamb Pot Pie. — Tomatoes, peas, browned potatoes. 

Chicken Pot Pie. — Cranberry sauce, or sour jelly, hominy plain, or 
croquettes, mashed potatoes, cold slaw. 

Pork and Beans. — Potatoes in their jackets, sour baked apples, 
squash. 

Many of these accompaniments are not imperative, but the sauces are 
nearly all so; for instance, currant jelly with game, cranberries with 
tame fowl. Celery may be used with almost everything ; also all summer 
vegetables with any dinner. If fish is a course by itself, no vegetables 
are used unless macaroni with cheese. With baked or boiled fish any 
vegetables may be served with it, but two are sufficient to serve at once. 



CHARLES R. BROWN 

Insurance Contractor. 



Real Estate and Loans. 



PRUDENTIAL BUILD- 
ING, NEWARK, N. J., 

AND 

^\rOODBRir>aE, N, J. 

Even good cooks cannot prepare a good dinner with 
poor meat ! 



BUY THE BEST MEAT 



FROM 



O. IF. TTJIRIsrEI^. 



Choice Meats ^ ^ Beef, Mutton, Veal, 

at all times..*. j^ Lamb, Pork, &c..» 



SEASONABLE SPECIALS POULTRY, TURKEYS, 

IN SEASONABLE TIME... GEESE, DUCKS, &c.... 



Buy GOOD MEAT, have a good cook, a good 
appetite, and you will have good health. 

Telephone 9 b. Regular and Special Deliveriea. 



1869. ^^02. 

H. B. ZIMMERMAN, 

44 Church Street, New Brunswick, N. J. 

Manufacturer of Wigs, Switches 
and all the latest novelties in 

HTiman Hair Goods. 

Toilet Requisites, Manicure Sup- 
plies, Tortoise-shell Combs, and 
all goods usually found in an up- 
to-date hair store. 



Mail orders receive Hairdressing, Sham- 

prompt attention. .. pooing, Manicuring . 

HUGHES & Mcelroy, 

Contractors ^Builders 

Jobbing Promptly ^ Plans and Esti- 

Attcnded to *^ ^ mates Given. * • 



Address: 

Scwarcn, . - - - New Jersey- 



PHILIPP'S 

Casli IVTeat IVIgirliet 

Also Dealer In Fresh Fish. 



Ta J4 A. "^ ^ Main Street, 

Local 2* ^ Woodbridge, N. )• 



SOUPS. 

** Now good digestion wait on appetite, and health on both." 

— Shakespeare. 

STOCK FOR SOUPS 
Five pounds of clear beef, cut from the lower part of the 
round. Five quarts of cold water, let come to a boil slowly; 
skim carefully, and set where it will keep just at the boiling 
point for eight or ten hours. Strain and set away to cool. 
In the morning skim off the fat and turn the soup into the 
y kettle, being careful not to let the sediment pass in. Into the 
soup put an onion, one stalk of celery, two leaves of sage, two 
sprigs of parsley, two of thyme, two of summer savory, two 
bay leaves, twelve peppercorns, and six whole cloves. Boil 
gently from ten to twenty minutes; salt and pepper to taste; 
strain through an old napkin. This is now ready for serving 
as a simple clear soup, or for the foundation of all kinds of clear 
soups. 

— S. M. B. 

VEAL STOCK 
Two knuckles of veal; five quarts of cold water; one table- 
spoonful of salt; one onion; one carrot; one bay leaf; one 
^turnip; stalk of celery; sprig of parsley; four cloves; one blade 
of mace. Wipe the knuckles with a damp towel and have the 
bones cracked. Put them into a soup kettle with cold water 
and salt. Place on moderate fire and bring slowly to a boil; 
skim. Now simmer gently for four hours. Qean the vege- 
tables and add them and all other ingredients to the soup and 
I simmer one hour longer Strain and it is ready to use. 

— Mrs. Rorer. 



GRAHAM & Mccormick, 

Caterers, Confectioners, Fancy Cake Bakers 



and 



Ice Cream Manufacturers^ 



Wholesale and Retail. 



Brick Molds and Fancy Creams a Specialty. 



109, 111, and 113 Churcli Street, New Brunswick, H. J. 



FIRST-CLASS RESTAURANT IN 
CONNECTION. 



Frank P* Edgar^ 

Practical 

Plumber, Gas and Steam Fitter 



REPAIRING PROMPTLY ATTENDED TO. 



Green Street, WOODBRIDGE, N. J. 



Estimates cheerfully given. 



WOODBRIDGE COOK BOOK 9 

ASPARAGUS SOUP 
Boil one bunch of asparagus, cut in inch lengths, in one 
quart of water till tender; rub through a colander and return 
to the water in which it was boiled. Heat one pint of milk; 
stir into it one tablespoonful of butter, rubbed with one of 
flour, and cook a few moments. Season and pour into aspara- 
gus. Let it get boiling hot, pour into tureen over croutons. 

— M. E. Perry. 

CREAM OF ASPARAGUS 
Cut tips from a bunch of asparagus and cook until tender 
in salted boiling water. Skim from the water and place in 
tureen. Cook the rest of the asparagus in the same water, 
adding more if needed, and when tender press through a sieve. 
For each pint of liquid, cook together one-fourth of a cup each 
of butter and flour, diluted gradually with a pint of white stock 
or milk, and cook ten minutes. When ready to serve add the 
pulp and the yolk of an egg beaten and diluted with cup of 
cream; let it heat over hot water, then pour over the tips in the 
tureen. — B. M. C. 

CREAMY ASPARAGUS SOUP 
Save water that asparagus boils in. Can be used the same 
meal or be saved one day. Melt two tablespoons butter in 
saucepan. Stir in two tablespoons of flour; add slowly to 
this the heated asparagus water, till it is nearly as thin as re- 
quired. Just before serving add a cup of rich milk or cream. 
Serve salt and pepper and add a few asparagus tips if you care 
to. Serve with crodtons. 

— Helen B. Ames. 

BEEF SOUP 
Cold beef bone, pieces of steak. Put them into a pot with 
three quarts of water; two carrots; two onions; one potato; a 



10 WOODBRIDGE COOK BOOK 

tablespoonful of rice; a can of tomatoes, if you have them. 
Boil two hours ; then strain ; salt and pepper and a little butter. 
Put back into the pot; if not thick enough, mix a tablespoonful 
of flour in a little water, stir into soup, and let boil ten minutes. 

— Mrs. Willis Gaylord. 

BEAN SOUP 
Soak one pint of beans in cold water over night; in the 
morning drain and put in the soup kettle with four quarts of 
beef stock, from which all the fat has been removed. Set it 
where it will boil steadily for at least three hours. Two hours 
before serving, add one onion and a carrot chopped fine. If 
the beans are not liked whole strain through a colander. 

— Mrs. J. E. Brown. 

BLACK BEAN SOUP 
One quart of beans, four quarts of stock (beef soup stock) ; 
soak the beans over night in cold water; wash clean in the 
morning; put in pot with stock; boil slowly six hours. Rub 
through a sieve; put back in pot; flavor to taste. Put one 
hard-boiled egg sliced, and one sliced lemon in bottom of 
tureen and pour the soup in. Serve very hot. If wine is used 
put one gill in the tureen with the lemon and egg. 

— S. M. Brewster. 

CHICKEN BROTH 
One-half chicken; one quart cold water; two tablespoonfuls 
of rice. Boil until thoroughly done; strain and season. 

— Selected. 

MUTTON BROTH 
Can be made in the same way by using one pound of 
mutton. 

— Selected. 



WOODBRIDGE COOK BOOK ir 

CREAM OF CHICKEN 
To half a cup of a chopped boiled chicken add three pints 
of veal stock ; adding one cupful of raw rice, one bouquet, half 
a teaspoonful of salt, twelve whole peppers, and three cloves. 
Boil thoroughly for thirty minutes, then strain through a fine 
sieve. Put in half a cupful of cream and serve with two table- 
spoonfuls of small pieces of cooked chicken in the tureen, or 
croiitons souffle instead of chicken. 

CREAM OF GAME 
The same as cream of chicken, using game instead of 
chicken; the same quantity of each being needed. 

CLAM BROTH WITH WHIPPED CREAM 
Twenty-five clams washed and put over the fire with about 
a tea cup of cold water. When clams are open remove 
meat, which must be chopped and put back in the liquor 
with butter and pepper to taste. Strain and serve in bouillon 
cups, with heaping tablespoon of whipped cream in each cup. 
Delicious. 

—Mrs. F. I. Perry. 

CLAM SOUP 
Two dozen clams ; brown one-half sliced onion in a teaspoon 
of butter, add clams, cover with quart of water, cook slowly 
for three hours; strain and add cream made of a large table- 
spoon of butter and same of flour. Use half and half of clam 
juice and milk. 

—Bertha M. Campbell. 

CREAM OF CORN SOUP 
One pint grated com; three pints boiling water, or better, 
veal stock; one pint hot milk; three tablespoonfuls butter; two 
even tablespoonfuls flour; yolks of two eggs. Salt and pepper 



WOODBRIDGE COOK BOOK 13 

to taste. Put the cobs, from which you have removed the 
corn, in boiling water, or stock, and boil slowly half an hour. 
Remove them; put in corn and boil until very soft, about 
twenty minutes, then press through a sieve. Season and let 
it simmer while you rub the butter and flour together; add 
those to the soup and stir constantly till it thickens. Now add 
boiling milk; cook one minute; then add the beaten yolks and 
serve immediately. 

— ^Aceola Cook Book. 

LEEK SOUP 
Twelve medium-sized leek stalks; three or four good-sized 
potatoes; one tablespoonful butter; pepper and salt to taste. 
Cook potatoes till tender and mash while hot in water they 
were cooked in; about one pint. Then add leek, which has 
been cooked till tender in one quart of water. Mix well, add 
butter; pepper and salt to taste, and serve hot. 

—Mrs. W. B. Krug. 

MOCK TERRAPIN SOUP 
Wash a calf's liver in cold water; then put into warm water 
and parboil it. Take it out, chop it fine, and return to the 
water in which it was boiled. Mix two tablespoons of flour 
with a piece of butter nearly the size of an egg and stir in. In 
the meantime have ready egg balls made of the yolk of hard- 
boiled eggs mashed fine and bound together with the yolk of 
one raw egg and a little flour, made into very small balls. 
When the butter and flour are added, put these into the soup 
and boil for ten minutes. Add to this one gill of sherry wine. 

MUTTON SOUP 
Six pounds of the neck; one onion; four quarts of cold water; 
one-half cup of rice; one bay leaf; salt and pepper to taste. 
Wipe the neck with a damp towel, put it in a soup kettle 



14 WOODBRIDGE COOK BOOK 

and cover with water; bring slowly to a boil, skim carefully; 
cover and simmer gently for four hours. Strain and stand away 
over night to cool. In the morning remove all fat from the 
surface. Put the soup into the kettle; add the onion, bay leaf, 
and rice. Simmer half an hour; season with salt and pepper 
and serve. 

— Selected. 

PEA SOUP 
One pint red split peas; one good-sized onion (red); one 
bone from used boiled ham, and tiny bit of washing soda as 
big as half a pea. Cover with about two quarts of cold water, 
bring slowly to a boil and simmer till the peas fall apart ; then 
thicken with a little flour (this prevents peas from settling) ; salt 
and pepper. Should be two quarts or more when finished, 
so add water if it boils away. 

— H. B. A. 

CREAM OF PEA 
To one can of peas, cooked very soft and strained, add 
cream made from one and one-half pints milk, two tablespoon- 
fuls of flour and two tablespoonfuls of butter. Season with 
pepper and salt to taste. 

— Mrs. Edwards. 

SPLIT-PEA SOUP 
One pint of split peas; one and one-half quarts of boiling 
water; one quart of stock; salt and pepper to taste. Wash 
peas in cold water (rejecting those which float) and soak them 
over night. In the morning drain the water ofif and cover 
them again with one quart of boiling water. Boil until 
tender, about one and one-half hours. Now add the stock and 
one pint of boiling water. Press the whole through a sieve; 
wash the soup kettle, return the soup, boil up once, add salt 



WOODBRIDGE COOK BOOK 15 

and pepper and serve with croutons. Dried-pea soup may be 

made in exactly the same manner, using one pint of dried 

peas instead of the spHt ones. 

— S. M. Brewster. 

POTATO SOUP 
For a family of four take one pint of sliced potatoes; one 
quart boiling water. When the potatoes are nearly done, add 
three-fourths of a pint of milk blended with three tablespoon- 
fuls of flour. Then add a piece of butter the size of an egg. 
Season well with salt and pepper. 

— Mrs. J. H. Tappen. 

TOMATO BISQUE NO. i 
One quart stewed tomatoes; season with salt, a little red 
pepper, a pinch of soda dissolved in a little cold water. Pour 
in soup tureen and stir in one quart boiling milk thickened 
with two or three teaspoons of flour. Do not mix until ready 
to serve. 

— Mrs. R. Valentine. 

TOMATO BISQUE NO. 2. 
One quart can of tomatoes stewed with one onion, when 
strained, add cream made from pint of milk, two tablespoon- 
fuls of butter, and two tablespoonfuls of flour. Season with 
salt and red pepper, and one teaspoonful of sugar. Do not 
boil after mixing. 

— Mrs. Edwards. 

TOMATO SOUP 
Boil a ham bone, or beef with two onions, two carrots, two 
turnips, one can tomatoes. Boil one hour, strain through a 
sieve. Toast some pieces of bread a light brown, cut them 
in dice form, and put them into the tureen. The soup should 
be turned onto the toast just before serving, as soaking spoils 
it. 

— Mrs. Willis Gaylord. 



The Bishop Company « 



CHARLES H. EDWARDS, President. 

CHARLES F. EILERT, HARRY O. BISHOP, 

Treasurer. Sec'y and Manager. 



122 SMITH STREET 

(Scheuer Building), 

PERTH AMBOY, N.J. 



j^ f The growth of Perth Amboy, with its 
IvCd^i corresponding enhancement of value in 

property, offers large inducements to the 
JbLStd^tC if^vestor for residential and business 

purposes. 



T FIRE, LIFE, CASUALTY and 

insurance plate glass. 



Loans 



negotiated on bond and 
MORTGAGE, 



WOODBRIDGE COOK BOOK 17 

TURKEY SOUP 
Place the rack of a cold turkey and what remains of dress- 
ing or gravy in a pot and cover with cold water — two or three 
stalks of celery is an improvement. Simmer gently for three 
or four hours, and let it stand until the next day. Take off 
what fat may have risen, strain, and put on to heat. To thicken 
add a cup of well-cooked rice. 

— Home Cook Book. 

CREAMED VEGETABLE SOUP 
Four good-sized potatoes, boiled, and put through a sieve, 
half dozen large tomatoes, or one can, and one onion cooked 
together; season with salt and pepper, put through a sieve, add 
potatoes, and cover with one pint of water, a lump of butter 
as large as an tgg, a few dried celery leaves and parsley rubbed 
through the hands; thicken with one teaspoon flour wet with 
water; cook a few minutes, add one pint of milk, and cook at 
once. 

— Mrs. J. E. Breckenridge. 

BOUQUET FOR SOUP 
Take four branches of well-washed parsley stalks — if 
branches are small take six — one branch of soup celery, well 
washed; one blade of bay leaf, one sprig of thyme, and two 
cloves, placed in the center of the parsley so as to prevent 
cloves, thyme, and bay leaf from dropping out of the bouquet 
while cooking; fold it well, and tightly tie with a string, and 
use when required in various recipes. 

— Editors. 

CROUTONS FOR SOUPS 
Cut bread in dice-shaped pieces and fry them in a pan with 
clarified butter; when a rich, golden color, drain, and add 
to the soup when needed. 

—Mrs. F, I. Perry. 



i8 WOODBRIDGE COOK BOOK 

NOODLES FOR SOUP 
To one tgg add as much sifted flour as it will absorb, with a 
little salt. Roll this out as thin as a wafer, dredge it very lightly 
with flour, roll it over and over in a large roll and then slice ofi: 
from the ends, shake out these strips loosely, and put in the 
soup, and serve with it. 

— Selected. 

CREAM OF TOMATO 

One quart canned tomatoes ; one pint milk ; half cup butter ; 
two tablespoons flour. Rub butter and flour together, heat 
tomatoes very hot, then rub through a fine sieve. Put milk 
on to heat ; when hot, put butter, flour, and one tablespoon of 
sugar in milk ; stir until thick. Have the tomatoes in another 
boiler ; add a lump of baking soda, size of a pea. Then strain 
tomatoes and when ready to serve pour the milk on tomatoes. 

—Mrs. M. D. Valentine. 

POTATO SOUP 

Six large potatoes boiled mealy, one quart milk boiled in 
double boiler. Mash potatoes while hot and add scant half 
cup butter. Pour boiling milk over and strain through a sieve. 
Put back into double boiler. Just before serving add a well 
beaten egg; stir thoroughly. 

Mrs. M. D. Valentine. 

BURNED SUGAR OR CARAMEL 
The utensils used can be of no service afterwards ; an old tin 
cup or ladle is good for this purpose. White is better than 
brown sugar, having a finer flavor. Put two ounces of sugar 
over a sharp fire, stir with a stick until it is black and begins 
to send forth a burning smell; add a gill or so of cold water; 
stir and boil gently four or five minutes : take off, cool, bottle 
for use. It keeps well, and may be used warm or cold. 

— Home Cook Book, 



FISH AND SHELL-FISH 

" The turnpike road to people's hearts I find. 
Lies through their mouths, or I mistake mankind." 

Fish are good if the gills are fed, the eyes are full, and the 
body of the fish firm and stiff. After washing them, they 
should be allowed to remain for a short time in salted water 
sufficient to cover them. Before cooking them, they should 
be well drained, wiped dry, dredged lightly with flour, and 
seasoned with salt and pepper. Salmon, trout, and the smaller 
fish, are usually fried or broiled. 

The recipes which are used in boiling or baking fresh cod 
or salmon will do for all other kinds of the larger fish. If 
stuffing is used, make it the same as for meat or fowls. While 
baking fish, baste them frequently with the drippings to which 
you have added a little butter. Large or thick-meated fish are 
very nice steamed. 

When fish are to be boiled, they should be put in cold 
water, unless otherwise directed in the recipe. The flesh is 
firmer if this method is followed. 

BOILED FISH— FRESH 

A good recipe, which may be used for cod, salmon, shad, or 
any other fresh fish. 

Let the fish remain in cold water, slightly salted, for an hour 
before it is time to cook it. Wrap it then in a clean towel, 
after it has been drained and dried, which has been dredged 
with flour. Fasten the cloth closely, and put it over to boil 
for about half an hour. Take up and serve with a fish sauce 
poured over it. 

A very nice sauce is prepared in the following way: To one 

19 



WOODBRIDGE COOK BOOK 21 

teacup of milk add one teacup of water; put it on the fire to 
scald, and when hot stir in a tablespoonful of flour, previously 
wet with cold water. Add two or three eggs. Season with 
salt and pepper, a little celery, vinegar, and three tablespoons 
of butter. Boil four or five eggs hard, take off the shells and 
cut in slices, and lay over the fish. Then pour over the sauce, 
and serve. 

— Home Cook Book. 

BAKED FISH 

Prepare the fish the same as for boiling, and put it on a wire 
gridiron. Place the gridiron on a dripping-pan with a little hot 
water in it, and bake it in a hot oven. Just before it is done, 
butter it well on the top, and brown it nicely. The time of 
baking depends on the size of the fish. A small fish will bake 
in about half an hour, and a large one in an hour. 

Baked halibut or salmon is very nice cooked as above, and 
served with a sauce which is made from the gravy in the drip- 
ping-pan, to which is added a tablespoonful of catsup and 
another of some pungent sauce, and the juice of a lemon. 
Thicken with browned flour, moistened with a little cold water. 
Garnish handsomely with sprigs of parsley and currant jelly. 

—J. E. H. 

FISH CHOWDER NO. i 
Take any white fish weighing six or seven pounds; cut it in 
four or five pieces ; take from half to three-quarters of a pound 
of salt pork, cut it into fine pieces, and fry until the scraps are 
a light brown, in the pot that you are to make the chowder in ; 
then cut up four or five good-sized onions and fry them in the 
pork about five or ten minutes ; then put the fish in and rather 
more than cover it with water; boil it until the fish comes 
freely from the bone (about half an hour); then put in a tea- 
spoonful of pepper, salt to taste; mix four tablespoonfuls of 



22 WOODBRIDGE COOK BOOK 

flour with milk and stir in; dip some crackers in water and 
add them to the mixture; let the whole boil up, and it is 
done. 

— Home Cook Book. 

FISH CHOWDER NO. 2 
Five pounds of any kind of fish (the light salt-water fish is , 
the best), half a pound of pork, two large onions, one quart 
sliced potatoes, one quart water, one pint of milk, two tea- ! 
spoonfuls of flour, six crackers, salt, pepper. Skin the fish, 
and cut all the flesh from the bones. Put the bones on to 
cook in a quart of water and simmer gently ten minutes. Fry 
the pork, then add the onions, cut into slices; cover and cook 
five minutes; then add the flour and cook eight minutes longer, 
stirring often. Strain on this the water in which the fish-bones 
were cooked, and boil quietly for five minutes; then strain all 
on the potatoes and fish. Season with salt and pepper, and 
simmer fifteen minutes. Add the milk and crackers, which 
were first soaked for three minutes in the milk. Let it boil 
up once, and serve. The milk may be omitted and a pint of 
tomatoes used if you like. 

— Editors. 

TO CREAM CODFISH 
Take quantity of salt codfish needed for family, soak in cold 
water for about an hour, pour off, and cover again with cold 
water; this is repeated three times. Then pick your fish fine. 
Heat your milk with a little butter and pepper. Mix in your 
codfish, and thicken to a thick cream. Just before serving stir 
in two well-beaten eggs. Serve with or without toast. 

— H. K. Osborn. 

SALT CODFISH BALLS 
One cup raw salt fish, one pint potatoes, one teaspconful 
butter, one egg well beaten, one-fourth saltspoonful pepper, 



WOODBRIDGE COOK BOOK 23 

more salt if needed. Wash the fish, pick in half-inch pieces, 
and free from bones. Pare the potatoes, and cut in quarters. 
Put the potatoes and fish in a stewpan, and cover with boiling 
water. Boil twenty-five minutes, or till the potatoes are soft. 
Be careful not to let them boil long enough to become soggy. 
Drain off all the water; mash and beat the fish and potatoes 
till very light. Add the butter and pepper, and when slightly 
cooled add the egg and more salt if needed. Shape in a table- 
spoon without smoothing much, slip them ofif into a basket, 
and fry in smoking hot lard one minute. Fry only five at a 
time, as more will cool the fat. The lard should be hot 
enough to brown a piece of bread while you count forty. Or, 
first dipping the spoon in the fat, take up a spoonful of the 
fish and plunge it into the hot fat. Drain on soft paper. 
These fish-balls should be mixed while the potatoes and fish 
are hot. If you wish to prepare them the night before make 
into flat cakes, and in the morning fry in a little fat. 

—Mrs. W. T. Ames. 



BAKED HALIBUT 
Upon the grate of the dripping-pan put a buttered sheet of 
thick writing paper, place the lump of fish upon the paper, 
cover the top with powdered cracker, salt, bits of butter. Bake 
in a hot oven until well browned; about an hour for two 
pounds. Slip from the paper on to platter, garnish with slices 
of hard-boiled eggs. Serve with butter sauce. 

— Selected. 



DEVILED HALIBUT 
This is made the same as deviled crabs, using one pound of 
cold-boiled halibut instead of one dozen crabs. Serve in clam 
or scallop shells. 

— S. M. Brewster. 



Those desirous of Purchasing Nursery Stock will 

SAVE from 30 to 50 Per Cent. 

By Ordering Direct from 

THE ELIZABETH NUESERY CO., 

Wilder Street, .... Elizabeth, N. J. 



Send for Our Catalogue, which is Free, 



JOHN T. BRICKELL, D.D.S., 

96 IRVING STREET, 

RAHWAX N.J. 



Telephone io a. 



A First-class Cook Requires : 
ist— TRIED ^ ^ 2d— THE BEST 

RECIPES. «^ <^ INGREDIENTS. 

In this book you The latter you 

have the former. get from .... 

Who keeps a large stock of all kinds of goods necessary for good cooking. 

Harned's Snow- Pure Royal Bak- 

flake Flour. Spices, &c. ing Powder. 

51 Main St., Woodbridge, N. J, 

Telephone, N, Y. & N. J., 4 A. 



WOODBRIDGE COOK BOOK 25 

TO PREPARE SALT MACKEREL TO COOK 
First remove the backbone, which is very easily done by 
cutting off the ribs close to it, and pulling it out. Then 
freshen it over night by laying it in a pan full of water, the 
skin side up. It will freshen quicker if a few little sticks are 
placed under it, to float it in the water. All salt fish will 
freshen faster in warm weather than in cold, unless water a 
little warm is used. After freshening, place in a wire grid- 
iron and broil. When done, pour over sweet cream, if you 
have it; if not, make a little gravy of milk, thickened with 
flour, and a piece of butter added. 

— Selected. 

A NICE WAY TO COOK SALT MACKEREL 
Soak the fish for several hours in lukewarm water, changing 
the water several times ; then put them into cloths ; wrap them 
closely; lay them in cold water until it boils; take them out; 
drain them; lay them on the platter; put a little butter and 
pepper on them ; set them in a hot oven for four or five min- 
utes, and serve with sliced lemons. 

— Selected. 

SALMON CROQUETTES 
One can salmon, four tablespoonfuls of milk, one and one- 
third cups of bread crumbs, two eggs, four tablespoonfuls of 
melted butter; salt, pepper, mace, parsley. Drain fish, mash 
fine, add the beaten eggs, melted butter, bread crumbs, and 
milk in order named ; beat until a soft paste is formed. Place 
a small spoonful in beaten egg, then in bread crumbs, and fry 
in deep fat a delicate brown, drain on soft paper. 

— Mrs. D. S. Voorhees. 

SCALLOPED SALMON 
One can salmon picked fine, one grated onion; salt and pepper 



26 WOODBRIDGE COOK BOOK 

to taste. Boil one pint milk; mix two tablespoonfuls of flour. 
Butter size of an egg add to the hot milk, and let all thicken; 
add two well-beaten eggs. Then make in layers with the 
salmon, putting fine bread crumbs on top. Bake in quick 
oven. 

—Mrs. O. M. H. 

BAKED SHAD. 
Make a dressing of one cup of stale bread crumbs, one 
tablespoonful of melted butter, one tablespoonful of chopped 
parsley, a half teaspoonful of salt, and a little black pepper; 
mix well, and stuff the body of the fish, and sew it up with soft 
yarn. Now score one side of the fish with a sharp knife, mak- 
ing the scores about an inch apart, and put a strip of salt pork 
in each gash. Grease a tin sheet, if you have one, place it in 
the bottom of a baking-pan, put the fish on it, dredge thickly 
with salt, pepper, and flour. Cover the bottom of a pan with 
boiling water, and put in a hot oven. Bake fifteen minutes 
to every pound fish, basting each ten minutes with the gravy 
in the pan. As the water evaporates add more to again cover 
the bottom of the pan. When done, lift the tin sheet from the 
pan, and slide the fish carefully into the center of the dish on 
which it is to be served; garnish with slices of lemon, fried 
potato balls, and parsley. Serve with sauce — Hollandaise or 
roe sauce. 

— Mrs. Rorer. 

FRIED SMELTS 
Clean smelts thoroughly and drain; salt well, and dip in 
beaten egg; roll in bread crumbs or Indian meal; fry in a 
basket plunged in boiling fat. These will cook in about three 
minutes. Place on a piece of blotting paper to drain. Serve 
hot. 

—Mrs. H. K. Osborn. 



WOODBRIDGE COOK BOOK 27 

CLAMS A LA NEWPORT 
Fifteen soft-shell clams, one lemon; butter, one-half cup, 
cream, two eggs. Remove the hard part of the clams, and 
put them in a saucepan with two tablespoonfuls of butter, juice 
of half lemon, and salt and pepper. Cook for a few minutes. 
Add the rest of the clams, chopped fine. Mix the yolks of 
the eggs with the cream, add to the clams; heat, but do not 
boil. Serve on toast. 

—Mrs. F. L Perry. 

DEVILED CLAMS 
Thirty clams; drain from liquor and chop fine; put half of 
the juice back on the clams and cook fifteen minutes. Cook 
two eggs hard and chop fine; one small onion; one teaspoon 
chopped parsley. Take one-half cup milk, let it come to a boil, 
and while boiling, stir in one teacup bread crumbs; add this 
to clams while boiling; also stir in one-fourth pound butter, 
plenty of pepper and a little salt. Put all together and stir 
well, fill shells, sprinkle with bread crumbs and a little butter; 
bake fifteen minutes. 

—Mrs. S. B. Hinsdale. 

CLAM CHOWDER, NO. i 
One quart clams, chopped fine; six good-sized potatoes; 
four large onions ; one cup tomatoes ; one-half pound salt pork. 
Chop pork fine, put in bottom of pot and let brown. Then 
add the clams, with their juice; then the chopped onions and 
potatoes and tomatoes. Let them boil slowly for one hour. 
Add as much water as you like, and season to taste. 

— Mrs. S. B. Hinsdale. 

CLAM CHOWDER NO. 2 
One-half pound pickled pork; seventy-five to one hundred 
clams; six onions; twelve potatoes; ten corn; six hard tack; 



1 



WOODBRIDGE COOK BOOK 29 

six hard-boiled eggs ; one-half teaspoonful of allspice ; one-half 
teaspoonful of mace; one large teaspoonful of cinnamon; one 
large teaspoonful of cloves; one dessertspoonful celery seed; 
salt and pepper; one quart milk; one-fourth pound of butter; 
pork fried crisp. Onions chopped fine, and added; seventy- 
five to one hundred clams opened and washed, juice strained 
and added to pot. Potatoes sliced and added. Corn cut off 
cob and added. Tomatoes cut fine and added. When these 
ingredients are done, add hard tack or ship biscuit, broken fine, 
over which has been sprinkled the spices, and the butter added. 
Over these pour the boiled milk. Hard-boiled eggs chopped 
fine and added. Thin with boiling water. 

— Mrs. M. Brewster. 



DEVILED CRAB 
Twelve nice heavy crabs; one-half pint cream; three table- 
spoons of butter; one tablespoonful of chopped parsley; one- 
half tablespoon salt ; one-fourth nutmeg. Put the cream on to 
boil; rub the butter and flour together, add to the boiling 
cream, and cook for a few minutes. Take from the stove and 
add crab meat and yolks of four hard-boiled eggs. Put the in- 
gredients in the crab shells. Then brush the top with the 
white of an egg, sprinkle with bread crumbs and bake in a hot 
oven. 

— Mrs. Margaretta Brewster. 

LOBSTERS 
Never buy a dead lobster. Choose the smaller ones that are 
heavy for their size; the larger ones are coarse and tough. 
They should be perfectly fresh and very lively. The male lobster 
is preferred for eating and the female for sauces and soups. 
The female has a broader tail and less claws than the male. 
If possible, always boil the lobster at home; but in some 
localities, where it is necessary to buy them boiled, see that the 



30 WOODBRIDGE COOK BOOK 

tail is stiff and elastic, so that when you bend it out, it 
springs back immediately; otherwise they were dead before 
boiling. Lobsters boiled when dead are watery and soft; 
they are very unwholesome, even to a dangerous degree. 

— Mrs. Rorer. 



TO BOIL AND OPEN A LOBSTER 
Fill a kettle with warm water (not boiling), put in the lobster, 
head downward; add a tablespoonful of salt; cover the kettle, 
and stand it over a very quick fire. They suffer less by being 
put into warm than in boiling water. In the latter they are 
killed by heat, in the warm water they are smothered. A 
medium-sized lobster should boil half an hour; a larger one, 
three-quarters. Cooking them too long makes them tough, j 
and the meat will stick to the shell. When done and cool, f 
separate the tail from the body and twist ofif all the claws; shake 
out carefully the tom-alley (this is the liver of the lobster and 
may be known by its greenish color); also the coral. Then 
draw the body from the shell, remove the stomach (sometimes 
called the lady), which is found immediately under the head, 
and throw this away. Now split the body through the center 
and pick the meat from the cells. Cut the underside of the I 
tail shell, loosen the meat and take it out in one solid piece. - 
Now split the meat of the tail open and you will uncover a 
little vein running its entire length, this remove. The vein is 
not always the same color; sometimes it is red, sometimes 
black and sometimes white; but in all cases it must be care- 
fully taken out and thrown away. The stomach or lady, the 
vein and the spongy fingers between the body and shell, 
are the only parts not eatable. Crack the claws and take out 
the meat. 

