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WOOD'S ILLUSTRATED 



HAND-BOOK 



TO 



NEW YORK 

AND ENVIRONS. 

A Guide for the Traveller or Resident. 

WITH 

MINUTE INSTRUCTIONS FOR SEEING THE METROPOLI: 

£N ONE OR MORE DAYS. 

TOGETHER WITH NUMEROUS VALUABLE HINTS TO VISI- 
TORS ON NEARLY EVERY TOPIC THAT ARISES 
UPON THE SUBJECT OF SIGHT-SEEING. 

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SSBitt) ©riginal Praioinga mntse eipicsglg for tfj? SHorft. 



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(7. W. Carleton &* Co., Ptiblishers, 

LONDON: S. LOW, SON & CO. 
M.DCCC.LXXIII. 




Entered according to Act of Congress, in the year 1873, by 

G. W. CARLETON & CO., 
In the Office of the Librarian of Congress, at Washington. 



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Pooi.E & Maci.auchlan, 

PRINTERS AND BOOKBINDERS, 

205-213 East \2.th St, 



MINIATURE HISTORY OF NEW YORK. 



MANHATTAN or New York Island was discovered September 6, 1609, by a crew ot 
five men from Hudson's vessel. In the year 1625 it was purchased by the Dutch 
from the Indians for twenty -four dollars, the contents of the Island then being esti- 
mated at 22,000 acres. In 1635 the first church built of wood was erected in the pres- 
ent Bridge street ; the first English settlers arrived the same year. In 1638 tobacco 
WiU5 produced to a considerable extent on the Island. In 1643 the houses were most- 
ly o^e-story cabins with roofs of straw and chimneys of wood. In 1648 a wooden 
whnrf was completed on the East River, on the present line of Moore street, being a 
continuation of the first wharf constructed in the city. The first lawyer commenced 
practice in 1650 ; in 1652 the first public school was established. The first City Hall 
was built in 1653 at the head of Coenties SUp. In 1656 the city was first surveyed 
and the streets laid down on a map. In 1659 a foreign trade first allowed to mer- 
chants of the city. In the year 1665 the city was incorporated imder the government 
of a mayor, alderman and sheriff. Streets first paved in 1676 : average price of lots 
fifty dollars. Rents vaiied from twenty-five to one hundred dollars per annum, pay- 
able partly in trade. The Anneke Jans farm of modem notoriety was leased on a 
rental equivalent to forty dollars per year, the lessee also to build a bam in part 
payment. In 1667 there were 12 streets and 384 houses. The number of licensed 
taverns in 1677 was 14. In 1678 the shipping belonging to the city was three ships 
and fifteen sloops and barks. In 1693 the first printing press was established in the 
city by WiUiam Bradford. The streets cleaned by contract in 1695 for £30 per an- 
num. The debit and credit account of the city income and expenditure, one hun- 
dred and sixty-two years ago, presents a curious comparison with that of the pres- 
ent day. The items of outlay in the year 1710 were as follows : for the City Watch, 
which consisted of four men who went about the town " crying the hour of the night 
and the state of the weather," annual expense thirty-six pounds, exclusive of fire 
and light in the watchhouse, and the cost of lanterns and hour-glasses (which then 
served the place of watches) for the watchmen. For the salary of the Town Clerk, 
twenty poimds per annum. For the salary of the City Marshal, ten pounds per 
annum. The City Treasurer received five per cent, commission on his receipts. 
Besides the above, there were no stated expenditures. The items of income were 
derived from the following sources : leases of Corporation lands, about fifty pounds ; 
liquor Ucenses, fifty-one pounds ; fees for granting citizens' licenses of trade, ten 
pounds ; and licenses to gangers, four poimds. Rent of the Long Island ferry, one 
hundred and eighty pounds. In 1711 a slave market was established in Wall street ; 
in 1729 three-pence a foot was given for land on the west side of Broadway, near the 
Battery. The first stage route between New York and Boston was established in 
1732 ; time, 14 days from city to city. The first Merchants' Exchange established in 
1752. When the British evacuated the city, November 25, 1783, the buildings did 
not extend beyond Murray street. In 1801 Broadway was ordered to be continued 
through Thomas Randall's land, near 8th street, to meet the Bowery. Previous to 
this extension of Broadway, the Bowery was the only entrance into the city, 
through groves of cedar, to the Bull's Head, now the Bowery Theatre. The old 
Potter's Field is now Washington Parade Gromid. In 1806 there were two ferries 
to Brooklyn : one from Fly Market shp, now the foot of Maiden Lane, and one from 
Catherine slip ; also there was a ferry to Paulus Hook, now Jersey City. These fer- 
ries were by row-boats, barges, and lighters. In 1807 Robert Fulton made his first 
trip to Albany in the first steamboat he built, called the Clermont ; time, 32 hours. 
In April, 1807, there were only four Banks in the city. 




Map of New York City— Lower Portion. Page 6. 




Map of New York City — Upper Portion. Page 7. 




PAGE 

Bird's-eye View 2 

Map of New York City 6 

Coat of Arms New York. . . 8 

Castle Garden and Battery, 19 

Southern Point of N. Y. . . 21 

Old Washington Market. . . 26 

Billiard Saloon 27 

The Narrows 30 

Astor House and Park 32 

A. T. Stewart's Charity. . . 35 

The Omnibuses 37 

Madison Square 39 

Stock Exchang-e 45 

Astor Library 46 

Booth's Theatre 50 

Academy of Design 54 

Cooper Institute 56 

Department of Charities ... 57 

Colored Orphan Asylum. ... 58 

Deaf and Dumb Asylum ... 59 



PAGE 

Roman CathoKc Asylum ... 60 

Rand; ill's Island 62 

SaUors' Snug Harbor, S. I. 63 

Clinton HaU 65 

Roman Catholic CoUeg-o. . . 67 

Seamen's Retreat, S. I. . . . 70 

Third Ave. R. R. Depot ... 72 

Grand Central Depot 74 

Union Leagne Club 76 

Grace Church 78 

Jewish Synag"Ogue. ...... 80 

Knickerbocker Life Ins. Co. 82 

Gilsey House 84 

Fire Department 86 

Old Post-Office 87 

Blackwell's Island 89 

Columbia Colleg-e 91 

Fulton Ferry House 92 

Fort Richmond, S.I 95 

Rutgers College 98 



LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS. 



IX 



PAGE 

Fifth Avenue. 99 

The Grand Hotel 100 

Bible House 103 

Egyptian Museum 105 

Society Library 107 

Historical Society 109 

Harlem Dispensary 110 

St. Luke's Hospital 112 

Seventh Regiment Armory 113 

College of New York 115 

Croton Reservoir 117 

Croton High Bridge 118 

Navy Yard, Brooklyn 121 

Produce Exchange 124 

Battery Park 127 

Washington Monument 128 

Lincoln Monument 129 

Mount Sinai Hospital 130 

New Post-Office 131 

Tombs Prison 133 



PAGE 

Deaf and Dumb Asylum . . . 134 

Bamum's Museum 138 

Convent of Sacred Heart . . 144 

HeU Gate Excavations 150 

Steam Fire Engine 155 

The Morgue 157 

Trinity Church Yard 162 

St. Paul's Church Yard ... 163 

Trinity Church Yard 164 

Flower Girl 168 

Franklin Monument 169 

Cafe Brunswick 170 

Jerome Park Races 173 

Bethel Church 174 

Blind Asylum 180 

Central Park, Summer H. . 181 

Central Park, Lake 183 

Central Park, Cave 183 

Central Park, Grotto 184 

Lunatic Asylum 193 




METHODICAL TABLE OF CONTENTS. 



PAGE 



1. — Alphabetical Index, 

2.— A Few Words about the City, - - - 19 

Giving a bird's-eye view of the Metropolis and its 
Inhabitants, and introducing the visitor to a lite- 
ral acquaintance with the different phases of life 
and character to be found. 

3.— Beware! 27 

. 4. — A separate Guide on opposite pages for 
Travellers arriving up-town and those 
arri\ing down-town, - - - - 30 

5. — Narrative Guide, - - - - - 30 
The Tour of the City in half a day, one day, or more 
days. 

6. — Amusements, - - - - - - 50 

7. — Ai-t Galleries, - 54 

8. — Asylums, 57 

9. — Benevolent Institutions, - - - - 61 

10. — Benevolent Societies, - - - - 64 

11.— Street Cars, 72 

12.— Clubs, 76 

13.— Churches, 78 



/ 



PAGB 



14. — Companies, - • • - 82 

15.— Consuls, - - - - 85 

16. — Municipal Departments, - -87 

17. — ^Excursions, • - - - - - 89 

18.— Ferries, ------- 92 

19.— Forts, 95 

20. — Hacks, Coaches, Cabs, etc., - - - 97 

2J . — ^Hotels and Restaurants, - - - - 99 ^ 

22. — ^Literary and Scientific Institutions, - - 10 } 

23. — Medical Institutions, - - . . HO ^ 

24". — ^Miscellaneous, - 113 

25.— Public Omnibuses, .- . . - 126 

26. — ^Parks and Squares, - - - - - 127 

27.— Public Buildings, 131 

28. — Summer Resorts, and how to go to them, - 135 

29. — ^Hints and E"otes on every variety of local 

matters, - - - - - - 137 

Including matters of dress, visits, and every item 
that the most inexperienced visitor to the City 
may require to know. 

30.— The Central Park, - - - - - 181 
31._Brief History of Old New York, - - 187 
32. — Brooklyn and vicinity, - - - - 194 
33.— Steamboat Travel, 198 



ALPHABETICAL INDEX. 



-^♦♦- 



A. 

A few Words about the City. 19 

Advice to Travellers 24 

Additional Hints and Notes. 137 

Amusements 50 

A New York Snow Storm. . 176 

Armories of the City Militia. 113 

Armories ; 114 

Asylums 57 

American Telegraph Co.. . . 83 
Aqueducts. (See ' ' Croton 

Waterworks.") 117 

Adjacent Islands 61 

Artists' Studios 114 

Art Galleries 54 

Avenues and Streets 114 

Associations 64 

Apprentices' Library 102 

A Lady may Wear .... 137 

Arrival in New York 30 

Area of the City 19 

American Museum of Art. . 55 



B. 



Banks 116 

Banks Open 139 

Benevolent Listitutions .... 57 

Benevolent Societies 64 

Baths— of aU kinds 116 

Boarding- Houses 177 

Billiards 139 

Breweries 



Bay of New York 30 

Buildings 159 

Brooklyn 194 

Bamum's Museum as it was 138 

Bible House 103 

BlackweU's Island 61 

Beware ! 27 

Base Ball 139 

Boat Races 139 

Budget of New York 139 

Baths— Free Public 116 

Boulevards 139 



c. 

Cars — Street and Omni- 
buses 73 

Courts 142 

Croton Water Works 117 

Churches 78 

Corporation Library 104 

Cemeteries 196 

Consuls 85 

Clubs 76 

Choice of Locality 143 

Collections of Objects of 

Art 142 

Commerce, Industry, and 

Immigration 140 

Custom House Dues 141 

Courts Open 142 

CoUeges 142 

City Statistics 139 



14 



ALPHABETICAL INDEX. 



CaT)s 97 

Confectioneries 116 

Courts open to the Public. 143 

Carts and Cartmen 143 

Colored Relief 66 

Calls and Callers, and How 

to Dress 141 

Central Park 181 

Conservatories of Music. . . 50 

Clinton HaU 104 

Chop Houses 99 

City HaU 131 

Commercial Register 117 

Club Houses, how to be seen 77 
Custom House Regulations. 141 

Calls after Dinner 145 

City Directory 144 



Elevators 145 

East River 90 

English Sparrows in the 
Squares, and their Habi- 
tations 21 

Express OflBces 83 

Express — how to send by. . 34 
Emigrants' Landiag Depot. 153 

E veiling Newspapers 168 

Excursion Boats 198 

Egyptian Museum. See 
" Historical Society" .... 105 



Description of the City. ... 19 

Departments 87 

Dispensaries Ill 

Detectives 145 

Docks 119 

Distances across the Ferries. 143 

Directory 144 

Dinner Hour and after Din- 
ner Visits 145 

Dinners, public and private ; 

where to give them 99 

Daily Newspapers 168 

DrirJcing Saloons 144 

Distances in the City 143 



E. 

Excursions 89 

Effects of a New York Snow 
blockade 176 



F. 

Fund Societies — are in al- 
phabetical order in " Be- 
nevolent Societies." See 

Index 64 

Ferries and Piers 93 

Fashion Plates 145 

Fashionable Dress Makers. 145 

Free Academy 104 

Forts 95 

French Cooking 145 

Ferries to Brooklyn. 93 

Freemasons 67 

Foreign Money 146 

Fashionable Day for Ladies 145 
Fashionable Newspapers. . . 146 
French and German Waiters 146 

Furnished Apartments 146 

Furnished Houses 146 

Fruit Stores 146 

Fashionable Patterns of all 
kinds for Ladies' and 
Children's G-arments. . . . 145 
Fashion 145 



ALPHABETICAL INDEX. 



15 



G. 

Great Thoroughfares 147 

German and Swedish Im- 
migration 146 

Gambling Houses and De- 
coys 148 

German Music Halls or Re- 
unions 52 

Greenwood 196 

Gymnasiums 148 

Grocery Stores 147 

Government Warehouses.. 141 



H. 

Hell Gate and the East 
Eiver Improvements, and 
their probable effect in 
changing the business lo- 
calities 149 

How to Descend from a Car 
or Omnibus when you 

wish to 153 

How to see a Newspaper, 
See "Reading Rooms" in 

Index 153 

Hotel Coaches 151 

How to Stop a Stage or Car 

when you wish to get out 148 
How to get a Newspaper. . . 153 
How to see New York 

Quickly 24 

How to see New York Lei- 
surely ... 38 

Hints to Visitors in the Me- 
tropolis. See " Hints and 

Notes" 137 

Holidays in New York 151 

Hudson River 90 

Harlem River 149 



History of New York 187 

How to Stop a Stage or Car 
where you wish to get out 153 

Hacks and Hackmen 97 

Hotels and Restaurants for 
all respectable persons ac- 
cording to their means. . 99 

Help for Educated but Poor 
Girls from the Country. . 68 

Howard Mission for Little 
Wanderers 68 

How to Catch a Train in a 

liurry I53 

Hints on Accepting Invita- 
tions 149 

How to Dress at Operas and 
Theatres, and other places 
of amusement. See In- 
dex for "Amusements". . 51 



I. 



Illustrated Newspapers 168 

If you leave an article in an 

Omnibus or Car 153 

Infirmary 58 

Ice Water I53 

If you choose to see to your 

own Baggage 153 

If you are Invited to an En- 
tertainment 149 

Information Bureau for 
Friends of Arriving Im- 
migrants 153 

Immigration I53 

Immigration — Comparative 
Protestant and Cathohc. 155 



J. 
Jerome Park 173 



16 



ALPnABETlCAL INDEX. 



L. 

Letters 155 

Literary and Scientific In- 
stitutions 103 

Libraries. (See Lidex for 
Literary and Scientific 

Institutions. ) 102 

Length of Blocks 143 

Long Branch Steamers. . . . 203 
Ladies' Depository. (Re- 
duced Ladies.) 69 

Letter Stamps 155 

Laborers 156 

List of Engravings 7 

Letter Boxes 155 



M. 

May Anniversaries 156 

Moving Day in the Metro- 
polis 158 

Measures of Length 159 

Medical Institutions 110 

Mock Auctions 28 

Map of the City 

Miscellaneous llB 

Map of Brooklyn 

Miscellaneous Exhibitions. . 135 

Messengers 156 

Mayor's Office 88 

Modes of Visiting Separate 

Places on the Hudson ... 91 
Mechanics' Society School. 1()6 

Markets 120 

Matinees 175 

Morgue 157 

Musical Matters. (See In- 
dex for ' ' Amusements " 
and under ' ' Literary and 
Scientific Institutions " . . 50 



Municipal Division of the 

City 158 

Measures of Capacity 159 

Money 119 



N. 



Navy Yard 120 

Naval Dry Dock 119 

Newspapers 168 

New York Fashionable Sea- 
son 24 

Narrows 30 

National Academy of Design 54 

Novelty Works 120 

No Rule for Business Office 

Hours 139 

North, East, and Harlem 

Rivers and Sound Boats. 198 

Natural Flowers 167 

New Buildings 159 

Narrative Guide 30 

New York Yacht Club 77 

New York City Taxes for 

1872 166 



O. 

Organ (Jrinders and Street 

Beggars 28 

Offices or Bureaus are in 
alphabetical order in 

" JMisceUaneous " 113 

Opera 51 

Omnibuses and Cars 126 

Odd-Fellows 69 

Out-door Statues and Mon- 
uments 128 



ALPHABETICAL INDEX. 



17 



P. 

Public Lectures 53 

Public Instruction 161 

Public Buildings 131 

Parks and Squares 127 

Public Schools 161 

Postage 120 

Public Schools, — how they 
are built, arranged, and 

conducted 161 

Postal Arrangements 121 

Public Porters 122 

Police 88 

Police Stations 122 

Police Courts 88 

Picture Galleries — public . . 54 

Picture Galleries — private. 55 

Post-office 131 

Population of the City 19 

Popular Preachers 196 

Places and Sights which a 

Stranger should see 90 

Printing House Square 123 

Publishing Offices 123 

Piers and Ferries 92 

Public and Private Dinners 145 

Photography 54 

PoHce Protection and Detec- 
tive Department 88 

Police Telegraph 88 

R. 

Eesorts at short distances 

from Town 135 

Eesorts for Evenings. (See 
Index for "Amuse- 
ments.") 50 

Railroad Stations 124 

Bides and Drives 89 

Keservoirs. (See Index for 
' ' Croton Water Works. "). 1 17 



Races 172 

Re-unions — German 52 

Restaurants 99 

Riding School 173 

Reading and Smoking 

Rooms 153 

Religion 173 

Routine to make the Trav- 
ellers' sight -seeing de- 
lightful and not trying 
and exhausting to mind 

and body 45 

Religious Newspapers 173 

Religious Notes 173 

The tour of the City in half 
a day 38 

S. 

Servants 156 

Summer Resorts, or Water- 
ing Places at a distance, 
and how to go to them. . 135 

Schools— public 161 

Shop Butchers 175 

Streets and Avenues 143 

Steamboats 198 

Saturday 175 

Silver Communion Service, 

presented by Queen Anne 175 
Safe Deposit Companies. . . 124 

Simday Services 196 

Study of Students in Art . . 54 
Something for the Anti- 
quary 191 

Stewart's Store 123 

Society for the Prevention 

of Cruelty to Animals ... 71 
Stevens Apartment Build- 
ing 38 

Salaries of Public Employes 166 
Sailors' Snug Harbor. ..... 64 

Sailors' Chapels 175 



18 



ALPHABETICAL INDEX. 



Shopping 175 

Shipping' Intelligence 177 

Seeing to your own baggage 153 
Shipping in the Harbor. . . . 

Sites of remarkable events. 

Suburban Trains or Rail- 

jrodiiXo ••■•■•••••••«••••• 

Suburban Railroad Stations 

Suburban Villages 

Shooting Galleries 175 

Seamen's Exchange 123 

Sum total of business trans- 
acted in the City of New- 
York in 1871. (See' 'Com- 
merce and Industry.").. 141 
Summer 136 



23 
191 

124 
135 

177 



The Tour of the City in one 
day 39 

The Tour of the City in 
three or more days 38 

To give an idea of the fash- 
ionable watering places 
frequented by New York- 
ers 89 



U. 

United States Treasury. . . 
Unfurnished Apartments. 

V. 



134 

178 



T. 

Trip up the Hudson 90 

The Police 88 

Table of Distances 179 

Theatres 51 

The New York Bar 168 

Telegraphy 83 

Telegraph Offices 125 

Take the Right-hand 177 

Traffic 208 

The Churches 78 

Tides 208 

Time Tables 178 

Telegraph Companies 83 

Thermometric Scale 159 

Trips 90 

The Tombs, or City Prison 133 

To hear Trials 142 

Those who wish to remain 
in New York as Students, 

Clerks, &c 34 

There are no American Ser- 
vants 156 

To Philadelphia, Baltimore, 
aaid Washington 198 



Views of New York 125 



w. 

Weights and Measures 159 

Width of Streets and Ave- 
nues 143 

Wall Street 40 

Wall Street Sneak Thieves. 180 
Where to Lunch, Dine, and 

Sup 99 

Wharves and Wharf Scenes, 125 

Working Girls' Hotel 35 

What to beware of 29 

WTiat can be bought in 

Broadway 125 

Woodlawn 106 

Waiters in Hotels 180 

Washington 128 

Wines and Liquors 180 

Y. 

Yachting 77 

Religious Statistics for the 
United States 173 



HANDBOOK OF NEW YORK. 



A FEW WORDS ABOUT THE CITY. 




[Castle Garden, at the Battery.] 

-EW YORK stands at the head of the magnifi- 
if cent bay of the same name, seventeen miles 
g# from the Atlantic Ocean. Into the bay flows 
on one side of the city the East river, and on 
the other tne Hudson or North river. The Harlem river and 
Spuyten Duyvil creek make the northern boundary, and com- 
plete the island, which is the limit of the city proper. 

Its shape is long and narrow, with an average width of a 
mile and a half; and its principal street — Broadway — extends 
its entire length, a distance of fifteen miles. The population is 
over one million, not taking into account that of Brooklyn, 
Jersey City, and the contiguous places in Westchester county, 
which would increase it to about a million and three-quarters. 
The growth of New York is amazing, the last few years wit- 



20 A FEW WORDS ABOUT THE CITY. 

nessing the rapid extension of streets from river to river, 
and the opening of broad avenues northward, far beyond thfl 
city boundaries. 

The advance of ISTew York has been remarkable ever since 
the Revolution, the events and peculiarities which make history 
seeming to have no limit in the variety and perpetuity of their 
striking elements. 

The climate, though variable, is extremely healthy. Fogo 
never obscure the heavenly blue skies, and such weather as 
Nature sends has a poetic beauty, whether in sunshine or storm. 
Here are found the exhilaration of the Russian winter, the 
balmy influence of the tropical summer, and the incomparable 
spring and autumn seasons peculiar to the northern United 
States. The lavish supply of pure water distributed by the 
Croton Aqueduct is its chief artificial sanitary arrangement. 
This is at the command of all, rich and poor. It is carried into 
every house, however insignificant, and distributed through it 
from top to bottom in pipes let into the walls and turned out 
by faucets, with larger pipes to carry off the waste water. 

The sewage of the whole metropolis is conducted into the 
Hudson and East rivers through brick tunnels which underlie 
the streets. No drainage is necessary into those wide rivers 
which communicate with the ocean and are salt. 

The breezes which sweep from the ocean through these 
noble rivers and along the streets, temper the rigor of the 
winters, and cool the sultry heats of summer. As the streets 
run from river to river, the air has free scope in carrying away 
malaria and the foul odors due to neglectful city authorities, 
and serve to mitigate the fiercest ravages of disease in seasons 
of epidemic. 

The parks and squares are delightful breathing spots. Unen- 
closed and beautifully paved, they are peculiarly inviting. 
They are planted with trees, and have beautifully kept grass- 



A FEW WORDS ABOUT THE CITY. 



21 



plots and admirable walks and inviting seats. They are filled 
•with English sparrows (imported for the protection of the trees 
against the caterpillars) ; and in Madison and Union Squares are 
ingeniously contrived miniature buildings for these little birds, 
placed among the branches of the trees, which represent dif- 
ferent business departments, as "The Post-Office," "The Cus- 
tom-House," " The Exchange," &g., &c., &c., and it is very 
amusing to see the little creatures enter these different edifices, 
their busy, hurried air irresistibly giving tbe idea that they 
really know where they are going and have a purpose in it. 

It will strike a stranger how infinitely greater ia. the propor- 
tion of respectable and elegant streets, and how comparatively 
limited are those absorbed by poverty and vice. If he has time 
for investigation he will learn also how ample are the provisions 
for the extinction of the latter. There is no city in the world 
where there are so many charitable institutions of all kinds. 

The northern or upper part of the city is appropriated to 
private life; the lower or southerly portion to commerce. 




[Tfie Southern Pomt of New York.'] 

traffic, and law. Wealth, taste, and ambition are stamped upon 
the streets devoted to business as fully as upon those designed 
expressly for luxury and ease. Warehouses are nowhere shut 



22 A FEW WORDS ABOUT THE CITY. 

in by dingy, unwholesome alleys, but are in every street lighted 
by the bright sunshine; and the '- dark ways," if there are any, 
are confined to interior transactions. Commerce at and near 
the wharves is carried on in the unobscured light of day, which 
gives the cheerfulest aspect to all concerned, and an infinite 
animation to the varied and ever-changing scenes. 

Along the Hudson and East rivers can be seen almost the 
largest display of shipping in the world. For several miles you 
behold literally a "forest of masts." 

The city is full of public schools, where the best English 
education can be had free. 

The intellectual quickness produced by the rapidity of ITew 
York life, renders the corps of lawyers quite independent of the 
seclusion of a London "Lincoln's Inn" or a "Temple." In 
New York, commerce and law are found in close juxtaposition. 

Retail trade, on the other hand, has scarcely a foothold in the 
so-called business part of the city, but is scattered about in the 
great thoroughfares with a judicious adaptation of the quality 
of the merchandise to the quality of the neighborhood. 

Fortunate business and professional men, retired men of 
wealth, in short, millionaires — whether they have made their 
money in the retail trade or at wholesale, whether as mechanics 
or lawyers, bankers or brokers, as doctors or as clergymen, so 
long as the money is made — buy lots and build magnificent 
houses in the most fashionable streets. The "born gentleman," 
with a long pedigree and a lean purse, will find scanty recog- 
nition there. Indeed there is probably a greater social dis- 
tinction in some of the business quarters of the city between 
the different occupations, than in the private portions of the 
metropolis, where the only distinguishing features are the dif- 
ferent degrees of wealth displayed. 

In ISTew York there is no technical division between the 
business and the 2:)rivate portion of the town. It is all the 



A FEW WORDS ABOUT THE CITY. 23 

' city." "We are going to the 'city"' — "We have been to 
the 'city'" — "We have business in the 'city'" — means New 
York, and not as in London only a small part of the metropolis. 

The expressions "down town" and "up town" are em- 
ployed to designate the business and social quarters of the city. 
There is no confusion in New York, as in London, from many 
streets bearing the same name. 

The government of New York is vested in the Mayor and 
Board of Aldermen and Assistant Aldermen, with a vast 
machinery of branches, from the city Comptroller down. There 
are also various departments, such as the " Department of Pubhc 
Works," the " Department of Public Charities and Correction," 
&c., which to an extent are independent in their working, and 
which serve to increase the confusion in the management of 
the city's affairs. It is to be hoped that a comprehensive and 
intelligible charter will in time be enacted, which will enable 
New Yorkers to escape from the official thieves and robbers 
who have of late so audaciously plundered them. 

The active, cheerful labor which is shared by all classes, each 
in their specific sphere, the hope which the unlimited facilities 
for enterprises of all kinds stamp upon every countenance, the 
bearing, imbued with conscious independence, all render the 
New Yorker an eminent example of the true type of republican 
character. 

Here every nationality on the face of the earth would appear 
to be represented. This large influx of foreigners, who adopt 
New York for their home, while they introduce many of the 
habits and customs of their native land, quickly imbibe the 
spirit of our free institutions and become rapidly Americanized. 
This makes the city thoroughly Cosmopolitan. 

The city of New York is the head-quarters of the trade and 
commerce of the United States. It is also the nucleus of all 
southern and western travel in the summer season. A peculiar 



24 A FEW WORDS ABOUT THE CITY. 

feature of Kew York is the multiplicity of fashionable hotels 
and boarding-houses. These are sustained to a great degree by 
the "respectability" of the metropolis. This is partly owing to 
the want of good servants (a great want), partly to the fact that 
only persons of large incomes can pay the enormous rents for 
private houses, it being a rule of "good society" that every 
family must live in a wliole house (if they keep house at all) ; 
and fashion, arbitrary here as elsewhere, compels people hoping 
to maintain their position to live in a large and handsome 
house, however small their family may be. Hence, hotel and 
boarding-house life has been reduced to a fine art. 

It is getting to be much the custom for families who are so 
fortunate as to own splendid houses on the avenues, and who 
lack somewhat the means to support these establishments, to 
live almost wholly at their suburban residences, which, as a 
rule, are very fine, and come in the city to a hotel at their 
convenience and pleasure, while the town house, with all its 
rich furniture, is let to a "'fashionable" boarding-house keeper. 

Fashionable New York usually quits town for the country in 
June, and returns in October. Before the civil war the city 
was none the less gay for the flight of its inhabitants to cooler 
regions. The southern planters came north with their families, 
flocking like tropical birds of brilliant plumage to the hotels, 
fluttering along the walks, and keeping the sultry streets full of 
life and brightness. They come still, those who can; but they 
have no longer the inclination nor the means for their former 
display. 

The most fashionable period at the chief summer resorts is 
the last week of July and the first two weeks in August. 

The fashionable season in the city is from early in November 
to Lent. ' 

The first impulse of a stranger in coming into a metropolis is 
to consult a map. But the visitor who is limited for time will 



A FEW WORDS ABOUT THE CITY. - 25 

find it to his advantage to follow a little ^Hour^' marked out for 
him in the narrative part of the "handbook," a perusal of which 
will take but a few minutes. It has been planned with study 
and care, and will be found very comprehensive and satis- 
factory. Afterwards, the map will come in use. The "tour" 
gives an exterior view of the most beautiful and the most 
characteristic portions of the metropolis, with their archi- 
tectural features, and many buildings which are pointed out by 
name. The most busy as well as the most fashionable portions 
are included. 

In passing through the business thoroughfares the visitor 
will find the striking peculiarities of our American life ag- 
glomerated with almost a weird effect. He will find palatial 
banks and banking houses, immense insurance buildings, law- 
yers' offices, brokers' offices in great variety, enormous whole- 
sale stores of every possible description, spacious government 
warehouses, towering newspaper offices, and innumerable 
hotels, mixed up with restaurants, lunch-rooms, cigar-shops, 
wine and fruit stores, a few churches, and large numbers of 
second-hand book stores; while along the streets are innumer- 
able stands, where newspapers and light literature are dis- 
pensed, or oranges, apples, bananas, in fact all the fruits of the 
season, are sold, together with roasted chestnuts, peanuts, 
crockery, new and second-hand clothing, &c., &c. ; while far 
"up town" stretch rows of private houses, interspersed with 
churches, hotels, boarding-houses, fashionable restaurants, and 
confectionery establishments. 

The markets are interesting places to visit, especially early 
in the morning, before the full tide of traffic is begun. The 
varieties of home produce, the great market-baskets of fruits 
and vegetables, the game, the- live poultry, the heaps of eggs, 
the bunches of flowers and of herbs, the huge, ruddy-faced, 
bright market women who reign over their stalls, inviting by 



26 



A FEW WORDS ABOUT THE CTTT. 




[Old Washi7igt07i Market. — Morning, "l 

■word and glance the new oomer. or welcoming -with the free- 
dom of their class the old-established customer, with oflfers of 
bargains mingled with the witty remark and the sharp but 
good-humored repartee — all these form a scene and a picture 
which should not be overlooked. 

It is much the custom in New York for gentlemen, and often 
ladies, to go themselves to market to make their purchases fer 
the day's requirements. 

And now we introduce the reader to New York, as beyond 
question one of the freshest, liveliest, and most fascinating cities 
in the world. 



BEWARE! 




{Scene in Billiard Saloon.'] 

EWARE— 

On approaching and coming into the city, of the 
good-natured civilities of persons you have never 
seen before. Grratuitous offers of assistance or advice, 
or good-fellowship, are suspicious, to say the least. 
Do not be persuaded to go anywhere with these 
casual acquaintances. If you are an utter stranger, you 
will find the "Handbook" your best and most trustworthy 
friend. It will not mislead you. While it is not necessary to 
particularize every place in the metropolis that is respectable as 
a stopping-place, or as a resort for amusement, it leaves unmen- 
tioned such as are in the least doubtful, and which ought to be 
avoided. Some which are notorious and extremely insidious, 
are briefly specified under this heading, while the newspapers 
give daily accounts of the innumerable ways of entrapping 
strangers in the city. 
Beware — 

If you are at a loss in the street, of accosting any one but a 



28 BEWARE. 

policeman ; him you "vvill know bv his uniform — blue coat and 
cap, and brass buttons. If you do not see a policeman, step 
into the nearest store or hotel and make your inquiries. 
Beware — 

Of the purlieus of the city. They are only to be visited 
under the escort of a police oflS.cer. 
Beware — 

Of Mock Auctions in stores, and of the pleasant-faced man 
who invites you to look in. 
Beware — 

Of Panel Houses. A sliding panel is let into the walls of 
some doubtful houses, through which thieves enter unperceived 
and have you at their mercy. 
Beware — 

Of Saloons with " Pretty Waiter Girls." They are among the 
most dangerous decoys in the city. 
Beware — 

Of all who accost you in the street, particularly if they want 
your advice about a pocket-book they have just found, or a roll 
of money which they have picked up. Such persons have a very 
innocent and inexperienced air. Distrust them — don't stop to 
listen to them. 
Beware — 

Of visiting a fashionable gambling-house, "just to see what 
is going on." 
Beware — 

Of giving street beggars or organ-grinders more than a few 
pennies. 
Beware — 

Of walking late in the evening, except in the busiest thorough- 
fares of the city. 
Beware — 

Of exposing your watch, pocket-book, or jewelry in the 



BEWARE. 29 

streets, lecture-rooms, theatres, or in omnibuses or cars. You 
should suspect any one, man or woman, well or ill dressed, who 
a-owds or presses against you ; the contents of your pockets are 
in danger. Ladies, keep your pocket-books in the bosom of 
your dress. 
Beware — 

Of Hack-drivers' extortions. (See index for "Hacks and 
Hackmen.") 
Beware — 

Of passing under a building in course of erection or repairs. 
It is worth while to cross the street twice to avoid it. 
Beware — 

Especially in the evening, of persons who ask you what time 
it is. They have designs on your watch. 
Beware — 

Of leaving any considerable sum of money or any valuables 
in your trunk, or of carrying them on your person. There is a 
safe in every hotel where you can deposit such things without 
charge. , " 

Beware — 

Of talking about your business before strangers. 
Beware — 

Of even the orderly " Dance-Houses." A sadder story of 
New York life cannot be written than that connected with 
these places. 