To serve plain boiled lobster, arrange the meat thus taken 
out in the center of a cold dish, garnish with the claws, sprigs 
of fresh parsley, hard-boiled eggs cut into quarters, and pickled 



WOODBRIDGE COOK BOOK 31 

beets cut into fancy shapes. Let each person season to suit 
himself. 

— Mrs. Rorer. 



LOBSTER FARCI 
Put one tablespoon of butter in a frying pan. When it has 
melted add one tablespoon of flour; stir over fire until smooth, 
then add slowly three-fourths cup of milk; stir until it boils. 
Remove from fire. Add two level teaspoonfuls of chopped 
parsley; a little nutmeg and cayenne or paprika to taste; then 
add two cupfuls of lobster meat, cut in small pieces. Have 
the lobster shell washed and dried; fill with the lobster mixture; 
spread over the top buttered crumbs; place shells together, 
put them in a baking pan, prop them with a piece of coal to 
support the shells. Bake in oven until the crumbs are brown. 
Arrange on a platter and garnish with parsley and the small 
claws of the lobster. 

— Mrs. L. H. Brown. 



LOBSTER A LA NEWBERG 
Split two good-sized freshly boiled lobsters. Pick all the 
meat from the shells, then cut into one inch length equal pieces. 
Place it in a saucepan on a hot range, with an ounce of very 
good butter. Add a pinch of salt and half a saltspoonful of 
red pepper, and two good truffles cut into small dice-shaped 
pieces; cook for five minutes, then add a wineglass of good 
Madeira wine. Reduce to one-half, which will take three 
minutes. Have three egg yolks in a bowl with half a pint of 
sweet cream; beat well together, and add to the lobster. 
Gently shuffle for two minutes longer, or until it thickens weld. 
Pour it into a hot tureen and serve hot. 

— Mrs. F. L Perry. 



EPHRAIM CUTTER, 

Masonic Hall Building, 
Grreen Street, "Woodbridge, N. J. 



Notary Public, Supreme Court 
Commissioner. 



[Prompt attention given to collections. 



Titles to Real Estate Examined. 



The Largest Assortment 

••• of ••• 

r\RY AND p ANCY r^ QODS 

••• in ••• 

MIDDLESEX COUNTY 

••• zx — 

B.ea,soYia,l>le Profit Prices, 



REYNOLDS & HANSON, 

128 & 130 SMITH STREET. 

PERTH AMBOY, N. J. 



WOODBRIDGE COOK BOOK 33 

BALTIMORE FRY 
Wrap each oyster in a slice of bacon cut very thin; fasten 
with little wooden skewers ; fry quickly in a hot spider. Serve 
on toast. 

— Mrs. Oscar Miller. 

OYSTER COCKTAILS 
One quart of oysters was used, putting four or five into a 
sherbet cup. They were well chilled; then over each was put 
the following mixture: Two tablespoons of horseradish; one 
teaspoon of Tabasco sauce; two tablespoons vinegar; two 
tablespoons Worcestershire sauce; four tablespoons lemon 
sauce; two tablespoons tomato catsup, and one teaspoon of 
salt. 

— Selected. 

CREAMED OYSTERS 
Twenty-five oysters; one cupful oyster juice; two cupfuls 
milk or cream; yolks three eggs; two tablespoonfuls butter; 
four tablespoonfuls flour; one scant teaspoon salt; dash pep- 
per; dash nutmeg. Scald the oysters in their liquor until 
plump and curled. Put milk on to scald. Cream flour and 
butter. Stir in slowly the oyster juice, also the milk. When 
smooth, remove from fire and when a little cooled stir in 
the beaten yolks. Place again on fire and stir until thick- 
ened; then add the oysters and serve. 

— B. Campbell. 

CREAM OYSTERS 

One quart oysters ; one-half pint cream ; one-half pint milk ; 

one tablespoon flour; one teaspoon curry powder. Take flour, 

put in a pinch of salt and curry powder, and mix. Put cream 

and milk on fire and bring to a boil. Bring oysters to a boil 



34 WOODBRIDGE COOK BOOK 

in their own liquor. When to a boil, pour off the liquor and 
put the oysters in a dish. Thicken the milk with flour, and 
boil; then pour over oysters. 

— Mabel Freeman. 

CUCKOO OYSTERS AND CHICKEN 
Boil two small chickens ; remove from bones ; chop them, and 
add an equal quantity of oysters, scalded and chopped. Sea- 
son with a little chopped celery, salt and pepper. Make a 
sauce with the juice of the oysters, a Httle cornstarch, milk, and 
butter. Then butter one dozen large shells; fill with chicken 
and oysters and bread crumbs, in layers, and bake brown. 

— Mrs. L. H. Brown. 

A DELICIOUS WAY TO COOK OYSTERS 
Put your oysters into a colander and let cold water run over 
them, then drain; dip each oyster in egg, then in rolled 
cracker or bread crumbs; lay them side by side in a baking 
pan until the bottom of the pan is covered; cut up butter and 
lay over the top; season with pepper and salt; then put another 
layer of oysters, then seasoning until you have just three lay- 
ers, no more. Bake in a hot oven about twenty minutes. 
Serve immediately. 

— ^Aceola Cook Book. 

ESCALOPED OYSTERS 
Have seventy-five large fine oysters. Roll fine about half a 
pound banquet, or other nice crackers. Add to cracker 
crumbs one teaspoonful Royal baking powder. Put a layer of 
crumbs in bottom of earthen baking dish; add a little salt, 
pepper, and generous bits of butter. Now add a layer of 
oysters. Continue in this way until dish is full; putting 
plenty of butter on top. Now add about a cup of milk. 
Cover and bake in quick oven for half an hour; take off cover 
and brown. 

—Mrs. S. B. Hinsdale. 



WOODBRIDGE COOK BOOK 35 

OYSTER OMELET 

Stew one dozen oysters in their own liquor, if possible; if 
not, use a very little water. Roll two or three lumps of butter 
size of butternuts in flour; put in and let come to a boil. Sea- 
son well with pepper and salt. Take out the oysters and chop 
them; and if necessary to thicken, add a little flour to the 
sauce. Put back the oysters, and set on the back part of the 
stove. Beat four eggs very light and add two tablespoons of 
milk or cream. Fry in a well-buttered pan. When done, re- 
move to a hot platter. Serve hot with oyster sauce. 

— Selected. 

KEBOBBED OYSTERS 

Rinse in their own liquor fifty oysters (and drain). Chop 
parsley to make two tablespoons (heaping). Of celery the 
same. Beat two eggs and add to them one tablespoon of 
oyster liquor. Have handy at your left hand a baking dish. 
Have also a pint of nice bread crumbs. Dip each oyster first 
in egg, then roll in crumbs, and put at once in dish. Continue 
until the bottom of dish is covered. Sprinkle over a little 
salt, a dash of pepper, a sprinkling of parsley and celery. Dip 
another layer of oysters and put in as before. Add salt, pep- 
per, parsley, and celery, and so continue until all are used. 
Cut a tablespoon of butter into small pieces over the top and 
bake in a quick oven fifteen minutes. Clams, if small and 
tender, could be used in the same way. 

—Mrs. F. G. Tisdall. 



PANNED OYSTERS COOKED IN RAMEKINS 

Cut pieces of toast the size of the bottoms of the individual 

dishes; butter and moisten with the oyster liquor. Put them 

in the ramekins, cover them with raw oysters; season with 

salt, pepper, and butter, and bake until they are plump. Send 



* 



WOODBRIDGE COOK BOOK 37 

the dishes to the table on napkins. Serve with lemon and 
catsup. 

—H. K. O. 



TO FRY SCALLOPS 

Cover the scallops with boiling water and let them stand 
three minutes; drain, and dry them with a towel; season with 
salt and pepper, dip first in beaten egg, then in bread crumbs, 
and fry in boiling fat or oil. 

— Mrs. S. M. Brewster. 



FISH AND MEAT SAUCES 

Drawn butter is the basis for most sauces. A great variety 
may be produced by adding to this sauce different flavors — 
anchovies, okra, onions, celery, parsley, mint, spices, and rel- 
ishes, using those flavors which are suitable for the meat, game, 
or fish, with which the sauces are to be served. A good 
standard recipe for drawn butter is as follows : 

DRAWN BUTTER 

Rub one tablespoonful of flour with one-quarter of a pound 
of butter; when well mixed, put in a saucepan with a table- 
spoonful of milk or water. Set it in a dish of boiling water, 
shaking it well until the butter melts and is near boiling. It 
should not be set directly on the stove, or over the coals, as 
the heat will make the butter oil, and spoil it. 

This sauce may be varied by adding cream, hard-boiled 
eggs, or lemon juice. 

For brown sauces browned flour is nice. Put a pound of 

flour in a clean plate, or in a small pan, and set in a hot oven 

until browned through; stir it often. Keep in a dredge box 

for gravies and soups. 

—Mrs. S. B. H. 

BROWNED BUTTER FOR COLORING GRAVIES 

Put butter in a frying-pan, and toss it about until it browns 

without burning. Then add browned flour, and stir together 

until it thickens. This is to be used for coloring gravies. 

With the addition of celery, vinegar, or any flavored vinegar, 

with a little brown sugar and cayenne, it forms a very nice 

sauce for fish. 

— Home Cook Book. 

38 



WOODBRIDGE COOK BOOK 39 

BEARNAISE SAUCE 

Served with broiled beefsteaks, sweetbreads, broiled smelts, 
and other fish. Chop fine two small onions, or better still, two 
small shallots. Add five peppercorns and a tablespoonful of 
tarragon vinegar. Stir in the yolks of five raw eggs, then 
add two tablespoonfuls of good sweet butter. Put this in 
double boiler. Add a scant teaspoonful of salt and a dozen 
tarragon leaves chopped fine. Stir this sauce all the time it is 
in the water. It will take three or four minutes to cook, and 
should be as thick as a mayonnaise dressing when it is done. 
Some cooks add a teaspoonful of meat glaze just before it is 
taken off the stove, and stir it in till it is thoroughly melted; 
but this is not an essential part of the sauce. 

—-Mrs. E. H. Boynton. 

BROWN SAUCE 

One tablespoonful butter; one-half pint stock; one table- 
spoonful flour; one-half teaspoonful onion juice; one-half tea- 
spoonful salt; one-eighth teaspoonful pepper. Melt the butter, 
stir until a dark brown, add the flour, mix well ; add the stock, 
and stir continually until it boils; add onion juice, salt and pep- 
per, and it is ready for use. 

— Philadelphia Cook Book. 

CAPER SAUCE 

Two tablespoonfuls butter; one tablespoonful flour; one-Half 
pint boiling water; one-half teaspoonful of salt; one large table- 
spoonful capers. Mix the butter and flour to a smooth paste in 
a bowl; place the bowl over the fire in a pan of boiling water, 
add the boiling water gradually, stirring all the time until it 
thickens. Add the salt and capers. Take from the fire and 
serve immediately. 

—Mrs. E. H. B. 



Compliments of 

H. D. BREWSTER 



WQODBRIDGE COOK BOOK 41 

CRANBERRY SAUCE 

One quart of cranberries; one pint of water; one pint of 
sugar. Wash the cranberries in cold water. Put them in a 
porcelain-Hned kettle with the pint of water. When they 
come to a boil, let them boil rapidly for ten minutes. Press 
through a sieve. Return to the kettle, add the sugar and stir 
over the fire about three minutes; turn out to cool. 

—J. E. H. 

DRESSING FOR BAKED FISH 

Moisten bread crumbs with melted butter; season with 
chopped pickle, lemon juice, a pinch of powdered herbs, salt 
and pepper. Add a little cold water if needed. 

— ^Editors. 

MINT SAUCE 

One tablespoonful chopped spear mint; two tablespoonfuls 
sugar; saltspoon of salt. Pour over it one small cup boiling 
hot vinegar; set away to cool. Serve with lamb. 

—Mrs. S. B. Hinsdale. 

NUT-BROWN SAUCE 

Place an ounce of good butter in a frying-pan; let it heat un- 
til it becomes a nut-brown color, then add one drop of vinegar 
and use when needed. 

—Mrs. F. I. Perry. 

TARTARE SAUCE 

A tartare sauce is a most delicious sauce to serve with fried 
or baked fi<6h, broiled chicken, lamb or veal. Break the yolks 
of two eggs in a bowl, add drop by drop at first a half cupful of 
best olive oil. After the oil has been dropped in until the sauce 
becomes thick like creamed butter, it may be added more rap- 



42 WOODBRIDGE COOK BOOK 

idly. When the oil is all in, add about two teaspoonfuls of good, 
sharp tarragon vinegar; a teaspoonful of fine English mustard; 
a shallot or a small onion, minced very fine; twelve capers; a 
small cucumber pickle, chopped as fine as possible; an even 
teaspoonful of salt, and a pinch of pepper. 

— N. Y. Tribune. 

TOMATO SAUCE 

To prepare a tomato sauce, begin by frying in a tablespoon- 
ful of butter one small white onion and three slices of carrot, 
minced fine; half a spray of thyme; half a bay leaf; a stalk 
of celery, and a little parsley. Let the vegetables and herbs 
cook for five minutes, then stir in a heaping tablespoonful of 
flour. When the flour browns, add a quart of tomatoes. Let 
the sauce cook about forty-five minutes. Season with a tea- 
spoonful of salt, a saltspoonful of pepper, and a tablespoonful 
sugar. Strain the sauce through a sieve, a Scotch cap sieve 
is best. In winter this will keep for weeks if bottled. 

— Mrs. S. B. Hinsdale. 

SAUCE FOR RAW OYSTERS 

One pint of vinegar; one-fourth teaspoonful of salt; one- 
fourth teaspoonful black pepper; one dash Worcestershire 
sauce; one dash Tabasco sauce; one bunch minced shallots; 
one bunch minced chives. Keeps well if bottled and corked 
tightly 

—M. E. Perry. 

WHITE SAUCE 

One tablespoon butter; one tablespoon flour; one-half pint 
milk ; salt and pepper to taste. Rub butter and flour together, 
add the milk, boiling hot; stir over the fire one minute; add 
seasoning. 

* * * 



MEAT 

*• 'Tis not the meat, but 'tis the appetite 
Makes eating a delight. " 

BEEF A LA MODE 

Select a good cross-rib piece of beef, weighing about five 
pounds. Make incisions with a sharp knife through the beef; 
fill these incisions with a dressing made of bread seasoned 
highly with salt, pepper, finely chopped onion, and Worcester- 
shire sauce, compressing as much of the dressing into the beef 
as possible. When thus prepared, stick whole cloves over 
the top, put into a double baker, with about a cup of water, 
and cook two or three hours. During the last half hour given 
to cooking the beef place in the pan slices of potatoes, carrots, 
and turnips, and with these garnish the dish for the table, 
adding celery leaves and parsley. 

—J. E. H. 

FILLET OF BEEF WITH MUSHROOMS 

Slice beef, replacing before serving. Mushrooms added to 
gravy, and poured over beef arranged as if whole. Arrange 
small carrots, beans, peas, and small potato balls, separately, 
around beef on platter. 

—Mrs. F. I. Perry. 

BEEFSTEAK WITH MUSHROOMS 

Put in the frying-pan some butter; into this put mushrooms 
which have been nicely peeled. Cook them in the butter until 
thoroughly heated through, season with a teaspoonful of wine 
to every mushroom, pepper and salt, and a little nutmeg. 

43 



WOODBRIDGE COOK BOOK 45 

Then pour over nicely broiled porter-house steaks on the plat- 
ter. A soupgon of onion put first into the butter enriches the 
flavor. 

— Editors. 



STEAK PIE 

Cut rump or beefsteak in conveniently sized pieces; flour 
and fry them a nice brown; then place the fried steak in a 
stewpan with sufficient water for the amount of gravy wanted, 
and pepper and salt to taste. Add some finely chopped onion 
and bay leaf, and stew for an hour or two until tender. Place 
the meat in a pie dish which has previously been lined with 
pastry, add some hard-boiled eggs sliced in, pour over the 
gravy, dust in a little flour, add bits of butter, cover pastry and 
bake. 

— Home Cook Book. 



ROAST BEEF WITH YORKSHIRE PUDDING 

Roast the beef on a rack laid over the dripping-pan. About 
three-quarters of an hour before the meat is done, pour the 
drippings from the pan, leaving only enough in the pan to 
prevent the pudding from sticking. Have ready a pudding 
prepared thus : Put into a bowl or dish one pint of sifted flour, 
one pint of milk, a little salt, and four eggs. Beat all well 
together. Then pour tliis in your dripping pan, which, for 
this quantity of pudding, should be a small one, replace the 
rack on which your beef is laid, and bake for three-quarters of 
an hour. If your dripping-pan is a large one, put the pudding 
in a pie tin, in which you have poured a little of the beef drip- 
pings, and put this in the center of the dripping-pan, below 
the beef on the rack 

—J. E. H. 



46 WOODBRIDGE COOK BOOK 

TO ROAST BEEF 

Time for cooking rib roast, rare, eight to ten minutes per 
pound. Time for cooking rolled roast, rare, from ten to 
twelve minutes per pound. Place the meat to be baked on a 
rack, which will raise it a little above the bottom of the pan. 
Dredge the whole top and sides with flour. Place in a corner 
of the pan a half teaspoonful of salt and a quarter teaspoonful 
of pepper. Do not let them touch the raw meat, as they draw 
out the juices. Put into the pan also two tablespoonfuls of 
drippings. Place in a very hot oven for fifteen or twenty min- 
utes, or until the meat is biowned, then shut off the drafts and 
lower the temperature of the oven, and cook slowly until done ; 
baste frequently. Do not pour water in the pan, as it makes 
steam and prevents browning. A roast has a better appear- 
ance if the ribs are not too long. They may be cut ofif and saved 

for the soup pot. 

— Century Cook Book. 

TO PAN A BEEFSTEAK 

When there are no conveniences for broiling (and we never 
fry a steak) heat an iron pan very hot, put in the steak, turn 
it from side to side over a very hot fire for about fifteen min- 
utes. The steak should be about three-quarters of an inch in 
thickness. Serve on a hot plate, seasoned the same as broiled 
steak. 

— Selected. 

HAMBURG STEAKS 

Have your butcher chop fine one pound of steak from the 
round; mix with this one teaspoonful salt; one-half teaspoon- 
ful pepper; one tablespoonful chopped parsley, and two or 
three drops of onion juice. Form into small pats with the 
hand; heat a tablespoonful of butter in a frying-pan; put in the 
meat and cook slowly until done, and serve with brown sauce. 

— Editors. 



WOODBRIDGE COOK BOOK 47 

BAKED BEEF LOAF 

Three and one-half pounds of lean raw beef chopped very 
fine; mix with it six soda crackers, rolled fine; three eggs; one 
full tablespoon of salt; one teaspoon of pepper; one nutmeg, 
grated; four tablespoons of milk or cream, and butter the size 
of an egg. Mix all thoroughly, make into a loaf, and bake in 
a bread pan one and one-half to two hours, basting as roast 
beef. 

— Mrs. Charles Taylor Pierce. 

BEEFSTEAK AND KIDNEY PUDDING 

One pound of beefsteak; one beef kidney; pepper and salt, 
and a little flour; suet paste. Take the steak and cut it into 
pieces about a quarter of an inch thick, also cut the kidney in 
small pieces ; season them well with pepper and salt, and dredge 
a little flour over them. Lightly butter a round-bottomed 
pudding basin. Roll out the paste to about half an inch in 
thickness, and line the basin; then put in the beef and kidney; 
pour in three or four tablespoonfuls of water (and a little Wor- 
cestershire sauce if liked); cover a piece of paste over the top; 
press it firmly together with the thumb. Then tie the basin in 
a floured cloth, and put into a saucepan of water. Keep it 
constantly boiling, adding more boiling water. Time to boil, 
two hours. 

—Mrs. H. K. Scott. 

TO BOIL CORNED BEEF 

Put corned beef into cold water, to which has been added 
two slices of lemon and a bay leaf. Have enough water to 
cover the meat. Place where it will simmer only, allowing 
thirty minutes or more for each pound. A piece from the 
round is a good cut, or a rump piece is liked best by some. 

—J. E. H, 



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Get Your Milk from the 

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Supplies Sewaren and Woodbridgc 
Telephone No. 26 F. 



WOODBRIDGE COOK BOOK 49 

BOILED HAM 

Soak the ham one hour in cold water; then wash thoroughly; 
put it over a fire in cold water to cover it, with one cup of 
vinegar and one-half cup of sugar in the water. Allow it to 
cook twenty minutes for every pound of meat, or until the 
rind comes off easily. Sprinkle with brown sugar and bread 
crumbs and brown in the oven quickly. 

—Mrs. W. L. Harned. 

LEFT-OVER HAM 

When all is used for sHcing, the rest can be used as follows: 
(i) Chop the little bits previously taken from the bone. Pour 
boiling water over it for a few minutes. Drain and add a cup, 
or nearly a cup, of cream sauce. Serve for breakfast on but- 
tered toast. (2) Chop fine; mix with good quantity of salad 
dressing and serve on lettuce for luncheon. 

— Helen B. Ames. 

TO BAKE OR ROAST A QUARTER OE LAMB 

Wipe the meat with a damp towel, place it in a baking-pan 
and dredge it with pepper. Put one teaspoonful of salt in 
the bottom of the pan, add one cup of water to baste with at 
first. When that evaporates, use its own drippings. Lamb 
must be basted every ten minutes, and baked fifteen minutes 
to every pound, in a very hot oven. Mint sauce, green peas, 
and asparagus tips should be served with spring lamb. 

— Mrs. Rorer. 

BOILED LEG OF MUTTON 

Wipe the leg with a damp towel. Dust a cloth thickly with 
flour and wrap the leg up in it. Put it into a kettle, cover 
with boiling water, and simmer gently fifteen minutes to every 
pound; add a teaspoonful of salt when the leg is half done, 



so WOODBRIDGE COOK BOOK 

When done remove the towel carefully; garnish with parsley, 
and serve with caper sauce either in a sauce-boat or poured 
over the mutton. 

— Mrs. Rorer. 

MUTTON A LA VENISON 

Take a leg of mutton, and lard it with salt pork, by cutting 
deep slits in the meat and inserting slips of pork the size of your 
finger, which have been rolled in pepper, salt, and cloves. Bake 
two hours, or according to the size of your roast; baste it fre- 
quently. About half an hour before serving spread it over 
with currant jelly and let it brown. 

— Home Cook Book. 



ROAST PORK 

If the skin is left on, cut it through in lines both ways, form- 
ing small squares. Put a cupful of water in the pan with the 
meat. Rub the meat with salt and pepper; bake in a moderate 
oven, allowing twenty to twenty-five minutes to the pound. 
Pork must be thoroughly cooked. Serve with apple sauce or 
fried apples. 

— Mrs. E. H. Boynton. 

TO COOK SWEET-BREADS 

Sweet-breads spoil sooner than any other kind of meat. Buy 
and use them the same day; as soon as brought into the house 
put the sweet-breads in cold water; leave them for half an hour, 
or until ready to cook them. Throw into water boiling hot 
and well salted, and boil for twenty minutes. Throw once 
more into very cold water, and leave a little while. This 
sweetens them. Pull out all cartilage and pipes when cold. 
The sweet-breads can then be cut into little chunks and dipped 
in tgg and bread crumbs, and boiled in lard. Serve with 



WOODBRIDGE COOK BOOK 51 

French peas. A pretty arrangement for a platter is made of 
sweet-breads, peas, stuffed tomatoes, garnished with partly- 
pared radishes. 

—Mrs. W. T. Ames. 



VEAL OR LAMB CROQUETTES 

Chop meat fine^ season with a teaspoonful of onion chopped 
fine, and a teaspoonful or less of chopped parsley, pepper, and 
salt. Put a cup of milk or meat stock (milk preferable) in a 
frying-pan set over the fire, and as soon as it boils lay in it a 
slice or two of bread. Let it boil till soft, then stir in it the 
seasoned veal till all are well mixed. Remove from the fire, 
and stir in one well-beaten egg. When cold mold finely, not 
in wrinkles. Roll in bread or cracker crumbs, then in eggs 
and again in cracker or bread crumbs. Boil in hot lard. 

—Mrs. W. T. Ames. 

VEAL SQUABS 

Have veal cutlets cut quite thin, spread each with finely- 
chopped salt pork mixed with an equal quantity of bread 
crumbs. Small seasoning of minced onion, pepper, and salt 
to taste. Lay two good-sized oysters in the center of each cut- 
let, and roll up tightly, and tie with string. Put in a dripping- 
pan, pour over a cup of boiling water and bake (covered) until 
the meat is done. Skim the gravy, and thicken with flour, 
and pour over the squabs as they lie on a dish. Garnish with 
parsley, and serve. 

— Mrs. L. H. Brown. 

BLANQUETTE OF VEAL 

Make a rich gravy with two teaspoons of flour rubbed into 
one-fourth of a pound of butter, one pint of water, juice of one 
lemon, parsley, salt, mace, and a wee pinch of red pepper. 
Slice cold veal, and scald it thoroughly in the gravy; take 



WOODBRIDGE COOK BOOK 53 

up on a dish; have ready the yolks of two eggs well beaten; 
stir them into the gravy which is still on the fire, and pour 
the gravy directly over the veal. 

— Mrs. Charles Taylor Pierce. 

PRESSED VEAL 

Cover with water a shin of veal (have the butcher crack 
bones) put in a little salt, and boil until the meat drops off the 
bones. When done pick apart or chop a little, pour over the 
liquor it was boiled in; add pepper and curry; stir all together 
well; put in a mold; slice cold. 

— Mrs. J. H. Coddington. 

VEAL CUTLETS 

Beat one egg, add salt and pepper. Lay the cutlets in this 
mixture, then dip in bread or cracker crumbs. Put in pan 
with lump of butter, and cook slow at first; increase heat. 
When done it should be a nice brown. A nice gravy to serve 
with this is made by adding a cup of milk after veal is done 
and taken up to the liquor in the pan; thicken and strain. 



* * 



BEWITCHED VEAL 

Three pounds lean veal, one-half pound of fat pork, one nut- 
meg grated, one small onion, butter size of egg, little red 
pepper, and salt. Chop all very fine, and mix them together 
with three eggs well beaten, and a teacup of milk. Form into 
a small loaf, pressing very firmly. Bake one and one-half 
hours. 

—J. E. H. 

VEAL LOAF 

Three and one-half pounds chopped lean raw veal, three 
eggs well beaten, one tablespoonful of cream, one tablespoon- 



54 WOODBRIDGE COOK BOOK 

ful of salt, four crackers rolled fine. Mix all together. Make 
into a loaf, tie in a buttered cloth, and roast, basting as for 
roast beef — one and one-half hours should be ample if fire is 
not too slow. 

—Mrs. W. T. Ames. 

PLAIN HASH 

Take any pieces left from cold roasts, steaks, or stews, 
chop very fine. To every quart of meat allow a quart of 
chopped potatoes. Season with salt and pepper. Put in fry- 
ing-pan with generous piece of butter, and one-half pint of 
milk or water; two hard-boiled eggs chopped fine improve 
this, and a little onion may be added if liked. This can be 
shaped like an omelet, and browned. 

—J. E. H. 



EGGS 

EGG BAKED IN TOMATOES 

Remove a slice from top of each tomato, take out enough 
pulp to admit the egg, sprinkle with salt and pepper, drop an 
egg into each, put a piece of butter on, put on a buttered dish, 
and bake until the egg is set and tomato tender. Serve on 
hot buttered toast. 

— H. K. O. 

DEVILED EGGS 

One dozen eggs boiled hard, split open, and cream the yel- 
lows, adding butter or oil, salt, pepper, lemon juice, or vinegar; 
fill the half of the whites with the ingredients. Serve cold. 

— Mrs. W. H. Demarest. 

EGG FARCI 

Cut hard-boiled eggs in halves, — cross-wise, — remove the 
yolks, put the whites aside in pans, rub the yolks through a 
sieve, or mash very fine; add an equal quantity of cold, cooked 
chicken or veal, finely chopped ; mix in a little butter or mayon- 
naise; season to taste with salt, pepper, mustard, lemon 
juice, and cayenne. Fill whites, put them together; sprinkle 
with chopped parsley; serve in lettuce leaves or on a plate of 
thinly-cut slices of ham. Nice luncheon dish. 

—Mrs. L. H. Brown. 

SCALLOPED EGGS 

One dozen hard-boiled eggs sliced; butter pudding-dish, 
putting layer of the eggs, salt, pepper, and grated cheese and 

55 



Compliments 

of 

Boynton Beach. 
MORROW & DAY, 

8 J Montgomery St., ^ Jersey City< 



Specialties 



Catering, .... 

Ice Cream, .... 

Fine Cakes. . . . 



JOHN W. SALING. 

FLORIST, 

Cor. Chtifch and Harrison Streets, - - - Rahway, N.J. 

Rear the First Presbyterian Church. 



WOODBRIDGE COOK BOOK 57 

small lumps of butter on till eggs are all used. Make sauce 
of one cup milk and one tablespoonful of flour, pour over and 
bake. — Mrs. Oscar Miller. 

OMELET 

Six eggs, tablespoonful of milk to each egg; eggs beaten 
separately; salt and pepper. Cook in a hot, buttered frying- 
pan until well set, then place in the oven to brown the top. 

— Georgia Brokaw. 

OMELET 

Six eggs, three small tablespoonfuls of flour, three cups of 
milk, a little salt. Grease pan well, and bake about fifteen 
minutes; turn out on platter, and roll. 

— Anon. 

VARIATIONS OF THE OMELET 

No. i; sprinkle a little parsley chopped fine over the top. 
No. 2; turn tomato, Becham, or mushroom sauce on the dish 
around the omelet. Sprinkle the top with chopped mush- 
roms if that sauce is used. Garnish with pointed croutons. 
No. 3 ; green omelet. Mix chopped parsley with the egg mix- 
ture before cooking the omelet, and do not brown the sur- 
face. No. 4; with peas or tomatoes. Before turning a plain 
omelet spread with a few green peas or tomatoes, cooked and 
seasoned. Asparagus, or any other vegetable may be used the 
same way. No. 5; with ham. Spread the plain omelet with 
ham chopped fine before turning it. Any other cooked meat 
may be used the same way. 

— Selected. 
EGGS FOR INVALIDS 

The best way to cook an egg for an invalid is to drop them 
in boiling water or pour boiling water over egg in the shell, 
and let it stand a few minutes on the back of the stove. 

H. K. O. 



58 WOODBRIDGE COOK BOOK 

LIMED EGGS FOR WINTER 

Get a lump of new lime and pour enough water to cover it, 
slake it. It will be like thick pudding if right ; one good cup- 
ful of this slaked lime, one handful of salt to every two quarts 
of water; let that settle, and pour the clear lime water on 
your eggs ; keep them well covered with the lime water ; buy or 
get heavy butter firkins, one to mix the brine in, and the 
other for the eggs. One firkin holds about fifteen dozen eggs. 
Keep lime water brine always on hand, and watch eggs from 
time to time to prevent the water from evaporating. Limed 
eggs are good for all cooking except boiling. Be sure to 
have fresh eggs to lime. 

—Mrs. W. T. Ames. 



POULTRY AND GAME 

TURKEY. 

Young hen turkeys are best for roasting. The legs should 
be black, the skin white, the breast broad and fat; and the 
shorter the neck the better. An old hen has reddish, rough 
legs. A gobbler, if young, should have black legs and small 
spurs, and is always much larger than the hen of the same 
age. The flesh of an old gobbler is strong and tough, and it 
can be told by its reddish legs and long spurs. Roast turkey 
with giblet sauce. Clean and prepare exactly the same as roast 
chicken, using double the amount of stuffing, and roasting 
fifteen minutes to every pound. 

— Selected. 



TO ROAST CHICKEN 

Clean and stufif the breast and part of the body with dressing 
made as follows: Take a pint of bread crumbs; add a tea- 
spoonful of salt, a little pepper, a teaspoonful of chopped par- 
sley, a pinch of sweet marjoram, a heaping tablespoonful of 
butter, and mix well together. Dredge the fowl with salt and 
pepper; rub well with soft butter. Then put in enough water 
to cover the bottom of the pan. Baste every fifteen minutes. 
When one side is browned turn and brown the other. The 
last basting should be done with soft butter. The water in 
the pan must be frequently renewed. Roast for an hour or 
more. Serve with giblet gravy made according to the usual 
recipe. 

— Editors. 

59 



WOODBRIDGE COOK BOOK 6i 

CHICKEN FRICASSEE 

Clean and cut the chicken into joints, put it in a sauce- 
pan with the giblets; stew in just enough water to cover it, 
until tender; season with pepper, salt, and butter; thicken with 
flour; boil up once, and serve with the gravy poured over it. 

— Miss Georgia Brokaw. 

CHICKEN CROQUETTES NO. i 

One pint of chopped chicken (boiled), one cup chicken stock 
or cream, two eggs, one tablespoon of flour, one teaspoon of 
salt, one-half teaspoon of pepper, one tablespoon of lemon 
juice, two tablespoons of butter. Boil all together until thick- 
ened; put in the chicken and one-half point of boiled rice; make 
into croquettes, dip into egg and dried bread crumbs; set aside 
over night, then fry in hot lard. 

— Mrs. Charles Taylor Pierce. 

CHICKEN CROQUETTES NO. 2 

One cup of chicken chopped very fine, one and one-half tea- 
spoonfuls of salt, one and one-half teaspoonfuls of pepper, one 
and one-half teaspoonfuls of celery salt, two tablespoonfuls of 
bread crumbs. Mix all together with white sauce. Cool and 
shape; dip in egg and cracker dust, and fry in very hot lard. 



FRIED CHICKEN A LA MARYLAND 

Take a young chicken weighing from one to two pounds, 
cut it up as for fricassee, dip each piece in egg, then in 
cracker dust, and fry in hot lard. Have lard hot, but cook 
slowly about three-quarters of an hour with a cover over the 
pan. Trim the pieces of chicken after to prevent burning. 
Fry to a nice golden brown. 

—Mary E. Franklin. 



62 WOODBRIDGE COOK BOOK 

CREAMED CHICKEN 

Select tender fowls, dress, and joint them. Place in a 
baking pan, and season with salt and pepper, and if it be not 
over fat, a few small lumps of butter. Cover with rich, sweet 
milk, and set in a moderate oven with pan uncovered, and 
bake. When the milk has cooked away the chicken will be 
done. 

— Luella T. Kelly. 

PRESSED CHICKEN 

Boil a chicken until tender, take out all the bones, and 
chop the meat very fine; season with salt, pepper, and plenty 
of butter; add to the Hquor the chicken was boiled in one cup of 
bread crumbs made soft with hot water; add to this the 
chopped chicken. When heated, take out and press into a 
dish. Serve cold. 

— Editors. 

QUAIL 

Quail should be larded through and through, and not 
stufifed; basted repeatedly with butter, and not cooked in too 
hot an oven. Grouse should have an onion and herbs laid in 
the pan, or if stufifed with celery alone is delicious and savory. 

— Aceola Cook Book. 

BROILED QUAILS 

Clean, wash, and split down the back. Lay in cold water 
half an hour. Wipe carefully; season with salt and pepper, 
and broil on a gridiron over a bright fire. When done, lay in 
a hot dish, butter on both sides well, and serve at once. 
Pigeons, woodcock, and small birds may be broiled in the same 
manner. 

— Editors. 



WOODBRIDGE COOK BOOK 63 

DRESSING FOR TURKEY 

One loaf stale bakers' bread, crumbled very fine; add one 
teaspoonful Royal baking powder, a little thyme, a little sum- 
mer savory, salt and pepper to taste; one pint of oysters drained 
from their liquor, a pint of chopped celery; butter the size of a 
teacup. 

—Mrs. J. E. Nash. 

OYSTER DRESSING FOR TURKEY 

Take a loaf of stale bread, cut ofif crust, and soften by plac- 
ing in a pan, pouring on boiling water, draining off imme- 
diately, and covering closely ; crumble the bread fine, add half 
pound of melted butter, or, if it be very rich, add a teaspoon- 
ful each of salt and pepper, or enough to season rather highly; 
drain off liquor from a quart of oysters, bring to a boil, skim, 
and pour over the bread crumbs, adding the soaked crusts 
and one or two eggs. Mix all thoroughly, and if dry moisten 
with a little sweet milk, lastly adding the oysters, being care- 
ful not to break them, or first put in a spoonful of dressing, 
then three or four oysters, and so on until the turkey is filled. 

— Selected. 




Sell BECAUSE Can 
Conscientiously Recommend 

J. mm k m 

Well-known 

TEAS^ 

COFFEES 



We know them to be the purest j|^ ^_'oyfi£'e ^,^ 
and best obtainable in any market 
in the world and that each brand 
is always uniform in quality, in 
aroma, in flavor. 

We have all their leading brands 
in open stock; also their famous blends in sealed 
packages. 

GEO. H. BROWN. W. L. HARNED. 




VEGETABLES 

Nearly all vegetables require to be put on to cook in boiling 
water. Green peas, asparagus, string-beans, and those that 
should retain their fresh color should be kept uncovered while 
cooking. The abuses in the cooking of vegetables are as great 
as in the cooking of meats. Put cabbage, cauliflower, and 
spinach in cold salt water for an hour before cooking. This 
takes out all worms or vermin. 

TIME FOR COOKING VEGETABLES 

(Summer j 
Green dandelions, one and one-half hours; spinach, one hour; 
string beans, two hours; green peas, one-half hour; beets, one 
hour; turnips, one hour; squash, one hour; potatoes, one-third 
of an hour; corn, one-third of an hour; asparagus, one-third 
of an hour. This applies to young and fresh vegetables. 

(Winter.) 
Squash, one hour; potatoes (boiled) one-half hour; potatoes 
(baked) one hour; sweet potatoes (boiled) three-fourths of an 
hour; sweet potatoes (baked) one hour; turnips, two hours; 
beets, three and one-half hours; parsnips, one hour; carrots, 
one and one-half hours; cabbage, three hours. 

BOILED ASPARAGUS 

Roll in wet cloth as soon as it is brought to the house, to 
keep it crisp. Scrape the coarse fiber from the stalk, and cut 
to even lengths. Boil in salted water gently for three-quarters 
of an hour. Dressing — one tablespoonful of butter melted; 
add one even tablespoonful of flour, stir till smooth, and add 

65 



66 WOODBRIDGE COOK BOOK 

slowly a cup or more of the water the asparagus was boiled in 
to make a smooth drawn butter. A tablespoonful of cream is 
an addition. Dip toast also in the water, and serve under the 
asparagus. 

— Mrs. Helen B. Ames. 

ASPARAGUS WITH BUTTER SAUCE. 

Four eggs, butter, half cup; water, half cup; lemon juice, 
two tablespoonfuls; salt to taste, red pepper to taste. To pre- 
pare: Put beaten yolks of eggs with water, lemon juice; salt, 
pepper in double boiler until the mixture thickens; add 
butter cut in small pieces one at a time; when it boils and is 
smooth it is done. Serve with other boiled vegetables. 

— M. E. Perry. 

BAKED BEANS 

Soak a pint of small white beans over night. In the 
morning pour ofif all the water, pour on a pint of cold water, 
and set on the back of the range to simmer slowly for three- 
quarters of an hour. Place the beans in a bean-pot with half 
a pound of scored salt pork in the middle, half a teaspoonful 
of dry mustard, salt, white pepper, and two tablespoonfuls of 
molasses. Add water from time to time, as it grows dry, and 
bake twelve hours. 

— Editors. 

CAULIFLOWER AND CHEESE 

Prepare and cook your cauliflower the same as for creamed 
cauliflower; make a sauce of one tablespoonful of butter, 
melted; stir into this one tablespoonful of flour, then add one 
cup of milk and one-half teaspoonful of salt; when boiling stir 
in one-half cup grated cheese; put your boiled cauliflower in a 
baking-dish, pour this sauce over it with a sprinkling of cheese 
on top, and brown in a hot oven. 

— Selected. 



WOODBRIDGE COOK BOOK ^7 

CREAMED CAULIFLOWER 

Break up your head of cauliflower in small pieces; wash 
well, and let stand in cold water; put in a kettle of boiling water 
with a teaspoonful of salt, and boil from twenty-five to thirty 
minutes; drain, put in a vegetable dish, and pour over the 
following sauce : melt one-half tablespoonf ul butter, stir in this 
one-half tablespoonful of flour, when smooth add one-half cup 
milk and one-fourth teaspoonful of salt; stir until it boils; pour 
over the cauliflower, and serve at once. To whiten cauliflower, 
soak in salt water one hour before cooking. 

— Editors. 

CABBAGE, VERY DELICIOUS 

Boil a head of cabbage in three waters, salting the last water, 
drain it, and chop very fine. Make a sauce of flour, milk, and 
butter such as for cauliflower, mix with the cabbage, put in a 
baking-dish, ^rate cheese over it, and bake half an hour. 

— Mrs. L. H. Brown. 

CREAM COLD SLAW 

Take one-half cup cream, make very sweet, then take an- 
other half cup cream, mix with vinegar, pepper, and salt to 
taste; beat to a froth, and then pour on cabbage with sweet 
cream. 

— Mabel Freeman. 

HOT SLAW 

Take a nice, small, white head of cabbage, cut fine on slaw 
cutter; put piece of butter size of walnut in agate pot, and one- 
half teacup of water; add cabbage, and let simmer on back 
of stove one hour. Take one-half teacup of vinegar, if very 
strong add a little water, one teaspoonful sugar, one ^%^\ 
pepper and salt to taste. Beat ^z%\ add vinegar, sugar, pep- 



WOODBRIDGE COOK BOOK 69 

per, and salt; bring the cabbage forward on stove; stir in the 
mixture, being careful not to let it curdle. Serve at once. 

—Mrs. Etter. 



BOILED GREEN CORN 

This should be cooked the same day it is gathered; it loses 
its sweetness in a few hours. Strip off the husks, pick out all 
the silk, and place in cold water over a quick fire. When the 
water boils the corn is ready for the table. Serve on an open 
dish covered with a napkin. 

— S. M. Brewster. 

CORN OYSTERS NO. i 

One pint of raw corn grated from the ear, one small tea- 
cup of flour, from one-half to two-thirds of a cup of milk, ac- 
cording to the juice in the corn. Let the mixture be soft 
enough to drop from the spoon, and fry in hot fat. 

— Mrs. Charles Taylor Pierce. 

CORN OYSTERS NO. 2 

Chop one pint canned corn very fine; add the well-beaten 
yolks of two eggs, two generous tablespoonfuls sifted flour, a 
pinch of pepper, one-half teaspoonful of salt, and, last, the 
beaten whites; drop by spoonfuls in boiling fat. 

— ^J. E. Brown. 

CORN PUDDING 

One dozen ears of corn, grated; four eggs, one pint of milk, 
one salt-spoon of salt. Beat yolks and whites separate. Add 
yolks to corn, and mix thoroughly ; add salt and milk ; stir in 
carefully whites of eggs. Butter a pudding-dish, pour in the 
mixture, and bake slowly one hour. Eat immediately. 

— Mrs. J. B. Edgar. 



70 WOODBRIDGE COOK BOOK 

CORN CAKES 

One dozen ears of corn, nine soda crackers, one and a half 
cups of milk, one teaspoonful of salt, one teaspoonful of sugar. 

—Mrs. E. C. R. 

GREEN CORN FRITTERS 

Half a dozen ears of corn, two eggs, one tablespoonful of 
flour, one-half teaspoonful of salt (scant). Cut corn from cob; 
add eggs, flour, and salt; fry in hot butter, or butter and 
lard. 

—Mrs. Etter. 

GREEN CORN OMELET 

Twelve ears of green corn, four eggs, three tablespoonfuls of 
flour, pinch of salt; mix this all well together, and drop table- 
spoonful in very hot lard; fry slowly to golden brown. 

—Mrs. Etter. 

CUCUMBERS 

Cucumbers should be placed in ice water some time before 
using; then pare them, being careful to cut away all the green. 
Cut in thin slices, and sprinkle with salt. When ready to 
serve drain oflf the water, and put on bits of ice, and season 
with pepper and vinegar. 

— M. Brewster. 

MACARONI 

Take the quantity of macaroni you wish to use and soak in 
warm water about three-quarters of an hour, then pour off the 
water and add milk enough to cover the macaroni. Boil about 
ten minutes. Place the macaroni in a dish, one layer at a 
time, covering each one with butter, grated cheese, and a little 
salt. When the dish is filled, add a little more milk — enough 



WOODBRIDGE COOK BOOK 71 

to prevent it from drying — and place in the oven ten or fifteen 
minutes, or until the macaroni is well browned. 

—Mrs. S. B. Hinsdale. 

MACARONI WITH CHEESE 

One-quarter pound or twelve sticks macaroni broken into 
one-inch lengths, and cooked in three pints boiling salted water 
twenty minutes. Turn into a colander, and pour over it cold 
water; drain. Make a sauce of one tablespoonful each of but- 
ter and flour, and one and one-half cups hot milk; salt. Put 
a layer of grated cheese in bottom of bake dish, then a layer 
of macaroni, and one of sauce; then cheese, macaroni and 
sauce, and cover the top with fine bread crumbs, with bits of 
butter dotted over, and a little grated cheese. Bake until 
brown. 

—Mrs. W. L. Harned. 

STEWED MUSHROOMS— FRESH 

Let them lie in salt and water one hour, then cover with 
fresh water, and stew until tender. Season with butter, salt, 
and pepper; cream if you wish. 

— M. E. Perry. 

MUSHROOMS COOKED UNDER GLASS 

Saute one-fourth pound of peeled mushroom caps in a table- 
spoonful of butter; season with one-fourth a teaspoonful of 
salt, and a dash of pepper. Add half a cup of thin cream; 
cover, and let simmer until the cream is somewhat reduced. 
Then arrange on a round of bread in the dish, and pour the 
liquid over them. Cover with the glass made for the purpose, 
and bake about twenty minutes in a slow oven. An agate 
dish and large jelly glass may be used, provided the special 
dish with glass be not at hand. Send the mushrooms to the 
table covered with the glass. 

—Bertha M. Campbell 



H. CUTTER. S. B. BREWSTER, Manager 

Cutter & Brewster, 

"Wholesale and Retail Dealers in 

Flour, Meal, Feed, Bran, and Grain, Baled 

Hay, Straw, Peat Moss, and Shavings, 

MAIN STREET, 

PhSiX WOODBRIDGE, N. J. 



CATERIKC DELICACIES 

MISS SUSIE FREEMAN, 

Rahway Avenue, Woodbridge, 

CATERER. 



Sponge Cakes, Finger Rolls, etc., to order. 
Shortest Notice. 



^y'triryfo PERTH AMBOY 

stop at 

GREENBADM'S DEPARTMENT STORE, 

On the left-hand side of STATE STREET 
(400 State Street). 



Dry . Fancy ^ Best of 

Goods. Goods. Everything. 



WOODBRIDGE COOK BOOK 73 

TO KEEP LETTUCE FRESH 

Clean and wash as soon as brought to the house. Have 
bags made of cheese cloth to keep it in; wet the bag, and in 
this place the lettuce leaves, shaking off some of the water. 
Put on ice in summer, and in cold place in winter. Will keep 
two days or three and be crisp and fresh. Celery also should 
be treated this way to preserve it. 

— Helen B. Ames. 



ESCALOPED SWEET POTATOES 

Boil a quantity of sweet potatoes. Have ready a well- 
buttered baking-dish, and when the potatoes are cold, slice and 
put a layer in bottom of dish; add a tablespoonful of sugar, 
salt, and pepper, and plenty of butter; then another layer 
of potatoes, with sugar, pepper, salt, and butter, as before. 
Proceed. in this way until your dish is full. Pour over the 
whole enough milk, so that when you tip the dish you can see 
it. Bake in hot oven from an hour and a half to two hours. 

—Mrs. S. B. Hinsdale. 



POTATOES A LA CLYDE 

Bake as many potatoes as are required. Select long po- 
tatoes; after baking the potatoes split them lengthwise with 
a »harp knife, and remove the pulps from the rinds carefully 
with a spoon. Keep the rinds whole. Press the pulp through 
a colander, then whip through it some melted butter and 
cream ; a flavoring of chopped chives and parsley ; season with 
salt and pepper. Return this pulp to the potato shells. Make 
it up in mound shape; grate Parmesan cheese over the top of 
each mound, then stand them in a hot oven till quite brown. 
Serve piping hot with beefsteak or chops. 

— Selected, 



74 WOODBRIDGE COOK BOOK 

POTATO CROQUETTES 

Two cups cold mashed potatoes free from lumps, two eggs 
beaten to a froth, one tablespoonful melted butter; salt and 
pepper to taste; form into croquettes; roll in beaten tgg and 
cracker crumbs, and fry in hot lard. 

—Mrs. W. A. Osborn. 

POTATO CROQUETTES 

Five good-sized potatoes boiled mealy. Pour over potatoes 
while mashing one-half cup of scalding milk. Add one tea- 
spoon of butter, a little nutmeg, pepper and salt. When cold 
form in shape ; dip in Qgg and cracker crumb ; fry in hot deep 
lard. 

— Mrs. M. D. Valentine. 

POTATO FINGER PUFFS 

Four potatoes pared and boiled until soft; mash with a 
little milk and butter, and put aside to cool; when cold add 
one egg, and beat five minutes with a silver fork. With 
floured hand mold into finger puffs, and fry to a light brown 
in beef drippings. Serve in hot side-dishes. 

— Mrs. Oscar Miller. 

POTATOES AU GRATIN 

Chop rather fine cold-boiled potatoes. Have ready a small 
earthen baking-dish, put in the bottom of this dish a layer 
of the potatoes ; put over them a dash of white pepper, a little 
salt, and small bits of butter; grate over all a small quantity of 
cheese ; now add another layer of potatoes, salt, pepper, butter, 
and cheese as before, and proceed until the dish is full. Pour 
milk into the dish until when you tip it you can see it. Bake 
in slow oven about one and one-half hours. The milk should 
all disappear and the potatoes should be a nice brown. Boiled 

rice is very nice cooked in the same way. 

— E. G. H. 



WOODBRIDGE COOK BOOK 75 

STUFFED POTATOES 

Take fair, large potatoes, bake until soft, cut a round slice 
off the top of each ; scrape out the inside carefully, so as not to 
break the skin, and set aside the empty skins with their covers. 
Mash the inside very smoothly, working into while hot some 
butter and cream, about half a teaspoonful of each for every 
potato. Season and work soft with milk; put into a sauce- 
pan to heat. When hot fill the skins with mixture, replacing 
the tops. Return to oven three minutes; arrange on a napkin 
in deep dish with caps uppermost; cover with folds of napkin, 
and eat hot. 

— Mrs. Oscar Miller. 

LYONNAISE POTATOES 

Two cupfuls of cooked chopped potatoes, one even table- 
spoonful of finely chopped onion, two tablespoonfuls of butter, 
one tablespoonful chopped parsley; salt and pepper to taste. 
Melt the butter, add the onion, and fry until a nice brown; add 
the seasoned potatoes, and stir until they have absorbed all the 
butter. Add the parsley, and serve at once. 

— Aceola Cook Book. 

ESCALOPED POTATOES 

Butter a baking-dish, pare potatoes, and slice them; put in 
dish a layer of potatoes, and sprinkle with salt, pepper, a little 
butter, and then another layer of potatoes, etc., until the dish 
is nearly full ; then fill with milk or cream. Bake one and one- 
half hours. 

— Aceola Cook Book. 

BOILED PARSNIPS 

If young, scrape before cooking; if old, pare carefully, and 
if large, split. Put into boiling water, salted, and boil if small 
and tender from half to three-quarters of an hour; if full 



WOODBRIDGE COOK BOOK 77 

grown, more than an hour. When tender drain and slice 
lengthwise, buttering well when they are dished. For frying 
after boiling cut in thick slices; dredge with flour, and fry 
brown on both sides in hot butter. 

— M. E. Perry. 

RICE CROQUETTES 

Half a coffee cup of rice, one teaspoonful of salt, one quart 
cold water; cook rice until tender, and set aside to cool; 
when cold add the grated rind of half a lemon, form into cro- 
quettes, dip in well-beaten egg, then bread crumbs; fry in but- 
ter until golden brown. 

—Mrs. Etter. 

BAKED SQUASH 

Boil and mash fresh squash; stir in two teaspoonfuls of 
butter and an egg well beaten, a quarter of a cup full of milk; 
salt and pepper to taste. Fill a buttered pudding-dish with 
this; strew fine buttered bread crumbs over the top, and bake 
to a nice brown. This is a very delicate way to prepare 
squash, 

— Mrs. L. H. Brown. 

BAKED TOMATOES 
Remove the tops of fresh tomatoes, also a little of the in- 
side; prepare buttered crumbs; season with salt, pepper, and 
powdered sage. Onion juice or other seasoning may be used 
in place of the sage. Fill the cavities, and cover the top with 
crumbs. Bake in a hot oven until the crumbs are a delicate 

brown. 

— M. Brewster. 

FRIED TOMATOES 

Wash and cut into halves six nice smooth tomatoes; place 
in a granite baking-pan with the skin side down. Cut a 



;8 WOODBRIDGE COOK BOOK 

quarter pound of butter in small pieces, and place over the 
tomatoes ; dust with salt and pepper, and stand over a moderate 
fire to fry slowly. When the tomatoes are tender take them 
up carefully with a cake turner, and slide on a heated dish. 
Draw the baking-pan over a quick fire ; stir until the butter is 
a nice brown; then add two tablespoonfuls of flour; mix until 
smooth; add a pint of milk or cream; stir continually until it 
boils; season with salt and pepper to taste; pour over the 
tomatoeSj and serve. 

— Miss Georgia Brokaw. 

ESCALOPED TOMATOES. 

One pint of fresh or canned tomatoes, one generous pint of 
bread crumbs, one tablespoonful of sugar, one scant table- 
spoonful of salt, one-fourth teaspoonful of pepper. Put a 
layer of the tomatoes in a baking-dish ; dredge with salt or pep- 
per, and dot butter here and there. Now put in a layer of 
crumbs, continue this until all the ingredients are used, hav- 
ing crumbs and butter for the last layer. If fresh tomatoes 
have been used bake one hour, but if canned bake half hour. 

— Miss Georgia Brokaw. 



SALADS AND SALAD DRESSINGS 

" To make a perfect salad there should be a spendthrift for oil, a 
miser for vinegar, a wise man for salt, and a madcap to stir the ingre- 
dients up and mix them well together."— Spanish Proverb. 



CHEESE SALAD 

Mash one Neufchatel cheese and moisten with milk; form 
into balls size of robins' eggs, sprinkle with finely chopped 
parsley, arrange in lettuce leaves, and garnish with olives or 
radishes, and serve with French dressing. 

— Mrs. L. H. Brown. 



EGG SALAD 

Six eggs boiled hard. Take the whites off without break- 
ing the yolks. Chop the whites; chop about twice as much 
celery as you have egg; mix together, and season with salt and 
pepper to taste. Place about two tablespoonfuls of this on 
the center of lettuce leaves in a pyramid, and crown with the 
yolk. Put over this a tablespoonful of mayonnaise. 

— Georgia Brokaw. 



FRUIT SALAD 

Serve on lettuce leaves with French dressing, sliced oranges, 
bananas, Malaga grapes, and English walnuts. 

— S. M. Brewster, 

79 



ARTERET TLECTRIC 



r ARTERET £ 



LSC 



OMPANY 



T T/^^TT'T'Q ^^^ ^s good as 
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GIVE the VOLTAGE 

we agree to, 

and are ALWAYS READY 

in case of emergency. 



We make them BURN 



Let us LIGHT YOUR 

HOUSE and you can 
depend upon the service. 



WOODBRIDGE COOK BOOK 8i 

POTATO SALAD 

Six potatoes, two onions, three eggs boiled hard. Slice 
potatoes, onions, and whites of eggs together. Rub the yolks 
to a cream ; add one half pint of cream ; salt, pepper, and vine- 
gar to taste. 

— Mrs. John Lockwood. 

SWEET-BREAD SALAD 

Boil the sweet breads in salted water until tender; when cold 
pick in small pieces, and serve with lettuce and mayonnaise 
dressing. 

— Mrs. Georgiana Crater. 

TOMATO SALAD 

Select nice, smooth round tomatoes, peel and remove a 
portion of the pulp. In the opening in the tomato pour 
chopped celery and cabbage, seasoned with salt and pepper, 
celery, and mustard seeds. Allow one-third celery to two- 
thirds cabbage. Serve ice-cold on lettuce leaves with a table- 
spoonful of mayonnaise on each tomato. 

— Mrs. M. J. Demarest. 

WALDORF SALAD 

Mix equal quantities of fine-cut apple and celery, and 
moisten with mayonnaise dressing. You want tart apples. 
When you pare any fruit, use a silver knife. As you pare the 
apples for this salad, put them into cold water with a little 
bit of lemon juice; the sour water prevents them from turning 
dark, and keeps them white. Have your celery cut in cubes 
the same size as the apples. If you wish, add English walnuts 
to this salad. Garnish with curled celery. An attractive way 
for serving Waldorf salad is to remove the tops from perfect 



82 WOODBRIDGE COOK BOOK 

apples, red, or green, scoop out the fruit, leaving enough to 
keep the skins shapely. Fill the shells with the salad, replace 
the tops, and serve on lettuce leaves. 

— Editors. 

CHICKEN SALAD 

Boil fov^ls well done and remove the skin; cut white and 
dark meat in small squares. Two stalks of celery and two 
hard-boiled eggs, chopped fine, and mix thoroughlv with the 
meat. Season to taste, and add mayonnaise dressing. 

— ^James Ash. 

CABBAGE DRESSING NO. i 

Half cup of vinegar, one teaspoonful of salt, one-half tea- 
spoonful of pepper, one teaspoonful sugar, one-half cup cream ; 
beat all together; pour cold over cabbage. 

—Mrs. W. H. Demarest. 

CABBAGE DRESSING NO. 2 

One-half cup of vinegar, one-half teaspoonful of salt, one- 
half teaspoonful of pepper, one tablespoonful of sugar; let this 
come to a boil ; one tablespoonful of butter, one teaspoonful of 
flour; cream together, and boil five minutes. Add one egg 

beaten light. 

— Mrs. Margaretta Brewster. 

SALAD DRESSING— FRENCH 

Two tablespoonfuls of oil, one tablespoonful of vinegar, one- 
half teaspoonful of salt, one-half teaspoonful of pepper. Mix 
all well together. 

SALAD DRESSING NO. i 

One egg well beaten, one teaspoonful of mustard, one tea- 
spoonful gf salt, one teaspoonful of sugar, one-fourth tea- 



WOODBRIDGE COOK BOOK 83 

spoonful black pepper, two-thirds of a cup of vinegar. Mix 
together, and boil until it thickens, being careful not to scorch. 

— Mrs. M. Irving Demarest. 



SALAD DRESSING NO. 2 

One-half cup of vinegar, one egg, one-half teaspoonful of 
mixed mustard, one teaspoonful of sugar, a little salt. Mix 
well ; put on the stove, and heat until it thickens, stirring all the 
time. 

—Mrs. Oscar H. Miller. 



SALAD DRESSING NO. 3 

One pint of vinegar, two tablespoonfuls of butter, one table- 
spoonful of salt, two tablespoonfuls of sugar. Put into farina 
boiler, and melt all together. Reserve a little of the vinegar, 
and mix with two teaspoonfuls of mustard, one-fourth tea- 
spoonful of Cayenne pepper, five eggs, well beaten. When the 
first mixture has cooled some, stir it into cold vinegar, mus- 
tard, and pepper, then into the eggs. Return to farina boiler, 
and cook until it thickens. Before serving them with cream, if 
vinegar is very sour, dilute it with water. 

— Mrs. Jessie F. Donald. 

SALAD CREAM 

One heaping tablespoonful of mustard, one teaspoonful of 
salt, one tablespoonful of sugar; scald with hot water enough 
to mix. Add butter size of an egg. Add one-half cup of 
milk and two-thirds of a cup of vinegar and three well-beaten 
eggs Put over the fire in double boiler, and cook to smooth, 
creamy consistency. Will keep some time bottled in a cool 
place. 

— Mrs. E. H. Boynton. 



WOODBRIDGE COOK BOOK 85 

MAYONNAISE DRESSING 

Chill thoroughly eggs, oil, plate, and fork. Put the yolks 
of two eggs in a soup plate, add one-half teaspoonful of salt, 
and stir with a silver fork until yolks are well mixed; add oil 
drop by drop at first; add a drop of vinegar as needed; that is, 
when the dressing grows oily. As it grows thicker, oil may be 
added more quickly; add only acid enough to keep the oil and 
other ingredients from separating. Two eggs will take a 
half pint of oil. The dressing should be smooth and thick 
when finished. Season with red pepper and lemon juice. 

— Mrs. D. S. Voorhees. 

MAYONNAISE DRESSING FOR CHICKEN OR CAB- 
BAGE SALAD 

Two eggs, raw, well beaten; one tablespoonful of corn 
starch, three tablespoonfuls of sugar, one teaspoonful of salt, 
one saltspoonful of red pepper, two teaspoonfuls of mustard, 
one cup of vinegar. Dissolve corn starch, mustard, red pep- 
per, salt, and sugar together with a little cold water. Put 
vinegar on fire, and when hot pour over the eggs, then add the 
other mixture, and return to the fire, and stir constantly until 
the consistency of cream. Add two tablespoonfuls of butter 
at the very last. 

— Mrs. E. Franklin. 



BREAD, ROLLS, ETC. 

BREAD NO. I 

Four medium-sized potatoes, boiled in two quarts of water; 
rub through sieve. When cool add two tablespoonfuls of 
sugar, one of salt, and piece of compressed yeast; cover, and 
let stand over night. In the morning knead, and let stand 
until light. Mold, put in pans, and when light, or, once 
again its size, bak^. This will make four medium-sized loaves. 

— Mrs. D. S. Voorhees. 

BREAD NO. 2 

One tablespoonful of lard, one tablespoonful of butter (large) 
one handful of salt, one pint of milk, one pint of water, or one 
quart of milk, one-half of a compressed yeast cake, two quarts 
of flour, one tablespoonful of sugar. Boil milk and water, and 
allow to cool. Rub lard and butter into flour; add sugar and 
salt; dissolve yeast in part of milk, and slowly work quart of 
milk and water into the flour; set over night, knead thor- 
oughly, let rise, and bake one hour. This makes two large 
loaves. 

—Mrs. Etter. 

PUMPKIN BREAD 

One quart of stewed pumpkin, one yeast cake dissolved in 
a pint of water, one cup of sugar, lump of butter size of a wal- 
nut, two teaspoonfuls of salt; mix together, and knead the 
same as for other bread. It should be slightly stififer than 
white bread. When it is light, mold out, and put in pans; 

86 



WOODBRIDGE COOK BOOK 87 

let it rise; mold the second time, and when light, bake in a 
moderate oven one hour. This will make two good-sized 
loaves. 

— Mrs. A. E. Clarkson. 

OCEAN GROVE BREAD 

One and one-half cups of flour, one teaspoonful of sugar, 
two teaspoonfuls of salt, butter the size of a walnut. Over this 
pour one and one-half quarts of boiling milk. Beat well. 
When cold put in one cake of yeast; let stand until bed time; 
then add three and one-half quarts of flour. Mold in the 
morning, and let stand until light. 

— Mrs. S. M. Brewster. 

MILK BREAD 

Put one quart milk on the stove to boil; while the milk is 
beating, put one pint of flour in your bowl. One tablespoon 
lard, sugar and salt. When your milk is boiling pour it on 
your ingredients and stir until smooth ; put one-half yeast cake 
in half-cup warm water; after the mixture is cool enough pour 
in your yeast and knead in flour until it will not stick to the 
fingers, when thrust in the dough. Be careful not to put in too 
much flour. 

— Mother Valentine. 

BROWN BREAD 

Two cups of corn meal, one cup of rye flour, one-half cup of 
molasses, three cups sour milk, one tablespoonful of soda, a 
pinch of salt. Beat thoroughly; pour in well-greased mold; 
steam four hours, and bake twenty minutes. 

— A. E. Hoagland. 

BOSTON BROWN BREAD 

One cup of rye flour, one and one-half cups of Indian meal, 
half a cup of flour, one cup of molasses, half a pint (scant) sour 



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WOODBRIDGE COOK BOOK 89 

milk, one teaspoonful of salt, one teaspoonful of soda, two tea- 
spoonfuls of shortening. 

— H. B. Ames. 