NARRATIVE GUIDE. 




[Tfie Narrows, at Fort Hamilton.'^ 

^p HOSE who, for the first time, sweep up our 
H magnificent Bay, pass the brilHant " Nar- 
rows," and reach the city at its lower 
extremity, and those who arrive by the numerous steamboat 
Hues, or who ahght from the various routes of travel at 
the stupendous " Grand Central Depot " at Forty-second 
Street, will naturally wish for a thorough but concise and 
lucid Guide to not only the most convenient or accessible 
Hotels, but also to Churches of all denominations, the Thea- 
tres, Opera Houses, Museums, Public Libraries, and the most 
eligible Retail Stores. They will also desire to be guided in 
their strolls about town. 



NARRATIVE GUIDE. 31 

The more necessary landmarks being well fixed in the mind. 
Public Institutions of all kinds, Public Buildings, and private 
streets of note will come next in interest. The channels which 
lead out of the city then occupy the attention, and the traveller 
feels quite at home. 

He can now observe without the hurry and excitement which 
always accompany a sense of strangeness ; and whether his stay 
be for a few weeks, days, or only hours, he can repose while he 
contemplates the characteristics of the great metropolis of the 
Western World, and the peculiarities of its inhabitants as they 
are exhibited in their places of business, their homes, and their 
chosen pursuits and pleasures. 

N. B. — Travellers arriving at either extremity of the 
metropolis will find separate instructions on opposite pages 
until it is time for them to join company. 

Traveller from Down-Town. 

The stranger entering the metropolis from the Jersey Ferries, 
or by the Hudson and East Elvers, will find his way to his 
stopping-place by the aid of the Handbook. (See Index for 
Hotels and Eestaurants.) 

Having consigned your baggage to the care of the express 
agent — who gives you a receipt, and whose " Company " is re- 
sponsible for it until it safely reaches its destination; having 
paid your hackraan (see Index for " Hackmen "), or, with car- 
pet-bag in hand, having chosen to vary the boat or railroad 
motion by a brisk walk to your stopping-place, and taken 
your comfortable meal, reposed for a few moments in your 
apartment, or, if but a passing traveller, in the reading-room 
or the office of the hotel, or in your chair in the dining-room or 
restaurant, with the Handbook before you, you are soon rested 
and armed for an excursion about the city. 

If you have taken an apartment, we advise you to preface 



32 



NARRATIVE GUIDE. 



your first meal by a bath and clean linen. Besides making you 
presentable wherever you may choose to go, it wonderfully 
accelerates the cheerful feeling which gives all the zest to sight- 



seemg. 



If you have not engaged an apartment, you can still have 
the use of the toilet-room of the hotel with water, soap, and 
towels, and thus enjoy something of the invigoration of the 
bath. 




[Astor House — Broadioay and Park Row.l 

T now propose a little tour. I shall make the Astor House 
the starting-point for the down-town sight-seer. (See Index 
for "Hotels.") If you arrive by one p.m. in winter, or by 
three p.m. at any other season, commence your sight-seeing by 



NARRATIVE GUIDE. 33 

stepping from the Broadwa}- door of the Astor House into a 
Fifth Avenue omnibus, going up town, or north. One passes 
every few minutes. This will carry you up Broadway to 
Eleventh Street, thence into the far-famed Fifth Avenue. 
Continue your ride up this avenue to the upper end of the 
'' Reservoir," at Forty-second Street. Here alight, and walk 
one block in an easterly direction and you are at Madison 
Avenue, near the " Grand Central Depot," which occupies 
almost the whole block between Madison and Fourth Avenues. 
From here you take the "Tour" marked out for the sight-seer 
from " Up-Town." (See page .) This tour will bring you 
to the corner of Broadway and Twenty-third Street, where 
take an omnibus and return down town to your stopping-place 
in time to rest, dress, and dine, and visit some evening place of 
amusement. The waiter at your chair will bring you a daily 
newspaper, if you have not already one in your possession, and 
you can make your choice of places of resort while you are 
sipping your coffee. 

If you arrive by a morning boat I propose a different and 
much more comprehensive tour, as follows: 

After breakfast, step into a Broadway and Wall Street 
omnibus, going down, or southerly. This will take you down 
Broadway a short distance, and then will turn into Wall Street, 
which is the famous money mart of the metropolis, and carry 
you to the Wall Street Ferry. The distance is not great, but 
as the streets are thronged, you can observe to better advantage 
from a slight elevation, and the ride will cost you but ten cents, 
which you hand up to the driver on entering the omnibus. At 
the head of WaU Street you will meet with the sight-seer from 
" up-town," and from this point you join company in all your 
excursions. 



o* 



34 narrative guide. 

Traveller from "Up-Town.'' 

On approaching the metropoHs, an express agent passes 
through the cars, exclaiming " Checks for baggage." You will 
have made up your mind where you desire to go, and it will be 
wise to entrust your baggage to him. Accost him as he ap- 
proaches. Tell him where you wish it taken — whether to 
another railroad depot, or to a steamboat (if you are only pass- 
ing through town), or to some part of the city. He takes out 
his book, puts down your instructions; you deliver to hira your 
checks, for which he gives you a receipt, and you have tians- 
ferred all the care of your baggage to the express company, 
who are responsible for it until it is safely delivered. The 
express charge is half a dollar for each trunk. 

On emerging from the immense Depot, you find yourself in 
Forty-second Street, facing the south or " down-town," with 
Madison Avenue on your right and Fourth Avenue on your 
left. If you are weary and travel-soiled, take a hack (see Index 
for "Hacks and Hackmen") for your place of destination; but if 
you have only a few hours to spend in the metropolis, and are 
a pretty good walker, I propose a short tour which will give 
you the best view of the most elegant part of the city at various 
points, with many buildings of note, and without greatly re- 
tracing your steps, which is the discouraging and time-stealing 
impediment to th« sight-seer. The up-town streets are seen to 
much better advantage in walking than in riding. 

Proceed, then, down Park Avenue (this is built over Fourth 
Avenue, the latter being used for a railroad tunnel), and walk 
leisurely straight before you to its termination at Thirty-second 
Street, where it ia merged in Fourth Avenue. Park Avenue 
is one of the three most beautiful and fashionable avenues in 
the metropolis, and has been recently, and in an incredibly 
short time, built up over the Harlem Railroad tunnel. Here, al 



NARRATIVE GUIDE. 



35 




[A, T. Stewart's Working- Girls' Hotel] 

Thirty-second Street, ia A, T. Stewart's great charity, The 
Working-Girls' Hotel, If you want any articles of the toilet, 
thread, needles, pins, scissors, a thimble, a ribbon, a neck-tie, a 
comb and brush, etc., proceed a few blocks in the same direc- 
tion along Fourth Avenue, and make the purchases at any of 
the stores whose windows exhibit such and similar articles. 
The few minutes you have spent in Fourth Avenue will be suf- 
ficient to give you an idea of the character of that thorough- 
fare, which, together with Third Avenue, is merged at 
Seventh Street in the broad highway called the Bowery, lead- 
ing to the lower part of the city. You may now retrace your 
steps to the corner of Thirty-fourth Street, turn here to your 



3G NARRATIVE GUIDE. 

left, or we>;terly, and one block brings you to Madison Avenue, 
Take a glance up and down its beautiful double line of private 
residences and pass on to theifeext crossing, and you are in tlie 
Fifth Avenue, and directly before you is tlie classical marble 
edifice built by A. T. Stewart, merchant, for his private resi- 
dence. You have now seen from the best point of view the 
most fashionable avenues and several of the finest up- town 
streets of the metropolis, presenting, in their regular intersec- 
section, facades of unrivalled extent and beauty. Turn here at 
your left and walk down Fifth Avenue to Madison Square, 
pausing at the corner of Twenty-fifth Street to look about 
you. This is a short half mile farther. If it is afternoon and 
a fine day, you will meet the " belles " and " beaux " of 
New York in their elegant toilets, and have the advan- 
tage of a near inspection of the much-boasted beauty of 
the New York ladies; also of the brilliant display of equi- 
pages as they roll along, bearing their freight of wealth and 
fashion to Central Park. Giving a glance at the Worth Monu- 
ment near which you are standing, walk to the lower or south- 
ern extremity of the square in Twenty-third Street, and you 
are at the intersection of Broadway with the Fifth Avenue, 
which is one of the finest points in the city. The view in every 
direction is imposing. Directly opposite, is the massive marble 
front of the Fifth Avenue Hotel, and in this vicinity are con- 
gregated a large number of the first-class hotels of the city. 
After taking a survey of the scene, turn to your left, or easterly, 
and walk one block, and you will find yourself at the corner of 
Fourth Avenue and Twenty-third Street. Here, standing oppo- 
site each other, are The National Academy of Design and the 
building of The Young Men's Christian Association. The exte- 
rior is all you have time to look at to-day. Retrace your steps, 
walking westerly past the lower side of Madison Square till you 
come again to Broadway. 



NARRATIVE GUIDE. 



37 



[N.B. — Tf yon have come in town, travelled, soiled, and weary, 
and have anoth''r day for siglit-seeing, you will wish to proceed 
directly to your hotel; preface your first meal by a rapid bath; it 
wonderfully revivifies. There are barber shops and bath-rooms in 
all first-class hotels. At other houses, a bed-room with water and 
towels answer the purpose; in fact, this refreshment will be well 
worth the time in the rest it will give you and the zest it will 
add to your first venture at sight-seeing, even if you have but 
a ^evr hours to spend in the metropolis.] 

The next step, after once more pausing to admire the scene 
around you from where you stand — corner of Twenty-third 
Street and Broadway — is to consult your watch and see what 
time you have for further sight-seeing. If you have still an 
hour left, take a South Ferry Omnibus — "South Ferry" is 
painted on it in large letters — and ride down to the Bowling 
G-reen and return by 

^^.^^..^..^^^^m^^^. ^^Q^rie. This will 



give you a pano- 
ramic view of the 
whole of Broadway, 
with a glimpse of 
all the intersecting 
streets and of the 
Battery, and you 
will have had al- 
ready a good view 
of New York. 

You can now re- 
fresh yourself, dine, 
and attend some 
place of amusement 
in the evening. 




38 NARRATIVE GUIDE. 

If you have arrived by a mcrning train and have but a few 
hours in the city, proceed at once by talking tlie httle tour just 
described. 

If you have longer to stay, the first thing for you to do after 
comfortably arranging yourself at your hotel, is to sally forth 
and stop a Broadway and Wall Street Omnibus, going down- 
town or south. Stop it by raising your finger. There is gener- 
ally a policeman in uniform at hand to help passengers across 
the streets when they are much crowded. Step into the omni- 
bus and pass up your fare — teyi cents. You will get correct 
change for any small bill, if necessary, though it is much more 
convenient to be prepared with the exact sum. For a distance 
of two or three miles you have nothing to do but admire the 
buildings which compose this splendid street. 

On Broadway are most of the prominent hotels of the 
metropolis, all buildings of imposing structure and proportions. 
Here are theatres, museums, and an infinite number of magnifi- 
cent edifices for merchandise, for of&ces, &c. Your omnibus 
does not go up Broadway above Twenty-third Street, but turns 
into Madison Avenue; therefore you should take it at this 
point, or below it. If you have chosen the G-rand Hotel or 
any of the contiguous hotels for your stopping-place, you 
can readily walk down to Twenty-third Street. The Grand 
is the farthest north of a series of hotels. Starting from here, 
corner of Thirty- first Street, cross to the west side of Broadway, 
and you will see all the hotels to the best advantage. On the 
next block below, at your left hand, is the G-ilsey House, also a 
beautiful building of more florid architecture. Near the corner 
of Thirtieth Street, at your right hand, is "Wood's Museum ; on 
the next block, at your left, is the Sturtevant House, and on your 
right, nearly opposite, is the Coleman House. A little farther 
on, at your left, is a large and striking building of brick, with stone 
facings ; this is the new Stevens Apartment Building^ constructed 



NAKKATIVE GUIDE. 



39 



in *' flats" for families, after the French style and in the most 
ele^^ant manner. 

At the corner of Twenty-fifth Street and Broadway pause 
a moment. From this point is one of the most beautifiil 
views of the metropohs. Two blocks at your left, across 
Madison Square, is the showy and singular building of the 
Union League Club. On your right stretches a marble facade 
of several of the first-class hotels. The first of these white 
marble buildings is the St. James Hotel, which you have just 
passed, corner of Twenty-sixth Street. At Twenty-fifth Street, 
Broadway, after intersecting the Fifth Avenue, by which the two 
form one broad high v/ ay for a couple of blocks, now sweeps 




{Madisoji Square— Fifth Avenue Hotel.'] 

in its northerly course to the left, str-etching quite to the ex- 
tremity of the island. 



40 NARRATIVE GUIDE. 

Proceeding on the same side (right hand) of the way, the 
next white marble building is the Hoffman House, Broadway 
and Twenty-fifth Street. The Albemai'le comes next, and the 
whole of the next block is occupied by the Fifth Avenue Hotel. 
Walk past this hotel, and cross the street to your left; you are 
now at the foot of Madison Square, and from this point you 
have a fine view of it and a part of Madison Avenue, the Worth 
House and Monument, while the classical proportions but simple 
architecture of the Fifth xlvenue Hotel are presented to the 
greatest advantage. 

j^ow stop the Wall Street omnibus, as before directed, going 
south or down town; seated in it you will pass, on your right, 
a succession of splendid buildings used — in fact built — expressly 
for retail stores by their present occupants. On the corner of 
-Thirteenth Street and Broadway, at your left, is Wallack's Thea- 
tre. On your left, just above Tenth Street, is G-race Church, 
one of the most "fashionable" Bspiscopal churches, and the 
next block, still on your left hand, is occupied by Stewart's 
Retail Store. Both are easily distinguished from other build- 
ings. As you descend the city you pass many fine stores, 
the St. Denis, New York, the Grand Central, the Metropolitan, 
and St. Nicholas Hotels, and come to the "City Park," in 
which are situated the City Hall, the Court House and various 
Pubhc Buildings for the city's use, and also the magnificent 
immense building, now in course of construction, for the United 
States Post Office and Court House. On reaching Wall 
Street your omnibus will turn into it, and at this point you 
are joined hy the doim-town traveller. 

Wall Street is a most striking: street. Look at the buildins's 
on both sides of it. Your omnibus will carry you to its ter- 
minus, the Wall Street Ferry. On arriving at the ferry you 
should cross the East River to Brooklyn, a few minutes' trip, 
and have a delisrhtful water view and a breath of salt air. 



NARRATIVE GUIDE. 41 

Return loith the boat, and reserve your tour of Brooklyn for a 
particular day. The same omnibus will take you to Broadway ; 
and in the few moments you may have to wait for the stage, 
you "wiil find abundance to interest you in the Cosmopolitan 
throng about the ferry, if you are an observer of human nature. 
But I would advise you not to take the omnibus. Walk back 
up Wall Street and observe closely, and at your leisure, the 
splendid buildings which American pride has erected for the 
most practical uses. You will easily distinguish the name 
and use of each one, flaunting in ambitious rivalry over its 
neighbor. 

Pursue your walk to the corner of Wall and William Streets, 
where stands the U. S. Custom House, a mammoth cfranite 
building. Turn here to your left, and go down William Street 
a few steps, to its intersection with Beaver Street. There stands 
the traditional and time-honored restaurant, "Delmonico." You 
will get nothing better to eat or to drink in the whole metrop- 
ohs than here. Order an ice, if nothing more ; but if it is lunch 
time, take it there. Then retrace your steps to the corner of 
Wall and William Streets, and walk up westerly to Broadway, 
observing all the buildings as you stroll along. On the corner 
of Nassau and Wall Street, at your right, is the United States 
Treasury, a conspicuous marble building with columns — per- 
haps the most solidly built structure in America. It was built 
for the Custom House, but transferred to the Treasury. Step 
in and examine the interior. In Broad Street, lookins; to the 
left, is the gilded pile built for and used as the Stock Exchange. 
Here you may be interested also, and if you are acquainted 
'with a member, can find admittance into the stormy Babel 
within. As you approach Broadway, cast your eyes before 
you, and directly facing the head of Wall Street looms up in 
exquisite proportions the spire of Trinity Cathedral. It 
is one of the finest single spires in the world. Its chimes 



42 NARRATIVE GUIDE. 

can scarcely be heard for the din in the streets. At the 
head of Wall Street turn down or to your left, and walk to the 
Bowling Green. Keep on as far as you can go, then turn 
to your right, and you will be at the Battery, the lowest 
extremity of the city. Observe and examine the more con- 
spicuous buildings you may pass at this point. Stop here and 
breathe the air from the Bay. Around the Battery, and in 
a circuit of fifteen minutes' walk, is the historical part of the 
city, though there is nothing at present to indicate it, absorbed 
as it is by the vast and various practical enterprises peculiar 
to the spirit of the age, and eminently so of the American 
people — a spirit which defies even the illumination of recent 
heroic splendor, and forbids anything like a permanent atmos- 
phere of romance or sentiment. 

Many of the houses once occupied by the elite of the city are 
standing much as they were. They can be easily distinguished 
from other contiguous buildings by an indescribably private 
look. But the Battery, though considerably enlarged, is not 
greatly changed since that day. Here the refined, the lovely, 
tlie gay, were wont to display their charms in a morning or 
afternoon promenade; or, if more sentimentally inclined, stroll 
through its walks in small parties, and finish the evening in 
Castle G-ardeji, in some pretty embowered arbor, enjoying 
their favorite ice-cream, not served in a saucer and shaped and 
tinted into artificial forms, but in high-piled tender-stemmed 
glasses, more suggestive of a commingling of classical associa- 
tions than is the more material style of the present day. On 
the other hand, let humanity be grateful that the Battery 
is now a breathing spot for the humbler classes, to many 
of whom it is perhaps their only luxury ; and that Castle 
Garden^ now the Emigrant Depot, gives the poor wanderers to 
our hospitable shores a feeling of security they could not possi- 
bly know without it. 



NAUUATIVE GUIDE. 



4.J 




[Castle Garden, at the Baiter?/.] 

In its transition state, about twenty-five years ago, Castle 
Garden was used as a concert-liall, and here Jenny Lind made 
her first appearance in America. 

From the Battery retrace your steps until you reach the 
Bowhng G-reen again. Stop at the head of the Bowhng Green, 
and wait for a Broadway and Fourtli Avenue, or a Broadway 
and Twenty-third Street omnibus. Whichever you take, ahght 
at Union Square, and Hnger a moment before you take another 
omnibus. Turn to page 40 for the most prominent objects 
from Wall Street to this point, reversing them, however, as 
you are now going up-town. 

N.B. — It would be useless to give you at present the locali- 
ties of any but such places as the most unaccustomed eye 
would instantly separate from their surroundings, because you 
do not yet know even the localities of the streets. You must 
have time to refer to your index and your map for particular 
directions. Enjoy, this fii'st day, the inspiriting panorama! It 
will be tlie more vividly photographed upon your memory 
without those details which only confuse and harass the inex- 
perienced sight-seer. 

In the vicinity of Union Square, on your left, as you face 
the north, are many beautiful houses and pri\'^cMt-e dwellings,; 



44 NARRATIVE GUIDE. 

but as Fashion creeps upward, most of them are hired by 
" fashionable boarding-house keepers," or are already in course 
of alteration for stores. In these boarding-houses many of the 
most respectable families choose to live, — preferring them, in 
some instances, to the hotels, — but transient boarders are not 
admitted. 

At the southerly extremity of the square is what was several 
years ago a fashionable and expensive hotel, now converted 
into a theatre. Directly in front of it is an equestrian statue 
of Washington ; opposite, on the Fourteenth Street side, is a 
statue of Lincoln. On the east side of the square runs Fourth 
Avenue. On the upper, or north side of the square is the 
" Everett House," and nearly opposite, corner of Fourth Avenue 
and Eighteenth Street, The Clarendon — both first-class hotels. 
Now, walk one block west to Fifth Avenue, step into a Broad- 
way and Fifth Avenue omnibus, going north, and ride up to 
the Reservoir — a most beautiful specimen of masonry. Ahght 
and ascend to its battlements, and walk around the embrasure, 
look into its two basins of water and at the surrounding streets. 
Descend and glance at the somewhat picturesque block facing 
the Reservoir, on Fifth Avenue. This is the Rutgers Institute 
and some private houses grouped together, producing a very 
pleasing effect. From hence walk easterly, and you are at 
Madison Avenue, and near the G-rand Central Depot at Forty- 
second Street. Here commence the walk suggested at page 

. After the walk, return to your hotel, dress, dine, and go to 
eome place of amusement. (See Index for amusements, also 
the newspaper for that day.) 

You have now, in one day^ seen the exterior of what is 
most noteworthy in the metropolis. At your leisure you can, 
with the'aid of the Handbook, pursue your investigations into 
the interior of the public, artistic, benevolent, mechanical, 
and tradinof life within it. 



NARRATIVE GUIDE. 



45 



Your sight-seeing, so far, has been done witliout anxiety, 
hurry, or fatigue. It has been healthful recreation, not labor. 
You get home in ample time for the usual New York dinner 
hour at six, and at a moment when all that is interesting in the 
moving panorama without begins to fade from the streets; and 
with your spirits invigorated by the impiessions of the day, 
you feel prepared for the veiy different diversions which the 
evening in the metropolis brings with it. 




[aiOik Excluinge and U. 8. Treasury — Corner WaU and Broad.] 



SECOND DAY. 




nil If Sunday, you have your choice of places of 
worship. (See Index.) The Sunday morning Herald also gives 
a list of many of the sermons to be preached on that day, and 
by whom and where. 

If a week-day, after enjoying your breakfast and the morning 
paper, you will like to visit some of the public institutions — 
the Astor Library and the Cooper Institute, perhaps. (See 
Index.) If you are np-to\vn, step to Madison Avenue, east 
from Broadway, and take a Madison Avenue omnibus. Tell the 
driver to stop with you at Astor Pla^-e. If you are at a down- 
town hotel, take any Broadway omnibus, and request tlie 
driver to drop you at Astor Place. Walk easterly one block and, 



SECOND DAY. 47 

passing the Mercantile Library, you come to Lafayette Place — 
a short street running southerly from Astor Place to Fourth 
Street. On the west side of this short street is a row of build- 
ings with columns, which formerly were recherche private resi- 
dences. Opposite these, on the east side of the street, is the 
Astor Library. The Cooper Institute, the Bible House, and 
the Mercantile Library (originally built for an opera house), are 
all grouped near here. (See Index.) You will find entertain- 
ment for a longer or shorter time, according to your feeUngs, at 
these institutions. On leaving Astor Place, you may feel inclined 
to take a walk; if so, stroll toward Second Avenue; you come to 
it by walking easterly from any of the institutions you have been 
visiting through Seventh or Eighth Streets. For many blocks 
northward^ this avenue is finely built up, and much of the 
property is still owned and occupied by the descendents of the 
old Dutch Governors. You may extend your walk in Second 
Avenue as far up as Stuyvesant Park, stopping to visit the 
rooms of the Historical Society, corner of Eleventh Street, oi 
you may prefer on reaching Fourteenth Street to walk through 
it westerly, look at the Academy of Music, the New York Circus, 
and Stein way Hall, and then walk up Irving Place to Grramercy 
Park. Here you will see the Gramercy Park Hotel and the 
Westminster, and walking along the upper side of the Park 
westerly, the first street you reach is Lexington Avenue. 
You have now seen the whole catogory oi' fashionable avenues. 
Walk up Lexington Avenue a little way, and look at the Free 
Academy — some day you may wish to enter it and see its 
arrangements, and become acquainted with its plan. Turn 
westerly from here and walk to Broadway. If yon wish for 
lunch, step into any confectionery, hotel, or restaurant near 
you. 

For the afternoon you will desire some variety of entertain- 
ment. The most enjoyable will be a drive to Central Park, 



48 SECOND DAY, 

indeed, every afternoon may be most agreeably and profitably 
devoted to this delightful recreation, and if it is any season but 
summer, you may spend your whole day from breakfast to 
dinner time out-doors to advantage, but in summer, beware of 
the heat in the middle of the day. At this season, in very warm 
days, at least four hours, from half-past eleven till half-past 
three should be spent in the repose of a shady room. Your 
drive to the Park should then be taken not earlier than four 
o'clock, and as it is the most delightful place you can be in on a 
summer afternoon, you can dine there (there is an admirable 
restaurant, see Index for Casino in Central Park), and return 
at evening in time for some place of amusement. 

At any season except midsummer, return before dark. 

We think the sight-seer may now be safely left with the 
" Handbook " to the guidance of the Index and Map and to his 
own inclinations and judgment. 

lie will speedily discover that our object in the preparation - 
of this volume has been not to confuse and weary him by stale 
remarks and hackneyed observations about this or that, but to 
put him in a position to see, and admire, and criticize from his 
own stand-point of taste and opinion. We think the sight-seer 
requires ready hints, not stupid essays ; and if we conduct him 
to a remarkable locality or a well-known structure, he will not 
care to have us stand perpetually at his elbow telling him what 
to admire, and what he ought not to be pleased with. 

We suggest that in visiting institutions, it is a saving of time 
to take such ones for one day as are most nearly contiguous to 
each other, and to visit them in the morning, leaving the 
lighter objects of curiosity and interest to the after part of the 
day, when recreation will be more enjoyable than research. On 
visiting Central Park, take differejit horse-cars on each visit, 
so as to enter by different approaches and have different views. 
You will see the whole Park in this way with less fatigue and 



SECOND DAY. 49 

less time, besides seeing in the various car-routes, through the 
streets, such of the metropoKs as you might not otherwise be 
tempted to visit. 

The principal Public Benevolent Institutions (see Index) are 
situated mainly in the suburbs of the city. They are imposing 
buildings, with carefully cultivated grounds, and in some 
instances command splendid views. These can all be visited 
by extending one of your drives in Central Park, if you go by 
private conveyance, while there are car routes which pass 
nearly all of them. 

On taking leave of the sight-seer, let us assure him or her, 
of cheerful and welcoming looks wherever they may go, and 
an entire exemption from that system of feeing which is so 
harassing to the traveller in all parts of Europe. We must, 
notwithstanding, hint, that they should at all times and in all 
places, have a wary regard to the safety of all their personal 
property, including their purses, for in New York, as in all 
large places, there is a tendency among what would seem to be 
an irrepressible class to fee themselves. 




AMUSEMENTS. 




{BootKa'TIieatre — Cor. Sixth Avenue and 23<l Street."] 

'efore starting out for the day, it is prudent for 
those who desire to pass the evening at a place 
W of amusement to secure seats in advance. 

New York is distinguished for the number 
and variety of its recreations and amusements. The various 
peoples who gather here, including Germans, Irish, French, 
English, Swiss, etc., etc., and who have adopted the metropolis 
for their home, have, each in their way, established many of 
the amusements, sports, and games of their native land. While 
these are quite subordinate to the American element, they lend 
new and fresh features to the whole. 

See daily raorniug papers "Amusement" column. 



AMUSEMENTS. 51 

Operas and Theatres. 

Places can be taken in advance at the Operas and Theatres 
with a choice of seats. Reserved seats are half a dollar more. 
Tickets can be got at the Of&ces in all the Theatres and Opera 
Houses. When a piece has a great run, it is best to secure 
seats some days in advance. These are reserved for the pur- 
chaser until after the first act of the play only. 

Boxes must be taken entire ; you cannot, as in Paris, take 
part of a box. 

Academy of Mltsio — corner Irving Place and Fourteenth 
Street. First class. Private Boxes, full dress; Parquette, 
visiting cosume and dress bonnet; other parts of the house^ 
walking suits. 

Aimee's Opera Bouffe — 720 Broadway. 

Booth's Theatre — South-east corner of Sixth Avenue and 
Twenty-third Street. First class. Walking costume. 

Bowery Theatre — 46 Bowery. 

Bryant's Opera House — Negro Minstrels. West Twenty- 
third Street between Sixth and Seventh Avenues. First class. 
Walking costume. 

Circus — New York — Fourteenth Street nearly opposite 
Stein way Hall. (See " Steinway Hall") First class. Walking 
costume. 

Fifth Avenue Theatre — Twenty-fourth Street, adjoining 
Fifth Avenue Hotel. First class. Walking costume. 

French Theatre — Fourteenth Street, north side, near Sixth 
Avenue. First cfass. Walking costume. 

GrRAND Opera House — corner Eighth Avenue and Twenty- 
third Street, north-west side. First class. Private Boxes, full 
dress; Parquette, visiting costumes and dress bonnet; other 
parts of the house, walking suits. 

NiBLo's Garden — Broadway between Prince and Houston 
Streets, east side — lately destroyed by fire and rebuilding. First 



52 AMUSEMENTS. 

clas3 people attend to see popular performances. Walking 
costume. 

Olympic Theatrjh-624: Broadway. Amusing performances. 

Stadt Theatre — G-erman. 42 and 47 Bowery. First class. 
Walking costume. 

St. James' Theatre — corner Twenty-eighth Street and 
Broadway. 

San Francisco Minstrels — 585 Broadway. 

Tony Pastor's Opera House— 201 Bowery. 

Theatre Comique — French. 514 Broadway. 

Union League Theatre — First class. Private. 

Union Square Theatre — corner of Fourteenth Street and 
Broadway. 

Wallack's Theatre — corner of Broadway and Thirteenth 
Street, north-west side. First class. Walking costume. 

Wood's Museum — Broadway, west side, near Thirty-first 
Street. Dress, walking costume. 

Public Balls. — These, in the winter, are a feature in New 
York of great variety in caste and class. They are fully adver- 
tised in the Herald, with all the necessary particulars. That 
called the " Charity Ball " is the most fashionable public ball of 
the season, and is especially patronized by the upper classes. It 
is always attended by foreign celebrities who happen to be in 
New York, and is gotten up with great splendor. 

Egyptian Museum. — See " Historical Society." 

Steinway Hall — Fourteenth Street, north side, between 
Irving Place and Fourth Avenue. First-class. Walking cos- 
tume. Here are given lectures and concerts. 

German Musio Hall — Adjoining Bowery Theatre. Every 
evening. Free. All classes, male and female, go; music, con- 
versation, &c., &c. ; Teutonic ; respectable. It is quite an in- 
teresting incident to make the tour of these places along the 
Bowery, especially of a Saturday evening. The student of 



AMUSEMENTS. 53 

character has only to be provided with a sufficient quantity of 
small change to purchase a few glasses of lager — for no admis- 
sion fee is demanded — and his visit will amply repay his 
expenditure of time and money. Here every phase of the 
German-American element is exhibited. Old and young, rich 
and poor, learned and ignorant, meet here in a motley but in- 
teresting group, upon perfect equality under the shadow of 
Gambrinus. 

Thomas's Concerts — First-class. See daily newspapers for 
when and where they take place. Walking suits are worn to 
these. In summer they take place in Central Park. 

In summer the German population are particularly fond of 
pic-nics, evening concerts in the open air, &c., &c., while 
target excursions, base-ball playing, boating, &c., &io., exist in 
great variety. In winter skating, curling, and sleigh-riding 
greatly abound. 

Public Lectures — Humorous lectures on current events, and 
on scientific, historical, and various popular subjects, are de- 
livered during the winter season by different distinguished men, 
and are largely and fashionably attended. These are always 
advertised in the daily newspapers. 



54 



AMUSEAIENTS. 



Art Galleries. 




[Acade7n^ of Design — East Twenty-third Street.'] 



The National Academy of Design — corner of Twenty-third 
Street and Fourth Avenue. Permanent Gallery of Paintings 
by American Artists. Admission 25 cents. 

Metropolitan Museum of Art — Temporary G-allery, 681 
Fifth Avenue. At last we have something to represent to us 
what the Louvre is to Paris and the National G-allery to Lon- 
don. To the vast body of the public who cannot afford to visit 
Europe the Metropolitan Museum of Art will supply a means 
of becoming acquainted with the works of the great artists of 
past ages. But the principal value of such a collection as has 
been brought together in Fifth Avenue is for the student, for he 
will be able now to study from his first step in art the manner 



AMUSEMENTS. 55 

of excellence of the different schools. About $130,000 has 
been expended on the collection. Preparations are being made 
to erect a suitable building for it in Central Park. The tempo- 
rary gallery of the museum is open daily, except Sunday and 
Monday, from nine a. m. to five p. m., and on Monday 
evenings from seven to ten p. m. Admission to the public 
for the present is confined to Saturday, from 9 a. m. to 5i 
A. M. On other days it is necessary to have tickets, which are 
placed at the disposal of all subscribers, but which can readily 
be obtained on written or personal application to the Honorary 
Superintendent, at the museum, or at his ofiice, 54 East 
Twenty-third Street, or from any subscriber. The directors 
of this excellent institution are resolved not to allow any op- 
portunity to pass in advancing the knowledge of art. Already 
several lectures have been given on various subjects connected 
with art, and the directory seem resolved to continue steadily 
in the road they have entered upon. 