STEAMED BROWN BREAD 

In two-thirds of a cup of molasses beat up one tablespoonful 
of shortening (butter or lard). Then add one and one-half 
cups of buttermilk with one teaspoonful of soda, a little salt, 
ont cup of Indian meal, one cup of graham flour, and one cup 
of wheat flour. Beat well, and steam one hour. Then place 
in hot oven for ten or fifteen minutes until nice and brown. 
The above amount makes two loaves. 

— Mrs. John H. Love. 

CORN BREAD NO. i 

One and one-half cups of white meal, one and one-half cups 
of flour, one-half cup of butter, one-half cup of sugar, one pint 
of milk, two teaspoonfuls of cream of tartar, one teaspoonful of 
soda, two eggs, a little salt. 

—Mrs. H. K. Osborn. 

CORN BREAD NO. 2 

One cup of corn meal, sifted; one cup of milk, one egg, one- 
fourth cup of sugar, one cup of flour, one tablespoonful melted 
butter, one-half teaspoonful of salt, two teaspoonfuls of baking- 
powder; beat hard. 

— Mrs. Ernest H. Boynton. 

CORN BREAD NO. 3 

One-half pint of flour, one gill of corn meal, one-half pint of 
milk, two tablespoonfuls of sugar, one generous tablespoonful 
of butter, one and one-half teaspoonfuls of baking-powder, one- 
third teaspoonful of salt, two tablespoonfuls of boiling water, 
one egg. Mix all the dry ingredients together, and rub them 



90 WOODBRIDGE COOK BOOK 

through a sieve. Beat the egg till light, and add milk to it; 
then pour this mixture on the dry ingredients, which should 
be beaten well. Now add the butter, first melting it in the hot 
water. Pour batter in well buttered pan, and bake for half an 
hour. 

—Mrs. R. E. Morris. 

CORN CAKE 

Two cups of Indian meal, one-half teaspoonful of salt, two 
teaspoonfuls baking-powder, one tablespoonful of sugar, one 
tablespoonful wheat flour, one pint of milk, one egg. Beat 
all together, and bake one-half hour, or till done. 

— Mrs. Isaac Inslee. 

CORN GEMS 

Two cups of corn meal, two cups of flour, two cups of 
sweet milk, two eggs, three heaping teaspoonfuls of baking- 
powder, one-half cup of butter, one-half cup of sugar. Bake 
in gem pans. 

—Mrs. W. H. Miller. 

BREAKFAST CORN CAKES 

One cup of flour, one cup of corn meal, scant; one-half cup 
of sugar, one tablespoonful of melted butter, two cups of milk, 
two eggs beaten thoroughly, two teaspoonfuls of baking- 
powder. Bake in gem pans. 

— Mrs. Charles Taylor Pierce. 

BISCUIT 

One pint of milk, piece of butter size of an egg, two tea- 
spoonfuls of cream of tartar, two teaspoonfuls of;soda; flour, 
salt; mix soft. 

—Mrs. M. G. V. 



WOODBRIDGE COOK BOOK 91 

RAISED BISCUIT NO. i 

One quart of sweet milk, one cup of butter or lard and but- 
ter, half and half; a little sugar; salt to taste; one compressed 
yeast; make quite soft. After light make into small biscuits, 
and raise until very light, then bake in quick oven. 

— Mrs. J. E. Breckenridge. 

RAISED BISCUIT NO. 2 

One pint of milk, one cup of lard, one-half cake of com- 
pressed yeast, one tablespoonful of sugar, one-half teaspoon- 
ful of salt; flour to make a soft dough; let rise over night; in 
morning make into balls; let them rise, and bake them in 
quick oven. 

— Mrs. J. Edgar Brown. 

RAISED BISCUIT NO. 3 

One-half cake Magic Yeast, one-half pint milk, one-half cup 
of water, four cups of flour, one-half cup butter and lard, 
mixed, one egg, one teaspoonful of salt; one tablespoonful of 
sugar. Prepare a sponge at night as follows: Heat one-half 
pint of milk, then add enough sifted flour to make a rather 
stifif batter; add one-half cake of yeast, previously soaked in 
one-half cup lukewarm water; then set in a warm place to rise. 
In the morning mix thoroughly intp the dough one-half pint 
warm milk, also the butter (mix the butter and the lard into 
the milk before adding to the dough). Then add the egg, 
sugar, salt, and the remainder of the flour. Let rise, and 
when ready to make into biscuit, set to rise again until light; 
then place in a moderately hot oven, and bake for twenty 
minutes. This quantity will make about twenty-five biscuits. 

—Mrs. E. Stelle. 

APPLE PANCAKES 

Four eggs, one quart of sweet milk, one quart of chopped 
apples; flour enough to bake on griddle. Sauce for apple 



WOODBRIDGE COOK BOOK 93 

pancakes, one pint of molasses, one-fourth teacupful of vinegar, 
lump of butter size of a walnut; boil well together; flavor to 
taste. 

—Mrs. C. B. 



APPLE FRITTERS 

One cup of sweet milk, one teaspoonful of sugar, two eggs, 
white and yolks beaten separately; two cups of flour, one tea- 
spoonful of baking-powder. Chop some good, tart apples; 
mix in the batter; fry in hot lard; serve with maple syrup. 

— Mrs. J. E. Breckenbridge. 



BATTER FOR FRITTERS OR EGG PLANT 

Two eggs, one-half cup of milk, a little salt; flour enough 
to make a stiff batter. Beat eggs, add milk, and salt, then 
gradually stir in the flour, being careful to get the mixture 
smooth and free from lumps. Cut egg plant, or apples, very 
thin; dip in batter, and fry in deep, boiling fat. 

—Mrs. W. H. Jewett. 

CINNAMON BUN 

One cup of sweet milk, lukewarm; one cup of sugar, one 
yeast cake, dissolved in one cup of tepid water; one scant cup 
of butter and lard mixed; three eggs, little salt; flour suffi- 
cient to roll. Let rise over night, knead down, roll out about 
one inch thick, spread with butter, sprinkle with cinnamon, 
and you can add currants. Make in roll, cut down in slices, 
and put in pan; when light bake. To make the candy dress- 
ing seen in bakeries, cover the bottom of the pan Hberally with 
lard, and then sprinkle with sugar; it is best not to let this pan 
set on the bottom of the oven, so the dressing will not burn. 

— s. c. c. 



94 WOODBRIDGE COOK BOOK 

CINNAMON CAKE 

One cup mashed potatoes; one cup of the water in which 
they were boiled; two cups sugar; one cup butter and lard, 
mixed; one teaspoonful salt; a cup of yeast; one tgg; flour to 
make a dough. At night set a sponge thus: The cup of 
mashed potatoes; the cup of potato water; one of sugar and 
yeast and flour. In the morning add the other cup of sugar, 
butter, lard, egg, and flour to make dough. When perfectly 
light, cut slices off large enough to cover a pie plate. They 
should be less than an inch thick. Let them rise until very 
light; then wash them well with melted butter, and sprinkle 
thickly with sugar, cinnamon, and a little flour, rubbed to- 
gether. Bake in a moderate oven about twenty minutes. They 
are delicious hot or cold. 

— Mrs. Harriet E. Williams. 

CORN-MEAL GEMS 

One pint of corn meal; one pint of wheat flour; one-half 
teaspoon salt; six tablespoonfuls of sugar; butter size of an 
egg; one pint of milk. Bake in gem tins. 

— Mrs. J. Edgar Brown. 

COFFEE CAKE 

One cup sugar; one cup butter; one pint milk; four eggs; 
one yeast cake; two quarts of flour; enough lukewarm milk 
to make a stiff batter. Let it rise; then stir with spoon, and 
pour into well-greased dripping-pans. For the top: A lump of 
butter, size of an egg, melted; then add confectioners' sugar 
(little lumps), and sprinkle with ground cinnamon, and pour 
on top. When it rises in pans, bake in moderate oven one- 
half hour. 

—Mrs. W. B. Krug. 



WOODBRIDGE COOK BOOK 95 

FAIRY-TOAST. 

Take whites of three eggs and whip to a stiff froth; and 
then add one wine-glass of currant or grape jelly, which will 
make it a pretty shade of pink. Then take one dozen indi- 
vidual square sponge cakes, place in a flat glass dish, and on 
top of each heap a tablespoonful of the above mixture, with 
a drop of jelly the size of a cherry, on top of each. Make a soft 
custard of yolks of eggs; flavor with drop of vanilla, and pour 
around the cakes, when you will have a simple and delicious 
little dessert. 

—Mrs. W. B. Krug. 

FRENCH ROLLS 

Dissolve one cake of dry yeast in one-half pint of lukewarm 
water; add flour to make a sponge. Set in warm place to raise 
till very light. Add one-half cup butter; one pint sweet milk 
(previously scalded) ; two eggs; one teaspoonful salt; two table- 
spoonfuls sugar. Knead in flour as for bread. Set in warm 
place to raise. When light, mold rolls. Raise again and 
bake. 

— Mrs. N. Johnson. 

GEMS 

One pint of sweet milk; one egg; one-third cup butter; 
one teaspoonful of soda; two teaspoonfuls cream of tartar; 
three cups flour; one teaspoon salt. Bake in gem tins. 

—J. B. Edgar. 

GERMAN PUFFS 

One cup flour; one cup milk; one tablespoonful butter; 
four eggs. Put milk and butter on the stove, when to the boil- 
ing point, add flour and stir constantly until thick; then let 
pool. Add ;yolks of eggs, and stir till smooth. Beat whites 



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WOODBRIDGE COOK BOOK 9^ 

of eggs to a stiff froth; and add to other mixture butter and 
flour. Use gem pans ; fill each about half full ; bake in a mod- 
erate oven thirty-five minutes. These are very nice for lunch- 
eon, and can also be filled with cream and used as a dessert. 

—Mrs. L. H. Brown. 

GLOUCESTER WAFFLES 

Three eggs, one quart of milk, one-fourth of a pound of but- 
ter, two tablespoonfuls of sugar, pinch of salt, yeast powder. 
Flour to mix in a thick batter. 

— Mrs. Robert Valentine. 

WHITE MUFFINS 

One ^%^ beaten separately, two tablespoonfuls of butter 
melted, one cup of milk, one and one-half cups of flour, two 
teaspoonfuls of baking powder. 

— Mrs. R. N. Valentine. 

GRAHAM BREAD NO. i 

Take one and one-half pints of lukewarm water: dissolve 
one yeast cake (compressed) in this if desirable to have it rise 
in a few hours; if otherwise, half a cake. Mix with enough 
white flour to make a good sponge, salt, and add one cup 
of molasses; left to rise. When light add graham flour to 
make stiff enough to put in a pan, simply stirring with spoon. 
Do not knead. In using graham flour, sift it, first using 
all you need of sifted flour, and one-half of the bran that will 
be left in the sifter; spread with spoon into small bread tins; 
left to rise again. Wlien very light stir over all with a fork, 
and bake from three-quarters to one hour in medium oven. 

— H. B. Ames. 

GRAHAM BREAD NO. 2 
Two cups of graham flour, one cup of white flour, one cup 



98 WOODBRIDGE COOK BOOK 

of sour milk, one cup of molasses, one teaspoonful of soda 
dissolved in milk. Steam two hours; dry in oven. 

—Mrs. W. L. Harned. 

GRAHAM GEMS 

Two cups of milk, one egg, one tablespoonful of molasses, 
one-third teaspoonful of salt, one-third teaspoonful of soda; 
graham flour to make a stiff batter. Bake in gem pans. 

— Mrs. Isaac Inslee. 

GRAHAM BISCUITS 

One cup of sour milk, a scant tablespoonful of brown sugar, 
half a teaspoonful of salt, two cups of flour, one teaspoonful of 
baking powder. 

— Mrs. Charles Taylor Pierce. 

GRIDDLE CAKES 

Three cups of flour, salt, two eggs broken without beating 
directly into flour, add milk to make batter, beat very hard. 
Just before baking add two spoonfuls of baking powder. 

—J. E. H. 

RAISED GRIDDLE CAKES 

One quart of water, one-half cake of compressed yeast, one 
teaspoonful of salt; mix to the right thickness by adding two 
spoonfuls of flour to one of Indian meal. Prepare this at 
night; in the morning add salt and a spoonful of soda. In the 
morning keep one cup of this batter, to which add one cold 
cake, broken in small pieces, and stir stiff with flour, and let 
this rise until night; when add water, and mix again with 
flour and meal for the next morning. This process will keep 
the cakes light for some weeks without adding fresh yeast. 
The cold cake added makes them brown nicely. 

^-Mrs. D. S. Voorhees. 



WOODBRIDGE COOK BOOK 99 

MILK ROLLS NO. i 

Six cups of flour, one yeast cake, one pinch salt; but- 
ter the size of an egg, enough milk to mix with a stiff dough. 
Let them rise until very light; roll out, cut with a biscuit 
cutter, put a piece of butter on each one, and fold over. When 
very light bake fifteen minutes. 

— Mrs. J. Lockwood. 

MILK ROLLS NO. 2 

Six cups of flour, one yeast cake, one pinch of salt, butter 
size of an egg; enough milk to mix a stiff dough, and let it 
rise. Then roll out quickly on floured board; cut in good-sized 
rounds with biscuit cutter. Butter one-quarter surface, and 
fold over; then place in pan; allow to rise again; bake in 
quick oven thirty minutes. 

—Mrs. W. D. Krug. 

MUFFINS 

Two eggs, one cup of milk, one tablespoonful of butter, two 
teaspoonfuls of baking powder, and flour enough to thicken; 
a little salt. 

— Mrs. Margaretta Brewster. 

CORN MUFFINS 

Two eggs, one cup of corn meal, one and one-half cups of 
flour, one tablespoonful of butter, one-half cup of sugar, one 
cup of sweet milk, two teaspoonfuls of baking powder; a little 
salt. 

— Mrs. F. F. Anness. 

ENGLISH MUFFINS 

One quart of milk, tablespoonful of butter slightly warmed, 
tablespoonful of sugar, two and a half cups of flour. Add half 

LofC, 



WOODBRIDGE COOK BOOK loi 

a cup of yeast, and let it rise over night. Put a little salt in the 
batter. This will make eighteen muffins. 

— Mrs. Charles Taylor Pierce. 

MUFFIN BREAD 

One pint sweet milk ; two tablespoons sugar ; two of melted 
butter; two cups flour; two eggs beaten very light; two tea- 
spoons baking powder; pinch of salt. 

—Mrs. M. D. Valentine. 

PARKER HOUSE ROLLS 

One pint of milk, three and one-half cups of flour, one heap- 
ing tablespoonful of butter, a dessertspoonful of salt, and two 
of sugar. Scald the milk; let cool; rub the butter, salt, and 
sugar all together with the hands until no trace of the butter 
is left in the flour; put one compressed yeast cake into a cup 
of luke-warm water, and let stand about ten minutes; then add 
to the milk and stir; make a well in the flour, and pour in the 
yeast and milk; let stand one hour. Then mix and stand 
over night. In the morning add more flour ; knead very lightly, 
and let rise again. When very light toss on board, roll out, 
and cut with biscuit-cutter about an inch thick; fold over with 
small piece of butter between every one. 

— Mrs. L. H. Brown. 

POP OVER 

One cup milk, one cup flour, two eggs, a little salt, and a 
little sugar. Beat very hard, and put in gem pans that have 
been heated very hot. 

—Mrs. J. E. Nash. 

RUSK NO. I 

Scald one pint of milk; when lukewarm add two ounces of 
butter cut into bits, four tablespoonfuls of sugar, half a 



102 WOODBRIDGE COOK BOOK 

yeast cake dissolved, a quarter of a teaspoonful of salt, and 
sufficient flour to make a smooth batter. Beat thoroughly, 
cover, and stand aside in a warm place for four hours. When 
light add sufficient flour to make soft dough ; knead carefully, 
form into small rusks, stand in greased pan; when doubled in 
bulk brush with milk, and bake in quick oven twenty min- 
utes. To glaze, take from oven a few minutes before time ex- 
pires ; brush with mixture of sugar and white of an egg beaten 
lightly together. 

—Edith G. Hinsdale. 

RUSK NO. 2 

One and one-half pints of milk warmed, two and one-half 
cups of sugar, scant cup of shortening, one yeast cake mixed 
up an hour or so before mixing the rusk, to let it rise. There 
should be about one and one-half teacupfuls of the yeast 
when light. Mix up soft and put in a warm place to rise. It 
is a good plan if you have a warm place, to mix over night. 
When light or in morning do them out with the hands like 
biscuit, crowding them slightly in the pan. Let rise until 
they are fully as large again as when you do them out. Bake 
in a quick oven for about fifteen minutes. These are very nice 
split open, and browned and dried in a slow oven, to eat with 
coffee. 

— Mrs. A. E. Clarkson. 

RUSK NO. 3 

One scant cup of sugar, three-quarters of a cup of butter, 
one cup of yeast, one pint of milk, one teaspoonful of salt, one 
egg; flour enough to make a soft dough. Cream the butter 
and sugar, heat the milk lukewarm, and heat the egg; add 
salt, yeast, and flour, and set in a warm place over night to 
rise in the morning. Make into balls the size of an eggy and 
let rise, and bake from twenty to thirty minutes. 

—Mrs. C. P. Osborn. 



WOODBRIDGE COOK BOOK 103 

RICE CAKES 
Boil one cup of rice soft, one pint of flour, two eggs, one cup 
of milk, salt. Bake on a griddle. 

—S. M. 

SALLY LUNN NO. i 
Sift together one quart of flour, one teaspoonful of salt, two 
teaspoonfuls baking powder; rub in two-thirds of a cup of but- 
ter, cold; add four beaten eggs, one-half pint milk; mix into a 
firm batter like cup-cake; pour into two round cake tins, and 
bake twenty-five minutes in pretty hot oven. 

—Mrs. S. B. Hinsdale. 

SALLY LUNN NO. 2 

One pint of flour, two teaspoonfuls of baking powder, one- 
half teaspoonful of salt, two eggs, one-half cup of sweet milk, 
one-half cup of melted butter. Beat the eggs, whites and 
yolks, separately; add to the yolks the milk, stir slowly into 
flour; then add the butter and the whites of egg last. Bake in 
mufifin pans two-thirds full. 

— Mrs. Etter. 

TEA ROLLS 

One pint of sweet milk boiled. While still warm add lump 
of butter size of egg, two tablespoonfuls of sugar, a little salt, 
half cake of compressed yeast. When light mold fifteen min- 
utes; let rise again, and cut into round cakes. Spread each 
half with butter, and fold over on the other half. Put into 
pans, and when light bake in a quick oven. 

— Mrs. F. J. Perry. 

WAFFLES 

One quart of milk, three eggs, one teaspoonful of salt, three 
cups of flour, three teaspoonfuls of baking powder, one table- 
spoonful of molasses. 

— Mrs. C. Edwards. 



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WOODBRIDGE COOK BOOK 105 

QUICK WAFFLES 

Two pints sweet milk; one cup melted butter; sifted flour 
to make soft batter; then add well-beaten yolks of six eggs; 
then beaten whites; lastly, just before baking, four teaspoon- 
fuls baking powder. After putting in eggs, and before adding 
baking powder, beat very fast and hard for a few minutes. 

—Mrs. S. B. Hinsdale. 



PUDDINGS 

** The woman who maketh a good pudding in silence is better than 
she who maketh a tart reply." 



APPLE DUMPLINGS (OLD) 

Three pints of flour; a little salt added to the flour; two 
teaspoons of soda; four teaspoons of cream tartar. Sift all 
thoroughly together. Now rub into the flour shortening the 
size of an egg; add milk to make soft dough made into dump- 
ling. Sauce to cook them in: One pint boiling water; one 
and one-half cup sugar; one-half cup butter. Let it be boil- 
ing hot when dumplings are added. Bake. 

— Mrs. J. Edgar Brown. 



BAKED APPLE DUMPLING 

Pare and core five tart apples. Make a plain pie crust; 
roll it out and cut in as many pieces as you want dumplings. 
Lay an apple on each crust ; fill the core with sugar and grated 
nutmeg or cinnamon. Now bring the corners up over the 
top of the apple and close it. Butter well a deep baking dish, 
lay the apples in as close as possible. Stir to a cream one 
cup of butter and two of white sugar. Put this over the top 
of the dumplings. Pour cold water round them to keep from 
sticking, and bake nearly two hours, slowly. These will need 
no other sauce than that in which they baked. Serve in the 
baking dish. 

—Mrs. J. M. L. 
io6 



WOODBRIDGE COOK BOOK 107 

APPLE PUDDING 

Fill a buttered baking dish with sliced apples. Pour over 
the top a batter made of one tablespoonful of butter; one-half 
cup sugar; one egg; one-half cup of milk; one cup of flour, in 
which has been sifted one teaspoonful of baking powder. 
Bake in a moderate oven. Serve with cream and sugar or 
liquid sauce. 

— Mrs. I. N. Harned. 

APRICOT PUDDING 

One can of apricots ; small half cup of tapioca ; one small cup 
of sugar; one-half teaspoonful vanilla. Soak tapioca over 
night, drain juice and boil until clear; take off; season; pour 
over apricots, and bake until brown. 

— Miss Preston. 

CABINET PUDDING 

Beat one-fourth of a pound of butter and one and one-half 
pounds of sugar to a cream ; then the beaten yolks of five eggs ; 
one-half cup of milk ; one-half pound of flour, sprinkled in with 
the whites of five eggs. At last, one pound of raisins and one 
small lemon, juice and rind, grated. Spices to taste. Boil 
two and one-half hours or longer. 

— Mrs. Nash. 

CHERRY TAPIOCA 

One and one-half pounds sour cherries; one cup of tapioca; 
sugar to taste. Soak tapioca over night; in the morning put 
on the fire with one pint of boiling water; simmer slowly until 
the tapioca is perfectly clear; stone the cherries; stir them into 
the boiling tapioca; sweeten; turn into the dish in which they 
are to be served and put away to cool. Serve cold with sugar 
and cream. 

— Mrs. Wm. Edgar. 



WOODBRIDGE COOK BOOK 109 

CHERRY PUDDING 

Into one pint of sifted flour put two teaspoonfuls of baking 
powder and one-half a teaspoonful of salt. Add one cup of 
milk and two tablespoonfuls of melted butter. Beat the yolks 
of two eggs, add one-half cup of sugar, and beat them well 
into the dough, then add the whites of the eggs, beaten stifif; 
then a pint of stoned cherries, well rolled in flour. Boil for 
two hours, in buttered pudding mold. Any kind of fruit 
can be used. 

— Dellie B. Hancock. 

CHOCOLATE BLANC MANGE 

One quart milk; one-half box of gelatine, dissolved in hot 
milk; two tablespoonfuls of grated chocolate; one cup of 
sugar; two eggs. Dissolve sugar and chocolate together, let- 
ting it cook a little; add eggs, well beaten; add all to gela- 
tine and milk, while hot. Serve with soft custard. 

— Mrs. William Edgar. 

CHOCOLATE PUDDING 

One quart of milk on to boil; add one and one-half pints 
of bread crumbs ; one-third of a cake of chocolate, grated ; let 
this boil. Then beat the yolks of three eggs; sugar to taste; 
a piece of butter the size of a walnut; beat one yolk very light, 
and stir into the mixture. Bake in oven over one hour; put 
frosting on top, if desired. 

— Miss Preston. 

DANDY PUDDING 

One quart milk; four eggs; one cup sugar; one tablespoon 
cornstarch. Four yolks, sugar and cornstarch beaten well to- 
gether to a stiff froth. Put a little of the boiling milk to the 
egg and then mix together, and add vanilla; whites four eggs; 
four tablespoons of powdered sugar, beaten to a stiff froth; 
add it to the pudding and brown. 

— S. M. Brewster. 



no WOODBRIDGE COOK BOOK 

ENGLISH SUET PUDDING 

Two cups chopped suet; two and one-half cups flour; two 
and one-half cups raisins; one cup milk (large); one egg; one 
teaspoon salt; two teaspoons baking powder. Mix suet, flour, 
raisins, baking powder, and salt together; beat egg, and add 
to milk; moisten the dry mixture with this; tie in pudding- 
bag, and boil two hours. If bag is wet, then dusted with flour 
before putting in the mixture, it will turn out nicely without 
sticking. Serve with milk sauce. 

— Mrs. H. J. Forbes. 

FIG PUDDING 

One pound of figs cut fine; one pound suet; one loaf of 
baker's bread, crumbled fine; one pound sugar; one nutmeg; 
four eggs; one tablespoonful baking powder; one cup of sweet 
milk; one cup sifted flour. Mix well together. Boil two 
hours. 

— Miss Minnie Campbell. 



FRUIT DUMPLINGS 

Make a nice biscuit crust with one coffee-cup of flour; two 
spoonfuls of Royal baking powder, and a piece of butter the 
size of an egg. Mix quickly together, with just enough milk 
to make a soft dough. Put into a round earthen dish either 
raspberries, peaches, or apples, as the season may be, and fill 
the dish two-thirds full of fruit. Put over them a cup of 
sugar. If peaches or apples, a cup of water; if raspberries, 
not quite so much, and a very little butter. Cover this with a 
thick crust of dough. Turn over this another two-quart basin, 
just the size of your dish and cover closely; set on the top a 
flat-iron or some weight, and put your dish on the stove to 
cook. As the fruit stews, if the dish is closely covered, the 



WOODBRIDGE COOK BOOK m 

crust will steam done. A flat cover will not allow the dough 
to rise, which will be very light and fill nearly one-half of the 
upper dish. Serve with any nice sauce. 

—J. E. H. 

GRAHAM PUDDING NO. i 

One and one-half cups of graham flour; one-half cup of 
New Orleans molasses; one-half cup of butter; little salt; one- 
half cup of sweet milk; one egg; one teaspoonful of cinnamon; 
one-half teaspoonful of cloves; one cup of raisins; one-half 
cup of currants. Put in a tin mold and steam two hours. 
Use a hard or liquid sauce, whichever is preferred. 

— Mrs. A. E. Clarkson. 

GRAHAM PUDDING NO. 2 

One and one-half cup graham flour; one cup milk; one-half 
cup molasses; one cup chopped raisins; one-half teaspoon salt; 
one teaspoon soda. Put in steamer. 

—Mrs. S. E. Potter. 

HEAVENLY REST 

Take a fresh home-made angel cake, cut in three layers, and 
use the top of the cake for the bottom fitting, the others as they 
belong. Whip one pint of good thick cream, ice-cold, to a 
firm froth, do not get beyond that, it must not be buttery. 
Add one tablespoon of sherry one tablespoon of vanilla; sugar 
to taste ; one-fourth of a pound of preserved cherries ; fresh and 
firm marshmallows, about one-half pound, very fresh, and 
torn into two or three parts. You may add preserved ginger, 
or any preserved fruits, angelica or preserved violets. You 
want all the ingredients fresh and of the best quality. Place 
mixture between layers and cover the whole outside of cake 
also. Keep cold until time to serve. 

—Mrs. F. G. Tisdall 



Square Dealing 



We charge just what the drugs 
are worth. Size of bottle has 
nothing to do with cost. A small 
quantity of one drug may be ex- 
pensive, while a big lot of another 
drug may cost next to nothing. 
Leave that to us. It sounds con- 
ceited for us to say that you can 
trust us; but we know that you can, 
because we know that we charge 
only what is right, according to 
the exact cost of the drugs used. 



BRADLEY'S PHARMACY 

Cor. George and Church Sts., New Brunswick, N. J. 

The Hudson ^ Middlesex 

Telephone & Telegraph Co. 

Have brought the price of Telephones (tlO/ 
in Woodbridge from $60 a year down \//L 

A YEAR. 



Don't you think we deserve your patronage ? 

Address: 

I. CT. ]yi:..^:N"iD:E"V"iXjXjE, 

Contract Ag^ent, 
70 SHITH ST.^ PERTH AIUBOY, N. J. 



WOODBRIDGE COOK BOOK 113 

HONEYCOMB PUDDING 

One-quarter pound butter, warmed in one teacup milk; 
one pint molasses; one teacup sugar; one teacup flour; six 
or eight eggs, beaten separately; one teaspoonful soda, just 
before baking. Bake in a moderate oven thirty or forty 
minutes. Eat with wine sauce or fairy butter. 

— Miss Preston. 

INDIAN MEAL PUDDING 

Mix together seven tablespoonfuls of Indian meal; one cup 
of sugar; two teaspoonfuls of cinnamon; lump of butter, size 
of walnut; pinch of salt. When mixed, pour over it a pint of 
milk, previously scalded, and stir until a smooth batter; steam 
two hours. Use hard or liquid sauce, whichever is preferred. 

— Mrs. Clarkson. 

INDIAN PUDDING NO. i 

Three pints milk; four eggs; one heaping cup yellow corn 
meal; one small cup molasses; two tablespoons butter; one 
teaspoon salt; one teaspoon ground ginger; one teaspoon 
cinnamon. Heat milk in double boiler. When it is scalding 
hot, pour it on the salted meal, stirring carefully to prevent 
lumping. Return to the fire and cook one-half hour, stirring 
often. Beat molasses and butter together; add the eggs, 
whipped light; the spice, and the meal, and milk; beat hard. 
Turn all into a buttered pudding dish and bake, covered, one 
hour. Stir the pudding well up from the bottom and brown. 

— Mrs. E. H. Boynton. 

INDIAN PUDDING NO. 2 

Two quarts milk, boiled. Add eight tablespoonfuls white 
corn meal, wet with cold milk; boil a short time. When par- 
tially cold, add four eggs; a little butter; four tablespoons 

molasses. Bake two hours. 

—Mrs. C B. 



114 WOODBRIDGE COOK BOOK 

JOHN'S DELIGHT 

Two cups chopped bread; one-half cup chopped suet; one- 
half cup molasses; one egg; a little flour; one cup raisins; one 
cup sweet milk, with half a teaspoon of soda dissolved in it; 
one-half teaspoon cloves; one teaspoon cinnamon; a pinch of 
mace. Salt. Boil two hours in a pudding boiler. Sauce: 
Whites of two eggs, beaten with one cup of sugar. Pour over 
it one cup of boiling milk. Just before serving add the juice 
of one lemon. 

—Bertha M. Campbell. 

KENILWORTH PUDDING 

One cup brown or white sugar; one cup milk; one cup 
bread crumbs; one cup currants and raisins; one-half nutmeg; 
one teaspoon cinnamon; a little allspice; two eggs, well 
beaten; butter the size of an egg. Mix all together and bake 
half an hour. 

— Miss Preston. 

LANSINGBURGH PUDDING 

Two tablespoonfuls of sugar; two eggs; butter the size of an 
egg; one cup milk; two cups flour; two teaspoonfuls of baking 
powder; one cup chopped raisins, or one-half pound of figs — 
fruit. Boil one hour. To be eaten with hard sauce. 

— Mrs. W. H. Demarest. 

LEMON PUDDING 

One quart milk; one and one-half cups bread crumbs; two 
CRRS (yolks); one lemon, grated rind and juice; one table- 
spoonful butter (scant); one cup sugar. Bake in moderate 
oven; when done, take from oven; let partly cool; make 
meringue of whites, sprinkle on top, return to oven, and 
brown. Serve cold. 

— Florence Dixon, 



WOODBRIDGE COOK BOOK 115 

LOG CABIN PUDDING 

Eight lady fingers, split and spread with jelly. Lay upon a 
flat dish in crossbars; beat whites of two eggs and pour over 
the cabin; brown one minute in hot ©ven. Make a custard of 
yolks of eggs to eat with it. 

— Mrs. Oscar Miller. 



MOUNTAIN OF SNOW 

One-half box gelatine (Cox's) ; one-half cup cold water ; one- 
half cup boiling water; whites of six eggs; two cups white 
sugar (granulated); juice of two lemons. Put gelatine to 
soak in cold water for an hour or more; then add boiling 
water. Beat whites, sugar, and gelatine, and juice together 
three-quarters of an hour and set to form on ice. Custard: 
Yolks of six eggs; one and one-half quarts milk; six table- 
spoonfuls sugar. Cook in saucepan on stove. 

—Mrs. W. H. Jewett. 



ORANGE BASKETS 

One-half dozen oranges; one ounce gelatine; one and a 
third cup sugar; one lemon. Cut the oranges in halves; dig 
out contents, and be careful not to break the skin. Then 
pink out the edges and place in cold water. Proceed to make 
orange jelly by soaking gelatine ten minutes in a very little 
cold water, to which add the juice of lemon and oranges and 
the sugar. After this has soaked, add one and one-half pints 
of boiling water, and stir till gelatine and sugar are all dis- 
solved and then strain into the orange baskets. By adding 
a little handle, made by twisting two strips of tissue paper, 
orange and white, together, and tying to each side our dainty 
dessert is completed. 

—Mrs. W. B. Krug. 