Institute of Fine Arts — 625 Broadway. Paintings and 
Statuary. 

American Museum of Katural History — Central Park, 
Sixty-fourth Street and Fifth Avenue. Enter by Fifty-ninth 
Street entrance. The collection is large and valuable. On the 
first Tuesday of every month private receptions are given by the 
subscribers. On all other days the Museum is open to the public. 

Private Picture G-alleries. — These are far superior to any- 
thing on pubhc exhibition, with the exception of the Metro- 
politan Museum of Art. The finest are the collections of John 
Taylor Johnston, William H. Aspinwall, August Belmont, Mar- 
shall 0. Roberts, John Hoey, Robert L. Stuart, and Alexander 
T, Stewart. Applications should be made by letter, with your 
card enclosed. (See directory for residence.) 

There are now residing in Rome between thirty and furty 
American painters and sculptors. 



56 



AMUSEMENTS. 



Leavitt Art Rooms — 817 Broadway. 

SoMEERViLLE Art GrALLERY — 82 Fifth Avenue. 

Shaus GrALLERY — 654 Broadwaj. 

Goupil's — corner Fifth Avenue and Twenty-Second Street 
Beautiful paintings, engravings, and a thousand varieties of 
ornamental articles sold here. Also a picture gallery, open to 
the public gratis. 




[Couijer luniitute — Fourth Avenu» and Astor Place,] 



ASYLUMS. 



57 



ASYLUMS. 




[Departmeiit of Public Clmritien — Tlilrd Avenue^ 

HE benevolent institutions of the city are among 
its prominent features. New Yorkers are gay, mercurial, fond 
of pleasures and of fresh excitements, but in the midst of these, 
extraordinary attention has always been paid to the require- 
ments of the unfortunate and to the situation of the numerous 
waifs, who may be termed the children of the metropolis, and 
who by desertion or from other cause have been left without 
natural protectors. 

In addition, nearly every nationality is represented here by 
its appropriate society, which, while meeting for social purposes, 
is essentially a benevolent institution for the benefit of all who 
originally were of the same country. 



58 



ASYLUMS. 



Asylum for Aged and Infirm Seamen — Sailor's Snug Harbor. 
(See "Benevolent Institutions.") 

Blackwell's Island Asylums — (See "Benevolent Institu- 
tions.") 

Blind Asylum — Ninth Avenue, between Thirty-third and 
Thirty-fourth Streets, occupying nearly three acres. 

Well worth visiting to see the peculiar mode of instruction, 
which comprises all the ordinary branches of education. Open 
to visitors from 1 to 6 p.m., except Sunday. 




[Colored Orphan Asylum — Tenth Avenue.] 

Colored Orphan Asylum — West One Hundred and Forty- 
third Street, Boulevard, 

Colored Home — Sixty-fifth Street, near First Avenue. 



ASYLUMS. 



59 




[Deaf and Dumb Asylum — 162d Street.] 

Deaf and Dumb Asylum at Fanwood (Washington Heights) — 
One Hundred and Sixty-second Street. Take Hudson River 
Raih'oad. Exceedingly interesting to examine the ingenious 
methods of instruction. Can be visited every day between 1.30 
and 4 o'clock. 

GrERMAN Orphan Asylum — Comcr Avenue A and East 
Eighty-sixth Street. 

Hebrew Benevolent and Orphan Asylum — East Seventy- 
seventh Street near Third Avenue. 

Insane Asylum — One Hundred and Seventeenth Street, 
west side of Tenth Avenue, Blooraingdale. 

This is a branch of the New York Hospital; the grounds are 
large and fine, the buildings airy and capacious. The establish- 
ment admirably managed. 



60 



ASYLUMS. 




[Eoman Catholic Orphan Asylum — Fifth Avenue."] 



Roman Catholic Orphan Asylum — Fifth Avenue, between 
Fifty-first and Fifty-second Streets. 

Juvenile Asylum — For the protection and improvement of 
neglected children. Near High Bridge. See " High Bridge." 

One of the most important charities of the city, retrieving from 
vagrancy and crime hundreds annually, and providing homes 
for them in the west. The grounds are large — over twenty 
acres — and are intended for th« employment of the children. 



BENEVOLENT INSTITUTIONS. 61 

Five hundred can readily be accommodated here, and two hun- 
dred in the " House of Reception " of this institution, at 71 
West Thirteenth Street, open daily. Take Hudson River Rail- 
road or Manhattan ville Stages. 

Lying-in Asylum — Charity. 85 Marion Street. This insti- 
tution, designed exclusively for married women, is in a most 
prosperous condition. 

Magdalen Asylum — Eighty-eighth Street near Fifth Ave- 
nue. 

Orphan Asylum — Beautifully located in grounds, comprising 
nine acres, near Eightieth Street, Bloomingdale. An old insti- 
tution, well managed, accommodating over two hundred orphans. 
Open daily. 



BENEVOLENT INSTITUTIONS. 

Blackwell's Island. — East River. 
Devoted Exclusively to the City Establishments. 

Lunatic Asylum. 

Almshouse and Hospital. 

Penitentiary. 

Hospital for Incurables. 

New Work House for the purpose of separating mere vagrants 
from criminals; can accommodate six hundred people. Steamer 
foot of Twenty-seventh Street, East River, at 12 noon, also, 
ferry foot of Ninety-second Street and East River, at all hours. 



62 



BENEVOLENT INSTITUTIONS. 




[Motcee of B^uge—EandalVs Island.] 



Randall's Island, — East River. 



Devoted Exclusively to the City Establishments. 

House of Refuge for the reformation of children. 

Idiots' Hospital. 

Infants' Hospital. 

Steamer foot of Twenty-seventh Street, East River, at 12 
noon, and ferry foot of Ninety-second Street and East River, 
cross at all hours. Take Second or Third Avenue Cars for 
ferry. . ^ 



BENEVOLENT INSTITUTIONS. 



63 



These two islands and their institutions are of the most 
interesting character and are always visited by strangers. 

Permits for visiting both islands are had of the " Department 
of Charities and Correction." See Index for " Departments." 

Ward's Island. 
Devoted Exclusively to the City Establishments. 
Inebriate Asylum. 
City Cemetery. 

Ferry foot of One Hundred and Tenth Street, East River. 
Visitors should apply for admission to Commissioners of Emi- 
gration, New City Hall, in the Park. Same conveyance as to 
preceding Islands. 




[Sailoi-'s Snug Harbor — Staten Island. 



64 benevolent institutions. 

Sailors' Snug Harbor 

For the maiiitainance and support of aged, decrepit, and 
worn-out sailors. Is situated at Port Richmond, Staten Island. 
Pier No. 19, North Eiver, boats every hour except 1 p.m. 
Office of Trustees, 156 Broadway. 

This noble charity was established in 1801 by Captain John 
Randall, who bestowed for its foundation a considerable quan- 
tity of land, then quite remote from New York, but now in the 
very heart of the city. By a systematic plan of leasing, these 
lands, which soon became city lots, now return a large and 
constantly increasing rental. 

There is one hundred ard sixty acres of land connected with 
the institution which accommodates three hundred old and dis- 
abled seamen. 

Seaman's Fund and Retreat. 
Home for Sailors' Children. 
Marine Hospital. 

All at " Quarantine Grounds,'' Staten Island. Ferry Boats 
every hour from Whitehall Street. 

Bellevue Hospital. 

Foot of Twenty-sixth Street, East River. Can be visited 
from 11 A.M. to 2 p.m. 



BENEVOLENT SOCIETIES. 

Artists' Fund Society — Fourth Avenue, corner of East 
Twenty-third Street. 

American Musical Fund Society — 33 Delancey Street. 
American Seamen's Fund Society — Office, 80 Wall Street. 
African Society for Mutual Relief — 185 Bleecker Street 



BENEVOLENT SOCIETIES. 



65 



Association for the Improved Instruction of Deaf-Mutes 
— 42 Seventh Avenue. 

American Dramatic Fund Association — 842 Broadway. 
Open first Tuesday of every month. 

Association for the Relief of Respectable Indigent Fe- 
males — 226 East Twentieth Street. 

American Home Missionary Society — 34 Bible House. 

American Board of Commissioners for Foreign Missions — 
31 Bible House. 

Commission of Home Missions to Coloeed People — 57 Bible 
House. 




[Clinton Eall—Astor Place.] 



66 BENEVOLENT SeCIETIES. 

Children's Aid Society — 11 Clinton Hall, Astor Place. 
This institution is under no sectarian control, but is managed 
by a board of lady managers, representing all the Protestant 
denominations of the city, and by a like constituted board 
of gentlemen acting as trustees. Of course it is designed 
especially for the reception and nurture of foundlings and 
infants abandoned by impoverished or dissolute parents, and to 
aid in preventing the widespread and terrible crime of infanti- 
cide, as well as to give guidance and protection to the unfor- 
tunate mothers, and thus aid in saving them from destruction. 
At present there is no similar Protestant institution in New 
York, and, as a consequence, mothers with their children, rep- 
resenting every religious denomination, are compelled to enter 
the Asylum of the Roman Catholic sisters, or abandon their 
children, and thus let them become inmates of the Randall's 
Island Nursery, or finally place them in the care of some irre- 
sponsible person, in whose hands their lives are soon ter- 
minated by starvation and neglect. It is proposed to establish 
this Protestant asylum on the broadest basis. The results of 
the experience of the wisest physicians will be applied to the 
organization and operation of the charity. A country home, 
with all its salubrious surroundings, will be secured, and every 
precaution will be taken and every measure employed to carry 
out the beneficent intentions of the charter, and to render the 
New York Infant Asylum a praise even among the many 
noble charities of the metropolis. 

Colored Relief Association — No. 65 Bible House. [Ser- 
vants provided for the South direct.] 

Colonization Society — New York, 42 Bible House. 

Five Points House of Industry — 155 Worth Street. 

Five Points Mission House — Directly opposite. 

Named Five Points from the circumstance of five streets 
meeting here at a point. 



BENEVOLENT SOCIETIES. 



67 



Formerly the most disreputable spot in the city. Through 
the exertions, first of individuals, then of societies, it has 
become the seat of missions and is almost entirely reclaimed. 

This charity is not sectarian. Visitors admitted daily, from 

9 A.M. to 5 P.M. 

Freemasons — Meet every evening corner of Broome and 
Crosby Streets, or at Odd Fellows' Hall, corner of Grand and 
Centre Streets. 

The Masonic Temple, corner of Twenty-third Street and 
Sixth Avenue, will be completed within the year. The edifice 
is of granite, massive in construction, and very handsome. The 
top of the dome reaches 165 feet above the prroand. 




N. V Vis=<ir-i >- 



[Romai Cathode CoUefje — Boulevard <fe \PA.st Sireet.\ 



68 BENEVOLENT SOCIETIES. 

German Benevolent Society — 5 Battery Place. 

GrENERAL SoCIETY OF MECHANICS AND TRADESMEN 472 

Broadway. 

German Mission House Association — 426 Pearl Street. 

Howard Mission and Home for Little Wanderers — 40 
New Bowery. Open daily, from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Is not sec- 
tarian. Day school, musical exercises, church service, Sunday 
school, Sunday morning, breakfast. 

The "little wanderers" of the Howard Mission are gene- 
rously supplied with abundant gifts for their Christmas-trees. 
The principal booksellers of our city make large donations of 
books, others give toys, others cornucopias, while food and 
clothing are liberally donated, and the little people have a 
joyous time. 

Help for Poor Girls, or Young Ladies' Christian Asso- 
ciation — 64 Irving Place. 

The class of persons which it is desired principally to reach 
is not domestics, but young persons of education — those 
especially who have been reduced from comfort to a struggle 
for daily bread amid the sharp competition of ISTew York life. 
Lonely and friendless girls — coming from the country, perhaps, 
to support aged parents or younger brothers and sisters — are 
most earnestly sought after, counselled, guided, and aided. The 
association is wholly non-sectarian. Catholics and Protestants 
alike being assisted, and already one-third of those applying 
to it have been placed in good positions. 

Home for Friendless, Unprotected, and Destitute Women 
AND Children — Office, 29 East Twenty-ninth Street. 

Home for Aged and Infirm Israelites — 215 West Seven- 
teenth Street. 

Hebrew Benevolent Society — Third Avenue and East 
Seventy-seventh Street. 



BENEVOLENT SOCIETIES. 69 

Hibernian Benevolent Society — 195 West Seventeen «li 
Street. 

Italian Benevolent Society — 685 Broadway. 

Irish Emigrant Society — 51 Chambers Street. 

Ladies' Depository — 876 Broadway. 

This is an institution to give needle-work to reduced ladies 
and needy women at their own homes. The work is done in 
the best manner. Those who want work, and those who want 
work done, apply here. 

Midnight Mission for the Rescue of Fallen Women — 23 
Amity Street, between Greene and Mercer Streets. 

A most praiseworthy society, and already productive of 
great good. 

Netherlands Emigrant Protective Society — 224 William 
Street. 

New England Society — Astor House. 

New York Infants' Asylum — 24 Clinton Place. 

Odd Fellows — G-rand Lodge, corner Centre and Grand 
Streets. 

Presbyterian Home for Aged Women — ^East Seventy-third 
Street, near Madison Avenue. 

Protestant Episcopal Society for the Promotion of Evan- 
gelical Knowledge — 3 Bible House. 

Wilson Industrial Mission — Corner of Eighth Street and 
Avenue A. 

This institution was organized about nineteen years ago, 
and now embraces a day school, from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m., which 
is attended by two hundred girls, who are instructed in the 
elementary English branches, and, after a hearty dinner, are 
taught sewing by hand, while making their own garments, 
which they earn by a system of credit marks, thus securing 
them from the pauperizing influence of indiscriminate gratuitous 



70 



BENEVOLENT SOCIETIES. 



distribution. There are also industrial classes of girls from 
twelve to twenty years of age, who are taught dressmaking 
and family sewing. This institution relies wholly for support 
on voluntary contributions. Its annual expenditures, with 
strict economy, amount to $9,000. 

Port Society for Seamen — 72 Madison Street, corner of 
Catharine Street. 

This embraces a church, mission station, temperance society, 
Sunday school, reading rooms, loan library, and bibles and 
miscellaneous books for circulation gratis. 

St. George's Society — 40 Exchange Place, 




{Seaman's Eetreat —Staten Island.] 



BENEVOLENT SOCIETIES. 71 

Seamen's Fund and Retreat — Office, 12 Old Slip; Quaran- 
tine, Staten Island. 

Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals — 
Office, 696 Broadway. 

Under the auspices of this society troughs for watering 
horses and thirsty dogs are placed at accessible spots all through 
the metropolis. 

[^^For all other societies of all kinds see "City Register" 
in the New York Directory. 

A ladies' association has been formed to promote the com- 
fort of patients in the various charity institutions of the city. 
The widow of Admiral Farragut is President. A record is to 
be kept of the visits and the condition in which the inmates 
of the institution were found. 

It is a noteworthy fact that the commissioners recently 
appointed to investigate the management of the organized 
charities in New York State received the keys of two hundred 
and forty charitable institutions. 




CARS — (Street or Horse). 
Iheir Starting Pointy Terminus, and Route. 




[Depot of Third Avenue Horse Hailroad.] 
CENTRAL PARK CARS. 

Western or North, River Division. — From South Ferry through 
Whitehall Street, to Battery Place, to West Street, to Tenth 
A. venue, to West Fifty-ninth Street, to Fifth Avenue (Central 
Park), Return by same route. Fare, each way, five cents. 

Eastern or East River Division. — From South Ferr)'' through 
Front Street, to Old Slip, to South Street, to Montgomery 



CARS — (street or horse). 73 

Street, to South Street, to Jackson Street, to Monroe Street, 
to G-rand Street, to G-oerck Street, to East Houston Street, to 
Avenue D, to East Fourteenth Street, to Avenue A, to East 
Twenty-third Street, to First Avenue, to East Fifty-ninth 
Street, to Fifth Avenue. Return nearly same route. Fare, 
each way, five cents. 

DRY-DOCK, EAST BROADWAY, AND BATTERY CARS. 

From corner of East Fourteenth Street and Avenue B to 
East Eleventh Street, to Avenue D, to Eighth Street, to Lewis 
Street, to G-rand Street, to East Broadway, to Chatham Street, 
to Park Row, to Ann Street. Returning same route to Colum- 
bia Street, and on to East Fourteenth Street. 

SECOND AVENUE CARS. 

From Peck Slip to Pearl Street, to Chatham Street, to 
Bowery, to Grand Street, to Allen Street, to First Avenue, to 
East Twenty- third Street, to Second Avenue, to Harlem, and 
return. Fare, five cents. 

THIRD AVENUE CARS. 

From Ann Street through Park Row to Chatham Street, to 
Bowery, to Third Avenue, to Harlem Bridge. Return the 
same route. Fare, five cents to East Sixty-fifth Street, six 
cents to East One Hundred and Thirtieth Street. 

1^" There is a palace car on this line, fare fifteen cents. 

FOURTH AVENUE CARS. 

From Astor House through Centre Street to Grand Street, 
to Bowery, to Thirty-second Street. 

Here one division turns East to Thirty-fourth Street Ferry 
and East River, and return. 

The other division continues up Fourth Avenue to the Grand 
Central Depot (Forty-second Street), thence to Madison Ave- 



74 CARS — (street or horse). 

nue, up Madison Avenue to Central Park, and return. Fare to 
Thirty-fourth Street Ferry or Grrand Central Depot, six cents ; 
beyond that, eight cents. 




[Grand Central Depot— Forty-second Street.] 
GRAND CENTRAL DEPOT, 

A new line of cars runs from the City Hall Park through 
Chatham Street, Bowery, and Lexington Avenue, to the G-rand 
Central Depot. Passengers will find it more rapid and pleasant 
than by the Fourth Avenue line. 

EIGHTH AVENUE CARS. 

From corner Broadway and Yesey Street through Church 
Street, to Chambers Street, to West Broadway, to Canal Street, 



CARS — (street or horse). 75 

to Hudson Street, to Eighth Avenue, to West One Hundred 
and Twenty-fifth Street. Return by same route. 

BROADWAY AND SEVENTH AVENUE, OR, AS THEY ARE SOMETIMES 
CALLED, UNIVERSITY PLACE CARS. 

From Seventh Avenue to West Fifty-ninth Street, through 
Broadway to University Place, to Wooster Street, to West 
Broadway, to Barclay Street, to Broadway. Return through 
Barclay Street, to Church Street, to G-reene Street, to Clinton 
Place, to University Place, to Broadway, to Seventh Avenue. 

N.B. — Those marked "Seventh Avenue" turn ofif from Uni- 
versity Place to Seventh Avenue; the others continue up 
Broadway to Seventh Avenue. 

FORTY-SECOND AND GRAND STREET CARS. 

From foot of West Forty-second Street to Tenth Avenue, to 
West Thirty-fourth Street, to Broadway, to East Twenty- 
third Street, to Fourth Avenue, to East Fourteenth Street, to 
Avenue A, to East Houston Street, to G-rand Street, to G-rand 
Street Ferry. Fare, five cents. 

The general route is printed in large letters on outside of all 
cars. ' 

For other City Railroad Routes see "City Register" in New 
York Directory. To be seen in all hotels, grocery stores, and 
apothecaries. 

N.B. — The street cars run all night. 




CLUBS. 




[Union League Cliib — Madison Ave7iue.] 

clubs of New York are well worth visiting. 
Among the most prominent may be mentioned the following:— 
Army and Navy Club — The Army and Navy Club occupy 
the brown-stone building No. 8 West Twenty-eighth Street, 
between Broadway and Fifth Avenue. It has been elegantly 
fitted up as a club house. The club now numbers over two 
hundred members. 



CLUBS. 77 

Century Club — No. 109 East Fifteenth Street. Composed 
of "Authors, Artists, and Amateurs." One of the most select 
clubs of the city. 

Manhattajt Club — No. 96 Fifth Avenue. The aristocratic 
Democratic (political) Club of New York, 

New York Yacht Club is situated over the Jockey Club 
Rooms, on the corner of Twenty-seventh Street and Madison 
Avenue. These rooms are beautifully fitted up, and contain a 
perfect museum of nautical curiosities, comprising some hand- 
some pictures, and a complete set of models of all the yachts 
that have belonged to the clnb. There are now over six hun- 
dred members to the club. The members have inaugurated a 
system of monthly dinners, which brings yachtsmen together 
and gives them an opportunity of talking over past and future 
yachting events. There is an annual cruise which is always 
fully advertised in detail in the daily papers. 

Travellers' Club — No. 222 Fifth Avenue. 

Union Club — No, 149 Fifth Avenue. Composed of old New 
Yorkers, and of rich bankers and brokers, and retired men of 
wealth. 

Union League — Madison Avenue corner East Twenty-sixth 
Street. A very large, rich, and influential political (Republican) 
club (see illustration on page 76). 

Clubs are only to be visited with a member, or by invitation 
on a member's application. 

For other Clubs see "City Register," in New York Directory. 




CHURCHES. 

In Alphabetical Order. 



Some of the most accessible of 
the principal churches of all de- 
nominations are: — 

African Union — No. 161 West 
Fifteenth Street. 

Baptist Church — Corner of 
Thirty-first Street and Madison 
Avenue. 

Bethel— Colored— No. 214 Sul- 
livan Street. 

Congregational Church — Cor- 
ner Thirty -fourth Street and Sixth 
Avenue. 




[Grace Churchr—Broaaway and Tenth Street.] 



CHURCHES. 79 

Calvinistio Church — 225 East Thirteen tli Street. 

Dutch Reformed Church — Corner Fifth Avenue and Twenty- 
ninth Street. 

Friends — East Twentieth Street, near Third Avenue. 

French (Protestant) Church, named Eglise du St. Esprit — 
Twenty-second Street, between Fifth and Sixth Avenues. 

French Roman Catholic Church, named St. Francis Xavier 
—No. 36 West Sixteenth Street. 

GrRACE Church — (Episcopal). No. 800 Broadwa/, east side, 
near Tenth Street. Rev. Dr. Potter, Rector. 

German Evangelical Reformed Church — No. 97 SufFollc 
Street, east of Broadway. 

G-ERMAN Roman Catholic Church, named Church of the 
Holy Redeemer — Third Street, near Avenue A. 

German Lutheran Church — 81 Christopher Street. 

Greek Church (Russian) — No. 951 Second Avenue. Aside 
from the solemnity of the worship, which, claiming as it does 
to antedate all others, is interesting and inspiring from its 
antiquity, there is no more engaging entertainment than a visit 
to this chapel ; and when the new church is completed it will 
probably be a popular resort, from the attractiveness of its 
Oriental architecture and the richness of its ceremonials. 

Jewish Synagogue — Corner Fifth Avenue and Forty-third 
Street. The visitor should not fail to see the interior. 

Lutheran Church — 47 West Twenty-first Street. 

Methodist (Welsh). 

Methodist Episcopal Church, named St. Paul's — Corner 
Fourth Avenue and Twenty-second Street. 

Mariner's Church (Protestant) — Corner Madison and Cath- 
arine Streets. 

Presbyterian Church — Madison Avenue corner Twenty- 
fourth Street. 

Presbyterian Church — Corner Nineteenth Street and Fifth 
Avenue. 



80 



CnURCHES, 




[Jewish Synagogue— Fifth Avemie.] 

Presbyterian Church (G-erman) — 290 Madison Street. 

Roman Catholic Church, named St. Steven's — 149 East 
Twenty-eighth Street near Lexington Avenue. 

The new magnificent Roman Cathohc Cathedral is in Fifth 
Avenue, between Fifty-first and Fifty-second Streets. 

Ritualistic Church, named St. Alban's — East Fortv-seventh 
Street near Lexington Avenue. 

St. John's — (Episcopal). In Yarick Street. One of the 
ancient churches of the city. It has the grandest portico in 



CnU'RCHES, 81 

the metropolis to-day ; a work not surpassed in any of the 
London churches of the period in which it was built. 

St. Paul's — (Episcopal). Broadway, between Vesej and 
Fulton Streets. In stately grace it still retains its proud place 
in ecclesiastical architecture. Here is a marble tablet to the 
memory of General Montgomery, also a monument to Thomas 
Addis Emmett. 

SwEDENBORGiAN Church — 114 East Thirty-fifth Street. 

Trinity Church — (Episcopal, Cathedral). In Broadway di- 
rectly facing Wall Street. 

This church is open every day at all hours. In its graveyard 
is the tomb of Alexander Hamilton. From the steeple, which 
rises 334 feet from the ground, is a superb view of New York 
City and suburbs. It will amply repay the visitor to ascend it. 

Trinity Chapel — A branch of Trinity Church. Is in East 
Twenty-fifth Street, near Broadway, 

Unitarian Church, named Church of All Souls — Corner 
Fourth Avenue and Twentieth Street. 

Universalist Church — Corner Fifth Avenue and Forty-third 
Street. 

There are numerous "Bethels" for Sailors, along both the 
Hudson and East Rivers. 

N.B. — For all other churches, of which there is in New York 
a very great number and variety, see " City Register," end of 
New York Directory. 

Directory to be seen at Hotels. Groceries, and Apothecaries. 






COMPANIES. 




[Knickerbocker Life Insurance Co. — Broadway^ cor. Park Bow.'X 



COMPANIES. 83 

No attempt is made to give a list of the numerous business 
companies of the city. Many of these occupy superb buildings 
(see illustrations), but only those are mentioned which by pos- 
sibility the traveller may desire to have access to. 

American Emigrant Company — 4 Bowling Green. 

Adams Express Company — 59 Broadway. 

Atlantic Coast Mail Steamship Company — 187 "West Street. 

Atlantic Mail Steamship Company — 5 Bowling Green. 

American Merchants' Union Express — 115 Broadway. 

Anchor Line of Steamships — 7 Bowling Green. 

Bankers and Brokers' Association — 25 Broad Street. 

Central American Transit Company — 56 Exchange Place. 

Cunard Line Mail Steamship Company — 111 Broadway. 

Hamburg- American Packet Company — 61 Broadway. 

Inman Line Steamship Company — 15 Broadway. 

Knickerbocker Life Insurance Co. — 239 Broadway. (See 
cut, page 82.) 

North German Lloyd Steamship Company — New York, 
Southampton, and Bremen. Office, 2 Bowling Green. 

New York Associated Press — 83 Liberty Street. 

National Express Company — 65 Broadway. 

National Line of Steamships — New York and Liverpool, 
and New York and London. Office, 69 Broadway. 

Pacific Mail Steamship Company — 59 Wall Street. 

Safe Deposit Company — 146 Broadway. 

Telegraphy. — American Telegraph Company, Western Union. 
— The head-quarters of this Company are corner of Broadway 
and Liberty Street. It has a capital of over $2,000,000, em- 
ploys over 20,000 miles of wire, has 800 officers, and the names 
of 2,000 on its pay-roll. Its expenses are over half a miUion of 
dollars a year. 

Transatlantic Mail Steamship Company — 58 Broadway. 

United States Express Company — 82 Broadway. 



84 



COMPANIES. 




"^ ^^'^^r prii'f?-Pv:'.('<'. 



\Gilsey House — Broadway, cor. 29^A street.l 



United States Mail Line of Steamships — 29 Broadway. 
Westcott's Express Company — 785 Broadway. 
White Star Line or Steamships — 19 Broadway. 



CONSULa 

Austria — 33 Broadway. 

Belofium— 45 Worth Street. 

Brazil — 13 Broadway. 

Baden — 68 Broad Street. 

Bavaria — 85 Nassau Street. 

Bolivia — 63 Pine Street. 

Chili— 249 West Forty-second Streek 

Colombia — 25 William Street. 

Costa Rica — 19 Broad Street. 

Denmark — '112 Front Street. 

Dominica — 23 William Street. 

Ecuador — 7 Broadway. 

France — 4 Bowling Green. 

Great Britain — 17 Broadway. 

Greece — 47 Exchano-e Place. 

Guatemala — 13 South William Street. 

Hayti— 29 Front Street. 

Hawaiian Islands — 24 Beaver Street, 

Hesse-Darmstadt — 58 Beaver Street. 

Honduras — 135 East Thirty-ninth Street, 

Italy — 7 Broadway. 

Liberia — 42 Bible House. 

Mexico — 52 Exchange Place. 

Monaco — 4 Bowling Green. 

Netherlands — 45 Exchange Place, 

Norway — IS Exchange Place. 

Nicaragua — 

North German Union — 117 Broadway. 

Peru — 26'^ Broadway. 



86 



CONSULS. 



Portugal— 148 Pearl Street. 
Paraguay — 91 Wall Street. 
Russia— 25 Old Slip. 
Spain — 29 Broadway. 
Sweden — 18 Exchange Place. 
Switzerland — 23 John Street. 
Turkey — 66 Broadway. 
Uruguay — 19 Broad Street. 
Venezuela — 121 Front Street. 




Fire Btpartment^ Head Quarters — 127 Mercer Street.] 



DEPARTMENTS. 




[Old Pout Office— Corner NoBsau and Cedar Streets.^ 

Coroners' Office — 11 City Hall. 
Commissioners of Emigration — Office, Castle Garden. 
Commissioners of Charities and Correction — Corner East 
Eleventh Street and Third Avenue. 

Commissioners of Education — Corner Grand and Elm Streets. 
Excise Department. — 299 Mulberry Street. 
Free Labor Bureau. — 8 Clinton Place. 



88 DEPARTMENTS. 

Health Department — 301 Mott Street. 
Law Department — 82 Nassau Street. 
Marine Court — 32 Chambers Street. 
_ Mayor's Office — City Hall, No. 6, first floor. 

Military Pay Department— Corner Greene and West Houston 
Streets. 

Old Post Office. — Nassau Street, between Cedar and 
Liberty Streets (see illustration on page 87). 
Port Warden — Office, 52 South Street; open 7 a.m. to 5 p.m. 
Public Parks — Office, 265 Broadway. 

Police Protective and Detective Department— Central 
Depot, 300 Mulberry Street. 
Police Telegraph — 

This proves to be a very successful mode of detecting crime. 
Public Administrator — Office, 115 Nassau Street. 
Department of Public Instruction — Corner Grand and Elm 
Streets. 

Department OF Public Works — Office, 237 Broadway. 
Police Courts — 

At the Tombs, corner Centre and Franklin Streets. 

At City Hall. 

At East Fifty-seventh Street. 

At 69 Essex Street. 
School Commissioners' Offices — 

665 Broadway. 

237 Broadway. 

285 Broadway. 

Herald Building, Corner Ann Street and Broadway. 

54 Wall Street. 

785 Beekman Street. 
United States Assay Office — 30 Wall Street. Visitors ad- 
mitted from 11 to 12 a.m. No deposits received of less than $100. 
United States Navy Paymaster — 29 Broadway. 



4 



EXCURSIONS. 




[Blackiceirs Island — East River.] 

Y all means visit the larger Institutions situated 
on the various Islands in the East River. 

There are also delightful drives in all direc- 
tions from the Metropolis : beyond Central 
Park into Westchester County, on both the 
JSTorth River and East River sides: — across the different 
Ferries into New Jersey; also to Staten Island and Long 
Island; much lovely scenery and many beautiful villages can 
be seen, by taking a carriage for the day, and driving leisurely 
in any direction, stopping to lunch and rest your horses when 
and where you feel inclined. 

The North and East River steamboats are a delightful mode 
of taking excursions. — See Steamboat Travel in Index. The 
" Excursion Boats " are usually monopolized by the middle and 
lower classes, especially on Sunday. Sunday excursions of any 
kind, are not considered in good taste in New York, except 
among the foreign population. There is quite enough to in- 
terest a stranger in the city on the fashionable avenues, at church, 



90 EXCURSIONS. 

and in visiting charitable institutions, to keep him well em- 
ployed within the Metropolis. 

Many places in the environs of New York can readily be 
visited by steam- cars and horse-cars, but we advise the stranger 
to avoid these modes of conveyance whenever he can, as the 
charm of these short excursions consists of the drive or sail, 
although, if expense has to be considered, the horse-cars are by 
far the cheapest means of conveyance. 

A trip on the Hudson should be a matter of course with the 
traveller. Ko one would visit New York without passing up 
or down this perhaps most beautiful river in the world. Though 
it does not possess the castellated fortresses and historical asso- 
ciations which have made the Rhine so celebrated, it surpasses 
its far-famed rival in grand and never-ending scenes and in a 
wealth and beauty of landscape. To view it to advantage, go 
by boat. The steamboats themselves are worth seeing ; they 
are floating palaces. 

East Eiver. — Blackwell's Island and Randall's Island, con- 
taining Prisons, Small-pox Hospitals, Lunatic Asylums, Houses 
of Refuge for children, etc. 

Hudson River.— For trip up the Hudson take morning boat, 
Pier 39 North River, foot of Vesey Street. See " Steamboat 
Travel " in index. Most noteworthy points on the Hudson 
are, — 

Fort Washington. 

The Palisades. 

Sunny Side — Residence of Washington Irving. 

Tappan — Headquarters of Washington, and place of Andre's 
execution. 

Tarrytown — Place where Andre was captured. 

Seeepy Hollow — Scene of Irving's " Legend of Sleepy Hol- 
low." 

SrNG Sing — State's Prison. 



EXCURSIONS. 



91 



Stony Point — Site of old Fort. 