WOODBRIDGE COOK BOOK u; 

ORANGE SERVED WITH RICE 

Take the pulp out as whole as possible and drop it in a rich 
syrup, leaving it just long enough to heat thoroughly. Have 
rice boiled, not toO' dry. Make a nest of the rice; put the 
orange and syrup in the center and serve with whipped cream. 

— Mrs. A. E. Clarkson. 

PEACH PUDDING 

Make a custard of one pint of milk and yolks of three eggs. 
Drain a can of peaches and cut fine and put in the custard. 
Bake until the custard sets. When cool add a meringue top 
made of the whites of three eggs and put in a hot oven until 
it browns. With the liquor left from the peaches a delicate 
pudding may be made by adding enough hot water to make a 
pint, then put in a little sugar and four teaspoonfuls of corn- 
starch and boil a few minutes. Served cold with cream it is 
delicious. 

— Mrs. J. H. Tappan. 

GRANDMA PERRY'S PLUM PUDDING 

One-half pound of raisins; one-half pound currants; one-half 
pound citron; one-half pound suet; one pint bread crumbs; 
one-half cup flour (scant); three eggs; one-half cup molasses; 
one-half teaspoon of soda; one teaspoon of allspice; one tea- 
spoon of cinnamon; one teaspoon of cloves; a little nutmeg; a 
little salt. Steam four hours. 

PLUM PUDDING 

Take half a pound of currants; a pound of sultana raisins; 
half a pound of Muscatel raisins, seeded and cut in large bits ; 
three ounces each of candied orange peel, lemon peel, and 
citron. Toss this fruit with a tablespoonful of dried and sifted 
flour. Mix in a cup a teaspoonful of powdered cinnamon, half 



Ii8 WOODBRIDGE COOK BOOK 

a teaspoonful of cloves and half a nutmeg. Chop fine three- 
quarters of a pound best beef suet, free from shreds. Sprinkle 
over it a teaspoonful of salt. Now add the fruit and mix 
thoroughly. Now add three-quarters of a pound of bread 
crumbs, that have been dried and sifted, and moisten with a 
cup of boiling milk. At this stage add half a pound of sugar, 
and sprinkle in the spices. Beat together without separating 
the whites from the yolks, eight eggs, and add them, to the 
pudding. It should now be so stiff that it can be stirred with 
difficulty, and the only sure way is to stir it with your hands 
as you would bread. Add now a gill of brandy and one of 
sherry, and mix the pudding thoroughly. Put in a greased 
bowl and tie a cloth over it. Steam six hours. This can be 
made a month before Christmas and put away to ripen. 
When you are ready to use it, put it in the steamer again and 
steam about two hours. Remove to a large platter, pour 
brandy over it, and touch a match to it as it is carried to the 
table. 

—Mrs. S. B. Hinsdale. 

ENGLISH PLUM PUDDING 

Half pound currants; half pound sultanas; half pound seed- 
less raisins; half pound beef suet, shredded finely; one grated 
nutmeg; one teaspoonful cinnamon; one pound brown sugar; 
two cups bread crumbs; two cups flour, with pinch of salt; 
one small carrot grated; four eggs; enough milk to make a 
stiff batter. Butter the pudding molds, tie in cloths and boil 
five or six hours, according to size. 

— Mrs. John H. Love. 

POTATO PUDDING 

Two and one-half pounds potatoes, made fine by running 
through a sieve; one pound butter; one pound sugar; nine 
eggs, beaten separately; one nutmeg; one glass of milk; one 



WOODBRIDGE COOK BOOK 119 

glass of brandy. For a pie only, add an undercrust. Take 
half as much for a small family. 

—Mrs. F. G. Tisdall. 

PRUNE PUDDING NO. i 

One pound prunes, soaked over night. Stew one hour 
with three tablespoons of sugar, two tablespoons of sherry. 
Rub through a colander, then add whites of six eggs, beaten 
stiff with wire spoon; bake one hour slowly. Serve with 
whipped cream, flavored with vanilla or sherry. Grease the 
pan you bake it in. It is very delicate. 

— ^^Jennie M. Valentine. 

PRUNE PUDDING NO. 2 

Take one pound of prunes; stew soft and mash through a 
colander; add four tablespoonfuls sugar; whites of six eggs, 
beaten to a stiff froth. Beat well. Bake twenty minutes. 
Eat cold with cream or custard. 

— Miss Preston. 

QUEEN OF PUDDINGS 

One quart of milk; one pint of bread crumbs; four eggs; 
one tablespoon of butter; half cup sugar; pinch of salt. Beat 
yolks of eggs, sugar, butter; add milk, bread crumbs, 
flavoring, and bake. When done cover with layer of sliced 
fruit or jelly, then the meringue, beat the whites of eggs 
to a stiff froth, sweeten and flavor to taste, spread on top of 
pudding and brown. Serve cold with sweetened cream. 

— Mrs. J. Edgar Brown. 

A THIN RICE PUDDING 

Three even tablespoons of rice; six even tablespoons of 
sugar; one quart of milk. Flavor with nutmeg or vanilla. 
Bake slowly about two hours. 

— Mrs. M. Irving Demarest. 



Cbe first JMational Bank, 

PERTH AMBOY, N. J. 



Capital $i 00,000.00 

Surplus 46,000.00 

Stockholders' Liability ) _ . f HO nnCi nn 

under National Law [ lUU,UUU.OO 

Depositors' security over ) ^OAa nr^n nn 

deposits themselves j ff^4b,UOO.OO 



President — Hamilton F. Kean. 
Cashier — Harry Conard. 



DIRECTORS: 

John W. Whelan, Robert Carson, 

Charles D. Snedeker, Albert D. Brown, 

Peter Nelson, George J. Haney, 

Hamilton F. Kean. 



ISSUES: 
Drafts, Letters of Credit, Bills of Exchange, Cer- 
tificates of Deposit, Cashiers' Checks. 



Pays Interest on Daily Balances : 

3 Per Cent, on moOO and Over, 

2 Per Cent, on 3500 and Over, 



WOODBRIDGE COOK BOOK 121 

RICE MERINGUE 

One cup of boiled rice; one pint of milk; two eggs; one cup 
of sugar; one lemon. Beat the yolks of eggs with sugar, then 
add milk and rice; cook until as thick as soft custard, in a 
double boiler; then add grated rind of lemon. Pour into but- 
tered dish. Make meringue of whites of eggs and add juice of 
lemon; pour on pudding and brown in oven. 

— Mrs. F. F. Anness. 

RUSSIAN CREAM 

Two-thirds box of gelatine; four eggs; one cup of sugar; 
one quart of milk. Cover gelatine with warm water and let it 
stand about fifteen minutes. Put yolks of eggs and sugar to- 
gether beating very light, add the gelatine. Boil the milk and 
add the mixture to it; cook same as soft custard; take off and 
stir briskly for five minutes ; add whites, which have previously 
been beaten to a stifif froth, and one cup of wine. 

—Mrs. J. B. Edgar. 

SALEM PUDDING 

One cup butter; half-cup molasses; one and one-half cups 
milk; one teaspoon soda; two teaspoons cream tartar; three and 
one-half cups flour; one cup raisins; spice to taste. Steam two 
and one-half hours. 

— Mrs. Nash. 

SHERRY CREAM 

One pint of cream, whipped ; about eight kisses ; sherry and 
Maraschino cherries. Break the kisses into lemonade glasses; 
pour over a little sherry, and then fill glasses up w.ith the 
whipped cream, saving some large pieces of the kisses for the 
top; then put two or three cherries on top. Flavor cream with 
sherry and powdered sugar. Serve very cold. 

— Mrs. Oscar Miller. 



122 WOODBRIDGE COOK BOOK 

SNOW PUDDING 

One-half box of gelatine, soaked ten or fifteen minutes in 
four tablespoonfuls of cold water. Then add a pint of boiling 
water; the juice of three lemons, and one cup of sugar. Strain 
it away to cool, not stiff, and add the whites of three well- 
beaten eggs, and mix thoroughly. Pour into a mold and cool. 

—Mrs. W. H. Miller. 

SNOW PYRAMIDS 

To one cup of cold heavy cream, add two tablespoonfuls 
of powdered sugar; half a teaspoonful of vanilla extract, and 
one tablespoonful of gelatine that has been soaked in a little 
cold water, and dissolve by stirring it over boiling water. 
Add to the cream when cool, and whip until light and thick; 
turn into glasses and stand in a cool place. Just before leav- 
ing, beat the whites of two eggs, adding two tablespoons 
powdered sugar, and add gradually, one-fourth cup of currant 
jelly. Drop one spoonful on top of each glass of the jelly, 
heaping it like a pyramid. 

— Mrs. L. H. Brown. 

SPANISH CREAM 

One-half box gelatine, dissolved in half pint of cold water; 
one quart of milk, come to a boil; four eggs, yolks beaten with 
half pint of sugar. Whites beaten stiff, mixed with the rest. 

— Miss Georgia Brokaw. 

STRAWBERRY SHORT CAKE 

One-half cup of sugar; one cup of flour; one egg] one even 
tablespoonful of butter; one-half cup of milk; one and one-half 
teaspoonful baking powder. Bake in two layers. Sweeten 
the berries and smother them with whipped cream. Put be- 
tween* the layers and on top of the cake. 

— Mrs. R. E. Morris. 



WOODBRIDGE COOK BOOK 123 

STEAM SUET AND FRUIT PUDDING 

Two and one-half cups flour; one teaspoon soda; one-half 
teaspoon salt; one-half saltspoon cinnamon; one-half salt- 
spoon nutmeg; one cup chopped suet, or two-thirds cut 
butter; one cup chopped raisins or currants; one cup water or 
milk; one cup molasses. Sift the soda, salt, and spice into the 
flour; rub in the butter and add the raisins. Mix the milk 
with the molasses, and stir into the dry mixture. Steam in a 
buttered pudding mold three hours. Serve with creamy 
sauce. If water and butter be used, three cups of flour will 
be required, as these thicken less than milk and suet. This 
pudding is sometimes steamed in small stone cups. 

—Mrs. W. T. Ames. 

TAPIOCA CREAM 

One-half cup of tapioca, soaked until it becomes soft; add 
one pint of milk; the yolks of two eggs; two-thirds of a cup 
of sugar; cook until thick; flavor when cool. Make frosting 
for top with whites, and brown in oven. 

—Mrs. H. M. 

WHEAT PUDDING 

Two and one-half cups of flour; two teaspoons of cream of 
tartar; one teaspoon of soda; a little salt. Sift these together. 
Beat four eggs well, add to one quart of milk, stir slowly into 
the flour. Bake in dish, or pour into cups, and steam in pan 
of hot water in oven. Serve hot with wine or brandy sauce. 

— Mrs. J. Edgar Brown. 

VELVET CREAM 

One heaping teaspoonful gelatine; two tablespoonfuls of 
cold water; wine-glass of sherry wine; teaspoonful of lemon 
juice; one pint of cream, whip, sweeten to taste. Line a dish 
with lady fingers or sponge cake; put the contents in the 
middle. 

— Mrs. W. H. Demarest. 



WOODBRIDGE COOK BOOK 125 

A PRETTY DESSERT. 

To the beaten whites of six eggs, add one cup of powdered 
sugar, a large spoonful of butter, melted; two cups of flour, 
and three cups of milk. Flavor to taste; beat all smoothly 
together, and bake in a quick oven twenty minutes; cool. To 
be eaten with cream. It should be transparent and delicate. 

— Mrs. L. H. Brown. 



SAUCES FOR PUDDINGS 

CREAMY SAUCE 

One-quarter cup butter; one-half cup powdered sugar, sifted; 
two tablespoonfuls wine; two tablespoonfuls cream. Cream the 
butter; add the sugar slowly; then the wine and cream. Beat 
well, and just before serving place the bowl over hot water, 
and stir till smooth and creamy, but not enough to melt the 
butter. When the wine and cream are added, the sauce has 
a curdled appearance. This is removed by thorough beating, 
and by heating just enough to blend the materials smoothly. 
It is not intended to be a hot sauce, and if the sauce becomes 
oily in heating, place the bowl in cold water, and beat again 
until smooth, like thick cream. Omit the wine if desired, and 
use half a cup of cream and one teaspoonful of lemon or va- 
nilla. Serve on any hot pudding. 

—Mrs. W. T. Ames. 

SAUCE FOR CABINET PUDDING 

Rub one cup sugar and one tablespoon of butter to a cream ; 
then the beaten yolks of four eggs; juice and grated rind of 
lemon; one teaspoon cinnamon. Beat all together ten min- 
utes, then add wine-glass of wine. Set on stove to get hot, 

not boil. 

— Mrs. J. E. Nash. 

EGG SAUCE 

The yolks of two eggs, well beaten; add pulverized sugar, 
beating hard until rather stiflf; flavor with wine or vanilla. 
Good for cottage pudding, raisin puffs, etc. 

—J. E. H. 

126 



WOODBRIDGE COOK BOOK 127 

EXTRA GOOD SAUCE 

Beat well together one cup of sugar; one-half cup butter; 
yolk of one egg; mix tablespoon flour in cold water; add one-half 
cup hot water; when boiling mix with the other. Just before 
using add the whites of the egg, beaten to a stiff froth. 

—Mrs. C. B. 

GOLDEN SAUCE 

Beat one-third cup of butter to a cream, gradually beating 
into it one cupful of powdered sugar; the yolks of three un- 
beaten eggs; three tablespoonfuls of wine; beat vigorously. 
Beat the whites of the eggs to a stiff froth, pour into the mix- 
ture; set in a bowl of boiling water; beat five minutes, and 
serve at once. A teaspoonful of vanilla or juice and grated 
rind of a lemon, may be substituted for the wine. 

— Susie Freeman. 

HARD SAUCE 

One-quarter cup of butter; one cup powdered sugar; one 
teaspoonful vanilla, or a tablespoonful of brandy; whites of 
two eggs. Beat the butter to a cream, add gradually the sugar; 
and beat until very light and frothy, then add gradually the 
flavoring and beat again. Heap it on a small dish; sprinkle 
lightly with grated nutmeg, and stand away on ice to harden. 

— Mrs. Rorer. 

MILK SAUCE 

One quart of milk; one large tablespoonful butter; pinch of 
salt. Put this over the fire and when boiling add two table- 
spoonfuls flour, mixed to a smooth paste with either cold 
milk or water. It should be about as thick as heavy cream. 
Sweeten to taste, and flavor with any desired flavoring (wine 
or extracts). 

—-Mrs. H. J. Forbes. 



MORTON'S 
ICE CREAM 



Made from Pure Cream. It is the 
Best and Most Popular in the World. 



Unrivalled French and Italian Ice 
Cream, Sorbets and Puddings. 



Steamboats, Gardens, Excursions, Con- 
fectioners, Families, Parties, Weddings, 
Boarding Houses, Hotels, Restaurants, 
Church Fairs, Sunday School Festivals, 
etc., Supplied. 



All Orders Promptly Filled, City or Country, 



DEPOTS: 

NEW YORK. —1 15 Park Row, 598 Sixth Avenue, 302 Colum- 
bus Avenue, 142 W. 125th Street, no E. 125th 
Street, 305 Fourth Avenue. 

BROOKLYN.— 495 Fulton Street; Factory, Atlantic Avenue, 
Pacific Street and Carleton Avenue. 

JERSEY CITY.— L. D. Cassell, 581 Jersey Avenue. 

Telephone Calls. — Each depot connected by telephone. See 
last telephone book for numbers. 



WOODBRIDGE COOK BOOK 129 

PUDDING SAUCE NO. i 

One and one-half cups of sugar; three-fourths cup of butter; 
stir until it is light; then beat one egg, and stir in it to scald 
a goblet of wine, and stir in boiling hot with the mixture. Re- 
turn to the same pan and stir until it begins to thicken. Use 
hot or cold. 

—Mrs. H. E. Williams. 

PUDDING SAUCE NO. 2 

One cup sugar; one-half cup butter; one-half cup water. 
Let it come to a boil; add grated rind and juice of lemon; little 
cinnamon, and one egg well beaten. Must not boil after egg 
is added. Wine improves it. 

— Mrs. Ernest H. Boynton. 



FROZEN DESSERTS 

BISCUIT TORTONI NO. i 

One ounce of gelatine; one quart of cream; one pint of milk; 
vanilla; powdered sugar; white wine; one-half pound stale 
macaroons. Paper cups or ramekins. Soak gelatine in 
milk ten minutes; then place over fire, and stir till gelatine is 
thoroughly dissolved; then beat well with egg-beater. Flavor 
cream with teaspoonful of vanilla and powdered sugar, and 
serve to suit taste. Pour mixture together, and whip well. 
Fill cups with mixture, and sprinkle macaroons, which have 
been powdered thickly, over top; then put on ice till serving 
time. 

— Mrs. F. I. Perry. 

BISCUIT TORTONI 

One pint of cream, one dozen macaroons, three-fourths 
of a cup of sugar, three-fourths of a cup of water, three eggs. 
Boil sugar and water to thread, beat the eggs, yolks and 
whites separately till very light ; mix together, and add the boil- 
ing sugar syrup. Beat until cool, thick, and creamy; add 
one teaspoonful of vanilla and two tablespoonfuls of sherry (or 
two tablespoonfuls of Maraschino and one of Kirsch) and the 
cream whipped very stiff. Have macaroons browned and 
rolled; put half the crumbs in bottom of three-pint mold; add 
the Tortoni mixture, and on top place the rest of the crumbs. 
Fasten cover tightly, grease the crack, and place a strip of 
greased paper over crack to keep out salt water, pack in ice 

130 



WOODBRIDGE COOK BOOK 131 

and salt; let stand four hours, or in frilled paper cases with mix- 
ture, and sift the macaroons over top, and put in freezer with 
layers of stiff pasteboard between. 

—Mrs. H. C. Nevius. 



COFFEE MOUSSE 

One pint of cream, two cups of cofifee; boil coffee with 
three tablespoonfuls of granulated sugar; when very cold add 
cream, which has been whipped with two tablespoonfuls of 
powdered sugar and vanilla, to taste. Pack in mold for three 
or four hours. Enough for four persons. 

—Mrs. F. I. Perry. 

CRANBERRY SHERBET 

Wash one quart of cranberries, put in porcelain-lined kettle, 
add one pint of water, cover, and stew fifteen minutes; add one 
pound sugar and grated rind and juice of one lemon, stand 
back where it will not boil hard for ten minutes; then take 
off and strain through bag until perfectly clear. Let stand 
until cold, then turn into freezer and freeze. 

—Mrs. C. A. Campbell. 

ICE CREAM WITHOUT COOKING 

One quart of cream, one pint of good milk, one quart of 

fruit juice. If you use grape juice or peaches use the juice 

of one lemon. Sweeten to taste. If you use canned fruit, 

such as raspberries or strawberries, put through a sieve to take 

out seed. 

— Mrs. A. E. Qarkson. 

PLAIN ICE CREAM 

To each quart of rich milk add two eggs, two teaspoonfuls of 
flour made smooth with a little cold milk. Sugar to taste. It 



WOODBRIDGE COOK BOOK I33 

will take about two ctipfuls; a tiny pinch of salt; flavor with 
vanilla; cook as for soft custard. To make a " Chocolate Sun- 
day " make a good, rich chocolate and pour over hot, just as 

you serve it, very fine. 

— Mrs. John Lockwood. 

CONDENSED MILK ICE CREAM 

One can of condensed milk (Eagle brand), one quart of milk, 
four eggs beaten light. Mix all together and freeze. 

— Mrs. C. J. Demarest. 

LEMON SHERBET 

One quart of milk, one-half pound of sugar, five lemons, 
or according to taste; whites of three eggs. Boil the sugar 
and the rind of one lemon in the milk, when cool put in the 
freezer, and half freeze; add to this the juice of the lemons 
mixed with a little sugar and the whites of the eggs beaten to 
a stiff froth. Freeze solid. 

— Miss Georgia Brokaw. 

NESSELRODE PUDDING 

One cupful of French chestnuts, one cup of granulated 
sugar, yolks of three eggs, one pint of cream, one-half pound 
of mixed candied fruits, one cupful of almonds, one table- 
spoonful of Maraschino, or two tablespoonfuls of sherry, one- 
half teaspoonful of vanilla. Blanch chestnuts, boil, and press 
through sieve; blanch almonds, chop, and pound them fine; 
pour Maraschino over candied fruit, and let stand until ready to 
use. Put into saucepan, the sugar, and one-fourth cup of 
boiling water; cook slowly five minutes; beat eggs, pour onto 
them slowly the sugar syrup; place on fire, stir constantly until 
thick enough to coat spoon; beat until cold; then add cream, 
fruit, chestnuts, almonds, and vanilla, and freeze; serve 

with whipped cream. 

— Mrs. C. A. Campbell. 



134 WOODBRIDGE COOK BOOK 

NESSELRODE PUDDING NO. 2 

Use the same custard and cream as for tutti-frutti ; shell one 
pint of chestnuts, blanch and boil one-half hour, mash to pulp, 
and stir in cream. When partially frozen add one pint mixed 
fruit cut fine. 

— Mrs. H. C. Nevius. 

PLUM PUDDING GLACE 

One and one-fourth pounds of stoned raisins, pour over them 
three pints of fresh milk, add three sticks of cinnamon, simmer 
this in a saucepan tightly covered ten minutes, beat yolks of 
four eggs with half a pound of sugar to a cream. Strain milk 
through a fine sieve and boil again. Pound in a mortar one- 
fourth pound almonds. When the milk boils pour in yolks 
and sugar as for a custard; remove from fire; when almost 
cold add almonds, then the raisins that were boiled in milk, 
but not cinnamon. Stir one-half pound citron cut into very 
thin slices, also one-half pound preserved ginger; add one 
quart of cream; stir all well together, and freeze in ice cream 

freezer. 

— Mrs. L. H. Brown. 

TUTTI FRUTTI 

Make a boiled custard of one quart of milk, yolks six eggs, 
one cup of sugar, cook slightly till smooth. Strain, and 
when cool add one quart of cream, enough sugar to make 
quite sweet, and some vanilla. When partly frozen add three 
tablespoonful of Maraschino or large wineglass of sherry, 
six macaroons browned and rolled, one pound French can- 
died fruit cut fine, pineapples and cherries preferred; a dozen 
English walnuts, blanched and pounded, and fifteen or twenty 

hazelnuts pounded fine. 

— Mrs. H. C. Nevius. 



PIES 

•• No soil upon earth so dear to our eyes, 
As the soil we first stirred in terrestial pies." 

— O. W. Holmes. 

FLAKY PIE CRUST 

Three cups of flour, one cup of lard, a little salt, about one- 
half cup of cold water. Mix flour, salt, and lard thoroughly 
before adding water, which must be added gradually. Never 
put your hands in it; chop with a knife, and handle as little as 
possible. Sprinkle pie tin with a little flour before putting on 
the paste. 

— Mary E. Franklin. 

PIE CRUST 

One quart of flour sifted in a chopping bowl, one-half pound 
of butter, one-fourth pound of lard, have butter and lard very 
cold; chop all together until very fine. Mix with ice water, 
divide dough in four parts, pound out each piece with rolling 
pin, spread three layers with flakes of butter, shake dry flour 
on each piece, put layers together, the piece without butter on 
top; pound out with rolling-pin, this will make pie crust for 
two large pies. 

—Mrs. F. G. Tisdall. 

CREAM PIE NO. i 

Three eggs well beaten, one cup of powdered sugar, one cup 
of flour, two teaspponfuls of baking powder, one tablespoonful 
of sweet milk. Cream — one scant cup of sugar, one-fourth 

135 



)VI. D. YatcMtine & Bro. Co., 

GOAL DEALERS, 

^W^OODBRIDQE, N. J. 



The above advertisement is purposely to call the 
attention of the public to our Family Coal — Egg, 
Stove and Chestnut. 

I St. — We can supply shorter tons than any other 
dealer, so as to take shorter time for cooking and 
baking. 

2d. — For several months past we have made no 
charge for family coal for obvious reasons (had none). 

3d. — The shorter the credits the longer the tons. 

4th. — Poultry, game, fish and meats prefer our 
coal, there is so little heat in it. 

5th. — If the old man loses his train in the morning 
when the cook has overslept, it is customary to blame 
Valentine's Coal as the easiest way they have from 
getting fired themselves. 

6th. — All the recipes in this book have been tried. 
The survivors are all in the Home for Dyspeptics. 

7th. — Parties using our coal need carry no insur- 
ance. If they will raise the windows they can see 
the fire escape. 



WOODBRIDGE COOK BOOK 137 

cup of flour, two teaspoonfuls of essence of lemon, two eggs. 
Beat all together, stir into a pint of boiling milk. 

— Mrs. R. N. Valentine. 

CREAM PIE NO. 2 

For two pies take three cups of sweet cream, three table- 
spoonfuls of flour, one egg; sweeten to taste, and flavor with 
vanilla. 

—Mrs. L. L. 

CREAM PIE 

Three eggs, one-half cup of sugar, one cup of flour, one 
heaping teaspoonful of baking powder. Divide in two cake 
tins. When cold split horizontally, and fill with cream. 
Filling for same — One pint of milk, one egg, one cup of sugar, 
three teaspoonfuls of cornstarch, a little butter and flavoring 
(orange especially good). 

— Mrs. N. Johnson. 

CHOCOLATE PIE 

One pint milk ; one cup of sugar ; two eggs ; two tablespoons 
of chocolate and two of cornstarch. Add whites of eggs at the 
last. Blend chocolate over hot water and cook all in double 
boiler. When cool have ready the baked crust and pour filling 
in the shell. Spread over the top one cup of whipped cream ; 
sweeten with one large tablespoon of powdered sugar and 
flavor with vanilla. 

— Mrs. M. D. Valentine. 

LEMON PIE NO. i 

Take the grated rind and juice of one lemon, add to it one 
cup of sugar and a piece of butter one-half the size of an egg. 
With one cup of boiling water stir one tablespoonful of corn- 
starch beaten with the yolks of two eggs; then mix in the 



138 WOODBRIDGE COOK BOOK 

other ingredients, bake with under crust. When done spread 
over the whites beaten stiff with two tablespoonfuls of pow- 
dered sugar, and brown in oven. 

—Mrs. I. N. Harned. 



LEMON PIE NO. 2 

Three lemons grated and the juice, two cups of sugar, two 
cups of milk, three eggs, two tablespoonfuls of cornstarch. 
Bake with two crusts. 

— Mrs. W. L. Harned. 

LEMON PIE NO. 3 

Grated rind and juice of one lemon, one cup of sugar, one 
cup of boiling water, two tablespoonfuls of cornstarch, butter 
half size of an egg. Boil all together until cle ir; add yolk of 
one egg. Line a plate with rich paste, fill with the above, and 
bake. Beat the white of egg with some powder £d sugar, cover 
pie with it, return to the oven, and brown slightly. 

—Mrs. R. B. Hart. 



LEMON PIE NO. 4 

Two and one-half tablespoonfuls of cornstarch; mix thor- 
oughly in a little cold water; add a pint and one-half of boiling 
water; while this is partially cooking, prepare the juice and 
grated rind of two and one-half lemons, and one and one- 
third cups of sugar, and yolks of four eggs; mix them well, 
and then stir in the cornstarch. Line two pie pans with 
pastry, fill them with mixture, and bake in moderate oven 
about half hour. Then beat the whites of eggs to stiff froth, 
add two tablespoonfuls of sugar, spread over the pies in 
mound shapes, return to oven to brown very lightly. 

—Mrs. W. B. Krug. 



WOODBRIDGE COOK BOOK 139 

LEMON MERINGUE PIE 

To make crust take one cup of flour, two tablespoonfuls of 
lard, and rub the lard thoroughly through the flour, then add 
one-third cup of very cold water. Roll quickly on pastry 
board, and line bottom of pie plate. Prick several times to 
keep from raising from plate, and bake in quick oven ten 
minutes. When cool add following filling: Three cups of 
boiling water, one cup of sugar, little salt, two tablespoonfuls 
of cornstarch. Boil until thick, then add when nearly cold 
beaten yolks of three eggs and juice of two lemons. 

— Mrs. Edwards. 

LEMON PIE WITH RAISINS 

Made with upper crust, juice and chopped rind of one lemon, 
one egg, one cup of molasses, one cup of sugar, one-half cup 
of water, one tablespoonful of flour, one-half cup of chopped 
raisins. 

—Mrs. J. B. Edgar. 

MOTHER'S OLD-FASHIONED PIE 

One-half cup of sugar, two tablespoonfuls of flour, one cup 
of water, one-half cup of molasses, good tablespoonful of but- 
ter, juice and rind of one large lemon. Put water, molasses, 
sugar, and lemon on to boil ten minutes; then add the butter, 
also flour wet with water and made smooth. Cook until 
thickened, then pour mixture in pie crust, and bake with two 
crusts. 

— Mrs. C. A. Campbell. 

FILLING FOR LEMON PIE 

Three eggs, two lemons, and grated rind, one cup of sugar, 
one tablespoonful of flour, one cup of milk, pinch of salt. 
Grate lemons, and mix with sugar, flour, and salt. Beat yolks 



WOODBRIDGE COOK BOOK 141 

of eggs and milk together; then mix all quickly together, and 
fill pie crust and bake. Make meringue of whites of eggs. 

— Mrs. F. F. Anness. 



MINCE PIES NO. I 

Two pounds of sirloin beef and beeve's heart, or upper part 
of round ; boil or simmer with little water, so that it is rich and 
juicy; one pound of beef suet cleared of strings and minced 
finely; five pounds of apples, pared and chopped; two pounds 
of raisins seeded and chopped, one pound of Sultana raisins 
washed and picked over, two pounds of currants, washed and 
carefully picked over, three-quarter pounds of citron cut up 
fine, two tablespoonfuls of cinnamon, one teaspoonful of pow- 
dered nutmeg, two tablespoonfuls of mace, one tablespoonful of 
cloves, one tablespoonful of allspice, one tablespoonful of fine 
salt, two and one-half pounds of brown sugar, one quart of 
sherry, one pint of the best four-proof brandy, and add a little 
brandy each time pie is made. Remarks — Always much more 
fruit than meat. Sweet cider can be used, boiled down, and 
skimmed. The best of puff paste. 

—Mrs. T. C. Tisdall. 



MINCE PIES 

Ten pounds of beef roasted and seasoned will measure 
four quarts chopped, eight quarts chopped apples, two pounds 
of melted butter, one and one-half pounds citron, seven pounds 
of sugar, one ounce mace, two teaspoonfuls of ground cloves, 
three nutmegs grated, juice of four lemons and peel of same 
grated, one quart of brandy, two quarts of boiled cider, four 
pounds chopped raisins, two pounds of currants; if necessary 
add more cider. 

—Mrs. C. W. Boynton. 



142 WOODBRIDGE COOK BOOK 

PUMPKIN PIE 

To one quart of stewed and sifted pumpkin add four well- 
beaten eggs, two cups of sugar, one teaspoonful of salt, one 
tablespoonful of ginger, and one quart of milk. Bake about 
forty minutes in deep platter lined with good pastry. 

— Mrs. S. B. Hinsdale. 

RAISIN PIE 

One pound of raisins seeded, stew slowly in a little water un- 
til tender; then stir in one cup of sugar, juice of a lemon, two 
tablespoonf uls of flour, a little salt ; bake with two crusts. This 
makes two pies. 

— Mrs. J. H. Coddington. 

WHITE POTATO PIE 

Two cups of hot mashed potatoes, lump of butter the size of 
a walnut, one quart of milk, three eggs beaten with six table- 
spoonfuls of sugar, one large lemon, or two small ones ; grate 
rind, squeeze juice, bake one crust till set like custard, before 
putting in oven sprinkle top well with cinnamon. 

— Mrs. J. Lockw(K>d. 



CAKE 

*• With weights and measure just and true, 
Oven of even heat, 
Well buttered tins and quiet nerves, 
Success will be complete." 

ANGEL CAKE 

Whites of ten fresh eggs, one and one-fourth cups of sifted 
granulated sugar, one cup of sifted flour, one-half teaspoonful 
of cream of tartar, a pinch of salt added to eggs before beat- 
ing. After sifting flour four or five times measure and set 
aside one cup. Beat whites of eggs about half, add cream of 
tartar, and beat until very, very stiff; stir in sugar, then flour 
very lightly. Flavor with sweet almond. Put in tube pan in 
a moderate oven at once. Will take from forty-five to fifty- 
five minutes to bake. For this and sunshine cake I always 
use pastry flour. 

— Mrs. S. B. Hinsdale. 