West Point and the Highlands — Military Academy. 

Idlewild — Residence of the late N. P. Willis, the poet. 

PiSHKiLL— Grand scenery. 

Newberg — Headquarters of Washington. 

Cats KILL Mountains. 

These places can also be visited separately by rail. 

Places on west shore of the Hudson by Erie Railroad, and 
on the east shore by the Hudson River Railroad. 

We have not undertaken to give any " guide " to the Hudson 
River, only some prominent points of special interest. The 
traveller will find everywhere on sale picturesque maps of the 
river, with notes and descriptions. 




[Col'unJna Col ege — Fiftutk Street.} 



PERRIES. 




[Brooklyn Femj Rouse — Fulton iStreet.] 
_J^^! OR many years about the year 1644, there lived an 
S^J^ industrious, hard-working Hollander near what is now 
Peck Shp, who, finding that persons occasionally desired to 
cross the East River, undertook to ferry over foot passengers 
in a httle skiff, for a small sum payable in wampum. As he 
could not aflbrd to "watch and wait" for customers, he sus- 
pended a large tin horn to a branch of a tree near the river, on 
which the traveller was forced to practise till the ferryman was 
summoned. 

In the year 1G55 a more elaborate arrangement was made, a 



FERRIES. 93 

ferry ordinance having been passed by the officials of New 
Amsterdam. Ferry-houses were built, and rates established by 
law. After 1667, when the rights and privileges of a town 
were confirmed by patent upon Brooklyn, the establishment of 
ferries became a bone of contention between New York and 
Brooklyn, which served for both sides of the river to pick at 
for something like a hundred years. Just before the Revolu- 
tionary war three regular ferries were established. 

TO BROOKLYN. 

Fulton Ferry, foot of Fulton street, to Fulton street in 
Brooklyn. 

From 3 a.m. to 12 p.m. ever}' 10 minutes. From 12 to 3 a.m. 
every 15 minutes. 

Fulton street, Brooklyn, is a thoroughfare and mart. 

Fulton street runs out of Broadway easterly. Take Broad- 
way and Fifth Avenue omnibus. 

Hamilton Avenue Ferry, foot Whitehall street. New York, 
to Atlantic Dock, Brooklyn. Boats cross from 7 a.m. to C-^ 
P.M. every 10 minutes. From 6^ to 9 p.m. every 15 minutes. 
From 9 p.m. to 7 a.m. every half-hour. 

South or Atlantic Ferry, foot of Whitehall street to At- 
lantic street in Brookljm. 

From 5 a.m. to 11 p.m. every 12 minutes. From 11 p.m. to 
5 a.m. every half hour. 

Whitehall street is at the lower easterly extremity of the 
city. Take Broadway and Fourth Avenue or 23d street omni- 
bus. 

Wall street Ferry, foot of Wall street, to Montague street 
in Brooklyn. 

From 5 a.m. to 8 p.m. every 10 minutes. From 8 p.m. to 
midnight every 20 minutes. 

Montague street, Brooklyn, is a private and beautiful fctreet. 



u 



FERRIES. 



This is the " Court end " of that city. 

Wall street runs out of Broadway easterly. Take Madison 
avenue omnibus. 

Williamsburg — or Brooklyn, E. D., Ferry foot of East 
Houston street, New York, to G-rand street, in Brooklyn, 
E. D., and Ferry foot of G-rand street, New York, to Grand 
and South 7th streets in Brooklyn, E. D. 42d and Grand street 
cars will take you to these ferries. 

STATEN ISLAND. 

For Hoboken, New Jersey, foot of Barclay street, North 
River. Barclay street runs out of Broadway westerly. Take 
Broadway and 7th Avenue cars. 

Also for Hoboken, foot o-f Christopher street, from 5 a.m. to 
8 P.M. every 15 minutes. From 8 to 12 p.m. every 20 minutes. 

For New Brighton, Sailor's Snug Harbor, Castleton, Fort 
Eichmond, and Elm Park. Pier 19, North River. Boats go 
every hour except 1 p.m. 

For Philadelphia, Baltimore, and Washington, Jersey City 
Ferry foot of Cortlandt street, North River. 

For Tompkinsville, Stapleton, and Yanderbilt's Landing, 
foot of Whitehall street, from 6 a.m. to 9 p.m. every hour. 

Also at 11:45 p.m. the 6, 7, and 9 a.m. and 1, 4, 5 and 6 p.m. 
boats connect with the Trains of the Staten Island Rail- 
roads. Take Broadway and Fourth Avenue or 23d street omni- 
bus. 

For all other Ferries and for Piers, see " City Register " in 
New York Directory. To be seen in every Hotel, Grocery 
Store, or Apothecary. 




fifj 



FORTS. 




[Fort Bichmond — Staten Island.'] 
AIR weather and pleasant excursions may be 
enjoyed, by visiting the Fortifications on the 
neighboring Islands. 

Fort Hamilton — Long Island — The Kar- 
rows. Horse Railroad from Brooklyn to Fort Hamilton ; also 
Steamboat. 

An elaborate work with all modern war contrivances. 
Fort La Fayette — The Narrows. 

An island fort — now almost a ruin — of no use as a defence. 
Famous for being the place of confinement for prominent poli- 
tical prisoners during our civil war. 
Fort Tompkins — Staten Island — The Narrows. 
A formidable fortification admirably constructed. 



96 FORTS. 

Fort Richmond — Staten Island — The Narrows. 

A dangerous " work" for an enemy. 

The "Narrows" are so called because here the Long Island 
and Staten Island shores, after forming the magnificent " Lower 
Bay," suddenly contract to within a distance of about four- 
fifths of a mile of each other. Here the land is high, and here 
a series of menacing forts guard the approach to the city. This 
passed, the shores again recede, forming the Upper Bay. 

Fort Columbus and Castle William — Governor's Island, 

facing Castle Garden. 

These two fortifications have underground connection and are 
for the defence of the inner harbor. Castle William especially 
is an important work 600 feet in circumference and 60 feet high. 
At Fort Columbus is stationed a corps of United States soldiers. 

Of easy access by rowboat from Castle Garden — Battery. 

There are also important fortifications on Bedlow's Island and 
Ellis Island — two small Islands in the upper Bay lying nearly 
opposite, west, to Governor's Island. 

Other fortifications near Sandy Hook and to guard Long Island 
Sound are not mentioned. 

The Fort Hamilton and Coney Island, and also the Long 
Branch steamers give you. a view of these Forts. For these 
steamers see index for " Summer Eesorts." 




ELA.CKNEY COACHES, HACKMEN, CARRIAGES AND 

CABS. 

The rates for " hacks" in New York are exorbitant compared 
with those of any other city, and the drivers are often unscru- 
pulous and extortionate. It is always best, therefore, for the 
stranger to arrange in advance what he is to pay for the desired 
service, and with the "Hand-book" before him he will know 
exactly what that should be. 

Whenever the sight-seer can use an omnibus or street car 
let him do so and avoid the hacks. If he is staying at a hotel 
we advise him to order a carriage for driving out at the office. 

Rates. 

One passenger, one mile or less 50 

Each additional passenger 37^ 

One passenger, any distance within two miles 75 

Every additional passenger 3T-| 

For one passenger to new Alms House, and return. . $1 00 

Each additional passenger 50 

To Harlem (one or more passengers, and return), to 

remain three hours or less 5 00 

To the High Bridge one or more passengers, and re- 
turn, to remain three hours or less 5 00 

To King's Bridge (for one or more passengers, and 

return), to remain all day or less time 5 00 

For use of hackney coach or carriage, by the day, for 

one or more ..passengers 5 00 

Tor the use of hackney coach or carriage, by the hour, 

to stop when and where as often as you please 1 OD 

For infants no charge. 

For children under 14 years, half price. 



98 HACKNEY COACHKS, HACKMEN, CARKIAGES AND CABS. 

In case of disagreement as to price the matter may be laid be- « 

fore the Mayor. 

Fastidious persons will prefer to go to a first-class livery 
stable, or first-class hotel, for a more elegant equipage, though 
at a higher price. There is no danger of extortion at these. 
Charges are $2 an hour, and for a party, opera, or theatre, to go 
and return, from $3 to $4. 




[Butgers Female College — Fifth Avenue.] 



HOTELS. 

_ Among the prominent hotels in the Metropohs are the 

AsTOR House — Broadway, between Barclay and Vesey 
streets, European plan. First class. Cars start every few mo- 
ments for up town from the Astor. This is the most eligible, 
first class hotel for business and commercial men who wish to 
stop down town. It ranks with the Queen's Hotel, St. Martins- 
le-Grand, and the Old London Coffee House, London. 




[Fifth. Avenue, corner of 26th street — Hotel L'runsicic/c.] 

N.B, — There are several very respectable Second Class Hotels 
in Cortlandt street, near Broadway, including the " Western," 



^.AQ^'IOO 



100 



HOTELS. 



the "Merchants," the "National," etc., well adapted to the 
wants of business men who desire to stop down town, and who 
wish to consult economy. 

Ashland House — European plan, corner Fourth avenue and 
24th street. Second class. , Eooms and meals reasonable. 

Brevoort House — Corner Fifth avenue and Eighth street. 
European plan. First class. 

Clarendon Hotel — Corner Fourth avenue and 18th street. 
American plan. First class. 

Fifth Avenue Hotel — Fifth avenue, 23d, and 24th streets. 
American plan. First class. 




[The Grand Hotel — Broadway, cornet' o/olat street.] 



HOTELS. 101 

Grand Hotel — Corner 31st street and Broadway. Euro- 
pean plan. First class. 

The Fifth Avenue Hotel and the Grand Hotel, are elijrible 
first-class houses for the sight-seer. They are each probably 
the best type of their kind in the country, the Fifth Avenue 
being a very perfect exposition of the purely American style 
of hotel-hfe, and the Grand the most finished in its details on 
the European plan. They are also perhaps the most expensive. 

Hotel Brunswick — Madison Square, corner of Fifth avenue 
and 26th street — European Plan, First class. N.B. — Cafe on 
first floor. 

Hoffman House — Cornerof Broadway and 2oth street. Eu- 
ropean plan. First class. 

New York Hotel — Broadway, Washington place and Wa- 
verley place. First class. Much frequented by Southerners. 

Putnam County House — Corner 26th street and Fourth ave- 
nue. European plan. Third class. Strictly respectable. 

Rooms and clean beds from 50 cents to 75 cents per day. 

It is largely frequented by drovers, milkmen, and marketmen 
generally. It is open all night, and hot meals of excellent quality 
are served at all hours of the night as well as day, and at very 
moderate charges. It is curious to look in at one, two, or three 
o'clock in the morning to see who are customers at such hours 
for hot steaks and hot cakes and coffee. 

There are a large number of first, second, and third class 
hotels scattered through the city of the highest respectability. 
We by no means undertake to give a list of all. 

At all hotels on the European plan, meals can be got at any 
hour between 7 o'clock in the morning and 12 o'clock at night. 



102 LITERARY AND SCIENTIFIC INSTITUTIONS. 



LITERARY AND SCIENTIFIC INSTITUTIONS. 

• American Geographical and Statistical Society — Cooper 
Institute. Open to members and to others on invitation. 

American Institute — Cooper Institute, Agricultural and 
Mechanical. Open to members and invited guests. 

The first "Great Medal of Honor" ever awarded by the 
American Institute to an inventor of that association was re- 
cently presented to Mr. James Lyall, inventor of the " Positive- 
motion Loom." This invention has been applied, with great 
success, to the weaving of cloths of all kinds, performing much 
more work in the same time than is possible by the old pro- 
cesses. This medal was aw^arded in 1869. 

Apprentices' Library — In Mechanics' Hall, 472 Broadway, 
near Grand street. Open to members. 

Anthropological Institute — Formerly the Ethnological So- 
ciety, corner Second avenue and East 11th street. Open to 
members and invited guests. 

This Society publishes the " Journal of the Anthropological 
Institute of New York." In the late change the scope of the 
society has been greatly enlarged, and many of the difficulties 
attendant upon the maintenance of the old organization have 
been obviated. There is little doubt that the new society will 
occupy a prominent place in advancing knowledge in the world. 

Astor Library, east side Lafayette place, near Astor place. 
Founded by John Jacob Astor. 

Containing over one hundred thousand volumes, full of liter- 
ary treasures. 

Open to the public from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. 

The sight-seer must not omit to visit tliis library. 

American Microscopical Society, 64 Madison avenue. 



LITERARY AND SCIENTIFIC INSTITUTIONS. 



103 



Bible House — A.stor place. — Astor place is a street of but 
two blocks, running out of Broadway, east side, a block below 



Eighth street. 




\_Biblo House — Fourth Avenue aad Astor Place.] 



The Bible House fronts on Fourth arenue, Astor place, and 
Third avenue. It is a gigantic building of brick, with stone 
facings. The principal entrance is on Fourth avenue. 

It has put in circulation over 10,000,000 of Bibles and Testa- 
ments, and produces them in various dialects. A large number 
of benevolent societies and missions have their offices in this 
building. 



104 LITERARY AND SCIENTIFIC INSTITUTIONS. 

City Library — 12 City Hall — open to the public daily, from 
10 to 4 o'clock. 

Columbia College — Forty-ninth street^ between Fourth and 
Fifth avenues. 

An old and famous seminary of learning. 

Clinton Hall — Formerly Astor Place Opera House. — Astor 
place. {See illustration, page 65.) 

This is the first structure ever erected solely for Opera in Kew 
York. On an attempt to render it exclusive — one of the regu- 
lations beinti: that no one could obtain a seat unless in full dress 
with white gloves — the house became exceedingly unpopular 
with the lower classes, and fashionable people were actually 
pelted with snowballs as they were entering. This feeling was 
not the ostensible though probably the real cause of the famous 
Macready riot, for the populace gladly availed themselves of the 
feeling manifested by " Upper Tendom " toward their favorite 
actor Forrest, and undertook to stop the performances of Mac- 
ready by force. The military were called out and were obliged 
to fire on the mob, killing several before they could disperse it. 
This, while the law was properly vindicated, threw a shadow 
over the spot as a place of amusement, and it was finally sold 
for other purposes. 

We may add that the absurd attempt at anti-republican cus- 
toms, even in small things, was effectually cut short. 

Convent of the Sacred Heart — Manhattan ville — a short drive 
from Central Park. Fine and extensive building and grounds. 

Cooper Union — Fronts on Seventh and Eighth streets and on 
Third and Fourth avenues. 

Founded by Peter Cooper. Contains an art gallery for stu- 
dents in art, free, a large library, lecture-rooms, school of de- 
sign for women, &c., &c., &c. 

Free Academy — or College of the City of New York — Cor- 
ner Lexington avenue and Twenty-third street. 



LITERARY AND SCIENTIFIC INSTITUTIONS. 



105 



This College is for rich and poor. The best classical education 
can be obtained here. All the expenses, including instruction, 
are paid out of the public treasury. A high order of scholarship 
prevails. 

Genealogical and Biographical Society — Open to members 
and invited guests — 64 Madison avenue. 




[Egyptian Museum — Interior of Historical Society. 1 

Historical Society — Open to members and invited guests —  
Corner Second avenue and Eleventh street. Egyptian Muse- 
um. 

Ladies' Art Association — 20 Clinton Hall, Astor pl^ce. 



106 LITERARY AND SCIENTIFIC INSTITUTIONS. 

Lyceum Natural History — Fourteenth street near Fourth 
avenue. Open to the pubHc. 

AIercantile Library — Clinton Hall, Astor place. Yisitors 
admitted. {See illustration^ page 65.) 

Originally for merchants' clerks. The public admitted to the 
privileges of the reading-room and library for $5 per annum. 
The largest collection of books in the city except the Astor Li- 
brary. 

Mechanics' Institute — 20 Fourth avenue. Open to mem- 
bers. Large library. 

Mechanics' Society School — G-eneral Society'of Mechanics 
and Tradesmen. Society's building, 472 Broadway. The society 
is one of the oldest organizations in the United States, having 
been instituted in 1798 and incorporated in 1820. Eighteen 
years ago the evening school was opened. It has been contin- 
ued with success ever since. At present it contains 430 pupils, 
mostly the sons of mechanics and themselves apprentices to 
some mechanical trade. Bookkeeping, writing, and drawing 
are taught. This institution is free. There are three freehand 
classes in the school, one for mechanical and one for architec- 
tural drawing. The school is under the management of a com- 
mittee of twelve members of the society. 

Mott Memorial — Free Medical Library — 64 Madison avenue. 
Open to the public. 

National Academy of Design — Corner of Twenty-third 
street and Fourth avenue. Instituted in 1826. Annu.al exhi- 
bitions in May, June and July. Works of living artists only. 
Admission 25 cents. {See illusiraiion, page 54.) 

The National Academy of Design has resolved to open an ex- 
hibition of that institute on Sundays to the people, from 12 m. 
to 6 p. M., at a reduction of the entrance fee to 15 cents. 

Samuel Morse, the father of telegraphy, was also the founder 
of the National Academy of Design. It was at first a mere 



LITERARY AND SCIENTIFIC INSTITUTIONS. 



107 



drawing association, organized by himself and a few other ar- 
tists, in 1824. After it became an academy Mr. Morse was its 
first President, and continued in office sixteen years. 

New York Law Institute — 41 Chambers street, Law Li- 
brary, open daily to members. 

New York University — Washington square, east side. 

New York Conservatory of Music — 820 Broadway. 




[Societ]/ Library — University Place.] 

New York Society Library — University place, near 12th 
street. Founded in 1754, contains 40,000 volumes, visitors 
admitted. 



108 literary and scientific institutions. 

Polytechnic Association of the American Institute — 24 
Cooper Institute. 

Printers' Pree Library — 3 Chambers street, open Saturday 
evenings. 

School of Art — Cooper Institute. 

Theological Seminary — corner Twentieth street and Ninth 
avenue. 

Union Theological Seminary — 9 University place. 

"Woman's Library — in New York University Building. 

Young Men's Christian Association — corner Fourth avenue 
and Twenty-third street, visitors admitted. It contains Eecep- 
tion-room, bathing-room, bowling alley, gymnasium, class-rooms, 
library, lecture-room, parlor, reading-room, and lecture hall. 

The building and lots cost five hundred thousand dollars, 
three hundred and fifty thousand dollars of which was given to 
the Association for the purpose by the merchants interested in 
the work. This is one of the most praiseworthy and best man- 
aged institutions in the city. It was organized in 1852. It 
was especially intended for young men who come from the 
country to enter in business life here. The idea was to present 
to such, and indeed to all young men, so agreeable a spot to 
spend their evenings in that they would irresistibly be drawn 
to it. This has proved an entire success. 

The building is elegantly furnished, and presents a cheering 
appearance during the long winter evenings. Open fires of soft 
coal blaze in every room, and crowds of young men can be seen 
in every room with happy faces. Any young man is welcome, 
be he member or not. 

There are classes for French, G-erman, Book-keeping, Wri- 
ting, G-ymnastics, and a Glee Club. 

A ticket costing five dollars admits the owner to all the above 
classes, and to the use of gymnasium, bowling-alley, and baths 
for one year. 



LITERARY AND SCIENTIFIC INSTITUTIONS. 



109 



Besides the buildings above described, the Association con- 
tains three branches, viz. : at 285 Hudson street — at 473 Grand 

street — and at 125th street, between Third and Fourth avenues. 




[Historical Society — Second Avenue.^ 



no 



MEDICAL INSTITUTIONS. 



MEDICAL INSTITUTIONS. 




{Harlem Dinpenaary — Fourth uv. ami lioih Street.] 

College of Physicians and Surgeons — Corner of 23d street 
and Fourth avenue. Founded in 1807. The colle,i?e has a 
corps of ei^ht professors and is well attended. For admittance 
to the Museum apply to the Janitor. 

College of Dentistry — Corner Broadway and East 21st 
street. 

College of Female Physicians— Corner Second avenue and 
12th street. 



MEDICAL INSTITUTIONS, 111 

College of Pharmacy — No 90 East 13th street. 

HoMCEOPATHic Medical College — Third avenue and East 
20th street. 

Medical College and Charity Hospital — In the City Hos- 
pital, 319 Broadway, rear of the lot. 

New York Medical College — No. 90 East 13th street. 
Founded in 1850. Valuable museum, laboratory, etc. Able 
corps of professors. 

Dispensary and Hospital of the Women's Institute — 459 
Sixth avenue. Lady Physician in charge. 

Dispensary for Throat and Chest Diseases — 234 Fifth 
street. Open Mondays, Wednesdays, and Fridays, from 1 to 

3 P.M. 

Demilt Dispensary — 401 Second avenue. Medical attendance 
from 9 A.M. to 4 p.m. Open daily. Sundays from 9 to 10 a.m. 
and from 1 to 2 p.m. 

Eastern Dispensary — 57 Essex street, corner of Grand street. 
Open from 8 to 6 for medicine. Medical attendance 9 to 3. 

German Dispensary — No. 8 Third street. Open daily, ex- 
cept Sundays, from 1 to 5 p.m. 

Homceopathic Dispensary — 493 Seventh avenue. Open daily, 
except Sundays, from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. 

Manhattan Dispensary — Corner 131st street and Tenth 
avenue. 

New York Homgkopathio Dispensary — 109 West 34th 
street. Open from 10 to 4. 

New York City Dispensary — 114 White street, coi-ner 
Centre street. Open daily, except Sundays and holidays, from 
9 A.M. to 5 p.m. for medicine. For medical attendance 10 a.m. 
to 3 P.M., Sundays from 9 to 10 a.m. 

North Eastern Dispensary — 100 East 59th street, near 
Third avenue. Open from 9 to 6. 

North Western Dispensary — No. 511 Eighth avenue. 



112 



MEDICAL INSTITUTIONS. 




[St. Lukd's Hospital — Fifth aveince and 5it/i street.] 

Northern Dispensary — Waverley place, corner of Christo- 
pher street. 

YoRKViLLE Dispensary — Third avenue, between 83d and 
84th streets. 

Eye and Ear Infirmary — Corner 13th street and Sec.nd 
avenue. 




MISCELLANEOUS. 



113 



MISCELLANEOUS. 

Armories of New York City Militia. — Seventh Eegiment 
New York National Guard Armory. Over Tompkins Market, 
corner Seventh street and Third avenue. Fitted up and fur- 




\_Seveath Eefjiment Armury aiid Tompkina Market — Third avenue.] 

nished at the expense of the companies of the regiment. The 
site of the armory was granted them by^the consent and at the 
pleasure of the Common Council. Built 1859, entirely of iron. 
Cost $250,000. 



114 MISCELLANEOUS. 

Eighth Regiment Armory — Over Centre Market, corner 
Grand and Centre streets. 

Twenty-Second Regiment Armory — Fourteenth street near 
Sixth avenue. Built 1863. Cost $150,000. 

Thirty-Seventh Regiment Armory — Junction Broadvp'ay 
and Sixth avenue. Built 1861. Cost $200,000. 

Area of the Island of Manhattan, or City of Kew York — 
22 square miles and 20,424 square yards. 

A JSTew York snowstorm gives temporary employment to 
eight thousand men and boys. 

Assay Office — Adjoining Custom House, Pine street. Visi- 
tors admitted Wednesday from 10 to 12 a.m. 

Associated Press, Xew York — 83 Liberty street. 

Arsenal — New York State — Seventh avenue, corner Thirty- 
fifth street. 

Armory — City — Corner Elm and White streets. 

Appraiser — 119 G-reenwich street. 

Artists' Studios — Studio buildings, 51 West Tenth street, 
near Sixth avenue. 

Association Studios — Twenty-third street and Fourth av- 
enue. 

Avenues and Streets — Avenues run North and South. 
Streets generally East and West. After passing Amity street 
the streets are named by numbers — First — Second — Third, etc., 
to which is prefixed " East" or "West," as the streets lie East 
or West of the Fifth avenue. Avenues are named by letter on 
the extreme East sj^e of the town. The letters run from Av- 
enue " A " eastward. 

The avenue directly west of Avenue A is First avenue, and 
they continue numbering from thence westward, as Second 
avenue, Third avenue, and so on. 

Lexington, Park, Madison and Fifth avenues are the fash- 
ionable avenues of New York. Fourth and Sixth avenues are 



MISCELLANEOUS. 



115 



thoroughfares and marts. Third avenue, and the easterly ave- 
nues, are more or less of this description, but not much visited 
by the higher classes. Eighth avenue may be classed with 
Fourth avenue in its character. Second avenue is a highly 
respectable avenue for most of its length, and a portion of it is 
elegant and aristocratic but not fashionable. 




{College of the City of New Yot'k — Lexington avenue J\ 

The streets up town run at right angles v/ith the avenues and 
are easily accessible by horse-cars, as they all cross Broadway 
and Fifth avenue. The irregular streets can be most easily 
found by referring to the map. 



1 1 1> MISCELLANEOUS. 

In the lower part of the city the streets are very irregular. 
A traveller in 1806 remarks in a letter to a friend — " I am per- 
plexed to find my vray through the crooked streets. The 
houses appear to be huddled together like trees in a forest. 
When I think I am travelling in the road I wish to go, I fre- 
quently find myself in one which runs in a contrary direction." 

Baths. 

Electric, Sun, Turkish, and other baths, 61 Lexington avenue. 
Russian Vapor Baths, 25 E. 14th street. 

Public Free Baths. 

Foot of Charles street, North River. 

Foot of Fifth street. East River. 

Open, under very carefully printed rules and regulations, for 
males on Tuesdays, Thursdays, and Saturdays, from 5 a.m. to 9 
P.M., and on Sundays from 5 a.m. to 12 m. For females on Mon- 
days, Wednesdays, and Fridays, from 5 a.m. till 9 p.m. 

Banks. 

Bank of Commerce, 

Nassau, corner Cedar street. 
American Exchange Bank, 

128 Broadway. 
For other banks, of which there are a large number, see City 
Register, in New York Directory. 

Board of Underwriters (Marine), 49 Broadway. 

Bar Association, 20 West 27th street. 

Committee of the Labor Exchange Office, Castle Garden. 

Confectioneries. 

The best are scattered along Broadway, above Canal street. 
Prices generally uniform in fashionable streets. 



MISCELLANEOUS. 



]17 



Commercial Register. 
One is to be found in the latter part of the New York City 
Directory, containing the names of the principal merchants 
and manufacturers, and forming a complete Business Directory. 

Croton Water Works. 
The Croton River is forty miles distant from the City, and its 
current turned into an aqaeduct, and conveyed to the metro- 
polis. 




[New Croton Beservoir — In the Central Park.] 

The Croton Aqueduct Department is in the Rotunda of the 
City Hall — down-town Park. 
The Chief Officers are . — 

Thomas Stephens President. 

Robert L. Darraofh Assistant Commissioner. 

G-eorge S, Greene Chief Engineer. 

Henry L. Robertson .... Chief Clerk. 

Benjamin S. Church .... Assistant Engineer. 
The Croton Dam. — The Dam is 250 feet long, and 38 feet 
\\ide, allowing a discharge of water sufficient to supply the 



118 



MISCELLANEOUS. 



lake, which covers an area of 400 acres. Tlie dam is built across 
Croton River, about six miles from its mouth. 

The Croton Aqueduct — Is thirty-two miles in length, built 
underground of stone and brick. 

The water is carried in iron pipes over the High Bridge, 
which spans the Harlem River and Valley, distant eight miles 
from City Hall. 

The Receiving Reservoir, five miles from the City Hall, by 




[Cfoton Water Aqueduct — '• High Bridge.''''] 



Harlem R. R., is capable of containing 150,000,000 gallons of 
water. 



MISCELLANEOUS. 119 

The Distributing Reservoir, on 40th and 42d streets, is a 
splendid specimen of masonwork. Its architecture is in the 
Egyptian style. 

The New Reservoir in Central Park is intended to supply a 
higher pressure of water for those parts of the city where the 
high ground renders such an improvement necessary. 

The cost of the whole enterprise was over thirteen millions of 
dollars. When the season is remarkably dry the entire flow of 
the Croton River is brought into the city, and if it ever becomes 
necessary, resort will be had to the storage lakes in Putnam 
County for a supply of water for New York. 

High Bridge. — Over the Harlem River, eight miles from the 
City HalL Reached by carriage or stage to Carmansville. 

Docks. 

Naval Dry Dock, Wallabout Bay, Brooklyn. 

Take Bridge street Ferry, foot of New Chambers street. 

Balance Diy Dock, between Piers 41 and 42, East river. 

Sectional Dry Docks, for the purpose of lifting vessels, foot of 
Pike street. East river ; also between Piers 42 and 43, and Piers 
48 and 49, East river. 

Department of Docks — Office, 348 Broadway. 

Dry Dock. — To visit it take East Broadway and Dry Dock 
cars. See Index for " Cars." 

Express. — See " Companies." — Packages can always be sent 
by express from the office of your hotel. 

Emigrant Landing Depot — Castle Garden. 

Free Labor Bureau, and Intelligence Office, 8 Clinton 
place. 

Money. — American money is represented by dollars and cents, 
and consists of gold, silver, and copper coin. The gold coins 
are : the eagle, double eagle, half-eagle, quarter-eagle, and dol- 
lar, of the value of $10, $20, $5, $2.50, and $1 respectively. 



120 MISCELLANEOUS. 

The silver coins are the dollar (100 cents), the half-dollar, the 
quarter-dollar, and the ten cent and five cent pieces. The cop- 
per coins are of one and two cent pieces. During the long and 
severe civil war the Grovernment were forced to issue a paper 
currency, which is still the circulating medium of the country, 
though fast approximating in value to gold. This G-overnment 
issue is familiarly known by the name of "G-reenbacks," and 
consists of notes in value from ten cents upwards; there is also 
a nickel piece of five cents. Greenbacks are made " lawful 
tender " by law, except for payment of duties. 

There are also "National Bank" notes, an issue of private 
corporations, secured by a deposit of government stocks. No 
issue under one dollar. 

Markets. 

The two characteristic markets of the metropolis are 

Fulton Market — Fulton street, near Fulton ferry. East 
river. 

Washington Market, corner of Fulton and West streets?, 
North river. 

Visit one of these markets early in the morning. 

Naturalization Office — First floor, 12i City Hall. 

Novelty Works— Foot of 12th street. East river. 

Nayy Yard — Wallabout Bay, Brooklyn. Take Bridge street 
Ferry, at the foot of New Chambers street. Second avenue 
cars are the most eligible, but do not carry you quite to the 
ferry. 

Post-Office — Corner Nassau and Liberty streets. Open the 
entire day on week days. 

Sundays, from 9 to 10 a.m., and from 12^ to 1^ p. m. 

Postage — For any part of the United States postage must be 
prepaid, on all letters in three cent stamps for letters of single 
weight; six cent stamps for double letters, and so on ; news- 



MISCELLANEOUS. 



121 




[The Navy Yard — East River, Brooklyn.] 

papers, from one cent up, according to weight; small packages, 
like a handkerchief, or a pair of gloves, or a book, can be sent 
bj mail, the number of stamps depending upon the number of 
ounces the package may weigh. Single letters throughout the 
city require a two cent stamp. Circulars, one cent. Stamps 
may be purchased at the Post-Ofl&ce, or its branches, and ordi- 
narily at book-stores and at the office of your hotel. 

The Distributing Stations, connected with the Carrier's De- 
partment, are : — Station A, 100 Spring st, — B, 382 Grand st. — • 
C, 627 Hudson st.— D, 12 Astor Place— E, 465 Eighth avenue— 
F, 342 Third avenue— G, 735 Seventh avenue— H, 978 Third 
avenue, Torkville — K, 86th street, near Third avenue — L, 1922 
Third avenue, Harlem — M, 158th street, Washington Heights. 

There are letter-boxes attached to the lamp-posts every two 
or three blocks in the thoroughfares. All letters can be dropped 



122 MISCELLANEOUS. 

in any of these. They are collected nine times a day, and 
promptly and safely deli veered. 

Articles purchased at the booksellers' or music-stores can be 
sent directly from there by mail or by express. 

Public Porters — Each public porter wears a brass badge in 
a conspicuous place upon the person, with *' public porter," and 
the number of his license engraved thereon. 

For carrying any article in the hands half a mile or less, 
twenty-five cents. 

If carried on a hand-cart, fifty cents. 

In the same proportion for greater distances. 

To charge more is a violation of the law, and subjects the 
ofiender to a penalty. 

In event of overcharge, apply to the Mayor, No. 6, City 
Hall. 

Police Stations. 

156 West 20th street. 

165 East 22d street. 

Pirst avenue, corner Fifth street. 

221 Mercer street. 

53 Spring street. 

247 Madison street. 

160 Chambers street. 

126th street, near Third avenue. 

152d street and Tenth avenue. 

126 Wooster street. 

City Hall, in the Park, Broadway and Chambers street. 

65 Grreenwich street. 

300 Mulberry street. 

Whitehall street, corner of State street. 

120 East 35th street. 

Police Commissioners — Office 300 Mulberry street 

The above are a few of tlie Ul0^t accesiisible stations. 



MISCELLANEOUS. 123 

Printing-House Square — Opposite City Hall Park. 

An open paved space scarcely large enough to be called a 
square. In its vicinity are nearly all the leading newspaper 
establishments of the city. The Times, Tribune, and Sun are 
within the square. The Herald, the World, the News, the Ex- 
press, the Mail, the Staats Zeitung, and a large number and va- 
riety of weekly and other prints in the immediate neighborhood. 

A statue of Franklin ornaments the square. 

Printing-offices — The printing establishments of New York 
are a marvel. The sight-seer should not fail to visit some of the 
more important, and witness the working of the machinery and 
the numerous appointments connected with the issue of the 
large dailies of the metropolis. He should then pay a visit to 
" The Harpers," Franklin square — perhaps the largest establish- 
ment in the world — and to " Frank Leslie's," corner of Pearl 
and Elm streets, another mammoth establishment, and witness 
the printing of the pictorials — a very curious operation. 

Produce Exchange — A handsome brick edifice in Whitehall 
street, between Water and Pearl, — a general daily meeting 
ground for dealers in grain, flour, produce, etc. 

Eailroad Companies — For these see City Register in New 
York Directory, 

Railroad GruiDE — Appleton*s. Tourists had better purchase 
one. l^rice 25 cents. 

Seamen's Exchange — 187 and 189 Cherry street. A hand- 
some four-story building, with a white stone front and a Man- 
sard roof. It is intended to be a creditable and safe resort for 
Jack ashore. 

Stewart's Store — This is a feature of the city, from its size 
and being a mart in itself. It occupies the entire block from 
Broadway to Fourth avenue, and from Ninth to Tenth streets. 
It is the largest retail store in the world. It is visited as a cu- 
riosity and is also a safe and convenient place for shopping. It 



124 



MISCELLANEOUS. 




[The Produce Exchange — Whitehall Streei.] 



contains almost everything that is to be bought in the different 
varieties of stores in Broadway. Here is but one price, and 
there are cheap articles for those limited in purse. 

Safe Deposit Companies — These are admirable institutions. 
Valuables of larger or smaller bulk are kept here secure for a small 
percentage. For principal office see Index for " Companies." 

Suburban Railroads — Hudson River Railroad Depot, for 
places between New York and Yonkers, Corner of Thirtieth 
street and Tenth avenue. 

New Haven Railroad Depot, corner Twenty-seventh street 
and Fourth avenue. 



MISCELLANEOUS. 125 

Hudson Kiver and Harlem Railroad Depot, Forty-second 
street and Fourth avenue. {See illustration, page 74.) 

Steamboats — The North and East River Steamboats are in 
their luxurious appointments, and their elegance of finish and 
ornamentation really palatial. To be seen at the wharves. 

Tiffany's — This store, an exquisite establishment, is also 
visited as a curiosity. So full of rare and beautiful combinations 
of jewelry, bronzes, and ornamental articles, large and small — 
its interior seems an enchanted palace, while its exterior exhi- 
bits one of the finest specimens of architectural taste in the me- 
tropolis. 

Telegraph Offices — These offices are in all the principal 
Hotels and Railroad Depots. 

View of New York — The most comprehensive is to be seen 
from Brooklyn Heights — take Wall Street Ferry — and from the 
steeple of Trinity Church, 

What can be Bought in Broadway — Everything. Some 
useful articles are cheaper in the avenues. See Index for 
"Shopping." 

Wharves. — Among the most picturesque scenes presented to 
the sightseer are the wharves of any city. Perhaps the 
most so in the world are those of New York, partly owing to 
their extent, the city being an island, partly to the cosmo- 
politan character of those employed at, or who build about them. 

There are belt railways leading from and connecting some 
of the principal car lines, so that the wharves are easily acces- 
sible. The North river wharves, particularly those towards the 
lower end of the city, are the most interesting, as here there 
is an accumulation of home trade which gives infinite anima- 
tion to the scene. 

Besides the forests of shipping clustered in our harbor, 
the magnificent river steamboats are something to be seen only 
in American docks. 



126 OMNIBUSES. 



OMNIBUSES. 

Their starting-point, terminus, and route. 

Omnibuses have their route printed in large letters on tlie 
outside. 

They run till 12 o'clock at night. They do not run on Sun- 
days. 

Fare, ten cents. 

Broadway and Fifth Avenue. — From Fulton Ferry to 
Fulton street, to Broadway, to Eleventh street, to University 
place, to Thirteenth street, to Fifth avenue, to Forty-seventh 
street. Returns same route. 

Broadway and Fourth Avenue. — From South Ferry to 
Broadway, to Union square, to Fourth avenue, to Thirty-second 
street. Returns same route. 

Broadway, Twenty-third Street and Ninth Atenue. — 
From South Ferry to Broadway, to Twenty-third street, to 
Kinth avenue, to Thirtieth street. Returns same route, 

Madison Avenue. — From Wall street Ferry through Wall 
street, to Broadway, to Twenty-third street, to Madison ave- 
nue, to Fortieth street. Returns same route. 

For other Omnibus routes see outside of the di£ferf*nt 
vehicles. 




PARKS AND SQUARES. 



127 



PARKS AND SQUARES. 




[The Park at '• The Batter^/.''] 



There are numerous public squares, or so-called "parks" 
scattered through the metropolis ; but as it is impossible to 
visit other places of particular interest without passing them, 
we give the localities of only the principal ones, and these 
without description. We believe that what can be left un- 



128 



PARKS AND SQUARES. 



described is always more fully enjoyed: description uniformly 
raising the expectations beyond probable realization. It is 
for this reason we have pursued this principle throughout the 
hand-book. 

Battery. — At the lowest or southerly extremity of the city, 
on the Bay. 

Size twelve acres. Fine treej and seats. Music in summer. 

Bowling G-reen — Just above the Battery and at the foot of 

Broadway. At the time of the Revolution it contained a 

leaden statue of G-eofge III. which the patriots demolished and 

converted into musket balls. 

Gramercy Park — Between Irving place and Lexington 
avenue and 20th and 21st streets. 

Hudson Square — Hudson, Laight, Yarick and Beach streets. 
This was once the " Court end" of town. The houses still re- 
main as they 
were. On this 
square are St. 
John's Episco- 
pal church, and 
the Laight 
Street church, 
formerly un- 
der the pasto- 
rate of Dr. 
Cox, the dis- 
t i n g u i s h e d 
[WashingtoTi Mo7iicment — Union Square."] Presbvterian. 

Hudson square is now the Hudson River freight depot. 

Madison Square — Seven acres — Madison avenue and Fifth 
avenue, east and west; 26th street and 23d street, north and 
south. This square is in, perhaps, the most beautiful part of 
the city 




PARKS AND SQUARES. 



129 



On the east side is Dr. Adams' Presbyterian Church. This 
clergyman is one of the most profound, as well as popular 
preachers of his denomination. 

On the west side of the square is the Fifth Avenue and other 
fine hotels, and the Worth monument, and on the south side 
Broadway intersecting Fifth avenue. {See illustj^ation^ V^ye 39.) 

Stuyvesant Square — Four acres — Both sides of Second ave- 
nue, east and west, between 
17th and 15th streets, north 
and south. 

Tompkins Square — lO-J 
acres — Avenues B and A, 
east and west, between 10th 
and 7th streets, north and 
south. 

Music in summer. 

This square is especially 
accessible for the working 
classes. 

The Park — 11 acres — 
Broadway, Chambers street, 
Centre street and Park row. 

In it are the City Hall and 
the various corporation build- 
ings, the New Court House, 
and the new United States 
Post- Office. 

Union Square — 3| acres — Between Fourth avenue and Broad- 
way, east and west, and 17th and 14th streets, north and south. 

Wasu ngton Square— 9 J- acres — University place, Waverley 
place. Macdougal street, and Fourth street. 

This square was formerly called " Washington Parade 
Ground." Previously to that it was used as the " Potters' 




[Lincoln MonumeTit — Union Square.^ 



130 



PARKS AND SQUARES. 



Field," so called — that is, the pauper's burying ground, and for 
many years an immense number of interments took place in 
trenches, where now flourish its finest trees. 

After it became a pleasure ground, fine residences sprung up 
around it, and it was a centre of fashion. The houses still re- 
main, and in some instances are occupied by their original 
owners. 

On the east side of the Square is the "University ; " also a 
Dutch Reformed Church; minister, Eev. Dr. Hutton, an old 
and able Dutch Reformed preacher. Music in summer. 

All the parks are constantly undergoing improvements, 
which add from year to year to their beauty and luxury. 




\^Mount Sinai Hospital — Lexington Avenue.'^ 



PUBLIC BUILDINGS. 



131 



PUBLIC BUILDINGS. 




\The New Post Office, in the City Hall Park.'] 

Among the most conspicuous for architectural effect are: 

City Hall, in the Park. Built in 1803-10. It is a noble 
edifice of admirable proportions. Its clock-tower is the finest 
in the country, and its clock, as a time-keeper, unsurpassed.. 
The clock is illuminated at night. 

Paintings in the Grovernor's room, by Trumbull, Weir, Catlin, 
In man, Elliott, and others — all American artists. 

Accessible during all the day. 



132 PUBLIC BUILDINGS. 

It is an interesting fact, showing the amazing growth of the 
city, that the rear of this edifice is built of brown-stone, wlnle 
the front and sides are of marble. No one then supposed the 
city would ever reach above the City Hall, and brown-stone 
was used for the rear as a matter of economy. 

Court House — New. In the Park. Built at a fabulously 
exaggerated expense, and even now not finished. Its cost, 
including the furniture, according to the commissioner's ac- 
counts, is thus far nearly fifteen millions of dollars! It will be a 
monument of the extravagance, corruption and rascality of the 
municipal party in power at the time of its construction. 

Custom House — Formerly Merchants' Exchange. Southeast 
corner Wall and William streets. 

Constructed of blue granite ; 200 feet in length, 171 in width. 
Fine portico of 18 Ionic columns. The interior is equally impos- 
ing. Built in 1835. Cost $1,800,000. 

Castle Garden — In the Battery. Built in Colonial times 
for a fort. It afterwards became a fashionable resort; then a 
concert hall, and is now the Emigrant Depot. 

New Post Office — In the Park. 

Here the United States Courts will be held. 

Perhaps the finest structure of the kind in America. Will cost 
about five millions of dollars. It consists of three stories, sur- 
mounted by a Mansard roof of the style (French Renaissance) 
of the Tuileries and the Hotel de Yille. It will be ornamented 
by twenty fine statues, and will display large clocks at several 
points. The public corridor is 600 feet in length and 25 feet 
wide. 

Present Post Office — In Nassau street, from Cedar street to 
Liberty street. (See illustration, page 87.) 

This building was formerly the Middle Dutch church, of revo- 
lutionary memory. In its steeple Franklin studied and de- 
veloped his electrical theories. 



PUBLIC BUILDINOS. 



133 




[Ciii/ Prisons — The " To7nbs'" — Centre Street.] 



The "Tombs," or City Prisox — It occupies a square between 
Centre, Elm, Franklin, and Le -nard streets. 

The prison contains 150 cells. The police and other courts 
are held in the building. Executions take place in the interior 
court. It is a massive structure, built of granite, and in the 
Egyptian style, and especially gloomy in appearance. Visitors 
are admitted on application to the keeper. 

There are eleven cells especially constructed for criminals sen- 
tenced to death or imprisonment for life. This corridor is 
called " Murderers' Row." Each prisoner costs the county 
about thirty cents a day. 



134 



PUBLIC BUILDINGS. 



There are many more cells on the male than on the female 
side of the prison. 

It was built in 1838. There is both Catholic and Protestant 
worship held in the Tombs. 

United States Treasury — Corner Wall and Nassau streets. 

Imposing building. White marble. Grecian architecture. 
One of the most substantially built edifices in the world. It 
is 200 feet long; 80 feet high, and 80 feet wide. At the 
main entrance is a flight of 18 marble steps. It has two porti- 
cos of eight Grecian columns, each 32 feet high. On this site 
(the old Federal Hall), Washington delivered his Inaugural Ad- 
dress. {See illustration^ page 45.) 

Other public buildings, all of which are costly and imposing, 
are indicated in the "Narrative," in '' Asylums," in "Benevo- 
lent Institutions," in '' Literary and Scientific Institutions," and 
under other headings. 




[Deaf cmd Dumb Institution-^l&'M Street.'] 



SUMMER RESORTS — WATERING PLACES. 135 



SUMMER RESORTS— W-ITERING PLACES. 

The most distinguished are : — 

Saratoga Springs and Lake George. — Via Hudson River 
Railroad. Distance from ISTevv York, 183 miles. 

Newport, Rhode Island. — Via Fall River steamboat. Pier 
28, foot of Murray street. — Distance from New York, 144 miles. 

Long Branch, New Jersey. — Pier 32, North River, foot of 
Duane and Jay streets. Distance from New York, 32 miles. 

White Mountains. — Yia New Haven Railroad. Distance 
from New York, 330 miles. 

Niagara Falls. — Yia Harlem or Hudson River Railroad. 
Distance from New York, 450 miles. 

West Point. — By boat. Pier 39, North River, or by Hudson 
River Railroad. Distance from New York, 52 miles. 

Places of Resort Short Distances from Town of Lesser 
Note but First-class, and Pleasant for a Trip of a Day. 

New Brighton, Staten Island. — Ferry, foot of Whitehall 
street. Boats leave several times daily. 

Coney Island. — Though not a ftishionable resort, has a 
splendid beach, and very fine surf-bathing, and is about 10 
miles from New York. By boat. Pier 1, North River, Battery 
place; by car, Brooklyn horse cars. Depot, 36th street, near 
Fifth avenue, Brooklyn. 

Catskill Mountains. — By boat, Pier 35, North River, foot of 
Franklin street, or by Hudson River Railroad. 

New Rochelle. — Eighteen milet;, by New Haven Railroad. 

HoBOKEN. — Interesting from being the place where Burr and 
Hamilton fouglit their fatal duel. Ferry, foot of Barclay street. 
Boats run every fifteen minutes. 



136 SUMMER RESORTS WATERING PLACES. 

The vicinity of New York abounds in pleasant summer re- 
treats. The summer generally comes with sudden fierceness, 
and precipitating the heated term, and leading every one to 
think of the numerous cool resorts by the seaside and on the 
mountain top. Then hotel proprietors of these places set ac- 
tively to work, preparing for the reception of the dusty and 
overworked of the metropolis, who seek brief refuge from the' 
cares of business. In the countless cosy little nooks that clus- 
ter on the Sound and Bay and inlets on the Atlantic coast, that 
are scattered broadcast over the valleys of New Jersey and Penn- 
sylvania, that greet the wayfarer at every station on the railroads 
of the Empire State, that hide under the shadow of the mountains 
of New England, and that dot the vast region of the West, the 
hum of preparation is heard. The annual flight from the 
haunts of business and the hurly-burly of the metropolis is a 
cheerful phase in American life. The prodigious energy and 
untiring attention to business displayed by our people, which 
seem incredible to our transatlantic friends, find a necessary 
safety valve in the summer time, when the merchant, the 
broker, the manager, the speculator, the editor, etid omne genus, 
meet together in some cool, pleasant spot, to lose the cares and 
trials of a busy life in the lethe of a watering place, a mountain 
eyrie, or a quiet rural cottage. 




HINTS AND NOTES. ' 137 



HINTS AND NOTES. 

We have endeavored to prepare and group systematically the 
information we have furnished for the visitor to the metropolis. 
But there are innumerable points on almost innumerable sub- 
jects which defy classification, but which it is an absolute ne- 
cessity for the traveller to be informed about. "VVe conceive it 
to be one of the important points for a Handbook or Guide to 
answer certain questions which naturally rise to the lips of the 
visitor about a thousand matters of everyday occurrence. We 
have devoted, therefore, considerable room to these everyday 
topics. They will serve the stranger better than if we had used 
the same space in describing the very buildings he is going to 
see, or in telling him what he cannot help finding out when he 
arrives at the spot. We have arranged even these desultory 
but interesting pieces of information as far as possible in alpha- 
betical order, thus carrying out the plan with which we com- 
menced, to present everything in that shape, so that while we 
give a very extensive and minute index, the possessor of the 
Handbook may open at any page and pass from one subject to 
another in the order of the alphabet. This is making every- 
thing as simple as A, B, C. 

A LADY MAY WEAR, at the present time, to any entertainment, 
a high-necked, long-sleeved dark or black silk dress, if it be 
fresh and fashionably made. This is convenient to know, for 
there are many ladies who, in travelling, do not wish to be 
cumbered with the enormous trunks which are necessary to 
carry a set of regular party dresses. Gentlemen, at parties, 
must appear in full dress — i. e., black dress coat and pantaloons, 
plain vest, and gloves. 



138 



HINTS AND NOTES, 



A GLASS OF BRANDY, ill ail emergency, can be obtained at any 
apothecary. No wines, ales, or liquors are permitted to be sold 
in New York at any bar on Sunday. The guests of a hotel 
can be served with them, however, at table or in their rooms. 

Barnum's Museum, as it was, was one of the institutions of 
the metropolis, but exists no longer. It formerly stood on the 




[Interior of Wood's Museum — Formerly JBarnum's Ifuseum.] 



site of the Herald building. It was removed farther up town 
and destroj^ed by fire a few years ago, with most of its stock 
of curiosities. The killing of a tiger which had escaped into 
the street, by one of the policemen, was one of the incidents of 
the fire. The curiosities which were saved were distributed 



HINTS AND NOTES, 139 

among private exhibitions, except those now included in 
Wood's Museum.. Tlie receipts of Barnum's Museum were at 
one time between four and five hundred thousand dollars a year. 
There was 2^ furore about it all over the country, and even in 
Europe. People coming in town would visit it the first thing 
after securing their rooms at their hotel, and distinguished for- 
eigners asked to see "Barnum." 

Billiards — There are billiard rooms connected with most of 
the hotels and large saloons and restaurants throughout the 
city. 

Boulevards — The Grand Boulevard is a continuation of 
Broadway, above 59th street and Eighth avenue; running 
diagonally to 72d street and Tenth avenue ; thence continu- 
ing north to the upper end of the Island, at Harlem Eiver. 
The Grand Boulevard, when completed, with its long vistas 
of shade-trees, will far surpass the Champs Elysees of Paris, 
the Unter der Linden of Berlin, or Hyde Park Lane in 
London. 

Bay of New York. — It is considered by some the finest in 
the world. 

Banks Open — From 10 to 3 o'clock. There is no special rule 
for the business offices as to hours. 

Base Ball Games — Every week in summer, in the various 
suburbs. Generally advertised in the daily papers. Go and 
see them. 

Boat Races and Horse Races — Are always advertised in 
the daily papers before they take place. 

The City Budget. — We give the following to show the curi- 
ous financial operations of the Metropolis : — 

The Chamberlain makes the following weekly exhibit of the 
city finances, showing thj receipts, payments and balances of 
each account : — 



14Q ^ HINTS AND NOTES. 

t Balance ^ 

April 20. April 30. 

City Treasury.. $2,964,155.89 $2,573,088.15 

Sinkincr Fund Redemption 22,732.75 52,4G\10 

Sinking Fund Interest 299.345.61 125,467.26 

Interest on City Stocks 34,659.68 2,402,180.60 

Board of Apportionment 40,966.00 63,500.79 

County Treasury 1,131,164.56 663,906.91 

Total $4,473,024.49 $5,970,700.81 

Payments. Receipts. 

City Treasury $1,797,052.50 $1,405,984.76 

Smking Fund Redemption 3,025.84 32,760.24 

Sinking Fund Interest 182,991.89 9,113.49 

Interest on City Stocks 1,034.74 2,458,555.66 

Board of Apportionment 22,624.79 

County Treasury 700,997.91 233,740.26 

Totals $2,685,102.88 $4,162,779.20 

Commerce, Industry, and Immigration. 

The principal branches of New York industry may be divided 
into three classes. The first class embraces those branches 
which furnish what is most indispensable to Hving: food, cloth- 
ing, construction of buildings, and furniture. 

The second class comprises : manufactures in articles of luxu- 
ry, goldsmiths' work, plate, jewelry, carriages, trade in indus- 
trial articles, and implements manufactured in New York State, 
and the New England States. 

Those most intimately connected with intellectual wants, such 
as printing, engraving, the paper-trade, etc., particularly re- 
markable in this Metropolis. 

The commercial, or industrial associations, which are estab- 
lished in the city of New York are, besides many great railways 
and financial companies, the following: life insurance compa- 
nies, omnibus companies, gas-lighting companies, dry dock 
companies, the trans-Atlantic telegraph company, fire insurance 



HINTS AND NOTES. 141 

companies, express companies, various dock companies, and 
steamship companies. In fine, New York is the centre of an 
immense category of prosperous enterprises. 

CusTOM-HousE Dues. 

Persons arriving from foreign countries in New York have 
to submit to the visit of the custom-house officer before disem- 
barking. This is apt to be disagreeable in proportion to the 
resistance you are disposed to show. 

Since the war, duties on imported articles have been very 
largely increased and the examinations of travellers' baggage, 
formerly so slight, is now very strict. 

It appears from the report of the Bureau of Statistics, lately 
issued, that there was in the last year, ending December 31, 
a large increase, both of our commerce and immigration, over 
the previous year. The total number of emigrants that arrived 
in 1871 was 346,939, of whom 204,728 were males, and 142,210 
females. This is at the rate of nearly a thousand a day. 

Our imports of merchandise for 1871 amounted to $572, 501,- 
304, and of domestic exports to $445,563,658. Our export of 
specie, however, was $65,682,. 42, or, deducting $17,399,415 of 
specie and bullion imported, the balance of the precious metals 
exported amounted to $48,282,927. The total commerce in im- 
ports and exports, including re-exports of foreign merchandise 
and specie, amounted to the vast sum of $1,127,943,676. The 
total imports for the year 1871 exceeded those of 1870 
$103,078,902, and the exports amounted to $57,300,173 over 
those of 1870. Our commerce increased in one year, imports 
and exports included, $160,379,080. 

City Wall. — The only city wall was one long since de- 
molished, built across Wall street to keep out the Indians. 

Calls and Callers. — Calls of ceremony are made between 
two and half-past four o'clock. Morning calls between eleven 



142 HINTS AND NOTES. 

and twelve, evening calls between eight and nine; evening 
calls may be prolonged to ten or half-past ten. Morning calls 
are made in simple walking costume, afternoon and evening 
calls in more dressy suits, with either long or short skirts. 

Courts are open to the Public at all times. No fees 
necessary; secure a seat if you can. 

City Limits extend over the entire island of Manhattan, 
and the Central Park Commissioners have also control over the 
southerly portion of Westchester county. 

Colleges of the City: — 

Columbia College. 

Free Academy, or College of the City of New York. 

University. 

Medical Colleges. 

Female Medical College. 

Theological Seminaries. 

Collections of Objects of Art. — These are to be ?^QQXi at 
Art Galleries (see index), and at Groupil's, Tiffany's, and at 
other public places wliicli have no permanent locality, but are 
advertised freely in the daily newspapers. 

Carts and Carmen. — The prices lor loading, transportation, 
and unloading of goods, wares and other articles, are fixed bylaw. 

When the distance exceeds half a mile, and is within a mile, 
one-third more shall be added to the regular rates, and in the 
same proportion for any greater distance. Asking and receiv- 
ins: more than the leojal rates is a violation of the law, and 
puaishable accordingly. In any difficulty apply to the Mayor. 
Each cart is numbered. Take a memorandum of the number 
before you lose sight of your goods. 

On the first of May, or " moving-day," the demand for cart- 
age is so great, that exaggerated prices have to be paid to get 
your goods and chattels moved at all. This is the only excep- 
tion to the general rule. 



HINTS AND NOTES. 143 

Choice of Locality. — Any of the streets crossing Broadway, 
either side, are ehgible as a residence as far down town as Wa- 
verley Place (though few would care to go below 20th street), 
and as far up town as you choose to go. Also all the avenues, 
west of First avenue, except Third, Sixth, and Eighth. These 
are occupied by shop-keepers, artisans, etc. The fashionable 
streets for those who are able to live in them are easily dis- 
tinguished by their beauty and elegance. 

Crystal Palace. — The Crystal Palace once stood on the Sixth 
avenue side of the 42d street reservoir. That spot is now a 
small and pretty public square — called Reservoir Park. 

Churches. — (For list of the most prominent, see page 78.) 

N. B. — The variety in style of our churches proclaims the su- 
premacy of the public conscience, which imposes no belief on 
any man, but lets the congregations of any creed build as they 
like, if they can pay for it. 

Distances in the City — Twenty blocks make a mile. This 
means the length of the blocks, including the streets, and not a 
square block. 

Distances across the Ferries. 

South, 1,066 yards. 

Fulton, 731 yards. 

Catharine, 745 yards. 

Williamsburg, 952 y.ards. 
 Staten Island, 6,418 yards. 

The length of the blocks between First and 121st streets, 
varies from 181 to 212 feet; distance between the avenues, from 
405 to 920 feet. 

• Width of Streets and Avenues. 
The avenues are all 100 feet wide, excepting Lexington and 
Madison, which are 75, and Fourth avenue, above 34Lh street, 
which is 140 feet wide. 



Ii4 



HINTS AND N0TE5. 



The numerical streets are all 60 feet wide, excepting 14th, 
23d, 3tth, 42d, and eleven others, northof these, which are 100 
feet wide. 

Drinking Saloons — Fjom the most aristocratic to the most 
disreputable, are scattered through all parts of the Metropolis, 
and are a feature of New York life quite incomprehensible to 
the European. 

Directory. — There is but one New York Directory. It is 
published every year in July with revisions, and comprehends 
all names with business address and private residence, and an 
immense amount of local statistics and information. 




[Academy of the Sacred Heart — Tenth Avenue.'] 



HINTS AND NOTES. 145 

Dinner Hour. — The dinner hour in New York is from five to 
half-past six. Evening calls may be made by gentlemen and 
ladies as early as eight o'clock. 

Detectives. — The Detective force in New York is an invalua- 
ble institution. Its members are shrewd and courageous, 
and it is an art with them to appear like private citizens. 

Dorlan's Oysters — Are to be had at a stand in Fulton Mar- 
ket. His " Saddle Rocks," cooked in various ways, are very 
celebrated. If near the market, try them. 

Elevators — These are now introduced not only in all the 
principal hotels, but also in the large buildings down town 
which are let for offices. 

Fashionable Dressmakers — Their charges are so exorbitant 
that many ladies in the upper circles prefer to buy patterns, and, 
with the aid of a plain seamstress and a sewing-machine, make 
their own dresses. See daily papers for seamstresses' adver- 
tisements. 

Patterns, of all kinds, can be bought at stores where nothing 
else is kept. See daily papers for advertisements of these. 

Fashion Plates — There are many monthly magazines, and 
some weekly papers, devoted to these special illustrations, but 
altogether the best descriptions accompany those in Frank 
Leslie's Lady's Magazine. These descriptions are minute and 
intelligible. Single numbers can be bought at any book-store 
or book-stand. Frank Leslie's Lady^s Journal^ a weekly paper, 
also contains excellent illustrations, as also Harper's Bazar. 

Fashion. — The approach of summer dispels all thoughts of 
gas-light receptions. These are succeeded by a grand display 
of street-fashions, every Sunday, on Fifth avenue, and later, by 
a still more brilliant display, at the races at Jerome Park, All 
New York, young and old, on the tip-toe of expectation, im- 
patiently wait for the opening of the Jerome Park races. 

French Cooking — Is now fully appreciated and practised in 



146 HINTS AND NOTES. 

New York. The first-class hotels all employ French cooks ; so 
do the clubs, as well as rich private families. 

Fashionable Newspapers — There are several of these week- 
lies. They are mainly interesting from furnishing the most 
minute and elaborate descriptions of some of the costly parties, 
receptions, and weddings, given in the metropolis, and for their 
gossip and small talk about so-called fashionable people. They 
cannot be relied on as to the social status of individuals and 
families, being got up entirely in the Jenkins style of literature. 
The stranger will, however, be entertained in looking at some 
of these issues. 

Foreign Money — Is not current, but can be exchanged at 
exchange offices. You will find many of these in Wall street, 
and along Broadway. 

French and German Waiters, — There is a large mixture of 
these, wirh Irish and Enghsh waiters, in most of the hotels and 
restaurants. 

Fruit Stores — The finest are principally in Broadway, and 
among the business streets down town. Home and foreign 
fruits, fresh and diied, and in the greatest perfection, are to be 
had at these stores at all seasons. Also every species of nuts, 
both American and foreign. 

Furnished Apartments, — This has become a very customary 
way for letting rooms. Those to be let, without board, are 
advertised in the daily payers. 

Furnished Houses, — There are splendid, as well as merely 
comfortable, furnished houses to be let by the year — all at an 
extravagant price, however. See daily newspapers' advertis- 
ing columns. 

German Emigration — The Hamburg papers report that emi- 
gration of Germans to the United States (1872), from Meck- 
lenburg, is of such a remarkable character that several villages 
are almost depopulated. Forty-five hundred Mecklenburgers 



HINTS AND NOTES. 147 

passed through Hamburg last year on their way to this country, 
and large numbers are preparing to follow them this season. 
The same can be said of other parts of Germany. It is shown 
by the statistics that the Grerman element in the United States, 
fed by continual accessions from the Fatherland, is increasing 
relatively faster than any other. 

Grocery Stores — These stores, which occupy the first floor 
of many corner buildings, supply most families of all classes 
with every species of food with the exception of butchers' 
meat. The sale of the latter, with most of the vegetables, 
poultry, game, and fish, is monopolized by the markets and 
"shop butchers." 

Great Thoroughfares — Broadway is the principal thorough- 
fare of New York, and extends from the extreme lower end 
of the metropolis to its limit at the end of the island, whence it 
is continued through the suburban city of Yonkers, a distance 
of about twenty miles. This street is policed and lighted its 
whole length. In the unbuilt or country districts it is guarded 
by mounted policemen. If there be a unique street architec- 
turally, it is Broadway. The entire disregard of unity, the 
competition in costly and massive buildings, the diversity of 
material, as well as adornment, combine to make it as a highway 
of commerce, the paragon of the world, and in every pillar, 
facade and cornice proclaim it the special result of the energy 
and enterprise of a free, thriving people. 

The Bowery — Bes^ins at Chatham street, and extends until 
it meets Third and Fourth avenues at Sixth street. It is filled 
with stores of all kinds, where cheaper goods are sold than in 
Broadway. Most of the stores are kept by Jews and Germans. 
The shops of the former are open on Sunday in this thorough- 
fare. Almost all the German places of amusement are in the 
Bowery. 

Canal Street — Which runs east and west, from the North 



148 niXTS AND NOTKS. 

River to East Broadway, crossing the Bowery, Broadway, and 
Hudson street, is one of the widest streets and busiest tho- 
roughfares in the metropohs; but being now "down town" it 
partakes more or less of the character of the down-town com- 
merce and trade. 

For other thorousfhfares see " Avenues and Streets." 

Eighth Avenue — This avenue joins Hudson street at Abing- 
don square, and constitutes one large and busy thoroughfare 
soutiiward. On the north it runs up a broad and strait drive 
to Macomb's Dam, Harlem river, or one hundred and fifty-fifth 
street. Hudson street is an old street and exhibits less of the 
foreign element in its inhabitants than any other thoroughfare 
in New York. An old, respectable and substantial class of 
trades-people occupy it, and the streets in its neighborhood, 
which are well built up, with here and there even handsome 
houses. Here is evidently considerable wealth, though far re- 
moved from any fashionable vicinity or associations. 

Sixth Avenue — Is much frequented by ladies of the highest 
class for shopping. Here are excellent markets and grocery 
stores. One of the finest street views in the city is from either 
corner of Sixth avenue and Twenty-third street, looking east 
and west through the latter street. This view increases in 
beauty until you reach Broadway. 

Gambling Houses — These are of two classes, the high and the 
low. It is dangerous foi' any one to enter either.. Persons are 
enticed iftto the low houses to become victims. The high-class 
houses are on their dignity and solicit no one. But if you entrr, 
woe be to you. There are no places so seductive as these 
houses, and the misery they create is deadly. The " day " 
gambling houses are down town among business marts. 

Gymnasiums — See the popular advertisements. Excellent 
ones abound in the metropolis. 

How to stop a stage or car when you wish to get out: In 



HINTS AND NOTES. 149 

the omnibus pull the strap which runs along the top. In the 
car speak to the conductor when you give him your fare, and 
tell him where you wish to get off. 

ITarlem River — This river, with Spuyten Duyvel creek, con- 
nects the East River with the Hudson, and forms the northern 
boundary of New York. The Harlem is a beautiful river with 
verdurous and wooded banks and bordered with elegant resi- 
dences, and spanned by stately bridges and plied by pretty 
steamboats and other craft. 

Hints on Accepting Invitations — If you are invited to an 
entertainment and you find the letters " R. S. V. P." in the 
corner of the card or note, be sure to answer it, accepting or 
declining, and in no case alter your determination afterwards. 
If the hour is indicated, do not go before that hour. In arriving 
at the house, ask the man who shows you up the steps at what 
hour the carriage must be ordered for you to leave. 

If you are invited to dine, be punctual to the minute. If to 
an evening entertainment, and the hour is not designated, do 
not go before ten o'clock. 

At all entertainments the lady of the house is the first person 
3^ou will see on entering the rooms. She is always near the 
drawing-room door to receive her guests. After receiving an 
invitation it is customary to call in acknowledgment of the 
courtesy within a week after the entertainment has taken 
place. 

Hell Gate and the East River Improvement. — Fevv peo- 
ple are aware of the stupendous work going on at Hell Grate 
and of the important results that may be expected to ensue from 
it. The removal of the rocks there, so as to make a perfectly 
free and safe channel for the largest vessels, was a vast under- 
taking. In this age, however, hardly anything seems impossi- 
ble to engineering skill. In view, therefore, of the importance 
of opening a free and safe channel for the commerce of New 



150 



HINTS AND NOTES. 