CITRON CAKE 

One and one-half cups of powdered sugar sifted, one cup of 
butter, one cup of milk, two eggs, two and one-half cups of 
flour sifted five times, two teaspoonfuls of baking powder, 
one-half pound of citron; cream, butter, and sugar; add milk, 
flour, and baking powder; fold in eggs (without beating) very 
carefully; then add citron cut very thin and dusted with 
flour. 

— Mrs. Etter. 

143 



The Colonial Dairy 

S E ^\^ A. R E :N^. 

Sewarcn's Supply of 
MILK AND CREAM. 

Telephone No. 26 F. 

GORHAM L. BOYNTON, 

Wholesale and Retail 

Lumber and Timber, 

Telephone 15 B. SEWAREN, N. J. 



Take the Trolley. 



/^ OOD COOKS pURE TV /T ILK /^ REAM I 
The Beit is Supplied by 

The Colonial Dairy, 

Telephone No. 26 F. SeWareil. 



WOODBRIDGE COOK BOOK HS 

CHOCOLATE CAKE NO. i 

Two eggs, one cup of sugar, one-half cup of butter, five 
tablespoonfuls of water, five tablespoonfuls of milk, two cups 
of flour, one-half cup of grated chocolate, melt until soft; two 
teaspoonfuls of baking powder. Frosting — One cup of pow- 
dered sugar, put two tablespoonfuls of boiling water on it; 
flavor. 

—Mrs. S. E. Potter. 



CHOCOLATE CAKE NO. 2 

One-half cup of butter, two cups of sugar, three eggs, one- 
half cup of sour milk, one-half teaspoonful of soda, two cups of 
flour, one teaspoonful of vanilla, one-third of a cake of Baker's 
chocolate, two cups of boiling water. Beat the butter to a 
cream, then add sugar; then beat well, and add eggs; dis- 
solve the soda in the sour milk; then add vanilla and one- 
third of Baker's chocolate dissolved in one-half cup of boiling 
water, and last, add the flour; bake in two deep jelly tins. 
Icing or filling for the cake: four tablespoonfuls of milk, let 
come to boiling heat, take off the stove, and stir in about three- 
fourths of a pound of confectioner's sugar and little vanilla; 
put between the cakes and all over the top and sides. 

—Mrs. J. H. Coddington. 



CHOCOLATE CAKE NO. 3 

One-half cup of butter, two cups of sugar, three eggs, one- 
half cup of milk, two cups of flour, two teaspoonfuls of 
baking powder, one-third cake of Baker's chocolate dissolved 
in one-half cup of boiling water, teaspoonful of vanilla. 
Icing — Four tablespoonfuls of milk, three-quarters of a pound 
of confectioner's sugar. 

— Mrs. Lockwood. 



146 WOODBRIDGE COOK BOOK 

CHOCOLATE CARAMEL CAKE 

One-half cup of butter, one and one-half cup of sugar, three 
eggs, one cup of milk, two and one-half cups of flour, two tea- 
spoonfuls of baking powder; vanilla to taste. Filling — ^Two 
cups of brown sugar, one cup of cream or milk, butter the size 
of an egg, one tablespoonful of vanilla, three-quarters of a cup 
of chocolate (scraped). Boil until thick; spread between lay- 
ers and on top. 

— Mrs. Oscar Miller. 

CHOCOLATE ROLL 

Four eggs, one-half cup of sugar, one cup of flour, one tea- 
spoonful of Royal baking powder. This makes two cakes; 
spread thin on long tins; spread chocolate over cake, and 
roll up immediately. This will not break in rolling if there 
is not too much flour. Will keep some time. 

— Mrs. E. Freeman. 

COFFEE CAKE NO. i 

One cup of sugar, one cup of butter, one cup of molasses, 
one cup of cold, strong cofifee, three cups of flour, three eggs, 
one teaspoonful of soda, one teaspoonful of cloves, one tea- 
spoonful of cinnamon, one teaspoonful of allspice, a little nut- 
meg, one large cup chopped raisins. 

—Mrs. J. B. Edgar. 

COFFEE CAKE NO. 2 

One cup of sugar, one cup of molasses, one cup of strong, 
cold cofifee, one cup of butter, three cups of flour, one egg, one 
pound of raisins, one pound of currants, one-half pound citron, 
three level teaspoonfuls of baking powder, one teaspoonful of 
cloves^ two teaspoonfuls of cinnamon. Bake slowly three 
hours. 

^•Mrs. M. Irving Demarest, 



WOODBRIDGE COOK BOOK H? 

CURRANT CAKE 

One-half pound of currants, one-half pound of flour, one- 
half pound sugar, one-quarter pound of butter, one-half cup 
of milk, two eggs, heaping teaspoonful of baking powder. 
Bake forty minutes in medium oven. 

— Miss Minnie Campbell. 

DELICIOUS CAKE 

One and one-half cups powdered sugar, two-thirds of a cup 
of butter, five eggs (whites only), one-half cup of cornstarch, 
one cup of milk, two and one-half cups of flour, two tea- 
spoonfuls of baking powder. Beat sugar and butter to a 
cream, add the whites of eggs beaten to a stiff froth, stir, and 
beat this until as light as foam, then add cornstarch dis- 
solved in part of the milk, flour, and baking powder; flavor 
with vanilla. White icing for filling — One-half cup of water, 
one and one-half cups of sugar (soft white), one egg (white 
only); boil sugar and water until it drops thick and heavy, 
then pour it slowly on the white of egg which has been 
beaten very light; add one teaspoonful of either orange or 
lemon — always use different flavoring in cake and filling. This 
cake is better if not cut for two or three days after baking. 

— Mrs. Etter. 

EGOLESS CAKE 

One cup of sugar, one cup of sour milk, one cup seeded 
raisins, one-half cup of currants, one-half cup of butter, two 
cups of flour, one teaspoonful of soda, one teaspoonful of cin- 
namon, one-fourth teaspoonful of gi^ound cloves, one-half 

nutmeg. 

— Mrs. J. H. Coddington. 

FEATHER CAKE 
One and one-half cups of sugar, one-half cup of butter, two 



WOODBRIDGE COOK BOOK 149 

eggs, one cup of milk, two and one-half cups of flour, one 
teaspoonful of soda^ two of cream of tartar. 

— Miss Georgia Brokaw. 

FRUIT CAKE 

One pound of sugar, one pound of butter, one pound of 
flour, three pounds of raisins, three and one-half pounds of 
currants, one and one-half pounds of citron, ten eggs, one- 
half gill of brandy, one-half gill of molasses, one-fourth ounce 
of cinnamon, one-fourth ounce of mace, one-fourth ounce of 
ginger. 

—L. A. H. 

FRUIT CAKE NO. 2 

One pound of butter, one pound of sugar (H. B.), one pound 
of flour, six eggs, three pounds of raisins, two pounds of cur- 
rants, one cup of molasses, one cup of brandy, twO' ounces of 
cinnamon, two ounces of allspice, one-half ounce of nutmeg 
(grated) ; salt. Bake three or four hours. 

— Mrs. Josephine Romond. 

FRUIT CAKE NO. 3 

One pound of butter, one pound of brown sugar, one pound 

of flour, ten eggs, five pounds of raisins (seeded), one pound 

of citron cut very thin, one cup of molasses, one cup of 

brandy, one tablespoonful of cinnamon, one tablespoonful of 

cloves, one tablespoonful of nutmeg; cream, butter, and sugar 

together; add eggs one at a time; flour the fruit, and add a 

little salt to the whole mixture. To be baked in a slow oven all 

night. 

— Mrs. John Lockwood. 

GOLD CAKE 

One cup of sugar, two-thirds of a cup of butter, one-half 
cup of sweet milk, yolks of five eggs, one teaspoonful of 



150 WOODBRIDGE COOK BOOK 

cream of tartar, one-half teaspoonful of soda, two cups of 
flour. Beat the e^gs to a froth, heat the butter and sugar to- 
gether before adding the eggs. Flavor to suit taste. 

-— H. K. Osborn. 

GRAFTON CAKE 

Two tablespoonfuls of butter, one and one-half cups of sugar, 
two eggs beaten separately, one cup of water, scant two and 
one-half cups of flour, one heaping teaspoonful of baking 
powder, one-fourth of a nutmeg grated, or one teaspoonful of 
almond flavoring. 

— Mrs. Charles Taylor Pierce. 

HICKORY NUT CAKE 

Four eggs, two cups of sugar, one-half cup of cream or but- 
ter, two and one-half cups of flour, two teaspoonfuls of bak- 
ing powder (Royal), three-fourths of a cup of milk. Bake 
in layers. Filling — Two eggs, one cup of sugar, two heaping 
tablespoonfuls of cornstarch, one cofifee cup of chopped hick- 
ory nuts, one pint of milk; beat eggs, sugar, cornstarch, and 
nuts together, and stir into milk while boiling; let cook as thick 
as a custard; when cold spread between layers. 

— Mrs. H. J. Forbes. 

HICKORY NUT AND RAISIN CAKE 

Two quarts of hickory nuts before cracked, one and three- 
fourths pounds of raisins seeded, one pound of brown sugar, 
one pound of flour, three-fourths pound of butter, six eggs, 
one nutmeg, and one-half tumbler of wine. 

—Mrs. O. Miller. 

HOOSIER CAKE 

One an'd one-half cup of butter, one cup of molasses, two 
cups of sugar, four cups of flour, one cup of sour milk, one 



WOODBRIDGE COOK BOOK 151 

teaspoonful of soda, fire eggs, one and one-half pounds of 
raisins, one-half pound of citron, one nutmeg, one teaspoonful 
of cinnamon, one-half teaspoonful of cloves. 

— Mrs. Henry P. Cortelyou. 



IMPERIAL CAKE 

One pound of flour, one pound of sugar, one pound of but- 
ter, three-fourths of a pound of blanched almonds sliced, 
two pounds of raisins, one pound of citron, ten eggs, one wine- 
glass of grape juice and rind of three lemons, grated, and the 
juice, too; two tablespoonfuls of baking powder. Bake three 
or more hours in a slow oven. 

— Mrs. A. E. Clarkson. 



LEMON CAKE 

Make in four layers, icing between them. The yolks of four 
eggs and the whites of three beaten separately, one pound of 
granulated sugar, one cup of milk, one large tablespoonful of 
butter, two and one-half cups of flour, one teaspoonful of soda, 
and two of cream of tartar. Icing — ^White of one egg, one 
pound of pulverized sugar, and the grated rind and juice of one 
large lemon. 

— Mrs. J. Edgar Brown, 



LILY CAKE 

One pound of sugar, one-half pound of butter, whites of 
seven eggs beaten to a stiff froth, one cup of sweet milk, one 
teaspoonful of soda dissolved in the milk, two teaspoonfuls of 
cream of tartar mixed with the flour, two and one-half cups of 
flour, one-half cup of cornstarch. 

— Mrs. Ann B. Voorhees. 



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WOODBRIDGE COOK BOOK 153 

MOLASSES CAKE 

Two eggs well beaten, one cup of brown sugar, one table- 
spoonful of butter, one cup of molasses, one cup of cold coffee, 
three cups of flour, one-half teaspoonful of salt, three tea- 
spoonfuls of baking powder, one teaspoonful of cloves, one 
teaspoonful of ginger, one teaspoonful of allspice. Cook in 
moderate oven for twenty minutes. 

— Mrs. Edwards. 

PLAINFIELD MOLASSES CAKE 

One teacup of molasses, one egg, one . tablespoonful of 
shortening, two cups of flour. Mix all together; add one tea- 
cup of boiling water or coffee with a teaspoonful of soda dis- 
solved in it, a little salt, and spice to taste. 

— Mrs. Robert Valentine. 

MOLASSES GINGERBREAD 

One cup of molasses, two tablespoonfuls of butter melted 
and mixed with molasses, one cup boiling water, one teaspoon- 
ful of soda dissolved in the water while hot; let cool before ad- 
ding two and one-eighth cups of flour, one teaspoonful of 
ginger, one teaspoonful of cinnamon. 

— Mrs. W. L. Harned. 

MOLASSES CAKE 

One egg beaten very light. Half cup sugar; half cup 
molasses ; half cup drippings, half cup boiling water ; one even 
teaspoonful baking soda; half teaspoon ginger and cinnamon; 
one and one-half cup flour. 

— Mrs. M. D. Valentine. 

MOTHER'S CAKE 

One-half cup of milk with a teaspoonful of butter on the 
stove to get hot. Beat the whites of two eggs stiff, then put 



154 WOODBRIDGE COOK BOOK 

in yolks and beat; cup of sugar beaten in with eggs nicely, 
then put in one cup of flour with two level teaspoonfuls of 
baking powder; add hot milk, and flavoring (one teaspoonful 
of vanilla). 

—Mrs. R. B. Hart. 



NOVELTY CAKE 



i 



Two cups of powdered sugar, three-fourths of a cup of 
butter, three eggs, one cup of milk, two teaspoonfuls of bak- 
ing powder (Royal), flour to make smooth batter. Bake two 
layers of this batter, then add to that remaining one-half tea- 
spoonful of allspice, one-half teaspoonful of cloves, one tea- 
spoonful of cinnamon, one-fourth pound of raisins, one-fourth 
pound citron, one-fourth pound of currants. Bake this in one 
layer, and place between the two white layers, using soft icing 
for filling. Soft icing — One-half teaspoonful of butter, two 
tablespoonfuls of milk, one-half teaspoonful vanilla (or any 
other desired flavoring), confectioner's sugar enough to make 
it spread nicely, the icing will not crack in cutting. 

-—Mrs. Etter. 

MOTHER BREWSTER'S ONE-EGG CAKE 

One eg^, one cup of sugar, one cup of milk or cream, two 
and one-half cups of flour, two tablespoonfuls of butter, two 
teaspoonfuls of baking powder, or one of soda and two of 
cream of tartar. 

ORANGE CAKE NO. i 

Two cups of sugar, five eggs, one-half cup of water, juice 
and rind of one orange, two cups of flour, two teaspoonfuls of 
baking powder, pinch of salt. Icing — ^Juice_and rind of a 
large or two small oranges; stiffen with confection. Spread 
between layers and on top. 

— Mrs. Willard Freeman. 



WOODBRIDGE COOK BOOK 155 

ORANGE CAKE NO. 2 

Two cups powdered sugar (sifted), two-thirds of a cup of 
butter, three eggs, three and one-half cups of flour sifted seven 
times, two teaspoonfuls of cream of tartar, one teaspoonful of 
soda, two large sour oranges. Cream, butter, and sugar to- 
gether; take the juice and a little grated rind of the oranges 
put in a cup, and if it does not fill it add water enough to do 
so; dissolve cream of tartar and soda in part of this, then add 
flour, and, lastly, fold in the eggs one at a time; bake in layers. 
Filling — Juice and grated rind of one sour orange, one egg 
(yolk), one-half teaspoonful of butter, one pound of con- 
fectioner's sugar (sifted). Take butter and a little of the sugar 
and cream together, add yolk of egg, and gradually add or- 
ange juice and rind and sugar until all is well creamed to- 
gether. This will make filling for cake and cover top and 
sides. 

—Mrs. Etter. 

ORANGE CAKE— LAYER CAKE 

Two eggs separate, one-half cup of butter, heaping cup of 
sugar, cream, butter, and sugar; add yolks of eggs; one cup of 
milk, two cups of flour, two teaspoonfuls of baking powder; 
Lastly add beaten whites. 

— Mrs. J. E. Breckenridge. 

PLAIN CAKE 

Two eggs, beat well, one cup of sugar, one cup of flour, one 
heaping teaspoonful of baking powder, one pinch of salt. Beat 
well, and add, last of all, one-half cup of hot milk. Bake in 
a deep pan with a good oven to start — from thirty to forty 
minutes. Flavor to taste. 

FANCY POUND CAKE 
One pound of flour, one pound of sugar, three-fourths of a 



WOODBRIDGE COOK BOOK i57 

pound of butter, six eggs, one cup of sweet milk, one nutmeg, 
one teaspoonful of soda, two of cream of tartar. 

— Miss Georgia Brokaw. 

POUND CAKE 

One pound of sugar, three-fourths of a pound of butter, 
one pound of pastry flour, scant; nine eggs; cream, butter, 
and sugar. Add eggs unbeaten, two at a time, till all are 
beaten in. Beat very, very hard. Put in moderate oven. 

— Miss Susie Freeman. 

FRENCH POUND CAKE 

Three-fourths of a pound of butter, one pound of sugar, 
six eggs beat in separate, one-half cup of milk, one pound of H. 
O. flour. 

—Mrs. W. H. D. 

SCRIPTURE CAKE 

One cup of butter, Judges 5 125 ; two cupfuls of sugar, Jere- 
miah 6:20; three and one-half cupfuls of flour, I Kings 4:22; 
two cupfuls of raisins, I Samuel 30:12; two cupfuls figs, I 
Samuel 30:12; one cupful almonds, Genesis 43:11; one cup- 
ful water, Genesis 24:20; six eggs, Isaiah 10:14; a little salt, 
Leviticus 3:13; one large iron spoonful honey, Exodus 16:31; 
sweet spices to taste, I Kings 10:2. Follow Solomon's advice 
for making good boys (first clause of Proverbs 23:14) and you 
will have a good cake. Sift two teaspoonfuls of baking pow- 
der with the flour, pour boiling water on almonds to remove 
from skin; seed raisins and chop figs. 

— Mrs. George Moffett. 

SILVER CAKE 

One cup of sugar, two-thirds of a cup of butter, one-half cup 
of sweet milk, whites of five eggs beaten to stiff froth, one tea- 



158 WOODBRIDGE COOK BOOK 

spoonful of cream of tartar, one-half teaspoonful of soda; flavor 
with bitter almonds. Flour to make good batter. 

— H. K. O. 

SNOW CAKE 

One-half cup of butter, one cup of sugar, one-half cup flour, 
one-half cup sweet milk; whites of four eggs, one teaspoon- 
ful of baking powder. 

— Miss Minnie Campbell. 

SPONGE CAKE NO. i 

Twelve eggs ; take the weight of ten in sugar, the weight of 
six in flour; beat the yolks and sugar to a cream; put in the 
grated rind of a lemon. Beat the whites to a stifif froth, and 
add to the yolks and sugar. Beat hard, very hard, for fifteen 
minutes; stir the flour in very gently; add the juice of the 
lemon, stirring very lightly; bake in shallow pans in a moder- 
ate oven for thirty minutes. 

— Susie Freeman. 

SPONGE CAKE NO. 2 

Six eggs, one-half pound of flour, three-fourths pound of 
sugar, one lemon, rind and juice, one-half cup of water. Boil 
the water and sugar together until it drops from a spoon like 
jelly. Beat the whites of the eggs until very light; then mix 
them with the unbeaten yolks, and pour the syrup over them, a 
little at a time, beating all the while ; continue to beat until the 
mixture is cold; then add the lemon and flour, stirring lightly. 
Bake fifteen or twenty minutes in a quick oven. 

— Miss Preston. 

SPONGE CAKE NO. 3 

Three eggs beaten very light, one and one-half cups of 
ground sugar, beat well ; one cup of flour with one teaspoonful 



WOODBRIDGE COOK BOOK i59 

of cream of tartar; one-half cup of cold water with one-half 
teaspoonful of soda. Lastly, add one cup of flour, and beat 
for five minutes. Cook in slow oven. 

— Mrs. Edwards. 



CREAM SPONGE CAKE 

Sift two cups of flour with two teaspoonfuls of baking pow- 
der, mix in two cups sifted sugar, one cup sweet cream, the 
well-beaten yolks of four eggs; flavor with lemon. Just before 
pouring in the pan add the whites of four eggs beaten light. 

— A. E. Hoagland. 



HOT WATER SPONGE CAKE 

Six eggs, two cups of sugar (sifted), three cups of flour, one 
cup of boiling water, one teaspoonful of baking powder. Beat 
sugar and yolks of eggs to cream; add water; let stand until 
you beat whites of eggs very stiff; then add flour and baking 
powder, and, lastly, the whites of eggs beaten fifteen minutes. 
The success of this cake is in the beating. 

— Mrs. Etter. 



LEMON CREAM SPONGE CAKE 

Three eggs, one and one-half cups of sugar, one-half cup of 
cold water, two cups of flour, two teaspoonfuls of baking 
powder. Separate eggs, add sugar to yolks, beat until light, 
add water, then sift in flour and beat thoroughly, lastly fold in 
whites, but do not beat; then bake in jelly pans. Filling — 
Beat white of one egg in bowl and add powdered sugar until 
thick, add grated rind and juice of one large lemon or two 
small ones, add more sugar until you have the right con- 
sistency, then spread between and on top of cake. 

— S. C. C. 



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WOODBRIDGE COOK BOOK i6i 

STIR CAKE 

One pound of powdered sugar, one cup of butter, one and 
one-half cups of milk, two teaspoonfuls of baking powder, 
three cups of flour, four eggs. Beat sugar and butter to 
cream; add milk, flour, baking powder; lastly, fold in the eggs 
one at a time without beating. Bake in moderate oven. 

—Mrs. H. J. Forbes. 

SUNSHINE CAKE 

Whites of seven small fresh eggs, yolks of five, one cup of 
sifted granulated sugar, two-thirds of a cup of flour, one- 
third of a teaspoonful of cream of tartar, and a pinch of salt. 
Sift flour four or five times; measure and set aside. Beat 
yolks of eggs thoroughly. Add salt to whites, and beat about 
half; then add cream of tartar, and beat until very, very stiff. 
Stir in sugar lightly, then beat yolks thoroughly; then add 
flour put in tube-pan, set in the oven at once. Bake from 
forty-five to fifty minutes. 

—Mrs. S. B. Hinsdale. 

VARIETY CAKE 

One and one-half cups of sugar, one-half cup of butter, one- 
half cup of milk, three cups of flour, three eggs, one teaspoon- 
ful of cream of tartar, one-half teaspoonful of soda. To one- 
third of the butter add one-half teaspoonful of cloves, one-half 
teaspoonful of cinnamon, nutmeg, and a cup of chopped rai- 
sins. Bake in three tins; put the dark in the center with the 
frosting or jelly between. 

— Mrs. Ann B. Voorhees. 

VELVET CAKE 

One-half pound of butter creamed with one pound of sugar, 
beat three minutes, six eggs added, one at a time, beating well 



l62 WOODBRIDGE COOK BOOK 

after each egg is added; add gradually one cup of lukewarm 
milk, beat well, then add one teaspoonful of baking powder to 
one pound of flour; sift flour into the cake, flavor, beat well 
for ten minutes. Can be baked in layers or loaf. 

— Mrs. de Russy. 

VELVET LUNCH CAKE NO. i 

One cup of sugar, one-half cup of butter, one cup of sour 
milk, two cups of flour, one egg, one teaspoonful of soda dis- 
solved in milk, oiie cooking spoonful of molasses, one tea- 
spoonful of cinnamon, one-half teaspoonful of cloves, three- 
fourths of a cup of raisins, one-half cup of currants. 

— L. A. H. 

VELVET LUNCH CAKE NO. 2 

One cup of sugar, one-half cup of butter, one cup of sour 
milk, two cups of flour, one egg, one teaspoonful of soda, two 
tablespoonfuls of molasses, one teaspoonful of cinnamon, one- 
half teaspoonful of cloves, one-half teaspoonful of nutmeg. 
Fruit added to the above makes a nice fruit cake. 

—May E. Kelly. 

WASHINGTON CAKE 

One pound of sugar, one pound of flour, one-half pound of 
butter, four eggs, one and one-half pounds of raisins, one tea- 
cup of cream, and some brandy. 

— Mrs. Ezra Brewster. 

WHITE CAKE 

Three-lourths cup of butter, one and one-half cups of sugar, 
one-half cup of milk, two and one-half cups of flour, two tea- 
spoonfuls of baking powder, the whites of eight eggs; flavor 
with vanilla. 

— Mrs. D. S. Voorhees. 



SMALL CAKES 

COOKIES NO. I 

Two cups of sugar, one cup of butter, a little more than one 
quart of flour, two eggs, four tablespoonfuls of sweet milk, two 
teaspoonfuls of baking-powder. 

— Mrs. E. H. Boynton. 

COOKIES NO. 2 

One cup of butter, one cup of powdered sugar, one quarter 
cup of milk, two eggs, one and one-half cups of flour, one tea- 
spoonful of baking powder, pinch of salt, one tea- 
spoonful of vanilla. Mix together, and roll very thin; after 
cutting rub the top of each cookie with white of egg beaten to 
a froth, and sprinkled with chopped almonds. 

— Mrs. William Edgar. 

COOKIES NO. 3 

One cup of sugar, three-fourths of a cup of butter, one egg^ 
one teaspoonful of cream of tartar, one-half teaspoonful of 
baking soda, one tablespoonful of milk (any flavor may be 
used) ; dissolve cream of tartar and soda in milk ; add flour to 
make stiff dough; roll very thin; sprinkle with granulated 
sugar, and cut with biscuit-cutter; bake in moderate oven. 

— Mrs. Etter. 

COOKIES NO. 4 

Two cups of sugar, one cup of butter, two eggs, one-half cup 
of milk, one-half teaspoonful of vanilla and lemon mixed, one- 

163 



WOODBRIDGE COOK BOOK 165 

fourth teaspoonful of salt, two teaspoonfuls of baking pow- 
der sifted through flour enough to roll thin. Bake in hot 
oven. Very pretty cut in fancy shapes, and iced with different 
colors. 

— Mrs. Isaac Inslee. 

CHOCOLATE COOKIES 

Beat to a cream one-half cup of butter, one cup of sugar, 
one-fourth teaspoonful of salt, one teaspoonful of cinnamon, 
two ounces of Baker's chocolate; add one egg, one teaspoon- 
ful of baking powder, two tablespoonfuls of milk, about two 
and one-half cups of flour. Roll thin. 

■— Mittie E. Hamed. 

COCOANUT COOKIES NO. i 

Two cups of sugar, one cup of butter, two cups of grated 
cocoanut, two eggs, one teaspoonful of baking powder; mix 
with enough flour to roll easy; roll very thin. Bake in quick 
oven, but not too brown. 

—Mrs. C. A. Campbell. 

COCOANUT COOKIES NO. 2 

One-fourth pound of flour, one-fourth pound of butter, 
one pound of powdered sugar, four eggs, two cocoanuts grated 
and dried by the fire. 

— Susie Freeman. 

SUGAR COOKIES 

Cream three-fourths of a pound of sugar and same of but- 
ter togfether, add pinch of salt, four well-beaten eggs, one 
pound of flour to suit taste, or add caraway seeds, roll thin, 
cut in shapes, and bake in quick oven. 

— Mrs. W. A. Osborn. 



i66 WOODBRIDGE COOK BOOK 

CREAM PUFFS NO. i 

Take one cup of boiling water, add one-half cup of butter, 
one cup of flour, stirring until it is a smooth thick paste, stir 
quickly five minutes; take off, and when it is a little cool, stir 
in six eggs, and drop them on a greased pan a little way apart; 
make them small, for they spread. Bake in a very hot oven. 
When done cut open and spread cream between. 

— Mrs. R. Valentine. 

CREAM PUFFS NO. 2 

One-half cup of butter melted in one cup of hot water. Set 
on stove to boil, while boiling stir in one cup of flour. When 
cool stir in three eggs, one after the other, without beating. 
Drop on hot tins, and bake for twenty-five minutes. Filling — 
One cup of milk, one egg, one-half cup of sugar. Boil and 
thicken with cornstarch. Flavor with vanilla. 

—Mrs. W. L. Hamed. 

CRULLERS NO. i 

One cup of sugar, seven tablespoonfuls of melted butter, one 
teacup of sweet milk, two dessertspoonfuls of baking powder, 
two eggs. Mix all together with flour enough for a soft 
dough. 

—Mrs. W. B. Krug. 

CRULLERS NO. 2 

One cup of sugar, pinch of salt, one-half nutmeg grated, one 
teaspoonful of shortening, lard or cottolene preferred, two eggs 
beaten, yolks and whites together; one scant cup of milk, one 
quart of flour, measured before sifting; two even teaspoonfuls 
of baking powder — sift twice. Mix in the order given, 
but do not use all the flour; this quantity will be enough to 
dredge the board and perhaps leave some. Stir in enough 



WOODBRIDGE COOK BOOK 167 

flour to be spoon-stiff. Roll out as soft as can be handled; 
cut out. Boil in smoking hot lard, i. e., this will be right when 
a smoke first begins to rise from the kettle. A deep smoke 
will make hard burnt crullers. Drain on butcher paper and 
when half cold roll in powdered sugar. 

— Mrs. Anton Kuhlmann. 

DOMINOES 

Take sponge cake, baked in thin sheets, and cut in small 
oblong pieces, the size of a domino, a trifle larger. Frost the 
top and sides. When the frosting is hard, draw the black 
lines, and make the dots, with a small brush dipped in melted 
chocolate. These are very nice for children's parties. The 
lines and dots can also be made of pink frosting. 

— Mrs. Charles Taylor Pierce. 

CONNECTICUT DOUGHNUTS 

One cup butter; two cups sugar; three cups milk; two eggs; 
one yeast cake. Take half sugar and butter, after working to- 
gether add milk and yeast; make a stiff batter and stand over 
night. Beat batter with the hand until soft as possible. In 
the morning, work in remainder of sugar and butter, and flour 
enough to roll out. Roll out and stand until light enough 
to fry. 

—Mrs. J. B. Edgar. 

DROPPED DOUGHNUTS 

One cup sugar; two tablespoons butter; three-fourths cup 
of milk; three eggs; three cupfuls flour; one large teaspoon- 
ful baking powder. Salt and flavoring to taste. Beat butter 
and sugar to a cream ; add flavoring, salt, and egg yolks and 
whites beaten separately. Now add the milk, and finally the 
flour. Drop this batter by teaspoonfuls into hot fat, and cook 
about five minutes. Drain and cover with sugar. 

— Mrs. F. F. Anness. 



A General Storekeeper Knows 

his SUCCESS lies in keeping a stock of those 
goods his customers require, of the BEST 
QUALITY, at BEST RATES ; giving good 
attention ; quick and prompt deliveryi 



W, Ti. H^RJSrED'S STORE 

is governed by these rules. 

GROCERIES, DRY GOODS, NOTIONS. 

51 Main St., Woodbridge, N. J. 

Telephone, N. Y. & N. J., 4 A. 

BoSTOlSr ©TORE, 



We keep a la,tgc and well- 
selected stock of DRY and 
FANCY GOODS at the 
Lowest Market Prices 

Agent for Butterick Patterns. 

WILLIAM MURDOCH. 

jsr. n. wTlllams, 

DEALER IN 

STAPLE and FANCY 
DRY GOODS 

Carpets, Oil Cloth, Mattings and Upholstery. 



136 Broad Street, - - Elizabeth, N. J. 



WOODBRIDGE COOK BOOK 169 

RAISED DOUGHNUTS 

One tablespoonful lard; one quart flour; one-half cup sugar; 
one-half tablespoonful salt; one-half cake compressed yeast; 
one cup milk, warm; one cup water, warm; two eggs, well 
beaten. Knead into soft dough and let rise over night. 
Next morning knead again, and roll on board about one inch 
thick. Cut in biscuit shape and set to rise again on board, 
for two hours, then fry in boiling lard. When brown and cool 
dip in powdered sugar. 

— Mrs. C. H. Edwards. 



HERMITS 

Three eggs and one and one-half cups of sugar; one cup of 
melted butter; one-half teaspoon of soda, dissolved in two tea- 
spoons of boiling water; one teaspoon of cloves, allspice, and 
one of cinnamon, fuller than the others; one-half a nutmeg, 
grated ; one teaspoon of salt (scant) ; one and one-half cups of 
chopped raisins ; two cups of flour. This mixture to be dropped 
with a spoon on flat tins. 

— Mrs. Qiarles Taylor Pierce. 



HICKORY NUT MACAROONS 

One pint of chopped nuts; one-half pint of flour; one pound 
pulverized sugar; four eggs. Beat sugar and eggs to a cream; 
add flour and nuts last. 

— Mrs. M. Irving Demarest. 



JUMBLES 

One pound butter; one pound sugar; one and one-fourth 
pound flour; six eggs; one teaspoonful essence lemon. 

— Mrs. Henry P. Cortelyou. 



I70 WOODBRIDGE COOK BOOK 

LITTLE POUND CAKES 

Five eggs; the weight of the five eggs in granulated sugar; 
the weight of four in butter and flour, with three tablespoon- 
fuls taken out. When you have put in the last of the flour, 
sprinkle in with the fingers a piece of soda the size of a pea. 

— Susie Freeman. 

MOLASSES SNAPS 

One cup of molasses; one cup of sugar; one cup of butter 
and lard, mixed; one egg; one-half teaspoon salt; one table- 
spoon ground ginger; one teaspoonful of soda, di<isolved in 
one-half cup of boiling water; flour enough to roll ^ery thin. 
Bake in hot oven. 

— Mrs. Isaac Inslee. 

MERINGUES 

Whites of three eggs beaten very light, with pinch of salt; 
one good cup granulated sugar, added slowly. Drop on 
greased paper; place in oven hot enough for cake and watch 
them closely until they have formed a light colored crust. 
There is no difficulty in making meringues if the eggs are 
sufficiently whipped before and after the sugar is in. They 
must not spread. If they do, add more sugar and beat. Bake 
fifteen minutes, or until a light brown. Fill with whipped 
cream just before serving, putting them together. 

— Mrs. C. A. Campbell. 

MISS MULFORD'S CAKES 

Five eggs; their weight in granulated sugar; the weight of 
four in butter and flour, with three tablespoons of flour taken 
out. When the last of the flour is put in, sprinkle in with the 
fingers a pinch of soda the size of a pea. 

— Mabel Freeman. 



WOODBRIDGE COOK BOOK 171 

NUT COOKIES 

Beat to a cream one-half cup of butter; one cup of sugar; 
one-fourth of a teaspoonful of salt; one tgg\ two tablespoon- 
fuls of milk; about two and one-half cups of flour; one tea- 
spoonful of baking powder; one large cup of nuts chopped. 
Roll out thin. 

—Mrs. W. L. Harned. 

SAND TARTS 

One coflfee-cup of sugar; one coffee-cup of butter; three 
eggs, leave out the white of one. Flour to make stiff as cookies ; 
roll thin. Beat the white of the one you left out to a stiff 
froth. After rolling out thin, cut with a cake-cutter, put in 
pan and with a feather or small brush wipe over the egg. 
Lay three or four halves of almonds that have been blanched ; 
then sprinkle over with cinnamon and granulated sugar; bake 
as cookies. 

— Susie Freeman. 

SANTA BARBARA'S CAKE 

One cup of sugar; one-half cup of butter; one-half cup of 
milk ; two eggs with the yolk of a third ; two and one-half cups 
of fiour; one teaspoon of baking powder. Frosting if you Hke. 
This makes twenty-one little cakes. 

— Mrs. Charles Taylor Pierce. 

SOFT COOKIES 

One heaping cup butter; one and one-half cups sugar; two 
eggs; three tablespoons sour milk; one small teaspoonful soda; 
as little flour as will make them stiff enough to roll. Sprinkle 
with sugar and grated nutmeg or cinnamon. Before cutting 
pass over roller. Cut, and bake a light brown. 

— Mrs. Oscar Miller.- 



WOODBRIDGE COOK BOOK 173 

WAFFLES 

Two cups of sugar; one-half cup butter; one cup milk; three 
eggs; two teaspoonfuls baking powder; flour enough to make 
a stiff batter. 

— L. A. H. 

WALNUT WAFERS 

Two eggs; one cup of brown sugar; six tablespoonfuls of 
flour; one-half teaspoonful of baking powder; one-third tea- 
spoonful salt; one cup of walnut meats, broken, but not 
chopped. If the spoon will not stand alone in the batter, add 
a little more flour. Drop from spoon on buttered pans, and 
bake in a quick oven. Remove from the pans as soon as 
baked. 

— Mrs. de Russy. 



FILLINGS AND ICINGS 

BOILED ICING. NO. i 

One cup granulated sugar; five tablespoons water; white of 
one egg. Add water to sugar and boil over a hot fire until it 
threads from the spoon, stirring often at first. Beat white of 
egg quite stiff, just before your sugar is ready for it. When 
sugar threads, turn it into beaten white and stir rapidly for 
about one-half minute; then put in beater and beat until light 
and creamy. When cooled to proper consistency, spread on 

^^^^- —Mrs. S. B. Hinsdale. 



BOILED ICING NO. 2 

One cup powdered sugar; one-half cup water. Bofl until it 
cracks from spoon ; then beat quickly into beaten white of one 

^^^' — Mrs. Edwards. 

CREAM FILLING FOR CAKE 

One pint of milk; one egg; one-half cup of sugar; two even 
tablespoons of cornstarch; one teaspoon of vanilla. Mix 
together, and boil until it thickens. 

— Mrs. M. Irving Demarest. 

CHOCOLATE FILLING NO. i 

Three-fourths cup of milk; two ounces of chocolate. Let 
boil until thick enough. When cool, sweeten and flavor to 
taste. _L A. H. 

174 



WOODBRIDGE COOK BOOK 175 

CHOCOLATE FILLING NO. 2 

One cup of sugar; one cup of milk; two even tablespoons 
of cornstarch; one-fourth of a cake of Baker's chocolate; a 
little butter, and a teaspoon of vanilla. Boil until it thickens. 

— Mrs. M. Irving Demarest. 

CHOCOLATE FILLING FOR CAKE NO. 3 

One tablespoon butter; one-half small cup sugar; one-half 
cup milk; two ounces of chocolate; one teaspoonful of corn- 
starch. Boil until thick. 

— Miss Georgia Brokaw. 



CURRANT JELLY AND WALNUT FILLING 

To a cupful of home-made currant jelly, add a cupful of finely 
chopped English walnuts. If this be too tart, a tablespoonful 
of boiled icing may be put with the mixture. Almonds may 
be substituted for the walnuts. These fillings look well with 
the yellow layer cakes. 

— Mrs. J. Edgar Brown. 



FIG FILLING FOR CAKE 

Three-fourths pound of figs, chopped fine ; three-fourths cup 
of water; three-fourths cup of sugar. Boil until thick. 

— Miss Georgia Brokaw. 



FIG FILLING FOR CAKE 

Chop one pound figs; add one-half cup of sugar; one cup of 
water; cook until soft and smooth. Spread between layers. 

— Mrs. William Edgar. 



The donor's compliments and best (wishes 
for the success of the 

Ladies' Aid Society 

of the 

First G)ngregationaI Church, 

WOODBREXiE, N. J. 



I 



WOODBRIDGE COOK BOOK 177 

HICKORY-NUT FILLING 

One cup chopped hickory nuts; one cup sugar; one cup 
sour cream. Boil together slowly until it begins to thicken. 
Spread on layers when cool. 

— Mrs. W. A. Lockwood. 

MAPLE-SUGAR ICING 

One pound maple sugar; one and one-half cups water. Dis- 
solve sugar in water and boil until it strings from spoon. 
Then pour slowly into beaten white of one egg, beating until 
creamy. 

ORANGE ICING 

A delicate orange icing for cakes can be made without using 
eggs. To half pound of powdered sugar, add the grated rind 
of one orange; add a tablespoonful of boiling water and 
enough orange juice to moisten it thoroughly. Stir smooth 
and spread over the cake. In grating oranges the same care 
must be used as with lemons, not to grate the bitter white 
skin that is just below the outer white covering. 

—Mrs. R. B. Hart. 

ORANGE FILLING 

One cup boiling water; one cup sugar; grated rind of one 
orange; juice of two oranges; one egg; lump of butter size of 
nut; good tablespoonful cornstarch. Stir over fire until thick. 

— Mrs. J. E. Breckenridge. 



JELLIES AND PRESERVED FRUITS 

ASPIC 

One shin of beef; one knuckle of veal; four cloves; one bay 
leaf; two onions; one carrot; one stalk of celery; one turnip; 
one-half package gelatine; one cupful of sherry or Madeira. 
Put the beef and veal in a pot; cover them well with cold water, 
and let simmer for five or six hours, with the pot covered 
closely. An hour before removing from the fire, add the 
carrot, cut into dice, the cloves, and bay leaf. Fry in butter the 
onions and celery (cut into pieces) to a dark brown, and add 
them to the stock at the same time. Remove from the lire, 
strain, and add one-half package of gelatine, which has been 
soaked for an hour in one cupful of water, and one cupful of 
sherry or Madeira. Stir until the gelatine is dissolved. Set 
away until the next day. There should be two quarts of jelly. 
If it is not solid to stand, more gelatine may be added at the 
time of clearing. Boiling down jelly will not make it more 
firm. 

— Mrs. C. A. Campbell. 

TO CLEAR ASPIC 

Remove all the grease from the top of the jelly, and wipe it 
oflf with a cloth wet in hot water, so that every particle of 
grease will be removed. Stir into the cold jelly the beaten 
whites and the shells of three eggs (do not froth the eggs). 
Put it on the fire and continue to stir until it boils. Let it boil 
for five minutes then strain it through a double cloth. If not 

173 



WOODBRIDGE COOK BOOK 179 

perfectly clear, strain it a second time. Let the jelly drain 
through a cloth without pressure. 

— Mrs. C. A. Campbell. 

GELATINE APRICOTS 

One can apricots; one-half box gelatine; one lemon; ten 
pieces cut sugar; glass of sherry. Cut apricots in small pieces; 
put in saucepan with the syrup from the can; rub the lumps 
of sugar on rind of the lemon; put in the juice of lemon and 
sherry. Boil slowly for half an hour. Take from the fire and 
strain in dissolved gelatine. 

—Mrs. H. E. Williams. 



COFFEE JELLY 

Use the recipe given for wine jelly, using three-fourths of a 
cupful of clear, strong coffee instead of the wine, and omitting 
the lemon; mold in a ring, and fill the center with whipped 
cream ; or if this is not convenient, use any mold, and serve 
with it a sweetened milk or a soft custard. 

— Century Cook Book. 

PRESERVED FRUITS 

Fruits for preserving should be carefully selected, removing 
all that are imperfect. Small fruit should never be allowed 
to stand over night after they are picked, without scalding 
them. Use only the best sugar for preserving. If fruit is 
sealed in glass cans, it is best, before putting it away, to wrap 
around the cans paper of two or three thicknesses. Jellies are 
finest made from fruit that is not quite ripe. It should be 
picked upon a dry day, and not be allowed to stand over night 
without scalding, as it may not jelly. Cranberry jelly is best 
made fresh as it is wanted. LTse only the best sugar for jellies 
or jams. When jelly is cold, put over the top melted paraf- 
fin and cover with paper or glass cover. 



WOODBRIDGE COOK BOOK i8i 

CURRANT JELLY NO. i 

Buy twelve quart baskets of fine currants (generally cost one 
dollar). Have every basket turned over that you may be sure 
they are nice. Sort them over, but do not stem them. Put in 
the preserve kettle to heat thoroughly. Mash and strain 
through two thicknesses of cheese-cloth. You will have about 
nine pints of juice. To every pint of juice allow one pound of 
sugar (granulated). Place the sugar in a yellow earthen dish 
in the oven, with the door open. Put your currant juice back 
in the kettle, and over the fire to boil. When boiling, let boil 
fifteen minutes, and remove the scum meanwhile. At end of 
fifteen minutes add hot sugar, and stir until dissolved, and keep 
over the fire about five minutes. Have tumblers wet with cold 
water standing ready and fill to overflowing, as the jelly 
shrinks as it cools. You will have twenty-four tumblers from 
twelve baskets, or nine pints of juice and nine pounds of sugar. 
Do not attempt to do more than the above, as you cannot 
handle more with any comfort. I do not use tin lids. Paper 
pasted over the top of the tumblers is far nicer. This jelly is 
of a beautiful color, and keeps perfectly over a year. 

—Mrs. F. G. Tisdall. 

CURRANT JELLY NO. 2 

Select nice fresh fruit, not too ripe. Wash carefully, but 
do not stem. Put in kettle with as much water as will be con- 
sumed in cooking fruit sufficiently to heat it (about a pint of 
water to four quarts of fruit). Take from the fire and squeeze 
a small portion at a time through a jelly cloth. (I use a 
double cheese-cloth.) Take one quart of juice and two pounds 
of sugar, and put in a granite kettle. Stir thoroughly and 
place over a quick fire. Boil ten minutes, or until it will drop 
from a spoon when slightly cooled. Have the glasses warm, 
and pour in the liquid. When cold cover with melted 

— S. M. Brewster. 



i82 WOODBRIDGE COOK BOOK 

CURRANT AND RASPBERRY JELLY 

Take one-fourth as many raspberries as cunants and fol- 
low rule for currant jelly No. 2. 

— S. M. Brewster. 

QUINCE JELLY 

Wipe fruit thoroughly ; cut in small pieces, but do not pare. 
Be sure to remove all seeds. Cover fruit with water and place 
in a porcelain or granite covered kettle. When fruit is cooked 
very tender, squeeze through jelly cloth, and proceed the same 
as with currant jeUy No. 2. 

— S. M. Brewster. 

APPLE GINGER 

Four pounds of apples chopped fine; four pounds sugar 
(scant); four small lemons; one ounce of white ginger root. 
Make syrup with three pounds of sugar to one pint of water. 
When boiling put in the apples and ginger; boil slowly for one 
hour; then drop in the lemons, sliced, after grating the rind; 
now cook another hour, then add the grated rind just before 
taking from the fire. Put in marmalade jars. 

— Mrs. Charles Taylor Pierce. 

CURRANTS AND ORANGES 

One quart of currants; one large orange; one cup stoned 
raisins; one and one-half pounds sugar. Stew currants and 
sugar fifteen minutes; then squeeze the pulp and juice of the 
orange ; also the skin of the orange, cut into dice. Cook about 
half an hour, or until thick. Very nice to eat with meat. 

—Mrs. H. E. Williams. 

SPICED GRAPES 

Seven pounds grapes; remove the skins and boil the pulps 
long enough to loosen the pits; then squeeze and strain. Add 



WOODBRIDGE COOK BOOK 183 

five pounds of sugar; one teaspoon each of cinnamon, cloves, 
and mace, tied in a bag; one pint vintgar; then boil all the 
above, including the grape skins, three-quarters of an hour. 

— Bertha M. Campbell. 

ORANGE MARMALADE NO. i 

Twelve oranges; four lemons. Slice straight through, re- 
moving all seeds. Cut very thin. Put them in jar with four 
quarts cold water, and let stand thirty-six hours. Boil one 
and one^half hours until soft; add eight pounds of white sugar; 
boil about one hour until jellied. 

— Mrs. H. C. Nevius. 

ORANGE MARMALADE NO. 2 

Slice two oranges; one lemon, very thin; remove seeds, and 
add three pints cold water to each pound of fruit. After it is 
cut let it stand twenty-four hours. Boil till tender; let remain 
till following day; then weigh, and to each pound of fruit add 
one and one-half pounds sugar. Boil whole together till it 
jellies or the chips are transparent. 

— Mrs. H. E. Williams 

CANNED PEARS 

Pare the fruit and cut in halves. Drop in cold water to keep 
color. Make a syrup of one pint of sugar to half a pint water. 
Boil together ten minutes and skim. Boil in the syrup a few 
slices of lemon. Drop the pears in the boiling syrup and cook 
until they can be easily pierced with a silver fork. Fill jars 
with fruit, and fill up wtih strained syrup. 

— Mrs. Oscar Miller. 

PICKLED PEARS OR PEACHES 

Fourteen pounds fruit; seven pounds granulated sugar; two 
quarts vinegar; one-quarter pound allspice (whole); one-quar- 



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WOODBRIDGE COOK BOOK 185 

ter pound cinnamon, and a few cloves. Weigh fruit and boil 
until tender, in water, with a little vinegar and sugar in. Put 
the fruit in jars and cover slightly until syrup is ready. 
Make syrup acording to directions, tying spices in bags. 
Cook until quite thick — about fifteen minutes. Pour over 
cooked fruit. If syrup will not fill the jars, fill up with the 
water the fruit was cooked in; it must be hot, though. Don't 
cook the fruit too long. Fruit may be pared or unpared. 

—Mrs. Oscar Miller. 

PEAR JAM 

Eight pounds of chopped pears; six pounds of sugar; one- 
quarter of pound chopped candied ginger; one lemon chopped. 
Take out the seeds. Cook all together until quite thick. 

—Mrs. J. H. Coddington. 

PRESERVED PUMPKIN 

One large pumpkin, cut in dice. To every pound of 
pumpkin add three-quarters of a pound of sugar; juice and 
grated rind of six lemons; one-quarter pound of green ginger 
root, which must be scraped and chopped very fine. Let all 
stand over night. Cook very slowly next day, to a rich syrup. 

— Mrs. Hamlin. 

SPICED TOMATOES 

(Use very small yellow tomatoes if you can get them.) 
Seven pounds of tomatoes; one-half ounce stick cinnamon; 
three pounds of sugar; one-half ounce whole cloves; one quart 
vinegar; three peppercorns; small piece green ginger root. 
Tie the spices in coarse muslin bag and put into the vinegar, 
add the sugar and boil and skim. Let cool and then add the 
tomatoes, boil slowly until they look clear, take out, put in jars; 
boil the syrup a quarter of an hour; pour over the fruit in the 

jars and seal. 

— E. G. H. 



1 

vo I 



i86 WOODBRIDGE COOK BOOK 
WINE JELLY 

One-half box of gelatine; one-half cupful cold water; two 
cupfuls boiling water; one cupful sugar; juice of one lemon; 
three-fourths cupful of sherry. Soak the gelatine in the cold 
water for an hour or more. Put the boiling water, the sugar, 
and a few thin slices of lemon peel in a saucepan on the fire. 
When the sugar is disolved, add the gelatine, and stir until 
that is also dissolved; then remove, and when it is partly 
cooled, add the lemon juice and the wine. Strain and pour 
into a mold. 

TO KEEP FRESH STRAWBERRIES FROM 
SOFTENING 

Hull, but do not wash the fruit. Put in large-mouthed jars, 
without the rubbers. Lightly screw on the top. Keep in ice 
box till wanted. Then wash, if necessary, and serve. Berries, 
if fresh, can be kept for three days and often four, and be fresh 
as if just picked. A good way to save for Sunday's and Mon- 
day's use. 

— Helen B. Ames. 



PICKLES 

BORDEAUX SAUCE 

Two gallons of chopped cabbage; one gallon of chopped 
tomatoes; twelve onions; one ounce of celery seed; one ounce 
grain allspice; one ounce grain cloves; one ounce grain black 
pepper; one-half ounce ground turmeric; one-half pound 
white mustard seed; one pound brown sugar; one gill salt; two 
quarts vinegar. Boil together fifteen minutes. 

— Mrs. M. Irving Demarest. 



RAW CATSUP 

One-half peck ripe tomatoes, cut in one-half inch cubes, the 
skins left on; two roots of horseradish, grated; one small tea- 
cup of salt; one cup of black and white mustard seeds, mixed; 
two tablespoons of black pepper; two tablespoons of chopped 
red peppers, without seeds; seven or eight stalks of celery, 
cut fine, or one-half ounce of celery seed; one cup of nastur- 
tiums; one-half cup of onions cut fine; one teaspoonful of 
ground cloves; one teaspoonful of mace; one teaspoonful of 
cinnamon; one small cup of brown sugar; one quart of best 
cider vinegar. 

— Miss Lizzie Cortelyou. 



CHILI SAUCE NO. i 

Seventy-five ripe tomatoes ; eight sweet red peppers (remove 
seeds); six large onions; three cups vinegar; three tablespoons 
sugar; two tablespoons ground mustard. Chop tomatoes, 

187 



WOODBRIDGE COOK BOOK 189 

peppers, onions separately; then mix with other ingredients. 
Boil till thick. Salt to taste ; then can. 

— Mrs. R. Valentine. 



CHILI SAUCE NO. 2 

Forty large ripe tomatoes; twelve onions; eight green pep- 
pers, all chopped fine; drain well; four tablespoonfuls each of 
salt and sugar; six cups vinegar, and a little ground cinnamon. 
Boil all together about two hours. Bottle while hot. 

— Mrs. M. Brewster. 

CHILI SAUCE NO. 3 

One peck tomatoes (ripe); six green peppers; two teaspoons 
ground cinnamon; two teaspoons ground cloves; two tea- 
spoons ground allspice; two cups sugar; five cups vinegar; 
six onions; one-half cup of salt. Chop onions and peppers 
very fine; add tomatoes. Boil and skim two hours; then bottle. 

— Mrs. F. F. Anness. 

SLICED CUCUMBER PICKLE. 

Two dozen cucumbers cut in thin slices; one-half dozen 
onions cut in thin slices. Lay down in salt over night; then 
scald with one pint of vinegar, and put in colander to drain. 
Make a dressing of two tablespoons of mustard; one-half tea- 
spoon of cayenne pepper, and one pint of vinegar. Do not 
cook this, but pour over the cucumbers and onions. Mix 
all together and put in tight jars. 

— Mrs. M. Irving Demarest. 

CUCUMBER PICKLE 

To one hundred pickles take one pint of salt, dissolved 
in enough boiling water to cover them; let remain twenty- 
four hours, then wipe dry and scald in weak vinegar twice. 



190 WOODBRIDGE COOK BOOK 

Put in jars. Then boil enough vinegar, spiced with white 
mustard seed, cloves, cinnamon, red pepper, a little sugar and 
alum to cover them. Pour this over boiling hot and cork 
tight. 

— Miss Margaret Brewster. 



JERSEY PICKLE. 

One peck green tomatoes. (Do not skin.) Cut them in 
slices. Three green peppers; six medium-sized onions; three- 
fourths teacup of salt. Sprinkle over them and let them 
stand all night. In the morning, pour off the liquor, then put 
on to boil with one pint of vinegar, teacup of sugar. Cut 
onions up fine. 

— Miss Minnie Campbell. 



MUSTARD PICKLES 

Two red peppers; six sweet green peppers; two quarts 
onions; one-half peck cucumbers; one pound brown sugar; 
three-fourths pound of mustard; three quarts vinegar; one-half 
ounce celery seed; one-half ounce white mustard seed; one 
dessertspoonful of turmeric powder; one teaspoonful each cin- 
namon and cloves. Cut the cucumbers and onions in pieces 
and soak in water over night. In the morning drain all the 
water from them; mix turmeric powder, mustard, and spice 
with a part of the vinegar to prevent lumping. Put the re- 
mainder of the vinegar on the fire, adding the sugar and the 
seed, carefully stirring in the paste of spices and powder, and 
let boil up well. Then add the red peppers (chopped), also 
the green ones, and stir all together. After it begins to boil, 
boil it well for twenty minutes, or until cucumbers and onions 
are tender. Put up in glass jars. 

—Mary E. Franklin. 






WOODBRIDGE COOK BOOK 191 

MUSTARD PICKLE NO. 2 

One quart of small cucumbers; one quart of large cucum- 
bers, sliced; one quart of green tomatoes, sliced; one quart of 
onions; one large cauliflower; six green peppers. Put them in 
weak salt water, let them stand twenty-four hours, then scald 
in some water and drain. The cauliflower must be boiled un- 
til tender enough to be pierced with a fork. Pour boiling 
water on the onions and tomatoes, and let them stand until they 
are cold. Dressing: Six tablespoonfuls of mustard, two 
tablespoonfuls of turmeric powder, or one-half ounce of it; one 
and one^half cups of sugar; one cup of flour; two quarts of 
vinegar. Mix thoroughly; scald the mixture for nearly one 
hour, stirring constantly, and then pour on the pickles. Cook 
the dressing in a pan over hot water for fear of scorching. 

—Mrs. C. W. Boynton. 

TOMATO CATSUP NO. i 

One bushel of ripe tomatoes; boil and strain. Add two 
ounces of cinnamon; two ounces of cloves; two ounces of all- 
spice (whole); one ounce ground mace; one ounce black pep- 
per; two tablespoons of red pepper; three pints of vinegar; 
salt to taste. Boil down. 

— Mrs. Robert Valentine. 



TOMATO CATSUP NO. 2 

To eight quarts of tomatoes, after being heated, strained, 
and boiled three hours, add one cup of sugar; two-thirds cup 
salt; one and one-half pints vinegar; one tablespoon of ground 
mustard; one of grated nutmeg; one and one-half black pep- 
per; one teaspoon ground cloves; one teaspoon allspice; one 
teaspoon cinnamon; one-half teaspoon cayenne pepper. Boil 
fifteen minutes after the spices are all in. Bottle hot. 

—Mrs. R. J. Ten Eyck. 



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WOODBRIDGE COOK BOOK 193 

TOMATO CHOW-CHOW 

Chop one peck of green tomatoes; six green peppers; one 
dozen onions. Stir in one cup of salt. Let them stand over 
night; then pour oflf the water. Put them in a kettle, with 
vinegar enough to cover, then add one cup of grated horse- 
radish; one tablespoonful of cinnamon; one tablespoonful of 
allspice; one cup of sugar. Cook until soft. 

—Mrs. W. L. Harned. 

GREEN TOMATO PICKLE 

Four quarts green tomatoes, sliced without peeling; six 
large onions (white) sliced; one quart vinegar; one pint brown 
sugar; one tablespoon salt; two tablespoonfuls of ground mus- 
tard, dissolved in vinegar; two tablespoonfuls ground black 
pepper; one tablespoonful allspice; one tablespoonful cloves. 
Tie all the spice, except the pepper and mustard, in a thin 
muslin bag. Mix all together and boil until tender, stirring 
often lest they scorch. Put up in small glass jars. 

— Mary E. Franklin. 

GREEN TOMATO SOY 

Two gallons tomatoes (green) and sliced without peeling; 
twelve good-sized onions, sliced; two quarts vinegar; one pint 
sugar; two tablespoonfuls salt; two tablespoonfuls black pep- 
per; two tablespoonfuls mustard (ground); one tablespoonful 
allspice; one tablespoonful cloves. Mix all together and stew 
until tender, stirring often lest they should scorch. 

—Mrs. S. B. Hinsdale. 

RIPE TOMATO SOY 

One peck of tomatoes, peeled and sliced ; eight onions, sliced 
thin; one cup of salt. Let them stand twenty-four hours; 



194 WOODBRIDGE COOK BOOK 

drain off all liquor, and add two quarts of vinegar; one table- 
spoon each of ground mustard, ginger, cloves, and allspice, 
and one-half tablespoonful cayenne pepper. Stew slowly two 
or three hours, and when nearly done, add two pounds sugar 
and one-fourth pound of white mustard seed. 

—Rachel A. Kelly. 



SANDWICHES 
t 

Bread for sandwiches should be of fine grain and a day old. The 
crust should be cut off, and the loaf trimmed to good shape before the 
slices are cut. 

BROWN BREAD SANDWICHES 

Cut very thin slices of Boston brown bread, spread with 
cream cheese, to which has been added butter, salt and pepper 
to taste. These are good in any way, but if cut in fancy 
shapes are ornaments as well. 

—J. E. H. 

CANAPES OF CAVIARE WITH LEMON 

Spread small pieces of buttered toast with caviare cut into 
crescents with buscuit-cutter. Serve with lemon quarters 
and olives. 

— M. E. Perry. 

CHEESE CANAPES 

With a large cake-cutter cut circles of bread half an inch 
thick; cut them again so as to make crescent-shaped pieces. 
Fry in butter to a light brown. Grate some cheese, and put 
one teaspoonful on each piece of bread; a little salt and pep- 
per, brown quickly in a hot oven, and serve at once. 

— Mrs. Oscar Miller. 

CLUB SANDWICHES 

Spread toasted bread with butter, then add slices of cold 
turkey or chicken ; two white crisp lettuce leaves, with mayon- 

195 



WOODB RIDGE COOK BOOK i97 

naise spread on lettuce. Then have ready slices of nicely 
cooked bacon; add one piece for each sandwich. Salt and 
pepper to taste. Serve immediately while bacon is hot. 

—Mrs. C. A. Campbell. 



CREAM CHEESE AND OLIVE SANDWICHES 

Stone and chop fine a dozen large olives. Mash a cream 
cheese and mix with them, adding butter enough to make a 
paste suitable for spreading. 

— Mrs. W. A. Osbom. 



LETTUCE SANDWICHES 

Buy firm head lettuce; wash each leaf; put in clean towel, 
and shake dry. Buy bread the day before making sand- 
wiches, and put in tin box to keep moist. Slice very thin 
and trim edges. Spread thin with softened butter. Put let- 
tuce between bread and spread one good teaspoonful mayon- 
naise dressing. 

— Mrs. Ernest H. Boynton. 

PEANUT SANDWICHES 

Chop a cup of freshly roasted shelled and blanched peanuts, 
very, very fine, and mix with them three tablespoonfuls of 
mayonnaise dressing; add salt to taste, and spread upon but- 
tered slices of thinly-cut, crustless bread. 

— Mrs. W. H. Demarest. 



SARDINE CANAPES 

To make canapes, skin and bone a box of sardines ; mash to 
a paste; add lemon juice, salt, red pepper, and minced parsley 
to your taste; spread on thin bread and butter, cut in fancy 
shapes. 



198 WOODBRIDGE COOK BOOK 

SARDINE SANDWICHES 

Mince the sardines on a plate, with a silver fork, leaving! i 
the oil with them as it comes. Cut thin slices of bread, and 
spread with the sardines. The oil takes the place of butter. 
Fold slices of bread together, and trim. 

— Selected. 



■is 



RELISHES 

SALTED ALMONDS 

After the nuts are shelled, pour boiling water over them, and 
let them stand two or three minutes, when they blanch very 
easily. Then place them on flat tins; put in the oven until 
they are a light brown, stirring them frequently so they may 
brown. Remove them from the oven; let them get thor- 
oughly cooled; then take the white of an egg without beating, 
put it into a large dish, and turn the almonds into it. Stir un- 
til the almonds are covered with the egg; then spread once 
more upon the plates; sprinkle the salt over them evenly on 
both sides. Return the almonds to the oven, stirring them 
frequently. When cold they are ready for use. 

— Mrs. W. H. Demarest. 

CHEESE STRAWS 

One cup of English dairy cheese, grated; one cup of flour; 
one-half cup of butter; one^half teaspoonful mustard (scant); 
one teaspoonful of salt (scant) ; pinch of cayenne pepper. Rub 
all together as for pastry dough; then add seven teaspoonfuls 
of ice water. Roll out thin. Cut in strips and bake ten min- 
utes, or until light brown. 

— Mrs. F. L Perry. 

CHEESE STRAWS 

One cup grated cheese; one-fourth cup butter; one-half 
cup flour; a small pinch cayenne pepper; one scant teaspoon- 
ful salt; one scant teaspoonful mustard; four teaspoonfuls cold 

199 



T. F. DUNIGAN. 



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COAL and WOOD. 

Lime, Cement, 

plaeter, Brick, etc., 

Constantly on Rand. 

All orders promptly attended to. 

N..r R.}fr7.lfii.t.on. WOODBRIDGE, N. J. 



WOODBRIDGE COOK BOOK 201 

water. Mix like pie crust, roll thin, cut in strips, bake light 
brown. 

— ^A. E. Hoagland. 

LEMON CHEESE 

Three eggs, well beaten; one small cup of sugar; one table- 
spoon of butter; one lemon (juice and a little of the grated 
rind). Mix all together and boil until it thickens, being care- 
ful not to burn it. 

— Mrs. M. Irving Demarest. 



FOR THE CHAFING-DISH 

SCRAMBLED EGGS 

Beat six eggs until they are well mixed ; add one tablespoon- 
ful of cold water for each egg, a quarter teaspoonful of salt, 
and a bit of butter the size of a walnut. Put a similar sized! 
piece in the chafing-dish when hot; turn in the eggs and st*'* 
constantly until cooked. Serve at once. 

—Miss E. G. Hinsdale. 



LOBSTER A LA NEWBURG 

Put yolks of three eggs with one-half pint cream in dish to 
scald; first beating the eggs to a paste. Also make a paste 
of one tablespoonful of butter, rubbed into a heaping table- 
spoon of flour. Stir gently into the cream until it is smooth 
and thick. Then add one and one-half cups of lobster. Sea- 
son, but not too highly, on account of wine. Add two table- 
spoons of butter, piece by piece, and four tablespoons of sherry. 

—Mrs. C. A. Campbell. 

OYSTERS A EA CHAMBERLAIN 

Drain free from all liquor fifty good fat oysters and put them 
in the chafing-dish. Put a quarter pound of butter by the 
side, one-half cup of good cream (one cup of good rich milk 
would do). When seated light the lamp, and with a long 
wooden spoon stir carefully until boiling hot; add butter, cut 
into four bits, the cream, a teaspoonful of salt, and a dash 
of cayenne. Make sure the oysters are cooked, then put out 

202 



WOODBRIDGE COOK BOOK 203 

the lamp, and add two tablepoonfuls of Madeira or sherry — 
first always preferable. Serve at once from dish. 

— Lillian Rogers. 