York by the way of Long Island Sound and the East River, the 
government resolved to remove the Hell Grate obstructions. 
The work was commenced a little more than two years ago, 
and it is believed that in less than two years more the whole 
will be completed. It is under the charge of Major-G-eneral John 
Newton, of the United States Engineer Corps, A vast deal of 
rock has already been blasted out and cleared away. Of about 
one hundred and sixty-five thousand cubic yards of rock to be 
removed, at least forty two thousand yards have been taken out. 
For removing the rest the rock is being tunnelled and pierced 
in every direction. When this is accomplished a tremendous blast 
will be made with seven thousand pounds of nitro-glycerine, 
equal in force to seventy thousand pounds of gunpowder. The 




Excavations Under the East River, Hell Gate. 



HINTS AND NOTES. 151 

explosion will be a small earthquake. The details of the work 
are exceedingly interesting to scientific men. But the import- 
ant fact is with regard to the results that must follow to the 
commerce of the city and to the improvement of the upper part of 
the island. When the largest steamship in the European trade 
can come safely to this port through Hell Gate and by way of 
Long Island Sound, thus saying time and sometimes avoiding 
danger by the outer passage, we may expect a portion of the 
business at least will be located far up town ; and when, in 
addition to the clearing of Hell Gate, a large ship canal and a 
fine system of docks shall be made, by the Harlem River and 
Spuyten Duy vel, to connect the Sound and East River with the 
Hudson River, there will be, no doubt, a surprising change in 
the business localities of JSTew York. 

Hotel Coaches — These are equally respectable with the 
hacks for taking travellers to or from their specific hotels, and 
much cheaper, for you have only to pay for your own seat. 

Holidays in New York. 

Thanksgiving-DAT is celebrated in every household in New 
York by a particularly good dinner, but not with the absolute 
zest of the New Endand feast. Great numbers of New York- 
ers go into New England to spend the day with relations at 
their old homes. 

The Fourth of July. — The great national holiday is a day 
of unexampled confusion in the metropolis. The poorest boy 
or girl has, at least, a handful of fire-crackers, and the majority 
of private citizens have a display of small fireworks in their 
yards in the evening, while in the parks, and especially at the 
City Hall, the exhibition is one of surpassing splendor. The 
firing of pistols and crackers on every hand is heard at daybreak, 
simultaneously with the firing of guns from the Battery, the 



152 HINTS AND NOTES. 

Fort.=, the shipping in the harbor, and the Navy Yard, The 
excitement knows no abatement until midnight. 

Washington's Birth- day is celebrated by a parade of all the 
military companies of the city, and a universal rejoicing; but, 
unlike the 4th of July, the day is characterized by the utmost 
idecorum and dignity. 'v 

EvACUATioN-DAY. — The day the British evacuated New York 
is celebrated like Washington's Birth-day, but with less general 
feeling. 

New Year's Day. — This is specially a New York institution, 
for it originated with the Dutch settlers, and is maintained with 
unabated enthusiasm, especially by the fashionable classes. 
Ladies stay at home to receive calls, and gentlemen have the 
undisputed use of the thoroughfares and streets from nine 
o'clock in the morning till midnight. Houses are put in the 
finest order in preparation for the day, and every one is in their 
best dress, best spirits, and best looks ; and the most elaborate 
tables, loaded with every delicacy, are prepared. It is the great 
festival day of New York. 

Christmas Day is also universally observed, especially among 
the children, to whom a Christmas party and Christmas tree 
are a matter of course. 

On all these holidays business is entirely suspended as on 
Sunday. 

The religious holidays of Episcopalians and Roman Catholics 
are celebrated here as elsewhere. 

St. Patrick's Day is the great holiday of Irish emigrants. 
They parade the streets with military companies, music and 
banners. 

The Orangemen now also have their parades, as do the Ger- 
mans, while the various benevolent societies, target compa- 
nies, and other companies, keep the city gay with their turn- 
outs. 



HINTS AND NOTES. 153 

How TO Descend at tue Right Spot from a Stage or 
Car. — If you wish to stop at a street on your car or omnibus 
route, whose locahty you do not know, request the stage-driver 
or car conductor, when you hand him your fare, to let you 
know when he reaches there. 

How TO Get a Dai*.y Paper. — They are to be bought in all 
hotels in the morning and at stands in the streets, at or near depots 
and ferries, and of newsboys as they pass along, and in the 
steam cars and ferry-boats, and can be seen in the reading-rooms 
of many hotels. 

Information bureau, for friends of arriving emigrants — Castle 
Garden. 

If YotJ ARE IN A Hurry and wish to Catch a Train — 
Take a cab at a hack-stand, to be seen along any of the parks 
or squares, on the thoroughfares. The omnibuses and cars have 
to stop frequently, which takes up a great deal of time ; see 
" Hacks and Hackmen " for prices. 

If You Choose to take the Trouble of Seeing to Your 
Own Baggage — One trunk, one bag, and one bundle for each 
person can be put on your carriage free of charge. 

If You leave an Article in an omnibus or car, and remem- 
ber the ninnber of the conveyance, go to its depot. See index 
for omnibuses and cars. There is a good chance of your recover- 
ing it. If not, there is no other way feut to advertise it with 
promise of a reward. See first column in morning Herald for 
these kind of advertisements. 

Ice Water can be had for the asking at all railroad depots, 
at restaurants — in fact, everywhere. 

Extension of the City of New York since 1836 : At that 
period the Astor House, which was opened first of June in that 
year, was considered " up town." 

Immigration — From the 1st of January to the 31st of March, 
1872, 12,497 persons arrived in New York from the German 



154 HINTS AND NOTES. 

States — against 3,948 from Ireland, 7,554 from England, and 
1,368 from France. The excess of G-erman immigration was a re- 
markable feature in the returns of 18G9-70, but the French war 
stopped the tide for the ensuing year. It is now setting in again 
with remarkable vigor, the German arrivals this year already out- 
numbering the Irish three to one. Another noticeable point is 
the unusual increase in the number of skilled laborers who are 
coming in ; the aggregate being 3,570 for the months of Janu- 
ary, February and March, against a total of 6,241 unskilled 
workmen — and if to these be added the number of 3,239 far- 
mers who have arrived during the same period, the common 
laborers who follow no other avocation than that of the hewers 
of wood and the drawers of water are actually in a minority. 
This is a good sign. It shows that the careful farmer and the 
skilled mechanic are beginning to take the places of the ignorant 
peasant and the pauper, and that the general character of the im- 
migration will add to our national strength. Another fact, inter- 
esting to students of social problem^:, is the rapid increas-^ of the 
Protestant over the Roman Catholic element. Great Britain, 
exclusive of Ireland, has sent us 7,554 immigrants since Janu- 
ary ; the German States and the Scandinavian countries 
to""ether have sent more than 13,000 ; and the Dutch and 
Belgians number about 400 — making a total of over 20,000, 
out of the whole immigration of 28,000 for three months, who 
are chiefly of the Protestant faith. The religious enthusiasts 
will find food for thought and speculation in these statements. 

The majority of the immigrants, of all classes, are between 
the ages of fifteen and forty, and there is a marked dispropor- 
tion between the numbers of the males and the females— the 
total of the former being 19,316, and of the latter, 8,884. The 
principal trades represented are those of the carpenter, the 
mason, the tailor, the shoemaker and the baker, and there is 
room enough and work enough for all, provided they are wise 



HIXTS AND NOTES. 



155 



enough to leave the crowded seaports, and, like the G-ermans, 
find their new homes in the places where their labor is always 
in demand. 

ImxMigration — Comparative Protestant and Catholic : 20,000 
out of the whole immigration of 28,000 for the months of 
January, February and March for 1872 are Protestants. See 
previous paragraph. 

Letter Stamps — Can be bought at any stationery or book 
store. A few can be obtained at the office of your hotel, or at 
an apothecary, genei-ally at a corner grocery. 

Letter- Boxes — There are letter-boxes on corner lamp-posts 
every block or two in all the thoroughfares, and in all the first- 
class hotels, and in railroad depots. 




[Fire Department — Steam Fire-Enc/ine.] 



156 HINTS AND NOTES. 

Laborers — Nearly all the laborers in New York, as in the 
other large cities of the United States, are foreigners. There is 
no class of Americans in our cities below that of the mechanic 
and artisan. Education and foreign immigration keeps the 
American in this desirable position. 

Messengers 

Can be sent from your hotel and from various other points 
on any errands. The charge is ordinarily 25 cents. 

Metropolitan Fire Department. — Up to 1865 all the Fire 
Companies were volunteers. It is now a force under the con- 
trol of the State Grovernment, and the members receive good 
salaries. The drilling of the Fire Department may be compared 
to that of the Military Department in carefulness and exactness. 

May Anniversaries. ^ 

With the month of May, smiling May, as from childhood we 
have been in ths habit of hearing it named, come also the re- 
ligious anniversaries. From time immemorial, and in almost all 
lands, May has been the favorite month for religious reunion. 

The citv of New York is a favorite religious centre. Our 
religious societies as well as our enterprising merchants re- 
veal an affection for the great City. If here sin abounds, 
so also do empire and wealth. The money which is given 
freely for every laudable enterprise has never been grudg- 
ingly bestowed on the churches and the other kindred associa- 
tions. The principal Societies represented are : the American 
Home Missionary Society, the American Seamen's Friend So- 
ciety, the American Female Gruardian Society, the National 
Temperance Society, the American Tract Society, the American 
Bible Society, the American and Foreign Christian Union, and 
the American Congregational Union. 



HINTS AND NOTES. 



K7 



All these associations are representatives of the religious 
life of onr people. 




[T/ie Morgue, or Dead House — Interior vieio.'] 

At the anniversary season this city fills up with strangers, 
and clergymen and laymen come hither to discuss measures 
for the future progress of their work. 

Morgue — It is situated at the foot of 26th street, East Kiver. 
It receives dead unrecognized bodies which have been found in 
the rivers or within the city limits. It is open to the public 
from morning to night. Bodies are detained there three daj's, 
unless claimed sooner. 

Money. — Twenty cents American money is equal to ten pence 
English money and one franc French money. 



158 hints and notes. 

First of May or Moving Day in the Metropolis. 

It is a panderaonium in New York. The poor go from the 
cellar or garret of one tenement-house to another, wealthy peo- 
ple up town pack trunks, cases, and boxes for the country, or 
change for a more eligible location, or to obtain cheaper rates of 
rent in town. All landladies are less amiable than usual, and 
most are fui'ious. Matrons lose their temper through the din 
and dust of the general commotion. Servants enjoy the privi- 
lege of reckless demolition. Young children cry, and larger ones 
help servants to break. Heads of families ache, and their lungs 
are smothered, and their throats are choked with dust. Count- 
less Micawbers pocket the curses of their enraged landlords, who 
themselves can pocket nothing. And so the day wears on 
in every part of the city. The carriers and carmen reap the 
harvest. Eight, ten and fifteen dollars per load are the prices, 
and furniture wagons are scarce even at these rates. Some are 
engaged weeks before. At night people find themselves away 
from their old home — if one can be said to have a home under 
conditions of yearly migration — and in a strange place. Papa 
goes "round the corner," feeling very blue. Mamma can find 
nothing she needs for the children, and the dear children sit 
about on the floor in a most lugubrious and lachrymose condi- 
tion, bewailing the fall of china ans^els and the breakins; of lit- 
tie playthings. Such is life on May-day in New York. 

Municipal Divisions of the City — New York is divided into 
Twenty-two Wards, which are subdivided into Three Hundred 
and Forty Election Districts. 

State Assembly Districts are represented by those for Alder- 
men and Assistant Aldermen. 

Police and Civil Justices' Districts consist of eight districts. 

School Districts consist of seven districts. 

The only ward officers now elected by the people of the city, 



HINTS AND NOTES. 159 

are Trustees of Common Schools — one for each ward — at each 
charter election. 

Measures, Weights, etc. — The English measures which we 
use are not gauged with the scientific accuracy of the French. 
Thus the English yard, which is one- tenth less than the French 
" metre," is an arbitrary measure and not the unit of length, 
which is the ten-millionth part of the spherical distance from the 
pole to the equator, and which the French call the " metre." 

Weights — The English pound is in use with us — is equal 
to the French " litre." 

Measuring Capacity — The measure of capacity is the quart. 

Thermometric Scale — Fahrenheit's scale is used in the United 
States. It differs from the " centigrade " thermometers used in 
France. Thus, 32*^ or freezing point in Fahrenheit is zero 
in the Centigrade, and 212° or boiling point in Fahrenheit is 
100° in the Centigrade. 

New Buildings in New York. 

Building, if it goes on at the rate it has done for the past five 
years — that is, 2,000 houses per annum, will make a continuous 
line of brick and mortar from the Battery to Washington 
Heisrhts. 

That the visitor may fully comprehend this we give a descrip- 
tion of the principal public buildings in course of erection in this 
city. The greater number are to be devoted to educational and 
benevolent purposes. Some of those referred to below, Avhen 
finished, will present the finest specimens of architectural skill. 
There are at all times a number of hotels and factories building 
in the upper wards, and numerous extensive warehouses are to 
be seen in progress and upon which workmen are busily en- 
gaged. Tenement houses of the better class, and handsome 
private residences are also to be observed in course of construc- 
tion along the avenues up to and beyond Central Park. 



160 HINTS AND NOTES. 

New York, the empress city of our country in wealth, is 
eqvially so in architectural munificence. The peculiar bent of 
its development shows that it exhibits none of the hackneyed 
cui-bing lines of European cities. In point of private effort it 
surpasses any city in the world. When the newcomer wanders, 
uptown and sees the stately brown stone and marble mansions^ 
at every step, his longing to see one huge palace must be 
checked in the idea that we own no kings or princes here ; that 
the wealth he sees is that of individual citizens of a great na- 
tion, with just a vote like their poorer neighbors. 

The Lenox Library — The city of New York will soon be 
provided with another free library, and in the same building 
are to be galleries of paintings and a museum, for which the 
citizens will be indebted to the munificence of Mr. James Lenox, 
a gentleman who has devoted many years to the collection of 
rare and valuable books, manuscripts, paintings, statuary, 
and other works of art and antiquities. The building, which 
is on Fifth avenue, and is to cover the whole front of the 
block between 70th and 71st streets, is advanced to the 
second story. Its length is 198 feet and 114 feet in depth. 
The modern French style of architecture has been adopted, but 
the entire exterior of the edifice is to have a unique and im- 
pressive appearance. The edifice consists of two wings, divi- 
ded by the court-yard ; and in the far end a large hall. The 
only ornamentation of exterior are pediments and capitals of 
columns. Busts of Minerva and other allegorical figures are 
placed on pedestals, and so arranged as to add to the effect of 
the general appearance. In the two stories of the south wing 
will be situated the library proper and reading room. The 
second story is to consist of two rooms, same size as those on 
first, and a hall, besides a picture gallery forty by sixty feet. 
In the north wing is the Museum and committee room, and the 
third story or attic is to be used as another picture gallery. The 



HINTS AND NOTES. 161 

library, according to the charter and design of Mr. Lenox, is to 
be open at all reasonable hours for general use, free of expense. 

Strangers may be interested in the style in which our Public 
Schools are built, arranged, and conducted. The Department 
of Education includes : — 

Board of Education. 

School Commissioners. 

Standing Committees. 

School Inspectors, and 

School Trustees. 

New Public Schools — Besides the Normal College, the Board 
of Education have approved of plans and accepted proposals 
for the erection of five new school buildings in different parts 
of the city. Three of these houses are to be ready for occupa- 
tion on the 1st of September, and the other two about the begin- 
ning of next year. The building at the corner of Sheriff and 
Stanton streets, in the Eleventh ward, No. 22, is among the 
former. The main building is 55 feet by 150 feet, and the ex- 
tension 40 feet by 44 feet. There are four stories and cellar. ' 

The public school buildings are in architectural design nearly 
all alike, and there is no departure from the uniform rule in 
this structure nor in the others to be mentioned. 

The buildings are provided with over thirty wardrobes. The 
staircases are black walnut. 

Monuments — Many interesting tombstones and relics of 
former ages will be found in the old graveyards surrounding 
Trinity Church and St. Paul's, a few of which our artist has 
sketched in these pages. 

Other Educational Schools — The two other schools to be 
ready for occupation on the 1st of September are one on the 
south side of 57th street, in the Nineteenth ward, and the 
other on Fifth street, in the Seventeenth ward.' Both are of 
the same class as the one just described. 



162 



HINTS AND NOTES. 



St. Michael's Roman Catholic Schools — Two large edifices 
are about completed — one for a grammar school for girls and 
the other for boys. There is besides a preparatory school, all 
three are connected, forming a massive pile of buildings. The 
building on xsiuth avenue, near 31st street, is intended for 
girls. 

The boys' grammar school is on 32d street. 




[Gi'ave of Ciiarlotte Temple.'] 




[Tomb of Captain Lawrence^ of the " Chesapealt.'''\ 



HINTS AND NOTES. 



163 



GrERMAN Savings Bank — The directors of the German 
Savings Bank in the city of 'New York liave nearly completed 
a very costly and imposing building, at the corner of 14tli 
street and Fourth avenue. 

Eleventh Ward Savixgs Bank — The new building for this 
institution, situated at the corner of Avenue C and Seventh 
street, has just been completed. The structure is built of iron 
and is three stories liigh, whh French roof. 




[Tomb of Albert Gallatin.] 




[Tomb of Alexander IIa7niUoji.'\ 



164 



TTS AND NOTES. 



Catholic Church on Ward's Island— The desire to ac- 
commodate as far as possible the inmates of the Emigrant 
refuofe in the exercise of their reho-ious duties, has induced the 
Commissioners of Emigration to approve tlie plans prepared 
by Messrs. Eenwick &; Sands, architects, for the erection of a 
Catholic Church on Ward's Island. The work on it has already 
commenced, and it is expected to be finished in about six 
months from this date. 




[Tomb of General Ifontgomery.'] 



The Hebrew Industrial School — The Asylum building was 
not large enough to allow the requisite arrangements for work- 
shops to be made. Accordingly the society is erecting a build- 
ing on the lot in the rear of the asylum especially for this pur- 
pose. 



HINTS AND NOTES. 165 

Third Judicial Court House — The new court house and 
prison for the Third district are commenced, on the ground ad- 
joining Jefferson Market, Sixth avenue, and are intended to 
take the place of the old building now in use for similar pur- 
poses. 

The style of architecture is French Grothic ; the material used 
so far is Philadelphia brick trimmed with Ohio yellow stone. 

New Jail — The new jail, to front on Tenth street, will have 
two stories and be 128 feet in length and 45 feet high. This 
large building is to be in part occupied by the clerks attached 
to the courts, and furnish accommodation also to the detach- 
ment of police assigned to duty in the precinct. 

New York Ophthalmic Hospital — The New York Ophthal- 
mic Hospital, incorporated in April, 1852. is now ready for oc- 
cupation at the corner of Third avenue and Twenty-third street. 

The New Masonic Hall — Among the most noteworthy 
buildino-s in course of construction in the citv, is Masonic Hall 
at the corner of Sixth avenue and Twenty- third street. It fronts 
141 feet on the street and runs 100 feet on the avenue. The 
massive construction and gi'and proportions of this edifice have 
already attracted no small share of public attention. 

St. Luke's, Home for Indigent Females — St, Luke's Home 
for Indigent Females has been in existence about twenty years. 
It is at present on Hudson street, and its doors are open to 
persons of respectability in reduced circumstances, and who are 
members of the Episcopal Church. The new building just 
ready for occupation is on the north-east corner of Madison 
avenue and Eighty-ninth street, one block from Central Park, 
and two blocks only from one of the principal entrances to the 
Park. It is four stories high. The style is mediaev^al Gothic, 
witli Mansard roof and three towers. 

Church of the Beloved Disciple — This church fronts 57 feet 
on Eighty-ninth street, and is 100 feet deep. It is nearly fin- 



166 HINTS AND NOTES. 

ished. The style of architecture is Grothic ; the material used 
is Buena Vista stone, and brick for the side walls. 

Old Ladies' Home of the Baptist Church, on Sixty-eighth 
street, near Fourth avenue. The ground upon which the Home 
stands runs through the entire block and has a front of 125 
feet. 

St. Joseph's Home for the Aged — The trustees in charge of 
this institution, in charge of the Sisters of Charity, have com- 
pleted their new buildmg on the site of the old Home on Fif- 
teenth street. 

The new TJ. S. Post Office and the new Roman Catholic Ca- 
thedral exceed in magnificence any other buildings in the me- 
tropolis. 

The New Court House has nothing to boast of but size. 

Names of Streets and Avenues are still very generally 
printed on little strips, and nailed on the houses at every corner. 
At the same time the improved plan is adopted through the 
city of painting the name of the street on the glass of the corner 
lamp-post. 

North, East and Harlem River and Sound Boats con- 
stantly ply those waters, giving a remarkably gay and busy as- 
pect to the scene. See Index for " Steamboat Travel." 

New York City Taxes for 1872 — The Board of Apportion- 
ment directed the raising, by tax, during 1872, on real and per- 
sonal property, $30,437,513 01, us follows : — 
Valuation of the estates, real and personal, 

subject to taxation in the city and county 

of New York in the year 1871 $1,076,253,633 00 

Tax at the rate of 2f per cent on such valua- 
tion 29,596,974 91 

Excess of the quota of state tax for county 

over the amount charged on county for 

state taxes in the year 1870 : — 



HINTS AND NOTES. 1G7 



State tax in 1872 $5,746,049 32 

State tax in 1870 4,904,501 22 



840,548 10 



Total to be raised by tax $30,437,523 01 

Of this $14,915,777 75 is apportioned for the following pur- 
poses for 1872 : — 

State tax, including State tax for Common 
Schools to be paid by the County of New- 
York . $5,745,049 32 

Interest on bonds and stocks of the County 

of New York 2,412,670 00 

Interest on bonds and stocks of the City of 

New York 6,072,637 74 

Principal of bonds and stocks as may become 
due and payable from taxations within the 
year 1872/. 685,420 69 

Total $14,915,777 75 

Natural Flowers — Fresh natural flowers can be bought at 
the flower-stores which are scattered through Broadway. 
These are made into bouquets or garlands, or arranged to or- 
der. Here you can select the rarest exotics, or the wild-flowers 
of the woods, or the simple old-fashioned garden flowers of the 
country homesteads. You can buy as little as one flower if you 
wish. 

Men, women, and children stand on the steps of hotels, and 
on the side-walks, here and there, with baskets of prettily ar- 
ranged and sweet-smelling small bouquets for sale — frequently 
as low as ten cents. 

Stores for the sale of plants of all kinds are to be found in 
Broadway, The plants are sometimes placed growing in very 
ornamental pots and baskets. 

Newspapers. — The principal morning papers are the H^rdldj 



168 



HINTS AND NOTES. 



yers. 



Tribu72e, TimeSj World^ and 
Sun. Principal evening pa- 
pers are the Post, Commer- 
cial^ Express, Mail, and News. 
The principal weekly illus- 
trated papers are Harper's 
Weekly^ Frank Leslie's Weekly, 
The Lady^s Journal, and 
Harper^s Bazar. 

New York Bar — There 
are between 3,000 and 4,000 
lawyers in the metropolis. 
They generally all make a 
good living. The prominent 
members of the profession 
clear from ten to twenty-five 
thousand dollars a year. 
There is not the espi^it de 
corps among lawyers here 
that is observable in most 

other cities. The lack of this 
\ Street Flower-Girl,] n ■,■ • , c- i x i 

leehng IS not connned to law- 
It is noticeable throughout all the "liberal professions." 





BINTS AND NOTES. 



169 



Organ-GtRINders and Street-Beggahs — Thousands of chil- 
dren are annually exported from Italy to the United States for 
the purpose of making them organ-grinders and street- beggars, 
of whom a multiplicity are to be seen in New York. A bill has 
been brought before the Italian Parliament, designed to put a 
stop to this disgraceful traffic in children. It punishes with five 
years' imprisonment all persons exporting children under twelve 
years of age to foreign countries, under any pretext. 

Out-door Statues and Monuments — Equestrian statue' of 
Washington, Union Square; statue of Lincoln, Union Square; 
G-eneral Worth (Monument), Madison Square. 

The New Franklin Statue. 

The new bronze statue of 
Benjamin Franklin has just 
been erected in Printinsr-House 
Square. It was cast from a 
model designed by Captain De 
Groot, who designed the hu2:e 
Vanderbilt monument in St. 
John's Park. The statue is a 
gift from the designer to the 
Press of the city. 

There are some important 
monuments in St. Paul's Church- 
yard and in Trinity Churchyard. 

There is a good deal of fine statuary in Central Park which 
the visitor will discover on going over the grounds. 

Photography. — Every species of sun-picture is taken in New 
York from the tin-type at 25 cents to the elaborate imperial 
photograph touched up to imitate fine ivory painting at a cost 
of fifteen to fifty dollars. The photograph galleries make quite 
a display along Broadway, an exhibition of many fine speci- 




170 



HINTS AND NOTES. 



mens of the art being placed conspicuously at the entrances 
on the street. In some of the principal galleries a few 
rare and costly paintings may be seen, besides a large number 
of admirable specimens of photographic art. The stranger 
must spend a morning in these galleries — free admittance. 

Population of jSTew York proper is about one million. 

Prices at the Hotels in New York do not vary with the 
seasons. They range from $2 to $5 per day, which includes 
no extras. 

Hotels on the European plan cost according to your orders. 




[Interior of the Cafe Brunswisk — Fifth Avemie.] 
Public and Private Dinners and Suppers can be given at 
any hotel whether you live there or not. Delmonico's Restau- 
rant, corner Fifth avenue and 14th street, is a favorite place for 



HINTS AND NOTES. 171 

such entertainments. They are got up with any degree of 
elegance you choose to pay for, and without any trouble to your- 
self, except to loosen your purse-strings. 

The Cafe Brunswick, under the Hotel of that name, is also 
a fashionable place for these entertainments, No. 223 Fifth 
avenue, corner Madison Square and 26th street. 

Police — All the streets and suburbs are well guarded by 
policemen. There are also mounted police ranging through the 
upper part of the city and the lower part of Westchester coun- 
ty to the distance of twenty miles from the Battery. 

Places and Sights which, among others, a Stranger should 

See. 
Battery. 

Blackwell's Island and Randall's Island. 
Broadway from near the Worth monument. 
Brooklyn Heights. • 
Central Park. 

Fifth avenue from corner of Twenty-seventh street. 
Fifth avenue from corner of Thirty-fourth street. 
Grand Central Depot. 
G-reenwood Cemetery. 
High Brid2:e. 
Jews' Synagogue. 
Markets. 

New Roman Catholic Cathedral. 
Opera Houses. 
Photograph G-alleries. 
Printing-offices and Machinery. 
Trinity Cathedral — ascend to top of steeple. 
Wall street. 
Wharves and Docks. 
"Woodlawn Cemetery. 



172 



HINTS AND NOTES. 



Eaces. 

Jerome Park Races — Fordham. Take Harlem Accommo- 
dation Train, or, which is much pleasanter but more expensive, 
drive out in a carriage. 




[Jerome Park Race Course.] 

These races are fashionable, and attended by ladies in very 
dressy carriage suits. 

Fashion Course — Near Jamaica, L. I. Ferry foot of East 
Thirty-fourth street to railroad depot. You can go by rail or 
drive out in a carriage. 

Fleetwood Park Trotting Course — Morrisania. You can 

go by Harlem Accommodation Train or drive in carriage. 
Prospect Park Races — Brooklyn. Of easy access by horse- 



car or carnage. 



HINTS AND NOTES. 173 

All the races take place late in spring or early summer, 
and autumn, and are fully advertised with all particulars in the 
daily papers. 

Eeligious Inteligence 

And Notes relating to all sects are to be found in the Sun- 
day morning papers. A very full report of sermons by the 
leading clergymen of all denominations appears every week in 
Monday's papers. 

Religious Newspapers — Among these are : — 

Catholic Freeman's Journal. 

Christian Union (Henry Ward Beecher's paper). 

Church Weekly — a "Free Church and State'' paper. 

Evangelist (Presbyterian). 

Jewish Messenger. 

Observer (Piesbyterian). 

Tablet (Catholic). 

Riding School — Fifth av. cor. 40th street. 

Reading Rooms — Are in nearly all first-class hotels, with a 
iarge variety of newspapers. 

Religion — Religion is fashionable in New York. The metro- 
polis is filled with " po.iular preachers," who draw full houses, 
particularly on Sunday morning. The ministers have large 
salaries, and many of them are very wealthy. 

Religious Statistics for the United States — The statistics 
of religion for the United States, just completed at the Census; 
Office, show the total number of church organizations upon the 
1st of June, 1870, to be 72,451 ; the total number of church 
edifices to be 63,074; the total church accommodation to be 
21,659,502, and the aggregate value of the church property to 
be $354,429,581. The statistics of church accommodation for 
the principal denominations are as follows : — Baptist Regular, 
3,997,116; Baotist, other, 363,019; Roman Cathohc, 1,990,514; 



174 



HINTS AND NOTES. 



Congregational, 1,117,212 ; Episcopal, 991,051 ; Lutheran, 
997,332 ; Methodist, 6,528,209 ; Presbyterian, Eegular, 2, 198,900 ; 
Presbyterian, other, 499,344. The value of the Church pro- 
perty owned by these denominations is:— Baptist, regular, 
$39,229,221; Baptist, other, $2,378,977; Catholic, Roman, 
$60,985,566; Congregational $25,069,698; Episcopal, $36,514,- 
549; Lutheran, $14,917,747; Methodist, $69,851,121 ; Presby- 
terian, regular, $47,828,732 ; Presbyterian, othei-, $5,436,524. 




[Bethel Church, or Seamen's Floating Chapel.] 

Statistics — See Manual of the Corporation of New York. 

It contains details of the institutions of the city ; the State 
and Aletropolitan Commissions, and the Government Depart- 
ments of the city. 



HINTS AND NOTES. 175 

To be found in Corporation library, room No. 12, first floor, 
City Hall. 

Saturday — Is a fashionable day for ladies to attend public 
entertainments — alone. These are advertised in the daily 
papers under the head of "Matinees." Handsome walking 
suits are worn, G-entleinen can of course attend these mati- 
nees either with or without ladies, but the number of ladies 
very far predominates. 

Seamen's Chapels — All along the North and East Rivers are 
chapels for seamen, of different denominations. 

Silver Communion Service, Presented by Queen Anne — 
This is owned and used by Trinity Cathedral. The original 
church which stood on the site of the present edifice was the 
recipient of it. 

Singing in Churches — There is fine singing in most of the 
Protestant as well as the Catholic churches in the metropolis; 
solos by a lady artiste being considered a great addition to the 
service. 

Shooting Galleries — The sign will attract the stranger as he 
goes along Broadway. He has only to enter, take his turn, and 
" pay the shot." 

Shopping — Cheap goods are principally sought for in the 
Bowery, Third avenue, Grand street, Catharine street, and 
Division street, on the east side of town, and on the west 
side in Hudson, Carmine, and Bleecker streets; but those who 
live remote from these streets will ofenerallv find little advan- 
tage in going out of Broadway. Here, in the best known 
emporiums, goods can be found at fair prices, and but one 
price is asked. Very cheap goods are necessarily of inferior 
quality and fashion, and look so. These you do not find in 
Broadway. 

Shop Butchers — These persons have a license to sell meats 
and vegetables, and have small markets wherever they choose 



176 HINTS AND NOTES. 

to erect them in various parts of the city. These little markets 
are a great convenience. 

Steamboat Travel — (See page 192.) 

Shall WE have Flower Shows? — The suggestion is certainly 
a pleasing one, and all the necessary ingredients to its success 
are at hand. The flower shows of London are renowned for 
their popularity, and gain yearly in attractiveness and beauty. 
Why should not our own upper ten inaugurate the custom here ? 
In the spring, just after the theatrical season is over, and before 
it is time to repair to the seaside and watering places, there 
comes a dull time here which the flower show just fits. Some- 
thing light and graceful is needed, and an exhibition of spring 
flowers, aided by the attractions of music, sunshine, and soft air, 
is admirably the thing. In the fall another void in the social 
life appears. The first brisk winds of autumn depopulate the 
summer resorts, and yet the time for winter amusements is not 
quite come. Once more, a flower show meets the need. The 
spring has its odorous blossoms and the fall its gorgeous blooms. 

Snow Blockade — Once in four or five years comes a snow 
blockade which impedes all kinds of locomotion, stops the trains 
about to leave the city, and fills to repletion every hotel, small 
and great, of every class. It furnishes great amusement to the 
young, and valuable occupation to the laborer. 

Street Processions — These have always been a special 
feature in New York; all nationalities having been allowed 
free scope to display their banners and march through our 
streets, often to the great discomfort of business people or the 
interruption of travel. At last, owing especially to danger from 
the bitter feeling exhibited in the case of the Orange procession 
in 1871, the legislature interfered and regulated the afi'air of 
street processions, which are still free, but subject to proper re- 
strictions. The bill provides for the freedom of the streets in 
which cars run, and the unobstructed passage of the cars, by 



HINTS AND NOTES. 177 

declaring that " whenever any procession shall find it necessary 
to march across a railway track, the portion of said procession 
which in so marching is likely to stop the passage of any car or 
cars upon said track shall come to a halt in order to permit 
said car to proceed." The bill also forbids processions except 
of the National Guard, the Police, and the Fire Department, 
unless notice is given to the Police authorities, and the latter 
are empowered to designate to such procession or parade how 
much of the street in width it can occupy with special reference 
to crowded thoroughfares through which said procession may 
move. Sunday parades, excepting actual funeral processions, 
are forbidden. 

Suburban Villages— Those within the city limits are Car- 
raansville, Manhattanville, Torkville, and Harlem. These are 
last becoming continuous with the city. 

Melrose, Morrisania, Tremont, Fordham, etc., are almost con- 
tinuous in Westchester County— reached by Harlem Kailroad 
Accommodation Train. 

These are characteristic American villages of the more 
affluent type. 

The suburban Long Island villages are Astoria, Flatbush, 
Flushing, Jamaica, Newtown, etc., etc. The Staten Island 
villages are seen to best advantage from the Bay. The resi- 
dences from this point of view have a very picturesque effect. 
The neighboring villages in new Jersey are also fine places of 
resort in summer. 

Shipping Intelligence — Is to be found minutely recorded in 
the daily papers. 

Take the Right Hand side as you walk along the streets ; 
also the right hand in riding or driving. 

Those who wish to remain for some time in the Metropolis 
and who desire to practise the strictest economy, had better 
apply at some of the first-class boarding-houses advertised ia 



178 HINTS AND NOTES. 

the daily papers. A small but comfortable bedroom can be 
had in one of these, with good meals, for ten or twelve dol- 
lars a week. Apply only where references are given and re- 
quired. 

Time Tables — At all the railroad depots in the city, and in 
the ferry-boats, and across the ferries at depots, are Time Ta- 
bles nailed up on the walls of the waiting-rooms. As the 
hours of starting vary with the seasons, it is best to leave the 
travellers to consult these as to when, and at the same time 
how, to go to distant places. 

The Time Tables contain a printed list of places near and dis- 
tant on the railroad routes, marking the towns and villages at 
which each of the different trains stop, and at what hours; also 
the hours for starting from New York and the hours of leaving 
the aforesaid places, and of arrival from them in New York. 
These Time Tables will be found in all railway stations through- 
out the country, and are most explicit. One of them printed on 
paper can be had for the asking at the ticket office of the station 
in New York. 

Unfurnished Apartments — These are abundant for the lower 
and working classes in what are called " tenement houses." 
For the higher classes they are not so common, the latter find- 
ing their homes in hotels, boarding-houses, and in a whole pri- 
vate house. A new class of fashionable lodging-houses is, how- 
ever, being introduced, but their success is still to be proved. 
The rates charged are exorbitant. The largest of the kind is 
the new Stevens Apartment Building. 

Underground Railroad. — This great work, which is to give 
rapid transit for the people of Westchester County to the low- 
er part of the city, has been commenced and will be carried to 
a rapid completion. It is expected that the road will be fin- 
ished before September 1, 1874. Commodore Yanderbilt is the 
leading spirit of the enterprise and altogether controls it. 



HINTS AND NOTES. 



179 



TABLE OF DISTANCES. 



FHOM 


FROM 


FROM 


Tr> 


BATTERY. 


EXCHANGE. 


CITY HALL. 


±\j» 


:|:mile. 






Rector street. 


i 


i mile. 




Fulton. 


f 


i 




City Hall. 


1 


f 


i mile. 


Leonard. 


li 


1 


^ 


Canal. 


H 


n 


f 


Spring. 


If 


n 


1 


Houston. 


2 


H 


li 


Fourth. 


2i 


2 


li 


Ninth. 


2i 


2i 


If 


Fourteenth. 


2f 


2i 


2 


Nineteenth. 


3 


2f 


2i 


Twenty -fourth. 


H 


8 


2^ 


Twenty-ninth. 


H 


3i 


2f 


Thirty-fourth. 


3f 


3i 


3 


Thirty- eighth. 


4 


3f 


3i 


Forty-fourth. 


41: 


4 


3^ 


Forty-ninth. 


4i 


4i 


3f 


Fifty-fourth. 


4f 


4i 


4 


Fifty-eighth. 


5 


4| 


4i 


Sixty-third. 


5i 


5 


H 


Sixty-eighth. 


5i 


5i 


4f 


Seventy-third. 


5f 


■H 


5 


Seventy-eighth. 


C 


5f 


5i 


Eighty -third. 


6i 


6 


5i 


Eighty-eighth 


6^ 


6i 


5f 


Ninety-third. 


6f 


Gi 


6 


Ninety-seventh. 


7 


6* 


6i 


One Hundred and Second. 


7i 


7 


6i 


One Hundred and Seventh, 


7i 


n 


6f 


One Hundred and Twelfth. 


7f 


H 


7 


One Hundred and Seventeenth. 


8 


n 


7ir 


One Hundred and Twenty-first. 


Sir 


8 


7-} 


One Hundred and Twenty-sixth. 


8i 


8i 


7f 


One Hundred and Thirty-first. 


8i 


8J 


8 


One Hundred and Thirty-sixth. 


9 


8f 


Si 


One Hundred and Fortieth. 


9i 


9 


8i 


One Hundred and Forty-fifth. 


9i 


9i 


8f 


One Hundred and Fiftieth. 


9f 


9i 


9 


One Hundred and Fifty-fourth. 



From Battery to King's Bridge ("city limit), 15 miles. 



180 



HINTS AND NOTES. 



Wines and Liquors — These can be got of as good a quality 
as from the importers at a first- class retail grocery store. These 
stores are numerous in our principal thoroughfares, both up 
and down town. You can purchase these either by the box 
or single bottle. 

Wall Street Sneak Thieves have a new device by which 
to commit " sneak robberies." They lay some harmless explo- 
sive article on the floor, which when trodden on naturally at- 
tracts the attention of clerks and others. They take that op- 
portunity to seize upon any valuables within reach. 

Waiters in Hotels — New York Hotel waiters are accus- 
tomed to being civilly spoken to, and are respectful accordingly. 
Here, as everywhere in the United States, only the under-bred 
and vulvar are arbitrarv in manner towards servants. 




{Institution for the Blind —Ninth Avenue."] 



THE CENTRAL PARK. 



181 



t 



THE CENTRAL PARK. 




[Ceiitral Park — Summer House on the Lake.] 

Central Park — Between Fifth avenue and Eighth ave- 
nue — East and West — and between 59th street and 110th 
street, North and South. 

The Central Park was commenced in 1857. 

At each gate of the Park is a gate-keeper. On the grounds are 
park-keepers. One of their duties is to give any necessary in- 
formation to visitors. Lost articles are taken care of by a Prop- 
erty Clerk in. the Old Arsenal. 

See InJex for " Cars," which go to the Park. 



182 



THE CENTRAL PARK. 



Gates open all day, at all seasons, and in summer from 5 a. m. 
to 11 p. m. 

No fees permitted to any of the officials in the Park. 

Central Park is one of the four largest parks in the world, 
and perhaps the most beautiful of all. It covers an area of 
about 850 acres, laid out in such varied beauty as to harmonize 
with the mood of the moment, and attract and satisfy all tastes. 
The stately drives, the rural walks, the commanding views, the 




[Central Park — The Upper Lake.] 



romantic dells — the bridges, the statues, the arches, the terrace, 
to attract the artistic eye — the pond, the dairy, the play-ground 
suggestive of juvenile sports and juvenile simplicity. The Mall, 
the Casino for the fashionable and the bon vivant — the lake 



THE CENTRAL PARK. 



183 



with its boats, and the cave with its weird entrance for the 
sentimental dreamer. 

The Maze, invented it would seem expressly for lovers, 
since its central point and egress are designedly left almost un- 
attainable, of old fortifications, reminding one of sterner times 
the strea-ms, the cascades, suggestive of untrammelled nature. 




[Central Park — The Cave— Lower Lake.] 



The reservoir bringing the mind forcibly back to the practical fact 
of human progress, and the luxury of its perfected inventions. 
The Museum of Natural History, with all its w^onders, and 
the Menagerie, and to render the combination complete, the 
perfect abandon which all — rich or poor — may enjoy in their 



184 



THE CENTRAL PARK. 



rambles. It is a spot well worth coming a hundred miles to 
visit. 

It would take up too much space to mention each object of 
attraction minutely, but the Park is open at all hours of the day, 
and to all. 

On Saturday afternoons in summer, there is a fine band of 
music. The Music Pavilion is at the northern end of the Mall 
and not far from the Casino. 

Carriages, provided by the Park Commissioners and accommo- 




[Central Park — Orotto leading to the Cave.] 

dating ten or a dozen persons, are to be found at the Fifth 
avenue and 59th street gate, and at the Eighth avenue and 
^^ih street gate. 



THE CENTRAL PARK. 185 

They leave at short intervals. — Fare 25 cents for each person. 

New structures are constantly in progress of execution for or- 
namenting the Central Park and also for the convenience of visi- 
tors. 

The Park, under the genial warmth of Spring and Summer 
suns fresh with green verdure, fostered with the moisture of 
gentle rains, makes a charming retreat for the residents of the 
city, tired and weary with their weekly labors in the densely 
populated busmess quarters. It is only on a fine Sunday that 
we can really appreciate the many charms of the Park, and un- 
derstand the happiness and pleasure that its beautiful walks, pic- 
turesque chalets Siud refreshing limpid lakes afford to thousands 
of our fellow citizens. On week days the carriages of the rich 
roll along its level drives and children play about the smooth 
grass plats; but it is only on Sundays that Central Park be- 
comes a really cosmopolitan resort. If the weather is fine all 
classes are there. The young aristocrat drives by in his showy 
dog-cart and tandem, and Hans, with his frau, six children, 
frauds mother and frau's brother, carrying an ample basket 
containing the lunch, come in a party to breath the fresh air and 
enjoy the afternoon. 

There ai-e Cottages for ladies placed in different parts of 
the grounds, in charge of a female attendant. 

Entrances to the Central Park. 

The Scholars' Gate, Fifth avenue and 59th street. 
The Artists' Gate, Sixth avenue and 59th street. 
The Artisans' Gate, Seventh avenue and 59th street. 
The Merchants' Gate, Eighth avenue and 59th street. 
The Women's Gate, Eighth avenue and 72d street. 
The Hunters' Gate, Eighth avenue and 79th street. 
The Mariners' Gate, Eighth avenue and 85th street. 
The Gate of All Saints, Eighth avenue and 96th street. 



186 THK CENTRAL PARK. 

The Bovs' Gate, Eiohth avenue and 100th street. 
The Children's Gate, Fifth avenue and 72d street. 
The Miners' Gate, Fifth avenue and 79th street. 
Tlie Engineers' Gate, Fifth avenue and 90th street. 
The Woodman's Gate, Fifth avenue and 96th street. 
The Girls' Gate, Fifth avenue and 102d street. 
The Pioneers' Gate, Fifth avenue and 110th street. 
The Farmers' Gate, Sixth avenue and 110th street. 
The Warriors' Gate, Seventh avenue and 110th street. 
The Strangers' Gate, Eighth avenue and 110th street. 




BRIEF HISTORY OF OLD NEW YORK. 187 



BRIEF HISTORY OF OLD NEW YORK. 

Passing over Scandinavian traditions, which contain accounts 
of the landing of the Norsemen on our continent some time be- 
fore the expedition of Christopher Columbus, we give but slight 
credit to the statement of some, that tlie site of the present city 
of New York was actually visited by an early navigator named 
Yerazzano, in the year 1524. 

The earliest authentic account is that of the voyage of Henry 
Hudson (frequently written Hendrick Hudson), an Englishman 
in the service of the Dutch East India Company. The Euro- 
pean world was still intent on a North-East passage to India. 
Hudson, who was not only an intelligent, but a bold and fear- 
less navigator, had induced English enterprise to test his the- 
ory for two successive years. His friends then became dis- 
courao-ed and Hudson abandoned England for Holland, which 
country at that period enjoyed a commercial supremacy. 

It is well settled that Hudson, in the " Half Moon," dropped 
anchor in the Bay of New York on the 3d of September, 160D. 
Pusliing up the noble river which now bears his name, he came 
to the " Tappan See," where the river widens into a bay, and 
had his faitli confirmed that he was on the right course for 
China. This confidence was soon weakened as he entered tlie 
Highlands, but he persevered till he reached A.lbany, when he 
abandoned all idea of the feasibility of his project and returned 
down tlie river and back to Amsterdam. 

We reject the story (with many others) of the purchase of 
as much land by the whites of tiie Indians as the hide of a bul- 
lock could encompass, and of the cutting it into slender thongs 
so that it reached over a goodly portion of the island. The tale 



188 BRIEF HISTORY OF OLD NEW YORK. 

is taken almost literally from Virgil, and refers to the purchase 
of Carthage: — 

" The wandering exiles bought a space of ground 
Which one bullhide enclosed and compassed round." 

jEneid, Book 1, 490-1. 

That Hudson inspired the natives with a friendly feeling is 
indicated by the name given to the spot — Manahachtanienks — 
said to mean *' place where all got drunk ;" from this comes 
*' Manhattan," by which the island is even now designated. 
A still better evidence is in the fact that the Dutch in the fol- 
lowing year, 1610, sent vessels to open a trade with the natives 
and a settlement was almost immediately commenced. 

So admirable a site for a town was not destined to remain in 
the peaceful possession of the first discoverers. The Enghsh, 
inheriting the old Saxon love of right by the strong arm, soon 
pounced on the enviable locality. Argal, Governor of Virginia, 
returning from a raid on the French settlements in Acadia, put 
into New Amsterdam, surprised the honest Dutch governor, 
Christiaensen, and compelled a surrender of the place to the 
King of England. But the Dutch rallied in force the following 
year, retook the place and fortified it, and the same year, 1614, 
Holland made a "grant" of the whole -country under the title 
of New Netherland. Under this possession it was long held 
and known. No important event took place till the reign of 
Charles II. king of England. In 1664 that monarch, disregard- 
ing the rights, claims, and settlements of the Dutch, granted 
all New Nethei-land to his brother James, then Duke of Tork 
and Albany^ afterwards the noted James II. of England, who 
was virtually expelled from the English throne and was suc- 
ceeded by *' Wilham and Mary." 

An expedition was fitted, consisting of four frigates and 300 
soldiers, to take possession under the grant of Charles ; and on 
the 27th August, 1664, the city of New Amsterdam capitulated 



BRIEF HISTORY OF OLD NEW VORK. 189 

to tlie English, and on the 24th of September Fort Orange 
made a similar submission. In commemoration of the titles of 
the Duhe, who luas the grantee of the patent^ New Amsterdam was 
named New York^ and Fort Orange^ Albany. In 1667, by the 
treaty of Breda, New Netherland was confirmed to the English, 
and as a compensation Surinam was ceded to the Dutch. 

But the English occupation was not to exist without its 
reverses. In 1673 a Dutch war broke out, and a small 
squadron sent by them, after committing ravages in Virginia, 
came to New York and demanded surrender not only of the 
town but of all the country. This was assented to with- 
out a shot being fired on either side, and the Dutch once 
more took possession. The very next year, peace wan 
made between England and Holland. New Netherland was 
restored to the English, and the English territories in 
Guiana to the Dutch. The Duke of York confirmed his title by 
a new patent, and Andreas was made governor. The first legis- 
lative assembly was held under governor Dougan, in 1683. 
New York suffered greatly from the arbitrary rule of James, 
but in 1689 William and Mary came to the English throne and 
restored New York to its lawful privileges. In 1692 special 
attention began to be turned towards the fortifications. 

In 1698 the Earl of Bellomont was made governor. From 
his speech to the Legislature it would seem that New York 
rulers have inherited the practice of plundering the city. The 
Earl says : "I cannot but observe to you what a legacy my 
predecessor has left me and what difficulties to struggle with; 
a few miserable, naked, half-starved soldiers, not half the num- 
ber the king allowed pay for ^ Much more follows in the same 
vein, from which we conclude that human nature was pretty 
much the same then as in the davs of our " Ring^." 

The English now felt secure of their rich possessions. 

A free grammar-school was started in 1702, which seems for 



190 BRIEF HISTORY OF OLD NEW" YORK. 

years to have sufficed, so far as free schools were concerned. 
In 1725 the first newspaper was issued, and in 1732 a free 
Classical Academy was founded. New York now began to 
rapidly improve and increase. Business of every kind flour- 
ished, and the city assumed a more vigorous aspect. 

In the troubles with the mother country which some years 
after succeeded, and which culminated in the war of the Revo- 
lution, New York took a firm and undaunted stand. But the 
city was too great a prize for the English not to lay out all 
their forces to possess. The unfortunate issue of the battle of 
Long Island made it impossible for G-eneral Washington to 
hold New York. The result was, that the city with all its 
fortifications and appurtenances fell into the hands of the Bri- 
tish fleet and army under Admiral and Greneral Howe, Septem- 
ber, 1776, For a little more than seven years — in fact till the 
end of the war — the English held possession of the town. On 
the 25th of November, 1783, they evacuated it, and Wash- 
ington and the Grovernor of the State made their trium- 
phal entry. Ten years later New York had doubled its popu- 
lation. 

From the completion of the Erie Canal, in 1825, may be dated 
the new era of commercial prosperity and grandeur for this me- 
tropolis. She now soon outstripped her rival in population — 
Philadelphia — and has continued to increase in almost fabulous 
proportions. In October, 1842, the Croton Aqueduct was com- 
pleted, supplying the only serious need of the city. 

New York, though a very healthy place, has been thrice 
visited by a very severe pestilence. In 1795 by yellow fever, 
and in 1832 and again in 1849 by Asiatic cholera. The city has 
suffered from two fires of almost unexampled extent — one in 
1835, and the other in 1845. Nothing, however, has served 
apparently even to check the growth of this metropolis. 



brief history of old new york. 191 

Sites of Remarkable Events. 

The brilliant assemblies of the '' Court of Washini^ton " were 
held in the old City Hotel between Pine and Cedar streets. 

" The Old Sugar House," converted into a prison for Ameri- 
can soldiers, by the British, stood in Liberty street, near the 
old post-office. 

Washington's residence stood at the North angle of Franklin 
square. Here he held his State receptions. 

Washington Irving was born in one of a row of houses, and 
at about the centre of the block, in William street, between 
John and Fulton. 

At the corner of Charlton and Yarick streets, once lived suc- 
cessively, Washington, John Adams, and Aaron Burr. 

At the Bowling-green stood once a Dutch and Enolish Fort. 

On the site of the United States Treasury was once a pil- 
lory and whipping-post. 

On the same site, in the Hall of Legislature, George Wash- 
ington was elected the first President of the United States. 

Col. Alexander Hamilton lived in a neighboring house. 

The stamps were burned in 1776, where Catharine street 
now stands. 

Talleyrand, when ambassador to the United States, lived on 
the site of the Metropolitan, the large building between Prince 
and Houston streets, east side Broadway, 

Washington's farewell interview with his officers took place 
at a tavern corner Pearl and Broad streets. 

At No. 1 Broadway, lived successively during the Revolution, 
Lord Cornvvallis, Gen. Clinton, Lord Howe, and Gen. Wash- 
ington. 

' Fulton died in a house on this site. The traitor Arnold here 
concocted his nefarious projects. 



192 OLD NEW YORK ADVERTISEMENTS. 



OLD NEW YORK ADVERTISEMENTS. 

To be Sold, a good, likely Negroe Man, about 22 years of 
Age, is an extraordinary cook, and understands all Manner of 
House work. Enquire of the Printers here of. — The New York 
Gazette : or the Weekly Post-Boy, July 9. 1753. 

To he Let Bedloe's Island, alias Love Island, together with 
the Dwelling House and Light House, being finely situated 
for a tavern, where all kind of Garden Stuff, Poultry, &c., may 
be easily raised for the Shipping outward bound, and from 
where any Quantity of pickled Oysters may be obtained ; it 
abounds with English Rabbits. — Ibid. 

Travelers are desired to observe, in going from Flat-Bush to 
said Ferry (Yellow Hook ferry), to keep the mark'd trees oa 
the right hand. — New York Mercury, June 18, 1753. 

Just imported in the Ship Fame, Capt. Seymour, from Ham- 
burgh, and to be Sold on board the said Vessel, by Joseph 
Haynes or said Master; A parcel of very likely, healthy Pala- 
tines, of all Trades. As also Women and Children, &lq. — Ibid. 

To-Morrow will be Published (Price Is.), And sold by the 
Printer hereof; The Tragedy of Cato, by Mr. Addison. — Ibid. 

Notice is hereby 'jiven that Abraham Webb, being provided 
with a Boat exceeding well fitted, with a very handsome 
Cabbin, and all necessary accomodations ; proposes to give his 
attendance, at the White Hall Slip, every Monday and Thurs- 
day ; and the same Day, Wind and Weather permitting, to 
proceed for Amboy Ferry to John Cluck's, where a Waggon, 



OLD NEW YORK ADVERTISEMENTS. 



193 



Kept by John Kichards, will be ready to receive either Goods 
or Passengers, and to proceed with them to Borden's Town, 
where a Stage Boat will be ready to carry them to Philadel- 
phia ; and the same method will be followed from the Crocket 
Billet Wharf at Philadelphia, up to Borden's Town, and shall 
proceed Load or no Load, twice a Week, by which Means, Pas- 
sengers or Groods may never be detained on the Road. As 
they purpose to endeavour to use People in the best Manner 
they are capable of, they hope all good Persons will give it 
the encouragement it deserves. So with Respect they remain 
Friends to the Publick. — The New YorTx, Gazette: or the Weekly 
Post-Boy, June 4:, 1753. 





% 


ki 


^..M 




[JSloomingdale Lunatic Asylum — 111 t/i street.} 



194 BROOKLYN. 



BROOKLYN. 

Brooklyn, ■which has a population of nearly half a million, is 
the third city in size in the United States, ranking next to 
Philadelphia. It is separated from New York only by the 
East river, and is as much a part of the metropolis, as the 
" Surrey Side " is of London. The Brooklynites have steadily 
resisted being incorporated witli their larger neighbor, though 
they have themselves swallowed Williamsburgh — now called 
" Brooklyn E, D." — East District. Brooklyn has been termed 
the '' lodging-house of New York," because probably nine- 
tenths of the wealthy residents do business in the city. Never- 
theless, the inhabitants feel very independent of the metropolis, 
and are ambitious of rivalling it. The numerous ferries which 
cross every two or three minutes make access between the two 
places very easy, and the great bridge soon to be completed 
will add to the facility of mtercommunication. 

Public Buildings. 

City Hall — One mile from Fulton Ferry, and is opposite 
the junction of Fulton and Court streets. 

Post Office — Washington street, near the junction of Myr- 
tle avenue and Fulton street. 

City Armory — Corner Henry and Cranberry streets. 

Long Island College Hospital — Henry st., near Pacific. 

City Hospital — Raymond st., near Dekalb av. 

There are in Brooklyn Asylums, various Institutes, and Dis- 
pensaries, Banks, Lyceums, and all other accessories of a large 
city. The Mercantile Library numbers forty-one thousand 
volumes. 

Marine Hospital — Wallabout Bay 



BROOKLYN. 195 

State Arsenal — Corner Portland avenue and Auburn Place. 

Academy of Music — Montague street, between Court and 
Clinton streets. 

Kings County Jail — Raymond street, Fort Green. 

Academy of Design — The increasing popularity and success 
of the semi-annual exhibitions of the Brooklyn Art Association 
demanded a larger and more suitable room than the Assembly 
Room of the Academy of Music. The Association therefore 
have erected a building that contains ample accommodation for 
the exhibitions and the School of Design. It is next to the 
Academy of Music. 

The exterior, which is ornate, is of tinted stone, the buff 
stone from Scotland, and the red freestone from Ohio. The 
arches over the entrance and windows are delicately sculptured 
in the forms of birds, reptiles, ferns, etc. From the main en- 
trance a tower rises into a picturesque gable to the height of 
one hundred and ten feet from the sidewalk. This tower con- 
tains the vestibule and main stairway. The interior walls are 
finished in buflf pressed brick reheved by bands of Philadelphia 
brick and Ohio sandstone. The stairway is built of oak with 
mahogany trimmings. No soft wood is used in the building. 
The basement is devoted to the use of the schools of the 
Academy of Design. The grand gallery on the second floor is 
very fine. Opening out of this hall is a water-color gallery and 
a sculpture-room. An arched doorway opens from the main 
gallery into the assembly-room of the Academy, thus giving 
abundance of wall space for the pictures and of floor for the 
guests on reception nights. Studios are above. 

The chronological collection embraces works representative 
of American art, as far as it was possible to obtain them, from 
1715 to the present time. 

Charles Wilson Peale, one of our earliest American artists, is 
represented by two portraits, one of Washington and one of 



196 BROOKLYN. 

Franklin. The last sitting for this portrait was but eight days 
before the death of Franklin, and it is unfinished. 

At one end of the gallery is G-ilbert Stuart's full-length por- 
trait of Washington, painted in 1794. 

Opposite the Stuart portrait hangs Trumbull's portrait of 
"Washington, considered the finest one in existence. 

Public Works. 

United States ISTavy Yard, situated on Wallabout Bay. See 
Index for " Ferries." 

Atlantic Dock, South Ferry. Take Hamilton Ferry, foot 
White Hall street, K Y. 

Prospect Park — A new park of immense size, which promi- 
ses to rival even Central Park in extent and artificial adornments. 
It commands beautiful views. It is well wooded. It can be 
reached by horse-cars starting from the ferries. 

Greenwood Cemetery — A couple of miles from South Ferry. 
Omnibuses carry you there from the ferry. It is at the present 
time one of the largest and perhaps the most beautiful cemetery 
in the world ; it commands, also, splendid views of city and 
harbor. Free admission on week-days, etc. Permits obtaina- 
ble at any undertaker's. 

Water Works — The resources of the Brooklyn Water Works 
are said to be six times as great as those of New York. The 
water is supplied from Rockville Lake, Hempstead, L. I., and 
also from Ridgewood. 

Cars — There are cars starting from all the ferries for all parts 
of Brooklyn. 

Churches of Brooklyn and Prominent Preachers. 

Plymouth Church, Congregationalist — Orange street, be- 
tween Henry and Hicks streets. Rev. Henry Ward Beecher 

Church of the Pilgrims, Presbyterian— Corner Remsen ana 
Henry streets. Rev. Dr. Storrs. 



BROOKLYN. 197 

The Dutch Reformed Church, in Pierrepont street, is a par- 
ticularly beautiful church. 

Church named Church of the Holt Trinity, Episcopal — 
Corner Clinton and Montague streets. 

GrRACE Church, Episcopal — Hicks street, near Remsen. 

Church named Church of the Saviour, Unitarian — Corner 
Pierrepont street and Munroe place. 

Dutch Reformed Church — Rear of the City Hall. Rev. Dr. 
Dwight. 

Methodist Church — Clinton street near Atlantic street. 
Rev. Dr. Cuyler. 

From the numerous religious edifices in Broolslyn, that city 
has acquired the name of "The City of Churches." 

Hotels of Brooklyn. 

The best hotel is the Pierrepont House, Montague place, op- 
posite Wall street Ferry. 

The Mansion House, Henry street, near Pierrepont street, 
and the Gtlobe Hotel, 242 Fulton street, are also first-class ho- 
tels. 




198 STEAMBOAT TRAVEL. 



STEAMBOAT TRAVEL. 

The following is a complete list, alphabetically arranged, of 
the steamboats which ply between this city and points on the 
Hudson Eiver, East River, Long Island Sound, New York Bay 
and New Jersey. None of these boats make a Sunday trip 
unless specially mentioned. 

Albany — New Jersey Steamboat Company, " People's Line." 
One of the fine steamboats of the line — Drew or Dean 
Eichmond — will leave Pier 41 North River, foot of Canal 
street, at 6 p. m. daily, connecting at Albany with railroads, 
North, East and West; returning from Albany at 7 p. m. 
daily, or on the arrival of connecting trains. 

Albany and Troy Day-Boats — Landing at Catskill, Cornwall, 
Cozzens', Hudson, TivoH, Newburgh, Nyack, Poughkeepsie, 
Rhinebeck, Tarrytown, West Point and Yonkers. Steam- 
boats D. Drew and C. Yibbard leave Pier 39 North River 
at 8:30 a. m., landing at 34th street, 

Albany, Troy and Catskill — New York and Troy Steamboat 
Company's steamboats Connecticut and Yanderbilt, leave 
Pier 44 North River at 6 p. m. daily, Saturdays excepted, 
connecting at Albany with railroads, North, East and 
West. Returning, leave Troy at 6 K m., and Albany at 
7 P. M., Saturdays excepted. 

Albany, Troy, and Catskill — Steamboats Sunnyside and 
Thomas Powell, leave Pier 43 North Rive" daily, Saturdays 
excepted, at 6 p. m., connecting at Albany with railroads 
North. Returning, leave Troy daily, Saturdays excepted, 
at 6 p. M. 



steamboat travel. 199 

Athens, Tarrytown, Catskill, Tivolt, Hyde Park, Staats- 
BURG, Smith's Dock, Rhinebeck, Germantown, Maldeh 
AND Stuyvesant — -Propeller Andrevr Harder leaves Pier 
35 North River, Tuesdays, Thursdays and Saturdays, at 5 
p. M. Returning, leaves Athens, Mondays, Wednesdays 
and Fridays, at 5 p. m. 

Astoria, L. I. — Steamboats Sylvan Glen and Sylvan Stream, 
Sylvan Dell and Sylvan Grove, daily, from Pier 24 East 
River, at 6:30, 8, 9 and 10 a. m. ; 12 m. ; 1, 3, 4, 5, 6:15, 7 
p. M. Returning, leave Astoria at 6:15, 7:15, 8:15, 9:15, 
10:15, 11:15 a. m.; 2:15, 3:15, 4:15, 5:15, 6:15 p. m. Sun- 
day Arrangement. — Boats leave Harlem at 8:30 a. m. and 
hourly and half-hourly thereafter during the day, landing 
at Astoria and Eleventh street, each trip. Last boat 
leaves Harlem at 7:30 p. m. and Peck slip at 8:15 p. m. 
This is the only hne connecting with the regular line of 
boats for High Bridge. Passengers by this line of boats 
can visit the Government Works at Hell Gate, Schneider's 
and Schutzer's Parks at Astoria, Christ Park and Karl's 
Park at North New York, and High Bridge. 

Baylis's Dock, L. I. (Port Schuyler) — Steamboat Seawanhaka 
daily, from Pier 24 East River, at 4 p. m., calling at Thirty- 
third street each way. Returning, leaves Baylis's Dock 
at 8:20 a. m. 

Bay Ridge, L. I. — Steamer Bay Ridge, from Wall street ferry 
at 8.30 and 11 a. m. ; 2, 4, 5:15 and 6:30 p. m. Returning, 
leaves Bay Ridge at 8, 9:10 A. m., and 12:45, 2:35 and 4:35 

p. M. 

Bergen Point, N. J. — Steamboat Chancellor at 11 A. m. and 
4:30 p. M. daily, from Pier 14 North River. Returning, 
leaves Bergen Point at 8:25 a. m. and 2:25 p. m. 



200 STEAMBOAT TRAVEL. 

Boston — Steamboats Bristol and Providence, daily, from Pier 
28 North River at 5 p.m. Ee turning trains leave Old 
Colony and Newport Railway Depot, Boston, at 5:30 p.m., 
connecting at Fall River. 

Boston — Steamboats Electra and Metis, daily, from Pier 27 
North River at 5 p.m. Returning train leaves Boston at 2 

P.M. 

Boston — Steamboats Stonington and Narragansett daily, from 
Pier 33 North River at 5 p.m. Returning trains leave 
Boston from Boston and Providence Railroad Depot, at 
5:30 P.M. 

Boston — Steamboats City of Boston and City of New York, 
daily, from Pier 40 North River at 5 p.m. Returning train 
leaves from Boston, Hartford and Brie Railroad Depot, foot 
of Summer street, at 6:15 p.m. 

Bridgeport, Conn. — Steamboats Bridgeport and J. B. Schuyler, 
daily, at 12 m. and at 12 midnight, from Pier 35 East River. 
Returning, leave Bridgeport daily, except Saturdays, at 9 
A.M. and 11 P.M. 

Bridgeport, Conn. — Steamboats Artisan at 11:30 a.m., and 
Wyoming at 4 p.m. Returning, leave Bridgeport at 7:25 
A.M. and 11:30 p,m. - 

Cold Spring, Cornwall, Fishkill, Haverstraw, Newburgh, 
Low Point, Marlborough, and New Hamburg — Steamers 
Walter Brett and River Queen leave Pier 43 North River at 
4:30 P.M. Returning, leave New Hamburg daily, except 
Saturdays, at 7 p.m. 

Catskill, Smith's Dock, Hyde Park, Staatsburg, Cold Spring, 
Rhinebeck, Tivoli, Malden, West Camp, Germantown, 
&c. — Steamboat Neversink^ from Pier 35 North River at 



STEAMBOAT TRAVEL. 201 

G P.M. Tuesdays, Thursdays and Saturdays. Returning, 
leaves Catskill at 6 p.m. Mondays, Wednesdays and Fridays. 

College Point — Steamboat Osseo, daily, except Sunday, from 
Pier No. 22 East River at 10 a.m. and 4 p.m. Returning, 
leaves College Point at 8 a.m. and 1:15 p.m. 

Coxsackie, Athens, G-ermantown and Malden. — Steamer Moni- 
tor leaves Pier 49 North River on Monday, Wednesday 
and Friday at 5 p.m. Returning, leaves Coxsackie on 
Tuesday, Thursday and Sunday at 4 p.m. 

Coxsackie.— Steamer Redfield leaves Pier 51 North River on 
Tuesday, Thursday and Saturday at 5 p.m. Returning, 
leaves Coxsackie on Monday, Wednesday and Friday at 
4:30 P.M. 