CHAFED OYSTERS 

Drain and wash twenty-five oysters, straining and preserv- 
ing the juice; put into the chafing-dish a generous tablespoon- 
ful of butter, and when that is thoroughly browned add the 
oysters, with pepper and salt; as soon as the edges of the 
oysters begin to curl add the oyster juice, and let come to a 
boil. Serve immediately on slices of hot, buttered toast. 

— Miss E. G. Hinsdale. 



WELSH RAREBIT 

Melt one tablespoonful of butter, and add one pound of 
cheese, grated or cut in small pieces. Beat thoroughly an egg, 
and with it mix one small teaspoonful of mustard, one-half tea- 
spoonful of salt, a pinch of cayenne, and add this to the cheese 
when nearly melted. Lastly stir in slowly one cupful of ale 
or beer, with a teaspoonful of Worcester sauce. Cook until it 
thickens, stirring constantly, taking care that it does not 
curdle. Serve hot on toast or soda crackers. 

— Editors. 



WELSH RAREBIT 

Cut one pound of fresh cheese into small pieces, and put in 
the chafing-dish. As it begins to soften add two level table- 
spoonfuls of butter, a saltspoonful of mustard, one-half tea- 
spoonful of salt, a dash of cayenne or paprika. When well 
mixed add one-half cup of milk or cream; stir until smooth, 
then add two well-beaten eggs; stir hard again for a moment, 

and serve with crackers or toast. 

— H. K. O. 



DRINKS 

BOILED COFFEE 

Put the ground coffee into the pot, wet slightly with cold 
water, add the white of an egg, and the crushed shell; shake 
all together, then pour over it boiling water; let it come to the 
boiling point; set one side on the range, and pour one table- 
spoonful of cold water down the spout. Allow one table- 
spoonful for each cup, and one over for the pot. 

—Mrs. C. A. Campbell. 

DRIP COFFEE 

One dessertspoonful of coffee, pulverized, to a cupful or 
half pint of water, put coffee in bag and pour the boiling 
water over it; strain through twice. The bag must be firm 
and close, so as to prevent the fine powder straining through. 
Have the pot hot before beginning. Coffee will not be right 
unless the water is fresh boiled. Serve at once. 

— Mrs. C. A. Campbell. 

COFFEE FOR ENTERTAINMENTS 

Tie the ground coffee in cheese-cloth bags loosely. Put 
twelve tablespoonfuls of coffee in a bag, and if for a large 
crowd, twenty-four to a bag will be good. Have a bag or 
so more than you need for emergencies. One pound of coffee 
will make about thirty cups of medium strength ; one quart of 
water is allowed to each five cups required. Soak as many of 
the bags as you think you will need in cold water, measuring 
the cold water before pouring over the coffee bags. Cover, 

205 



"ii 



206 WOODBRIDGE COOK BOOK 

and let stand several hours. Measure the water required, and 
place on the fire in large kettle to be slowly coming to a boil. 
This must be boiling when you are ready to serve refresh- 
ments. If it looks as though it had boiled away, your water 
covering the coffee will make up the deficiency. If it has not 
dip out a little to add later if coffee proves too strong. Add 
the soaked coffee bags and water. Let it all boil up one 
quickly. Draw to the back of the range, and it is ready to 
serve. Coffee made after this formula is always good, be- 
cause it is made just when you need it. Always have another 
kettle of boiling water and extra coffee bags to plunge in if 
more than planned for is needed. 

— H. B. Ames. 

BLACKBERRY WINE 

To four quarts of berries put one quart of boiling water. 
Let it stand twenty-four hours in a stone jar; then drain the 
liquid from the fruit. Add one and one-halt pounds of sugar. 
Bottle it. It will be ready for use in three months. 

— Home Cook Book. 

CHERRY CORDIAL 

To one gallon of the juice of cherries put two pounds of 
sugar. Boil together and add one pint of best brandy to one 
gallon. When cold, bottle. 



DANDELION WINE 

Four quarts of dandelion blossoms steeped in five quarts 
of water until strength is extracted. Add juice of five or- 
anges and three lemons, four pounds of sugar and two-thirds 
of a yeast cake, while warm. Put the rind of oranges and 
lemons to steep with blossoms. Set in a warm place to fer- 
ment for two or three days. Strain and bottle. 

—Mrs. W. H. Demarest. 



WOODBRIDGE COOK BOOK 207 

EGG-NOGG 

Stir the yolk of one egg and a teaspoonful of sugar with one 
tablespoonful of whisky or brandy and a little rum. Whip 
the white of the tgg to a stiff froth. Turn the yolk into a 
glass, and fill nearly full with milk, then stir in the white. Add 
more sugar if desired. Grate a dash of nutmeg over the 
top. 

— H. C. Nevius. 

FRUIT PUNCH 

Ten lemons, six oranges, one quart can of cherries, one 
quart can of currants, one pint can of pineapple, one pint can 
of raspberries, one gallon of water; let stand two days, then 
strain and sweeten to taste ; let stand a day or two ; strain again, 
and bottle ; cork tightly. When ready to use add sliced lemon 
and ice. 

— Mrs. J. Edgar Brown. 

HOME-BREWED GINGER BEER 

Nine pounds of sugar cane, nine ounces of good, unbleached 
Jamaica ginger well bruised, three ounces of tartaric acid, one 
and one-half ounces of soluble essence of lemon, nine gallons 
of boiling water. Macerate the above with frequent stirring 
until barely lukewarm, then add of yeast one-half pint, and 
keep in a moderately warm place to excite a brisk fermenta- 
tion. The next day rack the liquor and strain through a jelly 
bag or flannel. Allow it to work for another day or two 
according to the weather, then strain it twice, and put into 
bottles, the corks of which should be wired down. 

—Mrs. H. K. Scott. 

GRAPE JUICE 

Ten pounds of Concord grapes, two quarts of water. Boil 
briskly five minutes, then strain and add one and one-half 



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Be sure and read Tables of Comparison between 
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w 



WOODBRIDGE COOK BOOK 209 



pounds of sugar to juice; boil two minutes; bottle, and cork 
tightly. 

— H. K. O. 

ORANGE CORDIAL 

Take all the white from the peel of one large or two small 
oranges; put the yellow part into a quart of pure alcohol; let 
it stand for two or three days. Pour off the liquor; dissolve 
two and one-half pounds of sugar in three pints of water over 
a slow fire; don't let it boil; strain, mix with the alcohol, and 
bottle. Let it stand two or three weeks. 

— Mrs. Charles Noble. 

PINEAPPLE LEMONADE 

Boil together for about five minutes two quarts of water, 
one pound of sugar, and the grated rind of one lemon; 
strain, and when cold add one pineapple pared and chopped 
very fine, and the juice of six lemons. Ice well before serving. 

— Selected. 

RASPBERRY VINEGAR 

Two gills of acetic acid, two quarts of water, four quarts of 
raspberries, one and one-half pounds of sugar to one quart of 
juice. Throw the raspberries in the water containing the acid 
and allow to stand for forty-eight hours, or until they begin to 
sour. Strain and boil the liquid with the sugar. Bottle and 
seal. 

TO MAKE TEA 

Always make tea with fresh-boiled water. Allow one tea- 
spoonful of tea for each person and one for the pot. Have the 
teapot hot when you put the tea into it. Pour the desired 
quantity of boiling water onto the tea, and allow to steep one 

minute. 

—Mrs. S. B. Hinsdale, 



2IO WOODBRIDGE COOK BOOK 

TEA A LA RUSSE 

Have ready fresh, juicy lemons pared and sliced. As you 
pour out the tea put a slice of lemon in the bottom of each 
cup and sprinkle on a little white sugar, then pour the tea 
hot and strong over. If preferred the lemon peel may be left 
on. 

— Mrs. S. B. Hinsdale. 

TEA PUNCH 



f 



One and one-half pounds of granulated sugar, one quart 
of sherry wine, six lemons, one orange, one cup goodi, strong 
green tea (use a teaspoonful of tea to one cup of water). 
Peel the lemons very thin, and pour the tea boiling hot on the 
peel. Mix the juice of lemons and orange with the sugar; 
then add tea, pouring the wine on last. When ready to serve I 
have a large pitcher or punch bowl with plenty of crushed ice; ■ 
in straining the punch pour on ice. This receipt makes one 
gallon of punch. Very good. 

— Mrs. L. H. Brown. 



WINE WHEY 



One wine glass of wine to three of boiling milk. Let the 
milk boil up once. Strain and sweeten. 

— Mrs. Charles Noble. 






CANDY 

FONDANT 
The white of one egg; measure the egg and use the same 
quantity of water. Mix in as much sugar as you can (use 
XXX). Flavor to taste. When lemon or orange juice is 
used leave out the water. 

— Helen Brewster. 

CREAM FONDANT 
One pound of granulated sugar, one-half cup of water. Put 
the sugar into the saucepan, add the water, and stir over the 
lire until the sugar is dissolved; not an instant longer. Boil 
until it forms a syrup which will hair, which will be from four 
to six minutes, depending somewhat on the quality of the 
sugar; pour the syrup quickly and carefully (do not scrape the 
vessel) on a meat platter that has been lightly brushed with 
water. Watch the cooling, and when it is warm, not hot, so 
you can put the finger into it, stir it with a wooden spoon or 
paddle until it is a white, creamy mass; then take it in the hand 
and knead, and it will become soft and smooth, and ready to be 
formed into the various shapes. Add the desired flavoring 
while kneading. 

— ^Aceola Cook Book. 

BUTTER SCOTCH 
One cup of molasses, one cup of sugar, one tablespoonful 
of vinegar, butter the size of an egg; boil until it hardens when 
dropped in cold water; then stir in one teaspoonful of soda; 
when cool flavor and pour on buttered tins. 

—Mrs. H. K. O. 

211 



WOODBRIDGE COOK BOOK 213 

CARAMELS 

Three pounds of brown sugar, one-half pound of Baker's 
chocolate, one-half pound of butter, one cup of milk, three 
tablespoonfuls of molasses, three tablespoonfuls of vinegar, 
two teaspoonfuls of vanilla. Boil thirty minutes. Beat ten 
minutes if you want it granulated. 

—Mrs. J. H. Tappen. 

CHOCOLATE TAFFY 

One cup of molasses, one cup of sugar, one-half cup of milk, 
two ounces of chocolate, small lump of butter. 

— Mittie E. Harned. 

COCOANUT BALLS 

Take a piece of vanilla fondant, work into it as much 
shredded cocoanut as it will take, and still admit of its being 
molded; roll into balls about the size of ordinary marbles, and 
lay on waxed paper to dry; they can be dipped in chocolate if 

preferred. 

— L. H. J. 

CREAMED DATES 

Mold fondant into a ball, then roll between the palms of the 

hands until about the length of a date ; place inside the stoned 

date, and press the edges of the date together, allowing about 

a quarter of an inch of the fondant to show the whole length of 

the date; roll in granulated sugar. 

— L. H. S. 

STUFFED DATES 
Remove pits from two pounds of good dates, being careful 
not to cut date in two, have ready the pounded nuts from 
one pound English walnuts. Mix with two tablespoonfuls of 
powdered sugar and two tablespoonfuls of sherry. Fill dates 
with this mixture, and roll in confectioner's sugar. 

—Mrs. J. B. Edgar. 



214 WOODBRIDGE COOK BOOK 

FUDGE 

Two cups of sugar, three ounces of Baker's chocolate, one- 
half cup of milk, small lump of butter. Boil ten minutes; 
flavor with vanilla. 

— Mittie E. Harned. 

SMITH COLLEGE FUDGE 

Melt one-quarter cup of butter; mix together in a separate 
dish one cup of white sugar, one cup of brown sugar, one- 
fourth cup of molasses, and one-half cup of cream or milk. 
Add this to the butter, and after it has been brought to a boil 
continue boiling for two and one-half minutes, stirring rapidly.* 
Then add two squares of Baker's chocolate scraped fine. Boir J 
this five minutes. After it has been taken from the fire add one 
and one-half teaspoonfuls of vanilla. Then stir constantly 
until the mass thickens. Pour into buttered pan, and set in a 
cool place. 

—May E. Kelly. 

NUT CANDY 

One cup of sugar, one-third cup of milk; boil five minutes! 
and remove from fire; stir in as many nuts as you wish; keep 
stirring hard till stiff; spread on buttered platter. 

—Mrs. C. A. 

HOW TO CANDY FLAG ROOT 

First peel the roots until they are a clear white, and slice as 
thin as possible. To two cups of sugar add one-half cup of 
water, and stir it over the fire until a thin syrup is formed; 
into this syrup pour the root and continue the stirring until 
the liquid is entirely absorbed. Pour the confection into a 
dish; when it is cool it will be crisply candied. 

— Mrs. W. H. Demarest. 



WOODBRIDGE COOK BOOK 215 

ORANGE STRAWS 

Cut the rind into narrow strips about like straws, then put 
them into cold water and boil. Boil them in three waters, 
about twenty minutes in each water. Drain, and to each cup 
of peel add a cup of granulated sugar; add some boiling water, 
but not enough to cover, and boil to a thick syrup. Then 
drain and roll in granulated sugar. 

—Mrs. A. T. Connet 

SUGAR CANDY 

One-half cup of vinegar, one-half cup of water, one pound of 
granulated sugar; let boil until it hardens when dropped into 
cold water, then pour on greased pan or plate. 

—Mrs. R. B. Hart. 



J. LiDDLE & Sons 

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Dealers in Natural 
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Telephone 35 WOODBRIDGE, N. J. 



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MISCELLANEOUS 

A teaspoonful of cornstarch mixed with a cup of salt will 
keep it from clogging in the shaker. When soft custard cooks 
too long and becomes curdled it can be made smooth again by 
setting the dish in cold water and beating it thoroughly. 

Milk which has changed may be rendered fit for use again 
by stirring in a little soda. 

Fish may be scaled easier by first dipping them into boiling 
water for a minute. 

Kerosene will soften boots and shoes that have been hard- 
ened by water and render them pliable as new. 

— Mrs. T. F. Zettlemeyer. 

CARE OF STOVE 

No cook stove, though it is in continual use, should have 
a fresh coat of blacking applied oftener than once a month, 
though every stove should be polished of? with a stove brush 
every morning before the cooking begins. When a fresh coat 
of blacking is applied monthly, remove the old coat by rub- 
bing of¥ the stove while it is warm, but not hot, with a rag 
dipped in kerosene oil. This removes all grease stains. Ap- 
ply the new coat of blacking when the stove is cold, using 
cold cofifee instead of water for mixing the blacking. Be care- 
ful not to blacken any of the stove edges, which are of polished 
iron, or any of the knobs and other nickel work, but polish 
these by using a scouring soap or brick dust for the polished 
iron and whiting or any silver soap for the nickel work. Af- 
ter the stove is thoroughly polished, wipe it ofif with a dry, 
clean rag to remove any dust of the blacking. After this pol- 
ishing, all that is necessary is to keep a stove cloth at the side 

217 



2i8 WOODBRIDGE COOK BOOK 



rnecM 



of the stove to wipe up spots of grease before they are burne( 
in, and make a more enduring stain, and to go over the stove" 
with a poHshing brush in the morning while the fire is coming 
up. Thus with Httle care a stove may be kept in prime order, 
unless the cook is one of those unhappy slovens who spill or 
boil over everything they take hold of. Cooking which is 
done in a methodical manner does not spill over on the stove. 
There is no surer indication of a household sloven than an 
ill-kept cook stove. Applying kerosene with a rag when you 
are about to put your stoves away for the summer will pre- 
vent them from rusting. 

— Mrs. T. F. Zettlemeyer. 

To clean cooking utensils that have become discolored, boil 
them in potato parings. 

—Mrs. D. S. V. 

FOR SWEETENING KITCHEN SINKS 
One-half pound of copperas, and one quart of pulverized 
charcoal dissolved in two gallons of water. Heat the mixture 
to nearly a boiling point, and pour a quart of it or more at 
one time down the sink-pipe. This mixture will remove 
strong, disagreeable odors from either glass or earthen vessels, 
by simply rinsing them thoroughly with it. 

ANTS 
Sprigs of wintergreen or ground ivy will drive away red 
ants ; branches of wormwood will drive away black ants. These 
insects may be kept out of sugar barrels by drawing a wide 
mark with chalk around the top near the edge. 

—Mrs. T. F. Z. 

GILT FRAMES 
To restore and clean gilt frames gently rub with a sponge 
moistened with turpentine. 

—Mrs. T. F. Z. 



WOODBRIDGE COOK BOOK 219 

Charcoal is recommended as an absorber of gases in the 
milk room where foul gases are present. It should be freshly 
powdered and kept there continually. 

—Mrs. T. F. Zettlemeyer. 

One teaspoonful of ammonia to a teacupful of water, applied 
with a rag, will clean silver or gold jewelry. 

—Mrs. T. F. Zettlemeyer. 

FRUIT STAINS 

To remove the stains of acid fruit from the hands: wash 
your hands in clear water, dry slightly, and while yet moist 
strike a match and hold your hands around the flame. The 
stains will disappear. 

Paint stains that are dry and old may be removed from 
cotton or woolen goods with chloroform : First cover the spot 
with olive oil or butter. 

— Mrs. T. F. Zettlemeyer. 

TO REMOVE INK STAINS 

While the ink spot is fresh take warm milk and saturate the 
stain. Let stand a few hours, then apply more fresh milk. 
Rub spot well. If ink has become dry use salt and vinegar, or 
salts of lemon. 

— Mrs. N. Johnson. 

Tar stains can be removed by rubbing lard or butter on 
them thoroughly before applying soap. 

FOR RENOVATING SILK 

Take an old kid glove, dark colored, if the silk be dark; 
light if the silk be light; tear it in pieces; put in a tin cup, and 
cover with water. Set on stove, and let simmer until the kid 



^CHOICE , 

HOME^ 3 

SITES^ 

HENRY H. SCHULTE 



\inu Self 



Lots and Houses 

On Easy Terms 

The best part of Woodbridge 

Convenient to both Woodbridge 
and EdgSLf Depots, P. K. K. 



HENRY H. SCHULTE THOMAS TmORRIS 
m Murray Street jJ Main Street 

NEW YORK WOODBRJDGE, N. J. 



WOODBRIDGE COOK BOOK 221 

can be pulled into shreds. Take a cloth or sponge, dip in this 
water, rub over silk, and iron immediately. This process will 
cleanse and stiffen old silk, and give it the appearance of new. 

— Mrs. M. Johnson. 

HOW TO WASH BLANKETS 

Select a bright day with little wind; take two ounces of 
powdered borax and one large cake of Ivory soap cut fine; 
melt in water on the stove, and add to a tub full of cold, soft 
water. Put blankets to soak early in the morning; jar 
occasionally with a stick to loosen dirt; do not rub them on a 
board. At noon squeeze a little with the hand, and put 
through the wringer; rinse in clean, cold water; put through 
the wringer again, and hang lengthwise on the line without any 
clothespins; watch carefully while drying to keep them 
straight. 

—Mrs. W. S. Ames. 

TO WASH DRESS GOODS. 

Take a ten-cent package of soap bark, pour over it two 
quarts of cold water; put on the stove, and let come to a boil 
slowly. Strain and pour in a pan or tub, and add as much 
luke-warm water as is necessary to handle the goods easily. 
Rub with the hands, after which rinse several times in luke- 
warm water. Hang on the line without swinging, and while 
still damp iron on the wrong side of the goods with very hot 
irons. A lukewarm suds of Ivory soap is next best to soap 
bark. 

— W. A. Lockwood. 

A teaspoonful of turpentine boiled with your white clothes 
will aid the whitening process. 

A teaspoonful of borax put into the last water in which 
clothes are rinsed will whiten them surprisingly. Pound the 
borax so it will dissolve easily. 

—Mrs. T. F. Zettlemeyer. 



222 WOODBRIDGE COOK BOOK 



1 



Cooked starch may be greatly improved by a tablespoonful 
of kerosene. It makes clothes glossy when ironed, and keeps 
the iron from sticking. Cooked starch may be improved by 
adding a suds made from ivory soap to the water in which the 
starch is dissolved. 

—Mrs. D. T. V. 

TO CLEAN FURNITURE 

First rub with cotton waste dipped in boiled linseed 
oil, then rub clean and dry with a soft cotton flannel cloth. 
Care must be taken that the oil is all rubbed off. 

— Mrs. T. F. Zettlemeyer. 

FURNITURE POLISH 

Mix together equal parts of raw linseed oil, turpentine, and 
vinegar. 

— Luella T. Kelly. 

FURNITURE CREAM 

(An English receipt obtained by Mrs. N. H. B.) 
Three ounces of beeswax, one-half ounce of Castile soap, 
one-half pint of turpentine, one-half pint of rain water. Shred 
bees* wax fine and pour in a jar, cover with turpentine; cut 
soap fine, and cover with water. Let each stand in separate 
jars for twenty-four hours. Then mix together and shake for 
twenty minutes. Shake five minutes with a Dover egg- 
beater, and save your strength. Seal in big-mouthed jars or 
glasses. Paraffin on top will keep it from hardening. 

FURNITURE PASTE 

Take putty, pumice stone, and linseed oil in equal parts; 
mix into a paste, and add cochineal or brown umber until 
color of furniture is obtained, and then fill up the cracks and 
marks. 

— ^Mrs. Hinsdale. 



WOODBRIDGE COOK BOOK 223 

FURNITURE POLISH 

Five ounces of raw linseed oil, three-fourths ounce of sul- 
phuric ether, seven ounces of alcohol, three ounces of turpen- 
tine, three-fourths ounces of tincture alkanet. This mixture 
will separate. Use the upper liquid for all stains, and shake 
up the bottle for general cleaning. This will not injure the 
finest piano. 

— Mrs. Hinsdale. 

TO MAKE SHELLAC THAT IS FINE AND WILL NOT 

CRACK 

Four ounces of shellac (shells), one pint of pure alcohol. Let 
stand in warm place for two or three days in closed bottles. 
Shaking occasionally will help dissolve the shellac. 

A GOOD COLD CRE\M 

Cocoanut butter, four ounces; lanoline, four ounces; glycer- 
ine, four ounces; rose water, five ounces; elder-flower water, 
five ounces. Melt the fats and glycerine, and slowly add the 
other ingredients. 

EXCELLENT SKIN FOOD 

Melt together a dram of spermaceti, a dram of white 
wax, three ounces of sweet oil of almonds, two ounces of 
lanoline, and one ounce of cocoa butter. Remove from the 
fire, and beat until cold. Add while you are beating twenty 
drops of tincture of benzoin and ten drops of oil of rose. 

— Mrs. Hinsdale. 

A GOOD SHAMPOO 

Take one cake of olive-oil soap, melt it in a quart of boiling 
water, add one tablespoonful of common washing soda, mix 
thoroughly, and let stand. It will jelly. Take for each sham- 



Thomas H. Morris 

JUSTICE OF THE PEACE COIIIIISSIONEB OF DEEDS 

NOTABY PUBLIC 

Collections a Specialty 

WOOPBRIDSE, U. J. 

Frank Miller 



i 



BAKER 

MAIN STREET - - - WOODBRIDGE, N. J. 

Fresh Bread, Pies and Cakes constantly on hand 

"7ohn Thompson 

SADDLE AND HARNESS MAKER 

Repairing a Specialty 
Main Street WOODBRIDGE, N. J. 

C. H. Wooden. 

ProLCticotl Horse-SKoer 

WOODBKIDGE, N. J. 

O. E. Petersen 

■Watchmaker and Jeweler 

WOODBRIDGE, N. J. 

BIOYOLES HEFAIEINa SEWING MACHINES 



WOODBRIDGE COOK BOOK 225 

poo a tablespoonful of the jelly, add five or ten drops of am- 
monia, also a teacupful of warm water. Wet the head thor- 
oughly with warm water before applying the shampoo, then 
rub the soapy mixture thoroughly into the scalp all over the 
head. Rinse several times until all the soap has been worked 
out. This method will result in a clean, healthy scalp. 



HAIR WASH 

One fourth cup of sage leaves, one pint of cold water, a 
little perfumery; steep the leaves (not boil) until the strength 
is out, then strain and bottle. Use freely. 

— Mrs. Robert Valentine. 



SLIPPERY ELM TEA 

A teaspoonful of powdered slippery elm in tumbler, pour on 
cold water, season with lemon and sugar. 

Ginger poultices instead of mustard, but prepared in the 
same way are good for neuralgia, and will not blister. 

RHEUMATISM CURE 

Four ounces of Holland gin, two ounces of white mustard 
seed, one-fourth ounce of niter. Let stand a day before using. 
Dose, one teaspoonful three times daily. 

— Mrs. H. C. Nevius. 

BITES AND STINGS OF INSECTS 
Wash with a solution of water of ammonia. 

BURNS 

Make a paste of baking soda and water and apply it promptly 
to the burn. Will check the inflammation and pain. 



226 WOODBRIDGE COOK BOOK 

AN OLD-FASHIONED RECEIPT FOR A LITTLE 
HOME COMFORT 

"Take of thought for self one part, two parts of thought 
for family; equal parts of common sense and broad intelligence, 
a large modicum of the sense of fitness of things, a heapingi| 
measure of living above what your neighbors think of you,' 
twice the quantity of keeping within your income, a sprink- 
ling of what tends to refinement and aesthetic beauty, stirredl 
thick with the true brand of Christian principle, and set it to* 
rise." 



TABLE OF WEIGHTS AND MEASURES. 

4 teaspoonfuls of liquid, i tablespoonful 

4 tablespoonfuls of liquid, . . |^ gill, % cup, or i wineglassful 
I tablespoonful of liquid, »^ ounce 

1 pint of liquid, i pound 

2 gills of liquid i cup or yi pint 

I kitchen cup, . ' y^ pint 

I heaping quart of sifted flour, i pound 

4 cups of flour I quart or i pound 

I rounded tablespoonful of flour, ^ ounce 

3 cups of corn meal, i pound 

\yi pints of corn meal, i pound 

I cup of butter, ^ pound 

I pint of butter, i pound 

I tablespoonful of butter, i ounce 

Butter the size of an QZ'g, . , 2 ounces 

Butter the size of a walnut, i ounce 

1 solid pint of chopped meat, i pound 

10 eggs, I pound 

A dash of pepper, . . . , y^ teaspoonful or 3 good shakes 

2 cups of granulated sugar, i pound 

1 pint of granulated sugar, i pound 

I pint of brown sugar, 13 ounces 

2>^ cups of powdered sugar, i pound 

The white of a common-sized ^%% weighs one ounce. 
A common sized tumbler holds half a pint. 
A common-sized wine glass holds half a gill. 



We Will Connect 

your home with the Elixir of Life and 
Light that now flows past your threshold. 
There is Life in the food that's cooked 
by gas and in the great saving of toil effected 
by the gas stove. We will connect you— 
and your home — with comfort — health — 
joy — beneficent economy — by connecting 
the gas from our mains with a gas stove 
in your home. 

PERTH AMBOY GAS LIGHT CO. 



GAS 

cooking retains all the life-giving qualities of the meats it 
bakes or boils. No food tastes so well as that prepared upon a 

GAS STOVE 

It's the cooking that cures dyspepsia and cuts down 
doctors' bills. 

GAS 

Be sure and read Tables of Q>mparison between 
G)al and Gas as given on pages 228 and 229. 



RECORD OF 8i6 GAS RANGE. 



Weight. 
A..+{^i<» How Before After Loss— a>,-„„ 

Article. Cooked. Cooking. Cooking. Per Cent. ■^'°^^- 

Blue Fish, Baked 3 lbs. 2 lbs. 6 oz. 20 35 m. 

Rib of Beef, Roasted gibs. 4 oz. 7 lbs. 11 oz, 17 i h. 25 m. 

Chicken, Roasted 3 lbs. i oz. 2 lbs. 10 oz. 14 i h. 

Beefsteak, Broiled i lb. 2 oz. 15 oz. i6| 8 m. 

Lamb Chops, Broiled i lb. 13I oz. 15 10 m. 

Sweet Potatoes, Steamed 3 lbs. 5 oz. 

White Potatoes, Steamed 3 lbs. 8 oz. JHi 

Tomatoes, Stewed 4 lbs. I^H 

Cauliflower, Boiled 3 lbs. 12 oz. 9| 

Bread, Baked 5 lbs. 7 02. 37 m. 

Sago Pudding, Baked 3 lbs. 3 oz. 18 m. 

Lemon Pie, Baked 2 lbs. 14 oz. 22 m. 

Sauces, etc. 

Total time from lighting of gas until everything was ready to serve, 
I hour and 50 minutes. Consumption of gas by test meter : 

Cost of gas, II cents 

Cost of coal, 13 cents 

Saving of gas over coal, 2 cents 

Heating rooms may be accomplished at a reasonable cost 
with Gas Heaters scientifically made. Prices, $1.00 to $25.00. 

Rotary Gas Water Heater will furnish all hot water required 
at extremely small consumption of gas. $11.00. Connected 
Free. Ranges, $13 and up. Connected Free. Cookers, $8.50. 
Connected Free. 



WOODBRIDGE GAS OFFICE 

Cor. of Main & Fulton Sts. 



Table of Comparison between Cost of Cooking by Coal and Gas. 
RECORD OF COAL RANGE NO. 8. 

Weight. 
Article. 

Blue Fish, 

Rib of Beef, 

Chicken, 

Beefsteak, 

Lamb Chops, 

Sweet Potatoes, 

White Potatoes, 

Tomatoes, 

Cauliflower, 

Bread, 

Sago Pudding, 

Lemon Pie, 

Sauce for fish, beef, and cauliflower. 

Total time for lighting of fire until everything was ready to serve, 2 hours 
and 40 minutes. Of this time 30 minutes were required to heat the oven, 
leaving 2 hours and 10 minutes actual cooking time. Weight of coal, includ> 
ing lighting of fire, 44 lbs. At the end of the time the fire was ready for 
more coal. 

Cost of coal, at $6.00 per ton, la cents 

Kindling, i cent 



How 
Cooked. 


Before 
Cooking. 


After 
Cooking. 


Loss— 
Per Cent. 


Time. 


Baked 


3 lbs. 




2 lbs. 


I OZ. 


32 


31 m. 


Roasted 


gibs. 


70Z. 


6 lbs. 


8 OZ. 


32 1 


h. 37 m. 


Roasted 


3 lbs. 




2 lbs. 


2 OZ. 


30 I 


h. 6 m. 


Broiled 


lib. 


2 OZ. 




I3i OZ. 


25 


II m. 


Broiled 


lib. 


1 OZ. 




II OZ. 


35 


12 m. 


Steamed 


3 lbs. 


50Z. 










Steamed 


3 lbs. 


8 OZ, 










Stewed 


4 lbs. 












Boiled 


3 lbs. 


12 OZ. 










Baked 






5 lbs. 


2 OZ. 




46 m. 


Baked 






3 lbs. 


5 OZ. 




27 m. 


Baked 






2 lbs. 


12 OZ. 




30 m. 



Total cost of meal by coal, 13 cents 

The above facts and figures were brought out by actual 
comparative tests made between a Coal Range and a Gas 
Range. The articles cooked were twelve in number, and were 
cooked so that they were all ready to place on the table at one 
and the same time. 

The articles were weighed before cooking and also after 
cooking, and the percentage in loss of weight and time 
required were carefully ascertained. 

This shows the cost of cooking a meal with Gas at a cost of 
$1.60 per thousand cubic feet. Price of coal, $6.00 per ton. 

By comparing these figures one can readily see the great 
economy in using GAS as the 20TH-CENTURY FUEL. 



P 5 1903 

FOR 

FIFTY 

YEARS 

We have been one of the leading clothing 
establishments in the city. 

Millions of people have bought the latest 
novelties in men's apparel from us during that time. 

This season's product is one of the largest and 
finest that we have ever offered. 

Men's Street, Business and $10 00 $^0 00 
Dress Suits ------ >^^ to ^^* 

Men's Chesterfield and $10 00 $Or 00 
Covert Top Coats - - - >^* to ^^* 

Men's Fine Wool and Worsted $^ 00 $0 00 
Trousers ^ . sJ* to ^* 

Hats, Shoes, Men's Furnishings, Golf, Bicycle, 
Tennis and Athletic Goods. 

Cravenette Coats, Mackintoshes, Umbrellas, 
Trunks, Bags, Dress Suit Cases, etc., etc. 

One of the larffest and flnest Custom Tallorlns 
Departments in New York 

jl ^ ^ EVERYTHING FOR MEN'S WEAR ^ ^ J« 

A. RAYMOND & CO. 

Clothiers and Outfitters 

Nassau and Fulton Streets - - NEW YORK 



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HECKMAN 

BINDERY INC. ^ 

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