Elizabethport, N. J". — Steamboats Chancellor and Kill Yon 
Kull, at 11 A.M., 4:30 p.m. and 5 p.m. daily, from Pier No. 14 
North River Returning, leave Elizabethport at 6:45 and 
8 A.M. and 2 p.m. 

Fall Rtver, Mass. — Steamboats Bristol and Providence from 
Pier No. 28 North River at 5 p.m. daily. Returning, leave 
Fall River at 7 p.m. 

Fort Lee and Pleasant Valley — Pleasant Valley, from Pier 
No. 43 North River at 10 a m., 2 and 5:15 p.m., calling at 
Thirty-fourth street each way. 

Flushing. L. T. — Steamboat Osseo, daily from Pier 22 East 
River at 10:50 a.m. Returning, leaves Flushing at 12:40 

P.M. 

Glen Cove, G-lenwood, Mott's Dock, Great Neck, Sea Cliff 
Grove, Whitestone, Sands' Point, and Roslyn, L. I. — 
Steamboat Seawanhaka, at 4 p.m., from Pier 24 East River, 



202 STEAMBOAT TRAVEL. 

calling at 33d street each way. Eeturning, leaves G-len 
Cove at 7:40 a.m. 

Glen Cove, Sea-Cliff G-rove, Sands' Point and Whitestone, 
L. I. — Steamboat Arrowsmith, from Pier 24 East River at 
9:15 a.m. Eeturning, leaves G-len Cove at 1:45 p.m., calling 
at 33d street each way. 

GtReenport, New Suffolk, Sag Harbor and Orient, L. I. — 
Steamboat Escort. Tuesday, Thursday, and Saturday, 
from Pier 4 North River, at 5 p.m. Returning, leaves 
Greenport Monday, Wednesday, and Friday at 5:30 p.m. 

Harlem and Torkville, N. Y. (landing at 11th and 120th 
street.) — Steamboats Sylvan Stream, Sylvan Dell, and 
Sylvan G-rove daily, from Pier 24 East River (Peck Slip) 
at 7, 7:30, 8, 9, 9:30, 10, 11:30 a.m., 12 m., 1, 1:30, 3, 3:30, 

4, 5, 5:30, 6:15, 7 p.m. Returning, leave Harlem at 6, 6:30, 
7, 8, 8:30, 9, 10, 10:30, 11 a.m., 12:30, 2, 2:30, 3, 4, 4:30, 

5, 6 p.m. 

Hartford, Middletown, and Connecticut River Landings — 
Steamer State of New York or Granite State, from Pier 24 
East River (Peck Slip) daily at 4 p.m. Returning, leave 
Hartford daily, at 4 p.m., Sundays excepted. 

Haverstraw — Landing at Yonkers, Englewood, Nyack, Tarry- 
town, Hastings, Dobb's Ferry, and Sing Sing. Steamer 
Adelphi, from Pier 34 North River at 4 p.m. daily. Re- 
turning, leaves Haverstraw at 6:20 a.m. 

High Bridge and Kingsbridge — Connect at Harlem with boats 
from Pier 24 East River. 

Hudson — Nupha and Redfield, from Pier 51 North River, at 6 
p.m. Returning, leave Hudson daily, except Saturday, 

7 P.IL 



STEAMBOAT TRAVEL. 203 

Ketport, N. J. — Steamboat Matteawan. daily, from Pier 26 
North River at 4 p.m. Returning, leaves Keyport at 

7 A.M. 

Long Branch, N. J. — Steamboats Magenta or Gen. Sedgwick, 
daily, from Pier 28 North River at 6:40 and 9:40 a.m. 4 and 
6 P.M. Returning, leave Long Branch at 7:40 and 10:33 
A.M. and 6:05 p.m. 

Mariners' Harbor — Steamer Chancellor at 11 a.m. and 4:30 
P.M., from Pier 14 North River. Returning, leaves Mari- 
ners' Harbor at 7, 8, 10 a.m., and 2:10 p.m. 

MoRRiSANiA, Astoria and Harlem (landing at 8th and 119th 
streets each way) — Steamboats Morrisania and Harlem, 
daily, from Pier 22 East River, at 7:15, 8:15, 9:15, 10:15, 
a.m.; 1:15, 3:15, 4:15, 5:15, 6:20 p.m. Returning, leave 
Morrisania 6:5, 7:15, 8:15, 9:20, 10:15 a.m., 1:30, 2:45, 4:15, 
5:15 p.m. 

Newark— Thomas P. Way, from Pier 26 North River at 10:30 
A.M. and 4:30 p.m. daily. Returning, leaves Newark at 7:15 
A.M. and 1 P.M. 

New Bedford, Mass.— Steamers Acushnet and Wamsutta, 
Wednesday and Saturday, from Pier 13 East River at 3 
P.M. Returning, leave New Bedford Wednesday and Sa- 
turday at 2 P.M. 

New Haven, Conn. — Steamboats Elm City, daily at 3:15 p.m. ; 
City of Hartford, at 11 p.m., Saturday night at 12, from 
Pier 25 East River. Returning, leave New Haven at 10:15 
A.M. and 11 p.m. Steamer New Haven leaves New Haven 
for New York Sunday nights only, at 11 o'clock. 

New London, Conn. — Steamboats City of Boston and City of 



204 STEAMBOAT TRAVEL. 

New York, daily, from Pier 40 North River at 5 p.m. 
Returning, leave New London at 10:30 p.m. 

New London, Conn. — Steamboats City of Lawrence and City of 
Norwich, daily, from Pier 40 North River at 5 p.m. Re- 
turning, leave New London at 9:30 p.m. 

Newport, R. L — Steamboats Providence and Bristol, daily, at 
5 p.m. from Pier 28 North River. Returning, leave New- 
port at 8 P.M. 

NoRWALK, Conn. — Nelly White, from Pier 37 East River, daily, 
at 2:45 p.m., and Thirty-third street at 3 p.m. Returning, 
leaves Nor walk at 7:45 a.m. 

Norwich, Conn. — Steamboats City of Lawrence and City of 
Norwich, daily, from Pier 40 North River at 5 p.m. 

Ntack. — Landing at Yonkers, Hastings, Irvington, Dobbs' 
Ferry, Carraansville, Englewood, and Tarrytown — Alexis, 
from Pier 34 North River at 5 p.m. Returning, leaves 
Nyack at 6:15 a.m. 

Oyster Bay. — Calling at Bayville, Huntington, Jones' Dock, 
Laurelton, City Island, and Cold Spring — D. R. Martin, 
from Pier 37 East River, daily, at 4 p.m. Returning, leaves 
Oyster Bay at 6:30 a.m., calling at Thirty-third street both 
ways. 

Peekskill. — Calling at Yonkers, Dobbs' Ferry, Tarrytown, 
Nyack, Sing Sing, Haverstraw, Verplanck's and Grassy 
Point — Steamer Antelope, from Pier 34 North River, daily, 
Sundays included, at 8 a.m., and Thirty-fourth street at 
8:15 A.M. Returning, leaves Peekskill at 1:30 p.m., arriving 
in New York at 5.30 p.m. 

Peekskill. — Landing at Yonkers, Irvington, Tarrytown, Nyack, 
Rockland Lake, Haverstraw, Grassy Point and Yerplanck'a 



STEAMBOAT TRAVEL. 205 

— The Clirystenah, from Pier ISTo. 34 North River at 3:45 
P.M. Returning, leaves Peekskill at 6:30 a.m. 

Perth Amboy, Rossville and Staten Island Sound Landings. — 
Steamboat Matano, daily, from Pier ISTo. 13 North River 
at 3 P.M. Returning, leaves Perth Amboy at 7:05 a.m. 

Port Washington, Whitestone and G-reat Neck, L. T. — Steam- 
boat Arrowsmith, from Pier 24 East River at 5 p.m. Re- 
turning, leaves Port Washington at 6:45 a.m. 

Poughkeepsie, Newburgh, Cornwall Cozzens', New Ham- 
burg, Milton. Rondout and Westpoint. — Steamer Mary 
Powell leaves Pier 39 North River at 3:30 p.m. Returning, « 
leaves Rondout at 5:30 a.m. 

Poughkeepsie. — Landing at Marlboro', Highland, and New 
Hamburg — J. L. Hasbrouck and D. S. Miller, from Pier 
No. 35 North River at 5 p.m. Returning, leave Pough- 
keepsie at 7 P.M. 

Providence, R. I. — Electra and Meta, daily, from Pier 27 
North River, at 5 p.m. Returning, leave Providence at 
5:30 P.M. 

Red Bank and New Jersey Highlands. — Steamboat Helen 
leaves Pier 35 North River daily, according to tide. 

Rondout — Landing at Cozzens', Cornwall, Newburgh, Milton, 
Poughkeepsie and Esopus — James W. Baldwm or Thomas 
Cornell, daily, from Pier No. 34 North River at 4 p.m. 
Returning, leave Rondout daily, except Saturdays, at 6 

P.M. 

Sao Harbor, L. I. — Steamer Escort, Tuesday, Thursday and 
Saturday, from Pier 26 East River at 5 p.m. Returning, 
leaves Sag Harbor Monday, Wednesday and Friday at 4 
p.m. 



206 STEAMBOAT TRAVEL. 

Saugerties and Tivoli — Steamboat Ausonia, Pier 49 North 
River, Tuesdays, Thursdays and Saturdays, at 5 p.m. Ee- 
turuing, leaves Saugerties Mondays, Wednesdays and Fri- 
days, at 6 P.M. 

South Ambot, N. J. — Steamboat William Cook, daily, from 
Pier 1 ISTorth Hiver at 4 p.m. (See Camden and Amboy 
Railroad.) Returning, leaves South Amboy at 10 a.m. 

Staten Island Ferry — (North Shore) — Steamboats Pomona 
and Thomas Hunt, and Castleton, from Pier 19 North 
River for New Brighton, Port Richmond and Elm Park, 
every hour from 7 a.m. to 12 m., and from 2 p.m. to 7 p.m. 

Staten Island Railroad Ferry — (South Shore) — Boats leave 
foot of Whitehall street for Vanderbilt Landing hourly, 
from 6 A.M. until 7 p.m. Returning from Vanderbilt Land- 
ing from 6 A.M. to 7 p.m., and at 10 p.m. 

Stamford and G-reenwich — Steamer Nelly White, from Pier 
37 East River, daily, at 3:30 p.m., calling at 33d street. 
Returning, leaves Stamford at 7 a.m. 

Stonington, Conn. — Steamboats Stonington and Old Colony, 
daily, from Pier 33 North River, at 5 p.m. Returning, 
leave Stonington at 9 p.m. 

Wistchester — Unionport — Steamboat Osseo, daily, from Pier 
22 East River, at 4:15 p.m. Returning, leaves Westchester 
at 7:15 a.m. 



SUBURBAN RESORTS. 



207 



SUBURBAN RESORTS. 



Valuable Facts as to tlie Places Neighboring New York. 



We present below a carefully compiled exhibit of tbe railroad 
stations within a radius of fifty miles around this city, together 
with other collateral figures of general interest. The rates of 
commutation on the Hudson and Harlem roads are g4ven approx- 
imately ; those of the New Haven road are in accordance with the 
schedule of reductions recently made — on one or two other roads 
there are no rates obtainable. For all practical purposes, how- 
ever, the list will be found complete enough. 



PLACES. 



Allendale .... 

Avenel 

Amityville . . . 
Brick Church 
B] cornfield. . . 
Bayonne. . . . 
Bergen Point. 
Bound Brook. 
Belleville 



6 




o 




a 




d 


O 


-g 


s 


fi 


H 


26 


1.45 


23 


1.00 


29 


1.53 


13 


.53 


11 


.59 


5 


28 


7 


.30 


27 


1.35 


11 


.41 





s 



Bailroads. 



$76 


00 


77 50 


85 


00 


69 


00 


69 50 


50 00 


50 


00 


95 


00 


62 50 



Erie 

New Jersey. . 
South Side.. . 
Mor. & Essex 
Mor. & Essex 
N. J. Central 
N. J. Central 
N. J. Central 
Erie 



c3 

CQ 

•3 



11 

6 

7 

16 

13 

26 

32 

14 

7 



208 


SUBURBAN RESORTS. 






PLACES. 


o 

i 
S 


S 

H 


1 

S 

as 


Railroads. 


• 
CS 

05 

a 
H 

4 


Bosfota 


13 
15 
39 
19 
16 
14 
19 
23 
32 
35 
40 
25 
29 
13 
2 

2i 

6 
15 
14 

9 
15 
17 
19 
22 
29 
30 
43 

7 
82 
48 
34 
37 
29 
13 
17 
38 
38 


.48 

1.00 

1.47 

.40 

.31 

.29 

1.20 

1.38 

2.00 

2.06 

2.12 

1.85 

1.48 

.58 

.15 

.17 

.27 

.59 

.48 

.42 

1.03 

1.09 

1.17 

1.23 

1.29 

1.32 

1.54 

0.27 

1.30 

2.10 

1.26 

1.38 

1.23 

0.23 

0.36 

1.50 

1.50 


64' 00 
105 00 
104 00 

94 00 
80 00 
75 00 
75 00 
85 00 
90 00 
46 00 
82 00 
90 00 
63 00 
45 00 
45 00 
50 00 
70 00 
63 00 
60 00 
75 00 

44*66 

90 00 

250 00 

111 00 

114 00 

95 00 
72 00 
90 00 
98 00 
98 00 


Midland 

Harlem 

Harlem ...... 

Flushing 

Flushing 

Flushing.. . . . 

South Side . . . 

u 

n 
u 
(( 

Mor. & Essex. 

u 
u 

N. J. Central.. 

u 

a • 
• • 

• • 

Erie 


Bronx\T.lle 


6 


Bedford 


4 


Brookdale 


4 


Bay Side 


6 


Broadway 


6 


Baldwin sville 

Belmore 


8 
6 


Breslau 


6 


Babylon 


7 


Bay Shore 


4 


Chatham 


9 


Convent 


4 


Clifton 


4 


Communipaw 

Claremont 


26 
19 


Centreville 


26 


Crawford 


16 


Clifton 


12 


Carlstadt 


li 


8 


Cherry Hill 


u 


9 


Cresskill 


North N. J... 

u 

• • • 

u 

• • « 

Midland 

u 
Harlem 

Huds m 

New Haven. , . 

Flushing 

Flushing. , . . . . 
Long Island. , . 
M. & E 


7 


Closter 


9 


Corrieville 


4 


Campgaw 


5 


Crystal Lake 

Charlotteburg 

Central Morrisania. . . 

Chappaqua. 

Croton Falls 

Croton 


5 

4 

12 

3 

4 
6 


Cruger's 


6 


Cos Cob 


10 


College Point 

Creedmore Range . . . 
Centerport 


21 
4 
3 


Denville 


5 



SUBURBAN RESORTS. 



209 



PLACES. 



Dunellen 

Demarest 

Dundee Lake 

Dobb's Ferry 

Darien 

Douglaston 

Deer Park 

East Orange 

Elizabethport 

Elizabeth 

Englewood 

East Newark 

Evona 

Fanwood 

Findeme 

Franklin 

Fairview 

Fordham 

Fort Washington. 
Five Mile River. . 
Fort Montgomery 

Flushing. 

Far Rockaway. . . 

Farmingdale 

Freeport 

Greenville 

Grranton 

Grreenwood 

Golden Bridge. . , . 

Glenwood 

Garrisons 

Greenwich 

Green's Farms. . . 

Garden City 

Glen Cove 

Glen Head. .,.,.. 



O 

c 

c3 



24 
18 
18 
20 
38 
16 
36 
11 
8 
12 
14 
8 
23 
20 
31 
13 
8 
9 
5 
39 
45 
12 
20 
20 
30 
21 
3 
7 
44 
44 
15 
49 
29 
49 
22 
28 
26 



fl5 

s 


i 


1.25 


90 00 


1.13 




0.57 




0.52 


100 00 


1.40 


105 00 


0.36 


98 00 


1.54 




0.48 


68 00 


0.39 


60 00 


0.47 


65 00 


1.00 


•  •  « 


0.28 


65 60 


1.21 


87 50 


1.10 


80 60 


1.40 


100 00 


0.47 


63 00 


0.43 


25 00 


0.38 


60 00 


0.24 


52 00 


1.43 


110 00 


1.59 


100 00 


0.25 


68 00 


1.03 


75 00 


1.30 


80 00 


1.26 


85 00 


1.25 


75 00 


0.20 


45 00 


0.37 




2.38 


109 25 


1.57 


111 00 


0.41 


76 00 


2.03 


112 00 


1.18 


90 00 


2.02 


125 00 


0.42 


100 00 


1.28 


100 00 


1.20 


9o 00 



Railroads. 



N. J. Central 
North N. J 
Midland. . . 
Hudson , . . 
New Haven 
Flushing. . . 
Long Island 

M. &E 

N. J. Central 
" &N. J 
North. N. J. . 
New Jersey. . 
N, J. Central 

a 
n 

Erie 

North N. J. 
Harlem .... 
Hudson .... 
New Haven. 
Hudson .... 
Flushing, . . . 
Long Island 
South Side-. 
Long Island. 
Sonth Side. 
N. J. Central 
North. N. J. 

Erie 

Harlem .... 
Hudson .... 



New Haven. 
Flushing. . . . 



Long Island 



C 
•ft 

U 
H 



10 
8 
6 
9 
7 
5 
2 

16 

30 

70 
9 

10 
5 

14 
9 
7 
7 

14 

13 
4 
2 

20 
4 
4 
2 
7 

26 
6 
1 
4 
5 
7 

10 
5 
5 
4 
4 



210 



SUBURBAN RESORTS. 



PLACES. 



Glendale 

Huntley 

Hawthorne . . . . 

Hoboken 

Highland 

Highland Mills. 

Hillsdale 

Homestead 

Houtenville. . . , 
Hackensack. . . . 

Harlem 

Hart's Corners . 

Hastings 

Harrison 

Hempstead .... 
Hempstead . . . . 

Hitjsdale 

Hyde Park 

Hyde Park 

Hicksville 

Huntington .... 
Inwood ........ 

Irvington 

Islip 

Jamaica 

Jamaica 

Jerusalem 

Kingsland 

Kinder Kamock 

Katonah 

Lafayette 

Lake View 

Lodi 

Leonia 

Linden 

Larchmont 

Little Neck. . , . 



o 

i 

ft 


e 


i 


5 


0.30 


50 00 


21 


1.21 


78 00 


19 


1.22 


67 50 


24 


1.39 


72 25 


15 


0.53 


63 50 


49 


2.03 


118 75 


21 


1.27 


108 00 


5 


0.32 




22 


1.00 


75 00 


13 


0.45 




4 


0.15 


28 00 


20 


1.15 


88 00 


19 


0.44 


96 00 


22 


0.58 


80 00 


24 


0.50 


100 00 


22 


1.09 


75 00 


18 


0.38 


90 00 


20 


0.43 


95 00 


17 


0.59 


75 00 


25 


1.12 


80 00 


35 


1.45 


96 00 


5 


0.28 


60 00 


22 


57 


108 00 


43 


2.17 


47 00 


10 


0.30 


60 00 


8i 


0.45 


60 00 


28 


1.18 


85 00 


8 


0.41 


60 00 


19 


1.18 


96 00 


42 


1.49 


108 00 


• • 


0.15 


45 00 


16 


0.56 


64 25 


12 


0.50 


63 50 


11 


0.53 




18 


1.00 


65 60 


18 


50 


75 00 


17 


0.40 


98 00 



Railroads. 



South Side 
M. &E, 
Erie 



u 
a 
u 
u 



North. N. J 
New Jersey 
Midland. . 
Harlem . . 



Hudson . . . 
New Haven 
Flushing. . . 
Long Island 
Flushing.. 



(i 



Long Island 



u 



Hudson 



South Side 
Long Island 
South Side 
Long Island 
Morris & B 

Erie 

Harlem . . . 
New'k&N. 
Erie 



North. N. J 
New Jersey 
New Haven 
Flushing. . 



CS 

u 

EH 



SUBURBAN RESORTS. 



211 



PLACES. 


6 
PI 

•i-H 


S 


pi 
S 

s . 

O o 
u 


Railroads. 


Trains daily. 


Lawrence 


18 

30 

48 

lOi 

19 

15 

17 

19 

17 

31 

34 

11 

21 

30 

50 

3 
24 
26 
37 
15 
25 

5 

6 

7 
37 
13 
38 
14 
20 
20 
23 

9 

9 

17 

6 

21 


58 
1.30 
2.27 
0.50 
1.25 
1.02 
1.09 
1.15 
1.38 
1.45 
1.50 
1.05 
1.25 
1.56 
2.58 
0.20 
1.05 
1.12 
1.51 
0.47 
1.16 
0.19 
0.24 
0.27 
1.41 
0.37 
1.37 
0.37 
0.54 

1 00 
1.30 
0.40 
0.36 
0.35 
1.11 
0.35 
1.21 


75 00 
100 00 

66 '66 

80 00 
71 00 
73 00 
75 00 
85 00 
90 00 
93 00 
71 00 

80 00 

81 50 
123 75 

45 00 
75 00 

75 00 
85 00 

• » • 

32 '66 
36 40 
40 00 
96 00 

76 00 
120 00 

70 00 
80 00 
75 00 
75 00 
65 60 
60 00 
65 60 
87 00 

• • • • 

• • • • 


Long Island . . 

... 

(( 

South Side,.! 
South Side. . . 
M. &E 

u 
ti 
u 

u 

Erie 


4 


Locust Valley 

Lakeland 


2 
2 


Locust Avenue 

Lawrence 


5 

4 


Montrose 


16 


Maplewood 


7 


]\Iilbum 


12 


Madison 


8 


Morristown 


9 


Morris Plains 

Montclair 


5 
15 


Mountain View 

Mawah 


2 

7 


Monroe 


a 


8 


Marion 


N. J 


16 


Meulo Park 


(4 
U 

U 

Midland 

u 

Harlem 

u 

Hudson 

New Haven . , 

• • 

Long Island . . 
South Side... 
M. &E 

Erip. ...,-- 


5 


Metuchen 


3 


Middlebush 


4 


Majwood 


6 


Midland Park 

Mott Haven 


7 
14 


Melrose 


14 


Morrisania 


14 


Mount Kisco 

Mount St. Vincent. . . 
Montrose 


4 

13 

6 


Mount Vernon 

Mamaroneck. 

Mineola 


10 

10 

6 


Merrick 

Newark 


8 
30 


u 


8 


a 


New Jersey. . . 
Erie 


43 


New Milf ord 


8 


New Durham 

Norwood 


Nor. N. J.... 

u  

• « • • 


6 

7 



212 



SUBURBAN RESORTS. 



PLACES. 


ID 
.i-t 


a 


Yearly Commu 
tation. 


Eailroads. 


-a 

CO 

a 
1 


Nanuet 


31 
32 

17 

37 

2 

9 

40 

43 

12 

12 

14 

14i 

18 

25 

31i 

45i 

17 

18 

m 
11 

12 
15 
17 
20 
4 
22 
27 
27 
344 
45f 
45 
16 
26 
13 
11 
11 


1.30 

1.29 

2.00 

0.47 

1.37 

1.48 

0.17 

2.00 

2.12 

0.44 

0.50 

0.56 

0.59 

1.14 

1.15 

1.35 

2.05 

0.56 

1.22 

2.22 

0.53 

0.44 

1.00 

1.00 

1.00 

0.23 

1.05 

1.35 

1.24 

1.43 

2.06 

1.46 

0.41 

1.11 

0.38 

0.45 

0.50 


• • • • 

85 00 

105*65 
105 00 
115 00 

64 00 
100 00 

26*56 

68 50 

69 50 

70 00 
89 00 

• • • • 

• • •  

75*66 
80 00 

• • • • 

62 25 
62 25 

65 00 
65 00 

45*66 

85 00 

75*56 

126*60 

120 00 

70 00 

85 00 

65 00 

66 00 
m 00 


Nor. N. J 

New Jersey. . 
Midland 

New Haven . . 

u 

• • 

• • 

Flushing 

Long Island. . 

• • 

Erie 


8 


New Brunswick.. .. 

Newfoundland 

New E ochelle 

Norston 


21 

4 

11 




Norwalk(So.) 

Newton 


13 

11 


Northport 


8 


North Islip 

N. Belle viUe 


2 

7 


Orange Junction 

Orange 


Morris & E. . . 

• • 
a 

u 

Nor. N. J. . ! ! 

Midland 

it 

Long Island.. 
South Side... 

u 

• • • 

Morris & E. . . 
Erie 


16 

17 


Orange Valley 

OradeU 


16 

8 


Orangeburg 


8 


Oakland 


5 


Oak Ridge 


2 


Ocean Pond 


4 


Ocean Point 


4 


Oakdale 


4 


Passaic 


4 


t i 


17 


Paterson 


Morris & E. . . 

Erie 

Midland 

N. J. Central. 

u 

North. N. J. ! 
New Jersey . . 

Midland 

Harlem 

Hudson 

N. Haven .... 

• • • • 

Long Island . . 
Morris & E. . . 

• • • 


6 


n 


22 


u 


8 


Pamrapo 


26 


Plainfield 


18 


Piemiont 


7 


Perth Amboy 

Pompton 


6 
6 


Purdy's 


8 


Peekfckill 


11 


Pelhamville 





Port Chester 

Queens 


11 
6 


Roseville 


22 


a 


11 



SUBURBAN RESORTS. 



213 



PLACES. 


o 

a 
S 

03 
•i-t 


• 

S 

H 


3 
OS 


Railroads, 


m 
H 


Rockaway, N. J 

Ridgewood 


40 
11 
22 

9 
10 
14 
28 
34 
16 
20 
11 
16 
21 
30 
12 
24 
39 
24 

7 
17i 
2.5 
16 
22 
33 
32 
36 
42 
24 
33 

25 

29 

39 

49| 

19 

11 

29 


2.08 
1.02 
1.32 
0.45 

37 
0.54 
1.51 
2.08 
1.08 
1.04 
0.33 
0.50 
1.04 
1.24 
0.36 
1.05 
1.43 
1.14 
0.37 
1.15 
1.40 
1.04 
1.25 
1.45 
2.02 
2.15 
2.30 
1.31 
1.37 
0.55 
1.19 
1.19 

1 58 
2.10 
1.11 
0.31 
1.14 


100 00 

70 00 

71 00 
60 00 
60 00 
65 00 

71 50 
87 00 

82 75 
75 00 

• • • • 

• • • • 

95 '66 

72 00 
85 00 

110 00 
95 00 
50 00 
75 00 
75 00 
72 00 
78 00 

100 00 

83 25 
90 75 

104 50 

05 '66 

77 50 
75 00 

• • • • 

86 '66 

68 00 
99 00 


 Morris & E. . , 

u 

Erie 


5 

14 


i I 


11 


Rutherford Park 


Morris & E. . . 
Erie 


4 
17 


Roselle 


N. J. Central. 
Erie 


16 


Ramsey's 


10 


Ramapo 


Erie 


6 


River Edge 


Erie 


8 


Rahway 


New Jersey . . 
Midland 

a 

New Haven. . 

Hudson 

New Haven. . . 

... 

Long Island. . 

South Side. .. 
u 

• • 

(( 
Morris & E. . . 

u 

... 

N. J. Central. 
Erie 


17 


Ridgefield Park 

Rochelle 

Riverside 


6 

7 
5 


u 


10 


Riverdale 


16 


Rye 

Rowayton 


10 
4 


Roslyn 


4 


Richmond Hill 

Rockville Centre 

Lxdgewood, L. I 

South Orange 

Summit 


7 

7 

6 

17 

1'>, 


Somerville 


1'^, 


Suffem 


10 


Sloatsburg 


Erie 


5 


Southfields 


Erie 


6 


Sparkill 


Nor. N. J 

• • • • 

New Jersey. . 

• • 

u 

Midland. ....'! 

u 

Harlem 

Hudson 


9 


Spring Valley ... 

South Elizabeth 

Spa Springs 


3 

15 

6 


Stelton 


3 


Smith's Mills 

Snufftown 


3 

4 


Scarsdale 


6 


Spuyten Duy vil 

Scarborough 


15 
8 



214 



SUBURBAN EESORTS. 



PLACES. 



Sing Sing- 

Stamford 

So, Norwalk 

Southport 

S josset 

St. Johnsland . . . . 

Smithtown.. 

Springfield 

So. Oyster Bay . . . 

Sayviile , . . . 

Turner's 

Tenafly, 

Tappan , 

Tallman's 

Tremont , , . 

Tuckahoe 

Tarrytown 

Uniontown. ...... 

Unionville.. 

Van Winkle's 

Voorhees 

Valley Stream. . . . 

Watsessing 

Whitehall. 

Westfeld 

Woodside 

Woodbridge 

Westwood 

Waverley 

Wortendyke 

WVckoff 

William sbridg« . . . 

Woodlawn 

West Mt. Vernon. 

White Plains 

Westport 







s 






S 






S . 






O r- 






O 3 


O 


• 




to 


s 


i 


P 


H , 


99 00 


80 


1.20 


34 


1.29 


100 00 


43 


1.48 


115 00 


50 


2.07 


135 00 


29 


1.36 


95 00 


45 


3.18 


103 00 


49 


3.36 


105 00 


IH 


0.54 


60 00 


27 


1.45 


80 00 


50 


3.25 


53 00 


48 


3.50 


117 75 


16 


1.05 


• • • • 


23 


1.26 


• • • • 


37 


1.45 


• • • • 


n 


0.33 


48 00 


16 


1.03 


64 00 


25 


1.06 


112 00 


23 


1.03 


75 00 


28i 


1.17 


90 00 


23i 


1.13 


• • • 


35 


1.44 


85 00 


Uf 


1.05 


75 00 


11 


0.56 


69 50 


25 


1.38 


90 00 


17 


1.05 


75 00 


10 


0.39 


62 00 


10 


0.46 


60 75 


23 


1.13 


77 50 


20 


1.33 


103 00 


12 


0.45 


65 60 


26 


1.30 


• V • • 


27i 


1 33 


• • • • 


lOi 


0.44 


64 00 


13 


0.48 


64 00 


13i 


0.45 


64 00 


22i 


1.13 


100 00 


45 


1.57 


130 00 



Railroads. 






Long Island 

u 
South Side. 



u 
a 



Erie 

Nor. N. J. . 

u 
u 

Harlem. . . . 



a 



Hudson. . . . 
New Jersey 
Harlem. . . . 
Midland . . . 
New Jersey 
South Side. 
M. & E. . . . 



a 



N. J. Central 

Erie 

Erie 

New Jersey 

Erie 

New Jersey 
Midland 



Harlem . 



u 
a 



N. Haven. 









Hudson. . , 
N. Haven. 



10 

17 

13 
6 
8 
8 

• 3 
7 
7 
4 

13 
9 
8 
8 

14 
6 

10 
4 
3 
5 
4 
8 

13 
2 

18 
7 
8 
6 
9 

13 
8 
5 

14 
5 
9 
9 
6 



SUBURBAN RESORTS. 



215 



PLACES. 



^\^litestone. , . . 

Winfield 

West Flushing 

Woodside 

Westbury ... . 
Woodsburg. . . . 
Yonkers 







i 






ri 






s 


c* 




a§ 






>.i 


d 


« 




1^ 


S 


c3 

0- 


s 


H 


>H 


15 


0.34 


78 00 


Si 


0.15 


60 00 


10 


0.19 


64 00 


8 


0.12 


56 00 


22 


1.05 


80 00 


^n 


1.18 


80 00 


15 


0.45 


66 00 



Railroads. 



Flushing. . . 

a 
(( 
u 

Long Island 
South Side. 
Hudson .... 



C3 



a 



21 
12 
11 
12 
5 
4 
14 



y 



GILSEY HOUSE, 

Corner Broadway and 29th Street, 

[NEW YORK.] 

ETJI^o:p:E-A-^:s^ :e^ t^ j^ isr . 
BRESLIN, GARDNER &, CO. 



METROPOLITAN HOTEL, 

BROADWAY, 

BETWEEN HOUSTON AND PRINCE STREETS, 

[NEW YORK,] 

BRESLIN, PURCELL & CO. 



GRAND UNION HOTEL, 

[Saratoga Springs,] 

OIPElsr J-TJIsriE 1st, 1873^ 
FOR RECEPTION OF GUESTS. 



Application for Rooms can be made to either 

of the above Hotels. 




o 




LIFE INSURANCE COM PAN 



239 BROA 



OoK. Park Place, 



NEW YORK 



CHAELES STANTOIir, Pres, GEOSGE F. SXIFFE13', Sec. 

JOEU A. NICHOLS, 2d Vice-Pres. OHAELES M. HDBBAED, Actuary. 



ASSETS, OVER $S,000,000. 



This Company now issues policies on its new Savings 
Bank Plan — the best, safest, and most satisfactory system 
in usd. 

Tliese Policies Guarantee a Surrender Value, 

cannot be misunderstood, and are commended by the 
leading actuaries of the country. 



SEWING machin; 



The sales of Sewing Machines in 1872, as reported under oath, in 

1873, to the owners of the Sewing Machine 

Patents, show that the 



sfflu: 




m 



1 



uu. 



LAST YEAR SOLD 

219^758 MacMnee^ 

OK., 3S,t>-i^ ^XOUE TIIAIV IIV 1 S^ 1 , 

SO Per Cent, of them being for Family Use. 

THIS IS OVEll 

^ S 9 o o o 

More Sewing Machines than were sold by any other company 

during the same period, and over ONE QUARTER 

of all the Machines sold in 1872. 



PHINCIPAL OFFICE OF 



A THE SINGEH 3IANLFACTVIIING CO., 



34 UNION SQUARE, NEW YORK. 



<16